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Full text of "Maquon cook book"

8 



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ISSUED BY THE 
MAQUON CEME 



MAOUON T 




J^ 




Is full of hope and promise for all and 
each succeeding day should find us a step 
nearer the goal of success and affluence. 

Frugality is an important element in our 
effort to attain success and as an adjunct 
to frugality we suggest a savings account 
at the First National Bank-A FIRST AND 
IMPORTANT STEP-and particularly for 
the young. 

The First National Bank makes a special 
feature of its Savings Department and pays 
3 per cent per annum. Begin RIGHT and 
start a savings account— then watch it 
grow. 

/■'. ('. Urn run/it . I'i(xi(hnt. 

John Wolf, Virt I midriff. 

A . S. Path ''. ' nshii r. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 

Maquon. III. 



CRAIQ & HARRIS, 



Monumental Work. 



For fine 





You can't do better than call on 

Craig & Harris. 

132 E. Simmons St. 
GALESBURG, ILLINOIS. 



Johnston's 

DRY GOODS 

and 
NOTIONS. 

Knoxville, - Illinois. 

THE 

KNOX BRAND 

OF 

Canned Goods and Coffees. 

ARE ALWAYS GUARANTEED BY YOUR 

GROCER. 

.A* for Them. W. A. JOfdOH CO. 

Distributors. GALESBURG, ILL. 



I WAS CURED OF RUPTURE 



BY 

DR. W. S. RICE, ADAMS, N. Y. 

READ MY LETTER 

Nov. 28, 191 f. 
Dear Doctor; -1 should be pleased to meet you face to face to express my 
thanks and give you a good handshake, but inasmuch as I cannot i will be 
satisfied in telling all who are afflicted with rupture that the RICE METHOD 
cures. Such a treatment as yours should be known far and near. 

You will remember that mine was a bad Scrotal Rupture of eighteen years 
Standing Your price was in my easy reach. I could use the Treatment right 
at home while attending to my daily work, and I ne\er lost an hour. No one 
but a rupture sufferer can realize my feeling of gratitude and what the cure 
means to me. 

You may publish this letter and print the fact of MY LURE by the RICE 
METHOD in big letters. Sincerely Yours, 

Aurora, III. R. D. No. 4, Bov 52. JOSEPH KAl TENBERGER. 

1" All who are ruptured should get the benefit of Dr. Rice's 
advice and treatment at once. 

AGE IS NO BAR TO A CURE. 

Letter of Jan. 25, 1906 
"Will sa\ I am confident that Dr. Rice's Truss and Lymphol will do 
all that he claims for them. I did not hold up on anything. I am a painter 
and paper hanger by trade and I climbed and swung 
my ladders like the husky old fellow that I am. The 
Truss was always easy and stayed in place, a thing 
that no other Truss would do when it came to hard 
reaching and stretching. I wore the Truss some time 
after being cured so as to be safe, but I took it off at 
least two years ago and I believe the cure to be per= 
manent. 

I worked on an extension ladder today, and am 
over seventy-five years old . Have : ried many trusses 
but Dr. Rice's puts them all out of business." 

C E. FERGUSON' 
9714 Prospect Ave., Chicago, 111. 

1 received a letter from Mr. Ferguson only a few weeks ago stating he was 
still well and happy and had no further need of a truss These arc only two of 
the many who have used my Treatment with success. I should be glad to 
advise all who are afflicted with rupture just how they, too, may be cured and 
be done with truss wearing for all time. Both of these Gentlemen will be 
willing to answer all inquires as to their experience il a self-addressed en- 
velope is enclosed. Send all orders or letters of inquiry as to the price of my 
Method of Treatment to 

W. S. Rice, Adams, 50 Main St., N Y. 

I can test if) to the efficiency of Dr. Rice's rupture cure. 

Mrs. Sam'l Alexander, Maquon, III. 





& 




KNOXVILL 



Sells Good o o 



Clothin 



and 
■ Shoes 

The Best for the Money 
or Your Money Back. 




MAKING FRIENDS 

"T~0 make friends is about as good 

' business policy known. 
We have been in business many years 
and have made number of friends by 
selling good, dependable merchandise. 

AIco System Clothes 

These clothes have all the style re- 
quirements, fit and good wearing quali- 
ties of the best system-made garments. 
They are made in the fashion centers 
of America; by tailors who combine 
brains with skill. Yours for Business. 

Chas. Gumbiner 8 Son, 

Clothing, Shoes, Gents Furnishings 

Maquon, 111. 



THE ILLINI CLUB. 
A Sabtcs Siterary anb historical Stuby <£lul\ 

Bible Study and Current Topics 1910-12. 



Wits. D. IK. Roustj, president. 



Hlrs. <£. D. tSrabill, Secretary 



J. R. PAUL, RESTAURANT 

ooooooooooooo AND LUNCH ROOM. 

Full line of Confectioneries, Ice Cream, Soft Drinks, and Oysters 
in their season. o o West Side, Maquon, 111. 



F. J. WALKER, M. D. 

Complete Telephone Connections. 

MAQUON, ILLINOIS. 



Taylor & Gray. 

Lumber, Implements, Buggies. 

All kinds of Building Material, Wire Fence 
and Hard and Soft Coal. 

TILE CEMENT 

PLASTER CEMENT BLOCKS 
PAINTS GLASS 

LIME SALT 

MAQUON, ILLINOIS. 

DRUNKENNESS IS A DISEASE. 

We positively remove all desire for 
Liquor or Tobacco. 

PURELY VEGETABLE TREATMENT—ABSOLUTELY SAFE 

Write for literature and information. 

Address— The Willow Bark, 

or Dr. Parkhurst's Sanatarium, <Dept. L) 

DANVERS, ILLINOIS, U.S.A. 



ELMWOOD ELECTRIC LIGHT CO. 



Yes, you say. Electric things are nice to have, but is that all? 
Are you not overlooking the convenience available thru the 24-hour 
service now at your command? Is there not some drudgery or 
waste of time to which you are bound- from which it waits to re- 
lieve you? If your time, your business or home life are of value it 
will save more than its cost, while doing speedily and well the 
most monotonous tasks. 

Ask us about MOTORS, for any power application; PUMPS, 
STOVES, TOASTERS, FLAT IRONS, FANS, WATER HEATERS, 
RADIATORS, LAMPS. 

You are not doing the best for yourself and your family, 

It isn't sanitary, it isn't up-to-date, unless it's ELECTRIC. 

Manager E. 0. BfOWfl. 



The Peoria Mud Baths. 

Why leave the State of Illinois 

= for = 
Mineral Baths or Mud Baths? 







215-17 N. A Jams St. 

PEORIA, ILL 



THE AQUA VITAE MINERAL SPRINGS. 

Are located Is miles Northeast of Maquon on the banks of Spoon 
River. For about 20 years these Springs have been known for 
their great curative qualities. 

In 1911 there was a modern Sanatarium opened for the public, 
thus making it one of the most beneficial summer resorts in the 
middle west. Water from these Springs has been shipped 10 all 
parts of the United States and Canada. 

Address A. C. Burnett & Co., Maquon, 111. 

H. J. OUDERKIRK. 

Phone No. 7 Drop. Maquon, 111. 

GROCERIES, HARDWARE, TINWARE 
AND STOVES. 

Sole Agents for Jennison's Best and Sweet Cream Flours. 

DOES CLOTHING AND SHOE 
ECONOMY INTEREST YOU? 

Our store is known as the store that brings che prices down. 
.Small expense of conducting it enables us to sell at much lower 
price than any competitor. We guarantee to save you from $3.00 
to $7.00 on a suit and from 50c to $1.50 on a pair of shoes. 

Quality and style equal to that sold for higher prices. 
Every purchase made here is accompanied with positive guar- 
antee of satisfaction or money back. 

M. STAMM. 

-Out of the high rent District, 336 East Main Street. 

GALESBURG, ILL. 



MONUMENTS. 

Buy your MONUMENTS and HEADSTONES 
direct from the manufacturer. Our plant is fully 
equipped for all classes of work. 






J. P. Bourgoin & Co. 



Wholesale & Retail, 
ELMWOOD, ILL. 



Merchandise of Quality. 

Always- Ever since the foundation of this business our 
one aim has been to sell only merchandise of quality. No 
garment, no piece of goods is allowed to enter this store 
until it has under gone a rigid test and proven beyond a 
doubt right to bear the trade mark "MERCHANDISE OF 
QUALITY."' The strict adhering to this principle has caused 
us to grow to what is now the LARGEST EXCLUSIVE DRY 
GOODS STORE in this section of the State. 

KELLOGG DRAKE & CO. 

GALESBURG, ILL. 



FOR RELIABLE TRUSTWORTHY 

Life Insurance, Consult 
W. H. SPINNER. GENERAL AGENT 

NEW YORK LIRE 

AMERICA'S GREATEST COMPANY 
Galesburg, 111. 



R. O. GOTTRICK. 

Drugs and Medicines 
Jewelry and Toilet Articles PHYSICIANS' 

Paints PERSCRIPTIONS 

Oils and ACCURATELY 

Glass. Spectacles and Eyeglasses COMPOUNDED. 

KNOXV1LLE, ILL. 



KODAK CAMERAS. VIEW GROUPS. 

Developing and Finishing-. Smokeless Flashlights. 
Photo 5 and Post Cards. Opening evenings for Sittings. 

OSGOOD PHOTO SUPPLY CO. 

GALESBURG, ..... ILLINOIS 

MODEL CLEANING PARLORS. 
I7iab Class 

CLEANERS AND DYERS. 

142 East Main St. Galesburg, HI. 

McCracken & Mattson, 

Dealers in 

FRESH = AND = SALT = MEATS. 

Highest Cash Price Paid for Hides. 

Knoxville, ... . Illinois. 



Maquon Lodge No. 530. 

A. F. and A. M. 

Meets in regular communication the First and Third Mondays of 
each month. Visiting brethren welcome. 

J. E. Shearer. W. M. 0. G. Shearer, Sec. 



Maquon Lodge No, 256. 

I. 0. 0. F. 

Meets every Wednesday evening. Visitors cordially invited. 
F. J. Housh, N. G. J. E. Shearer, Sec. 



Maquon Lodge No. 171. 

K. of P. 

Meets in their Castle Hall every Thursday night. Visiting breth- 
ren always welcomed. 

C. L. Hayes, C. C. C. F. Maple, K. of R. and S. 



. A. Camp No. 3618 

Meets the second Tuesday of each month in the K. of P. Hall. If you 
find it hard to pay interest on the mortgage and meet the every day 
living expenses of your family, how do you suppose your wife could 
pay the interest and keep the family together if you should happen to 
die? A certificate in the Modern Woodman of America furnishes the 
means by which the wife can keep the family wilh her. Are you- a 
member? John Finney Consul. L. A. \\ heeler r Cl&rk,. 



Good Will Chapter No. 184. 

Order of Eastern Star. 
Meets Second and Fourth Tuesdays in each month in Masonic Hall. 

Winifred Housh, W. M. Florence Thurman, Sec. 



Maquon Rebekah Lodge No 707 

Meets in Odd Fellow Hall the First and Third Tuesday in each 
month. Visitors always welcome. 

Rozina Darnell, N. G. Georgia Allen, See. 



Bertie Lenore Temple No. 10. 

Pythian Sisters, Maquon, 111. 

Meets the First and Third Fridays of each month in K. of P. Hall. 
Visiting sisters and brothers always welcome. 

Florence Housh, M. E. C. Anna Stonesipher, M. of R. C. 



R N of A Camp No 6386 

June Camp 

Meets every Fourth Friday night in K. of P. Hall. Visitors always 
welcome. Beneficial and Social Society. 

Dollie Wheeler, Oracle, Chloie Smith. Recorder. 



USE JENS VERY BEST 
UNO SWEET CREAM 





W. J. Jennison & Co. 

922 Flour Exchange. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

WHY? 



No. 1. No better Flour made. 

No. 2. Gives universal satisfaction. 

No. 3. Has been sold in this store for 15 years. 

Mrs. Flora Clark, chairman of the Maquon Cook Book Committee, 

and many others, have used this 
flour and can verify Statement No. 
2. 





i.ffl«B#- 



^j-ETAN. M* rt " 



Sole Agent 

H. J. Ouderkirk 

GROCERIES, HARDWARE, 

STOVES. 

Maquon, = Illinois 



INDEX. 

PAGES. 

Breads 2 to 5 

Meats 6 to 13 

Cakes 14 to 36 

Pies 37 to 44 

Puddings 45 to 51 

Vegetables 52 to 53 

Salads 54 to 58 

Pickles 59 to 64 

Candy 65 to 66 

Ice Cream 67 to 68 

Miscellaneous 69 to 78 



2Haquon Sabies Cemetery Association. 

(Dnjanizefc 1900. 

3ncorporatcb / un&er statues for establishing anb maintaining 

cemeteries, H)().~. 

Funds in charge of a board of six trustees. 

Income accrues from investment of perpetual fund and 
annual dues of members. 

Your lots cared for. 

Suggestions for improvement invited and complaints ac- 
corded attention. 

Our improvement fund is what is realized from the sale 
of the Cook Book at 25c each. 

Let us attend to your duties. 

Payment of $10.00 insures perpetual care for one lot. 

Annual payment of 50c insures care for year, April to April 

Higher contributions much prized. 
Elsie D. Hartsook, President, 

Florence Thurman, Secretary. 

COOK BOOK. 

First edition, three hundred copies, 1905, 

Second edition, three hundred copies, 1907, 

Third edition, copyrighted, four hundred copies, 1912. 



MAQUON 



COOK BOOK. 



THIRD EDITION 

REVISED 



ISSUED BY THE LADIES OF THE 

Maquon Cemetery Association. 

The Maquon Ladies Cemetery Association, Incorporated 
' under the State Laws of Illinois, August 20, 1903. 



- - TRUSTEES. - - 

Elsie Hartsook, President. 
Viola Foster, Vice President. 
Amelia Barbero, Treasurer. 
Florence Thurman, Secretary. 
Sarah Bearmore 
Prudence Grabill. 
Joe Paul, Sexton. 

Copyright; 1912 by the Maquon Ladies Cemetery Association. 



tf 



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23reabs. 



STARTER, LIGHTNING YEAST. 

Soak 1 cake of yeast until perfectly soft with enough 
water to cover well. Boil 6 small potatoes in enough water to 
make a pint when done. Add to this potato water 3 table- 
spoons of granulated sugar. Let cool to luke warm, then add 
yeast foam. Prepare this at noon and let rise till evening, 
then take half of it to mix bread and put remainder away in 
a glass fruit jar in a cool place and use it to start again. 
Proceed with saving water from your potatoes for dinner as 
before, always adding three cablespoons of sugar. Never 
add salt to the potato water. By following this exact you 
will never have to go to your neighbors for a starter. —Mrs. 
Florence Thurman. 

BREAD. 

Use for four loaves of bread six quarts of Jennison's Best 
flour, one cake of yeast foam, one quart of luke warm water 
Dissolve yeast in little warm water, pour the yeast into one 
quart of rich luke warm potato water, add one tablespoon 
salt and one of sugar, flour enough to make a thick batter, 
set in warm place to rise. I make this sponge at noon and 
mix into one large loaf next morning, let rise and knead 
down once, let rise again, make into loaves, let rise twice 
their size and bake in moderately hot oven.— Mrs. Maud 
Ouderkirk. 

VIENNA ROLLS (Heat 90 degree.) 

Two cups flour, one cup milk, one cake compressed yeast 
dissolved in one-fourth cup of water, one eg*;, one table- 
spoon butter, one tablespoon each of salt and sugar. Heat 
milk luke warm, beat all together at noon, let rise from four 
to six hours, roll out and cut with biscuit cutter, butter and 
fold over, let rise again. -Mrs. Ida Howard. 
FRENCH ROLLS. 

Two cups of light dough, one tablespoonful of sugar, two 



|0.' 
G«.A309346 



j^ BREADS. 3. 

/* tablespoonsful of melted butter, one egg; roll thin, cut small 
squares of butter and lap over; let them raise and bake in a 
quick oven. — Mrs. W. Prall. 

BISCUITS. 

Four teacups of flour, a little salt and four teaspoons bak- 
ing powder sifted together, then rub thru flour two table- 
spoons of lf>.rd and mix to a soft dough with one and one-half 
teacups of sweet milk. Bake in hot oven.— Bert Smith. 

MAPLE'S BISCUITS. 

One quart of flour, two tablespoonsful of lard, three heap- 
ing teaspoonsful of baking powder, one-half teaspoon soda, 
enough thick sour milk to mix. Sift baking powder, soda and 
flour together, rub lard well into it, then mix with sour milk: 
cut small and bake in a hot oven. — C. F. Maple. 

BAKING POWDER BISCUIT. 

One quart of flour, one pint of rich cream, two heaping 
teaspoonsful of baking powder, salt, roll out, and bake in a 
quick oven. —Mrs. Elizabeth Walter. 

CREAM MUFFINS. 

Yolk of two eggs well beaten, one-half cup of milk, one- 
third cup of butter, one-half teaspoon of salt, stir into one 
pint of flour sifted with three teaspoonsful of baking powder. 
Add beaten whites of eggs last. Bake in hot muffin pans 
quickly.— Mrs. J. Shearer, Galesburg. 

OATMEAL GEMS. 

One pint of cooked oat meal, one pint of sweet milk, two 
eggs, two tablespoons of melted butter, one teaspoon of bak- 
ing powder, flour enough to make stiff batter: have gem pans 
well greased and hot.— Elizabeth Green Westerfield, 

deceased, Chicago. 

STEAMED BROWN BREAD. 

Two cups sweet milk, one cup sour milk, two cups corn 
meal, one cup flour, one and one-half cups molasses, one 
teaspoon soda, a little salt. Fill baking powder cans half full 
after being well greased, steam three hours. — Gertrude 
Calhoun, Indianola* Iowa. 



4. BREADS. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 

One cup of sour milk, one-half cup of molasses, one tea- 
spoon of soda, two cups graham flour, salt. Steam in quart 
tin cans one hour and bake ten minutes. —Mrs. F. P. Hurd. 

PAN-CAKES (Family of six.) 

Break one egg into a basin, then put in one teaspoon of 
salt, one teaspoon of soda, one pint of water, one pint of 
buttermilk, two cups of corn meal, one cup flour. —Mrs. C. 
A. Walker. 

JOLLY BOYS. 

Mix and sift together three cups of rye meal, one cup of 
flour, one-half cup Indian meal, one-fourth teaspoon powdered 
cinnamon, one- half teaspoon of salt, two teaspoons of 
baking powder and two tablespoons of sugar. Add one egg 
well beaten, two tablespoons of molasses and sufficient cold 
water to make a thick batter. Drop by small spoonful in a 
kettle of smoking hot fat and cook till brown. —Mrs. Howard 
Hartsook. 

APPLE FRITTERS. 

Beat two eggs until quite light, then add one cup of milk, 
a little salt, enough flour to thicken to about the consistency 
of cake dough and two teaspoons of baking powder. Slice 
apples, or chop them, and stir them in this batter, fry in 
hot lard. To be eaten with syrup. — Mrs. Barnwell, Elgin. 

DR. TILDEN'S BREAD. 

One quart flour, salt sufficient, heaping teaspoon baking 
powder. Make into biscuit dough by using unskimmed milk. 
Mix with whole wheat flour and bake thoroly. — Mrs. A. H. 
Barbero. 

CORN BREAD. 

Two heaping cups of Indian meal, one cup of flour, pinch 
of salt, two tablespoons of white sugar, two teaspoons of 
baking powder, sifted together, three eggs beaten very light, 
one tablespoon of butter, melted, two and one-half cups of 
sweet milk, pour into meal and beat hard. Bake quickly and 
steadily for twenty minutes. This may seem too thin but 
will be stiff enough when baked.— Arlina Buell, Topeka, Kas.. 



BREADS. 5. 

CORN BREAD. 

Three teacups sour milk, three teacups of meal, one tea- 
spoon of soda, one tablespoon of lard, two eggs, one table- 
spoon of salt. Bake in a hot oven.- Mrs. Lodema McGirr, 
deceased. 

GRAHAM GEMS. 

Two cups of buttermilk, level teaspoon of soda, two tea- 
spoons of salt, one-half cup of sugar, two teaspoons of baking 
powder stirred in the graham, make very stiff and bake in 
gem pans in very hot oven. —Mrs John Forquer. 

CORN BREAD 

Three fourths cup of corn meal, one half cup of flour, two 
tablespoons of sugar, three fourths cup of sweet milk, one 
half teaspoon baking powder, one half teaspoon salt, one 
teaspoon butter, one egg.— Mrs. Jack Maher, Elm wood. 

CORN BREAD 

Beat two eggs, one half cup sugar, three cups sour milk, 
one half cup lard, scant teaspoon soda, little salt, one half 
flour and one half meal, stir the thickness of cake. — 

Raymond Housh. 

CORN BREAD OR JCHNNY CAKE 

One cup of corn meal, one half cup of flour, one large 
tablespoon of lard, one tablespoon of sugar, one tablespoon 
baking powder, one teacup of sweet milk, little salt or add 
one half cup of sugar and bake in gem pans. — Anna Child, 
Calif. Deceased. 

GRAHAM BREAD 

One quart sour milk, two round teaspoons soda, two tea- 
spoons salt, one cup New Orleans molassess, two tablespoons 
brown sugar, four coffee cups graham flour sifted, four cof- 
fee cups wheat flour sifted. Bake one-half hour in slow oven 
- Mrs. O. C. Melton 



6. 

