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Full text of "Manual of the Legislature of New Jersey"



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NEW JERSEY 



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THE LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO UASf 



Call No. 



3531 




Accession 
Number 



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STATE OF NEW JERSEY, 



MANUAL 



Legislature of New Jersey 



One Hundred and Forty-Sixth Session. 



1922. 




BY AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATURE. 



Josephine A. Fitzgerald, Publisher 
John P. Dullard, Ccmpiier. 



Trenton, N. J, 



Entered according-to Act of Congress, in 1922, by 

JOSEPHINE A. FITZGERALD, 

in the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington, D. C. 



4®=- The newspaper press are welcome to use such parts of the work as 
they may desire, on giving credit therefor to the MANUAL. 



STATE GAZETTE PUB. CO., PKINTEHS, 
TRENTON, N. J. 



University or •.... . --.--' Library 



K 
.3 53 i 



COXTENTS. 



PAGE' 

Portrait of Governor Edwards Frontispiece 

Notes 1 

Calendar. 1922 3 

IV rpetual Calendar 4 

Legal Holidays and Important Dates 5 

State House, Illustration of 6 

New Jersey History 7 

Courts, New Jersey, Jurisdiction of 11 

Governors, List, 1624 to date 19 

Declaration of Independence 23 

Constitution of United States 28 

Constitution of United States — Contents Table .lO 

Constitution of New Jersey 52 

Constitution of New Jersey — Contents Table 73 

Srate Institutions. Description of 70 

Republican State Platform 112 

Democratic State Platform 121 

State Committees 129 

County Committee Chairmen 132 

Classification of Counties and Municipalities 133 

Commission (iovernment Municipalities 134 

Council Members, 1608-1703 135 

1703-1775 130 

1776-1844 137 

I'residents. 1703-1775 141 

Vice-Presidents. 1776-1844 142 

Senate Miunbers. 1845 to date 143 

Presid^-nts 148 

Secretaries 150 

Assemblv Members, 1668-1703 151 

1703-1775 154 

1776-1844 158 

1845-1921 170 

Speakers. 1703 to date 193 

Clerks, 1845 to date 196 

I^egislaturos. duration of 197 

Political Complexion of 199 

Extra Sessions 201 

Judiciary, 1704 to date 203 

State Officers, former. 1776 to date 206 

Counties — When and How Cremated 209 

Courts. Time of Holding 210 

Appropriatron Laws. Summary of 211 

iii 






iv CONTENTS. 

PACK 

Census Tables — 

Counties by Minor Civil Divisions 214 

Incorporated Places in New Jersej- 232 

Counties (Totals), 1T90 to date 238 

Age Groups by Counties 2.".'.» 

Nativity and Color, Counties and Cities 24'> 

Congressional Districts 241 

United States, by States and Dependencies 242 

United States, Cities over 2."), 000 24.-. 

School I>aw. Synopsis of 2ri0 

Counties. Area of 257 

Newspapers of New Jersey 2r»s 

Biographies — 

Governor Edward I. Edwards 273 

United States Senator Joseph S. P'relinghuysen . . . 27»> 

United States Senator Walter E. Edge 27S 

Congressmen from New Jersey (07th Congress) . . . 2S4 

State Senators 204 

Assemblymen 30S 

Judiciary 342 

United States Officers for New Jersey 370 

State Officers and Members and Officers of Boards. 

Commissions. Etc 372 

Congress. New Jersey Districts, ^lap 2S3 

State Senators— When Elected 307 

Treasurer's Report, Abstract of 437 

Taxes and Assessment Department Report, Abstract of. 441 
Election Returns — 

County Tables. 1921 Election 440 

Republican Presidential Primary Vote. 1920 4S7 

Democratic Presidential Primary Vote, 1920 492 

Republican Congressional Primary Vote. 1920 490 

Democratic Congressional Primary Vote. 1920 4r'!t 

Congressional A'ote. 1920 (Totals for Districis; . . . r.'i2 

Average County Vote for President, 1920 oO." 

Average County Vote for Assembly, 1921 riOt; 

Soldiers' Bonus •'•07 

Interstate Bridges and Tunnels o07 

Institutions and Agencies oOs 

Number of Election Districts in Sta'fe oOS 

Republican and Democratic Primary Vote for Gov- 
ernor. 1919 : •""'•' 

Governor. Vote for, 1919 •"►I'"' 

Presidential Vote. 1920, U. S.. by States ".11 

Electoral Vote, 1920, U. S., by States 5] 2 

Electoral Vote of New Jersey. 1789 to daite ol3 

Popular Vote of New Jersey for President. 1840 to 

date •'^-^ 

Popular Vote of New Jersey for Governor. 1844 to 

date ^'l'" 



CONTENTS. V 

PAGK 

United States (iovernment— 

President, Vice-President, Cabinet Officers and 

Supreme Court •. 51" 

Congress (67tli) New Jersey Members 517 

Officials for New Jersey 518 

Salaries, United States Officials 519 

Court Officials for New Jersey, 17S0 to dale 520 

Presidents of United States 521 

Vice-Presidents of United States 522 

Senators from New Jersey, 1789 to date 523 

New Jersey Members Continental Congress 524 

New Jersey Congressmen, 1789 to date 524 

County Officials, List of 532 

Legislature of 1922— 

Senate Meml>ers 551 

Assemljly Members 551 

Senate Officers 553 

Senate Committees 554 

Assembly Officers 555 

Assembly Committees 55ri 

Senate Rules 559 

Assembly Rules 570 

Joint Rules 581 

Governor Edwards' Second Annual Message 582 

GoA-ernor, Prerogatives and Duties of 594 

Appointments by, for 1922 590 

State Officers, Departments, etc 000 

Courts and T^aw Department 014 

Institutions and Agencies ^17 

Examining and Licensing P.oards 022 

Investigating Commissions fi25 

Associations and Societies 027 

Salaries, State and County Officials 029 

Legislative Officers C30 

Legislative Correspondents f»'^>7 

Index ^39 



NOTES. 



In the compilaticn of the l'.>i'-' New Jersey Legislative 
Manual, an effort has heen made to keep up the high 
standard oi; previous years and to add such new features 
as may have sugg-ested themselves as desirable. Many of 
the old features have been revised and rearranged and, 
where considered necessary, expanded. 

Among the new features ar(» descriptive sketches of the 
State Agricultural College (New Jersey State T'niversity), 
the Agricultural Experiment Stations and the various Staite 
armories. 

To the Census Tables have been added data showing the 
population of the State by counties, l)y age groups and by 
counties and principal cities, by nativity and color. 

In the Census Tabb s, the official title of the Borough of 
Roosevelt in :Middlesex County is shown to have been 
changed to Cartt ret. Since these tables were published, tne 
action of ithe liooseveit authorities in making this change 
has been rescinded and the name of Roosevelt resumed. 

The list of State officers, departments, institutions, etc. 
(beginning on page (i(JO) has been entirely rcarraug-ed under 
tive headings as follows: I'^irsr, State Officers. Departments, 
etc. ; second. Courts and Law Department : third. Institu- 
tions and Agencies ; fourth. Examining and Licensing 
Boards : fifth. Investigating Commissions. There has also 
been added a new feature (page 027), giving a list of State 
associations and societies that are more or les< identitied 
with the State (iovernment. 

The list of County officials (page r>:V2) has been very 
materially enlarged so as to include many County < fficers 
heretofore not given. 

In the Election Returns there is given on page o()8 a 
table showing the number of election districts in the State 
in the lOl'l election, number of names on registry lists, 
number of names on poll l)ooks and number of' ballots re- 
.iected. 

This Manual is made up as of conditions prevailing at the 
time of the convening of the 11)22 Legis'ature but added 
thereto is the organization of the 11)22 Session, with a list 
of members, officers and committees, and th(> (iovernor's 
Annual Mesisage. 

Since the convening of the 1022 Legislature, the following 
nominations have been sent to the Senate by (Governor 
Edwards : .Tauuary l(>th — State Prison Keeper. Joseph S. 
Hoff, Mercer. Circuit Court Judges, George S. Silzer, Mid- 
dlesex ; William H. Speer, Hudson. Trosecuitor, Gloucester 
County, William T. Porch. 



2 iNOTES. 

January lioil — Supreme Court Justicos, James F. Min- 
turn, Hudson : Charles C. Black, Hudsou. Court of Errors 
and Appeals, Walter P. Gardner, Hudson. Couutj' Judge, 
Camden County, Samuel M. Shay. 

January 30th — Prosecutor, Essex County. John O. Bige- 
low. State Commissioner of Education, John Enright, Mon- 
mouth. Commissioners of Commerce and Navigation, J. 
Spencer Smith, Robert Engle. Also the twenty-one Visitors 
of the State Agricultural College already holding office ad 
interim. 

February 6th — Common Pleas Judges. Hunterdon County, 
Adam O. Roblnus : Ocean County, Henry E. Newman. Prose- 
cutors of Pleas. Hunterdon County, Marshall Miller : Ocean 
County, Wilfred J. Jayne, Ji-. County Tax Board members, 
Atlantic County, Charles J. Collins. 

I-'ebi-uary 13th — ^State Tax Board, Mahlon R. Margerum, 
Mercer ; St aler Weights and Measures, J. Harry Foley, Hud- 
son. 

It might also be added Ithat since the compilation of the 
section of the Manual devoted to United States Govern- 
ment (page 517), Mr. Elmer H. Geran has been superseded 
as United States District Attorney by Mr. Walter G. Winne. 
Also since ithe compilation of the List of State Officers, Mr. 
Alfred Gaskill, State Forester and Director of the Depart- 
ment of Conservation and Development, has resigned the 
latter position and has been succeeded by Dr. H. B. Kiim- 
mel, State Geologist. Mr. Gaskill retains his position as 
Sfate Forester and Dr. Kiimmel his as State Geologist. 

From the list of newspapers there has been inadvertently 
omitted the Weekly Visitor of Audubon, Camden County, 
which is published on Saturdays and of which Samuel F. 
Dietrich is editor and publisher. 

While every effort towards accuracy has been made, the 
compiler invites information as to any possil>le errors and 
suggestions for otherwise improving future issms of the 
Manual. 

J. P. D. 



Calendar for 1922 



1922 


i 


1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


192 2 


1 


1 


J 


1 


ti 


^^ 


j 


JAN.. 
















JULY.. 














1 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 




2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 




8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 




9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 




15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 




16 


17 


18 


19 


2(1 


21 


22 




22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 




23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


FEB... 


29 


30 


31 










Aua... 


30 


31 












1 


2 


3 


4 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 




5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 




6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 




12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 




13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 




19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 




20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 




26 


27 


28 








... 




27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




... 


MAR... 








1 


2 


3 


4 


SEPT.. 












1 


2 




5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 




3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 




10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


16 


16 




19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 




17 


18 


19 


2(1 


21 


22 


23 




26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


... 




24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


APR 














1 


OCT 


















2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 




9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 




8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 




16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 




15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 




23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 




22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


MAY... 


30 

"1 














NOV... 


29 


30 


31 










1 
8 


2 
9 


t? 


4 
11 


5 
12 


6 
18 


1 
8 


2 

9 


3 
10 


4 
11 




5 


6 


7 




14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 




12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 




21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 




19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 




28 


29 


SO 


31 










26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


... 


... 


JUNE 










1 


<^ 


8 


DEC 












i 


2 




4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 




3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




11 


12 


13 


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15 


16 


17 




10 


11 


12 


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18 


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22 


23 


24 




17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


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23 




25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


... 




24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 












... 



PERPETUAL CALENDAR 

FOB ASCERTAINING THE DAY OF THE AVEEK FOR ANY YEAR 
BETWEEN 1700 AND 2499. 



Table of Dominical 
Letters. 



YEAR OF THE CENTUR'S 



N. B.—A star 
on (he l(<ft 
denotes leap S 
year. 1'^ 



*28'*56 



»4 *32 *60 
5 33l 61 

3l| 6; 
35 63 

*-8'*36*G4 
9 37 1 (35 
30 3S' 66 
39 



11 



*12*40 



17 

18 
19 

*20 
21 
22 
23 

*24 
25 
26 

27 



E G 
I) F 

C'jE 

f 

g'b 

FA 
E G 
D F 



B D 
AC 
G B 

FiA 

DiF 
G E 
B D 
A 

F 
E 
D 
C 

A 

G 
F 
E 

C 
B 
A 
G 



c 


D 


A 


B 


G 


A 


F 


G 


E 


F 


C 


D 


B 


c 


A 


B 


G 


A 


E 


F 


D 


E 


(; 


D 


■^ 


c 



Month. 



Jan. Oct. 

Feb. Mar. Nov. 

Jan. Apr. July 

May 

June 

Feb. Auj?. 

Sept. Dec. 



J 



15' 22 
9 16, 23 
10 17 24 
n IS 25 

12 19 26 

13 20 27 

14 21 28 



Dominical Letter. 



A 


B 





D 


E 


F 


D 


E 


F 


G 


A 


B 


G 


A 


B 


G 


I) 


v. 


H 


G 


D 


E 


F 


G 


E 


F 


(i 


A 


B 


C^ 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


A 


b' 


^ 


A 


B 


C 


D 


S 


S 


F 


Th 


w 


Ttt 


1\[ 


s 


S 


F 


Th 


W 


TlJ 


M 


s 


s 


F 


Th 


W 


Tv 


M 


s 


s 


F 


Th 


W 


Tit 


^r 


i 


S 


Jb' 


Th 


\V 


Tti 


s 


B 


F 


Th 


vv 


Tu 


M 



M 

Tu 
W 

Th 
F 

S 

S 



EXPLANATION. 

Tjnder the Century, and in the line wiia 
the Year of the CnUuiy, is the Dominical 
Letter of the Year. Then in the line with 
the month find the column couiaining 
this letter; in this column, and in line 
with the day of the Month, is the day of 
the Week. In Leap Years, the letters for 
January and February are in the lines 
where these months are printed in Italics. 

EXAMPLES. 

For December 31st, 1875 : for ISib, the 
letter is C ; under C, in a line with 31, is 
Friday ; and for January 1st, 1876, the 
letter is A ; under A, and in a line witii 
1, is Saturday. 



LEGAL HOLIDAYS. 



(See Compiled Statutes, Vol. 3, page 3091, and P. L. 1914, 
page 188.) 

New Year's Day — Januaiy 1. 
Lincoln's Birthday — February 12. 
Washington's Birthday — February 22. 
(iood Friday — April 14. 
Memorial Day — May 30. 
Independence Day — July 4. 
Laltor Day — Sepifembt-r 4. 
Columbus Day — October 12. 
(reneral Election Day — Xovembt-r 7. 
Thanltsgiving Day — November ;>0. 
Christmas Day — December 25. 



OTHER IMPORTANT DAYS. 

Jackson Day — January 8. 

Ash Wednesday — March 2. 

Easter Sunday — April IG. 

Arbor Day — April 8. 

Passover — April 13-20. 

Mothers' Day— May 3. 

Flag- Day — June 14. 

Jewish New Year — Septc^nber 23. 

Day of Atonement ( Yom Kippur) — Octo])er 2. 

Armistice Day — November 11. 



OUTLINE HISTORY OF NEW JERSEY. 



Within the limits of what is now the State of New Jer- 
sey, asiJe from any evidences of the presence of prehis- 
toric man in the "Trenton Gravels," the original inhabi- 
tants of the commonwealth w^ere Lenni Lenape, or Dela- 
ware, Indians. This subdivision of the great Algonkin 
family occupied the river valleys of the State, had made 
some progress in agriculture and in elementary arts, were 
peaceable but small in numbers, and at last have become 
totally extinct in this portion of the United States. 

In its settlement, New Jersey was not an English colony. 
The claims of the Crown, based upon early discovery and 
various grants, were totally ignored by two great com- 
mercial nations of Europe — Holland and Sweden. It was 
not until 1664, practically a half century after the first 
occupancy of New Jersey by a white man, that England 
had aught more than a slight iniluence upon the destinies 
of the State. In settlement, Holland was first to send out 
planters, under the auspices of the Dutch West India 
Company. Claiming both the valleys of the Hudson and 
the Delaware, by virtue of the explorations of Hudson and 
Mey, land was taken up upon the banks of the Hudson, 
Passaic, Hackensack, Raritan and smaller streams tribu. 
tary to New York harbor, as well as at Gloucester upon 
the Delaware, By 1630 these claims were well established 
by occupancy, and by the creation of a centre of local 
government in what is now New York city. Upon the 
rapidly growing influence of Holland, Sweden looked with 
jealous eye, Gustavus Adolphus, in his plan to make 
Sweden a world-power, saw the Dutch to be dangerous 
rivals in America, In 1638 there was equipped a Swedish 
expedition to settle the valley of the Delaware, What 
is now the State of Delaware, the valley of the Schuylkill 
and isolated portions of the west bank of the Delaware 
River were occupied, civil and military government was 
established, and the colony of farmers and traders entered 
upon a brief career of prosperity. The death of Gustavus 
Adolphus, internal dissensions in Sweden, the inherent 
weakness of the Delaware settlements, and the constantly 
increasing power of Holland brought matters to a crisis. 
In 1655 New Sweden was conquered by New Netherlands, 
(7) 
I 



8 HISTORY OF NEW JERSEY. 

and for nine years the soil of New Jersey was absolutely 
under Dutch control. 

Emerging- from the interregnum of the Crom wells, the 
restoration of the House of Stuart brought peace to Eng- 
land. On the 12th of March, 1G64, Charles II., with royal 
disregard for previous patents, grants and charters, deeded 
to his brother James, Duke of York, a vast tract embrac- 
ing much of New England, New York and all of what is 
now New Jersey. This was accompanied by active prep- 
arations to drive the Dutch from America, as they, in 
alien claims to New Jersey, practically separated the New 
England colonies from Virginia, Maryland and the Care- 
linas. In the summer of 1GG4 armed vessels appeared in 
New York harbor. After negotiations, the Dutch sur- 
rendered and the power of Holland in North America be- 
came simply a mattei of history. In the meantime James. 
Duke of York, transfe"red to two favorites of the House 
of Stuart— John, Lord Berkeley, and Sir George Carteret— 
practically what is now the State of New Jersey. In 
honor of Carteret's defense of the Island of Jersey (Cae- 
sarea) during the Parliamentary wars, the territory was 
called New Jersey (Nova Caesarea). 

Carteret and Berkeley, in granting a liberal frame of 
government and extolling the advantages of their colony 
so well located for agriculture, commerce, fishing and 
mining, attracted settlers not only from England, but 
from Scotland and New England, particularly Long Island 
and Connecticut. These planters were largely Calvinists, 
from Presbyterian and Congregational communities, and 
m.ainly occupied land in Newark, Elizabeth and upon the 
north shore of Monmouth county. The valley of the Dela- 
ware remained unsettled. The Calvinists brought into 
East Jersey distinctive views upon religious and civil mat- 
ters. Early legislatures punished many crimes by death, 
the penalties being similar to those of the Jewish dispen- 
sation, while the "town-meeting" strengthened the indi- 
vidual action of the small communities. There was an 
intense individualism in every phase of political and relig- 
ious development, the life of the people centering around 
the church and the school house, the head of both, as in 
New England, being the minister. 

In 1676 a division of the interests of Carteret and Berke- 
ley occurred. In the meantime Berkeley had disposed of 
his rights to a company of English Quakers, a conflict had 
ensued, and to establish the claims of all parties concerned, 
the two colonies of L^ast and West Jersey came into 
existence. A line was drawn from a point in Little Egg 



HISTORY OF NEW JERSEY. « 

Harbor to the Delaware Water Gap, Berkeley and his 
assigns retaining- West Jersey as their moiety, Carteret 
obtaining East Jersey. 

By Berkeley's transfer the dominant influence in West 
Jersey was that of the Society of Friends. Salem was 
settled in 1675, Burlington, Gloucester and the site of Tren- 
ton about five years later, while within ten years there- 
after the "shore" communities of Cape May and Tucker- 
ton came into existence. The Society of Friends estab- 
lished in West Jersey a series of communities in which 
the life of the people was different from that of East Jer- 
sey. As East Jersey resembled New England in civil gov- 
ernment, so West Jersey resembled Virginia. The political 
and social centres of the large plantations were the shire- 
towns, slave owning was common, a landed aristocracy 
was established, prominent families intermarried, and 
under the advice of William Penn and his friends good 
faith was kept with the Indians. Capital punishment was 
practically unknown and disputes were settled frequently 
by arbitration. 

Two elements of discord marked the genesis of East Jer- 
sey and of West Jersey. One, external, was the attitude 
of the Duke of York after he became James II. In 1673 
New Jersey was recaptured by the Dutch, who held the 
colony until the early sprirg of 1674. A question arose as 
to the Duke of York's title after 1674, reconveyances were 
made, but in spite of past assurances. James 11. claimed 
the proprietary right of government. To that end Sir Ed- 
mund Andros was commissioned Governor of New Jersey, 
and a climax was reached in 16S0 when the proprietary 
governor of East Jersey was carried prisoner to New York. 
In 1681 the Crown recognized the justice of the proprietors' 
contention, and local government was re-established, but 
not before the seeds of discontent were sown that bore 
fruit in the Revolutionary War. 

An internal disturbance was a contest b3tween the 
Boards of Proprietors and the small land owners. Both 
in East and West Jersey, Carteret and Berkeley and their 
assigns had transferred to wealthy combinations of capi- 
talists—most of whom were non-residents— much of the 
broad acreage of the colonies. With the land went the 
right of selection of Governors and of members of Execu- 
tive Councils, which right Berkeley and Carteret had 
derived from the Crown. This, with "quit-rent" agita- 
tions in East Jersey, led to much bitterness. Finally, dis- 
gusted with turmoil, and viewing a sentiment of revolt 
on the part of the people, the Boards of Proprietors sur- 



10 HISTORY OP NEW JERSEY. 

rendered to the Crown, in 1702, their rights of government, 
retaining only their interest in the soil, East and West 
Jersey were united, and the two provinces became the 
royal colony of New Jersey. 

From 1702 until the outbreak of the Revolution the polit- 
ical history of the colony was quite uneventful. Through- 
out the period of seventy-five years there was almost con- 
stant friction between the Legislature and the Governor 
and his Council. The governors, in the main, were Crown 
favorites sent over the sea without a personal Icnowledge 
of the colony and with but an ill-concealed ambition to 
wrest from the people as much money as could be secured 
for the support of themselves and the executive office. 
The Councils, composed of wealthy land owners of the 
Society of Friends and rich merchants from East Jersey, 
were quiescent, and even the members of the popular 
branch of the I^egislature were chosen by those possessing 
property qualifications. The small non-voting farmers 
raised the cry of "aristocracy," and the equivalent of 
"taxation without representation," and while loyal to the 
Crown were open in their expressions of dissatisfaction 
to the personal attitude of their governors. In 173S New 
Jersey, in recognition of this sentiment, was given a gov- 
ernor separate from the one appointed jointly for the colo- 
nies of New York and New Jersey. 

During this period the farm was the centre of the activi- 
ties of the life of the people; particularly was this true in 
the western part of the colony, where favoring climate 
and soil, slave labor and the proximity of Philadelphia led 
to abundant crops and a good market. In East Jersey a 
commercial spirit was more active. Pertli Amboy threat- 
ened to rival New York, and Jersey ships from Newark, 
Elizabeth and the Monmouth villages were to be found 
from Boston to Charleston. The repressive economic 
policy of the Crown precluded the development of manu- 
factures. In the southern part of the State, sand and un- 
limited forests of oak and pine led to the development of 
glass making, while "bog iron," with abundance of lime 
from oyster shells, gave an impetus to the erection of 
forges and bloomaries. These, as well as the copper mines 
of the trap rock region, were throttled by adverse Parlia- 
mentary legislation. Ship building was a recognized in- 
dustry, and cedar was extensively "mined" from the 
sunken forests of the tide-water district. Whaling and 
other fisheries were unhampered, and were profitable, as 
was also the trade in skins and in hay from the salt 
meadows of the coast. 



HISTORY OF NEW JERSEY. D 

Throughout the years from 1702 to 1776 gold and silver 
and copper money was scarce. In obedience to the de- 
mand of the English merchants that competition should 
be crushed, legislation was enacted to draw "hard" money 
away from the colony. An inflated paper currency, first 
issued in 1707 to provide ways and means to aid the Cana- 
dian expedition against the French, poured from the 
printing presses. Trade was reduced to barter, and gold, 
silver and copper were practically at a premium for nearly 
three generations. 

Of the more prominent incidents during the period were 
the organized attempts to suppress piracy in New York 
and Delaware bays, the growth of a well-defined system 
of transportation by land and water between New York 
and Philadelphia, the establishment of ferries and post 
roads, the reclamation of waste land, the injection of 
Hugenot, Scotch-Irish and Palatinate German elements 
into the settled population, the chartering of Princeton 
University and Rutgers College, the religious revival led 
by Whitefield, the propogation of abolition doctrines by 
Woolman, the erection of a series of barracks owing to the 
French and Indian war, and what is probably of supreme 
importance, the growth of a sentiment of indoi^ndence 
fostered by the stupid policy of the Crown, and carried 
from hamlet to hamlet, as much bj^ itinerant hawkers and 
by "Redemptioners," who had served their time, as by any 
other cause. 

The opening of the Revolution found New Jersey's senti- 
ment unevenly crystalized. Few, if any, were favoring 
absolute independence. There were three elements. One, 
the Tory party, was led by Governor William Franklin, 
the illegitimate sen of Benjamin Franklin. This conserva- 
tive class embraced nearly all the Episcopalians, a vast 
proportion of the non-combatant members of the Society 
of Friends and some East Jersey Calvinists. Another ele- 
ment was composed of men of various s'hades of belief, 
some in favor of continual protest, others desirous of com- 
promise. This included at the outbreak of the struggle 
most of the Calvinists, some few Quakers of the younger 
generation, and the Scotch-Irish. The third party drew 
its support from a few bold, aggressive spirits of influence 
whose following included men who believed that war 
for independence would benefit their fortunes. 

The part played in the Revolution by New Jersey has 
been frequently told. Events passed rapidly after the 
affairs of Trenton and Princeton; Monmouth and Red Bank 
will never be forgotten, while the raids at Salem. Spring- 



If HISTORY OF tih^W JERSEY. 

field, Elizabeth, in the valley of the Haekensack, and the 
winter at Morristown are a part of national history. Oc- 
cupying- a position between New York and Philadelphia, 
its soil was a theatre where the drama of war was always 
presented. At no time was the Tory element suppressed, 
finding- its expression in open hostility, or in the barbaric 
cruelties of the "Pine Robbers" of Monmouth, Burlington, 
Gloucester and Salem counties. Though under suspicion, 
the Society of Friends were neutral, for conscience sake, 
remaining close to the teachings of their creed. 

The close of the struggle found the people of New Jersey 
jubilant and not disposed to relinquish their sovereignty. 
The Articles of Confederation were weak and had become 
a by-word and a jest. There was much State pride and 
much aristocratic feeling among the old families who con- 
tinued to dominate State politics. The Constitution of 1776, 
adopted by New Jersey as a makeshift war measure, pro- 
vided that all State officers of prominence should be elected 
by a Legislature, which was chosen by voters possessing 
property qualifications. As in the colony, the Governor 
was Chancellor, and class distinctions were closely drawn. 
In spite of agitation, all proposed changes were rejected, 
and a strong federal union with the other States was 
viewed^ith dislike and suspicion. The State, in a quarrel 
with New York, at one time refused to obey the requests 
of Congress, and, in the exercise of her sovereignty, estab- 
lished a Court of Admiralty and coined money. 

While the spirit of "State rights" was dominant, it was 
recognized by leaders of public thought that New Jersey 
was too weak to stand alone. She entered the Annapolis 
convention called to revise the Articles of Confederation, 
and whose lasting monument was the present Federal 
Constitution adopted in Philadelphia in 1787. Upon the 15th 
of June of that year the "New Jersey Plan" was pre- 
sented, which, while lost as a measure, led to the famous 
compromise upon representation, whereby in the Senate 
of the United States the States were given equal vote, with 
a representation based on population in the House. 

The adoption of the Constitution of the United States 
led to the rapid growth of political parties in New Jersey 
as elsewhere. In spite of the intense conservatism of the 
State, led by the Quakers of West Jersey, who were Fed- 
eralists almost to a man, the anti-Federalist sentiment de- 
veloped rapidly, spurred by a virulent party press, the 
death of men who had been trained in colonial methods of 
thought and the democratic tendency of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, which crew in strength in West Jersey. 



HISTORY OF NEW JERSEY. 13 

In the eastern part of the State there was among the Indi- 
vidualistic Calvinists a strong- anti-Federal spirit. This, 
in 1800, led to the election of Thomas Jefferson as President 
of the United States, and in ISOl the election of his political 
ally, Joseph Bloomfield, as Governor of the State of New 
Jersey. The death of Hamilton at the hands of Burr, and 
the death of Livingston, the "war" Governor, tore down 
l"he strongest pillars of Federalism in New Jersey, and led 
to the absolute domination of the State by the anti-Feder- 
alists, who held power until the outbreak of the second war 
with England. 

The period from 1790 to 1812 in New Jersey was marked 
by a demand for internal improvements and better trans- 
portation. The agitation concerning' the Delaware and 
Raritan Canal, Stevens' experiments in 1802 with steam, 
along- the lines laid down in 1785 by Fitch, the project of 
the Society for Establishing Useful Manufactures at Pat- 
erson as early as 1791, and highways conducted through the 
northwest portion of the State, indicate the trend of public 
sentiment. 

The second war with England was not altogether a pop- 
ular measure in New Jersey. The Federalists, the "Peace 
Party," secured control of the Legislature and elected 
their Governor. Nevertheless the State furnished her 
quota of troops. The one permanent effect of the struggle 
upon the State was indirect. Owing to the movement of 
supplies and the necessity of quick transportation between 
Philadelphia and the exposed port of New York, the wagon 
roads between Bordentown and Perth Amboy, and between 
Trenton, New Brunswick, Metuchen, Rahway, Elizabeth 
and Newark, were improved and their advantages as 
"short routes" demonstrated. Upon these lines two later 
railroads, now a part of the Pennsylvania Railroad system, 
were constructed. 

The era following the close of the war of 1812 until the 
opening of the Civil War was one of stupendous activity. 
Interrupted only by the financial depressions of 1817 and 
1837, and slightly retarded by the Mexican War, the pro- 
gress of the State was beyond the wildest dreams of the 
enthusiast, Alexander Hamilton. In the eastern part of 
the State, aided by a constantly increasing foreign popula- 
tion, Jersey City rose from the marshes, Newark grew 
toward her present greatness, Paterson became a centre 
of industry, while in the west, Camden was recognized as 
an available site for m.anufactures. The public school 
system was established and extended, reforms in the car- 
ing for the criminal, defective, delinquent and dependent 



]4 HISTORY OF NEW JERSEY. 

classes were Instituted, railroads were reaching every town 
of size, in the vicinity of New Yorlj and Philadelphia, fer- 
ries were erected, banks established, post oflBces opened 
and newspapers printed. In 1844, when social unrest was 
most marked, the present State Constitution was adopted 
by a large popular majority and needed reforms tending to 
elevate the legal position of married women, imprisoned 
debtors and bankrupts were adopted. 

The year 1860 brought a termination to the then impend- 
ing conflict. While every other State north of Mason and 
Dixon's line by 1850 had set the black man free, there were 
still 236 negroes in bondage in New Jersey. The abolition 
movement made slow progress and an anti-war party had 
a decided following. But when the die was. cast New Jer- 
sey responded to the call for men and money. She fur- 
nished 88,305 men, or within 10.501 of her entire militia. 
For organizing, subsisting, supplying, supporting and trans- 
porting her troops she paid $2,894,385, and upon the field 
sustained the reputation for bravery she had won during 
the days of Trenton and Monmouth. 

New Jersey has made great advances since the Civil War. 
Among the important legislation was the passage of the 
General Railroad law in 1873. This ended the domination 
of the Camden and Amboy monopoly and opened the way 
for other enterprises in the same field. 

Although the State passed an Emancipation act in 1804, 
the Constitution was not amended as to legalize negro 
suffrage until 1875. The Legislature of 1871 ratified the 
fifteenth amendment to the U. S. Constitution which gives 
absolute authority to the negro to cast his vote at all 
national. State, county and municipal elections. 

Women exercised the right of suffrage in New Jersey 
under laws passed in 1790 and 1797. That right was taken 
from them by an act passed in 1807. In 1912 the Supreme 
Court held that the 1776 Constitution did not confer any 
right on women to vote. The Constitution of 1844 limited 
the right to vote to males. In 1887 women were given the 
right to vote at school meetings. This was declared un- 
constitutional in 1894 as to voting for school trustees and 
officers; they could vote, however, on other school matters. 

A proposed amendment to the State Constitution in 1897 
giving women the right to vote for school officers was 
defeated. The vote was 65,021 for, to 75,170 against. In 
1915 another proposed amendment conferring full suffrage 
on women was defeated. The vote was 133,282 for and 
184,390 against. In 1883 laws were enacted regulating the 
labor of women and children in factories. 

In 1838, the last whipping post disappeared from New 
Jersey. It stood on a vacant lot in Trenton, where many 
offenders had suffered the degrading punishment. Franklin 
S. Mills, a veteran reporter of that time, called several 



HISTORY OF NEW JERSEY. 15 

kindred spirits around him and they decided that the 
whipping post must go. There was unanimous agreement 
that the best time for its vanishment would be a dark night, 
and meanwhile the plot was kept a profound secret. The 
plan was carried out and the post was never set up again. 
"The next step to lessen the horror of capital punishment 
was in 1907, when the penalty was changed from hanging 
to eloctrocution. In the same year tuberculosis was pro- 
nounced infectious and a sanitorium for the treatment of 
such patients was established. 

Gambling at race tracks and all other places was pro- 
hibited by law in 1894 and in 1897 a constitutional amend- 
ment was adopted to the same effect. 

In 1907 the first primary law went into operation. In 
1911, the direct primary was extended to the oflBces of 
governor and representatives in Congress. In 1915 it was 
extended to the oflBce of United States Senator. In 1911, 
a blanket form of ballot was adopted. In 1907 the Board 
of Railroad Commissioners for the State of New Jersey 
was created, and in 1910, the name was changed to the 
Board of Public Utility Commissioners. In 1911, the Em- 
ployers' Liability act was passed. 

The admirable system of public education in New Jersey 
deserves more than passing notice. The first stops were 
taken during the colonial period, and soon after the Revo- 
lution a number of private schools and academies were es- 
tablished. In 1816, the Legislature ordered that the sum 
of $15,000 should be invested in a Permanent Educational 
Fund. During the following two years, this sum was in- 
creased to $113,236.78. In 1824, a tenth of the State tax 
was added to the school fund. Improvement was continually 
made in the educational lacilities, the annual appropriation 
being increased in 1838 to $30,000. The new Constitution 
adopted in 1844, prohibited the diversion of any part of the 
school fund under any pretext. Two years later every town- 
ship was required to raise the same amount contributed 
by the State, and in 1851 the State appropriation was in- 
creased to $40,000. 

Since no one is considered qualified to follow a profession 
without special training, it followed that that of the teacher 
should receive the same preparation. In 1855. the first 
State Normal School was opened in Trenton and proved 
highly successful. It has been followed by others with the 
most beneficial results to the cause of education throughout 
the State. 

In 1867, the whole school system was remodeled and 
placed on a sound basis. Provision was made for the con- 
tinual maintenance of the Normal School and the Model, 
or training school, attached to it ; for the examination and 
licensing of teachers; for increasing the State Educational 
Fund ; defining the duties of district and township trus- 



16 HISTORY OF NEW JERSEY. 

tees, the city boards of education, the county superintend- 
ents, the State superintendent and the State Board of Edu- 
cation. 

In 1881, an act was passed by the Legislature to encourage 
the establishment of schools for industrial education. In 
1888, manual training was provided for and several such 
institutions have been established. The Compulsory Edu- 
cation law went into effect in 1884. Parents and guardians 
are compelled to send children between the ages of seven 
and fourteen years to school each day the schools are in 
session, or provide for their instruction at home or else- 
where. The State College for Agriculture and the Mechanic 
Arts is connected with Rutgers College at New Brunswick. 
Candidates for this course are examined annually at the 
county seat of each county. The number of pupils is limited 
to sixty and tuition is free. Other State institutions are 
referred to elsewhere. 

One of the most beneficent enterprises with which New 
Jersey is specially identified is the life-saving service. The 
United States has more than ten thousand miles of sea 
and lake coast. Thousands of lives and untold millions of 
dollars of property have been swept down to death and 
destruction by the fearful storms which at times rage over 
these waters. Of all the vast extent of coast, there is none 
more dangerous than that of New Jersey. The causes of 
this is the peculiar formation of the Long Island and New 
Jersey shores, and the fact that a bar runs parallel with 
the beach at a distance therefrom of from two hundred 
yards to a mile. The water on this bar is shallow, and 
many a ship, when driven towai-d shore goes to pieces long 
before it can be reached by the anxious watchers on the 
beach. 

One of the residents of Monmouth county who was deeply 
impressed by the frightful loss of life was Dr. William A. 
Newell, a member of Congress from 1848 to 1851, and 
governor of New Jersey from 1857 to 1860. It is worth 
mentioning in this place that Dr. Newell was in Congress 
when John Quincy Adams was stricken with apoplexy and 
caught him in his arms as he was falling. Dr. Newell, 
during the first part of his term, secured an appropriation 
of $10,000 for the protection of life and property from 
shipwreck on the coast between Sandy Hook and Little Egg 
Harbor. Some months later, the ship Ayrshire was driven 
on Squan Beach. The life car was employed to bring the 
202 passengers and crew ashore and only one man who re- 
fused to enter the car was drowned. Instances without 
number occurred, when with the help of the life-savins: 
crew, not a single life was lost, when without such aid all 
would have perished. 

At the close of 1914, the life-saving establishments in 
the United States included 285 stations, 203 being on the 



HISTORY OF NEW JERSEY. 17 

Atlantic and Gulf coasts, 62 on the lakes, 19 on the Pacific 
coast, 1 at Nome, Alaska, and 1 at the falls of the Ohio, 
Louisville, Ky. 

Since the establishment of the life-saving service down to 
June 30th, 1914, the number of disasters was 28,121 ; 
value of property involved, $355,401,084 ; value of property 
saved, $288,871,237 ; value of property lost, $66,529,847 ; 
persons involved, 178,741; persons lost, 1,455; shipwrecked 
persons succored at stations, 28,711 ; days' succor afforded, 
59,659. 

In addition to the 522 disasters in 1914, there were 1,415 
casualties to lesser craft, such as launches, sailboats, row- 
boats, &c., on which were 3,757 persons of whom all were 
saved excepting 12. 

As in every State and in the National government, the 
government consists of the legislative, executive and ju- 
diciary. The last named embraces the courts. 

Justice's Court. — This is the lowest court with common 
law and criminal jurisdiction. Suits involving no more than 
$200 may be tried in it, and appeal can be had to the 
Court of Quarter Sessions. 

Police Court. — This is composed of a police justice, or a 
justice of the peace appointed by him. Ilis criminal juris- 
diction in the city for which he is appointed is the same 
as that of a justice of the peace. He tries cases of vio- 
lation of city ordinances and appeal is to the Court of 
Common Pleas, or Quarter Sessions, or to the Supreme or 
Circuit Court. 

District Court. — The jurisdiction of this court is limited 
to the county in which the court is held. It has authority 
in all suits of a civil nature in which the sum involved 
does not exceed $500, exclusive of costs, including disputes 
between landlords and tenants and replevin and attachment 
cases. Appeal is to the Supreme Court. 

Court of Quarter Sessions. — This court has jurisdiction 
over all offences of an indictable nature within the county, 
except treason and murder. As a court of common law 
jurisdiction, it can hear only appeals from the justices' 
courts and the police courts. 

Court of Common Pleas. — The jurisdiction of this court 
is extensive. It holds three stated terms each year and 
special terms when so ordered by the Supreme Court. Its 
original jurisdiction includes all personal actions not in- 
volving the freehold ; the changing of the name of any 
town or village in the county or of any person on his 
request ; cases relating to insolvency, roads and wrecks ; 
the property of absconding debtors ; applications for exemp- 
tion from military duty, and it decides suits against con- 
stables who neglect to execute warrants. It grants licenses 
and tries cases referred to it by the Circuit Court. The 
presiding officer is a judge appointed to that oflflce. The 



18 HISTORY OF NEW JERSEY. 

justice of the Supreme Court, holdin,;? the Circuit Court 
within the county, is ex-ofpcio judge of the Court of Common 
IMeas. It can try cases referred to it hy the Circuit Court 
and certify the same to the Supremo Court. 

Circuit Court. — This court has concurrent jurisdiction with 
the Supreme Court except in criminal cases and has author- 
ity to try Supreme Court issues. It holds three stated 
terms annually and a special term when so ordered by a 
justice of the Supreme Court. Appeals are taken to the 
Court of Errors and Appeals. 

Supreme Court of Judicature. — The chief justice and eight 
associate justices compose this court, which may be held 
by any one of the nine justices. It meets in Trenton on the 
third Tuesday in February and the first Tuesdays respec- 
tively of June and November. Special terms may be ordered 
by the chief justice or any two associate justices. Its 
jurisdiction covers all real, personal or mixed actions at 
common law, and it has power to decide when the laws 
and joint resolutions have not been duly passed and ap- 
proved. It has authority to review the proceedings of other 
courts and the only appeal is to the Court of Errors and 
Appeals. The business of this court has grown to such an 
extent that it has been divided into parts I., II. and III. 

Court of Errors and Appeals. — This court is composed of 
the chancellor, the justices of the Supreme Court and six 
specially appointed justices. It is the highest tribunal in 
the State from whose decisions there is no appeal. 

Court of Chancery. — The members of this court are the 
chancellor and eight vice-chancellors. Its function is to 
give such relief as is not given by the common law courts, 
and appeal must be made to the Court of Errors and Appeals. 

Surrogate Court. — Each county has a surrogate whose 
duties mainly relate to will cases. Appeals have to be 
made to the Orphans' Court of the county. 

Orphans' Court. — This court is held hy the judge of the 
Court of common Pleas, the justices of the Supreme Court 
being judges ex-officio. It decides all disputes relating to 
wills, the accounts of executors, the recovery of legacies, 
the mental condition of persons in the military, naval or 
marine service, the division of estates, &c. 

Prerogative Court. — The chancellor is the judge of the 
Prerogative Court, which has authority to grant the probate 
of wills, letters of administration and the settlement of 
disputes relating to the same. Its decisions are to the 
Court of Errors and Appeals. 

Court for the Trial of Impeachments. — This court con- 
sists of the senate which tries the governor or any officer 
of the State for misdemeanor while holding such office. 
The impeachment must be by the assembly. A two-thirds 
vote is necessary to convict and from such conviction there 
is no appeal. 



LIST OF GOVERNORS. 19 

Court of Pardons. — This court consists of the governor, 
chancellor and the six .iudgcs of the Court of Errors and 
Appeals. A majority of the court of whom the governor 
must he one, may remit fines and forfeitures, grant pardons 
after conviction except in cases of impeachment, and com- 
mute sentences of death fo imprisonment at hard labor 
for life or a stated number of years. There is no appeal 
from the judgment of this court. 

Court of Oyer and Terminer. — This court is composed of 
any Supreme Court justice and the judge of the Court of 
Common Pleas. It meets in the respective counties and has 
jurisdiction over all offences of an indictable nature, from 
which appeal may be made to the Supreme Court. 

In addition to the courts specified, there is one for the 
trial of juvenile offenders, which is for the beneficent pur- 
pose of reforming rather than punishing youthful criminals, 
and the Coroner's Court, whose duty is to inquire into 
the causes of all deaths in prison and of those elsewhere 
which have a suspicious appearance. No appeal can be 
taken from the verdict of a coroner's jury. 

It is a singular coincidence that the three presidential 
cabinet members from New Jersey down to 1877, were each 
Secretary of the Navy. They were, Samuel L. Southard, 
1823-29 ; Mahlon Dickerson, 1834-38, and George M. Robe- 
son, 1869-77. The cabinet officers from this State, since 
the last-named date, were, F. T. Frelinghuysen, Secretary 
of State, 1881-85 ; John W. Griggs, Attorney-General, 1898- 
1901, and Lindley M. Garrison, Secretary of War, 1913-1916. 
Having done so well with the cabinet. New Jersey gave the 
nation her governor (Woodrow Wilson), in 1913, and again 
in 1917, as President of the United States. 



CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OP GOVERNORS 

Cornelius Jacobsen Mey (Director New Netherlands), 1624 

William Verhulst (Director New Netherlands) 1625 

Peter Minuit (Governor of New Netherlands) 1626 to 1631 

Bastlaen Janssen Crol (Director Gen. New Nether- 
lands) 1631 to 1633 

Wouter Van Twlller (Governor of New Netherlands) . . 1633 to 1637 

William Kleft (Governor of New Netherlands) 1633 to 1637 

Col. John Printz (Governor of New Sweden) 1642 to 1653 

Peter Stuyvesant (Governor of New Netherlands) 1646 to 1664 

Philip Carteret (first English Governor) 1664 to 1676 

GOVERNORS OF EAST JERSEY. 

Philip Carteret 1677 to 1682 

Robert Barclay (Proprietary Governor in England)... 1682 to 1690 

Thomas Rudyard (Deputy Governor) 1682 to 1683 

Gawen Lawrie (Deputy Governor) 1683 to 1686 



20 LIST OF GOVERNORS. 

Lord Neil Campbell (Deputy Governor) 1686 to 1687 

Andrew Hamilton (Deputy Governor) 1687 to 1690 

Major Edmund Andross (Royal Governor of New York), 1688 to 1689 
John Tatliam (Proprietary Governor — rejected by 

Trovince) 1690 

Col. Joseph Dudley (Proprietary Governor — rejected by 

the Province) 1692 to 1697 

Colonel Andrew Hamilton 1692 to 1697 

Jeremiah Basse 1698 to 1699 

Andrew Bowne (Deputy Governor) 1699 

Andrew Hamilton 1699 to 1702 

GOVERNORS OF WEST JERSEY. 

Board of Commissioners 1676 to 1681 

Edward Byllinge (Governor) 1680 to 1687 

Samuel Jennings (Deputy Governor) 1681 to 1684 

Thomas Ollive (Deputy Governor) 1684 to 1685 

John Skene (Deputy Governor) 16So to 1687 

Daniel Coxe 1687 to 1692 

Major Edmund Andros (Governor of New York) 1688 to 1689 

Edward Hunloke (Deputy Governor) 1690 

West Jersey Societv of Proprietors 1691 

Colonel Andrew Hamilton 1692 to 1697 

Jeremiah Basse (of both Provinces) 1697 to 1699 

Colonel Andrew Hamilton 1699 to 1702 

EAST AND WEST JERSEY UNITED. 

Edward, Lord Cornbury, Governor 1703 to 1708 

John, Lord Lovelace (died in office) 1708 

Richard Ingoldsby, Lieutenant-Governor 1709 to 1710 

General Robert Hunter 1710 to 1719 

Lewis Morris (President of Council) 1719 to 1720 

William Burnet 1720 to 1727 

John Montgomerie 1728 to 1731 

Lewis Morris (President of Council) 1731 to 1732 

William Cosby 1732 to 1736 

John Anderson (President of Council) 1736 

John Hamilton (President of Council) 1736 to 1738 

(The foregoing were also Governors of New Y'ork at the same 
time.) 

SEPARATE FROM NEW YORK. 

Lewis Morris 1738 to 1746 

John Hamilton (President of Council) 1746 to 1747 

John Reading (President of Council) 1747 

Jonathan Belcher 1747 to 1757 

Thomas Pownall, Lieutenant-Governor 1757 

John Reading (President of Council) 1757 to 1758 

Francis Bernard 1^58 to 1760 

Thomas Boone 1~60 to 1761 

Josiah Hardy 1T61 to 1762 

William Franklin 1'63 to 1776 

FROM THE ADOPTION OF THE STATE CONSTITUTION. 

William Livingston (Federalist) 1776 to 1790 

William Paterson (Federalist) 1790 to 1<92 

Richard Howell (Federalist) 1792 to 1801 

Joseph Bloomfield (Democrat) 1801 to 1802 



LIST OF GOVERNORS. 21 

John Lambert, President of Council and Acting Gov- 
ernor (Democrat) 1802 to 1803 

Josepli Bloomfield (Democrat) 1803 to 1812 

Aaron Ogden (Federalist) 1813 to 1813 

William S. Pennington (Democrat) 1813 to 1815 

Mahlon Dickerson (Democrat) 1815 to 1817 

Isaac H. Williamson (Federalist) 1817 to 1829 

Garret D. Wall (Democrat) 1829 decl'd 

Peter D. Vroom (Democrat) 1829 to 1832 

Samuel L. Southard (Whig) 1832 to 1833 

Elias P. Seeley ( Whig) 1833 to 1833 

Peter D. Vroom (Democrat) 1833 to lb36 

Pliilemon Dickerson (Democrat) 1836 to 1837 

William Pennington ( Whig) 1837 to 1843 

Daniel Haines (Democrat) 1843 to 1844 

Charles C. Stratton (Whig) 1845 to 1848 

Daniel Haines (Democrat) 1848 to 1851 

George F. Fort (Democrat) 1851 to 1854 

Rodman M. Price (Democrat) 1854 to 1857 

William A. Newell (Keimblican) 1857 to 1860 

Charles S. Olden (Republican) 1860 to 1863 

Joel Parker (Democrat) 1863 to 1866 

Marcus L. Ward (Republican) 1866 to 1869 

Theodore F. Randolph (Democrat) 1869 to 1872 

Joel Parker ( Democrat) 1872 to 1875 

Joseph D. Bedle (Democrat) 1875 to 1878 

George B. McClellan (Democrat) 1878 to 1881 

George C. Ludlow (Democrat) 1881 to 1884 

Leon Abbott (Democrat) 1884 to 1887 

Robert S. Green (Democrat) 1887 to 1890 

Leon Abbett (Democrat) 1890 to 1893 

George T. Werts (Democrat) 1893 to 1896 

John W. Griggs (Republican) 1896 to 1898 

Foster M. Voorhees (Rep.), Acting Governor 

Feb. 1, '98, to Oct. 18, '98 

David 0. Watkins (Rep.), Acting Governor 

Oct. 18, '98. to Jan. 16, '99 

Foster M. Voorhees (Republican) 1899 to 1902 

Franklin Murphy (Republican) 1902 to 1905 

Edwanl C. Stokes (Republican) 1905 to 1908 

John Franklin Fort (Republican) 1908 to 1911 

Woodrow Wilson (Democrat) 1911 to 1913 

James F. Fielder (Democrat), Acting Governor 

March 1, '13, to Oct. 28, '13 

Leon R. Taylor (Democrat), Acting Governor 

Oct. 28 to Jan. 20, '14 

James F. Fielder (Democrat) 1914 to 1917 

Walter E. Edge (Republican) 1917 to May 16, 1919 

William N. Runyon (Republican), Acting Governor.. 

May 16, '19, to Jan. 13, '20 
Clarence E. Case (Republican). Acting Governor.. 

Jan. 13, '1020, to Jan. 20. "20 

Edward I. Edwards (Democrat) 1920 to 



22 LIST OF GOVERNORS. 

OTHER ACTING GOVERNORS OF NEW JERSEY. 

The following is a list of Presidents of the Senate who served 
as Acting Governors, for brief periods, during temporary absence 
of regular Governors: 

William M. Johnson (Rop.), Bergen 1900 

Edmund W. Wakelee (Rep.), Bergen 1904 

Joseph S. Frelinghuysen (Rep.), Somerset 1909 

Ernest R. Ackerman (Rep.), Union 1911 

John Dyneley Prince (Rep.), Passaic 1912 

John W. Sloouni (Dem.), Monmouth 1914 

Walter E. Edge (Rep.). Atlantic 1915 

George W. F. Gaunt (Rep.), Gloucester 1916-1917 

Thomas F. McCran (Rep.), Passaic 1918 



DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. 23 

DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE 

OF THE 

UNITED STATES. 



When, in the course of human events, it becomes neces- 
sary for one people to dissolve the political bands which 
have connected them with another, and to assume, among 
the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to 
which the laws of nature and of nature's God entitle them, 
1 decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that 
they should declare the causes which impel them to the 
separation. 

We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are 
created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with 
certain unalienable rights; that among these are life, lib- 
erty and the pursuit of happiness. That, to secure these 
rights, governments are instituted among men. deriving 
their just powers from the consent of the governed; that 
whenever any form of government becomes destructive of 
these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or abolish 
it, and to institute a new government, laying its founda- 
tions on such principles, and organizing its powers in such 
form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their 
safety and happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that 
governments long established should not be changed for 
light and transient causes; and accordingly, all experience 
hath shown that mankind are more disposed to suffer, 
while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by 
abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But, 
when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing in- 
variably the same object, evinces a design to reduce them 
under absolute despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, 
to throw off such government, and to provide new guards 
for their future security. Such has been the patient suffer- 
ance of these colonies, and ruch is now the necessity which 
constrains them to alter their former systems of govern- 
ment. The history of the present king of Great Britain is 
a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having, 
in direct object, the establishment of an absolute tyranny 
over these States. To prove this, let facts be submitted to 
a candid world: 

He has refused his assent to laws the most wholesome 
and necessary for the public good. 



24 DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. 

He has forbidden his Governors to pass laws of imme- 
diate and pressing importance, unless suspended in their 
operations till his assent should be obtained; and when so 
suspended, he has utterly neglected to attend to them. 

He has refused to pass other laws for the accommodation 
of large districts of people, unless those people would re- 
linquish the right of representation in the Legislature— a 
right inestimable to them, and formidable to tyrants only. 

He has called together legislative bodies at places un- 
usual, uncomfortable and distant from the repository of 
their public records, for the sole purpose of fatiguing them 
into compliance with his measures. 

He has dissolved representative houses repeatedly, for 
opposing, with manly firmness, his invasions on the rights 
of the people. 

He has refused, for a long time after such dissolutions, 
to cause others to be elected; whereby the legislative 
powers, incapable of annihilation, have returned to the 
people at large for their exercise; the State remaining, in 
the meantime, exposed to all the dangers of invasions from 
without, and convulsions within. 

He has endeavored to prevent the population of these 
States; for that purpose, obstructing the laws for the nat- 
uralization of foreigners; refusing to pass others to en- 
courage their migration hither, and raising the conditions 
of new appropriations of lands. 

He has obstructed the administration of justice, by re- 
fusing his assent to laws for establishing judiciary powers. 

He has made judges dependent on his will alone, for the 
tenure of their offices, and the amount and payment of 
their salaries. 

He has erected a multitude of new offices, and sent hithei 
swarms of officers to harass our people, and eat out their 
substance. 

He has kept among us in times of peace, standing armies, 
without the consent of our Legislatures. 

He has affected to render the military independent of, 
and superior to, the civil povrer. 

He has combined, with others, to subject us to a jurisdic- 
tion foreign to our constitutions, and unacknowledged by 
our laws; giving his assent to their acts of pretended leg- 
islation: 

For quartering large bodies of armed troops among us; 

For protecting them, by a mock trial, from punishment, 
for any murders which they should commit on the inhab- 
itants of these States; 

For cutting off our trade with all parts of the world; 



DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. 25 

For imposing taxes on us without our consent; 

For depriving us, in many cases, of the benefit of trial by 
jury; 

For transporting us beyond seas to be tried for pretended 
offenses; 

For abolishing the free system of English laws in a 

neighboring province, establishing therein an arbitrary 

government, and enlarging its boundaries, so as to render 

it at once an example and fit instrument for introducing 

• the same absolute rule into these colonies; 

For taking away our charters, abolishing our most valu- 
able laws, and altering, fundamentally, the forms of our 
governments; 

For suspending our own Legislatures, and declaring 
themselves invested with power to legislate for us in all 
cases whatsoever. 

He has abdicated government here, by declaring us out 
of his protection, and waging war against us. 

He has plundered our seas, ravaged our coasts, burned 
our towns, and destroyed the lives of our people. 

He is, at this time, transporting large armies of foreign 
mercenaries to complete the works of death, desolation and 
tyranny, already begun, with circumstances of cruelty and 
perfidy scarcely paralleled in the most barbarous ages, and 
totally unworthy the head of a civilized nation. 
)He has constrained our fellow-citizens, taken captive on 
the high seas, to bear arms against their country, to be- 
come the executioners of their friends and brethren, or to 
fall themselves by their hands. 

He has excited domestic insurrection among us, and has 
endeavored to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the 
merciless Indian savages, whose known rule of warfare is 
an undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and con- 
ditions. 

In every stage of these oppressions, we have petitioned 
for redress, in the most humble terms; our repeated peti- 
tions have been answered only by repeated injury. A 
prince whose character is thus mSrked by every act which 
may define a tyrant, is unfit to be the ruler of a free people. 

Nor have we been v/anting in our attentions to our Brit- 
ish brethren. We have warned them, from time to time, of 
attempts by their Legislature to extend an unwarrantable 
jurisdiction over us. We have reminded them of the cir- 
cumstances of our emigration and settlement here. We 
have appealed to their native justice and magnanimity, 
and we have conjured them, by the ties of our common 
kindred, to disavow these usurpations, which would inev- 



26 



DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. 



Itably interrupt our connections and correspondence. They, 
too, have been deaf to the voice of justice and of consan- 
guinity. We must, therefore, acquiesce in the necessity, 
which denounces our separation, and hold them, as we 
hold the rest of mankind, enemies in war, in peace, friends. 
We, therefore, the representatives of the United States 
of America, in General Congress assembled, appealing to 
the Supreme Judge of the World for the rectitude of our 
Intentions, do. in the name and by the authority of the 
good people of these colonies, solemnly publish and de- 
clare, that these United Colonies are, and of right ought 
to be, Free and Independent States; that they are also ab- 
solved from all allegiance to the British crown, and that 
all political connection between them and the State of 
Great Britain, is, and ought to be, totally dissolved; and 
that, as Free and Independent States, they have full power 
to levy war, conclude peace, contract alliances, establish 
commerce, and do all other acts and things which Inde- 
pendent States may of right do. And, for the support of 
this declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of 
Divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other, our 
lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor. 

JOHN HANCOCK. 



Georgia- 
Button Gwinnett. 
Lyman Hall. 
Geo. Walton. 

iouth Carolina- 
Edward Rutledge. 
Thos. Hayward, Jr. 
Thomas Lynch, Jr. 
Arthur Middleton. 

■^''irginia- 

George Wythe. 
Richard Henry Lee. 
Thos. Jefferson. 
Benjan. Harrison. 
Thos. Nelson, Jr. 
Francis Lightfoot Le«. 
Carter Braxton. 

Delaware- 
Caesar Rodney, 
Geo. Read. 

New Jersey— 

Richd. Stockton. 
Jno. Witherspoon. 
Fras. Hopkinson. 
John Hart. 
Abra. Clark. 



Maryland- 
Samuel Chase. 
Wm. Paca. 
Thos. Stone. 
Charles Carroll, 

of Carrollton. 

Pennsylvania— 
Robt. Morris. 
Benjamin Rush. 
Benja. Franklin. 
John Morton. 
Thomas McKean, 
Geo. Clymer. 
Jas. Smith. 
Geo. Taylor. 
James Wilson. 
Geo. Ross. 

New York— 
Wm. Floyd. 
Phil. Livingston. 
Fran's Lewis. 
Lewis Morris. 

New Hampshire — 
Josiah Bartlett. 
Wm. Whipple. 
Matthew Thornton. 



DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. 



2f 



Massachusetts Bay— 
Saml, Adams. 
John Adams. 
Robt. Treat Paine. 
Elbridge Gerry. 

North Carolina— 
Wm. Hooper. 
Joseph Hewes. 
John Penn. 



Rhode Island and Provi- 
dence, &c. — 
Step. Hopkins. 
William Ellery. 

Connecticut- 
Roger Sherman. 
Saml. Huntington. 
Wm. Williams. 
Oliver Wolcott. 



Ordered: IN CONGRESS, January 18, 1777. 

That an authenticated copy of the Declaration of Inde- 
pendency, with the names of the Members of Congress 
subscribing the same, be sent to each of the United States, 
and that they be desired to have the same put on record. 

By order of Congress. JOHN HANCOCK. 

Attest, Chas. Thomson, A true copy. President 

Secy. John Hancock, 

Presldt. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

CONSTITUTION 

OF THE 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.* 



We, the people of the United States, in order to form a 
more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tran- 
quillity, provide for the common defense, promote the gen- 
eral welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to our- 
selves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this Con- 
stitution of the United States of America. 

ARTICLE I. 

LEGISLATIVE POWERS. 
Section I. 
All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in a 
Congress of the United States, which shall consist ot a 
Senate and House of Representatives. 

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 
Section II. 
1. The house of representatives shall be composed of 
members chosen every second year by the people of the 
several States; and the electors in each State shall have 
the qualifications requisite for elecftors of the most numer- 
ous branch of the State legislature. 

MEMBERS' QUALIFICATIONS. 

2 No person shall be a representative who shall not have 
attained to the age of twenty-five years, and been seven 
years a citizen of the United States, and who shall not, 
when elected, be an inhabitant of that State in which he 
shall be chosen. 

RULE OF APPORTIONING REPRESENTATIVES 
AND DIRECT TAXES. 

3. Representatives and direct taxes shall be apportioned 
among the several States which may be included within 

*Thi3 Constitution went into operation on the first Wed- 
nesday in March, 1789. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE Ls S. 29 

this Union, according to their respective numbers, which 
shall be determined by adding to the whole number of free 
persons, including those bound to service for a term of 
years, and excluding Indians not taxed, three-fifths of all 
other persons. The actual enumeration shall be made 
within three years after the first meeting of the congress 
of the United States, and within every subsequent term 
of ten years, in such manner as they shall by law direct. 
The number of representatives shall not exceed one for 
every thirty thousand, but each State shall have at least 
one representative; and until such enumeration shall be 
made, the State of New Hampshire shall be entitled to 
choose three; Massachusetts, eight; Rhode Island and 
Providence Plantations, one; Connecticut, five; New York, 
six; New Jersey, four; Pennsylvania, eight; Delaware, 
one; Maryland, six; Virginia, ten; North Carolina, five; 
South Carolina, five; and Georgia, three. 

FILLING OF VACANCIES. 

4. When vacancies happen in the representation of any 
State, the executive authority thereof shall issue writs of 
election to fill such vacancies. 

OFFICERS— IMPEACHMENT. 

5. The house of representatives shall choose their speaker 
and other ofRcers, and shall have the sole power of im* 
peachment. 

SENATE— HOW COMPOSED. 

Section III. 

1. The senate of the United States shall be composed of 
two senators from each State, chosen by the legislatur« 
thereof, for six years, and each senator shall have one 
vote. 

ROTATION OF SENATORS. 

2. Immediately after they shall be assembled, in conse- 
quence of the first election, they shall be divided as equally 
as may be into three classes. The seats of the senators of 
the first class shall be vacated at the expiration of the 
second year; of the second class, at the expiration of the 
fourth year; and of the third class, at the expiration of 
the sixth year, so that one-third may be chosen every 
second year. And if vacancies happen by resignation, or 
otherwise, during the recess of the legislature of any 
State, the executive thereof may make temporary appoint- 
ments until the next meeting of the legislature, which 
shall then fill such vacancies. 



30 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

THEIR QUALIFICATIONS. 

3. No person shall be a senator who shall not have at- 
tained to the age of thirty years, and been nine years a 
citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when 
elected, be an inhabitant of that State for which he shall 
be chosen. 

PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE. 

4. The Vice-President of the United States shall be presi- 
dent of the senate, but shall have no vote unless they be 
equally divided. 

SENATE OFFICERS. 

5. The senate shall choose their other officers, and also a 
president pro tempore, in the absence of the Vice-Presi- 
dent, or when he shall exercise the office of President of 
the United States. 

THE SENATE'S POWERS. 

6. The senate shall have the sole power to try all im- 
peachments. When sitting for that purpose, they shall be 
on oath or affirmation. When the President of the United 
States is tried, the chief justice shall preside. And no 
person shall be convicted without the concurrence of two- 
thirds of the members present. 

7. Judgment, in cases of impeachment, shall not extend 
further than to removal from office, and disqualification 
to hold and enjoy any office of honor, trust or profit under 
the United States; but the party convicted shall, never- 
theless, be liable and subject to indictment, trial, judg- 
ment and punishment according to law. 



MEMBERS OF CONGRESS— HOW ELECTED. 
Section IV. 

1. The times, places and manner of holding elections for 
senators and representatives shall be prescribed in each 
State, by the legislature thereof; but the congress may, at 
any time, by law, make or alter such regulations, except 
as to the places of choosing senators. 

WHEN CONGRESS SHALL MEET. 

2. Congress shall assemble at least once in every year; 
and such meeting shall be on the first Monday in Decem- 
ber, unless they shall by law appoint a different day. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 31 

POWERS AND DUTIES OF EACH HOUSE. 
Section V. 

1. Each house shall be the judge of the elections, returns 
and qualifications of its own members; and a majority of 
each shall constitute a quorum to do business; but a small- 
er number may adjourn from day to day, and may be 
authorized to compel the attendance of absent members, in 
such manner and under such penalties as each house may 
provide. 

RULES, «&C. 

2. Each house may determine the rules of its proceedings, 
punish its members for disorderly behavior, and, with the 
concurrence of two-thirds, expel a member. 

JOURNALS. 

3. Each house shall keep a journal of its proceedings, and 
from time to time publish the same, excepting such parts 
as may, in their judgment, require secrecy; and the yeas 
and nays of the members of each house, on any question, 
shall, at the desire of one-fifth of those present, be entered 
on the journal. 

ADJOURNMENT. 

4. Neither house, during the session of congress, shall, 
without the consent of the other, adjourn for more than 
three days, nor to any other place than that in which the 
two houses shall be sitting. 

COMPENSATION, PRIVILEGES AND INCAPACITIES. 
Section VI. 

1. The senators and representatives shall receive a com- 
pensation for their services, to be a,scertained by law, and 
paid out of the treasury of the United States. They shall, 
in all cases, except treason, felony, and breach of the 
peace, be privileged from arrest during their attendance 
at the session of their respective houses, and in going to 
and returning from the sam.e; and for any speech or de- 
bate in either house, they shall not be questioned in any 
other place. 

APPOINTMENT TO OFFICE. 

2. No senator or representative shall, during the time for 
which he was elected, be appointed to any civil office under 
the authority of the United States, which shall have been 
created, or the emoluments whereof shall have been in- 
creased, during such time; and no person holding any office 



32 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. J>. 

under the United States, shall be a member of either house 
during his continuance in office. 

REVENUE BILLS. 

Section VII. 

1. All bills for raising revenue shall originate in the house 
of representatives; but the senate may propose or concur 
with amendments, as on other bills. 

PASSING BILLS, «S:C. 

2. Every bill which shall have passed the house of repre- 
sentatives and the senate, shall, before it become a law, 
be presented to the President of the United States; if he 
approve, he shall sign it; but if not, he shall return it, with 
his objections, to that house in which it shall have origi- 
nated, who shall enter the objections at large on their jour- 
nal, and proceed to reconsider it. If, after such reconsid- 
eration, two-thirds of that house shall agree to pass the 
bill, it shall be sent, together with the objections, to the 
other house, by which it shall likewise be reconsidered, 
and if approved by two-thirds of that house, it shall be- 
come a law. But in all such cases the votes of both houses 
shall be determined by yeas and nays, and the names of 
the persons voting for and against the bill shall be en- 
tered on the journal of each house respectively. If any 
bill shall not be returned by the President within ten days 
(Sundays excepted) after it shall have been presented to 
him, the same shall be a law, in like manner as if he had 
signed it, unless the congress, by their adjournment, pre- 
vent its return, in which case it shall not be a law. 

ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 

3. Every order, resolution or vote, to which the concur- 
rence of the senate and house of representatives may be 
necessary (except on the question of adjournment), shall 
be presented to the President of the United States, and 
before the same shall take effect, shall be approved by 
him, or, being disapproved by him, shall be repassed by 
two-thirds of the senate and house of representatives, ac- 
cording to the rules and limitations prescribed in the case 
of a bill. 

POWERS OF CONGRESS. 

Section VIII. 
The congress shall have power: 

1. To lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts and excises, 
to pay the debts and provide for the common defense, and 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 33 

general welfare of the United States; but all duties, im- 
posts and excises shall be uniform throughout the United 
States. 

2. To borrow money on the credit of United States; 

3. To regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among 
the several States, and with the Indian tribes; 

4. To establish an uniform rule of naturalization, and 
uniform laws on the subject of bankruptcies, throughout 
the United States; 

5. To coin money, regula.te the value thereof, and of for- 
eign coins, and fix the standard of weights and measures; 

6. To provide for the punishment of counterfeiting the 
securities and current coin of the United States; 

7. To establish post offices and post roads; 

8. To promote the progress of science and useful arts, by 
securing, for limited times, to authors and inventors, the 
exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries; 

9. To constitute tribunals inferior to the supreme court; 

10. To define and punish piracies and felonies committed 
on the high seas, and offenses against the law of nations; 

11. To declare war, grant letters of marque and reprisal, 
and make rules concerning captures on land and water; 

12. To raise and support armies; but no appropriation of 
money to that use shall be for a longer term than two 
years; 

13. To provide and maintain a navy; 

14. To make rules for the government and regulation of 
the land and naval forces; 

15. To provide for calling forth the militia to execute the 
laws cf the Union, suppress insurrections and repel in- 
vasions; 

16. To provide for organizinz, arming and disciplining the 
militia, and for governing such part of them as may be 
employed in the service of the United States, reserving to 
the States, respectively, the appointment of the officers, 
and the authority of training the militia according to the 
discipline prescribed by congress; 

17. To exercise exclusive legislation, in all cases whatso- 
ever, over such district (not exceeding ten miles square), 
as may, by cession of particular States, and the accept- 
ance of congress, become the seat of government of the 
United States; and to exercise like authority over all places 
purchased by the consent of the legislature of the State 
in which the same shall be, for the erection of forts, maga- 
zines, arsenals, dock-yards and other needful buildings; 
and— 

18. To make all laws which shall be necessary and proper, 



34 ' CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

for carrying into execution the foregoing powers and all 
other powers vested by this constitution in the govern- 
ment of the United States, or in any department or officer 
thereof. 

LIMITATIONS OF THE POWERS OF CONGRESS. 

Section IX. 

1. The migration or importation of such persons as any 
of the States now existing shall think proper to admit, 
shall not be prohibited by the congress, prior to the year 
one thousand eight hundred and eight, but a tax or duty 
may be imposed on such importation, not exceeding ten 
dollars for each person. 

2. The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not be 
suspended, unless, when in cases of rebellion or invasion, 
the public safety may require it. 

3. No bill of attainder, or ex post facto law shall be 
passed. 

4. No capitation or other direct tax shall be laid, unless 
In proportion to the census or enumeration hereinbefore 
directed to be taken. 

5. No tax or duty shall be laid on articles exported from 
anj' State. No preference shall be given, by any regulation 
of commerce or revenue, to the ports of one State over 
those of another; nor shall vessels bound to or from one 
State, be obliged to enter, clear or pay duties in another. 

6. No money shall be drawn from the treasury, but in 
consequence of appropriations made by law; and a regular 
statement and account of the receipts and expenditures of 
all public money shall be published from time to time. 

7. No title of nobility shall be granted by the United 
States; and no person holding any office of profit or trust 
under them, shall, without the consent of the congress, 
accept of any present, emolument, office or title of any kind 
whatever, from any king, prince or foreign State. 

LIMITATIONS OF THE POWERS OF INDI- 
VIDUAL STATES. 

Section X. 

1. No State shall enter into any treaty, alliance or con- 
federation; grant letters of marque and reprisal; coin 
money; emit bills of credit; make anything but gold and 
silver coin a tender in payment of debts; pass any bill of 
attainder, ex post facto law, or law impairing the obliga- 
tion of contracts; or grant any title of nobility. 

2. No State shall, without the consent of the congress, 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 35 

lay any imposts or duties on Imports or exports, except 
what may be absolutely necessary for executing its in- 
spection laws; and the net produce of all duties and im- 
posts laid by any State on imports or exports, shall be for 
the use of the treasury of the United States; and all such 
laws shall be subject to the revision and control of the 
congress. 

3. No State shall, without the consent of congress, lay 
any duty of tonnage, keep troops or ships of war in time 
of peace, enter into any agreement or compact with an- 
other State, or with a foreign power, or engage in war, 
unless actually invaded, or in such imminent danger as will 
not admit delay. 

ARTICLE II. 

THE EXECUTIVE POWER. 
Section I. 

1. The executive power shall be vested in a President of 
the United States of America. He shall hold his office dur- 
ing the term of four years, and, together with the Vice- 
President, chosen for the same term, be elected as follows: 

HOW ELECTED. 

2. Each State shall appoint, in such manner as the legis- 
lature thereof may direct, a number of electors equal to 
the whole number of senators and representatives to which 
the State may be entitled in congress; but no senator or 
representative, or person holding an office of trust or profit 
under the United States, shall be appointed an elector. 

ELECTORAL COLLEGES. 

3. The electors shall meet in their respective States, and 
vote by ballot, for two persons, of whom one, at least, shall 
not be an inhabitant of the same State with themselves. 
And they shall make a list of all the persons voted for, and 
of the number of votes for each; which list they shall sign 
and certify, and transmit, sealed, to the seat of the gov- 
ernment of the United States, directed to the president of 
the senate. The president of the senate shall, in the pres- 
ence of the senate and house of representatives, open all 
the certificates, and the votes shall then be counted. The 
person having the greatest number of votes shall be the 
President, if such number be a majority of the whole num- 
ber of electors appointed; and if there be more than one 
who have such majority, and have an equal number of 
votes, then the house of representatives sha'l immediately 



36 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

choose by ballot, one of them for President; and If no per* 
son have a majority, then from the five highest on the 
list, the said house shall in like manner choose the Presi- 
dent. But in choosing the President, the votes shall be 
taken by States, the representation from each State having 
one vote; a quorum for this purpose shall consist of a mem- 
ber or members from two-thirds of the States, and a ma- 
jority of the States shall be necessary to a choice. In 
every case, after the choice of the President, the person 
having the greatest number of votes of the electors, shall 
be the Vice-President. But if there should remain two or 
more who have equal votes, the senate shall choose from 
them, by ballot, the Vice-President. [See Xllth amend- 
ment.] 

4. The congress m.ay determine the time of choosing the 
electors, and the day on which they shall give their ■■"■tes, 
which day shall be the same throughout the United States. 

WHO MAT BE ELECTED PRESIDENT, "t 

5. No person except a natural born citizen, or a citizen of 
the United States at the time of the adoption of this con- 
stitution, shall be eligible to the office of President; neither 
shall any person be eligible to that office who shall not 
have attained to the age of thirty-five years, and been 
fourteen years a resident within the United States. [See 
Xllth amendment.! 

ON THE DEATH, REMOVAL, &C., OF THE PRESI- 
DENT, THE POWERS AND DUTIES DE- 
VOLVE UPON THE VICE- 
PRESIDENT. 

6. In case of the removal of the President from office, or 
of his death, resignation or inability to discharge the pow- 
ers and duties of the said office, the same shall devolve on 
the Vice-President; and the congress may, by law, provide 
for the case of removal, death, resignation or inability, 
both of the President and Vice-President, declaring what 
officer shall then act as President, and such officer shall 
act accordingly, until the disability be removed, or a 
President shall be elected. 

COMPENSATION OF THE PRESIDENT. 

7. The President shall, at stated times, receive for his 
services a compensation which shall neither be increased 
nor diminished during the period for which he shall have 
been elected; and he shall not receive, within that period. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 37 

any other emolument from the United States or any of 
them. 

8. Before he enters on the execution of his office, he shall 
take the following oath or affirmation: 

THE OATH. 

"I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully 
execute the office of President of the United States, and 
will, to the best of my ability, preserve, protect and defend 
the constitution of the United States." 

POWERS, &C., OF THE PRESIDENT. 
Section IT. 

1. The President shall be commander-in-chief of the army 
and navy of the United States, and of the militia of the 
several States, when called into actual service of the 
United States; he may require the opinion, in writing-, of 
the principal officer in each of the executive departments, 
upon any subject relating to the duties of their respective 
offices, and he shall have power to grant reprieves and 
pardons for offenses against the United States, except in 
cases of impeachment. 

TREATIES, AMBASSADORS, &C. 

2. He shall have power, by and with the advice and con- 
sent of the senate, to make treaties, provided two-thirds 
of the senators present concur; and he shall nominate, and 
by and with the advice and consent of the senate shall 
appoint, ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls, 
judges of the supreme court, and all other officers of the 
United States whose appointments are not herein other- 
wise provided for, and which shall be established by law. 
But the congress may, by law, vest the appointment of 
such inferior officers as they think proper in the President 
alone, in the courts of law, or in the heads of department. 

APPOINTING POWER. 

3. The President shall have power to fill up all vacancies 
that may happen during the recess of the senate, by grant- 
ing commissions, w^hich shall expire at the end of their 
next session. 

DUTIES OF THE PRESIDENT. 
Section III. 
He shall, from time to time, give to the congress infor- 
mation of the state of the Union, and recommend to their 



38 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

consideration such measures as he shall judge necessary 
and expedient; he may, on extraordinary occasions, con- 
vene both houses, or either of them; and in case of disa- 
greement between %hem with respect to the time of ad- 
journment, he may adjourn them to such time as he shall 
think proper; he shall receive ambassadors and other pub- 
lic ministers; he shall take care that the laws be faithfully 
executed, and shall commission all the officers of the 
United States. 

IMPEACHMENT, &C. 

Section IV. 

The President, Vice-President and all civil officers of the 
United States shall be removed from office on impeachment 
for, and conviction of, treason, bribery or other high 
crimes and misdemeanors. 

ARTICLE III. 

THE JUDICIAL POWER. 

Section I. 

The judicial power of the United States shall be vested 
in one supreme court, and in such inferior courts as the 
congress may from time to time ordain and establish. The 
judges, both of the supreme and inferior courts, shall hold 
their offices during good behavior, and shall, at stated 
times, receive for their service a compensation, which shall 
not be diminished during their continuance in office. 

EXTENT OF THE JUDICIAL POWER. 

(See Amendments, Art. XI.) 

Section II. 

1. The judicial power shall extend to all cases in law and 
equity arising under this constitution, the laws of the 
United States, and treaties made, or which shall be made, 
under their authority; to all cases affecting ambassadors, 
or other public ministers and consuls; to all cases of ad- 
miralty and maritime jurisdiction; to controversies to 
which the United States shall be a party; to controversies 
between two or more States; between a State and citizens 
of another State; between citizens of different States; be- 
tween citizens of the same State, claiming lands under 
grants of different States, and between a State, or the 
citizens thereof, and foreign States, citizens or subjects. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 39 

ORIGINAL AND APPELLATE JURISDICTION OF 
THE SUPREME COURT. 

2. In all cases affecting ambassadors, other public min- 
isters and consuls, and those in which a State shall be 
party, the supreme court shall have original jurisdiction. 
In all the other cases before mentioned, the supreme court 
shall have appellate jurisdiction, both as to law and fact, 
with such exceptions and under such regulations as the 
congress shall make. 

TRIALS FOR CRIMES. 

3. The trials of all crimes, except in cases of impeach- 
ment, shall be by jury, and such trial shall be held in the 
State where the said crime shall have been committed; but 
when not committed within any State, the trial shall be at 
such place or places as the congress may by law have 
directed. 

TREASON— WHAT AND HOW PUNISHED. 

Section III. 

1. Treason against the United States shall consist only in 
levying war against them, or in adhering to their enemies, 
giving them aid and comfort. No person shall be con- 
victed of treason unless on the testimony of two witnesses 
to the same overt act, or on confession in open court. 

2. The congress shall have power to declare the punish- 
ment of treason, but no attainder of treason shall work 
corruption of blood, or forfeiture, except during the life of 
the person attainted. 

ARTICLE IV. 

ACTS, RECORDS, &C., OF EACH STATE. 

Section I. 

Full faith and credit shall be given, in each State, to the 
public acts, records and judicial proceedings of every other 
State. And the congress may, by general laws, prescribe 
the manner in which such acts, records and proceedings 
shall be proved, and the effect thereof. 

PRIVILEGES OF CITIZENS. 

Section II. 

1. The citizens of each State shall be entitled to all privi- 
leifes and immunities of citizens in the several States. 



40 CONSTITUTION OP THE U. S. 

FUGITIVES FROM JUSTICE. 

2. A person charged in any State with treason, felony or 
other crime, who shall flee from justice and be found in 
another State, shall, on demand of the executive authority 
of the State from Vv^hich he fled, be delivered up, to be 
removed to the State having- jurisdiction of the crime. 

SERVANTS, &C., TO BE SURRENDERED ON CLAIM. 

3. No person held to service or labor in one State, under 
the laws thereof, escaping into another, shall, in conse- 
quence of any law or regulation therein, be discharged 
from such service or labor, but shall be delivered up, on 
claim of the party to whom such service or labor may be 
due. 

HOW NEW STATES ARE ADMITTED. 
Section III. 

1. New States may be admitted by the congress into this 
Union; but no new State shall be formed or erected within 
the jurisdiction of any other State, nor any State be 
formed by the junction of two or more States or parts of 
States, without the consent of the legislatures of the 
States concerned, as well as of the congress. 

THE DISPOSITION OF TERRITORIES. 

2. The congress shall have power to dispose of, and make 
all needful rules and regulations respecting, the territory 
or other property belonging to the United States; and 
nothing in this constitution shall be so construed as to 
prejudice any claims of the United States, or of any par- 
ticular State. 

GUARANTY AND PROTECTION OF THE STATES 
BY THE UNION. 

Section IV. 

The United States shall guarantee to every State in this 
Union, a republican form of government, and shall protect 
each of them against invasion; and, on application of the 
legislature or of the executive (when the legislature can- 
not be convened), against domestic violence. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 41 

ARTICLE V. 

AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION- 
HOW MADE. 

The congress, whenever two-thirds of both houses shall 
deem it necessary, shall propose amendments to this con- 
stitution; or, on the application of the legislatures of two- 
thirds of the several States, shall call a convention for 
proposing amendments, which in either case shall be valid, 
to all intents and purposes, as part of this constitution, 
when ratified by the legislatures of three-fourths of the 
several States, or by conventions in three-fourths thereof, 
as the one or the other mode of ratification may be pro- 
posed by the congress; provided, that no amendment which 
may be made prior to the year eighteen hundred and eight 
shall in any manner affect the first and fourth clauses in 
the ninth section of the first article, and that no State, 
without its consent, shall be deprived of its equal suffrage 
in the senate. 

ARTICLE VI. 

FORMER DEBTS VALID. 
Section I. 
All debts contracted, and engagements entered into, be- 
fore the adoption of this constitution, shall be as valia 
against the United States under this constitution as under 
the confederation. 

THE SUPREME LAW OF THE LAND. 
Section II. 
This constitution, and the laws of the United States 
which shall be made in pursuance thereof, and all treaties 
made, or which shall be made, under the authority of the 
United States, shall be the supreme law of the land; and 
the judges in every State shall be bound thereby, anything 
in the constitution or laws of any State to the contrary 
notwithstanding. 

THE CONSTITUTIONAL OATH NO RELIGIOUS TEST. 
Section III. 
The senators and representatives before mentioned, and 
the members of the several State legislatures, and all ex- 
ecutive and judicial officers, both of the United States and 
of the several States, shall be bound by oath or affirmation 
to support this constitution; but no religious test shall ever 



42 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 



be required as a qualification to any office of public trust 
under the United States. 



ARTICLE VII. 

WHEN THE CONSTITUTION TO TAKE EFFECT. 

The ratification of the conventions of nine States shall be 
sufficient for the establishment of this constitution be- 
tween the States so ratifying the same. 

Done in the convention, by the unanimous consent of the 
States present, the seventeenth day of September, in the 
year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty- 
seven, and of the independence of the United States of 
America the twelfth. 

In witness whereof, we have hereunto subscribed our 
names. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON, President. 

And Deputy from Virginia. 



New Hampshire — 
John Langdon, 
Nicholas Gilman. 

Massachusetts- 
Nathaniel Gorman, 
Rufus King. 

Connecticut- 
William Samuel Johnson, 
Roger Sherman. 

New York- 
Alexander Hamilton. 

New Jersey- 
William Livingston. 
David Brearley, 
William Paterson, 
Jonathan Dayton. 

Pennsylvania- 
Benjamin Franklin, 
Thomas Mifflin, 
Robert Morris, 
George Clymer, 
Thomas Fitzsimons, 
Jared Ingersoll, 
James Wilson, 
Gouv. Morris. 



Attest: 

William Jackson, 

Secretary. 



Delaware- 
George Reed. 
Gunning Bedford, Jun., 
John Dickinson, 
Richard Bassett, 
Jacob Broom. 

Maryland— 

Dan'l of St. Thos. Jeni- 
fer, 
James McHenry, 
Daniel Carroll. 

Virginia- 
John Blair, 
James Madison, Jun. 

North Carolina — 
William Blunt, 
Rich'd Dobbs Spaight, 
Hugh Williamson. 

South Carolina- 
John Rutledge, 
Chas. Coatesworth Pinck- 

ney, 
Charles Pinckney, 
Pierce Butler. 

Georgia- 
William Few, 
Abraham Baldwin. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 43 



AMENDMENTS 

TO THE CONSTITUTION of the United States. Ratified 
According to the Provisions of the Fifth Article of the 
Foregoing Constitution. 



The following articles proposed by congress, in addition 
to and amendments of the constitution of the United 
States, having been ratified by the legislatures of three- 
fourths of the States, are become a part of the consti- 
tution. 



ARTICLE I. 

RIGHT OF CONSCIENCE, FREEDOM OF THE 
PRESS, &C. 

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment 
of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or 
abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the 
right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petitioi. 
the government for a redress of grievances. 

ARTICLE II. 

OF THE MILITIA. 
A well-regulated militia being necessary to the security 
of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear 
arms shall not be infringed. 

ARTICLE III. 

OF QUARTERING SOLDIERS. 
No soldier shall in time of peace be quartered in any 
house without the consent of the owner; nor in time of 
war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law. 

ARTICLE IV. 

OF UNREASONABLE SEARCHES AND SEIZURES. 

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, 
houses, papers and effects, against unreasonable searches 



44 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

and seizures, shall not be violated; and no warrant shall 
issue but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affir- 
mation, and particularly describing- the place to be 
searched, and the persons or things to be seized. 

ARTICLE V. 

OF CRIMES AND INDICTMENTS. 

No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or other- 
wise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indict- 
ment of a grand jury, except in cases arising in the land 
or naval forces, or in the militia, when in actual service 
in time of war or public danger, nor shall any person be 
subject, for the same offense, to be twice put in jeopardy 
of life and limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal 
case to be witness against himself; nor to be deprived of 
life, liberty or property, without due process of law, nor 
shall private property be taken for public use without just 
compensation. 

ARTICLE VI. 

OF CRIMINAL PROSECUTIONS. 

In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the 
right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of 
the State and district wherein the crime shall have been 
committed, which district shall have been previously ascer- 
tained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause 
of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses 
against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining 
witnesses in his favor, and to have the assistance of coun- 
sel for his defense. 

ARTICLE VII. 

OF TRIAL BY JURY IN CIVIL CASES. 

In suits at common law, where the value in controversy 
shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall 
be preserved; and no fact tried by a jury shall be other- 
wise re-examined in any court of the United States, than 
according to the rules of the common law. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

OF BAILS, FINES AND PUNISHMENTS. 

Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines 
imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 45 

ARTICLE IX. 

RESERVED RIGHTS. 

The enumeration in the constitution, of certain rights, 
shall not be construed to deny or disparage others, retained 
by the people. 

ARTICLE X. 

POWERS NOT DELEGATED RESERVED. 

The powers not delegated to the United States by the 
constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved 
to the States respectively, or to the people. 



ARTICLE XL 

THE JUDICIAL POWER— SEE ART. 3, SEC. 2. 

The judicial power of the United States shall not be con- 
strued to extend to any suit, in law or equity, commenced 
or prosecuted against one of the United States, by citizens 
of another State, or by citizens or subjects of any foreign 
State. 



ARTICLE XII. 

HOW THE PRESIDENT AND VICE-PRESIDENT 
ARE ELECTED. 
The electors shall meet in their respective States,* and 
vote by ballot for President and Vice-President, one of 
whom, at least, shall not be an inhabitant of the same 
State with themselves; thej' shall name, in their ballots, 
the person voted for as President, and in distinct ballots 
the person voted for as Vice-President; and they shall 
make distinct lists of all persons voted for as President, 
and of all persons voted for as Vice-President, and of the 
number of votes for each; which list they shall sign and 
certify, and transmit sealed, t to the seat of the government 
of the United States, directed to the president of the sen- 



•On the second Monday In January next following their 
appointment. 
tAfter the second Monday in January. 



46 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

ate; the president of the senate shall, in the presence of 
the senate and house of representatives, open all the cer- 
tificates,* and the votes shall then be counted; the person 
having the greatest number of votes for President shall 
be the President, if such number be a majority of the whole 
number of electors appointed. And if no person have such 
majority, then from the persons having the highest num- 
bers, not exceeding three, on the list of those voted for as 
President, the house of representatives shall choose imme- 
diately, by ballot, the President; but in choosing the Presi- 
dent, the votes shall be taken by States, the representation 
from each State having one vote; a quorum for this pur- 
pose shall consist of a member or members from two- 
thirds of the States, and a majority of all the States shall 
be necessary to a choice; and if the house of representa- 
tives shall not choose a President, whenever the right of a 
choice shall devolve upon them, before the fourth day of 
March next following, then the Vice-President shall act as 
President, as in the case of the death or other constitu- 
tional disability of the President. The person having the 
greatest number of votes as Vice-President shall be the 
Vice-President, if such number be a majority of the whole 
number of electors appointed; and if no person have a ma- 
jority, then from the two highest numbers on the list, the 
senate shall choose the Vice-President; a quorum for the 
purpose shall consist of two-thirds of the whole number of 
senators, and a majority of the whole number shall be 
necessary to a choice. But no person constitutionally ineli- 
gible to the office of President, shall be eligible to that of 
Vice-President of the United States. 



ARTICLE XIII. 

SLAVERY ABOLISHED— 13TH AMENDMENT. 

Section I. 
Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a 
punishment for crime, whereof the party shall have been 
duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any 
place subject to their jurisdiction. 

Section II. 
Congress shall have power to enforce this article by ap- 
propriate legislation. 



*On the 2d Wednesday in February, by the same act. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 47 

CITIZENS AND THEIR RIGHTS— 14TH AMENDMENT. 

Section I. 

All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and 
subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the 
United States, and of the State wherein they reside. No 
State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge 
the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United 
States. Nor shall any State deprive any person of life, 
liberty or property without due process of law, nor deny 
to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection 
of the laws. 

APPORTIONMENT OF REPRESENTATIVES. 

Section II. 

Representatives shall be apportioned among the several 
States according to their respective number, counting the 
whole number of persons in each State, excluding Indians 
not taxed; but whenever the right to vote at any election 
for electors of President and Vice-President, or for United 
States representatives in congress, executive and judicial 
officers, or the members of the legislature thereof, is de- 
nied to any of the male inhabitants of such State, being 
twenty-one ye.vrs of age, and citizens of the United States, 
or in any way abridged, except for participation in rebel- 
lion or other crime, the basis of representation therein 
shall be reduced in the proportion which the number of 
such male citizens shall bear to the whole number of male 
citizens twenty-one years of age in such State. 



DISABILITY OF PERSONS ENGAGED IN THE 
REBELLION. 

Section III. 

No person shall be a senator or representative in con- 
gress, elector of President and Vice President, or hold any 
office, civil or military, under the United States, or under 
any State, who, having previously taken an oath as a 
member of congress, or as an officer of the United States, 
or as a member of any State legislature, or as an executive 
or judicial officer of any State to support the constitution 
of the United States, shall have engaged in insurrection or 
rebellion against the same, or given aid or comfort to the 
enemies thereof; but congress may, by a vote of two-thirds 
of each house, remove such disability. 



48 CONSTITUTION OP THE U. S 

VALIDITY OF PUBLIC DEBT NOT TO BE QUES- 
TIONED. 

Section rv. 

The validity of the public debt of the United States au- 
thorized by law, including debts incurred for the payment 
of pensions and bounties for service in suppressing insur- 
rection or rebellion, shall not be questioned, but neither 
the United States nor any State shall assume or pay any 
debt or obligation incurred in aid of insurrection or rebel- 
lion against the United States, or claim for the loss or 
emancipation of any slave, but all such debts, obligations 
and claim.s shall be held illegal and void. 

Section V. 

The congress shall have power to enforce, by appropri- 
ate legislation, the provisions of this article. 



ARTICLE XV. 

RIGHT OF SUFFRAGE NOT TO BE IMPAIRED. 

Section I. 

The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall 
not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any 
State, on account of race, color or previous condition of 
servitude. 

Section II. 

The congress shall have power to enforce this article 
by appropriate legislation. 

ARTICLE XVL 

POWER TO LAY AND COLLECT TAXES ON 
INCOMES. 

The congress shall have power to lay and collect 
taxes on incomes, from whatever source derived, with- 
out apportionment among the States, and without 
regard to any census or enumeration. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 4 9 

ARTICLE XVII. 

UNITED STATES SENATORS TO BE ELECTED BY 
THE PEOPLE. 

The senate of the United States shall be composed 
of two senators from each State, elected by the people 
thereof, for six years; and each senator shall have 
one vote. The electors in each State shall have the 
qualifications requisite for election of the most numer- 
ous branch of the State legislatures. 

Whenever vacancies happen in the representation of 
any State in the senate, the executive authority of 
such State shall issue writs of election to fill such 
vacancies, provided that the legislature of any State 
may empower the executive thereof to make temporary 
appointments until the people fill the vacancies by 
election as the legislature may direct. 

This amendment shall not be so construed as to 
affect the election or term of any senator chosen 
before it becomes valid as part of the Constitiition. 

ARTICLE XVIII. 

PROHIBITION OF THE LIQUOR TRAFFIC. 

Section 1. After one year from the ratification of 
this article the manufacture, sale or transportation 
of intoxicating liquors within, the importation thereof 
into, or the exportation thereof from the United 
States and all territories subject to the jurisdiction 
thereof for beverage purposes are hereby prohibited. 

Section 2. The Congress and the several States shall 
have concurrent power to enforce this article by ap- 
propriate legislation. 

Section 3. This article shall be inoperative unless 
it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the 
Constitution by the Legislatures of the several States, 
as provided in the Constitution, within seven years 
from the date of the submission hereof to the States 
by the Congress. 



no CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

ARTICLE XIX. 

WOMAN SUFFIiACE. 

The riglil of citizens of tlie United States to vote shall 
not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any 
State on account of sex. 

Congress shall have power to enforce this article by ap- 
propriate legislation. 

U. S. CONSTITUTION— CONTENTS TABLE. 

ART I CUE I. 

1. Of the legislative power. 

2. House of representatives ; qualification of members ; 
apportionment of representatives and direct taxes ; census ; 
first apportionment ; vacancies ; officers of the house ; im- 
peachments. 

'A. Senate, classification of senators; qualifications of; 
vice president to preside ; other officers ; trial of impeach- 
ments. 

4. Election of members of congress ; meetings of congress. 

5. Powers of each house ; expulsion of members ; journal ; 
adjournments. 

6. Compensation and privileges ; disabilities of meml>ers. 

7. Revenue bills ; passage and approval of bills ; orders 
and resolutions. 

8. General powers of congress. 

0. Certain limitations of the powers of congress. 
10. Uimltation of the powers of individual states. 

ARTICLE II. 

1. Of the executive power ; electors, how and when 
chosen ; qualifications of president when powers of. to 
devolve upon vice president ; compensation and oath of 
president. 

2. Powers and duties of president; making of treaties; 
power of appointment. 

:>. Other powers and duties. 

4. Officers lialtle to impeachment. 

ARTICLE HI. 

1. Of the judicial power. 

2. Extent of the judicial power ; jurisdiction of the su- 
preme court ; trials for crimes. 

3. Treason defined ; trial for and punishment. 

ARTICLE IV. 

1. RfiEect of public acts, records, etc.. of each state. 

2. Citizenship ; fugitives from justice and from service 
to be delivered up. 

3. Admission of new states ; power of congress over ter- 
ritory. 

4. Republican form of government guaranteed to the 
several states; protection from invasion or domesiic vio- 
lence. 

ARTICLE V. 
1. How constitution may be amended. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. ol 

ARTICLE VI. 
1. Of the public debt ; constitution to W supreme law 
of tbe bind; constitutional oatb t)f oitico ; religious tests 
prohibited. 

AliTICLE VII. 
1. Ilatilicatiou of const it ut ion. 

AMENDMENTS. 

1. Religious freedom; freedom of speech and of the press; 
right of petition. 

2, Right to bear arms. 
li. Quartering of soldiers. 

4. Unreasonable searches and seizures : search warrants. 
~). Rights of persons charged with crimes ; taking of 
private property. 

0. Trials in criminal cases and rights of the accused. 

7. Trials bj' jury in civil cases. 

8. Excessive bail, fines and punishments. 
0. Rights of the people. 

10. Of powers reserved to the states. 

11. Extent of judicial powers. 

12. Planner of electing president and vice prcsirlent ; quali- 
fication of vice president. 

13. rrohibition of slavery. 

14. Citizenship ; security of persons and property : ap- 
portionment of representatives ; who prohibited from hold- 
ing office ; validity of the public debt ; what obligation 
to be void. 

ir». Right of citizens to vote. 

16. Income tax. 

17. Election of United. States senators. 

18. Prohibition of the liquor traffic. 

19. Woman suffrage. 

DATE OF RATIFICATION OF AMENDMENTS. 

Article I to X. Proposed Septeml)er 2.'., 1780, at first ses- 
sion oifi First Congress. Ratified by requisite number of 
States, 1790. 

Article XI. Proposed March 5, 1794. Declared ratified 
January 8, 1708. 

Article XII. Proposed December 12, 1803. Declared rati- 
fied September 25, 1804. 

Article XIII. Proposed February 1, 18G5. Declared rati- 
fied December 18, 1805. 

Article XIV. Proposed June 16, 1866. Declared rati- 
fied July 28. 1868. 

Article XV. Proposed February 27. 1860. Declared rati- 
fied March 30, 1870. 

Article XVI. Proposed Julv 12. 1009. Declared ratified 
February 25, 1013. 

Article XVII. Proposed Mav 16, 1912. Declared ratified 
May 31, 1913. 

Article XVIII. Proposed December 17, 1917. Declared 
ratified January 16, 1919. Effective January 16, 1920. 

Article XIX. Proposed June 4, 1919. Declared ratified 
August 26, 1020. 



52 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

STATE CONSTITUTION, 



A CONSTITUTION agreed upon by the delegates of the 
people of New Jersey, in convention begun at Trenton 
on the fourteenth day of May, and continued to the 
twentj'-ninth day of June, in the j-ear of our Lord one 
thousand eight hundred and forty-four, ratified by the 
people at an election held on the thirteenth day of 
August, A. D. 1844, and amended at a special election 
held on the seventh day of September, A. D. 1875, and 
at another special election held on the twenty-eighth 
day of September, A. D. 1S97. 

We, the people of the State of New Jersey, grateful to 
Almighty God for the civil and religious liberty which He 
hath so long permitted us to enjoy, and looking to Him 
for a blessing upon our endeavors to secure and transmit 
the same unimpaired to succeeding generations, do ordain 
and establish this Constitution: 

ARTICLE I. 

RIGHTS AND PRIVILEGES. 

1. All men are by nature free and independent, and have 
certain natural and unalienable rights, among which are 
those of enjoying and defending life and liberty; acquir- 
ing, possessing and protecting property, and of pursuing 
and obtaining safety and happiness. 

2. All political power is inherent in the people. Govern- 
ment is instituted for the protection, security and benefit 
of the people, and they have the right at all times to alter 
or reform the same, whenever the public good may re- 
quire it. 

3. No person shall be deprived of the inestimable privi- 
lege of worshiping Almighty God in a manner agreeable to 
the dictates of his own conscience; nor, under any pretense 
whatever, to be compelled to attend any place of w^orship 
contrary to his faith and judgment; nor shall any person 
be obliged to pay tithes, taxes or other rates for building 
or repairing any church or churches, place or places of 
worship, or for the maintenance of any minister or min- 
istry, contrary to what he believes to be right, or has de- 
liberately and voluntarily engaged to perform. 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 53 

4. There shall be no establishment of one religious sect 
in preference to another; no religious test shall be required 
as a qualification for any office or public trust; and no 
person shall be denied the enjoyment of any civil right 
merely on account of his religious principles. 

5. Every person may freely speak, write and publish his 
sentiments on all subjects, being responsible for the abuse 
of that right. No law shall be passed to restrain or abridge 
the liberty of speech or of the press. In all prosecutions 
or indictments for libel, the truth may be given in evidence 
to the jurj-; and if it shall appear to the jury that the 
matter charged as libelous is true, and was published with 
good motives and for justifiable ends, the party shall be ac- 
quitted; and the jury shall have the right to determine the 
law and the fact. 

6. The right of the people to be secure in their persons, 
houses, papers and effects, against unreasonable searches 
and seizures, shall not be violated; and no warrant shall 
issue but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirm- 
ation, and particularly describing the place to be searched 
and the papers and things to be seized. 

7. The right of a trial by jury shall remain inviolate; but 
the legislature may authorize the trial of civil suits, when 
the matter in dispute does not exceed fifty dollars, by a 
jury of six men. 

8. In all criminal prosecutions the accused shall have the 
right to a speedy and public trial by an impartial jury; to 
be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to 
be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have 
compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, 
and to have the assistance of counsel in his defense. 

9. No person shall be held to answer for a criminal of- 
fense, unless on the presentment or indictment of a grand 
jury, except in cases of impeachment, or in cases cogniz- 
able by justices of the peace, or arising in the army or 
navy; or in the militia, when in actual service in time of 
war or public danger. 

10. No person shall, after acquittal, be tried for the same 
offense. All persons shall, before conviction, be bailable 
by sufficient sureties, except for capital offenses, when 
the proof is evident or presumption great. 

11. The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not 
be suspended, unless in case of rebellion or invasion the 
public safety may require it. 

12. The military shall be in strict subordination to the 
civil power. 

13. No soldier shall, in time of peace, be quartered in 



54 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

any house without the consent of the owner; nor in time 
of war, except in a manner prescribed by law. 

14. Treason against the State shall consist only in levying 
war against it, or in adhering to its enemies, giving them 
aid and comfort. No person shall be convicted of treason, 
unless on the testimony of two witnesses to the same overt 
act, or on confession in open court. 

15. Excessive bail shall not be required, excessive fines 
shall not be imposed, and cruel and unusual punishments 
shall not be inflicted. 

16. Private property shall not be taken for public use 
without just compensation; but land may be taken for 
public highways as heretofore, until the legislature shall 
direct compensation to be made. 

17. No person shall be imprisoned for debt in any action, 
or on any judgment founded upon contract, unless in cases 
of fraud; nor shall any person be imprisoned for a militia 
fine in time of peace. 

18. The people have the right freely to assemble together, 
to consult for the common good, to make known their 
opinions to their representatives, and to petition for re- 
dress of grievances. 

19. No county, city, borough, town, township or village 
shall hereafter give any money or property, or loan its 
money or credit, to or in aid of any individual, asso- 
ciation or corporation, or become security for or be 
directly or indirectly the owner of any stock or bonds 
of any association or corporation. 

20. No donation of land or appropriation of money shall 
be made by the State or any municipal corporation to or 
for the use of any society, association or corporation what- 
ever. 

21. This enumeration of rights and privileges shall not be 
construed to impair or deny others retained by the people. 



ARTICLE II. 

RIGHT OF SUFFRAGE. 

1. Every male citizen of the United States, of the age of 
twenty-one years, who shall have been a resident of this 
State one year, and of the county in which he claims his 
vote five months, next before the election, shall be entitled 
to vote for all officers that now are, or hereafter may be, 
elective by the people; provided, that no person in the 
military, naval or marine service of the United States 
shall be considered a resident in this State, by being sta- 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 55 

iloned i .1 any garrison, barrack, or military or naval place 
or stafon within this State; and no pauper, idiot, insane 
person, or person convicted of a crime which now excludes 
him from being- a witness unless pardoned or restored by 
law to the right of suffrage, shall enjoy the right of an 
elector; and provided further, that in time of war no 
elector in the actual military service of the State, or of 
the United States, in the army or navy thereof, shall be 
deprived of his vote by reason of his absence from such 
election district; and the legislature shall have power to 
provide the manner in which, and the time and place at 
which, such absent electors may vote, and for the return 
and canvass of their votes in the election districts in 
which they respectively reside. 

2. The legislature may pass laws to deprive persons of the 
right of suffrage who shall be convicted of bribery. 

ARTICLE III. 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE POWERS OF GOVERNMENT. 

1. The powers of the government shall be divided into 
three distinct departments— the legislative, executive and 
judicial; and no person or persons belonging to, or consti- 
tuting one of these departments, shall exercise any of the 
powers properly belonging to either of the others, except 
as herein expressly provided. 

ARTICLE IV. 

LEGISLATIVE. 
Section I. 

1. The legislative power shall be Vested in a senate and 
general assembly. 

2. No person shall be a member of the senate who shall 
not have attained the age of thirty years, and have been 
a citizen and inhabitant of the State for four years, and 
of the county for which he shall be chosen one year, next 
before his election; and no person shall be a member of 
the general assembly who shall not have attained the age 
of twenty-one years, and have been a citizen and inhab- 
itant of the State for two years, and of the county for 
which he shall be chosen one year next before his election; 
provided, that no person shall be eligible as a member of 
either house of the legislature, who shall not be entitled 
to the right of suffrage. 



56 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

3. Members of the senate and general assembly shall be, 
elected yearly and every year, on the first Tuesday after 
the first Monday in November; and the two houses shall 
meet separately on the second Tuesday in January next 
after the said day of election, at which time of meeting 
the legislative year shall commence; but the time of hold- 
ing such election may be altered by the legislature. 

Section II. 

1. The senate shall be composed of one senator from each 
county in the State, elected by the legal voters of the 
counties, respectively, for three years. 

2. As soon as the senate shall meet after the first election 
to be held in pursuance of this constitution, they shall be 
divided as equally as may be into three classes. The seats 
of the senators of the first class shall be vacated at the 
expiration of the first year; of the second class at the ex- 
piration of the second year; and of the third class at the 
expiration of the third year, so that one class may be 
elected every year; and if vacancies happen, by resigna- 
tion or otherwise, the persons elected to supply such 
vacancies shall be elected f'^.r the unexpired terms only. 

Section III. 

1. The general assembly shall be composed of member? 
annually elected by the legal voters of the counties, re 
spectively, who shall be apportioned among the said coun 
ties as nearly as may be according to the number of theii 
inhabitants. The present apportionment shall continue 
until the next census of the United States shall have been 
taken, and an apportionment of members of the general 
assembly shall be made by the legislature at its first ses- 
sion after the next and every subsequent enumeration or 
census, and when made shall remain unaltered until an- 
other enumeration shall have been taken; provided, that 
each county shall at all times be entitled to one member; 
and the whole number of members shall never exceed 

sixty. 

Section IV. 

1. Each house shall direct writs of election for supplying 
vacancies, occasioned by death, resignation, or otherwise; 
but if vacancies occur during the recess of the legislature, 
the writs may be issued by the governor, under such regu- 
lations as may be prescribed by law. 

2. Each house shall be the judge of the elections, returns 
and qualifications of its own members, and a majority of 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 57 

each shall constitute a quorum to do business; but a small- 
er number may adjourn from day to day, and may be 
authorized to compel the attendance of absent members, 
in such manner, and under such penalties, as each house 
may provide. 

3. Each house shall choose its own officers, determine 
the rules of its proceedings, punish its members for dis- 
orderly behavior, and, with the concurrence of two-thirds, 
may expel a member. 

4. Each house shall keep a journal of its proceedings, and 
from time to time publish the same; and the yeas and nays 
of the members of either house on any question shall, at 
the desire of one-fifth of those present, be entered on the 
journal. 

5. Neither house, during the session of the legislature, 
shall, without the consent of the other, adjourn for more 
than three days, nor to any other place than that in which 
the two houses shall be sitting. 

6. All bills and joint resolutions shall be read three times 
in each house, before the final passage thereof; and no bill 
or joint resolution shall pass unless there be a majority of 
all the members of each body personally present and agree- 
ing thereto; and the yeas and nays of the members voting 
on such final passage shall be entered on the journal. 

^7. Members of the senate and general assembly shall re- 
ceive annually the sum of five hundred dollars during the 
time for which they shall have been elected and while they 
shall hold their office, and no other allowance or emolu- 
ment, directly or indirectly, for any purpose whatever. 
The president of the senate and the speaker of the house 
of assembly shall, in virtue of their offices, receive an ad- 
ditional compensation, equal to one-third of their allow 
ance as members. 

8. Members of the senate and general assembly shall, in 
all cases except treason, felony and breach of the peace, 
be privileged from arrest during their attendance at the 
sitting of their respective houses, and in going to and re- 
turning from the same; and for any speech or debate, in 
either house, they shall not be questioned in any other 

place. 

Section V. 

1. No member of the senate or general assembly shall, 
during the time for which he was elected, be nominated or 
appointed by the governor, or by the legislature in joint 
meeting, to any civil office under the authority of this 
State which shall have been created, or the emoluments 
whereof shall have been increased, during such time. 



58 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

2. If any member of the senate or general assembly shall 
be elected to represent this State in the senate or house of 
representatives of the United States, and shall accept 
thereof, or shall accept of any office or appointment un- 
der the government of the United States, his seat in the 
legislature of this State shall thereby be vacated. 

3. No justice of the supreme court, nor judge of any other 
court, sheriff, justice of the peace nor any person or per- 
sons possessed of any office of profit under the government 
of this State, shall be entitled to a seat either in thf. sen- 
ate or in the general assembly; but, on being elected and 
taking his seat his office shall be considered vacant; and 
no person holding any office of profit under the government 
of the United States shall be entitled to a seat in either 
house. 

Section VI. 

1. All bills for raising revenue shall originate in the 
house of assembly; but the senate may propose or concur 
with amendments, as on other bills. 

2. No money shall be drawn from the treasury but for 
appropriations made by law. 

3. The credit of the State shall not be directly or indi- 
rectly loaned in any case. 

4. The legislature shall not, in any manner, create any 
debt or debts, liability or liabilities, of the State which 
shall, singly or in the aggregate with any previous debts 
or liabilities, at any time exceed one hundred thousand 
dollars, except for purposes of war, or to repel invasion, 
or to suppress insurrection, unless the same shall be au- 
thorized by a law for some single object or work, to be 
distinctly specified therein; which law shall provide the 
ways and means, exclusive of loans, to pay the interest of 
such debt or liability as it falls due, and also to pay and 
discharge the principal of such debt or liability within 
thirty-five years from the time of the contracting thereof, 
and shall be irrepealable until such debt or liability, and 
the interest thereon, are fully paid and discharged; and 
no such law shall take effect until it shall, at a general 
election, have been submitted to the people, and have re- 
ceived the sanction of a majority of all the votes cast for 
and against it at such election; and all money to be raised 
by the authority of such law shall be applied only to the 
specific object stated therein, and to the payment of the 
debt thereby created. This section shall not be construed 
to refer to any money that has been, or may be, deposited 
with this State by the government of the United States. 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 59 

Section VII. 

1. No divorce shall be granted by the le^slature. 

2. No lottery shall be authorized by the leg^islature or 
otherwise in this State, and no ticket in any lottery shall 
be bought or sold within this State, nor shall pool-selling, 
book-making or gambling of any kind be authorized or 
allowed within this State, nor shall any gambling device, 
practice or game of chance now prohibited by law be 
legalized, or the remedy, penalty or punishment now pro- 
vided therefor be in any way diminished. 

3. The legislature shall not pass any bill of attainder, 
ex post facto law, or law impairing the obligation of con- 
tracts, or depriving a party of any remedy for enforcing 
a contract which existed when the contract was made. 

4. To avoid improper influences which may result from 
intermixing in one and the same act such things as have 
no proper relation to each other, every law shall embrace 
but one object, and that shall be expressed in the title. 
No law shall be revived or amended by reference to its 
title only; but the act revived, or the section or sections 
amended, shall be inserted at length. No general law 
shall embrace any provision of a private, special or local 
character. No act shall be passed which shall provide 
that any existing law, or any part thereof, shall be made 
or deemed a part of the act. or which shall enact that any 
existing law, or any part thereof, shall be applicable, ex- 
cept by inserting it in such act. 

5. The laws of this State shall begin in the following 
style: "Be it enacted by the Senate and General Assem- 
bly of the State of New Jersey. " 

6. The fund for the support of free schools, and all 
money, stock and other property which may hereafter be 
appropriated for that purpose, or received into the treas- 
ury under the provision of any law heretofore passed to 
augment the said fund, shall be securely invested and re- 
main a perpetual fund; and the income thereof, except so 
much as it may be judged expedient to apply to an increase 
of the capital, shall be annually appropriated to the sup- 
port of public free schools, for the equal benefit of all the 
people of the State; and it shall not be competent for the 
legislature to borrow, appropriate or use the said fund, 
or any part thereof, for any other purpose, under any 
pretense whatever. The legislature shall provide for the 
maintenance and support of a thorough and efficient sys- 
tem of free public schools for the instruction of all the 
children in this State between the ages of five and eigh- 
teen years. 



60 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

7. No private or special law shall be passed authorizing 
the sale of any lands belonging- in whole or in part to a 
minor or minors, or other persons who may at the time be 
under any legal disability to act for themselves. 

8. Individuals or private corporations shall not be au- 
thorized to take private property for public use, without 
just compensation first made to the owners. 

9. No private, special or local bill shall be passed unless 
public notice of the intention to appl3' therefor, and of the 
general object thereof, shall have been previously given. 
The legislature, at the next session after the adoption 
hereof, and from time to time thereafter, shall prescribe 
the time and mode of giving such notice, the evidence 
thereof, and how such evidence shall be preserved. 

10. The legislature may vest in the circuit courts, or 
courts of common pleas within the several counties of this 
State, chancery powers, so far as relates to the foreclosure 
of mortgages and sale of mortgaged premises. 

11. The legislature shall not pass private, local or special 
laws in any of the following enumerated cases; that is to 
say: 

Laying out, opening, altering and working roads or high- 
ways. 

Vacating any road, town p^ot, street, alley or public 
grounds. 

Regulating the internal affairs of towns and counties; 
appointing local offices or commissions to regulate munici- 
pal affairs. 

Selecting, drawing, summoning or empaneling grand or 
petit jurors. 

Creating, increasing or decreasing the percentage or al- 
lowance of public officers during the term for which said 
officers were elected or appointed. 

Changing the law of descent. 

Granting to any corporation, association or individual 
any exclusive privilege, immunity or franchise whatever. 

Granting to any corporation, association or individual the 
right to lay down railroad tracks. 

Providing for changes of venue in civil or criminal cases. 

Providing for the management and support of free public 
schools. 

The legislature shall pass general laws providing for the 
cases enumerated in this paragraph, and for all other cases 
which, in its judgment, may be provided for by general 
laws. The legislature shall pass no special act conferring 
corporate powers, but they shall pass general laws under 
which corporations may be organized and corporate powers 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 61 

of every nature obtained, subject, nevertheless, to repea\ 
or alteration at the will of the legislature. 

12. Property shall be assessed for taxes under general 
laws, and by uniform rules, according to its true value. 

Section VIII. 

1. Members of the legislature shall, before they enter on 
the duties of their respective offices, take and subscribe 
the following oath or affirmation: 

"I do solemnly swear [or affirm, as the case may be,] 
that I will support the constitution of the United Slates 
and the constitution of the State of New Jersey, and that 
I will faithfully discharge the duties of senator [or mem- 
ber of the general assembly, as the case may be,] accord- 
ing to the best of my ability." 

And members-elect of the senate or general assembly 
are hereby empowered to administer to each other the said 
oath or affirmation. 

2. Every officer of the legislature shall, before he enters 
upon his duties, take and subscribe the following oath or 
affirmation: "I do solemnly prom.ise and swear [or af- 
firm] that I will faithfully, impartially and justly perform 

all the duties of the office of , to the best of my 

ability and understanding; that I will carefully preserve 
all records, papers, writings or property intrusted to me 
for safe-keeping by virtue of my office, and make such 
disposition of the same as may be required by law." 

ARTICLE V. 

EXECUTIVE. 

1. The executive power shall be vested in a governor. 

2. The governor shall be elected by the legal voters of 
this State. The person having the highest number of votes 
shall be the governor; but if two or more shall be equal 
and highest in votes, one of them shall be chosen gov- 
ernor by the vote of a majority of the members of both 
houses in joint meeting. Contested elections for the office 
of governor shall be determined in such manner as the 
legislature shall direct by law. When a governor is to be 
elected by the people, such election shall be held at the 
time when and at the places where the people shall re- 
spectively vote for members of the legislature. 

3. The governor shall hold his office for three years, to 
commence on the third Tuesday of January next ensuing 
the election for governor by the people, and to end on the 



62 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

Monday preceding the third Tuesday of January, three 
years thereafter; and he shall be incapable of holding 
that office for three years next after his term of service 
shall have expired; and no appointment or nomination to 
office shall be made by the governor during the last week 
of his said term. 

4. The governor shall be not less than thirty years of 
age, and shall have been for twenty years, at least, a citi- 
zen of the United States, and a resident of this State seven 
years next before his election, unless he shall have been 
absent during that time on the public business of the 
United States or of this State. 

5. The governor shall, at stated times, receive for his 
services a compensation which shall be neither increased 
nor diminished during the period for which he shall have 
been elected. 

6. He shall be the commander-in-chief of all the military 
and naval forces of the State; he shall have power to con- 
vene the legislature, or the senate alone, whenever in his 
opinion public necessity requires it; he shall communicate 
by message to the legislature at the opening of each ses- 
sion, and at such other times as he may deem necessary, 
the condition of the State, and recommend such measures 
as he may deem expedient; he shall take care that the laws 
be faithfully executed, and grant, under the great seal of 
the State, commissions to all such officers as shall be re- 
quired to be commissioned. 

7. Every bill which shall have passed both houses shall 
be presented to the go-^'ernor; if he approve he shall sign 
it, but if not, he shall return it, with his objections, to the 
house in which it shall have originated, who shall enter 
the objections at large on their journal, and proceed to re- 
consider it; if, after such reconsideration, a majority of 
the whole number of that house shall agree to pass the 
bill, it shall be sent, together with the objections, to the 
other house, by which it shall likewise be reconsidered, 
and if approved of by a majority of the whole number of 
that house, it shall become a law; but in neither house 
shall the vote be taken on the same day on which the bill 
shall be returned to it; and in all such cases, the votes of 
both houses shall be determined by yeas and nays, and 
the names of the persons voting for and against the bill 
shall be entered on the journal of each house respectively. 
If any bill shall not be returned by the governor, within 
five days (Sunday excepted) after it shall have been pre- 
sented to him, the same shall be a law in like manner as 
if he had signed U, unless the legislature by their adjourn- 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 63 

ment prevent its return, in which case it shall not be a 
law. If any bill presented to the governor contain sev- 
eral items of appropriations of money, he may object to 
one or more of such items while approving of the other 
portions of the bill. In such case he shall append to the 
bill, at the time of signing it, a statement of the items to 
which he objects, and the appropriation so objected to 
shall not take effect. If the legislature be in session he 
shall transmit to the house in which the bill originated, 
a copy of such statement, and the items objected to shall 
be separately reconsidered. If, on reconsideration, one 
or more of such items be approved by a majority of the 
members elected to each house, the same shall be a part 
of the law, notwithstanding the objections of the governor. 
A.11 the provisions of this section in relation to bills not 
approved by the governor shall apply to cases in which 
.16 shall withhold his approval from any item or items 
contained in a bill appropriating money. 

8. No member of congress, or person holding an office 
under the United States, or this State, shall exercise the 
office of governor; and in case the governor, or person 
administering the government shall accept any office un- 
der the United States or this State, his office of governor 
shall thereupon be vacant. Nor shall he be elected by the 
legislature to any office under the government of this State 
or of the United States, during the term for which he shall 
nave been elected governor. 

9. The governor, or person administering the government, 
■shall have power to suspend the collection of fines and for- 
feitures, and to grant reprieves, to extend until the expira- 
tion of a time not exceeding ninety days after conviction; 
jut this power shall not extend to cases of impeachment. 

10. The governor, or person administering the govern- 
ment, the chancellor, and the six judges of the court of 
errors and appeals, or a major part of them, of whom the 
governor, or person administering the government, shall 
be one, may remit fines and forfeitures, and grant pardons, 
after conviction, in all cases except impeachment. 

11. The governor and all other civil officers under this 
State shall be liable to impeachment for misdemeanor in 
office during their continuance in office, and for two years 
thereafter. 

12. In case of the death, resignation or removal from of- 
fice of the governor, the powers, duties and emoluments 
of the office shall devolve upon the president of the sen- 
ate, and in case of his death, resignation or removal, then 
upon the speaker of the house of assembly, for the time 



64 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

being, until another governor shall be elected and quali- 
fied; but in such case another governor shall h^ chosen at 
the next election for members of the legislature, unless 
such death, resignation or removal shall occur within 
thirty days immediately preceding such next election, in 
which case a governor shall be chosen at the second suc- 
ceeding election for members of the legislature. When a 
vacancy happens, during the recess of the legislature, in 
any office which is to be filled by the governor and senate, 
or by the legislature in joint meeting, the governor shall 
fill such vacancy and the commission shall expire at the 
end of the next session of the legislature, unless a suc- 
cessor shall be sooner appointed; when a vacancy hap- 
pens in the office of clerk or surrogate of any county, the 
governor shall fill such vacancy, and the commission 
shall expire when a successor is elected and qualified. No 
person who shall have been nominated to the senate by 
the governor for any office of trust or profit under the 
government of this State, and shall not have been con- 
firmed before the recess of the legislature, shall be eligible 
for appointment to such office during the continuance of 
such recess. 

13. In case of the impeachment of the governor, his ab- 
sence from the State or inability to discharge the duties 
of his office, the powers, duties and emoluments of the 
office shall devolve upon the president of the senate; and 
in case of his death, resignation or removal, then upon the 
speaker of the house of assembly for the time being, until 
the governor, absent or impeached, shall return or be ac- 
quitted, or until the disqualification or inability shall cease, 
or until a new governor be elected and qualified. 

14. In case of a vacancy in the office of governor from 
any other cause than those herein enumerated, or in case 
of the death of the governor-elect before he is qualified into 
office, the powers, duties and emoluments of the office shall 
devolve upon the president of the senate or speaker of the 
house of assembly, as above provided for, until a new gov- 
ernor be elected and qualified. 

ARTICLE VI. 

JUDICIARY. 

Section I. 

1. The judicial power shall be vested in a court of errors 
and appeals in the last resort in all causes as heretofore; 
a court for the trial of impeachments; a court of chancery; 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 65 

a prerogative court; a supreme court; circuit courts, and 
such inferior courts as now exist, and as may be here- 
after ordained and established by law; which inferior 
courts the legislature may alter or abolish, as the public 
good shall require. 

Section II. 

1. The court of errors and appeals shall consist of the 
chancellor, the justices of the supreme court, and six 
judges, or a major part of them; v/hich judges are to be 
appointed for six years. 

2. Immediately after the court shall first assemble, the 
six judges shall arrange themselves in such manner that 
the seat of one of them shall be vacated every year, in 
order that thereafter one judge may be annually ap- 
pointed. 

3. Such of the six judges as shall attend the court shall 
receive, respectively, a per diem compensation, to be pro- 
vided by law. 

4. The secretary of state shall be the clerk of this court. 

5. When an appeal from an order or decree shall be 
heard, the chancellor shall inform the court, in writing, 
of the reasons for his order or decree; but he shall not sit 
as a member, or have a voice in the hearing or final sen- 
tence. 

6. When a writ of error shall be brought, no justice who 
has given a judicial opinion in the cause in favor of or 
against any error complained of, shall sit as a member, or 
have a voice on the hearing, or for its affirmance or re- 
versal; but the reasons for such opinion shall be assigned 
to the court in writing. 

Section III. 

1. The house of assembly shall have the sole power of 
impeaching, by a vote of a majority of all the members; 
and all impeachments shall be tried by the senate; the 
members, when sitting for that purpose, to be on oath or 
affirmation "truly and impartially to try and determine 
the charge in question according to evidence;" and no per- 
son shall be convicted without the concurrence of two- 
thirds of all the members of the senate. 

2. Any judicial officer impeached shall be suspended from 
exercising his office until his acquittal. 

3. Judgment in cases of impeachment shall not extend 
farther than to removal from office, and to disqualification 
to hold and enjoy any office of honor, profit or trust under 



66 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

this State; but the party convicted shall, nevertheless, be 

liable to indictment, trial and punishment according to law. 

4. The secretary of state shall be the clerk of this court. 

Section IV. 

1. The court of chancery shall consist of a chancellor. 

2. The chancellor shall be the ordinary or surrogate gen- 
eral, and judge of the prerogative court. 

3. All persons aggrieved by any order, sentence or decree 
of the orphans' court, may appeal from the same, or from 
any part thereof to the prerogative court; but such order, 
sentence or decree shall not be removed into the supreme 
court, or circuit court if the subject-matter thereof be 
within the jurisdiction of the orphans' court. 

4. The secretary of state shall be the register of the pre- 
rogative court, and shall perform the duties required of 
him by law in that respect. 

Section V. 

.1. The supreme court shall consist of a chief justice an<3 
four associate justices. The number of associate justices 
may be increased or decreased by law, but shall never be 
less than two. 

2. The circuit courts shall be held in every county of this 
State, by one or more of the justices of the supreme court, 
or a judge appointed for that purpose, and shall, in all 
cases within the county except in those of a criminal na- 
ture, have common law jurisdiction, concurrent with the 
supreme court; and any final judgment of a circuit court 
may be docketed in the supreme court, and shall operate 
as a judgment obtained in the supreme court from the 
time of such docketing. 

3. Final judgments in any circuit court may be brought 
by writ of error into the supreme court, or directly into 
the court of errors and appeals. 

Section VI. 

1. There shall be no more than five judges of the inferior 
court of common pleas in each of the counties in this 
State, after the terms of the judges of said court now in 
office shall terminate. One judge for each county shall be 
appointed every year, and no more, except to fill vacancies, 
which shall be for the unexpired term only. 

2. The commissions for the first appointments of judges 
of said court shall bear date and take effect on the first 
day of April next; and all subsequent commissions for 
jr'iges of said court shall bear date and take effect on the 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 67 

first day of April in every successive year, except commis- 
sions to fill vacancies, which shall bear date and take ef- 
fect when issued. 

Section VII. 

1. There may be elected under this constitution two, and 
not more than five, justices of the peace in each of the 
townships of the several counties of this State, and in each 
of the wards, in cities that may vote in wards. "When a 
township or ward contains two thousand inhabitants or 
less, it may have two justices; when it contains more than 
two thousand inhabitants, and not more than four thou- 
sand, it may have four justices; and when it contains more 
than four thousand inhabitants, it may have five justices; 
provided, that whenever any township not voting in wards 
contains more than seven thousand inhabitants, such town- 
ship may have an additional justice for each additional 
three thousand inhabitants above four thousand. 

2. The population of the townships in the several coun- 
ties of the State and of the several wards shall be ascer- 
tained by the last preceding census of the United States, 
until the legislature shall provide, by law, some other 
mode of ascertaining it. 

ARTICLE VII. 

APPOINTING POWER AND TENURE OF OFFICE. 

Section I. 

MILITIA OFFICERS. 

1. The legislature shall provide by law for enrolling, or- 
ganizing and arming the militia. 

2. Captains, subalterns and non-commissioned officers 
shall be elected by the members of their respective com- 
panies. 

3. Field officers of regiments, independent battalions and 
squadrons shall be elected by the commissioned officers 
of their respective regiments, battalions or squadrons. 

4. Brigadier-generals shall be elected by the field officers 
of their respective brigades. 

5. Major-generals, the adjutant-general and quarter- 
master-general shall be nominated by the governor, and 
appointed by him, with the advice and consent of the 
senate. 

6. The legislature shall provide, by law, the time and 
manner of electing militia ofllcers, and of certifying their 
elections to the governor, who shall grant their commis- 



68 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

sions, and determine their rank, when not determined by 
law; and no commissioned officer shall be removed from 
ofRce but by the sentence of a court-martial, pursuant to 
law. 

7. In case the electors of subalterns, captains or field offi- 
cers shall refuse or neglect to make such elections, the 
governor shall have power to appoint such officers, and 
to fill all vacancies caused by such refusal or neglect. 

8. Brigade inspectors shall be chosen by the field officers 
of their respective brigades. 

9. The governor shall appoint all militia officers whose 
appointment is not otherwise provided for in this consti- 
tution. 

10. Major-generals, brigadier-generals and commanding 
officers of regiments, independent battalions and squad- 
rons shall appoint the staff officers of their divisions, bri- 
gades, regiments, independent battalions and squadrons, 
respectively. 

Section II. 

CIVIL OFFICERS. 

1. Justices of the supreme court, chancellor, judges of 
the court of errors and appeals and judges of the inferior 
court of common pleas shall be nominated by the gover- 
nor, and appointed by him, with the advice and consent 
of the senate. 

The justices of the supreme court and chancellor shall 
hold their offices for the term of seven years; shall, at 
stated times, receive for their services a compensation 
which shall not be diminished during the term of their 
appointments; and they shall hold no other office under 
the government of this State or of the United States. 

2. Judges of the courts of common pleas shall be ap- 
pointed by the senate and general assembly, in joint meet- 
ing. 

They shall hold their oflfices for five years; but when 
appointed to fill vacancies, they shall hold for the unex- 
pired term onlj'. 

3. The state treasurer and comptroller shall be appointed 
by the senate and general assembly, in joint meeting. 

They shall hold their offices for three years, and until 
their successors shall be qualified into office. 

4. The attorney-general, prosecutors of the pleas, clerk 
of the supreme court, clerk of the court of chancery, sec- 
retary of state and the keeper of the state prison shall be 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 69 

nominated bj^ the governor, and appointed by him, with 
the advice and consent of the senate. 
They shall hold their offices for five j^ears. 

5. The law reporter shall be appointed bj^ the justices of 
the supreme court, or a majority of them; and the chan- 
cery reporter shall be appointed by the chancellor. 

They shall hold their offices for five years. 

6. Clerks and surrogates of counties shall be elected by 
the people of their respective counties, at the annual elec- 
tions for members of the general assembly. 

They shall hold their offices for five years. 

7. Sheriffs and coroners shall be elected by the people of 
their respective counties, at the elections for members of 
the general assembly, and they shall hold their offices for 
three years, after which three years must elapse before 
they can be again capable of serving. Sheriffs shall an- 
nually renew their bonds. 

8. Justices of the peace shall be elected by ballot at the 
annual meetings of the townships in the several counties 
of the State, and of the wards in cities that may vote in 
wards, in such manner and under such regulations as may 
be hereafter provided by law. 

They shall be commissioned for the county, and their 
commissions shall bear date and take effect on the first 
day of May next after their election. 

They shall hold their offices for five years; but when 
elected to fill vacancies, they shall hold for the unexpired 
term only; provided, that the commission of any justice 
of the peace shall become vacant upon his ceasing to re- 
side in the township in which he was elected. 

The first election for justices of the peace shall take place 
at the next annual town-meetings of the township's in the 
several counties of the State, and of the wards in cities 
that may vote in wards. 

9. All other officers, whose appointments are not other- 
wise provided for by law, shall be nominated by the gov- 
ernor, and appointed by him, with the advice and consent 
of the senate; and shall hold their offices for the time pre- 
scribed by law. 

10. All civil officers elected or appointed pursuant to the 
provisions of this constitution, shall be commissioned by 
the governor. 

11. The term of office of all officers elected or appointed, 
pursuant to the provisions of this constitution, except 
when herein otherwise directed, shall commence on the 
day of the date of their respective commissions; but no 



70 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

commission for any office shall bear date prior to the ex- 
piration of the term of the incumbent of said office. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

GENERAL PROVISIONS. 

1. The secretary of state shall be ex officio an auditor of 
the accounts of the treasurer, and as such, it shall be his 
duty to assist the legislature in the annual examination 
and settlement of said accounts, until otherwise provided 
by law. 

2. The seal of the State shall be kept by the governor, 
or person administering the government, and used by him 
officially, and shall be called the great seal of the State of 
New Jersey. 

3. All grants and commissions shall be in the name and 
by the authority of the State of New Jersey, sealed with 
the great seal, signed by the governor, or person adminis- 
tering the government, and countersigned by the secretary 
of state, and it shall run thus: "The State of New Jersey, 

to , greeting." All writs shall be in the name of 

the State; and all indictments shall conclude in the follow- 
ing manner, viz., "against the peace of this State, the gov- 
ernment and dignity of the same." 

4. This constitution shall take effect and go into operation 
on the second day of September, in the year of our Lord 
one thousand eight hundred and forty-four. 

ARTICLE IX. 

AMENDMENTS. 

Any specific amendment or amendments to the constitu- 
tion may be proposed in the senate or general assembly, 
and if the same shall be agreed to by a majority of the 
members elected to each of the two houses, such proposed 
amendment or amendments shall be entered on their jour- 
nals, with the yeas and nays taken thereon, and referred 
to the legislature then next to be chosen, and shall be pub- 
lished for three months previous to making such choice, 
in at least one newspaper of each county, if any be pub- 
lished therein; and if in the legislature next chosen as 
aforesaid, such proposed amendment or amendments, or 
any of them, shall be agreed to by a majority of all the 
members elected to each house, then it shall be the duty 
of the legislature to submit such proposed amendment or 
amendments, or such of them as may have been agreed 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 71 

to as aforesaid by the two legislatures, to the people, in 
such manner and at such time, at least four months after 
the adjournment of the legislature, as the legislature shall 
prescribe; and if the people at a special election to be held 
for that purpose only, shall approve and ratify such 
imendment or amendments, or any of them, by a majority 
of the electors qualified to vote for members of the legisla- 
ture voting thereon, such amendment or amendments so 
approved and ratified shall become part of the constitu- 
tion; provided, that if more than one amendment be sub- 
mitted, they shall be submitted in such manner and form 
that the people may vote for or against each amendment 
separately and distinctly; but no amendment or amend- 
ments shall be submitted to the people by the legislature 
oftener than once in five years. 

ARTICLE X. 

