(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Marta = Martha : opera in four acts"

GRAND OPERA 

LIBRETTOS 



ITALIAN 
AND ENGLISH TEXT 

AND MUSIC OF THE PRINCIPAL AIRS 

MARTA 

(MARTHA) 



BY 

FLOTOW 



JL 



JD. 



OLIVER DITSON COMPANY 
BOSTON 




MADE IN U. S. A. 





Standa 


rdOp 


era Libi 


•ettos 


All libreflos have English text. Additional texts are indicated by 


Italic letters, as 


follows: /, Italian; G, 


German; F, French. Those marked with 


(*) contain no 


music. All the others 


have the music of the principal airs. 
PRICE, 30 CENTS, EACH 






A- 


-G 




Title Text 


Composer 


Title Text 


Composer 


Africaine, L' I. 


Giacomo Meyerbeer 


Don Giovanni I. 


W. A. Mozart 


Alda /. 


Giuseppe Verdi 


Don Pasquale /. 


Gaetano Donizetti 


Armide F. 


C. TF. von Gluck 


* Dorothy 


Alfred Cellier 


Ballo in Maschera, Un 




Dumb Girl of Portici, 




(The Masked Ball) /. 


Giuseppe Verdi 


The (Masaniello) 1. 


D. F. E. Auber 


Barbe-Bleue 




Elisire d'amore, I' 7. 


Gaetano Donizetti 


(Blue Beard) /'. 


Jncqv fs Often hnch 


'^Erminie I. 


Edward Jakobowski 


Barbiere di Siviglia, li 




Ernani I. 


Giuseppe Verdi 


(Barber of Seville) I. 


Gioacchino A. Rossini 


Etoile du Nord, L' (The 




Bartered Bride d. 


Fredericii Smetana 


Star of the North) I. 


Giacomo Meyerbeer 


Belle Helena, La F. 


Jacques Offenbach 


Fatinitza 


Franz von Suppé 


Bells of Corneville 




Faust F. 


Charles Gounod 


(Chimes of Normandy) 


Robert Planquette 


do. I. 


do. 


'Billee Taylor 


Edward Solomon 


Favorita, La I. 


Gaetano Donizetti 


"^Boccaccio 


Franz von Suppé 


Fidelio G. 


L. van Beethoven 


Bohemian Girl, The 


Michael W?». Balfe 


Figlia del Reggimento, 




do. I. 


do. 


La (Daughter of the 




Carmen F. 


Georges Bizet 


the Regiment) 1. 


Gaetano Donizetti 


do. 7. 


do. 


Fille de Madame Angot, 




Cavalleria Rusticana 7. 


Pietro Mascagni 


La F. 


Charles Lecocq 


Chimes of Normandy 




Flauto Magico, Il 




(Bells of Corneville) 


Robert Planquette 


(The Magic Flute) 7. 


VP. A. Mozart 


Cleopatra's Night 


Henry Hndlcy 


do. O. 


do. 


Contes d'Hoffmann, Les 


' 


Fledermaus, Die 




(Tales of Hoffmann )F. 


Jacqu es Off en bach 


(The Bat) G. 


Johann Strauss 


Crispino e la Comare 




Flying Dutchman, The 


Richard Wagner 


(The Cobbler and 




do. G. 


do. 


the Fairy) I. 


Luigi and F. Ricci 


Fra Diavolo 7. 


D. F. E. Auber 


Crown Diamonds, The F. 


D. F. E. Auber 


Freischìitz, Der G. Carl Mario von Weber 


Dame Blanche, La 


F. A. Boicldieu 


do. 7. 


do. 


Damnation of Faust, 




'Gillette {La Belle 




The F. 


Hector Berlioz 


Coquette) 


Edmond A.udran 


Dinorah 7. 


Giacomo Meyerbeer 


Gioconda, La 7. 


Ain ilcare PonchielU 


'Doctor of Alcantara, 




Girofle-Girofla F. 


Charles Lecocq 


The 


Julius Eichberg 


Gotterdammerung, Di((r. 


Richard Wagner 


BOSTON: 


OLIVER 


DITSON COMPANY 


New York: Chas. 


H. Ditson & Co. 


Chicago : Ly 


on ér Healy 




Order of you 


r local dealer 




Made in U. S *.. 









MARTA 



(MARTHA) 



OPERA IN FOUR ACTS 
...BY... 

FRIEDRICH VON FLOTOW 



CONTAINING THE 

ITALIAN TEXT, WITH AN 
ENGLISH TRANSLATION 

AND 

THE MUSIC OF THE PRINCIPAL AIRS 

30 

BOSTON: OLIVER DITSON COMPANY 

New York: CHAS. H. DITSON & CO. Chicago: LYON & HEALY. INC. 

Made in U. S. A. 



Cò/^ì(:5^ 



MUSIC LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY 
OF CALIFORNIA 
BERKELEY J 



2^B 



CHARACTERS 



LADY HARRIET, Maid of Honor to Queen Anne . . Soprano 

LORD TRISTAN DE MICKLEFORD, Her Cousin . . . Bass 

PLUNKETT, a Young Farmer Bass 

LIONEL, His Foster-Brother, afterwards Earl of Derby . Tenor 

NANCY, Waiting-Maid to Lady Harriet .... Contraltc 

SHERIFF .......... Bass 



Courtiers, Pages, Ladies, Hunters and Huntresses, Farmers, Servants, Etc 



THE STORY OF "MARTHA" 



LADY HARRIET, a lady of rank at the 
court of Queen Anne of England, tired 
of the amusements which court life affords 
her, forms the plan to visit the Servants' Fair 
at Richmond in the disguise of a servant girl 
in search of employment. She is accompanied 
by Nancy, her maid, and Sir Tristan, a cousin 
and admirer of hers, rather advanced in years, 
both appropriately attired for the occasion. 

Hither also repair two young farmers, 
Lionel and Plunkett. Lionel is the adopted 
child of Plunkett's parents, now both deceased. 
His parentage is unknown. His father was 
found, one evening, at the door of the farm- 
house, where he had sunk down from exhaus- 
tion. Lionel, then a small boy, was with him. 
Both were taken in and provided for, but the 
father died soon, leaving his son to the charity 
of Plunkett's parents. He left to his son noth- 
ing but a ring, with the injunction to present 
it to the Queen if ever he should be in distress. 
The two foster-brothers come to the Fair with 
the purpose of engaging help for their farm, 
which has been left to their management by 
their mother, just deceased. Here they are 
struck with the personal appearance of Lady 
Harriet and her maid, and offer to engage 
them. The Lady and Nancy, who relish this 
joke exceedingly, accept the offer and take the 
earnest-money, unaware that thereby they are 
bound in law to serve them for "the space of 
one year. When they want to leave the Fair, 
the farmers detain them. Tristan's interfer- 
ence is useless, and as Lady Harriet does not 



wish to reveal her name and character, lest her 
reputation should suffer by it, she is obliged 
to mount with Nancy the farmer's wagon and 
drive off with them. 