MEAT S. 

TO BOIL EGGS, SOFT. 

Have water boiling rapidly, drop eggs in gently and boil 
three minutes. — C. E. Hartsook. 

CODFISH AND EGGS. 

We have ham and eggs, why not codfish and eggs as well. 
Properly soak and pick the fish to pieces and to ea2h cup of 
fish put in two eggs and beat well together and drop from 
a spoon into hot butter and fry a nice brown on both sides. 
— Mrs Louisa Dunn, deceased, Chicago. 

EGG LUNCH. 

Slice nine hard boiled eggs in a dish then put one table- 
spoon of butter in pan and slightly brown, add level tea- 
spoon of flour, stir smooth and add one cup of cream, season 
with salt and pepper, when done pour over the eggs and 
serve cold. — Eliza Jobes, Abingdon. 

OYSTER STEW. 

One pint of milk (let boil) one half pint of oysters, cook till 
oysters float. Season to taste. — Wm.Belden. 

TO FRY OYSTERS. 

Take large fresh oysters roll in cracker dust salted and 
dip in well beaten egg, then again in cracker dust and pat 
out with hands and fry brown in hot skillet in butter or lard 
— Obe Swearingen- 

ESCALLOPED OYSTERS. 

Take one quart of oysters and one pint of milk; put on 
stove and cook together. When it boils thicken with crack er 
crumbs and add plenty of butter, pepper and salt. Pour into 
a dish, putting bits of butter on top and bake a nice brown. 
—Nora Walter, Galesburg. 

SPARE RIBS AND KRAUT. 

Take sufficient spare ribs and saurer kraut put on to boil. 
Boil until the ribs are tender but if the ribs require more 



MEATS. 7. 

than two hours, boil them awhile before adding kraut.— 
Emanuel Regnold. 

A FAVORITE DISH OF MINE. 

Take fresh spare ribs, back bone or smoked ham, boil ten- 
der. About one hour before time to serve put on dried apples 
sufficient for a meal to boil, when done put some of the stock 
on apples and make drop dumplings and drop in with the 
apple?, add the meat, let all cook together until the dumplings, 
are done, then serve. - G. P. Burnett 

BAKED FISH. 

Dress, wipe dry and salt a large fish Fill with one cup 
of bread crumbs in which has been minced a lump of butter 
the size of a hickory nut, a pinch of salt and pepper and 
moisten with milk. Fill and bake. Cover until tender then 
remove cover and brown.— Jane Richardson, deceased. 

RABBIT PIE. 

Clean two young rabbits, cover with boiling water, add an 
onion cut fine, season to taste and simmer slowly until ten- 
der. After removing bones place in a baker, thicken gravy 
with flour, cover with rich biscuit crust and bake one half 
hour.— Mrs S. C. Burnett 

BAKED FISH 

To dress any kind of fish, scald very carefelly inside and 
out, remove the skin, wipe dry, rub the salt and pepper in 
thoroughly, let stand an hour at least, over night is better. 
When preparing for the oven rub in all the flour it will 
moisten, then spread with butter. Keep water in the bottom 
of pan almost to top of rack. Bake three hours, the last 
hour with damper open. Use covered pan.— Mrs. A. S. Potter 
Galesburg. 

TOMATO SOUP. 

One pint of tomatoes, one and one half quart of water, let 
boil, then add one and one half quarts of milk and put part 
cream if you have it. When it has boiled and ready to take 
off of the the stove add butter and salt and pepper. Be sure 
and stir well while adding milk. — Judson C. Briggs. 



8. MEATS. 



CHICKEN POT PIE. 

Two cups fiour, one teaspoon salt, two teaspoons baking 
powder, two tablespoons melted shortening, one egg beaten 
light, one cup milk. Pour the stewed chicken with thickened 
gravy into a dripping pan, drop in the dumplings and bake 
until well browned which will be about thirty minutes. 
Better and more wholesome than when boiled. - 

Mrs. Wash. Simkins. 

PRESSED CHICKEN. 

Cut up two young chickens, season with salt, black pepper 
and butter about size of an egg, stew slowly until the meat 
will drop from the bones, chop meat fine, add liquor and 
press into a mold. It is delicious sliced thin for picnic or 
luncheon sandwiches. — Mrs. Elnora 0. White, Whicesville, 
New Jersey. 

CHICKEN PIE. 

Stew chicken until tender, seasoning well. Remove bones. 
Line a pan with rich biscuit dough. Putin a layer of chicken 
then pieces of dough, previously baked, then more chicken. 
Pour over it the stock the chicken was cooked in. Cover with 
crust with an opening in center and bake well done.— Mrs. 
W. A. Housh. 

OLD VIRGINIA DISH (Brunswick Stew.) 

Cut up a young chicken and put on to stew, put in one 
quart of lima beans, six large ripe tomatoes, cut fine three 
ears of sweet corn from the cob, three spoonsful of butter 
and one spoonful of flour rubbed together to thicken, season 
with salt and pepper to taste. — Mrs. Josephine Wells. 

CHICKEN PIE. 

Make a crust a little richer than good biscuit dough, cook 
chicken well done, pick from the bones. Line a pan with 
the crust, then put in chicken with small pieces of the 
dough and more chicken on that. Then take the stock the 
chicken was cooked in and fill the pan full, put on the top 
crust and bake well done.— Mrs. Elizabeth Walter. 



MEATS. 9. 

SPRING CHICKEN IN OCTOBER. 

When young chickens get too old to fry, they are nice pre- 
pared in the following manner. Put two large spoonsful of 
butter, or lard and butter, in a roasting pan, pepper and 
salt the chicken and turn in flour as you would to fry, put in 
the pan and almost cover with sweet milk* put on the cover 
and roast for about an hour or until tender. When done lift 
out the chicken* turn in a spoonful of flour and a pint of 
milk and boil on top of the stove. This makes a nice sauce. 
-Mrs. Edna L. Hughs. 

ENGLISH TOAD IN THE HOLE 

Make a nice batter in the following way: take four large 
tablespoons of flour and sift it into a basin with a pinch of 
salt; make a well in the center and mix in two well beaten 
eggs and enough milk to bring the mixture up to the con- 
sistency of thick cream. The milk must be added very grad- 
ually as the batter must be absolutely free from any lumps. 
Set it aside for an hour or so. Take a pound and a half of 
beefsteak and a nice kidney cut in conveniently sized pieces 
for serving, season with pepper and salt, lay at the bottom 
of a well greased pie dish. Beat up the batter again, pour 
it over the meat, bake for an hour and a half. If liked 
mushrooms and oysters can be added. —Eliza Payne. 

CHICKEN PIE WITH OYSTERS 

Prepare and disjoint a nice fat chicken; put in a vessel, 
cover with water, season highly with salt and pepper Mid 
stew until it begins to get tender. Line the sides of a deep 
baking dish with a nice crust, remove the largest bones from 
the chicken and place a layer of the meat in the crust. 
Dredge it with flour, then add a layer of oysters, with salt, 
pepper and bits of butter and so on until all are used. Pour 
in half of the gravy and some oyster liquor. Cover with top 
crust and bake one hour. Belle Wheeler, Galesburg. 

BEEF OR CHICKEN CROQUETTES 

Take cold roast beef or boiled beef or chicken, chop fine 
and to a pint of chopped meat add one beaten egg and a 
pinch of salt. Make into cakes and roll in bread crumbs, fry 



10. MEAT'S. 

to alight brown in mixed butter and drippings of lard. Serve 
hot. If the meat is dry it will be improved by adding a little 
gravy. — Abbie Dickson. 

BEEF OMLET 

Three pounds beef chopped fine, three eggs beaten, six 
crackers rolled fine, one tablespoon salt, one tablespoon pep= 
per, one tablespoon melted butter, sage to taste. Mix well 
and make like a loaf of bread, put a little water and bits of 
butter into the pan, invert a pan over it, baste occasionally; 
bake an hour and a quarter and when cold slice very thiru— 
Miss Inez Burnett. 

CREAMED SALMON. 

Drain the liquor from a can of salmon. Add a lump of but- 
ter, salt and pepper to suit taste, set over fire to heat. Beat 
smooth a spoonful of flour with a teacup of milk, add to the 
heated liquor and when all is thoroughly hot add salmon, set 
on back of stove to let salmon gradually heat through. Re- 
move to a deep platter and serve while hot. A teaspoonful 
of lemon juice improves it for some peoples taste.— Mrs. 
Cobb. 

MY MOTHER-IN-LAW'S RIB PIE. 

Chop spare ribs into small pieces, stew until tender with 
plenty of gravy, salt and pepper; line a dripping pan with a 
biscuit dough made a little richer than for biscuits, put in a 
layer of the ribs with the gravy, then little pieces of the 
dough and cover with dough the top layer being sure to have 
plenty of liquid. Bake and serve warm with a little gravy to 
pour over when served. —Mrs. E. L. Housh. 

RECEIPT 

To fry beefsteak so it will be nice and tender and sweet 
you mast have your frying pan with fat in it red hot; place 
your meat in and turn when heated thru, allowing it to re- 
main on this side until it is thoroughly heated, then take 
out, salt and pepper to suit taste. — E. R. Mc Williams 

SCRAPPLE 

Clean the hog's head nice. Put the jowles in the sausage. 



MEATS. 11. 

Cook the heads till the meat falls from the bone. For two or 
three heads, use at least two gallons of water, when they 
are tender, take the meat from the bones, return the meat 
to the water in the kettle, salt to taste, stir in corn meal the 
same as making mush; stir all the time and have as thick as 
can be stirred with comfort. Let boil rather fast for half an 
hour stir every five minutes. Then set on top of stove, let 
boil two hours and stir occasionally. Turn out in pans to cool. 
Fried for breakfast it takes the place of meat and potatoes. 
— Mrs. Margaret E. Alexander. 

IRISH PIE 

Line a pudding pan with paste, chop two pounds cooked 
cold meat, place in dish and season with onion, salt and pep 
per, pour over it one fourth pint of gravy, have cooked and 
mashed one quart of potatoes seasoned, cover the meat nice- 
ly with the potatoes like a crust, garnish with butter put in 
oven and bake until nicely browned. — Maggie Housh. 

MEAT AND POTATO PIE 

Peel two pounds of potatoes and slice or chop not too fine, 
cut up one to two pounds cold cooked meat, lean and fat to- 
gether. Place potatoes in pudding pan with one fourth pint 
of beef gravy, season with pepper and salt. Add two medium 
sized onions sliced, place meat over potatoes, few more po- 
tatoes over meat and some butter or dripping on these pota- 
toes. Put paste over top with hole in center, thru which pour 
a little beef stock once or twice while cooking. Bake in a hot 
oven three fourths of an hour.— Flora Clark. 

MEAT LOAF 

Three pounds of best round steak, one half pound break- 
fast bacon, two eggs, three medium sized crackers one small 
slice of dry bread, one cup of milk, butter size of an egg, salt 
and pepper to taste. Grind or chop the steak, bacon, crackers 
and bread, mix with the egg milk and butter, form in a loaf 
or place in a mold and bake two hours. Mrs. Clara Burkhal- 

ter, Peoria 111. 

VEAL LOAF 

Three pounds of veal chopped fine, one half pound of salt 
pork, chopped; six large crackers rolled fine, two eggs well 



12. MEATS. 

beaten* one teaspoonful salt and one teaspoon pepper. Bake 
in slow oven about one and one half hours. — Mrs. Townsend* 
Avon ; 

PAN-BROILED BEEF 

Have sirloin steak one large or two small pieces an inch or 
more in thickness. At ten minutes or less before the meal is 
to be served have iron skillet hot* put in two cubic inches of 
suet cut up fine (or two tablespoons chopped) when this fat 
and skillet smoke blue, put in meat. Let cook two minutes* 
turn, cook same, turn again same time, turn again for final 
two minutes, take up on hot platter salt and pepper, butter 
if you like- Pour a small quantity of water in skillet, serve 
this gravy from hot bowl. If clock is not convenient, sing a 
stanza of America to each turn. —Mrs. C. E. Hartsook. 

ROAST TURKEY SAGE DRESSING. 

Dress and rub turkey inside and out thoroughly with salt, 
preferably two or three days before cooking, as your turkey 
will be more tender and better seasoned. Have your oven so 
hot that the turkey will begin to brown at once. Use as large 
a dripping pan as your oven will accommodate. Place turkey 
im pan with about three pints of hot water, a teaspoonful of 
salt. Baste well and often by dipping stock from your roast- 
ing pan over turkey, as the moisture of your turkey, when 
serving depends largely on basting. The more often basted 
the more juicy will be your roast and you wi'l not have that 
very general complaint that roast turkey is too dry. When 
thoroughly browned, cover with asbestos paper or another 
pan, that it may not brown further. Allow about twenty-five 
minutes to the pound for a two-year-old bird. If one year old 
it does not take so long. Use your own judgment, as this 
depends somewhat on the heat of your oven. After your tur- 
key is nicely and evenly browned cook slowly the remainder 
of the time. Put your giblets with the neck, in a kettle with 
three pints of water, one teaspoonful of salt and one table- 
spoon of butter. Cook until tender, remove from stock and 
chop fine for gravy. When y9ur turkey is done, remove it 
from pan, and if too much fat, pour off until you have about 
one pint of drippings left. Place pan on top of stove and add 
giblets and about one tablespoon of flour, stir all well to- 



MEATS. 13. 

gether and add enough hot water to make gravy the right 
consistency. Scrape all the articles from the roasting pan 
while stirring* as by so doing the flavor of your gravy is 
greatly enhanced. Salt and pepper to suit taste. 

For Dressing —Break up as much stale bread as you desire 
for dressing, cover with cold water. When soft squeeze dry 
and add salt, pepper and pulverized sage to suit taste, pour 
over stock in which giblets were cooked and add enough 
drippings from turkey to suit taste. Mix well and place in 
turkey about one and one-half hours before it is done; cover 
the openings with floured cloth and stick on with toothpicks. 
Put turkey back in oven and proceed to cook slowly until 
tender. If you have more dressing than will fill your turkey, 
steam over boiling water. —Mrs. F. Thurman. 

SAUSAGE. 

One teaspoon of salt to each pound of meat, one small 
teaspoon of pepper to every two pounds of meat, one table- 
spoon of sage to every four pounds of meat. Season and then 
grind.— Flora B. Clark. 

EGG SOUFFLE. 

One cup grated cheese, one cup milk, yolk of four eggs, 
one tablespoon butter, one tablespoon flour, salt and pepper. 
Cook till thick, when cold add whites of four eggs well 
beaten, put into greased pan and bake one-half hour. —Alma 
Bailey, Leesburg, Ohio. 

MACARONI AND CHEESE. 

Boil one-fourth pound of macaroni twenty minutes, then 
drain through cullender, pour cold water over same. One- 
fourth pound grated cheese. Put one layer of macaroni, 
then cheese, repeat until dish is full. One tablespoon of 
butter, one cup of milk, one tablespoon of flour. Cook until 
consistency of thick cream, pour over macaroni and cheese. 
Melt two tablespoons of butter and stir thick with dry bread 
crumbs, put on top and bake until brown-— Mrs. F. P. Hurd. 



14. 

C AKE S. 

SUGAR COOKIES. 

Two cups of sugar, one-half cup sour cream, one Cup but- 
ter, two eggs, one half teaspoon soda; mix and roll— Mrs; 
Mary Simkins. 

SUGAR COOKIES 

Two cups of sugar, one cup of flour, one cup sour cream'; 
teaspoonful of soda dissolved in cream, two eggs, flour to mix 
to stiff dough, roll thin, sprinkle with sugar, roll it lightly 
and bake in quick oven. — Mrs Lucy Thurman. Knoxville. 

SUGAR COOKIES 

Three cups of sugar, one cup of lard, three eggs, half tea- 
spoon of salt, one cup of sour milk, one heaping teaspoon of 
soda dissolved in the milk, one tablespoonful of vanilla or 
two teaspoonsf ul of lemon and a little nutmeg, flour enough 
to make a stiff dough, work the flour in slow so as not to 
get it too stiff as it will make the cookies tough. Roll out 
very thin and bake in a quick oven. These are crisp and will 
keep a long time. —Edna Hurd Traeger, Peoria. 

GOOD COOKIES. 

Two cups sugar, one cup lard, one half cup water, two 
eggs, one teaspoon soda, four cups flour, flavor with lemon. 
—Miss Mattie Hobkirk. 

COOKIES 

Two cups of butter creamed with one cup of butter, three 
eggs, one cup of sweet milk, three cups flour sifted with two 
teaspoons baking powder, one cup chopped raisins, flavor 
with nutmeg.— Cassie McWilliams. 

COCOANUT COOKIES. 

One cup grated cocoanut, one and one-half cups sugar, one- 
half cup milk, two eggs, one large teaspoon baking powder, 
one- half teaspoon extract of vanilla and flour enough to roll. 
—Mrs. Hattie Moore. 



CAKES. 15. 

COOKIES 

One cup of butter, two cups of sugar, one third of a nut- 
meg, one teaspoon of soda dissolved in three tablespoons of 
sour milk, three eggs.— Mrs. M. M. Kenyon, deceased. 

COOKIES 

Take four fresh eggs and beat them thoroly, two cups of 
sugar, one cup butter, mix them together until very light 
and smooth; then add one teaspoon extract of lemon and 
four cups of flour which has been sifted three or four times 
With two heaping teaspoons of baking powder. A little more 
flour will be needed to make the dough easily handled. Do 
not add either milk or water. Bake in a quick oven. These 
cookies are excellent. —Mrs. Louisa B. Williamson. 

OATMEAL COOKIES. 

Two cups of flcur, two cups of oatmeal, one cup of sugar, 
one half cup of butter, two eggs, one teaspoon ful of cinna- 
mon, one tablespoonful of baking powder, one teaspoonful 
of soda dissolved in three tablespoonsful hot water, one cup 
ful of chopped raisins. — Mrs. Mary Jones. 

CRULLERS. 

One egg, piece of butter size of walnut, two thirds cup of 
milk, one cup sugar, two teaspoons baking powder, a pinch 
of salt and nutmeg, flour to roll.— Kate Warren. 

TO MAKE HERMITS. 

One and one-half cups C. sugar, one cup butter, one cup 
sour cream, one teaspoon soda dissolved in cream, three eggs 
(whites and yolks beaten separately) one and one half tea- 
spoons cinnamon, pinch of salt, three cups of flour, one cup 
English walnuts, two cups seeded raisins; drop in a spoonful 
at a place in a dripping pan; bake in hot oven —Mrs. Susie 
Westerfield, Chicago. 

DROP CAKES. 

Two cups sugar, one cup molasses, one cup water or milk, 
two teaspoons baking powder, flour to make stiff batter, 
drop a tablespoonful in a place in a dripping pan. — Elizabeth 
Howard, East Galesburg, deceased. 



16. CAKES. 

SWEET CRACKERS, 

Two and one-half cups light brown sugar; one pint sweet 
milk, one cup lard, two eggs, five cents Worth of baking 
ammonia, five cents worth of lemon oil or vanilla avoring if 
you choose; flour to roll, cut in squares to bake —Mrs. G. L^ 
Simkins, Rapatee. 

FRUIT AND NUT COOKIES. 

Two cups brown sugar, one cup chopped nuts, one Cujj 
chopped raisins, one cup sour cream, one-half cup butter, 
scant, three eggs beaten separately, whites in last, one tea- 
spoon cinnamon, one-fourth teaspoon nutmeg, one teaspoon 
soda in cream, one teaspoon baking powder sifted in flour. 
Make stiffer than cake and drop small pieces into pan and 
don't have them touch. Good, and will keep if under lock 
and key.— I. J. Rambo. 

OATMEAL COOKIES. 

One cup of sugar, one third cup of butter, two cups of oat 
meal, three cups flour, one cup of chopped raisins, one tea- 
spoon soda in a tablespoon hot water, one teaspoon cinna- 
mon, two eggs, one teaspoon baking powder. — Mrs Lucinda 
Jones. 

FROSTED CREAMS. 

One cup of black molasses, one cup of brown sugar, one 
cup of lard, one cup of water, one heaping teaspoon of ^oda, 
yolks of four eggs, save the whites for frosting. Bake in 
cakes the size of a dripping pan, frost and when cold cut in 
cakes the size you like — Mrs. Sarah Wallick, Knoxville, 111. 

ARTISTIC COOKIES. 

Three beaten eggs, one cup of sugar, three fourths cup of 
shortening one-half teaspoon of cinnamon, one and one- 
half cups of chopped raisins, one half teaspoon of soda, two 
cups of flour, one fourth teaspoon of baking powder, two 
cups of rolled oats, a little salt. Drop teaspoonful at a time 
on buttered pans; have oven hot. —Mrs. Gertrude Gullett, de- 
ceased. 

GINGER CREAMS- 

One cup of sugar, one cup molasses, good one-half cup of 



CAKES. \7. 

lard, good one-half cup of hot water, one teaspoon soda dis- 
solved in hot water, one tablespoon ginger, just flour enough 
to roll. Frost with the boiled frosting. —Barbara Swadlev 
Kapatee. 