SCHEDUI.E, 

That no inconvenience may arise from the change in the 
constitution of this State, and in order to carry the same 
into complete operation, it is hereby declared and ordained, 
that— 

1. The common law and statute laws now in force, not 
repugnant to this constitution, shall remain in force until 
they expire by their own limitation, or be altered or re- 
pealed by the legislature; and all writs, actions, causes of 
action, prosecutions, contracts, claims and rights of indi- 
viduals and of bodies corporate, and of the State, and all 
charters of incorporation, shall continue, and all indict- 
ments which shall have been found, or which may here- 
after be found, for any crime or offense committed before 
the adoption of this constitution, may be proceeded upon 
as if no change had taken place. The several courts of 
law and equity, except as herein otherwise provided, shall 
continue with the like powers and jurisdiction as if this 
constitution had not been adopted. 

2. All officers now filling any office or appointment shall 
continue in the exercise of the duties thereof, according 
to their respective commissions or appointments, unless by 
this constitution it is otherwise directed. 

3. The present governor, chancellor and ordinary or sur- 
rogate-general and treasurer shall continue in oflJice until 
successors elected or appointed under this constitution 
shall be sworn or affirmed into office. 

4. In case of the death, resignation or disability of the 



72 ^ STATE CONSTITUTION. 

present governor, the person who may be vice-president of 
council at the time of the adoption of this constitution 
shall continue in office and administer the government un- 
til a g-overnor shall have been elected and sworn or af- 
firmed into office under this constitution. 

5. The present governor, or in case of his death or inabil- 
ity to act, the vice-president of council, together with the 
present members of the legislative council and secretary 
of state, shall constitute a board of state canvassers, in 
the manner now provided by law, for the purpose of ascer- 
taining and declaring the result of the next ensuing elec- 
tion for governor, members of the house of representa- 
tives, and electors of president and vice-president. 

6. The returns of the votes for governor, at the said next 
ensuing election, shall be transmitted to the secretary of 
state, the votes counted, and the election declared in the 
manner now provided by law in the case of the election of 
electors of president and vice-president. 

7. The election of clerks and surrogates, in those counties 
where the term of office of the present incumbent shall 
expire previous to the general election of eighteen hun- 
dred and forty-flve, shall be held at the general election 
next ensuing the adoption of this constitution; the result 
of which election shall be ascertained in the manner now 
provided by law for the election of sheriffs. 

8. The elections for the year eighteen hundred and forty- 
four shall take place as now provided by law. 

9. It shall be the duty of the governor to fill all vacancies 
in office happening between the adoption of this constitu- 
tion and the first session of the senate, and not otherwise 
provided for, and the commissions shall expire at the end 
of the first session of the senate, or when successors shall 
be elected or appointed and qualified. 

10. The restriction of the pay of members of the legisla- 
ture, after forty days from the commencement of the ses- 
sion, shall not be applied to the first legislature convened 
under this constitution. 

11. Clerks of counties shall be clerks of the inferior 
courts of common pleas and quarter sessions of the several 
counties, and perform the duties, and be subject to the 
regulations now required of them by law until otherwise 
ordained by the legislature. 

12. The legislature shall pass all laws necessary to carry 
into effect the provisions of this constitution. 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 73 

State of New Jersey: 

I. George Wurts, Secretary of State of the State of New 
Jersey, do hereby certify the foregoing to be a true copy 
of the Constitution of the State of New Jersey as amended, 
as the same is taken from and compared with the original 
Constitution and amendments thereto, now remaining on 
file in my office. 

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my 
CL. S.] hand and affixed my official seal, this twenty-sixth 
day o^ October, A. D. eighteen hundred and ninety- 
seven. GEORGE WURTS. 



STATE CONSTITUTION— CONTENTS TABLE. 

ARTICLE I. 
RIGHTS AND PUIVILEGES. 

Defines individual rights and privileges; providos for 
roligious freedom ; prohibits establishment of a state church ; 
grants freedom of speech and protection against unreason- 
able searches ; guarantees and regulates trial by jury : 
l^abeas corpus not to be suspended : acquitted persons not 
to be retried for same offence : defines treason ; prohibits 
excessive 1 ail : private property not to be taken for public 
use without compensation ; prohibits imprisonment for debt : 
guarantees rigbt of assemblage: prohibits appropriations 
for use of private corporations, associations or individuals. 

ARTICLE II. 

UIGIIT OF SIFFK.VOE. 

1. Wbo entitled to. 

2. Disfranchisement for bribery. 

ARTICLE III. 

DISTUIBUTION OF POWERS OF GOVERNMENT. 

1. Legislative, executive and judicial ; powers of one 
department not to be exercised by any person or persons 
belonging to either of the other departments. 

ARTICLE IV. 

LEGISLATIVE. 

1. (1) Legislative powers vested in senate and general 
assembly: (2) qualifications of legislative members; (3) 
wlien to be elected. 

2. (1) Number and term of senators; (2) vacancies filled 
for unexpired term. 

8. Number of assembly members ; apportionment to coun- 
ties. 



74 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

4. (1) Writs of election to fill vacancies in legislature: 
(2) each house judge of qualifications and election of Its 
own members ; quorum: adjournment: absent members : (.'}) 
each house to choose own oflScers ; (4) each house to keep 
journal : vea and nay vote : ( ."» ) one house ma.v not adjourn 
"for more than three days; (G) bills and joint resolutions 
to be read three times: vote necessary to pass: (7) com- 
pensation of members: (8) members privileged from arrest 
in certain cases ; not accountable elsewhere for speeches in 
lesislature. 

5. Restrictions as to legislators holding other offices t)r 
other officers ser^ang in legislature. 

fi. Raising revenue, appropriations; state debt. 

7. Limitations and prohibitions as to laws that may be 
enacted: form of enactment; school fund: spLcial legis- 
lation ; taxation of property. 

8. Oaths of legislators. 

ARTICLE V. 

EXECUTIVE. 

1. Governor to have executive power. 

2. Election of governor. 

3. Governor ; term : not to succeed self ; limitation as to 
appointments by. 

4. Qualifications of govMnor. 
r». Compensation of governor. 

6. Governor commander-in-chief state's militia and naval 
forces: may convene legislature, commission officers recom- 
mend legislation. 

7. Veto of bills bv governor : procedure. 

8. Governor not to hold other office. 

0. Governor may grant reprieves. 

3 Governor and others may grant pardons. 
11. Governor and ciA'il officers may be impeached. 
12-14. Vacancy in governorship : successor (acti)ig gov- 
ernor) in case of vacancy. 

ARTICLE YI. 
.TroiriAUY. 

1. lU'fin.'s dilTeront courts. 

2. Court of errors : how constituted, terras and com- 
pensation. , - 

3. Court of Impeachment: powers and procedure. 
-i". Court of chancery. 

."i. Supreme and circuit courts, 
n. Common pleas court. 
7. Justices of the peace. 

ARTICLE VI T. 
APPOINTING rOWEU AND TENURE OF OFFICE. 

1 Militia officers : (1) legislature to provide for organiz- 
ing 'militia: (2-10) militia officers and how chosen. 

2. Civil offi-cers and their terms and manner of appoint- 
ment. 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 75 

ARTICLE VIII. 

GKX KKAL PROVI SIGN S. 

Airliting treasurer's accounts : state seal : form uf irrauts ; 
commissions, writs and Indictments : when constitution 
effective. 

ARTICLE IX. 

AMEXDMEXTS. 

Manner and time of makin:? amendments to cons' itution 
and resli-iction as to freqnency of proposing amendments. 

ARTICLE X. 

SCHEDULE. 

Mal<es provision for contingencies at time of and im- 
mediately following constitution going into effect. 



76 THE STATE CAPITOL. 

STATE INSTITUTIONS, 



THE STATE CAPITOL. 

This edifice, a massive structure, erected at sundry 
times and added to at various periods, is located on 
West State street, near Willow street. Tlie grounds 
have a frontage of 425 feet on State street and extend 
southerly a distance of about 700 feet to the Dela- 
ware river. The original plot, up to the year 1910, 
had a frontage of 310 feet, extended back in a parallel- 
ogram and embraced about 31/^ acres. 

The seat of Government was fixed at Trenton by an 
act of the Legislature, approved November 25th, 1790. 
James Cooper, Thomas Lowery, James Ewing, Maskell 
Ewing, George Anderson, James Mott and Moore Fur- 
man were appointed commissioners to select, purchase 
or accept so much land as was needed, and to erect 
thereon suitable buildings for the use of the Legis- 
lature. They purchased a site, containing about three 
and three-quarters acres — a frontage on Second street 
(now West State street) of 247 feet and 6 inches, and 
a depth from the front to low water line of the Dela- 
ware river of 666 feet — at a cost of £250 5s. The old 
State House was a plain, bare-looking, rough-cast 
building, and was erected at a cost of £3,992 3s. h^d. 
By an act of March 4th, 1795, a building was erected 
to serve as an office for the Secretary of State, and 
for the preservation of the public records, at a cost of 
£620 19s. lOd. Numerous improvements and repairs 
were made, and on March 3d, 1S06, an act was passed 
appointing commissioners to make certain repairs to 
the State House, to provide and hang a suitable bell, 
&e. This was done, and the bell was used for inform- 
ing the members of both houses, as well as the courts, 
of the hour of meeting. The bell was eventually dis- 
carded, and an American flag substituted, which waves 
from the building unto this day, when the Legislature 
is in session, and upon holidays and State occasions. 
In 1848, the State House was altered by the removal 
of the rough-casting, and changing the style of the 
front by placing neat porticoes over the front and 
rear entrances, and erecting two additional buildings 



THE STATE CAPITOL. 77 

adjoining: tlie main one, as offices for the Clerks of 
the Chancery and Supreme Courts. The rotunda was 
also erected, and the grounds fenced, graded, laid out 
and shade trees planted, all at a cost of $27,000. The 
commissioners under whose direction the work was 
completed, were Samuel R. Gummere, Samuel R. Hamil- 
ton and Stacy A. Paxson. In 1863, '64 and '65, appro- 
priations were expended in building additions for 
the State Library, Executive Chambers, &c. In 1871, 
Charles S. Olden, Thomas J. Stryker and Lewis Perrine 
were appointed commissioners to cause a suitable ad- 
dition to be built — more commodious apartments for 
the Senate and Assembly, &c. The sum of $50,000 was 
appropriated, and the buildings for the Legislature 
were ready for occupancy in time for the meeting of 
the Legislature in 1872. In 1872, $120,000 was appro- 
priated for completing the building, $3,000 for fitting 
up the Executive Chamber, $4,000 for fitting up the 
Cliancery and Supreme Court rooms, and $2,000 for 
fitting up tlie offices on the first floor of the east wing. 
In 1873, the sum of $43,000 was appropriated for the 
improvement of the front of the building, completing 
unfinished repairs and improvements, and for fitting up 
the Library, &c. On March 18th, 1875, the sum of 
$15,000 was appropriated for the purpose of putting a 
new three-story front to the building, and to fit up 
offices on the second floor for the Clerks of the Court 
of Chancery and Supreme Court, and for providing a 
suitable museum for geological specimens, and the 
battle-flags of New Jersey volunteer regiments, carried 
during the war of the Rebellion. 

On March 21st, 1885. the front portion was destroyed 
by fire, and the Legislature appropriated $50,000 for 
rebuilding, and in 1886, an additional appropriation of 
$225,000 was granted. 

The new building was finished in 1889. It is of rec- 
tangular shape and of the Renaissance style of archi- 
tecture, with a frontage of one hundred and sixty feet 
on State street, a depth of sixty-seven feet, and three 
and a half stories high, with a rotunda thirty-nine 
feet across, which connects the new section of the 
Capitol with the original part. The rotunda is sur- 
mounted l)y a dome one hundred and forty-five feet 
high. 



78 THE STATE CAriTOL. 

The building has about sixty feet more frontage than 
the former one, and approaches about ten feet nearer 
the street. 

The walls are constructed of solid, fire-proof, brick 
masonry, faced with a light-colored stone from In- 
diana, known as Salem Oolitic, with foundations and 
trimmings of New Jersey free stone, from the Pralls- 
ville quarries, in Hunterdon county. The portico, door- 
head and trimmings about the door are of the same 
material. The portico, with balcony, is supported by 
massive pillars of polished granite and surmounted by 
the coat of arms of the State. 

The apartments used for offices are very spacious, fitted 
throughout In the most approved modern style, and each 
department Is supplied with one or more of the finest 
fire-proof vaults. The first and second stories are set 
aside for dfflces, and the entire third story Is used for 
the State Library. This front portion, including the 
dome, was designed and constructed under the plans 
and supervision of L. H, Broome, architect, of Jersey 
City. 

The old State Library apartments have been im- 
proved and extended, and are now used as offices for 
the Attorney-General, State Superintendent of Public 
Instruction and Commissioner of Banking and Insur- 
ance. 

In 1891, a new Assembly Chamber was erected. The old 
one was too small and poorly ventilated, and besides, 
there was a lack of suitable committee rooms. The Leg- 
islature of 1891 passed a Joint Resolution, which was ap- 
proved on March 20th, authorizing the Governor "to pro- 
vide a suitable chamber and committee rooms for the use 
of the General Assembly of this State," &c., and also, 
"to make such additions and alterations as will afford the 
necessary accommodations for the Supreme Court and 
Court of Errors and Appeals, or for other State offices, 
and sufficient money Is hereby appropriated for that pur- 
pose, to be paid by the Treasurer of this State on the 
warrant of the Comptroller, after approval by the Gov- 
ernor." 

The new chamber was built by James W. Lanning, of 
Trenton, from plans prepared by James Moylan. of Jer- 
sey City, and under the superintendency of Bernard J. 
Ford of Newark. It covers the site of the former cham- 
ber, and extends beyond it to Delaware street on the 



Tin-: STATE CAl'lTUL. 70 

east and to the water power on the south. It has a front- 
age on Delaware street of 120 feet ard a depth of 7B feet. 
The exterior finish and design of the building are similar 
to the adjoining portion of the Capitol. The foundation 
is of brown stone, from the Stockton quarries, and the 
trimmings of light Indiana stone. The interior is finish 
ed in Trenton tile, quartered oak and Italian statuary 
marble. It is a fire-proof building throughout, and is 
specially ventilated. The committee rooms are ample and 
convenient, and the interior design arrangement and fin- 
ish make It a model legislative chamber. It cost the 
Stale $140,500. The cost of the steam heating and ventilat- 
ing systems was about 525.000. 

The other new addition to the Capitol provides a '^onp'!!- 
tatlon room for the Judges of the Supreme Court and the 
Court of Errors and Appeals and a private room for the 
Governor, a room for the Museum of the Geological Sur- 
vey, and other offices, and cost $34,500. 

Two Otis elevators have been placed in the building, 
which gives easy access to all the upper floors. 

In 1900 the Legislature appropriated $96,000 for additions 
and alterations to the Capitol, which Included the cost of 
an electric light plant. 

A new Senate Chamber was erected in 1903, and was 
ready for occupancy in 1904, at a cost of about $182,- 
000. In 1904 about $60,000 was expended for other im- 
provements in the Capitol. The architect was Arnold 
H. Moses, Merchantville. 

Another addition was made to the Capitol in 1907 at 
a cost of about $100,000. It is a massive structure of a 
classical style of architecture and is finished in stucco 
to match the rest of the Capitol. It contains four 
stories above a deep basement. The construction Is 
fire-proof, consisting of solid brick walls, steel beams 
and columns and concrete floors. The exterior Is at- 
tractive with its classic lines and Indiana limestone 
trimmings. The structure was designed and all the 
plans drawn by George E. Poole. State Architect. 

In 1911 the Legislature made an appropriation of 
$60,000 for the extension of the west wing of the front 
part of the building, and in 1912 $70,000 was appro- 
priated for the extension of the east wing. 

In 1910 and subsequent years to 1915, the State pur- 
chased Delaware street, the Green property which 
fronted on West State street, properties which fronted 



80 STATE LIBRARY. 

on Front and Willow streets and which extended to 
the old Water Power, now Sanhican creek, all of 
which embrace about the same area as the old State 
House site, 3^ acres, making a total of about 7 acres 
north of the creek. 

The land across Sanhican creek, that has been ac- 
quired by the State, has been filled in to the river wall, 
is computed to be about 19 or 20 acres, making the 
sum total of the State's holdings about 26 acres. The 
river park has been laid out and completed by the 
State and the city of Trenton, the area of which is 
about 40 acres. The old Revolutionary Barracks and 
the old Masonic Temple have been preserved on the 
park grounds. The State park contains about 19 
acres, is an up-to-date enterprise and presents a most 
beautiful and attractive appearance. The cost of all 
the improvements was about $400,000, Additional 
property was purchased on West State street in 1917 
and stiliscqucnt y(>ars and is nsod for office purposes, 

TKK STATE I.I3JRARY. 

This valuable collection of books is located on the third 
floor of til.' Slate ("apitol. 

The first library of the State was a case ordered to be 
procured by Maskell Ewing, Clerk of the House of As- 
sembly, for the keeping and preservation of such books 
as belonged to the Legislature. It was ordered by a reso- 
lution passed March 18th. 1796. This was the nucleus of 
the present extensive library. On February ISth, 1804, 
William Coxe, of Burlington; Ezra Darby, of Essex, and 
John A. Scudder, of Monmouth, were appointed a Com- 
mittee on Rules to make a catalogue; they reported that 
there were 168 volumes belonging to the State, and pre- 
sented a code of seven rules, which was adopted. On 
February 10th, 1813, an act (the first one) was passed, en- 
titled "An act concerning the State Library." Up to 1822 
It appears that the Clerk of the House had charge of 
the books, as Librarian, and. on November 16th, 1822, an 
act was passed for the appomtment of a State Librarian, 
annually, by joint meeting. In 1846, on April 10th, an act 
was passed making the term of office three years. The 
Law Library at that time belonged to the members of 
the Law Library Association. The only persons allowed 
the use of the Library were members of the Association, 
the Chancellor, and the judges of the several courts. 
Stacy G. Potts was Treasurer and Librarian of the Asso- 



STATE ARSENAL. 81 

ciation. The Law Library was kept In the Supreme Court 
room until 1837, when the Legislature authorized the 
State Librarian to fit up a room adjoining the Library 
for the care and reception of the books and papers be- 
longing to the State Library. Thus the two Libraries 
were consolidated. On March 13th, 1872, $5,000 per 
year for three years was appropriated for the Library 
by the Legislature, and by the act of March 15th, 1876, 
the sum of $2,500 was appropriated for finishing and 
refurnishing the Library room. In 1890, the Library 
was removed to the third story of the new part of the 
Capitol. 

In 1904 the Legislature made a special appropriation of 
$15,000 for the installation of steel stacks, and the shelf- 
space was doubled. There is room now for more than 
125,000 books and pamphlets. About the same time the 
decimal classification system was Introduced and the 
work of making a modern card catalogue begun, which 
was practically finished In 1905. 

THE STATE ARSENAL. 

The building now used as the State Arsenal was form- 
erly the old State Prison. It Is situate on Second street, 
In the Sixth Ward of the city of Trenton, and has on Its 
front the following inscription: 

Labor, Silence, Penitence. 

The Penitentiary House. 

Erected by Legislative Authority. 

Richard Howell, Governor. 

In the XXII. Year of American 

Independence. MDCCXCVII. 

That Those Who Are Feared For Their 

Crimes May Learn to Fear the Laws 

And be Useful. 

Hie Labor, Hoc Opus. 

In the messages of Governors P. D. Vroom and S. L. 

Southard, recommending the erection of the new prison. 

It was proposed that the old one be converted into an 

Arsenal for the safe keeping of the arms and military 

property of the State, which, previous to that time, had 

been kept In the Old State Bank, corner of "Warren and 

Bank streets, with accoutrements and camp and garrison 

equipage at the State House. After the removal of the 

State convicts from the old prison, permission was given 



82 STATE HOSPITALS. 

to the county of Mercer to occupy it as a jail until Its 
jail, then In course of completion, was finished, and when 
it was again vacated it was converted into an arsenal. 

Among the stores, &c., at the Arsenal are one bronze 
gjn, French, of the date of 1758; two bronze guns. Eng- 
lish, four-pounders, and two iron six-pounders. There is 
also one gun captured at the battle of Trenton, December 
26th, 1776. and two guns captured at Torktown, October 
19th, 1781. There are also a large quantity of fire-arms, 
ammunition, ordnance, tents, clothing, blankets, &c. 

STATE HOSPITAL. 

Trenton. 

This institution is located on the left bank of the 
Delaware River, about two miles northwest of the 
City Hall. The buildings are constructed of reddish 
sandstone, obtained from quarries near the hospital, 
and are located on an elevation of about seventy-five 
feet above the river. The front of the Main, or Ad- 
ministration Building, Is ornamented by a handsome 
porch of Ionic architecture, designed by the celebrated 
Notman, from which may be obtained one of the finest 
landscape views in the State. 

In 1844, after repeated and unsuccessful attempts 
to cause action to be taken by the Legislature for 
the building of a State institution for the special care 
and treatment of the Insane, a commission was ap- 
pointed, chiefly through the earnest efforts of Dr. 
Lyndon A. Smith, of Essex, and Dr Lewis Condict, 
of Morris, and the eminent philanthropise, Miss D. L. 
Dix, to select a site. An appropriation of $35,000 was 
made to purchase the land and to commence the erec- 
tion of the building. The present site was selected 
by the commissioners from among many that were 
offered In various sections of the State, because of 
the large spring of excellent water found on the place. 
This spring was developed, and furnished a daily 
supply of about one-half million of gallons of pure 
water for many years. In the severe drought of 1880 
the supply was greatly diminished, falling off nearly 
two hundred and fifty thousand gallons. In 1907 the 
city sewer, running about 200 feet from the spring, 
burst or overflowed, and this caused contamination of 
the water supply, resulting in a typhoid epidemic, so 



STATE HOSPITALS. 83 

that it was necessary to discontinue the use of the 
spring. At present the hospital Is supplied with 
water by six artesian wells, one of which gives 150 
gallons of water per minute. The spring has been 
filled up, and thus an important landmark destroyed. 

Work was commenced on the main building in No- 
vember of 1845, and the hospital was opened for the 
reception of patients on tne loth day of May, 1848. 
Numerous additions have been made from time to 
time to the building, increasing its capacity. 

In 1887 the Legislature passed an act appropriating 
$100,000 for providing additional accommodations. The 
new building is a handsome structure of red sand- 
stone, and similar to that used in the mtiln building. 
This Is five hundred feet long, three stories In height, 
and capable of accommodating three hundred patients, 
one hundred and fifty of each. The building Is de- 
signed to accommodate the chronic incurable class, 
and was a great relief from the overcrowded state 
that existed in the main building prior to its comple- 
tion. The building was completed within the appro- 
priation, and opened for the reception of patients 
In the month of October, 1889. 

Much has been done for the comfort and pleasure 
of the patients. A greenhouse has been erected for 
the purpose of furnishing plants and flowers for the 
patients' corridors, handsome pictures adorn the 
walls, and everything about the hospital presents a 
comfortable and homelike appearance. 

The Institution possesses a library, one of the larg- 
est. If not the largest, in this country, connected with 
a hospital for the Insane. The books are accessible 
to all members of the household. They have been 
freely used, and do much to relieve the monotony of 
many an hour of hospital life. The library now con- 
sists of about 4.000 volumes, and Is the result of the 
bequest of a former nurse (Anne Robinson) who, by 
will, bequeathed her earnings for several years as a 
nurse and attendant in this hospital. She made the 
bequest, as she herself expressed It when making her 
will, for the purpose of purchssing books to be used 
for the pleasure and benefit of those to whom she 
had, for so many years, endeavored to minister. 

During the year 1898 a handsome amusement room, 
capable of seating about four hundred, was finished; 



84 STATE HOSPITALS. 

also, a large and commodious chapel, in which relig- 
ious exercises are held every Sunday, when various 
clergymen, without regard to denominational prefer- 
ence, officiate. The new chapel is capable of seating 
about five hundred patients. In 1904-1905 an appro- 
priation of $250,000 was made for the erection of two 
additional wings to the annex building, which will 
accommodate 400 more patients. In 1905 the Legisla- 
ture appropriated $12,500 for the construction of fire 
escapes. 

A few years ago a modern laboratory building was 
erected, and at the present time is fully equipped for 
scientific work. 

In 1907 the new wings, spoken of above, were opened 
for the reception of patients, so that now the hospital 
is not overcrowded. 

In 1908 the Legislature appropriated $111,000 for 
extraordinary improvements, which included instal- 
lation of modern plumbing throughout the buildings, 
also tiling for toilet rooms, water sections, etc. 

Two buildings for tuberculosis patients, male and 
female, have been erected, and will accommodate 
twenty-five, each known as the "open air" ward. 

Since January 1st, 1908, there has been no mechan- 
ical restraint of any kind used in the hospital. All 
restraint apparatus, chairs, straight jackets, straps, 
etc., have been removed from the hospital building, 
and are stored away where no one can get at them. 

During the year 1909 the plumbing and tiling of the 
old building was completed, and the sanitary arrange- 
ments for the hospital have been considered by those 
competent to judge, to be the best of any public Insti- 
tution of this character. 

In both the male and female departments a hydro- 
therapeutic apparatus has been Installed for giving the 
continuous bath treatment. This apparatus was made 
especially for the hospital, and has given satisfactory 
service in the treatment of acutely excited cases. 

The Legislature of 1911 appropriated $103,000 for ex- 
traordinary improvements. Two farms in the neigh- 
borhood of Trenton Junction have been purchased, 
which will add 250 acres of farm land to the hospital. 
A new laundry has been erected and equipped with 
modern machinery, at a cost of $30,000. 
■ The Legislature appropriated $2,800 for research 
work, which enables the hospital to employ two 



STATE HOSPITALS. 85 

trained field workers who go out in the community 
and look up facts regarding the patients' heredity 
and personal history, which gives valuable informa- 
tion to the medical history. They also engage in 
"after care" work, I. e., in visiting discharged patients 
at certain intervals, investigating their condition, and 
reporting to the hospital any unusual conditions which 
have any bearing on the recurrence of mental disease. 
During the years 1910 and 1911 $5,000 has been spent 
for furniture for the wards. The Legislature of 1912 
appropriated $165,000 for new buildings, including 
one for the criminal insane. The erection of additional 
buildings to cost $350,000 is now receiving attention. The 
institution at this time has about 1,900 inmates. 

STATE HOSPITAL. 

Morris Plains (P. O. Greystone Park). 

Further provision for the accommodation of the In- 
sane being made necessary by the overcrowded con- 
dition of the State Hospital at Trenton, the Legislature 
of 1871 appointed a commission to select a site and 
build a hospital in the northern part cf the State. 

At a cost of $78,732.36 a tract of 408 acres of land, 
beautifully situated in the hills of Morris County, 
was purchased and work on the hospital buildings 
begun. 

Additional tracts of land have since been purchased 
at a cost of $32,318.00, making a total of S97 acres. 
at a total cost of $111,050. The original building, now 
known as the "Main Building," was erected, at a cost 
of $2,511,622. The "Dormitory Building" and a new 
reservoir, made necessary by its construction, cost, 
when completed, about $650,000; a new laundry build- 
ing, $18,200; the nurses' cottage, $20,000, and in 1907 
the annual appraisement placed the personal prop- 
erty of the hospital at $294,709, thus making the total 
cost of the entire plant approximately $3,605,581. 

The location is ideal for an institution caring for 
the mentally afflicted, and is unsurpassed in this par- 
ticular by any similar institution in the United States. 
The buildings command a. magnificent view of the 
surrounding country, and the air is cool and balmy in 
Summer and crisp and stimulating in "Winter. 

The main building, opened in 1876, is four stories 
in height, 1,243 feet in length, 542 in depth, and has 



S<5 STATE HOSPITALS. 

ten acres of floor space, it contains the executive 
offices, receptions rooms, medical library, chapel, 
amusement hall and forty wards, which, when crowded 
to their full capacity, will accommodate 1,200 patients. 
In 1901 the dormitory building was completed. It 
Is situated 1,200 feet in the rear of the main building, 
accommodates 600 patients, and is constructed on the 
day room and dormitory plan. On the fourth floor 
of the building- are well-equipped pathological and 
chemical laboratories, five splendidly-lighted rooms on 
the top floor of the northeast tower being devoted to 
this work. The laboratories have been well equipped 
with many of the latest and best Instruments for the 
prosecution of scientific, clinical and research work, 
and have proved to be a highly important adjunct to 
the purely psychiatric work of the hospital. 

A cottage for nurses was built in 1906. This is a 
three-story brick building, trimmed with sandstone, 
and Is situated in front and to the south of the main 
group of buildings. It is within easy access of the 
female wards, and affords sleeping quarters for forty 
female nurses, who formerly, after working daily fif- 
teen hours with the insane, were compelled to spend 
their nights in the wards, in close proximity to noisy 
and disturbed patients. In addition to furnishing ac- 
commodation for the night, the cottage has a recep- 
tion room and library, where the nurses may spend 
their time when off duty. 

In order to give the hospital a better mail service, 
the United States government, on March 23, 1908, es- 
tablished a new post office in the main building of the 
hospital, and named It Greystone Park. The mail 
matter of the institution was formerly handled at 
Morris Plains post office, which is one and one-half 
miles from the building. 

The Legislature of 1911 appropriated $15,000 for the 
erection of a new fire house. This fire house provides 
stabling quarters for two horses and sleeping room for 
twenty male employes who are always to be members 
of the fire department. 

The same Legislature appropriated $40,000 for the 
erection of a male nurses' -home. This building accom- 
modates seventy-six men nurses. 

A cold storage plant has been added to the institu- 
tion which produces five tons of ice per day and also 



STATE llOSriTALS. ST 

provides a room for the storage of hospital food sup- 
plies. 

The Legislature of 1911 made an appropriation of 
$15,000 for a dynamo and building, and there was also 
appropriated $10,000 for a building for the segregation 
of tubercular patients. The same Legislature also ap- 
propriated $8,000 for screening the windows of the 
main building and dormitory building. 

The Legislature of 1912 appropriated $GS,000 for 
new buildings and alterations. 

A Training School for Nurses was established in 
1894 and it has proved to be of great advantage to the 
hospital in the humane care and treatment of the in- 
sane. A graded three-years' course is given to the 
nurses and consists of lectures and practical demon- 
strations given by the medical staff in anatomy, physi- 
ology, materia medica and therapeutics, chemistry and 
toxicology, obstetrics and gynecology, genito-urinary 
diseases, practice of medicine, minor surgery, practical 
bedside nursing and bandaging. Tlie course is com- 
pulsory upon all who are employed as attendants, and 
since the establishment of the school, 226 persons have 
been granted diplomas. 

Further provision for the scientific treatment of 
patients has been made by the equipment of rooms, 
both in the male and in the female departments, with 
complete hydrotherapeutlc apparatus and by the 
Installation of electrotherapeutic appliances, and a 
powerful static machine in a room in the main build- 
ing, convenient to both male and female departments. 

A room has also been set apart and fully equipped 
with Instruments and appliances for the examination 
and treatment of patients suffering from diseased 
conditions of the eye, ear, nose and throat. 

The medical library contains over 1,300 volumes of 
carefully-selected text books and reference works on 
medical and other scientific subjects, together with 
well-bound volumes of the annual reports of every hos- 
pital for the insane in the United States, Canada, South 
American States and many of the countries in Europe. 

Among the many Improvements added in recent 
years is a new system of keeping case records. The 
complete record of each patient from the time he en- 
ters the hospital until he is discharged is kept in a 
separate envelope, filed vertically in steel cabinets 



88 STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 

especially constructed for the purpose. The flies are 
thoroughly cross-indexed, which permits of needful in- 
formation being- rapidly and easily obtained in any 
given case. 

Additional protection from fire has been provided 
by equipping the hospital with the Kirker-Bender type 
of fire escape. 

Fire drills are held at regular intervals so that the 
patients may become familiar with the location of the 
fire escapes and accustom themselves to their use so 
as to enable them in the event of fire to go through 
this means out of danger in an orderly and expeditious 
manner. 

The hospital has equipped Dental Rooms with the 
latest and most modern appliances, thus enabling the 
Resident Dentist to do scientific work for the patients 
needing dental attention. 

The Legislature of 1912 appropriated $15,000 for a 
storehouse in which all supplies are kept, and $8,000 
was also appropriated for the construction of an in- 
dustrial building which is equipped with apparatus 
and supplies of the manufacture of a great variety 
of tiospital utilities. 

Tlie Morris Plains Hospital wliich now lias ovor 2.700 
patients has .$800,000 in appropriations available for very 
much needed additional buildings. 

STATE NORMAL. SCHOOL AT TRENTON. 

The New Jersey State Normal and Model Schools at 
Trenton were established by an act of the state legislature 
in 1855. In 1017 the Model School, which at that time 
included all grades fi*om the kindergarten through the high 
school, was discontinued and a public practice school, in- 
cluding the kindergarten and first six grades, was estab- 
lished in its place. 

The following courses are offered in the Normal School 
to graduates of four-year approved high schools : General, 
Kindergarten-Primary. Commercial, Domestic Science and 
Arts, Manual Training. Music. Physical Training, and a 
course for Teachers of Subnormal Children. In addition, 
it is closely affiliated with the State School for the Deaf 
in training teachers of the deaf, and co-operates with the 
Trenton School of Industrial Arts in fitting students to 
teach the subjects which that institution offers. 

The school buildings are equipped with laboratories, gym- 
nasiums, and the modern appliances necessary to meet the 
requirements of good work. The dormitories provide a com- 
fortable home for about 450 students. 

The property belonging to tbe Trenton State Normal 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 89 

School is uow valuod at raoio than three-quarters of a mil- 
lion dollars. The grounds, including the athletic lieUl. cover 
more than seven acres. The scliuol is located in a goo:l 
residential section of the city, and is easily accessii)le irom 
botli the Pennsylvania and the Reading Railroad stations. 

The enrollment in the Normal School in 1855 was forty- 
three. For the year ending June 30, 1021, it was 553, and 
there were 388 pupils in the Training School. During its 
history the Nomial School has graduated over seven thou- 
sand students. 

The principals of the schools have been as follows : Wil- 
liam F. Phelps, A.M., 1855 to 1865 ; John S. Hart. LL.D.. 
1805 to 1871; Lewis M. Johnson, A.M., 1871 to 1876; 
Washington Hasbroucli. Ph.D.. 1876 to 1889 : James M. 
Green, Ph.D., LL.D., 1880 to 1017 ; J. J. Savitz, A.M., 
Pd.D., 1917 to the present time. 

MOiXTCLAlR STATE XOR3IAL SCHOOL, 

Upper Montclair, New Jersej'. 

The Montclair State Normal School is located in the 
extreme northern part of Montclair on a plot of more 
than twenty-five acres. By special act of the legis- 
lature, so much of this site as was originally in Pas- 
saic county was set over into Essex county. 

A more beautiful or healthful site could not have 
been selected. The grounds have an elevation of 400 
feet above sea level and command an uninterrupted 
view of a landscape of remarkable beauty. The 
Orange range stretches aw^ay to the right, while at 
the front and left the Passaic valley, the Hudson 
and the taller buildings of New York City are plainly 
visible. 

The main school building, in the mission style, 
334 feet long and 133 feet deep, of brick covered with 
white stucco, is situated on the highest part of the 
grounds, facing the New York landscape. In front 
is an esplanade 260 feet long and 44 feet wide, pro- 
tected by a concrete wall from which steps descend 
to the lawn. 

About 500 feet directly in front of the main school 
building, parallel to it and connected with it by a 
broad w^alk of bricl?, is the Russ Memorial Dormitory, 
the gift of the late Edward Russ of Hoboken. 

This building, which was opened for the reception 
of students in September, 1915, is fireproof throughout 
and is designed in the Spanish Mission style, with 



no STATE nor:mat. soiiools. 

white stucco exterior walls and red Spanish tile roof, 
to conform in character to the present Normal School 
building. 

The dormitory accommodates 96 students, there 
being 52 single rooms and 22 double rooms. Each 
floor is provided with ample bath and toilet room 
facilities, and at each end of the hall, conveniently lo- 
cated, are two enclosed fireproof stairs extending from 
the top floor to the ground and giving ample exits. 

The main floor is particularly well planned for the 
social requirements of a school. The living room 
at one end is 33 feet wide and 40 feet long, having 
at one end a reading room, 13 feet by 32 feet. This 
is elevated a few steps above the general level of the 
living room and is used as a reading room and as a 
stage for giving amateur plays. On one side of the 
living room is a large open fireplace, which adds 
much to the attractiveness of the room. 

At the other end of the building is the large dining 
room, accommodating 110 persons. This is finished in 
old ivory tints and has an attractive fireplace at one 
side of the room. 

The kitchen and serving rooms are up-to-date in 
every respect. They are arranged with a view to the 
best sanitary requirements and every convenience of 
a large kitchen has been installed. 

On the first fioor is located the matron's suite, which 
contains a living room and bedroom. There is also 
a reception room for visitors and a hospital room. 

The basement contains store rooms, trunk rooms 
and a large and well-equipped laundry. 

The sleeping rooms, both single and double, are 
equipped with comfortable and attractive furniture. 
Each student has a single iron bedstead and excellent 
mattress, a chiffonier, a desk, a commode, an easy 
chair and a straight chair. Each student has a sepa- 
rate closet for clothing. 

The equipment of both school and dormitory is of 
the latest and best. The ample grounds have been 
graded and beautified by walks, drives and by the 
planting of many evergreens and shrubs. 

Four tennis courts, a large athletic field called "The 
Bowl," a school garden of two acres and an extensive 
grove of fine trees sheltering a numerous bird life, 
give opportunity for outdoor games, athletic contests, 
field gymnastics, horticulture, kitchen garden, geog- 



STATE NORMATj SCHOOLS. 91 

raphy and nature study such as few institutions can 
offer. 

The Montclair State Normal Scliool opened for its 
first session September 15th, 1908, with an attendance 
of 187 pupils. Its present enrollmfut is 557. The princi- 
pal is Dr. Charles S. Chapin. who has been at the head of 
the school since July 1st, lf;08. 

AEAV JERSEY STATE NOR3IAL SCHOOL, AT 
NEWARK. 

The State Normal School building at Newark i-< centrally 
located, between Broad Stre< t and Bellevill(> Avenue, at 
the intersection of Fourth Avenue, and occupies, including its 
spacious grounds, an entire city block. The beauty of its 
grounds is enhanced by a sunken garden with weil-arranged 
flower beds, hedges and tree life. The interior has been 
greatly admired for the beauty of its color scheme, its fine 
appointments and educational features. It is considered one 
of the most modern and up-to-date normal school buildings 
in this country. 

This building opened its doors September 16th, lOlH, with 
an enrollment of over 400 students, and now has an enroll- 
ment of nearly 900 students, making it not only the largest 
State Normal School in New Jersey, but one of the largest 
in the United States. These students represent fourteen 
counties, fifty hiijh schools and one hundred and thirty- 
five cities, villages and townships. The trolley and rail- 
road facilities are such that students can readily come 
and return to their homes without undue fatigue. Excel- 
lent boarding facilities are found by the principal for those 
who desire to board in Newark, many students securing 
quarters at the Young Women's Christian Association and 
also in private families. 

Since the school was organized nine years ago, it haN 
graduated over 2,500 students who are acceptably filling pri- 
mary and grammar school positions in various parts of the 
state. 

There are 776 students pursuing the General Course and 
lie the Kindergarten Course. Although the student l>ody 
is largely a commuting element a great deal is done to 
promote school spirit through social activities, and to give 
helpful and valuable suggestions to students along lines 
which are closely connected with the development and happi- 
ness of children. Each class has an organization of its own 
under the direction of a faculty advisor, who plans with 
them many social affairs of an instructive nature. 

Again, the whole school acts as a unit with principal and 
faculty in arranging informal social activities for the pur- 
pose of mutual acquaintance and for the discussion of im- 
portant school matters. 



02 STATE HOME FOR BOYS. 

The honlth of the stiuh ut body is made an important 
problem. All stndi'nts are ijiven a thorous^h pliysical ex- 
aniinatifHJ b.v two ph.vsit-ian.s, and tlie results of these ex- 
aminations are tiled for the use of principal and facult.v, 
whicli keeps-^ them in close touch with health conditions. 
In connection with athletics the gymnasium is also used 
as a social center and for health promotion. All depart- 
ments of the school working together produce a unified re- 
sult in the training of prospective teachers, and make the 
school of service to the state. 

The principal of the school is Dr. W. Spader Willis, who 
for fourteen years was principal of the City Normal School 
at Newaik. 

THE STATE H03IE FOR BOYS. 

"The New Jersey State Reform School" was estab- 
lished by act of the Legislature approved April 6th, 1865. 
A farm of 490 acres was purchased for the purpose near 
Jamesburg, Middlesex county. 

The first boy was received July 6th, 1867. Its first Sup- 
erintendent was Rev. Luther H. Sheldon, who was In 
ofiice from April 10th, 1867, till April 1st, 1874, and was 
succeeded by James H. Eastman, who was Superinten- 
dent from April 1st, 1874. till September 15th, 1884. Upon 
his withdrawal Ira Otterson was made acting Superin- 
tendent, and on December 10th. 1SS4, he was elected Sup- 
erintendent. In 1902 Mr. Otterson was succeeded by John 
Wildes who, March 1, 1904, gave way to John C. Kalleen. 
In 1900 the name of The Reform School was changed to 
the State Home for Boys. 

Since founding the school, beside the Administration 
building, there have been erected on the campus eight 
family buildings (two of them double buildings), capa- 
ble of accommodating fifty boys each, a chapel, hos- 
pital, store and cook house, Industrial building, elec- 
tric light, heat and power, generating station and 
farm buildings, conservatory, up-to-date cow barn, 
piggery, all of brick, many of the buildings con- 
structed with bricks manufactured by the boys on 
the place. 

Besides domestic and farm labor, all boys are Instruct- 
ed In the rudiments of an English school education, and 
many receive Instruction in shorthand and typewrit- 
ing and In the different mechanical branches and 
band music. 

In 1900 there was erected by boys' labor, under regular 
Instructors, a building 40 by 100 feet, two stories high, In 
which are established schools for trade teaching. In 



STATE HOME FOR GIRLS. 93 

1910, In this building, a complete outfit of machinery 
consisting of a planer, mortiser, universal and band 
saw, and others necessary to make it complete was 
supplied. While in the past, so far as the accommoda- 
tions would permit, a number of boys have received 
instruction In mechanical trades, and with the accom- 
modations furnished in the new building, a greater 
number of boys receive a more thorough knowledge 
in lines of skilled handicraft, which will the better 
prepare them to become good citizens. 

During 1910 the cow and dairy barn have been re- 
modeled and rebuilt, and the Legislature of 1910 appro- 
priated $40,000 with which to erect a central school 
building. The Legislature of 1912 appropriated 
$40,000 for the erection of a double cottage. 

There are over six hundred boys in this Home. lu 1920 
there was added to the hospital a wing for operating- room. 

STATE HOME FOR GIRLS, TRENTON. 

This institution was established April 4th, 1871, as an 
educational institution for girls committed througii the 
courts for delinquency. Its first home was at "Pine (Jrovo" 
in the Sixth ward of Trenton. Its present location is on 
Stuyvesant Avenue, near the Ti'cnton State Ilospilal, on the 
'i'renton Branch of the I'hiladelphia and Reading Kailroad. 
The property includes eighty acres, valued in 1921 at $54,- 
000, and buildings appraised at $301,000, comprising besides 
the first "Main" building, two cottages for colored girls, 
one for younger white girls, one for older white girls, an 
infirmary, a chapel, a laundry, a boiler house, and various 
small farm buildings. The administration building, called 
Fort Cottage, the counterpart of Washington's Headquarters 
at Morristown, N. .1., was the New Jersey building at 
the Jamestown, Va., exposition, after which it was brought 
to Trenton, and formally opened Februai'y 11th, 1910, to 
serve in its present function. 

The age of commitment is from eight to nin"teen, and 
the girls so committed are wards of the state until they are 
twenty-one. The object of the institution is to give these 
girls the education, vocational training, and medical care 
necessary to prevent. wh<:n possible, their becoming perma- 
nent wards of the state, and to return them to their com- 
munities as self-supporting, self-respecting members of so- 
ciety. 



94 thp: state prison. 

the state prison. 

The New Jersey State Prison, situated on the block en- 
closed by Federal, Third, Cass and Second streets, in the 
Pity of Trenton, is onp of Ihp flnpst Institutions of its 
kind In the country. Its erection was authorized by an 
act of the Legislature passed February 13th, 1832, and it 
was completed in the year 1836, having 150 cells, at a cost 
of $179,657.11. It was built of red sand-stone, from the 
Ewing quarries, and the style of its architecture is Egyp- 
tian, having four Egyptian columns in front of the main 
entrance, on Third street. 

Previous to the year 1798 there was no State Prison, 
and prisoners were confined in the county jails. On 
March 1st, 1797, Jonathan Dcane was appointed by an act 
of the Legislature as an agent to purchase a lot of land 
from Peter Hunt, situate at Lamberton, containing six 
and a half acres, and to erect suitable buildings thereon. 
This was done at an expense of £9,842 Os. 3d., and what is 
now the State Arsenal, at Second and Cass streets, Is 
the result. Solitary confinement was not practiced pre- 
vious to 1836, in which year the old prison was vacated 
and the present one occupied. 

On March 4th, 1847, $5,000 was appropriated to build an 
additional wing to the original building. On March 25th, 
1852. $15,000 was granted for the erection of a new wing 
for hospital purposes. On March 22d, 1860, the sum of 
$17,000 was voted for *he purpose of building an additional 
wing for cells, and on February 16th, 1861, a further sum 
of $2,243.01 was appropriated to complete the same. On 
April 16th, 1868, $6,000 was appropriated for the building of 
an additional wing to provide room for female convicts. 
An act passed April 2d, 1869, provided for the appoint- 
ment of commissioners to extend the grounds of the 
prison to the wall of the State Arsenal, to build an ad- 
ditional wing and workshops, and made an appropriation 
of $50,000 for that purpose, and in the same month $9,734 
was appropriated for the purpose of completing the wing 
of the female department. On April 4th. 1871, the sum 
of $75,000 was appropriated for the purpose of completing 
thp ppw or past w)nsr. and on April 4th. 1872. n furthpr 
sum of $28,700 was appropriated for the completion of the 
same. March 3d, 1874, $12,000 was voted for the con- 
struction of gas works for the supply of Illuminating gas 
for the prison. On March 8th, 1877. the sum of $100,000 
was appropriated for the enlargement of the prison and 



HOMES FOR DISABLED SODDIEKS. 95 

the purchase of a burial ground for deceased convicts. 
The north wing was remodeled out of this last appro- 
priation and a burial ground purchased. The Legislature 
of 1895 appropriated $150,000 for the enlargement and Im- 
provement of the prison. The Legislature of 1899 appro- 
priated $14,000 for alterations in the women's wing of the 
prison. In 1905 $250,000 was appropriated for the erection 
of a new wing, and it was finished in 1907. The addi- 
tion, which is at the northeast corner of the institu- 
tion, is one of the most complete in the United States. 
There are five tiers, each having seventy cells. The 
interior Is wholly of steel and concrete. The cells are 
separated from the outer walls by a passageway for 
the keepers and the entire section of each tier Is com- 
pletely enclosed in a cage of steel. Thirty-flve cells 
are controlled by a combination looking device, al- 
though any one cell door or a series of doors can be 
thrown open by a lever system from the end of the 
corridor where the locking device is located. Between 
the cell sections there is a narrow utility court from 
which the ventilation is controlled and v'here the sani- 
tary parts can be reached without any necessity for 
going into the cells. Each cell has a steel cot, port^e- 
lain washstand and sanitary arrangement and is light- 
ed by electricity. Special attention has been given to 
ventilation. A death house was also built on the prison 
grounds in 1907 to comply with the law regarding the 
electrocution of persons condemned to death. 

Tn 1917 $.30,000 was appropriated for the recon.struo- 
tion of wins No. .3 and a new moss hall and chapel. It is 
now possible for all of the more than one thousand in- 
mates to be congre;^ated at one time. 



THE ^'EAV JERSEY MEMORIAL HOME FOR 
DISABLED SOLDIERS. 

Phis Institution Is located in Kearny, Hudson county. 
It originated in the mind of Governor Marcus L. Ward 
just before the close of the Civil War. His petition to 
the Legislatures of 1863-64 resulted In the passage of an 
act on April 12th, 1864, appointing himself, ex-Governors 
Daniel Haines, William A. Newell and Charles S. Olden, 
and Edwin A. Stevens and Rynear H. Veghte as com- 
missioners to examine into and report on the subject. On 
February 1. 1865. they made their report to Governor 
Parker and the Legislature appropriated $50,000 for the 



90 HOMES FOIi DISABLED S ILDIERS. 

desired purpose. Grounds were purchased in the city of 
Newark and in March, 1866, the same commissioners were 
appointed managers of the Home. The board appointed 
Colonel A. N. Dougherty, Commandant; Rev. Samuel T. 
Moore, Superintendent and Chaplain, and Dr. A. M. Mills, 
Surgeon, of the Home. It was opened for reception on 
July 4th, 1866. For twenty-two years the Home remained 
in Newark, when a new site was selected in Kearny. This 
comprises about sixteen acres and $225,000 was appro- 
priated for the buildings, furnishings, &c. On October 
4th, 1888, the old home was vacated and the new home 
occupied. The New Jersey Home is the parent of similar 
institutions throughout the country. In order to gain ad- 
mission to the Home the applicant must have served in 
the army, navy or marine service and been honorably 
discharged therefrom. He must have lived In the State 
for at least two years next preceding date of applica- 
tion, or have served in a New Jersey organization, 
and must be unable to earn a living for himself by man- 
ual labor. Since 1888 various additions have been 
made and rocently much interior reconstruction work has 
Y,e»n done and u new plumbing system installed. 

NEW JERSEY HOME FOR DISABLED SOLDIERS. 
SAILORS OR MARINES AND THEIR WIVES. 

Vineland. 
This Home was organized in 1898, the sum of $5,000 ha- 
ing been appropriated for the purpose. A plot of ground, 
comprising 20 acres, and a building containing about 75 
rooms and basement, situated in the town of Vineland. 
were purchased for a Home, and in 1899 an additional 
appropriation of $21,500 was made to pay for the prop- 
erty. In the same year the sum of $20,000 was appro- 
priated for altering, repairing and furnishing the build- 
ings. In 1900* a special appropriation of $13,000 was made 
for new floors, porches, laundry machinery, engine and 
boiler and furniture. The Home was opened in Decem- 
ber, 1899, for the admission of inmates and the first were 
admitted January 2d. 1900. In 1901 the sum of $7,700 was 
appropriated for an elevator, alterations and appliances, 
making the cost of building and land $67,200. In 1903 nine 
acres of additional land was purchased at a cost of $2,000 
and the same year an act was passed by the Legislature 
providing for the care and maintenance of widows of vet- 



SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF. 97 

erns, and the sum of $28,000 was appropriated for the con- 
struction and furnishing of buildings necessary to carry 
out the provisions of the act. An additional sum of $2,500 
was appropriated for extra woric and the building was 
completed and ready for occupancy in July, 1904. 
Since then two new wings, each eighty feet long and 
containing some 120 rooms, have been added, and a 
separate boiler house in the rear of the main build- 
ings erected. A new heating and lighting plant has 
been Installed, and other marked improvements for 
the care and comforts of the inmates completed. In 
1912 the Legislature appropriated $30,000 for a new 
hospital. In 1920 and 1921 the Legislature made liberal 
appropriations for improvements to this institution, and the 
Home is now considered one of the finest in the United 
States. 

SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF. 

The New Jersey School for the Deaf at Trenton is strictly 
an educational institution, under the management of the 
State Board of Education. It is part of the public school 
system of the state ; a boarding school for the education 
of deaf residents of the state, between the ages of six 
and twenty-one years. Speech and speech-reading are taught 
to those who can most profitably acquire that art. Instruc- 
tion is given in all of the branches of common school educa- 
tion. There is an advanced course preparatory to Gal- 
laudet College. 

The industi'ial department is larger and better equipped 
than most schools of its kind. Courses are given in print- 
ing, including hand composition, press work, linotype work 
and photo-engraving. A monthly magazine, called the 
"Silent Worker," is issued by the printing department, 
which, in point of raeclianical execution and of quality of 
contents, ranks as the best of its kind. All of the work 
of this paper is performed by the pupils of this school. 
There is an excellent course in woodworking and mechanical 
drawing. The girls are taught cooking, dressmaking and 
millinery. 

After the pupils graduate from the grammar course, they 
are privileged to complete their trades or take a college 
preparatory course. , 

The yearly attendance has risen from 12.j in June, 189G, to 
about 225. The increase is limited by the accommodations. 
A new ninety-acre site has been purchased beyond the 
State Hospital, near Trenton Junction. Three hundred thou- 
sand dollars has been appropriated to build a prim.ary 
unit thereon. It is expected further moneys will be ap- 
propriated to complete the institution in order to remove 



1^8 IIUM1-: FOR FEEBLE-MINDED WOMEN. 

the cliildren fi-om the present huiidings which are hre traps 
for children who cannot hear. 

home: for THE3 CARE AND TRAINING OF FEEBLE- 
MINDED ^V03IEN. 

Vineland. 

This Institution was established by virtue of the act of 
March 27th, 1888, the late S. Olln Garrison, who drafted 
the original law, being Its first superintendent. On No- 
vember 7th, of the same year, he was succeeded by Mary 
J. Dunlap, M.D., and then by Dr. Madeleine A. Hallo- 
well. Upon organization of the first board of mana- 
gers, the late Hon. Alexander G. Catell, of Camden 
county, was chosen President, a place he acceptably 
filled until his death. He was succeeded by the Hon. 
Benjamin F. Lee, of Mercer county, Clerk of the Su- 
preme Court, who occupied the position until his 
death In 1909. Mrs. Emily E. H. Williamson, of 
Union county, was secretary of the board from its 
organization until her death in 1909. The first 
treasurer was the Hon. Belmont Perry, of Gloucester 
county, he being succeeded by ex-Senator Philip P. 
Baker, of Cumberland county; the late Senator Barton 
F. Thorn, of Burlington county, and George B. Thorn, 
Esq., of Burlington county, the present incumbent. 
Harry H. Pond was elected President in 1909. 

As Its ofiicial title suggests, this institution has for Its 
object the care and training of feeble minded women. 
Its location in a peculiarly healthful and fertile portion 
of the State, the plan and scope of the buildings, as well 
as their equipment and the employment of modern ad- 
ministrative methods, make the Home a subject for fav- 
orable comparison with any similar Institution In the 
country. The property consists of about 50 acres. 

The most conspicuous building of the Home Is that de- 
voted to purposes of administration and instruction. In- 
cluding dormitories and a gymnasium. There Is also a 
laundry, a power-house, with heating apparatus, and 
pump for raising th^ sewage of the home into the Vine- 
land system. Fire escapes and a water tower give pro- 
tection to the State's wards. All the buildings are light- 
ed with gas or electricity. 

In 1912 the Legislature appropriated $60,000 for a 
new dormitory, &c. 



SLIIUOL FOR FEEBLE-MINDED ClllLDKEN. 09 

TRAl-MXG SCHOOL FOR B VCKAVARD AXD 
FEEBLE-3IIXDED CHILDREX. 

X'inelar.d. 

This luiblic institution is an outgrowth of a private one 
ostablisliod liy I'rof. S. Olin Garrison in Millviilo. Cnmbt'r- 
land county, in 188-7. It was opened at Vineland on March 
1st, 1888, with ten pupils in one building on forty acres. 

There are now eighteen cottages ; a fifty-bed hospital ; an 
assembly hall, seating 600 and containing kindergarten and 
music rooms, drill hall and gymnasium, and a vocational 
school of fifteen rooms. The plan and scope of training re- 
quires sixteen teachers in English. Kindergarten. Music, 
Physical Culture, Domestic and Vocational Training of 
various kinds. 

The Wistar Laboratory is fully equipped to house the De- 
partment of Research, devoted to the study of causes, pre- 
vention and methods of training-. , 

There are 250 acres of farm and garden land, a dairy 
and a poultry plant. 

The Training School also conducts the Menantico Colony 
for 100 adult males. The colony property consists of 800 
acres and seven buildings. The industries are clearing land. 
raising hogs, and growing farai crops. 

The total property is worth about $600,000, real and per- 
sonal, with a debt of kss than $30,000. Besides good^ 
property acquisitions at low cost, at least $375,000 has' 
been donated to the school since its organization, especially 
for new buildings and other improvements and for research 
work. 

STATE VILLAGE FOR EPILEPTICS. 

Skillman, Somerset County. 
This village Is located in Montgomery township, Somer- 
set county, at Skillman Station, on the line of the 
Philadelphia and Reading Railroad. The location is 
one of the most beautiful and healthful in the State, 
and Is admirably adapted for the purposes of this 
kind of an institution. The managers have secured 
six adjoining farms containing in all about 1,100 acres. 

Thi* six farm houses are no^V being used, one for 
the Administration building, one for residence of the 
Superintendeut, four for employes. In all there are 54 
buildings, 10 used to house patients. 



100 STATE VILLAGE FOR EPILEPTICS. 

In 1884 Dr. John W. Ward. Superintendent of the State 
Hospital at Trenton, realizing the necessity of separating 
the epileptics from the Insane, went before a legislative 
committee and strongly urged the appropriation of $50,- 
000 to erect a building upon the grounds of that institu- 
tion for the proper care of the epileptics. Professor 
S. Olin Garrison, Principal of the New Jersey Training 
School for Feeble-Mlnded Children, at Vineland, early re- 
cognized the necessity of separate provision for the epi- 
leptics in that institution, and was Indefatigable in his 
efforts to establish the present village. 

For a number of years the subject was agitated, and 
in 1895, in accordance with a resolution passed by the 
Legislature, the Governor appointed a commission to in- 
vestigate the number and condition of epileptics In the 
State. The report of the commission was presented to 
the Legislature of 1896 and a bill was Introduced for the 
establishment of a colony on a plan recommended by the 
commission. The bill failing to become a law, the New 
Jersey State Medical Society, by resolution at their an- 
nual meeting In 1896, endorsed the necessity of such 
legislation. In 1897 the President, Dr. Thomas J. Smith, 
of Bridgeton, most ably presented the necessity of pro- 
viding for the epileptics, and urged that the State author- 
ities be Importuned most earnestly to revive the move- 
ment initiated the year before to establish an Industrial 
epileptic colony in our State. The Society reaffirmed Its 
position, and appointed a committee to urge the matter 
further. 

Through the combined efforts of those Interested and 
with the zealous co-operation of Senator Stokes, of Cum- 
berland, who had charge of the legislation, an act was 
passed by the Legislature of 1898, and promptly signed by 
Acting Governor Voorhees, making the necessary provi- 
sions for the establishment of the institution. The sum 
of $15,000 was appropriated for the purchase of a site and 
to pay for the equipment and maintenance of the vil- 
lage. The "Maplewood Farm," containing about 187 
acres, was purchased for $11,500, and the village was 
opened for the reception of male patients November 1st. 
1SP8. 

All epileptics of either sex. over live ycnrs of a.a:e, and 
not insane or idiotic ai'e admitted. 



NEW JERSEY REFORMATORY. 101 

NEW JKRSEV REFORMATORY, RAH WAY. 

The New Jersey Koformatory was opt uecl August 1st, 
1901. Its puipose was to provide a place where young nieu 
who had been guilty of an offense for which they could be 
sent to the State Prison might be separated from the older 
offenders, so that the opportunity for them to reform might 
be made as great as possible. The institution was located 
near Rahway because the state had in its possession a con- 
siderable plot of ground which was not being used for any 
particular purpose. The plant opened then has grown into 
quite a large one, and now has approximately 250 acres of 
ground, which is either under cultivation, or upon which 
the buildings are located. The buildings of the institution 
are as follows : 

A center, known as "the dome," which is said to be 
the third largest dome in the world. From this extends on 
either side two dormitory wings capable of accommodating 
632 young men. Attached also to this dome is a "tie-to"' 
building, providing (fllcers' and hospital facilities. Adjoin- 
ing this is the domestic building, in which are the dining- 
room, chapel, school rooms, laundry, baths and drill hall. 
Back of this building is the kitchen, with bakery, cold stor- 
age, officers' dining room attached. 

Separate from this group is a large industrial building, 
accommodating store room, print shop, shoe shop, tailor 
shop, electric shop and band, with shipping room for State 
Use purposes. Back of this is the power house with three 
generators. Further back in the yard are located the foun- 
dry, carpenter shop, paint, tinware, plumbing and black- 
smith shops. A wall 3.600 feet long encloses these build- 
ings, with the exception of the dormitory and wings. Twenty- 
one acrrs of ground provide drill fields, baseball grounds, etc. 

The estimated value of the plant is $1,350.00. There have 
been received to date 6.058 inmates. The young men go 
to school half a day and work half a day. They have base- 
ball and basketball games in competition with outside teams ; 
moving pictures every two weeks during the winter, and 
religious services on Sunday. • 

The first aim of the institution is to bring every influ- 
ence possible to bear upon the young man that will help 
him to reform. 

STATE TUBERCULOUS SANITARIUM. 

Glen Gardner. 
This Sanitarium, which was completed in 1907, Is lo- 
cated at Glen Gardner, near High Bridge, Hunterdon 
county. The site is on the slope of a mountain nearly 
1,000 feet above the level of the sea, where the State 



lOJ STATE TUr.ERrULOrS SANITARIUM. 

has acquired about 600 acres. The slope has been cut 
away and leveled for a considerable space, and here 
the building-s were constructed. On a clear day the 
view from this point is one of the most magnificent In 
this picturesque section of North New Jersey. It looks 
away over a rolling country of wooded hills and culti- 
vated farm lands to the mountains on the other side of 
the valley, which run at its foot. Away in the dis- 
tance like a thin ribbon of silver is the South Branch 
river, and in whatever direction the eye turns some 
new and charming scene is encountered. The structure 
consists of a service building, administration building 
and east and west wards. The service building is the 
source of supplies for the institution. It is 84x110 feet, 
three stories, including basement, in which Is the 
boiler room, engine room and electric light plant. A 
cold storage Is located in the basement. On the second 
floor is the main dining hall, which is 84x48 feet, the 
service room, bakery, kitchen, storeroom, butcher shop 
and cold storage. The third flood Is fitted up with 
rooms for the doctors, employees' rooms, ironing, dry- 
ing and linen rooms, coat rooms, sterilizing room, &c. 
All the buildings are built of field stone, stuccoed on 
the outside and finished with white plaster on the in- 
terior. The ward building is 32x150 feet and the ad- 
ministration building 52x120 feet. The buildings are 
so constructed that additions may be made from time 
to time as the necessity of the case demands. About 
175 patients can be comfortably accommodated in the 
ward buildings. The water supply is derived from a 
large reservoir which Is kept supplied from the springs, 
The system of sewerage is among the most sanitary 
in existence. The total cost of the Sanitarium repre- 
sents an outlay of about $300,000. 

The first Impetus for caring for the State's consump- 
tive poor was given*In an address delivered In 1900 be- 
fore the State Medical Society by Dr. Halsey, then 
president. A bill was drawn by a committee of the 
society, and was passed by the Legislature In 1902, 
when a Board of Managers was appointed by Governor 
iviurphy. Of this Board. Dr. Charles J. KIpp of Newark 
was elected president, and for whom the mountain on 
which the State Sanitarium was built v/as named. The 
Legislature appropriated $50,000 to carry the bill Into 
effect. The Sanitarium is Intended as a model Instltu- 



IIORDENTOWX INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 103 

tion, largely educational In character, which would 
jive a practical demonstration of up-to-date methods 
of treating cases of tuberculosis and point the way for 
other Institutions of a similar type, at the same time 
extending the direct benefits of Its system to as large a 
number of cases as Its necessarily limited facilities 
would enable it to care for. The Institution handles 
about six hundred cases annually. Its purpose is 
to arrest the disease In its Incipient stage and dis- 
charge the patient In such condition that, with the 
aid of the instruction he receives while at the Institu- 
tion, he may be reasonably certain of being able to ef- 
fect his own cure. This Instruction will prove valuable 
not only to himself, but to the public In general, as It 
becomes disseminated through his agency and that of 
the other patients who undergo treatment and go out 
again In the world at large. As k rule, the cases se- 
lected will be such as can be treated with reasonable 
expectancy of a cure. In 1912 the Legislature appro- 
priated $89,500 for new buildings. 

BORI>E]VTOWN INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 

The Manual Training and Industrial School for Col- 
ored Youth located at Bordentown, N. J., is a State 
institution maintained by appropriations from the 
State and under the supervision of the State Board 
of Education. 

The purpose of the school is to make good citizens 
and to prepare its graduates to participate intelli- 
gently and efficiently in the economic and industrial 
life of the communities in which they live. . The 
school aims to teach each student a trade, and also 
to surround him with a wholesome, refined and in- 
dustrious atmosphere. It is patterned after the plan 
of Hampton and Tuskegce, one-half day being given 
to trade work and the other half to academic work 
correlated with the trades. It is an educational institution 
and not in any sense a correctional or charitable Institution. 
The school occupies a conspicuous siie on the 
banks of the Delaware River, comprising 275 acres 
of good farm land. The physical equipment of the 
school includes an administration building ; two girls' 
dormitories ; a boys' dormitory and barracks ; a laundry ; 
a trade building for machine shop, auto repairing and 
carpentry ; a printing shop ; and a group of farm buildings. 

Two hundred and seventy students are enrolled, this num- 
ber exhausting the facilities for accommodation. 



HU STATE REFORMATORY FOR WOMEN. 

Tuitiou is free, but a charcje of aliout $150 per year is 
made for l)oarcl, wasliiny, medical attendance and registra- 
tion. 

STATE REFORMATORY FOR A\03IEN AT ClilNTON. 

The Reformatory is located on a farm of 346 acres, one 
and one-half miles from Clinton. It was dedicated on May 
26th, 1913. 

There are eight buildings in use at this institution, as 
follows : 1, Fielder Cottage, old farmhouse, enlarged to ac- 
commodate twenty-seven to thirty women ; 2, Homestead 
Cottage, Superintendent's house, living-room and dining-room 
used by staff officers as well as Superintendent ; 3, Stowe 
Cottage, for colored, accommodates thirty women ; 4, Pad- 
dock Hall, second floor entirely taken up as a hospital, first 
floor accommodates twenty-three women ; 5, Wittpenn Cot- 
tage, this is the maternity cottage and houses mothers and 
infants ; this will accommodate twenty mothers and twenty 
infants : 6. Chapel of Good Shepherd, basement of the 
chapel is a gymnasium and is used as a general assembly 
room and school room ; 7, Farm Cottage, this is occupied 
by the farm manager ; 8, Old Cottage, this is an old cot- 
tage which had been used for storing farm machinery during 
the winters, but it has been repaired and is now being used 
as a dwelling by a farm hand. No. 1 is the original cot- 
tage in Avhich the institution opened. No. 2 was formerly 
used by the utility man and family. No. 3 was opened for 
inmates in 1915. No. 4 was opened for inmates in 1918. No. 
5 has very recently been opened for inmates and the equip- 
ment is not quite all here yet. No. 6 was given to the in- 
stitution by Mrs. H. Otto Wittpenn as a memorial to her 
son and niece. 

Officers : Fielder Cottage, 4 ; Homestead. 3 ; Stowe. 5 ; 
Paddock. 5 : Wittpenn, 2 ; Farm Cottag:e, 3 ; Old Cottage, 
1. In addition to the officers required for the management 
of each cottage, the staff is divided into all the cottages 
for living quarters wherever there may be space for their 
sleeping rooms. The fact that the officers live In a cot- 
tage does not mean that their duties are there. 

STATE COLOXY FOR FEEBLE MINDED MALES. 

New Lisbon. 

This institution is located in Burlington County, six miles 
from New Lisbon, on the Long Branch Division of the 
P. R. R. Has a farm of sixty acres, which is being de- 
veloped principally by the inmates. 

The present population is one hundred and thirty, and pro- 
visions are under way to develop to a capacity of five hun- 



STATE CAMP GROUNDS. 105 

died. The construction is principally cement block buildings, 
stuccoed outside. The location, some distance from the rail- 
road, but exceptionally healthy on account of the surround- 
ing pine forests, makes it desirable for the class of inmates 
admitted. It is intended to develop a large farm, by In- 
mate labor, from the adjoining State reservations. 

There are at present twelve substantial buildings and 
ground is being broken for the construction of a dormitory 
building to admit sixty additional cases, for which an ap- 
propriation of $60,000 was granted last year. 

An improved road is being built between New Lisbon and 
the Colony, 

The admissions for the present are desired to be of such 
mentality that they may be able to contribute to the pres- 
ent development. 

Woodbine Colony, at Woodbine, Cumberland County, is a 
gift from the Baron de Hirsh estate. Has been remodeled 
and in such condition that wards to the number of forty 
have been received. The intention is to receive only low 
grade or idiotic type. It is under the control of the same 
board of managers as the Colony at New Lsbon. 

STATE CAMP GROUNDS. 

Sea Girt. 

With a view to provide a suitable location for a per- 
manent camp of instruction for the National Guard, the 
Legislature by an act approved April 29, 1884. authorized 
the Quartermaster-General to "lease or purchase, with the 
approval of the Commander-in-Chief, a suitable ground for 
that purpose,'* to combine the essentials necessary for in- 
struction in camp duty, drills and parades 'with natural 
advantages for the establishment of a range for rifle prac- 
tice, and a sea coast battery for heavy artillery practice. 

Quartermaster-General Lewis Perrine and Major-General 
Gershom Mott, then commanding the Division, National 
Guard, after consultation and inspection by Governor Leon 
Abbett, located a temporary camp on a property at Mana- 
squan known as the "Bailey Farm," lying near the sea 
shore, and here the first encampment of the National Guard 
in the vicinity of Sea Girt was held in 1884. The use of 
these grounds was discontinued in 188.5. 

The Stockton Farm at Sea Girt (the present location of 
the Camp Ground) the property of the Sea Girt Land Im- 
provement Company was then visited and finding it admir- 
ably located and fully adequate for all purposes of a 
military camp, it was leased for a term of five or ten years 
at an annual rental of .$o.000 and the first encampment 
held there August 15th to 22d, 1885 ; and it has been used 
for encampment and mobilization purposes in peace and 
war up to the present time. 



106 STATE FISH HATCHERY AND GAME FARM. 

In 1891, when General Richard A. Donnelly was Quar- 
termaster-General, the tract was purchased and title ac- 
quired. In 1907, Quartermaster-General Murray acquired 
by purchase, authorized by the Legislature, two additional 
tracts at the lower end of the ground giving an ocean 
frontage equal to the western boundary line. With these 
additions the total area of the camp grounds is 165 acres 
at a total cost of $88,085.27. 

The cottage on the camp ground, knowns as the "Little 
White House," was removed from its original location 
fronting the ocean roadway to a position south of the 
famous "Little Round Top" and facing the parade grounds. 
This little building has become historical for in it have been 
entertained many dignitaries, of State, National and for- 
eign repute. 

In 1906, the New Jersey State Building used at the 
Louisiana-Purchase Exposition, held at St. Louis, was re- 
moved to and erected at the State Camp Grounds at the 
entrance thereto facing the parade grounds. This beauti- 
ful building has also been the scene of many political and 
social gatherings and is used each summer by the Governor 
of the State as his headquarters as commander-in-chief of 
the militia of the State. 

STATE FISH HATCHERY AND GAME FARM. 

In 1912 the Board of Fish and Game Commissioners se- 
cured land at Hackettstown, Warren County, for the estab- 
lishment of a fish hatchery, and land at Forked River, Ocean 
County, for the establishment of a Game Farm. In the 
beginning the Legislature made some direct appropriations, 
but since 1915 both establishments, as well as the entire 
work of the Board, are maintained from direct receipts of 
the Board, thereby relieving the people at large from any 
expense in their upkeep or for what they produce. 

The hatchery embraces 118 acres. Operations commenced 
in 1912. There are 164 ponds, carrying 12,000,000 gallons 
of water. The supply consists of approximately 2,500,000 
gallons daily of pure spring water owned and controlled 
by the State, and 2,500,000 gallons of spring brook water 
largely owned and controlled by the State. The last an- 
nual output of fish was 63.092,826, consisting of brook, 
brown and rainbow trout, large and small mouth bass, 
yellow and pike perch. The average number of employes 
for farm, hatchery and construction work is 15. 

Among the buildings are : Superintendent's residence, 
containing four rooms for Commissioner's use, foreman's 
residence, gate lodge, hatchery building, nursery building, 
ice house, building for meat room, garage, carpenter and 
paint shop, machine shop, barn, storehouse and laboratory. 



STATE ARMORIES. 107 

The grounds are attractively arranged, producing a park 
like effect. 

The game farm has 537 acres. Operations commenced 
in 1912. The farm consists of about an equal amount of 
woodland, salt meadows and cultivated lands surrounded 
by an eight foot fence, excepting on the meadows where 
the fence is four feet. One hundred and twenty-five acres 
are fenced for a deer park, and 10 acres are fenced for a 
rabbit warren. The annual game production is about 
6,000 head, consisting of English pheasants, wild turkeys, 
quail and deer. The average number of employes for farm 
and game production is 11. 

Among the buildings are : Hatching house, 50 x 18 feet ; 
incubator building, 50 x 20 feet ; chicken houses, brick pump 
house, five enclosed pens containing approximately three 
hundred square feet, these pens being seven feet high and 
covered with two-inch mesh wire, and a number of smaller 
pens ; Superintendent's residence, containing rooms for 
Commissioners ; two frame dwelling houses, gate lodge, ice 
house, barns and other suitable structures. 

STATE ARMORIES. 

Beside the State Arsenal at Trenton and the camp grounds 
at Sea Girt, the state has eighteen armories for use of 
the several organizations of the National Guard. 

These armories, constructed with administration building-s 
and ample drill shed, are all equipped with modern steel 
lockers for officers and enlisted men, rifle ranges, and store- 
room facilities for the care of the large quantities of federal 
property issued to the state on requisition of the governor 
under the provisions of the national defense act for uniform- 
ing, arming and equipping the National Guard for field 
service. 

The Quartermaster General by authority of law exei-cises 
supervision of all armories, including construction, altera- 
tions, equipment and furnishing, care, maintenance and pro- 
tection thereof ; also custody of all moneys derived as rent- 
als for use of armories by beneficial, veteran or civic organi- 
zations, for dances, athletic and other exhibitions. Per- 
mission for such use of armories is obtained by applica- 
tion to local custodians and submitted to the Quartermaster 
General with recommendation for final action. 

REGIMENTAL. 

Location. Cost. 

Newark, N. J $262,531.79 

Trenton, N. J 283,959.05 

Camden, N. J 170,152.88 

.Jersey City, N. J 203,790.89 

Paterson, N. J 171,874.13 



108 STATE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

TROOP^ BATTERY AND BATTALION. 

Location. Cost. 

East Orange, Battery $127,000.00 

Camden, Battery 136.800.00 

Newark, Cavalry Regiment Headquarters 160.000.00 

Red Bank, Troop 85,000.00 

Westfield, Troop (stabling and riding ring) . . 10,000.00 

Elizabeth, Infantry Battalion 130.000.00 

Orange, Infantry Battalion 144,000.00 

COMPANY. 

Somerville, X. J $30,000.00 

New Brunswick, N. J 46,000.00 

Asbury Park, N. J 34,000.00 

Bridgeton, N. J 28,000.00 

Hackensack, N. J. (acquired by purchase) 14,000.00 

Morristown, N. J. (acquired by purchase) .... 45,000.00 
Englewood, N. J. (not owned by state, rented 

from Armory Association) 

Under various acts of the legislature, sites for armories 
in cities of the first and second class are selected and pur- 
chased (by condemnation if necessary) by the state military 
board, sitting as an Armory Commission ; and for company 
armories in smaller towns by a special commission appointed 
by the mayor or other governing body. The cost of the 
ground for all armories is paid by the counties and th^ 
title given to the state, and the state pays for cost of 
construction, fitting, furnishing, etc. 

RUTGERS COLLEGE AND THE STATE L'XIVERSITY 

OP NEW JERSEY — STATE AGRICULTURAL 

COLLEGE. 

Rutgers College is located at New Brunswick. It was 
founded as Queen's College by charters from George III, the 
first given November 10th. 1766, and the second given March 
20th. 1770. The purpose of the college expressed in the 
charter is "the education of youth in the learned languages, 
liberal and useful arts and sciences." The work of the 
college began in 1771, and forty years later it was removed 
to its present site. In 1825 the name was changed to Rut- 
gers College. The governor, the chief justice of the Supreme 
Court and the attorney general of the state of New Jersey 
are ex-officio members of the board of trustees. 

In 1803 the trustees established new courses of scientific 
instruction, and in 1864 the legislature, accepting the pro- 
visions of the land-grant act, passed in 1867 by the congress 
of the United States, made the Rutgers Scientific School 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS. 109 

the State College for the benefit of agriculture aud tbe 
meclianic arts, usually called the State Agricultural College, 
and made the trustees of the college the trustees of the work 
of higher education to be thus maintained by the nation 
and the state. A board of visitors was created, its mem- 
bers to be appointed by the governor ; it is now composed of 
one representative from each county. In 1918 the legisla- 
ture designated the State College also the State University 
of New Jersey. 

Tbe courses of instruction at the college and university 
now include liberal arts, the pure and applied sciences, agri- 
culture, engineering and education. The degrees of bachelor 
of arts, bachelor of letters and bachelor of science are 
granted. Courses of graduate study are also given, leading to 
the advanced degrees of master of arts, master of science 
and doctor of philosophy. 

A summer session extension courses, short courses in 
agriculture and an agricultural experiment station are also 
maintained. 

The New .Jersey College for Women, not co-educational, 
was organized as a department or college of the State Uni- 
versity in 191S and located on a campus separate from the 
campus of the college for men. It offers all usual courses 
in liberal arts and sciences and also courses in home econom- 
ics, leading to the usual degrees. 

The land occupied by Rutgers College and the State Uni- 
versity now includes the Queen's campus, the Neilson cam- 
pus, the Athletic Field and the College Farm, beside the 
campus used by the Women's College, about 400 acres in all. 
The buildings are : the Queen's Building. Van Nest Hall, 
Library, Chapel, Gymnasium, Geological Hall. Engineering 
Building, Chemistry Building, Entomology Building, Winants 
Dormitory, Ford Dormitory, Ceramics Building, Agricul rural 
Building, Horticultural Building, Poultry Husbandry Build- 
ing, Short Course Building, beside many smaller buildings, 
and beside College Hall and Cooper Hall of the Women's 
College. 

The registry for the present year, 1921-22, is : Under- 
graduates. 76.3 ; graduate students. 25 : special students, 6 : 
Women's College, 286 ; short courses in agriculture. 133 ; 
summer session, 636 ; extension courses, 635 ; total, 2,486. 

AGRICULTURAL EXPERI3IENT STATIONS. 

Chapter 106, P. L. 1880, provides : "That, for the benefit 
of practical and scientific agriculture, and for the develop- 
ment of our unimproved lands, the New Jersey Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station, with suitable branches, is hereby 
established." In accordance with the provisions of this 
act the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station, one of 
the pioneers in its" field in the United States, was organized 



110 AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS. 

at Nt'w Brunswick. N. J., under the leadersbip of Dr. George 
II. Cook, at tliat time State Geologist of New Jersey and 
I'rofessor of Geology at Rutgers College. By an act of 
Congress, approved March 2d, 1SS7, funds were set aside 
for the organization of experiment stations in all of the 
states of the Union, these stations to be in each case a 
department of the state college for the benefit of agricul- 
ture and the mechanic arts. There are, therefore, two ex- 
periment stations in New Jersey, one of them governed 
directly by a board of managers appointed by the governor 
of the state, for a tenn of two years, and the other by the 
board of trustees of Rutgers College, subject to the general 
supervision and control of the board of visitors, likewise 
appointed by the governor of the state for a period of two 
years. The personnel of the board of managers of the Ex- 
periment Station and of the board of visitors of the State 
Agricultural College is practically the same, and dififers only 
as to certain ex-oflScio members. By subsequent acts, both 
state and federal, the functions and activities of the two 
experiment stations have been enlarged to a point where 
they have come to play an important role in the develop- 
ment of the agriculture of the state. 

The activities of the New Jersey Experiment Stations are 
of a threefold nature. Certain of these activities have to 
do with control or regulatory matters. These include the 
collection and analysis of samples of fertilizers, lime, in- 
secticides, feeding stuffs and agricultural seeds sold in the 
state. It is intended through this regulatory service to pro- 
tect both the consumer and the legitimate manufacturer 
and dealer against fraud or unscrupulous competition. A 
staflf of chemists and of other technically trained men is 
maintained by the Stations for this purpose. Another im- 
portant group of activities of the Stations has to do with 
research. Soil, fertilizer, insect, plant disease, live stock, 
farm management and numerous other problems are made 
the subject of investigation by the members of the staff. 
Another group of activities of the Station is educational in 
character. By means of bulletins, circulars, press articles, 
lectures, exhibits, movable schools and demonstrations the 
rural communities of the state are kept in touch -n^th the 
progress of agricultural science and the important practical 
applications indicated by investigations in New Jersey 
and elsewhere. Much of the educational work is carried on 
through county organizations, particularly the farm bureaus, 
which employ county agents, home demonstration agents and 
leaders of boys' and girls' clubs. These activities, aside 
from imparting information, aim to encourage the develop- 
ment of leadership in the rural communities, the defining 
of the rural problems and the search for methods for solv- 
ing these problems. 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS. Ill 

Since their establishment the Experiment Stations have 
helped to introduce new crops into the state, such as alfalfa, 
soy beans, cow peas and crimson clover, to establish im- 
portant varieties of plants, to find better methods of feed- 
ing farm animals and of dealing with destructive insect 
pests and plant diseases. The New Jersey Stations have a 
recognized reputation for investigations in the field of soil 
fertility and the use of commercial fertilizers in soil im- 
provement and the more profitable production of farm crops. 
Among its staff there have been in the past and there are 
now men of reputation in different fields of agricultural 
science. 



112 llEPUBLICAN STATE PLATFORM. 

REPUBLICAN STATE PLATFORM. 

(Adopted at Trenton, October 4, 1921.) 

We, the lawfully constituted members of the convention 
of the Republican Party, duly assembled, formally make 
our pledges as to our legislative action, if entrusted with 
power by the voters of our State. 

As an evidence of our sincerity, we call attention to the 
fact that every pledge made in the Party Platform of 1920 
was fulfilled, and. in a number of cases, by overriding the 
veto of a Democratic Governor. We call particular atten- 
tion to the fulfillment of our pledges made to the women as 
new voters of the State. 

PRESIDENT HARDING'S ADMINISTRATION. 

We commend the human and kindly qualities of President 
Harding, and approve his able and courageous administra- 
tion. He has shown himself to be a man of the people, in 
sympathy with the country's needs and prompt in remedial 
suggestion. His reverent attitude and recognition of the 
sanctity of his trust is in keeping with the Christian char- 
acter of our presidents. 

UNITED STATES SENATORS AND CONGRESSMEN. 

We heartily commend the efficient and patriotic services 
of our two United States Senators, Hon. Joseph S. Fre- 
linghuysen and Hon. Walter E. Edge and the Republican 
members of the congressional delegation from our State. 

DISARMAMENT. 

The whole country approves of President Harding's invita- 
tion to the chief nations for a conference on the limitation 
of armaments. This is the most important problem before 
the country and the world. It is the first practical step 
towards peace the world has ever seen, and it marks 
President Harding as the broad-visioned champion of a 
new era. The fact that out of every dollar spent by the 
National Government, over 90 cents is for war purposes and 
less than 10 cents for civic, educational objects and all 
other purposes combined, shows the need of limiting arma- 
ment and abolishing war if civilization is to progress. That 
America takes the lead in the reduction of armament, the 
curtailment of the wasteful expenditures in preparation for 
war, and, most inspiring of all, the saving of human life, 
is a source of gratification to all Americans, irrespective 
of party. We extend to our President our hearty support 



REPUBLICAN STATE TLATFORM. 113 

and encouragoment in his efforts to fulfill this saci-erl and 
solemn trust. 

PPvESIDENTS POLICIES COMMENDED. 

In accordance with the President's expressed policies, we 
demand of Congress the prompt and immediate passage of 
a bill "Facilitating the funding of the debts of the rail- 
ways to the United States," thus insuring a large and im- 
mediate demand for the employment of men now idle. 

The railways buy about one-third of the products of 
this country. When their buying power is curtailed, in- 
dustry is checked and non-employment follows. If their 
buying power is restored through this refunding bill and 
payment made by the Government of its debts to the rail- 
v>ays, the latter will be enabled to make purchases, starting 
business anew, stimulating trade and insuring employment 
and wages. 

We also demand of Congress a reduction of Federal taxes, 
to be effective this year. The people of the country voted 
the Republican ticket with this object in view and we sug- 
gest to the Republican Congress that the country should not 
be compelled to pay another Democratic tax bill under a 
Republican administration. Democratic taxes have proved 
a handicap upon industry and business, have prevented 
the revival of good times and are discouraging production 
and business. 

Legislation along these lines will go far toward solving 
the problem of non-employment by providing work that will 
increase the army of wage earners. 

As a further aid to furnishing employment, we ask Con- 
gress to enact a tariff bill that will protect our wage-earners 
against the competition of the low-priced labor abroad, paid 
in a cheap and depreciated money, which makes it possible 
to produce foreign goods at a cost below a living American 
wage. To accept these goods from foreign nations in pay- 
ment of their debts means less employment and less wages 
at home, and a reduction in the purchasing power of the 
people. We cannot provide employment at home by pur- 
chasing our goods abroad. We prefer to open our mills 
to the workmen of America rather than send our dollars 
to the cheap markets of the world. 

TAXATION. 

Taxation has become a burden upon our municipalities 
as well as upon the nation. Prosperity demands less taxes, 
not more taxes, of any kind. We protest against a State 
income tax and pledge ourselves to prevent the enactment 
of a law for such a tax, at least during the period of re- 
adjustment. While the Federal Government is endeavoring 



114 REPUBLICAN STATE PLATFORM. 

to reduce income taxes, it is inexpedient for New Jersey 
to thwart the Federal Government's laudable purpose by 
creating a State income tax. 

ECONOMY. 

In 1916 New Jersey adopted a uniform bond act that 
adequately controlled the borrowing power of municipalities 
and counties, thereby advancing the credit of its borrowing 
agencies and contributing to the welfare of its people. At 
each session of the Legislature, there has been a demand 
for an extension of this borrowing power, which we feel 
will injure the credit standing of New Jersey municipalities. 
If elected, we pledge ourselves not to increase the borrow- 
ing powers of our municipalities and counties. 

The practice of appealing to the Legislature for salary 
increases for county and city officials, when such salaries 
may be fixed by the local authorities under the Home Rule 
acts passed by Republican Legislatures of 1917 and 1918, is 
contrary to the spirit of Home Rule, and we recommend 
that the practice be discouraged. 

FINANCE. 

The Treasury of the State is in a safe and healthy con- 
dition. Since 1915, when a Republican Legislature faced 
the financial stringency caused by the deficit in 1913 cre- 
ated by Democratic control, a constructive policy of busi- 
ness-like management has been continuously pursued. 

During the past seven years of Republican legislative 
majorities, we have passed through a grave financial era, 
yet the revenues of the State have been so administered 
that no special war taxes were imposed, and at the end 
of each fiscal year a substantial balance was left in the 
Treasury. 

Believing that this has been made possible by the intro- 
duction of the budget system, safeguarded by Republican 
Legislatures, we pledge ourselves to the improvement of 
the Budget Act by such amendments as may more clearly 
define its purposes and fulfill its spirit; and we regret 
this lack of co-operation on the part of the Democratic Gov- 
ernor who has hampered our efforts in this regard. New 
Jersey was one of the few States that was enabled to bear 
the burden of the war, and yet avoid a deficit or issue bonds 
for war purposes. 

The financial policy of the Republican Party has been 
to consider existing conditions. During the past year the 
increase of unemployment has been recog-nized as a factor 
which should properly effect appropriations. AVe affirm 
our belief that the State has a responsibility to alleviate 
such a condition and should absorb labor through the erec- 



RErUBLICAN STATE PLATFORM. 115 

tion of any necessary new buildings and by improvements 
and expansions, in so far as the state of the Treasury 
warrants. 

INSTITUTIONAL BOND BILL. 

Dependency is the menace of civilization. It is a con- 
dition which unless checked means a moral and financial 
bankruptcy to the State. 

New Jersey should continue to care humanely for her 
dependents and should provide proper institutions, labora- 
tories and equipment which would make possible scientific 
study and investigation and develop means of prevention. 
Any justifiable State policy must be remedial as well as 
custodial, to the end that as many as possible may be 
saved or restored to useful and productive citizenship. 

The Republican Party has given uniform support to this 
policy and advocates a program that permits the inaugura- 
tion and completion of a comprehensive, constructive de- 
velopment, providing not only for immediate needs, but 
also for known future requirements. 

This program is presented at a time when the working 
man needs employment and will offer relief to a situation 
which demands immediate attention. The cost of carry- 
ing the bond issue to create this program will be no greater 
than the moneys being annually appropriated to provide for 
the maintenance and reconstruction of the present in- 
adequate buildings, and for piece-meal construction thereof. 

We therefore urge the citizens of the State to vote in 
favor of the Institutional Bond Bill, an economic measure 
recommended by a special legislative commission adopted by 
both houses of the Legislature. 

GOOD ROADS AND HIGHWAYS. 

New Jersey was the pioneer in good roads. The traffic 
over her highways is greater than that of any other State 
in the Union. Her agricultural, industrial and residential 
districts are dependent on good and usable highways. The 
present condition of our roads has caused tourists to avoid 
New Jersey and has entailed a tremendous loss upon our 
merchants and has depressed real estate value. We con- 
demn the present highway commission for its dilatory, in- 
efficient and expensive methods, for its wasteful delays, 
and for unnecessarily prolonging the use of detours in the 
midst of the summer season. We favor the construction 
of all public highways under open and uniform specifications 
which will permit of unrestricted bidding. 

We urge our representatives to adopt a financial pro- 
gram for the completion as promptly and as uermanently 
as possible, of our present State Highw^ay System without 
increasing the one mill State Tax now in effect. 



IIG REPUBLICAN STATE TLATFORM. 

The importance of good i-oacls to a rural distriot cannot 
be over-estimated. To sliow profit and to liave a proper 
living condition on a farm, liard surface roads must be 
accessible. We recommend, therefore, the establishment of 
a standarized sj'stem of management, construction and 
maintenance of our rural roads. 

AGRICULTURE. 

In twenty j-ears New Jersey has risen in population from 
the 16th to the 10th State in the Union, To feed this popu- 
lation at as low a cost as possible, farm acreage and farm 
production must show a proportionate increase. 

The high cost of food supplies can only be reduced by 
assuring profit on the farm through modern methods of pro- 
duction and distribution, and contentment in the farmer's 
home through living conditions which approach as nearly 
as possible the advantages of city life. 

As a State, we should develop a definite agricultural policy 
and as a party, we pledge ourselves to further such action. 
We consider farming a basic industry of our State, and there- 
fore favor the development of farmer organizations and of 
the activities of the State Department of Agriculture and 
the State Agricultural College, and we pledge our support 
in their efforts to standardize quality of production and pack- 
ages and to insure their purity in the interests of buyer and 
seller. 

We ask that special attention be given to the rural schools 
of our State in order that the elevating influence of good 
schools in our rural communities may be retained and in- 
creased. 

PURE FOOD. 

We pledge ourselves to safeguard the purity of our food 
supply and advocate adequate protection of milk and milk 
products by preventing the use of cocoanut oil and other 
like substances. 

The health of the children of our State is of paramount 
importance and we condemn any commercial interest which 
permits their exploitation and thus endangers the well being 
of our citizens. 

We deplore the action of the Democratic Governor in veto- 
ing the bill to prevent the adulteration of ice cream and 
recommend this and other legislation to protect our citizens 
from the increasing danger resulting from a lack of proper 
supervision of the food sold and served in this State. 

HEALTH. 

We condemn the Democratic Governor for refusing to ap- 
point women members of the State Board of Health, as re- 



ItEPUBLICAN STATE PLATFORM. 117 

quired by a law passed unanimouslj- by both Houses of the 
Legislature and signed by himself, thus depriving the De- 
partment of Health of the direct services of the women of 
New Jersey. 

BRIDGE AND TUNNEL. 

We are proud of the advance made under Republican aus- 
pices in extending our State highways by connecting with 
our adjacent States by tunnel and bridge across the great 
waterway on our border. 

The people have demanded that a tunnel be built between 
Jersey City and New York. Bonds have been issued, but 
the Tunnel Commission has failed to prosecute the work. 
Public oflSce is a public trust, and the people demand prompt 
results from their servants. If the Democratic members of 
tliis commission who are in control continue to obstruct the 
building of the tunnel, it will be the duty of those in power 
to see that a commission is appointed that can and will carry 
forward this great improvement. 

In order to speedily complete the Delaware River Bridge 
we urge upon those in authority that they co-operate with 
authorities of Philadelphia and Pennsylvania, to speedily 
match New Jersey's appropriations so that the completion of 
this great project may be promptly accomplished. 

INJURED WORKMEN. 

We commend the work of the commission for the rehabili- 
tation of injured workmen which, through Republican initia- 
tive and support, has been enabled within three years to 
establish clinics in the large industrial centers throughout 
our State. We realize the value of this progressive activity, 
and pledge ourselves to its further development. 

EX-SERVICE MEN. 

We pledge our effort to maintain and increase the efficiency 
of the State Department of Labor to the end that it may 
better perform the duty of securing employment for ex-service 
men, and we further pledge the co-operation of every State 
agency with the Federal A'eterans' Bureau, and all other vet- 
eran welfare organizations. 

NEW JERSEY'S PATRIOTISM. 

New Jersey's record in the war was second to none among 
the States of the Union, and reflected great credit upon the 
patriotism of her citizens. We accord to them unstinted 
praise and appreciative acknowledgment. We rejoice that 
New Jersey has provided, through a bond issue, an acknowl- 
edgment that the men who fought our battles have not 
been forgotten by the people of this State. Our State fur- 



118 REPUBLICAN STATE PLATFORM. 

nished 123,000 noble sons for service in the war. Of these 
115,000 have filed claim, 91,000 of which have been ap- 
proved and paid, and it is likely that all pending claims 
and those received before November 30th will have been 
paid before January 1st. This record speaks for itself. 

We recognize the justice and need of adjusted compensa- 
tion for the ex-service man, and in this connection we urge 
Congress to take action to secure from the foreign gov- 
ernments payment, or funding of the interest and debts 
they owe us in order to provide the National Treasury with 
the necessary means for such purpose. 

PARTY ORGANIZATION. 

In order that party organization may be simplified and 
standardized to enable it to function more effectively and 
promptly, we recommend that the Legislature be authorized 
to appoint a commission from each party to suggest modifi- 
cations in the interests of uniformity, simplicity and effi- 
ciency. 

LYNCHING— KU KLUX KLAN. 

The practice of lynching has become a national shame 
and disgrace, and a violation of the Federal constitution in 
that it deprives a citizen of life without due process of 
law. We therefore call upon the present Congress to pass 
the Anti-Lynching Bill, making lynching a Federal crime. 

We deplore the increasing- disrespect for law and order, 
which strikes at the very base of our Republican form of 
government, and encourages and culminates in mob vio- 
lence. We denounce individuals, organizations and mobs 
which attempt through the propagation of religious and race 
hatred to override the majesty of the law and usurp the 
powers of constituted authority. There is no room in this 
country for a masked super-government, like that of the so- 
called Ku Klux Klan organization. 

CLEAN WATERWAYS. 

The pollution of our beaches by oil and refuse is detri- 
mental to the welfare of the counties bordering on the 
ocean, bays and rivers of our State. The destruction of the 
fish by this means is a serious danger to one of the great 
food supplies of the nation. We pledge the co-operation of 
our -State with the National Government, to remedy this 
menace. 

LAW ENFORCEMENT. 

"The Government will endure on the rock of law en- 
forcem.ent or it will perish in the quicksand of lawlessness." 

In this emphatic statement, the Attorney-General of the 
United States has recently pointed out the importance of 



REPUBLICAN STATE PLATFORM. 119 

obedience to tlie law of the land on the part of all loyal 
citizens, as well as the necessity of proper enforcement of 
the law on the part of those charged with that duty. 

On such fundamental questions there should be' no dif- 
ference of opmion. In a nation ruled by law, the will of 
the people, when expressed in the method provided by the 
people themselves, must be supreme, else popular govern- 
ment fails. 

We, accordingly, reaffirm the party policy declared at the 
State Convention of 1920 and thereafter approved by an 
unprecedented majority of the voters of the State, that 
there must be honest and impartial enforcement of the 18th 
Amendment and the laws relating thereto. 

EDUCATION. 

The educational system of New Jersey has always had 
the support of the Republican Party by wise laws and 
liberal appropriations. 

The Constitution of New Jersey requires the establishment 
and maintenance of free public schools for the equal benefit 
of all the people of the State. In order that this wise and 
.iust provision be observed, the educational system of this 
State should be maintained on a basis of the highest effi- 
ciency, and due care should be taken that the children of 
all sections of the State, rural as well as urban, be given 
every possible opportunity for thorough and efficient in- 
struction. 

SCHOOL ATTENDANCE. 

In order to improve the attendance of childron in the 
schools of the State, we favor the passage of such laws 
as shall require the taking of an adequate census at rea- 
sonable intervals, and the employment of a county attendance 
officer in each county, when so recommended by the County 
Superintendent of the county and approved by the State 
Commissioner of Education and the State Board of Educa- 
tion. 

MOTOR VEHICLE LEGISLATION. 

We unhesitatingly commend the 1921 Republican Legis- 
lature for the passage of the new Motor Vehicle Act and 
commit ourselves to the strict enforcement of its provisions, 
together with such improvement as its actual operation may 
show to be desirable. 

WOMEN IN INDUSTRY. 

We condemn the Governor for refusing to make his ap- 
pointment to the Maternity Commission as directed by the 
1921 Legislature, thereby preventing scientific investigation 
of the working conditions of women in industry. We believe 



120 REPUBLICAN STATE PLATFORM. 

that New Jersey should join the large group of States which 
protect the health of woraen, and that of their children, by 
legislation limiting night work for women in industries 
whose continuance and service is not dependent upon a 24- 
hour schedule. 

HOUSING. 

Realizing that housing facilities in certain parts of the 
State of New Jersey are inadequate for the needs of the 
people, and that constant agitation has been had therefor, 
and untold hardship endured especially in the congested 
districts, therefore we recommend the passage of such legis- 
lation at the next session of the Legislature as will tend 
to alleviate existing conditions in order that the families 
suffering therefrom may obtain much needed relief. 

CLEAN SPORTS. 

If the Boxing Laws of the State are to be preserved, 
they must be kept free from political manipulation and 
properly regulated for the protection of the public as against 
unprincipled and unscrupulous promoters. Sports of the 
State should be so regulated as to prevent them from ever 
becoming a possible source of revenue of any political party 
or organization. Admission to boxing matches within New 
Jersey can only be justified on the ground that it is of pub- 
lic interest and benefit. If so, the public should be per- 
mitted to witness these exhibitions at a reasonable and 
not at a prohibitive price. We therefore recommend, fol- 
lowing the example of New York, a regulation that will 
make the price of the admission reasonable to the attending 
public and not unreasonable for the benefit of the wealthy 
promoter and his silent political partner, 

PORT TREATY. 

The signing of the treaty by New Jersey and New York 
created a port district and setting up a port authority marks 
an historical epoch in the relations of the two States. To 
set in motion with legal machinery authorized by the treaty 
a comprehensive plan outlining the great work proposed 
to be constructed remains to be submitted to the next Legis- 
lature by the Port Authority Commission. We pledge our 
party to the adoption of such a comprehensive plan as will 
enable our State to reap the inestimable benefits which the 
development of our harbor and river within the port dis- 
trict will insure to our people. 

We are proud to submit our record of accomplishment in 
the past, and therefore we feel justified in asking the sup- 
port of the people of New Jersey. 



I)E:M(!CRATIC state rLATFOIi.M. 1_>1 

DEMOCRATIC STATE PLATFORM. 

(Adopted at Trenton, October 4, 1921.) 

The Democratic Party, in State Convention assembled, 
adopts the following platform of principles to which its 
candidates for membership in the Senate and General As- 
sembly are pledged : 

We comm^end Governor Edwards for his splendid admin- 
istrative achievements tund for the efficient manner in which 
he has at all times looked after the interests of the people 
of New Jersey. 

At his inaugural Governor Edwards asserted that to him 
the holding of a public office was a sacred trust, and this 
thought has dominated his every action. 

At a time when extravagances and excesses prevailed 
<^hroughout the land, he insisted that the affairs of New 
Jersej' should be conducted in a business-like manner, and 
demanded that every department and commission coming 
under his control should exercise the most rigid economies. 
He has successfully co-ordinated the various departments 
and commissions so that a spirit of harmony and unity pre- 
vails, with the result that the party does not need to ask 
for endorsement upon high-sounding promises, but can 
point to a record of constructive accomplishment. 

The Democratic Party, through a Democratic Governor, 
has kept faith with the people of New Jersey. 

THE VOLSTEAD ACT. 

The Constitution of the United States is the supreme 
law of the land, which every citizen must uphold in the 
interest of a more perfect union, the advancement of do- 
mestic tranquility and the promotion of the general wel- 
fare, so that the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our 
posterity may be secured. 

The Democratic Party of New .Jersey re-affirms its al- 
legiance to the Constitution of the United States, and to 
each and every of its amendments in each and every of 
their provisions. 

At the same time, we unhesitatingly insist that the 
Constitution must be upheld and maintained in a Constitu- 
tional manner by the enactment and enforcement of laws 
which do not contravene any of its provisions. 

We contend that the Volstead Act. as at present con- 
stituted, does not represent the true spirit of the Eight- 
eenth Amendment, honestly interpreted. We contend that 
't contravenes the provisions of the Fourth Amendment, and 



122 DEMOCRATIC STATE PLATFORM. 

pioflEers an arbitrary and unwarranted interferance with 
Uie unalienable rights of every American citizen. 

There can be no difference of opinion about honest law 
enforcement, as the law of the land must be observed or 
orderly government will cease. 

The Volstead Act was foisted upon an unwilling people 
by paid professional reformers, working for revenue only, 
who by coercion and intimidation have arrogantly set at 
naught the promises of the founders of this Republic — "the 
right of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness." 

The Volstead Act should be repealed, or modified, because 
it has resulted in hypocrisy, in bribery, in evasion of the 
law. and in increased drunkenness. 

The Volstead Act has not resulted in moral good or 
economic benefit to anybody or to any community. The 
inevitable consequences of abridging individual rights and 
denying individual freedom have resulted in a decline of 
public spirit and in disrespect for all law. 

The Volstead Act has fostered the only tyranny to be 
feared in the world to-day — the tyranny of a government 
by fanatical minorities over the consciences, personal acts 
and property rights of individuals. 

We believe the time has now arrived when the men 
and women of New Jersey should beg'in an agitation for 
the repeal or modification of this iniquitous measure. 

THE VAN NESS ACT. 

The particular attention and careful thought of every 
citizen of New Jersey is directed by the members of the 
Democratic State Convention to a law passed at the last 
session of the New Jersey Legislature by a Republican Sen- 
ate and a Republican General Assembly, known as the Van 
Ness Act. 

Despite the veto of Governor Edwards and unmindful 
of the warnings of press and bar, a Republican Senate 
and Assembly were coerced and intimidated into placing 
upon the statute books of New Jersey the most reprehensible 
and tyrannical measure ever enacted by this or any other 
commonwealth. 

The Van Ness Act sets at naught many of the provisions 
of the Constitution of the United States, and contravenes 
many of the provisions of the Constitution of the State of 
New Jersey. 

The Van Ness Act subjects the citizens of New Jersey 
to search and arrest without a Avarrant, despite the sacred 
provisions of both Federal and State Constitutions, which 
explicitly declare that "the right of the people to be secure 
in their persons, houses, papers and effects against unrea- 
sonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no 
warrant shall issue but upon probable cause, supported by 



DEMOCRATIC STATE TLATFORM. 123 

oath or affirmation and particularly describing the place 
to he searched and the papers and things to be seized." 

The Van Ness Act deprives the men and women of New 
Jersey of the sacred right of a trial by jury, despite the 
fact that both Federal and State Constitutions explicitly 
declare that "the right of trial by jury shall remain in- 
violate." 

The Van Ness Act sets at naught the sacred right to 
indictment, as provided by the State Constitution, which ex- 
plicitly declares that "no person shall be held to answer for 
a criminal offense unless on presentment of indictment of 
a grand jury, except in cases of impeachment." 

The Van Ness Act permits men and women of New Jersey 
to be arrested, prosecuted, fined and imprisoned and their 
property confiscated without due process of law. 

We reiterate : There can be no difference of opinion 
about honest law enforcement, as the law of the land 
must he observed or orderly government will cease. 

At the same time we aver that the Constitution of 
the United States and the Constitution of New Jersey 
m.ust be respected and their sacred provisions must be 
kept inviolate, if our fi-ee institutions are to be maintained. 
Therefore, we pledge the Democratic Party to repeal the 
Van Ness Act. 

ENFORCEMENT OF 18TH AMENDMENT. 

We favor the enactment by the Leg-islature of the State 
of New Jersey of a measure to honestly interpret and 
fairly enforce the provisions of the Eighteenth Amendment 
to the Constitution of the United States. 

SUNDAY BLUE LAWS. 

Not satisfied with having robbed the American people 
of their individual liberties, with brazen effrontery the 
same zealots have now turned their attention to the task 
of imposing Sunday Blue Laws upon the people. 

The Democratic Party candidates assert their helief in 
the sanctity of the Sabbath Day, believing that its observ- 
ance as a day of worship makes for a higher and nobler 
citizenship. At the same time, in the language of Holy 
Writ, we believe "the Sabbath was made for man ; not man 
for the Sabbath." 

We believe the Sabbath to be not only a day of worship, 
but also a day of rest — particularly for the great body 
of toilers in the mills and factories of our industrial cities 
— the men and women who have made New Jersey one of 
the premier States of the East. Surely, they are entitled 
to a surcease from their daily round of labors and to in- 
nocent enjoyment. 



124 DEMOCRATIC STATE PLATFORM. 

What we seek for New Jersej' is a reign of law. based 
upon the consent of tlie governed, and sustained and up- 
lield by public opinion, and we deprecate tbe attempts of 
psendo-reformers to impose Sunday Blue Laws upon our 
citizens. 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS AND EDUCATION. 

The hope of the future of American manhood and woman- 
hood lies in the children of the present day. The true 
progress and growth of New Jersey is primarily dependent 
upon the proper conduct and development of its educa- 
tional facilities. 

The public school system is very near to the heart of 
New Jersey, and our candidates are pledged to the develop- 
ment of our school system by extending the agencies for 
industrial education, enlarg-ing the opportunities for the 
training of teachers, improving the country schools, and 
by instituting night schools and other educational facilities. 

We endorse the present tenure of office law for teach- 
ers and pledge our party to continue it. 

PUBLIC UTILITIES. 

We commend Governor Edwards for his appointment of 
a Public Utility Commission, the members of which are 
evidencing daily their ability to solve the vexing prob- 
lems incident to public and quasi-public utilities in a manner 
that not only protects the interests of the people but also 
conserves the interests of the corporations engaged in serv- 
ing the public. 

bridCtE and tunnel. 

We commend the New Jersey Interstate Bridge and Tun- 
nel Commission for the great care its members are exer- 
cising in the initial work incident to the construction of a 
tunnel under the Hudson River and a bridge over the 
Delaware River, engineering projects that by reason of their 
magnitude call for exactness both as to plan, scope and 
detail. 

We endorse the presieut ma.iority personnel of the com- 
mission, and w^e stand with it in its determination to com- 
pel respect for the equal rights of the State of New Jersey 
as a full partner with the State of New York. 

We deplore the injection of party politics into these vast 
State Enterprises, which can only be brought to a suc- 
cessful culmination by the exercise of a spirit of mature co- 
operation and helpfulness that should actuate every citi- 
zen, regardless of party affiliation. 



DEMOCRATIC STATE PLATFORM. 125 

MQiRRIS CANAL. 

We direct the attention of tbe people of New Jersey to 
tlie Morris Canal, long since abandoned by tbe Lebigb Val- 
ley Railroad Company. Its present value lies in its potable 
water rights, now so greatly needed by the municipalities 
of the northern part of the State, and also in its basin 
facilities. 

The State has the right to take the canal in the year 
1924, upon paying to the owners thereof the appraised value 
of the same, to be estimated and fixed upon by ten com- 
missioners, or a majority of them, to be mutually chosen 
by tbe State and tbe Company in the year 1923. 

We pledge our party to use its every endeavor to effect 
a settlement of this important matter, which has been a 
source of constant annoyance for many years. 

INSTITUTIONS AND AGENCIES. 

The proper care of tbe dependents and wards of tbe 
State — the poor, tbe aged, the infirm, the sick, the insane, 
as well as those who have violated its laws — is a sacred 
duty and obligation, recognized by tbe men and women of 
New Jersey, who at all times have sanctioned tbe expendi- 
ture of public moneys to build, equip, extend and ade- 
quately maintain hospitals, homes, sanatoriums, correctional, 
reformatory, penal and other public institutions. 

During- the last session of the Legislature an act author- 
izing the creation of a debt of the State of New .Jersey 
for the construction, extension, and concerning tbe institu- 
tions of the State under the State Board of Control of 
Institutions and Agencies by the issuing of bonds in an 
amount not to exceed fourteen millions of dollars was 
passed. 

This act is now before the people of New Jersey upon 
referendum for decision at the next general election. 

We urge the careful consideration of every voter to this 
important measure. 

rORT AND WATERWAYS DEVELOPMENT. 

The future growth, development and welfare of New 
Jersey as an industrial and commercial State is dependent 
to a large degree upon the extension of its transportation 
facilities, its ports and coastal and inland waterways. 

The present transportation facilities as represented by 
its rails and canals are inadequate to properly and economi- 
cally care for the mobilization and transportation of the 
pi'oducts of its farms, mines, industries and commerce for 
interstate and foreign shipment. 



12G DEMOCRATIC STATE TLATFORM. 

We pledge our party to the enactment of legislation by 
which the several ports of New Jersey will be developed, 
and also to the creation of a comprehensive system of 
watei^ways. 

HOUSING. 

The homes of the people are the very boginuinc: of t^^o 
progress of our commonwealth, the very centers of its law 
and order, and of its social and political prosperity. They 
arc the central points from which radiate the crystallizing 
and solidifying- processes of city, state and national life. 

The need for additional homes in New Jersey is urgent. 
Recognizing the great hardship now experienced by a large 
number of the men and women of this state, due to housing 
shortage and rent profiteering, we pledge our candidates 
to use their every endeavor to enact laws that \A-ill put 
a stop to rent profiteering and stimulate the building of 
homes. 

We commend the Building and Loan Associations of New 
Jersey for the substantial assistance given home builders 
in providing funds for construction work and also for their 
assiduous labors in curbing rent profiteering. 

KU KLUX KLAN. 

While we believe that the right of the people to form 
voluntary associations for mutual assistance and protec- 
tion has been definitely established, we deprecate the per- 
nicious activities of secret organizations having for their 
sole purpose the creation of race and religious prejudice 
as a creed. 

In this connection we advocate an oflacial inquiry by 
the Federal authorities of the activities of the so-called Ku 
Klnx Klan, to the end that this great conspiracy to abridge 
civil and religious liberty shall be checked for all time, 
and we call upon our representatves in the United States 
Senate and in the House of Representatives to urge the 
thorough investigation of this insidious un-American organi- 
zation. 

IRELAND. 

Within the limits of international comity, we urge that 
every power of this nation and State be exerted to the end 
that the principle of self-government may be speedily estab- 
lished in Ireland, 

STATE ROADS. 

We aflSrm our contention that improved roads and high- 
ways are of vital importance to commerce, to industry, to 
agriculture and to rural life, and now, as always, we aver 
that the creation of a comprehensive State Highway System, 



DEMOCRATIC STATE PLATFORM. 127 

with the burdoii of cost placed equitably upon all the peo- 
ple of the State, is necessary to the welfare of the people 
of New Jersey. 

We commend the work of the State Highway Commis- 
sion and particularly do we commend the work of the 
State Highway Engineer, through whose activities and 
under whose direction an equitable and comprehensive high- 
way system is being established throughout New Jersey 
in an economical and efficient manner. 

We direct attention to the fact that during three years of 
Republican domination of the State Highway Commission 
forty miles of highways were built, while within the brief 
period of eighteen months of Democratic control, one hun- 
dred and fifty miles of State highways have been con- 
structed — an increase of 375 per cent., in addition to which 
five hundred and twenty miles of State highways have been 
maintained in a high state of efficiency, while during the 
past winter three hundred and fifty miles of highways were 
cleared of snow and ice, and made available for vehicular 
traffic. 

LABOR. 

The Democratic Party is the party of the working man 
and the working woman. The attitude of the Democratic 
I'arty with respect to labor is known to everyone. 

The Democratic Party always has maintained that labor 
is not a commodity, because it is human, and has asserted 
that labor is the basis of individual well-being, of prosperity 
and of all progress. It has insisted that the value of labor 
as an element of prosperity must be distinctly recognized 
and the welfare of the working man and woman regarded as 
especially entitled to legislative care. 

The Democratic Party has been a friend of Labor in New- 
Jersey for many years. There is not a labor measure on 
the statute books that has been placed there by the Repub- 
lican Party. Every beneficial labor law has been placed 
upon the statute books by the Democratic Party. 

We pledge our party to the enactment of laws forbidding 
the unwarranted issuance of writs of injunction in labor 
disputes w^here no property rights are involved other than 
the property rights claimed in the labor of the human being. 

We favor prohibition of night work for women in factories 
between the hours of 10 P. M. and 6 A. M., and call upon 
the State Legislature to speedily pass this long-delayed 
measure. 

We favor a State appropriation sufficient to enforce the 
existing Child Labor laws. 



128 Democratic state platform, 

state income tax. 

W'c are opposed to any iutroduction into the State of 
New Jersej' of a State Income Tax, because it will operate 
against the welfare of the great masses of the people, already 
tax-ridden and overburdened. 

ASSEMBLY DISTRICTS. 

The New Jersey Senate represents the counties, the Gen- 
eral Assembly represents the people of the State. 

In order that the General Assembly may be made truly 
representative of the people of New Jersey, Ave advocate 
the adoption of an amendment to the State Constitution 
for the creation of Assembly Districts. 

AGRICULTURE. 

We renew our pledge to seek in every possible way to 
promote the welfare of our agricultural and rural interests. 
To this end we favor : 

Support of agrricultural associations and the State Depart- 
ment of Agriculture in their efforts to standardize quality 
of products and packages and to insure their purity in the 
interests of buyer and seller. 

Continued development of tbe work of the State Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, the Agricultural College and the Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station through liberal appropriations. 

ADJUSTED COMPENSATION FOR SOLDIERS. SAILORS 
AND MARINES. 

We pledge the Democratic Party of New Jersey to use 
every endeavor to secure Congressional action for the proper 
care' and training of disabled veterans of tbe late World's 
War. and we favor ad.iusted compensation by the Federal 
Government for all veterans of the late war. 

THE SPIRIT OF SERVICE. 

The spirit of the Democratic Party is the Spirit of Ser- 
vice. The right of the Democratic Party to be known as 
the Party of Progress has been proven by its record in the 
past. 

To the foregoing exposition of principles we invite the 
support of everv citizen, to the end that New Jersey may 
achieve her destiny— that of being the most progressive 
and prosperous and the happiest State in the Union. 



STATE COMMITTEES. 129 

STATE COMMITTEES. 



REPUBLICAN 
IlEADQLAKTEES — 139 East Hanover Street, Trenton. 

OFFICERS. 

Edward C. Stokes, Chairman ; A. Dayton Oliphant, Vice- 
Chairman : Chas. N. Codding, Vice-Chairman : Mrs. E. F. 
Feickert, Vice-Chairman ; Wm. H, Albright, Secretary ; Og- 
den H. Hammond, Treasurer ; Kenneth H. Lanning, Legal 
Advisor : Henry D. Thompson, Publicity Director : Wm. P. 
Bowman, Speakers' Bureau ; James E. Mitchell, Army and 
Navy Bureau ; Joseph M. Middleton, Auditor ; James E. 
Van Home, Executive Secretary. 

MEMBEKS. 

Atlantic— Albert H. Darnell, Atlantic City; Mrs. R. H. 
Ingersoll, Atlantic City. 

Bergen — Daniel E. Pomeroy, Englewood ; Mrs. W. H. 
I^eters, Rutherford. . 

Burlington — Henry P. Thorn, Medford ; Mrs. H. J. Sher- 
man, Moorestown. 

Camden^ — David Baird, Camden ; Mrs. A. H. Lippincott, 
Camden. 

Cape May — Lewis T. Stevens, Cape May City ; Mrs. G. 
II. Steelman, Ocean City. 

Cumberland — Edward C. Stokes, Trenton ; Miss Jennie 
A. Comins, Vineland. 

Essex — William Bittles, Newark ; Mrs. G. W. Gehin, 
Newark. 

Gloucester — William H. Albright, Woodbury ; Mrs. G. W, 
Cresse, Woodbury. 

Hudson — Pierre P. Garven, Bayonne ; Mrs. C. P. Eaton, 
Jersey City. 

Hunterdon — Ellsworth P. Baylor, Hampton ; Mrs. George 
K. Large, Flemington. 

Mercer — A. Dayton Oliphant, Trenton ; Mrs. Charles A. 
Woodruff, Princeton. 

Middlesex — Frederick C. Schneider, New Brunswick ; Mrs. 
C. W. Stevens, Jjr., New Brunswick. 

Monmouth — C. Asa Francis, Long Branch ; Mrs. Leon 
Cubberly, Long Branch. 

Morris — E. Bertram Mott. Morristown ; Mrs. W. R. 
I>aker, Madison. 



130 STATE COMMITTEES. 

Ocean — Harold L. Brinley, Toms River ; Mrs. Joseph 
Thompson, New Egypt. 

Passaic — Wm. P. Burpo. Paterson ; Dr. Mary G. Cum- 
mins, Paterson. 

Salem — Lucius E. Hires, Salem ; Mrs. Ho\A-ard Whitehead, 
Salem. 

Somerset — Wm. P. Bowman, New York City ; Mrs. E. F. 
Feickert, Plainfield. 

Sussex — Ford W. Margerum, Sussex ; Mrs. R. V. Arm- 
strong. Augusta. 

Union — Charles X. Codding, Elizabeth ; Mrs. Victor Mrav- 
lag, Elizabeth. 

Warren — Arthur Knowles, Phillipsburg ; Mrs. John M. 
Guthrie, Phillipsburg. 



New Jersey Member Republican National Committee — Ham- 
ilton F. Kean. Elizabeth. 



DEMOCRATIC. 
Headquaetees — Trenton. 

OFFICEES. 

Charles F. McDonald. Englishtown. Chairman : James 
Baker, Jersey City, Secretary. 

MEMBERS. 

Atlantic County — Charles J. Collins, Somers Point : Mrs. 
David A. DeVanny. Haverford Apartments, Atlantic City. 

Bergen County — James H. Snyder, Ridgewood : Mrs. A. 
C. Hart. Montross Ave., Hackensack. 

Burlington County — Richard P. Hughes. Burlington : Mrs. 
Kate S. Sitgreaves, Pemberton. 

Camden County— Edward J. Kelleher, Camden ; Mrs. 
Katherine Donges. Merchantville. 

Cape May County — William W. Campbell. Ocean City ; 
Miss Mary H. Baker, Wildwood. 

Cumberland County — Samuel Jones. Bridgeton : Mrs. 
Marie V. Roberts. Chestnut Ave.. Yineland. 

F^ssex County — John F. Monahan, Newark ; Mrs. Philip 
McKim Garrison, Llewellyn Park. 

Gloucester County — Edward E. Grosscup, Wenonah ; Mrs. 
Joseph J. Summeriil, Woodbury. 

Hudson County— Joseph F. S. Fitzpatrick, Jersey City ; 
Mrs Robert F. Norton, 90 Reservoir Ave.. Jersey City. 

Hunterdon County— Oliver C. Holcombe, Lambertville ; 
Mrs. John Sharp. Flomington. 



STATE COMMITTEES. 131 

Mei'cer Countj— Joseph S. Hoff, Princeton ; Miss Sara T. 
Pollock, 224 E. Hanover St., Trenton. 

Middlesex County — Thomas H. Haggerty, New Brunswick ; 
Mrs. John J. Campbell, Middlesex Borough, P. O. Bound 
Bjook. 

Monmouth County — Charles F. McDonald, Englishtown ; 
Mrs. Walter Taylor, Asbury Park. 

Morris County — Allen H. Fanchei", Dover ; :Miss Mar- 
garet Ryan, 21 King's Road, Madison. 

Ocean County — Harry E. Newman, Lakewood ; Mrs. Caro- 
line Johnson, Point Pleasant. 

Passaic County — Dr. A. F. McBride, Paterson ; Mrs. Mun- 
son Force, 457 Totowa Ave., Paterson. 

Salem County — Harry Burt Ware, Salem ; Mrs. Mary R. 
C. Clayton, Salem. 

Sussex County — Henry T. Kays, Newton. 

Somerset County — William J. Kirby, Somerville ; Mary 
T. Bergen, 166 Middagh St., Somerville. 

Union County — Dennis F. Collins, Elizabeth ; Mrs. H. N. 
Simmons, 1277 Clinton Place, Elizabeth. 

Warren County — Thomas Barber, Phillipsburg : Mrs. Eg- 
bert Rosecrans, Blairstown. 



New Jersey Member Democratic National Committee — 
Robert S. Hudspeth, Jersey City. 

National Committee Women — Mrs. James Billing! on, 2614 
Boulevard, Jersey City; Mrs. H. Otto Wittpenn, 1 Newark 
St., Hoboken ; Mrs. Joseph L. Bodine, 146 W. State St., 
Ticnton. 



132 COUNTY COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN. 

COUNTY COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 



REPUBLICAN. 

Atlantic — Lewis O'Donnell, Hammonton. 
Bergen — Joseph A. Brobel, Hackensack. 
Burliugton — Wm. H. Reeves. Mt. Holly. 
Camden — Wm. D. Brown, Court House, Camden. 
Cape May — J. Albert Harris, Wildwood. 
Cumberland — Benjamin Stevens, Vineland. 
Essex — Jesse R. Salmon. Newark. 
(Gloucester — Oliver J. West, Woodbury. 
Hudson — Robert Torrance, Kearay. 
Hunterdon — Judiah. Higgins, Flemington. 
Mercer — A. Dayton Olipbant, Trenton. 
Middlesex — John I*feiffer, Maurer. 
Monmouth — Edgar I. Yanderveer, Freehold. 
Morris — Charles W. Ennis, Morristown. 
Ocean — A. W. Brown. Jr., Toms River. 
Passaic — Frederick W. Van Blarcom, Paterson. 
Salem — Dr. N. S. Hires, Salem. 
Somerset — Edward E. Cooper, North Plainfield. 
Sussex — Edward Dutcher, Newton. 
T'nion — George H. Johnston, Scotch Plains. 
Warren — J. Milton Guthrie, Jr., Phillipsburg. 

DEMOCRATIC. 
Atlantic — Charles I. LaCferty, Chelsea Bank Bldg., Atlantic 
City. 

Bergen — George J. Falkner. Englewood, N. J. 

Burlington — Reeves Stewart, Mount Holly, N. J. 

Camden — Rudolph S. Ayres, 428 Market St., Camden, N. J. 

Cape May — 

Cumberland — Morris V. McDonald, Vineland. N. J. 

Essex — T. A. Adams, 2-i Prospect Terrace, Montclair, N. J. 

Gloucester — John Holiday, Pitman, N. J. 

Hudson — 

Hunterdon — Erastus W. Sutton. Lebanon, X. J. 

:\rercer — Joseph S. Hoff. 46 Wiggins St.. Princeton, N. J. 

Middlesex — Thomas H. Haggerty, New Brunswick, N. J. 

Monmouth — Ward Kramer. Asbury Park, N. J. 

Morris — R. M. Barry, Gillette, N. J. 

Ocean — Horace L. Lippincott, Sea Side Park, N. J. 

Passaic — John F. McBride. Paterson, N. J. 

Salem — George Schalack, Centreton, N. J. 

Sussex — Vacancy. 

Somerset — Andrew E. Kenny. North Plainfield. N. J. 

T'nion — Francis V. Dobbins. Rahway. N. J. 

Warren — Flovd Bowers. 11 John St., Phillipsburg. N. J. 



f'LASSIFICATION— COUNTIRS & MUNICIPALITIES. 13?. 

CLASSIFICATION OF COUNTIES 
AND MUNICIPALITIES. 

COUNTIES. 
(Compiled Statute;?, Vol. 1, page 525, Laws lf>ll, page 10.) 

First Class (Having a population exceeding 300,000) — 
Essex, Hudson. 

Second Class (Having a population of not less than 50.- 
000 nor more than 300,0004 — Passaic, Bergen, Union, Cam- 
den. Middlesex. Mercer, Monmouth, Atlantic, Morris, Bur- 
lington, Cumberland. 

Third Class (Having a population of not less than 20,000 
nor more than 50,000) — Gloucester, Somerset, Warren, 
Salem. Hunterdon, Sussex, Ocean. 

Fourth Class (Having a population of less than 20.000) 
— Cape May. 

CITIES. 

(Compiled Statutes. Vol. 1, page 056.) 

First Class (Having a population exceeding 150.000) — 
Newark, Jersey City. 

Second Class (Having a population of not less than 12.000 
nor more than 150,000) — Paterson, Trenton, Camden, Eliza- 
beth, Bayonne. Hoboken. Passaic, East Orange, Perth Am- 
boy. Orange. New Brunswick. Pla infield, Clifton, Garfield, 
Hackensack, Millville. Bridgeton. Gloucester City. 

Third Class — All cities not embraced within either the 
first- or second classes, except cities bordering- upon the 
Atlantic Ocean and being seaside or summer resorts. 

Fourth Class — All cities bordering upon the Atlantic 
Ocean and being seaside or summer resorts. 



BOROUGHS AND INCORPORATED VILLAGES. 

(Compiled Statutes, Vol. 3, pages 3473-4.) 

First Class — Having a population exceeding 3,000. 
Second Class — Having a population between 1.500 and 
3.000. 

Third Class — All not in first or second classes. 



N. B. — For a complete list of incorporated municipalities 
in New Jersey, see Census Tables in this Manual. 



i;)4 COMMISSION GOVERNMENT MUNICIPALITIES. 

COMMISSION GOVERNMENT 
MUNICIPALITIES 



Tlie Commission form of municipal government in New Jersey 
was provided for by Chapter 221, Laws 1911 (the Walsh Act), 

and tlie following is a list of the municipalities governed by that 
act and its various amendments and supplements. 

Municipality. County. Class. Adopted. 

Allenhurst Monmouth ....Borough Feb. 8,1916 

A.sburv Park Monmouth ....City Jan. 19,191.5 

Atlantic City Atlantic City May 14, 1912 

Audubon Camden Borough March 15, 1921 

Avalon Cape May ...Borough Oct. 14,1919 

Avon Monmouth ....Borough Oct. 24, 1919 

Bayonne Hudson City March 9, 1915 

Belleville Essex Town Oct. 20,1914 

Bordentown Burlington . . . City A-pril 15, 1913 

Bradley Beach Monmouth — Borough Feb. 2, 1915 

Cape May City Cape May . . . City Sept. 14, 1915 

Cape May Point Cape May ...Borough jan. 25, 1916 

Collingswood Camden Borough Dec. 11,1917 

Deal Monmouth ....Borough Aug. 27, 1912 

Haddonfield Camden Borough Nov. 23, 1913 

Hawthorne Passaic Borough julv 18, 1911 

Hoboken Hudson City Feb. 9, 1915 

Irvington Essex Town May 19,1914 

Jersey City Hudson City June 17, 1913 

T.ambertville Hunterdon ...City Aug. 19,1916 

I.ong Branch Monmouth City April 9, 1912 

I.ongport Atlantic Borough May 12,1912 

Lyndhurst Bergen Township Aug. 12, 1913 

"(Formerly Union.) 

Margate City Atlantic City Sept. 26,1911 

Millville Cumberland ..City April 1,1913 

Montclair Essex Town July 11,1916 

Newark Essex City Oct. 9,1917 

New Brunswick Middlesex .... City March 2, 1915 

Nutley Essex Township May 21,1912 

Ocean City Cape May ...City Aug. 15, 1911 

Orange Essex City April 14,1914 

Passaic City Passaic City July 25, 1911 

Phillipsburg Warren Town Nov. 18, 1913 

Rahwav Union City Jan. 22,1918 

Ridgefi'eld Park Bergen Village April 30,1912 

Ridgewood Bergen Village Sept. 12, 1911 

Sea Isle City Cape May ...City May 8, 1913 

Trenton Mercer City June 20, 1911 

Mneland Cumberland ..Borough May 13,1913 

Wildwood Cape May . . . City Sept. 24, 1912 

Note. — Beverly at the general election on November 2, 1920, 

decided to return to its original form of government and tlie 
change went into effect in May, 1921. 



MEMBERS OF COU^X"IL. 



135 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 

l«i;S to 1703. 

(Under the Proprietary Government.) 



East Jersey. 



72, 75—79, 82—84, 

Lawrence Andresse 
72, 75—79, 82—88, 
John Berry. 
72, 75 — 79, John Bishop. 
92 — 1703. John Bishop, Jr. 
68, 75, 79, James Bollen. 

68, Robert Bond. 
92 — 99, Andrew Bowne. 
84—88. 98, Thomas Codrington. 
92—98, Samuel Dennis. 
92 — 98, James Dundas. 
68, 72, 75 — 78, Samuel Edsall. 
86—88, James Emott. 
1700—01, Benjamin Griffith. 
1700—03, Samuel Hale. 
86—87, Andrew Hamilton. 
84, 98—99, Eichard Hartshorne. 
93 — 99, John Inians. 
8G — 88, John Johnston. 
84 — 96, Isaac Kingsland. 

99, William Lawrence. 



86 — 87, Gawen Lawrie. 
1700—01, Samuel Leonard. 
84—86, Henry Lyon. 
8G— 95, David Mudie. 
82 — 84, Lewis Morris. 
93 — 95, 1703, Lewis Morris. 
82 — 84, John Palmer. 
68, 72, 75—79, William Pardon. 
68, Daniel Pierce. 

72, 7.5—79, John Pike. 
99—1703, William Pinhorne. 
82 — 86, Benjamin Price. 
92—93, 98 — 99, John Royse. 

73, 75—79, 82—86, 

William Sandford. 
1700—03, William Sandford. 
86-92, Richard Townley. 
08, 72 — 75, Robert Vanquellin. 

68, Nicholas Verlet. 
81—82, Robert Vickers. 
98—99, Thomas Warne. 
86—88, Samuel Winder. 



West Jersey. 



1 


701, 


Jonathan Beers. 


82- 


-84, 


James Nevill. 


82- 


-85, 


1701, William Biddle. 


82- 


-83, 


Mark Newhie. 




85, 


James Budd. 


82- 


-84, 


Thomas Ollive. 


82- 


-83, 


Thomas Budd. 




98, 


Edward Randolph. 




85, 


Samuel Carpenter. 


97- 


-98, 


Thomas Revell. 




82, 


Jolm Chaffin. 


85, 


1701, Andrew Robeson. 


83- 


-84, 


Francis Collins. 




83, 


John Skeeue. 




85, 


Francis Davenport. 




83, 


Henry Stacy. 


1 


701, 


George Deacon. 


82- 


-84, 


Mahlon Stacy. 


84- 


-85, 


Robert Dinsdale. 


82, 


84- 


—85, Robert Stacy. 


84- 


-85, 


William Emley. 


97- 


-98, 


John Tatham. 


82- 


-85, 


Elias Farre. 


1 


701, 


John Thompson. 


82- 


-85, 


1701, Thomas Gardner. 


84- 


-85, 


Robert Turner. 


83- 


-85, 


John Gosling. 


83- 


-84, 


William Welsh. 




84, 


Richard Guy. 




97, 


Nathaniel Westland. 


97, 


17( 


31, Edward Hunloke. 




84, 


Christopher Wliite. 




85, 


George Hutchinson. 


82, 


84- 


-85, Daniel Wills. 




98, 


John Jewell. 




97, 


John Worlidge. 



136 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL,. 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 



170:». to 1775. 

(Colony of New Jersey.) 

* Died in Office. t Resigned. x Eemoved. 

II Seat Forfeited. 



t Suspended. 



Eastern Division. 



AVestern Division. 



23—56, 
61—75, 
13—36, 
43—61, 
53—69, 
03—08, 
13—22, 
35—38, 
10—22, 
38—39, 
44—62. 
47—62, 
18—32, 
47—75, 
47—58. 
16—26, 
38—42, 
06—15, 
03—04, 
08—34, 
38—64, 
52—75, 
13—17, 
65—75, 
18—32, 
03—13, 
34^0, 
49—62, 
03—09, 
38—39, 
70—75, 
65 — 75, 
08—13, 
63—75, 
69—75. 
06—11, 
27—40. 
03—04, 
2-'> 

57— 6S; 



*James Alexander. 
William Alexander. 
*John Anderson. 
tEdward Antill. 
*Lewis Morris Ashfield. 
♦Andrew Powne. 
xThomas Byerl.v. 
Tliomas Farmar. 
*Thomas Gordon. 
♦Robert T ettice Ilcmiier. 
*Janies Ilude. 
♦Andrew Johnston. 
*Jolin Johnston, Jr. 
Peter Kemble 
tTbonias Leonard. 
♦David I.yell. 
♦Fenwick Lyell. 
♦Roger Mompesson. 
tLewis Morris. 
II Lewis Morris. 
♦Robert Hunter Morris. 
David Ogdeu. 
♦Elisha Parlier. 
James Parker. 
♦John Parker. 
tWilliam Pinborn. 
JWilliam Provoost. 
♦Richard Saltar. 
William Sand ford. 
tJobn Schu.vler. 
Stephen Skinner. 
Frederick Smyth. 
tPeter Sonmans. 
John Stevens. 
Richard Stockton. 
♦Richard Townley. 
ICornelius VanHorne. 
♦Samuel Walker. 
tGeorge Willocks. 
♦Samuel WoodriilT. 