Arrived at the farm, the foster-brothers 
soon find out that their new servants know ab- 
solutely nothing of their duties. But as Lionel 
is quite smitten with the Lady, and Plunkett 
pleased with the maid, their domestic incapac- 
ity is excused. Nancy teases Plunkett, who in 
his turn gets angry. The maid, frightened, 
runs away to hide in the kitchen, pursued by 
Plunkett. Lionel, left alone with his new ser- 
vant (who has adopted the name of Martha), 
makes advances. Lady Harriet answers eva- 
sively. Asked to sing, the Lady treats him to 
;he old Irish ballad. The Last Rose of Summer, 
Lionel, who now is completely enamored, asks 
her to become his wife. Lady Harriet laughs 
at him. They are interrupted by Plunkett 
and Nancy, the latter just caught after a hard 
chase. The clock strikes midnight, and 
masters and servants part to go to rest. Then 
Tristan, who has followed the track of the 
prisoners, enters through a window and assists 
in the escape of the ladies. Plunkett, who in 
his apartment has heard loud talking in the 
hall, comes in again, meaning to send the ser- 
vants to bed, whom he thinks up yet and 
chattering. Seeing the window open, and 
hearing the noise of carriage wheels dying 
away in the distance, he becomes alarmed, 
thinks they have been robbed, and calls in 
Lionel. They become aware of the flight of 



04185 



their servants; Piunkett rings the large bell 
out in the farmyard; the whole neighborhood 
assembles ; they hear what has transpired, and 
all start in pursuit of the fugitives, who, how- 
ever, make good their escape. 

A little while after this occurrence, the 
Queen, with the ladies of her court — among 
whom are Lady Harriet and her maid — hunt 
in a forest adjoining the village of which 
Plunkett's farm forms a part. Accidentally, 
Piunkett and Lionel fall in with a party of 
huntresses, headed by Lady Harriet. They 
recognize their former servants, but the ladies 
deny all knowledge of them. Their cortege 
comes to their assistance, and the two farmers 
are about to be arrested when Lady Harriet, 
who is at last touched by Lionel's wild grief, 
causes them to go off unharmed, stigmatizing 
them as madmen, unworthy of serious notice. 
Lionel, driven almost frantic by the cruel 
calmness with which Martha pretends not to 
know him, bethinks himself that he has the 
ring left him by his father. He entrusts it to 
Piunkett, and as the Queen is passing by, 
Piunkett immediately delivers it to her. By 
means of this ring it is found out that Lionel 
is the only son of the late Earl of Derby, who 
ended his days in disgrace, into which he un- 
justly had fallen. Queen Anne causes the title 
and all the possessions of the late Earl to be 
restored to the son by an Act of Parliament. 



Lady Harriet has, after the unfortunate 
meeting in the forest, become aware that she is 
deeply in love with Lionel, and now, anxious 
to re-establish herself in the favor of the new- 
created count, contrives to be the first one 
to communicate to him the news of his parent- 
age. But Lionel receives her coldly, and 
when the lady, who is a prey to the most vio- 
lent feelings of affection towards Lionel, and 
of remorse for having repulsed him so harshly, 
offers her hand to him, and, kneeling, prays 
him to accept her, he even then cannot over- 
come the bitter feeling in his heart towards 
the false and cruel lady. But the indefatiga- 
ble Lady Harriet, with the assistance of Piun- 
kett, who in his alarm for the health, and 
even life of his foster-brother, was easily per- 
suaded to take part in the scheme, contrived 
still another plan to bring about a reconcilia- 
tion. A part of the lady's park is artfully 
transformed into a facsimile of the market- 
place at Richmond. Farmers and servants 
appear, a counterfeit sheriff presents himself, 
and the lady in her peasant's dress mingles 
with the throng. Hither Lionel is conducted. 
At the sight of Lady Harriet in the costume of 
a servant all his former love for her comes 
back, and the two lovers are at last united. 
So are Piunkett and Nancy; and the curtain 
descends on two happy couples. 




ART A 

(MARTHA) 



SCENE I. — Toilet Chamber of Lady Harriet, richly fur- 
nished. 

Lady Harriet, Nancy, Ladies in attendance. 

Chorus. 

Why these gloomy clouds of sadness 
Overshadowing thy brow? 
Why should laughing mirth and gladness 
Vanish from our presence now? 
Round thee of thy friends' devotion 
Glittering presents witness bear: 
Jewels, laces, silks and satins 
Wait to deck a form so fair. 

Nancy 

(Presenting a nosegray.) 

Flowers are these Sir Tristan sends you. 

Lady. 

Ah! their odor sickens me! 

Nancy 

(Presenting a set of jewelry.) 

Diamonds which the richest envy. 

Lady. • 

Ah, they blind; I cannot see. 

Nancy. 
Lady! 

Lady. 

Leave me! 

Nancy. 

Mistress! 

Lady. 

Leave me! 

Go ye who my joys have known; 

Sorrows want not your attendance, 
• Sorrow bears its weight alone. 

Chorus. 

Why these gloomy clouds of sadness, 
Overshadowing, &c. 

(The Ladies retire.) 



ATTO I. 



SCENA I. — Salotto di Lady Enrichetta, con serene. 
Lady Enrichetta, Nanoy, Donne. 

Coro. 

Tu pili vaga d' una stella, 
Dell' Aprile il più bel fior, 
Tu gentil, leggiadra e bella, 
Il desio di tutti i cor. 
Perchè mai solinga e mesta 
Viver vuoi, giovin beltà. 
Ne t' alletta alcuna festa 
All' aurora dell' età? 

Nancy 

(Presentandole un mazzolino di fiori.) 

Questi fior di Sir Tristano? 

Enrichetta. 

Non li voglio; serba i fior. 

Nancy 

(Offrendole un monile di gemme.i 

Questo dono d' un sovrano? — 

Enrichetta. 

Ahi! per me non ha valor. 

Nancy. 

Ma— 
Enrichetta. 

Mi lascia. 
Nancy. 

Oh! s'io— 
Enrichetta 

(Interrompendola con impazienza.) 

Né sola 

M' è concesso di restar! 
Ogni voce, ogni parola 
Fa pili crudo il mio penar. 

Coro. 

Tu pili vaga d' una stella. 
Dell' Aprile il più bel fior, ec. 

(Le Donne partono.) 



MARTHA 



SCENE II. — Lady Harriet and Nancy. 


SCENA II. — Lady Enrichetta e Nancy. 


Nancy. 

Dearest mistress — 




Nancy. 

Mesta ognor? — 


Lady. 

Ah, these tears! They 


ease my bosom! 


Enrichetta. 

Pianger verrei! 


Nancy. 

Tears? And why? 




Nancy. 

Perchè mai? 


Lady. 

I know it not! 




Enrichetta. 

Perchè ? — Nói so. 


Nancy. 

Excellent cause! Desire for love 
Is moving, hap, your virgin heart. 


Nancy. 

Io svelave vel potrei. 

Se il chiedessi al vostro cor. 


Lady. 

Love, in me? 




Enrichetta. 

Chiedil pure. 


Nancy. 

Yes. Cupid's arrows 
Travel with the speed of 


lightning. 


Nancy. 

Amor soltanto 

Di quel pianto — io credo autor. 



QUESTO DUOL — OF THE KNIGHTS 



Nancy 

I An dante 



'hj^^y j,v | ;,y ;,r i r^. 