GINGER CREAMS. 
One cup sugar, one cup butter, one cup molasses, one-half 
cup buttermilk, yolks two eggs, one teaspoon each of cinna- 
mon, ginger, cloves and nutmeg, two teaspoons soda dissolv- 
ed in one tablespoon good vinegar; add flour enough to mix 
soft and roll out one-half inch thick. Bake in a hot oven and 
cover with boiled frosting. -Mrs. George Elliot, 

GINGER COOKIES. 
Two cups of sugar, one cup of shortening, two cups of 
molasses, two eggs, one-half cup sour cream, two tablespoons 
of ginger, one teaspoon soda, dissolve in boiling water — 
Mrs. Chas. D. Way, Rapatee. 

GINGER COOKIES. 
Three cups flour, one tablespoon soda, one cup sugar, one 
tablespoon ginger, one teaspoon salt, one teaspoon cinna- 
mon, one cup lard or butter, two cups molasses, one cup of 
buttermilk or sour milk and one teaspoon strong vinegar. 
Mix thoroly and add enough flour to roll out in shape. These 
cookies keep splendidly and are soft like bakers cookies - 
Mrs. F. H. Harper. 

GINGER COOKIES. 

One cup sugar, one cup molasses, three-fourths cup lard 
or butter, two eggs, one-half cup sour cream with two tea- 
spoons soda, one teaspoon each of cinnamon and ginger, 
flour to roll. -Mrs. Robert Harper. 

GINGER COOKIES. 

One cup of lard and butter mixed, one cup sugar, one cup 
molasses, one cup sour milk, one heaping teaspoon soda, two 
eggs, one tablespoon ginger, flour to roll.— Mrs. Howard. 

GINGER COOKIES. 
One cup sour milk, one cup brown sugar, two cups mo- 
lasses, two eggs, two teaspoons ginger, two-thirds cup short- 



18. CAKES. 

ening, two teaspoons soda, one teaspoon vinegar, flour 
enough to roll. — Mrs. Hattie Davis. 

GINGER COOKIES. 

One cup of butter, one cup sugar, one cup molasses, one 
egg, one tablespoon soda, one tablespoon ginger; mix very 
very stiff and sprinkle with sugar before baking.— Mrs. 
Salina Clark. 

GINGER COOKIES. 

One cup of sugar, one cup molasses, one cup butter, three 
eggs one tablespoon ginger, one teaspoon cinnamon, one tea- 
spoon soda; dissolve soda in a little warm water and stir into 
the molasses; flour enough to roll, bake in a quick oven. 
Mrs. Elma Shearer. 

MOTHER BRIGGS' GINGER COOKIES 

One cup of New Orleans molasses, one-half cup of brown 
sugar, two-thirds of a cup of sour milk, two tablespoons of 
ginger, one teaspoon of salt, one heaping teaspoon of soda. 
Make a soft dough.— Mrs. Lizzie Briggs. 

SOFT GINGER BREAD. 

One cup of New Orleans molasses, one-half cup sugar,, 
one-half cup of lard, two and one-half cups of flour, two tea- 
spoons of soda in one cup of boiling water, one teaspoon of 
cinnamon, one teaspoon of cloves, one teaspoon of ginger, 
two eggs well beaten and one-fourth teaspoon of salt.— Mrs. 
G. S. Sutherland, Galesburg. 

SOFT GINGER BREAD. 

One cup lard and butter, one cup Orleans molasses, one 
cup sugar, one tablespoon soda, two tablespoons cinnamon, 
two tablespoons ginger, one cup boiling water, two eggs, a 
pinch of salt, five scant cups flour with two teaspoons bak- 
ing powder in flour. The best part of this is the batter will 
keep two weeks and can be baked on the shortest possible 
notice in jempans. — Mrs- Asa Rambo. 

GINGER BREAD. 

One cup of sugar, one cup of butter or lard, one egg, one 
cup of molasses, one heaping teaspoon of soda dissolved in 



CAKES. 19. 

one cup of sour milk, one teaspoon of cloves, one teaspoon 
of nutmeg, one teaspoon of ginger, one teaspoon of cinna- 
mon, two and one-half cups of flour, add one pound of rais- 
ins if desired. Bake in slow oven. - Mrs. Fred Traeger. 
Peoria. 

GINGER BREAD. 

One-half cup of sugar, one-half cup of molasses, one-half 
cup of butter, one-half cup of sour milk, tea or coffee, one 
teaspoon of soda in two cups of flour, one teaspoon of ginger 
one well beaten egg.— Jennie M Bennett. 

GINGER BREAD. 

Three pints of sugar, t>cant pint of butter, one quart of 
sour milk (not buttermilk) two tablespoonsful of soda, one 
tablespoon of pulverized alum, two tablespoonsful of ginger, 
flour to make as stiff as coaky dough; keep in a cool place 
and bake as needed. Roll to about an inch thick, the size of 
a bread pan and bake. Cut in squares to be eaten warm. — 
Mrs. Mary E. Darnell, Atlanta, Mo. 

NUT BREAD. 

One cup granulated sugar, one egg, one cup sweet milk, 
three cups flour, four teaspoons baking powder, one cup of 
chopped nuts. Put in greased pan about four inches deep, 
let raise]twenty minutes and bake forty minutes in slow oven 
—Mrs. 0. C. Bailey. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

Three eggs, one cup sour milk, two cups of sugar, one 
teaspoon of soda, one tablespoon of lard. —Mrs. A. C. Housh 

DOUGHNUTS. 

One and one-half cups of sugar, one cup sour milk, one 
teaspoon soda, two teaspoons baking powder, three table- 
spoons hot lard, two or three eggs, one quart of flour.— Mrs 
Laura Stoke. 

FRIED CAKES. 

One cup of sugar, one cup sweet milk, two eggs, one scant 
tablespoon melted lard, three teaspoons baking powder, 
flour to make stiff dough.— Ada Howard. 



20. CAKES. 

DOUGHNUTS 

One pint bowl sugar, four pints of flour (do not put all in 
at first) butter size of egg worked into sugar, a little salt, 
one nutmeg, four eggs beat with fork till very light, fill 
bowl with milk if it runs over will not hurt, six teaspoons 
baking powder; work with spoon until smooth, turn, onto 
board using all of the flour. Pinch off a piece and try when 
ever wanted. The dough will keep for two weeks if kept in 
a cool place.— Sadie Buell, Topeka, Kansas. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

Two cups mashed potatoes with butter the size of an 
egg while warm, one and one-half cups sugar, two eggs, 
one cup of sweet milk, five cups of flour, five teaspoons bak- 
ing powder, nutmeg and salt. —Flora Clark. 

RAISED DOUGHNUTS. 

Three eggs, one cup sugar, one third cup of butter, three 
pints bread sponge, mix with the hand as soft as possible; 
let it rise, mold again, have the bread-board floured, put the 
dough on it, roll half an inch thick and cut out, let raise 
half an hour and fry in moderately hot lard.— Mrs. Prosper 
Morrison. 

CREAM PUFFS. 

Boil together one cup of water, one-half cup of sugar; 
then add one cup flour, stir all together till it leaves the side 
of the pan. When cool, add three eggs not beaten, a pinch 
of soda about the size of a pea; bake one-half hour. 

Filling— Take the juice and rind of a lemon, one and one- 
half cups of sugar, three tablespoons of flour, one and one- 
half cups water, two eggs; boil till thick and fill puffs.— Mrs 
N- Belden. 

CREAM PUFFS. 

One cup of hot water, one half cup butter, boil together 
and while boiling stir in one cup of sifted dry flour, take 
from stove and stir in three unbeaten eggs, stir it five min- 
utes. Drop in tablespoonsful on a buttered tin and bake in a 
quick oven twenty-five minutes, opening the stove door no 
oftener than is absolutely necessary and being careful that 



CAKES. 



21. 



they do not touch each other in the pans. This will make 

Cream for above. -One cup milk, one cup sugar, one egg 
three tablespoons flour, vanilla to flavor. Stir the flour in a 
little of the milk; boil the rest; turn this in and stir until the 
whole thickens. When both this and the puffs are cool, open 
the puffs a little way with a sharp knife and fill with the 
cream.-Mrs. Maud R. Newberg, Ottumwa, Iowa. 

DEVIL'S FOOD CAKE. 

One and one-half cups sugar, one-half cup butter, two and 
one-half cups flour, one-half teaspoon soda in one-half cud 
of hot water, two eggs, four tablespoons of cocoa dissolved 
in two-thirds of a cup of coffee flavored with vanilla 

Filhng-One-half cup of sweet milk and cream, one table- 
spoon of butter, one-half cup of sugar, white of one ego: 
one teaspoon flour. -Josie Kennelly. 

DEVIL'S FOOD CAKE. 
Cream two cups of dark brown sugar, one-half cup of 
butter, one-half cup each of sour milk and hot water two 
eggs well beaten, one teaspoon soda dissolved in hot water 
two and one-half cups of flour, two squares of unsweetened 
chocolate dissolved in a little water on back of stove mix all 
together well and bake in layers and put together with boil- 
ed frosting (white). -Mrs. Jack Maher, Elmwood. 
DEVIL'S FOOD. 

One-half cup of grated chocolate, one-half cup of sweet 
milk, one-half cup of brown sugar mixed and put in a double 
boiler, heat until all dissolved and when cold add the follow 
ing: one cup brown sugar, scant one-half cup butter, yolks 
of three eggs, one-half cup sweet milk, one-half teaspoon of 
soda, two cups of flour, two teaspoons baking powder one 
teaspoon vanilla, bake in layers. 

Filling-One cup sour cream, one cup sugar, two teaspoon 
cornstarch boil and when cool add vanilla and one large cup 
of chopped walnut meats. -Miss Winifred Housh. 
ANGEL FOOD. 

Whites of nine eggs, one and one-fourth cups of granulat- 



22. CAKES. 

ed sugar; beat the eggs, salt and cream of tartar very stiff; 
add sugar; beat very thoroly; stir in one cup of flour which 
must be measured after sifting, very lightly; flavor to taste 
Bake very slowly about forty minutes. 

Filling— One cup of sugar, two tablespoons of cold water, 
boil until it threads, beat the white of one egg very stiff and 
pour boiling syrup over. Beat until it looks like mallow.— 
Mrs. Martin. 

ANGEL FOOD. 

Whites of eleven eggs, one and one-half tumblers of gran- 
ulated sugar, one tumbler of flour, one teaspoon cream of tar- 
tar, one teaspoon of vanilla extract. Break the whites of the 
eggs in a bowl, add a pinch of salt and beat light with an 
egg beater; sift the sugar three times and stir lightly into 
the whites; add the vanilla; sift flour four times; add cream 
of tartar and sift once more and stir lightly into the eggs 
and sugar. Bake from forty minutes to an hour; don't grease 
the tin. —Mrs. Delia Kemper. 

SPICE CAKE. 

One and one half cups of sugar, one-half cup of butter, one- 
half cup sour milk with one teaspoon soda dissolved in it, 
three eggs beaten stiff, two cups seeded raisins, one-half 
grated nutmeg, one teaspoon cinnamon and cloves. Mix very 
stiff. -Mrs. Nellie Mc Williams, 

YEAST FRUIT CAKE. 

Two eggs, one coffee cup of yeast sponge, one and one- 
half cups of sugar, two-thirds of a cup of butter and lard 
mixed one cup raisins, one-half cup currants, one-fourth 
teaspoon soda in one-fourth cup of coffee, spices to taste, 
flour to make a rather stiff batter, let stand for several hours 
bake in a moderate oven from forty to sixty minutes. —Lucy 
Shephard. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

Three-fourths of a pound of butter, one pound of dark 
brown sugar, two and one-half pounds of raisins, two pounds 
of currants, one pound citron, one-fourth pound lemon peel- 



CAKES. 23. 
^— " i ■ 

ings, one-fourth pound cracked almond, twelve eggs, one- 
half cup hot water, one teaspoon soda, one tablespoon cacia 
buds, one pound flour, one teaspoon mace, one tablespoon cin- 
namon, one teaspoon callander seeds, one tablespoon allspice 
one tablespoon cloves, one teacup Orleans molasses. Boil 
fruit in one-half cup of flour, one wine glass of brandy, one 
wine glass of wine. Stirabout one-half hour and bake in a 

dripping pan. —Mrs. Martin Maher. 

SPICE CAKE. 

One-half cup sugar, one teaspoon butter, one cup sour milk 
one-half cup syrup, one egg, one and one-half teaspoons cin- 
namon, one and one-half teaspoons, cloves, one teaspoon 
soda; flour to thicken. Fay Bearmore. 

FAVORITE SPICE CAKE. 

One cup brown sugar, one cup cut raisins, one-half cup of 
butter, one-half cup sour milk, one level teaspoon soda, two 
whole eggs, one-half teaspoon of cinnamon and a dash of 
nutmeg, one and one-fourth cups of flour. 

Frosting- One-half cup of sugar; cook until it threads 
from spoon; set off and let cool. Beat the white of one egg 
to stiff froth, stir in syrup, add flavor desired. —Mrs. Mattie 
Bennett. 

SPICE CAKE. 

One-fourth cup of lard or butter, two cups brown sugar, 
three eggs, three cups flour, one cup sour milk, one teaspoon 
soda, one-fourth teaspoon allspice, two teaspoons cinnamon. 
— Miss. Jennie McKenney. 

COFFEE CAKE. 

One-half cup butter, one cup sugar, two eggs, one-half 
cup of molasses, one-half cup cold coffee, two cups, flour, 
one teaspoon soda in coffee, one teaspoon cloves, one tea- 
spoon mace, one teaspoon cinnamon. --Edna Way. 

COFFEE CAKE 

One cup raisins, one cup coffee, one cup sugar, one cup 
butter, one-half cup molasses; one egg one teaspoon each 



24. CAKES. 

cinnamon and allspice, two teaspoons baking powder, enough 
flour to stiffen.— Mrs. Wilson Harler. 

COFFEE CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, one cup butter, three eggs, one cup cold 
coffee, two teaspoons baking powder, two teaspoons cinna- 
mon, one teaspoon cloves, one cup currants, three cups flour. 
—Mrs. Fanny Richard. 

GERMAN COFFEE CAKE. 

One quart bread sponge, one cup sugar, two eggs, one 
teaspoon each of cinnamon and nutmeg, one pint sweet milk 
one cup butter, one-half teaspoon salt, flour to make a soft 
dough; let it rise, then knead down, roll out an inch thick 
and put in bread pans and let rise again: brush over the top 
with beaten egg; sprinkle thickly with sugar, dust with cin- 
namon, bake. —Mrs G. P. Burnett, Galesburg, deceased. 

BLACKBERRY JAM CAKE. 

One cup of sugar, one-half cup butter, three eggs, four 

tablespoons of sour milk, one teaspoon each of nutmeg, 

cinnamon and allspice, one and three-fourths cups of flour, 

mix and then add one cup of blackberry jam and stir lightly. 

Bake in layers and spread with jelly. — Mrs. Jennie Milam., 

Elmwood. 

BLACKBERRY CAKE. 

Two cups of sugar, two eggs, reserving part of the whites 
for frosting, one-half cup of butter, one large cup of canned 
berries, drain juice and mash them up fine, two-thirds of a 
cup of sour milk or cream, a pinch of salt, one-half teaspoon 
of soda dissolved in the milk, one heaping teaspoon of bak 
ing powder sifted with the flour, one teaspoon each of cinna- 
mon, ground cloves, and nutmeg. Beat eggs, butter and 
sugar together, add other ingredients and enough flour to 
make as ordinary cake, bake in two layers. If berries have 
been sweetened use one and one-half cups of sugar. — Mrs. 
Ollie Kinser. 

MARBLE CAKE. 

One egg and the yolk of another, one-half cup of butter,, 
three-fourths cup of sweet milk, two cups of flour, one tea- 



CAKES. 25. 

*■ =^ 

spoon each of baking powder, cinnamon, allspice, cloves and 
nutmeg. Use the white of one egg for frosting and divide 
the batter before putting in the spices. — Mrs. D. H. Hart- 
sook, Galesburg. 

MARBLE CAKE. 

This is made in separate batters, a dark and a light one. 
For the dark one take one half cup of butter, one cup of 
brown sugar* two and one-half cups of flour, one teaspoon 
of Royal Baking powder, yolks of four eggs, one-half cup of 
milk, one teaspoon each of extract of cinnamon, cloves and 
allspice. For the light part take one-half cup of butter, one 
cup of sugar, two and one-half cups of flour, one teaspoon of 
baking powder, whites of four eggs, one-£ialf cup of milk, 
one teaspoon lemon extract. Both batters are made by rubb- 
ing the butter and sugar to a cream, adding the eggs, beat 
a few minuses, then add the flour sifted with the powder, 
then the extract and milk, mixing into rather firm batter. 
Bake in quick oven. — Miss Ada Mills. 

RAISIN CAKE. 

Whites of three eggs, yolks of one, one and one-half cups 
of sugar, one-half cup butter, one cup of milk, three cups of 
sifted flour, three teaspoons of baking powder. Filling — one 
cup of sugar, yolks of three eggs, one-half cup of milk, 
butter size of walnut, two tablespoons of flour, one cup of 
raisins. Cook until as thick as custard.— Mrs. Joseph Shearer. 

SODA CAKE. 

Two cups of sugar, one cup sour cream, two eggs, two 
tablespoons of butter, one teaspoon of soda, Make stiff 
enough to spread over pan. —Mrs. Sarah E. Selby, Allen, 

Kas. 

DELICATE CAKE. 

One cup of cornstarch, one cup butter, two cups sugar, 
one cup sweet milk, two cups flour, whites of seven eggs. 
Rub butter and sugar to a cream, mix one teaspoon cream 
of tartar with the flour and cornstarch, one-half teaspoon of 
soda with the sweet milk, add them to the sugar and butter 
and then add flour and whites of eggs. Flavor to taste.— 
Mrs. J no. Hollo way. 



26. CAKES. 

SOUR CREAM CAKE. 

One coffee cup of sugar, one cup of rich sour Cream, two 
scant cups of flour, one level teaspoon of baking powder; 
one tablespoon of water in which dissolve one-half teaspoon 
of soda, one egg, beaten separately, a pinch of salt, flavor 
with nutmeg. 

An excellent layer cake— Take two-thirds of the mixture 
and bake in two jelly pans and to the remaining batter add 
one tablespoon of rich sour cream, one of best New Orleans 
molasses, one- fourth teaspoon of soda, one-third cup of flour, 
one-third teaspoon of baking powder, a little salt, one tea- 
spoon each of cinnamon and allspice, a small cup of seedless 
raisins chopped fine, very good without. Put layers together 
with boiled frosting— Mrs. D. M. Housh. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

One cup butter, one cup brown sugar, one cup Orleans 
molasses, two eggs one cup sour milk, one teaspoon soda, 
three cups flour, one cup raisins, one cup currants, one cup 
figs, one teaspoon cinnamon, one teaspoon cloves; bake in 
layers. -Eunice Housh. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

Two cups of sugar, one cup molosses, two pounds of rais- 
ins, two pounds currants, one pint brandy or cider, two tea- 
spoons cinnamon, one teaspoon nutmeg, one pound of but- 
ter, ten beaten eggs, two teaspoons baking powder. This is 
fine— Mrs Nancy Ward, Tecumseh, Neb. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

Two scant teaspoons of butter, three cups brown sugar, 
six eggs white and yolks beaten separately, one pound seed- 
ed raisins, one pound currants, washed and dried, one-half 
pound citron cut in thin strips, one-half cup cooking molasses 
and one cup sour milk. Stir the butter and sugar to a cream 
add to that one-half a grated nutmeg, one tablespoon ground 
cinnamon, one teaspoon each of cloves and mace; add mo- 
lasses and sour milk; stir all well, then put in beaten yolks 
of eggs, a wine glass of brandy; stir well again and then 
add four cups of sifted flour alternately with the beaten 
whites of eggs. Dissolve a level teaspoon of soda and stir in 



CAKES. 27. 

thoroly. Mix the fruit together and sitrinto it two heaping 
tablespoons flour, then stir it into the cake. 

Butter two common size baking tins; carefull line them 
with paper well buttered, and bake in a moderate hot oven 
two hours. After it is baked, let cool in the pans. Afterward 
put it in a tight can or let remain in the pans and cover 
tightly. This cake has been kept eighteen months and can 
be kept longer. — Mrs. F. J. Walker. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

One cup sugar, one-half cup butter creamed with sugar, 
one cup molasses, one cup sour milk, one-half cup each of 
raisins and currants, two eggs, one teaspoon soda, one lea- 
spoon cinnamon, one-half teaspoon each of cloves, allspice 
and nutmeg, two cups flour. Bake in layers and put togeth- 
er with chocolate filling. — Mrs. Salina Clark. 

WHITE MOUNTAIN CAKE. 

One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half cup sweet 
milk, one-half cup cornstarch, one cup flour, whites six eggs, 
a little vanilla, two teaspoons baking-powder; bake in layers. 

Frosting for above - Whites of five eggs, twenty table- 
spoons sifted sugar, beaten very light, a little vanilla. 
Spread between layers and outside. — Mrs. J. E. Holloway. 

WHITE CAKE. 

Three cups sugar, one cup butter, one cup milk, three 
cups flour, one cup cornstarch, whites of twelve eggs, beat- 
en to a stiff froth, two teaspoons baking powder; cream the 
butter and sugar together; add starch dissolved in milk then 
the eggs and flavoring. Mrs.Lenora Chase. 

WHITE CAKE. 

