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Full text of "Manual of the Legislature of New Jersey"

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THE LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO 



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Call No. 

3551 



Accession 
Number 








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STATE OF NEW JERSEY. 



MANUAL 



OF THE 



Legislature of New Jersey. 



One Hundred and Thirty-Third Session. 



1909 




BY AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATURE. 
Copyright, 1908, by Thomas F. Fitzgerald. 



trenton, n. j. : 
Thomas F. Fitzgerald, Legislative Reporter, 

Compiler and Publisher. 



Entered according to Act of Congress, in 1908, by 

THOMAS F. FITZGERALD, 

in the OfTice of the Librarian of Congress^ at Washington, D. C. 



j^S" The newspaper press are welcome to use such parts of the work as 
they may desire, on giving credit therefor to the MANUAL. 



STATE GAZETTE PUB. CO., PRINTERS 
TRENTON, N. J. 



University of New Mexico Library 






Calendar for 1909. 













oo 
















00 






1909 

JAM 


g 
i 


1 


eg 


'^ 
S 


1 


1 


— 

9 


1909 


1 


1 




1 


ti 


1 


1 


JULY. 










1 


2 


.S 




3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


o'lo 




10 


11 


1213 


14 


15 


16 




11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


1617- 




17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 




18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 24 


FEB... 


24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


Aua... 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


1 


"2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 




7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 




8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


1314 




14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 




15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20!21 




21 


22 


23 24 


25 


26 


27 




22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


MAR ... 


28 














SEPT.. 


29 


30 


31 










1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


1 


2 


3 


4 




7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 




5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


JO'll 




14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19:20 




12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17il8 




21'22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 




19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 25 




28 29 


30 


31 










26 


27 


28 


29 


30 






APR... 










1 


2 


3 


OCT.... 












1 


2 




4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 




3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 




10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15116 




18 


19 


20 21 


22 


23 


24 




17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 23 




25'26 


27 28 


29 30 






24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 30 


MAY ... 
















NOV... 


31 

"7 
























1 
8 


1 
8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4 
11 


5 6 
1213 




2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 




910 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 




14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 20 




1617 


18 


19 


2021 


22 




21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 27 


JUilE. 


23,^4 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


DEC... 


28 


29 


30 










30 


31 










1 


2 


3 


4 


'5' 








1 


2 


3 


4 




6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 




5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


1011 




13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19, 




12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


1718 




20 21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 




19 


20 


21 


22 


23 24 25 




27 28 


29 


30 


... 


... 


... 




26 


27 


28 


29 


30 31'... 









PERPETUAL CALENDAR 


FOB ASCERTAINING THE DAY OF THE WEEK FOR ANV YEAR 


BETWEEN 1700 AND 2499. 


Table of Dominical 
Letterc 


Month. 


Dominical Letter. 


j YEAR OF THE 


CENTUR'S. 


Jan. Oct. 


A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


CENTURY. 




Feb. Mar. Nov. 
Jan. Apr. July 


D 

G 


E 
A 


F 
B 


G 
C 


A 
D 


B 

E 


C 
F 


s 


s 


8 


o 


N. B.—A star 


o 


1 May 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


A 


on the (eft 


r* 


C) 


c5 


S 


June 


E 


F 


G 


A 


B 


C 


D 


denotis leap 


!§ 


o 


o 


a' 


Feb. Aug. 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


A 


B 


year. 


c 


E 


G 


Sept. Dec. 


F 


G 


A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


0*28 


.56 


*84 


1 


8 


15 


22 


29 


s 


S 


F 


Th 


W 


Tu 


M 


1 


29 


57 


85 


B 


D 


F 


G 


2 


9 


16 


23 


30 


M 


s 


S 


F 


Th 


\V 


Tu 


2 


30 


58 


86 


A 


C 


E 


F 


3 


10 


17 


24 


31 


Tu 


M 


s 


s 


F 


Th 


W 


3 


31 


59 


87 


G 


B 


D 


E 


4 


11 


18 


25 




W 


Tu 


M 


s 


S 


F 


Th 


















5 


12 


19 


26 




Th 


W 


Tu 


M 


s 


S 


F 


*4*32 


*60 


*88 


E 


G 


B 


C 


6 


13 


20 


27 




F 


Th 


w 


Tu 


M 


s 


S 


5 


33 


61 


89 


D 


F 


A 


B 


7 


14 


21 


28 




s 


F 


Th 


W 


Tu 


M 


s 


6 

7 

*8 
9 


34 
35 

«36 

37 


62 
63 

*64 
65 


90 

91 

*92 
93 


C 
B 


E 
D 

B 
A 


G 
F 


A 

G 

E 
D 


























EXPI.AXATION. 


10 
11 


3S 
39 


66 
67 


94 
95 


E 
D 


G 
F 


B 

A 


C 
B 


iJuder the Century, and in the line m rtn 
the Year of the Century, is the Dominical 


*12 


*40 


*68 


*96 


B 


D 


F 


G 


Letter of the Year. Then in the line with 


13 
14 


41 

42 


69 
70 


97 

98 


A 

G 


B 


E 
D 


I 


the month find the column couiaining 


15 


43 


71 


99 


F 


A 


C 


D 


this letter; in this column, and in line 
with the day of the Month, is the day of 


*16 
17 


*44 
45 


*72 
73 




D 
C 


F 
E 


A 

G 


B 
A 


the Week. In Leap Years, the letters for 


18 


46 


74 




B 


D 


F 


G 


January and Februarj'^ are in the lines 


19 


47 


75 




A 


c 


E 


F 


where these months are printed in Italics, i 


*20 


*48 


*76 




F 


A 


c 


D 


2L 


49 


77 




E 


G 


B 


c 


EXAMPLES. 


22 


50 


78 




D 


F 


A 


B' 




23 


51 


79 




C 


E 


G 


A 


For December 31st, 1875 : for 1^5, the 
letter is C ; under C, in a line with 31, is 


*24 
25 


*52 
53 


*80 
81 




A 


C 


I 


F 

E 


Friday ; and for January 1st, 1876, the 


2G 


54 


82 




F 


A 


C 


D 


letter is A ; under A, and in a line with 


27 


65 


83 




E 


G 


B 

_ 


CI 
1 


1, is Saturday. 



OUTLINE HISTORY OF NEW JERSEY. 



Within the limits of what is now the State of New Jer- 
sey, aside from any evidences of the presence of prehis- 
toric man in the "Trenton Gravels," the original inhabi- 
tants of the commonwealth were Lenni Lenape, or Dela- 
ware, Indians. This subdivision of the great Algonkin 
family occupied the river valleys of the State, had made 
some progress in agriculture and in elementary arts, were 
peaceable but small in numbers, and at last have become 
totally extinct in this portion of the United States. 

In its settlement, New Jersey was not an English colony. 
The claims of the Crown, based upon early discovery and 
various grants, were totally ignored by two great com- 
mercial nations of Europe— Holland and Sweden. It was 
not until 1664, practically a half century after the first 
occupancy of New Jersey by a white man, that England 
had aught more than a slight influence upon the destinies 
of the State. In settlement, Holland was first to send out 
planters, under the auspices of the Dutch West India 
Company. Claiming both the valleys of the Hudson and 
the Delaware, by virtue of the explorations of Hudson and 
Me3% land was taken up upon the banks of the Hudson, 
Passaic, Hackensack, Raritan and smaller streams tribu- 
tary to New York harbor, as well as at Gloucester upon 
the Delaware. By 16.30 these claims were well established 
by occupancy, and by the creation of a centre of local 
government in what is now New York city. Upon the 
rapidly growing influence of Holland, Sweden looked with 
jealous eye. Gustavus Adolphus, in his plan to make 
Sweden a world-power, saw the Dutch to be dangerous 
rivals in America. In 1638 there was equipped a Swedish 
expedition to settle the valley of the Delaware. What 
is now the State of Delaware, the valley of the Schuylkill 
and isolated portions of the west bank of the Delaware 
River were occupied, civil and military government was 
established, and the colony of farmers and traders entered 
upon a brief career of prosperity. The death of Gustavus 
Adolphus, internal dissentions in Sweden, the inherent 
weakness of the Delaware settlements, and the constantly 
increasing power of Holland brought matters to a crisis. 
In 1655 New Sweden was conquered by New Netherlands, 
(7) 



8 HISTORY OF NEW JKKSIOY. 

and for nine years the soil of New Jersey was absolutely 
under Dutch control. 

Emerging- from the interregnum of the Cromwells, the 
restoration of the House of Stuart brought peace to Eng- 
land. On the 12th of March. 1C64, Charles 11.. with royal 
disregard for previous patents, grants and charters, deeded 
to his l)rother James, Duko of York, a vast tract embrac- 
ing much of New England, New York and all of what is 
now New Jersey. This was accompaniod by active prep- 
arations to drive the Dutch from America, as they, in 
alien claims to New Jersey, practically separated the New 
England colonies from Virginia. Maryland and the Caro- 
linas. In the summer of 1664 armed vessels appeared In 
New York harbor. After negotiations, the Dutch sur- 
rendered and the i;ower of Holland in North America be- 
came simply a mattei of history. In the meantime James. 
Duke of York, transfe-red to two favorites of the House 
of Stuart— John. Lord I-Jerkeley, and Sir George Carteret— 
practically what is now the State of New Jersey. In 
honor of Carteret's defense of the Island of Jersey (Cae- 
sarea) during the Parliamentary wars, the territory was 
called New Jersey (Nova Caesarea). 

Carteret and Berkeley, in granting a liljeral frame of 
government and extolling the advantages of their colony 
so well located for agriculture, commerce, fishing and 
mining, attracted settlers not only from England, but 
from Scotland and New England, particularly I^ong Island 
and Connecticut. These planters were largely Calvinists, 
from Presbyterian and Congregational communities, and 
mainly occupied land in Newark. Elizabeth and upon the 
north shore of Monmouth county. The valley of the Dela- 
ware remained unsettled. The Calvinists brought into 
East Jersey distinctive views upon religious and civil mat- 
ters. Early legislatures punished many crimes by death, 
the penalties being similar to those of the Jewish dispen- 
sation, while the "town-meeting" strengthened the indi- 
vidual action of the small communities. There was an 
intense individualism in every phase of political and relig- 
ious development, the life of the people centering around 
the church and the school house, the head of both, as in 
New England, being the minister. 

In 1676 a division of the interests of Carteret and Berke- 
ley occurred. In the meantime Berkeley had disposed of 
his rights to a company of English Quakers, a conflict had 
ensued, and to establish the claims of all parties concerned, 
the two colonies of East and West Jersey came into 
existence. A line was drawn from a point in Little Egg 



HISTORY OF NEW JERSEY. 9 

Harbor to the Delaware Water Gap, Berkeley and his 
assigns retaining West Jersey as their moiety, Carteret 
obtaining East Jersey. 

By Berkeley's transfer the dominant influence in West 
Jersey was that of the Society of Friends. Salem was 
settled in 1675, Burlington, Gloucester and the site of Tren- 
ton about five years later, while within ten years there- 
after the "shore" communities of Cape May and Tucker- 
ton came into existence. The Society of Friends estab- 
lished in West Jersey a series of communities in which 
the life of the people was different from that of East Jer- 
sey. As East Jersey resembled New England in civil gov- 
ernment, so West Jersey resembled Virginia. The political 
and social centres of the large plantations were the shire- 
towns, slave owning was common, a landed aristocracy 
was established, prominent families intermarried, and 
under the advice of William Penn and his friends good 
faith was kept with the Indians. Capital punishment was 
practically unknown and disputes were settled frequently 
by arbitration. 

Two elements of discord marked the genesis of East Jer- 
sey and of West Jersey. One, external, was the attitude 
of the Duke of York after he became James II. In 1673 
New Jersey was recaptured by the Dutch, who held the 
colony until the early spring of 1674. A question arose as 
to the Duke of York's title after 1674, reconveyances were 
made, but in spite of past assurances, James II. claimed 
the proprietary right of government. To that end Sir Ed- 
mund Andros was commissioned Governor of New Jersey, 
and a climax was reached in 1680 when the proprietary 
governor of East Jersey was carried prisoner to New York. 
In 1681 the Crown recognized the justice of the proprietors' 
contention, and local government was re-established, but 
not before the seeds of discontent were sown that bore 
fruit in the Revolutionary War. 

An internal disturbance was a contest between the 
Boards of Proprietors and the small land owners. Both 
in East and West Jersey, Carteret and Berkeley and their 
assigns had transferred to wealthy combinations of capi- 
talists—most of whom were non-residents— much of the 
broad acreage of the colonies. With the land went the 
right of selection of Governors and of members of Execu- 
tive Councils, which right Berkeley and Carteret had 
derived from the Crown. This, with "quit-rent" agita- 
tions in East Jersej', led to much bitterness. Finally, dis- 
gusted with turmoil, and viewing a sentiment of revolt 
on the part of the people, the Boards of Proprietors sur- 



10 HISTORY OF NEW JERSEY. 

rendered to the Crown, in 1702, their rights of government, 
retaining only their interest in the soil. East and West 
Jersey were united, and the two provinces became the 
royal colony of New Jersey. 

From 1702 until the outbreak of the Revolution the polit- 
ical history of the colony was quite uneventful. Through- 
out the period of seventy-five years there was almost con- 
stant friction between the Legislature and the Governor 
and his Council. The governors, in the main, were Crown 
favorites sent over the sea without a personal knowledge 
of the colony and with but an ill-concealed ambition to 
wrest from the people as much money as could be secured 
for the support of themselves and the executive office. 
The Councils, composed of wealthy land owners of the 
Society of Friends and rich merchants from East Jersey, 
were quiescent, and even the members of the popular 
branch of the Legislature were chosen by those possessing 
property qualifications. The small non-voting farmers 
raised the cry of "aristocracy," and the equivalent of 
"taxation without representation," and while loyal to the 
Crown were open in their expressions of dissatisfaction 
to the personal attitude of their governors. In 173S New 
Jersey, in recognition of this sentiment, was given a gov- 
ernor separate from the one appointed jointly for the colo- 
nies of New York and New Jersey. 

During this period the farm was the centre of the activi- 
ties of the life of the people; particularly was this true in 
the western part of the colony, where favoring climate 
and soil, slave labor and the proximity of Philadelphia led 
to abundant crops and a good market. In East Jersey a 
commercial spirit was more active. Perth Amboy threat- 
ened to rival New York, and Jersey ships from Newark, 
Elizabeth and the Monmouth villages were to be found 
from Boston to Charleston. The repressive economic 
policy of the Crown precluded the development of manu- 
factures. In the southern part of the State, sand and un- 
limited forests of oak and pine led to the development of 
glass making, while "bog iron," with abundance of lime 
from oyster shells, gave an impetus to the erection of 
forges and bloomaries. These, as well as the copper mines 
of the trap rock region, were throttled by adverse Parlia- 
mentary legislation. Ship building was a recognized in- 
dustry, and cedar was extensively "mined" from the 
sunken forests of the tide-water district. W^haling and 
other fisheries were unhampered, and were profitable, as 
was also the trade in skins and in hay from the salt 
meadows of the coast. 



HISTORY OF NEW JERSEY. U 

Throughout the years from 1702 to 1776 gold and silver 
and copper money was scarce. In obedience to the de- 
mand of the English merchants that competition should 
be crushed, legislation was enacted to draw "hard" money 
away from the colony. An inflated paper currency, first 
issued in 1707 to provide ways and means to aid the Cana- 
dian expedition against the French, poured from the 
printing presses. Trade was reduced to barter, and gold, 
silver and copper were practically at a premium for nearly 
three generations. 

Of the more prominent incidents during the period were 
the organized attempts to suppress piracy in New York 
and Delaware bays, the growth of a well-defined system 
of transportation by land and water between New York 
and Philadelphia, the establishment of ferries and post 
roads, the reclamation of waste land, the injection of 
Hugenot, Scotch-Irish and Palatinate German elements 
into the settled population, the chartering of Princeton 
University and Rutgers College, the religious revival led 
by "Whitefield, the propogation of abolition doctrines by 
Woolman, the erection of a series of barracks owing to the 
French and Indian war, and what is probably of supreme 
importance, the growth of a sentiment of independence 
fostered by the stupid policy of the Crown, and carried 
from hamlet to hamlet, as much by itinerant hawkers and 
by "Redemptioners," who had served their time, as by any 
other cause. 

The opening of the Revolution found New Jersey's senti- 
ment unevenly crystalized. Few, if any, were favoring 
absolute independence. There were three elements. One, 
the Tory party, was led by Governor William Franklin, 
the illegitimate sen of Benjamin Franklin. This conserva- 
tive class embraced nearly all the Episcopalians, a vast 
proportion of the non-combatant members of the Society 
of Friends and some East Jersey Calvinists. Another ele- 
ment was composed of men of various shades of belief, 
some in favor of continual protest, others desirous of com- 
promise. This included at the outbreak of the struggle 
most of the Calvinists, some few Quakers of the younger 
generation, and the Scotch-Irish. The third party drew 
its support from a few bold, aggressive spirits of influence 
whose following included men who believed that war 
for independence would benefit their fortunes. 

The part played in the Revolution by New Jersey has 
been frequently told. Events passed rapidly after the 
affairs of Trenton and Princeton; Monmouth and Red Bank 
will never be forgotten, while the raids at Salem, Spring- 



12 HISTORY OF NEW JERSEY. 

field, Elizabeth, in the valley of the Hackensack, and the 
winter at Morristown are a part of national history. Oc- 
cupying- a position between New York and Philadelphia, 
its soil was a theatre where the drama of war was always 
presented. At no time was the Tory element suppressed, 
finding its expression in open hostility, or in the barbaric 
cruelties of the "Pine Robbers" of Monmouth, Burlington, 
Gloucester and Salem counties. Though under suspicion, 
the Society of Friends were neutral, for conscience sake, 
remaining close to the teachings of their creed. 

The close of the struggle found the people of New Jersey 
jubilant and not disposed to relinquish their sovereignty. 
The Articles of Confederation were weak and had become 
a by-word and a jest. There was much State pride and 
much aristocratic feeling among the old families who con- 
tinued to dominate State politics. The Constitution of 1776, 
adopted by New Jersey as a makeshift war measure, pro- 
vided that all State officers of prominence should be elected 
by a Legislature, which was chosen by voters possessing 
property qualifications. As in the colony, the Governor 
was Chancellor, and class distinctions were closely drawn. 
In spite of agitation, all proposed changes were rejected, 
and a strong federal union with the other States was 
viewed with dislike and suspicion. The State, in a quarrel 
with New York, at one time refused to obey the requests 
of Congress, and, in the exercise of her sovereignty, estab- 
lished a Court of Admiralty and coined money. 

While the spirit of "State rights" was dominant, it was 
recognized by leaders of public thought that New Jersey 
was too weak to stand alone. She entered the Annapolis 
convention called to revise the Articles of Confederation, 
and whose lasting monument was the present Federal 
Constitution adopted in Philadelphia in 1787. Upon the 15th 
of June of that year the "New Jersey Plan" was pre- 
sented, which, while lost as a measure, led to the famous 
compromise upon representation, whereby in the Senate 
of the United States the States were given equal vote, with 
a representation based on population in the House. 

The adoption of the Constitution of the United States 
led to the rapid growth of political parties in New Jersey 
as elsewhere. In spite of the intense conservatism of the 
State, led by the Quakers of West Jersey, who were Fed- 
eralists almost to a man, the anti-Federalist sentiment de- 
veloped rapidly, spurred by a virulent party press, the 
death of men who had been trained in colonial methods of 
thought and the democratic tendency of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, which grew in strength in West Jersey. 



HISTORY OF NEW JERSEY. 13 

In the eastern part of the State there was among the indi- 
vidualistic Calvinists a strong anti-Federal spirit. This, 
in 1800, led to the election of Thomas Jefferson as President 
of the United States, and in ISOl the election of his political 
ally, Joseph Bloomfield, as Governor of the State of New- 
Jersey. The death of Hamilton at the hands of Burr, and 
the death of Livingston, the "war" Governor, tore down 
fhe strongest pillars of Federalism in New Jersey, and led 
to the absolute domination of the State by the anti-Feder- 
alists, who held power until the outbreak of the second war 
with England. 

The period from 1790 to 1812 in New Jersey was marked 
by a demand for internal improvements and better trans- 
portation. The agitation concerning the Delaware and 
Raritan Canal, Stevens' experiments in 1802 with steam, 
along the lines laid down in 1785 by Fitch, the project of 
the Society for Establishing Useful Manufactures at Pat- 
erson as early as 1791, and highways conducted through th£ 
northwest portion of the State, indicate the trend of public 
sentiment. 

The second war with England was not altogether a pop- 
ular measure in New Jersey. The Federalists, the "Peace 
Party," secured control of the Legislature and elected 
their Governor. Nevertheless the State furnished her 
quota of troops. The one permanent effect of the struggle 
upon the State was indirect. Owing to the movement of 
supplies and the necessity of quick transportation between 
Philadelphia and the exposed port of New York, the wagon 
roads between Bordentown and Perth Amboy, and between 
Trenton, New Brunswick, Metuchen, Rahway, Elizabeth 
and Newark, were improved and their advantages as 
"short routes" demonstrated. Upon these lines two later 
railroads, now a part of the Pennsylvania Railroad system, 
were constructed. 

The era following the close of the war of 1812 until the 
opening of the Civil War was one of stupendous activity. 
Interrupted only by the financial depressions of 1817 and 
1837, and slightly retarded by the Mexican War, the pro- 
gress of the State was beyond the wildest dreams of the 
enthusiast, Alexander Hamilton. In the eastern part of 
the State, aided by a constantly increasing foreign popula- 
tion, Jersey City rose from the marshes, Newark grew 
toward her present greatness, Paterson became a centre 
of industry, while in the west, Camden was recognized as 
an available site for manufactures. The public school 
system was established and extended, reforms in the car- 
ing for the criminal, defective, delinquent and dependent 



14 LIST OF GOVERNORS. 

classes were instituted, railroads were reaching every town 
of size, in the vicinity of New York and Philadelphia, fer- 
ries were erected, banks established, post offices opened 
and newspapers printed. In 1844, when social unrest was 
most marked, the present State Constitution was adopted 
by a large popular majority and needed reforms tending to 
elevate the legal position of married women, imprisoned 
debtors and bankrupts were adopted. 

The year 1S60 brought a termination to the then impend- 
ing conflict. While every other State north of Mason and 
Dixon's line by 1850 had set the black man free, there were 
still 236 negroes in bondage in New Jersey. The abolition 
movement made slow progress and an anti-war party had 
a decided following. But when the die was cast New Jer- 
sey responded to the call for men and money. She fur- 
nished 88,305 men, or within 10,501 of her entire militia. For 
organizing, subsisting, supplying, supporting and trans- 
porting her troops she paid $2,894,385, and upon the field 
sustained the reputation for bravery she had won during 
the days of Trenton and Monmouth. 

Since the Civil War New Jersey has become the centre 
of marvelous activity in nearly every line of human pro- 
gress. Her mills clothe multitudes; within her borders are 
found the termini of every railroad system of the United 
States, with one exception, penetrating the South and 
West; her market gardens feed 5,000,000 people; a series of 
cities arisen upon the desolate sands of the sea shore fur- 
nish health and pleasure to hundreds of thousands of vis- 
itors; her mines supply iron, zinc and copper; her fisheries 
are world-famous, and her farms and dairies are models. 



CHRONOLOGICAL LISTOF GOVERNORS OF NEWJERSEY. 

GOVERNORS OF EAST JERSEY. 

Philip Carteret 1665 to 1681 

Robert Barclay 1682 to 1683 

Thomas Rudyard, Deputy Governor 1683 

Gawen Laurie 1683 

Lord Niel Campbell 1685 

Andrew Hamilton 1692 to 1697 

Jeremiah Basse 1698 to 1699 

GOVERNORS OF WEST JERSEY. 

Samuel Jenings, Deputy 1681 

Thomas Oliver, Governor 1684 to 1685 

John Skein, Deputy 16S5 to 1687 



LIST OF GOVERNORS. 15 

William Welsh, Deputy 1686 

Daniel Coxe, Governor 1687 

Andrew Hamilton 1692 to 1697 

Jeremiah Basse, Deputy 1697 to 1699 

Andrew Hamilton, Governor, 1699 till surrender 

to the Crown 1702 

EAST AND WEST JERSEY UNITED. 

Edward, Lord Cornbury, Governor 1703 to 1708 

John, Lord Lovelace (died in office) 1708 

Richard Ingoldsby,, Lieutenant-Governor 1709 to 1710 

General Robert Hunter 1710 to 1719 

Lewis Morris (President of Council) 1719 to 1720 

William Burnet 1720 to 1727 

John Montgomerie 1728 to 1731 

Lewis Morris (President of Council) 1731 to 1732 

William Crosby 1732 to 1736 

John Anderson (President of Council) 1736 

John Hamilton (President of Council) 1736 to 1738 

(The foregoing were also Governors of New York at the 
same time.) 

SEPARATE FROM NEW YORK. 

Lewis Morris 1738 to 1746 

John Hamilton (President of Council) 1746 to 1747 

John Reading (President of Council) 1747 

Jonathan Belcher 1747 to 1757 

Thomas Pownall, Lieutenant-Governor 1757 

John Reading (President of Council) 1757 to 1758 

Francis Bernard 1758 to 1760 

Thomas Boone 1760 to 1761 

Josiah Hardy 1761 to 1763 

William Franklin 1763 to 1776 

FROM THE ADOPTION OF THE STATE CONSTI- 
TUTION. 

William Livingston (Federalist) 1776 to 1790 

William Paterson (Federalist) 1790 to 1792 

Richard Howell (Federalist) 1792 to 1801 

Joseph Bloomfield (Dem.ocrat) ISOl to 1802 

John Lambert, President of Council and Acting 

Governor (Democrat) 1802 to 1803 

Joseph Bloomfield (Democrat) 1803 to 1812 

Aaron Ogden (Federalist) 1813 to 1813 

William S. Pennington (Democrat) 1813 to 1815 

Mahlon Dickerson (Democrat) 1815 to 1817 

Isaac H. Williamson (Federalist) 1817 to 1829 



16 LIST OF GOVERNORS. 

Garret D. Wall (Democrat) 1829 decl'd 

Peter D. Vroom (Democrat) 1829 to 1832 

Samuel L. Southard (Whig) 1832 to 1833 

Elias P. Seeley (Whig) [[[[[[ 1833 to 1833 

Peter D. Vroom (Democrat) 1833 to 1836 

Philemon Dickerson (Democrat) 1836 to 1837 

William Pennington (Whig) !.'.".'."!.* 1837 to 1843 

Daniel Haines (Democrat) 1843 to 1844 

Charles C. Stratton (Whig) .'.' 1845 to 1848 

Daniel Haines (Democrat) 1848 to 1851 

George F. Fort (Democrat) 1851 to 1854 

Rodman M. Price (Democrat) 1854 to 1857 

William A. Newell (Republican) 1857 to 1860 

Charles S. Olden (Republican) 1860 to 1863 

Joel Parker (Democrat) 1863 to 1866 

Marcus L. Ward (Republican) 1866 to 1869 

Theodore F. Randolph (Democrat) 1869 to 1872 

Joel Parker (Democrat) 1872 to 1875 

Joseph D. Bedle (Democrat) 1875 to 1878 

George B. McClellan (Democrat) 1878 to 1881 

George C. Ludlow (Democrat) 1881 to 1884 

Leon Abbett (Democrat) 1884 to 1887 

Robert S. Green (Democrat) 1887 to 1890 

Leon Abbett (Democrat) 1890 to 1893 

George T. Werts (Democrat) 1893 to 1896 

John W. Griggs (Republican) 1896 to 1898 

Foster M. Voorhees (Rep.), Acting Governor... 

Feb. 1, '98, to Oct. 18, '98 

David O. Watkins (Rep.), Acting Governor 

Oct. 18, '98, to Jan. 16, '99 

•Foster M. Voorhees (Republican) 1899 to 1902 

tFranklin Murphy (Republican) 1902 to 1905 

Edward C. Stokes (Republican) 1905 to 190S 

John Franklin Fort (Republican) 1908 to 

•President of the Senate William M. Johnson served as 
Acting Governor from May 21 to June 19, 1900, when Gov- 
ernor Voorhees was absent from the State. 

tPresident of the Senate Edmund W. Wakelee served 
as Acting Governor from April 25 until June 5, 1904. while 
Governor Murphy was in Europe; and also from June 15 
until June 27, 1904, while the Governor was out of the State. 



UNITED STATES SENATORS. 



UNITED STATES SENATORS. 



The following is a list of the United States Senators for 
New Jersey from 1789 to date: 

Jonathan Elmer, March 4, 1789, to March 3, 1791. 
William Paterson, March 4, 1789, to November 23, 1790. 
Philemon Dickinson, November 23, 1790, to March 3, 179.3. 
John Rutherford, March 4, 1791, to December 5, 1798. 
Frederick Frelinghuysen, March 4, 1793, to November 12, 

1796. 
Richard Stockton, November 12, 1796, to March 3, 1799. 
Franklin Davenport, December 5, 1798, to February 14, 1799. 
James Schureman, February 14, 1799, to February 26, 1801. 
Jonathan Dayton, March 4, 1799, to March 3, 1805. 
Aaron Ogden, February 26, 1801, to March 3, 1803. 
John Condit, September 1, 1803, to March 3, 1809. 
Aaron Kitchell, March 4, 1805, to March 21, 1809. 
John Lambert, March 4, 1809, to March 3, 1815. 
John Condit, March 21, 1809, to March 3, 1817. 
James Jefferson Wilson, March 4, 1815, to January 26, 1821. 
Mahlon Dlckerson. March 4, 1817, to March 3, 1829. 
Samuel L. Southard, January 26, 1821, to November 12, 1823. 
Joseph Mcllvaine, November 12, 1823, to August 16, 1826. 
Ephraim Bateman, November 10, 1826, to January 30, 1829. 
Theodore Frelinghuysen, March 4. 1829, to March 3, 1835. 
Mahlon Dickerson, January 30, 1829, to March 3, 1833. 
Samuel L. Southard, March 4, 1833, to June 26, 1842. 
Garret D. Wall, March 4, 1835, to March 3. 1841. 
Jacob W. Miller, March 4. 1841. to March 3, 1853. 
William L. Davton, July 2. 1842, to March 3, 1851. 
Jacob W. Miller, January 4, 1841, to March 3, 1853. 
Robert F. Stockton. March 4. 1851, to February 11, 1853. 
William Wright, March 4, 1853, to March 3. 1859. 
John R. Thomson (died), February 11, 1853, to December, 

1862. 
Richard S. Field (vacancy), December 12, 1862, to January 

13, 1863. 
John C. Ten Eyck, from March 17, 1859, to March 3, 1865. 
James W. Wall (vacancy), January 14, 1863, to March 3, 1863. 
William Wright. March 4, 1863, to November, 1866. 
F. T. Frelinghuysen, November, 1866. to March 3, 1869. 
John P. Stockton. March 4. 1865, to March 27, 1866. 
Alexander G. Cattell, March 27, 1866. to March 3, 1871. 
John P. Stockton. March 4. 1869, to March 3, 1875. 
F. T. Frelinghuysen. March 4, 1871, to March 3, 1877. 
T. F. Randolph, March 4. 1875, to March 3. 1881. 
John R. McPherson, March 4. 1877, to March 3, 1895. 
William J. Sewell. March 4. 1881, to March 3, 1887. 
Rufus Blodgett, March 4, 1887. to March 3, 1893. 
James Smith. Jr., March 4, 1893, to March 3, 1899. 
William J. Sewell, March 4, 1895, to December 26, 1901. 

John Kean. March 4. 1899, to . 

John F. Dryden, February 4, 1902, to March 3, 1907. 
Frank O. JBriggs, March 4, 1907, to . 



18 DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. 

DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE 

OF THE 

UNITED STATES. 



When, in the course of human events, it becomes neces- 
sary for one people to dissolve the political bands which 
have connected them with another, and to assume, among 
the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to 
which the laws of nature and of nature's God entitle them, 
a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that 
they should declare the causes which impel them to the 
separation. 

We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are 
created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with 
certain unalienable rights; that am.ong these are life, lib- 
erty and the pursuits of happiness. That, to secure these 
rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving 
their just powers from the consent of the governed; that 
whenever any form of government becomes destructive of 
these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or abolish 
it, and to institute a new government, laying its founda- 
tions on such principles, and organizing its powers in such 
form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their 
safety and happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that 
governments long established should not be changed for 
light and transient causes; and accordingly, all experience 
hath shown that mankind are more disposed to suffer, 
while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by 
abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But, 
when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing in- 
variably the same object, evinces a design to reduce them 
under absolute despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, 
to throw off such government, and to provide new guards 
for their future security. Such has been the patient suffer- 
ance of these colonies, and s-uch is now the necessity which 
constrains them to alter their former systems of govern- 
ment. The history of the present king of Great Britain is 
a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having, 
in direct object, the establishment of an absolute tyranny 
over these States. To prove this, let facts be submitted to 
a candid world: 

He has refused his assent to laws the most wholesome 
and necessary for the public good. 



DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. 19 

He has forbidden his Governors to pass laws of imme- 
diate and pressing importance, unless suspended in their 
operations till his assent should be obtained; and when so 
suspended, he has utterly neglected to attend to them. 

He has refused to pass other laws for the accommodation 
of large districts of people, unless those people would re- 
linquish the right of representation in the Legislature— a 
right inestimable to them, and formidable to tyrants only. 

He has called together legislative bodies at places un- 
usual, uncomfortable and distant from the repository of 
their public records, for the sole purpose of fatiguing them 
into compliance with his measures. 

He has dissolved representative houses repeatedly, for 
opposing, with manly firmness, his invasions on the rights 
of the people. 

He has refused, for a long time after such dissolutions, 
to cause others to be elected; whereby the legislative 
powers, incapable of annihilation, have returned to the 
people at large for their exercise; the State remaining, in 
the meantime, exposed to all the dangers of invasions from 
'without, and convulsions within. 

He has endeavored to prevent the population of these 
States; for that purpose, obstructing the laws for the nat- 
uralization of foreigners; refusing to pass others to en- 
courage their migration hither, and raising the conditions 
of new appropriations of lands. 

He has obstructed the administration of justice, by re- 
fusing his assent to laws for establishing judiciary powers. 

He has made judges dependent on his will alone, for the 
tenure of their offices, and the amount and payment of 
their salaries. 

He has erected a multitude of new offices, and sent hither 
swarms of officers to harass our people, and eat out their 
substance. 

He has kept among us in times of peace, standing armies, 
without the consent of our Legislatures. 

He has affected to render the military independent of, 
and superior to, the civil pov/er. 

He has combined, with others, to subject us to a jurisdic- 
tion foreign to our constitutions, and unacknowledged by 
our laws; giving his assent to their acts of pretended leg- 
islation: 

For quartering large bodies of armed troops among us; 

For protecting them, by a mock trial, from punishment, 
for any murders which they should commit on the inhab- 
itants of these States; 

For cutting off our trade with all parts of the world; 



20 DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. 

For imposing taxes on us without our consent; 

For depriving- us, in many cases, of the benefit of trial by 
jury; 

For transporting us beyond seas to be tried for pretended 
offenses; 

For abolishing the free system of English laws in a 
neighboring province, establishing therein an arbitrary 
government, and enlarging its boundaries, so as to render 
it at once an example and fit instrument for introducing 
the same absolute rule into these colonies; 

For taking away our charters, abolishing our most valu- 
able laws, and altering, fundamentally, the forms of our 
governments; 

For suspending our own Legislatures, and declaring 
themselves invested with power to legislate for us in all 
cases whatsoever. 

He has abdicated government here, by declaring us out 
of his protection, and waging war against us. 

He has plundered our seas, ravaged our coasts, burned 
our towns, and destroyed the lives of our people. 

He is, at this time, transporting large armies of foreign 
mercenaries to complete the works of death, desolation and 
tyranny, already begun, with circumstances of cruelty and 
perfidy scarcely paralleled in the most barbarous ages, and 
totally unworthy the head of a civilized nation. 

He has constrained our fellow-citizens, taken captive on 
the high seas, to bear arms against their country, to be- 
come the executioners of their friends and brethren, or to 
fall themselves by their hands. 

He has excited domestic insurrection among us, and has 
endeavored to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the 
merciless Indian savages, whose known rule of warfare is 
an undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and con- 
ditions. 

In every stage of these oppressions, we have petitioned 
for redress, in the most humble terms; our repeated peti- 
tions have been answered only by repeated injury. A 
prince whose character is thus marked by every act which 
may define a tyrant, is unfit to be the ruler of a free people. 

Nor have we been v.^anting in our attentions to our Brit- 
ish brethren. We have warned them, from time to time, of 
attempts by their Legislature to extend an unwarrantable 
jurisdiction over us. We have reminded them of the cir- 
cumstances of our emigration and settlement here. We 
have appealed to their native justice and magnanimity, 
and we have conjured them, by the ties of our common 
kindred, to disavow these usurpations, which would inev- 



DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. 



21 



itably interrupt our connections and correspondence. They, 
too, have been deaf to the voice of justice and of consan- 
guinity. We must, therefore, acquiesce in the necessity, 
which denounces our separation, and hold them, as we 
hold the rest of mankind, enemies in war, in peace, friends. 
We, therefore, the representatives of the United States 
of America, in General Congress assembled, appealing to 
the Supreme Judge of the World for the rectitude of our 
intentions, do. in the name and by the authority of the 
good people of these colonies, solemnly publish and de- 
clare, that these United Colonies are, and of right ought 
to be. Free and Independent States; that they are also ab- 
solved from all allegiance to the British crown, and that 
all political connection between them and the State of 
Great Britain, is, and ought to be, totally dissolved; and 
that, as Free and Independent States, they have full power 
to levy war, conclude peace, contract alliances, establish 
commerce, and do all other acts and things which Inde- 
pendent States may of right do. And, for the support of 
this declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of 
Divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other, our 
lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor. 

JOHN HANCOCK. 



Georgia- 
Button Gwinnett. 
Lyman Hall. 
Geo. Walton. 

iouth Carolina- 
Edward Rutledge. 
Thos. Hayward, Jr. 
Thomas Lynch, Jr. 
Arthur Middleton. 

■^''irginia- 

George Wythe. 
Richard Henry Lee. 
Thos. Jefferson. 
Benjan. Harrison. 
Thos. Nelson, Jr. 
Francis Lightfoot Lee. 
Carter Braxton. 

Delaware — 

Caesar Rodney. 
Geo. Read. 

New Jersey— 

Richd. Stockton. 
Jno. Witherspoon. 
Fras. Hopkinson. 
John Hart. 
Abra. Clark. 



Maryland- 
Samuel Chase. 
Wm. Paca. 
Thos. Stone. 
Charles Carroll, 

of Carrollton. 

Pennsylvania— 
Robt. Morris. 
Benjamin Rush. 
Benja. Franklin. 
John Morton. 
Thomas McKean, 
Geo. Clymer. 
Jas. Smith. 
Geo. Taylor. 
James Wilson. 
Geo. Ross. 

New' York— 
Wm. Floyd. 
Phil. Livingston. 
Fran's Lewis. 
Lewis Morris. 

New Hampshire— 
Josiah Bartlett. 
Wm. Whipple. 
Matthew Thornton. 



22 



DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. 



lyiassachusetts Bay— 
Saml. Adams. 
John Adams. 
Robt. Treat Paine. 
Elbridge Gerry. 

North Carolina — 
Wm. Hooper. 
Joseph Hewes. 
John Penn. 



Rhode Island and Provi- 
dence, &c. — 
Step. Hopkins. 
William Ellery. 

Connecticut- 
Roger Sherman. 
Saml. Huntington. 
Wm. Williams. 
Oliver Wolcott. 



Ordered: IN CONGRESS, January 18, 1777. 

That an authenticated copy of the Declaration of Inde- 
pendency, with the names of the Members of Congress 
subscribing the same, be sent to each of the United States, 
and that they be desired to have the same put on record. 

By order of Congress. JOHN HANCOCK, 

Attest, Chas. Thomson, A true copy. President. 

Secy. John Hancock, 

Presidt. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 23 

CONSTITUTION 

OF THE 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA* 



We, the people of the United States, in order to form a 
more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tran- 
quillity, provide for the common defense, promote the gen- 
eral welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to our- 
selves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this Con- 
stitution of the United States of America. 

ARTICLE I. 

LEGISLATIVE POWERS. 
Section I. 
All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in a 
Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a 
Senate and House of Representatives. 

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 
Section II. 

1. The house of representatives shall be composed of 
members chosen every second year by the people of the 
several States; and the electors in each State shall have 
the qualifications requisite for electors of the most numer- 
ous branch of the State legislature. 

MEMBERS' QUALIFICATIONS. 

2. No person shall be a representative who shall. not have 
attained to the age of twenty-five years, and been seven 
years a citizen of the United States, and who shall not, 
when elected, be an inhabitant of that State in which he 
shall be chosen. 

RULE OF APPORTIONING REPRESENTATIVES 
AND DIRECT TAXES. 

3. Representatives and direct taxes shall be apportioned 
among the several States which may be included within 



*This Constitution went into operation on the first Wed- 
nesday in March, 1789. 



24 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

this Union, according to their respective numbers, which 
shall be determined by adding to the whole number of free 
persons, including those bound to service for a term of 
years, and excluding Indians not taxed, three-fifths of all 
other persons. The actual enumeration shall be made 
within three years after the first meeting of the congress 
of the United States, and within every subsequent term 
of ten years, in such manner as they shall by law direct. 
The number of representatives shall not exceed one for 
every thirty thousand, but each State shall have at least 
one representative; and until such enumeration shall be 
made, the State of New Hampshire shall be entitled to 
choose three; Massachusetts, eight; Rhode Island and 
Providence Plantations, one; Connecticut, five; New York, 
six; New Jersey, four; Pennsylvania, eight; Delaware, 
one; Maryland, six; Virginia, ten; North Carolina, five; 
South Carolina, five; and Georgia, three. 

FILLING OF VACANCIES. 

4. When vacancies happen in the representation of any 
State, the executive authority thereof shall issue writs of 
election to fill such vacancies. 

OFFICERS— IMPEACHMENT. 

5. The house of representatives shall choose their speaker 
and other officers, and shall have the sole power of im- 
peachment. 

SENATE— HOW COMPOSED. 

Section III. 

1. The senate of the United States shall be composed of 
two senators from each State, chosen by the legislature 
thereof, for six years, and each senator shall have one 

vote. 

ROTATION OF SENATORS. 

2. Immediately after they shall be assembled, in conse- 
quence of the first election, they shall be divided as equally 
as may be into three classes. The seats of the senators of 
the first class shall be vacated at the expiration of the 
second year; of the second class, at the expiration of the 
fourth year; and of the third class, at the expiration of 
the sixth year, so that one-third may be chosen every 
second year. And if vacancies happen by resignation, or 
otherwise, during the recess of the legislature of any 
State, the executive thereof may make temporary appoint- 
ments until the next meeting of the legislature, which 
shall then fill such vacancies. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 25 

THEIR QUALIFICATIONS. 

3. No person shall be a senator who shall not have at- 
tained to the age of thirty years, and been nine years a 
citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when 
elected, be an inhabitant of that State for which he shall 
lie chosen. 

PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE. 

4. The Vice-President of the United States shall be presi- 
dent of the senate, but shall have no vote unless they be 
equally divided. 

SENATE OFFICERS. 

5. The senate shall choose their other officers, and also a 
president pro tempore, in the absence of the Vice-Presi- 
dent, or when he shall exercise the office of President of 
the United States. 

THE SENATE'S POWERS. 

6. The senate shall have the sole power to try all im- 
peachments. When sitting for that purpose, they shall be 
on oath or affirmation. When the President of the United 
States is tried, the chief justice shall preside. And no 
person shall be convicted without the concurrence of two- 
thirds of the members present. 

7. Judgment, in cases of impeachment, shall not extend 
further than to removal from office, and disqualification 
to hold and enjoy any office of honor, trust or profit under 
the United States; but the party convicted shall, never- 
theless, be liable and subject to indictment, trial, judg- 
ment and punishment according to law. 



MEMBERS OF CONGRESS— HOW ELECTED. 

Section IV. 

1. The times, places and manner of holding elections for 
senators and representatives shall be prescribed in each 
State, by the legislature thereof; but the congress may, at 
any time, by law, make or alter such regulations, except 
as to the places of choosing senators. 

WHEN CONGRESS SHALL MEET. 

2. Congress shall assemble at least once in every year; 
and such meeting shall be on the first Monday in Decem- 
ber, unless they shall by law appoint a different day. 



26 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

POWERS AND DUTIES OF EACH HOUSE. 
Section V. 

1. Each house shall be the judge of the elections, returns 
and qualifications of its own members; and a majority of 
each shall constitute a quorum to do business; but a small- 
er number may adjourn from day to day, and may be 
authorized to compel the attendance of absent members, in 
such manner and under such penalties as each house may 
provide. 

RULES, &C. 

2. Each house may determine the rules of its proceedings, 
punish its members for disorderly behavior, and, with the 
concurrence of two-thirds, expel a member. 

JOURNALS. 

3. Each house shall keep a journal of its proceedings, and 
from time to time publish the same, excepting such parts 
as may, in their judgment, require secrecy; and the yeas 
and nays of the members of each house, on any question, 
shall, at the desire of one-fifth of those present, be entered 
on the journal. 

ADJOURNMENT. 

4. Neither house, during the session of congress, shall, 
without the consent of the other, adjourn for more than 
three days, nor to any other place than that in which the 
two houses shall be sitting. 

COMPENSATION, PRIVILEGES AND INCAPACITIES. 
Section VI. 

1. The senators and representatives shall receive a com- 
pensation for their services, to be a.scertained by law, and 
paid out of the treasury of the United States. They shall, 
in all cases, except treason, felony, and breach of the 
peace, be privileged from arrest during their attendance 
at the session of their respective houses, and in going to 
and returning from the sam.e; and for any speech or de- 
bate in either house, they shall not be questioned in any 
other place. 

APPOINTMENT TO OFFICE. 

2. No senator or representative shall, during the time for 
which he was elected, be appointed to any civil office under 
the authority of the United States, which shall have been 
created, or the emoluments whereof shall have been in- 
creased, during such time; and no person holding any office 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 27 

under the United States, shall be a member of either house 
during his continuance in office. 

REVENUE BILLS. 

Section VIL 

1. All bills for raising revenue shall originate in the house 
of representatives; but the senate may propose or concur 
with amendments, as on other bills. 

PASSING BILLS, &C. 

2. Every bill which shall have passed the house of repre- 
sentatives and the senate, shall, before it become a law, 
be presented to the President of the United States; if he 
approve, he shall sign it; but if not, he shall return it, with 
his objections, to that house in which it shall have origi- 
nated, who shall enter the objections at large on their jour- 
nal, and proceed to reconsider it. If, after such reconsid- 
eration, two-thirds of that house shall agree to pass the 
bill, it shall be sent, together with the objections, to the 
other house, by which it shall likewise be reconsidered, 
and if approved by two-thirds of that house, it shall be- 
come a law. But in all such cases the votes of both houses 
shall be determined by yeas and nays, and the names of 
the persons voting for and against the bill shall be en- 
tered on the journal of each house respectively. If any 
bill shall not be returned by the President within ten days 
(Sundays excepted) after it shall have been presented to 
him, the same shall be a law, in like manner as if he had 
signed it, unless the congress, by their adjournment, pre- 
vent its return, in which case it shall not be a law. 

ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 

3. Every order, resolution or vote, to which the concur- 
rence of the senate and house of representatives may be 
necessary (except on the question of adjournment), shall 
be presented to the President of the United States, and 
before the same shall take effect, shall be approved by 
him, or, being disapproved by him, shall be repassed by 
two-thirds of the senate and house of representatives, ac- 
cording to the rules and limitations prescribed in the case 
of a bill. 

POWERS OF CONGRESS. 

Section VIII. 
The congress shall have power: 

1. To lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts and excises, 
to pay the debts and provide for the common defense, and 



28 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

general welfare of the United States; t>ut all duties, im- 
posts and excises shall be uniform throughout the United 
States. 

2. To borrow money on the credit of United States; 

3. To regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among 
the several States, and with the Indian tribes; 

4. To establish an uniform rule of naturalization, and 
uniform laws on the subject of bankruptcies, throughout 
the United States; 

5. To coin money, regulate the value thereof, and of for- 
eign coins, and fix the standard of weights and measures; 

6. To provide for the punishment of counterfeiting the 
securities and current coin of the United States; 

7. To establish post offices and post roads; 

8. To promote the progress of science and useful arts, by 
securing, for limited times, to authors and inventors, the 
exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries; 

9. To constitute tribunals inferior to the supreme court; 

10. To define and punish piracies and felonies committed 
on the high seas, and offenses against the law of nations; 

11. To declare war, grant letters of marque and reprisal, 
and make rules concerning captures on land and water; 

12. To raise and support armies; but no appropriation of 
money to that use shall be for a longer term than two 
years; 

13. To provide and maintain a navy; 

14. To make rules for the government and regulation of 
the land and naval forces; 

15. To provide for calling forth the militia to execute the 
laws of the Union, suppress insurrections and repel in- 
vasions; 

16. To provide for organizinz, arming and disciplining the 
militia, and for governing such part of them as may be 
employed in the service of the United States, reserving to 
the States, respectively, the appointment of the officers, 
and the authority of training the militia according to the 
discipline prescribed by congress; 

17. To exercise exclusive legislation, in all cases whatso- 
ever, over such district (not exceeding ten miles square), 
as may, by cession of particular States, and the accept- 
ance of congress, become the seat of government of the 
United States; and to exercise like authority over all places 
purchased by the consent of the legislature of the State 
in which the same shall be, for the erection of forts, maga- 
zines, arsenals, dock-yards and other needful buildings; 
and— 

18. To make all laws which shall be necessary and proper, 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 29 

for carrying- into execution the foregoing^ powers and all 
other powers vested by this constitution in the govern- 
ment of the United States, or in any department or officer 
thereof. 

LIMITATIONS OF THE POWERS OF CONGRESS. 

Section IX. 

1. The migration or importation of such persons as any 
of the States now existing shall think proper to admit, 
shall not be prohibited by the cong-ress, prior to the year 
one thousand eight hundred and eight, but a tax or duty 
may be imposed on such importation, not exceeding ten 
dollars for each person. 

2. The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not be 
suspended, unless, when in cases of rebellion or invasion, 
the public safety may require it. 

3. No bill of attainder, or ex post facto law shall be 
passed. 

4. No capitation or other direct tax shall be laid, unless 
in proportion to the census or enumeration hereinbefore 
directed to be taken. 

5. No tax or duty shall be laid on articles exported from 
any State. No preference shall be given, by any regulation 
of commerce or revenue, to the ports of one State over 
those of another; nor shall vessels bound to or from one 
State, be obliged to enter, clear or pay duties in another. 

6. No money shall be drawn from the treasury, but in 
consequence of appropriations made by law; and a regular 
statement and account of the receipts and expenditures of 
all public money shall be published from time to time. 

7. No title of nobility shall be granted by the United 
States; and no person holding any office of profit or trust 
under them, shall, without the consent of the congress, 
accept of any present, emolument, office or title of any kind 
whatever, from any king, prince or foreign State. 

LIMITATIONS OF THE POWERS OF INDI- 
VIDUAL STATES. 

Section X. 

1. No State shall enter into any treaty, alliance or con- 
federation; grant letters of marque and reprisal; coin 
money; emit bills of credit; make anything but gold and 
silver coin a tender in payment of debts; pass any bill of 
attainder, ex post facto law, or law impairing the obliga- 
tion of contracts; or grant any title of nobility. 

2. No State shall, without the consent of the congress, 



30 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

lay any imposts or duties on Imports or exports, except 
what may be absolutely necessary for executing its in- 
spection laws; and the net produce of all duties and im- 
posts laid by any State on imports or exports, shall be for 
the use of the treasury of the United States; and all such 
laws shall be subject to the revision and control of the 
congress. 

3. No State shall, without the consent of congress, lay 
any duty of tonnage, keep troops or ships of war in time 
of peace, enter into any agreement or compact with an- 
other State, or with a foreign power, or engage in war, 
unless actually invaded, or in such imminent danger as will 
not admit delay. 

ARTICLE II. 

THE EXECUTIVE POWER. 
Section I. 

1. The executive power shall be vested in a President of 
the United States of America. He shall hold his office dur- 
ing the term of four years, and, together with the Vice- 
President, chosen for the same term, be elected as follows: 

HOW ELECTED. 

2. Each State shall appoint, in such manner as the legis- 
lature thereof may direct, a number of electors equal to 
the whole number of senators and representatives to which 
the State may be entitled in congress; but no senator or 
representative, or person holding an office of trust or profit 
under the United States, shall be appointed an elector. 

ELECTORAL COLLEGES. 

3. The electors shall meet in their respective States, and 
vote by ballot, for two persons, of whom one, at least, shall 
not be an inhabitant of the same State with themselves. 
And they shall make a list of all the persons voted for, and 
of the number of votes for each; w^hich list they shall sign 
and certify, and transmit, sealed, to the seat of the gov- 
ernment of the United States, directed to the president of 
the senate. The president of the senate shall, in the pres- 
ence of the senate and house of representatives, open all 
the certificates, and the votes shall then be counted. The 
person having the greatest number of votes shall be the 
President, if such number be a majority of the whole num- 
ber of electors appointed; and if there be more than one 
who have such majority, and have an equal number of 
votes, then the house of representatives shall immediately 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 31 

choose by ballot, one of them for President; and if no per- 
son have a majority, then from the five highest on the 
list, the said house shall in like manner choose the Presi- 
dent. But in choosing the President, the votes shall be 
taken by States, the representation from each State having 
one vote; a quorum for this purpose shall consist of a mem- 
ber or members from two-thirds of the States, and a ma- 
iority of the States shall be necessary to a choice. In 
every case, after the choice of the President, the person 
having the greatest number of votes of the electors, shall 
be the Vice-President. But if there should remain two or 
more who have equal votes, the senate shall choose from 
them, by ballot, the Vice-President. [See Xllth amend- 
ment.] 

4. The congress may determine the time of choosing the 
electors, and the day on which they shall give their votes, 
which day shall be the same throughout the United States, 

WHO MAY BE ELECTED PRESIDENT. 

5. No person except a natural born citizen, or a citizen of 
the United States at the time of the adoption of this con- 
stitution, shall be eligible to the office of President; neither 
shall any person be eligible to that office who shall not 
have attained to the age of thirty-five years, and been 
fourteen years a resident within the United States. [See 
Xllth amendment.] 

ON THE DEATH, REMOVAL, &C., OF THE PRESI- 
DENT, THE POWERS AND DUTIES DE- 
VOLVE UPON THE VICE- 
PRESIDENT. 

6. In case of the removal of the President from office, or 
of his death, resignation or inability to discharge the pow- 
ers and duties of the said office, the same shall devolve on 
the Vice-President; and the congress may, by law, provide 
for the case of removal, death, resignation or inability, 
both of the President and Vice-President, declaring what 
officer shall then act as President, and such officer shall 
act accordingly, until the disability be removed, or a 
President shall be elected. 

COMPENSATION OF THE PRESIDENT. 

7. The President shall, at stated times, receive for his 
services a compensation which shall neither be increased 
nor diminished during the period for which he shall have 
been elected; and he shall not receive, within that period, 



32 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

any other emolument from the United States or any of 
them. 

8. Before he enters on the execution of his office, he shall 
take the following oath or affirmation: 

THE OATH. 

"I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully 
execute the office of President of the United States, and 
will, to the best of my ability, preserve, protect and defend 
the constitution of the United States." 

POWERS, &C., OF THE PRESIDENT. 

Section II. 

1. The President shall be commander-in-chief of the army 
and navy of the United States, and of the militia of the 
several States, when called into actual service of the 
United States; he may require the opinion, in writing, of 
the principal officer in each of the executive departments, 
upon any subject relating to the duties of their respective 
offices, and he shall have power to grant reprieves and 
pardons for offenses against the United States, except in 
cases of Impeachment. 

TREATIES, AMBASSADORS, &C. 

2. He shall have power, by and with the advice and con- 
sent of the senate, to make treaties, provided two-thirds 
of the senators present concur; and he shall nominate, and 
by and with the advice and consent of the senate shall 
appoint, ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls, 
judges of the supreme court, and all other officers of the 
United States whose appointments are not herein other- 
wise provided for, and which shall be established by law. 
But the congress may, by law, vest the appointment of 
such inferior officers as they think proper in the President 
alone, in the courts of law, or in the heads of department. 

APPOINTING POWER. 

3. The President shall have power to fill up all vacancies 
that may happen during the recess of the senate, by grant- 
ing commissions, which shall expire at the end of their 
next session. 

DUTIES OF THE PRESIDENT. 
Section III. 
He shall, from time to time, give to the congress infor- 
mation of the state of the Union, and recommend to their 



CONSTITUTION OP THE U. S. 33 

consideration such measures as he shall judge necessary 
and expedient; he may, on extraordinary occasions, con- 
vene both houses, or either of them; and in case of disa- 
greement between <vhem with respect to the time of ad- 
journment, he may adjourn them to such time as he shall 
think proper; he shall receive ambassadors and other pub- 
lic ministers; lie shall take care that the laws be faithfully 
executed, and shall commission all the officers of the 
United States. 

IMPEACHMENT, &C. 

Section IV. 

The President, Vice-President and all civil officers of the 
United States shall be removed from office on impeachment 
for, and conviction of, treason, bribery or other high 
crimes and misdemeanors. 

ARTICLE III. 

THE JUDICIAL POWER. 

Section I. 

The judicial power of the United States shall be vested 
in one supreme court, and in such inferior courts as the 
congress may from time to time ordain and establish. The 
judges, both of the supreme and inferior courts, shall hold 
their offices during good behavior, and shall, at stated 
times, receive for their service a compensation, which shall 
not be diminished during their continuance in office. 

EXTENT OF THE JUDICIAL POWER. 

(See Amendments, Art. XI.) 

Section II. 

1. The judicial power shall extend to all cases in law and 
equity arising under this constitution, the laws of the 
United States, and treaties made, or which shall be made, 
under their authority; to all cases affecting ambassadors, 
or other public ministers and consuls; to all cases of ad- 
miralty and maritime jurisdiction; to controversies to 
which the United States shall be a party; to controversies 
between two or more States; between a State and citizens 
of another State; between citizens of different States; be- 
tween citizens of the same State, claiming lands under 
grants of different States, and between a State, or the 
citizens thereof, and foreign States, citizens or subjects. 
3 



34 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

ORIGINAL. AND APPELLATE JURISDICTION OF 
THE SUPREME COURT. 

2. In all cases affecting ambassadors, other public min- 
isters and consuls, and those in which a State shall be 
party, the supreme court shall have original jurisdiction. 
In all the other cases before mentioned, the supreme court 
shall have appellate jurisdiction, both as to law and fact, 
with such exceptions and under such regulations as the 
congress shall make. 

TRIALS FOR CRIMES. 

3. The trials of all crimes, except in cases of impeach- 
ment, shall be by jury, and such trial shall be held in the 
State where the said crime shall have been committed; but 
when not committed within any State, the trial shall be at 
such place or places as the congress may by law have 
directed. 

TREASON— WHAT AND HOW PUNISHED. 

Section III. 

1. Treason against the United States shall consist only in 
levying war against them, or in adhering to their enemies, 
giving them aid and comfort. No person shall be con- 
victed of treason unless on the testimony of two witnesses 
to the same overt act, or on confession in open court. 

2. The congress shall have power to declare the punish- 
ment of treason, but no attainder of treason shall work 
corruption of blood, or forfeiture, except during the life of 
the person attainted. 

ARTICLE IV. 

ACTS, RECORDS, &C., OF EACH STATE. 

Section I. 

Full faith and credit shall be given, in each State, to the 
public acts, records and judicial proceedings of every other 
State. And the congress may, by general laws, prescribe 
the manner in which such acts, records and proceedings 
shall be proved, and the effect thereof. 

PRIVILEGES OF CITIZENS. 

Section 11. 

1. The citizens of each State shall be entitled to all privi- 
lei^es and immunities of citizens in the several States. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. ^5 

FUGITIVES FROM JUSTICE. 

2. A person charged in any State with treason, felony or 
other crime, who shall flee from justice and be found in 
another State, shall, on demand of the executive authority 
of the State from Vv^hich he fled, be delivered up, to be 
removed to the State having- jurisdiction of the crime. 

SERVANTS, &C., TO BE SURRENDERED ON CLAIM. 

3. No person held to service or labor in one State, under 
the laws thereof, escaping- into another, shall, in conse- 
quence of any law or regulation therein, be discharged 
from such service or labor, but shall be delivered up, on 
claim of the party to whom such service or labor may be 
due. 

HOW NEW STATES ARE ADMITTED, 
Section III. 

1. New States may be admitted by the congress into this 
Union; but no new State shall be formed or erected within 
the jurisdiction of any other State, nor any State be 
formed by the junction of two or more States or parts of 
States, without the consent of the legislatures of the 
States concerned, as well as of the congress. 

THE DISPOSITION OF TERRITORIES. 

2. The congress shall have power to dispose of, and make 
all needful rules and regulations respecting, the territory 
or other property belonging- to the United States; and 
nothing in this constitution shall be so construed as to 
prejudice any claims of the United States, or of any par- 
ticular State. 

GUARANTY AND PROTECTION OF THE STATES 
BY THE UNION, 

Section IV, 

The United States shall guarantee to every State in this 
Union, a republican form of government, and shall protect 
each of them against invasion; and, on application of the 
legislature or of the executive (when the legislature can- 
not be convened), against domestic violence. 



36 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

ARTICLE V. 

AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION- 
HOW MADE. 

The congress, whenever two-thirds of both houses shall 
deem it necessary, shall propose amendments to this con- 
stitution; or, on the application of the legislatures of two- 
thirds of the several States, shall call a convention for 
proposing amendments, which in either case shall be valid, 
to all intents and purposes, as part of this constitution, 
when ratified by the legislatures of three-fourths of the 
several States, or by conventions in three-fourths thereof, 
as the one or the other mode of ratification may be pro- 
posed by the congress; provided, that no amendment which 
may be made prior to the year eighteen hundred and eight 
shall in any manner affect the first and fourth clauses in 
the ninth section of the first article, and that no State, 
without its consent, shall be deprived of its equal suffrage 
in the senate. 

ARTICLE VI. 

FORMER DEBTS VALID. 
Section I. 
All debts contracted, and engagements entered into, be- 
fore the adoption of this constitution, shall be as valid 
against the United States under this constitution as under 
the confederation. 

THE SUPREME LAW OF THE LAND. 
Section IL 
This constitution, and the laws of the United States 
which shall be made in pursuance thereof, and all treaties 
made, or which shall be made, under the authority of the 
United States, shall be the supreme law of the land; and 
the judges in every State shall be bound thereby, anything 
in the constitution or laws of any State to the contrary 
notwithstanding. 

THE CONSTITUTIONAL OATH NO RELIGIOUS TEST. 
Section III. 
The senators and representatives before mentioned, and 
the members of the several State legislatures, and all ex- 
ecutive and judicial officers, both of the United States and 
of the several States, shall be bound by oath or affirmation 
to support this constitution; but no religious test shall ever 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 



37 



be required as a qualification to any office of public trust 
under the United States. 



ARTICLE VII. 

WHEN THE CONSTITUTION TO TAKE EFFECT. 

The ratification of the conventions of nine States shall be 
sufficient for the establishment of this constitution be- 
tween the States so ratifying the same. 

Done in the convention, by the unanimous consent of the 
States present, the seventeenth day of September, in the 
year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty- 
seven, and of the independence of the United States of 
America the twelfth. 

In witness whereof, we have hereunto subscribed our 
names. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON, President, 

And Deputy from Virginia. 



New Hampshire- 
John Langdon, 
Nicholas Oilman. 

Massachusetts- 
Nathaniel Gorman, 
Rufus King. 

Connecticut- 
William Samuel Johnson, 
Roger Sherman. 

New York- 
Alexander Hamilton. 

New Jersey- 
William Livingston, 
David Brearle, 
William Paterson, 
Jonathan Dayton. 

Pennsylvania — 

Benjamin Franklin, 
Thomas Mifflin, 
Robert Morris, 
George Clymer, 
Thomas Fitzsimons, 
Jared IngersoU, 
James Wilson, 
Gouv. Morris. 



Attest: 



Delaware — 

George Reed, 
Gunning Bedford, Jun., 
John Dickinson, 
Richard Bassett, 
Jacob Broom. 

Maryland— 

Dan'l of St. Thos. Jeni- 
fer, 
James McHenry, 
Daniel Carroll. 

Virginia- 
John Blair, 
James Madison, Jun. 

North Carolina- 
William Blunt, 
Rich'd Dobbs Spaight, 
Hugh Williamson. 

South Carolina- 
John Rutledge, 
Chas. CoatesworthPinck- 

ney, 
Charles Pinckney, 
Pierce Butler. 

Georgia- 
William Few, 
Abraham Baldwin. 



William Jackson, 

Secretary. 



38 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 



AMENDMENTS 



TO THE CONSTITUTION of the United States, Ratified 
According to the Provisions of the Fifth Article of the 
Foregoing Constitution. 



The following articles proposed by congress, in addition 
to and amendments of the constitution of the United 
States, having been ratified by the legislatures of three- 
fourths of the States, are become a part of the consti- 
tution. 

First Congress, First Session, March 5th, 1789. 

ARTICLE I. 

RIGHT OF CONSCIENCE, FREEDOM OF THE 
PRESS, &C. 

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment 
of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or 
abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the 
right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition 
the government for a redress of grievances. 

ARTICLE 11. 

OF THE MILITIA. 
A well-regulated militia being necessary to the security 
of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear 
arms shall not be infringed. 

ARTICLE III. 

OF QUARTERING SOLDIERS. 
No soldier shall in time of peace be quartered in any 
house without the consent of the owner; nor in time of 
war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law. 

ARTICLE IV. 

OF UNREASONABLE SEARCHES AND SEIZURES. 

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, 
houses, papers and effects, against unreasonable searches 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 39 

and seizures, shall not be violated; and no warrant shall 
issue but upon probable cause, supported by oath or afflr- 
mation, and particularly describing- the place to be 
searched, and the persons or things to be seized. 

ARTICLE V. 

OF CRIMES AND INDICTMENTS. 

No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or other- 
wise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indict- 
ment of a grand jury, except in cases arising' in the land 
or naval forces, or in the militia, when in actual service 
in time of war or public danger, nor shall any person be 
subject, for the same offense, to be twice put in jeopardy 
of life and limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal 
case to be witness against himself; nor to be deprived of 
life, liberty or property, without due process of law, nor 
shall private property be taken for public use without just 
compensation. 

ARTICLE VI. 

OF CRIMINAL PROSECUTIONS. 

In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the 
right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of 
the State and district wherein the crime shall have been 
committed, which district shall have been previously ascer- 
tained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause 
of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses 
against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining 
witnesses in his favor, and to have the assistance of coun- 
sel for his defense. 

ARTICLE VII. 

OF TRIAL BY JURY IN CIVIL CASES. 

In suits at common law, where the value in controversy 
shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall 
be preserved; and no fact tried by a jury shall be other- 
wise re-examined in any court of the United States, than 
according to the rules of the common law. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

OF BAILS, FINES AND PUNISHMENTS. 

Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines 
imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted. 



40 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

ARTICLE IX. 

RESERVED RIGHTS. 

The enumeration in the constitution, of certain rights, 
shall not be construed to deny or disparage others, retained 
by the people. 

ARTICLE X. 

POWERS NOT DELEGATED RESERVED. 

The powers not delegated to the United States by the 
constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved 
to the States respectively, or to the people. 

Third Congress, Second Session, December 2d, 1783. 

ARTICLE XL 

THE JUDICIAL POWER— SEE ART. 3, SEC. 2. 

The judicial power of the United States shall not be con- 
strued to extend to any suit, in law or equity, commenced 
or prosecuted against one of the United States, by citizens 
of another State, or by citizens or subjects of any foreign 
State. 

Eighth Congress, First Session, October 17th, 1803. 

ARTICLE XIL 

HOW THE PRESIDENT AND A'ICE-PRESIDENT 
ARE ELECTED. 
The electors shall meet in their respective States,* and 
vote by ballot for President and Vice-President, one of 
whom, at least, shall not be an inhabitant of the same 
State with themselves; they shall name, in their ballots, 
the person voted for as President, and in distinct ballots 
the person voted for as Vice-President; and they shall 
make distinct lists of all persons voted for as President, 
and of all persons voted for as Vice-President, and of the 
number of votes for each; which list they shall sign and 
certify, and transmit sealed.f to the seat of the government 
of the United States, directed to the president of the sen- 



*0n the second Monday in January next following their 
appointment. 
tAfter the second Monday in January. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 41 

ate; the president of the senate shall, in the presence of 
the senate and house of representatives, open all the cer- 
tificates,* and the votes shall then be counted; the person 
having the greatest number of votes for President shall 
be the President, if such number be a majority of the whole 
number of electors appointed. And if no person have such 
majority, then from the persons having the highest num- 
bers, not exceeding three, on the list of those voted for as 
President, the house of representatives shall choose imme- 
diately, by ballot, the President; but in choosing the Presi- 
dent, the votes shall be taken by States, the representation 
from each State having one vote; a quorum fof this pur- 
pose shall consist of a member or members from two- 
thirds of the States, and a majority of all the States shall 
be necessary to a choice; and if the house of representa- 
tives shall not choose a President, whenever the right of a 
choice shall devolve upon them, before the fourth day of 
March next following, then the Vice-President shall act as 
President, as in the case of the death or other constitu- 
tional disability of the President. The person having the 
greatest number of votes as Vice-President shall be the 
Vice-President, if such number be a majority of the whole 
number of electors appointed; and if no person have a ma- 
jority, then from the two highest numbers on the list, the 
senate shall choose the Vice-President; a quorum for the 
purpose shall consist of two-thirds of the whole number of 
senators, and a majority of the whole number shall be 
necessary to a choice. But no person constitutionally ineli- 
gible to the office of President, shall be eligible to that of 
Vice-President of the United States. 

ARTICLE XIII. 

SLAVERY ABOLISHED— 13TH AMENDMENT, 

PASSED 1865. 

Section I. 

Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a 

punishment for crime, whereof the party shall have been 

duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any 

place subject to their jurisdiction. 

Section II. 
Congress shall have power to enforce this article by ap- 
propriate legislation. 



*On the 2d Wednesday in February, by the same act. 



42 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

CITIZENS AND THEIR RIGHTS-14TH AMENDMENT. 

Section I. 

All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and 
subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the 
United States, and of the State wherein they reside. No 
State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge 
the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United 
States. Nor shall any State deprive any person of life, 
liberty or property without due process of law, nor deny 
to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection 
of the laws. 

APPORTIONMENT OF REPRESENTATIVES. 

Section II. 

Representatives shall be apportioned among the several 
States according to their respective number, counting the 
whole number of persons in each State, excluding Indians 
not taxed; but whenever the right to vote at any election 
for electors of President and Vice-President, or for United 
States representatives in congress, executive and judicial 
officers, or the members of the legislature thereof, is de- 
nied to any of the male inhabitants of such State, being 
twenty-one years of age, and citizens of the United States, 
or in any way abridged, except for participation in rebel- 
lion or other crime, the basis of representation therein 
shall be reduced in the proportion which the number of 
such male citizens shall bear to the whole number of male 
citizens twenty-one years of age in such State. 



DISABILITY OF PERSONS ENGAGED IN THE 
REBELLION. 

Section III. 

No person shall be a senator or representative in con- 
gress, elector of President and Vice President, or hold any 
office, civil or military, under the United States, or under 
any State, who, having previously taken an oath as a 
member of congress, or as an officer of the United States, 
or as a member of any State legislature, or as an executive 
or judicial officer of any State to support the constitution 
of the United States, shall have engaged in insurrection or 
rebellion against the same, or given aid or comfort to the 
enemies thereof; but congress may, by a vote of two-thirds 
of each house, remove such disability. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 43 

VALIDITY OF PUBLIC DEBT NOT TO BE QUES- 
TIONED. 

Section IV. 

The validity of the public rlebt of the United States au- 
thorized by law, including- debts incurred for the payment 
of pensions and bounties for service in suppressing insur- 
rection or rebellion, shall not be questioned, but neither 
the United States nor any State shall assume or pay any 
debt or obligation incurred in aid of insurrection or rebel- 
lion against the United States, or claim for the loss or 
emancipation of any slave, but all such debts, obligations 
and claims shall be held illegal and void. 

Section V. 

The congress shall have power to enforce, by appropri- 
ate legislation, the provisions of this article. 



ARTICLE XV. 

RIGHT OF SUFFRAGE NOT TO BE IMPAIRED. 

Section I. 

The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall 
not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any 
State, on account of race, color or previous condition of 
servitude. 

Section II. 

The congress shall have power to enforce this article 
by appropriate legislation. 

[The fifteenth amendment passed at the Fortieth Con- 
gress.] 



44 PRESIDENTS. 



PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES. 



Tear of 

Qualification. Name. Where From. Term of OflSce. 

1789 — George Washington... Virginia 8 years. 

1797 — John Adams Massachusetts.. 4 years. 

1801 — Thomas Jefferson Virginia 8 years. 

1S09 — James Madison Virginia 8 years. 

1817 — James Monroe Virginia 8 years. 

1824 — John Quincy Adams.. Massachusetts.. 4 years. 

1829 — Andrew Jackson Tennessee 8 years. 

1837 — Martin Van Buren — New York 4 years. 

1S41 — Wm. Henry Harrison*. Ohio 1 month. 

1841 — John Tyler Virginia 3 yr., 11 mos. 

1845 — James Knox Polk Tennessee 4 years. 

1849 — Zachary Taylort Louisiana lyr., 4mo., 5d 

1850.... Millard Fillmore New York 2y., 7m., 26d. 

1853 Franklin Pierce N. Hampshire... 4 years. 

1857 — James Buchanan Pennsylvania 4 years. 

1861 — Abraham Lincoln^ Illinois 4y., Im., lOd. 

1865 — Andrew Johnson Tennessee 3y., 10m., 20d. 

1869 — Ulysses S. Grant Illinois 8 years. 

1877.... Rutherford B. Hayes.. Ohio 4 years. 

1S81.... James A. Garfield**... Ohio 6m., 15d. 

18S1.... Chester A. Arthur New York .3y., 5m., 15d. 

1885 — Grover Cleveland New York 4 years. 

1889 — Benjamin Harrison Indiana 4 years. 

1893. . . .Grover Cleveland New York 4 years. 

1897.... William McKinleytt- ..Ohio 4y., 5m.. lid. 

1901 — Theodore Roosevelt... New York 

*Died in ofTice April 4. 1841, when Vice-President Tyler 
succeeded him. 

tDied in office July 9, 1S50, when Vice-President Fillmore 
succeeded him. 

^Assassinated April 14. 1865: died April 15, 1865, when Vice- 
President Johnson succeeded him. 

**Assassinated July 2. 1881; died September 19, 1881, when 
Vice-President Arthur succeeded him. 

ttAssassinated September 6, 1901; died September 14, 
1901, when Vice-President Roosevelt succeeded him. 



VICE-PRESIDENTS. 



VICE-PRESIDENTS OF UNITED STATES. 



Tear of 

Qualification. Name. Where From. 

1789 John Adams Massachusetts. 

1797 .Thomas Jefferson Virginia. 

1801 Aaron Burr New York. 

1804 George Clinton New York. 

1813 Elbridge Gerry Massachusetts. 

1817 Daniel D. Tompkins New York. 

1824 John C. Calhoun South Carolina. 

1833 Martin Van Buren New York. 

1837 Richard M. Johnson Kentucky. 

1841 John Tyler Virginia. 

1842 Samuel L. Southard* New Jersey, 

1845 George M. Dallas Pennsylvania. 

1849 Millard Fillmore New York. 

1851 William R. King* Alabama. 

1853 David R. Atchinson* Missouri. 

1855 Jesse D. Bright* Indiana. 

1857 John C. Breckenridge Kentucky. 

1861 Hannibal Hamlin Maine. 

1865 Andrew Johnson Tennessee. 

1865 Lafayette C. Foster* Connecticut. 

1869 Schuyler Colfax Indiana. 

1873 Henry Wilsonf Massachusetts. 

1875 Thomas W. Ferry* Michigan. 

1877 William A. Wheeler New York. 

1881 Chester A. Arthur New York. 

1883 George F. Edmunds Vermont. 

1885 Thomas A. HendricksJ... Indiana. 

1886 John Sherman* Ohio. 

1889 Levi P. Morton New York. 

1893 Adlai E. Stevenson Illinois. 

1897 Garret A. Hobart** New Jersey. 

1899 William P. Frye* Maine. 

1901 Theodore Roosevelt New York. 

1901 William P. Frye* Maine. 

19ao Charles W. Fairbanks Indiana. 

"Served as President pro tem. of Senate. 
tDied in office November 22, 1875. 
tDied in office November 25, 1885. 
**Died in office November 21, 1899. 



46 STATE CONSTITUTION. 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 



A CONSTITUTION agreed upon by the delegates of the 
people of New Jersey, in convention begun at Trenton 
on the fourteenth day of May, and continued to the 
twenty-ninth day of June, in the year of our Lord one 
thousand eight hundred and forty-four, ratified by the 
people at an election held on the thirteenth day of 
August, A. D. 1844, and amended at a special election 
held on the seventh day of September. A. D. 1875, and 
at another special election held on the twenty-eighth 
day of September, A. D. 1897. 

We, the people of the State of New Jersey, grateful to 
Almighty God for the civil and religious liberty which He 
hath so long permitted us to enjoy, and looking to Him 
for a blessing upon our endeavors to secure and transmit 
the same unimpaired to succeeding generations, do ordain 
and establish this Constitution: 

ARTICLE I. 

RIGHTS AND PRIVILEGES. 

1. All men are by nature free and independent, and have 
certain natural and unalienable rights, among which are 
those of enjoying and defending life and liberty; acquir- 
ing, possessing and protecting property, and of pursuing 
and obtaining safety and happiness. 

2. All political power is inherent m the people. Govern- 
ment is instituted for the protection, security and benefit 
of the people, and they have the right at all times to alter 
or reform the same, whenever the public good may re- 
quire it. 

3. No person shall be deprived of the inestimable privi- 
lege of worshiping Almighty God in a manner agreeable to 
the dictates of his own conscience; nor, under any pretense 
whatever, to be compelled to attend any place of worship 
contrary to his faith and judgment; nor shall any person 
be obliged to pay tithes, taxes or other rates for building 
or repairing any church or churches, place or places of 
worship, or for the maintenance of any minister or min- 
istry, contrary to what he believes to be right, or has de- 
liberately and voluntarily engaged to perform. 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 47 

4. There shall be no establishment of one religious sect 
in preference to another; no religious test shall be required 
as a qualification for any office or public trust; and no 
person shall bo denied the enjoyment of any civil right 
merely on account of his religious principles. 

5. Every person may freely speak, write and publish his 
sentiments on all subjects, being responsible for the abuse 
of that right. No law shall be passed to restrain or abridge 
!he liberty of speech or of the press. In all prosecutions 
or indictments for libel, the truth may be given in evidence 
to the jury; and if it shall appear to the jury that the 
matter charged as libelous is true, and was published with 
good motives and for justifiable ends, the party shall be ac- 
quitted; and the jury shall have the right to determine the 
law and the fact. 

6. The right of the people to be secure in their persons, 
houses, papers and effects, against unreasonable searches 
and seizures, shall not be violated; and no warrant shall 
issue but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirm- 
ation, and particularly describing the place to be searched 
and the papers and things to be seized. 

7. The right of a trial by jury shall remain inviolate; but 
the legislature may authorize the trial of civil suits, when 
the matter in dispute does not exceed fifty dollars, by a 
jury of six men. 

8. In all criminal prosecutions the accused shall have the 
right to a speedy and public trial by an impartial jury; to 
be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to 
be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have 
compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, 
and to have the assistance of counsel in his defense. 

9. No person shall be held to answer for a criminal of- 
fense, unless on the presentment or indictment of a grand 
jury, except in cases of impeachment, or in caises cogniz- 
able by justices of the peace, or arising in the army or 
navj'; or in the militia, when in actual service in time of 
war or public danger. 

10. No person shall, after acquittal, be tried for the same 
offense. All persons shall, before conviction, be bailable 
by sufficient sureties, except for capital offenses, when 
the proof is evident or presumption great. 

11. The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not 
be suspended, unless in case of rebellion or invasion the 
public safety may require it. 

12. The military shall be in strict subordination to the 
civil power. 

13. No soldier shall, in time of peace, be quartered in 



^8 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

any house without the consent of the owner; nor in time 
of war, except in a manner prescribed by law. 

14. Treason against the State shall consist only in levyin? 
war against it, or in adhering to its enemies, giving them 
aid and comfort. No person shall be convicted of treason 
unless on the testimony of two witnesses to the same overt 
act, or on confession in open court. 

15. Excessive bail shall not be required, excessive fines 
shall not be imposed, and cruel and unusual punishment? 
shall not be inflicted. 

16 Private property shall not be taken for public use 
without just compensation; but land may be taken for 
public highways as heretofore, until the legislature shall 
direct compensation to be made. 

17. No person shall be imprisoned for debt in any action 
or on any judgment founded upon contract, unless in cases 
of fraud; nor shall any person be imprisoned for a militia 
fine in time of peace. 

18. The people have the right freely to assemble together, 
to consult for the common good, to make known their 
opinions to their representatives, and to petition for re- 
dress of grievances. 

19. No county, city, borough, town, township or village 
shall hereafter give any money or property, or loan its 
money or credit, to or in aid of any individual association 
or corporation, or become security for or be directly or 
indirectly the owner of any stock or bonds of any associa- 
tion or corporation. 

20. No donation of land or appropriation of money shall 
be made by the State or any municipal corporation to or 
for the use of any society, association or corporation what- 
ever. 

21. This enumeration of rights and privileges shall not be 
construed to impair or deny others retained by the people. 

ARTICLE II. 

RIGHT OF SUFFRAGE. 

1. Every male citizen of the United States, of the age of 
twenty-one years, who shall have been a resident of this 
State one year, and of the county in which he claims his 
vote five months, next before the election, shall be entitled 
to vote for all officers that now are, or hereafter may be, 
elective by the people; provided, that no person in the 
military, naval or marine service of the United States 
shall be considered a resident in this State, by being sta- 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 49 

tiorled in any garrison, barrack, or military or naval place 
or station within this State; and no pauper, idiot, insane 
person, or person convicted of a crime which now excludes 
him from being- a witness unless pardoned or restored by 
law to the right of suffrage, shall enjoy the right of an 
elector; and provided further, that in time of war no 
elector in the actual military service of the State, or of 
the United States, in the army or navy thereof, shall be 
deprived of his vote by reason of his absence from such 
election district; and the legislature shall have power to 
provide the manner in which, and the time and place at 
which, such absent electors may vote, and for the return 
and canvass of their votes in the election districts in 
which they respectively reside. 

2. The legislature may pass laws to deprive persons of the 
right of suffrage who shall be convicted of bribery. 

ARTICLE III. 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE POWERS OF GOVERNMENT. 

1. The powers of the government shall be divided into 
three distinct departments— the legislative, executive and 
judicial; and no person or persons belonging to, or consti- 
tuting one of these departments, shall exercise any of the 
powers properly belonging to either of the others, except 
as herein expressly provided. 

ARTICLE IV. 

LEGISLATIVE. 
Section I. 

1. The legislative power shall be vested in a senate and 
general assembly. 

2. No person shall be a member of the senate who shall 
not have attained the age of thirty years, and have been 
a citizen and inhabitant of the State for four years, and 
of the county for which he shall be chosen one year, next 
before his election; and no person shall be a member of 
the general assembly who shall not have attained the age 
of twenty-one years, and have been a citizen and inhab- 
itant of the State for two years, and of the county for 
which he shall be chosen one year next before his election; 
provided, that no person shall be eligible as a member of 
either house of the legislature, who shall not be entitled 
to the right of suffrage. 

4 



50 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

3. Members of the senate and general assembly shall b6 
elected yearly and every year, on the first Tuesday after 
the first Monday in November; and the two houses shall 
meet separately on the second Tuesday in January next 
after the said day of election, at which time of meeting 
the legislative year shall commence; but the time of hold- 
ing such election may be altered by the legislature. 

Section II. 

1. The senate shall be composed of one senator from each 
county in the State, elected by the legal voters of the 
counties, respectively, for three years. 

2. As soon as the senate shall meet after the first election 
to be held in pursuance of this constitution, they shall be 
divided as equally as may be into three classes. The seats 
of the senators of the first class shall be vacated at the 
expiration of the first year; of the second class at the ex- 
piration of the second year; and of the third class at the 
expiration of the third year, so that one class may be 
elected every year; and if vacancies happen, by resigna- 
tion or otherwise, the persons elected to supply such 
vacancies shall be elected for the unexpired terms only. 

Section III. 

1. The general assembly shall be composed of members 
annually elected by the legal voters of the counties, re- 
spectively, who shall be apportioned among the said coun- 
ties as nearly as may be according to the number of their 
inhabitants. The present apportionment shall continue 
until the next census of the United States shall have been 
taken, and an apportionment of members of the general 
assemblj' shall be made by the legislature at its first ses- 
sion after the next and every subsequent enumeration or 
census, and when made shall remain unaltered until an- 
other enumeration shall have been taken; provided, that 
each county shall at all times be entitled to one member; 
and the whole number of members shall never exceed 
sixty. 

Section IV. 

1. Each house shall direct writs of election for supplying 
vacancies, occasioned by death, resignation, or otherwise; 
but if vacancies occur during the recess of the legislature, 
the writs may be issued by the governor, under such regu- 
lations as may be prescribed by law. 

2. Each house shall be the judge of the elections, returns 
and qualifications of its own members, and a majority of 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 51 

each shall constitute a quorum to do business; but a small- 
er number may adjourn from day to day, and may be 
authorized to compel the attendance of absent members, 
in such manner, and under such penalties, as each house 
may provide. 

3. Each house shall choose its own officers, determine 
the rules of its proceedings, punish its members for dis- 
orderly behavior, and, with the concurrence of two-thirds, 
may expel a member. 

4. Each house shall keep a journal of its proceeding's, and 
from time to time publish the same; and the yeas and nays 
of the members of either house on any question shall, at 
the desire of one-fifth of those present, be entered on the 
journal. 

5. Neither house, during- the session of the legislature, 
shall, without the consent of the other, adjourn for more 
than three days, nor to any other place than that in which 
the two houses shall be sitting. 

6. All bills and joint resolutions shall be read three times 
in each house, before the final passage thereof; and no bill 
or joint resolution shall pass unless there be a majority of 
all the members of each body personally present and agree- 
ing thereto; and the yeas and nays of the members voting 
on such final passage shall be entered on the journal. 

7. Members of the senate and general assembly shall re- 
ceive annually the sum of five hundred dollars during the 
time for which they shall have been elected and while they 
shall hold their office, and no other allowance or emolu- 
ment, directly or indirectly, for any purpose whatever. 
The president of the senate and the speaker of the house 
of assembly shall, in virtue of their offices, receive an ad- 
ditional compensation, equal to one-third of their allow- 
ance as members. 

8. Members of the senate and general assembly shall, in 
all cases except treason, felony and breach of the peace, 
be privileged from arrest during their attendance at the 
sitting of their respective houses, and in going to and re- 
turning from the same; and for any speech or debate, in 
either house, they shall not be questioned in any other 
place. 

Section V. 

1. No member of the senate or general assembly shall, 
during the time for which he was elected, be nominated or 
appointed by the governor, or by the legislature in joint 
meeting, to any civil office under the authority of this 
State which shall have been created, or the emoluments 
whereof shall have been increased, during such time. 



^2 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

2. If any member of the senate or general assembly shall 
be elected to represent this State in the senate or house of 
representatives of the United States, and shall ac-cept 
thereof, or shall accept of any office or appointment un- 
der the government or the United States, his seat in the 
legislature of this State shall thereby be vacated 

3. No justice of the supreme court, nor judge of any other 
court, sheriff, justice of the peace nor any person or per- 
sons possessed of any office of profit under the government 
of this State, shall be entitled to a seat either in thf sen- 
ate or in the general assembly; but. on being elected and 
taking his seat his office shall be considered vacant; and 
no person holding any office of profit under the government 
house ^^^ ^^""^^ ^^ entitled to a seat in either 

Section VI. 

1. All bills for raising revenue shall originate in the 
house of assembly; but the senate may propo.se or concur 
with amendments, as on other bills. 

2. No money shall be drawn from the treasury but for 
appropriations made by law. 

3. The credit of the State shall not be directly or indi- 
rectly loaned in any case. 

4 The legislature shall not. in any manner, create any 
debt or debts, liability or liabilities, of the State which 
sha 1. singly or in the aggregate with any previous debts 
or liabilities, at any time exceed one hundred thousand 
dollars, except for purposes of war. or to repel invasion 
or to suppress insurrection, unless the same shall be au- 
thorized by a law for some single object or work, to be 
distmctly specified therein; which law shall provide the 
ways and means, exclusive of loans, to pay the interest of 
such debt or liability as it falls due, and also to pay and 
discharge the principal of such debt or liability within 
thirty-five years from the time of the contracting thereof 
and shall be irrepealable until such debt or liability and 
the mterest thereon, are fully paid and discharged,' and 
no such law shall take effect until it shall, at a general 
election, have been submitted to the people, and have re- 
ceived the sanction of a majority of all the votes cast for 
and against it at such election; and all money to be raised 
by the authority of such law shall be applied only to the 
specific object stated therein, and to the pavment of the 
debt thereby created. This section shall not be construed 
to refer to any money that has been, or may be. deposited 
with this State by the government of the United States. 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 53 

Section VTT. 

1. No divorce shall be granted by the legislature. 

2. No lottery shall be authorized by the legislature or 
otherwise in this State, and no ticket in any lottery shall 
be bought or sold within this State, nor shall pool-selling, 
book-making or gambling of any kind be authorized or 
allowed within this State, nor shall any gambling device, 
practice or game of chance now prohibited by law be 
legalized, or the remedy, penalty or punishment now pro- 
vided therefor be in any way diminished. 

3. The legislature shall not pass any bill of attainder, 
ex post facto law, or law impairing the obligation of con- 
tracts, or depriving a party of any remedy for enforcing 
a contract which existed when the contract was made. 

4. To avoid improper influences which may result from 
intermixing in one and the same act such things as have 
no proper relation to each other, every law shall embrace 
but one object, and that shall be expressed in the title. 
No law shall be revived or amended by reference to its 
title only; but the act revived, or the section or sections 
amended, shall be inserted at length. No general law 
shall embrace any provision of a private, special or local 
character. No act shall be passed which shall provide 
that any existing law, or any part thereof, shall be made 
or deemed a part of the act, or which shall enact that any 
existing law, or any part thereof, shall be applicable, ex- 
cept by inserting it in such act. 

5. The laws of this State shall begin in the following 
style: "Be it enacted by the Senate and General Assem- 
bly of the State of New Jersey. " 

6. The fund for the support of free schools, and all 
money, stock and other property which may hereafter be 
appropriated for that purpose, or received into the treas- 
ury under the provision of any law heretofore passed to 
augment the said fund, shall be securely invested and re- 
main a perpetual fund; and the income thereof, except so 
much as it may be judged expedient to apply to an increase 
of the capital, shall be annually appropriated to the sup- 
port of public free schools, for the equal benefit of all the 
people of the State; and it shall not be competent for the 
legislature to borrow, appropriate or use the said fund, 
or any part thereof, for any other purpose, under any 
pretense whatever. The legislature shall provide for the 
maintenance and support of a thorough and efficient sys- 
tem of free public schools for the instruction of all the 
children in this State between the ages of five and eigh- 
teen years. 



54 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

7. No private or special law shall be passed authorizing 
the sale of any lands belonging in whole or in part to a 
minor or minors, or other persons who may at the time be 
under any legal disability to act for themselves. 

8. Individuals or private corporations shall not be au- 
thorized to take private property for public use, without 
just compensation first made to the owners. 

9. No private, special or local bill shall be passed unless 
public notice of the intention to apply therefor, and of the 
general object thereof, shall have been previously given. 
The legislature, at the next session after the adoption 
hereof, and from time to time thereafter, shall prescribe 
the time and mode of giving such notice, the evidence 
thereof, and how such evidence shall be preserved. 

10. The legislature may vest in the circuit courts, or 
courts of common pleas within the several counties of this 
State, chancery powers, so far as relates to the foreclosure 
of mortgages and sale of mortgaged premises. 

11. The legislature shall not pass private, local or special 
laws in any of the following enumerated cases; that is to 
say: 

Laying out, opening, altering and working roads or high- 
days. 

Vacating any road, town p'ot, street, alley or public 
grounds. 

Regulating the internal affairs of towns and counties; 
appointing local offices or commissions to regulate munici- 
pal affairs. 

Selecting, drawing, summoning or empaneling grand or 
petit jurors. 

Creating, increasing or decreasing the percentage or al- 
lowance of public officers during the term for which said 
officers were elected or appointed. 

Changing the law of descent. 

Granting to any corporation, association or individual 
any exclusive privilege, immunity or franchise whatever. 

Granting to any corporation, association or individual the 
right to lay down railroad tracks. 

Providing for changes of venue in civil or criminal cases. 

Providing for the management and support of free public 
schools. 

The legislature shall pass general laws providing for the 
cases enumerated in this paragraph, and for all other cases 
which, in its judgment, may be provided for by general 
laws. The legislature shall pass no special act conferring 
corporate powers, but they shall pass general laws under 
which corporations may be organized and corporate powers 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 55 

of every nature obtained, subject, nevertheless, to repeal 
or alteration at the will of the legislature. 

12. Property shall be assessed for taxes under general 
laws, and by uniform rules, according to its true value. 

Section VIII. 

1. Members of the legislature shall, before they enter on 
the duties of their respective offices, take and subscribe 
the following oath or affirmation: 

"I do solemnly swear [or affirm, as the case may be,] 
that I will support the constitution of the United States 
and the constitution of the State of New Jersey, and that 
I will faithfully discharge the duties of senator [or mem- 
ber of the general assembly, as the case may be,] accord- 
ing to the best of my ability." 

And members-elect of the senate or general assembly 
are hereby empowered to administer to each other the said 
oath or affirmation. 

2. Every officer of the legislature shall, before he enters 
upon his duties, take and subscribe the following oath or 
affirmation: "I do solemnly promise and swear [or af- 
firm] that I will faithfully, impartially and justly perform 

all the duties of the office of , to the best of my 

ability and understanding; that I will carefully preserve 
all records, papers, writings or property intrusted to me 
for safe-keeping by virtue of my office, and make such 
disposition of the same as may be required by law." 

ARTICLE V. 

EXECUTIVE. 

1. The executive power shall be vested in a governor. 

2. The governor shall be elected by the legal voters of 
this State. The person having the highest number of votes 
shall be the governor; but if two or more shall be equal 
and highest in votes, one of them shall be chosen gov- 
ernor by the vote of a majority of the members of both 
houses in joint meeting. Contested elections for the office 
of governor shall be determined in such manner as the 
legislature shall direct by law. When a governor is to be 
elected by the people, such election shall be held at the 
time when and at the places where the people shall re- 
spectively vote for members of the legislature. 

3. The governor shall hold his office for three years, to 
commence on the third Tuesday of January next ensuing 
the election for governor by the people, and to end on the 



56 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

Monday preceding the third Tuesday of January three 
years thereafter; and he shall be incapable of holding 
that office for three years next after his term of service 
shall have expired; and no appointment or nomination to 
office shall be made by the governor during the last week 
of his said term. 

4. The governor shall be not less than thirty years of 
age, and shall have been for twenty years, at least, a citi- 
zen of the United States, and a resident of this State seven 
years next before his election, unless he shall have been 
absent during that time on the public business of the 
United States cr of this State. 

5. The governor shall, at stated times, receive for his 
services a compensation Vhich shall be neither increased 
nor diminished during the period for which he shall have 
been elected. 

6. He shall be the commander-in-chief of all the military 
and naval forces of the State; he shall have power to con- 
vene the legislature, or the senate alone, whenever in his 
opinion public necessity requires it; he shall communicate 
by message to the legislature at the opening of each ses- 
sion, and at such other times as he may deem necessary, 
the condition of the State, and recommend such measures 
as he may deem expedient; he shall take care that the laws 
be faithfully executed, and grant, under the great seal of 
the State, commissions to all such officers as shall be re- 
quired to be commissioned. 

7. Every bill which shall have passed both houses shall 
be presented to the governor; if he approve he shall sign 
it, but if not, he shall return it, with his objections, to the 
house in which it shall have originated, who shall enter 
the objections at large on their journal, and proceed to re- 
consider it; if, after such reconsideration, a majority of 
the whole number of that house shall agree to pass the 
bill, it shall be sent, together with the objections, to the 
other house, by which it shall likewise be reconsidered, 
and if approved of by a majority of the whole number of 
that house, it shall become a law; but in neither house 
shall the vote be taken on the same day on which the bill 
shall be returned to it; and in all such cases, the votes of 
both houses shall be determined by yeas and nays, and 
the names of the persons voting for and against the bill 
shall be entered on the journal of each house respectively. 
If any bill shall not be returned by the governor, within 
five days (Sunday excepted) after it shall have been pre- 
sented to him, the same shall be a law in like manner as 
if he had signed it, unless the legislature by their adjourn- 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 57 

merit prevent its return, in which case it shall not be a 
law. If any bill presented to the governor contain sev- 
eral items of appropriations of money, he may object to 
one or more of such items while approving of the other 
portions of the bill. In such case he shall append to the 
bill, at the time of signing it, a statement of the items to 
which he objects, and the appropriation so objected to 
shall not take effect. If the legislature be in session he 
shall transmit to the house in which the bill originated, 
a copy of such statement, and the items objected to shall 
be separately reconsidered. If, on reconsideration, one 
or more of such items be approved by a majority of the 
members elected to each house, the same shall be a part 
of the law, notwithstanding the objections of the governor. 
All the provisions of this section in relation to bills not 
approved by the governor shall apply to cases in which 
he shall withhold his approval from any item or items 
contained in a bill appropriating money. 

8. No member of congress, or person holding an office 
under the United States, or this State, shall exercise the 
office of governor; and in case the governor, or person 
administering the government shall accept any office un- 
der the United States or this State, his office of governor 
shall thereupon be vacant. Nor shall he be elected by the 
legislature to any office under the government of this State 
or of the United States, during the term for which he shall 
have been elected governor. 

9. The governor, or person administering the government, 
shall have power to suspend the collection of fines and for- 
feitures, and to grant reprieves, to extend until the expira- 
tion of a time not exceeding ninety days after conviction; 
but this power shall not extend to cases of impeachment. 

10. The governor, or person administering the govern- 
ment, the chancellor, and the six judges of the court of 
errors and appeals, or a major part of them, of whom the 
governor, or person administering the government, shall 
be one, may remit fines and forfeitures, and grant pardons, 
after conviction, in all cases except impeachment. 

11. The governor and all other civil officers under this 
State shall be liable to impeachment for misdemeanor in 
office during their continuance in office, and for two years 
thereafter. 

12. In case of the death, resignation or removal from of- 
fice of the governor, the powers, duties and emoluments 
of the office shall devolve upon the president of the sen- 
ate, and in case of his death, resignation or removal, then 
upon the speaker of the house of assembly, for the time 



58 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

being, until another governor shall be elected and quali- 
fied; but in such case another governor shall be chosen at 
the next election for members of the legislature, unless 
such death, resignation or removal shall occur within 
thirty days immediately preceding such next election, in 
which case a governor shall be chosen at the second suc- 
ceeding election for members of the legislature. When a 
vacancy happens, during the recess of the legislature, in 
any ofl^ce which is to be filled by the governor and senate, 
or by the legislature in joint meeting, the governor shall 
fill such vacancy and the commission shall expire at the 
end of the next session of the legislature, unless a suc- 
cessor shall be sooner appointed; when a vacancy hap- 
pens in the office of clerk or surrogate of any county, the 
governor shall fill such vacancy, and the commission 
shall expire when a successor is elected and qualified. No 
person who shall have been nominated to the senate by 
the governor for any office of trust or profit under the 
government of this State, and shall not have been con- 
firmed before the recess of the legislature, shall be eligible 
for appointment to such office during the continuance of 
such recess. 

13. In case of the impeachment of the governor, his ab- 
sence from the State or inability to discharge the duties 
of hia office, the powers, duties and emoluments of the 
office shall devolve upon the president of the senate; and 
in case of his death, resignation or removal, then upon the 
speaker of the house of assembly for the time being, until 
the governor, absent or impeached, shall return or be ac- 
quitted, or until the disqualification or inability shall cease, 
or until a new governor be elected and qualified. 

14. In case of a vacancy in the office of governor from 
any other cause than those herein enumerated, or in case 
of the death of the governor-elect before he is qualified into 
office, the powers, duties and emoluments of the office shall 
devolve upon the president of the senate or speaker of the 
house of assembly, as above provided for, until a new gov- 
ernor be elected and qualified. 

ARTICLE VI. 

JUDICIARY. 

Section I. 

1. The judicial power shall be vested in a court of errors 
and appeals in the last resort in all causes as heretofore; 
a court for the trial of impeachments; a court of chancery; 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 59 

a prerogative court; a supreme court; circuit courts, and 
such inferior courts as now exist, and as may be here- 
after ordained and established by law; which inferior 
courts the legislature may alter or abolish, as the public 
good shall require. 

Section II. 

1. The court of errors and appeals shall consist of the 
chancellor, the justices of the supreme court, and six 
judges, or a major part of them; which judges are to be 
appointed for six years. 

2. Immediately after the court shall first assemble, the 
six judges shall arrange themselves in such manner that 
the seat of one of them shall be vacated every year, in 
order that thereafter one judge may be annually ap- 
pointed. 

3. Such of the six judges as shall attend the court shall 
receive, respectively, a per diem compensation, to be pro- 
vided by law. 

4. The secretary of state shall be the clerk of this court. 

5. When an appeal from an order or decree shall be 
heard, the chancellor shall inform the court, in writing, 
of the reasons for his order or decree; but he shall not sit 
as a member, or have a voice in the hearing or final sen- 
tence. 

6. When a writ of error shall be brought, no justice who 
has given a judicial opinion in the cause in favor of or 
against any error complained of, shall sit as a member, or 
have a voice on the hearing, or for its affirmance or re- 
versal; but the reasons for such opinion shall be assigned 
to the court in writing. 

Section III. 

1. The house of assembly shall have the sole power of 
impeaching, by a vote of a majority of all the members; 
and all impeachments shall be tried by the senate; the 
members, when sitting for that purpose, to be on oath or 
affirmation "truly and impartially to try and determine 
the charge in question according to evidence;" and no per- 
son shall be convicted without the concurrence of two- 
thirds of all the members of the senate. 

2. Any judicial officer impeached shall be suspended from 
exercising his office until his acquittal. 

3. Judgment m cases of impeachment shall not extend 
farther than to removal from office, and to disqualification 
to hold and enjoy any office of honor, profit or trust under 



GO 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 



this State; but the party convicted shall, nevertheless, be 

liable to indictment, tnal and punishment according to law, 

4. The secretary of state shall be the clerk of this court. 

Section TV. 

1. The court of chancery shall consist of a chancellor. 

2. The chancellor shall be the ordinary or surrogate gen- 
eral, and judge of the prerogative court. 

3. All persons aggrieved by any order, sentence or decree 
of the orphans' court, may appeal from the same, or from 
any part thereof to the prerogative court; but such order, 
sentence or decree shall not be removed into the supreme 
court, or circuit court if the subject-matter thereof be 
within the jurisdiction of the orphans' court. 

4. The secretary of state shall be the register of the pre- 
rogative court, and shall perform the duties required of 
him by law in that respect. 

Section V. 

1. The supreme court shall consist of a chief justice and 
four associate justices. The number of associate justices 
may be increased or decreased by law, but shall never be 
less than two. 

2. The circuit courts shall be held in every county of this 
State, by one or more of the justices of the supreme court 
or a judge appointed for that purpose, and shall, in all 
cases within the county except in those of a cnminal na- 
ture, have common law jurisdiction, concurrent with the 
supreme court; and any final judgment of a circuit court 
may be docketed in the supreme court, and shall operate 
as a judgment obtained in the supreme court from the 
time of such docketing. 

3. Final judgments in any circuit court may be brought 
by writ of error into the supreme court, or directly into 
the court of errors and appeals. 

Section VI. 

1. There shall be no more than five judges of the inferior 
court of common pleas in each of the counties in this 
State, after the terms of the judges of said court now in 
oflice shall terminate. One judge for each county shall be 
appomted every year, and no more, except to fill vacancies, 
which shall be for the unexpired term only. 

2. The commissions for the first appointments of judges 
of said court shall bear date and take effect on the first 
day of April next; and all subsequent commissions for 
judges of said court shall bear date and take effect on the 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 61 

first day of April in every successive year, except commis- 
sions to fill vacancies, which shall bear date and take ef- 
fect when issued. 

Section VII. 

1. There may be elected under this constitution two, and 
not more than five, justices of the peace in each of the 
townships of the several counties of this State, and in each 
of the wards, in cities that may vote in wards. When a 
township or ward contains two thousand inhabitants or 
less, it may have two justices; when it contains more than 
two thousand inhabitants, and not more than four thou- 
sand, it may have four justices; and when it contains more 
than four thousand inhabitants, it may have five justices; 
provided, that whenever any township not voting in wards 
contains more than seven thousand inhabitants, such town- 
ship may have an additional justice for each additional 
three thousand inhabitants above four thousand. 

2. The population of the townships in the several coun- 
ties of the State and of the several wards shall be ascer- 
tained by the last preceding census of the United States, 
until the legislature shall provide, by law, some other 
mode of ascertaining it. 

ARTICLE VII. 

APPOINTING POWER AND TENURE OF OFFICE. 

Section I. 

MILITIA OFFICERS. 

1. The legislature shall provide by law for enrolling, or- 
ganizing and arming the militia. 

2. Captains, subalterns and non-commissioned officers 
shall be elected by the members of their respective com- 
panies. 

3. Field officers of regiments, independent battalions and 
squadrons shall be elected by the commissioned officers 
of their respective regiments, battalions or squadrons. 

4. Brigadier-generals shall be elected by the field officers 
of their respective brigades. 

5. Major-generals, the adjutant-general and quarter- 
master-general shall be nominated by the governor, and 
appointed by him, with the advice and consent of the 
senate. 

6. The legislature shall provide, by law, the time and 
manner of electing militia officers, and of certifying their 
elections to the governor, who shall grant their commis- 



62 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

sions, and determine their rank, when not determined by 
law; and no commissioned officer shall be removed from 
office but by the sentence of a court-martial, pursuant to 
law. 

7. In case the electors of subalterns, captains or field offi- 
cers shall refuse or neglect to make such elections, the 
governor shall have power to appoint such officers, and 
to fill all vacancies caused by such refusal or neglect. 

8. Brigade inspectors shall be chosen by the field officers 
of their respective brigades. 

9. The governor shall appoint all militia officers whose 
appointment is not otherwise provided for in this consti- 
tution. 

10. Major-generals, brigadier-generals and commnnding 
officers of regiments, independent battalions and squad- 
rons shall appoint the staff officers of their divisions, bri- 
gades, regiments,, independent battalions and squadrons, 
respectively. 

Section II. 

CIVIL OFFICERS. 

1. Justices of the supreme court, chancellor, judges of 
the court of errors and appeals and judges of the inferior 
court of common pleas shall be .nominated by the gover- 
nor, and appointed by him, with the advice and consent 
of the senate. 

The justices of the supreme court and chancellor shall 
hold their offices for the term of seven years; shall, at 
stated times, receive for their services a compensation 
which shall not be diminished during the term of their 
appointments; and they shall hold no other office under 
the government of this State or of the United States. 

2w Judges of the courts of common pleas shall be ap- 
pointed by the senate and general assembly, in joint meet- 
ing. 

They shall hold their offices for five years; but when 
appointed to fill vacancies, they shall hold for the unex- 
pired term only. 

3. The state treasurer and comptroller shall be appointed 
by the senate and general assembly, in joint meeting. 

They shall hold their offices for three years, and until 
their successors shall be qualified into office. 

4. The attorney-general, prosecutors of the pleas, clerk 
of the supreme court, clerk of the court of chancery, sec- 
retary of state and the keeper of the state prison shall be 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 63 

nominated by the governor, and appointed by him, with 
the advice and consent of the senate. 
They shall hold their offices for five years. 

5. The law reporter shall be appointed by the justices of 
the supreme court, or a majority of them; and the chan- 
cery reporter shall be appointed by the chancellor. 

They shall hold their offices for five years. 

6. Clerks and surrogates of counties shall be elected by 
the people of their respective counties, at the annual elec- 
tions for members of the general assembly. 

They shall hold their offices for five years. 

7. Sheriffs and coroners shall be elected by the people of 
their respective counties, at the elections for members of 
the general assembly, and they shall hold their oflfices for 
three years, after which three years must elapse before 
they can be again capable of serving. Sheriffs shall an- 
nually renew their bonds. 

8. Justices of the peace shall be elected by ballot at the 
annual meetings of the townships in the several counties 
of the State, and of the wards in cities that may vote in 
wards, in such manner and under such regulations as may 
be hereafter provided by law. 

They shall be commissioned for the county, and their 
commissions shall bear date and take effect on the first 
day of May next after their election. 

They shall hold their offices for five years; but when 
elected to fill vacancies, they shall hold for the unexpired 
term only; provided, that the commission of any justice 
of the peace shall become vacant upon his ceasing to re- 
side in the township in which he was elected. 

The first election for justices of the peace shall take place 
at the next annual town-meetings of the township's in the 
several counties of the State, and of the wards in cities 
that may vote in wards. 

9. All other officers, whose appointments are not other- 
wise provided for by law, shall be nominated by the gov- 
ernor, and appointed by him, with the advice and consent 
of the senate; and shall hold their oflaces for the time pre- 
scribed by law. 

10. All civil officers elected or appointed pursuant to the 
provisions of this constitution, shall be commissioned by 
the governor. 

11. The term of oflfice of all officers elected or appointed, 
pursuant to the provisions of this constitution, except 
when herein otherwise directed, shall commence on the 
day of the date of their respective commissions; but no 



64 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

commission for any office shall bear date prior to the ex- 
piration of the term of the incumbent of said office. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

GENERAL PROVISIONS. 

1. The secretary of state shall be ex officio an auditor of 
the accounts of the treasurer, and as such, it shall be his 
duty to assist the legislature in the annual examination 
and settlement of said accounts, until otherwise provided 
by law. 

2. The seal of the State shall be kept by the governor, 
or person administering the government, and used by him 
officially, and shall be called the great seal of the State of 
New Jersey. 

3. All grants and commissions shall be in the name and 
by the authority of the State of New Jersey, sealed with 
the great seal, signed by the governor, or person adminis- 
tering the government, and countersigned by the secretary 
of state, and it shall run thus: "The State of New Jersey, 

to , greeting." All writs shall be in the name of 

the State; and all indictments shall conclude in the follow- 
ing manner, viz., "against the peace of this "State, the gov- 
ernment and dignity of the same." 

4. This constitution shall take effect and go into operation 
on the second day of September, in the year of our Lord 
one thousand eight hundred and forty-four. 

ARTICLE IX. 

AMENDMENTS. 

Any specific amendment or amendments to the constitu- 
tion may be proposed in the senate or general assembly, 
and if the same shall be agreed to by a majority of the 
members elected to each of the two houses, such proposed 
amendment or amendments shall be entered on their jour- 
nals, with the yeas and nays taken thereon, and referred 
to the legislature then next to be chosen, and shall be pub- 
lished for three months previous to making such choice, 
in at least one newspaper of each county, if any be pub- 
lished therein; and if in the legislature next chosen as 
aforesaid, such proposed amendment oi- amendments, or 
any of them, shall be agreed to by a majority of all the 
members elected to each house, then it shall be the duty 
of the legislature to submit such proposed amendment or 
amendments, or such of them as may have been agreed 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 65 

to as aforesaid by the two legislatures, to the people, in 
such manner and at such time, at least four months after 
the adjournment of the legislature, as the legislature shall 
prescribe; and if the people at a special election to be held 
for that purpose only, shall approve and ratify such 
amendment or amendments, or any of them, by a majority 
of the electors qualified to vote for members of the legisla- 
ture voting thereon, such amendment or amendments so 
approved and ratified shall become part of the constitu- 
tion; provided, that if more than one amendment be sub- 
mitted, they shall be submitted in such manner and form 
that the people may vote for or against each amendment 
separately and distinctly; but no amendment or amend- 
ments shall be submitted to the people by the legislature 
oftener than once in five years. 

ARTICLE X. 

SCHEDUJ^E. 

That no inconvenience may arise from the change in the 
constitution of this State, and in order to carry the same 
into complete operation, it is hereby declared and ordained, 
that— 

1. The common law and statute laws now in force, not 
repugnant to this constitution, shall remain in force until 
they expire by their own limitation, or be altered or re- 
pealed by the legislature; and all writs, actions, causes of 
action, prosecutions, contracts, claims and rights of indi- 
viduals and of bodies corporate, and of the State, and all 
charters of incorporation, shall continue, and all indict- 
ments which shall have been found, or which may here- 
after be found, for any crime or offense committed before 
the adoption of this constitution, may be proceeded upon 
as if no change had taken place. The several courts of 
law and equity, except as herein otherwise provided, shall 
continue with the like powers and jurisdiction as if this 
constitution had not been adopted. 

2. All officers now filling any office or appointment shall 
continue in the exercise of the duties thereof, according 
to their respective commissions or appointments, unless by 
this constitution it is otherwise directed. 

3. The present governor, chancellor and ordinary or sur- 
rogate-general and treasurer shall continue in office until 
successors elected or appointed under this constitution 
shall be sworn or affirmed into office. 

4. In case of the death, resignation or disability of the 

5 



ee STATE CONSTITUTION. 

present governor, the person who may be vice-president of 
council at the time of the adoption of this constitution 
shall continue in office and administer the government un- 
til a governor shall have been elected and sworn or af- 
firmed into office under this constitution. 

5. The present governor, or in case of his death or inabil- 
ity to act, the vice-president of council, together with the 
present members of the legislative council and secretary 
of state, shall constitute a board of state canvassers, in 
the manner now provided by law, for the purpose of ascer- 
taining and declaring the result of the next ensuing elec- 
tion for governor, members of the house of representa- 
tives, and electors of president and vice-president. 

6. The returns of the votes for governor, at the said next 
ensuing election, shall be transmitted to the secretary of 
state, the votes counted, and the election declared in the 
manner now provided by law in the case of the election of 
electors of president and vice-president. 

7. The election of clerks and surrogates, in those counties 
where the term of office of the present incumbent shall 
expire previous to the general election of eighteen hun- 
dred and forty-five, shall be held at the general election 
next ensuing the adoption of this constitution; the result 
of which election shall be ascertained in the manner now 
provided by law for the election of sheriffs. 

8. The elections for the year eighteen hundred and forty- 
four shall take place as now provided by law. 

9. It shall be the duty of the governor to fill all vacancies 
in office happening between the adoption of this constitu- 
tion and the first session of the senate, and not otherwise 
provided for, and the commissions shall expire at the end 
of the first session of the senate, or when successors shall 
be elected or appointed and qualified. 

10. The restriction of the pay of members of the legisla- 
ture, after forty days from the commencement of the ses- 
sion, shall not be applied to the first legislature convened 
under this constitution. 

11. Clerks of counties shall be clerks of the inferior 
courts of common pleas and quarter sessions of the several 
counties, and perform the duties, and be subject to the 
regulations now required of them by law until otherwise 
ordained by the legislature. 

12. The legislature shall pass all laws necessary to carry 
into effect the provisions of this constitution. 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 67 

State of New Jersey: 

I, George Wurts, Secretary of State of the State of New 
Jersey, do hereby certify the foregoing- to be a true copy 
of the Constitution of the State of New Jersey as amended, 
as the same is taken from and compared with the original 
Constitution and amendments thereto, now remaining on 
file in my office. 

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my 
[L. S.] hand and affixed my official seal, this twenty-sixth 
day of October, A. D. eighteen hundred and ninety- 
seven. GEORGE WURTS. 



RULES OF THE SENATE. 

SENATE. 

RULES ADOPTKI) THIS YKAK. 



PRESIDENT. 



1. The President shall take the chair at the time appoint- 
ed; and a quorum heing- present, the Journal of the prpced- 
inpT day shall he read, to the end that any mistake therein 
may he corrected. 

2. He shall not engage in any debate without leave of the 
Senate, except so far as shall be necessary for reprulatinp: 
the form of proceedings. 

3. He shall rise to put a question, but may state it sitting. 
He shall, on all occasions, preserve the strictest order and 
tlecorum. 

4. When two or more Senators shall rise at the same 
time, he shall name the one entitled to the floor. 

5. He shall have the right to name a Senator to perform 
the duties of the Chair, but such substitution shall not 
extend beyond one day. 

6. He shall decide every question of order without de- 
bate, subject to an appeal to the Senate; and he may call 
for the sense of the Senate upon any question of order. 

7. He shall cause all persons to be arrested or removed 
from the Senate chamber who shall interrupt the proceed- 
ings of the Senate or conduct themselves improperly in the 
lobby or gallery'. 

8. The Senate may elect a President pro tempore, who 
shall possess all the powers and discharge all the duties 
of the President, when the latter is absent in discharge 
of his constitutional duty of administering the government 
of the State. 

QUORUM. 

9. A majority of the members of the Senate shall consti- 
tute a quorum; and whenever a less number than a quo- 
rum shall convene at a regular meeting, and shall ad- 
journ, the names of those present shall be entered on the 
journal. 

10. "VMienever a less number than a quorum shall convene 
at any regular meeting, they are hereby authorized to send 
the Sergeant-at-Arms, or any other person or persons by 
them authorized, for any or all absent Senators. 



RULES OF THE SENATE. 



ORDER OP BUSINESS. 



11. After the President has taken the Chair the order of 
business shall be as follows: 

I. Prayer, 
II. Calling the Roll. 

III. Reading the Journal. 

IV. Presentation and reference of petitions and memo- 

rials. 
V. Introduction of bills, 
VI. Reports of Committees. 

1. Standing Committees (in accordance with 
Rule 13). 

2. Select Committees. 
VII. Unfinished business, 

VIII, Senate bills on second reading. 
IX, Senate bills on third reading. 
X. Assembly bills on second reading. 
XI. Assembly bills on third reading. 

COMMITTEES. 

12. All Committees shall be appointed by the President, 
unless otherwise ordered by the Senate. 

13. The following Standing Committees, consisting of 
three members each, except the Appropriation Committee, 
which shall consist of four members, shall be appointed at 
the commencement of each session, until otherwise or- 
dered, with leave to report by bill or otherwise: 

A Committee on the Judiciary. 

A Committee on Appropriations, 

A Committee on Revision and Amendment of the Laws. 

A Committee on Finance, 

A Committee on Corporations, 

A Committee on Municipal Corporations. 

A Committee on Railroads, Canals and Turnpikes, 

A Committee on Banks and Insurance Companies. 

A Committee on the Clergy. 

A Committee on Commerce and Navigation. 

A Committee on Federal Relations. 

A Committee on Stationery and Incidental Expenses, 

A Committee on Education. 

A Committee on Militia. 

A Committee on Game and Fisheries. 

A Committee on Riparian Rights. 

A Committee on Agriculture. 

A Committee on Miscellaneous Business, 

A Committee on Elections, 

A Committee on Public Health. 

A Committee on Unfinished Business. 

A Committee on Labor and Industries, 

A Committee on Boroughs and Townships. 



70 RULES OF THE SENATE. 

A Committee on Printed Bills, whose duty it shall be tc 
examine all bills and joint resolutions before they shall be 
put upon their third reading, and who shall report the 
same to the Senate, and the Secretary shall enter upon 
the journal that the same have been correctly printed. 

Special Committees shall consist of three members, un- 
less otherwise ordered by the Senate. 

The several Joint Committees shall consist of three 
members each, and shall be also appointed to act con 
jointly with corresponding committees to be appointed bj 
the House of Assembly. 

A Committee on the Treasurer's Accounts. 

A Committee on the State Prison. 

A Committee on the State Hospitals. 

A Committee on the Library. 

A Committee on Public Grounds and Buildings. 

A Committee on Public Printing. 

A Committee on Passed Bills. 

A Committee on Soldiers' Home. 

A Committee on Reform School for Boys. 

A Committee on Sinking Fund. 

A Committee on Industrial School for Girls. 

A Committee on the New Jersey School for Deaf-Mutes 

A Committee on the New Jersey State Reformatory. 

A Committee on State Village for Epileptics. 

A Committee on Home for Feeble-minded Women. 

A Committee on School for Feeble-minded Children. 

A Committee on Sanatorium for Tuberculous Diseases 

BILLS AND JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 

14. When a memorial or bill Is referred to a committee 
praying or providing for an act of incorporation, or foi 
any other act, notice of the application for which is re 
quired by law to be previously advertised, the committee 
shall not have leave to report such bill unless satisfactory 
evidence has been presented to the committee that the 
application for such act has had a bona fide advertisement 
according to law; and all committees reporting such bills 
referred to them shall certify to the Senate that such 
proof has been presented and is deemed satisfactory. 

1.5. The titles of all bills and the parts of bills affected 
by amendments, together with the amendments, shall be 
entered on the Journal. 

16. When leave is asked to bring in a bill, its title shall 
be read for the information of the Senate, and if objected 
to it shall be laid over for one day; and all public and pri 



RULES OF THE SENATE. 71 

vate bills and joint resolutions shall, after the first read- 
ing, be printed for the use of the Senate, but no other 
paper or document shall be printed without special order. 

17. All bills and special reports of committees shall be 
numbered by the Secretary as they are severally intro- 
duced, and a list made of the same, and such bills and re- 
ports shall be called up by the President for consideration, 
in the order in which they are reported and stand upon 
the calendar, unless otherwise ordered; and the Secretary 
shall read from the said list or calendar, and not from the 
files of bills or reports. 

18. No bill shall be committed or amended until it shall 
have been ordered to a second reading, after which it may 
be referred to a committee. 

19. All bills may be made the order of a particular day, 
and public bills when called for shall have the preference 
of private bills; and when two or more bills shall be called 
for by Senators, they shall be taken up according to their 
seniority, reckoning from the date of their introduction. 

20. On the second and third readings of bills and joint 
resolutions, printed copies thereof shall be used. 

21. When bills or joint resolutions are introduced, the 
Secretary of the Senate shall forthwith deliver the same 
to the Supervisor of Bills, who shall prepare them for 
printing, in conformity with the rules defining the duties 
of said oflficer. 

22. Original bills and joint resolutions, after being print- 
ed, shall be delivered by the Supervisor of Bills to the 
Secretary. 

23. Bills and joint resolutions origmating in and passed 
by the Senate and amended by the House, when concurred 
in by the Senate, shall be delivered by the Secretary to the 
Supervisor of Bills for re-printing. 

24. Bills and joint resolutions which have passed their 
second reading, together with all amendments thereto, 
shall be delivered by the Secretary to the Supervisor of 
Bills, who shall see that the same are in proper form for 
printing for third reading. 

25. When the Supervisor of Bills receives from the print- 
er the bill or joint resolution ordered to a third reading 
and the same shall be found correct, he shall affix his offi- 
cial stamp to each page of the copy to be used as the 
official copy and intended to be submitted, to the Governor 
for his approval, and shall deliver the same to the Sec- 
retary. 

26. Two copies of every bill and of every joint resolution 
ordered to a third reading shall be printed on good bond 



^^ RULES OF THE SENATE 

of which shall hP ^l^i. T ^ ^^'''^ ^"'^ ^he other 

thereafter as he officJf'n '' Z^' Secretary to be used 
tion. "^"^'^^ ^«Py «^ ^'-^iJ ^^Hl or joint resolu- 

o?t^^i^eZ:rT:rtL^i':T^ '^^^ ^^^"^^^ ^- *^^ -e 

copies Of every bill or in^nf '7" ^' ^"^^^ '^"^ h""^^''^-^ 
reading, wh^ch shall i^T """^'"^ion ordered to a third 
Copy Re-pHnt Th^ Sun^" '"' ^-'^"^ted as "Official 

twenty-onL-opies of all burr^^ ^'"'^ '^^^^^ ^^>'-'- 

nated as "OfficiaTrnnt t, "^ ^""'"^ resolutions desig- 

Senate. an^^i:;^; ^e^ fes^tTe^arrJ^o^thri^^^ '^' ''' 
he shall retain the rpr>..,i^^ J ^^ *^^ House, and 

use Of StateTnd^t^-rre^^ -,^;« ^^^ ^^^^^ ^- *^e 

cedufeTh'iL'L'^'erri't^f"'"^''"^''^^^ '^^'^^ -^ P- 
in the preparation of " ' bms^^'^:? ''^' '""" ^^ ^""'^-^d 
th^eir various readi;;s^^s"faril prfetSi/^^^"*^^- ^^ 

there shail^^^ a' mi omj^'^o"/ afrth"i'°c£ «^.^" Pasru,??ess 
rresent and agreeing thereto in^^fK^"^^''^^ personally 
Senators votin| on the tinfl A.^^o^ the yeas and nays of 
resolution shall be entered on ^he Iff, ''^''"^' ^'^^ or joint 
try on any other question shai? h^ J;^^.T^ ^"^ ^^^ 1^^^ en- 
any Senator. i^'^^uun snail be made at the desire of 

re'adinlr[?e^^U"^^ its "b^ei^iy l^^^d • ^L"i^ .T^'^^ ^^-^ 
shall givo notice at each rPofiJ?^ 1 '.u^"*^ *^e President 
second or third, which readfn^ifhn^'^K^^^'' '^ ^^ ^^e first, 
days; but no bill or joiSrresolutio^rl^.''P ^^^^^ different 
the committee to which it shiVi^ reported adversely by 

Pu^rl^ose ^m^le-Ey^ o^H^^^^o^^ol^^^'S^ -^ 

bfo^JcSle^oTu^t^r or^?nl^1.;Tn°"t'h ^1f^*"^ ^' --'^' 
whether it shall be reaci I tui^l ^^ ^" *^^ Senate shall be 
shall be receivid at tS third re. diTo-^^ ^,"^ 'l^ amendment 
consent of the SenatS?s present b'L^t u"'lh',?^K""^"^"^«"s 
before the final nassae-e of t,.,;' ^"t it shall be m order. 

tion. to n:ove its'^SommUment l^^n"? .^h" ?J ^'^^"^ ''^^^"- 
mitment take place anH o^ • ^ should such recom- 
the comnlmee he slfd bm^nr'^f^^,'".^^^ ^^ reported by 
read a second time and n^^^-^^^^L''^'^" ^^all be again 
question again put considered and the aforeSd 

and rYconside?id a'nV iJSl i^S^Sl f "" ^^^^ ^^^ ^o^t. 
be reconsidered but by thiim^I^?^^''"'^ ^^^" "ot again 
Senate. °^ ^°^ unanimous consent of the 



RULES OF THE SENATE. 73 

33. Bills and joint resolutions, when passed by the Sen- 
ate, shall be signed by the President. 

34. When a Senate bill or joint resolution shall have been 
passed, the same shall be signed, taken to the House of 
Assembly, and its concurrence therein requested, without 
a motion for that purpose. 

35. When a bill or resolution passed by the Senate shall 
be carried to the House of Assembly, all papers and docu- 
ments relating thereto on the files of the Senate shall be 
carried by the Secretary, with such bill or resolution, to 
the House of Assembly. 

MOTIONS AND THEIR PRECEDENCE. 

36. When a motion shall be made, it shall be reduced to 
writing by the President or any Senator, and delivered 
to the Secretary at his table and read before the same 
shall be debatable. 

37. All motions entered on the Journal of the Senate 
shall be entered in the names of the Senators who make 
them. 

38. If the question in debate contains several points, any 
Senator may have the same divided; but a motion to strike 
out and insert, or to commit with instructions, shall not 
be divided. 

39. The rejection of a motion to strike out and insert one 
proposition shall not prevent a motion to strike out and 
insert a different proposition, nor prevent a subsequent 
motion simply to strike out; nor shall the rejection of a 
motion simply to strike out prevent a subsequent motion 
to strike out and insert. 

40. On tilling blanks the question shall be first taken on 
the largest sum, the greatest number, and the most dis- 
tant day. 

41. When motions are made for reference of the same 
subject to a Select Committee, and to a Standing Com- 
mittee, the question of reference to a Standing Committee 
shall be put first. 

42. When a question is before the Senate, no motion shall 
be received but— 

1. To adjourn. 

2. To proceed to the consideration of Executive business. 

3. To lay on the table. 

4. To postpone indefinitely. 

5. To postpone to a certain day. 

6. To commit. 

7. To amend. 

Which several motions shall have precedence in the or- 
der in which they stand arranged. 



74 RULES OF THE SENATE. 

43. The motion to adjourn, or to fix a day to which the 
Senate shall adjourn, shall always be in order, exceY>t 
when a vote is being taken or while a Senator is addressing 
the Senate. 

44. The motions to adjourn, to proceed to the considera- 
tion of Executive business, and to lay on the table, shall 
be decided without debate. 

45. A motion to strike out the enacting clause of a bill 
shall have precedence of a motion to amend, and if car- 
ried shall be equivalent to its rejection. 

46. When a motion shall have been once made and car- 
ried in the affirmative or negative, it shall be in order for 
any Senator who voted on the prevailing side to move a 
reconsideration thereof on the same day or next succeed- 
ing day of actual session; but no motion for the reconsid- 
eration of any vote shall be in order after a bill, resolu- 
tion, message, report, amendment or motion upon which 
the vote was taken, announcing their decision, shall have 
gone from the possession of the Senate, and they shall 
not pass from the possession of the Senate until the ex- 
piration of the time in which a reconsideration is permit- 
ted; and every motion for reconsideration shall be decid- 
ed by a majority of votes, except a motion to reconsider 
the vote on the final passage of a bill or joint resolution, 
which shall require the same majority as is necessary for 
their final passage. 

MEMBERS. 

47. The seats within the bar shall be reserved exclusively 
for the Senators, the officers of the Senate, and the re- 
porters of the press who may have seats assigned them. 

48. No Senator shall speak in any debate without rising, 
nor more than three times on any subject of debate, un- 
less he shall first obtain leave of the Senate. 

49. Every Senator, in speaking, shall address the Presi- 
dent, confine himself to the question under debate, and 
avoid personality. 

50. Any Senator may change his vote before the decision 
of the question shall have been announced by the Chair. 

51. No Senator shall have his vote recorded on any ques- 
tion, when the yeas and nays are called, unless he shall 
be present to answer to his name. 

MESSAGES. 

52. All messages shall be sent to the House of Assembly 
by the Secretary, under the direction of the President, 
as a standing order, without a vote thereon. 



RULES OF THE SENATE. 75 

53. Messages may be delivered at any stage of the busi- 
ness, except when a vote is being taken. 

54. When a message shall be sent from the Governor or 
House of Assembly to the Senate, it shall be announced 
at the door by the Sergeant-at-Arms. 

SENATE BILLS IN THE HOUSE. 

55. When an amendment made in the Senate to a bill 
from the House of Assembly shall be disagreed to by that 
House, and not adhered to by the Senate, the bill shall 
be considered as standing on a third reading. 

56. An amendment of the House of Assembly to a Senate 
bill shall not be divisible. 

57. In case of disagreement between the Senate and 
House of Assembly, the Senate may either recede, insist 
and ask a conference, or adhere, and motions for such 
purposes shall take precedence in that order. 

58. When a Senate bill shall be returned, amended by 
the House of Assembly, the sections of the bill so amend- 
ed, together with the amendments, shall be read by the 
Secretary for a first reading and be entitled to a second 
reading without special motion, at which reading the 
proposed amendments shall be open to the action of the 
Senate. And if, at its third reading, upon the question be- 
ing put by the President, "Will the Senate concur in the 
House amendment to Senate bill No. — ?" a majority of the 
whole Senate should, by a vote of years and nays, con- 
cur, the question shall then be upon ordering the bill to 
be re-printed. If so ordered, the bill shall be re-printed, 
the amendments embodied therein and the re-printed bill 
examined and reported by the Committee on Printed Bills 
and read in open Senate, to the end that it may be known 
to be correctly printed, and shall be then signed and certi- 
fied as other bills. 

DISORDER. 

59. In case of any disturbance in the gallery or lobby, the 
President shall have power to order the same to be 
cleared. 

60. The Sergeant-at-Arms shall aid in the enforcement of 
order, under the direction of the President. 

61. No Senator, in speaking, shall mention a Senator 
then present by his name. 

SPECIAL ORDERS. 

62. When the hour shall have arrived for the considera- 
tion of a special order, the same shall be taken up, and 



76 RULES OF THE SENATE. 

the Senate shall proceed to consider it, unless it shall be 
postponed by the Senate. 

63. The unfinished business in which the Senate shall 
have been engaged at the last preceding- adjournment shall 
have the preference in the special order of the day. 

64. No concurrent resolution shall pass unless by the 
consent of a majority of the Senators elected. 

SECRET SESSION. 

65. On motion made and seconded to shut the doors of the 
Senate on the discussion of any business which may, in the 
opinion of a Senator, require secrecy, the President shall 
direct the chamber to be cleared, and during the discus- 
sion of such motion the doors shall remain shut. 

RULES. 

66. No standing rule or order of the Senate shall be sus- 
pended unless by the consent of two-thirds of the Senators 
elected, nor rescinded or amended but by the same num- 
ber, and one day's notice shall be given of the motion for 
rescission or amendment. 

EXECUTIVE SESSION. 

67. When nominations shall be made by the Governor 
to the Senate, they shall, unless otherwise ordered by the 
Senate, be referred to appropriate committees; and the 
final question on every nomination shall be, "Will the 
Senate advise and consent to this nomination?" which 
question shall not be put on the same day on which the 
nomination is received, nor on the day on which it may 
be reported by a committee, unless by the unanimous con- 
sent of the Senate. 

68. When acting on Executive business the Senate shall 
be cleared of all persons except the Senators and Secre- 
tary. 

69. All information or remarks concerning the character 
or qualifications of any persons nominated by the Gover- 
nor to office shall be kept a secret. 

70. The Legislative and Executive proceedings of the 
Senate shall be kept in separate and distinct books. 

71. All nominations approved by the Senate, or other- 
wise definitely acted on, shall be transmitted by the Secre- 
tary to the Governor, with the determination of the Senate 
thereon, from day to day, as such proceedings may occur; 
but no further extract from the Executive journal shall 
be furnished, published or otherwise communicated, ex- 
cept by special order of the Senate. 



RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 77 

HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY. 

KULES ADOPTED THIS YEAR. 



OF THE MEETING OF THE HOUSE. 
1. Any member or members less than a quorum may 
meet and adjourn the House from day to day, when neces- 

T^Every member shall attend in his place precisely at 
the hour to which the House was last adjourned; and m 
case of neglect, he shall be subject to a r^P"^^"^„^^^^^^ 
the Chair, unless excused by the House; nor shall any 
member absent himself from the House for more than the 
space of a quarter of an hour without leave previously ob- 

^Tln'case a less number of members than ^ quo run, s^" 
be present after the arrival of the hour to which the House 
stood adjourned, they are hereby authorized to send the^ 
Sergeant-at-Arms. or any other person or persons by them 
authorized, with a warrant duly executed, for any and al 
absent members, as the majority of such as are present 
may ag^ee, and at the expense of such absent members 
respectively, unless such excuse for non-attendance shall 
be rendered as the House, when a quorum is convened 
shall judge sufficient. Immediately after the appomtment 
Of the Standing Committees, the members shall arrange 
among themselves their several seats appropriated to their 
Tuntfes; and in case of disagreement, the same shall be 
decided by lot. 