Que - sto duol che 

Of the Knights so 



SI v'af - fan-na, 

brave and charm-ing 



^ 



mei ere -de - te, 
Who sur-round our 



h j'' il .h '/ 1 1^ ^ m^ 



^^ 



* 



=^^ 



^ p f r ^ 



vien dal cor, 
gra-cious queen. 



mei ere - de - te vien dal cuo - re, la 

And themselves with wit are arm-ing^ Some 



tri 
one 



'i ;> V ;, y I r^ 



F^^ 



^^ 



s^5 



stez - za che — ti - ran-na, vi co-pri -va di pal-lor, 

has so luck - y been, Your cold,haught-y heart to win! 

ad lib. 
4r 



p Ip iiJ'i- ^ ' 1 j> J'i,J'i' l i J n i p ^ 



a 



' p» p p 



lo so ben, tri - stez -za, duo - Io, ven-gon sol dal 
Is there aught in this a- larm-ing? Is there aught a 



Clio 
larm. 



,g.^ 



MARTA 



Lady. 

Vain belief! how can rejoice me 
Such insipid, idle love? 
For to please and interest me 
Flattery is not enough! 

lyancy. 

Riches heap on you their treasures 
Honor high is ofiFered you. 



Lady. 



In the midst of gold and pleasures 
Weariness alone I see. 



Enrichetta. 

Ah! t' illudi; invano il cielo 
Per amar mi dava un cor; 
Come langue fior pel gelo 
Io mi struggo nel dolor. 

Nancy. 

Quai fantasmi vi create! 
Via scacciate — quel martir. 

Enrichetta. 

Con me stesso anch' io m' adiro. 
Né più aspiro — che a morir. 



LE SUL LABBRA — r/MT IS REALLY TOO DISTRESSING 



Nancy 



^ ^ i .OlMJ)J> l J'^'' j,-^'IJ. ^' i iJ>P l P>^i.iì 



Le_ sue lab-bra non dis - ser- ra il sor- ri- so dell' a- mor, non v'ha 
That is real-ly too dis - lress-ing;Hers is call'd a bril-liant lot? //"_ not^ 



-'!> ;, .h Ji J> I i'--^' ji J' I ;. ■^' i iJ^ 



m 



m 



gio-ja sul - la ter - ra che le - nis-cajl suo do - lor, non_ v'ha 
love does work " won-der Fades this flow'r and bias • soms not! It is 



h ]) j) ;> > I |J>. r J) J' I i' J^^ 



? 



^^ 



£ 



* • 



jjio - ja sul- la ter- ra che le - nis-cajl suo do - lor! 
real-ly tou dis - tress -ing^ Hers is call'd a bril-liant loti 



le sue 

//_ not, 



cresa 



p p r p I r ^ £j EJ' I p p p f I c>-r Q^ 



m 



lab-bra non dis - ser- ra, il sor n - so dell' a - mor, non v'ha 

love does work a won-der. Fades this flower, and blossoms not. Fades this 



é''' P P P P IP '^ 1 l'" l "^ ^' i ' ^ ^ 



gio-ja sul - la ter - ra che le-nis-cajl duel. 

flow'r, and blossoms not, «A, fades and bios - soms not. 




non v'ha 
/f_ not. 



h \ cresc. 




gio-ja sul-la ter-ra che le nis-caJl mio do - lor,_ che le 

love does work a won-der. Fades this flow'r and blossoms not,^ If— not, 



MARTHA 




A 



^ 



" r r F F I p 



p-p^f-^ 



/lis-cajl mio do - lor, ah!. 
love does work a won - der^. 



■ 
che le - 
Fades this 



nis 
flou^r 



- cajl 
and 



SUO do • 
blos • soms 



lori 
noti 



Nancy. 

Balls and tournaments are giving, 
And your colors win the prize, 
Proudly from the banners waving, 
While the victor vainly sighs 
For a smile from your fair eyes. 
Which his armor penetrated! 

Lady. 

All my glowing ardent wishes 
Please me not, are they fulfilled! 
What a happiness I dreamed 
Always has disgust instilled. 
The homages they offer, 
Praise and honor they bestow 
Leave me joyless, once obtained 
Do not make with pride me glow. 

Nancy. 

Then, from ennui to save you. 
Nothing is for you remaining 
But to let your heart be conquered. 
Not a particle retaining! 

SCENE III. — Tristan announced by a footman, and the 
same. 

Footman. 

Sir Tristan of Mickleford! 
Member of the house of Lords! 
Knight, with many orders honored — 

Lady 

(Interrupting him.) 

We will spare you the remainder 
Tristan 

(Entering.) 

Most respected, gracious cousin. 
Lady of Her Majesty — 
Most respectfully I venture — 

Lady 

(Impatiently.) 

Quick, my lord, for time doth flee. 

Tristan. 

May I inquire — 



Nancy. 

Danze, corse, giostre e feste 
Voi dovreste — qui veder; 
Tutto brilla a voi d'intorno 
Tutto invita qui a goder; 
Cada il sole, nasca il giorno 
Non irradia che il piacer. 

Enrichetta. 

Chi può dir dov' è la calma 
Che vorrei né so trovar ! 
Chi può dir perchè quest' alma 
E dannata a sospirar! 
. Preda son d' arcane ambasce. 
Non so pili se m' abbia un cor, 
Non m' allegra il dì che nasce, 
Non m' attrista il di che muor. 

Nancy. 

Sol 1' amore il vostro tedio 
Dissipar bandir potrà; 
Altre uccide il suo rimedio 
Ma la vita a voi darà. 

SCENA III. — Sir Tristano annunziato da un Servo, i 
precedenti. 

Servo 

(Annunziando.) 

Sir Tristan di Mickleford 
D'Inghilterra pari e lord 
Baronetto e gran scudiero! — 

Enrichetta 

(Interrompendolo.) 

Basta, basta, via, ciarliero! 
Tristano 

(Entrando.) 

Vezzosissima cugina 

Cui 1' eguale il ciel non fé', 

(Prostrandosi.) 

Bella lady a voi s'inchina — 
Enrichetta 

(Impaziente.) 

Dite subito, che e' è? — 

Tristano. 

Oso chieder — 



MARTA 



Lady. 

You may, Sir. 

Tristan. 

If the night has brought you rest, 
And for new diversions zest? 

Lady. 

Answer, Nancy! 

Nancy 

(To Tristan.) 

Little, Sir. 

Tristan. 

Deign to listen to the programme 
I've laid out for us to-day: 
Luncheon at the donkey-races — 

Nancy. 

(Incomplete without my Lord!) 

Tristan. 

Then a promenade — 

Lady. 

Not with me. Sir! 

Tristan. 

Then a horse-race — 

Lady 

(Ironically.) 

Where you will 

Through the lightness of your body 

Surely win all the prizes. 

(Aside.) 

Ah, what madness, gross and glaring. 

What display of vanity; 

Idle fancies make him daring, 

And he feigns to sigh for me. ^ 

Tristan. 

See her smiling and delighted 
My devotion to behold. 
Yes, to move her heart of marble 
Takes a lover shrewd and bold. 

Nancy 

(To Tristan.) 

See her smiling and delighted 
Your devotion to behold; 
Press your suit with fire and ardor, 
Be a lover brave and bold. 



Tristan 



Tournament? 



(To Lady.) 



Enrichetta 

(Come sopra.) 

Più spedito! 

Tristano. 

Se vi posso dir buon dì, 
E se avete ben dormito — 



(A Nancy.) 