One cup sugar, one half cup butter, whites of three eggs, 
one-third cup of milk two cups flour, two teaspoons of bak- 
ing powder, vanilla. Beat the eggs, butter and sugar to a 
cream. — Mrs. Harvey Jones. 

WHITE CAKE. 

One and one-half cups sugar, two-thirds cup of butter, 
work these to a cream, add the whites of five eggs well beat- 
en, stir and beat until light as foam, then add one-half cup 



28 CAKES. 

cornstarch which has been dissolved in a little sweet milk; 
stir in not quite two-thirds ciip of sweet milk and two and 
one-half cups sifted flour with two teaspoons of baking- 
powder: flavor to suit taste. — Mrs, Henry Benfield. 

WHITE CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, one scant cup butter* one cup sweet milk; 
whites of five egg's* three cups flour* two teaspoons baking 
powder* flavor to taste. Cream the butter and sugar, add 
the milk, into this stir the flour and baking powder sifted 
together, then the whites of the eggs well beaten. — Mrs. 
Everett Allen, Galesburg. 

BLACKBERRY JAM CAKE. 

One and one-half cups of jam, one cup brown sugar, one- 
half cup sour milk, one-half cup butter, three eggs, reserve 
white of one for frosting, two teaspoons of cinnamon, two 
teaspoons cloves, one teaspoon allspice, one teaspoon soda, 
three cups flour. — Mrs. Emma Brockelhurst. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

One pound light brown sugar, one pint molasses, one cup 
butter, ten eggs, one large teaspoon cinnamon, one-half table 
spoon cloves, one-half tablespoon allspice, one nutmeg, one 
teaspoon soda dissolved in three tablespoons hot water, one 
pound each of raisins, currants and figs, one-half pound of 
citron; put fruit in the sugar and butter, add flour until the 
spoon will stand up straight; two teaspoons of baking pow- 
der, one tablespoon lemon extract, This cake will keep fine. 
—Mrs. Rachel Boynton, deceased. 

COMMON FRUIT CAKE. 

Cream one and one- fourth cups butter and two cups sugar, 
add the well beaten yolks of three eggs, one cup sweet milk 
and the stiffly beaten whites of three eggs. Have ready three 
and one-half cups sifted flour, sift again with two teaspoons 
cinnamon, one teaspoon cloves, one teaspoon allspice a 
pinch of mace and one-half of a grated nutmeg and four 
teaspoons baking powder, roll one cup of currants and one 
cup of raisins in a little flour and add the rest to the mix- 
ture. Beat well and then add the floured fruit; bake in a 



CAKES, 29. 

large loaf a little more than an hour. This makes one large 
or two small cakes. — Mrs. Oliver Hannah, Knoxville. 

BLUE GRASS CAKE. 

Nine eggs, two cups of sugar, three and one-half cups of 
flour, one-half cup of water or milk, one cup of butter, three 
teaspoons of baking powder. Beat the whites of eggs and 
sugar together, then add milk or water, then flour and bak- 
ing powder, then the butter beaten to a cream, and flavor. 
This can be baked as a layer or a loaf cake.— Mrs. Libbie 
Davis. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

Beat thoroughly the yolks of nine eggs, add to one pound 
of granulated sugar; beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff 
froth and add alternately with one pound of flour; grate the 
rind of two lemons and add the juice of the lemons.— Joshua 
Boynton. 

NUT LAYER CAKE. 

One and one-half cups of sugar, one-half cup of butter, 
one-half cup of cold water, two cups of flour, two teaspoons 
of baking powder; after beating thoroly, add the whites of 
three eggs beaten to a stiff froth. 

Filling for same. — One and one fourth cups sweet milk, 
yolks of three eggs or one whole egg, two tablespoons of 
sugar, butter the size of an egg; dissolve one tablespoon of 
flour in a little milk, beat with sugar and yolks of eggs; add 
to the hot milk and cook till it thickens; then add one cup of 
chopped nuts.— Mrs. G. K. Walker, St Louis, Mo. 

WHITE COCOANUT CAKE. 

Two cups of sugar, two- thirds of a cup of butter, one cup 
of milk, whites of eight eggs, three teaspoons of baking 
powder, four cups of flour, two teaspoons of cocoanut in the 
cake. Frosting Four eggs< whites). eight teaspoons of cocoa- 
nut, sugar, mix. — Mrs. A. C. Housh. 

CREAM CAKE. 

One and one-half cups sugar, one-half cup or one heaping 
tablespoon butter, two and one-half cups flour, two teaspoons 
baking powder, whites of three eggs, one cup sweet milk. 



30. CAKES. 

Bake in layers, cover and fill with whipped cream. Good and 
easy made.— Mrs Anna Stonesipher. 

SEED CAKE. 

Beat one egg till light, adding gradually one cupful of sug- 
ar and with the egg beater, and one-half cup warm milk, 
and before mixing add three and one-half cups sifted pastry 
flour and one heaping teaspoon baking powder. Stir well, 
then add one-half cup melted butter and one teaspoon cara- 
way seeds. Stir till fine and white. Bake in shallow buttered 
pan and when cool cut in squares- — Mrs. T. C. Grabill. 

DELICIOUS CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

Whites of eight eggs, two cups of sugar, one cup butter, 
three cups flour, one cup sweet milk, three teaspoons bak- 
ing powder. Beat the butter to a cream, stir in the sugar, add 
the milk then the flour and the beaten whites of eggs. When 
well beaten divide into two equal parts. Into half grate half 
a cake of chocolate, bake in layers and spread with custard. 

Custard— One tablespoon of butter, one-half pint of milk, 
let come to a boil, stir in two beaten eggs with one cup of 
sugar, add two teaspoons cornstarch dissolved in a little 
milk. Mrs. Mary Housh. 

BROWNSTONE FRONT CAKE. 

One cup chocolate, one-half cup water, one-half cup sugar, 
yolk of one egg; stir all together and put on the stove and 
boil until thick, while you beat; two eggs, one-fourth cup 
sweet milk, one-half cups butter, one-half cups sugar, two 
cups flour, one teaspoon soda, dissolved in a little water; 
then stir all together and bake in layers: this will make 
four layers. —Mrs. Elery McWilliams. 

HICKORYNUT CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, one cup milk, two-thirds of a cup of but- 
ter, three cups of flour, three eggs, two teaspoons baking 
powder, one cup of nut kernels cut fine. Tried and not found 
wanting. -Fanny Denny. 

SUNSHINE CAKE. 

Whites of seven eggs, yolks of five eggs, one and one- 
fourth cups sugar, one scant cup of flour, one-third tea- 



CAKES. 31, 

spoon cream of tartar, a pinch of salt added to the whites 
of eggs before whipping. Sift, measure and set aside flour 
and sugar; separate eggs; put whites in mixing bowl and the 
yolks in a bowl; beat yolks to a foam and the whites to a 
stiff froth; add cream of tartar and whip very stiff; add the 
sugar to whites and beat in; then yolks and beat in; fold the 
flour in lightly; bake twenty to forty minutes. — Mrs. Cecil 
Epley. 

MAGNOLIA CAKE. 

Two cups of flour, two cups of sugar, one cup of butter, 
one cup of corn starch, one cup sweet milk, two teaspoons 
lemon, two teaspoons baking powder. Mix corn starch and 
milk together; whites of six eggs to be put in last. -Miss 
Lou Wilson. 

POOR MAN'S CAKE. 

One cup sugar, two-thirds cup sweet milk, butter size of a 
walnut, two cups sifted flour, well beaten whites of two 
eggs, two teaspoons baking powder sifted in floor. Bake in 
three layers. 

Filling for same— Grated rind and juice one lemon, one 
cup sugar, yolks of three eggs, teaspoon corn starch, mix 
well, boil till thick.- Mrs. Maggie Temple- 

EGGLESS CAKE. 

One cup sugar, two tablespoons butter, one cup of sweet 
milk, two cups flour, two teaspoons baking powder, flavor 
to taste. Mrs. Ann Donason- 

BRIDE'S CAKE. 

Two cups of light brown sugar, one cup of butter, one cup 
of sweet milk, two and one-half cups of flour, two and one- 
half teaspoons of baking powder, whites of five eggs beaten 
stiff, one teaspoon of lemon extract. 

Frosting for same— One and one- half cups of granulated 
sugar, seven teaspoonsful of sweet milk, let boil one minute; 
take from stove and stir till it becomes thick, flavor with 2 
tablespoonsful of lemon extract.— Mrs. Katherine Libolt. 



32; CAKES. 

ENGLISH WALNUT CAKE. 

One-half coffee cup of butter, two coffee Cups sugar, one 
coffee cup sweet milk, one-half teaspoon soda, three coffee 
cups flour, one teaspoon cream of tartar, two eggs, one 
pound of English walnuts chopped fine.— Mrs. Clara Dennis; 
Quincy. 

CREAM CAKE. 

One cup of sugar, one-half cup of sweet milk running over, 
one egg and white of another, two teaspoons baking powder 
use flour to thicken.— Mrs. Julia F. Melton. 

YEAST DOUGH CAKE. 

One cup of yeast dough, one-half cup of butter, one cup 
of sugar, one cup of dried currants, two eggs; season with 
nutmeg or any other spice preferred; mix well with the 
hands; put in cake pan to raise; bake in a modeiate oven; 
very nice lunch for school children.— Mrs. Mary Johnson 
Cast, Clermont, Ind. 

ROLL JELLY CAKE 

One cup of sugar, two eggs well beaten together; add two 
tablespoons of water; mix one and one-half teaspoons of 
baking powder with one and one-half cups of flour: flavor 
to taste. Bake in a dripping pan in a hot oven: roll while 
warm: fold in a cloth closely to prevent cracking,- Mrs. 
Flora Clark. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

Three eggs, yolks and whites beaten separately, two cups 
sugar, scant one-half cup butter, one-half cup cold water, 
small cup chocolate, one half cup boiling water poured over- 
chocolate to melt it, two cups of flour, two teaspoons of bak- 
ing powder, flavor with vanilla; put in whites of eggs last 
thing.— Mrs. Georgia Allen. 

ROLL JELLY CAKE. 

Four eggs, one cup sugar, one cup flour, one teaspoon of 
baking powder, spread with jelly and roll while hot.— Mrs. 
Minerva Bornbarger, Burr, Otto Co., Neb. 



CAKES. 33. 

CREAM CAKE. 

Three pggs well beaten, one cup of sugar, one and one- 
half cups of flour, two tablespoons of cold water, one large 
teaspoon of baking powder. For the custard or filling- One- 
half pint of sweet milk, let come to a boil one tablespoon of 
corn starch, one egg, one-half cup of sugar, one-fourth cup 
of butter, flavor to suit the taste. Beat all together and stir 
into the milk. -Mrs. Alice E. Dawdy, Peoria, 111. 

QUICK CAKE. 

One-third cup of soft butter, one and one-third cups of 
brown sugar, two eggs, one-half cup of milk, one and three- 
fourths cups of flour, three level teaspoons of baking powder 
one-half teaspoon each of cinnamon and nutmeg, one cup of 
fruit (dates, raisins, figs or currants). Put all ingredients in 
bowl and beat three minutes. Bake in moderate oven about 
forty-five minutes. If ingredients are added separately it 
will fall but if directions are followed it makes a splendid 
moist cake- -Mrs. X Ouray Meyer, Merriam, Kas. 

VELVET SPONGE CAKE. 
Can be both mixed and baked in thirty-five minutes. Sep- 
arate the whites and yolks of four eggs, beat the whites 
until stiff enough to remain in bowl when inverted, beat 
into them one-half cup of sugar, beating for five minutes, 
add to the yolks the grated rind and juice of one lemon, 
beat together well the white and yolk mixtures, add one cup 
of flour, stirring as little as possible. Bake twenty-five 
minutes in a moderate oven.— Miss Edith Cook, Hinsdale, 111. 

GRAPE SAUCE CAKE. 

One cup sugar, two-thirds cup grape sauce, four table- 
si i ions of sour milk with one teaspoon of soda, one-half cup 
of butter, one and one-half teaspoons of cinnamon, one tea- 
spoon each of allspice and nutmng, yolks of two eggs, two 
and one-half cups of flour. Bake in layers. 

Filling— One cup of sugar with enough water to melt, put 
on the fire and boil until it ropes, then stir in the whites of 
two well beaten eggs.— Mrs. Priscilla Briggs. 



34. CAKES. 

ROLL SPONGE CAKE. 

One cup of sugar, one cup of flour, three eggs, one table- 
spoon of milk, one teaspoon cream of tartar, one-half teaspoon 
of soda, bake in thin sheets, spread with jelly and roll while 
hot. This recipe is fine, try it.— Mrs. Rose Moore, deceased. 

POUND CAKE 

One pound of sugar, three-fourths of a pound of butter, 
pound of corn starch, whites of ten eggs, one-half cup of 
sweet milk, two teaspoons of baking powder, flavor to taste. 
-Thena Woolsey, deceased. 

MOLASSES CAKE 

One cup molasses, one cup sugar, one cup of cold tea or 
coffee, one cup of butter, two eggs, two teaspoons of soda, 
one tablespoon of ginger, a little salt and flour to thicken,— 
Mrs. Lidie Gardner, deceased. 

BROWN STONE FRONT CAKE. 

Six eggs well beaten, two cups of sugar, two and one-half 
cups of flour, three-fourths cup of water, three- fourths cup 
of butter, one cup of chocolate dissolved in boiling water, 
two teaspoons of baking powder. Put together with white 
icing. Mrs. Maria Mclntire. 

EGOLESS CAKE. 

One cup of sugar, two tablespoons of butter, two cups of 
flour, two teaspoons of baking powder. 

Filling— One cup of sugar, one- half cup of cream, enough 
chocolate to make it brown, teaspoon of vanilla, cook until 
it threads when dropped in water. — C. M. Bright. 

PORK CAKE. 

Chop one-half pound of fat meat fine, then pour one-half 
pint of boiling water over it, when cold add one and one-half 
cups of brown sugar, one-half cup of molasses, one-half tea 
spoon each of cloves.cinnamon, allspice, one teaspoon of soda, 
one-half pound each of currants and raisins, one-half teaspoon 
of salt, three cups of flour; beat all together; bake in loaf.— 
James Donaldson. 



CAKES. 35. 

FIG CAKE. 

Silver part: Two cups of sugar, two-thirds cup of butter, 
not quite two-thirds cup of sweet milk, whites of eight eggs, 
three heaping teaspoons of baking powder, sifted with 
three cups of flour. Stir sugar and butter to a cream, add 
milk and flour and last the beaten whites of eggs. 

Gold part: One cup of sugar, three-fourths cup of butter, 
one-half cup of sweet milk, one and one-half teaspoons of 
baking powder sifted in a little more than one and one-half 
cups of flour, yolks of seven eggs thoroly beaten and one 
Whole egg, one teaspoon of allspice and cinnamon until you 
can taste it. 

Bake the white in two long pie tins. Put half of the gold 
in a long pie tin and lay on one pound of halved figs, previ- 
ously sifted over with flour, so that they will just touch each 
other, put on the rest of the gold and bake- Put the cakes 
together with frosting while warm, the gold between the 
white and cover with frosting. —Mrs. Jane Keck, Valparaiso 
Nebr. Saunders Co. 

SPICE CAKE. 

Two cups of C sugar, one cup of sour milk, three whole 
eggs thoroly beaten, one cup of butter, two and one half 
cups of flour and no more, one teaspoon of soda dissolved in 
milk, two teaspoons of cinnamon, scant one-half teaspoon 
each of cloves, allspice and nutmeg, one teaspoon of baking 
powder sifted in flour, one cup of seeded raisins floured and 
added last. Bake in two layers and put together with boiled 
frosting as follows: one cup of granulated sugar, five table- 
spoons of boiling water and boil until it hairs, then pour on 
beaten white oi! one egg, stir all the time and stir in one cup 
of chopped raisins. —Mrs. C. F- Burkhalter, 600 Tompkin 
St., Galesburg, 111. 

MAHOGANY CAKE. 

One and one-half cups of brown sugar, one-half cup of 
butter, two cups of flour, three eggs, one teaspoonful of soda 
dissolved in one tablespoon of sweet milk, one-half cup of 
grate i chocolate cooked in one- half cup of sweet milk, flavor 
with vanilla. —Sadie Snyder. 



36. Cakes. 

dried apple cake. 

Soak two cups of dried apples over night, in the morning 
drain, chop fine, let simmer for two hours in two cups of 
molasses. When cool add one cup of sugar, two eggs, one- 
half cup butter, four cups of flour, one cup of sour milk, one 
dessert spoon of soda, one cup of raisins. Nutmeg, cinnamon 
and cloves. -Mrs. Alice Andrews, Middlegrove, 111. 

AMBROSIA CAKE. 

One-half cup of milk, three- fourths of a cup of butter, two 
cups of sugar, three cups of flour, four eggs, three teaspoons 
of baking powder. When cool spread with the following: two 
eggs, one pint of cream, one cup of sugar, juice of two 
oranges, rind of one and cocoanut if wanted.— Mrs. Mary 
West. 

PANHANDLE CAKE. 

One egg, one cup of sugar, one-half cup of butter, one 
and one-fourth cups of buttermilk, one level teaspoon each 
of soda and baking powder, one teaspoon of vanilla, one- 
half teaspoon of cinnamon, one-half teaspoon of nutmeg, 
two cups of flour, three-fourths of a cup of raisins, three- 
fourths of a cup of nut meats. Bake in layers and put 
together with chocolate or cream icing. — Cena M. Babcock. 

OLD FASHIONED DROP CAKES. 

Two eggs, one-half cup of sugar, one-half cup of New- 
Orleans molasses, one-half cup of butter and lard mixed, 
one-half cup of hot water, one teaspoon of lemon extract, 
one teaspoon of ginger, one and one-half teaspoons of soda, 
two and one-half cups of flour. Mix and let stand one-half 
of an hour before baking. Drop the mixture on buttered tins 
and bake in hot oven.— Mrs. J. T. Sleight. 



PIES. 37. 

PIES . 

PIE CRUST. 

One-third cup of lard, rubbed into one cup of flour, use 
fingers, one third cup of water, one-half teaspoon of salt, 
mix dough with spoon or knife, knead lightly, separate into 
three-fifths and two-fifths portions. Use larger portion for 
lower crust. — Mabel Bennett. 

PUMPKIN PIE. 

For four pies cook a small pumpkin; take an egg to a pie, 
one quart of milk, sugar, one tablespoon each of cinnamon 
and ginger, one teaspoon of nutmeg and allspice. — Mrs. 
Maggie McWilliams, East Galesburg. 

CREAM PIE 

One pint of cream, a small half cup of sugar, whites of three 
eggs whipped stiff, flavor to taste, pour the cream on the 
sugar, let stand while the rest is prepared.— Alice Wasson. 

CHOCOLATE PIE. 

Five tablespoons of grated chocolate, yolks of two eggs, 
one teaspoon of vanilla, two-thirds cup of sugar, little salt 
one tablespoon of corn starch one cup boiling water. Beat 
the whites of two eggs with one tablespoon of sugar, spread 
over top and slightly brown in oven.— Mrs, Ed Sargent. 

AMBER PIE. 

One and one-half cups of sugar two tablespoons of butter, 
two teaspoons of flour, one teaspoons each of cinnamon and 
all spice, one-half teaspoon of cloves, four eggs, one- half 
pounds of raisins, one cup of sour milk, two teaspoons of 
vinegar, beat whites of eggs, put on top. Enough for two 
pies,— Mrs. Edith Walker. 

MY MOTHERS CHEESE PIE. 

Line pie pan as for custard pie. Take one cup of cottage 
cheese, one egg, one-half cup of sugar, flavor with nutmeg, 
allspice or cinnamon to taste. Mix all together, stir in enough 
milk to All pan. Bake slow— Mrs. Amelia Barbero. 



38. PIES. 

CARAMEL PIE. 

One cup dark brown sugar, one cup sweet milk, one egg, 
one heaping tablespoon of corn starch dissolved in a little of 
the milk, one teaspoon of vanilla, cook on top of stove, when 
thick pour in crust that has been baked.— Mrs. 0. C. Bailey. 

GRANDMA BURNETT'S CREAM PIE. 

Line a large pie tin with crust. One cup of sugar, one- 
fourth scant cup of flour, mix with fingers or spoon, fill pint 
cup half full of cream and fill up with water, add nutmeg, 
pour in pie and bake.— Mrs. Leota F. Smith. 

CRANBERRY PIE. 

One cup of cranberries chopped, one cup of sugar, one 
heaping teaspoon of flour, yolks of two eggs. Bake in one 
crust and when done frost with the whites of one egg and a 
little sugar and return to the oven to brown. — Anna M. 
Harshbarger, Abingdon. 

RAISIN PIE. 

One cup of seedless raisins, one cup of water, one cup of 
sugar, one tablespoon of flour, one teaspoon each of vanilla 
and lemon, one tablespoon of butter. Put raisins on stove in 
the cup of water and boil a few minutes, add sugar and 
butter, then beat flour into a small amount of water until 
smooth paste stir into the raisins and sugar and add vanilla 
and lemon. Bake in two crusts. — Inez Burnett, Galesburg. 

CHESS PIES. 

Two eggs, reserve the white of one for frosting, one cup 
of sugar, brown is better, butter the size of a hulled walnut, 
one tablespoon of vinegar, one tablespoon of molasses im- 
proves them and nutmeg. Line gem pans with crust and 
put in the filling and bake. When done cover with the beat- 
en white of egg and a little sugar, and return to the oven to 
brown. They will keep for a long time and will make ten or 
twelve tarts. — Flora B. Clark. 