OF THE DUTIES OF THE SPEAKER. 

4 He shall take the chair at the hour to which the House 
shall have adjourned, and immediately call the members 
S order; and on the appearance of a quorum, shall cause 
the journal of the preceding day to be read, which maj 
then be corrected by the House. /,^v,^tP 

5 He shall preserve order and decorum, and m debate 
shall prevent personal reflections, and confine members 
?o the question under discussion; but he shall not engage 

n any debate, nor propose his opinion on any question, 
without first calling on some member to occupy the chair 
When two or more members rise at the same time, he 
shall name the one entitled to the floor. 



f8 



RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 



6. He shall decide questions of order, subject to an ap- 
peal to the House, when demanded by any four members, 
on which appeal no member shall speak more than once, 
unless by leave of the House. 

7. All questions before the House shall be stated by the 
Speaker, and distinctly put in the following- form, to wit: 
"As many as are in favor of (the question) will say aye;" 
and after the affirmative is expressed, "Those of a con- 
trary opinion, no." If the Speaker doubts, or a division be 
called for, the House shall divide; those in the affirmative 
of the question shall first rise from their seats, and after- 
wards those in the negative; and in case of an equal divi- 
sion, the Speaker shall decide. 

8. All Committees shall be appointed by the Speaker, un- 
less otherwise specially directed by the House. 

9. All acts, addresses and joint resolutions shall be signed 
by the Speaker; and all writs, warrants and subpoenas is- 
sued by the order of the House shall be under his hand 
and seal, and attested by the Clerk. If the Speaker be ab- 
sent, a less number of members than a quorum may ap- 
point a Speaker pro tempore, who may sign any warrants 
or perform any act requisite to biing in absent members. 

10. He shall have a general direction of the hall, and he 
may name a member to perform the duties of the Chair- 
but such substitution shall not extend beyond a second 
adjournment. 

OF THE ORDER OF BUSINESS. 

11. After the reading of the journal, the business of the 
first meetmg of each day shall be conducted in the follow- 
ing manner, to wit: 

I. Letters, petitions and memorials, remonstrances and 
accompanying documents may be presented and dis- 
posed of. 

II. Reports of Committees may be read. 

III. Original resolutions may be offered and considered- 
items of unfinished business referred; motions to recon- 
sider and to appoint additional members of Committees 
made; and leave of absence, leave to withdraw documents 
and leave to introduce bills asked. 

LEAVE FOR BILLS AND TO INTRODUCE BILLS. 

IV. Bills and joint resolutions on a third reading may be 
taken up. 

V. The House shall then proceed in the order of the day 
preference being always given to the unfinished business 
of the previous sitting; after which bills and joint resolu- 



RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 79 

tions on a second reading- shall be taken in their order; 
and the House, in its afternoon session, will proceed to 
business as though there had been no adjournment of its 
morning- session, excepting that original resolutions, and 
leave to introduce bills of Committees, be the first business 
in the afternoon session; and shall, on demand of the ma- 
jority, proceed with the order of the day. 

12. The Clerk shall make a list of all public bills and 
joint resolutions. He shall keep a separate calendar of 
private bills. No bills for granting, continuing, altering, 
amending, or renewing a charter for any corporation, 
other than a municipal corporation, shall be placed on the 
calendar of public bills. All bills, public and pi:v'ate, shall 
be numbered according to the time of their introduction 
into the House. They shall be taken up and considered 
in the order of time in which they were reported, or or- 
dered to a third reading, as appears by the calendar; and 
the calendar shall be proceeded in until all the bills there- 
on are called up before the commencement of the calendar 
anew. The Clerk shall post in a conspicuous place in 
his office a list of all hearings to be held on bills. 

13. All messages shall be sent from this House to the 
Senate by the Clerk. 

OF DECORUM AND DEBATE. 

14. When a member is about to speak in debate, or com- 
municate any matter to the House, he shall rise from his 
seat and respectfully address himself to the Speaker, con- 
fining himself to the question under debate, and avoiding 
personality. 

15. If any member in debate transgress the rules of the 
House, the Speaker shall, or any member may, call him 
to order, in which case the member so called to order shall 
immediately sit down, unless permitted to explain. The 
House shall, if appealed to, decide on the case, but with- 
out debate; if there be no appeal, the decision of the Chair 
shall be submitted to. If the decision be in favor of the 
member called to order, he shall be at liberty to proceed; 
if otherwise, he shall not be permitted to proceed without 
leave of the House, and if the case require it, he shall be 
liable to censure of the House. 

16. If a member be called to order for words spoken in 
debate, the person calling him to order shall repeat the 
words excepted to, and they shall be taken down in writ- 
ing at the Clerk's table; and no member shall be held to 
answer, or be subject to the censure of the House, for 
words spoken in debate, if any other member has spoken, 



80 RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 

or other business has intervened after the words spoken 
and before exception to them shall have been taken 

17. No member shall speak more than twice, or longer 
than five minutes each time, without leave of the House 

18. While the Speaker is putting any question, or ad- 
dressmg the House, none shall walk out of or across the 
hall; nor in such case, or when a member is speaking 
shall anyone entertain private discourse; nor shall anyone 
while a member is speaking, pass between him and the 
Chair, 

19. No member shall vote on any question in the event of 
which he is particularly interested, nor in any case where 
he was no. within the bar of the Hou.se when the question 
was put. 

20. Every member who shall be in the House when the 
question is put shall give his vote, unless the House for 
special reasons shall excuse him. All motions to excuse a 
member from voting shall be made before the House di- 
vides, or before the call of the yeas and nays is com- 
menced; any member requesting to be excused from vot- 
ing may make a brief verbal statement of the reasons for 
such request, and the question shall then be taken without 
further debate. 

21. Petitions, memorials and other papers addressed to 
the House shall be presented by the Speaker, or by a mem- 
ber in his place; a brief statement of the contents thereof 
shall be made by the introducer, and, if called upon he 
shall declare that it does not. in his opinion, contain any 
indecent or reproachful language, or any expressions of 
disrespect to the House, or any committee of the same 

22. It shall be the duty of the Sergeant-at-Arms, at all 
times, not to allow any person to smoke in the Assembly 
chamber. 

ON MOTIONS. 

23. Every motion shall be reduced to writing, if the 
Speaker or any member desire it. 

24. When a motion is made and seconded, it shall be 
stated by the Speaker, or being in writing, it shall b- 
handed to the Chair and read aloud by the Clerk, when it 
shall be deemed to be in the possession of the House and 
open to debate; but it may be withdrawn at any time be- 
fore a decision or amendment. 

25. When a question is under debate no motion shall be 
received but— 

1. To adjourn. 

2. A call of the House. 



RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 81 

3. To lay on the table. 

4. For the previous question. 

5. To postpone indefinitely. 

6. To postpone to a day certain. 

7. To g-o into a Committee of the Whole on the pending 

subject immediately. 

8. To commit to a Committee of the Whole. 

9. To commit to a Standing Committee. 
10. To commit to a Select Committee. 

IL To amend. 

Which several motions shall have precedence in the order 
in which they are stated, and no motion to postpone to a 
day certain, to commit, or to postpone indefinitely, being 
decided, shall be again allowed on the same day, and at 
the same stage of the bill or proposition. 

26. A motion to strike out the enacting clause of a bill or 
joint resolution shall have precedence of a motion to 
amend, and if carried shall be considered equivalent to its 
rejection. 

27. A motion to adjourn shall be always in order, except 
when the House is voting, or while a member is addressing 
the House, or immediately after the question to adjourn 
has been negatived; that, and the motion to lay on the 
table, shall be decided without debate. 

28. Any member may call for a division of the question, 
which shall be divided if it comprehends questions so dis- 
tinct that one being taken away from the rest may stand 
entire for the decision of the House; a motion to strike 
out and insert shall be deemed indivisible; but a motion to 
strike out being lost, shall preclude neither, amendment 
nor a motion to strike out and insert. 

29. When any motion shall be made and seconded, the 
same shall, at the request of any two members, be en- 
tered on the Journal of the House. 

30. When a motion has been once made and carried in 
the affirmative or negative, it shall be in order fcr any 
member who voted with the prevailing party to move for 
the reconsideration thereof, on the same day or on the 
next day of actual session of the House thereafter; all 
motions may be reconsidered, by a majority of the mem- 
bers present; but bills, to- be reconsidered, must have the 
same majority that would be necessary to pass them; and 
such vote, on motion to reconsider, shall be by taking the 
yeas and nays. 

31. When a blank is to be filled, the question shall first 
be taken on the largest sum. or greatest number, and re- 
motest day. 



82 RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 

32. The yeas and nays shall be entered on the Journal of 
the House, when moved for and seconded by five members, 
and in taking- the yeas and nays the names of the mem- 
bers, including- the Speaker, shall be called alphabetically. 

33. The previous question shall be put in this form: 
"Shall the main question be now put?" It shall only be 
admitted when demanded by a majority of the members 
present, and its effect shall be, if decided affirmatively, to 
put an end to all debate, and bring the House to a direct 
vote upon amendments reported by a committee, if any, 
then upon pending- amendments, and then upon the main 
question; if decided in the negative, to leave the main 
question and amendments if any, under debate for the 
residue of the sitting, unless sooner disposed of by taking 
the question, or in some other manner. All incidental 
questions of order arising after a motion is made for the 
previous question, and pending such motion, shall be de- 
cided, whether on appeal or otherwise, without debate. 

34. After the Clerk has commenced calling the yeas and 
nays on any question, no motion shall be received until a 
decision shall have been announced by the Chair. 

OF COMMITTEES. 

35. The following Standing Committees shall be appoint- 
ed at the commencement of the session, until otherwise 
ordered: 

A Committee of Ways and Means. 

A Committee on Bill Revision. 

A Committee on the Judiciary. 

A Committee on Agriculture and Agricultural College. 

A Committee on Appropriations. 

A Committee on Education. 

A Committee on Elections. 

A Committee on Printed Bills. 

A Committee on Municipal Corporations. 

A Committee on Boroughs and Borough Commissions. 

A Committee on Militia. 

A Committee on Claims and Revolutionary Pensions. 

A Committee on Corporations. 

A Committee on Banks and Insurance. 

A Committee on Unfinished Business. 

A Committee on Incidental Expenses. 

A Committee on Stationery. 

A Committee on Riparian Rights. 

A Committee on Revision of Laws. 

A Committee on Game and Fisheries. 

A Committee on Miscellaneous Business. 



RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 83 

A Committee on Railroads and Canals. 
A Committee on Labor and Industries. 
A Committee on Towns and Townships. 
A Committee on Public Health. 
A Committee on Federal Relations. 
A Committee on Commerce and Navigation. 
Which several committees shall consist of five members 
each. 

JOINT COMMITTEES. 

The following Joint Committees, of five members each, 
shall also be appointed to act conjointly with correspond- 
ing- committees to be appointed by the Senate: 

A Committee on the Treasurer's Accounts. 

A Committee on the State Prison. 

A Committee on Printing. 

A Committee on the State Library. 

A Committee on the State Hospitals. 

A Committee on Public Grounds and Buildings. 

A Committee on Passed Bills. 

A Committee on Sinking Fund. 

A Committee on Soldiers' Home. 

A Committee on Reform School for Boys. 

A Committee on Industrial School for Girls. 

A Committee on the New Jersey School for Deaf- Mutes. 

A Committee en the New Jersey State Reformatory. 

A Committee on State Village for Epileptics. 

A Committee on Home for Feeble-minded Women. 

A Committee on School for Feeble-minded Children. 

A Committee on Sanatorium for Tuberculous Diseases. 

36. The several Standing Committees of the House shall 
have leave to report by bill or otherwise. 

37. No committee shall sit during the sitting of the 
House, without special leave. 

38. All committees appointed at the first sitting shall 
continue to act during every subsequent sitting of the 
same Legislature, or until they have reported on the busi- 
ness committed to them, or have been discharged. 

OF THE COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE HOUSE. 

39. In forming a Committee of the Whole House, the 
Speaker shall leave his chair, and a chairman to preside 
in committee shall be appointed by the Speaker. 

40. The rules of proceeding in the House shall be ob- 
served, as far as practicable, in Committee of the Whole, 
except that any member may speak oftener than twice 
on the same subject, but shall not speak a second time 
until every member choosing to speak shall have spoken; 
nor shall a motion for the previous question be made 
therein. 

41. All amendments made in Committee of the Whole 
shall be noted by the Clerk, but need not be read by the 



84 RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 

Speaker on his resuming the chair, unless required by the 
House. 

ON BILLS AND JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 

42. All bills and joint resolutions shall be introduced by 
motion for leave, or on the report of a committee, and 
the member offering the same shall indorse his name on 
them, that the committee may confer with him should 
they so desire. 

43. Every bill and joint resolution shall receive three sep- 
arate readings in the House previous to its passage, but no 
bill or joint resolution shall be read twice on the same 
day, withoiat special order of the House. 

44. All bills and joint resolutions shall, after their first 
reading, be printed for the use of the members, and re- 
ferred to their appropriate committees. 

45. All bills and joint resolutions may be made the ord2r 
of a particular day, on which day they shall be taken up 
in preference to others on the calendar; and the calendar 
of private bills shall not be taken up until the calendar of 
public bills shall have been been gone through with. 

46. All bills and joint resolutions, previous to their final 
passage by the House, all petitions, motions and reports, 
may be committed at the pleasure of the House. And the 
recommitment of any bill or resolution, when the same 
has been ordered to a third reading, shall have the effect 
of placing the same upon the second reading. 

47. Printed bills and joint resolutions shall be used on 
their second and third readings, and no amendment shall 
be received to any bill or joint resolution on its third read- 
ing. 

48. "When bills or joint resolutions are introduced, the 
Clerk of the House shall forthwith deliver the same to the 
Supervisor of Bills, who shall prepare them for printing 
in conformity with the rules defining the duties of said 
officer. 

49. Original bills and joint resolutions, after being print- 
ed, shall be delivered by the said Supervisor of Bills to the 
Clerk. 

50. Bills and joint resolutions originating in and passed 
by the House and amended by the Senate, when concurred 
in by the House, shall be delivered by the Clerk to the 
Supervisor of Bills for re-printing. 

51. Bills and joint resolutions which have passed their 
second reading, together with all amendments thereto, 
shall be delivered by the Clerk to the Supervisor of Bills 



RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 85 

who shall see that the same are in proper form for print- 
ing for third reading. 

52. When the Supervisor of Bills receives from the printer 
the bill or joint resolution ordered to a third reading 
and the same shall be found correct, he shall affix his 
official stamp to each page of the copy to be used as the 
official copy and intended to be submitted to the Governor 
for his approval and shall deliver the same to the Clerk. 

53. Two copies of every bill and of every joint resolution 
ordered to a third reading shall be printed on good bond 
paper, to be approved by the Supervisor of Bills, one of 
which copies shall be retained in his office and the other 
of which shall be delivered to the Clerk, to be used there- 
after as the official copy of said bill or joint resolution. 

54. The Supervisor of Bills shall have printed, for the 
use of the members of the Legislature, at least one hun- 
dred copies of every bill or joint resolution ordered to a 
third reading, which shall be known and designated as 
"Official Copy Re-print." The Supervisor of Bills shall 
deliver twenty-one copies of all bills and joint resolutions 
designated as "Official Copy Re-print" to the Secretary of 
the Senate, and sixty copies to the Clerk of the House, and 
he shall retain the remainder in his own custody, for the 
use of State and Legislative officers. 

55. Except as o-therwise provided, the system and pro- 
cedure which have heretofore prevailed shall be followed in 
the preparation of all bills and joint resolutions for their 
various readings, as far as practicable. 

56. On a motion to strike out any item in the incidental 
bill, the question to be submitted to the House shall be, 
"Shall the item be retained in the bill?" and a majority 
of all the members of the House shall be necessary to 
adopt the same. 

57. After the introduction of any private bill, the appli- 
cants for said bill shall, at their own expense, furnish the 
usual number of copies for the use of the members, unless 
the printing thereof be dispensed with by a special order 
of the House. 

58. On the question of the final passage of all bills and 
joint resolutions, the yeas and nays shall be entered on 
the Journal of the House. 

59. Whenever a bill or resolution that has passed the 
House shall be carried to the Senate, all papers and docu- 
ments relating thereto, on the files of the House, shall be 
carried with such bill or resolution to the Senate. 



86 RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 

OF RULES. 

60. No standing? rule or order of the House shall be re- 
scinded or changed without one day's notice being given of 
the motion therefor; nor shall any rule be suspended ex- 
cept by a vote of the majority of the whole number of 
members of the House. 

61. When an Assembly bill is returned amended by the 
Senate, the report thereof by the Secretary of the Senate 
shall be taken as the first reading, and the same be en- 
titled to a second reading, without a motion for that pur- 
pose; after its second reading, the question shall be, "Shall 
the Senate amendments to Assembly bill No. — have a 
third reading?" If ordered to a third reading, the amend- 
ments shall be read, but these readings shall be on differ- 
ent days; the question shall then be, "Will the House of 
Assembly concur in the Senate amendments to Assembly 
bill No. — ?" upon which question the votes shall be by 
yeas and nays. If concurred in by a majority of the whole 
House, the bill shall be re-printed, the amendments em- 
bodied therein, and the re-printed bill examined and re- 
ported upon by the Committee on Printed Bills, and read 
in open Assembly, to the end that it may be known to be 
correctly printed, and then signed and certified as other 
bills. 

62. Cushing's Manual shall in all cases, when not in con- 
flict with the rules adopted by the House, be considered 
and held as standard authority. 

63. No person shall be allowed on the floor of the House 
during its sessions except State officers and members and 
officers of the Senate, unless by written permission of the 
Speaker. 

64. No committee of this House shall report a bill ad- 
versely without notifying the introducer of the bill; nor 
shall such adverse report be acted upon unless the intro- 
ducer of the bill is in his seat. 

65. After the calling of the roll has been commenced upon 
any question, no member shall be permitted to explain his 
vote. 

66. Every bill amended in the House, after its report by 
the committee to which it was referred upon introduction, 
shall, when ordered to be printed and have a third reading, 
be delivered to the Committee on Bill Revision, whose duty 
it shall be to examine the same, and if it be found that 
such amendment agrees with the context the" bill shall 
then be printed. If in the opinion of the committee such 
amendment is, as to form, improper, they shall report to 



RULES OF THE ASSEMBLE. 87 

the House with such recommendation as they think fit. 
Such report shall be made promptly. 

67. That hereafter any motion or resolution which will 
result in relieving: a standing committee of a bill referred 
to it. shall not be entertained unless twenty-four hours' 
notice shall be given the House of the introduction of 
such motion or resolution; provided, however, that on 
a written request of fifteen members of the House, 
handed to the chairman of a committee, said commit- 
tee shall, within two hours, report on the bill named 
in said request. 

68. When a bill is introduced amending an existing law, 
it must, in the body of the bill, have all new matter under- 
scored, and all portions of the law proposed to be omitted 
must be printed in its proper place, enclosed in black- 
faced brackets. Every bill which amends or supple- 
ments an existing- law shall have printed thereon, un- 
der the number of the bill, the pag-e of the General 
Statutes or the Pamphlet Laws at which is found the 
law proposed to be amended or supplemented. 

All bills reported with amendments shall be immediately 
reprinted; the new matter must be underscored, and all 
matter proposed to be eliminated by amendment must be 
included in brackets. 

It shall be the duty of the Speaker to direct the Clerk 
to cause any bill appearing on the calendar and not com- 
plying with this rule to be immediately amended and 
reprinted, so as to comply with the same, and when 
reprinted it shall be restored to its place on the calendar. 
69. At each session of the House the Sergeant-at- 
Arms shall call the roll of officers and employes of 
the House, and shall report in writing, within twenty- 
four hours, to the chairman of the Committee on Inci- 
dental Expenses as to the attendance of said officers 
and employes. 

The Committee on Incidental Expenses shall recom- 
mend such action as said report may show to be neces- 
sary. 



JOINT RULKS AND ORDERS. 

JOINT RULES AND ORDERS 

OF TUB 

SENATE AND GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 



1. In every case of an amendment of a bill agreed to in 
one House and dissented from in the other, if either House 
shall request a conference and appoint a committee for 
that purpose, and the other House shall also appoint a 
committee to confer, such committee shall, at a conven- 
ient hour, to be agreed on by their respective chairmen, 
meet in conference, and state to each other, verbally or 
in writing, as either shall choose, the reasons of their re- 
spective houses for and against the amendment, and con- 
fer freely thereon. 

2. After each House shall have adhered to its disagree- 
ment, a bill or resolution shall be lost. 

3. When a bill or resolution which shall have passed in 
one House is rejected in the other, notice thereof shall be 
sent to the House in which the same shall have passed. 

4. Each House, in which any bill or resolution shall have 
passed, shall transmit therewith to the other House, all 
papers and documents relating to the same. 

5. When a message shall be sent from either House to 
the other it shall be announced at the door of the House 
by the doorkeeper, and shall be respectfully communi- 
cated to the Chair by the person by whom it is sent. 

6. After a bill shall have passed both Houses it shall be 
delivered by the Clerk of the Assembly or the Secretary 
of the Senate, as the bill may have originated in one House 
or the other, to a Joint Committee on Passed Bills, of 
two from each House, appointed as a Standing Commit- 
tee for that purpose, and shall be presented by said Com- 
mittee" to the Governor for his approbation, it being first 
indorsed on the back of the bill certifying in which House 
the same originated, which indorsement shall be signed 
by the Secretary or Clerk, as the case may be, of the 
House in which the same did originate, and shall be en- 
tered on the Journal of each House. The said committee 
shall report on the day of presentation to the Governor, 
which time shall also be carefully entered on the Journa/ 
of each House. 



CONSTITUTIONAL. CONVENTION. 

CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION 

OF 1844. 



List of Delegates elected to the Convention to form a 
government for the people of the State of New Jersey, 
which met at Trenton, on May 14th, 1S44, and continued 
to June 29th of the same year. The constitution was agreed 
to in convention by a vote of 55 to 1 (Mr. Condit), Mr. 
Stokes being excused from voting. It was ratified by the 
people on August 13th, 1844, by a vote of 20,276 for, and 
3,526 against, 69 ballots being rejected. The figures indicate 
the ages of the respective members. The compiler of this 
work is indebted to Hon. G. D. W. Vroom, of Trenton, for 
the important data given. 

Atlantic County.— Jonathan Pitney, 46, physician. 

Bergen County.— John Cassedy, 47, gentleman; Alexander 
Westervelt, 50, gentleman. 

Burlington County.— William R. Allen, 42, farmer; Jon- 
athan J. Spencer, 51, physician; Charle?. Stokes, 52, farm- 
er; John C. Ten Eyck, 20, lawyer; Moses Wills, 51, mer- 
chant. 

Camden County.— Abraham Browning, 35, lawyer; John 
W. Mickle, 50, mariner. 

Cape May County.— Joshua Swain, 66, farmer. 

Cumberland County.— Joshua Brick, 62, farmer; Daniel 
Elmer, 59, lawyer; William B. Ewing, 68, physician. 

Essex County.— Silas Condit, 66, gentleman; Oliver S. 
Halsted, 51, lawyer; Joseph C. Hornblower, 67, lawyer; 
David Naar, 43, farmer; William Stites, 52, merchant; 
Elias Van Arsdale, 73, lawyer; Isaac H. Williamson, 71, 
lawyer. 

Gloucester County.— John R. Sickler, 43, physician; 
Charles C. Stratton, 48, farmer. 

Hudson County.— Robert Gilchrist, 52, county clerk. 

Hunterdon County.— Peter I. Clark, 53, lawyer; David 
Neighbour, 46, merchant; Jonathan Pickle, 45, farmer; 
Alexander Wurts, 48, lawyer. 

Mercer County.— Richard S. Field, 39, lawyer; Henry W. 
Green, 39, lawyer; John R. Thomson, 43, gentleman. 

Middlesex County.— Moses Jaques, 73, farmer; James 
Parker, 68, farmer; Joseph F. Randolph, 40, lawyer; James 
C. Zabriskie, 40, tailor. 

Monmouth County.— Bernard Connolly, 40, printer; Geo. 



90 CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION. 

F. Fort. 35, physician; Thomas G. Halght, 49, farmer; Dan- 
iel Holmes, 50, farmer; Robert Laird, 32, physician. 

Morris County.— Francis Child, 51, farmer; Mahlon Dick- 
erson, 73, lawyer; Ephraim Marsh, 48, farmer; William N. 
Wood, 38, lawyer, 

Passaic County.— Elias B. D. Ogden, 44, lawyer; Andrew 
Parsons, 53, merchant. 

Salem County.— Alexander G. Cattell, 28, merchant; John 
H. Lambert, 45, merchant; Richard P. Thompson, 39, attor- 
ney-general. 

Somerset County.— George H. Brown, 34, lawyer; Ferdi- 
nand S. Schenck, 54, physician; Peter D. Vroom, 52, law- 
yer. 

Sussex County.— John Bell, 58, merchant; Joseph E. Ed- 
sall, 54, manufacturer; Martin Ryerson, 29, lawyer. 

Warren County.— Samuel Hibbler, 44, painter; P. B. Ken- 
nedy, 42, lawyer; R. S. Kennedy, 41, farmer. 

Presidents of the Convention— Isaac H. Williamson, Es- 
sex (resigned June 2Sth, 1844); Alexander Wurts, Hunter- 
don. 

Vice President— Alexander Wurts, Hunterdon. 

Secretary— William Paterson, 27, lawyer, Middlesex. 

Assistant Secretary— Th. S. Saunders, 35, physician, Glou- 
cester, 

Recapitulation.— Lawyers, 20; farmers, 14; physicians, 7; 
merchants, 7; other professions, 10; ex-Governors, 3; ex- 
Members of Congress, 7, Four between 70 and SO years of 
age; six between 60 and 70; seventeen between 50 and 60; 
twenty between 40 and 50; nine between 30 and 40; two 
under 30, 



CONSTITUTIONAL COMMISSION, 1873. 

CONSTITUTIONAL COMMISSION 

OF 1873. 



On April 4th, 1873, the Legislature passed a concurrent 
resolution empowering- the Governor to appoint, by and 
with the advice of the Senate, a commission of two persons 
from each Congressional District, to suggest and propose 
amendments to the State Constitution for submission to 
and consideration by the next two Legislatures, and after- 
wards to be submitted to a vote of the people. 

On April 24th, of the same year. Governor Parker nomi- 
nated the following gentlemen, who were duly confirmed 
by the Senate: 

First District— Benjamin F. Carter, Woodbury; Samuel 
H. Grey, Camden. Second District— Mercer Beasley, Tren- 
ton; John C. Ten Eyck, Mount Holly. Third District- 
Robert S. Green, Elizabeth; John F. Babcock, New Bruns- 
wick. Fourth District— Martin Ryerson and Jacob L. 
Swayze, both of Newton. Fifth District— Augustus W. 
Cutler, Morristown; Benjamin Buckley, Paterson. Sixth 
District— Theodore Runyon and John W. Taylor, both of 
Newark. Seventh District— Abraham O. Zabriskie and 
Robert Gilchrist, both of Jersey City. 

Shortly afterwards Chief Justice Mercer Beasley declined 
to serve, and Philemon Dickinson, of Trenton, was ap- 
pointed in his stead. Martin Ryerson resigned and Joseph 
Thompson, of Somerset, was appointed to fill the vacancy. 
Chancellor Theodore Runyon also declined and George J. 
Ferry, of Orange, was appointed in his stead. Ex-Chan- 
cellor Zabriskie was unanimously elected president of the 
Commission, and upon his decease, which occurred in a 
short time afterwards, Dudley S. Gregory, of Jersey City, 
was appointed to fill the vacancy in the Seventh District. 
John C. Ten Eyck was elected president, vice Zabriskie, 
deceased. The secretaries were Joseph L. Naar and Ed- 
ward J. Anderson, both of Trenton. Subsequently Robert 
Gilchrist resigned and William Brinkerhoff, of Jersey City, 
was appointed in his place. John W. Taylor also resigned 
and Algernon S. Hubbell, of Newark, was appointed in his 
place. 

The first session of the Commission was held on May 8th, 
1873, and the last on December 23d, of the same year. The 
amendments submitted were partially adopted by the two 
succeeding Legislatures, and were ratified by a vote of the 
people at a special election held on September 7th, 1875. 



92 CONSTITUTIONAL COMMISSION. 1894. 

CONSTITUTIONAL COMMISSION 



In pursuance of a Joint Resolution of the Legislature, 
approved on May 17th, 1894. "for the appointment of Com- 
missioners to report amendments of the system of juris- 
prudence of this State, and provide for the election of cer- 
tain officers by the people," Governor Werts sent the fol- 
lowing' nominations to the Senate, all of which were con- 
firmed: 

At Large— John P. Stockton, Trenton; Allan L. McDer- 
mott, Jersey City; Samuel H. Grey, Camden;, and William 
Walter Phelps, Englewood. 

First District— George Hires, Salem; Howard Carrow, 
Camden. Second District— William M. Lanning, Trenton; 
Edward D. Stokes, Mount Holly. Third District— Henry 
Mitchell, Asbury Park; George C. Ludlow, New Bruns- 
wick. Fourth District— John Franklin Fort, East Orange; 
Carman F. Randolph, Morristown. Fifth District— Garret 
A. Hobart, Paterscn; John D. Probst, Englewood. Sixth 
District— Edward Balbach, Jr., and Frederick Freling- 
huysen, Newark. Seventh District— Edwin A. Stevens, 
Hoboken; Joseph D. Bedle, Jersey City. Eighth District- 
John Kean, Jr., Elizabeth; John McC. Morrow, Newark. 

Messrs. Hobart and Balbach declined to serve on the 
Commission, and their places were filled by the appoint- 
ment of Eugene Emley, of Paterson, and E. Cortlandt 
Drake, of Newark. 

On Tuesday, June 5th, the Commission met in the Senate 
Chamber, at Trenton, and organized by the election of 
Samuel H. Grey as President; George C. Ludlow, Vice 
President, and Joseph L. Naar, of Trenton, Secretary. 
The last session of the Commission was held on Septem- 
ber 25th. Several amendments were suggested by the Com- 
mission and submitted, through the Governor, to the Leg- 
islature, none of which were adopted by that body. 



THE STATE CAPITOL. 93 

STATE INSTITUTIONS. 



THE STATE CAPITOL. 

This edifice, a massive structure, erected at sundry times 
and various periods, is located on West State street, at 
the corner of Delaware street, running thence westerly 
along State street to the grounds of the late ex-Chancellor 
Green, and southerly to the Water Power. The location 
is a good one, and the building presents a very imposing 
appearance. 

The seat of Government was fixed at Trenton by an act 
of the Legislature, approved November 25th, 1790. James 
Cooper, Thomas Lowery, James Ewlng, Maskell Ewing, 
George Anderson, James Mott and Moore Furman were 
appointed commissioners to select, purchase or accept so 
much land as was needed, and to erect thereon suitable 
buildings for the use of the Legislature. They purchased 
the present site, containing about three and three-quarters 
acres— a frontage on Second street (now West State street) 
of 247 feet and 6 inches, and a depth from the front to low 
water line of the Delaware river of 666 feet— at a cost of 
£250 5s. The old State House was a plain, bare-looking, 
rough-cast building, and was erected at a cost of £3,992 
3s. %d. By an act of March 4th, 1795, a building was 
erected to serve as an office for the Secretary of State, 
and for the preservation of the public records, at a cost 
of £620 19s. lOd. Numerous improvements and repairs 
were made, and on March 3d, 1806, an act was passed ap- 
pointing commissioners to make certain repairs to the 
State House, to provide and hang a suitable bell, &c. This 
was done, and the bell was used for informing the mem- 
bers of both houses, as well as the courts, of the hour 
of meeting. The bell was eventually discarded, and an 
American flag substituted, which waves from the build- 
ing unto this day, when the Legislature is in session, and 
upon holidays and State occasions. In 1848, the State 
House was altered by the removal of the rough-casting, 
and changing the front to the style of the Mercer County 
Court House, placing neat porticoes over the front and 
rear entrances, and erecting two additional buildings ad- 
joining the main one, as offices for the Clerks of the 
Chancery and wupreme Courts. The rotunda was also 
erected, and the grounds fenced, graded, laid out and 
shade trees planted, all at a cost of $27,000. The commis- 



94 THE STATE CAPITOL. 

sloners under whose direction the work was completed, 
were Samuel R. Gummere, Samuel R. Hamilton and 
Stacy A. Paxson. In 1863, '64 and '65, appropriations were 
made and expended in building additions for the State 
Library, Executive Chambers, &c. In 1871, Charles S. 
Olden, Thomas J. Stryker and Lewis Perrine were ap- 
pointed commissioners to cause a suitable addition to be 
built— more commodious apartments for the Senate and 
Assembly, &c. The sum of $50,000 was appropriated, and 
the buildings for the Legislature were ready for occu- 
pancy in time for the meeting of the Legislature in 1872. 
In 1872, $120, COO was appropriated for completing the 
building, $3,000 for fitting up the Executive Chamber, 
$4,000 for fitting up the Chancery and Supreme Court 
rooms, and $2,000 for fitting up the offices on the first floor 
of the east wing. In 1S73, the sum of $43,000 was appro- 
priated for the improvement of the front of the building, 
completing unfinished repairs and improvements, and for 
fitting up the Library, &c. On March 18th, 1875, the sum 
of 215,000 was appropriated for the purpose of putting a 
new three-story front to the building, and to fit up offices 
on the second floor for the Clerks of the Court of Chan- 
cery and Supreme Court, and for providing a suitable mu- 
seum for geological specimens, and the battle-flags of 
New Jersey volunteer regiments, carried during the war 
of the Rebellion. 

On March 21st, 18S5, the front portion was destroyed by 
fire, and the Legislature appropriated $50,000 for rebuild- 
ing, and, in 18S6, an additional appropriation of $225,000 
was granted. 

The new building was finished in 1889. It is of rectangu- 
lar shape and of the Renaissance style of architecture, 
with a frontage of one hundred and sixty feet on State 
street, with a depth of sixty-seven feet, and three and a 
half stories high, with a rotunda thirty-nine feet across, 
which connects the new sectio nof the Capitol with the 
original part. The rotunda is surmounted by a dome one 
hundred and forty-five feet high. 

The building has about sixty feet more frontage than 
the former one, and approaches about ten feet nearer the 
street. 

The walls are constructed of solid, fire-proof, brick 
masonry, faced with a light-colored stone from Indiana, 
known as Salem Oolitic, with foundations and trimmings 
of New Jersey free stone, from the Prallsville .quarries, 
in Hunterdon county. The portico, door-head and trim- 



THE STATE CAPITOL. 95 

mings about the door are of the same material. The por- 
tico, with balcony, is supported by massive pillars of pol- 
ished granite and surmounted by the coat of arms of the 
State. 

The apartments used for offices are very spacious, fitted 
throughout in the most approved modern style, and each 
department is supplied with one or more of the finest 
fire-proof vaults. The first and second stories are set 
aside for offices, and the entire third story is used for 
the State Library. 

The old State Library apartments have been improved 
and extended, and are now used as offices for the Attor- 
ney-General, State Superintendent of Public Instruction 
and Commissioner of Banking and Insurance. A new 
story was added, which is used for the Geological Mu- 
seum and State offices. 

In 1891, a new Assembly Chamber was erected. The old 
one was too small and poorly ventilated, and besides, 
there was a lack of suitable committee rooms. The Leg- 
islature of 1891 passed a Joint Resolution, which was ap- 
proved on March 20th, authorizing the Governor "to pro- 
vide a suitable chamber and committee rooms for the use 
of the General Assembly of this State," &c., and also, 
"to make such additions and alterations as will afford the 
necessary accommodations for the Supreme Court and 
Court of Errors and Appeals, or for other State offices, 
and sufficient money is hereby appropriated for that pur- 
pose, to be paid by the Treasurer of this State on the 
warrant of the Comptroller, after approval by the Gov- 
ernor." 

The new chamber was built by James W. Lanning, of 
Trenton, from plans prepared by James Moylan, of Jer- 
sey City, and under the superintendency of Bernard J. 
Ford of Newark. It covers the site of the former cham- 
ber, and extends beyond it to Delaware street on the 
east and to the water power on the south. It has a front- 
age on Delaware street of 120 feet and a depth of 75 feet. 
The exterior finish and design of the building are similar 
to the adjoining portion of the Capitol. The foundation 
is of brown stone, from the Stockton quarries, and the 
trimmings of light Indiana stone. The interior is finish 
ed in Trenton tile, quartered oak and Italian statuary 
marble. It is a lire-proof building throughout, and is 
specially ventilated. The committee rooms are ample and 
convenient, and the interior design arrangement and fin- 
ish make it a model legislative chamber. It cost the 



9G THE STATE LIBRARY. 

State $140,500. The cost of the steam heating and ventilat- 
ing systems was about $25,000. 

The other new addition to the Capitol provides a consul- 
tation room for the Judges of the Supreme Court and the 
Court of Errors and Appeals and a private room for the 
Governor, a room for the Museum of the Geological Sur- 
vey, and other offices, and cost $34,500. 

An electric light apparatus was also placed in the Cap- 
itol, which cost $23,000. Every department in the build- 
ing is now lighted by electricity. 

Two Otis elevators have been placed in the building, 
which gives easy access to all the upper floors. 

In 1900 the Legislature appropriated $96,000 for additions 
and alterations to the Capitol, which included the cost of 
an electric light plant. 

A new Senate Chamber was erected in 1903, and was 
ready for occupancy in 1904, at a cost of about $182,000. In 
1904 about $60,000 was expended for other improvements 
in the Capitol. 

Another addition was made to the Capitol in 1907 at 
a cost of about $100,000. It is a massive structure of a 
classical style of architecture and is finished in stucco 
to match the rest of the Capitol. It contains four 
stories above a deep basement. The construction is 
fire-proof, consisting of solid brick walls, steel beams 
and columns and concrete floors. The exterior is at- 
tractive with its classic lines and Indiana limestone 
trimmings. The structure was designed and all the 
plans drawn by George E. Poole, State Architect. 

THE STATE LIBRARY. 

This valuable collection of books is located on the third 
floor of the State Capitol. The old saying, "Great oaks 
from little acorns grow," most appropriately applies to 
this institution. 

The first library of the State was a case ordered to be 
procured by Maskell Ewing, Clerk of the House of As- 
sembly, for the keeping and preservation of such books 
as belonged to the Legislature. It was ordered by a reso- 
lution passed March 18th, 1796. This was the nucleus of 
the present extensive library. On February 18th, 1804, 
William Coxe, of Burlington; Ezra Darby, of Essex, and 
John A. Scudder, of Monmouth, were appointed a Com- 
mittee on Rules to make a catalogue; they reported that 
there were 168 volumes belonging to the State, and pre- 
sented a code of seven rules, which was adopted. On 



THE STATE ARSENAL. 97 

February 10th, 1813, an act (the first one) was passed, en- 
titled "An act concerning the State Library." Up to 1822 
it appears that the Clerk of the House had charge of 
the books, as Librarian, and, on November 16th, 1822, an 
act was passed for the appointment of a State Librarian, 
annually, by joint meeting. In 1846, on April 10th, an act 
was passed making the term of office three years. The 
Law Library at that time belonged to the members of 
the Law Library Association. The only persons allowed 
the use of the Library were members of the Association, 
the Chancellor, and the judges of the several courts. 
Stacy G. Potts was Treasurer and Librarian of the Asso- 
ciation. The Law Library was kept in the Supreme Court 
room until 1837, when the Legislature authorized the 
State Librarian to fit up a room adjoining the Library 
for the care and reception of the books and papers be- 
longing to the State Library. Thus the two Libraries 
wer consolidated. On March 13th, 1872, $5,000 per year for 
three years was appropriated for the Library by the Leg- 
islature, and by the act of March 15th, 1876, the sum of 
$2,500 was appropriated for finishing and refurnishing the 
Library room. In 1890, the Library was removed to the 
third story of the new part of the Capitol. 

In 1904 the Legislature made a special appropriation of 
$15,000 for the installation of steel stacks, and the shelf- 
space was doubled. There is room now for more than 
125,000 books and pamphlets. About the same time the 
decimal classification system was introduced and the 
work of making a modern card catalogue begun, which 
was practically finished in 1905. 

TilE STATE ARSENAL. 

The building now used as the State Arsenal was form- 
erly the old State Prison. It is situate on Second street, 
in the Sixth Ward of the city of Trenton, and has on its 
front the following inscription: 

Labor, Silence, Penitence. 

The Penitentiary House. 

Erected by Legislative Authority. 

Richard Howell, Governor. 

In the XXII. Year of American 

Independence, MDCCXCVIL 

That Those Who Are Feared For Their 

Crimes May Learn to Fear the Laws 

And be Useful. 

Hie Labor, Hoc Opus. 



98 STATE HOSPITALS. 

In the messages of Governors P. D. Vroom and S. L. 
Southard, recommending thp °'-«rtion of the new prison, 
it was proposed that the old one be converted into an 
Arsenal for the safe keeping of the arms and military 
property of the State, which, previous to that time, had 
been kept In the old State Bank, corner of Warren and 
Bank streets, with accoutrements and camp and garrison 
equipage at the State House. After the removal of the 
State convicts from the old prison, permission was given 
to the county of Mercer to occupy it as a jail until its 
jail, then in course of completion, was finished, and when 
it was again vacated it was converted into an arsenal. 

Among the stores, &c., at the Arsenal are one bronze 
gjn, French, of the date of 1758; two bronze guns, Eng- 
lish, four-pounders, and two iron six-pounders. There is 
also one gun captured at the battle of Trenton, December 
26th, 1776, and two guns captured at Yorktown, October 
19th, 1781. There are also a large quantity of fire-arms, 
ammunition, ordnance, tents, clothing, blankets, &c. 

STATE HOSPITAL. 

Trenton. 

This institution is located on the right bank of the 
Delaware River, about two miles northwest of the 
City Hall. The buildings are constructed of reddish 
sandstone, obtained from quarries near the hospital, 
and are located on an elevation of about seventy-five 
feet above the river. The front of the Main, or Ad- 
ministration Building, is ornamented by a handsome 
porch of Ionic architecture, designed by the celebrated 
Notman, from which may be obtained one of the finest 
landscape views in the State. 

In 1844, after repeated and unsuccessful attempts 
to cause action to be taken by the Legislature for 
the building of a State institution for the special care 
and treatment of the insane, a commission was ap- 
pointed, chiefly through the earnest efforts of Dr. 
Lyndon A. Smith, of Essex, and Dr. Lewis Condict, 
of Morris, and the eminent philanthropist, Miss D. L. 
Dix, to select a site. An appropriation of $35,000 was 
made to purchase the land and to commence the erec- 
tion of the building. The present site was selected 
by the commissioners from among many that were 
offered in various sections of the State, because of 



STATE HOSPITALS. 99 

the large spring- of excellent water found on the place. 
This spring- was developed, and furnished a daily 
supply of about one-half million of gallons of pure 
water for many years. In the severe drought of 1880 
the supply was greatly diminished, falling off nearly 
two hundred and fifty thousand gallons. In 1907 the 
city sewer, running about 200 feet from the spring, 
burst or overflowed, and this caused contamination of 
the water supply, resulting in a typhoid epidemic, so 
that it was necessary to discontinue the use of the 
spring. At present the hospital is supplied with 
water by six artesian wells, one of which gives 150 
gallons of water per minute. The spring has been 
filled up, and thus an important landmark destroyed. 

Work was commenced on the main building in No- 
vember of 1845, and the hospital was opened for the 
reception of patients on the 15th day of May, 1848. 
Numerous additions have been made from time to 
time to the building, increasing its capacity from fifty 
patients, in 1848, to 1,348 in 1908. 

In 1887 the Legislature passed an act appropriating 
$100,000 for providing additional accommodations. The 
new building is a handsome structure of red sand- 
stone, and similar to that used in the main building. 
This is five hundred feet long, three stories in height, 
and capable of accommodating three hundred patients, 
one hundred and fifty of each. The building is de- 
signed to accommodate the chronic incurable class, 
and was a great relief from the overcrowded state 
hat existed in the main building prior to its comple- 
tion. The building was completed within the appro- 
priation, and opened for the reception of patients 
in the month of October, 1889. 

Since the opening of the institution in May, 1848, 
there have been received and treated 13,480 patients. 
At the close of the fiscal year, October 31st, 
1908, there were under care of the hospital 1,302 pa- 
tients — 654 men and 648 women. Much has been done 
for the comfort and pleasure of the patients. A green- 
house has been erected for the purpose of furnishing 
plants and flowers for the patients' corridors, hand- 
some pictures adorn the walls, and everything about 
the hospital presents a comfortable and homelike ap- 
pearance. 

The institution possesses a library, one of the larg- 



100 STATE HOSPITALS. 

est, if not the largest, in this country, connected with 
a hospital for the insane. The books are accessible 
to all members of the household. They have been 
freely used, and do much to relieve the monotony of 
many an hour of hospital life. The library now con- 
sists of about 4,000 volumes, and is the result of the 
bequest of a former nurse (Anne Robinson) who, by 
will, bequeathed her earnings for several years as a 
nurse and attendant in this hospital. She made the 
bequest, as she herself expressed it when making her 
will, for the purpose of purchasing books to be used 
for the pleasure and benefit of those to whom she 
had, for so many years, endeavored to minister. 

During the year 1898 a handsome amusement room, 
capable of seating about four hundred, was finished; 
also, a large and commodious chapel, in which relig- 
ious exercises are held from time to time; various 
clergymen, without regard to denominational prefer- 
ence, officiate every Sunday. The new chapel is capa- 
ble of seating about five hundred patients. In 1904- 
1905 an appropriation of $250,000 was made for the 
erection of two additional wings to the annex build- 
ing, which will accommodate 400 more patients. In 
1905 the Legislature appropriated $12,500 for the con- 
struction of fire escapes. 

A few years ago a modern laboratory building was 
erected, and at the present time is fully equipped for 
scientific w^ork. 

In 1907 the new wings, spoken of above, were opened 
for the reception of patients, so that now the hospital 
is not overcrowded. 

In 1908 the Legislature appropriated $111,000 for 
extraordinary improvements, which included instal- 
lation of modern plumbing throughout the buildings, 
also tiling for toile rooms, water sections, etc. 

The building for tuberculosis patients is now being 
erected, which will accommodate twenty-five, known 
as the "open air" ward. 

Since January 1st, 1908, there has been no mechan- 
ical restraint of any kind used in the hospital. All 
restraint apparatus, chairs, straight jackets, straps, 
etc., have been removed from the hospital building, 
and are stored away w^here no one can get at them. 



STATE HOSPITAI.S. 101 

STATE HOSPITAL. 

Morris Plains. 

Further provision for the accommodation of the in- 
sane being- made necessary by the overcrowded con- 
dition of the State Hospital at Trenton, the Legislature 
of 1871 appointed a commission to select a site and 
build a hospital in the northern part of the State. 

At a cost of $78,732.36 a tract of 408 acres of land, 
beautifully situated in the hills of Morris County, 
was purchased and work on the hospital buildings 
beg-un. 

Additional tracts of land have since been purchased 
at a cost of $32,318.00, making a total of 852 acres, 
at a total cost of $111,050. The original building, now 
known as the "Main Building," was erected, at a cost 
of $2,511,622. The "Dormitory Building" and a new 
reservoir, made necessary by its construction, cost, 
when completed, about $650,000; a new laundry build- 
the annual appraisement placed the personal prop- 
erty of the hospital at $294,709, thus making the total 
cost of the entire plant approximately $3,605,581. 

The location is ideal for an institution caring for 
the mentally afflicted, and is unsurpassed in this par- 
ticular by any similar institution in the United States. 
The buildings command a magnificent view of the 
surrounding country, and the air is cool and balmy In 
Summer and crisp and stimulating in Winter. 

The main building, opened in 1876, is four stories 
in height, 1,243 feet in length, 542 in depth, and has 
ten acres of floor space, it contains the executive 
ofl^ces, receptions rooms, medical library, chapel, 
amusement hall and forty wards, which, when crowded 
to their full capacity, will accommodate 1,200 patients. 

In 1901 the dormitory building was completed. It 
is situated 1,200 feet in the rear of the main building, 
accommodates 600 patients, and is constructed on the 
day room and dormitory plan. On the fourth floor 
of the building are well-equipped pathological and 
chemical laboratories, five splendidly-lighted rooms on 
the top floor of the northeast tower being devoted to 
this work. The laboratories have been well equipped 
with many of the latest and best instruments for the 
prosecution of scientific, clinical and research work, 
and have proved to be a highly important adjunct to 
the purely psychiatric work of the hospital. 

A cottage for nurses was built in 1906. This is a 



102 STATE HOSPITALS. 

three-story brick building-, trimmed with sandstone, 
and is situated in front and to the south of the main 
group of buildings. It is within easy access of the 
female wards, and affords sleeping quarters for forty 
female nurses, who formerly, after working daily fif- 
teen hours with the insane, were compelled to spend 
their nights in the wards, in close proximity to noisy 
and disturbed patients. In addition to furnishing ac- 
commodation for the night, the cottage has a recep- 
tion room and library, where the nurses may spend 
their time when off duty. 

A Training School for Nurses was established in 
1894, and it has proved to be of great advantage to 
the hospital in the humane care and treatment of the 
insane. A graded two-years' course is given to the 
nurses, and consists of lectures and practical demon- 
strations given by the medical staff in anatomy, physi- 
ology, materia medica and therapeutics, chemistry 
and toxicology, obstetrics and gynecology, genito- 
urinary diseases, practice of medicine, minor sur- 
gery, practical bedside nursing and bandaging. The 
course is compulsory upon all who are employed as 
attendants, and since the establishment of the school 
154 persons have been granted diplomas. 

Further provision for the scientific treatment of 
patients has been made by the equipment of rooms, 
both in the male and in the female departments, with 
complete hydortherapeutic apparatus and by the in 
stallation of electrotherapeutic appliances, and a pow- 
erful static machine i,n a room in the main buildinq-, 
convenient to both male and female departments. 

A room has also been set apart and fully equipped 
with instruments and appliances for the examination 
and treatment of patients suffering from diseased con- 
ditions of the eye, ear, nose and throat. 

The medical library contains over 1,300 volumes of 
carefully-selected text books and reference works on 
medical and other scientific subjects, together with 
well-bound volumes of the annual reports of every 
hospital for the insane in the United States, Canada, 
South American States and many of the countries in 
Europe. 

Among the many improvements added in recent 
years is a new system of keeping case records. The 
complete record of each patient from the time he 
enters the hospital until he is discharged is kept in a 
separate envelope, filed vertically in steel cabinets 
especially constructed for the purpose. The files are 



NORMAL. AND MODEL. SCHOOLS. 103 

thoroughly cross-indexed, which permits of needful 
information being rapidly and easily obtained in any 
given case. 

Additional protection from fire is being provided 
for the patients by the installation of five spiral fire 
escapes of the most approved form. 

In order to give the hospital a better mail service, 
the government, on March 23, 1908, established a new- 
post office in the main building of the hospital, and 
named it Greystone Park. The mail matter, of the 
institution was formerly handled at Morris ' Plains 
post office, which is one and one-half miles from the 
building. This frequently occasioned considerable de- 
lay in the delivery of important letters, and the new 
office is found to be of great convenience to the hos- 
pital community. 

Since the opening of the hospital, in 1876, 8,877 
patients have been admitted, 2,133 have been cured, 
1,389 discharged in a greatly improved mental condi- 
tion, and 581 discharged unimproved. The institu- 
tion has an average yearly increase of about fifty in 
population. On September 1, 1908, there were 1,950 
patients under care and treatment in the hospital. 

NORMAL AND MODEL. SCHOOLS. 

Trenton. 

These schools are the property of the State, and are 
located at the junction of Perry street and Clinton ave- 
nue, Trenton. There are two buildings, the one for the 
schools located on the west side of Clinton avenue, the 
other, containing the boarding halls and dormitories, sit- 
uated on the east side of the avenue. These schools were 
established in 1855 by an act of the Legislature. The pur- 
pose of the Normal School was defined to be "the train- 
ing and education of its pupils in such branches of knowl- 
edge, and such methods of teaching and governing, as 
will qualify them for teachers of our common schools," 
The Model School was designed to be a place where "the 
pupils of the Normal School shall have opportunity to 
observe and practice the modes of instruction and disci- 
pline inculcated in the Normal School, and in which pu- 
pils may be prepared for the Normal School. 

The following figures show the first cost to the State 
and the present valuation of the Normal School prop- 
erty. The first cost to the State has been supplemented 
from time to time by the contributions of private individ- 
uals, and by balances from he Boarding Hall receipts 
after meeting the annual expenses of the Hall. 



104 NORMAL AND MODEL SCHOOLS. 

FIRST COST TO THE STATE. 

Original Normal and Model School 

Buildings $3S,000 

Appropriation of 1890 40,000 

Appropriation of 1891 3,000 

Appropriation of 1893 12,000 

Appropriation of 1894 10,000 

Appropriation of 1897 25,000 

Appropriation of 1903 5,000 

$133,000 

Original Boarding Halls $30,000 

Sundry Annual Appropriations 67,075 

Appropriation of 1904 40,000 

$137,075 

Total $270,075 

PRESENT VALUATION. 

Original School Buildings $51,000 

Appropriation of 1890 40,000 

Appropriation of 1891 ^ . 8,000 

Appropriation of 1893 12,000 

Appropriation of 1894 10,000 

Appropriation of 1897 25,000 

Appropriation of 1902 5,000 

Furniture and apparatus 30,000 

$181,000 

Boarding Halls $71,000 

North Wing, 1893 30,000 

Principal's residence, 1893 16,000 

Buildings and lot, 1899 20,400 

Sundry Annual Appropriations 67,075 

Appropriation of 1904 40,000 

Furniture 50,000 

Grounds 115,000 

$409,075 

Total $590,075 

The enrollments in 1855 were as fellows: Normal 
School, 43; Model School, 125. For the year ending 
June 30th, 1908, these enrollments had increased to 564 
in the Normal and 611 in the Model. During its his- 
tory the Normal School has graduated 4,192 students. 



MONTCLAIR NORMAL SCHOOL. 105 

The Principals of the schools have been as follows: Wil- 
liam F. Phelps, A. M., October 1st, 1855, to March 15th, 
1865; John S. Hart, LL. D., March 15th, 1865, to February 
7th, 1871; Lewis M. Johnson, A. M., February 7th, 1871, to 
July 1st, 1876; Washington Hasbrouck, Ph. D., July 1st, 
1876, to February 10th, 1889; James M. Green, Ph. D., LL. 
D., February 10th, 1889, to the present. 

THE MONTCLAIR STATE NORMAL, SCHOOL.. 

Montclair, Essex County. 

The increasing- demand for professionally trained 
teachers, and the inability of the present State Nor- 
mal School, at Trenton, to meet it, led to the passage 
of a resolution by the Legislature of 1902 directing 
the State Board of Education to investigate as to the 
need of increased normal school accommodations and 
how best to provide them, should the board find the 
present accommodations inadequate. 

In its study of the question the board discovered 
that there were 7,561 teachers in the public schools 
of the State, and that of this number 2,224 were grad- 
uates of normal schools, 457 were college graduates, 
and 1,663 graduates of city training schools, leaving 
3,217 teachers, or nearly one-half of the entire num- 
ber, who had not had any special training. Of the 
graduates of normal schools employed, nearly forty 
per cent, came from other States, notwithstanding the 
fact that the New Jersey State Normal School was 
working to its full capacity. 

In its report to the Legislature in 1903 the board 
recommended that a normal school be erected in the 
northern part of the State. In 1904 the Legislature 
appropriated $25,000 for the purchase of a site. The 
board, after inspecting numerous sites, finally pur- 
chased a plot in the northern part of Montclair, in 
Essex County, at a cost of $25,000. The plot contains 
twenty-five acres and is 400 feet above sea level, giv- 
ing an uninterrupted view of Newark and surrounding 
towns and of the bridges and skyscrapers of New 
York City. The plot is large enough to accommodate 
the school building and dormitories, should it be found 
necessary in the future to provide them, and also lo 
give a large campus and sufficient ground for illus- 
trating methods of teaching agriculture, which will 
in the near future be as important a subject in trie 



106 MONTCLAIR NORMAL SCHOOL. 

ing, S18,200; the nurses' cottage, $20,000, and In 1907 
curriculum of a well organized normal school as illus- 
trating the methods of teaching chemistry or litera- 
ture is at present. Within a radius of ten miles from 
the site selected there is a population of more than 
one million. 

In 1906 the Legislature appropriated $275,000 for 
the erection and furnishing of the building. The plans 
were prepared by State Architect George E. Poole and 
Assistant Architect Francis H. Bent, of the Depart- 
ment of Charities and Corrections. The mission style 
of architecture was adopted, and the material is brick 
covered with pure white stucco, the roof being red tile. 
The building is 334 feet long and 133 feet deep, the 
centre and wings projecting. In front is an esplanade 
260 feet long and 44 feet wide, protected by a con- 
crete wall from which steps descend to the lawn. 

In the basement are the manual training and do- 
mestic science rooms, four rooms for observation 
classes, locker and dressing rooms, showers, recrea- 
tion and lunch rooms. 

On the main floor are the board room, the princi- 
pal's offices, a library 32x60 feet, the study hall and 
gymnasium, each 57x76 feet, two large lecture rooms 
and eight class rooms. The study hall and gymnasium 
have ceilings twenty-five feet high, giving ample 
space for gallery and running track, respectively. 

On the second floor is the drawing room, 32x60 feet, 
with high ceiling and north light, three lecture rooms, 
large laboratories for chemistry, physics, botany and 
zoology, and dark rooms for photography. Teacher.s' 
rooms are provided on each floor. 

The finish is in hard pine, except the study hall, 
which is in white and gold. The study hall will also 
be used as the auditorium. The walls of the labora- 
tories are of white tile and the floors of cement. The 
walls of the gymnasium are of cream-colored brick. 

The heating and ventilating plant is in a separate 
structure, located some distance from the main build- 
ing. The cost of the buildings, exclusive of furniture 
and grading, will be less than $250,000. 

The school was formally opened on Monday, Sep- 
tember 28, 1908. Addresses were made by Governor 
Fort, President Hays, of the State Board of Education, 
Edward Russ, chairman of the Building Committee, 
and others. 



THE STATE HOME FOR BOYS. 107 

The regular sessions of the school began September 
15, 1908, with an attendance of 187 pupils. 

The Principal is Dr. Charles S. Chapin, formerly 
Principal of the Rhode Island State Normal School. 

The school may be reached in three ways: 

1. By Erie Railroad — Greenwood Lake Division. The 
Montclair Heights station adjoins the grounds of the 
Normal School. 

2. By D. L. and W. Railroad to Montclair station, 
thence by Valley Road trolley to the grounds. 

3. By Bloomfield Avenue trolley with transfer at 
Valley Road to Valley Road trolley. 

Passengers by the Pennsylvania Railroad to Newark 
can take Bloomfield Avenue trolley at Newark station. 

Passengers by the Central Railroad of New Jersey 
to Newark can take Bloomfield Avenue trolley at cor- 
ner of Market and Broad Streets, Newark. 

THE STATE HOME FOR BOYS. 

"The New Jersey State Reform School" was estab- 
lished by act of the Legislature approved April 6th, 1865. 
A farm of 490 acres was purchased for the purpose near 
Jamesburg, Middlesex county. 

The first boy was received July 6th, 1867. Its first Sup- 
erintendent was Rev. Luther H. Sheldon, who was in 
office from April 10th, 1867, till April 1st, 1874, and was 
succeeded by James H. Eastman, who was Superinten- 
dent from April 1st, 1874, till September 15th, 1884. Upon 
his withdrawal Ira Otterson was made acting Superin- 
tendent, and on December 10th, 1884, he was elected Sup- 
erintendent. In 1902 Mr. Otterson was succeeded by John 
Wildes who, March 1, 1904, gave way to John C. Kalleen. 
In 1900 the name of The Reform School was changed to 
the State Home for Boys. 

Since founding the school, beside the Administration 
building, there have been erected on the campus eight 
family buildings (two of them double buildings), capa- 
ble of accommodating fifty boys each, a chapel, hos- 
pital, store and cook house, industrial building, elec- 
tric light, heat and power, generating station and 
farm buildings, all of brick, many of the buildings 
constructed with bricks manufactured by the boys on 
the place. 

Besides domestic and farm labor, all boys are instruct- 
ed In the rudiments of an English school education, and 



108 STATE HOME FOR GIRLS. 

many receive instruction in different meclianical brandies 
and band music. 

In 1900 there was erected by boys' labor, under regular 
instructors, a building 40 by 100 feet, two stories high, in 
which are established schools for trade teaching. While 
in the past, so far as the accommodations would permit, 
a number of boys have received instruction in mechan- 
ical trades, and with the accommodations furnished in 
the new building, a greater number of boys receive a 
more thorough knowledge in lines of skilled handicraft, 
which will the better prepare them to become good citi- 
zens. 

In 1908 there were 530 boys in the institution. 

STATE HOME FOR GIRLS. 

This Institution is located on the line of the Trenton 
Branch of the Delaware and Bound Brook Railroad, in 
Ewing township, near the Trenton State Hospital, and is 
located on a farm of about 79 acres of land. A substan- 
tial building was erected at a cost of $23,334, and other 
improvements since made bring the value of the place, 
with furniture, &c., up to $140,000. Previous to the erec- 
tion of the new building, the school was at "Pine Grove," 
in the Sixth Ward of the city of Trenton. This place 
had been leased so as to afford room for persons sen- 
tenced under the act of April 4th, 1871, and a subsequent 
act. The Legislature of ISOO appropriated $30,000 for the 
erection of an additional building. In 1900 and 1901 about 
$31,000 was spent for improvements and the Legislature 
of 1905 appropriated $45,000 for the erection of a new cot- 
tage and about $9,000 for various other improvements. 
The institution is for girls between the ages of ten and 
nineteen years who may be committed to it by the courts. 
In 1908 there were 170 inmates. 

THE STATE PRISON. 

The New Jersey State Prison, situated on the block en- 
closed by Federal, Third, Cass and Second streets, in the 
city of Trenton, is one of the finest institutions of its 
kind in the country. Its erection was authorized by an 
act of the Legislature passed February 13th, 1832, and it 
was completed in the year 1S36. having 150 cells, at a cost 
of $179,657,11. It was built of red sand-stone, from the 
Ewing quarries, and the style of its architecture is Egyp- 
tian, having four Egyptian columns in front of the main 



THE STATE PRISON. 109 

entrance, on Third street. It consists of a main building, 
used as a residence for the Keeper and as reception 
rooms and offices. From time to time the prison has been 
enlarged, and although there is not sufficient room to 
afford separate confinement for each prisoner, as requir- 
ed by law, the provisions of the act are carried out as far 
as possible. The rules and regulations now in force have 
brought the internal affairs of the institution, as to clean- 
liness, discipline, victualing, &c., to a much higher stand- 
ard than was ever before reached, and a visit thereto will 
convince the visitor that the management is as perfect 
as can be. 

Previous to the year 1798 there was no State Prison, 
and prisoners were confined in the county jails. On 
March 1st, 1797, Jonathan Doane was appointed by an act 
of the Legislature as an agent to purchase a lot of land 
from Peter Hunt, situate at Lamberton, containing: six 
and a half acres, and to erect suitable buildings thereon. 
This was done at an expense of £9,842 Os. 3d., and what is 
now the State Arsenal, at Second and Cass streets, is 
the result. Solitary confinement was not practiced pre- 
vious to 1836, in which year the old prison was vacated 
and the present one occupied. 

On March 4th, 1847, $5,000 was appropriated to build an 
additional wing to the original building. On March 25th, 
1852, $15,000 was granted for the erection of a new wing 
for hospital purposes. On March 22d, 1860, the sum of 
$17,000 was voted for the purpose of building an additional 
wing for cells, and on February 16th, 1861, a further sum 
of $2,243.01 was appropriated to complete the same. On 
April 16th, 1868, $6,000 was appropriated for the building of 
an additional wing to provide room for female convicts. 
An act passed April 2d, 1869, provided for the appoint- 
ment of commissioners to extend the grounds of the 
prison to the wall of the State Arsenal, to build an ad- 
ditional wing and workshops, and made an appropriation 
of $50,000 for that purpose, and in the same month $9,734 
was appropriated for the purpose of completing the wing 
of the female department. On April 4th, 1871, the sum 
of .$75,000 was appropriated for the purpose of completing 
the new or east wing, and on April 4th, 1872, a further 
sum of $28,700 was appropriated for the completion of the 
same. March 3d, 1874, $12,000 was voted for the con- 
struction of gas works for the supply of illuminating gas 
for the prison. On March 8th, 1877, the sum of $100,000 
was appropriated for the enlargement of the prison and 



110 HOME FOR DISABLED SOLDIERS. 

the purchase of a burial ground for deceased convicts. 
The north wing was remodeled out of this last appro- 
priation and a burial ground purchased. The Legislature 
of 1895 appropriated $150,000 for the enlargement and im- 
provement of the prison. The Legislature of 1899 appro- 
priated $14,000 for alterations in the women's wing of the 
prison. In 1905 $250,000 was appropriated for the erection 
of a new wing, and It was finished in 1907. The addi- 
tion, which Is at the northeast corner of the institu- 
tion, Is one of the most complete In the United States. 
There are five tiers, each having seventy cells. The 
Interior is wholly of steel and concrete. The cells are 
separated from the outer walls by a passageway for 
the keepers and the entire section of each tier is com- 
pletely enclosed in a cage of steel. Thirty-five cells 
are controlled by a combination looking device, al- 
though any one cell door or a series of doors can be 
thrown open by a lever system from the end of the 
corridor where the locking device Is located. Between 
the cell sections there is a narrow utility court from 
which the ventilation Is controlled and v^'here the sani- 
tary parts can be reached without any necessity for 
going into the cells. Each cell has a steel cot, porce- 
lain washstand and sanitary arrangement and Is light- 
ed by electricity. Special attention has been given to 
ventilation. A death house was also built on the prison 
grounds in 1907 to comply with the law regarding the 
electrocution of persons .condemned to death. 

THE NEW JERSEY HOME FOR DISABLED 
SOLDIERS. 

This institution Is located in Kearny, Hudson county. 
It originated in the mind of Governor Marcus L. Ward 
just before the close of the Civil War. His petition to 
the Legislatures of 1863-64 resulted in the passage of an 
act on April 12th, 1864, appointing himself, ex-Governors 
Daniel Haines, William A. Newell and Charles S. Olden, 
and Edwin A. Stevens and Rynear H. Veghte as com- 
missioners to examine into and report on the subject. On 
February 1, 1865, they made their report to Governor 
Parker and the Legislature appropriated $50,000 for the 
desired purpose. Grounds were purchased in the city of 
Newark and in March, 1866, the same commissioners were 
appointed managers of the Home. The board appointed 
Colonel A. N. Dougherty, Commandant; Rev. Samuel T. 



HOME FOR DISABLED SOLDIERS, ETC. Ill 

Moore, Superintendent and Chaplain, and Dr. A. M. Mills, 
Surgeon, of the Home. It was opened for reception on 
July 4th, 1866. For twenty-two years the Home remained 
in Newark, when a new site was selected in Kearny. This 
comprises about sixteen acres and $225,000 was appro- 
priated for the buildings, furnishings, &c. On October 
4th, 1888, the old home was vacated and the new home 
occupied. The New Jersey Home is the parent of similar 
institutions throughout the country. In order to gain ad- 
mission to the Home the applicant must have served in 
the army, navy or marine service and been honorably 
discharged therefrom. He must have lived in the State 
for at least two years next preceding date of application, 
and must be unable to earn a living for himself by man- 
ual labor. Since 1888 various additions have been made 
at a cost of about $58,000. 

NEW JERSEY HOME FOR DISABLED SOLDIERS, 
SAILORS OR MARINES AND THEIR WIVES. 

Vineland. 
This Home was organized in 1898, the sum of $5,000 hav- 
ing been appropriated for the purpose. A plot of ground, 
comprising 20 acres, and a building containing about 75 
rooms and basement, situated in the town of Vineland, 
were purchased for a Home, and in 1899 an additional 
appropriation of $21,500 was made to pay for the prop- 
erty. In the same year the sum of $20,000 was appro- 
priated for altering, repairing and furnishing the build- 
ings. In 1900 a special appropriation of $13,000 was made 
for new floors, porches. laundry machinery, engine and 
boiler and furniture. The Home was opened in Decem- 
ber, 1899, for the admission of inmates and the first were 
admitted January 2d. 1900. In 1901 the sum of $7,700 was 
appropriated for an elevator, alterations and appliances, 
making the cost of building and land $67,200. In 1903 nine 
acres of additional land was purchased at a cost of $2,000 
and the same year an act was passed by the Legislature 
providing for the care and maintenance of widows of vet- 
ems, and the sum of $28,000 was appropriated for the con- 
struction and furnishing of buildings necessary to carry 
out the provisions of the act. An additional sum of $2,500 
was appropriated for extra work and the building was 
completed and ready for occupancy in July, 1904. 
Since then two new wings, each eighty feet long and 
containing some 120 rooms, have been added, and a 



112 SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF, 

separate boiler house in the rear of the main build- 
ings erected. A new heating: and lighting plant has 
been installed, and other marked improvements for 
the care and comforts of the inmates completed. Ev«n 
with these large additions, the Home is filled to ils 
capacity, the membership at the close of the last fiscal 
year, October 31, 1908, being 249 persons-85 males 
, and 164 females. 

SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF. 

This Institution, which is located at Trenton, is a part 
of the public school system of the State, and is open to 
deaf residents of the State between the ages of six and 
twenty-one years. The pupils are instructed ' In the 
branches of common-school education, and are also train- 
ed in some handicraft. Speech is taught to all who can 
acquire it, and with such success that in some classes it 
becomes the principal means of communication. 

The industrial department is larger and better equip- 
ped than in most schools of this kind. From the printing 
office is issued monthly a paper, the Silent Worker, 
which, in point of mechanical execution and of quality 
of contents, ranks as the best issued from any institution 
in the country. All the work on this paper is performed 
by pupils of the school. 

The wood-working department, under the charge of a 
graduate of a technical school of high rank, has a course 
in which theory and practice are united in an unusual de- 
gree. 

A course of kindergarten work, especially adapted to 
the deaf child, has been worked out in the school and 
has been followed by some of the best schools of the kind 
in this country. 

A building for hospital purposes, designed in accord- 
ance with the best modern practice and ample to meet 
any possible need, was opened in 1899. 

The attendance of pupils has risen from 125 in June 
1896, until at the present time it is about 160. 

The school possesses a well chosen library, which at 
present contains about 4,000 volumes, and is rapidlv 
growing. 



HOME FOR FEEBLE-MINDED WOMEN. 113 



home: for the care and training op feeble- 
minded WOMEN. 

Vineland. 

This institution was established by virtue of the act of 
March 27th, 1888, the late S. Olin Garrison, who drafted 
the original law, being its first superintendent. On No- 
vember 7th, of the same year, he was succeeded by Mary 
J. Dunlap, M. D., the present incumbent. Upon organ- 
ization of the first board of managers, the late Hon. 
Alexander G. Catell, of Camden county, was chosen 
President, a place he acceptably filled until his death. He 
was succeeded by the Hon. Benjamin F. Lee, of Mercer 
county. Clerk of the Supreme Court, who has since occu- 
pied the position. Mrs. Emily E. H. Williamson, of Union 
county, has been secretary of the board from its organiz- 
ation. The first treasurer was the Hon. Belmont Perry, 
of Gloucester county, he being succeeded by ex-Senator 
Philip P. Baker, of Cumberland county; the late Senator 
Barton F. Thorn, of Burlington county, and George B. 
Thorn, Esq., of Burlington county, the present incum- 
bent. 

As its official title suggests, this institution has for its 
object the care and training of feeble minded women. 
Its location in a peculiarly healthful and fertile portion 
of the State, the plan and scope of the buildings, as well 
as their equipment and the employment of modern ad- 
ministrative methods, make the Home a subject for fav- 
orable comparison with any similar institution in the 
country. The property consists of about 50 acres. 

The most conspicuous building of the Home is that de- 
voted to purposes of administration and instruction, in- 
cluding dormitories and a gymnasium. There is also a 
laundry, a power-house, with heating apparatus, and 
pump for raising the sewage of the home into the Vine- 
land system. Fire escapes and a water tower give pro- 
tection to the State's wards. All the buildings are light- 
ed with gas or electricity. 

For Board of Managers see list of State officers. 

TRAINING SCHOOL, FOR FEEBLE-MINDED 
CHILDREN. 

Vineland. 
This public institution is an outgrowth of a private one, 
which Prof. S. Olin Garrison established in Millville, Cum- 
berland county, on September 1st, 1887. It was opened at 



114 STATE VILLAGE FOR EPILEPTICS. 

VIneland, on March 1st, 1888, with an enrollment of ten 
Inmates. Adjacent properties were soon acquired and a 
handsome building, costing about $18,000, was erected In 
1890-91. Tliere are eleven cottages, besides a hospital, 
large barns, shops and manual training rooms, located 
on a farm of 250 acres. The school has a fine assem- 
bly hall, seating over 600, and also containing seven 
school rooms, drill room and a gymnasium. The De- 
partment of Research has a well equipped laboratory, 
where studies as to the cause and prevention of feeble- 
mindedness are carried on. 

The plan and scope of training and education by the 
school, require fourteen teachers in English, Kindergar- 
ten, Music, Physical Culture and Manual Trades depart- 
ments, thereby Indicating the special and comprehensive 
fields of instruction. There is also a custodial depart- 
ment for the Idiotic. 

The property is worth over $250,000, real and personal, 
with a debt of only $21,000. Besides very good prop- 
erty acquisitions at low cost, at least $150,000 have 
been donated to the school since its organization, to 
aid in the current expenses, in improvements and new 
buildings. 

On November 1st, 1908, there were 375 boys and girls 
in the institution. 

STATE VILLAGE FOR EPILEPTICS. 

Skillman, Somerset County. 

This village is located In Montgomery township, Somer- 
set county, about one mile from Skillman Station, on the 
line of the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad. The loca- 
tion is one of the most beautiful and healthful In the 
State, and Is admirably adapted for the purposes of this 
kind of an institution. The managers have secured three 
adjoining farms containing in all about five hundred 
acres. 

The three farm houses are now being used, one for the 
Administration building, one for male and one for female 
patients. 

In 1884 Dr. John W. Ward, Superintendent of the State 
Hospital at Trenton, realizing the necessity of separating 
the epileptics from the insane, went before a legislative 
committee and strongly urged the appropriation of $50,- 
000 to erect a building upon the grounds of that Institu- 



STATE VILLAGE FOR EPILEPTICS. 115 

tion for the proper care of the epileptics. The late Prof. 
S. Olin Garrison, Principal of the New Jersey Training 
School for Feebie-Minded Children, at Vineland, early re- 
cognized the necessity of separate provision for the epi- 
leptics in that institution, and was indefatigable in his 
efforts to establish the present village. 

For a number of years the subject was agitated, and 
in 1895, in accordance with a resolution passed by the 
Legislature, the Governor appointed a commission to in- 
vestigate the number and condition of epileptics in the 
State. The report of the commission was presented to 
the Legislature of 1896 and a bill was introduced for the 
establishment of a colony on a plan recommended by the 
commission. The bill failing to become a law, the New 
Jersey State Medical Society, by resolution at their an- 
nual meeting in 1896, endorsed the necessity of such 
legislation. In 1897 the President, Dr. Thomas J. Smith, 
of Bridgeton, most ably presented the necessity of pro- 
viding for the epileptics, and urged that the State author- 
ities be importuned most earnestly to revive the move- 
ment initiated the year before to establish an industrial 
epileptic colony in our State. The Society reaffirmed its 
position, and appointed a committee to urge the matter 
further. 

Through the combined efforts of those interested and 
with the zealous co-operation of Senator Stokes, of Cum- 
berland, who had charge of the legislation, an act was 
passed by the Legislature of 1898, and promptly signed by 
Acting Governor Voorhees, making the necessary provi- 
sions for the establishment of the institution. The sum 
of $15,000 was appropriated for the purchase of a site and 
to pay for the equipment and maintenance of the vil- 
lage. The "Maplewood Farm," containing about 187 
acres, was purchased for $11,500, and the village was 
opened for the reception of male patients November 1st, 
of the same year. 

The Legislature of 1900 appropriated $30,000 for the erec- 
tion of two cottages for patients, and $16,000 for the pur- 
chase of two farms adjoining the property. Additional 
appropriations were made in 1901, '02, '03, '04 and '05, 
aggregating about $200,000 for extensions and im- 
provements. All epileptics of either sex, over five 
years of age, and not insane, are admitted. 



IIG NEW JERSEY REFORMATORY. 

NEW JERSEY REFORMATORY. 

Rahway. 

In 1895 the Legislature passed an act, approved by 
Governor Werts on March 28 of taat year, providing 
for the appointment of a commission to consist of 
six persons, who were charged with the duty of build- 
ing an intermediate prison for the criminal classes. 
The commission was authorized to set apart the prop- 
erty known as the Edgar farm, located in Union and 
Middlesex Counties, and then "belonging to the State 
Sinking Fund. 

If it were found necessary they were authorized to 
purchase adjoining property for the completion of 
the site at a cost not to exceed ten thousand dollars, 
but this authority was not availed of. 

The institution, when completed, was designed to 
accommodate not less than one thousand inmates, 
and the sum of one hundred thousand dollars was ap- 
propriated to begin the work. 

The site now comprises about eighty-five acres. 
That which is not occupied by the buildings or en- 
closed within a stockade surrounding the same, fur- 
nishes occupation to the inmates, and is devoted to 
the purpose of tillage, to supply farm products and 
sustain the animals used by the institution. 

The original Commissioners were Patrick Farrelly, 
George S. Mott, David M. Chambers, William A. Ure, 
John T. Daly and Thomas M, Gopsill. 

According to the plans ariginally adopted, the build- 
ing, when completed, was to have four wings, capable 
of accommodating 1,024 inmates. The first wing and 
centre were completed in the year 1901, and inmates 
were then first received. 

Offenders only are admitted between the ages of 
sixteen and thirty years. 

The criminal courts of the State are empowered in 
their discretion to commit offenders to the Reforma- 
tory instead of State Prison. The original commission 
was replaced by the present Board of Commissioners, 
consisting of nine persons, including the Governor, 
and no more than four to be of the same political 
party. 

The reformatory and grounds are located about one 
and a half miles south of the City of Rahway. The 



STATE TUBERCULOUS SANITARIUM. 117 

building-s now erected comprise the guard-room build- 
ing- and northeast wing, with the southeast wing in 
course of construction and nearly completed, the do- 
mestic building and "Tie-to" building, connecting it 
with the Guard-room building, the industrial building, 
the power house, hospital for contagious diseases, 
tuberculous pavillion, barn, hennery, piggery, shelter 
station and cold storage warehouse. 

The "Tie-to" building, the hospital, the pavilion, 
barn, hennery, piggery, shelter station and cold stor- 
age warehouse were constructed entirely by the in- 
mates and without cost to the State, except for mate- 
rial. 

The construction of a sewage disposal system was 
contracted for by the former Board of Managers, but 
has never been completed. 

Up to the 1st of September, 1908, the total number 
committed has been 1,530, of whom 532 have been 
released on permanent parole and 439 are at large 
pending their final discharge. The total number of 
inmates present on the day last mentioned was 527, 
and as many as 573 have been In detention at one 
time. 

The inmates are detailed to different trade classes, 
and do all the work required for betterments and 
repairs. They enjoy daily educational advantages and 
are regularly drilled in military tactics. 

.• ( 
STATE TUBERCULOUS SANITARIUM. 

This Sanitarium, which was completed in 1907, is lo- 
cated at Glen Gardner, near High Bridi^e, Hunterdon 
county. The site is on the slope of a mountain nearly 
1,000 feet above the level of the sea, where the State 
has acquired about 600 acres. The slope has been cut 
away and leveled for a considerable .space, and here 
the buildings were constructed. On a clear day the 
view from this point is one of the most magnificent in 
this picturesque section of North New Jersey. It looks 
away over a rolling country of wooded hills and culti- 
vated farm lands to the mountains on the other side of 
the valley, which run at its foot. Away in the dis- 
tance like a thin ribbon of silver is the South Branch 
river, and in whatever direction the eye turns some 
new and charming scene is encountered. The structure 
consists of a service building, administration building 



118 STATE TUBERCULOUS SANITARIUM. 

and east and west wards. The service building- is the 
source of supplies for the institution. It is 84x110 feet, 
three stories, including basement, in which Is the 
boiler room, engine room and electric light plant. A 
cold storage is located in the basement. On the second 
floor is the main dining hall, which is 84x48 feet, the 
service room, bakery, kitchen, storeroom, butcher shop 
and cold storage. The third flood is fitted up with 
rooms for the doctors, employees' rooms, ironing, dry- 
ing and linen rooms, coat rooms, sterilizing room, &c. 
All the buildings are built of field stone, stuccoed on 
the outside and finished with white plaster on the In- 
terior. The ward building is 32x150 feet and the ad- 
ministration building 52x120 feet. The buildings are 
so constructed that additions may be made from time 
to time as the necessity of the case demands. About 
125 patients can be comfortably accommodated In the 
ward buildings. There are ten private wards in each 
of the ward buildings, which will accommodate three 
or four persons each. These are for those who can 
afford to pay lor treatment. The water supply Is de- 
rived from a large reservoir, which Is kept supplied 
from the springs. The system of sewerage Is among 
the most sanitary in existence. The total cost of the 
Sanitarium represents an outlay of about $300,000. 

The first impetus for caring for th3 State's consump- 
tive poor was given in an address delivered in 1900 be- 
fore the State Medical Society by Dr. Halsey, then 
president. A bill was drawn by a committee of the 
society, and was passed by the Legislature in 1902, 
when a Board of Managers was appointed by Governor 
Murphy. Of this Board, Dr. Charles J. Kipp of Newark 
was elected president, and for whom the mountain on 
which the State Sanitarium was built v/as named. The 
Legislature appropriated 150,000 to carry the bill into 
effect. The Sanitarium is intended as a model institu- 
tion, largely educational in character, which would 
give a practical demonstration of up-to-date methods 
of treating cases of tuberculosis and point the way for 
other institutions of a similar type, at the same time 
extending the direct benefits of its system to as large a 
number of cases as its necessarily limited facilities 
would enable it to care for. The institution expects to 
handle about five hundred cases annually. Its purpose 
is to arrest the disease in its incipient stage and dis- 



BORDENTOWN INDUSTRIAL. SCHOOL. 119 

charge the patient in such condition that, with the 
aid of the instruction he receives while at the institu- 
tion, he may be reasonably certain of being able to ef- 
fect his own cure. This instruction will prove valuable 
not only to himself, but to the public in general, as it 
becomes disseminated through his agency and that of 
the other patients who undergo treatment and go out 
again in the world at large. As a rule, the cases se- 
lected will be such as can be treated with reasonable 
expectancy of a cure. 

BORDENTOWN INDUSTRIAL, SCHOOL.. 

The Manual Training and Industrial School for Col- 
ored Youth located at Bordentown, N. J., is a State 
institution supported by appropriations from the State 
Treasury. 

The objects and purposes of the school are to give 
a liberal industrial education to the colored boys and 
girls of the State of New Jersey. The work of the 
school is divided into four departments, namely, train- 
ing in practical agriculture, manual training along the 
lines of work in the trades, home economics, including 
sewing, cooking and practical instruction in house- 
hold management, and academic instruction supple- 
mentary to the industrial work. 

Competent instructors are provided at the head of 
each of these departments. The school is under the 
immediate supervision and control of a special com- 
mittee of the State Board of Education. It is equipped 
with a commodious administration building, one good 
dormitory, a fairly good barn and dairy house with 
numerous other small buildings. 

The school is located upon the banks of the Dela- 
ware, and has in connection with it 225 acres of most 
excellent farm land. About one hundred students are 
now enrolled in the school and a considerable number 
are on the waiting list, this being all that can be 
accommodated under the present conditions. The 
instruction is free and the board is furnished at a 
nominal price to the students, making it possible for 
the poorest pupils to avail themselves of the advan- 
tages of this opportunity for industrial training. 



120 



ELECTORAL VOTE. 



ELECTORAL VOTE FOR PRESIDENT, 1888. 



FOR HARRISON, REP. 

California 

Colorado 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Maine 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New York 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

Vermont 

Wisconsin 



FOR CLEVELAND, DEM. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

Connecticut . . . 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maryland 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

New Jersey . . . 
North Carolina 
South Carolina 

Tennessee 

T.'xaa 

Virginia 

West Virginia 



Total 233 

Harrison's majority, 65. 

ELECTORAL VOTE FOR PRESIDENT, 1892. 



FOR CLEVELAND, DEM. 

Alabama 11 

Arkansas 8 

California 8 

Connecticut 6 

Delaware 3 

Florida 4 

Georgia 13 

Illinois 24 

1 udiana 15 

Kentucky 13 

Louisiana 8 

Maryland 8 

Michigan 5 

Mississippi 9 

Missouri 17 

New Jersey 10 

New York 36 

North Caroline 11 

North Dakota I 

3hio 1 

South Carolina 9 

Tennessee 12 

Texas 15 

Virginia 12 

West Virginia 6 

Wisconsin 1^ 

Total 

Cleveland over Harrison, 
Cleveland over Harrison 



FOR HARRISON, REP. 

California 

Iowa 

Maine 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Montana 

Nebraska 

New Hampshire 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Dakota 

Vermont 

Washington 

Wyoming 

Total 

FOR WEAVER, POP. 

Colorado 

Idaho 

Kansas 

Nevada 

North Dakota 

Oregon 



77 I 



Total 

132. 
and Weaver, 110. 



ELECTORAI. VOTE. 



121 



ELECTORAL VOTE FOR PRESIDENT, 1896. 



FOK MCKINLBY, RKP. 

California 8 

Connecticut 6 

Delaware 3 

IlUnois 24 

Indiana 15 

Iowa.. 13 

Kentucky 12 

Maine 6 

Maryland 8 

Massachusetts 15 

Michigan 14 

Minnesota . 9 

New Hampshire 4 

New Jersey 10 

New York 86 

North Dakota 3 

Ohio 23 

Oregon 4 

Pennsylvania 32 

Rhode Island 4 

Vermont 4 

West Virginia 6 

Wisconain 12 

271 
McKlnley'a majority, 95. 



For Bryan, Dem. 

Alabama 11 

Arkansas 8 

California 1 

Colorado 4 

Florida 4 

Georgia 18 

Idaho S 

Kansas 10 

Kentucky 1 

Louisiana 8 

Mississippi 9 

Missouri 17 

Montana 3 

Nebraska 8 

Nevada 3 

North Carolina 11 

South Carolina 9 

South Dakota 4 

Tennessee 12 

Texas 16 

Utah 8 

Virginia 12 

Washington 4 

Wyoming ■. 8 



122 ELECTORAL VOTE. 



ELECTORAL VOTE, 1900— 1904. 

1904 1900 



State. Roosevelt, Parker, 

Rep. Dem. 

Alabama — 11 

Arkansas — 9 

California 10 — 

Colorado 5 — 

Connecticut 7 — 

Delaware 3 — 

Florida — 6 

Georgia — 13 

Idaho 3 — 

Illinois 27 — 

Indiana 15 — 

Iowa 13 — 

Kansas 10 — 

Kentucky — 13 

Louisiana — 9 

Maine 6 — 

Maryland 1 7 

Massachusetts — 16 — 

Michigan 14 — 

Minnesota 11 — 

Mississippi — 10 

Missouri 18 — 

Montana 3 — 

Nebraska 8 — 

Nevada 3 — 

New Hampshire... 4 — 

New Jersey 12 — 

New York 39 — 

North Carolina — — 12 

North Dakota 4 — 

Ohio 23 — 

Oregon 4 — 

Pennsylvania 34 — 

Rhode Island 4 — 

South Carolina — 9 

South Dakota. 4 — 

Tennessee — 12 

Texas — 18 

Utah 3 — 

Vermont 4 — 

Virginia — 12 

Washington 5 — 

West Virginia 7 — 

Wisconsin 13 — 

Wyoming 3 — 

Total 336 140 292 155 

Under the apportionment of 1901. the electoral vote of 

the country was increased from 447 to 476, making 239 
necessary to a choice. 



McKinley, 


Bryan, 


Rep. 


Dem. 





11 





8 


9 






4 


6 




3 


_ 




4 





13 


— 


3 


24 




15 


— 


13 


— 


10 


— 





13 


— 


8 


6 





8 


— 


15 


_ 


14 


— 


9 


._ 




9 





17 


— 


3 


8 






3 


4 





10 


— 


36 







11 


3 


_ 


23 


— 


4 





32 


— 


4 







9 


4 


_ 




12 





15 


3 




4 


— 




12 


4 




6 


— 


12 


— 


3 


— 



PRESIDENTIAL. VOTE. 



123 



PRESDENTIAL VOTE, 1880 AND i 





1884. 1 1880. 


STATES. 
(38) 


Blaine, 
Rep. 


Cleve- 
land, 
Dem. 


Butler, 
Gr'b'k. 


St. John 
Pro. 


Garfield, 
Rep. 


Han- 
cock, 
Dem. 


Alabama 


59,444 

50,895 

100,816 

36,277 

65,898 

12 788 

28,039 

47.964 

337.449 

288.480 

197,089 

153,158 

118,674 

46,347 

72 209 

85.699 

146,724 

192669 

111,923 

42 774 

♦202.261 

76 877 

8,381 

43.166 

123,433 

562,001 

125,068 

400.082 

26,8^2 

474.268 

19,030 

21,733 

124.078 

88,353 

39,514 

139.356 

*63,096 

161,147 


92973 

72,927 

88.307 

27,627 

67,182 

17,054 

31,769 

94,567 

312,320 

244,992 

♦177,288 

89,466 

152,757 

62.546 

52.140 

96,932 

122,352 

♦191,225 

70,144 

78.547 

235 972 

♦54,354 

7,000 

39,166 

127,784 

663,048 

142,905 

868,280 

24,593 

393,510 

12,391 

69,764 

133,258 

223,208 

17, 31 

14r,497 

67,317 

146.4^4 


762 
1,844 
1,975 
1,957 
tl,685 
6 

125 

10,753 
8,176 

*"l6,ll6 
1,655 


610 


56,221 

42,436 

80 348 

27,450 

67,071 

14,133 

23.654 

54,086 

318,037 

232,164 

183,927 

121,549 

106,306 

^38.637 

74.039 

78,515 

165.205 

185,341 

93.903 

34.854 

153,567 

64,979 

8,732 

44,852 

120,555 

555.444 

115,874 

375,048 

20,619 

444,704 

18,195 

58,071 

107 677 

67,893 

45.567 

84,020 

46.243 

144,000 


91 1»5 




60 775 


California 

Colorado 


2,640 

759 

{2,492 

65 

74 

184 

11,824 

3,018 

1,472 

4,495 

3,106 


86,426 
24,647 
64,415 
15,275 
27,964 


Connecticut 


Florida 




102 470 


Illinois 


277,321 
225,522 
105 845 




Iowa 


Kansas 


59 801 




149 068 


Louisiai a 


65,067 
♦65,171 
93 706 


Maine 


3,953 

531 

24,382 

tt763 

3,587 


2.160 
2,794 
9.923 
18,403 
4,691 


Massachusetts.. 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 


111,960 
131,59" 
53,315 

75 750 




2,153 
2,858 


208,609 

28,523 
9,613 

40.794 
122,565 
634,511 
124,208 
340,821 

19,948 
407,428 

10,779 
112,312 
128,191 
156 428 


Nebraska . 




IINevada 


' 


N. Hampshire.. 

New Jersey. 

New York 

North Carolina 


552 
8,494 
16,955 


1,573 

6.155 

24,999 

448 

11,269 

488 

15,366 

928 


Ohio 


5,170 

723 

16,942 

422 


Oregon 


Pennsylvania... 
Rhode Island- 
South Carolina 


IFTennessee 

•Texas 


957 
8,321 

785 

""ttsib 

4,597 


1.131 
8,511 
1,752 
143 
939 
7.649 


Vermont 


18,316 

al28,586 

57,391 

114,649 


Virginia 

West Virginia... 
Wisconsin 


Total 

Plurality 


4,844.002 


4,914947 
70915 


134,599 


151,531 


4,454,416 
9.464 


4,444,952 



1884— Sea tteriner and Imperfect, 7,876: Lockwood, 5: total vote. 

10,053.770. 
1880— Greenback, 308.578; Prohibition. 10,305; American, 707; 

scattering, 989 ; total vote, 9,219,947. 

♦Fusion, trncluding 160 misspelled, t Including 232 misspelled. 
IT One county missing in 1884. |i One county estimated in 1884 g Voto 
for the two Republican tickets (Regular, 27.676; "Beattie, 30,340) 
combined, ft Straight Gre ^uback. aRegular (96,912) and Readjuster 
(31,674) votes combined. 



124 



PRESIDENTIAL VOTE. 



PRESIDENTIAL VOTE, 1888. 



States. 


Harrison. 


Cleveland. 


Fisk. 


Labor. 




57.197 

58,752 

124,809 

50,766 

74,584 

12,978 

26,650 

40,453 

370,470 

263,361 

211,598 

182,914 

155,134 

30,184 

73.734 

99,986 

183,456 

236,370 

136,359 

30,096 

236,325 

108,4-25 

7.238 

45,728 

144,344 

650,338 

134,709 

415,792 

33,293 

526,091 

21,969 

13,740 

138,815 

83,280 

45,192 

150,438 

78,491 

176,553 

5,430,607 


117,310 

85,90-.' 

117,7-29 

37,542 

74,9'2-. 

16,411 

39,561 

100,472 

348,25<^ 

261,01:- 

179,877 

102,73»< 

183,fc00 

89,941 

50,482 

106,168 

151,990 

218,404 

99,664 

85,476 

261,957 

80.552 

5,326 

43,358 

151.493 

645,%5 

148.336 

399,969 

26,524 

446,200 

17,530 

65,8-25 

159,079 

234,883 

16,788 

151,977 

79,330 

155,232 


583 

614 

6 761 

2, UK) 

4,234 

400 

403 

1,802 

21,386 

9,881 

3,550 

6,779 

5,-225 

130 

2,690 

4,766 

8,636 

20,942 

15,000 

218 

4,954 

9,424 

45 

7,585 

7,904 

30,3-27 

5.787 

4,618 

1.677 

20,743 

1,251 


10,643 

i,'59i 

1,205 
240 


Arkansas 




Connecticut 






Florida 






136 


Illinois 


7,410 
2,69 1 
9 10 1 


Indiana 




Kansas 


37 7ft7 




622 


Louisiana 




Maine 


1,345 




Massachusetts 




Michigan 


4,542 




Mississippi 






15,853 


Nebraska 


Nevada 






42 


New Jersey 




New York 


5,050 


North Carolina 


Ohio 


3,452 
363 


Pennsylvania 


3,865 
18 


Rhode Island 


South Carolina 




Tennessee 


5,669 
4,749 
1,450 
1,678 


43 


Texas 




Vermont 

Virginia 


35' 


West Virginia 


■*"* 


Wisconsin 


14,277 


8,52i 




TofAl 


5,538,045 


257,248 


114,623 



PRESIDENTIAL VOTE, 1892. 



STATES. 


i 

> 


a 


1 


"53 


a g 




Alabama 


138 138 

87.834 

118,174 


9,197 

46,974 

118,027 

38,620 

77,032 

18,077 

22 

48,305 

8,599 

399 288 

255,615 

219,795 

157,241 

135,441 

26,134 

62,878 

92 73fi 

202 927 

222 708 

122,823 

1,406 

226,918 

18,861 

87 227 

2811 

45,658 

166,101 

609,459 

100.565 

17.519 

405 187 

35,002 

516,011 

26.975 

13,384 

34.888 

99,851 

77,475 

37 992 

113 266 

36 460 

80,293 

170,846 

8,454 


85,181 
11.831 
25 311 
53,584 
809 

4 843 

42.939 
10,520 
22.207 
22,208 
20,595 
163.111 
23 500 
27,903 

2,381 
796 

3,348 
19.796 
29 313 
10.256 
41213 

7,334 
83,134 

7264 
293 
985 
16.436 
44 732 
17 700 
14,852 
26,965 

8,714 
228 

2,410 
26,544 
23,780 
99,688 
42 
12 274 
19 054 

4.166 

9 909 

7,722 


241 
113 

8,096 

1.687 

4,026 

564 

570 

988 

288 

25 870 

13.050 

6,402 

4,553 

6,442 


128 941 

40,860 

147 




California 




Colorado 


38.620 




82,395 

18 581 

30,143 

129,386 

2 

426,281 

262,740 

196,367 


5,363 

504 

30 121 

81,081 


Delaware 












Idaho . .. 


8,597 




26,993 
7,125 










23,428 






157,241 


Kentucky 


175,461 

87,622 

48 044 

113,866 

176,858 

202,296 

100,920 

40,237 

268,398 

17,581 

24,943 

714 

42.081 

171.066 

654,908 

133,098 


46.026 
61,488 




Maine . . .. 


3 062 

5.877 

7,539 

20 857 

14,182 

910 

4,331 

649 

4,902 

89 

1,297 

8.134 

38.191 

2,636 

899 

26,012 

2 281 

25 123 

1,654 


14,834 


Maryland 


21,130 




26 069 


Michigan 




20,412 
21,903 




Mississippi 

Missouri 


38,831 
41,480 






1,270 


Nebraska 




62,284 


Nevada 




2,097 


N. Hampshire 
New Jersey ... 
New York 




3,577 


14.965 
45 449 
32,533 




N Carolina 




N. Dakota 


17,519 




404,115 
14 243 

452,264 
24.336 
54,698 
9,081 

136,594 

239 148 
16,325 

163,977 
29.844 
84.467 

177,335 




1,072 
20,759 







Pennsylvania.. 


63 747 




2,639 




41,314 






25,807 


Tennessee 


4 776 
2.165 
1,424 
2,736 
2 553 
2,145 
13,132 
530 


36,743 
161,673 




Texas 




Vermont 


21,667 


Virginia 


50,721 




Washington ... 
West Virginia, 


6,616 


4,174 
6,489 






'Wyoming 


8,454 










Totals 


5 554.561 


5,185,028 


1 055,871 


270.876 


918 145 


548,612 



Cleveland's plurality, 369,533. 

Wing-. Socialist-I-,abor, received in Connecticut, 333 votes; 
in Massacliusetts, 676; in New Jersey, 1,337; in New York, 
17,958; in Pennsylvania, 898. Total, 21,202. 

*In Louisiana the Republican and People's parties votea 
each for four of the other's eight candidates for electors. 
Thus some of the Louisiana voters are counted twice in the 
above table, and while all the Presidential candidates re- 
ceived a total of 12,098,668 votes in the whole country, ther^ 
were only 12,070,766 actual voters. 

(125) 



126 



PRESIDENTIAL. VOTE. 



POPULAR VOTE FOR PRESIDENT, i8q6. 



STATES. 




11 


Palmer, Kat. 
Dem. 


Levering and 
Bentley, Pro. 
and Nat. 


si 


Alabama 


64,737 
87,612 

146,588 
26,279 

110,285 
20,452 
11,257 
60,091 
6,814 

607,130 

823,748 


181,226 
110.103 
144,766 
161,'269 
66,740 
16.615 
31.968 
94,672 
23,185 
464,523 
806.206 


6,462 


2,147 

889 

2,678 

2,104 

1,806 

602 

644 

6,716 

172 

10.611 

6,241 

8,544 

2,281 

4,781 




898 


California 

Colorado . .. 






1 

4,336 

969 

1,772 

2.708 


160 


Connecticut 


1,223 


Florida 








Idaho 




Illinois 


6,390 
2,146 
4,516 
1,209 
6,104 
1,834 
1,870 
2,607 
11,749 
6.930 
8,216 
7,617 
2,855 


1,147 


Indiana 


848 


Iowa 

Kansas 


289.293: 223,741 

159,345 170,636 

218.171 217,890 

22,037 77,175 

80,465 34,588 

136.978 104.746 

278,976 105,711 

293,3271 237.251 

193,5031 139,735 

5,123' 46.283 

804.940 363.667 

10 490< 43.680 


453 








Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

MipVlicrBTl 


1.570 
6,058 
2.998 
6,777 
4,363 
890 
2,462 


m 

2,114 


Minnesota ........ 


918 


MigKlssiDDi 




Missouri 


695 


Mnntnnii. 




Nebraska... 


102,664 

1,939 

67.444 

221,367 


115,624 

8,3«9 

21,6J50 

133.675 


2,797 


1,993 


18« 


Nevada 




New Hampshire.. 
New Jersey 


3,420 

6,878 

18,972 

578 


776 

6.614 

16,075 

921 

3.58 

7,784 

919 

19,274 

1,165 


2M 
3,985 


New York 

North Carolina... 

North Dakota. 

Ohio 


819,838! 651.513 
155 222 174 488 


17,731 


26.336 
625,991 

48,779 
728,300 

37.437 
9,313 

41,042 
148,773 
162,506 

13,461 

60,991 
135,388 

39,153 
104.414 
268.359 

10,072 


•20,586 

477,497 

46,739 

433.'230 

14,459 

58.801 

41,225 

168,176 

368,289 

67.053 

10,607 

154.985 

61.646 

92.927 

163.441 

10,861 




1,858 

977 

11,000 

1,166 

8-24 


1,167 






Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina ... 
South Dakota. 


6,108 

558 


800 
8.098 
5,030 




1,951 
4,853 















1,329 
2,127 
1,668 
677 
4,244 


728 
2,344 
1,116 
1,203 
6,659 

159 




Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 


116 




594 


Wyoming 








Total 

Plurality 


7,105.729 
613.752 


6,491,977 


133,554 


142,491 


39,221 



ELECTION RETURNS. 127 



POPULAR VOTE FOR PRESIDENT, 1900. 



ft 5 S ::Z 6 2d m o Of) 



^rt ^Q 5Ph df^ "ajw rtm 

§ pq ^ pq Q S 

Alabama 53,669 96,368 1,407 3,797 

Arkansas 44,800 81,142 584 972 

California 164,755 124,985 5,024 7,572 ..... 

Colorado 93,072 122,733 3,790 389 684 7l4 

Connecticut 102,572 74,014 1,617 1,029 908 

Delaware 22,560 18,863 546 57 

Florida 7,499 28,007 2,239 1.090 603 

Georgia 35,036 81,700 1,396 4,584 

Idaho 27,198 29,414 857 213 

Illinois 597,985 503,061 17,626 1,141 9,687 1,373 

Indiana 336,063 309,584 13,718 1,438 2,374 663 

Iowa 307,808 209,265 9,502 613 2,742 259 

Kansas 185,955 162,601 3,605 1,605 

Kentucky 226,801 234,899 2,429 2,017 760 289 

Louisiana 14,233 53,671 

Maine 65.435 36,832 2,585 878 

Maryland 136,212 122,271 4,582 908 391 

Massachusetts... 239,147 157,016 6,208 9,716 2,610 

Michigan 316,269 211,685 11,859 833 2,826 903 

Minnesota 190,461 112,901 8,555 3,065 1,329 

Mississippi 5,753 51,706 1,644 

Missouri 314,093 351,913 5,963 4,244 6,128 1,294 

Montana 25,373 37,146 298 708 116 

Nebraska 121,835 114,013 3,686 1,104 823 

Nevada 3,849 6,347 

New Hampshire 54,798 35,489 1,271 790 

New Jersey 221,707 164,808 7,183 669 4,609 2,074 

New York 821,992 678,386 22,043 12,869 12,622 

North Carolina.. 133,081 157,752 1,009 830 

North Dakota... 35,891 20,519 

Ohio 543,918 474,882 

Oregon 46,526 33,385 

Pennsylvania ... 712,665 424,232 

Rhode Island.... 33,784 19,812 

South Carolina.. 3,525 47,283 

South Dakota... 54,530 39,544 

Tennessee 123.008 145,250 

Texas 130,641 277,432 

Utah 47,089 44,949 

Vermont 42,569 12,849 

Virginia 115,865 146,080 

Washington .... 57.457 44,833 

West Virginia... 119.851 98,791 

Wisconsin 2fi5.866 159,285 

Wyoming 14,482 10,164 



731 


110 


518 




10,203 


251 


4,847 


1.688 


2,536 


275 


1,494 




27,908 


638 


4,831 


2,936 


1,529 






1,423 


1,542 


339 


169 





3,900 


1,368 


410 





2,644 


20,981 


1,846 


162 


205 




717 


106 


383 


367 






2,150 








2,345 





1,906 


1,066 


1,586 


279 


286 




10,124 




7,095 


524 




2 








7,217,677 6,357.883 207,368 50,188 94,552 33,450 



128 ELECTORAL VOTE OF NEW JERSEY. 

ELECTORAL VOTE OF NEW JERSEY. 



FOR PRESIDENT AND VICE-PRESIDENT, FROM 
MARCH 4, 1789. 

1789— George Washington, of Virginia 6 

John Adams, of Massachusetts 1 

John Jay, of New York 5 

1793— George Washington, of Virginia 7 

John Adams, of Massachusetts 7 

1797— John Adams, of Massachusetts 7 

Thomas Pinckney, of South Carolina 7 

1801— John Adams, of Massachusetts 7 

C. C. Pinckney, of South Carolina 7 

1805— Thomas Jefferson, of Virginia 8 

George Clinton, of New York 8 

1809— James Madison, of Virginia 8 

George Clinton, of New York 8 

1813— DeWitt Clinton, of New York 8 

Jarard Ingcrsoll, of Pennsylvania 8 

1817— James Monroe, of Virginia 8 

Daniel D. Tompkins, of New York 8 

1821— James Monroe, of Virginia 8 

Daniel D. Tompkins, of New York 8 

1825— Andrew Jackson, of Tennessee 8 

John C. Calhoun, of South Carolina 8 

1829— John Q. Adams, of Massachusetts 8 

Richard Rush, of Pennsylvania 8 

1833— Andrew Jackson, of Tennessee 8 

Martin Van Buren, of New York 8 

lS37_William H. Harrison, of Ohio 8 

Francis Granger, of New York 8 

1841— William H. Harrison, of Ohio 8 

John Tyler, of Virginia 8 

1845— Henry Clay, of Kentucky 3 

Theodore Frelinghuysen, of New Jersey 7 

1849— Zachary Taylor, of Louisiana 7 

Millard Fillmore, of New York 7 

1853— Franklin Pierce, of New Hampshire 7 

William R. King, of Alabama 7 

1857— James Buchanan, of Pennsylvania 7 

John C. Breckinridge, of Kentucky 7 



NEW JERSEY PRESIDENTIAL VOTE. 129 

1861— Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois 4 

Hannibal Hamlin, of Maine 4 

Stephen A, Douglas, of Illinois 3 

Herchel V. Johnson, of Georgia 3 

1865— George B. McClellan, of New Jersey 7 

George H. Pendleton, of Ohio 7 

1869— Horatio Seymour, of New York 7 

Francis P. Blair, of Missouri 7. 

1873— Ulysses S. Grant, of Illinois 7 

Henry Wilson, of Massachusetts 7 

1877— Samuel J. Tilden, of New York 9 

Thomas A, Hendricks, of Indiana 9 

1881— Winfield Scott Hancock, of Pennsylvania 9 

William H. English, of Indiana 9 

1885— Grover Cleveland, of New York 9 

Thomas A. Hendricks, of Indiana 9 

1889— Grover Cleveland, of New York 9 

Allan G. Thurman, of Ohio 9 

1893— Grover Cleveland, of New York 10 

Adlai E. Stevenson, of Illinois 10 

1897— William McKinley, Ohio 10 

Garret A. Hobart, New Jersey 10 

1901— William McKinley, of Ohio 10 

Theodore Roosevelt, of New York 10 

1905— Theodore Roosevelt, of New York 12 

Charles W. Fairbanks, of Indiana 12 

1909— William Howard Taft, of Ohio 

James S. Sherman, of New York 



PRESIDENTIAL VOTE OF NEW JERSEY FROM 1840 
TO DATE. 

1840— Harrison, Whig, 33,351; Van Buren, Dem., 31,034. 
Harrison's majority, 2,327. 

1844— Clay, Whig, 38,318; Polk, Dem., 37,495. Clay's major- 
ity, 823. 

1848— Taylor, Whig, 40,015; Cass, Dem., 36,901; Van Buren, 
819. Taylor's plurality, 3,114. 

1852— Pierce, Dem., 44,305; Scott, Whig, 38,556; Hale, Free 
Soil, 350. Pierce's plurality,, 5,749. 

1856— Buchanan, Dem., 46,943; Fremont, Rep., 28,338; Fill- 
more, Amer., 24,115. Buchanan's plurality, 18,605. 

1860— Dem. Fusion ticket, 62,869; Lincoln, Rep., 58,346. 
Fusion majority, 4,523. (Three Douglas electors. Cook, 
Parker and Runyon, were chosen, the highest vote being 
62,869 for Cook, and four Lincoln electors were chosen, 
Hornblower, Brown, Elmer and Ivins, the highest vote 
being 58,346 for Hornblower. The highest vote cast for a 
Breckinridge elector (Wurts) was 56,237.) 
9 



130 NEW JERSEY GUBERNATORIAL VOTE. 

1864 — McClellan, Dem., 68,024; Lincoln, Rep., 60,723. 
McClellan's majority, 7,301. 

1868— Seymour, Dem., 83,001; Grant, Rep., 80,131. Sey- 
mour's majority, 2,870. 

1872— Grant, Rep., 91,656; Greeley, Dem., 76,456. Grant's 
majority, 15,200. 

1876— Tilden, Dem., 115,962; Hayes, Rep., 103,517. Tilden's 
majority, 12,445. 

1880-Hancock, Dem., 122,565; Garfield, Rep., 120,555. Han- 
cock's majority, 2,010. 

1884— Cleveland, Dem., 127,784; Blaine, Rep., 123,433. Cleve- 
land's majority, 4,351. 

18S8— Cleveland, Dem., 151,493; Harrison, Rep., 144,344; 
Fisk, Pro.. 7,904. Cleveland's plurality, 7,149. 

1892— Cleveland, Dem., 171,066; Harrison, Rep., 156,101; 
Bidwell, Pro., 8,134; Wing, Social.-Lab., 1,337; Weaver, 
People's, 985. Cleveland's plurality, 14,965. 

1896— McKinley, Rep., 221,367; Bryan, Dem., 133,675; Palmer. 
Nat. Dem., 6,373; Levering, Pro., 5,614; Matchett, Soc.-Lab., 
3.985. McKinley's plurality, 87.692. 

1900— McKinley, Rep., 221,707; Bryan, Dem., 164,808; Wool- 
ley, Pro., 7,183: Debs, Soc.-Dem., 4,609; Malloney, Soc.-Lab.. 
2,074; Barker, People's, 669. McKinley's plurality, 56,899. 

1904— Roosevelt, Rep., 245,164; Parker, Dem., 164,566; Swal- 
low, Pro., 6,845; Debs., Socialist, 9,587; Corrlgan, Soc-Lab., 
2,680; Watson, People's Dem., 3,705. Roosevelt's plurality, 
80,598. 

1908— Taft, Rep., 265,298; Bryan, Dem., 182,522; Debs, 
Soc, 10,249; Chafin, Pro., 4,930; Gillhaus, Soc.-Lab., 
1,196; Hisgen, Ind., 2,916. Taft's plurality, 82,776. 



NEW JERSEY'S VOTE FOR GOVERNOR 

From 1844 to Date. 



1844— Stratton, Whig, 37,949; Thomson. Dem., 36.591; Park- 
hurst, 76. Whig plurality, 1,358. 

1847— Haines, Dem., 34,765; Wright, Whig. 32.166; William 
Right, 87; Moses Jaques, 146; Scattering, 109. Democratic 
plurality, 2,599. 

1850— Fort, Dem., 39,723; Runk, Whig, 34,054. Democratic 
majority, 5,669. 

1853— Price, Dem.. 38,312; Haywood, Whig. 34,530. Demo- 
cratic majority, 3,782. 

1856— Newell. Rep., 50.903; Alexander, Dem., 48,246. Re- 
publican majority, 2,657. 

1S59— Olden, Rep., 53,315; Wright, Dem., 51,714. Republican 
majority, 1,601. 



79,072. Demo- 

76,383. Demo- 

84,050. Demo- 

85,094; Hoxsey, 
, 1,439. Demo- 



NEWI JERSEY GUBERNATORIAL VOTE. 131 

1862— Parker, Dem., 61,307; Ward, Rep., 46,710. Democratic 
majority, 14,597. 

1855— Ward, Rep., 67,525; Runyon, Dem., 64,736. Repub- 
lican majority, 2,789. 

1868— Randolph, Dem., 83,619; Blair, Rep., 
cratic majority, 4,547. 

1871_Parker, Dem., 82,362; Walsh, Rep., 
cratic majority, 5,979. 

1874— Bedle, Dem., 97,283; Halsey, Rep., 
cratic majority, 13,233. 

1877— McClellan, Dem., 97,837; Newell, Rep., 
Greenback, 5,069; Bingham, Tax and Pro. 
(watic Plurality, 12,746. 

1880-Ludlow, Dem., 121,666; Potts, Rep., 121,015; Hoxsey, 
Greenback, 2,759; Ransom, Pro., 195. Democratic plu- 
rality, 651. 

1883-Abbett, Dem., 103,856; Dixon, Rep., 9^,047; Urner, 
Nat., 2,960; Parsons, Pro., 4,153. Democratic plurality, 6,809. 

1886-Green, Dem., 109,939; Howey, Rep., 101,919; Fiske, 
Pro., 19,808. Democratic plurality, 8,020. 

1889- Abbett, Dem., 138,245; Grubb, Rep., 123,992; La Monte, 
Pro., 6,853. Democratic plurality, 14,253. 

1892_Werts, Dem., 167,257; Kean, Jr., Rep., 159,362; Ken- 
nedy, Pro., 7,750; Keim, Soc.-Lab., 1,338; Bird, People's, 894. 
Democratic plurality, 7,625. 

1895-Griggs, Rep., 162,900; McGill, Dem., 136.000; Wilbur, 
Pro., 6,661; Ellis, People's, 1,901; Keim, Soc.-Lab., 4,147. Re- 
publican plurality, 26,900. 

1898— Voorhees, Rep., 164,051; Crane, Dem., 158,552; Lan- 
don. Pro., 6,893; Maguire, Soc.-Lab., 5.458; Sc irayshuen, 
People's, 49L Republican plurality, 5,499. 

1901-Murphy, Rep., 183,814; Seymour, Dem., 
Brown, Pro., 5,365; Vail. Soc, 3,489; Wilson, Soc. 
1,918. ts Republican plurality, 17,133. 

1904^Stokes, Rep.. 231,363; Black, Dem., 179,719; Parker, 
Pro., 6,687; Kearns, Soc, 8,858; Herrschaft, Soc.-Lab., 
2,526; Honnecker, People's Dem., 3.285. Republican plural- 
ity, 51,644. 

1907— Fort, Rep., 194,313; Katzenbach, Dem., 186,300; Mas- 
on, Pro., 5,255; KrafEt, Soc, 6,848; Butterworth, Soc.-Lab., 
1,568. Republican plurality, 8,013. 



166,681: 
Labor, 



132 NEW JERSEY CONGRESSMEN. 



NEW JERSEY CONGRESSMEN. 



FROM 1774 TO THK PRESENT TIME. 

CONTINENTAL CONGRESS. 

1774-5, James Kinsey; 1774-6, John Cooper, Stephfn Crane. 
John De Hart, Francis Hopkinson. William Livingston, 
Richard Smith. Richard Stockton; 1776-7, Jonathan D. Ser- 
geant; 177C-S, Abraham Clark. Jonathan Elmer; 1776-9. John 
Witherspoon; 1777-8, Elias Boudinot; 1777-9, Nathaniel Scud- 
der; 1778-9, Frederick Frelinghuysen, Elias Dayton; 1778, 
John Neilson; 1778-SO, John Fell; 1779. Thomas Henderson; 
1779-81, William Ch. Houston; 1780-1, William Burnett, Wil- 
liam Paterson; 1780-3, Abraham Clark; 1780-2, John Wither- 
spoon; 1781-3. William Paterson; 17S2-3, Frederick Freling- 
huysen; 1781-4, Silas Condict, Jonathan Elmer; 1783-5, John 
Beatty. Samuel Dick; 17S3-4, John Stevens. Sr. ; 1784-5. 
Charles Stewart, William Ch. Houston; 17S4-7. Lambert 
Cadwalader; 1785-6, John Cleaves Symmes, Josiah Horn- 
blower; 1786-7, James Schureman; 1786-8. Abraham Clark; 
1787, William Paterson; 17S7-S, Jonathan Elmer; 1787-9, Jona- 
than Dayton. 

FROM 1789 TO DATE. 

L 1789-91— Elias Boudinot, Burlington; Lambert Cadwal- 
ader, Hunterdon; James Schureman, Middlesex; Thomas 
Sinnickson, Salem. 

IL 1791-3— Elias Boudinot. Burlington; Abraham Clark, 
Essex; Jonathan Dayton, Essex; Aaron Kitchell, Morris; 
James Schureman, Middlesex. 

IIL 1793-5— John Beatty, Hunterdon; Elias Boudinot. 
Burlington; Lambert Cadwalader, Hunterdon: Jonathan 
Dayton, Essex; Abraham Clark, Essex (died 1794); Aaron 
Kitchell, Morris (to fill vacancy). 

IV. 1795-7— Jonathan Dayton (Speaker), Essex; Thomas 
Henderson, Monmouth; Aaron Kitchell, Essex; Isaac 
Smith, Hunterdon; Mark Thompson, Sussex. 

V. 1797-9— Jonathan Dayton (Speaker), Essex; James H. 
Imlay, Monmouth; James Schureman, Middlesex; Thomas 
Sinnickson, Salem; Mark Thompson. Sussex. 

VI. 1799-1801— John Condit, Essex; Franklin Davenport, 
Gloucester; Samuel H. Imlay, Monmouth; Aaron Kitchell, 
Morris; James Linn, Somerset. 



NEW JERSEY CONGRESSMEN. 133 

VII. 1801-3— John Condit, Essex; Ebenezer Elmer, Cum- 
berland; William Helms, Sussex; James Mott, Burlington; 
Henry Southard, Somerset. 

VIII. 1803-5— Ebenezer Elmer, Cumberland; William 
Helms, Sussex; James Mott, Burlington; James Sloan, 
Gloucester; Henry Southard, Somerset; Adam Boyd, Ber- 
gen. 

IX. 1805-7— Ebenezer Elmer, Cumberland; William 
Helms, Sussex; John I^ambert, Hunterdon; James Sloan, 
Gloucester; Henry Southard, Somerset; Ezra Darby, 
Essex. 

X. 1807-9— William Helms, Sussex; John Lambert, Hun- 
terdon; Thomas Newbold, Burlington; James Sloan, Glou- 
cester; Henry Southard, Somerset; Ezra Darby, Essex 
(until 1808); Adam Boyd, Bergen (from 1808-9). 

XI. 1809-11— Jam.es Cox, Monmouth (until 1810); William 
Helms, Sussex; Jacob Hufty, Cumberland; Thomas New- 
bold, Burlington; Henry Southard, Somerset; Adam Boyd, 
Bergen. 

XII. 1811-13— Adam Boyd, Bergen; Lewis Condict, Mor- 
ris; Jacob Hufty, Cumberland; George C. Maxwell, Hun- 
terdon; James Morgan, Middlesex; Thomas Newbold, Bur- 
lington. 

XIIL 1813-15— Lewis Condict, Morris; William Cox, Bur- 
lington; Richard Stockton, Somerset; Thomas Ward, Es- 
sex; James Schureman, Middlesex; Jacob Hufty, Cumber- 
land (until 1814); Thomas Binns, Essex (1814-15). 

XIV. 1815-17— Ezra Baker, Middlesex; Ephraim Bateman, 
Cumberland; Benjamin Bennett, Monmouth; Lewis Con- 
dict, Morris; Henry Southard, Somerset; Thomas Ward, 
Essex. 

XV. 1817-19— Ephraim Bateman, Cumberland; Benjamin 
Bennett, Monmouth; Joseph Bloomfield, Burlington; 
Charles Kinsey, Essex; John Linn, Sussex; Henry South- 
ard, Sussex. 

XVI. 1819-21— Ephraim Bateman, Cumberland; Joseph 
Bloomfield, Burlington; John Linn, Sussex; Barnard Smith, 
Middlesex; Henry Southard, Somerset; John Condit, Essex 
(until 1820); Thomas Binns, Essex (1820-1). 

XVn. 1821-3— George Cassady, Bergen; Lewis Condict, 
Morris; G. E. Holcombe, Monmouth; James Matlack, 
Gloucester; Ephraim Bateman, Cumberland, Samuel 
Swan, Somerset. 

XVIII. 1823-5— George Cassady, Bergen; Daniel Garrison, 
Salem; G. E. Holcombe, Monmouth; James Matlack, Glou- 
cester; Lewis Condict, Morris; Sam-« ■\ Swan, Somerset. 



i:!l NEW JERSEY CONGRESSMEN. 

XTX. 182b-7— George Cassady, Bergen; Lewis Condlct, 
Morris; Daniel Garrison, Salem; G. E. Holcomhe, Mon- 
mouth; Samuel Swan, Somerset; Ebenezer Tucker, Bur- 
lington. 

XX. 182^-9— Lewis Condlct, Essex; Isaac Plerson, Essex; 
Samuel Swan, Somerset; Ebenezer Tucker, Burlington; 
George E. Holcombe, Monmouth (until 1828); Hedge 
Thompson, Salem (until 1S2S); James Fitz Randolph, Mid- 
dlesex (1S2S-9): Thomas Sinnickson, Salem (1828-9). 

XXI. 1829-21— Richard M. Cooper, Gloucester, Lewis Con- 
diet, Morris; Thomas H. Hughes, Cape May; Isaac Pier- 
son, Essex; James Fitz Randolph, Middlesex; Samuel 
Swan, Somerset. 

XXIL 1831-3— Lewis Condlct, Morris; Richard M. Cooper, 
Gloucester; Thomas H. Hughes, Cape May; James Fitz 
Randolph, Middlesex; Isaac Southard, Somerset; Silas 
Condit, Essex. 

XXIII. 1S33-5— Philemon Dickerson (D.), Essex; Samuel 
Fowler (D.), Sussex; Thomas Lee (D.), Cumberland; 
James Parker (D.), Middlesex; Ferdinand S. Schenck (D.), 
Somerset; William N. Shinn (D.), Burlington, 
•XXIV. 1835-7— Philemon Dickerson (D.), Passaic (re- 
signed and elected Governor); Samuel Fowler (D.), Sus- 
sex; Thomas Lee (D.), Cumberland; James Parker (D.), 
Middlesex; Ferdinand S. Schenck (D.), Somerset; William 
N. Shinn (D.), Burlington; William Chetwood (D.), Essex 
(vacancy 1S36-7). 

XXV. 1S37-9— John B. Aycrigg (W.), Bergen; William 
Halstead (W.), Mercer; John P. B. Maxwell (W.), Warren; 
Joseph F. Randolph (W.), Monmouth; Charles C. Stratton 
(W.), Gloucester; Thomas Jones York (W.), Salem. 

XXVL 1839-41- William B. Cooper (D.), Gloucester; 
Philemon Dickerson (D.). Passaic; Joseph F. Randolph 
(W.), Monmouth; Daniel B. Ryall (D.), Monmouth; Joseph 
Kille (D.), Salem; Peter D. Vroom (D.), Somerset. 

XXVII. 1841-3— John B. Aycrigg (W.), Bergen; William 
Halstead (W.), Mercer; John P. B. Maxwell (W.), Warren; 
Joseph F. Randolph (W.), Monmouth; Charles C. Stratton 
(W.), Gloucester; Thomas Jones Yorke (W.), Salem. 

XXVIIL 1843-5— Lucius Q. C. Elmer (D.), Cumberland; 
George Sykes (D.), Burlington; Littleton Kirkpatrick (D.), 
Middlesex; Isaac G. Farlee (D.), Hunterdon; William 
Wright (W.), Essex. 

XXIX. 1845-7- James G. Hampton (W.), Cumberland; 
Samuel G. W^right (W.) (died 1845), Monmouth; George 
Sykes (D.), (vacancy), Burlington; John Runk (W.). Hun- 



NEW JERSEY CONGRESSMEN. 135 

terdon; Joseph E. Edsall (D.), Sussex; William Wright 
(W.), Essex. 

XXX. 1847-9 — James G. Hampton (W.), Cumber- 
land; William A. Newell (W.), Monmouth; John Van 
Dyke (W.), Middlesex; Joseph E. Edsall (D.), Sussex; 
Dudley S. Gregory (W.), Hudson. 

XXXI. 1849-51— Andrew K. Hay (W.), Cam»den; 
William A. Newell (W.), Monmouth; John Van Dyke 
(W,), Middlesex; Isaac Wildrick (D.), Warren; James 
G. King (W.), Hudson. 

XXXn. 1851-3— Nathan T. Stratton (D.), Glouces- 
ter; Charles Skelton (D.), Mercer; George H. Brown 
(W.>, Somerset; Isaac Wildrick (D), Warren; Rodman 
M. Price (D.), Essex. 

XXXIII. 1853-5— Nathan T. Stratton (D.), Glouces- 
ter; Charles Skelton (D.), Mercer; Samuel Lilly (D.), 
Hunterdon; George Vail (D.), Morris; A. C. M. Penn- 
ington (W.), Essex. 

XXXIV. 1855-7— Isaiah D. Clawson (R.), Salem; 
George R. Robbins (R.), Mercer; James Bishop (N. A.), 
Middlesex; George Vail (.D.), Morris; A. C. M. Penning- 
ton (R.), Essex, 

XXXV. 1857-9— Isaiah D. Clawson (R.), Salem; 
George R. Robbins (R.), Mercer; Garnet B. Adrain (D.), 
Middlesex; John Huyler (D.), Bergen; Jacob R. Wor- 
tendyke (D.), Hudson. 

XXXVI. 1859-61 — John T. Nixon (R.), Cumberland; 
John L. N. Stratton (R.), Burlington; Garnet B. Adrain 
(D.), Middlesex; Jetur R. Riggs (D.), Passaic; William 
Pennington (R.) (Speaker), Essex. 

XXXVII. 1861-3— John T. Nixon (R.), Cumberland; 
John L. N. Stratton (R.), Burlington; William G. Steele, 
(D.), Somerset; George T. Cobb (D.), Morris; Nehemiah 
Perry (D.), Essex. 

XXXVIII. 1863-5-HJohn F. Starr (R.), Camden; 
George Middleton (D.), Monmouth; William G. Steele 
(D.), Somerset; Andrew J. Rogers (D.), Sussex; Nehe- 
miah Perry (D.), Essex. 

• XXXIX. 1865-7— John F. Starr (R.), Camden; Will- 
iam A. Newell (R.), Monmouth; Charles Sitgreaves 
(D.), Warren; Andrew J. Rogers (D.), Sussex; Ed. R. 
V. Wright (D.), Hudson. 

XD. 1867-9 — William Moore (R.), Atlantic; Charles 
Haight (D.), Monmouth; Charles Sitgreaves (D.), War- 
ren; John Hill (R.), Morris; George A. Halsey (R.), 
Essex. 

XLI. 1869-71 — William Moore (R.), Atlantic; Charles 



136 NEW JERSEY CONGRESSMEN. 

Halght (D.), Monmouth; John T. Bird (D.), Hunterdon; 
John Hill (R.), Morris; Orestes Cleveland (D.), Hudson. 

XLH. 1871-3— John W. Hazleton (R.). Gloucester; Sam'l 
C. Forker (D.), Burlington; John T. Bird (D.), Hunterdon; 
John Hill (R.), Morris; George A. Halsey (R.). Essex. 

XLIH. 1S73-5— John W. Hazleton (R.), Gloucester; Sam- 
uel A. Dobbins (R.), Burlington; Amos Clark, Jr. (R.), 
Union; Robert Hamilton (D.), Sussex; William Walter 
Phelps (R.), Bergen; Marcus I... Ward (R.), Essex; Isaac 
W. Scudder (R.), Hudson. 

XLIV. 1875-7— Clement H. Sinnickson (R.). Salem; Sam- 
uel A. Dobbins (R.), Burlington; Miles Ross (U.), Middle- 
sex; Robert Hamilton (D.), Sussex; Augustus W. Cutler 
(D.), Morris; Frederick H. Teese (D.), Essex; Augustus A. 
Hardenbergh (D.), Hudson. 

XLV. 1877-9— Clement H. Sinnickson (R.), Salem; J, 
Howard Pugh (R.), Burlington; Miles Ross (D.), Middle- 
sex; Alvah A. Clark (D.), Somerset; Augustus W. Cutler 
(D.), Morris; Thomas B. Peddie (R.), Essex; Augustus A. 
Hardenbergh (D.), Hudson. 

XLVI. 1879-81— George M. Robeson (R.), Camden; Heze- 
kiah B. Smith (D.), Burlington; Miles Ross (D.), Middle- 
sex; Alvah A. Clark (D.), Somerset; Charles H. Voorhis 
(R.), Bergen; John L. Blake (R.), Essex; Lewis A. Brigham 
(R.), Hudson. 

XLVII. 1881-3— George M. Robesoh (R.), Camden; John 
Hart Brewer CR), Mercer; Miles Ross (D.), Middlesex; 
Henry S. Harris (D.), Warren; John Hill (R.). Mortis; 
Phineas Jones (R.), Essex; Augustus A. Hardenbergh (D.), 
Hudson. 

XLVTII. 1883-5— Thomas M. Ferrell (D.), Gloucester; 
John Hart Brewer (R.), Mercer; John Kean, Jr. (R.), 
Union; Benjamin F. Howey (R.), Warren; William Walter 
Phelps (R.), Bergen; William H. F. Fiedler ^D.), Essex; 
William McAdoo (D.), Hudson. 

XLIX. 18S5-7— George Hires (R.), Salem; James Bu- 
chanan (R.), Mercer; Robert S. Green (D.), Unicm; James 
N. Pidcock (D.), Hunterdon; William Walter Phelps (R.), 
Bergen; Herman Lehlbach (R.), Essex; William McAdoo 
(D.), Hudson. 

L. 1837-9— George Hires (R.), Salem; James Buchanan 
(R.), Mercer; John Kean, Jr. (R.), Union; James N. Pid- 
cock (D.), Hunterdon; W^illiam Walter Phelps (R.), Ber- 
gen; Herman Lehlbach (R.), Essex; William McAdoo (D.), 
Hudson. 

LJ. 1889-91— Christopher A. Bergen (R.), Camden; James 



NEW JERSEY CONGRESSMEN. 137 

Buchanan (R.), Mercer; Jacob A. Geissenhainer (D.), 
Monmouth; Samuel Fowler (D.), Sussex; Charles D, 
Beckwith (R.), Passaic; Herman Lehlbach (R.), Essex; 
William McAdoo (D. ), Hudson. 

LH. 1891-3— C. A. Berg-en (R.), Camden; James 
Buchanan (R.), Mercer; J. A. Geissenhainer (D.), Mon- 
mouth; Samuel Fowler (D.), Sussex; C. A. Cadmus 
(D.), Passaic; T. D. English (D.), Essex; *E. F. Mc- 
Donald (D.), Hudson. 

LHI. 1893-5— Henry C. Loudenslager (R.), Glouces- 
ter; John J. Gardner (R.), Atlantic; J. A. Geissenhainer 
(D.), Monmouth; Johnston Cornish (D.), Warren; C. A. 
Cadmus (D.), Passaic; T, D. English (D.), Essex; 
Georg-e B. Fielder (D.), Hudson; John T. Dunn (D.), 
Union. 

LIV. 1895-7 — Henry C. Loudenslager (R.), Glouces- 
ter; John J. Gardner (R.), Atlantic; Benjamin F. How- 
ell (R.), Middlesex; Mahlon Pitney (R.), Morris; James 
T. Stewart (R.), Passaic; R. Wayne Parker (R.), Es- 
sex; Thomas McEwan (R.), Hudson; Charles N. Fow- 
ler (R.), Union. 

LV. 1897-9 — Henry C. Loudenslager (R.), Glouces- 
ter; John J. Gardner (R.), Atlantic; Benjamin F. How- 
ell (R.), Middlesex; Mahlon Pitney (R.), Morris; James 
T. Stewart (R.), Passaic; R. Wayne Parker (R.), Es- 
sex; Thomas McEwan (R.), Hudson; Charles N. Fow- 
ler (R.), Union. 

L.VI. 1899— 1901— Henry C. Loudenslager (R.), Glou- 
cester; John J. Gardner (R.), Atlantic; Benjamin F. 
Howell (R.), Middlesex; Joshua S. Salmon (D.), Morris; 
James T. Stewart (R.), Passaic; R. Wayne Parker 
(R.), Essex; tWilliam D. Daly (D.), Hudson; Charles N. 
Fowler (R.), Union. 

LVn. 1901-3 — Henry C. Loudenslager (R.), Glou- 
cester; John J. Gardner (R.), Atlantic; Benjamin F. 
Howell (R.), Middlesex; $Joshua S. Salmon (D.), Mor- 
ris; James T. Stewart (R.), Passaic; R. Wayne Parker 



*Mr. McDonald died November 5th, 1892, and he was suc- 
ceeded by George B. Fielder. 

fMr. Daly died after the first session of this Congress, 
and Allan L. McDermott was elected to fill the unexpired 
term. 

JMr. Salmon died during the first session of this Con- 
gress, and DeWitt C. Flanagan (D.), was elected to fill 
the vacancy. 



138 NEW JERSEY CONGRESSMEN. 

(R.), Essex; Allan L. McDermott (D.), Hudson; Charles 
N. Fowler (R.), Union. 

LVIII. 1903-5 — Henry C. Loudenslager (R.), Glou- 
cester; John J. Gardner (R.), Atlantic; Benjamin F. 
Howell (R.), Middlesex; * William M. Lanning (R.i, 
Mercer; Charles N. Fowler (R.), Union; William 
Hughes (D.), Passaic; Richard Wayne Parker (R.), 
Essex; William H. Wiley (R.), Essex; Allan Benny 
(D.), Hudson; Allan L. McDermott (D.), Hudson. 

LIX. 1905-7— Henry C. Loudenslager (R.), Glou- 
cester; John J. Gardner (R.), Atlantic; Benjamin F. 
Howell (P.), Middlesex; Ira W. Wood (R.). Mercer; 
Charles N. Fowler (R.), Union; Henry C. Allen (R.), 
Passaic; Richard Wayne Parker (R.), Essex; William 
H. Wiley (R.). Essex; Marshall Van Winkle (R.), Hud- 
son; Allan L. McDermott (D.). Hudson. 