20—34, 
40—43, 
06—13, 
71—75, 
46—50, 
03—07. 
03—18. 
18, 
10—12, 
09—13, 
13—47, 
41—44, 

09-17] 
18—31, 
06—09, 
03, 06, 
63—70, 
71—75, 
03—08, 
03—13, 
61—74, 
13—17. 
21—58, 
03—08, 
38—56, 
23—32, 
62—71. 
38—50, 
67—75, 
18-^0, 



♦Peter Bard. 
♦Peter Baynton. 
tDaniel Coxe. 
Daniel Coxe. 
tJohn Coxe. 
♦Francis Davenport. 
xGeorge Deacon. 
♦Peter Fret well. 
♦Thomas Gardiner. 
tWilliam Hall. 
♦John Hamilton. 
♦Archibald Home. 
Francis Hopkinson. 
♦Hugh Huddy. 
♦John Hugg. 
♦Richard Ingoldsby. 
$Samuel Jennings. 
♦John Ladd. 
John Lawrence. 
tDaniel Teeds. 
♦Robert Quary. 
tCharles Read. 
♦John Reading. 
tJohn Reading. 
tThomas Revell. 
♦John Rodman. 
♦James Smith. 
♦John Smith. 
♦Richard Smith. 
Samuel Smith. 
IJohn Wills. 



Councillor Extraorrtinary. 

1735, John Peagrum. 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 

MEMBERS OF COUNCIL, 

1770 to 1844. 



Atlnntic County. 



1837, Lewis M. Walker. 
38—39, Japbet Ireland. 



40—41, Mahlon Canfleld. 
42 — 44, Absolam Cordery. 



nergeu County. 



76, 82—83, John Fell. 
77—78, Robert Morris. 
79—81, Tbeunls Dey. 
84—90, 92—95, Peter flaring. 
91, 9G — 00, John Cutwater. 

07, 09—11, Peter Ward. 

08, 12—13, William Colfax. 
14—15, 18, Adrian Post. 

IG, 19—21. John D. llarlng. 

17, Martin Ryerson. 
22—23, Christian Zabriskie. 



24—26, 30, 32—33, 

Charles Board. 
27—29, Nathaniel Board. 

31, Jacob M. Ryerson. 
34—35, Christian C. Zabriski 
3G — 37, Samuel R. Deinarest. 
38 — 39, Francis Price. 

40, Albert G. Doremus. 
41 — 42, John CasPedy. 
43^4, John 11. Zabriskie. 



Itiirliiii^ton County. 

76, Richard Smith. 02—04, Samuel ITongh. 

77, John Imlay. 10 — 13, John Beatty. 
78—80, 83, Peter Tallman. 14, Caleb Earl. 
81—82, John Cox. 15-17, William Irlck. 
84—86. 89—90, William Newbold.l8, 29—31, William N. Sliinu. 
87—88, Josei)h Smith. 32—33, Richard Cnraplou. 

91, James Kinsey. 34, James NewboM. 

!»•-'. isiS— -JS. C'alob Xewliild. 35—36, Charles Stokes. 



93-90, John Black. 
97—1801, 04—09, 

George Anderson. 



37-^1, William Irl.k. 
42, Moffett Craig. 
43 — 44, James S. lUiIme. 



Cnpc ;>Iiiy County. 



1776, Jonathan Hand. 11, 

77, 79—80. 82—83, Jesse Hand. 14, 

78, Jonathan Jenkins. 15 — 19, 

81, 85. Elijah Hughes. 

84. 80—93, Jeremiah Eldredge. 20—23, 

94—95, 1800, 09—10, 28—30, 

Matthew Whlllden. 31—33, 

96—98, 1800, 04, 34—35, 

Permenus Corson. 36 — 37, 

99. John T. Townsend. 38—39, 

1801—04. 07, Ebenezer Newton. 40—41, 

05—06, William Eldredge. 42^4, 

08, 12—13, Joseph Falkenberge. 



Nathaniel Flolmos. 
Furman Learning. 

24, 20—27, 
Joshua Swalne. 

25, Thomas II. Flughes 
Israel Townsend. 
Joshua Townsend. 
Jeremiah Leamlng. 
Richard Thomson. 
Amos Corson. 
Thomas P. Hughes. 
Maurice Beesley. 



138 MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 

1770 to 1844. 
Cuinberlnnd County. 

70— 77, 82, Tbeopbilus Elmer. 13, Ezeklel Foster. 

78, Epbraiiu Harris. 14, 18, James f'lark. 

79, John Buck. -0 — 21, James D. Westcott. 

80, 84, JonatliuD Elmer. -G, Epbraim Batemau. 

81, 83, 85 — 94, 90 — 07, 90—1800, 27—28, John Treacliaril. 

Samuel Ogden. 20—32, Ellas P. f^eeley. 

95, Eli Elmer. 33, 37, Israel Stratton. 

98, Joel Fitliian. 34, David Keeves. 

1801—02, David Moore. 35—30, Joshua Brick. 
03 — 04, 10 — 11, George Burgiu. 38, Nathaniel Foster. 

05 — 00, Abraham Sayre. 39 — 40, Samuel Barber. 
06, 08, 12—13, 15 — 17, 19, 22—25, 41, Ephraim H. Whitecar. 

Ebenezer Seeley. 42, David Whitaker. 

07, Ebenezer Elmer. 43 — 44, Enoch II. Moore. 

09, James B. Hunt. 

Essex County. 

76—77, 79, Stephen Crane. 15—10, 25, 28, Amos Harrison. 

78, Abraham Clark. 19—22, 20, Silas Condit. 

80, James Caldwell. 24, 30, John Dow. 

81 — 84, Josiah Horublower. 27, Samuel Pennington. 

85—87, John Peck. 29, Amzi Dodd. 

88, John Chetwood. 31 — 32, Isaac 11. Williamson. 

80, Jonathan Dayton. 33, Jacob M. Mead. 

90—97, John Condit. 34, Oliver S. Halstead. 

98—1800, Daniel Marsh. 35, Stephen D. Day. 

01, 00, 10—13, Charles Clark. ' 30, Andrew Parsons. 

02—03, William S. Pennington. 37, John J. Chetwood. 

04 — 06, 17-18, 23, John Dodd. 38 — 40, Amzi Armstrong. 

07, Moses Jacynes. 41 — 42, William diet wood. 

08—09, Thomas Ward. 43—44, Joseph S. )Jodd. 

14, Charles Kinsey. 



Gloucester County. 

1776—80, 84, John Cooper. 21—22, Michael C. Fisher. 

81, Joseph llugg. 23, 20, 31—32, Joseph Kaighn. 

82—83, 85—80, Elijah Clark. 24—25, Isaac Wilkius. 

87—94, Joseph Ellis. 26, John Moore White. 

95 — 97, Josei)h Cooper. 27, Christoplier Sickler. 

98 — 1802, Thomas Clark. 28, Jeremiah J. Foster. 

03—06, 11, Isaac Mickle. 30, 33—35, John W. Mickle. 
06, 14, 16, Samuel W. Harrison. 36—38, John C. Smallwood. 

07—10, Kichard M. Cooper. 39 — 40, Joseph Porter. 

12—13, James Hopkins. 41, William It. Cooper. 

17 — 18, James Matlack. 42, Joseph Saunders. 

19 — 20, John Baxter. 43 — 44, Joshua P. Browning. 



Hudson County. 

1840, Abraham Van Santvoord. 43 — 44, Edwin V. R. Wright. 
41—42, John S. Condit. 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 



139 



1770 to 1844. 



Iliiutrrditu County. 



1776—81. Jolin Stevens. 

8-, .Tose|>li Ueailinj;. 
83 — 84, I'hileuion Uicliinson. 
85 — 88, Kobert-Lettis Ilooiier. 

8'.», nenjaniin Van Cleve. 
90—1804, Jolin Lambert. 
05 — 00, John Wilson. 
00 — 14, John Haas. 

15, Aaron Vansyckle. 
16—19, 21, 24—25, 

Kluathan Stevenson. 

20. Tliomas Trail. 



22 — 23, John Cavanagh. 
20 — 20, George Maxwell. 
30, Tboujas Capuer. 
31—32, Peter I. Clark. 

33, Alexander Wurts. 

34, Natlianiel Saxton. 
35, 42^4, William Wilson. 

36, Henry S. Hunt. 
37 — 38, Joseph Moore. 

39, James Snyder. 
40 — 41, John Lilly. 



183S— 39, Charles G. McChesney. 42 
40 — 41, James White. 



fiercer County. 

George Woolsey. 



Miildlesex County. 



177G, John Wetherlll. 18, 

77—79, Jonathan Deare. 10, 21, 

80, 83, 88, Benjamin Manning. 2.3—24, 
SI— 82. John Beatty. 

84—85, 90, Samuel Fitz-Pvantlolph. 25, 

86—87. 89-94, Samuel Randolph. 29, 

95, 97, 99—1806. 30, 

Ephralm Martin. 32, 

98, 1820, Andrew Klrkpatrlck. 33, 

06. Ercurit'S Beatty. 34, 

07, 09, 14—17. 22, 35, 

Ercurles Beatty. 30 — 38, 

08, 10, 12—13. James Schureman.30 — 40, 
11, John James. 42 — 44, 
13, John Neilson. 



John N. Simpson. 

27—28, James T. Dunn. 

26, 30, 

Bobert McChesney. 

William Edgar. 

James Cook. 

Samuel Edgnr. 

John T. McDowell. 

fosiah B. Howell. 

Andrew Snowliill. 

John Perrine, Jr. 

41, George T. McDowell. 

David B. Appleget. 

Abraham W. Browi\. 



]>Ioiiiiioiitli County. 



1776. 


Nathaniel Scudder. 


10—11, 


77—79. 


Joseph Holmes. 


22 


80—83. 


89—92, 95, 


23—24', 




Elisha Laurence. 


25. 28- 


84. 


John Inilay. 


26—27, 


85, 


Dnvld Forman. 


30, 


86—88. 


99, Asher Holmes. 


31, 34, 


93—94. 


1812—13, 


32—33, 




Thomas Henderson. 


35—36. 


96—98. 


Elislia Walton. 


37, 


1800. 


John Lloyd. 


38—39, 


01—07, 


Thomas Little. 


40, 


08, 


William Lloyd. 


41—44, 


09, 


John A. Scudder. 





13—21, Silas Crane. 
William Andrews. 
William I. Bowne. 
-20, William L Emley. 
Henry D. Poliiemus. 
Samuel G. Wright. 
John Patterson. 
Daniel Holmes. 
Thomas Aarowsmith. 
William L. Dayton. 
Benjamin Olipliant. 
Peter Vredenburgh, Jr. 
James Patterson. 



140 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 



1776 to IS44. 



Morris County. 



1776 — 80, Silas Condlct. 
81—84, John Carle. 

85, Jolin-Cleve Symmes. 
8G— 88, 93—94, 96—1800, 

Abrabain Kit^bel. 
89—90, William WoodliuU. 
91— 9*J, 95, Ellis Cook. 
1801—06, David Welsh. 
07 — 14, Benjamin Ludlow. 
15 — 22, Jesse Dpson. 



23—27, Silas Cook. 

28—30, Edward Condlct. 

31—32, 40 — 41, James Wood. 

33, Mahlon Dickeisou. 

34, William Monro. 
35—36, Jei)hthab B. Munn. 
37—38, William Brirtin. 

39, Jacob W. Miller. 

42, Ezekiel B. Gaines. 

43 — 44, John 11. Stansborough. 



Pas.sjtic County. 



1837 — 38, Andrew Parsons. 
39—40, Nathaniel Board. 
41, Silas E. Canfleld. 



42, William Deckey. 
43—^4, Silas D. Canfield. 



SHleni County. 

1776, 78—79, Andrew Sinnickson. 23, 40, 
77, Edward Keasbv. 

80, 82, 86, Whitten Cripps. 

81, 83—84, John Holme. 
85, 87—93, John Mayhew. 
94—96, Thomas Sinnickson. 
97—99, 1801—04, William Parret. 

1800, William Wallace. 
04, 06—07, Jacob Iluftv, 
05—06, 09—13, Isaiah Shinn. 

08, Samuel Ray. 
13-17, Jedediah Dubois. 
18, 20—22, John Dickinson. 

19, Hedge Thompson. 



23, 40, 


Josiah M. Reeve. 


24—25, 


Zaclieus Ray. 


26—28, 


32, Israel K. Clawson. 


29, 


Philip Freas. 


30, 


James Newell. 


31, 


Henry Freas. 


33, 


Charles Swing. 


34, 37, 


William F. Reeve. 


35, 


Samuel HumpLreys. 


36, 


Tliomas Yarrow. 


38—39, 


John A. Lambert. 


■11, 


Robert Newell. 


42, 


Samuel Bolron. 


43^4, 


Joseph C. Nelson. 



Somerset County. 



1776, William Patprson. 
77, 93—97, James Linn. 

78, Abraham Van-Nesfe. 
79, 81—89, Ephraim Martin. 

80, John Witlierspoon. 
90—92, Frederick Frelinghuysen. 
98— 1S04. Peter D. Vrouiii. 

04, Henry Vanderveer. 
05—13, 15—19, 

John Frelinghuysen. 



14, 26—29, Andrew Howell. 
20 — 25, Peter I. Stryker. 
30—34, James S. Green. 

35, William Thompson. 
36—38, Walter Kirkpa trick. 

39, Augustus R. Taylor. 
40 — 11, Josei)h W. Scott. 
42 — 44, George H. Brown. 



rUESIDENTS OF COUN'CIL. 



141 



1770 to 1844. 
Sussex County. 



177G, 80. Jolin-Cleves Symmes. 19—120, 

77, 84—85, 89—90, 21, 

Robert Hoops. 2'2, 

78—79, Robert Ogdon. 23—24, 

81—83, Hugh Hughes. 25—26, 

86 — 88, Mark Tliomson. 27, 

91—99, Cbarles Beardslee. 28—31, 

1800—04, William McCulIough. 32, 

04, Jobn Linn. 33—34, 

05—06, George Blflleman 37—38, 

06, Jacob S. Thomson. 39 — 40, 

07 — 13, Barnabus Swayze. 41 — 42, 

13—15, William Kennedy. 43—44, 
16 — 18, Thomas Vankirk. 



Robert W. Rutherford. 
William T. Anderson. 
Jeremy Mac key. 
Jacob Thompson. 
Thomas C. Ryerson. 
Samuel Fowler. 

35, Davlil Ryerson. 
Peter Merkel. 

36, Samuel Price. 
Richard R. Morris. 
Daniel Haines. 
Alexander Boyles. 
Benjamin Hamilton. 



\\'arren County. 



1825, Jacob Thompson. 

26—28, Jeremy Mackey. 

29—30, Jonathan Robbing. 

31, Samuel Wilson. 

32—33, Charles Carter. 



34—35, Charles Sitgreaves. 
36—39, Robert H. Kennedy. 

40, Caleb H. Valentine. 

41, Henry H. Van Ness. 
42 — 44, Charles J. Ihrie. 



PRESIDENTS OF COUNCIL. 



* Died in office. 



(Colony of New Jersey.) 
1703 to 1775. 

t Resigned. || Seat forfeited. t Suspended. 



170.3—04, tl-ewis Morris. 
05 — 08, *Andrew Bowne. 
08—34, II Lewis Morris. 
35 — 36, *John Anderson. 
36 — 47, *John Hamilton. 
47—58, tJohn Reading. 
58 — 64, *Robert Hunter 
64—75, Peter Kendjlc. 



LEGISLATIVE OFFICERS. 



VTCE-PRESIDENTS OF COUNCIL. 

(From 177fi to 1844. when the new Constitution was formea 

(Th.' (lovornor nndor tlio 1 77G Constitution was 
Prosiilont of the Council.) 



VICE-PRESIDENTS. 

1776-81— John Stevens. Hunterdon. 
1782 —John Cox. Burlington. 
1783-84— Philemon Dickinson, Hunterdon. 
1785-88— Robert Lettls Hooper, Hunterdon 
1789-92— Elisha Lawrence, Monmouth. 
1793-94— Thomas Henderson. Monmouth. 
1795 —Elisha Lawrence, Monmouth. 
1796-97— James Linn, Somerset. 
1798-1800— George Anderson, Burlington 
1801-04— John Lambert, Hunterdon. 

1805 —Thomas Little. Monmouth. 

1806 —George Anderson, Burlington 

1807 — Ebenczer Elrner, Cumberland 

1808 — Ebenezer Seeley, Cumberland 

1809 —Thomas Ward. Essex. 
1810-11— Charles Clark. Essex. 

1812 —James Schureman, Middlesex 

1813 —Charles Clark. Essex. 
1814-15— William Kf:nnedy. Sussex. 
1816-22— Jesse Upson. Morris. 
1823-25— Peter J. Stryker, Somerset. 

1826 — Ephralm Bateman, Cumberland 

1827 —Silas Cook, Morris. 

1828 — Caleb Newbokl, Burlington. 
1829-30— Edward Condlct, Morris. 
1831-32— Ellas P. Seeley, Cumberland 

1833 — Mahlon Dlckerson. Morris. 

1834 —Jehu Patterson, Monmouth. 

1835 —Charles Sitgreaves. Warren. 

1836 — Jeptha B. Munn, Morris. 
1837-38— Andrew Parsons, Passaic. 
1839-40— Joseph Porter. Gloucester. 

1842 —John Cassedy, Bergen. 

1843 —William <"hetwood, Essex. 

1844 —Jehu I'atterson. Monmouth. 



STATE SENATORS. 



143 



STATE SENATORS. 



BY COUXTIES, FROM 1S45 TO DATE. 

(Nute. — Years indicate those of Legislative Sessions during 
Senators served or are to serve.) 



Atlantic County. 



45—47, 
48—50, 
51—53, 
54—56, 
57— 5'J, 
60— G-', 
63—65, 
60—68, 
HU— 71, 
71'— 74, 



45—47, 
48^0. 
50—51. 
5-J— 53. 
54— r>6, 
57—50, 
(50—6-:. 
63—65, 
66—68, 
69—71, 
72—74, 



Joel Adams. 
Lewis M. Walker. 
Joseph B. Potts. 
David B. Somers. 
Enocb Cordery. 
Thomas E. Morris. 
Samuel Stllle. 
David S. Blackman. 
Jesse Adams. 
William Moore. 



75 — 77, Ilosea F. Madden. 
78 — 92, John J. Gardner. 
93—98, Samuel D. Hoffman. 
99-1901, Lewis Evans. 
02—07, Edward S. Lee. 
08—11), Eilward A. Wilson. 
11—16, Walter E. Edge. 
17, 18, Emerson L. Itit•llarlI^ 

19, Vacancy. 
20—22, Charles D. White. 



IJergen Counts'. 



Richard R. Paulison. 
Isaac 1. Harding. 
John Van Brunt. 
Abraham Hopper. 
Daniel D. Depew. 
Thomas 11. Herring. 
Ralph S. Demarest. 
Daniel llolsnian. 
John Y. Dater. 
James J. Brlnkerhoff. 
CornelUis Lydecker. 



75 — 77, George Dayton. 
78 — 80, Cornelius S. Cooper. 
81—83, Isaac Wortendyke. 
84—85, Ezra Miller. 
86—89, John W. Bogert. 
90—95, Henry D. Winton. 
96—1000, William M. Johnson. 
Ul— 10, E.lnnind W. Wakolec 
11—13, Jas. A. C. Johnson. 
14—16, Charles O'C. Hennessy. 
17 — 22, William B. Macka.v, Jr. 



liurlington County. 



45—46, 
47-^9, 
50—52, 
53—58, 
59—61, 
62, 
63—64, 
65—67, 
68—70, 
71—73, 
74—76, 
77—79. 
80—82, 



45. 
46—48, 
49—51, 
52—54, 
55—00, 
61-03. 
64—66. 
67—72, 
73—81. 
82—84, 



James S. Hulme. 
Thomas H. Richards. 
Joseph Satterthwalte. 
Joseph W. Allen. 
Thomas L. Norcross. 
Joseph W. Pharo. 
William Garwood. 
Geo. M. Wright. 
Job II. Gaskell. 
Henry J. Irick. 
Barton F. Thorn. 
Caleb G. Rldgway. 
Wm. Budd Deacon. 



83—85. Hezeklah B. Smith. 

86—91, William 11. Carter. 

92—94, Mitchell B. Perkins. 

95—97, William C. Parry 
98—1900. Howanl E. Packer. 

01—03, Nathan Haines. 

04 — 00, John G. Horner. 

07 — 09, Samuel K. Robbins. 

10—12. Griffith W. Lewis. 

13—15, Blanchard H. White. 

16—19, Harold B. Wells. 

20—21, Blanchard II. White, 

22 — 24, Emmor Roberts. 



Camden County. 



Richard W. Howell. 
Joseph C. Stafford. 
John GUI. 

Thomas W. Mulford. 
John K. Roberts. 
William P. Tatem. 
James M. Scovel. 
Edward Bettle. 
William J. Sewell. 
Albert Merritt. 



85 — 87, Richard N. Herring. 
88 — 90, George PfeilTer, Jr 
c)i_9G, Maurice A. Rogers. 
97—1902, Herbert W. Johnson. 
03—11. William J. Bradley. 
12—10. William T. Read. 

17. John B. Ivates. 
18 — 20, Joshua C. Haines. 
21 — 23, Joseph E. Wall worth. 



144 



STATE SENATORS. 



Cape May County. 



45—46, 
47—49, 
50—52, 
53—55, 
5^—58, 
59—61, 
62—64, 
65—67, 
68—70, 
71—73, 
74—76. 
77—79, 



Reuben WlUets. 
James L. Smith. 
Enoch Edmunds. 
Joshua Swain, Jr. 
Jesse II. Dlverty. 
Downs Edmunds. 
Jonathan F. Leamlng. 
Wllmon W. Ware. 
Leamlng M. Ulce. 
Thomas Beesley. 
Richard S. LeamlnK 
Jonathan P. Leamlng. 



80—85, Waters B. Miller. 
86—88, Joseph II. Ilanes. 
89—91, Walter S. Lennilng 
92-04, Lemuel E. Miller 
05 — 97, Edmund L. Hoss. 
08—1903, Robert B. Hand. 
04 — 00, Lewis M. Cresse. 
07—12, Robert E. Hand, 
l.*] — 15, Harry C. AVht-aton. 
16—18, Lewis T. Stevens. 
19—24, William H. Bright. 



Cumberland County. 



45—46, 
47—50, 
51—53, 
54—56, 
57—59, 
60—02, 
63—68, 
69—71, 
72—74, 
75—77, 



Enoch 11. More. 
Stephen A. Garrison. 
Reuben Flthlan. 
Lewis IIowoll. 
John L. Sharp. 
Nat. Stratton. 
Providence Ludlam. 
James II. Nixon. 
C. Henry Shepherd. 
J. Howard Wlllets. 



78 — 80, George S. Whilk-ar. 
81—80, Isaac T. Nichols. 
87—89, Philip P. Baker. 
90—92, Seaman R. Fowler. 
93—1901, Edward C. Stokes. 
02—10, Bloomfield II. Miiioh. 
11—13, Isaac T. Nldiols. 
14—16, Johu A. A.-klcy. 
17—10, J. Hamilton Fitliian. 
20 — 22, Firman ]\I. Reeves. 



Esse.x County. 



45, 
46—48, 
49—51, 
52—54, 
55—57, 
58—60, 
61—63, 
64—66, 
67—09, 
70—75, 
76—78, 
79—81, 
82—84, 



Joseph S. Dodd. 
Stephen R. Grover. 
Asa Whitehead. 
Stephen Congar. 
George R. Chetwood. 
Charles L. C. Gififord. 
James M. Qulnby. 
John G. Trusdell. 
James L. Hays. 
John W. Taylor. 
William II. Kirk. 
William IT. Francis. 
William Stalnsby. 



85—87, Frederick S. Fish 
88—90, A. F. R. Martin. 
91—93, Michael T. Barrett. 
94—99, George W. Ketoliam. 
1900—02, Thos. N. McCarter, Jr 
03 — 05, J. Henry Bacheller. 
00-08. Everett Colby. 
09 — 11, Harry V. Osborne. 
12—16, Austen Colgate. 

17, Edmund B. Osborne. 
18—20, Charles C. Pilgrim. 
21—23, William H. Parry. 



Gloucester County. 



45—48, 
49—51, 
52—54, 
55—57, 
58—60, 
61—63, 
64—66, 
67—69, 
70—75, 
76—78. 
79—81. 



John C. Small wood. 
Charles Reeves. 
John Burk. 
Joseph Franklin. 
Jeptha Abbott. 
John Pierson. 
Joseph L. Reeves. 
Woodward Warrick. 
Samuel Hopkins. 
Thomas P. Mathers. 
John F. Bodlne. 



82—83, Thomas M. Ferrell. 
84—87, Stacy L. Pancoast. 
88 — 90, Joseph B. Roe. 
91 — 03, George H. Barker. 
04—00, Daniel J. Packer 
97—1902, Solomon H. Stanger. 
03 — 05, Thomas M. Ferrell. 
OG— OS, John Boyd Avis. 
00—17! George W. F. Gaunt. 
18—22. Edward L. Sturgos.s. 
23, Ilorat'!' ;m. Foodei-. 



STATE SENATOKS. 



145 



Hudson County. 



45—47, 
48-^9. 
50, 
51—53, 
54—50, 
57—59, 
60—61. 
612—65, 
66-68, 
69—71. 
72—74, 
7.5—77, 
78—80, 
81—83. 



45—46. 
47—49, 
50—52, 
53—55, 
56—58. 
59—01, 
62—64, 
65—07, 
68—70. 
71—73, 
74—70. 
77—79. 



nicLard Out water. 
Jolin Tonnele. 
John Cassedy. 
Abrabam O. Zabrlskle. 
.Moses R. Bramball. 
C. V. CUckener. 
Samuel Westcott. 
Tbeo. F. Randolph. 
Charlos II. VVlnfleld. 
Noah D. Taylor. 
John R. McPherson. 
I.eon Abbett. 
Rudolph F. Rabe. 
Elijah T. Taxon. 



84-86, William Rrinkerboff. 
87—89, ^yHHKm D. Edwar.ls. 
90—91, 'Edward F. McDonald. 

92, Robert S. Hudspeth. 
92—98, William D. Daly. 
99—1900, Allan L. McDermott. 
01—04, Robert S. Iludsepth. 
05 — 07, James F. Minturn. 
08-13, •♦Janu-s F. Fiidder. 
14—16. Charles M. Egan. 
17 — 18, Cornelius A. McGlennon. 

19. Edward I. Edwan^s. 
20^22, Alexander Simpson. 



Hunterdon Countj*. 



Alexander Wurts. 
Isaac G. Farlee. 
John Manners. 
Alexander V. Bonnell. 
John C. Rafferty. 
Edmund Perry. 
John Blane. 
Alexander Wurts. 
Joseph G. Bowne. 
David II. Banghart. 
Fred A. Potts. 
James N. Pldcock. 



80—82. Ell Bosenbury. 
8.3 — 85, John Carpenter, Jr. 
86 — 88, George II. Large. 
89—91, Mobes K. E.-erltt. 
92—94, William II. Martin. 
95-97, Richard S. Kuhl. 
93—1900, John R. Foster. 
01—03, William C. Gebhardt. 
04 — 06, George F. Martens, Jr. 
07—12. William C. Gebhardt. 
13—21. George F. Martens, Jr. 
22 — 24, David II. Agans. 



Mercer County. 



45—50, Charles S. Olden. 

51 — 5G, Wllll.im C. Alexander. 

57 — 59. Robert C. Hutchinson. 

60 — 62, Jonatlian Cook 

63—65, Edward W. Scudder. 

66—68, Aug. G. Rlcl.ey. 

69—71, John Woolverton. 

72—74, Charles Hewitt. 

75 — 77, Jonathan II. Blackwell. 

78—80, Crowell Marsh. 



81—83, John Taylor. 

84—86, George 0. V'anderbilt. 

87—92, John D. Rue. 

93—98, William H. Skirm. 

99—1904, Elijah C. Hutchinson. 

05 — 07, Barton B. Hutchinson. 

08—13, Harry D. Leavitt. 

14 — 16, Barton B. Hutchinson. 

17 — 19, James Hammond. 

20—22, S. Roy Heath. 



>Iiddlesex County. 



45 — 16, 
47—49, 
50—52, 
53—55. 
56—58. 
59—61. 
62—70, 
71—76, 
77—79, 
80—82, 
83—85, 



David Crowell. 
Adam Lee. 
Edward Y. Rogers. 
Ralph C. Stults. 
Henry V. Speer. 
Abra. Everltt. 
Amos Bobbins. 
Levi D. Jarrard. 
George C. Ludlow. 
Isaac L. Martin. 
Abraham V. Schenck. 



86—88, Daniel C. Chase. 

89—94, Robert Adrain. 

95 — 97, Charles B. Herbert. 

98 — 1900, James II. Van Cleef. 

01—03, Theodore Strong. 

04 — 06, Wm. H. C. Jackson. 

07 — 12. George S. Silzer. 

13 — 15, William E. Ramsay. 

16 — IS, William E. Florance. 

19—21, Thomas Brown. 

22 — 24, Morgan F. Larson. 



♦Mr. McDonald was unseated the last week of the session of 
1S90, and William S. Stuhr was given his seat. The first week of 
the se.ssion of 1891 Mr. Stuhr was unseated and Mr. McDonald 



resumed his seat. 

•♦Became Acting Governor March Ist, 
28th. 



'13; resigned October 



146 



STATE SENATORS. 



« 45, 
46—48, 
49— ."il, 
52—54, 
55—57, 
58—00. 
61— o;?, 
64—71, 
72 
73—78.' 
79—81. 



Moiiinou 


ith C. 


Thomas E. Combs. 


82- 


George F. Fort. 


85- 


John A. Morford. 


88- 


William D. Davis. 


91 — 


Robert S. J.alnl. 




Will. 11. Ilendrlckson. 


94- 


Anthony IJeckless. 


97- 


Henry S. Little. 


03— 


Wii). 11. Conover. Jr. 


12— 


Wm. 11. llendrlckson. 


15— 


George C. Ueekman. 


20— 



.>1 orris 

45 — 47, Jolin B. Johnes. 
48—50, Ephralm Marsh. 
51 — 5;{, John A. Rleecker. 
54 — 5G, Alexander Itobertsou. 
57—59, Andrew B. Cobb. 
60—02, Daniel Rudd. 
6.'{ — 65, Lyman A. Chandler. 
66—70, George T. Cobh. 
71, Columbns Beach. 
72—74, Augustus \V. Cutler. 
7.=>— 77. John RIU. 
78—80. Augustus C. Canfleld. 

<)c«an 

51—53, Samuel Birdsall. 
54 — 56, Jas. Cowperthwalte. 
57—62, William F. Brown. 
63—68, George D. Horner. 
69—71, John Torrey, Jr. 
72—74, John G. W. Havens. 
75—77, John S. Schultze. 
78 — 80, Ephralm P. Emson. 
81—83, Abram C. B. Havens. 
84 — 92, George T. Cranmer. 

Tassaic 
4.5 — 46, Cornelius G. Garrison. 
47 — 49, Martin J. Byerson. 
r,0—52, Silas D. Canfield. 
53 — 55, Thomas D. lloxsey. 
56—58, Jetur R. Biggs. 
59—67, Benjamin Buckley. 
68—70, John Hopper. 
71—73, Henry A. Williams. 
74 — 76, John Hopiier. 
77—82. Garret A. TTobart. 
83—88, John W. Griggs. 

Salem County. 
45. William J. Rhlnn. 79—81. 

46 — 48, Benjamin Acton Jr. 82—84, 

49 — 51 John Surnmorill, Jr. 85 — 87. 

52—54, Allen Wallace. 88—90. 

55—57. Charles P. Smith. 91—93, 

58—00. Joseph K. Blley. 94—96, 

01—63. Emmor Reeve. 97—190: 

64—66, Richard M. Acton. 03—05, 

07 — 69, Samuel Plummer. 06 — 11, 

70—72, John C. Belden. 12—13, 

73—75, Isaac Newklrk. 14, 

76—78, Charles S. Plummer. 15—23, 



oiinty. 

-84, John S. Applegate. 
-87, Thomas G. Chattlo. 
-90, Henry M. Nevius. 
-92, Thomas S. R. Brown. 
93, Henry S. Terhune. 
-96, James A. Bradley. 
-1902. Charles Asa Frands 
-11, Oliver H. Brown. 
-14, John W. Slocum. 
-19, Henry E. Ackerson, Jr. 
-23, William A. Stevens. 

County. 

81 — 86, James C. Youngblood. 
87—92, George T. Werts. 
9.3—95, Ellas C. Drake. 
96—98, John B. Vreel.iml. 
99—1901, Mahlon Pitney. 
02—04, Jacob W. Welsh. 
05 — 09, Thomas J. Hlllery. 

10, Edward K. Mlll.>*, 
11—13, Richard Fitzherbert. 
14—10, Charles A. Rathbun. 
17—18. Harry W. Mutcliler. 
19—22, Arthur Whitney. 

County. 

93—95, George G. Smith. 
96 — 98. Robert B. Engle. 
99—1901. George G, Smith. 
02 — 07, George L. Shlnn. 
08—09, William J. Harrison. 

10, Thomas A. Mathis. 
11—13. George C. Low. 
14 — 16, Thomas A. Mathis. 
17—19, David G. Conrad. 
20 — 22, Harry T. Hagaman. 
County. 

89 — 91, John Mallon. 
92—94. John HinchllCfe. 
95—97, Robert Williams. 
98—1900, Christian Braun. 
01 — 00. Wood McKee. 
07—09, John Hincliliffe. 
10—12, John D. Prince. 
13_1,5, Peter J. McGiniiis. 
10 — 18. Thomas F. McCran. 
19—24, Albin Smith. 



Qulnton Keasbey. 
George Hires. 
Wyatt W. Miller. 
William Newell. 
James Butcher. 
Jolin C. Ward. 
2, Richard C. Miller, 
James Strlmple. 
William Plummer, 
J. Warren Davis. 
Isaac S. Smick. 
Collins B. Allen. 



Jr. 



STATE SENATORS. 



147 



Somerhet County. 



45, 
4&-48, 
49—51, 
52—54, 
55—57, 
5S— 60, 
61—63, 
64—66, 
67—69, 
70—72, 
73—75, 
76—78, 



45—46, 
47—49, 
50—52, 
53—55, 
56—58. 
59—61, 
62—64. 
65—67, 
6&— 73, 
74—76. 
77—79, 



George II. Brown. 
William II. Leupp. 
John W. Craig. 
Mosee Craig. 
Sain.el K. Martin. 
James Caniiibell. 
Itynier II. Vegbte. 
JoBhua Doiiglity. 
John II. Anderson. 
Calvin Corle. 
FliflL.i P. Wood. 
Charles B. Moore. 



79—81, John G. Schenck. 
82—84, Eugene S. Doughty. 
85 — 90, Lewis A. Thompson. 
91—93, William J. Keys. 
94 — 96, Lewis A. Thompson. 
97—1902, Charles A. Beed. 
03—05, Samuel S. Childs. 
06 — 11, Jos. S. Frelinghuyseu. 
12—16, William W. Smallcy. 

17, Vacancy. 
18—23, ***Clarence E. Case. 



Sussex County. 



Benjamin Hamilton. 
Nathan Smith. 
Joseph Greer. 
Isaac Bunnell. 
Zachariah II. Price. 
Edward C. Moore. 
Peter Smith. 
Joseph" S. Martin. 
Richard E. Edsall. 
Samuel T. Smith 
Francis M. Ward. 



80 — 82, Thomas Lawrence. 
83—85, Lewis Cochran. 
86—88, John A. McBride. 
89—91, Peter D. Smith. 
92—94, John McMlokle. 
95—97, Jacob Goulil. 
98—1903, Lewis J. Martin. 
04 — 12, Jacob Cole Price. 
13 — 18, Samuel T. Munson. 
19—24, Henry T. Kays. 



Union County. 



58—60, 
61—63, 
64—65, 
66, 
67—69, 
70—72, 
73—75, 
7&— 78, 
79—84, 



45. 
46—48. 
49—51, 
52—54, 
55—57, 
58—60, 
61—63, 
64—66, 
67—69. 
70—72, 
73—75, 
70—78, 



John R. Ay res. 
Joseph T. Crowell. 
James Jenkins. 
Philip II. Grier. 
Amos Clark, Jr. 
James T. Wiley. 
J. Henry Stone. 
William J. Magle. 
Benjamin A. Vail. 



85 — 87, Robert L. Livingston. 
88 — 90, James L. Miller. 
91—93, Frederick C. Marsh. 
94—98, •Foster M. VuurliL'cs. 
99 — 05, Joseph Cross. 
06 — 11. Ernest R. Ackerman. 
12—17. Carlton B. Pierce. 
18 — 23, **William N. Ruiiyon. 



Warren County. 



Charles J. liirie. 
Jeremy Ma-^key. 
George W. Taylor. 
Charles Sltgreaves. 
William Rea. 
Philip Mowry. 
James K. Swayze. 
Henry R. Kenneily. 
Abraham Wlldrlok. 
Edward 11. Bird 
Joseph B. Cornish. 
William Sil vert horn 



79—81, Peter Cramer. 

82—84, George H. Beatty. 

8.T — 87, James E. Moon. 

88 — 90, Martin Wyckoff. 

91 — 93, Johnston Cornish. 

94 — 96, Christopher F. Staates. 

97 — 99, Isaac Barber. 

1900 — 1902, Johnston Cornish. 

03 — 05, Isaac Barber. 

06—11. Johnston Cornish. 

]2 — 23. Thomas Barber. 



•Became Acting Governor Keoruary let. "98 resigned OctoDec 
18th 

**Served as Acting Governor May 16th. '19. to January 13th, '20. 

***Sprved as Acting Governor January 13th, '20, to January 
20th. '20. 



148 LEGISLATIVE OFFICERS. 

SENATE PRESIDENTS. 

184r> to Date. 



1845-48 — John C. Smallwood. Gloucester. 
1849-50— Ephralm Mursh. Morris. 

1851 —Silas D. Caufli'M. Passaic. 

1852 — John ManniTs. Iliintcrdon. 
1853-5G— W. C. AlexandiT. Mercer. 
1857-58— Henry V. Speer. MlcUllesex. 
1859 — Thomas R. Ilerriug, Bergen. 
18G0 — C. L. C. Glffonl. P:ssex. 
1861 — Edmund Perry, Hunterdon. 
18G2 —Joseph T. Crowell. Union. 

1863 — Anthony Reckless. Monmouth. 

1864 —Amos Robblns, Middlesex. 
18G5 —Edward W. Scudder, Mercer. 
1806 —James M. Scovel. Camden. 
1867 — Benjamin Buckley, Passaic. 
18G8-G9— Henry S. Little, Munmouth. 
1870 —Amos Rolibins, Middlesex. 
1871-72— Edward Bettle, Camden. 
1873-75— John W. Tavlor, Essex. 

1876 — W. J. Sewell. Camden. 

1877 —Leon Abbett. Hudson. 

1878 — G. C. Ludlow, Middlesex. 
1879-80— W. J. Sewell, Camden. 
1881-82— G. A. Ilobart, Passaic. 

1883 —J. J. Gardner, Atlantic. 

1884 — B. A. Vail, Union. 

1885 —A. V. Schenck. Middlesex. 

1886 — John W. Griggs, Passaic. 

1887 — F'rederlck S. Fish. Essex. 

1888 — George H. Large, Hunterdon. 

1889 —George T. Werts. Morris. 

1890 —IT. M. Nevlus, Monmouth. 

1891-93— Robert Adraln. Middlesex. * 

1894 — Maurice A. Rogers, Camden. 

1895 —Edward C. Stokes. Cumberland. 

1896 — Lewis A. Thompson, Somerset; Robert Williams. Passaic. 

1897 —Robert Williams. Passaic. 

ISOS —Foster M. Vooriiees, Uiiinii: William II. Skiriii (pro 
tem.), Mercer. 

1899 — Charles A. Reed, Somerset. 

1900 —William M. Johnson, Bergen. 

1901 — Mahlon Pitney. Morris. 

1902 — C. Asa Francis, Monmouth. 

1903 —Elijah C. Hutchinson. Mercer. 

1904 — Edmund W. Wakelee. Bergen. 

J905 — 'Joseph Cross, Union: ♦Wm. J, Bradley, Camden. 
inOG — William J. Bradley. Camden. 

1907 — Bloomfleld H. Mlnch, Cumberland. 

1908 — Thomas J. Hlllery, Morris. 



• Joseph Cross resigned on March 30, and he was succeeded by 
William J. Bradley. 



LEGISLATIVE OFFICERS. 149 

1909 —tSamuel K. Robbing, Burlington; Joseph S. Frellngbuy- 

SPn, Somerset. 

1910 —Joseph S. P'rellut;hiiysen, Somerset. 

1911 — Ernest R. Acki rtuan. Union. 
1SM2 — Joliu Uyiiele.v I'rlnee, rMSsaio. 

1913 — *Jaiiie8 F. I'leltK-r, llu.lsun; .lames A. C. Joluirsuu, I'-er- 

geii (i>ro leiii.). 

1914 — Jolin W. iSIocmii, Moiiiiu.nlli. 
1015 —Walter E. Edge, Atlantic. 

1916 —William T. Read, Camden; George W. F. (iaiiut, Gluucos- 

ter (i)ro tern.). 

1917 — George W. F. Gaunt, Gloucester. 

1918 — Tlionias F. McCran, Passaic. 

1919 — William N. Runyon, Union. 

1920 — Clarence E. Case, Somerset. 

1921 —Collins P.. Allen, Salem. 

1922 —William P.. Miickay. Jr. 

t Samuel K. Robblns resigned on April 10 and was succeeded 
by Joseph S. Frellngbuyseu. 

• Became A. ling (Juvt-nior. .Manli 1. 



150 SENATE SECRETARIES. 

SENATE SECRETARIES. 

1845 to Date. 

1845-47— DanleJ Dodd, Jr., Essex. 
1848-50— Philip J. Gray. Camden. 
1851 — John Uogers, liurlington. 
1852-53— Samuel A. Allen, Salem. 
1854 —A. R. Throckmorton. Hudson. 
1800-5G — A. R. Throckmorton, Monmouth. 
1857-58- A. B. Chamberlain, Hunterdon. 
1859-GO— John C. Rafferty, Hunterdon. 
ISGl — Joseph J. Sleeper, Burlington. 
1862-0.3— Morris R. Hnmilton, Camilen. 
1804-6.'.— John 11. Meeker. Essex. 
1866-07— i;noch R. Borden, Mercer. 
1808-GO — Joseph B. Conilsh, Warren. 
1870 — John C. Rafferty, Hunterdon. 
1871-74— John F. Babcock, Middlesex. 
]87.i-7G— N. W. Voorhees, Hunterdon. 
1877-78 — C. M. Jemlson, Somerset. 
1879 — .N. \V. Voorhees, Hunterdon. 
lSSO-82— Georpe Wurts. Passaic. 
1883-85— W. A. Stiles, Sussex. 
1886-88— Richard B. Reading, Hunterdon. 
1889 —John Cari.enter, Jr., Hunterdon. 
1800 -Wilbur A. Mott, Kssex. 
1891-92 — ^John Carpenter, Jr., Hunterdon. 

1893 —Samuel C. Tliompson, Warren. 

1894 —Wilbur A. Mott, Essex. 
1805-97— Henry B. Roillnson, Union. 
1808 — George A. Frey. Camden. 
1800-1000— Augustus S. Barber, Jr., Gloucester. 
1901-02-03-04— Walter E. Edge, Atlantic. 
1005-10— Howard E. Tvler, Cumberland. 

1011 —William C. Hiurphey, Camden. 

1012 — Francis B. Davis, Gloucester. 
1013-14— WilliMiu 1.. Dill. Passnic 
1015-16-17— Francis B. Davis, Gloucester. 
1018-22— William 11. Albright, Gloucester. 



MKMBEUS OF ASSEMBLY 



MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY. 

1<J«S to 1703. 

(Under t'.xe Proprietary Government.) 



E^nst Jersey. 



80. SG, 88, 92. .Je.le.liali Allen. 
74—76, 81—82, 8.j. 87, 92. 
Ephraini Aiulrcsso. 

80, Lewis Baker. 
92—93, 98—99, John Barclay. 

68, Balthazar Bayard. 
86, 88, 94 — 95. Eichard Berry. 

68, John Bishop 
80, 84—85, 1701, 

John Bishop, Jr. 

1701, Jonathan Bishop. 
80—87, Ezekiel Bloomfield. 

73, Thomas Bloonifleld, Sr. 

75, Thomas Bloomfield, Jr. 

92, Tliomas Boell. 

7.3, Stephen Bond. 

92, Nathaniel l'.onnell. 
68, 75, 79—81, 8.3, John Bowne, 
92—93, 95. John Bowne. 

68, John Brackett. 
79 — 96, John Brown. 
76, Matthew Bunn. 
86, 92, 94—96, 98—99. 

Benjamin Burden. 

86, John Camptell. 
94 — 95, John Carrington. 
92, 94 — 96. Gerbrandt Classen. 
86, 92, Benjamin Clarke. 
93—94, 98—99, 

Thomas Codrington. 

1702, John Compton. 
92—93, Thomas Cook. 

99, John Cooper. 
81—83, Matthew Cornelius. 

92, John Craig. 
93—95, Azariah Crane. 
68 — 73, Jasper Crane. 
94, 97 — 98, Jasper Crane. Jr. 
79, 81, 83, 86. 88. 92, 

John Curtis. 
75, 80, 86. Hans Dedrirk. 
68—69, 72. Eobert Dennis. 
75, 79—84, 87—88, 

Samuel Dennis. 
92—95, 97—98. Samuel Dennis. 
92—93, Daniel Dodd. 

80, William Douglas. 
84—88, 92. George Drake. 
92—93. John Drake. 
73, 1701, Jonathan Dunham. 



93—95, 98—99, Edward Earle, Jr. 

86, Samuel Edsall. 
79—81, John Ensile. 

93, John Fitzrandoliili. 
93—95, Nathaniel Fitzrandolpli. 
<.I3— 95. Tliomas Fitzrandolpli. 
75, 79—81, 83, John Gillman. 

92, Thomas Gorden. 
88, 92, 95—96, 

Benjamin Griffith. 
68, James Grover. 
SO— 88, William Ilaig. 
98 — 99, Andrew Hampton. 
68, 80, 83, 86, 98—99, 

John Hance. 
95—96, 98—99, Daniel Harcolt. 

92, Han» Harmanse. 
93—95, 98—99, 

John Harriman. Sr. 

79, 83, 80, 88, 92—90, 98, 99, 

Richard Hartshorne. 
9,3 — 94, David Herriott. 
SO, 88. Peter Hessells. 
9.5 — 99. Jedediah Higgins. 
93—95, Thomas Higgins. 
95, 96. Thomas Hilburno. 
68. SO. Jonathan Holmes. 
1700—01, Adam Hude. 
75, 92—93, Hopewell Hull. 
85, Thomas Huntington. 
79—86, 92—96, John Ilslay. 
75, 79 — 81, 83, Tl)omas Johnson. 

92, John Johnston. 
88, Jeffrey Jones. 

93—95, William Laing. 
87—88, John Langstaifife. 
88, 92—96. 98—99. 

William Lawrence. 
93 — 95, Samuel Leonard. 
9.5—98, Cornelius Longfield. 
9.5—96. William Looker, Sr. 
98, William Loreridge. 
75, 81, 83, Henry Lyon. 

80, 92—93, John Lron. 
73, 75, 83, 92—95. 98—99 

Elias Miehielson. 

81, 88, 95, Enoch Miehielson. 

93, Hartman Michiel.'Jon. 
OS. Jacob Mollins. 
-71, 82—83, 88, 



08- 



ir,2 



MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY. 



Samuel Moore. 
98 — 99, Lewis Morris. 
92 — 93, Henrv Norris. 
68. 79, John Ogden, Sr. 
1701—02, Eli.«ha Parker. 
86, 88, 92, John Parker. 

83, Joseph Parker. 

83, Benjamin Parkis. 
92—99, John Pike. 

99, Thomas Pike. 
86, 99 — 1701. William Pinhorne 

73, Adrian Post. 
75, 80 — 81, Benjamin Price. 

86, William Pylos. 
93—94, William Redford. 
92—95, 98—99, John lieiil. 
77, 92 — 93, Thomas Richards. 
95—96, 98—99, 

Clans Janseu Romaine. 
94—96, John Royse. 
95—96, Richard Saltar. 

75, William Shattoek. 
80—81, 83, Edward Slater. 
75, 81, John Slocum. 
84 — 86, I.saac Smalley. 



71—72, John Smith. 

68, Casper Steenmets. 

98 — 99, Johannes Steenmets. 

68, Samuel Swaine. 

68, Edward Tart. 
-96, Albert Terhune. 
-94, Thomas Thorpe, Sr. 
-94, Job Throckmorton. 

88, John Throckmorton. 

81, Peter Tilton. 
-95, 98—99, John Treat. 

68, Robert Treat. 

99, Peter Van Este. 
-93, Walling J. Van Winkel. 
-99, Samuel Walker. 

80, John Ward. 

92, Eliakim Wardell. 
92 — 93. John White. 

81, Thomas White. 

-96, 98—99, John Williams. 
-96, 98—99, George Willocks 
68, Thomas Wintertou. 
-94, Jonas Wood. 
-1700, John Worth. 



«<;<;s to 17o:j. 



Wfst Jcr.*soy, 



1697, 


John Adani.s. 




85, 


William Albertson. 




85, 


Richard Arnold. 




97, 


John Ashbrook. 


84- 


07, 


James Atkinson. 




1701, 


John Bacon. 




85, 


Samuel Bacon. 




83—84, 


Michael Barron. 


82- 


85, 


Thomas Barton. 




83—85, 


Richard Basnet t. 


84- 


83—85, 


William Pates. 


] 


97, 


Jonathan Beers. 


82- 


83—85, 


97, William Biddle. 




82, 


Samuel Borden. 


82- 


83—85, 


John Borton. 


83- 


83—85, 


Edward Bradway. 




84—85, 


William Braithwaite. 




89, 97, 


, Benjamin Bramma. 




97, 


Timothy Brandreth. 


82- 


97, 


Joseph Brown. 




85, 


James Budd. 


83- 


82—83, 


85, Thomas Budd. 


82- 


85, 


William Budd. 


97- 


97, 


Henry Callinger. 


82, 


84—85, 


Roger Carary. 




85—86, 


Samuel Carpenter. 




82—83, 


John Chaftin. 


84- 


83—85, 


Samuel Cole. 


82, 


83—85, 


Francis Collins. 




97, 


Joseiih Cooper. 




82—85, 


97. William Cooper. 




97, 


John Crawford. 


8.3- 


82, 


John Cripps. 





85, Peter Dalboc. 

85, Wolla Dalboe. 

97, Ricliard Daukiu. 
-85, 97, 01, 

Francis Davenport. 

97, Jolni Day. 

97, Jacob Dayton. 
-85, 97, George Deacon. 

82, Bernard Devonish. 
-85, Robert Dimsdale. 
701, Simeon Ellis. 
-85, William Eniley. 

85, William Evans. 
-85, Elias Farre. 
-84, John Fenwick. 

84, Francis Forrest. 

97, Peter Fretwell. 

97, Hananiah Gam. 
-85, 97, 1701, 

Thomas Gardiner. 
-85, John Gosling. 
-85, Richard Guy. 
-1701. William Hall. 

84, Godfrey Hancock. 
82, Richard Hancock. 

701, John Hand. 

-85, George Ilaselwood. 

85, 97, 1701, 
Samuel Hedge. 

85, Israel Helme. 
97, Richard Heritage. 
-84, 97, John Hollinsliead. 
97, John Holme. 



MI]MBERS OF ASSEMBLY 



83—84, Joliji Ilooton. 

8r», Jobn IIurniM-. 
8;5 — 85, Thomas IIowi-11. 
8.J, 117. John Ilugg. 

!»7, John Hu}.'}!, Jr. 

07, Joshua lluinphreys- 
84 — 85, George Hutchinson. 

68, Peter Jegou. 
85, 97, 1701, Samuel Jennings. 

85, Richard Johnson. 
85, 1701, John Kay. 

82, John Lambert. 
82—85, 97, Thomas Lambert. 

84, Marcus Lawrence. 

85, Richard Lawrence. 
82, Daniel Leeds. 

85, Hypolite Lefever. 

97, Frederick J. Lippincott. 
1701, Restore Lippincott. 
83 — 85, John Maddocks. 
82—84, Isaac Marriott. 

97, Peter Matsou. 

85, Thomas Matthews. 

97, Matthew Medcalfe. 
97, 1701, Archibald Mieklo. 

97, Daniel Mills. 
84—85, Roger Milton. 

85, Anthony Nealson. 
82—85, James Nevill. 
82—83, Mark Newbie. 
82—85, Thomas Ollive. 

68, Fop F. J. Outhout. 

85, John Pancoast. 

97, William Pate. 
1701, Philip Paul. 

82—85, William Peacbev. 

85, William Penton. 
82, 84, John Pledger. 
97, 1701, John Rambo. 

98, Edward Randolph. 
97, Thomas Rapier. 

85, 97, 1701. John Reading. 
82. 85, Mark Reeves. 
85, 97, Andrew Robeson. 
85, Richard Russell. 



84, ("hristoi'lier Saunders. 

84, Renjamin S<ott. 
97, 1701. John Scott. 

85, Thomas Shari>. 
97, John Shaw. 

83, John Skeene. 
82, 84, John Smith. 

84, Thomas Smith. 
97, Samuel Spicer. 

83, Henry Stacy. 

82—85, 97, 1701, Mahlou Stacy. 
82-85, Robert Stacy. 

92, John Tatham. 

97, George Taylor. 

97, John Taylor. 
82, 85, 97, 1701, 

Thomas Tliackare. 
82 — 84, Anilrew Thorn [son. 
83—84, 97, John Thompson. 

85, Richard Tindall. 
83 — 85, Percival Towle. 
84 — 85, Henry Treadway. 
84—85, Robert Turner. 
82 — 85, Edward Wade. 

97, Samuel Wade. 
85, William Warner. 
97, Benjamin Wheate. 

84, Christopher White. 
82, John White. 

85, Joseph White. 
1701, Thomas Wilkins. 

82—85, Daniel Wills, Sr. 

97, Robert Wilson. 
83—84, Henry Wood. 

85, John Wood. 

97, William Wood. 
1701, John Woodruff. 

97, Joseph Woodruff. 
83—84, 97, John Woolston. 

85, John Worlidge. 

97, John Wright. 
82—85, Joshua Wright. 
82—84, Thomas Wrigiit. 
82 — 85, Robert Zane. 



MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY. 



MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY 

1703 to 1775. 

(Colony of New Jersey.) 



**Die(l before sworn in. 
5 Resigned. fExiielled. 



EASTERN DIVISIOA. 
At Large. 



tSeat vacaled. 



1703—04, Jedediah Allen. 04—06, 

03—06, Obadiab Bowne. 04—06, 

03—04, John Harrison. 07—09, 

03—06, Richard Hartshorue. 07 — 08, 

03—04, :Michael Howden. 07—00, 

03—04, John Reid. 07—08, 

03—04, Richard Townley. 07 — 09, 

03—04, Cornelius Tunison. 07—09, 

03—06, Peter Van Este. 07—08, 

04 — 07, tJohn Bowne. 09, 

04 — 08, Jasper Crane. 08—09. 

04—06, John Lawrence. 08—09, 

04—09, John Royse. 08—09, 

04—06, Richard Saltar. 09, 



John Tunison. 
Anthony Woodward. 
Thomas Faruiar. 
William Lawrence. 
Enoch Michielson. 
Lewis Morris. 
William Morris. 
Elisha Parker. 
Daniel Price. 
John Kinsey. 
Elisha Lawrence. 
Benjamin Lyon. 
Gershom Mott. 
John Treat. 



City of Perth Amboy, 



1703—09. Thomas Gordon. 

03—04, Miles Forster. 30—33, 

04—06. John Barclay. 38—42, 

07—09, 16—19, 43—44, 

John Harrison. 44 — 51, 

10—14, John Johnston. 45 — 48, 

30—14, John Reid. 51—63, 

16, Thomas Farmar. . 51 — 59, 

16—19, William Eires. 60—03, 

21—32, *John Johnston. 63 — 68, 

21, Andrew Redford. 63 — 75, 

22 — 25, Samuel Leonard. 69 — 71, 

27—29, 33—44, 72—75, 



Andrew Johnston. 
Gabriel Stelle. 
49 — 51, Lewis Johnston. 
Samuel Leonard. 
Samuel Nevill. 
Pontius Stelle. 
John Stevens. 
*John Johnston. 
Andrew Smyth. 
John Johnston. 
Courtland Skinner. 
John L. Johnston. 
John Coombs. 



Bergen County. 

1709 — 10, Lawrence Van Buskirk. 27 — 33, Peter Sonmans. 

10 — 16, Andreas Van Buskirk. 27 — 51, Lawrence Van Buskirk. 

10—16, William Saudford. 34 — 48. David Demarest. 

16, tHenry Brockholst. 49—54, Derick Dey. 

16, tDavid Ackerman. 51 — 54, Cornelius Van Vorst. 

16 — 21, Hessell Peterson. .54 — 60, George Vreeland. 

16—21, Philip Schuyler. 54—68, Reynier Van Giesen. 

21 — 27, William Provoost. 61 — 75, Tbeunis Dey. 

21 — 27, Isaac Van Giesen. 69 — 75, Johannes Demarest. 



MF.MBERS OF ASSEMBLY 



15o 



lO.ssex County. 



170!)— 14, Joliu Tit^at. 
()!»— 10, Henjaiuin Price. 
10 — 14, Joseph Marsh. 
16—25, 38—39, JosiaU Ogileu. 
16—30, 38—39, 43, 

Joseph Bonnel. 
27 — 33, John Cooper. 
30—33, Benjamin Price. 
40—42, 45—47, 51—53, 

John Low. 
40—42, John Eolph. 



43, '"'Peter Ka.vanl. 

4.3 — 44, (Jeorge VreeUin<l. 

44 — 51, John Crane. 

49 — 51, Joseph Caniii. 

51—54, 56—65, §Robert Ogden. 

.54—56, §Jacob De Hart. 

54—58, §Robert Bradbury. 

60 — 71. SJohn Ogtlen. 

66 — 75, Stephen Crane. 

72 — 75, Henry Garrit.'^e. 



Mi<ldle.sex County. 



1700, Jolin Johnston. 
09, George Duncan. 
10—14, 40—^4. 45. 

Thomas Farmar. 
10—14, Aflam Hude. 
16—25, John Kinsey, Jr. 
16—19, Charles Morgan. 
21 — 25, Moses Roliih. 
27—33, John Kinsey, Jr. 
27— .39, James Hude. 
.38—39, Edward Antill. 
40—42, 44, Robert Hude. 



43—44. 54—64, *Samuel Nevill. 

44, William Ouke. 
45 — 48. John Heard. 

45, *John Moores. 
46 — 48. Philip Kearney. 
49—75, John Wetherill. 
49 — 51. James Smith. 
51—54, Shobal Smith. 
6.5 — 71. Reune Runyon. 
72 — 74, *John Moores. 

75, Azariah Dunham. 



Monmouth County. 



1709, 10—19, Elisha Lawrence. 

09—14, Gershom Mott. 

10 — 25, William Lawrence. 

21 — 25, Garret Schenck. 

27 — 50, *John Eaton. 

27—33, James Grover. 

38 — 42, Cornelius Vanderveer. 



43 — 60, Robert Lawrence. 
51 — 62. *Jnmes Holmes. 
61—68, 72—75, 

Richard Lawrence. 
6.3—68. John Anderson. 
69 — 71. Robert Hnrtshorne. 
69 — 75. Edward Taylor. 



l^lorrLs County. 



Jacob Ford. 



-75, William Winds. 



Sonier.set County. 



1709, 
*9. 
10—14, 
10—14, 
16—19. 
16—19, 
21—25, 
21—25, 
27—29, 
30—39, 



Thomas Fitz Randolph. 

Dennis. 

Cornelius Longfield. 

John Tunison. 

27. 29. Thomas Hall. 

Ben.jamin Clark. 

Robert L. Hooper. 

40 — 42. Thomas Leonard. 

Thomas Farmar. 

George Tannest. 



.30—33. §Isaac Vanzant. 

3.3— .39, Peter Dumont. 

40 — 54, John Van Middlesworth. 

40, tHendrick Fisher. 
43 — 44, Dirck Vas Veghten. 
45 — 75. Hendrick Fisher. 
54 — 67, *John Hoagland. 

68, Abraham Tannest. 
69—71, John Berrien. 
72—75, John Roy. 



156 



MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY, 



W K ST I : l{ .\ 1 ) I \ I S lO \ . 



-nr^o 



1703—04, William Biddle. 

03 — 04, Joseph Cooper. 

03—08, William Hall. 

03 — OG, John Hugg, Jr. 

03—00, John Ka.v. 

03—00, Thomas Lambert. 

03—06, Eestore Lippincott. 

03— OG, John IMason. 

03 — OG, John Smith. 

03—04, William Steavenson. 

04 — 08, Thomas Br.vant. 

04 — 06, Robert Wheeler. 

04 — 06, Joshua Wright. 

07-08, Peter Corson. 



07—00, liichard Johusor. 
07—08, Philip Paul. 
07 — 08, John Thompson. 
07—08, John Wills. 
07—08, Bartholomew Wyatt. 

09, Nathaniel Breading. 

09, Nathaniel Cripps, 

09, Ezekiel Eldredge. 

09, John Kaighn. 

09, John Lewis. 

09, Hush Middleton. 

09, Hugh Sharp. 

09, John Somers. 



City of Burlington. 



1703—06. Peter Fretwell. 

03—09, Thomas Gnrdiner. 

07^-08, Samuel Jennings. 

09, Thomas Rapier. 

09—14, Robert Wheeler. 

09, William Bustill. 

10 — 14, Isaac Derow. 

16—18, *Samuel Smith. 

16—19, Daniel Smith. 

21—25, John Allen 

21 — 25, Jonathan Wright. 

27 — 29, John Rodman. 

27 — 44, Isaac Pearson. 



30-^5, 


Richard Smith. 


46—50, 


Richard Smith, Jr. 


45—50, 


Daniel Smith. 


51—00, 


Charles Read. 


51—54, 


John Deacon. 


46—66, 


Samuel Smith. 


61—68, 


John Lawrence. 


67—68, 


Thomas Rodman. 


69—71, 


Abraham Hewliugs. 


69—71, 


Joseph Smith. 


72—75, 


James Kinsey. 


72 — 75, 


Thomas Polegreen Hew- 




liugs. 



Burlington County. 



1709—14, 21—29, 

Thomas Lambert. 
09— Samuel Smilh. 
10 — 14, Joshua Humphreys. 
16 — 19, Jacob Doughty. 
16—19, Matthew Champion. 
21—24. *William Trent. 
27-^2, *Mahlon Stacy. 
30 — 33, Joshua Wright. 
38—54, William Cook. 



43—44, Thomas Shinn. 
45 — 48, Samuel Wright. 
49—51. Joshua Bispham. 
51 — 57, *Barzillai Newbold. 
54—60, 69 — 75, Henry Paxson. 
57 — 60, Samuel Stokes. 
01—08. Daniel Doughty. 
01 — 08. Joseph Borden. Jr. 
09—71, Joseph Bullock. 
72 — 75, Anthony Sykes. 



Cape 3Iay County. 



1709—19, Jacob Spicer. 
09—14. Peter Fretwell. 

16. tJacob Heulings. 
16 — 19, Jeremiah Basse. 
21 — 25, Humi)hrey Hughes. 
21—29, Nathaniel Jenkins. 
27- — 45, Aaron Leaming. 



30—39. 44, Henry Young. 

40 — 42, 46 — 71. Aaron Leaminj 

43—44. John Willets. 

44—65, *Jacob Spicer. 

66—71, *Nicholas Stillwell. 

71 — 75, Jonathan Hand. 

72 — 75, Eli Eldredge. 



Cumberland County. 

1772 — 75, John Sheppard. 72 — 75, Theophilus Elmer. 



MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY. 



157 



Gloucester County. 



1709 — 19, John Kay. 
09 — 14, John Kaighn. 

16, tDaniel Coxe. 

16, tRichard Bull. 
21 — 25, Samuel Cole. 
21—29, 38—44, John Mickle. 
27 — 33, William Harrison. 
30 — 49, *Joseph Cooper. 
45 — 48, Ebenezer Hopkins. 



49 — 50, *James Hinchman. 

50—54, William Mickle. 

51 — 54, Joseph Ellis. 

54 — GO, John Ladrl. 

54 — 65, *Samuel Clement. 

Gl — G8, David Cooper. 

66 — 68, Samuel Clement. 

69 — 75, Robert Friend Price. 

69 — 75, John Hinchman. 



Hnnti'rdon County. 



1727—33. John Porterfield. 
27—33, Joseph Stout. 
38—42, Benjamin Smith. 
38 — 39, John Emley. 
40 — 42, Joseph Peace. 



4.3^5, William :Mott. 
4.3—44, ^Andrew Smith. 
44 — 15, Daniel Doughty. 
72 — 75. Samuel Tucker. 
72 — 75, John Mehelm. 



Hunterdon itnd Morris Counties. 

1746—54, William Mott. 46—54, John Emley. 

Hunlorddii, 3I«rri.s and Su.ssex Counties. 



1754—60, Josei.h Yard. 
54—00, Peter Middagh. 
61 — 68, George Reading. 



61-71, John Hart. 
69—71, Samuel Tucker. 



To^vn of Salem. 



09, John Lewis. 

09, Parker. 

10—14, Hugh Middleton. 
10—14, 21—25, John Mason. 



16 — 19, Isaac Shari). 

16, t Henry Joyce. 
16—19, Richard Johnson. 
21 — 25, Thomas Mason. 



Saleni County. 



1709, Thomas Sheppard. 
09—14, 21—25, Isaac Sharp. 
10—14, 21—25, 

Bartholomew Wyatt. 

16, tWilliam Hall. 

16, tWilliam Clowes. 
10 — 19, Dickinson Sheppard. 
27 — 29, Joseph Keen. 
27 — 29, Thomas Mason. 
30—33, John Brick. 



30 — 33, *James Whit ton. 

33, t 38—39, Joseph Reeves. 



33—51, 

40—41, 

43—44, 

44, 



AYilliam Hancock. 

=Eichard Smith. 

'Leonard Gibbon. 
Moses Sheppard. 



<L' 



■-> 7 



-51, John Brick, Jr. 
75, Grant Gibbon. 
75, Benjamin Holme. 



Salem and Cumberland Counties. 



1751—62. *William Hancock. 
51—54, Richard Wood. 
54 — 71, Ebenezer Miller. 



G3— 68, Edward Keasbey. 
69—70, *Isaac Sharp. 
71, Grant Gibbon. 



1772 — 74. *Thomas Yan 
72—75, Nathaniel Pettit. 



Su.ssex County. 

Home. 74 — 75, Joseph Barton. 



lo8 



MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY, 



MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY. 

177C to 1S44. 



Atlantic County. 



1837, Joseph Endicott. 
38—39, Robert B. Risley. 



40 — il, Joseph S. Read. 
42 — 44, George Wlieaton. 



Bergen County. 



1776, Peter Zahriskie. 
76, 83, Thennis Dey. 

76, 84, 86, David Board 
77 — 78, Joast Beam. 

77, 81, Garret Leydefker. 

77, 82. 87, 1815, John Cutwater. 
78—81, 87, Peter Wilson. 

78, 97—1804, Tliomas lUancb. 

79, Robert Morris. 
79—83, Isaac Blancli. 

80, Gabriel Ogden. 
82—83, 87, 94—95, Adam Boyd. 
84—86, 92, 96, 1810-11, 

Jacob Terluine (Terheun), 

84. Edow Mersealliis. 

85, Abraham Blauvelt. 
85—86, 88—90, 93, Isaac NlcoU. 
88—90, 93, John (A.) Benson. 
90—91, Edmund \V. Kingsland. 
91, 95, John Ilaring. 

!>1 — 92, 96. ITenrv Berry. 
92—94, 96-1802, 04—00, 
Peter Ward. 

94, William M. Bell. 

05. Ben.ininin Blnclidge. 
97—98, Robert Campbell. 
99—1801. John Dey. 
02—04, 06, Isaac Kipp. 
03 — 04, Martin I. Ryerson. 
04—06. 08 — 09, Adrian Post. 
05—06. Odonljah Schuyler. 
OC — 07, 09—11, William Colfax. 

07, John Vanhorn. 

07, Abraham Forshee. 
08, 14—17. Albert C. Zabriskie. 
08 — 09, 18, John Hopper. 
10— n, 13, John A. Westervelt. 
12 — 13, Martin Van Tlouten. 
12 — 13, 19. Casparu.'! Bogart. 
12 — 13, Tliomas Dlokerson. 

14, Richanl Cadmus. 

14, Jacob K. Mend. 
15. 20 — 21, Charles Board. 

1.5, Garret A. I.ydacker. 
le— 17, Jacob Banta. 



10—17, 


Cornelius Morsoiles. 


16, 21- 


-22, Peter Sip. 


18. 


Casi)arus Prior. 


18, 24, 


Nathaniel Board. 


19—20, 


25—26, 29, 




Cornelius Van Winkle. 


19, 


Silas Brlnkerhoof. 


20, 


Sebe Brlnkerhoof. 


21—23, 


John Westervelt, Jr. 


22—23, 


25—27, David I. Christie. 


23—24, 


Garret Ackerson. 


24, 


John V.Tu Waggoner. 


25, 


Henry B. llaggerman. 


26, 


Charles Kinsey. 


27, 30, 


Peter J. Terhune. 


27, 


Cornelius D. Vjin Riper. 


28. 


Clirisflan Zabriskie. 


28, 


Peter C. Westervelt. 


28—29, 


Andrew P. Hopper. 


29—30, 


Jolin Ward. 


.30, 33. 


Samuel R. Demarest. 


31. 


Garret Sip. 


31, 


Andrew IT. Hopper. 


31, 


John R. Blauvelt. 


32—33. 


Garret P. Hopper. 


32—33, 


John M. Cornelison. 


32, 


Samuel Demarest. 


34, 


John F. Hopper. 


34—35, 


Abraham I.ydecker. 


.34, 


Peter I. Ackerman. 


35, 36. 


Michael Saunler. 


35, 


John H. Hopi>er. 


36, 


Henry Doromus. 


36. 


Jetur R. Riggs. 


.37—38, 


David D. Van Bussum. 


37—38, 


Albert G. I.ydecker. 


37— .38, 


John Cassedy. 


39—40, 


John G. Ackerson. 


39. 


Albert G. Doremua. 


39—40, 


Albert J. Terhune. 


41—42, 


James 1. Demarest. 


41—42, 


John H. Zabriskie 


4.3—44, 


William G. Hopper 


43—44, 


Jacob C. Terhune 



MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY 



150 



1770 to 1844. 



lturlin;;:tun County. 



1776—77, Peter lallman. 20, 

.70. 78, 83, Caleb Rlireve. 21—24. 

70, Joseph Newbol.l. 21—23, 

77, Samuel Rotrers. 22, 

77—82, Tlionias Feiiiinore. 23—24, 

78—79, Josiah Foster. 25—27, 

79, 85—90, Joseph Riddle. 25—27, 

80, William Trent. 25—28, 

80. William Hough. 28—30, 

81—83, Israel F?hreve. 28, 

81. 83; 90—92. 95, 28, 

George Anderson. 29, 

82, Thomas Reynolds. 29, 

84, James Klnsey. 30, 

84, Cleayton Newbold. .30—35, 
84—85. 87, Richard S. Smith. 30, 

85, Joseph Smith. 30—32, 
80, D.ivid Rldgwav. 31—32, 
80, Uriah Woolman. 31-32, 

87—89, Robert Strettell Jones. 31—32, 

8&— 90, Daniel Newb..ld. 31, 

91. Joshua ,M. Wallace. 32—34, 

91. Caleb Newbold. 33. 

92. moi— 04. John l.acey. 33, 

92—93. Thomas Ilollonshead. 33—34, 

9.3—90. Samuel ITough. 33, 

93, Henry Ridgway. 34, 

94. Joseph Stokes. 34, 
94, John Van Emburgh. 34, 

95—90. Stacy Riddle. 3.5—36, 

90—1804. 00—09, 10—17. 35—36, 

William Coxe, Jr. 35—36, 

97, 1820—22, Thomas Newbold. 35—36, 

97—1801, Job T.ipplncott. 36, 

97—1800. 02—07. 37—38. 

William Stockton 37—38. 

98. Joseph Riidd. 37. 

99—1804. 08-17. 19. 37. 

William Pearson. 38—39. 

1804-11. 13—14, William Irick. 38, 

04—00, Isaac Cowgill. .39—41. 

04—13. Caleb Earle. 39—41, 

10—15, Charles Ellis. 39—40, 

12—17, Samuel J. Read. 40—41, 

1.5-16. William Reeve. 41-42, 

17—19, 24, John Evans, Jr. 42—44, 

18—19. 2.3—24, William Griffith. 42-^4, 

18—19, John Newbold. 42—44, 

18. Samuel ITalnes. 42, 

20, George ITulme. 4.3 — 44, 

20—22. 25—27, Gershom Mott. 43^4, 



William Stockton, Jr. 
Richard I.. Realty. 
William Woolman. 
Samuel Deacon. 
Jonathan Hough. 
29, Joshua S. Eail. 
Isaiah Toy. 
37 — 41, John Emley. 
Samuel Rlack. 
Philip F. Howell. 
Richard Eayre. 
John Warren. 
Charles M. Wells. 
Charles Stoki^s. 
George Deacon. 
Richard Campion. 
Benjamin II. Lii»i>incott. 
Joshua Wright, Jr. 
Renjamin Shreve. Jr. 
William R. Allen. 
Samuel Rlack. 
Israel Riddle. 
John TI. Rulon. 
Zebedee M. Wills. 
Isaac Ililliard. 
George Rlack. 
Renjamin Fisli. 
Amos Stilos. 
Thomas Page. M.D. 
Anderson Lalor. 
Moses Wills. 
Thomas F. Rudd. 
Renjamin Davis. 
John W. Fennimore. 
Jesse Richards. 
Amos W. Archer. 
Robert C. Hutchinson. 
Phineas S. Bunting. 
Bowes Reed Rrown. 
William W. Norcross. 
William Black. 
Levi Borton. 
Elihu Mathis. 
Isaac Stokes. 
Thomas II. Richards. 
John C. Deacon. 
Renjamin Ridgway. 
Joseph Satterthwait. 
Thomas Harrison. 
Thomas Harris. 
Isaiah Adams 



IGO 



MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY 



177G to 1844. 
Cape Mjty County. 



1776, 
70, 

76—77, 

77, 79, 

77—78. 

78, 

78, 81, 

79, 

79, 

80, 83, 

80—82, 

82—83, 
8-J, 84- 

84, 

85, 89- 

89, 

93, 



Ell Eldridge. 

Joseph Savage. 

Iliigli Hatliorne. 

84, 

Henry- Young Townsend. 

80—81, 

Jeremiah Eldredge. 

John Hand. 

87-88, 90-96, 

Richard Townsend. 

James \Yliilden. 

Jonathan Learning. 

Josei.h Ilildreth. 

86—88, 91—93, 1804, 

Matthew WhlUlen. 

85—80, John Baker. 
-92, 90, 98, 

Elijah Townsend. 

Levi i::idredge (Resigned) 
-90, Nezer Swain. 

Eli Townsend. 

Ebenezer Newton. 



94, David Johnston. 
94—95, Eleazer Hand. 

95, Reuben Townsend 
90, 99, 1801, Abijah Smith. 
97, 1800, Persons Learning. 
1802—04, 10, Joseph Falkiubuige. 
05—07, 09, 12—13, 

Thomas IL Hughes. 
06, 08, 11, 15—17, 18—19. 22. 
Nicholas Willits. 

13, Joshua Sw.iin. 

14, Robert M. Holmes 
20—21, 23, 26, 28—29, 

Joshua Townsend. 
24—25, 27, Israel Townsend. 
30 — 33, Jeremiah Learning. 
34—35, Richard Thomson. 
36 — 37, Amos Corson. 
38—39, Thomas P. Hughes. 
40 — 41, Maurice lieesley. 
42—44, Reuben WiUets. 



Cuniberhtnd County. 



1770—77, 82—84, 80—87, 92, 
Ephraim Harris. 

70, 78, 82—83, 85-80, 96, 99, 
Jonathan Boweu. 

70 — 78, John Buck. 

77, 94, Ephraim Seeley. 

78 — 79, James Ewing. 

79, 91—93, Joel Flthian. 

79. Timothy Elmer. 

80. Thomas Ewing. 
80, Samuel Ogden. 

80, Ladis Walling. 
81—83, Joshua Ewing. 

81, Joshua Brick. 
81, Josiah Seeley. 
84, William Kelsey. 

84—85, 87—89, 91—92, 

John Burgin. 
8.=)— 88, John Sheppard. 
8S— 89. Eli Elmer. 
89—91, 93—95, 1817, 19, 
Ebenezer Elmer. 
90. 1800, Richard Wood, Jr. 
93. 90—97, David Moore. 
94—05. Benjamin Peck. 

95. Ebenezer Seeley. 
90—97, James Harris. 

98, Isaac Wheaton. 

98, John Sheppard, Jr. 
99—1802, George Burgin. 
1801—04, Azel Plerson. 



03—04, 

04, 

1800, 05—06, 

05—06, 

06, 10, 

00—07, 

07—08, 

08—09, 

09—15, 

10, 

12—13, 

14, 

15—16, 

15, 17, 

10, 18, 

17—18, 

IS— 19, 

19—23, 

20—23, 

23— ii; 

24, 

20— 29^ 

20—28, 

29, 

29, 

.SO— 31, 

■SO, 



Robert Smith. 
Abijah Davis. 
James Lee. 
Jedodiah Ogden. 
James D. Westcotf. 
Benjamin Champneys. 
Jonathan Moore. 
11, 13, Ephraim Batemaii. 
Daniel Richman. 
Isaac Watts Crane. 
Stephen Willis. 
Thomas J.ee. 

20, 24. Nnthan Leake. 
John S. Wood. 
Daniel Parvin. 

John Sibley. 

21. John I.anning, Jr. 
2.5—28, 30. 
William B. Ewing. 
Lucius Q. C. Elmer. 
J. Mayhew. 

Ishrael Stratton. 
Oeorge Souder, 
Edmund Sheppard. 
Nathaniel Foster. 
30, Ellas P. Seeley. 
Philip Fithian. 
Michael Swing. 
Jeremiah Stratton. 
William D. Barrett. 



MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY, 



161 



1770 to 1844. 



31—32, Jobn Lanning. 

31, Henry Shaw. 

43 — 44, Josiah Shaw. 

'62, Reuben Hunt. 

33, Jeremiah Stull. 

33, Noah \V. Flanagan. 

33, William Lore. 

30, Thomas K. Hunt. 
34 — 35, 39, Isaac Newcomb. 
34, 39, Ephraim II. Whitaker 
(Whitecar). 

30, Peter Ladow. 

37, Noah W. Flanagin. 

37, Samuel Bowen. 



32 



34 



37, David Whitaker (White- 
car). 

38 — 39, Bel ford M. Bonbam. 

38, Daviil Jones. 

40, Lewis lUce. 
40—41, Benjamin F. Chew. 
40—41, William V. Seeley. 

41, Elmer Ogdeu. 

42, Thomas Ware. 
42, Joseph Butclier. 
42, John K. Cory. 

43—44, Daniel L. Burt. 
43 — 44, Joseph Taylor. 



E.ssex County. 



1T7G, 83 — 85, Abraham Clark. 
76—82, 93, Caleb Camp. 
70, 82—88, Henry Garritse. 

77, Edward Fleming. 
77—79, 81, Jacob Brookfield. 
78, 82, Isaac Woodruff. 
79—80, Josiah llornblower. 
80, 82—83, 85—80, 89, 93, 
Daniel Marsh. 

81, Samuel Totter. 

84, John I'eck. 
80—87, 90, Jonathan Dayton. 
87—90, 94—97, Jonas Wade. 
88 — 89, John Condi t. 

90, Abraiiam Ogden. 
91—92, 94-90, Ellas Dayton. 
91—92, Matthias Williamson. 
91—92, Israel Iledden. 
93, 90. 98—1800, 00—07, 
Abraham S[)ear. 
94 — 95, James Ile<Men. 
97—99, William S. Pennington. 

97, Beeompence Stansbury. 
98—1800, 05—00, 09, 10, 

Charles Clark. 
1800 — 01, Jabez I'arkhuret. 
01, 04, 00. 10, Amos Harrison. 

01, Ralph Post. 
02—04. 07, 10, 24, 28, 

Abraham Godwin. 
02—04, 08—09, 13. 15, 17-18. 

Israel Day. 
02—04. Ezra Darby. 
04, 00, James Willoock. 
04. 00—09, Silas Whitehead. 
05-00, 10—15, 20—23, 25, 

Samuel Pennington. 
05 — 06, Moses Jacques. 
05—00, 17—18, William Gould. 

07, Abraham Vanhouten. 
08—09, 19, Nathan Squier. 



08, 

10. 

11. 
11, 14, 

11, 
12—13, 
12—14, 
12—13, 
14—15, 
15—16, 

10, 
17—19, 
17—23, 
20, 26- 
21—22, 

21, 

23, 25, 
24, 

24, 26- 
24—26, 

25, 

26, 

27, 

27—28, 

28, 

29, 

29, 

29, 

29, 

30, 83, 

80—32, 

30—32, 



31—82, 
31—32, 
31—32, 
33—34, 
33—34, 
^3, 



Andrew Wilson. 
Joseph Quinby. 
Thaddeus Mills. 
Samuel Condit. 
Abraham Ackerman. 

19, Charles Kinsey. 
James Wilson. 

10, Silas Condit. 
Jonathan Dayton. 

20, 22—23. John Dow. 
Isaac II. Williamson. 
Thomas T. Kinney. 
Samuel B. Miller. 

-27, Steplien D. Day. 
Philemon Dickerson. 
Caleb Ilalstead. 
John Mann. 

Francis C. F. Randolph 
-27, Amzi Dodd. 
28. William Stites. 
John Travers. 
Brant Van Blarcom. 
Oliver S. Ilalsted. 
Dennis Coles. 
William Pennington. 
Joseph C. Ilornb'.ower. 
John J. Chetwood. 
John Vail. 
Luther Little. 
Cornelius G. VanRiper. 
John J. Baldwin. 
Ira F. Randoli)h. 
Moses Smitli. 
Stephen J. Meeker. 
David Martin. 
Jolin P. Jackson. 
William Dickey. 
Asa Whitehead. 
John J. Bryant. 
Robert Morrell. 



MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY. 





1776 


to 1844. 


33—34, 


Gideon llotis. 


39—40, 


a4— 35, 


AaUrew Parsons. 


39—40. 


34, 


Jouas Smith. 


40—41, 


35— 3U, 


Jacob Klatt. 


40—41, 


35— 3U, 


Josei)b N. Tuttle. 


40—41, 


35— 3G. 


James W. Wude. 


41^4, 


35—30, 


John J. Chetwood. 


41, 


36—37, 


William J. IMeison. 


41^12, 


37, 


Stephen Dod. 


41-42, 


37—38, 


Alexaniler C. M. Penn- 


42—44, 




ington. 


42—44, 


37—38, 


John Littell. 


42—44, 


37, 


Israel Crane. 


42—44, 


38—313, 


Edward Sanderson. 


43^4, 


38—39, 


William Stites. 


43—44, 


38, 


Abraham V. Spear. 





James II. Uoblnson. 
Samuel II. Gardner. 
William U. Baldwin. 
Alexander Wilson. 
Benjamin F. Biookfieli 
Stephen Cougar. 
Jonas Smith. 
David B. Lum. 
Jabez Cook. 
Lemuel W. Jacobus. 
Jotham Potter. 
Samuel C. Smith. 
Jephtha Baldwin. 
Isaac Van Wagenan. 
John Kunyon. 



Glouce.ster County. 



76, 92, Richard Somers. 

76, Robert F. Price. 

76, 1801, Isaac Mickle. 

77, 78, Elijah Clark. 

77, John Wilkius, Jr. 
77, Isaac Tomliuson. 

78, 81—85, 87—93, 1S03— 04. 

Joseph Cooper. 
79 — 80, John Sparks. 

79, Joseph Low. 

79 — 80. Thomas iieunard. 

80. Isaac Kay. 
81—83, 90, Samuel Ilugg. 
78, 81—85, 

Joseph Ellis (Resigned). 
84—88, 90—91, Thomas Clark. 

85, David D.ivis. 
80—80, Franklin Davenport. 

80, John Kille. 
89, 93, 95—97, 1800, 02, 

Abel Clement. 
91—94, Jolin Blackwood. 

94, Benjamin Whitall. 
94, 99, Thomas Wilkins. 
95—97, 1800 — 02, Samuel French. 
95 — 90, Thomas Somers. 

97, Daniel Leeds. 
98—99, Joshua L. Howell. 
98—1802, Samuel W. Harrison. 

98. James Wilkins. 
1803—00, Robert Newell. 
03—04, 15—16, Richard Risley. 
05 — 06, Reuben Clark. 

05 — 06, Samuel G. Champion. 
OC, 10—11, Matthew Gill. 
06—07, 10. Michael C. Fisher. 
07—08, 11, Jacob Glover. 
07—08, 10, Benjamin Rulon. 
08 — 09, Thomas Doughty. 



11, Joseph V. Clark. 

09, John Brick. 
-17, Isaac Pine. 
-13, Joseph C. S'vett. 
-13, Daniel Carrell. 
-14, 24, 26, 

Charles French (Jun.). 

14, Nicholas Rape. 
-17, Edward Sharp. 

23, 28, John Estile (Estill). 

24, 20, Daniel Lake. 
-19, Samuel Kille. 

18, Samuel L. iJowell. 

19, Jeremiah J. Foster. 

19, Thomas Garwood. 

20, Jehu Wilson. 
20, William Tatem. 
23, John Moore White. 

-22, 25, 23, 34, 
John R. Scull. 

23, 28, Charles C. Stratton. 
-22, Joseph Kaighn. 

22, Isaac Miciiie, Jr. 
-25, Benjamin B. Cooper. 

24, Thomas Chapman. 
-27, Thomas Bee. 

-28, 37 — 38, Joseph Porter. 
29, John W. Mickle. 

29, Isaac llinchmau. 
-30, Japhet Ireland. 
-31, Jacob llowey. 

-31, 38 — 10, Charles Reeves. 

30. Robert L. Armstrong. 
-32, Charles F. Wilkins. 
-32, Samuel B. Westcott. 

32, John Gill, Jr. 
38-^0, Elijah Bower. 

-35, Joseph Rogers. 

33, Jesse Smith. 



MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY. 103 



1776 to 1S44. 

33—35, William R. Cooper. 41—42, Thomas II. Whitney. 

34—35, Samuel B. I.ippencott. 41, John B. Miller. 

35, Joseph TOntlicott. 41, Charles Knight. 
36—38, Joseph W. Cooper. 42, Samuel C. Allen. 
36 — 37, James W. Caldwell. 42, Charles II. French. 
36—37, David C. Ogden. 43^4, Nathan T. Stratton. 

36, John Richards. 43 — 44, Thomas B. Wood. 
39 — 40, Joseph Franklin. 43-^4, Benjamin Harding. 
39 — 40, 42. Richard W. Snowden. 43 — 44, Samuel W. Cooper. 

41, Joseph L. Pierson. 

Hudson County. 

1840, Jolin S. Condit. 43 — 44, Benjamin F. Welch. 
41 — 42, Abraham L. Van Bos- 
kerck. 

Hunterdon County. 

1776—78, John Hart. 07—11, 21, Moses Stout. 

76, 81, Jolin Mehelm. 09—11, 22, James J. Wil.'^on. 
76, Charles Coxe. 10, Elnathan Stevenson. 

77—78, 82, Neheuilah Dunham. 11, Thomas Prall, Jr. 

77, 79—81, 83—88, 01-93, 95—98, 12—13, William Potts. 
1800, 02, 12— 13. David Manners. 

Benjamin Van Cleve. 12 — 13, Benjamin Wright. 

78, David Chambers. 13—14, Edward Yard. 
79—80, Jared Sexton. 13—14, Samuel Barber. 

79, William Gano. 13—14, John Opdycke. 
80—85, 88, John Lambert. 15, Samuel L. Southard 
82—84, Samuel Tucker. (Re.signed). 
85—87, Joab Houghton. 15 — 16, John Farlee. 
86—87, 89—90, 94. 15—17, William Nixon. 

John Anderson. 15-16, 18—20, 23. 

88, Robert Taylor. Abraham Stout. 

89, Joshua Corshcn. 16 — 17, Thomas Prall. 
89, Charles Axford. 17-18, Robert McNeely. 

30-92, Thomas l.owrey. 18—19, 27—29, Isaac G. Farlee. 

90, 92, John Taylor. 1^—23, George MawvoU. 

91, 93—98, 1800. •2, 19, 21, Isaac Taylor. 

Aaron D. Woodruff. 20, Israel Taylor. 
93—98, 1800, 02, Simon Wyckoff. 20— 21, 25—27, Tlioiuas Capner. 

93, Samuel Stout. 22, Levi Knowles. 

94—95. David Frazer. 22, 27, Garret D. Wall. 

96—97, 99—1800, 02. 23—28, 30—32, Enoch Clifford. 

Stei>hen Burrows. 23 — 24, David Johnston. 

97, Samuel R. Stewart. 24 — 26, Asa C. Dunham. 

98, Joseph Beavers. 24, 28 — 31, Alexander Wurts. 
98—99, 1801, 03—08. 25—26. 30, 3.3, John Ban on. 

Josei)h IlanUlnson. 28 — 29, Stacy G. Potts. 

99-1801. 03—06, 17, John Haas. 29, Gabriel Iloff. 

99, John Lequear. 30—33, Edward S. Mcllvaine. 
1801, 03—06, Nathan Stout. 30—32, 34—35, William Marshall. 
01—03, Peter Gordon. 31—32, Cornelius Ludlow. 

04, Hugh Runyon. 33—34, William II. Slocn. 

04, Ellett Tucker. 33—34. Surpliln Garrison. 

05 — 06. 08. Joshtia Wright. 33, Andrew Weart. 

06—14. Aaron Vansyckle. 33—34, John W. nine. 

07, John Dowers. 34. William McKee. 



164 



MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY. 



[776 to 1S44. 



35—36 

35—37 

35-30 

35—30 

30 

37 

37—38 

37, 43 

37 

38—40 



, Joseph Brown. 
, John ITall. 
, Wilson Bray. 
, John Blane. 

Andrew I.arason. 
, James A. Phillips. 
, David Neiglibonr. 
— 44, Jonathan Piokel. 
, John II. Iln.Tuian. 
, rbilip Ililer. 



38, James Sny.ler. 
30 — 40, George Servis. 
39 — 40, Joseph Exton. 

41, Jonathan Dawes. 
41—42, Leonard IT. Flomerfelt. 
41^2, John I?. Mattison. 
41—42, Isaac K. Rrope. 
43 — 44, John Swackhamer. 
43—44, John II. Ca.'^e. 
43 — 44, Joseph Johnson. 



Mercer County. 



1838—39, Joslah S. Worth. 

38, Robert C. ^lutchinson. 
39-^0, William Rosco. 

40, James Wilson. 

41, Isaac Baker. 

41, Isaac W. I.anning. 



41—42, John B. Mount. 

42, Isaac Batten. 

42, Henry \V. Green. 
43 — 44, Israel J. Woodward. 
43—44. Richard J. Bond. 
43 — 44, John Lowry. 



niiddle.<«ex County. 



1776, 82—88. 91. 99. 1802, 


06—10, 




John Combs. 




1776, 


Daniel Moores. 


00—07, 


76—78, 


94—95, 99. 


08—10, 




Benjamin Manning. 


11. 


77. 79. 


Matthias Baker. 


11, 


W. 


Jacob Vandike. 


11. 17, 


78, 80, 


Jacob Schenok. 


14—15, 


78. 


Ebenezer I'ord. 


14, 


79, 


John Neilson. 


16, 


79, 


Thomson Stolle. 


16—18, 


80-82. 


Jacob Snydam. 


17—18. 


80, 88. 


Melanctlion Freeman. 


19. 2,5, 


81. 


Jacob Martin. 


19, 21- 


81—82. 


John Conger. 


19—22. 


83—85. 


88. James Schnurman. 


20—20, 


83. 


Samuel Fitz-Randolph. 




84. 


Moses Bloom fleld. 


23—24, 


85—80. 


87, 89, James Bonney. 


23—24, 


80—87. 


James Donglass. 


27—28, 


89. 


John Beatty. 


28, 


89—90. 


92—93. 90. 98. 


29, 




Thomas McDowell. 


•29. 


90—95, 


Poter Vredenbergh. 


29. 


90—92. 


John Runyan. 


.30—31. 


93. 


John Rattoone. 


.30—31 . 


94— 9S, 


Jamos Morgan. 


31—32. 


90. 


Joseph F. Randolph. 


32. 


97—1804, Gershoni Dunn. 


32. 


97. 


Andrew Kirkpatrick. 


.32. .34. 


1800. 14—15, William Edgar. 


33. 


1800—01, John Neil son. 


33. 


01—00, 


12—1.3. 20. 


33. 36. 




Erknries Beatty. 


33—34. 


03—10, 


12 — 13, James Voorhees. 


34—35. 


05—06, 


Andrew Elston. 


34—35. 



12—13. 15—16, 18, 27, 
James Parker. 
Alexander Dunn. 
George Boice. 
John Brewster. 
John L. Anderson. 
26, James T. Dunn. 
John N. Simpson. 
Alexander Dunn. 
Ilezekiah Smith. 
Allison Ely. 
Frazee Ayres. 
27—28, Charles Carson. 
-22, Samuel Edgar. 
25 — 26, James Cook. 
,30—31. 

John T. McDowell. 
James F. Randol|)h. 
David Sclienck. 
Andrew Snowhill. 
Nicholas Booraom. 
Littleton Kirkpatrick. 
Abraham Cruser. 
Josiah B. Howell 
Lewis S. Randolph. 
Charles G. McChesney 
David W. Vail. 
John II. Disborough. 
Simeon »Iundy. 
Henry Vandyke. 
John M. Tufts. 
Abraham W. Brown 
Samuel C. Johnos. 
37. Richard S. Field 
Ralph M. Crowell. 
Elias Runyon 



mhmbeUkS of assembly. 



165 



ra to 1844. 



35—38, George P. Malleson. 

35, George T. McDowell. 

36, Thompson Kdgar. 

3G, WilUaui C. Alexauiler. 
37—38, David U. Api.leget. 
37—39, Lewis Gohling. 

38, 40, Adam I.ee. 

39, Frederick Klclimond. 

39, 41, David Duuii. 

39, Cornelius C. Criiser. 



40 — 41, Jobn Acken. 

40, Israel K Corlell. 

40, Dean Brit ton. 

41, I'razoe Ayes 
41, Aaron <Julii-k 

42^4, Jolin D. Field 

41', Warren Broun. 
42 — 44, William ^*atter8on. 
42—44, William L. 8clienck. 
43—44, Joel B. Lalng. 



.>l«tiiniotitk County. 



177G, 81—82, 92, 

John Covenlioven. 

76, Joseph llulmes, Jr. 
76 — 79, James Mott, Jr. 
77—78, 86, Peter Schenck. 
77—79. Ilendrlck Smock 
79 — 81, Thomas Seabrook. 

80, Nathaniel Scuddor. 
80 — 84, Thomas Henderson. 
82 — 85, Daniel Ilendrkkson. 

S3, Peter Covenlioven. 
84—86, 94—95, Elisha Walton. 
85—1801, Joseph Siillwcll. 
87— Oa, Thomas Little. 
87 — 89, James Rogers. 
90—91, John Imlay. 
93—96, James II. Imlay. 

96, William Wickoff. 

97, 1808, Robert Montgomery. 
97—1800, William Lloyd. 

98, 1800, 08, David Gordon. 
99, Edward Taylor. 

1801 — 07, James Cox. 
01—04, 10—11, Peter Knott. 
01 — 07, John A. Scudder. 
04 — 07, 09, Henry Tiebout. 
08, 12—13. Tylee Willian.s. 

09, Silas Crane. 
09—10, 13—14, John S. Holmes. 
10—11, 13—14, 19—20, 

Thomas Cox. 
11, 13 — 14, James Anderson. 
12—13, John Stillwell. 
12—13, 23, 2.1—28, James Lloyd. 
15 — 16, George llolcombe. 
15—18, 20, Matthias Van Rarkle 
15 — 18, Reuben Shreve. 
17—19, 21, Charles Parker. 
18—19, William Ten Eycke. 

19. Jacob I'.nfchor. 



20, 

20. 

21—24, 

21-27! 

23! 
24—26. 
24—30. 

27, 
28—30, 

28. 
29— ;]0. 
29—30, 
31, 33, 
31—36, 
81, 33- 
31, 33- 

32, 



34—36, 

36. 

37, 

37, 

37. 

37, 

38—39, 

38—39, 

38—39. 

38— ;{9. 

40, 

40, 

40, 

40. 

41—44, 

41-44, 

41 — 14, 

41—14, 

41—44, 



Samuel F. Allen 

Isaac Han<-e. 

William I. Cono\er. 

Corlis Lloyd. 

John r. Woodluill. 

John J. Ely. 

Cornelius Walling. 

Joseph Conovcr. 

James West. 

James Hoiiping. 

Daniel II. Ellis. 

Leonard Walling. 

Augustus W. Bennett. 

Ivliis (W.) Davis. 

I'enjaniin Woodward. 

Annaulah Glfford. 
-35, Daniel C. Rynll. 
-36, Thomas G. Height. 

James S. Lawrence. 

Nicholas Van Wlckle. 

Elisha Lippincott. 

William Burtis. 

Arthur V. Conover. 

Samuel Mairs. 

ICdnuind T. Willlan.s, 

Thomas Miller. 

James Guluk. 

James Craig. 

Thomas E. Combs. 

William P. Forman. 

Garret Hiers. 

John Meirs. 

Henry W. Wolcott. 

James Grover. 

Charles Morris. 

Thomas C. Throckmorton 

Joiin R. Conover. 

Joseidi Brinley. 

Benjamin L. Irons. 

Samuel R. OUphant 



IGG 



MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY. 



1776 to 1844. 
Morris County. 



1776 — 78, Jacob Drake. 
70—77, 79, 81—90, Ellis Cook. 
7G— 77, William Woodbull. 
78—79, Abraham Kitchel. 
78, 95, David Thomson. 

79. Alexander Carmlchael. 

80, William Winds. 
80, John Carle. 

80, Eleazer I.indsly. 
81—82, 84, 86—90, 93—94, 07, 
1801—04, 09. 

Aaron Kitchel. 
81—83. 85—88. 91, 95, 
John Starke. 
83, Jonathan Dickerson. 
84 — 85, 89—90, Jacob ArnoM. 
91—94, 96—98, 1800, Silas Coudit. 
91—92, Iliram Smith. 

92, John Wnrts. 
93—94, 96—97, 1800, 
David Wclfh. 

95, John Debow. 

96, John Cobb. 
98—99, 1801—04, 

William Corwin. 
98 — 1800, Cornelius Voorhees. 

99, William Cami-fleld. 
1802—04, Jonathan Ogden. 
04 — 06, Je.'sse Upson. 
05—09, Lewis Condlrt. 
05 — 06, Ceorge Tucker. 
06 — 08. N'icholas Neighbour. 
07-13, Stephen Dod. 
10—14, Jephthah B. Afunn. 
10, 1.3—15, Nicholas MandevUle. 
11 — 13, Mahlon Dickerson. 
13, 31, Leonard Neighbor. 
14 — 22, David Thompson, Jr. 
15—16, 19, Benjamin Condlt. 
1.5—16, Ezekiel Kitchell. 
16—18, Samuel ITnlllday. 
17—18, John S. Darcy. 
17, 21—22, 24, 

Benjamin McCurry (Mc- 

Courry). 
18—19. 21-24, 32, 

William Brittln. 
19—20, Silas Cook. 



20—21, 

20, 
22—23, 

23—26, 
24, 
25—26, 
25—27. 
26. 35. 



27, 
28—30, 
28—30, 
28—30. 

31, 
31, 3:{- 
31, 35, 

3-'. 

32, 

32, 
3.3—34, 
33—35, 
33—34, 

35, 

36, 



36, 

37—38, 

37—38, 

37—38, 

37—38, 

39—40, 

39—40, 

39, 

39—40, 

40—41, 

41, 

41-^2, 

41, 

42, 

42, 

42—44, 

43—44, 

43—44, 

43—44, 



23, 28—30, 
William Monro. 
Benjamin Smith. 
25, Ebenezer F. Smith 
George K. Drake. 
John Scott. 
Joseph Dickerson. 
Ephraim Marsh. 
John D. Jackson. 
David Mills. 
Stephen Thompson. 
Walter Kirkpatritk. 
Joseph Jackson. 
Charles Ilillard. 
John Hancock. 
Elijah W^ard. 
-34, Thomas Mulr. 
James Cook. 
Samuel Beach. 
Jacob W. Miller. 
Joseph Smith. 
Joseph Dickerson, Jr. 
ITenry Ililliard. 
Silas Liudsley. 
Isaac Qulmby. 
John A. Bleeker. 
William Delli«^ker. 
Alexander Dickerson. 
William Logan. 
Lewis Condict. 
Silas Tuttle. 
Robert C. Stephens. 
Ezekiel B. Gaines. 
Abraham Erlttin. 
Ebenezer F. Smith. 
Jacob Welse. 
Paul B. De Bow. 
James W. Drake. 
Samuel B. Ilalsey. 
William Stepliens. 
Thomas C. Willis. 
Samuel C. Ilalsey. 
David T. Cooper. 
James Clark. 
John M. Losey. 
Samuel Wlllet. 
George Vail. 



*«.s.*jjiic County. 



1837, Aaron R. Pennington. 
37— .38, Henry M. Brown. 
38—39, Ellsha Clarke. 
39 — 40, John F. Ryerson. 

40, James Speer. 

41, George M. Ryerson. 



41, Samuel A. Van Saun. 

42, Martin I. Ryerson. 

42. Adrian R. Van llouten. 
43 — 44, William S. Ilogenoamp. 
43 — 44, Thaddeus Board. 



MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY. 



167 



1770 to 1844. 
Salem Coirnty. 



1776, 86, 89, Edmund Wetherby. 

7G, Samuel Dick. 

70, Elisha Basset, Jr. 
77, 87 — 89, Benjamin Holme. 
77—79, Wbitten Cripps. 

77, 82, 84—85, 87—88, 

Thomas Sinniclison. 

78, 80, Allen Congleton, Jr. 
78 — 80, Jolin Maybew. 

79, 82, 84—85, Anthony Sharp. 

80, 84, William Smith. 

81, 83, 86, Ephraim Lloyd. 
81—82, 84—85, 87—89. 

Edward Hall. 
81, James James. 
83, Thomas Norris. 
86, 90—91, Samuel Sharp. 
90, John Smith. 
90, Benjamin Cripps. 

91, 93, Bateman Lloyd. 

91 — 95, 98, John Sinnickson. 
92—95, 1800, Eleazer Mayhew. 

92, 94, Thomas Clement. 
95—97, William Wallice. 

96, William Parret. 
90, Gervas Hall. 

97, Clement Hall. 

97, 99, 1801, Artis Seagrave. 

98, 1800, Anthony Keasby. 
98—99, Joseph Shinn. 
99—1800, Isaac Moss. 

1801 — 04, Edward Burroughs. 

01 — 04, Merryman Smith. 

02—04, Samuel Ray. 

04 — 14, Jeremiali Dubois. 

05—06, Charles Jones. 

05 — 06, Hedge Thompson. 

06 — 08, Daniel Garrison. 

06, Daniel Tracy. 
07 — 08, Nathan Batssett. 
09—10, 17, Philip Curriden. 
09, 11, John Smith. 

10, Samuel Miller. 

11, Anthony Nelson. 
12—13, Robert H. Van Meter. 
12 — 15, 19, James Newell. 
13—14, John Dickinson. 

13, 26—27, Henry Freas. 
15—16, Joseph Kille. 

15, 19—20, 22, Morris Hancock. 
16—18, Stacy Lloyd. 

16, 18, John Mayhew. 

17, Peter Bllderback. 

18, Thomas Yarrow. 



19, 

20, 30, 
20—21, 

21, 23, 
21. 23. 



23, 

24—26, 

24—25, 

24, 

26, 

27, 29, 

27, 

28, 

28, 

28, 

29, 

29, 31, 

30, 

30, 

31, 

31, 

32. 



37 



32, .34, 

33, 

33, 

33, 

34, 

34, 

35—36, 

35, 

35, 

36, 

36. 

37, 

42, 

38, 

38—39, 

38—39, 

39, 

40, 

• 40, 

40, 

41, 

41, 

41, 

42, 

42, 

43—44, 

43 — i4, 

43 — 44, 



Thomas MurpLy. 
Zaccheus Ray. 
John G. Mason. 
25, Robert G. Johnson. 
Abraham Swing. 
Jonathan Ricnnian. 
John Sinnickson. 
Aaron O. Dayton. 
Samuel Ilumplireys. 
Israel R. Clawson. 
Samuel Clement. 
Benjamin Archer. 
William N. Jeffers. 
Thomas Sinnickson. 
Edward Smith. 
Jeremiah Foster. 
William J. Shinn. 
Jacob Wick. 
David Hurley. 
Joseph C. Nelson. 
John Suramerill. 
James Butcher. 
Isaac Johnson. 
Anthony Nelson. 
James W. iJulford. 
37, Isaac Johnson, 2d. 
Nehemiah Garrison. 
Richard P. Thompson. 
Jacob Hitcliner. 
Samuel IIunii)lireys. 
Joseph Llppencott. 
Hudson A. Springer. 
Thomas J. Yorke. 
William Cook. 
Woodnut Petit. 
H. J. Fries. 
John Hall. 
John W. Maskell. 
Joseph Hancock. 
John Sumerille, Jr. 
Moses Richman. Jr. 
David Hurley. 
John Dickinson. 
Samuel Bolton. 
Alexander G. Cattell. 
John G. Ballinger. 
AVilliam H. Nelson. 
Thomas Flanagan. 
Nathaniel Robbins. Sr. 
Thomas Dickinson, Jr. 
Samuel Capner. 
Allen Wallace. 
Thomas Bllderback. 



108 



MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY. 



1770 to 1844. 
Somerset County. 



1770, Jacob Bogart. 

70, Alexander MacEowen. 
70, Keoloff Vandike. 
77—78, William-Cliurcbill Hous- 
tou. 
77, Alexander Kirkpatrlck. 
77 — 71.), Iteoloff Sebring. 
78, 80—81, 84, 

David Kirkpatrick. 
79—88, 94, Edward Bunn. 

79, Henry Vandike. 
80, 84, Christopher Hoagland. 
81 — 82, John Schuurraan. 

82, Deick Longstreet. 

83, Cornelius Ten-Broeck. 

83, 89, John Witherspoon. 

84, 1800—04, 

Frederick Frelinghuysen. 
85—89, 92, 

Robert Blaire (Blair). 
85—87, David Kelluy. 

88, John Ilardeiibergh. 
89, 1812—13, 

Jacob R. Ilardenburgh. 
90—91, 93, 95, Robert Stockton. 
90—91, 94—96, 1811—13, 

Peter D. Vroom. 
90 — 91, James Linn. 

92, William Wallace. 
92—99, 1811, Henry Southard. 

93, Jonathan Ford Morris. 
96—1810, 12—14, 

James Van Duyn. 

97, John Stryker. 

98, David Kelly. 
99—1806, 11, 

William McEowen. 



1804, 16—19, 22—23, 

James Stryker. 

04, John Anuin. 
05 — 10, Peter I. Stryker. 

07, Samuel Swan. 
08—10, John N. Simpson. 
13 — 15, Samuel Bayard. 
13 — 19, Joseph Annin. 

15, Andrew Howell. 

IG, Cornelius Van Horn. 
17—19, Martin Schenck. 
20—21, 23—25, Dickinson Miller 
20—25, 30—31, Jacob Kline. 
20 — 21, John H. Disborough. 

22, Henry Vanderveer. 
24 — 27, James S. Green. 
26 — 27, James D. Stryker. 
26—27, 29, Peter D. Vroom, Jr. 
28 — 29, James S. Nevius. 

28, William C. Annin. 

28, John H. Voorhees. 
29—31, Ferdinand S. Schenck. 
30—31, 35, William Cruser. 
32—34, John Brees. 
32—34, William D. Stewart. 
32—34, Cornelius L. Ilardeuburg. 
35 — 36, Nicholas C. Jobs. 

35, William D. Mclvissack. 
3(>— 38, David T. Talmage. 
3t) — 38, Henry Duryee. 
37 — 38, Ralph Voorhees. 
39 — 41, Henry H. Wilson. 
39—41, Daniel Cory. 
39—41, Arthur V. P. Sutphin. 
42 — 44, Samuel Reynolds. 
42 — 44, Peter Voorhees. 
42 — 44, Peter Kline. 



Sussex County. 



iG— 7 

76, 

—77, 



8, Casper Shaffer. 
Abia Brown. 
Thomas Peterson. 
John MacMurtie. 
Jacob MacCoUum. 
Benjamin MacCuUough. 
Mark Thompson. 
Peter Hopkins. 
Anthony Broderick. 
I'^dmund Martin. 
Hugh Hughes. 
Samuel Kennedy. 
Joshua Swayze. 
Isaac Van-Campen. 



82, Isaac Martin. 
82—92, Aaron Ilankinson. 

83, William Maxwell. 
84—89, Charles Beardslee. 

85 — 88, Christopher Longstreet. 
89 — 90, John Rutherford. 

90, Robert Ogden. 
91—92, William Helmes (Helms). 
91 — 92, Bidleman Voluntine (Val- 
entine). 
93—96, 99, William McCullough. 
93—94, Martin Ryerson. 
93—97, Peter Sharp. 

95, George Armstrong 



MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY. 



1G9 



17T0 to 1844. 



96—97, Peter Smith. 

97, Thomas Armstrong. 
97—08, John Gustln. 

98 — 1800, Joseph Gaston. 
98—1800, Levi Howell. 

98, William Ilunkle. 
99—1802, Silas Dickerson. 
1800, 04—06, 10—112, 

Joseph Sharp. 
01 — 04, John Linn. 
01—04, Abraham Shaver. 
03 — 04, John Johnson. 
04—00, 08—11, 

William Kennedy. 
05 — 06, William Armstrong. 
00 — 08, Henry Ilanklnson. 

06, John Coursen. 
06—07, Daniel Barker. 

00, William A. Ryerson. 
07 — 09, Aaron Kerr. 
07—09, Jolm Cox. 
09—11, Klchard Edsall. 

10, George Bklleman. 

11, Garret Vlelt. 
12—15, Simon Cortrlght. 
12 — 15, James Davison. 
12—15, Robert W. Rutherford. 
13 — 15, Joseph Sharp. 

16 — 17, Abraham lUdleman. 
16—19, Robert C. Thomson. 

16, William Darrah. 

16, Peter Decker. 
17 — 19, George Beardslee. 
17 — 19, Jeremy Mackey. 
18—19, 22—23, 

Thomas Teasdale, Jr. 

20, Jacob llornbeck. 



20, Abraham Shaver. 

20, Peter Kline. 
20, 23, Joseph Coryell. 

21 — 22, Leffert llaughawoui. 
21—22, 32—34, 

Benjamin Hamilton. 

21, Jacob Ayres. 

21 — 22, 24, James Egbert. 

23, Abraham Newman. 
23, 25 — 27, Joseph Chandler. 

24, Daniel Swayze. 
24, Evi A. Sayer. 

24, Joseph Edsall. 

25, Nathan A. Shafer. 
20 — 27, Hiram Munson. 
28 — 31, Peter Merkel. 

28 — 29, James Evans. 
30 — 31, Simeon McCoy. 
30—31, John Hull. 
32 — 34. Joseph Greer. 
32—33, Peter Young. 
34 — 35, Joshua Shay. 
35 — 36, John Strader. 
35—36, Joseph Linn. 

36, Benjamin Hull. 
37—38, William J. Willson. 
37—38, Isaac Shiner. 
37—38, John Hull. 
39 — 40, Samuel Truex. 
39 — io, William H. Nyce. 
39 — 40, Joseph Greer. 
41 — 42, Isaac Bonnell. 
41 — 42, David llynard. 
41 — 42, Nathan Smith. 
43^4, Jesse Bell. 
4.3 — 44, Absalom Dunning. 
43—44, Timothy II. Cok. 



Wnrren County. 



1825, 

25, 

26, 

26—27, 

27—28, 

28—29, 

29, 

30, 

30—32, 

30—31, 
31, 33, 
32—33, 
32—33, 



James Egbert. 
Daniel Swayze. 
Archibald Robertson. 
Jacob Armstrong. 
Jonathan Robbins. 
Daniel Vlelt. 
Jacob Summers. 
Samuel Wilson. 
35—36, 

Caleb n. Valentine. 
Richard Shackelton. 
Charles Sitgreaves. 
John Blair. 
Isaac Shipman. 



34, 
34—37, 

34, 
35—30, 
37—38, 
37—38, 
38—39, 
39—41. 
39^1, 
40 — 42, 
42 — 44, 
42—44, 
43-^4, 



Jacob Brotzman. 
George Flummerfelt. 
Henry Ilanklnson. 
John Young. 
William Larrison. 
Henry Van Nest. 
Samuel Shoemaker. 
George W. Smyth. 
John Moore. 
Jacob II. Winter. 
Stephen Warne. 
Abraham Wildrlck. 
Robert C. Caskey. 



170 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 

BY COUNTIES, FROM 1S45 TO 1921. 



Atlantic County. 



45, 46, Joseph Ingersoll. 
47 — 49, Mark Lake. 
50, 51, Robert B. Rlsley. 

52, John H. Boyle. 

53, Thomas D. Winner. 

54, Daniel Townsend. 

55, Nicholas F. Smith. 

56, 57, David Fra-nbes. 

58, John B. Madden. 

59, Thomas E. Morris. 
6a— 62, Charles E. P. Mayhe\ 

63, John Godfr'^y. 

64, Simon Hanthorn. 

65, Simon Lake. 
66, 67, P. M. Wolfselffer. 
68, 69, Jacob Keira. 
70, 71, Benj. H. Overhelser. 
72, 73, Samuel IL Cavlleer. 
74, 75, Lemuel Conorer. 

76, 77, Leonard H. Ashley. 

78, Israel Smith. 
79, 80, James Jefifrlos. 

81, George Elvins. 

82, Joseph H. Shlnn. 

83, John L. Bryant. 

Bergen 

45, William G. Hopper. 
45, Jacob C. Terhune. 

46, 47, John G. Banta. 

46, 47, Jacob J. Brinkerhoff. 
48, 49, John Ackerman, Jr. 
48, 49, Henry H. Voorhis, Jr. 
50, 51, John H. Hopper. 
50—52, John Huyler. 

52-, John Zabriskie. 
53, 54, Jacob I. Demarest. 
53, 54, Abraham Van Horn. 
55, 56, Ralph S. Demarest. 
55, 56, Thomas W. Demarest. 

57, 58, Daniel Holsman. 

57, 58, Aaron H. Westervelt. 

59, Andrew C. Cadmus. 
59, 60, Enoch Brinkerhoff. 

60, John A. Hopper. 
61, 62, Abram Carlock. 
61, 62, John R. Post. 

63, 64, Thomas D. English. 
63, 64, John Y. Dater. 
65, 66, Isaac Demarest. 



84, 85, Edward North. 

86, 87, James S. Beckwith. 

88, James B. Nixon. 
89, 90, Shepherd S. Hudson. 

91, Smith E. Johnson. 

92, Samuel D. Hofifman. 

93, Charles A. Baake. 

94, Frederick Schuchardt. 

95, Wesley C. Smith. 

96, 97, Marcellus L. Jackson. 
98, 99, Leonard H. Ashley. 
1900, 01, Charles T. Abbott. 
02 — 07, Thomas C. Elvins. 
08, 09, Martin E. Keffer. 

10, Walter E. Edge. 

11, Isaac Bacharach. 

12, 14—16, Carlton Godfrey. 

12, 13, 14, Emerson L. Richards 

13, Joseph W. Salus. 
15 — 37, Bertram E. Whitman. 

17, Irving P. Parsons. 
18—21, William A. Blair. 
18, 19, Underwood Cochran. 
20 — 21, Joseph A. Corio. 



County. 



65, 


66, 


Abraham J. Harlng. 




67, 


A. Van Emburg. 


67, 


68, 


Cornelius Christie. 


68, 


69, 


Henry G. Herring. 


69, 


70, 


Eben Winton. 


70, 


71, 


Henry A. Hopper. 


71. 


72. 


Jacob G. Van Riper. 


72, 


73, 


George J. Hopper. 




73, 


John J. Anderson. 


74, 


75, 


Henry C. Herring. 


74, 


75. 


John W. Bogert. 


76, 


77, 


John II. Winant. 


76, 


77, 


Barney N. Ferdon. 




78, 


M. Corsen Gillham. 


78. 


79. 


Southey S. Parramore. 


79, 


80, 


John A. Demarest. 




80, 


Oliver D. Smith. 


81, 


82, 


Ellas H. Sisson. 


81- 


-83, 


86, John Van Bussum. 


S3, 


84, 


Peter R. Wortendyke. 




84, 


•Jacob W. Doremus. 




85, 


Peter Ackerman. 


85, 


86, 


Eben Winton. 



•John W. Doremus was first elected, but died before Legis- 
lature convened. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



171 



87, 


88, 


Anderson Bloomer. 


05, 


06, 




87, 


Peter Ackerman. 


07, 


08, 


88, 


89, 


Charles F. Harrington. 


07, 


08, 


89, 


90, 


Abram De Ronde. 


09, 


10, 


90, 


91, 


George Zimmermann. 


09, 


10, 




91, 


John H. Iluyler. 




11, 


92, 


93, 


Samuel G. II. Wright. 




11, 


92, 


93, 


John J. Dupuy. 




12, 




94, 


Walter Dewsnap. 




12, 


91, 


95, 


David D. Zabrlskie. 


12, 


13, 


95, 


96, 


Fred'k L. Voorhees. 




13, 


96, 


97, 


Jacob H. UUman. 


13, 


14, 


97. 


98, 


Abram C. Holdrum. 


14. 


15, 


98, 


99. 


John M. Bell. 


14, 


15. 


99, 


1900, Edmund W. Wakelee. 




16. 


1900, V 


acancy caused by death of 




16, 






John L. C. Graves. 


10- 


-19, 


01, 


02, 


Joseph H. TillotBon. 




17, 


01, 


02, 


James W. Mercer. 


17- 


--1, 


03, 


04, 


U. S. Ayers. 




IS. 


03, 


04. 


George Cook. 


19- 


-21, 


05, 


06, 


Clarence Mabie. 


20- 


-21, 






Burling:ton C 


'oun 




45, 


Joseph Satt^rthwalt. 


57- 


-59, 




45, 


Isaiah Adams. 


58, 


59, 


45, 


47, 


48, John W. C. Evans. 


59, 


60, 




45, 


Edward Taylor. 


59- 


-01, 




45, 


William Biddle. 


60, 


61, 




46, 


Clayton Lipplncott. 




61, 




46, 


William Malsbury. 


60- 


-62, 




46, 


Garrit S. Cannon. 


60-62, 




46, 


Stephen Willets. 


62, 


03, 




46, 


Wm. G. I.ippincott. 


62, 


63, 




47, 


William Biddle. 


62— 64. 


47, 


48, 


Joseph W. Allen. 


63- 


-65, 


47—49, 


John S. Irlok. 




64. 


47-^9, 


Benjamin Kemble. 




65. 


48—50, 


Edward French. 


65, 


00. 


49- 


-51, 


Samuel Stockton. 


06, 


07. 


49- 


-51, 


William R. Braddock. 


06, 


07. 


50, 


51, 


William S. Embley. 


00, 


67, 


50- 


-52, 


William Brown. 


67- 


-09. 


51- 


-53, 


Allen Jones. 




08, 




52, 


Benajah Antrim. 




08. 


52- 


-54, 


John W. Fennimore. 


08—71, 


52, 


53, 


Charles Haines. 




09, 


53, 


54, 


Mahlon Hutchinson. 


69- 


-71, 


53, 


54, 


Jacob L. Githens. 




70, 




54, 


Job H. Gaskill. 


70, 


Tl, 


54- 


-56, 


William Parry. 


71- 


-73, 




55, 


Joeephus Sooy, Jr. 




72, 




55, 


Benjamin Gibbs. 


72- 


-74, 


55. 


57. 


Thomas L. Norcross. 


72- 


-74, 


55, 


56, 


EHsha Gaunt. 


73, 


74, 




56. 


Richard Jones. 




V4, 




56, 


William M. Collom. 




75, 


56, 


57, 


Jervis H. Bartlett. 




75, 


57, 


58, 


Samuel Keys. 




75, 




58, 


Samuel C. Middleton. 


75- 


-77, 


57- 


-59, 


Charles Mickle. 




76. 



John Heck. 
Guy L. Fake. 
James Devine, Jr. 
Joseph H. ScharfC. 
Harry P. Ward. 
G. R. Alyea. 
Wm. H. Ilinners. 
William E. Ogden. 
Frank M. Stevens. 
C. O'C. Hennessy. 
John \V. Zisgen. 
15, Arthur M. Aguew 
Edgar A. De Yoe. 
John J. Johnson. 
James T. Ackerman. 
Herbert il. Eailey. 
Walter G. Winne. 
Roy M. Robinson. 
\Y. Irving Glover. 
Addison K. Burroughi 
W. St. John Tozer. 
John Y. Dater. 



Ezra Evans. 
Charles S. Kemble. 
John Larzalere. 
Samuel A. Dobbins. 
George B. Wills. 
Joseph L. Lamb. 
Robert B. Stokes. 
William Sooy. 
John M. Illgbee. 
Israel W. Heullngs. 
Wm. P. McMlchael. 
Henry J. Irick. 
Jarett Stokes. 
Samuel Stockton. 
Cbarlos G. Lathrop. 
George W. Thompson. 
Samuel Coate. 
Andrew H. Fort. 
Wallace Lipplncott. 
Chas. E. Hendrlckson. 
Charles Collins. 
John J. Maxwell. 
Theophilus I. Price. 
Thomas C. Alcott. 
Levi French. 
Abraham Perkins. 
Edward T. Thompson. 
Robert Aaronson. 
E. Budd Marter. 
George B. Borton. 
Townsend Cox. 
Joseph P. Adams. 
Levi French. 
Charles J. Gordon. 
Henry Moffett. 
Samuel Taylor. 
Daniel L. Piatt. 



172 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



76—78, 
76—78, 
77—79, 

78, 79, 
79, 

79, 80, 
80—82, 
80—82, 

80, 81, 
81, 
82, 
83, 

83, 84, 
83—86, 
84—86, 
85, 86, 
87, 88, 

87, 88, 

88, 89, 



John Cavlleer. 
Edward F. Mathews. 
George Sykes. 
Wm. Budd Deacon. 
Wm. R. Llpplncott. 
John W. Haines. 
William H. Carter. 
Henry C. Herr. 
Abraham Marter. 
John Cavlleer. 
Thomas M. Locke. 
Horace Cronk. 
87, Stacy H, Scott 
Theodore Budd. 
Thomas J. Alcott. 
Allen H. Gangewer. 
90, R. C. Hutchinson. 
89, William H. Doron. 
Albert Ilansell. 
George C. Davis. 



90. 91, Mitchell B. Perkins. 

90, 91, I^wlB L. Sharp. 

91, 92, A. Harry White. 

92, 93, Howard E. Packer. 

93, Mlcajah E. Matlack. 

94. Augustus C. Stecher. 

94, 95, Mlcajah E. Matlack. 

95, 96, 97, George Wildes. 

96, 97, Joshua E. Borton. 
98, 1900, Joel Horner. 
98—02, Charles Wright. 
01 — 03, John G. Horner. 
03 — 05, Benj. D. Shedaker 
04 — 06, Samuel K. Bobbins. 
06—09, John B. Irick. 
07—09, Griffith W. Lewis. 
10, 11, Warren C. Pine. 

10, 11, 12. Blanchard H. White. 

L3. 14, 15, Robert Peacock. 

16 — 21, Emmor Roberts. 



Camden County. 





45, 


Joseph Kay, Jr 




64, 




45, 


John Redfleld. 


64, 


65, 




46, 


Joel G. Clark. 




65, 




46, 


Gerrard Wood. 


65. 


60, 




47, 


Edward Turner. 


66, 


67, 




47, 


Joseph B. Tatem. 


66, 


67, 




48, 


John C. Shreeve. 




67, 




48, 


John E. !\Iarshall. 




68, 




49, 


Jacob Troth. 




68, 




49, 


Joseph Wolohon. 




68, 


50, 


51, 


Charlos D Hlnellne. 




69, 


50, 


51, 


Thomas W. HurCf. 


69, 


70, 




52, 


J. Ka>. 


69, 


70, 




52, 


Jonathan Day. 




70, 


52, 


53. 


J. 0. Johnson. 




71. 




53, 


Samuel Lytle. 




71. 


53, 


54. 


John K. Roberts. 


71. 


72 


54, 


55, 


Samuel S. Cake. 




72.' 




55, 


James L. Hlnes. 


72- 


-74. 


54- 


-56, 


Rellcy Barret. 




73, 




56, 


Evan C. Smith. 


73. 


74, 


56, 


57, 


John P. Harker. 




74, 




57, 


T. B. Atkinson. 




75, 




57, 


Joseph M. Atkinson. 


75, 


76, 


57- 


-.59, 


♦Samuel Scull. 


7.5- 


-77, 




58, 


Edmund Hoffman. 


76. 


77. 


58, 


59. 


S.nmuol M. Thorne. 




77. 




59. 


Zebedee Nicholson. 




78. 




60. 


Joseph Stafford, Jr. 




78. 




60. 


George Brewer. 


78, 


79. 


60, 


61, 


John R Graham. 


79, 


80, 




61. 


James L. Hlnes. 


80. 


81, 


61. 


62. 


Joel P. Klrkbride. 


81, 


82, 




62. 


Daniel A. Hall. 


81, 


82, 


62, 


63. 


Edwin J. Osier. 




82, 




63. 


James M. Scovel. 




83. 


63, 


64, 


Chalkley Albertson. 




83, 



Samuel Tatem. 
Paul C. Brinck. 
John F. Bodlne. 
Isaac W. Nicholson. 
George W. N. Custis. 
Thomas H. Coles. 
Edward Z. Ceilings. 
John Hood. 
James Wills. 
Chalkley Albertson. 
Thomas H. Coles. 
Henry L. Bonsall. 
William C. Shinn. 
Samuel Warthman. 
Charles Wilson. 
Isaac W. Nicholson. 
Stevenson Leslie. 
Fred. Bourquin. 
George B. Carse. 
Isaac Foreman. 
William II. Cole. 
Chalkley Albertson. 
Henrv B. Wilson. 
79. 80, R. N. Herring. 
Alden C. Scovel. 
Oliver Lund. 
Samuel T. Murphy. 
Isaiah Woolston. 
Andrew J. Rider. 
Alonzo D. Nichols. 
Edward Burrough. 
Henry L. Bonsall. 
Chris. J. Mines, Jr. 
John H. McMurray. 
Robert F. S. Heath. 
George W. Borton. 
John Bamford. 



•In 1857 Mr. Scull was unseated by T. 



Atkinson. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



173 



83, 


84, 1 




84, 


84—87, 




85, 


85, 


86, 




86, 




87, 




87, 


88, 


89, 


88, 


89, 


88, 


89, 




90, 


90, 


91, 


91, 


92, 


91, 


92, 




93, 


93, 


94, 


93, 


94, 




94, 




95, 


95, 


96, 


96, 


97, 


96, 


97, 


98, 


99, 


98, 


99, 




45, 




40, 




47, 


48, 


49, 


50, 


51, 




52, 




53, 


54, 


55. 


56—58, 


59, 


60, 




61, 


62- 


-64, 


65- 


-67, 




68, 


71- 


-73, 




74, 




75, 


76—78. 




79, 




45, 


45, 


46, 


45, 


46, 




46, 




47, 




47, 


47, 


48, 


48, 


49, 


48, 


49, 


49, 


50, 


50, 


. 51, 


50, 


, 51, 


51, 


, 52, 



10, 
10, 



52, 



93, Clayton Stafford. 
Jobn W. Branning. 
Edward A. Armstrong. 
Benjamin M. Braker. 
Henry M. Jewett. 
George Pfeiffer. 
PblUp Young. 
Henry Turley. 
Adam Clark Smith. 
90, John Harris. 
George II. Higglns. 
Franklin C. Woolman. 
92, Abram W. Nash. 
Joseph M. Engard. 
also 73, 74, Wm. H. C 
George W. Henry. 
95, Clayton Stafford. 
William J. Thompson. 
William Watson. 
George W. Barnard. 
97, Louis T. Derousse. 
Frank T. Lloyd. 
Henry S. Scovel. 
John H. McMurray. 
Edgar J. Coles. 

Cape 
John Stites. 
Samuel Towusend. 
Richard S. Ludlam. 
Nathaniel Holmes, Jr. 
Mackey Williams. 
Joshua Swaim. 
Waters B. Miller. 
Jesse H. Diverty. 
Downs Edmunds, Jr. 
Abram Reeves. 
Jonathan F. Leaming. 
Wllmon W. Ware. 
69, 70, Thos. Beesley. 
Samuel R. Magonagle. 
Richard S. Leaming 
Alexander Young. 
Richnrd D. Edmunds. 
William T. Stevens. 
Daniel Schellinger. 

Cumberland 

Joslah Shaw. 

George Heisler. 

Lewis Howell. 

Steplien A. Garrison. 

Leonard Lawrence. 5i 

Jeremiah Parvin. 5; 

Uriah D. Woodruff. 

Reuben Flthian. 

Richard Lore. 

John T. Nixon. 

BenJ. Ayres. 

Joel Moore. 

Samuel Mayhew. 

David Campbell. 



98—1902, William J. Bradley. 
1900, F. F. Patterson, Jr. 
01, 



02, Ephralm T. Gill. 
02, George A. Waite. 
04, John S. Roberts. 
Henry S. Scovel. 
Theodore B. Gibbs. 
05 — 07, Samuel P. Jones. 
07, 08, Frank B. Jess. 

09, Joseph Potter. 

10, Harry R. Tatera. 

11, 12, Albert De Unger. 
11, 12, George W. Whyte. 



00, 

01, 

03, 

03—06, 

03—09 



08, 



11, 12, 


13, Isaac W. Coles. 


:ole. 13—16, 


John B. Kates. 


13, 


James K. Carrow. 


14—17, 


Garfield Pancoast. 


14, 


Henry S. Scovel. 


15—18, 


Charles A. Wolverton. 


17—10, 


Ralph N. Kellam. 


18, 


Paul N. Litchfield. 


19—21, 


T. Harry Rowland. 


19. 20, 


Joseph F. Wallworth. 


20—21, 


J. Heulings Coles. 


21, 


Willard F. Gibbs. 


May County. 


80, 83- 


-85, Jesse D. Ludlam. 


81, 82, 


Furman L. Richardson. 


86, 87, 


Alvin P. Hildreth. 


88, 


Walter S. Leaming. 


89, 90, 


91, Eugene C. Cole. 


92, 93, 


94, Edmund L. Ross. 


95, 96, 


Furman L. Ludlam. 


97, 


Robert E. Hand. 


98, 


Eugene C. Cole. 


99, 1900, Ellis H. Marshall. 


01—03, 


Lewis M. Cresse. 


04—06, 


12, Jas. M. E. Hildreth. 


07—09, 


17, Corsville E. Stille. 


10, 11, 


Christopher S. Hand. 


13. 


William Porter. 


14, 15, 


Lewis T. Stevens. 


16. 18. 


19. Mark Lake. 


20—21 


Andrew C. Boswell. 



58, 



County. 

53, Enos S. Gandy. 

53, Lewis Woodruff. 

54, Daniel Harris. 
54, Morton Mills. 

56, James M. Wells. 
, 56, John F. Keen. 

57, Uriah Mayhew. 

57, Elias Doughty. 

58, Elwell Nichols. 
, 59, Robert Moore. 

59, Aaron S. Westcott. 

60, Ebenezer Hall. 
60, John Carter. 

. 62, William Bacon. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



61, 62, 



63, 


64, 


63, 


64, 


65- 


-67, 


65- 


-68, 




68, 




69, 


69- 


-71, 


70, 


71, 


72, 


73, 


72, 


73, 




74, 


74, 


75, 


75- 


-77, 




76, 


77, 


78. 




78, 


79, 


SO, 


79, 


80, 




81. 


81, 


82. 




82. 




83, 


83, 


84, 


84, 


85, 


85, 


86, 


86, 


87, 




45, 




45, 


45, 


46, 


45, 


46, 


45, 


46, 


45, 


46, 


45. 


46, 


46, 


47, 


46, 


47, 


47, 


48, 


47, 


48, 


47, 


48, 


47, 


48, 


47, 


48, 




48. 


48, 


49. 




40, 




49, 


49, 


50, 


49, 


50, 


49, 


50. 


49, 


50, 




51. 


50, 


51, 


50, 


51. 


50, 


51, 




51, 


51, 


52, 


51, 


52. 




52, 




52, 




52, 




52. 



J. Edmund Sheppard. 

B. Rush Bateman. 
Edward W. Maylia. 
Kobert Moore. 
James H. Nixon. 
Thomas D. Westcott. 

C. Henry Shepherd. 
William A. House. 
Charles C. Grosscup. 
George S. Whiticar. 
J. Howard Wlllets. 
George B. Langley. 
Lewis H. Dowdney. 
George W. Payne. 
Isaiah W. Richman. 
Isaac T. Nichols. 
James Loughron. 
Robert P. Ewing. 
Arthur T. Parsons. 
John H. Avis. 
Charles Ladow. 
Philip P. Baker. 
Isaac M. Smalley. 
John B. Campbell. 
Jeremiah II. Lupton. 
Wilson Banks. 
Franklin Lawrence. 



87, Thomas II. Hawkins. 

88, Mulford Ludlam. 

88, Isaac M. Smalley. 

89, Thomas W. Treuchard. 

89, 90. Reuben Cheesman. 

90, 93, 94, John N. Glaspell. 
91, James L. Van Syckel. 

91, 92, Edward C. Stokes. 

92, 93, Wilber H. Baxter. 
94 — 96, Thomas F. Austin. 
95—97, Bloomfield H. Mlnch. 

97, 98, James J. Hunt. 

98. 09. Wilson II. Shropshire. 
99—1901, Jesse S. Steelman. 
00, 01, 02, William J. Moore. 
02—06, Louis H. Miller. 
03—09, B. Frank Buck. 

07, 08, Frank B. Potter. 

09, 10, Isaac T. Nichols. 

10, 12, Albert R. McAllister. 
11, Walter E. Turner. 
11, E. H. Whiticar. 