Enrichetta 
Dillo tu. 

Nancy. 

Così, così. 

Tristano, 

Dimandar volea del pari, 
Ma vorreste oggi goder 
D' una corsa di somari — 

Nancy. 

Vi farete là veder? — 

Tristano. 

Ma sapete — 

Enrichetta 

(Con impazienza.) 

So Ogni cosa. 

Tristano. 

Che voi siete — 

Enrichetta. 

Il resto io so. 
Una spina in core ascosa 
Voi serbate. E vero o no? 
(Ah! che matto! che figura! 
Vecchio, brutto, e chiede amor! 
No, che egual caricatura, 
Scimia ugual non vidi ancor!) 

Tristano. 

Voi ridete; segno è questo 
Che fo breccia in bel cor. 
Come no, se vispo e lesto 
Cuginetta, io sono ancor! 

Nancy. 

Ella ride; segno è questo 
Che gradisce il vostro amor. 
E fa ben, che vispo e presto. 
Sir Tristano, siete ancor. 

Tristano 

(Ad Enrichetta) 

Corse al prato? — 



10 



MARTHA 



Lady. 

Bah! my fan, Sir! 



Tristan 

Boat excursion r 



(Fetches and presents it.) 
9 



Lady. 

Please my perfume! 

(Tristan fetches it as before.) 

Nancy. 

(His love evaporates already.) 

Lady. 

How chilly feels the air! 

Would you close the window, cousin? 

(Tristan goes and shuts it.) 



Tristan 



Camp-work ! 



(Aside.) 



Lady. 

Oh! this atmosphere — 
Air — the window — 

Tristan. 
Open? 



Lady. 

Aye, Sir! 



(Tristan re-opens it.) 



Nancy. 

(My lord's running for the prize!) 

(Here the song of Servant-girls, bound for the Fair at 
Richmond, is beard from outside.) 



Enrichetta 

(A Tristano.) 

Il mio ventaglio. 
Tristano 

(Va a prendere il ventaglio e lo dà a Lady Enrichetta.) 

In battei o? — 

(Tristano va a prenderli come sopra.) 

Enrichetta 

(A Tristano.) 

I fior — No, sbaglio. 

(Lascia i fiori.) 

Nancy. 

(Gli fa fase il burattino.) 
Enrichetta. 

Oh! qual vento dal giardino! 

Quel veron chiuder volete? 

(Tristano lo chiude.) 

Tristano. 
Cacce? — 

Enrichetta. 

Ed ora il caldo è troppo! — 
Aprite! Aria! — 

Tristano. 
Aprir? 

Enrichetta. 
Correte. 

(Tristano lo riapre.) 

Nancy. 

(Il galoppo — vi conviene 
L'esercizio, vi fa bene.) 

(S'ode venir dalla via il canto delle contadine che vanno 
alla fiera di Richmond.) 



Chorus 
Allegretto 



QUI \Em AM — LIGHT AND GAY 



f'^^'71^ W'I^ f 



P 



^ 



^ 



W 



2=1 



Qui ve - niam, lie-tejn cor, non chie - diam che la - vor, /o^ua - da - 
Light and g^y. All the day, Street and lane, Hill and plain, Ri)igs a - 



I 



^ i t i' V J' 



^F 



:h=dt 



F I p ^ p M f ^ ^ [^ M p ^ ^' fT*"^^ 



gnar noi vo-^liam, co -me far, ser-ve siam! Qui ve -niam, lie-teJn 
'oìip Mer-ry song Till the night Si-lence bids. Light and gay All thn 



MARTA 



11 



cor, non chic - di am che la- vor, gua-da-gnar noi vo - gliam co - me 
day^ Sintt and lane, Hill and plain, Rings a - long Mtr - ry song Till the 



f P 



far, ser-ve siam! Qui ve - niam lie-te in cor, Ser-ve siam-oin cer-ca an- 
light Si-lence bids! Pleas-ure startSjGlee irn -parts Cheer-ful songs to youth -fui 



S 



^f i J H'Nw ^ 




diam d'un pa r dron che sia buon, se cer chia-mo le tro - viaml 
hearts^ Trav-'ling ihus^ Sor-row - less. Are we io the Rich-mond mart. 



Lady. 

Hark, what sounds? 

Nancy. 

How gay a chorus! 

Tristan. 

Gay? Pshaw! Common, Miss, say I. 

Lady. 

Happy people these must be! 

Tristan. 

Know these people happiness? 

(The Chorus is repet.ted outside.) 

Nancy 

(Who has gone to the window, and looked at the singers.) 

To the Servants' Fair, at Richmond, 
These plump lasses way are making. 
Where the sturdyminded farmers 
Smart survey of them are taking. 
Carrying each a bundle light, 
And their bonnets flower-decked. 
To the dance first, then to work 
Wander they, with lightsome hearts! 

Tristan. 

Dull affair! 
Nancy. 

Time-honored custom ! 
Lady. 

Ah! most charming rural scene! 

Could I, unknown, with them mingle 

On the luscious village green! 



Enrichetta 



(Ascoltando.) 



Quali voci! 

Nancy. 

E come liete! 

Tristano. 

Dan fastidio e nulla piiì. 

Tristano. 

( Ignorante servitù ! ) 

(S' odono di nuovo le voci delle serve venar dalla via.) 

Nancy. 

Son le serve; ho indovinato 
Delle voci il lieto suon. 
Di Richmond vanno al mercato, 
Sono in cerca d'un padron. 
Non han dote; il lor tesoro 
Son le braccia è l'onestà, 
Ma se povere son d'oro 
Ricche son d'ilarità. 

Tristano. 

Strana fiera! 

Nancy. 

Così si usa. 

Enrichetta. 

S'io potessi! — Qua! pensieri 
Con le serve anch' io confusa 
Del mercato il brio veder. 



12 



MARTHA 



Tristan. 

Absurd wish this ! 

Lady. 

How obliging! 

Follow I shall my fancy now. 

Just to tease your noble Lordship! 

Tristan. # 

Lady! Cousin! Hear I right? 

Lady. 

Nancy, find us peasant dresses, 
To those lasses garments mated! 

Tristan. 

Might I ne'er thus see you humbled! 

Lady. 

Humbled, cousin? Elevated! 

(Laughing.) 

New-made rustics at a hop, 
Martha, Nancy, and Sir Bob! 

Tristan. 

Who is Bob? 

Lady. 

Bob are you! 

Tristan. 

No, not I ! Be Bob who may ! 

Lady 

(Approaching him with feigned tenderness.) 

How? Tristan! Is this your affection? 
Your good heart prompts your consenting. 
Take this sign of my relenting! 

(Gives him a boquet.) 



Tristan 
Ah! 



(Sighing.) 



Lady. 

Now, my ever laughing Nancy, 
Teach him how the peasants dance! 

Tristan. 

(When will end these whims tormenting?) 

Lady. 

Lay aside your graceful manners, 
Stiff and heavy move about! 



Tristano. 

Pazzarella ! 

Enrichetta. 

A me parlate? 

Per dispetto lo farò — 

Vo' che voi m' accompagniate. 

Tristano. 

Qual follia! Vi pare! — Ohibò! 

Enrichetta. * 

Ho il vestir da contadina 
Del veglion della Regina — 

Tristano. 

Degradarvi, o ciel! cosi? 