LX. 1907-9 — Henry C. Loudenslager (R.). Glouces- 
ter; John J. Gardner (R.), Atlantic; Benjamin F. How- 
ell (R.), Middlesex; Ira W. Wood (R.), Mercer; Charles 
N. Fowler (R.), Union; William Hughes (D.), Passaic; 
R. W"ayne Parker (R.), Essex; LeGage Pratt (D.), 
Essex; Eugene W. Leake (D.), Hudson; James A. 
Hamill (D.), Hudson. 

LXI. 1909-11 — Henry C Loudenslager (R.), Glou- 
cester; John J, Gardner (R.), Atlantic; Benjamin F. 
Howell (R.), Middlesex; Ira W. Wood (R.), Mercer; 
Charles N. Fowler (R.), Union; William Hughes (D.), 
Passaic; R. Wayne Parker (R.), Essex; William H. 
Wiley (R.), Essex; Eugene F. Kinkaid (D.), Hudson; 
James A. Hamill (D.), Hudson. 



♦Mr. Lanning resigned after the first session of this 
Congress, and Ira W, Wood (R.), was elected to the 
vacancy. 



THE JUDICIARY. 139 

THE JUDICIARY. 

(From 1704 to date.) 



CHANCELLORS. 
(Term, seven years — Salary, $11,000.) 
1845. Oliver S. Halsted; 1852. Benjamin Williamson; 1860. 
Henry W. Green; 1866, Abraham O. Zabriskie; 1873, Theo- 
dore Runyon; 1887, Alexander T. McGill; 1900. William J. 
Magie; 1908, Mahlon Pitney. 

CHIEF JUSTICES. 
(Term of office, seven years — Salary, $11,000.) 
1704, Roger Mompesson; 1709, Thomas Gordon; 1710, David 
Jamison; 1723, William Trent; 1724, Robert Lettis Hooper; 
1728, Thomas Farmer; 1738, Robert Hunter Morris; 1758. 
William Aynsley; 1764, Charles Read; 1764, Frederick 
Smyth; 1776, Richard Stockton (declined; 1776, John De 
Hart (declined); 1777, Robert Morris; 1779, David Brearley; 
1789. James Kinsey; 1803, Andrew Kirkpatrick; 1824, Charles 
Ewing; 1832, Joseph C. Hornblower; 1846, Henry W. Green; 
1853, Peter D. Vroom (declined); 1853. Alexander Wurts (de- 
clined); 1861, Edward W. Whelpley; 1864. Mercer Beasley; 
1897, William J. Magie; 1900, David A. Depue; 1901, William 
S. Gummere. 

ASSOCIATE JUSTICES OF THE SUPREME COURT. 
(Term of office, seven years — Salary $10,000 each.) 

1704, William Pinhorne; 1705, William Sandford; 1705, An- 
drew Bowne; 1706. Daniel Coxe; 1708. Thomas Revel; 1708. 
Daniel Leeds; 1710, Peter Sonmans; 1710, Hugh Huddy; 1711, 
Lewis Morris: 1711, Thomas Farmer; 1721, Peter Bard; 1734, 
Daniel Coxe; 1735, John Hamilton; 1739, Joseph Bonnel; 1739, 
John Allen; 1748, Samuel Nevil; 1749, Charles Read; 1754. 
Richard Salter; 1764. John Berrien; 1772, David Ogden; 1774, 
Richard Stockton; 1776. Samuel Tucker; 1776. Francis Hop- 
kinson (declined); 1777. Isaac Smith; 1777. John Cleves 
Symmes; 1788. John Chetwood; 1797, Andrew Kirkpatrick; 
1798, Elisha Boudinot; 1804. William S. Pennington; 1804, 
William Rossell; 1813. Mahlon Dickerson; 1815, Samuel L. 
Southard; 1820, Gabriel H. Ford; 1826, George K. Drake; 
1834. Thomas C. Ryerson; 1838, John Moore White; 1838. 
William L, Dayton; 1838. James S. Nevius; 1841. Daniel 
Elmer; 1841, Ira C. Whitehead; 1845. Thomas P. Carpenter; 
1845. Joseph F. Randolph; 1845. James S. Nevius; 1848. Elias 
B. D. Ogden; 1852. Lucius Q. C. Elmer; 1852. Stacy G. Potts; 
1852. Daniel Haines: 1855. Peter Vredenburgh; 1855. Martin 
Ryerson; 1855. Elias B. D. Ogden; 1858. Edward W. Whelp- 
ley; 1859, Daniel Haines; 1859, William S. Clawson; 1859, 



140 THE JUDICIARY. 

John Vandyke; 1861, George H. Brown; 1861, L. Q. C. Elmer; 
1862, Peter Vredenburgh; 1862, L. Q. C. Elmer; 1862, Ellas 
B. D. Ogden; 1865. Joseph D. Bedle; 1866, Vancleve Dalrlm- 
ple; 1866, George S. Woodhull; 1866, '73. '80, '87 and '94, David 
A. Depue; 1869, '76, '83. '90 and '97, Bennet Van Syckel; 1869, 
'76, '83 and '90, Edward W. Scudder; 1875, '82 and '89, Man- 
ning M. Knapp; 1875. '82, '89 '96 and '03, Jonathan Dixon; 1875, 
•82 and '89. Alfred Reed; 1880 and '87. Joel Parker; 1880, '87 
and '94, William J. Magie; 1888, '95 and '02, Charles G. Gar- 
rison; 1892, George T. Werts; 1893, Job H. Lippincott; 1893, 
Leon Abbett; 1895, William S. Gummere; 1895, George C. 
Ludlow; 1897, Gilbert Collins; 1900, John Franklin Fort; 

1900, Abram Q, Garretson; 1901, Charles E. Hendrickson; 

1901, Mahlon Pitney; 1903, Francis J. Swayze; 1904, Alfred 
Reed; 1906, Thomas W. Trenchard; 1907, Charles W. 
Parker; 1907, James J. Bergen; 1908, Willard P. Voor- 
hees, James F. Minturn. 

ATTORNEY-GENERALS. 
(Terra, five years— Salary, $7,000.) 
1704, Alexander Griffith; 1714. Thomas Gordon; 1719, Jere- 
miah Basse; 1723, James Alexander; 1728, Lawrence Smith; 
1733, Joseph Warrel; 1754. Cortland Skinner; 1776. William 
Paterson; 1783. Joseph Bloomfield; 1792. Aaron D. Woodruff; 
1811, Andrew S. Hunter; 1817, Theodore Frelinghuysen; 1829, 
Samuel L. Southard; 1833, John Moore White; 1838, Richard 
S. Field; 1841, George P. Mollesson; 1844. Richard P. Thomp- 
son; 1845, Abraham Browning; 1850, Lucius Q. C. Elmer; 
1852, Richard P. Thompson; 1857, William L. Dayton; 1861, 
F. T. Frelinghuysen; 1867, George M. Robeson; 1870, Robert 
Gilchrist; 1875, Joel Parker; 1875, Jacob Vanatta; 1877, John 
P. Stockton; 1897, Samuel H. Grey; 1902, Thomas N. McCar- 
ter; 1903, Robert H. McCarter; 1908, Edmund Wilson. 

CLERKS IN CHANCERY. 
(Term, five years— Salary, $6,000.) 
1831, Stacy G. Potts; 1840, Samuel R. Gummere; 1851, Dan- 
iel B. Bodine; 1856, William M. Babbitt; 1861, Barker Gum- 
mere; 1871, Henr>- S. Little; 1881, George S. Duryee; 1886, 
Allan L. McDermott; 1896, Lewis A. Thompson; 1901, Ed- 
ward C. Stokes; 1905, Vivian M. Lewis. 

CLERKS OF SUPREME COURT. 
(Term, five years— Salary. $6,000.) 
1776, Jonathan D. Sergeant (declined); 1776, Bowes Reed; 
1781, William C. Houston; 1788, Richard Howell; 1793, Jona- 
than Rhea; 1807, William Hyer; 1812, Garret D. Wall; 1817, 
Zachariah Rossell; 1842, Eli Morris; 1842, James Wilson; 
1852, William M. Force; 1857, Charles P. Smith; 1872, Benja- 
min F. Lee; 1897, William Riker, Jr. (term expires Novem- 
ber 2, 1912). 



STATE OFFICERS. 141 

STATE OFFICERS. 

(From 1776 to date.) 



SECRETARIES OF STATE. 
(Term, five years— Salary, $6,000.) 
1776, Charles Pettit (resigned October 7th, 1778); 1778, 
Bowes Reed; 1794, Samuel W. Stockton; 1795, John Beatty; 
1805, James Linn; 1820, Daniel Coleman; 1830, James D. 
Westcott; 1840, Charles G. McChesney; 1851, Thomas S. 
Allison; 1861, Whitfield S. Johnson; 1866, Horace N. Congar; 
1870, Henry C. Kelsey; 1897, George Wurts; 1902, Samuel D. 
Dickinson (term expires April 1, 1912). 

STATE TREASURERS. 
(Term, three years— Salary, $6,000.) 
1776, Richard Smith (resigned February 15th, 1777); 1777, 
John Stevens, Jr.; 1783, John Schureman (declined); 1783, 
James Mott; 1799, James Salter; 1803, Peter Gordon; 1821, 
Charles Parker; 1832, William Grant; 1833, Charles Parker; 
1836, Jacob Kline; 1837, Isaac Southard; 1843, Thomas Ar- 
rowsmith; 1845, Stacy A. Paxson; 1848, Samuel Mairs; 1851, 
Rescarrick M. Smith; 1865, David Naar; 1866, Howard Ivins; 
1868, William P. McMichael; 1871, Josephus Sooy, Jr.; 1875, 
Gershom Mott; 1876, George M. Wright; 1885, Jonathan H. 
Black well; 1885, John J. Toffey; 1891, George R. Gray; 1894, 
George B. Swain; 1902, Frank O. Briggs; 1907, Daniel 
S. Voorhees (term expires February 14, 1910). 

STATE COMPTROLLERS. 
(Term, three years— Salary, $6,000.) 
1865, William K. McDonald; 1871, Albert L. Runyon; 1877, 
Robert F. Stockton; 1880, Edward J. Anderson; .1891, Wil- 
liam C. Heppenheimer; 1894. William S. Hancock; 1902, J. 
Willard Morgan; 1908, Harry J. West (term expires 
February, 1911). 

ADJUTANT-GENERALS. 
(Salary, $2,500.) 
1776, William Bott; 1793, Anthony Walton White; 1803, 
John Morgan; 1804, Ebenezer Elmer; 1804, Peter Hunt; 1810, 
James J. Wilson; 1812, John Beatty; 1814, James J. Wilson; 
1814, Charles Gordon; 1816, Zachariah Rossell; 1842, Tnomas 
Cadwallader; 1858, Robert F, Stockton, Jr.; 1867, William S. 
Stryker; 1900, Alexander C. Oliphant; 1902, R. Heber Breint- 
nall. 



142 STATE OFFICERS. 

QUARTERMASTERS-GENERaL. 
(Salary, $2,500.) 

[The office of Quartermaster-General of New Jersey 
was established by an act of the Legislature, approved 
March 11, 1806.] 

1807-1814, Jonathan Rhea; 1814, Charles Gordon; 1814-1821, 
Ellet Tucker; 1821-3824, James J. Wilson; 1824-1837, Garret 
D. Wall; 1837-1855, Samuel R. Hamilton; 1855-1889 Lewis 
Perrine; 1890-1905, Richard A. Donnelly; 1905-C. Edward 
Murray. 

[General Lewis Perrine died in 1889 and the vacancy was 
filled by Adjutant-General Stryker until the appointment 
of General Donnelly. General Donnelly died February 
27, 1905.] 

STATE LIBRARIANS. 

(Term since 1878, five years— Salary, $3,000.) 

3822. William L. Prall; 1823 to '28, Charles Parker; 1829 to 
'33, William Boswell; 1833 to '36, Peter Forman; 1837 to '42, 
Charles C. Yard; 1843 to '45, Peter Forman; 1845 to '52' 
William D'Hart; 1852 to '53, Sylvester Vansickle; 1853 to 
•66, Charles J. Ihrie; 1S6G to '69, Clarence J. Mulford; 1869 
to '71, Jeremiah Dally; 1872 to '83, James S. McDanolds: 

1884 to '99, Morris R. Hamilton; 1899 to , Henry C 

Buchanan. 

STATE PRISON KEEPERS. 
(Term since 1876, five years. Salary, $3,500.) 



Crooks; 1811, Henry Bellerjeau; Francis La- 

baw; 1829, Ephraim Ryno; 1830. Thomas M. Perrine; 
1836, Joseph A. Yard; 1839, John Voorhees; 1841, Jacob 
B. Gaddis; 1843, Joseph A. Yard; 1845, Jacob B. Gaddis; 
1851, William B. Vanderveer; 1857, Robert P. Stoll; 
1862, T. V. D. Hoagland; 1863, Joseph B. Walker; 1866,' 
Peter P. Robinson; 1868, Joseph B. Walker; 1869, David 
D. Hennion; 1871, Robert H. Howell; 1873. Charles Wil- 
son; 1876, Gershom Mott; 1881, P. H. Laverty; 1883, 
John H. Patterson; 1896, Samuel S. Moore; 1902, George 
O. Osborne (term expires March 18, 1912). 



NEW JERSEY LEGISLATXJRES. 



143 



NEW JERSEY LEGISLATURES. 



Below is a record of the length of each 
of meeting and adjournment of, and the 
enacted by the various Legislatures since 



session, the date 
number of laws 
the adoption of 



the new ( 


:onstltutio 


Q in iott ; 






Laws 


Joint 
Resolu- 


Year. Meeting. 


Adjournment. 


Length. 


enacted. 


tions. 


1845— January 14, 

1846— " 13, 

1847— " 12. 

1848— " 11. 

1849— " 9, 

1850— " 8, 

1851— " 14, 

1852— " 13. 

1853— " 12. 

1854— '• 10. 

1855 — " 9. 


April 4, 
" 18, 

M'ch 5, 
" 9, 
2, 
" 8, 
" 19, 
" 30, 
" 11. 
" 17. 

April 6, 


12 Weeks. 
14 " 

8 " 

9 " 

8 " 

9 " 

10 " 

11 " 
9 " 

10 " 

13 " 


138 
114 
109 
136 
136 
123 
171 
213 
198 
223 
258 


7 

15 

13 

14 

12 

9 

3 

9 

12 

13 

5 


1856— 
1857— 
1858 — 


8, 
13, 
12, 


M'ch 14, 
" 21, 
" 18, 


10 
10 
10 


„ 


180 
223 
215 


11 
2 
8 


1859— 
1860— 
1861— 
1862— 
1863— 
1864— 
1865— 
1866— 
1867— 
1868— 
1869— 
1870 — 


11, 
10, 

8, 
14, 
13, 
12, 
10, 

9, 
18, 
14, 
12, 
11, 


" 23, 

" 22, 

" 15, 

•• 28, 

•' 25, 

April 14, 

6, 

6, 

" 12, 

" 17, 

2, 

M'ch 17, 


11 
11 
10 
11 
11 
14 
13 
13 
12 
14 
12 
10 




231 
270 
181 
194 
279 
446 
514 
487 
480 
566 
577 
532 


1 
6 
2 
5 
3 
7 
5 
6 
12 
11 
5 
6 
9 
10 
1 
1 


1871— 
1872— 
1873— 
1874 — ■ 


10, 

9, 

14, 

13, 


April 6, 
4, 
4, 

M'ch 27, 


13 
13 
12 
11 


" 


625 
603 
723 
534 


1875— 
1876— 


12, 
11, 


April 9, 
" 21, 


13 
15 


" 


439 
213 



6 




1877— 


9, 


M'ch 9. 


9 




156 



144 



NEW JERSEY LEGISLATURES. 















Joint 












Laws Re.solu- 


Tear. Meet 


ng. 


Adjournment 


Length. 


enacted. 


tions 


1878— January 8, 


April 


5, 


13 Week 


s. 267 


7 


1879 — 


14, 


M'ch 


14, 


9 


209 


3 


1880— 


13, 


" 


12, 


9 


224 


4 


1881— 


11, 


" 


25. 


11 


230 


10 


1882— 


10, 


" 


31, 


12 


190 


7 


1883— 


9, 


" 


23, 


11 


208 


6 


1884— 


8, 


April 


18, 


15 


225 


9 


1885— 


13, 


" 


4, 


12 


250 


4 


1886—* 


12, 


June 


2, 


15 


279 


3 


1887— t " 


11, 


April 


7,' 


13 


182 


3 


1888— 


10, 


M'ch 


30, 


12 


337 


11 


1889— 


8, 


April 


20, 


15 


297 


8 


1890— 


14, 


May 


23, 


19 


311 


3 


1891— 


13, 


M'ch 


20, 


10 


285 


6 


1892— 


12, 




11. 


9 


296 


1 


1893— 


10, 


" 


11. 


9 


292 


2 


1894 — t 


9. 


Oct. 


2, 


20 


354 


7 


1895—11 


8, 


June 


13, 


13 


434 


8 


1896— 


14, 


M'ch 


26, 


11 


219 


2 


1897— 


12, 


" 


31, 


12 


206 


1 


1898— 


11. 




25, 


11 


242 


2 


1899— 


10, 


" 


24, 


11 


219 


•3 


1900 — 


9, 


" 


23, 


11 


198 


3 


1901— 


8. 


" 


22, 


11 


210 


2 


1902— 


14, 


•• 


27, 


11 


279 


4 


1903— 


13, 


April 


2, 


12 


273 


3 


1904-^ 


12, 


M'ch 


25, 


11 


250 


10 


1905— 


10, 


•' 


30, 


12 


270 


5 


1906— 


9, 


April 


12, 


14 


331 


11 


1907— ft " 


8, 


Oct. 


12, 


40 


290 


8 


1908— 


14, 


April 


11, 


13 


322 


11 



♦After a session of 14 weeks the House took a recess on 
April loth till June 1st. The Senate continued in session, 
as a Court of Impeachment, till April 22d. when a recess 
was taken till June 1st. Up to the lime of taking the re- 
cess the Senate and House were in session together 14 
weeks, and the Senate, by itself, one week. 

fThe Ser.ate did not organize till February 1st. 

$0n May 26th a recess was taken until October 2d. when 
the Legislature re-assem.bled, and without transacting 
any busines-s adjourned sine die at 3.30 in the afternoon. 

llOn March 22d, a recess "was taken until June 4th, when 
the Le.gislature re-assembled, and, remaining in session 
two weeks, adjourned sine die on June 13th. 

ttThis Legislature was in continuous session 14 weeks, 
and on April 12 adjourned to June IS. Then there was an- 
other adjournment, and subsequently frequent recesses 
were taker until final adjournment. 



NEW JERSEY LEGIS'LATURES. 145 

POLITICAL COMPLEXION OF NEW JER- 
SEY'S LEGISLATURES. 

(From 1840 to date.) 



1840— Council, 13 Whigs; 5 Dems. House, 41 Whigs, 12 
Dems. 

1841— Council, 9 Whigs; 9 Dems. House, 35 Whigs; 
Dems. 

1842— Council, 10 Whigs; 8 Dems. House, 32 Whigs; 
Dems. 

1843— Council, 6 Whigs; 12 Dems. House, 23 Whigs; 
Dems. 

1848— Council, 13 Whigs; 6 Dems. House, 40 Whigs; 
Dems. 

1845— Senate, 12 Whigs; 7 Dems. House, 30 Whigs; 
Dems.; 1 Native American. 

1846— Senate, 12 Whigs; 7 Dems. House, 40 Whigs; 
Dems. 

1847— Senate, 12 Whigs; 7 Dems. House, 38 Whigs; 
Dems. 

1848— Senate, 12 Whigs; 7 Dems. House, 39 Whigs; 
Dems. 

1849— Senate, 10 Whigs; 9 Dems. House, 33 Whigs; 
Dems. 

1850— Senate, 9 Whigs; 11 Dems. House, 25 Whigs; 
Dems. 

1851— Senate, 10 Whigs; 10 Dems. House, 28 Whigs; 
Dems. 

1852— Senate, 13 Dems:; 7 Whigs. House, 45 Dems. 
Whigs. 

1853— Senate, 13 Dems.; 7 Whigs. House, 39 Dems. 
Whigs. 

1854— Senate, 13 Dems.; 7 Whigs. House, 40 Dems. 
Whigs. 

1855— Senate, 10 Dems.; 9 Whigs; 1 Native American. 
House, 29 Dems.; 25 Whigs; 6 Native American. 

185S— Senate, 11 Dems.; 5 Whigs; 4 Native American. 
House, 30 Dems.; 14 Whigs; 1 Ind. Dem. ; 15 Native Amer- 
ican. 

1857— Senate, 11 Dems.; 6 Whigs; 3 Know Nothings. 
House, 38 Dems.; combined opposition, 22. 

1858— Both Houses Democratic. 

1859— Senate, Democratic. House, Opposition. 

1860— Senate, Democratic. House, 30 Dems.; 28 Reps.; 2 
American. 

1861— Senate, Republican. House, Democratic. 

1862— Senate, Democrats and Republicans, tie; Independ- 
ent, 1. House. Democratic. Democratic majority on joint 
ballot, 3. 
10 



146 



NEW JERSEY LEGISLATURES. 



House, 
House. 



House, a 



35 



32 

37 

House, 32 



10 Democrats. House, 



1863-64— Both Houses Democratic. 

186j— Senate, Democratic. House, a tie. 

1866-67— Both Houses Republican. 

1868-69-70— Both Houses Democratic. 

187:.-72-73— Both Houses Republican. 

1874— Senate, 14 Republicans; 7 Democrats. 
Republicans; 28 Democrats. 

1875— Senate, 13 Republicans; 8 Democrats. 
Democrats; 19 Republicans. 

1876— Both Houses Republican. 

1877— Senate, 11 Democrats; 10 Republicans, 
tie. 

1878— Both House Democratic. 

1879-80-81— Both Houses Republican. 

1882— Senate, Republican. House, Democratic. 

1883— Senate, 12 Republicans; 9 Democrats. House, 
Democrats; 25 Republicans. 

1884— Senate, Republican. House, Democratic. 

1885— Both Houses Republican. 

1886— Both Houses Republican. 

1887— Senate, 12 Republicans; 9 Democrats. House, 
Democrat?, 26 Republicans; 2 Labor Democrats. 

1888— Senate, 12 Republicans; 9 Democrats. House, 
Republicans; 23 Democrats. 

1889— Senate. 11 Democrats; 10 Republicans. 
Democrats; 28 Republicans. 

1890— Senate, 11 Republicans; 
Democrats; 23 Republicans. 

1891— Senate, 14 Democrats; 
Democrats; 20 Republicans. 

1892— Senate, 16 Democrats; 
Democrats; 18 Republicans. 

1893— Senate, 16 Democrats; 
Democrats; 21 Republicans. 

1894— Senate, 11 Republicans; 
Republicans; 20 Democrats; 1 Ind. Dem. 

1895— Senate, 16 Republicans; 5 Democrats. 
Republicans; 6 Democrats. 

1896— Senate, 18 Republicans; 3 Democrats. 
Republicans; 16 Democrats; 1 Ind. Dem. 

1897— Senate, 18 Republicans; 3 Democrats. 
Republicans: 4 Democrats. 

1898-99— Senate, 14 Republicans; 7 Democrats. 
Republicans; 23 Democrats. 

1900— Senate, 14 Republicans; 7 Democrats. 
Republicans; 16 Democrats; 1 vacancy. 

1901— Senate, 17 Republicans; 4 Democrats. 
Republicans; 15 Democrats. 

1902— Senate, 17 Republicans; 
Republicans; 14 Democrats. 

1903-4— Senate, 14 Repubhcans; 
Republicans; 22 Democrats.D 

1905— Senate, 14 Republicans; 
Republicans; 14 Democrats. 

1906— Senate, 17 Republicans; 4 Democrats. House, 
Republicans; 1 Ind. Rep.; 3 Democrats. 

1907— vSenate, 15 Republicans; 6 Democrats. 
Democrats: 29 Republicans. 

1908— Senate, 14 Republicans; 7 Democrats. House, 
Republicans; 20 Democrats. 

1909— Senate, 13 Republicans; 
Republicans; 15 Democrats. 



Republicans. 
Republicans. 
Republicans. 



House, 
House, 
House. 



10 Democrats. House, 39 



House, 54 
House, 43 
House, 56 
House, 37 
House. 43 



House, 45 
4 Democrats. House, 46 
7 Democrats. House, 38 



Democrats. House, 



House, 



8 Democrats. House, 



LEGISLATIVE OFFICERS. 147 

VICE-PRESIDENTS OF COUNCIL AND 

SPEAKERS OF THE HOUSE 

OF ASSEMBLY. 

(From 1776 to 1844, when the new Constitution was formea.i 



VICE-PRESIDENTS. 

1776-81— John Stevens, Hunterdon. 
1782 —John Cox, Burlington. 
1783-84— Philemon Dickinson, Hunterdon. 
1785-88— Robert Lettis Hooper. Hunterdon. 
1789-92— Elisha Lawrence, Monmouth. 
1793-94— Thomas Henderson, Monmouth. 
1795 —Elisha Lawrence, Monmouth. 
1796-97— James Linn, Somerset. 
1798-1800— George Anderson, Burlington. 
1801-04— John Lambert, Hunterdon. 

1805 —Thomas Little, Monmouth. 

1806 —George Anderson, Burlington. 

1807 — Ebenezer Elmer, Cumberland. 

1808 —Ebenezer Seeley, Cumberland. 

1809 —Thomas Ward, Essex. 
1810-11— Charles Clark, Essex. 

1812 —James Schureman, Middlesex. 

1813 —Charles Clark, Essex. 
1814-15— William Kennedy, Sussex. 
1816-22— Jesse Upson, Morris. 
1823-25— Peter J. Stryker, Somerset. 

1826 — Ephraim Bateman, Cumberland. 

1827 —Silas Cook, Morris. 

1828 —Charles Newbold, Burlington. 
1829-30— Edward Condict, Morris. 
1831-32— Elias P. Seeley. Cumberland. 

1833 — Mahlon Dickerson, Morris. 

1834 —Jehu Patterson, Monmouth. 

1835 —Charles Sitgreaves, Warren. 

1836 — Jeptha B. Munn, Morris. 
1837-38— Andrew Parsons. Passaic. 
1839-40— Joseph Porter, Gloucester. 

1842 —John Cassedy. Bergen. 

1843 —William Chetwood, Essex. 

1844 —Jehu Patterson, Monmouth. 



148 LEGISLATIVE OFFICERS. 

SPEAKERS. 

1776-78— John Hart, Hunterdon. 

Second Session 1778— Caleb Camp, Essex. 

1779 —Caleb Camp, Essex. 

1780 — Josiah Hornblower, Essex. 

1781 —John Mehelm, Hunterdon. 
1782-83— Ephraim Harris. Cumberland. 
1784 —Daniel Hendrickson, Monmouth. 
1785-86— Benjamin Van Cleve, Hunterdon. 

1787 —Ephraim Harris. Cumberland. 

1788 —Benjamin Van Cleve, Hunterdon. 

1789 —John Beatty, Middlesex. 

1790 —Jonathan Dayton, Essex. 

1791 — Ebenezer Elmer, Cumberland. 
1792-94— Silas Condict, Morris. 

1795 —Ebenezer Elmer, Cumberland. 

1796 —James H. Imlay, Monmouth. 

1797 —Silas Condict, Morris. 
1798-1800— William Coxe, Burlington. 

1801 —Silas Dickerson, Sussex. 

1802 —William Coxe, Burlington. 

1803 —Peter Gordon, Hunterdon. 
1804-07— James Cox, Monmouth. 
1808-09— Lewis Condict, Morris. 
1810-11— William Kennedy, Sussex. 

1812 —William Pearson, Burlington. 

1813 —Ephraim Bateman, Cumberland. 
1814-1&— Samuel Pennington, Essex. 

1816 —Charles Clark, Essex. 

1817 —Ebenezer Elmer, Cumberland. 
1818-22— David Thompson. Jr., Morris. 

1823 —Lucius Q. C. Elmer, Cumberland. 

1824 —David Johnston, Hunterdon. 
1825-26— George K. Drake, Morris. 
1827-28— William B. Ewing, Cumberland. 
1829-31— Alexander Wurts, Hunterdon. 
1832 —John P. Jackson, Essex. 
1833-35— Daniel B. Ryall, Monmouth. 
1836 —Thomas G. Haight, Monmouth 
1837-38— Lewis Condict, Morris. 

1839 —William Stites, Essex. 
1840-41— John Emley, Burlington. 
1842 —Samuel B. Halsey, Morris. 
1843-44— Joseph Taylor, Cumberland. 



LEGISLATIVE OFFICERS. 149 



SENATE OFFICERS. 



PRESIDENTS. 



1845-48— John C. Smallwood. Gloucester. 
1849-50— Ephraim Marsh, Morris. 

1851 —Silas D. Canfield, Passaic. 

1852 — John Manners, Hunterdon. 
1853-56— W. C. Alexander, Mercer. 
1857-58— Henry V. Speer, Middlesex. 

1859 —Thomas R. Herring, Bergen. 

1860 — C. L. C. Gifford, Essex. 

1861 —Edmund Perry, Hunterdon. 

1862 —Joseph T. Crowell, Union. 

1863 —Anthony Reckless, Monmouth. 

1864 —Amos Robbins, Middlesex. 

1865 —Edward "W. Scudder, Mercer. 

1866 — James M. Scovel, Camden. 

1867 —Benjamin Buckley, Passaic. 
1868-69— Henry S. Little, Monmouth. 
1870 —Amos Robbins, Middlesex. 
1871-72— Edward Bettle, Camden. 
1873-75— John W. Taylor, Essex. 

1876 — W. J. Sewell. Camden. 

1877 —Leon Abbett, Hudson. 

1878 — G. C. Ludlow, Middlesex. 
1879-80-W. J. Sewell, Camden. 
1881-82— G. A. Hobart, Passaic. 

1883 —J. J. Gardner, Atlantic. 

1884 — B. A. Vail, Union. 

1885 —A. V. Schenck, Middlesex. 

1886 —John W. Griggs. Passaic. 

1887 —Frederick S. Fish, Essex. 

1888 —George H. Large, Hunterdon. 

1889 —George T. Werts, Morris. 

1890 — H. M. Nevius, Monmouth. 
1891-93— Robert Adrain, Middlesex. 

1894 —Maurice A. Rogers, Camden. 

1895 —Edward C. Stokes, Cumberland. 

1896 —Lewis A. Thompson, Somerset; Robert Williams, 

Passaic. 

1897 —Robert Williams, Passaic. 

1898 —Foster M. Voorhees, Union; William H. Skirm (pro 

tern.), Mercer. 

1899 —Charles A. Reed, Somerset. 



150 LEGISLATIVE OFFICERS. 

1900 —William M. Johnson. Bergen. 

1901 — Mahlon Pitney, Morris. 

1902 — C. Asa Francis, Monmouth. 

1903 —Elijah C. Hutchinson, Mercer. 

1904 —Edmund W. Wakelee, Bergen. 

1905 — •Josepn Cross. Union; •Wm. J. Bradley, Camden. 

1906 —William J. Bradley, Camden. 

1907 — Blcomfield H, Minch, Cumberland. 

1908 —Thomas J. Hillery, Morris. 

SECRETARIES. 

1845-47— Daniel Dodd, Jr., Essex. 
1848-50— Philip J. Gray. Camden. 
1851 —John Rogers. Burlington. 
1852-53— Samuel A. Allen, Salem. 
1854 —A. R. Throckmorton, Hudson. 
1855-56— A. R. Throckmorton, Monmouth. 
1857-58— A. B. Chamberlain, Hunterdon. 
1859-60— John C. Rafferty, Hunterdon. 
1861 —Joseph J. Sleeper, Burlington. 
1862-63— Morris R. Hamilton, Camden. 
1864-65— John H. Meeker, Essex. 
1866-67— Enoch R. Borden, Mercer. 
1868-69— Joseph B. Cornish, Warren. 
1870 —John C. Rafferty, Hunterdon. 
1871-74— John F. Babcock, Middlesex. 
1875-76— N. W. Voorhees, Hunterdon. 
1877-78— C. M. Jemison, Somerset. 
1879 — N. W. Voorhees, Hunterdon. 
1880-82— George Wurts, Passaic. 
1883-85— W. A. Stiles, Sussex. 
1886-88— Richard B. Reading, Hunterdon. 

1889 —John Carpenter, Jr., Hunterdon. 

1890 —Wilbur A. Mott, Essex. 
1891-92— John Carpenter, Jr., Hunterdon. 

1893 —Samuel C. Thompson, Warren. 

1894 —Wilbur A. Mott, Essex. 
1895-97— Henry B. Rollinson, Union. 
1898 —George A. Frey, Camden. 
1899-1900— Augustus S. Barber, Jr., Gloucester. 
1901-02-03-04— Walter E Edge, Atlantic. 
1905-06-07-08— Howard L. Tyler, Cumberland. 



•Joseph Cross resigned on March 30, and he was sul- 
ceeded by William J. Bradley. 



LEGISLATIVE OFFICERS. 151 

ASSEMBLY OFFICERS. 



SPEAKERS. 

1845 —Isaac Van Wagenen. Essex. 

1846 —Lewis Howell, Cumberland. 
1847-48— John W. C. Evans, Burlington. 

1849 — Edw. W. Whelpley, Morris. 

1850 —John T. Nixon, Cumberland. 

1851 —John H. Phillips, Mercer. 

1852 —John Huyler, Bergen. 

1853-54— John W. Fennimore, Burlington. 

1855 —William Parry, Burlington. 

1856 —Thomas W. Demarest, Bergen. 

1857 — Andrew Dutcher, Mercer. 

1858 —Daniel Holsman, Bergen. 

1859 —Edwin Salter, Ocean- 

1860 —Austin H. Patterson, Monmouth. 

1861 — F. H. Teese, Essex. 

1862 —Charles Haight, Monmouth. 

1863 —James T. Crowell. Middlesex. 

1864 —Joseph N. Taylor, Passaic. 

1865 —Joseph T. Crowell, Union. 

1866 —John Hill, Morris. 

1867 — G. W. N. Curtis, Camden. 

1868 —Aug. O. Evans, Hudson. 
1869-70— Leon Abbett, Hudson. 

1871 —Albert P. Condit, Essex. 

1872 —Nathaniel Niles, Morris. 

1873 —Isaac L. Fisher, Middlesex. 

1874 —Garret A. Hobart, Passaic. 

1875 —George O. Vanderbilt, Mercer. 

1876 —John D. Carscallen, Hudson. 

1877 —Rudolph F. Rabe, Hudson. 

1878 —John Eagan, Union. 

1879 —Schuyler B. Jackson, Essex. 

1880 —Sherman B. Oviatt, Monmouth. 

1881 —Harrison Van Duyne, Essex. 

1882 —John T. Dunn. Union. 

1883 —Thomas O'Connor, Essex. 

1884 —A. B. Stoney, Monmouth. 
1885-86— E. A. Armstrong, Camden. 

1887 —William M. Baird, Warren. 

1888 —Samuel D. Dickinson, Hudson. 

1889 —Robert S. Hudspeth, Hudson. 

1890 — W. C. Heppenheimer, Hudson. 
1891-92— James J. Bergen, Somerset. 
1893 —Thomas Flynn, Passaic. 



152 T^EGISLATIVE OFFICERS. 

1894 —John T. Holt,* Passaic; Joseph Cross,* Union. 

1895 —Joseph Cross, Union. 

1896 —Louis T. Derousse, Camden. 

1897 —George W. Macpherson, Mercer. 
1898-99— David O. Watkins, Gloucester. 
1900 —Benjamin F. Jones, Essex. 
1901-02— William J. Bradley, Camden. 
1903 —John G. Horner, Burlington. 
1904-05— John Boyd Avis, Gloucester. 

1906 —Samuel K. Bobbins, Burlington. 

1907 —Edgar E. Lethbridge. Essex. 

1908 —Frank B. Jess, Camden. 

CLERKS. 
184E —Alexander D. Cattell. Salem. 
1841 —Adam C. Davis, Hunterdon. 
1847-50— Alex. M. Gumming, Mercer. 
1851-52— David Naar, Essex. 
1853-54— David W. Dellicker, Somerset. 
1855 —Peter D. Vroom, Hudson. 
1856-57— WilHam Darmon, Gloucester. 

1858 -Daniel Blauvelt. Essex. 

1859 —John P. Harker, Camden. 

1860 — D. Blauvelt, Jr., Essex. 
1861-62— Jacob Sharp, Warren. 
1863-64— Levi Scoby, Monmouth. 
1865-66— George B. Cooper, Cumberland. 
1867 —Ed. Jardine, Bergen. 
1868-70— A. M. Johnston, Mercer. 

1871 —A. M. Gumming, Mercer. 

1872-74— Sinnickson Chew, Camden. 

1875 —Austin H. Patterson, Monmouth. 

1876-77— John Y, Foster, Essex. 

1878 —Austin H. Patterson, Monmouth. 

1879-81— C. O. Cooper, Morris. 

1882-83— Arthur Wilson, Monmouth. 

1884 —Henry D. Winton, Bergen, 

1885-86— Samuel Toombs, Essex, 

1887 —Joseph Atkinson, Essex. 

1888 —James P, Logan, Burlington. 
1889-90— John J. Matthews, Union. 
1891-92— Thos. F, Noonan, Jr., Hudson. 

1893 —Leonard Kalisch, Essex. 

1894 —J. Herbert Potts, Hudson. 
1895-97— James Parker, Passaic. 
1898-99— Thomas H. Jones, Essex. 
1900-06-08— James Parker, Passaic. 
1907 —Michael W. Higgins, Essex, 



•Speaker Holt resigned on May 26th, and Mr. Cross suc- 
ceeded him. 



STATE CENSUS. 153 

CENSUS OF NEW JERSEY, 1905. 



Population of New Jersey by Minor Civil Divisions, 
1905 and 1900. 

ATLANTIC COUNTY. 

1905. 1900. 

Absecon Town 616 530 

Atlantic City 37,593 27,838 

First Ward 7,518 

Second Ward 8,273 

Third Ward 9,600 

Fourth Ward 12,202 

Brigantine City 95 99 

Buena Vista Township 2,624 1,646 

Egg Harbor City 2,280 1,808 

Egg Harbor Township 1,468 1,863 

Galloway Township 1,876 2,469 

Hamilton Township 2,021 1,682 

Hammonton Town 4,334 3,481 

First District 2,017 

Second District 2,317 

Lin wood Borough 503 495 

Longport Borough 133 80 

Mullica Township 794 880 

Northfield City 688 

First District 373 

Second District 315 

Pleasantville Borough , 2,824 2,182 

Port Republic 451 

First District 215 

Second District 236 

Somers Point Borough 431 308 

First District 215 

Second District 216 

South Atlantic City Borough 115 69 

Ventnor City 116 

Weymouth Township 900 972 

59,862 46,402 

BERGEN COUNTY. 

Alpine Borough 448 

Allendale Borough 762 694 

Bergen Township 346 

Bergenfields Borough 1,095 729 

Bogota Borough 522 337 

Carlstadt Borough 3,100 2,574 

First District 1,867 

Second District 1,233 

Cliffslde Park Borough 2,128 968 

Closter Borough :... 1,272 

Cresskill Borough 505 486 

Delford Borough 841 746 

Demarest Borough 480 

Dumont Borough 913 643 

East Rutherford Borough 3,165 2,640 



154 STATE CENSUS. 

1905. 1900. 

Edgewater Borough 1,392 

Englewood City 7,922 6,253 

First Ward 1,900 

Second Ward 1,658 

Third Ward 2,585 

Fourth Ward 1,779 

Englewood Cliffs Borough 266 218 

Etna Borough 681 

Fairview Borough 1,693 1,003 

Fort Lee Borough 3,433 

Franklin Township 1,566 2,139 

Garfield Borough 5,092 3,504 

Glen Rock Borough 778 613 

Harrington Township 521 3,224 

Harrington Park Borough 283 

Hasbrouck Heights Borough 1,650 1,255 

Haworth Borough 400 

Hillsdale Township 945 891 

Hohokus Township 3,107 2,610 

Leonia Borough 1,041 804 

Little Ferry Borough 1,776 1,240 

Lodi Borough 2,793 1,917 

Lodi Township 1,061 448 

May wood Borough 687 536 

Midland Township 1,465 1,298 

Midland Park Borough 1,617 1.348 

Montvale Borough 502 416 

New Barbadoes Township coextensive 

with Hackensack Town 11,098 9,443 

First Ward 2,810 

Second Ward 2,697 

Third Ward 2,451 

Fourth Ward 2,078 

Fifth Ward 1,062 

North Arlington Borough 408 290 

Norwood Borough 432 

Oakland Borough 586 

Old Tappan Borough 280 269 

Orvil Township 752 1.207 

Orvil Borough 443 

Overpeck Township 2,850 1,987 

Palisades Township 1,042 860 

Palisades Park Borough 911 644 

Park Ridge Borough 1,189 870 

Ridgefield Borough 745 584 

Ridgewoood Township coextensive with 

Ridgewood Village 3,980 3,298 

Riverside Borough 670 561 

Ridgefield Township 2,612 

Rutherford Borough 5,218 4,411 

First District 2.538 

Second District 2,680 

Saddle River Borough 474 415 

Saddle River Township 2,048 1,954 

Teaneck Township 1,222 768 

Tenafly Borough 2,142 1,746 

Undercliff Borough 1.006 

Union Township 2,188 1,590 

Upper Saddle River Borough 324 326 



1905. 


1900. 


2,475 


1,812 


382 


782 


1,044 


828 


477 


329 


721 


582 



STATE CENSUS. 155 



Wallington Borough 

Washington Township 

Westwood Borough 

Woodcliff Borough 

Woodridge Borough 

100,003 78,441 

BURLINGTON COUNTY. 

Bass River Township 728 800 

Beverly City 2,258 1,950 

Beverly Township 2,181 1,804 

Bordentown City 4,073 4,110 

First District 1,675 

Second District 1,551 

Third District 847 

Bordentown Township 534 488 

Burlington City 8,038 7,392 

First Ward 1,706 

Second Ward 2,457 

Third Ward 2,099 

Fourth Ward 1,746 

Burlington Township 1,012 1,061 

Chester Township 4,849 4,420 

East District 2,117 

West District 2,732 

Chesterfield Township 1,141 1,143 

Cinnaminson Township 1,064 1,078 

Delran Township 1,340 890 

Easthampton Township 587 584 

Evesham Township 1,356 1,429 

Fieldsboro Borough 457 459 

Florence Township 1,967 1,955 

Lumberton Township 1,683 1,624 

Mansfield Township 1,493 1,518 

Medford Township 2,030 1,969 

Mount Laurel Township 1,671 1,644 

New Hanover Township 960 1,827 

North Hanover Township 747 

Northampton Township 5,509 5,168 

First District 1,854 

Second District 1,553 

Third District 2,102 

Palmyra Township 

Pemberton Borough 

Pemberton Township 

Riverside Township 

Riverton Borough 

Shamong Township 

Southampton Township 

Springfield Township 

Tabernacle 

Washington Township 

Westhampton Township 

Willingboro Township 

Woodland Township 

62,042 58,241 



2,643 


2,300 


821 


. 771 


1,706 


1,493 


3,301 


2,581 


1,557 


1,332 


508 


910 


1,860 


1,904 


1,323 


1,382 


462 




568 


617 


544 


567 


658 


673 


413 


398 



156 STATE CENSUS. 

CAMDEN COUNTY. ^ ^ 

^rd'eTcftr."^"..::;::::::::;:::::::::.:::. «3li 7^,935 

First Ward o-^;^ 

Second Ward ].439 

Third Ward 4.865 

Fourth Ward 4.»ol 

Fifth Ward ^.448 

Sixth Ward 8'i^^ 

Seventh Ward 1U61 

Eighth Ward 7.530 

Ninth Ward 7.157 

Tenth Ward 6.107 

Eleventh Ward ^•'%'^ 

Twelfth Ward 5.J77 

Center Township 2.651 Al^ 

Chesilhurst Borough ^^» ^*" 

Clementon Township ^'f^i . -„ 

Collingswood Borough ^.^e» f'X^ 

Delaware Township i.J'^ J'^^ 

Gloucester City ••••: »'05=» ''•"^ 

First Ward f-;^^ 

Second Ward 4.795 

Gloucester Township ^'f^ 

Haddor Township • ^'"^ 

Haddon Heights Borough ^ „ _» 

Haddonfield Borough ^''^ fi^ 

Mercnantville Borough 1.63^ ^'^ 

Oaklyn i^orough t^ 3 , .- 

Pens^iken Township ••••• 3,957 6,1^0 

First District f'?^' 

Second District l.^-i" .^^ 969 

Voorhees Township ^-"V^ 2 161 

Waterford Township ^'^ ^-iX, 

Winslow Township 2,^ ^"^^ 

Woodlynne Borough ^^ 

121.555 107.643 



First Ward 



950 



4,018 
2.012 



CAFE MAY COUNTY. 

Anglesea Borough 400 161 

Avalon Borough ^'^ .„ 

Cape May Point Borough 2 257 

Cape May City 3.006 A^J 

Dennis Township t'''' '"'egg 

Holly Beach Borough j'((' - ?2i 

Lower Township ^'t^ 2*191 

Middle Township ^'^ I'on^ 

Ocean City ^'^ ^'"^"^ 



340 



Second Ward 885 

Sea Isle City Borough *^^ "T', 

South Cape May Borough » . ^, 

Upper Township •• -^'^^^ ^'^ 

West Cape May Borough ^ J^ 

Wildwood Borough ^ -"~ 

Woodbine Borough ^'^°^ 

17,390 13.201 



STATE CENSUS. 157 

CUMBERLAND COUNTY. 

1905. 1900. 

Bridgeton City 13.624 13.913 

First Ward 2,402 

Second Ward 2.933 

Third Ward 3.420 

Fourth Ward 3.074 

Fifth Ward 1.795 

Commercial Township 2,476 2,982 

Deerfield Township 3,212 3,066 

Downe Township 1,664 1,833 

Fairfield Township 1,625 1,911 

Greenwich Township 1,122 1,283 

Hopewell Township 1,840 1,807 

Landis Township 5.351 4.721 

Lawrence Township 1.730 1,658 

Maurice River Township 2,134 2,132 

Millville City 11,884 10.583 

First Ward 3,737 

Second Ward 2,123 

Third Ward 3,391 

Fourth Ward 2.633 

Stowe Creek Township 855 934 

Vineland Borough 4,593 4,370 

52,110 51,193 

ESSEX COUNTY. 

Belleville Town 7,632 5,907 

Bloomfield Town 11,668 9,668 

First Ward 4,373 

Second Ward 3,278 

Third Ward 4,017 

Caldwell Borough 1.670 1.367 

Caldwell Township 1.644 1.619 

East Orange City 25.175 21,506 

First Ward 3,605 

Second Ward 5,054 

Third Ward 5,722 

Fourth Ward 4,112 

Fifth Ward 6,682 

Essex Fells Borough 393 

Glen Ridge Borough 2,362 1,960 

Irvington Town 7,180 5,255 

First Ward 2,048 

Second Ward 2,520 

Third Ward 2,612 

Livingston Township 1,407 1.412 

Milburn Township 3,182 2,837 

Montclair Town 16,370 13,962 

First Ward 4,976 

Second Ward 4,100 

Third Ward 3,704 

Fourth Ward 3,590 

Newark City 283,289 246,070 

First Ward 12,831 

Second Ward 13,647 

Third Ward 22,959 

Fourth Ward 11,455 

Fifth Ward 15.321 

Sixth Ward 25.760 



158 STATE CENSUS. 

1905. 1900. 

Seventh Ward 13.897 

Eighth Ward 15.307 

Ninth Ward 14,863 

Tenth Ward N 20,829 

Eleventh Ward 21,518 

Twelfth Ward 17,853 

Thirteenth Ward 29,390 

Fourteenth Ward 29,422 

Fifteenth Ward 18,237 

Clinton Twp. (now part of Newark) 1.325 

Vailsburg (now part of Newark) 2,779 

North Caldwell Borough 483 297 

Nutley Town (formerly Franklin Twp)... 4,556 3,682 

First Ward 1,384 

Second Ward 1.587 

Third Ward 1,585 

Orange City 26.101 24,141 

First Ward 6.685 

Second Ward 4,196 

Third Ward 5,658 

Fourth Ward 6,171 

Fifth Ward 3.391 

South Orange Township 1.946 1.630 

South Orange Village 4,932 4.608 

First District 2.493 

Second District 2,439 

Verona Township 2,576 2,139 

West Caldwell Borough 490 

West Orange Town 7,872 6,889 

409,928 359.053 
GLOUCESTER COUNTY. 

Clayton Borough 1,864 1,951 

Clayton Township ^ 38 

Deptford Township 2,234 2.114 

East Greenwich Township 1,299 1,323 

Elk Township 939 997 

Franklin Township 2.197 2.252 

Glassboro Township 2,607 2,677 

First District 1,422 

Second District 1,185 

Greenwich Township 754 2,252 

Harrison Township 1,624 1.569 

Logan Township 1,528 1,444 

Mantua Township 1,471 2,101 

Monroe Township 2,519 2,402 

National Park Borough 160 

Paulsboro Borough 2,269 

Pitman Borough 1,018 

South Harrison Township 680 706 

Swedesboro Borough 1,484 

Washington Township 1,336 1,252 

Wenonah Borough 569 498 

West Deptford Township 2,227 l,9ol 

Woodbury City 4.560 4,087 

First Ward 1,101 

Second Ward 2.051 

Third Ward 1,408 

Woolwich Township 1.138 2,291 

34,477 31,905 



STATE CENSUS. 159 

HUDSON COUNTY. 

1905. 1900, 

Bayonne City 42,262 32,722 

First Ward 6,955 

Second Ward 15,763 

Third Ward 8,713 

Fourth Ward 3,479 

Fifth Ward 7,352 

East Newarli Borough 2,828 2,500 

Guttenberg Town 4,563 3,825 

Harrison Town 12,823 10,596 

First Ward 2,687 

Second Ward 1,409 

Third Ward 3,454 

Fourth Ward 5,273 

Hoboken City 65,468 59,364 

First Ward 10,979 

Second Ward 8,736 

Third Ward 17,405 

Fourth Ward 15,814 

Fifth Ward 12,534 

Jersey City 232,699 206,433 

First Ward 21,359 

Second Ward 20,223 

Third Ward 18,039 

Fourth Ward 14,736 

Fifth Ward 16,625 

Sixth Ward 17,071 

Seventh Ward 16,988 

Eighth Ward 23,691 

Ninth Ward 17,428 

Tenth Ward 17,517 

Eleventh Ward 25,570 

Twelfth Ward 23,452 

Kearny Town 13,601 10,896 

First Ward 3,974 

Second Ward 3,455 

Third Ward 3,017 

Fourth Ward 3,155 

North Bergen Township 11,134 9,213 

Secaucus Borough 3,191 1,626 

Union Town 17,005 15,187 

First Ward 5,198 

Second Ward 4,871 

Third Ward 6,936 

Weehawken Township 8,027 5,325 

West Hoboken Town 29,082 23,094 

First Ward 9,121 

Second Ward 10.412 

Third Ward 9,542 

West New York Town 7,196 5,267 

First Ward 2,013 

Second Ward 1,963 

Third Ward 3.220 



449,879 386,048 



160 STATE CENSUS. 

HUNTERDON COUNTY. 

1905 1900 

Alexandria Township 1,007 1,045 

Bethlehem Township 1,594 1,634 

Clinton Borough 830 816 

Clinton Township 2,026 2.296 

Delaware Township 1,926 1,953 

East Amwell Township 1,256 1,327 

Franklin Township 1,105 1,258 

Frenchtown Borough 975 1,020 

High Bridge Borough 1,382 1,377 

Holland Township 1,528 1,652 

Junction Borough 974 998 

Kingwood Township 1,188 1,304 

Lambertville City 5,016 4,637 

First Ward 1,457 

Second Ward 1,464 

Third Ward 2,095 

Lebanon Township 1,983 2,253 

East District 1,006 

West District 977 

Raritan Township 3,861 4,037 

Readington Township 2,423 2,670 

North District 1,386 

South District 1,037 

Stockton Borough 588 590 

Tewksbury Township 1,815 1,883 

West District 928 

East District 887 

Union Township 

West Amwell Township 



MERCER COUNTY. 

East Windsor Township 

Ewing Township 

Hamilton Township 

North District 1,673 

South District 1,718 

West District 1,759 

Hightstown Borough 

Hopewell Borough 

Hopewell Township 

West District 1,061 

South District 1,108 

Central District 1,040 

Lawrence Township 

Pennington Borough 

Princeton Borough 

Princeton Township 

Trenton City 

First Ward 5,625 

Second Ward 4,419 

Third Ward 5,932 

Fourth Ward 8,966 

Fifth Ward 10,038 

Sixth Ward 3,610 

Seventh Ward 5.040 



858 


839 


33,258 


34,507 


863 
1,560 
5,150 


894 
1,333 
4,164 


2,083 

984 

3,209 


1,749 

980 

3,360 


2,043 

768 

6,029 

1,144 

84,180 


1,555 

733 

3,899 

955 

73.307 



STATE CENSUS. 161 

1905. 1900. 

Eighth Ward 4.459 

Ninth Ward 7,599 

Tenth Ward 7,321 

Eleventh Ward 8,837 

Twelfth Ward 3,663 

Thirteenth Ward 5,708 

Fourteenth Ward -2,963 

Washington Township 1,173 1,157 

West Windsor Township 1,320 1,279 



110,516 95,365 

MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 

Cranbury Township 1,465 1,428 

Dunellen Borough 1,517 1,239 

East Brunswick Township 2,025 2,423 

First District 1,098 

Second District 927 

Helmetta Borough 575 447 

Highland Park Borough 714 

Jamesbiirg Borough 1,350 1,063 

Madison Township 1,582 1,671 

Metuchen Borough 1,907 1,786 

Milltown Borough 1,210 561 

Monroe Township 2,023 1,899 

New Brunswick Township coextensive 
with New Brunswick City 23,133 20,006 

First Ward 4,082 

Second Ward 3,738 

Third Ward 3,719 

Fourth Ward 3,649 

Fifth Ward 4,408 

Sixth Ward 3,537 

North Brunswick Township 929 847 

Perth Amboy Township coextensive with 
Perth Amboy City 25,895 17,699 

First Ward 3,138 

Second Ward 2,633 

Third Ward 3.813 

Fourth Ward 5,570 

Fifth Ward 4,364 

Sixth Ward 6,377 

Piscataway Township 2.767 2,628 

Raritan Township 2,612 2,801 

Sayreville Township 4,779 4,155 

South Amboy Township coextensive with 
South Amboy Borough 6,258 6.349 

First Ward 2,272 

Second Ward 1,938 

Third Ward 2,048 

South Brunswick Township 2,489 2,337 

South River Borough 3,585 2,792 

Woodbridge Township 10.221 7.631 

First District 2,478 

Second District 3,210 

Third District 4,533 



97,036 79,762 



162 STATE CENSUS. 

MONMOUTH COUNTY. 

1905. 1900. 

Allenhurst Borough 247 165 

Allentown Borough 653 695 

Asbury Park City 4,526 . 4,148 

First Ward 2,006 

Second Ward 2,520 

Atlantic Township 1.355 1.410 

Atlantic Highlands Borough 1,480 1.383 

Avon Borough 322 

Belmar Borough 1.089 902 

Bradley Beach Borough 1.037 982 

Deal Borough 164 70 

Eatontown Township 2,874 3,021 

Englishtown Borough 416 410 

Farmingdale Borough 399 

Freehold Town 3.064 2,934 

Freehold Township 2,474 2.234 

Highlands Borough 1,275 1,228 

Holmdel Township 1.221 1,190 

Howell Township 2.585 3.103 

Keyport Town 3,385 3,413 

Long Branch Town 12,183 8,872 

First Ward 1,503 

Second Ward 2.625 

Third Ward 2,022 

Fourth Ward 2.398 

Fifth Ward 1.860 

Sixth Ward 1.775 

Manalapan Township 

Manasquan Borough 

Marlboro Township 

Matawan Borough 

Matawan Township 

Middletown Township 

Millstone Township 

Neptune Township 

First District 1,973 

Second District 2,100 

Third District 2,484 

Fourth District 2,800 

Neptune City Borough 

Ocean Township 

Raritan Township 

Red Bank Town 

Middle Division 2.190 

Western Division 2,367 

West Red Bank 1,706 

Seabright Borough 

Shrewsbury Township 

East District 3.332 

South District 2,070 

Spring Lake Borough 

North Spring Lake Borough (now part of 

Spring Lake) 

Upper Freehold Township 

Wall Township 

First District 2,012 

Second District 1,506 

87,919 82,057 



1.392 
1,636 
1.664 
1.479 
1.365 
5,600 
1.432 
9,357 


1,435 
1,500 
1,747 
1,511 
1,310 
5,479 
1.509 
7,943 


808 
1,574 
1,473 
6,263 


1.009 
4,251 
1,524 

5.428 


1,166 
5,402 


1,198 
3,842 


1,039 


526 


2.002 
3,518 


361 
2.112 
3,212 



STATE CENSUS. 163 

MORRIS COUNTY 

1905. 1900. 

Boonton Township 343 809 

East District 26 

West District 317 

Boonton Town 3,935 3,901 

East District 1,884 

West District 2,051 

Butler Borougli 2,188 

Ciiatliam Borougrh 1,554 1,361 

Chatham Township 629 620 

Chester Township 1,378 1,409 

Dover Township 6,353 5,938 

Florham Park Borough 803 752 

Hanover Township 5,294 5,366 

North District 821 

South District 2,939 

West District 1,534 

Jefferson Township 1,259 1,341 

First District 713 

Second District 546 

Madison Borough 

Mendham Township 

Morris Township 

Morristown Town 

First Ward 3,467 

Second Ward 3,515 

Third Ward 2,742 

Fourth Ward 2,422 

Mt. Arlington Borough 

Mt. Olive Township 

Montville Township 

Netcong Borough 

Passaic Township 

North District 990 

South District 1,173 

Pequanac Township 

Randolph Township 

Rockaway Borough 

Rockaway Township 

North District 2,364 

South District 969 

West District 1,820 

Roxbury Township 

Washington Township 

Wharton Borough (formerly Port Oram) 



OCEAN COUNTY. 

Bamegat City 

Bay Head Borough 

Beach Haven Borough 

Berkeley Township 

Brick Township 

East District 1,294 

West District 828 

Dover Township 

Eagleswood Township 

Harvey Cedars Borough 

Island Heights Borough 



4,115 
1,724 
2,650 
12,146 


3,754 

1,600 

2,571 

11,267 


250 
1,098 
1,650 
1,024 
2,163 


275 
1,221 
1,908 

941 
2,141 


1,674 
2,327 
1,585 
5,153 


3,250 
2,246 
1,483 
4,528 


2,323 
2,021 
2,285 


2,185 
2,220 
2,069 


67,934 


65,156 


78 

278 

301 

558 

2,122 


247 

239 

694 

2,130 


2,869 

534 

46 

250 


2,618 

563 

39 

316 



164 STATE CENSUS. 



Jackson Township 

Lacey Township 

Lakewood Township 

First District 2.436 

Second District 1,829 

Lavalette City 

Little Egg Harbor Township 

Long Beach Township 

Manchester Township 

Ocean Township 

Plumstead Township 

Point Pleasant Beach Borough 

Seaside Park Borough 

Stafford Township 

Surf City Borough 

Tuckerton Borough 

Union Township 



PASSAIC COUNTY. 



1905. 1900. 



1,534 


1.595 


653 


718 


4.265 


3.094 


22 


21 


517 


1,856 


73 


152 


785 


1.033 


409 


436 


1.241 


1.204 


978 


746 


92 


73 


994 


1.009 


36 


9 


1.332 




913 


955 



20.880 19.747 



Acquackanonk Township 7.187 5.351 

First District 4.636 

Second District 1.464 

Third District 1,087 

Hawthorne Borough 2.570 2,096 

Little Falls Township 3.079 2,908 

Manchester Township 2,277 3.989 

North Haledon Borough 697 

Passaic City 37.837 27,777 

First Ward 15.464 

Second Ward 4.798 

Third Ward 4.952 

Fourth Ward 12.623 

Paterson City 111,529 105.171 

First Ward 11,835 

Second Ward 15,707 

Third Ward 12.520 

Fourth Ward 14.606 

Fifth Ward 7,436 

Sixth Ward 4,194 

Seventh Ward 6.940 

Eighth Ward 8.455 

Ninth Ward 12.126 

Tenth Ward 9,887 

Eleventh Ward 7.826 

Pompton Township 2.981 2.404 

Pompton Lakes Borough 1,013 847 

Prospect Park Borough 1,911 

Totowa Bofough 738 562 

Wayne Township 2,017 1,985 

West Milford Township 2,022 2,112 



175,858 155.202 



STATE CENSUS. 



165 



SALEM COUNTY. 

1905. 

Alloway Township 1,562 

Elmer Borough 1,219 

Elsinboro Township 398 

Lower Alloways Creek Township 1,220 

Lower Penns Neck Township : . , 1,327 

Manning-ton Township 1,652 

Oldmans Township 1,374 

PennsgTove Borough 2,062 

PilesgTove Township 1,726 

Pittsgrove Township 2,154 

Quinton Township 1,135 

Salem City 6,443 

East Ward 3.555 

West Ward 2,888 

Upper Penns Neck Township 793 

Upper Pittsgrove Township 1,722 

Woodstown Borough 1,500 

26,278 
SOMERSET COUNTY. 

Bedminster Township 2,246 

Bernards Township 4,514 

Branchburg Township 979 

Bridgewater Township (exclusive of 

Bound Brook Borough 9,896 

Somerville 4,782 4,843 

Raritan 3,954 3,244 

Martinsville 435 

Portion of Township 725 1,601 

Bound Brook Borough 3,389 

Franklin Township 3,577 

South Bound Brook 939 883 

East Millstone 333 447 

Portion of Township 2,305 2,398 

Hillsboro Township 2,247 

Millstone Borough 156 

Montgomery Township 1,504 

North Plainfield Borough 5,616 

First District 2,608 

Second District 3,008 

North Plainfield Township 693 

Rocky Hill Borough 479 

Warren Township 974 

36,270 
SUSSEX COUNTY. 

Andover Borough 427 

Andover Township 478 

Branchville Borough 591 

Byram Township 426 

Frankford Township 998 

Fredon Township 462 

Green Township 500 

Hopatcong Borough (formerly Brooklyn) 125 

Hampton Township 623 

Hardyston Township 3,434 

Lafayette Township 619 

Montague Township 661 

Newton Town 4,422 



1900. 
1,528 
1,140 
445 
1,242 
1,424 
1,745 
1,382 
1,826 
1,744 
2,092 
1,280 
5,811 



775 
1,725 
1,371 

25,530 



1,925 
3,066 
1,012 



2,622 
3,728 



2,439 

200 

1,243 

5,009 



654 
354 

1,008 

32,948 



987 

526 

1,235 

932 

627 
75 

775 
3,425 

717 

710 
4.376 



166 STATE CENSUS. 

1905 1900 

Sandyston Township 872 939 

Stanhope Borough 887 

Sparta Township ] 1 6I3 2 070 

Stillwater Township , 'glS ijog 

Sussex Borough (formerly Dec«.ertown). . 1,318 1.'306 

Vernon Township 1649 1733 

Walpack Township ' '325 '371 

Wantage Township 2.080 2,217 

,_„ 23.325 24.134 

UNION COUNTY. 

Clark Township 387 374 

Cranford Township .' 3 600 2 8.S4 

First District 1696 

Second District 1*904 

Elizabeth City ;... 60.509 52.130 

First Ward 6 563 

Second Ward 4617 

Third Ward 7*937 

Fourth Ward 4264 

Fifth Ward 5591 

Sixth Ward 4444 

(Seventh Ward 5*359 

Eighth Ward 4 872 

Ninth Ward 4*348 

Tenth Ward 3*718 

Eleventh Ward 4*003 

Twelfth Ward 4.793 

Fan wood Borough *. ... 445 399 

Fanwood Township .''.' 1,341 j 20O 

Garwood Borough " '554 

Linden Borough 403 402 

Linden Township 1096 619 

Mountainside Borough '314 357 

New Providence Borough 754 565 

New Providence Township 456 469 

Plalnfleld City 18.468 15.369 

First Ward 3,566 

Second Ward 4 291 

Third Ward 3'695 

Fourth Ward 6,926 

Rahway City 8,649 7,935 

First Ward 1.856 

Second Ward 1,701 

Third Ward 2,010 

Fourth Ward 1,952 

Fifth Ward 1,130 

Roselle Borough 2 142 1652 

Roselle Park Borough 2 236 

Springfield Township 1,123 1073 

Suinmlt City 6,845 5.'302 

First Ward 3,439 

Second Ward 3,406 

Union Township 2 614 4 315 

Westfleld Town 5 265 4328 

First Ward 1,769 

Second Ward 743 

Third Ward 1.444 

Fourth Ward 1,309 

117,211 99.353 



STATE CENSUS. 



167 



WARREN COUNTY. 

1905. 

Allamuchy Township 571 

Belvidere Town 1,869 

Blalrstown Township 1,537 

Franklin Township 1,309 

Prelinghuysen Township 728 

Greenwich Township 854 

Haclcettstown Town 2,594 

Hardwick Township 370 

Harmony Township 1,086 

Hope Township 1,025 

Independence Township 835 

Knowlton Township 1,222 

Lopatcong Township 695 

Mansfield Township 1,234 

Oxford Township 2,964 

First District 1,364 

Second District 1,600 

Pahaquarry Township 230 

Phillipsburg Town 13,352 

First Ward 2,664 

Second Ward 2,411 

Third Ward 2,185 

Fourth Ward 1,912 

Fifth Ward 2,244 

Sixth Ward 1,936 

Pohatcong- Township 3,408 

Washington Borough 3,431 

Washington Township 1,089 

40,403 



1900. 

588 
1,784 
1,576 
1,280 

797 

909 
2,474 

400 
1,080 
1,144 

805 
1,210 
1,962 
1,324 
3,095 



257 
10.052 



2,215 
3,580 
1,249 

37,781 



Population by Counties. 

1905 

Atlantic 59,862 

Bergen 100,003 

Burlington 62,042 

Camden 121,555 

Cape May 17,390 

Cumberland 52,110 

Essex 409,928 

Gloucester 34,477 

Hudson 449,879 

Hunterdon 33,258 

Mercer 110,516 

Middlesex 97,036 

Monmouth 87,919 

Morris 67,934 

Ocean 20,880 

Passaic 175,858 

Salem 26,278 

Somerset 36,270 

Sussex 23,325 

Union 117,211 

Warren 40,403 



1900. 
46,402 
78,441 
58,241 

107,643 
13,201 
51,193 

359,053 
31,905 

386,048 
34,507 
95,365 
79,762 
82,057 
65,156 
19,747 

155,202 
25,530 
32,948 
24,134 
99,353 
37,781 



Increase. 
13,460 
21,562 

3,801 
13,912 

4,189 

917 

50,875 

2,572 
63,831 
♦1,249 
15,151 
17,274 

5,862 

2,778 

1,133 

20,656 

757 

3.322 

•809 

17,858 

2,622 



♦Decrease. 

Net increase, 260.474. 



2,144,134 1, 



STATE CENSUS 



POPULATION BY COUNTIES, 
SINCE 1790. 







1790. 


1800. 


1810. 


1820. 


1830. 


1840. 


Atlantic 










8726 


Bergen 




12601 


15156 


16603 


18178 


22414 


13190 


Burlington ., 

Camden 

Cape May.. 




18095 


21521 


24979 


28822 


31107 


32809 





2571 


3066 


3632 


'4265 


'4945 


5324 


Cumberland 




8248 


9529 


12670 


12668 


14091 


14322 


Essex 




17785 


22269 


25894 


30793 


41928 


44512 


Gloucester .. 




13363 


16115 


19744 


23089 


28431 


25509 


Hudson 














9451 


Hunterdon .. 




20253 


21261 


24553 


28604 


31066 


24661 


Mercer 














21498 


Middlesex .. 




15956 


17890 


20381 


21470 


23157 


21873 


Monmouth .. 




16918 


19872 


22150 


25038 


29233 


32912 


Morris 




16216 


17750 


21828 


21368 


23580 


25777 


Ocean 
















Passaic 














16704 


Salem 




10437 


11371 


12761 


14022 


14155 


16012 


Somerset 




12296 


12815 


14728 


16506 


17689 


17457 


Sussex 




19500 


22534 


25549 


32752 


20349 


27773 


Union 
















Warren 













18634 


20342 


Total 




184239 


211149 


245562 


277575 


320779 


372859 




1850. 


1860. 


1870. 

14163 


1880. 


1890. 


1900. 


1905. 


Atlantic 


,. 8964 


11835 


18704 


28836 


46402 


59862 


Bergen 


. 14708 


21618 


31033 


3678G 


47226 


78441 


100003 


Burlington .. 


. 43204 


49370 


53774 


55402 


58528 


58241 


62042 


Camden 


. 25569 


34457 


46206 


62942 


87687 


107643 


121555 


Cape May 


. 6432 


7130 


8529 


9768 


11268 


13201 


17390 


Cumberland 


.. 17003 


22605 


34688 


37687 


45438 


51193 


52110 


Essex 


. 73995 


98875 


143907 


189929 


256698 


359053 


409928 


Gloucester .. 


. 14653 


1S444 


21727 


25886 


28649 


31905 


34477 


Hudson 


. 21874 


62717 


129288 


187994 


275126 


386048 


449879 


Hunterdon .. 


. 29064 


33654 


36961 


38570 


35355 


34507 


33258 


Mercer 


. 27991 


37411 


46470 


58061 


79978 


95365 


110516 


Middlesex .. 


. 28671 


34810 


45057 


52286 


61754 


79762 


97036 


Monmouth .. 


,. 30234 


39345 


46316 


55538 


69128 


82057 


87919 


Morris 


. 30173 


34679 


43161 


50861 


54101 


65156 


67934 


Ocean 


. 10043 


11176 


12658 


14455 


15974 


19747 


20880 


Passaic 


. 22577 


29013 


46468 


68860 


105046 


155202 


175858 


Salem 


. 19500 


22458 


23951 


24579 


25151 


25530 


26278 


Somerset 


. 19668 


22057 


23514 


27162 


28311 


32948 


36270 


Sussex 


. 22990 


23845 


23168 


23539 


22259 


24134 


23325 


Union 




27780 


41891 


55571 


72467 


99353 


117211 


Warren 


. 22390 


28834 


34419 


36589 


36553 


37781 


40403 


Total 


.489703 


672073 


907149 1131116 1444933 1883669 2144134 



STATE CENSUS. 169 

Population of the Incorporated Cities, Towns, Villag;es 
and Boroug^hs of New Jersey. 

1905. 1900. 1890. 

Absecon town 616 530 501 

Allendale borough 762 694 

Allenhurst borough 247 165 

Allentown borough 653 695 

Alpine borough 448 

Andover borough 427 

Anglesea borough 400 161 161 

Asbury Park city 4,526 4,148 

Atlantic City 37,593 27,838 13,055 

Atlantic Highlands borough 1,480 1,383 945 

Audubon borough 525 

Avon borough 322 

Avalon borough 86 93 

Barnegat city 78 

Bay Head borough 278 247 

Bayonne city 42,262 32,722 19,033 

Beach Haven borough 301 239 

Belmar borough 1,089 902 

Belleville town 7,632 5,907 3,487 

Belvidere town 1,869 1,784 1,768 

Bergenflelds borough 1,095 729 

Beverly city 2,258 1,950 1,957 

Bloomfield town 11,668 9,668 7,708 

Bogota borough 522 337 

Boonton town 3,935 3,901 2,981 

Bordentown city 4,073 4,110 4,232 

Bound Brook borough 3,389 2,622 1,462 

Bradley Beach borough 1,037 982 

Branchville borough 591 526 

Bridgeton city 13,624 13,913 11,424 

Brigantine city 95 99 

Burlington city 8,038 7,392 7,264 

Butler borough 2,188 

Caldwell borough 1,670 1,367 

Camden city 83,363 75,935 58,313 

Cape May city 3,006 2,257 2,136 

Carlstadt borough 3.100 2,574 1,549 

Chatham borough 1,554 1,363 780 

Chesilhurst borough 258 283 

Clayton borough 1,864 1,951 1,807 

Cliffside Park borough 2,128 968 

Clinton borough 830 816 913 

Closter borough 1,272 

Collingswood borough 2,538 1,633 539 

Creskill borough 505 486 527 

Deal borough 164 70 

Delford borough 841 746 

Demarest borough 480 

Dover town 6,353 5,938 

Dumont borough 913 643 

Dunellen borough 1,517 1,239 1,060 

East Millstone 333 447 

East Newark borough 2,828 2,500 

East Orange city 25,175 21,506 13,282 

East Rutherford borough 3,165 2.640 1.438 



1.808 


1.4^9 


52,130 


37.764 


1.140 


842 


6,253 


... 


218 




410 


444 



170 STATE CENSUS. 

1905. 1900. 1890. 

Edgewater borough 1,392 

Egg Harbor city 2,280 

Elizabeth city 60.509 

Elmer borough 1,219 

Englewood city 7,922 

Englewood Cliffs borough 266 

Englishtown borough 416 

Essex Fells borough 393 

Etna borough 681 

Fairview borough 1,693 1,003 

Fan wood borough 445 399 

Farmingdale borough 399 

Fieldsboro borough 457 459 

Florham Park borough 803 752 

Fort Lee borough 3.433 

Freehold town 3,064 2,934 2,932 

Frenchtown borough 975 1,020 1,023 

Garfield borough 5,092 3,504 1,028 

Garwood borough 564 

Glen Rock borough 778 613 

Glen Ridge borough 2,362 1,960 

Gloucester city 8,055 6,840 6,564 

Guttenberg town 4,563 3,825 1,947 

Hackensack town 11,098 9,443 6,004 

Hackettstown town 2,594 2.474 2,417 

Haddonfleld borough 3,466 2,776 2,502 

Haddon Heights borough 654 

Hammonton town 4.334 3,481 3,833 

Harrington Park borough 283 

Harrison town 12,823 10,596 8,338 

Harvey Cedars borough 46 

Hasbrouck Heights borough 1,650 

Ha worth borough 400 

Hawthorne borough 2,570 

Helmetta borough 575 

High Bridge borough 1,382 

Highlands borough 1,275 

Highland Park borough 714 

Hightstown borough 2,083 

Hoboken city 65,468 

Holly Beach borough 1,327 

Hopewell borough 984 

Hopatcong borough (formerly 

Brooklyn) 125 

Irvington town 7,180 

Island Heights borough 250 

Jamesburg borough 1,350 

Jersey City 232,699 

Junction borough 974 

Kearny town 13.601 

Keyport town 3,385 

Lambertville city 5,016 

Lavalette city 22 

Leonia borough 1,041 

Linden borough 403 

Linwood borough 503 

Little Ferry borough 1,776 

Lodi borough 2,793 

Long Branch town 12,183 



3,'48i 


10,596 

39 

1,255 


2,'696 

447 

1.377 

1,228 



1.749 


1,875 


59,364 


43,648 


569 


217 


980 


... 


75 




5,255 




316 


271 


1.063 


887 


206,433 


163.003 


998 


518 


10,896 




3.413 


3,4ii 


4,637 


4,142 


21 




804 




402 


936 


495 


536 


1.240 


781 


1,917 


998 


8,872 


7.231 



STATE CENSUS. 

1905. 

Longport borough 133 

Madison borough 4,115 

Manasquan borough , 1,636 

Martinsville 435 

Matawan borough 1,479 

Maywood borough 687 

Merchantville borough 1,632 

Metuchen borough 1,907 

Midland Park borough 1,617 

Millstone Borough 156 

Milltown borough 1,210 

Millville city 11,884 

Montclair town 16,370 

Montvale borough 502 

Morristown town 12,146 

Mountainside borough 314 

Mt. Arlington borough 250 

National Park borough 160 

Neptune City borough 808 

Netcong borough 1,024 

Newark city 283,289 

New Brunswick city 23,133 

New Providence borough 754 

Newton town 4,422 

North Arlington borough 408 

North Caldwell borough 483 

North Haledon borough 697 

North Plainfield borough 5,616 

Northfield city 688 

Norwood borough 432 

Nutley town 4,556 

Oakland borough 586 

Oaklyn borough 454 

Ocean City 1,835 

Old Tappan borough 280 

Orange city 26,101 

Orvil borough 443 

Palisades Park borough 911 

Park Ridge borough 1,189 

Passaic city 37,837 

Paterson city 111,529 

Paulsboro borough 2,269 

Pemberton borough 821 

Pennington borough 768 

Pennsgrove borough 2,062 

Perth Amboy city 25,895 

Phillipsburg town 13,352 

Pitman borough 1,018 

Plainfield city 18,468 

Pleasantville borough 2,824 

Point Pleasant borough 978 

Pompton Lakes borough 1,013 

Port Republic city 451 

Princeton borough 6,029 

Prospect Park borough 1,911 

Rahway city 8,649 

Raritan town 3,954 

Red Bank town 6,263 

Ridgefleld borough 745 





171 


1900. 


1890. 


80 




3,754 


2,469 


1,500 


1,506 


1,511 


1,491 


536 




1,608 


1,225 


1,786 


770 


1,348 


... 


200 


... 


561 




10,583 


10,002 


13,962 


8,656 


416 





11,267 


8,156 


367 





275 




1,009 





941 




246,070 


181,830 


20,006 


18,603 


565 


.. 


4,376 


3,003 


290 




297 





5,009 





i'M 


"452 


269 




24,141 


18,884 


644 





870 




27,777 


13,028 


105,171 


78,347 


771 


834 


733 


588 


1,826 




17,699 


9,512 


10,052 


8,644 


15,369 


11,267 


2,182 


2,824 


746 





847 





3,899 


3,422 


7,935 


7,'i65 


3,244 


2,556 


5,428 


4,145 


584 





172 STATE CENSUS. 

1905. 

Rldgewood village 3,980 

Riverside borough 670 

Rlverton borough 1,557 

Rockaway borough 1,585 

Rocky Hill borough 479 

Roselle borough 2,142 

Roselle Park borough 2,236 

Rutherford borough 5,218 

Saddle River borough 474 

Salem city 6.443 

Seabright borough 1,166 

Sea Isle City borough 432 

Seaside Park borough 92 

Secaucus borough 3,191 

Somers Point borough 431 

Somerville town 4,782 

South Amboy borough 6,258 

South Atlantic City borough 115 

South Cape May borough 5 

South Orange village 4,932 

South River borough 3,585 

Spring Lake borough 1,039 

Stanhope borough 887 

Stockton borough 588 

Summit city 6,845 

Surf City borough 36 

Sussex borough (formerly Deck- 

ertown) 1.318 

Sweedesboro borough 1,484 

Tenafly borough 2,142 

Totowa borough 738 

Trenton city 84.180 

Tuckerton borough 1,332 

Union town 17,005 

Upper Saddle River borough 324 

Ventnor city 116 

Vineland borough 4,593 

Wallington borough 2,475 

Washington borough 3.431 

Wenonah borough 569 

West Caldwell borough 490 

West Cape May borough 902 

West Hoboken town 29.082 

West New York town 7,196 

West Orange town 7,872 

Westwood borough 1,044 

Wharton borough (formerly Port 

Oram) 2,285 

Wildwood borough 500 

Woodbine borough 1,850 

Woodbury city 4,560 

Woodcliff borough 477 

Woodlyne borough 388 

Woodridge borough 721 

Woodstown borough 1,500 



1900. 


1890. 


3,298 




561 




1,332 


1,075 


1.4S3 





354 




1,652 


996 


4.411 


2,293 


415 




5.811 


5,516 


1,198 





340 


766 


73 




1,626 


. . 


308 


191 


4.843 


3,861 


6,349 


4.330 


69 





14 




4.608 


3,106 


2,792 


1,796 


526 





590 





5.302 


3,502 


9 




1.306 


993 


i;746 


1.046 


562 


. 


73,307 


57.458 


15,187 


10.643 


326 




4,370 


■3[822 


1,812 




3,580 


2.834 


498 


383 


696 


757 


23,094 


11,665 


5.267 




6.889 


4,358 


828 




2,069 


775 


150 


... 


4.087 


3,911 


329 




582 


'■575 


1,371 


1,516 



UNITED STATES CENSUS. 173 

POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES. 

CENSUS OF 1900. 



Per 

States and Territories. 1900. 1890. Increase, cent. 

Alabama 1,828,697 1,513,017 315,680 20.9 

Alaska 63 592 

Arizona".*!!!.'.'.'!!!!!!!'.! 122!931 ■"59!626 ■"39!936 6'7!6 

Arkansas 1,311,564 1,128,179 183,385 16.3 

California 1,485,053 1,208,130 274,049 22.7 

Colorado 539,700 412,198 126,357 30.7 

Connecticut 908,420 746,258 162,162 21.7 

Delaware 184,735 168,493 16,242 9.6 

District of Columbia.. 278,718 230,392 48,326 21.0 

Florida 528,542 291,422 137,120 35.0 

Georgia 2,216,331 1,837,353 378,978 20.6 

Hawaii 154,001 

Idaho 161,772 84,385 74,762 88.0 

Illinois 4,821,550 3,826,351 995,199 26.0 

Indiana 2,516,462 2,192,404 324,058 14.8 

Indian Territory 392,060 

Iowa 2,231,853 1,911,896 319,572 16.7 

Kansas 1,470,495 1,427,096 41,373 2.9 

Kentucky 2,147,174 1,858,635 288,539 15.5 

Louisiana 1,381,625 1,118,587 263,038 23.5 

Maine 694,466 661,086 33,380 5.0 

Maryland 1,188,044 1.042,390 145,654 14.0 

Massachusetts 2,805,346 2,238,943 566,403 25.3 

Michigan 2,420,982 2,093,889 327,093 15.6 

Minnesota 1,751,394 1,301,826 440,160 33.8 

Missippi 1,551,270 1,289,600 261,670 20.3 

Missouri 3,106,665 2,679,184 427,481 16.0 

Montana 243,329 132,159 99,400 75.2 

Nebraska 1,066,300 1,058,910 7,390 0.7 

Nevada 42,335 45,761 *5,099 11.1 

New Hampshire 411,588 376,530 35,058 9.3 

New Jersey 1,883,669 1,444,933 438,736 30.4 

New Mexico 195,310 153,593 29,727 19.4 

New York 7,268,894 5,997,853 1,265,257 2.11 

North Carolina 1,893,810 1,617,947 275,863 17.1 

North Dakota 319,146 182,719 129,520 70.9 

Ohio 4,157,545 3,672,316 485,229 13.2 

Oklahoma 398,331 61,834 320,407 518.2 

Oregon 413,536 813,767 95,518 30.4 

Pennsylvania 6,302,115 5,258,014 1,044,020 19.9 

Rhode Island 428,556 345,506 83,050 24.0 

South Carolina 1,340,316 1,151,149 189,167 16.4 

South Dakota 401,570 328,808 55,079 16.8 

Tennessee 2,020,616 1,767,518 253,098 14.3 

Texas 3,048,710 2,235.523 813,187 36.4 

Utah 276,749 207,905 67,047 32.2 

Vermont 343,641 332,422 11,219 3.4 

Virginia 1,854,184 1,655,980 198,204 12.0 

Washington 518,103 349.390 162.194 46.4 

West Virginia 958,800 762,794 196.006 25.7 

Wisconsin 2,069,042 1,686,880 376.036 22.3 

Wyoming 92,531 60,705 29,865 49.2 

76,303,387 62,622,250 12,937,008 20.7 

•Decrease. 



174 UNITED STATES CENSUS. 

Cities Having 25,000 Iiihiibltaiits and More. 

1900 

New York, N. Y 3.437,202 

ghfcago 111..... 1,698,575 

Philadelphia, Pa 1,293.697 

St. Louis. Mo '575'238 

Boston, Mass ,,'. m,m 

Baltimore, Md 508 957 

Cleveland. Ohio 381*768 

Buffalo, N. Y : 352:.387 

San Francisco, Cal 342 782 

Cincinnati, Ohio 325^,902 

Pittsburg. Pa 321,616 

New Orleans, La 287 104 

Detroit Mich 285^04 

Milwaukee, Wis 285 315 

Washington, D. C '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 278718 

Newark, N. J 246.'070 

Jersey Cily, N. J 206,4.33 

Louisville, Ky 204 731 

Minneapolis. Minn ........' 2(p'il8 

Providence, R. 1 175*597 

Indianapolis, Ind 169164 

Kansas City, Mo 163:752 

St. Paul, Minn 163,065 

Rochester N. Y 162,608 

Denver, Col 133 8.59 

Toledo, Ohio ' " i.3i'829 

Allegheny, Pa [ J29,sie 

Columbus, Ohio 125,560 

Worcester, Mass 118 421 

Syracuse, N. Y :.•; io8:374 

New Haven, Conn 108 027 

Paterson, N. J 105*171 

Fall River, Mass ;;;;;; i04',863 

St. Joseph Mo 102.979 

Omaha, Neb 10'> 555 

Los Angeles, Cal " 102*479 

Memphis, Tenn 102*320 

Scranton -^ ?a W] m'^G 

Lowell, Mass 94 Qfiq 

Albany, N. Y gl'isj 

Cambridge, Mass 91*886 

Portland, Ore 90;426 

Atlanta, Ga 89 872 

Grand Rapids, Mich .'.[ 87*565 

gayton, Ohio 85:333 

Richmond, Va 85 050 

Nashville. Tenn '.'.'.'.'.'. 80*865 

Seattle, Wash 80*671 

Hartford, Conn 79:850 

Reading, Pa 78'Qfil 

Wilmington, Del ..:::: 76508 

Camden, N. J -fr'qql 

Trenton, N. J 73'30? 

Bridgeport, Conn ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! 70:996 

Lynn, Mass 68 513 

Oakland, Cal y/, ^960 

Lawrence, Mass 6? e^^q 

New Bedford, Mass '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 62,^ 

♦Decrease. 





Inc. 


1890. 


P.C. 


2,492,591 


.37.8 


1.099,850 


54.4 


1,046.964 


23.5 


451,770 


27..3 


448.477 


25.0 


434,439 
261.353 


17.1 


46.0 


255.664 


37.8 


298,997 


14.6 


296.908 


9.7 


2.38,617 


34.7 


242,039 


18.6 


205,876 


38.7 


204,468 


39.5 


230,392 


20.9 


181,830 


35.3 


163,003 


26.6 


161,129 


27.0 


164.738 


23.0 


132,146 


32.8 


105.436 


60.4 


132.716 


23.3 


133,156 


22.4 


133,896 


21.4 


106,713 


25.4 


81,434 


61.8 


105,287 


23.3 


88,150 


42.4 


84,655 


39.8 


88,143 


22.9 


81,298 


32.S 


78,347 


34.2 


74,398 


40.9 


52,324 


96.8 


140,452 


*26.9 


50,395 


103.3 


64,495 


58.6 


75,215 


3.5.6 


77,696 


22.2 


94,923 


*0.8 


70,028 


31.2 


46,385 


94.9 


65,533 


37.1 


60,278 


45.2 


61,220 


39.3 


81,388 


4.4 


76,168 


6.1 


42,837 


88.3 


53,230 


50.0 


58,661 


34.6 


61,431 


24.5 


58,313 


30.2 


57,458 


27.5 


48,866 


45.2 


55,727 


22 9 


48,682 


37.5 


44,654 


40.0 


40,733 


53.2 



UNITED STATES CENStTS. 175 



1900. 

Des Moines, Iowa 62,139 

Springfield, Mass 62,059 

Somerville, Mass 61,643 

Troy, N. Y 60,651 

Hoboken, N. J 59,364 

Evansville, Ind 59,007 

Manchester, N. H 56,987 

Utica, N. Y 56,383 

Peoria, 111 56,100 

Charleston, S. C 55,807 

Savannah, Ga 54,244 

Salt Lake City, Utah 53,531 

San Antonio, Tex 53,321 

Duluth. Minn 52,969 

Erie, Pa 52,733 

Elizabeth, N. J 52,130 

Wilkesbarre, Pa 51,721 

Kansas City, Kan 51,418 

Harrisburg, Pa 50,167 

Portland, Me 50,145 

Yonkers, N. Y 47,931 

Norfolk, Va 46,624 

Waterbury, Conn 45.859 

Holyoke, Mass 45,712 

Fort Wayne, Ind 45,115 

Youngstown, Ohio 44,885 

Houston, Tex 44,633 

Covington, Ky 42,938 

Akron, Ohio 42,728 

Dallas, Tex 42,638 

Saginaw, Mich 42,345 

I^ancaster. Pa 41,459 

Lincoln, Neb 40,169 

Brockton, Mass 40,063 

Binghamton, N. Y 39,647 

Augusta,- Ga 39,441 

Pawtucket, R. 1 39,231 

Altoona, Pa 38.973 

Wheeling. W. Va 38,878 

Mobile, • Ala 38,469 

Birmingham, Ala 38,415 

Little Rock, Ark 38,307 

Springfield, Ohio 38,253 

Galveston. Tex 37,789 

Tacoma. Wash 37,714 

Haverhill, Mass 37,175 

Spokane, Wash 36,848 

Terre Haute, Ind 36,673 

Dubuque, Iowa 36,297 

Quincy, 111 36.252 

South Bend. Ind 35,999 

Salem, Mass 35.956 

Johnstown, Pa 35,936 

Elmira. N. Y 35.672 

Allentown, Pa 35,416 

Davenport, Iowa 35,254 

McKeesport. Pa 34,227 

Springfield, 111 34,159 

Chelsea, Mass 34,072 

Chester, Pa 33,988 

♦Decrease. 





Inc. 


1890. 


P.C. 


50,093 


24.0 


44,179 


40.4 


40,152 


53.5 


60,956 


*0.5 


43,648 


36.0 


50,756 


16.2 


44,126 


29.1 


44,007 


28.1 


41,024 


36.7 


54,955 


l.b 


43,189 


25.5 


44,843 


19.3 


37,673 


41.5 


33,115 


59.9 


40,634 


29.7 


37,764 


38.0 


37,718 


37.1 


38,316 


34.1 


39,385 


27.3 


36,425 


37.6 


32,033 


49.6 


34,871 


33.7 


28,646 


60.0 


35,637 


28.2 


35,393 


27.4 


33,220 


35.1 


27,557 


61.9 


37,371 


14.8 


27,601 


54.8 


38,067 


12.0 


46,322 


*8.5 


32,011 


29.5 


55,154 


*27.1 


27,294 


46.7 


35,005 


13.2 


33,300 


18.4 


27,633 


41.9 


30,337 


28.4 


34,522 


12.6 


31,076 


23.7 


26,178 


46.7 


25,874 


48.0 


31,895 


19.9 


29,084 


29.9 


36.006 


4.7 


27,412 


35.6 


19,922 


84.9 


30,217 


21.3 


30,311 


19.7 


31,494 


15.1 


21,819 


64.9 


30,801 


16.7 


21,805 


64.8 


30,893 


15.4 


25,228 


40.3 


26,872 


31.1 


20,741 


65.0 


24,963 


36.8 


27,909 


22.0 


20,226 


68.0 



176 UNITED STATES CENSUS. 

1900. 

York, Pa 33,708 

Maiden. Mass 33,664 

Topeka, Kan 33,608 

Newton, Mass 33,587 

Sioux City, Iowa 33,111 

Bayonne, N. J 32,722 

Knoxville, Tenn 32,637 

Chattanooga, Tenn 32,490 

Schenectady, N. Y 31,682 

Fitchburg, Mass 31,531 

Superior, Wis 31.091 

Rockford, 111 31,051 

Taunton, Mass 31,036 

Canton, Ohio 30,667 

Butte, Mont 30,470 

Montgomery, Ala 30,346 

Auburn, N. Y 30.345 

East St. Louis, 111 29.655 

Joliet, 111 29,353 

Sacramento, Cal 29.282 

Racine. Wis 29.102 

La Crosse, Wis 28,895 

Williamsport, Pa 28,757 

Jacksonville, Fla. 28,429 

Newcastle, Pa 28,339 

Newport, Ky 28,301 

Oshkosh, Wis 28,284 

Woonsccket, R. 1 28,204 

Pueblo. Col - 28,157 

Atlantic City, N. J 27,838 

Passaic, N. J 27,777 

Bay City, Mich .• 27,628 

Fort Worth, Tex 26,688 

Lexington, Ky 26.369 

Gloucester, Mass 26,121 

South Omaha, Neb 26.001 

New Britain. Conn 25,998 

Council Bluffs, Iowa 25,802 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa 25,656 

Easton. Pa 25,238 

Jackson, Mich 25,180 

♦Decrease. 





Inc. 


1890. 


P.C. 


20,793 


62.1 


23,031 


46.1 


31,007 


a.d 


24,379 


37.7 


37,806 


♦12.4 


19,033 


71.9 


22,535 


44.8 


29,100 


11.6 


19,902 


59.1 


22,037 


43.0 


ll,y83 


159.4 


23,584 


31.6 


25,448 


21.9 


26,189 


17.0 


10,723 


184.1 


21,883 


38.6 


25,858 


17.3 


15,169 


95.4 


23,264 


26.1 


26,386 


10.9 


21,014 


38.4 


25,090 


15.1 


27,132 


5.9 


17.201 


65.2 


11,600 


144.3 


24,918 


13.5 


22,836 


23.8 


20,830 


35.4 


24,558 


14.6 


13,055 


113.2 


13,028 


113.2 


27,839 


*0.7 


23,076 


15.6 


21,567 


22.2 


24,651 


5.9 


8,062 


222.5 


16,519 


57.3 


16.519 


57.3 


18,020 


42.3 


14,481 


74.2 


20,798 


21.0 



PRESIDENTIAL VOTE. 



177 



POPUXAR VOTE FOR PRESIDENT, 1904. 
(From New York Tribune Almanac, 1905.) 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idabo 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massacbusetts . . . 

Micbigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampsbire.. 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina . . . 
North Dakota.... 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania .... 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina... 
South Dakota.... 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia... 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

Totals ..7,620,332 

Plurality 2,541,291 

12 



4) 


0) 


o 


§ 


o 


p 


a 


Q 


0, 


m 


m 


^ 


22,472 


79,857 


612 


853 


.... 


5,051 


46,860 


64,434 


993 


1,816 


.... 


2,318 


205,226 


89,294 


7,380 


29,533 


.... 


.... 


134,687 


100,105 


3,438 


4,304 


325 


824 


111,089 


72,909 


1,506 


4,543 


575 


494 


23,705 


19,347 


607 


146 


.... 


51 


8,314 


27,046 


5 


2,337 


.... 


1,605 


24,003 


83,472 


684 


197 


.... 


21,511 


47,783 


18,480 


1,013 


4,954 


.... 


353 


632,645 


327,606 


34,770 


69,225 


4,698 


6,725 


368,289 


274,345 


23,496 


12,013 


1,598 


2,444 


307,907 


149,141 


11,601 


14,847 


.... 


2,207 


210,893 


84,800 


7,245 


15,494 


.... 


6,156 


205,277 


217,170 


6,609 


3,602 


596 


2,511 


5,205 


47,708 




995 


.... 


.... 


64,438 


27,648 


1,510 


2,106 


.... 


338 


109,497 


109,446 


3,034 


2,247 


.... 


.... 


257,822 


165,746 


4,279 


13,604 


2,350 


1,294 


361,866 


134,151 


13,302 


8,941 


1,012 


1,159 


216,651 


55,187 


6,253 


11,692 


974 


2,103 


3,189 


53,376 




393 


.... 


1,425 


321,449 


296,312 


7,191 


13,009 


1,674 


4,226 


34,932 


21,773 


335 


5,676 


208 


1,520 


138,558 


51,876 


6,323 


7,412 


.... 


20,518 


6,867 


3,982 


.... 


925 


.... 


344 


54,177 


33,992 


749 


1,090 




81 


245,164 


164,566 


6,845 


9,587 


2,680 


3,705 


859,533 


683,981 


20,787 


36,883 


9,127 


7,459 


81,372 


123,458 


361 


124 


.... 


819 


52,595 


14,273 


1,140 


2,017 


.... 


165 


600,095 


344,674 


19,339 


36,260 


2,633 


1,392 


60,432 


17,444 


3,860 


7,051 


.... 


784 


840,949 


335,430 


33,717 


21,863 


2,211 


.... 


41,605 


24,839 


768 


956 


488 


.... 


2,254 


54,635 


.... 


22 


.... 


1 


72,083 


21,969 


2,965 


3,138 


.... 


1,240 


105,369 


131,653 


1,889 


1,354 


.... 


2,491 


51,242 


167,200 


4,292 


2,791 


421 


8,062 


62,444 


33,413 




5,767 


.... 


.... 


40,459 


9,777 


792 


844 


.... 


.... 


46,450 


80,638 


1,382 


56 


218 


359 


101,540 


28,098 


3,229 


10,023 


1,592 


669 


132,608 


100,850 


4,569 


1,572 


.... 


324 


279,870 


124,036 


9,770 


28,220 


223 


530 


20,467 


8,904 


207 


1,077 


.... 


.... 



5,079,041 258,847 402,159 33,612 113,258 



I'^S STATE COMMITTEES. 

STATE COMMITTEES. 



REPUBLICAN. 

Headquarters, Newark. 

Franklin Murphy, Newark, Chairman; Edward C 
Stokes, Millville, Vice-Chairman; Winton C. Garrison. 
Newark, Treasurer; Edward W. Gray, Newark, Secre- 
tary. 

At Larg-e— Franklin Murphy, Newark; Frank H. 
Sommer, Newark; John Kean, Elizabeth; Samuel K. 
Robbins, Moorestown. 

Atlantic — John J. Gardner, Egg Harbor. 

Bergen — Edmund W. Wakelee, Demarest. 

Burlington— R. C. Hutchinson, Bordentown. 

Camden — David Baird, Camden. 

Cape May— Robert E. Hand, Erma. 

Cumberland— Edward C. Stokes, Millville. 

Essex — Henry M. Doremus, Newark; Alfred N. Dal- 
rymple, Newark, 

Gloucester— George D. Whitney, Glassboro. 

Hudson — John Rotheram, Jersey City; George M. 
McCarthy, Jersey City. 

Hunterdon— Percival Christie, High Bridge. 

Mercer— Frank O. Brig-gs, Trenton. 

Middlesex — Theodore Strong, New Brunswick. 

Monmouth-^C. Asa Francis, Long- Branch. 

Morris — D. S. Voorhees, Morristown. 

Ocean — William H. Fisher, Toms River. 

Passaic — Robert Williams, Paterson. 

Salem — D. Harris Smith, Salem. 

Somerset — Lewis A. Thompson, Somerville. 

Sussex — Henry C. Hunt, Newton. 

Union — Hamilton Kean, Elizabeth. 

W^arren— John I. Blair Reilly, Phillipsburg. 

Executive Committee — Frank O. Briggs, Chairman; 
John Kean, Edward C. Stokes, Daniel S. Voorhees. 
John J. Gardner, Edmund W. Wakelee, Theodore 
Strong-, Alfred N. Dalrymple, David Baird. 

Finance Committee — Clarence E. Breckenridge, Win- 
ton C. Garrison, Frank H. Sommer, Samuel K. Rob- 
bins, C. Edward Murra5^ James A. McGraw, Robert 
Williams, Joseph S. Frelinghuysen, Joseph McDermott. 



i STATE COMMITTEES. 179 

NEW JERSEY LEAGUE OF REPUBLICAN CLUBS, 

385 Elizabeth Ave., Newark, N. J. 

F. F. Meyer, Jr., State Organizer, and New Jersey 
Member National Republican League Executive Com- 
mittee, in charge, to whom all communications should 
be addressed. 

DEMOCRATIC COMMITTEE. 

Headquarters, Newark. 

James R. Nugent, Chairman, Newark; William K. 
Devereux, Secretary, >4.sbury Park; Denis F. Collins, 
Treasurer, Elizabeth. 

At Large — William C. Happenheimer, Jersey City; 
Gottfried Krueger, Newark; Frank S. Katzenbach, Jr., 
Trenton; Edward Furman, Sayreville; Howard Carrow, 
Camden. 

Atlantic — William A. Faunce, Atlantic City. 

Bergen — Cook Conklin, Hackensack. 

Burlington — Benajah P. Wills, Mount Holly, 

Camden — William H. Davis, Camden. 

Cape May— Michael Kearns, Cape May City. 

Cumberland — George Hampton, Bridgeton. 

Essex — James R. Nugent, Newark. 

Gloucester — Edward E. Grosscup, Wenonah. 

Hudson — Robert S. Hudspeth, Jersey City. 

Hunterdon — William D. Bloom, Flemington. 

Mercer — Charles H. Gallagher, Trenton. 

Middlesex — Oliver Kelly, Metuchen. 

Monmouth — David S. Crater, Freehold. 

Morris — Willard W. Cutler, Morristown. 

Ocean — William J. Harrison, Lakewood. 

Passaic — Thomas Flynn, Paterson. 

Salem — Robert Gwynne, Salem. 

Somerset — Samuel S. Childs, Bernardsville. 

Sussex — Lewis S. Iliff, Newton. 

Union — Denis F. Collins, Elizabeth. 

Warren — Johnson Cornish, Washington. 



180 STATE COMMITTEES. 

DEMOCRATIC STATE AUXILIARY COMMITTEE OF 
NEW JERSEY. 

Chairman, Job H. Lippincott, Jersey City; Vice- 
Chairmen, J. Harry Hull, Nutley; Ralph W. E. Donges, 
Camden; Secreta'ry, Ray E. Mayham, Rahway; Secre- 
tary for South Jersey, William C. French, Camden; 
Treasurer, Horace Codington, Somerville; Chairman 
of Campaign Committee, Walter I. McCoy, South 
Orange; Ex-Officio, James R. Nugent, Chairman Demo- 
cratic State Committee. 

(By a resolution passed at the Democratic State 
Convention of 1908, the Democratic State Auxiliary 
Committee was made a part of the official State or- 
ganization.) 

FEDERATION OF DEMOCRATIC CLUBS OF NEW 
JERSEY. 

President, Ray E. Mayham, Rahway; Vice-President, 
H. Otto Wittpenn, Jersey City; Vice-President, Frank 
S. Katzenbach, Jr., Trenton; Secretary, James Nor- 
ton, Hackensack; Treasurer, Ormsby F. Potter, Pat- 
erson. 

Executive Committee — Chairman, Walter L McCoy, 
South Orange; John B. Cavagnaro, Ridgewood; Joseph 
L. Shaner, Atlantic City; Thomas H. Hagerty, New 
Brunswick; ^ailiam C. French, Camden. 

Officers Ex-Officio — James R. Nugent, Chairman of 
Democratic State Committee; Job H. Lippincott, Chair- 
man Democratic State Auxiliary Committee. 

ANTI-SALOON LEAGUE OF NEW JERSEY. 

Executive Office — 136 Roseville Avenue, Newark. 

President, Rev. Charles L. Mead, D. D.; Vice-Presi- 
dent, J. W. Arrowsmith; Secretary, William Cairns; 
Treasurer, G. Rowland Munroe; State Superintendent. 
J. Frank Burke. 

State Headquarters Committee — Fillmore Condit, 
Chairman; Rev. Minot C. Morgan, George H. Strobell, 
S. J. Sloan, Rev. George H. Neal, D. D., Rev. Joseph 
Lyons Ewing, Rev. O. C. Horsman, Rev. John L. Scud- 
der, D. D. 



PARTY PLATFORMS. 181 

PARTY PLATFORMS. 



REPUBLICAN. 



(Adopted at the State Convention held at Trenton, 
Thursday, September 19, 1907.) 

The Republican party again presents to the people 
of New Jersey an account of its stewardship and offers 
its record of faithful execution of pledges as a guar- 
antee of future performances. 

We indorse the administration of President Roose- 
velt as courageous and patriotic, distinguished by 
intelligent, earnest and successful efforts to promote 
the welfare of all the people. Continued prosperity 
has been maintained in every branch of industry, and 
the position of the Nation at home and abroad is 
stronger and better than at any time in its history. 

We also indorse the wise, progressive and successful 
administration of Governor E. C. Stokes. 

The Republican party came into power after a long 
period of misrule, during which the State government 
had been administered in a spirit of partisan greed; 
actual dishonesty had marked many transactions; the 
State's money had been expended without authority 
of law, necessitating a diversion of the school fund 
to save the party then in power from the odium of a 
State tax; political power had been perpetuated by 
the creation of partisan officeholders, and by legisla- 
tive gerrymanders; by the corruption of the ballot and 
by the wholesale pardon of convicted criminals. 

To remedy these abuses and rescue the State from 
misrule and disgrace, the people called upon the Re- 
publican party. Its fourteen years' record is a story 
of faithful performance of this duty and of increas- 
ingly high standards of good government. 

Republican administrations have pursued a consis- 
tent policy of advancement and reform. 

Republican legislation drove the gamblers" vice from 
our State and pledged her constitution to its perpetual 
banishment. 

It inaugurated a system of publicity in appropria- 
tions. It has inaugurated a policy of using the sur- 
plus of the treasury for the payment of local school 
taxes. 



182 PARTY PLATFORMS. 

In the fulfillments of its pledges to give a fearless 
and thorough consideration to the long-standing prob- 
lems of equal taxation as between railroads and other 
property, it has passed the laws declared valid by the 
courts of the State, which have increased the revenue 
of our municipalities and raised the State's income 
from less than $1,000,000 to over $3,500,000 per annum. 
$2,500,000 of which is by law distributed to the local 
taxing districts for school purposes. 

The Republican party has inaugurated a policy of 
taxation of corporate franchises and by which the 
State annually collects a large sum for distribution 
to the taxing districts. We favor such systems as will 
compel franchises to bear a just share of the burden 
of taxation as compared with corporate *and Individual 
property. 

A Republican Senate has twice passed a civil service 
reform act which has been defeated by the present 
Democratic House of Assembly. We pledge ourselves 
to the enactment of a comprehensive civil service 
measure in the interest of higher efficiency in admin- 
istrative affairs. 

The Legislature has passed resolutions favoring an 
amendment to the federal constitution of the election 
of United States Senators by popular vote; and until 
such amendment has been adopted, we favor the en- 
actment of a law for expression in some authoritative 
way by the voter of his choice for United States Sen- 
ator. 

We believe in the separation of State and municipal 
elections and to that end favor a constitutional amend- 
ment providing that national and State elections shall 
be held in even years and municipal elections in odd 
years. 

We have enacted legislation for the reform of our 
petit jury system, and we pledge a continuance of our 
efforts for a better system of selecting grand juries. 
Our primary law — a Republican enactment — has 
done away with violence and fraud at the primaries 
and has enabled voters to express their choice and 
exercise their will in the nominating conventions. We 
pledge ourselves to such amendments of this act as 
will simplify and improve our primary system. We 
favor the modification and simplification of the present 
primary law in the respects in which It is now cum- 
bersome and intricate; and we believe that the most 
effective method to accomplish this purpose Is a direct 



PARTY PLATFORMS. 183 

primary for candidates for all municipal and county 
offices, including Senators and Assemblymen, and we 
favor such an amendment of the primary law as will^ 
accomplish this end, with proper provisions for judi- 
cial review and recount. 

The party has already undertaken the question of 
supervision of public utility corporations, with a view 
of increasing the efficiency, safety and economy of 
service in the interests of the public. We pledge our- 
selves to enact a law providing for a commission with 
ample jurisdiction and powers to enable it to regulate 
such corporations effectively and authoritatively. 

The Republican party has accomplished needed re- 
form in excise legislation and pledges itself to the 
maintenance of it. . 

The policy of State aid for good roads was inaug- 
urated by the Republican party, and this policy has 
placed New Jersey first in the nation in its road sys- 
tem. The Republican party stands pledged to its con- 

" W^'favor the pending amendment of the constitu- 
tion providing for the creation of Assembly districts, 
passed by the present Legislature upon the recom- 
mendation of a Republican Governor. ,,^,,^^ 
we favor a law providing that all moneys collected 
for or belonging to the State shall be paid into the 
State treasury, and that no disbursements of State 
funds shall be made except upon the audit and war- 

^Te bllilv: in^Xncity of government and we favor 
ronsouaation of all departments and commissions ot 
:?mli character, and regret the '-"-« »' '^^f J^;;: 
cratio House ot Assembly to co-operate with the Sen 

^*We°pledge"o''urselves to correct any and all abuses 
thai may L found in any State department or inst - 
tuUo" Ld to hold all Officials to a strict account- 
abilitv for faithful public service. 

we call the attention of the people to the -nco^npe- 

rractf:rscerthafmarr.tfp=^{to 

HTrtrCrye'm-nJT'ihe-i^rsrrX^.H 
-rtr s-bm= t re%"ue o7tr^^f Hf 
senaratlon of the State and municipal elections, and 
W the reform measures passed by the Republican 
Senate. 



184 PARTY PLATFORMS. 



DEMOCRATIC. 



(Adopted at the State Convention held at Trenton 
on Tuesday, September 17, 1907.) 

The Democratic party of New Jersey, through Its 
representatives in convention assembled at Trenton, 
this 17th day of September, 1907, makes this declara- 
tion of principles: 

Virtue in State government depends upon and Is 
measured by the integrity of its servants. The repre- 
hensible practices of State officials of retaining and 
applying public funds to their personal advantage and 
to the detriment of the State, ■ persistent and chronic 
failure to discharge official duties, commonly called 
"absenteeism," occupying dual positions, carrying 
double emoluments, but involving no increased labors, 
nepotism, the constant multiplication of commissions 
to discharge similar public functions, the extrava- 
gance and wastefulness of the State House Commission 
in the construction of public buildings, the non- 
feasance and gross mismanagement of the managers 
of State institutions, warrant unqualified condemna- 
tion and demand immediate correction, and to this end 
we favor and bind ourselves to the enactment of laws 
whereby: 

Public funds shall be paid to and directly disbursed 
by the Treasurer of the State. "One State and one 
purse." 

Public moneys shall be interest-bearing in all cases. 

Public officials shall give daily attention to the dis- 
charge of their duties, and shall be permitted to hold 
but one office. 

Public contracts shall be made and supplies pur- 
chased upon competitive bidding after due advertise- 
ment. 

The numerous commissions now having charge of 
the public water supply, sewage and other matters 
pertaining to public health shall be abolished, and 
their powers and duties vested in a reorganized State 
board. 

State boards and commissions exercising kindred 
functions shall be consolidated. 

We reiterate the demands of the Democratic plat- 
forms for many years past ^or the equal taxation of 
all property not used for religious, charitable or edu- 
cational purposes. 



i PARTY PLATFORMS'. 185 

We declare for the taxation of the tangible property 
of railroad and canal companies where located, and 
the taxation of their franchises by the State, and we 
insist that the legislation on taxation enacted since 
the ascendancy of the Republican party in this State 
has been the result of Democratic initiative, but has 
not measured up to the constitutional requirement of 
equal taxation. 

We declare for the taxation at local rates of the 
value of the franchises of public utility companies in 
place of the present inadequate taxation under the 
Voorhees law. 

We favor the establishment of a commission, with 
ample powers for the proper regulation of steam and 
trolley railroads, electric light, gas, water, telegraph 
and telephone companies and all other public utility 
corporations. 

We call attention to the constantly increasing cost 
of the State government under Republican rule, the 
yearly expenses having been increased from $1,857,982 
under the last Democratic administration to $4,553,- 
685.57 for the present year, and demand that rigid 
economy be exercised in future expenditures to the 
end that the surplus revenues may be applied to the 
lessening of the burden of taxation upon our citizens. 

In recognition of the constitutional doctrine that all 
political power is inherent in the people, we favor the 
enactment of laws, and where necessary constitutional 
amendments, providing for: 

The selection of United States Senators by popular 
suffrage. 

The election of Assemblymen by districts. 

The nominating of candidates for public office by 
direct primary vote, without the intervention of dele- 
gates or conventions. 

The election by the people of the principal State 
and county officials. 

In order to secure the true expression of the will 
of the voter we favor: 

Municipal elections distinct from State and national 
elections. 

The passage of stringent laws against bribery and 
corruption in all elections, primary and general. 

The vesting of summary jurisdiction in the courts 
to settled disputes growing out of primary elections, 
with ample power to order recounts. 



186 PARTY PLATFORMS. 

The abolition of the voting machines. 

We favor the acquisition by our State and sister 
States of all toll bridges crossing inter-state bound- 
aries, in order that the same may be made free for 
inter-state traffic. 

We favor the greatest extension of the principle of 
home rule In municipal government, securing to each 
municipality the absolute control of all matters re- 
quiring local administration, without undue interfer- 
ence by the Legislature. 

We favor the enactment of stringent anti-monopoly 
laws. 

We favor the establishment of an elective civil serv- 
ice commission by an act which will take the employ- 
ment of subordinate public officials out of politics. 

We ask the support of all citizens favoring these 
principles. 



PRESIDENTIAL TICKETS. 1908. 187 

PRESIDENTIAL TICKETS, 1908. 



REPUBLICAN. 

For President, William H. Taft. For Vice-President, 
James S. Sherman. 

For Presidential Electors — Frederick Frelinghuysen, 
Moses Taylor Pyne, Thomas E. French, Walter E. 
Edg-e, Lewis S. Thompson, Grant B. Schley, Alexander 
Gilbert, J. Hull Browning, Peter Campbell, George R. 
Howe, Henry J. Melosh, Alvin Hunsicker. 

DEMOCRATIC. 

For President, William J. Bryan. For Vice-Presi- 
dent, John. W. Kern. 

For Presidential Electors — Thomas M. Ferrell, Archi- 
bald S. Alexander, Joseph E. Nowrey, James H. Birch, 
Sr., Thomas J. Scully, William J. Keys, Peter Bon- 
nett, Lewis J. Martin, Samuel E. Robertson, Joseph W. 
Stover, Henry Byrne, Horace L. Allen. 

NATIONAL PROHIBITION. 

For President, Aaron W. Chafin. For Vice-Presi- 
dent, Aaron S. Watkins. 

For Presidential Electors — Joel W. Brown, John R. 
Mason, Grafton E. Day, George Abbott, John P. Holm, 
William Lunger, Henry Johnston, Archibald C. Worth, 
Robert Burnet, John Berryman, Daniel Black, William 
T. Reynolds. 

SOCIALIST. 

For President, Eugene V. Debs. For Vice-President, 
Benjamin Hanford. 

For Presidential Electors — David W. Wilson, Frank 
C. Barnes, Robert O. Schumann, John Harrison, Henry 
F. Malloy, Robert W. Bergman, Edwin Hedden, Max 
Richter, Charles P. MacFall, John Keyes, George H. 
Strobell, William F. Schliephacke. 

SOCIALIST-LABOR. 

For President, August Gillhaus. For Vice-President, 
Donald Monro. 

For Presidential Electors — Gustave Stelzner, Her- 
man Landgraf, Charles Schrafft, John Hossack, Charles 
Fallath, Harry Bateman, Ernest Oatley, Emil Land- 
graf, Hugo Preuss, John Reise, Frank Campbell, 
George Herschaft, Jr. 



188 REPUBLICAN NATIONAL DELEGATES, 1908. 

INDEPENDENCE. 

For President, Thomas L. Hisgcn. For Vice-Presi- 
dent, John Temple Graves. 

For Presidential Electors — Frank J. McElhone, 
George Francis Kenny, Charles W. Cullen, Otto G. 
Horster, Alexander Bell, John A. Young-, George Schae- 
fer, Solomon S. Carvalho, George L. Spence, Sam W. 
Hoke, Milton C. Mook, Samuel Warbasse. 



REPUBLICAN NATIONAL DELEGATES, 1908. 

At the Republican State Convention, held in Tren- 
ton on Tuesday, May 5th, 1908, and presided over by 
former Senator Dryden, the following delegates were 
chosen to represent New Jersey at the Republican 
National Convention, held at Chicago on June 16th, 
1908: 

Delegates-at-Large — John Franklin Fort, John 
Kean, Frank O. Briggs. David Baird. 

Alternates — Walter E. Edge, C. Edward Murray, 
Lewis S. Thompson, Daniel S. Voorhees. 

District Delegates — First — Henry C. Loudenslager.* 
Gloucester; E. Ambler Armstrong, Camden. 

Second — Robert E. Hand, Cape May; Samuel K. Rob- 
bins, Burlington. 

Third — Thomas N. McCarter, Monmouth; George G. 
Smith, Ocean. 

Fourth — Ferdinand W. Roebling, Mercer; D. Led- 
yard Blair, Somerset. 

Fifth — Ernest R. Ackerman, Union; Richard H. Wil- 
liams, Morris. 

Sixth — William Barbour, Passaic; John R. Ramsey. 
Bergen. 

Seventh — Winton C. Garrison, Essex; Thomas D. 
Webb, Essex. 

Eighth — Leslie D. Ward, Essex; William F. Allen, 
Essex. 

Ninth — Joseph A. Dear, Sr., Hudson; Pierre P. Gar- 
vin, Hudson. 

Tenth — John A. Blair, Hudson; George Gonzales, 
Hudson. 

Franklin Murphy was endorsed as a Vice-Presiden- 
tial candidate. 



DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL DELEGATES, 1908. 189 

DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL. DELEGATES, 1908. 

At the Democratic State Convention, held in Tren- 
ton on Tuesday, April 28th, 1908, and presided over 
by George A. Viehmann, of New Brunswick, the fol- 
lowing- delegates were chosen to represent New Jersey 
at the Democratic National Convention, held at Den- 
ver, Col., on July 7th, 1908: 

Delegates-at-Large — James Smith, Essex; Frank 
S. Katzenbach, Jr., Mercer; John Hinchcliffe, Passaic; 
Howard Carrow, Camden. 

Alternates — John S. Bell, Essex; David S. Crater, 
Monmouth; James E. Martine, Union; Michael A. De- 
vine, Atlantic. 

District Delegates — First, William H. Davis, Cam- 
den; E. E. Grosscup, Gloucester. 

Second — Charles L. Cole, Atlantic; Mulford Ludlam, 
Cumberland. 

Third — W. Parker Runyon, Middlesex; Melvin A. 
Rice, Monmouth. 

Fourth — Charles H. Gallagher, Mercer; James N. 
Pidcock, Hunterdon. 

Fifth — William E. Tuttle, Jr., Union; Willard W. 
Cutler, Morris. 

Sixth — Frank J. Van Noort, Passaic; Archibald Hart, 
Bergen. 

Seventh — John F. Sinnott, Essex; John R. Hardin, 
Essex. 

Eighth — James R. Nugent, Essex; Walter J. McCoy, 
Essex. 

Ninth — H. Otto Wittpen, Hudson; Robert S. Huds- 
peth, Hudson. 

Tenth — James A. Hamill, Hudson; Robert Davis, 
Hudson. 



190 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL, 

1776 to 1844. 



Atlantic County. 



1837, Lewis M. Walker. 
3&— 39, Japhet Ireland. 



40-41, Mahlon Canfleld. 
42 — 44, Absolam Cordery. 



Bergen County. 



76. 82-83, John Fell. 
77—78, Robert Morris. 
79—81, Theunis Dey. 
84—90, 9^—95, Peter Haring. 
91, 96—06, John Cutwater. 

07, 09—11. Peter Ward. 

08, ia-13, William Colfax. 
14—15, 18, Adrian Post 

16, 19—21, John D. Haring. 

17, Martin Ryerson. 
22—23, Christian Zabrlskie. 



24—26, 30, 32-33, 

Charles Board. 
27—29, Nathaniel Board. 

31, Jacob M. Ryerson. 
34—35, Christian C. Zabrlskie. 
36—37. Samuel R. Demarest. 
3^—39, Francis Price. 

40, Albert G. Doremus. 
41 — 42, John Cassedy. 
43^4. John H. Zabrlskie. 



Burlington County. 



76, Richard Smith. 

77, John Imlay. 
78—80, 83, Peter Tallman. 
81—82, John Cox. 

84—86, 8^-90, 

William Newbold. 
87—88, Joseph Smith. 
91, James Kinsey. 
92. 1818—28, Caleb Newbold. 
93—96, John Black. 
97-1801, 04-09, 

George Anderson. 



02—04. Samuel Hough. 
10—13. John Beatty. 

14, Caleb Earl. 
lS-17, William Irick. 
18. 29—31. William N. Shinn. 
32—33. Richard Campion. 

34, James Newbold. 
35—36, Charles Stokes. 
37—41. William Irick. 

42, Moffett Craig. 
43^4. James S. HuJme. 



Cape May County. 



1776, Jonathan Hand. 11, 

77, 79—80, 82—83, Jesse Hand. 14, 

78, Jonathan Jenkins. 1&— 19, 

81, 85, Elijah Hughes. 

84, 86—93. Jeremiah Eldredge.a>— 23, 

94—95, 1806, 0^-10, 28-30, 

Matthew Whillden. 31—33, 

96—98, 1800, 04, 34—35. 

Permenus Corson. 36—37, 

99, John T. Townsend. 38—39, 

1801—04. 07, Ebenezer Newton. 40--il, 

05—06, William Eldredge. 42—44, 

08, 12-13, 

Joseph Falkenberge. 



Nathaniel Holmes. 
Furman Leaming. 

24, 26—27. 
Joshua Swalne. 

25, Thomas H. Hughes. 
Israel Townsend. 
Joshua Townsend. 
Jeremiah Leaming. 
Richard Thomson. 
Amos Corson. 
Thomas P. Hughes. 
Maurice Beesley. 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 

1776 to 1844. 

Cumberland County, 



191 



76—77, 82, Theophllus Elmer. 13, 

78, Ephralm Harris. 14, 18, 

79, John Buck. 20—21, 

80, 84, Jonathan Elmer. 26, 

81, 83, 85—94, 96—97, 99—1800, 27—28, 

Samuel Og-den. 29—32, 

95, Eli Elmer. 33, 37, 

98, Joel Fithian, 34, 

1801—02, David Moore. 35—36, 

03—04, 10—11, George Burgin. 38, 

05—06, Abraham Sayre. 39—40, 

06, 08, 12-13, 15-17, 19, 22—25, 41, 

Ebenezer Seeley. 42, 

07, Ebenezer Elmer. 43—44, 

09, James B. Hunt. 



Ezekiel Foster. 
James Clark. 
James D. Westcott. 
Ephralm Bateman^ 
John Trenchard. 
Elias P. Seeley. 
Israel Stratton. 
David Reeves. 
Joshua Brick. 
Nathaniel Foster. 
Samuel Barber. 
Ephralm H. Whltecar. 
David Whitaker. 
Enoch H. Moore. 



Bssex County. 



76—77, 79, Stephen Crane. 

78, Abraham Clark. 

80, James Caldwell. 
81—84, Josiah Homblower. 
85— S7, John Peck. 

88, John Chetwood. 

89, Jonathan Dayton. 
90—97, John Condit. 
98—1800, Daniel Marsh. 

01, 06, 10—13, Charles Clark. 
02—03, William S. Pennington. 
04^-06, 17—18, 23, John Dodd. 

07, Moses Jacques. 
08—09, Thomas Ward. 

14, Charles Kinsey. 



15-16, 

19—22, 

24, 30, 

27, 

29, 

31—32, 

33, 

34, 

35, 

36, 

37, 

38—40, 

41-42, 

43-44, 



25, 28, Amos Harrison. 

26, Silas Condit. 
John Dow. 
Samuel Pennington. 
Amzi Dodd. 

Isaac H. Williamson. 
Jacob M. Mead. 
Oliver S. Halstead. 
Stephen D. Day. 
Andrew Parsons. 
John J. Chetwood. 
Amzi Armstrong. 
William Chetwood. 
Joseph S. Dodd. 



Gloucester County. 



1776—80, 84, John Cooper. 

81, Joseph Hugg. 
82—83, 85—86, Elijah Clark. 
87—94, Joseph Ellis. 
95—97, Joseph Cooper. 
98—1802, Thomas Clark. 
03—06, 11, Isaac Mickle. 
06, 14-16, 



21—22, Michael C. Fisher. 
23, 29, 31—32, Joseph Kalghn. 
24—25, Isaac Wilklns. 

26, John Moore White. 

27, Christopher Sickler. 

28, Jeremiah J. Foster. 
30, 33—35, John W. Mickle. 
36—38, John C. Smallwood. 



Samuel W. Harrison. 39—40, Joseph Porter. 



97—10, Richard M. Cooper. 
12—13, James Hopkins. 
17—18, James Matlack. 
19—20, John Baxter. 



41, William R. Cooper. 

42, Joseph Saundersi. 

43 — 44, Joshua P. Browning. 



Hudson County. 



1840, Abraham 
voord. 



Van 



Sant-41— 42, John S. Condit. 

43-44, Edwin V. R, Wright. 



192 MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 

1776 to 1844. 
Hunterdon County. 

1776—81. John Stevens, 22—23. John Cavanagh. 

82. Joseph Reading. 26—29, George Maxwell. 

83—84, Philemon Dickinson. 30, Thomas Capner. 

85—88, Robert-Lettis Hooper. 31— 32, Peter I. Clark. 

89, Benjamin Van Cleve. 33, Alexander Wurts. 
90—1804. John Lambert. 34, Nathaniel Saxton. 

0&-O6, John Wilson. 35, 42—44. William Wilson. 

06—14, John Haas. 36, Henry S. Hunt. 

15, Aaron Vansyckle. 37—38. Joseph Moore. 

16—19, 21, 24—25, 39, James Snyder. 

Elnathan Stevenson. 40—41, John Lilly. 

20. Thomas Prall. 

Mercer County. 

1838—39, Charles G. McChe»-40-41, James White. 

ney. 42 — 44, George Woolsey. 



MlddleNex County. 

1776, John Wetherill. 13. John Neilson. 

77—79, Jonathan Deare. 18. John N. Simpson. 

80. 83. 88. Benjamin Manning. 19. 21, 27—28. James T. Dunn. 

81—82, 1806, John Beatty. 23—24, 26. 30, 
84—85, 96, Robert McChesney. 

Samuel Fitz - Ran- 25. William Edgar, 
dolph. 29, James Cook. 

86—87, 89—94, 30, Samuel Edgar. 

Samuel Randolph. 32. John T. McDowell. 

95, 97, 99—1806, 33, Joslah B. Howell. 

Ephraim Martin. 34, Andrew Snowhill. 

98, 1820, Andrew Kirkpatrlck. 35. John Perrine, Jr. 

07, 09, 14—17. 22. 36-38, 41. 

Ercuries Beatty. George T. McDowell. 

08, 10, 12—13. 39—40. David B. Appleget. 

James Schureman. 42 — 44, Abraham W. Brown, 
11, John James. 

Monmouth County. 

1776, Nathaniel Scudder. 10—11, 13—21. Silas Crane. 
77—79. Joseph Holmes. 22. William Andrews. 

80—83, 89—92. 95. 23—24, "William I. Bowne. 

Elisha Lawrence. 25. 28—29, William I. Emley. 

84, John Imlay. 26—27, Henry D. Polhemus. 

85, Da^ad Forman, 30, Samuel G. Wright. 
86—88. 99, Asher Holmes, 31, 34. John Patterson. 
93—94, 1812—13. 32—33, Daniel Holmes. 

Thomas Henderson. 35—36, Thomas Aarowsmith. 
96—98. Elisha "Walton. 37, William L. Daj^on. 

1800, John Lloyd. 38—39, Benjamin Ollphant. 
01—07, Thomas Little. 40, Peter Vredenburgh, Jr 

08, William Lloyd. 41—44, James Patterson. 

09, John A. Scudder. 



MEMBERS OP COUNCIL. 

1776 to 1844. 

Morris County. 



193 



1776-80, Silas Condict 23—27, 

81—84, John Carle. 28—30, 

85, John-Cleve Symmes. 31—32, 

86—88, 93—94, 96—1800, 33, 

Abraham Kitchel. 34, 

8^-90, William Woodhull. 35—36, 

91—92, 95. Ellis Cook. 37—38, 

1801—06, David Welsh. 39, 

07—14, Benjamin Ludlow. 42, 

15—22, Jesse Upson. 43—44, 



Silas Cook, 
Edward Condict. 
40 — 41, James Wood. 
Mahlon Dickerson. 
William Monro-. 
Jephthah B. Miinn. 
William Brittin. 
Jacob W. Miller. 
Ezekiel B. Gaines. 
John H. Stansborough 



Passaic County. 



1837—38, Andrew Parsons. 
39-40, Nathaniel Board. 
41, Silas E. Canfield. 



42, William Deckey. 
43-44, Silas D. Canfield. 



Salem County. 



1776, 7^79, 


19, 


Andrew Sinnickson. 


23, 40, 


77, Edward Keasby. 


24-25, 


80, 82, 86, Whitten Cripps. 


26-28, 


81, 83—84, John Holme. 


29, 


85, 87—93, John Mayhew. 


30, 


94—96, Thomas Sinnickson. 


31, 


97-99, 1801-04, 


33, 


William Parret. 


34, 37, 


1800, William Wallace. 


35, 


04, 06-07, Jacob Hufty. 


36, 


05—06, 09—13, Isaiah Shinn. 


38-39, 


08, Samuel Ray. 


41, 


13-17, Jedediah Dubois. 


42, 


18, 20—22, John Dickinson. 


43^4, 



Hedge Thompson. 
Josiah M. Reeve. 
Zacheus Ray. 
32, Israel R. Clawson. 
Philip Freas. 
James Newell. 
Henry Freas. 
Charles Swing. 
William F. Reeve. 
Samuel Humphreys. 
Thomas Yarrow. 
John A. Lambert. 
Robert Newell. 
Samuel Bolton. 
Joseph C. Nelson. 



Somerset County. 



1776, William Paterson. 
77, 93—97, James Linn. 

78, Abraham Van-Neste. 
79, 81—89, Ephraim Martin. 

80, John Witherspoon. 
90—92, Frederick Frellnghuy- 

sen. 
98—1804. Peter De Vroom. 
04, Henry Vanderveer. 



IS 



05—13, 15—19, 

John Frelinghuysen. 
14, 26—29, Andrew Howell. 
20—25, Peter I. Stryker. 
30—34, James S. Green. 

35, William Thompson. 
36—38, Walter Kirkpatrick. 

39, Augustus R. Taylor. 
40—41, Joseph W. Scott. 
42 — 44, George H. Brown. 



194 MEMBERS .iNCIL. 

1770 tu 1H44. 
Sussex County. 

1776, 80, John-Cleves Syrmnes. 19— 20, Robert W. Rutherford. 
77, 84—85, 89—90, 21. William T. Anderson. 

Robert Hoops. 22, Jeremy Mackey. 

78—79, Robert Ogderu 23—24, Jacob Thompson. 

81—83, Hugh Hughes. 25—26. Thomas C. Ryerson. 
ii&— 88, Mark Thomson. 27, Samuel Fowler. 

91—99, Charles Beardslee. 28—31, 35, David Ryerson. 
1800—04, William McCullough. 32, Peter Merkel. 

04. John Linn. 33—34. 36. Samuel Price. 

05—06, George Bidleman. 37—38. Richard R. Morris. 

06. Jacob S. Thomson. 39—40. Daniel Haines, 

07—13, Barnabus Swayze. 41-42, Alexander Boyles. 

13—15, William Kennedy. 43—14, Benjamin Hamilton. 
1&— 18, Thomas Vankirk. 

Warren County. 

1825, Jacob Thompson. 34—35, Charles Sltgreaves. 

26—28, Jeremy Mackey. 36—39, Robert H. Kennedy. 
29—30, Jonathan Robbins. 40, Caleb H. Valentine. 

31, Samuel Wilson. 41, Henry H. Van Ness. 

32—33, Charles Carter. 42—44, Charles J. Ihrle. 



MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY. 195 

MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY. 

1776 to 1844. 



Atlantic County. 

1837, Joseph Endicott. 40—41, Joseph S. Read. 

3S— 39, Robert B. Risley. 42—44, George Wheaton. 

Bergen County. 

1776, Peter Zabriskie. 16—17, Jacob Banta. 

76, 83, Theunis Dey. 16—17, Cornelius Merseiles. 

76, 84, 86, David Board. 16, 21—22, ireter Sip. 
77—78, Joast Beam. 18, Casparus Prior. 

77, 81, Garret Leydecker. 18, 24, Nathaniel Board. 

77, 82, 87—89, 1815, 19—20, 25—26, 29, 

John Cutwater. Cornelius Van Winkle. 

78—81, 87, Peter Wilson. 19, Silas Brinkerhoof. 

78, 97—1804, Thomas Blanch. 20, Sebe Brinkerhoof. 

79, Robert Morris. 21—23, John Westervelt, Jr. 
79—83, Isaac Blanch. 22—23, 25—27, David I. Christie 

80, Gabriel Og-deru 23—24, Garret Ackerson. 
82—83, 87, 94—95, Adam Boyd. 24, John Van Waggoner. 
84_86, 92, 96, 1810—11, 25, Henry B. Hagerman. 

Jacob Terhune (Ter- 26, Charles Kinsey. 
heun). 27, 30, Peter J. Terhune. 

84, Edow Merseallus. 27, Cornelius D. Van 

85, Abraham Blauvelt. Riper. 

85—86, 88—90, 93, Isaac Nicoll. 28, Christian Zabriskie. 
88—90, 93, John (A.) Benson. 28, Peter C. Westervelt. 

90—91, Edmund W. Kingsland28— 29, Andrew P. Hopper. 
91, 95, John Haring. 29—30, John Ward. 

91—92, 96, Henry Berry. 30, 33, Samuel R. Demarest. 

92—94, 96—1802, 04-06, 31, Garret Sip. 

Peter Ward. 31, Andrew H. Hopper. 

94, William M. Bell. 31, John R. Blauvelt. 

95, Benjamin Blaclidge. 32—33, Garret P. Hopper. 
97—98, Robert Campbell. 32—33, John M. Cornelison. 
99—1801, John Dey. 32, Samuel Demarest. 
02—04, 06, Isaac Kipp. 34, John F. Hopper. 
03—04, Martin I. Ryerson. 34—35, Abraham Lydecker. 
04—06, 08—09, Adrian Post. 34, Peter I. Ackerman. 
05—06, Odonijah Schuyler. 35, 36, Michael Saunier. 
06—07, 09—11, William Colfax. 35, John H. Hopper. 

07, John Vanhorn. 36, Henry Doremus. 

07, Abraham Forshee. 36, Jetur R. Riggs. 

08, 14—17, Albert C. Zabriskie. 37— 38, David D. Van Bussum. 
08—09, 18, John Hopper. 37—38, Albert G. Lydecker. 

10—11, 13, John A. Westervelt 37— 38, John Cassedy. 
12—13, Martin Van Houten. 39—40, John G. Ackerson. 
12—13, 19, Casparus Bogart. 39, Albert G. Doremus. 

12—13, Thomas Dickerson. 39—40, Albert J. Terhune. 

14, Richard Cadmus. 41 — 42, James I. Demarest. 

14, Jacob K. Mead. 41—42, John H. Zabriskie. 
15, 20—21, Charles Board. 43-44, William G. Hopper. 

15, Garret A. Lydacker. 43^44, Jacob C, Terhune. 



11*6 



Mii^MBERS OF ASSEMBLY. 



1776 to 1844. 



Burlington County. 