13, John A. Ackley. 
14 — 17. Raymond Shepi)ard. 
18. 19, Firman M. Reeves. 
20—21, David C. Blizzard, Jr. 



Essex County. 



Isaac Van Wagenen. 
John Runyon. 
William M. Scudder. 
Hugh F. Randolph. 
Jabez Pierson. 
Keen Pruden. 
Alvah Sherman. 
George W. McLane. 
Parker Teed. 
A. S. Hubbeel. 
Jabez G. Goble. 
Francis B. Chetwood. 
Abraham Van Riper. 
Elston Marsh. 
Hugh IT. Bowne. 
Charles Harrison. 
Hugh II. Bowne. 
Lewis C. Grover. 
Joel W. Condit. 
Obadlah Meeker. 
William F. Day. 
Stephen Personett. 
Wm. M. Whitehead. 
Isaac H. Pierson. 
Jonathan Valentine. 
David Wade. 
Cornelius Boice. 
Beach Vanderpool. 
John C. Beardsley. 
Thomas McKlrgan. 
John M. Clark. 
William M. Sand ford. 
Silas Merchant. 



56, 



52, 
52, 
53, 
53, 
53, 
53, 
53, 
53, 
54, 
54, 
54, 
54, 
54. 
54. 
54, 
55, 
55. 

55. 
56. 
56. 
56, 
56, 
56, 
56, 
56. 
56. 
57, 
57, 
57, 
57, 
57, 
57, 



John Munn. 
James S. Bell. 
John B. Clark. 
Stephen Day, Jr. 
Grant J. Wheeler. 
Edward T. Illllyer. 
Charles T. Day. 
Charles O. Bolles. 
Abiathar Harrison. 
Daniel Price. 
William Dennis. 
David S. Craig. 
Daniel H. Noe. 
James N. .Toraleman. 
David Ripley. 
Hugh Holmes. 
Daniel D. Benjamin. 
Charles O. Bolles 
Daniel F. Tompkins. 
Nehemlah Perry. 
James A. Pennington. 
Apollos M. Elmer. 
Joseph T. Hopping. 
Warren S. Baldwin. 
Samuel R. Wlnans. 
James E. Bathgate. 
George II. Doremus. 
Wm. K. McDonald. 
John C. Denman. 
Moses P. Smith. 
John L. Blake, Jr. 
William B. Baldwin. 
Charles L. C. Glfford. 



asse:mblymen. 



175 





57, 


Elihu Day. 


68, 


69, 


John Kennedy. 


57, 


58, 


Charles C. Stewart. 


68. 


69, 


Timothy W. Lord. 


57, 


58, 


Joba C. Thornton. 


08, 


69, 


Francis Macken. 




58, 


Simeon Harrison. 


69, 


70, 


James L. Gurney. 




58, 


James McCracken. 


69. 


70, 


John Hunkole. 




58, 


Joseph Booth. 


69, 


70, 


William W. Hawkins. 




58, 


Ira M. Harrison. 


69, 


71, 


James G. Irwin. 




58, 


Thomas Kirkpatrlck. 


TO, 


Tl, 


Joseph F. Sanxay. 




59, 


Cashier De Witt, Jr. 


70, 


71, 


Farrand Kitchell. 




59, 


David Ayres. 


70, 


71, 


Henry W. Wilson. 




59, 


Isaac P. Trimble. 




70, 


Chauncey G. Williams. 




59, 


David A. Hayes. 




70, 


William R. Sayre. 


59, 


60, 


Adolphus W. Waldron. 




70, 


Matthew Murphy. 


59, 


60, 


James F, Bond. 




71, 


Albert P. Condit. 


59, 


60, 


Amzi Condit. 




71, 


William A. Ripley. 




60, 


James McCracken. 


71, 


72, 


Edmund L. Joy. 




60, 


J. W. Hale. 


71. 


72', 


Theodore Horn. 


60, 


61, 


Frederick H. Teese. 


Tl, 


72, 


Rochus Helnisch, Jr. 


60, 


61, 


James Wheeler. 




72. 


David Anderson. 




61, 


James E. Smith. 




72. 


Daniel Murphy. 


61, 


62, 


James M. Lang. 




72, 


Moses II. Williams. 


61, 


62, 


David Oakes. 


"2, 


73, 


Samuel Wilde. 


61, 


62, 


John Flintoft. 


72, 


73, 


Joseph G. Hill. 


61, 


62, 


George A. Halsey. 


72, 


73. 


Theodore Macknett. 


62, 


63, 


Walter Tompkins. 




73, 


L. M. Armstrong. 


62, 


63, 


Corra Drake. 




73, 


John W. Campbell. 


62, 


63, 


John D. Freeman. 


73, 


74, 


Ellas 0. Dorenuis. 


02, 


63. 


John P. Jackson. 


73, 


74, 


Phineas Jones. 


62, 


63, 


Thomas McGrath. 


73, 


74, 


Aaron G. Baldwin. 




03, 


Amzi Dodd. 


73- 


-75, 


Samuel Morrow, Jr. 




63, 


John C. Littell. 




74, 


James T. Vanness. 


63, 


64, 


Adolidi Schalk. 




74, 


Moses E. Halsey. 


63, 


64, 


James Smith. 


74, 


75, 


Thomas S. Henry. 




64, 


Jeremiah DeCamp. 


74, 


75, 


Julius C. Fitzgerald. 




64, 


Ira M. Harrison. 


74, 


75, 


William H. Kirk. 


64. 


65. 


It 11 f us F. Harrison. 




75, 


Andrew Teed. 


64. 


65, 


Charles A. T.lghtplpe. 




75, 


Hugh Kinnnrd. 


64. 


65, 


Thomas B. Peddle. 




75, 


Patrick Doyle. 


64, 


65, 


John C. Seiffert. 




75, 


William Carrolton 


«4. 


65. 


Bernard Kearney. 


75, 


76, 


David Dodd. 




65, 


J. B. S. Robinson. 




76. 


Charles H. Harrison. 




65 


John H. Landell. 




76. 


Marcus S. Richards. 




65. 


James D. Cleaver. 




76. 


Philip W. Cross. 


65. 


66, 


David Anderson. 


76, 


77. 


Albert D. Traphagen. 




66. 


William Bodwell. 


76. 


77. 


Francis K. Howell. 




66. 


John F. Anderson. 


76, 


77. 


S. V. C. Van Rensselaer. 




66. 


David Ayres. 


76. 


77. 


Elkanah Drake. 




66, 


James L. Hays. 


76. 


80. 


James M. Patterson. 


66. 


67. 


Albert P. Condit. 




77, 


Joseph n. Wightman. 


66. 


67. 


Isaac P. Trimble. 


77. 


78. 


Gottfried Krueger. 


66. 


67, 


William n. Murphy. 


77, 


78. 


Charles Gomer. 


66. 


68. 


Edward L. Price. 


77. 


78. 


James Malone. 




67, 


Israel D. Condit. 


77, 


78. 


Edward D. Pierson. 




67. 


Daniel Ayres. 




78. 


Alexander Phillips. 




67. 


William R. Sa.vre. 




78. 


Charles Holzwarth. 




67. 


M. II. C. Vail. 


78, 


79. 


Edward W. Crane. 


67. 


68. 


Samuel Atwater. 


78. 


79, 


George S. Duryee. 


67, 


68. 


Edward Hedden. 


78. 


79. 


82, Wm. H. F. Fiedler. 




68. 


Joslah L. Baldwin. 


78, 


79, 


Schuyler B. Jackson. 


68. 


69. 


Josiah Speer. 




79. 


Charles A. Felch. 


68. 


69. 


James Peck. 


79, 


80, 


Peter J. Gray. 



17G 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



8B. 



83, 89, John Gill. 
Harrison Van Duyne. 
83, Thomas O'Connor. 
•William H. Brown. 
Ellas A. Wilkinson. 
Thos. W. Langstroth. 
William R. Williams. 
Joseph L. Munn. 
William Wright. 
**Chas. G. Bruemmer. 
Michael McMahan. 
John H. Parsons. 
David Yo'ing. 
Robert McGowan. 
Roderick Robertson. 
Ulysses B. Brewster. 
Edw'd R. Pennington. 
Adam Turkes. 
Edwin B. Smith. 
Lucius B. Hutchinson. 
James N. Arbuckle. 
John H. Murphy. 
William Hill. 
93, John L. Armltage. 
93, William Hnrrigan. 
Rush Burg>?,.j. 
Frederick S. Fish. 
Herman Lehlbach. 
George B. Harrison. 
David A. Bell. 
Edward Q. Keasbey. 
William E. O'Connor. 
Charlese Ilolzwarth. 
Franklin Murphy. 
Henry M. Doremus. 
R. Wayne Parker. 
Augustus F. R. Martin. 
Henry A. Potter. 
Edwin Lister. 
Jacob Schrelhofer. 
Charles F. Underbill. 
Elias M. Condit. 
93. John H. Peal. 
Michael T. Barrett. 
Elvin W. Crane. 
James Peck. 
Charles E. Hill. 
James Marlatt. 
Frank M. McDermltt. 
DeForrest P. Lozler. 
Augustus Dusenberry. 
James A. Christie. 
Thomas McGowan. 
Adrian Riker. 
Joseph Schmelz. 
John Gill. 
Moses Bigelow. 



89, 


90, 


89, 


90, 


89, 


90, 


90, 


91, 


90, 


91, 


90, 


91, 


90, 


91, 


90, 


91, 


90- 


-92, 


90, 


92. 




91, 


91, 


92, 


91, 


92, 


91, 


92, 




92, 




92, 




92, 




92, 


92, 


93, 




93, 




93, 




93, 




93, 


93, 


94. 


93, 


94, 


93, 


94, 


93, 


94, 


93, 


94, 


93, 


94. 




94. 


94- 


-96. 


94, 


95, 


94, 


95, 


94, 


95, 




95, 


95. 


96, 


95. 


96. 


95, 


96, 


95. 


96, 


95. 


96, 


95, 


96. 




96. 


96, 


97, 


96. 


97. 


96, 


97. 


97, 


98. 


97, 


98. 


97. 


98. 


97. 


98. 




97. 


97. 


98. 


97, 


98. 


97. 


98. 




98, 



Geo. W. Wiedenmayer. 
Richard A. Price. 
92, Leonard Kalisch. 
Reuben Trier. 
George Rabensteln. 
Thomas H. Pollock. 
Charles Trefz. 
John J. Bertram. 
Edward W. Jackson. 
Thomas Smith. 
Edward II. Snyder. 
Edward M. Taylor. 
John Nleder. 
John R. Hardin. 
George W. Ketcham. 
Thomas F. Cavanagh. 
James A. Dempsey. 
Benedict Ulrlch. 
William L. Glorleux. 
Augustus C. Studer. 
John L. Armltage. 
William J. Kearus. 
John H. Peal. 
Timothy Barrett. 
William Harrlgan. 
Joseph P. Clarke. 
Joseph M. Byrne. 
Thomas A. Murphey. 
Dennis F. Olvaney. 
J. Broad head Woolsey. 
Thomas P. Edwards. 
Charles B. Duncan. 
John C. Elsele. 
Charles B. Storrs. 
George P. Olcott. 
Frederick W. Mock. 
Amos W. Harrison. 
Alfred F. Sklnnpr. 
James A. Christie. 
George L. Smith. 
David E. Benedict. 
Charles A. Schober. 
Hayward A. Harvey. 
Thomas H. Jones. 
Albert J. Simpson. 
James J. Hogan. 
Charles W. Powers. 
George W. W. Porter. 
Edwin F. Steddlg. 
Alvln C. Eble. 
George B. Harrison. 
Jacob Ran. Jr. 
Peter B. Falrchild. 
Carl V. Bauman. 
Joseph B. Johnson. 
Oliver B. Dawson. 
William C. Schmidt. 



•In 1880, W. H. Brown was unseated by William R. Williams. 
••Mr. Bruemmer was elected for 1882. but died before Legis- 
lature convened. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



17' 



98, 99, Albert T. Guenther. 
99, John L. Bulhird. 

90, 1900, Jacob Clark. 

99, 1900, John W. Wesenian. 
99, 1900, John Kreitlcr. 

99, 1900, Frederick J. Deleot. 
99, 1900, G. F. Brandenburgh. 
99, 1900, William Mungle. 
99, 1900, John N. Klein. 
99, 1900, John P. Dexheimer. 
99, 1900, Benjamin F. Jones. 

1900, George S. Campbell. 
00 — 02, J. Henry Bacheller. 
01, 02, Fred'k Curamlngs. 
01 — 03, Wm. B. Garrabrants. 
01—03, John Howe. 
01—03, Robert W. Brown. 
01—03, Ralph B. Schmidt. 
01—03, Edward E. Gnichtel. 
01—03, William G. Sharwell. 
01 — 03, Edgar Williams. 
01—03, Robert M. Boyd, Jr. 
01—03, William A. Lord. 
03 — 05, Frederick R. Lehlbach. 
03 — 05, Everett Colby. 
04, 05, William Pennington. 
04, 05, Frederick Manners. 
04, 05, Abraham Kaiser. 
04, 05, Herbert W. Taylor. 
04, 05, John J. Gallagher. 
04, 05, Samuel F. Wilson. 
04, 05, Edward D. Birkholz. 
04, 05, H. L. Johnstone. 
04, 05, Edward D. Duffleld. 
OG, 08, 09, William P. Martin. 

06, Gustav W. Roeber. 

06, George F. Serbe. 
06, 08, 09, Henry Clay Hines. 

06, Philip C. Walsh, Jr. 

06, Chas. R. Underwood. 

06, Gustav A. Kayser. 

OR, Russell M. Everett. 
06, 08, 09, Austen Colgate. 
06, 08, William F. Morgan. 

06, Gustav V. Sommer. 

07, Edward H. Wright, Jr. 
07, Simon Hahn. 

07, John J. Baader. 
07, Patrick H. Corish. 
07, Thomas J. Mead. 
07, John C. Groel. 
07, John Breunnlg. 
07, John W. Lane. 
07, Edgar E. Lethbrldge. 
07, Daniel J. Brady. 

07, Harry F. Backus. 
08, 09, Henry Young, Jr. 
08, 09, William Roberts. 
08, 09, John F. Clark. 

08, James H. Lowrey. 
08, 09, H. Stacy Smith. 



08, 09, 



09, 


10, 


09, 


10, 




09. 




10, 




10, 




10, 




10, 




10, 




10, 




10, 




10, 




10, 




11, 




11, 




11, 




11, 




11, 




11, 




11, 




11, 




11, 




11, 




11, 




12, 




12. 




12, 




12, 




12, 




12, 




12, 




12, 




12, 




12, 




12, 




12, 


13, 


14, 


13, 


14, 




13, 


13, 


14, 




13, 




13, 




13, 


13, 


14, 


13, 


14. 




13, 




13, 


13, 


14, 




14, 




14, 




14. 


14, 


15, 


14- 


-16, 


14—16. 


15, 


16, 


15, 


16. 


15- 


-17, 


1.5- 


-17. 


15, 


16, 


15- 


-17. 



August J. Miller. 
Rudolph A. Braun. 
Thomas II. Brooks. 
Lewis G. Bowden. 
Eliot E. Ford. 
William Lee. 
Emil Wohlfarth. 
Thomas Goldingay. 
Thomas Gillen. 
Robert S. Terhune. 
J. William Huegel. 
Coleman E. Kissam. 
Duane E. Minard. 
Harold A. Miller. 
Harry F. Backus. 
John J. Bracken. 
James P. Mylod. 
Charles W. Brown. 
Mark F. Phillips. 
Michael Leveen. 
M. J. McGowan, Jr. 
Frank P. Shalvoy. 
Frank A. Boettner. 
Wm. P. Macksey. 
Edw. D. Balentlne. 
William M. Beard. 
Henry F. Holloway. 
Charles G. Llnnenkohl. 
Mortimer Lowy. 
Robert E. Mitchell. 
Frank J. Murray. 
Fred Prout. 
Thomas J. Smith. 
William E. Stagg. 
Fred G. Stickel, Jr. 
Henry J. Theln. 
William G. Weigel. 
Charles A. Nutting. 
Bennett H. Fishier. 
John J. Bracken. 
Laurence McCahe, Jr. 
John A. Matthews. 
William E. Maguire. 
Louis Lewis. 
Frank A. Foley. 
Hubert J. Rowe. 
Simon L. Fisch. 
Joseph F. Papscoe. 
Joseph B. Bloom. 
James R. Byrne. 
Edward C. Eaton. 
Michael J. Quigley. 
Thomas J. Smith. 
E. Morgan Barradale. 
W. Clive Crosby. 
William P. Berry. 
Marcus W. De Camp. 
Seymour P. Gilbert. 
Harry D. Johnson. 
Charles C. Pilgrim. 
Edward Schoen. . 



178 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



15—17, Eugene T. Scudder. 
15, 16, George M. Titus. 

15, H. Edward Wolf. 
IG, 17, Herbert J. Bueblcr. 

16, Paul K. Silberman. 
17, IS, Theodore J. Badgley. 

17, Dudley Brauiliall. 
17, George W. Keating. 
17, Cliarles A. LeMaster. 
17, Andrew N. MacKinnon. 
17, Samuel Press. 

17, Gustave C. Wolber. 

18, Augustus W. Abbott. 
18, Edgar H. Bostock. 

18—21, Frank B. Champion. 

18, 0. Bell Close. 
18—21, Harry G. Eaton. 
18—21, George S. Hobart. 

18, Howell G. Lord. 

18, Olindo Marzulli. 

18, Walter R. Pruden. 

18, Charles H. Stewart. 



18, 
19, 
T.I. 
10, 20, 
m, 20, 
19, 20 
19, 20, 



19, 20, 
19, 20, 
19, 20, 
20, 
20, 
21, 
21, 
21, 
21, 
21, 
21. 
21, 
21, 
21. 



George G. Yarrow. 
Edric C. Greaves. 
Harry A. AngeubHck. 
Elroy Headley. 
James F. Hyland. 
James J. Whaleu. 
James J. Cross. 
Michael F. Judge. 
Joseph J. Finley. 
Louis E. Freund. 
Charles B. Casale. 
Joseph Siegler. 
Hugh C. Barrett. 
Louis Lewis. 
Felix Forlenza. 
Warren Patten Coon. 
Philip D. Elliot. 
Pearce R. Franklin. 
Daniel A. McMillin. 
Eynier V. Taylor. 
Jennie C. Yan Ness. 
:^rargaret B. Laird. 
Charles B. Dutcbor. 
Walter G. Alexamier. 



Gloucester County. 



51, 



Samuel W. Cooper. 
Benjamin Harding. 
John B. Miller. 
John B. Hilyard. 
John Burk. 
John Duell. 
Thomas Gaskill. 
Edmund Weatherby. 
Benjamin C. Tatem. 
Thomas Mills. 
Joseph Abbott. 
John V. Porch. 
Joseph Franklin. 
Benjamin Beckett. 
Jacob G. Tomlln. 
James B. Albertson. 
John H. Bradway. 
Benjamin Smith. 
John F. Thomas. 
George C. Hewitt. 
•Joseph Harker. 
John Starr, 
t Joseph IL Duffield. 
Thomas G. Batten. 
Allen Moore. 
E. C. Heritage. 
Nathan S. Abbott. 
William D. Wilson. 
William W. Clark. 
Jacob J. Hendrickson. 



68. Charles T. Molony. 

68, Wm. B. Rosenbaum. 

69, 70, Leonard F. Harding. 

69 — 71, Nimrod Woolery. 

71, 72, John S. Eulon. 

72, John R. Mlddleton. 

7.3, 74, Obadiah Eldrldge. 

73, 74, D. W. C. Hemmlngway. 

75, Simeon Warrington. 

75. 76. Thomas B. Lodge. 

76, 77. Samuel Moore. 
77—79, Caleb C. Pancoast. 
78, 79, Lawrence Locke. 
80, 81, George Craft. 

80, 81, Thomas M. Ferrell. 

82, Abljah S. Hewitt. 

8.3—85. Job S. Haines. 

86, 87, Joseph B. Roe. 

88—90, James West. 

91. 92. James J. Davidson. 

93—96. Solomon H. Stanger. 

97—99. §Davi.l O. Watkiiis. 
1900, 01, William P. Buck. 

02 — 05, John Bo.vd Avis. 

0&— 08. William C. Cattell. 

09. 10. Walter Heritage. 

11. 12, James Laflferty. 

tl3, Yacancv- 

14-17. Oliver J. West. 

18—21, Horace M. Fooder. 



•Mr. Harker died during the session of 1860. and Mr. Duffleld 
was elected to All thp vn^flnoy 

tYacancy caused by death of Edward C. Leeds. 
§Became Acting Governor in '98. 



ASSEMBrA'MEN. 



179 



Hudson County. 



45, 


46, 


Hartman Van Wagenen. 


70, 


71, 




47, 


Benjamin F. Welsh. 




71, 




48, 


Oliver S. Strong. 




71, 




49, 


Jas. J. Van Boskerck. 




71, 




nO, 


Edward T. Carpenter. 




71, 


51, 


52, 


John Van Vorst. 




72, 




52, 


Edmund T. Parker. 




72, 




52, 


Joseph W. ITancox. 


72, 


73, 




53, 


John Dunn Llttell. 


72 


73, 




53, 


James S. Davenport. 


72,' 


73, 




53, 


Jacob M. Vreeland. 


72, 


73, 




54, 


Clement M. Hancox. 


72, 


73, 




54, 


Aug. F. Ilardenbergh. 


72, 


73, 


54, 


55, 


Jacob M. Merseles. 




73, 




55, 


Dudley S. Gregory. Jr. 


73, 


74, 




55, 


John M. Board. 




74, 




56, 


John D. Ward. 




74. 




56, 


James T. Hatfield. 


74, 


75, 


56. 


57, 


George V. De Mott. 


74, 


75, 




57, 


Robert Gilchrist. Jr. 


74, 


75, 


57, 


58, 


Robert C. Bacot. 


74- 


-76. 




58, 


William Voorhees. 


74—77, 


5a-60. 


Garret M. Van Horn. 




75, 




59, 


Wm. H. Hemenover. 




75, 




59, 


Samuel A. French. 


75, 


76, 




60, 


W. n. Peckham. 




76, 




60, 


N. C. Slalght. 




76, 




61, 


Franklin B. Carpenter. 




76, 




61, 


Theo. F. Randolph. 


76, 


77, 


61, 


62, 


Michael J. Vreeland. 


76. 


78. 




62, 


Edward D. Relley. 




T7. 


62, 


63, 


George McLaughlin. 




77. 


62, 


63. 


Joslali Conley. 




77, 


62, 


63, 


John B. Perry. 


77, 


78, 


62- 


-64, 


Joshua Benson. 


77. 


78, 


63, 


64, 


James Lynch. 


77, 


78, 


63, 


64. 


Garret D. Van Reipen. 




78, 




64. 


John B. Drayton. 




78, 


64, 


65, 


John Van Vorst. 


78, 


79, 


64, 


65, 


Abraham W. Duryee. 


78, 


79, 




05, 


Delos E. Culver. 




79, 




65, 


William E. Broking. 




79, 




65. 


Hiram Van Busklrk. 




79, 


65, 


66, 


69, 70. Leon Abbett. 




79, 




60. 


John Ramsay. 


79. 


80. 




66. 


Charles F. Ruh. 


79, 


80, 


66, 


67. 


0. D. Falkenburg. 




80. 


66, 


67. 


De Witt C. Morris. 


80. 


81. 


66—68, 


Noah D. Taylor. 


80, 


81, 


67, 


68, 


Hosea F. Clark. 


80. 


81. 


67, 


08. 


A. 0. Evans. 


80, 


81, 


67, 


68, 


John Dwyer. 


80, 


82, 




68, 


John Van Vorst. 




81, 


68. 


69. 


Henry C. Smith. 


81. 


82. 


69, 


70, 


Sidney B. Bevans. 




82. 


69, 


70, 


James B. Doremus. 




82, 




69, 


Elbridge V. S. Besson. 




82, 


69, 


71. 


Michael Coogan. 




82. 




70, 


Abel I. Smith. 




82, 




70, 


William Brinkerhoff. 


82. 


83, 



Herman D. Busch. 
James F. Fielder. 
John Anness. 
George Warrin. 
Joslah Hornblower. 
James Stevens. 
John A. O'Neill. 
George H. Farrier. 
Dennis Reardon. 
George S. Plympton. 
Henry Gaede. 
Jasper Wandel. 
Anthony J. Ryder. 
John Lee. 

Richard C. Wasliburn. 
Henry Coombs. 
James K. Selleck. 
Alexander T. McGill. 
Patrick Sheeran. 
Alexander McDonnell. 
John D. Carscallen. 
Rudolph F. Rabe. 
Thomas Carey. 
Edward F. McDonald. 
John J. Toffey. 
William A. Lewis. 
Harry Brautlgam. 
Thomas C. Browu. 
Thomas J. Hannon. 
Alex. Jocobus. 
Martin M. Drohan. 
Lewis A. Brigham. 
Elijah T. Paxton. 
Marmaduke Tilden. 
Alexander W. Harris. 
James Stevens. 
Dudley S. Steele. 
Edward P. C. Lewis. 
81, T. J. McDonald. 
Henry Dusenberry. 
John Owen Rouse. 
Frank C. Frey. 
G. A. Lllllendahl. 
John E. Tangeman. 
Joseph Meeks. 
Samuel Stllslng. 
Patrick Sheeran. 
Noah D. Taylor. 
Allan L. AIcDermott. 
J. Herbert Potts. 
James Curran. 
David W. Lawrence. 
Frederick Payne. 
James J. Casey. 
William McA3oo. 
Robert McCague, Jr. 
George H. Farrier. 
David M. Durrell. 
John O'Rourke. 
Thomas V. Gator. 



ISO 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



82—84, 
82—84, 
83, 
83, 
83, 84, 
83, 84, 
83, 84, 

83, 84, 
83—85, 

84, 

84, 85, 

84, 85, 
85, 
85. 
85, 
85, 
85, 
85, 

85, 86, 
86, 
86, 
86, 
86, 

86, 87, 
86, 87, 
86, 87, 
86, 87, 

86, 87, 
87. 

87, 88, 
87—89, 
87—90, 

88, 



88, 89, 
88. 89. 

88. 89. 
89, 
89, 

89, 90, 

89. 92, 
90, 
90, 
90, 

90, 91, 
90, 91, 
90, 91, 

90, 91, 
90—92, 

91. 
91, 
91. 
91. 

91, 92, 
92, 
92, 
92, 

92, 93, 



JameB C. Clarke. 
Dennis McLauglilln. 
Peter F. Wanser. 
John M. Shannon. 
Martin Steljes. 
Augustus A. Rich. 
Frank O. Cole. 
Joseph T. Kelly. 
Edwin O. Chapman. 
Michael J. O'Donnell. 
Cornelius S. See. 
87, 88, S. D. Dickinson. 
Thomas H. Kelly. 
Isaac Romalne. 
John W. Ileck. 
James J. Clark. 
John Wade. 
Fred Frambach, Jr. 
John C. Besson. 
R. B. Seymour. 
D. A. Peloubet. 
A. B. Dayton. 
T. J. McDonald. 
Philip Tumulty. 
John Pearson. 
89, R. S. Hudspeth. 
Thomas F. Noonan. 
Edward I.ennon. 
Edward T. McLaughlin. 
William H. Letts. 
John P. Feeney. 
Wra. C. TTeppenhelmer. 
Joseph Gallagher. 
Charles W. Fuller. 
•E. Frank Short. 
James F. Norton. 
Richard Brown. 
Edward P. Farrell. 
Peter T. Donnelly. 
Judson C. Francois. 
Laurence Fagan. 
Patrick IT. O'Neill. 
James Murphy. 
James S. Erwin. 
John F. Kelly. 
Michael Mullone. 
Henry Byrne. 
Andrew J. Boyle. 
Thomas B. Usher. 
J. Herbert Potts. 
Simeon II. Smith. 
Henry Puster. 
John F. ^radden. 
William D. Daly. 
James Moylan. 
Thomas Magner. 
James Tumilty. 
George A. Heaney. 
Martin Lawless. 



92, 93, Cornelius J. Tahen. 

92, 93, John Zeller. 
92—94, Timothy J. Carroll. 
92—94, Michael J. Covle. 

93, Henry II. Holmes. 
93, Adam J. Dittmar. 

93, S. V. W. Stout. 

93, 94, Ebenezer Berry. 
93, 94, Max Salinger. 

93, 94, Hugh A. Kelly. 

94, Thomas Egan. 

94, George W. Harding. 

94, John Kerr. 

94, Thomas McEwan, Jr. 

94, Charles Erlenkotter. 

94, 95, James Usher. 

95, Henry C. Gruber. 
95, James F. Blackshaw. 
95, Henry M. Nutzhorn. 
95, Frederick Schober. 
95, Robert McAndrew. 

95, William E. Drake. 

95, 96, William N. Parslow. 
95, 96, Pierce J. Fleming. 
95, 96, Richard M. Smart. 

95, 96, David H. Cagney. 

96, Carl H. Ruempler. 
96, John W. Queen. 
96, John E. Hewitt. 
96, Edward Hoos. 

96. Joseph P. Mullln. 

96, 98, Horace L. Allen. 
96, 98, Charles T. Bauer. 

97. Elmer W. Demarest. 
97. William M. Kllnk. 
97. Robert D. Urquhart. 
97. Isaac F. Goldenhorn. 
97. William G. Nelson. 
97. John E. McArthur. 
97, Theodore C. Wlklman. 
97, Charles M. Evans. 

97. Clement DeR. Leonard. 
97, William H. Dod. 

97, Wm. O. Armbruster. 

98, Alexander Simpson. 
98, Adolph Walter, Jr. 

98—1900, Allan Benny. 
98—1900, James J. Murphy. 
98, 99, James P. Hall. 
98, 99, Fergus T. Kelaher. 
98, 99. Michael J. Bruder. 

98, 99. John J. Marnell. 
98—1900, Tim. J. Carroll. 

99, 1900, J. Emll Walscheid. 
99—1901, Leon Abbett. 
99—1901, Maurice Marks. 
99—1901, John IT. Toilers. 
1900. 01, P. Anthony Brock. 
00—02, Geo. G. Tennant. 



•Mr. Short was elected to a second term of offl •€, but he died 
before the Legislature met. Mr. Francois was chosen for the 
vacancy. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



181 



00, 


01, 


00, 


01, 


01, 


02, 


01, 


02, 


01, 


02. 


01—03, 




02. 


02, 


03. 


02, 


03. 


02—03, 


02—05, 




03, 


03—05, 


03, 


04, 


03. 


04. 


03. 


04, 


03—05, 


03, 


04, 


04. 


05. 


04. 


05. 


04. 


05. 


04. 


05. 




04. 




05. 




05. 




05, 




05, 


05. 


00. 




on. 




00. 




on. 




00. 




06. 




00. 




00. 




00. 




00. 




00, 




00. 


07, 


08. 


07. 


08. 


07. 


08, 


07. 


08. 


07. 


08. 


07. 


08. 




07. 




07. 


07, 


OS. 


07. 


08. 


07. 


08, 


07. 


08. 


03, 


00, 


08. 


on. 


on. 


MO. 


09. 


JO. 


09, 


10. 




09. 


10. 


11. 


10- 


-13, 


10, 


11, 



02. John J. Fallon. 
02, Edward J. Kice. 
Jobn A. Dennin. 
Patrick II. Counolly. 
Kllian V. Lutz. 
Peter Stlllwell. 
William F. Hurley. 

C. G. A. Schumann. 
John J. Treacy. 
Frederick Weismann. 
James A. llaniill. 
Michael J. Cannon. 
Joseph C. Duff. 
William D. Kelly. 
James F. Fielder. 
J \V. Rufus Besson. 
Edgar H. Loveridge. 
Thomas P. McGlennon. 
Myron C. Ernst. 
Godfrey B. Mattheus. 
Harry W. Lange. 
John Gallery. 

D. Kelsey Whltaker. 
Archibald S. Alexander. 
Edward A. Murphy. 
Joseph A. Rlordan. 
William J. Boucher. 
Robert IT. Scott. 
John J. Coyle. 
Joseph F. Galvin. 
William A. Joerg. 
James E. Woolley. 
Edward K. Patterson. 

E. W. Arrosmlth. 
Herman A. Berg. 
J. Philip Dippel. 
John II. Eggers. 
Harry F. Thompson. 
HMieodore L. Bierck. 
09. 10. Mark A. Sullivan. 
09, 10. Charles P. Olwell. 
09. 10, Jos. P. Tumulty. 
09, 10. James Baker. 
C. E. Hendrickson, Jr. 
Charles IT. Blohm. 
Joseph A. Rionliin. 
Archibald S. Alexander. 
Philip Daab. 
09. 10. 

Oscar L. Auf der Ileide. 

09. Albert C. Epplnger. 
Valentine Holzapfel. 
Amadeus Valente. 

10. 11. Edw. ICenny. 
W. C. Kackenmester. 

11. 12, Wm. S. Davidson. 

11, 12, Peter IT. James. 
Frederick H. Otto. 
James H. Christie. 
15, IG, James C. Agnew. 

12, Cornelius Ford. 



11. 


12, 


11, 


12, 


11- 


-13, 


11, 


12, 




11, 


11, 


12, 


12, 


13, 




12. 


12, 


13, 


13, 


14, 




13, 


13, 


14, 




13, ' 




13, 




13, 


13, 


14, 


14, 


16, 


14, 


16, 




14, 




14. 


14, 


16, 




14, 




14, 




15, 


15, 


17, 


15, 


17, 




15, 




15, 


15, 


IT, 




15, 




15. 




15. 


15. 


17. 


10, 


17. 




16. 


10, 


17, 




16, 


16, 


IT, 


16. 


17, 


16, 


18, 


17, 


18. 


IT, 


IS, 


17, 


18, 




IT, 




18. 


18- 


-20, 




IS, 




18. 


18- 


-20, 


18, 


10, 


18, 


19, 




18. 


19, 


20, 


10, 


20. 


19, 


20, 


19, 


20, 


19, 


20, 


19, 


20, 


19, 


20, 


10, 


20, 




20, 




20, 



Thomas M. Donnelly. 

13, Charles M. Egan. 

15, Thomas I"'. Jlartin. 

14, Thos. F. A. Griffin. 
James J. McGrath. 
Chas. E. S. Simpson. 
14, Joseph M. Branegan. 
Geo. F. Brensinger. 
Philip Steuerwald. 
Magnus Bre<lenbek. 
Arthur F. McGrath. 

16, Harry Kulilke. 
Thomas C Mulligan. 

Henry W. Moser. 

Daniel J. Murray. 

Walter L. McDermott. 

George J. Brackner. 

Joseph Carroll. 

Tliomas P. Curran. 

Clinton E. Fisk. 

Thomas G. Gannon. 

Dennis Long. 

Joseph P. Mulligan. 

Francis P. Boland. 

Charles C. Colgan. 

I'rank A. Dolan. 

Archil)ald M. Henry. 

Frank A. T.a Pointe. 

Jacob J. Singer. 

T.eo S. Sullivan. 

Edward C. Zeiger. 

Charles W. Ostrom. 

Ulysses G. Borden. 

Timothy F. Aaron. 

Charles F. Dolan. 

John J. Dugan. 

Dennis Dunn. Jr. 

Charles IT. Felten. 

Allan W. Moore. 

Alexander Simpson. 

Dennis J. Gallagher, Jr. 

Joseph F. Hurley. 

William J. McGovern. 

Theodore Taistra. 

James A. Dugan. 

Henry J. Gaede. 

William J. Hanley. 

Samuel T,. Hirschberg. 

James J McAteer. 

Andrew E. Nolan. 

George W. Snow, Jr. 

Edward P. Stout. 
, James Bowen. 
, John J. Coppinger. 
, Michael J. Donovan. 
, William M. Schultz. 
, Francis A. Stanton. 
. Edward J. Sullivan. 
, Andrew Muro. 
, Louis Silver. 

William George 

Lewis G. Hansen. 



182 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



21, HuroLl B. Tuttle. 
21, James A. Templeton. 
21, John B. Rosser. 
21, Thomas Loughran, Si-. 
21, Arthur II. Nelson. 
21, Joseph J. Loori. 
21, Albert E. Stephens. 



21, F. E. Eugleke, Jr. 
21, Edward K. Patterson. 
21, John B. Stephens. 
21, Rutherford B. Seibel. 
21, William F. Fallon. 
21, fJohu B. Rosser. 



Hunterdon County. 



45, 
45, 
45, 

45, 48, 
46, 

46, 47, 
46, 47, 
46, 47, 
47—49, 
48, 49, 
48, 49, 
50. ."SI, 
50, 51, 
50, 51, 
50—52, 

52. 
52, 53, 

52, 53, 

53, 54, 

53, 54, 

54, 55, 
54, 55, 

55, 

56, 57, 

56, 57. 

56, 57, 

56. 57. 

58, 59, 

58, 59, 

58, 59, 

58, 59, 
60. 

60. 61, 

60. 61, 

60, 61, 

61, 62, 

62, 63, 
62—64, 

63, 64, 

64, 65. 

65, 66, 



45. 
45. 



John Swackhauimer. 
Anios Moore. 
John H. Case. 
49, Jonathan Plckel. 
Henry Stevenson. 
Isaac R. Srope. 
Joseph Fritts. 
Frederick Apgar. 
John Lambert. 
Andrew Banghart. 
David Van Fleet. 
John Marlow. 
T.nther Oi)dycke. 
William Tlnsman. 
John R. Young. 
Illram Bennett. 
Peter IT. Aller. 
Andrew Vauaickle. 
John Lambert. 
Samuel IT. Eritton. 
Lewis Young. 
Peter E. Voorhees. 
Jacob S. C. Pittenger. 
EdwRrd Runt. 
William Sergeant. 
John M. Voorlils. 
Joseph W. Willever. 
John P. Rittenhouse. 
John II. Horn. 
William Snyder. 
Cornelius B. Sheets. 
Frederick Apgar. 
Thos. Banghart, Jr. 
Charles Denson. 
Ambrose Barcroft. 
D. D. Schomp. 
Jacob II. Huffman. 
S. R. TTnselton. 
Josei>Ii W. Wood. 
David IT. Banghart. 
David B. Boss! 
James J. Willever. 



65—67, 

66, 67, 

67, 68. 

68, 69, 
68—70, 

69, 70, 



70, 71, 

71, 72, 
71, 72, 
73, 74, 
73, 74, 
75, 76, 
75, 76, 
77, 78, 
77, 78. 
79, 80, 
79, 80, 
81, 82, 
81, 82, 
83, 84, 
83, 84, 
85—87, 
85—87, 
88—90, 
88—90, 
91, 92, 
91—93, 

93, 
94, 95, 
94—96, 
96—98. 
97—99, 
99—01, 
00—02, 
03—05, 
06—08, 

09— n, 

15—17. 

18—20, 

21, 



William I. Iliff. 
Richard II. Wilson. 
Baltes Plckel. 
John Williamson. 
Theodore Probasco. 
John P. Lare. 
John Kugler. 
Peter Voorhees. 
Aug. E. Sanderson. 
W. L. Hoppock. 
John Carpenter, jr. 
James Bird. 
William W. Swayze 
Henry Britten. 
John Ilackett. 
Charles W. Godown. 
James N. Ramsey. 
George H. Mathews. 
Jacob Hipp. 
John V. Robbins. 
W. Howard Lake. 
John C. Arnwine. 
Chester Wolverton. 
William II. Martin. 
Laurence H. Trimmer. 
William B. Niece. 
Benjamin E. Tine. 
J. L. Chamberlin. 
Charles N. Redding. 
William C. Alpaugh. 
David Lawshe. 
George F. Martens, Jr. 
Oliver I. Blackwell. 
W. A. Laudenberger. 
James IT. Willever. 
12, 13, 14, 
Oliver C. Ilolcombe. 
John J. Matthews. 
Harry J. lobPt. 
David H. Agans. 
A. Lincoln Moore. 



Mercer County. 



Israel J. Woodward. 
Richard J. Bond. 
*JoIm Lowrey. 
Isaac Pullon. 
John M. Vancleve. 
William White. 
Samuel C. Cornell. 



48, 49, James M. Redmond. 
48 — 50, Josiah Bnzby. 

49, John R. Dill. 

50, John F. Hageman. 
50, 51, John II. Phillips. 

51, Ell Rogers. 

51, Westley P. Danser. 



•Died In nffloo 

tDied before Legislature convened. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



183 





52, 




52. , 




52, , 




53, 




53, 




53, 




54, 




54, 




54, 




55, 




55, 




55, 




56, 


56, 


57, 


56, 


57, 


57, 


58. 




58, 


58. 


fi'.). 




50, 


59, 


60, 




60, 


60, 


61, 




61, 


61, 


62. 




62, 


62, 


63, 




63, 


63, 


64, 




64. 


64, 


65, 


65, 


66, 


65, 


66. 


66. 


67, 




67. 


67, 


71. 




68, 




68, 


68, 


69, 




69, 


69, 


70, 




70, 


70, 


71, 




71. 




72, 




72, 


72. 


73. 


73. 


74, 


73, 


74. 


74. 


75. 




75 




75. 




76, 




76. 




76. 




77, 




77, 


77, 


, 78. 


78, 


, 79, 


78, 


, 79, 




79. 


80, 


. 81, 


80 


, 81. 


80 


, 81, 



William Napton. 
John C. Ward. 
Jeremiah Vandyke. 
Abner B. Tomllnson. 
Elijah L. Hendrlckson. 
Randal C. Kobblns. 
James H. Hill. 
Franklin S. Mills. 
Runey R. Forman. 
James Vanderenter. 
William Jay. 
Garret Sclienck. 
Samuel Wooley. 
Geo. R. Cook. 
Andrew Dutcher. 
Jacob Van Dyke. 
Jonathan S. Fish. 
Augustus L. Martin. 
Robert Altken. 
Ed. T. R. Applegate. 
Harper Crozer. 
Joseph Abbott. 
William S. Yard. 
Morgan F. Mount. 
John G. Stevens. 
Geo. W. Johnston. 
Peter Crozer. 
James G. West. 
James F. Bruere. 
John A. Weart. 
Alex. P. Green. 
Samuel Fisher. 
Thomas Crozer. 
Charles W. Mount. 
Joseph IT. Bruere. 
Thomas J. Corson. 
Thomas C. Pearce. 
Absalom P. T^anning. 
John P. Nelson. 
James C. Norris. 
Charles 0. Hudnut. 

William FT. Barton. 

T.lscomb T. Bobbins. 

Richard R. Rogers 

John n. Silvers. 

Alfred W. Smith. 

John N. Lindsay. 

Andrew J. Smith. 

Geo. O. Vnnderbilt. 

Snmuel M Younians. 

Robt. S. Woodrufif. Jr. 

Enoch H. Drake. 

John Hart Brewer. 

Robert L. Hutchinson. 

William S. Yard. 

J. Vance Powers. 

Horatio N. Burroughs. 

82, Eckford ISIoore. 

John D. Rue. 

William Roberts. 

Charles S. Robinson. 

Richard A. Donnelly. 

John V. D. Beekman. 



8.3, Nelson M. Lewis. 

83, William J. Convery. 

84, Joseph H. Apidegale. 

85, A. Judson Rue 
85, John Camluade. 

85, BenJ. F. Chambers. 
87, S. B. Hutchinson. 

86, James C. Taylor, Jr. 

86, William Ossenberg. 

87, Frederick Walter. 

87, George D. Scudder. 

88, Charles II. Olden. 
88, Joslah Jones. 

88, Lyman Leavitt. 

89, Uriel T. Scudder. 

89, Thomas S. Chambers. 

90, John Scliroth. 

90, Howell C. Stull. 

91, Jacob R. Wyckoff. 
James II. Mulheron. 
Patrick T. Burns. 
James W. Lanning. 
Barton B. Hutchinson. 
Charles G. Roebllng. 
William L. Wilbur. 

95. John Ginder. 
95, William T. Exton. 
97. Elijah C. Ilutclilnson. 
97, Geo. W. Macpherson. 

97, J. Wlggans Thorn. 

98, Frank M. Weller. 
98, 99, John B. Yard. 

98, 99, Henry J. Nicklin. 

99, 1900, Ira W. Wood. 
1900, 01, J. Warren Fleming. 
1900, 01, Frederick P. Rees. 



91. 
92, 
93, 
93, 
93, 
95, 



01, 


02, 


George W. Page. 


02, 


03, 


Harry D. Leavitt. 


02, 


03, 


Bertrand L. Gulick. 


03. 


04, 


Thomas Colclough, Jr. 


04. 


05, 


Ralph Hulse 


04. 


05, 


Thomas B. DeCou. 


or,— 07, 


Alfred N. Barber. 


06—08, 


Henry D. Tliompson. 


06, 


07, 


William F. Burke. 


08, 


09, 


Edward H. Ginnelley. 


08. 


09, 


10. George W. Housel. 


09- 


-11. 


Charles IT. Mather. 


10. 


11, 


Allan B. Walsh. 


11, 


12, 


13. George W. Adams. 




12, 


John B. Gill. 


12. 


14. 


15. Edgar G. Wenrt. 




13. 


Erwin E. Marshall. 


13. 


14. 


Hervey S. Moore. 


14- 


-10, 


James Hammond. 


1.=;- 


-17, 


A. Dayton Oliphant. 


16- 


—IS. 


Josiah T. Allinson. 


17 


—18, 


, 21, Clinton H. Road. 


18. 


19, 


, .Tolin E. Gill. 




19. 


TTorvev S. Moorp. 


19- 


-21, 


, Willifim H. Blaokwoll, 


20- 


—21. 


, George W. Guthrie. 




20, 


William A. Moore. 



184 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



Middlesex County. 



45. 


46, 


45, 


46, 


45, 


46, 


45, 


4G, 




47, 




47, 




47, 


47, 


48. 




48, 


48, 


49, 


48, 


49, 




49, 


49, 


50, 




50, 




50, 




50, 




51, 




51, 




51, 


51, 


52, 




52, 


52, 


53, 


53—55, 


53, 


54, 


54, 


55, 


55, 


56, 




56, 


56, 


57. 




57, 


57, 


58, 


58, 


59, 


58- 


-60. 




59, 


60, 


61, 


60, 


61. 


61, 


62, 




62. 


62, 


63, 


63. 


64. 


63, 


64, 


64, 


65, 




65. 


65- 


-67. 


66, 


67, 


66, 


67, 




68. 


68, 


69, 


68. 


09, 




70, 


70. 


71. 




71, 


71- 


-73, 




72, 


72 


73, 




73, 




74, 




74, 


74, 


75, 




75, 



Simeon W. PlillUps. 
lUlph C. Stults.* 
Daniel C. Dunn. 
Charles Abraham. 
Garret G. Voorhees. 
Theodore F. King. 
John A. Davison. 
Richard McDowell. 
Melancton F. Carman. 
Lewis S. Kandolph. 
Aaron Gulick. 
William A. Gulick. 
James Bishop. 
Henry Vandyke. 
Charles Abraham. 
Israel R. Coriell. 
David Dunn. 
Peter F. Dye. 
J. B. Johnson. 
Robert M. Crowell. 
James Applegate. 
Josephus Shann. 
Martin A. Howell. 
Abraham Everett. 
Samuel E. Stelle. 
William Hutchinson 
John T. Jenkins. 
Amos Robblns. 
Henry Stults. 
John D. Buckelew. 
Garret I. Snedeker. 
Ellis B. Freeman. 
Andrew McDowell. 
Thomas Booraem. 
Ellas Dey. 
Elias Ross. 
Orlando Perrlne. 
James T. Crowell. 
Miles Ross. 
David B. WyckofC. 
Abraham C. Coriell. 
James G. Goble. 
69, 70, Levi I). Jarrard. 
Nathan H. Tyrell. 
John W. Perrlne. 
George E. Strong. 
Alfred W. Jones. 
William M. Cox. 
George E. Brown. 
Albert L. Runyon. 
Edward F. Roberts. 
Isaac L. Fischer. 
Johnston Ilolcombe. 
Joseph C. Letson. 
II. F. Worthington. 
John Von Deursen. 
John F. Ten Broeck. 
Joseph C. Magee, Jr. 
James IT. Van Cleef. 



75, Josephus Shann, 

70, Isaiah Rolfe. 
76, 77, Charles A. Campbell. 
76, 77. Daniel Z. Martin. 

77, John Waldron. 
78, 79, Isaac L. Martin. 
78, 79, Patrick Convery. 
78, 79, Vincent W. Mount. 

80, Robert G. Miller. 

80, John M. Board. 

80, 81, Stephen M. Martin. 

81, 82. James II. Van Cleef. 

81, 83, Manning Freeman. 
82, John Adiiir. 

82, 83, James 11. Goodwin. 

83, 84, William R. Jernee. 

84, 85, Edward S. Savage. 

84, 85, Robert Carson. 

85, 80, John Martin. 

86, 87, John F. Ten Broeck. 

86, 87, R. R. Vandenbergh. 

87, 88. John Mulvey. 

88, 89, Eiihralm Cutter. 
88, 89, Charles B. Herbert. 

89, Daniel M. Kane. 
90, 91, Luther H. Tappen. 
90. 91, William C. Jacques. 
90, 91, Charles II. Manahan. 
92, 93. John H. Dnly. 
92, 93, Ilezeklah Warne. 
92—94, John W. Beekman. 

94, William F. Ilarkins. 
94 — 96, Andrew II. Slover. 
9.5, 96, Edward W. Hicks. 
95, 96. George H. Tice. 

07. Alexander C. Lltteret. 

97, Jacob H. Whitfield. 

97, James Fountain. 
98. 99. Adam Eckert. 
98, 99, Joseph II. Ridgeway. 
98. 99, John J. Quaid. 
1900, 01, Adrian Lyon. 
1900, 01, H. Raymond Groves. 
00 — 03. J. E. Montgomery. 

02, Myron J. Whitford. 

03. W. II. C. Jackson. 
03. Bernard M. Gannon. 
05, J. II. Thayer Martin. 
05, Alexander R. Fordyce. Jr. 
05, Frank C. Henry. 
07. Frank Crowther. 
07, William R. Drake. 

07, Edward E. Haines. 
08, 10, 11. W. E. Ramsay. 
08, 09, William C. Voorhees. 

08, S. C. Van Cleef. 

09, Rene P. F. Von Minden 

09, Edwin C. McKeag. 

10. Edward Burt. 



02. 

04, 
04, 
04, 
06, 
06, 
06. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



185 



10, 11, Jno. V. L. Booraem. 

11, 12, Aug. C. Streltwolf. 
12, J. F. Ten Broeck. 

12, 13, 14, J. P. Kirkpatriok. 

13, 14, 15, ArtLur A. Quinn. 
13, 14, George L. Bur ton. 
15, 16, E. Leon Lobleiu. 

15, 16, Charles Anderson. 
16, Richard J. Galvin. 



17, 18, George S. Applegate. 
17, IS, James A. Edgar. 
17, IS, Fred. C. Sohneid.-r. 

10, Andrew J. Wiglit. 
10, 20, Fred \V. De \ oe. 

10, Andrew Kirkpatrit-k. 
20—21, Albert W. Appleby. 
20 — 21, C. Raymond 1 yons. 

21, Edward J. Peterson. 



Monmouth County. 



45, 
45, 

45, 46, 
45—47, 
45—47, 
4G, 47, 

46, 47, 
47, 
48, 
48, 
48, 
48, 
48, 

49, 50, 
49, 
49, 

49, 50, 

49, 50, 
50, 
50, 
51, 

51, 52, 

51, 52, 

51—53, 

52, 

53, 

53, 

54, 

54, 

.54, 

54—56, 

55, 

55, 

55, 

50, 57, 
56, 57, 
56, 57, 
57—59, 
57-60, 
58, 50, 
58, 59, 

60, 
60, 61, 

60, 61, 

61, 02, 
61, 62, 

62, 
63—65, 



53, 



George F. Fort. 
•Jas. II. Hartshorne. 
Andrew Simpson. 
Hartshorne Tantum. 
Joseph B. Coward. 
William Vandoren. 
John Borden. 
Andrew Simpson. 
William W. Bennett. 
Joel Parker. 
Ferdinand Woodward. 
•Samuel Bennett. 
Joel W. Ayres. 
Alfred Walling. 
James Hooper. 
John B. Williams. 
George W. Sutpbln. 
James D. Hall. 
William G. Hooper. 
Charles Butcher. 
Bernard Connolly. 
William II. ConoTer. 
Garret S. Smock. 
Samuel W. Jones. 
Charles Butcher. 
Charles Allen. 
Daniel P. Van Doren. 
Robert Allen. 
Forman Ilendrickson. 
John L. Corlies. 
Henry E. Lafetra. 
John Vandoren. 
Thomas B. Stout. 
William H. Johnson. 
Jacob Herbert. 
Jolin R. Barricklo. 
Samuel Beers. 
John V. Conover. 
Austin H. Patterson. 
George Middleton. 
Richard B. Walling. 
J. J. McNinney. 
William H. Mount. 
James Patterson. 
William V. Ward. 
Charles Halght. 
George C. Murray. 
Michael Taylor. 



63, 


64, 


63, 


64, 


G5, 


66, 


65, 


66, 




66, 


67, 


68, 


67, 


68, 


67, 


68, 




69, 


69, 


70, 


69, 


70, 


70- 


-72, 




71, 


71, 


72, 




72, 


73, 


74, 


73, 


74, 


73- 


-75, 


75, 


76, 


75, 


76, 


76, 


77, 




77, 


77, 


78, 




78, 


78, 


79, 


79, 


80, 


70, 


80, 


80, 


81, 




81, 


81, 


82, 




82, 


82, 


83. 


83, 


84, 


83, 


84, 


84, 


85, 




85, 



85, 86, 
86, 

86, 87, 



88, 


89, 




89, 


90, 


91, 


00, 


91, 


90, 


91, 


92, 


93, 


92, 


93, 


92, 


93, 



Osborn Curtis. 
David H. Wyckoff. 
Daniel A. Holmes. 
George Scheuck. 
William C. Browne. 
Charles Allen. 
Francis Corlies. 
Thomas S. R. Brown. 
William H. Conover. 
Daniel H. Van Mater. 
Andrew Brown. 
Austin H. Patterson. 
William S. Horner. 
John T. Halght. 
Wm. B. Hendrickson. 
John B. Gifford. 
John S. Sproul. 
George W. Patterson. 
Chas. D. Hendrickson. 
William V. Conover. 
James L. Rue. 
James H. Leonard. 
William H. Bennett. 
George J. i=^ly. 
Arthur Wilson. 
87, Sherman B. Oviatt. 
92, 93, John D. Honce. 
87, 88, G. H. Lufburrow. 
Holmes W. Murphy. 
David A. Bell. 
Benjamin Griggs. 
Peter Forman, Jr. 
Alfred B. Stoney. 
Thomas G. Chattle. 
Charles H. Bond. 
William IT. Grant. 
Frank E. Heyer. 
William Pintard. 
W. S. Throckmorton. 
Edward B. Potts. 
Archibald A. HIgglns. 
William F. Patterson. 
Aaron E. Johnston. 
William D. Campbell. 
Ch.irles H. Ivins. 
John D. Honce. 
Reuben G. Strahan. 
William Taber Parker. 



♦Died In oflBce. 



ISG 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



94, Charles L. Walters. 

94, Richard Borden. 

94, 95, David D. Denise. 

95, 96, Charles A. Francis. 
95, 96, George B. Snyder. 

96, Alfred Walling, Jr. 

97, William H. Keid. 
97, Oliver U. Brown. 

97, Daniel E. Van Wlckle. 

98, 99, Joseph L. Butcher. 

98, 99, Joseph C. Heyer. 

98, 99, B. Drummond Woolley. 
1900, 01, Charles R. Snyder. 
1900, 01, Sam'l W. Kirkbrlde. 
1900, 01, William Ilyres. 

02, William T. Hoffman. 

02, Somers T. Champion. 

02, 03, John A. ITowland. 

03, 04, Charles F. McDonald. 
03, 04, Amzi M. Posten. 

04, William F. LeCferson. 

05, 06, Edgar I. VanderVeer. 

05, 06, Walter S. Reed. 



Morris 



Timothy Kitchel. 
Matthias Kitchel. 
Henry Seward. 
George H. Thompson. 
Calvin Howell. 
Richard Lewis. 
Charles McFarland. 
Samuel Hilts. 
Andrew I. Smith. 
David T. Cooper. 
Samuel Van Ness. 
Edward W. Whelpley. 
John L. Kanouse. 
Andrew Cobb. 
Freeman Wood. 
George H. Thompson. 
Horace Chamberlain. 
Jonathan P. Bartley. 
Joslah Meeker. 
Cornelius B. Doremus. 
C. S. Dickerson. 
John D. Jackson. 
Robert Albright. 
John L. Kanouse. 
Andrew B. Cobb. 
William P. Conkllng. 
William Logan. 
Aaron Pitnoy. 
Edward Howell. 
Wm. M. Muchmore. 
William A. Carr. 
Daniel Budd. 
Benjamin M. Felch. 



05, 


06, 




07, 




07, 




07, 




08, 




08, 




08, 


09, 


10, 


09, 


10, 


09, 


10, 




11, 


11, 


12, 


11, 


1-, 


13, 


14, 




14, 


15- 


-17, 




15, 


is, 


19, 


18- 


-20, 




20, 




21, 




21, 


Coi 

57, 


anty 

58, 


58, 


59, 


58, 


59, 




59, 


59, 


60, 




60, 


60—62, 


GO— 62, 




61, 


61, 


62, 


62, 


63. 




63, 


63- 


-65, 




64. 


64, 


65, 




65, 




66, 


66, 


67, 


66, 


67, 




67, 




68, 




68, 


68—70, 


69, 


70, 


69, 


70, 


71, 


72. 


71, 


72, 


71- 


-73, 


73, 


74, 


73, 


74, 


74- 


-76. 


75, 


76, 


75. 


76. 



George C. Henry. 
Isaac B. Davison. 
T. Nelson Llllagore. 
Frank J. Manson. 
Wilbert A. Beecroft. 
David E. Tantum. 
John W. Keough. 
Joseph D. Bedle. 
Monroe \ . Poole. 
Peter V'redenburgh. 
Jas. A. Hendrlckson. 
IG, 17, Elmer H. Geran. 
13, 'Leon R. Taylur. 
William E. Mount. 
William Winans. 
Harry G. Van Note. 
John Thomson. 
T. Lloyd Lewis. 
Dallas G. Young. 
Richard W. Stout. 
Edward A. Sexsmith. 
Clinton B. Lohsen. 



Richard Speer. 
Lyman A. Chandler. 
John Naughright. 
A. H. Stansborough. 
James IL Ball. 
Eugene Ayres. 
Nelson IL Drake. 
Nathan Horton. 
William W. Beach. 
John Hill. 
Jacob Vanatta. 
William J. Wood. 
Jesse Hoffman. 
Henry C. Sanders. 
John Bates. 
Alfred M. Treadwell. 
John Hill. 
James C. Yawger. 
Ellas M. White. 
Lewis Estler. 
Daniel Coghlan. 
George Gage. 
Jesse M. Sharp. 
Theodore W. Phoenix. 
Columbus Beach. 
Nathaniel Niles. 
W. B. Lefevre. 
August C. Canfleld. 
W. XL Howell. 
Jacob Z. Budd. 
Ellas M. SkelUnger. 
James C. Youngblood. 
Edmund D. Halsey. 



'Became Acting Governor in '13. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



18' 





78. 




78, 


79, 


80, 


79, 


80, 


79. 


80. 


81, 


8-', 


81, 


82. 


81, 


82. 


S3, 


84. 


83, 


84. 


83- 


-85. 


85, 


86. 


85, 


86. 


86, 


87, 


87, 


88. 


87, 


88, 


88, 


89. 


89, 


90, 


89, 


00. 


90, 


91. 


91, 


92. 




93. 




93, 


94, 


95, 


94, 


95, 


51- 


-53, 




54. 


55, 


56. 


57- 


-59. 



Abm. C. Van Duyne. 
•♦Cummins 0. Cooper. 
C. P. Garrabrant. 
Francis J. Doreuius. 
Joshua S. Salmon. 
Charles F. Axtell. 
James II. Bruen. 
Holloway W. Hunt. 
William C. Johnson. 
91, 92, John F. Post. 
Oscar Llndsley. 
James II. Neighbour. 
Amzl F. Weaver. 
George W. Jenkins. 
John Seward Wills. 
Ellas C. Drake. 
John Norwood. 
Samuel S. Lyon. 
John R. ^Itney. 
Carnot B. Meeker. 
John Norris. 
William S. Naurlght. 
Jas. Preston Albright. 
Ford D. Smith. 
Thomas J. O'Brien. 
Sylvester Utter. 
Charles A. Baker. 
William C. Bates. 



96, 97. Charles F. Hopkins. 

96, 07, Joseph B. Rlgbter. 

98, 99, G forge E. Poole. 
98—1900, Jacob W. Welsh. 
1900, 01, Samuel L. Garrison. 

01, 02. Chas. R. Whitehead. 

02, 03, William T. Brown. 

03, 04. Thomas J. Illllery. 

04, 05, Charles A. Baker. 

05, 00. John M. Mills. 

06, 07, Richard J. Chaplin. 

07, 08, Henry W. Buxton. 

08, 09, James A. Lyon. 

09, 10, Oscar B. Smith. 

10, 12, William F. Birch. 
11, Albert Bunn. 

11. Eugene S. Burke. 

12. Joseph G. Willis. 

13. James J. Lyons. 

13, Edward D. Neighbour. 
14—16, 19—20, G. W. Downs. 



-16. Harry W. ]\Iutchler. 
IS, Jacob J. Vreeland. 
18. Arthur Whitney. 
20, David Young. 

20. Fletcher L. Fritts. 

21, Samuel K. Owen. 



Ocean County. 



61, 



64, 65, 

66, 67, 

68. 69, 

70, 71, 

72, 

73, 

74, 

75, 87, 

76, 

77, 

78—80, 

81, 



45. 46. 

45, 46, 
47, 

47, 48, 
48, 
49. 

49. 50. 

50. 51. 

51. 52. 



Joel Haywood. 
A. 0. S. Havens. 
William F. Brown. 
Edwin Salter. 
Thomas W. Ivins. 
Charles H. Applegate. 
Ephralm Emson. 
Edwin Salter. 
Jacob Birdsall. 
Job Edwarls. 
G. W. Cowperthwaite. 
Albert M. Bradshaw. 
Richard B. Parker. 
John S. Shultze. 
Edward M. Lonan. 
88. 89. J. S. Goble. 
Ephralm P. Emson. 
Isaac A. Van Hise. 
Rufus Blodgett. 
William H. Bennett. 



82, Clifford Horner. 

83, George T. Cranmer. 

84, Augustus W. Irons. 
86, George G. Smith. 

-92, Adolph Ernst. 

94, John T. Burton. 

96, Abraham Lower. 

98, Roderick A. Clark. 
-1901, Courtney C. Carr. 

02. George W. Holman, Jr. 

03. William J. Harrison. 

05, Cornelius C. Pearce. 

06, George C. Warren. 

07, Samuel S. Taylor. 
09, 10, BenJ. II. Crosby. 
12. Harry E. Newman. 

-16, David G. Conrad. 

-10. Harry T. Ilag.Tman. 

-21, Woodburn S. Cranmer. 



George W. Colfax. 
Chlleon F. De Camp 
Abm. Prall. 
Henry M. Van Ness. 
John M. Demarest. 
Oscar Decker. 
C. S. Van Wagoner. 
Thomas D. Hoxsey. 
Benjamin Geroe. 



Passaic County. 

52, 54, John L. Laroe. 

52, J. S. Fayerweather. 

53, J. V. R. Van Blarcom. 

53, Cornelius Van Winkle. 

54, Philip Rafferty. 

54, Charles H. May. 

55, William C. Stratton. 

55, William M. Morrell. 

56, John Schoonmaker. 



53, 



55, 



••In 1878, 
Salmon. 



Cummins O. Cooper was unseated by Joshua S. 



ISS 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 





56, 


Peter 11. Whrltenor. 




89. 


56—58, 


BenJ. Buckley. 




89, 




57. 


John J. Brown. 




90, 




57. 


James B. Beam. 


90, 


91, 




58. 


Patrick Magennls. 


00, 


91, 


58, 


59, 


Richard Van Houte<i. 


90, 


91, 




59, 


Joel M. Johnson. 




91, 


59—61, 


Samuel Pope. 




92, 




60, 


Isaac Stagg. 


92, 


93, 


60, 


61, 


Isaac P. t.'ooley. 


92, 


93, 


61, 


62, 


Socrates Tuttle. 


93, 


94, 


62- 


-66, 


John N. Terhune. 




94, 


62—66. 


Chandler D. Norton. 




94, 




63, 


Samuel Pope. 




95, 


63, 


64, 


Joseph N. Taylor. 


95. 


96, 


63, 


64, 


Charles F. Johnson. 


95, 


96, 


64, 


65, 


Aaron Klnter. 


95, 


96. 


65, 


66, 


Garret Van Wagoner. 


96—08. 


65, 


66, 


Isaac D. Blauvelt. 




97, 




67, 


E. A. Stansbury. 




97, 


67, 


68, 


David Henry. 


98. 


99, 


67, 


68, 


Joseph R. Baldwin. 


98, 


99, 


68, 


69, 


A. A. Van Voorhees. 




98. 


69, 


70, 


Hugh Reid. 


99—01. 


69, 


70. 


72, C. Hemmlngway. 


1900. 




70. 


Henry Hobbs. 


00—03. 




70, 


Charles P. Gurnee. 


01, 


02. 


71. 


72. 


75, Robert M. Torbet. 


01—03. 


71, 


78. 


79, John O'Brien. 




02. 


72, 


73. 


Henry McDanolds. 


02, 


03, 




73. 


George Barnes. 




03. 


73, 


74. 


Garret A. Ilobart. 


03—05, 


74, 


75. 


David Henry. 




04, 


74, 


75. 


John P. Zeluff. 


04, 


05, 


76, 


77. 


John W. Griggs. 


04, 


05, 


76, 


77. 


John Sanderson. 


05, 


06, 


76, 


77. 


Jos. Ti. Cunningham. 


05, 


00, 




78. 


John Kennell. 




06, 


78, 


79. 


John H. Robinson. 


06, 


08, 


79, 


80. 


George W. Conkllng. 




06. 


80, 


81, 


Robert B. Morehead. 




07, 


80, 


81, 


Thomas B. Vreeland. 




07, 




81. 


Jacob Latus. 




07, 




82. 


Joseph A. Greaves. 




07, 


82, 


83, 


Patrick H. Shields. 




07, 


82. 


83. 


William F. Gaston. 


08, 


09, 


82- 


-85, 


92, 93. 94. Thos. Flynn. 






83, 


84, 


Clark W. Mills. 




08, 




84, 


William Prall. 


08, 


09. 




84, 


Cornelius A. Cadmus. 




08. 


85, 


86, 


John Scheele. 


09, 


10, 


85. 


86, 


De Witt C. Bolton. 




09, 


85. 


80, 


George II. Low. 


10, 


11. 




86, 


William B. Gourley. 


10, 


11. 


87, 


88, 


George Law. 




11. 




87, 


John Donohue. 




12, 




87, 


Robert A. Carroll. 




12, 


87, 


88, 


89. James Keys. 




13, 




88, 


James IT. Rogers. 




13, 




88, 


Eugene Emley. 




13, 




89, 


John I. Holt. 




13, 



Chas. T. Woodward. 
William W. Welch. 
Thomas McCran. 
John King. 
John F. Kerr. 
Robert Williams. 
Richard Carroll. 
James Parker. 
Frank Gledhill. 
John F. Smith. 
John 1. Holt. 
John M^Kelvey. 
William I. Lewlb. 
Samuel Frederick. 
James Robertson. 
Samuel Bullock. 
97, 99, 1900, John King. 
Henry W. Gledhill. 
Frank Atherton. 
Phlneas Bridge. 
Wood McKee. 
John W. Sturr. 
John Donohue. 
Vivian M. Lewis. 
Richard Berry. 
Edmund G. Stalter. 
Wm. B. Davidson. 
Hiram Keasler. 
Raymond Bogert. 
04, F. W. Van Blarcom. 
Anton L. Pettersen. 
George H. Dalrymple. 
Jacob De Lazier. 
Ernest Shaw. 
10, 11, Thos. R. Layden. 
George F. Wright. 
Henry Marelll. 
Arthur M. Smethuret. 

09, John D. Prince. 
Colin R. Wise. 
William A. Merz. 
Abram Klenert. 
Frank A. Pawelskl. 
Henry J. Earle. 
John D. Van Blarcom. 

10, 11, 12, 

Amos H. Radcllffe 
Samuel McCold. 
William B. Burpo. 
Henry C. Whitehead. 
Edward T. Moore. 
James G. Blauvelt. 
12, Thomas F. McCran. 
12, Leonard PIkaart. 
Arthur P. Jackson. 
William W. Watson. 
G. H. Vermuelen. 
Robert F. Buckley. 
James E. Kerwin. 
Robert A. Roe. 
James Matthews. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



189 



13. 

14, 15, 

14—17, 

14, 15, 

14—16, 

14—17, 

16, 

16, 

IT, 



45, 
45, 
45, 
46, 
46, 
46, 
47, 
47. 

47, 48, 
48, 
48, 
49, 
4<J, 
49, 
50, 
50, 
.50, 
51, 
51, 
51, 
52, 
52, 
53, 
58, 
54, 
54, 
55, 
55. 
50, 
5G, 
57, 

57—59, 

58, 59, 
RO, 

60, 61, 
61. 
62, 
62, 
63, 

03, 64, 
64, 
65, 



Joseph A. Delaney. 
William J. Barbour. 
George II. Dalrymple. 
William Huglies. 
John Hunter. 
Edmund B. Randall. 
John H. Adamson. 
Josiah Dadley. 
Clinton D. Ackeniian. 



17—21, Henry G. Heishfield. 

17-21, Fred J. Tattersall. 

IS, 19, Thomas Foxhall, Jr. 

18—20, William R. Rogers. 

18. Albin Smith. 

19—21, William W. Evans. 

20, Grover P. Heinzmanu. 

21, Lester F. Meloney. 
21, John J. Roeguer. 



Salem County. 



David Wiley. 
Isaiah Conklyn. 
Robert Hewitt. 
Ephralm Carel. 
Charles Bilderback. 
George Remster. 
Joseph M. Springer. 
James Vanmeter. 
Joseph Foster. 
BenJ. F. McCollister. 
Joseph R. Chew. 
James H. Trenchard. 
Isaac Llpplncott. 
John Fowler. 
Charles B. Newell. 
David Slthens. 
Benjamin Remster. 
Smith Bilderback. 
Charles Benner. 
Harman Ri';hnian. 
Jacob HItchner. 
John C. I.ummis. 
Nathaniel G. Swing. 
John Blackwood. 
Isaiah D. Clawson. 
Richard Grler. 
Joshua Thompson. 
John Harris. 
Joseph Kille. 
Samuel Plummer. 
William Beckett. 
Thomas B. Jones. 
Alfred Simpkins. 
Samuel Ilabermayer. 
Joshua Llpplncott. 
Ow<»n Ii. .fones. 
William P. Somers. 
Samuel D. Miller. 
Joseph Waddington. 
Jorieph W. Cooper. 
William N. Hancock. 
William Callahan. 



09 



66, A. M. P. V. H. Dickeson. 

67, Samuel Garrison. 

67, John S. Newell. 

68, Henry M. Wright. 

69, Andrew S. Reeves. 

70, Charles F. H. Gray. 

70, David Evans. 

71, John W. Dickinson. 

71, John HItchner. 

72, Smith Hewitt. 

72, 73, Daniel P. Darrell. 

73, 74, William Iszard. 

74, 75, William B. Carpenter. 
75, Charles P. Swing. 

70, Richard Coles. 
76 — 78. Qulnton Keasbey. 

77, John S. Elwell. 

78, William C. Kates. 
79—81, Henry Barber 
79—81, John T. Garwood. 
82 — 84, Henry Combs. 

85, 86. Joseph D. Whltaker 

87. William Newell. 

88. Millard F. Riley. 
89. 90. John C. Ward. 
91, 92, James Strimple. 
93, 94, William Diver. 

95, 90, Charles W. Powers. 
97, 98, Joseph B. Crinpen. 

99. Frank Wright. 
1900, 01. Henry J. Blohm. 

02, John Tyler 

03, Ephralm C. Harris. 
04—06. Thomas E. Hunt. 

07, 08, 10, Samuel A. Rldgway. 

09, John D. Schade. 

11, Chas. L. Richmond. 
12. 13, Isaac S. Smick 

14, William M. W^heatley. 
1.5 — 17. Lemuel H. Greenwood. 
IS. 19, Charles B. Robinson, Sr. 
20—21, William S. Stiles. 



Somerset County. 



45, Peter "Voorhees. 
45, Samuel Reynolds. 

45. Peter Kline. 

46. James B. Elmendorf. 
46. 47. Peter T. Beekman. 



46, Jonathan Cory. 
47 — 49, Samuel K. Martin. 
47-^9, F. V. D. Voorhees. 
48 — 50, John M. WyckoCf. 

50, Samuel S. Doty. 



190 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



50, 51, 
51, 

51, 52, 
52, 

53, 54, 
54—56, 

55, 
56, 57, 

57, 
58, 59, 
58, 59, 
60, 61, 
61—63, 
62. 63. 
64, 65, 
64, 65, 
66, 67, 

67, 

68, 
68, 69, 
69—71, 

71, 
72, 73, 
72, 73, 
74, 75, 
75—77, 



45, 

45, 

45, 

46, 

46, 47, 

46—48, 

47^9, 

48—50, 

49. 

50, 51, 

50, 51, 

51, 

52, 

52—54, 

52, 55, 

53, 54, 
53, 54, 

55, 
55—57, 
56—58, 
50—58. 

58. 
59. 60. 
59, 60, 
59, 60. 

61, 

62. 
62—64. 



53, Jobn De Mott. 
Frederick D. Brokaw. 
Eugene .S. Doughty. 
Michael II. Nevius. 
John H. Anderson. 
John S. Iloagland. 
Alvah Lewis. 
Cornelius M. Schomp. 
Cornelius N. Allen. 
Nehemlah V. Steele. 
60, Elisha B. Wood. 
70, J. W. Arrowsmlth. 
John G. Schenck. 
John M. Mann. 
Daniel Corey. 
66, Rynier A. Staats. 
Ralph Davenport. 
Peter A. Voorhees. 
Abraham T. Huff. 
John J. Bergen. 
John R. Staats. 
James Doty. 
David D. Smalley. 
74. Jno. G. Schenck. 
William V. Sutphln. 
Joseph II. Voorliees. 



76, 77, 91, 92, Jas. J. Bergen. 
78—80, John Klngelmann. 
78 — 80, J. Newton Voorhees. 

81, John L. Oakey. 
81, 82, William A. Schomp. 
83, 84, Cornelius S. Ilofifman. 
85, 86, John Vetterleln. 

87, George E. Pace. 

88, Oscar Conkllng. 
89, 90. Jacob Klotz. 

93, George H. Cramer. 
94, 95, Frank W. Somers. 

96, Charles A. Reed. 
97, 98, Peter V. D. Van Doren 
99, 1900, Edward E. Cooper. 
01, 02, Henry W. Hoagland. 
03, 04, Sam'l S. Swackhamer. 
05, 00, Irving Hoagland. 
07, 08, 09, 10. Wm. W. Smalley. 

11, Geo. M. La Monte. 

12, William de La Roche 

Anderson. 
13, 14, Azariah M. Beekman. 
15, 16, Ogden II. Hammond. 
1" — 19, John S. .\merman. 
20—21, David Hastings. 



Sussex County. 



Absalom Dunning. 
Jesse Bell. 
Timothy H. Cook. 
Juhn Hunt. 
Peter Young. 
Thos. D. Armstrong. 
Peter Hoyt. 
Jacob Ilornbeck, Jr. 
Martin Ryerson. 
Guy Price. 
William Slmonson. 
Daniel D. Decker. 
George "W. Collver. 
Timothy E. Shay. 
Aaron K. Stlnson. 
Benjamin Hamilton. 
Luther Hill. 
James L. Decker. 
Daniel D. Gould. 
William Smith. 
John W. Opdyke. 
Sanford McKeeby. 
Martin Cole. 
61, Charles Mackerly. 
61. Daniel D. Decker. 
William Price. 
Thomas N. McCnrter. 
William H. Bell. 



63, 64, Robert Hamilton. 

65, Samuel Fowler. 

65—67, William M. Iliff. 

66, 67, 73, 74, F. M. Ward. 

68—70, Hiram C. Clark. 

68—70, Samuel II. Hunt. 

71, Peter Smith. 

71, 72, Lebbeus Martin. 

75. 76, William Owen. 

77. 78. George Greer. 

79—81, Lewis J. Martin. 

82—84, William E. Ross. 

85—87, Horatio N. Kinney. 

88—90, Andrew J. Bale. 

91—93, Jacob Swartwout. 

94 — 96. William P. Coursen. 

97, Horace E. Rude. 

98. 99, 1900, Elvln E. Smith. 

1901, Theodore M. Roe. 

02, 03, 04, Lewis S. Iliff. 

05, Vacancy.* 

06—08, Levi II. Morris. 

09, 10. 11, 12, Chas. A. Meyer. 

13, 14. 15. Henry T. Kays. 

16, Edward Ackerson. 

17. IS, Philip S. Wilson. 

19. Harold M. Simpson. 

20—21, Hugh C. Baldwin. 



•JacKPon R. Decker was elected, but died before meeting 
of Legislature. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



191 



Union County. 





58, 




59, 


59, 


60, 


60, 


61, 




61, 




62, 


f>2 


en. 


63, 


64, 


64, 


65, 



58, Benjamin M. Price. 
Carmon Parse. 
William Stiles. 
Elston Marsh. 
Darlil Mulford. 
Israel O. Maxwell. 
John J. High, 
fc'aniuel L. Moore. 
Noah Wooilruff. 
Philip Dougherty. 

65, Joseph T. Crowell. 

66, John R. Crane. 

66, Thomas J. Lee. 

67, A. M. W. Ball. 
67, Enos W. Runyon. 
69, Jolin IL Whelan. 

69, DeWitt C. Hough. 

70, Albert A. Drake. 

71, 75, Fenl. Blancke. 

71, Joseph W. Yates. 

72, Andrew Dutcher. 
-74, William McKlnley. 

73, John H. Lufberry. 
73, Jabez B. Cooley. 
75, William n. Gill. 
75, Ellas R. Pope. 
77, Moses F. Cary. 

77, Benjamin A. Vail. 
-78, John Egan. 

78, Joseph B. Coward. 
-80, George M. Stiles. 

80, Philip H. Vernon. 
John T. Dunn. 
George T. Parrott. 
Frank L. Sheldon. 
Edward J. Byrnes. 
Asa T. Woodruff. 
DeWitt C. Hough. 
Jacob Kirkner. 
Peter L. Hughes. 
William H. Corbln. 
Wm. Cimmberlain. 
John J. Matthews. 
Foster ^^ Voorhees. 
88—90, John Ulrlch. 



70, 



72, 



76, 



78- 



79- 


-82, 


81, 


82, 


81- 


-83, 


83, 


84, 


83, 


84, 




84, 




85, 


85, 


86. 


85- 


-87, 


86. 


87, 


87. 


88, 


88- 


-90, 



89, 90, Frederick C. Marsh. 
91, 92, John Carroll. 
91—93, George Kyte. 
91—93, Th/^mas F. Lane. 

93, Timothy M. Kelly. 
94, 95, John N. Burger. 
94, 95, Joseph Cross. 
94, 95, Charles N. Codding. 
96, 97, Henry Clauss. 
96, 97, J. Martin Roll. 
96, 97, William R. Codington. 
98, 99, George A. Squire. 
98, 99, Roger F. Murray. 
98, 99, Robert G. Houston. 
1900, 01, Ellis R. Meeker. 
1900, 01, Chester M. Smith. 
1900, 01. Charles S. Foote. 

02, Frederick Miller. 
02, 03. William Newcorn. 

02, 03, William F. Hall. 

03, 05, Edward S. Coyne. 
04, Charles L. MoCfett. 
04, Joseph T. Hague. 
04, Joseph H. Gunn. 

05—07, Peter Tillman. 
05—07, *Rand(.]iiii Perkins 
06, Everard K. Tucke:^. 

07, 08, John R. Moxon. 

08, 09, 10, Carlton B. Pierce. 

08, 09, Albert F. Kirsteln. 

09, 10, Augustus W. Schwartz. 

10, 11, Lloyd Thompson. 

11, Calvin E. Brodhead. 

11, 13, H. J. McLaugiilin. 

12, William F. Groves. 
12. George C. Otto. 

12, George L. Babcock. 
L3. 14. William A. Leonard. 
13, 14, John J. Griffin. 

14, Francis V. Dobbins. 
1.") — 17, William N. Runyon. 
1.") — 19. Cliarles L. Morgan. 
1.5 — 21, Arthur N. Piersou. 
18—21, Arthur E. Warner. 
20—21, Sidney W. Eldridge. 



45, 
45, 
45, 46, 
46—48, 
46-^8, 
47—49, 
49—51, 
49—51, 
50, 51, 



Abram Wlldrlck. 
Stephen Warne. 
Robert C. Caskey. 
Jonathan Shot well. 
Amos H. Drake. 
Samuel Mayberry. 
Andrew Rlbble. 
Benjamin Fritts. 
53, John Loller. 



Warren County. 

52, .John Cline. 

52 — 54, John Sherrer. 

52—54, David V. C. Crate. 

.54—56, George IL Beatty. 

5.5—57, Archibald Osborn. 

55—57, John White. 

57 — 59, Isaac Leida. 

58, Abm. S. Van Horn. 

58, 59, William Felt. 



•Elected to fill vacancy caused by death of George H. Embree 
In 1905. 



10-2 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



59—61, 
GO, 
60—02, 
61, 63, 
62—64, 
63—65, 
64—66, 
65, 66, 
66—08, 
67, 08, 
67— 6!i, 
69—71, 
69-71, 
70—72, 
72—74, 
73—75, 
75, 
76, 
76—78, 
77—79, 
79—81, 
80—82, 
82, 
83—85, 



Robert Rusling. 
Pbilip Shoemaker. 
John C. Bennett. 
David Smith. 
William W. Strader. 
Elijah Allen. 
Charles G. Hoagland. 
Silas Young. 
Antlrew J. Fulnier. 
John N. (Uvens. 
Nelson Vllet. 
Absalom B. Pursell. 
Caleb H. Valentine. 
William Silverthorn. 
Valentine Mutchler. 
Joseph Anderson. 
John M. Wyckoff. 
William Carpenter. 
Elias J. Mat-key. 
Silas W. De Witt. 
Coursen H. Albertson. 
William Fritts. 
Robert Bond. 
Stephen C. Larison. 



83—85, Isaac Wildrick. 

80, Thomas L. Titus. 
86, 87, William M. Balrd. 
87—89. Samuel B. Mutchler. 
88—91, Eliphalet Hoover. 
90—92, Daniel W. Hagerty. 
92—94, L. .Milton Wilson. 

93, Richard H. Sheppard. 
94, 95, Samuel V. Davis. 

95, George W. Smith. 
96—98, Alfred L. Flummerfelt. 
96—98, William K. Bowers. 
99—1901, Hiram D. White. 
99—1901, Jacob B. Smith. 

02, William R. I.alre. 
03—05, John A. Wildrick. 
06—08, Joseph 1 1. Firth. 

09, Harry B. Moon. 
10, 11, George B. Cole. 
12, 13, 14, Henry O. Carhart. 
15—18, Alonzo D. Herrick. 
19, 20, Thomas A. Shields. 

21, Harry Runyon. 



LEGISLATIVE OFFICERS. 193 

ASSEMBLY SPEAKERS. 

1703 to 1775. 

* Died in Office. + Resigned. t Expelled. 

1703 — 04, Thomas Gardiner, City of Burlington. . . 

. 04 — OG, Peter Fretwell, City of Burlington. 
07, Samuel Jenings, City of Burlington. 

08 — 09, Thomas Gordon, City of Perth Amboy. 

09 — 14, John Kay, Gloucester. 
16, tDaniel Coxe, Gloucester. 

16 — 19, John Kinsey, Middlesex. 

21—22, 2.5—29, John Johnston, City of Pertli Amboy. 

23 — 24, * William Trent, Burlington. 

30—33, 38, John Kinsey, Jr., Middlesex. 

38—39, Joseph Bonnel, Essex. 

40 — 44, Andrew Johnston. City of Perth Amboy. 

44 — 45, 48 — 51; 59 — 62, Samuel Nevill. City of Perth Amboy. 

46 — 48, 54 — 58, Robert Lawrence, Monmouth. 
51—54, Charles Read, CitT of Burlington. 
63—65, {Robert Ogden, Essex. 

65 — 70, 73 — 75, Courtland Skinner, City of Perth Amboy. 
70 — 72, Stephen Crane, Essex. 



'G to Date 



1776-78— John Hart, Hunterdon. 

Second Session 1778— Caleb Camp, Essex. 

177y —Caleb Camp, Essex. 

1780 — Josiah liornblower, Essex. 

1781 —John Mehelm, Hunterdon. 
1782-83— Ephralm Harris, Cumberland. 
1784 —Daniel Hendrickson, Monmouth. 
1784-86 — Benjamin Van Cleve, Hunterdon. 

1787 —Ephralm Harris. Cumberland. 

1788 —Benjamin Van Cleve, Hunterdon. 

1789 —John Beatty, Middlesex. 
i7yu —Jonathan Dayton, Essex. 

1791 — Ebenezer Elmer, Cumberland. 
1792-94— Silas Condlct, Morris. 

1795 —Ebenezer Elmer, Cumberland. 

1796 — James H. Imlay, Monmouth. 

1797 —Silas Condlct, Morris. 
1798-1800— William Coxe, Burlington. 

1801 —Silas Dickerson, Sussex. 

1802 —William Coxe, Burlington. 

1803 —Peter Gordon, Hunterdon. 
1804-07— James Cox, Monmouth, 
1808-09- Lewis Condlct. Morris. 
1810-11— William Kennedy, Sussex. 

1812 — WMlliam Pearson. Burlington. 

1813 —Ephralm Bateman. Cumberland. 
1814-15— Samuel Pennington, ii.ssex. 

1816 —Charles Clark. Essex. 

1817 —Ebenezer Elmer, Cumberland. 
1818-22— David Thompson. Jr.. Morris. 
1823 —Lucius Q. C. Elmer, Cumberland. 



104 LEGISLATIVE OFFICERS. 

1824 —David Johnston, Hunterdon. 
1825-26— George K. Drake, Morris. 
1827-28— William B. Ewlng, Cumberland. 
1829-31— Alexander Wurts, Hunterdon. 
1832 —John P. Jackson, Essex. 
1833-35— Daniel B. Ryall. Monmouth. 
1836 —Thomas G. Haight, Monmouth 
1837-38— Lewis Condict, Morris. 
1839 • —William Stites, Essex. 
1840-41— John Emley, Burlington. 
1842 —Samuel B. Halsey, Morris. 
1S4S-44 — Joseph Taylor. Cumhprland. 
1845 — Isaac Van Wagenen, Essex. 
1S40 — T.Hwis Howell, Cumberland. 
1847-48 — John W. C. Evans, Burlington. 

1849 — Edw. W. Whelpley, Morris. 

1850 — John T. Nixon. Cumberland. 
IS.'il — John H. Phillips, Mercer. 
ia=i2 —John Huylor, Bergen. 

1853-54 — John W. Fennimore. Burlington. 

1855 — William Parry, Burlington. 

1856 — Thomas W. Demarest, Bergen. 

1857 — Andrew Dutcher, Mercer. 

1858 —Daniel Holsman, Bergen. 

1859 — Edwin Salter, Ocean. 

1860 — Austin H. Patterson, Monmouth. 

1861 — F. H. Teese, Essex. 

1862 — Charles Ilalght, Monmouth. 

1863 —James T. Crowell, Middlesex. 

1864 — Joseph N. Taylor, Passaic. 

1865 —Joseph T. Crowell, Union. 

1806 — John nill, Morris. 

1807 — G. W. N. Curtis. Camden. 
1868 — Aug. O. Evans, Hudson. 
1869-70 — Leon Abbett, Hudson. 

1871 —Albert P. Condlt. Essex. 

1872 — Nathaniel Nlles, Morris. 
1S7.S — Isaac L. Fisher, Middlesex. 

1874 — Garret A. Hobart, Passaic. 

1875 — George O. Vanderbilt, Mercer. 

1876 — John D. Carscallen, Hudson. 

1877 — Rudolph F. Rabe. Hudson. 

1878 — John Egan. Union. 

1879 — Schuyler B. Jackson, Essex. 

1880 — Sherman B. Ovlatt, Monmouth. 
18S1 — Harrison VanDuyne, Essex. 

1882 —John T. Dunn, Union. 

1883 — Thomas O'Connor. Essex. 

1884 — A. B. Stoney, Monmouth. 
1885-86 — E. A. Armstrong, Camden. 

1887 —William M. Balrd. Warren. 

1888 —Samuel D. Dickinson. Hud.'^on. 

1889 — Robert S. Iludsppth. Hudson. 

1890 — W. C. Heppenhelmer. Hudson. 
1891-92 — James J. Borpen, Somerset. 

1893 — Thomas Flynn. Passaic. 

1894 — 'John I. Holt. Passaic; *Joseph Cross, Union. 

1895 — Joseph Cross, Union, 



• Speaker Holt resigned on May 26th, and Mr. Cross succeeded 
him. 



LEGISLATIVE OFFICERS. 195 



1896 — Louis T. Derousse, Camden. 

1897 — George W. Macpherson, Mercer. 
1898-99— **DaTid 0. Watkins, Gloucester. 
1900 — Benjamin F. Jones, Essex. 
1901-02— William J. Bradley, Camden. 
1903 — John G. Horner, Burlington. 
1904-05 — John Boyd Avis, Gloucester. 

1906 — Samuel K. Bobbins, Burlington. 

1907 —Edgar E. Lethbrldge, Essex. 

1908 — Frank B. Jess, Camden. 

1909 —John D. Prince, Passaic. 

1910 —Harry P. Ward, Bergen. 

1911 —Edward Kenny, Hudson. 

1912 —Thomas F. McCran. Passaic. 

1913 — *Leon R. Taylor, Monmouth. 

1914 — Azariah M. Beekman. Somerset. 
191.5 — Carlton Godfrey, Atlantic. 

1916 —Charles C. Pilgrim, Essex. 

1917 — Edward Schoen. Essex. 

1918 —Charles A. Wolverton, Camden. 

1919 — Arthur N. Pierson, Union. 
1020 — W. Irving Glover, Bergon. 
1921 — George S. Hobart, Essex. 
192L — T Harry Rowland. 



** Became Acting Governor, October 18th, 1898, and served to 
January 17th, 1899. 

• Became Acting Governor October 28th. 



196 LEGISLATIVE OFFICERS. 



ASSEMBLY CLERKS. 



1.S45 to Date. 

1845 —Alexander G. Cattell, Salem. 

1846 — Adam C. Davis, Hunterdon. 
1847-rin — Alex. M. Cummliig, Mercer. 
18nl-.52 — David Naar. Essp.x. 
1853-54— David W. Dolllclcpr, Somerset. 
1855 — Peter D. Vronm, Hudson. 
1856-57— William Darnion, Gloucester. 
1858 —Daniel Blanvclt, K-^s.-x. 

18.=i9 — John P. Harker, Camden. 

18(50 — D. Blauvelt, Jr.. Kssex. 

1861-62 — Jacob Sharp, Warren. 

1863-64 — Levi Scobey, Monmouth. 

1865-66 — George B. Cooper, Cumberland. 

1867 — Ed. Jardine, Bergen. 

1868-70 — A. M. Johnston, Mercer. 

1871 — A. M. Gumming, Mercer. 

1872-74 — Sinnlckson Chew, Camden. 

1875 — Austin II. Patterson, Monmouth. 

1876-77 — John Y. Foster, Essex. 

1878 — Austin R. Patterson, Monmouth. 

1879-81— C. O. Cooper, Morris. 

1882-83 — Arthur Wilson, Monmouth. 

1884 — Henry D. Wlnton, Bergen. 

1885-86 — Samuel Toombs, E.ssex. 

1887 — Joseph .\tklnson, Essex. 

1888 — James P. Logan, Burlington. 
1889-90— John J. Matthews, Union. 
1801-92 — Thos. F. Noonan, Jr., Hudson. 
1803 — Leonard Kallsch, Essex. 

1894 —J. Herbert Potts, Hudson. 
1895-97 — James Parker. Passaic. 
1808-99- Thomas IT. Jones, Essex. 
1907 —Michael W. Hlggins, Essex. 
1900-06; 08-09-10 — James Parker, Passaic. 
1911 — Daniel A. Dugan, Essex. 
1012 — T'liton S. Jefferys. Camden. 
101.3-14— Mark F. Phillins. Essex. 
101,->-18, 20-22— Upton S. Jefferys. Camden. 
1919 Edward J. Handley, Essex. 



NEW JERSEY LEGISLATURES. 



107 



NEW JERSEY LEGISLATURES. 



Below Is a record of the length 
meeting and adjournment of, and 
by the various Legislatures since th 
tutlon In 1844: 



of each session, the date oi 
tlie number of laws enacted 
e adoption of the new Constl- 















Joint 












Laws 


Resolu- 


Year. Meeting. 


Adjournment. 


Ivongth. 


enacted 


. tion*. 


184r) — January 


14. 


April 


4, 


12 Weel£3. 


138 


7 


184G— 


13. 


*• 


18. 


14 


114 


15 


1847— " 


12. 


M'ch 


5, 


8 


109 


13 


1848— " 


11. 




9. 


9 


186 


14 


1849— " 


9, 


" 


2. 


8 


136 


12 


1850— 


8. 


" 


8. 


9 


123 


9 


1851— '• 


14. 


" 


19, 


10 


171 


S 


1852— " 


13. 


" 


30, 


11 


213 


9 


1853— 


12. 


'• 


11. 


9 


198 


12 


1854— 


10, 


'• 


17, 


10 


223 


13 


1855— " 


9. 


April 


6, 


13 


258 


6 


1850— -' 


8. 


M'ch 


14. 


10 


180 


11 


1857- " 


13. 


•• 


21, 


10 


223 


2 


1858— " 


12, 


• • 


18, 


10 


215 


8 


1859— 


11. 


• • 


23. 


11 


231 


1 


I860— 


10. 


• • 


22, 


11 


270 


6 


1861— " 


8. 


•• 


15. 


10 •• 


181 


2 


1862— " 


14. 


«' 


28, 


11 


194 


5 


1863— " 


13. 


• » 


25, 


11 


279 


S 


1864 — 


12. 


April 


14. 


14 


440 


7 


1865— 


10. 


«• 


6, 


13 


514 


5 


1866— 


9. 


• « 


6. 


13 •• 


487 


6 


1867— " 


18, 


«• 


12. 


12 " 


480 


12 


1868— " 


14. 


•« 


17. 


14 


566 


11 


1869— 


12, 


• • 


2. 


12 


577 


5 


1870— 


11. 


M'ch 


17, 


10 


532 


6 


1871— " 


10. 


April 


6, 


13 


625 


9 


1872— " 


9, 


•• 


4, 


13 


603 


10 


1873— *' 


14, 


" 


4, 


12 


723 


1 


1874— 


13. 


M'ch 


27, 


11 


534 


1 


1875— " 


12, 


April 


9, 


13 


439 





1876— 


11, 


'• 


21. 


15 


213 


6 


1877— 


9, 


M'ch 


9, 


9 


156 


6 


1878— " 


8. 


April 


5. 


13 


267 


7 


1879— " 


14. 


M'ch 


14, 


9 


209 


S 


1880— " 


13. 


•• 


12. 


9 


224 


4 


1881— 


11, 


• • 


25. 


11 


230 


10 


1882— 


10, 


• • 


31, 


12 


190 


7 


1883— 


9. 


'• 


23. 


11 


208 


6 


18^1— " 


8. 


April 


18, 


15 


225 





1885— " 


13. 


" 


4, 


12 


250 


4 


1886—* " 


12. 


June 


2. 


15 '• 


279 


3 


1887— t " 


11, 


April 


7, 


13 " 


182 


8 



• After a session of 14 weeks the nouse took a recess on April 
16th till June 1st. The Senate continued in session, as a Court 
of Impeachment, till April 22d. when a recess was taken till June 
1st. Dp to the time of taking the recess the Senate and House 
were in session together 14 weeks, and the Senate, by itself, one 
week, 

t The Senate did not organize till February 1st 



108 NEW JEKSEY LEGISLATURES. 















Joint 












Laws 


Resolu- 


Year. Meeting. 


Adjournment. 


Length. 


enacted 


. tionA. 


1888— Jan-y 


10, 


M'ch 


30, 


12 Weeks 


337 


11 


1889— " 


8, 


April 20, 


15 


297 


8 


1890— " 


14, 


May 


23, 


19 


311 


8 


1891— " 


13. 


M'ch 


20, 


10 


285 


6 


1892— " 


12. 


♦• 


11. 


9 


296 


1 


189.S— " 


10. 


•* 


11. 


a " 


292 


2 


1S94— t " 


9, 


Oct. 


2, 


20 


3.54 




1895— § " 


8. 


June 


13', 


13 


434 


8 


189G— " 


14, 


M'ch 


26. 


11 


219 


2 


1897— " 


12, 


" 


31. 


12 


206 




1898— " 


11. 


" 


25, 


11 


242 


2 


1899— " 


10. 


" 


24. 


11 


219 


3 


1900— " 


9. 


" 


23, 


11 


198 


8 


1901 — 


8. 


<< 


22. 


11 


210 


2 


1902— " 


14, 


" 


27. 


11 


279 


4 


1903— •• 


13. 


April 


2. 


12 


273 


3 


1904— " 


12. 


M'ch 


25. 


11 


250 


10 


1905— 


10. 




30. 


12 


270 


6 


1900— 


9. 


April 


12. 


14 


331 


11 


ino7— ' " 


8. 


Oct. 


12. 


40 


290 


8 


1908— " 


14. 


April 


11. 


13 


322 


11 


190O— " 


12. 


" 


10. 


14 


272 


8 


1910— 


11. 


" 


7, 


13 


308 


2 


1911— " 


10. 


" 


21, 


15 


382 


8 


IMIJ— ** " 


n 


" 


10. 


15 


420 


10 


1913— It " 


h; 




3. 


12 


367 


6 


1914— " 


13, 




9 


13 


274 


2 


1915- n " 


12. 


" 


20. 


15 


413 


6 


1916— " 


11, 


M'ch 


29. 


12 


289 


9 


1917— " 


9. 






12 


278 


11' 


1918— " 


8. 


Feb. 


28^ 


8 


290 


5 


1919— t " 


14, 


April 


11, 


13 


261 


9 


1920— 


13, 


Jan'y 
192 


11. 
1, 


52 " 


377 


- 


1921— " 


11, 


ADril 


8, 


13 


351 


7 



t On May 26th a recess Mas taken until October 2d, when the 
Legislature re-assembled, and. without transacting any business, 
adjourned sine die at 3:30 in the afternoon. 

§ On March 22d. a recess was taken until June 4th, when the 
Legislature ro-assembled. and, remaining In session two weeks, 
adjourned sine die on June 13th. 

" This Legislature was in continuous session 14 weeks, and on 
April 12 adjourned to June 18. Then there was another ad- 
journment, and subsequently frequent recesses were taken until 
final adjournment. 

** This Legislature was in session until March 29th, then took a 
recess to April 10th, and on April 11th took a recess to April 16th 
and then adjourned sine die. 

tt First sjieoial session. May 6th to 26th. Laws enacted, 22. 

tt Second s|)e(ial session. August 5th to 12th. Laws enacted, 2. 

j± Special ses.sinn. May 3d. Laws enacted. 2. 
t House did not organize until February lOtii. 



NEW JERSEY LEGISLATURES. 



109 



POLITICAL COMPLEXION OF NEW JER- 
SEY'S LEGISLATURES. 



(From 1845 to date.) 



12 Whigs; 


7 Dems. 


House, 


80 Whigs; 


27 Dems.; 


can. 
12 Whigs; 


7 Dems. 


House, 


40 Whigs; 


18 Dems. 


12 Whigs; 


7 Dems. 


House, 


38 Whigs; 


20 Dems. 


12 Whigs; 


7 Dems. 


House, 


39 Whigs; 


19 Dems. 


10 Whigs; 


9 Dems. 


House, 


33 Whigs; 


25 Dems. 


9 Whigs; 


11 Dems. 


House, 


25 Whigs; 


35 Dems. 


10 Whigs; 


10 Dems. 


House, 


, 28 Whigs; 


; 30 Dems. 


13 Dems.; 


7 Whigs. 


House, 


45 Dems.; 


15 Whigs. 


13 Dems.; 


7 Whigs. 


House, 


39 Dems.; 


21 Whlg8, 


13 Dems.; 


7 Whigs. 


House, 


40 Dems.; 


20 Whigs. 


10 Dems.; 


9 Whigs; 


1 Native America 


n. House, 



1845 — Senate, 
1 Native Amer 
1846— Senate, 
1847— Senate, 
1848 — Senate, 
1849— Senate, 
1850— Senate, 
1851 — Senate, 
1852 — Senate, 
1853— Senate, 
1854 — Senate, 
1855 — Senate, 

29 Dems.; 25 Whigs; 6 Native American. 
1856 — Senate, 11 Dems.; 5 Whigs; 4 Native American. 

30 Dems.; 14 Whigs; 1 Ind. Dera.; 15 Native American. 
1857 — Senate, 11 Dems.; Whigs; 3 Know Nothings. 

38 Dems.; combined opposition, 22. 

1858 — Both Houses Democratic. 

1859 — Senate, Democratic. House, Opposition. 

I860— Senate, Democratic. House, 30 Dems.; 28 Reps.; 
lean. 

1861— Senate, 

1862 — Senate, 



House, 
House, 



2 Amer- 



Republican. House, Democratic. 
Democrats and Republicans, tie; Independent, 1. 
House, Democratic. Democratic majority on joint ballot, 3. 

1863-64 — Both Houses Democratic. 

1865 — Senate, Democratic. House, a tie. 

1866-67— Both Houses Republican. 

1868-69-70 — Both Houses Democratic. 

1871-72-73 — Both Houses Republican. 

1874 — Senate, 14 Republicans; 7 Democrats. House, 32 Repub- 
licans; 28 Democrats. 

1875 — Senate, 13 Republicans; 8 Democrats. House. 41 Demo 
crats: 19 Republicans. 

1876 — Both Houses Republican. 

1877 — Senate, 11 Democrats; 10 Republicans. House, a tie. 

1878 — Both Houses Democratic. 

1879-80-81— Both Houses Republican. 

1882 — Senate, Republican. House, Democratic. 

1883— Senate, 12 Republicans; 9 Democrats. House, 35 Demo- 
crats; 25 Republicans. 

1884 — Senate, Republican. House, Democratic. 

1885 — Both Houses Republican. 

1886 — Both Houses Republican. 

1887 — Senate, 12 Republicans; 9 Democrats, House, 32 Demo- 
crats, 26 Republicans; 2 Labor Democrats. 

1888 — Senate, 12 Republicans; 9 Democrats. House, 87 Repub- 
licans: 23 Democrats. 

1889 — Senate, 11 Democrats; 10 Republicans. House, 32 Dem- 
ocrats; 28 Republicans. 

1890— Senate, 11 Republicans; 10 Democrats. House, 37 Demo- 
crats; 23 Republicans. 



200 



NEW JEIiSEr LEGISLATURES. 



Republicans, 

Republicans, 

Republicans. 

Democrats. 



Democrats 
Democrats, 



1891 — Senate, 14 Democrats; 
crats; 20 Republicans. 

1892 — Senate, 16 Democrats- 
crats; 18 Republicans. 

1893 — Senate, IG Democrats; 
crats: 21 Republicans 

1894 — Senate, 11 Republicans; 10 
Ucans; 20 Democrats; 1 Ind. Dem. 

1895 — Senate, 16 Republicans; 5 Democrats, 
llcans; 6 Democrats. 

1896— Senate, 18 Republicans; 3 Democrats, 
llcans; 16 Democrats; 1 Ind. Dem. 

1897 — Senate, 18 Republicans; 3 Democrats, 
licans; 4 Democrats. 

1898-99— Senate, 14 Republicans; 
publicans; 23 Democrats. 

1900— Senate, 14 Republicans; 7 
Ucans; 16 Democrats; 1 vacancr. 

1901— Senate, 17 Republicans;" 4 
llcans: 15 Democrats. 

1902— Senate, 17 Republicans; 4 
llcans; 14 Democrats. 

1903-4— Senate, 14 Republicans; 7 Democrats 
llcans; 22 Democrats. 

190"o — Senate, 14 Republicans; 7 Democrats, 
llcans; 14 Democrats. 

1906— Senate, 17 Republicans; 4 
llcans; 1 Ind. Rep.; 3 Democrats. 

1907 — Senate, 15 Republicans; 6 Democrats 
crats; 29 Republicans. 

1908 — Senate, 14 Republicans; 7 
llcans; 20 Democrats. 

1909 — Senate, 13 Republicans; 8 Democrats, 
llcans; 15 Democrats. 

1910 — Senate, 15 Republicans; 6 Democrats, 
llcans; 19 Democrats. 

1911 — Senate, 12 Republicans; 9 Democrats, 
llcans; 42 Democrats. 

1912 — Senate, 11 Republicans; 10 Democrats, 
llcans; 23 Democrats. 

1913 — Senate, 12 Democrats; 9 Republicans, 
crats; 8 Republicans; one vacancy. 

1914 — Senate, 11 Democrats; 10 Republicans, 
crats: 23 Repuhllcans. 

1915 — Senate, 11 Republicans; 10 Democrats, 
llcans: 22 Demorrats. 

1916 — Senate, 13 Republicans: 8 Democrats, 
llcans; 20 Democrats. 

1917 — Senate, 15 Republicans; 
llcans: 16 Democrats. 

1918 — Senate, 15 Republicans; 
Ucans: 14 Democrats. 

1919 — Senate. 14 Republicans: 
30 Republicans: 30 Democrats. 
1920 — Senate, 15 Republicans; 
licans; 27 Democrats. 

1921 — Senate. 15 Republicans; 
licans: 1 Democrat. One vacancy 

1922 — Senate. 16 Republicans: 
licans; 15 Democrats. 



House, 40 Demo- 
House, 42 Demo- 
House, 39 Demo- 
House, 39 Repub- 
House, 54 Repub- 
House, 43 Repub- 
House, 56 Repub- 
7 Democrats. House, 37 Re- 
Democrats. House, 43 Repub- 
House, 



House, 



Democrats. House 



Democrats. House 



6 Democrats. 
6 Democrats. 
6 Democrats: 
6 Democrats. 
6 Democrats. 



Democrats. House 



45 Repub- 

46 Repub- 
House, 38 Repub- 

House, 46 Repub- 
56 Repub- 
House, 31 Demo- 
40 Repub- 
House, 45 Repub- 
House, 41 Repub- 
House, IS Repub- 
House, 37 Repub- 
House, 51 Demo- 
House, 37 Demo- 
House, 38 Repub- 
House, 40 Repub- 
House 44 Repub- 
House, 46 Repub- 
1 vacancy. House, 
House, 33 Repub- 
House, 58 Repub- 
45 Repub- 



EXTRA SESSIONS. 201 



EXTRA SESSIONS OF THE LEGISLATURE AND 
SPECIAL, SESSIONS OF THE SENATE. 

1861— An extra session of the Legislature was convened on 
April 30th, and adjourned on May 10th, 1861, called in 
obedience to Govemor Olden's proclamation, to raise 
troops for the war. Laws enacted, 13; Joint Reso- 
lutions, 2. 

1866 — A special session of the Legislature was called 
by Governor Marcus L. Ward for the purpose of 
ratifying the Fourteenth Amendment to the 
Federal Constitution. It met on September 10, 
ratified the amendment and adjourned Septem- 
ber 19. The Governor in his proclamation called 
attention to a vacancy in New Jersey's repre- 
sentation in the United States Senate. 

1877— A special session of the Senate was convened in 1877, 
for the purpose of acting on the Governor's nomina- 
tions of District Court Judges. It met on March 28th 
and adjourned on March 30th. 

1884— A special session of the Senate was convened in 1884, 
to act on the Governor's nominations for members of 
the State Board of Assessors. It met on April 23d 
and lasted two hours. 

1897— An extra session of the Legislature was called on 
May 25th, 1897, to correct an error In a law providing 
for the submission to the people of proposed amend- 
ments to the Constitution. The session met at noon 
and adjourned sine die the same day at 6:47 P. M. 

1903— An extra session of the Legislature was convened 
April 21st, 1903, to correct an error In the "Passaic 
Valley Sewerage District act" of 1903. The session 
lasted about five hours and a final adjournment was 
effected on the same day. 

1903— Another extra session of the Legislature was con- 
vened on October 15th, 1903, to pass an act to estab- 
lish a sj'stem of public Instruction to take the place 
of an act of March 26th, 1902, which had been declared 
unconstitutional by the Court of Errors and Appeals. 
The session covered four days, and a final adjourn- 
ment was effected on October 19th. The action of 
the Legislature was confined to the subject for which 
It was convened In extraordinary session. 



202 EXTRA SESSIONS. I 

1904— An extra session of the Legislature was convened on 
April 12th to consider the report of the Morris Canal 
Commission and the bill to prevent the shooting of 
pigeons from traps. The session was adjourned on 
the night of the same day, after having passed four 
bills which became laws. 
1908— A special session of the Senate was convened on 
Friday, May 8th, to act on nominations by the 
Governor. It lasted only a few hours, when there 
was a final adjournment. 
1913 — An extra session of the Legislature was convened 
on May 6th to consider a new jury system, pro- 
posed constitutional convention and small board 
government for counties. After several recesses 
a final adjournment occurred on May 26th. Laws 
enacted, 22. 
1913 — Another extra session of the Legislature con- 
vened on August 5th to consider questions relat- 
ing to Jersey City commission government, and a 
final adjournment occurred on August 12th. 
Laws enacted, 2. 
1914 — A special session of the Senate was convened 
on April 24th to act on nominations by the 
Governor. It lasted only three quarters of an 
hour when there was a final adjournment. 
1915 — An extra session of the Legislature was con- 
vened on May 3d to correct errors in a law pro- 
viding for a special election to consider proposed 
amendments to the State Constitution. The ses- 
sion lasted ten hours and was adjourned the 
same day. Laws enacted, 2. 
1916 — A special session of the Senate was held on 
June 27th to act on nominations by the Gover- 
nor. It lasted about an hour wlien there was a 
final adjournment. 

1920 — The Senate during recesses of the Legislature held 
three special sessions to consider Gul)ernatorial nom- 
inations. These were held July 27, December 30, 
1920, and January 5, 1921. 

1921 — Special session of the Senate, June 7, to confirm 
nominations by the Governor. 



TUB JUDICIARY. 203 

THE JUDICIARY. 

(From 1704 to date.) 



CHANCELLORS. 
1710, Andrew Hunter; 1719, William Burnet ; 1728, John 
Montgomery; 1731, Lewis Morris; 1732, William Cosby 
1732, John Anderson ; 1732, John Hamilton ; 1738, Lewis 
Morris; 1746, John Hamilton; 1747, John Reading; 1747 
Jonathan Belcher ; 1757, John Reading ; 1758, Francis Ber 
nard ; 1760, Thomas Boone ; 1761, Josiah Hardy ; 1762 
William Franklin; 1776, William Livingston; 1790, Wil 
liam Paterson ; 1793, Richard Howell ; 1801, Joseph Bloom 
field; 1802, John Lambert; 1803, Joseph Bloomfield ; 1812 
Aaron Ogden ; 1813, William S. Pennington ; 1815, Mah 
Ion Dickerson ; 1817, Isaac H. Williamson ; 1829, Garret 
D. Wall (declined); 1829, Peter D. Vroom ; 1832, Samuel 
L. Southard; 1833, Ellas P. Seely ; 1833, Peter D. Vxoom ; 
1836, Philemon Dickerson ; 1837, William Pennington ; 
1843, Daniel Haines; 1845, Oliver S. Halsted ; 1852-59, Ben- 
jamin Williamson ; *1860, Henry W. Green ; 1866, Abraham 
O. Zabriskie ; 1873, Theodore Runyon ; 1887, Alexander T. 
McGill; 1900, William J. Magie ; 1908, Mahlon Pitney; 
1912, Edwin Robert Walker. 

VICE-CHANCELLORS. 

Note. The number of Vice-Chancellors in New Jersey 
has been increased from time to time from one in 1871, wnen 
the office was first enacted, to eight at present. 

1871-'75, 1881-'82, Amzi Dodd ; 187o-'94, Abraham V. 
Van Fleet; 1882-'y6, John T. Bird; 1889-'07, Henry C. 
Pitney ; 1890-'95, Robert S. Green ; 1895-'15, John R. 
Emery ; 1893-'04, Alfred Reed ; 1896-'19, Frederic W. Ste- 
vens ; 189G-'06, Martin P. Grey ; 1901 , Eugene Steven- 
son ; 1004-'07, James J. Bergen ; 1904-'13, Lindley M. 

Garrison ; 1906 , Edmund B. Leaming ; 1907-'12, Edwin 

II. Walker ; 1907-'16, James E. Howell ; 1912 , Vivian 

M. Lewis ; 1913 , John H. Backes ; 1913 , John 

Griffin ; 1916-'19, Merritt Lane ; 1916 , John E. Foster ; 

1919 , Malcolm G. Buchanan ; 1919 , James F. 

Fielder. 

CHIEF JUSTICES. 
1704, Roger Mompesson ; 1709, Thomas Gordon; 1710, 
David Jamison ; 1723, William Trent ; 1724, Robert Lettlce 

Hooper; 1728, Thomas Farmer; 1729, Robert Lettice 
Hooper ; 1738, Robert Hunter Morris ; 1758, William 
Aynsley ; 1761, Robert Hunter Morris ; 1764, Charles 



*There was a vacancy in the cbauccllorsbip from March, 
1859, to March 15, 1860. 



204 THE JUDICIARY. 

Road ; 1764, Frederick Smyth ; 1776, Richard Stockton 
(declined) ; 1776, John De Hart (declined) ; 1777, Robert 
Morris ; 1779, David Brearley ; 1789, James Kinsey ; 
1803, Andrew Kirkpatrick ; 1824, Charles Ewing ; 1832, 
Joseph C. Hornblower; 1846-53, Henry W. Green; 1853, 
Peter D. Vroom (declined) ; 1853, Alexander Wurts (de- 
clined) ; 1853-60, Henry W. Green ; *1861, Edward W. 
Whelpley ; 1864, Mercer Beasley ; 1897, William J. Magie ; 
1900, David A. Depue ; 1901, William S. Gummere. 

ASSOCIATE JUSTICES OF THE SUPREIME COURT. 

1704, William Plnhome ; 1705, William Sandford ; 1705, 
Andrew Bowne ; 1706, Daniel Coxe ; 1708, Thomas Revel ; 
1708, Daniel Leeds; 1710, Peter Sonmans ; 1710, Hugh 
Huddy ; 1711, Lewis Morris ; 1711, Thomas Farmer ; 1721, 
Peter Bard; 1734, Daniel Coxe; 1735, John Hamilton; 
1739, Joseph Bonnel ; 1739, John Allen; 1748, Samuel Ne- 
vil ; 1749, Charles Read ; 1754, Richard Salter ; 1764, John 
Berrien ; 1772, David Ogden ; 1774, Richard Stockton ; 

1776, Samuel Tucker ; 1776, Francis Hopkinson (declined) ; 

1777, Isaac Smith; 1777, John Cleves Symmes ; 1788, John 
Chetwood; 1797, Andrew Kirkpatrick; 1798, Elisha Boudi- 
not; 1804, William S. Pennington; 1804, William Rossell ; 
1813, Mahlon Dickerson ; 1815, Samuel L. Southard; 1820, 
Gabriel H. Ford; 1826, George K. Drake; 1834, Thomas C. 
Ryerson; 1838, John Moore White; 1838, William L. Day- 
ton ; 1838, James S. Nevius ; 1841, Daniel Elmer ; 1841, 
Ira C. Whitehead ; 1845, Thomas P. Carpenter ; 1845, Joseph 
F. Randolph ; 1845, James S. Nevius ; 1848, Ellas B. D. Og- 
den ; 1852, Lucius Q. C. Elmer ; 1852, Stacy G. Potts ; 1852, 
Daniel Haines; 1855, Peter Vredenburgh ; 1855, Martin 
Ryerson; 1855, Elias B. D. Ogden; 1858, Edward W. Whelp- 
ley ; 1859, Daniel Haines ; 1859, William S. Clawson ; 1859, 
John Vandyke ; 1861, George H. Brown ; 1861, L. Q. C. El- 
mer ; 1862, Peter Vredenburgh; 1862, L, Q. C. Elmer; 1862, 
Ellas B. D. Ogden ; 1865, Joseph D. Bedle ; 1866, Vancleve 
Dalrimple; 1866, George S. Woodhull ; 1866 to 1901, David 
A, Depue ; 1869, '76, '83, '90, '97 and 1904, Bennet Van 
Syckel ; 1869, '76, 'S3 and '90, Edward W. Scudder ; 1875, 
'82 and '89, Manning M. Knapp ; 1875 to 1906, Jonathan 
Dixon; 1875 to '95, 1904 to '11, Alfred Reed; 1880 to 1888, 
Joel Parker; 1880 to 1897, William J. Magie; 1888 to 1920, 
Charles G. Garrison ; 1892, George T. Werts ; 1893 and 
1900, Job H. Lippincott; 1893 to 1895, Leon Abbett ; 1895 
to 1901, William S. Gummere ; 1895 to 1901, George C. 
Ludlow; 1897 to 1903, Gilbert Collins; 1900 to '07, John 
Franklin Fort ; 1900 and '07, Abram Q. Garretson ; 1901-'08, 
Charles E. Hendrickson ; 1901 and '08. Mahlon Pitney ; 1903 
to , Francis J. Swayze ; 1906 , Thomas W. 



*Tbere was a vacancy in the Chief Justiceship from 
March 15, 1860, to January 21, 1861. 



THE JUDICIARY. 205 

Trencliard ; 1907 , Charles W. Parker ; 1907 , 

James J. Bergen ; 1908 to '14, Willard P. Voorliees ; 1908 

, James F. Minturn ; 1911 , Samuel Kaliscli ; 1914 

, Charles C. Black ; 1920 , Frank S. Katzenbach, Jr. 

COURT OF ERRORS AND APPEALS— JUDGES. 
1845, Joshua Brick ; 1845-'48, Aaron Robertson ; 1845-'49, 
Jonathan J. Spencer ; 1845-'51, James Speer ; 1845-'52, 
Joseph Porter; 1845-'53, Ferdinand S. Schenk ; 1846-'50, 
Thomas Sinnickson ; 1848-'51, Robert H. McCarter ; 1849- 
'50, Garret D. Wall; 1850-'63, Joseph L. Risley ; 1851-'57, 
Moses Wills ; 1851-'60, Caleb H. Valentine ; 1851-'67, John 
M. Cornelison ; 1852-'58, Thomas Arrowsmith ; 1853-'57, 
John Huyler ; 1857-'63, Joshua Swain ; 1857-'65, William N. 
Wood; 1858-'64, Joseph L. Combs; 1860-'72, Robert S. 
Kennedj^ ; 1863-'68, George F. Fort ; 1863-'81, Edmund L. 
B. Wales ; 1864-'94, John Clement ; 1865-'71, George Vail ; 
1867-'73, James L. Ogden ; 1868-'73, Charles S. Olden : 
1871-'82, Francis S. Lathrop ; 1872-'82, Amzi Dodd ; 1873- 
'80, Samuel Lilly; 1873-'85, Caleb S. Green; 1880-'91, 
Martin Cole ; 1881-'93, Jonathan Whitaker ; 1882-'84, Wil- 
liam Kirk ; 1882-'89, William Paterson ; 1884-'96, Hendrick 
H. Brown ; 1885-'90, John McGregor ; 1889-'95, Abram Q. 
Smith ; 1891-1903, Gotfried Krueger ; 1891-1915, John W. 
Bogert; 1893-'94, William Walter Phelps; 1894-'95, Robert 
S. Green ; 1894-'96, Clifford Stanley Sims ; 1895-'96, Al- 
bert R. Talman ; 1895-'96, George T. Smith ; 1896-'97, John 
S. Barkalow ; 1896-'97, William L. Dayton ; 1896-1900, James 
H. Nixon ; 1896-1901, Charles E. Hendrickson ; 1897-1903, 
Frederick Adams ; 1897-1916, William H, Vredenburgh ; 1900- 
'05, Peter Van Voorhees ; 1901-'13, G; D. W. Vroom ; 
1903-'10, George R. Gray ; 1903-'09, Elmer Ewing Green ; 
1905-'10, James B. Dill; 1909-'14, Joseph W. Congdon ; 

1910-'12, Mark A. Sullivan; 1911 , John J. White; 

1912-'13, John J. Treacy ; 1913-'19, Henry S. Terhune ; 

1913 , Ernest J. Heppenheimer ; 1914 , Robert 

Williams; 1915-'21, Frank M. Taylor; 1916 , Walter P. 

Gardner ; 1919 , Henry E. Ackerson ; 1921 , George 

VanBuskirk. 

CIRCUIT COURT JUDGES. 
1893-1900, Richard T. Miller; 1893-1900, Francis Child; 
1896-1903, Henry M. Nevius ; 1900-'03, James H. Nixon ; 
1900-'03, Francis J. Swayze ; 1903-'07, Charles W. Parker; 
1903-'ll, Allen B. Endicott ; 1903-'19, Frederic Adams; 
1904-'ll, Wilbur A. Heisley ; 1906-'14, Benjamin A. Vail ; 

1906 , Frank T. Lloyd; 1907-'08, James F. Minturn; 

1907 , William H. Spear; 1908-'14, Charles C. Black; 

1911-'13, Clarence L. Cole; 1911 — — , Nelson Y. Dungan ; 

1913-'20, Howard Carrow ; 1914 , Luther Campbell; 

1914 , George S. Silzer ; 1916 , Willard W. Cutler ; 

1919 ^ Worral F. Mountain ; 1920 , Ralph W. E. 

Donges. 



206 STATE OFFICERS. 



STATE OFFICERS. 

(From 1776 to date.) 



SECRETARIES OF STATE. 

1776, Charles Pettit (resigned October 7th. 1778) ; 1778, 
Bowes Reed ; 1794, Samuel W. Stockton ; 1795, John Beatty ; 
1805, James Linn ; 1820, Daniel Coleman ; 1830, James D. 
Westcott ; 1840. Charles G. McChesney ; 1851, Thomas S. 
Allison ; 1861, Whitfield S. Johnson ; 1866, Horace N. Con- 
gar ; 1870, Henry C. Kelsey ; 1897, George Wurts ; 1902, 
Samuel D, Dickinson ; 1912, David S. Crater ; 1915, Thomas 
F. Martin. 

STATE COMPTROLLERS. 

1865, William K. McDonald; 1871, Albert L. Runyon ; 
1877, Robert F. Stockton ; 1880, Edward J. Anderson ; 1891. 
William C. Heppenhoimer ; 1894, William S. Hancock ; 1902, 
J. Willard Morgan; 1908, Harry J. West; 1911, Edward I. 
Edwards; 1917, Newton A. K. Bugbee. 

STATE TREASURERS. 

1776, Richard Smith (resigned February 15th, 1777) ; 
1777, John Stevens, Jr. ; 1783, John Schureman (declined) ; 
1783, James Mott ; 1799, James Salter; 1803, Peter Gor- 
don; 1821, Charles Parker; 1832, William Grant; 1833, 
Charles Parker; 1836, Jacob Kline; 1837, Isaac Southard; 
1843, Thomas Arrowsmith ; 1845, Stacy A. Paxson ; 1847, 
Samuel S. Stryker ; 1848, Samuel Mairs ; 1851, Rescarrick 
M. Smith; 1865, David Naar ; 1866, Howard Ivins ; 1868, 
William P. McMichael ; 1871, Josephus Sooy, Jr. ; 1875, 
Gershom Mott ; 1876, George M. Wright ; 1885, Jonathan 
H. Blackwell ; 1885, John J. Toffey ; 1891, George R. Gray ; 
1894, George B. Swain ; 1902. Frank O. Briggs ; 1907, 
Daniel S. Voorhees; 1913, Edward B. Grosscup ; 1916, 
William T, Read. 

ATTORNEYS-GENERAL. 

1704, Alexander Griffith; 1714, Thomas Gordon; 1719. Jere- 
miah Basse; 1723, James Alexander; 1728, Lawrence Smith; 
1733. Joseph Warrel; 1754. Cortland Skinner; 1776. William 
Paterson; 1783. Joseph Bloomfleld; 1792. Aaron D. Woodruff; 
1811. Andrew S. Hunter; 1817. Theodore Frelinghuysen; 1829. 
Samuel L. Southard; 1833. John Moore White; 1838. Richard 
S. Field; 1841. George P. Mollesson; 1844. Richard P. Thomp- 
son; 1845. Abraham Browning: 1850. Lucius Q. C. Elmer; 
1852. Richard P. Thompson; 1857, William L. Dayton; 1861. 
F. T. Frelinghuysen; 1867. George M. Robeson; 1870, Robert 



STATE OFFICERS. 207 

Gilchrist: 1875, Joel Parker; 1875, Jacob Vanatta; 1877. John 
P. Stockton; 1897, Samuel H. Grey; 1902, Thomas N. McCar- 

ter; 19U3, Robert H. McCarter; 1908. Edmund Wilson; 
1914, John W. Wescott; 1919, Thomas F. McCran. 

CLERKS IN CHANCERY. 

1831, Stacy G. Potts; 1840, Samuel R. Gummere; 1847, 
Joseph Scattergood; 1851, Daniel B. Bodine; 1856, Wil- 
liam M. Babbitt; 1861, Barker Gummere; 1871, Henry 
S. Little; 1881, George S. Duryee; 1886, Allan L. Mc- 
Dermott; 1896, Lewis A. Thompson; 1901, Edward C. 
Stokes; 1905, Vivian M. Lewis; 1909, Samuel K. Rob- 
bins; 1914, Robert H. McAdams; 1919, Jesse R. Salmon. 

CLERKS OF SUPREME COURT. 

1776, Jonathan D. Sergeant (declined); 1776, Bowes Reed; 
1781, William C. Houston; 1788. Richard Howell; 1793, Jona- 
than Rhea; 1807, William Hyer; 1812, Garret D. Wall; 1817, 
Zacharlah Rossell; 1842, Ell Morris; 1842, James Wilson; 
1852, William M. Force; 1857, Charles P. Smith: 1872. Benja- 
min F. Lee; 1897, William Riker, Jr.; 1912, Joseph P. 
Tumulty; 1913, William C. Gebhardt; 1918, Enoch L. 
Johnson. 

ADJUTANTS-GENERAL. 

1776, William Bott ; 1793, Anthony Walton White; 1803, 
John Morgan ; 1804, Ebenezer Elmer ; 1804, Peter Hunt ; 
1810, James J. Wilson ; 1812, John Beatty ; 1814, James J- 
Wilson ; 1814, Charles Gordon ; 1816, Zachariah Rossell ; 
1842, Thomas Cadwallader ; 1858, Robert F. Stockton, Jr. ; 
1867, William S. Stryker ; 1900, Alexander C. Oliphant ; 
1902, R. Heber Breintnall; 1909, Wilbur F. Sadler, Jr. 
(Died Nov. 10th, 1916); 1916-17, Charles W. Barber; 
1917, Frederick Gilkyson, 

QUARTERMASTERS-GENERAL. 

[The office of Quartermaster-General of New Jersey 
was established by an act of the Legislature, approved 
March 11th, 1806.] 

1807-1814, Jonathan Rhea; 1814, Charles Gordon; 
1814-1821, Ellet Tucker; 1821-1824, James J. Wilson; 
1824-1837, Garret D. Wall; 1837-1855, Samuel R. Hamil- 
ton; 1855-1889, Lewis Perrine; 1890-1905, Richard A. 
Donnelly; 1905 — C. Edward Murray. 

[General Lewis Perrine died in 1889 and the vacancy 
was filed by Adjutant-General Stryker until the ap- 
pointment of General Donnelly. General Donnelly died 
February 27th, 1905.] 



208 STATE OFFICERS. 

STATE LIBRARIANS. 

1822, William L. Prall; 1823 to '28, Charles Parker; 
1829 to '33, William Boswell; 1833 to '36, Peter For- 
man; 1837 to '42, Charles C. Yard; 1843 to '45, Peter 
Forman; 1845 to '52, William D'Hart; 1852 to '53, Syl- 
vester Vansickle; 1853 to '66, Charles J. Ihrie; 1866 to 
'69, Clarence J. Mulford; 1869 to '71, Jeremiah Dally; 
1872 to '83, James S. McDanolds; 1884 to '99, Morris R. 
Hamilton; 1899 to 1914, Henry C. Buchanan; 1914 to 
1919, John P. Dullard; 1919 to — — , Francis E. Croas- 
dalc. 

STATE PRISON KEEPERS. 

William Crooks; 1811, Henry Bellerjeau; 1822, Francis 
Labaw; 1829, Ephraim Ryno; 1830, Thomas M. Perrine; 
1836, Joseph A. Yard; 1839, John Voorhees; 1841, Jacob 
B, Gaddis; 1843, Joseph A. Yard; 1845, Jacob B. Gaddis; 
1851, William B. Vanderveer; 1857, Robert P. Stoll; 
1862, T. V. D. Hoag-land; 1863, Joseph B. Walker; 1866, 
Peter P. Robinson; 1868, George A. Walker; 1869, 
David D. Hennion; 1871, Robert H. Howell; 1873, 
Charles Wilson; 1876, Gershom Mott; 1881, P. H. Lav- 
erty; 1886, John H. Patterson; 1896, Samuel S. Moore; 
1902, George O. Osborne; 1912, Thomas B. Madden; 
1916, Richard P. Hughes; 1917-'22, James H. Mulheron. 



COUNTIES— WHEN AND HOW CREATED. 209 

COUNTIES— WHEN AND HOW 
CREATED. 



Atlantic. 1837. Taken from Gloucester. 

Bergen. 1682. One of! original four counties of East 
Jersey. Portion of Hudson re-annexed 1852. 

Burlington. 1694. Portions of Atlantic and Camden an- 
nexed 1902. 

Camden. 1844. Taken from Gloucester. 

Cape May. 1692. Portions of Cumberland annexed 1878, 
1880, 1891. 

Cumberland. 1748. Taken from Salem. 

Essex. 1682. One of original four counties of East Jer- 
sey. 

Gloucester. 1694. Part of Camden re-annexed 1871. 

Hudson. 1840. Taken from Bergen. 

Hunterdon. 1714. Taken from Burlington. 

Mercer. 1838. Taken from Hunterdon, Middlesex, Bur- 
lington and Somerset. Another portion of Hunterdon an- 
nexed 1839. 

Middlesex. 1682. One of original four counties of East 
Jersey. 

Monmouth. 1682. One of original four counties of East 
Jersey. 

Morris. 1739. Taken from Hunterdon. 

Ocean. 1850. Taken ftrom Monmouth. Portion of Bur- 
lington annexed 1891. 

Passaic. 1837. Taken from Bergen and Essex. 

Salem. 1694. 

Somerset. 1688. Taken from Middlesex. Portion of 
Essex annexed 1741. Another portion of Middlesex an- 
nexed 1858. 

Sussex. 1753. Taken from Morris. 

Union. 1857. Taken from Essex. 

Warren. 1824. Taken from Sussex. 



210 TIME OF HOLDING COURTS. 



TIME OF HOLDING COURTS. 

The Court of Chancery — No stated terms. 

The Supreme Court meets on the third Tuesday in Feb- 
ruary, the fli'st Tuesday in June and the first Tuesday in 
November. 

The Court o£ Errors and Appeals meets on the first 
Tuesday in March, the third Tuesday in June and the third 
Tuesday in November. 

The Court of Pardons meets on the first Tuesday in 
March, the third Tuesday in June and the third Tuesday 
in November. 

For time of holding county courts, see County Directory, 

The United States District Court meets at Newark on the 
first Tuesdays in April and November, and at Ti'enton on 
the third Tuesday in January and second Tuesday in Sep- 
tember each year. 

United States Court of Appeals (Third District) meets 
first Tuesday in March and the first Tuesday in October in 
Philadelphia. 

CIRCUITS OF NEW JERSEY. 

The Supreme Court Circuits of New Jersey are divided 
as follows : 

1st District — Cape May, Cumberland, Salem and Atlantic, 
Justice Black. 

2d District — Gloucester and Camden. Justice Katzen- 
bach. 

3d District — Monmouth, Burlington and Ocean. Justice 
Kalisch. 

4tli District — Mercer, Hunterdon and Warren. Justice 
Trencbard. 

5th District — Middlesex and Union. Justice Bergen, 

6th District — Somerset, Morris and Bergen, Justice 
Parker. 

7th District — Essex, Chief Justice Gummere, 

8th District — Hudson. Justice Swayze. 

9th District — Passaic and Sussex. Justice Minturn, 

CIRCUIT COURT JUDGES' ASSIGNMENTS, 

Judge Donges — Atlantic, Burlington, Cape May, Glouces- 
ter, Salem and Cumberland. 

Judge Silzer — Passaic, Somerset, Sussex, Union and War- 
ren. 

Judge Lloyd — Camden, Ocean, Mercer and Middlesex, 

Judge Mountain — Essex. 

Judge Dungan — Essex. 

Judge Campbell — Hudson, 

Judge Speer — Hudson. 

Judge Cutler — Essex, Bergen, Hudson, Hunterdon, Morris 
and Monmouth, 



SUMMARY OF AI'PR* »rRIATION LAWS. 211 

SUMMARY OF APPROPRIATION 
LAWS 



statement of the annual and supplemental la\YS for tlio 
fiscal year from 1896 to date. 

Previous to 1918 the fiscal year ended October 31st, but in 
the latter year the Legislature changed it so that it now 
ends on June 30th. 

The annual bill in each instance is enacted by the Legis- 
lature of the preceding year and becomes operative on July 
1st of the same year. At the time the fiscal year was 
changed the previous method ofi having passed a supple- 
mental bill was abandoned and any additional appropria- 
tions which might be needed by the various departments and 
institutions are provided by the State House Commission 
through what is known as the Emergency Fund. 

1896. 

Annual $1,954,829 32 

Supplemental 287,885 53 

$2,242,714 85 

1897. 

Annual $2,273,371 32 

Supplemental 126,561 64 

$2,399,932 96 

1898 

Annual $2,139,934 32 

Supplemental 234,928 99 

$2,374,863 31 

1899. 

Annual $2,199,867 32 

Supplemental 554,521 49 

$2,754,388 81 

1900. 