VINEGAR PIE. 

One and one-half cups of good vinegar, two cups of sugar 
one cup of water, one tablespoon of butter, flavor with 



___ PIES. 39. 

lemon extract and put in a stew pan on the stove. While 
this is heating take the yolks of five eggs beaten with one 
cup of water and two heaping tablespoons of flour. When 
the vinegar comes to a boil stir in the eggs and flour, stirr- 
ing until well cooked. Have four pie pans lined with ' pastry 
fill with the mixture and bake. Beat the whites of the eggs 
to a stiff froth and add a little sugar. When pies are done 
spread this over them and return to the oven a few minutes. 
These pies can be baked in two crusts by using four whole 
eggs.— Mrs. Melissa Baird, Galesburg. 

CREAM RAISIN PIE. 
One egg, one cup of raisins, one scant cup of sour cream, 
one scant cup of sugar, one tablespoon of flour, one tea- 
spoon of cinnamon, spice and cloves, butter the size of a 
hickory nut. This should make two pies baked with two 
crusts.— Mrs. 0. H. Hunsaker, Camp Point. 111. 

MY NEVER FAIL CUSTARD PIE. 
One pint of sweet milk, one-half cup of sugar, three eggs, 
save out white of one for frosting, beaten thoroly, pinch of 
salt and one teaspoon of lemon. Prick the crust well with a 
fork before putting in custard. Bake in moderate oven.— 
Margaret Smith. 

COCOANUT PIE. 
Take one cup of sugar and stir in three level tablespoons 
of flour, beat the yolks of two eggs and stir in one cup of 
sweet milk, then add sugar and flour. When these are mixed 
stir in one cup of shredded cocoanut, bake with one crust 
when done spread over the top the beaten whites of two 
eggs to which has been added a little sugar and sprinkle 
cocoanut on top and brown. -Laura Walter, Galesburg. 

MOCK MINCE MEAT PIE. 
One cup of bread crumbs, one cup of hot water, one cup 
of molasses, one cup of sugar, one cup of currants, one cup 
of raisins, one-half cup of vinegar, butter size of an egg, 
cinnamon and allspice, cloves, etc., to taste. A cup of canned 
cherries improves the pie. This is for four pies.— Mrs. Lida 
Howard, East Galesburg. 



40. PIES. 

CHESS PIE 

Three eggs, two-thirds cup of sugar, one-half cup of butter 
( one-half cup of milk may be added if not wanted so rich) 
beat butter to a cream, add yolks and sugar beaten to a froth 
with the flavoring, stir all together rapidly and bake in a nice 
crust. When done spread with the beaten whites and three 
tablespoons of sugar and a little flavoring. Return to the 
oven and brown. This makes one pie which should be served 
immediatly,— Mrs. Frank Graver. Galesburg. 
BOSTON CREAM PIE. 

Three eggs beaten separately, one cup gratulated sugar, 
one-one-half cups of sifted flour, one large teaspoon of baking 
powder and two tablespoons of milk. Divide the batter in 
half and bake on two pie tins. When cool split each one in 
half and spread cream part between each. Serve cold. 

Cream part— Heat one pint of milk. Break two eggs into 
a dish and add one cup of sugar and one-half cup of flour pre- 
viously mixed: after beating well stir into hot milk, add one 
ounce of butter and keep stirring one way until it thickens. 
Flavor the cake and custard with vanilla or lemon. —Mrs. 
Faye Hitchcock. 

MINCE MEAT. 

Four pounds of cold boiled lean beef, ten pounds of apple?,, 
one and one-half lbs. of suet chopped fine, two lbs. of currants, 
four pounds of raisins (one-half pound chopped fi n e) 
one-half pound of citron sliced fine, four pounds of 
sugar, one quart of liquor, meat was boiled in, one pint boiled' 
cider, one quart of molasses, three teaspoons of ground cloves,. 
ten of ground cinnamon, and one of pepper, six tablespoons 
of salt, two nutmegs and the juice of three lemons. Add any 
kind of fruit juices. Mix altogether and if packed in fruit 
jars will keep as long as desired. One quart of vinegar may 
be used instead of cider and lemon juice. Mrs. George Moore. 

LEMON PIE. 

Grated rind and juice of two lemons, one and one-half cups 
of sugar, two tablespoons of flour, piece of butter size of a 
walnut, three eggs, whites of two for frosting. —Mrs. Julia 
Melton. 



PIES. 41. 



CREAM PIE. 

One cup of thick sweet cream poured in two-thirds cup of 
sugar, add beaten whites of two eggs and stir, flavor with 
nutmeg and bake in a slow oven in one crust.— Mrs. Belle 
Tabor. Farmington. 

MOCK MINCE PIE. 

Six soda crackers, or a cup of bread crumbs will do, two 
ai d one-half cups of cold water, one cup each of molasses 
ai d sugar, one-half cup of vinegar, if not too strong, one 
ci p of chopped raisins, one cup of currants, butter size of 
an egg, melted, two teaspoons of cinnamon, one teaspoon 
of cloves. — Mrs. M. R. Scudder. 

LEMON PIE. 

Filling for pie. One pint of water, one cup of sugar, the 
grated rind and juice of one lemon, two eggs, save whites 
for frosting, two tablespoons of corn starch. Bake crust and 
fill, beat whites and add sugar, brown slightly. Put water 
aid sugar on stove to melt, add lemon and rind, beat eggs 
separately, add corn starch to yolks and stir in water and 
sugar, cook till thick and pour in baked crust, frost and 
brown.— Mrs. James Donaldson. 

LEMON PIE WITH TWO CRUSTS. 

The juice and grated rind of one lemon, one cup of sugar, 
two eggs, one teaspoon of butter, one teaspoon of corn 
starch, one cup sweet milk. Beat lemon, sugar and eggs to- 
gether, rub butter and corn starch together and add to 
sugar and eggs, stir all well together. Water can be used if 
milk is not handy.— Mrs. A. Simkins, Douglas. 

MINCE MEAT. 

Three pounds each of apples, suet and meat, two pounds 
each of raisins and currants, one pint of sugar, one and 
one-half pints of molasses, vinegar, and whiskey, three 
le nons, two tablespoons each of cloves and allspice, three of 
ci mamon, one each of mace and ginger, a little salt. Cook 
slowly three hours and keep covered while cooking.— Lillie 
M. Thompson, Lawton, Okla. 



42. PIES. 

CREAM PIE 

Lay in a pie plate a crust as for custard pie. Stir to a 
cream one-half cup of sugar and one teaspoon of butter, 
add two well beaten eggs, two tablespoons of flour, two 
cups of milk; mix all together and flavor with lemon. For 
one pie. — Mrs. Vena Benson, Galesburg. 

GRATED APPLE PIE. 

Six large apples or one cup of grated apple, one cup of 
sugar, one cup of chopped raisins, four eggs, four table- 
spoons of butter, one small teaspoon of cinnamon, one-half 
teaspoon of cloves. Save whites of two eggs for meringue to 
put on the top. Beat remainder of eggs and mix all together 
and bake with one crust. Will make two pies. — Mrs. C. F. 
Maple. 

VINEGAR PIE. 

First, bake your crusts, then make the following filling; 
three eggs, save whites for frosting, beat yolks and three 
large tablespoons of flour together, add two cups of water, 
two cups of sugar, two tablespoons of sharp vinegar, pinch 
of salt and nutmeg. —Mrs. Rebekah McWilliams. 

CREAM PIE. 

For two pies— three egg, reserve whites of two for frost- 
ing, three tablespoons of flour, two-thirds cup of sugar, 
butter the size of a walnut, two and one-half cups of milk, 
nutmeg, salt; heat the milk before adding the other ingre- 
dients, reserve enough milk to mix the flour, cook filling 
and bake crusts separately. — Mrs. Hattie Walker. 

LEMON PIE THAT IS DELICIOUS. 

Use the juice of two lemons, two cups of water, two table- 
spoons of corn starch, four eggs, a little salt. Heat the water 
until it boils, mix the corn starch with a little cold water 
and stir into the boiling water, put the- sugar in also as it 
melts readily. Let cool before mixing with yolks of eggs and 
lemon, which should be beaten together. Us the whites for 
frosting, Bake the pies before adding the frosting, then 
brown after that is in. This will make two large pies. — Mrs. 
Rosella Buck. 



PIES. 43. 

POTATO PIE. 

Two eggs, one-half cup of sweet milk, four tablespoons of 
gi anulated sugar, one cup of finely mashed potatoes, one 
te ispoon of ginger, bake in one crust. — Mrs. Margaret Sim- 
kins, deceased. 

BANANA PIE. 

Bake bottom crust, fill with sliced bananas: make custard 
as follows— one pint of milk, one cup of sugar, two tea- 
spoons of corn starch, yolks of two eggs, boil till thick and 
p< ur over bananas. Make frosting of the whites and set in 
oven to brown. -Mrs. Ida Rambo. 

COCOANUT PIE- 

This is for two pies —two cups of milk, one cup of cream, 
two cups of sugar, yolks of seven eggs, save the whites for 
frosting, one cup cocoanut, two tablespoons of corn starch, 
two tablespoons of lemon extract, cook on stove. Have 
crusts baked and fill them, frost, set in oven to brown.— 
Mrs. Nelson Holloway. 

CRACKER PIE. 

Ten or twelve butter crackers, yolks of three eggs, three 
tablespoons of sugar, one pint of milk; put together and 
cook; after cooking flavor; bake crust separately, when 
done frost the top. —Mrs. Jessie Blandy. Columbus, 0. 

MOCK MINCE PIE. 

One cup of raisins, one cup of crackers or bread crumbs, 
two cups of sugar, one-half cup each of vinegar and butter, 
two teaspoons of cinnamon, one teaspoon of cloves, one-half 
teaspoon of black pepper, one grated nutmeg; stir all to- 
gether and pour two cups of hot water over it, then stir. 
Bake in two crusts. Will make three pies.— Mrs. John Davis. 

LEMON PIE. 

Juice of two small lemons, grated rind of one, yolks of 
three eggs well beated, one cup of sugar, one teaspoon of 
butter, unbeaten whites of two eggs. Frost if desired.— 
Mrs. Addie Shearer, Galesburg. 



44. PIES. 

PUMPKIN PIE. 

One half cup of stewed pumpkin, two well beaten eggs, 
one-third cup of sugar, two tablespoons of Orleans molasses 
one teaspoon of cinnamon, one-half teaspoon each of cloves, 
allspice and ginger, pinch of salt, one cup of sweet milk. 
Mrs. J. M. Groves. 

MINCE MEAT. 

Five cups of chopped beef, two cups of uncooked suet, 
three cups of raisins, one cup each of dried currants or 
cherries, five cups of brown sugar, six cups of nice cider or 
if no cider, use three and one-half cups of water and two 
and one-half cups of good vinegar, two cups of chopped 
citron, two lemons, cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, salt 
each one tablespoon; to two cups of this mixture put three 
cups of chopped apples.— Cora Latimer, Chicago. 

LEMON PIE. 

Take one-half of a large lemon, grate the rind and squeeze 
out the juice, put two-thirds of a cup of sugar and butter 
the size of an egg into a bowl; stir a tablespoon of corn starch 
into just enough cold water to make it smooth, then stir this 
into a cup of boiling water in a sauce pan; as soon as it be- 
gins to boil pour it on the butter and sugar, stir in the lemon 
juice and rind and when a little cooler stir in the beaten 
yolks of two eggs, pour this into the crust which should 
stand ready, bake as you would custard, until thick but not 
wheys; beat the whites of the two eggs to a stiff froth, beat 
in a tablespoon of powdered sugar, spread this on the pie 
return to the oven to brown. — Rozina Buck. 



45. 

PUDDINGS. 



RICE PUDDING. 

Two heaping tablespoonsful of rice, one quart rich sweet 
milk, one-third cup of sugar, pinch of salt and one- third of 
a nutmeg. Stir all together and bake until rice is soft and 
the whole creamy. Stir occasionally. Serve cold. — Mrs. Mary 

Ann West. 

SUET PUDDING. 

One cup of beef suet or three-fourths cup of butter, one 
ci p of raisins, one cup of milk, one cup of molasses, two 
teaspoons of soda, one teaspoon of salt, three cups of flour, 
boil two hours. -Mrs. Leona Walter. 

PLUM PUDDING, 

One cup of chopped suet, one cup each of molasses, sugar, 
sweet milk, raisins and currants, one teaspoon each of soda, 
ci.inamon, allspice and cloves, flour to make stiff batter, 
steam three hours. — Agnes Parkinson. 

SUET PUDDING. 

One-half cup chopped suet, one cup each of sugar, sweet 
m Ik, currants and raisins, add flour as tho baking fruit 
cave, two teaspoons of baking powder, place in pan, steam 
ore and one-half hours.— Mrs. A. A. Gifford. Peoria. 

BROWN BREAD. 

One cup of corn meal, one cup of flour, two thirds cup of 
molasses, two-thirds teaspoon of soda and a pinch of salt. 
st 3am two hours and put in the oven to dry thirty minutes. 
Nice plain or with sauce. —Mrs. Ann Sturtevant. 

ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING. 

One pound of flour, one pound of suet, one and one-half 
p< unds each of raisins and currants, one-half pound of 
csndiedpeel, one-half pound of sugar, six eggs, a little spice, 
wet it with sweet milk, not too stiff, tie up tight in a cloth 
in two puddings and boil four or five hours.— Mary Tasker. 



46. PUDDINGS. 

CREAM TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

Soak three tablespoons of tapioca in water over night, put 
it into a quart of boiling milk and boil a few minutes; beat 
the yolks of four eggs with a cup of sugar, three tablespoons 
of prepared cocoanut, stir and boil a few minutes longer, 
pour into a pudding dish; beat the whites of four eggs to a 
stiff froth, three tablespoons of sugar, put this over top, 
sprinkle with cocoanut and brown for five minutes.— Pearl 
H. Walter. 

SUET PUDDING. 

One cup of chopped suet, one cup of molasses, any kind, 
one cup of sweet milk, one teaspoon of baking powder, one 
pint of currants, a little citron cut fine, flour to make a soft 
batter, tie loose in a cloth and boil two and one-half hours, 
or let steam three hours. 

Sauce— One-third cup of butter, one- third cup of sugar, 
one-half cup of boiling water, flour or corn starch to thicken 
flavor with vinegar or favorite extract.— Mrs. F. Donaldson. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

One-half box of gelatine soaked in one-half pint of hot 
water, not boiling, one quart of cream beaten stiff, two cups 
of powdered sugar, whites of four eggs beaten, one table- 
spoon of vanilla; line the mould with lady fingers and pour- 
in the filling and set in a cool place.— Mrs. Jennie Suther- 
land, Galesburg. 

BATTER PUDDING. 

One cup each of butter, sugar and milk, two eggs, two 
cups of flour, flavor; bake in moderate oven. 

Sauce — Hard sauce or the juice of one lemon thickened 
with as much sugar as it will take up. —Mrs. Maggie Simkins 

BOILED PUDDING. 

One pint of sour milk, one-half pint of sugar, one pound 
of suet, one-half pound each of currants and raisins, one- 
half teaspoon of soda, flour enough to make real stiff when 
stirred; pour contents into cloth and boil two hours. Serve 
with pudding sauce.— Margie Donaldson. 



PUDDINGS. 47. 

NICE DESSERT. 

Slice oranges, sprinkle with sugar, then put some cocoa- 
nut over the oranges and serve with whipped cream.— Mrs 
Libbie Kille. 

HINGHAM PUDDING. 

One-half cup each of melted butter, molasses and sugar, 
one teaspoon of soda, one cup of hot water, three cups of 
flour, steam three hours. 

Dip— Not quite one-half cup of butter, one cup of sugar, 
one tablespoon of flour, mix until creamed, pour on boiling 
water and cook until it thickens, flavor after taking from 
the stove. -Mrs. F. P. Hurd. 

COTTAGE PUDDING. 

One cup of sugar, one cup of milk, one egg, lump of butter 
the size of an egg, one pint of flour, pinch of salt, one heap- 
ing teaspoon of baking powder. Bake. 

Sauce— One cup of sugar, one egg, one teaspoon of flour, 
small piece of butter, mixed, pinch of salt; add boiling water, 
let come to a boil, flavor. — Mrs. Nate Simkins. 

STEAMED FRUIT PUDDING. 

One egg beaten thoroly, one cup of sour milk, one cup of 
sugar, one tablespoon of soda, pinch of salt, enough flour to 
make a stiff batter, one cup of seedless raisins, tablespoon 
each of cinnamon and allspice, steam three hours. 

Sauce— One teacup of sugar, two tablespoons of flour, one 
tablespoon of butter, dampen with cold water, pour boiling 
water over and stir until clear and flavor with nutmeg. — 
Mrs. F. J. Housh. 

BANANA PUDDING. 

Beat three eggs with a pinch of salt five minutes, add a 
cup of sugar, beat good, one cup of flour with one teaspoon 
of baking powder, flavor with banana, stir in one cup of 
boiling water, bake in a loaf. When done slice and put in 
alternate layers of cake and bananas until the pudding dish 
is two-thirds full, then make a filling of three cups of milk, 
three eggs, save whites of two for frosting, two tablespoons 
of corn starch, put on and cook until done then flavor and 



48. PUDDINGS. 



pour over cake and bananas. Any other fruit may be used. 
Mrs. Turbitt, Peoria < 

FRENCH COCOANUT PUDDING. 

One quart of milk, three tablespoonsful of corn starch; 
yolks of four eggs, one-half cup sugar, salt; put part of milk, 
salt and sugar on back of stove and let boil, dissolve corn 
starch in the rest of the milk, stir into boiling milk, add 
yolks and one cup of cocoanut. Flavor with vanilla. 

Frosting- Whites of four eggs beaten, one-half cup sugar, 
flavor with lemon, spread it on pudding and put in oven to 
brown; put on grated cocoanut to give it the appearance of 
snow flake. -Mrs. Alva Kinser. 

BANANA PUDDING. 

Peel arid slice three bananas, lay in pudding dish. Sepa 
rate three eggs, put one pint of milk in a double boiler, 
when hot stir in one tablespoon of corn starch and a little 
salt, cook until thick, stirring constantly, add the beaten 
yolks and three-fourths of a cup of sugar and after stirring 
smooth add the whites of one egg well beaten, pour over 
the bananas: beat the whites of the two eggs, add two 
tablespoons of powdered sugar spread on pudding and place 
in the oven to brown and serve hot or cold. — Mrs. Clare 
Burkhalter, Peoria. 

CORN STARCH PUDDING. 

One quart of sweet milk, whites of three eggs, t w o 
tablespoonsful of corn starch, three tablespoonsful of flour, 
a small teacup of sugar, salt and two teaspoonsful of lemon, 
put the milk in a pan and set in a kettle of hot water and 
when it reaches the boiling point add the sugar then the 
starch and flour dissolved in a little cold milk, and lastly the 
beaten whites of the eggs. Beat it and let cook for a minute 
or two, remove from the fire, add flavoring and pour in cups 
to mold, filling them about half full. 

Dressing Take a pint of milk, one cup of sugar, the yolks 
of four eggs, one teaspoonful of lemon, one tablespoonful of 
corn starch and two tablespoonsful of flour, cook in the same 
way. In serving put one of the molds in a sauce dish for each 



PUDDINGS. 49. 

person and pour over it some of the dressing, which, like the 
pudding, is ice cold. — Miss Mary Hobkirk. 

SHORT CAKE. 

A scant one-half cup of sour cream, four tablespoons of 
sugar, one tablespoon of butter, one teaspoon of baking 
powder, one egg, pinch of salt. Mix all together in as soft a 
dough as can be rolled, roll one-half inch thick, take two 
pie pans turn them wrong side up and cover .with the dough 
as for cream pie and fill as for cream pie and fill with holes 
and bake.— Mrs. James Gebhart. 

FRUIT BLANC MANGE. 

Four tablespoons of corn starch in one quart of milk, four 
tablespoons of sugar, salt, one-half cup each of chopped 
seedless raisins and dried currants, and a piece of cinnamon 
stick. Heat to near boiling, add dissolved corn starch and 
boil five minutes, stirring briskly, take out cinnamon, stick 
and pour into a mold or cups to cool. Serve cold with whipped 
cream. This is delicious.— Mrs. Carrie Jones. 

PEACH PUDDING. 

Make a batter of one egg, one cup of milk, butter the size 
of an egg, melt, two teaspoons of baking powder, flour 
enough to make a very soft dough, pat and pull in shape 
with hands, cover over one quart of peaches or other fruit 
put paper over it and bake. To be eaten with cream or a 
sauce.— Mary A. Benson. 

STRAWBERRY PUDDING. 

Two cups of sugar, one cup of flour, one rounding a tea- 
spoon of baking powder, four eggs, juice of one lemon, one 
quart of strawberries, two quarts of whipped cream. Beat 
together one cup of sugar, the lemon juice and yolks of the 
eggs, beat whites separately add, then add the flour and 
baking powder well sifted; bake in a buttered pan. Crush 
the strawberries, add the second cup of sugar and set in a 
cool place. When ready to serve, heap the strawberries on 
the cake, then the whipped cream last. Be sure and have 
plenty of juice with the fruit. —Mrs. Edna L. Hughs. 