Enrichetta. 

Vuo' distrarmi! Va, Nancy, 
Presto, pria che inoltri il dì. 
Marta io son; Nancy; voi John — 

Tristano. 

Marta, John — ma dove son? 

Enrichetta. 

Marta io son, John siete voi. 

Tristano. 

John! io John! oh, questo no. 

Enrichetta 

(Avvicinandosi a lui e facendogli delle moine.) 

E d' amarmi dici poi? 
Chi ricusa amar non può. 
Brami dunque ch'io ti preghi? 
Un capriccio a me tu neghi? 
Vedi, a te serbai quei fior. 

(Prende i fiori e glieli dà.) 



Tristano 



(Sospirando e cedendo.) 



Ah! 

Enrichetta. 

La danza del contado 

Or, Nancy, gli dèi mostrar. 

Tristano. 

Con questi abiti! Vi par! 

Enrichetta. 

Presto! in collera già vado 

(Con dolcezza.) 

Via, cugin, non mei negar. 



MARTA 



13 



Nancy. 

Feet bent outward, bold and wayward. 
Briskly, crisply stamp the floor; 
Hat knocked shapeless, half tipped over. 
Reel and swagger to and fro! 

Tristan, 

Ah, how can I? 

Lady. 

'Tis my pleasure! 

Tristan. 

Never! no! 

Lady. 

From left to right! 

Tristan. 

I, a Lord! 

Nancy. 

A noble sport! 

You'll easily catch the spirit, my lord! 

Tra, la, la. 

(They make him dance.) 

Lady. 

Quicker move you — 

Nancy. 

'Twill improve you! 

Tristan. 

Mercy ! I'm out of breath. 

Lady. 

Less of polish! 

Nancy. 

Imitate, Sir, genuine nature. 

TrLitan. 

Nature. How? It were my death. 

Lady. 

What prodigious agility! 
Bravo! bravo! what vigor! 

Tristan. 

What tormenting exercises! 
Enough! Or I shall faint! 

Nancy. 

How graceful, what handsome bearing! 
I cannot help admiring him! 



Nancy. 

Attenzione' il ballo è questo 

(Mostrando la danza del villaggio.) 

Si va in giro, snello il pie. 
Pili si va, più si fa presto, 
Di galoppo andar si de'. 

Tristano. 

F. dovrei? — 

Enrichetta 

(Insistendo.) 

Ma sì, consenti. 

Tristano. 

Un mio pari ! 

Nancy. 

Stiamo attenti! 

Tristano. 

Come! un lord! 

Nancy 

(Predendolo per mano.) 

Badate a me. 

Ecco qua — come si fa: 

Tra, la, la, lara, la la. 

(Le fa ballare.) 

Enrichetta. 

Com' è svelto! 

Nancy. 

Com' è bello! 

Tristano. 

(Ahi! che fiato non ho più.) 

Enrichetta. 

Che bel tipo! 

Nancy. 

Che modello! 

Tristano. 

(Se ancor dura casco giù.) 

Enrichetta. 

Che prodigio! che sveltezza ! 
Bravo! bravo! qual vigor! 

Tristano. 

Che tormento ! che stanchezza ! 
Basta! basta! ho male a^ cor. 

Nancy. 

Oh! che grazia! — che bel torso! 
Non son sazia — d'ammirar. 



14 



MARTHA 



Tristan. 

(I look very much like a bear 
Whom monkies are forcing to dance.) 

(Exeunt dancing.) 

SCENE IV. — Market-place at Richmond. — Tents, shops, ta- 
bles, benches, &c. — Farmers, Peasants, afterwards 
Servants. 

Chorus. 

Maidens, bright and fair, 

Draw near, draw near; free is the Fair! 

Hither hasten quick; 

Through diligence lies the way to luck! 

Haste you, hasten, cheerful lasses. 

Be not tardy on your way. 

For the Fair will soon be open. 

And advancing is the day. 

Done! and the bargain consummated 

Neither party can undo it; 

(With joy.) 

Is the servant faithful, honest, 
Neither party then will rue it. 
They are coming, gaily singing; 
Let us meet them, welcome bringing. 

(Servants enter.) 

Chorus of Servants. 

Light and gay, all the day. 
Street and lane, hill and plain, 
Rings along merry song 
Till the night silence bids. 
Pleasure starts, glee imoarts 
Cheerful song to youthful hearts 
Travelling thus sorrowless 
Are we to the Richmond mart. 

Farmers. 

Maidens bright, maidens fair. 
Welcome are: the Fair is free! 

Servants. 

Travelling has made us weary, 
Let's disperse, seeking rest! 

(Disperse.) 



SCENE v. — Lionel ;.nd Plunkett. 

Plunkett. 

What clattering, what a prattling. 

Volleys of bewildering sound! 

Healthy tongues, that know their business. 

In this motley crowd abound. 

Well, my brother, a selection 

Hast thou made with circumspection? 



Tristano. 

(La figura fo dell' orso 
Che le scimmie fan danzar ! ) 



SCENA IV. — La piazza di Richmond— Betteghe, panche, 
deschi, sgabelli — Fattori, Contadini, poi le Serve. 

Fattori. 

Accorrete, giovinette, 
Accorrete! a clie tardar? 
Qui venite, ingenue e schiette, 
Non vi fate più aspettar! 
Il pili vago corsaletto. 
Ed un nastro porporin, 
Dee fregiare il vostro petto, 
Intrecciarsi al vostro crin. 
Su! 

Se sarete oneste e buone, 
Se il lavoro si farà! 
Troverete un buon padrone, 
Che per voi riguardi avrà! 
Accorrete, giovinette 
Non vi fate più aspettar. 
Senza valide servette 
Non possiamo qui restar. 
Ecco giungono al villaggio 
Restiam qui sul lor passaggio. 

Coro di Servitore. 

Qui veniam liete in cor 
Non chiediam che Favor, 
Guadagnar noi vogliam 
Come far serve siam ! 
Qui veniam liete in cor 
Serve siam, in cerca andiam 
D'un patron che sia buon 
Le cerchiamo lo troviam. 

Coro di Fattore. 

Tutte qui non tardar 

Da gran tempo v'aspettiam! 

Coro di Servitore. 

Dal matin noi corriamo 
Stanche già ci affrettiam! 



SCENA V. — Plumkett e Lionello. 



Plumkett. 



Quante voci! quante grida. 
Che terribile frastuon! 
Qui le serve il lucro guida; 
Vanno in cerca d'un padron. 
Tu, fratello, almen lo spero. 
La tua scelta hai fatta già ! 



MARTA 



15 



Lionel. 

Ah! what for? 

Plunkett. 

What for? Assistance 

On our farm we sadly need — 

Which (our mother hath so willed it) 

Now together we must keep. 

Lionel. 

Blessed be her memory ever! 

Plunkett. 

Aye! she was an excellent soul; 
Such a manager was never 
Born to bustle, to control. 
Thine were always her caresses; 
Tender hearted! well they might; 
I, more sturdy, got the scoldings: 
As her child, they were my right. 

Lionel. 

You dear brother ! 

Plunkett. 

Thou art calling 

Not a soul to love thee, thine; 

Friends and kinsmen never knew'st thou, 

Should not then their place be mine? 



Lionello, 

E perchè? 

Plumkett. 