177&-77, Peter Tallman. 21—24, 

76, 78, 83, Caleb Shreve. 21—23, 

76, Joseph Newbold. 22, 

77, Samuel Rogers. 23—24, 
77—82, Thomas Fenimore. 25—27, 
78—79, Josiah Foster. 25—27, 
79, 85-90, Joseph Biddle. 25—28, 

80, William Trent. 28—30, 

80, William Hough. 28, 

81—83, Israel Shreve. 28, 

81, 83, 90—92, 95, 29, 

George Anderson. 29, 

82, Thomas Reynolds. 30, 

84. James Kinsey. 30—35, 

84, Cleayton Newbold. 30, 
84—85, 87, Richard S. Smith. 30—32, 

85, Joseph Smith. 

86, David Ridgway. 31—32, 
86, Uriah Woolman. 31—32. 

87—89. Robert-Strettle Jones. 31—32, 

88—90, Daniel Newbold. 31, 

91, Joshua M. Wallace. 32—34, 

91. Caleb Newbold. 33, 

92, 1801—04. John Lacey. 33, 

92—93, Thomas Hollenshead. 33—34, 

93—96. Samuel Hough. 33. 

93. Henry Ridgway. 34. 

94, Joseph Stokes. 34, 
94, John Van Emburgh. 34, 

95—96. Stacy Biddle. 35—36. 

96—1804. 06—09. 16—17. 35-36, 

William Coxe. Jr. 35—36. 
97. 1820—22. Thomas Newbold. 35— 36. 

97—1801. Job Lippincott. 36. 

97—1800. 02—07. 37—38. 

William Stocktooi. 37—38, 

98, Joseph Budd. 37, 

99—1804. 08-17, 19. 37, 

William Pearson. 38—39, 

1804—11. 13—14. William Irlck. 38, 

04—06. Isaac Cowgill. 39-^1, 

04—13. Caleb Earle. 39—11. 

10—15, Charles Ellis. 39-^0, 

12—17. Samuel J. Read. 40—41, 

15—16. William Reeve. 41—42, 

17—19. 24. John Evans. Jr. 42—44. 
18—19, 2.3—24. William Griffith. 42— 44, 

18—19, John Newbold. 42—44, 

18. Samuel Haines. 42, 

20, George Hulme. 43 — 44, 

20—22, 25-27. Gershom MotL 43-44, 

20, William Stockton, Jr. 



Richard L. Beatty. 
William Woolman. 
Samuel Deacon. 
Jonathan Hough. 
29, Joshua S. Earl. 
Isaiah Toy. 
37— il, John Emley. 
Samuel Black. 
Philip F. Howell. 
Richard Eayre. 
John Warren. 
Charles M. Wells. 
Charles Stokes. 
George Deacon. 
Richard Campion. 
Benjamin H. Lippin- 
cott. 
Joshua Wright, Jr. 
Benjamin Shreve, Jr. 
William R. Allen. 
Samuel Black. 
Israel Biddle. 
John H. Rulon. 
Zebedee ^^L Wills. 
Isaac Hilliard. 
George Black. 
Benjamin F^h. 
Amos Stiles. 
Thomas Page, M. D. 
Anderson Lalor. 
Moses Wills. 
Thomas F. Budd. 
Benjamin Davis. 
John W. Fennimore. 
Jesse Richards. 
Amos W. Archer. 
Robert C. Hutchinson. 
Phineas S. Bunting. 
Bowes Reed Brown. 
William W. Norcross. 
William Biack. 
Levi Borton. 
Elihu Mathis. 
Isaac Stokes. 
Thomas H. Richards. 
John C. Deacon. 
Benjamin Ridgway. 
Joseph Satterthwait. 
Thomas Harrison. 
Thomas Harris. 
Isaiah Adams. 



MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY. 



197 



1776 to 1844. 



Cape May Coanty. 

1776, Eli Eldridge. 94, David Johnston. 

76, Joseph Savage. 94—95, Eleazer Hand. 

76—77, Hugh Hathorne. 95, Reuben Townsend. 

77, 79, 84, Henry- Young Town- 96, 99, 1801, Abijah Smith. 



send, 
77—78, 80—81, 

Jeremiah Eldredge. 

78, John Hand. 
78, 81, 87-88. 90-96, 

Richard Townsend. 

79, James Whilden. 
79, Jonathan Learning. 

80, 83, Joseph Hildreth. 
80-82, 86—88, 91—93, 1804, 

Matthew Whilden. 
82—83, 85—86, John Baker. 
82, 84—92, 96, 98. 

Elijah Townsend. 
84, Levi Eldredge 
signed). 
85, 89—90, Nezer Swain. 
89, Eli Townsend. 
93, Ebenezer Newton. 



97, 1800. Persons Leaming. 
1802—04. 10, Joseph Falkin- 

burge. 
05—07, 09. 12-13, 

Thomas H. Hughes. 
06, 08, 11, 15—17, 18—19, 22, 

Nicholas Willits. 

13, Joshua Swain. 

14, Robert M. Holmes. 
20—21, 23, 26, 28—29, 

Joshua Townsend. 
24—25, 27, Israel Townsend. 
30—33, Jeremiah Leaming. 
34—35. Richard Thomson. 
(Re- 36— 37. Amos Corson. 

38—39, Thomas P. Hughes. 
40 — 41, Maurice Beesley. 
42—44, Reuben Wlllets. 



Cumberland County. 



1776—77, 82—84, 86—87, 92, 03—04, 

Ephraim Harris. 04, 

76, 78, 82—83, 85—86, 96, 99, 1800,05-06, 

Jonathan Bowen. 05—06, 

76—78, John Buck. 06, 16. 

77. 94, Ephraim Seeley. 06—07, 
78—79. James Ewing. 07—08. 
79, 91—93. Joel Fithian. 08—09, 

79, Timothy Elmer. 

80. Thomas Ewing. 09—15. 
80, Samuel Ogden. 10, 

80, Ladis Walling. 12—13, 
81—83, Joshua Ewing. 14, 

81, Joshua Brick. 15—16, 
81, Josiah Seeley. 15, 17, 
84, William Kelsey. 16. 18, 

84—85, 87—89, 91—92, 17—18, 

John Burgin. 18—19. 

85—88. John Sheppard. 19—23. 

88—89, Eli Elmer. 

89—91. 93—95, 1817, 19, 20-23, 

Ebenezer Elmer. 22, 

90, 1800. Richard Wood, Jr. 23—25, 

93, 96—97, David Moore. 24, 

94—95, Benjamin Peck. 25, 

95. Ebenezer Seeley. 26—29. 

96—97, James Harris. 26—28, 

98, Isaac Wheaton. 29, 

98, John Sheppard, Jr. 29, 

99—1802, George Burgin. 30—31, 

1801—04, Azel Pierson. 30, 



Robert Smith. 
Abijah Davis. 
James Lee. 
Jedediah Ogden. 
James D. Westcott. 
Benjamin Champneys. 
Jonathan Moore. 
11. 13, 

Ephraim Bateman. 
Daniel Richman. 
Isaac Watts Crane. 
Stephen Willis. 
Thomas Lee. 

20, 24, Nathan Leake. 
John S. Wood. 
Daniel Parvin. 
John Sibley. 

21, John Lannlng, Jr. 
25-28, 30, 

William B. Ewing. 
Lucius Q. C. Elmer. 
J. Mayhew. 
Ishrael Stratton. 
George Souder. 
Edmund Sheppard. 
Nathaniel Foster. 
36. Elias P. Seeley. 
Philip Fithian. 
Michael Swing. 
Jeremiah Stratton. 
William D. Barrett. 



198 



MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY. 



1776 to 1844. 



31—32, John Lannlng. 37, 

31, Henry Shaw. 

32, 43—44, Josiah Shaw, 38—39, 

32, Reuben Hunt. 38, 

33, Jeremiah Stull. 40, 
33, Noah W. Flanagan. 40-^1, 
33. William Lore. 40—41, 

34—36, Thomas E. Hunt. 41, 

34—35, 39, Isaac Newcomb. 42, 

34, 39, Ephraim H. Whitaker 42, 

(Whltecar). 42, 

36, Peter Ladow. 43—14, 

37, Noah W. Flanagin. 43—44, 
37, Samuel Bowen. 



David Whitaker 
(Whitecar). 
Belford M. Bonham, 
David Jones. 
Lewis Rice. 
Benjamin F. Chew. 
William P. Seeley. 
Elmer Ogden. 
Thomas Ware. 
Joseph Butcher. 
John R. Cory. 
Daniel L. Burt. 
Joseph Taylor. 



E.ssex County. 



1776, 83—85, Abraham Clark. 
76—82, 93, Caleb Camp. 
76, 82—88, Henry Garritse. 

77, Edward Fleming. 
77—79, 81, Jacob Brookfield. 
78, 82, Isaac Woodruff. 
79—80, Josiah Hornblower. 
80, 82-83, 85—86. 89, 93, 
Daniel Marsh, 

81, Samuel Potter. 
84, John Peck. 
86—87, 90, Jonathan Dayton, 
87—90, 94—97, Jonas Wade. 
88—89, John Condit. 

90, Abraham Ogden. 
91—92, 94—96. Elias Dayton. 
91—92, Matthias Williamson, 
91—92, Israel Hedden. 
93, 96, 98—1800. 06—07, 

Abraham Spear. 
94—95, James Hedden. 
97—99, William S, 
ton. 



08-09, 19, Nathan Squier. 
08, Andrew Wilson. 

10, Joseph Quinby. 

11, Thaddeus Mills. 
11, 14, Samuel Condit. 

11, Abraham Ackerman. 
12—13, 19, Charles Kinsey. 
12—14, James Wilson. 
12—13, 16, Silas Condit. 
14—15, Jonathan Dayton. 
15—16, 20, 22—23, John Dow. 

16, Isaac H. Williamson. 
17—19, Thomas T. Kinney. 
17—23, Samuel B. Miller. 
20, 26—27, Stephen D. Day. 
21—22, Philemon Dickerson. 

21, Caleb Halstead. 

23, 25. John Mann. 

24, Francis C. F. Ran- 
dolph. 

24, 26-27, Amzi Dodd. 
Penning- 24— 26, 28, William Stites. 

25, John Travers. 



97, Stansbury Recompence 
98—1800, 05—06, 09. 16, 

Charles Clark. 
1800—01, Jabez Parkhurst. 
01. 04, 06, 10, 

Amos Harrison. 
01, Ralph Post. 
02—04, 07. 10. 24, 28. 

Abraham Godwin^ 
02—04, 08—09, 13, 15, 17—18, 

Israel Day. 
02—04, Ezra Darby. 
04, 06, James Willcock, 
04. 06—09, Silas Whitehead. 
05—06, 10—15. 20—23, 25, 

Samuel Pennington. 
05 — 06, Moses Jacques. 
05—06, 17—18, William Gould 
07, Abraham Vanhouten 



26, Brant Van Blarcom. 

27, Oliver S. Halsted. 
27—28, Dennis Coles. 

28, William Pennington. 

29, Joseph C. Hornblower. 
29, John J. Chetwood. 
29, John Vail. 

29, Luther Little. 
30, 33, Cornelius G. VanRiper. 
30—32, John J. Baldwin. 
30—32. Ira F. Randolph. 

30, Moses Smith. 
30, Stephen J. Meeker. 

31—32, David Martin. 
31—32. John P. Jackson. 
31—32, William Dickey. 
33—34, Asa Whitehead. 
33—34. John J. Brvant. 
33, Robert Morrell. 



MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY. 



199 





1776 


to 1844 


33-34, 


Gideon Ross, 


39-40, 


34-35, 


Andrew Parsons. 


39-^0, 


34, 


Jonas Smith. 


40-41, 


35-36, 


Jacob Flatt. 


40—41, 


35-36, 


Joseph N. Tuttle. 


40—41, 


35-36, 


James W. Wade. 




35-36, 


John J. Chetwood. 


41-44, 


36-37. 


William J. Pierson. 


41, 


37, 


Stephen Dod. 


41-42, 


37-38, 


Alexander C. M. Pen-41-42. 




nington. 


42-44, 


37-38, 


John Littell. 


42-44, 


37, 


Israel CTane. 


42—44, 


38—39, 


Edward Sanderson. 


42-44, 


38-39, 


William Stites. 


43-44, 


38, 


Abraham V. Spear. 


43^4, 



James H. Robinson. 
Samuel H. Gardner. 
William B. Baldwin. 
Alexander Wilson. 
Benjamin P. Brook- 
field. 
Stephen Congar. 
Jonas Smith. 
David B. Lum. 
Jabez Cook. 
Lemuel W. Jacobus. 
Jotham Potter. 
Samuel C. Smith. 
Jephtha Baldwin. 
Isaac Van Wagenan. 
John Runyon. 



Gloucester County. 



76, 92, Richard Somers. 

76, Robert F. Price. 

76, 1801, Isaac Mickle. 

77, 78, Elijah Clark. 

77, John Wilkins, Jr. 
77, Isaac Tomlinson. 

78, 81—85, 87—93, 1803—04, 

Joseph Cooper. 
79—80, John Sparks. 

79, Joseph Low. 
79—80, Thomas Rennard. 

80, Isaac Kay. 
81—83, 90, Samuel Hugg. 

78, 81—85, Joseph Ellis (Re- 
signed). 
84—88, 90—91. Thomas Clark. 

85, David Davis. 
86—89, Franklin Davenport. 

86, John Kille. 
89, 93, 95—97, 1800. 02, 

Abel Clement. 
91—94, John Blackwood. 

94, Benjamin Whitall. 
94, 99, Thomas Wilkins. 
95—97, 1800—02, 

Samuel French. 
95—96, Thomas Somers. 

97, Daniel Leeds. 
98—99, Joshua L. Howell. 
98—1802. Samuel W. Harrison. 

98, James Wilkins. 
1803—06. Robert Newell. 
03—04, 15—16, Richard Risley. 
05—06, Reuben Clark. 
05—06, Samuel G. Champion. 
06, 10—11, Matthew Gill. 
06—07, 10, Michael C. Fisher. 
07—^8, 11, Jacob Glover. 
07—08. 10. Benjamin Rulon. 
08—09, Thomas Doughty. 



08, 11, Joseph V. Clark. 

09, John Brick. 
12—17, Isaac Pine, 
12—13, Joseph C. Swett. 
12—13, Daniel Carrell. 
13—14, 24, 26, Charles French 
(Jun.). 

14, Nicholas Rape. 
15—17, Edward Sharp. 

17, 23, 28, John Estile (Estill). 

18, 24, 26, Daniel Lake. 
18—19, Samuel Kille. 

18, Samuel L, Howell. 

19, Jeremiah J. Foster. 

19, Thomas Garwood. 

20, Jehu Wilson. 
20, William Tatem. 

20, 23. John Moore White. 
21—22, 25, 33, 34, 

John R. Scull. 

21, 23, 28, 

Charles C. Stratton. 
21—22, Joseph Kaighn. 

22, Isaac Mickle, Jr. 
24—25, Benjamin B. Cooper. 

24, Thomas Chapman. 
26—27, Thomas Bee. 
27—28, 37—38, Joseph Porter. 
27, 29. John W. Mickle. 

29, Isaac Hinchman. 
29—30, Japhet Ireland. 
30—31, Jacob Po-owey. 

30—31, 38-40, Charles Reeves. 

30, Robert L. Armstrong. 
31—32, Charles F. Wilkins. 
31—32, Samuel B. Westcott. 

32, John Gill. Jr. 

32. 38—40. Elijah Bower. 
33—35, Joseph Rogers. 

33. Jesse Smith. 



200 MEMBERS OP ASSEMBLY. 

1776 to 1844. 

o^""of' 5^^1"am R. Cooper. 41, Joseph L. Plerson. 

■^ o^' ?^"^"el B. Llppencott.41— 42, Thomas H. Whitney, 
o. E' Joseph Endicott. 41, John B. Miller. 

1^3 Joseph W. Cooper. 41, Charles Knight. 

^^E' James W. Caldwell. 42, Samuel C. All^n. 

^^J- P'l^'^ ^- O&den. 42, Charles H. French, 

oo ^a' t°^" Richards. 43-^4. Nathan T. Stratton. 

39—40, Joseph Franklin. 43—44, Thomas B. Wood. 

39—40, 42, Richard W. Snow- 43— 44, Benjamin Harding, 
den. 43-^4, Samuel W. Cooper. 

HudMon County. 

.,^^12' 'I°J^"^^- Condit. 43^4. Benjamin F. Welch. 

41—42, Abraham L. Van Bos- 
kerck. 

Hunterdon County. 

177&— 78, John Hart. 07—11, 21, Moses Stout. 

'^' E- John Mehelm. 09-11, 22, James J. Wilson. 
rrr, lo' £"^^'?s Coxe. 10, Elnathan Stevenson. 

II~H' ^^' Nehemiah Dunham. 11, Thomas Prall, Jr. 
^^'.J^^' S3-88. 91-93. 95-98,12-13, William Potts. 

1800, 02, 12—13, David Manners. 
Benjamin Van Cleve. 12—13, Benjamin Wright, 

/8, David Chambers. 13—14, Edward Yard. 

''^2' Jared Sexton. 13—14, Samuel Barber. 

o. 3 William Gano. 13—14, John Opdycke. 

80—85, 88, John Lambert. 15—16, John Farlee. 

82-84, Samuel Tucker. 15—17, William Nixon. 

85—87, Joab Houghton. 15—16, 18—20. 23 
86-87. ^90, 94, Abraham Stout. 

John Anderson. 16—17, Thomas Prall. 

88, Robert Taylor. 17—18, Robert McNeely. 

89, Joshua Corshen. 18—19. 27—29, Isaac G. Farlee. 
«« ^' £,h^^^^s Axford. 18—23, George Maxwell. 
90—92, Thomas Lowrey. 19, 21, Isaac Taylor. 

90, 92. John Taylor. 20, Israel Taylor 

no tl' ,4^°ii ^- Woodruff. 20—21, 25—27. Thomas Capner. 
93-98. 1800. 02. 22, Levi Knowles. 

Simon Wyckoff. 22, 27, Garret D. Wall. 

93, Samuel Stout. 23—28. 30—32. Enoch Clifford. 

^f~^^' 2^VA Kl^^^- 23-24, David Johnston. 

96-97, 99—1800, 02. 24-26, Asa C. Dunham. 

Stephen Burrows. 24, 28—31. Alexander Wurts. 

97, Sajnuel R. Stewart. 25—26, 30, 33, John Barton. 

98, Joseph Beavers. 28—29. Stacv G. Potts. 
98-99, ISOl, 03-08, 29, Gabr'iel Hoff. 

f>n ,o«/9?®5h Hankinson. 30—33. Edward S. Mcllvaine. 
99—1801, 03—06, 17, John Haas. 30— 32, 34—35, 

■.oa-,^^ao'^°.!J"^J^^?"®^^- William Marshall. 

1801 03— 06. Nathan Stout. 31—32, Cornelius Ludlow. 

^^~5?' ?^^^^ Gordon. 33—34, William H. Sloan. 

04, Hugh Runyon. 33—34, Sutphin Garrison, 
n. SI' ¥r}K^^ ,Tucker. 33. Andrew Weart. 

05—06, 08, Joshua Wright. 33—34, John W. Kline. 
06—14, Aaron Vansyckle. 34, William McKee. 

07. John Dowers. 35—36, Joseph Brown. 



MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY. 



201 



1776 to 1844. 



35—37, John Hall. 
35—36, Wilson Bray. 
35—36. John Blane. 

36, Andrew Larason. 

37, James A. Phillips. 
37—38, David Neighbour. 
37, 43—44, Jonathan Pickel. 

37, John H. Huffman. 
38—40, Philip Hiler. 

38, James Snyder. 



39—40, George Servis. 
39—40, Joseph Exton. 

41, Jonathan Dawes. 
41 — 42, Leonard H. Flamer- 

felt. 
41—42, John B. Mattison. 
41 — 42, Isaac R. Srope. 
43—44, John Swackhamer. 
43^, John H. Case. 
43 — 44, Joseph Johnson. 



Mercer County. 

1838—39, Josiah S. Worth. 41—42, John B. Mount. 

38, Robert C. Hutchinson. 42, Isaac Batten. 
39—40, William Rosco. 42, Henry W. Green. 

40, James Wilson. 43—44, Israel J. Woodward. 

41, Isaac Baker. 43—44, Richard J. Bond. 
41, Isaac W. Lanning. 43 — 44, John Lowry. 



Middlesex Connty. 



1776, 82—88, 91, 99, 1802, 06—10, 

John Combs. 

1776, Daniel Moores. 06—07, 

76—78, 94—95, 99, 08^10, 

Benjamin Manning. 11, 

■ 77, 79, Matthias Baker. 11, 

77, Jacob Vandike. 11, 17, 
78, 80, Jacob Schenck. 14—15, 

78, Ebenezer Ford. 14, 

79, John Neilson. 16, 
79, Thomson Stelle. 16—18, 

80—82, Jacob Suydam. 17—18, 

80, 88, Melancthon Freeman. 19, 25, 

81. Jacob Martin. 19, 21- 

81—82, John Conger. 19—22, 
83—85, 88, James Schuurman. 20—26, 

83, Samuel Fitz-Randolph. 

84. Moses Bloomfield. 23—24. 
85—86, 87, 89, James Bonney. 23—24. 
86—87, James Douglass. 27—28, 

89, John Beatty. 28, 

89—90, 92—93. 96, 98, 29, 

Thomas McDowell. 29, 

90—95. Peter Vredenbergh. 29, 

90—92, John Runyan, 30—31, 

93, John Rattoone. 30—31. 

94—98. James Morgan. 31—32. 

96, Joseph F. Randolph. 32, 
97—1804, Gershom Dunn. 32, 

97. Andrew Kirkpatrick. 32, 34, 
1800, 14—15, William Edgar. 33, 
1800—01, John Neilson. 33, 
01—06. 12—13. 20. 33. 36. 

Erkuries Beatty. 33—34, 
03—10, 12—13, James ■Voorhees34— 35, 

05—06. Andrew Elston. 34—35. 



12—13, 15—16, 18, 27, 
James Parker. 
Alexander Dunn. 
George Boice. 
John Brewster. 
John L. Anderson. 
26, James T. Dunn. 
John N. Simpson. 
Alexander Dunn. 
Hezekiah Smith. 
Allison Ely. 
Frazee Ayres. 
27—28, Charles Carson. 
-22. Samuel Edgar. 
25—26. James Cook. 
30-51, 

John T. McDowell. 
James F. Randolph. 
David Schenck. 
Andrew Snowhill. 
Nicholas Booraem. 
Littleton Kirkpatrick. 
Abraham Cruser. 
Josiah B. Howell. 
Lewis S. Randolph. 
Charles G. McChesney. 
David W. Vail. 
John H. Disborough. 
Simeon Mundy. 
Henry Vandyke. 
John M. Tufts. 
Abraham W. Brown. 
Samuel C. Johnes. 
37, Richard S. Field.. 
Ralph M. Crowell. 
Elias Runyon. 



202 



MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY. 



1776 to 1844. 

85—38, George P. Malleson. 40—41, 

35, Georgre T. McDowell. 40, 

36, Thompson Edgar. 40, 
36, William C. Alexander. 41, 

37—38, David B. Appleget. 41, 

37—39, Lewis Golding. 42-^4, 

38, 40, Adam Lee. 42, 
39, Frederick Richmond. 42—44, 

39, 41, David Dunn, 42—44, 
39, Cornelius C. Cruser. 43—44, 



John Acken. 
Israel R. Corlell. 
Dean Britton. 
Frazee Ayres. 
Aaron Gulick. 
John D. Field. 
Warren Brown. 
William Patterson. 
William L. Schenck. 
Joel B. Laing. 



Monmouth County. 



1770, 81—82, 92, 

John Covenhoven. 

76, Joseph Holmes, Jr. 
76—79, James Mott, Jr. 
77_78, 86, Peter Schenck. 
77—79, Hendrick Smock. 
79—81, Thomas Seabrook. 

80, Nathaniel Scudder. 
80—84, Thomas Henderson. 
82—85, Daniel Hendrickson. 

83, Peter Covenhoven. 
84—86, 94—95, Elisha Walton 
85—1801. Joseph Stillwell. 
87—93. Thomas Little, 
87—89, James Rogers. 



20, Isaac Hance. 
21—24, William I. Conover. 
21—22. Corlis Lloyd. 
21—27, John T. Woodhull. 

22. John J. Ely. 

23, Cornelius Walling. 
24—26, Joseph Conover. 
24—30, James West. 

27, James Hopping. 
28—30, Daniel H. Ellis. 

28. Leonard Walling. 
29—30, Augustus W. Bennett. 
29—30, Ivins (W.) Davis. 

31, 33, Benjamin Woodward. 
31—36, Annaniah Gifford. 



90—91, 93—96, John (H.) ImlaySl. 33—35. Daniel B. Ryall 



96. William Wickoff. 

97, 1808, Robert Montgomery. 
97—1800, William Lloyd. 

98, 1800, 08. David Gordon. 
99, Edward Taylor. 

1801—07. James Cox. 
01—04, 10—11, Peter Knott. 
01—07, John A. Scudder. 
04—07, 09, Henry Tiebout. 
08, 12—13. Tylee Williams. 
Silas Crane. 



31, 33—36, Thomas G. Height. 

32, James S. Lawrence. 

32, Nicholas Van Wickle. 

32, Elisha Lippincott. 
34^36, William Burtis. 

36, Arthur V. Conover. 

37, Samuel Mairs. 

37, Edmund T. Williams. 
37, Thomas Miller. 
37, James Gulick. 
38—39, James Craig. 



09—10, 13—14, John S. Holmes. 38— 39, Thomas E. Combs. 
10—11, 13—14. 19—20. :^S— 39. William P. Forman 

Thomas Cox. 38—39. Garret Hiers. 

11, 13—14, James Anderson. 40, John Meirs. 

12—13, John Stillwell. 40, Henry W. Wolcott. 

12—13, 23, 25—28, James Lloyd. 40, James Grover 



15—16, George Holcombe. 
15—18, 20, 

Matthias Van Barkle. 
15—18, Reuben Shreve. 
17—19, 21, Charles Parker. 
18—19, William Ten Eycke. 

19, Jacob Butcher. 

20. Samuel F. Allen. 



40. Charles Morris. 
41—44, Thomas C. Throck- 
morton. 
41 — 44, John R. Conover. 
41 — 44, Joseph Brinley. 
41 — 44, Benjamin L. Irons. 
41—44. Samuel R. Oliphant. 



MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY. 



203 



1776 to 1844. 



Morris County. 



1776—78, Jacob Drake. 

76—77, 79, 81—90, Ellis Cook. 
76—77, William Woodhull. 
78—79, Abraham Kitchel. 
78, 95, David Thomson. 



19—20, 
20—21, 



20, 
22—23, 



79, Alexander Carmichael. 23— 26, 



William Winds. 
80, John Carle. 
80, Eleazer Lindsly. 
81—82, 84, 86—90, 93—94, 97, 
-04, 09, 

Aaron Kitchel. 
81—83, 85-88, 91, 95, 
John Starke. 
83, Jonathan Dickerson. 
84—85. 89—90, Jacob Arnold, 
91—94, 96—98, 1800, 

Silas Condit. 
91—92, Hiram Smith. 

92, John Wurts. 
93—94, 96—97, 1800, 

David Welsh. 

95, John Debow. 

96, John Cobb. 
98—99, 1801—04, 

William Corwin. 
98—1800, Cornelius Voorhees. 

99, William Campfield. 
1802—04, Jonathan Ogden. 
04—06, Jesse Upson. 
05—09, Lewis Condict. 
05—06, George Tucker. 
06—08, Nicholas Neighbour. 
07—13, Stephen Dod. 
10—14, Jephthah B. Munn 
10, 13—15, Nicholas 

ville. 
11—13, Mahlon Dickerson. 
13, 31, Leonard Neighbor. 
14—22, David Thompson, Jr. 
15—16, 19, Benjamin Condit. 
15—16, Ezeklel Kitchell. 
16—18, Samuel Halliday. 
17—18, John S. Darcy. 
■^'j 21 22 24 

Benjamin McCiirry43— 44, 

(McCourry). 43—44. 

18—19, 21—24, 32, 43—44, 

William Brittin. 



24 

25—26, 

25—27, 

180126, 35, 

27, 

27, 

27, 

28—30, 

28—30, 

28—30, 

31, 

31, 33- 

31, 35, 

32, 

32, 

32, 

33—34, 

33—35, 

33—34, 

35, 

36, 

36, 

36, 

36, 

37—38, 

37—38, 

37—38, 

37—38, 

39 40 

Mande-39— 4o! 
39, 

39-^0, 

40-41, 
41, 

41—42, 
41, 
42, 
42, 

42—44, 



Silas Cook, 
23, 28—30, 
William Monro. 
Benjamin Smith. 
25, Ebenezer F. Smith. 
George K. Drake. 
John Scott. 
Joseph Dickerson. 
Ephraim Marsh. 
John D. Jackson. 
David Mills. 
Stephen Thompson. 
Walter Kirkpatrick. 
Joseph Jackson. 
Charles Hillard. 
John Hancock. 
Elijah Ward. 
-34, Thomas Miilr. 
James Cook. 
Samuel Beach. 
Jacob W. Miller. 
Joseph Smith. 
Joseph Dickerson, Jr. 
Henry Hilliard. 
Silas Lindsley. 
Isaac Quimby. 
John A. Bleeker. 
William Dellicker. 
Alexander Dickerson. 
William Logan. 
Lewis Condict. 
Silas Tuttle. 
Robert C. Stephens. 
Ezekiel B. Gaines. 
Abraham Brittin. 
Ebenezer F. Smith. 
Jacob Weise. 
Paul B. De Bow. 
James W. Drake. 
Samuel B. Halsey. 
William Stephens. 
Thomas C. Willis, 
Samuel C. Halsey. 
David T. Cooper. 
James Clark. 
John M. Losey. 
Samuel Willet. 
George Vail. 



Passaic County. 

1837, Aaron S. Pennington. 42, Martin I. Ryersouu 
37—38, Henry M. Brown. 42, Adrian R. Van Hou- 

38—39, Elisha Clarke. ten. 

39-^0, John F. Ryerson, 43—44, William S. Hogen- 

40, James Speer. camp. 

41, George M. Ryerson. 43 — 44, Thaddeus Board. 
41. Samuel A. Van Saun. 



204 



MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY. 



1776 to 1844. 



Salem County. 



1776, 86, 89, 

Edmund Wetherby. 

76, Samuel Dick. 

76, Elisha Basset, Jr. 
77, 87—89, Benjamin Holme. 
77—79, Whitten Cripps. 

77, 82, 84—85, 87—88. 

Thomas Sinnlckson. 

78, 80, Allen Congleton, Jr. 
78—80, John Mayhew. 

79, 82, 84—85, Anthony Sharp. 

80, 84, William Smith. 

81, 83. 86. 

Ephraim Lloyd. 
81—82, 84—85, 87—89, 

Edward Hall. 
81, James James. 
83, Thomas Norrls. 
86, 90—91, Samuel Sharp. 
90, John SmJth. 
90, Benjamin Cripps. 

91, 93. Bateman Lloyd. 
91—95, 98, John Sinnlckson. 
92—95, 1800. Eleazer Mayhew. 

92. 94. Thomas Clement. 
95—97, William Wallice. 

96, William Parret. 

96. Gervas Hall. 

97. Clement Hall. 

97. 99. 1801. Artis Seagrave. 

98, 1800, Anthony Keasby. 
98—99, Joseph Shinn. 
99—1800, Isaac Moss. 
1801—04, Edward Burroughs. 
01—04, Merryman Smith. 
02—04, Samuel Ray. 

04—14. Jeremiah Dubois. 
05—06. Charles Jones. 
05—06, Hedge Thompson. 
06—08. Daniel Garrison. 

06. Daniel Tracy. 
07—08, Nathan Bassett. 
09—10, 17. Philip C-urriden. 
09, 11, John Smith. 

10, Samuel Miller. 

11, Anthony Nelson. 
12—13. Robert H. Van Meter. 
12—15, 19, James Newell. 
13—14, John Dickinson. 

13, 26—27. Henry Freas. 
15—16. Joseph Kille. 

15, 19—20. 22. Morris Hancock, 
16—18, Stacy Lloyd. 

16, 18. John Mayhew. 
17, Peter Bilderback. 



18. 
19, 

20, 30, 
20-21, 

21, 23, 
21, 23, 

22, 
22. 
23, 

24—26. 

24—25. 
24, 
26. 

27, 29. 
27, 



29, 
29, 31. 



32, 34, 
33, 
33. 
33. 
34. 
34. 

35 — 36. 
35, 
35, 
36, 
36. 
37. 

37, 42, 
38. 

38-39. 

38-39. 
39. 
40, 
40, 
40, 
41. 
41. 
41, 
42. 
42. 

43—44. 

43^4, 

43^4, 



Thomas Yarrow. 
Thomas Murphy. 
Zaccheus Ray. 
John G. Mason. 
25, Robert G. Johnson. 
Abraham Sv/Int?. 
Jonathan Richman. 
John Sinnlckson. 
Aaron O. Dayton. 
Samuel Humphreys. 
Israel R. Clawson. 
Samuel Clement. 
Benjamin Archer. 
William N. Jeffers. 
Thomas Sinnlckson. 
Edward SmJth. 
Jeremiah Foster. 
William J. Shinn. 
Jacob Wick. 
David Hurley. 
Joseph C. Nelson. 
John Summerill. 
James Butcher. 
Isaac Johnsoru 
Anthony Nelson. 
James W. Mulford. 
37, Isaac Johnson. 2nd. 
Nehemiah Garrison. 
Richard P. Thompson. 
Jacob Hitchner. 
Samuel Humphreys. 
Joseph Lippencott. 
Hudson A. Springer. 
Thomas J. Yorke. 
William Cook. 
Woodnut Petit. 
H. J. FMes. 
John Hall. 
John W. Maskell. 
Joseph Hancock. 
John Sumerille. Jr. 
Moses Richman, Jr. 
Da\id Hurley. 
John Dickinson. 
Samuel Bolton. 
Alexander G. Cattell. 
John G. Ballinger. 
William H. Nelson. 
Thomas Flanagan. 
Nathaniel Robbins, Sr. 
Thomas Dickinson, Jr. 
Samuel Capner. 
Allen Wallace. 
Thomas Bilderback. 



MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY. 205 

1776 to 1844. 
Somerset County. 

1776, Jacob Bogart. 1804, 16—19. 22—23, 

76, Alexander MacEowen^ James Stryker. 

76, Reoloff Vandike. 04, John Annin. 
77—78, William-C h u r c h i 1 105—10, Peter I. Stryker. 

Houston. 07, Samuel Swan. 

77, Alexander KirkpatrickOS— 10, John N. Simpson. 
77—79, Reoloff Sebring. 13—15, Samuel Bayard. 

78, 80—81, 84, David Kirkpat-13— 19, Joseph Annin. 

rick. 15, Andrew Howell. 

79—88, 94, Edward Bunn. 16, Cornelius Van Horn. . 

79, Henry Vandike. 17—19, Martin Schenck. 

80, 84, Christopher Hoagland. 20— 21, 23—25, Dickinson Miller 
81—82, John Schuurman. 20—25, 30—31, Jacob Kline. 

82, Deick Longstreet. 20—21, John H. Disborough. 

83, Cornelius Ten-Broeck. 22, Henry Vanderveer. 

83, 89, John Witherspoon. 24—27, James S. Green. 

84, 1800—04, 26—27, James D. Stryker. 

Frederick Frelin.ghuy-28— 29, James S. Nevius. 
sen. 28, William C. Annin. 

85—89, 92, 28, John H. Voorhees. 

Robert Blaire (Blair). 29—31, Ferdinand S. Schenck. 
85—87, David Kelley. 30—31, 35, William Cruser. 

88, John Hardenbergh. 32—34, John Brees. 
89, 1812—13, 32—34, William D. Stewart. 

Jacob R. Hardenburgh32— 34, Cornelius L. Harden- 
90—91, 93, 95, Robert Stockton. burg. 

90_91, 94—96, 1811—13, 26—27, 29,35—36, Nicholas C. Jobs. 

Peter D. Vroom. 35, William D. McKissack 

90-91, James Ldnn. 36—38, David T. Talmage. 

92, William Wallace. 36—38. Henry Duryee. 
92—99, 1811, Henry Southard. 37—38, Ralph Voorhees. 

93. Jonathan Ford Morris. 39 — 41. Henry H. Wilson. 
96—1810, 12—14, 39—41, Daniel Cory. 

James Van Duyn. 39—41, Arthur V. P. Sutphin. 

97, John Stryker. 42 — 44, Samuel Reynolds. 

98. David Kelly. 42—44, Peter Voorhees. 
99—1806. 11, 42-^4, Peter Kline. 

William McEowen. 

Sussex County. 

1776—78. Casper Shaffer. 82—92, Aaron Hankinson. 

76, Abia Brown, 83, William Maxwell. 
76—77, Thomas Peterson. 84—89, Charles Beardslee. 

77, John MacMurtie. 85—88, Christopher L o n g - 

78, Jacob MacCollum. street. 

78, Benjamin MacCul-89— 90, John Rutherford. 

lough. 90, Robert Ogden. 

79, Mark Thompson. 91—92, William H e 1 m e s 

79, 81, Peter Hopkins. (Helms). 

79, Anthony Broderick. 91—92, Bidleman Voluntine 

80, Edmund Martin. (Valentine). 

80, Hugh Hughes. 93—96, 99, William McCul- 

80, Samuel Kennedy. lough. 

81, Joshua Swayze. 93—94, Martin Ryerson. 
81—84, Isaac Van-Campen. 93—97, Peter Sharp. 

82, Isaac Martin. 95, George Armstrong. 



MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY. 



1770 to 1844. 



96-97, Peter Smith. 

97, Thomas Armstrong. 
97—98. John Gustin, 
98—1800, Josepi. Gaston. 
98—1806, Levi Howell. 

98, William Runkle. 
99—1802. Silas Dickerson. 
1800, 04—06. 10—12, 

Joseph Sharp. 
01-04, John Linn. 
01—04, Abraham Shaver. 
03—04, John Johnson. 
04—06, 0&-11, 

William Kennedy. 
05—06, William Armstrong. 
06—08, Henry Hankinson. 

06, John Coursen. 
06—07, Daniel Harker. 

06, William A. Ryerson. 
07—09, Aaron Kerr. 
07—09. John Cox. 
09—11, Richard Edsall. 

10, George Bidleman. 

11. Garret Vleit. 
12—15. Simon Cortright. 
12—15, James Davison. 
12—15. Robert W. Rutherford 
13—15, Joseph Sharp. 

16—17. Abraham Bidleman. 
16—19, Robert C. Thomson. 

16, William Darrah. 

16, Peter Decker. 
17—19, George Beardslee. 
17—19, Jeremy Mackey. 
18—19, 22-23. 

Thomas Teasdale, Jr. 

20, Jacob Hornbeck. 



20, Abraham Shaver. 

20, Peter Kline. 
20, 23, Joseph Coryell. 
21—22, Leffert Haughawout. 
21—22, 32—34, 

Benjamin Hamilton. 

21, Jacob Ayres. 
21—22, 24, James Egbert. 

23, Abraham Newman. 
23, 25—27, Joseph Chandler. 

24, Daniel Swayze. 
24, Evi A. Saver. 

24, Joseph Edsall. 

25, Nathan A. Shafer. 
26—27, Hiram Munson. 
28—31. Peter Merkel. 
28—29, James Evans. 
30—31. Simeon McCoy. 
30-.01, John Hull. 

32—34. Joseph Greer 
32—33. Peter Young. 
34—35. Joshua Shay. 
35—36, John Strader. 
35—36. Joseph Linn. 

36. Benjamin Hull. 
■^7-38. William J. Wlllson. 
.37—38. Isaac Shiner. 
37—38. John Hull. 
39—40. Samuel Truex. 
39-40. William H. Nyce. 
39-40. Joseph Greer. 
41—42. Isaac Bonnell. 
41—42. David Hynard. 
41-42. Nathan Smith. 
43 — 44. Jesse Bell. 
43 — 44. Absalom Dunning. 
43—44. Timothy H. Cok. 



W'^arren County. 



1825, James Egbert. 34 

25, Daniel Swayze. 34—37' 

26, Archibald Robertson. 34 
26—27, Jacob Armstrong. 35— 36^ 
27—28. Jonathan Robbins. 37—38. 
28—29. Daniel Vleit. 37-38. 

29. Jacob Summers. 38—39! 

30. Samuel Wilson. 39— 4l' 
30—32, 35—36, 39-41 

Caleb H. Valentine. 40—42! 

30—31. Richard Shackelton. 42—44 

31, 33. Charles Sitgreaves. 42—44' 

32—33. John Blair. 43-^4 
32—33, Isaac Shipman. 



Jacob Brotzman. 
George Flummerfelt. 
Henry Hankinson. 
John Young. 
William Larrlson. 
Henry Van Nest. 
Samuel Shoemaker. 
George W. Smyth. 
John Moore. 
Jacob H. Winter. 
Stephen Warne. 
Abraham Wildrick. 
Robert C. Caskey. 



STATE SENATORS. 207 

STATE SENATORS. 

BY COUNTIES, FROM IS45 TO 1909. 



Atlantic County. 

45—47, Joel Adams. 69—71, Jesse Adams. 

48—50, Lewis M. Walker, 72—74, William Moore. 

51—53, Joseph E. Potts. 75—77, Hosea F. Madden. 

54—56, David B. Somers. 78—92, John J. Gardner. 

57—59, Enoch Cordery. 93—98, Samuel D. Hoffman. 

60—62, Thomas B. Morris. 99—1901, Lewis Evans. 

63—65, Samuel Stille. 02—07, Edward S. Lee. 

66—68, David S. Blackman. 08—11, Edward A. Wilson. 

Bergen County. 

45—47, Richard R. Paulison. 72—74, Cornelius Lydecker. 
48 — 49, Isaac I. Harding. 75—77, George Dayton. 

50—51, John Van Brunt, 78—80, Cornelius S. Cooper. 

52—53, Abraham Hopper. 81—83, Isaac Wortendyke. 

54—56, Daniel D. Depew. 84—85, Ezra Miller. 

57—59, Thomas H. Herring. 86—89, John W. Bogert. 
60—62, Ralph S. Demarest. 90—95, Henry D. Winton. 
63—65, Daniel Holsman. 9&— 1900, William M. Johnson. 

66—68, John Y. Dater. 01—11, Edmund W. Wakelee. 

69—71, James J, BrinkerhofC. 

Burlington County. 

45—46, James S. Hulme. 77—79, Caleb G. Ridgway. 

47—49, Thomas H. Richards. 80—82, Wm. Budd Deacon. 
50—52, Joseph Satterthwaite. 83—85, Hezekiah B. Smith. 
53—58, Joseph W. Allen. 86—91, William H. Carter. 

59—61, Thomas L. Norcross. 92—94, Mitchell B. Perkins. 

62, Joseph W. Pharo. 95—97, William C. Parry. 

63—64, William Garwood. 98—1900, Howard E. Packer. 

65—67, Geo. M. "Wright. 01—03, Nathan Haines. 

68—70, Job H. Gaskell. 04-06, John G. Horner. 

71—73, Henry J. Irick. 07—10, Samuel K. Bobbins. 

74—76, Barton F. Thorn. 

Camden County. 

45, Richard W. Howell. 73—81, William J. Sewell. 

46—48, Joseph C. Stafford. 82—84, Albert Merritt. 

49—51, John Gill. 85—87, Richard N. Herring. 

52—54, Thomas W. Mulford. 88—90, George Pfeiffer. 

55—60, John K. Roberts. 91—96, Maurice A. Rogers. 

61—63, William P. Tatem. 97—1902, Herbert W. Johnson. 

64—66, James M. Scovel. 03—12, William J. Bradley. 
67—72, Edward Settle. 

Cape May County. 

45—46, Reuben Willets. 74—76, Richard S. Learning. 

47—49, James L. Smith. 77—79, Jonathan F. Leaming. 

50—52, Enoch Edmunds. 80—85, Waters B. Miller. 

53—55, Joshua Swain, Jr. 86—88, Joseph H. Hanes. 

56—58, Jesse H. Diverty. 89—91, Walter S. Leaming. 

59—61, Downs Edmunds. 92—94, Lemuel E. Miller. 

62—64, Jonathan F. Leaming. 95—97, Edmund L. Ross. 
65—67, Wilmon W. Ware. 98—1903, Robert E. Hand. 
68—70, Leaming M. Rice. 04—06, Lewis M. Cresse. 

71—73, Thomas Beesley. 07—10, Robert E. Hand. 



208 STATE SENATORS. 

Cumberland Connty. 

45—46, Enoch H. More. 72—74, C. Henry Shepherd. 

47—50, Stephen A. Garrison. 75—77, J. Howard Willets. 

51—53, Reuben Fithian. 78—80, George S. Whiticar, 

54—56, Lewis Howell. 81—86, Isaac T. Nicols. 

57—59, John L. Sharp. 87—89, Philip P. Baker. 

60—62, Nat. Stratton. 90—92, Seaman R. Fowler. 

63—68, Providence Ludlam. 93—1901. Edward C. Stokes. 

69—71, James H. Nixon. 02—11, Bloomfield H. Minch. 

EMsex County. 

45, Joseph S. Dodd. 79—81, William H. Francis. 

46—48, Stephen R. Grover. 82—84, William Stainsby. 

49—61, Asa Whitehead. 8.5—87, Frederick S. Fish. 

52—54, Stephen Congar. 88—90, A. F. R. Martin. 

55—57, George R. Chetwood. 91—93. Michael T. Barrett. 

58—60, Charles L. C. Gifford. -94—99, George W. Ketcham. 

61—63, James M. Quinby. 1900—02, Thos.N.McCrirter,Jr. 

64—66, John G. Trusdell. 03—05. J. Henry Bacheller, 

67—69, James L. Hays. 06—09, Everett Colby. 

70—75, John W. Taylor. 09—12, Harry V. Osborne. 
76—78, William H. Kirk. 

Gloucester County. 

45—48, John C. Smallwood. 79—81, John F. Bodine. 

49—51, Charles Reeves. 82—83, Thomas M. Ferrell. 

52—54, John Burk. 84—87, Stacy L. Pancoast. 

55—57, Joseph Franklin. 88—90, Joseph B. Roe. 

58—60, Jeptha Abbott. 91—93, George H. Barker. 

61—63, John Pierson. 94—96, Daniel J. Packer. 

64—66, Joseph L. Reeves. 97—1902 Solomon H. Stanger. 

67—69, Woodward Warrick. 03—05, Thomas M. Ferrell. 

70—75, Samuel Hopkins. 06—09, John Boyd Avis. 

76—78, Thomas P. Mathers. 0^—12, George W. F. Gaunt. 

Hudson County. 

45—47, Richard Outwater. 78—80, Rudolph F. Rabe. 

48—49, John Tonnele. 81—83, Elijah T. Paxon. 

50, John Cassedy. 84—86, William Brinkerhoff. 
51—53, Abraham O. Zabriskle.87— S9, William D. Edwards. 

54—56, Moses B. Bramhall. 90—91. *Edward F. McDonald. 
57—59, C. V. Clickener. 92, Robert S. Hudspeth. 

60—61, Samuel Westcott. 92—98, William D. Daly. 

62—65, Theo. F. Randolph. 99—1900, Allan L. McDermott. 

6&— 68, Charles H. Winfield. 01—04, Robert S. Hudspeth. 

69—71, Noah D. Taylor. 05—07, James F. Minturn. 

72—74, John R. McPherson. 08—11, James F. Fielder. 
75—77, Leon Abbett. 

Hunterdon County. 

45 — 46, Alexander Wurts. 77—79, James N. Pidcock. 

47—49, Isaac G. Farlee. 80—82, Eli Bosenbury. 

50—52, John Manners. 83—85, John Carpenter, Jr. 

53—55, Alexander V. Bonnell. 86—88, George H. Large. 

56—58, John C. Rafferty. 89—91, Moses K. Everitt. 

59—61, Edmund Perry. 92—94, William H. Martin. 

62—64, John Plane. 95—97, Richard S. Kuhl. 

65—67, Alexander Wurts. 98—1900. John R. Foster. 

68—70, Joseph G. Bowne. 01—03. William C. Gebhardt. 

71—73, David H. Banghart. 04—06, George F. Martens, Jr. 

74—76, Fred A. Potts. 07—10, William C. Gebhardt. 



*Mr. McDonald was unseated the last of the ses- 
sion of 1890, and William S. Stuhr was given his seat. The 
first week of the session of 1891 Mr. Stuhr was unseated 
and Mr. McDonald resumed his seat. 



STATE SENATORS. 



209 



45—50, 

51—56, 
57—59, 
60-62. 
63—65. 
66—68. 
69—71, 
72—74. 
75—77, 

45-^6. 
47—49, 
50—52. 
53—55. 
56—58, 
59—61. 
62—70. 
71—76. 
77—79, 



Mercer 

Charles S. Olden. 
William C. Alexander. 
Robert C. Hutchinson. 
Jonathan Cook. 
Edward W. Scudder. 
Aug. G. RIchey. 
John Woolverton. 
Charles Hewitt. 
Jonathan H, Blackwell, 



County. 

78—80, Crowell Marsh. 
81—83, John Taylor. 
84—86. George O. Vanderbllt. 
87—92. John D. Rue. 
93—98, William H. Sklrm. 
99—1904, Elijah C. Hutchinson 
05—07. Barton B. Hutchinson. 
08—11, Harry D. Leavitt. 



Midaie.sex County. 



David Crowell. 
Adam Lee. 
Edward Y. Rogers. 
Ralph C. Stults. 
Henry V. Speer. 
Abra. Everitt. 
Amos Robbins. 
Levi D. Jarrard. 
George C. Ludlow. 



80—82. Isaac L. Martin. 
83—85. Abraham V. Schenck. 
86—88, Daniel C. Chase. 
89—94. Robert Adrain. 
95—97. Charles B. Herbert. 
98—1900. James H. Van Cleef. 
01—03, Theodore Strong. 
04—06. Wm. H. C. Jackson. 
07—10, George S. Silzer. 



Monmouth County. 



45, Thomas E. Combs. 
46—48, George F. Fort. 
49—51, John A. Morford. 
52—54. William D. Davis. 
55—57, Robert S. Laird. 
58—60, Wm. H. Hendrickson. 
61—63, Anthony Reckless. 
64—71. Henry S. Little. 

72. Wm. H. Conover. Jr. 
73—78, Wm. H. Hendrickson. 
Morris 
45 — 47, John B. Johnes. 
48—50, Ephraim Marsh, 
ol— 53. John A. Bleecker. 
54 — 56. Alexander Robertson. 
57—59. Andrew B. Cobb. 
60—62, Daniel Budd. 
63—65. Lyman A. Chandler. 
66—70, George T. Cobb. 

71, Columbus Beach. 
72—74. Augustus W. Cutler. 
Ocean 
51—53. Samuel Birdsall. 
54—56. Jas. Cowperthwaite. 
57—62. William F. Biown. 
63—68, George D. Horner. 
69—71, John Torrey. Jr. 
72—74, John G. W. Havens. 
75—77. .Tohn S. Schultze. 
78—80. Ephraim P. Emson. 

Passaic 
45—46. Cornelius G. Garrison. 
47—49, Martin J. Ryerson. 
50—52. Silas D. Canfield. 
53—55, Thomas D. Hoxsey. 
56—58. Jetur R. Riggs. 
59—67, Benjamin Buckley. 
68—70. John Hopper. 
71—7.?. Henry A. Williams. 
74—76. John Hopper. 
14 



79—81. George C. Beekman. 
82—84. John S. Applegate. 
85—87, Thomas G. Chattle. 
88—90. Henry M. Nevius. 
91—92, Thomas S. R. Brown. 

93. Henry S. Terhune. 
94—96. James A. Bradley. 
97—1902. Charles Asa Francia 
03—12, Oliver H. Brown. 

County. 

75—77, John Hill. 
78—80. Augustus C. Canfleld. 
81—86. James C. Youngblood. 
87—92, George T. Werts. 
93—95, Elias C. Drake. 
96—98, John B. Vreeland. 
99—1901. Mahlon Pitney. 
02—04, Jacob W. Welsh. 
05—11, Thomas J. Hillery. 

County. 

81—83, Abram C. B. Havens. 
84—92. George T. Cranmer. 
93—95. George G. Smith. 
96—98, Robert B. Engle. 
99—1901, George G. Smith. 
02—07, George L. Shinn. 
08—11, William J. Harrison. 

County. 

77—82, Garret A. Hobart. 
83—88. John W. Griggs. 
89—91, John Mallon. 
92—94, John Hinchliffe. 
95—97. Robert Williams. 
98—1900. Christian Braun. 
ni— 06. Wood McKee. 
07—10, John Hinchliffe. 



210 



STATE SENATORS. 



Salem 

45, William J. Shlnn. 
46—48, Benjamin Acton, Jr. 
49—61, John Summerill, Jr. 
52—54. Allen Wallace. 
55—57, Charles P. Smith. 
58—60. Joseph K. Riley. 
61—63, Emmor Reeve. 
64—66, Richard M. Acton. 
67—69, Samuel Plummer. 
70—72, John C. Belden. 
73—75, Isaac Newkirk. 



County. 

76—78, Charles S. Plummer. 
79—81, Quinton Keasbey. 
82—84, George Hires. 
85—87, Wyatt W. Miller. 
88—90, William Newell. 
91—93, James Butcher. 
94—96, John C. Ward. 
97—1902, Richard C. Miller. 
03—05, James Strimple. 
OG— 12, William Plummer, Jr. 



Somerset County. 



45, 
46-48, 
49-51, 
52—54, 
55-57, 
58—60, 
61—63, 
64—66, 
67—69, 
70—72, 



George H. Brown. 
William H. Leupp. 
John W. Craig. 
Moses Craig. 
Samuel K. Martin. 
James Campbell. 
Rynier H. Veghte. 
Joshua Doughty. 
John H. Anderson. 
Calvin Corle. 



73—75, Ellsha B. Wood. 
76—78. Charles B. Moore. 
79—81, John G. Schenck. 
82—84. Eugene S. Doughty. 
85—90. Lewis A, Thompson. 
91—93, William J. Keys. 
94—96, Lewis A. Thompson. 
97—1902. Charles A. Reed. 
03—05, Samuel S. Childs. 
OG— 12, Jos. S. Frelinghuysen. 



Sussex 

45 — 46, Benjamin Hamilton. 
47—49, Nathan Smith. 
50—52, Joseph Greer. 
53—55. Isaac Bonnell. 
56—68, Zachariah H. Price. 
59—61, Edward C. Moore. 
62—64, Peter Smith. 
65—67, Joseph S. Martin. 
68—73, Richard E. Edsall. 
74—76, Samuel T. Smith. 



County. 

77—79, Francis M. Ward. 
80—82. Thomas Lawrence. 
83—85. Lewis Cochran. 
86—88. John A. McBride. 
89—91, Peter D. Smith. 
92—94. John McMickle. 
95—97. Jacob Gould. 
98—1903. Lewis J. Martin. 
04—10, Jacob Cole Price. 



58—60. John R. Ayres. 
61—63, Joseph T. Crowoll. 
64 — 65, James Jenkins. 

66. Philip H. Grier. 
67—69. Amos Clark. Jr. 
70—72. James T. Wiley. 
73—75. J. Henry Stone. 
76-78. Will 'am J. Magie. 

Warren 

45. Charles J. Ihrie. 
46—48. Jeremy Mackey. 
49—51. George W. Taylor. 
52—54, Charles Sitgreaves. 
55—57, William Rea. 
5S_6n. Philip Mowry. 
61—63, James K. Swayze. 
64—66, Henry R. Kennedy. 
67—69, Abraham Wildrick. 
70—72. Edward H. Bird. 
73—75. Joseph B. Cornish. 



TJnlon County. 

79—84, Benjamin A. Vail. 
85—87, Robert L. Livingston. 
88—90, James L. Miller. 
91—93. Frederick C. Marsh. 
94—98. Foster M. Voorhees. 
99—0.5, Joseph Cross. 
06—12, Ernest R. Ackerman. 



County. 

76—78, William Silverthorn. 
79—81. Peter Cramer. 
82—84, George H. Beatty. 
85—87, James E. Moon. 
88—90, Martin Wyckoff. 
PI— 93, Johnston Cornish. 
94—96, Christopher F. Staates. 
97—99. Isaac Barber. 
1900—1902, Johnston Cornish. 
ns— 05. Isaac Barber. 
06—12. Johnston Cornish. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



211 



ASSEMBLYMEN, 

BY COUNTIES FROM 1845 TO 1909. 



Atlautic 

45, 46, Joseph Ingersoll. 
47—49, Mark Lake. 

50, 51, Robert B. Risley. 

52, John H. Boyle. 

53, Thomas D. Winner. 

54, Daniel Townsend. 

55, Nicholas F. Smith. 

56, 57, David Frambes. 

58, John B. Madden. 

59, Thomas E. Morris. 
60—62, Charles E. P. Mayhew. 

63, John Godfrey. 

64, Simon Hanthom. 

65, Simon Lake. 

66, 67, P. M. Wolfseiffer. 
68, 69, Jacob Keim. 

70, 71, Benj. H. Overheiser. 
72, 73, Samuel H. Cavileer. 
74, 75, Lemuel Conover. 
76, 77, Leonard H. Ashley. 

Bergen 

45, William G. Hopper. 
45, Jacob C. Terhune. 

46, 47, John G, Banta. 

46, 47, Jacob J. BrinkerhofC. 
48, 49, John Ackerman, Jr. 
48, 49, Henry H. Voorhis, Jr. 
50, 51, John H. Hopper. 
50—52, John Huyler. 

52, John Zabriskie. 
53, 54, Jacob I. Demarest. 
53, 54, Abraham Van Horn. 
55, 56, Ralph S. Demarest. 
55, 56, Thomas W. Demarest. 

57, 58, Daniel Holsman. 

57, 58, Aaron H. Westervelt. 

59, Andrew C. Cadmus. 
59, 60, Enoch Brinkerhoff. 

60, John A. Hopper. 
61, 62, Abram Carlock. 
61, 62, John R. Post. 

63, 64, Thomas D. English. 
63, 64, John Y. Dater. 
65, 66, Isaac Demarest. 
65, 66, Abraham J. Haring. 
67, A. Van Emburg. 

67, 68, Cornelius Christie. 

68, 69, Henry G. Herring. 

69, 70, Eben Winton. 

70, 71, Henry A. Hopper. 

71, 72, Jacob G. Van Riper. 

72, 73, George J. Hopper. 
73, John J. Anderson. 



County. 

78, Israel Smith. 
79, 80, James Jeffries. 

81, George Elvins. 

82, Joseph H. Shinn. 

83, John L. Bryant. 
84, 85, Edward North. 

86, 87, James S. Beckwith. 

88, James B. Nixon. 
89, 90, Shepherd S. Hudson. 

91, Smith E. Johnson. 

92, Samuel D. Hoffman. 

93, Charles A. Baake. 

94, Frederick Schuchardt. 

95, Wesley C. Smith. 

96, 97, Marcellus L. Jackson. 
98, 99, Leonard H. Ashley. 
1900, 01, Charles T, Abbott. 
02—07, Thomas C. Elvins. 
08, 09, Martin E. Keffer. 



County. 

74, 75, Henry C. Herring. 
74, 75, John W. Bogert. 
76, 77, John H. Winant. 
76, 77, Barney N. Ferdon. 
78, M. Corsen Gillham. 

78, 79, Southey S. Parramore. 

79, 80, John A. Demarest. 
80, Oliver D. Smith. 

81, 82, Elias H. Sisson. 
81—83, 86, John Van Bussum. 
81, 84, Peter R. Wortendyke. 

84, *Jacob W. Doremus. 

85, Peter Ackerman. 
85, 86, Eben Winton. 

87, 88, Anderson Bloomer. 
87, Peter Ackerman. 

88, 89, Charles F.Harrington. 

89, 90, Abram De Ronde. 

90, 91, George Zimmermann. 
91, John H. Huyler. 

92, 93, Samuel G. H. Wriprht. 
92, 93, John J. Dupuy. 
94, Walter Dewsnap, 

94, 95, David D. Zabriskie. 

95, 96, Fred'k L. Voorhees. 

96, 97, Jacob H. Ullman. 

97, 98, Abram C. Holdrum. 

98, 99, John M. Bell. 

99, 1900, Edmund W. Wakelee. 
1900, Vacancy caused by death 

of John L. C. Graves. 
01—02, Joseph H. Tillotson. 



*John W. Doremus was first elected, but died before 
Legislature convened. 



212 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



01, 02, James W. Mercer. 
03, 04, M. S. Ayers. 
03, 04, George Cook. 
05, 06, Clarence Mabie. 
05, 06, John Heck. 



07, 08, Guy L. Fake. 

07, 08, James Devlne, Jr. 

09, Joseph H. ScharfE. 

09, Harry P. Ward. 



45, 

45, 

45, 47, 

45, 

45. 

46, 

46, 

46, 

46, 

46, 

47, 

47, 48, 

47—49, 

47-^9, 

48-50, 

49—51, 

49-51, 

50, 51, 

50-52, 

51—53. 

52, 

52—54, 

52—54, 

53, 54, 

53, 54, 

54, 

54-56, 

55, 

55, 

55, 57, 

55, 56, 
56, 
56, 

56, 57, 

57, 58, 
58, 

57—59, 
57—59, 

58, 59, 

59, 60, 
59-61. 

60, 61, 
61, 

60—62, 
60—62. 
62, 63. 
62, 63, 
62—64, 
63—65. 
64, 
65, 

65, 66, 

66. 67, 
66, 67, 
66, 67, 



Burlini/^ton County. 

Joseph Satterthwalt. 67—69, Wallace Llppincott. 



68, Chas. E. Hendrickson 

68. Charles Collins. 
68—71. John J. Maxwell. 

69. Theophilus I. Price. 
69—71, Thomas C. Alcott. 

70. Levi French. 
70, 71, Abraham Perkins. 
71—73. Edward T. Thompson. 

72, Robert Aaronson. 
72—74, E. Budd Marter. 
72—74. George B. Borton. 
73. 74. Townsend Cox. 

74, Joseph P. Adams. 

75, Levi French. 
75. Charles J. Gordon. 

75, Henry MolTett. 
75—77, Samuel Tavlor. 

76, Daniel L. Piatt. 
76—78, John Cavlleer. 
76—78, Edward F. Mathews. 
77—79, George Sykes. 

78, 79, Wm. Dudd Deacon. 
79, Wm. R. Lippincott. 

79, 80, John W. Haines. 
80—82, William H. Carter. 
80-82, Henry C. Herr. 

80, 81, Abraham Marter. 

81, John Cavileer. 

82, Thomas M. Locke. 

83, Horace Cronk. 
83. 84, 87, Stacy H. Scott. 
83—86. Theodore Budd. 
84—86, Thomas J. Alcott. 
85. 86. Allen H. Gangewer. 
87, 88, 90, R. C. Hutchinson. 

87, 88, 89, William H. Doron 

88, 89, Albert Hansell. 
89, George C. Davis. 

90, 91. Mitchell B. Perkins. 

90, 91. Lewis L. Sharp. 

91, 92, A. H. White. 

92, 93, Howard E. Packer. 

93. Micajah E. Matlack. 

94. Augustus C. Stecher. 

94, 95. Micajah E. Matlack. 

95, 96, 97, George Wildes. 

96, 97. Joshua E. Borton. 
98—1900, Joel Horner. 
98—1902, Charles Wright. 
01—03, John G. Horner. 



Isaiah Adams 

48, John W. C. Evans. 

Edward Taylor. 

William Biddle. 

Clayton Lippincott. 

William Malsbury. 

Garrit S. Cannon. 

Stephen Willets. 

Wm. G. Lippincott. 

William Biddle. 

Joseph W. Allen. 

John S. Irick. 

Benjamin Kemble. 

Edward French. 

Samuel Stockton. 

William R. Braddock. 

William S. Embley. 

William Brown. 

Allen Jones. 

Benajah Antrim. 

John W. Fennimore. 

Charles Haines. 

Mahlon Hutchinson. 

Jacob L. Githens. 

Job H. Gaskill. 

William Parry. 

Josephus Sooy, Jr. 

Benjamin Gibbs. 

Thomas L. Norcross. 

Elisha Gaunt. 

Richard Jones. 

William M. Collom. 

Jervis H. Bartlett. 

Samuel Keys. 

Samuel C. Middleton. 

Charles Mickle. 

Ezra Evans. 

Charles S. Kemble. 

John Larzalere. 

Samuel A. Dobbins. 

George B. Wills. 

Joseph L. Lamb. 

Robert B. Stokes. 

William Sooy. 

John M. Higbee. 

Israel W. Heulings. 

Wm. P. McMichael. 

Henry J. Irick. 

Jarett Stokes. 

Samuel Stockton. 

Charles C. Lathrop. 03—05, Benj. D. Shedaker. 

George W. Thompson. 04—06, Samuel K. Robbins. 

Samuel Coate. 06-^9, John B. Irick. 

Andrew J. Fort. 07, 09, Griffith W. Lewis. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



213 





45, 




45, 




46, 




46, 




47. 




47, 




48, 




48, 




49, 




49. 


50, 


51. 


50. 


51. 




52, 




52. 


52, 


53. 




53. 


53. 


54, 


54. 


55, 




55. 


54-56, : 




56, 


56, 


57, 




57. 




57. 


57- 


-59. ■ 




58. 


58, 


59. 1 




59, 




60, , 




60, 


60. 


61, , 




61, , 


61, 


62, , 




62, 


62, 


63, 




63, , 


63. 


64, 




64, 1 


64, 


65. 




65. , 


65, 


66. : 


66. 


67. < 


66. 


67. ' 




67, : 




68, . 




68, . 




68, ( 




69, ' 


69, 


70, ] 


69, 


70, ■ 




70, 1 




71, i 




71. ] 


71, 


72. ! 




72, : 




45, . 




46, J 




47. : 


48, 


49, ] 



Camden County. 

Joseph Kay, Jr. 72—74, George B. Carse. 

73, Isaac Foreman. 
73, 74, William H. Cole. 



John Redfield. 
Joel G. Clark. 
Gerrard Wood. 
Edward Turner. 
Joseph B. Tatem. 
John C. Shreeve. 
John E. Marshall. 
Jacob Troth. 
Joseph Wolohon. 
Charles D. Hineline. 
Thomas W. Hurff. 
J. Kay. 

Jonathan Day. 
J. O. Johnson. 
Samuel Lytle. 
John K. Roberts. 
Samuel S. Cake. 
James L. Hines. 
Reiley Barret. 
Evan C. Smith. 
John P. Harker. 
T. B. Atkinson. 
Joseph M. Atkinson. 
♦Samuel Scull. 
Edmund Hoffman. 
Samuel M. Thorne. 
Zebedee Nicholson. 
Joseph Stafford, Jr. 
George Brewer. 
John R. Graham. 
James L. Hines. 
Joel P. Kirkbride. 
Daniel A. Hall. 
Edwin J. Osier. 
James M. Scovel. 
Chalkley Albertson. 
Samuel Tatem. 
Paul C. Brinck. 
John F. Bodine. 
Isaac W. Nicholson. 
George W. N. Custls. 
Thomas H. Coles. 
Edward Z. Collings. 
John Hood. 
James Wills. 
Chalkley Albertson. 
Thomas H. Coles. 
Henry L. Bonsall. 
William C. Shinn. 
Samuel Warthman. 
Charles Wilson. 
Isaac W. Nicholson. 
Stevenson Leslie. 
Fred. Bourquin. 



74, Chalkley Albertson. 

75, Henry B. Wilson. 

75, 76, 79, 80, R. N. Herring. 
75—77, Alden C. Scovel. 

76. 77, Oliver Lund. 

77, Samuel T. Murphy. 

78, Isaiah Woolston. 
78. Andrew J. Rider. 

78, 79, Alonzo D. Nichols. 

79, 80, Edward Burrough. 

80, 81, Henry L. Bonsall. 

81, 82, Chris. J. Mines, Jr. 
81, 82, John H. McMurray. 

82, Robert F. S. Heath. 

83, George W. Borton. 

83, John Bamford. 

83, 84, 93, Clayton Stafford. 

84, John W. Branning. 
84—87, Edward A. Armstrong. 

85, Benjamin M. Braker. 
85, 86, Henry M. Jewett. 

86, George Pfeiffer. 

87, Philip Toung. 
87, Henry Turley. 

88, 89, Adam Clark Smith. 
88, 89, 90, John Harris. 
88, 89, George H. Higgins. 
90, Franklin C. Woolman. 

90, 91, 92, Abram W. Nash. 

91, 92, Joseph M. Engard. 

91, 92, also 73, 74. Wm. H. Cole. 

93. George W. Henry. 
93, 94, 95, Clayton Stafford. 
93, 94, William J. Thompson. 

94. William Watson. 

95. George W. Barnard. 

95, 96, 97, Louis T. Derousse. 

96, 97, Frank T. Lloyd. 
96. 97, Henry S. Scovel. 
98, 99, John H. McMurray. 
98, 99, Edgar J. Coles. 
98—1902, William J. Bradley. 

1900, F. F. Patterson, Jr. 

00, 01, 02, Ephraim T. Gill. 

01, 02, George A. Waite. 
03, 04. John S. Roberts. 
03-06, Henry S. Scovel. 
03—09, Theodore B. Gibbs. 
05—07. Samuel P, Jones. 

07, 08, Frank B. Jess. 

08, 09, Joseph Potter. 



09, Harry R. Tatem. 
Cape May County. 

John Stites. 50, 51, Mackey Williams. 

Samuel Townsend. 52, Joshua Swaim. 

Richard S. Ludlam. 53, Waters B. Miller. 

Nathaniel Holmes, Jr. 54, 55, Jesse H. Diverty. 

*In 1857 Mr. Scull was unseated by T. B. Atkinson, 



214 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



56—58, Downs Edmunds, Jr. 
59, 60, Abram Reeves. 

61, Jonathan F. Learning 
62—64, Wllmon W. Ware. 
65—67, 69, 70, Thos. Beesley 



81, 82, Furman L. Richardson 
86, 87, Alvin P. Hlldreth. 

88, Walter S. Learning. 
89. 90, 91, Eugene C. Cole. 
92, 93, 94, Edmund L. Ross. 



68. Samuel R. Magonagle. 95, 96, Furman L. Ludlam. 
71—73, Richard S. Leamlng. 97, Robert E. Hand. 

74, Alexander Young. 98, Eugene C. Cole. 

75, Richard D. Edmunds. 99, 1900, Ellis H. Mar.shall. 
76—78, William T. Stevens. 01—03, Lewis M. Cresse. 

79, Daniel Schellinger. 04—06. James M. E. Hlldreth. 
80, 83—85, Jesse D. Ludlam. 07, I'S, 09, Corsville E. Stille. 
Cumberland County. 

72, 73, J. Howard Wlllets. 

74, George B. Langley. 

74, 75, Lewis H. Dowdney. 



45, Josiah Shaw. 
45, 46, George Helsler. 
45, 46, Lewis Howell. 

46, Stephen A. Garrison 

47, Leonard Lawrence. 
47, Jeremiah Parvin. 

47, 48, Uriah D. Woodruff. 

48, 49. Reuben Fithian. 
48, 49, Richard Lore. 
50, 51, Benj. Ayres. 

50, 51, Joel Moore. 

51, 52, Samuel Mayhew. 

52, David Campbell. 

53, Enos S. Gandy. 

53, Lewis Woodruff. 

54, Daniel Harris. 
54, Morton Mills. 

55, 56, James M. Wells, 
55, 56, John F. Keen. 
57. Uriah Mayhew. 

57, Elias Doughty, 

58, Elwell Nichols. 
58, 59. Robert ]\Ioore. 

59, Aaron S. Westcott. 

60, Ebenezer Hall. 
60, John Carter. 

61, 62, William Bacon. 



5—77, George W, Payne. 

76, Isaiah W. Richman. 
77, 78, Isaac T. Nichols. 

78, James Loughron. 
79, 80, Robert P. Ewing. 
79, SO, Arthur T. Parsons, 

81, John H. Avis. 
81, 82. Charles Ladow. 

82, Philip P. Baker. 

83, Isaac M. Smalley. 

83, 84, John B. Campbell. 

84, 85. Jeremiah H. Lupton. 

85, 86. Wilson Banks. 

86, 87. Franklin Lawrence. 

87, Thomas H. Hawkins. 

88, Mulford Ludlam. 

88, Isaac M. Smalley. 

89. Thomas W. Trenchard. 

89, 90, Reuben Cheesman. 

90, 93, 94, John N. Glaspell. 
91, James L. Van Syckel. 

91, 92, Edward C. Stokes. 

92, 93, Wilber H. Baxter. 
94—96, Thomas F. Austin. 



61, 62, J. Edmund Sheppard. 95—97, Bloomfield H. Minch. 



63. 64, B. Rush Bateman. 
63, 64, Edward W. Maylin. 
65—67. Robert Moore. 
65—68. James H. Nixon. 

68, Thomas D. Westcott, 

69, C. Henry Shepherd. 
69—71, William A. House. 
70, 71, Charles C. Grosscup 
72, 73, George S. Whiticar. 

Essex County. 



98, James J. Hunt. 
98, 99, Wilson H. Shropshire. 
99—1901. Jesse S. Steelman. 
00, 01, 02, William J. Moore. 
02—06, Louis H. Miller. 
03— ;:'9. B. Frank Buck. 
07, 08, Frank B. Potter. 

09, Isaac T. Nichols. 



45, Isaac Van Wagenen, 

45, John Runyon. 
45, 46, William M. Scudder. 
45, 46, Hugh F. Randolph. 
45, 46, Jabez Pierson. 
45, 46, Keen Pruden. 

45, 46, Alvah Sherman. 

46, 47, George W. McLane. 

46, 47, Parker Teed. 

47, 48, A. S. Hubbeel. 
47, 48, Jabez G. Goble. 

47, 48, Francis B. Chetwood. 



47, 48, Abraham Van Riper, 

47, 48, Elston Marsh. 

48. Hugh H. Bowne. 

48, 49, Charles Harrison. 

49. Hugh H. Bowne. 
49, Lewis C. Grover. 

49, 50, Joel W. Condlt. 
49. 50, Obadiah Meeker 
49, 50» William F. Day. 

49, 50, Stephen Personelt. 
51, Wm. M, Whitehead. 

50, 51, Isaac H. Pierson, 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



215 



50, 


51, 


50, 


51, 




51, 


51, 


52, 


51, 


52. 




52, 




52, 




52, 




52, 




52, 




52. 


52. 


53, 




53. 




53, 




53, 




53, 




53, 


53, 


54, 


53, 


54, 


53, 


54, 




54, 




54, 




54, 




54, 


54, 


55, 


54. 


55. 




55, 




55, 


55, 


56, 


55, 


56, 


55, 


56, 


55, 


56, 




56, 


55, 


56, 




56. 




56. 


56, 


57. 




57, 




57, 




57, 




57. 




57. 




57, 


57, 


58, 


57, 


58. 




58, 




58, 




58. 




58. 




58, 




59. 




59. 




59. 




59, 


59. 


60, 


59. 


60. 


59, 


60, 




60, 




60. 


60. 


61, 


60, 


61. 




61, 


61. 


62. 


61. 


62. 


61, 


62, 



Jonathan Valentine. 
David Wade. 
Cornelius Bolce. 
Beach Vanderpool. 
John C. Beardsley, 
Thomas McKlrgan. 
John M. Clark. 
William M. Sandford. 
Silas Merchant. 
John Munn. 
James S. Bell. 
John B. Clark. 
Stephen Day, Jr. 
Grant J. Wheeler. 
Edward T. Hillyer. 
Charles T. Day. 
Charles O. Bolles. 
Abiathar Harrison. 
Daniel Price. 
William Dennis, 
David S. Craig. 
Daniel H. Noe. 
James N. Joraleman. 
David Ripley. 
Hngh Holmes. 
Daniel D. Benjamin. 
Charles O. Bolles. 
Daniel F. Tompkins. 
Nehemiah Perry. 
James A. Pennington. 
Apollos M. Elmer. 
Joseph T. Hopping. 
Warren S. Baldwin. 
Samuel R. Winans. 
James E. Bathgate. 
George H. Doremus. 
Wm. K. McDonald. 
John C. Denman. 
Moses P. Smith. 
John L. Blake, Jr. 
William B, Baldwin. 
Charles L. C. Gifford. 
Elihu Day. 
Charles C. Stewart. 
John C. Thornton. 
Simeon Harrison. 
James McCracken. 
Joseph Booth. 
Tra M. Harrison. 
Thomas KIrkpatrick. 
Gashier De Witt, Jr. 
David Ayres. 
Isaac P. Trimble. 
David A. Hayes. 
Adolphus W.Waldron. 
James F. Bond. 
Amzl Condit. 
James McCracken, 
J. W, Hale. 
Frederick H, Teese, 
James Wheeler. 
James E. Smith. 
James M. Lang. 
David Oakes. 
John Fllntoft. 



61, 62, 



62, 


63, 


62, 


63, 


62, 


63, 


62, 


63, 


62, 


63, 




63. 




63, 


63, 


64, 


63, 


64, 




64. 




64, 


64, 


65, 


64, 


65, 


64. 


65. 


64. 


65, 


64. 


65, 




65. 




65, 




65. 


65. 


66, 




66. 




66. 




66. 




66, 


66. 


67. 


66. 


67. 


66. 


67. 


66. 


68, 




67. 




67. 




67. 




67. 


67. 


68. 


67. 


68. 




68. 


68. 


69, 


68. 


69. 


68. 


69. 


68, 


69, 


68. 


69. 


69. 


70, 


69. 


70. 


69. 


70. 


69. 


71. 


70. 


71. 


70. 


71. 


70. 


71, 




70. 




70, 




70. 




71. 




71. 


71. 


72. 


71. 


72. 


71. 


72. 




72. 




72. 




72. 


72. 


73. 


72. 


73. 


72. 


73. 




73. 




73. 


73, 


74, 



George A. Halsey. 
Walter Tompkins, 
Corra Drake, 
John D. Freeman, 
John P, Jackson. 
Thomas McGrath, 
Amzl Dodd. 
John C, Littell, 
Adolph Schalk, 
James Smith. 
Jeremiah DeCamp. 
Ira M. Harrison. 
Rufus F, Harrison, 
Charles A, Lightpipe. 
Thomas B, Peddle. 
John C. Seiffert. 
Bernard Kearney, 
J. B, S. Robinson. 
John H. Landell. 
James D. Cleaver. 
David Anderson. 
William Bodwell. 
John F. Anderson. 
David Ayres, 
James L. Hays. 
Albert P. Condit, 
Isaac P, Trimble. 
William H. Murphy. 
Edward L. Price, 
Israel D. Condit. 
Daniel Ayres. 
William R. Sayre. 
M. H. C, Vail. 
Samuel Atwater. 
Edward Hedden. 
Joslah L. Baldwin. 
Josiah Speer, 
James Peck. 
John Kennedy, 
Timothy W. Lord, 
Francis Macken. 
James L. Gurney, 
John Hunkele. 
W^illiam W. Hawkins. 
James G. Irwin. 
Joseph F. Sanxay, 
Farrand Kitchell. 
Henry W. Wilson. 
Chauncey G.Williams 
William R. Sayre. 
Matthew Murphy. 
Albert P. Condit. 
William A. Ripley, 
Edmund L. Joy, 
Theodore Horn . 
Rochus Heinisch, Jr. 
David Anderson, 
Daniel Murphy, 
Moses H. Williams, 
Samuel Wilde. 
Joseph G. Hill. 
Theodore Macknett, 
7 J. M. Armstrong. 
John W, Campbell. 
Ellas O. Doremus. 



216 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



73, 


74, 


73, 


74, 


73-75. 




74. 




74. 


74, 


75, 


74, 


75, 


74, 


75, 




75, 




75, 




75, 




75, 


75, 


76, 




76, 




76. 




76. 


76, 


77, 


76, 


77. 


76, 


77, 


76. 


77, 


76, 


80. 




77, 


77, 


78. 


TJ. 


78, 


TJ, 


78. 


77. 


78, 




78. 




78. 


78, 


79. 


78, 


79. 


78, 


79. ! 


78, 


79. 




79. 


79, 


80. 


79. 


80. : 


79-81. ] 


79-81. i 




80. ' 


80. 


81. : 


80. 


81. ' 


80, 


81. ' 




81. . 




81. • 




81. * 


81. 


82. ] 


82. 


83. . 


82. 


83. ] 




82. ] 




82. ] 




82. 1 




S2. ] 




82. . 




82. 1 




83. ] 




83. : 




83. : 




83. ^ 


83. 


84. f 


83-87. 9 




84. ] 



Phlneas Jones. 
Aaron G. Baldwin. 
Samuel Morrow, Jr. 
James T. Vanness. 
Moses E. Halsey. 
Thomas S. Henry. 
Julius C. Fitzgerald. 
William H. Kirk. 
Andrew Teed. 
Hugh Klnnard. 
Patrick Doyle. 
William Carrolton. 
David Dodd. 
Charles H, Harrison. 
Marcus S. Richards. 
Philip W. Cross. 
Albert D. Traphagen 
Francis K. Howell. 
S.V.C.Van Rensselaer 
Elkanah Drake. 
James M. Patterson. 
Joseph H. Wlghtman 
Gottfried Krueger. 
Charles Gomer. 
James Malone. 
Edward D. Plerson. 
Alexander Phillips. 
Charles Holzwarth. 
Edward W. Crane. 
George S. Duryee. 

82. Wm. H. F. Fiedler. 
Schuyler B. Jackson. 
Charles A. Felch. 
Peter J. Gray. 

83. 89. John Gill. 
Harrison Van Duyne. 
83. Thomas O'Connor. 
•William H. Brown. 
Ellas A. Wilkinson. 
Thos W. Langstroth. 
William R. Williams. 
Joseph L. Munn. 
William Wright. 
♦♦Chas. G. Bruemmer. 
Michael McMahan. 
John H. Parsons. 
David Young. 
Robert McGowan. 
Roderick Robertson. 
Ulysses B. Brewster. 
Edw'd R. Pennington. 
Adam Turkes. 
Edwin B. Smith. 
Lucius B. Hutchinson 
James N. Arbuckle. 
John H. Murphy. 
W^iiliam Hill. 
93. John L. Armltage. 
93. W^llHam Harrigan. 
Rush Burgess. 



84 

84, 
84. 85, 
84, 85, 
84, 85, 
84. 85, 

84. 85, 
85, 

85. 86, 
85, 86, 
85. 86, 



86. 87, 
86, 87, 

86, 87, 
87, 
87, 

87, 88, 
87, 88, 
87. 88, 
87—89. 



88. 89. 
89, 
89. 
89. 

89. 90. 
89. 90, 

89, 90, 

90, 91. 
90. 91. 
90. 91. 
90. 91. 
90. 91. 
90-92. 

90, 92. 
91. 

91. 92. 
91, 92. 

91. 92. 
92. 
92. 
92. 
92. 

92. 93, 
93. 
93. 
93. 
93. 

93. 94, 
93, 94. 
93. 94. 
93. 94. 
93. 94. 



, Frederick S. Fish. 
Herman Lehlbach. 
George B. Harrison. 
David A. Bell. 
Edward Q. Keasbey. 
William E. O'Connor. 
Charlese Holzwarth. 
Franklin Murphy. 
Henry M. Doremus. 
R. Wayne Parker. 
Augustus F. R. Martin 
Henry A. Potter. 
Edwin Lister. 
Jacob Schreihofer. 
Charles F. Underhlll. 
. Elias M. Condlt. 
93. John H. Peal. 
Michael T. Barrett. 
Elvin W. Crane. 
James Peck. 
Charles E. Hill. 
James Marlatt. 
Frank M. McDermltt. 
DeForrest P. Lozler. 
Augustus Dusenberry. 
James A. Christie. 
Thomas McGowan. 
Adrian Riker. 
Joseph Schmelz. 
John Gill. 
Moses Bigelow. 
Geo. W. WIedenmayer 
Richard A. Price. 
92. Leonard Kallsch. 
Reuben Trier. 
George Rabensteln. 
Thomas H. Pollock. 
Charles Trefz. 
John J. Bertram. 
Edward W. Jackson. 
Thomas Smith. 
Edward H. Snyder. 
Edward M. Taylor. 
John NIeder. 
John R. Hardin. 
George W. Ketcham. 
Thomas F. Cavanagh. 
James A. Dempsey. 
Benedict Ulrich. 
William L. Glorieux. 
Augustus C. Studer. 
John L. Armitage. 
William J. Kearns. 
John H. Peal. 
Timothy Barrett. 
William Harrigan. 
Joseph P. Clarke. 
Joseph M. Byrne. 
Thomas A. Murphey. 
Dennis F. Olvaney. 



•Tn 1880, W. H. Brown was unseated by William R. WIN 
Hams. 

**Mr. Bruemmer was elected for 3882. but died before 
Lejdslature convened. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



217 



93, 94, J.Broadhead Woolsey.Ol— 03, William G, Sharwell. 
94, Thomas P. Edwards. 01—03, Edgar Williams. 



94r-96, Charles B. Duncan. 
94, 95, John C. Eisele. 
94, 95, Charles B. Storrs. 

94, 95, George P. Olcott. 

95, Frederick W. Mock. 

95, 96, Amos W. Harrison. 
95, 96, Alfred F. Skinner. 
95, 96, James A. Christie. 
95, 96, George L. Smith. 
95, 96, David E. Benedict. 

96, Charles A. Schober. 



01—03, Robert M. Boyd, Jr. 
01—03, William A. Lord. 
03—05, Frederick R. Lehlbach 
03—05, Everett Colby. 
04, 05, William Pennington. 
04, 05, Frederick Manners. 
04, 05, Abraham Kaiser. 
04, 05, Herbert W. Taylor. 
04, 05, John J. Gallagher. 
04, 05, Samuel F. Wilson. 
04, 05, Edward D. Birkholz. 



96, Hayward A. Harvey. 04, 05, H. L. Johnstone. 



96, 97, Thomas H. Jones. 

96, 97, Albert J. Simpson, 

96, 97, James J. Hogan. 

97, 98, Charles W. Powers. 



04, 05, Edward D. Duffield. 
06, OS. 09, William P. Martin. 

06, Gustav W. Roeber. 

06, George F. Serbe. 



97, 98, George W. W. Porter.06, 08, 09, Henry Clay Hines. 



97, 98, Edwin F. Steddig 
97, 98, Alvin C. Ebie. 

97, George B. Harrison. 
97, 98, Jacob Rau, Jr. 

97, 98, Peter B. Fairchild. 

97, 98, Carl V. Bauman. 

98, Joseph B. Johnson. 
98, Oliver B. Dawson. 

98, William C. Schmidt. 

98, 99, Albert T. Guenther. 

99, John L. Bullard. 

99, 1900, Jacob Clark. 

99, 1900, John W. Weseman. 

99. 1900, John Kreitler. 

99, 1900, Frederick J. Deleot. 



06, Philip C. Walsh, Jr. 

06, Chas R. Underwood. 

06, Gustav A. Kayser. 

06, Russell M. Everett. 
06, 08, 09, Austen Colgate. 
06, 08, WilUam F. Morgan. 

06, Gustav V. Sommer. 

07, Edward H. Wright, Jr. 
07, Simon Hahn. 

07, John J. Baader. 
07, Patrick H. Corish. 
07, Thomas J. Mead. 
07, John C. Groel. 
07, John Breunnig. 
07, John W. Lane. 
07, Edgar E. Letheridge. 
07, Daniel J. Brady. 
07, Harry F. Backus. 



99, 1900, G. F. Brandenburgh 

99, 1900, William Mungle. 

99, 1900, John N. Klein. 

99, 1900, John P. Dexheimer.08, 09, Henry Young, Jr 

99, 1900, Benjamin F. Jones. 08, 09, William Roberts. 

1900, George S. Campbell. 08, 09, John F. Clark. 

00—02, J. Henry Bacheller. 08, James H. Lowrey. 

01, 02, Fred'k Cummings. 08, 09, H. Stacy Smith. 

01—03, Wm. B. Garrabrants. 08, 09, August J. Miller. 



01—03, John Howe. 
01—03, Robert W. Brown. 
01—03, Ralph B. Schmidt. 
01-03, Edward E. Gnichtel. 



08, Rudolph A. Braun. 

09, Thomas H. Brooks. 
09, Lev/is G. Bowden. 
09, Eliot E. Ford. 



Gloucester County. 



45, 46, Samuel W. Cooper. 
45, 46, Benjamin Harding. 
47, 48, John B. Miller. 
47, 48, John B. Hilyard. 

49, John Burk. 
49, 50, John Duell. 

50, Thomas Gaskill. 

51, Edmund Weatherby. 
51, 52, Benjamin C. Tatem. 

52, Thomas Mills. 

53, Joseph Abbottt. 
53, John V. Porch. 



54, Joseph Franklin. 

54, Benjamin Beckett. 
55, 56, Jacob G. Tomlin. 
55, 56, James B. Albertson. 

57, John H. Bradway, 

57, Benjamin Smith. 
58, 59, John F. Thomas. 
58, 59, George C. Hewitt. 

60, *Joseph Harker. 
60, 61, John Starr. 
60, 61, *Joseph H. Duffield. 

62, Thomas G. Batten. 



*Mr. Harker died during the. session of 
Duffield was elected to fill the vacancy. 



and Mr. 



218 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



62, 63, Allen Moore. 

63, 64, E. C. Heritage. 

64, 65, Nathan S. Abbott. 

65, 66, William D. Wilson. 

66, 67, William W. Clark. 

67, Jacob J. Hendrickson. 

68. Charles T. Molony. 
68, Wm. B. Rosenbaum, 

69, 70, Leonard F. Harding. 
69—71. Nimrod Woolery. 
71, 72, John S. Rulon. 

72, John R. MIddleton. 
73, 74. Obadiah Eldridge. 
73, 74. D.W.C.Hemmingway. 

75. Simeon Warrington. 
75, 76. Thomas B. Lodge. 

Hudson 

45, 46, Hart'an Van Wageneh 

47, Benjamin F. Welsh. 

48, Oliver S. Strong. 

49, Jas. J. Van Boskerck, 

50, Edward T. Carpenter. 
51, 52, John Van Vorst. 

52, Edmund T. Parker. 

52, Joseph W. Hancox. 

53, John Dunn Littell. 
53, James S. Davenport. 

53, Jacob M. Vreeland. 

54, Clement M. Hancox. 

54, Aug. F. Hardenbergh. 
54, 55, Jacob M. Merseles. 

55, Dudley S. Gregory, Jr. 

55. John M. Board. 

56. John D. Ward. 

56, James T. Hatfield. 

56, 57, George V. De Mott. 

57, Robert Gilchrist, Jr. 

57, 58, Robert C. Bacot. 

58, William Voorhees. 
58—60, Garret M. Van Horn. 

59, Wm. H. Hemenover. 

59. Samuel A. French. 

60, W. H. Peckham. 

60, N. C. Slaight. 

61, Franklin B. Carpenter. 

61, Theo. F. Randolph. 

61, 62, Michael J. Vreeland. 

62. Edward D. Reiley. 

62, 63. Georg« McLaughlin. 
62. 63. Josiah Conley. 

62, 63. John B. Perry. 
62—64, Joshua Benson. 

63, 64, James Lynch. 

63, 64, Garret D. Van Reipen. 

64, John B. Drayton. 

64. 65, John Van Vorst. 

64, 65, Abraham W. Duryee. 

65, Delos E. Culver. 

65, William E. Broking. 

65, Hiram Van Buskirk. 

65, 66, 69, 70, Leon Abbett. 

66. John Ramsav. 
66, Charles F. Ruh. 



76, 77, Samuel Moore. 
77—79, Caleb C. Pancoast. 
78, 79. Lawrence Locke. 
80, 81, George Craft. 
80, 81, Thomas M. Ferrell. 

82, Abljah S. Hewitt. 
83—85. Job S. Haines. 
Sf>, 87. Joseph B. Roe. 
88—90, James West. 
91, 92, James J. Davidson. 
93—%, Solomon H. Stanger. 
97—99, David O. Watkins. 
1900, 01, William P. Buck. 
02—05, John Boyd Avis. 
06—08. William C. Cattell. 

09, AValter Heritage. 

County. 

66. 67, O. D. Falkenburg. 

66, 67, De Witt C. Morris. 
66—68, Noah D. Taylor. 

67, 68. Hosea F. Clark. 
67. 68, A. O. Evans. 

67, 68. John Dwyer. 

68, John Van Vorst. 

68, 69, Henry C. Smith. 

69, 70, Sidney B. Bevans. 
69, 70, James B. Doremus. 

69, Elbridge V. S. Besson. 

69, 71. Michael Coogan. 

70, Abel I. Smith. 

70, William Brinkerhoff. 

70, 71, Herman D. Busch. 

71, James F. Fielder. 
71, John Anness. 

71. George Warrin. 

71, Josiah Hornblower. 

72, James Stevens. 

72, John A. O'Neill. 
72, 73. George H. Farrier. 
72, 73, Dennis Reardon. 

72, 73, George S. Plympton. 
72, 73. Henry Gaede. 
72. 73. Jasper Wandel. 

72, 73. Anthony J. Ryder. 

73, John Lee. 

73, 74, Richard C. Washburn. 

74, Henrj' Coombs. 

74. James K. Selleck. 

74, 75. Alexander T. McGlll, 
74, 75. Patrick Sheeran. 

74, 75. Alexander McDonnell. 
74—76. John D. Carscallen. 
74—77, Rudolph F. Rabe. 

75, Thomas Carey. 

75. Edward F. McDonald. 

75, 76, John J. Toffey. 

76, William A. Lewis. 
76, Henry Brautigam. 

76. Thomas C. Brown. 

76, 77, Thomas J. Hannon. 
76, 78. Alex. Jocobus. 

77, Martin M. Drohan. 
T7. Lewis A. Brigham. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



219 



77, 
77, 78, 
77, 78, 

77, 78, 
78, 
78, 

78, 79, 

78, 79, 
79, 
79, 
79, 
79, 

79, 80, 

79, 80, 
80, 

80, 81, 
80, 81, 
80, 81, 
80, 81, 

80, 82, 
81, 

81, 82, 
82, 
82, 
82, 
82, 
82, 

82, 83, 
82—84, 
82—84, 

83, 
83, 

83, 84, 
83, 84, 
83, 84, 

83, 84, 
83—85, 

84, 

84, 85, 

84, 85, 
85, 
85, 
85, 
85, 
85, 
85, 

85, 86, 



86, 87, 
86. 87, 
86, 87, 
86, 87, 

86, 87, 
87, 

87, 88, 
87—89, 
87—90, 



Elijah T. Paxton. 
Marmaduke Tilden, 
Alexander W, Harris. 
James Stevens. 
Dudley S. Steele. 
Edward P. C. Lewis. 
81, T. J. McDonald. 
Henry Dusenberry. 
John Owen Rouse. 
Frank C. Frey. 
G. A. Lilliendahl. 
John E. Tangeman. 
Joseph Meeks. 
Samuel Stilsing. 
Patrick Sheeran. 
Noah D. Taylor. 
Allan L. McDermott. 
J. Herbert Potts. 
James Curran. 
David W. Lawrence. 
Frederick Payne. 
James J. Casey. 
William McAdoo. 
Robert McCague, Jr. 
George H. Farrier. 
David M. Durrell. 
John O'Rourke. 
Thomas V. Gator. 
James C. Clarke. 
Dennis McLaughlin. 
Petetr F. Wanser. 
John M. Shannon. 
Martin Steljes. 
Augustus A. Rich. 
Frank O. Cole. 
Joseph T. Kelly. 
Edwin O. Chapman. 
Michael J. O'Donnell. 
Cornelius S. See. 
87, 88, S. D. Dickinson. 
Thomas H. Kelly. 
Isaac Romaine. 
John W. Heck. 
James J. Clark. 
John Wade. 
Fred Frambach, Jr. 
John C. Besson. 
R. B. Seymour. 
D. A. Peloubet. 
A. B. Dayton. 
T. J. McDonald. 
Philip Tumulty. 
John Pearson. 
89, R. S. Hudspeth. 
Thomas F. Noonan. 
Edward Lennon. 
Edw'd T. McLaughlin. 
William H. Letts. 
John P. Feeney. 
Wm. C. Heppenheimer. 



88, 


89, 


88, 


89, 




89, 




89, 


89, 


90, 


89, 


92, 




90, 




90, 




90, 


90, 


91, 


90, 


91, 


90, 


91, 


90, 


91, 


90-92, 




91, 




91, 




91, 




91, 


91, 


92, 




92. 




92, 




92, 


92, 


93, 


92, 


93, 


92, 


93. 


92-94, 


92- 


-94, 




93, 




93, 




93, 


93, 


94, 


93, 


94, 


93, 


94, 




94. 




94. 




94. 




94, 




94, 


94, 


95, 




95, 




95, 




95. 




95, 




95, 




95, 


95, 


96, 


95, 


96, 


95, 


96, 


95, 


96, 




96, 




96, 




96, 




96, 




96, 


96, 


98, 


96, 


98, 



Joseph Gallagher. 
Charles W. Fuller. 
*E. Frank Short, 
Jamcrs F. Norton. 
Richard Brown. 
Edward P. Farrell. 
Peter T. Donnelly, 
Judson C, Francois, 
Laurence Fagan, 
Patrick H, O'Neill. 
James Murphy. 
James S. Erwin. 
John F. Kelly. 
Michael MuUone, 
Henry Byrne. 
Andrew J. Boyle. 
Thomas B. Usher. 
J. Herbert Potts. 
Simeon H. Smith. 
Henry Puster. 
John F. Madden. 
William D. Daly. 
James Moylan. 
Thomas Magner. 
James Tumilty. 
George A. Heaney. 
Martin Lawless. 
Cornelius J. Tahen. 
John Zeller. 
Timothy J. Carroll. 
Michael J. Coyle. 
Henry H. Holmes. 
Adam J. Dittmar. 
S. V. W. Stout. 
Ebenezer Berry. 
Max Salinger. 
Hugh A. Kelly. 
Thomas Egan. 
George W. Harding. 
John Kerr. 
Thomas McEwan, Jr. 
Charles Erlenkotter, 
James Usher. 
Henry C. Gruber. 
James F. Blackshaw. 
Henry M. Nutzhorn, 
Frederick Schober, 
Robert McAndrew, 
William E. Drake. 
William N. Parslow, 
Pierce J. Fleming, 
Richard M. Smart. 
David M. Cagney. 
Carl H. Ruempler. 
John W, Queen, 
John E. Hewitt. 
Edward Hoos. 
Joseph P. Mullin. 
Horace L. Allen. 
Charles T. Bauer. 



*Mr. Short was elected to a second term of office, but 
he died before the Legislature met. Mr- Francis was 
chosen for the vacancy. 



220 ASSEMBLYMEN. 

97, Elmer W. Demarest. 03—05, Edgar H. Loveridge. 

97, William M. Klink. 03, 04, Thomas P. McGlennon 

97, Robert D. Urquhart. 04, 05, Myron C. Ernst. 

97, Isaac F. Goldenhorn. 04, 05, Godfrey B. Mattheus 

97, William G. Nelson. 04, 05, Harry W. Lange. 

97, John E. McArthur. 04, 05, John Gallery. 

97, Theodore C. Wildman. 04, D. Kelsey Whitaker. 



97, Charles M. Evans 

97, Clement DeR.Leonard 

97, William H. Dod. 

97, Wm. O. Armbruster. 

98, Alexander Simpson. 
98, Adolph Walter, Jr. 

98—1900, Allan Benny. 
98—1900, James J. Murphy. 
98, 99, James P. Hall. 
98, 99, Fergus T. Kelaher. 
98, 99, Michael J. Bruder. 

98, 99, John J. Marnell. 
98—1900, Tim. J. Carroll. 

99, 1900, J. Emil Waischeid. 
99—1901, Leon Abbett. 
99—1901, Maurice Marks. 
99—1901, John H. Vollers. 
1900, 01. P. Anthony Brock. 
00—02, Geo. G. Tennant. 
00, 01, 02, John J. Fallon. 

00, 01, 02. Edward J. Rice. 

01, 02, John A. Dennin. 
01, 02, Patrick H. Connolly. 

01, 02, Kilian V. Lutz. 
01—03, Peter Stillwell. 

02, William F. Hurley. 

02, 03, C. G. A. Schumann. 
02, 03, John J. Treacy. 

02, 03, Frederick Weismann 
02—05. James A. Hamill. 

03. Michael J. Cannon. 
03—05, Joseph C. Duff. 

03, 04, William D. Kelly. 
03, 04, James F. Fielder. 
03, 04, J. W. Rufus Besson. 



05, Archibald S.Alexander 
05, Edward A. Murphy. 
05, Joseph A. Riordan. 

05, William J. Boucher. 
05, 06, Robert H. Scott. 

06, John J. Coyle. 
06. Joseph F. Galvin. 
06, William A. Joerg. 
06. James E. Woolley. 
06. Edward K. Patterson. 
06, E. W. Arrosmith. 
06, Herman A. Berg. 
06, J. Philip Dippel. 
06, John H. Eggers. 
06, Harry F. Thompson. 

06, Theodore L. Bierck. 
07, 08. 09. Mark A. Sullivan. 
07. 08, U9, Charles P. dwell. 
07. 08, 09. Joseph P. Tumulty. 
07, 08. 09, James Buker. 
07. 08. C. E. Hendrickson, Jr. 
07, 08, Charles H. Blohm. 

07, Joseph A. Riordan. 
07, Archibald S.Alexander 

07. 08, Philip Daab. 
07, C8, ':»9, 

Oscar L. Auf der Heide. 
07, 08, 09, Albert C. Eppinger. 

07, 08, Valentine Holzapfel. 

08, 09, Amadc-us Valente. 
08, 09, Edward Kenny. 

09. W. C. Kackenmester. 
09, William S. Davidson. 
09. Peter H. James. 
09. Frederick H. Otto. 



Hunterdon County. 



45, John Swackhammer. 
45, Amos Moore. 

45, John H. Case. 

45, 48. 49, Jonathan Pickel. 

46, Henry Stevenson. 

46, 47, Isaac R. Srope. 
46, 47, Joseph Fritts. 

46, 47, Frederick Apgar. 
47 — 49, John Lambert. 
48, 49, Andrew Banghart. 
48, 49, David Van Fleet. 
50, 51, John Marlow. 
50, 51, Luther Opdycke. 
50, 51, William Tinsman. 
50—52, John R. Young. 
52, Hiram Bennett. 
52, 53, Peter H. Aller. 

52, 53, Andrew Vansickle. 

53, 54, John Lambert. 

53, 54, Samuel H. Britton. 

54, 55, Lewis Young. 



54, 55, Peter E. Voorhees. 

55, Jacob S. C. Pittenger. 

55, Edward Hunt. 

56, 57. William Sergeant. 

56, 57, John M. Voorhis. 

56, 57, Joseph W. Willever. 

56. 57, John P. Rittenhouse. 

58, 59, John H. Horn. 

58, 59, William Snyder. 

58, 59. Cornelius B. Sheets. 

58, 59, Frederick Apgar. 

60, Thos. Banghart, Jr. 

60, 61, Charles Denson. 

60, 61, Ambrose Barcroft. 

60, 61, D. D. Schomp. 

61, 62, Jacob H. Huffman. 

62, 63, S. R. Huselton. 

62, 64, Joseph W. Wood. 

63, 64, David H. Banghart. 

64, 65, David B. Boss. 

65, 66, James J. Willever. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



221 



65, 67, 

66, 67, 

67, 68, 

68, 69, 
68—70, 
6y, 70, 

70, 71, 

71, 72, 
71, 72, 
73, 74, 
73, 74. 
75, 76, 
75, 76, 
77, 78, 
77, 78, 
79, 80, 
79, 80, 
81, 82, 
81, 82, 

45, 

45, 

45, 

46, 47, 

46, 47, 

46, 47, 

48, 

48, 49, 

48—50, 

49, 

50, 

50, 51, 

51, 

51, 

52, 

52, 

52, 

53, 

53, 

53, 

54, 

54, 

54, 

55, 

55, 

55, 

56, 

56, 57, 

56, 57, 

57, 58, 
58, 

58, 59, 
59, 

59, 60, 
60, 

60, 61, 
61, 

61, 62, 
62, 

62, 63, 
63, 

63, 64, 



William I. IlifE. 
Richard H. Wilson. 
Baltes Pickel. 
John Williamson. 
Theodore Probasco. 
John P. Lare. 
John Kugler. 
Peter Voorhees. 
Aug. E. Sanderson. 
W. L. Hoppock. 
John Carpenter, Jr. 
James Bird. 
William W. Swayze. 
Henry Britton. 
John Hackett. 
Charles W. Godown. 
James N. Ramsey. 
George H. Mathews. 
Jacob Hipp. 

Mercer 
Israel J. Woodward. 
Richard J. Bond. 
*John Lowrey. 
Isaac Pullen. 
John M. Vancleve. 
William White. 
Samuel C. Cornell. 
James M. Redmond. 
Josiah Buzby, 
John R. Dill. 
John F. Hageman. 
John H. Phillips. 
Eli Rogers. 
Westley P. Danser. 
William Napton. 
John C. Ward. 
Jeremiah Vandyke. 
Abner B. Tomlinson. 
Elijah L. Hendrickson 
Randal C. Robbins. 
James H. Hill. 
Franklin S. Mills. 
Runey R. Forman. 
James Vandeventer. 
William Jay. 
Garret Schenck. 
Samuel Wooley. 
Geo. R. Cook. 
Andrew Dutcher. 
Jacob Van Dyke. 
Jonathan S. Fish. 
Augustus L. Martin. 
Robert Aitken. 
Ed. T. R. Applegate. 
Harper Crozer. 
Joseph Abbott. 
William S. Yard. 
Morgan F. Mount. 
John G. Stevens. 
Geo. W. Johnston. 
Peter Crozer. 
James G. West. 



83, 84, Jolin V. Robbins. 
83, 84, W. Howard Lake. 
85—87, John C. Arnwine. 
85—87, Chester Wolverton. 
88—90, William H. Martin. 
88—90, Laurence H. Trimmer. 
91, 92, William B. Niece. 
91—93, Benjamin E. Tine. 

93, J. L. Chamberlin. 
94, 95, Charles N. Redding. 
94-96, William C. Alpaugh. 
96—98, David Lawshe. 
97—99, George F. Martens, Jr. 
99—01, Oliver I. Blackwell. 
00—02, W. A. Laudenberger. 
03—05, James H. Willever. 
06-08, OUver C. Holcombe. 

09, John J. Matthews. 

County. 

64, James F. Bruere. 

64, 65, John A. Weart. 

65, 66, Alex. P. Green. 

65, 66, Samuel Fisher. 

66, 67, Thomas Crozer. 

67, Charles W. Mount. 

67, 71, Joseph H. Bruere. 

68, Thomas J. Corson. 

68, Thomas C. Pearce. 

68, 69, Absalom P. Lanning. 

69, John P. Nelson. 

69, 70, James C. Norris. 

70, Charles O. Hudnut. 

70, 71, William H. Barton. 

71, Liscomb T. Robbins. 

72, Richard R. Rogers. 
72, John H. Silvers. 

72, 73, Alfred W. Smith, 

73, 74, John N. Lindsay. 

73, 74, Andrew J. Smith. 

74, 75, Geo. O. Vanderbilt. 
75, Samuel M. Youmans. 

75, Robt. S. Woodruff, Jr. 

76, Enoch H. Drake. 
76, John Hart Brewer. 

76, Robert L. Hutchinson. 

77, William S. Yard. 
77, J. Vance Powers. 

77, 78, Horatio N. Burroughs 

78, 79, 82, Eckford Moore. 
78, 79, John D. Rue. 

79, William Roberts. 
80, 81, Charles S. Robinson. 
80, 81, Richard A. Donnelly. 
80, 81, John V. D. Beekman. 
82, 83, Nelson M. Lewis. 

82, 83, William J. Convery. 

83, 84, Joseph H. Applegate. 

84, 85, A. Judson Rue. 
84, 85, John Caminade. 

85, Benj. F. Chambers. 
86, 87, S. B. Hutchinson. 



^Died in office. 



222 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 





87. 




87. 




88, 




88. 




88. 




89. 




89. 


89. 


90. 




90. 


90, 


91. 




91. 


91. 


92. 


92. 


93. 


92. 


93, 




93, 


94. 


95, 


94. 


95. 


94. 


95, 


96. 


97. 


45. 


46, 


45. 


46. 


45. 


46. 


<5. 


46. 




47. 




47. 




47. 


47. 


48. 




48. 


48, 


49, 


48, 


49. 




49, 


49. 


50, 




50, 




50. 




50, 




51, 




51, 




51. 


51, 


52. 




52. 


52. 


53. 


53-55, 


53. 


54. 


54. 


55. 


55. 


56. 




56, 


56, 


57, 




57, 


57. 


58. 


58. 


59. 


58-60, 




59. 




60. 




60. 


61. 


62. 




62. 


62. 


63. 


fiS. 


fi4. 


6R. 


64. 


64. 


fin. 



James C. Taylor, Jr. 
William Ossenberg. 
Frederick Walter. 
George D. Scudder. 
Charles H. Olden. 
Josiah Jones. 
Lyman Leavltt. 
Uriel T. Scudder. 
Thomas S. Chambers 
John Schroth. 
Howell C. Stull. 
Jacob R. Wyckoff. 
James H. Mulheron. 
Patrick T. Burns. 
James W. Lannlng. 
Barton B. Hutchinson 
Charles G. Roebling. 
William L. Wilbur. 
John Glnder. 
William T. Exton. 
Elijah C. Hutchinson. 

Middlese: 

Simeon W. Phillips. 
Ralph C. Stults. 
Daniel C. Dunn. 
Charles Abraham. 
Garret G. Voorhees. 
Theodore F. King. 
John A. Davison. 
Richard McDowell. 
Melancton F. Carman 
Lewis S. Randolph. 
Aaron Gulick. 
William A. Gulick. 
James Bishop. 
Henry Vandyke. 
Charles Abraham. 
Israel R. Coriell. 
David Dunn. 
Peter F. Dye. 
J. B. Johnson. 
Robert M. Crowell. 
James Applegate. 
Josephus Shann. 
Martin A. Howell. 
Abraham Everett. 
Samuel E. Stelle. 
William Hutchinson. 
John T. Jenkins. 
Amos Bobbins. 
Henry Stults. 
John D. BuckPlew. 
Garret I. Snrdeker. 
Ellis B. Frppman. 
Andrew McDowell. 
Thomas Booraem. 
Elias Dey. 
Ellas Ross. 
Orlando Perrine. 
James T. Crowell. 
Miles Ross 
David B. Wyckoff. 
Abraham C. Coriell. 
James G. Goble. 



96, 97, Geo. W. Macpherson. 
96, 97, J. Wiggans Thorn. 

98, Frank M. Weller. 
98, 99. John B. Yard. 

98. 99. Henry J. Nicklln. 

99, 1900, Ira W. Wood. 

1900, '01, J. Warren Fleming. 
1900, '01, Frederick P. Rees. 

01, 02, George W. Page. 

02, 03, Harry D. Leavitt. 

02, 03. Bertrand L. Gulick. 

03, 04, Thomas Colclough. Jr. 

04, 05. Ralph Hulse. 

04. 05. Thomas B. DeCou. 
0.".— 07, Alfred N. Barber. 
06—08. Henry D. Thompson. 
06. 07. William F. Burk. 

05, 09. Edward H. Ginnelley. 
08, 09, George W. Housel. 

09, Charles H. Mather. 



c County. 

65—67, 69. 70. Levi D. Jarrard. 
66. 67. Nathan H. Tyrell. 
66. 67. John W. Perrine. 
68. George E. Strong. 
68. 69. Alfred W. Jones. 
68. 69. William M. Cox. 

70. George E. Brown. 
70, 71, Albert L. Runyon. 

71. Edward F. Roberts. 
71—73. ■'saac L. Fischer. 

72. ochnston Holcombe. 
72, 73. Jorseph C. Letson. 

73. H. F. Worthington. 

74. John Von Deursen. 

74, John F. Ten Broeck. 
74, 75, Joseph C. Magee, Jr. 

75, James H. Van Cleef. 

75, Josephus Shann. 

76, Isaiah Rolfe. 

76. 77, Charles A. Campbell. 
76, 77, Daniel Z. Martin. 

77, John Waldron. 
78, 79, Isaac L. Martin. 
78, 79. Patrick Convery. 
78. 79. Vincent W. Mount. 

80. Robert G. Miller. 
80, John M. Board. 

80, 81. Stephen M. Martin. 

81, 82. James H. Van Cleef. 

81. 83. Manning Freeman. 
82. John Adair. 

82. 83. James H. Goodwin. 

83. 84. William R. Jernee. 

84. 85. Edward S. Savage. 

84. 85. Robert Carson. 

85. 86. John Martin 

86. 87. John F. Ten Broeck. 

86. 87, R. R. Vandenbergh. 

87. 8!?. John Mulvey. 
SS. 89. Ephraim Cutter. 

88. 89. Charles B. Herbert. 
89, Daniel M. Kane. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



223 



90, 91, Luther H. Tappen. 
90, 91, William C. Jacques. 
90, 91, Charles H. Manahan. 
92, 93, John H. Daly. 
92, 93, Hezekiah Warne. 
92—94, John W. Beekman. 

94, William F. Harkins. 
94— yb, Andrew H. Slover. 
95, 96, Edward VV. Hicks. 
95, 96, George H. Tice. 

97, Alexander C. Litterst. 

97, Jacob H. Whitfield. 

97, James Fountain. 
98, 99, Adam Eckert. 
98, 99, Joseph H. Ridgeway. 
98, 99, John J. Quaid. 
1900, 01, Adrian Lyon. 



lyuu, '01, H. Raymond Groves 
00—03, J. E. Montgomery. 

02, Myron J. Whitford. 
02, 03, W. H. C. Jackson. 

03, Bernard M. Gannon. 
04, 05, J. H, Thayer Martin. 
04, 05, Alexander R. Fordyce. 

04, 05, PYank C. Henry. 
06, 07, Frank Crowther. 
Of.. 07, V/illiam R. Drake. 
06, 07, Edward E. Haines. 

08, W. E. Ramsay. 

05, 09, William C. Voorhees. 

08, S. C. Van Cleef. 
09, 

Rene P. F. Von Minden. 

09, Edwin C. McKeag. 



45. 
45. 

45, 46, 
45—47, 
45—47, 

46, 47, 
46, 47, 

47, 

48, 

48, 

48, 

48, 

48, 

49, 50, 

49, 

49, 

49, 50, 

49, 50, 

50, 

50, 

51, 

51, 52, 

51, 52, 

51—53, 

52, 

53, 

53, 

53, 54, 

54, 

54, 

54—56, 

55, 

55, 

55, 

56, 57, 

56, 57, 

56, 57, 

57—59, 

57—60, 

58, 59, 

58, 59, 

60, 

60, 61, 

60, 61, 



Monmouth County. 



George F. Fort. 
*Jas. H. Hartshorne. 
Andrew Simpson. 
Hartshorne Tantum. 
Joseph B. Coward. 
William Vandoren. 
John Borden. 
Andrew Simpson. 
William W. Bennett 
Joel Parker. 
Ferdinand Woodward. 67^ 



61, 
61, 

63, 
63, 
63, 
65, 
65, 



•Samuel Bennett. 
Joel W. Ayres. 
Alfred Walling. 
James Hooper. 
John B. Williams. 
George W. Sutphin. 
James D. Hall. 
William G. Hooper. 
Charles Butcher. 
Bernard Connolly. 
William H. Conover. 
Garret S. Smock. 
Samuel W. Jones. 
Charles Butcher. 
Charles Allen. 
Daniel P. Van Doren. 
Robert Allen. 
Forman Hendrickson. 
John L. Corlies. 
Henry E. Laf etra, 
John Vandoren. 
Thomas B. Stout. 
William H. Johnson. 
Jacob Herbert. 
John R. Barricklo. 
Samuel Beers. 
John V. Conover. 
Austin H. Patterson. 
George Middleton. 
Richard B. Walling. 
J. J. McNinney. 
William H. Mount. 
James Patterson. 



67, 



62, William V. Ward. 
62, Charles Halght. 
62, George C. Murray. 

65, Michael Taylor. 
64, Osborn Curtis. 
64, David H. Wyckoff. 

66, Daniel A. Holmes. 
66, George Schenck. 
66, William C. Browne. 

67, 68, Charles Allen. 
Francis Corlies. 
Thomas S. R. Brown. 
69, William H. Conover. 
69, 70, Daniel H. Van Mater. 
69, 70, Andrew Brown. 
70—72, Austin H. Patterson. 

71, William S. Horner. 
71, 72, John T. Halght, 

72, Wm. B. Hendrickson. 
73, 74, John B. GifCord. 

73, 74, John S. Sproul. 
73—75, George W. Patterson. 
75, 76, Chas. D. Hendrickson. 
75. 76. William V. Conover. 

James L. Rue. 

James H. Leonard. 

William H. Bennett. 

George J. Ely. 

Arthur Wilson. 

87, Sherman B. Oviatt. 

80. 92. 93. John D. Honce. 

81, 87. 88, G. H. Lufburrow 
81. Holmes W. Murphy. 

81. 82. David A. Bell. 

Benjamin Griggs. 
Peter Forman, Jr. 
Alfred B, Stoney. 
Thomas G. Chattle. 
Charles H. Boud. 
William H. Grant. 

85, 86. Frank E. Heyer. 
86. William Plntard. 

86. 87, W. S. Throckmorton. 
88, 89, Edward B. Potts. 



76. 77. 
77, 

77, 78, 
78, 

78, 79. 

79. 80, 
79, ■ 



82. 
83, 
84, 
84, 
85, 
85, 



•Died In office. 



224 
88, 89 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



90, 


91. 


90. 


91. 


90, 


91, 


92. 


93. 


9-A 


93, 


92, 


93. 




94. 




94, 


94. 


95. 


95. 


96, 


95, 


96. 




96. 




97. 




97. 




97. 


98, 


99. 



1900. 



45. 



59, 60, 
60, 



, Archibald A. Higglna 
, William F. Patterson. 
, Aaron E. Johnston. 
, William D. Campbell. 
, Charles H. Ivins. 
, John D. Honr<» 
, Reuben Q. Strahan. 
, William Taber Parker. 
, Charles L. Walters. 
, Richard Borden. 
. David D. Denlse. 
, Charles A. Francis. 
. George B. Snyder. 
. Alfred Walling. Jr. 
. William H. Reld. 
, Oliver H. Brown. 
. Daniel E. Van Wlckle. 
, Joseph L. Butcher. 
, Joseph C. Heyer. 
. B. Drummond Woolley 
01, Charles R. Snyder. 

Morris 

Timothy KItchel. 
Matthias Kitchel. 
Henry Seward. 
George H. Thompson. 
Calvin Howell. 
Richard Lewis. 
Charles McFarland. 
Samuel Hilts. 
Andrew L Smith. 
David T. Cooper. 
Samuel Van Ness. 
Edward W. Whelpley. 
John L. Kanouse. 
Andrew Cobb. 
Freeman Wood. 
George H. Thompson. 
Horace Chamberlain. 
Jonathan P. Bartley. 
Joslah Meeker. 
Cornelius B. Doremus. 
C. S. Dlckerson. 
John D. Jackson. 
Robert Albright. 
John L. Kanouse. 
Andrew B. Cobb. 
William P. Conkling. 
William Logan. 
Aaron Pitney. 
Edward Howell. 
Wm. M. Muchmore. 
William A. Carr. 
Daniel Budd. 
Benjamin M. Felch. 
Richard Speer. 
Lyman A. Chandler. 
John Naughright. 
A. H. Stansborough. 
James H. Ball. 
Eugene Ayres. 



1900. • 

1900, ' 

02, 

02 

02, 03 

03, 04, 
03, 04, 

04 

05. 06 

05, 06 

05. 06 

07, 

07, 

07, 



01, Sam'l W. Kirkbride. 
01, William Hyres. 
, William T. Hoffman. 
. Somers T. Champion. 
. John A. Howland. 

Charles F. McDonald. 

Amzi M. Posten. 

William F. Lefferson. 
, Edgar I. VanderVeer. 

Walter S. Reed. 
, George C. Henry. 
, JoaMC B. Davison. 

T. Nelson Lillagore. 

Frank J. Manson. 
, Wilbert A. Beecroft. 
, David E. Tantum. 
, John W. Keough. 
, Joseph D. Bedle. 
, Monroe V. Poole. 

Peter Vredenburgh. 



County. 

60—62. Nelson H. Drake. 
60—62, Nathan Horton. 
61, William W. Beach. 

61. 62. John Hill. 

62. 63, Jacob Vanatta. 

63. William J. Wood. 
63—65. Jesse Hoffman. 

64. Henry C. Sanders. 
64, 'i5, John Bates. 

65. Alfred M. Treadwell. 

66. John Hill. 
66. 67. James C. Tawger. 
66, 67. Ellas M. White. 

67. Lewis Estler. 

68. Daniel Coghlan. 
68. George Gage. 

68—70. Jesse M. Sharp. 
69. 70. Theodore W. Phoenix. 
69. 70, Columbus Beach. 
71. 72, Nathaniel Nlles. 
71. 72, W. B. Lef evre. 
71—73. August C. Canfleld. 

W. H. Howell. 

Jacob Z. Budd. 

Elias M. Skellinger. 

James C. Youngblood. 

Edmund D. Halsey. 

Abm. C. Van Duyne. 

♦Cummins O. Cooper. 

C. P. Garrabrant. 

Francis J. Doremus. 

Joshua S. Salmon. 

Charles F. Axtell. 

James H. Bruen. 
80. Holloway W. Hunt 

William C. Johnson. 

91. 92. John F. Post. 

Oscar Lindsley. 
84, James H. Neighbour. 

*In 1878. Cummins O. Cooper was unseated by Joshua 
S. Salmon. 



73. 


74. 


73. 


74. 


74-76. 


75. 


76, 


75, 


76. 




77. 




77, 


77, 


78, 




78. 




78. 


79. 


80, 


79. 


80. 


79. 


80. 


81, 


82. 


81, 


82. 


81, 


82. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



225 



83, 84, 



85, 


86, 


85. 


86, 


86, 


87, 


87, 


88, 


87, 


88, 


88, 


89, 


89, 


90, 


89. 


90, 


90, 


91, 


91. 


92. 




93. 




93, 


94, 


95, 


51-53. 




54. 


55, 


56. 


57- 


-59. 




60. 




61, 




62. 




63, 


64. 


65. 


66. 


67. 


68, 


69, 


70. 


71. 




72. 




73. 




74. 


75, 


87. 




76. 




77. 


45, 


46. 


45. 


46, 




47. 


47, 


48. 




48. 




49. 


49, 


50. 


50, 


51. 


51. 


52. 


51, 


52. 




52. 




53. 




53. 


53, 


54. 




54. 




55. 




55. 


55, 


56, 




56. 


56-58, 




57. 




57, 




58, 


58, 


59. 




59, 



Amzi F. Weaver. 
George W. Jenkins. 
John Seward Wills. 
Elias C. Drake. 
John Norwood. 
Samuel S. Lyon. 
John R. Pitney. 
Carnot B. Meeker. 
John Norris. 
William S. Naurlght. 
Jas. Preston Albright 
Ford D. Smith. 
Thomas J. O'Brien. 
Sylvester Utter. 
Charles A. Baker. 

Ocean 

Joel Haywood. 
A. O. S. Havens. 
William F. Brown. 
Edwin Salter. 
Thomas W. Ivlns. 
Charles H. Applegate. 
Ephraim Emson. 
Edwin Salter. 
Jacob Birdsall. 
Job Edwards. 
G. W. Cowperthwalte. 
Albert M. Bradshaw. 
Richard B. Parker. 
John S. Shultze. 
Edward M. Lonan. 
88. 89, J. S. Goble. 
Ephraim P. Emson. 
Isaac A, Van Hise. 



94. 95. William C. Bates. 
96. 97. Charles F. Hopkins. 

96. 97. Joseph B. Righter. 
98, 99. George E. Poole. 
98—1900. Jacob W. Welsh. 
1900, '01, Samuel L. Garrison. 

01, 02, Chas. R. Whitehead. 

02, 03, William T. Brown. 

03, 04, Thomas J. Hillery. 

04, 05, Charles A. Baker. 

05, 06, John M. Mills. 

06, 07, Richard J. Chaplin. 

07, 08, Henry W. Buxton. 

08, 09, James A. Lyon. 
09, Oscar B. Smith. 

County. 

78—80. Rufus Blodgett. 

81. William H. Bennett. 

82. Clifford Horner. 

83. George T. Cranmer. 

84. Augustus W. Irons. 
85, 86, George G. Smith. 
90—92, Adolph Ernst. 

93, 94. John T. Burton. 

95, 96, Abraham Lower. 

97, 98. Roderick A. Clark. 
99—1901, Courtney C. Carr. 

02, George W. Holman, Jr. 

03, William J. Harrison. 
04, 05, Cornelius C. Pearce. 

06. George C. Warren. 

07, Samuel S. Taylor. 
09, Benj. H. Crosby. 



60, 61, 



Passaic 

George W. Colfax. 
Chileon F. De Camp. 
Abm. Prall. 
Henry M. Van Ness. 
John M. Demarest. 
Oscar Decker. 
C. S. Van Wagoner. 
Thomas D. Hoxsey. 
Benjamin Geroe. 
54. John L. Laroe. 
J. S. Fayerweather. 
J. V. R. Van Blarcom. 
Cornelius Van Winkle 
Philip Rafferty. 
Charles H. May. 
William C. Stratton. 
William M. Morrell. 
John Schoonmaker. 
Peter H. Whritenor. 
Benj. Buckley. 
John J. Brown. 
James B. Beam. 
Patrick Magennis. 
Richard Van Houten. 
Joel M. Johnson. 
Samuel Pope. 
Isaac Stagg. 
Isaac P. Cooley. 
15 



08, 

County. 

61. 62. Socrates Tuttle. 
62—66, John N. Terhune. 
62—66, Chandler D. Norton. 

63, Samuel Pope. 
63, 64, Joseph N. Taylor. 

63, 64, Charles F. Johnson. 

64, 65, Aaron KInter. 

65, 66, Garret Van Wagoner. 
65, 66, Isaac D. Blauvelt. 

67. E. A. Stansbury. 
67, 68, David Henry. 

67, 68, Joseph R. Baldwin. 

68, 69, A. A. Van Voorhees. 

69, 70, Hugh Reid. 

69, 70, 72, C. Hemmlngway. 

70. Henry Hobba. 

70, Charles P. Gumee. 
71, 72, 75, Robert M. Torbet. 

71. 78, 79. John O'Brien. 

72, 73, Henry McDanolds. 
73, George Barnes. 

73. 74. Garret A. Hobart. 

74, 75, David Henry. 
74, 75, John P. Zeluff. 
76, 77, John W. Griggs. 
76, 77, John Sanderson. 

76, 77, Jos. L. Ctmningham. 
78, John Kennell. 



226 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



78. 


79, 


79, 


80. 


80. 


81, 


80, 


81, 




81. 




82, 


82. 


83, 


82, 


83, 


82- 


-85. 


83. 


84, 




84, 




84, 


85. 


86. 


85. 


86. 


85. 


86. 




86. 


87. 


88. 




87. 




87. 



87, 88, 
88, 



47. 



64. 



John H. Robinson. 
George W. Conkling. 
Robert B. Morehead. 
Thomas B. Vreeland. 
Jacob Latus, 
Joseph A. Greaves. 
Patrick H. Shields. 
William F. Gaston. 
92, 93, 94, 

Thomas Flynn. 
Clark W. Mills. 
William Prall. 
Cornelius A. Cadmus. 
John Scheele. 
De Witt C. Bolton- 
George H. Low. 
William B. Gourley. 
George Law. 
John Donohue. 
Robert A. Carroll. 
89, James Keys. 
James H. Rogers. 
Eugene Emley. 
John L Holt. 
Chas. T. Woodward. 
William W. Welch. 
Thomas McCran. 
John King. 
John P. Kerr. 
Robert Williams. 
Richard Carroll. 
James Parker. 
Frank Gledhlll. 
John F. Smith. 
John I. Holt. 
John McKelvey. 
William I. Lewis. 
Samuel Frederick. 

Salem 

David Wiley. 
Isaiah Conklyn. 
Robert Hewitt 
Ephraim Carel. 
Charles Bilderback. 
George Remster. 
Joseph M. Springer. 
James Vanmeter. 
Joseph Foster. 
Benj. F. McCoUlster. 
Joseph R. Chew. 
James H. Trenchard. 
Isaac Llpplncott. 
John Fowler. 
Charles B. Newell. 
Da\id SIthens. 
Benjamin Remster. 
Smith Bilderback. 
Charles Benner. 
Harman RIchman. 
Jacob Hitchner. 
John C. Lummis. 
Nathaniel G. Swing. 
John Blackwood. 
Isaiah D. Clawson. 



95. 96, James Robertson. 
95, 96. Samuel Bullock. 
95. 96. 97. 99. 1900. John King 
S&— 98. Henry W. Gledhllf 
97. Frank Atherton. 

97. Phlneas Bridge. 
98. 99. Wood McKee. 
98. 99. John W. Sturr. 

98. John Donohue. 
99—01. Vivian M. Lewis. 

1900. Richard Berry. 
GO— C;i, Edmund G. Stalter. 

01. 02. Wm. B. Davidson. 
01—03. Hiram Keasler. 

02, Raymond Bogert. 

02. 03. 04. F. W. VanBlarcom. 

03, Anton L. Pettersen. 
03—05. George H. Dalrymple. 

04, Jacob De Lazier. 
04. 05. Ernest Shaw. 

04. 05. Thomas R. Layden. 

05. 06, George F. Wright. 
05, 06, Henry Marelli. 

06, Arthur M. Smethurst. 
'36, 08. O'J. John D. Prince. 

06, Colin R. Wise. 

07, William A. Merz. 
07, Abram Klenert. 

07, Frank A. Pawelski. 
07, Henry J. Earle. 

07, John D. Van Blarcom. 
08, 09. Amos H. Radcliffe. 

08, Samuel McCoid. 
OS, 09, William B. Burpo. 

08. Henry C. Whitehead. 

09, Edward T. Moore. 
09, James G. Blauvelt. 



County. 

54, Richard Grier. 

55. Joshua Thompson. 

55. John Harris. 

56, Joseph Kille. 

56. Samuel Plummer. 

57. William Beckett. 
57—59, Thomas B. Jones. 
58, 59. Alfred Slmpklns. 

60. Samuel Habermayer. 
60, 61. Joshua Llpplncott. 

61. Owen L. Jones. 

62. William P. Somers. 

62, Samuel D. Miller. 

63. Joseph Waddington. 
63, 64. Joseph W. Cooper. 

64. William N. Hancock. 

65, William Callahan. 

65. 66. A. M. P. V. H. DIckeson 

66, 67, Samuel Garrison. 

67, John S. Newell. 

68. Henry M. Wright. 

68, 69. Andrew S. Reeves. 

69. 70. Charles F. H. Gray. 

70, David Evans. 

71, John W. Dickinson. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



227 



71, 

72, 

72, 73, 

73, 74, 

74, 75, 
75, 

76, 
76—78, 
77, 
78, 
79—81, 
79-81, 
82—84. 



45. 

45. 

45, 

46. 
46. 47, 

46. 
47-49. 
47-49, 
48—50. 

50. 

50, 51. 
51. 

51, 52, 
52. 

53. 54. 
54—56. 

55. 
56, 57. 

57. 

58. 59, 

59. 60, 

60. 61. 
61—63. 
62. 63, 

64. 65. 

65. 66. 

66. 67. 
67. 



John Hitchner. 
Smith Hewitt. 
Daniel P. Darrell. 
William Iszard. 
William B. Carpenter 
Charles P. Swing. 
Richard Coles. 
Quinton Keasbey. 
John S. Elwell. 
William C. Kates. 
Henry Barber. 
John T. Garwood. 
Henry Combs. 
Joseph D. Whitaker. 



87, William Newell. 

88, Millard F. Riley. 
89, 90, John C. Ward. 
91, 92, James Strimple. 
93, 94, William Diver. 

95. 96, Charles W. Powers. 
97. 98. Joseph B. Crispen. 

99. Frank Wright. 
1900. '01, Henry J. Blohm. 

02. John Tyler. 

03, Ephraim C. Harris. 
04—06, Thomas E. Hunt. 

07, 08, Samuel A. Ridgway. 
09, John D. Schade. 



Somerset County. 



Peter Voorhees. 
Samuel Reynolds. 
Peter Kline. 
James B. Elmendorf. 
Peter T. Beekman. 
Jonathan Cory. 
Samuel K. Martin. 
F. V. D. Voorhees. 
John M. WyckofC. 
Samuel S. Doty. 
53. John De Mott. 
Frederick D. Brokaw. 
Eugene S. Doughty. 
Michael R. Nevlus. 
John H. Anderson. 
John S. Hoagland. 
Alvah Lewis. 
Cornelius M. Schomp. 
Cornelius N. Allen. 
Nehemlah V. Steele. 
Elisha B. Wood. 



68. Abraham T. Huff. 
68. 69, John J. Bergen. 
69—71, John R. Staats. 

71, James Doty. 

72. 73. David D. Smalley. 

73. 74, John G. Schenck. 

74. 75. William P. Sutphin. 
75—77. Joseph H. Voorhees. 
76. 77, 91, 92, Jas. J. Bergen. 
78—80. John Ringelmann. 
78—80, J. Newton Voorhees. 

81. John L. Oakey. 
81, 82, William A. Schomp. 
83, 84, Cornelius S. Hoffman. 
85, 86, John Vetterlein. 

87. George E. Pace. 

88. Oscar Conkling. 
89. 90. Jacob Klotz. 

93. George H. Cramer. 
94, 95. Frank W. Somers. 
96. Charles A. Reed. 



70. J. W. Arrowsmlth. 97. 



John G. Schenck. 
John M. Mann. 
Daniel Corey. 
Rynler A. Staats. 
Ralph Davenport. 
Peter A. Voorhees. 

Sussex 

45, Absalom Dunning. 
45, Jesse Bell. 

45. Timothy H. Cook. 

46. Juhn Hunt. 
46. 47. Peter Young. 
46^18, Thos. D. Armstrong. 
47—49. Peter Hoyt. 

48—50. Jacob Hornbeck. Jr. 

49, Martin Ryerson. 
50. 51. Guy Price. 
50, 51, William Simonson. 

51. Daniel D. Decker. 

52. George W. Collver. 
52—54. Timothy E. Shay. 

52, 55. Aaron K. Stlnson. 

53. 54. Beniamin Hamilton. 
53, 54. Luther Hill. 

55, James L. Decker. 



Peter V. D. VanDoren. 



99. 1900. Edward B. Cooper. 
01, 02. Henry W. Hoagland. 
03. 04. Sam'l S. Swackhamer. 
05, 06, Irving Hoagland. 

07, 08, 09. 

William W. Smalley. 

County. 

55-57, Daniel D. Gould. 
56—58. William Smith. 
56—58. John W. Opdyke. 

58. Sanford McKeeby. 
59. 60. Martin Cole. 
59, 60, 61. Charles Mackerly. 
59, 60. 61. Daniel D. Decker. 

61. William Price. 

62. Thomas N. McCarter. 
62—64. William H. Bell. 

63, 64. Robert Hamilton. 

65. Samuel Fowler. 
65-67. William M. Riff. 
66. 67, 73. 74, P. M. Ward. 
68—70. Hiram C. Clark. 
68—70. Samuel H. Hunt. 

71, Peter Smith. 
71, 72, Lebbeus Martin. 