50. PUDDINGS. 



ORANGE SHORTCAKE. 

Heaping cup of sifted flour* heaping teaspoonfUl of bak^ 
ing powder, two teaspoonsful of sugar, one- fourth teaspoon- 
ful of salt, put together and sift three times, beat one egg y 
small teaspoonful of butter, one-half cup of milk* stir in like 
cake batter, butter pie tin, bake, then split, lay in oranges 
sliced cross-wise. Serve with sugar and cream.— Julia Tobin. 

CARROT PUDDING. 

One cup of grated raw carrot, one cup of grated raw po- 
tato, one cup sugar, one heaping cup of flour, one cup seed- 
ed raisins, or half amount of currants, one-half cup butter, 
one level teaspoonful of soda in potato, one teaspoonful each 
of cloves and cinnamon, one nutmeg, little salt. Boil three 
hours and serve with liquid sauce. —Mrs. Ralph L. McCoy, 
Long Beach, Cal 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

One pint of milk, seven tablespoons grated bread crumbs, 
six tablespoonsful of grated chocolate, four eggs, small lump 
of butter, flavoring and sugar enough to sweeten. Separate 
yolks and whites of three eggs, beat the yolks and one whole 
egg with the sugar. Heat milk and pour over bread and cho- 
colate; add beaten eggs, sugar and flavoring; pour into but- 
tered dish and bake one hour. When cold have three whites 
beaten with a little sugar, place on pudding and set in oven 
to brown.— Mrs. M. A. Thurman, Elmwood. 

APPLE SHORTCAKE. 

Make a dough of one pint of sifted flour with two teaspoons 
of baking powder and one-half teaspoonful of salt; rub one 
tablespoonful of butter thoroly into the flour and add a tea- 
cupful of sweet milk or enough to make a soft dough; divide 
into three equal parts and roll, handling as little as possible, 
lay in a greased pan, lightly grease the top of dough with 
butter, lay on the second sheet, grease and add the last 
sheet pf dough. Bake in a hot oven until done. Separate the 
sheets and spread between them warm apple sauce seasoned 
with sugar, butter, cinnamon sprinkled over. Serve warm 
with cold cream or rich milk. —Rose B. Johnston. Galesburg. 



PUDDINGS. 51. 



JELLO DESSERT. 

One box jello, strawberry preferred, mix well with one 
cup of sugar, pour over it one pint of boiling water, slice 
two oranges and two bananas alternately into it, set in a 
coo] place and serve in glass dishes. —Mrs. Edna Kinser. 

ENGLISH LEMOM CHEESE. 

Four ounces of butter, one pound granulated sugar, three 
lemons, five eggs. Place butter and sugar in an earthenware 
ja • that will hold three pounds, also the juice and grated 
rind of lemons, place jar in a pan of boiling water, beat the 
eggs and stir them in when the other ingredients are melted 
and boil until set. — Mary Mc Henry. 

STEAMED CHERRY PUDDING. 

One cup of sugar, two cups of flour, one cup of milk, two 
cu ds of cherries, two teaspoons of baking powder. Steam 
two hours. — Mrs. Sarah Boy n ton. 

FRUIT PUDDING. 

Whites of five eggs, one cup of sugar, one cup of flour, 
on 3 teaspoon of baking powder, flavor and bake. 

Custard— Yolks of the five eggs, one-half cup of sugar, 
on 3 and one-half pints of milk, three full teaspoons of corn 
sti rch, small piece of butter. Put together in layers, one of 
the cake, then the fruit and pour over the custard. This is 
nice with fruit such as peaches, bananas or oranges. — Mary 
West, Galesburg. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

Soak three large tablespoons of tapioca in one quart of 
cold water over night, drain and add one quart of new 
milk, one cup of sugar. Put in double boiler, stir and when 
it s boiling hot add beaten yolks of four eggs thinned with 
a little milk, stir a minute then set in cold water and stir to 
keep it from curdling: flavor with vanilla, pour in pudding 
dish. Whip the whites of eggs with two teaspoons of sugar 
an I spread over pudding sprinkling granulated sugar on 
this, set in the oven to brown. In serving put a spoonful of 
cream in each dish and serve cold. — Mrs. Iram Biggs. 
Galesburg. 



52. 

VEG ETAB LES. 

t TABLE of TIME for cooking different foods. 

Asparagus, boiling water, 30 minutes. 

Beans (dry) cold water, 2 to 3 hours, 

Beans, green, boiling water, li to 2 hours, 

Beans, lima, boiling water, J hour ; 

Beets, boiling water, 1 hour 

Cabbage, creamed, 20 minutes, boiled 1 hour. 

Carrots, creamed, 30 minutes, 

Cauliflower, creamed, 30 minutes, 

Celery, creamed, 20 minutes, 

Corn on cob or cut off, 20 minutes, boiling water, 

Dumplings, 20 minutes, do not raise cover, 

Kraut, 10 minutes, 

Macaroni, about 1 hour, boiling water. 

Noodles, about 20 minutes, 

Parsnips, about 35 minutes, boil 15 min. and fry 20 min. 

Peas, 25 or 30 minutes, boiling water, 

Potatoes, 30 to 35 min. , 

Spinach, 30 minutes. 

Squash, 30 minutes, 

Rice, 20 minutes, 

Tomatoes, 10 minutes, 

Turnips, 45 minutes, 

-Mrs. Elsie D. Hartsook. 

BOSTON BAKED BEANS. 

Two quarts of beans, cooked with a pinch of soda until 
tender, adding cold water if they boil dry. Boil one pound of 
salt pork till tender, when both are done, drain beans and 
put a thick layer of beans in a one gallon crock, salt and 
pepper to taste, another layer of beans and so on until the 
crock is half full, put pork in center and put the rest of the 
beans around pork, then adJ more pepper and salt and one 
pint of molasses. Cover with water, then cover and bake 
two or three hours in a slow oven.- Mrs. Fred Treager, 
Peoria. 



VEGETABLES, 53. 

CREAMED CELERY. 

Cut celery into inch lengths and stew in sufficient water 
to cover. Cook for one hour, then season with cream and 
butter and thicken with a little flour, salt to taste. — Miss 
Abbie A. Dickson. 

CREAMED CUCUMBERS, 

Peel and take out seeds, cut in sections about one inch 
long; boil about thirty minutes in salt water; put butter the 
size of a small egg in a skillet and heat, stir in one table- 
spoon of flour* add cold milk gradually until thick as gravy. 
Have slices of toast ready, place cucumbers on them, pour 
dressing over all.— -Mrs. E. L. Brown, Elmwood. 

VEGETABLE STEW. 

Boil equal parts of turnips and potatoes with onions add- 
ed according to taste; when ready to serve cream.— Mrs. 
Leota F. Smith, Maquon. 

FRIED EGG-PLANT. 

Peel egg-plant rather thick, slice a quarter of an inch 
thick and let soak in salted water from fifteen to thirty 
minutes. Beat one egg and add two or three tablespoons of 
milk, dip slices of egg-plant in egg mixture, roll in cracker 
or bread crumbs and fry in hot butter and lard. Instead of 
using bread crumbs, if prefered mix a couple of spoonsful 
of flour with the egg and milk and dip egg-plant in that 
mixture and fry. — Mrs. Margaret E. Alexander 

SARATOGA POTATOES. 

Pare and cut into thin slices on a slaw cutter four large 
potatoes, new are best, let stand in ice cold salt water while 
breakfast is cooking; take a handful of the potatoes, squeeze 
the water from them and dry in a napkin; separate the 
slices and drop a handful at a time into a skillet of boiling 
lard, taking care that they do not strike together, stir with 
a fork till they are a light brown color, take out with a wire 
spoon, drain well and serve in an open dish. They are nice 
served cold, 



54, 

SALADS. 



MAYONNAISE DRESSING. 

One cup of vinegar, weakened, one tablespoon of butter, 
yolks of four or five eggs^ sugar: cook in double boiler; 
mustard to taste.— Mrs. Emma McKenney. 

BEET SALAD. 

One quart of cabbage chopped fine, one quart of boiled 
beets, two cups of sugar, one tablespoon of salt, one tea- 
spoon of pepper, one cup of grated horse radish; cover with 
cold vinegar and seal. —Mrs. Susie Simkins. 

FRUIT SALAD. 

One box Plymouth Rock gelatine dissolved in water ac- 
cording to directions, three oranges, 25c can of pineapple 
chunks, juice of two lemons, sugar to taste: bananas, candied 
cherries, nuts and any kind of fruit may be added. —Mrs. 
Mary Long. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

One egg well beaten, a little melted butter, one table- 
spoon of sugar, one teaspoon of mustard, salt, one-half cup 
of vinegar, one cup of cream. — Mrs. Harriet Longwell. 

CHICKEN SALAD. 

Boil one chicken tender, chop moderately fine the whites 
of twelve hard boiled eggs and the chicken, add equal quan- 
tities chopped celery and cabbage; mash the yolks fine, add 
two tablespDons of butter, two of sugar, one teaspoon of 
mustard, pepper and salt to taste and lastly one-half cup of 
good cider vinegar; pour over the salad and mix thoroly. — 
Mrs. F. C. Bearmore. 

POTATO SALAD. 

To one quart of chopped potatoes add salt and onions to 
taste. Dressing— One-half cup of sour cream, two teaspoons 
of sugar, one teaspoon ground mustard, vinegar to taste. — 
Miss Emma Allen, Wallace, Idaho. 



SALADS. 55. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

Three eggs, one level teaspoon of mustard, one teaspoon 
of sugar, salt and pepper, butter half the size of an egg, 
ten tablespoons of vinegar. Beat eggs, put everything in 
and stir over a kettle of boiling water until it thickens. If 
too thick when cool, add a little milk or cream.— Mrs. Alice 
E. Dawdy> Peoria. 

FRUIT SALAD. 

Cover one-half box of gelatine with cold water, let stand 
one-half hour, pour over this one pint of boiling water and 
stir until gelatine is all dissolved, then add one cup of sugar 
set in a cool place until it begins to jell then add the fruit, 
oranges, bananas and mixed nuts, or any fruit you wish. Is 
excellent if fresh strawberries are used. Either pink or 
white gelatine may be used.— Mrs. Everett Allen, Galesburg 

BOTTLED SALAD DRESSING. 

Beat the yolks of eight eggs, add to them a cup of sugar, 
one tablespoonful each of salt, mustard and black pepper, a 
little cayene, and half a cup of cream, mix thoroughly; bring- 
to a boil a pint and a half of vinegar, add one cup of butter. 
let come to a boil, pour upon the mixture, stir well and when 
cold put into bottles and let set in a cool place. It will keep 
indefinately. I find this an excellent way of using the yolks 
when making angel food.— Nell Bailey Rowe, Greenfield. 0. 

ENGLISH WALNUT SALAD. 

Throw the English walnut meats into boiling stock let 
them boil rapidly for twenty minutes, cool and remove the 
brown skins. Mix with these an equal quantity of the white 
meat of cooked chicken cut into small blocks; season with 
salt and a little red pepper and to each pint sprinkle over a 
teaspoon of Worchestershire sauce: put a layer of finely 
chopped celery the nuts and chicken on top and more celery, 
and over all this pour two tablespoons of good vinegar. At 
serving time mix it with sufficient mayonnaise dressing to 
cover each piece well. Dish on lettuce leaves and serve very 
cold. Very fine.— Ethel Allen. 



56. SALADS. 

GRANDMA NELSON'S HOT SLAW. 

Chop cabbage fine and out in a crock with vinegar, pepper 
salt, mustard to taste and sufficient meat fryings to make 
quite greasy. Keep on the back of the stove and when steam- 
ing hot, not boiling, serve. — Gladys Nelson. 

SALMON SALAD. 

One can of salmon, one pint of cabbage chopped fine, salt, 
mix with mayonnaise dressing. — Mrs. Blanche Sears. 

TILDEN SALAD. 

Two cups of cabbage, one-half cup of celery, two apples, 
three medium sized tomatoes. Chop or slice separately, then 
mix and add salt to taste and the juice of one-half of a 
lemon. Serve at once.— Mrs. Cena Babcock. 

CABBAGE SALAD. 

One small head of cabbage, two green peppers with the 
veins removed, two small cucumbers, one onion. Chop all 
together very fine, serve with French dressing of salt, 
pepper, vinegar and oil. Very nice without the oil. — Mrs. J. 
C. Hurd. 

SALMON SALAD. 

Two cans of pink salmon, drained thoroly, when dry pick- 
to pieces with a fork, removing all bones and fatty skin- 
Dice very fine ten heads of celery, only using the best, mix, 
salt and season highly with ceyenne and black pepper and a 
dash of paprika. 

Dressing— Yolks of three eggs, one-half teaspoon of salt, 
one teaspoon of mustard, three tablespoons of sugar, juice of 
three lemons, one heaping tablespoon butter or oil. Cook 
until thick. As you remove it from the stove stir in the 
well beaten whites of three eggs. -Mrs. J. C. Hurd. 

FRUIT SALAD. 

Four oranges, one can pineapple, one box Coxe's gelatine 
soaked in one pint of water; add one pint of boiling water 
and stir all together; pour over fruit and eat with whipped 
cream. —Mrs. Henry Ouderkirk. 



SALADS. 57. 

SALAD. 

Pare and chop fine two tart apples* same amount of 
chopped cabbage and two-thirds of a glass of nut meats. 

Dressing- Two- thirds of a glass of vinegar, two table-' 
spoons of sugar, boil for several minutes then add one egg 
well beaten and stir slightly.— Mrs. Carrie Housh. 

TOMATO SALAD. 

Select smooth medium sized tomatoes, peel and put on ice 
to chill; chop cabbage, celery and an onion fine and season 
with salt and pepper, make a mayonnaise dressing and pour 
over. Scoup out the centers of the tomatoes and fill with the 
chopped cabbage, etc., put a spoonful of dressing on top of 
each and serve on lettuce leaves. — Mrs. Minnie Woods. 

SLAW. 

Chop fine one quart of cabbage just before ready to serve: 
one egg well beaten, two-thirds cup of sour cream, one-third 
cup of vinegar, one tablespoon of sugar, one teaspoon ground 
mustard, pinch of salt, put over fire and stir continually till 
it comes to boiling heat then pour it over cabbage and serve 
as soon as possible. —Mrs. A. H. Barbero. 

POTATO SALAD. 

Six boiled potatoes, medium size, six eggs boiled hard, one 
onion, one cup of sour cream, one-half pint of vinegar, salt. 
Chop potatoes, whites of eggs and onions fine; mash yolks 
fine and pour vinegar and cream over them, pour this dress- 
ing over the chopped mixture.— Addie Lewallen. 

SALMON SALAD. 

One can of salmon, one cup of celery, one cup of nuts, I 
use English walnuts, two hard boiled eggs: chop separately, 
mix with silver fork and add juice of two lemons and pinch 
of salt. Three or four small sweet pickles improves this. 
Anna M. Harshbarger, Abingdon. 

BANANA, CELERY AND NUT SALAD. 

One-half cup of nut meats cut in small pieces, one cup of 
celery cut in small pieces and six bananas cut in quarters 
lengthwise and sliced in one-half inch slices. Mix salad dress- 



58. SALADS. 

ing with each ingredient separately, then combine the mix- 
tures. It may be served in the banana peeling or on lettuce 
leaves. —Violet West, Galesburg. 

CHEESESTICKS. 

Sift one cup of flour, one teaspoon of baking powder, add 
one cup of grated cheese and mix with one-half cup of cold 
water- Roll out to a very thin sheet and cut in thin strips. 
Bake in a hot oven — Mrs. Amelia Barbero. 

WALDORF SALAD. 

Two cups of cabbage, one cup of apples, one-half cup of 
nut meats, one-half cup of salad dressing, three small stalks 
of celery, Chop cabbage very fine, pare and chop apples; 
mix cabbage, apples, nut meats and celery together and then 
add dressing. If more liquid is needed add sweet cream.— 
Mrs. Emanuel Foster. 

OYSTER SALAD. 

Drain one pint of oysters, put in vinegar enough to cover, 
place over fire, let remain until plump (but not cooked) then 
drop immediately in cold water, drain; chop two pickled cu- 
cumbers fine, one quart celery cut very small, season with 
salt and pepper. Mix this well with oysters, tossing up with 
a fork. Pour over all this mayonnaise dressing: yolks of 4 
eggs well beaten, two tablespoonsful of sugar, one-half tea- 
spoon of dry mustard, salt and pepper, seven tablespoonsful 
of vinegar heated, add the above, cook in a double boiler un- 
til thickens. When cold add one cup of whipped cream, olive 
oil if desired. Garnish with celery tips and hard boiled eggs 
and serve on a lettuce leaf or a dainty plate. — 

Florence Housh. 



5$. 



PICKLES 

PERSERVES AND BUTTER, 



CHILLI SAUCE. 

One-half bushel of tomatoes sliced and run thru collander. 
then cook one hour; add ten onions chopped fine, six red pep- 
pers, four cups of vinegar, two teaspoonsful of cinnamon, 
two tablespoonsful of salt; boil real hard for another hour.— 
Martha Allen, Douglas. 

CUCUMBERS FOR WINTER. 

Slice thin as for table, allow for shrinkage, let stand sev- 
eral hours after salting, drain, pack close in self sealing jars 
and cover with cider vinegar, seal and keep in cool dark 
place. — Mrs. Susan Jones. 

THE NEW PICKLE. 

Four quarts of chopped cabbage, four green peppers and 
four quarts of onions chopped, four tablespoons of sugar, 
two of salt, three pints of vinegar; cook three-fourths of an 
hour. Take one gill of ground mustard, one gill of flour, one 
gill of tumeric, mix and moisten with a little vinegar, stir 
into your pickles, then boil until thick. — Mrs. A. A Gifford. 
Peoria. 

MIXED PICKLES, or CHOU-CHOU. 

One gallon of long pickles cut lengthwise, one dozen smal j 
ones left whole and the same number of small onions, one 
large cauliflower, one quart of small green tomatoes; put 
cucumber in brine and scald the rest in salt water: add 
pepper and whatever you like, two and one-half cups of 
sugar, one cup of flour, six tablespoons of mustard; pour 
this mixture over the whole and bottle when cool: keep 
sealed. I cook the cauliflower until it is tender with enough 
salt, just like you were going to serve on table, the onions 
the same. Mix all together and put in the vinegar and mus- 
tard liquid. Let boil for ten or fifteen minutes, then can. — 
Mrs. Belle Libolt. 



60- PICKLES. 

CHILI SAUCE. 

Three gallons of ripe tomatoes, sliced, cooked .and put 
thru colander; add to this six onions, four green peppers 
chopped fine, one cup of sugar, one-half cup of salt, one 
tablespoon each of cinnamon, allspice and cloves* three pints 
of vinegar: boil three hours or until it thickens and bottle. 
--Mary Longwell. 

TOMATO CHOWDER. 

Two dozen large tomatoes, one dozen green peppers, eight 
medium sized onions chopped fine, three cups of vinegar, 
one tablespoon of salt, three tablespoons of sugar, one of 
allspice, one teaspoon of cinnamon, and one of cloves. Tie 
the ground spices in a thin cloth. A little chopped horse- 
radish may be added before sealing the pickle. Boil the 
whole two hours slowly. It is better to seal but will keep 
without.— Mrs. Alice E. Dawdy, Peoria. 

CHICAGO HOT. 

One peck of ripe tomatoes chopped and drained, two cups 
of chopped celery, two cups of chopped onions, one cup of 
white mustard seed, one cup of grated horseradish, two cups 
of sugar, one-half cup of salt, six cups of vinegar, two table- 
spoons of mixed spices, five green peppers, three red peppers 
chopped; mix and pour vinegar over cold, need not seal.— 
Josephine Jones, Des Moines, Iowa. 

MUSTARD PICKLES. 

Two quarts of small cucumbers sliced lengthwise, one 
quart of green tomatoes, one quart of onions, whole, two 
quarts of green beans broken up, two or three green pep- 
pers chopped and all the celery you like; some use green 
corn, I don't. Mix all thisone morning and make a brine of 
four quarts of water, one pint of salt, pour over all and let 
stand twenty-four hours, lift' out in colander and let drain. 
Mix one cup of flour, six tablespoons of ground mustard, one 
of tumeric which is to color the pickle yellow and can be 
purchased at any drug store, isn't so nice without it; mix all 
of this with cold vinegar to make smooth paste then put on 
stove one cup of sugar, two quarts of vinegar, let boil, stirr- 



PICKLES. 61. 

ing all the time to keep from burning, when smooth stir in 
the pickles and cook a few minutes. —Mrs. Sarah Ouderkirk 

SPICED CURRANTS. 

Five pounds of currants, three pounds of brown sugar, one 
quart of vinegar, one tablespoon each of salt, cloves, allspice 
and cinnamon: boil sugar, vinegar and spices ten minutes, 
then add currants and boil twenty minutes.— Caroline Hurd- 
Bailey. 

WATERMELON RIND PICKLES. 

Peel and trim all soft parts from fresh, crisp melon rind. 
cut in squares, wash and weigh: to each pound allow a scant 
one-half pint of vinegar and one-half pound of sugar; put 
vinegar and sugar in preserving kettle, while boiling stick 
two whole cloves in each piece, drop in syrup and cook from 
eight to ten minutes. Too long cooking renders them soft. 
Lift out with fork and pack in glass or stone jars, boil syrup 
down and pour over boiling hot, tie paper over and keep in 
cool place. Will be good in two or three months and will 
keep indefinitely. — Mrs. Mary Benson. 