Annual $2,434,096 23 

Supplemental 349,254 55 

$2,783,350 78 

1901. 

Annual ' $2,234,940 32 

Supplemental 1,219,319 20 

$3,454,259 52 

1902. 

Annual $3,255,269 32 

Supplemental 715.219 75 

$3,970,489 07 

1903. 

Annual $3,551,749 32 

Supplemental 1,001,056 25 

$4,552,805 57 



212 SUMMARY OF APPROPRIATION LAWS. 

1904. 

Annual $3,853,800 98 

Supplemental 1,038,464 93 

■ $4,892,205 91 

1905. 

Annual $4,188,215 65 

Supplemental 1,075,526 21 

$5,263,741 86 

1906. 

Annual $4,301,733 57 

Supplemental I,uy8,342 03 

$5,400,075 60 

1907. 

Annual $4,519,826 57 

Supplemental 622,942 05 

$5,142,769 22 

1908. 

Annual $4,618,407 17 

Supplemental 768,329 62 

$5,386,736 79 

1909. 

Annual $4,379,474 90 

Supplemental 331,774 24 

$4,711,249 14 

1910. 

Annual $4,245,017 32 

Supplemental 871,791 00 

$5,116,808 32 

1911. 

Annual $5,072,592 77 

Supplemental 1,337,517 18 

$6,410,109 95 

1912. 

Annual $5,476,508 35 

Supplemental 972,097 05 

$6,448,605 40 

1913. 

Annual $0,509,785 50 

Supplemental 1,199,514 34 

$7,709,299 84 

1914. 

Annual $6,825,191 36 ' 

Supplemental 834,676 49 

$7,659,867 85 

1915. 

Annual $7,634,413 60 

Supplemental 412,704 36 

$8,047,117 96 

1916. 

Annual $8,073,255 25 

Supplemental 691,611 55 

$8,764,866 80 



SUMMAKY OF AITIH >rHIATIOX LAWS. 213 

1917. 

Annual $7,953,255 25 

Supplemental 871,058 13 

$8,824,313 38 

1918. 

Annual $0,157,085 G4 

Supplemental 771,058 13 

$0,928,143 77 

1918-1910. 

Annual $9,755,045 57 

1919-1920. 
Annual $13,744,990 2G 

1920-1921. 
Annual $15,009,438 GO 

1921-1922. 
Annual $16,879,475 47 



214 



NEW JERSEY CENSUS. 



NEW JERSEY CENSUS. 

Population by aiinor Civil Divisions, 1920, 1915, 1910, 
Official. 

ATLANTIC COUNTY. 



19.20 

Absecon City 702 

Atlantic City 50,707 

Ward 1 13.407 

Ward 2 9,833 

Ward 3 11.028 

Ward 4 16,349 

Buena Vista Township 3,647 

East Atlantic City 12 

Egg Harbor City 2,622 

Egg Harbor Township 1,360 

Folsom Borough 217 

Gallaway Township 2,115 

Flamilton Township 2,406 

Ilammonton Town 6,417 

Linwood Borough 638 

Longport Borough 100 

Margate City .' 249 

Mullica Township 1,166 

Northfield City 1.127 

Pleasantville City 5,887 

Ward 1 3,184 

Ward 2 2,703 

Port Republic City 340 

Somers Point City 843 

Ventnor City 2.193 

Weymouth Township 1,166 



1915 

870 

51,667 



1910 

781 

46,150 



3,599 


2,723 


20 


67 


2,416 


2.181 


1.856 


1.110 


266 


232 


2.115 


1.976 


2,432 


2,271 


5,896 


5,088 


610 


602 


143 


lis 


291 


129 


967 


811 


968 


866 


4,863 


4,390 


422 


405 


790 


604 


1,676 


491 


973 


899 



83,914 82.840 



'1,894 



BERGEN COUNTY. 



Allendale Borough . . . 

Alpine Borougla 

Berg-enfield Borough . 

Bogota Borougla 

Carlstadt Borough . . . 
Cliff side Park Borough 

Closter Borough 

Cresskill Borough .... 

Delford Borough 

Demarest Borough . . . 



,165 


1.121 


937 


350 


533 


377 


i.667 


2,924 


1.991 


.906 


2.341 


1.125 


.472 


4,137 


3,807 


.709 


4,778 


3,394 


.840 


1.735 


1,483 


942 


922 


550 


.286 


1,244 


1,005 


654 


588 


560 



1915 

2,278 


1910 
1,783 


4,576 

3.150 

906 

11.071 


4,275 

2,655 

767 

9,924 



532 


410 


4,016 


2,441 


5.288 


4,472 


2,238 


1,954 


.5,455 


10,213 



NEW JERSEY CENSUS. 215 

19.20 

Dumont Borou^rh 2,537 

East Paterson Borough 2.441 

East Rutherford Borough 5,463 

Edgewater Borough 3,530 

Emerson Borough . . .' 973 

Englewood City 11,627 

Ward 1 1,806 

Ward 2 2,211 

Ward 3 3,963 

Ward 4 3,647 

Englewood Cliffs Borough .... 594 

Fairview Boroug-h 4,882 

Fort Lee Borough 5,761 

Franklin Township 1,671 

Garfield Citv 10,381 

Ward 1 5,111 

Ward 2 '. 4.499 

Ward 3 5.117 

Ward 4 4,654 

Glen Rock Borough 2,181 1.689 1,055 

Hackensack City* 17,667 15,856 14,050 

Ward 1 5,884 

Ward 2 3,364 

Ward 3 3,061 

Ward 4 3,374 

Ward 5 1,984 

Harrington Tark Borough 627 

Ilashrouck Heights Borough . . 2,895 

Haworth Borough 748 

Hillsdale Township 1,720 

Hohokus Borough 586 

Hohokus Township 2.081 

Leonia Borough 2,979 

Little Ferry Borough 2.715 

Lodi Borough 8,175 

Lodi Township 987 

Lyndhurst Township 9,515 

(Formerly Union.) 

May wood Borough 1.618 

Midland Township 2,203 

Midland Park Borough 2,243 

Montvale Borough 779 

Moonachie Borough 1,194 

North Arlington Borough .... 1,767 

Northvale Boroughf 827 

Norwood Borough 820 

Oakland Borough 497 



551 


377 


2.424 


2,155 


733 


588 


1,444 


1,072 


561 


488 


2,428 


1,881 


2,132 


1,486 


2.729 


2.541 


6,379 


4,138 


904 


693 


7,299 


4,076 


1,309 


889 


3-, 884 


1,480 


2.130 


2,001 


728 


522 


993 


638 


1,079 


437 


785 


588 


680 


564 


628 


568 



*Hackensack City, formerly New Barbadoes Township. 
fFormerly Harrington Township. 



216 NEW JERSEY CENSUS. 



Old Tappan Borough 

Palisades Township 

Palisades Park Borough 

Park Ridge Borough 

Ramsey Borough 

Ridgefield Borough 

Ridgefield Park Alllagc, coexten- 
sive with Overpeck Township, 

Ridgewood Village, coextensive 
with Ridgewood Township.. 

Riverside Borough 

Rivervalo Township 

Rutherford Borough 

Saddle River Borough 

Saddle River Township 

Teaneck Township 

Tenafly Borough 

Teterhoro Borough 

Upper Saddle River Borough . . . 

Waldwick Borough* 

Wallington Borough 

Washington Township 

Westwood Borough 

\Yoodcliffi Lake Borough 

Wood Ridge Borough 



1920 


1915 


1910 


404 


323 


305 


1,768 


1,592 


1,141 


2,633 


2,264 


1,411 


1,481 


1,643 


1,401 


2,090 


1.973 


1,667 


1,560 


1,187 


966 


8,575 


7,000 


4,512 


7,580 


6.729 


5.416 


1,077 


949 


736 


583 


530 


450 


9,497 


8,347 


7,045 


506 


ooo 


483 


2,845 


4,014 


3,047 


4,192 


3.254 


2,082 


5,650 

24 

251 


2,999 


2,756 


364 


273 


1.296 


1.167 


970 


5,715 


4.071 


3,448 


194 


218 


100 


2,597 


2,217 


1,870 


587 


522 


470 


1,923 


1,500 


1,043 



210,703 178,596 138,002 



BURLINGTON COUNTY. 



Bass River Township 

Beverly City 

Beverly Township 

Bordentown City 

Bordentown Township 

Burlington City 

Ward 1 1,444 

Ward 2 2,318 

Ward 3 2,529 

Ward 4 2,758 

Burliington Township 

Chester Township 

Chesterfield Township 

Cinnaminson Township 

Delran Township 

Easthampton Township 

♦Formerly Orvil Township. 



612 


735 


685 


2,562 


2,450 


2,140 


2,794 


2,719 


2,337 


4,371 


4,095 


4,250 


596 


529 


608 


9,049 


9,044 


8,336 



1,520 


1,424 


1,220 


7,273 


6,061 


5,069 


1,133 


1,228 


1,130 


1,587 


1,585 


1,266 


1,475 


1,409 


1,031 


539 


486 


508 



NEW JERSEY CENSUS. 



217 



Evesham Township 

Fieldsboro Borough 

Florence Township 

Lumberton Township .... 

Mansfield Township 

]Medford Township 

Mount Laurel Tow^nship . 
New Hanover Township . 
North Hanover Township 
Northampton Township* 

Palmyra Township 

Pemberton Borough 

Pemberton Township .... 

Riverside Township 

Riverton Borough 

Shamong Township 

Southampton Township . . 
Springfield Township . . . 
Tabernacle Township .... 
Washington Township . . 
Westhampton Township . 
Willingboro Township . . . 
Woodland Township .... 
Wrightstown Boroughf . 



1920 


1915 


1910 


1,284 


1,396 


1,408 


530 


510 


480 


7,100 


6,240 


4,731 


1,571 


1,854 


1,768 


1,517 


1,597 


1,526 


1,891 


1,978 


1,903 


1,667 


1,736 


1,573 


586 


932 


948 


651 


692 


696 


5,901 


5,657 


5,652 


3.834 


3,295 


2,801 


800 


793 


797 


1,444 


1,865 


1,679 


6,018 


5,465 


4,011 


2,341 


2,141 


1,788 


414 


500 


483 


1,641 


1,848 


1,778 


1,223 


1,329 


1,278 


431 


479 


487 


500 


672 


597 


478 


612 


564 


601 


703 


562 


548 


678 


475 


5,288 









81,770 74,737 



66,565 



CAMDEN COUNTY. 



Audubon Borough 4,740 

Barrington Borough 1,333 

Berlin Towmship 2,093 

Camden City 116,309 

Ward 1 7,342 

Ward 2 7,444 

Ward 3 5,759 

Ward 4 4,840 

Ward 5 8,381 

Ward 6 7,894 

Ward 7 10,929 

Ward 8 15,839 

Ward 9 7,258 

Ward 10 9,616 

Ward 11 8,421 

Ward 12 8,886 

Ward 13 13,700 

Center Township 4,004 



3,009 

2,076 
102,215 



3,710 



*Includes Mount Holly, unincorporated, 
tincludes population (5,018) of Camp Dix. 



1,343 

1,611 
94,538 



3,200 



218 



NEW JERSEY CENSUS. 



Chosilliiust Borough 

Clementon Townsliip 

Collingswood Borough 

Delaware Township 

Gloucester City 

Ward 1 4.834 

Ward 2 7,328 

Gloucester Township 

Haddon Township 

Haddon Heights Borough 

Haddonfield Borough 

Laurel Springs Borough 

Magnolia Borough 

Merchantville Borough 

Oaklyn Borough 

Pensauken Township 

Yoorhees township 

Waterford Township 

Winslow Township 

Woodlynne Borough 



Avalon Borough 

Cape May City 

Cape May Point Borough 

Dennis Township 

Lower Township 

Middle Township 

North Wildwood Borough 

Ocean Cit.v 

Sea Isle City 

South Cape May Borough 
Stone Harbor Borough . . 

Upper Township 

West Cape May Borough 

Wildwood City 

Wildwood Crest Borough 

Woodbine Borough 

Holly Beach Borough . . . 
Wildwood Borough 



1920 


1915 


1910 


287 


314 


240 


3.401 


2.605 


2,704 


8.714 


6.600 


4,705 


2,331 


2.227 


1,706 


12,102 


10,554 


0,402 


3.007 


2.764 


2,380 


2.708 


2.082 


1.465 


2.050 


2.207 


1.452 


5.646 


5,077 


4,142 


Oil 


701 





1.245 


077 




2.740 


2.242 


1,006 


1,148 


703 


653 


6.474 


5,213 


4,160 


1,305 


1.330 


1,174 


1.017 


1,036 


1,484 


3.370 


3,531 


2,010 


1.515 


878 


500 


100,508 


163,221 


142,020 


COUNTY 






107 


323 


230 


2,000 


2,513 


2,471 


121 


170 


162 


1,630 


1,804 


1.751 


1,006 


1,271 


1,188 


2,760 


3,383 


2,074 


807 


1,088 


833 


2.512 


3.721 


1,050 


564 


055 


551 


10 


10 


7 


150 


450 




1,272 


1.580 


1,483 


067 


1.068 


844 


2,700 


3,858 




161 


317 


103 


1,406 


1,860 


2,300 
1,001 







808 



10,460 

CUMBERLAND COUNTY. 

Bridgeton City 14,323 

Ward 1 2.313 

Ward 2 3,502 



24,407 10,745 



13,611 14,200 



NEW JERSEY CENSUS. 219 

1920 1915 1910 

Ward 3 3,372 

Ward 4 3,200 

Ward 5 1,936 

Commercial Township 2,202 

Deerfield Township 3,153 

Downe Township 1,322 

Fairfield Township 1,514 

Greenwich Township 966 

Hopewell Township 1,844 

Landis Township 10,035 

Lawrence Township 1,549 

Maurice River Township 2,016 

Millville City 14,691 

Ward 1 2.866 

Ward 2 2.169 

Ward 3 3.397 

Ward 4 3,190 

Ward 5 3,069 

Stowe Creek Township 844 962 880 

Vineland Borough 6,799 6,531 5,282 



2,624- 


2,604 


3,621 


3,311 


1.570 


1,519 


1,621 


1,629 


1,147 


1.145 


1,807 


1,818 


8,658 


6,435 


1,801 


1,746 


2,221 


2.124 


.3,307 


12,451 



61,348 59,481 55,153 
ESSEX COUNTY. 

Belleville Town 15,660 11,096 0,801 

Ward 1 5,386 

Ward 2 6,323 

Ward 3 3,951 

Bloomfield Town 22,019 17,306 15,070 

Ward 1 8,354 

Ward 2 6.631 

Ward 3 7,034 

Caldwell Borough 3,993 

Caldwell Township 717 

Cedar Grove Township 3.181 

East Orange City 50,710 

Ward 1 6.653 

Ward 2 7,328 

Ward 3 15.956 

Ward 4 7,263 

Ward 5 13,510 

Essex Fells Borough 598 538 442 

Glen Ridge Borough 4,620 4,153 3.260 

Irvington Town 25,480 20.342 11.877 

Ward 1 7,008 

Ward 2 7,344 

Ward 3 11,128 

Livingston Township 1,126 1,202 1.025 

Millhurn Township 4,633 4,372 3,720 



3,409 


2.236 


782 


704 


2.979 


2,409 


40,961 


34,371 



220 NEW JERSEY CENSUS. 

1920 1915 1910 

Montclair Town 28,810 25,029 21,550 

Ward 1 5,793 

Ward 2 5,177 

Ward 3 5,449 

Ward 4 6,812 

Ward 5 5.579 

Newark City 414,524 306,721 347,469 

Ward 1 30,047 

Ward 2 17,014 

Ward 3 35,343 

Ward 4 12,450 

Ward 5 20,863 

Ward 6 20,335 

Ward 7 17,102 

Ward 8 31,077 

Ward 9 34,698 

Ward 10 22,754 

Ward 11 20,976 

Ward 12 25,426 

Ward 13 38,396 

Ward 14 36,112 

Ward 15 16,010 

Ward 16 35,921 

North Caldwell Borough 466 664 595 

Nutley Town 9,421 7,987 6,009 

Ward 1 3,742 

Ward 2 2,874 

Ward 3 2,805 

Orange City 33,268 29,805 29,630 

Ward 1 8.327 

Ward 2 5,352 

Ward 3 8,158 

Ward 4 6.912 

Ward 5 4,519 

Roseland Borough 609 

South Orange Township 5,283 

South Orange Village 7,274 

Verona Borough 3,039 

West Caldwell Borough 1,085 

West Orange Town 15,573 

Ward 1 4,945 

Ward 2 3,101 

Ward 3 3,142 

Ward 4 986 

Ward 5 3,399 



593 


486 


4,676 


2,979 


5,866 


6,014 


2,643 


1,675 


690 


494 


.3,610 


10,080 



652,089 566.324 512.886 



NEW JERSEY CENSUS. 



221 



GLOUCESTER COUNTY. 



Clayton Borough 

Deptford Township 

East Greenwich Township .... 

Elk Township 

Franklin Township 

Glassboro Borough 

Greenwich Township 

Harrison Township 

Logan Township 

Mantua Township 

Monroe Township 

National Park Borough 

Paulsboro Borough 

Pitman Borough 

South Harrison Township .... 

Swedesboro Borough 

Washington Township 

Wenonah Borough 

West Deptford Township 

Westville Borough 

Woodbury City 

Ward 1 1,279 

Ward 2 2,756 

Ward 3 1,766 

Woodbury Heights Borough . . . 

Woolwich Township 



1920 


1915 


1910 


1,905 


1,729 


1,926 


2,224 


1,800 


2,524 


1,483 


1,614 


1,406 


951 


1,042 


1,022 


3.448 


3,008 


2,603 


3.073 


3.030 


2,821 


1,751 


1,155 


874 


1,633 


1,793 


1,682 


1,510 


1,521 


1,523 


2,002 


1,849 


1,529 


3,292 


3,490 


3,015 


1,000 


529 


325 


4.352 


2,876 


2,121 


3,385 


2,577 


1,950 


583 


687 


694 


1,838 


1,738 


1,477 


1,460 


1,626 


1,396 


918 


821 


645 


1,781 


1,728 


2,057 


2,380 


2,036 





5,801 


5,288 


4,642 


481 


339 




973 


1,311 


1,136 



48,224 43,581 



37,368 



HUDSON COUNTY. 



Bayonne City 76,754 64,461 55,545 

Ward 1 17,296 

Ward 2 17,772 

Ward 3 16,150 

Ward 4 13.203 

Ward 5 12,333 

East Newark Borough 3,057 

Guttenberg Town 6,726 

Harrison Town 15,721 

Ward 1 4,438 

Ward 2 1,503 

Ward 3 4,617 

Ward 4 5,163 

Hoboken City 68,166 67,611 70,324 

Ward 1 10,691 

Ward 2 9,848 

Ward 3 18,224 



2,873 

6,322 

14,520 



3,163 

5,647 

14,498 



222 NEW JERSEY CENSUS, 

1920 1915 1910 

Ward 4 14,050 

Ward 5 15,353 

Jersey City 298,103 270,903 207,779 

Ward 1 17,738 

Ward 2 19,820 

Ward 3 16,893 

Ward 4 15,288 

Ward 5 18,136 

Ward 19,816 

AYard 7 39,193 

Ward S 38,626 

Ward 9 29,410 

Ward 10 26,363 

Ward 11 27.594 

Ward 12 29,226 

Kearny Town 26,724 22,150 18,659 

Ward 1 5,459 

Ward 2 9,093 

Ward 3 6,308 

Ward 4 5,864 

North Bergen To^Ynsbip 23,344 20,679 15.662 

Secaucus Town 5,423 4,906 4,740 

Ward 1 2,987 

Ward 2 977 

Ward 3 1,459 

Union Town 20,651 21,739 21,023 

Ward 1 5,563 

Ward 2 5,775 

Ward 3 9,313 

Wceliawken Township 14,485 13,488 11,228 

West Hobolien Town 40,074 38,776 35,403 

Ward 1 12,625 

Ward 2 15,245 

Ward 3 12,204 

West New Yorlv Town 29,926 22,943 13,560 

Ward 1 14,416 

Ward 2 0.294 

Ward 3 9,216 

629,154 571,371 537,231 
HUNTERDON COUNTY. 



Alexandria Township , 
Bethlehem Township . , 
Bloomshnry Borough . , 

Califon Borough 

Clinton Town 

Clinton Township . . . . 
Delaware Township . . 
East Amwell Township 



938 


1,093 


1,045 


798 


975 


980 


650 


630 


600 


513 







950 


841 


836 


1,987 


2.157 


2.108 


1.705 


1,941 


1,740 


1,102 


1,251 


1,203 



1920 


1015 


1910 


2.590 


2.635 




980 


1,141 


1,099 


1,104 


983 


984 


818 






916 


843 


914 


1,795 


1,700 


1,545 


911 


975 


1.699 


1,160 


1,241 


1,265 


4,660 


4.600 


4,657 


1,083 


2,211 


2,179 


656 


687 





1,677 


1,896 


4,003 


2,525 


2,648 


2,569 


519 


613 


605 


1,279 


1.734 


1.742 


834 


1,054 


930 


735 


848 


866 



NEW JERSEY CENSUS. 



Flemington Borough 

Franklin Township 

French town Borough 

Glen Gardner Borough .... 

Hampton Borough 

High Bridge Borough 

Flolland Township 

Kingwood Township 

Lamhertville City 

Lebanon Township 

Milford Borough 

Raritan Township 

Readington Township 

Stockton Borough 

Tewksbury Township 

Union Township 

West Amwell Township . . . 

32,885 34,697 33,569 

MERCER COUNTY. 

East Windsor Township 733 

Ewing Township 3,475 

Hamilton Township 14,580 

Hightstown Borough 2.674 

Hopewell Borough 1,339 

Hopewell Township 3,249 

Lawrence Township 3,686 

Pennington Borough 965 

Princeton Borough 5,917 

Princeton Township 1,424 

Trenton City 119,289 

Ward 1 5.800 

Ward 2 5,620 

Ward 3 6.375 

■ Ward 4 9^808 

Ward 5 14.366 

Ward 6 4,321 

W^ard 7 4,780 

Ward 8 8,381 

Ward 9 8,145 

Ward 10 11.791 

Ward 11 15,241 

Ward 12 9,280 

Ward 13 8,990 

Ward 14 6,391 

Washington Township 1,161 1.215 1.090 

West Windsor Township 1,389 1,426 1,342 



839 


941 


3,261 


1,889 


11,143 


7,899 


2,592 


1,879 


1,341 


1,073 


3,430 


3,171 


3.339 


2,522 


944 


722 


5,678 


5,136 


1,414 


1,178 


103,190 


96,815 



159,881 139,812 125,651 



224 



NEW JEFiSEY CENSUS. 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 



1920 1915 

*Carteret Borough 11,047 8,049 

Cranbury Township 1,083 1,533 

Dunellen Borough 3,394 2,877 

East Brunswick Township .... 1,857 1,865 

Helmetta Borough 687 767 

Highland Park Borough 4,866 2,901 

Jamesburg Boroug-h 2,052 1,865 

Madison Township 1,808 2,123 

Metuchen Borough 3,334 2,692 

Middlesex Borough 1,852 1,310 

Milltown Borough 2.573 1,902 

Monroe Township 2,625 2,581 

New Brunswick City 32,779 30,019 

Ward 1 4,823 

Ward 2 7,370 

Ward 3 3,510 

Ward 4 5,387 

Ward 5 6,810 

Ward 6 4,879 

North Brunswick Township . . . 1,399 1,247 

Perth Amboy City 41,707 39,719 

Ward 1 4,827 

Ward 2 3.202 

Ward 3 3,845 

Ward 4 8,872 

Ward 5 6,826 

Ward 6 14,135 

Piscataway To%\Tiship 5,385 3,624 

Plainsboro Township 460 

Raritan Township 5,419 3,412 

Sayreville Borough 7,181 6,312 

South Amboy City 7,897 7,482 

Ward 1 2,110 

Ward 2 1,813 

Ward 3 1,974 

Ward 4 2,000 

South Brunswick Township . . . 2,206 2,929 

South River Borough 6.596 6,691 

Spotswood Borough 704 683 

Woodbridge Township 13,423 12,133 



162,334 144,716 

MONMOUTH COUNTY. 

Allennhurst Borough 343 203 

Allentown Borough 634 642 

Asbury Park City 12,400 10,910 



1910 
5,786 
1,424 
1,990 
1,602 

661 
1,517 
1,560 
1,621 
2,138 

1,584 

2,238 

23,388 



990 
32,121 



3,523 

2,707 
5,783 
7,007 



2,443 

4,772 

623 

8,948 


114,426 

306 
634 

10,150 



*Formerly Roosevelt Borough. 



NEW JERSEY CENSUS. 225 

1920 1915 1910 



Ward 1 9,366 

Ward 2 3,034 

Atlantic Township 1,074 

Atlantic Highlands Borough . . 1,629 

Avon Borough 647 

Belmar Borough 1,987 

Bradley Beach Borough 2,307 

Brielle Borough 392 

Deal Borough 420 

Eatontown Township 2,682 

Englishtown Borough 641 

Fair Haven Borough 1,295 

Farmingdale Borough 474 

Freehold Borough 4,768 

Freehold Township 1,498 

Highlands Borough 1,731 

Holmdel Township 1,100 

Howell Township 2,549 

Keansburg Borough 1,321 

Keyport Borough 4,415 

Long Branch City 13,521 

Ward 1 1,550 

Ward 2 2,565 

Ward 3 2,377 

Ward 4 2,983 

Ward 5 2,175 

Ward 6 1,871 

Manalapan Township 1.080 

Manasquan Borough 1,705 

Marlboro Township 1,710 

Matawan Borough 1.910 

Matawan Township 1.856 

Middletown Township 5,917 

Millstone Township 1,405 

Monmouth Beach Borough .... 410 

Neptune Township 6,470 

Neptune City Borough 539 

Ocean Township 1,581 

Raritan Township 1,659 

Red Bank Borough 9,251 

Rumson Borough 1,658 

Seabright Borough 856 

Sea Girt Borough 110 

Shrewsbury Township 1,944 

Spring Lake Borough 1,009 

Upper Freehold Township 1.737 

Wall Township 3,324 

West Long Branch Borough . . . 966 



1.200 


1,205 


1,771 


1,645 


707 


426 


2,553 


1,433 


2,236 


1,807 


"227 


273 


2,164 


2,076 


605 


468 


1,490 





483 


416 


3,622 


3,233 


2,338 


2,329 


1,759 


1,386 


1,315 


1,058 


2,931 


2,703 


4,019 


3,554 


14,565 


13,298 



1,467 


1,375 


1,817 


1,582 


1,842 


1,754 


1.771 


1,646 


1,833 


1,472 


7,795 


6,653 


1,255 


1,461 


652 


485 


6.774 


5,551 


614 


488 


1.405 


1,377 


1,955 


1,583 


8,631 


7,398 


1,583 


1,449 


1,327 


1,220 


2,315 


3,238 


1.393 


853 


2.064 


2.053 


4.338 


3,817 


1,065 


879 



104,925 107,636 94,734 



226 



NEW JERSEY CENSUS. 



MORRIS COUNTY. 

1920 

Boonton Town 5,372 

Ward 1 1,371 

Ward 2 ] ,387 

Ward 3 1,575 

Ward 4 1,039 

Boonton Township 684 

Butler Borough 2,886 

Chatham Borough 2,421 

Chatham Township 736 

Chester Township 1,195 

Denville Township 1,205 

Dover Town 9,803 

Ward 1 2,162 

Ward 2 1,961 

Ward 3 2,376 

Ward 4 3,304 

Florham Park Borough 787 

Hanover Township 8,531 

Jefferson Township 1,226 

Madison Borough 5,523 

Mendham Borough 969 

Mendham Township 699 

Montville Township 1.515 

Morris Township 2,607 

Morristown Town 12,548 

Ward 1 3,498 

Ward 2 4,402 

Ward 3 2,616 

Ward 4 2,032 

Mount Arlington Borough . 
Mount Olive Township .... 

Netcong Borough 

Passaic Township 

Pequannock Township .... 

Randolph Township 

Rockaway Borough 

Rockaway Township 

Roxbury Township 

Washington Township .... 
Wharton Borough . . : 



1915 
5,207 



1910 
4,930 



527 


428 


2,534 


2,265 


2,207 


1,874 


818 


812 


1,357 


1,251 


1,012 





8,971 


7,468 



970 


558 


S.121 


6,228 


1,186 


1,303 


5,628 


4,658 


1,248 


1,129 


845 


792 


1,719 


1,944 


3,034 


3,161 


13,006 


12,507 



213 


397 


277 


1,008 


1,084 


1,160 


1,800 


1,680 


1,532 


2,373 


2,457 


2,165 


2.291 


2.313 


1,921 


2.509 


2,545 


2,307 


2,655 


2 224 


1,902 


3,506 


3,264 


4,835 


2,976 


2,514 


2,414 


1,779 


2,055 


1,900 


2,877 


2,591 


2,983 



82,694 81,514 74,704 



OCEAN COUNTY. 



Barnegat City Borough 
Bay Head Borough . . , 
Beach Haven Borough 



69 


77 


70 


273 


492 


281 


329 


434 


272 



NEW JERSEY CENSUS. 



:27 



Beachwood Borough 

Berkeley Township 

Brick Township 

Dover Township 

Eagleswood Township 

Harvey Cedars Borough 

Island Heights Borough 

Jackson Township 

Lacey Township 

Lakewood Township 

Lavallette Borough 

Little Egg Harbor Township.. 

Long Beach Township 

Manchester Township 

Mantoloking Borough 

Ocean Township 

Ocean Gate Borough 

riumsted Township 

Pooint Pleasant Beach Borough, 

Seaside Heights Borough 

Seaside Park Borough 

Stafford Township 

Surf City Borough 

Tuckerton Borough 

Union Township 



1920 


1915 


1910 


40 







576 


900 


597 


2,084 


2.308 


2,177 


2,198 


2,676 


2,452 


420 


525 


550 


G5 


47 


33 


194 


368 


313 


1,268 


1,465 


1,325 


504 


678 


602 


6,110 


4,662 


5,149 


117 


174 


42 


410 


474 


388 


106 


105 


107 


1,034 


998 


1,112 


37 


50 




286 


374 


397 


69 






1.276 


1.186 


1,123 


1,575 


1.204 


1,003 


154 


252 




179 


275 


101 


830 


933 


934 


43 


44 


40 


1,106 


1,312 


1.268 


803 


998 


982 



22,155 23,011 21,318 



PASSAIC COUNTY. 

Bloomingdale Borough 2,193 

Clifton City 26,470 

Ward 1 4,651 

Ward 2 3,348 

Ward 3 4,853 

Ward 4 8,059 

Ward 5 5,559 

Ilaledon Borough 3,435 

Hawthorne Borough 5,135 

Little Falls Township 3,310 

North Haledon Borough 887 

Passaic City 63,841 

Ward 1 20,860 

Ward 2 12.242 

Ward 3 8,520 

Ward 4 22,219 

Paterson City 135,875 

Ward 1 16,829 

Ward 2 14,813 

Ward 3 15,579 



20,822 11,869 



2,890 


2,560 


3,999 


3,400 


2,928 


3,750 


834 


749 


61.225 


54,773 



124,815 125,600 



228 



NEW JERSEY CENSUS. 



1920 



1915 



1910 



Ward 4 18,872 

Ward 5 8,997 

Ward 6 4,816 

Ward 7 10,944 

Ward 8 10,048 

Ward 9 13,889 

Ward 10 12,510 

Ward 11 8,578 

Pompton Lakes Borough 

Prospect Park Borough 

Ringwood Borough 

Totowa Borough 

Wanaque Borough 

Waj-ne Township 

West Milford Township 

West Paterson Borough 

*Pomptou Township 



2,008 


1,400 


1,060 


4,292 


3,853 


2,719 


1,025 






1,864 


1,493 


1,130 


2,916 






2,302 


2.625 


2,281 


1,763 


1,877 


1,967 


1,858 


1.535 







6,068 


4,044 



259,174 236,364 215,902 



SALEM COUNTY. 

Alloway Township 1,431 

Elmer Borough 1,115 

Elsinboro Township 374 

Lower Alloways Creek Twp. ... 1,084 

Lower Penns Neck Township . . 2,149 

Mannington Township 1,456 

Oldmans Township 1,328 

Pennsgrove Borough 6,060 

Pilesgrove Township 1,770 

Pittsgrove Township 1,842 

Quinton Township 956 

Salem City 7,435 

East Ward 4,282 

West Ward . . . . . 3,153 

Upper Penns Neck Township... 6,259 

Upper Pittsgrove Township . . . 1,724 

Woodstown Borough 1,589 



1,500 


1,533 


1,143 


1,167 


432 


419 


1,289 


1,252 


1,605 


1,544 


1,653 


1,606 


1,324 


1,364 


4,412 


2,118 


1,763 


1,786 


2,169 


2,394 


999 


1,091 


6,953 


6,614 


1,559 


744 


1.984 


1,754 


1,507 


1,613 



36,572 30.292 26,999 



SOMERSET COUNTY. 

Bedminster Township 1,088 1.342 2,375 

Bernards Township 4.243 5.057 4,608 

Bound Brook Borough 5=906 5,152 3,970 

Branchburg Township 931 1,034 970 

Bridgewater Township 1,934 2,039 1,742 

*Pompton Township taken to form Bloomingdale, Ring- 
wood and Wanaque Boroughs. 



NEW JERSEY CENSUS. 



229 



East Millstone Town 

Franklin Township 

Hillsboro Township 

Millstone Borough 

Montgomery Township 

North Plainfield Borough 

North Plainfield Township 

Peapack-Gladstone Borough . . . 

Raritan Town 

Rocky Hill Borough 

Somerville Borough 

South Bound Brook Borough . . 
Warren Township 



1920 


1915 


1910 


427 




356 


2.055 


3,090 


2,395 


5,124 


3,183 


2,313 


178 


154 


157 


2.082 


1,961 


1,637 


6,916 


6,037 


6,117 


1,116 


985 


880 


1,226 


1,346 





4,457 


4,028 


3,672 


305 


470 


502 


6,718 


6,038 


5,060 


1,302 


1,108 


1,024 


1,083 


1,099 


1,036 



47,991 44,123 38,820 



SUSSEX COUNTY. 



Andover Borough . 
Andover Township 
Branchville Borough 
Byram Township . . 
Frankford Township 
Franklin Borough . 
Fredon Township . . 
Oreeu Township . . . 
Hampton Township 
Hardyston Township 
Hopatcong Borough 
Lafayette Township 
Montague Township 

Newton Town 

Ogdenshurg Borough 
Sandyston Township 
Sparta Township . . 
Stanhope Borough . 
Stillwater Township 
Sussex Borough . . . 
Vernon Township . . 
Walpack Township 
Wantage Township 



417 


479 


884 


473 


504 


521 


588 


620 


663 


409 


437 


1,055 


936 


1.096 


1,004 


4,075 


3,262 





269 


448 


457 


454 


504 


888 


592 


700 


671 


1,928 


2,030 


5,210 


179 


234 


146 


634 


687 


683 


534 


630 


621 


4,125 


4,433 


4,467 


939 


600 





727 


796 


855 


1,017 


1.170 


1,579 


1,031 


1.028 


1,031 


671 


891 


796 


1,318 


1,251 


1,212 


1,433 


1,604 


1,675 


258 


304 


286 


1,898 


2,269 


2,077 



24,905 25,977 26,781 



UNION COUNTY. 



Clark Township 794 

Cranford Township 6,001 

Elizabeth City 95,783 



541 


469 


4.967 


3,641 


82,036 


73,409 



230 



NEW JERSEY CENSUS. 



i9.:o 



1913 



1910 



Waid 1 S.OOS 

Ward 2 7,471 

Ward 3 8.664 

Ward 4 6.522 

Ward 5 6.981 

Ward 6 0,091 

Ward 7 9.290 

Ward 8 9.634 

Ward 9 5,223 

Ward 10 8.853 

Ward 11 7.230 

Ward 12 7,316 

Fanwood Borough 

Garwood Borough 

Hillside Township 

Kenilworth Borough 

Linden Borough 

Linden Township 

Mountainside Borough 

New Providence Borough 

New Providence Township .... 

Plainfield City 

Ward 1 5.925 

Ward 2 6.295 

Ward 3 5.947 

Ward 4 9,533 

Rahwav City 

Ward 1 2.306 

Ward 2 2.330 

Ward 3 2.857 

Ward 4 2,043 

Ward 5 1,506 

Roselle Boroug'h 

Roselle Park Borough 

Scotch Plains Township* 

Springfield Township 

Summit Citv 

Ward 1 4,816 

Ward 2 5,358 

Union Township 

Westfield Town 

Ward 1 3.464 

Ward 2 1.412 

Ward 3 2.408 

Ward 4 1.779 



724 


099 


471 


2.084 


1.642 


1.118 


5.267 


2.773 




1.312 


997 


779 


1.756 


1,150 


610 


6.612 


3,826 


1,988 


493 


421 


362 


1.203 


1.132 


873 


954 


847 


526 


27.700 


24.516 


20,550 



11,042 



9.586 



9,337 



5.737 


3.823 


2.725 


5.438 


4.327 


3,138 


2.343 


1,970 


1.616 


1,715 


1.619 


1.246 


10,174 


9,136 


7,500 


3.962 


3.167 


3.419 


9,063 


8,147 


6,420 



200,157 167,322 140,19' 



formerly Fanwood Township. 



NEW JERSEY CENSUS. 231 



\YARREN COUNTY. 

1920 

Allamucby Township 556 

Alpha Borough 2,140 

Belvideie Town 1,793 

Blairstown Township 1,361 

Franklin Township 1,457 

Frelinghuysen Township 682 

Greenwich Township 1,050 

Hackettstown Town 2,936 

Hardwick Township 352 

Harmonj- Township 1,444 

Hope Township 948 

Independence Township 933 

Knowlton Township 1,073 

Lopatcong Township 1,050 

Mansfield Township 1,133 

Oxford Township 2,035 

Pahaquarry Township 128 

Phillipsburg Town 16,923 

Ward 1 2.950 

^Yard 2 2.481 

Ward 3 3,002 

Ward 4 2,027 

Ward 5 2.524 

Ward 6 3,879 

Pohatcong Township 1,559 1,634 3,202 

Washington Borough 3,341 3,250 3,567 

Washington Township 1,002 1,078 1,023 

White Township 1,161 1,237 



1915 


1910 


666 


642 


2,084 





1,823 


1,764 


1,447 


1,718 


1,310 


1,585 


788 


1,074 


1.014 


904 


2,976 


2,715 


369 


405 


1,465 


1,490 


1,074 


1,119 


1.151 


867 


1.192 


1,556 


938 


766 


1,217 


1,238 


1,975 


3,444 


196 


205 


15,430- 


13,903 



45,057 44,314 43,18' 



232 



NEW JERSEY CENSUS 



POPULATION OF INCORPORATED PLAGES. 

Incorporated Place County 

Absecon City Atlantic 

Allendale Bor Bergen 

Allenhurst Bor Moumoutli ... 

Allentown Bor Moumoutli . . . 

Alpha Bor Warren 

Alpine Bor Bergen 

Andover Bor Sussex 

Asbury Park City Monmouth . .. 

Atlantic City Atlantic .... 

Atlantic Highlands Bor. .Monmouth ... 

Audubon Bor Camden 

Avalon Bor Cape May . . . 

Avon Bor Monmouth . . . 

Barnegat City Bor Ocean 

Barrington Bor.* Camden 

Bay Head Bor Ocean 

Bayonne City Hudson 

Beach Haven Bor Ocean 

Beachwood Bor.* Ocean 

Belleville Town Essex 

Belmar Bor Monmouth . . . 

Belvidere Town AVarren 

Bergenfield Bor Bergen 

Beverly City Burlington .. 

Bloomfield Town Essex 

Bloomingdale Bor.* Passaic 

Bloomsbury Bor Hunterdon . . . 

Bogota Bor Bergen 

Boonton Town Morris 

Bordentown City Burlington .. 

Bound Brook Bor Somerset .... 

Bradley Beach Bor Monmouth . . . 

Branchville Bor Sussex 

Bridgeton City Cumberland .. 

Brielle Bor.* Monmouth . . . 

Burlington City Burlington 

Butler Bor Morris 

Caldwell Bor Essex 

Calif on Bor. * Hunterdon . . . 

Camden City Camden 

Cape May City Cape May . . . 

Cape May Point Bor. ...Cape May ... 

Carlstadt Bor Bergen 

Chatham Bor Morris 

Chesilhurst Bor Camden 

Clayton Bor Gloucester . . . 

Clififside Park Bor Bergen 

Clifton City* Passaic 

Clinton Town Hunterdon . . . 

Closter Bor Bergen 

Collingswood Bor Camden 

Cresskill Bor Bergen 

Deal Bor Monmouth . . . 



1920 


1915 


1910 


70-2 


870 


781 


1,165 


1,121 


937 


343 


203 


306 


634 


642 


634 


2,140 


2,084 




350 


533 


377 


417 


479 


884 


12,400 


10,910 


10,150 


50,707 


51,667 


46,150 


1,629 


1,771 


1,645 


4.740 


3,009 


1,343 


197 


323 


230 


647 


707 


426 


69 


77 


70 


1,333 






273 


492 


281 


76,754 


64,461 


55,545 


329 


434 


272 


40 






15,660 


11,996 


9,891 


1,987 


2,553 


1,433 


1,793 


1,823 


1,764 


3,667 


2,924 


1,991 


2.562 


2,450 


2,140 


22,019 


17,306 


15,070 


2,193 






650 


630 


600 


3,906 


2,341 


1,125 


5.372 


5,207 


4,930 


4,371 


4,095 


4.250 


5,906 


5,152 


3,970 


2,307 


2,236 


1,807 


588 


620 


663 


14,323 


13.611 


14,209 


392 






9,049 


9,044 


8,336 


2,886 


2,534 


2,265 


3,993 


3,409 


2,236 


513 






116.309 


102,215 


94,538 


2,999 


2,513 


2,471 


121 


170 


162 


4,472 


4,137 


3,807 


2,421 


2,207 


1,874 


287 


314 


246 


1.905 


1.729 


1,926 


5.709 


4,778 


3.394 


26.470 






9.50 


841 


836 


1,840 


1.735 


1.483 


8,714 


6,600 


4.795 


942 


922 


550 


420 


227 


273 



''Incorporated since 1915. 



NEW JERSEY CENSUS. 23' 



Incorporated Place County 

Delf ord Bor Bergen . . 

Demarest Bor Bergen .. 

Dover Town Morris . . . 

Dumont Bor Bergen . . 

Dunellen Bor Middlesex 

East Atlantic City Atlantic ., 

East Millstone Town Somerset , 

East Newark Bor Hudson . . . 

East Orange City Essex . . . , 

East Paterson Bor.* Bergen ... 

East Rutlierford Bor. . . . Bergen . . . 

Edge water Bor Bergen . . . 

Egg Harbor City Atlantic . . 

Elizabeth City Union . . . . 

Elmer Bor Salem . . . . 

Emerson Bor. Bergen ... 

Englewood City Bergen . . . 

Englewood Cliffs Bor. ...Bergen ... 

Englishtown Bor Monmouth 

Essex Fells Bor Essex 

Fair Haven Bor Monmouth 

Fairview Bor Bergen . . . 

Fanwood Bor Union . . . . 

Farmingdale Bor Monmouth 

Fieldsboro Bor Burlington 

Flemington Bor Hunterdon 

Florham Park Bor Morris . . . 

Folsom Bor Atlantic . . 

Fort Lee Bor Bergen . . . 

Franklin Bor Sussex . . . 

Freehold Bor Monmouth 

FrenchtoM-n Bor Hunterdon 

Garfield City . Bergen . . . 

Garwood Bor Union . . . . 

Glassboro- Bor Gloucester 

Glen Gardner Bor.* . . . . . .Hunterdon 

Glen Ridge Bor Essex 

Glen Rock Bor Bergen . . . 

Gloucester City Camden . . 

Guttenberg Town Hudson . . . 

Hackensack Town Bergen . . . 

Hackettstown Town Warren . . 

Haddon Heights Bor Camden . . 

Haddonfield Bor Camden . . 

Haledon Bor Passaic . . 

Hammonton Bor Atlantic . . 

Hampton Bor Hunterdon 

Harrington Park Bor. ...Bergen ... 

Harrison Town Hudson . . . 

Harvey Cedars Bor Ocean . . .": 

Hasbrouck Heights Bor.. Bergen ... 

Haworth Bor Bergen . . . 

Hawthorne Bor Passaic 

Helmetta Bor [[ Middlesex 

High Bridge Bor Hunterdon 

♦Incorporated since 1915, 



1920 


1915 


1910 


1,286 


1,244 


1.005 


654 


588 


560 


0.803 


8,971 


7.408 


2.537 


2.278 


1,783 


3,394 


2,877 


1,990 


12 


20 


67 


427 




356 


3,057 


2,873 


3,163 


50,710 


40,961 


34,371 


2.441 






5,463 


4,576 


4,275 


3.530 


3,150 


2,655 


2,022 


2,416 


2.181 


95,783 


82,036 


73,409 


1,115 


1,143 


1,167 


973 


906 


767 


11.627 


11,701 


9,924 


594 


532 


410 


641 


605 


468 


598 


538 


442 


1,295 


1.490 




4,882 


4,016 


2,441 


724 


690 


471 


474 


483 


416 


530 


510 


480 


2.590 


2.635 


2,693 


787 


970 


558 


217 


266 


232 


5.761 


5.288 


4,472 


4.075 


3,262 




4.768 


3.622 


3.233 


1.104 


983 


984 


19.381 


35,455 


10,213 


2,084 


3.642 


1.118 


3,073 


3,030 


2,821 


818 






4,620 


4.153 


3.260 


2.181 


1.689 


1.055 


12.162 


10.554 


9.462 


6.726 


6. .322 


5.647 


17.667 


15.856 


14.050 


2.936 


2,076 


2.715 


2.950 


2.297 


1.4.52 


5.646 


5.077 


4.14:' 


3.435 


2.890 


2,560 


6.417 


5.896 


5,088 


916 


843 


914 


627 


551 


377 


15,721 


14.520 


14,498 


C5 


47 


33 


2.895 


2.424 


2.1.55 


748 


733 


588 


5,1.35 


3.999 


3.400 


687 


767 


661 


1,795 


1,700 


1,545 



234 NEW JERSEY CENSUS. 



Incorporated Place County 

Highland Park Bor Middlesex . . 

Highlands Bor Monmouth . . 

Ilightstown Bor Mercer 

Hoboken City Hudson 

Hohokus Bor Bergen 

Hopatcong Bor Sussex 

Hopewell Bor Mercer 

Irvington Town Essex 

Island Heights Bor Ocean 

Jamesburg Bor Middlesex . . 

Jersey City Hudson 

Keansburg Bor.* Monmouth .. 

Kearny Town Hudson 

Kenilworth Bor Union 

Keyport Bor Monmouth . . 

Lambertville City Hunterdon . . 

Laurel Springs Bor Camden 

Lavallette Bor Ocean 

Leonia Bor Bergen 

Linden Bor Union 

Linwood Bor Atlantic . . . . 

Little Ferry Bor Bergen 

Lodi Bor Bergen 

Long Branch City Monmouth . . 

Longport Bor Atlantic 

Madison Bor Morris 

Magnolia Bor . Camden . . . . 

Manasquan Bor Monmouth . . 

Mantoloking Bor Ocean 

Margate City Atlantic 

Matawan Bor Monmouth . . 

May wood Bor Bergen 

Mendham Bor IMorris 

Merchautville Bor Camden 

Metuchen Bor Middlesex . . 

Middlesex Bor Middlesex . , 

Midland Park Bor Bergen 

Milford Bor Hunterdon . . 

Millstone Bor Somerset . . . 

Milltown Bor Middlesex ., 

Millville City Cumberland 

Monmouth Beach Bor. ...:Monmouth ., 

Montclair Town Essex , 

Montvale Bor Bergen . . . . , 

Moonachie Bor Bergen . . . . - 

Morristown Town Morris 

Mount Arlington Bor. ...Morris ..... 

Mountainside Bor Union 

National Park Bor Gloucester . 

Neptune City Bor Monmouth . 

Netcong Bor Morris .... 

New Brunswick City Middlesex . 

New Providence Bor. . . . Union 

Newark City Essex 

Newton Town Sussex .... 

North Arlington Bor. . , . Bergen .... 



1920 


1915 


1910 


4,866 


2,901 


1,517 


1,731 


1,759 


1,386 


2,674 


2,592 


1,879 


68,166 


67,611 


70,324 


586 


561 


488 


179 


234 


146 


1,339 


1,341 


1,073 


25,480 


20,342 


11,877 


194 


368 


313 


2,052 


1,865 


1,560 


298,103 


270,903 


267,779 


1,321 






26,724 


22,150 


18,659 


1,312 


997 


779 


4,415 


4,019 


3,554 


4,660- 


4,600 


4,657 


911 


791 




117 


174 


42 


2.979 


2,132 


1,486 


1,756 


1,150 


610 


638 


610 


602 


2,715 


2,729 


2,541 


8,175 


6,379 


4,138 


13,521 


14,565 


13,298 


100 


143 


118 


5,523 


5,628 


4,658 


1,245 


977 




1,705 


1,817 


1,582 


37 


50 




249 


291 


129 


1,910 


1,771 


1,646 


1,618 


1,309 


889 


969 


1,248 


1,129 


2,749 


2,242 


1,996 


3,334 


2,692 


2,138 


1.852 


1,310 




2,243 


2,130 


2,66i 


656 


687 




178 


154 


157 


2,. 573 


1,902 


1,.584 


14,691 


13,307 


12,451 


410 


652 


485 


28,810 


25,029 


21,550 


779 


728 


522 


1.194 


993 


638 


12,548 


13,006 


12,. 507 


213 


397 


277 


493 


421 


362 


1,000 


529 


325 


539 


614 


488 


1,800 


1,680 


1,.532 


32,779 


30,019 


23,388 


1,203 


1,132 


873 


414,524 


366,721 


347,469 


4,125 


4,433 


4,467 


1,767 


1,079 


437 



'Incorporated since 1915. 



NEW JERSEY CENSUS. 235 



Incorporated Place County 

North Caldwell Bor Essex 

North Haledon Bor Passaic . . . 

North Plainfield Bor. ...Somerset .. 

North Wildwood Bor Cape May . 

Northfleld City Atlantic . . . 

Northrale Bor.* Bergen 

Norwood Bor Bergen .... 

Nutley Town Essex 

Oakland Bor Bergen .... 

Oaklyn Bor Camden . . . 

Ocean City Cape May . 

Ocean Gate Bor.* Ocean 

Ogdensburg Bor Sussex 

Old Tappan Bor Bergen .... 

Orange City Essex 

Palisades Park Bor Bergen 

Park Ridge Bor Bergen .... 

Passaic City Passaic ... 

Paterson City Passaic 135,8' 

Paulsboro Bor Gloucester , 

Peapack-Gladstoue Bor. . . .Somerset . . 

Pemberton Bor Burlington 

Pennington Bor Mercer .... 

Penns Grove Bor Salem 

Perth Amboy City Middlesex 

Phillipsburg Town Warren ... 

Pitman Bor Gloucester . 

Plainfield City Union 

Pleasantville City Atlantic ... 

Pt. Pleasant Beach Bor.. Ocean 

Pompton Lakes Bor Passaic ... 

Port Republic City Atlantic . . . 

Princeton Bor Mercer .... 

Prospect Park Bor Passaic 

Rahway City Union 

Ramsey Bor Bergen .... 

Raritan Town Somerset .. 

Red Bank Bor Monmouth , 

Ridgefield Bor Bergen 

Ridgefield Park Village. . .Bergen 

Ridgewood Village Bergen 

Ringwood Bor. * Passaic '. '. 

Riverside Bor Bergen . . . . 

Riverton Bor Burlington 

Rockaway Bor Morris 

Rocky Hill Bor Somerset 

fRoosevelt Bor Middlesex ' '. 

Roseland Bor Essex 

Roselle Bor Union 

Roselle Park Bor Union 

Rumson Bor Monmouth , 

Rutherford Boc Bergen .... 

Saddle River Bor Bergen 

Salem City Salem 

Sayreville Bor.* Middlesex 



1920 


1915 


1910 


466 


664 


595 


887 


834 


749 


6,916 


6,037 


6,117 


807 


1,088 


833 


1,127 

827 
820 


968 


866 


"680 


"564 


'J,421 


7,987 


6,009 


497 


628 


568 


1,148 


793 


653 


2,. 512 


3,721 


1,950 


69 






939 


600 




404 


323 


305 


33.268 


29,805 


29,630 


2.633 


2,2G4 


1,411 


1.481 


1,643 


1,401 


63,841 


61,225 


54,773 


35,875 


124,815 


125,600 


4.352 


2,876 


2,121 


1,226 


1,346 




800 


793 


797 


965 


944 


722 


6.060 


4.412 


2,118 


41,707 


39,719 


32,121 


16,923 


15,430 


13,903 


3,385 


2,577 


1,950 


27,700 


24,516 


20.550 


5,887 


4,663 


4,390 


1.575 


1,204 


1,003 


2.008 


1,400 


1,060 


340 


422 


405 


5,917 


5.678 


5,136 


4,292 


3,853 


2,719 


11.042 


9,. 586 


9,337 


2.090 


1,973 


1,667 


4.4.57 


4.028 


3.672 


9,251 


8,631 


7,398 


1,560 


1,187 


966 


8.575 






7,580 




5,416 


1,025 






1,077 


949 


736 


2,341 


2.141 


1.788 


2,655 


2 224 


1,902 


305 


470 


502 


11,047 


8,W9 


5,786 


609 


593 


486 


5,737 


3,823 


2.725 


5,438 


4,327 


3,138 


1.6.58 


1,583 


1,449 


9,497 


8,347 


7.045 


506 


555 


483 


7,435 


6,953 


6,614 


7,181 


6,312 


5,783 



*Incorporated since 1915. 

tName changed to Carteret Borough in 1921. 



236 



NEW JERSEY CENSUS. 



Incorporated Place County 

Sea Girt Bor.* Monmouth 

Sea Isle City Cape May 

Sea Bright Bor Monmouth 

Seaside Heights Bor. ...Ocean ... 

Seaside Park Bor Ocean . . . 

Secaucus Town Hudson . . 

Somers Point City Atlantic . 

Somerville Bor Somerset 

South Amboy City Middlesex 

South Bound Brook Bor. .. Somerset 
South Cape May Bor. ...Cape May 
South Orange Village ...Essex ... 

South River Bor Middlesex 

Spotswood Bor Middlesex 

Spring Lake Bor Monmouth 

Stanhope Bor Sussex . . 

Stockton Bor Hunterdon 

Stone Harbor Bor Cape May 

Summit City Union . . . 

Surf City Bor Ocean . . . 

Sussex Bor Sussex . . 

Swedesboro Bor Gloucester 

Tenafly Bor Bergen . . 

Teterboro Bor.* Bergen .. 

Totowa Bor Passaic . 

Trenton City Mercer . . 

Tuckerton Bor Ocean . . . 

Union Town Hudson . . 

Upper Saddle River Bor.. Bergen .. 
Ventnor City Atlantic . 

Essex . . . 

Cumberland 

Bergen . . 

Bergen . . 

Passaic . 

Warren . 

Gloucester 

Essex . . . 

Cape May 

Hudson . . 



Verona Bor 

Viueland Bor. 

Waldwick Bor.* 

Wallington Bor. 

Wanaque Bor.* . 

Washington Bor. 

Wenonah Bor. . . 

West Caldwell Bor. 

West Cape May Bor 

West Hoboken Town 

West Long Branch Bor. .. Monmouth 

West New York Town. .. Hudson .. 

West Orange Town Essex . . . 

West Paterson Bor Passaic . 

Westfield Town Union . . . 

Westville T3or Gloucester 

Westwood Bor Bergen . . 

Wharton Bor ilorris . . 

Wildwood City Cape May 

Wildwood Crest Bor. ...Cape May 

Woodbine Bor Cape Ma.v 

Woodbury City Gloucester 

Woodbury Heights Bor. . .Gloucester 

Woodcliff Lake Bor Bergen .. 

Woodlynne Bor Camden . 



1920 


1915 


1910 


110 






564 


955 


551 


856 


1,327 


1,220 


154 


252 




179 


275 


101 


5.423 


4,906 


4,740 


843 


790 


604 


6.718 


6,038 


5,060 


7.897 


7.482 


7,007 


1,302 


1,108 


1,024 


10 


19 


7 


7.274 


5,866 


6.014 


6,596 


6,691 


4,772 


704 


683 


623 


1.009 


1.393 


853 


1.031 


1,028 


1,031 


519 


613 


605 


159 


459 





10,174 


9,136 


7,500 


43 


44 


40 


1.318 


1,251 


1,212 


1.838 


1.738 


1,477 


5,650 


2,999 


2,756 


24 






1,864 


1.493 


1,130 


19,289 


103,190 


96,815 


1.106 


1,312 


1,268 


20.651 


21,739 


21,023 


251 


364 


273 


2.193 


1,676 


491 


3.039 


2,643 


1.675 


6.799 


6.531 


5,282 


1.296 






5.715 


4,071 


3,448 


2,916 






3.341 


3,250 


3,567 


918 


821 


645 


1.085 


690 


494 


967 


1,068 


844 


40.074 


38,776 


35,403 


966 


1,065 


879 


29.926 


22,943 


13,560 


15.573 


13.610 


10,980 


1.858 


1,535 




9.063 


8,147 


6,420 


2.380 


2.036 




2.597 


2.217 


1.870 


2.877 


2.591 


2,983 


2,790 


3.858 


898 


161 


317 


103 


1.406 


1.869 


2.399 


5,801 


5.288 


4,642 


481 


■ 339 




587 


522 


470 


1,515 


878 


500 



^Incorporated since 1915, 



NEW JERSEY CENSUS. 237 



1920 


1915 


1910 


1.923 


1.500 


1,043 


1,589 


1,507 


1,613 


5,288 







Incorporated Place County 

^Vooll Kidge Bor Bergen . . . 

Woodstown Bor Salem 

Wrightstowu Bor.* Burlington 

*Incorporated since 1915. 



Additional Ineorporated Places. 

The following incorporated places, not set out in the foregoing 
list, came into existence as herein set forth: 

Far Hills Borough, Somerset County, Chapter 171, P. L. 1921. 

Hamburgh Borough, Sussex County, Chapter 15, P. L. 1920. 

Lakehurst Borough. Ocean County, Chapter 168, P. L. 1921. 

Oceauport Borough, Monmouth County, Chapter 96, P. L. 1920. 

Point Pleasant Borough, Ocean County, Chapter 299, P. L. 1920. 

Pompton Borough, Morris County, Chapter 118. P. L. 1921. 

Tavistock Borough, Camden County. Chapter 12. P. L. 1921. 

West AVildwood Borough, Cape May County, Chapter 302, P. L. 
1920. 

Notes. — The incorporation of Ocean Grove as a borough under 
Chapter 96, P. L. 1920, was set aside by the courts. Hackensack 
Town (co-extensive with New Barbadoes township, Bergen county), 
became a city at the November election 1921 under authority of 
Article II of Chapter 1.52, P. L. 1917. The name of Roosevelt Bor- 
ougli, Middlesex County, was changed to Carteret Borough by coun- 
cilmanic action December 19. 1921. 

Incorporation of the following municipalities, authorized by laws 
of 1921, was rejected at referendum elections held during 1921: 
Basking Ridge Borough. Somerset County; Bernardsville Borough, 
Somerset '"'ounty; IJucoln Townshiii, Morris County. 



238 



NEW JERSEY CENSUS. 



POPULATION BY COUNTIES, 
SINCE 1790. 







1790. 


1800. 


1810. 


1820. 


1830. 


1840. 


Atlantic 








8726 


Bergen 




12601 


15156 


16603 


18178 


22414 


13190 


Burlington .. 




18095 


21521 


24979 


28822 


31107 


32809 


Camden 

















Cape May 




2571 


3066 


3632 


4265 


4945 


5324 


Cumberland 




8248 


9529 


12670 


12668 


14091 


14322 


Essex 




17785 
13363 


22269 
16115 


25894 
19744 


30793 
23089 


41928 
28431 


44512 


Gloucester .. 




25509 


Hudson 














9451 


Hunterdon .. 




20253 


21261 


24553 


28604 


31066 


24661 


Mercer 














21498 


Middlesex .. 




15956 
16918 


17890 
19872 


20381 
22150 


21470 
25038 


23157 
29233 


21873 


Monmouth .. 




32912 






16216 


17750 


21828 


21368 


23580 


25777 


Ocean 






Passaic 




10437 


ii37i 


12761 


14022 


iiiss 


16704 


Salem 




16012 


Somerset — 




12296 


12815 


14728 


16506 


17689 


17457 


Sussex 




19500 


22534 


25549 


32752 


20349 


27773 


Union 
















...... 


Warren 









245562 


277575 


18634 
320779 


20342 


Total 


184239 


211149 


372859 










1850. 


1860. 


1870. 
14163 


1880. 


1890. 
28836 


1900. 
46402 


1905. 


Atlantic 


. 8964 


11835 


18704 


59862 


Bergen 


. 14708 


21618 


31033 


36786 


47226 


78441 


100003 


Burlington .. 


. 43204 


49370 


53774 


55402 


58528 


58241 


62042 


Camden 


. 25569 


34457 


46206 


62942 


87687 


107643 


121555 


Cape May.... 


. 6432 


7130 


8529 


9768 


11268 


13201 


17390 


Cumberland 


.. 170O3 


22605 


3-1688 


37687 


45438 


51193 


52110 


Essex 


,. 73995 


98875 


143907 


189929 


256698 


359053 


409928 


Gloucester .. 


,. 14653 


18444 


21727 


25886 


28649 


31905 


34477 


Hudson 


,. 21874 


62717 


129288 


187994 


275126 


386048 


449879 


Hunterdon .. 


,. 29064 


33654 


36961 


38570 


35355 


34507 


33258 


Mercer 


,. 27991 


37411 


46470 


58061 


79978 


95365 


110516 


Middlesex .. 


. 28671 


34810 


45057 


52286 


61754 


79762 


97036 


Monmouth .. 


.. 30234 


39345 


46316 


55538 


69128 


82057 


87319 


Morris 


.. 30173 


34679 


43161 


E0861 


54101 


65156 


67934 


Ocean 


,. 10043 


11176 


12658 


14455 


15974 


19747 


20880 


Passaic 


.. 22577 


29013 


46468 


68860 


105046 


155202 


175858 


Salem 


,. 19500 


22458 


23951 


24579 


25151 


25530 


26278 


Somerset .... 


,. 19668 


22057 


23514 


27162 


28311 


32948 


36270 


Sussex 


,. 22990 


23845 


23168 


23539 


22259 


24134 


23325 


Union 




27780 


41891 


55571 


72467 


99353 


117211 


Warren 


.. 22390 


28834 
672073 


34419 
907149 


36589 
1131116 


36553 


37781 
1883669 


40403 


Total 


.489703 


1444933 


2144134 



For later figures see next page. 



NEW JERSEY CENSUS. 



239 



POPULATION BY COUNTIES- 

County. 1920 

Atlantic 83,914 

Bergen 210,703 

Burlington 81,770 

Camden 190,508 

Cape May 19,460 

Cumberland 61,348 

Essex 652,089 

Gloucester 48,224 

Hudson 629,154 

Hunterdon 32,885 

Mercer 159,881 

Middlesex 162,334 

Monmouth 104,925 

Morris 82,694 

Ocean 22,155 

Passaic 259,174 

Salem 36,572 

Somerset 47,991 

Sussex 24,905 

Union 200,157 

Warren 45,057 



-Contiiiuecl. 

1915 

82,840 
178,596 

74,737 
163,221 

24,407 

59,481 
566,324 

43,587 
571,371 

34,697 
139,812 
144,716 
107,636 

81,514 

23,011 
236,364 

30,292 

44,123 

25,977 
167,322 

44,314 



1910 

71,894 

138,002 
66,565 

142,029 
19,745 
55,153 

512,886 
37,368 

537,231 
33,569 

125,657 

114,426 
94,734 
74,704 
21,318 

215,902 
26,999 
38,820 
26,781 

140,197 
43,187 



3,155,900 2,844,342 2,537,167 



POPULATION (1920) BY AGE GROUPS. 



j:c= 



Atlantic . . . 

Bergen 

Burlington 
Camden . . . 
Cape May . 
Cumberland 

Essex 

Gloucester , 
Hudson . . . . 
Hunterdon . 
Mercer . . . . 
Middlesex . 
Monmouth 
Morris . . . . 

Ocean 

Passaic . . . 
Salem . . . . 
Somerset . , 

Sussex 

Union .... 
Warren . . 



H 


^ 


O 


O 


83,914 


10,381 


19,489 


54,144 


210,703 


32,354 


55,326 


123,023 


81,770 


11,145 


19,799 


50.826 


190,508 


28,378 


46,857 


115,273 


19,400 


2,495 


4,630 


12,335 


61,348 


7,772 


16,090 


37,486 


652,089 


94,147 


159,278 


398,664 


48,224 


7.059 


11,565 


29,600 


629,154 


97,959 


160,348 


370,847 


32,885 


4.061 


7,562 


21,262 


159,881 


24,129 


38,975 


96,777 


162,334 


30,520 


42,135 


89,679 


104,925 


13,119 


25,423 


66,383 


82,694 


11,143 


19,393 


52,158 


22,155 


2,466 


5,436 


14,253 


259,174 


39,403 


67,480 


152,291 


36,572 


5,393 


8,969 


22,210 


47,991 


7,315 


11,934 


28,742 


24,905 


3,734 


5,710 


15,461 


200,157 


32,373 


40,016 


118,768 


45,057 


6,630 


10,625 


27,802 


3,155,900 


471,976 


786,040 


1,897.884 



240 NEW JERSEY CENSUS. 

XEW JERSEY POPUIiATIOjV, 1920, BY NATIVITY 
AXD COLOR. 



-bo S 



Counties. g2 §'§ S I 

g^ ^ s Si •! 

Atlaulic 38,077 20,420 12,732 12,597 

Jiergen G9,444 82,815 54,184 4,136 

IJuriingtou 53.356 14,004 8,974 4,493 

Camden 102,392 48,107 27,832 12,107 

Oipe Maj- 12,819 3,150 1,916 1,560 

Cumbei-lanil 41,377 10,464 6,397 3,094 

Kssex 216,857 244,696 161,111 28,956 

Gloucester 31,481 8,757 4,823 3,154 

Hudsou 163,447 273.979 182,117 9,351 

Huuterdon 25,246 4,469 2.803 359 

Mercer 67,372 49.505 35.916 6,991 

Middlesex 45.215 65,042 49,198 2,815 

Monmouth 61,007 23,895 13,030 8.938 

Morris 44.163 21,955 14,662 1,861 

Ocean 16.428 2.866 2,282 566 

Passaic 59.411 108.383 88,742 2.. 522 

Salem 25.731 4,152 2.717 3,962 

Somerset 21.523 14,841 10,360 1,221 

Sussex 18,503 3.408 2,902 90 

Union 67.581 73,846 50,524 8,087 

Warren 31,245 8,145 5,391 272 

Totals 1,212,675 1,085,799 738,613 117,132 

Municipalities — 

Atlantic City 22.087 10.500 7,009 10,946 

Bavonne 14.497 36.103 25.472 648 

Camden 56,249 31,242 20,262 8.500 

Clifton 4.866 11,931 9,611 47 

East Oranffe 27.455 14.075 6.780 2,378 

Elizabeth 25.887 39,668 28.215 1,970 

Hobokeu 14.473 29,945 23,496 204 

Irvington 9.806 10.058 5,508 104 

Jersey Citv 87,083 126,945 75.981 8,000 

Kearny 7.739 10,979 7,904 78 

Montciair 12.671 7,480 5.159 3,467 

New Bruns\yick ... 11.546 11.153 8.935 1,124 

Newark 113.413 166.807 117,003 16,977 

Oranse 30.063 12.600 6.963 3,621 

Passaic 8.816 28.042 26,365 591 

Paterson 31,824 57.285 45.145 1,551 

Perth Amboy 6,348 19.923 14.918 492 

Plainflekl 11.614 8,124 5,502 2.445 

Trenton 44,195 40,634 30,073 4,315 

West Hoboken .... 8.504 17,457 14,076 13 

West New Yoik.... 7.916 12,985 8,928 92 
Xote.— A fifth classification, Indians, Chinese, Japanese, etc., is 
omitted from the aboye tables, as the figures are negligible, only 
1.681 for the entire State. 



NEW JERSEY CENSUS. 241 

POPULATIOX BY COXGRESSIOXAL DISTRICTS. 

District 

First 

Second 

Third 

Fourtli 

Fifth 

Sixth 

Seventh 

Eighth 

Ninth 

Tenth 

Eleventh 

Twelfth 

3,155,900 2,537,167 

Note. — For boundaries of Congressional districts see Biographies 
of Congressmen. 

ADDITIONAL, POPULATION DATA. 

Of the total i»opulation of the State, 338,690 are under live 
years of age. Those over Ave and under seven years of age 
number 143,280. 

Of the Total of 1,897,884 twenty-one years of age or over, 
900,837 are males and 937,047 are females. Of the males twenty- 
one years of age or over, 360,902 are foreign-born white, and of 
these 158,727 are naturalized. Of the females of the State twenty- 
one years of age or over, 314,320 are foreign-born white, and of 
these 146,789 are naturalized. The negroes of the State twenty- 
one years of age or over total 75,671, and of these 37,511 are 
males and 38,160 are females. 



1920 


1910 


Census 


Census 


275,304 


206,390 


246,492 


213,357 


289,414 


230,478 


240,757 


198,046 


282,851 


214,901 


288,562 


213.981 


251,277 


209,891 


276,612 


207,647 


261,313 


213,027 


275,613 


206,692 


228,615 


199,612 


239,090 


223,138 



242 UNITED STATES CENSUS. 

POPUIiATION OP THE UNITED STATES, BY 
STATES, 1920, 1910. 

States. 1920. 1910. Increase. % 

United States 105,710,620 91,972,266 13,738,354 14.9 

Alabama 2,348,174 2,138,093 210,081 9.8 

Arizona 334,162 204,354 129,808 63.5 

Arkansas 1,752,204 1,574,449 177,755 11.3 

California 3,426,861 2,377,549 1,049,312 44.1 

Colorado 939,629 799,024 140,605 17.6 

Connecticut 1,380,631 1,114,756 265,875 23.9 

Delaware 223,003 202,322 20,681 10.2 

District of Columbia 437,571 331,069 106,502 32.2 

Florida 968,470 752,619 215,851 28.7 

Georgia 2,895,832 2,609,121 286,711 11.0 

Idaho 431,866 325,594 106,272 32.6 

Illinois 6,485,280 5,638,-591 846,689 15.0 

Indiana 2,930,390 2,700,876 229,514 8.5 

Iowa 2,404,021 2,224,771 179,250 8.1 

Kansas 1,769,257 1,690,949 78,308 4.6 

Kentucky 2,416.630 2,289,905 126,725 5.5 

Louisiana 1,798,509 1,656,388 142,121 8.6 

Maine 768,014 742,371 25,643 3.5 

Maryland 1,449,661 1,295,346 154,315 11.9 

Massachusetts 3,852,356 3,366,416 485,940 14.4 

Michigan 3,668,412 2,810,173 858,239 30.5 

Minnesota 2,387,125 2.075,708 311,417 15.0 

Mississippi 1,790,618 1,797,114 *6,496 *0.4 

Missouri 3,404,055 3,293,335 110,720 3.4 

Montana 548,889 376,053 172,836 46.0 

Nebraska 1,296,372 1,192,214 104,158 8.7 

Nevada 77,407 81,875 *4,468 *5.5 

New Hampshire 443,083 430,572 12,511 2.9 

New Jersey 3,155,900 2,537,167 618,733 24.4 

New Mexico 360.350 327,.301 33,049 10.1 

New York 10,385,227 9,113,614 1,271,613 14.0 

North Carolina 2,559,123 2,206,287 352,836 16.0 

North Dakota 646,872 577,056 69,816 12.1 

Ohio 5,759,394 4,767,121 992,273 20.8 

Oklahoma 2,028,283 1,657,155 371,128 22.4 

Oregon 783,389 672,765 110,624 16.4 

Pennsylvania 8,720,017 7,665,111 1,054,906 13.8 

Rhode Island 604,397 542,610 61,787 11.4 

South Carolina 1,683,724 1,515,400 168,324 11.1 

South Dakota 636,547 583,888 52,659 9.0 

Tennessee 2.337,885 2,184,789 1.53,096 7.0 

Texas 4,66:^,228 3,896,542 766,686 19.7 

Utah 449,396 373,351 76.045 20.4 

Vermont 352,428 3.55.956 *3,528 *1.0 

Virginia 2,309,187 2,061,612 247,575 12.0 

Washington 1,356.621 1,141,990 214,631 18.8 

West Virginia 1,463,701 1,221,119 242,582 19.9 

Wisconsin 2,632,067 2,333,860 298,207 12.8 

Wyoming 194,402 145,965 48,437 33.2 

*Decrease. 

POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES AND 
OUTLYING POSSESSIONS, 1920. 

Continental United States, 105,710,620; Alaska, 55,036; Samoa, 
8,056; Guam, 13,275; Hawaii, 255,912; Panama Canal Zone, 
22,858; Porto Eico, 1,299,809; Military and Naval, etc., service 

abroad, 117,238; Philippine Islands, 10,350,040; Virgin Islands 
of the United States, 26,051. Grand total for Continental United 
States and outlying possessions, 117,859,495. 



UNITED STATES CENSUS. 



243 



POPULATION OF UNITED STATES CITIES HAVING 
25,000 OR MORE INHABITANTS. 

CITIES r- Population — ^ of In- 

1920 1910 crease 
Alabama. 

Birmingham 178,806 132,685 34.8 

Mobile 60,777 51,521 18.0 

Montgomery 43,464 38,136 14.0 

Arizona. 

Phoenix 29,053 11,134 1G0.9 

Arkansas. 

Fort Smith 28,870 23,975 20.4 

Little Kock 05,142 45,941 41.8 

California. 

Alameila 28,806 23,383 23.2 

Berkeley 56,036 40,434 38.6 

Fresno 45,086 24,892 81.1 

Long Beach 55,593 17,809 212.2 

Los Angeles 576,673 319,198 80.7 

Oakland 216,261 150,174 44.0 

Pasadena 45,354 30,291 49.7 

Sacramento 65,908 44,696 47.5 

San Diego 74,683 39,578 88.7 

San Francisco 506,676 416,912 21.5 

San Jose 39,642 28,946 37.0 

Stockton 40,296 23,253 73.3 

Colorado. 

Colorado Springs 30,105 29.078 3.5 

Denver 256,491 213,381 20.2 

Pueblo 43,050 41,747 3.1 

Connecticut. 

Bridgeport City 143,555 102,054 40.7 

Hartford City 138,036 98,915 39.6 

Meriden Town (including Meriden 

Citv) 34,764 32,066 8.4 

Meriden City 29,867 27,265 9.5 

New Britain Town, coextensive with 

New Britain City 59,316 43,916 35.1 

New Haveu City 162,537 133,605 21.7 

New London City 25,688 19,659 30.7 

Norwalk Town, coextensive with 

Norwalk City 27,743 24,211 14.6 

Norwalk City 27,743 6,954 299.0 

Norwich Town 29,685 28,219 5.2 

Stamford Town (including Stam- 
ford City) 40,067 28,836 38.9 

Stamford City 35,096 25,138 39.6 

Waterbury Town, coextensive with 

Wat?rbury City 91,715 73,141 25.4 



244 UNITED STATES CENSUS. 

CITIES r- Population -^, of In- 

1920 1910 crease 

Wilmington ' 110,108 87 411 2G.0 

District of Columbia. 
Washington 437,571 331,009 32.2 

Florida. 

Jacksonvill.! 

^Miami 

Pensacola 

Tami)a 

Georgia. 

Atlanta 

Augusta 

Columbus 

Macon 

Savannah 

Illinois. 

Aurora 

Bloomington 

Chicago 

Cicero Toaa n 

Danville 

Decatur 

East St. Louis 

Elgin 

Evanston 

.Toilet 

Moline 

Oak Park Village 

Peoria 

Quincy 

Rock Island 

Rockford 

Springfield 

Indiana. 

Anderson 

East Chicago 

Evansville 

Fort ^^'a.vne 

(lary 

Hammond 

Indianapolis 

Kokomo 

-Mumie 

Richmond 

South Bend 

Terre Haute 

Iowa. 

Cedar Rapids 

Council Bluffs 

Davenport 

Des Moines 

Dubuque 

Sioux City 

Waterloo 

*Decrease. 



91,558 


57,699 


58.7 


29,571 


5,471 


440.5 


31,035 


22,982 


?5.0 


51,608 


37,782 


36.6 


200,616 


1.54,839 


29.6 


52,548 


41,040 


28.0 


31,125 


20.5.54 


51.4 


52.995 


40,605 


30.3 


83,252 


65,064 


28.0 


36, .397 


29,807 


22.1 


28,725 


25,768 


11.5 


,701,705 


2,185,283 


23.6 


44,995 


14.5.57 


209.1 


33,776 


27.871 


21.2 


43.818 


31,140 


40.7 


66.767 


58,. 547 


14.0 


27,454 


25,976 


5.7 


37,234 


24,978 


49.1 


38.442 


34.670 


10.9 


30.734 


24,199 


27.0 


39.858 


19,444 


105.0 


76,121 


66,9.50 


13.7 


35.978 


36, .587 


*1.7 


35,177 


24,335 


44.6 


65.651 


45,401 


44.6 


59,183 


51,678 


14.5 


29.767 


22,476 


32.4 


35,967 


19,098 


88.3 


85.264 


69.647 


22 4 


86,. 549 


63,933 


35.4 


55.378 


16,802 


229.6 


36,004 


20,925 


72.1 


314.194 


233,6.50 


34.5 


30,067 


17,010 


76.8 


36.524 


24.005 


52.2 


26,765 


22,324 


19.9 


70,983 


.53,684 


32.2 


66,083 


58,157 


13.6 


45.566 


32,811 


38.9 


36.162 


29,292 


23.5 


.56,727 


43,028 


31.8 


126.468 


86,368 


46.4 


39.141 


38.494 


1.7 


71.227 


47,828 


48.9 


36.2.30 


26,693 


35.7 



Kansas City 

Topeka 

Wichita 

Kentucky. 

Coviugtoii 

Lexington 

Louisville 

Newport 

Louisiana. 

New Orleans 

Sbreveport 

Maine. 

Bangor 

Lewiston 

Portland 

Maryland. 

Baltimore 

("umberlanil 

Ilagerstown 

Massachusetts. 

Boston 

Brockton 

Brookline Town 

Cambridge 

Chelsea 

Chicopee 

Everett 

Fall River , 

Fitchburg 

Haverhill 

Ilolyoke 

Lawrence 

Lowell 

Lynn 

:\Ialilen 

:Meaforu 

New Bedford 

Newton 

Pittsfleld 

Quiucy 

Revere 

Salem 

Somerville 

Springfield 

Taunton 

AValtham 

AVorcester 

Michigan. 

Battle Creek 

Bay City 

Detroit 

Flint 

*Decrease. 



UNITED STATES CENSUS. 245 



CITIES 
Kansas. 



r- Population ^ 


of In- 


1920 


1910 


crease 


101.177 


82,331 


22 


50,022 


43,684 


14.5 


72,217 


52,450 


37.7 


57.121 


53.270 


7 "^ 


41,534 


35,099 


18.3 


234,891 


223.928 


4.9 


20,317 


30,30iJ 


*3.3 


387.210 


339,075 


14.2 


43,874 


28,015 


56.6 


25,078 


24,803 


4.7 


31,701 


26.247 


21.1 


GO, 272 


58,571 


18.3 


733,826 


558,485 


31.4 


20.837 


21,839 


36.6 


28,064 


16,507 


70.0 


748,060 


070,585 


11.6 


66.254 


56.878 


16.5 


37,748 


27,792 


35.8 


100,604 


104,839 


4.6 


43.184 


32,452 


33.1 


36.214 


25,401 


42.6 


40.120 


33,484 


10.8 


120.485 


119,205 


1.0 


41,020 


37.826 


8.5 


53.884 


44.115 


22.1 


60.203 


57.730 


4.3 


04.270 


85,802 


9.8 


112.750 


106,204 


6.1 


00,148 


80.336 


n.o 


49.103 


44.404 


10.6 


30,038 


23.150 


68.6 


121,217 


06.652 


25.4 


46,054 


30.806 


15.7 


41.763 


32,121 


30.0 


47,876 


32.642 


46.7 


28.823 


18.210 


58.2 


42,529 


43,607 


'2.7 


03,001 


77.236 


20.5 


120,614 


88.026 


45.8 


37,137 


34.250 


8.4 


.30.015 


27.834 


11.1 


170,754 


145,086 


23.1 


36.164 


25.267 


43.1 


47,554 


45.166 


5.3 


903,678 


465,766 


113.3 


01,500 


38,550 


137.6 



246 



UNITED STATES CENSUS. 



CITIES 

Grand Rapids 

Hamtramck Village 

Highland Park 

Jackson 

Kalamazoo 

Lansing 

Muskegon 

Pontiac 

Port Huron 

Saginaw 

Minnesota. 

Duluth 

Minneapolis 

St. Paul , 

Missouri, 

.Toplin 

Kansas Citj' 

St. Joseph 

St. Louis 

Springfield 

Montana. 
Butte 

Nebraska. 

Lincoln 

Omaha 

New Hampshire. 

Manchester 

Nashua 

New Jersey. 

Atlantic City 

Bayonne 

Camden 

Clifton 

East Orange 

Elizabeth 

Hoboken 

Irvington Town 

Jersey City 

Kearny Town 

Montclair Town 

New Brunswick 

Newark 

Orange 

Passaic 

Paterson 

Perth Amboy 

Plainfield 

Trenton 

West Hoboken Town 

West New York Town . . . 



r- Population --, 


of In- 


1920 


1910 


crease 


137,634 


112,571 


22.3 


48,615 


3,559 


1,266.0 


46,499 


4,120 


1,028.6 


48,374 


31,433 


53.9 


48,487 


39,437 


22.9 


57,327 


31,229 


83.6 


36,570 


24,062 


52.0 


34,273 


14,532 


135.8 


25,944 


18.863 


37.5 


61,903 


50,510 


22.6 


98,917 


78,466 


26.1 


380,582 


301,408 


26.3 


234,698 


214,744 


9.3 


29.902 


32,073 


*6.8 


324,410 


248,381 


30.6 


77,939 


77,403 


0.7 


772,897 


687,029 


12.5 


39,631 


35,201 


12.6 



41,611 



39,165 



.54,948 


43,973 


25.0 


191,601 


124,096 


54.4 


78,. 384 


70.063 


11.9 


28,379 


26,005 


9.1 


50,707 


46.1.50 


9.9 


76,754 


55,545 


38.2 


116,309 


94.538 


23.0 


26,470 


11,869 


123.0 


50,710 


34,371 


47.5 


95,783 


73,409 


30.5 


68,166 


70,324 


*3.1 


25,480 


11,877 


114.5 


298.103 


267,779 


11.3 


26,724 


18,6.59 


43.2 


28,810 


21,5.50 


33.7 


32,779 


23,388 


40.2 


414, .524 


347,469 


19.3 


33.268 


29.630 


12.3 


63.841 


54,773 


16.6 


135.875 


125,600 


8.2 


41.707 


32.121 


29.8 


27,700 


20,550 


34.8 


119,289 


96,815 


23.2 


40,074 


35.403 


13.2 


29,926 


13,560 


120.T 



''Decrease. 



UNITED STATES CENSUS. 247 

% 

CITIES r- Population -^ of In- 

1920 1910 crease 
New York. 

Albany 113.344 100 253 13.1 

Amsterdam 33,524 31,267 7.2 

Auburn 36.192 34,668 4.4 

Blnghamton 66,800 48,443 37.9 

Buffalo 506,775 423.715 19.6 

Elmira 45,393 37,176 22.1 

Jamestown 38,917 31,297 24.3 

Kingston 26,688 25,908 3.0 

Mount Vernon 42,726 30.919 38.2 

New Roelielle 30,213 28,867 25.4 

New York City 5,020,048 4,766,883 17.9 

Manhattan Borough 2,284,103 2,331,542 »2.0 

Bronx Borough 732,016 430,980 69.8 

Brooklyn Borough 2,018,356 1,634,351 23.5 

Queens Borough 469,042 284,041 65.1 

Biehmond Borough 116,531 85,969 35.6 

Newburgh 30,366 27,805 9.2 

Niagara Falls 50,760 30,445 66.7 

Boughkeepsie 35,000 27,936 25.3 

Rochester 285,750 218,149 35.6 

Rome 26,341 20,497 28.5 

Schenectady 88,723 72,826 21.8 

Syracuse 171,717 137.249 25.1 

Troy 72,013 76,813 »6.2 

Utiea 94,156 74,419 26.5 

Watertown 31,285 26,730 17.0 

Yonkers 100,176 79,803 25.5 

North Carolina, 

Asheville 28,504 18,762 51.9 

Charlotte 46,338 34,014 36.2 

Wilmington 33,372 25,748 29.6 

Winston-Salom 48,395 22,700 113.2 

Ohio. 

Akron 208,435 69,067 201.8 

Canton 87,091 50,217 73.4 

Cincinn.-iti 401,247 .363,591 10.4 

Cleveland 796,841 560.663 42.1 

Columbus 237,031 181,511 30.G 

Daj-ton 152,559 116,577 30.9 

East Cleveland 27,292 9,179 197.3 

Hamilton 39,675 35,279 12.5 

Lakawood 41,732 15,181 174.9 

Lima 41,326 30.508 35.5 

l.ornin 37,295 28,883 29.1 

Mansfield 27,824 20,768 34.0 

Marion 27,891 18,232 53.0 

Newark 26.718 25,404 5.2 

Portsmouth 33,011 23.481 40.6 

Springfield 60,840 46.921 29.7 

Steubenville 28,508 22,391 27.3 

Toledo 243,164 168,497 44.3 

Warren 27,050 11,081 144.1 

Y'oungstown 132,358 79,066 67.4 

Zanesville 29,569 28,026 5.5 



♦Decrease. 



248 UNITED STATES CENSUS. 

% 

CITIES r- Population - of In- 

1920 1910 crease 
Oklahoma. 

Muskogee 30,277 25,278 19.8 

Oklahoma City 91,295 64,205 42.2 

Tulsa 72,075 18, 182 296.4 

Oregon. 

Portiand 2,58,288 207,214 24.6 

Pennsylvania. 

Alleutown 73,.502 51,913 41.6 

Altoona 60,331 52,127 15.7 

Bethlehem 50,358 12,837 292.3 

Chester 58.030 38,-537 50.6 

Easton 33.813 28,523 18.5 

Erie 93,372 66,525 40.4 

Harrisburg 75,917 64,186 18.3 

llazletou 32.277 25,4.52 26.8 

Johustowu 67,327 55.482 21.3 

Lancaster .53.150 47.227 12.5 

McKeesport 46.781 42.694 9.6 

New Castle 44.938 36.280 23.9 

Norristown Borou^i: 32,319 27,875 15.9 

Philadelphia 1.823.779 1,549,008 17.7 

Pittsburgh 588.343 533,905 10.2 

Reading 107.784 96,071 12.2 

Scranton 137.783 129,867 6.1 

Wilkes-Barre 73.833 67.105 10.0 

AVilliamsport 36.198 31.860 13.6 

York 47,512 44,750 6.2 

Rhode Island. 

Cranston 29.407 21.107 39.3 

Newport 30,2.55 27.149 11.4 

Pawtucket 64.248 51,622 24.5 

Providence 237.595 224.326 5.9 

Woonsocket 43,496 38,125 14.1 

South Carolina. 

Charleston 67.957 58.833 15.5 

Columbia 37,.524 26,319 42.6 

South Dakota. 

Sioux Falls 25,202 14,094 78.8 

Tennessee. 

Chattanooga .57.895 44.604 29.8 

Knoxville 77.818 36,346 114.1 

Memphis 162.3.51 131.105 23.8 

Nashville 118.342 110,304 7.2 

Texas. 

Austin .•^4.876 29.860 16.8 

Beaumont 40.422 20,640 95.8 

Dallas 1.58.976 92,104 72.6 

El Paso 77.560 39,279 97.5 

Fort Wortli 106,482 73.312 45.2 

Galveston 44,255 36.981 19.7 

Houston 138.276 78.800 75.5 

San Antonio 161,379 96,614 67.0 

Waco .38..500 26.425 45.7 

Wichita Falls 40,079 8,200 388.8 



UNITED STATES CENSUS. 249 



CITIES r- Population -. of In- 

1920 1910 crease 

Utah. 

Ogden 32.804 25,580 28.2 

Salt Lake City 118,110 112,777 27.3 

Virginia. 

Lynchburg 30.070 20.494 2.0 

Newport News 35,596 20.205 7C..2 

Norfolk 115.777 67.452 71.6 

retersburg 31,012 24.127 28.5 

Portsmouth 54,387 33.190 63.9 

Kichmona 171.667 127,628 34.5 

Uoauoka 50.842 34,874 45.8 

Washington. 

P.pllingham 25,585 24,298 5.3 

Everett 27,644 24.814 11.4 

Seattle 315,312 2.37.194 32.9 

Spokane 104.437 104.402 t 

Tacoma 96,965 83,743 15.8 

West Virginia. 

Charleston 39.608 22.996 72.2 

Clark.sburg 27.8a9 9.201 202.9 

Huntington .50.177 31.161 61.0 

Wheeling .56.208 41,641 .35.0 

Wisconsin. 

Oreen Bay 31.017 25.236 22.9 

Kenosha 40.472 21,371 89.4 

La Crosse .30.421 30.417 t 

:Ma(lison 38.378 25,531 .50.3 

:Milwaukee 4.57.147 373,857 22.3 

Oshkosh 33,162 .33.062 0.3 

Racine 58..593 38,002 .54.2 

Sheboygan .30.9.55 26..398 17.3 

Superior .39,671 40.3^ *1.8 

* Decrease. 

fLess than one-tenth of one per cent. 



250 SCHOOL LAW 



SYNOPSIS OF SCHOOL LAW. 



The State Board of Education consists of ten members, 
not more than one of whom shall reside in the same county, 
and not more than five of whom shall belong to the same 
political party. Not less than two of the ten members must 
be women. The State Board has, among its other duties, 
control of the State Normal Schools, the School for the 
Deaf and the Manual Training and Industrial School for 
Colored Youth. It confirms the appointment of the county 
superintendents of schools, decides appeals from the de- 
cisions of the Commissioner of Education, and makes rules 
for the granting of teachers' certificates and for carrying 
into effect the school laws of the State. 

The Commissioner of Education is appointed by the gov- 
ernor and confirmed by the Senate. He appo.nts the county 
superintendents of schools, decides controversies that arise 
under the school law ; may withhold the State school moneys 
from any district for neglect or refusal to comply with the 
provisions of the school law, and has general supervision of 
the public schools. There are four assistant commissioners 
appointed by the commissioner by the advice and consent of 
the State Board of Education ; one acts as inspector of 
secondary schools, another as inspector of elementary schools, 
another as inspector of industrial education, and another to 
hear controversies and disputes arising under the school law. 
The Commissioner may designate a business manager, who 
shall supervise and direct all business matters under the 
control of the Commissioner. 

There is a superintendent of schools for each county, ap- 
pointed by the Commissioner of Education and confirmed by 
the State Board of Education. The County Superintendent 
apportions the school moneys among the districts in his 
county, has general supervision of the schools and, in con- 
nection with the local Board of Education, prescribes the 
course of study to be pursued in the district, approves the 
necessity for transportation and the cost and method thereof. 

Each municipality in the State constitutes a school dis- 
trict, unless by a vote of the people two or more munici- 
palities decide to unite and form one district. Therp are 
two classes of school districts, cities forming one class and 
all other municipalities the other, but a district in either 



SCHOOL LAW. 251 

class may, by a vote of the people, be transferred to the 
other class. The members of the Board of Education in a 
city school district are appointed by the mayor. 

In order to be eligible to membership in the Board of 
Education, a person must be a citizen of the United States 
and must have been a resident of the district for at least 
three years immediately preceding his or her election or ap- 
pointment and must be able to read and write. A city 
school district may have a city ruperintendent, but until one 
is appointed the County Superintendent has supervision of 
the schools. 

In each city school district there is a Board of School 
Estimate, consisting of the mayor, two members of ^he body 
having the power to make appropriations ifor city purposes, 
and two members of the Board of Education. The Board 
of Education presents its estimate of the amount of local 
appropriation needed, and the Board of School Estimate 
certifies to the body in the city having power to make appro- 
priations, the amount to be raised for cchool purposes. The 
amount so certified must be raised. 

In districts other than cities the Boards of Education 
consist of nine members each, elected by the people on the 
third Tuesday in March. The term of office begins the first 
Monday in April, The qualifications for membership are 
the same as in city school districts. The special district 
school tax is voted either at the annual meeting or at a 
special school meeting called by the Board of Education. 
Bonds for school houses are authorized by the legal voters, 
unless amount is $10,000 or less. School bonds cannot be 
sold at private sale except to the Trustees of the School 
Fund or Sinking Fund Commissioners, unless if no bids are 
received for any bonds after advertisement has been made, 
as provided by law, they may be sold at private sale. Bonds 
cannot be delivered to any purchaser other than the Trus- 
tees of the School Fund, except upon payment of full pur- 
chase price. Women may now vote on all school questions. 
Truant officers and janitors cannot be discharged or their 
compensation decreased except for cause and after a hearing. 

Funds for the support of schools come from the following 
sources : First, from the income of the State School Fund. 
The principal of this fund is derived almost entirely from 
the sale and rental of lands under water belonging to the 
State, The principal cannot be used for any purpose, and 
the income can be used only for the support of public schools. 
Second, from State appropriation made by the Legislature to 
reduce the State school tax. Third, from State school tax, 



252 SCHOOL LAW. 

an amount which when added to the State appropriation 
will mal£e a sum equal to two and three-fourths mills on 
each dollar of the taxable property in the State. Fourth, 
the railroad tax received by the State in excess of one-half 
of one per cent, of the value of the railroad property. Fifth, 
interest of surplus revenue, and sixth, local school tax. 

The income from the school fund is apportioned amons: 
the counties by the State Superintendent on the basis of 
the total days' attendance of pupils in the public schools. 
The State appropriation is apportioned among the counties 
by the State Comptroller on the basis of the ratables. Ninety 
per cent, of the State school tax paid by each county is 
returned to it, and the ten per cent, received from all the 
counties forms the reserve fund, which is apportioned among 
the counties in the discretion of the State Board of Educa- 
tion. The railroad tax is apportioned on the ratables. 

The County Superintendent apportions to each district $600 
for the Superintendent or Supervising Principal, if there be 
one ; $500 for each teacher in a special class for subnormal 
children ; $400 for each Assistant Superintendent and Super- 
visor, and for each permanent teacher employed in a high 
school having a full four-years' course of study ; $300 for 
each permanent teacher employed in a high school having 
a full three-years' course of study ; $315 for each teacher 
employed in an intermediate school associated with a high 
school ; $200 for each permanent teacher employed in 
any kindergarten, primary or grammar grade or in a 
high school having less than three years' course of study ; 
$80 for each temporary teacher employed more than 
four months ; $80 for each evening school teacher ; $25 
for each high school pupil for whom a tuition fee is 
paid to another district ; $5 for each pupil below the high 
school grade for whom such tuition fee is paid, and 75 per 
cent, of the cost of transportation of pupils approved by 
the County Superintendent. The balance of the State school 
moneys received by the county is apportioned on the basis 
of the total number of days' attendance of the pupils. 

The custodian of municipal funds is the custodian of 
school moneys, unless the Board of Education appoints the 
collector as custodian. In either case, the compensation of 
the custodian must be fixed by the Board of Education and 
paid from school funds. If there are two or more munici- 
palities in the district, the Board of Education may appoint 
its own custodian. 



SCHOOL LAW. 253 

Each collector must pay to the county collector the 
amount of State school tax due from his taxing district not 
later than December 22d. If the tax is not paid by that 
date the County Superintendent must withhold the amount 
of reserve fund apportioned to the district and divide it 
the following year among all the districts in the county. 
The county collector must pay the State school tax to the 
State Treasurer not later than January 20th. 

If a district provides a course in manual training, and 
such course is approved by the State Board of Education, the 
State will give to such district each year a sum equal to that 
raised in the district for manual training, provided State-aid 
shall not exceed $5,000 in any one year, and provided the 
amount raised for establishment of school is not less than 
$250. 

County vocational schools may be established in any 
county under rules made by the State Board of Education, 
The location of these schools shall be approved by the Com- 
missioner of Education with the advice and consent of the 
State Board of Education. The Board of Education for 
such vocational school shall consist of the County Superin- 
tendent and four persons to be appointed by the judge of 
the Court of Common Pleas in the county. The State 
appropriates a sum equal to that raised in the county for 
the establishment of such school. The amount contributed 
by the State for any such school shall not exceed in any 
one year the sum of $10,000. 

Every district must provide free text-books and supplies 
for all pupils and must also provide a flag for each school 
house, which flag must be displayed every day the school is 
in session. The selection of a text-book requires the vote of 
a majority of the whole number Oif members of the Board 
of Education. A Board of Education must employ medical 
inspectors and attendance officers. 

Every school which raises $20 to establish a school library 
may receive a like amount from the State. After the first 
payment, the State will give $10 each year that the school 
raises the same amount. Library moneys may be used for 
library books, reference books, apparatus, or educational 
works of art. 

All plans for school houses must be submitted to the State 
Board of Education for suggestion and criticism. Every 
school house hereafter erected must comply with the follow- 
ing requirements : First, light must be admitted to the class 
rooms only from the left and rear. Second, the total light 



2oi SCHOOL LAW. 

area must equal 20 per cent, of floor space. Third, there 
must be 18 square feet of floor space and not less than 200 
cubic feet of air space for each pupil. Fourth, all rooms 
must have a proper sj'stem of ventilation which will supply 
30 cubic feet of fresh air per minute for each pupil. Fifth, 
all ceilings must be at least 12 feet in height and all stairs 
must be at least 4 feet wide, with intermediate landings, 
enclosed in brick walls or by partitions of slow-burning con- 
struction, and without open well holes. Sixth, a school 
house having eight rooms must have two flights of stairs, 
each four feet in width, or one flight not less than six feet 
in width, one having from eight to sixteen rooms, two flights 
of stairs not less than five feet in width, and one having 
sixteen or more rooms, four flights of stairs not less than 
four feet in width, or two flights not less than six feet in 
width. Seventh, all ceilings must be either metal, wood or 
plaster on metal laths and painted white or some light tint. 

A person cannot be legally employed as a teacher unless 
he holds a teacher's certificate in full force and effect at 
the time he begins teaching. Before beginning to teach he 
must show his certificate to the Superintendent of Schools. 
A Board of Education may adopt rules governing the em- 
ployment of teachers. In the absence of rules, the contract 
must be in writing in triplicate, one copy filed with the 
Board of Education, one with the County Superintendent, 
and one with the teacher. The employment, promotion or 
dismissal of a teacher requires the vote of a majority of the 
whole number of members of the Board of Education. After 
three years' continuous service a teacher cannot be removed 
except upon charges and after a hearing. 

The State Board of Examiners consists of the Commis- 
sioner of Education, the Principals of the Normal Schools 
and one Assistant Commissioner, a County Superintendent 
and a City Superintendent appointed by the State Board 
of Education. This Board issues certificates valid in all 
parts of this State and in any school or grade. 

All kindergarten teachers must hold special kindergarten 
certificates. Special certificates may be issued for kinder- 
garten, physical training, manual training, music, drawing, 
modern languages, commercial branches, cooking, sewing, 
agriculture and penmanship. All applicants for certificates 
must file testimonials of good moral character, and, in case 
of previous experience, of success as teachers. 

Graduates of the Normal Schools receive State certifi- 
cates. Graduates of normal schools in other States may 



SCHOOL LA^Y. 255 

have their diplomas endorsed, provided the course of study 
pursued is equivalent to the course in the New Jersey Nor- 
mal Schools, and the State in which they were issued grants 
reciprocal privileges to graduates of the New Jersey Normal 
Schools. 

All children between the ages of 5 and 20 are entitled to 
attend the public schools in the districts in which they 
reside. If a kindergarten has been established, children 
4 years of age may attend. A Board of Education must 
provide suitable school facilities for all the children desiring 
to attend school. The Board of Education may provide for 
the education of pupils in the higher grades by payment of 
tuition fees to adjoining districts. If a child lives remote 
from any school in the district, the Board may transport 
such child to school or pay for its tuition in another district. 
A Board of Education may close a school and transport all 
the children to another school. Children who have never 
attended any school can be admitted to a public school 
only during the ten days immediately following the opening 
of the school in the fall and during the first five days in 
January and April, except by the vote of a majority of all 
the members of the Board of Education. 

All children between the ages of 7 and 16 must attend 
either a public or private school every day such school is in 
session, unless they are taught at home or are physically 
or mentally unfit to attend. Children between 14 and 16 
years of age who have completed five yearly grades may be 
granted certificates permitting them to go to work, but must 
attend a continuation school in district where employed. The 
parent of a child who does not attend school may be pro- 
ceeded against before a magistrate as a disorderly person. 
If the parent is unable to control the child, such child may 
be proceeded against as a disorderly person. 

A course in physical training' is prescribed by law 
which shall be adapted to the ages and capabilities of 
the pupils in the several grades, and shall include 
exercises, calisthenics, formation drills, instruction in 
personal and community health and safety, and in cor- 
recting- bodily deficiency, together with instruction as 
to the privileges and responsibilities of citizenship as 
they relate to community welfare; and in addition for 
female pupils, instruction in domestic hygiene, first 
aid and nursing. The law further provides for a 
course in high schools which shall include military 
training. This latter part, however, is not mandatory. 



256 KCIIOOL LAW. 

Corporal putiishiiieht in all public schools is absolutely 
prohibited. 

There were three dififerent laws enacted bj' the State 
Legislature of 1919, pertaining to pensions and annuities 
for teachers. 

The first act amended the old "Teachers' Retirement 
Fund Law" hj permitting all members to withdraw from 
the old fund provided that in withdrawing they waived 
all rights to their benefits in that fund. 

The law was also amended so as to give a choice to all 
old teachers to become members of the new fund. 

The second act repealed the old "Thirty-five Year Pen- 
sion Law," such repeal to take effect September 1st, 1919. 

A new "Pension and Annuity Fund law" was enacted 
providing for a pension and annuity for teachers after 
reaching age sixty-two, or after thirty -five years of service, 
and also providing for a pension and annuity for all teachers 
who become incapacitated for teaching during service, after 
teaching ten years in >sew Jersey. 

The new Pension and Annuity Law is to take the place 
of the old Retirement Fund system and the old Thirty- 
five Year Pension Law. The pension is provided by the 
State, and the annuity is provided by the contributions 
of the teachers themselves. The contributions arc based 
upon the age of the teacher when he or she becomes a mem- 
ber of the new fund. The percentage of deduction for 
women is slightly greater than for men. 

All pensions granted by the State after September 1st, 
1919, are based on V140 of the average salary of the teacher 
for the last five years multiplied by the number of years 
of service since the teacher became a member of the new 
fund. 

An additional pension is based on the number of years 
of service of a teacher and is equivalent to one-seventieth of 
the teacher's average salary for the last five years of ser- 
vice multiplied by the number of years of service certified on 
his prior service certificate. 

The teacher by his or her contributions accumulates a 
fund which will produce an estimated annuity of V140 of 
the average salary for the last five years of service. 

In each high school of the State there shall be given 
a course of study in Community Civics and a course of 
study in Problems of American Democracy. 

The time to be devoted to each of the courses of study 
shall be at least sixty full hours in periods of at least 
forty minutes each. 

On and after July 1st, 1020, the Board of Education in 
every school district in this State, in which are employed 
twenty or more children between the ages of 14 and 16 
venrs, to whom have been granted an Age and Schooling 



AKEA OF NEW JERSEY COUNTIES. 257 

Certificate in accordance with the Child Labor Law, shall 
establish what is known as a Continuation School for such 
pupils. That is to say, that during certain hours in the 
day-time children working in factories or in any other em- 
ployment shall attend the Continuation School for a period 
of at least six hours in each week, for a period of thirty- 
six weeks per year. 

The minimum salary of every teacher in every school 
district of this State shall be i?70 per month for each and 
every month during the school year, when employed. 



AREA OF NEW JERSE:Y COUXTIES. 

(Data furnished by Department of Conservation and Development.) 



Counties. 



S 1 



Atlantic 610.31 

Bergen 24G.17 

Burlington 827.12 

Camden 225.51 

Cape May 450.91 

Cumberland 674.33 

Es.sex 129.72 

Cloucester 341.45 

Hudson 60.48 

Hunterdon 439. 12 

Mercer 227.90 

Middlesex 324.44 

Monmouth 537.94 

Morris 480.19 

Ocean 7.50.91 

Passaic 198.65 

Salem 389.37 

Somerset 305.02 

Sussex 535.31 

Union '. 104.94 

Warren 364.65 

The State 8,224.44 



390.. 598 


362,114 


28.484 


157.547 


151,848 


5,699 


529,351 


524,022 


5,329 


144,325 


141,777 


2,548 


288,585 


169,815 




431,541 


320.241 


111,300 


83.023 


81,377 


1,646 


218.528 


212.236 


6,292 


38.709 


27.254 


11,455 


281,0.37 


279.919 


1,118 


145.858 


144.605 


1,2.53 


207,639 


199,639 


8.000 


344.280 


306,278 


38,002 


307,318 


303,910 


3,408 


480,. 584 


407,903 


72,681 


127.134 


125,488 


1,646 


249.198 


219,918 


29,280 


195.213 


194,965 


248 


342,603 


338,393 


4,210 


67.164 


65.717 


1,447 


233,376 


231,769 


1,607 


5,263,641 


4,809,218 


454,423 



258 NEW JERSEY XEWSPArERS. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS, 



Tlie following is a list of the titles of newspapers pub- 
lished in the State of New Jersey, town and county where 
published, time of publication, political or special char- 
acter, and names of editors and publishers : 

ATLANTIC COUNTY. 

NEWS — Egg Harbor City. Weekly, on Wednesday. Re- 
publican. Frank O. Breeder, publisher. 

riLOT-TRIBUNE — Egg Harbor City. Weekly, on Thursday. 
Republican. Henry Gries, editor and publisher. 

SOUTH JERSEY REPUBLICAN — Hammonton. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Republican. Wm. O. Hoyt, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

SOUTH JERSEY STAR— Hammonton. Weekly. Independ- 
ent. Thomas B. Delker, editor and publisher. 

ATLANTIC CITY GAZETTE-REVIEW — Atlantic City. 
Daily, except Sunday. Republican. Gazette-Review Co. 
William P. Houpt, editor. 

ATLANTIC CITY DAILY PRESS— Atlantic City. Daily, 
every morning, except Sunday. Independent. Press Union 
Publishing Co. Francis E. Croasdale. editor. 

ATLANTIC COUNTY RECORD — Mays Landing. Weekly, 
on Saturday. Republican. Record Publishing Company. 
Ira T. B. Smith, editor. 

EVENING UNION— Atlantic City. Every afternoon, ex- 
cept Sunday. Independent. Press Union Publishing Co. 

SUNDAY GAZETTE — Atlantic City. Weekly, on Sunday. 
Republican. Gazette-Review Co. William P. Houpt, ed- 
itor. 

PLEASANTVILLE PRESS — Pleasantville. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Republican. The Whitman Company, Inc. 
W. W. Whitman, editor. 

VENTNOR NEWS — Ventnor City (Atlantic City), Weekly, 
on Fridav Independent. J. Frank Peters. 

LABOR ADVOCATE— Atlantic City. Weekly. L. M. Hen- 
man, editor and owner. 

ATLANTIC CITY' MIRROR — Atlantic City, Weekly, on 
Saturday. Amusement Publishing Company. Charles 
Scheuer, editor. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 259 

BERGEN COUNTY. 

THE EVENING RECORD— Hackensack. Evening. Inde- 
pendent. Evening Record Publishing Company, publishers. 
James M. Smith, editor. 

THE HACKENSACK REPUBLICAN — Hackensack. Weekly, 
on Thursday. Republican. Eugene K. Bird, editor and 
publisher. 

CARLSTADT FREIE PRESSE (German) — Carlstadt. 
Weekly, on Saturday. Independent. August Moench, 
publisher and editor. 

THE ENGLEWOOD PRESS— Englewood. Weekly, on Sat- 
urday. Republican. Englewood Press, Inc. Joseph H. 
Tillotson, editor. 

THE BERGEN RECORD— Tenafly. Weekly, on Thursday. 
Independent. Republican. Tenafly Publishing Company. 
J. Z. Demarest, editor 

THE NEWS — Ridgewood. Weekly, on Friday. Independent 
Democratic. Franklin Fisher, editor and publisher. 

THE PARK RIDGE LOCAL— Park Ridge. Published 
weekly, on Wednesday. James B. H. Storms and John C. 
Storms, editors and proprietors. 

RUTHERFORD REPUBLICAN— Rutherford. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Rutherford Publishing Company. Republican. 
Wm. Raysdale, editor. 

THE ENTERPRISE— East Rutherford. Weekly, on Wednes- 
day. Republican. The Petrie Press, publisher. John 
Nelson, editor. 

TPIE SENTINEL — Fort Lee. Weekly, on Thursday. Re- 
publican. J. N. Race, publisher. 

THE NEWS-LETTER— Hasbrouck Heights. Weekly, on 
Wednesday. Independent. Alonzo Chamberlain, editor 
and publisher. 

RIDGEFIELD PARK BULLETIN— Weekly, on Friday. In- 
dependent. Charles Enders, Jr., editor. 

RIDGEWOOD HERALD — Weekly, on Tliursday. Independ- 
ent Republican. Brainard G. Smith, editor and proprietor. 

THE RAMSEY JOURNAL — Ramsey. Weekly, on Thursday. 
Republican. John Y. Dater, editor and proprietor. 

PALISADIAN — Palisades. Weekly, on Saturday. Inde- 
pendent. Charles T. Logan, editor and owner. 

SOUTH BERGEN EAGLE— Rutherford. Weekly, on Friday. 
Independent Democratic. Max L. Simon, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

GARFIELD NEWS — Garfield. Weekly, on Saturday. In- 
dependent Democratic. Max L. Simon, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

THE GARFIELD GUARDIAN— Garfield. Weekly, on Sat- 
urday. Independent. Ralph W. Chandless, publisher. F. 
Wm. Busch, editor. 

WESTWOOD CHRONICLE— Westwood. Weekly. Inde- 
pendent. James B. H. and John C. Storms, publishers. 
S. E. Lieberman, editor. 



2G0 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

IXTERBORO NEWS — Teaneck. Weekly, on Friday. Inde- 
pendent. Bergen County Publishing Co.. publishers. Paul 
A. Schneider, editor. 

BOROUGH NEWS— Edgewater. Weekly, on Friday. Inde- 
pendent Republican. Elliott Underwood, publisher. B. F. 
Underwood, editor. 

NORTH BERGEN WEEKLY— Westwood. Weekly, on Sat- 
urday. Independent. William A. Kinsley, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

INDEPENDENT — Lodi. Saturday. Independent Democratic. 
yiAx. L. Simon, editor and proprietor. 

REVIEW — Wallington. Saturday. Democratic. Max L. 
Simon, editor and proprietor. 

THE SATURDAY REVIEW AND BOGOTA MESSENGER— 
Bergenfield. Weekly, on Friday. Independent. Bergen 
County Publishing Company. AVm. R. Jones, editor. 

THE REVIEW— Ridgcfield I'ark. Weekly, on Thursday. 
Independent. Review Publishing Company. Charles A. S. 
Freeman, editor. 

BURLINGTON COUN'i^'. 

NEW JERSEY MIRROR— Mount Holly. Weekly, on Wed- 
nesday. Republican. Charles H. Folwell, editor and 
proprietor. 

THE MOUNT HOLLY HERALD — Mount Holly. AVeckly, 
on Saturday. Democratic. Sleeper & LaTour. publishers. 

NE'WS — Mount Holly. Weekly, on Tuesday. Republican. 
H. L. Walters and Joseph C. Kingdon, proprietors. J. 
C. Kingdon. editor. 

BURLINGTON GAZETTE — Burlington. Weekly, on Friday. 
Democratic. James M. Davis, publisher. 

THE DAILY ENTERPRISE— Burlington. Daily, in the 
afternoon. Republican. Joseph R. Cheesman, president 
and editor. 

B0RDENT;)WN register — Bordentown. Weekly, on Fri- 
day. Independent. James D. Magee. editor. 

BEVERLY BANNER — Beverly. Weekly, on Friday. In- 
dependent. L. W. Perkins, editor and proprietor. 

MOORESTOWN CHRONICLE — Moorestown. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Independent. W. J. Lovell. editor. 

BURLINGTON COUNTY PRESS — Riverside. Weekly, on 
Friday. Independent. Hiram D. Torrey, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

THE NEW ERA — Weekly, on Saturday. Independent. 
Riverton. Walter L. Bowen. editor. 

THE WEEKLY NITVVS — Palmyra. Weekly, on Friday. In- 
dependent. Frank E. Chambers, editor. 

THE CENTRAL RECORD — Medford. AVeekly, on Thursday. 
Independent. Central Record Publishing Company. 
Charles F. Clymer, editor. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSrAPFRS. 261 

CAMDEN COUNTY. 

WEST JERSEY PRESS— Camden. Weeklj'. on Saturday. 
Republican. Sinnickson Chew <& Sons' Company, pub- 
lishers and proprietors. William 11. Chew, editor. 

CAMDEN POST-TELEGRAM— Camden. Daily, in the af- 
ternoon. Republican. Post-Telegram Company, pro- 
prietors. Upton S. Jeflferys, editor. F. F. Patterson, Jr., 
manager. 

CAMDEN DAILY COURIER— Camden. Daily, in the after- 
noon. Independent Republican. J. David Stern, editor 
and publisher. 

THE CAMDEN TIMES — Camden. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Democratic. John J. Tiscliner. publisher. 

CAMDEN ARGUS AND EAST SIDE PRESS — Camden. Ke- 
publican. Weekly, on Thursday. William H. Jefferys, 
Sr.. editor and publisher. 

:MERCHANTVILLE times — Merchantvllle. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Republican. Freeman Printing Co. R. II. 
Freeman, editor. 

IIADDON GAZETTE — Haddonfield. Weekly, on Thursday. 
Yictor H. Clymer, editor and publisher. 

WEEKLY RETROSPECT— Collingswood. Weekly, on Fri- 
day. CoUingswood Publishing Co., publishers. 

CAPE MAY COUNTY. 

CAPE' MAY STAR AND WAVE— Cape May City. Re- 
publican. Weekly, on Saturday. Albert R. Hand, editor 
and publisher. 

CAPE MAY COUNTY GAZETTE— Cape May Court House. 
Weekly, on Friday. Republican. Alfred Cooper, editor 
and publisher. 

SENTINEL — Ocean City. Weekly, on Thursday. Inde- 
pendent. Lewis L. Barrett, general manager. 

FIVE-MILE BEACH JOURNAL— Wildwood. Independent. 
Weekly, on Friday. Jed Dubois, editor and proprietor. 

OCEAN CITY LEDGER — Weekly, on Saturday. Republican. 
Ocean City Ledger Company, proprietors. J. F. McNamee, 
editor. 

SUN-TRIBUNE — Wildwood. Weekly, on Thursday. Demo- 
cratic. Sun Publishing Company. Sidney C. Sommers, 
editor. 

CAPE MAY COUNTY TIMES— Sea Isle City. Weekly, on 
Friday. Independent Republican. W. A. Haffert, editor. 

WILDWOOD LEADER — Wildwood. Weekly, on Friday. 
Independent Republican. Albert R. Hand, publisher. 
Harrv F. Greaves, editor. 



262 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

CUMBERLAND COUNTY. 

BRIDGETON EVENING NEWS— Bridgeton. Republican. 
Evening News Companj^ publishers. C. L. Snowden, gen- 
eral manager. 

BRIDGETON DAILY PIONEER— Bridgeton. Daily. Re- 
publican. George W. McCowan, publisher. H. L. Tyler, 
editor. 

DOLLAR WEEKLY NEWS — Bridgeton Republican. 

Weekly, on Thursday. G. L. Schofield, manager. W. J. 
Kirby, editor. 

THE EVENING JOURNAL— Vineland. Afternoon. Inde- 
pendent. Geo. C. Ladd, editor. 

MILLVILLE DAILY REPUBLICAN— Millville. Evening. 
Republican. W. E. Middleton, publisher and editor. 

THE ADVERTISER— Port Norris. Weekly. Advertiser 
Printing Co., publishers. 

ESSEX COUNTY. 

NEWARK EVENING NEWS— Newark. Afternoon. Inde- 
pendent. Evening! News Publishing Company. Wallace 
M. Scudder, publisher. Edward W Scudder. editor. 

THE NEWARK STAR-EAGLE— Newark. Afternoon. In- 
dependent Republican. Newark Star Publishing Co. 
Nathaniel C. Wright, editor. 

NEWARK MORNING LEDGER— Newark. Morning and 
Sunday. Independent. L. T. Russell, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

NEW JERSEY FREIE ZEITUNG (German)— Newark. 
Daily, also Sunday edition. Republican. W^ashington 
Publishing Comipany. Wm. von Katzler, editor. 

THE SUNDAY CALL — Newark. Weekly, on Sunday. In- 
dependent. The Newark Call Printing and Publishing 
Company, publishers. G. Wisner Thorne, managing editor. 
Jas. P. Logan, editor. 

UNION (Colored) — Orange. Saturday. Republican. George 
R. Pratt, editor. 

TOWN TALK— Newark. Weekly, on Saturday. Independent. 
T. E. Burke and Herman E. L. Beyer, editors and pub- 
lishers. 

RAILROAD EMPLOYEE — Newark. Monthly. Benjamin E. 
Chapin, editor and publisher. 

THE MONITOR — Newark. Weekly, on Saturday. Catholic. 
Very Rev. Wm. P. Cantwell, editor-in-chief. A. B. Ford, 
publisher. 

LA TRIBUNA — Newark. Saturdays. Tribune Publishing 
Company, publisher. Olindo Marzulli, editor. 

LA MONTAGNA (THE MOUNTAIN) (Italian)— Newark. 
Republican. Weekly, on Saturday. F. A. Fiore, editor. 

THE REVIEW— LA RIVISTA (Italian and English)— New- 
ark. Weekly. Richard F. Mattia, proprietor. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 2G3 

KRONIKA (Polish) — Newark. Fridays. Independent. 
Kronika Publishing- Company, proprietors. 

THE ORANGK ADVERTISER— Orange. Weekly, on Fri- 
day. Independent Republican. G. C. Jones, publisher and 
editor. 

EAST ORANGE RECORD— East Orange. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Republican. L. C. Gillis, editor and publisher. 

THE INDEPENDENT PRESS— Bloomfield. Weekly, on 
Friday. Independent Press, Inc., publishers. Charles R. 
Blunt, editor. 

MHNTCLAIR TIMES— Montclair. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Republican. Established 1877 by A. C. ' Studer. A. C. 
Studer. nublisher E. A. McGeehan, editor. 

THE HERALD — Montclair. Weekly, on Saturday. Mont- 
clair Herald Company, publishers. Charles Henry Kin- 
ney, editor. 

THE CLINTON WEEKLY — Irvington. Weekly, on Friday. 
Independent Republican. The Clinton Publishing Co. 
Walter S. Grav, managing editor. 

THE ROSEVILLE CITIZEN— Newark. Thursdays. Inde- 
pendent. The Citizens Publishing Co. R. W. Bennett, 
manager. Devoted to the interests of Roseville. 

THE HOME NEWS— Maplewood. Weekly. Independent 
Republican. Kempson Publishing Company. J. F. Kemp- 
son, editor. 

THE ITEM— Short Hills and Milburn. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Independent Republican. J. F. Kempson, editor. 

THE CALDWELL PROGRESS— Caldwell. Weekly, on Sat- 
urday. Independent. The Progress Publishing Company. 
William H. Van Wart, editor and publisher. 

SUN — Nutley. Weekly, on Saturday. E. B. Foy, publisher. 
Johnson Foy, editor 

THE BELLEVILLE TIMES— Belleville. Weekly. Inde- 
pendent. S. II. Blaydes. president and manager. 

WEST ORANGE PRESS— West Orange. Fridays. Inde- 
pendent Republican. G. C. Jones, publisher and editor. 

AMPERE CITIZEN — East Orange. Weekly, on Friday. In- 
dependent. Citizen Publishing Company. R. W. Bennett, 
editor. 

WEST SIDE CITIZEN. Newark. Weekly, on Friday. In- 
dependent. Citizen Publishing Company. R. W. Bennett, 
editor. 

CLINTON HILL CITIZEN AND CHAT— Newark. Weekly, 
on Friday. Independent. Citizen Publishing Company. 
R. W. Bennett, editor. 

SUN — Orange. Weekly, on Sntui-dny. Republican. G. R. 
Pratt, editor and publishei-. 



204 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

GLOUCESTER COUNTY. 

THE CONSTITUTION— Woodbury. Weekly, on Wednesday. 
Republican. The Constitution Company, publishers. Louis 
W. Albright, editor. 

GLOUCESTER COUNTY DEMOCRAT— Woodbury. Weekly, 
on Thursday. Democratic. J. D. Carpenter & Son, pub- 
lishers. Edmund H. Carpenter, editor. 

WEEKLY ITEM— Newfleld. Weekly, on Friday. Demo- 
cratic. J. Hampton Leonard, editor and publisher. 

THE NEWS — Swedesboro. Weekly, on Friday. Republican. 
Wilbur Knight Sloan, editor and publisher. 

WOODBURY DAILY TIMES— Woodbury. Daily, except 
Sunday. Independent. Woodbury Daily Times Company. 
J. Frank Wilson, editor. 

THE HElRALD and SUN— Paulsboro. Weekly. Republican. 
Chas. W. Hawn, editor and publisher. 

PITMAN GROVE REVIEW — Pitman. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Independent Republican. Paul Peterson, editor and 
publisher. 

THE ENTERPRISE — Glassboro. Weekly. Independent. 
Glassboro Board of Education, proprietors. Selden Alys- 
worth. editor. 

HL^DSON COUNTY. 

THE JERSEY JOURNAL — Jersey City. Afternoon. Re- 
publican. The Evening Journal Association, publishers. 

Joseph A. Dear, editor. 
HUDSON OBSERVER— Hoboken. Afternoon. Democratic. 

Iloboken Printing and Publishing Company, publishers. 

John P. McCormick. editor. 
BAYONNE HFJIALD — Bayonne. Weekly, on Saturday. 

Democratic. Bayonne Herald Printing Co., publishers. 

Hugh II. Mara, editor. 
THE TIMES — Daily, except Sunday. Independent. Hyman 

I^azarus. publisher. II. L. Martin, Editor. 
BAYONNE NEWS AND REVIEW — Bayonne. Afternoon. 

Republican. C. A. Ruhlmann, publisher. L. E. Travis, 

editor. 
BAYONNE DEMOCRAT — Bayonne. Weekly, on Thursday. 

Democratic. Michael R. Freel. editor and proprietor. 
HUDSON DISPATCH — Union Hill. Daily. Independent 

Democratic. Thomas F. Martin, publisher. Haddon Ivins, 

editor. 
HARRISON-KEARNY RECORD — Harrison. Weekly. on 

Friday. Independent Democratic. Philip A. McAviney, 

publisher. J. McClinchie, editor. 
KEARNY OBSERVER — Arlington. Weekly, on Saturday. 

Independent Republican. W. W. Beadell, editor and pro- 
prietor. 
WEST HUDSON PRESS — Kearny. Weekly, on Saturday. 

Independent. James J. McAteer, editor and publisher. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 265 

HUDSON COUNTY REVUE (German)— Town of Union. 
Democratic. Weekly, on Saturday. Robert Penning, 
owner. Paul E. Nebring, editor. 

HUDSON NEWS — West Hoboken. Weeklj^ on Friday. In- 
dependent. Dixie Anzer, editor and proprietor. 

THE LABOR REVIEW — Jersey City. Montlily. Kenuetb 
N. Forbes, proprietor and editor, 205 Lexington avenue, 
Jersey City. 

HUNTERDON COUNTY. 

HUNTERDON COUNTY DEMOCRAT— Flemington. Weekly, 
on Wednesday. Democratic. Antbony Killgore, editor and 
proprietor. 

DEMOCRAT-ADVERTISER— Flemington. Weekly, on Tburs- 
day. Independent Democratic. C. Bishop Fowler, pub- 
lisher. Irving T. McNally. editor. 

HUNTERDON REPUBLICAN— Flemington. Weekly, on 
Wednesday. Republican. W. A. Abbott, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

THE BEACON— Lambertville. Weekly. on Thursday. 
Democratic. J. N. Hazen, editor and proprietor. 

THE LAMBERTVILLE RECORD— Lambertville. Weekly, 
on Friday. Republican. Gordon Cooper, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

THE CLINTON DEMOCRAT— Clinton. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Independent. Leon A. Carpenter, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

HUNTERDON INDEPENDENT— Frenchtown. Weekly, on 
Friday. Independent. Independent Printing Company, 
publishers. Morgan T. Davy, editor. 

THE FRENCHTOWN STAR— Frenchtown. Weekly, on 
Wednesday. Independent. William II. Sipes, editor and 
publisher. 

MILFORD LEADER— Milford. Weekly, on Thursday. In 
dependent. W. H. Farrand, proprietor and editor. 

WEEKLY AVALANCHE— Glen Gardner. Weekly, on Wed- 
nesday. Independent. E. W. Rush, editor and publisher. 

THE HIGH BRIDGE GAZETTE — High Bridge. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Republican. High Bridge Printing Company, 
proprietor. C. A. Vandegrift, editor and manager. 

WEEKLY REVIEW— White House Station. Independent. 
F. R. Shampanore, publisher and editor. 

MERCER COUNTY. 

STATE GAZETTE — Trenton. Daily. Independent Repub- 
lican. The State Gazette Publishing Company, proprietors. 
Charles H. Baker, business manager. Forrest R. Dye, 
editor. 

THE TRENTON EVENING TIMES— Trenton. Afternoon. 
Independent. Trenton Times Companj', publishers. James 
Kerney, editor. Owen Moon, Jr., business manager. 



266 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

THE NEW JERSEY STAATS JOURNAL (German)— Tren- 
ton. Weekly. Republican. William Zenzer, editor and 
proprietor. 

SUNDAY TniES-ADVERTISER— Trenton. Weekly, on Sun- 
day. Independent. Trenton Times, proprietors. James 
Kerney, editor. Owen ^Moon, Jr.. business manager. 

TRADES UNION ADVOCATE— Trenton. Weekly, Friday. 
Labor. Reuben Forker. editor and publisher. 

THE FUGGETLENSEG (Hungarian News)— Trenton. Hun- 
garian. Weekly. Independent. A. J. Orosz, proprietor. 

HIGHTSTOWN GAZETTE— Hightstown. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Independent. George P. Dennis, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

THE DAILY PRIXCETONIAN— Princeton. Published daily, 
except Sundays, during the college year. Devoted to the 
interests of Princeton University. Edited by students. 

THE HOPEWELL HERALD — Hopewell. Weekly, on Wed- 
nesday. Independent. E. V. Savidge, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

THE PACKET — Princeton. Weekly, on Saturday. Inde- 
pendent. Charles H. Tourette, editor and proprietor. 

IL SECOLO XX (Italian) — Trenton. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. A Perilli, editor. 

PEOPLE'S BULLETIN (Italian)— Trenton. Weekly, on Fri- 
day. Attilo Perilli, editor. 

L'lTALIO-AMERICANO (Italian)— Trenton. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Raffaele Cavalieri, editoi-. 

MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 

THE HOME NEWS — New Brunswick. Every afternoon, ex- 
cept Sunday. Independent. Homo News Publishing Com- 
pany, proprietors. E. B. Boyd, editor. 

THE SUNDAY TIMES— New Brunswick. Independent. 
Home News I^iblishing Company. Elmer B. Boyd, editor, 

THE EVENING NEWS — Perth Amboy. Daily. Independ- 
ent. Perth Amboy Evening News Company. J. Logan 
Clevenger, editor. 

THE NEW JERSEY MOSQUITO — Perth Amboy. Weekly, 
on Saturday. Independent. H. E. Pickersgill, editor and 
publisher. 

THE LEADER— Woodbridge. Weekly, on Friday. Inde- 
pendent. Woodbridge Printery, publishers. John A. Flood, 
editor. 

THE RECORDER— Metuchen. Weekly, on Saturday. In- 
dependent Republican. Charles A. Prickitt, editor and 
proprietor. 

THE ADVANCE^ — Jamesburg. Weekly, on Thursday. 
Printed and published by the New Jersey State School 
for Boys. V. W. Messick, editor. 

THE CITIZEN— South Amboy. Weekly, on Saturday. In- 
dependent. South Amboy Printing Company, publishers. 
M. N. Roll, editor. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 2G7 

THE PRESS — Cranbury. Weekly, on Friday. Republican. 
George W. Burroughs, editor. 

THE DUNELLEN WEEKLY CALL— Dunellen. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Dunellen Publishing Company. Arthur L. 
Kirk, editor. 

THE ROOSEVELT NEWS — Roosevelt. Republican Weekly, 
on Friday. Published by The News Publishing Com- 
pany. Thomas Yorkc. manager. 

THE RARITAN INDEPENDKNT— New Brunswick. Weekly. 
Mrs. O. R. Winfield, proprietor. 

THE SOUTH RIVER SPOKESMAN— South River. Weekly, 
on Friday. George A. Bowen and Samuel M. Christie, 
publishers. S. M. Christie, editor. 

WOnDBRIDGE INDEPENDENT— Woodbridge. Weekly, on 
Friday. Republican. Middlesex Press, publishers. Max- 
well Logan, editor. 

MONMOUTH COUNTY. 

THR MONMOUTH INQUIRER— Freehold. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Republican. Maxcy Applegate, editor and 
publisher. 

THE MONMOUTH DEMOCRAT— Freehold. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Democratic. Joseph A. Y'ard, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

THE TRANSCRIPT— Freehold. Weekly, on Friday. Demo- 
cratic. Moreau Bros. (Alex L. Moreau), publishers and 
proprietors. 

RED BANK STANDARD — Red Bank. Weekly, on Friday. 
Republican. William A. Sweeney, editor. Standard Pul> 
lishing Company, proprietors. 

RED BANK REGISTER — Red Bank. Weekly, on Wednes- 
day. Independent. John II. Cook, editor and proprietor. 

KEYPORT ENTERPRISE— Keyport. Weekly, on Friday. 
Democratic. A. F. Walling, editor and proprietor. 

KEYPORT WEEKLY— Keyport. Weekly, on Friday. Pro- 
gressive Republican. Ben.iamin F. S. Brown Estate, pro- 
prietors. J. Mabel Brown and Herbert Brown, editors. 

THE LONG BRANCH RECORD— Long Branch. Daily. 
Independent. F. M. Taylor l^iblishing Company, owner. 
Guion P. Wilson, editor. 

THE MONMOUTH AMERICAN — Long Branch. Weekly, on 
Friday. Independent Republican. Benjamin B. Bobbitt, 
editor and publisher. 

THE MATAWAN JOURNAL — Matawan. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Progressive Republican. Benjamin F. S. Brown 
Estate, proprietors. J. Mabel Brown and Herbert Brown, 
editors. 

THE SUNDAY PRESS— Asbury Park. Weekly, on Sunday. 
Independent Democrat. J. L. Kinmonth, editor and pro- 
prietor. 



268 NEW JERSEY XEWSPAPERS. 

ASBURY PARK EVENING PRESS— Asbury Park. Daily. 
Independent Democrat. J. L. Kinmonth, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

OCEAN GROVE TIMES— Ocean Grove. Weekly, on Friday. 
Republican. E. V. Rainear, piiblisber. .1. E. Quin. editor. 

THE COAST STAR— :Manasc[uan. Weekly, on Friday. Re- 
publican. Tracy M. Hoskins. editor and proprietor. 

THE COAST ADVERTISER— Belmar. Weekly, on Friday. 
Independent. Louis Barr. publisher and editor. 

THE JOURNAL — Atlantic Highlands. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Independent. M. R. Shale, editor and publisher. 

SPRING LAKE GAZETTE — Spring Lake Bench. Weekly, 
on Friday. Republican. John L. CoflBn, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

ALLENTOWN MESSENGER— Weekly, on Thursday. In- 
dependent Republican. J. W. Naylor. editor and publisher. 

THE SEACOAST NEWS — Bradley Beach. Independent. 
Weekly, on Friday. C. Arthur Hall, editor and publisher. 

THE BEACON — Keansburg. Weekly, on Thursday. Inde- 
pendent. Chester J. Beaman, ipublisher. Chester J, 
Beaman and F. R. Nichols, editors. 

FEDERATIONIST AND LABOR STANDARD GAZETTE— 
Official organ of Building Trades Council. Published at 
Asbury Park. Monthly. Labor, State and County issues. 
W. A. Buckridge, editor and publisher. 

MORRIS COUNTY. 

THE JERSEYMAN — Morristown. Daily. Republican. The 
Jerseyman. Inc. Wood M. Vance, editor. 

TRUE REPUBLICAN BANNER — Morristown. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Republican. John W. Smith, treasurer ; True 
Republican Banner. Inc.. publishers. 

MORRIS COUN'I'Y PRESS— Morristown. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Republican. David King, editor. Press Printers 
& Publishers. Inc.. publishers. 

THE DAILY RECORD — Morristown. Independent. Norman 
B. Tomlinson, owner and editor. 

DOVER INDEX — Dover, Weekly, on Thursday. Independ- 
ent-Democratic. M. M. and W. G. Hummel, owners. W. 
G. Hummel, editor. 

THE DOVER ADVANCE — Dover. Semi-weekly. Mondays 
and Thursdays. Republican. Harry R. Gill, editor and 
publisher. , 

THE BULLETIN — Boonton. Weekly, on Thursday. Re- 
publican. Samuel L. Garrison, editor and publisher. 

THE TIMES — Boonton. Weekly, on Thursday. Independ- 
ent. Charles L. Grubb, editor and proprietor. 

THE EAGLE — Madison. Weekly, on Friday. Independent 
Republican. John E. Clarey, Jr., publisher, Ernest Smith, 
editor. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 269 

THE RECORD — Rockaway. Weekly, on Friday. Independ- 
ent. News Printing Company, publishers. Frank E. 
Porter, editor. 