Perchè? Davvero 
Strana in chiesta tu mi fai! 
Nel morir la madre, il sai. 
Disse: "Or chi ti guiderà?" 

Lionello. 

Sia dal cielo benedetta ! , 

Plumkett. 

Fu paziente, fu amorosa, 
Pei suoi figli senza posa 
Fu veduta lavorar — 
Le carezze, i baci suoi 
Tutti furono per te. 
Sgarbi e busse erano poi 
Riserbati solo a me. 

Lionello. 

Buon fratello! 

Plumkett. 

Va, fa core! 

Non sei solo, teco io sto. 
Per me sacro è il tuo dolore. 
Scudo e guida a te sarò. 



Lionel 
Larghetto 



SOLO, PROFUGO— LOSr, PROSCRIBED 




n I m 



pif p ir p 



f 



^ 



So - lo, pro - fu - go, re - jet - to. Di mia vi - ta sul mat -tin. 
Lost, pro -^scribed, a friend-less fil-^rim, Sink-ing at your cot-tage door 



^ 



ffi 



p If Mr r 



^^ 



fc 



E 



£ 



W 



Sot-toil vos-tro^a-mi - CO tet-to Ac - co-glieste un pel- le - grin: E - ra 
'Neath your friend-ly roof sought shel-terj In his arms his_son he bore. This poor 



4 



m 



e 



^m 



P 



f+f- i r NT p 



e 



w 



I'uom che^a me., fu pa-dre E-gliji voi mi con>tfi^-«dò; Poi la Sto - ce 
^J>L-- SV^^ was my fa-ther Who to you::. did me. ^con- fide- WitKLhis dy - ing 



16 



MARTHA 



^ 



g-nr p i r F i r ^ 



m 



^ 



i^^ 



P 



di mia ma-dre, Su nel ciel lo ri-chia-mò, Sii nel ciel lo ri-chia-mo! 

breath im-plor-ing That his child through life you'dguide, That his^^child through life you'd guide! 



Plunkett. 

We have never learnt his station, 
Never learnt your father's rank; 
All he left to tell the secret 
Is the jewel on your hand. 
"If your fate should ever darken," 
Quoth he, "show it to the Queen, 
She will save you, she will guard you 
When no other help is seen." 

Lionel. 

Here in peace and sweet contentment 
Have I passed my life with you ; 
Stronger, daily, grew a friendship 
That forever lasts, when true. 
Brother, think not wealth and splendor, 
If perchance they ever be mine, 
Can as happy this heart render 
As the friendship fixed in thine! 

SCENE VI. — A crowd of Farmers and Servants enter- 
The clock strikes mid-day. 

Chorus. 

Hark, haik, the bell! In wig and robe 
The Sheriff comes the Fair to ope! 
Draw near now, lasses, gather round! 

Sheriff 

(Entering pompously.) 

For your government a space ' 
Open, low-bred populace! 

Chorus. 

For the government leave a space! 

Sheriff 

(Unfolding a large parchment.) 

I shall now the law expound; 

Listen all, come close around. 

"Anna, we, the Queen of England," 

(Hats off, as I hav't myself: 

Never comes amiss politeness,) 

"We acknowledge by this Act 

These to be the rules exact 

Of the yearly Richmond Fair: 

That all contracts made with servants 

In the open market here, 

Shall be binding with both parties 



Plumkett. 

Né giammai saper potemmo 
Chi foss' ei, donde venia. 
Questa gemma sol vedemmo 
A te dar mentre moria; 
E ti disse: "Se mio figlio 
Un pariglio — incontrerà, 
Ch' ei la mostri a la sovrana. 
Né a lui vana — tornerà." 

Lionello. 

Fratel mio, me non seduce. 
Delle corti lo splendor, 
Non son vago d' altra luce 
Che del raggio dell' amor. 
Pace amica qui godiamo. 
Regna qui la libertà. 
Le dovizie non cerchiamo, 
Un tesoro è l'amistà. 

SCENA VI. — Fattori e Serve arrivando in folla ; i prece- 
denti. — Suona mezzo-dì. 

Coro. 

Ecco suona mezzo-dì, il mercato s' apre già. 
Tutti pronti siamo qui, lo scerififo arriverà. 
Largo! largo! eccolo qua. 
I cont. atti approverà. 

Sceriffo. 

Nessun s'oda piiì fiatar, 
Sol la legge dee parlar. 

Tutti. 

Stiam la legge ad ascoltar. 

Sceriffo 

(Leggendo una pergamena munita di. suggelli.) 

"Noi, Regina d'Inghilterra — 
(V'inchinate come me 
Che m' inchino sino a terra) 
Comandiamo e vogliam che 
Un contratto — che al mercato 
Sarà fatto — di Richmond 
S' abbia come stipulato 
E di pubblica di ragion." 
Chi a servire qui si espone. 



MARTA 



17 



For the then ensuing year. 
Not a power there is can break them, 
If money has been given and taken. 
Did you hear? 

Chorus. 

We knew it this long time 

Sheriff. 

Now, my girls, we'll learn your virtues. 

(One of the servants advances.) 

Tell us yours first, Molly Pitt. 

First Servant. 

I'm in sowing and in mowing. 
And in reaping, cutting, sweeping. 
Cutting, knitting, dresses fitting. 
Quite expert, believe me, Sir. 

Sheriff. 

Price, four guineas! Who'll engage her? 

A Farmer. 

I will run the risk and danger. 

Sheriff. 

What can you do, Polly Smith? 

Second Servant 

(Advancing.) 

I'm at baking, pudding making, 
Roasting, broiling, stewing, boiling. 
Sweets abounding, cakes compounding, 
Rated as a first rate hand. 

Sheriff. 

Price, five guineas! Who will try her? 

A Farmer's Wife. 

I will. Mister City-crier! 

Sheriff. 

What can you do, Betsy Witt? 

Third Servant 

(Advancing.) 

To my master I shall prove me 
Faithful warden of the garden. 
Digging, sowing, reaping, mowing, 
And the poultry feeding well. 

Sheriff. 

Kitty Bell and Liddy Well, 
And Nelly Box and Sally Fox! 



Quando l'arra ricevè. 

Per lo meno il suo padrone 

Tutto un anno servir de'. 



•.\9 



Coro. 

Nessun s' oppone. 

Sceriffo. 

Or lasciatevi veder — 

(Fa avanzar una delle serve e 1' interrogw.) 

Tu, Molly, che puoi saper? 
Molly 

(Avanzandosi) 

Io cucino, orlo, ricamo. 
Riposare mai non bramo. 
Spacco legna, vengo, vo. 
Ed in ozio — non mi sto. 

Sceriffo. 

Quattro lire! chi la vuole? 

Un Fattore. 

Qua son io! non più parole. 

Sceriffo 

(Chiamando una seconda serva, ed interrogandola.) 

Tu, Tolly, che sai tu far? 
Tolly 

(Avanzandosi) 

Fo le torte, fo il vin mosto, 
Fo le creme, il bove arrosto 
Per cucire e per lavar. 
Me nessuna, può uguagliar. 

Sceriffo. 

Cinque lire! Chi la prende? 

Sceriffo 

(Come sopra, chiamandone una terza.) 

Betly, vieni, spetta a te. 

Betlj. 