228 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



75, 76, William Owen. 
77, 78, George Greer. 
79—81, Lewis J. Martin. 
82—84. William E. Ross. 
85—87, Horatio N. Kinney. 
88—90, Andrew J. Bale. 
91—93, Jacob Swartwout. 
94—96, William P. Coursen. 



97, Horace E. Rude. 
98, 99, 1900. Elvln E. Smith. 

1901, Theodore M. Roe. 
02, 03. 04. Lewis S. Iliff. 

05, Vacancy.* 
06—08, Levi H. Morris. 

Od, Charles Meyer. 



58, 
58, 
59, 

59. 60, 

60, 61, 
61, 
62, 

62, 63. 

63, 64, 

64, 65, 
65, 
66, 
66, 
67, 
67. 

68, 69, 
68, 69, 

70, 
70, 71, 

71, 

72. 
72-74. 
72—74. 

73. 
74. 75. 
14. 75. 
76. 77. 
76. 77. 
76-78, 

78, 
78-80. 
79. 80. 
79—82. 
81. 82. 
81—83. 
83. 84. 
83. 84. 

84. 



45. 

45, 
45. 46. 
46—48. 
46-48. 
47-49. 
49—51, 
49—51, 



Union County. 

Benjamin M. Price. 85. 86. Peter L. Hughes. 

85-87. William H. Corbin. 

86, 87. Wm. Chamberlain. 

87. 88. John J. xviatthews. 
88—90. Foster M. Voorhees. 
88-90. John Ulrlch. 
89. 90. Frederick C. Marsh. 
91. 92, John Carroll. 
91—93, George Kyte. 
91—93. Thomas F. Lane. 

93. Timothy M. Kelly. 
94, 95. John N. Burger. 
94, 95. Joseph Cross. 
94. 95. Charles N. Codding. 
96, 97, Henry Clauss. 
96. 97, J. Martin Roll. 
96, 97, William R. Codington 
98. 99. George A. Squire. 
98, 99. Roger F. Murray. 
98, 99, Robert G. Houston. 
1900. '01, Ellis R. Meeker. 
1900, '01, Chester M. Smith. 
1900, '01, Charles S. Foote. 

02, Frederick Miller. 
02, 03. William Newcorn. 

02. 03. William F. Hall. 

03, 05, Edward S. Coyne. 
04. Charles L. Moffett. 
04, Joseph T. Hague. 
04. Joseph H. Gunn. 

05—07. Peter Tillman. 
05—07. Randolph Perkins.f 
06. Edward K. Tucker. 

07, 08, John R. Moxon. 

08. 09, Carlton B. Pierce. 
08. 09, Albert F. Kirstein. 

09, 
Augustus W. Schwartz. 



Cooper Parse 
William Stiles. 
Elston Marsh. 
David Mulford. 
Israel O. Maxwell. 
John J. High. 
Samuel L. Moore. 
Noah Woodruff. 
Philip Dougherty. 
Joseph T. Crowell. 
John R. Crane. 
Thomas J. Lee. 
A. M. W. Ball. 
Enos W. Runyon. 
John H. Whelan. 
DeWItt C. Hough. 
Albert A. Drake. 
75, Ferd. Blancke. 
Joseph W. Yates. 
Andrew Dutcher. 
William McKlnley. 
John H. Lufberry. 
Jabez B. Cooley. 
William H. Gill. 
Ellas B. Pope. 
Moses F. Cary. 
Benjamin A. Vail. 
John Egan. 
Joseph B. Coward. 
George M. Stiles. 
Philip H. Vernon. 
John T. Dunn. 
George T. Parrott. 
Frank L. Sheldon. 
Edward J. Byrnes. 
Asa T. Woodruff. 
DeWitt C. Hough. 
Jacob Klrkner. 



"Warren County. 



Abram Wildrick. 
Stephen Warne. 
Robert C. Caskey. 
Jonathan Shotwell. 
Amos H. Drake. 
Samuel Mayberry. 
Andrew RIbble. 
Benjamin Fritts. 



50, 51. 53. John LoUer. 

52. John Cllne. 
52—54, John Sherrer. 
52—54. David V. C. Crate. 
54—56. George H. Beatty. 
55—57, Archibald Osborn. 
55—57. John White. 
57—59, Isaac Leida. 



*Jackson R. Decker was elected, but died before meeting 
of Legislature. 

tElected to fill vacancy caused by death of George H. 
Embree in 1905. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



229 



58, Abm. S. Van Horn. 
58, 59, William Felt. 
59—61, Robert Rusling. 

60, Philip Shoemaker. 
60—62, John C. Bennett 
61, 63, David Smith. 
62—64, William W. Strader. 
63—65, Elijah Allen. 
64—66, Charles G. Hoagland. 
65, 66, Silas Young. 
66—68, Andrew J. Pulmer. 
P.7. 68, John N. Glvens. 
67—69, Nelson Vliet. 
69—71, Absalom B. Pursell. 
69—71, Caleb H. Valentine. 
70—72, William Silverthorn. 
72—74, Valentine Mutchler. 
73—75, Joseph Anderson. 

75, John M. Wyckoff. 

76, William Carpenter. 
76—78, Ellas J. Mackey. 
77—79, Silas W. De Witt. 



79—81, Coursen H. Albertson. 
80—82, William Fritts. 

82, Robert Bond. 
83—85, Stephen C. Larison. 
83—85, Isaac Wlldrick. 

86, Thomas L. Titus. 
86, 87, William M. Baird. 
87—89, Samuei B. Mutchler. 
88—91, Eliphalet Hoover. 
90—92, Daniel W. Hagerty. 
92—94, L. Milton Wilson. 

93, Richard H. Sheppard. 
94, 95, Samuel V. Davis. 

95, George W. Smith. 
96—98, Alfred L. Flummerfelt. 
96—98, William K. Bowers. 
99—1901, Hiram D. White. 
99—1901, Jacob B. Smith. 

02, William R. Laire. 
03—05, John A. Wlldrick. 
06—08, Joseph H. Firth. 

09, Harry B. Moon. 



230 THE EXECUTIVE. 

THE EXECUTIVE. 



PREROGATIVES AND DUTIES OF THE GOVERNOR 

The Governor is Commander-in-Chief of all the mili- 
tary and naval forces of the State; is President (ex- 
officio) of the Board of Trustees of Princeton and 
Rutg-ers Colleges, and also of Burlington College, and 
of the Board of Managers of the Geological Survey. 
He is Chairman of the State Board of Canvassers, and 
has power to fill any vacancy for New Jersey that may 
occur in the United States Senate, during a recess 
of the Legislature. 

He is a member of the following Boards: Trustees of 
School Fund; Riparian Commissioners; Court of Par- 
dons; Commissioners of Agricultural College Fund; 
Commissioners of the State Library and State House 
Commission. 

With the advice and consent of the Senate, he has 
the power of appointing the following officers: Chan- 
cellor, Chief Justice, Judges of the Supreme Court and 
Circuit Courts, Inferior Courts and Lay Judges of the 
Court of Errors and Appeals, Attorney-General, Sec- 
retary of State, Clerk of the Court of Chancery, Clerk 
of the Supreme Court, Keeper of the State Prison, a 
Commissioner of Banking and Insurance, a Superin- 
tendent of Public Instruction, Prosecutors of the Pleas, 
Visitors to the State Board of 'Agriculture, State Board 
of Assessors, State Board of Education, Chief of Bu- 
reau of Labor Statistics, Major-General, Quartermas- 
ter-General, Adjutant-General, Supervisor of the State 
Prison, six Inspectors of the State Prison, Commis- 
sioners of Pilotage, the Board of Managers of the State 
Hospitals, Judges of the District Courts, Riparian 
Commissioners, Manag'ers for the Home for Feeble- 
Minded Women, Port Wardens and Harbor Masters, 
State Board of Medical Examiners, State Board of 
Equalization of Taxes, County Boards of Equalization 
of Taxes, Railroad Commissioners, Labor Commission- 
ers, State Home for Boys, State Home for Girls, Com- 
missioners of New Jersey Reformatory, Managers 
State Home for Disabled Soldiers, Marines and Their 
Wives, State Board of Health, Commissioner of Chari- 
ties and Corrections, Managers of the State Village 
for Epileptics, Managers for Sanitorium for Tu- 
berculous Diseases, Civil Service Commissioners, 



THE EXECUTIVE. 231 

State Road Commissioner, Fish and Game Commis- 
sioners, Oyster Commissioners, Auditor of Accounts, 
Commissioner of Reports, Palisadees, Inter-State Park 
Commission, Board of Tenement House Supervision, 
Board of Undertakers and Embalmers, etc., etc. 

Without the consent of the Senate: Foreign Commis- 
sioners of Deeds; New Jersey State Pharmaceutical 
Association, State Board of Dentistry, Inspectors of 
Steamboats, Private Secretary, Notaries Public, Moral 
Instructors in the State Prison, Managers New Jersey 
Firemen's Home, Inspectors of Power "Vessels, Railroad 
Policemen and other Boards and Commissioners, and 
fill all vacancies that occur in any office during a 
recess of the Legislature, which ofllces are to be filled 
by the Governor and Senate, or Legislature in Joint 
Meeting; also, vacancies happening in the offices of 
Clerk or Surrogate in any county; issues warrants for 
the admission of blind and feeble-minded children into 
institutions; grants requisitions and renditions, and 
has power to offer rewards for apprehending and se- 
curing persons charged with certain crimes; signs or 
vetoes all bills and joint resolutions passed by the 
Laegislature; has power to convene the Legislature, 
or Senate alone, if, in his opinion, public necessity 
requires it; grants, under the Great Seal of the State, 
commissions to all such officers as require to be com- 
missioned; has right to borrow money for the State; 
sign all leases or grants issued by the Riparian Com- 
missioners; he has power to reprieve in cases of capi- 
tal punishment, and to suspend fines at any time not 
exceeding ninety days after conviction, and in case of 
pardon or commutation of sentence, the Governor's 
veto in the affirmative is necessary. 

Besides all these duties, the Governor finds it neces- 
sary to read and answer a large mass of correspond- 
ence, which comes to the department daily. All bills 
and joint resolutions passed by the Legislature are 
compared, and then indexed in the Executive Depart- 
ment, before presentation to the Governor. 

He receives a salary of $10,000 a year, and is not 
allowed any fees or perquisites what ever. 

His term of office is three years. 

OFFICES FILLED BY THE LEGISLATURE IN JOINT 
MEETING. 

State Treasurer, State Comptroller, Commissioners 
of Deeds and State Director of Railroads and Canals. 



232 COUNTIES, CITIES AND BOROUGHS. 

CLASSIFICATION OF COUNTIES, CITIES 
AND BOROUGHS. 



COUNTIES. 
(See act of March 22d, 1901.) 

First Class — Having a population exceeding 200,000. 
Hudson, 449,879; Essex, 409,928. 

Second Class — Having- a population of not less than 
50,000 nor more than 200,000. Passaic, 175,858; Cam- 
den, 121,555; Union, 117,211; Mercer, 110,516; Bergen, 
100,003; Middlesex, 97,036; Monmouth, 87,919; Morris, 
67,934; Burlington, 62,042; Atlantic, 59,862; Cumber- 
land, 52,110. 

Third Class — Having a population of not less than 
20,000 nor more than 50,000, Warren, 40,403; Somerset, 
36,270; Gloucester, 34,477; Hunterdon, 33,258; Salem, 
26,278; Sussex, 23,325; Ocean, 20,880. 

Fourth Class — All counties not embraced in the first, 
second and third class. Cape May, 17,390. 

CITIES. 
(See act of March 18th, 1901.) 

First Class — Having a population exceeding 150,000. 
Newark, 283,289; Jersey City, 232,699. 

Second Class — Having a population of not less than 
12,000 nor more than 150,000, Paterson, 111,529; Tren- 
ton, 84,180; Camden, 83,363; Hoboken, 65,468; Elizabeth, 
60,059; Bayonne, 42,262; Passaic, 37,837; Orange, 26,101; 
Perth Amboy, 25,895; East Orange, 25,175; New Bruns- 
wick, 23,133; Plainfield, 18,468; Bridgeton, 13,624. 

Third Class — All cities not embraced within either 
the first or second class, except cities binding upon 
the Atlantic Ocean and being seaside and Summer 
resorts. 

Fourth Class — All cities binding upon the Atlantic 
Ocean and being seaside or Summer resorts. 

BOROUGHS. 
(See act of March 23d, 1883, and Supreme Court de- 
cision. State, Borough of Hightstown, pros., vs. 
James Glenn, 18 Vr., page 105.) 

First Class — Having a population exceeding 3,000. 
Second Class — Having a population between 1,500 
and 3,000. 

Third Class — All boroughs and incorporated vil- 
lages not contained in the first and second classes. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 233 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS, 



The following- is a list of the titles of newspapers 
published in the State of New Jersey, town and county 
where published, time of publication, political or spe- 
cial character, and names of editors and publishers: 

ATLANTIC COUNTY. 

DER PILOT (German)— Egg- Harbor City. Weekly, 
on Saturday. Republican. H. Mass & Co., publish- 
ers. H. Mass, editor. 

DEUTSCHER HEROLD (German)— Egg Harbor City. 
Weekly, on Saturday. Republican. George F. Bre- 
der. 

FORTSCHRIFT (German) — Weekly on Wednesday, 
Fortschrift Publishing Company. 

SOUTH JERSEY REPUBLICAN — Hammonton Weekly, 
on Saturday. Republican. Hoyt & Son, publishers. 

SOUTH JERSEY STAR— Hammonton. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Thomas B. Delker, editor and publisher. 

ATLANTIC REVIEW— Atlantic City. Daily, every 
morning except Sunday, and weekly, on Saturday. 
Republican. Henry S. Wallace, publisher. 

ATLANTIC CITY DAILY PRESS— Atlantic City. Daily, 
every morning", except Sunday. Republican. Wal- 
ter E. Edge, publisher and proprietor. 

ATLANTIC COUNTY HERALD — Atlantic City. Week- 
ly on Saturday. Independent. The Herald Publish- 
ing Company. John A. Bischoff, editor. 

THE OBSERVER — Atlantic City. Daily. Democratic. 
James B. Adams, editor, 

JERSEY JUSTICE — Atlantic City. Weekly, on Wed- 
nesday. Independent, John L. Sprogle, editor and 
proprietor. 

THE BEACON — Atlantic City. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Republican (colored). A. L. Murray, publisher. 
Rev. I, W. L. Roundtree, editor. 

MAYS LANDING RECORD— Mays Landing. Weekly, 
on Saturday. Republican. E. C. Shaner, editor and 
publisher. 



234 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

EVENING UNION— Atlantic City. Every afternoon, 
except Sunday. Evening News Publishing Company. 
Walter E. Edge, president. Office in Daily Press 
Building. 

SUNDAY GAZETTE— Atlantic City. Weekly, on Sun- 
day. Republican. Harry E. Smith, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

WEEKLY PRESS— Pleasantville. Weekly, on Wed- 
nesday. Republican. Hugh Collins, proprietor. 

FREIE PRESSE (German)— Atlantic City. Weekly, oa 
Friday. 

BERGEN COUNTY. 

BERGEN COUNTY DEMOCRAT— Hackensack. Week- 
ly, on Friday. Democratic. Bergen County Demo- 
crat Publishing Company, publishers. 

THE HACKENSACK REPUBLICAN — Hackensack. 
Weekly, on Thursday. Republican. Eugene K. 
Bird, editor and publisher. 

THE RECORD— Hackensack. Evening. Republican. 
Caleb Van Husen Whitbeck, editor. 

CARLSTADT FREIE PRESSE (German)— Carlstadt. 
Weekly. on Saturday. Independent. August 
Moench. editor. 

THE ENGLEWOOD PRESS— Englewood. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Republican. Joseph H. Tillotson, editor 
and proprietor. 

RECORD — Tenafly. Weekly, on Thursday. Republi- 
can. Record Publishing Company. 

THE NEWS — ^Ridgewood. Weekly, on Friday. F. A. 
Baxter, publisher. 

THE PARK RIDGE LOCAI^-Park Ridge. Published 
weekly, on Wednesday. James B. H. Storms and 
John C. Storms, editors and proprietors. 

RUTHERFORD AMERICAN— Rutherford. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Republican. John E. Tyler, editor and 
proprietor. 

RUTHERFORD REPUBLICAN— Rutherford. Weekly, 
on Saturday. Rutherford Publishing Company. Re- 
publican. Frank P. Newman, editor. 

THE ENTERPRISE — East Rutherford. Weekly, on 
Wednesday. Republican. The Petrie Press, pub- 
lisher. 

THE SENTINEL— Fort Lee. Weekly, on Thursday. 
Republican. J. N. Race, publisher. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 235 

THE NEWS-LETTER— Hasbrouck Heights. Weekly, 
on Tuesday. Alonzo Chamberlain, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

THE PALISALE POST— Cliffside. Weekly. Repub- 
lican. 

RIDGEPIELD PARK BULLETIN— Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Independent. J. E. Hoey, editor. 

RIDGEWOOD HERALD— Weekly, on Thursday. Re- 
publican. Brainard G. Smith, editor and proprietor. 

THE RAMSAY JOURNAL — Ramsay. Weekly. Repub- 
lican. John Y. Dater, Jr., editor. 

BURLINGTON COUNTY. 

NEW JERSEY MIRROR— Mount Holly. Weekly, on 
W"ednesday. Republican. Charles H. Folwell, edi- 
tor and proprietor. 

THE MOUNT HOLLY HERALD— Mount Holly. Week- 
ly, on Saturday. Democratic, William B. Wills, edi- 
tor. 

NEWS — Mount Holly. Weekly, on Tuesday. Republi- 
can. H. L. Walters, George W. Hand and Joseph C. 
King-don, publishers. J. C. Kingdon, editor, 

BURLINGTON GAZETTE— Burlington. Daily and 
weekly. Weekly, on Saturday. Daily, in the after- 
noon. Democratic. Dr. R. B. Glasgow, editor and 
publisher. 

THE NEW JERSEY ENTERPRISE — Burlington. 
Daily, in the afternoon, and weekly, on Saturday. 
Republican. George C. Gunn, editor and publisher. 

BORDENTOWN REGISTER — Bordentown. Weekly, 
on Friday. Independent. James D. Flynn, editor 
and proprietor. 

BEVERLY BANNER— Bexerly. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Independent. L. W. Perkins, editor and proprietor. 

MOORESTOWN CHRONICLE — Moorestown. Weekly, 
on Thursday. Independent. W. J. Lovell, editor and 
proprietor. 

BURLINGTON COUNTY PRESS— Riverside. Weekly, 
on Saturday. Independent. Hiram D. Torrie, Jr., 
editor and proprietor. 

THE REPUBLICAN — Moorestown. Weekly, on Wed- 
nesday. Republican. Earle Bowen, editor and pro- 
prietor. 



236 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

THE NEW ERA— Weekly, on Saturday. Independent. 
Riverton and Palmyra. Walter L. Bowen, pub- 
lisher. J. D. Jenney, M. D., editor. 

THE WEEKLY NEWS— Palmyra. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Independent. C. F. Sleeper, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

THE CENTRAL RECORD— Marlton. Weekly, on Fri- 
day. Independent. Heister Clymer, editor. 

CAMDEN COUNTY. 

WEST JERSEY PRESS— Camden. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Republican. Sinnickson Cliew & Sons' Com- 
pany, publishers and proprietors. Harry C. Dole, 
editor. 

CAMDEN POST-TELEGRAM— Camden. Daily, in the 
afternoon. Republican. Post-Telegram Company, 
proprietors. Upton S. Jefferys, editor. F. F. Patter- 
son, Jr., manager. 

THE COURIER — Camden. Daily, in the afternoon. 
Republican. Courier Publishing Association, pro- 
prietors. 

NEW JERSEY GAZETTE— Camden. Weekly, on Sat- 
urday. A. C. Graw, editor and publisher. 

CAMDEN COUNTY JOURNAL (German) — Camden. 
Weekly, on Friday. Louis Holler, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

ECHO — Camden. Weekly, on Saturday. Religious. 
A. A. Holt, editor and proprietor. 

ADVERTISER — Gloucester City. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Democratic. William D. Jenkins, editor and 
publisher. 

THE TRIBUNE — Haddonfield. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Republican. W. G. Taylor, editor and publisher. 

STOCKTON TIMES — Camden. Weekly, on Saturday. 
John J. Tischner, publisher. 

CAMDEN ARGUS AND EAST SIDE PRESS— Camden. 
Republican. Weekly, on Saturday. William H. Jef- 
ferys, editor and publisher. 

MERCHANTVILLE TIMES — Merchantville. Weekly, 
on Saturday. William J. Paul, editor and publisher. 

HADDON GAZETTE — Haddonfield. Weekly, on Fri- 
day, Clymer Brothers, publishers. Allen Clymer, 
editor. 

MAGNOLIA PRESS — Magnolia. W^eekly, on Thursday. 
Republican. C. J. Klein, publisher. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 237 



CAPE MAY COUNTY. 

CAPE MAY STAR AND WAVE— Cape May City. Re- 
publican. Weekly, on Friday. Star and Wave Pub- 
lishing Company. Aaron W. Hand, manager. 
CAPE MAY HERALD— Cape May City. Republican. 
Weekly, on Thursday, also morning during July and 
August. Lewis T. Stevens, editor and proprietor. 
CAPE MAY COUNTY GAZETTE— Cape May Court 
House. Weekly, on Friday. Republican. Alfred 
Cooper, editor and publisher. 
SENTINEI^-Ocean City. Weekly, on Thursday. Re- 
publican. R. Curtis Robinson, editor and propri- 
etor. 
FIVE-MILE BEACH JOURNAI^-Wildwood. Inde- 
pendent. Weekly, on Wednesday. Jed Dubois, edi- 
tor and proprietor. 
OCEAN CITY LEDGER — Weekly, on Saturday. Pro- 
hibition. Ocean City Ledger Publishing Company, 
proprietors. New Jersey Methodist Publishing Com- 
pany. 
FIVE-MILE BEACH SUN— Wildwood. Weekly, on 

Saturday. Republican. T. C. Hamilton. 
CAPE MAY COUNTY TIMES— Sea Isle City. Weekly, 
on Friday. Independent Republican. George Car- 
penter Connor, editor and proprietor. 

CUMBERLAND COUNTY. 

BRIDGETON PIONEER — Bridgeton. Daily and 
weekly. Weekly, on Thursday. Republican. 
George W. McCowan, editor and publisher. 

NEW JERSEY PATRIOT— Bridgeton. Weekly, on 
Friday. Democratic. John Cheeseman, editor and 

publisher. -r. v^t 

BRIDGETON EVENING NEWS— Bridgeton. Republi- 
can. Evening News Company, publishers. J. W. 
Richardson, editor and manager. 
DOLLAR WEEKLY NEWS— Bridgeton. Independent. 
Weekly, on Saturday. Evening News Company, 
publishers. 



238 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

WEEKLY INDEPENDENT— Vineland. Weekly, on 
Friday. Populist. J. J. Streeter, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

THE EVENING JOURNAI^— Vineland. Afternoon. 
Democratic. B. Franklin Ladd, editor. 

MILLVILLE REPUBLICAN AND REPORTER — Mill- 
ville. Evening-. Republican. Millville Republican 
and Publishing Company, publishers. George Doyles, 
editor. 

THE VINELAND NEWS — Vineland. Afternoon. Re- 
publican. The News Publishing Company. James 
Cooper and Montevert Landis, editors. 

EVERY SATURDAY AND REPUBLICAN — Vineland. 
Weekly. Republican. Charles F. Graff, publisher. 

ESSEX COUNTY. 

NEWARK EVENING NEWS— Newark. Afternoon. 
Independent. Evening News Puolishing Company. 
Wallace M. Scudder, editor and publisher. 

THE MORNING STAR AND NEWARK ADVER- 
TISER — Newark. Independent. Every morning, 
Sundays excepted. Newark Daily Advertiser Pub- 
lishing Company. James Smith, Jr., president and 
manager. John J. Leidy, editor. George A. Lindsay, 
managing editor. 

THE EVENING STAR AND NEWARK ADVER- 
tiser. Newark. Independent. Newark Daily Ad- 
vertiser Publishing Company. James Smith, Jr., 
president and manager. John J. Leidy, editor. 
Frank A. Clark, managing editor. 

NEW JERSEY FREIE ZEITUNG (German)— Newark. 
Dally, also Sunday edition. Republican. Mrs. B. 
Prieth, proprietress. William Katzeler, editor. Bene- 
dict Prieth, business manager. 

SUNDAY CALL — Newark. Weeklj', on Sunday. Inde- 
pendent. The Newark Call Printing and Publishing 
Company, publishers. G. Wisner Thorne, president 
and treasurer; C. G. VanGorden, secretary; William 
T. Hunt, G. Wisner Thorne and Louis Hannoch, di- 
rectors. William T. Hunt, editor. 

SENTINEL OF FREEDOM — Newark. Weekly, on Sat- 
urda5\ Independent Republican. Published by the 
Advertiser Publishing Company. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 239 

DER ERZAHLER (German)— Newark. Sunday edition 
of New Jersey Freie Zeitung. Weekly, on Sunday. 
Republican, Published at the New Jersey Freie 
Zeitung- office. 

NEWARK PIONEER (German)— Newark. Weekly. 
Independent. F. E. Adler & Co., publishers. 

TOWN TALK — Newark. Weekly, on Saturday. Illus- 
trated Politico-social. T. E. Burke and Herman E. 
L. Beyer, editors and publishers. 

NEW JERSEY TRADE REVIEW — Newark. Semi- 
monthly. Commercial. Paul V. Flynn, editor and 
publisher. 

RAILROAD EMPLOYEE. — Newark. Monthly. B. E. 
Chapin, editor and publisher. 

THE NEWARK LEDGER — Newark. Weekly, on Sat- 
urdaj'-. Democratic. Newark Ledger Publishing 
Company, proprietors. 

THE MONITOR— Newark. Weekly, on Saturday. Cath- 
olic. The Monitor Company. Rev. Wm. P. Cant- 
well, editor-in-chief. 

FRUSTA LA (Italian) — Newark. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. 

LA MONTAGNA (THE MOUNTAIN) (Italian)— Repub- 
lican, Newark. Weekly, on Saturday. F. A. Fiore, 
editor. 

ROSEVILLE WEEKLY— Newark. Weekly, on Friday. 
A. K. Davidson, editor and publisher. 

THE ORANGE CHRONICLE— Orange. Evening. In- 
dependent. H. W. Brush, proprietor. Daniel Pier- 
son, editor. 

THE ORANGE ADVERTISER — Orange. Weekly, on 
Friday. Democratic. F. C. Shann, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

ORANGE VOLKSBOTE (German) — Orange. Weekly, 
on Saturday. Democratic. F. G. Temme, editor and 
proprietor. 

EASE ORANGE RECORD — East Orange. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Independent. L. C. Gilles, editor and 
publisher. 

THE BLOOMFIELD CITIZEN — Bloomfleld. Weekly, 
on Friday. Republican. 'William A. Ritscher, Jr., 
editor and proprietor. 

MONTCLAIR TIMES — Montclair. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Republican. A. C. Studer, editor and pub- 
lisher. 



240 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

THE MONTCLAIR HERALD— Montclair. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Francis Loon Chrisman, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

ITEM— Short Hills. Weekly, on Saturday. Independ- 
ent. Gibbs & Wright, editors and publishers. 

THE CALDWELL NEWS— Caldwell. Weekly, on Sat- 
urday. Independent. 

NEWS — Irving-ton. Weekly, on Saturday. Independ- 
ent. Irvington News Publishing Company, editors 
and proprietors. 

SUN — Isutley. Weekly, on Friday. James D. Foy, pub- 
lisher. 

GLOUCESTER COUNTY. 

THE CONSTITUTION— Woodbury. Weekly, on Wed- 
nesday. Republican. The Constitution Company, 
publishers. Louis W. Albright, editor. 

GLOUCESTER COLaTV DEMOCRAT — Woodbury. 
Weekly, on Thursday. Democratic. J. D. Carpenter, 
editor and publisher. 

WEEKLY ITEM— Newfield. Weekly, on Friday. Dem- 
ocratic. A. C. Dalton, editor and publisher. 

ENTEKji-iilSE — Glassboro. Weekly, on Saturday. Re- 
publican. A. M. Seabrook, editor and publisher. 

t).vEDESBORO i\EWS — Swedesboro. Weekly, on Sat- 
urday. Independent. George W. Pither, editor and 
publisher. 

P.vULSBORO PRESS — Paulsboro. Weekly, on Friday. 
Independent. E. L. Leonard, editor and publisher. 

WOODBURY DAILY TIMES— W^oodbury. Daily, ex- 
cept Sunday. Independent. Hawn & Wilson, editors 
and publishers. 

REPORTER — Clayton. Weekly, on Wednesday. Inde- 
pendent. A. F. Jenkins, editor and publisher. 

HOME GUIDE — National Park. Weekly, on Thursday. 
Clement L. Burtnett, editor. 

THE SUN — Paulsboro. Weekly, on Friday. Republi- 
can. Charles G. W^illiam, editor and publisher. 

HUDSON COUNTY. 

THE EVENING JOURNAL — Jersey City. Afternoon. 
Republican. Evening Journal Association, proprie- 
tors. Joseph A. Dear, publisher. 

JERSEY CITY HERALD — Jersey City. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Democratic. J. J. Dowling and J. McCue, 
proprietors. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 241 

JERSEY CITY DEMOCRAT— Jersey City. Weekly. 
Democratic. J. F. Norton, editor. 

THE CHRONICLE— Jersey City. Weekly, on Wednes- 
day. Chronicle Publishing Company, publishers. 

THE MIRROR — Jersey City. Weekly. Independent. 
Abraham Lincoln Graham, editor. 

THE OBSERVER — Hoboken. Afternoon. Democratic. 
Hoboken Printing and Publishing Company, pub- 
lishers. Matt C. Ely, editor. 

THE INQUIRER — Hoboken. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Democratic. Philip Daab, proprietor. W. W. Bax- 
ter, editor. 

WACHT AM HUDSON (German)— Hoboken. After- 
noon. H. E. Schneider & Co., publishers and editors. 
[They also publish the BELLES-LETTRES JOUR- 
NAL, NEWS FROM GERMANY, SAXON JOURNAL, 
NEW PRUSSIAN GAZETTE, RUNDSCHAU and 
NEW JERSEY STAATS ZEITUNG, weekly German 
journals.] 

DEMOCRAT (German) — Hoboken. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. William Faas, publisher. 

BAYONNE HERALD — Bayonne. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Democratic. 

BAYONNE TIMES — Bayonne. Daily. Republican. 
Bayonne Printing and Publishing Company. J. T. R. 
Proctor, editor. 

BAYONNE DEMOCRAT — Bayonne. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Democratic. Michael R. Freel, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

HUDSON COUNTY DISPATCH— Union Hill. Daily. 
Democratic. 

KEARNY RECORD— Harrison. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Democratic. Philip A. McAviney, editor and propri- 
etor. 

THE OBSERVER — Arlington. Weekly, on Saturday. 
J. E. Beckwith, editor and proprietor. 

WEST HUDSON PRESS— Kearny. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Independent. L. E. Travis, editor. Kearny 
Publishing Company, proprietors. 

HUDSON COUNTY REVUE (German)— Union Hill. 
Democratic. Weekly. Michel & Rank, publishers. 

NORTH HUDSON NEWS— West Hoboken. Independ- 
ent. A. L. Ransom, editor. 

SOCIALIST REVIEW — West Hoboken. Weekly. 
Charles Ufert, editor. 
16 



242 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

HUNTERDON COUNTY. 

HUNTERDON COUNTY DEMOCRAT — Flemington. 
Weekly, on Tuesday. Democratic. Anthony Kill- 
gore, editor and proprietor. 

DEMOCRAT-ADVERTISER — Flemington. Weekly, '^n 
Friday. Democratic. H. M. Voorhees, editor an 1 
proprietor. 

HUNTERDON REPUBLICAN— Flemington. Weekly, 
on Wednesday. Republican. William G. Callis, edi- 
tor and proprietor. 

THE BEACON — Lambertville. Weekly, on Friday. 
Independent. Phineas K. Hazen & Son, editors and 
proprietors. 

THE LAMBERTVILLE RECORD — Lambertville. 
Weekly, on Wednesday. Republican. Jessie E. Pier- 
son, editor and publisher. 

WEEKLY ARGUS— Lambertville. Weekly, on Tues- 
day. B. H. Joiner & Son, editors and publishers. 

THE CLINTON DEMOCRAT— Clinton. Semi-weekly, 
on Tuesday and Friday. Democratic. John Carpen- 
ter & Son, editors and publishers. 

HUNTERDON INDEPENDENT— Frenchtown. Weekly, 
on Friday. Independent. John R. Hardon, editor 
and publisher. 

THE STAR — Frenchtown. Weekly, on Wednesday. 
Independent. William H. Sipes, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

MILFORD LEADER— Milford. Weekly, on Thursday. 
Independent. W. H. Farrand, proprietor. 

THE AVALANCHE — Glen Gardner. Weekly, on Wed- 
nesday. E. W. Rush, editor and publisher. 

THE HUNTERDON GAZETTE— High Bridge. Weekly. 
Republican. High Bridge Printing Company, pro- 
prietor. 

WEEKLY REVIEW^ — White House Station. George 
W. Shampanore & Sons, publishers. 

AMERICAN GAM -'-KEEPER — Wooaglen. Weekly. 
Poultry. A. L. fehr mpanore, editor and publisher. 

MERCER COUNTY. 

STATE GAZETTE — Trenton. Daily and weekly. 
Weekly, on Thursday. Republican. The State Ga- 
zette Publishing Company, proprietors. Thomas 
Holmes, editor. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 243 

TRUE AMERICAN — Trenton, Daily. Democratic. 
Henry Eckert Alexander, editor and publisher. 

THE TRENTON EVENING TIMES— Trenton. After- 
noon and weekly. Weekly, on Thursday. Inde- 
pendent Republican. Trenton Times Company, pub- 
lishers. 

THE NEW JERSEY STAATS JOURNAL (German) — 
Trenton. Semi-weekly. Republican, Ernest C. 
Stahl, editor and proprietor. 

SUNDAY ADVERTISER — Trenton. Weekly, on Sun- 
day. Independent. Advertiser Publishing- Company, 
editors and proprietors. 

TRADES UNION ADVOCATE— Trenton. Weekly, Fri- 
day. Labor. Reuben Forker, editor and publisher. 

THE TRENTON DEUTSCHE ZEITUNG (German) — 
Trenton. Weekly. Republican. Otto Erdlen, editor 
and publisher. 

THE MAGYAR KOSTARSASAG — Trenton, Hungar- 
ian, Weekly. Republican, Dr, Eugene Antal, edi- 
tor, 

HIGHTSTOWN GAZETTE — Hightstown, Weekly, on 
Thursday, Independent, L. D. Tillyer, proprietor, 

PRINCETON PRESS— Princeton, Weekly, on Satur- 
day, Republican, C. S, Robinson & Co,, editors and 
publishers, 

THE DAILY PRINCETONIAN— Princeton, Published 
daily, except Sundays, during the college year. De- 
voted to the interests of Princeton University, 
Edited by students, 

THE HOPEWELL HERALD— Hopewell. Weekly, on 
Tuesday. Independent. Race & Savidge, editors and 
publishers. 

THE PENNINGTON POST — Pennington. Independent. 
Weekly, on Wednesday. W. B. R. Mason, publisher 
and proprietor, T, D. Durling, editor, 

MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 

THE HOME NEWS — New Brunswick, Every after- 
noon, except Sunday. Independent, Hugh Boyd, 
proprietor, Arthur H, Boyd, editor and manager. 

THE WEEKLY HOME NEWS— New Brunswick. Pub- 
lished every Thursday afternoon. Independent, 
Arthur H, Boyd, editor. 



244 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

THE TIMES — New Brunswick. Afternoon and weekly. 
Weekly, on Friday. Independent. Rev. Linn E. 
Wheeler and George D. Johnson, editors and pro- 
prietors. 

THE CHRONICLE— Perth Amboy. Daily. Independ- 
ent. Perth Amboy Publishing- Company, publishers. 
J. S. Wright, editor. 

THE EVENING NEWS — Perth Amboy. Daily and 
Weekly. Independent. Perth Amboy Evening News 
Company. J. Logan Clevenger, editor. 

WEEKLY REGISTER— Woodbridge. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Republican. R. D. Uhler, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

THE NEWS — Woodbridge. Weekly, on Friday. Wood- 
bridge News Publishing Company, proprietors. M. 
H. Clark, editor. 

THE RECORDER — Metuchen. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Independent Republican. Prickett Bros., editors and 
proprietors. 

THE ADVANCE — Jamesburg. Weekly, on Thursday. 
Printed and published by the New Jersey State 
School for Boys. 

THE CITIZEN — South Amboy. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Independent. M. N. Roll, editor and publisher. 

THE PRESS — Cranbury. Weekly, on Friday. Repub- 
lican. George W. Burroughs, editor. Press Print- 
ing Company, proprietors. 

THE DUNELLEN WEEKLY CALI^Dunellen. Week- 
ly, on Thursday. George W. Day, proprietor. 

THE ROOSEVELT WEEKLY — Roosevelt. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Thomas Yorke, editor. 

MONMOUTH COUNTY. 
THE MONMOUTH INQUIRER — Freehold. Weekly, on 

Thursday. Republican. Maxey Applegate, editor 

and publisher. 
THE MONMOUTH DEMOCRAT— Freehold. Weekly, 

on Thursday. Democratic. Joseph A. Yard, editor 

and manager. 
THE TRANSCRIPT— Freehold. Weekly, on Friday. 

Democratic. Moreau Bros. (Alex. L. Moreau), pub- 

lisners and proprietors. 
NEW JERSEY STANDARD— Red Bank. Weekly, on 

Friday. Democratic. William A. Sweeney, editor. 

Standard Publishing Company, proprietors. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 245 

RED BANK REGISTER — Red Bank. Weekly, on Wed- 
nesday. Republican. John H. Cook, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

KEYPORT ENTERPRISE — Keyport. Weekly, on Fri- 
day. Democratic. A. F. Walling, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

KEYPORT WEEKLY — Keyport. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Independent. E. D. Pettys, editor and propri- 
etor. 

THE LONG BRANCH RECORD— Long Branch. Daily 
and weekly, on Friday. Independent-Democratic. 
F. M. Taylor Publishing Company. B. B. Bobbitt, 
editor. 

LONG BRANCH NEWS— Long Branch. Weekly, on 
Friday. Democratic. Long Branch News Company, 
publishers. 

THE LONG BRANCH HERALD — Long Branch. Inde- 
pendent. Weekly, on Friday. Jacob Stults, editor. 

THE LONG BRANCH PRESS— Long Branch. Weekly. 
Independent. Long Branch Press Company. 

CITY JOURNAL — Long Branch City. Weekly, on 
Thursday. D. H. Van Brunt, publisher. 

THE TAXPAYER AND WORKINGMAN— Long Branch. 
Weekly, on Saturday. Joseph A. Poole, editor. 

THE MATAWAN JOURNAL— Mata wan. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Republican. Benjamin F. S. Brown, edi- 
tor and proprietor. 

THE JOURNAL — Asbury Park. Daily and weekly. 
Weekly, on Wednesday. Republican. Morton and 
Chester Pennypacker, editors and proprietors. 

THE SHORE PRESS — Asbury Park. Weekly, on Sun- 
day. Democratic. J. L. Kinmonth, publisher and 
proprietor. 

THE EVENING PRESS — Asbury Park. Also morning 
during July, August and September. J. L. Kinmonth, 
publisher and proprietor. 

OCEAN GROVE TIMES — Ocean Grove. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Republican. J. E. Quinn, editor. E. N. 
Woolston, manager. 

THE ADVERTISER — Eatontown. Weekly, on Friday. 
Democratic. William T. Cole, editor, publisher and 
proprietor,' 

THE COAST STAR DEMOCRAT — Manasquan. Weekly, 
on Friday. Democratic. Tracy M. Hoskins, editor 
and proprietor. 



246 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

MANASQUAN NEWS — Manasquan. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Independent. Theo. F. Hults, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

'iHE COAST ADVERTISER— Belmar. Weekly, on 
Friday. Democratic. J. G. Murphy, proprietor and 
publisher. 

THE JOURNAL— Atlantic Highlands. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Republican. A. G. Hall, proprietor. 

SEASIDE GAZETTE— Spring Lake Beach. Weekly, on 
Friday. Republican. E. S. V. Stultz, editor and 
publisher. 

MONMOUTH PRESS— Atlantic Highlands. Republican. 
Weekly, on Saturday. William J. Leonard, editor. 

SEA BRIGHT SENTINEL — Sea Bright. Weekly, on 
Thursday (May to September). Independent. Sen- 
tinel Company, publishers. 

SEA BRIGHT NEWS— Sea Bright. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Republican. Sea Bright Publishing Company. 
P. Hall Packer, editor. 

ALLENTOWN MESSENGER— Weekly, on Thursday. 
J. W. Naylor, editor and publisher. 

THE SEACOAST NEWS— Bradley Beach. Independent. 
Weekly, on Friday. C. Arthur Hall, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

HIGHLANDS HERALD— Highlands. On Saturday. In- 
dependent. Co-operative Press Company, publishers. 
William J. Leonard, editor. 

RED BANK INDEPENDENT — Red Bank. On Satur- 
day. Independent. Co-operative Press Company, 
publishers. William J. Leonard, editor. 

MAIL AND EXPRESS— Red Bank. Weekly, Friday. 
Republican. Louis O. Somerset, editor. 

OCEANIC ADVANCE— Oceanic. On Saturday. Inde- 
pendent. Co-operative Press Company, publishers. 
William J. Leonard, editor. 



MORRIS COUNTY. 

THE JERSEYMAN — Morristown. Weekly, on Friday. 

Republican. Pierson & Surdam, proprietors. I. R. 

Pierson, editor. 
TRUE DEMOCRATIC BANNER— Morristown. Weekly, 

on Thursday. Democratic. Vogt Bros., editors and 

proprietors. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 247 

THE MORRIS COUNTY CHRONICLE— Morristown. 
Weekly, on Tuesday. Republican. Pierson & Sur- 
dam, publishers, 

THE MORRISTOWN NEWS — Morristown. Daily. Re- 
publican. Sayre & Cobbett, editors and proprietors. 

THE DAILY RECORD — Morristown. Independent. E. 
H. Tomlinson, proprietor. 

THE IRON ERA — Dover. Tuesday, Thursday and 
Saturday. Republican. J. E. Williams, editor and 
proprietor. 

DOVER INDEX — Dover. Weekly, on Friday. Demo- 
cratic. Frank F. Hummell, editor and proprietor. 

THE DOVER ADVANCE— Dover. Semi-weekly. Mon- 
days and Thursdays. Republican. Harry R. Gill, 
editor and publisher. 

THE BULLETIN— Boonton. Weekly, on Thursday. 
Republican. Samuel L. Garrison, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

THE TIMES — Boonton. Weekly, on Thursday. Inde- 
pendent. Charles L. Grubb, editor and proprietor. 

THE EAGLE — Madison. Weekly, on Friday. Inde- 
pendent. Edgar C. Markham, editor and publisher. 

THE RECORD— Rockaway. Weekly, on Friday. In- 
dependent. Sidney Collins, editor and publisher. 

THE STANHOPE EAGLE— Netcong. Independent. 
Weekly, on Wednesday. George T. Keech, editor 
and proprietor. 

UNION TIMES — Netcong-, Weekly, on Wednesday. 
Independent. Charles W. Eaton, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

CHATHAM PRESSU-Chatham. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Independent. J. Thomas Scott, editor and propri- 
etor. 

THE BUTLER PRESS— Butler. Weekly, on Friday. 
H. L. Wells & Son, editors and publishers. 

OCEAN COUNTY. 

NEW JERSEY COURIER — Toms River. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Republican. W. H. Fischer, editor and 
proprietor. 

NEW JERSEY TRIBUNE — Toms River. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Neutral. Estate of Charles L. Hazlett. 

TIMES AND JOURNAL — Lakewood. Weekly, on Fri- 
day, and semi-weekly, Tuesday and Friday, Decem- 
ber to May. Republican. Leslie R. Fort, editor and 
publisher. 



248 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

THE BEACON — Point Pleasant. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Roy Havens, editor and proprietor. 

THE TUCKERTON BEACON— Tuckerton. Weekly. 
Benjamin H. Crosby, editor and publisher. 

LAKEWOOD CITIZEN— Lakewood. Weekly, on Fri- 
day. Republican. Harry T. Hagaman, editor and 
publisher. 

PRESS — New Egypt. Weekly, on Friday. Moore 
Bros., editors and publishers. 

PASSAIC COUNTY. 

PATERSON GUARDIAN— Paterson. Afternoon and 
weekly. Weekly, on Friday. Democratic. Guard- 
ian Printing- and Publishing Company, publishers 
and proprietors. Clarence H. Baxter, editor. 

THE PATERSON PRESS — Paterson. Afternoon and 
weekly. Weekly, on Thursday. Republican. The 
Press Printing and Publishing Co., publishers and 
proprietors. George Wurts, editor. 

THE MORNING CALL — Paterson. Daily, except Sun- 
day. Republican. The Call Printing and Publish- 
ing Company, proprietors and publishers. Joseph E. 
Crowell, editor. 

EVENING NEWS — Paterson. Daily, afternoon, except 
Sunday. Independent. News Printing and Publish- 
ing Company, proprietors. E. B. Haines, editor. 

SUNDAY CHRONICLE — Paterson. Sunday. Inde- 
pendent. Paterson Chronicle Company, proprietors. 
Charles A. Shriner, editor and manager. 

PATERSON TELEGRAM — Paterson. Sunday. Demo- 
cratic. John J. O'Rourke, editor and proprietor. 

PATERSON VOLKS-FREUND (German)— Paterson. 
Daily, afternoon. Independent. The German-Amer- 
ican Printing and Publishing Company, proprietors 
and publishers. William T. Apel, editor. 

DE TELEGRAF (Holland) — Paterson. Semi-weekly. 
Republican. Tanis & Schrauder, publishers. 

PATERSON CENSOR — Paterson. Monday. Printed 
record of the counties of Bergen and Passaic. A. E. 
and B. Vanderhoven, editors and proprietors. 

PASSAIC HERALD — Passaic. Daily, afternoon. Demo- 
cratic. Robert G. Bremner, editor and publisher. 

PASSAIC DAILY NEWS— Passaic. Afternoon. Inde- 
pendent. George M. Hartt, editor. News Publishing 
Company, proprietors and publishers. 

WOCHENBLATT (German) — Passaic. Saturday. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 249 

SALEM COUNTY. 

SALEM STANDARD AND JERSEYMAN — Salem. 
Weekly, on Wednesday. Republican. Standard and 
Jerseyman Company, publishers. William H. Chew, 
editor. 

SALEM SUNBEAM — Salem. Weekly, on Friday. 
Democratic. Robert Gwynne, editor. Sunbeam Pub- 
lishing- Company, publishers. 

THE MONITOR-REGISTER— Woodstown. Weekly, on 
Friday. Independent. Benjamin Patterson, propri- 
etor. 

PENNSGROVE RECORD — Pennsgrove. Weekly, on 
Friday. Independent. W. A. Summerill, proprietor. 

ELMER TIMES — Elmer. Weekly, on Friday Inde- 
pendent. S. P. Foster and G. W. Hawn, editors and 
publishers. 

SOMERSET COUNTY. 

THE SOMERSET MESSENGER — Somerville. Weekly, 
on Wednesday. Democratic. John H. Mattison, edi- 
tor and publisher. 

THE UNIONIST-GAZETTE— Somerville. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Republican. The Unionist-Gazette Asso- 
ciation, publishers. Charles H. Bateman, editor and 
manager. 

THE SOMERSET DEMOCRAT— Somerville. Weekly, 
on Friday. Democratic. E. M. Wight, proprietor. 
Carlton P. Hoagland, editor and manager. 

BOUND BROOK CHRONICLE— Bound Brook. Weekly, 
on Friday. Republican. W. B. R. Mason, editor and 
publisher. 

STATE CENTRE-RECORD — Bound Brook. Weekly, 
on Thursday. Democratic. Daniel Clark, editor. 

DER SOMERSET BOTE (German) — Bound Brook. 
Weekly, on Tuesday. Democratic. Walter Reiss, 
editor and publisher. 

THE NEWS — Bernardsville. Weekly, on Friday. In- 
dependent. L. R. Trumbull, editor. 

THE TIMES — Bernardsville. Weekly, on Wednesday. 
Independent. Joseph Kronenburg, editor. 

THE ROYAL CRAFTSMAN— Somerville. Monthly. 
Devoted to masonry. Somerset Publishing Com- 
VSLuy, publishers. 

NORTH PLAINFIELD WEEKLY REVIEW— North 
Plainfield. Weekly, on Friday. Republican. Harry 
H. Webb, publisher. 



250 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

SUSSEX COUNTY. 

THE SUSSEX REGISTER— Newton. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Republican. Richard F. Goodman, editor 
and publisher. Robert E. Foster, assistant editor. 

THE NEW JERSEY HERALD— Newton. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Democratic. Jacob L. Bunnell and Mar- 
tin J. Cox, editors and proprietors. Hency C. Bon- 
nell, assistant editor. 

SUSSEX INDEPENDENT— Sussex. Weekly, on Fri- 
day. Independent. J. J. Stanton and C. A. Wilson, 
editors. 

THE WANTAGE RECORDER — Sussex. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Democratic. C. E. Stickney, editor. 

THE MILK REPORTER — Sussex. Monthly. Agricul- 
ture. John J. Stanton, editor and proprietor. 

UNION COUNTY. 

ELIZABETH DAILY JOURNAL — Elizabeth. After- 
noon. Republican. Augustus S. Crane, manager. 

THE EVENING TIMES — Elizabeth. Democratic. The 
Elizabeth Printing and Publishing Company. Nel- 
son E. Barton, manager. J. Leo Sauer, editor. 

UNION COUNTY RECORD— Elizabeth. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Isaac Newton Lewis, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

THE UNION DEMOCRAT — Rahway. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Democratic. Lewis S. Hyer, editor. J. I. 
Collins, business manager. 

THE NEW JERSEY ADVOCATE — Rahway. Weekly, 
on Thursday. Republican. H. B. Rollinson, editor 
and publisher. 

THE DAILY PRESS — Plainfield. Published at the of- 
fice of the CONSTITUTIONALIST. Independent. A. 
L. Force, proprietor. 

THE CONSTITUTIONALIST — Plainfield. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Independent. A. L. Force, publisher. 

THE PLAINFIELD COURIER-NEWS— Plainfield. Af- 
ternoon. Republican. George H. Frost, editor and 
proprietor. 

THE SUMMIT RECORD — Summit. Democratic. Week- 
ly. Alfred J. Lane, proprietor. 

THE SUMMIT HERALD — Summit. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Republican. J. W. Clift, publisher. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 251 

THE UNION COUNTY STANDARD— Westfield. Week- 
ly, on Saturday. The Standard Publishing Concern. 
Robert Hoffman, editor and manager. 

THE CRANFORD CHRONICLE— Weekly, on Wednes- 
day. John Alfred Potter, editor a:id publisher. 

THE CRANFORD CITIZEN— Cranford. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Independent. E. R. Clyma, editor and 
manager, 

THE WESTFIELD LEADER— Westfield. Weekly, on 
Wednesday. Republican. G. A. V. Hankinson, edi- 
tor. 

NORTH JERSEY ENTERPRISE— Roselle. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Walter Scott, editor. Thomas H. Evans, 
Business manager and publisher. 

WARREN COUNTY. 

BELVIDERE APOLLO— Belvidere. Weekly, on Fri- 
day. Republican. J. Madison Drake, Jr., editor and 
proprietor. 

THE WARREN JOURNAL — Belvidere. Weekly, on 
Friday. Democratic. Smith Bros., editors and pub- 
lishers. 

HACKETTSTOWN GAZETTE— Hackettstown. Week- 
ly, on Friday. Democratic. Charles Rittenhouse, 
editor and publisher. 

WARREN REPUBLICAN— Hackettstown. Weekly, on 
Friday. Republican. Curtis Bros., proprietors. 
George P. Curtis, editor. 

THE WASHINGTON STAR— Washington. Weekly, on 
Tnursday. Democratic. Charles L. Stryker, editor 
and proprietor. 

THE BLAIRSTOWN PRESS— Blairstown. Weekly, on 
Wednesday. Independent. De Witt C. Carter, editor 
and publisher. 

THE WARREN TIDINGS— Washington. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Republican. Frank B. Porter, proprietor. 

THE POST — Phillipsburg. Evenings, except Sunday. 
Republican. Michael T. Lynch, proprietor and pub- 
lisher. 



252 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

SUMMARY. 

There are 54 daily, 235 weekly, 4 semi-weekly, 2 
semi-monthly, 4 monthly and 5 Sunday papers alto- 
gether in New Jersey, of which 95 are Republican, 65 
Democratic, 95 Independent, 32 Neutral, 2 Labor, 2 
Religious, 2 Prohibition, and one each as follows: 
Agricultural, Milk, Poultry, Populist, Railroad Em- 
ployees, Law, Masonic, State School for Boys, College, 
Commercial and Theatrical. Twenty-two are pub- 
lished in the German language, 2 in Italian, 1 Holland, 
1 Hungarian. 

The summary by counties is as follows: Atlantic, 16; 
Bergen, 17; Burlington, 15; Camden, 14; Cape May, 
8; Cumberland, 13; Essex, 28; Gloucester, 10; Hudson, 
25; Hunterdon, 14; Mercer, 14; Middlesex, 16; Mon- 
mouth, 34; Morris, 16; Ocean, 7; Passaic, 15; Salem, 5; 
Somerset, 10; Sussex, 5; Union, 14; Warren, 8. Total, 
304. 



THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 253 

THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 



(For the year ending October 31, 1909.) 

CHAPTER 319. 

An act making appropriations for the support of the 
State government and for several public purposes 
for the fiscal year ending October 31st, 1909. 
Be it enacted by the Senate and General Assembly 
of the State of New Jersey: 

1. The following sums, or so much thereof as may be 
necessary, be and they are appropriated out of the 
State fund for the respective public officers and for 
the several purposes herein specified, for the fiscal 
year ending on the 31st day of October, in the year 
1909, namely: 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

For the Governor, for salary, $10,000. 

For the Secretary to the Governor, for salary, $4,000. 

For compensation for assistants in the Executive 
Department, $4,000. 

For blanks and stationery for the use of the Execu- 
tive Department, $1,000. 

For postage, expressage and other incidental ex- 
penses for the Executive Department, $2,000. 

OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER. 

For the Comptroller, for salary, $6,000. 

For the Deputy Comptroller, for salary, $3,600. 

For compensation for clerical services and expenses, 
$7,100. 

For allowance for salary and expenses of the State 
Auditor, provided he remains in this department, 
$3,000. 

For blanks and stationery for use in the office of 
the Comptroller, $900. 

For postage, expressage and other incidental ex- 
penses for the Comptroller's oflSce, $1,500. 



254 THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 

OFFICE OF THE TREASURER. 

For the Treasurer, for salary, $6,000. 

For compensation for clerical services in the ofRce 
of the Treasurer, $10,500. 

For blanks and stationery for use in the office of the 
Treasurer, $650. 

For postage, expressage and other incidental ex- 
penses for the office of the Treasurer, $650. 

OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE. 

For the Secretary of State, for salary, $6,000. 

For the Assistant Secretary of State, for salary, 
$3,000. 

For compensation for clerical services in the office 
of the Secretary of State, $11,350. 

For postage, expressage and other incidental ex- 
penses for the office of Secretary of State, $2,500. 

For blanks and stationery for use in the office of the 
Secretary of State, $5,300. 

For the purpose of compiling indices of wills, deeds 
and other records, in the general vault of the office of 
the Secretary of State, $2,400. 

For services and expenses for the purpose of carry- 
ing out the provisions of "An act respecting the re- 
cording of certificates and other papers relating to 
and affecting corporations," approved March 28th, 
1904, $3,500. 

For the care, inspection and other expenses con- 
nected with voting machines, $4,000. 

ATTORNEY-GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT. 

For the Attorney-General, for salary, $7,000. 

For the Assistant Attorney-General, for salary, 
$5,000. 

For compensation and expenses of assistants em- 
ployed by the Attorney-General, $9,700. 

For additional allowance for compensation and ex- 
penses of assistants employed by the Attorney-Gen- 
eral, $1,400. 

For blanks and stationery for use in the office of 
the Attorney-General, $600. 

For postage, expressage and other incidental ex- 
penses for the Attorney-General's Department, $1,800. 



THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 255 

For the use of the Attorney-General in the employ- 
ment of special counsel to institute proceedings to as- 
certain by final judicial determination of the courts 
(1) what equity or interest the State of New Jersey 
has in the "tidewater basin of 1867," and (2) by what 
authority the Lehigh Valley Railroad Company ope- 
rates the Morris Canal, since its charter does not au- 
thorize it to conduct a canal business, the sum of 
$5,000 is hereby appropriated, and the Attorney-Gen- 
eral is hereby directed to use this sum or any part of 
it in the prosecution of said proceedings. 

For compensation and expenses of counsel employed 
by the Attorney-General in foreign States to collect 
taxes due from bankrupt and other insolvent cor- 
porations, $1,000. 

STATE BOARD OF ASSESSORS. 

For the members of the State Board of Assessors, 
salaries, $10,000. 

For Secretary of the State Board of Assessors, for 
salary, $2,500. 

For compensation for clerical service in the office 
of the State Board of Assessors, $8,000. 

For blanks and stationery for use in the office of 
the State Board of Assessors, $900. 

For postage, expressage and other incidental ex- 
penses for the State Board of Assessors, $900. 

For compensation of local Assessors and witnesses, 
for compensation and expenses of Surveyors, pursuant 
to chapter 101 of the laws of 1884, $6,000. 

DEPARTMENT OF BANKING AND INSURANCE. 

For the Commissioner of Banking and Insurance, 
for salary, $6,000. 

For the Deputy Commissioner of Banking and In- 
surance, for salary, $2,500. 

For compensation for assistants in the Department 
of Banking and Insurance, $10,000. 

For blanks and stationery, for use in the Depart- 
ment of Banking and Insurance, $4,000. 

For postage, expressage and other incidental ex- 
penses for the Department of Banking and Insurance, 
$3,000. 



256 THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 

For compensation of building and loan association 
examiners, $15,300. 

For actual and necessary traveling and incidental 
personal expenses of building and loan association 
examiners, $4,500. 

For necessary appraisals of real estate and all other 
incidental expenses in connection with examinations 
of building and loan associations, $1,000. 

BOARD OF EQUALIZATION OF TAXES. 

For salaries for President and four members, 
$19,000. 

For salary of Clerk, $2,500. 

For salary of Assistant Clerk, $1,200. 

For extra clerical services, $100. 

For blanks and stationery for use of the Board of 
Equalization of taxes, $400. 

For postage, expressage and other incidental ex- 
penses for the Board of Equalization of Taxes, $500. 

STATE LIBRARY. 

For the Librarian, for salary, $3,000. 

For compensation for assistants in the State Library, 
$2,400. 

For the repair, preservation and purchase of useful 
books for the State Library, $3,500. 

For blanks, stationery, postage, expressage and 
other incidental expenses for the State Library, $500. 

STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

For the State Board of Health, pursuant to the pro- 
visions of chapter 68, laws of 1887, $2,325. 

For compensation of assistants in the office of the 
State Board of Health, pursuant to said chapter, 
$8,540. 

For additional allowance for compensation of as- 
sistants in the office of the State Board of Health, pur- 
suant to said chapter, $2,100. 

For compensation to the Secretary of said board, 
pursuant to said chapter, $2,500. 

For expenses to be incurred pursuant to chapter 
225, laws of 1886, $2,000. 



THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 257 

For blanks and stationery for use in the office of 
State Board of Health, $1,800. 

For maintenance of the bacteriological laboratory, 
$6,000. 

For postage required in sending to the physicians 
of this State the annual report of the State Board of 
Health and of the Bureau of Vital Statistics, $350. 

For the purpose of carrying into effect the pro- 
visions of "An act to secure the purity of foods, bever- 
ages, confectionery, condiments, drugs and medicines, 
and to prevent deception in the distribution and sales 
thereof," passed at the legislative session of 1907, and 
"An act to prevent deception in the sale of oleomar- 
garine, butterine or any imitation of dairy products, 
and to preserve the public health," pursuant to chap- 
ter 84 of the laws of 1886, $20,000. 

BUREAU OF STATISTICS. 

For the Chief of the Bureau of Statistics, for salary, 
$2,500. 

For the Deputy Chief of the Bureau of Statistics, for 
salary, $2,000. 

For the current expenses of the Bureau of Statistics, 
$7,000. 

For blanks and stationery for use in the office of 
the Bureau of Statistics, $400. 

STATE HOUSE COMMISSION. 

For the State House Commission, for the care and 
safe-keeping of the State Capitol, the property therein 
and adjacent public grounds, and for expenses to be 
incurred in carrying out the provisions of chapter 339 
of the laws of 1894, $65,000. 

For insurance upon State House and contents 
thereof, $500. 

STATE MUSEUM. 

For Curator, for salary, $1,500. 

For the commission to acquire new material for the 
museum, and for blanks, stationery and other inci- 
dental expenses, $1,500. 
17 



258 THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 

GEOLOGICAL SURVEY. 

For the State Geologist, for salary, $4,000. 

For the Chemist, for salary, $1,500. 

For services and expenses of the Department of the 
Geological Survey, including the continuance of for- 
estry investigations and expenses in connection with 
the publication of the reports and maps of the geo- 
logical survey, $11,000. 

SUPREME COURT. 

For the Chief Justice and Associate Justices of the 
Supreme Court, for salaries, $82,000. 

For the Judges of the Circuit Court, for salaries, 
$52,500. 

For compensation of S'ergeant-at-Arms and Criers, 
$1,300. 

For the payment of expenses incurred by the order 
of the Supreme Court, pursuant to chapter 149 of the 
laws of 1900, $2,500. 

For blanks and stationery for use of the Chief Jus- 
tice and Associate Justices of the Supreme Court, $200. 

OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE SUPREME COURT. 

For the Clerk of the Supreme Court, for salary, 
$6,000. 

For compensation for clerical service in the office 
of the Clerk of the Supreme Court, $17,500. 

For blanks and stationery for use in the office of 
the Clerk of the Supreme Court, $1,150. 

For postage, expressage and other incidental ex- 
penses for the office of the Clerk of the Supreme 
Court, $1,700. 

COURT OF CHANCERY. 

For the Chancellor, for salary, $10,000. 

For the Yice-Chancellors, for salaries, $70,000. 

For compensation of Sergeants-at-Arms, $4,500. 

For compensation of stenographers, and for serv- 
ices, pursuant to section 103 of chapter 158, laws of 
1902, $15,500. 

For compensation and allowance of Advisory Mas- 
ters, $3,250. 



THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 259 

For rent of rooms in Atlantic City, Jersey City, 
Newark and Morristown, for the use of the Chan- 
cellor, Vice-Chancellors and Advisory Masters, $7,700. 

For miscellaneous expenses in connection with such 
rooms, $200. 

For compensation of Stenographer for the Chan- 
cellor, $600. 

For additional allowance for compensation of Sten- 
ographer for the Chancellor, $900. 

For allowance for stationery for the Court of Chan- 
cery, $500. 

For compensation of Special Masters and others in 
examining" the trust funds and appraising securities, 
to be disbursed under special order of the Chancellor, 
$1,000. 

OFFICE OF CLERK IN CHANCERY. 

For the Clerk in Chancery, for salary, $6,000. 

For compensation for clerical service in the office 
of the Clerk in Chancery, $24,500 

For blanks and stationery for use in the office of 
the Clerk in Chancery, $1,800. 

For postage, expressage and other incidental ex- 
penses for the office of the Clerk in Chancery, $2,075. 

COURT OF ERRORS AND APPEALS. 

For compensation of Judges of the Court of Errors 
and Appeals, $19,000. 

For additional salary for the Chancellor, Chief Jus- 
tice and Associate Justices of the Supreme Court, 
$10,000. 

For compensations of officers of the Court of Errors 
and Appeals, $1,025. 

For additional allowance for compensation of of- 
ficers of the Court of Errors and Appeals, $225. 

For furnishing printed or typewritten copies of 
draft opinions under the direction of the Presiding 
Judge, $1,000. 

COURT OF PARDONS. 

For compensation for judges of Court of Pardons, 
$2,500. 

For compensation of subordinate officers and inci- 
dental expenses, $1,500. 



260 THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 

LAW AND EQUITY REPORTS. 

For the publication of the Chancery reports, $7,000. 

For the publication of the law reports, $4,000. 

For salary of Chancery Reporter, $500. 

For salary of Supreme Court Reporter, $500. 

For binding- Chancery and law reports, $1,000. 

NATIONAL GUARD. 

For expenses for division, brigade and regimental 
headquarters, $4,000. 

For allowance for two batteries of artillery, $2,000 
each, $4,000. 

For allowances for two troops of cavalry, at $2,000 
each, including rent of armory, $4,000. 

For allowance for sixty companies of infantry, at 
$500 each, $30,000. 

For allowance for one signal and telegraph corps, 
$1,500. 

For transportation for battalion drills, inspections, 
parades, and for pay and expenses of inspecting of- 
ficers, $5,000. 

For compensation of officers and employees, and 
expenses incurred in connection with rifle practice, 
$9,500. 

For pay of officers and enlisted men, and expenses 
in connection with the annual encampment, $62,200. 

For compensation of the superintendent and em- 
ployees, and for forage, fuel and maintenance of the 
State camp grounds, $10,000. 

For fuel, light and maintenance of the State Arse- 
nal, $1,500. 

For expenses of military boards and courts-mar- 
tial, $1,500. 

For transportation of disabled soldiers of the late 
rebellion and the Spanish-American war, $50. 

For maintaining, heating and lighting armories at 
Jersey City, Camden, Newark (two), Paterson and 
Trenton, at $4,500 each, $27,000. 

For insuring regimental armories, buildings at the 
State camp grounds at Sea Girt, the State Arsenal 
and all public military stores, $4,000. 

For ordnance, stores, uniforms, clothing, camp and 
garrison equipage, freight and expressage and mis- 
cellaneous supplies, $8,000. 



THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 261 

For the equipment and furnishing of the First 
Troop Armory, at Newark, $4,000. 

For allowances for uniforms and equipments for of- 
ficers of regiments, troops, batteries, companies, sig- 
nal corps, and the naval reserve, as provided in sec- 
tion 127 of "An act concerning the militia of the 
State," approved May 16th, 1906, $7,020. 

NAVAL, RESERVE. 

First Battalion, in lieu of company allowances, 
$1,500. 

For battalion headquarters, $300. 

For pay of shipkeeper, maintenance and expenses, 
$5,500. 

For pay and expenses of officers and men on annual 
cruise, $2,400. 

Second Battalion, in lieu of company allowances, 
$1,500. 

For battalion headquarters, $300. 

For pay of shipkeeper, maintenance and expenses, 
$5,500. 

For pay and expenses of officers and men on annual 
cruise, $1,800. 

ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT. 

For the Adjutant-General, for salary, $2,500. 

For compensation for clerical service in the Adju- 
tant-General's office, $5,680. 

For additional allowance for compensation for cler- 
ical service in the Adjutant-General's office, $1,140. 

For blanks and stationery for use in the Adjutant- 
General's office, $1,500. 

For postage, expressage and other incidental ex- 
penses for the Adjutant-General's office, $800. 

For annual dues to Interstate National Guard Asso- 
ciation for the year 1909, $50. 

For printing, binding and distributing the annual 
report of the proceedings of the department of New 
Jersey, Grand Army of the Republic, $300. 

QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT. 

For the Quartermaster-General, for salary, $2,500. 
For compensation for assistants in the Department 
of the Quartermaster-General, namely: 



262 THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 

For Chief Clerk, for salary, $2,500. 

For Clerks, for salaries, $1,700. 

For additional allowance for Clerks, for salaries, 
$150. 

For Military Storekeeper, for salary, $1,200. 

For carpenter, machinist and to persons having in 
charge accoutrements, etc., cleaning arms, etc., team- 
ster and laborer, for salaries, $4,579.25. 

For blanks and stationery for use in the Quarter- 
master-General's Department, $500. 

For postage, expressage and other incidental ex- 
penses for the Quartermaster-General's Department, 
$450. 

MONMOUTH BATTLE MONUMENT. 

For the commission having in charge the Monmouth 
battle monument and grounds, pursuant to chapter 
118 of the laws of 1886, $500. 

TRENTON BATTLE MONUMENT. 

For the Trenton Battle Monument Association, for 
the purpose of keeping said property in good condi- 
tion and repair, $500. 

PENSIONS. 

For amount required to pay pensions, pursuant to 
various acts relative thereto, irrespective of any pro- 
vision therein that pensions shall be made in the ap- 
propriation or tax levy for the department of public 
service from which the pensioner shall be so retired, 
$6,784. 

HOME FOR DISABLED SOLDIERS AT KEARNY. 

For support of the New Jersey Home for Disabled 
Soldiers at Kearny, and for the Chaplain thereof, 
$50,000. 

SOLDIERS' STATE PAY. 

For claims of volunteers in the civil war, for State 
pay, pursuant to chapter 13 of the laws of 1861, $100. 

WASHINGTON ASSOCIATION OF NEW JERSEY. 

For trustees of the Washington Association of New 
Jersey, $2,500. 



THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 263 

STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 

For the State Board of Agriculture, $8,000. 

For the State Board of Agriculture, for the purpose 
of carrying out the provisions of an act to prevent 
the introduction into and spread of injurious insects 
in New Jersey, to provide a method for compelling 
their destruction, to create the office of State Ento- 
mologist, to authorize inspection of nurseries and to 
provide for certificates of inspection, $3,000. 

TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 

For expenses and payments by the State Tubercu- 
losis Commission. $20,000. 

AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. 

For salaries and expenses of the Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station, $20,000. 

For printing bulletins of the Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station, $1,500. 

For expenses incurred by the New Jersey Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station in carrying out the pro- 
visions of "An act concerning the regulation of the 
sale of concentrated commercial feeding stuffs," three 
thousand dollars. 

For expenses incurred by the New Jersey Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station in carrying out the pro- 
visions of "An act to regulate the sale of Paris 
green," approved April 9th, 1906, $500. 

For the purpose of carrying out the provisions of 
an act to amend an act, entitled "An act to provide 
for the scientific investigation of oyster propagation," 
being chapter 187 of the laws of 1907, $1,200. 

To the Agricultural Experiment Station, for the 
purpose of carrying out the provisions of "An act to 
provide for locating and abolishing mosquito-breed- 
ing salt-marsh areas within the State, for assistance 
in dealing with certain inland breeding places, and 
appropriating money to carry its provisions into ef- 
fect," approved April 20th, 1906, $15,000. 



264 THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 

BOARD OF VISITORS TO THE AGRICULTURAL 
COLLEGE OF NEW JERSEY. 

For the Board of Visitors to the Agricultural Col- 
lege of New Jersey, for personal expenses incurred, 
pursuant to chapter 365 of the laws of 1873, $50. 

For advertising, pursuant to chapter 9 of the laws 
of 1879, $90. 

STATE HOSPITALS. 

For traveling expenses of managers, $800. 

For expenses in transferring insane convicts, $200. 

For medical examination of insane convicts, $300. 

STATE HOSPITAL AT TRENTON. 

For maintenance of county patients, at the rate of 
$2 per week; for support and clothing of insane con- 
victs, at the rate of $5 per week for each insane con- 
vict, and support and clothing of indigent patients, 
at the rate of $4 per week, $158,000. 

For salaries of officers, $14,000. 

For additional allowance for salaries of officers, 
$1,000. 

For appraisement of personal property, $200. 

For plumbing for old part of building, for all toi- 
lets, bath-rooms, kitchens and operating room, $25,000. 

For tiling old part of building, all toilets, bath- 
rooms, kitchens and operating room, $10,000. 

For repairs to roads, buildings and grounds, $1,000. 

STATE HOSPITAL AT MORRIS PLAINS. 

For maintenance of county patients, at the rate of 
$2 per week; for support and clothing of insane con- 
victs, at the rate of $5 per week for each insane con- 
vict, and support and clothing of indigent patients, 
at the rate of $4 per week, $263,650. 

For salaries of officers, $16,550. 

For appraisement of personal property, $75. 

For clothing for State indigent patients and insane 
convicts, $10,950. 



THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 265 

COUNTY LUNATIC ASYLUM. 

For the support of county patients in the Essex 
County Lunatic Asylum, $116,000. 

In the Hudson County Lunatic Asylum, $65,000. 
In the Camden County Lunatic Asylum, .$23,500. 
In the Burlington County Lunatic Asylum, $ll"),000. 
In the Passaic County Lunatic Asylum, $4,000. 
In the Gloucester County Lunatic Asylum, $1,000. 
In the Cumberland County Lunatic Asylum, $14,000. 
In the Salem County Lunatic Asylum, $1,800. 
In the Atlantic County Lunatic Asylum, $8,000. 

STATE PRISON. 

For maintenance of convicts, $112,000. 

For maintenance of Principal Keeper and Resident 
Physician, pursuant to chapters 163 and 244 of the 
laws of 1906, $1,200. 

For furniture, appliances and repairs of State 
Prison, $12,000. 

For the Principal Keeper, for salary, $3,500. 

For the Supervisor, for salary, $3,000. 

For the Physicians, Deputy Keepers and employees, 
for salary, $115,000. 

For six Inpsectors, for salaries, $3,000. 

For the Keeper, for payments to discharged con- 
victs, $2,500. 

For Teacher and Moral Instructor to the convicts in 
the State Prison, pursuant to section 7, chapter 155 
of the laws of 1876, for salary, $1,000. 

For traveling and other necessary expenses incurred 
by the parole agent, pursuant to chapter 232, laws of 
1905, $950. 

For maintenance of the electrocution plant, pur- 
suant to the provisions of chapter 79, laws of 1906, and 
acts amendatory thereto, $8,000. 

STATE HOME FOR BOYS. 

For the Trustees of the New Jersey State Home for 
Boys, $80,000. 

For the Trustees of said Home, for expenses in- 
curred by them in the discharge of their duties, $500. 



266 THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 

STATE HOME FOR GIRLS. 

For the Trustees of the New Jersey State Home for 
Girls, for the support and necessary repairs to the 
home, $60,000. 

For the Trustees of said home, for expenses incurred 
in the discharge of their duties, $500. 

For the salary of a Probation Officer, $900. 

For traveling expenses of the Probation Officer, 
$300. 

PRESERVATION OF RECORDS. 

For the purpose of publishing and completing the 
early records of this State, known as "New Jersey 
Archives," $3,500. 

BOARD OF FISH AND GAME COMMISSIONERS. 

For the fish and game Wardens, including the fish 
and game Protector, for compensation, $15,600. 

For additional allowance for the fish and game War- 
dens, including the fish and game Protector, for com- 
pensation, $7,500; provided, said sum is authorized by 
enactment of the present Legislature. Disapproved. 

For salary of Secretary, $1,800. 

For clerical services and incidental expenses, $3,400. 

For expenses of the fish and game Wardens and fish 
and game Protector, $5,100. 

For the purpose of stocking the waters of the State 
with food fishes and for defraying the cost of main- 
taining a hatchery and for the protection and propa- 
gation of birds and game animals within this State, 
$5,000. 

For expenses of the fish and game Commissioners, 
$1,000. 

For printing game laws, license blanks, etc., $750. 

BLIND AND FEEBLE-MINDED. 

For clothing, maintenance, support and instruction 
of the blind persons, inhabitants of this State, $15,000. 

For clothing, maintenance, support and instruction 
of the feeble-minded persons, inhabitants of this State, 
$72,000. 

For maintenance, support and instruction of feeble- 
minded women, $40,000. 



THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 267 

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR. 

For the Commissioner, for salary, $3,500. 

For the Assistant Commissioner, for salary, $2,000. 

For eleven Inspectors, for salaries, $16,500. 

For department Clerks, for services, $3,250. 

For printing, postage, expressage and other inci- 
dental expenses, $1,500. 

For expenses of Commissioner, Assistant Commis- 
sioner and Inspectors, $5,650. 

STATE CHARITIES AID ASSOCIATION. 
For expenses of the association, $600. 

STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY. 

To the Treasurer of the New Jersey State Horticul- 
tural Society, the sum of $600. 

STATE OYSTER COMMISSION FOR THE DISTRICT 
OF OCEAN COUNTY. 

For the Commissioners, for salaries, $750. 
For the Superintendent, for salary, $1,000. 
For patrol service, $1,000. 

For incidental expenses, $500; provided, all bills are 
approved by the Governor. 
For office rent, $50. 

ADVERTISING. 

For advertising proclamations issued by the Gov- 
ernor, notices of the Attorney-General in relation to 
delinquent miscellaneous corporations, and notices of 
the Comptroller in regard to public printing, etc., 
$10,000. 

PRINTING. 

For printing and binding public documents, $45,000. 

For compensation of an Expert Printer, for services 
in preparation of specifications for bids, supervision of 
work, examination of bills, and such other duties as 
may by law be imposed upon him, $600. 

For preparing index of session laws, $100. 

For printing and circulation of the laws, $6,000. 



268 THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 

PUBLIC ROADS, 

For public roads, $300,000, 

For State Commissioner of Public Roads, for salary, 
$5,000. 

For compensation of Supervisor for assisting the 
State Commissioner of Public Roads, in supervising, 
constructing and performing such other duties as 
necessity may require, $2,500, 

For additional allowance for compensation of Super- 
visor for assisting the State Commissioner of Public 
Roads, in supervising, constructing and performing 
such other duties as necessity may require, $1,100. 

For expenses for Clerk hire, Consulting Engineer, 
fees, stationery and actual traveling expenses, $6,000, 

OFFICES OF THE STATE COMPTROLLER AND 
STATE TREASURER, 

For the purpose of carrying out the provisions of 
chapter 288 of the laws of 1907, $5,000. 

LEGISLATURE. • 

For compensation of Senators and members of the 
General Assembly, $40,833.32. 

For compensation of officers and employees of the 
Legislature, $30,150. 

For stationery for use of the legislative session, 
pursuant to chapter 208 of the laws of 1868, $500, 

For Manuals of the Legislature of New Jersey, 
$2,000, 

For indexing the Journal of the Senate and Minutes 
of the Executive Sessions and the Minutes of the 
House of Assembly, and other incidental and con- 
tingent expenses of the Legislature, $7,000, 

For toilet and other necessary supplies for use at 
the legislative session, to be furnished by the State 
House Commission, $500, 

COLLATERAL INHERITANCE TAX. 

For Surrogates' fees. Appraisers' compensation and 
expenses, legal and other disbursements, pursuant to 
chapter 210 of the laws of 1894, $15,000. 



THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 269 

REFUNDING TAXES ON MISCELLANEOUS CORPO- 
RATIONS. 

For taxes improperly levied upon corporations and 
to be refunded, pursuant to law, $500. 

HIGH SCHOOL INSPECTION. 
For High School inspection, $2,500. 

PRACTICE TEACHING. 

For extra compensation to the Teachers in the vari- 
ous school districts in the State, for training and nor- 
mal school pupils in the art of teaching, $5,000. 

BODIES THROWN UPON SHORES OF THE STATE 
BY SHIPWRECK. 

For expenses incurred in viewing bodies cast upon 
shores by shipwreck, $100. 

COURT EXPENSES. 

For compensation of Judges of the Court of Com- 
mon Pleas, pursuant to section 49, chapter 149 of the 
laws of 1900, $1,500. 

AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE FUND. 

To the Treasurer of Rutgers College, for interest on 
$116,000, certificates of indebtedness of the State of 
New Jersey, due January 1st and July 1st, 1909, pur- 
suant to the provisions of chapter 135 of the laws of 
1896, $5,800. 

RIPARIAN COMMISSION. 

For salaries of Riparian Commissioners, $6,000. 
For salaries and expenses incurred in the prosecu- 
tion of the work of the Commissioners, $6,500. 

OBSTRUCTIONS TO NAVIGATION. 

For expenses incurred in removing any boat, barge 
or scow stranded or sunk in any of the navigable 
rivers of this State, $200. 



270 THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 

MANUAL TRAINING AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 
FOR COLORED YOUTH. 

For maintenance of the Manual Training and Indus- 
trial School for Colored Youth, $12,000. 

NEW JERSEY SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF. 

For the New Jersey School for the Deaf, for the 
teaching-, maintenance and clothing of pupils taught 
therein, for purchase and repair of furniture, school 
apparatus and other appliances, for making needed 
improvements and repairs in the buildings and 
grounds, for insruance thereof, and for maintaining 
the system of manual and industrial education in said 
school, $45,000. 

STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT TRENTON. 

For the support of the State Normal School at Tren- 
ton, $55,000. 

For necessary repairs to the grounds, buildings and 
furniture, and for keeping the same insured, $5,000. 

FREE SCHOOL LIBRARIES. 

For the formation of libraries in the free public 
schools of the State, $7,000. 

FARNUM PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 

For the support of the Farnum Preparatory School 
at Beverly, $2,250. 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. 

For payments to schools established for industrial 
education, pursuant to chapter 20 of the laws of 1906, 
$20,000. 

For payments to schools for manual training, $75,000. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

For salary of State Superintendent of Public In- 
struction, $5,000. 

For salary of Assistant Superintendent and for cler- 
ical services in the office of the State Superintendent 
of Public Instruction, $12,000. 



THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 271 

For stationery and blanks, $4,500. 

For necessary incidental expenses incurred by the 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction in the per- 
formance of his official duties, $2,500. 

For 1,000 copies of the Manual of the Legislature of 
New Jersey, as provided by chapter 109, laws of 1904, 
$1,000; provided. Manuals are furnished schools not 
heretofore having- received them, so far as possible, 
and all public schools be included in the distribution. 

SCHOOL FUND EXPENSES. 

For necessary legal and other expenses incurred by 
or under the direction of the Trustees for the support 
of public schools in the investment and protection of 
the school fund, and in the collection of the income 
thereof, $3,000. 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

For necessary expenses of the State Board of Edu- 
cation, $3,000. 

For expenses of bureau of information for teachers 
and school officers, $500. 

TEACHERS' INSTITUTES. 
For expenses of teachers' institutes, $2,000. 

TEACHERS' LIBRARIES. 

For the establishment and maintenance of libraries 
for use of teachers, $600. 

COUNTY SUPERINTENDENTS. 

For County Superintendents of Schools, for salaries, 
$42,000. 

EMERGENCY. 

For the Governor, to enable him to meet any emer- 
gency requiring the expenditure of money not other- 
wise appropriated, and to cover any incidental ex- 
pense of commissioners appointed by him under stat- 
ute or in his discretion, the sum of $20,000, said sum, 
or any part thereof, to be paid by the Treasurer on 
the warrant of the Comptroller, upon accounts ap- 
proved by the Governor, 



272 THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 

STATE BOARD OF EXAMINERS. 

For expenses incurred by the State Board of Exam- 
iners and compensation for the person appointed by 
the State Board of Education, $250. 

STATE SEWERAGE COMMISSION. 

For salaries of Commissioners, $7,500. 

For salary of Secretary, $1,800. 

For rent and necessary expenses of the Commis- 
sioners, including experimental work, $7,500; provided, 
said expenses are approved by the Governor. Disap- 
proved. 

NEW JERSEY HOME FOR DISABLED SOLDIERS, 

SAILORS, MARINES AND THEIR WIVES AND 

FOR THEIR WIDOWS, AT VINELAND. 

For salary of Commandant, $1,500. 
For salary of Adjutant, $1,000. 

For salaries of assistants and incidental expenses, 
$5,000. 

For repairs to the buildings and furniture, $500. 
For maintenance and all other expenses, $25,000. 

STATE OYSTER COMMISSION. 

For the better regulation and control of the tak- 
ing, planting and cultivating of oysters on the lands 
lying under the tide-waters of the Delaware River, 
Delaware Bay, Maurice River Cove and Raritan Bay, 
in the State of New Jersey, $13,000. 

For the protection of the natural seed oyster 
grounds on lands lying under the tidal-waters of the 
Delaware River and Delaware Bay, North of the 
"Southwest line," in the State of New Jersey, $4,000. 

For expenses of surveying and mapping lands to be 
leased for oyster culture under the tidal-waters of the 
Delaware River, Delaware Bay, Maurice River Cove 
and Raritan Bay, in the State of New Jersey, $400. 

STATE BOARD OF CHILDREN'S GUARDIANS. 

To the State Board of Children's Guardians, for 
expenses, $8,000. 



THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 273 

PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION. 

For the purpose of carrying into effect the provis- 
ions of cnapter 62, laws of 1900, for clerical assistance, 
necessary traveling and other expenses incurred by 
the commission, and for carrying into effect the pro- 
visions of chapter 175, laws of 1898, and its supple- 
ments, providing for the establishing and mainten- 
ance of a system of traveling libraries, $5,000. 

For the purpose of carrying into effect the provis- 
ions of chapter 115, laws of 1906, $500. 

TEACHERS' RETIREMENT FUND. 

For payment of expenses incurred in connection 
with the administration of the teachers' retirement 
fund, pursuant to chapter 139, laws of 1907, $3,000. 

NEW JERSEY REFORMATORY. 

For traveling and other official expenses of Com- 
missioners, $1,000. 

For the subordinate officers and employees, for sal- 
aries, $50,000. 

For the Superintendent, for salary, $3,000. 

For additional allowance for the subordinate officers 
and employees, for salaries, $9,500. 

For maintenance, $55,000. 

For furniture, appliances and repairs (including 
industrial departments), $20,000. 

For the Superintendent, for payments to discharged 
inmates, $3,000. 

For traveling expenses of parole officers, $2,000. 

For fuel and water, $10,000. 

For farm live stock, implements, etc., $1,000. 

VILLAGE FOR EPILEPTICS. 

For expenses of Managers, $300. 
For the Superintendent, for salary, $3,000. 
For the Steward, for salary. $1,500. 

For the First Assistant Physician, for salary, $1,500. 
For the Second Assistant Physician, for salary, $800. 
For maintenance, including fuel and light, $65,000. 
For additional allowance for salaries of officers, $200. 
For water supply, $10,000. 
18 



274 THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 

For the erection of a cottage for patients, $25,000. 
For repairs to buildings, $5,000. 
For trees and shrubbery, $2,000. 

For the erection of a school building and library, 
$15,000. 

STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

To the Treasurer of Rutgers College, to pay the State 
Agricultural College for the benefit of agriculture and 
the mechanic arts, pursuant to chapter 90 of the laws 
of 1905, $12,000. 

For salaries, supplies and all other expenses for the 
maintenance of short courses in practical and scientific 
agriculture, pursuant to chapter 55 of the laws of 
1905, and chapter 43 of the laws of 1907, $11,500. 

For the purpose of carrying into effect the provis- 
ions of "An act to provide for the establishment of a 
course in practical and scientific instruction in the art 
of clay-working and ceramics in the State Agricul- 
tural College," approved March 17, 1902, and a sup- 
plement approved March 14, 1907, being chapter 7, laws 
of 1907, $5,000. 

For the furnishing and equipment of a building 
known as the engineering building at the State Agri- 
cultural College, pursuant to chapter 95, laws of 190S, 
$20,000. 

BURIAL GROUNDS. 

For the care and maintenance of burial grounds pur- 
chased by the State, pursuant to chapter 171, laws of 
1898, $100. 

STENOGRAPHIC REPORTERS. 

For amount to be refunded to various counties in 
this State for salaries of Stenographic Reporters ap- 
pointed by the Justices of the Supreme Court, pursuant 
to chapter 81 of the laws of 1901, $11,000. 

STATE SCHOOL TAX. 

For the purpose of reducing the State school tax to 
be assessed for the year 1909, $100,000. 

BUREAU OF SHELL FISHERIES. 

For the Chief of the bureau, for salary, $1,200. 
For blanks, stationery and other incidental ex- 
penses, $1,000. 



THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 275 

SANITORIUM FOR TUBERCULOUS DISEASES. 

For maintenance, $70,000. 

For farming of land, feed for stock, purchase of 
horses and farming implements, $2,500. 

VESSELS' NAVIGATING THE WATERS ABOVE TIDE- 
WATERS WITHIN THE STATE. 

For salary of Chief Inspector, $600. 

For expenses of Chief Inspector, $250. 

For salary and expenses of Assistant Inspector $500. 

TENEMENT HOUSE SUPERVISION. 

For rent of offices, $2,000. 

For furnishing- office, $300. 

For printing and stationery, $1,750. 

For clerical service and Stenographer, $3,000. 

For salary of Architect and Plan Examiner, $1,800. 

For twenty-two Inspectors, $1,000 each, $22,000. 

For Assistant Plan Examiner, $1,200. 

For salary of Chief Clerk, $1,200. 

For salary of Law Clerk, $1,200. 

For salary of additional Record Clerk, $1,200. 

For Secretary and Executive Officer, $3,000. 

For incidentals, postage and expressage, $1,000. 

For Inspectors' expenses, $3,000. 

For traveling expenses of Executive Officer and Plan 
Examiners, $400. 

For salary of Record Clerk, $1,200. 

For expenses of members of the Board of Tenement 
House Supervision, $500. 

EVENING SCHOOL FOR FOREIGN-BORN RESI- 
DENTS. 

For the purpose of carrying out the provisions of an 
act, entitled "An act providing for the establishment 
of evening schools for foreign-born residents in the 
State of New Jersey," approved April 11, 1907, $10,000. 

ARMORY FOR FIRST TROOP CAVALRY. 

For the purpose of erecting an armory in the city of 
Newark, for the use of First Troop Cavalry, pursuant 
to chapter 204 of the laws of 1903, $25,000. 



276 THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 

DIGEST OF LAW AND CHANCERY REPORTS. 

For the purchase of 500 sets Digest of the Law and 
Chancery Reports, pursuant to the provisions of chap- 
ter 67 of the laws of 1907, |21,000. Disapproved in 
parts. 

STATE OYSTER COMMISSION FOR THE DISTRICT 
OF ATLANTIC COUNTY. 

For the Commissioners, for salaries, $900. 
For the Superintendent, for salary, $1,000. 
For patrol service, $1,680. 
For incidental expenses, $220. 
For surveys, $150. 

ELECTORAL COLLEGE AND STATE BOARD OF 
CANVASSERS. 

For per diem allowance of $10 to each member of 
the Electoral College and Board of State Canvassers, 
and incidental expenses connected therewith, $500. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHARITIES AND CORRECTIONS. 

For salary of Commissioner, $4,000. 

For salary of Assistant (Architect), $3,600. 

For salary of Draughtsman, $2,000. 

For additional allowance for salary of Draughts- 
man, $500. 

For allowance for clerical service, $1,000. 

For traveling expenses of Commissioner and As- 
sistant, $700. 

For blanks, stationery, postage, etc., $1,000. 

FOREST PARK RESERVATION COMMISSION. 

For the purchase of forest lands and expenses there- 
with by the State Board of Forest Park Reservation 
Commissioners, pursuant to chapter 47, laws of 1905, 
$20,000. 

For the use of the State Board of Forest Park Reser- 
vation Commissioners, pursuant to said chapter, in- 
cluding maintenance of State forest lands, $6,000. 

For the use of the State Board of Forest Park Reser- 
vation Commissioners, for the purpose of carrying out 
the provisions of chapter 123. laws of 1906, $4,500. 



THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 277 

STATE NORMAL SCHOOL AT MONTCLAIR HEIGHTS. 

For support of the State Normal School at Montclair 
Heights, $30,000. 

For necessary improvements and repairs to the 
grounds, buildings and furniture, and for keeping the 
same insured, $3,000. 



HEALTH OFFICERS OF THE PORT OF PERTH 
AMEOY. 

For salary of the Health Officer of the port of Perth 
Amboy, pursuant to chapter 328, laws of 1906, $1,000. 

For salary of the Deputy Health Officer of the port 
of Perth Amboy, pursuant to said chapter, $250. 

COUNTY BOARDS OP TAXATION. 

For salaries of members of the County Boards of 
Taxation, $93,000. 

SECRETARY OF STATE, DEPARTMENT OF MOTOR 
VEHICLE REGULATION AND REGISTRATION. 

For salary for the Commissioner of Motor Vehicles, 
$1,500. 

For salary of Chief Inspector, -$1,500. 

For compensation for Inspectors, $3,000. 

For expenses and equipment of Inspectors, $2,000. 

For compensation for clerical services, $5,000. 

For postage, expressage and other incidental ex- 
penses, $2,000. 

For blanks and stationery, $1,000. 

For the purchase and packing of identification marks 
and dies for use in connection with the same, $12,000; 
provided, the proposed amendments to the law are 
enacted by the present Legislature. 

BOARD OF RAILROAD COMMISSIONERS. 

For salaries and expenses of members of the Board 
of Railroad Commissioners, $30,000. 

STATE PRISON SCHOOL. 

For the establishment and maintenance of a school 
in the State Prison, pursuant to chapter 65 of the laws 
of 1907, $2,500. 



278 THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 

COMMISSIONERS OF THE PALISADES' INTERSTATE 
PARK. 

For expenses incurred by the Commissioners of the 
Palisades Interstate Park, $2,500; said expenses to be 
approved by the Governor. 

STATE WATER SUPPLY COMMISSION. 

For salaries of Commissioners, $12,500. 

For salary of Secretary, $2,500. 

For blanks, stationery, postage and other incidental 
expenses of the Commission, $2,500. 

For expenses incurred in connection with new or 
additional water supplies, $3,500. 

For engineers, inspectors, field work, etc., $5,500. 

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION. 

For salaries and expenses of a Civil Service Com- 
mission, $25,000; provided, said Commission is created 
by enactment of the present Legislature. 

PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION. 

For salaries and expenses of a Public Utilities Com- 
mission, $60,000; provided, said Commission is created 
by enactment of the present Legislature. Disap- 
proved. 

DEPARTMENT OF INLAND WATERWAYS. 

For the purpose of carrying out the provisions of 
chapter 15, laws of 1908, $2,000 

For the purpose of carrying out the provisions of 
chapter 55, laws of 1908, $2,000. 

For the purpose of carrying out the provisions of 
chapter 56, laws of 1908, $10,000. 

For the purpose of carrying out the provisions of 
chapter 83, laws of 1908, $50,000. 

For the salaries and expenses of the Board of Health 
of the State of New Jersey, $23,000; provided, a bill 
pending, entitled "An act to amend an act entitled 
'An act to establish in this State boards of health and 
a bureau of vital statistics, and to define their re- 
spective powers and duties,' approved March 31, 1887," 
becomes a law. 



THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 279 

For salaries and expenses of the Department of Pub- 
lic Reports, $3,000; provided, a bill pending, entitled 
"An act creating- the Department of Public Reports," 
becomes a law. 

For the purpose of carrying out the provisions of 
a bill pending, entitled "An act providing for the re- 
tirement of certain judicial officers and former judicial 
officers and fixing their compensation when retired," 
$10,333.33; provided, said bill becomes a law. 

For salaries and expenses for a Department of Ac- 
counts, $11,000; provided, a bill pending, entitled "An 
act to create a Department of Accounts, and to pro- 
vide for a uniform system of bookkeeping and ac- 
counts throughout the difEsrent departments and in- 
stitutions of the State," becomes a law. 

ARMORY AT SOMERVILLE, SOMERSET COUNTY. 

For the construction of an armory at Somerville, 
Somerset county, pursuant to chapter 254 of the laws 
of 1907, $25,000. 

2. The following sum is hereby appropriated out of 
the income of the school fund for the purpose specified 
for the fiscal year ending on the 31st day of October, 
in the year 1909. 

FREE PUBLIC SCHOOL. 

For the spuport of free public schools, $200,000. 

There shall be paid from the income of the school 
fund such sums required to pay premiums and accrued 
interest on bonds purchased by the trustees for the 
support of public schools. 

3. Before any building or buildings shall be com- 
menced or work undertaken, for the cost of which 
money is appropriated by this act, the plans, specifica- 
tions and contracts necessary for the entire completion 
thereof shall, and each of them shall, be submitted to 
and approved by the Governor, and such contracts 
shall not be approved or entered into if the total ex- 
penditure under all the contracts necessary to the 
entire completion of such building, buildings or work 
according to such plans and specifications shall ex- 
ceed the amount appropriated by this act for such 
building, buildings or work; and in any and every 



280 THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 

case where it shall appear that the appropriation is 
insufficient to complete such building-, buildings or 
work, the appropriation hereby made therefor shall 
not be applied toward the construction of such build- 
ing or buildings, or prosecution of such work, but 
shall lapse and no payment shall be made therefrom. 

4. No money shall be drawn from the treasury ex- 
cept for objects as hereinabove specifically appropri- 
ated, and except such sums which are by law devoted to 
specific purposes, namely. State school tax to Agricultural 
college, United States appropriation for disabled soldiers, 
United States appropriation for disabled soldiers, sailors, 
marines and their wives, Agricultural College fund and 
taxes for the use of taxing districts in this State, moneys 
received by the State from the taxation of railroad and 
canal property, which may be by law apportioned to 
the various counties of the State for school purposes, 
and loans to "State School Fund," which last-named 
sums shall be paid pursuant to the laws applicable 
thereto; this section shall not be construed to prohibit 
the payment due upon any contract made under an 
appropriation of the previous year, nor of any pay- 
ments into the State Treasury by State institutions and 
commissions, pursuant to an act, entitled "An act 
regulating the receipt and disbursement of State 
moneys in certain cases, approved October 31, 1907 
(chapter 2SS, laws of 1907), which moneys by the pro- 
visions of chapter 41, laws of 1908, are appropriated 
for the maintenance of said State institutions and 
commissions making such payments, but nothing 
herein shall be construed to apply to the payments 
into the State Treasury by the State Reformatory and 
State Prison of the receipts for the labor of the in- 
mates of those institutions. 

5. This act shall take effect on the 1st day of No- 
vember, 1908. 

Approved except as to the items disapproved as per 
memorandum hereto annexed April 16, 1908. 

In Senate Bill No. 336, entitled "An act making ap- 
propriations for the support of the State government 
and for several public purposes for the fiscal year end- 
ing October 31, 1909," I disapprove the following items 
of expenditure therein authorized: 

Item No. 43 is disallowed to this extent: "For addi- 
tional allowance for the fish and game wardens, in- 



THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 281 

eluding- the fish and game protector, for compensation, 
$7,500," as the bill providing for the increase of salary 
to these officers, which made necessary this appropria- 
tion, was not approved. 

Item No. 77. This entire item is disallowed, for the 
reason that this board was abolished at the present ses- 
sion of the Legislature, and this appropriation is 
therefore unnecessary. 

Item No. 95. This item is disapproved to the extent 
of $6,000, and is approved for $15,000 only. The reason 
for this is that the price to the State for the volumes 
furnished is excessive, and until further legislation is 
had upon the subject I shall disapprove $6,000 of this 
item. 

Item No. 107. I disapprove of the item for expenses 
incurred in connection with new or additional water 
supplies, $3,500, to the extent of $2,500, leaving the 
said item approved for $1,000. 

I disapprove of the item for engineers, inspectors, 
field work, etc., $5,500, to the extent of $3,000, leaving 
the said item approved for $2,500. 

Item No. 109. This item for salaries and expenses 
of a Public Utilities Commission, $60,000, is disap- 
proved, for the reason that the bill establishing such 
a commission did not pass the Legislature, and this 
appropriation is therefore unnecessary. 



282 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS. 

CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS. 



Amendments Proposed to the ConHtltntlon of the State 
of New Jersey by the Leslslature of 1908, and to be 
Submitted to the Legrislatiire of 190». 

SENATE CONCURRENT RESOLUTION NO. 6. 

1. Strike out paragraph 3 of section 1, article IV, 
and insert in place thereof the following: 

3. Elections for members of the Senate and General 
Assembly shall be held every two years, on the first 
Tuesday after the first Monday in November, begin- 
ning- A. D. 1910, and every second year thereafter; 
and the two Houses shall meet separately on the sec- 
ond Tuesday in January in each year, at which time 
of meeting the legislative year shall commence. 

2. Strike out paragraph 1 of section 2, article IV, 
and insert in place thereof the following: 

1. The Senate shall be composed of one Senator from 
each county in the State, elected by the legal voters 
of the counties, respectively, for four years. 

3. Strike out paragraph 2 of section 2, article IV, 
and insert in place thereof the following: 

2. As soon as the Senate shall meet after the first 
election, to be held in pursuance of this Constitution, 
they shall be divided by the Senate as equally as may 
be into two classes. The seats of the Senators of the 
first class shall be vacated at the expiration of the 
second year; of the second class, at the expiration of 
the fourth year, so that one class may be elected 
every second year, and if vacancies happen, by resig- 
nation or otherwise, the persons elected to supply such 
vacancies shall be elected for the unexpired terms 
only; provided, that the Senators having the longest 
period of time still to serve at the time of making 
said division shall be entitled to the longer terms. 

4. Strike out paragraph 1 of section 3, article IV, 
and insert in place thereof the following: 

1. The General Assembly shall be composed of mem- 
bers elected by the legal voters of the counties, re- 
spectively, every second year, beginning on the first 
Tuesday after the first Monday in November, A. D. 
1910, who shall be apportioned among the said coun- 
ties as nearly as may be according to the number of 
their inhabitants. The Legislature shall, in the year 



CONSTITUTIONAL, AMENDMENTS. 283 

1910, and at its first session after each United States 
decennial census hereafter, and not oftener, divide 
and arrang-e each county of this State into a district 
or districts for the election therein of a member or 
members of the General Assembly. Each Assembly 
district so constituted shall contain, as nearly as prac- 
ticable, an equal number of inhabitants, and shall con- 
sist of convenient and contiguous territory in a com- 
pact form, but no county, or part thereof, shall be 
joined with any other county, or part thereof, in any 
such district; provided, that each county shall, at all 
times, be entitled to at least one member, and the 
whole number of members to be chosen shall never 
exceed sixty. 

The court of last resort, by whatever name known, 
is hereby invested with exclusive original jurisdic- 
tion and with full power, under such procedure as it 
may by rules prescribe, to review any division and 
arrangement made by the Legislature into Assembly 
districts of the counties of this State for the purpose 
of determining whether such arrangement and divi- 
sion, or any part thereof, is in accordance or in con- 
flict with this section, and, if in conflict herewith, to 
adjudge the same, or such part thereof as may be in 
conflict herewith, null and void. In case said court 
shall determine such arrangement and division, or 
any part thereof, to be null and void, the Legislature 
shall proceed to make a new arrangement and divi- 
sion, entire or partial, as the action of the court may 
require. 

5. Strike out paragraph 3 of article V and insert in 
place thereof the following: 

3. The Governor shall hold his office for four years, 
to commence at 12 o'clock, noon, on the third Tuesday 
of January next ensuing the election for Governor by 
the people, and to end at 12 o'clock noon on the third 
Tuesday of January four years thereafter; and he 
shall be incapable of holding that office for four yeai's 
next after his term of service shall have expired; and 
no appointment or nomination to office shall be made 
by the Governor during the last week of his said term. 

6. Strike out paragraph 6 of section 2, article VII, 
and insert in place thereof the following: 

6. Clerks and surrogates of counties shall be elected 
by the people of their respective counties at the elec- 
tions for members of the General Assembly. They 
shall hold their offices for six years. 



284 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS. 

7. Strike out paragraph 7 of section II, article VII, and 
insert in place thereof the following: 

7. Sheriffs and coroners shall be elected by the peo- 
ple of their respective counties at the elections for 
members of the General Assembly, and shall hold their 
offices for four years, after which four years must 
elapse before they can be again capable of serving. 
Sheriffs shall annually renew their bonds. 

8. Add to section 2 of article VII three paragraphs, 
to be known as paragraphs 12, 13 and 14. 

12. All elections for Governor, members of the Sen- 
ate and General Assembly, sheriffs, coroners, county 
clerks and surrogates of counties and all other officers 
now or hereafter necessary to be chosen by the electors 
of the whole State, or of any county thereof, shall be 
held every second year, on the first Tuesday after the 
first Monday in November, beginning A. D. 1910. 

13. All elections for justices of the peace and all and 
any municipal officers, as distinguished from State and 
county officers as hereinbefore provided, now or here- 
after necessary to be chosen by the electors of any 
city, borough, town, township, village or subdivision 
thereof, or any municipality of this State, except 
counties, shall be held every second year on the first 
Tuesday after the first Monday in November, begin- 
ning A. D. 1911. 

14. Except as herein provided with relation to the 
office of Senators, all officers filling any elective office 
at the time these amendments taffe effect shall con- 
tinue in the exercise of the duties thereof according 
to their respective commissions or terms of office, and 
until their successors may be elected and qualified 
under the provisions of these amendments, and all 
officers whose terms of office would expire after these 
amendments take effect and prior to the election and 
qualification of their successors in office, at the elec- 
tion for the respective offices first held under the pro- 
visions of these amendments, shall continue in office 
until their successors can be elected and qualified, at 
the election for such office or offices to be held next 
after these amendments take effect, according to the 
provisions hereof. 

The Legislature shall pass all necessary laws to 
arrange the terms of office of all statutory elective 
officers so that said terms may be in harmony with 
these amendments, and to carry into effect the pro- 
visions hereof. 



CONSTITUTIONAL. AMENDMENTS. 285 

These amendments, if adopted, shall take effect and 
g-o into operation on the 1st day of February, in the 
year of our Lord 1910. 

ASSEMBLY CONCURRENT RESOLUTION NO. 4. 

1. Strike out paragraph 10, of section 7, of article 
IV, and change the numbers of the following para- 
graphs to correspond. 

2. Change paragraph 10 of article V so as to read as 
follows: 

10. The Governor or person administering the gov- 
ernment, and four citizens of the State appointed by 
the Governor, by and with the advice and consent of 
the Senate, shall constitute the Board of Pardons. 
The members of said board, or any three of them, of 
whom the Governor or person administering the gov- 
ernment shall be one, may remit fines and forfeitures, 
and grant reprieves, commutations, pardons and pa- 
roles, after conviction in all cases except impeachment. 
The four members specially appointed shall hold office 
for five years, and receive for their services a com- 
pensation which shall not be diminished during the 
term of their appointment. 

3. Change section 1 of article VI so as to read as 
follows: 

SECTION I. 

The judicial power shall be vested in a court for the 
trial of impeachments, a supreme court, county courts, 
and such other courts, inferior to the supreme court, 
as may be established by law, which inferior courts the 
Legislature may alter or abolish as the public good 
shall require. 

4. Strike out all of sections 2, 4, 5, 6 and 7, of arti- 
cle VI, change the number of section 3 of article VI 
to section 2, and insert the following sections in arti- 
cle VI: 

SECTION IIL 

Any judge of any of the courts of the State may be 
removed for disability continuing for one year, or for 
refusal to perform the duties of his office, by a vote 
of two-thirds of all the members of the Senate and 
of two-thirds of all the members of the House of 
Assembly, voting separatel3^ after a hearing" before 
both Houses in joint session. 



286 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS. 

SECTION IV. 

1. The Supreme Court shall be organized in three 
divisions, namely: The Appeals Division, the Law Di- 
vision and the Chancery Division. It shall consist of 
a Presiding- Justice of the Appeals Division, who shall 
be styled the Chief Justice; a Presiding Justice of the 
Law Division, who shall be styled the President Jus- 
tice, and a Presiding Justice of the Chancery Division, 
who shall be styled the Chancellor, and eighteen As- 
sociate Justices, which number may be increased by 
law. 

2. The Appeals Division shall consist of the Chief 
Justice and six other Justices of the Supreme Court, 
to be assigned by the Governor. A Justice of the Su- 
preme court assigned by the Governor to the Appeals 
Division shall serve in said division until the end of 
his term. 

The remaining Justices shall be assigned by the 
Supreme Court to the Law or Chancery Division, as 
the business of the court may require. 

3. Whenever the number of causes before the Ap- 
peals Division shall be so great that the division 
cannot promptly hear and determine them, the Gov- 
ernor shall, when authorized by statute, temporarily 
assign five of the Justices of the other divisions lo 
sit in the Appeals Division, which shall thereupon sit 
in two divisions for the hearing and decision of 
causes pending at the time of such assignment. 

4. Four Justices shall be necessary to constitute a 
quorum on the final hearing of any cause in the Ap- 
peals Division, but the Supreme Court may provide by 
rule for the making of interlocutory orders by a lesser 
number of Justices, or by one Justice; such orders 
to be subject to revision by the Appeals Division. 

On the hearing of a cause in the Appeals Division, 
no Justice who has given a judicial opinion in the 
cause in favor of or against the judgment, order or 
decree under review, shall sit at the hearing to review 
such judgment, order or decree, but the reasons for 
such opinion shall be assigned to the court in writing. 

5. A majority of all the members of the Supreme 
Court, to be presided over by the Chief Justice, shall 
constitute a quorum for the assignment of Justices, 



CONSTITUTIONAL, AMENDMENTS. 287 

and for the appointment of officers and the enactment 
of rules. 

6. The Supreme Court shall appoint one or more 
reporters, not exceeding three, to report the de- 
cisions of the court, and shall by rule define his or 
their duties and powers. The reporters shall hold 
office for five years, subject, however, to removal at 
the discretion of the court. 

SECTION V. 

1. The Appeals Division shall have and exercise the 
appellate jurisdiction heretofore possessed by the 
Court of Errors and Appeals, the jurisdiction hereto- 
fore possessed by the Supreme Court on writ of error, 
and the juisdiction heretofore possessed by the Pre- 
rogative Court on appeal, and by the Ordinary on 
appeal, and such further appellate jurisdiction as may 
be conferred upon it by law, together with such 
original jurisdiction as may be incident to the com- 
plete determination of any cause on review, saving, 
however, the right of trial by jury. 

2. The jurisdiction heretofore possessed by the Su- 
preme Court and the Justices thereof not hereby con- 
ferred on the Appeals Division, and the jurisdiction 
heretofore possessed by the Circuit Courts and the 
Judges thereof, and such further original jurisdiction 
not of an equitable nature, and such further appellate 
jurisdiction from inferior courts, as may be conferred 
by statute, shall be exercised by the Law Division of 
the Supreme Court and by the several Justices thereof, 
in accordance with rules of practice and procedure 
prescribed by statute, or in the absence of statute, by 
the Supreme Court. 

3. The jurisdiction heretofore possessed by the Pre- 
rogative Court and the Ordinary, not hereby conferred 
on the Appeals Division, and the jurisdiction hereto- 
fore possessed by the Court of Chancery and the 
Chancellor, and such further original equity jurisdic- 
tion as may be conferred by statute, and such further 
original jurisdiction as is now conferrable on the Pre- 
rogative Court, shall be exercised by the Chancery 
Division, and by the Chancellor and the several Jus- 
tices of said division in accordance with rules of prac- 
tice and procedure prescribed by statute, or, in the 
absence of statute, by the Supreme Court, but the 
Justices of that division shall be under such control 



288 CONSTITUTIONAL, AMENDMENTS. 

and supervision by the Chancellor as shall be provided 
by the Supreme Court. 

4. Terms of the Supreme Court presided over by a 
single Justice of the Law Division for the trial of 
issues joined in or brought to the Law Division of 
the Supreme Court, shall be held in the several coun- 
ties at times fixed by the Supreme Court. Until so 
fixed, such trial terms shall be held at the places and 
times now fixed by law for the holding- of the Courts 
of Common Pleas in the several counties. 

5. The Supreme Court may provide by rule for the 
transfer of any cause or issue from the Law Division 
to the Chancery Division, or from the Chancery Di- 
vision to the Law Division of the Supreme Court, and 
from the County Court to the Law Division or the 
Chancery Division of the Supreme Court, and for the 
giving of complete legal and equitable relief in any 
cause in the court or division where it may be pend- 
ing. 

6. Nothing herein contained shall prevent the altera- 
tion, by law of any statutory power or jurisdiction 
conferred upon any court or Judge since the adoption 
of Constitution, in the year 1844, and nothing herein 
contained shall prevent the Legislature from con- 
ferring upon any inferior court which may hereafter 
be established such power or jurisdiction as was exer- 
cised by or which may now be conferred upon the in- 
ferior courts mentioned in section 1 of article "VI of 
the Constitution of 1844. 

SECTION VL 
The County Courts shall have and exercise, in all 
cases within the county, such original common law 
jurisdiction concurrent with the Supreme Court, and 
such other jurisdiction heretofore exercised by courts 
inferior to the Supreme Court and the Prerogative 
Court as may be provided by law. The final judgments 
of the County Courts may be brought for review be- 
fore the Supreme Court in the Appeals Division. Until 
otherwise provided, the jurisdiction heretofore exer- 
cised by the Courts of Common Pleas, Orphans' Courts, 
Courts of Oyer and Terminer, Courts of Quarter Ses- 
sions, or by the Judges thereof, shall be exercised by 
the County Courts, pursuant to rules prescribed by 
the Supreme Court. The Justices of the Law Division 
of the Supreme Court shall be ex-ofl[icio Judges of the 



CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS. 289 

County Courts. All other jurisdiction or authority 
now vested in any court, Judge or magistrate with 
jurisdiction inferior to the courts in this section men- 
tioned, and not superseded by this article, shall con- 
tinue to be exercised by such court, Judge or magis- 
trate until the Legislature shall otherwise provide. 

SECTION VII. 

This amendment to the Constitution shall not cause 
the abatement of any suit or proceeding pending when 
it takes effect. The Supreme Court shall make such 
general and special rules and orders as may be neces- 
sary for the transfer of all suits and proceedings to 
the appropriate division or court created by this 
amendment. Matters pending when this amendment 
takes effect shall be decided by the Judge or Judges 
to whom they were submitted, and the order, judg- 
ment or decree made or advised by said Judge shall be 
entered as that of the division or court to which the 
suit or proceeding shall have been transferred. 

5. Strike out paragraphs 1, 2, 5 and 8 of section 2 of 
article VII, and substitute the following paragraphs 
in place of paragraphs 1 and 2 ,and change the num- 
bers of the paragraphs following 5 to correspond: 

1. The Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, the Presi- 
dent Justice of the Law Division, the Chancellor and 
the Associate Justices of the Supreme Court shall be 
nominated by the Governor and appointed by him, 
with the advice and consent of the Senate. They shall 
not be less than thirty-five years of age, and shall have 
been practicing attorneys in the State for at least ten 
years. They shall hold office for the term of seven 
years; shall, at stated times, receive for their services 
a compensation which shall not be diminished during 
their term of office, and they shall hold no other office 
under the government of the State, or of the United 
States, and shall not engage in the practice of law 
during their term of office. The Chancellor and the 
Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, and the Vice- 
Chancellors and Associate Justices of the Supremo 
Court, in office when this amendment takes effect, 
shall be Justices of the Supreme Court until the ex- 
piration of their respective terms. 

The Circuit Court Judges in office when this amend- 
ment takes effect shall be continued in office with the 
19 



290 CONSTITUTIONAL. AMENDMENTS. 

powers of the Justices of the Supreme Court at the 
Circuit until the expiration of their respective terms. 
They may hold the County Courts, subject to assign- 
ment by the Law Division of the Supreme Court. 

2. The Governor, by and with the advice and con- 
sent of the Senate, shall appoint one Judge of the 
County Court in each county, and such additional 
County Judge or Judges in any county as may be au- 
thorized by law. The county Judges may hold court 
in any county subject to the control of the Supreme 
Court. The county Judges shall not be less than thirty 
years of age, and shall have been practicing attorneys 
in this State for at least five years. They shall hold 
office for the term of five years; shall at stated times 
receive for their services such compensation, which 
shall not be diminished during their term of office, 
as the Legislature in its discretion shall fix for each 
county, and they shall hold no other office under the 
government of the State or of the United States, and 
shall not engage in practice of the law in the courts 
of the county where they hold court during their term 
of office. The Judges of the Common Pleas, in office 
when this amendment takes effect, shall be the Judges 
of the County Courts until the expiration of their 
present terms. 

3. This amendment shall take effect on the first 
Monday in February, in the year next following Its 
adoption by the people. 

4. The Legislature shall pass all laws necessary 
to carry into effect the provisions of the Constitution 
and this amendment thereof. 

ASSEMBLY CONCURRENT RESOLUTION NO. 9. 

Amend by striking out paragraph 7, section 4, arti- 
cle 4, and insert in place thereof the following: 

7. Members of the Senate shall receive, annually, the 
sum of $1,000, and members of the General Assembly 
shall receive, annually, the sum of $1,000, during the 
time for which they shall have been elected and while 
they shall hold their office, and no other allowance 
or emolument, directly or indirectly, for any purpose 
whatever. The President of the Senate and the 
Speaker of the General Assembly shall, in virtue of 
their offices, receive an additional compensation, equal 
to one-third of their allowance as members. 



SCHOOL LAW. 291 

SYNOPSIS OF SCHOOL LAW. 



The State Board of Education consists of two members 
from each Congressional District. It has control of the 
State Normal School, the School for the Deaf, the Famum 
School, and the Manual Training and Industrial School for 
Colored Youth. It appoints the county superintendents 
of schools, decides appeals from the decisions of the State 
Superintendent, and makes rules for the granting of 
teachers' certificates and for carrying into effect the 
school laws of the State. 

The State Superintendent of Public Instruction is ap- 
pointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. He 
decides controversies that arise under the school law; may 
withhold the State school moneys from any district for 
neglect or refusal to comply with the provisions of the 
school law. and has general supervision of the public 
schools. He is a member of all boards of examiners) for 
teachers' certificates. 

There is a superintendent of schools for each county, 
appointed by the State Board of Education. The County 
Superintendent apportions the school moneys among the 
districts in his county, has general supervision of the 
schools and, in connection with the local Board of Educa- 
tion, prescribes the course of study to be pursued in the 
district. He is the chairman of the County Board of Ex- 
aminers and appoints the other members of the board. 

Each municipality in the State constitutes a school dis- 
trict, unless by a vote of the people two or more munici- 
palities decide to unite and form one district. There are 
two classes of school districts, cities forming one class 
and all other municipalities the other, but a district in 
either class may, by a vote of the people, be transferred 
to the other class. The members of the Board of Educa- 
tion in a city school district may be appointed by the 
Mayor or elected at the regular municipal election as de- 
termined by the legal voters, but until so determined the 
members shall be selected in the same manner as prior 
to the passage of the present law. 

In order to be eligible to membership in the Board of 
Education, a person must have been a resident of the dis- 
trict for at least three years Immediately preceding his 
election and must be able to read and write. A city school 
district may have a city superintendent, but until one Is 
appointed the County Superintendent has supervision of 
the schools. 



292 SCHOOL LAW. 

In each city school district there is a Board of School 
Estimate, consisting of the Mayor, two members of the 
body having the power to make appropriations for city 
purposes, and two members of the Board of Education. 
The Board of Education presents its estimate of the 
amount of local appropriation needed, and the Board of 
School Estimate certifies to the body in the city having 
power to make appropriations, the amount to be raised 
for school purposes. 

In districts other than cities the Boards of Education 
consist of nine members each, elected by the people on 
the third Tuesday in March. The qualifications for mem- 
bership are the same as in city school districts. The spe- 
cial district school tax is voted either at the annual meet- 
ing or at a special school meeting called by the Board of 
Education. Bonds for school houses are authorized by 
the legal voters. Women may vote at district meetings 
on all questions except the election of members of the 
Board of Education, which is prohibited by the Constitu- 
tion. 

Funds for the support of schools come from the follow- 
ing sources: First, from the income of the State School 
Fund. The principal of this fund is derived almost en- 
tirely from the sale and rental of lands under water be- 
longing to the State. The principal cannot be used for 
any purpose, and the income can be used only for the 
support of public schools. This income amounts to 
$200,000 per annum. Second, from State appropriation 
made by the Legislature to reduce the State school tax. 
Third, from State school tax, an amount which when 
added to the State appropriation will make a sum equal 
to two and three-fourths mills on each dollar of the tax- 
able property in the State. Fourth, interest of surplus 
revenue, and, Fifth, local school tax. 

The $200,000 from the school fund is apportioned among 
the counties by the State Superintendent on the basis of 
the total days' attendance of pupils in the public schools. 
The State appropriation is apportioned among the counties 
by the State Comptroller on the basis of the ratables. 
Ninety per cent, of the State school tax paid by each 
county is returned to it, and the 10 per cent, received from 
all the counties forms the reserve fund, which is appor- 
tioned among the counties in the discretion of the State 
Board of Education. 

The County Superintendent apportions to each dis- 
trict $600 for the Superintendent or Supervising Prin- 
cipal, if there be one; $400 for each Assistant Super- 
intendent, and for each permanent teacher employed 



SCHOOL. i^AW. 293 

in a hig-h school having a full four-years' course of 
study; $300 for each permanent teacher employed in 
a hig-h school having- a full threo-years' course of 
study; $200 for each permanent teacher employed in 
any kindergarten, primary or grammar grade or in a 
high school having less than three years' course of 
study; $80 for each temporary teacher employed more 
than four months; $80 for each eveninsj- school teacher; 
$25 for each high school pupil for -whom a tuition fee 
is paid to another district; $5 for each pupil below the 
high school grade for whom such tuition fee is paid, 
and 75 per cent, of the cost of tran.-jportation of pupils 
to schools in other districts. The balance of the State 
school moneys received by the county is apportioned 
on the basis of the total number of days' attendance 
of the pupils. 

The custodian of municipal funds is the custodian of 
school moneys, unless the Board of Education appoints 
the collector as custodian. In either case, the compensa- 
tion of the custodian must be fixed by the municipal au- 
thorities and paid from municipal funds. If there are 
two or more municipalities in the district, the Board of 
Education may appoint its own custodian and fix his 
compensation, which then is paid from school moneys. 

Each collector must pay to the county collector the 
amount of State school tax due from his taxing district 
not later than December twenty-second. If the tax is 
not paid by that date the County Superintendent must 
withhold the amount of reserve fund apportioned to the 
district and divide it the following year among all the 
districts in the county. The county collector must pay 
the State school tax to the State Treasurer not later than 
January twentieth. 

If a district provides a course in manual training, and 
such course is approved by the State Board of Education, 
the State will give to such district each year a sum equal 
to that raised in the district for manual training, provided 
the amount raised is not less than $250 or more than $5,000. 

Every district must provide free text-books and sup- 
plies for all pupils and must also provide a flag for eacn 
school house, which flag must be displayed every day 
the school is in session. The selection of a text-book re- 
quires the vote of a majority of the whole number of 
members of the Board of Education. A Board of Educa- 
tion may employ medical inspectors and triiant officers. 

Every school which raises $20 to establish a school 
library may receive a like amount from the State. After 



294 SCHOOL LAW. 

the first payment, the State will grive $10 each year that 
the school raises the same amount. Library moneys may 
be used for library books, reference books, apparatus, or 
educational works of art. 

All plans for school houses must be submitted to the 
State Board of Education for suggestion and criticism. 
Every school house hereafter erected must comply with 
the following requirements: First, light must be admitted 
to the class rooms only from the left and rear. Second, 
the total light area must equal 20 per cent, of floor space. 
Third, there must be 18 square feet of floor space and not 
less than 200 cubic feet of air space for each pupil. Fourth, 
all rooms must have a proper system of ventilation which 
will supply 30 cubic feet of fresh air per minute for each 
pupil. Fifth, all ceilings must be at least 12 feet in 
height and all stairs must be at least 4 feet wide, with 
intermediate landings, enclosed in brick walls or by parti- 
tions of slow-burning construction, and without open 
wall holes. Sixth, a school house having eight rooms 
must have two flights of stairs, each four feet in width, 
or one flight not less than six feet in width, one having 
from eight to sixteen rooms, two flights of stairs not less 
than flve feet In width, and one having sixteen or more 
rooms, four flights of stairs not less than four feet in 
width, or two flights not less than six feet in width. 
Seventh, all ceilings must be either metal, wood or plaster 
on metal laths and painted white or some light tint. 

A person cannot be legally employed as a teacher unless 
he holds a teacher's certificate in full force and effect at 
the time he begins teaching. Before beginning to teach 
he must show his certificate to the Superintendent of 
Schools. A Board of Education may adopt rules govern- 
ing the employment of teachers. In the absence of rules, 
the contract must be in writing in triplicate, one copy filed 
with the Board of Education, one with the County Super- 
intendent, and one with the teacher. The employment, 
promotion or dismissal of a teacher requires the vote of 
a majority of the whole number of members of the Board 
of Education. 

The State Board of Examiners consists of the State 
Superintendent, the Principal of the Normal School and a 
person appointed by the State Board of Education. This 
Board issues certificates valid in all parts of this State 
and in any school or grade. 

The County Board of Examiners consists of the County 
Superintendent and three teachers appointed by him. This 
Board issues certificates valid In the county. The third 
grade certificate is valid in an ungraded school or primary 



SCHOOL LAW. 295 

department; the second grade in an ungraded school or 
in any grade below the eighth; the first grade In any 
school in the county. City certificates are good only in 
the city. All kindergarten teachers must hold special 
kindergarten certificates: Special certificates may be is- 
sued for kindergarten, physical training, manual train- 
ing, music, drawing, ancient or modern languages, and 
commercial branches. All applicants for certificates must 
file testimonials of good moral character, and in case of 
previous experience, of success as teachers. 

Graduates of the Normal School receive State certifi- 
cates. Graduates of normal schools in other States may 
have their diplomas endorsed, provided the course of 
study pursued is equivalent to the course in the New 
Jersey Normal School, and the State in which they were 
issued grants reciprocal privileges to graduates of the 
New Jersey Normal School. 

All children between the ages of 5 and 20 are entitled to 
attend the public schools in the districts in which they 
reside. If a kindergarten has been established, children 
4 years of age may attend. A Board of Education must 
provide suitable school facilities for all the children de- 
siring to attend school. The Board of Education may 
provide for the education of pupils in the higher grades 
by payment of tuition fees to adjoining districts. If a 
child lives remote from any school in the district, the 
Board may transport such child to school or pay for its 
tuition in another district. A Board of Education may 
close a school and transport all the children to another 
school. "When this is done the district continues to receive 
the $200 theretofore apportioned for the teacher employed 
in the school which was closed. Children who have never 
attended any school can be admitted to a public school 
only during the ten days immediately following the open- 
ing of the school in the fall and during the first five days 
in January and April, except by the vote of a majority of 
all the members of the Board of Education. 

All children between the ages of 7 and 14 must attend 
either a public or private school every day such school is 
in session, unless they are taught at home or are physi- 
cally or mentally unfit to attend. The parent of a child 
who does not attend school may be proceeded against be- 
fore a magistrate as a disorderly person. If the parent 
is unable to control the child, such child may be pro- 
ceeded against as a disorderly person. 

Corporal punishment in all public and private schools 
is absolutely prohibited. 



296 COXGRESSTONAL DISTRICTS. 

CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS. 

(Formed by an act of the Legislature of 1901, approved 

March 19. See page 94, pamphlet laws.) 

Ratio, 194.182. 



FIRST— The counties of Camden, Gloucester and 
Salem. Population, 165,078. Vote cast in 1908 — Repub- 
lican, 27,443; Democratic, 17,640; Socialist, 810; Prohi- 
bition, 1,140. Total vote, 47,033. Republican plural- 
ity, 9,803. 

SECOND— The counties of Cape May, Cumberland, 
Atlantic and Burlington. Population, 169,037. Vote 
Cast in 1908 — Republican, 23,906; Democratic, 20,506; 
Socialist, 347; Prohibition, 1,012. Total vote, 4.5,771. 
Republican plurality, 3,400. 

THIRD— The counties of Middlesex, Monmouth and 
Ocean. Population, 181,566. Vote cast in 1908— Re- 
publican, 26.302; Democratic, 19,766; Prohibition, 399. 
Total vote, 46,467. Republican plurality, 6,536. 

FOURTH — The counties of Hunterdon, Somerset and 
Mercer. Population, 162,820. Vote cast in 1908— Re- 
publican, 23,919; Democratic, 17,210; Socialist, 738; Pro- 
hibition, 472. Total vote, 42,339. Republican plural- 
ity. 6,709. 

FIFTH — ^The counties of Inion, Morris and Warren. 
Population. 202,290. Vote cast in 1908— Republican. 
27,948; Democratic, 20,485; Socialist, 1,314; Prohibition, 
606. Total vote, 50,353. Republican plurality, 7,463. 

SIXTH — The counties of Bergen, Passaic and Sussex. 
Population, 257,777. Vote cast in 1908 — Republican. 
27,989; Democratic, 29,516; Socialist, 1,601; Prohibition, 
535. Total vote, 59,641. Democratic plurality, 1,527. 

SEVENTH — The First, Fourth, Sixth, Seventh, 
Eighth. Eleventh and Fifteenth ^W^ards of the city of 
Newark, and the city of Orange, and the towns of 
Bloomfield, Montclair and West Orange, and the bor- 
oughs of Glen Ridge, Caldwell and North Caldwell, and 
the townships of Franklin, Belleville, Livingston, Ve- 
rona and Cadwell, all in the county of Essex. Popu- 
lation, 177,106. Vote cast in 1908 — Republican, 24,863; 
Democratic, 18,104; Socialist, 661; Prohibition, 181; 
Soc. -Labor, 104. Total vote, 43,913. Republican plu- 
rality, 6,759. 

EIGHTH— The Second, Third, Fifth. Ninth, Tenth, 
Twelfth, Thirteenth and fourteenth Wards of the city 




Map of the New Jersey Congressional Districts 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS. 297 

of Newark, and the city of East Orange, and the town 
of Irving-ton, and the borough of Vailsburgh, and the 
village and township of South Orange, and the town- 
ships of Clinton and Milburn, all in the county of 
Essex. Population, 181,947. Vote cast in 1908 — Repub- 
lican, 24,536; Democratic, 16,276; Socialist, 1,332; Pro- 
hibition, 122; Soc. -Labor, 134. Total vote, 42,400. Re- 
publican plurality, 8,260. 

NINTH — The city of Bayoime, the Seventh, Eighth, 
Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh and Twelfth Wards of the city 
of Jersey City, and all of the Sixth Ward of said city 
of Jersey City, excepting the First and Second Pre- 
cincts, or that portion which lies north of Morris 
canal and east of Summit avenue, and the towns of 
Kearny and Harrison, and the borough of East 
Newark, all in the county of Hudson. Population, 
176,319. Vote cast in 1908 — Republican, 18,614; Demo- 
cratic, 23,485; Socialist, 823; Prohibition, 82; Soc- 
Labor, 71. Total vote, 43,075. Democratic plurality, 
4,871. 

TENTH — The First, Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth 
Wards of the city of Jersey City, and all that portion 
of the Sixth Ward of said city (the First and Second 
Precincts) which lies north of the Morris canal and 
east of Summit avenue, and the city of Hoboken, and 
the towns of West Hoboken, Union, West New York 
and Guttenburg, and the townships of North Bergen 
and Weehawken, and the borough of Secaucus, all m 
the county of Hudson. Population, 209,729. Vote cast 
in 1908 — Republican, 16,105; Democratic, 23,820; Social- 
ist, 1,340. Total- vote, 41,265. Democratic plurality, 
7,715. 

SUMMARY. 

Popu- Total Rep. Dem. 

Districts. lation. Vote. Plur. Plur. 

First 165,078 47,033 9,803 

Second 169,037 45,771 3,400 

Third 181,566 46,467 6,536 

Fourth 162,820 42,339 6,709 

Fifth 202,290 50,353 7,463 

Sixth 257,777 59,641 1,527 

Seventh 177,106 43,913 6,759 

Eighth 181,947 42,400 8,260 

Ninth 176,319 43,075 4,871 

Tenth 209,729 41,265 7,715 

Total 1,883,669 462,257 48,930 14,113 

Net Republican plurality, 34,817. 



298 BIOGRAPHIES. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 



GOVERNOR OF NEW JERSEY. 



JOHN FRANKLIN FORT. 

Governor Fort was born in Pemberton, Burlington 
county, N. J., on March 20, 1852, and is the son of 
Andrew H. Fort, who still lives in Mount Holly. His 
father was in 1866-67 a member of the House of 
Assembly, and his father's brother was Governor 
George F. Fort, who held the executive office from 
1851 to 1854. Young Fort remained in Pemberton until 
he was twenty-one years of age, leading the life of 
a farmer's boy and having his share of the country 
boy's hardships. His early education was secured in 
Miss Nicholson's private school in Pemberton, and after 
that he went to Pemberton Academy, where his teacher 
was Charles E. Hendrickson, a warm personal friend 
and in recent years his associate on the Supreme Court 
bench. 

Justice Fort's next tutor was William Hutchinson, 
afterward well known as "John Sands," under which 
name he wrote articles for the New York Sun. He 
then went to Mount Holly Institute, conducted by 
Charles Aaron, and from there he went to Pennington 
Seminary, where he graduated in 1869. 

In the fall of 1869 he entered the law office of former 
Chief Justice Edward M. Paxton, who was then a well- 
known practicing lawyer in Philadelphia, but six 
months later he was compelled to return to New Jer- 
sey because of Mr. Paxton's appointment to a common 
pleas judgeship by Governor Gerry of the Keystone 
State. Upon his return he entered the office of Ewan 
Merritt in Mount Holly, and in order to help pay his 
expenses while studying he taught school at Ewan- 
ville. He was also in the office of Colonel Garrit S. 
Cannon at Bordentown, from which place he went to 
the Albany Law School, where he graduated in 1872 
with the degree of LL.B. Among his most intimate 
friends and a roommate at the law school was former 



BIOGRAPHIES. 299 

Chief Judge Alton B. Parker, candidate on the Demo- 
cratic ticket for President of the United States in 1904. 
This friendship still continues. 

Returning- from law school without having attained 
his majority, he again entered the office of Ewan Mer- 
ritt, and in November, 1873, having just passed twenty- 
one by a few months, he was admitted to the bar. 

"When Mr. Fort returned from law school the Gree- 
ley-Grant campaign of 1872 was in progress, and he 
entered that campaign for General Grant with vigor. 
During the next three months he made twenty-seven 
speeches in South Jersey. In the winter of 1873 he 
was made Assistant Journal Clerk of the Assembly, 
and he also held the same position in 1874, earning 
money enough to reimburse his father for every cent 
the latter had spent on his education. 

Mr. Fort went to Newark at the solicitation of John 
W. Taylor, then President of the Senate, who was at 
that time the Senator from Essex. Hardly had he set- 
tled in Newark before he became interested in politics, 
and in 1874 he went on the stump for George A. Hal- 
sey, the Republican candidate for Governor. In April, 
1876, Mr. Fort married Miss Charlotte Stainsby, daugh- 
ter of former State Senator William Stainsby, of New- 
ark. 

In 1878 Governor McClellan appointed Mr. Fort a 
Judge of the District Court in Newark, and he was 
reappointed by Governor Ludlow, but resigned the 
office in 1886 to engage solely in the practice of the 
law. 

In 1884 he was elected a delegate at large by the 
Republican State Convention to the National Conven- 
tion held at Chicago. At that place, with six others, 
he acted independently and voted for George F. Ed- 
munds, of Vermont, for President, until the latter was 
dropped, and then voted with the rest of the New 
Jersey delegation for James G. Blaine, whom he loyally 
and vigorously supported after the convention. In 1889 
he was chairman of the convention which nominated 
General E. Burd Grubb for Governor, and toured the 
State with him, and was greatly disappointed at his 
defeat. He was also chairman of the Griggs conven- 
tion in 1895 and was a speaker with the latter in the 
"whirlwind" campaign of that year, which resulted in 
the election of the first Republican Governor in thirty 
years. 