THE STANHOPE EAGLE^Netcong. Independent. Weekly, 
on Wednesday. George T. Keech, editor and proprietor. 

CHATHAM PRESS— Chatham. Weekly, on Saturday. In- 
dependent Republican. J. Thomas Scott, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

THE BUTLER ARGUS— Butler. Weekly, on Friday. Inde- 
pendent. James L. T^liite, editor and publisher. 

OCEAN COUNTY. 

LAKEWOOD CITIZEN— Lakewood. Weekly, on Friday. In- 
dependent Republican. Harry T. Ilagaman, editor and 
publisher. 

NEW JERSEY COURIER— Toms River. Weekly, on Fri- 
day. Republican. W. H. Fischer, editor and proprietor. 

NEW JERSEY TRIBUNE — Toms River. Weekly, on Friday. 
Independent Democratic. Tribune Publishing Co., Frank 
Richie, editor. 

TIME'S AND JOURNAL— Lakewood. Weekly, on Friday. 
Independent Republican. Arthur W. Emerson, lessee, 
editor and manager. 

THE TUCKERTON BEACON— Tuckerton. Weekly. Repub- 
lican. E. Moss Mathis, editor and publisher. 

PRESS — New Egypt. Weekly, on Friday. Moore Bros., pub- 
lishers. Addison U Moore, editor. 

OCEAN COUNTY REVIEW— Seaside Heights. Weekly. 
Shore Review Publishing Co. William H. Magill, editor 
and president. 

OCEAN COUNTY LEADER— Point Pleasant Beach. Weekly, 
on Friday. Independent. Point Pleasant Publishing Co. 
Ralph Robinson, editor. 

PASSAIC COUNTY. 

THE PATERSON PRESS-GUARDIAN— Paterson. Daily, 
afternoon, except Sunday. Independent. William B. 
Bryant, publisher. John L. Matthews, editor. 

THE MORNING CALL— Paterson. Daily, except Sunday. 
Republican. Call Printing and Publishing Company, pro- 
prietoi's and publishers. Ferdinand A. Friedrich, editor. 
Garret H. Sturr, business manager. 

EVENING NEWS — Paterson. Daily, afternoon, except Sun- 
day. Independent. News Printing Company, proprietors. 
Harry B. Haines, editor. 

SUNDAY CHRONICLE — Paterson. Sunday. Independent. 
William B. Bryant, publisher. John L. Matthews, editor. 

DE TELEGRAF (Holland)— Pater.son. Weekly. Republi- 
can. Cornelius Poelstra, publisher and editor. 

HET OOSTEN (Holland) — Paterson. Weekly. Independent. 
Lont & Overkamp, publishers. 



270 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

IL MASSAGGERO (Italian) — Paterson. Weekly. Nicola 
Parrillo, publislier. M. Viviano, editor. 

RISVEGLIO (Italian) — Paterson. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Independent. Francisco Palleria, editor and publisher. 

PASSAIC HERALD— Passaic. Daily, afternoon, except 
Sunday. Independent. E. A. Bristor, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

PASSAIC DAILY NEWS — Passaic. Daily, afternoon, ex- 
cept Sunday. Independent. George M. Hartt, editor. 
Passaic Daily News, Inc., proprietors and publishers. 

THE BULLETIN— Pompton Lakes. Weekly. H. R. Wells, 
editor. Wells Printing Company, publishers. 

WOCHENBLATT (German) — Passaic. Saturday. Mrs. 
Maria Emmy Lindenstruth, editor and proprietor. 

SZABAD SA.JTO (Hungarian) — Passaic. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Independent. Free Press Publishing Company. 
Francis Kalnay, editor. 

CLIFTON TIMES— Clifton. Independent. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Clifton Times Publishing Company. I. 
Neville Tickers, editor. 

CLIFTON JOURNAL — Clifton. Semi-weekly. The Clifton 
Press. Inc., publishers. Edward C. Brennan, editor. 

BLOO:\IINGDALE ARGUS — Bloomingdale. Weekly, on 
Thursday. James White, editor and publisher. 

POMPTON LAKES LEDGER— Pompton Lakes. Weekly, on 
Thursday. James White, editor and publisher. 

KATOLICKY SOKOL (Slovak) — Passaic. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Independent. Roman and Greek Catholic Gymnastic 
Slovak Union Sokol. Dr. Gustav Kosik, editor. 

SALEM COUNTY. 

SALEM STANDARD AND JERSEYMAN — Salem. Weekly, 
on Wednesday. Republican. Standard and Jerseyman 
Company, publishers. William H. Chow, editor. 

SALEM SUNBEAM — Salem. Weekly, on Friday. Demo- 
cratic. Sunbeam Publishing Company, publishers. J. S, 
Foster, editor. 

THE MONITOR-REGISTER — Woodstown. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Preston S. Foster, publisher. J. L. Stouten- 
burgh, editor. 

PENNSGROVE RECORD — Pennsgrove. Weekly, on Friday. 
Democratic. Wm. A. Summerill, editor and proprietor. 

E'LMER TIMES — Elmer. Weekly, on Friday. Independent. 
Preston S. Foster, editor. Elmer Times Compan.v, pub- 
lishers. 

SOMERSET COUNTY. 
THE SOMERSET MESSENGER — Somerville. Weekly, on 
Wednesday. Democratic. J. P.. Varley, editor and pul> 
iisher. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 271 

THE UNIONIST-GAZETTE — Somerville. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Republican. The Unionist-Gazette Association, pub- 
lishers. Charles H. Bateman. editor and manager. 

THE SOMERSET DEMOCRAT — Somerville. Weekly, on 
Friday. Democratic. Carlton P. Hoagland, editor and 
proprietor. 

BOUND BROOK CHRONICLE— Bound Brook. Weekly, on 
Friday. Republican. W. B. R. Mason, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

STATE CENTRE-RECORD — Bound Brook. Weekly, on Fri- 
day. Democratic. Daniel D. Clark, Jr., editor and pro- 
prietor. 

THE NEWS— Bernardsville. Weekly, on Thursday. Inde- 
pendent. H. M. Trumbull, publisher. C. H. B. Trum- 
bull, editor. 

SUSSEX COUNTY. 

THE SUSSEX REGISTER — Newl>n. Weekly, on Thursday. 
Republican. Nelson E. Barton, editor and owner. 

THE NEW JERSEY HI^RALD— Newton. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Domooratic. Jacob L. IUuhk^H and Martin J. Cox. 
publisher,s. Jacob L. P.unnell, editor. 

SUSSEX INDEPENDENT — Sussex. Weekly, on Friday. 
Independent. J. J. Stanton and C. G. Wilson, publishers. 
John J. Stanton, editor. 

THE WANTAGE RECORDER — Sussex. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Democratic. C. E. Stickney, editor. 

THE MILK REPORTER— Sussex. Monthly. Agriculture. 
John J. Stanton, editor and proprietor. 

SUSSEX COUNTY BOARD OF AGRICULTURE NEWS— 
Newton. Monthly. Sussex County Board of Agriculture. 

UNION COUNTY. 

ELIZABETH DAILY JOURNAL — Elizabeth. Afternoon. 
Republican. Elizabeth Daily Journal, Inc. Aug. S, Crane, 
editor. 

ELIZABETH EVENING TIMES — Elizabeth. Democratic. 
The Evening Times Company, proprietors. Leonard F. 
Sawvel, editor. 

THE INDEX — Elizabeth. Sunday. Independent. Kemp- 
son Bros., publishers. 

THE RAHWAY RECORD — Rahway. Semi-weekly. Inde- 
pendent. Rahway Publishing Corporation, publishers. 
Henry B. Rollinson, editor. 

THE PLAINFIELD RECORD— Weekly. Independent. Al- 
bert F, La Rock, editor. 

PLAINFIELD COURIER-NEWS — Plainfield. Afternoon. 
Republican. Courier-News Publishing Company. Charles 
Hamilton Frost, manager. John A. Gaffney, editor. 

THE SUMMIT RECORD — Summit. Democratic. Weekly. 
Summit Record, Inc., publishers. Albert S. Morse, editor. 



272 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

THE' SUMMIT HERALD — Summit. Weekly, on Friday. 
Independent Republican. J. W. Clift, president. Fred 
W. Clift, editor. 

THE STANDARD— Wcstfield. Weekly, on Friday. The 
Standard Publishing Concern. Byron M. Prugh, managing 
editor. 

THE CRANFORD CITIZEN AND CHRONICLE— Cranford. 
Weekly, on Thursday. Independent Republican. James 
E. Warner, editor and publisher. 

THE WESTFIELD LEADER— Westfield. Weekly, on Wed- 
nesday. Independent. Westfield Leader Publishing and 
Printing Company, proprietors. Walter J. Lee, editor. 

THE PASSAIC VALLEY NEWS— New Providence. Weekly, 
on Wednesday. Republican. Thos. J, Scott, publisher and 
editor. 

THE SPECTATOR — Roselle — Roselle Park. Weekly, on 
Friday. Independent. Kempson Bros., owners and pub- 
lishers. Grover C. Kempson, editor. 

LINDEN OBSERVEH— Linden. Weekly. Kempson Brothers, 
Inc., publishers. 

SUNDAY TIMES — Elizabeth. Independent Democratic. 
Evening Times Company. Leonard F. Sawvol, editor. 

GLOS POL-SKI (Polish) — Elizabeth. Weekly, on Friday. 
Independent. Bernard F. Skulik, editor and publisher. 

WARREN COUNTY. 

BELVIDERB APOLLO— Belvidere. Weekly, on Thursday. 
Republican. J. Madison Drake, Jr., editor and proprietor. 

THE W^ARREN JOURNAL— Belvidere. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Democratic. Elmer I. Smith, editor and publisher. 

HACKETTSTOWN GAZETTE— Hackettstown. Weekly, on 
Friday. Democratic. Alfred C. Walling, editor and man- 
ager. 

THE WASHINGTON STAR— Washington. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Independent Democratic. Frank A. Robertson, 
editor and proprietor. 

THE BLAIRSTOWN PRESS— Blairstown. Weekly, on 
Wednesday. Independent. DeWitt C. Carter, editor and 
publisher. 

NEW JERSEY PRESS ASSOCIATION. 

Officers — President, J. W, Naylor, Allentown Messenger ; 
vice-president, E. A. Bristor, Passaic Herald ; Secretary, 
John W. Clift, Summit Herald ; Treasurer, W. B. R. Mason, 
Bound Brook Chronicle. 

Executive Committee — W^m. B. Bryant, Paterson Press 
Guardian ; Edmund H. Carpenter, Woodbury Democrat ; 
John E. Clarey, Madison Eagle ; Eugene W. Farrell. Newark 
Evening News ; Chas. H. Frost, Plainfleld Courier-News ; 
B. V. Savidge, Hopewell Herald ; W. L. Tushingliam, Cam- 
den Courier. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 



BIOGRAPHIES 



GOVERNOR OF NEW JERSEY. 



EDWARD IRVING EDWARDS. 

Governor Edwards was born in that part of Jersey 
City formerly known as the Town of Bergen, Decem- 
ber 1st, 1863. He is a son of William W. Edwards and 
Emma J. Edwards, both of whom are now deceased. 
His father was a native of Wales, and his mother of 
England. He received his education at Public School 
No. 12, Jersey City High School and New York Univer- 
sity. Af'ter leaving college he entered the law office of 
his brother, the late Senator William D. Edwards, but 
discontinued the study of the law to accept a position 
with the First National Bank, Jersey City, where he 
remained for about seven years, during which time he 
studied carefully the subject of finance and taxation. 
Overstudy and the confining nature of his work com- 
pelled him to sever his connections with the bank, 
and for several years thereafter he was interested in 
the general contracting business as a memiber of the 
firm of Edwards Brothers. 

He served as Clerk to the Martin Act Commission 
during 'the busy years of that board, and was consid- 
ered an authority on all matters relating to taxation. 
In 1903, at the request of the late Edward P. C. Young, 
then President of the First National Bank, Jersey 
City, he again became connected with that bank as 
an assistant to the President. He thereafter became 
Cashier and a Director, and finally President of this 
important institution, which position he holds at the 
present time. 

Upon the election of Woodrow Wilson as Governor, 
and the control of the Legislature of 1912 by the 
Democratic Party, Mr. Edwards' knowledge of finance 
and taxation made him the logical choice for the posi- 
tion of Comptroller of the Treasury, and on February 
7th, 1911, he was elected for the term of three years. 



274 BIOGRAPHIES. 

In 1913 he became a candidate for the office of State 
Treasurer, but by reason of the factional differences in 
tlie Democratic Party liis election was opposed by 
Governor Wilson and other leaders, and 'he was de- 
feated. He was one of the leaders In the movement 
which finally brought about the adoption of the com- 
mission form of g-overnment for Jersey City. He was 
also actively engaged in the campaigns which resulted 
in the nomination and election of James F. Fielder as 
Governor. Mr, Edwards was re-elected Comptroller 
of the Treasury for a further term of three years on 
February 20th, 1914. During the six years thus served 
as Comptroller .he succeeded in having passed the Re- 
quisition Act, and by compelling a strict compliance 
with all of its requirements he established the "Pay 
As You Go" policy. He also succeeded in having 
passed the amendments to the Inheritance Tax stat- 
utes whereby the annual revenue derived from this 
source was increased from $750,000 to approximately 
$4,000,000. The constitutionality of these amend- 
ments have been upheld by the Supreme Court and 
the Court of Errors and Appeals of the State of New 
Jersey, and .by the Supreme Court of the United States. 

Possibly the greatest degree of confidence in the 
ability and judgment of Mr. Edwards was evidenced 
by the Republican Legislature of 1915, when it incor- 
porated in the Appropriation Act the following provi- 
sion: 

"The Comptroller of the Treasury is hereby empow- 
ered and It shall be his duty in the disbursement of 
funds available for the general uses of the State, to 
first provide for the maintenance of the administration 
of the government of the State, and of its courts, and 
of its penal, correctional and charitable institutions, 
and to apply the remainder .of such available funds in 
such manner and to such purpose for which appropria- 
tion may have been made as in his judgment may best 
conserve the interest of the State." 

Mr. Edwards retired from the office of State Comp- 
troller in 1917, but on November 5th, 1918, he returned 
to public life as State Senator from Hudson County, 
having been elected to fill the unexpired term of Cor- 
nelius McGlennon, who had resigned to become a can- 
didate for Congress. The demand that he becomxe a 
candidate for Governor became so insistent that not- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 275 

withstanding a strong- desire to retirx: rrom public life 
and to devote his time to his pi'ivate busir.ess affairs, 
he yielded to the State-wide sentiment and announced 
his candidacy. Never an orator or debater, Mr. Kd- 
wards nevertheless made an effective campaign by 
frankly stating and steadfastly maintaining his atti- 
tude on all matters of public interest. He fought 
hard but clean and established for himself the reputa- 
tion of being a man of conviction and great courage. 
In the contest for the nomination he defeated James 
Nugent of Essex County. Notwithstanding the plu- 
rality of 69,647 by which Governor Edge was elected 
in 1916, Mr. Edwards was elected Governor over N. A. 
K. Bugbee, the Republican candidate, by a plurality 
approximating 15,000. 

Governor Edwards had the united support of the 
New Jersey Democracy for the Presidential nomina- 
tion at the San Francisco Convention in June, 1920, 
and, besides the votes of the entire New Jersey dele- 
gation in that Convention, received votes for several 
ballots from other States as well. 

Early in his life Mr. Edwards took an active part in 
the State Militia, being a member of Company F, 4th 
Regiment, Jersey City. H'i passed through the various 
ranks and became Captain, in which capacity he served 
for several years. Like all one hundred per cent 
Americans, Mr. Edwards took a deep interest in war 
work, and gave freely of his energy and ability to the 
Allied cause. His son, E. I. Edwards, Jr., served dur- 
ing the war and was overseas for almo.st two years, 
returning to this country at the close or the war. 

Mr. Edwards was married on November 14, 1888, to 
Miss Jule Blanche Smith, daughter of Captain and 
Mrs. William Smith. They have a son, Captain E. T. 
Edwards, Jr., and a daughter. Miss Elizabeth Edwards. 
Mr. Edwards is a vestryman of Saint Paul's Episcopal 
Church of Jersey City. He is a member of Bergen 
Lodge, F. & A. M., of Jersey City, American Banking 
Association, New Jersey State Bankers' Association, 
Zeta Psi Fraternity, and many other social fraternities 
and civic organizations. 



276 BIOGRAPHIES. 



UNITED STATES SENATORS. 



JOSEPH S. FRELINGHUYSEN, Raritan. 

Senator Frelinghuysen was born March 12th, 1869, 
at Raritan, N. J., and has always made that town his 
home. His ancestor, Rev. Theodorus Jacobus Fre- 
linghuysen, came from Holland in 1720 and was the 
pioneer in establishing the Reformed Dutch Church in 
New Jersey. Major-General Frederick Frelinghuysen, 
who served with great distinction in the Revolutionary 
war, and who was a member of the Continental Con- 
gress, was his great grandfather. General John Fre- 
linghuysen, an officer in the war of 1812, was his 
grandfather. Theodore Frelinghuysen, United States 
Senator, Chancellor of the University of New York, 
and candidate for Vice-President with Henry Clay on 
the Whig ticket, was a great uncle. His father, 
Frederick John Frelinghuysen, was a prominent lawyer 
and closely identified with the political and religious 
life of Somerset county. 

Senator Frelinghuysen's inclination for and ac- 
tivity in public affairs is a natural heritage. Forced 
by stress of circumstances to surrender his natural 
inclination for a college education, he, after preparing 
for college at the Somerville Grammar school, ob- 
tained employment as clerk in a fire insurance office, 
and has since that time built up a business in New 
York City which is recognized as one of the foremost 
general agencies in the country, representing nearly 
a score of large and profitably conducted fire insurance 
companies. 

Senator Frelinghuysen served eight years in Troop 
3, Squadron A Cavalry, New York, and rose to the 
position of Second Lieutenant. At the outbreak of 
the Spanish-American war he went to the front as 
Second Lieutenant of the troop formed from that or- 
ganization. For special services rendered in that 
campaign he was recommended to the President by 
Brigadier-General Guy V. Henry, his commanding of- 
ficer, for promotion to Brevet First Lieutenant for 
zealous and efficient services in Porto Rico. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 277 

He served several years as chairman of the Somerset 
County Republican Executive Committee. In 1902, he 
made his first campaign for political honors as a 
candidate for State Senator and under the most ad- 
verse conditions was defeated by Samuel S. Childs, 
Democrat, by a small plurality. In 1905, he was 
again nominated for the same position against the 
same opponent, and was elected by a plurality of 1,056, 
and in 1908, he was re-elected to the Senate, over 
Colonel Nelson Y. Dungan, Democrat. During his ca- 
reer as State Senator he has always taken a prominent 
part in legislation. He was the father of the famous 
Frelinghuysen Automobile law, generally recognized 
as one of the most efficient enactments on the subject 
yet passed in this country. He has also secured the 
enactment of many acts of especial benefit to the 
agricultural industry of the State. He was instru- 
mental in having the live stock commission created 
and while serving on a special commission to investi- 
gate the school system secured knowledge which he 
later utilized in framing various bills for the thorough 
re-organization of the school system. He was one of 
the special committee who drafted the present Civil 
Service law, and in 1909, he served as chairman of 
the Special Committee on Finance, also other impor- 
tant committees and in other years he held influential 
assignments in the preparation of legislation. 

He was party leader on the floor of the Senate in 

1909, and upon the resignation of President Robbins 
he was unanimously elected as his successor in the 
chair. He was re-elected President of the Senate in 

1910, During the absence of Governor Fort from the 
State in those years, Senator Frelinghuysen, by vir- 
tue of his position, served as Acting Governor. 

He was chosen President of the State Board of 
Agriculture in 1912, and still holds that position. Upon 
the creation of the New State Board of Education in 

1911, Governor Wilson appointed Mr, Frelinghuysen 
a member of that body for a term of two years, and 
in 1913 he was given a full term of eight years. He 
became President of the board in 1915. 

Senator Frelinghuysen is active in social and 
philanthropic enterprises; is a member of the New 
York Chamber of Commerce; N. J. State Chamber of 
Commerce; Down Town Association; Raritan Valley 



278 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Grange No. 153; the Union League Club, of New York; 
of the Somerville Board of Trade; Solomon's Lodge 
No. 46, F. and A. M.; Somerville Lodge No. 885, B. 
P. O. E., Plainfield, and is trustee of the Somerset 
hospital. 

At the primary election held on September 26th, 
1916, for United States Senator and Governor, Senator 
Frelinghuysen for the former ofRce received a plu- 
rality of 7,878 votes over ex-Governor Franklin 
Murphy. At the regular election held on November 
7th, he received a plurality of 74,696 over James E. 
Martine, Democrat. 

1916 — Frelinghuysen, Rep., 244,715; Martine, Dem., 
170,019; Doughty, Soc, 13,358; Barbour, Pro., 7,178; 
Katz, Soc.-Lab., 1,826. 



WALTER EVANS EDGE, Atlantic City. 

Senator Edge was born in Philadelpliia, Pennsyl- 
vania, November 20th, 1873. Shortly afterward his 
father moved to Pleasantville, New Jersey, a com- 
munity located five miles from Atlantic City. There 
the boy entered the public schools and graduated. 
This was all the schoolroom education that he was 
destined to receive, for stress of circumstances made 
it necessary for him to forego a college course and 
to earn a living. 

With scarcely more than a dollar of capital, but 
with an ambition which is characteristic, Walter Edge 
started to earn money in the humble, but strenuous 
post of "printer's devil" at the Atlantic Review, At- 
lantic City's oldest newspaper. Later, at the age of 
sixteen, he secured a position with the Dorland Ad- 
vertising Agency of Atlantic City. At the time this 
was merely a local business, specializing in hotel ad- 
vertising. Young Edge took such a keen interest in it 
and displayed such aptitude that when the proprietor 
died, about two years later, he purchased the business. 

Given a free rein under his own management. Edge 
aimed high. Plans for developing the business be- 
yond Atlantic City, throughout the country and even 
into Europe did not prove visionary. He started a 
daily newspaper in Atlantic City and put into practice 
a co-operative advertising idea in which his news- 



BIUGRAPHIES. 279 

paper, his advertising agency and newspapers 
thoug-hout the country participated. In a remarkably 
short time Atlantic City and its famous hotels and 
attractions became advertised from one end of the 
earth to the other. All hotel men in Atlantic City 
cheerfully testify to the part which Edge played in 
giving the map its "greatest resort." The agency de- 
veloped until its field became first national, handling 
advertising north, south, east and west in the United 
States, and then international, advertising outputs of 
Europe, Edge opened offices in New York, London, 
Paris, Berlin and elsewhere. His newspaper, the At- 
lantic City Daily Press, progressed from a mere hotel 
advertising medium to the leading news medium of 
Atlantic City. In the meantime Edge purchased the 
Atlantic City Evening Union and conducted it as the 
afternoon edition of his morning publication. Later, 
as the time which he devoted to private business be- 
came wholly occupied with his growing international 
advertising business and his activities in home bank- 
ing and other institutions, he leased both newspapers 
'to a company, consisting of young men who had been 
faithful in his employ, and he is not now in any 
way connected with their management. 

In politics, as in business, Walter Edge began as 
an apprentice. In business life he started as an office 
boy, with errands to run and floors to sweep; in 
public life, as one of the minor employes of the New 
Jersey Senate. In 1897, '98, '99 he served as Journal 
Clerk of the Senate, and in 1901, '02, '03, '04 was Sec- 
retary of that body. He acquired a taste for military 
life from responding to the call of the country at the 
outbreak of the war with Spain in 1898 and froin his 
activities in the Morris Guards an independent mili- 
tary company of Atlantic City which mustered into 
the service during the Spanish-American War as 
Company F, Fourth New Jersey Volunteer Infantry. 
Edge was commissioned second lieutenant of this com- 
pany. Some years later he served as captain of Com- 
pany L, Third Regiment, New Jersey National Guard. 
He was a member of the personal staff of Governors 
Murphy and Stokes and subsequently was Lieutenant- 
Colonel and Chief of Ordnance Department on the 
staff of Major-General C. Edward Murra3^ New Jersey 
National Guard. In Atlantic City there is a Walter 



280 BIOGRAPHIES. 

E. Edge Garrison of the Army and Navy Union. Mr. 
Edge is also the head of the Boy Scout movement in 
Atlantic county. 

In 1904, Colonel Edge was a presidential elector and 
in 1908, an alternate delegate-at-large to the Republi- 
can National Convention in Chicago. In 1909, he was 
elected to the Assembly from Atlantic county by the 
phenomenal plurality of 7,798 over Burgan, the Demo- 
cratic candidate. Thus "phenomenal pluralities" were 
not exactly new to Colonel Edge when he was elected 
Governor in 19x6 by a margin of 69,647 votes — 18,003 
more than the largest plurality ever received by a 
gubernatorial candidate in New Jersey. 

Colonel Edge had the distinction of serving as Re- 
publican leader of the House of Assembly during the 
first year that he occupied a seat in that body. He 
was elected to the State Senate in 1910 by a plurality 
of 5,496 over Langham, Democrat. In 1912, he was 
the majority leader on the floor of the Senate. In 
1913, the Colonel was re-elected to the Senate by a 
plurality of 3,990 over Shaner, Democrat. In 1915, he 
served as President of the Senate with much dignity, 
ability and impartiality. For five weeks in 1915 he 
was Acting-Governor of the State while Governor 
Fielder was attending the Panama-Pacific Exposition 
in California, and this brief special "term" was 
characterized by close application to the executive 
duties. 

It was during his service in the Senate, however, 
that the Colonel carved his record for progressive 
legislation and made possible his famous gubernatorial 
slogan of "A Business Man "With a Business Plan." 
As member of a research commission he studied con- 
ditions and statutes which resulted in the framing of 
the Workmen's Compensation act, one of the first 
practical-working laws of the kind in this country. 
He fathered this bill in the legislature. Besides suc- 
cessively completing the task of protecting working 
women with a ten-hour law and securing legislation 
safeguarding factory workers against dangerously- 
constructed workshops and occupational diseases. 
Senator Edge found time to serve as head of the 
Economy and Efficiency Commission which initiated 
legislation eliminating political commissions and con- 
solidating various boards and departments of New 



BIOGRAPHIES. 281 

Jersey in the interest of economy and increased ef- 
ficiency. These bills he personally sponsored and 
fought through to final passage in the legislature 
against bitter political opposition. Later on he in- 
troduced the State Budget System Bill, aimed to sys- 
tematize New Jersey's finances and make the Governor 
the responsible head of the fiscal system. Another 
act which he initiated, creating the Central Pur- 
chasing Bureau, is designed to save money by pur- 
chasing supplies for the State and its institutions on 
a wholesale scale and following a fixed standard. It 
was Senator Edge, too, who thought of legislation 
abolishing the useless State Census, which had cost 
$100,000. 

"With this comprehensive record for constructive 
legislation at his back, Colonel Edge entered the race 
for the office of Governor in 1916 on a platform of 
"business government." His program consisted of a 
pledge to apply ordinary business principles to the 
thirty-million-dollar business of the State of New 
Jersey. His outlined plan designated "the Governor 
as the business manager, the legislature the board of 
directors and the people the stockholders." The 
stockholders approved the record and liked the plan. 

In the first two years of his administration the Gov- 
ernor has succeeded in carrying out the plan; all de- 
partmental activities have been consolidated and co- 
ordinated and New Jersey's institutions have been cen- 
tralized under a single managing head; prison con- 
tracts have been abolished and the State-use system 
substituted. As "War Governor," Edge has ever been 
alert and resourceful. 

Governor Edge "inherited" a taste for public life. 
Two great uncles were members of the Pennsylvania 
Legislature and another for years was Collector of 
the Port of Philadelphia. His great grandfather was 
a judge in the courts of Pennsylvania for forty years. 

On June 5th, 1907, Governor Edge married Lady 
Lee, only daughter of Mrs. Sarah Lee Phillips of 
Memphis, Tennessee. She died suddenly in July, 1915, 
leaving a robust baby boj', "Walter Edge, Jr., who is 
now the bright particular star of the Edge household. 
The latter consists of Governor Edge, Mrs. Phillips 
and the little boy. 



282 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Walter Evans Edge was nominated as a candidate 
for Governor at the primary election held on Sep- 
tember 26th, 1916, by a plurality of 3,611 over Austen 
Colg-srte. At the regular State election held on No- 
vember 7th, 1916, he was elected Governor over H. 
Otto Wittpenn, Democrat, by a plurality of 69,647. 
He was inaugurated on January 16th, 1917, for a term 
of three years. The salary is $10,000 per annum. 

1916 — Edge, Rep., 247,343; Wittpenn, Dem., 177,696; 
Krafft, Soc, 12,900; Vaughan, Nat. Pro., 5,873; But- 
terworth, Soc.-Lab., 2,334. Edge's plurality, 69,647. 

At the primary election held on September 24th, 
1918, Governor Edge was nominated by the Pwepublican 
party for United States Senator to succeed the late 
Senator William Hughes, defeating George L. Record 
by a plurality of 71,575, the total vote being Edge, 88,- 
741; Record, 17,166; Edward W. Gray, 16,958. 

The Governor was elected for the full term of six 
years at the following general election, November 5th, 
with a plurality of 25,279 over George M. LaMonte, 
Dem. 

1918 — Edge, Rep., 179,022; LaMonte, Dem., 153,743; 
Reilly, Soc, 14,723; Wallace, Single Tax, 2,352; Day, 
Nat. Pro., 5,816. Edge's plurality, 25,279. This includes 
both the civilian and soldier vote. 

The Governor resigned his office on May 16 and 
took the oath of office as United States Senator May 
19th, 1919. His term will expire in 1925. 




Kew Jersey Congressional Distriets. 



284 BIOGRAPHIES. 

NEW JERSEY CONGRESSMEN 



FIRST DISTRICT. 

Camden, Gloucester and Salem Counties. 

FRANCIS F. PATTERSON, JR. 

(Rep., Camden.) 

Mr. Patterson was born in Newark, N. J., July 30th, 
1867. He was educated at the Woodbury Academy and 
early took up newspaper work with his father, F. F. 
Patterson, Sr., who established the Camden Courier in 
1862. The subject of this sketch was New Jersey editor 
of the Philadelphia Record from 1891 to 1894. For 
many years past he has been the manager of the Cam- 
den Post-Telegram. Mr. Patterson was a member of 
the New Jersey Assembly in 1900, and from 1901 to 
1921 he was County Clerk of Camden County, having 
been elected for four terms, no other clerk ever having 
served more than two terms. Affable, but forceful, 
Mr. Patterson is very popular and a recognized leader 
in the Republican party in South Jersey. He is a mem- 
ber of many clubs and fraternal organizations, is 
president of the West Jersey Trust Company, and the 
Pyne Point Building and Loan Association. 

At the November election in 1920 he was elected to 
Congress for the short term to fill the vacancy caused 
by the death of William J. Browning and for the full 
term beginning March 4th, 1921. 

Mr. Patterson was married in 1896 to Isabelle 
F. Leyburne and they have two sons in college and 
two daughters at school. The Patterson home is at 327 
Cooper Street, Camden. 



SECOND DISTRICT. 

Cape May, Atlantic, Cumberland and Burlington 

Counties. 

ISAAC BACHARACH. 
(Rep., Atlantic City.) 
Mr. Bacharach was born in Philadelphia, Pa., Janu- 
ary 5th, 1870, and is in the real estate business. He is 
a graduate of the Atlantic City High School of the 
class of 1885. He is a director of the Second National 



BIOGRAPHIES. 285 

Bank of Atlantic City, the Pleasantville Trust Com- 
pany and the Atlantic Safe Deposit and Trust Com- 
pany; treasurer of the South Jersey Title and Finance 
Company, and president of the Atlantic City Lumber 
Company. Mr. Bacharach -^as a member of the Coun- 
cil of Atlantic City from January 1st, 1907, to January 
1st, 1910, and was re-elected to that body for another 
term of three years from January 1st, 1910. He was 
elected to the House of Assembly in 1912. In 1914 
he was elected to Congress; in 1916 re-elected, and 
again in 1918 by a plurality of 12,134 over French, 
Dem. He was re-elected for a fifth term in 1920. 



THIRD DISTRICT. 

Middlesex, Monmouth and Ocean Counties, 

THEODORE FRANKLIN APPLEBY. 

(Rep., Asbury Park.) 

Mr. Appleby was born at Old Bridge, Middlesex 
county, N. J., October 10th, 1864; educated at Asbury 
Park and New Brunswick High Schools and Penning- 
ton Seminary, and graduated from Fort Edward Insti- 
tute. Has been actively engaged in real estate and 
insurance business since 1885, conducting one of the 
largest real estate offices on the Jersey Coast under the 
firm name of T. Frank Appleby Company; was member 
Asbury Park Board of Education from 1887 to 1897, 
serving same as district clerk and president; niember 
State Board of Education 1894-1902; member Asbury 
Park City Council 1899-1906; mayor of Asbury Park 
two terms', 1908-1912; member Monmouth County 
Board of taxation 1917-1920; director of the Asbury 
Park and Ocean Grove Bank; vice-president of the 
Asbury Park Bviilding and Loan Association; mem- 
ber Asbury Park Chamber of Commerce; member New 
Jersey Fire Insurance Underwriters; member Real 
Estate League of New Jersey; president of the Ocean 
Boulevard Committee; member Deal Golf Club; dele- 
gate to the Republican National Convention of 1896; 
married Alice C. Hoffman, of Lebanon, N. J., and has 
three sons — Stewart, Harry and Theodore — all of whom 
served in the World War; was elected to the Sixty- 
seventh Congress, defeating Dr. Williain E. Ramsej', 
Democrat. 



286 BIOGRAPHIES. 

FOURTH DISTRICT. 

Hunterdon, Somerset and Mercer Counties. 

ELIJAH C. HUTCHINSON. 

(Rep., Trenton.) 

Mr. Hutchinson was born at Windsor, Mercer county, 
N. J., August 7th, 1855, and is a merchant miller. He 
has been treasurer of the Trenton Bone and Ferti- 
lizer Company since its organization in July, 1889, 
and its manager since 1892. He does a large business 
with his flour mill and grain elevator, which are 
situated in Hamilton township, also President of the 
Trenton Flour Mills Co. in Trenton, and has large 
interests in two potteries, being Vice-President of 
N. J. China Pottery Co. and Treasurer of Cochran, 
Drugan & Co., and is a Director of Broad St. Bank 
and Mercer Trust Co. He was a director of the Inter- 
State Fair Association and was its first treasurer, 
having served three years in that position. 

Mr. Hutchinson was a member of the House of As- 
sembly in 1896-97; State Senator, 1899-1904, and Presi- 
dent of the Senate 1903. He served as State Road 
Commissioner three years — 1905-8. In 1914 he was 
elected to the National House of Representatives, re- 
elected in 1916 and again in 1918 and 1920. 



FIFTH DISTRICT. 

Union and Morris Counties. 

ERNEST R. ACKERMAN. 

(Rep., Plainfield.) 

Mr. Ackerman was born in New York City, June 
17th, 1S63. He was educated in the Plainfield public 
schools; graduated from the High School with the 
class of 1880. He became a member of the Plainfield 
Common Council, serving for the years 1891 and 1892. 
In 1905 he was elected to the State Senate and re- 
elected in 1908. In 1911 he was elected President of 
the State Senate, and during Governor Wilson's ab- 
sence from the State he served as Acting Governor of 
New Jersey on several occasions. The passage of the 
first Civil Service law was largely due to his efforts 



BIOGRAPHIES. 287 

and he introduced and pushed to final passage the 
first Employers' Liability Bill in New Jersey. He was 
Secretary of the New Jersey Presidential Electors in 
1897, and v/as a delegate to the Republican National 
conventions of 1908 and 1916. 

Mr. Ackerman is a Director of the Young Men's 
Christian Association and a member of the Plainfield 
Boy Scouts Council; an Associate Member of the 
American Society of Civil Engineers and a member of 
the Engineers' Club of New York. He belongs to the 
Union League Club, the Bankers' Club of America; is 
a member of the Chamber of Commerce of New York, 
the Merchants' Association of New York, serving on 
the Committees of Commercial Law and City Traffic. 
He was appointed a meinber of the State Board of 
Education by Governor Edge for the unexpired term 
to July 1st, 1921, of the Hon. Joseph S. Frelinghuysen, 
elected United States Senator. 

Mr. Ackerman was elected a member of the National 
House of Representatives on November 5th, 191S, and 
re-elected in 1920. 



SIXTH DISTRICT. 

♦Bergen, Sussex and Warren Counties and the Town- 
ships of *Pompton and West Milford in 
Passaic County. 

RANDOLPH PERKINS. 
(Rep., Woodcliff Lake Borough.) 

Mr. Perkins was born in Dunellen, New Jersey, on 
November 30th, 1871. son of James H. and Elizabeth 
Perkins; admitted to the New Jersey Bar in June, 
1893; elected Mayor of Westfield, Union County, April, 
1905; member of the New Jersey House of Assembly 
from Union County, 1905, 1906 and 1907, majority leader 
in 1906; Chairman of the Republican County Com- 
mittee Bergen County, from 1911 to 1916, inclusive; 
elected to the House of Representatives in Congress in 
1920, over Thomas Shields, Democrat, plurality 28,570. 

*Pompton township now divided into the boroughs of 
Bloomingdale, Ringwood and Wanaque. 



28S BIOGRAPHIES. 



SEVENTH DISTRICT. 

Passaic County, excepting- the Townships of *Pompton 

and West Milford. 

AMOS H. RADCLIFFE. 

(Rep., Paterson.) 

Mr. Radcliffe was born in Paterson, January 16th, 
1870. He attended the public schools and was gradu- 
ated from the Paterson High School. He entered his 
father's shop as an apprentice to the blacksmith trade, 
and in the meantime he spent a year at the New York 
Trade Schools at night time, from which he was 
graduated. He spent two years at night time under 
instruction as draughtsman, and entered into partner- 
ship with his father and brother in 1896, and upon the 
incorporation of the James Radcliffe & Sons Company 
in 1907 he was made Secretary, which office he still 
holds with the Arm. 

Mr. Radcliffe served six years in the State National 
Guard and was honorably discharged as a sergeant. 

Mr. Radcliffe served in the Assembly five years, 
from 1907 to 1912. He was elected Sheriff of Passaic 
county in 1912. In 1915 he won the Republican nomi- 
nation for Mayor of Paterson and was elected by a 
plurality of 1,573 over J. Willard DeYoe, the Demo- 
cratic candidate. In 1917 he was re-elected as Mayor 
by a plurality of 3,385 over John Stafford, Democrat. 
He was elected to the Sixty-sixth Congress by a plu- 
rality of 3,934, defeating Judge Joseph A. Delaney, 
Dem. He was re-elected to the Sixty-seventh Con- 
gress in 1920. 

Mr. Radcliffe is a member of practically all the 
leading clubs and fraternal organizations in Paterson. 



*Pompton township now divided into boroughs of 
Bloomingdale, Ringwood and "VVanaque. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 289 

EIGHTH DISTRICT. 

The Eighth, Eleventh and Fifteenth wards of the 
city of Newark, the towns of Belleville, Bloomfield 
and Nutley, all in the county of Essex, and the 
towns of Harrison and Kearny, the borough of East 
Newark, the Seventh ward of the city of Jersey 
City and the city of Bayonne, all in the county of 
Hudson. 

HERBERT W. TAYLOR. 
(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr. Taylor was born in Belleville, N. J., on February 
19th, 1869. He was educated in the public schools of 
Belleville and Harrison and studied law in the Uni- 
versity of the City of New York, where he finished 
his course in 1891. In early life before taking up the 
practice of law Mr. Taylor did newspaper work. Mr. 
Taylor has had an unusually active political career. 
He served in the Newark Common Council from the 
Eighth Ward from 1899 to 1903 and was a member of 
the New Jersey Assembly during the sessions of 1904 
and 1905. For four years, from 1913 to 1917, .he v/as 
chairman of the Essex County Republican Committee 
and from 1916 to 1919 he was County Counsel of Essex 
County. At present he is County Attorney for the 
same county, 

Mr. Taylor in 1895 married Miss Florence Wat.son of 
Belleville, N. J., and they have five children, three 
girls and two boys. 

Besides being an attorney and counselor in New 
Jersey, Mr. Taylor has also been admitted to practice 
in New York. 

The Congressman was elected to the Sixty-seventh 
Congress at the November, 1920, election, defeating 
the then incumbent, Cornelius A. McGlennon. 



290 BIOGRAPHIES. 

MATH DISTRICT. 

The cities of East Orange and Orange and the First, 
Third, Sixth, Seventh, Thirteenth and Fourteenth 
Wards of the City of Newark. 

RICHARD WAYNE PARKER. 
(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr. Parker was born August 6th, 1848, in Morris- 
town, New Jersey, and is a son of the late Cortlandt 
Parker of Newark. He has lived in Newark all his 
life and was graduated in 1864 at Phillips Academy, 
Andover; at Princeton College in 1867, Columbia Col- 
lege Law School in 1869, was admitted to the New 
Jersey Bar in June, 1870, and was made Counselor in 
June, 1873. He began his practice in Newark with 
the law firm of Parker & Keasby, and continued under 
the title of Cortlandt and Wayne Parker. He was a 
member of the New Jersey Legislature in 1885 and 
1886; was defeated for Congrcos in 1892; was elected 
in 1894, and thereafter serving from 1895 to 1911; 
was defeated at the next two elections, and in 1914 
was elected again and continued to serve until 1919. 
At the November election in 1920 he was once more 
elected, receiving a plurality of 12,001 over Congress- 
man Daniel Minihan, Democrat. Mr. Parker has led 
a very active career both as a lawyer and a legislator. 
Plis ability and industry were marked not only in the 
New Jersey Legislature, .but also in the National House 
of Representatives, wliere he has already served eight 
consecutive terms. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 291 

TENTH DISTRICT. 

The Second, Fourth, Fifth, Ninth, Tenth, Twelfth and 
Sixteenth wards of the city of Newark, the towns 
of Irvington, Montclair and West Orange, the bor- 
oughs of Cald-well, Essex Fells, Glen Ridge, North 
Caldwell, Roseland, Verona, West Caldwell, and the 
townships of Caldwell, Cedar Grove, Livingston, 
Millburn, South Orange and the village of South 
Orange, all in the county of Essex. 

FREDERICK R. LEHLBACH. 
(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr. Lehlbach was born in New York City, January 
31st, 1876. Upon the death of his father in 1884 he 
moved to Newark where he has since resided. He 
attended the public schools of Newark and went from 
the High School to Yale University, graduating there- 
from in the class of 1897. He then studied law in the 
New York Law School and was admitted to the bar 
of New Jersey in February, 1899, and has practiced his 
profession since that time. Mr. Lehlbach has been 
an active worker for the success of the Republican 
party since attaining his majority and he has served 
as a member of the Essex County Republican Com- 
mittee. In 1899 he was elected a member of the Board 
of Education of Newark from the Third ward, and 
in 1902 he was elected to the House of Assembly and 
served three years, 1903, 19G4, 1905, from Essex 
county. During his term he took an active part in 
legislation. Upon the organization of the State Board 
of Equalization of Taxes he was appointed clerk of 
that body for a term of five years, and served in that 
office from March, 1905, until April, 1908, when he 
resigned to accept the office of Second Assistant 
Prosecutor of the Pleas of Essex County. Shortly 
thereafter he was promoted to First Assistant Prose- 
cutor, which office he resigned in April, 1913. Since 
then he has been practicing law in Newark, being 
the senior member of the firm of Lehlbach & Van 
Duyne. Mr. Lehlbach was a member of the Sixty- 
fourth and Sixty-fifth Congresses and was re-elected 
to the Sixtj-^-sixth by a plurality of 587 over Flanagan, 
Dem. Again Mr. Lehlbach was elected in 1920 to the 
Sixty-seventh Congress. 



292 BIOGRArHIES. 

ELEVENTH DISTRICT. 

The townships of Weehawken and North Bergen, the 
towns of Guttenberg-, West Hoboken, West New 
York and Union and the borough of Secaucus, the 
city of Hoboken and the Second ward in the city 
of Jersey City, all in the county of Hudson. 

DR. ARCHIBALD E. OLPP. 
(Rep., West Hoboken.) 

Dr. Olpp, who is the first Republican to be elected to 
Congress from the Eleventh District since it was 
created ten years ago, is a practicing physician and 
was formerly a chemist. He was born in Bethlehem, 
Pennsylvania, May 12th, 1882, and received his early 
education at the Moravian Public School, from which 
he graduated in 1899. Four years later he graduated 
from Lehigh University. Subsequently he took a med- 
ical course at the University of Pennsylvania and fin- 
ished there in 1908. 

Mr. Olpp's prior public offices consist of his having 
been town physician of West Hoboken from 1913 to 
1915 and to having been twice chosen school physician 
of Secaucus. 

In the election in November, 1920, Mr. Olpp was 
elected to Congress over John J. Egan, Democrat, who 
served the district for four successive terms. 



TWELFTH DISTRICT. 

The First, Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Eighth, Ninth, 
Tenth, Eleventh and Twelfth wards of Jersey City, 
all in the county of Hudson. 

CHARLES F. X. O'BRIEN. 
(Dem., Jersey City.) 

Mr. O'Brien is a native of Jersey City. He is .a 
graduate of Fordham University, New York, having 
received the degrees of A.B. and A.M. After finishing 
his college course he studied law at the New York 
Law School and was subsequently admitted as a mem- 
ber of the New Jersey bar. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 293 

When Commission Government was first established 
in Jersey City, Mr. O'Brien was appointed Judge of the 
Second Criminal Court, and later was one of the five 
successful City Commissioners elected by the people. 
At the conference among the Commissioners he was 
chosen Director of Public Safetj . 

At the Democratic National Convention held in San 
Francisco, June, 1920, Mr. O'Brien was selected to 
make the nominating speech placing the name of G-ov- 
ernor Edwards before the Convention as the Demo- 
cratic Presidential nominee, and his oration was re- 
garded as one of the big events of the Convention. 

Upon the record he made as Judge and as one of the 
Jersey City Commissioners, Mr. O'Brien was elected 
to the Sixty-seventh Congress by more than five thou- 
sand majority, although the rest of the Democratic 
ticket was overwhelmingly defeated, he being the only 
Democrat elected to Congress from New Jersey. 

Mr. O'Brien belongs to a number of social and fra- 
ternal organizations in Hudson County. He is 
married and lives with his wife and three children at 
No. 407 Bergen Avenue, Jersey City. 



294 BIOGRAPHIES. 



STATE SENATORS. 



Atlantic County. 

CHARLES DOUGHTY WHITE. 
(Rep., Atlantic City.) 

Senator White was born at Denton, Md., July 8th, 
1875, and is a hotel proprietor. He is son of Josiah 
White, formerly of Philadelphia, Pa., and Mary Kirby 
Allen, of Haddonfield, N. J. He lived on a farm at 
Denton until 1887, and moved to Atlantic City that 
year. He attended public schools and High School, 
also Swarthmore College, being a member of the class 
of 1895 — arts course. He was graduated from the 
University of Pennsylvania, class of 1896 — law. The 
Senator practiced law in Philadelphia five years and 
then entered the firm of Josiah White & Sons, owners 
and managers of the hotels Marlborough-Blenheim 
and Luray, Atlantic City, with which institutions he 
is still connected. 

The Senator was a member of Atlantic City Council, 
1911-12, and City Commissioner of Atlantic City, 1916- 
1920, being Director of Streets and Public Improve- 
ments. He was an Alternate Delegate to the Repub- 
lican National Convention at Chicago in 1916. 

Pie was elected to the State Senate in 1919 by a plu- 
rality of 3,045 over Lafayette J. Brown, Democrat, the 
vote being 8,048 to 5,003, and was chosen majority 
floor leader in the Senate of 1922. 



Berg-en County. 

WILLIAM B. MACKAY, JR. 
(Rep., Hackensack.) 

Senator Mackay, Jr., was born in Greenock, Scot- 
land, August 21st 1876. After going through the 
public schools in Hackensack, N. J., he studied law in 
the office of George R. Dutton and attended the N. Y. 
Law School. He was admitted to the bar at the June 
term, 1899, and became a counsellor-at-law at the 
February term, 1906. He w£ls appointed a Supreme 



BIOGRAPHIES. 295 

Court Commissioner on April 16th, 1915, and a Spe- 
cial Master in Chancery of N. J. on January 18th, 1918. 
In the fall of 1916 he was the Republican candidate 
for State Senator and received the unusual plurality 
of 6,930 votes over his opponent, Arthur M. Agnew. 
He was the father of the Mackay Local Option Bill, 
which was introduced in the Legislature and became 
a law in the year 1918. He took an active part dur- 
ing the past three years in all progressive legislation 
that was introduced and passed by the Legislature. 
In 1919 he introduced the tunnel bill, which was the 
culmination of a number of legislative acts and the 
persistent efforts on the part of many prominent men 
of the State. This important piece of legislation will 
be the means of connecting the State of New Jersey 
with the State of New York by a tunnel. In 1919 he 
was the candidate for re-election and received the 
unusual plurality of 7,692 votes over ex-Judge Wil- 
liam M. Seufert, the Democratic nominee. Senator 
Mackay was chosen majority floor leader in the Senate 
for the 1921 session and was made President of the 
Senate for the session of 1922. 



Burlington County. 

EMMOR ROBERTS. 
(Rep., Moorestown.) 

Mr. Roberts was born at Moorestown, Burlington 
county, N. J., March 13th, 1890, and is a fruit grower 
and farmer. He is a graduate of Swarthmore College, 
1911, and Cornell Short Agricultural Course, 1912. He 
owns and directs five large fruit farms in Burlington 
county. He is also a director of Stokes Seeds Farms 
Company, a member of the national committee of seed 
inspection and certification, and a director of Moores- 
town Trust Company. Mr. Roberts was a member of 
Delaware Farmers' Institute Lecturing Staff, 1913, and 
New Jersey, 1914-15, and lectures considerably in 
eastern agricultural colleges. He is a member of the 
New Jersey Public Library Commission. 

Before his election to the Assembly, Mr. Roberts 
never held public office. In 1920 he was given a sixth 
•term as Assemblyman, unusual in Burlington county. 

At the election in 1921 he was chosen as Burlington 
county's representative in the State Senate. 
10 



296 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Camden County. 

JOSEPH F. WALLWORTH. 
(Rep., Haddonfield.) 

Mr. Wallworth was born in Philadelphia February 
24th, 1876, and is member of the firm of J. Wallworth's 
Sons, Philadelphia, manufacturers of cotton and wool 
waste. He has been a member of the Camden County 
Republican Executive Committee four years, and is 
associated with the following' org-anizations: Presi- 
dent of the Haddonfield Republican Club, member Cam- 
den Lodg-e of Elks, of various Masonic fraternities, of 
the Crescent Temple, Mystic Shrine, of Trenton, and of 
the Union League Club of Philadelphia. 

He was re-elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 
7,371 over Collins, higli Democrat, the total vote being 
17,193 to 9,822. After two years in the Assembly Mr. 
Wallworth in 1920 was elected to the State Senate for 
a term of three years. 



Cape May County. 

WILLIAM H. BRIGHT. 
(Rep., Wildwood.) 

Senator Bright was born at Bridgehampton, Michi- 
gan, October 21st, 1863, and is in the real estate and 
insurance business. He was Sheriff of Cape May 
county, 1905-1908, and was elected to the State Senate 
by a plurality of 1,524 over William Porter, Dem., re- 
ceiving 2,366 votes to 842 for Porter, Dem. Mr. Bright 
was re-elected to the Senate in 1921 over his Demo- 
cratic opponent, after having won a re-nomination 
froiii Assemblyman Andrew C. Boswell. 



Cumberland County. 

FIRMAN M. REEVES. 
(Rep., Millville.) 

Senator Reeves was born at Millville, N. J., Septem- 
ber 20th, 1877, and is in the drug business. He was 
educated in the Millville public schools and was grad- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 297 

uated from Bridgeton Business School. He has alwaj^s 
taken an active part in the civic affairs of the city. 
He is a director of the Mechanics National Bank and 
president of the Hope Building and Loan Association, 
and treasurer of the Firemen's Relief Association, all 
of Millville. He is a member of Millville Lodge, B. P. 
O. E.; Fraternal Order of Eagles, Loyal Order of Moose 
and Tuscola Tribe, Red Men. He was a member of the 
Assembly in 1918-'19, and was elected State Senator 
by a majority of 1,409 over Charles S. Stevens, Dem., 
at the fall election in 1919. His plurality was 1,409. 



Essex County. 

A^'ILLIAM H. PARRY. 
(Rep., Xewark.) 

Mr. Parry was born at Mount Holly, November 11th, 
1877. He is the only son of the late Dr. William C. 
Parry, who represented Burlington County in the 
State Senate from 1895 to 1898. He is a graduate of 
the Friends' High School a,t Moorestown, the Mount 
Holly Academy, the University of Pennsylvania and 
the law school of the University of Michigan. For 
several years he was secretary of the New Jersey 
League of Republican Clubs. He was admitted to the 
New Jersey Bar on November 11th, 1901, and shortly 
afterwards commenced the practice of law in Newark, 
where he is still practicing. He resided for a number 
of years at Nutlej% where he was town recorder and 
afterwards town attorney for a period of four years. 
He now resides at 578 Summer Avenue, Newark. Dur- 
ing the war he was a Four-Minute Man in New York, 
Newark and Orange and is credited with having ad- 
dressed more theatre audiences than any other Four- 
Minute Man in the State. He is Presiaent of the North 
End Civic League and of the Federation of Improve- 
ment Associations of Newark. He Avas counsel in the 
recent probe of the Newark tax board. This is the 
first time that he has been a candidate for office. He 
is a member of the University of Michigan Club 
of New York, the University of Pennsylvania Club 
of New York, Speakers' Club of New York, Lincoln 
Club of Newark, Newark Real Estate Board, Woodside 



298 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Council, Royal Arcanum; Crystal Lodge, Knights of 
Pythias; Nutlej- Lodge of Elks, and other organiza- 
tions. Mr. Parry was elected to the State Senate at 
the fall election in 1920. 



Gloucester County. 

HORACE M. FOODER. 
(Rep., Williamstown.) 

Dr. Fooder was born on September 6th, 1884, in 
Philadelphia, Pa., and is a physician. He was educated 
in the Philadelphia public schools and attended the 
Philadelphia high school; began the study of medicine 
at Medico-Chirurgical College at Philadelphia, and 
graduated in 1908 from that institution. He is a mem- 
ber of the American Medical Association, Philadelphia 
Medical Club, Physicians' Motor Club of Camden, presi- 
dent of the Gloucester County Medical Society, and 
also a member of the Odd Fellows and Elks lodges. 

He was elected as the first Republican Freeholder 
from Monroe township in twenty-one years and in 
1916-17 was director of the board. He is chairman of 
the Board of Fire Commissioners of that township 
and physician to the Board of Health. 

The doctor was re-elected to the Assembly for a 
fourth term at the November, 1920, election. 

In 1921 Dr. Fooder was elected to the State Senate 
from Gloucester county to fill the unexpired term of 
Edward L. Sturgess, who resigned to become Internal 
Revenue Collector for the Fifth New Jersey District. 
Senator Fooder's term will expire in 1924. 



Hudson County. 

ALEXANDER SIMPSON. 
(Dem., Jersey City.) 

Senator Simpson was born in Jersey City June 12th, 
1872, and is a lawyer. He was formerly a newspaper 
representative. He has had much experience in leg- 
islation, having been a member of the Assembly in 
1898, 1916, '18. He was minority leader the latter two 
years. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 299 

He was elected to the State Senate by a plurality 
of 21,015 over Harlan Besson, Rep., the vote being 
44,780 to 23,765. 

Mr. Simpson was chosen Democratic floor leader in 
the Senate for the session of 1922. 



Hunterdon County. 

DAVID H. AGANS. 
(Dem., Three Bridges.) 

Mr. Agans was born at Pleasant Run, N. J., Novem- 
ber 20th, 1868, and is a farmer, and was formerly a 
miller. He attended the public schools at Readington 
and finished at the Reading Academy, Flemington. 

Mr. Agans served on the Board of Education of 
Readington for three years and for four years on the 
Board of Registry and Election. He is very much 
interested in agriculture and besides owning a fine 
farm has been a member of the Grange for some 
twenty years. He is a charter member of Riverside 
Grange and was its first Master, serving eight years. 
He was elected Lecturer of the New Jersey State 
Grange in 1904 and served in that position for many 
years. He is at present Master of the State Grange. 

Mr. Agans was elected to the Assembly from Hunter- 
don county three successive times, serving in the 
sessions of 1918, 1919 and 1920. He was not a candi- 
date in 1920 for the 1921 session and at the November 
election, 1921, was chosen State Senator for a full 
term of three years. 



Mercer Cou»ty. 

S. ROY HEATH. 
(Dem., Trenton.) 

Senator Heath was born in Ewing Township, Mer- 
cer county, N. J., in 1884, and in business is a lum- 
berman, being vice president and treasurer of Sam- 
uel Heath Company, which firm succeeded his father, 
the late Samuel Heath, one of the best known lumber- 
men in New Jersey, and one of Trenton's prominent 
business men. He was educated in the country dis- 
trict school. State Model School and Princeton Uni- 



300 BIOGRAPHIES. 

versity. He has been a press agent, sales agent and 
superintendent, and was a member of the Board of 
Managers of the State Village for Epileptics for one 
year, having been appointed by Governor Fielder. 
He takes a very active part in the affairs of Trenton 
and the Chamber of Commerce. 

The Senator married Janet Field Curtis in 1910, 
and they have four children, Curtis Franklin, Mary 
Elizabeth, Dartha and S. Roy, Jr. 

On November 4th, 1919, he was elected to the State 
Senate by a plurality of 2,050 over Assemblyman John 
E. Gill, the vote being Heath, Dem., 11,875; Gill, Rep., 
9.825. 

Mr. Heath is the first Democratic Senator from 
Mercer county in thirty-four years, since 1886, when 
George O. Vanderbilt occupied the seat. 



Middlesex County. 

MORGAN F. LARSON. 
(Rep., Perth Amboy.) 

Mr. Larson was born in Perth Amboy on June 15th, 
1882, and has lived there ever since. He was educated 
in the common schools of that city and then studied 
engineering at Cooper Union, New York City, at- 
tending night classes for five years — working in the 
daytime at the practical side of his profession. He 
graduated in 1907 with the degree of Bachelor of 
Science and later received the degree of Civil En- 
gineer. 

From 1907 to 1910 Mr. Larson was county engineer 
of Middlesex county. He then formed the partnership 
of Larson & Fox, and as head of that firm has played 
an important part in many of the big projects that 
have been witnessed in the development of this sec- 
tion of New Jersey. 

In 1917 Mr. Larson was named city engineer of 
Perth Amboy and also received appointment as town- 
ship engineer for Woodbridge that year. Among the 
more important works he completed may be mentioned 
the big reservoir for Perth Amboy, the Fords sewer 
system and a complete system of city streets in Perth 
Amboy — second to none in the State. 

Mr. Larson was elected to the State Senate at the 
November, 1921, election on the Republican ticket. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 301 

Monmouth County. 

WILLIAM A. STEVENS. 
(Rep., Long Branch.) 

Senator Stevens was born at Stapleton Heights, 
Staten Island, July 19th, 1879, and is a lawyer. He 
was educated in public schools of Long Branch, grad- 
uating from High School in 1897; studied later at 
New Jersey State Normal School, Trenton, N. J.; en- 
tered law ofRces of Public Utility Commission Presi- 
ident John W. Slocum in 1899 as a law student; en- 
tered New York Law School in fall of 1899, gradu- 
ating with degree of Bachelor of Laws, class of 1901, 
and was admitted to N. J. Bar in February, 1902. Mr. 
Stevens has specialized on municipal law and espe- 
cially commission government law. He has been city 
counsel for the city of Long Branch and Boards of 
Education and Health from 1912 to the present time; 
borough attorney of West Long Branch for past 
eleven years; for Deal past four years, and Monmouth 
Beach 1912 to 1916. He is married and has two 
daughters, eleven and fourteen, respectively. 

He was elected to the State Senate in 1919 for an 
unexpired term and was re-elected for a full term in 
1920. 



Morris County. 

ARTHUR WHITNEY. 
(Rep., Mendham.) 

Senator Whitney was born July 5th, 1871, at Morris 
Plains, N. J., and lived there until his marriage in 
1906, when he moved to his present farm in Mendham 
township. After a successful business career of 
twenty years as a banker and broker he first ran for 
public office in 1916, when he was elected to the House 
of Assembly. He was returned to the Assembly in 
1917, and in 1918 elected to the Senate to fill out the 
unexpired term of Senator Mutchler. 

Senator Whitney's banking experience has led him 
to take much interest in the financial management of 
the State, and he has served on the Committee on Ap- 
propriations since his first year in the Legislature. 
In 1917 he acted as chairman for the Assembly of the 



302 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Appropriations Committee, and in 1918 was chairman 
of the Joint Committee on Appropriations, an honor 
only once before accorded a Senator in 'his first year, 
and for three years continued to hold that chairman- 
ship. He was chairman of the Commission for the 
Investigation of County and Township Roads, which 
rendered a report at the 1919 session of the Legisla- 
ture. 

He was re-elected to the State Senate in 1919 by a 
plurality of 3,653 over Judge Joshua Salmon, his 
Democratic opponent, and was high man on the Re- 
publican ticket. Whitney, 8,806; Salmon, 5,153. 



Ocean County. 

HARRY T. HAGAMAN. 
(Rep., Lakewood.) 

Senator Hagaman was born at Toms River, N. J., 
June 2d, 1869, and is an editor and publisher. He is 
son of ex-Sheriff John Hagaman, of Toms River; has 
always been a Republican, and is a member of a num- 
ber of secret societies. He was Secretary of the Ocean 
County Tax Board for four years. Mr. Hagaman is a 
director of the Lakewood Trust Company, the largest 
financial institution in Ocean county; was vice-presi- 
dent of the New Jersey Editorial Association in 1918, 
is a charter member and a director of the Lakewood 
Chamber of Commerce, is grand master-at-arms of the 
Grand Lodge, Knights of Pythias of N. J.; a thirty- 
second degree Mason and a member of Salaam Tem- 
ple, Mystic Shrine, of Newark, N. J. He served three 
years in the House of Assembly. 

He was elected State Senator without opposition, 
receiving a total vote of 3,061. 



Passaic County. 

ALBIN SMITH. 

(Rep., Paterson.) 

Senator Albin Smith was born at Franklin Furnace, 

Sussex county, N. J., and is a counselor-at-law. He 

was educated in the Paterson public schools and later 



BIOGRAPHIES. 303 

was employed as a telegraph operator and railroad 
clerk. He attended the New York Law School (even- 
ing division) and passed his New Jersey bar examina- 
tion in June, 1905, and counselor in June, 1911. 

He w^as an Alderman of the city of Paterson in 1903- 
1907, and was elected to the Assembly of New Jersey 
November, 1917. 

In November, 1918, he was elected to the Senate of 
New Jersey, and in 1921 was re-elected for another 
three-year term. 



Salem Comi<y. 

COLLINS B. ALLEN. 
(Rep., Salem.) 

Senator Allen, a prominent farmer in INIannington 
township, Salem county, N. J., was born on the old 
Homestead farm, August 9th, li.'66. He entered the lo- 
cal public school, afterward attended a private school 
in Salem, He was elected a member of the Board of 
Education of Mannington township in 1S96, appointed 
district clerk of that board in 1897 and now holds 
both positions. In 1897 he was elected township 
clerk and held that office until he was nominated for 
the Senate. Mr. Allen served as sheriff of Salem 
county for a term of three years, beginning in 1905. 

He is a director of the Salem National Banking 
Company, also a director of the South Jersey Farmers' 
Exchange. He is a member of Salem Grange No. 
172, and held the office of master for two years, and 
is also a member of Forest Lodge No. 7, K. of P. 

He was elected to the Senate in 1914 by a plurality 
of 519 over Smick, Democrat, and was re-electe-i in 
1917 by the increased plurality of 1,707 over David 
A. English, Democrat, the total vote being, Allen, 3,776; 
English, 2,069; Pro., 331. In 1920 Senator Allen was 
re-elected to the Senate for a third term. 

The Senator was chosen majority leader for the 
session of 1920 and was made President of the Senate 
for the 1921 session. 



,';04 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Somerset County. 

CLARENCE EDWARDS CASE. 
(Rep., Somerville.) 

Senator Case was born in Jersey City, N. J., Sep- 
tember 24th, 1877, and is a lawyer. He is a graduate 
of Rutgers Preparatory School, 1896; Rutgers College, 
1900; New Jersey Law School, 1902, and received the 
honorary degrees — B.A., M.A., LL.B. — and is a mem- 
ber of the following fraternities: Delta Upsilon, Phi 
Betta Kappa, Phi Delta Phi, and is a member of the 
Elks, Masons and Knights of Pythias. 

The Senator was clerk of the Judiciary Committee 
of the Senate, 1909, and Private Secretary to the Presi- 
dent of the Senate, 1910. 

He was County Judge, Somerset county, from 1910 
to 1913, when he resigned. 

He was elected to the Senate in 1917 by a plurality 
of 1,920 over Peter B. Hall, Democrat, the total vote 
being, Case, 4,202; Hall, 2,282; Pro., 185. In 1919 he 
was majority leader during the session of the Senate 
and served as chairman of the Committees on Judi- 
ciary, Finance and Sanatorium for Tuberculous Dis- 
eases and member of the Committees on Education, 
Commerce and Navigation and Home for Feeble- 
Minded Women. 

The Senator served as chairman of the legislative 
committee, representing the State of New Jersey in 
conference with a like committee from the State of 
New York in the matter of the New York-New Jersey 
port, and he has also been a member of the commis- 
sion to investigate and report on tax assessment. 

He was President of the Senate for the session of 
1920 and served as Acting Governor from January 13th 
to January 20th, 1920. In the fall of 1920 the Senator 
v^as re-elected to the Senate for another three-year 
term. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 305 

Sussex County. 

HENRY T. KAYS. 
(Dem., Newton.) 

Senator Kays was born at Newton, N. J., September 
29th, 1878, and is a lawj'er. He was graduated from 
Newton public school in 1896; from the English and 
Classical School in 1898; entered Princeton University 
in 1899, and was graduated in the spring of 1903. 
He taught science in the English and Classical School 
of Newton two years. He studied law at Newton in 
the law offices of Thomas M. Kays, his father, and was 
admitted to the New Jersey bar in February, 1910. 
He was a member of the Board of Chosen Freehold- 
ers of Sussex county from May, 1910, to June, 1911, 
and has served as counsel of the board since January, 
1917. He was Federal Food Administrator for Sussex 
county. He served as a member of the House of 
Assembly in 1913, '14, '15, and was elected to the Sen- 
ate in 1918 by a plurality of 430, receiving 2,487 votes 
to 2,057 for "Wilson, Rep. Mr. Kays was chosen Demo- 
cratic floor leader in the Senate for the session of 
1921, and at the fall election in 1921 he was re-elected 
to the Senate for a second term. 



Union County. 

WILLIAM N. RUNYON. 
(Rep., Plainfield.) 

Senator Runyon was born at Plainfield, N. J., March 
5th, 1871, and is a lawyer. He was prepared for col- 
lege at the Plainfield High School; graduated from 
Yale in 1892 and from the New York Law School in 
1894; was admitted to the New York bar in 1894; to 
the New Jersey bar as attorney, 1898, and counselor, 
1901. 

He was a member of the Plainfield Common Coun- 
cil for two years, 1897-'98; City Judge, 1899-1910, and 
for three years, 1915-'16-'17, was a member of the As- 
sembly. 

He was elected State Senator in 1917 for a full 
term. In 1919 he was chosen president of the Senate 



306 BIOGRAPHIES. 

and administered the duties of that office with much 
credit and impartiality. 

Upon the resignation of Walter E. Edge as Governor 
May 16th, 1919, President Runyon, by virtue of his 
office, became Acting Governor and served as such 
until January, 1920. Governor Runyon was a can- 
didate for the Republican nomination for Governor 
at the State primary election on September 23d, but 
was defeated by Newton A. K. Bugbee. The Governor 
carried his own county by a plurality of 5,376 over 
Bugbee. Mr. Runyon was re-elected to the Senate in 
1920. 



Warren County. 

THOMAS BARBER. 
(Dem., Phillipsburg.) 

Senator Barber was born at Port Warren, Warren 
County, New Jersey, May 11th, 1868; and is a physi- 
cian by profession. He is a lineal descendant of John 
Barber, Esq., who settled at what is now Lopatcong 
Township, prior to 1740. Dr. Barber's ancestors were 
actively engaged in the Revolution. His great grand- 
father, Barber, was for some time a revolutionary 
soldier. His great grandfather, Thomas Kennedy, a 
nephew of General William Maxwell, was a member 
of Kennedy's brigade of teams. His great grand- 
father, Henry Stroh, Sr., was wounded at the battle of 
Trenton. His great great grandfather, Mathias Ship- 
man, was Lieutenant Colonel of Second Sussex Regi- 
ment. His great great grandfather, Jonas Hartzell, 
was a member of a committee of safety. His grand- 
father, Henry Stroh, Jr., was a sergeant in the war of 
1812. Dr. Barber received his early education in the 
public schools, and prepared for college at the Phil- 
lipsburg and Easton High Schools. He entered Lafa- 
yette in 1891, graduated in the arts, 1895; and in 
medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, 1898. He 
located in Phillipsburg and has since practiced in con- 
junction with his brother. Dr. Isaac Barber. In the 
1911 election, in Phillipsburg alone, he received a 
majority of 1,568, the largest majority ever given a 
candidate for any office in the history of the munici- 
pality. The Doctor was then elected to the Senate by 



BIOGRAPHIES. 307 

a plurality of 2,152 over Marvin A. Pierson, Repub- 
lican. He was re-elected in 1914 by the increased 
plurality of 2,439 over Shoemaker, Republican, and 
again in 1917 by a plurality of 780 over John C. Sharpe, 
Republican. The total vote was: Barber, 3,775; 
Sharpe, 2,995; Pro., 388.; Soc, 144. In 1920 Dr. Barber 
was re-elected to the Senate for a fourth term. 



Summary. 

Senate — Republicans .... 16 Democrats 5 = 21 

House — Republicans 45 Democrats 15 = 60 

61 20 81 

Republican majority on joint ballot, 41. 



When Regular Senatorial Election.s Occur. 

• In 1922 — Atlantic, Bergen, Cumberland, Morris and 
Ocean, now represented by Republicans, and Hudson 
and Mercer, represented by Democrats, 7. 

In 1923 — Camden, Essex, Gloucester, Somerset, 
Salem, Monmouth and Union, now represented by Re- 
publicans, and "Warren, represented by a Democrat, 8. 

In 1924 — Burlington, Cape May, Middlesex and Pas- 
saic, now represented by Republicans, and Hunterdon 
and Sussex, represented by Democrats, 6. 



308 BIOGRAPHIES. 



HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY. 

Atlantic County. 

WILLIAM A. BLAIR. 
(Rep., Elwood.) 

Mr. Blair was born in Philadelphia, Pa., in 1882, and 
is a farmer, and was formerly a mechanical engineer. 
He was a member of the Board of Chosen Freeholders, 
Atlantic county, in 1916-17. He was re-elected to the 
Assembly for a fifth term at the November, 1921. 
election. 

With a single exception Mr. Blair has the distinction 
of having been more frequently elected to the As- 
sembly from Atlantic county than any other person 
since the county was created in 1837. That exception 
was Thomas C. Elvins, who served in the Assembly 
for six consecutive sessions beginning in 1902. 

JOSE-PH A. CORIO. 

(Rep., Atlantic Cily.) 

Mr. Corio was born in Philadelphia, Pa., June 11th, 
1887, but has resided for many years in Atlantic City. 
He attended the Atlantic City public schools and was 
graduated from the Atlantic City High School. He 
enrolled in the Law School of the University of Penn- 
sylvania, from which be graduated. He also studied 
law in the offices of James H. Hayes, Jr., and Louis 
Repetto, the latter now Judge of the District Court 
in Atlantic City. Mr. Corio was admitted to the bar 
as an attorney, December, 1911, and as a counsellor, 
July, 1915. He is Town Solicitor of Hammonton, N. J., 
and frequently officiates as Acting Recorder in At- 
lantic City. For years Mr. Corio has taken an active 
part in the affairs of Atlantic City Elks, of which 
lodge he is Esteemed Leading Knight for the term 
1921-22. Mr. Corio was elected to the Assembly for a 
third consecutive term at the November, 1921, election. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 309 

Bergen County. 

JOHN Y. DATER. 
(Rep., Ramsey.) 

Mr. Dater was born at Ramsey, N. J., August 27th, 
1870. He was educated in the public schools of his 
home town and later took a business course in a Pat- 
erson college. By choice he entered the printing busi- 
ness in his early twenties and soon after started the 
Ramsey Journal, a weekly newspaper, which he has 
edited and published for nearly twenty-eight years, 
and is still engaged in publishing. He has always 
been interested in educational affairs and has served 
on his local Board of Education for nearly twenty- 
four years, fifteen years of that time as president. 
He has also been prominent in educational affairs of 
the State. In Y. M. C. A. matters he has also been 
intensely interested and was the first county chairman 
of the Bergen County Y. M. C. A., a position which he 
held for two years. The election as a member of the 
Assembly is the first elective office lie has held. He 
was re-elected to the Assembly for a third term in 
1921. 

He is a member of the Masonic fraternitj', the I. O. 
O. F., Jr. Order of United American Mechanics. Also a 
member of the Legislative Correspondents' Club and 
of the New Jersey Press Association, and has served 
as president of the State Federation of District Boards 
of Education of the State. 

WILLIAM DELORENZO. 
(Rep., Hackensack.) 

Mr. DeLorenzo, who is a lawyer by profession, was 
born in Sevino, Italy, December 28th, 1886. He came to 
this country when twelve years old and settled in 
Hackensack, where he still lives. He attended the 
Hackensack High School and afterward the New York 
Law School, from which he received the degree LL.B. 
in 1909. He became an attornej^ the same j'ear and 
In 1912 became a counsellor. 

Mr. DeLorenzo was a member of the Hackensack 
Board of Education from 1911 to 1914. He has been 
counsel for the Lodi Board of Education for six years 
and for the Hackensack Board of Health for the past 
year. 



310 BIOGRAPHIES. 

ROBERT TODD. 
(Rep., Palisades Park.) 

Mr. Todd was born January 30th, 1879, and received 
his education at the Harlem (New York) High School. 
He is in the real estate business and has been active 
in the affairs of Palisades Park. For six years he 
served as a member of council in that municipality 
and at the end of that time, in 1915, became Mayor, a 
position he still holds. 

Mr. Todd was elected to the Assembly for the first 
time in November, 1921. 



Burlington County. 

CLIFFORD ROSS POWELL. 
(Rep., Mt. Holly.) 

Mr. Powell was born at Lumberton, Burlington 
County, N. J., July 26th, 1893, and is a lawyer, prac- 
ticing since 1914 in the firm of Palmer & Powell at 
Mt. Holly. He received his education at the Mt. Holly 
High School, graduating in 1911. 

Mr. Powell has served as Assistant Prosecutor of 
Burlington County and is solicitor for several munic- 
ipalities in his county. He was Second Lieutenant 
in Co. E. Third Infantry, N. J. N. G., at the outbreak 
of the World War, when he was assigned to Co. H, 
114th Inf.; promoted to First Lieutenant 114th Inf. 
Nov. 7th, 1917; transferred to Air Service (aeronau- 
tics) November 20th, 1917, and sailed for France De- 
cember 17th, 1917. Was attached to French Army 
February 7th, 1918, and studied at French Aerial 
Gunnery School at Cazaux, until March 1st. Served 
in four major operations with the French Ninth Bom- 
bardment Groupe during March, April and May. Was 
severely wounded and shot down on June 1st, 1918, 
at Soissons and still carries a bullet in right thigh. 
Spent all of the summer in hospitals. Again served 
in two major operations before the Armistice. Twice 
decorated with the French Croix de Guerre, and offi- 
cially credited with the destruction of two German 
planes. After the war assi'Sted in reorganization of 
the National Guard and now serving as First Lieu- 
tenant, Battalion Adjutant, 114th Infantry, N. J. N. G. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 311 

Several times competed in National Rifle Matches with 
the New Jersey State Rifle Team; in 1920 had the 
highest scores in New Jersey in the "expert" and 
"long'-distance expert" qualifications; served on the 
staff of General Bird W. Spencer, Inspector General of 
Rifle Practice, in 1919. 



Camden County. 

T. HARRY ROWLAND. 
(Rep., Camden.) 

Mr. Rowland was born in Boston, Mass., May 22d, 
1888, and is a lawyer. He is a graduate of Lafayette 
College, and studied law at the University of Penn- 
sylvania and Temple Court. He was a member of the 
Board of Education of the city of Camden seven 
years, and is a member of the Camden Lodge of Elks 
and Ionic Lodge of Masons. 

Mr. Rowland was re-elected to the Assembly for a 
fourth term at the November, 1921, election and upon 
organization of the 1j21 Assembly was made chair- 
man of the Republicans, which carried with it the 
majority leadership. His success as a leader in that 
session earned for him a promotion to the Speaker- 
ship of the 1922 Assembly. 

J. HEULINGS COLES. 

(Rep., Moorestown R. D.) 

Mr. Coles was born at Colestown, N. J., April 26th, 
1876, and is a farmer and dairyman. He is a son of 
Isaac W. Coles, who was an Assemblyman in 1911, '12, 
'13. Mr. Coles was elected to the Assembly for a third 
term at the 1921 election. 

WILLARD T. GIBBS. 

(Rep., Clementon.) 

Mr. Gibbs was born at Kirkwood, N. J., August 2d, 
1866. He was educated at the Friends' Central School, 
Philadelphia. He is engaged in the real estate busi- 
ness and is President of the Clementon Real Estate 
Company. He is also a banker and is President of 
the Clementon National Bank. Another position held 



312 BIOGRAPHIES. 

by Mr. Gibbs is that of President of the Clementon 
Building- and Loan Association. 

From 1908 to 1912 Mr. Gibbs was a member of the 
Camden County Tax Board. Mr. Gibbs at one time 
was engaged in the contracting business. He was 
elected to the Assembly for the second time at the 
November, 1921, election. 



Cape May County, 

ROBERT J. KAY. 
(Rep., Wildwood.) 

Mr. Kay, who was elected to the Assembly for the 
first time at the November, 1921, election, was born 
in the city of Philadelphia October 5th, 1882, and was 
educated in the Philadelphia High School. 

Mr. Kay has resided in ■\'\'ildwood for many years 
and is actively identified with the affairs of that city. 
He was collector of taxeis in Wildwood from 1912 to 
1920, City Treasurer from 1912 to date, and secretary 
and treasurer of the Sinking Fund from 1916 to the 
present time. Besides his public positions Mr. Kay 
was President of the Wildwood Board of Trade in 
1917. He is a director of the Marine National Bank 
of Wildwood and of the Ocean City Title and Trust 
Company, secretary of the Five-Mile Beach Building 
and Loan Association and is also secretary and treas- 
urer of the Beecher Kay Realty Company and the 
Wildwood Bungalow Company. 



Cumberland County. 

DAVID C. BLIZZARD, JR. 
(Rep., Port Norris.) 

]\Ir. Blizzard was born at North Port Norris, Cumber- 
land county, N. J., August 3d, 1872, and is a wholesale 
oyster dealer. He has been actively engaged in the 
planting and growing of oysters in Delaware Bay and 
Maurice River Cove since 1892, also in the fruit busi- 
ness. He is especially interested in growing a high 
grade quality of goods to meet with the approval and 
needs of the people. 

Mr. Blizzard was elected to the Assembly for a third 
term at the 1921 election. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 313 

Essex County. 

WARREN PATTEN COON. 
(Rep., Newark.) 

Chaplain Warren Patten Coon, clergyman, soldier 
and lecturer, son of the Rev. George Washington Coon 
and Emily Elizabeth (LeVan) Coon, was born in 
Boston, Mass., January 8th, 1879. He is of Scotch and 
French Huguenot ancestry, the former settling in 
Cambridge, Mass., in 1650, and the latter in Exeter 
Township, Pa., in 1730. His ancestors were actively 
engaged in the American Revolution. He married 
Miss Ethel M. Rude, niece of the Hon. Horace Edsall 
Rude, Assemblyman from Sussex county in 1897, and 
also a direct descendant of the Hon. Samuel Edsall, 
Member of Council for East Jersey under the Pro- 
prietary Government in 1668, '72, '75-'78, and Member 
of Assembly in 1686. The Chaplain was educated in 
Boston University, New York University and Drew 
Theological Seminary, Madison, N. J., is a member of 
the Newark Annual Conference of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, and was a pastor for nine years. Com- 
missioned Captain-Chaplain of the First Regiment, N. 
G. N, J., May 15th, 1916, he accompanied his regiment to 
the Mexican Border in June of that year; served with 
the same rank in the 113th Infantry, 29th Division, 
A. E. F., for nearly a year in France, and is now a 
Chaplain with rank of Captain in the Officers' Reserve 
Corps, U. S. Army. Since his return from the A. E. F., 
he has been engaged in Americanization work. 

The Reverend Mr. Coon never held any political 
office before being elected to the Assembly at the No- 
vember, 1920, election, except that he was a borough 
clerk of Haledon, Passaic county, for the year 1912. 
He is a member of Copestone Lodge, No. 147, F. & 
A. M. ; Jersey Commandery, K. T., No. 19; Jersey 
City Consistory, Scottish Rite; Salaam Temple, A. A. 
O. N. M. S.; Masonic Club of Newark; Sons of the 
American Revolution; General Putnam Council, No. 
137, Jr. O. U. A. M.; Crescent No. 1, Court of the 
Orient; Pride of General Putnam Council, D. of L., 
No. 31; Protection Lodge, No. 28, I. O. O. F.; Frater- 
nity Post, No. 101, American Legion; Camp No. 48, 
P. O. S. of A.; Beta Theta Pi, college fraternity; Rose- 
ville Athletic Association, and other civic and social 



314 BIOGRAPHIES. 

organizations. He is a State Speaker of the Masonic 
Service Association of the United States, and a Na- 
tional Speaker of the American Legion Speakers' 
Bureau. 

The Assemblyman has always been a Republican, 
particularly interested in the abolition of Capital 
Punishment and in Americanization. He was elected 
to the Assembly in November, 1921, for a second term, 
and is the only clergyman in the New Jersey Legisla- 
ture, His home is at 442 Fourth Avenue, Newark, N. J. 

PHILIP D. ELLIOT. 
(Rep., Caldwell.) 

Mr. Elliot was born at Grafton, Massachusetts, 
March 6th, 1886, and is a lawyer. He graduated from 
Williams College in 1908 with the degree A.B., and 
from the New York Law School in 1911 as a LL.B. 

Mr. Elliot was police recorder of Caldwell during 
the years 1918-1921 and was a member of the Caldwell 
Board of Education in 1920 and 1921. He is the author 
of "A Digest of New Jersey Statutes" for law students. 
Among the organizations to which Mr. Elliot belongs 
are Caldwell Lodge, F. & A. M., Zeta Psi Fraternity, 
Phi Delta Phi Legal Fraternity and Jr. O. U. A. M. 

Mr. Elliot married Miss Dorothy Colby in 1912 and 
they have two children. 

At the November, 1921, election Mr. Elliot was 
chosen for a second time to be a representative from 
his county in the New Jersey Assembly. 

FRANK B. CHAMPION. 

(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr. Champion was born in Dorchester, N. J., Jan- 
uary 29th, 1876, and is a traveling salesman. He was 
educated in the public schools of Philadelphia and at 
Pierce's Business College in that city. He was a 
bookkeeper in Brooklyn, N. Y., until 1901, when he ac- 
cepted a position as office manager in a factory in 
Newark and in 1907 was given control of a largo 
territory for the same concern and has been a travel- 
ing salesman ever since. 

Mr. Champion is much interested in civic affairs 
and takes a particular interest in welfare work among 
young men. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 315 

At the November, 1920, election Mr. Champion was 
chosen by the voters of Essex county for the Assembly 
for a second time, he having been a member of the 
House during- the session of 1918 and at the November, 
1921, election he was chosen for a third term. 

GEORGE S. HOBART. 
(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr. Hobart was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., October 
24th, 1875, and is a lawyer. He was brought up on a 
farm at Marlboro, Monmouth county; prepared for 
college at high school in Freehold and at Glenwood 
Institute, at Matawan; graduated from Rutgers Col- 
lege in the class of 1896, and thereafter began the 
study of law in the office of Hon. William H, Vreden- 
burgh, former judge of the Court of Errors and Ap- 
peals, at Freehold. He continued the study of law in 
the office of Collins & Corbin, in Jersey City, and at 
New York Law School. 

At the outbreak of the Spanish War in 1898, Mr. 
Hobart enlisted in the Third New Jersey Regiment, 
U. S. Volunteers, and shortly thereafter received a 
commission as major in the Adjutant-General's De- 
partment. He was assigned to duty with the Seventh 
Army Corps, under command of Major-General Fitz- 
hug^h Lee, and served under him until near the close 
of the war, when he resigned to resume the study 
of law. 

He was graduated from New York Law School in 
the class of 1899; was admitted to the bar of New Jer- 
sey as an attorney at the June term, 1899, and as 
counsellor at the June term, 1902, and shortly there- 
after became a member of the firm of Collins & Cor- 
bin, with whom he has since been associated. He was 
admitted to the bar of the United States Supreme 
Court in December, 1914. His business address is 243 
Washington Street, Jersey City, and also 128 Market 
Street, Newark, N, J., where his firm has recently 
opened a branch office. 

Mr. Hobart has been elected to the Assembly three 
times, in 1917, 1920 and 1921. He was Speaker of the 
House during the 1921 session. 



316 BIOGRAPHIES. 

HARRY GILLETTE EATON. 
(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr. Eaton was born at Newark, N. J., Feb. 23d, 1866. 
He was educated in the public school near Mendham, 
N. J„ a grammar school in New York City, and the 
hig-h school in Long Island City, N. Y. Being of a 
mechanical turn of mind he became connected with a 
large -w-agon manufacturing and wheelwright com- 
pany in Long Island City, N, Y. After some time with 
this firm the military spirit of his father (Amherst 
Eaton, First Lieutenant 8th N. J. Vol. during the Civil 
War), developed, and he joined the 1st U. S. Cavalry, 
then stationed at Fort Custer, Montana. He served 
there five years, during which time he was in several 
campaigns and engagements against hostile Indians 
throughout Montana, Dakota and Wyoming. He is 
now a member of the National Indian Veterans Camp, 
No. 6, of Newark, N. J. On his return from the west 
he became connected with a large mineral com- 
pany of East Orange, N. J., as salesman for ten years, 
during which lime he became interested in the study 
and development of the telephone, and for the past 
twenty years has been with the New York Telephone 
Company, New Jersey division. He takes an active 
interest in fraternal, military and social organizations 
and holds membership in Northern Lodge, No. 25, F. 
& A. M. ; Tall Cedars of Lebanon, Essex Counity For- 
est No. 8; Craftsmen's Club, No. 25, General Putnam 
Council, No. 137, Jr. O. U. A. M. (treasurer for twenty- 
one years); Court South End 1652, I. O. O. F., Crescent 
No. 1, Court of the Orient, Director of the Jr. Order 
Building and Loan Association for twenty-five years, 
The Telephone Society, Bay View Wheelmen, Senior 
Vice Department Commander Army and Navy Union, 
S. & D. of L., No. 31, and several others. 

Mr. Eaton is a veteran of the 1st N. J. Infantry, hav- 
ing served two enlistments in that organization and 
one enlistment in the 5th Regiment, and was supply 
sergeant at the Mexican border in 1916. Mr. Eaton 
is a believer in Am-erican principles and is a direct 
descendant of the Pilgrim Fathers who landed on the 
shores of Connecticut in 1562. He was a member of 
the 1918 Legislature, was chairman of the Militia. 
Games and Fisheries and Printing committees, and 



BIOGRAPHIES. 317 

has always been a staunch Republican. He was 
elected over William H. Smith, hig-h Democrat, with 
a plurality of 60,762. 

ilr. Eaton is classified as a veteran of the World's 
War, as he was held on the National Reserve from 
Nov.. 1916, until July, 1917, when he was discharged, 
and took an active part in a military way in protect- 
ing municipal interests in Newark. 

PEARCE R. FRANKLIN. 
(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr. Franklin was born in Newark, March 31st, 1892, 
and is a lawyer by profession. He was educated at 
the Barrington High School of Newark, graduating in 
1911, and in 1915 finished his course at the New York 
Law School. 

Before his admission to the practice of law Mr. 
Franklin was a reporter on the then Morning Star of 
Newark, and afterward did special work with the 
Newark Board of Works examining titles to meadow 
property at Port Newark before this property was 
acquired by the city. 

While at the Barrington High School Mr. Franklin 
was a m.ember in 1910 and 1911 of the school's base- 
ball team which won the state scholastic champion- 
ship. He was also an all around athletic champion 
of the Newark Y. M. C. A. in 1913 and 1914. 

Mr. Franklin is a member of St. Cecile Lodge, No. 
193. F. & A. M., holds the office of Esquire in New- 
ark Lodge of Elks, and is a past chancellor commander 
of Henry Clay Lodge, Knights of Pythias. Also he 
belongs to the Newark Athletic Club and the Automo- 
bile Club of Newark. 

Mr. Franklin has held no other public office and was 
elected to the Assembly for the second time at the 
November, 1921, election. 

DANIEL A. M'MILLIN. 

(Rep., East Orange.) 

Mr. McMillin was born in Ontario, Wayne county. 
New York, August 30th, 1874. Pie was educated in the 
schools of Western New York and is a graduate of 
the Rochester Business Institute and Lincoln-Jefferson 
University. He has been associated with both public 



318 BIOGRAPHIES. 

and private schools and colleges in New York, Penn- 
sylvania and New Jersey. From 1900 to 1906 was in 
Federal service as bookkeeioer under the Navy De- 
partment at the Philadelphia Navy Yard. Since Feb- 
ruary 1st, 1912, he has been head of the commercial de- 
partment of Central High School, Newark. 

Mr. McMillin resides in East Orange and is a mem- 
ber of the Board of Education of that city. He is a 
member of Ea&t Orange Lodge, No. 208, F. & A. M., 
Jersey City Consistory, Scottish Rite and Salaam Tem- 
ple, A. A. O. N. M. S. At one time he was president 
of the New Jersey High School Teachers' Association, 
and for the p'ast ten years has been a member of the 
Executive Board of the Eastern Commercial Teachers' 
Association, the last six of which he has served as 
secretary. 

RYNIER VEGHTE TAYLOR. 
(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr. Taylor was born at Hopewell, Mercer county, on 
September 11th, 1873. He was educated in the public 
schools of Stoutsburg and Somerville, New Jersey; is 
a linotype operator and printer by trade. He has been 
connected with the Somerset Democrat and the Union- 
ist-Gazette, of Somerville; the Newark Daily Adver- 
tiser and Newark Evening News, and is now superin- 
tendent of the Laidlaw-Smit'h Typesetting Co. of 
Newark. 

In 1915 he was appointed to fill an unexpired term 
on the Newark Board of Education, being subsequently 
reappointed, and is now entering on 'his sixth year 
of service on that board, where he served for three 
years as chairman of the Committee on Instruction 
and Educational Supplies, the board's most important 
committee. 

In 1917 he was selected by the Board of Trade of 
Newark as one of its five candidates for City Com- 
missioner, and in 1918 was a candidate for the Assem- 
bly from Essex county. That year he served as assist- 
ant in the office of the Supervisor of Bills of the 
House, and during the same year was appointed gov- 
ernment appeal agent for the Third District of New- 
ark. He also has served on several citizens' commit- 
tees appointed by the Mayor of Newark, the Citizens' 
Health Committee being one of them. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 319 

MARGARET B. LAIRD. 
(Rep., Newark.) 

Mrs. Laird's home is at 34 Goldsmith Avenue, New- 
ark. She drew the plans for the house herself, ac- 
cording- to her ideas of making housekeeping simple 
and efficient. She is the wife of Reginald M. Laird, a 
druggist, and besides her daughter, h'as a son, Robert, 
nineteen. She is of Scotch descent, and was born in 
Newark. She is a graduate nurse, having been in the 
class of 1907 at the City Hospital Training School. 

In 1916 she was appointed to the Board of Health by 
City Commissioner Raymond, who was then Mayor, 
but the Democratic majority in the Common Council 
refused to confirm the appointment. The following 
year she was appointed by Mr. Raymond to the com- 
mittee of ten in charge of "Bundle Day." During the 
250th Newark anniversary celebration she was a 
member of the Mayor's committee of fifty women. 

For the past four years Mrs. Laird has been State 
Treasurer of the National Woman's Party. Formerly 
she was secretary of the Essex County Suffrage Asso- 
ciation. 

In the 1915 campaign for suffrage she was chair- 
man for Newark for the National American Woman's 
Suffrage Association. She is one of the trustees of 
the Contemporary and has been a member of the leg- 
islative and civic committees of that organization. 
During the Liberty Loan drives she v/as chairman for 
the Contemporary. She is a member of the women's 
auxiliary of the Y. M. C. A., the Red Cross, the Y. W. 
C. A. and the State Health Nurses' Association. 

Mrs. Laird is one of the first two women ever elected 
to the New Jersey Assembly. She was first elected in 
1920 and was re-elected in 1921. 

WALTER GILBERT ALEXANDER. 
(Rep., Orange.) 
Walter Gilbert Alexander was born December 1st, 
18S0, at Lynchbug, Va. His parents were Royal Alex- 
ander and Amelia Terry. At the age of eight he be- 
gan work as messnger in a jewelry store, working- 
after school hours. In this way he earned enough to 
be entirely self-supporting. At fourteen, after having- 



320 BIOGRAPHIES. 

finished one and a half years in the Lynchburg High 
School, he entered Lincoln University, being the 
youngest student 'in his class and the youngest one 
that had ever matriculated at this institution. 
Throughou't the entire four years he was first honor 
man, winning the Bradley Medal in Science and de- 
livering the Latin salutatory on Commencement day. 

In September, 1899, Mr. Alexander entered Bost Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons and was graduated 
from this institution in June, 1903, winning first prizes 
for the best theses on "Tuberculosis" and "Cerebral 
Localization." He practiced for more than a year in 
Kimball, W. Va., and then moved to Orange, N. J., 
where he has built up a very large practice. Has been 
actively interested in all movements and enterprises 
for the welfare and progress of his race. Has been 
identified with all civic inovements in the Oranges. Is 
connected with a large number of fraternal and busi- 
ness organizations. 

For nine years Dr. Alexander has been General Sec- 
retary of the National Medical Association, and is a 
member of several other medical societies. Was a 
candidate for the Assembly on the Progressive ticket 
in 1912 and was candidate for Orange City Commis- 
sioner in 1914, and for the Assembly on the Republican 
ticket in 1919. Dr. Alexander is the first colored man 
elected to a State office in New Jersey. 

LEWIS E. MENNINGER. 
(Rep., Orange.) 

Mr. Menninger was born in New York City, Decem- 
ber 1st, 1884, and was educated in the public schools 
of that city. He has resided in Orange for many years 
and is active in that city's affairs although he has 
never before held public office. He is president and 
treasurer of the Menninger and Company, Inc., dealers 
in pianos and musical merchandise. 

Mr. Menninger is at the present time treasurer of 
the Municipal Republican Club of Orange and holds a 
similar position in the Merchants' Association of that 
city. He is a member of Corinthian Lodge, F, & A. M., 
Orange Lodge, B. P. O. Elks and Grace Episcopal 
Church of Orange. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 321 

HOWARD W. LAMBERT. 
(Dem., Newark.) 

Mr. Howard W. Lambert was born in Newark, N. J., 
on September 25th, 1893, and has lived there all his 
life. He is the son of Ex-Judge George H. Lambert, 
who is well known in New Jersey as a lawyer and 
as a public official. Howard W. Lambert is also a 
lawyer, and occupies a suite of offices with his father 
in the Union Building in Newark. They both live at 
54 North Seventh Street, Newark. 

Mr. Lambert graduated from Barringer High School, 
Newark, in 1912. He received his legal education at 
the New York University Law School, and served his 
law clerkship with the firm of McCarter & English in 
Newark. In 1915 he was admitted to the bar of New 
Jersey. He has a general law practice. 

In July, 1917, Mr. Lambert enlisted as a private in 
the United States Army and was eventually com- 
missioned as a Lieutenant. During the time he was in 
the service, he was stationed in New York State, 
Georgia, Florida, "Washington, D. C, New Jersey, 
England and France. In 1919 he completed a special 
four months course in French Law and the French 
Language under French professors at Toulouse Uni- 
versity, France. He came back to this country in 
July, 1919, and received an honorable discharge on 
August 15th, 1919. 

Mr. Lambert is a member of many social and fra- 
ternal organizations, among them being Kane Lodge, 
No. 55, F. & A. M.; Union Chapter, No. 7, R. A. M.; 
Kane Council, No. 2, R. & S. M.; Roseville Athletic 
Association; Military Order of the World War, and 
the American Legion. 

Mr. Lambert has always been a Democrat in politics, 
and has been a member of the Essex County Demo- 
cratic Committee for the past two years. 

There were twelve Assemblymen, three Freeholders 
and a County Supervisor elected in Essex county at 
the last election, but Mr. Lambert was the only Demo- 
crat who was successful. It was the first time he ever 
ran for any public office, except that of County Com- 
mitteeman. He received 39,560 votes, and defeated 
Mrs. Van Ness by 888 votes. Mrs. Van Ness was the 
only Republican who was beaten in the election. 



322 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Gloucester County. 

JOHN B. STRATTON. 
(Rep., Mount Royal.) 

Mr. Stratton was born at Mount Royal, N. J., De- 
cember 7th, 1885, and was educated in the local gram- 
mar school and at the South Jersey Institute. He 
is a farmer by occupation and has been actively 
identified with agricultural organizations. Among 
other positions he has filled are member of executive 
committee of tlie Tomato Growers' Association of 
Gloucester county, .and representative of Gloucester 
county for two years at the annual State agricultural 
meetings at Trenton. 

Mr. Stratton is chairman of the executive committee 
of the Gloucester County Firemen's Association and 
treasurer of the Beneficial Department of the same 
society. 

During 1917-18, Mr. Stratton was Grand Master of 
the I. O. O. F. 



Hudson County. 

D. PERRY MORGAN. 
(Dem., Bayonne.) 

Mr. Morgan was born in Philadelphia, Pa., Septem- 
ber 6th, 1894, and was educated in the public schools. 
His occupation is that of assistant superintendent. 
He has never before held public office. 

Mr. Morgan served his country both in the Mexican 
Border troubles and during tAe World War. HiiS 
military career is as follows: Served as private, cor- 
poral and sergeant during Mexican Border compaign 
in 1916; enlisted as private at the outbreak of the 
World War in April, 1917, promoted to corporal, thence 
to sergeant; admitted to First Officer's Training Camp 
at Fort Myer, Va., June 1st, 1917, commissioned Second 
Lieutenant August 14th, 1917, and assigned to 318th 
Infantry, 80th Division; sailed for France May 22d, 
1918, arrived at Brest May 30th, 1918, promoted to 
First Lieutenant August 14th, 1918; left France for 
U. S. May 23d, 1919, arrived at New Port News, Va., 
May 31st, 1919, discharged June 6th, 1919; at present 



BIOGRAPHIES. 323 

time holds a cominission as First Lieutenant in Officers 
Reserve Corps; has recently been assigned to Head- 
quarters, 310th Infantry, 78th Division. 

ALEXANDER B. CIECIUCH. 
(Dem., Jersey City.) 

Mr. Cieciuch vs^as born in Jersey City, September 2d, 
1895, and is a practicing lawyer. He attended St. 
Anthony's Parochial School, Public School No. 4, and 
Dickinson High School, all Jersey City; also the New 
York Law School and the New Jersey Law School. 
He served twenty-two months in the U. S. Army dur- 
ing the World War, going overseas with the 312th 
Infantry, Seventy-eighth Division. He was wounded 
and gassed in action near Thiaucourt during the St. 
Mihiel offensive. 

Mr. Cieciuch is a member of Jersey City Lodge, No. 
211, B. P. O. Elks and of the Union League and other 
organizations. 

WILLIAM GEORGE. 

(Dem., Jersey City.) 

Mr. George was born in Philadelphia, Pa., July 15th, 
1890, and moved to New Jersey in the year 1903. He 
was in the real estate and insurance business in Jer- 
sey City, until September, 1914, at which time he 
began the study of law in the offices of Assistant 
United States District Attorney Isaac Grx)ss, in Jer- 
sey City, at the same time entering the New Jersey 
Law School at Newark, N. J., from which institution 
he received the degree of LL.B., June, 1917. 

Mr. George was admitted to the bar of New Jersey 
as an attorney in November, 1917, and as a counselor 
in November, 1920, and is engaged in the practice of 
his profession, having offices in the Union Trust Com- 
pany Building at Jersey City. 

He was elected in 1919 to the 1920 Assembly and 
was a member of the Assembly committees on federal 
relations, miscellaneous business and the joint com- 
mittee on school for feeble-minded children. 

He was elected to the Assembly in 1921 for a second 
time by a plurality of 46,614 over William F. Fallon, 
high Republican, the vote being 82,014 to 35,400. 



324 BIOGRAPHIES. 

DEWIS G. HANSEN. 
(Dem., Jersey City.) 
^Ir. Hansen was born in Jersey City, November IStli, 
1891, and is a lawyer. He is graduate of Public School 
No. 6 and Dickinson High School, both of Jersey City. 
He attended the New York University Law School and 
was graduated with the degree of LL..B. in 1912. He 
was admitted to the New Jersey bar at the February 
term, 1913. For three years he served a clerkship in 
the office of James A. Gordon of Jersey City. He was 
elected to the Assembly in 1919 and was again elected 
in November, 1921. 

KATE WHELAN BRO^\'N. 
(Dem., Jersey City.) 

Mrs. Brown is the first Democratic woman to be 
elected to the Legislature in New Jersey, and the 
first woman to be chosen from Hudson county. She 
resides Avith her husband (James A. Brown) at 9 
Virginia Avenue, Jersey City. Her education was ac- 
quired in the public schools and St. Aloysius Academy 
of Jersey City, and through post graduate courses. 
Before her marriage she was einployed in the Bureau 
of Pensions under Col, Samuel Truedell and General 
Michael Kirwin. 

During the World War Mrs. Brown assisted in 
general war work and visited the several camps in 
New Tork and New Jersey and helped entertain the 
soldiers with readings and recitations. She is a mem- 
ber of the Jersey City Woman's Club. 

Mrs. Brown's father, William H. Whelan was presi- 
dent of the Jersey City Board of Public Works from 
1882 to 1884. 

ALEXANDER CRAWFORD. 
(Dem., Arlington.) 

Mr. Crawford, who is a direct descendant of the 
early settlers of West Jersey, was born in Brooklyn, 
N. Y., February 13th, 1873. He was educated in the 
public schools and is engaged in the steel and iron 
foundry business. 

Mr. Crawford has never before held any public 
office. He is actively interested in the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks and is a Past Exalted Ruler 



BIOGRAPHIES. 325 

of Kearny Lodge and vice-president of the Northeast 
Jurisdiction of the New Jersey State Elkis' Association. 
Mr. Crawford's plurality over W. J. Fallon, high 
Republican, in the November, 1921, election was 
46,602. 

LEWIS B. EASTMEAD. 

(Dem., "West Hoboken.) 

Mr. Eastmead was born in Savannah, Georgia, on 
June 17'th, 1885. In 1893 his family and he moved to 
Jersey City. Since that time Mr. Eastmead has made 
his home in Hudson county. 

He was educated in the public schools of Jersey 
City, being a graduate of Public School No. 7, and the 
Jersey City High School. He obtained his legal educa- 
tion at the New York Law School. 

Mr. Eastmead is a lawyer, practising his profession, 
with offices at 254 Summit Avenue, West Hoboken. 
He was admitted to the bar as an attorney-at-law and 
solicitor in chancery, in December, 1911, and as a 
counsellor at law and Master in chancery, in Decem- 
ber, 1917. 

For about ten years Mr. Eastmead was a United 
States customs inspector at the port of New York. 
He has never before held elective public office. 

He is a member of Carroll Council, Knights of 
Columbus, of which organization he is now Grand 
Knight; and is also a member of the following or- 
ganizations: Jersey City Lodge, No. 211, B. P. O. E.; 
North Hudson Aerie, No. 1882, F. O. E.; Court Friend- 
ship, No. 65, P. of A.; Anchor Athletic Club of Jersey 
City; Egbert Alumni of School No. 28; Hudson County 
Bar Association and Nort'a Hudson Lawyers' Club. 

HENRY J. GAEDE. 

(Dem., Hoboken.) 

Mr. Gaede was born in Jersey City, June 25th, 1884, 
and is a lawyer. In 1893 he moved with his parents 
to a farm at Marlborough, N. Y., and was educated 
at the Newburgh Academy. Afterward he entered the 
New York University Law School, receiving his LL.B. 
deg-ree in 1904. He then took a special course in law 
at Cornell niversity. He was admitted to the New 
Jersey bar in June, 1905, as an attorney, and in .June, 



326 BIOGRAPHIES. 

190S, as a counselor. He was admitted to the New 
York bar in 1911 and is now engaged in the practice 
of law in Hoboken in association with his father, 
Henry A. Gaede, under the firm name of Gaede & 
Gaede. 

Mr. Gaede is a member of the Theta Lambda Phi 
Pratenaty and of the Hoboken Lodge, No. 74, B, P. 
O. B He was first elected to the Assembly in 1918 
and was re-elected in 1919. In 1921 he was chosen for 
a third term and is the Democratic floor leader in the 
1922 Assembly. 

LOUIS J. MESSANO. 
(Dem., Jersey City.) 

Mr. Messano was born in Jersey City, March 14th, 
1892. He graduated from Public School No. 9, and 
Spencer's Business College, Jersey City, and in 1909 
took a position in the law oflfices of Albert Leuly, 
Hudson Trust Building, West Hoboken, as a stenog- 
rapher. He then attended the New York Preparatory 
School and later entered the New Jersey Law School 
at Newark, from which he graduated in 1913 with the 
degree of LL.B. He was admitted to the bar at the 
November term, 1913, and as a counselor-at-law at 
the November term, 1916. He is the senior member 
of the law firm of Messano and Messano, his brother, 
Ralph P. Messano, being the junior member. 

Mr. Messano was managing clerk in the law oflfice 
of Albert Leuly until January 1st, 1919, when he 
opened an office for himself. Since his majority he 
has always been an active Democrat in the politics of 
Hudson county and also has manifested a keen inter- 
est in public affairs. 

FRANCIS A. STANTON. 
(Dem., Hoboken.) 
Mr. Stanton was born at Hoboken, N. J., January 
19th, 1888, and is a counselor-at-law. He was formerly 
a mechanical engineer. He never before held public 
office. He was graduated from Stevens Institute of 
Technology, with degree of Mechanical Engineer, in 
1907; pursued a law course at New York University; 
was admitted to the New York bar in 1911 and has 
specialized in patent cases. He was a Lieutenant, 



BIOGRAPHIES. 327 

Field Artillery, in the United States Army, until June 
1st, 191S, when he was retired because of physical disa- 
bilities. 

Mr. Stanton's father was Edward R. Stanton, who 
for many years was politically prominent in Hudson 
county. His mother's maiden name was Mary A. 
O'Connell. 

The subject of this sketch is married, his wife having- 
been Miss Elizabeth Havens Wyoth, of Hoboken. 

Mr. Stanton served in the 1919 and 1920 Assemblies 
and was elected for a third time in November, 1921. 

MARCUS O. SAROKIN. 
(Dem., Weehawken.) 

Marcus O. Sarokin, of Weehawken, comes to the 
Legislature after a difficult, uphill strug-gle that has 
made one of the most representative and ag-gressive 
young men of Hudson county. 

He was born in Vilna, Russia, November 22d. 1890, 
but came to this country at the age of three. After 
graduating the Keyport, N. J., schools, he tried his 
hand at various lines of work and finally wound up 
in the newspaper business; first, as a reporter and 
finally, as advertising manager. When war was de- 
clared he was one of the first to enlist and served 
overseas with the 309th Ambulance Co., 78th Division. 

On his return from France he decided to capitalize 
the fact that he had made so mam friends in Hudson 
county bj^ going into the real estate and insurance 
business. He is at present in the Hvidson Dispatch 
Building, Union Hill, and is conceded to be one of the 
most active realtors in that section of the state. 
This is the first public office he has ever held. 

EDWARD J. FLYNN. 
(Dem., Jersey City.) 

Mr. Flynn was born in Jersey City, July 3d, 1891. 
He was educated in St. Peter's Schools, that city, and 
his business is that of marine supplies. 

Mr. Flynn is holding his first public office. He is a 
member of a number of organizations, incUiding- Jer- 
sey City Chamber of Commerce, Jersey City Lodge 
B. P. O. E., Jersey City Council Knights of Columl)us, 
11 



328 BIOGRAPHIES. 

and St. Peter's Club; and is in addition, standard 
bearer of the Edward J. Flynn Association. 



Hunterdon County. 

FRANK H. WELSH. 
(Dem., Lebanon.) 

Mr. Welsh was born on a farm near Lebanon, on 
May 24th, 1875, and was educated in the local public 
school. All his life he has been actively identified 
with farming interests, although for six years (1907- 
'13) he kept a general store at Potterstown. 

Mr. Welsh now operates a fine 400-acre farm known 
as Wayside. He is president of the Lebanon Co-opera- 
tive Association, president of the Lebanon branch of 
the Dairymen's League, director of the Hunterdon 
County Farmers' Co-operative Association, and was 
president of the Hunterdon County Board of Agricul- 
ture until his election as an Assemblyman necessi- 
tated his resignation. Mr. Welsh was very effective 
in aiding to bring the membership of this organiza- 
tion up to one thousand. 

Mr. Welsh was also a member of the Board of Edu- 
cation and district clerk in Tewksbury township for 
three or four years. 



Mercer County. 

GEORGE W. GUTHRIE 

(Rep., Trenton.) 

Mr. Guthrie was born at Trenton, October 12th, 
1881, and is a pressman. He was sergeant-at-arms, 
N. J. Senate, session of 1919, and is a member of the 
following organizations and lodges: Mercer Lodge, F. 
& A. M., Scottish Rite; Knights of Pythias, P. O. S. of 
A., Modern Woodmen, Republican Club of Trenton, 
Printing Pressmen's Union, financial secretary Mercer 
County Central Labor Union, secretary Printing Press- 
men and Assistants' League of New Jersey. He is 
also a member of the Trenton Board of Education. 

He was elected to the Assembly for a third term at 
the November, 1921, election. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 329 

WILLIAM AGUSTAVE MOORE. 
(Rep., Trenton.) 

Mr. Moore was born in Trenton, N. J., December 
19'th, 1891, and is an attornej^-at-law. He is son of the 
late John T. Moore, pottery manufacturer, and of the 
Sanitary Earthenware Specialty Company. He was 
graduated from the Trenton High School in 1910 and 
from Lafayette College in 1914. He studied law under 
Frank S. Katzenbach, Jr., and was admitted to the 
bar of New Jersey in 1917 as an attorney and in 1920 
as a counselor. 

Mr. Moore enlisted in the U. S, Army November, 
1917, and was discharged July, 1919. He spent one 
year in France, and was engaged in the following 
battles: St. Mihiel, Meuse, Argonne and with the 
Highland Light Infantry at Hazelrouch. He served 
with Co. E, 311th Infantry, 78th Division, and was 
promoted to the rank of Lieutenant. 

Mr. Moore is a member of the American Legion, 
Phi Delta Pheta Fraternity and the Knights of Colum- 
bus. 

WILLIAM T. ROBBINS. 
(Rep., Hamilton Square.) 

William Thomas Robbins resides at Hamilton 
Square. " He was born on a farm one-half mile east 
of Hamilton Square on August the 2d, 1868, and is 
the son of the late James C. and Elizabeth Robbins. 
His business is that of real estate and investments. 
He is church clerk and a deacon of the Hamilton 
Square Baptist Church and is also connected with the 
Masonic Order, Odd Fellows and the Jr. O. U. A. M. 
He was Grand Master of the Grand Lodge I. O. O. F. 
of New Jersey in 1911, and holds the position of Grand 
Representative from the Grand Lodge I. O. O. F. of 
New Jersey in the Sovereign Grand Lodge I. O. O. F, 
at the present time. He was first elected to that 
ofRce in 1914. Mr. and Mrs. Robbins have but one 
child, a daughter, the wife of Charles E. Cubberley of 
Robbinsville, Mercer county. Mr. Robbins was town- 
ship clerk of Hamilton township, Mercer covinty, from 
1902 to 1910 inclusive. 



330 BIOGRAPHIES. 

3Iiddlesex County. 

C. RAYMOND LYONS. 
(Rep., New Brunswick.) . 

Mr. Lyons was born at New Brunswick, N. J., De- 
cember 25th, 1894, and is a lawyer. 

After completing- his High School work in 1913, Mr. 
Lyons entered Fordham University, New York City, 
was graduated June 14th, 1916, with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. The following November he was 
admitted to practice law at the age of 21 years. 

During the time he was at law school Mr. Lyons 
studied with Edmund A. Hayes and Chester R. Hol- 
man, of New Brunswick. Upon his admission he 
formed a partnership with Frederick F. Richardson, 
County Solicitor for Middlesex county. New Jersey, 
under the firm name of Richardson & Lyons. 

In 1918 Mr. Lyons enlisted in the U. S. Marines and 
after completing the necessary course of training at 
Paris Island, S. C, was assigned to the Marine Bar- 
racks at Dover, N. J., where he was awaiting over- 
seas orders when the armistice was signed. 

Mr. Lyons is a member of several organizations and 
among other important positions in fraternal organi- 
zations is state treasurer of the X. J. Moose Associa- 
tion. His law fraternity is Delta Theta Phi. Held no 
previous public office. 

He was elected to the Assembly for a third term 
at the November, 1921, election. 

EDWARD J. PETERSON. 
(Rep., Perth Amtaoy.) 

Mr. Peterson was born in Perth Amboy, June llh, 
1889. He graduated from the Perth Amboy Grammar 
School and Trainer's Business College at that place 
and studied the Swedish language in private schools. 

Mr. Peterson is chief timekeeper and paymaster with 
the American Smelting and Refining Company, Maurer, 
N. J. In his earlier days he engaged in newspaper 
work, starting as a printer's "devil" and becoming a 
reporter on several papers and finally publisher of the 
Perth Am.boy Weekly Press in 1915. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 331 

He is a member of Rantan Lodge, No. 63, F. & A. 
M.; Lawrence Lodge, No. 62, I. O. O. F., and Anchor 
Council, No. 40, Jr. O. U. A. M. 

Mr. Peterson was elected to the Assembly for the 
second time at the November, 1921, election and has 
never before held aiiy public office. 

WILTON T. APPLEGATE. 
(Rep., Prospect Plains.) 

Mr. Applegate was born at Prospect Plains, Decem- 
ber 12th, 1893, and is a lawyer by profession with 
offices at Perth Amboy. He graduated froin the Free- 
hold High School in 1913 and from the New York 
Law School in 1918 when he received the degree of 
LL.B. He was admitted to the bar of New Jersey 
in 1920 after having- served a clerkship in the law 
offices of John P. Kirkpatrick, of New Brunswick, and 
with Charles F. Kelly, a New York counselor. 

During the World War Mr. Applegate was placed in 
the limited service by his draft board and then worked 
in the purchasing department of the "Wright Martin 
Aircraft Corporation. He is a member of Apollo 
Lodge, No. 156, F. & A. M., Tall Cedars of Lebanon, and 
Mechanics' Home Council, No. 71, Jr. O. U. A. M. 



Moil III oil 111 County. 

EDWARD A. SEXSMITH. 

(Rep., Belmar, R. D. 1.) 

Mr. Sexsmiih was born at Kortright, Delaware 
county. New York, July 24th, 1853, and is a farmer. 
He attended Franklin Institute, New York, and taught 
school two years in New York State. He then was 
principal of schools in New Jersey for sixteen years. 
Having become interested in farming while engaged 
in teaching, he dropped his profession and devoted 
his time to his farm at Belmar. Mr. Sexsmith held the 
position of Assistant Supervisor of Bills in the Senate 
from 1905 to 1909, inclusive, and Supervisor of Bills 
from 1910 to 1912, inclusive. He has been a member 
of the Monmouth County Board of Agriculture for 
many years and assisted in establishing the farm 
demonstration movement in that county. He has been 



332 BIOGRAPHIES. 

a lecturer at farmers' institutes and other agricul- 
tural meetings throughout the State, and in 1916 was 
elected a member of the State Board of Agriculture. 
He s serving his second term as Township Collector. 
He was elected to the Assembly for a second term at 
the 1921 election. 

JACOB GODFREY CAMPBELL. 
(Rep., Allenhurst.) 

Mr. Campbell was born on the old homestead at 
Emilville, Atlantic county, N. J., March 25th, 1863, and 
was the youngest son of the late Jacob G. Campbell, 
Sr. "With his parents, he moved to Weymouth, N. J., 
when four years old. He was educated in the public 
schools of that town and was graduated at Penning- 
ton Seminary as an accountant and also as a civil 
engineer. He was employed seven years as clerk and 
manager of the Electric Light Company of Atlantic 
City. For twenty-five years he was employed by the 
Atlantic Coast Electric Light Company of Asbury 
Park, and as its secretary and manager for eighteen 
years, resigning in 1918. He is a director and secretary 
of The Neptune Mutual Building and Loan Association. 

Mr. Campbell is a member of the Asbury Park 
Lodge of Elks; Trinity Lodge, No. 79, F. & A. M., of 
Atlantic City; Salaam Temple, Mystic Shrine, of 
Newark, and of Moose Lodge, No. 1,407, of Asbury 
Park. He was president for nine years of the Board of 
Education of Allenhurst, and for two years was chief 
of the Allenhurst Fire Company. He has served as a 
member of the Monmouth Republican County Com- 
mittee and as its secretary from 1919 to 1920. 

Mr. Campbell niarried Miss Ida Virginia Borth- 
wick in 1890 at Atlantic City and they have four chil- 
dren, three girls and a boy. 



3Iorris County. 

SAMUEL K. OWEN. 
(Rep., Butler.) 

Dr. Owen, a practicing dentist, was born in Goshen. 
X. T., August 19th, 1S76. He studied at the Goshen. 
N. Y., High School, and the University of Pennsyl- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 333 

vania. He has been following his profession in But- 
ler since 1900. 

Dr. Owen has served as a member of Common Coun- 
cil in Dover and has been chief of the fire department 
of the boroug-h of Butler for seventeen years. He 
was elected to the Assembly for the second time at 
the November, 1921, election. 

DAVID F. BARKMAN. 
(Rep., Morristown.) 

Mr. Barkman was born near Gladstone, N. J., Jan- 
uary 13th, 1872, and is a lawyer. He was educated in 
the public schools of Somerset county. He was ad- 
mitted as an attorney in 1897 and as a counselor in 
1901. 

Mr. Barkman is serving his second term as Mayor 
of Morristown. He also served six years (1906-'12) as 
collector of taxes in that city. He is married, his wife 
having been Luetta H. Kennedy, of Gladstone. They 
were married in 1900 and have one daughter, Leilya 
K. Barkman, aged eighteen years. 

Mr. Barkman was elected to the Assembly for the 
first time in November. 



Ocean Connty. 

EZRA PARKER. 
(Rep., Barnegat.) 

Mr. Parker was born at Tuckerton, N. J., in 1854, 
He removed to Philadelphia at an early age and was 
educated at the Friends' Select School, Philadelphia, 
and the Westtown Boarding School, Westtown, Pa. 
He was in the manufacturing business in Philadelphia 
until 1906, when he removed to Barnegat, where he 
assisted in organizing a National bank, becoming its 
first president and still holding that position. 

Mr. Parker is a member of the Society of Friends, 
a member of Mariners' Lodge, F. & A. M., and of the 
Tall Cedars of Lebanon. He has served in the Ocean 
County Board of Freeholders and is treasurer of the 
Long Beach Turnpike Company, treasurer of the Bay 
Shore Building and Loan Association, vice president 



334 BIOGRAPHIES. 

of the Barneg-at School Board and director of the 
Long Beach Building- and Loan Association. 

Always an active Republican and actively interested 
in the affairs of Ocean county, he was first elected 
to the Assembly in November, 1921. 



Passaic County. 

HENRY G. HERSHFIELD. 
(Rep., Pompton Lakes.) 

Mr. Hershfield was born in 1876, in St. Louis, Mo., 
and is the son of Lewis Harris Hershfield, a pioneer 
of Montana, and a grandson of Harris Hershfield, one 
of the early settlers of Kansas. He was educated in 
the public schools in Helena, Montana, and at Col- 
umbia University, New York City, taking the Aca- 
demic and Legal courses. At the outbreak of the 
Spanish War, he entered the government service, 
being detailed for duty to the Indian Reservations, 
resigning in 1900 to take up newspaper work on the 
New York Morning Journal. He is now in the fire 
insurance business, representing several companies 
for northern New Jersey, with offices in New York 
City and Pompton Lakes. 

In 1914 he was appointed foreman of the first 
chancellor-drawn grand jury for Passaic county and 
in 1916 was elected a delegate to the Republican 
Convention in Chicago, representing the 7th Congres- 
sional district. 

He is now serving his fourth consecutive term as 
mayor of the borough of Pompton Lakes, being each 
time the nominee of both the Republican and Demo- 
cratic parties. 

Largely through his efforts the borough built and 
operated one of the few successful municipally owned 
water and electric light plants, which has proven to 
be a signal success. He was an organizer of the 1st 
National Bank of Pompton Lakes, also the Pompton 
Lakes Building and Loan Association, and is a di- 
rector in both of those institutions as well as in 
several insurance and real estate companies. 

He belongs to the Masons, Odd Fellows, Mechanics, 
the Theta Delta Chi fraternity, the Graduate Club of 



BIOGRAPHIES. 335 

New York City, and the Old Guard Veteran Battalion 
of New York State. 

Mr. Hershfield was re-elected to a sixth term at 
November, 1921, election. 

Mr. Hershfield was the Republican leader in the 
1920 Assembly. 

WILLIAM WADSWORTH EVANS. 

(Rep., Paterson.) 

Mr. Evans was born at Paterson, N. J., October 5th, 
1887, and was educated in the public schools of that 
city and was graduated from the Paterson High School 
in 1905, and the New York Law School in 1908. He was 
admitted to practice law in New York State in March, 
1909, and in New Jersey in November, 1911. He was 
Assistant Journal Clerk of the Senate in 1911, and Sec- 
r\stary to Speaker Thomas F. McCran in 1912. He was 
re-elected to Assembly for a fourth term at the No- 
vember, 1921, election, and was made leader of the 
Republican majority in the 1922 Assembly. 

LESTER F. MELOXEY. 
(Rep., Clifton.) 

Dr. Lester Foye Meloney was born in Brooklyn, N. 
Y., June 16th, 1881. He came to Clifton, N. J., with his 
parents when he was an infant and has resided there 
for the past thirty-eight years. He attended school in 
Clifton, then at the Passaic High School and the New 
York Preparatory School, after which he entered 
Columbia University, New York, where he took up his 
professional work in the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, graduating from the Medical School in 1905. 
After his graduation he further advanced his medical 
work in the New York Lying-in Hospital, at the 
French Hospital in New York City, at St. Bartholo- 
mew's Clinic, a specialty clinic in New York City and 
at Sanford Hall, Flushing, Ljong Island, N. Y. 

Dr. Meloney was then appointed surgeon to the 
Katala Hospital in Alaska. The doctor came home to 
pay a visit to his parents and while at home his father 
died and he decided to remain at home with his 
mother and an invalid brother and has practiced medi- 



336 BIOGRAPHIES. 

cine in Clifton and taken an active part in civic affairs 
since the spring- of 1908, 

He was next appointed township physician and then 
medical inspector of schools and his activities were of 
such importance to 'the township that his friends de- 
manded his candidacy for the township committee and 
lie was elected a committeeman in 1914. His argu- 
ments defeated an attempt to annex a part of Aquack- 
anonk itownship to the City of Passaic. Dr. Meloney 
to-ok a very active part in the welfare of the people 
and when the township was made a second class city 
he was elected a member of the City Council and was 
its President for the first year of the ci'ty's life. He 
was an examining physician on the Passaic County 
Draft Board No. 2, a member of the Volunteer Medical 
Service Corps No. 22732. He is a member of the B. P. 
O. E. (Elks), No. 387, Passaic, of Clifton Lodge of Free 
and Accepted Masons, of Acquackanonk Grange No. 
183. P. of H., of the Passaic County Medical Society, 
of the Medical Societj- of New Jersey and of the Amer- 
ican Medical Association. 

Dr. Meloney was elected to the Assembly for the 
second time at the November, 1921, election. 

JOHN JOSEPH ROEGNER. 
(Rep., Passaic.) 

Mr. Roegner was born in Passaic, March 19th, 1895. 
He was educated in the Passaic High School, Seton 
Hall College and Fordham University, at which latter 
institution he studied law and received the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. Mr. Roegner is now practicing his 
profession in Passaic. During the world war he en- 
listed on April 30th, 1917, and served as a lieutenant 
in the 48th Infantry of the U. S. Regular Army. 

Mr. Roegner was elected to the Assembly for the 
second time at the November, 1921, election. 

HENRY AUGUSTUS WILLIAMS. 

(Rep., Paterson.) 

Mr. Williams was born in Paterson, January 15th, 
1895, and is a lawyer by profession. After receiving 
early education at Paterson and Newark Academy, he 
entered Princeton University, graduating with Class 



BTOGRAPHTES. 337 

of 1916, and at once took up study of law at New 
York Law School, leaving same in the Spring of 
1917 to join the Army. He received a commission of 
2d Lieutenant Infantry on April 6th, 1917, and during 
the war served in France with the Blue Ridge (SOth) 
Division and the Air Service, taking part in the Somme 
Offensive, St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne; returned to 
America in April, 1919, to resume study of law, be- 
ing admitted to the bar in 1920. 

Mr Williains is the grandson of Henry A. Williams, 
Mayor of Paterson during the Civil "War and State 
Senator (1871-1873), and the son of Ex-Senator Robert 
Williams, now Judge of the Court of Errors and Ap- 
peals. 



Salem County. 

WILLIAM S. STILES. 
(Rep., Pedricktown.) 

Mr. Stiles was born in Oldman's township, Salem 
county, N. J., September 14th, 1869, and is a farmer. 
He attended schools in the vicinity. He was elected 
a member of the Township Committee in 1908 and 
again in 1912, and was chairman during both terms. 
He was a member of the Board of Education nine 
years and its president five years, and was appointed 
Journal Clerk of the Senate in 1916-17-18. 

Mr. Stiles was elected to the Assembly for a third 
term at the November, 1921, election. 



Somerset County. 

FREDERICK A. McCULLOUGH. 
(Rep., Somerville.) 

Mr. McCullough was born at Pluckamin, N. J., Jan- 
uary 29th, 1890. He is a lawyer by profession and 
was admitted as an attorney in June, 1914, and as a 
counselor in June, 1918. He spent his early days on 
a farm and was educated at the Somerville High 
School and at the New York Law School. He was 
chosen to the Assembly for the first time at the No- 
vember, 1921, election and has never before held pub- 
lic office. 



33S BIOGRAPHIES. 

Sussex County. 

ALFRED BEATTIE LITTELL. 
(Rep., Franklin.) 

Mr. Littell was born at Bethlehem, Ra.. July 1st, 
1893. He was educated at the Lawrenceville School 
and Princeton University, graduating- from the latter 
in 1920. He entered Princeton as a member of the 
class of 1918, but his studies were interrupted by his 
entering- the United States Military service during the 
World War. He enlisted December 14th, 1917, in the 
Third U. S. Field Artillery, and sailed for France in 
July, 1918. He graduated from the Samur (France) 
Artillery School in December, 1918, and was then sent 
by the A. E. F. to the London School of Economics 
and Political Science for a three months' course, fin- 
ishing in June, 1919. Mr. Littell was discharged from 
military service at Camp Dix, August 11th, 1919, with 
the rank of battalion sergeant major. 

Mr. Littell is a member of the American Legion 
and was a delegate from New Jersey to the Cleve- 
land Convention of that organization in 1920. He also 
is field agent for the New Jersey Soldiers' Bonus Com- 
mission for the Sixth Congressional district. Mr. Lit- 
tell is a member of the Republican County Committee 
of Sussex county and was secretary-treasurer of that 
body in 1920-'21. 



Union County. 

ARTHUR N. PIERSON. 
(Rep., Westfield.) 

Mr. Pierson was born at Westfield, N. J., June 23d, 
1867, and is in the wholesale sewer pipe and clay 
products business, with offices in New York City. 
He was educated in the public school, Pingry Academy, 
and John Leal's Academy. He is president of the 
Westfield Board of Trade and of the Westfield Town 
Plan and Art Commission. Mr. Pierson has always 
voted the Republican ticket. 

In 1914 he was elected to the Assembly by a plu- 
rality of 2,696; in 1915 by 4,019; in 1916 by 7,162; in 
1917 by 5,241; in 1918 by 3,720, and in 1919 by 3,387. 

Mr. Pierson served as Chairman of the Commission 



BIOGRAPHIES. 339 

for the Survey of Municipal Financing for four years; 
was the author of the Municipal Finance Laws of 
1917 and 1918, and the Tax and Tax Sale Acts of 1918. 
He also served as Chairman of the Pension and Re- 
tirement Fund Commission for the Revision of the 
Pension Laws of the State. 

Among- the important laws of which he was the 
author are the Pierson Budget Act, the Pierson Bond 
Act, the Pierson Sinking Fund Act, the Tax Act (Re- 
vision of 1918) and the Tax Sale Act (Revision of 1918) 
and the Physical Training Law of 1917. 

Mr. Pierson was the majority leader in the session of 
1918, which lasted only eight weeks, being the shortest 
since the year 1847, and his skillful leadership was 
largely instrumental in bringing about that record- 
breaking event in that period of legislation. He 
served as Speaker during the session of 1919 with 
much credit and impartiality, giving every satisfac- 
tion in a house that was a tie politically. 

He was re-elected to the Assembly for an eighth 
term at the November, 1921, election. 

JOHN W. CLIFT. 
(Rep., Summit.) 

Mr. Clift was born at Nyack, N. Y., December 5th, 
1856; resided in New Jersey since 1860. Attenfled the 
public schools at Morristown. In 1872, at an early age, 
he became an apprentice at the printing trade. From 
1883 to 1S94 Mr. Clift was associated with Fred B. 
Bardon as editors and publishers of the "Madison 
Eagle." From 1894 to 1896 he was associate editor and 
publisher of the "Morristown Chronicle." For the 
past twenty-five years Mr. Clift has been the editor, 
publisher and proprietor of the "Summit Herald," 

Mr. Clift was a former president and for the past 
twelve years secretary of the New Jersey Press As- 
sociation. 

For twelve years Mr. Clift was in the clerical de- 
partment of the State Senate as Assistant Secretary, 
Journal Clerk and Secretary to President Cross. He 
was for three years a member of the County Board of 
Taxation, having been appointed by Governor Edge in 
1917. 



340 BIOGRAPHIES. 

In his home city Mr. Clift is connected with all 
progressive and patriotic movements — member and 
former president of Passaic Valley Chapter Sons of 
the American Revolution; director of the Hill City 
Building and Loan Association; member of the Y. M. 
C. A.; trustee and treasurer of Benevolences of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church; member of the Business 
Men's Association; past Regent of the Royal Ar- 
canum; member and former president of the Fire- 
men's Relief Association; member and former presi- 
dent of the Exempt Firemen's Association. He was 
elected to the Assembly for the first time in Novem- 
ber, 1921. 

HERBERT J. PASCOE. 
(Rep., Elizabeth.) 

Mr. Pascoe, wiho is a native American, is thirty-nine 
years of age. He received his education in the public 
schools. He is a member of the Masonic Order and of 
the Liederkranz Singing Society, of Elizabeth. Also 
he is director of the Jefferson Park Building and 
Loan Association of his home city and a member of 
the advisory committee of the Port of New York 
Authority. In 1920-'21 he represented the Twelfth 
Ward in the Elizabeth City Common Council. 

Mr. Pascoe was elected to the Assembly for the 
first time in 1921, leading his ticket with a plurality 
of 10,765 over the highest Democratic candidate. 



Warren County. 

HARRY RUXYON. 

(Dem., Belvidere.) 

Mr. Runyon has the distinction of being the only 
Democrat elected to the Assembly at 'the November, 
1920, election. He was born in Hope township, War- 
ren county, December 8th, 1891. He was educated in 
the public schools, graduating from the Hackettstown 
High School in 1912. He then took up the study of 
law and was admitted to practice in 1915. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 341 

Mr. Runyon has served as a secretary to the Warren 
County Tax Board and also was for two years Mayor 
of Belvidere. In May, 1917, he enlisted in the United 
States Regular Army and served for two years until 
he was nonorably discharged in May, 1919. 

Mr. Runyon is a Past Noble Grand of the I. O. O. F., 
a member of the Masonic Order, of the Knights of 
Pythias and of the American Legion. 

He was elected to the Assembly for the second time 
in November, 1921. 



342 BIOGRAPHIES. 



THE JUDICIARY. 



UNITED STATES SUPREME COLUT. 

Third Circuit — Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware. 

MAHLON PITNEY, Justice. 

Mahlon Pitney, Associate Justice of the Supreme 
Court of the United States, was born in Morriscown, 
New Jersey, February 5th, 1858, a son of Henry C. 
Pitney, who served from 1889 to 1907 as a Vice-C.ian- 
cellor of New Jersey. He was graduated from the 
College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) in 
1879; admitted ito practice law in New Jersey in 1882; 
elected to Congress from that State as a Republican in 
1894 and re-elected in 1896, serving in the Fifty-fourth 
and Fifty-fifth Congresses; elected in 1898 to serve 
in tlie State Senate for a term of three years, and in 
1901 was president of that body; from November, 1901, 
until January, 1908, was an associate justice of the 
New Jersey Supreme Court, and in the later month be- 
came Chancellor of the State, in which office he served 
until he took his seat in the Supreme Court of the 
I'nited States; was appointed by President Taft on 
March 13th, 1912, to be an Associate Justice of that 
court, and took the oath of office five days later. Has 
received the degree of LL.D. from Princeton Uni- 
versity and from Rutgers College. 



L-MTED STATES CIRCUIT COURT OF APPEALS. 

Third Circuit — Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware. 
Circuit Court Judges. 

Joseph Bufilngton, Pennsylvania; Victor B. Wooley. 
Delaware; J. "Warren Davis, New Jersey. 