Curo i polli, fo il bucato. 
Tesso, filo, inaffio il pratto, 
Fo il pudding, il burro, il thè, 
Sempre pronta, sempre in pie. 

Sceriffo 

(Alle altre.) 

Kitty Bell, e Liddy Well, 
Nelly Box, e Jally Fox — 



18 



MARTHA 



Chorus. 

I can well take care of babies, 

Feed them, dress them, rock to sleep them. 

Chickens, pigeons, ducks 

I know how to provide for. 

I would try it, if I can. 

With some nice old gentleman. 

Lone old widower he might be, 

With no other help but me. 

Sheriff. 

Your cackling stop ! You make me deaf ! 

Farmers. 

Ready to trade we are; 
Look ye for masters now! 

(All gather round the magistrate.) 

SCENE VII. — Lady Harriet, Nancy, Tristan, in peasant's 
dresses ; afterwards Lionel and Pluhkett. 

Lady. 

Forward, Bob! What! need you pulling? 

Nancy. 

Bob, my friend, why look so sour? 

Tristan. 

Bob? oh fie! (There's no escaping 
Since I am in Amor's power!) 

Lady & Nancy. 

How with full contentment beaming 
Every sunburnt face appears! 

Tristan. 

I'm with rage and anger teeming. 
And can scare withhold my tears. 

Plunkett 

(Entering with Lionel.) 

Thunder! there's a brace of darlings! 

Lionel. 

Aye, indeed, they're young and fair! 

Plunkett. 

Much too fair for heavy labor. 

Lionel. 

For housework too? 

Plunkett. 

That they might bear. 



Tutti 

(Rispondono simultaneamente.) 

I bambini cullo ed amo 
Come fosser figli miei. — 
Buona a tutto qui mi chiamo, 
Non so cosa non farei — 
Posso dir che una gallina 

Fa per me quattr' ovi al dì. — 
Non mi vanto, ma in cucina 
Chi mi tenne s' arrichì. 

Sceriffo 

(Turandosi le orecchie.) 

Che gridìo, che scampanar! 

Coro. 

II contratto — è beli' e fatto, 
La caparra ho avuta già. 

(Viano.) 

SCENA VII. — Lady Enrichetta (Marta), Nancy, Sir Tris- 
tano, tutti e tre da Contaiini ; poi Lionello e Plumkett. 

Enrichetta. 

Vieni, John, già stanco sei ! 

Nancy. 

Caro John ! perchè temer ! 

Tristano. 

John! John! Via! partir vorrei! 
Se si giunge ciò a saper! 

Enrichetta e Nancy. 

Che delizia! che contento! 
Ben facemmo di venir. 

Tristano. 

Che vergogna! che tormento! 
Perche volli consentir! 

Plumkett 

(Arrivando.) 

To'! due giovani donnette! 

Lionello. 

Hai ragion, son belle inver! 

Plumkett. 

Troppo belle per servette. 

Lionello. 

Chi saran! 

Plumkett. 

Lascia veder. 



MARTA 



19 



Tristan. 

Note these fellows keenly staring! 
Let's be gone! 

Lady & Nancy. 

We're pleased to stay. 

Tristan. 

Quite suspicious is their bearing. 
Come, be gone! 

Lady. 

No ; I'm your servant not. 
Nor is such place to my liking. 

Tristan. 

Nonsense! Stay then; be it so. 

Nancy 

(Seeing herself observed by Plunkett and Lionel.) 
(To Tristan.) 

Well, I think you'll have to face it 
If with you she will not go! 

Lady. 

No, with him I will not go. 

Plunkett & Lionel. 
You hear it, Sir? 
She will not go. 

Plunkett. 

Comfort take! There's others yet. 
Girls! you yonder! Hither hasten; 
Here's a bidder, guinea laden ! 

Tristan. 

Kow malicious! 

Lady & Nancy. 
Fun delicious! 

(The girls come forward and surround Tristan.) 

AIL 

I'm in sowing, and in mowing, &c. 

Lady & Nancy. 

How they bother and distress him 
With tumultuous noises press him! 
Closer round him draws their circle, 
And he "ields in awkward flight! 

Tristan. 

My dilemma is dismaying! 

Naughty witches, stop your braying! • 



Tristano 

(Sotto voce alla donne,) 

Dai villan par che ci osservi; 
Andiam via. 

Nancy. 

Perchè? restiamo. 

Tristano, 

Dai villan' Dio mi preservi! 
Su, partiamo — 

Enrichetta. 

Noi vogliamo. 

(Con voce alta.) 

Non v' accetto per padrone! 



Tristano 



(Sotto voce.) 



Vi dovreste — vergognar! 

Nancy. 

Ma qual dritto, qual ragione 
Voi vorreste — esercitar? 

Enrichetta. 

Serva d' altro mi vo' far. 

Plumkett e Lionello 

( Avanzandosi. ) 

Non sarà così forzata, 

Se con vio non vuole andar. 

Plumkett. 

Lo lasciate, noi seguite 
Qui venite; — più gradite 
Voi sarete ad un padrone. 

Tristano. 

(Qual supplizio!) 

Enrichetta e Nancy. 
Hanno ragione! 

(Le "serve tornando, parlando tutte insieme e circondando 
Tristano.) 

Coro. 

Io cucino, fo il ricamo, ec. 

Enrichetta e Nancy. 

Che fracasso ! quanto Chiasso ! v 
Qual delizia! qual letizia! 
Più che n' odo — più ne godo! 
Circondato John han già. 

Tristano. 

Mi lasciate — non gridate! 
Che romore — che fragore! 



20 



MARTHA 



To appease them nought availeth, 
Reason faileth, 


Indiscrete — quante siete. 
Ve n' andate, via di qua! 


Flight alone may save me yet. 

(Tristan retreats from the stage, followed by the servant 
' girls.) 


(Le serve trascinano seco Sir Tristano e viano.) 


SCENE VIII. — Lady Harriet, Nancy, Plunkett, Lionel. 


SCENA Vili. — Lady Enrichetta, Nancy, Plumkett, Lionello, 


Lady. 

Nancy! See them eye us keenly! 


Enrichetta. 


Nancy, guarda che occhi ardenti! 


Nancy. 

Yes, we please, for all I know. 


Nancy. 

Or vedrem che sapran dir. 


Plunkett 


Plumkett. 


(To Lio-nel.) 

One of them would suit exactly. 


D'invitarle vuoi ch'io tenti? 
Lionello. 


Lionel. 

Would you separate them? No! 


Cerca, cerca di riuscir. 
Enrichetta. 


Lady 

(To Nancy.) 

Is he not a bashful fellow? 
Wonder how such peasant talks. 

Nancy. 

Plain, for one thing! 

Plunkett 

(To Lionel.) 

Why so timid? 
Go, address them! 


Son sicura — che ha paura. 
Come parla un contadin? 

Nancy. 

Non si parla. 

Plumkett. 

Via, coraggio? 
Parla tu? 

Lionello. 


Lionel. 


Non so che dir. 


Friend, I'm afraid. • 


Plumkett. 


Plunkett. 


Che poltron! — Stammi ad udir. 


Ah, poltroon! Look how I do it. 


(Si avanza, tossisce, smozzica le parole e s' interrompe.) 


(Advances towards the ladies, as if to speak to them, but 
checks himself and returns.) 


Nancy. 