300 BIO(iRAPHIES. 

In 1896 Mr. Fort was a delegate to the National Con- 
vention at St. Louis, at which McKinley and Hobart 
were nominated, and speaking for New Jersey, he 
placed the name of Garret A. Hobart before the con- 
vention. He was also chairman of the committee on 
credentials at this convention and presented the ma- 
jority report for that committee, which read J. Edward 
Addicks, of Delaware, out of the Republican party. 
Judge Fort's speeches denouncing Addicks and later 
nominating Hobart gave him a national reputation as 
an orator. 

Governor Griggs appointed Mr. Fort Judge of the 
Court of Common Pleas of Essex county in December, 
1896, and on May 4, 1900, he was appointed a Justice 
of the Supreme Court by Governor Voorhees. The date 
of his appointment was the anniversary of the date 
of his coming to Newark. 

While a member of the Supreme bench Justice Fort 
sat in many of the counties of the State and made 
friends in all. He has presided over the courts of 
Morris, Monmouth, Middlesex, Ocean, Union and Hud- 
son counties. While in Monmouth county he directed 
the movements which drove the gamblers from Long 
Branch in 1902. 

Governor Fort has made speeches in different parts 
of the country on various subjects by request. In 1899 
he made a tour of European prisons under a commis- 
sion from the United States and reported on them 
upon his return. The idea of probation and indeter- 
minate sentences was such a new one, that when 
Governor Fort drew the original bill providing for 
them for the Senate and House he had trouble in get- 
ting any one to father it. A hearing was given on the 
bill, and the Governor appeared in its behalf, with the 
result that it passed by unanimous vote in each house 
with the exception of one man. 

Governor Fort removed from Newark to East Orange 
in 1889, and has lived at 51 Arlington avenue, north, 
in that city since that time. He has three children, 
Miss Margretta Fort, Franklin W. Fort, a lawyer in 
Newark, and Leslie R. Fort, editor of the Lakewood 
Times and Journal. The Governor attends the Pres- 
byterian Church and is a trustee of the Munn Avenue 
Church at East Orange and the Spring Lake Presby- 
terian Church, at which latter place he owns a summer 



BIOGRAPHIES. 301 

cottage and spends five months in the year. He was 
active in St. Paul's Methodist Episcopal Church for 
many years when in Newark. 

He is a man with few recreations; no sports of any 
kind. He was devoted to the law and his judicial du- 
ties, and he found them a delight. 

He is no respecter of persons; rich and poor approach 
him with equal ease. He probably knows as many 
people as any man in the State. 

The Governor has been President of the Sons of 
the American Revolution of New Jersey since 1905 and 
is a member of the American Bar Association and the 
New York and East Orange Republican Club and the 
Essex Club. 

He was elected Governor of New Jersey for a term 
of three years, on November 5th, 1907, by a plurality 
of 8,013 over Frank S. Katzenbach, Jr., the Democratic 
candidate. 

Fort, Republican, 194,313; Katzenbach, Democrat, 
186,300; Mason, Pro., 5,255; Krafft, Soc, 6,848; Butter- 
worth, Soc.-Lab., 1,568. 



BIOaRAPHIP^S. 



UNITED STATES SENATORS. 



JOHN KEAN, Elizabeth. 

Senator Kean was born at Ursino, Union county. New 
Jersey, In the house where he now resides, on December 
4th, 1852. The house is historic, being known as "Liberty 
Hall," and was erected by Governor Livingston In 1772. 
Washington held many conferences with his Generals 
within its walls, and Alexander Hamilton studied law 
there. And in the same house John Jay was married to 
one of the daughters of the Governor. Another home, at 3 
East Fifty-sixth street, New Yorlc city, also belongs to 
Mr. Kean, where he spends much of his time during the 
winter. 

When a young boy the Senator was sent to a boarding- 
school in Stockbridge, Mass., and was transferred from 
there to a private academy at Sing Sing on the Hudson, 
where he received a much higher education than was neces- 
sary for him to enter Yale College, which he did in 1876. He 
afterward took a course in the Columbia College Law 
School, and was admitted to the bar of New Jersey in 1877. 

Mr. Kean was elected to Congress in 1882, and again in 
1886. In 1892 he was defeated for Governor by his Demo- 
cratic opponent, George T. Werts. 

The Senator is a prominent business man, and is engaged 
in numerous manufacturing, mercantile, railroad and 
financial enterprises, which furnish employment to a large 
number of mechanics and artisans, especially in the city 
of Elizabeth, where he is so well and favorably known. 
He has helped materially in promoting the growth of that 
city, and to him, more than to any other person, is due its 
present prosperity. He fills many positions of honor and 
trust in the banking and commercial communities. He is 
President of the National State Bank, of Elizabeth, and a 
director in the Elizabeth Banking Company. He Is also 
President of the Elizabeth Water Company and the Gas 
Light Company of the same city. He holds the largest 
interest in the Elizabeth Street Railway Company, and his 
latest undertaking was the construction of a trolley line 
from Elizabeth to Plainfield, for the franchise of which 
he paid a large sum of money. 

The Senator has always been an active Republican, and 
for several years he served as the Treasurer of the State 
Committee of his party. He was the unanimous choice of 



E'.IOGRAPHIES. 303 

the Republican caucus for United States* Senator in Janu- 
ary, 1899, and received the full vote of his party when he 
Tras elected to that office in a joint meeting- of the Legis- 
lature, held soon afterward, his Democratic opponent 
being- the then incumbent, James Smith. Senator Kean 
was elected for a term of six years in 1899 and was re- 
elected in 1905 for a similar term, which will expire in 
1911. 

FRANK O. BRIGGS, Trenton. 

Senator Briggs was born at Concord, New Hamp- 
shire, in 1851. Ho is the son of Major James F. Briggs, 
who held a commission in the Eleventh New Hamp- 
shire Volunteers during the Civil War. The father 
served three terms as Congressman and was a promi- 
nent candidate for United States Senator before the 
New Hampshire Legislature in 1883. There was an 
exciting contest for the office which lasted from June 
until August. Senator Rollins, although the nominee 
of the caucus, was defeated. Other candidates were 
General Marston and General Stevens, and Congress- 
man Pike, who was finally elected. 

The Senator was a student at Phillips Exeter Acad- 
emy in 1866, '67 and '68, and on September 1, 1868, 
entered the U. S. Military Academy at West Point, 
graduating sixth in rank in the class of 1872. He 
served in the Second U. S. Infantry as Second Lieuten- 
ant until 1877, when he moved to Trenton and became 
associated with the well-known firm of John A. Roeb- 
ling's Sons Company, wire rope manufacturers, bridge 
builders, etc., of which he is assistant treasurer. He 
was elected Mayor of Trenton on April 11, 1899, by a 
majority of 816 over Joseph A. Corey, Democrat, and 
served as such until January 1, 1902. He was ap- 
pointed a member of the State Board of Education by 
Governor Voorhees in 1901 for a term of three years, 
but resigned that office in 1902, upon his election to 
the position of State Treasurer. 

On January 3, 1902, the Senator was appointed State 
Treasurer by Governor Voorhees to fill a vacancy 
caused by the death of George B. Swain, of Newark, 
which occurred on December 25, 1901. That was an 
ad interim appointment. On February 11, 1902, he was 
elected by a joint meeting of the Legislature for a full 
term of three years, and he was re-elected by the 
Legislature of 1905. He served in the office until 



304 BIOGRAPHIES. 

March 1, 1907, when he resigned and was succeeded by 
Daniel S. Voorhees. Mr. Briggs was elected United 
States Senator February 5, 1907, for a full term of six 
years. 

During a residence of over thirty years in Trenton, 
Ms. Briggs has taken a deep interest in all matters 
which tended to promote the welfare of the city. As 
a public-spirited citizen he enjoys a high degree of 
popularity, and in politics he has always been a stead- 
fast Republican. In 1904 he was elected chairman of 
the State Republican Committee. He displayed great 
ability and industry in the management of the suc- 
cessful campaign of that year. For several years he 
was President of the Inter-State Fair Association. In 
1907 he resigned the presidency of that association and 
also that of the Republican State Committee. He is 
still a member of the latter body, representing Mercer 
county, and is chairman of the Executive Committee. 
His term as Senator will expire in March, 1913. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 305 

NEW JERSEY CONGRESSMEN. 



FIRST DISTRICT. 

Camden, Gloucester and Salem Counties. 
(Population, census of 1900, 165,078.) 

HENRY C. LOUDENSLAGER. 
(Rep., Paulsboro.) 

Mr. Loudenslager was born in Mauricetown, Cumberland 
county, N. J., May 22d, 1852. His parents moved to Pauls- 
boro, Gloucester county, in March, 1856, where he has con- 
tinuously resided ever since. His education was obtained 
in the common schools. After leaving the farm of his 
father, he entered the produce commission business in 
Philadelphia, and continued in it for ten years, from 1872 
to 1882. During this time his father was the County Clerk 
of Gloucester, and except when engaged in the market 
during the produce season, the son was employed in the 
oflace. He was elected to the office in 1882, and was re- 
elected in 1887. At both of his elections he ran far ahead 
of his ticket, his plurality the last time being 946. He was 
a member of the State Republican Committee for several 
years. Mr. Loudenslager is well known all over the State 
from his secret society connections. He has been the 
Great Keeper of Wampum, Improved O. R. M., of this 
State. He is a member of Florence Lodge, No. 87, F. & 
A. M., and is a thirty-second degree Mason. In 1908 he 
was elected to the Sixty-first Congress, for a ninth term, 
by a plurality of 9,803 over Grosscup, Democrat. 

1908 — Loudenslager, Rep., 27,443; Grosscup, Dem., 
17,640; Read, Pro., 1,140; Henderson, Soc, 810. 



SECOND DISTRICT. 

Cape May, Atlantic, Cumberland and Burlington Counties. 
(Population, census of 1900, 169.037.) 

JOHN J. GARDNER. 

(Rep., Atlantic City.) 
Mr. Gardner was born in Atlantic county, October 17, 1845, 
and has resided there all his lifetime, excepting during 
his term of service in the Civil War. He was reared a wat- 
20 



306 BIOGRAPHIES. 

erman until sixteen years of age, when he enlisted for three 
years in the Sixth New Jersey Volunteers; In March, 1865, 
he enlisted for one year in the United States Veteran Vol- 
unteers. He is in the real estate and Insurance business. 
He was elected Mayor of Atlantic City in 1868, '69, '70, '73 
and '74— having declined the nomination in 1872 and 1875. In 
the latter year he was elected a member of the Common 
Council, and one of the Coroners of the county. He was 
elected Senator in 1877, and was re-elected in 1880, "83, '86 and 
'89. He beat the record, with regard to the length of ser- 
vice, of any State Senator in the history of the State, hav- 
ing served five consecutive terms, or fifteen years alto- 
gether. In the session of 1883 he was President of the 
Senate, when he discharged the duties: of the position with 
much ability and impartiality. He always took a promi- 
nent part in legislation, and during many years was the 
leader of his party in the Senate. He was a delegate-at- 
large to the National Republican Convention at Chicago 
in 1884. He is a member of the State Republican Com- 
mittee. He v/as elected to the Sixty-first Congress and 
a ninth consecutive term, in 1908, by a plurality of 
3,400 over General E. Burd Grubb, the Democratic 
candidate. 

1908 — Gardner, Rep., 23.906; Grubb, Dem., 20,506; 
Steelman, Pro., 1,012; Leeds, Soc, 347. 



THIRD DISTRICT. 

Middlesex, Monmouth and Ocean Counties. 
(Population, census of 1900, 181,566.) 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN HOWELL. 
(Rep., New Brunswick.) 
Mr. Howell was born in Cumberland county, N. J., Jan- 
uary 27th, 1844, and is President of the People's National 
Bank of New Brunswick. He was Surrogate of Middlesex 
county for ten years, from November. 1882, until November. 
1892. He served with the Twelfth New Jersey Volunteers 
throughout the Civil War. He came to South Amboy, 
where he entered business, and continued his residence 
there until 1882, when he was elected Surrogate and re- 
moved to New Brunswick. He served t'aree years as a 
member of the Township Committee, aud two years as 
Chosen Freeholder, during the last year of which he was 
Director of the Board. He is a Director of the New Bruns- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 307 

wick Savings Bank and Vice-president of the First Na- 
tional Bank of Perth Amboy. In 1892 he was a delegate to 
the Republican National Convention at Minneapolis. He 
was elected to the Sixty-first Congress, being an eighth 
term, by a plurality of (i.SoG over Clark, Democrat. 

1S08— Howell, Rep., 1'6,302; Clark, Dem., 19,766; Scott, 
Pro., 399. 



FOURTH DISTRICT. 

Hunterdon, Somerset and Mercer Counties. 
(Population, census of 1900, 162,820.) 

IRA WELLS WOOD. 
(Rep., Trenton.) 

Mr. Wood was born in Wilkes Barre, Pa., June 19, 1856; 
is an alumnus of Princeton University, class of '77; Is a 
counsellor-at-law of the Bar of New Jersey; was a mem- 
ber of the Board of Education and Common Council of 
the city of Trenton; was President of Trenton Board of 
Trade; was a Member of Assembly in the New Jersey 
Legislature, 1899 and 1900; was appointed by Governor 
Murphy a Commissioner for New Jersey to the Louisiana 
Purchase Exposition; was elected to fill the vacancy in 
the Fifty-eighth Congress caused by the resignation of 
the Hon. William M. Lanning, who was appointed United 
States District Judge for the District of New Jersey, vice 
Hon. Andrew Kirkpatrick, deceased, and also for the full 
term in the Fifty-ninth Congress. In 1908 he was elected 
to the Sixty-first Congress by a plurality of 6,709 over 
Steele, Democrat. He also served in the Sixtieth Con- 
gress. 

1908— Wood, Rep., 23,919; Steele. Dem., 17,210; Slack, 
Pro., 472; Dennis, Soc, 738. 



FIFTH DISTRICT. 

Union, Warren and Morris Counties. 
(Population, census of 1900, 202,290.) 

CHARLES NEWELL FOWLER. 

(Rep., Elizabeth.) 

Mr. Fowler was born at Lena, Illinois, November 2d, 1852, 

and is in the banking business. His earlier years were 

passed on his father's farm, where he remained until his 



308 BIOGRAPHIES. 

eighteenth year, when he became a student at Belolt Col- 
lege, Wisconsin. Two years later he entered Yale College, 
from which he was graduated in 1876. He read law in the 
office of Williams & Thompson, in Chicago, and attended 
the Chicago Law School, and was graduated in 1878. He 
has been more or less engaged in active politics since he 
came to Elizabeth twenty years ago, and for some time 
he was Chairman of the City Republican Central Com- 
mittee. He served as a member-at-large of the Re- 
publican State Committee from 1898 until 1907. He 
was elected to the Sixty-first Congress, being an eighth 
term, by a plurality of 7,4t)3 over Barber, Democrat. 

1908— Fowler, Rep., 27,948; Barber, Dem., 20,485; 
Van Cise, Pro., 606; Stokes, Soc, 1,314. 



SIXTH DISTRICT. 

Bergen, Passaic and Sussex Counties, 
(Population, census of 1900, 257,777.) 

WILLIAM HUGHES. 
(Dem., i^aterson.) 
Mr. Hughes was born in Ireland on April 3, 1872, and 
came to this country with his parents when a child. He 
obtained nothing more than a common school education, 
abandoning his studies in 1882 to take a position as reel 
boy with the Barbour Flax Spinning Company, of Pater- 
son. Whpn he worked there for two months he returned 
to school, but after a short period of study he resumed 
work in a silk mill. He worked as a weaver for various 
silk firms in the city of Paterson until 1893, when he en- 
tered Oakley's Business College, at Paterson, where he 
studied and made himself proficient in the practice of 
stenography and typewriting. He then secured a position 
with the American Grocery Company in New York City as 
stenographer, and remained with that firm for about a 
year, leaving it for the purpose of beginning ihe study of 
law in the oflfice of William M. Rysdyk, of Paterson. In 
1898 he abandoned his studies to enlist in Company A of 
the Second Regiment, N. G. N. J., V. I., and served with 
his company at Sea Girt and Jacksonville, Fla., during 
the five months the regiment was in the volunteer service. 
At Sea Girt Mr. Hughes was detailed as stenographer to 



BIOGRAPHIES. 309 

Governor Foster M. Voorhees, and at Jacksonville was 
assigned to the headquarters of the Seventh Army Corps, 
where for a period of three months he acted as steno- 
grapher to Major-General Fitzhugh Lee. Returning to 
Paterson when the regiment was mustered out of service, 
in September, 1898, he entered the office of William Nelson 
to resume his legal studies. After remaining with Mr. 
Nelson for a time he entered the office of former Attorney- 
General John W. Griggs, where he remained until he was 
admitted to the bar, in June, 1900. During all his young 
manhood Mr. Hughes has been intimately connected with 
the^ cause of organized labor. He was president of the 
Eastside Workingmen's Association in 1897, and after his 
admission to the bar became the counsel for the Brick- 
layers and Masons' Union, the Bakers' Union, the Ribbon 
Weavers' Union and the United Silk Workers of America. 
Associated with Mr. James G. Blauvelt, he acted as coun- 
sel for the weavers in the celebrated Chancery case in 
which Vice Chancellor Pitney held a number of striking 
silk workers to be guilty of contempt of court and sen- 
tenced them to fines and imprisonment. Mr. Hughes mar- 
ried while a soldier in 1898, returning to Paterson from 
Jacksonville on furlough for that purpose. He was a 
candidate for Assembly on the Democratic ticket in Pas- 
saic county In 1901. He ran more than 800 ahead of his 
icket, but was defeated by Raymond Bogert, Republican, 
by 409 votes in the county. He was elected to Congress in 
1902 by a plurality of 3,848 over Barbour, Republican; in 
1904 he was again a candidate for Congress, when he was 
defeated by Henry Crosby Allen, Republican, by a plural- 
ity of 510. In 1905 he was defeated for Surrogate in Pas- 
saic county by Charles M. King, Republican. Mr. Hughes 
was a member of the Sixtieth Congress, and he was 
elected to the Sixty-first by a plurality of 1,527 over 
Foxhall, Republican. 

1908 — Hughes, Dem., 29,516; Foxhall, Rep., 27,989; 
Krafft, Soc, 1,601; Patton. Pro., 535. 



310 BIOGRAPHIES. 

SEVENTH DISTRICT. 

The First, Fourth, Sixth. Seventh, Eighth, Eleventh and 
Fifteenth wards of the city of Newark, and the city 
of Orange, and the towns of Bloomfield, Montclair and 
West Orange, and the boroughs of Glen Ridge, Cald- 
well and North Caldwell, and the townships of Frank- 
lin, Belleville, Livingston, Verona and Caldwell, all in 
the county of Essex. 

(Population, census of 1900, 177,106.) 
RICHARD WAYNE PARKER. 
(Rep., Newark.) 
Mr. Parker was born in Morristown, N. J., August 6th, 
1848, and is a lawyer by profession. He was graduated from 
Princeton College in 1867, studied law in the Columbia Law 
School, New York, and was admitted to the bar in 1870. He 
then became the law partner of his father, the late Cort- 
landt Parker, and the partnership continued until the 
death of the latter. He was a member of Assembly from 
Essex county in 1885 and 1886, when he took a prominent 
part in legislation. In 1892 he was defeated for Con- 
gress by tiie late Thomas Dunn English. He was a 
member of the Fifty-fourth, Fifty-fifth, Fifty-sixth, 
Fifty-seventh, Fifty-eighth, Fifty-ninth and Sixtieth 
Congresses, and was elected to the Sixty-first by a plu- 
lality of 6,751) over Townsend, Democrat, being his 
eighth consecutive term. 

1908 — Parker, Rep., 24,863; Townsend, Dem., 18,104; 
Anderson, Pro., 181; Murphy. Soc, 661; Carlin, Soc- 
Labor, 104. 



EIGHTH DISTRICT. 

The Second, Third. Fifth, Ninth, Tenth. Twelfth, Thir- 
teenth and Fourteenth wards of the city of Newark, 
and the city of East Orange, and the town of Irvington. 
and the borough of Vailsburgh, and the village and 
township of South Orange, and the townships of Clin- 
ton and Milburn, all in the county of Essex. 
(Population, census of 1900, 181,947.) 
WILLIAM H. WILEY. 
(Rep., East Orange.) 
Major Wiley, son of the late John Wiley, of East Orange, 
was born in New York city in 1842. He was graduated 
from the College of the City of New York in the class 



BIOGRAPHIES. 311 

of '61, known as the war class. He enlisted in the army 
at the age of 19. He was commissioned as First Lieuten- 
ant, was promoted to a Captaincy, and was finally re- 
warded with the brevet rank of Major for gallant and 
meritorious services. He had charge of a battery on 
Morris Island in the bombardment of Fort Sumter, and 
for a time was in command of Fort Wagner. After the 
war he enttred the Troy Polytechnic Institute and was 
duly graduated therefrom. He has been assistant engineer 
of the Brooklyn Water Works and of the Croton Water 
Works, also of Riverside Park, in Chicago. He was 
also resident engineer of the Reading Railroad for a 
time. He was ensraered in making surveys in Pennsyl- 
vania for the Newhope and Philadelphia Railroad, after- 
ward connected \\ ith the Bound Brook route. He was 
superintendent of a mine in the Hocking Valley, Ohio, 
with headquarters in Zanesville. In 1875 he became a 
member of the publishing house of John Wiley & Sons, 
which is now composed of himself and his brother, 
Charles Wiley. Major Wiley is a member of the Amer- 
ican Society of Civil Engineers, is Treasurer of the 
American Society of Mechanical Engineers, a member of 
the American Institute of Mining Engineers, the Amer- 
ican Institute of Electrical Engineers, the Society for the 
Advancement of Science, the Metropolitan Museum of 
Arts, the Municipal Arts Society, and the National Geo- 
graphical Society. 

He was at one time vice-president of the Engineer's 
Club, of New York; is a member of the Lroyal Legion, 
Army and Navy Club, and University Club, and Aldine 
Club, all of New York, and the Republican Club, of East 
Orange. He used to be quite active in East Orange af- 
fairs, and in 1886, 1887 and 1888 was a member of the 
Township Committee, serving as chairman part of the 
time. His advice and experience were most valuable in 
connection with the introduction of sewerage, that 
great improvement having been inaugurated during 
his membership. 

In 1897 he was made president of one of the juries at the 
Brussels Exposition, and although the rules of the Expo- 
sition forbid any member of a jury to be a member of 
the superior jury, that body passed a resolution by 
which he was made a member of it and served during 
their deliberations. For his services he received a 
decoration from King- Leopold, but has been often 



312 BIOGRAPHIES. 

heard to say the Loyal Legion badge was all the de- 
coration that any American needed in the presence 
of his countrymen. Governor Murphy appointed him 
a member of tlie New Jersey Commission of the Louisi- 
ana Purchase Exposition. He served in the Fifty- 
'lerth M'^d Fifty-ninth Congresses, and was elected 
to the Sixty-first Congress by a plurality of 8,260 over 
Pratt, Democrat. 

1908— Wiley, Rep., 24,536; Pratt, Dem.. 16,276; Sher- 
win, Soc, 1,332; Burnett, Pro., 122; Harting, Soc- 
Labor, 134. 



NINTH DISTRICT. 

The city of Bayonne, the Seventh, Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, 
Eleventh and Twelfth wards of the city of Jersey City, 
and all the Sixth ward of said city of Jersey City ex- 
cepting the first and second precincts, or that portion 
which lies north of the Morris canal and east of Sum- 
mit avenue, and the towns of Kearny and Harrison, 
and the borough of East Newark, all in the county of 
Hudson. 

(Population, census of 1900, 176,319.) 

EUGENE F. KINKEAD. 

(Dem., Jersey City.) 

Mr. Kinkead was born at Buttevant, Ireland, March 
27th, 1876, while his mother was on a visit to that 
country for her health. He is in the business of car 
advertising. He was an alderman of the Tenth ward, 
Jersey City, in 1899 and 1900, and was president of the 
Board of Aldermen in 190S. This Congressional dis- 
trict was carried by Marshall Van Winkle, Republi- 
can, in 1904, by a plurality of 2,425, and Mr. Kinkead 
was elected by a plurality of 4,871 over Critchfield, Re- 
publican. 

1908 — Kinkead. Dem.. 23.485; Critchfield. Rep.. 18.614; 
Reilly. Soc, 823; Gray. Pro.. 82: Hernberg. Soc- 
Labor, 71. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 313 

TENTH DISTRICT. 

The First, Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth wards of the 
city of Jersey City, and all that portion of the Sixth 
ward of said city (the first and second precincts) which 
lies north of the Morris canal and east of Summit ave- 
nue, and the city of Hoboken, and the towns of West 
Hoboken, Union, West New York and Guttenburg-, and 
the townships of North Bergen and Weehawken, and 
the borough of Secaucus, all in the county of Hudson 
(Population, census of 1900, 209,735.) 
JAMES A. HAMILL. 
(Dem., Jersey City.) 

Mr. Hamill was born in the old Sixth Ward of Jersey 
City, March 31, 1877, and is a counselor-at-law. In the year 
1890 he entered St. Peter's College, of Jersey City, and was 
graduated from that institution in 1897, receiving the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts. Returning the subsequent year, 
he completed the post graduate course in philosophy and 
received the degree of Master of Arts. He studied law 
in the office of the late Isaac Taylor, a one-time law part- 
ner of the late Chancellor Alexander T. McGill. While a 
student in the office of Mr. Taylor, Mr. Hamill attended 
the lectures of the New Yoi'k Law School, and on corn- 
pleting the regular course of two years was awarded the 
degree of Bachelor of Laws. In the year 1900, at the June 
term of the Supreme Court, he was admitted to the bar, 
and since then has practiced his profession in Jersey City. 
Mr. Hamill served four years as a member of the House 
of Assembly from Hudson county and he was minority 
leader for two years. His personal popularity is wide- 
spread and he is noted for oratory and skill in debate. He 
served as a member of the Sixtieth Congress, and he 
was elected to the Sixty-first by a plurality of 7,715 
over Dwyer, Republican. 

1908 — Hamill, Dem., 23,820; Dwyer, Rep., 16,105; 
Ufert Soc, 1,340. 



314 EXTRA SESSIONS. 

EXTRA SESSIONS OF THE LEGISLATURE AND 
SPECIAL SESSIONS OF THE SENATE. 

1861^An extra session of the Legislature was convened on 
April 30th, and adjourned on May 10th, 1861, called in 
obedience to Governor Olden' s proclamation, to raise 
troops for the war. Laws enacted, 13; Joint Reso- 
lutions, 2. 

1877— A special session of the Senate was convened in 1877, 
for the purpose of acting on the Governor's nomina- 
tions of District Court Judges. It met on March 28th 
and adjourned on March 30th. 

1884— A special session of the Senate was convened in 1884, 
to act on the Governor's nominations for members of 
the State Board of Assessors. It met on April 23d 
and lasted two hours. 

1897- An extra session of the Legislature was called on 
May 25th, 1897, to correct an error In a law providing 
for the submission to the people of proposed amend- 
ments to the Constitution. The session met at noon 
and adjourned sine die the same day at 6:47 P. M. 

1903— An extra session of the Legislature was convened 
April 21st, 1903, to correct an error in the "Passaic 
Valley Sewerage District act" of 1903. The session 
lasted about five hours and a final adjournment was 
effected on the same day. 

1903— Another extra session of the Legislature was con- 
vened on October 15th, 1903, to pass an act to estab- 
lish a system of public instruction to take the place 
of an act of March 26th, 1902, which had been declared 
unconstitutional by the Court of Errors and Appeals. 
The session covered four days, and a final adjourn- 
ment was effected on October 19th. The action of 
the Legislature was confined to the subject for which 
it was convened in extraordinary session. 

1904— An extra session of the Legislature was convened on 
April 12th to consider the report of the Morris Canal 
Commission and the bill to prevent the shooting of 
pigeons from traps. The session was adjourned on 
the night of the same day, after having passed four 
bills which became laws. 

1908— A special session of the Senate was convened on 
Friday, May 8th, to act on nominations by the 
Governor. It lasted only a few hours, when there 
was a final adjournment. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 315 

STATE SENATORS. 



Atlantic County. 

(Population, 59,862.) 

EDWARD ARMSTRONG WILSON. 
(Rep., Absecon.) 

Senator Wilson was born in Philadelphia, July 2, 
1862, and is a manufacturer of paper and paper bags. 
He is the first Senator elected in Atlantic county who 
resided outside of Atlantic City proper for thirty-two 
years. The Senator is active in fraternal orders, being- 
a member of the Masonic, Elks, Eagles, Red Men, 
Brotherhood of the Union, United Workmen, «S:c. He 
was educated in the public schools and a business col- 
lege. He was elected Mayor of Absecon City for three 
consecutive terms without opposition. For twenty 
years he has been actively engaged in politics without 
seeking office, and the senatorial nomination came to 
him unsolicited. He received the largest senatorial 
plurality ever given in Atlantic county, it being 2,903 
over Faunce, Democrat. Last year he served as chair- 
man of the Committees on Agriculture, Printing, Vil- 
lage for Epileptics, and as a member of the Commit- 
tees on Unfinished Business and Commerce and Navi- 
gation. 

1907 — Wilson, Rep., 6,710; Faunce, Dem., 3,807; 
Hughes, Pro., 199. 



Bergen County. 

(Population, 100,003.) 

EDMUND W. WAKELEE. 
(Rep,, Demarest.) 

Senator Wakelee was born at Kingston, N. Y., November 
21st, 1869, and is a lawyer by profession. He was the 
youngest member of the Senate of 1903. He was graduated 
from the Kingston Academy and then entered the New 
York University, from which institution he was graduated 
in 1891. He was admitted to the bar in the same year. He 
made his home in Bergen county, where he is now practic- 
ing law, having an office in Englewood, and also in New 



31fi BIOGRAPHIES. 

York city. He is a member of Alpine Lodge, No. 77, F. &. 
A. M., of Closter, New Jersey Sovereign Consistory, Hack- 
ensack Lodge, No. 658, B. P. O. E.. Tenafly Council, Royal 
Arcanum, and of Northern Valley Lodge, Knights of Honor, 
Tenafly, and all the prominent clubs in Bergen county. He 
served two years in the House of Assembly, in 1899 and 1900, 
and during the latter year he was the Republican- leader 
on the floor of the House. He took a prominent part in 
legislation and made himself so popular that, when William 
M. Johnson resigned his seat in the Senate as a representa- 
tive from Bergen county to accept the oflfice of First As- 
sistant Postmaster-General of the United States, Mr. 
Wakelee was nominated by his party to fill the vacancy, 
and he was elected by a plurality of 2,163 over his Demo- 
cratic opponent, Frank O. Mittag. In 1901 the Senator was 
elected for a full term of three years by a plurality of 1,321 
over Conkling, the Democratic candidate, and in 1904 he 
was re-elected by a plurality of 2,137 over Johnson, Dem. 
And again in 1907 he was re-elected by a plurality of 
679 over Hart, Democrat. 

In the session of 1903 he was the Republican leader 
on the floor of the Senate and filled that position 
with rare tact and ability. In 1904 he served as 
President of the Senate, when he discharged the duties 
of that office with much ability and impartiality. While 
Governor Murphy was in Europe, from April 23d to June 
5th, and while on a visit to Chicago and St. Louis, from 
June 14th to 27th, President Wakelee, by virtue of his 
office, served as Acting Governor and gave every satisfac- 
tion in his occupation of the position. 

In the session o:" 190S he was chairman of the Com- 
mittees on Fish and Game, Railroads and Canals, 
Sinking Fund and Soldiers' Home, and a member of 
the Committees on Corporations, Judiciary, State 
Library and New Jersey Reformatory. 

1907— Wakelee, Rep., 9,677; Hart, Dem., 8,99S: 
Lowndes, Pro., 227; Lucy, Soc, 289. 



Burlington Connty. 

(Population, 62,042.) 

SAMUEL K. ROBBINS. 
(Rep., Moorestown.) 

Senator Robbins was born at Mount Holly, JN. J., May 
9th, 1S53, and is an attorney and counselor-at-law. He was 
graduated at Princeton College (now Princeton University) 



BIOGRAPHIES. 317 

in the class of 1874. He studied law with Charles E. Hen- 
drickson, an ex-Justice of the Supreme Court, at Mount 
Holly, was admitted to the bar as an attorney at the June 
term, 1880, and as a counselor at the February term, 1884. 
He opened a law office at Moorestown, September 1, 1880, 
and also at Camden, and has been actively engaged in the 
practice of his profession since that time. He has always 
been identified with the Republican party and taken an 
active interest in the politics of his county and state. Mr. 
Robbins was a member of the Board of Education of 
Chester township from March, 1897, to March, 1903, and 
was president of the Board from March, 1899, to the end 
of his term. He was appointed to succeed Senator Haines 
as a member of the County Board of Elections of Burling- 
ton, October. 1900; was reappointed in 1902, and resigned in 
October, 1903. The Senator served as a member of the 
House of Assembly during the years 1904-05-06. In the lat- 
ter year he filled the office of Speaker with much credit 
and marked impartiality. He was elected to the Senate 
by a plurality of 2,227 over Collins, Democrat. In the 
session of 1908 he was the majority leader on the floor 
of the Senate, when he served as chairman of the 
Committees on Judiciary and Reformatory, and as a 
member of the Committees on Agriculture, Militia, 
State Home for Girls and Sinking Fund. 

1906— Robbins, Rep., 6,406; Collins, Dem., 4,179; Wilson, 
Pro., 398. Leeds, Soc, 118; Wildes, Ind., 808. Robbins' 
plurality, 2,227. 



Camden County. 

(Population, 121,555. 

WILLIAM J. BRADLEY. 
(Rep., Camden.) 

Senator Bradley was born in Maryland, May 6th, 1852, 
and is a mechanical engineer. He was elected to the Cam- 
den City Council in 1892, and served one year as President 
of that body. He was a delegate to the National Republi- 
can Convention held at Philadelphia in 1900. He served in 
the House of Assembly for five consecutive terms, from 
1898 to 1902, making a record of service in that body never 
before equalled from Camden county. In 1901 and 1902 he 
filled the Speaker's chair, with admirable ability. He was 
one of the seven Speakers who were re-elected to a second 



318 BIOGRAPHIES. 

term of office since the adoption of the present State Con- 
stitution, in 1844. He was elected to the Senate in 1902 by 
a plurality of 5,043 over William C. French, the Demo- 
cratic candidate, and in 1905 he was re-elected by a plur- 
ality of 4,317 over Benjamin, Democrat, and Roosevelt, 
Republican. And again, in 1908, he was elected by a 
plurality of 8,045 over Wescott, Democrat. The Sen- 
ator was elected President of the Senate by a unani- 
mous vote to fill the vacancy caused by the resig- 
nation of President Joseph Cross on the last day of 
the session of 1905. During that year the Senator 
was the Republican leader on the floor of the Senate. In 
1906 he was elected President of the Senate, when he dis- 
charged the duties of that office in a very satisfactory 
manner. Last j^ear he served as chairman of the 
Committees on Appropriations, Elections, State Home 
for Boys, and State Library, and as a member of the 
Committees on Municipal Corporations, Stationery, 
and Incidental Expenses and Treasurer's Accounts. 

1908— Bradley, Rep., 18.722; Wescott, Dem., 10,677; 
Doughty, Soc, 710; Sheldon, Pro., 692. Bradley's plu- 
rality, 8.045. 



Cape May County. 

(Population, 17,399.) 

ROBERT E. HAND. 
(Rep., Erma.) 

Senator Hand was born at Erma, Cape May county, 
June 28th, 1854. He was educated in the public schools, 
and at an early age gave evidence of business ability of 
an unusual order. He is now extensively engaged in 
oyster planting and general contracting. He is the owner 
of hundreds of acres of valuable timber lands, from which 
he cuts railroad ties, piling, poles, etc., in great quantity 
and employs more labor than any other man in the 
county. He married Lizzie W., daughter of Captain Will- 
iam S. Hoffman, of Cold Spring, N. J., in 1878. The Sen- 
ator began his public career as a member of the local 
Board of Education, and was its District Clerk for twelve 
years. He was an active and influential member of the 
Board of P"Yeeholders from 1887 to 1892, and in the latter 
year was elected Sheriff, after one of the most masterly 
campaigns in the history of the coun^. He was delegate 



BIOGRAPHIES. 319 

to the National Republican Convention at St. Louis, June 
16th, 1896. In 1896 he was elected to the Assembly by a 
plurality of 469 over David W. Roden, Democrat, and in 
1897 he was chosen State Senator over the same opponent 
by a plurality of 205 after one of the hottest contests ever 
waged in the county, being the only Republican Senator 
elected in New Jersey at that time. His many friends 
throughout the State congratulated him on his brilliant 
and decisive victory, and in their appreciation of his abili- 
ties expressed the opinion that, in politics as well as in 
business, he is in the foremost rank of enterprising citi- 
zens. In 1900 he was re-elected to the benate by the in- 
creased plurality of 325 over Miller, Democrat. Again in 
1908 he was elected to the Senate by a plurality of 610 over 
Ewing, Democrat. With the exception of Waters B. Mil- 
ler, Mr. Hand is the only Senator who was ever given 
more than one term in Cape May, and is the only Senator 
who was chosen for three terms of office. Last year 
he served as chairman of the Committees on Boroughs 
and Townships, Unfinished Business and Home for 
Feeble-Minded Women, and as a member of the Com- 
mittees on Miscellaneous Business, Railroads and 
Canals and Passed Bills. 

1906— Hand, Rep., 2,322; Ewing, Dem., 1,712; Weitbank, 
Soc, 56. 



Cumberland County. 

(Population, 52,110.) 

BLOOMFIELD H. MINCH. 
(Rep., Bridgeton.) 

Senator Minch was born upon a farm in Hopewell 
township, Cumberland county, October 10, 1864. Re- 
moving to Bridgeton with his father, he was educated 
at the South Jersey Institute, and for a number of 
years was actively engaged in mercantile pursuits 
and carried on large contracting. Since January, 1903, 
he has been vice-president of the Bridgeton National 
Bank, giving practically all of his time to that institu- 
tion as an executive officer. 

Senator Minch entered actively into politics as a 
young man, but has held only legislative office. 
Strongly independent, he has been a dominating force 
in South Jersey affairs and is recognized as a con- 



320 BIOGRAPHIES. 

servative and safe leader. He served as a member of 
the General Assembly in 1895, '96 and '97, and was 
prominent in the legislation of that body while he 
was a member. 

In 1901 he was elected to the Senate, re-elected in 
1904, and again in 1907. In each instance the nomina- 
tion was tendered him without opposition, and in each 
campaign his total vote and plurality exceeded that 
of any candidate upon the ticket. 

In the Senate his comprehensive grasp of affairs 
and his usual conservative and careful judgment has 
always appealed to his colleagues, and he is looked 
upon as a wise counselor and has exerted much 
wholesome influence. In 1907 Senator Minch was 
chosen President of the Senate, and by his fairness 
and dignified attention to the business of the State 
while in the chair he won the commendation of the 
members of the Senate irrespective of party, and the 
respect of the people of the State. Last year he 
served as chairman of the Committees on Municipal 
Corporations and Sanatorium for Tuberculous Dis- 
eases, and as a member of the Committees on App'"o- 
priations. Labor and Indu.=;try. Printing and School 
for Deaf Mutes. 

1907 — Minch, Rep., 5,340; Campbell, Dem., 3,15^; 
Pepper, Pro., 387. 



Essex Connty. 

(Population, 409.92S.) 

HARRY V. OSBORNE. 
(Dem., Newark.) 

Senator Osborne was born in Newark, Essex county, 
N. J., August 29th, 1872, and is an attorney and coun- 
selor-at-law. He comes of an old New Jersey family. 
His grandfather and father were connected with the 
Morris and Essex Railroad from its earliest days, both 
being members of the Brotherhood of Locomotive 
Engineers. He studied law in Trenton, in the oflfice 
of the late Robert S. Woodruff, was admitted as an 
attorney in November, 1895, and as a counselor in 
February, 1900. He moved to Newark and began prac- 
tice there in 1906. In spite of a busy professionr-.l 
career, he has found time to devote to the study of 



BIOGRAPHIES. 321 

social and charitable problems, and has been for some 
time counsel for the Newark Bureau of Associated 
Charities, of which he is also a director. He is mana- 
ger of and attorney for the Bureau of Adjustment of 
the Newark Credit Men's Association. This is his 
first public office. His advent into public life was as 
an independent candidate for the nomination on the 
Democratic ticket for State Senator from Essex 
county. He won from two other candidates, one of 
whom was an independent and the other the regular 
organization candidate. He was elected to the Senate 
by a plurality of 684 over Everett Colby, Republican, 
his predecessor in office. 

■ 1908— Osborne, Dem., 42,227; Colby, Rep., 41,543; 
Thompson, Soc, 1900; Heller, Pro., 237. Osborne's plu- 
rality, 684. 



Gloucester County. 

(Population, 34,447.) 

GEORGE W. F. GAUNT. 
(Rep., Mullica HiU.) 

Senator Gaunt was born on a farm near Mullica 
Hill, N. J., September 2d, 1865, and is a farmer. He 
is actively engaged in Grange work, has been master 
of New Jersey State Grange eight years, and lecturer 
of the National Grange four years, and continues in 
both positions. The Senator is president of the Peo- 
ple's Rural Telephone Company. He was elected to 
the Senate by a plurality of 524 over Newton, Demo- 
crat. 

1908 — Gaunt, Rep., 4,699; Newton, Dem., 4,175; Demp- 
sey. Pro., 417. Gaunt's plurality, 524. 



Hudson County. 

(Population, 449,879.) 

JAMES FAIRMAN FIELDER. 
(Dem., Jersey City.) 

Senator Fielder was born in Jersey City, February 
26, 1867, and is a lawyer by profession. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Jersey City, studied law 
21 



322 BIOGRAPHIES. 

with former Senator William Brinkerhoff (with whom 
he is now in partnership), was admitted to the bar 
of New Jersey as an attorney at the June term, 1888, 
and as a counselor at the June term, 1892. He was a 
member of Assembly in 1903 and 1904. At the elec- 
tions in 1902 and 1903, when he was chosen Assembly- 
man, he polled more votes than any other candidate 
on his ticket. In 1907 he was elected Senator by a 
plurality of 8,655. Last year he served on the Commit- 
tees on Banks and Insurance, Printed Bills, Riparian 
Rights, Public Grounds and Buildings, School for Deaf 
Mutes and Home for Feeble-Minded Boys and Girls. 

1907— Fielder, Dem., 42,094; Seitz, Rep., 33,439; Van- 
derhoef, 100; Fackert, Soc, 1,878; Heath, 158. 



Hunterdon Connty. 

(Population, 33,2o8.'» 

WILLIAM C. GEBHARDT. 
(Dem., Clinton.) 

Senator Gebhardt was born at Croton, Hunterdon 
county, N. J., March 28, 1859, and is a lawyer by profes- 
sion. He was graduated at the Clinton Institute and was 
admitted to the bar at the June term, 1884, as an attorney, 
and at the June term, 1887, as a counselor. He began the 
practice of his profession at Clinton, N. J., and still re- 
tains an office there, having one also at 259 Washington 
street, Jersey City. He served as Corporation Counsel of 
the town of Clinton for ten years, and as President of the 
Board of Education three years. He has also filled the 
position of School Principal. In 1900 he was elected to the 
Senate by a plurality of 1,281 over his Republican oppo- 
nent, Albert C. Gandy, and again in 1906 by a plurality of 
961 over Parker, Republican. Last year he served on 
the Committees on Education, Revision of Laws, 
Passed Bills, Treasurer!s Accounts, Commerce and 
Navigation and State Village for Epileptics. 

1906— Gebhardt, Dem., 3,881; Parker, Rep., 2,920; Volk, 
Pro., 135; Gebhardt's plurality, 961. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 323 

Mercer County. 

(Population, 110,516.) 

HARRY D. LEAVITT. 
(Rep., Trenton.) 

Senator Leavitt was born in Trenton, September 13, 
1871, and is assistant cashier of the Mechanics Na- 
tional Bank of Trenton. He is a son of the late Dr. 
Lyman Leavitt, who was an eminent physician, and 
was a member of Assembly in 1888. The Senator is 
a member of the Masonic fraternity. He served two 
terms in the Trenton Common Council, having been 
first elected in April, 1897, and retired on January 1, 
1902. 

In 1902 and '03 he served as a member of the Assem- 
bly, when he was assigned to prominent committees 
and took a leading part in legislation. He was a 
member of the Trenton Board of Park Commissioners 
for a brief period and resigned to become a member 
of the city Board of Education, which office he resigned 
in December, 1908. 

In 1907 he was elected State Senator by a plurality 
of 1,016 over William Allfather, Democrat. Last year 
he served as chairman of the Committees on Educa- 
tion, Stationery and Incidental Expenses, and Public 
Grounds and Buildings, and as a member of the Com- 
mittees on Revision of Laws and State Hospitals. 

1907 — Leavitt, Rep., 12,055; Allfather, Dem., 11,039; 
McDevitt, Soc, 416; Higgins, Pro., 210. 



Middlesex County. 

(Population, 97,036.) 

GEORGE S. SILZER. 
(Dem., New Brunswick.) 

Senator S'ilzer was born at New Brunswick, N. J., 
April 14th, 1870, and is a counselor-at-law. He was 
educated in the public schools, and was graduated 
from the High School in 1888, being the valedictorian 
of his class. He was admitted to the bar as an at- 
torney in November, 1892, and as counselor in Novem- 



324 BIOGRAPHIES. 

ber, 1899. Since then he has practiced his profession 
in New Brunswick, and resides in Metuchen. 

He has served on the Board of Examiners for candi- 
dates for admission to the bar, and is secretary of the 
local association. He has served in the New Bruns- 
wick Board of Aldermen as a member from the Third 
ward, and as chairman of the Democratic County- 
Committee. He was unanimously nominated for State 
Senator by his party, and successfully conducted his 
campaign on the principle of anti-bribery. 

Mr. Silzer was elected to the Senate after an ex- 
citing- campaign by a plurality of 106 over Senator 
Jackson, a very popular opponent. Last year he 
served as leader of the minority. 

1906— Silzer, Dem., 8,309; Jackson, Rep., 8,203; Marshall. 
Pro., 203. Silzer's plurality, 106. 



Monmouth County. 

(Population, 87,919.) 

OLIVER HUFF BROWN. 
(Rep., Spring Lake.) 

Senator Brown was born at Farmingdale, N. J., De- 
cember 12th, 1852, and is in the furniture, house-fur- 
nishing and imported china and glass business at 
Spring Lake, Asbury Park and Lakewood. At the age 
of nineteen he entered a small country store at New 
Branch, N. J., and after conducting it for two years he 
was employed in the establishment of John A. Githens, 
of Asbury Park, where for eight years he acted as 
manager. He made two trips across the ocean, which 
added much to his business qualifications. In 1881 he 
started business for himself at Spring Lake, which was 
then sparsely settled, and he has built it up so much 
that now he owns one of the largest stores 
along the sea coast. In 1889 he established 
a branch store at Lakewood, in which he does a 
most extensive business. The Senator has attained 
a widespread reputation as an art connoisseur and 
many homes in New York, Philadelphia and other cities 
contain selection of wares from his establishments. 
He is one of the largest property holders of Spring 
Lake and was Mayor of the borough for twelve 



BIOGRAPHIES. 325 

years. He is President of the new national bank 
at Spring Lalce and also of the First National 
Bank of Lakewood, and besides he is connected with 
a number of other financial institutions of Monmouth 
and Ocean counties. He is interested in the coasting 
trade, being part owner of several schooners, one cf 
which bears his name. He is a member of Ashler 
Lodge, No. 142, F. and A. M. In 1896 he was elected 
to the House of Assembly by the phenomenal plurality 
of 2,182 over Heyer, the highest candidate on the 
Democratic ticket, and he was at the head of the poll 
at that election. 

In 1902 Mr. Brown was elected to the Senate by a 
plurality of 153 over Dr. Hugh S. Kinmonth, his 
Democratic opponent, after a very lively campaign. 
In 1905 he was re-elected over the same opponent 
by a plurality of 3,364, and in 1908 he was again 
elected by a plurality of 1,893 over Lawrence, Demo- 
crat. In 1903 a new borough was formed by the con- 
solidation of Spring Lake, North Spring Lake and 
Como, and Mr. Brown was elected as its first Mayor. 
Last year he served as chairman of the Committees 
on Miscellaneous Business, Printed Bills and State 
Prison, and as a member of the Committees on Banks 
and Insurance, Boroughs and Townships, Fish and 
Game, Riparian Rights and Public Grounds and Build- 
ings. 

1908 — Brown, Rep., 11,771; Lawrence, Dem., 9,878; 
Wenck, Soc, 144; Taylor, Pro., 195. Brown's plurality, 
1,893. 



Morris County. 

(Population, 67,934.) 

THOMAS J. HILLERY. 
(Rep., Boonton.) 

Senator Hillery was born at Hibernia, N. J., November 
18, 1871, and is a lawyer by profession. He attended the 
public school at Hibernia, and subsequently at Rocka- 
way, where he was graduated and received a teachers' 
certificate for Morris county. 

After leaving school, he entered the employ of B. K. & 
G. W. Stickle, general merchants, where ne remained for 



326 BIOGRAPHIES. 

four years. He then became associated with a civil en- 
gineer at Boonton, N. J., and practiced civil engineering 
and land surveying for a number of years. During 
this time he took up the study of law, which he sup- 
plemented with a two years' course in the New York 
Law School. He was admitted to the New Jersey Bar 
at the February term, 1901, and as counselor Febru- 
ary term, 1904. 

He was elected to the Assembly in 1902, and served 
two years in the House. He was elected to the 
Senate in 1904, and again in 1907. He was leader of 
his party on the floor of the Senate for two years 
and President of the Senate during the term of 1908. 
In 1907 he was re-elected to the Senate by a plurality 
of 1,057 over Salmon, Democrat. 

1907 — Hillery, Rep., 6,383; Salmon, Dem., 5,326; 
Woodruff, Pro., 214; Hirscham, Jr., Soc, 351. 



Ocean County. 

(Population, 20,880.) 

WILLIAM J. HARRISON. 
(Dem., Lakewood.) 

Senator Harrison was born in Monmouth county, 
N. J., January 11, 1852, and is a druggist. For nine 
years he was Postmaster at Lakewood, having been 
appointed under the Cleveland administration. In 1902 
he was elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 490 
over William L. Butler, Republican. He was elected 
Senator in 1907 by a plurality of 1,383 over George L. 
Shinn, Republican, his predecessor in office. Mr. Har- 
rison is the only Democratic Senator from Ocean since 
1880, when Ephraim P, Emson was the incumbent. For 
over a quarter of a century Ocean has been a strong 
Republican county. Last year he served on the Com- 
mittees on Finance, State Home for Boys and Home 
for Feeble-Minded Women. 

1907 — Harrison, Dem., 2,870; Shinn, Rep., 1,487; Jef- 
frey, Pro., 66. Harrison's plurality, 1,383. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 327 

Passaic County. 

(Population, 175,858.) 

JOHN HINCHLIFFE. 
(Dem., Paterson.) 

Senator Hinchliffe was born in New York City, May 
19th, 1850, and has resided in Paterson since he was a year 
old. He is President of the Paterson Brewing and Malt- 
ing Company, also of the Empire State Granite Company. 
He was educated in the public schools of Paterson and, 
also, at the King James Grammar School, in Yorkshire, 
England, at the birthplace of his father. The Senator 
was a member of the Board of Education of Paterson 
from 1875 to 1877, and a Commissioner of Taxes and As- 
sessments for two terms from 1877 to 1881, and was Presi- 
dent of the Board durmg his last term. He was elected to 
the State Senate in 1891 by a plurality of 112 over Eugene 
Emley, Republican. The Senator was Mayor of the city 
of Paterson for three successive terms from 1897 to De- 
cember 31, 1903, inclusive, six and one-half years alto- 
gether. He was Mayor during the fire and floods of 1902 
and 1903. He suspended the Chief of Police during the 
riots of 1902 and took command of the police force himself, 
placing the city under martial law and restoring peace 
and quiet. He refused outside aid during the fire, and his 
slogan, "Paterson can take care of its own," has been 
echoed and re-echoed throughout the civilized world. He 
served as a member of the State Sewerage Commission 
from 1899 to 1902, and was treasurer of that body. He re- 
signed his membership. He was again elected to the State 
Senate in 1906 by a plurality of 4,348 over Wood McKee, 
Republican, it being the largest ever given a Democratic 
candidate for any oflSce in Passaic county. Last year 
he served on the Committees on Clergy, Labor and In- 
dustry, Municipal Corporations, Stationery and Inci- 
dental Expenses, Federal Relations and Sanatorium 
for Tuberculous Diseases. 

1906— Hinchliffe, Dem.. 15,719; McKee, Rep., 11,371; Ban- 
field, Soc, 683; Romary, Soc.-Lab., 331; Rowland, Pro., 231. 
HinchllfCe's plurality, 4,348. 



328 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Salem County. 

(Population. 26,278.) 

WILLIAM PLUMMER, JR. 
(Rep., Quinton.) 

Senator Plummer was born in Canton, N. J., January 
13th, 1855, and is a glass manufacturer. He was a School 
Trustee for sixteen years a.nd Postmaster of Quinton for 
thirteen years. He was elected to the Senate in 1905 by 
a plurality of CGO over former Senator William Newell, 
Democrat, and in 1908 he was re-elected by a plurality 
of 754 over Jolinson, Democrat. Last year he served 
as chairman of the Committees on Labor and Indus- 
try, State Home for Girls and School for Feeble- 
Minded Boys and Girls, and as a member of the Com- 
mittees on Printed Bills and State Prison. 

1908 — Plummer, Rep., 3,825; Johnson, Dem., 3,071; 
Woolman, Pro., 50. Plummer's plurality, 754. 



Somerset County. 

(Population, 36,270.) 

JOSEPH SHERMAN FRELINGHUYSEN. 
(Rep., Rartitan.) 

Senator Frelinghuysen was bom March 12th, 1869, at 
Raritan, N.. J., and is a fire insurance manager. For three 
years he was Chairman of the Somerset County Republi- 
can Executive Committee. In 1902 he was defeated for 
the Senate by Samuel S. Childs, Democrat. In 1905 he was 
elected over Mr. Childs by a plurality of 1,056, and in 
1908 he was re-elected by a plurality of 677 over Colo- 
nel Nelson T. Dungan, Democrat. Last year the 
Senator served as chairman of the Committees on 
Banks and Insurance, Federal Relations and Treas- 
urer's Accounts, and as a member of the Committees 
on Finance, Public Health and State Home for Boys. 

1908 — ^Frelinghuysen, Rep., 4,516; Dungan, Dem., 
3,839; Murphy, Pro., 62; Pascale, Soc, 24. Frelinghuy- 
sen's plurality, 677. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 329 

Sussex County. 

(Population. 23,325.) 

JACOB COLE PRICE. 
(Dem., Branchville.) 

Senator Price was born at Branchville. Sussex county, 
N. J., January 9th, 1850. By profession he is a physician. 
His father was a cousin of Governor Rodman M. Price, 
and was an Assemblyman from Sussex county in 1861. Dr. 
Price is a graduate of the Michigan University and the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons of New York city. 
He was County Physician for Sussex for fifteen years, and 
has served as Mayor, and also Postmaster, at Branchville. 
He was appointed as a member of the Board of Examining 
Surgeons for his Congressional District under the McKin- 
ley administration. Dr. Price was elected to the 
State Senate by a plurality of 758 over Woodward, 
Republican, and he was re-elected in 1906 by a plu- 
rality of 730 over Howell, Republican. Last year he 
served on the Committees on Agriculture, Corpora- 
tions, Fish and Game, Miscellaneous Business, Pub- 
lic Health, Printing, Sinking Fund, State Prison and 
Home for Feeble-Minded "Women. 

1906— Price, Dem., 2,593; Howell, Rep., 1,863; Benz, Pro., 
85. Price's plurality, 730. 



Union County. 

(Population, 117,211.) 

ERNEST R. ACKERMAN. 
(Rep., Plainfield.) 

Senator Ackerman was born in New York city, June 
17, 1863, and has been a resident of I'lainfield for the 
greater portion of his life. He was educated at the 
Plainfield public schools, graduating from the High 
School in the class of 1880. Mr. Ackerman's ancestors 
were actively engaged in the Revolution. Philip 
Markley, his great-great-grandfath(;r, was appointed 
in 1777 a commissioner to collect supplies for the 
American army, and John Markley, his great-grand- 
father, served in the Pennsylvania rhilitia in 1781. His 
father was J. Hervey Ackerman, of Plainfield, Presi- 
dent of the Common Council, and at one time its City 
Judge. 



330 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Obtaining a position with tiie Lawrence Cement 
Company, in New York, Mr. Ackerman rose tlirough 
its various offices to that of president, which position 
he still occupies. As a member of the Plainfield Com- 
mon Council, in 1891-1892, he was opposed to the 
granting- of unlimited franchises to public utilities 
corporations, and vigorously strove to limit the grants 
which were being considered at that time. 

In 1907 Mr. Ackerman was appointed by the New 
Jersey Senate, with Senators Hutchinson and Price, 
a committee of three to investigate the subject of 
capital punishment, and he was delegated to pursue 
the European end of the inquiry. On this mission he 
visited Great Britain, France, Belgium, Germany and 
Spain. An exhaustive report on this subject was pre- 
sented by the committee to the Senate of 1908. 

The Civil Service Law is considered by some as 
being the most important act of the Legislature of 
1908. Mr. Ackerman introduced the bill on the first 
day of the session. After continuous struggling 
throughout the winter and early spring, it was finally 
passed on the night of the last day of the session, 
and in a form to meet the approval of those advocat- 
ing this reform, which has been so successful for 
many j'ears in other States and in the United States 
Government. 

Last year he served as chairman of the Senate Com- 
mittees on Finance, Corporations and Riparian Rights, 
and for two sessions as a member of the Committee 
on Appropriations. 

Mr. Ackerman was a Republican Presidential Elec- 
tor in 1896, and was secretary of the New Jersey Elec- 
tors in 1897. He has been chairman of the Republican 
City Executive Committee of Plainfield, and has been 
a delegate to cit3% county, State and National Con- 
ventions of the Republican party. He was selected 
by the National Convention, held in Chicago, June, 
1908, to be New Jersey's representative on the commit- 
tee to notify the Hon. James S'. Sherman of his nomi- 
nation to the office of Vice-President. For twenty 
years Mr. Ackerman has been a director of the Young 
Men's Christian Association, and is an honorary gov- 
ernor of the Muhlenburg Hospital, of Plainfield. He 
is a member of the New York Chamber of Commerce, 
the Union League Club of New York, the Lawyers' 
Club and the American Association for the Advance- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 331 

ment of Science. He is also an active philatelist and 
numismatist, an associate of the American Society of 
Civil Engineers, and a fellow of the American Geo- 
graphical Society. Notwithstanding his many duties, 
Mr. Ackerman has found time to travel extensively, 
having made fourteen voyages to Europe, and also 
two trips encircling the globe. 

He was elected to the Senate in 1905 by a plurality 
of 2,799 over Nugent, Democrat. He was re-elected 
to the Senate in 1908 by a plurality of 5,895 over 
Hyer, Democrat. 

1908— Ackerman, Rep., 15,367; Hyer, Dem., 9,472; 
Cosgrove, Soc, 846; Sayre, Pro., 116; Morton, Ind., 247. 
Ackerman's plurality, 5,895. 



Warren County. 

(Population, 40,403.) 

JOHNSTON CORNISH. 
(Dem., Washington.) 

Senator Cornish, one of the representatives and 
active young business men of the State, in the prime 
of life, and with a political and business experience 
unsurpassed by few of his age, returns to the Senate 
of New Jersey for the fourth term, having been 
chosen again, by the largest majority ever accorded 
him by the voters of Warren county. The holding 
of public office by Senator Cornish is not of his own 
seeking, but in response to a popular demand. When 
a very young man he was elected Mayor of Washing- 
ton, and at the close of his first term was re-elected 
without opposition, and afterwards re-elected for an- 
other term, thus acting as Mayor for three consecu- 
tive terms. Following his final term as Mayor, in 
1890, he was elected to the Senate for the first time, 
and at the expiration of his Senatorial term was 
elected to Congress from the Fourth District of New 
Jersey. After having served his constituents in Con- 
gress he took up the active management of the ex- 
tensive piano and organ business of the Cornish 
Company, of which he was elected secretary and gen- 
eral manager. In 1899 he was again nominated and 
elected as the representative of Warren county in 
the State Senate by an increased majority. After 



332 BIOGRAPHIES. 

completing- his term he again became a private in 
the ranks and resumed his business relations with the 
Cornish Company, until the fall of 1905, when he was 
again elected to the Senate. Last fall he was the 
unanimous choice of the Democrats, and received the 
nomination for Senator without a dissenting vote. 
The Republican party nominated as his oppenent Ex- 
Mayor Robert M. Petty, of Washington, and a hard- 
fought contest followed, but Senator Cornish was 
elected by 1,821 majority, the largest majority he had 
ever received in Warren county, and carried every 
voting district in the county, with the exception of 
two small districts. Last year he served on the 
Committees on Appropriations, Elections, Militia, Rail- 
roads and Canals, State Home for Girls and State 
Library. 

1908 — Cornish, Dem., 5,639; Petty, Rep., 3,818; Moer- 
scher, Soc, 73; Richards, Pro., 266. Cornish's plurality, 
1,821. 



Summary. 

Senate — Republicans 13 Democrats 8=21 

House — Republicans 45 Democrats 15=60 

58 23 81 

Republican majority on joint ballot, 35. 



"Wlien Regrular Senatorial Elections Occur. 

In 1909 — Burlington and Cape May, now represented 
by Republicans, and Hunterdon, Middlesex, Passaic 
and Sussex, now represented by Democrats — 6. 

In 1910 — Cumberland, Atlantic, Mercer, Bergen and 
Morris, now represented by Republicans, and Hudson 
and Ocean, now represented by Democrats — 7. 

In 1911 — Monmouth, Union, Camden, Salem, Somer- 
set and Gloucester, now represented by Republicans, 
and Essex and Warren, now represented by Demo- 
crats — 8. 

Those Senators who will be elected in 1909 and 1910 
will each have a vote for a successor to John Kean, 
United States Senator, whose term will expire in 1911; 
and those Senators who will be elected in 1910 and 
1911 will each have a vote for a successor to Frank O. 
Briggs, United States Senator, whose term will expire 
in 1913. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 333 



HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY. 



Atlantic County. 

MARTIN EL.VIN KEFFER. 
(Rep., Atlantic City.) 

Mr. Keffer was born in Philadelphia, Pa., September 
23, 1883, and is an attorney at law. He studied law 
with Judge R. H. Ingersoll and former Judge John 
S. Westcott and later with E. B. Learning, who is now 
a Vice-chancellor. Mr. Keffer was admitted to the 
New Jersey bar at the age of twenty-one. This is his 
first public office. In 1907 he was elected to the 
Assembly by a plurality of 3,071 over Black, Democrat, 
and he was re-elected in 1908 by a plurality of 3,935 
over Burgan, Democrat. Last year he served as chair- 
man of the Committee on Bill Revision, and as a 
member of the Committees on Commerce and Naviga- 
tion, State Library and Printing. 

1908 — Keffer, Rep., 8,658; Burgan, Dem., 4,723; Til- 
ton, Pro., 345. Keffer's plurality, 3,935. 



Bergen County. 

JOSEPH H. SCHARFF. 
(Rep., Hasbrouck Heights.) 

Mr. Scharff was born in Newark in 1866. His mother, 
Frances A. Scharff, was a daughter of E. P. Seward, 
a member of the well-known Seward family. His 
father. Christian H. Scharff, came with his parents 
when a child to this country, from Amsterdam, Hol- 
land, in the early forties. His parents located in New- 
ark, and he graduated from Princeton, and became a 
prominent member of the Newark bar before he died, 
at the early age of thirty-five years, leaving a widow 
with six children, four boys and two girls, Joseph 
Henry being the youngest of the boys. 

Mr. J. H. Scharff, after finishing the public school 
course in Exeter, N. H., went for one year to Phillips 
Exeter Academy, and in 1833 was forced to leave and 
begin his business career at seventeen years of age. 



334 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Being- of a mechanical turn of mind, and as the elec- 
trical field at that time seemed most promising, he 
sought a position with the United States Electric 
Lighting- Company, in Newark, N. J„ with the inten- 
tion of learning the business thoroughly, and worked 
energetically through several departments. He was 
diverted from this into channels of experimental work, 
and the original intention was thus destroyed. The 
next two years were passed drifting from one occu- 
pation to another without definite aim. During this 
period of varied experiences he served as a clerk in 
New York, as a farm hand in Orange county, and as 
a traveling salesman for the Backus Water Motor 
Compnay, of Newark. In 1885, when but nineteen 
years of age, he was given an opportunity to go to 
Southern California in a mining enterprise, having in 
charge the "teaming outfit." At the end of two years, 
after many hard and bitter experiences, the ore vein 
ran out, and the mine closed down. Mr. ScharfC at 
that time held the position of superintendent. He re- 
turned to the East and procured a position with the 
State agency in the Mutual Benefit Life Company, of 
Newark, at Albany. Not liking the business, he went 
back as salesman for the Backus Water Motor Com- 
pany. Later Mr. Scharff left the Backus Motor Com- 
pany and organized a company of his own, under the 
name of "The Scharff Manufacturing Company," the 
purpose of which was the manufacturing of and in- 
stalling continuous process drying apparatus in manu- 
facturing plants. This company continued success- 
fully until the business depression in 1892. In 1893 
overtures were made to Mr. Scharff to go with the 
Fidelity and Casualty Company, which he did, in the 
capacity of special agent, operating in the territory of 
Paterson, Passaic and vicinity. Mr. Scharff's efforts 
on behalf of this company \^ere successful from the 
start, and he was shortly made resident manager of 
Northern New Jersey, with headquarters at Newark. 
Since then Connecticut and Southeastern New York 
have been added to his field. For the past seventeen 
years he has been active in Republican politics, and 
is a member of the Bergen County Republican Com- 
mittee. He is a member of both the Masons and Elks. 

He was elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 
6,023 over Burr, the highest candidate on the Demo- 
cratic ticket. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 335 

HARRY P. WARD. 
(Rep., Closter.) 

Mr. Ward is thirty-three years old, and is the son 
of Rev. Dr. Henry Ward, pastor of the Dutch Re- 
formed Church, of Closter. He is a graduate of 
Union College, of the class of 1896. He is a member 
of a large number of fraternal orders, has always 
been an ardent Republican, and has held the presi- 
dency of the Harrington Township Republican Club 
for a number of years. He is president, also, of the 
Board of Education of his home town. He is con- 
nected with the law department of the Title Insurance 
Company of New York, 135 Broadway, New York City. 
Mr. Ward was elected to the Assembly by a plurality 
of 6,114 over Burr, the highest candidate on the Demo- 
cratic ticket. 

THE TOTAL VOTE. 
Republicans. Democrats. 

Scharff 13,853 Burr 7,830 

Ward 13,944 Kenney 7,500 

Lydecker, Pro., 542; Minks, Soc, 546; Finger, Soc, 
537. 



Burlington County. 

JOHN B. IRICK. 
(Rep., Vincentown.) 

Mr. Irick was born in Vincentown, N. J , November 28, 
1845, and is a farmer and lumberman, formerly having 
been a merchant miller. He is the fourth son of the late 
General John S. Irick and is one of the third generation 
of the fam.ily holding legislative honors. This is the first 
county or state office he has held. In 1905 he was nomi- 
nated for the Assembly on the first ballot after a spirited 
contest and was elected by a plurality of 3,226 over Van- 
sciver, the highest candidate on the Democratic ticket, 
and leading his ticket by 281. He received in his own 
township 383 votes out of a total of 468. In 1906 he was re- 
elected by a plurality of 2,589 over Hughes. Democrat, 
and in 1907 he was chosen for a third term by a plur- 
ality of 1,937 over Birch, the highest candidate on the 
Democratic ticket. Again, in 1908, he was re-elected 
by a plurality of 1897 over Wilkinson, the highest 



336 BIOGRAPHIES. 

candidate on the Democratic ticket, thus giving Mr. 
Irick a fourth term, something unusual in Burlington 
county. 

Mr. Irick was Collector of Southampton Township 
fourteen years without opposition after the first elec- 
tion. He is and has been a director of the First Na- 
tional Bank of Vincentown for thirty-five consecutive 
years. Last year he served as chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Federal Relations, and on the Committees 
on Agriculture, Labor and Industries, Village for 
Epileptics and Sanatorium for Tuberculous Diseases. 

GRIFFITH WALKER LEWIS. 
(Rep., Burlington.) 

Mr. Lewis, who is president of the firm of G. W. Lewis 

& Son, wholesale manufacturer of misses', children's and 
infants' shoes, was born in Burlington, July 1st, 1863. His 
early education was derived from public schools, after- 
wards from the Burlington Milltaiy College. He entered 
his father's employ at the age of 18, and became owner of 
the business at the death of his father, in February, 1899. 
This business was established by G. W. Lewis, Sr. (de- 
ceased), in January, 1857, and has been in operation con- 
tinuously ever since. He was a member of Burlington 
City Council for six years, beginning with the spring of 
1894; President of that body for one year, and Chairman 
of its Finance Committee for two years. In the fall ol: 
1906 he finished three years as a member of the Republi- 
can County Executive Committee, and Is now Chairman 
of that body. He was elected Vice President of the Me- 
chanics National Bank in January, 1906, and President of 
the Burlington Electric Light and Power Co. in October, 
1906. Of these two institutions and the Burlington Saving 
Institution and Burlington Building and Loan Association, 
he is and has been a director for eight years; he is one 
of the incorporators and continuously a director of the 
Burlington City Loan and Trust Company, and at 
present one of the Excise Commissioners for the city 
of Burlington. 

He is Vice President of the Mount Holly Fair Associa- 
tion; is a member of many secret societies, a thirty-second 
degree Mason, a past master of the Burlington Lodge, No. 
^2. F. and A. M., member of Boudinot Chapter, R. A. M., 
No. 3, and Helena Commandary, No. 3, as well as the 
Mv.tic Shrine of Philadelphia; also a member of Burling- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 337 

ton Lodge, No. 22, I. O. O. P.; Hope Lodge, No. 13, K. of 
P.; a past exalted ruler of Mt. Holly Lodge, No. 848, 
B. P. O. E. 

He has been a life-long Republican and taken a more or 
less active part in politics both in his home city, county 
and State ever since he became a voter; always taken 
active part in Republican conventions, and in June, 1904, 
was an alternate delegate at large through this State to 
the National Republican Convention in Chicago. 

He was ele/^ted in November, 1906, to the office of As- 
semblyman by a plurality of 2,481 over Hughes, Demo- 
crat, and re-elected in 1907 by a plurality of 1,917 over 
Birch, Democrat, and in 1908 he was given a third 
term by a plurality of 1,865 over Wilkinson, the high- 
est candidate on the Democratic ticket. Last year he 
served as chairman of the Committee on Printed Bills, 
and on the Committees on Judiciary, Bill Files, State 
Prison and Public Grounds and Buildings. 

THE TOTAL VOTE. 
Republicans. Democrats. 

Irick 8,628 Wilkinsoti 6,731 

Lewis 8,596 Fish 6,621 

Socialist— Cox, 136; Carr, 131. 



Camden County. 

THEODORE B. GIBBS. 
(Rep., Clementon.) 

Mr. Gibbs was born near Mount Holl3^ N. J., October 
17, 1838, and is a miller. During the Civil War he was 
corporal of Company D, 29th New Jersey "Volunteers. 
He was appointed Postmaster at White Horse (now 
Kirkwood), Camden county, in 1866, and resigned the 
office in 1872. He was elected a member of the Board 
of Directors of the Atlantic City Railroad in 1876 and 
is still a member of that body. Mr. Gibbs was presi- 
dent of the Clementon Hall Association until its disso- 
lution. He was a member of the Township Committee 
of Gloucester township for six years and was elected 
Sheriff of Camden county in 1882. In 1889 he was ap- 
pointed Postmaster at Clementon and resigned that 
office in 1892. At the organization of the Clementon 
22 



338 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Building- and Loan Association in 1892 he was elected 
president and still serves in that capacity. He was 
re-elected to the Assembly for a seventh term by a 
plurality of 7,671 over Decker, the highest candidate 
on the Democratic ticket. Last year Mr. Gibbs served 
as chairman of the Committees on Bill Files and Sol- 
diers' Homes, and on the Committees on Railroads and 
Canals, Agriculture, Elections and Treasurer's Ac- 
counts. 

JOSEPH POTTER. 
(Rep., Camden.) 

Mr. Potter was born in England, December 23, 1848, 
and is a manufacturer of straw hats, having been in 
that business thirty-four years. He has lived in Cam- 
den about thirty-six years and always has been a Re- 
publican. He has been a member of the Camden Re- 
publican Club since its formation and served as presi- 
dent of that organization for three terms. For three 
terms he was President of the Camden City Council, 
has been a member of the latter body for thirteen 
years, and served as Councilman-at-Large until Janu- 
ary 1st, 1908, when he resigned that office. He was 
re-elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 7,851 over 
Decker, the highest candidate on the Democratic 
ticket. Last year he served on the Committees on 
Municipal Corporations, Public Health, Stationery, 
Clergy, State Reformatory and Village for Epileptics. 

HENRY RANDOLPH TATEM. 
(Rep., Collingswood.) 

Mr. Tatem was born in Collingswood, December 
20th, 1863, and is in the real estate and insurance 
business, which he has followed for twenty years in 
his native place, and has been most active in promot- 
ing the interests of that thriving- borough. He is a 
son of William P. and Achsah W. Tatem. His father 
was an early settler in that portion of Camden county 
now comprising the borough of Collingswood, where 
he owned a large tract of land. He was a member 
of the State Senate from 1861 to 1863, and for many 
years was Internal Revenue Collector for the First 
District of New Jersey. 

Mr. Tatem was Mayor of Collingswood in 1895-6, 
Postmaster from 1897 to 1907, has been a member of 



BIOGRAPHIES. 339 

the Republican County Committee for the last twelve 
years, is president of the CoUingswood National Bank, 
and a director in the Broadway Trust Company, Cam- 
den. He was elected to the Assembly by a plurality 
of 8,336 over Decker, the highest candidate on the 
Democratic ticket, and had more votes than any other 
candidate on the Legislative ticket. 

THE TOTAL. VOTE. 
Republicans. Democrats. 

Gibbs 18,381 Decker 10,710 

Potter 18,561 Muir 10,362 

Tatem 19,046 Wilkie 10,639 

Socialist — Allen, 716; Stites, 717; Stratton, 721. 
Prohibition — Cramer, 682; Morgan, 671; Propert, 687. 



Cape May County. 

CORSVILLE EDMUNDS STILLE. 
(Rep., Tuckahoe.) 

Mr. Stille was born at Millville, N. J., December 15, 
1876, and at present is engaged in farming. He is the 
son of Capt. William Stille. His early days were spent 
on a farm at Tuckahoe, N. J., where he received his 
education at the public schools. At the age of four- 
teen he went in the Baldwin Locomotive Works, Phila- 
delphia, to learn the trade of a machinist, and on its 
completion entered a business career of ten years' 
duration, when he held the position of manager of 
the American Bicycle Company at Washington, D. C ; 
and later, after the failure of that firm, represented 
a large wholesale hardware firm in the State of New 
Jersey, which he was, at the age of twenty-nine, 
forced to relinquish on account of ill health. He pur- 
chased a farm at Tuckahoe and at present is consid- 
ered a proficient and studious agriculturist. 

He comes of a staunch Republican family, and at 
the age of twenty-two was chosen secretary of the 
County Executive Committee. He was elected Assem- 
blyman in 1906 over Lake, Democrat, by 815 majority, 
in one of the hardest-fought battles in the county, 
and was re-elected in 1907 by a plurality over Hil- 
dreth. Democrat, of 3,407, running ahead of his ticket, 
and in 1908 was given a third term by a plurality of 



340 BIOGRAPHIES. 

1,124 over Slaug-hter, Democrat. Last year he served 
as chairman of the Committee on Riparian Rights, 
and on the Committees on Corporations, Game and Fish 
and State Prison. 

1908— Stille, Rep., 2,795; Slaughter, Dem., 1,671; 
Yerkes, Pro., 102; Wiltbank, Soc, 34. Stille's plurality, 
1,124. 



Cumberland County. 

B. FRANK BUCK. 
(Rep., Millville.) 

Mr. Buck was born at Millville, N. J., September 29, 
1875, and is a journalist. He was educated in the pub- 
lic schools of Millville. When only eighteen years of 
age he took charge of the Millville department of the 
Bridgeton Evening News. He was advertising man- 
ager of the Millville Republican and Daily Reporter, 
two years, 1899 and 1900, was managing editor of the 
Millville Transcript in 1901, and is now reporter for 
the Philadelphia Record, Philadelphia Inquirer, Phila- 
delphia North American, Philadelphia Times-Ledger, 
New York World, New York Journal and Associated 
Press, and business manager of the Millville Daily 
Republican. He has always taken a prominent part 
in politics and leading municipal questions, but has 
never held nor has been an aspirant for any public 
office before his election to the Assembly. He was re- 
elected to the Assembly for a seventh term by a plu- 
rality of 2,239 over Sheppard, the highest candidate on 
the Democratic ticket. Last year he served as chair- 
man of the Committee on Corporations, and as a 
member of the Committees on Labor and Industries, 
Riparian Rights and Village for Epileptics. 

ISAAC T. NICHOLS. 
(Rep., Bridgeton.) 

Mr. Nichols w^as born in Bridgeton, Cumberland 
county, New Jersey, March 22d, 1848, and is an author 
and journalist. He was educated at the Bank Street 
Public School, in Bridgeton, and afterward learned 
the trade of a printer. In October, 1874, entered into 
partnership, purchased the Pioneer, at Bridgeton, and 
edited that journal for twelve years. He served as 



BIOGRAPHIES. 341 

Assemblyman in 1877 and 1878, and as Senator for two 
terms, 1881-86. His political experience is unique. 
After twenty years he re-enters public life. He has 
had wide experience in State, county and municipal 
affairs. Re-nominated for the House of Assembly 
under the direct primary, September 22d, 1908, by 
2,148 majority, and was chosen at the general election, 
November 3d, 1908, by the great plurality of 2,918 over 
Sheppard, the highest candidate on the Democratic 
ticket. He received a plurality of 669 more than Wil- 
liam H. Taft, for President. 

Mr. Nichols is the author of a patriotic work, en- 
titled "Historic Days in Cumberland County — 1855-65." 

THE TOTAL VOTE. 
Republicans. Democrats. 

Nichols 7,265 Meyer 4,065 

Buck 6,586 Sheppard 4,347 

Prohibition — Collins, 439; Sharp, 450. 
Socialist — Schiner, 160; Gallagher, 145. 



Essex County. 

HENRY YOUNG, JR. 
(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr. Young was born in Newark, N. J., November 22, 
1871, and is an attorney and counselor at law. He is 
a son of the late Henry Young, formerly counsel for 
the city of Newark and Prosecutor of Essex county. 
Mr. Young was graduated from the Newark Academy 
in 1889, and from Princeton University in 1893. This 
is his first public office. He was re-elected to the As- 
sembly by a plurality of 13,188 over Herrmann, the 
highest candidate on the Democratic ticket. Last year 
he served as chairman of the Committee on Banks and 
Insurance, and as a member of the Committees on 
Elections and Home for Feeble-Minded Boys and Girls. 

HENRY C. HINES. 
(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr. Hines was born in Newark, N. J., March 2, 1858. 
He received a public school education, read law in 
Newark and the Columbia Law School, New Yerk, 
was admitted to the New Jersey bar at February term, 



342 BIOGRAPHIES. 

1883, practiced his profession but a short period, when 
he became engaged in the wholesale manufacture of 
clothing in Newark, which was continued until a -e- 
cent date. He served as a member of Assembly in 
1906 and 1908. Last November he was re-elected by 
a plurality of 12,600 over Herrmann, the highest can- 
didate on the Democratic ticket. Last year he served 
as chairman of the Committee on Home for Feeble- 
Minded Women, and as a member of the Committees 
on Public Health and Railroads and Canals. 

AUGUST J. MILLER. 
(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr. Miller was born in Newark, N. J., March 17, 1867, 
and is treasurer of the Miller Electric Company. He 
was School Commissioner from the Seventh ward of 
Newark for one term of two years, 1901 and 1903, was 
president of the Seventh Ward Republican Club for 
four years, and is a member of Lodge No. 176, F. and 
A. M., of Lodge No. 21, B. P. O. E., and of 44 Eagles. 
He was re-elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 
13,169 over Herrman, the highest candidate on the 
Democratic ticket. Last year he served on the Com- 
mittees on Stationery, Claims and Pensions, Incidental 
Expenses and Printing. 

WILLIAM PARMENTER MARTIN. 
(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr. Martin, who was born in Virg-inia City, Nevada, 
October 8, 1871, is descended from an old New Eng- 
land family and his immediate ancestry lived for many 
years in Union and Middlesex counties of this State. 
His early education was obtained in the public schools 
of San Francisco. He was graduated from Columbia 
University Law School in 1892 and entered the office 
of Tracy, Boardman & Piatt in New York. Soon 
afterward he opened an office independently in New 
York and has continued to practice there. He was 
admitted to practice in New Jersey early in 1893 and 
established a branch office in this State. Mr. Martin 
has been a member of the Common Council of Newark 
for six years and the leader of the Republican minor- 
ity in that body during the year 1P07. He was a 
member of the Legislature in 1906 and was in the 
Assembly a leader of the Progressive Republicans 



BIOGRAPHIES. 343 

and assisted in securing" the enactment into law of 
several important reforms. In 190S he was the leader 
of the Republican majority in the Assembly. 

Mr. Martin is a member of the Lawyers' Club of Es- 
sex county, Lincoln Club of Roseville, Roseville Ath- 
letic Association, Bar Association of the city of New 
York, California Society of New York, University 
Club, Essex County Country Club, Board of Trade of 
the City of Newark, Republican Club of the City of 
New York, Lawyers' Club, New York, and several 
bodies in the Masonic fraternity. In 1908 he w as re- 
elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 8,691 over 
Herrman, the highest candidate on the Democratic 
ticket. Last year he was chairman of the Committees 
on Judiciary and State Hospitals, and a member of 
the Committee on School for Deaf Mutes. 

WILLIAM ROBERTS. 
(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr. Roberts was born at Whitesboro, N. Y., January 
4th, 1864, and is a shoe buyer. He was re-elected to 
the Assembly by a plurality of 13,215 over Herrmann, 
the highest candidate on the Democratic ticket. Last 
year he served on the Committees on Militia, Appro- 
priations and State Home for Boys. 

JOHN FRANKLIN CLARK. 
(Rep., Nutley.) 

Mr. Clark was born in Exeter, N. H., September 2, 
1861. He was educated in the public schools of Man- 
chester, N. H., and Washing-ton, D. C, and Dartmouth 
Colleg-e. He left college in the middle of his junior 
5'ear. He is a member of Dartmouth Club, New York. 

He has been a resident of Nutley since September, 
1887, and has always been a staunch supporter of the 
Republican party. He was a member of the Nutley 
Board of Education six years and president of that 
body in 1900 and 1901. He was elected to the Board 
of Chosen Freeholders of Essex county from Nutley 
in 1900, served a full term of two years, and in 1902 
was returned for another term, during which he was 
chairman of the Finance Committee of the Board. 
Mr. Clark is general manager of the New Jersey gen- 
eral agency of the American Surety Company, with 
offices in the Prudential Building. He is a member of 



344 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Nutley Lodg-e, P. and A. M.; Kempton Council, Royal 
Arcanum, and Jr. O. U. A. M. of Nutley. He has been 
a member of the Executive Committee of the Republi- 
can County Committee for the last ten years. He was 
re-elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 13,056 over 
Herrmann, the highest candidate on the Democratic 
ticket. Last year he served on the Committees on 
Municipal Corporations, Towns and Townships and 
State Library. 

AUSTEN COLGATE. 
(Rep., Orange.) 

Colonel Colgate was born at Orange, N. J., August 
12th, 1863, is a manufacturer and a graduate of Yale 
University. He was a member of the Assembly in 
1906 and 1908. He was appointed by Governor Fort 
as his personal Aide in the Winter of 1908. He was 
re-elected to the Assembly last November by a plu- 
rality of 12,384 over Herrmann, the highest candidate 
on the Democratic ticket. Last year he served as 
chairman of the Committee. on Gam« and. Fish, and as 
a member of the Committees on Federal Relations, 
Treasurer's Accounts and State Reformatory. 

HENRY STACY SMITH. 
(Rep., Maplewood.) 

Mr. Smith was born in Newark, N. J., January 24, 
1873, and is in the business of tanners' supplies and 
bark extracts, which he has followed for sixteen years. 
He was a member of the Newark Board of Education 
for three years, 1897-1900; of the South Orange Town- 
ship Committee from 1902 to 1907, and was chairman 
of the committee for three years. He was re-elected 
to the Assembly by a plurality of 13,028 over Herr- 
mann, the highest candidate on the Democratic ticket. 
Last year he served as chairman of the Committee on 
Labor and Industries, and as a member of the Com- 
mittees on Corporations and State Prison. 

THOMAS HENRY BROOKS. 
(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr. Brooks was born in Ireland November 15th, 
1861, and is a grocer. He was formerly an insurance 
agent. He served five years in the Eighteenth United 
States Infantry. He is a member of Henry Clay Lodge, 
No. 45, K. of P., and of 44 Eagles, and was a member 



BIOGRAPHIES. 345 

of the Newark Board of Education in 1905 and 1906. 
Mr. Brooks was elected to the Assembly by a plurality 
of 13,254 over Herrmann, the highest candidate on the 
Democratic ticket, and was the highest candidate on 
the Republican Legislative ticket. 

ELIOT E. FORD. 
(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr. Ford was born at Bordentown, N. J., August 
21st, 1862, and is a mechanical engineer. He was 
elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 12,833 over 
Hermann, the highest candidate on the Democratic 
ticket. 

LEWIS G. BOWDEN. 
(Rep., Cedar Grove.) 

Mr. Bowden was born at Cedar Grove, N. J., October 
30th, 1871, and is a manufacturer. He has been a mem- 
ber of the Verona Township Committee for two years, 
and on November 3, 1908, was re-elected for a term 
of three years. He served as chairman of the com- 
mittee for one year. He was elected to the Assembly 
by a plurality of 13,069 over Herrmann, the highest 
candidate on the Democratic ticket. 

THE TOTAL VOTE. 
Republicans. Democrats. 

Clark 50,158 Lane 34,348 

Martin 45,793 Phillips .., 33,827 

Young, Jr 50,290 Dolan 33,683 

Colgate 49,486 Shalvoy 33,665 

Roberts 50,317 Maloney 33,790 

Hines 49,702 Herrmann 37,102 

Brooks 50,356 Backus 33,728 

Ford 49,935 Corish 33,516 

Miller 50,271 Astley 33,826 

Smith 50,130 Shann 34,168 

Bowden 50,171 S'turn 34,092 

Prohibitionist — Weeks, 297; Taylor, 286; Smith, 288; 
Sellick, 289; MacMillon, 296; Shaw, 289; Milliken, 294; 
Fergusen, 291; Roff, 289; Spear, 295; Stokes, 294. 

Socialist — Robertson, 2,178; Greenbaum, 2,130; Miller, 
2,139; Rau, 2,138; Narman, 2,131; Vate, 2,136; Wright, 
2,140; Grom, 2,142; WTiormby, 2,140; O'Leary, 2,138; 
Klein, 2,139. 

Social-Labor — Preuss, 201; Bateman, 200; Bernstein, 



340 BIOGRAPHIES. 

199; Simonovitch, 199; Skurld, 200; Hokonson, 200; 
Desch, 199; Dornum, 200; Dierta, 199; Carlson, 201; 
Kuego, 200. 

Independence — Roach, 433; Freeman, 449; Gutherson, 
443; Mueser, 435; Blythe, 451; Griffith, 439; Small, 438. 



Glaucester County. 

WALTER HERITAGE. 
(Rep., Swedesboro.) 

Mr. Heritage was born on a farm near Mickleton, 
East Greenwich township, N. J., March 21st, 1855. His 
primary education was acquired in the public schools, 
and was supplemented by study in the Friends' School 
at Mickleton, and by one year's study in Kennett 
Square. On putting aside his text-books he assisted 
his father on the farm until twenty-one years of age, 
after which he came to his present home, which is 
the birthplace of his father. He is a very successful 
raiser of garden produce, and has made a close study 
of the methods of cultivating the vegetables which 
find a prompt sale in the market. His business efforts 
are now attended with a creditable and satisfactory 
degree of success. He and his family are members of 
the Society of Friends, and in social relation he is 
connected with the Ancient Order of United Workmen, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Patrons 
of Husbandry, of which he is secretary. He was a 
member of the Township Committee for six years, act- 
ing as treasurer; was Assessor six years, clerk of the 
Board of Registrars for several years, secretary of 
the township Board of Health and director of the 
Clarksboro Building and Loan Association. For a 
number of years he was a member of the Executive 
Committee of the State Board of Agriculture, and at 
the present time is treasurer of the board; also a mem- 
ber of the New Jersey State Land Reclamation and 
Drainage Association, and was for many years a 
trustee of the Mickleton Friends' School. In 1903 he 
served as clerk in the Assembly to the Committee on 
Printed Bills. He was elected to the Assembly by a 
plurality of 1.332 over Allen. Democrat. 

1908 — Heritage, Rep., 5.171; Allen, Dem., 3,839; Moore, 
Pro., 326; Nightingale, Soc, 48. Heritage's plurality, 
1,332. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 347 

Hudson County. 

MARK A. SULLIVAN. 
(Dem., Jersey City.) 

Mr. Sullivan was born in Jersey City, November 23d, 
1878, and is a lawyer by profession. This is the first time 
he has held public office. He was educated at St. Peter's 
Parochial School, Jersey City, and graduated from St. 
Peter's College, Jersey City, in the class of 3897 with the 
degree of A. B., and received the degree of A. M. in 189S 
from the same institution. He was admitted to the bar of 
New Jersc^y at the P"'ebruary term, 1903. Mr. Sullivan was 
re-elected to the Assembly for a third term by a plu- 
rality of 3,179 over S. Smith, the second highest candi- 
date on the Republican ticket. Last year he served 
as leader of the Democratic minority, and as a mem- 
ber of the Committees on Judiciary, Appropriations 
and Feeble-Minded Women. 

CHARLES P. OLWELL. 
(Dem., Jersey City.) 

Mr. Olwell was born in Jersey City, March 17, 1880, and 
is a clerk. He was born in what is known as the "Horse- 
shoe" district and has lived there all his life. He attended 
St, Mary's Catholic Institute and St. Peter's College, Jer- 
sey City. He is a member of several dramatic societies 
and St. Peter's Alumni; Conception Council, K. of C; 
United Irish League, and is president of Division No. 1 
of Hudson County A. O. H. He was ve-elected to the 
Assembly for a third term by a plurality of 2,487 over 
S. Smith, the second highest candidate on the Repub- 
lican ticket. Last year he served on the Committees 
on Labor and Industries, Game and Pish and State 
Home for Girls. 

JOSEPH P. TUMULTY. 
(Dem., Jersey City.) 

Mr. Tumulty was born in Jersey City, May 5th, 1879, and 
is a son of ex- Assemblyman Philip Tumulty, who served 
in the Legislature of 1887-1888. He attended St. Bridget's 
Parochial School in Jersey City, and subsequently en- 
tered St. Peter's College, conducted by the Jesuits of Jer- 
sey City, from which institution he was graduated in the 
class of 1899, receiving the decree of Bachelor of Arts. He 
studied law in the offices of Messrs. Bedle, McGee & Bedle 



S48 BIOGRAPHIES. 

and John J. Mulvaney, County Attorney, of Jersey City, 
and. was admitted to the bar of this State at the Novem- 
ber term, 1902. In 1904 he entered into partnership with 
George E. Cutley, with whom he is now practicing his 
profession under the name of Tumuity & Cutley, with 
ofllces in thp Lincoln Trust Building, Jersey City. He is 
connected with many political and social organizations, 
chief among which are Knights of Columbus and St. Pet- 
er's Alumni Association. He was re-elected to the As- 
sembly for a third term by a plurality of 3,276 over 
S'. Smith, the second highest candidate on the Repub- 
lican ticket. Last year he served on the Committees 
on Education and Soldiers' Home. 

JAMES BAKER. 
(Dem., Jersey City.) 

Mr. Baker was born in Jersey City, N. J., December 
2, 1872. He was educated in the i;ublic schools and 
St. Peter's College, Jersey City. He is at present em- 
ployed in the office of the Register of Hudson county. 
For eleven years he has taken an active interest in 
politics, and has quite a reputation as a campaign 
speaker. He was re-elected to the Assembly for a third 
term by a plurality of 3,667 over S. Smith, the second 
highest candidate on the Republican ticket. He re- 
ceived the highest vote on the Democratic Assembly 
ticket in the election of 1908. Last year he served 
on the Committees on Public Health, Elections, Passed 
Bills and Treasurer's Accounts. 

OSCAR L. AUF DER HEIDE. 
(Dem., West New Tork.) 

Mr. Auf der Heide was born in New York City, Decem- 
ber 8th, 1874, and is in the real estate and insurance busi- 
ness. He came to West New York when fifteen years old. 
He served as Councilman for two terms, and later was 
chosen a member of the Board of Education, of which 
body he served as President. He entered commercial life 
with the firm of Park & Tilford, and later became man- 
ager of the cigar department in the Hotel Waldorf As- 
toria. For a time he conducted several stores on Broad- 
way, and afterward went into the real estate business. 
He is a member of Mystic Tie Lodge, No. 123, F. and A. 
M. ; Cyrus Chapter, R. A. M. ; Pilgrim Commandery, No. 
16, K. T. ; Mecca Temple, A. A. O. N. of the Mystic Shrine 



BIOGRAPHIES. 349 

Ccurt, West New York; Foresters of America; Hudson 
County Democratic Committee, and many political and so- 
cial organizations. Mr. Auf der Heide was re-elected 
to the Assembly for a third term by a plurality of 
2,303 over S. Smith, the second highest candidate on 
the Republican ticket. Last year he served on the 
Committees on Public Health, Stationery, Sinking- Fund 
and State Prison. 

ALBPJRT C. EPPINGER. 
(Dem., Town of Union.) 

Mr. Eppinger was born in the Town of Union, N. J., 
May 16, 1866, and is proprietor of a bottling establisnment. 
He is president of the Weehawken Building and Loan 
Association, treasurer of the County Park Realty 
Company, of the Town of Union Democratic Club, and 
vice-president of the Real Estate Company of New 
Jersey and a director of the Weehawken Trust Com- 
pany. He was Commissioner of Appeals for the term 
of one year, and in 1903 was elected a member of the 
Board of Education for a term of three years and was 
re-elected in 1906. He was chairman of the Board of 
Education and of the Board of Free Public Library 
Commissioners in 1905. He has always been active in 
the interests of the Democratic party. He was re- 
elected to the Assembly for a third term by a plurality 
of 2,017 over S. Smith, the second highest candidate 
on the Republican ticket. Last year he served on the 
Committees on Boroughs and Borough Commissions, 
Federal Relations, Public Grounds and Buildings and 
Home for Feeble-Minded Women. 

EDWARD KENNY. 
(Dem., East Newark.) 

Mr. Kenny was born in Newark, N. J., September 11, 
18.54, and is a lawyer by profession. He attended 
parochial school and public school of Newark and was 
graduated from Yale University in 1885. He has served 
as clerk, collector and attorney of the town of Kearny 
and as Mayor of East Newark from July, 1895, to Jan- 
uary 1st, 1908. He was re-elected to the Assembly 
by a plurality of 2,786 over S. Smith, the second high- 
est candidate on the Republican ticket. Last year he 
served on the Committees on Printed Bills, Claims and 
Pensions and State Hospitals. 



350 BIOGltAl'HIES. 

AMADEUS VALENrU. 
(Dem., Hoboken.) 

Mr. Valente was born in Hoboken, N. J., April 
27th, 1876, and studied law in the office of former 
Assemblyman Leon Abbett. Mr. Valente is a graduate 
of the New York University Law School, and is an 
attorney-at-law of this State, and is now engaged in 
the practice of law in the city of Hoboken. He was 
re-elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 2,186 over 
S. Smith, the second highest candidate on the Repub- 
lican ticket. Last year he served on the Committees 
on Commerce and Navigation and Incidental Expenses. 

WILLIAM CLAUS KACKENMEESTER. 
(Dem., Hoboken.) 

Mr. Kackenmeester was born in the city of Hobo- 
ken, N. J., September 28th, 1877, and is in the butter 
and egg business. He attended public school in his 
native city. He was appointed Mayor's Aid by Mayor 
Adolf Lankering on March 13th, 1906, and in January 
of the same year he was appointed Commissioner of 
Assessments. He was an unsuccessful candidate for 
Water Register in the Fall of 1907. On January 1st, 
1908, he was appointed Commissioner of Health. He 
was elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 2,395 over 
S'. Smith, the second highest candidate on the Republi- 
can ticket. 

FREDERICK HENRY OTTO. 
(Rep., Jersey City.) 

Mr. Otto has the distinction of being the only Repub- 
lican member of the General Assembly elected from 
Hudson county, and he is the youngest member of the 
House. Mr. Otto's election was a complete surprise 
to the voters of Hudson county, because of his bold 
stand against the existing excise laws and his open 
declaration that if elected he would use his every ef- 
fort to pass a law giving the people of his county and 
State, if possible, a Continental Sunday — open saloons 
after the noon hour, theatre performances on Sunday 
evening and Sunday baseball. 

Mr. Otto was born in New York City on February 
6th, 1884, and attended School No. 24 in that city until 
his ninth year, when his father. Captain August Otto, 
moved to Jersey City. He attended No. 1 School in 



BIOGRAPHIES. 351 

Jersey City, from which he graduated, and spent two 
years in the High School, which he left to enter Drake's 
Business College, from which he graduated. He next 
took a course in the New York Law School and gradu- 
ated from there a year ago. He was elected to the 
Assembly by a plurality of 1,490 over Feinberg, Demo- 
crat. 

WILLIAM STEWART DAVIDSON. 

(Dem., Jersey City.) 
Mr. Davidson was born in Portadown, Armagh 
county, Ireland, February 5th, 1872, and is in the real 
estate business at 541 Central avenue, Jersey City. 
He came to Jersey City at an early age, and was edu- 
cated in the public schools of that city, and also at 
Schell's Business School, in Hoboken. He is the son 
of John Davidson, a merchant in his native town, and 
Margaret Davidson. After considerable business ex- 
perience Mr. Davidson started in business for himself 
as a general real estate and insurance agent at his 
present address, in 1902, and has been active and suc- 
cessful therein from the beginning. 

He has been engaged in movements for public im- 
provements in his section for many years, and his 
popularity was first evinced by his election to the 
office of Justice of the Peace in the Twelfth Ward of 
Jersey City. His political activities have been mostly 
in connection with membership in the Twelfth Ward 
Democratic Club. He was elected to the Assembly 
by a majority of 2,508 over Samuel W. Smith, the 
highest of the defeated candidates on the Republican 
ticket. 

PETER H. JAMES. 

(Dem., Jersey City.) 

Mr. James was born in New York City February 
10th, 1875, and is a lawyer by profession. He has re- 
sided in Jersey City since about 1880, was graduated 
from Public School No. 1, Jersey City, and afterwards 
attended the Jersey City High School, graduated in the 
class of 1893, then attended New York Law School, 
from which he was graduated in 1897, with a degree 
of LL. B. During the time he was in attendance at 
the Law School he was a law student in the office of 
the late Henry S. White, former United States District 
Attorney for the State of New Jersey, was admitted to 
the New Jersey Bar in June, 1897, and a few days 
thereafter was appointed a Master in Chancery by the 



352 BIOGRAPHIES. 

late Chancellor Alexander McGill, since which time 
he has been in active practice of his profession. This 
is the first time he has held public office. 

Mr. James belongs to many fraternities and other 
organizations, among them being Highland Lodge, 
No. 80, F. and A. M. ; New Jersey Consistory, Thirty- 
second Degree S. R. Mason; Mecca Temple, Mystic 
Shrine; P. C. Knights of Pythias; Inspector General 
of the Uniform Rank, K. of P., New Jersey; Jersey City 
Lodge, No. 211, B. P. O. Elks; veteran of the Fourth 
Regiment, N. G. N. J., and Progress Club. He was 
elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 2,098 over S. 
Smith, the second highest candidate on the Republican 
ticket. 

THE TOTAL VOTE. 
Democrats. Republicans. 

Sullivan 42,966 Smith, J 38,907 

Baker 43,454 Smith, S 39,787 

Tumulty 43,063 Isbister 38,669 

Olwell 42,274 Otto 41,118 

Kackenmeester . . . 42,182 Dear 39,738 

Valente 41,973 Wooley 39,083 

Feinberg 39,628 Moran 39,203 

Kenny 42,573 Salley 39,273 

Auf der Heide 42,090 Martin 39,095 

Eppinger 41,804 Brokhaus 39,150 

Davidson 42.295 Meeks 39,546 

James 41,885 Fliegauf 38,908 

Socialist — Mead, 2,696; Meconnekin, 2,706; Cull, 2,699 
Clerkin, 2.673; LefRngwell, 2,699; Cartisser, 2,705 
Greiner, 2,714; Meyer, 2,705; Power, 2,693; Marks, 2,709 
Dodd, 2-,709; Fackert, 2,683. 

Social-Labor— Aiazzone, 263; F. Ceroid, 267; Guen- 
ther, 265; Sweeney, 266; Schouleber, 264; Morhart, 265; 
Eck, 264; Schwenk, 265; Oker, 265; Herschmann, 264; 
Zimmerman, 264; N. Ceroid, 264. 

Prohibitionist — W. M. Black, 182; Backmeyer, 188; 
Layman, 186; Kinley, 186; A. Black, 181; Davey, 188; 
Taylor, 185; McChesney, 194; Adam, 182; Theoburgh, 
172; Pratt, 167; Alduck, 172. 

Independence — Dinse, 864; Weinbold, 864; Roberts, 
864; Houseman, 863; Pearsall, 865; Walscheid, 864; 
Nelson, 864; Loucks, 864; White, 865. 

Union-Labor — Donnelly, 26; Masterson, 28; Thomas, 
2S; Smith, 27; McDermott, 30; Coughlin, 27; Cronk, 28; 
Sullivan, 29; VanderhofC, 29; Cox, 31; Brady, 37. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 353 

Hunterdon County. 

JOHN JOSEPH MATTHEWS'. 
(Dem., High Bridge.) 

Mr. Matthews was born in the city of New York Sep- 
tember 17th, 1862, and is a farmer. When nine years 
old he moved to Elizabeth with his mother, and in 1882 
began the study of law, but owing to his mother's 
death, he was obliged to suspend that vocation. In 
1883 he was elected to the Board of Education in 
Elizabeth, and served two years. In January, 1886, 
he was chosen secretary of that board. Mr. Matthews 
served as a member of the Assembly from the old First 
District of Union county in 1887 and '88, and was the 
youngest member of the Legislature in those years. 
He served as Clerk of the Assembly in 1889 and '90. 
Eight years ago he bought a farm in Hunterdon county, 
where he now resides. He was elected to the Assem- 
bly in 1908 by a plurality of 77 over Smith, Republican. 

1908 — ^Matthews., Dem^, 4,224; Smith, Rep., 4,147; Gor- 
man, Soc, 25. 



Mercer County. 

GEORGE W. HOUSEL. 
(Rep., Trenton.) 

Mr. Housel was born in Frenchtown, N. J., Octobor 
29, 1861, and is a wholesale dealer in butter and eggs. 
He w^as formerly a newsdealer. He was elected a 
member of the Board of Chosen Freeholders from the 
Third ward of Trenton in 1903 and was re-elected in 
1905. His term expired on December 31, 1907. Mr. 
Housel is an active Mason, Odd Fell*" w and Red Man. 
He was re-elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 
5,135 over Ferriot, the highest candidate on the Demo- 
cratic ticket. Last year he served on the Committees 
on Stationery, Claims and Pensions, Ways and Means 
and State Hospitals. 

EDWIN H. GINNELLEY. 
(Rep., Trenton.) 

Dr. Ginnelley was born in Fairfax county, Virginia, 
September 9, 1864, and is a dentist by profession. In 
1885 he was graduated from the National University, 
23 



354 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Washington, D. C. He has lived in Trenton since 1887. 
In 1903 he was elected a member of the Trenton Com- 
mon Council from the Thirteenth ward and was re- 
elected in 1905. He was president of that body in 1906 
and 1907. The doctor is a thirty-second degree Mason, 
a member of the Mystic Shrine, Fellowcraft Club, 
Knights of the Golden Eagle, Knights of Pythias and 
National Union. He was re-elected to the Assembly by 
a plurality of 5,146 over Ferriot, the highest candidate 
on the Democratic ticket. Last year he served as 
chairman of the Committee on Militia, Sanitorium for 
Tuberculous Diseases and Clergy, and as a member of 
the Committees on Railroads and Canals, Passed Bills 
and Treasurer's Accounts. 

CHARLES HUGHES MATHER. 
(Rep., Port Mercer.) 

Mr. Mather was born near Cran'oury, Middlesex 
county, N. J., October 7th, 1863, and is a representative 
of a family the first American member of which set- 
tled in this country in 1635. He is a general dealer in 
agricultural implements, dry goods, groceries, fertil- 
izers and coal. His education was acquired in the 
public schools and the Princeton Model School. Upon 
his graduation he engaged in farming pursuits, which 
he followed until 1895, when he purchased a store at 
Port Mercer, which he has conducted ever since. He 
has always been an active Republican. He served nine 
years on the Board of Assessors, has been a member 
of the School Board eighteen years, and for that period 
has been clerk of that body. He was a census enum- 
erator in 1S90, and served for six years on the County 
Board of Elections. He is a member of Nassau Lodge, 
No. 106, I. O. O. F., of Princeton. He was elected to 
the Assembly by a plurality of 5,129 over Ferriot, the 
highest candidate on the Democratic ticket. 

THE TOTAL VOTE. 
Republicans. Democrats. 

Ginnelley 14,718 Ferriot 9,572 

Housel 14,707 Higgins 9,532 

Mather 14,701 Rogers 9,508 

Socialist — Huber, 695; Moore, 690; Ackerman, 690. 
Prohibitionist — Peters, 361; Steward, 375; Willey, 
385. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 355 

Middlesex County. 

WILLIAM CLARK VOORHEES. 
(Rep., Cranbury.) 

Mr. Voorhees was born on his father's farm near 
Old Church schoolhouse, Monroe township, Middlesex 
county, N. J., October 25, 1864. He attended school at 
Old Church until at the age of seventeen years and 
then finished his school days at the Brainard Institute 
at Cranbury, N. J. He stayed on the farm with his 
parents until he was twenty-five years of age, then 
married and went farming- for himself on one of his 
father's farms. In 1893 he bought a farm near Cran- 
bury, where he now lives. In 1902 he was elected a 
member of the Board of Education of Cranbury town- 
ship and still holds that position. In 1903 he was a 
member of the Republican County Committee for Mid- 
dlesex county. He was appointed to the position of 
clerk to the Committee on Printed Bills of the Senate 
in 1906. He has always been active in looking after 
the best interests of the community in which he lives 
and the Republican party in his county, to which he 
has always belonged. His honest dealings with his 
party and active interest taken for his community 
have made him many friends. He is a member of 
Cranbury Council, No. 60, Jr. O. U. A. M., and Hights- 
town Lodge, No. 96, Patrons of Husbandry, also a 
member of Middlesex County Board of Agriculture, 
and one of the directors of the board. He was re- 
elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 1,727 over 
Ramsay, the highest candidate on the Democratic 
ticket. Last year he served on the Committees on 
Municipal Corporations, Elections and School for Deaf 
Mutes. 

RENE P. F. VON MINDEN. 
(Rep., New Market.) 

Mr. von Minden was born in New York City October 
9th, 1871, and is an attorney-at-law. He studied law 
at Yale University, graduating in the class of 1897 with 
the degree of LL. B. He was admitted to the Con- 
necticut and Massachusetts Bars in 1897 and to the 
New Jersey Bar in 1902. He is now practicing his pro- 
fession in Plainfield. In 1897 and '98 he was Assistant 



S56 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Prosecuting- Attorney at Wallingford, Conn., elected 
a Justice of the Peace in Middlesex county, N. J., In 
1902, and still in office, and was Corporation Attorney 
in Dunellen, N. J., in 1906 and 1907. He was elected to 
the Assembly by a plurality of 424 over Ramsay, the 
highest candidate on the Democratic ticket. 

EDWIN CORWIN McKEAG. 
(Rep., New Brunswick.) 

Mr. McKeag is a native of the city of New Bruns- 
wick, where he received his elementary training at 
Rutgers College, and the degree of the bachelor of arts 
was conferred on him in 1896. The ensuing year he 
spent in the study of the higher mathematics and prac- 
tical astronomy under Professor Prentice, and received 
the degree of master of arts in 1897. He then entered 
Columbia University, under the faculty of law, and at 
the end of a three-year course received the degree of 
bachelor of laws in 1900. During his vacations he 
studied for the New Jersey Bar in the office of Alan H. 
& Theodore Strong, of New Brunswick, and was ad- 
mitted as an attorney in 1898. In June, 1899, he was 
admitted as a counselor at the New York Bar. In 
November, 1901, he was admitted as a counselor at 
the New Jersey Bar. He then entered the office of 
Coudert Brothers, in New York City, for a short time, 
but was soon appointed to a university fellowship in 
Roman law and comparative jurisprudence at Colum- 
bia University, under Professor Munroe Smith, and 
while engaged in this work was admitted to the doc- 
torate, receiving the degree of doctor of philosophy 
in 1905. This training fitted him as a teacher of 
jurisprudence and political science, but he had entered 
meanwhile in the office of Howland, Murray & Pren- 
tice, of New York City, where he continued until he 
was appointed to the office of City Attorney for the 
city of New Brunswick. He received a reappointment 
to the office on January 1st, 1908, and still continues 
in this capacity. At the Fall election, in 1908, he was 
elected to the Assembly and received the highest vote 
of all the candidates. He had a plurality of 2,184 over 
Ramsay, the highest candidate on the Democratic 
ticket. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 357 

THE TOTAL. VOTE. 

Republicans. Democrats. 

Von Minden 9,584 Butcher 7,757 

McKeag 11,344 Van Cleef 7,826 

Voorhees 10,887 Ramsay 9,160 

Prohibition — Casselberry, 97; Dunham, 99; Ackin, 

848. - . 



Monmouth County. 

JOSEPH DORSETT BEDLE. 
(Rep., Keyport.) 

Mr. Bedle was born at Keyport, January 11th, 1876, 
and is in the paint, oil and varnish business. He was 
formerly a compositor. He was Overseer of the Poor 
from January 1, 1906, to January, 1909. He was elected 
to the Assembly by a plurality of 2,675 over Keough, 
the highest candidate on the Democratic ticket.' 

MONROE VAN BRACKLE POOLE. 
(Rep., West Long Branch.) 

Mr. Poole was born at Long Branch, N. J., July 28th, 
1848, and is a mason and building contractor. He was 
educated in the public schools of Long Branch and in 
Ocean Institute, which was considered one of the best 
schools in the county in its time. Fraternally, he is 
a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
Jr. O. U. A. M., and the Royal Arcanum; also colonel 
and department commander of the Patriarchs Militant 
of the State of New Jersey, which is the highest branch 
of Odd Fellowship; a director of the Long Branch 
Banking Company, and vice-president of the Master 
Builders Association of New Jersey. He was a mem- 
ber and secretary of the Board of Education of Eaton- 
town township from 1894 to 1908. He was elected the 
first Mayor of the borough of West Long Branch in 
June, 1908, and re-elected November 3d, 1908. Mr. 
Poole was elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 
2,225 over Keough, the highest candidate on the Demo- 
cratic ticket. 



358 BIOGRAPHIES. 

PETER VREDENBURGH. 
(Rep., Freehold.) 

Captain Vredenburgh was born at Freehold, N. J., 
September 25th, 1869, and is a counselor-at-law. He 
is a son of Judge William H. Vredenburgh, of the Court 
of Errors and Appeals, with whom he is practicing law. 
He is a graduate of Princeton University, class of 
1892, is president of the Intercollegiate Association, 
and was captain of the Princeton athletic teams of 
1891 and 1892. He served as an officer in the United 
States Army for ten years, most of the service having 
been in the Philippines, with a few years in Cuba. 
Owing to ill-health he resigned from the service. In 
the State military service he became second lieutenant 
of the regiment in April, 1893, and captain in January, 
1894. In April, 1898, he was elected captain of Com- 
pany I, Third Regiment, New Jersey Volunteers, Span- 
ish-American War, and was captain of the Twenty- 
eighth United States Volunteers during the Philippine 
Insurrection, June, 1899. He served as Military Gov- 
ernor of Calaca, Southern Luzon, P. I. In October, 
1908, he was appointed Assistant Prosecutor of the 
Pleas of Monmouth county. He was elected to the 
Assembly by a plurality of 2,883 over Keough, the 
highest candidate on the Democratic ticket, his vote 
being largely in excess of any other candidate. 

THE TOTAL. VOTE. 
Republicans. Democrats. 

Bedle 12,301 Keough 9,626 

Poole 11,851 Tantum 9,263 

Vredenburgh 12,509 Trout 9,467 

Socialist — Meyer, 135; Porteus, 135; Walch, 141. 
Prohibitionist — Crane, 196; Decker, 193, White, 205. 



Morris County. 

JAMES A. LYON. 
(Rep., Pompton Plains.) 

Mr. Lyon was born at Scranton, Pa., in 1872, and is 
a broker. Twenty-six years ago he came to Pompton 
Plains with his parents. After leaving school he was 



BIOGRAPHIES. 359 

in the employ of former Assemblyman John F, Post 
for a time, and afterward he was in the service of the 
Chase National Bank, of New York, where he remained 
fifteen years. Recently he became the senior member 
of the firm of Lyon & Polhemus, 33 Wall street, N. T. 
He has been a member of the Executive Committee of 
Pequannock township, Morris county, for ten years. 
He was re-elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 
3,469 over Looker, Jr., the highest candidate on the 
Democratic ticket. Last year he served on the Com- 
mittees on Printed Bills, Banks and Insurance and Bill 
Files, and was chairman of the Committee on Sinking 
Fund. 

OSCAR BARNETT SMITH. 
(Rep., Flanders.) 

Mr. Smith was born in Chester, N. J., October 2d, 
1867, and is a funeral director. He was educated in 
the public school and finished at a private school con- 
ducted by Rev. Mr. Brewster. In early manhood he 
removed to Flanders, where he owns a farm. Ten 
years ago he began the undertaking business and be- 
came connected with the firm of Smith & Holly, Mor- 
ristown. In 1906 he was elected to the Board of Free- 
holders from Mount Olive township and served two 
years. He was elected to the Assembly by a plurality 
of 3,488 over Looker, Jr., the highest candidate on the 
Democratic ticket. 

THE TOTAL VOTE. 
Republicans. Democrats. 

Lyon 8,827 Looker, Jr 5,358 

Smith 8,846 Wise 5,081 

Prohibitionist — King, 243; Logan, 243. 
Socialist — Stephens, 362; Harvey, 361. 



Ocean County. 



BENJAMIN H. CROSBY. 
(Rep., Tuckerton.) 



Mr. Crosby was born at Staten Islarid, N. Y., January 
17, 1859 and has been editor and proprietor of the 
Tuckerton Beacon for the past sixteen years. For- 
merly he was printing manager for George W. Helme 



360 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Co., at Helmetta, N. J. He is a son of Harrison W. 
Crosby, a war-time member of the Connecticut House 
of Assembly. Mr. Crosby has been urged to accept 
at different times every town elective office, but al- 
ways declined. For the past twelve years he has been 
Chief of the Tuckerton Fire Department. He has been 
secretary of the Tuckerton Creek Improvement Com- 
mittee, through whose efforts the U. S. government 
has recommended an expenditure of over $60,000 for 
improving that waterway, and T.lready $24,000 has 
been spent thereon. Mr. Crosby has been active in 
securing an improved lighthouse and buoy service 
in and near Little Egg Harbor Inlet. He is vice- 
president and one of the founders of the Tuckerton 
T. M. C. A. In the session of 1908 he was the author 
of the local option bill which caused so much discus- 
sion. He was re-elected to the Assembly by a plural- 
ity of 806 over Cox, Jr., Democrat. Last year he 
served on the Committees on Militia, Commerce and 
Navigation, Game and Fish, Passed Bills and State 
Home for Boys. 

1908 — Crosby, Rep., 2,843; Cox, Jr., Dem., 2,037; Ap- 
plegate, Pro., 59. 



Passaic County. 

JOHN DYNELEY PRINCE. 
(Rep., Ringwood.) 

Professor Prince was born in New York City April 
17th, 1868, and is a professor in Columbia University, 
and was formerly dean of the New York University. 
He is a Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins University, Bal- 
timore, Md. (1892). He has been a voluminous writer 
on historical, philological and historico-legal subjects. 
The professor was president of the Board of Educa- 
tion, Pompton township, from 1902 to 1905, and was 
re-elected in 1907 to the same board, of which he :s 
now^ vice-president. He was president of the United 
School Boards of Passaic county in 1904. He was a 
member of the Assembly in 1906 and 1908. During his 
two terms he has devoted himself more especially to 
legislation connected with public education. He is 
a member of the Elks. Odd Fellows and the Junior 
Order of American Mechanics. In 1908 he was re- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 361 

elected for a third term to the Assembly by a plural- 
ity of 4,672 over Matthews, the highest candidate on 
the Democratic ticket. Last year he served as chair- 
man of the Committees on Education and State 
Library, and as a member of the Committees on Ju- 
diciary, Boroug-hs and Borough Commissions and State 
Reformatory. 

AMOS H. RADCLIFFE. 
(Rep., Paterson.) 

Mr. RadclifEe was born in Paterson, N. J., January 
16, 1870, and is a member of the tirm of James Rad- 
cliffe & Sons Co., structural iron works manufactur- 
ers of Paterson. He attended the public schools and 
was graduated from the Paterson High School. He 
entered his father's shop as an apprentice to the 
blacksmith trade, and in the meantime he spent a 
year at the New York Trade Schools at night time, 
from which he was graduated. He spent two years 
at night time under instruction as draughtsman, and 
entered into partnership with his father and brother 
in 1896, and upon the incorporation of the company 
in 1907 he was made secretary. Mr. Radcliffe became 
associated as a worker in the Republican party in 1894 
and. has continued so up to the present time. He 
served six years in the State National Guard and was 
honorably discharged as a sergeant. He is a member 
of the Masonic fraternity and Jr. O. U. A. M. He was 
re-elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 4,974 over 
Matthews, the highest candidate on the Democratic 
ticket. Last year he served as chairman of the Com- 
mittees on Incidental Expenses and Treasurer's Ac- 
counts, and as a member of the Committees on Riparian 
Rights and Game and Pish. 

WILLIAM B. BURPO. 
(Rep., Paterson.) 

Mr. Burpo was born at Paterson, N. J., August 18th, 
1879, and is a lawyer by profession. He attended the 
public schools, and was graduated from the Pater- 
son High School. He studied law in the office of 
Judge Francis Scott, of Paterson, and was admitted 
to the Bar in 1902. Mr. Burpo is a member of Pater- 
sonson Lodge, No. 60, B. P. O. Elks; is also a member 
of Ivanhoe Lodge, No. 88, F. and A. M. ; Adelphic Chap- 



362 BIOGRAPHIES. 

ter, No. 33, R. A. M.; William Parker Council, No. 185, 
Jr. O. U. A. M. ; Pioneer Camp Modern Woodmen of 
America, and of the Phelphs Guards and the Lincoln 
Republican Club, of Paterson. He is one of the pro- 
bation officers of Passaic county, having been ap- 
pointed to that position in February, 1904. 

He was re-elected to the Assembly by a plurality 
of 4,834 over Matthews, the highest candidate on the 
Democratic ticket. Last year he served as chairm.in 
of the Committee on Unfinished Business, and as a 
member of the Committees on Revision of Laws, State 
Home for Boys and Sinking Fund. 

JAMES G. BLAUVELT. 
(Rep., Paterson.) 

Mr. Blauvelt was born in Lee, Mass., December 8th, 
1871, and is a lawyer by profession. He was educated 
in the public schools of Paterson, and graduated from 
Paterson High School, studied law with Eugene Emley 
and T. W. Randall and was admitted to Bar in 1893. 
Has taken deep interest in politics and been actively 
identified with the Republican party since attaining 
his majority. He married Miss Grace W. Brown in 
1896. They have three children. Mr. Blauvelt is a 
Free Mason, Elk, Forrester and member of the leading 
clubs. He resides at 318 East Thirty-second street, 
Paterson, N. J. This is the first time he has held 
public office. He was elected to the Assembly by a 
plurality of 4,568 over Matthews, the highest candidate 
on the Democratic ticket. 

EDWARD THOAL^S MOORE. 
(Rep., Passaic.) 

Mr. Moore was born at Passaic, N. J., July 3d, 1881, 
and is a lawyer hy profession. He attended the Passaic 
public schools and Stevens' Preparatory School, Ho- 
boken, and was graduated from Princeton College, 
with the degree of B. S., in 1903. He studied law with 
his father, the late Thomas M. Moore, in Passaic, and 
at the New York Law School. In 1905 Mr. Moore 
formed a law partnership with Henry C. Whitehead, 
but it was dissolved in 1908. At present he is the 
senior member of the law firm of Moore & Davison, 
his partner being John S. Davison, and their office is 
at 215 Main avenue, Passaic. Mr. Moore is a Mystic 



BIOGRAPHIES. 363 

Shriner and member of B. P. O. Elks, No. 387. He 
wa.s second assistant secretary of the National Re- 
publican Committee, campaig'n of 1908. He was elected 
to the Assembly by a plurality of 4,284 over Matthews, 
the highest candidate on the Democratic ticket. 

THE TOTAL. VOTE. 
Republicans. Democrats. 

Blauvelt 17,103 Merz 12,464 

Radcliffe 17,509 Matthews 12,535 

Prince 17,207 Furrey 12,128 

Burpo 17,369 Spitz 12,388 

Moore 16,819 Kesse 12,048 

Socialist — Keller, 1,047; Banfield, 1,064; Webster, 
1,057; Hulschmitt, 1,084; Korshet, 1,038. 

Prohibition — Rowland, 267; Blair, 261; Toun, 256; 
Berdan, 248; Henderson, 252. 

Social-Labor — Buttorworth, 211; Butz, 213; Slack, 
214; Berdan, 211; Picchetto, 210. 



Salem County. 

JOHN D. SCHADE. 
(Dem., Elmer R. F. D. No. 4.) 

Mr. Schade v/as born in Pittsgrove, Salem county, 
October 6th, 1867, is of German parentage and a 
farmer. He attended the villag-e school until he was 
fifteen years old, then entered his father's store and 
worked there for twenty-two years. He served as 
postmaster for two terms under the Cleveland admin- 
istration. He has been a member of the Township 
Committee and of the Board of Education for six 
years; serving as clerk for one year. At present he is 
a. member of the Salem county Board of Almshouse 
Trustees. Mr. Schade has been an Odd Fellow for 
twenty years, treasurer of his own lodge for five 
years, and a member of Chippewa Tribe of Red Men 
eighteen years, ever since the lodge was instituted, at 
Pole Tavern. He was elected to the Assembly by a 
plurality of 352 over Ridgway, Local Option League, 
and 1,108 over Crispen, Republican. 

1908 — Schade, Dem., 2,780; Ridgway, Local Option 
League, 2,428; Crispen, Rep., 1,672; Van Lier, Pro., 52. 



364 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Somerset County. 

WILLIAM W. SMALLEY. 
(Rep., Bound Brook.) 
Mr. Smalley was born in Middlesex county, near Bound 
Brook, December 17th, 18.^0. He was educated at the New 
York University Grammar School and Eastman's Busi- 
ness College. PouKhkeepsie, N. Y. He was a clerk in a 
New York City banking: house for seven years, and for 
the past twenty-nine years he has been engaged in the 
lumber business and manufacturing at Bound Brook. 
Twice he was elected Councilman in the borough of 
Bound Brook. Hf is vice-president of the First Na- 
tional Bank of Bound Brook. He was re-elected to 
the Assembly for a third term by a plurality of 1,475 
over Garretson, ,Demicrat. Last year he served as 
chairman of the Committees on Appropriations and 
Village for Epileptics, and as a member of the Com- 
mittees on Miscellaneous Business, Boroughs and Bor- 
ough Commissions, Clergy and Public Grounds and 
Buildings. 

1908 — Smalley, Rep., 4,902; Garretson, Dem., 3,427; 
Murphy, Pro., 62; Pascale, Soc, 24. 



Sussex County. 

CHARLES ANTHONY MEYER. 
(Dem., Andover.) 

Mr. Meyer was born in Hoboken, December 31st, 
1864, and is a civil engineer. He was defeated for the 
Assembly in the old Tenth District of Hudson county 
in 1893 Dy Colonel Charles Erlenkotter. In 1895 he 
was the Democratic caucus nominee for Clerk of the 
House. He served in the Spanish -American War, and 
was musterod out as captain November 17th, 1898. Mr. 
Meyer is a member of Harmony Lodge, No. 8, F. and 
A. M. ; Baldwin Chapter, De Molay Commandery and 
Salaam Temple. He is also a member of the Army and 
Navy Club. He v^as secretary of the Hudson County 
Democratic Committee, 1S94-J897. For the past three 
years he has been president of the Borough Council 
of Andover, and his term will expire in 1910. He was 
elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 559 over 
Hough, Republican. 

1908 — Meyer, Dem., 3,214; Hough, Rep., 2,655; Hoag- 
land, Pro., 58. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 365 

Union County. 

CARLTON B. PIERCE. 
(Rep., Cranford.) 

Mr. Pierce was born in Trenton, N. J., June 22, 1857, 
and is a lawyer by profession. He is a graduate of 
Rutg-ers and the Albany Law School. He was re- 
elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 6,065 over 
Brower, the highest candidate on the Democratic 
ticket. Last year he served on the Committees on Re- 
vision of Laws and Home for Feeble-Minded Women, 
and as chairman of the Committees on State Home for 
Boys. 

ALBERT F. KIRSTEIN. 
(Rep., Rahway.) 

Mr. Kirstein was born at Pomeroy, Ohio, February 
7, 1871, and is a druggist. He left his birthplace after 
the great flood of 1884 and lived at Logan, Ohio, until 
1888, when he went to Cincinnati to enter the Cincin- 
nati College of Pharmacy, where he was graduated in 
the spring of 1891. In the fall of the latter year he 
went to New York city to further his pharmaceutical 
experience, and in 1894 he came to Rahway and pur- 
chased a drug store, which he h?is conducted ever 
since. He w^as induced to take a nomination for 
member of the Board of Education in the spring of 
1900 on the Republican ticket, and has been more or 
less active in politics ever since. He was a member 
of the Rahway School Board from May, 1900, to De- 
cember, 1902. and was its president from January 1 to 
December 31 of the latter year. He has been first 
assistant cliief of the Fire Department since Novem- 
ber 1, 1907. He was re-elected to the Assembly by a 
plurality of 5,851 over Brower, the highest candidate 
on the Democratic ticket. Last year he served as 
chairman of the Committee on Claims and Pensions, 
and as a member of the Committees on Bill Revision, 
Printing and Public Grounds and Buildings. 

AUGUSTUS W. SCHWARTZ. 
(Rep., Elizabeth.) 

Mr. Schwartz was born in Elizabeth January 4th, 
1S67, and is advertising manager for the Elizabeth 
Times. For over twenty years he was connected with 



366 BIOGRAPHIES. 

the Elizabeth Daily Journal, ana was with the old 
Newark Daily Advertiser for one year, just before 
he assumed his present position. He is a graduate of 
the public and High Schools. He is actively interested 
in the business and social welfare of Elizabeth, and is 
always prominent in politics. In November, 1907, he 
was elected to the Board of Aldermen from the 
Twelfth Ward for a two-year term, and he served 
for eight years as a member of the City Central Com- 
mittee. Mr. Schwartz is president of the Veteran Vol- 
unteer Firemen's Association, of Elizabeth; a member 
of the Exempt Firemen's Association; of Orient Lodge, 
No. 126, F. and A. M.; Washington Chapter, No. 49, 
R. A. M.; St. John Commandery, No. 9, Knight Tem- 
plars; Adomrain Council, R. and S. M. ; Salaam Temple, 
Mystic Shrine; Court Child, I. O. F.; Past Masters' As- 
sociation of Union County, and Elizabeth Lodge, No. 
289, B. P. O. E. He was elected to the Assembly by 
a plurality of 6,205 over Brower, the highest candidate 
on the Democratic ticket. 

THE TOTAL VOTE. 
Republicans. Democrats. 

Kirstein 15,357 Brower 9,506 

Pierce 15,571 Kiernan 9,037 

Schwartz 15,711 Rieke 9,095 

Socialist — Zeitelback, 857; Walker, 864; Evans, 844. 
Prohibitionist — King. 119; Given, 112; Massett, 113. 
Independence — Roosa, 259; Larrison, 254; Anderson, 
237. 



Warren County. 

HARRY BARBER MOON. 
(Dem., Philllpsburg.) 

Mr. Moon was born in Belvidere October 5th, 1878, 
being a son of ex-Senator James E. Moon, his father 
at that time being County Clerk. His education was 
secured in the public schools of Philllpsburg, Lerch's 
Academy, in Easton, and Lafayette College, from 
which institution he was graduated in the class of 
1899. Since then he has been engaged with business 
houses in Philadelphia and Easton until recently, when 
he engaged in the real estate and investment business 



BIOGRAPHIES. 367 

for himself. Mr. Moon has been identified with the 
work of the Democratic party for several years, serving 
as a member of the Democratic County Committee for 
four years, and acting as secretary of the same for two 
years. During the Legislative session of 1907 he served 
as an officer in the House of Assembly. He was elected 
to the Assembly by a plurality of 2,060 over Vough, Re- 
publican. 

1908 — Moon, Dem., 5,799; Vough, Rep., 3,739; Carling, 
Soc, 84; Smith, Pro., 252. 

Sammary. 

House — Republicans 45 Democrats 15=60 

Senate — Republicans 13 Democrats 8=21 

58 23 81 

Republican majority on joint ballot, 35. 



368 BIOGRAPHIES. 

THE JUDICIARY. 



UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT. 

WM. M. LANNING, Trenton. 

Judge Lanning was born on a farm In Ewing township, 
Mercer county, N. J., January 1, 1849. His ancestors were 
among tlie earliest settlers in New Jersey, the family hav- 
ing resided within the territory now embraced in Mercer 
county since 1698. 

He was given a liberal education, graduating from the 
Lawrenceville High School in 1866. For six years subse- 
quent to his graduation he taught in the district schools of 
Mercer county and from 1872 to 1878 he was engaged as a 
teacher in the old Trenton Academy; from 1878 to 1880 he 
was principal of the public school at East Trenton. 

It was while acting as a justice of the peace in Ewing 
township that he acquired a taste for the law. He was 
elected as justice of the peace in 1876 and studied hard to 
fit himself for the place. From this study he decided to 
make law his life's work, and during the last four years of 
his position as a teacher he was also engaged in the study 
of the law with the late George A. Anderson and General 
Edward L. Campbell as his preceptors. He was admitted 
to the bar in November, 1880. 

Mr. Lanning at once opened an office in Trenton and his 
ability was soon recognized. In 1883 he was admitted as a 
counselor at law, and the following year he was made 
City Solicitor of Trenton. He served in that capacity until 
1887, when he was made Judge of the City District Court, 
a position he occupied until 1891, when, with other District 
Court judges, he was legislated out of office. 

With Judge Vroom, Judge Lanning in 1887 compiled the 
"Supplement to the Revision' of the General Statutes of 
New Jersey. In 1894 they were authorized by legislative 
enactment to compile and publish an up-to-date set of 
the General Statutes. 

In 18S5 Judge Lanning published a standard work entitled 
"Help for Township Officers." which has run into a second 
edition. He was a member of the Special Commission that 
framed the present comprehensive township laws. Judge 
Lanning was a member of the Constitutional Commission 
of 1894 and has participated in many notable events of a 
legal character in the state. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 369 

He was a director and counsel for the Mechanics Na- 
Monal Bank and for several years was also counsel for the 
Trenton Banking Company. He served for a time as Pres- 
ident of tlie Mechanics Bank, being succeeded by Edward 
C. Stokes (since Governor) in that position. 

Judge Lanning is a member of the Board of Managers of 
the Trenton Savings Fund Society, of the Board of Trus- 
tees of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church 
in the United States of America, of the Board of Directors 
of the Princeton Tlieo]ogical Seminary and of the 
Board of Trustees of the Lawrenceville School. 

He was elected to Congress in 1902 by a plurality of 2,006 
over Colonel Lewis Perrine, the Democratic candidate. 
After the first session of the Fifty-eighth Congress he 
resigned, in order to qualify for the judicial ofllce he now 
holds as successor to Judge Kirkpatrick, who died May 
30th, 1904. He took the oath of office June 6th, 1904. His 
salary is $6,000 a year, and the office has a life tenure. 

JOSEPH CROSS, Elizabeth. 

Judge Cross was born near Morristown, N. J., Decem- 
ber 29th, 1843. He graduated from Princeton University in 
the class of 1865. Immediately thereafter he began the 
study of law in the office of William J. Magie, ex-Chan- 
cellor of New Jersey. He also took a course of lectures 
at Columbia College Uaw School, and was admitted to 
practice as an attorney-at-law in June, 1868, and as 
a counselor in 1871. Upon his admission to tne 
bar he was taken into partnership by his preceptor, 
under the firm name of Magie & Cross, which relation ex- 
isted until 1880, when Mr. Magie was appointed one of the 
Justices of the Supreme Court. Judge Cross has resided in 
Elizabeth since the spring of 1858, and has always been a 
staunch Republican. In 1888 he was appointed Judge of the 
District Court of the city of Elizabeth, but in common with 
all of the other Republican District Court Judges of the 
State, was legislated out of office in April, 1891. 

Judge Cross was elected a member of the Assembly from 
Union county in the fall of 1893. and again in 1894. When 
Speaker Holt resigned the chair. May 26th, 1894, Mr. Cross 
was chosen his successor for the remainder of the session. 
In 1895 he was re-elected Speaker by the unanimous vote of 
his Republican colleagues. In November, 1898, he was 
elected Senator, to fill the vacancy caused by the resigna- 
tion of Senator Voorhees. who had been nominated as the 
Republican candidate for Governor. 
24 



370 BIOGRAPHIES. 

He was re-elected to the Senate for a full term in 1899 by 
a plurality of 2,471, being an increase of 491 over that of the 
previous year. He was again re-elected In 1902 by a plur- 
ality of 1,186 over James E. Martine, his Democratic oppo- 
nent. He served as President of the Senate during the 
session of 1905, and in April of that year he waa appoint- 
ed by President Roosevelt a Judge of the United States 
District Court for New Jersey. His salary is $6,000 a year 
and the office has a life tenure. 