J. WARREN DAVIS, Salem. 

Judge Davis was born in Elizabeth City, N. C, March 
4th, 1867, and spent his boyhood days at that place 
and at Norfolk, Va., where his father, John Smithson 
Davis, moved when the District Attorney was a boy. 
He received his early education at Elizabeth City and 



BIOGRAPHIES. 343 

Norfolk in the public schools. He prepared for college 
at Chester Academy, Chester, Pa„ and graduiated 
valedictorian of his class in 1892. He graduated from 
Bucknell University in 1896, from Crozer Theological 
Seminary in 1899, at both of which places he was one 
of the commencement speakers. Upon his graduation 
at Crozer he was elected instructor in Hebrew and 
Greek. He pursued past graduate studies in history 
and philosophy at the University of Chicago in 1901, 
and at the University of Leipsic, Germanj', in 1902 and 
1903, during which time he took lectures at the Uni- 
versities of Berlin and Halle. He returned to America 
and entered the Law School of the University of Penn- 
sylvania in 1904, and graduated in 1906, since which 
time lie has practiced law with his brother, James 
Mercer Davis, of Mount Holly, N. J., under the firm 
name of Davis & Davis, with their principal office in 
the Security Trust Building, Camden, N. J. He is a 
member of the bar of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, 
and of the State bar associations of both States. 

He has the degrees of A.B., A.M., B.D. and B.L. 

He was one of the charter members of the Kappa 
Sigma fraternity in college, and was a member of the 
Supreme Executive Committee, the executive of the 
fraternity-at-large for two 3'ears, being Worthy Grand 
Master of Ceremonies, having charge of the secret 
work of the fraternity. He was District Grand Master 
of the Second District, extending from Connecticut to 
Virginia, for two years. He is a member of the fol- 
lowing fraternal organizations: Masons, Odd Fellows, 
Red Men, Mechanics, P. O. S. of A., Grange, Knights of 
Pythias, Loyal Order of Moose, Tall Cedars and Eagles. 

In 1911 he was elected to the Senate of New Jersey 
from Salem county by a plurality of 732 over William 
Plummer, Jr., his predecessor in office. Mr. Davis 
served as Senator until June 4th, 1913, when he was 
appointed District Attorney for the State of New 
Jersey. He filled that office until May 29th, 1916, when 
he qualified as a Judge of the U. S. District Court 
for New Jerse.v. In 1920 Judge Davis was appointed 
one of the judges of the United States Circuit Court of 
Appeals for the Third Circuit. 



344 BIOGRAPHIES. 

UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT. 

JOHN RELLSTAB. Trenton. 
Judge Rellstab, who was born in Trenton, N. J., 
September 19, 1858, is a son of John and Theresa 
(Schaidnagel) Rellstab, the former a native of Switzer- 
land and the latter of Bavaria. He obtained his edu- 
cation in the parish school of the Trinity Evangelical 
Lutheran Church and the public schools of the city of 
Trenton. Before he was fourteen years of age he 
began to learn the pottery trade. During the latter 
part of his apprenticeship he began the study of law 
at night, having entered his name with the late Levi 
T. Hannum. In order to complete his law studies he 
left the trade of potter after becoming a journeyman 
and took a clerical position in the office of the New 
Jersey Pottery Company, later taking charge of the 
company's salesrooms in New York City and sub- 
sequently becoming salesman on the western and 
soutliern routes for the same firm. At a later period 
he served in the capacity of commercial traveler for 
the East Trenton pottery. Having chosen law as his 
profession, he kept steadily on with that one end In 
view and was finally admitted to the bar at the No- 
vember term, 1882, and as a counselor at the Novem- 
ber term, 1889. At one time he was a partner of the 
late Judge James Buchanan. He served in the capa- 
city of solicitor for the borough of Chambersburg from 
1884 to 1888, and for the city of Trenton from 1889 to 
1892, and from 1894 to 1896. In the last-named year 
he was made Judge of the District Court for the city 
of Trenton, serving until 1900, when he was made 
Judge of Mercer county. He was reappointed to the 
latter office in 1905. In politics Judge Rellstab Is a 
staunch supporter of Republican principles. In re- 
ligious faith he adheres to that of the Presbyterian 
Church, in which he is a ruling elder and teacher of 
the men's Bible class. He is one of the directors of 
the Young Men's Christian Association, the chairman 
of the Committee on Foreign Work of the same so- 
ciety, the chairman of the Advisory Board of the 
Florence Crittendon Mission, and a member of the 
Board of Managers of the New Jersey Children's Home 
Society. He was appointed United States District 



BTOnRAPHTES. 345 

Judge on May 6, 1909, and was confirmed on May 18. 
He was succeeded by Frederick W. Gnichtel as Judge 
of the Mercer County Court. 

CHARLES FRANCIS LYNCH, Paterson. 

Judge Lynch was born in Franklin borough, Sussex 
county, N. J., January 9th, 1884, His offices are in 
the Post-Offlce Building, Newark, and at 140 Market 
street, Paterson. He attended the public schools at 
Franklin in 1901, removed to Paterson and entered 
the law offices of Michael Dunn, now Prosecutor of 
the Pleas, as a student and clerk, remained there 
several years and then entered the law offices of Pierce 
& Greer, New York City. He was admitted to the bar 
of New Jersey at the November term, 1906. Shortly 
thereafter he became associated with former United 
States Senator William Hughes in the practice of law. 
Mr. Lynch was appointed Second U. S. District Attorney 
in June, 1913, was promoted to First Assistant in Sep- 
tember, 1914, and became District Attorney May 29th, 
1916. In June, 1919, he was appointed U. S. District 
Court Judge by President Wilson and was sworn into 
office on July 19th, 1919. 

JOSEPH L. BODINE, Trenton. 

Mr. Bodine was born at Trenton, November 6th, 
1883. He is a son of the late Dr. Joseph L. Bodine. 
He graduated from Princeton in 1905, and Harvard 
Law School in 1908, studied law with Judge G. D. W. 
Vroom, and was admitted to practice as an attorney 
at the November term, 1908, and as a. counselor three 
years afterwards. He was appointed Assistant Uniteu 
States Attorney in 1915 by Judge J. Warren Davis, 
and continued in this position during the term of 
Judge Charles F. Lynch as United States Attorney. 
Mr, Bodine was appointed United States Attorney on 
July 15th, 1919, by President Wilson, and in 1920, upon 
the elevation of Judge J. Warren Davis to the Circuit 
Court of Appeals bench, Mr. Bodine was made one of 
the three United States District Court Judges for the 
District of New Jersey. 



346 BIOGRAPHIES. 

COURT OF CHANCfiUY. 
Chancellor. 

EDWIN ROBERT WALKER, Trenton. 

Chancellor Walker was born in Rochester, New 
York, September 13th, 1862, where his father, Dr 
Walter Walker, practiced medicine and surgery, but 
since 1869 he has lived in Trenton, the home of his 
maternal ancestors, two of whom were officers in the 
American army during the Revolutionary war, and 
one of whom was State Treasurer of New Jersey. 

Mr. Walker went to the Model School until 1878, 
when he left to become clerk in the office of the late 
Hon. Henry S. Little, then Clerk in Chancery. While 
serving a clerkship in the Chancery office he studied 
law with the late Col. S. Meredith Dickinson and 
afterwards with Judge Garret D. W. Vroom. He was 
admitted to the bar at the June term of the Supreme 
Court, 1886, and at once thereafter commenced the 
practice of his profession, in which he was actively 
engaged until appointed to the bench. In 1891-92 
Mr. Walker was counsel for the Board of Chosen 
Freeholders of the county of Mercer, and in 1892-93 
was city counsel for the corporation ot Trenton. Mr. 
Walker was Judge-Advocate of the Second Regiment, 
N. G. N. J., with the rank of Captain in 1906, and in 
1907 was made Judge-Advocate of the Second Bri- 
gade with the rank of Major. He was appointed 
Vice-Chancellor by Chancellor Magie on October 29. 
1907, for a full term of seven years, to succeed Vice- 
Chancellor Bergen, who resigned to become a Justice 
of the Supreme Court. On March 18th, 1912, Governor 
Wilson nominated Mr. Walker for the office of Chan- 
cellor to fill a vacancy caused by the resignation of 
Chancellor Mahlon Pitney, and he was promptly con- 
firmed by the Senate. 

In 1916 Rutgers College conferred the degree of 
LL.D. upon Chancellor Walker. He was nominated 
for another term by Governor Edge in 1919, and was 
paid the unusual compliment of an immediate con- 
firmation by the Senate, an honor rarely bestowed 
except in the case of a Senator or a former Senator. 

The Chancellor is a Democrat in politics. His term 
will expire March 18th, 1926. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 347 

Vice-chancellors. 

EUGENE STEVENSON, Paterson. 

Vice-Chancellor Stevenson was born in Brooklyn, N. T., 
June 28, 1849. He moved to Paterson with his parents in 
1866, and has since resided there. He was graduated from 
Ihe New York University as a Bachelor of Arts in the 
class of 1870, and was also graduated from the Law De- 
partment of the same institution. Subsequently he en- 
tered the law office of Socrates Tuttle, father-in-law of 
the late Vice-President Hobart, where he continued his 
studies. In June, 1874, Mr. Stevenson was admitted to the 
bar as an attorney-at-law, and three years later was 
made a counsellor. In 1881 he was appointed a Prosecutor 
of the Pleas for Passaic county by Governor Ludlow. He 
served a full term of five years in that office. He did not 
seek a reappointment. Since that time he has never held 
a public office, although he has often been sought as a 
candidate for such. Prior to his elevation to the bench he 
enjoyed a very large practice in the higher courts of the 
State. He was appointed Vice-Chancellor on April 16, 1901, 
for a full term of seven years. He was reappointed in 
1908 and again in 1915. In politics he is a Democrat. 
His term will expire in 1922. 

EDMUND B. LEAMING, Camden. 

Vice-Chancellor Learning, who was born at Seaville, 
Cape May county, N. J., sixty-one years ago, is the son 
of ex-Senator and Dr. Jonathan F. Learning and a 
brother of Dr. Walter S. Learning, now deceased, who 
also served as Senator from Cape May. The Vice- 
Chancellor was, with his brother, educated under a 
private tutor, and subsequently as a post graduate 
in the University of Pennsylvania, and thereafter 
studied law with the late Judge and former Con- 
gressman James Buchanan in Trenton. United 
States Judge William M. Lanning, Congressman 
Ira Wood. Prosecutor of the Pleas Eugene Emley, Alfred 
L. Black, Samuel W. Beldon and Samuel Walker, Jr., 
were law students In Trenton at the same time and pre- 
pared for the bar with Vice-Chancellor Learning. He was 
admitted to the bar as an attorney in February, 1881, and 
as a counselor In February, 1884. From Trenton he went 
to Seattle, and then lo San Francisco, where he practiced 
his profession for a brief period. Upon his return to New 



.*'>48 BTOGRAPHTES. 

Jersey he formed a co-partnership with Samuel W. Bel- 
don. Upon its dissolution by the appointment of Mr. Bel- 
don as general counsel of the Fidelity Trust Company, at 
Newark, N. J., he practiced by himself in Camden and 
until he was appointed Vice-Chancellor by Chancellor 
Magie on September 21, 1906, to fill a vacancy caused by 
the death of Martin P. Grey. In 1913 he was appointed 
for another term by Chancellor Walker and was again 
reappointed in 1920. His term will expire September 
21st, 1927. 

VIVIAN M. LEWIS, Paterson. 

Vice-Chancellor Lewis was born at Paterson, N. J., 
June 8th, 1869. Prior to his admission to the bar he 
was engaged as correspondent of several New York 
newspapers. He was appointed judge-advocate of 
the old Second Regiment, National Guard, in July, 
1896, and served until the reorganization in 1899, 
when he was placed on the retired list with the rank 
of captain. He was elected to the Assembly In 
1898, 1899 and 1900, and was leader of the Republi- 
can majority on the floor of the House during his 
last term. He was for many years one of the counsel 
of the State Board of Health. He was elected City 
Counsel of Paterson in 1904 for a full term of office, 
but resigned upon his appointment by Governor Mur- 
phy as Clerk in Chancery, to fill the vacancy caused 
by the resignation of Edward C. Stokes, who was 
elected Governor. He was nominated for a full term 
of office in 1905, by Governor Stokes, and was con- 
firmed by the Senate. He served in that office until 
April, 1909, when he was appointed Commissioner o^ 
Banking and Insurance, which office he held until 
April 3d, 1912, when he was appointed a Vice-Chan- 
cellor by Chancellor Walker. He was reappointed in 
1919 and his term will expire April 3d, 1926. 

Vice-Chancellor Lewis was the Republican candi- 
date for Governor in 1910. 

JOHN H. BACKES, Trenton. 
Vice-Chancellor Backes was born in Trenton, N. J., 
August 18th, 1863. He was admitted to the bar as an 
attorney at the November term, 1884, and in February, 
1888, he was licensed as a counsellor. He has always 
practiced his profession in Trenton. In politics he is a 
Democrat. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 349 

Mr. Backes vcas appointed a • Vice-Chancellor by 
Chancellor Walker on February 22d, 1913, for a term 
of seven years and was reappointed in 1920. His term 
will expire February 21st, 1927. The Vice-Chancellor, 
while living- in Trenton, sits in Newark. 

JOHN GRIFFIN, Jersey City. 

Vice-Chancellor Griffin was born in Jersey City, 
June 26th, 1858. He was educated in the public schools 
and at an early age entered the law offices of Bedle, 
Muirheid & McGee as a student. He was admitted to 
the bar as an attorney in June, 1881, and as a coun- 
sellor three years later. At one time he was a partner 
of James A. Romeyn, and subsequently became a junior 
partner in the old firm headed by the late Governor 
Bedle. He specialized in admiralty law, of which he 
became a recognized authority. He has had an exten- 
sive practice in all the higher courts of the State and 
in the Supreme Court of the United States. Much of 
the municipal laws of the State have been framed by 
him, and for seventeen years he has been counsel to 
the Board of Freeholders of Hudson county. 

Mr. Griffin was appointed a Vice-Chancellor by Chan- 
cellor Walker, March 20th, 1913, for a term of seven 
years and was reappointed in 1920. His term will 
expire March 20th, 1927. In politics the Vice-Chan- 
cellor is a Democrat. 

JOHN E. FOSTER, Atlantic Highlands. 

Vice-Chancellor Foster was born in New York City, 
September 22d, 1864, and moved to Monmouth county, 
in this State, in 1879. He graduated from the Law 
School of Columbia College in 1886, and was admitted 
to the bar as an attorney at the November term, 
1886, and as a counsellor three years later. 

In 1900 he was appointed Prosecutor of the Pleas 
for Monmouth County and held that position until 
1904, when he was appointed Law Judge of that 
county; he held the position of Law Judge by re- 
appointments for eleven years and until he resigned 
in 1915. 

He was appointed a Vice-Chancellor by Chancellor 
Walker on January 15th, 1916, for a full term. In 
politics he is a Republican. 



350 BIOGRAPHIES. 

MALCOLM G. BUCHANAN, Trenton. 

Vice-chancellor Buchanan was born in Trenton, 
March 10th, 1881. He is a son of former State Li- 
brarian Henry C. Buchanan and a nephew of the late 
James Buchanan, for a number of years Equity Re- 
porter and Advisory Master of the Court of Chancery. 
He was graduated from Princeton University in the 
class of 1900 and from the Harvard Law School in 
1903. He was admitted to the .bar as an attorney at 
the June term, 1904, and received his counselor's 
license at the corresponding term in 1907. He began 
the active practice of law immediately upon admis- 
sion as a member of the firm of James & Malcolm G. 
Buchanan. The practice of the firm was extensive and 
varied. 

Since the death of his uncle in 1916, Vice-Chancel- 
lor Buchanan continued alone in the practice of law 
and had one of the most extensive practices In the 
middle section of the State. He has been essentially 
a trial lawyer, appearing frequently in all the courts, 
from those of first instance to the Court of Errors and 
Appeals, and has acquitted himself in a way to attract 
attention of the bench and bar. 

He was appointed Vice-Chancellor by Chancellor 
Walker and took the oath of office on October 15th, 
1919. 

JAMES F. FIELDER, Jersey City. 

Vice-Chancellor Fielder was born in Jersey City, 
February 26th, 1867. His ancestors on his mother's 
side were Hollanders and on his father's side English. 
The families of both father and mother of the Vice- 
Chancellor have been well known in the political 
history of the State. His paternal grandfather was a 
member of Assembly from Hudson county in 1871; 
his maternal grandfather was for many years a county 
judge of that county and his uncle, William Brinker- 
hoff, was State Senator from the same county. His 
father, George B. Fielder, was Register of Hudson 
county and a member of the Forty-third Congress. 

The Vice-Chancellor attended the public schools and 
high school of his home city and graduated from the 
Columbia University Law School in 1887 and -was ad- 
mitted to the bar of this State in 18SS. He was a 
member of Assembly from Hudson county in 1903 and 



BIOGRAPHIES. 351 

1904 and was elected to the State Senate in 1907 and 
re-elected in 1910. He was President of the Senate 
in 1913 and when Governor Wilson resigned his office 
in March of that year, Senator Fielder became Acting 
Governor and served until October 28th, when he re- 
signed as Senator to take part in the campaign for 
Governor, for which office he had been nominated at 
the Democratic State primary over Frank S. Katzen- 
bach, Jr., and at the regular election which followed 
he defeated Edward Caspar Stokes, the candidate of 
the Republican party. 

He was appointed Vice-Chancellor by Chancellor 
Walker and was sworn into office Deceinber 1st, 1919. 



JUSTICES OP THE SUPREME COU.XT. 
Chief Justice. 

WILLIAM S. GUMMERE. Newark. 

Chief Justice Gummere was born In Trenton, June J!4th, 
1852, and Is a son of the late Barker Gummere, who for 
many years was one of the acknowledged leaders of the 
bar of New Jersey. The Justice was educated a^ the old 
Trenton Academy and the Lawrenceville School, and was 
graduated from Princeton College In 1870. He studied lav 
with his father, and upon being admitted to the bar he 
practiced for a time In the office of G. D. W, Vroom, when 
that gentleman was Prosecutor of the Pleas for Mercer 
county. Subsequently Mr. Gummere formed a co-partner- 
ship with his uncle, the late ex-Governor Parker, In New- 
ark, and after that had been dissoW'^d he was associated 
with Oscar Keen, of the same city This continued until 
the late Edward T. Green was made Judge of the United 
States District Court, when Mr Gummere succeeded him 
as counsel for the Pennsylvan'a Railroad Company, with 
offices in Trenton. On February 18th, 1895, he was ap- 
pointed by Governor Werts as a Justice of the Supreme 
Court, to succeed the lat«» Justice Abbett for a term of 
seven years, and he was unanimously confirmed by the 
Senate on the day following. On January 28, 1901, he was 
nominated by Governor Voorhees for Chief Justice of the 
Supreme Court, to take effect on November 16, 1901. and he 
was confirmed on February 4th following. The nomination 
was made to fill a vacancy caused by the resignation of 



352 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Chief Justice David A. Depue, who, after serving a period 
of thirty-five years on the bench, vacated the office on 
November 16th, 1901. Chief Justice Gummere took the oath 
of office on November 19, 1901. He was reappointed 
by Governor I'ort on January 22d, 1908, and was at 
once confirmed by the Senate. In 1915 he was nomi- 
nated for another term by Governor Fielder and was 
unanimously confirmed by the Senate, In politics 
he is a Republican. His term will expire in 1922, His 
circuit comprises Essex county. 

FRANCIS J. SWAYZE, Newark. 

Justice Swayze was born in Newton, Sussex county. May 
15th, 1861, and is a son of Jacob L. Swayze. He was grad- 
uated from Harvard College in 1879, and afterward studied 
law in the office of Martin Rosenkrans, in Newton. He 
also took a course at Harvard Law School, and was admit- 
ted to the bar of New Jersey in June, 1882, and was made 
a counselor-at-law three years later. 

The Judge served as Chairman of the Sussex Republican 
County Committee from 1886 to 1889. He was a member of 
the Republican State Committee from 1889 to 1892, and was 
a delegate to the Republican National Convention In 1892. 
In that year he removed to Newark and thereafter confined 
himself to the practice of his profession. He became a 
member of the law firm of Colie & Swayze, later Colie, 
Swayze & Titsworih. On February 13th, 1900, he was nom- 
inated by Governor Voorhees as a Circuit Court Judge to 
succeed Francis Child and he was unanimously confirmed 
by the Senate for a term of seven years. On January 13, 
1903, he was nominated by Governor Murphy as a Justice 
of the Supreme Court to succeed Justice Collins, who had 
resigned, and the nomination was confirmed by the Senate 
on January 20, for a full term of seven years. He 
was renominated in 1910 and again in 1917. His term 
will expire January 23d, 1924. His circuit comprises 
the county of Hudson. 

THOMAS WHITAKER TRENCHARD, Trenton. 

Justice Trenchard was born In Centreton, Salem county, 
N. J,, December 13th, 1863. His father was William B. 
Trenchard, for many years Clerk of the County of Cum- 
berland. The Judge was educated In the public schools of 
Brldgeton and in the South Jersey Institute, from which 
he was graduated in the class of 1882. He road law In the 



BIOGRAPHIES. 353 

office of Porter and Nixon, and was admitted to the bar 
as an attorney at the November term of court In 1886, and 
as a counselor In February, 1893. He practiced law In 
Bridgeton, and In 1899 he was appointed Law Judge of 
Cumberland county by Governor Voorhees. In 1904 he was 
reappointed by Governor Murphy. He served as City So- 
licitor of Bridgeton from 1892 to 1899, and was a member of 
the House of Assembly In 1889. During many years he 
was Solicitor for the Board of Health of Bridgeton. He 
was one of the organizers of the Cumberland County Bar 
Association and has served as its president. In 1896 he 
was chosen a Presidential Elector, when lie cast his ballot 
for McKinley and Hobart. The Judge is a member of the 
Society of the Sons of the Revolution. On June 8th, 
1906, Governor Stokes appointed him a Justice of the 
Supreme Court, to fill a vacancy caused by the death 
of Justice Dixon. He was nominated and confirmed 
for a full term in 1907. In 1914 he was re-appointed 
for another term by Governor Fielder and was 
promptly confirmed by the Senate. He was again re- 
appointed in 1921 for a further term of seven years. 
His circuit comprises the counties of Mercer, Hunter- 
don and Warren. 

CHARLES W. PARKER. Jersey City. 

Justice Parker was born at Newark. N, J., October 
22, 1862, and is a son of the late Cortlandt and Eliza- 
beth W. (Stites) Parker. He received his preliminary 
education at Pingvy School, Elizabeth, N. J., and 
Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, N. H. He was grad- 
uated from Princeton College with honors in 1882; 
read law under the direction of his father and at Col- 
umbia Law School from 1882 to 1885; received these 
degrees: A.M., Princeton, 1885; LL.B., Columbia, 
1885; LL.D., Princeton, 1919; was admitted to 
the New Jersey bar as an attorney in June, 1885, 
and as a counselor at the February term, 1890. 
He practiced his profession in Newark till 1890, and 
thereafter in Bayonne City, and since 1891 in Jersey 
City. In 1898 he was appointed a District Court Judge 
for Jersey City, and in 1903 he was reappointed. He 
resigned that ofRce In 1903 and accepted an appoint- 
ment by Governor Murphy as a Judge of the Circuit 
Court. The appointment was unanimously confirmed 
by the Senate and he took his seat on March 2, 19u3. 



354 BIOGRAPHIES. 

This office he held until October, 1907, when he re- 
signed to become a Justice of the Supreme Court, to 
which office he was nominated by Governor Stokes 
and was unanimously confirmed by the Senate on Sep- 
tember 25 for a full term of seven years. He succeeds 
John Franklin Fort, who had resigned upon his nomi- 
nation as the Republican candidate for Governor. Ho 
served as Assistant Adjutant General of the State from 
1902 to 1907, after twelve years enlisted and com- 
missioned service in the Essex Troop and Fourth 
Regiment, and was aide de camp on the staff of Gov- 
ernor Franklin Murphy, during the letter's term of 
office. In politics the Justice is a Republican. Hi.s 
term will expire in 1921. He was reappointed by 
Governor Fielder in 1914 and was promptly confirmed 
by the Senate. His circuit comprises the counties 
of Morris, Bergen and Somerset. 

JAMES J. BERGEN. Somerville. 

Justice Bergen Is a lineal descendant of Han Hanson 
Bergen, who came from Holland to New York city and 
was the progenitor of nearly all those bearing the 
name in America. He married Sarah Rappelyea, who, 
it is said, was the first white child born In the New 
Netherlands. Mr. Bergen's New Jersey ancestor was 
a grandson of the original emigrant, and owned con- 
siderable tracts of land in the counties of Somerset 
and Hunterdon. The family is among the oldest of 
the Holland-Dutch settlers in this country, and Its 
members have always been conspicuous In business, 
professional and public affairs. 

The Justice is a son of John J. and Mary A. (Park) 
Bergen, and was born October 1, 1847, in Somerville, 
N. J., where he has always resided. He attended the 
old brick academy in his native town, and was grad- 
uated from Calvin Butler Seminary of the same place 
in 1863. At the age of seventeen he entered upon the 
study of law with the late Hugh M. Gaston, of Somer- 
ville, with whom he remained until he was admitted 
as an attorney at the November term in 1868. During 
the following year he practised his profession In 
Plainfield, N. J. On January 1, 1870, he returned to 
Romerville and formed a law partnership with his 
preceptor, Mr. Gaston, which was continued under the 
firm name of Gaston & Bergen for twenty years, when 



BIOGRAPHIES. 355 

Mr, Gaston withdrew. He was made a counselor in 
November, 1871. 

He was elected to the Legislature In 1875, 1876, 18D0 
and 1891, serving as Speaker of the Assembly during 
the sessions of 1891 and 1892, and in 1896 was a dele- 
gate to the Democratic National Convention. In 1877 
he was appointed by Governor BeJle as Prosecutor 
of the Pleas of Somerset county, which office he held 
for six years. He was president of the Board of Com- 
missioners of Somerville and of tho savings bank 
for a long time, and has been a director of the First 
National Bank of that place. He was especially active 
In organizing police and fire departments, and Is cred- 
ited with creating the public sentiment which made 
possible the introduction of a sewage system and other 
public improvements in Somerville. 

In March, 1904, he was appointed a Vice-Chancellor 
by Chancellor Magie for a full term of seven years, 
and on October 11, 1907, Governor Stokes sent his 
nomination as a Justice of the Supreme Court to the 
Senate, which was confirmed without reference. He 
took the oath of office on October 1G. 1907. His term 
will expire October 11th. 1921. He was re-appointed 
by Governor Fielder in 1914 and was promptly con- 
firmed by the Senate. In 1921 Governor Edwards 
named him for still another term of seven years and 
again his nomination was promptly confirmed. His 
circuit comprises the counties of Union and Middlesex. 
In politics he is a Democrat, 

JAMES F. MINTURN, Hoboken. 

Justice Minturn was born at Hoboken, N. J., July 
16th, 1860, He was educated in the Hoboken public 
schools and the IMartha Institute. Afterward he en- 
tered college, but was forced to retire owing to ill 
health, and he completed his studies under the tute- 
lage of Prof, Louis Barton, a graduate of Rutgers 
College. He was graduated from the Columbia College 
Law School, New York, with the degree of LL.B. He 
then entered the office of Ogden & Niven in Hoboken 
and there completed his study of New Jersey law. 
He was admitted to the bar of New York as an at- 
torney and counselor. In 1884 he was appointed Cor- 
poration Attorney of Hoboken and was retained in 
that office until he became a Circuit Judge, twenty-one 



356 BIOGRAPHIES. 

5'ears altogether, despite political changes in adminis- 
tration. 

He represented Hoboken in many notable law suits, 
carrying them through the highest courts of the State 
and the United States Courts. In 1889 he represented 
that city in the dispute over the ownership of the 
river front, in which the Hoboken l.aud and Improve- 
ment Company and the Pennsylvania Railroad Com- 
pany were parties in litigation. The case went through 
the State Courts and was taken to the United States 
Supreme Court. 

The Justice was counsel for the late Henry George 
in the celebrated case of the John Hutchins will, of 
Camden, in whinh (Considerable money was bequeathed 
for the circulation of George's works. After going 
through the Court of Chancery, It was taken on ap- 
peal to the Court of Errors and Appeals, where the 
claim of Mr. George was sustained. Mr. Minturn at one 
time declined the appointment of District Court Judge 
of Hoboken. He was one of the organizers of the 
Hudson County and State Bar associations. In 1903 
he wrote an article, which appeared in the New Jersey 
Law Journal, discussing the proposed constitutional 
amendments, taking the ground, while not opposing 
them, that they were Insufficient for the relief of the 
courts. He also contributed to Belford's Magazine an 
article, entitled "The Iniquities of the Tariff." A Latin 
scholar and linguist, he Is also an orator and a lecturer 
of high rank. 

In 1884 Mr. ]\Iinturn was appointed Judge-Advocate 
of the old Second Regiment, National Guard, and 
served seven years and until the regiment was amal- 
gamated with the Fourth. He Is an honorary member 
of the DeLong Guards of Hoboken. He has always 
taken an active interest in military affairs and has 
won several medals at the Sea Girt ranges and quali- 
fied as an expert marksman. 

The Justice was one of the organizers of the Free 
Public Library of Hoboken and of the State Charities 
Aid Association. Ke also helped organize the Society 
for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children and was its 
counsel for several years. He has been president of 
the First National Bank of Guttenburg and vice-presi- 
dent of the Ocean County Trust Company. 

He was elected Senator In Hudson county In 1904 and 
served in that office until he took his seat as Circuit 



BIOGRAPHIES. 357 

Judge. He was nominated for the Judgeship by Gov- 
ernor Stokes on June 21, 1907, was unanimously con- 
firmed by the Senate and was sworn into office on 
July 31, On January 22, 1908, he was nominated by 
Governor Fort as Justice of the Supreme Court, and 
was unanimously confirmed by the Senate. The degree 
of LL.D, was conferred on the Justice at Seton Hall 
College in June, 190S. 

He was nominated for another term in 1915 by 
Governor Fielder and was unanimously confirmed by 
the Senate. In 1922 he was nominated by Governor 
Edwards for a third term and again his nomination 
was immediately confirmed by the Senate. 

In politics he is a Democrat, and his term will ex- 
pire in 1922. His circuit comprises the counties of 
Passaic and Sussex. 

SAMUEL KALISCH. Newark. 

Justice Kalisch was born In Cleveland, Ohio, April 
18, 1851. He is a son of Isidor Kalisch, D.D., a noted 
Jewish divine, who was a pioneer in the establish- 
ment of Reformed Judaism in this country and died 
in Newark in 1886. Mr. Kalisch was educated in the 
public schools of Lawrence; Mass., and Detroit, Mich., 
and was also under the private tutelage of his father. 
He was graduated from the Columbia College Law 
School, New York, with the degree of LL. B. in 1870, 
and was in the office of the late William B. Guild, Jr., 
until he was admitted to the bar. He was city attor- 
ney of the city of Newark in 1875. He devoted him- 
self to a general practice of the law and built up an 
extensive and lucrative practice. He was one of the 
most prominent trial lawyers in the state and was 
counsel in many notable cases, both civil and crim- 
inal. In politics he is a Democrat. He was appointed 
by Governor Wilson June 16th, 1911, and by Governor 
Edge in 1918. His term will expire June 16th, 1925. 
His circuit comprises the counties of Monmouth, Bur- 
lington and Ocean. 

CHARLES C. BLACK, Jersey City. 
Justice Black was born on a farm in Burlington 
county, near Mount Holly, N. J., on July 29th, 1858. He 
was prepared for college at the Mount Holly Acad- 
emy, and entered Princeton College in 1874, being 



35S . BIOGRAPHIES. 

graduated with the class of '78. He studied law at 
Mount Holly, N. J., and at the University of Michigan, 
at Ann Arbor. He was admitted to tlie bar of New 
Jersey as an attorney In June, 1881, and as a coun- 
selor in June, 1884. After being admitted to the bar 
he located at Jersey Cit5^ and has practiced law there 
until his appointment to the bench under the firm 
name of Black & Dayton. 

He served for five years as a member of the Hudson 
County Board of Registration under the Ballot Reform 
Law. He was appointed as a member of the State Board 
of Taxation on March 21st. 1891, for a term of five years, 
was re-appointed for another term In 1896, and again In 
1901. He was again appointed In 1904 for a term of five 
years. Mr. Black has made valuable additions to the 
literature of the law In his "Proof and Pleadings in Acci- 
dent Cases," "New Jersey Law of Taxation" and "Law 
and Practice In Accident Ceases." Mr. Black was the 
Democratic candidate for Governor in 1904. He was ap- 
pointed a member of "The Equal Tax Commission" by 
Governor Murphy. Governor Stokes nominated him on 
March 30, 1905, as a member of the new Board of Equaliza- 
tion of Taxes, and he was at once confirmed by the Sen- 
ate. He served on that board until he was appointed a 
Circuit Judge by Governor Fort, on January 22d. 1908, 
to succeed Judge Minturn, who was appointed to the 
bench of the Supreme Court. The justice was ap- 
pointed on June 13th, 1914, by Governor Fielder to 
a vacancy in the Supreme Court caused by the death 
of Justice Voorhee3, which occurred on June 1st. 
He was nominated for a full term in 1915 and was 
unanimously confirined iDy the Senate. He was re- 
appointed in 1922 for another term. His circuit com- 
prises the counties of Atlantic, Cape May, Cumber- 
land and Salem. 

FRANK S. KATZENBACH, JR., Trenton. 

Justice Katzenbach was born at Trenton, New Jer- 
sey, November 5th, 1868, and is a son of Frank S. Kat- 
zenbach and Augusta (Mushbach) Katzenbach. He 
received his preliminary education at the State Model 
School, in Trenton, from which he graduated in the 
year 1885. He then entered Princeton College, and 
graduated from that institution in June, 1889. He 
read law with James Buchanan and Carroll Rolibins, 



BIOGRAPHIES. 359 

of Trenton, and attended the Columbia Law School 
during the years 1890 and 1891. He was admitted to 
the New Jersey bar as an attorney-at-law at the No- 
vember Term, 1892, and as a counselor-at-law at the 
November Term, 1895. He practiced his profession in 
the City of Trenton from November, 1892, to June 1st, 
1920. He succeeded Justice Garrison. 

In April, 1898, Justice Katzenbach was elected alder- 
man-at-large of the Trenton City Council and presided 
for two years over the City Council. On November 
5th, 1901, he was elected Mayor of the City of Trenton 
for a term of two years and was re-elected on No- 
vemiber 3d, 1903, for a like term. In September, 1907, 
he was nominated by the Democratic party as its can- 
didate for Governor. 

His circuit comprises the counties of Gloucester and 
Camden. His term will expire April 15th, 1927. 



Circuit Court Judges. 

FRANK T. LLOYD. Camden. 

Judge Lloyd was born at Middletown, Delaware, October 
29th, 1859. He was graduated from the Middletown Acad- 
emy, and after removing to Camden, In 1875, learned the 
trade of a compositor. During his apprenticeship he 
studied law with the Hon, James Otterson. of Philadel- 
phia, and was admitted to the bar of Pennsylvania in 1882. 
He was admitted to the New Jersey bar as an attorney 
in February, 1897, and as a counselor In February, 1900. 
In 1899, upon the death of the Incumbent, he was desig- 
nated by the Court to prosecute the pleas In Camden 
county, and was thereafter successively appointed to the 
position of Prosecutor by Governor Voorhees In 1900 and 
Governor Stokes in 1905. This position he held at the time 
of his appointment in 1906 by Governor Stokes to the bench 
of the Circuit Court. He was a member of the House of 
Assembly In 1896 and 1897. the later year being chairman of 
the Judiciary Committee of that body, and Is the author 
of the present marriage law of the State. He was a mem- 
ber of the Franchise Commission whose recommendations 
were in 1906 enacted Into law by the Legislature. 
Judge Lloyd's circuit comprises the counties of Cam- 
den, Ocean, Mercer and Middlesex. In 1914 he was 
reappointed by Governor Fielder and was promptly 
12 



360 BIOGRAPHIES. 

confirmed by the Senate. He was reappointed in 1921 
by Governor Edwards. In politics he is a Republican. 

WILLIAM H. SPEER, Jersey City. 

Judg-e Speer was born in Jersey Citj', N. J., October 
21st, 1868. He was educated in Hasbrouck Institute in 
Jersey City and at Columbia University In New York 
city. He studied law at Columbia University Law 
School and in the office of John Linn in Jersey City. 
At the November term, 1891, he was admitted to the 
bar of New Jersey, and was made a counselor-at-law 
in June, 1895. 

After being admitted to the bar. Judge Speer became 
a member of the firm of Linn & Speer, his partner 
being Clarence Linn, a son of John Linn. This partner- 
ship continued for a number of years. Mr. Speer was 
twice vice-president of the Hudson County Bar Asso- 
ciation, and became Its president in 1903. On February 
8th, 1903, Mr. Speer, having been appointed by Gov- 
ernor Franklin Murphy and confirmed by tlie Senate 
to the office of Prosecutor of the Pleas for Hudson 
county, qualified as such and held the office until De- 
cember 30th. 1907, when he was appointed by Governor 
Edward C. Stokes as a Circuit Court .Judge to succeed 
Charles W. Parker. On January 22d, 1908, he was 
appointed for a full term by Governor Fort, and in 
1915 he was re-appointed by Governor Fielder. Again 
he was re-appointed in 1922 for another term of seven 
years. 

Judge Speer has been active In politics, and Is a mem- 
ber of the Republican party. At the time of his ap- 
pointment as Judge he was a member of the firm of 
Speer & Kellogg, his partner being Frederick S. Kel- 
logg. His circuit comprises the county of Hudson. 

NELSON Y. DUNGAN, Somerville. 

Judge Dungan was born May 3, 1867, at Lambert- 
ville, Hunterdon county, N. J. He moved to Somerset 
county with his parents in 1873 and has lived there 
ever since, residing at the present time at Somerville. 
From 1883 to 1889 he was a teacher In the public 
schools of the county, teaching the last four years in 
Somerville. 

He was admitted to the bar as an attorney-at-law 
at the November term, 1890, and as a counselor, No- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 361 

vember term, 1893, and as an attorney and counselor 
of the United States Supreme Court, November, 1896. 
He is also an attorney and counselor of the State of 
New York and of the District of Columbia. He is a 
special master in Chancery and a Supreme Court 
Commissioner. From 1895 to 1900 he was Prosecutor 
of the Pleas of Somerset county, and served as a 
member of the Board of Managers of the New Jersey 
State Village for Epileptics from 1903 to 1907. He 
was associated with John F. Reger under the firm 
name of Dungan & Reger, from April 1st, 1898, to 
March 24, 1911. 

As a member of the National Guard of New Jersey 
he gained considerable prominence. He enlisted in 
the Guard as a private in Company H, Third Regiment, 
July 26, 1888, and served through the various grades 
until March 25, 1907, when he was elected Colonel of 
the Second Regiment, Infantry, which office he held 
at the time of his appointment to the Circuit Court, 
and was subsequently, February 21st, 1912, appointed 
Brigadier-General by brevet. He was retired from 
the office of Colonel of the Second Regiment the day 
after he received his commission as Judge, which was 
March 24th, 1911. He was re-appointed by Governor 
Edge in 1918. His circuit comprises the county of 
Essex. His term will expire on March 24th, 1925. In 
politics he is a Democrat. 

LUTHER A. CAMPBELL, Hackensack. 

Judge Campbell was born in Bergen county, N, J., 
November 28th, 1872. He read law with his father, 
the late Abraham D. Campbell, and was admitted to 
the bar in February, 1894, He formed a partnership 
under the name of A. D. & L. A. Campbell, which 
lasted until his father's death in October, 1896. Be- 
sides representing a large number of other munici- 
palities in Bergen county, he served as counsel to 
Hackensack for twelve years successively and as 
counsel to the Board of Chosen Freeholders of Ber- 
gen county for six years successively. 

Acting Governor Taylor appointed Mr. Campbell 
a Circuit Judge on January 6th, 1914. This was an 
ad interim appointment, and on January 20th, Gover- 
nor Fielder sent his name to the Senate for a full 
term of office, and he was promptly confirmed. He 



3G2 BIOGRAPHIES. 

was reappointed by Governor Edwards in 1921. His 
circuit comprises the county of Hudson. 

GEORGE S. SILZER, Metuchen. 

Judge Silzer was born at New Brunswick, April 
14th, 1870. He was educated in the public schools, 
and was graduated from the High School in 1888, 
being the valedictorian of his class; was admitted 
to the bar as an attorney in November, 1892, and 
as counselor in November, 1899. He practiced his 
profession in New Brunswick until his appointment 
as Circuit Court Judge in 1914. 

He has served in the New Brunswick Board of 
Aldermen, and as chairman of the Democratic County 
Committee. In 1906 he received a unanimous nomi- 
nation for State Senator in Middlesex county and 
conducted a successful campaign on the principle of 
anti-bribery. In 1909 he was renominated and re- 
elected by an increased plurality of 1,879 over Judge 
Hicks, Republican. During his six years service 
as senator he took a very prominent part in legis- 
lation and was one of the leaders of his party. 
In 1912 he was appointed prosecutor of the pleas of 
Middlesex county by Governor Wilson and served in 
that office until August 25th, 1914, when he was made 
a circuit judge b5' Governor Fielder. He was appointed 
for a full term of office in 1915, and was again re- 
appointed in 1922. His circuit comprises the counties, 
of Passaic, Union, Somerset and TV^'arren. 

WILLARD W. CUTLER, Morristown. 

Judge Cutler was born in Morristown, Morris county, 
New Jersey, on November 3d, 1856. 

He studied law with his father, tlon. Augustus W. 
Cutler, and upon being admitted to the bar at once 
began the practice of his profession. 

In December, 1882, he was appointed by Governor 
George C. Ludlow, Prosecutor of the Pleas for Morris 
county, to fill a vacancy, and continued to hold that 
position by re-appointments until 1893 when he re- 
signed to accept the position of President Judge of 
the Inferior Court of Common Pleas of that county. 

Upon the completion of his term as President Judge 
in 1898, he resumed the practice of law, having his 
office in his home town, and continued in active prac- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 363 

tice until he accepted the position of Circuit Court 
Judge in 1916. 

His term will expire March 15th, 1923. His circuit 
comprises the counties of Berg-en, Hudson, Essex, Hun- 
terdon, Monmouth and Morris. 

WORRALL F. MOUNTAIN, East Orange. 

Judge Mountain was born March 10th, 1877, at 
Brooklyn, New York. Shortly thereafter his family 
moved to New Jersey. He was graduated from the 
East Orange High School in 1894 and from Newark 
Academy in 1896. In 1900 he received the degree of 
B.S. from Princeton University. For a time he was 
employed by a steamship company of New York, and 
for two years thereafter he taught in the East 
Orange High School, while attending the evening 
classes in the New York Law School. 

In 1903 he received the degree of LL.B. from the 
latter institution. In 1904 he received the degree of 
M.S. from Princeton University. He was admitted to 
practice in New Jersey as an attorney in November, 
1904, and as a counselor in November, 1907. For ten 
years he was a member of the law firm of Raymond, 
Mountain, Van Blarcom & Marsh, with offices in the 
city of Newark. In May, 1909, he was nominated, ad 
interim. Judge of the District Court of the City of 
East Orange by Governor Fort. In January, 1910, his 
nomination for this position for the full term was 
sent to the Senate and was confirmed by it. In No- 
vember, 1914, he was elected Mayor of the city of 
East Orange and on January 1st, 1915, resigned as 
Judge to assume his mayoraltj^ duties. In Novem- 
ber, 1916, he was re-elected Mayor of East Orange 
for a second term. In January, 1919, he was nomi- 
nated by Governor Edge as Judge of the Circuit 
Court and this nomination was confirmed by the Sen- 
ate. In politics the Judge is a Republican. His term 
will expire in January, 1926. His circuit comprises 
the County of Essex. 

RALPH W. E. DONGES, Camden. 

Although born at Donaldson, Pa., May 5th, 1875, 
Ralph W. E. Donges has been a resident of Camden 
and identified with its activities most of his life. He 



364 BIOGRAPHIES. 

is the son of Dr. John W. Donges, a member of the 
city board cf assessors and for over a generation one 
of the best known physicians in Camden. 

Educated at a private school and graduating from 
Rugby Academy in 1892, he read law with former 
Judge John W. Wescott, being admitted to the bar ai 
the February, term, 1897, and receiving his counsel- 
lor's degree three years later. He has practiced law 
since, having ofRces at Third and Market Streets, Cam- 
den, with his brother, Raymond R. Donges. 

Always identified with the Democratic party, he was 
appointed a member of the Public Utility Commission 
on February 19th, 1913, by Governor Wilson. He was 
elected president of that body and won an enviable 
reputation for his fairness and his grasp of the many 
knotty problems that confronted 'that body. 

His term would have expired in 1919, but at the 
outbreak of the war with Germany he at once took a 
very active part, having for years been prominently 
identified with the National Guard, rising from second 
lieutenant of Company C, to captain and quarter- 
master of the regiment, a position he held from 1905 
to 1913. He resigned on May 16th, 1918, to enter the 
army. 

From May 29th, 1917, to May 1st, 1918, he was chair- 
man of the Camden City Draft Board No. 2, as well as 
chairman of the National Guard Committee and a 
member of the Executive Committee of the Camden 
Public Safeity Committee. He was also a member of a 
special war committee of five of the National Asso- 
ciation of the Public Utility Commissioners of the 
United States, dealing with utility problems growing 
out of "the war. 

In February, 1918, he became a member of the plan- 
ning staff of Major-General George W. Goethals, Quar- 
termaster-General and Assistant Chief of Staff. From 
March to May he was Assistant Chief of Administra- 
tion in the office of General Goethals, who was Direc- 
tor of the Purchase, Storage and Trafllc Division of 
the General 'Staff. 

When he entered the army he accepted a commis- 
sion as Lieutenant-Colonel. As a member of War De- 
partment Board of Appraisers it was his duty to con- 
duct proceedings and make awards for compensation 
for property of every character which was comman- 



:&IOGRAPHIES. 366 

deered, or produced under compulsory process for the 
War Department. The total awarded by this board 
aggregated millions of dollars' worth of war 
materials. 

He personally conducted trials and wrote opinions 
in more than five hundred and fifty cases before tha 
Board of Appraisers. 

Judge Donges was named to the New Jersey Circuit 
Court bench by Governor Edwards in 1920. Judge 
Donges' circuit comprises the counties or Atlantic, 
Burlington, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester and 
Salem. 



Judges of the Court of Errors and Appeals. 

(Specially appointed.) 

(Term of office, six years. Compensation, $20 a day 
for actual service. No mileage.) 

JOHN JOSIAH WHITE, Atlantic City. 

Judge White was born on his father's farm near 
Mount Holly, Burlington county, N. J., August 16, 
1863. He is the eldest son of Josiah White and Mary 
Kirby (Allen) White, the ancestors of both of whom 
have been earnest members of and often prominent 
ministers in the Society of Friends in New Jersey and 
Pennsylvania since the first of them came to America, 
attracted by William Penn's "Invitation to Friends" 
emigrated thither in search of religious liberty dur- 
ing the latter part of the seventeenth century. Among 
these direct ancestors of Judge White who thus emi- 
grated to America were Christopher White, who 
came in 1677 and settled at Alloways creek, Salem 
county, N. J.; William Haines, who settled at Bur 
lington in 1682; also Samuel Smith, in 1694, who was 
a member of Assembly until his death in 1718; Jo- 
seph Kirkbride, who came to Philadelphia in 1682, 
and Mahlon Stacy, who settled in what is now South 
Trenton, in 1678, all from England, and besides these 
other distinguished ancestors from the sam.e country. 
Another ancestor was Isaac Shoemaker, from Cres- 
heim (now Kriegshein) on the Rhine, who was one 
of a party of eighty German Quakers who founded 
Germantown. 



366 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Judge White attended Swarthmore Colleg-e two 
years, leaving at the end of his sophomore year to 
enter as a student of law in the office of Nathan H. 
Sharpless, one of the leaders of the Philadelphia bar. 
He also attended the law school of the University of 
Pennsylvania, receiving his B. L. degree in 1884. He 
was admitted the same year to the bars of Philadel- 
phia and Delaware counties, and three years later to 
the bar of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania. He 
continued in active practice in Philadelphia until 
1901, when he removed to Atlantic City and with his 
father and two brothers built the Marlborough-Blen- 
heim hotel, of which they have since continued to be 
the sole owners and managers. 

On June 14, 1911, he was appointed by Governor 
Wilson a Judge of the Court of Errors and Appeals 
to fill a vacancy caused by the death of Judge George 
R. Grayw In politics the Judge is a Republican. On 
January 29th, 1912, the Judge was nominated for a 
full term of office and was duly confirmed by the 
Senate. He was reappointed by Governor Edge and 
his term will expire February 6th, 1924. 

ERNEST J. HEPPENHEIMER, Jersey City. 

Judge Heppenheimer was born in Jersey City, N. J., 
February 24th, 1869, and is in the life insurance busi- 
ness. He attended Public School No. 8 in Jersey City 
until ten years of age, then spent three years at school 
in Germany. Upon returning to America he went to 
Peekskill Military Academy for three years, and fin- 
ished at Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass. He was a 
member of the firm of F. Heppenheimer's Sons, litho- 
graphers, in New York, until its formation into the 
American Lithographic Company, when he retired to 
engage in cattle raising in Texas. He conducted an 
extensive cattle ranch until 1897, when he returned to 
his native city. Together with prominent business men 
of the State he founded the Colonial Life Insurance 
Company of America, with its head office in Jersey 
City; became Secretary in 1897, Second Vice-President 
in 1902, and President in 1906. He was President of 
the Board of Aldermen, Jersey City, January, 1910, to 
June, 1913, when the commission form of government 
came into existence. He served as Commissioner of 



BIOGRAPHIES. 367 

Finance, Jersey City, 1910 to 1913; was a Presidential 
elector in 1912; President New Jersey Harbor Com- 
mission, 1912 to 1913, and resig-ned the latter position 
in March, 1913, after appointment by Governor Wil- 
son as Judge of the Court of Errors and Appeals. He 
was reappointed in 1919 and his term will expire 
February 26th, 1925. 

ROBERT WILLIAMS, Paterson. 

Judge Williams was born in Paterson, N. J., March 
16th, 1860, and is a lawyer by profession. He was 
graduated from Princeton College in 1881, and from 
Columbia College Law School in 1884. He studied 
law with his father, the late Senator Henry A. Wil- 
liams, in Paterson. In 1884 he was admitted to the 
bar as an attorney, and in 1887 as a counselor. He 
was a member of the House of Assembly in 1890 and 
1891, and in the latter year received the minority 
nomination for Speaker. In 1894 he was elected to 
the State Senate from Passaic county and served a 
full term of three years. He served on various im- 
portant committees and in 1896 he was chosen to fill 
a vacancy in the presidency of the Senate upon the 
resignation of Lewis A. Thompson, of Somerset. In 
1897 Mr. Williams was elected president for a full 
term. He has represented Passaic county as a mem- 
ber of the Republican State Committee. Upon the 
resignation of General Joseph W. Congdon, as a 
member of the Board of Railroad Commissioners, 
March 17th, 1909, Mr. Williams was appointed to the 
vacancy, resigning from the Board of Riparian Com- 
missioners, of which he had been a member since 
1904, being- chairman at the time of his resignation. 
His term expired on May 1st. 1913. The death of 
Judge Conger of the Court of Errors and Appeals 
occurred on May 1st, 1914, and Governor Fielder 
appointed Mr. Williams to the vacancy. He was ap- 
pointed for a full term in 1915 and was reappointed 
in 1921. 

WALTER P. GARDNER, Jersey City. 

Judge Gardner was appointed by Governor Fielder 
to succeed Judge Vredenburgh, whose term expired 
February 8th, 1916. He has been a resident of Jersey 
City since his birth there in 1869. 



368 BIOGRAPHIES. 

After being- graduated from the Jersey City High 
School in 1886, he was employed in the First National 
Bank of New York City. Meanwhile he commenced 
the study of law in association with Marshall Van 
"Winkle, having registered in the office of John Linn, 
but discontinued same to take up a course in bank 
accounting and commercial law. After a service of 
nine years with the bank, he was made cashier of the 
banking house of Groesbeck & Sterling and on Mr. 
Sterling's death, became a partner in the new firm of 
Groesbeck & Co., members of the New York Stock 
Exchange. 

In 1911 Judge Gardner was elected a director in 
the New Jersey Title Guarantee and Trust Company 
of Jersey City, and two years later retired from the 
bond business to take up the active duties of a vice- 
president of that trust company, which position he 
continues to hold. 

Judge Gardner is a member of the Executive Com- 
mittee of the New Jersey State Bankers Association, 
and is president of the Hudson county group of banks. 

In 1913 he was appointed by President Wilson a 
member of the New Jersey Commission for the 
Panama-Pacific International Exposition and served 
on its Executive Committee. In politics, Judge Gard- 
ner is a Republican. His term expires in 1928. 

HENRY ELIJAH ACKERSON, JR., Keyport. 

Judge Ackerson was born in Holmdel township, 
near Hazlet, Monmouth county, New Jersey, October 
15th, 1880. In 1890 his parents moved to Keyport, N. J. 
where he entered the local public school and was 
graduated from the Keyport High School in 1898 
with hig-h honors. He was then employed for a time 
as a clerk in the People's National Bank of Keyport, 
and then entered the Packard Commercial School, 
New York Citj% and after his graduation there, became 
secretary to the manager of a New York brokerage 
firm, and during- this employment he continued his 
education with the Senftner Preparatory School in 
New York City, attending the night classes, with 
the view of preparing himself to take up the study 
of law. He passed the New York Regents' exami- 
nations in 1900 and was admitted to the New York 
Law School, from which he graduated in the year 



BIOGRAPHIES. 369 

1902 at the head of a large class of students, with 
an exceptionally high average in his examinations, 
and as a result of this record he was appointed Pro- 
fessor of Pleading and Practice at the Law School, 
which position he occupied for two years, being at the 
same time connected with a law firm in Jersey 
City. He was admitted to the New Jersey Bar as 
an attorney-at-law, March 7th, 3 904, and was made 
a counsellor-at-law and Master in Chancery No- 
vember 28th, 1909. 

On May 1st, 1906, Mr. Ackerson left the law firm 
in Jersey City to engage in the practice of law by 
himself in his home town of Keyport, where he has 
practiced continuously ever since. He served as at- 
torney of the Borough of Keyport from January 1st, 
1909, to January 1st, 1914, and has been counsel for 
the township of Holmdel continuously since January 
1st, 1909. On February 11th, 1914, he was appointed 
counsel to the Board of Chosen Freeholders of the 
county of Monmouth, which office he now holds. 

He is a director of and attorney for the Peoples 
National Bank of Keyport, and is Vice-President of 
the Keyport Free Public Library Association, He 
is a member of the Royal Arcanum, being a Past 
Regent of that order and has also served as Super- 
vising Deputy Grand Regent for that order in Mon- 
moutli county. 

In 1914 he was elected to the State Senate and re- 
elected in 1917. He resigned as Senator in 1919 to 
qualify for the judgeship. His term will expire April 
12th, 1925. 

GEORGE VANBUSKIRK, Hackensack. 

Judge VanBuskirk was appointed to the Court of 
Errors and Appeals in 1921 for a full term of six 
years to succeed Judge Frank M. Taylor. Before his 
appointment Judge VanBuskirk was engaged in con- 
struction work. From 1915 to 1920 he was County 
Clerk of Bergen County and prior to that for a period 
of about ten years he was collector of taxes in Hack- 
ensack. 



370 BIOGRAPHIES. 



U. S. OFFICERS FOR NEW JERSEY. 



District Attorney. 

ELMER H. GERAX, Matawan. 
Mr, Geran was born in Matawan, N. J., October 24th, 
1875. He graduated from the Glenwood Military Insti- 
tute, Matawan, in 181)2, from Peddie Institute, Hights- 
town, in 1895, from Princeton University in 1899 and 
from the New York Law School in 1901. He was a 
member of the New Jersey Assembly in 1911, 1912, 
1915 and 1916 and during the latter two years was 
the Democratic floor leader. In 1912 Governor Wil&on 
appointed Mr. Geran a member of the New Jersey 
Water Supply Commission. This office Mr. Geran re- 
signed in 1915 to become Assistant Prosecutor of Mon- 
mouth county. In 1917 Mr. Geran was elected sheriff 
of Monmouth county and in 1920 President Wilson ap- 
pointed him United States District Attornej' for New 
Jersey. 



Clerk U. S. District Court. 

GEORGE T. CRANMER. Trenton. 
Mr. Cranmer was born at Barnegat, N. J., December 6th, 
1848. He was formerly engaged in the banking and broker- 
age, real estate and insurance business. He has been an 
active member of the State National Guard for a number 
of years, and from 1875 to 1899 was Quartermaster of the 
Seventh Regiment. In 1878 he was the Republican candi- 
date for member of Assembly, but was defeated by Hon. 
Rufus Blodgett, since a United States Senator. In Sep- 
tember, 1879, without his solicitation, he was appointed by 
President Hayes Collector of Customs for the District of 
Little Egg Harbor, N. J., which office he resigned July 1st, 
1880. In 1882 he was again nominated for member of As- 
sembly and elected over William J. Harrison by a majority 
of 477. In 1883 he was unanimously nominated for Senator, 
and elected over ex-Senator Ephraim P. Emson by a plur- 
ality of 36. In 1886 he was renominated for Senator, and 
elected over Judge Richard H. Conover by a plurality of 
743. In 1889 he was again unanimously renominated for Sen- 
ator, and elected over ex-Senator Ephraim P. Emson by a 
plurality of 272. He always took an active part In the pro- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 371 

ceedlngs of the Senate, and for many years was Chairman 
of the Senate Republican caucus, and also of the joint 
Republican caucus. In 1889 he was unanimously nominated 
by the Republican caucus for President of the Senate. He 
was an alternate Delegate-at-Large to the National Repub- 
lican Convention at Chicago in 1888, and also to the Minne- 
apolis Convention in 1892. In October, 1891, at a convention 
of the State League of Republican Clubs, he was elected 
an alternate Delegate-at-Large to the National Convention 
of Republican Clubs. He was appointed to his present 
office by the late Judge Green, in January, 1893, to succeed 
Lin.sly Howe, who had resigned. 



United States Marshal. 

JAMES H. MULHERON, Trenton. 

Mr. Mulheron was born in 1854, of Scotch-Irish par- 
ents, in Greenwich Village, New York City, and moved 
to Jersey City with parents in 1860. He attended 
public schools No, 1 and No. 2 in that city, and then 
learned the potters' art. 

He moved to Trenton in 1878, and was connected 
with the Cook Pottery as secretary and manager until 
retiring from that firm in 1910. He was elected to 
the Common Council of Trenton in 1886 and served 
three years in that body, and while a member helped 
reorganize the police department and inaugurated the 
patrol system; helped establish the fire department, 
park system and electric lighting for the city. He 
served in the Legislature in 1891 from the old Second 
District of Mercer county; as Tax Commissioner for 
five years, and as chairman of Republican County Com- 
mittee for seven years. He was appointed by Gov- 
ernor Edge Principal Keeper of the New Jersey State 
Prison, January 29th, 1917, was confirmed next day, 
and resigned the chairmanship of the Republican 
County Committee, February 1st. He is a member of 
the Republican Club of Trenton, Carteret Club, 
Knights of Pythias, Brotherhood of the Union, Elks, 
and Fraternal Lodge of Masons and a member of 
Crescent Temple. 

Mr. Mulheron was appointed United States Marshal 
in January, 1922, by President Harding and w^hile hav- 
ing only a few days to finish his term as State Prison 
Keeper, resigned the same to take up his new duties. 



372 BIOGRAPHIES. 

STATE OFFICERS. 

Secretary of State. 

THOMAS F. MARTIN. 

Mr. Martin was born in Hartford, Conn., January 
30th, 1868. He is a newspaper editor and publisher 
by profession and for the past fifteen years he has 
been the owner and editor of the Hudson Dispatch, 
published at Union Hill, Hudson county. This paper 
has grown from a local daily to one which now has 
an extensive circulation throughout the county of 
Hudson and a State-wide influence. 

Mr. Martin is a member of Palisade Council No. 
483, Knights of Columbus, the Cartaret Club of Jersey 
City, and a charter member of the North Hudson 
Board of Trade. His legislative career began in 1911. 
He served in the House of Assembly that year, in 
1912, and again in 1913. He was again elected to 
the House of 1915, when he was chosen as the leader 
of the Democratic members on the floor. 

Mr. Martin takes more gratification out of the re- 
sult of his efforts in connection with the attempt to 
enact Morris Canal legislation than any other bill 
in the passage or defeat of which he played any part. 
As the Democratic leader Mr. Martin vigorously op- 
posed legislation that he thought would prove detri- 
mental to the best interests of the State, and time 
has justified the position taken by him. 

When Governor Fielder was called upon to name 
a new Secretary of State because of the death of 
David S. Crater, the then secretary, Mr. Martin was 
accorded a tribute such as has never before been ex- 
tended to any man in this State. Every member of 
the House of Assembly, of which he was a member, 
waited upon the Governor, and regardless of their 
politics, they asked for the naming of Mr. Martin to 
the place. Governor Fielder named Mr. Martin as 
Secretary of State, April 5th, 1915, for a term of five 
years. Mr. Martin was reappointed for another full 
term in 1920 by Governor Edwards. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 373 

Assistant Secretary of State. 

WILLIAM L. DILL, Paterson. 

Mr. Dill -uas born in Freeburgh, Pa., March 15th, 
1S74. His father -was Major William H. Dill, com- 
mander of the famous 118th Regiment N. Y. Vol. 
Inf., and one of the foremost educators in the State 
of Pennsylvania at the time of his death. 

Mr. Dill came to New Jersey in 1888 and at once 
engaged in the fire and life insurance business; he 
was named by the late John Hinchliffe as private 
secretary to the mayor in 1902, and served in that 
capacity during the fire, floods and labor troubles 
which trinity of disasters made Paterson famous the 
world over. After his retirement from the mayor's 
office on December 31st, 1903, he was named secretary 
of the Passaic River Flood District Commission and 
upon the completion of this work was appointed 
secretary of the Taxpayers' Association of Paterson, 
a civic organization banded together to do the work 
which a Board of Trade would have done, had such 
a body existed in the silk city. He resigned this 
position to become clerk to the Board of Fire and 
Police Commissioners in 1908 and remained with such 
board until December 31st, 1913, when he resigned, 

Mr, Dill was for many years secretary to the Demo- 
cratic Senate Minority and when his party assumed 
control of the Senate, he was unanimously chosen 
by his party as Senate Secretary for the years 1913 
and 1914. He was a member of the Passaic County 
Board of Taxation for four years, serving as president 
during the last three years of his term, Mr. Dill 
resigned from the tax board to assume the duties of 
Assistant Secretary of State, to which office he was 
appointed on April 5th, 1915. By virtue of his office he 
is Commissioner of the Motor Vehicle Department. 
He was reappointed in 1920. 

In politics Mr. Dill has always been an ardent 
Democrat and is regarded as one of the best organizers 
within the ranks of his party. His acquaintance is 
State wide. He was secretary of the Democratic 
State Committee for some years and resigned in 1919, 



374 BIOGRAPHIES. 

State Treasurer. 

WILLIAM THACKARA READ, Camden. 
Senator Read was born in Camden, N. J., Novem- 
ber 22d, 1878, and is a counsellor-at-law of New Jer- 
sey. He was educated in the public schools of Cam- 
den and William Penn Charter School of Philadel- 
phia and was graduated from the University of Penn- 
sylvania in 1900 with degree of Bachelor of Science. 
He was registered as a law student in the office of J. 
Willard Morgan, former State Comptroller, and at- 
tended the Law School of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania. He was admitted to the bar of New Jersey as 
an attorney at the November term, 1903, and as a 
counsellor three years later. Since his admission he 
has practiced law at Camden. He is vice-president 
of the First National Bank of Camden, and solicitor 
of the Mutual Building and Loan Association of Cam- 
den; a director of the West Jersey Trust Company of 
Camden, member of the New Jersey Society of Penn- 
sylvania, of the New Jersey State Bar Association, 
and of the American Bar Association, and has been 
district examiner of the Board of Education of the 
city of Camden over eight years; has been solicitor 
of the borough of Riverton from January 1st, 1910 to 
1919. In March, 1909, he was appointed second lieu- 
tenant of the Third Regiment, N. G. N. J., and as- 
signed to the First Battalion as Quartermaster and 
Commissary. In 1909, '10, '11 he was an expert rifle- 
man, a member of the Third Regiment rifle team 1910- 
11, and a member of New Jersey State Rifle Team, 1910. 
In the spring of 1913 he was appointed to serve on the 
staff of Adjutant-General Sadler with the rank of Ma- 
jor. In Maj', 1917, he was appointed an Assistant In- 
spector General of Rifle Practice on the staff of Gen- 
eral Spencer, with the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel, and 
in 1918 was promoted to the rank of Colonel. He 
is a member of Camden Lodge, No. 15. F. and A. M., 
Siloam Chapter, Van Hook Council, Excelsior Con- 
sistory 32d Degree, Tall Cedars of Lebanon and Cres- 
cent Temple. He is also a member of the American 
Academy of Political and Social Science, and the Union 
League of Philadelphia, Sons of the Revolution, N. J. 
State Rifle Association, Rotary Club, Camden Lodge 
of Elks. In 1911 he was elected to the Senate by a 



BIOGRAPHIES. 375 

plurality of 1,255 over French, Democrat, and in 1914 
his plurality over Bleakly, Democrat, was increased 
to 9,530. 

He was also a member of the Jury Reform Commis- 
sion. He was minority leader on the floor of the Sen- 
ate in 1913 and 1914, and majority leader in 1915. He 
was President of the Senate in 1916 and discharged 
the duties of the office with much ability and im- 
partiality. He resigned the office of State Senator on 
March 29th, and became State Treasurer on April 1st. 
In 1919 he was elected for a second term. His term is 
three years and will expire April 1st, 1922. His salary 
is $6,000 per annum. 



State Comptroller. 

NEWTON ALBERT KENDALL. BUGBEE, Trenton. 

Mr. Bug-bee was born at Minneapolis, Minn., on April 
21st, 1876. He is the son of Alvin Newton and Lucy 
Kendall Bugbee. 

At about the age of twelve (12) years he moved, 
with his parents, to Templeton, Mass., where he fin- 
ished his education in the public schools of that town. 

At the age of eighteen (18) he started his business 
career at the Edge Moor Bridge Works, Wilmington, 
Del., and came to Trenton about twenty (20) years 
ago and entered the employ of the New Jersey Steel 
and Iron Co., from which position he resigned to 
start in business for himself, on January 1st, 1904. 

He is secretary and treasurer of the Newton A. K. 
Bugbee Co., Inc., structural iron work contractors. 
The company occupies a prominent position in the 
business world and Mr. Bugbee, himself, is very ac- 
tive in public affairs and all that tends toward the 
prosperity of the nation. He is a director of the Me- 
chanics National Bank of Trenton; was elected chair- 
man of the Republican State Committee in Septem- 
ber, 1913, and re-elected three years later. He wielded 
much influence in the great Republican victories in 
New Jersey in 1916, 1917 and 1918. 

IMr. Bugbee was elected State Comptroller in a joint 
meeting of the Legislature, held oh January 30th, 1917, 
for a term of three years in succession to Edward I. 
Edwards. He was re-elected in 1920 for another three 
year term. 



376 BIOGRAPHIES. 

He was the Republican candidate for Governor in 
1919, but was defeated by Edward I. Edwards, Demo- 
crat. 



State Purchasing Agent. 

EDWARD E. GROSSCUP, Wenonah. 

Mr. Grosscup was born in Brldgeton, Cumberland 
county, August 2, 1860, and is a son of the late Charles 
C. and Anna D. Grosscup. The father, Charles C. 
Grosscup, was a member of the Legislature in 1870 
and 1871. 

Mr. Grosscup, the subject of this sketch, has been 
prominent in Democratic politics in New Jersey for 
years. In 1896 he was the candidate of his party In 
Cumberland county for sheriff and in 1898 was the 
Democratic nominee in the same county for State Sen- 
ator against Governor Edward C. Stokes. 

In 1899 Mr. Grosscup changed his residence from 
Cumberland to Gloucester county and in the latter 
county in 1906 was the opponent of ex-Senator J. 
Boyd Avis for the Assembly. In 1908 Mr. Grosscup 
was the Democratic candidate for Congress in the 
first district against Congressman Henry C. Louden- 
slager. For years Mr. Grosscup served as a member 
of the State Board of Education. He Is at present a 
member of the Democratic State Committee, represent- 
ing Gloucester county, and while a resident of Cum- 
berland county served in a similar capacity as rep- 
resentative of that county. 

Mr. Grosscup is extensively engaged in real estate 
operations. Governor Wilson nominated him as a 
member of the State Board of Equalization of Taxes 
on April 20, 1911, for a term of five years and he was 
immediately confirmed by the Senate. 

He resigned that office to assume the duties of State 
Treasurer, for which he was chosen by a joint meet- 
ing of the Legislature held on January 28th, 1913. 
On August 24th, 1911, he was elected Chairman of the 
Democratic State Committee, was re-elected in 1913-16, 
and resigned in 1918. He rendered very effective ser- 
vice to his party during the Presidential campaign of 
1912, and in the Gubernatorial campaign of 1913, and 
also did hard work in the Presidential and Guberna- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 377 

torial campaign of 1916. He was nominated as Pur- 
chasing- Agent by Governor Fielder March 21st, 1916. 
and unanimously confirmed by the Senate on the 
twenty-ninth of that month. His term will expire 
April 1st, 1921, and salary $5,000 a year. 



Attorney General. 

THOMAS F. McCRAN. Paterson. 

The nomination of Mr. McCran to the office or Chief 
Law Officer of the State was sent to the Senate by 
Governor Edge on January 14, 1919, when it received 
a prompt and an unanimous confirmation. This is one 
of the most popular appointments made by the Gov- 
ernor and deserved tribute to the brilliant Paterson 
lawyer. 

Mr. McCran, who was born in Newark, December 
2d, 1875, is a son of Thomas McCran who was an As- 
semblyman from Passaic County in 1890. His rud- 
imentary education was received in the Paterson 
schools when he entered Seton Hall College and was 
graduated from that institution with the degree of 
B.S. in June, 1896. In September of that year he be- 
came a student in the law office of William B. Gourley, 
former Assemblyman; was admitted to the bar, as an 
attorney, November, 1899, and as counselor, February, 
1911. He practiced in Mr. Gourley's office until March, 
1907, and then went in business for himself. 

Close study, untiring industry, probity and persever- 
ance led him step by step up the ladder of success in 
his profession and now he is Attorney General of New 
Jersey. 

Mr. McCran's record: City Attorney of Paterson, 
1907-12; Assemblyman, 1910-11-12; minority leader, 
1911; Speaker, 1912; Senator, 1916-17-18; majority 
leader, 1917; chairman of the Republican State Con- 
vention, 1917; President of the Senate and Acting 
Governor, 1918; Attorney General, 1919. As an orator, 
ready debater and good parliamentarian, he is well 
and favorably known throughout the State and out- 
side as well. During his incumbency of the chair in 
each House, his rulings were prompt and strictly im- 
partial. 

His Alma Mater, June 13, 1917, conferred upon him 
the degree of LL.D. He is president of the Franklin 
Trust Co. of Paterson. 

Mr. McCran's term of office is five years and salary, 
$7,000. 



378 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Assistant Attorney General. 

WILLIAM NEWCORN, PLainfield. 

Mr. Newcorn was born at Cracow, Austria, in 1868, 
and came to this country with his parents as a child 
of two years. He was educated in the public schools 
of New York City. He then moved to Plainfield and 
opened a sporting- goods store and devoted his even- 
ings to the study of law. He was admitted to the 
bar as an attorney in June, 1897, and became coun- 
selor in February, 1903. He was a member of the 
House of Assembly in 1902-03; was appointed Judge 
of the District Court of the City of Plainfield on May 
20th, 1906, and served in that capacity until March 
12th, 1912; served as a member of the Union County 
Republican Committee and the Plainfield City Com- 
mittee for the past 28 j-ears. He is a member of the 
Improved Order of Red Men, the Elks, Knights of 
Pythias and Woodmen of the World. On January 
28th, 1919, he was appointed Assistant Attorney Gen- 
eral. 



Adjutant-General. 

FREDERICK GILKYSON, Trenton. 

General Gilkyson was born in Yardley, Pa., Decem- 
ber 1st, 1868. He is the son of Colonel Stephen R. 
Gilkyson who commanded the 6th Regiment, Infantry, 
New Jersey Volunteers, Civil War. He was educated 
in the Trenton public schools, and entered the em- 
ploy of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company in 1884, 
resigning in 1905 as Assistant Freight Agent, Tren- 
ton, to accept the office of Vice President and General 
Manager of the Bellmark Pottery Company, Trenton. 

The General served as clerk to the Trenton Park 
Board Commissioners; Tax Receiver, city of Trenton, 
for two terms, 1904-1908, and was appointed Commis- 
sioner of Public Roads, January 22d, 1908, for a term 
of three years. 

General Gilkyson entered the National Guard of the 
State as private. Company A, 7th Regiment, March 2d, 
1885; commissioned Battalion Adjutant, July 9th, 1894: 
subsequently served as Adjutant, 2d Regiment; Ad- 
jutant-General, 2d Brigade, and was appointed As- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 379 

sistant Adjutant-General of the State, with the rank 
of Colonel, December 30th, 1907. During the Spanish- 
American War, Colonel Gilkyson served as Battalion 
Adjutant, 4th Regiment, New Jersey National Guard 
Volunteer Infantry; honorably discharged April 6th, 
1899. 

Upon the declaration of war, April 6th, 1917, Gen- 
eral Gilkyson was detailed to duty in the Adjutant- 
General's office, and assigned as Chief of the Bureau 
of Enrollment and in charge of the operation of the 
Selective Service law, and appointed Acting Adjutant- 
General, July 25th, 1917, vice Brigadier General Charles 
W. Barber, mustered into the Federal service. On 
February 27th, 1918, he was nominated as Adjutant- 
General and was promptly confirmed by the Senate. 



Q,uartermaster-General. 

C. EDWARD MURRAY, Trenton. 

General Murray was bom in Lambertville, N. J., July 
17th, 1863. He is the only son of J. Howard Murray and 
Wllhelmina Solliday Murray, and came to Trenton with 
his parents In 1865. He received his education at the State 
Model School and the Stewart Business College. In 1883 
he became associated with his father In the mechanical 
rubber manufacturlner business. In 1892 he became sole 
proprietor of the business, and to-day has other large 
manufacturing interests. From boyhood he has taken a 
great deal of Interest in affairs Of the city of Trenton, as 
well as the Republican party, and in 1894 he was elected 
City Clerk, which office he kept until he declined re-elec- 
tion In 1904. In 1900 he represented the Second Congres- 
sional District as alternate to the National Republican 
Convention and in 1904 was elected a delegate to represent 
the Fourth Congressional District at the National Repub- 
lican Convention. 

His military career began with his enlistment In Com- 
pany A, Seventh Regiment, N. G. N. J., December 12, 1885. 
On June 30, 1890. the late Brigadier-General William H- 
Skirm, then Colonel of the Seventh Regiment, N. G. N. J., 
appointed him Paymaster of the Regiment with the rank 
of first lieutenant. On June 30, 1895, he was commissioned 
Captain and Paymaster. On May 2, 1899, he was retired 
under the act reorganizing the National Guard. March 8, 



380 BIOGRAPHIES. 

1905. Governor Edward C. Stokes appointed him Quarter- 
master-General, to succeed the late Brevet Major-General 
Richard A. Donnelly, and was commissioned Brigadier- 
General April 5, 1905. 

General Murray is one of the best known and most pop- 
ular among the public men of Trenton. He has distin- 
guished himself as a leader of his party and many of its 
victories m Trenton and Mercer county are mostly to his 
credit. He has a host of friends among people of all 
shades of political opinion, and as an employer of labor he 
stands high in the estimation of wage workers. 



Clerk of the Supreme Court. 

ENOCH L. JOHNSON, Atlantic City. 

Mr. Johnson, who was appointed Clerk of the Su- 
preme Court of New Jersey by Governor Edge in 1918, 
was born in Atlantic county, New Jersey, January 20th, 
1883, is the son of the late Smith E. Johnson, who was 
elected four times as Sheriff of Atlantic county. 

Mr. Johnson was educated in the public schools of 
Atlantic City and Mays Landing. He began his career 
in politics at an early age, being employed in the 
sheriff's office of Atlantic county as clerk and under- 
sheriff for a period of ten years. He developed rapidly 
in politics and was elected Sheriff of Atlantic county 
in 1908. Shortly after the conclusion of his term he 
was chosen by the Board of Freeholders of Atlantic 
county for County Collector. He has been Secretary 
of the Atlantic County Republican Executive Commit- 
tee for fourteen years. In addition to his political 
career Mr. Johnson has been active in business circles 
in Atlantic City and county. He is one of the owners 
of the Atlantic County Record, a weekly paper printed 
and published at the county seat of Atlantic county. 
He is also Secretary of the Atlantic Real Estate and 
Investment Company, taking an important part in 
the development of Atlantic City real estate. He is a 
member of the Masonic and Elks Lodges. His term 
will expire in 1923. His salary is $6,000 a year. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 381 

Clerk in Chancery. 

JESSE R. SALMON, Newark. 

Mr. Salmon was born near Flanders, Morris county, 
N. J., March 16th, 1863, and has lived in Newark since 
1858. For nearly twenty years he was an official ste- 
nographer in the Court of Chancery, serving- under 
Vice-Chancellors Emery, Pitney, Howell and Lane. 
He has always been actively interested in Republican 
politics, and was the first Supervisor of Bills of the 
Senate in 1899, 1900 and 1901, after the old engross- 
ing- system was abandoned. 

Mr. Salmon was appointed by Governor Edge in 
1919 as Clerk in Chancery and his term of office ex- 
pires April 15th, 1924. His salary is $6,000. 



Keeper of the State Prison. 

JOSEPH S. HOFF, Princeton. 

Mr. Hoff was born in Princeton, December 8th, 1867. 
He was educated in St. Paul's Parochial School and 
the Princeton High School, and afterward took a busi- 
ness college course in Trenton. Mr. Hoff served 
Princeton for nine years as tax collector and for sev- 
eral years was in active business in his native town. 
Pie is also a director in two banks in Princeton and 
is in many ways identified with the affairs of the 
well known college town. He was for several years 
a member of the New Jersey Civil Service Commission, 
having been first appointed by Woodrow Wilson, then 
Governor, in 1911 and re-appointed by Governor 
Fielder in 1915. 

Mr. Hoff has been active in New Jersey Democratic 
politics both as Chairman of the Merer County Demo- 
cratic Committee and as Mercer county's member on 
the Democratic State Committee. He was nominated 
by Governor Edwards on January 16th, 1922, to succeed 
James H. Mulheron as State Prison Keeper, and his 
nomination was immediately confirmed. 



382 BIOGRAPHIES. 

State Librarian. 

FRANCIS E. CROASDALE, Atlantic City. 

Mr. Croasdale was born in Atlantic City, N. J., on 
October 6th, 1886. His parents, Charles Wilson Croas- 
dale, who served during- the Civil War with the 
Pennsylvania Reserves and was mustered out as 
Brevet Captain, serving- later as a commissioned of- 
ficer in the Third U. S. B. V., and Anna Conover Croas- 
dale, who formerly resided in Gloucester City, N. J., 
were among the pioneer settlers of Atlantic City. He 
was educated in the public schools of Atlantic City, 
and graduated from the Atlantic City High School in 
1904. A class-mate of his was Wu Chao Chu, son of 
Wu Ting Fang, the former Chinese diplomat in this 
cpuntry who created much comment at the time by 
insisting that his boy be educated in the free schools 
of New Jersey. Immediately after graduating, Mr. 
Croasdale took a reportorial position on the Atlantic 
City Daily Press, which at that time was published 
by Governor Edge. He was studying law at the 
same time in the offices of Eugene G. Schwinghammer, 
Esq., Atlantic City. A few years later Mr. Edge 
appointed him editor of the newspaper. He also 
served as its legislative correspondent in Trenton. 
Some time later, Mr. Croasdale, with two other em- 
ployes, organized a company and leased the Press 
and the Atlantic City Evening Union from Mr. Edge. 

In April, 1919, the Press Union Publishing Co. was 
formed and incorporated and the property was pur- 
chased from Governor Edge. Mr. Croasdale is a di- 
rector and vice-president. 

Mr. Croasdale served as secretary to Governor Edge 
from the time of his inauguration until May 16th, 
1919, when the Governor resigned to become United 
States Senator. In 1915 Mr. Croasdale served as pri- 
vate secretary to Speaker of the House of Assembly 
Carlton Godfrey. He toured the State with Colonel 
Walter E. Edge and Senator Joseph S. Frelinghuysen 
in the campaign of 1916, handling the newspaper pub- 
licity work. 

In 1916 he married Helen Florence Thorne, of At- 
lantic City. They live in Atlantic City. 

He was appointed State Librarian in 1919 for a term 
of five years. His salary is $3,000 a year. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 383 

Coiiiniissioiier of Bankings and lusuranre. 

WILLIAM E. TUTTLE, JR., Westfield. 

Mr. Tuttle was born at Horseheads, New York, De- 
cember 10th, 1870, and was educated at the Elmira 
Free Academy and Cornell University. He has been 
engaged in the lumber business in Westfleld since 
1897. 

He was elected to the House of Representatives from 
the Fifth Congressional District in 1910, re-elected in 
1912, and, although leading his ticket by large mar- 
gins, was the unsuccessful candidate of his party in 
1914 and 1916. While in Congress he was a member of 
the Joint Commission which revised the laws fixing 
the compensation to railroads for the transportation 
of the mails and was actively identified with many re- 
forms in the postal service. He was a delegate to the 
Democratic National Conventions in 1908 and 1916. 
In 1915 Congressman Tuttle was appointed by Presi- 
dent Wilson the sole Commissioner of the United States 
to the National Exposition of Panama. He has served 
many years as Chairman of the Union County Demo- 
cratic Committee. He is Vice President of the Peoples 
Bank and Trust Company and a director of the Mutual 
Building and Loan Association of Westfield and is ac- 
tively engaged in several business enterprises. 

Mr. Tuttle was appointed by Governor Edge a mem- 
ber of the Board of Conservation and Development 
February 27th, 1918, and confirmed by the Senate for a 
term of four years. 

Mr. Tuttle was appointed Commissioner of Banking 
and Insurance by Governor Edwards on January 17th, 
1921, and was confirmed the same day by the Senate. 



Coininissioner Department of Labor. 

(The Bureau of Industrial Statistics is merged with 
this Department.) 

LEWIS T. BRYANT, Atlantic City. 

Colonel Bryant was born in July, 1874, in Atlantic 
county, N. J. He was graduated from the Pennsylvania 
Military College at Chester, Pa., with the degree of civil 



384 BIOGRAPHIES. 

engrineer; was admitted to the New Jersey bar In 1898; 
mustered Into the United States Volunteer Army as Cap- 
tain of Company F, Fourth New Jersey Volunteer In- 
fantry July 14th; promoted to Major In the same regi- 
ment In the spring of 1899, and was made Assistant In- 
spector General of the National Guard of New Jersey, 
with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel, in the spring of 1899, 
which position he stills holds. On January 8th, 1904, the 
Colonel was appointed Inspector of Factories and Work 
shops, to fill a vacancy caused by the resignation of John 
C. Ward. The title of the office was changed to that of 
Commissioner of Department of Labor by an act of the 
Legislature, and on March 24th, 1904, the Colonel was ap- 
pointed as such by Governor Murphy, and was confirmed 
by the Senate on the next day for a term of three years, 
at $2,500 a year. In 1907 he was given another term 
by Governor Stokes at a salary of $3,500, and he was 
reappointed by Governor Fort in 1910. On February 
18th, 1913, Governor Wilson appointed the Colonel for 
another term of office. The Colonel served as secretary 
of the New Jersey Commission, Louisiana Purchase Ex- 
position, from December 9, 1903, until the end. He is 
identified with the hotel interests in Atlantic City. His 
term is three years, and his salary is $6,000 per annum. 
He served as secretary of the Jamestown Exposition 
Commission. He was re-appointed by Governor Edge. 
His term will expire September 2d, 1923. 



State Board of Taxes and As.sessmeiit. 

JAMES BAKER, President, Jersey City. 

Mr. Baker was iborn in Jersey City, December 2d, 
1872, and was educated in the schools of Jersey City 
and' in St. Peter's Colleg-e. His business is that of 
New Jersey representative of DeLaurier's Column 
Mould Company of New York. 

Mr. Baker was a member of the Assembly in 1907, 
1908, 1909 and 1910. He served ten years as chief 
clerk in the office of Register of Deeds of Hudson 
and was also for a time Registrar of Vital Statistics 
for the same county. In 1920 he was nominated by 
Governor Edwards to the State Board of Assessment 
and Taxes and wa.s promptly confirmed. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 385 

Mr. Baker has actively participated in every polit- 
ical campaig-n in this State for the last fifteen years. 
His splendid oratorical ability has been recognized by 
the Democratic State Committee in many guberna- 
torial elections. He has a large personal acquaint- 
ance among public officials in New Jersey and has 
a host of warm friends in both political camps. 

FRANK B. JESS, Haddon Heights. 

Mr, Jess was born in Philadelphia, Pa., November 3d, 
1870, and is a lawyer by profession. He began news- 
paper work as a reporter in 1887, subsequently went 
to Philadelphia as news editor of "The Call," since 
suspended, then became successively news editor. 
Washington correspondent and financial editor of 
"The Bulletin." He was admitted to the New Jersey 
Bar in 1897, having studied law under the supervision 
of his brother, the late William H. Jess. He was a 
member of Council of the borough of Haddon Heights 
from its incorporation, In 1904, to January 1st, 1906, 
and of the Board of Education of Haddon township 
from 1902 till the organization of the Board of Educa- 
tion of Haddon Heights In 1904, and Is still a member 
of the latter board. At present he is Solicitor of the 
borough of Haddon Heights. Mr. Jess served two 
terms, 1907-1908, as an Assemblyman from Camden 
county, and in the latter year he was speaker, when 
he won high commendation as a presiding officer. He 
was appointed Chief Examiner of the Civil Service 
Board on May 8, 1908, and served In that capacity 
until April 16, 1909, when he was nominated and con- 
firmed as a member of the State Board of Equaliza- 
tion of Taxes. He was appointed president of the 
board in 1910, to succeed Carl Lentz, for a term of five 
years. In 1915 he was re-appointed, and upon the 
creation of the new Board of Taxes and Assessment 
Mr. Jess was appointed a member and confirmed by 
the Senate for a term of two years at a salary of 
$3,000 per annum. He was re-appointed by Governor 
Edge in 1917, and on February 28th, 1918, was ap 
pointed by the same Governor as President of the 
Board for a full term, which expired July 1st, 1921. 
Mr. Jess was reappointed to the board as a member, 
but not as president, by Governor Edwards. His pres- 
ent term will expire in 1924, 



386 BIOGRAPHIES. 

ISAAC BARBER, Phillipsburg-. 

Dr. Barber was born at Forty Fort, Luzerne county, 
Pa., September 4th, 1854, and is a phjsician by pro- 
fession. His father, a native of Warren county, re- 
moved to his native state in 1858. The doctor received 
his early education in the public schools, entered Blair 
Presbyterian Academy to prepare for college in 1869, 
Lafayette in 1872, and graduated in 1876. He studied 
medicine under the preceptorship of Professor Traill 
Green, of Easton, Pa., and graduated from the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania in 1879. He served as Medical 
Referee of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company 
in New York City for one year, located in Phillipsburg 
in July, 1880, and has since continued in the active 
practice of his profession. He lias served as city 
phj'sician and was a member of the Board of Health 
for two years. He was appointed Pension Examining 
Surgeon under the Cleveland administration July 1, 
1893. He was elected to the State Senate in 1896 by a 
plurality of 1,130 over Cramer, Republican, and served 
a full term of three years, and in 1902 he was elected 
for another term by a plurality of 749 over William R. 
Laire, the Republican candidate. In 1912 he was 
nominated by Governor Yv^ilson as a member of the 
State Board of Assessors for a term of four years, 
and was promptly confirmed by the Senate. Upon the 
creation of the new Board of Taxes and Assessment 
he was nominated as a member for a three-year term 
by Governor Fielder and was confirmed by the Senate. 
This term expired in 1918. In 1920 Mr, Barber was 
again named to this board by Governor Edwards and 
confirmed by the Senate. His term will expire in 
1923. 

MAHLON REID MARGERUM, Trenton. 

Major Margerum was born in Trenton October 28th, 
1856. He was educated in Trenton public schools and 
graduated from the Rider-Moore and Steward Busi- 
ness College. He has been closely associated with 
Trenton's business and political activities; was a mem- 
ber of the National Guard of the State of New Jersey 
for twenty-five years; enlisted as a private, rising to 
the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel. He served on the 
staffs of Major-General Peter F. Wanser, Brigadier- 
Generals Quincey O'Mara Gilmore and Dennis F. Col- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 387 

lins, also on the staffs of Governors Edward Casper 
Stokes and Walter Evans Edge. He was commissioned 
a Major in the United States Army on December 4th, 
1917, and detailed to Governor Walter E. Edge as Aide 
in the operation of the Selective Service Regulations. 
The Major was appointed by Governor Edge a mem- 
ber of the Board of Taxes and Assessment in 1919 and 
was confirmed by the Senate. His term will expire 
July 1st, 1922. 

HARRY W. MUTCHLER, Rockaway. 

Mr. Mutchler was born at Asbury, N. J., October 
8th, 1862, and is a traveling salesman. He has resided 
in Morris county practically all his life. When a young 
man he attended the Pliillipsburg High School. His 
first employment was as clerk in a general store at 
New Foundland, N. J., where he remained seven years, 
and next he became acting manager for Lawrence & 
King, at Stanhope, N. J., and subsequently was em- 
ployed by the Richards Beach Company, at Hibernia, 
for seven j-ears as bookkeeper, and for over twenty 
years has been a traveling salesman for Edward D. 
Depew & Co., wholesale grocers, of New York City. 
This firm having retired, he is now associated with J. 
S. Sills & Sons. 

Mr. Mutchler is a member of Acacia Lodge, No. 20, 
F. & A. M.; Citizens Lodge, No. 144, I, . O. O. F. ; 
Jr. O. U. A. M. ; and he is also a member of the Rock- 
away Fire Department and Board of Trade, and a di- 
rector of the Rockaway First National Bank and trus- 
tee of Dover General Hospital. He was a member of 
the Borough Council of Rockaway and served as Mayor 
two terms, 1908 to 1912. 

He served three years as a member of the House of 
Assembly and in 1916 was elected to the State Senate 
by a plurality of 1,876 over James J. Lyons, Dem. He 
served two years of his term when he resigned the 
office to accept membership of the Board of Taxation 
and Assessment to which he was appointed by Gover- 
nor Edge, February 27th, 1918, for a full term of three 
years, and was promptly confirmed by the Senate. He 
wias reappointed by Governor Edwards in 1921. 



388 BIOGRAPHIES. 

FRANK D. SCHROTH, Secretary, Trenton. 

Mr. Schroth was born in Trenton, October 18th, 
1884, and has alwaj's resided there. He is a son of 
the late Assemblyman, John Schroth, and like hia 
father, has always been actively interested in public 
affairs. Mr. Schroth is a newspaper man by profes- 
sion, having- been connected with the Trenton True 
American while a morning- paper, correspondent for 
several out of town papers, and general legislative 
reporter for the Trenton Evening Times up to the 
time of his appointment as Secretary of the State 
Board of Taxes and Assessment. Mr. Schroth was 
secretary to Prosecutor A. M. Beekman of Somerset 
county wTien the latter was Speaker of the House of 
Assembly, during the session of 1914. Later he was 
appointed State Supervisor of Census by the late 
David S. Crater, Secretary of State, and was retained 
in that position by Secretary of State Thomas F. 
Martin, until the work was Anally completed. Mr. 
Schroth was appointed secretary on December 14th, 
1915, to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Irvine 
E. Maguire. 

FRANK A. O'CONNOR, Clerk and Field Secretary, 
West Orange. 

Mr. O'Connor was born in the city of New York, Au- 
gust 25th,' 1867, and is a master plumber. He was 
graduated at St. John's School, Orange, N. J. He was 
Town Assessor, 1894 to 1904; Collector, 1904 to 1912 in- 
clusive, and was again re-elected in 1912. He was the 
first Assessor to tax gas, water, telephone, trolley and 
other public service corporations and advocate right of 
way and franchise taxes, and first Assessor to make 
inspection of New York city tax rolls and discover 
hundreds of thousands of dollars being sworn off in 
that city by men giving New Jersey as their legal resi- 
dence, where they had only summer homes, and paid, 
in many cases, not even a poll tax, with the result of 
adding such sums to New Jersey ratables. 

Mr. O'Connor has been a life long Democrat, and for 
many years served on the State Committee list of 
speakers. He was an Alternate Delegate to the Na- 
tional Democratic Convention at Denver in 1908, from 
the Ninth Congressional district. He was appointed 



BIOGRAPHIES. 389 

clerk of the State Board of Equalization of Taxes in 
April, 1913, and served in that office until July 1st, 
1915, -when he became Field Secretary of the New 
Board of Taxes and Assessment. 



Board of Public Utility Commissioners. 

JOHX J. TREACY, President, Jereey City. 

Judg-e Treacy was born in Jersey City and grad- 
uated from St. Peter's Colleg-e, that city, in 1891. He 
then attended the New York Law School and received 
the deg-ree of Bachelor of Laws in 1894. He became 
associated with a l&ading New York law firm and 
practiced law in that city until 1901, when he was 
admitted to the New Jersey Bar. In 1902 and 1903 
Judge Treacy was a member of the Assembly and in 
the latter year was the Democratic floor leader. 

President Wilson, in 1911, while Governor of New 
Jersey, appointed Judge Treacy to the Court of Errors 
and Appeals and this position the judge held until 
February, 1913, w^hen he resigned. He was appointed 
a member of the Public Utility Commission by Gov- 
ernor Fielder in 1914 to fill the unexipired term of 
Winthrop More Daniels. This term expired in 1917. 
Last year Governor Edwards named Judge Treacy 
to the Public Utility Commission for a term of six 
years and the nomination was promptly confirmed. 

HARRY' V. OSBORNE, Newark. 

Judge Osborne was born in Newark, August 29th. 
1872, and is a lawyer by profession. He studied law 
with the late Judg-e Robert S. Woodruff in Trenton 
and practiced in that city until 1896, when he moved 
to Newark. His first public office was that of State 
Senator from Essex County. He was elected in 1908 
on the Democratic ticket, defeating Everett Colby. In 
1911 Senator Osborne was appointed a Common Pleas 
Judge of Essex County by Governor Woodrow Wil- 
son land he was reappointed in 1916 by Governor 
Fielder and retained this position until the expira- 
tion of his term in 1921. Judge Osborne was named 
ais a Public Utility Commissioner for a term of four 
j^ears by Governor Edwards in 1921. 



390 BIOGRAPHIES. 

HARRY BACHARACH, Atlantic City. 

Mr. Bacharach, who lives at 108 St, Charles Place, 
Atlantic City, was born in Philadelphia, October 24th, 
1873. When a year old he was brought to Atlantic 
City by his parents, who had been summer cottagers 
at the shore up to that time. He has resided in the 
resort ever since. He attended the Atlantic City Pub- 
lic Schools and graduated from the Atlantic City High 
School and also from Prickett's Business College. 

Early in his business career, which has been highly 
successful, Mr. Bacharach was a merchant and real 
estate operator. Of late years his chief private occu- 
pation has been banking and real estate. He is Presi- 
dent of the Equitable Trust Company, an Atlantic 
City institution, which he was chiefly instrumental in 
organizing; President of the Equitable Building and 
Loan Association, Vice-President of the Atlantic 
Guarantee & Title Insurance Company and a director 
in numerous other financial institutions of Atlantic 
City. His present business firm is the Bacharach Real 
Estate Company, his partners being Congressman 
Isaac Bacharach, his brother, and J. E. Evans. 

Mr. Bacharach has taken a leading and active part 
in the civic, fraternal and social life of Atlantic City 
for more than a quarter of a centurj'. For twenty 
years he has been President of the Morris Guards, the 
resort's citizen-soldiery organization. He is a Past 
Exalted Ruler of the Atlantic City Lodge of Elks, at 
present Grand Esquire of the Grand Lodge of Elks 
and a member of the Masons, Moose and Eagles. He 
is also a member of the Atlantic City Country Club, 
Linwood Country Club, Seaview Country Club and 
Kiwanis. 

Mr. Bacharach was President of Atlantic City Coun- 
cil from March, 1900, to March, 1901. He was appointed 
Postmaster of Atlantic City by President McKinley 
February, 1901, and reappointed by President Roose- 
velt in 1905 and 1909. He was elected Mayor of Atl'antic 
City in 1911 and re-elected in 1916, under commission 
form of government, his term expiring May 16th, 1920. 
He was appointed a Public Utility Commissioner by 
Governor Edwards March 15th, 1921. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 391 

ALFRED N. BARBER, Secretary, Trenton. 

Mr. Barber was born in Lambertville, N. J., May 
19th, 1867. In 1884 he entered the employ of the New 
Jersey Steel and Iron Company, working for that com- 
pany until it became absorbed by the American Bridge 
Company, when he resigned as contracting agent to 
accept a position in the sales department of John A. 
Roebling's Sons Company. He worked In the office 
of the City Clerk of Trenton from April, 1880, to July. 
1884, and served as an Assemblyman from Mercer 
county for three years — 1905, '06 and '07 — and during 
the latter year was Republican leader. Mr. Barber 
was appointed secretary of the Board of Railroad 
Commissioners soon after the creation of that board, 
in 1907. 

THOMAS BROWN, Coun.sel, Perth Amboy. 

Senator Brown was born in England on December 
3d, 1877, while his parents were sojourning through 
that country. Since the first year of his life he has 
resided continuously in the County of Middlesex. He 
graduated from the New York Law School in 1905 with 
the degree of LL.B., and was admitted to the bar 
as an attorney in February term, 1907, and as a coun- 
selor-at-law three years later. He w^as elected to the 
State Senate in 1918 and served a full term of three 
years. In the 1921 session he was the Democratic 
leader in the Senate. 

Upon the resignation of L. Edward Herrmann -as 
counsel to the Public Util-ity Commission late in 1921, 
Senator Brown was ^selected as ^Ir. Herrmann's suc- 
cessor. 



Civil Service Comnii.s.siou. 

WILLIAM KRUSE DEVEREUX, Asbury Park. 

Mr. Devereux, a native of Trenton, is a son of 
Franklin Devereux, a pioneer Prohibitionist, and one 
of the seven to sign the call for the first Republican 
meeting held in New Jersey. He is descended in a 
direct line from Conrad Weiser, a missionary among 
the Indians and one of General George Washington's 
trusted scouts. Forced to leave school when a lad, he 
learned the printers' trade and later drifted into news- 
13 



392 BIOGRAPHIES. 

paper work. He was one of the founders of the Tren- 
ton Sunday Advertiser, and for sixteen years was part 
owner and editor of the Asbury Park Spray, Mon- 
mouth county's pioneer daily newspaper. For over 
thirty years he has been a leg-islative correspondent 
and is the head of the Legislative News Bureau. He 
served for seventeen years as secretary of the New 
Jersey State Democratic Committee and coined that 
popular slogan, "Win with Wilson." When the County 
Tax Boards were first established, he was named as a 
member of the Monmouth county board by Governor 
Stokes, and was reappointed by Governors Fort, Wilson 
and Fielder. He is a Past Exalted Ruler of Asbury 
Park Lodge of Elks and a former Councilman of that 
resort. He was appointed a member of the Civil Ser- 
vice Commission by Governor Walter E. Edge on March 
30th, 1917, and was named for a full term in January, 
1918. His salary is $3,000 a year. His term expires in 
1923. 

EDWARD HENRY WRIGHT, Newark. 
Mr. Wright was born in Newark, N. J., February 13th, 
1873, and is a lawyer by profession. He was educated 
at St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H., from 1885 to 1890, 
and entered the Princeton class of 1894. He studied 
law in the ofRce of McCarter, Williamson & McCarter, 
Newark, and the New York Law School, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar of New Jersey, June 21st, 1897. He 
is the grandson of the late United States Senator Wil- 
liam Wright, of New Jersey, and Steven Thomas Ma- 
son, first Governor of Michigan, and is the son of the 
late Colonel Edward H. Wright, aid on the staff of the 
late Generals Winfield Scott and George B. McClellan. 
He was a member of the House of Assembly in 1907, 
and made a good record as a legislator. Governor Wil- 
son appointed Mr. Wright a Civil Service Commissioner 
on February 17th, 1913, for a term of four years. 
Under the new law, Governor Edge appointed him a 
member of the Civil Service Commission on March 30th, 
1917, for the four-year term, and he was reappointed 
by Governor Edwards in 1921. 

WILLIAM D. NOLAN, Somerville. 
Mr. Nolan was born at Pleasant Grove, Schooley's 
Mountain, Morris county, N. J., November 8th, 1880; 
moved to Somerville in 1888, and attended the public 



BIOGRAPHIES. 393 

schools of Somerville and also Packards Business Col- 
lege in New York. After finishing there he went in 
the employ of the New Jersey Central Railroad, at No. 
143 Liberty street, New York, in 1896, which he quit 
in 1900, and then was given a position by Senator 
Joseph S. Freling-huysen in the insurance business at 
William street, New York. Subsequently, started in 
business with Mr. A. C. Swinton and formed the firm 
of Nolan & Swinton, at No. 12 West Main street, Som- 
erville, and No. 1 Liberty street. New York. The part- 
nership was dissolved July 1st, 1911, and Mr, Nolan has 
since conducted the business for himself at No. 12 
West Main street, Somerville. He has taken an active 
part in Somerset county politics in the past fifteen 
years. He was appointed a member of the Civil Ser- 
vice Commission by Governor Edge, March 30th, 1917, 
for the five-year term. 

THEODORE H. SMITH, Jersey City. 

Mr. Smith was born in Jersey City, New Jersey, on 
August 4th, 1878, and has lived there since that time 
He was educated in private and public schools in 
Jersey City and at Trinity School, New York City, 
New York. 

He is descended in a direct line from John Cadmus, 
who was the second male child born in Jersey City, 
Mr. Smith's grandfather served two terms as post- 
master of Jersey City. 

After leaving school, Mr. Smith was employed in 
the law office of Babbitt & Lawrence; later he ac- 
cepted a position with the Chapiiltepec Land Improve- 
ment Company. This company developed tlie exquisite 
residential section in the suburb of Mexico City, Mex- 
ico, which, before the present disturbances in that 
country was known as the "American Colony." He is 
the secretary and a director in this company. He is 
a member of the Jersey City and Carteret Clubs, and 
is also president of the Union Building and Loan 
Association. 

He has been a lifelong Republican, and was ap- 
pointed by Governor Fielder to the Civil Service Com- 
misson in 1913, but retired upon the reorganization 
of that board in 1917. He was again appointed to 
the board for a full term of five years by Governor 
Edwards in 1920. 



394 BIOGRAPHIES. 



Vacancy. 



There is a vacancy in the Civil Service Commission 
caused by the resignation of John Dyneley Prince, 
whom President Harding' appointed minister to Den- 
marl^;. 

CHARLES P. MESSICK, Chief Examiner and Secretary, 
Trenton, N. J, 

Mr. Messick was born near Georgetown, Sussex 
county, Delaware, on June 4th, 1882, and received his 
early educational training in the rural schools of that 
county. At the age of seventeen, he began teaching 
in the country schools and continued for a period of 
four years, in the meantime preparing for entrance to 
college. In September, 1903, he entered Delaware State 
College and was graduated from that institution in 
1907, with the degree of A.B. Two years later he re- 
ceived his Master's degree from the same institution, 
and in 1910 received the degree of A.M. from the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. 

During his college career he was a leader in many 
college activities and won distinction in scholarship, in 
military science and athletics. He is a member of the 
Phi Kappa Phi Honorary Society and of the Sigma Nu 
Fraternity, being tlie organizer of the local chapter at 
Delaware College. 

After graduation from college he removed to New 
Jersey, and for five years was head of the Department 
of History in the Trenton High School. He has been 
connected with the New Jersey State Civil Service 
Commission since 1910, and has devoted his entire time 
to the work since 1912. As Assistant Chief Examiner 
he has directed and developed the work of the Ex- 
amination Department. In 1914, he was tendered the 
Chief Examinership of the Municipal Civil Service 
Commission of Philadelphia, but chose to remain with 
the New Jersey Commission. 

Mr. Messick was appointed Supervisor of the Tren- 
ton Evening Schools in September, 1916, and has been 
unusually successful in reorganizing and improving 
the evening school work. On being appointed to his 
present position, he resigned the supervisorship. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 395 

State Board of Eiducation. 

MELVIN A. RICE, President, Leonardo, Monmouth Co. 

Mr. Rice was born in New York State, August 13th, 
1871. He was graduated from the State Normal School 
at Cortland in June, 1890. He is president of Donald 
W. MacLeod & Company, Importers of flax and' jute, 
690 Broadway, New York City. Mr. Rice was ap- 
pointed in 1911 by Governor Wilson, a member of the 
State Board of Education and was re-appointed by 
Governor Edge in 1919, and his term will expire in 
1927. 

JOHN CHARLES VAN DYKE, Vice-President, New 
Brunswick. 

Dr. Van Dyke, university professor, was born iE, 
New Brunswick, N. J., April 21st, 1856; son of Judge. 
John and Mary Dix (Strong) Van Dyke; studied at 
Columbia; studied art in Europe manj' years, and 
L, H. D., Rutgers, 1889; unmarried. He was admitted 
to the bar in 1877, but never practiced; Librarian, 
Sage Library, New Brunswick, since 1878, and Pro- 
fessor of History of Art, Rutgers, since 1889. Is 
lecturer at Columbia, Harvard and Princeton; a mem- 
ber of the National Institute of Arts and Letters. 
Author of "Books and How to Use Them," "Principles 
of Art," "How to Be Judge of a Picture," "Art For 
Art's Sake," "History of Painting," "Oldi Dutch and 
Flemish Masters," "Modern French Masters," "Nature 
For It's Own Sake," "The Desert," "Old English Mas- 
ters, With Coles' Engravings," "The Meaning of Pic- 
tures," "The Opal Sea," "Studies in Pictures," "The 
Money God," "The New New York." "What Is Art?," 
"New Guides to Old Masters;" Editor of "College His- 
tories of Art," "History of American Art," "The 
Studio," 1883-1884, "American Art Review," "Inter- 
national Quarterly," etc. 

He was appointed a member of the State Board of 
Education in 1911 and re-appointed February 12th, 
1918, for a full term of eight years. 

COL. D. STEWART CRAVEN, Salem. 
Col. Craven was born on a farm near St. Georges, 
Delaware, February 20th, 1873. The family is one of 
Scotch Presbyterian ancestry. He was educated in the 



396 BIOGRAPHIES. 

public schools of Salem (to which city his parents 
moved in 1880), at the Lawrenceville Academy, Law 
renceville, N. J., and at the Virginia Military Institute. 
Lexington, Va. 

The Salem Glass "Works were founded by a relative 
of Col. Craven's, in partnership with two other business 
men of the city, in 1863, and Col. Craven begun his 
business career with this industry in 1892. He is nov/ 
vice-president. 

In 1899, General W. J. Sewell, Division Commander 
of the National Guard of N. J., appointed Mr. Craven 
a member of his staff with the rank of Major. In 
1905, he was appointed assistant quartermaster-general 
with the rank of colonel. 

He was appointed a member of the State Board of 
Education in 1911 by Governor Wilson, and re-ap- 
pointed by Governor Fielder for the full term, April, 
1916. His term will expire in 1924. 

JOHN P. MURRAY, Jersey City. 

Mr. IMurray was born in Jersey City, in 1872. In 
1S91 he was graduated from St. Peter's College, Jer- 
sey City, in which city he resides. In 1893 he was 
graduated from the New York Law School and ad- 
mitted to the New York bar. Since then he has 
practiced! law in New York City. He was counsel to 
the Senate School Investigation Committee and drafted 
the laws' for the re-organization of the State School 
system. He was also counsel for the Economy and 
Efficiency Commission and drr^fted the laws for the 
consolidation and re-organization of the various State 
departments. He is a Democrat in politics. 

He was appointed' a member of the State Board of 
Education in 1911. In 1912 he was reappointed for a 
term of eight years and again in 1920 for another full 
term. His present term will expire in 1928. 

THOMAS WHITNEY SYNNOTT, Wenonah. 
Mr. Synnott was born; at Glassboro, N. J., in 1845. 
He is a son of Myles Synnott, M.D., and Harriet 
Heston Whitney Synnott, and was educated in the 
public schools and West Jersey Academy. jEngaged 
in glass manufacturing at Glassboro in 1865, in con- 
nection with the Whitney Glass Works, and became 
the first president of the company when it was later 



BIOGRAPHIES. 397 

incorporated. He retained this position until 1892 
when he retired from active business to devote his 
energies to benevolent work. (The glass works at 
Glassboro were acquired by Colonel Thomas Heston, 
the great-grandfather of the subject of this sketch, at 
the close of the Revolutionary War, and long known 
as Heston's Glassworks. Later the name was changed 
to Whitney Glass Works.) 

Mr. Synnott is a trustee of Lincoln University, of 
Keswick Colony, School for Christian Workers, presi- 
dent of Board of Trustees of Princeton Theological 
Seminary, member of Board' of Aid for Colleges of 
the Presbyterian Church, and of the Board of Pub- 
lication and Sabbath School Work of the Presbyterian 
Churchy and Executive Committee of the World's S. 
S. Work; of the National Institute of Social Sciences 
and of the National Economic League and of the Union 
League of Philadelphia. He is treasurer of the Inter- 
Church Federation of New Jersey; vice-president of 
the New Jersey State S. S. Asso. and of the Lord's 
Day Alliance of the United States and president of 
the Lord's Day Alliance of New Jersey, member of 
the Sons of the Revolution, of the Society of Colonial 
Wars, vice-president of the General Board of Educa- 
tion of the Presbyterian Church in the U. S. A., and 
trustee of the Presbyterian Home of the Synod of New 
Jersey, president of the First National Bank of Glass- 
boro, N. J., and director in numerous corporations. 

In politics, a Republican. Has never held' political 
office. He was appointed a member of the State 
Board of Education by Governor Fielder and his 
term expires July 1st, 1923. 

OSCAR W. JEFFERY, Englewood. 

Mr. Jeffery was born at Washington, New Jersey, 
June 7th, 1872, and is son of Oscar Jeffery and Emma 
L. Jeffery. He was educated at the public schools of 
Washington, the Bordentown Military Institute and 
Princeton University, Class of 1894. He graduated 
from the New York Law School in 1896 and was ad 
mitted to the bar of the State of New York in the same 
year. Since then he has been continuously engaged in 
the practice of law in New York City for years as a 
member of the firm of Wetmore & Jenner, which has 



398 BIOGRAPHIES. 

now been succeeded by Sexton, Jeffrey, Kimball & 
Eg-gleston. He is a member of the Board of Educa- 
tion of Englewood, and was appointed a member of the 
State Board of Education by Governor Edge February 
27th, 1918, to fill a vacancy caused by the resignation of 
Edgar H. Sturtevant. His term will expire July 1st, 
1922. 

ROBERT LYNX COX, Montclair. 

Mr. Cox was born on a farm in Joe Davies county, 
111., November 27th, 1865. He was educated in country 
schools and village high school; went to Buffalo, N. 
Y., when nineteen years of age, and entered the employ 
of the Buffalo School Furniture Company as a ship- 
ping clerk in foundry department; continued in this 
employment for several years and later became super- 
intendent; next associated with his uncle in publish- 
ing and printing business in New York and Buffalo, 
and while engaged in this activity took up the study 
of law; was admitted to the bar in July, 1898, after 
having received from the University of Buffalo the de- 
gree of LL.B., then engaged in general practice of law 
as senior partner successively with the firms of Cox &• 
Kimball, Cox, Kernan & Kimball and Cox, Kimball & 
Stowe. He represented the second assembly district 
in the city of Buffalo in the New York Assembly in the 
years 1903, 1904, 1905 and 1906, serving on the Cities, 
General Laws, Codes and Judiciary Committees, and 
was chairman of the last-named committee in 1906. 
He removed to New York in 1907 to accept the posi- 
tion as attorney and secretary of the Association of 
Life Insurance Presidents. Upon the death of Grover 
Cleveland in 1908. Mr. Cox succeeded him as chief 
executive officer of the association under title of gen- 
eral counsel and manager, and continued in this posi- 
tion until end of the year 1916, when he resigned to 
accept the office of third vice-president of the Metro- 
politan Life Insurance Company of New York. 

Mr. Cox is a Royal Arch Mason and Past Master of 
Washington Lodge, No. 240, F. & A. M. of Buffalo, 
N. Y. ; member of the Phi Delta Phi Fraternity, 
American Bar Association, also of the Manhattan and 
Republicans clubs in New York, and member and di- 
rector of the Montclair Golf Club and various other 
clubs in Montclair, N. J., where he has resided for 



BIOGRAPHIES. 399 

several years. He was appointed a member of the 
Board of Education in 1917 by Governor Edge for a 
full term of ofRce, which will expire in 1925. 

WILLIAM H. MORROW, Belvidere. 

Judge Morrow was born at Deckertown, N. J., Feb- 
ruary 10th, 1844, He is a lineal descendant of John 
Knox, the Scottish reformer. His grandfather, Solo- 
mon Morrow, served in the war of 1812. 

Judge Morrow attended the Deckertown Academy 
and after finishing his education he studied law with 
Levi Shepherd and was admitted as an attorney in 
1865 and received his counsellor's degree in 1869. In 
1879 he was appointed Common Pleas Judge of Warren 
County by Governor McClellan for the unexpired term 
of Judge Vliet, deceased, serving until 1883. In 1891 
he was again appointed to this same judgeship by 
Governor Abbett and reappointed in 1893 for a full 
term. 

Judge Morrow is at present engaged in the practice 
of law at Belvidere. He was appointed to the State 
Board of Education by Governor Edwards in 1921 for 
a full term of eight years. 

MARIE HILSON KATZENBACH, Trenton. 

Mrs. Katzenbach was born in Trenton, New Jersey, 
with which city her family has long been identified, 
on December 8th, 1882, and she still lives in that city. 
She is the daughter of Cleaveland and Matild'a E. Hil- 
son. 

She was educated in the New Jersey State Model 
School at Trenton, supplementing her education by 
courses at the University of Pennsylvania and study 
and travel abroad. She served for a number of years 
as cataloger and Chief of Staff of the Trenton Free 
Public Library. 

On November 7th, 1911, she was married to Edward 
L. Katzenbach. They have one son, Edward L. Kat- 
zenbach, Jr. 

Mrs. Katzenbach is a member of the Garden Club 
of Trenton and the Broad Seal Cha.pter, D. A. R. She 
was appointed to the Board of Education by Governor 
Edwards for a term of eight years, expiring in 1929. 



400 BIOGRAPHIES. 

AGfXES CPwOMWELL, Mendham. 

Mrs. Cromwell was born in Morris Plains, Morris 
county, New Jersey, a daug-hter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Stephen S. Whitney, whose families had been residents 
of Morristown for many years. She attended Miss 
Dana's seminary in Morristown and completed her 
education in Europe. Upon her marriage to Seymour 
L. Cromwell she moved from Morris Plains to Mend- 
ham. Mr. and Mrs. Cromwell have four sons, one of 
whom is at Stevens Institute, and another at Prince- 
ton University. 

Mrs. Cromwell h-as always been interested in edu- 
cational questions and her ability was recognized 
when, as one of the Gf-overnors of the Colony Club of 
New York City, she was chosen to act as Chairman of 
the Committee on Literature and Art. Eig-ht years ago 
she became 'a member of the Mendham Borough Board 
of Education. She has been twice re-elected and is 
now President of tlie Board. The honor of being one 
of the first two women appointed to the Board of 
Managers of the New Jersey State Hospital at Morris 
Plains waisi given to Mrs. Cromwell in 1917. She 
served upon the Board for four years and resigned in 
1921, when she accepted appointment as a member of 
the State Board of Education. The selection 'Of Mrs. 
Cromwell for this position had been urged by women's 
organizations throughout the State in recognition of 
her knowledge of matters concerning education and 
she had the distinction of being the first woman ever 
appointed to the State Board of Education of the Stale 
of New Jersey. 

Mrs. Cromwell was always a firm believer of extend- 
ing the suffrage to women and took an active part in 
all the New Jersey campaigns. She is now Vice-Presi- 
dent of the New Jersey Women's Republican Club. 
Her term as a member of the State Board of Educa- 
tion will expire in 1929. 



State Commissioner of Education. 

JOHN EXRIGHT, Freehold. 
John Enright was born at Colts Neck, Monmouth 
County, April 28, 1852. He received his early education 
in the school of his native town. In 1871 he was 



BIOGRAPHIES. 401 

graduated from the Trenton State Normal School. 
The following is Mr. Enrig-ht's record in school work 
in New Jersey: Teacher of a one-room school for 
three years; county superintendent for twenty-one 
years; teacher and principal in a high school for 
twenty years; assistant commissioner of education for 
six years, having charge of disputes and controversies 
^arising under the school law. He als-o had charge of 
bonding proceedings. 

During his early teaching Mr. Enright studied law 
for four years in the office of the late General Haight 
of Freehold, and attended lectures in the Law School 
of Columbia College. For several years he collaborated 
in scientic research with Dr. Samuel Dockwood, 
County Superintendent of Monmouth County, and his 
predecessor in office. He has given numerous lectures 
before teachers and has addressed school board asso- 
ciations in various parts of the State. He is the author 
of "New Jersey Government," a text-book on civics, 
and la history of education of Monmouth County. 

Mr. Enright has been president of the State Teach- 
ers' Association and president of the New Jersey Coun- 
cil of Education. He has served as a director for 
New Jersey in the National Education Association. He 
organized the Teachers' Pension 'and Annuity Fund 
under the law enacted in April, 1919. Since then he 
has been its secretary. For several years he was a 
member of the Monmouth County Board of Examiners 
for Teachers' Certificates. 

In June, 1921, Mr. Enright was appointed, ad interim. 
Commissioner of Education of New Jersey by Governor 
Edwards. He has long been a resident of Freehold, 
New Jersey. 



State Department of Health. 

DR. HENRY SPENCE, President, Jersey City. 

Dr. Spence was born at Starkey, N. Y., December 
30th, 1865, where his father, Dr. Byron Spence, began 
the practice of medicine in 1850. Dr. Spence prepared 
for the study of medicine at the Penn Yan Academy, 
Penn: Yan, N. Y., where he was graduated in 1886. 
He took further preparation for medicine at Cornell 
University during the years 1888 and 1889, going from 



402 BIOGR-APHIES. 

there to the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 
New York from which he graduated in 1892, Follow- 
ing a year of internship at Christ Hospital in Jersey 
City, 1892, 1893, he took up the practice of medicine 
in Jersey City where he has continued in the pro- 
fession up to the present time. From 1893 until 1901 
he was assistant visiting surgeon to Christ Hospital, 
following which he was elected to the post of surgeon. 
At present he is visiting surgeon (female division) 
to St. Francis Hospital, lecturer to the Christ Hos 
pital Training School for Nurses, and for the Training 
School for Nurses at the City Hospital, Jersey City. 
Dr. Spence has been president of the Hudson County 
District Medical Society, the Practitioners' Club of 
Jersey City, and the Alumni Association of Christ 
Hospital Internes and is now treasurer of the Society 
of Surgeons of New Jersey, and a director of the 
Chamber of Commerce and chairman of the Public 
Health Committee of Jersey City. He is a member 
of the New Jersey State Medical Society, the Ameri- 
can Medical Association, the New Jersey State Sani- 
tary Association, and of the Citizens' Federation of 
Hudson County and various other organizations. He 
was appointed a member of the State Board of Health 
by Governor Fielder and was re-appointed by Gov- 
ernor Edge, and his term expires in 1923. 

THOMAS B. LEE, M.D., Vice-President, Camden. 

Dr. Lee was born May 19th, 1881, at Glassboro, N. J. 
He was graduated from the "Woodbury High School in 
1900, and the Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, 

1905. In 1905-06 he was an intern in the Cooper Hos- 
pital, Camden; was elected Assistant Gynecologist in 

1906, and Gynecologist, 1912, of the same hospital. The 
latter position he now holds and is Consulting Gyne- 
cologist of the Camden County Hospital, physician- 
in-chief of Mary J. Ball Home for Friendless Children, 
and member of the city, county and State medical so- 
cieties, Philadelphia Medical Club and American Medi- 
cal Association. 

From 1906 to 1913 the doctor belonged to the Medi- 
cal Department of the National Guard, N. J., and re- 
signed with the rank of Major. On July 1st, 1917, he 
was appointed a member of the State Board of Health 
by Governor Edge, and his term expires in 1921. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 403 

DR. J. OLIVER Mcdonald, Trenton. 

Dr. McDonald is a physician, practicing at 194 West 
State Street, Trenton. His practice is limited to chil- 
dren. 

He was born at Englishtown, N. J., April 8th, 1884; 
graduated from Freehold High School, Princeton Uni- 
versity and College of Physicians and Surgeons 
(Columbia University, New York City); Alumnus of 
Presbyterian Hospital and Sloane Hospital for "Women, 
New York City; Fellow American College of Physi- 
cians; Assistant Attending Physician St. Francis Hos- 
pital and Attending Physician Children's Municipal 
Hospital, Trenton. 

Dr. McDonald was appointed by Governor Fielder 
in 1915 and reappointed by Governor Edge in 1919. 
He was president of this department in 1920-21. 

CLYDE POTTS, C.E., Morristown. 

Mr. Potts was born in Jefferson county, Iowa, No- 
vember 1st, 1876, and was graduated from the Des 
Moines (Iowa) High School and later entered Cornell 
University. He graduated from Cornell with the Class 
of 1901. Mr. Potts is a civil engineer by profession, 
specializing in sanitary work. Among the large 
number of commissions involving special difficulties 
carried out by him are the sewerage works of Morris- 
town, N. J.; West Haven, Conn., and Patchogue, N, Y. 
He has been employed as a sanitary expert in a 
number of important litigations and at the present 
time is so emploj^ed by the federal government. 

Mr. Potts is a member of the American Society of 
Civil Engineers; the American Public Health Associa- 
tion; the American Water Works Association; the 
New England' Water Works Association, and other 
State and National scientific societies. He is also a 
past president of the New Jersey Sanitary Association. 
He is president of the Cornell Society of Civil Engi- 
neers and a member of the Sigma XI. He was ap- 
pointed by Governor Fielder a member of the De- 
partment of Health in 1915. His term will expire 
July 1st, 1921. 

OLIVER KELLY, Oak Tree, Middlesex County. 
Mr. Kelly was born near Metuchen, Middlesex county, 
N. J., in 1847. He received a common school education, 



404 BIOGRAPHIES. 

and afterward entered the real estate business, which 
he conducted successfully for a number of years both 
in New Jersey and New York. He served as Collector 
of the Port of Perth Amboy until the first Cleveland 
administration, and in April, 1891, was appointed a 
member of the State Board of Assessors for a term of 
four years, and served in that office five years alto- 
gether. For over twenty-seven years he was an active 
member of the Democratic State Committee, and is 
now a member of the Middlesex County Democratic 
Committee. He was Chairman of the Middlesex County 
Board of Elections for several terms. He is also a 
member of the Raritan Township Board of Education. 
Mr. Kelly was appointed a member of the State Board 
of Health by Governor Wilson in 1913 for a term of 
six years, and in 1915 he 'U'as appointed a member 
of the new Department of Health by Governor Fielder, 
and re-appointed by Governor Edge in 1918, and his 
term will expire in 1922. 

HOWARD E. WINTER, V.S., Plalnfield. 

Dr. Winter was born at Red Bank, N. J., January 
30th, 1886, and is a veterinarian. He was graduated 
from Shrewsbury Academy, Red Bank, in 1902; com- 
pleted a three-year course in New York American 
Veterinary College in 1905, and practiced as an as- 
sistant over four years in New York City. In 1910 
he was graduated from the University of Pennsyl- 
vania in the Department of Veterinary Medicine. He 
has practiced his profession in Plainfield for six 
years. He was appointed a member of the Depart- 
ment of Health by Governor Fielder in 1916 to fill a 
vacancy caused by the death of John M. Everitt. He 
was re-appointed by Governor Edge in 1918, and his 
term expires in 1922. 

HAROLD J. HARDER, Paterson. 

Mr. Harder was born and resides in Paterson. He 
was educated in the Paterson schools and is a civil 
engineer. 

Was in the employ of Hilton and Menger, civil engi- 
neers and surveyors, at Paterson, from 1889 to 1896. 
Established an engineering and surveying business in 
Paterson and in Ridgewood in 1896, practicing survey- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 405 

ing, road building, drainage, etc. Appointed City 
Engineer of Paterson in 1900 and still holds that 
position. As city engineer he designed and supervised 
all of the public improvements made during that 
time. Designed and su'pervised the construction of 
the Lake View and the Totowa and West Paterson 
sewers, draining sections of the city that had not 
developed, because of the lack of drainage facilities. 
Made surveys, investigations, etc., for the numerous 
suits that were brought against Paterson for polluting 
the Passaic river, and for suits brought by Paterson 
against the Passaic and other water companies for 
diverting water from the Passaic river at Little Falls. 
Made surveys, detail plans and reports for the elim- 
ination of the grade crossings along 'the Erie and 
New York, Susquehanna and Western Railroads, 
within the Paterson limits. Made preliminary inves- 
tigations for a separate municipal water supply for 
Paterson. Designed and supervised 'the construction 
of water supply systems for the Borough of Haw- 
thorne and for the Ringwood Company for its develop- 
ment at Greenwood Lake. Designed and supervised 
the construction of sewerage systems and sewage dis- 
posal works for the Ringwood Company and for the 
Township of Little Falls, and sewerage system for 
the Boroughs of Haledon and Prospect Park and for 
part of the Village of Ridgewood. Designed sewerage 
system that will probably be built in 1922 for the 
Boroughs of Glen Rock, Totowa and West Paterson. 

Appointed a member of the State Department of 
Health to succeed Frederick T. Crane, deceased, and 
later for a full term. 

Member of the American Societ\- of Civil Engineers, 
American W^ater Works Association and the New 
Jersey Sanitary Association. 

DAVID D. CHANDLER. Newark. 
Mr. Chandler was born in 1854 at Caldwell, Essex 
County, New Jersey. After the completion of his 
education in the public schools he attended the Bryant, 
Stratton and Whitney Business College. For several 
years he was in the employ of the Metropolitan Life 
Insurance Company and in 1885 accepted the position 
of Superintendent of the Sanitary force of the Newark 
City Board of Health. Within a short time he became 



406 BIOGRAPHIES. 

health officer of the city and remained as such until 
his retirement in 1915. During- this period 'Of thirty 
years the City Department of Health was greatly en- 
larged and extended to cover all methods of health 
preservation and disease prevention. Upon his retire- 
ment from active duty in 1915, in- appreciation of his 
long and satisfactory service, he w&s granted a pen- 
sion by the city. 

He was appointed a member of the State Department 
of Health by Governor Edwards in 1920. His 'term ex- 
pires in 1924. 



Director of Health. 

JACOB COLE PRICE, M.D., Branchville. 

Dr. Price was born at Branchville, Sussex county, 
N. J., January 9, 1850. By profession he is a physi- 
cian. His father was a cousin of Governor Rodman 
M. Price, and was an Assemblyman from Sussex 
county in 1861. Dr. Price is a graduate of the Michi- 
gan University and the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons of New York city. He was County Physi- 
cian for Sussex for fifteen years, and has served as 
Mayor, and also Postmaster, at Branchville. He was 
appointed as a member of the Board of Examining 
Surgeons for his Congressional District under the 
McKinley administration. In 1903 Dr. Price was elected 
to the State Senate by a plurality of 758 over Wood- 
ward, Republican, was re-elected in 1906 by a plur- 
ality of 730 over Howell. Republican, and again in 
1909 by a plurality of 1,057 over Hunt, Republican. 
He was the only Senator who was ever given a third 
term in Sussex county. He served on the most im- 
portant committees of the Senate and his record Is 
without blemish. He was appointed a member of the 
State Board of Health by Governor Wilson in 1912 
and served one year, when he resigned, and Governor 
Wilson then appointed him Secretary of the board for 
a full term of six years. Upon the creation of the 
new Department of Health the doctor was elected 
director for a term of four 3'ears. He was re-ap- 
pointed by Governor Edge, and his term expires in 
1923. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 407 

Board of Commerce and Navigation. 

J. SPENCER SMITH, President, Tenafly. 

Mr. Smith was born in Sherbrooke, Canada, on July 
7th, ISSO. He was brought up in the suburbs of 
Brooklyn, his parents moving to Tenafly in 1899. He 
was elected to the Municipal Council in 1902 and 
served one term. He was elected member of the 
Board of Education March 17th, 1908, and has served 
continuously ever since and is now vice-president of 
the board. 

He was appointed by Governor Wilson, April 7th, 
1911, as member of the Commission to Investigate 
Port Conditions of New York. On April 15th, 1914, 
he was appointed by Governor Fielder as member of 
the New Jersey Harbor Commission. On July 1st, 
1915, he was appointed by Governor Fielder as mem- 
b'er of the Board of Commerce and Navigation, and was 
re-appointed by Governor Edge in 1917. He was re- 
appointed ad interim by Governor Edwards in 1921. 

RICHARD C. JENKINSON, Vice-President, Newark. 

Mr. Jenkinson was born in Newark, N. J., in 1853. 
After five years training for business in New York, 
he spent a year abroad studying, and on his return 
in 1876 he started the manufacturing business, of 
which he is now the head, R. C. Jenkinson & Co. He 
ran for Mayor of Newark on the Republican ticket 
in 1900 and was defeated by the Hon. Jas. M. Sey- 
mour, who was seeking re-election. 

Mr. Jenkinson was elected president of the Newark 
Board of Trade in 1898, and was re-elected later. 
He was one of the vice-presidents of the Pan-Ameri- 
can at Buffalo in 1901, representing the State of New 
Jersey. 

He is a trustee of the New Jersey Home for Feeble- 
Minded at Vineland, and vice-president of the Board 
of Commerce and Navigation. He is vice-president 
of the Board of Trustees of the Free Public Library 
of Newark, a director in the Iron Bound Trust Co. 
of Newark, and in several other corporations in New 
Jersey and New York. He is also a director in cor- 
porations in Canada. 

Governor Wilson appointed him a member of the 
New Jersey Harbor Board, and July 1st, 1915, Cover- 



408 BIOGIIAPHIES. 

nor Fielder appointed him a member of the Board of 
Commerce and Navigation, and was re-appointed by 
Governor Edge in 1918, and his term will expire in 
1922. 

Mr. Jenkinson was appointed Fuel Administrator for 
New Jersey under the National Government in 1917. 

W. PARKER RUNYON, Perth Amboy. 

Mr. Runyon was born in New Brunswick, N. J., De- 
cember 3d, 1861. He belongs to the French Hugenot 
family, whose progenitor, Vincent Runyon (Rognion^ 
was among the early settlers of East Jersey. He ob- 
tained his education in the public schools and Rut- 
gers Preparatory School of the city of his birth. He 
took a commercial course at the New Jersey Business 
College, Newark, N. J., and in 1881 entered that great- 
est of all schools^ — the business world — where his 
vital personality and pleasing and genial manner 
have stood him in good stead. 

After two or three positions filled successfully, he 
quite naturally became identified with boat craft, 
waterfront and navigation activities, as his father and 
grandfather each in his turn owned and operated the 
shipyard which met the needs of tlie Delaware and 
Raritan Canal at New Brunswick. 

He has been president for more than twenty years 
of the Perth Amboy Dry Dock Companj-. He, together 
with Mr. Charles D. Snedeker, re-organized the con- 
cern into a close corporation, and during his incum- 
bency the plant has grown from a capacity of two 
marine railways to one having five dry docks, ma- 
chine shops, angle, plate and boiler shops, ample 
wharves and piers. It has acquired the thirteen hun- 
dred feet of water front beside the several adjacent 
city blocks which it occupies. 

In 1904 he wa,^ elected an alternate delegate to the 
Democratic National Convention, held at St. Louis, 
and was a delegate to the one held at Denver in 1908. 
He is an active member of the Perth Amboy Chamber 
of Commerce, and he was a delegate to represent it 
in the seventh annual Atlantic Deeper Waterways 
Convention held in New York City in September, 1914. 

Mr. Runyon was appointed by Governor Fielder on 
the State Harbor Commission of New Jersey, and 
upon the recent re-organization of State Boards, was 



BIOGPwAPHIES. 409 

named as one of the long-term men on the Board of 
Commerce and Navig-ation, and has since been re-ap- 
pointed every year to that position, representing- the 
State. 

He was re-appointed by Governor Edge in 1919, and 
his term will expire in 1923. 

WILLIAM LAWRENCE SAUNDERS, Plainfield. 

Mr. Saunders was born November 1st, 1856, in 
Columbus, Ga. ; son of William Trebell Saunders, D.D., 
and Eliza Morton Saunders, Va. ; grandnephew of 
Robert Saunders, fourteenth president William and 
Mary College, Williamsburg, Va. His earliest an- 
cestors landed with the Jamestown expedition, James- 
town, Va., and is descendant of Sir Edward Saunders, 
one of the Knights of the Horseshoe who discovered 
the Alleghanies. He has degrees: Bachelor of Science, 
University of Pennsylvania, 1876; Doctor of Science; 
1911. 

Before graduation was editor-in-chief "University 
Magazine" and class poet, 1876, engaged in news- 
paper work, Philadelphia; special correspondent for 
southern newspapers Centennial Exposition; made two 
balloon ascensions, reaching height of three and a 
half miles, remaining up all night. 

From' 1878 to 1881, he was engineer in charge of 
building docks, warehouses and ship channel, New 
York Harbor, at Black Tom Island. He designed and 
patented apparatus for subaqueous drilling, using tube 
and water jet, system now in general use. 

In 1881, he was engineer for Ingersoll Rock Drill 
Company. He invented and patented rock drilling and 
quarrying devices, track channelers and gadders and 
bar channelers; invented and patented system of pump- 
ing liquids by compressed air, now generally used in 
Baku oil fields, Russia; also, radialaxe system of 
coal mining, 

Mr. Saunders is prominently identified with various 
industries both in New York and New Jersey, and is 
editor and author of numerous magazines, pamphlets, 
&c., relating to inventions, commerce, economics and 
politics. He was a member of the New Jersey Harbor 
Commission, formerly a member of the New Jersey 
State Democratic Committee, and was twice elected 
mayor of North Plainfield. 