CHOU-CHOU. 

One quart tiny young cucumbers not over two inches long, 
two quarts very small white onions, two quarts tender 
string beans, each cut in halves, three quarts of green 
tomatoes sliced and chopped very coarse, two heads of fresh 
cauliflower cut in small pieces or two heads of white hard 
cabbage. After preparing these articles, put them in a stone 
jar, mix them together, sprinkling salt on them sparingly; 
let stand twenty-four hours drain off all the brine and put 
these vegetables in a preserving kettle to cook. Sprinkle 
thru them an ounce of tumeric for coloring, six red peppers 
chopped coarse, four tablespoons of mustard seeds, two of 
celery seed, two of allspice, two of cloves, one coffee cup of 
sugar, two-thirds of a teacup of best ground mustard, pour 
on enough best cider vinegar to cover well; cover tight and 
simmer all until tender, watching and stirring often, pour 
into glass jars. It grows better as it grows older; seal while 
hot. — Mrs. W. C. Stevenson, Galesburg. 



62. PICKLES. 

SULPHURED APPLES. 

Pare and quarter apples as for cooking, place one bushel 
in a barrel leaving enough space for a cup in which two 
tablespoons of sulphur have been put: put cup in center of 
barrel, add fire to sulphur and cover closely for twenty- foUr 
hours. If more apples are desired hang in a market basket 
in top of barrel but do not add more sulphur. These will 
keep a long time sulphured in this manner.— Mrs. Frank 
Donason. 

SWEET CUCUMBER PICKLES. 

Take the ripe cucumbers, seed and pare them, cut up in 
strips, cook in water till very tender, salt when cooking, 
then put in a colander and let drain; put sugar, vinegar and 
spices together and boil until like thin syrup, then put the 
pickles in syrup and just heat thru and pour out. —Mrs. Maud 
Hulsey. 

SPANISH PICKLES, 

One dozen small red peppers, one dozen large cucumbers, 
four small heads of cabbage, one peck of green tomatoes, 
one dozen onions. Chop cucumbers and tomatoes the night 
before, salt and let drain. Next morning chop onions, cabb- 
age and peppers, take one gallon of vinegar, three ounces 
of white mustard seed, one ounce each of tumeric and celery 
seed, a little ground mustard, two and one-half pounds of 
brown sugar: boil vinegar, sugar and spices, then add chopp- 
ed stuff, let boil five minutes and seal in bottles. — Mrs. Kate 
Gifford, Peoria. 

SWEET TOMATO PICKLES. 

One peck of green tomatoes, two quarts of onions, slice or 
chop both, add one teacup of salt and let stand over night: 
in the morning drain and cook twenty minutes in three 
quarts of water. Drain and add two and one-half quarts of 
vinegar, three pounds of brown sugar, one- half ounce of 
white mustard seed, two tablespoons each of allspice, cloves 
and cinnamon, one of black pepper. Boil twenty minutes: re- 
heat vinegar for two successive mornings. This will keep for 
a year. —Mrs. S. B. McTier. 



Sickles. 63. 

cider apple butter. 

Forty gallons of cider fresh from the press, boiled down 
to ten gallons: two bushels of pared and cored apples cooked 
in fresh cider, when the apples are tender gradually put 
apples and cider together and boil down one-fourth of the 
original quantity of cider. This will keep without sealing.— 
George P. Burnett, 

GREEN TOMATO SOY. 

Two gallons of green tomatoes, before chopping, twelve 
onions chopped, two dozen chopped red and yellow mangoes 
one and one-half pints of sugar, two quarts of vinegar, one- 
fourth teaspoon of cayenne pepper, one tablespoon each of 
ground cloves and mustard, three tablespoons of celery seed, 
two tablespoons of allspice: save out enough vinegar to mix 
spices in: stir to keep from scorching and cook until tender. 
—Mrs. Cecil Hoxworth. 

STRAWBERRY PRESERVES. 

Wash and stem berries then crush with potato masher. 
Add one and one-half cups of sugar to one cup of fruit, then 
boil allowing it to boil twenty minutes from the time it com- 
mences to bubble. Do not boil more than three cups at a 
time. Put in jelly glasses and cover with paraffine --Mrs 
F. W. Traeger, 1610 Main St.. Peoria. 

SPANISH PICKLES. 

Two dozen large green cucumbers cut in one inch lengths, 
two large heads of cabbage chopped coarse. Sprinkle both 
with salt, put in bag, drain over night, one dozen large or 
two dozen small onions, one red pepper soaked in salt water 
two or three hours. Cook cabbage, peppers, cucumbers and 
onions with two ounces of white mustard seed, one ounce of 
celery seed, one ounce of tumeric, one pound ground English 
mustard, three pounds of light brown sugar mixed with one 
gallon of vinegar. Boil until it begins to thicken, bottle and 
seal while hot, will make about ten quarts. Dissolve tumeric 
and mustard in vinegar to keep from lumping. —Mrs, Essie 
A. Hammer, Fort Madison, la. 



64. PICKLES. 

FOSTER'S MUSTARD PICKLES. 

One quart each of large and small cucumbers sliced thin, 
one quart each of green sliced tomatoes, small onions, one 
large cauliflower divided into flowerets, four peppers cut 
fine. Make a brine of one cup of salt and four quarts of 
water and pour over vegetables and let stand over night, 
heat enough to scald then drain. Mix one cup of flour, six 
tablespoons of mustard and one tablespoon of tumeric with 
enough vinegar to make a smooth paste, then add one cup of 
sugar and two quarts of vinegar. Boil till thick then add 
vegetables, cook all till well heated thru.— Mrs, Emanuel 
Foster. 

PICKLED CUCUMBERS. 

To one-half bushel of cucumbers three gallons of water 
and one teacup of salt. Heat the water to boiling and pour 
over the cucumbers four successive mornings, on the :'ifth 
morning remove the brine and pour over them one gallon of 
boiling hot vinegar, or enough to cover them, in which is 
dissolved a piece of alum the size of a butternut, also put in 
a few horseradish roots. Towards spring new vinegar may 
be put on. -Mrs. Prudence Grabill. 

CHILLI SAUCE. 

Twelve large ripe tomatoes, four onions, two green and 
one red peppers, if you like it a little hot, peel onions, toma- 
toes, and seed peppers and chop all fine together. Two tea- 
spoons each of cinnamon, cloves and allspice, one teaspoon 
of ginger, one quart of vinegar: boil two hours and when 
cool seal in bottles.— Mrs. Laura Smith. 

PICKLE HODGEN. 

Chop one gallon of green tomatoes, sprinkle over them one- 
half pint of salt, let stand over night, in the morning drain 
off the water and add six onions chopped or sliced, six 
peppers chopped, one-half pint grated horseradish, one-half 
pint mustard seed, one tablespoon each of ground cloves and 
black pepper, two tablespoons of dry mustard, mix all well 
together pack jar three- fourths full and fill with vinegar.— 
Mrs. Eliza Housh. 



65 



CANDIES. 



NUT CANDY. 

One cup of light brown and one cup of granulated sugar, 
one-half cup of sweet milk, butter size of a walnut. Boil 
twenty minutes then add one cup of nut meats. Beat until 
thick and pour on buttered dish, when cold cut in squares, 
—Mrs. L. A. Wheeler. 

FUDGES. 

Two cups of sugar, one cup of milk, small piece of butter, 
one-half cup of chocolate: beat until it gets thick; boil until 
it can be picked up in water.— Louisa Huggins. 

FUDGES. 

Two eups of sugar, one cup of grated chocolate, one-third 
cup of butter: mix together then add one and one-half cups 
of milk and boil until done: pour into buttered pan and when 
ccol cut in squares.— Elery Donaldson. 

CARAMEL CANDY. 

Two cups of light brown sugar, two-thirds of a cup of 
rich milk, butter size of an egg, flavor with vanilla. Don't 
stir. Cook until thick, very fine.— Jay C. Hurd. 

MAPLE CREAM CANDY, 

Three cups of brown sugar*, butter the size of an egg, 
one-half cup of English walnuts chopped fine, one-half tea- 
spoon of vanilla.— Mrs. Minnie Woolsey, Gilson, 

COCOANUT CANDY. 

Whites of three eggs beaten stiff, sugar enough to make 
stiff enough to roll into balls, put in cocoanut to suit the 
taste: put balls into bake pan three inches apart with oiled 
paper in the bottom of pan, bake in oven until a light brown. 
— Arlina Buell, Topeka, Kas, 

SEA FOAM CANDY. 

One pound of brown sugar, whites of two eggs. Put sugar 
in a pan and pour enough cold water on to moisten, let boil 
till it gets taffy when dropped in cold water. Beat the eggs 



66. CANDIES. 

to stiff froth and pour taffy in the egg while hot. Beat till it 
gets stiff. — Mrs. Leota Smith. 

CHOCOLATE CREAMS. 

Stir into the whites of one egg and one tablespoon of 
water enough confectioners sugar to make into molds, flavor, 
roll into little balls, let stand until a crust forms and then 
dip into melted chocolate and set on a waxed paper in a 
cool place to harden. — Genevieve Celeste Bearmore. 

MARGUERITES. 

One cup chopped English walnuts, one cup powdered sugar, 
whites of two eggs: beat whites to stiff froth, add sugar 
and beat until light then stir in gradually the chopped nuts: 
spread thinly on wafers and place in a slow oven until light 
brown.— Mrs. Clara Burkhalter, Peoria. 

ENGLISH TURKISH DELIGHT. 

Three cups of sugar dissolved in one-half cup of water, 
boil until clear: add one ounce of Knox gelatine No. 1 dis- 
solved in one-half cup of clear water and boil twenty min- 
utes in double boiler: after it boils fifteen minutes add juice 
and grated rind of one orange and one-half the grated rind 
of a lemon then boil five minutes longer, strain in shallow 
pans that have been lightly greased, set away to harden, 
dust well with powdered sugar and turn into a paper cut in 
desired shape and serve. Part of it can be made pink by add- 
ing the pink powder before straining. — Mrs. Flora Clark. 

KISSES. 
Beat whites of four eggs to a stiff froth, then stir in one 
and two-thirds cups of sugar; flavor with vanilla or lemon: 
continue to beat until it will lie in a heap. Lay the mixture 
on letter paper in the size and shape of half of an egg and 
about an inch apart then place the paper on a piece of hard 
wood and put in a quick oven without closing the door. Watch 
them and when they turn yellowish take them out and let 
cool about a minute then slip a thin bladed knife under one 
and transfer it to your hand, then take another and join 
the two by the sides that lay on the paper and place the 
kisses thus made on a dish. I sometimes take part of the 
mixture out and add fruit coloring, or before flavoring add 
a little melted chocolate. — LaVere Hughs. 



67, 



ICE CREAM. 



LEMON SHERBET. 

One pint of sugar, juice of three lemons, one quart of 
milk. Double this makes three quarts when frozen. Dissolve 
sugar in milk before adding lemon to prevent curdling. — 
Josephine Woods, Galesburg. 

ICE CREAM. 

Scald one large pint of milk: mix together one cup of 
sugar, scant one-half cup of flour, two eggs and a little cold 
milk and add to the scalded milk. Cool and add one quart of 
cream, three-fourths cup of sugar and one spoonful of 
vanilla. Freeze slowly at first.— Fay G. Bearmore. 

ICE CREAM. 

One quart of cream, three quarts of milk, two ounces of 
gelatine or crystal-flake, two pounds of pulverized sugar. 
Put gelatine in a quart of milk and cook in double boiler 
until dissolved, then stir in your milk. Flavor to taste and 
freeze, — Al Lane, Knoxville. 

ICE CREAM, 
Two quarts of cream, one pint of milk, two teacups of 
sugar, two tablespoons of vanilla, one-half teacup of gelatine 
dissolved in a little hot water. Scald milk and sugar together 
flavor when cool, add cream and freeze; add whites of two 
eggs beaten very stiff, then turn the freezer very fast for 
three minutes. — Mrs. Elizabeth Runge, Taylorville, 111. 

LEMON ICE. 

One dozen lemons, two quarts of sugar and water enough 
to make six quarts. Beat the whites of six eggs to a stiff 
froth and add after it begins to freeze. — LaVere Hughs. 

CARAMEL ICECREAM. 

Boil one quart of milk, one cup of sugar, one-half cup of 
flour, two eggs: beat together and stir into the boiling milk 
and cook until done. Put another cup of sugar in a frying 
pan and stir over the fire until sugar turns to a liquid then 



68, ICE CREAM. 



add one quart of rich milk, pour this in the boiling mixture 
and set away to cool, then freeze.- Mrs. Flora Clark. 

IMITATION BRICK ICE CREAM. 

Moisten four tablespoons of gelatine in a little water; 
when dissolved add two cups of boiling water and six table- 
spoons of sugar; let the mixture come to a boil then beat in 
the whites of six eggs beaten to a froth, beat until cool and 
stiff, divide in three sections: flavor section one with vanilla 
and spread in an oblong pan sprinkling top with chopped 
nuts: color section two with fruit or vegetable coloring flavor 
with strawberry or lemon and spread over section one 
sprinkling with nuts: flavor section three same as section 
one and spread over section two. Set on ice till firm and 
serve with whipped cream. This recipe will serve eight 
people. — Lulu Traeger, Peoria. 



69, 

■ ■ . t ... ■ ; ■ . ■ -"V . __ — 

M ISCELL AN EOUS. 



LINIMENT 
For Barbed Wire and Other Wounds in Stock. 

Three ounces of oil of tai% three ounces of glycerine, three 
ounces of alcohol. Shake well. — A. F. Libolt. 

CAMPHOR ICE. 

Three ounces of mutton tallow, three ounces of powdered 
camphor gum, two ounces parafflne; melt tug-ether in double 
boiler then pour in molds to cool. Very fine for chapped 
hands, lips and chafing. -Mrs. Jessie Thurman. Galesburg. 

CHILBLAINS on the FEET. 

Take five cents worth of camphor gum, two tablespoons of 
fresh lard, put in a pan to dissolve, then put in a little tin 
box, bathe the feet at night and apply the ointment.- 
Lyman Walter. 

SNOW LINIMENT. 

Six eggs, eight pints of turpentine, one pint of vinegar or 
enough to thicken like cream: beat whites and yolks sep- 
arately, having whites real stiff; add turpentine and fill up 
with vinegar. Shake well. J. Thurman. 

LINIMENTS. 
Spavins, Blood or Bag, Wind Galls, Thrupits, Splints, etc. 

Permanent cure for— Very strong vinegar one pint, aqua- 
fortis, nitric acids, spirits of turpentine and best alcohol, 
each one ounce: mix. Directions. Bathe freely, rubbing hard. 
Rub downward until you cause quite a heat in the leg. It 
will not cause any blister whatever and before you realize 
it it will disappear. It has been over seven years since I 
cured a mare and it has never appeared again. Bathe three 
or four times a day, rubbing hard every time. It seems a 
very simple recipe, but I can warrant it a good one. —John 
M. Simkins. 

LINIMENT for RHEUMATISM. 

Gum of camphor one ounce, spirits of turpentine two 



7d. MISCELLANEOUS. 



ounces, corrosive sublimate one ounce ( oil of spike two 
ounces, one pint of alcohol.— Nelson Hollo way. deceased. 

STOCKER LINIMENT. 

One-half ounce of hemlock, one-half ounce each of oil of 
cedar, organam and amber, three-fourth ounce of worm- 
wood, one-half pint of alcohol; mix. An excellent liniment 
for sprains or bruises. —Mrs. Caroline Ouderkirk. 

LINIMENT. 

One ounce of iodine* one ounce tr. of camphor, one ounce 
turpentine, one ounce alcohol, one ounce hartshorn.— Dr. 
Cyrus Westerfield, Chicago, deceased. 

BEDBUG RECEIPT. 

One pint proof spirit, two ounces camphor, four ounces 
turpentine, one ounce corrosive sublimate. Poison.— A. C. 
Housh. 

HOME MADE SOAP. 

Twenty pounds of grease, ten gallons of water, five cans 
of lye, one pound of rosin, one-half pound of borax. Boil one 
hour. This may be put into a large vessel, cut out as usual, 
or may be cut into bars and dried. —Mrs. Rozella Buck. 

TO CURE PORK. 

For each one hundred pounds of pork take four pounds of 
barrel salt, three-fourths of a pound of brown sugar, one 
teaspoon of salt-peter, one tablespoon of ground pepper; 
crush fine and mix thoroly, divide the mixture and rub the 
meat with half of the mixture; place the pieces on a board 
one inch apart where it don't freeze and in ten days rub on 
the remainder of the mixture and hang up to smoke. For the 
first fire use one ounce of sulphur or brimstone with hickory 
wood. After the meat is smoked smear with sorghum molas- 
ses and black pepper and you can let it hang all summer.— 
Mrs. L. P. Darnell, Atlanta, Mo. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 71. 



TO KEEP CIDER SWEET. 

One ounce salicylic acid to twenty gallons of cider, enough 
alcohol to cut the cider before adding: the cider: put in eider 
the same day it is made. This has been tested. — Eliza Jones. 
Gilson. 

TO CUKE HAMS 

To one hundred pounds of meat, eight pounds of salt, two 
ounces of saltpetre v two pounds of brown sugar, one and 
one-half ounces of potash and four gallons of water. Boil 
and cool. Let meat lay two days before putting it in the 
brine. Let hams lay in brine six weeks, dry several days 
before smoking. Rub with fine salt before packing. —Mrs. T. 
A. Ashworth, Montrose, Colo. 

TO CURE PORK. 

Put meat in barrel rubbing well with salt, putting some 
salt loose between joints. Put shoulders in bottom, let stand 
three days then make a brine strong enough to bear up an 
egg, pour over meat and let stand in the brine just six weeks 
take out, rub well with powdered borax, sugar and red 
pepper: hang and smoke with clean corn cobs.-- A. H. 
Barbero. 

REMEDY for a BURN. 

Boil new milk: add cold water to store starch sufficient to 
dissolve it, stir this mixture into the hot milk, making it 
the consistency of thick cooked starch, spread on cloth, let 
cool and apply. Will produce ease, also prevent blistering if 
used immediately. Aunt Jane Simkins. 

FACE LOTION. 

One ounce of bay rum, one ounce of flake white, one-half 
dr. of glycerine, four ounces of rain water. Most all the 
ladies use it, but none want to own it. 

BEEF TEA. 

Tu'o pounds beef chopped fine without fat or bone, one- 
half cup of cold water: place in a jar in a kettle of cold 
water, simmer four hours.— Dr. G. L. Knowles. 



72. MISCELLANEOUS. 



TUTTI FRUTTI. 

Put one pint of best brandy into a jar that will hold one 
gallon. Into this put equal quantities of fruit and sugar: one 
usually begins with strawberries, stir now and then as the 
sugar will settle to the bottom; do not use bananas or fruit 
that is very seedy.— Mrs. Tom Henney, Latrobe, Pa. 

CHERRY BUTTER. 

Put cherries on to cook with the pits in and when done 
drain off the juice and rub thru a fruit sieve, to each cup of 
pulp add one cup of sugar and boil twenty minutes. The 
addition of some good cooking apples improves it— Mrs. 
Beulah Nelson. 

WINES. 

Left over juices can be utilized into wines and kept for 
any length of time by adding one-third water then three 
pounds of sugar to each gallon. Put in bottles but do not 
seal until it is thru hissing then it can be drawn off clear 
and corked tight. Some fruit requires more sugar so sweeten 
to suit the taste.— Mrs. Flora Clark. 

SUN KISSED CHERRY PRESERVES. 

Pit and drop the cherries in a pail of cold water and let 
stand until you have two quarts seeded, drain thru a colan- 
der: turn with about equal parts of sugar into a preserving 
kettle and put on the stove to heat; when just scalded pour 
out on platters and set in the sun to preserve for one or two 
days according to heat: put in jar and seal.— Miss Lettie 
Brant in g. 

APPLE BUTTER. 

Wash, core and cut up the apples but do not peel. Stew 
until tender in enough water to cover: rub thru colander and 
to each pint of pulp add hardly one-half pint of sugar: stir 
well, put into stone crock and cook in a slow oven till thick: 
flavor with a little cinnamon. As good as when made with 
cider.— Mrs. Lucinda Jones. 

PREVENTATIVE for CHOLERA. 
Or to keep chickens always well. One pound copperas, one 



MISCELLANEOUS. 73. 



ounce of sulphuric acid, one gallon water dissolved together, 
put two or three tablespoons of this mixture in drinking- 
water twice a week -Newton C. Westerfield, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

FUEL SAVING. 

Shake down fire well in German Heater or hard coal 
burner, take out ash pan and put in its place your pan of 
biscuit with next size larger over top: your roast of beef or 
pork, spare ribs or young chicken: when you take out to put 
in potatoes or dressing, turn meat over. Half of a pig 
shoulder will boil roast in three hours very well in your 
base burner this way. I've done these many times. Mrs. 
Carrie Jones. 

PENNSYLVANIA DUTCH COOKED SLAW. 

One-half medium head or one small head of cabbage, slice 
or cut on cutter (not chopped) making about a quart loosely 
thrown into a pan, about one-fourth pint of hot water, one- 
half teaspoon of salt; let it co>:, boil rather briskly five to 
ten minutes, add one level tablespoon of butter, when melt- 
ed put in three or four tablespoons of sour cream, same of 
vinegar and before it begins to boil again one teaspoon of 
flour scattered loosely over, stir let boil, when the gravy 
seems thick, remove from fire. Upon putting in dish for 
table make three layers with a tablespoon of sugar on each 
layer. 