COURT OF CHANCE KY. 

Chancellor. 

MAHLON PITNEY, Morristown. 
(Term seven years, salary $11,000 per annum.) 

Chancellor Pitney was born at Morristown, N. J., 
February 5th, 1858, and is a son of ex-Vice-Chancel- 
lor Pitney. He obtained his early education in the 
schools of his native town, and entered Princeton 
College in 1875, and was graduated in 1879. Upon 
graduation he at once commenced the study of law 
in the office of his father, who was then practicing 
in Morristown. He was admitted to the bar as an attorney 
in June, 1882, and became a counselor-at-law in 1885. He 
opened an office in Dover, Morris county, in 1882, and re- 
mained there until 18S9, when he returned to Morristown, 
where he practiced law until his elevation to the bench 
of the Supreme Court. He acted as Temporary Chairman 
of the Republican State Convention in 1895, which nomi- 
nated John W. Griggs for Governor. He was elected to 
Congress in 1894, in the old Fourth District, by a plurality of 
1,407 over Johi. ston Cornish, although the district was con- 
sidered Democratic. In 1896 he was re-elected by the in- 
creased plurality of 2,977, his own county of Morris giving 
him a plurality of 3,627, despite the fact that his Demo- 
cratic opponent, Augustus W. Cutler, was also a resident 
of that coui ty. In 1898 he was elected to the State Senate 
from Morris county by a plurality of 831. In 1900 he was 
the majority leader on the floor of the Senate, and in 1901 
he served as President of the Senate. He always took an 
active part in legislation both in the National House of 
Representatives and in the State Senate. On February 



BIOGRAPHIES. 37] 

5th, 1901, Senator Pitney was nominated by Governor 
Voorhees for Justice of the Supreme Court, to succeed Jus- 
tice Gummere, resigned, to take effect November 16th, 
1901, and the nomination, without reference, was at once 
confirmed by the Senate. Mr. Pitney was sworn into office 
on November 19tl!., 1901, for a term of seven years. On 
January 22d. 1908, the Justice was nominated as Chan- 
cellor by Governor Fort, and his nomination was at 
once confirmed by the Senate for a term of seven 
years. He v/as appointed to succeed Chancellor Magie. 
His term will expire on January 21, 1915. 

Vice-Chancellors. 

(Term seven years, salary $10,000 a year.) 
JOHN R. EMERY. Newark. 
Vice-Chancellor Emery was born in Flemington, Hunter- 
don county, N. J., July 6th, 1842. He was graduated from 
Princeton College in 1861, and studied law under Bennet 
Van Syckel, since a Justice of the Supreme Court, and also 
under the late Vice-Chancellor Van Fleet. He was 
a commissioned officer m the Fifteenth Regiment, New 
Jersey Volunteer Infantry, in the Civil War, but, con- 
tracting fever while in the service, was mustered out 
for physical disability. In 1865 he was admitted to the 
bar, when he formed a partnership with Mr. Van 
Fleet, which continued for one year. Then he went 
to Trenton, where he formed a partnership with the 
late Augustus G. Richey, which was continued until 
1874. The next year he moved to Newark, where he 
opened a law office and soon built up an extensive 
practice. About twenty years ago Mr, Emery was 
made an Advisory Master. He has never held any 
political office. He was appointed Vice-Chancellor by 
Chancellor McGill on Jaunary 29th, 1895, for a full 
term of seven years, to succeed the late Vice-Chancel- 
lor Van Fleet. He was re-appointed by Chancellor 
Magie in 1902. In politics he is a Republican. His 
term will expire in January, 1909. 

FREDERIC W. STEVENS, Newark. 
Vice-Chancellor Stevens was born in Hoboken. N. J., 
June 9th, 1846. He was graduated from Columbia Law 
College in 1865; was admitted to the bar of New Jersey as 



372 BIOGRAPHIES. 

an attorney in November, 1868, and as a counselor three 
years later. He first came into public life in 1873, when he 
was appointed Judge of the Second District Court of New- 
ark. He remained in that position for two years. In 1839 
the Judg^e was appointed County Counsel of Essex county, 
and filled that office for some years. Although he has noi 
held any other public offices, Mr. Stevens has always been 
a prominent figure in some of the biggest legal fierhts ever 
made in the State and County Courts. One of those was 
the settlement of the back taxes of the Delaware, Lacka- 
wanna and Western Railroad Company, In that case he 
and Judge Dillon acted as arbitrators. He Is a member 
of the Eo<^iesiastical Law Committee of the Protestant 
Episcopal Diocese of Newark, and, with the late Cort- 
landt Parker, revised all of the canons governing 
that body. He was appointed Vice-Chancellor in 1896, 
as a successor to John T. Bird. In 1903 he was ap- 
pointed for another term. In politL.-;s he is a Demo- 
crat. His term will expire in 1910. 

EUGENE STEVENSON, Paterson. 

Vice-Chancellor Stevenson was born in Brooklyn, N. T., 
June 28, 1849. He moved to Paterson with his parents in 
1866, and has since resided there. He was graduated from 
the New York University as a Bachelor of Arts in the 
class of 1870, and was also graduated from the Law De- 
partment of the same institution. Subsequently he en- 
tered the law office of Socrates Tuttle, father-in-law of 
the late Vice-President Hobart, where he continued his 
studies. In June, 1874, Mr. Stevenson was admitted to the 
bar as an attorney-at-law, and three years later was 
made a counsellor. In 1881 he was appointed a Prosecutor 
of the Pleas for Passaic county by Governor Ludlow. He 
served a full term of five years in that office. He did not 
seek a reappointment. Since that time he has never held 
a public office, although he has often been sought as a 
candidate for such. Prior to his elevation to the bench he 
enjoyed a very large practice in the higher courts of the 
State. He was appointed Vice-Chancellor on April 16, 1901, 
for a full term of seven years. He was reappointed in 
1908. In politics he is a Democrat. His term will 
expire in 1915. 

LINDLEY M. GARRISON, Jersey City. 
Vice-Chancellor Garrison was born in Camden, N. J., 
November 28th, 1864, and is a son of Rev. Joseph F. Gar- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 373 

rison, D.D., and Elizabeth V. Garrison. He is a brother 
of Supreme Court Justice Charles G. Garrison. He 
attended school at Exeter, N. H., spent one year in Har- 
vard College, read law with Redding, Jones and Carson, 
of Philadelphia, and Thomas E. French, of Camden, and 
finished his legal studies in the University of Penn- 
sylvania. He was admitted to the bar in Philadelphia in 
1886, and to the bar of New Jersey as an attorney at the 
June term, 1888, and as a counselor at the June term, 1892. 
He commenced practice in this state at Camden, N. J., 
in 1888. He moved from Camden to Jersey City in 1898, 
and became a member of the firm of Garrison, McManus 
and Enright. This partnership was dissolved when Mr. 
Garrison accepted the office of Vice-Chancellor, tendered 
to him by Chancellor Magie. He took the oath of office 
on June 15th, 1904, for a term of seven years. In politics 
he is a Democrat. His term will expire in 1911. 

EDMUND B. LEAMING, Camden. 

Vice-Chancellor Leaming, who was born at Seaville, 
Cape May county, N. J., fifty years ago, is the son 
of ex-Senator and Dr. Jonathan F. Leaming and a brother 
of Dr. Walter S. Leaming, now deceased, who also served 
as Senator from Cape May. The Vice-Chancellor was, 
with his brother, educated under a private tutor, and sub- 
sequently as a post graduate in the University of Penn- 
sylvania, and thereafter studied law with the late Judge 
and former Congressman James Buchanan in Trenton. 
United States Judge William M. Lanning, Congressman 
Ira Wood, Prosecutor of the Pleas Eugene Emley, Alfred 
L. Black, Samuel W. Beldon and Samuel Waiter, Jr., 
were law students in Trenton at the same time and pre- 
pared for the bar with Vice-Chancellor Leammg. He was 
admitted to the bar as an attorney in February, 1881, and 
as a counselor in February, 1884. From Trenton he went 
to Seattle, and then to San Francisco, where he practiced 
his profession for a brief period. Upon his return to New 
Jersey he formed a co-partnership with Samuel W. Bel- 
don. Upon its dissolution by the appointment of Mr. Bel- 
don as general counsel of the Fidelity Trust Company, at 
Newark, N. J., he practiced by himself in Camden and 
until he was appointed Vice-Chancellor by Chancellor 
Magie on September 21, 1906, to fill a vacancy caused by 
the death of Martin P. Grey. In politics he is a Re- 
publican. His term will expire in 1:)13. 



374 BIOGRAPHIES. 

JAMES E. HOWELL, Newark. 

Vice-Chancellor Howell was born in Wantage town- 
ship, Sussex county, N. J., June 25, 1848. He attended 
the common schools in that locality, and finishing in 
them was sent to Mt. Retirement Seminary, near 
Deckertown, now Sussex. This was a well-known 
academy in those days and was sometimes called 
Stiles' School. Taking up the law as his profession, 
Mr. Howell studied at the University of Michigan, 
from which he was graduated. He also read law in 
the office of Coult & VanBlarcom at Newton. He was 
admitted to the bar of New Jersey op an attorney in 
February, 1872, and as a counselor in June, 1880. 

In 1874 Mr. Howell came to Newark and has lived 
there ever since and practised his profession until he 
became a Vice-Chancellor. On January 1, 1876, he 
formed a co-partnership with Joseph Coult, which 
lasted under the well-kn"own firm oi Coult & Howell 
until he accepted his present office. Being much 
interested in literature, he owns a valuable private 
library and is a trustee of the Newark Free Public 
Library. He served as a commissioner for the erec- 
tion of the new City Hall in Newark, under appoint- 
ment of the late Mayor Seymour, and paid especial 
attention to the artistic decoration of the building. 
He served on the Essex County Sinking Fund Com- 
mission for several years, belongs to the Board of 
Trade, the Road Horse Drivers' Association, the State 
Bar Association, and is a member of several clubs. 
He was appointed Vice-Chancellor by Chancellor 
Magie to succeed Henry C. Pitney, who had resigned, 
and received his commission April 9, 1907, for a term 
of seven years. In politics he is a Republican. His 
term will expire in 1914. 

EDWIN ROBERT WALKER, Trenton. 

Vice-Chancellor Walker was born in Rochester, 
New York, September t3, 1862, where his father. Dr. 
Walter Walker, practiced medicine and surgery, but 
since 1869 he has lived in Trenton, the home of his 
maternal ancestors, two of whom were officers In the 
American army during the Revolutionary war, and 
one of whom was State Treasurer of New Jersey. 

Mr. Walker went to the Model S':hool until 1878, 



BIOGRAPHIES. 375 

when he left to become clerk in the office of the late 
Hon. Henry S. Little, then Clerk in Chancery. While 
serving a clerkship in the Chancery office he studied 
law with the late Col. S. Meredith Dickinson and 
afterwards with Judge Garret D. W. Vroom. He was 
admitted to the bar at the June term of the Supreme 
Court, 1886, and at once thereafter commenced the 
practice of his profession, in which he was actively 
engaged until appointed to the bench. In 1891-32 
Mr. Walker was counsel for the Board of Chosen 
Freeholders of the county of Mercer, and in 1892-93 
was city counsel for the corporation of Trenton. Mr. 
Walker was Judge-Advocate of the Second Regiment, 
N. G. N. J., with the rank of Captain in 1906, and in 
1907 was made Judge-Advocate of the Second Bri- 
gade with the rank of Major. He was appointed 
Vice-Chancellor by Chancellor Magie on October 29, 
1907, for a full term oi* seven years, to succeed Vice- 
Chancellor Bergen, who resigned to become a Justico 
of the Supreme Court. In politics he is a Democrat 
His term will expire in 1914. 



ju.*;tices op the supreme court. 

(Term of office, seven years. The salary of the Chief Jus- 
tice is $11,000 a year, and that of each Associate 
Justice, $10,000.) 

Chief Justice. 

WILLIAM S. GUMMERE, Newark. 

Chief Justice Gummere was born in Trenton, June 24th 
1852, and is a son of the late Barker Gummere, who for 
many years was one of the acknowledged leaders of the 
bar of New Jersey. The Justice was educated at the old 
Trenton Academy and the Lawrenceville School, and was 
graduated from Princeton College in 1870. He studied lav 
with his father, and upon being admitted to the bar he 
practiced for a time in the office of G. D. W. Vroom, when 
that gentleman was Prosecutor of the Pleas for Mercer 
county. Subsequently Mr. Gummere formed a co-partner- 
ship v.'ith his uncle, the late ex-Governor Parker, in New- 
ark, and after that had been dissolved he was associated 
with Oscar Keen, of the same city. This continued until 



376 BIOGRAPHIES. 

the late Edward T. Green was made Judg-e of the United 
States District Court, when Mr. Gummere succeeded him 
as counsel for the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, with 
offices in Trenton. On February 18th, 1S95, he was ap- 
pointed by Governor Werts as a Justice of the Supreme 
Court, to succeed the late Justice Abbett for a term of 
seven years, and he was unanimously confirmed by the 
Senate on the day following. On January 28, 1901, he was 
nominated by Governor Voorhees lor Chief Justice of the 
Supreme Court, to take effect on November 16, 1901. and he 
was confirmed on February 4th following. The nomination 
was made to fill a vacancy caused by the resignation of 
Chief Justice David A. Depue, who, after serving a period 
of thirty-five years on the bench, vacated the office on 
November 16th, 1901. Chief Justice Gummere took the oath 
of office on November :9tli, 19U1. He was appointed 
by Governor I ort on January 22d, 1908, and was at 
once confirmed by the Senate. In politics he is a Re- 
publican. His term will expire in 1915. His circuit 
comprises Essex county. Population, 409,928. 

CHARLES GRANT GARRISON, Merchantville. 

Justice Garrison was born in Swedesboro, Gloucester 
county, N. J., August 3d, 1S49. He is a son of Rev. Joseph 
Fithian Garrison, D. D., a well known divine of the Pro- 
testant Episcopal Church, who was a professor in a Phila- 
delphia college for a number of years, and died in 1893. 
The Judge was educated at Edgehill School, Princeton, at 
the Episcopal Academy, Philadelphia, and in the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, from which he graduated as a physi- 
-^ian in 1872. He practiced that profession until 1876, at 
Swedesboro, and then entered the law office of Samuel H. 
Grey, of Camden, where he remained until he was admit 
ted to the bar in 1S7S. He was made Judge-Advocate Gen- 
eral of New Jersey in 1SS4, and In 1S82 he was maae Chan- 
cellor of the Southern Diocese of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church of New Jersey. He was appointed to the Supreme 
Court bench in January, 1SS8, in the place of the late ex- 
Governor Joel Parker, for a full term of seven years. He 
was re-appointed in 1S95 by Governor Werts and again by 
Governor Murphy in 1902. In politics he is a Democrat. 
His term expires in 1909. 

His circuit consists of the counties of Camden and 
Gloucester. Total population, 156,032. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 377 

FRANCIS J. SWAYZE, Newark. 

Justice Swayze was born in Newton, Sussex county. May 
15th, 1861. and is a son of Jacob L. Swayze. He was grad- 
uated from Harvard College in 1879, and afterward studied 
law in the office of Martin Rosenkrans, in Newton. He 
also took a course at Harvard Law School, and was admit- 
ted to the bar of New Jersey in June, 1882, and was made 
a counselor-at-law three years later. 

The Judge served as Chairman of the Sussex Republican 
County Committee from 1886 to 1889. He was a member of 
the Republican State Committee from 1889 to 1892, and was 
a delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1892. 
In that year he removed to Newark and thereafter confined 
himself to the practice of his profession. He became a 
member of the law firm of Colie «& Swayze, later Colie. 
Swayze & Titsworth. On February 13. h. 1900, he was nom- 
inated by Governor Voorhees as a Circuit Court Judge to 
succeed Francis Child and he was unanimously confirmed 
by the Senate for a term of seven years. On January 13. 
1903, he was nominated by Governor Murphy as a Justice 
of the Supreme Court to succeed Justice Collins, who had 
resigned, and the nomination was confirmed by the Senate 
on January 20, for a full term of seven years. His term 
will expire in January, 1910. His circuit comprises the 
county of Hudson. Population, 449,879. 

ALFRED REED. Trenton. 
Justice Reed was born December 23d, 1839, in Ewing 
township, Mercer county. He attended the Lawrence- 
ville High School in 1856 and the Model School at 
Trenton in 1857-58, and entered Rutgers College, at New 
Brunswick, in 1859, In the fall of 1860 he was matriculated 
at the State and Normal Law School, at Poughkeepsie. 
N. Y., and in the summer of 1862 admitted to the practice 
of law in New York. He returned to Trenton and renewed 
his study of law, and was admitted to the bar of New Jer- 
sey at the June Term, 1864. In the spring of 1865 he was 
elected to the Common Council cff Trenton, of which body 
he was made President. He was elected Mayor of Trenton 
in 1867, serving for one year, and in the spring of 1869 he 
was appointed Law Judge of Mercer county, a positior> he 
held for a full term of five years. On April 8th. 1875, he was 
appointed by Governor Bedle a Justice of the Supreme 
Court; in 1882 he was re-appointed by Governor Ludlow, 
and in 1889 by Governor Green. In June, 1895 he was ap- 



378 BIOGRAPHIES. 

pointed a Vice-Chancellor by Chancellor McGill, to succeed 
the late Robert S. Green, for a term of seven years. He 
was re-appointed by Chancellor Magle In 1902. In 1904 he 
was again appointed a Justice of the Supreme Court by 
Governor Murphy, to fill a vacancy caused by the resigna- 
tion of Justice Van Syckel, who had served over thirty- 
five years on the bench. He was confirmed by the Senate 
for a full term of seven years on March 17th, and was 
sworn into office on June 16Lh, following. In politics he is 
a Democrat. His term will expire in 1911. His cir- 
cuit comprises the counties of Mercer, Hunterdon and 
Warren. Population, 184,177. 

THOMAS WHITAKER TRENCHARD, Bridgeton. 

Justice Trenchard was born in Centreton, Salem county, 
N. J., December 13th, 1863. His father was William B. 
Trenchard, for many years Clerk of the County of Cum- 
berland. The Judge was educated in the public schools of 
Bridgeton and in the South Jersey Institute, from which 
he was graduated in the class of 1882. He road law in the 
ofTice of Porter and Nixon, and was admitted to the bar 
as an attorney at the November term of court in 1886, and 
as a counselor in February, 1893. He practiced law in 
Bridgeton, and in 1S99 he was appointed Law Judge of 
Cumberland county by Governor Voorhees. In 1904 he was 
reappointed by Governor Murphy. He served as City So- 
licitor of Bridgeton from 1S92 to 1899, and was a member of 
the House of Assembly in 18S9. During many years he 
was Solicitor for the Board of Health of Bridgeton. He 
was one of the organizers of the Cumberland County Bar 
Association and has served as its president. In 1896 he 
was chosen a Presidential Elector, when lie cast his ballot 
for McKinley and Hobart. The Judge is a member of the 
Society of the Sons of the Revolution. On June 8th, 
1906, Governor Stokes appointed him a Justice of the 
Supreme Court, to fill a vacancy caused by the death 
of Justice Dixon. His term will expire in 1913. His 
circuit comprises the counties of Atlantic, Cape May, 
Cumberland and Salem. Population, 155,640. 

CHARLES W. PARKER. Jersey City. 
Justice Parker was born at Newark. N. J., October 
22, 1862, and is a son of the late Cortlandt and Eliza- 
beth W. (Stites) Parker. He received his preliminary 
education at Pingvy School, Elizabeth, N. J., and 



BIOGRAPHIES. 379 

Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, N. H. He was grad- 
uated from Princeton Colleg-e with honors in 1882; 
read law under the direction of his father and at Col- 
umbia Law School from 1882 to 1885; was admitted 
to the New Jersey bar as an attorney in June, 
1885, and as a counselor at the February term, 1890. 
He practiced his profession in Newark till 1890, and 
thereafter in Bayonne City, and since 1891 in Jersey 
City. In 1898 he was appointed a District Court Judg-e 
for Jersey City, and in 1903 he was reappointed. He 
resig-ned that office in 1903 and accepted an appoint- 
ment by Governor Murphy as a Judge of the Circuit 
Court. The appointment was unanimously confirmed 
by the Senate and he took his seat on March 2, 19o3. 
This office he held until October, 1907, when he re- 
signed to become a Justice of the Supreme Court, to 
which office he was nominated by Governor Stokes 
and was unanimously confirmed by the Senate on Sep- 
tember 25 for a full term of seven years. He succeeds 
John Franklin Fort, who had resigned upon his nomi- 
nation as the Republican candidate for Governor. H*» 
served as Assistant Adjutant General of the State from 
1902 to 1907, after twelve years enlisted and com- 
missioned service in the Essex Troop and Fourth 
Regiment, and was aide de camp on the staff of Gov- 
ernor Franklin Murphy, during the latter's term of 
office. In politics the Justice is a Republican. . His 
term will expire in 1914. His circuit comprises the 
counties of Morris, Bergen and Somerset. Population, 
204,207. 

JAMES J. BERGEN. Somerville. 

Justice Bergen is a lineal descendant of Han Hanson 
Bergen, who came from Holland to New York city and 
was the progenitor of nearly all those bearing the 
name in America. He married Sarah Rappelyea, who, 
it is said, was the first white child born in the New 
Netherlands. Mr. Bergen's New Jersey ancestor was 
a gran(?son of the original emigrant, and owned con- 
siderable tracts of land in the counties of Somerset 
and Hunterdon. The family is among the oldest of 
• the Holland-Dutch settlers in this country, and its 
members have always been conspicuous in business, 
professional and public affairs. 

The Justice is a son of John J. and Mary A. (Park) 
Bergen, and was born October 1. 1.^4/, in Somerville, 



380 BIOGRAPHIES. 

N. J., where he has always resided. He attended the 
old brick academy in his native town, and was grad- 
uated from Calvin Butler Seminary of the same place 
in 1863. At the age of seventeen ne entered upon the 
study of law with the late Hugh M. Gaston, of Somer- 
ville, with whom he remained until lie was admitted 
as an attorney at the November term In 1868. During 
the following year he practised his profession in 
Plainfield, N. J. On January 1, 1870, he returned to 
Somerville and formed a law partnership with his 
preceptor, Mr. Gaston, which was continued under the 
firm name of Gaston & Bergen for twenty years, when 
Mr. Gaston withdrew. He was made a counselor in 
November, 1871. 

He was elected to the Legislature in 1875, 1876, 1890 
and 1891, serving as Speaker of the Assembly during 
the sessions of 1891 and 1892, and in 1896 was a dele- 
gate to the Democratic National Convention. In 1877 
he was appointed by Governor Bedle as Prosecutor 
of the Pleas of Somerset county, which office he held 
for six years. He was president of the Board of Com- 
missioners of Somerville and of iho savings bank 
for a long time, and has been a director of the First 
National Bank of that place. He was especially active 
in organizing police and fire departments, and is cred- 
ited with creating the public sentiment which made 
possible the introduction of a sewage system and other 
public improvements in Somerville. 

In March, 1904, he was appointed a Vice-Chancellor 
by Chancellor Magie for a full term of seven years, 
and on October 11, 1907, Governor Stokes sent his 
nomination as a Justice of the Supreme Court to the 
Senate, which was confirmed without reference. He 
took the oath of oflftce on October 1(5. 1907. His term 
will expire in 1914. His circuit comprises the counties 
of Union and Middlesex. Population, 214,247. In poli- 
tics he is a Democrat. 

WILLARD P. VOORHEES, New Brunswick. 

.Justice Voorhees was born in New Brunswick, N. J., 
July 28th, 1851. After studying in the Rutgers Gram- 
mar School, and under the tutelage of the late Gus- 
tavus Fischer he entered Rutgers College, from which 
institution he was graduated in 1871. He studied law 
in the office of Judge Woodbridge Strong, and was 



BIOGRAPHIES. 381 

admitted to practice as an attorney in 1874, and as a 
counselor four years later. As a receiver he settled 
the affairs of several large companies. He was coun- 
sel in many important cases, one of which was for the 
executors of the estate of Christopher Meyer, which 
involved in litigation over $6,000,000. For some time 
he was one of the Water Commissioners of New 
Brunswick. He was appointed Associate Justice of 
the Supreme Court by Governor Fort January 22d, 
1908, for a term of seven years, and was at once con- 
firmed by the Senate. His term will expire in 1915. 
In politice he is a Republican. His circuit comproses 
the counties of Monmouth, Burlington and Ocean. 
Population, 170,841. 

JAMES F. MINTURN, Hoboken. 

Justice Minturn was born at Hoboken, N. J., July 16, 
1860. He was educated in the Hoboken public schools 
and the Marl ha Institute, from which he was grad- 
uated with high honors. Afterward he entered col- 
lege, but was forced to retire owing to ill health, and 
he completed his studies under the tutelage of Prof. 
Louis Barton, a graduate of Rutgers College. He was 
graduated from the Columbia College Law School, 
New York, with the degree of LL.B. in 1880, and com- 
pleted his law studies with John McKeon, one of the 
ablest lawyers of New York. He then entered the 
office of Ogden & Niven in Hoboken and there com- 
pleted his study of New Jersey law. Within a year 
after his graduation he was admitted to the bar of 
New York as an attorney and counselor. In 1884 he 
was appointed Corporation Attorney of Hoboken and 
was retained in that office until he became a Circuit 
Judge, twenty-one years altogether, despite political 
changes in administration. 

He represented Hoboken in many notable law suits, 
carrying them through the highest courts of the State 
and the United States Courts. In 1889 he represented 
that city in the dispute over the ownership of the 
river front, in which the Hoboken Land and Improve- 
ment Company and the Pennsylvania Railroad Com- 
pany were parties in litigation. The case went through 
the State Courts and was taken to the United States 
Supreme Court. 

The Judge was counsel for the Iciie Henry George 



382 BIOGRAPHIES. 

in the celebrated case of the John Hutchins will, of 
Camden, in whiob considerable money was bequeathed 
for the circulation of George's works. After going 
through the Court of Chancery, it was taken on ap- 
peal to the Court of Errors and Appeals, where the 
claim of Mr. George was sustained. Mr. Minturn at one 
time declined the appointment of District Court Judge 
of Hoboken. He was one of the organizers of the 
Hudson County and State Bar associations. In 1903 
he wrote an article, which appeared in the New Jersey 
Law Journal, discussing the proposed constitutional 
amendments, taking the ground, while not opposing 
them, that they were insufficient for the relief of the 
courts. He also contributed to Belford's Magazine an 
article, entitled "The Iniquities of the Tariff." A Latin 
scholar and linguist, he is also an orator and a lecturer 
of high rank. He is a member of several societies and 
of the Hoboken Board of Trade. 

In 1884 Mr. Minturn was appointed Judge-Advocate 
of the old Second Regiment, National Guard, and 
served seven years and until the rei^iment was amal- 
gamated with the Fourth. He is an lionorary member 
of the DeLong Guards of Hoboken. He has always 
taken an active interest in military affairs and has 
won several medals at the Sea Girt ranges and quali- 
fied as an expert marksman. 

The Judge was one of the organizers of the Free 
Public Library of Hoboken and of the State Charities 
Aid Association. He also helped organize the Society 
for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children and was 5ts 
counsel for several years. He has been president of 
the First National Bank of Guttenburg and vice-presi- 
dent of the Ocean County Trust Company. 

He was elected Senator in Hudson county in 1904 and 
served in that office until he took his seat as Circuit 
Judge. He was nominated for the Judgeship by Gov- 
ernor Stokes on June 21, 1907, was unanimously con- 
firmed by the Senate and was sworn into office on 
July 31. On January 22, 1908, he was nominated by 
Governor Fort as Justice of the Supreme Court, and 
was unanimously confirmed by the Senate. The degree 
of L.L. D. was conferred on the Justice at Seton Hall 
College in June, 1908. 

In politics he is a Democrat, and his term will ex- 
pire in 1915. His circuit comprises the counties of 
Passaic and Sussex. Population, 199,186. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 383 

Circuit Court Judgt^s. 

(Term of office, seven years. Salary, $7,500.) 

FREDERIC ADAMS. Summit. 

Judge Adams was born on October 9th, 1840, at Amherst, 
N. H. He was graduated from Phillips Academy at An- 
dover in 1858, and from Yale College in 1862. He read law 
at the Harvard Law School in 1863 and '64, and was admit- 
ted to the bar of New York city in 1864. He was admitted 
to Dractice in New Jersey as an attorney in February, 1868, 
and as a counselor in November, 1873. Nearly his entire 
practice has been in the city of Newark, where he has 
been much occupied by his duties as Special and Advisory 
Master in Chancery. The only political offices he ever held 
were as Clerk of East Orange township, Essex county, and 
as counsel for the same township. On March 23d, 1897, he 
was nominated as Judge of the Court of Errors and Ap- 
peals by Governor Griggs to succeed Judge Barcalow, who 
had been appointed as Judge of the Passaic County Courts. 
He was unanimously confirmed by the Senate on March 
25th, 1897. On January 13, 1903, he was nominated by Gov- 
ernor Murphy as a Judge of the Circuit Court for a full 
term of seven years, and on the 20th of that month he was 
unanlmouslj' confirmed by the Senate. In politics the 
Judge is a Republican. His term will expire in January, 
1910. His circuit comprises the county of Essex. 

ALLEN B. ENDICOTT, Atlantic City. 

Judge Endicott was born at May's Landing, March 7, 
1857. He was graduated at Peddle Institute, Hightstown, 
N. J., in June, 1876, with the degree of Ph.B., read law 
with Peter L. Voorhees, of Camden, and graduated in 
the law department of the University of Pennsylvania in 
1879 with the degree of L.L. B. He was admitted to the 
New Jersey bar in 1880 as an attorney, and as counselor 
in 1884. He served as Collector of Atlantic county for six- 
teen years, from May, 1883, till he was appointed Judge of 
the County Courts. For eleven years he was City Soli- 
citor for Atlantic City. He served as County Judge for 
Atlantic from April 1, 1898 (having been re-appointed on 
February 2, 1903), until December 29, 1903, when he was 
appointed a Circuit Court Judge by Governor Murphy to 
fill a vacancy caused by the death of James H. Nixon, 
which occurred on November 22, 1903. He was confirmed 



384 BIOGRAPHIES. 

by the Senate for a full term of office on February 2, 
1904. In politics the Judge is a Republican. His term 
will expire in February, 1911. His circuit comprises the 
counties of Camden, Cumberland, Atlantic and Cape 
May. 

WILBUR A. HEISLEY, Long Branch. 
Judge Heisley was born at Elmer, Salem county, N. J., 
February 11th, 1858. and is a son of Rev. Charles W. 
Heisley, of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in this state. 
He studifd law with Martin P. Grey, the late Vice- 
Chancellor, at Salem, received his attorney's license at 
June term, 1879, and immediately began the practice of 
his profession at Long Branch, and has resided there 
continuously since. At the June term, 1882, he received 
his counselor's license. In 1886 he was elected Mayor of 
Long Branch. On Januaiy 24th, 1897, he was appointed, 
by Governor Griggs, Prosecutor of the Pleas for Mon- 
mouth county. On April 1st, 1900, he was appointed, by 
Governor Voorhees, Judge of the Court of Common Pleas 
of Monmouth county, and on March 24th, 1904, he was 
appointed, by Governor Murphy, one of the Circuit 
Judges of New Jersey. His district comprises Essex, 
Monmouth and Ocean counties. In politics the Judge 
is a Republican. His term will expire in March, 1911. 

BENJAMIN AUGUSTUS VAIL, Elizabeth. 

Judge Vail is descended from Edward Fitz-Randolph, 
who came from England to Massachusetts about the year 
1637. His grandfather, Benjamin Vail, was an early settler 
between Rahway and Plainfield, N. J., and like his an- 
cestors was a member of the Society of Friends. The 
Judge is a son of Benjamin Franklin and Martha C. (Par- 
ker) Vail, and was born in Woodbridge township, Middle- 
sex county, N. J., Aiagust 15, 1844. He was graduated from 
Haverford College, Pa., in 1865, read law in Newark with 
Parker and Keasbey, was admitted to the bar as an at- 
torney in November, 1868, and as a counselor in November. 
1871. He practiced law in Rahway for a number of years, 
and was appointed Judge of Union county by Governor 
Griggs in 1898. He was reappointed in 1903 by Governor 
Murphy. He served as a member of the Rahway Common 
Council, and in 1376 and '77 he was a member or the House 
of Assembly. The Judge served as a State Senator from 
Union countj- two terms, from 1879 to 1885, and in 1884 was 
President of that body. He was appointed as a Circuit 



BIOGRAPHIES. 385 

Court Judge by Governor Stokes, May 9, 1906. His circuit 
comprises the counties of Hudson, Union and Somer- 
set. His term will expire in 1913. In politics he is a 
Republican. 

FRANK T. LLOYD, Camden. 

Judge Lloyd was born at Middletown, Delaware, October 
29th, 1S59. He was graduated from the Middletown Acad- 
emy, and after removing to Camden, in 1875, learned the 
trade of a compositor. During his apprenticeship he 
studied law with the Hon. James Otterson.. of Philadel- 
phia, and was admitted to the bar of Pennsylvania in 1882. 
He was admitted to the New Jersey bar as an attorney 
in February, 1897, and as a counselor in February, 1900. 
In 1899, upon the death of the incumbent, he was desig- 
nated by the Court to prosecute the pleas in Camden 
county, and was thereafter successively appointed to the 
position of Prosecutor by Governor Voorhees in 1900 and 
Governor Stokes in 1905. This position he held at the time 
of his appointment in 1906 by Governor Stokes to the bench 
of the Circuit Court. He was a member of the House of 
Assembly in 1896 and 1897, the later year being chairman of 
the Judiciary Committee of that body, and is the author 
of the present marriage law of the State. He was a mem- 
ber of the Franchise Commission whose recommendations 
were in 1906 enacted into law by the Legislature. 
Judge Lloyd's circuit comprises the counties of Burling- 
ton, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Gloucester and 
Salem counties. His term will expire in 1913. Tn 
politics he is a Republican. 

WILLIAM H. SPEER, Jersey City. 

Judge Speer was born in Jersey City, N. J.. October 
21st, 1868. He was educated in Hasbrouck Institute in 
Jersey City and at Columbia University in New York 
city. He studied law at Columbia University Law 
School and in the office of John Linn in Jersey City. 
At the November term, 1891, he was admitted to the 
bar of New Jersey, and was made a counselor-at-law 
in June, 1895. 

After being admitted to the bar, Judge Speer became 
a member of the firm of Linn & Speer, his partner 
being Clarence Linn, a son of John Linn. This partner- 
ship continued for a number of years. Mr. Speer was 
twice vice-president of the Hudson County Bar Asso- 
25 



386 BIOGRAPHIES. 

ciation, and became its president in 1903. On February 
8th, 1903, Mr. Speer, having been appointed by Gov- 
ernor Franklin Murphy and confirmed by the Senate 
to the office of Prosecutor of the Pleas for Hudson 
county, qualified as such and held the office until De- 
cember 30th. 1907. when he was appointed by Governor 
EdAvard C. Stokes as a Circuit Court .ludge to succeed 
Charles W. Parker. On January 22d, 1908, he was 
appointed for a full ternri by Governor Fort. 

Judge Speer has been active in politics, and is a mem- 
ber of the Republican party. At the time of his ap- 
pointment as Judge he was a member of the firm of 
Speer & Kellogg, his partner being Frederick S. Kel- 
logg. His circuit comprises the county of Hudson. 
His term will expire in 1915, 

CHARLES C. BLACK, Jersey City. 

Judge Black was born on a farm in Burlington 
county, near Mount Holly, N. J., on July 29th, 1858. He 
was prepared for college at the Mount Holly Acad- 
emy, and entered Princeton College in 1874, being 
graduated with the class of '78. He studies law at 
Mount Holly, N. J., and at the University of Michigan, 
at Ann Arbor. He was admitted to the bar of New 
Jersey as an attorney in June, 1881, and as a coun- 
selor in June, 1884. After being admitted to the bar 
he located at Jersey C?tJ^ and has practiced law there 
until his appointment to the bench under the firm 
name of Black & Dayton. 

He served for five years as a member of the Hudson 
County Board of Registration under the Ballot Reform 
Law. He was appointed as a member of the State Board 
of Taxation on March 21st, 1891, for a term of five years, 
was re-appointed for another term in 1896, and again in 
1901. He was again appointed in 1904 for a term of five 
years. Mr. Black has made valuable additions to the 
literature of the law in his "Proof and Pleadings in Acci- 
dent Cases," "New Jersey Law of Taxation" and "Law 
and Practice in Accident Cases." Mr. Black was the 
Democratic candidate for Governor in 1904. He was ap- 
pointed a member of "The Equal Tax Commission" by 
Governor Murphy. Governor Stokes nominated him on 
March 30, 1905, as a member of the new Board of Equaliza- 
tion of Taxes, and he was at once confirmed by the Sen- 
ate. He served on that board until he was appointed a 
Circuit Judge by Governor Fort, on January 22d, 1908, 



BIOGRAPHIES. 387 

to succeed Judge Minturn, who was appointed to the 
bench of the Supreme Court, His term will expire in 
1915. His circuit comprises the counties of Berg-en, 
Morris, Passaic and Sussex. 



Lay Judges of the Court of Errors and Appeals. 

(Term of office, six years. Compensation, $20 a day for 
actual service. No mileage.) 

JOHN W. BOGERT. Hohokus. 
Judge Bogert was born in Hohokus, Bergen county, Sep- 
tember 3d, 1839. His ancestors settled in that locality some 
time before the Revolution. He has held several township 
offices, and was Collector of Bergen county for fourteen 
years. He was a member of the House of Assembly from 
the Second District of Bergen county in the sessions of 
1874-75, and he served as State Senator for four years. He 
is an executor and administrator for several large estates. 
He was appointed by Governor Abbett Judge of the Court 
of Errors and Appeals in 1891, and re-appointed by Gover- 
nor Griggs in 1897, and again in 1903 by Governor Murphy. 
His term will expire in 1909. In politics he is a Democrat. 

WILLIAM H. VREDENBURGH, Freehold. 

Judge Vredenburgh comes from a very old Ntw Jersey 
family, being the second son of the late Judge Peter Vre- 
denburgh. The first generation of the family on this side 
of the Atlantic, as appears from ancient records, sprang 
from William I. Vredenburg, who came to New Nether- 
lands from The Hague in May, 1658, in the ship Gilded 
Beaver. 

Peter Vredenburg, father of the present Judge, was a 
prominent jurist in both State and nation. He served two 
terms as an Associate Justice of the New Jersey Supreme 
Court, being first appointed by Governor Price, in 1855, and 
again by Governor Olden in 1862. Many of his decisions are 
regarded as being among the ablest reported. 

Judge Vredenburgh was born August 19th, 1?:40; was 
graduated at Rutgers College in 1859; studied law in the 
office of the late Governor Joseph D. Bedle; was admitted 
to practice as an attorney in June, 1862, and as a counselor 
in June, 1865. He is one of three sons, all of whom were 
lawyers. 



388 BIOGRAPHIES. 

After his admission, young Vredenburgh began the prac- 
tice of his profession at Freehold, his native town, and has 
continued to carry on the law business there ever since, 
with the exception of about a year, 1864, when he was 
located at Eatontown, to continue the business of his 
brother. Major Peter Vredenburgh, Jr., who was absent 
in the military service, and who was killed September 19th, 
1864, at the battl*^ of Winchester, Va., at the head of his 
regiment. 

In 1865 Mr. Vredenburgh formed a law partnership with 
Philip J. Ryall. which continued for about five years, until 
Mr. Ryall's failing health compelled his retirement from 
practice. In the exciting general election of 1884, Mr. Vre- 
denburgh was nominated by the Republicans of Monmouth 
county for State Senator, and was only defeated by the re- 
tirement of the regular Democratic candidate a few days 
before the election and the fusion of the Democrats and 
Prohibitionists, and by a very narrow majority. 

In 1897 he was one of the special Commissioners to con- 
sider the question of railroad taxation, whose report be- 
came enacted into the body of the tax laws. 

In November. 1897. he was appointed a Judge of the Court 
of Errors and Appeals by Governor Griggs, to fill a vacancy 
caused by the death of Judge Dayton. On January 12th, 
1898, h« was nominated for a full term of six years by Gov- 
-smor Griggs, and he was confirmed by the Senate on the 
18th of the same mouth. On January 18th, 1904, he was 
appointed by Governor Murphy for another term of 
office, and on the 25th was confirmed by the Senate. In 
politics the Judge is a Republican. His term will expire 
in 1910. 

GARRET DORSET WALL VROOM, Trenton. 

Judge Vroom, son of the late Governor Peter Dumont 
Vroom and grandson of United States Senator Garret D. 
Wall, was born in Trenton, December 17th, 1843. After a 
preparatory course at the Trenton Academy, he entered 
Rutgers College, graduating therefrom in the year 1862. 
Among his classmates was the Ir.te Judge Abram 
Q. Garretson, Justice of the Supreme Court. After 
studying law wnth his father, Mr. Vroom was 
admitted to the bar as an attorney at the 
June term, 1865, and three years later he was made 
a counselor. He at once began the practice of his 
profession in Trenton. He was elected City Solicitor 
of Trenton in 1866, and held that office until 1870, and again 



BIOGRAPHIES. 389 

from 1873 to 1876. He was appointed Prosecutor of the 
Pleas of Mercer county in May, 1870, to succeed General 
C. K. Hall, deceased, which ofRce he resigned in December, 
1873, on being appointed Reporter of the Supreme Court, 
a position he has held ever since. From 1881 to 1884 Mr. 
Vroom was Mayor of the city of Trenton, and on the cre- 
ation of the Board of Public Works of that city, was ap- 
pointed a member of that body, and held the office of 
President during- its existence. In 1877, in conjunction 
with the late John H. Stewart, he prepared for publication 
the "Revision of the Statutes of New Jersey," under the 
direction of the Commissioners, which publication included 
the statutes revised as well as the entire body of the 
statute laws of the State. In 1887 Mr. Vroom and Judge 
William M. Lanning issued the supplement to the 
Revision, and in 1894 they were authorized to prepare a 
New Revision in three volumes, entitled "The General 
Statutes of New Jersey." 

Judge Vroom is Vice President of the General Society of 
the Sons of the Revolution and one of those most instru- 
mental in the organization of that body in the State. He 
was a member of the National Commission to promote uni- 
formity of laws throughout the United States. He is a 
member of the New Jersey Historical Society and Presi- 
dent of the Trenton Battle Monument Association, the 
Board of Managers of the New Jersey State Hospital at 
Trenton, and the Trenton Savings Fund Society. 

In 1900 Mr. Vroom was offered a seat on the bench of 
the Supreme Court by Governor Voorhees, which he de- 
clined. When Judge Hendrickson was made a Justice of 
the Supreme Court, a vacancy occurred in the Court of 
Errors and Appeals, which was filled by the nomination 
of Mr. Vroom by Governor Voorhees. The nomination was 
made on February 5th, 1901, for a full term of six years, 
and it was confirmed by the Senate on the 12th of the same 
month. In 1907 he was reappointed by Governor 
Stokes. 

The Judge has always been a member of the Democratic 
party, and ever since he has been a voter, until recent 
years, he has been a leader in its councils, and an active 
participator in National, State and local campaigns. His 
term will expire in 1913. 

ELMER EWING GREEN, Trenton. 

Judge Green was born at Trenton, N. J., February 14, 
1850, and is the only child of the late Caleb Smith Green 



390 BIOGRAPHIES. 

and Eleanor Graeme Ewing, his wife. He comes of a fam- 
ily well-known in the judicial history of the state, his 
father having been a Judge of the Court of Errors and 
Appeals from 1873 to 1885; his uncle, Henry W. Green, 
Chief Justice of the State, and afterward Chancellor, and 
his cousin, Edward T. Green, Judge of the United States 
District Court for New Jersey. One generation further 
back, his maternal grandfather, Charles Ewng, was a 
member of the New Jersey bar from 1802, and Chief Jus- 
tice of the Supreme Court from October. 1824, until his 
death in August. 18.32. 

Judge Green received his general education at the old 
Trenton Academy under George S. Grosvenor, and at the 
College of New Jersey, now Princeton University. From 
the latter institution he was graduated in June, 1870. His 
legal studies were pursued in his father's office in Tren- 
ton, and his professional life, since admission to the bar, 
has been passed in the same city. Aside from his profes- 
sion. Judge Green has held one political office, that of 
member of the Common Council of Trenton, from April, 
1882, to April, 1885, and several other offices of trust and 
confidence. In the directory of the Trenton Banking Com- 
pany he has had a seat by annual election since 1885: he 
was a manager of the Trenton Saving Fund Society from 
1891 until 1906, when he resigned, and for twelve years he 
has been a trustee of the Theological Seminary at Prince- 
ton, N. J. 

He was nominated by Governor Murphy in January, 1903, 
as Judge of the Court of Errors and Appeals, and the 
appointment was unanimously confirmed by the Senate. 
On the bench he will sit with Chief Justice Gummere, with 
whom he studied at the Trenton Academy, with whom he 
was graduated at Princeton, and with whom he signed 
the rolls of attorneys and counselors, in 1873 and 1876, re- 
spectively. His term of office will expire February 3, 1909. 
In politics the Judge is a Republican. 

GEORGE R. GRAY, Newark. 

Judge Gray was born in Newton, Sussex county, N. J., 
April 25, 1842, which was his home until 1860, when he 
moved to Newark, N. J. He was engaged as a book- 
keeper for the firm of William Wright & Co.. then man- 
ufacturers of carriage springs in that city, for some 
years. In 1863 the business was removed to Passaic street, 
and the firm was reorganized under the name of the 



BIOGRAPHIES. 391 

Passaic Spring Works. In 1867 Mr. Gray was taken into 
the firm as a partner, and continued as such until Janu- 
ary, 1875, when he was elected to the office of City Treas- 
urer of Newark by the Common Council, which was that 
year Democratic. The Republicans were returned to power 
in 1876, when he was superseded, but was at once elected 
Secretary of the Board of Assessments and Revision of 
Taxes. In 1881 he was elected Superintendent of the New- 
ark Aqueduct Board, and held that office until he resigned 
to accept the position of State Treasurer, in March, 1891. 
He served a full term of three years as State Treasurer 
and made an enviable record in that office. In 1892 Mr. 
Gray was appointed by Governor Abbett as a member of 
the State Beard of Commissioners of Electrical Subways 
to fill a vacancy caused by the resignation of James 
Smith, Jr. He was appointed for a full term of five years 
to that office by Governor Werts in 1893. The Judge is 
President of T. B. Peddle & Co., trunk manufacturers; 
Vice-President of Essex and Hudson Gas Co.; Director in 
Union National Bank, Firemen's Insurance Co., Herring 
Hall Marvin Safe Co. and Public Service Corporation of 
New Jersey. In 1903 Governor Murphy appointed him a 
Judge of the Court of Errors and Appeals for a full term 
of six years, and he was unanimously confirmed by the 
Senate. His term will expire on March 29th, 1909. In poli- 
tics the Judge is a Democrat. 

JAMES BROOKS DILL, East Orange. 

Judge Dill was born at Spencerport, N. Y., July 25th, 
1854, and is a son of Rev. James H, Dill, pastor of the 
South Congregational Church, Chicago, 111., at the time of 
the Civil War. The father was chaplain of the Eighty- 
ninth Illinois Regiment, known as "The Railroad Regi- 
ment," and during the war the chaplain was known as 
"The Fighting Parson." He was killed at the battle of 
Murfreesboro. 

Judge Dill was educated in the public schools of Chi- 
cago, prepared for college at the preparatory school of 
Oberlin College, Ohio, and graduated from Yale Univer- 
sity in 1876. Subsequently he was instructor in Latin and 
mathematics at Stevens Institute, Hoboken, and during 
that time entered the Law School of the University of 
New York, graduating in 1878. In this year he began the 
practice of law in New York and was admitted to the Bar 
of New Jersey. He was an active trial lawyer for about 



392 BIOGRAPHIES. 

fifteen years, when he gave special attention to the study 
of corporation law, principally in New Jersey. For years 
he has been recognized as an authority on this subject. 

He is the author of several books— "Dill on New Jersey 
Corporations" and a treatise on the banking laws of the 
State of New Jersey, and has written a number of publi- 
cations, mainly on economics and kindred topics. He has 
resided in East Orange, N. J., since 1878. 

He was appointed a Judge of the Court of Errors and 
Appeals by Governor Stokes in July, 1905, to fill a vacancy 
caused by the resignation of Judge Peter Van Voorhees. 
His term will expire in 1911. In politics he is a Re- 
publican. 



U. S. OFFICERS FOR NEW JERSEY. 

Di-strict Attorney. 

JOHN BEAM VREELAND, Morristown. 
Mr. Vreeland was born in Newark, N. J., December 30, 
1852, is a son of George W. and Sarah M. Vreeland and a 
descendant on his father's side from Holland ancestry, 
who came directly from Holland and settled in New Jer- 
sey in the seventeenth century, and on his mother's side 
from English settlers before the Revolutionary war. He 
has twice been married, first to Miss Ida A. Piotrowoki, 
December 18th, 1878, and,, second, to Miss Ida King Smith, 
June 2d, 1S97, He was educated in the common schools, 
and after attending the Newark High School one year his 
family, in 2868, moved to Morristown, where he has since 
resided. While in Newark he served a newspaper route 
morning and evening for nearly a j^ear. In 1870 Mr. Vree- 
land began the study of law with F. G. Burnham, com-, 
pleting his studies with the late Colonel F. A. DeMott, 
and was admitted to the bar as an attorney in November, 
1875, and as a counselor at the June term of the Supreme 
Court, in 1S79. Chancellor McGill appointed him a Special 
Master in Chancery in 1892, and the Supreme Court ap- 
pointed him a Commissioner of that court, June 7th, 1882. 
Mr. Vreeland has been in active and successful practice 
in Morristown since his admission to the bar. He has 
served as Township Clerk of Morris township, Deputy 
County Clerk, Acting Prosecutor of the Pleas of the county 
of Morris, and also as City Counsel of Morristown. In 



BIOGRAPHIES. 393 

1895 he was elected to the State Senate by a plurality of 
1,526 over Mr. McCracken, his Democratic opponent. Dur- 
ing his term of three years as State Senator he took an 
active part in legislation, served on leading committees 
and was a member of the Commission to Revise the Bank- 
ing and Trust Company Laws. In 1898 he was appointed 
by Governor Voorhees as Judge of the Morris County 
Courts for a term of five years, an ofRce which he filled 
with marked ability. 

Mr. Vreeland was appointed by President Roosevelt to 
the office of United States Attorney for the District of 
New Jersey on October 20, 1903, to fill the unexpired term 
of David O. Watkins, who had resigned that office. He 
was sworn into office on October 28th. He was appointed 
for a full term in 1904. Mr. Vreeland has always been a 
Republican In politics and has never failed to take a 
deep interest in the welfare of his party. He was re- 
appointed in 1907. His term will expire in 1912. 



Clerk U. S. Circuit Court. 

HENRY DUNCAN OLIPHANT, Trenton. 

Mr. Oliphant was born at Uniontown, Fayette county, 
Pa., -June 6th, 1855. He is the fourth son of the late 
General S. Duncan Oliphant, who died on October 23d, 
1904, after having served thirty-four years as Clerk of 
the United States Circuit Court for New Jersey, and 
whom he succeeds in that office. Mr. Oliphant's early 
education was received in the schools of his native town 
and of Princeton, N. J. In 1867 he moved, with his 
father, to Princeton. 

In the fall of 1872 he entered the College of New Jersey, 
now Princeton University, as a member of the class of 
1876, but left that institution to take a position as Clerk 
in the United States Circuit Court in the spring of 1875, 
which he occupied until October 18th, 1880, when he was 
appointed Deputy Clerk of the said court, an office he 
filled until he was promoted to the clerkship of the 
Court, by order dated October 29th, 1904, by United States 
Circuit Court Judges Acheson, Dallas and Gray, taking 
the oath of office November 1st. 1904. 

He was anoointed a Standing Examiner of the Court 
June 15th. 1897, and has been prominently before the 



394 BIOGRAPHIES. 

greatest lawyers of the country, notably in the famous 
shipbuilding case. 

He is an elder and trustee of the First Presbyterian 
Church of Trenton, and is a member of the Masonic 
order, belonginK to Column Lodge, No. 120, and of the 
Chapter. 

The salary of the Clerk is paid by the retention of 
fees to a limited amount, as provided by statute. 



Clerk U. S. District Court. 

GEORGE T. CRANMER. Trenton. 

Mr. Cranmer was born at Barnegat, N. J., December 6th. 
1848. He was formerly engaged in the banking and broker- 
age, real estate and insurance business. He has been an 
active member of the S'ate National Guard for a number 
of years, and from 1875 to 1899 was Quartermaster of the 
Seventh Regiment. In 1878 he was the Republican candi- 
date for member of Assembly, but was defeated by Hon. 
Rufus Blodgett, since a United States Senator. In Sep- 
tember, 1879, without his solicitation, he was appointed by 
President Hayes Collector of Customs for the District of 
Little Egg Harbor, N. J., which office he resigned July 1st, 
1S80. In 1882 he was again nominated for member of As- 
sembly and elected over William J. Harrison by a majority 
of 477. In 1883 he was unanimously nominated for Senator, 
and elected over ex-Senator Ephraim P. Emson by a plur- 
ality of 36. In 1886 he was renominated for Senator, and 
elected over Judge Richard H. Conover by a plurality of 
743. In 1889 he was again unanimously renominated for Sen- 
ator, and elected over ex-Senator Ephraim P. Emson by a 
plurality of 272. He always took an active part in the pro- 
ceedings of the Senate, and for many years was Chairman 
of the Senate Republican caucus, and also of the joint 
Republican caucus. In 1889 he was unanimously nominated 
by the Republican caucus for President of the Senate. He 
was an alternate Delegate-at-Large to the National Repub- 
lican Convention at Chicago in ISSS, and also to the Minne- 
apolis Convention in 1892. In October, 1S91, at a convention 
of the State League of Republican Clubs, he was elected 
an alternate Delegate-at-Large to the National Convention 
of Republican Clubs. He was appointed to his present 
office by the late Judge Green, in January, 1893, to succeed 
Linsly Rowe, who had resigned. No fixed salary, but In- 
stead, fees. 



BIOGRAPHIES. '395 

United States Marsbal. 

THOMAS J. ALCOTT, Mount Holly. 
Mr. Alcott was born in Mount Holly, N. J., January 24th, 
1840. In the year 1855 he commenced the study of pharmacy, 
and in 1859 entered Pennington Seminary, where he pursued 
his studies until the beginning of 1863, when he enlisted in 
the Twenty-third Regiment, New Jersey Volunteers, and 
served as Quartermaster Sergeant in the Army of the 
Potomac, under Generals Burnside and Hooker. In 1865 he 
became junior partner with his father, Hon. Thomas C. 
Alcott, who was a member of the Legislature in 1869, '70 and 
'71, in the foundry and machine business, under the name 
of T. C. Alcott & Son. Upon the death of his father, in 
1872, Mr. Alcott became sole proprietor of the business. He 
is the patentee and manufacturer of Alcott's improved 
turbine water-wheel, which is so favorably known through- 
out the United States, as well as in European and South 
American countries. He was a member of the House ot 
Assembly in 1884, '85 and '86, when he took a prominent 
part In legislation. He was appointed United States Mar- 
shal for New Jersey early in 1897, to succeed George Pfeif- 
fer, whose term had expired. His salary is $3,000 a year. 



STATE OFFICERS. 

Secretary of State. 

SAMUEL D. DICKINSON, Jersey City. 

Colonel Dickinson was born in Philadelphia, November 
5, 1850. He was educated in School No. 1, Jersey City. For 
some time he was employed in the old Union Bank in that 
city and he was also in the real estate business. He was 
enrolled as a private in the Fourth Regiment Rifle Corps, 
April 21, 1868, became corporal of Company E, Fourth 
Regiment, National Guard, April 14, 1869, and then served 
through all the grades to the colonelcy, which he reached 
on April 22, 1885. He resigned the colonelcy on December 6, 
1888. He was selected by the State Military Board as Adju- 
tant of the New Jersey Battalion which attended the cele- 
bration at Torktown in 1881. In 1883 he was an officer of the 



396 BIOGRAPHIES. 

American Rifle Team and went to England in that year to 
compete in the international rifle match. 

The Colonel has always been active in politics and for 
several years has been the recognized Republican leader of 
Hudson county. For a long period he has been in close 
relationship with the state leaders of his party and to an 
eminent degree enjoyed the confidence of the late General 
Sewell. He served as Comptroller of Jersey City for four 
years and until 1899. He was appointed Postmaster of 
Jersey City by President Harrison and served five years, 
one of which was under the Cleveland administration. He 
was City Treasurer of Jersey City for four years under 
an appointment made by Mayor Wanser. Upon leaving the 
Treasurer's ofl3ce he was made agent for the Hoboken 
division of the United Electric Company, which position he 
held until his appointment as Secretary of State. The 
Colonel was Collector of the Port of Hudson county for 
one year. 

The nomination of Franklin Murphy for Governor was 
brought about largely through the efforts of the Colonel. 
He started the movement in that direction and never tired 
until the State Convention of his party ratified his choice. 
The splendid endorsement given by the people at the polls 
to the selection of Mr. Murphy as a candidate was a de- 
monstration of the wisdom displayed by the Colonel in the 
matter. As a fearless leader and experienced politician 
the Colonel has made an enviable record in that hot-bed of 
Democracy, Hudson county. 

Colonel Dickinson was nominated for Secretary of State 
by Governor Murphy on March 17, 1902, and he was con- 
firmed by the Senate two days later by an unanimous vote. 
In 1907 he was renominated by Governor Stokes and 
was again confirmed by the Senate for another term. 
His term of office is five years and will expire on 
April 1, 1912. His salary is $6,000 a year. 



Assistant Secretary of State. 

J. B. R. SMITH, Trenton. 

Mr. Smith was born at BranchvlUe. Sussex county. In 
1869, coming of a line of ^^llage merchants of that town, ex- 
tending back to 1836. When ten years old he began a clerk- 
ship in his father's store, spending his evenings, holidays 
and vacations at that work, and attending the publi'- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 397 

schools during the daytime until he entered Wyoming Sem- 
inary, Kingston, Pa., in 1887. After completing his course 
at that Institution he became a partner in the Branchville 
business, which lasted until he purchased the newspaper 
known as the Warren Tidings, ,at Washington, N. J., 
in 1893, and became its editor. He was appointed 
court clerk in the Secretary of State's office May 
1, 1897, and held that position until he was promoted to his 
present office. He studied law with Oscar Jeffrey and was 
admitted to the bar as an attorney at the June term, 1900. 
On April 8, 1902, he received his commission as Assistant 
Secretary of State, and it was renewed in 1907. 

For several years Mr. Smith has been prominently iden- 
tified with the New Jersey newspaper profession, and he 
feels very proud of that record. For some years he has 
taken an active part in the politics of Warren county and 
is recognized as one of the leaders there of the Republican 
party. Since his admission to the bar he has enjoyed a 
good practice at corporation law and in the Surrogate's 
Court. 

Mr. Smith's powers and duties as Assistant Secretary of 
State, as defined by statute, are: "He shall, during the 
absence or inability, through sickness or other cause, of 
the Secretary of State, have the same powers and perform 
the same duties which are now imposed by law upon the 
Secretary of State." 



State Treasurer. 

DANIEL S. VOORHEES, Morristown. 

Mr. Voorhees was born in Somerville, N. J., August 
15, 1852. He is a descendant of Lucius Von Voorhees, 
who emigrated to this country in the year 1600. When 
a small boy he, with his family, moved to Elizabeth, 
Union county. He sold newspapers at the Elizabeth 
railroad station for some time and also worked in a 
hardware store. In 1869 he removed to Morristown, 
and on June 1, 1870, he became a clerk in the office of 
the Cleric of Morris county. In 1876 he was made 
Deputy Cleric by William McCarthy, the incumbent 
of the office, who was a Democrat. Mr. Voorhees held 
that office until 1898, when he received the Republi- 
can nomination for County Cleric and was elected by 
a majority of 1,200. He filled the ofrice with so much 
satisfaction and made himself so very popular 



398 B10GRAPllli:S. 

throughout the county that he was renominated and 
re-elected by the surprising- majority of 3,500. He 
spent thirty-seven years altogether in the County 
Clerk's office. Mr. Voorhees enjoys the distinction oT 
having nearly as many Democratic as Republican 
friends in Morris county. Broad-minded in his views 
of all public questions, a loyal member of his party, 
appreciative of his numerous friends, a great favorite 
in social circles, a member of many clubs, and ard- 
ently fond of the art of Izaak Walton, the popularity 
of Mr. Voorhees is thus attested. 

Mr. Voorhees was elected State Treasurer by a joint 
meeting of the Legislature on February 14, 1907, for 
a full term of three years to succeed Prank O. Briggs, 
who had resigned tlxe office to become United States 
Senator. He assumed the duties of the office on March 
1, 1907. His salary is $6,000 a year and his term ex- 
pires in 1910. 



State Comptroller. 

HKNRY J. WEST, Gloucester City. 

Mr. West was born in Rhode Island April 1st, 1849, 
and is the son of Henry F. West, for over thirty years 
the manager of the Washington Manufacturing Com- 
pany's mills, in Gloucester City. He attended the pub- 
lic schools in that city, Professor Gregory's School, In 
Philadelphia, and subsequently took a course in civil 
engineering at the Philadelphia Polytechnic College, 
leaving that institution to engage in the practical 
work of the mills. He served a regular apprenticeship 
in the machine shops and other departments of the 
works, after which he was made assistant in the man- 
agement of the. concern, retiring from that position 
in June, 1885. Mr. West was appointed Under Sheriff 
of Camden county, by Sheriff Baird, in November, 1887, 
and was elected Sheriff in 1890. Governor Werts ap- 
pointed him a member of the State Board of Taxation, 
and he was confirmed by the Senate on May 18th, 1894, 
for a term of fave years. He was reappointed in 1899 
by Governor Vooi-hees and was duly confirmed by the 
Senate. Again, in 1904, he was appointed by Governor 
Murphy and served only one year because he was leg- 
islated out of office by the creation of the new Board 
of Equalization of Taxes. Mr. West served as Presi- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 399 

dent of the State Board of Taxation for six years. He 
was elected State Comptroller by a joint meeting- of 
the Legislature h.^ld on February 11, 1908, for a term 
of three years, receiving the full vote of his party. His 
salary is $6,000 a year. 



Attorney-General. 

EDMUND WILSON, Red Bank. 

Mr. Wilson was born at Shrewsbury, Monmouth 
county, N. J., on the 15th day of December, 1863. He 
is the son of Rev. Thaddeus Wilson, D. D., and Char- 
lotte Ann Wilson. His father was the active pastor of 
the Presbyterian Church at Shrewsbury for forty-five 
years, and was pastor emeritus up to the time of his 
death. His son, having prepared for college at Phillips 
Exeter Academy, Exeter, N. H., entered Princeton Uni- 
versity in the Fall of 1881, and was graduated in 1885. 
He studied law at Columbia University, New York, and 
was registered as a student in the office of Hon. Henry 
M. Nevius, at Red Bank. He was admitted to the bar 
as an attorney in June, 1888, and as counselor in No- 
vember, 1891. Immediately upon being licensed as an 
attorney he formed a copartnership with Mr. Nevius, 
which continued until the latter w^as appointed a Cir- 
cuit Judge, March 2d, 1896. The partnership was then 
dissolved and Mr. Wilson continued the practice of 
law alone. His practice has been general in its char- 
acter, involving much activity as a trial lawyer in 
both civil and criminal courts. In September, 1903, 
he was appointed by the then Attorney-General of the 
United States, William H. Moody, a special assistant 
to the United States Attorney for the District of New 
Jersey for the purpose of assisting- in the preparation 
and trial of cases which the Department of Justice 
was pressing against certain bank officers in the State 
of New Jersey for violating the National Banking Act. 
For a number of years he served as a member of the 
State Board of Education. In June, 1907, he became a 
member of the Board of Railroad Commissioners of 
New Jersey, and resigned his position upon this board 
when appointed Attorney-General by Governor J. 
Franklin Fort, on the 17th of November, 1908. He suc- 
ceeded Hon. Robert H. McCarter, who had resigned 
that office. His salary is $7,000 a year. 



400 BIOGRAPHIES. 

AM.siNtant Attorney-General. 

NELSON B. GASKILL, Mount Holly. 

Mr. Gaskill was born at Mount Holly, N. J., September 
12th, 1875. He prepared for college at the Peddie Institute, 
Hightstown, N. J., and entered Princeton with the class 
of 1896. Upon p:raduation he spent two years at the Har- 
vard Law School and studied one year in the otflce of his 
father. Judge Joseph H. Gaskill. He was admitted to the 
bar as attorney in 1899 and passed the counselors' examin- 
ation three years later. Since admission he has practiced 
law in Camden, N. J., with his father as a member of 
the firm of Gaskill & Gaskill. He enlisted in the National 
Guard in 1896, and was made Captain of his company two 
years later; he was later appointed Battalion Adjutant 
with the Third Regiment, which commission he now holds 
He was appointed .Assistant Attorney General in Novem- 
ber, 1906, to succeed Edward D. Duffield. who had resigrned 
that office. He was reappointed in 1908. 



Major-General. 

PETER FARMER WANSER. Jersey City. 

General Wanser was born in Middlesex county, N. J., 
January 24, 1849. He was formerly in the produce business 
with his father in New York and is now engaged in the real 
estate business, being a member of the firm of Love & 
Wanser, of Jersey City. He was an Assemblyman from 
Hudson county in 1883. Hi was appointed Police Justice 
of Jersey City by joint session of the Legislature in 1885 
and was re-appointed in 1888 for terms of three years each. 
He served as Mayor of Jersey City for five years from 
1892 to 1897, having been elected to that office by a large 
majority over Allan L. McDermott, the Democratic can- 
didate. He was one of the few Republican Mayors that 
city has ever had. He is at present the Postmaster of 
Jersey City, having been appointed to that office by the 
late President McKinley. At one time he was a Custom 
House Inspector. 

The General has been a member of the National Guard 
of New Jersey for over thirty years. On June 1, 1870. he 
was enrolled as a private of Company E. Fourth Regi- 
ment, and was promoted through the various grades until 



BIOGRAPHIES. 401 

he became Colonel on February 20, 1889. He was appointed 
Brigadier General of the First Brigade, August 2, 1892. 
Governor Murphy nominated him as Major General of 
Division, January 27, 1902, and he was confirmed by an 
unanimous vote of the Senate the following day. The Gen- 
eral is the successor of General Sewell, who died on De- 
cember 27, 190L 



Adjutant-General. 

R. HEBER BREINTNALL, Newark. 

General Breintnall was born in Philadelphia, Pa., Aug- 
ust 18, 1843. In 1847 his family moved to Newark, N. J., 
where he has resided ever since. He was educated in the 
Newark Academy. The General is a member of Phil 
Kearny Post, No. 1, G. A. R., Department of New Jersey, 
and of the New York Commandery of the Loyal Legion, 
and also of the Society of the Army of the Potomac. 

The General's military record is as follows: Appointed 
corporal. Company D, New Jersey Volunteer Militia, 
Pennsylvania Emergency, in the War of the Rebel- 
lion, on June 23, 1863. and was discharged August 1 of 
the same year at the expiration of his term of service. 
On September 30, 1864, he became a private in Company K. 
Thirty-ninth Regiment. New Jersey Volunteers; was ap- 
pointed regimental quartermaster-sergeant, October 11, 
1864, and was discharged June 17, 1865, at the close of the 
war. 

Returning to Newark he enlisted in the First Veteran 
Regiment, Newark Brigade. February 12, 1867. and re- 
ceived a warrant as commissary sergeant. He served in 
that capacity until August 10, 1881, when he was commis- 
sioned as Captain and Inspector of Rifle Practice of the 
First Regiment, National Guard. He held that position 
until January 6, 1886, when he was elected Major. He was 
commissioned as Lieutenant-Colonel June 17, 1893, and as 
Colonel May 28, 1902. He was commissioned as Brigadier 
General and Adjutant General, September 30, 1902, to fill the 
vacancy caused by the death of General Alexander C. Oli- 
phant. 

He was commissioned as Lieutenant-Colorel, First Regi- 
ment, infantry, New Jersey National Guard Volunteers, 
Spanish-American war, April 27, 1898. and was discharged 
November 4 of the same year. 

When the Newark regiment went to Camp Alger in 1898 
26 



402 BIOGRAPHIES. 

General Breintnall was second In command, and as the 
command of the First Brigade, First Division, Second 
Army Corps, devolved on General Campbell, as the senior 
Colonel of the brigade, the care and conduct of the regi- 
ment was left to the Lieutenant-Colonel. His soldierly 
qualifications and the watchful care which he exercised 
over the men of the regiment won for him the commenda- 
tion of the brigade, division and corps conamanders. 

He Is a member of the Board of Managers of the New 
Jersey Home for Disabled Soldiers, located at Kearny, 
Hudson county, having been appointed to succeed the late 
General Richard A. Donnelly. 

The General is an expert rifleman. The records of the 
office of the Inspector-General of Rifle Practice show that 
he has qualified twenty-four times at Sea Girt as a marks- 
man and fourteen times as a sharpshooter, and four times 
as an expert, a distinction that comparatively few mem- 
bers of the Guard have attained. His salary is |2,500 a 
year. 



Q,aarterinastei>GeneraI. 

C. EDWARD MURRAY, Trenton. 

General Murray was bom in Lanabertville, N. J., July 
17th, 1863. He is the only son of J. Howard Murray and 
Wllhelmina Solliday Murray, and came to Trenton with 
his parents In 18tj5. He received his education at the State 
Model School and the Stewart Business College. In 1883 
he became associated with his father in the mechanical 
rubber manufacturing business. In 1892 he became sole 
proprietor of the business, and to-day has other large 
manufacturing interests. From boyhood he has taken a 
great deal of interest in affairs of the city of Trenton, as 
well as the Republican party, and In 1894 he was elected 
City Clerk, which office he kept until he declined re-elec- 
tion In 1904. In 1900 he represented the Second Congres- 
sional District as alternate to the National Republican 
Convention and in 1904 was elected a delegate to represent 
the Fourth Congressional District at the National Repub- 
lican Convention. 

His military career began with his enlistment In Com- 
pany A. Seventh Regiment, N. G. N. J., December 12, 1885. 
On June 30, 1890. the late Brigadier-General "William HL 
Skirm, then Colonel of the Seventh Regiment, N. G. N. J., 
appointed him Paymaster of the Regiment with the rank 



BIOGRAPHIES. 403 

of first lieutenant. On June 30, 1895, he was cominlssioned 
Captain and Paymaster. On May 2, 1899, he was retired 
under the act reorganizing the National Guard. March 8, 
1905, Governor Edward C. Stokes appointed him. Quarter- 
master-General, to succeed the late Brevet Major-General 
Richard A. Donnelly, and was commissioned Brigadier- 
General April 5, 1905. 

General Murray is one of the best known and most pop- 
ular among the public men of Trenton. He has distin- 
guished himself as a leader of his party and many of its 
victories m Trenton and Mercer county are mostly to his 
credit. He has a host of friends among people of all 
shades of political opinion, and as an employer of labor he 
stands high in the estimation of wage workers. 



Judge Advocate-General. 

EDWARD P. MEANT, Newark. 

Brigadier-General Meany of the National Guard, State 
of New Jersey, was born in 1854, of English and- Irish an- 
cestry. He is a son of the late Judge Edward A. Meany 
of Louisville, Kentucky. His grandfather. Captain Henry 
Gould Shannon, settled at Louisville in 1810 and served 
through the War of 1812 and the Mexican War, His 
father, Judge Edward A. Meany, was for a number of 
years conspicuously identified with the jurisprudence of 
the South, filling an honored place upon the bench and 
having a brilliant career at the bar. 

Commodore Barry and Captain John Meany of Philadel- 
phia were also members of this family. 

General Meany was educated in Kentucky and was care- 
fully prepared for the practice of the profession which his 
father had adorned, and was admitted to the bar in 1878. 
He served for several years as an officer of the Kentucky 
State Guard. 

He is counsel for the American Telephone and Telegraph 
Company and holds several positions of prominence and 
confidence in that and its associate companies. In 1884 
he was vice-president of the New Mexico Central and 
Southern Railroad Company. He represented that com- 
pany in Mexico and Europe, and obtained from the Mexi- 
can Government the concession under which it operates 
in the Republic of Mexico. 

General Meany is a Democrat in politics and was a 



404 BIOGRAPHIES. 

delegate from New Jersey to the Democratic National 

Conventions of 1896 and 1900, at both of which conventions 
he earnestly supported the cause of sound money. In 1893 
he was appointed Judge Advocate-General of New Jersey, 
with the rank of Brigadier-General. In 1894 he was one 
of the Palisades Commissioners of the State of New Jer- 
sey. He has been a trustee and treasurer of the Newark, 
N. J., Free Public Library. General Meany married Miss 
Rosalie Behr, daughter of Peter Behr, Esq., of St. Louis, 
Missouri. 



Deputy Adjutant-General. 

JAMES S. KIGER. Trenton. N. J. 

The subject of this sketch was born In Salem, Salem 
county, New Jersey, August 18, 1842, and was educated in 
the private and public schools of his native city. At the 
age of thirteen years he became identified, as messenger, 
with a clothing house: subsequently as a clerk with a 
dry goods firm. At the beginning of the War of the Re- 
bellion, 1861, he enlisted in the Salem Light Artillery, 
militia, as a private, April 25, 1861, and was later war- 
ranted corporal and sergeant. On August 11, 1862, he en- 
listed as private, Co. A, Twelfth Regiment, infantry. New 
Jersey Volunteers, for three years, and was warranted 
sergeant. September 4, 1862; by reason of injuries received 
in the Antietam (Md.) campaign, Sept., '62, and of typhoid 
fever contracted in active service near Falmouth, Va., 
February, 1863. was trarsf erred, June 6, 1863, to the Vet- 
eran Reserve Corps, and served as first sergeant, Co, K, 
Twenty-first Regiment, until July 6, 1865, when he was 
honorably discharged at the close of the war; October 18, 
1865, was appointed copyist in office of Clerk in Chancery. 
On May 1, 1867, he was appointed by the late General Wil- 
liam S. Stryker, Adjutant General, to a clerkship in his de- 
partment, and on January 1, 1890, received the appoint- 
ment of chief clerk. He rendered efficient service to Ad- 
jutant General William S. Stryker in compiling the roster 
of officers and men of New Jersey during the Revolution- 
ary war, issued in 1872; officers and men of New Jersey 
in Civil war, issued in 1876. At this date he is superintend- 
ing the preparation of data of officers and men of New 
Jersey, from the earliest Colonial period, 1636 to 1900. 

On May 23, 1881, he was commissioned Deputy Adjutant 
General, with rank of lieutenant-colonel; on May 16, 1906, 



BIOGRAPHIES. 405 

Deputj"- Adjutant General, with rank of colonel, and Is still 
in commission. By an act of the Legislature of this state, 
approved March 10, 1880, the Adjutant General's office was 
directed to render all possible assistance to veterans or 
their dependents having unsettled claims before the dif- 
ferent departments of the general government. The duty- 
was assigned to Colonel Kiger, who has since that time 
given this order his personal attention. 

Colonel Kiger served in the volunteer fire department of 
Trenton, from- July, 1865, until April 2, 1892, the time of 
the merging of the same into the paid fire department; is 
a past grand of Fred D. Stuart Lodge, No. 154, I. O. O. F. ; 
past grand master and past grand representative, Grand 
Lodge, I. O. O. F. ; past master. Ashlar Lodge, No. 76, 
F. «& A. M. ; past commander, Post 23, G. A. R.; sir knight, 
Mercer Castle, No 23, K. G. E. 

He has been one of the managers of McKinley Memorial 
Hospital since its organization, 1887, and is now president 
of the training class for nurses connected with that in- 
stitution. He has been a trustee of Pennington Seminary 
since March, 1882; is associated with the State Street M. 
E. Church, as an official, and with the Sunday school of 
said church as teacher of a senior Bible class. 



Clerk of the Supreme Court. 

WILLIAM RIKER. JR., Orange. 

Mr. Riker was born in Newark, N. J., January 14th, 1850. 
His father, William Riker, Sr., was for many years a suc- 
cessful manufacturing jeweler, and retiring from active 
business was succeeded by two of his sons, one of whom 
is the subject of this sketch. Mr. Riker completed his 
education In the Newark Academy, and thereupon engaged 
in the jewelry business with his father, afterwards becom- 
ing a partner, and later one of his successors, and is still 
engaged in that business. 

He was chosen as a delegate to the National Republican 
Conventions of 1884 and 1896; elected Alderman of the city 
of Orange in 1893 and Register of Deeds and Mortgages for 
Essex county in the same year. The latter office he re- 
signed before the completion of his term in order to accept 
the appointment by Governor Griggs as Clerk of the 
Supreme Court. He was re-appointed by Governor Mur- 
phy in 1902 and by Governor Stokes in 1907. 



406 BIOGRAPHIES. 

He has served as member and Treasurer of the Essex 
County Republican Committee for a number of years. He 
was chosen Treasurer of the Republican State Committee 
in 1898 and served six years. His salary is $6,000 a year, 
and his term of office, which is for five years, will expire 
on November 2, 1912. 



Clerk in Chancery. 

VIVIAN M. LEWIS, Paterson. 

Born at Paterson, N. J., June 8th, 1869, Is an at- 
torney and counselor-at-law. Prior to his admission 
to the bar he w^as engaged as correspondent of sev- 
eral Newr York newspapers. He was appointed judge- 
advocate of the old Second Regiment, National Guard, 
in July, 1896, and served until the reorganization in 
1899, when he was placed on the retired list with the 
rank of captain. "Was elected to the Assembly in 
1898, 1899 and 1900, and w as leader of the Republi- 
can majority on the floor of the House during his 
last term. He was for many years one of the counsel 
of the State Board of Health. He was elected City 
Counsel of Paterson in 1904 for a full term of office, 
but resigned upon his appointment by Governor Mur- 
phy as Clerk in Chancery, to fill the vacancy caused 
by the resignation of Edw^ard C. Stokes, who was 
elected Governor. He was nominated for a full term 
of office in 1905, by Governor Stokes, and was con- 
firmed by the Senate. His salary is $6,000 a year and 
his term will expire in 1910. 



Saperintendent of Public Ibstmction. 

CHARLES J. BAXTER, Trenton. 

Mr. Baxter was born at Glenwood, Sussex county, N. J., 
on November 8th, 1841. He attended the district school 
there until he was twelve years of age. after which he 
went to work on his father's farm, continuing his studies 
by himself and with the help of an uncle who had gradu- 
ated from Lafayette College and then lived on the nex' 
farm. On his eighteenth birthday he started his educa- 
tional work as a teacher in the district school at Frankfort 



BIOGRAPHIES. 407 

Plains, N. J. After twelve years of teaching in several 
district schools, Mr. Baxter was appointed Principal of 
the Franklin Furnace District School. He gradually im- 
proved the condition of the school until it was converted 
into a High School, remaining in that position for thirteen 
years. After leaving Franklin Furnace, about thir- 
teen years ago, he moved to Plainfield, where he be- 
came connected with the Provident Life and Trust 
Company, of Philadelphia. 

In 1875 Mr. Baxter was nominated and renominated as 
County School Superintendent of Sussex county by the 
State Board of Education, but was rejected by the Demo- 
cratic Board of Freeholders because of his party affilia- 
tions. This started the agitation which resulted in that 
power being taken from the Board of Freeholders and 
given to the Board of Education. He was appointed to his 
present position by Governor Griggs on March 24th, 1896, as 
a successor to Addison B. Poland, who had resigned. Two 
days later Mr. Baxter was confirmed by the Senate for a 
full term of three years. In 1899 he was re-appointed for 
another term of three years, and in 1902 for a new term of 
five years, and again in 1907 for another term. His 
salary is $5,000 a year. 



Keeper of the State Prison. 

GEORGE O. OSBORNE, Trenton. 

Mr. Osborne was born at Elmira, New York, June 24, 
1845. His great-great grandfather on his father's side came 
to this country from England about 1780 and located at 
New Fishkill, New York, where his grandfather, Jonah 
Osborne, was born in 1791, who served in the war of 1812 
and was wounded in the battle on Lake Ontario. At the 
close of the war he located near Elmira, N. Y., where Mr. 
Osborne's father was born in 1821. 

On his mother's side he is descended from Ezra Earll 
and his wife, Mary Sabin, one of the oldest families in 
New York State. The pioneers of the Earll family came 
to this country from England in 1639 and located on the 
ground where the city of Boston is now situated. The 
Earll family are the present owners of Cromwell's Lake, 
New York, which has been in their possession since 1762. 

When three years of age the subject of this sketch 
moved with his father, Ira Osborne, now living at Athens, 
Pa., to Vanettenville, Chemong county, N. Y.. where he 



408 lUOGRAPHIES. 

was educated. Mr. Osborne, Sr., enlisted in the Union 
Army when his son was about 17 years of age. After hid 
father had zone to the war Mr. Osborne ran away from 
home and enlisted twice, first in the Twelfth and after- 
wards in the One Hundred and Forty-first New York 
State Volunteers, but both times at the strong solicitation 
of his mother and through influence of friends, owing to 
his youth, he was discharged from the service and re- 
turned to his home, and then sent by his mother to a 
friend of the family, P. J. Powless, who had charge of the 
county Institutions at Snake Hill, Hudson county, N. J. 
At this place he was employed as assistant to the super- 
intendent from January, 1863, to November, 1865, at which 
date he was appointed Warden of the Hudson County 
Almshouse, to which position he was re-elected for ten con- 
secutive years. Upon retiring from that offlce he engaged 
in the livery business in Jersey City, which he conducted 
from 1876 to 1880. Next he accepted the position of clerk at 
the Barge Office in New York city, which position he held 
until April 22, 1882, when he was elected Warden of the 
City Hospital of Jersey City, a position he held until 1902, 
when he resigned to enter upon his duties as Keeper of 
the New Jersey State Prison, to which office he was ap- 
pointed by Governor Franklin Murphy. 

Mr. Osborne was the first vice-president of the Columbia 
Building and Loan Association of Jersey City, and he is 
now serving his twelfth term as president of that corpora- 
tion. For a number of years he has served as trustee of 
the Emory Methodist Episcopal Church of Jersey City; 
he is a member of the Highland Lodge of Masons, Hugh 
Depayne Commandery, of Jersey City; Mecca Temple of 
the Shrine; Union League Club of Jersey City; also the 
Bergen Republican Club. 

He was nominated by Governor Murphy to the office of 
Keeper of the State Prison on March 5. 1902. to succeed 
Samuel S. Moore, and the nomination was confirmed by 
the Senate six days later. He entered upon his duties as 
State Prison Keeper March 18, 1902. In 1907 he was 
appointed and confirmed for another term of office. 
The term is for five years and will expire March 18, 
1912, and the salary is $3,500 a year. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 409 

State Prison Supervisor. 

SAMUEL W. KIRKBRIDE, Asbury Park. 

Mr. Kirkbridt; was born May 30th, 1848, at Mt Holly, 
Burlington county, N. J., and is a contractor and builder. 
He spent his boyhood days in Mt. Holly, and received his 
ediication in the public schools of that place. At the age 
of fifteen years he enlisted in the Union army, to do bat- 
tle against the South, but was prevented by his family 
from going- to the front. Twice afterward he re-enlisted, 
but each time he was thwarted by his family, i'rom 1865 
to 1869 Mr. Kirkbride was variously employed— as a news- 
boy on trains of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, as 
clerk and as a carpenter's apprentice. Under his father 
he learned the trade of a carpenter, and so rapidly did he 
acquire a knowledge of the general work that in 1869 he 
was admitted into partnership with his father. He re- 
mained a member of the firm until 1871. He then began 
business on his own account, and in 1877 he formed a 
partnership with Joseph B. Kirkbride. A year later they 
engaged in business in Asbury Park, where they built 
several large hotels. He was a member of the Neptune 
Township Committee from 1884 to 1890, member of the 
Board of Health for five years, Township Treasurer for 
three years, member of the Board of Education for six 
years, and member of Common Council of Asbury Park 
for ten years and President of the latter body in 1898. He 
served as a member of the House of Assembly in 1900 and 
1901 and was assigned to important committees. Mr. 
Kirkbride was nominated by Governor Stokes to the office 
of Supervisor of the State Prison on February 20, 1906, and 
was unaimously confirmed by the Senate on March 5th. 
He has always been a steadfast Republican. His term is 
three years and salary $3,000. 



State Librarian. 

HENRY C. BUCHANAN. Trenton. 

Mr. Buchanan was born in Falls township. Pa., within a 
few miles of Trenton, March 7th, 1851. His father was 
William Buchanan, who came to this country from Scot- 
land in 1842, when a young man. The State Librarian 
attended the public schools in his native place until he was 



410 BIOGRAPHIES. 

about eleven years of age, when he entered the Trenton 
Academy. When thirteen years old he left school and 
learned the printer's trade, at which he was employed 
until January 1, 1882, when he became proofreader and 
news editor of the Trenton State Gazette, where he re- 
mained until his appointment as State Librarian. 

Besides being city and news editor on the Gazette, Mr. 
Buchanan, for sixteen years, was the Trenton corre- 
spondent of the Paterson Press, and for rive years he acted 
in a like capacity for the New York Sun. He was for 
several years also the Trenton correspondent of the Phila- 
delphia Inquirer. On February 1st, 1899, he received his 
commission as State Librarian as successor to Morris R. 
Hamilton, for a term of five years. In 1904 he was ap- 
pointed for another term of five years. His salary is 
$3,000 a year. 



Commissioner of Banking and Innnrance. 

DAVID O. WATKINS. Woodbury. 

Mr. Watkins was born at Woodbury, N. J., June 8lh, 
1S62. He worked on a farm in his neighborhood, studioa 
law at night time and was admitted to the bar as an 
attorney at the November term of the New Jersey Supreme 
Court, in 1893, and as a counselor at the February Term 
1897. He was Mayor of Woodbury for four terms of one 
year each, from 1886 to 1S90. He was Councilman from the 
Third Ward of Woodbury from 1892 to 1895, when he was 
re-elected and served until 1S98. He was elected Presideni 
of the City Council in March, 1895, again in 1896, and again 
in 1897. He has served for some time as Solicitor of the 
city of Woodbury, and counsel to the Board of Freeholders 
for Gloucester county. He was elected to the State Assem- 
bly in 1896 by a plurality of 1862. the largest ever given a 
candidate for public office in Gloucester. He was re-elected 
in 1897 and 1898. 

Mr, Watkins served as Speaker of the House of Assembly 
in 1898 and 1899, when he made a record for dignity, upright- 
ness and impartiality which has been seldom equalled in 
the Legislature of New Jersey. At the close of the session 
of 1898 he was presented on behalf of the members with a 
suitable testimonial in recognition of his worth, and the 
phrase, "As fair as Watkins" there and then originated to 
be handed dow^n as an examplp for future occupants of 
the chair. And at the close of the session of 1S99 he was 



BIOGRAPHIES. 411 

paid a similar compliment. On both occasions the Demo- 
cratic minority vied with the Republican majority in be- 
stowing the meed of praise. 

Speaker Watkins became Acting Governor of the State 
on October 18th, 1898. That office had been held by Presi- 
dent of the Senate Voorhees from January 31st, that year, 
and until the date mentioned, when his resignation as Sen- 
ator from Union county was presented and filed, thus cre- 
ating a vacancy also in the higher office, which was at 
once filled by the Speaker of the House, in accordance with 
the requirements of the Constitution of the State. The 
vacancy in the office of Governor in the first place was 
caused by the resignation of John W. Griggs, the then 
incumbent, that he might accept the position of Attorney- 
General of the United States. In his new sphere of duties 
Mr. Watkins gave eminent satisfaction, and he served in 
the office until January 16th, 1899, when Foster M. Voor- 
hees was sworn in as Governor for a term of three years. 

Mr. Watkins was appointed United States Attorney for 
the District of New Jersey in February, 1900, for a full term 
of four years, but resigned that office in March, 1903. He 
was nominated by Governor Murphy on March 10, 1903, to 
his present office and was unanimously confirmed by the 
Senate, two days later, for a full term of three years. 
He succeeded William Bettle, who held the office for 
eight years. He was reappointed by Governor Stokes 
in 1906. His salary is $6,000 a year and his term will 
expire April 2, 1909. In 1904 he was elected a member 
of the State Republican Committee from Gloucester 
county, and continued in office until 1908. 



Chief of the Bureau of Lahor and Statistics. 

WINTON C. GARRISON, Newark. 

Mr. Garrison is a native Jerseyman, having been born 
April 3, 1850, in that section of Newark known as the "Old 
Ninth Ward." 

He was among the first pupils that attended the Chest- 
nut Street School. After finishing his studies in that in- 
stitution he took the High School course, at the conclusion 
of which he entered the employ of a woolen house in New 
York. This was in 1866, and four years later he embarked 
in business tor himself. Mr. Garrison carried on business 
successfully for thirty-one years, when, having amassed 



412 BIOGRAPHIES. 

a moderate competence, he retired from active participa- 
tion In trade matters. 

Mr. Garrison early manifested that Interest In public 
affairs which has made him one of the best-known m.en 
in Newark, where he resides, but not until 1895, when he 
entered the City Council as the representative of the 
Eighth ward, did he hold a public office of any kind. He 
remained four years, or from 1895 to 1899, In the City Coim- 
cil, and during his last year of service was the recognized 
leader of his party in that body. He left the Council with 
the reputation of being one of the most painstaking and 
efficient members that had ever taken part in its delibera- 
tions. 

The next position of responsibility and trust held by Mr. 
Garrison was membership In the Board of Street and 
Water Commissioners of Newark, to which office he was 
elected in 1900 for a term of three years. As a Commis- 
sioner Mr. Garrison is fairly entitled to a large share of 
the credit due the Board for many improvements, some 
already realized and others"assured, in the lines of public 
service that came under its authority, chief among them 
being the elevation of the tracks of the Pennsylvania, Cen- 
tral, and D. L. & W. railroads; the settlement of the water 
supply contract, and the burying underground of electric 
light and trolley wires. While a Street and Water Com- 
missioner Mr. Garrison was offered and urged to accept 
a position on the Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission, 
but declined on the broad ground that the people had 
elected him to serve three years in the Street and Water 
Board and that a relinquishment of his office before com- 
pleting that term would be a breach of the contract which 
he regarded as morally existing between himself and 
them. He therefore served out his full term as a Street 
and Water Commissioner, during the last year of which 
he enjoyed the distinction of being President of the Board. 

On April 4, 1903. or immediately after the end of his 
service in the capacity last referred to, Mr. Garrison as- 
sumed the office of Chief of the Bureau of Statistics, hav- 
ing been appointed to that position by Governor Murphy 
to succeed William Stainsby. The office is one of re- 
sponsibility and importance because of the relations which 
exist between it and the great industrial interests of the 
state. The term is five years and the salary $2,500 per 
annum. He was reappointed by Governor Fort in 
1908. His term will expire in 1913. 

Mr. Garrison is a member of Northern Lodge, No. 25, 



BIOGRAPHIES. 413 

F. & A. M. ; Royal Arcanum, North End Club, a governor 
of Northern Republican Club, and director in the Eighth 
"Ward and the Post Office Building and Loan associations. 
In 1904 he was elected treasurer of the State Republican 
Committee. 



State Board of Assessors. 

DAVID BAIRD, President, Camden. 

Mr. Baird was born in Ireland, April 7th, 1839. When a 
lad he came to the United States, and in 1859 located in the 
city of Camden, which since has been his place of resi- 
dence. Mr. Baird is pre-eminently a self-made man. Com- 
mencing life in this country in a very humble way, he is 
to-day, and has been for some years, one of the foremost 
business men of his section of New Jersey, being extens- 
ively engaged in the business of handling spars, timber, 
piling, etc., in the city of Camden as well as being largely 
interested in lumber operations in other parts of the 
country. 

For the past thirty years Mr. Baird has been so closely 
identified with the politics of Camden city and county that 
the history of one would almost seem to be the history of 
the other. In 1874 he was elected a member of the Board 
of Chosen Freeholders, and was re-elected for and served 
four consecutive terms, during which period he was a 
member of some of the most important committees. In 
the fall of 1887 he was nominated and elected Sheriff of 
Caniden county, at a time when, through existing condi- 
tions, nothing but the personal popularity of David Baird 
secured to the county a Republican Sheriff. And again 
he was elected to the same office in 189fi, by the largest 
majority ever given any candidate for any office in the 
county. He was a delegate from New Jersey to the Re- 
publican National Convention of 1892, held at Minneapolis. 
He was chosen a Presidential Elector in 1900, when he cast 
his vote for McKinley and Roosevelt. For a number of 
years he has represented Camden county on the Republi- 
can State Committee and as a member of the Executive 
Committee of that body. 

He was appointed a member of the State Board of As- 
sessors by Governor Werts in 1895, for a term of four years, 
and served as such for one year and six months, when 
he resigned the office to become Sheriff of Camden county. 



414 BIOGRAPHIES. 

In 1901 he was again appointed a member of the same 
State Board, by Governor Voorhees, for a term of four 
years, beginning in May of that year, and in 1905 he was 
jiven another term by Governor Stokes. His term will 
expire in 1909. 

THEODORE STRONG, New Brunswick. 

Mr. Strong was born at New Brunswick, N. J., January 
15th, 1863, and is a lawyer by profession. He was gradu- 
ated from Rutgers College in 1883, studied law with the 
firm of Woodbrldge Strong & Sons, and was admitted to 
the bar in 1886 and became a member of the foregoing 
firm, which was dissolved when Woodbridge Strong was 
appointed County Judge of Middlesex in 1896. Then he 
formed a co-partnership with his brother, Alan H. Strong, 
which has continued ever since. Mr. Strong was County 
Solicitor for Middlesex from May, 1895, to May, 1897. He 
was elected to the Senate in 1900 by a plurality of 2.072 
over James H. Van Cleef, his predecessor in office. After 
serving nearly a full term of three years he resigned that 
office to accept his present position, to which he was 
nominated by Governor Murphy on April 1st, 1903, and 
was at once confirmed by the Senate. As a member of 
this Board he succeeded John C. Rankin, Jr., who died 
March 20, 1903. He was appointed for a full term of four 
years, and in 1907 he was reappointed by Governor 
Stokes. His term will expire in 1911. 

OBADIAH C. BOGARDUS, Keyport. 

Dr. Bogardus was gorn in Madison township, Mid- 
dlesex county, N. J., December 19th, 1859, and is a 
dentist by profession. His father, Dr. S. W. Bogardus, 
who at that time was practicing dentistry at Stew- 
artsville, N. J., was his preceptor. He entered the 
Pennsylvania Dental College, at Philadelphia, from 
which he w^as graduated in March, 1882. In May, 1882, 
he started the practice of his profession in Keyport, 
Monmouth county, where he established a large and 
lucrative practice, which he still continues. 

He has always been active in politics in his county, 
and served as STieriff of Monmouth county for a term 
of three years — 1902-1905. He was a delegate from 
New Jersey to the Democratic National Convention of 
1904, held at St. Louis. He was appointed a member 
of the State Board of Assessors by Governor Fort on 



BIOGRAPHIES. 415 

January 22d, 1908, for a term of four years, which ap- 
pointment was duly confirmed by the Senate. His 
term will expire in 1912. 

CHARLES E. HENDRICKSON, JR., Jersey City. 

Mr. Hendrickson was born in Mount Holly, Burling- 
ton county, N. J., December 21st, 1872. He is the oldest 
son of Charles E. Hendrickson, a former Justice of the 
Supreme Court, and Sarah Wood Noxon, of Monmouth 
cunty. On November 7th, 1900, he married Janet D. 
Estes, of Memphis, Tenn. He has one son, Charles E. 
Hendrickson III., and one daughter, Janet Douglass 
Hendrickson. He was graduated from Princeton Uni- 
versity with the degree of A. B., in 1895, and from the 
University of Pennsylvania with the degree of LL. B. 
in 1898. At Princeton he was a Clio man. 

Mr. Hendrickson is a lawyer. He was admitted to 
the bar of New Jersey as an attorney in 1898, and as 
a counselor in 1901. He is a Supreme Court Commis- 
sioner and a Special Master in Chancery. He has 
resided in Jersey City for the past ten years. He 
served two terms — 1907 and 1908 — as a member of 
Assembly from Hudson county, and was appointed 
a member of the State Board of Assessors by Gov- 
ernor Fort on January 22d, 1908, for a term of four 
years. 

IRVINE E. MAGUIRE, Secretary, Mount Holly. 

Mr. Maguire was born in Camden, N. J., on January 22d, 
1853, in which city he lived continuously until 1886, when he 
removed to Palmyra, Burlington county. Early in the 
Spring of 1907 he removed to Mount Holly, where he 
is now residing. He received his education in the 
public schools of Camden and Philadelphia, and in 
1868, at the age of fifteen years, entered the counting- 
room of Alexander G. Cattell & Co., then the largest 
grain exporting house in the city of Philadelphia, and 
of which firm the late ex-United States Senator Alex- 
ander G. Cattell was the senior member. Mr. Maguire 
remained in the service of the Messrs. Cattell until 
the year 1884, rising from the position of office boy 
to that of cashier and chief bookkeeper. In the lat- 
ter year, shortly after the organization of the State 
Board of Assessors, he was appointed Assistant Sec- 



416 BIOGRAPHIES. 

retary of that Board, and placed in charge particu- 
larly of the figures and accounting of the department. 
He was elected Secretary of the Board June 18, 1895. 



State Board of Kqiialization of Taxes. 

[This Board takes the place of the old State Board of 
Taxation and was created by an act of the Legislature 
approved March 29, 1905. Term of office, five years; salary 
of President, $5,000; of associate members, $3,500.] 

CARL LENTZ, Newark. 

Major Lentz was born at Bamberg, Bavaria, July 1st, 
1845, and came to the United States at an early age. When 
only sixteen he enlisted in the First Connecticut Cavalry 
Volunteers, First Brigade, Third Division, Cavalry Corps. 
From private he became a non-commissioned officer, and 
after the battle of the Wilderness he was promoted, In 
May, 1864, to a lieutenancy. In one of the cavalry fights, 
which took place July 12th, 1864, in the vicinity of Wash- 
ington, D. C, during the invasion of Early, he lost his 
right arm, and thus disabled he was mustered out of service 
December 24th, 1864. As soon as he had sufficiently recov- 
ered from the effects of his wounds he entered Columbia 
University, Washington, D. C, and was graduated there- 
from in 1869. Subsequently he became a student in the law 
department of the same university, and in 1873 received the 
degree of LL. B. In November of the latter year he was 
admitted to the bar of New Jersey, and soon afterward 
settled in Newark, where he began the practice of his pro- 
fession. He has always been an active Republican, and 
he has served as Chairman of the Essex County Republican 
Committee for several years. He was appointed a member 
of the State Board of Taxation by Governor Griggs, for a 
full term of five years, on February 18th, 1896, and was con- 
firmed by the Senate on March 3d following. He was re- 
appointed by Governor Voorhees in 1901 and by Governor 
Murphy in 190^. He was also appointed a member of 
"The Equal Tax Commission." 

On JMarch 30. 1905, the Major was nominated by Gov- 
ernor Stokes as President of the new Board for a term of 
five years, and he was at once confirmed by the Senate. 
His salary is $5,000 a year. His term will expire in 
1910. 



BIOGRAPHli:.S. 417 

EDWARD AMBLER ARMSTRONG, Camden. 

Mr. Armstrongr was. bom at Woodstown, Salem county, 
N. J., December 28. 1858, and removed to Camden in 1875, 
and is a lawyer by profession, having been admitted to 
the bar at the February term, 1880. He served as an 
Assemblyman from Camden county four years— 1884, '85, '86 
and 87, and was Speaker of the House in '85 and '86. He 
discharged the duties of that office in a very satisfactory 
manner. He served as Judge of the Camden City District 
Court from 1888 to 1901; as Judge-Advocate, Sixth Regi- 
ment Staff, N. G. N. J., with rank of Captain, 1886 to 1893; 
as Judge-Advocate on the Second Brigade Staff, with 
rank of Major, under the commands of Generals Sewell 
and Cooper, 189;j to 1902, when he resigned. He was Presi- 
dent Judge of the Camden County Court of Common Pleas 
from 1897 to 1902. 

On March 30, 1905, Governor Stokes nominated Mr. Arm- 
strong as a member of the State Board of Equalization 
of Taxes, and the nomination was at once confirmed by 
the Senate. His term will expire in 1909, having drawn ^he 
four-year lot, and his salary is $3,500 a year. 

HENRY J. IRICK, Vincentown. 

Mr. Irick is a son of General John Stockton and Emeline 
S. Irick and was born on March 13, 1833, near Vincentown, 
N. J., being the oldest of eight children. At an early age 
he was sent to a primary school, with an attendant to 
care for him, and at the age of twelve years he entered 
an academical school at Norristown, Pa., under the care 
of Rev. Samuel Aaron, a co-laborer of Burleigh, Giddings, 
Lucretia Mott, Wendell Philips and other anti-slavery 
champions. During his five years under Mr. Aaron he 
imbibed the political doctrines which made it So easy for 
him to join the ranks of Republicanism, carrying with 
him. however, the old Whig protection ideas of his ances- 
tors, which became a part of the fundamental principles 
of the great political party to which he has ever borne 
true allegiance. 

At the early age of seventeen years he undertook the 
overseeing of large farming and timber interests. In 1863 
he was elected to the House of Assembly from Burlington 
county and was twice re-elected. In 1865 the House was 
a tie, when he and Mr. Fisher, on the part of the Repub- 
licans, and Messrs. Abbett and Culver, on the part of the 
Democrats, were appointed a Special Committee on Or- 
27 



418 BIOGRAPHIES. 

ganization. During the struggle for leadership Colonel 
Fowler, a Democratic member, died, when Mr. Irick had 
a resolution adopted requiring the vote of thirty-one mem- 
bers to organize the House. This action was so eminently 
fair that Mr. Irick earned ^reat esteem from both sides of 
the House. Joseph T. Crowell, of Union, was subsequently 
elected Speaker. In 1870 Mr. Irick was elected to the 
Senate and served a term of three years. In 1873 he would 
have been elected President of the Senate but for the 
treachery of one whose political career he had done so 
much to promote. During his service as Senator he took 
a very active part in legislation, especially during the last 
year of his terrn, when there was great excitement over 
railroad matters. He served on the most important com- 
mittees and was Chairman of the Republican Caucus dur- 
ing his term of office. He was the author of the bill 
allowing the New Jersey Volunteers the right to vote in 
the field, and of other bills furthering the cause of edu- 
cation. About fifteen years ago he succeeded Judge Clem- 
ent as president of the Council Proprietors of West Jer- 
sey, the oldest corporation in the United States. 

"When his senatorial term closed he moved upon the old 
homestead, farmed its broad acres, and continued his pro- 
fession as a land surveyor until the present time. He has 
always taken an active Interest in politics and has ever 
been an unswerving supporter of the Republican party. 
Mr. Irick has always extended a helping hand to those in 
distress and feels that he has been amply paid for his 
charities. He is still hale and hearty and is engaged In 
a^ctive business pursuits. He is connected with the Great 
Interstate Fair Association and the Mount Holly Agricul- 
tural Fair. He has presided over more grand juries and 
political conventions than any living Jerseyman. 

Mr. Irick was nominated as a member of the Board of 
Equalization of Taxes by Governor Stokes on March 30, 
1905, and was at once confirmed by the Senate. He 
was appointed in 1907 for a full term, which will ex- 
pire in 1912. His salary is $3,500 a year. 

THEODORE SIMONSON, Newton. 

Mr. Simonson was born at Vernon, Sussex county, N. J., 
April 26, 1848. He has always lived in Sussex county and 
his ancestors for four generations were also residents of 
the county. On March 10, 1881, he was married to Fanny 
Townsend, a daughter of ex-Judge Townsend and a sister 
of the late Mrs. Henry C. Kelsey. He Is a lawyer by pro- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 419 

fession. He was admitted to the bar as an attorney at 
the February term, 1876, and as a counselor at the Feb- 
ruary term, 1883. He has always practiced law in Sussex 
county, his office being at Newton. He was Prosecutor of 
the Pleas of Sussex county for fifteen years, having been 
first appointed by Governor Ludlow on March 7, 1883, was 
re-appointed by Governor Green on March 29, 1888, and the 
third time by Governor Werts, on March 29, 1893. In 1892 
he was a Presidential Elector for New Jersey and Voted 
for Cleveland and Stevenson. Mr. Simonson served as 
attorney for Sussex county under an appointment by the 
Board of Freeholders. He is now vice-president of the 
Sussex National Bank and president of the Newton Li- 
brary Association. Governor Stokes nominated him as a 
member of the State Board of Equalization of Taxes on 
March 30, 1905, and he was at once confirmed by the Sen- 
ate. He was nominated and confirmed for a full term of 
five years in 1906. His salary is $3,500 a year. His 
term will expire in 1911. 

GEORGE M. McCarthy, Jersey City. 

Mr. McCarthy was born in Jersey City on -November 
12th, 1870, and is the eldest son of the late Charles J. 
McCarthy, who was also a native of Jersey City, and 
whose father was one of the early settlers of Hud- 
son's county seat. 

Mr. McCarthy attended the local public schools, was 
a pupil of the scientific classes at Cooper Union, New 
York, and studied law in the offices of the late Henry 
C. McCartin and with his brother, James "W. McCar- 
thy. He commenced his newspaper work as Chancery 
Court reporter for the Evening Journal, and at various 
times did general newspaper work for the New York 
Evening Post, Mail and Express, Evening Sun, Musical 
Courier, the Journalist, Jersey City Democrat and other 
New Jersey and New York publications. He was edi- 
tor of Jersey City Town Talk, and was dramatic editor 
of the Evening Journal for several j-ears. He was 
general press agent for the Herald Square Theatre 
and for Anna Held, Evans and Hoey, in "A Parlor 
Match"; DeKoven and Smith's opera, "The Mandarin"; 
Hermann the Great Company, the Lyric Theatre and 
other amusement enterprises. Mr. McCarthy founded 
cxie Society for the prevention of Cruelty to Animals 
in Hudson county, and was the originator of the popu- 



420 BIOGRAPHIES. 

lar movement that resulted in a special session of the 
Legislature for the passage of the anti-pigeon shooting 
bill. 

He is and always has been an organization Republi- 
can. He was elected Alderman in 1894 by 1,013 major- 
ity over a popular opponent who had two years before 
been elected to the same office by a Democratic ma- 
jority of 500. He served two years as Health Com- 
missioner, and resigned to assume the duties of City 
Clerk, to which office he was elected by the Board of 
Aldermen in 1906. In May, 1908, Governor Fort ap- 
pointed him to the State Tax Board. He is Hudson 
member in the Republican State Committee, secretary 
of the Hudson County Republican Committee, president 
of the Minkakwa Club, and a member of Mecca Tem- 
ple, Mystic Shrine; Jersey City Lodge, B. P. O. Elks; 
Enterprise Lodge, F. and A. M. ; New Jersey Consistory 
and Associate Scottish Rite bodies; Jersey City Aerie 
of Eagles, and other fraternal and political organiza- 
tions. 

Mr. McCarthy was Republican nominee for State 
Senator in 1904, and came nearer to election than any 
other Ref)ublican candidate before or since, with the 
ecxeption of Thomas V. Cator, who got fourteen votes 
nearer to it in 1883. Hudson county has never elected 
a Republican Senator. 

Mr. McCarthy while Health Commissioner, in 1905, 
made a secret investigation of the old Jersey City 
Hospital, and after unearthing a mass of evidence 
showing general carelessness, absence of management, 
alck of discipline and outrages and brutalities on pa- 
tients, put it in the form of charges, headed a munici- 
pal investigating committee, and cleaned out the neg- 
lected institution, hastening the establishment of a 
new City Hospital under the management of capable 
public officials. His term expires in 1913. 

HENRY WRIGHT BUXTON, Secretary, Morristown. 

Mr. Buxton was born in Jersey City, N. J., December 
14th, 1S71, and is a merchant. He was formerly a real 
estate broker. He was graduated from Dwight School. 
New York City, in the class of 1S90, and Princeton 
University, class of 1894. He is a member of the firm 
of Swain & Buxton, 45 Clinton street, Newark, doing 
a general tiling business. He served as an Assembly- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 421 

man from Morris county in 1907 and 1908, and was 
elected secretary of the Board of Equalization of Taxes 
April 14th, 1908, for a term of five years. His salary 
is $2,500 a year. 



Board of Railroad Commissioners. 

JOSEPH W. CONGDON, Paterson. 

General Congdon was born in New York City No- 
vember 26th, 1844. He was educated in famous Gram- 
mar School No. 35, in Thirteenth street, under Profes- 
sor Thomas Hunter, and ha? resided in New Jersey 
since 1867. He was in the book and wholesale fur- 
nishing business until 1886, and then became vice- 
president of the Phoenix Silk Manufacturing- Com- 
pany, Paterson, and four years later was made presi- 
dent. From 1903 until 1906 he was president of the 
Silk Association of America, and in 1907 became presi- 
dent of the United States Silk Conditioning Company. 
In 1903 he visited Japan in the interest of the silk in- 
dustry, and in 1907 the Emperor of Japan conferred 
upon him the court honor of the "Most Distinguished 
Order of the Sacred Treasure of Japan," with the rank 
of commander, with the jewel or decoration of the 
order. 

The general served as an Alderman of Paterson 
several years and was president of the board. He 
took an active part in the Hayes and Garfield cam- 
paigns, and in the sound money parades of 1896, 1900 
and 1904 in New York City, when he was marshal 
of the central dry goods division. From 1867 to 1876 
he served as lieutenant and captain in the Twenty- 
second Regiment, New York National Guard, and from 
1876 to 1880 was colonel of the Twenty-second Regi- 
ment Veteran Corps. In 1880 he organized the Paterson 
Light Guard, which afterward became the First Bat- 
talion, N. G. N. J., and served as major and lieutenant- 
colonel. In 1896 he w as commissioned by Governor 
Griggs as inspector-general, which office he still holds. 
He has held several high offices in the Masonic order, 
belongs to the Sons of the American Revolution, His- 
torical Society, several Japanese societies and the 
Order of Elks. The general is active in the charitable 
societies of Paterson, and is a member of several clubs, 



422 BIOGRAPHIES. 

including- the Union League, Army and Navy and 
Lotus, of New York. 

In 1895 he placed in nomination at the State Repub- 
lican convention John W, Griggs as a candidate for 
Governor, and in 1907 he nominated Vivian M. Lewis 
for the same office. He was grand marshal of the Pat- 
erson Centennial Celebration, in 1892, and declined the 
office of Court House Commissioner ana membership of 
the Board of Finance, in Paterson. The general was 
appointed Railroad Commissioner by Governor Stokes 
in June, 1907, for a term of six years and was made 
president of the board. His term expires in 1913 and 
his salary is $5,000 a year. 

BORDEN D. WHITING, Newark. 

Mr. Whiting was born in St. Louis, Mo., January 3d, 
1876, of New England ancestry. He is a son of Joseph 
Cary Whiting, deceased, and of Catherine Lippitt 
(Cady) Whiting. He was educated in the schools in 
St, Louis, and later in Providence, R. I., was graduated 
from Brown University in 1898, the New York Law 
School in 1900, admitted to the New York Bar in July, 
1903, and started practice in New York City that year 
in the office of Carter, Hughes & Dwight, Governor 
Hughes, of New York, being a member of the firm. 
He was admitted to the Rhode Island Bar in September, 
1902. In November, 1903, Mr. Whiting was elected to 
the Rhode Island State Legislature on the Republican 
ticket. He was appointed assistant attorney for the 
Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad the 
same year, and returned to New York. In January, 

1906, he was made assistant general attorney of the 
same road. He is a member of the American Academy of 
Political and Social Science. 

Mr. Whiting was admitted to the New Jersey Bar 
as an attorney in 1904, and as a counselor in June, 

1907. He formed a law partnership with Joseph Coult 
and William A. Smith, under the firm name of Coult, 
^Tilting & Smith, in November, 1907. He retired from 
that firm May 1st, 1908, to form a law partnership 
with Senator Everett Colby, under the firm name of 
Colby & Whiting. Mr. W^hiting was appointed Rail- 
road Commissioner by Governor Stokes in June, 1907. 
His term will expire in 1909, and his salary is $5,000 a 
year. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 423 

FRANK H. SOMMER, Newark. 

Mr. Sommer was born in Newark, N. J., in 1872, of 
German parents. For six years he went to the German 
and English School in Green street, and then went 
to work as office boy in a real estate office. Two years 
later he attracted the attention of William B. Guild, 
who offered him a place in his office, which he accepted, 
and worked hard until he was eighteen years old, 
when he went to the Metropolis Law School, then 
opened in New York. In 1893 he was graduated as 
honor man of his class, and became a member of the 
law school faculty. Two years later he was made 
professor, and continued as lecturer when the school 
was merged with the law department of the New York 
University. He joined the law firm of Guild & Lum, 
of Newark, but later gave it up to devote attention to 
teaching. About six years ago he went back to active 
practice, succeeding Thomas N. McCarter as partner 
with Edwin G. Adams. He has been president of the 
Lawyers' Club and is a member of the State Board of 
Examiners. He served as a member of the Board 
of Education, and in 1905 was elected Sheriff of Essex 
county, defeating Isaac S'hoenthal, Mayor of Orange, 
by 16,000 majority. He was appointed a Railroad Com- 
missioner by Governor Fort on November 17th, 1908, 
to succeed Edmund Wilson, who had been made At- 
torney-General. 

ALFRED N. BARBER, Secretary, Trenton. 

Mr. Barber was born in Lambertville, N. J., May 
19th, 1867. In 1884 he entered the employ of the New 
Jersey Steel and Iron Company, working for that com- 
pany until it became absorbed by the American Bridge 
Company, when he resigned as contracting agent to 
accept a position in the sales department of John A. 
Roebling's Sons Company. He worked in the office 
of the City Clerk of Trenton from April, 1880, to July, 
1884, and served as an Assemblyman from Mercer 
county for three years — 1905, '06 and '07 — and during 
the latter year was Republican leader. Mr, Barber 
was appointed secretary of the Board of Railroad 
Commissioners soon after the creation of that board, 
in 1907. His salary is $3,000. 



424 BIOGRAPHIES. 

State Civil Service CominiHsion. 

WILLIS FLETCHER JOHNSON, President, 
New Providence. 

Dr. Johnson is a son of the late William Johnson 
and Alathea Coles Johnson, and was born in the city 
of New York on October 7th, 1857. A few weeks later 
the family removed to a large estate at New Provi- 
dence, which was then in Essex county, but subse- 
quently became a part of Union county, N. J., and 
there the family has ever since been setMed. Dr. John- 
son was at first educated at home by his father, who 
was a man of high attainments, but later attended 
the Ladd School at Summit, near his home, and also 
Pennington Seminary, at Pennington, N. J., where he 
spent two years and was graduated with high honors. 
He was next matriculated at New York University and 
remained there for some time, but owing to impaired 
health left before the completion of his course. In 
1876 he was the Centennial Fourth of July orator at 
a great union celebration held by a number of towns 
in Burlington and Ocean counties, and for a time 
thereafter was principal of a public school at Tucker- 
ton, N. J. He married Miss Sue Rockhill, of that 
village, a relative of the Hon. William Woodville 
Rockhill, now Minister to China, and returned with 
her to his New Providence home. At the same time 
he began work as a lecturer, and also as a journalist, 
his first writing being done for the Toms River Cour- 
ier. In 1879 he was for a time city editor of the New 
York Daily Witness, and early in 1880 he became a 
member of the editorial staff of the New York Tribune, 
a connection which he has ever since retained un- 
broken, being now the senior member of the staff. 
During the administration of President Arthur he 
became deeply interested in civil service reform, and 
has since been an earnest student and advocate of the 
merit system, and a frequent writer and speaker 
upon it. He has also concerned himself with civic 
affairs, and was one of the founders and first presi- 
dent of the Republican Club of New Providence town- 
ship, and has frequently been a speaker in political 
campaigns. He has written and published a number 
of books, chiefly biographical and historical. In 1903 



BIOGRAPHIES. 425 

he published "A Century of Expansion," which has 
been recognized as the standard treatise on the terri- 
torial g-rowth of the United States and its constitu- 
tional, diplomatic and political results. In 1904 Dr. 
Johnson accompanied Secretary Taft on a visit to 
Panama, and later published a large volume, entitled 
"Four Centuries of the Panama Canal," which has 
been republished in other countries, and is accepted 
throughout the world as the authoritative history of 
the isthmian canal enterprise. For many years he has 
been actively interested in educational affairs. He 
was one of the organizers and president of the Board 
of Trustees of the Priscilla Braislin School for Girls, at 
Bordentown; has for a number of years been president 
of the Board of Trustees of Pennington Seminary, and 
is a member of the council of New York University, 
For thirty years he has been a popular lecturer, de- 
livering many occasional lectures and orations, as well 
as educational addresses at Pennington Seminary, the 
Lawrenceville School, the Priscilla Braislin School, the 
Bordentown Military Institute, and the public schools 
of Newark, Jersey City, Hoboken, Bayonne and other 
places in this State. He has also been in demand as a lec- 
turer in New York, Washington and other cities, and at 
New York University, Weslej-an University, Dickinson 
College, Amherst College and elsewhere. New York 
University has given him, in recognition of his literary 
attainments, the degree of master of letters, and 
Dickinson College added thereto the degrees of mas- 
ter of arts and doctor of humane letters. Dr. Johnson 
has always been an earnest organization Republican, 
and has frequently been invited to be a candidate for 
elective or appointive office, but invariably declined 
until the Spring of 1908, when, on May 8, he was ap- 
pointed by Governor Fort to be for four years a Civil 
Service Commissioner. Because of his long-standing 
interest in the merit system he accepted this appoint- 
ment, and upon the organization of the commission, 
on May 19th, 1908, he was elected its president. His 
salary is $2,000 a year as commissioner and $500 ad- 
ditional as president, and his term as commissioner 
will expire in 1912. His home, Firleigh Hall, which 
he has occupied since infancy, is on Springfield ave- 
nue, in the township of New Providence. 



426 BIOGRAPHIES. 

JAMES KERNEY, Trenton. 

Mr. Kerney was born in Trenton, N. J., April 29th, 
1873, and attended the old St. John's Parochial School. 
Later the family removed to Princeton, where he at- 
tended the parochial school until fifteen years of age, 
when he went to work in a grocery store. 

A year and a half later he came to Trenton to learn 
a trade, and the first year the High School was opened 
in the evenings he attended the class in stenography 
and typewriting. Mr. Kerney worked for four years 
as a stenographer in Trenton and New York, and en- 
tered the newspaper business with William H. Koons 
in 1895. He acquired an interest in the Trenton Times 
in 1903, succeeding Dr. Wishart in editorial charge. 
He is a director in the Trenton Trust and Safe Deposit 
Company, a member of the Knights of Columbus, 
Lotus and Country Clubs, and of St. Mary's Cathedral 
Parish. He was appointed Civil Service Commissioner 
by Governor Fort on May 8th, 1908, for three years, 
and his term will expire in 1911. His salary is $2,000 
a year. 

CHARLES H. BATEMAN, Somerville. 

Mr. Bateman was born at Pennington, Mercer county, 
N. J., July 2d, 1861. He was educated at Pennington 
Seminary, where he graduated in 1880, and after teach- 
ing one year entered Princeton University, class of 
1885. After leaving college Mr. Bateman began news- 
paper work in Trenton, where he was a reporter for 
the local dailies, and was at the same time acting as 
correspondent for New York and Philadelphia news- 
papers. For ten years he represented the New York 
Evening Post and Philadelphia Evening Telegraph in 
the New Jersey Legislature, and during that time and 
subsequently he has represented the Associated Press 
and various New Jersey and New York journals. In 
1891 he purchased a controlling interest in the Union- 
ist-Gazette, Somerville, N. J., and now conducts that 
newspaper and the large publishing business con- 
nected with it. 

In 1896, and again in 1902, Mr. Bateman was private 
secretary to the President of the New Jersey Senate. 
On May 8th, 1908, Governor Fort appointed him as a 
member of the Civil Service Commission for two years, 
and his term will expire in 1910. His salary is $2,000 
a year. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 427 

COLONEL, JAMES RANKIN MULLIKIN, Newark. 

Colonel Mullikin is a descendant of Colonial and Rev- 
olutionary ancestors and a native of New Jersey, hav- 
ing- been born at New Brunswick, and residing there 
until the death of his father, when the family removed 
to Jersey City, Upon the breaking out of the Civil 
War he was a student at the Kentucky Military School, 
leaving it to enter the army as captain. Thirty-fifth 
Indiana Volunteers. He ser\ed under Generals Nel- 
son, Buell and Rosecrans. His military service as set 
forth in the army records embraces several important 
details, such as provost marshal of Bardstown, Mun- 
fordsville and Bowling Green, in Kentucky, in 1861-62; 
commanding gunboat "Emma Duncan" at Fort Donel- 
son and capture of Nashville, 1862; at battles of Mt. 
Pleasant, Tenn., and Perryville, Ky., October, 1862, 
where he was wounded. He was provost marshal, 
Fifth Congressional District, Indiana, in 1863, and in 
March, 1864, was transferred to United States colored 
troops, and subsequently promoted major, lieutenant- 
colonel and colonel. At the close of the Civil War he 
was appointed second lieutenant, Fourth United States 
Infantry, and promoted first lieutenant and captain. 
He served as an officer of the regular army in the 
Cheyenne and Sioux campaigns and as military com- 
missioner in Virginia under the reconstruction laws. 
He was retired from active service for disabilities in- 
curred in the service. Upon returning to civil life 
he again became a citizen of New Jersey, making his 
home in Newark, where he still resides. In 1891 he 
was elected commander of the Department of New 
Jersey, G. A. R., and from its organization has been 
a prominent member of the New Jersey Society, Sons 
of the American Revolution, of which he is secretary. 

He was appointed Civil Service Commissioner by 
Governor Fort on May 8, 1908, and his term will expire 
in 1909. His salary is $2,000 a year. 

PRANK B, JESS, Chief Examiner, Haddon Heights. 

Mr, Jess was born in Philadelphia, Pa., November 3d, 
1870, and is a lawyer by profession. He began news- 
paper work as a reporter in 1887, subsequently went 
to Philadelphia as news editor of "The Call," since 
suspended, then became successively news editor. 



428 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Washington correspondent and financial editor of 
"The Bulletin." He was admitted to the New Jersey- 
Bar in 1897, having- studied law under the supervision 
of his brother, the late William H. Jess. He was a 
member of Council of the borough of Haddon Heights 
from its incorporation, in 1904, to January 1st, 1906, 
and of the Board of Education of Haddon township 
from 1902 till the organization of the Board of Educa- 
tion of Haddon Heights in 1904, and is still a member 
of the latter board. At present he is Solicitor of the 
borough of Haddon Heights. Mr. Jess served two 
terms, 1907-1908, as an Assemblyman from Camden 
county, and in the latter year he was speaker, when 
he won high commendation as a presiding officer. He 
was appointed Chief Examiner of the Civil Service 
Board on May 8th, 1908. His salary is $3,000. 

GARDNER COLBY, Secretary, Newark. 

Mr. Colby was born at East Orange, N. J., September 
12th, 1864. His father was Gardner R. Colby, who was 
a candidate for the nomination of the Republican 
party for Governor in 1886, but was defeated by Benja- 
min F. Howey. He was graduated from Brown Uni- 
versity in the class of 1887, and was a member of the 
Phi Beta Kappa Society and of the Alpha Delta Phi 
Fraternity at that institution. He is a trustee of 
Brown University and of Colgate University. This is 
the first time he has held public office. His salary i.^ 
$2,000. 



Commissioner Department of Labor. 

LEWIS T. BRYANT, Trenton. 

Colonel Bryant was born in J'jiy, 1874, in Atlantic 
county, N. J. He was graduated from the Pennsylvania 
Military College at Chester, Pa., with the degree of civil 
engineer; was admitted to the New Jersey bar in 189S; 
mustered into the United States Volunteer Army as Cap- 
tain of Company F, Fourth New Jersey Volunteer In- 
fantry July 14th; promoted to Major in the same regi- 
ment in the spring of 1899, and was made Assistant In- 
spector General of the National Guard of New Jersey, 
with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel, in the spring of 1899, 
which position he stills holds. On January 8th, 1904, the 



BIOGRAPHIES. 429 

Colonel was appointed Inspector of P"'actories and Work 
shops, to fill a vacancy caused by the resignation of John 
C. Ward. The title of the office was changed to that of 
Commissioner of Department of Labor by an act of the 
Legislature, and on March 24th, 1904, the Colonel was ap- 
pointed as such by Governor Murphy, and was confirmed 
by the Senate on the next day for a term of three years, 
at $2,500 a year. In 1907 he was given another term 
by Governor Stokes at a salary of $3,500. The Colonel 
served as secretary of the New Jersey Commission, 
Louisiana Purchase Exposition, from December 9, 1903, 
until the end. He is identified with the hotel interests 
in Atlantic City. His term is three years. He served 
as secretary of the Jamestown Exposition Commission. 



Assistant Conunissioner Department of Labor. 

JOHN 1. HOLT, Trenton. 

Mr. Holt was born at Hawthorn, a suburb of Paterson, 
December 4, 1851, and is a watchmaker by trade. For 
nearly twenty-five years he carried on the business as a 
dealer in clocks, watches, «6:c., in the city of Paterson. 
He served as a member of the Board of Education for six 
years and was president of that body during the last two 
years of his term. In 1885 he was elected Alderman from 
the First ward and was re-elected in 1887. In 1888 he was 
president of the Board. Mr. Holt was an Assemblyman 
from Passaic county in 1889 and 1893 and '94. He served as 
Speaker in the latter year, and at the close of the session 
he resigned so as to qualify himself for Riparian Com- 
missioner, in which office he served for five years. He 
was appointed Assistant Commissioner of the Labor De- 
partment in 1905 and again in 1907, and his salary is 
$z,500 a year. 



Custodian of the Capitol. 

JOHN W. WESEMAN. Newark. 

Mr. Weseman was born in Germany (his father being a 
citizen of the United States at the time) in 1861. He re- 
ceived his education in the public schools and business 
colleges of Newark. For fourteen years he conducted a 
grocery store in that city, which he has relinquished that 



430 BIOGRAPHIES. 

he might devote his whole time to the duties of his present 
position. At the November election in 1896 he was elected 
a member of the Board of Chosen Freeholders of Essex 
county from the Fourth Ward of Newark, for a term of 
two years. In 1898 he was elected a member of the House 
of Assembly by a plurality of 5,607, and the year following 
he was re-elected by a plurality of 7,068. While in the 
Assembly he served on some of the most important com- 
mittees. He was appointed Custodian of the Capitol in 
July, 1901, by the State House Commission, to fill the 
vacancy caused by the death of John H. Bonnell, which 
occurred on June 7th of that year. Mr. Weseman has 
always been a steadfast Republican and a hard worker 
for the success of his party. His salary is $3,500 a year. 



Commissioner of Public Roada. 

FREDERICK GILKYSON, Trenton. 

Colonel Frederick Gilkyson was born in Yardley, 
Pa., on December 1st, 1868, and came to Trenton in 
1877. He attended the public schools of Trenton, pass- 
ing through the primary, Grammar and High School 
courses. At the age of sixteen he entered the employ 
of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, remaining 
with that company until May 1st, 1905, when he re- 
signed the position of assistant freight agent to en- 
gage in the pottery business, having been made vice- 
president and general manager of the Bellmark Pot- 
tery Company.. 

Colonel Gilkyson belongs to many fraternal and 
social organizations, and is one of the most popular 
officers of the National Guard. In 1908 he was ap- 
pointed assistant adjutant-general of the State, to fill 
the vacancy caused by the retirement of Colonel 
Charles W. Parker. He joined the militia in 1890, 
becoming a member of Company A, old Seventh Regi- 
ment. In 1894 he was appointed battalion adjutant 
of the Fourth New Jersey Volunteers by Governor 
Voorhees, which position he retained until the regi- 
ment was mustered out of service, April 8th, 1908, at 
which time he was highly complimented on the busi- 
ness-like manner in which he had attended to his 
duties. 

The colonel was clerk to the Trenton Park Board 



BIOGRAPHIES. 431 

Commissioners for a brief period, and he served as 
Tax Receiver of the city of Trenton for two terms — 
1904 to 1908. He was appointed Commissioner of Pub- 
lic Roads by Governor Fort on January 22d, 1908, for 
a term of three years, and was duly confirmed by the 
Senate. His salary is $5,000 a year. 



Department of Charities and Corrections. 

REV. GEORGE WIGHT, D. D., Commissions, Trenton. 

Dr. Wight was born in Randolph, Mass., a suburb of 
Boston, October 14, 1841. In 1858 his parents removed to 
New York city, where he was educated in the public 
schools and in the College of the City of New York. In 
1859 he moved to New Brunswick, N. J., near which city 
he taught school until the breaking out of the Civil War, 
when he enlisted in Company G of the First Regiment, 
New Jersey Volunteers, May, 1861. In 1863 he was com- 
missioned lieutenant in the same regiment, serving in the 
Army of the Potomac from the first battle of Bull Run to 
the battle of Salem Church, near Chancellorville, in 1863, 
where he was wounded, captured and sent to Libby Prison 
in Richmond. After two months in Libby he was ex- 
changed and returned to his regiment, but was discharged 
for physical disability in 1864. In 1865 he entered the min- 
istry of the Methodist Episcopal Church, occupying the 
leading pulpits of that denomination in New Jersey. 
While pastor, he was appointed County Superintendent of 
Public Schools of Atlantic county, which office he filled 
for five years. On April 22, 1905, Governor Stokes ap- 
pointed him Commissioner of Charities and Corrections. 
In 1906 he was appointed for a full term of office and con- 
firmed by the Senate. His term of office is three years 
and salary $4,000. 



Assistant Commissioner, Charities and Corrections. 

GEORGE E. POOLE, Trenton. 

Mr. Poole was born in Newark, N. J., October 21, 1869, 
and is an architect. He formerly lived at Chatham, Mor- 
ris county, where he took an active part in politics. He 
was Collector of Chatham township from 1894 to 1897; was 
a member of the Board of Education from 1895 to 1899, 



432 BIOGRAPHIES. 

and Treasurer of Chatham borough from 1897 to 1899. He 
was a member of the Assembly from Morris county In 
1898 and '99, and in 1901 and '02 was Assistant Clerk of the 
Assembly. He served as Superintendent of Construction 
of the new Senate Chamber in 1903 and as Assistant Com- 
missioner of the Labor Department in 1904 and 1905. He 
was appointed to his present office in April, 1905. His sal- 
ary is $3,600. 



Commissioner of Reports. 

WILLIAM CLOKE, Trenton. 

Mr. Cloke has been in the newspaper business more 
than forty years. He was born near Canterbury, Kent 
county, England, in 1840, and came to this country 
with his parents in his infancy. He lived in New York 
until he was eight years old, when the family went to 
Monmouth county, in this State. As a young man 
he taught in a country school, but in 1861 became 
editor of the Monmouth Inquirer, at Freehold. In 
1865 he became principal of the Freehold Academy, 
and two years later assumed a position as reporter or 
city editor of the Trenton State Gazette, comprising, 
at that time — 1867 — the entire city force of the paper. 
Mr. Cloke for several years did all the reporting for 
the Gazette, reported the Legislative proceedings in 
the Winter, read the proofs, and did about everything 
on the paper except write the editorials. On the death 
of Enoch R. Borden, in 1871, Mr. Cloke became editor- 
in-chief, and held that position without a break for 
twenty-seven years. In 1894 he was appointed a mem- 
ber of the State Board of Riparian Commissioners for 
five years by Governor Werts, was reappointed for 
another five years' term by Governor Voorhees, and 
again by Governor Murphy. He had over a year yet 
to serve when appointed Commissioner of Reports by 
Governor Fort. Mr. Cloke did not seek this position, 
directly or Indirectly. In fact, he had three or four 
times urgently importuned the Governor in behalf of 
another man. 

Mr. Cloke served over a dozen years as secretary of 
the Trenton Board of Health, in the work of which 
he was greatly interested. While serving in that 
capacity he secured the passage of an act of the Leg- 
islature making it compulsory on property owners 



BIOGRAPHIES. 433 

who lived on the line of sewers to connect therewith. 
About thirty years ago he was Assistant Secretary of 
the Senate for three years. 

Mr. Cloke now writes political and other g-ossip for 
the New York Herald over the signature of "Trenton." 
This is the principal feature of the New Jersey edition 
of the Sunday Herald. His field is the State, and peo- 
ple who are interested in politics and public affairs 
consult his letters with great interest in all parts of 
New Jersey. He was appointed Commissioner of 
Reports by Governor Fort on August 31st, 1908, for a 
term of five years. His salary is $2,000 a year. 



Secretary to the Governor. 

LESLIE R. FORT, Lakewood. 

Mr. Fort is the youngest son of Governor Fort, and 
was born in Newark in 1883, from which place his 
parents moved to East Orange five years later. He 
received his early education in the public schools in 
East Orange, and went to Stevens' Preparatory 
School in Hoboken for four years, at that time in- 
tending to become a civil engineer. 

In 1901 he entered Amherst College, and remained 
there through the sophomore year. During the first 
summer at college, Mr. Fort was made a correspond- 
ent of the Newark Evening News, at the State Camp 
at Sea girt, and it was while working there that he 
decided to take up newspaper work permanentlj^. 

Upon the completion of his second year at college, 
he again took up newspaper work, and since that 
time has been the Sea Girt correspondent of a number 
of State papers every year. 

In September, 1905, Mr. Fort purchased the Times 
and Journal at Lakewood, and has been its editor 
and publisher since that time. 
28 



434 BIOGRAPHIES. 



executive Clerk. 



CHARLES A. RANSOM, East Orange. 
Mr. Ransom was born in Jersey City. He attended 
the Wesleyan Academy, Willraham, Mass., and the 
Wesleyan University, Middloown, Conn. He studied 
law with his father, the late Stephen Billings Ransom, 
of Jersey City, and was admitted to the New Jersey 
Bar. Preferring the newspaper business to the prac- 
tice of the law, he went upon the city staff of the New 
York Tribune soon after his admission to the bar. 
When the New iTork Press was started by the late 
Postmaster-General Frank Hatton and Robert Porter, 
he became a member of the city staff of that paper, 
which he left in 18S9, to assist in starting the Jersey 
City News. Prior to his appointment as Executive 
Clerk by Governor Fort, Mr. Ransom was for several 
years a Legislative correspondent at Trenton, and at 
different times represented, in that capacity, the Jer- 
sey City News, the Newark Evening News, the Hudson 
Observer, the New York Press, the New York Herald 
and the Evening Post, of New York. He is a lieutenant 
in the New Jersey Naval Reserves, a member of the 
Legislative Correspondents' Club of New Jersey, and 
of the New England Society. Orange. 



EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENTS. 435 



EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENTS. 



1909 

(With the Advice and Consent of the Senate.) 