410 BIOGPuAPHTES. 

He was appointed a member of the Board of Com- 
merce and Navigation by Governor Fielder in 1915, 
and in 1918 w^as re-appointed by Governor Edge. His 
term will expire in 1922. 

HENRY C. BROKING, Paterson. 

Mr. Broking was born in Carlstadt, N. J., August 
31st, 1881, receiving his preliminary education in the 
local school, as well as in the New York City and 
Brooklyn schools, having moved to Brooklyn at the 
age of 14. He enlisted in the Eighth New York Vol- 
unteers in 1898 for duration of the Spanish-American 
"War and was honorably discharged during the latter 
part of 1898. He moved to Paterson in 1907 and still 
resides there; was a member of the New Jersey State 
Militia with the rank of first lieutenant, and adjutant 
of the Sixth Battalion, resigning recently; is in the 
cotton converting business in New York City, being 
president and treasurer of Murray & Broking, Inc., 
and also treasurer of Thomas J. Harton & Co., Inc. 
Mr, Broking was appointed a member of the Board of 
Commerce and Navigation on July 1st, 1919, by Gov- 
ernor Edge. His term will not expire before July 1st, 
1923. 

WILLIAM T. KIRK, Beverly. 

Mr. Kirk was born in Philadelphia, Pa., July 1st, 
1860, and was educated at Friends Select School, 
Philadelphia, and has resided at Beverly, N. J., for 
the last twenty-four years. He served two terms in 
the city council, having overcome a normal Repub- 
lican majority at the election both times,, has been 
a delegate to two Gubernatorial Conventions and 
served as a member of the Burlington County Demo- 
cratic Committee, and is president of the Burlington 
County Democratic Club. 

He is a director of the First National Bank of 
Beverly; has served as director of the Building and 
Loan Association; is a vestryman in the Episcopal 
Church, and a vice-president of the Philadelphia-Dela- 
ware-Trenton Deeper Waterways Association. 

He is a wholesale grocer in Philadelphia, being a 
member of the firm of Kirk, Foster & Co.; also presi- 
dent of the Grocers' and Importers' Exchange of 
Philadelphia. He is a member of the Joint Committee 



BIOGRAPHIES. 411 

of the trade bodies of Philadelphia, on the Improve- 
ment of the Schuylkill and Delaware rivers. Mr. Kirk 
was appointed by Governor Fielder as a member of 
the Board of Commerce and Navigation in 1915. He 
was reappointed in 1916 and again in 1920. His term 
will expire in 1924. 

DAVID W. McCREA, Jersey City. 

Mr. McCrea was born at New Hampton. Orange 
county, N. Y., February 3d, 1861. He was educated in 
the Middletown, N. Y., Academy and at a private pre- 
paratory school at the same place. 

Mr. McCrea is a lawyer by profession and was ad- 
mitted to practice in New Jersey in 1882. His law 
offices are at 76 Montgomery Street, Jersey City. 

The appointment of Mr. McCrea to the State Board 
of Commerce and Navigation by Governor Edwards 
in 1920 was his first time of holding a public office. 
His term expires in 1924. 

ROBERT FRY ENGLE. Beach Haven. 

Mr. Engle was born near Mount Holly, N. J., ^Feb- 
ruary 4th, 1S6S. His father was Robert Barclay Engle, 
Senator from Ocean county, 189G to 1S9S, and his 
mother was Jane Darnell Engle of Mount Laurel, N. J. 
He was educated at Friends' Boarding School at West- 
town, Pa. His father, though born and raised a farmer, 
preferred the hotel business and became one of the 
pioneers ot Beach Haven, N. J., opening the "Parry 
House," when that resort was started in 1874. The 
Engleside was built in 1S7G, and after his education 
and a few years in the wholesale dry goods business in 
Philadelphia, the subject of this sketch came to the 
hotel to assist in its management. Upon the death of 
his father in 1901, the hotel property was incorporated 
as "The Engleside Company," and he became the treas- 
urer and general manager, which position he has held 
ever since. He is also president and general manager 
of the "Covington Company," owning and operating the 
Covington Apartment Hotel in West Philadelphia. He 
has been identified with the growth of Beach Haven for 
over thirty years, and has been a member of Borough 
Council for the last fifteen years. 



412 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Mr. Eugle was aijpointed a member of the Board of 
Commerce aud Xavigatiou by Goveruor Edge. February 
27th, 1917, for a full term of four years. He was re- 
appointed ad interim by Governor Edwards in 1921. 

B. F. CRESSON, JR., Consulting Engineer, Jersey City. 

Mr. Cresson was born in Philadelphia in 1873, and 
was educated at the Episcopal Academy of Philadel- 
phia, Lehig-h University and University of Pennsyl- 
vania; B.S. degree from the latter. 

From 1894 to 1900, he was employed on railroad 
work for the Lehigh Valley Railroad, Pennsylvania 
Railroad and West Virginia Short Line Railroad, and 
on the Reading Subway work in Philadelphia; from 

1900 to 1901, in the office of Jacobs and Davies, Con- 
sulting Engineers, New York City, on subaqueous tun- 
nel plans and surveys. North River and East River, 
and was Assistant Engineer in charge of the Atlantic 
avenue improvements in Brooklyn for the Long Island 
Railroad. 

In 1901 he was Assistant Engineer on resurvey 
plans, etc., for the completion of the Hudson Tunnels 
under the North River (McAdoo Tunnels), and from 

1901 to 1910, Assistant Engineer, Alignment Engineer 
and Resident Engineer in charge of precise triangu- 
lations on the North River, Resident Engineer in 
charge of subaqueous tunnels under the North River 
from Weehawken shaft; Resident Engineer in charge 
of Terminal Station-West, section of the Pennsyl- 
vania Station in New York, f i om the east side of 
Ninth avenue to the east side of Tenth avenue. 

In 1910-1913. was First Deputy Commissioner, De- 
partment of Docks and Ferries, New York City, in 
charge of engineering activities and Acting Dock 
Commissioner for several months of this time in the 
absence of the commissioner; 1913-1915, Chief Engi- 
neer, New Jersey Harbor Commission; July 1st, 1915, 
Chief Engineer, Board of Commerce and Navigation. 

Is a member of the American Society of Civil Engi- 
neers, American Institute of Mining Engineers, In- 
stitution of Civil Engineers of Great Britain, also 
Director, American Association of Port Authorities; 
Municipal Engineers of New York, International 
Congresses of Navigation, Engineers' Club of New 
York, etc.. Associate Member of the Naval Consulting 



BIOGRAPHIES. 413 

Board of the United States, appointed by Hon. Jo- 
sephus Daniels, Secretary of the Navy; Member of 
the Board of Directors for the State of New Jersey 
on Industrial Preparedness, and a member of the 
Pan-American Joint Eng-ineering Committee ap- 
pointed by the American Society of Civil Engineers. 



Department of Conservation and Development. 

WILLIAM E. FLORANCE, President, New Brunswick. 

Mr. Florance was born at Toronto, Canada, April 
16th, 1865. He is a graduate of Rutgers College, Class 
of 1885, and is at present a Trustee of that institu- 
tion. He was admitted as an attorney, November, 
1887, and as a counselor, November, 1890. He served 
as Mayor of New Brunswick 1908 to 1909; as a mem- 
ber of the State Board of Education, 1905 to 1911; a? 
Prosecutor of the Pleas of Middle.'^ex County, 1914, 
1915; as State Senator, 1916 to 1918. 

He is president of the Now Brunswick Mutual Fire 
Insurance Company, vice-president of the National 
Bank of New Jersey, one of the managers of and coun- 
sel for The New Brunswick Savings Institution and 
president of the Sinking Fund Commission of the City 
of New Brunswick. 

He was appointed a member of the Board of Conser- 
vation and Development by Acting Governor Runyon 
in 1919 to fill a vacancy, and by Governor Edwards 
in 1920 for the term expiring July 1st, 1923. 

PERCIVAL CHRYSTIE, High Bridge. 

Mr. Chrystie was born in the old Taylor home, 
"Solitude," High Bridge, New Jersey, May 31st, 1868, 
and is a son of Oliver W, and Emily Taylor Chrystie. 
He was educated in Turners' School, Pittsfield, Mass., 
and Leals Academy, Plainfield, New Jersey. 

Mr. Chrystie is vice-president of the Taylor-Wharton 
Iron and Steel Company, and he and his cousin, Knox 
Taylor, president, represent the fifth generation of the 
Taylor family that has been engaged in the manu- 
facture of iron and steel in .that locality for about 175 
years. The Taylor family and the company named 
after it have furnished the United States Government 



414 BIOGRAPHIES. 

with projectiles and other material for war purposes 
for every war in which the United States has been 
engaged since and including the Revolution in 1776. 

Mr. Chrystie has served as a member of the State 
Board of Education, Fish and Game Commission, and 
was appointed a member of the Board of Conservation 
and Development by Governor Edge in 1917, and re- 
ap.pointed bj- Governor Edwards in 1921. 

HENRY CROFUT WHITE, North Plainfield. 
Mr, White was born at Danbury, Conn., January 
29th^ 1869, and is a lawyer, and a member of the 
New York bar, 1893; of the Supreme Court bar, 1896; 
practices in New York City, being a member of the 
firm of White & Wait, 49 Wall street. Degrees were 
conferred on him by the following: A.B., Yale Uni- 
versity, 1891; A.M., Columbia University, 1892; L.L.B,, 
University of the State of New York, 1893. He is 
the author of the White Federal Income Tax law 
and other legal treatises. He was appointed a mem- 
ber of this new department in 1915 by Governor 
Fielder and reappointed in 1916. He was again ap- 
pointed by Governor Edwards in 1920 and his term 
will expire in 1924. 

SIMON PHILLIPS NORTHRUP, Newark. 
Mr. Northrup was born near Branchvllle, Sussex 
county. New Jersey, August 23d, 1876, and is son of 
Oscar and Mary J. (Phillips) Northrup. Both sides 
of family can trace descent to English Colonial an- 
cestry. The name Northrup is of English origin and 
is a compound of the words North and the Saxon 
thorp (Middle English thrope) meaning town or vil- 
lage. The earliest mention of the name found in 
England is of the marriage of Maude, daughter of 
Simon Northrope, in county York, in the reign of 
Henry VII. (1485-1509). Joseph Northrup, founder of 
the family in America, came from Yorkshire, England, 
with Sir Richard Saltonstall, in Eaton and Daven- 
port's Company, in the ship "Hector and Martha," 
landing at Boston on July 26th, 1637. With others 
he formed the settlement of Milford, Connecticut, in 
1639, and his name appears as one of the forty-four 
"Free Planters" on the document which laid the foun- 
dation for their government on the "Plantation." 



BIOGRAPHIES. 415 

He was graduated from Dickinson College "u-ith the 
Class of 1897, and from the Law School of Yale Uni- 
versity in 1899, receiving degree of bachelor of laws, 
and Kent prize for superiority in debate. In Febru- 
ary, 1899, he was admitted to practice before the 
New Jersey bar, and for a time was in several law 
offices, forming in 1905, a partnership with Francis 
TiafEerty. In 1907, he became connected with Fidelity 
Trust Company and later was elected its assistant 
title officer. 

He was appointed by Governor Fielder, in 1915, a 
member of the Department of Conservation and De- 
velopment, and re-appointed by Governor Edge in 1918. 
He was again re-appointed by Governor Edwards in 
1921. 

JOHN L. KUSER, Bordentown. 

Mr, Kuser was born in Newark, N. J., May 12th, 1862, 
and is a twin brother to Colonel Anthony R. Kuser, a 
member of the Highway Commission. The Kuser 
family moved to the outskirts of Trenton when the 
twins were five years old, and their mother lives there 
at the present time. 

John was educated at the Parochial school and after- 
wards at St. Benedict's College, Newark. He was con- 
nected with the newspaper business in Newark until 
1894 when he moved to Trenton. 

Mr. Kuser now holds the following positions: Presi- 
dent of the Howard Demountable Rim Company, Presi- 
dent National Flue Cleaner, Treasurer Mercer Auto- 
mobile Company, Secretary and Treasurer Peoples 
Brewing Company and Secretary and Treasurer Tren- 
ton Hygeia Ice Company. 

Governor Edge appointed Mr. Kuser a member of the 
Board of Conservation and Development in 1918 to 
fill a vacancy caused by the resignation of Charles 
Lathrop Pack. Mr. Kuser's term will expire in 1922. 

OWEN AVINSTON, Gladstone. 

Mr. Winston was born September 5th. 1882, in New- 
York City, the son of the late Dr. Gustavus Storrs 
Winston and Jeannie Louise Lewis. Educated at pri- 
vate schools and entered Harvard University from 
Cutler School in the fall of 1900. Graduated from 
Harvard with the degree of A.B. in 1904. In 1905 he 



416 BIOGRAPHIES. 

entered the employ of Brooks Brothers, one of the 
oldest firms in New Yorlc, and probably the oldest 
men's clothing concern in the country. He was made 
Secretary and elected a member of the Board of Di- 
rectors in 1913, and was elected Vice-President in 
1920. 

He was a mem'ber of the Military Training Camp 
at Plattsburgh in 1916, and attended the Officers' 
Training Camp at Fort Myer in 1917. He was com- 
missioned First Lieutenant Chemical Warfare Service 
in July, 1918, and was immediately ordered overseas. 
He served with the 79th Division through the Ar- 
gonne-Meuse offensive, first as Assistant Division Gas 
Oflicer, later as Division Gas Officer, being prom.oted 
in October. In December, after the Armistice, he 
served as an instructor in gas warfare in the 88th 
Division, returning home and receiving his discharge 
in February, 1919. 

He was appointed by Governor Edwards a member 
of the Department of Conservation and Development 
of New Jersey in 1920. and was elected a member of 
the Township Committee of Mendham Township at 
the election in the fall of 1920. 

He is a member of the Board of Managers of the 
Industrial Clinic, a member of the Board of Managers 
of the Harvard Club, and a member of the Executive 
Committee of the Metropolitan Golf Association. 

He married in 1905 Margaret Dey Lloyd, daughter of 
Francis G. and Matilda H. Lloyd, and has three sons. 

He is a Republican in politics, and has a farm at 
Mendham, Morris County, New Jersey, where he resides 
the greater part of the year. His term will expire in 
1923. 

JOHN A. WATERS, Gloucester City. 

Mr. Waters was born in Gloucester City, July 15th, 
1875. He was educated in St. Mary's School and the 
Gloucester City High School. 

Mr. Waters is Superintendent of the Gloucester 
Ferry Company, with which he has been connected a 
long time. Formerly he was the company's chief clerk 
and paymaster. 

Mr. Waters was solely resi^onsible for the sending 
out of the first and only steamer from New Jersey to 



BIOGRAPHIES. 417 

meet the first consignment of troops that came to the 
port of Philadelphia on the steamer Haverford. 

Mr. Waters' term as a member of the Department of 
Conservation and Development will expire in 1924. 

HOWARD F. McCONNELL, Montclair. 

Mr. McConnell was born at Coatesville, Pa., May 
18th, 1873. He came to Jersey City in 1891 and served 
for several years in various capacities with New Jer- 
sey Central, Lehigh Valley and Delaware, Lackawanna 
and Western Railroads. Among- the positions held 
were those of train despatcher and auditor. In 1909 
Mr. McConnell went into the brokerage business and 
is now a member of the New York Stock Exchange 
and at the head of the firm of H. F'. McConnell & Co., 
stock brokers, of 65 Broadway, New York City. 

Mr. McConnell was appointed Commissioner of 
Parks and Public Property in Montclair in 1919 to 
fill an unexpired term and in May, 1920, was chosen 
Mayor of Montclair for a four year term. He was 
appointed a member of the State Board of Conserva- 
tion and Development by Governor Edwards in Sep- 
tember, 1921, for an ad interim term. 

Mr. McConnell is married and is the father of three 
children. He belongs to the Bankers' Club, New York 
City, the Montclair Club, the Montclair Athletic Club, 
the Upper Montclair Country Club, Sons of the Amer- 
ican Revolution, Montclair Lodge, F. & A. M., Mont- 
clair Lodge, B. P. O. E., Montclair Republican Club, 
Commonwealth Club and the New Jersey Automobile 
Club. 

Vacancy. 

ALFRED GASKILL, Director and State Forester, 
Princeton. 

Mr. Gaskill was born in Philadelphia, November 6th, 
1861. For seventeen years he was engaged in the glass 
manufacturing business in Cumberland county, N. J., 
and in Philadelphia. In 1898, he gave up business, 
studied forestry in North Carolina, at Harvard Uni- 
versity, at the University of Munich and in the or- 
ganized forests of Europe. In 1901, he entered the 
United States Forest Service, and on February 1st, 



418 BIOGRAPHIES. 

1907, was engaged as State Forester by the Forest Park 
Reservation Commission of New Jersey. He is a di- 
rector of the American Forestry Association and a 
member of several forestry and allied organizations. 

On July 1st, 1915, he was appointed Director of Con- 
servation and Development, which position he holds 
coincidentally with that of State Forester. 



State Geologi-st. 

HENRY B. KUMMEL, Trenton. 

Mr. Kiimmel was born in Milwaukee, Wis., May 
25th, 1867. He graduated from Beloit College, Wis., 
in 1889, and after teaching two years, spent one year 
in post-graduate work in geology at Harvard Uni- 
versity and three years at the University of Chicago. 
He received the degree of M.A. from Harvard Uni- 
versity, and from Beloit College in 1892, and that of 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) from the University of 
Chicago in 1895. In 1891, he was employed as field 
assistant in geology on the United States Geological 
Survey, in Connecticut. In the summer of 1892 he 
joined the Geological Survey of New Jersey, and for 
several field seasons was engaged in surveys in War- 
ren, Sussex and Hunterdon counties. During a por- 
tion of 1898 he was employed on the Geological Sur- 
vey of New York, and also spent a short time in 
studying the geology of Scotland. Returning to New 
Jersey, he was appointed Assistant State Geologist in 
1899, and on the resignation of Dr. John C. Smock, 
on July 1st, 1901, Mr. Kiimmel was put in charge of 
the survey. On January 10th, 1902, he was made 
State Geologist, which position he still holds. Upon 
the establishment of the Forest Park Reservation 
Commission in 1905, he became ex-officio its executive 
ofllcer. With the organization of the Department of 
Conservation and Development, Mr. Kiimmel, as State 
Geologist, became the chief of the Division of Geology 
and acting director of the department during the ab- 
sence of the director. 

The high standing of the geological survey of New 
Jersey was recognized by the election of Mr. Kiimmel 
as first president of the American Association of State 



BIOGRAPHIES. 419 

Geologists, a position which he held for several terms. 
In 1907, he was a member of the International Geo- 
logical Congress held in the city of Mexico, and he 
was again a delegate to the same congress when it 
met in Toronto, Canada, in 1913, he accompanied 
Governor Fort as one of the three New Jersey dele- 
gates to the first Conference of Governors held at 
the White House in 190S, and was a member of 
several subsequent conservation congresses. He is a 
Fellow of the American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science, and of the Geological Society of 
America, and a member of the National Institute of 
Social Sciences. He is the author of numerous papers 
relating chiefly to the geology and natural resources 
of New Jersey. 



State Highway ConiiuLssion. 

GEORGE LEE BURTON, Chairman, South River. 

George Lee Burton was 'born in New Brunswick July 
10th, 1888, and is a lawyer by profession, practicing in 
the Borough of South River, Middlesex County, New 
Jersey. He was graduated from New Brunswick High 
School in 1905, attending the New York Law School, 
and was a student first with Alfred S. March of New 
Brunswick and later with Spencer Weart of Jersey 
City. He was admitted to the bar on March 17th, 
1911, as an attorney-iat-law and as a counsellor-at-law 
on March 20'th, 1914. Mr. Burton practised law in 
New Brunswick from 1911 until 1917, since which date 
he has maintained offices in South River. Mr. Burton 
represented Middlesex County as an Assemblyman in 
the Legislative sessions of 1913 and 1914. He was 
elected County Counsel of Middlesex County -and 
served as such for the years 1914, 1915 and 1916. He 
was elected and served as Mayor of 'the Borough of 
South River for the years 1920 and 1921. 

Governor Edwards named Mr. Burton to the State 
Highway Commission in June of 1920 and when that 
body organized for business his colle<agues honored 
him with the chairmanship of the commission, which 
position he s'till occupies. He was re-appointed in 
1921 for a full term of four years. In politics Mr. 
Burton is a Democrat. 



420 BIOGRAPHIES. 

JOHN FERRIS, Jersey City. 

Mr. Ferris was born in Ireland, May 2d, 1875. For 
the past twenty-five years he has been a contnactor in 
Jersey City and is President of the firm of Stillman, 
Delahanty, Ferris Com^pany, engineers and contractors, 
of Exchange Place, Jersey City. He is President of 
the Board of Education of t.iat municipality. Mr. 
Ferris was named a member of the new State Highway 
Commission June 29th, 1920, as a Democrat, and his 
present term will expire in 1923. 

WALTER F. WHITTEMORE, Newton. 

Col. Whitte;more was born at Camden, Maine, June 
12th, 1858, >and graduated from New York University 
with 'the class of 1883. He is a civil engineer by pro- 
fession. He is a member of the American Society; of 
Civil Engineers, a life member of the Marine Society of 
the City of New York, American Red Cross Society and 
the Sussex County Historical Society, and is a director 
of the Sussex National Bank of Newton. The sub- 
ject of this sketch for a number of years Wia.s engaged 
in the foreign merchant shipping trade and became 
captain of a ship while in that calling. He has had 
broad experience as an engineer. He designed and 
built all the big steam'ship docks at Hoboken, involv- 
ing millions of dollars expended in the period from 
1889 down to the start of the World War. The Col- 
onel's work also included the construction of railroad-s, 
liighways and some of the largest sewers in 
the state. He 'also built reservoirs and in his 
engineering capacity served some of the largest 
water companies in New Jersey and elsewhere. He 
served as a member of the Fredon Township Com- 
mittee, of Sussex County, from 1917 to 1920. On Feb- 
ruary 3d, 1897, Col. Whittemore enlisted in the First 
Troop of Cavalry, New Jersey National Guard, as a 
private. On November 6th, 1899, -he was commissioned 
captain in Company C, 4th Infantry, which he resigned 
September 1st, 1902. He then became captain and 
aide-de-camp on the division staff, where he served 
until May 19th, 1906. December 10th, 1907, he was 
commissioned lieutenant-colonel. Corps of Engineers, 
and on January 2d, 1914, was placed upon the un- 
assigned list. Col. Whittemore was named a member 



BIOGRAPHIES. 421 

of the new State Higliway Commission June 29th, 1920. 
by Governor Edwards. He is a Republican and his 
term will expire in 1922. 

THOMAS EDWARD COLLINS, Elizabeth. 

Mr. Collins was born November 7th, 18S1, at Mauch 
Chunk, in the State of Pennsylvania. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Pottsville, attended the 
United States Naval Academy at Annapolis for three 
years, and later took a post-graduate course in high- 
way engineering- at Columbia College, New York City. 
He was elected City Engineer of the City of Elizabeth 
in 1914, and has held that office ever since. Prior to 
coming to Elizabeth, he was employed as an engineer 
in the New York City Highway Department and later 
was associated with the Engineering Department of 
the Pennsylvania Railroad, Philadelphia Division. 
After several years' service in that department he was 
transferred to the engineering staff on the construc- 
tion of the Pennsylvania tunnels under the East River, 
New York. Three years later he was appointed to the 
State Board of Taxations and Valuations of Rail- 
roads and Canals in the State of New Jersey. Mr. Col- 
lins is a member of the American Society of Civil 
Engineers, American Society of Municipal Improve- 
ments and is a Past Exalted Ruler of the Elizabeth 
Lodge of Elks. He lives at 46 Palisade Road, Eliza- 
beth, and was named to the State Highway Commis- 
sion by Governor Edwards June 29th, 1920. His term 
expires in 1924. He is a Democrat. 

GEORGE PADDOCK, Newark. 

Mr. Paddock was born at Albany, X. Y., April 22d. 
1862, and attended the grammar and high schools of 
his native city. He is in the automobile business and 
claims to have been the first dealer of this kind in 
New Jersey. As a pioneer autoist he holds the record 
for having driven an automobile longer than any other 
person in the State. He was one of the organizers of 
the first auto club in New Jersey and was the first 
president of the original Automobile Dealers' Associa- 
tion of New Jersey and also of the national organiza- 
tion. Together with the late George E. Blakeslee and 
Walter H. Ellis he was a member of the committee of 



422 BIOGRAPHIES. 

three charged with the work of having- the referen- 
dum of 1916 providing for the Egan Road Bond Issue 
adopted by the people of the State, wliich was accom- 
plished by a handsome majority of 89,250. Mr. Pad- 
dock was also one of the committee of fifteen which 
worked for the passage by the New Jersey Legislature 
of a bill providing for automobile reciprocity, and took 
an active part in organizing the recent State Automo- 
bile Dealers' Association. He wa"5 appointed to the 
new State Highway Commission by G^overnor Edwards 
June 29th, 1920, as a Democrat. His term expires in 
1923. 

CHAR'LES F. SEABROOK, Bridgeton. 

Mr. Seabrook was born May 28th, 1881, in Hopewell 
Township, Cumberland county, and was educated in 
the public schools of his native county. He is a farmer 
by calling and has served as a member of the Board 
of Managers of the State Agricultural College, a di- 
rector of the State Chamber of Commerce and a direc- 
tor of the Bridgeton Chamber of Commerce. He is 
pres^ident of rhe Seabrook Farms Company, which 
operates the largest intensive farm with the greatest 
single acreage under overhead irrigation in the world. 
Mr. Seabrook is also president of the Seabrook Com- 
pany, which owns and operates one of the large&t 
apple orchards in the United States and the largest in 
the east. He is also president of the National Farm- 
ing Corporation. He was appointed a member of the 
State Highway Commission in December, 1920, by 
Governor Edwards. In .politics Mr. Seabrook is a 
Democrat. His term will expire in 1922. 

ADBERT SCOTT LINCOLN DOUGHTY, Mt. Holly. 

Mr. Doughty was born at Marlton, Burlington 
County, May 8th, 1861. He was educated at Penning- 
ton Seminary and the University of Michigan, Ann 
Arbor. For fifteen years he has been engaged in the 
coal and lumber business and was formerly a travel- 
ing salesman. From 1899 to 1902 Mr. Doughty was 
under sheriff of Burlington county and in 1917 was 
named by Governor Edge a member of the Board of 
Managers of the State Home for Girls and served as 
president and treasurer of that body. He is a charter 
member of the Mt. Holly Lodge, B. P. O. E., No. S4S, 



BIOGRAPHIES. 423 

and is also a member of Camden Lodge, No. 8967, Mod- 
ern Woodmen of America. Upon tlie reorganization of 
the State Highway Commission he was appointed to 
the new commission by 'Governor Edwards on June 
29th, 1920, and until December was the only South 
Jersey representative on that body, having jurisdic- 
tion in highway matters over all the territory from 
Middlesex down to Cape May County. In politics he is 
a Republican. His term expires in 1925. 

Vacancy. 

THOMAS J. WASSER, Jersey City, State Highway 
Engineer. 

Mr. Wasser was born in Philadelphia, Pa., January 
24th, 1871. He attended the Philadelphia Manual 
Training School and also took a private course in 
engineering and is a civil engineer hy profession. His 
experience in highway construction dates back to the 
nineties when he entered the employ of B. M. and J. 
F. Shanley Company, of Newark, which concern was 
engaged in macadam and telford road construction. 
Later he became associated with the Sanford and Still- 
man Company, general contractors and bridge build- 
ers. From 1903 to 1913 he was with the Robert W. 
Hunt Company engineering bureau and was engaged 
on county eng'ineering work assignments in Hudson 
county. During this period Mr. Wasser was the engi- 
neer in charge in the construction of the Fourteenth 
Street "Viaduct in Hoboken and jointly with James 
Owen, of Newark, was enginer in charge of the recon- 
struction of the Lincoln Highway between Hudson and 
Essex counties. In 1913 he became County Engineer 
of Hudson county and during that period designed and 
supervised most of the construction of the Newark 
turnpike, which is now nearing completion. In July, 
1920, he relinquished his position as county engineer 
when elected by the reorganized State Highway Com- 
mission to be State Highway Engineer in charge of 
the State's road construction program. Mr. Wasser is 
an associate member of the American Society of Civil 
Engineers and a member of the following organiza- 
tions: American Road Builders' Association, Amer- 
ican Society of Municipal Improvements, National 
14 



424 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Highway Traffic Association, American Association of 
Engineers and American Association of State Highi- 
way Officials. 

Since assuming liis duties as executive liead of the 
highway department the subject of this sketch has 
inaugurated a number of ideas for its advancement. 
Among the more important of these innovations is the 
"W'orlvs Committee," made up of the various division 
heads of the department who meet weekly for confer- 
ence. He fostered the formation of lan association 
of state highway employees for the purpose of de- 
veloping an esprit de corps among the state's road 
building forces. "The Highwayman," a monthly maga- 
zine, published by the department, containing infor- 
mation on road pLans and touching on the general 
activities of the department and its employes, is an- 
©■ther idea of the State Highway Engineer. 

A. LEE GROVER, Trenton, Chief Clerk and Secretary 

Mr. Grover was born at Hutchinson's Mills, Mercer 
county, near Trenton, New Jersey, April 19th, 1889, and 
is the son of Elmer E. and Laura W. Grover. His early 
life was spent on the farm, and liis entire life has been 
spent within the boundaries of Mercer county. He 
acquired his education in the public schools of the 
county, and also attended the Rider-Moore & Stewart 
School of Business, in Trenton, from which institution 
he graduated in 1907, and at once took up a clerical 
career. In 1911 he engaged in the electrical contract- 
ing business, until April 13th, 1913, when he accepted 
a position with the Department of Public Roads, under 
Colonel E. A. Stevens, State Road Commissioner, as ac- 
countant. He acquired an intimate knowledge of State 
and county highway financing and law and was pro- 
moted to the post of Chief Clerk. On the reorganiza- 
tion of the State Highw^ay Department, under the di- 
rection of General George W. Goethals, as provided 
under the "Edge Road Act" of 1917, he was appointed 
Chief Clerk of the Department, and Secretary to the 
State Higliway Commission, on recommendation of 
General Goethals. 

Mr. Grover is a member of Fraternal Lodge, No. IZd, 
F. & A. M.; Palestine Commanderj', K. T., and Crescent 
Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 425 

EDWARD E. REED, Assistant State Highway Engi- 
neer, Trenton. 

Mr. Reed was born in Trenton, New Jersey, on Au- 
gust 3d, 18S4. He was educated in the public schools 
and attended the School of Industrial Arts of Trenton. 
Practically all of his life has been devoted to public 
work, he having first been employed in the City Engi- 
neer's office at Trenton; later with the County Engi- 
neer's office, and on July 1st, 1909, he accepted the post 
of Assistant Supervisor of Roads, in the New Jersey 
Department of Public Roads. This title w^as later 
changed to that of Division Engineer, and he was 
placed in charge of the construction and repair work 
in the Central New Jersey counties. Mr. Reed was 
appointed Assistant State Highway Engineer on April 
1st, 1918, for a term of five years. 

He is a member of Princeton Lodge, No. 38, F. & A. 
M., and Spartacus Lodge, No. 10, K. of P. 

CHARLES FRANCIS BEDWELL, Construction 
Engineer, Trenton. 

Mr. Bedwell was born at Ironton, Ohio, December 
11th, 1881. He attended the public schools of Colum- 
bus, Ohio, and later studied at the Virginia Military 
Institute, Lexington, Va. He pursued higher courses 
at the Ohio State University, at Columbus and tlie 
McGill University, Montreal, Canada, from which lat- 
ter institution he was graduated in 1905 with the 
degree of B.Sc. Mr. Bedwell is by profession a civil 
and construction engineer and was engaged in that 
calling with the Public Service Railway Company for 
a period of fifteen years. In October of 1920 he re- 
signed his connection with that company to become 
engineer in charge of construction under the State 
Highway Commission. This is the first public posi- 
tion he has ever held. 



426 BIOGRAPHIES. 

State Board of Institutions and Asen<?iPS' 

OGDEN HAGGERTY HAMMOND. President, Bernards- 
ville. 

Mr. Hammond was born at Louisville, Kentucky, Oc- 
tober 13th, 1869, and is an insurance broker. He was 
graduated at Phillips Exeter Academy in 1889 and at 
Yale University 1893. He entered business at Superior, 
Wisconsin, in 1893, and was an alderman of that city 
for two years, 1896-98. In 1907 moved to Bernardsville 
where he has since resided. He was First Lieutenant 
of Company I, Third Regiment, Wisconsin National 
Guard, three years, 1894-96. 

Mr. Hammond served two years in the New Jersey 
House of Assembly from Somerset county — 1915-16 — • 
and took an active part in legislation. He is now 
Treasurer of the State Republican Committee, a posi- 
tion he has occupied since 1917. 

Governor Edge, on February 28th, 1918, nominated 
Mr. Hammond as a member of the State Board of 
Charities and Corrections and he was promptly con- 
firmed by the Senate. His term will expire June 
30th, 1923. 

DWIGHT WHITNEY MORROW, Englewood. 

Mr. Morrow was born January 11th, 1873, at Hunt- 
ington, West Virginia, and is a member of the firm of 
J. P. Morgan & Co., 23 Wall street. New York City. 
Formerly he was a member of the law firm of Simpson, 
Thacher & Bartlett, 62 Cedar street. New York City. 

Mr. Morrow was graduated from Amherst College in 
1895, with the A.B. degree, and from the Columbia 
University Law School in 1899 with the LL.B. degree. 
He was a member of the New Jersey Prison Inquiry 
Commission, succeeding William B. Dickson as its 
chairman on July 17th, 1917. On February 28th, 1918, 
he was appointed a member of the State Board of 
Charities and Corrections by Governor Edge and con- 
firmed by the Senate for a term ending June 30th, 
1919. He is now chairman of that Board. He was re- 
appointed by Governor Edge and his term expires la 
1927. 

Mr. Morrow was director of the War Savings cam- 
paign for New Jersey until July 11th, 1918, when he 



BIOGRAPHIES. 427 

resigned to take up important Government work in 
Europe. He is also a trustee of Amherst College, 
President of the Eng-lewood Free Public Library and of 
the Englewood Civic Association. 

FRANK A. FETRIDGE. 

Mr. Fetridge was born in Quincy, Mass., July 5th. 
1857, and was educated in the public schools of that 
city. After leaving school he learned the lathing trade, 
which he has followed ever since. 

In 1879 Mr. Fetridge came to Newark and at once 
became active in the Knights of Labor, and in 1899, 
when the Wood, Wire and Metal Lathers' International 
Union was organized, he became an active worker in 
same, both locally and internationally, serving two 
terms as International Vice-President during 1904- 
1905, and again during 1915-1916, and also two terms 
as International Organizer. At present he is serving 
as Secretary of the New Jersey State Council of 
Lathers and is Financial Secretary of Local No. 102 of 
Newark, of which local he also served twelve years as 
Business Representative. 

He is also connected with the Essex Trades Council 
and Building Trades Council of Newark, in which or- 
ganization he is an untiring and active worker, having 
served as president of both councils on different oc- 
casions. He also served two terms as "Vice-President 
of the New Jersey State Federation of Labor and as 
Vice-President of the State Building Trades Council 
for four years and Secretary for one year. Mr. Fet- 
ridge was also connected with the Newark Board of 
Health for eight years, four years of which he was 
Superintendent of the Contagious Disease Hospital. 

Always taking an active interest in public affairs and 
institutions, and being liberal in thought and action, 
he was twice a candidate for the Assembly but was 
defeated on both occasions. 

His appointment as a member of the State Board of 
Charities and Corrections as the representative of or- 
ganized labor is the first public office ever held by 
him. 

Besides these activities he helped to organize the 
Trades Union Anti-Tuberculosis Association of New- 
ark, of which organization he served two years as Sec- 



428 BIOGRAPHIES. 

retary, and is now serving as the President of that 
popular charity organization. His term will expire 
June 30th, 1928. 

ELLIS P. EARLE, Montclair. 

Mr. Earle was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., in September, 
1860, and is engag-ed in the business of minerals and 
metals. He has never held public office. He was ap- 
pointed a member of the Board of Charities and Cor- 
rections by Governor Edge February 28th, 1918, for a 
term ending June 30th, 1922, and confirmed by the 
Senate. 

GERALDIXE LIVINGSTON THOMPSON (Mrs. Lewis 
S. Thompson), Red Bank, N. J. 

Mrs. Thompson was born in New York City March 
2d, 1872. She has been President of the Monmouth 
County Branch of the State Charities Aid and Prison 
Reform Association (now the Monmouth County Or- 
ganization for Social Service) for several years. 

She has lived twenty-two years at Brookdale Farm, 
Monmouth county; is a member of the Legislative 
Committee of the New .Jersey Women's Federated 
Clubs and County Chairman of the Women's Commit- 
tee of the Council of National Defense. Mrs. Thomp- 
son is thoroughly interested in school matters and 
the farming interests of the county and State. 

She was appointed a member of the State Board of 
Charities and Corrections by Governor Edge February 
28th, 1918, for a term ending June 30th, 1925, and was 
confirmed by the Senate. 

CAROLINE B. WITTPENN, Jersey City. 

Mrs. Wittpenn, who was born in Hoboken, N. J., is 
a daughter of Edwin A. and Martha Bayard Stevens 
and a member of the Castle Point (Hoboken) Stevens 
family. She is the wife of Henry Otto Wittpenn, now 
Naval Officer of the Port of New York and former 
Mayor of Jersey City. He was the Democratic candi- 
date for Governor of New Jersey in 1916. 

Mrs. Wittpenn has made a distinguished record as a 
promoter of charitable institutions in New Jersey and 
the saving of youth of the State for honorable and 



BIOGRAPHIES. 429 

self-supporting activities in life. Through her energy 
the State Board of Childrens' Guardians was origi- 
nated, and she was deeply interested in the successful 
movement for the establishment of the State Reforma- 
tory at Rahway. She secured legislation which 
brought about the appointment of a State Probation 
Officer, and that was a forerunner to the creation of 
courts for the trial of juvenile delinquents. 

In October, 1918, Governor Edge appointed Mrs. 
Wittpenn a member of the State Board of Charities 
and Corrections. Her term expires in 1926. 

JOSEPH M. BYRNE, Newark. 

Mr. Byrne was born in Newark, N. J., October, 1861. 
His early education was received in the Newark local 
schools, and in 1879 he was graduated from Notre 
Dame University, Indiana. Mr. Byrne was a former 
Assemblyman from Essex County for two terms, was 
also a member of the Board of Street and Water Com- 
missioners of Newark, N, J., for one term. Mr. Byrne 
is president of the Jos. M. Byrne Co., general insur- 
ance corporation, with main office at Newark. He is 
also the senior member of J. M. Byrne & Co., members 
of the New York Stock Exchange, 60 Broadway, New 
York City; is a director of the Fidelity Union Trust 
Company, Newark, N. J., and vice-president U. S. Sav- 
ings Bank, Newark, and a director of the Newark Fire 
Insurance Com'pany. On May 10th, 1919, he was ap- 
pointed by Governor Edge a member of the State 
Board of Institutions and Agencies and reappointed 
by Governor Edwards. His term expires in 1929. 

F. WALLACE ARMSTRONG, Moorestown. 

Mr. Armstrong, who resides at Moorestown, N. J., is 
head of the F. W. Armstrong Company, an extensive 
advertising agency, with offices In the North Amer- 
ican Building, Philadelphia. He is a brother of for- 
mer Judge E. Ambler Armstrong, who was Speaker of 
the New Jersey Assembly in 1885 and 1886. 

Mr. Armstrong's term as a member of the Depart- 
ment of Institutions and Agencies will expire in 1924. 



430 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Commissioner of Iiislitutious and Agencies. 

BURDETTE G. LEWIS, Princeton. 

Mr. Lewis was born at Jamestown, Pa., January 1st, 
1882. He is a graduate of the University of Nebraska; 
was special scholar in economics at the University of 
Wisconsin and held the President White Fellowship 
in Political Science for two years at Cornell University. 
At the latter institution he was associated with Pro- 
fessor J. W. Jenks when the professor was serving as 
a member of the International Monetary Commission 
which introduced a new currency system into the Phil- 
ippines for the United States. Later, Mr. Lewis held 
an important position with the Interstate Commerce 
Commission, and in 1907 was appointed Statistician of 
the Public Service Commission, First District. 

Subsequently he became assistant to John Purroy 
Mitchell, when President of the New York Board of 
Aldermen, and as such served as a member of the sub- 
committee which made up the New York City budget. 

During Mayor Gaynor's administration he was di- 
rector of the Board of Estimate's investigation of the 
New York public schools; also as director of the Sink- 
ing Fund Commission's study of the sale of real estate 
in the city of New York. 

In 1913 Mr. Lewis was appointed First Deputy Com- 
missioner of Corrections of the city of New York, and 
in 1915 became commissioner of that department. 

During the early part of 1918 he served as executive 
assistant of the vice-president and general manager of 
the Air Nitrates Corporation, organizing the govern- 
ment for its very large industrial city at Muscle 
Shoals, Alabama, and organized the self-compensation 
insurance system for the 20,000 employes of that cor- 
poration. 

In May, 1918, Mr. Lewis was appointed Coinmissioner 
of Charities and Corrections for New Jersey. 



Board of Shell Fisheries. 

GEORGE A. MOTT, Director, Tuckerton. 
Mr. Mott was born at Tuckerton, N. J., July 2d, 
1864, and attended the public schools until he was 
eighteen years of age, when he went to Atlantic City, 



BIOGRAPHIES. 431 

where he worked as clerk in a grocery store for two 
years, after which he conducted a grocery business at 
Beach Haven, N. J., for eight years during which 
time he engaged in the planting and shipping of 
oj-sters. He was named as a member of the first 
oyster commission for the State of New Jersey by 
an act of the Legislature of 1893, and although a 
Democrat, he was renamed by an act of the Legis- 
lature of 1896, and was appointed by Governor Voor- 
hees in 1899, and by Governor Murphy in' 1902, and 
served' as a member and secretary of the commission 
during the twelve years of its existence. It was 
largely due to his efforts that the scientific study 
of oyster propagation was taken up by Professor 
Julius Nelson in 1900, and as there was no appro- 
priation made by the Legislature for that purpose, 
he furnished and maintained a suitable station for 
experimental purposes, also oysters, boats, floats, etc., 
for the use of the biologist and assisted him per- 
sonalis'- in his experimental work. In 1912, he was 
appointed oyster superintendent for the district of 
Ocean county by Governor Wilson and re-appointed 
by Governor Fielder in 1915. His selection as di- 
rector of shell fisheries was made unanimous by the 
Board of Shell Fisheries July 1st, 1915. 



Department of "Weights and Measures. 

FRANK WANSER, State Superintendent. 

Mr. Wanser was born at New Brunswick, N. J., April 
5th, 1861; son of Colonel Jarvis Wanser and Sarah 
Elizabeth Wanser. He removed with his parents to 
Trenton, N. J., in 1874, and received his education in 
the public schools of New Brunswick and Trenton. The 
family removed to Vineland, N, J., in 1878, w^here they 
have since resided. 

In 1879, he embarked in the real estate and insur- 
ance business with his father, and has been actively 
engaged in the real estate line ever since. In 1884, 
in connection with this business, he became special 
agent and adjuster for New Jersey and Eastern Penn- 
sylvania for a Boston fire insurance company. 

He was a page in the New Jersey House of Assembly 
in 1874, and in New Jersey Senate in 1875 and 1876, and 



432 BIOGRAPHIES. 

was bookkeeper in Government Publication Depart- 
ment, House of Representatives, at Washington, during 
the fifty-fourth Congress. 

Mr. Wanser was postmaster at Vineland from March 
15th, 1902, to July 15th, 1910, when he resigned to de- 
vote his entire time to real estate operations; has 
always taken an active interest in politics and has 
been affiliated with the Republican party from the time 
of his first vote. 

Governor Edge appointed Mr. Wanser Superintendent 
of Weights and Measures February 27th, 1917, and he 
was confirmed by the Senate on March 6th. His term 
is five years. 



Custodian of the Capitol. 

JOHN A. SMITH, Haddon Heights. 

Mr. Smith has been a life-long resident of Camden 
county, where he was born in the city of Camden, 
August 3d, 1861, and lived until 1907 when he moved 
from the South Jersey Metropolis to Haddon Heights, 
one of its suburbs. He was educated in the public 
schools of his home city and after a business college 
education, he began life as a clerk and salesman and 
later established a wholesale and retail merchandise 
business, which he conducted in Camden for several 
years. 

Later he dealt in real estate and conducted a general 
brokerage line until May, 1913, when he was ap- 
pointed by Comptroller Edwards to the position of 
assistant auditor, which position he held until July 
15th, 1914, when he was appointed custodian of the 
State House, to take effect on August 15th, 1914. Dur- 
ing the interval between his appointment and as- 
sumption of the duties of the office, the new custodian 
fully familiarized himself with all the duties ap- 
pertaining to the position, which his wide and varied 
experience in a business and professional way makes 
him peculiarly adapted to fill. 

The custodian has always been active in Demo- 
cratic affairs, and served as a member of the Demo- 
cratic State Committee from his home county for 
three years. His salary is $3,500 a year. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 433 

Commissioner of Public Reports. 

WILLIAM A. SWEENEY, Red Bank. 

Mr. Sweeney was born at Wickatunk, in Monmouth 
county, N. J., June 26th, 1875. In 1888 he moved to 
Atlantic Highlands with his parents, and after ac- 
quiring the equivalent of a present high school educa- 
tion he entered the mechanical department of the 
Monmouth Press. A few years later he went with a 
new paper started at Atlantic Highlands, called the 
Journal, and before attaining his majority was local 
editor of that publication under A, C. Hart, a well- 
known Monmouth county newspaper man. From the 
Journal Mr. Sweeney went with the Red Bank Regis- 
ter, and was a reporter on that paper for about nine 
years. In 1906 he formed a company for the purchase 
of the Red Bank Standard, and has since been editor 
of that paper and president of the company which 
publishes it. 

Mr. Sweeney was Assistant Journal Clerk of the 
Assembly in 1916 and has served as Assessment Com- 
missioner in his home town. He was chairman of the 
Monmouth County Republican Executive Committee in 
1913 and for ten years was chairman of the Red Bank 
Republican Executive Committee. 

He was appointed Commissioner of Public Reports 
by Governor Edge for a term of five years, beginning 
March 3d, 1919. The salary is $2,000 a year. 



Secretary to -the Governor. 

J. HARRY FOLEY, Jersey City. 

Mr. Foley was born in Jersey City, N. J., February 
2d, 1881, educated in local schools, started in business 
life at the age of thirteen in the N. Y. Produce Ex- 
change, then went into the steam heating contracting 
business; from there to the Colonial Life Insurance 
Company, and in 1908 took position in the City Hall, 
Jersey City, as Assistant Deputy Treasurer; in 1912 
was made City Cashier, holding that position until 
appointed to his present position. In politics always 
a Democrat. 

He is a life member and an officer of Jersey City 
Lodge, No. 211, B. P. O. Elks; also member of Jersey 



434 BIOGRAPHIES. 

City Council, Knights of Columbus, and an officer in 
same council. In 1912 he married Clare Marie Bailey, 
of Jersey City; has had four children, one dead, three 
girls living. Father was John B. Foley, of Goshen, N. 
Y. Mother, still living, Agnes Hallahan, Chester, N. Y. 



Executive Clerk. 

JOHN J. FARRELL, Trenton. 

Mr. Farrell was born in New York city, August 31st, 
1864, and has been a resident of the State of New Jer- 
sey since he was three years of age. He is a news- 
paper man by profession, and was State Riparian Com- 
missioner from 1899 to 1904. During that period the 
courts set aside as void the attempt of the Legislature 
to divert State lands, which now form the nucleus of 
the School Fund, to other purposes. For many years 
prior to that and since he has been a legislative cor- 
respondent, the line in which he was engaged when ap- 
pointed Executive Clerk to fill a vacancy, the second 
which occurred in that office in forty-seven years, on 
February 20th, 1913. 



Chief Auditor. 

HARRY B. SALTER, Trenton. 

Col. Salter was born iji Brookville, Hunterdon county. 
New Jersey, June 4th, 1873, and removed to Trenton 
with his parents in 1880. He is a direct descendant 
of Richard Salter, Justice of the Supreme Court of 
New Jersey during the Colonial period, and James 
Salter, who was State Treasurer in the early part 
of the last century. He received his education in the 
grammar and high schools of this city, and entered 
the newspaper profession in 1888. For several years 
he was employed on local newspapers and Trenton 
correspondent for New York and Philadelphia papers. 
In 1894 he was appointed Deputy City Clerk by C. Ed- 
ward Murray, which position he held until his election 
as City Clerk, January 1st, 1904. He was re-elected 
January 1st, 1907 and 1910, and held the position 
until August, 1912. He was secretary of the Chamber 



BIOGRAPHIES. 435 

of Commerce from 1914 to April, 1917, when he was 
appointed to his present position by Comptroller Bug- 
bee. 

Col. Salter has been identified with most of the pub- 
lic movements in Trenton for many years and is also 
Lieutenant-Colonel Quartermaster on the staff of 
Quartermaster General C, Edward Murray. He was 
originally commissioned Captain and Quartermaster, 
second Regiment, N, G. N. J., and successively there- 
after Major, Second Brigade, and Deputy Quartermas- 
ter General. 

He is a member of Trenton Lodge No. 5, F. & A. M. ; 
Scottish Rite, Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, National Union, Republican Club and other social 
organizations. In 1895 he married Ida M. Taylor, 
daughter of W. Scott Taylor. 



Secretary of the Senate. 

WILLIAM H. ALBRIGHT, Woodbury. 

Mr. Albright was born at Elmer, Salem county, N. J., 
December 20th, 1875. He received his early education 
in the schools of Camden city and at the age of six- 
teen entered the newspaper profession. He was for 
twelve years on the reportorial staff of the Philadel- 
phia Ledger, and for the past nineteen years has been 
associated with his father, Louis W. Albright, in the 
publishing and printing business in Woodbury. Mr. 
Albright has been active in Gloucester county politics 
for the past twenty years. He was for several years 
secretary and treasurer of the Republican County Com- 
mittee and is at present secretary of the New Jersey 
Republican State Committee and has taken an active 
part in the counsels of his party. He was the president 
of the Red Bank Battle Monument Commission which 
erected the handsome shaft on the Delaware for the 
State, and is a member of numerous social and fra- 
ternal organizations. He was chosen Secretary of the 
Senate for the sessions 1918 to 1922, inclusive. 



436 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Clerk of the House. 

UPTON SAGER JEFFERYS, Camden. 

Mr. Jefferys comes of a line of native Jersey folks 
dating- back to the Colonial period. One of his pa- 
ternal ancestors was among the original settlers of 
Connecticut Farms in East Jersey; on the maternal 
side were early settlers of Gloucester county. He was 
born in Trenton while his father, the Rev. William H. 
Jefferys, was pastor of State Street M. E. Church. He 
attended the public schools, learned the printer's 
trade, became a reporter for Camden and Philadelphia 
dailies, was New Jersey editor of the Philadelphia In- 
quirer for nine years, and since 1900 has been editor 
of the Camden Post-Telegram. He served in the New 
Jersey National Guard for sixteen years. As the first 
president of the Camden Board of Playground Com- 
missioners he put the municipal playgrounds and 
recreation centers on a permanent basis, and he 
helped to revise the playground laws of the State. 
His legislative experience began as a correspondent, 
then he was secretary to Speaker William J, Bradley, 
served as Assistant Clerk of the House for several 
terms, and was chosen Clerk in 1912, '15, '16, '17, '18, 
'20, '21 and '22. During United States Senator David 
Baird's term, ending March 4th, 1919, Mr. Jefferys 
acted as his secretary at Washington. He is a mem- 
ber and ex-president of the Legislative Correspondents' 
Club, member of the New Jersey Press Association, the 
Pen and Pencil Club, Philadelphia; Camden Lodge, 
No. 293, B. P. O. E., and of other political and social 
organizations. 



STATE DEPARTMENTS. 437 



REPORTS OF STATE DEPARTMENTS. 

state Treasurer's Report. 

SECURITIES BELONGING TO THE STATE FUND. 

Certificate No. 154. dated April 3d. 1S32. for 

cue tliousand (1.000) shares of the .ioint 

stock of the Delaware and Raritan Canal 

and Camden and Araboj' Railroad aua 

Transportation Companies, par value $100,000 00 

Certiticate No. 3.640. dated July 15th, 1864. 

for five hundred (500) shares of the joint 

stock of the Delaware and Raritan Canal 

and Camden and Amboj- Railroad and 

Transportation Companies, par value 50,000 00 

Certificate No. 2,565, dated January ivtru, 

1866, for two hundred and sixty-two (262) 

shares of the joint stock of the Delaware 

and Raritan Canal and Camden and Am- 

boy Railroad and Transportation Com- 
panies, par value 26,200 00 

Certificate No. 4,554, dated January 10th, 

1865, for one hundred and twenty-five (125) 

shares of the joint stock of the Delaware 

and Raritan Canal and Camden and Am- 

boy Railroad and Transportation Com- 
panies, par value 12,500 00 

$188,700 00 
STATEMENT JUNE 30th, 1921. 

STATE FUND. 

Balance in bank, June 30th, 1921 $11,047,672 74 

Gross disbursements $20,046,610 20 

Gross receipts 19,054,852 33 



Disbursements over receipts 991,766 87 



Balance in bank. June 30th, 1921 $10,055,905 87 

Securities '. 188.700 00 



State Fund $10,244,605 87 

STATE SCHOOL TAX. 

Receipts $8,238,451 29 

Disbursements 8,238,451 29 

LOCAL '(TAX ON RAILROADS. 

Balance in bank, July 1st, 1920 $285 34 

Receipts 3,651,520 38 



$3,651,805 72 
Disbursements 3,651,805 72 



438 STATE DEPARTMENTS. 



GOVERNMENT AID FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION. 

Balance in bank, July 1st, 1920 $43,138 77 

Receipts 76',484 77 



$119,623 54 
Disbursements 85,793 93 



Balance in bank, June 30th, 1921 $33,829 61 

STATE ROAD FUND. 

Balance in bank, July 1st, 1920 $8,182,162 06 

Receipts — 

Miscellaneous $501,465 43 

Federal aid 458,633 55 

Motor vehicle 4.069,475 97 

State road tax (counties), 3,321,213 73 

State road tax (railroads), 248,594 87 



8,599,383 55 



$16,781,545 61 
Disbursements 10,662,852 15 



Balance in bank, June 30th,- 1921 $6,118,693 46 

CLERK IN CHANCERY ENROLLMENT FUND. 

Balance in Bank, July 1st, 1920 $493 72 

Receipts 7,729 34 



Balance in bank, June 30th, 1921 $8,223 06 

UNCLAIMED SCRIPT FUND. 

Balance in bank, July Ist, 1920 

Receipts 



Balance in Bank, June 30, 1921 



FOREST RESERVE FUND. 



Balance in bank, July 1st, 1920. . , 
Balance in bank, June 30th, 1921, 



$10,199 
205 


83 
51 


$10,405 


34 


$85 
85 


05 
05 



U. S. APPROPRIATION FOR AGRICULTURAL 
COLLEGE. 

Receipts $50,000 00 

Disbursements 50,000 00 



STATE DEPARTMENTS. 439 

STATE WATER SUrPLY FUND. 

Balance in bank, July 1st, 1920 $1,743 87 

Receipts 72,148 65 

Balance in bank, June 30th, 1921 i?73,892 52 

GOVERNMENT AID A'OCATIONAL 
REHABILITATION, ETC. 

Receipts .'?15,573 30 

Balance in bank, June 30tli, 1921 15,573 30 

FEDERAL FOREST FIRE FUND. 

Receipts $895 33 

Disbursements 712 50 

Balance in bank, June 30th, 1921 $482 83 

AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

Amount of securities $116,000 00 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE FUND. 

The securities belonging to the fund are : 
One (1) Certificate of Indebtedness to the 

State of New Jersey, dated July 1st, 1895, $31,600 00 

One (1) Certificate of Indebtedness to the 

State of New Jersey, dated January 1st, 

1897 16,400 00 

One (1) Certificate of Indebtedness to the 

State of New Jersey, dated January 1st, 

1902 68,000 00 



$116,000 00 
Interest on the Certificates of Indebted- 
ness, amounting to $5,800.00, made payable 
from the State Fund, has been disbursed for 
the maintenance of Rutgers Scientific School 
at New Brunswick. 



SCHOOL FUND. 

The securities of the School Fund are the 
following : 

Bonds $7,416,325 00 

Stocks 146,500 00 

$7,562,825 00 

Bonds and Mortgages 156.284 00 

Real Estate 18,738 44 

Riparian Leases 2,350,674 68 



$10,088,522 12 



440 STATE DEPARTMENTS. 

STATEMENT OP THE SCHOOL FUND. 

Securities, July 1st, 1920 $7,959,943 50 

Add Bonds purcliased 1.093,500 00 

Add Ripaiiau Leases issued 1,399,193 72 



$10,452,637 22 

Less Securities paid off $359,663 10 

Less Riparian Leases can- 
celled 4,452 00 

364,115 10 



Securities, June 30tli, 1921 $10,088,522 12 

Balance in bank, June 30th, 1921 112,808 09 



Total Fund $10,201,330 21 

Amount of Securities, July 

1st, 1920 $7,959,943 50 

Balance in bank, July 1st, 

1920 276,344 43 



8,236,287 93 



Net increase in fund $1,965,042 28 



INSURANCE FUND. 



SECURITIES. 



Riverside township, Burlington county, school 

bonds, five per cent ' $44,000 00 

City of Wildwood, Cape May county, regis- 
tered five per cent water bonds 41,000 00 

Borough of Bergenfield, Bergen county, reg- 
istered five per cent school bonds 9,000 00 

Board of Education of the township of Ham- 
ilton, county of Mercer 4,000 00 

$98,000 00 



STATE DEPARTMENTS. 441 



TAXES AND ASSESSMENT, STATE BOARD OF. 

James Baker, President, Jersey City, 1923 ; Mahlon R. 
Margerum, Trenton. 1922 ; Isaac Barber, Ptiillipsbnrg, 1923 ; 
Frank B. Jess, Haddon Heights, 1924 ; Harry W. Mutchler, 
Rockaway, 1924. 

The State Board of Taxes and Assessment is a consoli- 
dation of the old Board of Equalization of Taxes and the 
State Board of Assessors. The new body was created under 
the provisions of Chapter 244 of the Laws of 1915. It 
organized July 1st. and the purpose of the merger was to 
co-ordinate two bodies having similar functions. 

The old State Board of Assessors was created under an 
act of the Legislature entitled "An act for the taxation of 
railroad and canal property," approved April 10th. 1884. 
The work of this body was increased during the same year 
by the passage of another act. entitled "An act to provide 
for the imposition of State taxes upon certain corporations, 
and for the collection thereof," approved April 18th. 1884. 
The Legislature further charged this board with the assess- 
ment and apportionment of the Municipal Franchise tax 
to be paid by persons, co-partnerships, associations or cor- 
porations using or occupying public streets, highways, roads 
or other public places, hy an act passed in 1900 and taking 
effect January 1st. 1901. 

Beginning with the year 1919, this Department is 
further charged with the carrying into effect of the pro- 
visions of Chapter 148, Laws of 1918. which provides for a 
tax on the gross receipts of street railway corporations and 
gas and electric light corporations at the average tax rate 
of the State, in lieu of the tax upon personal property at 
the local rates. 

The State Board of Equalization of Taxes was created by 
an act of the Legislature approved March 29th. 1905. and 
was designed to take the place of the old State Board of 
Taxation, 

The report of the State Board of Taxes and Assessment 
for the year 1921 shows that 103 railroad and canal com- 
panies within the State are subject to taxation. These 
companies represent more tlian 2,450 miles of railroads 
(see note) and 175 miles of canals. 

Since making the last report of this Department, the 
Trenton, Lawrenoeville and Princeton Railroad, and Ti-enton, 
Lawrenceville and Princeton Extension Railroad, hnve been 
taken out of this class of corporations. 



442 STATE DEPARTMENTS. 



VALUATION AND ASSESSMENT OF RAILROAD AND 
CANAL PROPERTY FOR THE YEAR 1922. 

(Payable in 1922.) 

Aggregate 

NAME OF SYSTEM Valuation 

Pennsylvania Raili-oad System $120,863,792 00 

Central Railroad of New Jersey System 88,529,663 00 

Philadelphia & Reading Railway System... 18,887,251 00 

Erie Railroad System 35,796,355 00 

Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad 

System 66,822,316 00 

New York, Susquehanna & Western Railroad 

System 8,281,866 00 

Lehigh Valley Railroad of New Jersey Sys- 
tem 36,319,924 00 

New York Central Railroad System 21,877,195 00 

Railroads Not Classified 18,395,548 00 

Total $415,773,910 00 

Total for 1921 390,229,488 00 

Increase in Valuation 1922 $25,544,422 00 

Note. — Pursuant to Chap. No. 138, Laws of 1921, the Rail- 
road Tax will not be completed until June 1st, 
1922. 



STATE DEPARTMENTS. 443 



MISCELLANEOUS CORPORATIONS. 

Under the provisions of tlie act of April IStli, 1884, and 
its supplements, the Board lias assessed for the year 1921 
a State franchise tax against 13,997 corporations, amount- 
ing to $3,033,041.74. 

The following table shows the comparison with previous 
years of the number of corporations assessed under this 
act and the amount of tax levied : 

Number Amount Inc. in Inc. in Dec. in 

Assessed. Number. Amount. Amount. 



1884 619 $195,273 51 

1S85 797 235,769 40 178 $40,495 89 

1886 917 244,035 81 120 8,266 41 

1887 1,132 287,702 13 215 43,666 32 

1888 1,457 360,197 59 325 72,495 46 

1889 1,698 438,893 42 241 78,695 83 

1890 2,103 574,048 16 405 135,154 74 

1891 2,377 629,659 62 274 55,661 46 

1892 3,149 788,486 86 772 158,827 24 

1893 3,889 973,417 19 740 184,930 33 

1894 4,283 1,077,066 39 394 103,649 20 

1895 4,450 1,092,744 59 167 15,678 20 

1896 4,593 1,060,056 52 143 $32,688 07 

1897 4,777 1,075,278 52 184 15,222 00 

1898 5,188 1,197,030 54 411 121,752 02 

1899 5,469 1,332,635 95 281 135,605 41 

1900 6,602 2,048,008 03 1,133 715,372 08 

1901 7,294 2,315,592 78 692 267,584 75 

1902 8,567 2,878,073 11 1,273 562,480 33 

1903 9,449 3,380,439 87 882 502,366 76 

1904 10,013 3,663,589 96 564 283,150 09 

1905 10,065 3,605,473 52 52 58,116 44 

1906 10,230 3,515,878 00 165 89,595 52 

1907 10,307 3,356.638 25 77 159,239 75 

1908 10,821 3,267,350 14 514 89,288 11 

1909 11,022 3,238,083 46 201 29,266 68 

1910 11,606 3,188,084 58 584 49,998 88 

1911 11,860 3,171,576 25 254 16,508 33 

1912 12.372 3,131,430 72 512 40,145 53 

1913 12,688 3,128,498 30 316 2,932 42 

1914 12,659 3,057.91112 Dec. 29 70,587 18 

1915 12.411 3.045,572 72 248 12,338 40 

1916 12,165 2.718,222 20 Dec. 241 324,65133 

1917 12..^10 2,678,390 81 145 39,83139 

1918 12,248 2,605,194 25 Dec. 62 73,196 56 

1919 11,984 2,521,509 74 Dec. 264 83,684 51 

1920 12.852 2,724,307 43 868 202.797 69 

1921 13,997 3,033,041 74 1,145 308,734 31 



444 



STATE DEiPARTMENTS. 



GROSS RECEIPTS TAX. 

This Act (Chapter 25, Laws 1919) provides for the taxa- 
tion of the gross receipts of street railway, traction, gas and 
electric light, heat and power corporations using or occupying- 
public streets, highways, roads or other public places, in lieu 
of the taxation of certain property of such corporations, at 
the "average rate of taxation" of the State (which for the 
year 1921 was $3,440 per $100 valuation) and is apportioned 
in proportion to the value of the personal property of this 
class of corporations, as certified to this Department by 
the County Boards of Taxation. This tax is due and pay- 
able in the same manner and at the same time as the Fran- 
chise Taxes. 

Previous to the passage of this act, this class of property 
was assessed and taxed by the local assessor at the rate of 
taxation in the districts where situated. 

Assessments, based upon returns made under the provis- 
ions of this act, were levied against 93 corporations for 
the year 1921, amounting m the aggregate to $2,881,791.92, 
which is an increase of $936,222.04 over the assessment 
for 1920, classified as follows : 



Niunbcr 
of 
Com- 
panies. Classification. 
IS Street Railway ., 
T.J Gas and Electric 

93 



Gross Receipts. 

$29,964,213 68 

53,808,807 44 



Tax at 
Average Rate 

of $3,440. 

$1,030,768 95 

1,851,022 97 



,773,021 12 $2,881,791 92 



The following table will show the apportionment of this 
tax to the various municipalities of the State, grouped by 
counties : 



Atlantic 



5,204 76 Monmouth 



Bergen 153.175 31 

Rurlington . . . 60.672 24 

Pamden 214.962 31 

Cape May 24,349 14 

Cumberland . . 34,893 62 

Essex i 733,089 45 

Gloucester . . . 27,192 90 

Hudson 803,688 91 

Fluntcrdon . . , 4,701 32 

Mercor 110.495 22 

Middlesex 94,790 51 



Morris . . 
Ocean . . . 
Passaic . 
Salem . . . 
Somerset 
Sus.sex . . 
Union . . 
Warren 



$96,132 


11 


50,101 


96 


10.368 


35 


173,939 


05 


14,060 


62 


15,260 


04 


2,740 


56 


144,538 


20 


27,435 


34 



$2,881,791 92 



STATE DEPARTMENTS. 445 



MUNICIPAL FRANCHISE TAX. 

Assessments, based upon returns made under provisions 
of Chapter 195, Laws of 1900 (as amended), and Chapter 
290, Laws of 1006, were levied against 249 corporations 
and 2 individuals, amounting in the aggregate to $4,604,- 
317.16 tax, classified as follows (the increase over 1920 
being the sum of $768,747.03) : 

Number. Classification. Tax. 

18 Street Railway $1,255,072 73 

106 Water 242.021 62 

75 Gas and Electric 2.523,669 04 

33 Telegraph and Telephone 652,418 37 

3 District Telegraph Messenger 5,447 68 

13 Sewer 10.662 30 

3 Pipe Lines 5,025 42 



251 $4,694,317 16 

The following table will show the apportionment of this 
tax to the various municipalities of the State, grouped by 
counties : 

Atlantic $167,479 18 Monmoutb . . . $171,671 24 

Bergen 406,846 23 Morris 87.466 04 

Burlington . . . 173.992 10 ( kean 22.217 75 

Camden 304,476 61 Passaic 363,486 81 

Cape May 44.477 91 Salem 28,450 34 

Cumberland . . 56.946 93 Somerset 62.382 53 

Essex 1,098.501 52 Sussex 5,396 38 

Gloucester . . . 58,625 94 Union 399.957 64 

Hudson 692,674 11 Warren 37,752 85 

Hunterdon . . . 8.137 67 — 

Mercer 218.003 67 $4,694,317 16 

Middlesex .... 285,373 71 

Previous to the amendment to Section 5 of Chapter 195, 
Laws of 1900, by Chapter 17, Laws of 1917, the rate of tax 
levied against all classes of Public Utility Corporations, 
except Street Railway Corporations, was two per cent. By 
the amendment the rate on all classes except Street Rail- 
way Corporations (which are now taxed at the rate of five 
per cent) and corporations whose gross receipts are not 
in excess of $50,000, was increased by one per cent each 
year, beginning with the year 1918, until the maximum rate 
of five per cent is reached. The tax levied and assessed 
for the year 1921, based upon the gross receipts for the year 
ending December 31st, 1920, was at the maximum rate of 
five per cent. 



446 STATE DEPARTMENTS. 



NEW JERSEY EATABLES (1921) 

The net valuation taxable of real and personal property 
listed by the local assessors and the county boards of tax- 
ation is $3,519,841,268.75, an increase of $264,876,999.77 
over the valuation of 1920. The net valuation does not in- 
clude bank and trust company stock, which is separately 
assessed at three-fourths of one per cent, and for 1921 is 
taxed $800,876.28 on a valuation of $106,783,504.00. 

These ratables are made up as follows : 
Keal estate, exclusive of second-class rail- 
road property $2,819,809,716 00 

Second class railroad property 136,469,236 00 

Personal property (exclusive of bank 

stock) 586,789,067 75 

Deductions : 

For household goods $19,937,711 00 

For debts 324,315 00 

For exemptions of sol- 
diers, sailors, etc . . . 2,964,725 00 

Total deductions . . $23,226,751 00 



Net valuation, taxable at local rates.. $3,519,841,268 75 
Amounts deducted under Chapter 57, Laws 

of 1910, and Chapter 188, Laws of 1912, 46,407,175 98 
Amounts added under Chapter 57, Laws of 

1910 870,501 00 

Value of personalty of Traction, Street 

Railway, Gas and Electric Companies. 

assessed under Chapter 25, Laws of 

1919 80,120,504 98 

Net valuation on which county and State 

school taxes are apportioned 3,554,425,098 75 

The taxes to be raised on the above valuations are as 
follows : 

Road tax $3,586,578 38 

State school taxes 9.008,608 18 

Soldiers' Bonus taxes 1,030,233 93 

Bridges and Tunnels taxes 412,075 99 

County taxes (exclusive of counties' quota 

of bank stock taxes) 23,469,959 98 

Taxes for local purposes (exclusive of mu- 
nicipalities' quota of bank stock taxes), 83,817,511 86 
Bank stock taxes (divided equally be- 
tween county and municipality) 800,876 28 

Poll taxes 534,156 00 



STATE DEPARTMENTS. 447 

The average tax rate, on whicli tlie railroad main stem 
taxes are assessed, is $3,440 per hundred dollars of valua- 
tion for 1921. 

Real estate and personal property specifically exempted 
from taxation for 1921 amounts to $353,283,810, divided 
among the following classes : 

Public school property $78,694,466 00 

Other school property 21,299,388 00 

I*ublic property 141,334.940 00 

Church and charitable property 90,316,757 00 

Cemeteries and graveyards 7,949,415 00 

Other exemptions not included in above 

classifications : 

Real $2,872,549 00 

I'ersonal 10,816,295 00 

13,688,844 00 



448 



STATE DEPARTMENTS. 



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EJLECTION RETURNS. 



449 



NEW JERSEY ELECTION RETURNS. 

OFFICIAL — 1921. 



ATLANTIC COUNTY. 



-Assembly- 



- a i£^ : 



Absecoii City — 

1 Ward 112 

2 Ward 149 

Total vote 261 

Atlantic City — 

1 Ward 1367 

2 Ward 1571 

3 Ward 1420 

4 Ward 1787 

Total vote G14."3 

Buena Vista Twp 273 

East Atlantic City — 

1 Ward 2 

2 Ward 8 

Total vote 10 

Egg Harbor City 497 

Egg Harbor Twp 344 

Folsom Bor 21 

Galloway Twi) 223 

Hamilton Twp 242 

Hammonton Town 886 

Tjinwood Bor 36 

Longport Bor 25 

Margate City 98 

Mullica Twp 310 

Nortlifleld City— 

1 Ward 35 

2 Ward 71 

Total vote 106 



c-oaT 


H C) 


H flJ 


ii^ 


SSfi 


«s« 


•-50 


^l-H 


-►-, 


110 


05 


67 


150 


23 


21 


200 


88 


88 


1325 


229 


227 


1543 


205 


203 


1398 


186 


182 


1742 


318 


321 


6008 


938 


933 


270 


57 


57 











7 


2 


3 


9 


4 


5 


471 


74 


-71 


230 


153 


228 


17 


12 


13 


216 


218 


223 


245 


71 


70 


852 


156 


158 


28 


19 


20 


25 


21 


21 


98 


28 


29 


278 


88 


81 


31 


26 


31 


62 


47 


56 



93 



87 



450 ELECTIOX RETURNS. 

ATLANTIC COUNTY— Continued. 



Pleasantville City — 

1 Ward 311 

2 Ward 308 

Total vote 619 

Tort Republic City— 

1 Ward 16 

2 AVard 24 

Total vote 40 

Somers Point City— 

1 Ward 126 

2 Ward 143 

Total vote 269 

Ventnor City — 

1 Ward 107 

2 Ward Ill 

Total vote 218 

Weymouth Twp 142 

Total vote, County 10775 



< 






%o^ 


1 §^ 




264 

282 


72 
45 


97 
79 


546 


117 


176 


15 
24 


18 


19 


39 


40 


41 


100 

141 


65 
69 


66 
71 


263 


134 


137 


100 
105 


31 
26 


32 

28 


205 
134 


57 

128 


60 
133 


10296 


2476 


2631 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



451 



Allendale Bor 

Alpine Bor 

bergenlield Bor 

Bogota Bor 

Carlstadt Bor 

CliCfslde Park Bor... 

Closter Bor 

Cresskill Bor 

Denierest Bor 

Dumont Bor 

East Poterson Bor.... 
East R'ltherford Bor.. 

Edgewater Bor 

Emerson Bor 

Englewood City — 

1 Ward 

2 Ward 

3 Ward 

4 Ward 

Total vote 

Englewood Cliffs Bor. 

Fairview Bor 

Fort Lee Bor 

Franklin Twp 

Garfield City— 

1 Ward 

2 Ward 

3 Ward 

4 Ward 

Total vote 

Glen Rock Bor 

Harrington Park Bor. 
Hasbrouck Heights Bor. 

Haworth Bor 

Hillsdale Twp 

Hohokus Bor 

Hohokus Twp 

Leonia Bor 

Little Ferry Bor 

Lodi Bor 

Lodi Twp 

Lyndhurst Twp 

Maywood Bor 

Midland Park Bor 

Midland Twp 

Montvale Bor 

Moonachie Bor 



BERGEN 


COUNTY, 












A r.f-nn^1^1»» 








3 


1 




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5 1 


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II 


Is 

^2 


Is 


Is 


« 2 

(So 


"52 


236 


232 


236 


89 


77 


71 


102 


107 


107 


48 


46 


46 


639 


626 


628 


469 


443 


450 


1041 


3051 


1055 


475 


496 


447 


430 


453 


439 


757 


724 


723 


908 


1076 


926 


600 


579 


527 


529 


505 


519 


121 


108 


116 


205 


205 


208 


49 


39 


34 


145 


145 


147 


49 


46 


45 


544 


536 


551 


299 


293 


280 


332 


383 


331 


121 


140 


131 


787 


789 


773. 


576 


541 


535 


554 


907 


956 


192 


542 


203 


142 


154 


146 


128 


124 


123 


628 


625 


630 


164 


158 


161 


553 


541 


563 


221 


229 


214 


770 


778 


783 


652 


643 


640 


624 


690 


650 


333 


327 


319 


. 2575 


2634 


2626 


1370 


1357 


1334 


99 


100 


100 


24 


24 


24 


285 


345 


330 


307 


313 


303 


856 


882 


1005 


405 


406 


387 


465 


442 


451 


77 


78 


69 


503 


493 


499 


239 


225 


241 


355 


356 


363 


1.32 


133 


125 


234 


367 


243 


416 


373 


404 


176 


193 


189 


129 


129 


128 


. 1268 


1409 


1294 


916 


860 


898 


759 


731 


740 


132 


126 


123 


231 


199 


197 


42 


39 


43 


708 


700 


715 


294 


286 


271 


228 


230 


234 


84 


84 


79 


456 


439 


442 


114 


114 


111 


187 


183 


186 


31 


28 


30 


205 


208 


208 


55 


43 


45 


781 


756 


827 


2.50 


253 


224 


200 


202 


201 


201 


206 


195 


488 


862 


485 


387 


357 


378 


24 


29 


23 


16 


14 


12 


440 


504 


452 


429 


402 


425 


305 


299 


296 


149 


167 


131 


433 


424 


432 


68 


60 


59 


390 


377 


380 


176 


193 


169 


238 


228 


233 


94 


96 


91 


49 


65 


47 


43 


55 


57 



452 



ELECTION RETURNS. 









•> 




^ 




o 


1 






• 


« 




'5 


d 


^ 


^1 


s S 


U 








11 


rs— 1 


•P^t 


i:^;^ 




M^ 


OP 


183 


280 


185 


130 


140 


114 


371 


397 


371 


202 


248 


174 


392 


393 


390 


104 


171 


94 


576 


527 


552 


145 


211 


128 


316 


318 


308 


99 


143 


84 


1838 


1915 


1806 


680 


913 


594 


319 


312 


316 


292 


282 


281 


104 


134 


107 


56 


45 


56 


187 


194 


181 


101 


98 


332 


101 


93 


97 


18 


15 


17 


31 


28 


30 


57 


59 


59 


394 


384 


388 


122 


128 


110 


1021 


1013 


1029 


330 


301 


303 


557 


544 


627 


268 


257 


242 


403 


425 


422 


159 


179 


157 


205 


203 


199 


178 


177 


171 


414 


392 


382 


163 


121 


137 


157 


151 


161 


55 


53 


43 


1511 


1486 


1513 


350 


222 


220 


295 


291 


295 


41 


40 


30 


154 


148 


155 


41 


41 


41 


2066 


2028 


2059 


733 


650 


664 


91 


89 


91 


07 


26 


22 


410 


420 


430 


195 


197 


185 


592 


576 


587 


197 


192 


176 


811 


824 


827 


329 


318 


305 


8 


8 


8 


8 


8 


8 


32 


26 


27 


12 


14 


15 


267 


257 


258 


206 


190 


192 


244 


229 


239 


190 


193 


196 


54 


53 


52 


31 


33 


30 


800 


786 


801 


385 


379 


367 


69 


67 


65 


32 


31 


31 


300 


314 


314 


247 


248 


245 



Hackensack Cily, form- 
erly New Barbadoes 
Twp. — 

1 Ward 

2 Ward 

3 Ward 

4 Ward 

5 Ward 

Total vote 

Nortli Arlington Bor. . 

Nortlivale Bor 

Norwood Bor ., . 

Oakland Bor '. . 

Old Tappen Bor 

Oradell Bor 

Overpeck Twp 

Palisades Park Bor 

Palisades Twp 

Park Ridge Bor 

Kanisey Bor 

Ridgefleld Bor 

liidgewood Twp 

Riverside Bor 

Rivervale Twp 

Rutherford Bor 

Saddle River Bor 

Saddle River Twp 

Teaneck Twp 

Tenafly Bor 

Teterboro Bor 

Upper Sadie River Bor., 

Waldwick Bor 

Wallington Bor 

Washington Twp 

Westwood Bor 

Woodcliff Lake Bor... 
Woodridge Bor 

Total vote. County, 31685 32807 32392 15040 
Singl" Tax Assembly A'ote for entire county, 841. 



15169 14224 



ELECTIOX RETURNS. 



453 



BURLINGTON COUNTY 

, — Senator— 



Assem- 
— bly 



Surro- 
-gate 



.•'^ 









O O) 

an s: 
S o 



3G 
309 
579 

273 



234 
424 
224 
445 



103 
164 

110 
135 
76 

321 
10 

107 
159 
151 
106 



37 
323 
562 

301 
111 

85 



242 
458 
222 
461 



31 
97 
142 

128 
127 



324 
20 

84 
150 
117 
110 



38 
295 
566 

294 

109 

90 

493 



254 
462 
241 
469 



Rass River 45 

Beverly City 125 

Beverly Twp 190 

Bordentown City — 

1 Ward 172 

2 Ward 152 

3 Ward 82 

Total vote 400 

Bordentown Twp 16 

Burlington City — 

1 Ward 106 

2 Ward 188 

3 Ward 156 

4 Ward 136 

Total vote 

Burlington Twp 

Chester Twp 

Chesterfield Twp 

Cinnaminson Twp 

Delran Twp 

Eastarapton Twp 

Evesham Twp 

Fieldsboro Bor 

Florence Twp 

Lumberton Twp 

Arausfield Twp 

jNledford Twp 

Mt. Laurel Twp 

New Hanover Twp 

North Hanover Twp... 

Northampton Twp 

Palmyra Twp 

Pemberton Bor 

Peraberton Twp 

Riverside Iwp 

Rlverton Bor 

Shamong Twp 

Southampton Twp 

Springfield Twp 

Tabernacle Twp 

Washington Twp 

Westampton Twp 

Willingboro Twp 

Woodland Twp 

Wrightstown Bor 

Total vote, County, 4783 11406 3817 12015 3820 11788 



586 


1327 


523 


1383 


461 


1426 


33 


242 


23 


253 


oo 


250 


274 


1388 


235 


1414 


236 


1386 


42 


158 


41 


149 


45 


142 


85 


198 


83 


207 


84 


190 


66 


96 


61 


100 


64 


87 


04 


104 


44 


128 


54 


110 


72 


258 


72 


252 


84 


217 


36 


30 


33 


26 


28 


37 


432 


793 


311 


883 


164 


923 


51 


191 


S3 


216 


45 


190 


150 


273 


146 


234 


165 


219 


88 


280 


67 


289 


80 


266 


142 


299 


119 


270 


120 


263 


21 


23 


16 


23 


17 


23 


63 


86 


59 


83 


59 


81 


545 


1397 


307 


1728 


368 


1676 


224 


824 


184 


837 


197 


804 


113 


198 


89 


207 


95 


203 


33 


93 


27 


94 


27 


93 


319 


416 


258 


434 


213 


480 


87 


531 


75 


526 


60 


546 


11 


40 


12 


39 


13 


36 


259 


203 


179 


254 


204 


224 


71 


153 


66 


143 


78 


126 


32 


61 


24 


57 


23 


58 




74 


5 


74 


4 


85 


11 


oo 


11 


52 


10 


55 


29 


72 


21 


76 


31 


67 


23 


38 


21 


41 


24 


37 




50 


25 


45 


31 


38 



454 



ELECTIO'X RETURNS 



CAMDEN COUNTY. 



M 

SI 


-? CO 




M 


^ 3 
> 1 




H;5 

If 

2 M 


.0 


^'5 




1^ 


si 

c C 


II 


331 


332 


332 


176 


174 


203 


263 


268 


259 


83 


79 


82 


555 


539 


552 


254 


234 


233 


639 


624 


623 


225 


208 


209 


70 


69 


68 


17 


15 


12 


926 


1000 


926 


299 


203 


219 


1435 


1275 


1369 


486 


469 


786 


1130 


1112 


1072 


534 


531 


517 


1347 


1343 


1300 


424 


399 


409 


790 


749 


789 


199 


164 


162 


807 


798 


793 


307 


283 


280 


1358 


1357 


1344 


527 


511 


484 


1150 


1148 


1150 


518 


495 


473 


1457 


1448 


1429 


458 


423 


405 


964 


961 


948 


578 


524 


494 


1227 


1208 


1176 


632 


617 


644 


1409 


1385 


1365 


750 


731 


713 


862 


863 


868 


542 


538 


493 


1170 


1177 


1160 


779 


758 


742 


1675 


1659 


1678 


957 


823 


830 


595 


597 


587 


273 


244 


257 


15941 


15805 


15659 


7478 


7041 


6903 


299 


280 


264 


90 


100 


94 


891 


883 


866 


682 


669 


650 


1335 


1330 


1293 


1157 


1141 


1134 


2226 


2213 


2159 


1839 


1810 


1784 


548 


558 


545 


251 


242 


261 


604 


605 


607 


114 


95 


126 


630 


629 


631 


132 


130 


139 


1131 


1051 


1027 


154 


147 


267 


003 


226 


222 


81 


77 


88 


130 


135 


131 


58 


59 


61 


510 


492 


499 


183 


168 


217 


146 


139 


140 


42 


44 


63 


824 


799 


80O 


233 


224 


230 


18 


15 


16 






6 


277 


304 


258 


139 


134 


149 


344 


332 


328 


80 


72 


79 


622 


536 


529 


176 


176 


154 


284 


277 


285 


253 


251 


275 



Audubon Bor 

ISarrington Bor 

Berlin Twp 

Center Twp 

Chesilhurst Bor 

Clementon Twp 

Collingswood Bor 

Camden Citv — 

1 Ward , 

2 Ward 

3 Ward 

4 Ward 

5 Ward 

6 Ward 

7 Ward 

8 Ward 

9 Ward 

10 Ward 

11 Ward 

12 W?rd 

13 W^ard 

14 Ward 

Total vote 

Delaware Twp 

Gloucester City — 

1 Ward 

2 Ward 

Total vote 

Gloucester Twp 

Haddon Heights Bor . 

Haddon Twp 

ITaddonfield Bor 

Laurel Springs Bor . . 

Magnolia Bor 

Merchantville Bor. . . 

Oaklyn Bor 

Pensauken Twp 

Tavistock Bor 

Voorhees Twp 

Waterford Twp 

Winslow Twp 

Woodlyn Bor 

Total vote, County, 28976 28493 28229 12662 12152 12640 



Socialist Assembly vote for entire county, 1,716. 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



CAPE MAY COUNTY. 

Assem- 
,— Senator— >, , bly — 



e^ *^« cJC 
o a .-I '^ I 

*- Q 2 S ^ o 



Avalon Borough 51 41 35 48 

("aye May City 410 488 392 493 

Cape May Point Borough 32 29 24 36 

Dennis Township 287 120 238 159 

Tower Township 233 267 250 250 

Middle Township 495 462 385 521 

North Wildwood Borough — 

1 Ward 113 273 102 220 

2 Ward 72 143 44 163 

Total vote 185 416 140 383 

Ocean City— 

1 Ward 236 

2 Ward 292 

Total vote 528 

Sea Isle City— 

1 Ward 51 

2 Ward 80 

Total vote 131 

South Cape May Borough 13 

Stone Harbor 98 

Upper Township 197 

AVest AYildwood 14 

West Cape May Borough 176 

Wildwood City— 

1 Ward 227 

2 Ward 128 

3 Ward 113 

Total vote 468 843 

Wildwood Crest Borough 38 110 

Woodbine 101 130 



Total vote, County 3526 

15 




4.10 



E'LECTIO'X RETURNS. 
CUMBERLAND COUNTY. 



-Asseuibly- 



« i 






P.ridgf'ton Citv— 

1 Wai-a 

2 Ward 

3 Ward 

4 Ward 

r, Wai-a 

Total vote 

Coiumorcial Township ... 

Deerfielrt Township 

Down Township 

Fairfield Township 

Greenwich Townsliip .... 
Hopeweil Townsliip .... 

Landls Township 

Lawrence Township .... 
iManrice PiA-er Township 
.Millville Citv— 

1 ^^'ard 

2 Ward 

.*] Ward 

4 Ward 

5 Ward 

Total vote 

Vineland Borongh 

Stoe Creek Township.... 

Total vote. Count.v 



416 


252 


457 


275 


805 


386 


0-Jl 


253 


185 


185 


2484 


1351 


275 


42 


138 


197 


255 


136 


201 


12.^: 


68 




286 


248 


1154 


788 


102 


47 


348 


180 


104 


81 


329 


49 


131 


106 


240 


207 


148 


69 


051 


412 


1120 


505 


117 


42 



4103 



•.10I.CBX 



•uoiilinuqo 












•ik)Ip:.t 









.leSiiiuuoj^ 



ELECTION 



M 3; O I I- ~^X 

CC in S I t^ rt -5 ?^ 



M IH CC I » 



:r ri ro I .-( i- ri i- 

^ l~- O L-5 L-5 ,-1 CO 

r: rt ITS o O c i- 



M 1-TI© 



:r o ^ I o j^ t~ ~ 



•4-U!qoii 



-41: J u-).i,u:av. 



U 'eJ.tBoj 



-t" - -^ I r: I- t- -0 

re rt O T- ^ -c; XI 



-j5 c n 1 iH ."2 =^ o 
rt ri :3 Kh ^ -^ X 



CI r- 1-1 , Ttt "^ o O 

tDTi-M o L-Ji-ri 

ccrio Ti t-icx 



RETURNS. 457 

\ OCi'*~ c:^r-iOi-i iri c:c: 

WrOrHO r-lCXt-O I ccccL-:. 

I Li » rH M M 10 C-l ■* CO I X iH O 

in r-frHiHi-li-lO t-I 

:2 ■* rH ir; ci co t- 1- o I ■* ■* cc 

LCXi-171 ciins-i-^co I xt-ho 

71 tH rH T-I r-l t-t O r-l 

10-* MX OLUDt-O |XC»H 

Tii<r-i- TtirroiHco Tf*o 

:rxr-iri 7iocoi--to C"--! 

I ?l r- r-f r-( i-l rH b- r-l 

I ^ X Lt CO Lt tH Tf t- rt I o I- LI 

01 r-l r^ ^ r-l rt O r-l 

I t- cc » o cr L": rc ■* '^ 1 ci c: -^ 

c;oc:-* TttXMccx li-cct- 

■* X 01 r-l L-O iM -^ CI 1 «£ r-l O 

|t-ord< -^cicooo icir-io 

I wXr-lCI CI C> CI 10 CO O r-l r-l 

CI rnr-lrlrHri I t- r-l 

iciTtoKX i-:oc:rHi>. |Cco;3 

r-l Lt rH I- ■<»< Lt X CI CO LO ■^ r-l 

:sXrHCi ci:rc'»c:o OriTH 

CI r- r^ r-l r-l r-l l~ r-l 

oci — o ccXrHCic hrcoc: 

'cOl-r-CI CCCr^CCr- OrlO 

|C. r-.r..r.|0 

iCtClr-CC C."— CSCi lOOCJ 

X'tOX rfrfClOCO CCTf<C; 

LTXr-lCI CI^^CIICCO OtHC 

CI tH r-l tH r-l r1 I- rH 

I X I- tr. t- CO r^: o c: CO I ■* ci c: 

I- CO rH 1.-5 CIl-CDl-O TtH-t"-^ 

I 10 X r-l CI CIL-iClT»<CO XriO 

CI r-l r-l r-l T-I r-i O r-l 

l-!t*tLOCO rH-<*<Clr-ICC Ir-ia^C 

CO C2 ^ I- LO LO X I- CO CO CO C5 l~- CO CO I rtf 

OX T-I CI CI X CM LO CO i C r-l O LOrfLO I I'j 

CI r-lrlrrr-r-iil-r-l Ir-I 

I o Tft CI LO ■* X o C CO I LO ■^ rH c: X I- I ■* 

LO :r O X LO O r- Ct LO r-l ^^ i-l I- ■>*< CO o 

C3 X r-l . i CI i; CO LO CO r^ r- rH LO ■* lO LO 

CI rl r-l r- rH r-l I- r-l T-! 



iS^o 


K 

"^ 


L0-*LO 


|i 


ise 


1 


s3i 


1 


fe;rLo 


LO 


i§i 



S 


TfCO'* 


CO 


"♦r^X 

or, CO CO 

lOTfLO 


1 


LOCO-t* 


CI 


r'^QO'J' 


1 1' 









1 












> 




1. 


1 

I 







^riCKO .HrHCICO -2 "^ "g ?? -H CI CO tJi LO ^ ^ 'E '^ "^l ^^^ - 



458 



E'LECTIO'N RETURNS. 






Sxrl 






UDiiuuLni,) 



I "* C r-l ■* I* I- W ■* I- (C O CC-I Tf I tH t- 

!OOororoect-oooT-io«oiOf-io I coo 



t- »£5 ■* lO Tjt t-. ■* 1 



V ptuna 



ooooiT-iT-iio-^oofocscococct-coi-t oo 

L- O in lO Tf I- ■* M re Cl CI C^l rl CC IS t- CO 
CC?I (N rt tH o 






I L- O I- CO -^ t- 



•luurr 
•JI ;e.iBS.iPi\[ 



1- r: -ri CO o 
I- o o Qo CO 



xcoTt<r^3:cicooii-©(riicicoeco i-*'* 
■*oooociiHcooaoo;coiooiTtio:co oo 

l-0'*i-*'*t-'#r-!C|C-lr-lCIOC010i» O 
CO CI CI T~l r-i LO 



•uoiu:.i 



CO O 01 TJH Tt* UO LO O LO l^ O t- <-! LO OC tH | t- l-Oi 
COCO^-ICI-^OTtlCOr-lr^OOt-i-lC^-^lO t-C5 
t- C lO lO -"^ t- ■* CO Tj( CO CI CI CI C-l O t- 135 



•40X113 



•0 einusf 



.losaiiHiaK 






THcscocot- I CO 

©i-ICOOO rH 
r-IOOC5LOt- T-l 



) CI C". LO LO CO 'Jl l-< c 

I oo o t- cc ffi <© Tj< c 

) CO CO O CI r-( CO 50 I 



OCCOOIO I o 
ao,-iO-*i- CI 
c:t-coT}Ho <r> 



— CO o lO CO 

I.O 00 I- 00 CO 

o I- 00 ■* t- 



o CI --I C' CO M c: CO CI c-. LO LO CO ■ 

Or-lOrH-^«5CO,HOOOt-«;ffit 
t-OKOlOTfl^TtCOCOCOOCIr-K 

CO CI CI T-l 

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'*'*L'ooO'*Mtt-Oi-Or-io:uoeo-*i-0 lOio 

COfflCIOCCCOQOCIOiCOOiTHlCt-CO. CO lOOO 

Tti-^'^Tt(C0OC0XC5 0IC5 0l05C|i0"* ?D 

01 i-l 1-1 1-1 CO 
I ""I 

CI LO' CI C5 lo Tti CD t- iH 1-1 CI o: CO »o CO CO CO i th i- 

o i-cocicicoxcooorioot-cio-^i- coo 

T-t t- O lO lO -* 1-- 'I' CO T}< CO CI(M CI CO CD I- t- 

^ COd CI r-l iH O 



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}1!J US.I.IBAV 



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■* CO in CI o 01 m rH i^ 1,0 iH 10 10 T-1 c lo i eo o 

oocoiHci-<j<i-ioinT-ii-iocoooicco ooo 

I- CD lo lo '^ L- T(< CO ■* w: CO CI i-( CO CO t- i- 

CO CI CI T-l tH CO 



•u:.i>iiii:,i..i 



oo ©romo^ rl-- ©-*»0l-O©©CDlffCDOlClr-©t-CD it-O 



T-l- r- oo O LO I- ^ oo © O 1!0 ■ 



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•tfO'S'S'S'S'H'S'H'H'E'S'E'E'H'E'H'S 

C>,. 03e3cBcSc3a3cieScSo3cS*KiSc:eS 



iSr-i: 

a; 
'A 



I CO -f 10 © I- c 



OTHMtOTl<l 



Pa5 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



459 



,V .lr»UIA'H 



illilulUti.l 



i.t o © I i^ r-i © o 00 o I o: L-5 r. cc I- ^ 
— :2 35 ■* Ti 00 to ^^ M c; ^'U- r-i lo --^ 

1 *■ ^^ 



, ^.„ ^ -----^ |;i jg 






©I- ©00 Tt<OLO'*c'ii-cic:3'9r: ;^9!25^J3^h^ 






-.lapuBxaiv 



IMtK^r 

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•noiB^i 






c -I ^ © L-i rt t:: oi eciH CO I- 00 



r I 



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^r-SscD c:oo-*ro©i-T-;t<©ML'5 C5i-in-*05'*i- 

S^?i © r-^^^cc I rrr^^CLt'-i L'5 CI ec rl M I t-; I c: 

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CITtHfC© OOOCO-*03|'!ttl-t-*©L';r-l ©C^CCrHTflXlCO 

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iOrH©iO oif:r-ioo©|oO'Hci©©a^ *'3I;3;'is;?;i2lS 

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CI JO 00 cc o I in 



P«M I ^ ^;=bobi- I ci^cici©^ inio^HMt- | m 1 {;. 

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CI 5^ CI © 00 ■* 03 TlH CO h?* T-l rt C t- .-( OCI.-Ort •* I 00 I 00 

I I ' 11"* 

©Tt<©|Co ci^-^cciccoooi-cjci 022f';i2;ilSlI2 

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ELECTION RETURNS. 
GLOUCESTER COUNTY. 

/—Assembly — ^ 



463 



Senator. 
Unex- 
-pjred TiTin-^ 



rinyton r.orougb 

Deptford Townsliii) 

East Greenwich Township. . 

Elk Township 

Franklin Township 

Glassboro Borough 

Greenwich Tow nship 

Harrison Township 

I,ogan Townshi]) 

Alantiia TownsJiip 

^Monroe Townsliip 

National Park I'.oron-ii 

raulslxiro I'oroiigh 

Tit man P.orough 

South Harrison Township... 

Swedesboro Porough 

AVashington Township 

AA'enonah P.orougii 

West De;)tfor(l Township... 

AVestville Porough 

AVooilbury Cit.v— 

1 Ward 

2 Ward 

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Total vote 

Woodbury Heights Borousrh. 
Woolwich Tow nship 

Total vote, County. . . 



c 1 


:s 


^^ 


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c 2 


v: 2 




<:i 


^:^ 


»-: ~ 


101 


62 


103 


07 


5G.3 


00 


548 


107 


180 


103 


210 


05 


98 


20 


93 


25 


474 


174 


451 


207 


3.".j 


76 


347 


06 


210 


104 


104 


107 


203 


5", 


257 


65 


30;j 


186 


274 




4118 


207 


478 


;528 


138 


120 


430 


207 


2114 


213 


202 


•>•>■> 


371 


288 


357 


304 


730 


188 


736 


226 


171 


;>i 


156 


72 


204 


81 


208 


85 


248 


165 


240 


201 


208 


34 


207 


37 


314 


101 


204 


132 


470 


102 


453 


239 


284 


51 


216 


73 


402 


76 


348 


136 


331 


78 


304 


100 


1017 


205 


868 


318 


165 


81 


155 


08 


68 


2( 


04 


36 



r802 



3601 



464 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



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I© eoooi-cDiC' I CO 



kO "* LO) tH o 

t- CO in in o 

OW CI CI Li 



00 CO CD oo i o 



iSi 


gg|g 


o 


cim CI cm 




^ggg 


o 


CO CO cc CO CI 
cjuocicltn 




^5|§ 


i 


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00 .H cr. * o 



ii)l 






"c ii- p 



^tH MCOtJHLn i^gS'-fClCOTj* OrHCTCCtlO 



468 



ELECTION RETURNS. 






•jl iu<)j.t..iiiii;i 



) i^ ■" T-ii- ci c; c? :r c 1 T-i 

■ -lOl-CKOOCClC 



T-1 1-1 ?? -c '— ■ c; 71 c-^'—'—':} a 
I- cr cc c i I- -t< o 00 k; 00 "M CD 
T-H C-: cci- c o LQ CI I- o T I 









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•a uuy 



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CICICI l-l r-l 



:i~Tt<C0C5»C00'>*00l-O 
r:'MOOTt<coc'it-oocu- 

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CI CI <M 1-1 tH 



ecoooooi-<t-t-o»ncio 

X — -*i-!OOiff,HOooc: cit- 

iH mci--i:Doc3ca-oci 

cic-aci rti-i 



I- 1- o Tt 00 1- CI o; C5 1< t2 CI 

— — t r-l «= Tt< CD Tt< ,-1 o r- cc 

Ti ot r^ ir: cr ^ CD CO QC o CI 

CICICI i-lH 



X ct -M CI 1-1 CD CI r- 1~ ^ CD CI 

c. —■ -* rH I- ^t c: t^ l:^ X o i-( 

m CCrCL- CD —. L-^CI t-CCI 
1-1 CI CI iHiH 



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C: CD n- CI I- '^ r^ C I- X i-i CO 
CI COCOLt CDCCDMl-OCI 



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CD r-; CIO I 



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cicoo LO <::■«*<■* i- 

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i-i CO CO »C CD O CD CI X O CI 
CICICI 1-1 iH 



C I-'; O CI I- ■* X CD C5 CD CO I- 

c: CD c: CI ■* CO CI o CI I- T- CO 
1-1 CO CO ut CD Cl m CI I- o CI 

r-lCJCI r-l 1-1 



CI CO X C: W CD CJ I- i-H CO O r-l 

c: CD ■* Tji X I- 1- o o X I- X 

r^ CO CO tV CD O CD CO X O CI 



ro -f D: X t- Lt CD LT CI X 1 1- 

~ "D CO ti O CD C I CO ■* CO w t 
7 I 10 -T CO I- '>D O O CI X C CI 



c: rn ^r I ■>«< c; © CO I CO 
CI CO cj I X c; '* ■* I i^ 



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CO xxt-LO I X 

X C !-< O LO CO 

Tf I- CI CO O I CO 

CI r-l r-l r-l I Tji 



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X cDi-'tcicr.' 1 CI 

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CO CO O I- O CO -^ I- 
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^^^^^^i?^i^^^^> ^F>>^^ HS^^^ :^i^^> H 






ELECTION RETURNS. 



469 



suuioqj. 



7\ 71 LI I O 



r' t" "' sf 



OC f^ Tt< 11- 



C CO LI 



U luojaoinna 



r. L-T' o I o 
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CM « o o 



1-C5 I- 
l-lr-l CC 



L-:c- 



•uos.Tepuv 






IM CO O I CI 

T-icoci I o 

ri CI 






Lt CI 00 

r-lL-a 



•snotidajs* 

a vwqiv 



•guo.usui.iy 

a 11" V 



I! ! 1111- 



•s.i.inimiis 
■]\: 'II'!!!! I 



•ii(is.i,»iii!,I 



•iiouin.\) 

a Og.lOOf) 



•uoiaidtuaj, 
Y sotnuf 



•uoiiit,.! 



•I.IOO'I 

•£ qilosof 



CIO CI I ■* 

o o LO uC' 
ciccL-s o 



:r XX I CI 

C X L- Tt< 

T-. CI 1- O 



- X X j I- 

ricil--. I c 



o L- r I 1 I 






r- o 'f I irD 

o S t- X 

CI COLO I o 

r 



1^ 












X L-: c 
d f T- 






CO o CO ':^ 



OTtil- I CO 



cicort I X 

tj-t-O \ ^ 

OTftX I CO 



xo;o ou 
o ■*! X I CO 



CC«Ot- I o 
<^r-H-l CI 



T--»no 
c:coo 



I X I L-: 

ISIS 

I X I CO 

r iTo 

i X I o 

rir, 

I <X 1 - 
I I CO 

I X I C- 

r !^ 
\^\^ 

00 1 o 
I I CO 



cixco 
c:coo 



loaiH I LI I o c 

(MOCI ri o - 

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X to 'O I X I c n 

ri^ c 



- ' t: K r; t; 



= k!&^ 



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5,-IOlCO .3Jr-ClC^ 



H ,-. ^ ^ ^ 



470 



ELECTIO'X RETURNS. 



HUNTERDON COUNTY. 



Alexandria Townsliiii . 
Bethlehem Townshii) . . 
P>loonisbur.v Borougli . . 

Califou Borough 

( 'Hilton Town 

Clinton Township 

Delaw'are Township 
East Amwell Township 
Fleniington Borough . . 
Franklin Townslilii ... 
Frenolitowu Borough . . , 
(Jlen (Jardurr l.oriiugh . 
Hampton Borough .... 
Higli Bridgi- Borough ., 
Holland Township .... 
Kingwood Township . . 
Lambertville City — 

1 Ward 

2 Ward 

3 Ward 

Total vote 

I.ebanon Townshiit 

Milford Borough 

Raritan Townshii) 

Readington Township . . 

Stockton Borough 

Tewksbury Townshi]) . 

Union Township 

West Amw(dl Townshiii. 

Total vote, Count 



, Sena 


tor ^ 


, — Asseml 


'ly—N 


o 


3 


_• 


- 










S 1 






^P 


^ i 




S 1 






3 ^^ 


.si 
■'I 




95 


116 


93 


112 


54 


56 


57 


53 


80 


135 


61 


148 


120 


149 


114 


155 


•205 


199 


186 


212 


314 


463 


258 


568 


29» 


331 


292 


333 


191 


232 


208 


208 


538 


522 


573 


460 


153 


188 


150 


189 


333 


282 


311 


299 


134 


119 


143 


115 


213 


162 


263 


143 


302 


164 


250 


206 


113 


138 


121 


121 


214 


167 


217 


160 


53 


289 


54 


289 


234 


181 


252 


175 


423 


275 


433 


270 


710 


745 


739 


734 


166 


158 


195 


143 


166 


122 


157 


133 


192 


346 


217 


298 


340 


625 


383 


580 


105 


60 


95 


(i8 


181 


322 


170 


332 


127 


145 


121 


136 


91 


96 


101 


90 



604!: 



5996 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



471 



MERCER COUNTY. 

Assembly 



<:i 









East Windsor Twp 103 100 100 30 

Kwins Twj) 528 396 515 125 

Hainilton Twp 2073 1575 212G 1025 

Ilightst-own I?nr 475 368 457 101 

Hopewell Koi- 207 140 292 141 

Hopewell Twp 408 261 397 154 

Lawrence Twit 601 405 595 180 

Pennington Bor 276 184 265 120 

Princeton Ilor 1123 900 1001 510 

Princeton Twp 201 119 186 168 

Trenton City — 

1 Wan! 560 522 571 322 

2 War.l 747 724 775 3!>5 

3 Wanl 419 435 437 400 

4 Wanl 140 195 158 319 

5 War.l 397 487 464 552 

6 Wanl 215 194 234 283 

7 War.l 327 324 350 236 

8 ^^'ar.l 251 338 308 255 

9 War.l 284 375 309 323 

10 War.l 632 598 650 464 

11 Ward 442 543 507 615 

1 2 Wanl 853 643 900 494 

13 Ward 1129 983 1151 477 

14 AN ar.l 880 680 869 273 

Total vote 7276 7047 7683 5408 

Washinsrton Twp 283 219 265 111 

West Windsor Twp... 220 100 199 48 

Total vote, ("onnty. 13864 11814 14141 8193 

Total Socialist vote in entire Connty for Assembly 



43 
180 


37 
198 


1437 


•J ooo 


240 


226 


172 


240 


191 


219 


254 


26G 


158 


174 


658 


1103 


173 


309 


421 


381 ; 


553 


545 


488 


443 


;!46 


348 


642 


604 


355 


320 


298 


2Cv2 


297 


281 


458 


385 


630 


533 


735 


662 


694 


615 


679 


593 


484 


549 


7080 


6526 


137 


124 


62 


134 


10785 


10694 


494. 





472 



ELECTIO'X RETURNS. 



. r -clan — nciu.TO.i ©©■^l- :r --hi- aoooo <:ro-*ocTr© 

L ■( 10|i — snoA"'i jc r-; ^ c ft «:: r: ^: n ^- p [u ^ :-€ ,- v t: 

( puoui a'BH • V n ^ U 5 ~ Ti ?: ^ ^ ?: ri -r i- rt i- © 2 

~ ;iii.«:iifTi!w cc © XI L- :^ -* irt c: :c o ro cr.©©Xi-c: 

- -J uoiit VV »-'5^iri« oc ec t- r-i 'J CO ir; i- oi x •<*< -* 



■ A^-,^ nnciAi;iT L-: >.- ?l rt X ■* M '^ c; iH I- C^LOCCOilU- 

< laa — nos.ie^dtl X I- -* X -.5 oi r-i fc rcM t- c: lci- Tti o co 



eO'*X-'-©CCXi-l,HM ClC^CfCCO 

- - - ■* cs t- Ti L-: CJ 

■* «2 M t- Tfi ■»»< 



=s I -daa— "os.iB"! j^ ^ ^^ ^ ,^ 5 ^ s CC.H rt ^ c= t- « s 
r= -J nBg.iOK ■*:='-< o n ri l-: t-i Lt r-: 



•luoa— i">4Vi:i.> £ "£ S •£ -. ^ ■ 



-J. 






. r -Li'ia— ^-iiiiiv: Sr:t-•3l~•-• 
H I 

t=) -r' '"''^,, X I- cc r. re (T. K ic '-' I- X xi-<m(Mc:i- 

O — — iMssi.ur^M cir-!r-©xci-0 wX© riocox^iM 

X I 

W ,' .■,,,^r. 'S'TU--^ rtx X - — t-x -i-xc-ft 

CO •uioQ — a;u30 c-.Tirit-i-r. t-i-i-x -; c^-x-rn-f 

W -J semuf t--*'* -- " '-^ 1. ^..L. T- 

§ i I ■ luaa— 9'^ ^'Xi $ S T-^ c ':^ S f:^ r. i3 i; 5 © ?f j^ 5 o fi 

^ r = • AV I"''-' J ^ ^ ^ -• ^ *■■ »-' • • " - '^^ ^ t- ^- i- 



1 t-00 

] xso 


t- CC X X I- X 


IS 

r 


1 'f ■* 




1 






cc 


c: o 
wo 


CC rH Tj< r-l(M rH 


Ol 

5^ 




»c c; CI X o X 

.-HOlOOfCO 


1 




1-: -r X »- -j: :■: 
■-:: \-. i^ X c n 
u: -^ TT I- L- r. 


1 


^ 


X 1- o e v: X 
I- c •* X r^ c; 


1 


! S^ 


ct I- Tf X cr. c: 
^ >:-: t- c r. X 


1 



:i rt cmcCL- t-irt i c; 



X ri i^x n I X 



^1 
. O p _ . ;,. 



-- 


E:' 


— 




- 


r; 


■A 


- 


p 


s 


^ 


.li 




1 


1 


1 


5 


15 




1 




« 


1 






S 












































,o 


■T 




■f: 


- 


-■ 


.£ 


i 


~ 


3 


£ 








c;2;a^^t^«Sr5SS^ 



?r 






ELECTION RETURNS. 

n.lO J -J 1- =: 'j: X rt i^ ^ g I -t; n ' . x 



473 



(IJJI — sHO.t'r •* >~ - I- >■: X X -^ X I c o !- o 



OCT-* 



1^ I 



-ajBSeidcIv S? 5 S ;; fc Ti 3 ^ 5^.1 K ?; i ?? 



gsoieo 



1^ 13 



(Isjl — nos.i8ie<i 5 ii [:: g Jl 



■<1.5;i — nos.iB'i z^' 



4 I 



[— uo J.VB K-) ;^ ^ g S ^ ^ X S - i O 3 = " 



I- 00'* 



rig 

I ?0 I 'f 



^ L 



•rasa— -f-i-ittK gi^sdi? ^;2;5;; 

•y S'^niBf ro rrr. I- -^rcr:: 



0U50 



ns 



•(uaQ _ _ _ _^ ^ 

-uassia; ti!>i X. ~ r~ 2 c c Vl .^ I ?1 



:^ 5 X q; re -: rl 



.^g I 



I CO 



•niDQ — f)o.v.*a 



t- — -*^:x x"mi 



X ' .- 'li I- 1 



^£tt- I t- I ^ 



> := •= ^ ^ - 



|"^ii§§ 11 = 5 



474 



E'LECTTD'X RETI^RXS. 



MONMOUTH COUNTY. 



-A.ssoiiibiy- 



y.;i ^S'C 



Allenliurst Boroiigli 

Allentown lloroiigli 

Asbui-y Park Citv— 

1 Ward 

li-AVard 

Total vote 

Atlantic Township 

Atlantic Highlands Borougli. 

Avon Borougli 

Belmar Borough 

Bradley Beach Borough 

Brielle Borough 

Deal Borough 

Eatontown Towushiii 

Knglislitown Borougli 

Fair Haven Borough 

Farmingdale Borough 

Freehold Borough 

Freehold Township 

Highland Borough 

Ilolmdel Township 

ITowell Township 

Keansburg Borough 

Keyport Borough 

Long Branch City — 

1 Ward 

2 Ward 

3 Ward 

4 Ward 

r. Ward 

G Ward 

Total vote 



93 


85 


34 


39 


190 


191 


81 


82 


G48 


599 


323 


304 


506 


491 


187 


190 


1154 


1090 


510 


494 


133 


135 


155 


155 


243 


241 


230 


223 


155 


151 


62 


79 


298 


362 


136 


205 


371 


324 


285 


252 


52 


47 


43 


50 


132 


93 


55 


54 


234 


234 


122 


119 


121 


124 


120 


118 


208 


203 


152 


158 


157 


153 


GO 


58 


r,74 


683 


681 


567 


223 


136 


226 


215 


200 


im 


325 


330 


61 


60 


127 


123 


432 


456 


347 


351 


317 


321 


181 


189 


546 


552 


464 


402 


130 


133 


120 


123 


236 


237 


288 


288 


256 


253 


201 


209 


375 


366 


229 


927 


349 


337 


181 


188 


292 


284 


161 


163 



1G38 



1610 



ELECTION RETURNS. 
MONMOUTH COUNTY— Continued. 



47c 



:Manalapan Township 

JIanas(iuan Boiougli 

Matawau Borough 

^latavvau Township 

Marlboro Township 

]Mi(l(lletown Townsliip 

Millstone Township 

Monmouth Beach Borough . . . 

Neptune City Borough 

Neptune Township 

Oceanport Borough 

Ocean Township 

Baritan Township 

Bed Bank Borough 

Piunison Borough 

Sea Bright Borough 

Sea Girt Borough 

Shrewsburj' Townsliip 

Spring Lake Borough 

Upier Freehold Township . . . 

Wall Township 

West Long Branch Borough. 

Total vote, Count.v... 



:j a 


"3 a> 


= Sq 


iS« 


^6 


H:c 


>-z:^ 


X^ 


229 


231 


99 


97 


424 


457 


210 


259 


398 


402 


339 


320 


138 


137 


178 


174 


188 


189 


359 


353 


1114 


1100 


731 


720 


192 


198 


183 


184 


99 


93 


00 


07 


118 


118 


97 


105 


1431 


1389 


429 


456 


78 


76 


58 


55 


401 


391 


340 


345 


145 


147 


142 


138 


1275 


1247 


752 


711 


452 


450 


420 


420 


145 


141 


237 


233 


49 


54 


15 


24 


273 


257 


120 


120 


225 


270 


104 


208 


327 


320 


161 


106 


594 


003 


518 


027 


100 


158 


87 


89 


10407 


10035 


11315 


11404 



476 



ELECTION RETURNS. 
MORRIS COUNTY. 



r.ooiiton Town — 

1 Ward 35G 

- ^\'al•.\ 394 

3 Ward 259 

4 Ward 244 

Total vote 1253 

Boonton Township 78 

Butler Borough 383 

Chatham Borough 383 

Chatham Township 76 

Chester Township 187 

Denville Township 13G 

Dover Town — 

3 Ward 343 

2 Ward 219 

3 Ward 322 

4 Ward 435 

Total vote 1319 

Florham Park Borough 132 

Hanover Township lOlC 

Jefferson Township 119 

Madison Borough 1089 

Mendham Borough 132 

Mendham Township 179 

Montville Townshii) 350 

Morristown — 

1 Ward r>8n 

2 Ward r.54 

3 Ward 473 

4 Ward •. 403 

Total vote 2010 

Morris Township 310 

Mt. Arlington Borough 79 

Mt. Olive Township 1->1 

Netcong Borough 147 

Passaic Township 009 

Pequannoek T-,)wnship 074 

Randoljih Township 284 

Rofkaway Borough 520 

Rockaway Township l^j, 

Roxbury Township -«< 

Washington Township 199 

AYharton Borough -'?' 

Total vote. County 12559 





'""■' 


^ 








Ph 




ri 








1 


■^.'i 


Sq 


^ C3 


VQ 












2 1 


& h 










= o 




z;^ 


M>-l 


KK 


352 


82 


88 


391 


07 


73 


247 


121 


138 


230 


99 


101 


1226 


369 


400 


77 


10 


10 


335 


125 


151 


384 


62 


61 


77 


15 


14 


197 


224 


229 


139 


41 


42 


347 


103 


116 


231 


95 


91 


324 


83 


87 


432 


120 


123 


1334 


401 


417 


138 


49 


48 


1029 


261 


282 


119 


46 


46 


10f)0 


511 


524 


127 


58 


59 


182 


82 


88 


330 


34 


40 


597 


196 


202 


597 


145 


159 


489 


134 


146 


421 


285 


299 


2104 


760 


806 


319 


120 


123 




23 


25 


152 


208 


175 


104 


308 


199 


679 


237 


318 


0.'',4 


87 


91 


•^80 


141 


151 


538 


189 


211 


155 


67 


73 


282 


267 


238 


222 


178 


177 


297 


93 


93 



12703 



5091 



ELECTION RETURNS. 477 

OCEAN COUNTY. 

, — Assembly — ^ , SlieriiT s 



Bainegat City Borough 

Bay Hgad Borough 

Beach Haven Borough 

Beachwood Borough 

Berkeley Townsliip 

Brick Township 

Dover Township 

Kagleswoort Township 

Harvey f'edars Borough 

Island Heights Borough 

Jackson Township 

I,a<py Township 

Lakeliurst Borengh 

I.akewuLKl Township 

Lavallette Borough 

Little Egg Harbor Townsliii). . . . 

Long Beach Township 

^Manchester Township 

Mantoloking Borough 

Ocean Township 

Ocean Gate Borough 

Plumsted Township 

Point Pleasant Beach Borough.. 

Point Pleasant Borough 

Seaside Heights Borough 

Seaside Park Borough 

Stafford Township 

Surf City Borough 

Tuckerton Borough 

Union Township 

Total vote, County -iWo 2922 4571 2844 



1 


i 


1-^ 1 


"'C 








•" 1 


lU 


.> — 


.= s 










as C 


s r: 


Ci; 


ic 




21 


7 


23 


4 


77 


56 


91 


40 


128 


65 


143 


29 


8a 


8 


89 


.5 


168 


88 


151 


85 


135 


115 


134 


106 


42ti 


309 


42'.» 


304 


r.iu 


20 


130 


28 




17 


4 


12 


'.11 


40 


IOC. 


38 


VX', 


217 


218 




145 


2(» 


135 


30 


104 


121 


85 


1.59 


SS(J 


749 


837 


951 


"2 


42 


35 


30 


141 


"0 


137 


23 


28 


23 


37 


10 


80 


24 


9.5 


15 


15 


14 


17 


12 


40 


16 


35 


20 


09 


25 


73 


20 


90 


167 


210 


60 


333 


298 


374 


260 


135 


138 


138 


138 


21 


110 


102 


24 


31 


98 


44 


75 


182 


25 


176 


25 


9 





9 





267 


45 


2.30 


50 


331 


21 


278 


34 



478 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



■'J O.JTJ.IOII r-l OlOlrlr-lr-l CCrHOIrl 



J Ulun!Ulr><J t-H OlOlrnr-lrt ; O r- CO r-. 



•.■) .lajiBAV '-I oimth,-it-i coi-^cm;:::. 



•II qdosof iH cioioir^rt I OrHOirt 






rlOlT-lTT 


i 


t-icoio 


Sill 




820 
1005 
1305 
1100 


137 
220 
101 
553 


s 
- 


710 
1524 
1231 
1000 


o 01 CO LO 

»-1 I— I- oc 

OICOOIQO 


5 
I- 


744 
1007 
1275 
1175 


'^.^cS 


P 


?io5' 



<I-»H— l'l->W fj 



10 CO — Tt< o I LO c: CO c X 

-,,s.ioii -o A-.UI.TI -CO ':H[:S!:?s!sS??2r^S 

|C0 ^ 



rt 01 OS CO 

c: •«i< 01"* 

T-IOIi-lOl 



2 I 



^ ! 



UI.'A'.I - t-i CO CO 01 CO I l- 

!I1!AV f^ o I' c. 10 1- CO LO r- 1- ,-1 



^; L- }; 1' ;:; ! S 



ococ. " 

CK -t< I ■<*< 



"(Ion — A'euoi Ttt xxioxr-j ]C-fcoiooi 
-OK \>I .lajse'i fo b i- ^ 5 x x lo r- ^. r- 



•(I>)M — .Ton ,H :; LOCO 1-1 ixooioi- 



•(Ian — sTtuui 01 t-ooooi irHoxooTji 

- I AV V A.TIDI I CO O I- O LO t- I- LO Ol l^ r^ 



luXl — AqrJ.iniv^ o o.H,-(r-0|OOTt-oco 

•T IlIPWll'J ^' ^COr. OIO .-TfO-^OI 
jI p.IBMlig rH C10li-!T-ir-l ! C r-H M r- 



(I.);i — i|4inix X oixcocooi .xxxoo 
niiiA- "-"^ xoc-.iOLO I'i'coir-o 

"! ll\ CO Cl'XLOl- rCSLOOll- — 

CO r-H 



'*;;^;h; 




36 jJoiob 


453 
1230 
1422 
1074 


I 


1900 
2453 
1284 
2380 


420 
1000 
1382 
1405 


^ 


1953 
2481 
1331 
2421 


mm 


CO 
X 


666 
1502 
1104 
1017 


415 
1080 

1380 


C5 


O ^^ CO ip 



■5 -• « ; ^ 

— — "^ s. '^ ■■- > O C _ •-'►:» t-^ ►^ >-^ O y. ^ ^ p ^ 

WO ^1^2 X^i Cm 



r 



ELECTION RETURNS. 479 

• -u^a-siioAv X i:' ^ 15 3 i; g I ,^ ?: S ;i ;J 5^ f£ 5 S I P^ 
^^'•■^ IS li; 

•maa-JjnH oj^gg^fi?! | ?; i^ 1^3 ?i £3 JS i=: J3 f2 | ^ 

• uioa-;oi,.niori g i-: {2 S g 5; S-! I ^ S g S g S S !r ^ I :i 

rl ?l C>l i-l fO II- 

I i-i I r-t 

"iiiarr — .CniBiarr co x ri cs o »r5 n \ la ^ t~ ■^ -r ~ ^ i- ■- \ci 

1-1 ,-H CI ?l IH Tfl QO 

"mr>(T — Tini).iop Tf ^ Tt I- 00 — :; 1 Tt. =; r- — :c cj l- -»< o 11^ 

, t-i In 

•IIS.13II -o .(juan ^ i g S g S S ! 53 !5 ae i; ^ ^ S S ?? Ut 

•«I3H — SUBA3 oi2'>2">si9Ci- I QC o 00 1- ci c L-; c: ri 10 

-1 r-ITI I I- , CI 

I T-l I C? 

•(l.i;X — .C.nio[ -^oxl-ooo i tt 'S'ciL-to t Tt-otr-i > c^ 

''l\. jT -l-J^SOl ■* X »0 I- S5 t— Ti ;-*c*X.H'*TjiL-;cO?| o 
I tH I CO 

•daji — .lan w eo ti< ci tc ic ro 1 m lt »- -f« :« u- x :r o 1- 

^c, ,1- - :cj . 

•flag— sniBii ^ r. ci ^t. ^ ^ ^3 1 i- n ..i ci cu- -. c t- - 

I !.V\ V A.uirtxi -^ X o X c: X ri I c; •* X i-i Tj. ■* L- re ?i 1 lt 

c^i 11 CI I- I CI 

■"'"*a— A'tiil.iiiiv: ocitciSC:r-,rc I i,TX,H-Xi--:r-cix 11- 
•.•I p.in.ui.:.! i2^i!?P!;^*2 I Mi-Ltt-ixr-. «=co In 

-.loji— „ jiui^. c. c o re 15 -^ -- I .H o x C-- -^ .- .T X in I c: 
^^c, |ac ,c. 

a :::::: : i^^ : : : i^^ | 

I ::•■•■; • ^^Z.- ■ .. '-'^Z £ 

^ o-^^S 3.7:0 o 



480 



E'LECTIOX RETURNS. 



PASSAIC COUNTY— Continued. 









Couutj 




-Shei 


•ift- 


^ 


, Clerk- 


— ^ 


o 




;: 


-■ 




^7 




^ 




s 


^^ 




■r' 


, 1 


>S 


■•: 2 






S§ 


?. 1 
















- 2 


C t^J 


?;sa 






c: o 




.= s 


t.H 




-v.O 


f~.'^ 


CQ 



Bloomingdale i:orougIi 365 

Clifton City— 

1 ^\'Ara 664 

- AVard 835 

3 Ward 906 

4 Ward 554 

5 Ward 801 

Total vote 3760 

ITalodon Borough 511 

Hawthorne Borough 1175 

little Falls Towiishiii 782 

North Ilaledon Borough 110 

Passaic CiLy — 

1 Ward 3G6 

2 Ward 1124 

3 AA'ard 1369 

4 Ward 1406 

Total vote 4265 

Paterson Citv — 

1 Ward 1881 

2 AVard 2539 

R Ward 1385 

4 AVard 220^ 

5 AA'ard 2468 

fi AA'ard 913 

7 AA\ird 629 

8 AA'arvl 955 

9 AVard 1229 

10 AVard 1977 

11 Ward 2046 

Total vote 18282 

Pompton Lakes Borough 384 

Prosjiect Park Borough 837 

Ringwood Borough 156 

Totowa BorougU 388 

AA'anaque Borough 449 

AA'avne Township 488 

AA'est Milforil Township 375 

AVost PatcMson Borough 292 

Total vole, County 32619 

Assembly — Social Labor. 345; Socialist, 
Labor. 556. County Clerk— Socialist Labor 



134 



197 



295 



241 658 

197 817 

184 826 313 

116 519 209 

132 765 215 



870 


3585 


1301 


188 


591 


221 


232 


1181 


344 


184 


711 


332 


23 


112 


25 


243 


335 


310 


322 


1069 


450 


228 


1253 


394 


764 


1205 


1119 


1557 


3862 


2273 


850 


2060 


762 


1528 


2529 


1671 


1228 


1420 


1362 


1447 


2585 


1209 


1057 


2440 


1069 


648 


893 


706 


1246 


611 


1351 


1925 


929 


2041 


2192 


1033 


2505 


1182 


1920 


1333 


S64 


2160 


775 


14107 


18580 


14784 


107 


363 


163 


65 


890 


54 


25 


160 


81 


156 


469 


107 


243 


454 


358 


107 


501 


136 


105 


363 


157 


182 


279 


227 



18345 32467 20760 

731. Sheriff—Socialist 
485. 



ELECTION RETURNS. 
SALEM COUNTY. 



481 



, — Assembly — n 



Allowaj- Township 

Elmer Borough 

Elsinboro Township 

Lower Alloway Creek Township 

Lower Penns Neck Townshij). . 

:Mannington Township 

OMmans Township 

Penns Grove Borough 

Pittsgrove Township 

Pilesgrove Township 

Quinton Township 

Salem City- 
East Ward 

West Ward 

Total vote 

Upper Penns Xerk Townshi;>.. 
Upper Pittsgrove Townsliiii. . . . 
Wooflstown Borough 

Total vote. County 



48 


1G8 


189 


210 


55 


53 


277 


145 


245 


314 


141 


42 


242 


34 


840 


340 


70 


42 


207 


232 


114 


81 


874 


386 


158 


35G 


532 


742 


o-,-> 


0( 


317 


181 


208 


79 



3737 



2729 



482 E'LECTIOX RETURNS. 

SOMERSET COUNTY. 



Bedniinster Townsliip . . . 

BernardSi Township 

Bound Brook Borough 

Branchburgh Townsliiii . . . 
Bridgewater Township .... 

Far Hills Borough 

Franklin Township 

Hillsborough Borough . . . . 

Millstone Borough 

Montgomer.v Township . . . 
North Plainfield Borough . 
North Plainfield Township 
Pepack-Gladstone Borough 

Rocky Hill Borough 

Somerville Borough 

South Bound Brook Boroug 
Warren Township 

Total Tote, County.. 



, — Assen)Ll 


y — N 


o 




Pi 




J 1 


s 






^-^ 


^■|^ 


•H-2 


yA 


O o 


O 4) 




C SO 






249 


124 


470 


339 


641 


523 


302 


108 


503 


530 


82 


29 


319 


78 


358 


120 


45 


16 


205 


42 


959 


326 


239 


124 


147 


116 


51 


47 


1266 


710 


150 


107 


236 


92 



ELECTIOX RETURNS. 



483 



SUSSEX COUNTY. 

, Senator s 



-Assembly 



i- \ 



Aiiflover Borough 

Andover Township 

RranchTille Borough .... 

Byram Township 

Frankford Township .... 

Franklin Borough 

Fredon Township 

f Jreen Township 

Hamburg Borougli 

Hampton Township 

Hardyston Township . . . 
Hopatcong Borough .... 
Lafayette Township .... 
Montague Township .... 

XeT' ton Town 

Ogdensburg Borough .... 

P<andyston Township 

Sparta Township 

Stanhope Borough 

Stillwater Township 

Sussex Borough 

Vernon Township 

Walpack Township 

Wantage Township 

Total vote, ("ounly 



SI 


117 


63 


122 


.34 


115 


31 


108 


11.5 


75 


88 


97 


.50 


81 


67 


53 


111 


161 


107 


147 


2.->n 


285 


487 


70 


71 


86 


52 


97 


72 


102 


54 


129 


1.J.5 


114 


118 


1.34 


43 


67 


36 


59 


l.So 


67 


138 


55 


83 


107 


114 


44 


132 


160 


1.50 


147 


36 


68 


38 


50 


541 


1165 


673 


854 


52 


97 


120 


00 


57 


139 


50 


120 


166 


185 


OJ2 


116 


86 


1.30 


97 


98 


63 


134 


57 


106 


338 


142 


270 


176 


123 


85 


93 


96 


24 


56 


17 


60 


204 


281 


169 


274 



236 



484 



E!LECTIO'X RETURNS. 



Clark Twi) 

Cranford T\\ p. . . 
Elizabeth City— 

1 Ward 

2 AVard 

3 Ward 

4 Ward 

y Ward 

6 Ward 

7 Ward 

8 Ward 

9 Ward 

10 Ward 

11 Ward 

12 Ward 

Total vote . . 
Fanwood Bor. . . 
(Jarwood P.or. 
Hillside Twji. . . 
Kenil worth Bor., 

Linden Bor 

T inden Twp. . . . 
Mount'side Bor., 
New Providou<-e 

Bor 

N e w Providence 

Twp 

Pljiinfield City— 

1 Ward 

2 Ward 

3 Ward 

4 War<l 

Total vote .. 
It ah way City — 

1 Ward 

2 Ward 

3 Ward 

4 Ward 

5 Ward 

Total vote . . 

Roselle Bor 

Ko'Jelle P a r k 

Bor 335 



UNION 


COUNTY. 






















County 







-Assembly-— 






, — Cle 


[.jj ^ 






■' ' 




<' i 


s 5 


i* . 


^ 


. 0^ 


^• 


<^7 


^•' ^ 


^•7 


'^'Q 


^ r.> 


'A I 


« 1 


•-'h4 


'-' a 


s 1 


i) 


?■! 


"2 7 


= ? 


•~i -^ 


"i 


ll 


~ '■? 














— ' s 




















^'2 


c = 


>^f£ 


<^ 


^t 


^,Z 


%^ 


%% 


70 


71 


<58 


87 


79 


82 


60 


91 


286 


305 


281 


1317 


1328 


1331 


223 


139 


709 


783 


751 


207 


ooo 


202 


742 


232 


455 


493 


462 


125 


156 


137 


490 


132 


457 


472 


439 


190 


221 


198 


424 


241 


365 


388 


366 


150 


169 


156 


403 


151 


437 


460 


426 


300 


333 


296 


396 


386 


987 


939 


941 


788 


89-.) 


819 


887 


971 


320 


328 


316 


281 


333 


284 


275 


336 


1379 


1385 


1330 


667 


727 


662 


1275 


810 


243 


267 


228 


293 


364 


319 


216 


379 


466 


507 


451 


1225 


1301 


1258 


429 


1328 


373 


417 


362 


1189 


1241 


1112 


319 


1294 


849 


857 


781 


1163 


1267 


1173 


756 


1333 


7100 


7296 


6853 


6578 


7233 


6616 


6612 


7593 


41 


43 


47 


127 


124 


128 


30 


137 


134 


151 


123 


171 


195 


200, 


83 


247 


230 


248 


233 


1080 


1073 


1064 


147 


1165 


119 


128 


119 


252 


254 


254 


116 


260 


123 


126 


123 


245 


248 


240 


77 


291 


332 


361 


303 


644 


677 


645 


204 


784 


38 


38 


37 


94 


105 


108 


20 


116 


58 


61 


58 


232 


243 


242 


51 


241 


67 


73 


44 


117 


173 


129 


34 


170 


111 


129 


143 


520 


537 


537 


91 


575 


181 


192 


199 


1045 


1039 


1040 


154 


1082 


228 


249 


240 


861 


861 


870 


208 


902 


345 


377 


370 


550 


564 


559 


277 


656 


- 


- 


. 


— — — ■ 




. 


, 


■ 


865 


947 


952 


2976 


3001 


3006 


730 


3215 


149 


153 


146 


239 


234 


235 


121 


262 


146 


154 


153 


230 


233 


235 


126 


260 


242 


249 


235 


588 


583 


588 


232 


617 


152 


161 


155 


237 


226 


225 


136 


251 


104 


109 


105 


305 


304 


309 


100 


312 


793 


826 


794 


1599 


1580 


1592 


715 


1702 


156 


177 


159 


812 


805 


795 


118 


868 



932 946 931 26^1 



ELECTIOX RETURNS. 



485 



UNION COUNTY— Continued, 
, Assembly 



Cdiintv 
-Clerk- 



■A ^ ^1 ^I ^! 

it b r ^' -z- ~ r ^ i 

Summit CitA' — 

1 Ward 140 144 134 83G 8;i6 

•1 Ward 222 223 204 805 805 

Total vote . . 3(18 307 338 1P>41 1641 

SpriuETfiold Twp.. 110 117 108 374 372 
Scotch Plains 

Twp 02 02 88 387 378 

T'liion Two 243 247 245 691 681 

AVestfie'.d Town— 

1 Ward 133 125 115 830 886 

2 Wanl 49 53 44 312 337 

3 Ward 83 85 73 413 453 

4 Ward 116 118 113 370 402 

Total vote .. 381 381 345 1925 2078 

Totak vote. 

County .. 11911 J2389 11650 22281 23213 2 

Total Socialist vote in entire County: Assombl 
Clerk, 1,087. 



876 
842 


115 
201 


873 
830 


1718 
379 


310 
S3 


1709 
391 


391 
691 


51 
199 


407 
704 


891 
342 

448 
402 


95 
37 
60 
80 


942 
357 
462 
436 



2083 



?625 
-. 1. 



1041G 
538; C 



24720 
ounty 



4. ST) ELECT I OX RETURNS. 

WARREN COUNTY. 



Asseiu- 
-bly~. 



K3 
PI 



Allamuchy rown.ship .• 35 

Alpha Borough 108 

Belvidere Town 512 

Blairstown Township 311 

Franklin Township 61 

Frelinghuysen Township 79 

Greenwich Township 116 

Hackett