N. B. Cream from a condensed milk can will do. -Mrs. 
Rudolph Jones, deceased. 

CORN SALAD. 

Cut corn from one dozen ears of corn, four onions and two 
green peppers chopped fine, two tablespoons each of salt 
and ground mustard, one cup of sugar and two quarts of 
vinegar. Mix all together and cook till corn is tender an<8 
seal air tight while hot. — Mrs. Lela Strode. 

BAVARIAN CREAM. 

Whip one pint of cream to a stiff froth; this should make 
two quarts: if too rich to whip add a little, milk. .Make a 



7 4 MISCELLANEOUS. 



custard with the cream that drains from the whip, adding 
milk enough to mi'ce on? pint, one scant cup of sugar, one- 
half box gelatine softened in cold water and one teaspoon of 
vanilla. Cook one minute and strain into broad pan set in 
ice water. Watch it carefully and as soon as it begins to 
thicken, add the whipped cream, folding it in as in omelet. 
Nuts and fruits of any kind may be used. Fresh strawberries 
are especially good, marashino cherries add a great deal to 
the cream if used with other fruits. —Miss Lola E Foster. 

HOUSEHOLD HINTS. 

If vegetables have scorched in the kettle just set the 
kettle in a pan of cold water and almost all of the burnt 
taste or odor will be removed. 

In cooking any kinds of drop dumplings if you will leave 
the cover off a few minutes and then cover close for ten 
minutes your dumplings will always be light. 

Eggs that are frozen and bursted will become like fresh 
and fit for use by putting them into boiling water. 

Rust spots of any kind will disappear by wetting them in 
lemon juice and salt and lay it in the sun, the second appli- 
cation may be necessary. 

FLOAT. 

Put one quart of milk on the stove, while it is heating, 
separate the whites and yolks of four eggs: to the yolks add 
a little cold milk and one-half cup of sugar with a pincn of 
salt, beat thoroly. drop in the scalding milk spoonsful of 
the beaten whites for a few minutes, then remove them 
nnd stir in the mixture and it will soon thicken, remove fiom 
fire, flavor and pour over it the whites, sit in a cool place, 
serve in cups or glasses, A small spoonful of corn starch is 
a good substitute for an egg. —Shelley Clark. 

BRAN BISCUIT. 

One quart of bran, one pint of flour, one pint of sour milk, 
one teaspoon of soda, salt, eight tablespoons of molasses. 
Very palatable and a fine remedy for constipation.— Mrs. 
Robert Housh. Galesburg. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 75. 

BUNS. 

Three cups of sweet milk, one-half cup of lard, one-half 
cup of sugar, a little salt, boil all together and when cool 
enough add one cake of yeast: dissolve yeast in little warm 
water, make a sponge with flour and set to rise. When light 
add flour to make a stiff dough, allow to rise again and when 
light bake in moderate oven twenty minutes. M is. E. F. 
Johnson. 

PINT CAKE. 

One pint of cream, one pint of sugar, two pints flour, 
yolks of three eggs, one and one-half teaspoons of soda, one 
teaspoon each of cloves, cinnamon, allspice and nutmeg. 
Bake in two square bread pans. For filling use the whites of 
three eggs beat stiff, cook a small pint of raisins and add 
to the whites of eggs with one cup of sugar. — Mrs. L. P. 
Darnell, Atlanta, Mo. 

GOLD AND SILVER CAKE. 

For the silver cake — Cream one-fourth of a cup of butter, 
one cup of sugar, one-eighth of a cup of milk, one and one- 
half cups of flour sifted with one teaspoon of baking powder 
flavor with lemon extract, add beaten wmites of four eggs. 

For the gold part— Cream one-half cup of butter and one 
cup of brown sugar, yolks of four eggs, one-half cup of 
milk and two cups of flour sifted with one and one-half tea- 
spoons of baking powder, flavor with vanilla. 

This is to be a layer cake, first a layer of silver and then 
a layer of gold.— Mrs. Chas. Tasker. 

MOCK ANGEL FOOD. 

Set one cup of milk in a double boiler to heat to boiling 
point, sift together one good cupful of flour, one cup of 
sugar, three teaspoons of baking powder and a pinch of salt, 
sift four times into this, pour the cupful of boiling milk and 
stir smooth then put in the whites of two eggs; do not stir or 
beat eggs in mixture fold them in carefully till well mixed, 
flavor with vanilla. Do not grease the pan, bake in a mod- 
erate oven not too fast. —Mrs. Marvin Jones. 



76 MISCELLANEOUS. 

FRUIT DROPS. 

Two cups of sugar, one cup of butter or lard, three eggs, 
one cup sour milk, one teaspoon of soda, one teaspoon each 
of cinnamon and cloves, one cup of chopped nuts, one cup of 
chopped dates or raisins, four cups of flour. Drop spoonsful 
in baking tin instead of cutting as for cookies. — Mrs. Guy- 
Williamson. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

One cup of granulated sugar, one cup of sweet milk, four 
tablespoons of melted butter, two eggs, three cups of un- 
sifted flour with three teaspoons of baking powder, one- 
half teaspoon of salt, one teaspoon of vanilla, add sufficient 
flour to roll out, sugar while warm. — Mrs. A. M. Ritchie, 
Rapatee. 

APPLE CAKE. 

One and one-half cups of unsweetened apple sauce, one 
cup of sugar, one-half a cup of butter, one teaspoon of cin- 
namon, cloves and nutmeg to taste, one-half cup of mixed 
candied citron, orange and lemon peel chopped fine, one- 
half cup of raisins and a few currants, flour to make a stiff 
batter. Use ordinary frosting.— Jas. C. McKee. 

PRINCE of WALES LAYER FRUIT CAKE. 
One cup of brown sugar, two-thirds cup of butter, yolks 
of three eggs, one-half tablespoon of soda, one pint of sour 
milk, three level cups of flour, one pound of raisins and one 
heaping cup of any kind of nuts ground together. If the 
raisins are not at hand use any kind of fruit. Bake in layers 
and use any kind of filling or icing preferable. This receipt 
is one of a professional bakers.- Mrs. Addie Lewallen. 

PORK CAKE. 

One pound of fat salt pork, one pint of boiling water, two 
and one-half cups of sugar, one and one-half cups of sor- 
ghum molasses, one pound each of raisins and currants, one 
tablespoon of soda, one small tablespoon each of cinnamon, 
cloves and allspice, one nutmeg, 10c worth of brandy, flour 
to make very stiff, usually about four pints of soft wheat 
■flour after sifting once. —Mrs. Ora Darnell Hawley, Marion- 
ville. Mo. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 77 



POTATO CAKES. 
Take one quart of left-over potatoes, add one-half cup of 
milk, one beaten egg, two fair sized onions, a little salt, one 
tablespoon of flour, stir all together, then make into cakes, 
^roll in flour, fry brown in hot butter. -Miss Edna Way. 

TOMATO SOUP. 

One quart of tomatoes, let them get hot not boiling, add 
pinch of soda, as soon as they have foamed turn into seive 
-and strain thru, add milk and thickened, butter, salt, pepper 
-and onions to taste a little cooked rice added improves the 
soup.— Mrs. Grace Foster. 

HAM SCALLOP. 

Two cups of boiled ham ground fine, six hard boiled eggs' 
•when cold separate whites from yolks and chop fine. Make 
a thick cream sauce of two tablespoons of butter and four 
.of flour: cook until smooth then add one pint of sweet milk; 
when thick season with salt and pepper. Butter baking dish 
putting in a layer of sauce first then add, in succession ham. 
yolks of eggs, whites and top layer of sauce, dust over 
with fine cracker crumbs and small pieces of butter. Bake 
until brown about half an hour.— Mrs. Chas. Way. 

CHICKEN PIE. 

CRUST— Two cups of flour, one teaspoon of salt, two tea- 
spoons of baking powder, two tablespoons butter, one cup 
of milk, pour over top of chicken. 

GRAVY— Two tablespoons butter, three tablespoons of 
flour, one cup of milk, three cups broth. -Mrs. Mary Gray 
itapatee, 111. 

MOCK DUCK. 

Two slices of veal about three-fourths inch thick, fasten 
together with a tooth pick and stuff with any dressing de- 
sired, place in skillet with one-half of a cup of butter; brown 
on both sides with a quick fire, then cover and set back to 
simmer for forty-five minutes to an hour. Mrs. A. E. 
McKee, Spokane, Wash. 



Monuments 

Headstones. 

Finest Showroom and Largest Stock in 
the State. 




JSifflte'm\>i 




MERKLE & SONS. 

410 South Adams Street. 

PEORIA, ILL. 



WM. THOMAS, 
JEWELER. 

Anything from a Collar Button to a Diamond Ring. 

MAQUON, ILL. 



MAQUON STATE BANK. 
Capital, Surplus and Profits, $42,000.00 

Wm. Swigarl, President. D. S. Hartsook, V. Pres 

J. E. Shearer, Cashier. 

s - vBoard of Directors.^=3* 

Nick Murphy. D. S. Hartsook 

Wm, Swigart. Asa Rambo. 

Nate Simkins. 



S. B. DAVIS GRANITE WORKS 

No. 150 West Main St. 
GALESBIRG, ILL. 

For all kinds of Cemetery work, 
Including 

MONUMENTS, MAUSOLEUMS, 
STATUARY, 

Makers, and Marble Garve Vaults. 




Right at Your Door, 
METROPOLITAN STORE. 

"Civilized man cannot live without cooks," says 
the well-known poet. By that same token, what 
would the people of this central western Illinois 
territory do without The 0. T. Johnson Company 
of Galesburg. We've been serving the public for 
almost fifty years— and never better than now. 

Residents of Maquon need take only a half hour's ride by 
steam cars to enjoy the facilities of this splendid, metropoli- 
tan store which provides everything to wear and everything 
for the home. There is every satisfaction for those who do 
their buying here. 



Rest Room 

AND 

Tea Room 

2nd Floor Annex. 



TflEEIGCroEE 



The 



l25-135E.MainSt. 



?T-JohnsonComP 



*»> 



Galesburg.His- 



Free Parcel 

AND 

Baggage Check 

Main Floor 
Bridge. 



Criebel & Sons. 

MONUMENTS, 

VAULTS, MAUSOLEUMS, 
STATUARY, 



PEORIA, ILLINOIS. 



1 12- 1 14 North Adams St. 



Oppsite Court House. 



OUR SPECIAL CASH PRICES 
For out of town customers are inducements for 
you to buy your FURNITURE, RUGS, Etc here 





torv 



BETTER FOOD FOR LESS MONEY. 

Groceries are vouv biggest item of living expanses— hence you watch the cost c'osely^ 
You may have "tried to "cut the cost of living" in many ways and faded to hud a witifiiactc 

'"Here is a way by which you can save one third of your grocery money each month and at the 
same time have better food than you have ever had before. 

Buv vour groceries at wholesale prices from our big pure food grocery department. When the 
first sh'imnent arrives at vour home vou will be astounded at the saving you have made. You will 
check over each item, compare our prices and duality with the prices you have been paying and 
the goods you have been getting. We know you will be pleased. We know what has been the ex- 
perience of thousands of others who are now our regular customers. 

All our goods are absolutely pure and scrupulously clean. 

Samwles of even- article we sell are tested in our laboratories to make sure that they are tnll\ 
up to our high standard of purity and wholesomeness. What other grocery stores exercise so 
mneh care? Where else can vou he so thoroughly protected? Our groceries are always tresis 1 he 
demands upon our grocery department are so heavy that goods never remain in stock long. For ex- 
ample our sales run as high as thirty tons of rice a day, two car loads of prunes a day a car load 
of raisins a dav. thousands ot pounds of coffee and tea daily ; no merchant ise remark long on our 
shelves growing stale and collecting dirt and dust. Everything in covered, all goods are packed 
and handled bv automatic machinerv and no human hands ever touches them. It space permitted, 
we could give hundreds of reasons why you should buy your groceries here even if you did not 
save a cent. 

SEND FOR OUR BIG FREE GROCERY LIST. 

Wpissueal rand new grocery list every two months. It will cost you nothing to write to us and 
tell us to put your name on our books to receive each issue of this list, It will prov* a big "money 
saver" for you. 

REDUCE ALL YOUR EXPENSES IN THIS EASY PLEASANT WAY. 

nvpr '1 000 000 satisfied customers fill every need from our big store. Why? Because they are 
.rutins the'best and most satisfactory merchandise. From the leading merchants of the world we 
Enrnnrffoods Therefore, it is the best that the market of the world affords that our customers 
„At and besides thev save from 20 cents to 50 cents on every dollar's worth of goods they purch- 
ase.' "How can you give such splendid values for so little money?" is the question we are asked 
every day. 

W^lmVevCTvthing from the sources of supply. We buy amounts so great that the figures would 
astound von For instance, we buy and sell in one year 6 miles of baby carriages. 30 mi es ot bicv- 
cle tires and enough "dash" to span the continent several times. This, of course, means low prioeF- 
"l^k bottom" prices to us. Then we sell direct to you withouly one small, legitimate profit ad^ed. 

flafetv is vours when vou buv from us. A. guarantee— a broad, liberal guarantee that takis away 
the element of risk-is Vour safeguard. Here is how we eliminate the element of nsk-we guaran- 
tee everv purohase will meet your every requirement. If for any reason it does not, we will make 
anv exchange or alteration you wish or refund your money Furthermore we will repay you any 
transportation charges you have had to pay. Fair, square dealing and satisfaction guaranteed is 
and always has been our policy. 

HERE ARE A FEW OF THE MANY SAYING OPPORTUNITIES WE OFFER 

Paints Men's Fur Coats Circular and Drag Saws, 

Pianos. Organs, Sewing Machines. Women's Fashion Book. 

Trunks. Rooting. Gasoline Engines. Rain Coats, Rubber ('oafs. etc. 

Vehicles. Furniture Cream Separators, Tombstones, and 

Incubators, Building Material. Monume.i. s 

Wall Paper. Stoves and Ranges. Men's Ready-Made Clothing, 

Typewriters, Underwear Samples. Women's Furs, 

Grocery List, Automobile Supplies. Dry Goods. 

Feed Cookers, Bicycles— Motorcycles. Muslin Underwear, 

Tank Heaters, Baby's Dress and Millinery. 

Wire Fencing. Toilet, Men's Made-to-Order- 

Carpets Rugs Women's Tailored Clothing 

Building Plans, Suits Spring Fashion Book 
Baby Carriages. 

SATISFACTION— OR MONEY REFUNDED 

We have built up our big. successful business through the policy of always pleasing the custo- 
mer. It you should order anything from us and the article does not please you for any reason— oi 
even for no particular reason -return the article for satisfactory exchange or your money 

MONTGOMERY WARD 8 CO. 

li)TH ANDCAMl'HKI.I. STS. KANSAS CITY. CHICAGO AVE, BHIDGK, CHICAGO. 



j. u £ono, ^m. m 



HIGHLANDER, FAULKS & CO. 

223 East Main St., GALESBURG, ILL. 

Exclusive Millinery. 
H. S. COBB 

Agent for old Reliable Insurance. 

MRS. H. S. COBB 

Repairing and Cleaning of Garments. 

Maquon. 111. 

Before You Build A Fire 

To do your cooking, you had better take an Insurance Policy in 
the KNOX COUNTY MUTUAL FIRE AND LIGHTNING 
INSURANCE COMPANY with 

G. G. Shearer, Agt. MAQUON, ILL. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENTISTS. 

First Church of Christian Scientists. Edna Hughs first Reader, 
Carrie Jones, Sec. Services 10 a. m. 

METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 

Dr. U. Z. GILMER, Pastor. 

Sunday School 10 a. m., Preaching service at 7:30 from Sent, to 
April; at 11:00 a. m- and 7:30 p. m. from April to Sept. for 1912. 



C. W.HOUCK, 

HORSESHOEING AND BLACKSMITHING 
GENERAL REPAIR WORK 

Neverslip Calks are just what the name indicates, they never slip. 

MAQUON, ILL. 



Qalesburg Piano Co. 
PIANOS 

LARGEST STOCK LOWEST PRICES. 

MAQUON DRUG CO., MAQUON. ILL. 
Dealers in 

Drugs, Chemicals, 

PATENT MEDICINES 

Perfumery, Combs, Brushes, Fine Toilet Soaps, Shoulder 
Braces, Books and Stationery, Glass, Putty, Paints, 
Oils, Varnishes, Dye Stuffs, etc. 



FLORISTS 

Phone 589 PEORIA, ILL. 

Largest Retail Growers of Cut Flowers in Central ILL 



Q. W. MARKS 
Dry Goods 



GALESBURG, ILL. 



V. fi. SMITH, THE TINKER. 

DEALER IN PUMPS, ROOFING, SPOUTING, 
AND ALL KIND OF ROOFING, 

Maquon, ILL. 

HOUSH & GAMPBELL. 

MAQUON. - GALESBURG. 

Meats and Groceries, 

WE TRY TO PLEASE YOU. 

Highest prices paid for country produce. Better 
get prices before selling. It will pay you. 

Housh & Campbell. 



ABOUT THE MYSTIC WORKERS 
OF THE WORLD, 



ON NOV. 1st 1 Q I I $ MS, 000 ,000 Insurance in Force. 
$3,000,000 paid in Benefits. 
Maquon Lodge No 729 Assets $556,362.06. 

Insurance for Men and Women at the same rate. El) BOWMAN, Sec 



M. R. SCUDDER, Agt. 

For the John Handcock Life and the AETNA Fire and Wind storm 
Insurance Co., also Fruit Grower Nurseries. NEWARK, N. Y. 



G. F. COWMAN 

TONSORIAL ARTIST. 

Shop North of First National Bank, 



MAQUON. ILL. 



L. C. DAVIS 

UNDERTAKING! 

Calls answered day and night. Phone; Complete line connections. 
MAQUON, ILL. 

DR. TRUITT, Specialist, 

(Jives special attention to all Chronic Diseases. Answers calls in 
town or country. Business strictly private. MAQUON. 



Dr. 0. Clark Bailey, 
DENTIST. 

All work guaranteed. Office over the drug store 
MAQUON. 



C. F. MAPLE, 

For School Stationery, Tablets, Pens, Pencils, Ink, Mucilage, at 

POST OFFICE, MAQUON, ILL. 



PILLSBURY, FLORIST. 
Flowers and Blooming Plants for all Occasions. 

at 65 South Seminery St. and 65 Locust St. 

GALESBURG, ILL. 



White Glazed Terra Cotta 
Grave And Lot Markers. 

Durable as Granite, White Marble, Cheap as 
wood. 

In general use from COAST to COAST. 
Send for Circular and price list. Made by 



Albright & Lightcap, 

Revenna, Ohio. 



DR. G. L. KNOWLES. 

Direct Telephone Connections with all lines. 
MAQUON, ILL. 



HURD & HURD 

F. P. Hurd, Funeral Director and Embalmer. 
Lidy Assistant. Complete line of Undertaking Goods. 
Drop 'Phone No. 16- Maquon, 111. 



CON MAHER, TONSORIALIST. 

All work guaranteed satisfactory. 

MAQUON, - ILLINOIS. 

MISS MILDRED ALLEN. 

DOUGLAS, ILL. 

Teacher of Piano. Student of Knox Conservatory. At Maquon 

every Friday. 

MAQUON HARNESS CO. 

For the best in everything in the Harness and Horse Goods line. 
Repairing neatly and promptly done. 

FRANK WALKER. 



JONES HOTEL 

Mrs. Mary Jones, Prop. 
First-class service in every respecc. 



Maquon, 111. 



JOSHUA FOSTER, 

Livery and Feed Stable 

Good Turnouts for all Occasions at Reason- 
able rates. 

MAQUON, ILL. 



THOS. MELTON 

Grain Dealer and Fire Insurance. 
MAQUON, ILL. 



Swigart & Company. 

Dealers in 

Groceries, Tinware, Queensware. 

ooo 
MAQUON, ILLINOIS. 

EYE, EAR, NOSE AND~THROaT7" 
Eyes Tested, Glasses Fitted. 

Drs. Abbott & Bohanan, 

602 South Adams St. Peoria. 111. 

Maquon Office at Mr. Cobb's Residence. The fourth Friday of e 
month. Examination, Consultation, Advice Free. 

If you have trouble see us. 




THE 



Optician. 

- f — 



GALESBURG, 



ILLINOIS. 



One copy del. to Cat. Div. 



FEb 21 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 





llll III I 

014 488 606 9 • 





UA&ITY is the 1 


kind of Clothing you should ins: 


ist upon ifcei^: 


ing. It is unwise, however to r 


■ ose's ( #n^ 


judgement in such matters; even 


# • 1 


ing men of large experience < 




thanks to the science of chemist 




test that never fails. YOU may ] 




ing here with every assurance 




the highest quality. 


•>£-i«!^^i' , ii^^ *^ 


Corner Alain K^Hii 
Cherry Streets. ^/^Q^f^j^J 


Corner Main 
W m niid 

«! Cherry Streets. 


GALESBURG'S GREATEST CLOTHIERS. 


M. A. Overs tree* , Arthur WainrJyht, Otis J. 


Goff, Proprietors