Judges Court of Errors and Appeals — John W. Bo- 
gert, George R. Gray, Elmer Ewing- Green. 

Justice of the Supreme Court — Charles G. Garrison. 

Attorney General — Edmund Wilson, ad in terim. 

District Court Judges — Jersey City, Charles L. Car- 
rick. 

County Judge — Cumberland, Royal P. Tuller. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — Cumberland, J. Hampton 
Fithian; Middlesex, George Berdine; Monmouth, John 
S. Applegate, Jr. 

State Board of Education — Edward E. Grosscup, 
William M. Hawke, William D. Forbes, Edward G. 
Robertson. 

Public Library Commissioner — Everett T. Tomlin- 
son. 

Riparian Commissioners — Robert Williams, Michael 
P. McLaughlin, Henry T. Caullet, Joseph A. Birk- 
holz. 

State Board of Assessors — David Baird. 

State Board of Equalization of Taxes — E. Ambler 
Armstrong. 

Commissioner of Banking and Insurance — David O. 
W,atkins. 

State Prison Inspectors — William H. Carter, Bernard 
Feeney, J. E. Mitchell, James H. Davenport, William 
A. Berry, Jacob Schurts. 

Supervisor of the State Prison — Samuel W. Kirk- 
bride. 

Civil Service Commission — James R. Mullikin. 

State Board of Health — William H. Chew. 

New Jersey Reformatory — ^Preeman Woodbridge, 
Rev. John Handley. 

State Home for Boys — John Guire, Frederick M. 
Lockwood. 

State Home for Girls — John D. Rue, Alfred D. Car- 
nagy, James Mitchell, Margaret Harrington Sickel, 
Mrs. Louise K. Jess. 



436 EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENTS. 

State Home for Disabled Soldiers, Marines and their 
Wives — Gilbert D. Bogert, Amos R. Dease, Ernest C. 
Stahl. 

State Hospital, Morris Plains — James M. Buckley, 
John C. Eisele, James G. Morgan, Patrick Ryan. 

State Hospital, Trenton — G. D. W. Vroom, John Tay- 
lor. 

Commissioner of Charities and Corrections — Rev. 
George B. Wight. 

State Village for Kpileptics — Caroline B. Alexander, 
William H. Clark. 

Home for Feeble-minded Women — Annie E. Gile. 

New Jersey Sanatorium for Tuberculous Diseases — 
Frederick A. Wild, Rudolph F. Rabe, Jr. 

State Board of Medical Examiners — Edward Hill 
Baldwin, John J. Bauman, John W. Bennett. 

State Board of Forestry — E. B. Voorhees. 

Fish and Game Commissioner — Simeon H. Rollin- 
son. 

Geological Survey — Alfred A. Woodhull, Thomas 
W. Synnott, M. D. Valentine, Joseph L. Munn. 

Palisades Interstate Park Commission — J. DuPratt 
White, Franklin W. Hopkins. 

Board of Tenement House Supervisors — Clinton 
Mackenzie. 

Railroad Commissioners — Borden D. Whiting, Frank 
H. Sonimer. ad in terim. 

Water Commissioner — George F. Wright. 

Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission — William Mc- 
Kenzie. 

Twenty members of the Board of Visitors to State 
Agricultural College. 

County Board Equalization of Taxes — Atlantic, Elias 
S. Reed; Bergen, James H. Coe; Burlington, Thomas 
C. Shreve; Camden, ^Hllard T. Gibbs; Cape May, Ellis 
Marshall; Cumberland, Thomas Whittaker; Essex, 
Lawrence T. Fell; Gloucester, Wilson T. Jones; Hud- 
son, James Allardice; Hunterdon, John C. Haynes; 
Mercer, Richard P. Wilson; Middlesex, William 
Schlesinger, Monmouth, Richard "W. Herbert; Morris, 
Edward J. Cahiil; Ocean, Joshua Hilliard; Passaic, 
Arthur Corhin; Salem, John Ward; Somerset, Newton 
B. Smalley; Sussex, Patrick J. Dolan: Union, Frederick 
H. Andrews; Warren, Marvin A. Pierson. 



EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENTS. 



GOVERNOR ALONE. 

State Board of Dentistry — Charles A. Meeker. 

State Board of Pharmacy — David Strauss. 

Newark Technical School — James L. Hays, Moses 
Plaut. 

Hoboken Industrial School — Mrs. C. V. Alexander, 
James Smith. 

Trenton Industrial School — B. C. Kuser, Garret D, 
W. Vroom. 

Six Commissioners of Pilotage. 

Board of Children's Guardians — Katherine E. Abbey, 
Anthony T. Williams. 

Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners — Herbert 
Lowe. 

State Oyster Commission — J. N. Ogden. 

Police Justice — Orange, Joseph B. Bray. 

Trustees of Teachers' Retirement Fund — Isabel Cra- 
ven, James E. Bryan. 

Chief and Assistant Inspectors of Power Vessels — 

Board of Undertakers and Embalmers — John F. Mar- 
tin, B. B. Weatherby. 

I9IO 

(With the Advice and Consent of the Senate.) 

Judge Court of Errors axid Appeals — W. H. Vreden- 
burgh. 

Clerk in Chancery — Vivian M. Lewis. 

Justice of the Supreme Court — Francis J. Swayze. 

Circuit Court Judge — Frederic Adams. 

District Court Judges — Newark, Thomas J. Lintott; 
Trenton, George W. Macpherson, 

County Court Judges — Mercer, John Rellstab; Mon- 
mouth, John E. Foster; Somerset, Louis H. Schenck. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — Bergen, Ernest Koester; 
Burlington, Samuel Atkinson; Salem, J. Forman Sin- 
nickson; Somerset, John F. Reger. 

State Board of Education — George A. Frey, Silas R. 
Morse, William R. Barricklo, William H. Morrow. 

Civil Service Commission — Charles H. Bateman. 

State Board of Health — John J. Marnell. 

Public Library Commissioner — William C. Kimball. 

State Board of Equalization of Taxes — Carl Lentz. 

New Jersey Reformatory — George W. Fortmeyer, 
Richard H. Wilson. 



438 EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENTS. 

State Home for Disabled Soldiers, Marines and their 
Wives — John C. Patterson. 

Labor Commissioner — Lewis T. Bryant. 

Water Commissioner — Henry S. Humphreys. 

State Home for Boys — Ge^vas Ely, Frank M. Dona- 
hoe. 

State Home for Girls — Thomas B. Holmes, Mrs. 
Frederick T. Johnson, Mrs. Louise K. Jess. 

New Jersey Sanatorium foi Tuberculous Diseases — 
Chester N. Jones, J. Walker Ingham. 

Home for Feeble-Minded Women — Emily H. Will- 
iamson, Richard C. Jenkinson. 

Geological Survey — Emmor Roberts, F. A. Canfield, 
Aaron S. Baldwin. 

Palisades Park Commission — Edwin A. Stevens, D. 
McNeely Stauffer. 

State Village for Epileptics — Herman F. Moos- 
1) rugger. 

Board of Tenement House Commission — John A. 
Campbell. 

Fish and Game Commission — Percival H. Christie. 

State Board of Forestry — Elmer H. Smith. 

State Board of Medical Examiners — Armin Uebe- 
lacker, William P. Watson, Horace G. Norton. 

Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission — Peter Hauck. 

County Boards Equalization of Taxes — Atlantic, 
John R. Fleming; Bergen, P. G. Zabriskie; Burlington, 
Joseph C. Kingdon; Camden, Irving Buckle; Cape 
May, Aaron W. Hand; Cumberland, Alexander R. 
Fithian; Essex, Lathrop Anderson; Gloucester, An- 
drew J. Nichol; Hudson, Joseph J. Guisto; Hunterdon, 
Charles N. Reading; Mercsr, J. Warren Fleming; Mid- 
dlesex, Frank Crowther; Monmouth, William T. Hoff- 
man; Morris, Charles A. Baker; Ocean, J. Horace 
Sprague; Passaic, George Wurts; Salem, D. Harris 
Smith; Somerset, P. V. D. Van Doren; Sussex, Henry 
C. Hunt; Union, C. C. Pollard; Warren, Jacob S. 
Stewart. 

GOVERNOR ALONE. 

State Board of Dentistry — H. S. Sutphen. 

State Board of Pharmacy — Edward B. Jones. 

Technical and Industrial Schools' Trustees — Newark, 
John B. Stabaeus, George R. Howe; Hoboken, William 
Keufel, Abraham J. Demarest. 



EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENTS. 439 

Trustees of Teachers' Retirement Fund — Elizabeth 
A. Allen, Mrs. Georgia B. Crater. 

Labor Inspectors — Twelve. 

State Board Veterinary Medical Examiners — T. Earl 
Budd, Whitfield Gray. 

Board of Undertakers and Embalmers — Raymond S. 
Taylor. 

State Oyster Commission — Jeremiah N. Ogden. 



440 UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT. 

UNITED STATES GOVERMENT. 



President — Theodore Roosevelt, New York. Salary, 
$50,000. 

Vice-President — Charles W. Fairbanks, Indiana. 
Salary, $12,500. 

President-elect — William H. Taft, Ohio. 

Vice-President-elect — James S. Sherman, New York. 

Secretary of State — Elihu Root, of New York. 

Secretary of the Treasury — George B. Cortelyou, of 
New York. 

Secretary of War — Luke E. Wright, of Tennessee. 

Secretary of the Navy — Truman H. Newberry, of 
Michigan. 

Secretary of the Interior — James R. Garfield, of Ohio. 

Postmaster-General — George Von L. Meyer, of Mas- 
sachusetts. 

Attorney-General — Charles J. Bonaparte, of Mary- 
land^ 

Secretary of Agriculture — James Wilson, of Iowa. 

Secretary of Commerce and Labor — Oscar S. Straus, 
of New York. 

The salary of each Cabinet officer is $12,500. 

Chief Justice of the Supreme Court — Melville W. 
Fuller, of Illinois. Salary, $13,000. 

Associate Justices — John M. Harlan, of Kentucky; 
David J. Brewer, of Kansas; Edward Douglass White, 
of Louisiana; Rufus W. Peckham, of New York; Joseph 
McKenna, of California; Oliver W^endell Holmes, of 
Massachusetts; William R. Day, of Ohio; William H. 
Moody, of Massachusetts. 

Salary of each Associate Justice, $12,500. 

OFFICERS OF THE ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES. 
Commander-in-Chief — Theodore Roosevelt, President. 
Secretary of War — Luke E. Wright. 
Assistant Secretary of War — Robert Shaw Oliver. 

DEPARTMENT OF WAR. 

Lieutenant-General — Arthur Mac Arthur. 

Major-Generals — Leonard Wood, John F. Weston. 
Frederick D. Grant, J. Franklin Bell, William P. 
Duval], Thomas H. Barry. 



UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT. 441 

Brig-adier-Generals — Frederick Funston, William H. 
Carter, Tasker H. Bliss. Albert J.. Mills, Winfteld S. 
Edgerly, John J. Pershing-, Albert L. Myer, Earl D. 
Thomas, Charles Morton, Charles L.. Hodges, William 
W. Wotoherspoon, Ramsay D. Potts, Daniel H. Brush, 
John B. Kerr, Frederick A. Smith. 

GENERAL STAFF OF THE ARMY. 
Major-General J. Franklin Bell, Chief of Staff; Major- 
General William P. Duvall, Brigadier-Generals Arthur 
Murray, William W. Wotherspoon. 

DEPARTMENTAL STAFF. 
Major-General Frederick C. Aainsworth, The Adju- 
tant-General; Brigadier-Generals Ernest A. Garlington, 
Inspector-General; George B. Davis, Judge Advocate- 
General; James B. Aleshire, Quartermaster-General; 
Henry G. .Sharpe, Commissary-General; Robert M, 
O'Reilly, Surgeon-General; Charles H. Whipple, Pay- 
master-General; William L. Marshall. Chief of En- 
gineers; William Crozier, Chief of Ordnance; James 
Allen, Chief Signal Officer. 

OFFICERS OF THE NAVY OF THE UNITED STATES. 

Secretary — Truman H. Newberry. 

Assistant Secretary — Herbert Livingstone Satterlee. 

Admiral — George Dewey. 

Hear Admirals — Caspar P. Goodrich, Charles S 
Sperry; William T. Swinburne, Joseph N. Hemphill, 
Richard Wainwright, James D. Adams, John A. 
Rodgers, Edwin K. Moore, William P. Potter, Conway 
H. Arnold, Uriel Sebree. Giles B. Harber, William J. 
Barnette, Raymond P. Rodgers, Gottfried Blocklinger, 
Newton E. Mason, John K. Barton, Adolph Marix, Royal 
R. [ngersoll, Seaton Schroeder, Thomas C. McLean, 

OFFICERS OF THE MARINE CORPS OF THPJ 
UNITED STATES. 
Major-General George F. Elliott, Commandant; Col- 
onel Charles H. Lauchheinier, Adjutant and Inspector. 



442 



U. S. COURT OFFICIALS. 



U. S. COURT OFFICIALS. 



(1789 to date.) 
FOR NEW JERSEY. 
The United States District Court was organized at 
New Brunswick, on Tuesday, December 22d, 1789. 



DISTRICT JUDGES. 



David Brearley 1789 

Robert Morris 1790 

William S. Pennington.. 1817 

William Rossell 1826 

Mahlon Dickerson 1840 



Richard S. Field 1863 

John T. Nixon 1871' 

Edward T. Green 1889 

Andrew Klrkpatrick 1896 

William M. Lanning 1904 



Philemon Dickerson 1841 Joseph Cross. 



.1905 



CLERKS. 



Jonathan Dayton 1789 

Andrew Klrkpatrick 1790 

Robert Boggs 1791 

William Pennington 1817 

Joseph C. Potts 1840 

Edward N. Dickerson.. 1844 
Philemon Dickerson, Jr. 1853 



Andrew Dutcher 1862 

Ralph H. Shreve 1863 

E. Mercer Shreve 1868 

Robert C. Bellville 1871 

William S. Bellville 1875 

Linsly Rowe 1882 

George T. Cranmer 1893 



MARSHALS. 



Thomas Lowry 1789 

John Heard 1802 

Oliver Barnett 1802 

Oliver W. Ogden 1808 

Robert S. Kennedy 1849 

George H. Neldeii 1853 

Benijah Deacon 1866 

W. Budd Deacon 1868 



Samuel Plummer 1869 

Robert L. Hutchinson.. 1877 

A. E. Gordon 1886 

W. Budd Deacon 1882 

W. Budd Deacon 1889 

George Pfeiffer 1893 

Thomas J. Alcott 1897 



DISTRICT ATTORNEYS. 



Richard Stockton 1789 

Abraham Ogden 1782 

Lucius H. Stockton 1798 

George C. Maxwell 1802 

Joseph McUvaine 1804 

Lucius Q. C. Elmer 1824 

Garret D. Wall 182S 

James S. Green 1837 

William Halsted 1849 

Garrit S. Cannon 1853 



Anthony Q. Keasbey 1861 

Job H. Lippincott 1886 

Samuel F. Bigelow 188*1 

George S. Duryea 1888 

Henry S. White 1890 

John W. Beekman 1894 

J. Kearny Rice 1890 

David O.Watkins 1900 

John B. Vreeland 1903 



U. S. COURT OFFICIALS. 443 

PRESENT OFFICIALS. 
Circuit Justice William H. Moody. 

f Joseph Buffington, 
Circuit Judges -( George M. Dallas. 

[ George Gray. 

District Judge William M. Lanning. 

District Judge Joseph Cross. 

District Attorney John B. Vreeland. 

[Walter H. Bacon. 
Assistant District Attorneys -{Harrison P. Linda- 

[ bury. 
Marshal Thomas J. Alcott, 

Deputy Marshals 1 Edwin IL Semple, 

( George D. Bower. 

Clerk of District Court George T. Cranmer. 

Deputy Clerk of District Court Benjamin F. Havens. 

Clerk of Circuit Court H. Duncan Oliphani. 

Deputy Clerk of Circuit Court Charles S. Chevrier. 

Postmaster at Trenton Alexander C. Yard. 

Internal Revenue Collector— 1st Dis. Isaac Moffatt. 

Internal Revenue Collector— 5th Dis.H. C. H. Herold. 

SENATORS AND CONGRESSMEN. 

United States Senators — John Kean, 1911; Frank O. 
Briggs, 1913. Salary, $7,500. 

Representatives in Sixty-first Congress — First dis- 
trict, Henry C. Loudenslager; Second district, John J. 
Gardner; Third district, Benjamin F. Howell; Fourth 
district, Ira W. Wood; Fifth district, Charles N. Fow- 
ler; Sixth district, William Hughes; Seventh district, 
Richard Wayne Parker; Eighth district, William H. 
Wiley; Ninth district, Eugene F. Kinkead; Tenth dis- 
trict, James A. Hamill. Salary, $7,500. 



444 STATE OFFICERS. 



STATE OFFICERS. 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 
Governor — John Franklin Fort, 1911. 
Secretary to the Governor — Leslie R. Fort. 
Executive Clerk — Charles A. Ransom. 

STATE DEPARTMENT. 
Secretary of State — Samuel D. Dickinson. 1912. 
Assistant Secretary — J. B. R. Smith, 1912. 
Chief Clerk— Frank Transue. 

TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 
State Treasurer — Daniel S. Voorhees. 1910. 
Deputy Treasurer — L. Kensil Wildrick. 
State Comptroller — Henry J. West, 1911. 
Deputy Comptroller — Isanc Doughton. 

LAW DEPARTMENT. 
Attornoy-General — Edmund Wilson, ad in terim. 
Assistant Attorney-General — Nelson B. Gaskill, 1913. 
Chief Clerk — Theodore Backes. 

Tlie Jiiillclary. 

Court of Errors and Appeals — The Chancellor, the 
Chief Justice and Justices of the Supreme Court; 
Judg-es John W. Bog-ert, 1909; William H. Vreden- 
burgh, 1910; Garret D. W. Vroom, 1913; George R. 
Gray, 1909; Elmer Ewing Green, 1909; James B. Dill, 
1912. Clerk, Secretary of State. 

CHANCERY. 

Court of Chancery — Chancellor, Mahlon Pitney, 
1915; Vice-Chancellors, John R. Emery, 1909; Frederic 
W. Stevens, 1910; Eugene Stevenson, 1915; Lindley M. 
Garrison, 1911; Edmund B. Learning, 1913; James E. 
Howell, 1914; Edwin Robert Walker, 1914. 

Vice-Ordinary and Vice-Surrogate-General — Edwin 
Robert Walker. 

Clerk in Chancery — Vivian M. Lewis, 1910. 

Deputy Clerk — Edward M. Appelgate. 

Chancery Reporter — James Buchanan, 1912. 



STATE OFFICERS. 445 

SUPREME COURT. 

Supreme Court — Chief Justice, William S. Gum- 
mere, 1915; Associate Justices, Charles G. Garrison, 
1909; Francis J. Swayze, 1910; Alfred Reed, 1911; 
Thomas W. Trenchard, 1914; Charles W. Parker, 1914; 
James J. Bergen, 1914; Willard P. Voorhees, 1915; 
James P. Minturn, 1915. 

Clerk of the Supreme Court — William Riker, Jr., 
1912. 

Deputy Clerk — Charles N. Codding, 1912. 

Law Reporter — Garret D. W. Vroom, 1913. 

CIRCUIT COURT. 
Circuit Court Judges — Frederic Adams, 1910; Allen 
B. Endicott, 1911; Wilbur A. Heisley, 1911; Benjamin 
A. Vail, 1914; Frank T. Lloyd, 1914; William H. Speer, 
1915; Charles C. Black, 1915. 

PARDONS. 
Court of Pardons — Governor, Chancellor and Lay 
Judges of the Court of Errors and Appeals. Clerk, 
Secretary of State. 

DISTRICT COURTS. 

District Court Judges — Camden, Samuel P. Jones, 
1912; Elizabeth, Clark McKay Whittemore, 1913; Jer- 
sey City, James S. Erwin, 1913; Charles L. Carrick, 
1909; Newark, Malcolm McLear, 1913; Thomas J. Lin- 
tott, 1910; Paterson, T\ailiam I. Lewis, 1911; Trenton, 
George W. Macpherson, 1910; Orange, Benjamin F. 
Jones, 1911; Hoboken, Frederick J. Stuhr, 1912; Pas- 
saic, William W. Watson, 1911; Atlantic City, Robert 
H. Ingersoll, 1911; Bayonne, Frederick E. Chamber- 
lain, 1911; New Brunswick, Edward W. Hicks, 1911; 
Perth Amboy, Adrian Lyon, 1911; Plainfield, William 
Newcorn, 1912. 

Military Department. 

Commander-in-Chief — Governor Fort. 

Major-General — Peter Farmer Wanser. 

Adjutant-General — R. Heber Breintnall. 

Assistant Adjutant General — Frederick Gilkyson. 

Quartermaster-General — Charles Edward Murray. 

Inspector General — Joseph W. Congdon. 



446 STATE OFFICERS. 

Judge-Advocate-General — Edward P, Meany. 

First Brigade — Brigadier-General Edward A. Camp- 
bell. 

Second Brigade — Brigadier-General Dennis F. Col- 
lins. 

Educational Department. 

Trustees of the School Fund — Governor, Secretary 
of State, Attorney-General, State Comptroller and 
State Treasurer. 

State Board of Education — Edward E. Grosscup, 
Winonah, 1909; George A. Frey, Camden, 1910; James 

B. Woodward, Bordentown, 1911; Silas R. Morse, At- 
lantic City, 1910; W. Edwin Florance, New Brunswick. 
1913; William G. Schauffer, Lakewood, 1913; Samuel 
St. John McCutcheon, Plainfield, 1911; William M. 
Hawke, Flemington, 1909; William H. Morrow, Belvi- 
dere, 1910; Charles E. Surdam, Morristown, 1912; 
John W. Thomson, Hackensack, 1913; Francis Scott, 
Paterson, 1911; Edward G. Robertson, Newark, 1909; 

C. Wilbur Sanford, Montclair, 1913; James L. Hays, 
Newark, 1911; T. O'Conor Sloane, South Orange, 1912; 
Ulamor Allen, Jersey City, 1913; William R. Bar- 
ricklo, Jersey City, 1910; Edward Russ, Hoboken, 
1912; William D. Forbes, Hoboken, 1909. President, 
James L. Hays; Vice-President, Edward G. Robert- 
son; Secretary, Charles J. Baxter; Treasurer, James B. 
Woodward. 

Principal State Normal and Model Schools, Trenton, 
James M. Green, Ph.D.; Steward, John S. Neary. 

Principal State Normal School, Montclair, Charles 
S. Chapin. 

Principal New Jersey School for Deaf-Mutes, John 
P. Walker; Steward, Thomas F. Hearnen. 

PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

State Superintendent — Charles J. Baxter, 1912. 

Assistant State Superintendent — J. Brognard Betts. 

High School Inspector — Louis Bevier, Jr., New 
Brunswick. 

County Superintendents — Atlantic, Samuel D. Hoff- 
man, Atlantic City; Bergen, B. C. Wooster, Hacken- 
sack; Burlington, Herman A. Stees, Beverly; Camden, 
Charles S. Albertson, Magnolia; Cape May, Oscar O. 
Barr, Cape May; Cumberland, John N. Glaspell, 
Bridgeton; Essex, A. B. Meredith, Nutley; Gloucester, 



STATE OFFICERS. 447 

Daniel T. Steelman, Glassboro; Hudson, M. H. Kinsley, 
Hoboken; Hunterdon, Jason S. Hoffman, Flemington; 
Mercer, Joseph M. Arnold, Princeton; Middlesex, H. 
Brewster Willis, New Brunswick; Monmouth, John En- 
right, Freehold; Morris, J. Howard Hulsart, Dover; 
Ocean, Charles A. Morris, Toms River; Passaic, Edward 
W. Garrison, Paterson; Salem, J. A. Wentzell, Elmer; 
Somerset, H. C. Krebs, Plainfield; Sussex, Ralph 
Decker, Sussex; Union, J. J. Savitz, Westfield; Warren, 
Franklin T. Atwood, Hackettstown. 

City Superintendents — Asbury Park, Fred S. Shep- 
herd; Atlantic City, C. B. Boyer, Supervising- Princi- 
pal; Bayonne, J. H. Christie; Bloomfield, George Mor- 
ris; Bridgeton, E. J. Hitchner; Burlington, Wilbur 
Watts; Camden, James E. Bryan; East Orange, Ver- 
non L. Davey; Elizabeth, Richard E. Clement; Engle- 
wood, Elmer C. Sherman; Gloucester, W. F. Burns; 
Hoboken, A. J. Demarest; Irvington, Frank H. Mor- 
rell; Jersey City, Henry Snyder; Kearny, Herman 
Dressal; Millville, H. F. Stauffer; Montclair, Randall 
Spaulding; Morristown, W. L. R. Haven; Newark, 
Dr. A. B. Poland; New Brunswick, W. C. Armstrong; 
Orange, James C. Riggs; Passaic, O. I. Woodley, Pat- 
erson, J. R. Wilson; Perth Amboy, S. E. Shull; Phil- 
lipsburg, Lewis O. Beers; Plainfield, Henry M. Max- 
son; Rahway, W. J. Bickett; Salem, W. A. Storrie; 
Trenton, Ebenezer Mackey. 

State Liibrary. 

Clommissioners — Governor, Chancellor, Chief Jus- 
tice, Attorney-General, Secretary of State, Treasurer 
and Comptroller. 

State Librarian — Henry C. Buchanan, 1909. 

Public Library Comiuissiouers. 

Dr. Ernest C. Richardson, Princeton University, 
1912; Moses Taylor Pyne, Princeton, 1911; William C. 
Kimball, Passaic, Chairman, 1910; Everett T. Tomlin- 
son. Elizabetn. 1909: Howard M. Cooper, Camden, 
1913. Secretary, Henry C. Buchanan. Sarah B. As- 
kew, Trenton, Organizer. 



448 BOARDS, BUREAUS, ETC. 

BOARDS, BUREAUS AND DEPART- 
MENTS. 



ACCOUNTS DEPARTMENT. 
Auditor — William E. Drake, Trenton, 1913; Assist- 
ants, Theodore B. Guerin, William J. Schmauder, and 
Alexander B. Bishop, Newark, 1913. 

ACCOUNTANTS, PUBLIC. 
George WiiKinson, Plainfield; Frank G. Dubois, 
Newark; John E. Cooper, Crariford, 1911. 

AGRICULTURAL. 

State Board of Agriculture — President, E. B. Voor- 
hees, New Brunswick; Treasurer, William Heritage, 
Swedesboro; Secretary, Franklin Dye, Trenton. 

Commissioners of Agriculture College Fund — Gov- 
ernor, Secretary of State, Treasurer, Attorney-Gen- 
erol and Comptroller. 

Board of Visitors to State Agricultural College — 
First district, Ephraim T. Gill, Daniel W. Horner; Sec- 
ond district, John E. Darnell, vacancy; Third district, 
David D. Denise, James Neilson; Fourth district, Sam- 
uel B. Ketcham, Charles Howell Cook; Fifth district, 
Ogden Woodruff, Melville S. Con.iit; Sixth district, 
Abram C. Holdrum, Henry Marelli; Seventh district, 
George E. DeCamp, Cyrus B. Crane; Eighth district, 
George Dorer, Joseph B. Ward; Ninth district, Philip 
M. Brett, John Hudson; Tenth district, Henry Bell, 
Henry A. Gaede; all in 1909. Secretary, Irving S. 
Upson. 

New Jersey State Agricultural Experiment Station 
No. 1 — Board of Managers: Governor, Professors W. H. 
S. Demarest and Edward B. Voorhees, together with 
the members of the Board of Visitors to the State 
Agricultural College. Director, Professor Voorhees; 
Chief Clerk, Secretary and Treasurer, Irving S. Upson. 

Station No. 2 — Board of Control: The Trustees of 
Rutgers College, Director, Professor Edward B. Voor- 
hees; Chief Clerk, Irving S. Upson. 



BOARDS, BUREAUS, ETC. 



449 



ARCHITECTS, STATE BOARD. 
State Board of Architects— Charles P. Baldwin, 
President, Newark; Charles Edwards, Paterson; Hugh 
Roberts, Secretary and Treasurer, Jersey City; Arnold 
H. Moses, Camden; David Provost, Elizabeth. All hold- 
over. 

ASSESSORS, STATE BOARD OF. 
David Baird, President, Camden, 1909; Theodore 
Strong, New Brunswick, 1911; Obadiah C. Bogardus 
Keyport, 1912; Charles E. Hendrickson, Jr., Jersey 
City, 1912. Secretary, Irvine E. Maguire. 

BANKING AND INSURANCE. 
Commissioner— David O. Watkins, 1909. 
Deputy Commissioner— Thomas K. Johnston. 
Chief Clerk — George B. Glover. 

CHARITIES AND CORRECTIONS. 
Commissioner— Rev. George B. Wight, Trenton, 
1909; Assistant Commissioner, George E. Poole, 1909. 

CHILDREN'S GUARDIANS. 
Board— Anthony T. Williams, Trenton, 1909; Emily 
E. Williamson, Elizabeth, hold-over; Hugh F. Fox, 
Bayonne, hold-over; Katherine E. Abbey, Mount Holly,' 
1909; Joseph McCrystal, Paterson, hold-over; Freder- 
ick G. Burnham, Morristown, 1912; Rev. J. R. Atkin- 
son, Elizabeth, 1912. 

CIVIL SERVICE. 
Commissioners— Willis Fletcher Johnson, New Prov- 
idence, President, 1912; James Kerney, Trenton, 1911; 
Charles H. Bateman, Somerville, 1910; James R. Mulli- 
kin, Newark, 1909. Chief Examiner, Frank B. Jess, 
Camden; Secretary, Gardner Colby, Newark. 

ENTOMOLOGIST, STATE. 
John B. Smith, New Brunswick. 

EQUALIZATION OF TAXES, STATE BOARD. 
State Board — Carl Lentz, Newark, President, 1910; E. 
Ambler Armstrong, Camden, 1909; George M. McCar- 



450 BOARDS. BUREAUS, ETC. 

thy, Jersey City, 1913; Henry J. Irick, Vincentown, 
1912; Theodore Simonson, Newton, 1911. Secretary, 
Henry W. Buxton, Morristown. 

COUNTY BOARDS — Atlantic County — William R. 
Harris (11), Atlantic City; Elias S. Reed (09), Buena 
Vista; John R. Fleming (10), Atlantic City. Frank 
E. Smith, Atlantic City, Secretary. 

Bergen County — Henry D. "Winton (11), Hacken- 
sack; James H. Coe (09), Englewood; P. G. Zabriskie 
(10), Ridgewood. Van Vorst "Wells, Hackensack, Sec- 
retary. 

Burlington County — George N. Wimer (11), Pal- 
myra; Thomas C. Shreve (09), Pemberton; Joseph C. 
Kingdon (10), Mount Holly. Joseph Kaighn, Moores- 
town. Secretary. 

Camden County — Joseph E. Nowrey (11), Camden; 
Willard T. Gibbs (09), Clementon; Irving Buckle (10), 
Camden. James Macauley, Camden, Secretary. 

Cape May County — Stillwell H. Townsend (11), Cape 
May; Ellis Marshall (09), Tuckahoe; Aaron W. Hand 
(10), Cape May. Wilbur E. Young, Anglesea, Secretary. 

Cumberland County — Morris Davis (11), Shiloh; 
Thomas Whitaker (09), Millville; Alexander R. Fith- 
ian (10), Bridgeton. H. M. Dolbey, Bridgeton, Secre- 
tary. 

Essex County — Charles W. Heilman (11), Newark; 
Lawrence T. Fell (09), Orange; Lathrop Anderson 
(10), Newark. James A. Mungle, Newark, Secretary. 

Gloucester County — W. Harrison Livermore (11), 
Woodbury; Wilson T. Jones (09), Franklinville; An- 
drew J. Nichol (10), Jefferson. Samuel Silver, Wood- 
bury, Secretary. 

Hudson County — James E. Connolly (11), Jersey 
City; James Allardice (09), Jersey City; Joseph J. 
Guisto (10), Hoboken. Joseph P. McLean, Jersey City, 
Secretary. 

Hunterdon County — Henry M. Voorhes (11), Flem- 
ington; Charles N. Reading (10), Frenchtown; John C. 
Haynes (09), Annandale. Alex, B. Allen, Flemington, 
Secretary. 

Mercer County — W. Holt Apgar (11), Trenton; 
Richard P. Wilson (09), Trenton; J. Warren Fleming 
(10), Titusville. Alexander McA. Phillips, Trenton, 
Secretary. 

Middlesex County — Frank Samsel (11), Sayreville; 



BOARDS, BUREAUS, ETC. 451 

William Schlesing-er (09), New Brunswick; Frank 
Crowther (10), Perth Amboy. William A. Spencer, 
Perth Amboy, Secretary. 

Monmouth County — William K. Devereux (11), As- 
bury Park; Richard W. Herbert (09), Wickatunk. 
William T; Hoffman (10), Englishtown. Charles L. 
Stout, Freehold, Secretary. 

Morris County — Charles A. Baker (10), Kenvil; Ed- 
ward J. Cahill (09), Boonton; Edward A. Quayle (11), 
Morristown. John M. Mills, Morristown, Secretary. 

Ocean County — Dr. Joshua Hilliard (09), Manahaw- 
ken; J. Horace Sprague (10), Barneg-at; A. O. S. Hav- 
ens (11), Point Pleasant. Harry T. Hagaman, Lake- 
wood, Secretary. 

Passaic County — George Wurts (10), Paterson; Ar- 
thur Corbin (09); Benjamin F. Roegiers (11), Pater- 
son. William H. Young, Paterson, Secretary. 

Salem County — Charles Mecum (11), Salem; John 
Ward (09), Centreton; D. Harris Smith (10), Salem. 
Samuel C. Allen, Woodstown, Secretary. 

Somerset County — P. V. D. Vandoren (10), Mill- 
stone; Newton B. Smalley (09), North Plainfield; 
Stewart A. Kenney (11), Somerville. T. G. Winsor, 
Somerville, Secretary. 

Sussex County — Patrick J. Dolan (09), Ogdensburg; 
Andrew J. Van Blarcom (11), Newton; Henry C. Hunt 
(10), Sussex. Obadiah E. Armstrong, Newton, Secre- 
tary. 

Union County — Frederic H. Andrews (09), Plain- 
field; C. C. Pollard (10), Elizabeth; Mulford M. Scud- 
der (11), Westfield. Edward Leroy Mack, Elizabeth, 
Secretary. 

Warren County — Jacob S. Stewart (10), Phillips- 
burg; William J. Barker (11), Hackettstown; Marvin 
A. Pierson (09), Washington. Ulysses G. Pursell, Phil- 
lipsburg. Secretary. 

FISH AND GAME DEPARTMENT. 
Commissioners — Benedict C. Kuser, Trenton, 1911; 
Percival H. Christie, High Bridge, 1910; Simeon H. 
Rollinson, West Orange, 1909; William A. Logue, 
Bridgeton, 1912. Secretary, Walter H. Fell, Trenton. 
Protector, James M. Stratton, Long Branch. War- 
dens — Atlantic, William B. Loder, Egg Harbor City; 
Bergen, Ward Varian, Demarest; Burlington, Howard 



452 BOARDS, BUREAUS, ETC. 

Mathis, New Gretna; Camden, Laurence T. Doran, 
Camden; Charles W. Folker, Camden; Cape May, Ste- 
phen Reeves, West Cape May; Cumberland, Fred 3. 
Conner, Bridgeton; George W. Phifer, Ormond; Essex, 
Fred J. Hall, Bloomfield; Gloucester, John H. Avis, 
Woodbury; Hudson, Herbert E. Dane, Orange; Hunt- 
erdon, John J, Park, White House Station; Morris, 
Mahlon Smith, Lake Hopatcong; Mercer, E. D. Wood, 
Hopewell; Middlesex, Charles Steuerwald, South Am- 
boy; Ocean, Anson J. Rider, Tuckerton; Passaic, Ed- 
ward Shorter, Paterson; Salem, E. R. Davis, Salem; 
Thomas J. Torton, Pennsgrove; Somerset, George H. 
Miller, Somerville; Sussex, J. B. Hendershott, Newton; 
Union, William Hoblitzell, Rah way; Warren, H. E. 
Cudney, Buckwood Park, Dunnfield. 

FORESTRY, STATE BOARD. 

Governor Fort, President ex-ofRcio; Henry B. Kum- 
mel. State Geologist, ex-officio; Prof. E, B. Voorhees, 
New Brunswick, 1909; Elmer H. Smith, Salem, 1910; 
Charles L. Pack, Lakewood, 1911. Secretary, Alfred 
Gaskill. 

GEOLOGICAL SURVEY. 

Board of Managers — Governor Fort, ex-offlcio. 

Members at Large — John C. Smock, 1913; David E. 
Titsworth, 1911; Emmor Roberts, 1910; Harrison Van 
Duyne, 1912; George G. Tennant, 1911; Thomas W. 
Synnott, 1909; Charles L. Pack, 1913; Alfred A. Wood- 
hull, 1909; all April 1. 

First district, Frederick R. Brace, 1911; Second dis- 
trict, P. Kennedy Reeves, 1912; Third district, M. D. 
Valentine, 1909; Fourth district, Washington A. Roeb- 
ling, 1913; Fifth district, F. A. Canfield, 1910; Sixth 
district, George W. Wheeler, 1911; Seventh district, 
Herbert M. Lloyd, 1912; Eighth district, Joseph L. 
Munn, 1909; Ninth district, Joseph D. Bedle, 1913; 
Tenth district, Aaron S. Baldwin, 1910; all April 1. 

State Geologist — Henry B. Kummel. 

HEALTH, STATE BOARD. 
John H, Capstick, Montville, President, 1914; Bruce 
S. Keator, Asbury Park, Secretary, 1913; George P. 
Olcott, East Orange, 1912; H. M. Herbert, Bound Brook, 
1911; John J. Marnell, Hoboken, 1910; William H. 
Chew, Salem, 1909. 



BOARDS, BUREAUS, ETC. 463 

HOSPITALS, STATE. 

Board of Managers at Morris Plains — James M. 
Buckley, Morristown, 1909; John C. Eisele, President, 
Newark, 1909; David St. John, Hackensack, 1912; John 
A. McBride, Sussex, 1912; James G. Morgan, Union 
Hill, 1909; Patrick J. Ryan, Elizabeth, 1909; John T. 
Gillson, Paterson, 1912; George W. Jagle, Newark, 
1913. Secretary, Harry A. Von Gilder, 1908. 

Board of Managers at Trenton — Garret D. W. 
Vroom, President, Trenton, 1909; John Taylor, Tren- 
ton, 1909; Joseph Rice, Trenton, 1913; L. A. D. Allen, 
Woodstown, 1912; Cornelius S. Hoffman, Somerville, 
1912; Luther M. Halsey, Williamstown, 1912; J. Bay- 
ard Kirkpatrick, New Brunswick, 1912; Peter J, Raf- 
ferty, Red Bank, 1912. Secretary, Scott Scammell. 

Officers at Morris Plains — ^Medical Director, Britton 

D. Evans, M. D.; Treasurer, Guido C. Hinchman; War- 
den, Moses K. Everitt. 

Officers at Trenton — Medical Director, Dr. Harry A. 
Cotton, M. D. ; Treasurer, Harvey H. Johnson; War- 
den, Samuel T. Atchley. 

LABOR, BUREAU OF STATISTICS, ETC. 
Chief — Winton C. Garrison, 1913. 
Deputy — James T. Morgan. 
Chief Clerk— Louis F. A. Herold. 

LABOR DEPARTMENT. 

Commissioner — Lewis T. Bryant, Trenton, 1910. 

Assistant Commissioner — John I. Holt, Trenton, 
1910. 

Clerk — James F. Dale. 

Inspectors — Henry Kuehnle, Egg Harbor City; Louis 
Holler, Camden; Joseph Milburn, Trenton; Andrew 
McCardell, Plainfield; Edward E. McClintock, Newark; 
W. J. E. Seder, Newark; August Graf, Hoboken; Will- 
iam Schlachter, Orange; Heber Wells, Paterson; James 

E. Stanton, Sussex. Female Inspectors — Mary F. Van- 
Leer, Camden; Mary McKean, Trenton; all in 1910; 
Laura W. Moore, Camden. Special Inspectors — Neil A. 
McCarthy, Elizabeth; Thomas McHugh, Newark. 



454 BOARDS, BUREAUS, ETC. 

MEDICAL, DENTISTRY, PHARMACY AND VETER- 
INARY. 

State Board of Medical Examiners — Armin Uebe- 
lacker, Morristown, 1910; William P. Watson, Jersey- 
City, 1910; Horace G. Norton, Trenton, 1910; E. L. B. 
Godfrey, Camden, 1911; Charles A. Groves, East 
Orange, 1911; David P. Borden, Paterson, 1911; Ed- 
ward Hill Baldwin, Newark, 1909; John J. Baumann, 
Jersey City, 1909. John W. Bennett, Secretary, Long 
Branch, 1909. 

State Board of Dentistry — Alphonso Irwin, Camden, 
1913; Benjamin P. Luckey, Paterson, 1912; W. E. 
Truex, President, Freehold, 1911; H. S. Sutphen, New- 
ark, 1910. Charles A. Meeker, Secretary-Treasurer, 
Newark, 1909. 

State Board of Pharmacy — George H. White, Jersey 
City, 1908; Henry A. Jorden, Bridgeton, 1911; Lewis W. 
Brown, Englewood, 1912; David Strauss, Elizabeth, 
1909; Edward B. Jones, Mount Holly, 1910. 

State Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners — 
William Herbert Lowe, Paterson, 1909; T. Earl Budd, 
Orange, 1910; Whitfield Gray, Newton, 1910; Thomas 
B. Rogers, Woodbury, 1911; R. W. A. English, Jersey 
City, 1911. 

MOTOR VEHICLES DEPARTMENT. 
Commissioner — J, B. R. Smith. 
Chief Inspector — Edward Johnson. 

MUSEUM, STATE. 

Commissioners — The State Geologist, State Super- 
intendent of Public Instruction, the President of the 
State Board of Agriculture, President of the Senate 
and Speaker of the Assembly. Curator, S. R. Morse, 
Atlantic City. 

OYSTER COMMISSIONS. 

State Oyster Commission — Jeremiah N. Ogden, 
Bridgeton, 1909; Edward Stites, Jr., Port Norris, 1910; 
Ogden Gandy, Dennisville, 1911; William De Groff, Key- 
port, 1911. Superintendent A. T. Bacon, Mauricetown. 

The Oyster Commission for the District of Ocean 
Countj' — Lorenzo D. Bobbins. New Gretna, 1911; Jesse 
P. Grant, Bayville, 1911; Napoleon E. Kelly, West Creek, 
1911. 



BOARDS, BUREAUS, ETC. 455 

Oyster Superintendent for District of Ocean County — 
Edward A. Horner, Jr., Tuckerton, 1911. 

Oyster Commissioner, District of Shark River — A. 
Frank Bennett, Jr., Avon, 1911. 

Oyster Superintendent, Atlantic County — Alfred B. 
Smith, Brigantine, 1911. 

Oyster Commissioners — Atlantic County, Isaac 
Smallwood, Port Republic, 1911; Henry Postoll, At- 
lantic City, 1911; Dr. R. M. Sooy, Pleasantville, 1911. 

The State Bureau of Shell Fisheries — Chief, Charles 
R. Bacon, Camden, 1911. 

PALISADES INTERSTATE PARK. 
Commissioners — George Waldridge Perkins, New 
York city, 1911; D. McNeely Stauffer, New York, 1910; 
Edwin A. Stevens, Hoboken, 1910; J. DuPratt White, 
Nyack, N. Y., 1909; Franklin W. Hopkins, Alpine, 
N. J., 1909; William H. Porter, New York, 1911; Will- 
iam A. Linn, Hackensack, 1911; Nathan F. Barrett, 
New Rochelle, N. Y., 1912; Abram De Ronde, Engle- 
wood, 1912; William B. Dana, New York city, 1911. 

PILOTAGE COMMISSION. 
Commissioners (Office, 17 State street, New York 
city) — Charles B. Parsons, Red Bank; John R. De- 
war, Jersey City; Thomas A. Mathes, Tuckerton; 
Mark Townsend, Linwood; John Scully, Perth Amboy; 
Douglas Haley, Mauricetown; all in 1909. 

POLICE JUSTICES. 
Orange — Joseph B. Bray, 1909. 
West Orange — J. Martin Roll, 1912. 

POWER VESSELS. 

Inspectors — Chief, J. Fred Runyon, Morristown, 
1909; Assistant, James B. Everitt, Lake Hopatcong, 
1909. 

PRISON, STATE— TRENTON. 

Head Keeper — George O. Osborne, 1912. 

Supervisor — Samuel W. Kirkbride, 1909. 

Inspectors — William H. Carter, Bordentown; Ber- 
nard Feeney, Paterson; J. E. Mitchell, Millville; James 
H. Davenport, Newark; William A. Berry, Asbury 
Park; Jacob Schurts, Somerville; all in 1909. 



456 BOARDS, BUREAUS, ETC. 

REFORMATORY, STATE— RAHWAY. 
Henry Schmidt, Elizabeth, 1912; Richard H. Wilson, 
Metuchen, 1910; George "W. Fortmeyer, East Orange, 
1910; Freeman Woodbridge, New Brunswick, 1909; 
Decatur M. Sawyer, Montclair, 1911; Foster M. Voor- 
hees, Elizabeth, 1911; Edward D. Duffield, South 
Orange, 1912; Rev. John Handley, Vineland, 1909. The 
Governor is an ex-officio member. Richard H. Wil- 
son, President. 

RAILROAD COMMISSIONERS. 
Joseph W. Congdon, President, Paterson, 1913; Frank 
H. Sommer, Newark, ad in terim; Borden D. Whiting, 
Newark, 1909. Secretary, Alfred N. Barber, Trenton. 

Inspectors — Charles D. McKelvey, Paterson; James 
Maybury, Jr., Clifton; Charles A. Meade, Upper Mont- 
clair. 

RAILROADS, JOINT COMPANIES. 
State Director — Joshua E. Borton, Moorestown, 1909. 

REPORTS, PUBLIC DEPARTMENT. 
Commissioner — William Cloke, Trenton, 1913. 

RIPARIAN BOARD. 
Commissioners — The Governor, President; Robert 
Williams, Paterson; Michael F. McLaughlin, Newark; 
Henry T. Caullet, Trenton; Joseph A. Birkholz, East 
Orange; all in 1909. Secretary and Engineer, John C. 
Payne, Jersey City. 

ROADS, PUBLIC, DEPARTMENT. 
Commissioner — Frederick Gilkyson, Trenton, 1911. 
Supervisor — Robert A. Meeker, Plainfleld. 

SEWERAGE, PASSAIC VALLEY COMMISSION. 
Julius A. Lebkueccher, President, Newark, 1912; 
Francis Child, Newark, 1911; Peter Hauck, Harrison, 
1910; William McKenzie, Carlton Hill, 1909; William 
S. Ackerman, Paterson, 1913. Secretary, John S. Gibson, 
Newark. 

STATE HOUSE COMMISSION. 
The Governor, State Treasurer and State Comp- 
troller. 



BOARDS, BUREAUS, ETC. 457 

Custodian of the State House and Public Grounds — 
John W. Weseman. Assistant, Charles E. Satter- 
thwait; Night Custodian, Simon Gerson. 

TEACHERS' RETIREMENT FUND. 
Trustees — Charles J. Baxter, Trenton, President; 
Daniel S. Voorhees, Trenton, Treasurer; Addison P. 
Rosenkrans, Paterson, 1911; Addison P. Poland, New- 
ark, 1912; William R. Coddington, Plainfield, 1912; 
Mrs. Isabel Craven, Cravenhurst, 1909; James E. 
Bryan, Camden, 1909; Elizabeth A. Allen, Hoboken, 
1910; Mrs. Georgia B. Crater, Newark, 1910; Miss 
Sophie M. Braun, Elizabeth, 1911. 

TECHNICAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLS. 

Trustees Newark Technical School — John B. Sta- 
baeus, 1910; George R. Howe, 1910; Samuel E. Robert- 
son, 1911; George W. Ketcham, 1911; Moses Straus. 
1911; Franklin Phillips, Newark, 1911; James L. Hays, 
1909; Moses Plant, 1909. 

Trustees Industrial Education, Hoboken — William 
Keuffel, 1910; Abraham J. Demarest, 1910; Edward 
Russ, 1910; William D. Forbes, 1911; William R. Jen- 
vey, 1911; Richard Stevens, 1911; Mrs. C. V. Alexander, 
1909; James Smith, 1909. 

Board of Trustees of Industrial Education, Trenton — 
Frederick H Clark, 1911; Edward C. Stover, 1911; 
Archibald M. Maddock, 1911; Harry C. Taylor, 1911: 
B. C. Kuser, 1909; Garret D. W. Vroom, 1909; Charles 
Howell Cook, 1910; Karl G. Roebling, 1910; all Decem- 
ber 30. Robert C. Bellville, Secretary, 

TENEMENT HOUSE SUPERVISION, BOARD. 
John A. Campbell, President, Trenton, 1910; Edward 
W. Gray, Newark, 1911; James M. Stewart, Paterson, 
1912; Edwin West, Jr., Hoboken, 1913; Clinton Mac- 
kenzie, Elizabeth, 1909. Secretary, Captain Charles J. 
Allen, Newark. 

UNDERTAKERS AND EMBALMERS, BOARD. 
Raymond S. Taylor, Trenton, 1910; W. Nelson 
Knapp, East Orange, President, 1911; William J. Mo- 
ran, Jersey City, 1911; John F. Martin, Elizabeth, Sec- 
retary, 1909; B. B. Weatherby, Millville, Treasurer, 
1909. 



458 BOARDS, BUREAUS, ETC. 

WATERWAYS, INLAND. 
Commissioner — Henry WL Schneider, Atlantic City, 
1913. 

Engineer — Henry J. Sherman, Camden. 

WATER SUPPLY COMMISSIONERS. 
Foster M. Voorhees, Elizabeth, 1912; Richard Mor- 
rell, Passaic, 1911; Harry R. Humphreys, Camden, 1910; 
George F. Wright, Paterson, 1909; J. Henry Bacheller, 
Newark, 1913. Secretary, Charles H. Folwell, Mount 
Holly. 

WEATHER SERVICE. 
State Director — Levi A. Judkins, Atlantic City. 



HOMES, SANITORIUMS, ETC. 459 



HOMES, SANITORIUMS, ETC. 



BOYS, STATE HOME FOR. 

Jamesburg-. 

Trustees — Frederick M. Lockwood, Jersey City, 1909; 

John Guire, Long- Branch, 1909; Gervas Ely, Lambert- 

ville, 1910; John E. Gill, Trenton, 1911; Edward Spaeth, 

Newark, 1911; Frank M. Donohoe, New Brunswick, 

1910. Superintendent, John C. Kalleen. 

GIRLS, STATE HOME FOR. 
Trenton. 
Trustees — John D. Rue, Trenton, 1909; Alfred D. 
Carnag-y, Secretary, Trenton, 1909; Thomas B. Holmes, 
Trenton, 1910; Joanna Hartshorne, Short Hills, 1911; 
urerMrs. Frederick T. Johnson, Newark, 1910; vacancy, 
1909; Mrs. Louise K. Jess, Haddon Heights, ad interim; 
Thomas P. Fay. President, Long Branch, 1911; Mrs. 
Margaret Harrington Sickel, 1909. Thomas B. Holmes, 
Trenton, Treasurer. Probation Officer, Miss Nellie F. 
Dullard, Trenton. 

EPILEPTICS, VILLAGE FOR. 
Skillman Station (Somerset County.) 
Theodore Foote, Vineland, 1911; Caroline B, Alex- 
ander, Hoboken, 1909, Herman F. Moosbrugger, Somer- 
ville, 1910; Jonas A. Fuld, Trenton, 1911; Richard H. 
Moldenke, Somerville, 1911; Virginia Doane Collard, 
Jersey City, 1911; Dr. William A. Clark, Trenton, 

1911. William H. Clark, New Brunswick, ad interim. 
Superintendent, David F. Weeks. 

FEEBLE-MINDED CHILDREN. 
Vineland. 
New Jersey Training School for Feeble-Minded 
Girls and Boys, Vineland — Directors — Governor, ex- 
officio; D. Wilson Moore, Clayton, 1911; William H. 
Nicholson, Haddonfield, 1911; Thomas J. Smith, M. D., 
Bridgeton, 1911; George Davidson, Vineland, 1912; 
Rev. H. H. Beadle, Bridgeton, 1912; E. E. Read, Jr.. 
Camden, 1912; Benjamin C. Reeve, Camden, 1909; W. 



460 HOMES, SANITORIUMS, ETC. 

Graham Tyler, Philadelphia, 1909; Charles Keighley, 
Vineland, 1909; P. P. Baker, Vineland, 1910; Howard 
Carrow, Camden, 1910; Howard L. Branson, Vineland, 
1912. Officers of the Board — Philip P. Baker, Presi- 
dent; William H. Nicholson, Vice-President; George 
Davidson, Treasurer; Edward R. Johnstone, Secre- 
tary and Principal. Board of Lady Visitors — Mrs. 
Charles Keighley, Vice-President, Vineland, 1911; Mrs. 
Fanny A. Shepperd, Greenwich, Secretary, 1911; Miss 
Susan N. Warrington, Moorestown, Treasurer, 1911; 
Miss Rachel E. Allinson, Yardville, 1909; Miss Julia 
Frame, Bridgeton, 1910; Mrs. Thomts J. Craven, Pres- 
ident, Salem, 1910; Mrs. Edward P. Shields, Bridgeton, 
1910; Mrs. William H, Skirm, Trenton, 1909; Mrs. Har- 
riet Townsend, Elizabeth, 1910; Mrs. John Moore, 
Clayton, 1909; Mrs. Hannah C. Reeve, Camden, 1910; 
Mrs. F. J. Collier, Wloodstown, 1911. 

FEEBLE-MINDED WOMEN. 
Vineland. 
Board of Managers — Benjamin F. Lee, President, 
Trenton, 1912; Mrs. Emily E. Williamson, Secretary, 
Elizabeth, 1910; Mrs. Annie E. Gile, Bloomfield, 1909; 
George B. Thorn, Treasurer, Burlington, 1912; John 
J. Cleary, Trenton, 1912; Harry H. Pond, Vineland, 
1913; Richard C. Jenkinson, Newark, 1909. Mary J. 
Dunlap, Supervisor and Medical Director. 

FIREMEN'S HOME. 
Boonton. 
Managers — Benjamin W. Cloud, Woodbury; John S. 
Gibson, Newark; Charles N. Reading, Frenchtown; 
Amos Edson, Paterson: Egbert Seymour, Bayonne; 
Evan F. Benners, Moorestown; John Conway, Jersey 
City; William T. Corliss, Red Bank, all in 1912. The 
State Comptroller and Commissioner of Banking and 
Insurance are members ex-officio. Secretary, William 
C. Astley, Newark. 

SOLDIERS, DISABLED, HOME FOR. 

Kearny (Hudson County.) 

Managers — Colonel Edward H. Wright, Newark; 

Amzi Dodd, Newark; Marcus L. Ward, Newark; James 

E. Flemming, Newark; General E. Burd Grubb, Edge- 



HOMES, SANITORIUMS, ETC. 461 

water Park; General R. Heber Breintnall, Newark. 
Officers — Superintendent, Major Peter F. Rogers; Ad- 
jutant, Bishop W. Mains; Quartermaster, E. W. Davis; 
Chaplain, Rev. John D. Ferguson; Matron, Mrs. Peter 
F. Rogers. 

SOLDIERS, DISABLED, SAILORS, MARINES AND 
THEIR ^V\^IVES. 
Managers — Gilbert D. Bogert, Treasurer, Passaic; 
Amos R. Dease, Camden; Ernest C. Stahl, Secretary, 
Trenton, in 1909; John C. Patterson, Ocean Grove, 1910; 
J. Howard Willets, Port Elizabeth, 1911. Command- 
ant, John Shields; Adjutant, Ed. P. Southwick; Matron, 
Emma J. Southwick. 

TUBERCULOUS DISEASES, SANITORIUM FOR. 
Glen Gardner (Hunterdon County.) 

Board of Managers — Dr. Elmer Barwis, Trenton. 
1911; Dr. William S. Jones, Camden President, 1911; 
Dr. Frederick A. Wild, Bound Brook, ad interim; Dr. 
Theodore Senseman, Atlantic City, 1912; Abram L. 
Beavers, Glen Gardner, Treasurer, 1912; Chester N. 
Jones, Summit, 1910; Dr. Rudolph F. Rabe, Hoboken, 
1909; J. Walker Ingham, Phillipsburg, 1910. Medical 
Director, Dr. Samuel B. English; Assistant, Dr. Henry 
B. Dunham. 

TRAINING, MANUAL, AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 
FOR COLORED YOUTH. 
Bordentown. 
This institution is under the supervision of the State 
Board of Education. James M. Gregory, A. M., Princi- 
pal; Fannie E. Gregory, Preceptress; J. T. Caruthers, 
Department of Agriculture; F. N. Bardwell, Depart- 
ment Manual Training; Lucinda McMillin, Department 
of Domestic Economy; Benjamin B. Church, Literary 
Department. 



462 COMMISSIONS. 

COMPAISSIONS. 



BANKS, TRUST COMPANIES AND SAVINGS BANKS, 
LAW FOR TAXATION OF. 
John O. H. Pitney, Newark; Bloomfield H. Minch, 
Bridgeton; Williajn H. Davis, Harrison; Albert M. 
Bradshaw, Lakewood; J. Haynes Lippincott, Atlantic 
City. 

BLIND, TO EXAMINE INTO CONDITION OF THE. 
John J. Stanton, Sussex; Richard C. Jenkinson, New- 
ark, President; Mrs. Frank B. Colton, East Orange; 
Miss Emily M. Roebling, Trenton; Algernon A. Os- 
borne, Newark, Secretary. 

DELAWARE RIVER BRIDGE. 
Oliver O. Bowman, Trenton; I. Snowden Haines, 
President, Burlington; George A. Angle, Belvidere. 
Secretary, Frank Barkley, Lambertville. 

DEPENDENCY AND CRIME. 
Michael T. Barrett, Chairman, Newark; Emily E. 
Williamson, Elizabeth; Caroline B. Alexander, Hobo- 
ken; B. B. Bobbitt, Long Branch; Charles A. Rosen- 
wasser, Newark; Ernest A. Boom, Merchantville; Ben- 
jamin Murphy, Jersej- City; Edward A. Ransom, Jr., 
Secretary, Jersey City. 

EAST JERSEY PROPRIETORSHIP. 
John D. Prince, Ringwood; Frankland Briggs, New- 
ark; Heulings Lippincott, Camden. 

EXCISE. 
Charles J. Fisk, Chairman, Plainfield; Caleb Van 
Husen Wliitbeck, Hackensack; J. Kearney Rice, New 
Brunswick; T. Frank Appleby, Asbury Park; John 
Howe, Newark; George G. Smith, Lakewood; Peter 
Backes, Trenton, Secretary; John P. Dengler, Newark. 

FISHERIES, TRI-STATE. 
Thomas J. Hillery, Boonton; Edmund W. Wakelee, 
Demarest; Joseph R. Frelinghuysen, Raritan; Frank 



COMMISSIONS. 463 

B. Jess, Haddon Heights; Oliver G. Holcombe, Lam- 

bertville; Henry D. Tliompson, Princeton; Austen Col- 
gate, Orange; Benedict C. Kuser, Trenton; Professor 
Henry Van Dyke, Princeton. 

HUDSON RIVER BRIuGE. 
Anthony R. Kuser, Bernardsville, President; Victor 
L. Mason, Passaic; Frank R. Long, Hackensack; Ellas 

D. Smith, Elizabeth; Frederick N. Eberhard, Hoboken. 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. 

George R. Howe, President, Newark; George 
G. Tennant, Jersey City; William A. Bembridge, Ro- 
selle Park; John W. Ferguson, Paterson; Ferdinand W. 
Roebling, Jr., Trenton. Secretary, Albert A. Snowden, 
Newark. 

LIVE STOCK. 

Edward B. Voorhees, New Brunswick; Samuel S. 
Conover, Harrisonville; Fred C. Minkler, New Bruns- 
wick; T. Earl Budd, Orange; Ephriam T. Gill, Haddon- 
field. 

MONMOUTH BATTLE MONUMENT. 

Members — Comptroller of the Treasury, Adjutant- 
General, Quartermaster-General, President of Senate, 
Speaker of House of Assembly, Theodore W. Morris, 
President; James T. Burtis, Treasurer; John B. Cono- 
ver; Joseph A. Yard, Secretary, Freehold. 

NATIONAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION. 
E. B. Voorhees, New Brunswick; Alfred B. Gaskill, 
Trenton; Morris R. Sherrard, Newark; Henry B. Kum- 
mell, Trenton; Henry J. Sherman, Camden. 

OLD TAVERN HOUSE IN THE BOROUGH OF HAD- 
DONFIELD, TO PURCHASE. 
Ephraim T. Gill, Jrames L. Pennypacker, Charles R. 
Stevenson, Robert Gwynne, Henry D. Moore. 

POOR LAWS REVISION. 
Algernon T. Sweeney, Newark; Vivian M. Lewis, 
Paterson; Thomas A. Davis, Orange; William H. 
Speer, Jersey City; A. W. McDougal, Newark; Mrs. 

E. E. Williamson, Elizabeth. 



464 LEGAL HOLIDAYS. 

PUBLIC STATUTES REVISION. 
Joseph L. Munn, East Orange; George T. Werts, 
Jersey City; Alan H. Strong, New Brunswick. Sec- 
retary, Francis B. Lee, Trenton. 

REFORMATORY FOR WOMEN. 
Edwin G. Adams, Montclair; Mrs. C. B. Alexander, 
Hoboken; Mrs. George W. Blackwell, East Orange; 
Mary Philbrook, Newark; vacancies. 

SALEM CHURCH BATTLEFIELD. 
John F. Dryden, Joseph W. Plume, John S. Gibson, 
A. W. Whitehead and H. H. Hoffman, all of Newark; 
W. H. Cawley, Somerville. 



LEGAL HOLIDAYS. 



New Year's Day — January 1. 
Lincoln's Birthday- — February 12. 
Washington's Birthday — February 22. 
Good Friday — 
Memorial Day — May 30. 
Independence Day — July 4 
Labor Day — First Monday in September. 
Thanksgiving Day — Last Thursday in November. 
General Election Day — First Tuesday after first 
Monday in November. 

Christmas Day — December 25. 



SALARIES AND TERMS OF OFFICE. 465 



SALARIES AND TERMS OF OFFICE 



Ot" State Officers and Members and Officers of the 
Legislature. 

EXECUTIVE, STATE, TREASURY AND LAW 
DEPARTMENTS. 

Governor, three years, $10,000. Secretary to the 
Governor, three years, $4,000. Executive Clerk, $1,800. 

Secretary of State, five years, $6,000. Assistant, five 
years, $3,000. 

State Treasurer, three years, $6,000. 

Deputy State Treasurer, $2,500. 

State Comptroller, three years, $6,000. 

Deputy Comptroller, three years, $3,600. 

Attorney-General, five years, $7,000. 

Assistant Attorney-General, $5,000; Chief Clerk, 
$3,000. 

THE COURTS. 

Chancellor, seven years, $11,000. 

Vice-Chancellors, seven y^ars, $10,000. 

Clerk in Chancery, five years, $6,000; Deputy, $3,000. 

Chief Justice Supreme Court, seven years, $11,000. 

Associate Justices of the Supreme Court, seven years, 
$10,000. 

Clerk of the Supreme Court, five years, $6,000; As- 
sistant Clerk, $3,600. 

Judges of the Court of Errors and Appeals, six 
years, $20 a day for attendance at court and $20 a 
day, not exceeding- thirty days each term, when en- 
gaged in examination of cases or writing of opinions. 

Circuit Court Judges, seven years, $7,500. 

Chancery and Law Reporters, each $500. 

Judges of County Courts (Common Pleas), five 
years. Essex and Hudson, $7,500; Passaic, $6,500; Ber- 
gen, Camden, Mercer, Monmouth and Union, $5,000; 
Atlantic, $4,500; Middlesex, $4,000; Burlington, Cum- 
berland, Morris, Somerset and Warren, $3,000; Glouces- 
ter, Hunterdon, Ocean, Salem, Cape May and Sussex. 
$1,800. 

District Court Judges, five years. Newark and Jer- 
sey City (two each), $4,000; Clerks, $2,000. Paterson, 
30 



466 SALARIES AND TERMS OF OFT^CE. 

$3,000; Clerk, $1,500. Atlantic City, Bayonne, Cam- 
den, Elizabeth, Hoboken, Orange, Passaic, Paterson, 
Perth Amboy, Trenton, $2,500; Clerk, excepting Orange 
and Perth Amboy, $1,250; Orange and Perth Amboy, 
Clerks, $900. New Brunswick, $2,000; Clerk, $900, 
Plainfield, $1,200; Clerk, $600. 

Bast Orange, no court, although an act of 1908 
seems to warrant one. 

An act of 1908 created three judicial districts in 
Bergen County, to take effect January 1, 1909. 

Prosecutors of the Pleas, five years. Essex and 
Hudson, $8,000; two Assistants each in Essex and 
Hudson, $6,000 and $4,000; Passaic, $7,500; Camden, 
Mercer and Union, $6,000; Middlesex and Bergen, 
$5,000; Monmouth and Atlantic, $4,000; Morris, $2,500; 
Burlington, $2,000; Cape May and Cumberland, $1,500; 
Somerset, $1,800; Salem, Gloucester, Ocean, Hunter- 
don, Warren and Sussex, not less than $1,200. 

Sheriffs, three years. Essex and Hudson, $10,000. 

County Clerks, Surrogates and Registers of Deeds, 
five years. Essex and Hudson, $7,500. 

The salaries of the Sheriffs, County Clerks, Surro- 
gates and Registers of Deeds, terms of ofRce being 
the same as in Essex and Hudson; in all other coun- 
ties are as follows: Passaic, $6,500; Bergen, Cam- 
den, Mercer and Union, $5,500; Middlesex and Mon- 
mouth, $4,500; Atlantic, Burlington, Cumberland and 
Morris, $3,500; Gloucester, Hunterdon, Somerset and 
Warren, $2,500; Cape May, Ocean, Salem and Sussex. 
$2,000. 

BANKING AND INSURANCE. 

Commissioner, three years, $6,000; Deputy, $2,500. 

MILITARY. 
Adjutant-General, $2,500; Chief Clerk, $2,500. 
Quartermaster-General, $2,500; Chief Clerk, $2,500. 

EDUCATIONAL — STATE LIBRARY, ETC. 
State Board of Education, five years, no salary. 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction, five 
years, $5,000; Assistant, $3,000. 
High School Inspector, $2,500. 
School Fund Superintendent, $2,500. 



SALARIES AND TERMS OF OFFICE. 467 

County Superintendents of Public Schools, three 
years, $2,000. 

State Librarian, five years, $3,000. 

Public Library Commissioners, five years, no salary 

STATE PRISON AND REFORMATORIES, ETC. 

Keeper of the State Prison, five years, $3,500. 

Inspectors of the State Prison, five years, $500. 

Supervisor of the State Prison, three years, $3,000. 

Moral Instructors of the State Prison, $1,000. 

Commissioners of the New Jersey Reformatory, four 
years, no salary. 

Superintendent of the New Jersey Reformatory, five 
years, $3,000. 

STATE HOSPITALS. 

Board of Managers, five years, no salary — Morris 
Plains, Medical Director, $4,500; first assistant, $1,800; 
second assistant, $1,500; third assistant, $1,200; fourth 
assistant, $1,100; fifth assistant, $1,000; sixth assist- 
ant, $950; Warden, $3,000; Treasurer and Secretary, 
each $500. Trenton, Medical Director, $3,500; first 
assistant, $2,000; second assistant, $1,500; third assist- 
ant, $1,200; fourth assistant, $1,100; fifth assistant, 
$1,000; Warden, $2,500; Treasurer and Secretary, each 
$500. 

STATE ASSESSORS, EQUALIZATION OF TAXES, &c. 

State Board of Assessors, four years, $2,500; Secre- 
tary, $2,500. 

Board of Equalization of Taxes, five years. Salaries, 
President, $5,000; other members, $3,500; Clerk, five 
years, $2,500 and expenses; Assistant Clerk, $1,200. 

County Boards of Equalization of Taxes, three 
years. Salaries, Essex and Hudson, $3,500; Passaic, 
$2,000; Berg-en, Camden, Mercer and Union, $1,600; Mid- 
dlesex and Monmouth, $1,400; Atlantic, Burlington, 
Cumberland and Morris, $1,200; Cape May, Gloucester, 
Hunterdon, Ocean, Salem, Somerset, Sussex and War- 
ren, $1,000. 

RAILROAD, WATER AND RIPARIAN 
COMMISSIONS. 
Railroad Commission — Six years, $5,000; Secretary, 
$3,000; Inspectors, $3,600 and $2,400. 



468 SALARIES AND TERMS OF OFFICE. 

Water Supply Commission — Five years, $2,500; Sec- 
retary, $2,500. 

Riparian Commissioners — Five years, $1,500. 

LABOR DEPARTMENTS. 

Chief of the Bureau of Labor and Statistics, five 
years, $2,500; Deputy, $2,000. 

Commissioner Department of Labor, three years, 
$3,500; Assistant Commissioner, three years, $2,500; 
Clerk, $1,900; Inspectors, three years, $1,500. 

CHARITIES AND CORRECTIONS. 
Commissioner, three years, $4,000; Assistant, three 
years, $3,600; draughtsman, $2,500; engineer, $750. 

STATE HOUSE CUSTODIAN. 
Custodian of the State House, at pleasure of the 
Governor, State Treasurer and State Comptroller. 
$3,500; Assistant, $1,500; Night Custodian, $1,500. 

STATE AUDITOR, CIVIL SERVICE BOARD, RE- 
PORTS COMMISSIONER AND INLAND WATER- 
WAYS. 
Auditor of Accounts, five years, $3,000; Assistant 

Auditors, five years, $2,000; Stenographer, $600. 
Commissioner of Public Reports, five years, $2,000. 
Civil Service Commissioners, five years, $2,000. 

President, $2,500; Secretary, $2,000; Chief Examiner, 

$3,000. 

Commissioner of Inland W^aterways, five years, 

$2,000. 

STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 
Members of Board, six years, salary $1,500; Secre- 
tary $2,500. 

Health Officer, Perth Amboy, $1,000; Assistants, 

$250. 

PUBLIC ROAD AND MOTOR VEHICLE 
DEPARTMENTS. 
State Commissioner of Public Roads, three years, 

$5,000; $4,000 for clerk hire, etc. 
Supervisor of Public Roads, $3,600. 
Motor Vehicle Department — Commissioner, $1,500; 

Chief Inspector, $1,500; Inspector, $3 a day. Appointed 

by Secretary of State. 



SALARIES AND TERMS OP OFFICE. 469 

SEWERAGE COMMISSION. 

Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission, five years, no 
salary. 

HOMES, SANATORIUMS, ETC. 

Board of Managers of the Home for Feeble-Minded 
Women, six years, no salary; Superintendent, $2,500. 

Board of Managers Home for Feeble-Minded Chil- 
dren, four years, no salary. 

State Home for Disabled Soldiers, Sailors, Marines 
and their Wives, five years, no salary; Commandant, 
$1,500; Adjutant, $1,000. 

Soldiers' Home, Kearny, no fixed terms, no salary. 

Board of Managers of the New Jersey Sanatorium 
for Tuberculosis Diseases, four years, no salary; Sec- 
retary, $800. 

Board of Managers Village for Epileptics, three 
years, no salary. 

Superintendent of the Village for Epileptics, $3,000; 
Steward, $1,500; First Assistant Physician, $1,500; Sec- 
ond Assistant Physician, $800. 

State Board of Children's Guardians, six years, no 
salary; General Agent, $1^000. 

Trustees Home for Boys, three years, no salary; 
Superintendent, $1,620. 

Trustees State Home for Girls, three years, no sal- 
ary; Superintendent, $1,000; Treasurer, $500; Secre- 
tary, $200. 

AGRICULTURE, OYSTERS, GEOLOGICAL, FISH AND 
GAME, FORESTRY, ETC. 

Board of Visitors to State Agricultural College, two 
years, no salary. 

Secretary State Board of Agriculture, $1,200. 

Members of Geological Survey, five years, no salary. 

State Geologist, $4,000; Assistant, $1,200; Chemist, 
$1,500. 

Director Agricultural Experiment Station, $2,250. 

School Fund Superintendent, $2,000. 

State Oyster Commissioner, three years, $500; Su- 
perintendent, $1,300. 

Fish and Game Commissioners, four years, no sal- 
ary; Fish and Game Protector, $1,200; Fish Wardens, 
each $600, and expenses, $200. 



470 SALARIES AND TERMS OF OFFICE. 

Secretary Fish and Game Commission, $1,800, 

State Oyster Commission for District of Ocean 
County, three years, $750; Superintendent, $1,000; Pa- 
trol, $1,000. 

Oyster Commission for the District of Atlantic 
County, three years, $500 first year, $300 afterward. 

Oyster Superintendent of Atlantic County, three 
years, $1,000. 

Chief of the State Bureau of Shell Fisheries, four 
years, $1,200. 

Forest Park Reservation Commissioners, three 
years, no salary. 

Commissioners of Palisades Interstate Park, five 
years, no salary. 

MEDICAL, DENTISTRY, ETC. 

Board of Medical Examiners, three years, no salary. 

Board of Pharmacy, five years, $5 a day and ex- 
penses. 

Board of Dentistry, five years, no salary. 

Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners, three years, 
no salary. 

Board of Undertakers and Embalmers, three years, 
no salary. 

MISCELLANEOUS BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS. 

Commissioners of Pilotage, three years, fees. 

Chief Inspector of Power Vessels, three years, $800; 
Assistant, three years, $500. 

State Board of Architects, two years, no salary. 

Board of Public Accountants, three years, $5 a day 
for actual service. 

Board of Tenement House Supervision, five years, 
no salary; Secretary, $3,000; Inspectors, $1,000 each; 
Architect, $3,000; Record Clerk, $1,200; Chief Clerk, 
$1,200; Law Clerk, $1,200. 

Curator State Museum, $1,500. 

MEMBERS AND OFFICERS OF THE LEGISLATURE. 

State Senators, three years, and Members of the As- 
sembly, one year, $500. 

Senate Officers — President, $666.66; President's Pri- 
vate Secretary, $600; Secretary, $1,500; Assistant Sec- 
retary, $1,200; Supervisor of Bills, $1,200; one Assist- 



SALARIES AND TERMS OF OFFICE. 471 

ant, $600; Journal Clerk, $1,000; assistant Journal 
Clerk, $500; Sergeant-at-Arms, $700; Assistant Ser- 
geant-at-Arms, $500; Calendar Clerk, $500; Bill Clerks, 
$500; five Door and Gallery Keepers, each $350; four 
Pages, each $200; Clerk to Committee on Printed Bills, 
$500. 

House of Assembly Officers — Speaker, $666.66; 
Speaker's Private Secretary, $600; Assistant Secretary, 
$400; Clerk, $1,500; Assistant Clerk, $1,200; Supervisor 
of Bills, $1,300; two Assistants, $600 each; Journal 
Clerk, $1,000; Assistant Joarnal ClerK, $500; Sergeant- 
at-Arms, $700; two Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms, each 
$500; twelve Doorkeepers, each $350; ten Pages, each 
$200; Clerk to Committee on Printed Bills, $500; Bill 
Clerk and Assistant, $500 each; four Clerks to Com- 
mittees, each $300. 



472 MILITARY. 



MILITARY. 



Roster of Officers of the National Guard. 

Commander-in-Chief — Governor J. Franklin Fort. 

General Staff — The Adjutant-General, Brigadier-Gen- 
eral R. Heber Brientnall; Inspector-General, Brigadier- 
General Joseph W. Congdon; Judge Advocate-Gen- 
eral, Brigadier-General Edward P. Meany; Quartermas- 
ter-General, Brigadier-General C. Edward Murray; 
Commissary-General, Brigadier-General C. Edward 
Murray; Surgeon-General, Brigadier-General John U. 
McGill; Paymaster-General, Brigadier-General C. Ed- 
ward Murray; Chief of Ordnance, Brigadier-General 
C. Edward Murray; Inspector-General of Rifle Prac- 
tice, Brigadier-General Bird W. Spencer. 

Staff Corps — Deputy Adjutant-General, Colonel 
Frederick Gilkyson; Deputy Adjutant-General, Colonel 
James S. Kiger; Assistant Inspectors-General, Lieuten- 
ant-Colonels Lewis T. Bryant, Charles Boltwood; As- 
sistant Judge-Advocate-General, Major Charles B. 
Bradley; Assistant Quartermaster-Generals, Colonels 
James V. Oliphant, D. Stewart Craven: Deputy Quarter- 
master-General, Lieutenant- Colonel Alexander R. Foy- 
dyce, Jr.; Assistant Military Storekeeper, Captain John 
H. Crissey; Assistant Commissary-General, Colonel 
William H. Earley; Assistant Surgeon-General. Colonel 
Edmund L. B. Godfrey; Medical Inspector, Lieutenant- 
Colonel Mortimer Lampson; Assistant Paymaster-Gen- 
eral, Major Samuel S. Armstrong; Assistant Inspectors- 
General of Rifle Practice, Colonel Charles A. Reid. Lieu- 
tenant-Colonels Richard B. Reading, William Libbey, 
William A. Tewes. 

Aides-de-Camp — Colonel Austen Colgate, Major Wil- 
bur F. Sadler, Jr., Captain Oscar H. Condit, First Lieu- 
tenant Nelson B. Gaskill. 

Division Headquarters, Jersey City — Major-General 
Peter Farmer Wanser. 

Staff — Adjutants-General, Colonel Thomas S. Cham- 
bers, Lieutenant-Colonel Leon W. Manton; Inspector- 
General, Lieutenant-Colonel Daniel B. Murphy; Judge 
Advocate, Lieutenant-Colonel George E. P. Howard; 
Deputy Quartermaster-General Lieutenant-Colonel 
James W. Howard; Deputy Commissary-General, Lieu- 



MILITARY. 473 

tenant-Colonel Forrest F. Dryden; Deputy Surgeon- 
General, Lieutenant-Colonel George W. Terriberry; 
Deputy Paymaster-General, Lieutenant-Colonel Mahlon 
R. Marg-erum; Lieutenant-Colonel Walter F. Whitte- 
more. Corps of Engineers; Ordnance Officer, Lieutenant- 
Colonel Walter E. Edge; Inspector of Small-Arms Prac- 
tice, Lieutenant-Colonel Arthur Rowland; Captains 
Harry S. Wright, Henry G. Stephens and Robert R. 
Howard, Corps of Engineers, Aides-de-Camp. 

First Brigade Headquarters, Newark — Brigadier- 
General Edward A. Campbell. 

Staff — 'Adjutant-General, Major Alexander P. Gray, 
Jr.; Inspector-General, Major William B. Miles; Judge 
Advocate, Major Robert I. Hopper; Quartermaster, 
Major Hobart Tuttle; Commissary, Major Frederick 
W. Garvin; Surgeon, xMajor William J. Parker; Paymas- 
ter, Major Allan B. Wallace; Major S. Wood McClave, 
Corps of Engineers; Inspector of Small-Arms Practice, 
Major Charles E. Burgess; First Lieutenant Charles H. 
Grant, Corps of Engineers, Aide-de-Camp. 

Second Brigade Headquarters, Elizabeth — Brigadier- 
General Dennis F. Collins. 

Staff — Adjutant-General, Major Harry P. Moorhead; 
Inspector-General, Major Robert L. Patterson; Judge 
Advocate, Major Scott Scammell; Quartermaster, Major 
Harry B. Salter; Commissary, Major Alexander W. 
Mack; Surgeon, Major Paul M. Mecray; Paymaster, 
Major Wilbur F. Sadler, Jr.; Major Edwin B. Broada- 
way, Corps of Engineers; Inspector of Small- Arms 
Practice, Major David M. Flynn; First Lieutenants Mer- 
ton S. West, Howard T. Alexander, Corps of Engineers, 
Aides-de-Camp. 

First Troop, Newark — Captain, William A. Bryant. 

Second Troop, Red Bank — Captain, Edwin Field. 

Battery A, Field Artillery, East Orange — Captain, 
Oscar H. Condit. 

Battery B, Field Artillery, Camden — Captain, Samuel 
G. Barnard. 

First Infantry Headquarters, Newark — Colonel, 
Henry W. Freeman; Captain and Adjutant, Alvin H. 
Graff. 

Second Infantry Headquarters, Trenton — Colonel, 
Nelson Y. Dungan; Captain and Adjutant, John M. 
Rogers. 

Third Infantry Headquarters, Camden — Colonel, John 
A. Mather; Captain and Adjutant, Harry C. Kramer. 



474 MILITARY. 

Fourth Infantry Headquarters, Jersey City — Colonel, 
Joseph H. Brensinger; Captain and Adjutant, William 
Robertson, Jr. 

Fifth Infantry Headquarters, Paterson — Colonel, Ed- 
win "W. Hine; Captain and Adjutant, John T. Hilton. 

Signal Corps Company, Jersey City — Captain, William 
C. Sherwood. 

Roster of Officers of the Naval Reserve. 

First Battalion, Armory, U. S. S. Portsmouth, Ho- 
boken — Commander, Edward McClure Peters. 

Second Battalion, Armory, U. S. S. Vixen, Camden — 
Commander, Albert DeUnger. 



COUNTY DIRECTORY. 475 



COUNTY DIRECTORY. 



County Officers, With the Date of the Bxpiratlon of 
Their Term of Office, Time of Holding: Courts, &c. 



ATLANTIC COUNTY. 
County Seat — .Mays Landing. Population, 1,359. 

Sheriff — Enoch L. Johnson, Rep., 1911. 

Coroners — Emmanuel Southeimer, 1911; William J. 
Dublei', 1909; Charles Cunningham, 1911. 

County Clerk — Samuel Kirby, 1913. 

Surrogate — Emanuel C. Shaner, 1912. 

County Collector — L. C. Albertson, Atlantic City. 

Circuit Justice — Thomas W. Trenchard, 1914. 

County Judg-e — Enoch A. Hig'bee, 1913. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — Clarence L. Goldenberg, 
1913. 

County Lunatic Asylum — T. L. McConnell, Supt. 

County Board of Elections — John D. Carver (1909), 
Louis A. Reppetto (1909), Dems.; William Howen- 
stein (1910), Harry Jenkins (1909), Reps. 

Terms of Court — Second Tuesday in January, May 
and October. 

BERGEN COUNTY. 

County Seat — Hackensack. Population, 11,098. 

Sheriff — George M. Brewster, Rep., 1910. 

Coroners — Dr. Willis W'. Currey, Dr. Cornelius C. 
De Mund, 1910; W. H. Tracy, 1911. 

County Clerk — John R. Ramsey, 1910. 

Surrogate — Earle L. D. Hester, 1913. 

County Collector — Orrin S. Trail, Hillsdale. 

Circuit Justice — Charles W. Parker, 1914, 

County Judge — Milton Demarest, 1913. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — Ernest Koester, 1910. 

Assistant Prosecutor — John S. Mackay. 

County Board of Elections — William Ely (1909), 
William H. Rogers (1910), Dem.; George Ricardo 
(1910), Albert Hoffman (1909), Reps. 

Terms of Court — April, first Tuesday; September, 
second Tuesday; and December, second Tuesday. 



476 COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

BURLINGTON COUNTY. 
County Seat — Mount Holly. Population, 5,509. 

Sheriff — William W. Worrell, Rep., 1911. 

Coroners — Barclay Seeds, 1909; W. Herman Bisbing, 
1910; William Grobler, 1911. 

County Clerk — Watson T. Sooy, 1909. 

Surrogate — William P. Liippincott, 1911. 

Auditor — Robert Peacock, 1909. 

County Collector — Joseph Powell, Mount Holly. 

Circuit Justice — Willard P. Voorhees, 1915. 

County Judge — John G. Horner, 1912. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — Samuel Atkinson, 1910. 

County Lunatic Asylum — C. C. Deacon, Supt. 

County Board of Elections — Henry H. Savage 
(1909), Robert Glasgow (1910), Dems.; Walter E. Bor- 
den (1910), J, Howard Burr (1909), Reps. 

Terms of Court — Fourth Tuesday in April, Septem- 
ber and December. 

CAMDEN COUNTY. 
County Seat — Camden. Population, 83,363. 

Sheriff— Cooper B. Hatch, Rep., 1911. 

Coroners — Wendell P. Wingender, Frank B. Cook, 
J910; Paul W. Titchfield, 1911. 

County Clerk — Frank F. Patterson, Jr., 1911. 

Register of Deeds — Edward W. Delacroix, 1910. 

Surrogate — Harry Reeves, 1912. 

County Collector — John W. Sell, Camden. 

Circuit Justice — Charles G. Garrison, 1909. 

County Judge — Charles Van Dyke Joline, 1912. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — Henry S. Scovel, 1912. As- 
sistant, Charles A. Wolverton. 

Port Warden — Charles A. Wolverton. 

County Lunatic Asylum — C. F. Curry, Supt. 

County Board of Elections — Francis J. McAdams 
(1910), Gottleib C. Mick (1909), Dems.; John S. Broome 
(1909), William H. Harrison (1910), Reps. 

Terms of Court — First Tuesday, April; second Tues- 
day, September and December. 



COUNTY DIRECTORY. 477 

CAPE MAY COUNTY. 
County Seat — Cape May Court House. Population, — 

Sheriff — Robert R. Corsoa, R., 1910. 

Coroners — Nathan A. Cohen, 1909; Wilson A. Lake, 
1910; Mark Lake, 1911. 

County Clerk — Julius Way, 1910. 

Surrog-ate^Charles P. Vanaman, 1912. 

County Collector — Joseph I. Scull, Ocean City. 

Circuit Justice — Thomas W. Trenchard, 1914. 

County Judge — James M. E. Hildreth, 1911. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — Ernest W. Lloyd, 1913. 

County Board of Elections — William Tyler (1910), 
Michael H. Kearns (1909), Dems. ; Henry F. Dougherty 
(1910), Learning E. Hughes (1909), Reps. 

Terms of Court — Second Tuesday in April, Septem- 
ber and December. 

CUMBERLAND COUNTY. 
County Seat — Bridgeton. Population, 13,624. 

Sheriff — George W. Payne, Rep., 1911. 

Coroners — John S. Halsey, 1909; Ralph R. Charles- 
worth, 1910; Harry Maier, 1911. 

County Clerk — Samuel M. Sheldon, 1909. 

Surrogate — John R. C. Thompson, 1913. 

County Collector — E. P. Eacon, Bridgeton. 

Circuit Justice — Thomas W. Trenchard, 1914. 

County Judge — Royal P. Tuller, 1909. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — J. Hampton Fithian, 1909. 

County Lunatic Asylum — David Elwell, Supt. 

County Board of Elections — John Ogden (1909), 
George W. Eckart (1910), Dems.; William H. Ballin- 
ger (1909), John R. Radcliffe (1910), Reps. 

Terms of Court — Fourth Tuesday in April, Septem- 
ber and December. 

ESSEX COUNTY. 

County Seat — Newark. Population, 283,289. 

Sheriff — William Karrigan, Dem., 1911. 
Coroners — Edwin Steiner, John Frank, Fritz Trep- 
kau. 1911. 

County Clerk — John B. Woolston, 1912. 
Surrogate — George E. Russell, 1909. 



478 COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

County Collector — P. J. McGinness, Newark. 

County Supervisor — Fred K Baldwin. 

Register of Deeds — Edward S. Perry, 1910. 

Circuit Justice — Chief Justice William S. Gummere, 
1915. 

County Judges — Jay TenEyck, 1911; Thomas A. 
Davis, 1913. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — Wilbur A. Mott, 1913. 

First Assistant Prosecutor — Thomas L. Raymond. 

Second Assistant Prosecutor — Frederick R. Lehl- 
bach. 

County Lunatic Asylum — Dr. D. M. Dill, Supt. 

County Board of Elections — Martin Conboy (1910), 
Edward Hart (1909), Dems. ; Harry Kalisch (1909), 
Samuel C. Martin (1910), Reps. 

Terms of Court — First Tuesday in April, third Tues- 
day in September and secoid Tuesday in December. 

GLOUCESTER COUNTY. 
County Seat — Woodbury. Population, 4,560. 

Sheriff — Thomas L. Wilson, Rep., 1911. 

Coroners — James Hunter, Jr., 1909; Dr. J. Gaunt Ed- 
wards, 1910; Vernon E. De Groff, 1911. 

County Clerk — Edward L. Sturgess, 1912. 

Surrogate — Anthony G. Silver, 1914. 

County Collector — George E. Pierson, Woodbury. 

Circuit Justice — Charles G. Garrison, 1909. 

County Judge — Lewis Starr, 1912. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — Alexander L. Rogers, 1912. 

County Lunatic Asylum — Joseph Ridgeway, Stew- 
ard. 

County Board of Electioas — Thomas C. Dikes (1909), 
Charles J. Wolferth (1910), Dems.; Theodore S. Bur- 
rows (1910). D. Beckett (1909), Reps. 

Terms of Court — First Tuesday in February and 
third Tuesday in May and October. 

HUDSON COUNTY. 

County Seat — Jersey City. Population, 232,699. 

Sheriff — James J. Kelly, Dem., 1911. 
Coroners — James McLaughlin, 1909; Robert Schlemm, 
J909; Matthew J. Boy Ian, 191L 

County Clerk — John Rotherham, 1910. 



COUNTY DIRECTORY. 479 

Surrogate — John P. Egan, 1911. 

County Collector — Stephen M. Egan, Jersey City. 

County Supervisor — Luke J. Clark. 

Register of Deeds — James C. Clarke, 1910. 

Circuit Justice — Francis J. Swayze, 1910. 

County Judges — John A. Blair, 1913; Robert Carey, 
1913. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — Pierre P. Garvan, 1913. 

First Assistant Prosecutor — George T. Vickers. 

Second Assistant Prosecutor — James W. McCarthy. 

Port Warden — John J. Toffey. 

Harbor Master — Martin Mulry. 

County Lunatic Asylum — George W. King, Supt. 

County Board of Elections — John Zeller (1910), 
Thomas F. A. Griffon (1909), Dems.; Robert West, 
(1909), William Leahy (1910), Reps. 

Terms of Court — First Tuesday in April and third 
Tuesday in September and Second Tuesday in Decem- 
ber. 

HUNTERDON COUNTY. 
County Seat — Flemington. Population, 2,000. 

Sheriff — George F. Green, Rep., 1911. 

Coroners — Jacob Naughright, 1911; John D. Stockton, 
1909; Patrick A. Cane, 1910. 

County Clerk — Oliver A. P'arley, 1910. 

Surrogate — George F. Hanson, 1910. 

County Collector — Lewis C. Potts, R. F. D. 1, Three 
Bridges. 

Circuit Justice — Alfred Reed, 1911. 

County Judge — John L. Connett, 1912. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — George K. Large, 1911. 

County Board of Elections — George W. Snyder 
(1909), John H. Reed (1910), Dems.; Elson Beatty 
(1910), Judson R. Kerr (1909), Reps. 

Terms of Court — Second Tuesdays in April, Septem- 
ber and December. 



MERCER COUNTY. 

County Seat — Trenton. Population, 84,180. 

Sheriff — Philip Freudenmacher, Rep., 1911. 
Coroners — Daniel V. Bower, W^illiam M. Disbrow, 
Frank K. Grove, 1911. 

County Clerk — George R. Robbins, 1913. 



480 COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Surrogate — John W. Cornell, IDuy. 

County Collector — Edward P. Mount, Trenton. 

Circuit Justice — Alfred Reed, 1911. 

County Judg-e — John Rellstab, 1910. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — William J. Crossley, 1913. 

Assistant Prosecutor — "William R. Piper. 

County Board of Elections — E. Dowdy Wood (1910), 
Anthony S. Brennan (1909), Dems. ; Holmes E. La Rue 
(1910), Hiram Cook (1909), Reps. 

Terms of Court — Third Tuesday in January, second 
Tuesday in May, and second Tuesday in October. 

MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 
County Seat — New Brunswick. Population, 23,133. 

Sheriff — William H. Quackenboss, Dem., 1911, 

Coroners — Ferdinand Garretson, 1911; ;lq.Re sharlsh 

Coroners — Jesse H. Beekman, 1909; Ferdinand Gar- 
retson, 1911; John V. Hubbard, 1911. 

County Clerk — John H. Cong-er, 1909. 

Surrogate — Peter Francis Daly, 1912. 

County Collector — H. Raymond Groves, New Bruns- 
wick. 

Circuit Justice — James J. Bergen, 1914. 

County Judge — Theodore Booraem, 1911. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — George Berdine, 1909. 

Health Officer, Port of Perth Amboy — Dr. Frank C. 
Henry. 

County Board of Elections — Hendrick H. Brown 
11910), Oliver Kelly (1909), Dems.; John E. Elmen- 
dorf (1909), John L. Suydam (1910), Reps. 

Terms of Court — First Tuesday in April, third 
Tuesday in September, and second Tuesday in Decem- 
ber. 

MONMOUTH COUNTY. 
County Seat — Freehold. Population, 3,064. 

Sheriff — Clarence E. F. Hetrick, Rep., 1911. 
Coroners — John V/. Flock, Robert M. Purdy, John 1. 
Sickles, 1911. 

County Clerk — Joseph McDermott, 1909. 
Surrogate — David S. Crater, 1913. 
County Collector — Asher T. Applegate, Freehold. 
Circuit Justice — Willard P. Voorhees, 1915. 



COUNTY DIRECTORY. 481 

County Judge — John E. Foster, 1910. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — John S. Applegate, Jr., ad 
interim. 

Assistant Prosecutor — Peter Vredenburg-h. 

County Board of Elections — ^John P. Walker (1910), 
Charles E. Conove-r (1909), Dems.; John C. Patterson 
(1910), David D. Denise (1909), Reps. 

Terms of Court — First Tuesday after the first day 
of January, first Tuesday m May and October. 

MORRIS COL NT Y. 
County Seat^Morristown. Population, 12,146. 

Sheriff— Calhoun Orr, Rep., 1911. 

Coroners — George Hitchins, 1909; Francis H. Glaze- 
brook. 1911; George L. Johnson, 1911. 

County Clerk — Elias Bertram Mott, 1913. 

Surrogate — David Young, 1913. 

County Collector — Joseph F. McLean, Butler. 

Circuit Justice — Charles W. Parker, 1914. 

County Judge — Alfred Elmer Mills, 1913. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — Charles A. Rathbun, 1913. 

County Board of Elections — George C. Smith (1909), 

John W. Fancher (I&IO), Dems.; A. A. Vance (1909), 
Sidney Collins (1910), Reps. 

Terms of Court — Third Tuesday in January, first 
Tuesday In May, and second Tuesday in October. 

OCEAN COUNTY. 
County Seat — Toms River. Population, about 1,350. 

Sheriff— Charles H Cox. Rep., 1911. 

Coroners — Frank Hagaman, 1910; R. Augustus Crane, 
1911; Harry C. Shoemaker, 1911. 

County Clerk — George H. Holman, 1913. 

Surrogate — Joseph Grover, 1912. 

County Collector — Cornelius C. Pearce, Burrsville. 

Circuit justice — Willard P. Voorhees, 1915. 

County Judge — Maja Leon Berry, 1912. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — ^Theodore J. R. Brown, 1912. 

County Board of Elections — Edward T. Francis 
(1909), Cornelius D. Kelly (1910), Dems.; Arthur B. 
Clute (1909), U. S. Grant (1910), Reps. 

Terms of Court — Second Tuesday in April, second 
Tuesday in September and second Tuesday in Decem- 
ber. 

31 



482 COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

PASSAIC COUNTY. 
County Seat — Paterson. Population, 111,599. 

Sheriff — Frank J. Van Noort, Dem., 1909. 

Coroners — Dr. Gordon G. Walton, 1910; Thomas A. 
Clay, Arthur A. Legg-, 1911, 

County Clerk— John J. Slater, 1911. 

Surrogate — Charles M. King, 1910. 

Register of Deeds — Richard Cogan, 1911. 

County Collector — John L. Conklin, Paterson. 

Circuit Justice — James F. Minturn, 1915. 

County Judge — Francis Scott, 1912. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — Eugene Emley, 1911. 

Assistant Prosecutor of the Pleas — Ralph W. Shaw. 

County Lunatic Asylum — John G. Donnelly, Supt. 

County Board of Elections — John W. DeMott (1910), 
Frank T. Forbes (1909), Dems.; Stephen Dawson 
(1910), Samuel Mulloy (1909), Reps. 

Terms of Court — First Tuesday after the first day 
oi January, fourth Tuesday in April and September. 

SALEM COUNTY. 
County Seat — Salem. Population, 6,443. 

Sheriff — Albert B. Batten, Rep. 1911. 

Coroners — James D. Torton, 1909; George W. Fitch, 
1911; Walter D. Wriggins, 1911. 

County Clerk — Benjamin E. Harris, 1909. 

Surrogate — Loren P. Plummer, 1912. 

County Collector — James Butcher, Salem. 

Circuit Justice — Thomas W. Trenchard, 1914. 

County Judge — Clement H. Sinnickson, 1911. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — J. Forman Sinnickson, 1910. 

County Lunatic Asylum — William B. Turner, Supt. 

County Board of Elections — Roger F. Moran (1910), 
William B. Jones (1909), Dems.; Isaac J. Prickett 
(.1910). vacancy. Rep. 

Terms of Court — Third Tuesday in April, Septem- 
ber and December. 



COUNTY DIRECTORY. 483 

SOMERSET COUNTY. 
County Seat — Somerville. Population, 5,507. 

Sheriff — Frank T. Ross, Dem., 1910. 

Coroners — Joseph A. Herberman, Mahlon C. Smalley, 
both in 1910; Fred A. Wild, id09. 

County Clerk — Alexander G. Anderson, 1913. 

Surrogate — William J. De Mond, 1912. 

County Collector — E. B. Allen, Somerville. 

Circuit Justice — Charles W. Parker, 1914. 

County Judge — Louis H. Schenck, 1910. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — John F. Reger, 1910. 

Assistant Prosecutor — E. j. Johnson, Jr. 

County Board of Elections — John H. Mattison 
(1909), Jacob Shurts (1910), Dems.; Theodore J. Hoff- 
man (1910), Joseph M. Lambruskin (1909), Reps. 

Terras of Court — Second Tuesday in April and Sep- 
tember and Third Tuesday in December. 

SUSSEX COUNTY. 
County Seat — Newton. Population, 4,422. 

Sheriff — George N. Harris, Dem., 1912. 

Coroners — Albert N. Jacob, 1910; Jeptha C. Clark, 
Roswell McPeak, 1911. 

County Clerk — ^Harvey S. Hopkins, 1912. 

Surrogate — Emmett H. Bell, 1913. 

County Collector — William E. Ross, Sparta. 

Circuit Judge — Charles W. Parker, 1914. 

County Judge — Joseph Coult, Jr., 1911. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — Henry Huston, 1912. 

County Board of Elections — Robert T. Smith (1909), 
Frank W. Coe (1910), Dems.; John L. Armstrong 
(1909), A. D. Cornell (1910), Reps. 

Terms of Court — Third Tuesday in April, September 
and December. 

UNION COUNTY. 
County Seat — Elizabeth. Population, 60,509. 

Sheriff— Robert J. Kirkland, Rep., 1911. 
Coroners — Charles B. I.uf burrow, 1909; William H. 
Donaldson, 1910; Adolph Dejenring, 1911. 
County Clerk — James C. Calvert, 1909. 
Surrogate — George T. Parrot, 1912. 



484 TIME OP HOLDING COURTS. 

Reg-ister of Deeds — Frank H. Smith, 1909. 

County Collector — N. R. Leavitt, Elizabeth. 

Circuit Justice — James J. Bergen, 1914. 

County Judge — Edward S. Atwater, 1912. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — Charles Addison Swift, 
1913. 

Assistant Prosecutor — Jo.an K. English. 

Harbor Master, Elizabeth and Elizabeth Creek — 
Reuben Savage. 

County Board of Elections — Robert H. McAdams 
(1909), Frederick Zior (1910), Dem.s.; George Stewart 
(1909), Ralph L. Morrow (1910), Reps. 

Terms of Court — First Tuesday in January, May and 
October. 

WARREN COUNTY. 

County Seat — Belvidere. Population, 1,869. 

Sheriff — Theophilus H, Wieder, Dem., 1911. 

Coroners — Edward W. Sharps, 1909; Michael Kenny, 
191]; Charles N. Shrope, 1911. 

County Clerk — Charles Hoagland, 1910. 

Surrogate — James A. Allon, 1909. 

County Collector — H. O. Carhart, Blairstown. 

Circuit Justice — Alfred Reed, 1911. 

County Judge — George M. Shipman, 1913. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — John I. Blair Reiley, 1911. 

County Board of Elections — James J. Shurts (1910), 
T. S. White (1909), Dems.; E. John Wildrick (1910). 
John Brady (1909), Reps. 

Terms of Court — Fourth Tuesday in April, fourth 
Tuesday in September and the first Tuesday after the 
fourth Tuesday in December. 



Time of Holding Courts. 

The Court of Chancery meets on the first Tuesday 
in February, the third Tuesday in May and the third 
Tuesday in October. 

The Supreme Court meets on the third Tuesday in 
February, the first Tuesday in June and the first Tues- 
day in November. 

The Court of Errors and Appeals meets on the first 
Tuesday in March, the third Tuesday in June and the 
third Tuesday in November. 



TIME OF HOLDING COURTS. 485 

The Court of Pardons meets on the second Tuesday in 
March, the third Tuesday in June and the third Tues- 
day in November. 

The Prerogative Court meets on the first Tuesday 
in February, the third Tuesday in May and the third 
Tuesday in October. 

The U. S. Circuit Court meets on the fourth Tuesday 
in March and the fourth Tuesday in September. 

The U. S. District Court meets on the third Tuesday 
in January, April, June and September. 

United States Court of Appeals meets first Tuesday 
in Marcxi and the third Tuesday in September. 

CIRCUITS OF NEW JERSEY. 

The Supreme Court Circuits of New Jersey are di- 
vided as follows: 

1st District — Cape May, Cumberland, Salem and At- 
lantic. Justice Trenchard. 

2d District — Gloucester pnd Camden. Justice Garri- 
son. 

3d District — Monmouth, Eurlington and Ocean. Jus- 
tice Vcorhees. 

4th District — Mercer, Hunterdon and Warren. Ju^^ 
tice Reed. 

5th District — Middlesex and Union. Justice Bergen. 

6th District — Somerset, Morris and Bergen. Justice 
Parker. 

7th District — Essex. Chief Justice Gummere. 

8th District — Hudson. Justice Swayze. 

9th District — Passaic and Sussex. Justice Minturn. 

For time of holding county courts, see County Di- 
rectory. 

CIRCUIT COURT JUDGES' ASSIGNMENTS. 

Judge Endicott — Atlantic, Cape May, Camden and 
Cumberland. 

Judge Black — Bergen, Morris, Passaic and Sussex. 

Judge Lloyd — Burlington, Gloucester, Hunterdon, 
Mercer, Middlesex and Salem. 

Judge Adams — Essex. 

Judge Heisley — Essex, Monmouth and Ocean. 

Judge Vail — Hudson, Somerset and Union. 

Judge Speer — Hudson. 



486 ELECTION RETURNS. 

NEW JERSEY ELECTION RETURNS. 

OFFICIAL — 1908. 



ATLANTIC COUNTY. 
— Elect. ->, ^Cong.^ ^As'mbly-.^ ^her.- 



c 



a 



^ a -C"^!, tl^ott- Eo^^ 

« Q c c ;2 C 4 (^ 
Atlantic City— 

1 Ward, 1 Pre 526 280 383 425 517 292 510 298 

2 Pre 424 205 330 29G 420 208 424 204 

3 Pre 499 101 443 155 492 108 495 103 

2 Ward, 1 Pre 457 127 382 198 447 135 438 142 

2 Pre 509 1.36 450 199 507 142 509 141 

3 Pre 290 96 249 137 292 92 287 96 

3 Ward, 1 Pre 2G5 61 240 86 263 68 259 68 

2 Pre 298 101 244 151 295 103 293 105 

3 Pre 325 91 291 125 .324 91 321 96 

4 Pre 226 68 195 99 225 71 227 68 

5 Pre 174 44 149 66 171 46 168 47 

6 Pre 277 64 254 84 277 62 270 67 

7 Pre 239 124 184 182 234 122 228 127 

4 Ward, 1 Pre 398 173 357 214 401 170 403 163 

2 Pre 358 293 354 296 353 297 385 267 

3 Pre..... 258 278 200 345 267 272 263 274 

4 Pre 300 268 207 .368 309 261 307 258 

Total— City 5823 2510 4912 3426 5794 2504 5787 2525 

Absecon Citj- — 

1 Ward 46 59 . .36 67 44 61 44 58 

2 W^ard 82 31 72 41 79 41 81 31 

Brigantine City — 

1 Ward 24 3 2 24 52 

2 Ward 84 84 83 111 

Buena Vista Twp.. 313 1.38 309 140 315 137 353 98 

Egg Harbor City 257 177 247 189 259 183 272 169 

Egg Harbor Twp 195 164 155 206 201 157 205 146 

Folsom Bor 27 27 24 30 26 28 26 28 

Galloway, 1 Pre 111 130 93 143 95 136 131 102 

2 Pre 75 98 63 110 74 100 83 91 

Hamilton Twp 257 185 218 224 253 191 275 171 

Hammonton. 1 Pre.. 250 151 177 227 213 180 220 183 

2 Pre.. 271 97 209 163 224 131 246 12] 

Linwood Bor 87 66 59 91 86 67 66 78 

Longport Bor 27 13 14 27 23 27 24 16 

Mullica Twp 129 56 106 78 121 60 118 00 

Northfield, 1 Ward.. .38 17 34 24 37 18 38 16 

2 Ward.. 54 27 43 36 53 28 57 24 

Pleasantville, 1 Pre. 182 186 134 236 173 197 170 173 

2 Pre. 2.34 140 187 190 224 144 227 1.32 

Pt. Republic, 1 Wd. 32 21 25 30 34 21 40 15 

2 Wd. 41 33 29 44 41 33 55 18 

Somers Point City — 

1 Ward 38 35 32 39 38 35 39 34 

2 Ward 41 43 34 50 41 44 42 38 

South Atlantic City. .34 32 33 29 34 32 48 18 

Ventnor City 83 25 43 64 81 25 82 25 

Weymouth Twp 85 108 95 99 85 110 93 101 

Total— County 8822 4577 7394 6009 8658 4593 8838 4473 

County Clerk— Kirby, Rep., 8,654; Senseman, Dem., 4,618. 

Electors— Socialist, 76; Prohibition, 341; Soc. -Labor, 13; Inde- 
pendence, 17. 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



487 



BERGEN COUNTY, 
-Elect 



Allendale Bor 103 

Alpine Bor 70 

Bergenfield Bor 124 

Bogota Bor 137 

Carlstadt Bo, 1 Dis. 219 

2 Dis. 109 

Clififside Park Bor.. 271 

Closter Bor 198 

Cresskill Bor 88 

Delford Bor 153 

Demarest Bor 200 

Dumont Bor 64 

E. Rutherford Bor^ 

1 Dis 311 

2 Dis 97 

Edgewater Bor 289 

Englewood City— 

1 Ward 267 

2 Ward 268 

3 Ward 3.39 

4 Ward 229 

Englew'd Cliffs Bor. 28 

Etna Bor 87 

Fairview Bor 175 

Fort Lee Bor., 1 Dis. 317 

2 Dis. 97 

Franklin Twp 242 

Garfield Bor., 1 Dis. .341 

2 Dis. 125 

Olen Rock Bor 94 

Harrington Twp.... 53 

Harrington Pk. Bor, 55 

Hasbrouok Hts. Bo. 300 

Haworth Bor 59 

Hillsdale Twp 173 

Hohokus Twp 211 

Hohokus Bor 77 

Leonia Bor 195 

Little Ferry Bor... 132 

Lodi Twp 75 

Lodi Bor 300 

Mavwood Bor 100 

Midland Twp 180 

Midland Park Bor.. 224 

Montvale Bor 52 

New Barbadoes Twp — 

1 Ward 232 

2 Ward 1 Dis.... 223 

2 Dis.... 127 

3 Ward 422 

4 Ward 423 

5 Ward 152 

N. Arlington Bor. . . 31 

Norwood Bor 72 

Oakland Bor 72 



It.-, 


^Cong.-, 


, 


Assembly — 


— ^ 




S ^ 


^a 


to . 


-d a 


.•a 


^•a 


i 




%'a 


C5 C 

-gas 


«C5 


ss 




Q 


fa 


s 


m 


^ 


tt 


Ui 


60 


87 


77 


98 


99 


71 


57 


27 


61 


36 


68 


66 


33 


28 


150 


97 


182 


123 


127 


153 


148 


48 


119 


68 


134 


133 


54 


48 


192 


179 


238 


273 


225 


114 


190 


147 


72 


191 


113 


102 


127 


153 


212 


244 


242 


283 


278 


199 


198 


129 


168 


161 


191 


213 


132 


126 


47 


85 


54 


88 


92 


49 


45 


72 


116 


114 


147 


148 


81 


70 


71 


60 


35 


64 


66 


37 


29 


32 


184 


88 


186 


190 


89 


08 


210 


252 


273 


326 


311 


195 


213 


56 


76 


77 


99 


97 


54 


55 


168 


261 


195 


272 


277 


180 


177 


111 


200 


177 


256 


258 


120 


122 


112 


187 


199 


257 


265 


128 


122 


273 


252 


362 


326 


343 


278 


277 


162 


218 


172 


229 


238 


155 


158 


16 


23 


24 


27 


27 


21 


15 


48 


66 


66 


87 


87 


50 


44 


152 


170 


174 


187 


188 


139 


136 


175 


286 


207 


335 


341 


158 


156 


128 


93 


138 


104 


108 


114 


122 


104 


221 


127 


234 


233 


121 


103 


129 


246 


223 


335 


343 


144 


120 


67 


86 


1.33 


127 


128 


68 


64 


69 


70 


95 


89 


90 


79 


67 


41 


52 


42 


54 


56 


38 


40 


26 


37 


44 


43 


43 


36 


36 


82 


266 


119 


298 


256 


128 


80 


25 


54 


32 


56 


67 


22 


23 


58 


132 


97 


149 


148 


83 


50 


86 


208 


90 


203 


204 


114 


78 


23 


63 


38 


76 


75 


26 


23 


47 


145 


95 


179 


188 


62 


46 


112 


133 


113 


136 


134 


111 


110 


60 


70 


66 


78 


75 


57 


59 


93 


250 


140 


297 


295 


95 


95 


58 


83 


78 


84 


84 


70 


65 


111 


3 54 


138 


175 


171 


116 


110 


101 


185 


139 


225 


211 


115 


101 


58 


47 


64 


52 


52 


58 


57 


288 


181 


342 


289 


337 


136 


242 


165 


172 


220 


240 


248 


1.36 


144 


130 


105 


159 


121 


132 


115 


119 


1.57 


362 


225 


416 


417 


158 


162 


107 


346 


185 


407 


411 


123 


114 


97 


122 


137 


153 


144 


87 


102 


36 


29 


38 


30 


31 


37 


36 


47 


70 


49 


72 


74 


45 


43 


28 


63 


36 


70 


71 


35 


28 



ELECTION RETURNS. 

BERGEN COUNTY— Continued. 

r-Elect.~^ r-CoDg.-^ , Assembly- 



«p. ^a , I-&. -cc. .a s-a 

Old Tappan Bor 16 50 14 52 23 22 43 44 

Oivil Tup 123 88 98 113 119 120 98 89 

Oveipeck Tp, 1 Dis. 264 102 222 151 263 264 108 102 

2 Dis. 214 110 176 152 210 212 123 106 

ralisade Twp 94 111 83 125 99 103 108 107 

Palisade Park Bor.. 153 52 134 82 158 158 49 47 

Park Ridge Bor.... 149 135 135 149 147 149 141 137 

Ramsej' Bor 222 127 198 157 215 217 144 130 

Ridgefield Bor 147 38 117 72 149 149 41 39 

Ridgewood Twp — 

1 Dis 343 96 274 168 305 310 142 99 

2 Dis 406 120 346 180 366 363 182 122 

Riverside Bor 97 30 85 42 90 86 37 37 

Riverdale Twp 57 48 51 53 58 66 47 43 

Rutherford Bor — 

1 Dis 521 1.37 404 255 491 491 176 151 

2 Dis 498 117 372 242 469 480 144 122 

Saddle River Twp. . 252 161 164 260 251 254 167 161 

Saddle River Bor.. . 75 29 66 37 78 72 26 24 

Teaueck Twp 236 63 225 73 235 234 64 64 

Tenaflv Bor 314 177 258 241 284 313 206 193 

Union Twp 271 197 210 262 266 267 204 200 

Up. Saddle Riv. Bo. 27 37 15 50 26 26 41 36 

Wallington Bor 206 149 136 216 209 211 145 142 

Washington Twp... 18 12 17 13 18 18 12 12 

Westwood Bor 195 156 171 183 202 199 152 122 

Woodcllff Bor 53 40 40 55 51 52 42 38 

Woodbridge Bor 109 43 102 52 111 111 43 43 

Total— County 14042 7628 1162110249 13853 13944 78317490 

Electors — Socialist, 575; Prohibition, 219; Soc.-Labor, 49; Inde- 
pendence, 315. 



ELECTION RETURNS. 489 

BURLINGTON COUNTY. 
-Elect. -^ ^Cong.->, , Assembly ^ ^her.-,^ 



g* g so; HP ~=i ?« rP fci c« ^C; 

tf Q o e ►i^ ^ ?; t- ?; « 

Bass River 74 113 68 123 90 92 109 108 72 118 

Beverly City 310 192 260 242 246 254 239 278 220 289 

Beverly Twp 315 212 261 273 274 279 269 268 148 387 

Bordentown — ■ 

1 Ward 328 139 248 217 309 315 150 153 295 172 

2 Ward 212 177 172 213 199 207 187 190 204 188 

3 Ward Ill 123 115 119 108 124 111 118 106 115 

Bordentown Tp. . 101 59 92 68 105 101 61 59 101 60 
Burlington — 

1 Ward 2.32 163 210 185 221 209 182 175 209 185 

2 Ward, 1 Dis. 152 114 146 119 129 137 137 133 147 122 

2 Dis. 182 88 158 108 162 157 108 108 171 96 

3 Ward 229 206 220 217 218 213 224 220 220 212 

4 Ward 241 171 223 191 221 218 195 193 233 180 

Burlington Twp. 149 79 135 96 130 132 102 100 136 93 

Chester Tp., E.. 327 135 267 205 227 225 273 224 327 146 

Chester Tp., W. 408 218 328 292 314 313 329 308 405 225 

Chesterfield 189 88 171 107 188 184 89 88 190 88 

Cinnaminson ... 135 141 121 156 132 130 140 142 135 141 

Delran 83 145 73 155 81 85 149 153 75 152 

Eastampton 89 75 87 75 93 91 74 72 102 62 

Evesham 173 190 157 206 158 158 162 161 179 185 

Fieldsboro 77 43 53 68 72 72 53 53 69 52 

Florence, 1 Dis.. 384 188 364 208 378 378 199 206 364 210 

2 Dis.. 168 73 152 84 163 166 74 75 160 74 

Lumberton 248 128 2.34 140 247 243 1.S2 129 242 133 

Mansfield 203 192 190 205 192 193 206 206 185 211 

Medford 255 282 264 275 334 312 197 192 239 302 

Mount Laurel... 223 169 202 191 202 204 187 180 203 183 

New Hagover... 116 143 102 157 153 151 108 109 111 147 
Northampton — ■ 

1 Dis .308 136 259 178 281 277 163 159 301 140 

2 Dis 203 127 180 146 190 193 137 133 204 121 

3 Dis 369 210 ,3.33 245 370 368 207 205 357 221 

North Hanover.. 113 106 105 120 116 116 114 114 117 112 

Palmyra 382 233 294 319 296 300 319 .321 353 260 

Pemberton Bor. . 93 121 85 1.34 99 98 123 118 92 127 

Pemberton Twp. 210 145 199 151 2.32 220 121 110 207 140 

Riverside, 1 Dis. 227 215 208 2.32 265 277 163 166 94 349 

2 Dis. 156 150 144 160 159 170 143 139 121 187 

Riverton 284 85 206 163 239 240 130 128 262 110 

Shamong 82 78 110 55 98 95 70 67 93 72 

Southampton ... 278 218 261 235 307 266 218 196 324 175 

Springfield 144 197 123 207 179 177 157 147 1.38 191 

Tabernacle 99 51 95 54 100 100 50 48 99 51 

Washington .... 143 .30 123 52 1.37 139 36 36 142 30 

Westampton ... 81 38 78 41 77 77 89 39 78 41 

Willingboro .... 58 69 58 71 51 56 76 76 47 81 

Woodland 76 29 77 29 86 84 19 18 75 32 

Total— County. 9020 6274 8011 7293 8628 8596 6731 6621 8352 6967 

Electors — Socialist, 140; Prohibition, 299; Soc-Labor, 20; Inde- 
pendence, 26. 



490 ELECTION RETURNS. 

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494 ELECTION RETURNS. 



CAPE MAY CUUNTY. 

^Electors-,, r-Congress-^ ^As'bly—^ 



P^ Q O t O MM 

cIpXv;iDis:::::::::;::::::2?6 15I 2i8 lis 269 ill 

Cape May Poi?";: ! ! .' ! ! i ! i .:::•• ^11 't 'II ''? 'if '^ 

Dennis Twp., 1 Dis 98 114 97 115 100 108 

„ ,, „ , 2 Dis 91 101 80 115 85 110 

Holly Beach 293 166 278 175 291 163 

Lower Twp. . 190 130 180 140 182 133 

Middle Twp., 1 Dis 287 122 250 159 245 165 

xr +V, T.r-,^ ^ P*^ 1^5 111 111 114 105 116 

nnll^ n^/^'^T^'? 145 46 138 54 142 47 

Ocean City, 1 Dis 207 41 175 77 199 52 

«.„ T 1 r.,*^?'^-- 184 53 140 97 171 63 

Sea Isle City, 1 Dis .35 43 23 53 50 27 

„ ^, ^ ,2 Dis 65 53 50 69 67 52 

South Cape May 18 ... 14 3 18 

Upper Twp 297 78 280 93 306 'ei 

^,?,st Cape May 1.30 75 117 89 123 81 

Wildwood 154 64 114 100 92 125 

Woodbine 94 85 95 86 94 85 

Total— County 2937 1553 2654 1834 2795 1671 

Electors— Socialist, 33; Prohibition, 111; Soc.-Labor, 4; Inde- 
pendence, 4. 

Congress — Socialist, 30; Prohibition, 89. 



ELECTION RETURNS. 495 

CUMBERLAND COUNTY. 

-Elect.-^ ^Cong.-, , -Assembly » ^Sher.^ 



g" a 53« £Q .Sitf §tf §Q ^Q S'tf §Q 

^"^wSTT 307 264 266 293 372 293 208 248 275 293 

2 Ward, 1 Dis. 225 141 208 153 249 212 125 129 210 154 

2 Dis. 208 175 207 180 256 205 145 158 190 200 

3 Ward, 1 Dis. 266 179 237 201 287 256 163 181 213 230 

2 Dis. 247 141 220 160 270 240 118 142 215 174 

4 Ward, 1 Dis. 249 143 205 188 280 240 111 136 218 176 

2 Dis. 188 143 160 169 215 182 107 139 176 155 

5 Ward 187 217 166 237 155 173 186 186 190 213 

Commercial-- ^^^ ^^^ 329 236 97 170 259 161 

2 Dis 118 82 122 76 122 124 68 80 99 102 

Deerfield, 1 Dis. 99 191 100 191 120 97 174 192 79 217 

2 Dis. 138 123 153 107 162 156 100 102 152 102 

Downe, IDis... 97 147 82 161 110 99 128 141 97 150 

2 Dis... 66 70 63 72 71 52 68 78 63 74 

Fairfield Twp... 200 117 199 113 220 200 95 103 165 147 

Greenwich Twp 168 94 168 93 173 170 89 89 166 96 

Hopewell Tw7. 191 193 189 195 206 191 178 189 178 207 

Landis, 1 Dis.... 148 86 129 105 149 144 87 82 152 82 

2 Dis.... 158 77 150 86 151 154 81 77 163 (8 

3 Dis. ... 206 124 185 148 204 204 129 124 200 125 

4 Dis 149 64 132 82 145 130 87 64 131 82 
Lawrence Twp.: 194 159 197 154 223 198 135 155 184 168 
Maurice River- ^^ 3^ 29 87 40 

I Dil::: :::::: les 159 iss ns 202 i63 m 159 168 leo 

^^l^wlrF 1 Dis 309 171 186 291 310 297 172 166 241 243 

1 W ard, 1 D s. 3uy i^i i»o ^_^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^2 169 

2 Ward : 341 129 220 241 351 349 127 119 298 183 

^^^'i?^^ iti it^ ?H fit lit m S 'II IS 



Total-County .6770 4521 5847 5370 7265 6586 4065 4347 6065 5213 
Electors-Socialist, 158; Prohibition, 476; Soc.-Labor, 24; Inde- 

^'gSks-Steelman, Pro., 441; Leeds. See, 145. 

sSgate-Thompson, Rep., 7,014; Wallace, Dem.. 4,26o. 



496 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



ESSEX COUNTY. 



-Electors- 



Congress 



-7th Dis-^ ^8th Dis^ 











t 


i ig >.i. 


4^a 


^. a 


£a 






d 


1 %A \h pk 


£a 


==^ 








tf 


C r-t 


^ 


^ 


jj 


c 


c 


Newark — 




















1 Ward 


1 Dis. 


223 


101 202 121 ... 




167 


153 




2 Dis. 


286 


155 258 176 ... 




251 


193 




3 Dis. 


176 


164 159 184 ... 




125 


212 




4 Dis. 


304 


152 193 166 




162 


197 




5 Dis. 


.335 


226 302 258 ... 




279 


285 




6 Dis. 


275 


220 239 253 ... 




208 


288 




7 Dis. 


206 


136 19( 


5 143 . . . 




165 


172 


2 Ward 


1 Dis. 


287 


144 


_ 




266 


ie- 


221 


212 




2 Dis. 


175 


112 






151 


13: 


) 123 


158 




3 Dis. 


106 


126 






103 


132 75 


155 




4 Dis. 


131 


244 






121 


255 88 


286 




5 Dis. 


278 


160 






267 


17] 


204 


227 




6 Dis. 


253 


194 






241 


206 187 


258 




7 Dis. 


378 


126 






350 


155 228 


274 




8 Dis. 


1.35 


128 






127 


1.3' 


r 98 


173 


3 Ward 


1 Dis. 


185 


194 






172 


205 88 


289 




2 Dis. 


247 


183 






212 


217 141 


289 




3 Dis. 


203 


205 






176 


232 107 


304 




4 Dis. 


149 


139 






140 


149 104 


189 




5 Dis. 


1.30 


109 






97 


142 79 


164 




6 Dis. 


284 


180 






263 


183 167 


303 




7 Dis. 


341 


179 






327 


194 259 


261 




8 Dis. 


154 


172 






132 


194 70 


253 




9 Dis. 


391 


147 






363 


172 258 


241 


4 Ward 


1 Dis. 


158 


124 ] 


15 


I 13 






131 


149 




2 Dis. 


135 


143 ] 


L2< 


5 15 






80 


177 




3 Dis. 


162 


157 ] 


15 


? 16 






124 


193 




4 Dis. 


100 


122 


9 








90 


133 




5 Dis. 


306 


201 5 


>8( 


) 22 






188 


316 




6 Dis. 


318 


100 '. 


>8< 


) 12 






220 


196 




7 Dis. 


129 


207 ] 


L2J 


? 20 






96 


241 




8 Dis. 


180 


79 


L6 


3 9 






118 


136 




9 Dis. 


282 


81 






271 


"9( 


) 231 


126 




10 Dis. 


221 


68 






192 




) 163 


121 


5 Ward 


1 Dis. 


200 


258 






192 


26^ 


1 132 


322 




2 Dis. 


191 


226 






181 


23' 


r 135 


282 




3 Dis. 


118 


124 






112 


1.3( 


) 79 


162 




4 Dis. 


190 


289 






179 


29' 


) 125 


357 




5 Dis. 


113 


150 






108 


15- 


66 


199 




6 Dis. 


122 


230 






118 


23; 


} 83 


264 


G Ward 


1 Dis. 


179 


140 ] 


L5' 


- is 






113 


200 




2 Dis. 


118 


306 ] 


LO 


1 31 






76 


350 




3 Dis. 


174 


193 


14 


- 21 






101 


268 




4 Dis. 


261 


202 '. 


>2 


3 23 






171 


298 




5 Dis. 


225 


145 '. 


IV 


^ 15 






187 


180 




6 Dis. 


290 


Ill 


24 


4 14 






219 


184 




7 Dis. 


155 


129 


13 


5 14 






119 


158 




8 Dis. 


143 


112 


12 


1 13 






84 


177 




9 Dis. 


307 


221 '. 


26 


B 25 






252 


290 




10 Dis. 


302 


168 5 


26 


? 21 






253 


216 


7 Ward 


1 Dis. 


312 


217 1 


28. 


2 23 






217 


305 




2 Dis. 


172 


142 


16 


i 14 






82 


232 




3 Dis. 


116 


188 


LO 


B 19 






88 


217 




4 Dis. 


150 


144 


L4 


) 15( 






97 


193 




5 Dis. 


236 


122 


L9 


B 16( 






157 


205 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



497 



ESSEX COUNTY— Continued. 







1.1^1 i5--j 




— vyuugn 


-o; 




-^ r-i^vu 










^7th Dis->, r 


-8th Dis 


-^ 










£a 


ca bft *;s 


>.d 


la 




ft 


a 

a: 




Tow: 
De 

Wilf 


1^ 




IS 




tt 


O 


Ch 


^ 


Q 


O 


N(»wark— 


















7 Ward, 6 Dis. 


230 


234 


206 


258 






141 


325 


7 Dis. 


105 


195 


103 


199 






81 


219 


8 Dis. 


89 


113 


81 


121 






69 


132 


9 Dis. 


112 


94 


100 


107 






81 


129 


10 Dis. 


111 


195 


95 


217 






88 


222 


11 Dis. 


114 


300 


103 


310 






91 


322 


12 Dis. 


204 


172 


195 


180 






148 


224 


8 Ward, 1 Dis. 


394 


71 


.358 


101 






337 


1.34 


2 Dis. 


303 


58 


270 


80 






270 


88 


3 Dis. 


406 


128 


386 


149 






3.38 


196 


4 Dis. 


285 


55 


260 


78 






235 


104 


5 Dis. 


325 


152 


265 


206 






277 


200 


6 Dis. 


290 


96 


272 


113 






236 


152 


7 Dis. 


390 


116 


345 


162 






328 


175 


8 Dis. 


487 


86 


454 


115 






460 


113 


9 Dis. 


211 


122 


178 


154 






92 


240 


9 Ward, 1 Dis. 


360 


187 






Hi 


i 199 252 


297 


2 Dis. 


393 


93 




... 


m 


) 119 331 


150 


3 Dis. 


280 


77 




... ! 


17) 


L 89 238 


120 


4 Dis. 


219 


79 




... '. 


n* 


) 81 177 


126 


5 Dis. 


289 


83 


. 


! 


>85 


2 92 246 


127 


6 Dis. 


380 


146 




... 


57( 


) 156 305 


223 


7 Dis. 


285 


56 




'. '. '. 277 65 242 


90 


10 Ward, 1 Dis. 


203 


158 






19^ 


1 167 142 


220 


2 Dis. 


209 


139 




... 


20] 


L 147 151 


193 


3 Dis. 


192 


189 




... 


19. 


2 189 129 


248 


4 Dis. 


277 


252 




' 


27. 


5 258 228 


301 


5 Dis. 


194 


286 






17 


) 303 135 


346 


6 Dis. 


313 


188 






?0{ 


) 201 187 


310 


7 Dis. 


180 


1.36 






6 


) 147 130 


189 


8 Dis. 


288 


202 




'.'.'. 278 212 152 


.339 


9 Dis. 


200 


138 




] 


L7f 


J 163 144 


221 


11 Ward, 1 Dis. 


275 


121 


243 


151 






226 


176 


2 Dis. 


245 


45 


208 


75 






208 


79 


3 Dis. 


200 


295 


176 


319 






135 


361 


4 Dis. 


284 


102 


256 


1.32 






259 


1.33 


5 Dis. 


305 


128 


272 


160 






264 


168 


6 Dis. 


374 


81 


318 


137 






309 


152 


7 Dis. 


194 


39 


165 


67 






175 


58 


8 Dis. 


323 


92 


273 


144 






298 


128 


9 Dis. 


312 


189 


274 


230 






258 


253 


10 Dis. 


398 


175 


358 


214 






341 


237 


12 Ward, 1 Dis. 


216 


181 






20 


2 i9 


r 93 


300 


2 Dis. 


143 


226 






L3( 


) 23 


) 56 


323 


3 Dis. 


229 


213 






205 


2 23! 


) 66 


373 


4 Dis. 


76 


282 






7. 


i 28. 


5 50 


309 


5 Dis. 


76 


223 






7 


L 22 


i 42 


264 


6 Dis. 


98 


272 






9. 


5 27 


i 58 


316 


7 Dis. 


118 


206 






11 


5 20 


) 86 


243 


13 Ward, 1 Dis. 


404 


193 






57 


i 22 


) 301 


296 


2 Dis. 


245 


164 




... 


23. 


5 16' 


r 182 


225 


3 Dis. 


85 


67 


"so 


72 






58 


94 


4 Dis. 


267 


178 






26 


i 18 


1 145 


302 


5 Dis. 


202 


159 






18 


1 17 


3 72 


289 


6 Dis. 


206 


212 






19' 


r 22 


3 119 


299 


7 Dis. 


198 


151 






19. 


2 15' 


) 77 


272 



32 



498 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



ESSEX COUNTY— Continued. 



-Electors-,, 



-7th Dis- 



Congress 



-8th Dis-^ 



^Senate- 









t » 


2a 


>■•£. 


^a 


>ia 


§a 






a 


l« 


U 


r(5 


£Q 


^0- 


la 




« 


Q 


d. 


H 


Ch 


O 


o 


Newark — 


















14 Ward, 1 Dis. 


111 


125 






106 


129 


44 


193 


2Dis. 


161 


116 






154 


122 


80 


193 


3 Dis. 


272 


240 






258 


254 


74 


439 


4 Dis. 


120 


126 






103 


141 


45 


203 


5 Dis. 


97 


119 


'. . '. 




94 


120 


34 


185 


6 Dis. 


133 


129 






123 


145 


77 


186 


7 Dis. 


223 


143 






203 


167 


90 


277 


8 Dis. 


157 


1.38 






149 


147 


71 


228 


9 Dis. 


234 


202 




'. '. '. 


225 


223 


81 


368 


10 Dis. 


181 


185 






177 


191 


69 


293 


11 Dis. 


207 


170 






191 


188 


109 


266 


12 Dis. 


109 


82 






106 


86 


63 


128 


13 Dis. 


164 


183 






152 


198 


35 


316 


15 Ward, 1 Dis. 


278 


163 


253 


i86 






204 


239 


2 Dis. 


233 


116 


223 


136 






173 


188 


3 Dis. 


258 


174 


236 


192 






190 


237 


4 Dis. 


260 


89 


224 


121 


. 


. 


211 


136 


5 Dis. 


266 


218 


252 


233 






202 


278 


6 Dis. 


272 


171 


247 


196 






204 


236 


16 Ward, 1 Dis. 


408 


192 






398 


202 


279 


316 


2 Dis. 


261 


222 




. 


251 


237 


99 


403 


3 Dis. 


218 


184 






213 


194 


69 


337 


4 Dis. 


316 


215 






.315 


216 


1.39 


396 


5 Dis. 


227 


173 






214 


186 


66 


319 


6 Dis. 


276 


93 






263 


106 


222 


150 


7 Dis. 


358 


166 






348 


163 


373 


257 


8 Dis. 


454 


182 






433 


204 


363 


270 


9 Dis. 


193 


50 






187 


57 


161 


82 


10 Dis. 


329 


107 


... 




309 


127 


231 


208 


Total— Newark. 32164 22058 


13446 


10707 


16261 


13742 


22528 31735 


Belleville, 1 Dis. 


222 


121 


191 


153 






164 


179 


2 Dis. 


278 


338 


242 


379 


. . . 


. . . 


223 


402 


3 Dis. 


203 


89 


185 


99 






151 


130 


4 Dis. 


304 


92 


279 


117 






265 


133 


Bloomfield^ 


















1 Ward, 1 Dis. 


344 


98 


331 


115 






290 


154 


2 Dis. 


.331 


124 


310 


142 






302 


154 


2 Ward, 1 Dis. 


293 


70 


277 


86 






267 


92 


2 Dis. 


259 


93 


244 


110 






180 


174 


3 Ward, 1 Dis. 


281 


94 


247 


125 






215 


159 


2 Dis. 


342 


143 


278 


200 






270 


212 


Caldwell Twp. . . 


110 


48 


106 


51 






94 


62 


Caldwell Bor 


307 


138 


266 


178 






280 


168 


Cedar Grove 


126 


68 


120 


75 






94 


100 


East Orange — 
1 Ward, 1 Dis. 


349 


118 






349 


119 


328 


138 


2 Dis. 


331 


48 




. . . 


329 


52 


312 


61 


2 Ward, 1 Dis. 


310 


44 






304 


49 


304 


48 


2 Dis. 


405 


81 






396 


90 


403 


86 


3 Dis. 


257 


27 






249 


34 


250 


32 


3 Ward, 1 Dis. 


409 


60 






398 


70 


388 


81 


2 Dis. 


388 


40 






375 


54 


387 


43 


3 Dis. 


515 


152 






506 


160 


486 


180 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



499 



ESSEX COUNTY— Continued. 







^Electors--^ 


^ 


— Congress - 




r-Senate-^ 










^7th Dis^ 


^Sth 


Dis^' 














!?• 


la 


^ft 


^a 


tAci 


6 








a 


"S 


IS 




SP-' 


l« 


U 






a 


O 


c< 


H 


n^ 








East Orange— 


















4 Ward, 


1 Dis. 


389 


69 






376 


83 


390 


71 




2 Dis. 


335 


43 






325 


55 


325 


54 




3 Dis. 


218 


85 


. 


. 


207 


95 


208 


98 


5 Ward, 


1 Dis. 


537 


61 




. . '. 


527 


70 


516 


78 




2 Dis. 


471 


76 






462 


86 


463 


83 




3 Dis. 


606 


121 






592 


139 


569 


163 


Essex Fells 


66 


12 


*58 


'26 






61 


17 


Glen Ridge 


460 


118 


416 


160 






460 


120 


Livingston 




229 


79 


221 


85 




. . '. 


219 


86 


Irvington- 


- 


















1 Ward 




396 


150 






384 


162 


252 


282 


2 Ward 




502 


125 


. 




492 


135 


346 


277