Nancy. 

He too is dumb! Stupid things! 


Non dice niente. 
Li lasciamo? 


Let us go. 


Enrichetta 


Lady. 

Yes, let us go. 


(Avviandosi.) 


Immantinente! 


Lionel. 

Friend, they're going. 


Lionello. 

Se ne vanno. 


Plunkett. 


Plumkett. 


'Twere too bad. 


Collie far! 



MARTA 



21 




IN MIA FÉ, SON STRANI IN VERO — ATOW INDEED OUR LEAVE 
Quartet 



^m 



p i p F p H^p 



i 



^ 



g 



mia 

tn 



fé, mia fé son stra-nHn ve - ro, 
deed our leave we may be tak - ing^ 



li la - sciam, par- 
Si 71CÉ their bat>h -fui- 



p p rip ^'^"'' i p^p^if pip r^m^ 




tiam ah! si par-tiam di qua! chi sa dir cos' han-no nelpen-sie- ro, 

ness thus our en - joy-meni tnars. Our hold game at this point itr-mi - nat - ing^ 

f 



j^ t i r n i^A 



^ 



m 



e^ 



prUJ'np p ^1^ 



w 



p 



^ 



se non par-Ian chi ca-pir-li sa? In mia fé, mia fé sonstra-nijn-ve - ro 
.Leaves US but to bless our luck -y stars! Yes in - deed ^ our leave we may he iah-ing. 



ritard. 



ttn i' P P 



a tempo 
f P 



^^3 



e^ 



^ 



^^ 



^ 



li la - sciam, par - tiam, ah! si, par-tiam di qua- chi sa dir cos' 

Since their bash -fui - ness thus our en - joy-meni marsj Our bold game at 



p P P M[>JlIl^ 



P n JmJ^'W 



han-no nel pen - sie - ro, se non 



par - Ian chi ca-pir li 



««•? 



thi'^ faint ter - mi - nat - i'^g, Leaves us hut to praise our luck- y stars! 



Lionel & Plunkett. 

Such rare chance must not slip by untaken. 
Servant girls like these are jewels seldom 

found! 
Those arch looks my heart have sorely 

shaken ; 
Not without her shall I leave this place! 

Plunkett. 

(Courage, Plunkett!) 

(Advances resolutely.) 

Wait one minute! 

You're our choice, girls — have no fears. 
If you're honest, smart and thrifty, 
May we be together years. 

Lionel. 

Yes, for years. 

Lady. 

And serving you. Sir? 



Lionello e Plumkett. 

Due donzelle pili vaghe e piii belle, 
Come lor, no, la città non ha. non ha. 
Son due gemme, sono due stelle, 
E il mio labbro a lor dire noi sa! 

Plumkett. 

(Su coraggio!) 

(Si avanza risolutamente.) 

Giovinette, 

Ci piacete; vi prendiamo; 
Se in servir siete provette 
Aggiustare ci possiamo. 



Lionello 



Vi prendiam. 

Enrichetta. 

Come servette? 



(Imitandolo.) 



22 



MARTHA 



Nancy 

(Laugbine-) 

Ha, ha, ha, ha! 

Lionel. 

You're laughing? 

Plunkett. 

Let them! Why not, laughing, earn one's 

money, 
If the work is done as well? 

Lady & Nancy. 
Work? we? 

Plunkett 

(To Nancy.) 

Geese and pigs and chickens 
Shall be entrusted to your care. 

(To Lady Harriet.) 

You shall till with hoe and shovel 
Field and garden. 

Lionel. 

Friend, forbear; 

She is poorly built for fanning; 

She may at home — 

Plunkett. 

Our socks be darning. 
Fifty crowns your yearly wages. 
And for extras we'll throw in 
Half a pint of ale on Sundays, 
And plum pudding New-year's day. 

Lady & Nancy. 

Who'd refuse such tempting offer? 

Lionel & Plunkett. 
Yes? 

Lady & Nancy. 
Yes, yes! 

(They shake hands.) 

Lionel & Plunkett. 

Here — take your money; 

For the journey quick prepare! 

SCENE IX. — Tristan re-appears upon the stage, still pur- 
sued by the Servants.) 

Tristan. 

Go — leave off — here's money, wenches! 
Plague upon your crazy band! 

(He throws them a purse; the girls desist. Seeing the 
Ladies converse with Lionel and Plunkett.) 



(Ridendo.) 



Nancy 

Ah! ah! ah! 

Lionello. 
Ridete! 

Plumkett. 

E buono! Le fatiche son più acceptn 
Se le serve allegro sono. 

Enrichetta e Nancy. 
(Noi serviri) 

Plumkett 

(A Nancy.) 

A te i montoni, 
Il fenil la scuderia. 

(A Lady Enrichetta.) 

Tu dovrai la fattoria 
Tener netta. 

Lionello 

(Opponendosi.) 

No, no, no, 

Noi potria — sì delicata. 

Sì gentil — 

Plumkett 

(Scotendo il capo.) 

Ci pensorò. 

Lavorate; e in premio avrete 

Dieci lire, se vi va. 

Ogni festa, se il volete 

Un pudding vi si darà. 

Enrichetta e Nancy. 

Sì, mi piace il vostro patto. 

Lionello. 
Va? 

Enrichetta. 
Si, va. 

(Si stringone la mano.) 

Lionello. 

Val per contratto 

Questa è l'arra. Ed or partiam. 



SCENA IX. 



Tristano. 



-Tristano, sempre parseguitato dalle Serve; 
e i precedenti. 



Ecco qui la somma intera. 
Ma partite, per pietà! 



(Vedendo Lady Enrichetta tra i due contadini.) 



MARTA 



25 



Ho! What's this? You are forgetting — 
Come, away! 

(Advancing towards Plunkett.) 

Plunkett 

(Brusqaely.) 

What may you want? 

Lady & Nancy. 
Yes, we'll go. 

Plunkett. 

I'd like to see you! 
Money binds you! 

Tristan. 

To be bor'd! 
Know then — 

Lady 

(Aside to Tristan.) 

So you want my ruin? 

What if this transpires at court! 

Nancy. 

We should be disgrac'd forever! 
Rather die — but tell them never. 

Tristan. 

Come then! 

(Tries to lead the ladies off.) 

Plunkett 

(Checking him.) 

Remain you! 

We have hir'd you for a year; 
Ask the sherifiF, he'll attest it. 
And will show our title clear. 

Sheriff & Chorus. 

If there's money given and taken 

The bargain must remain unshaken. 

Yes, the law knows no relenting. 

Since you're bound by free consenting. 

Nought can free you from your fetters 

Now, until a year is o'er! 

Aye, lass, the bargain's made! 

Aye, lass, the money's paid! 

Sacred keep your vows. 

And never swerve from duty's path. 

Fickle hearts and minds 

Are justly shunned by honest men. 

(Lady Harriet and Nancy mount with Lionel and_ Plun- 
kett a farmer's wagon, which is driven up in the 
rear of the stage. Tristan is kept back by the farm- 
ers and peasants. The curtain falls while the ladies 
depart. 



Che mai veggo ! Che maniera ! 
Vi scostate. 

(Avanzandosi a Plumkett.) 

Plumkett 

(Bruscamente.) 

Oh! che si fa? 

Enrichetta e Nancy. 
Or finiam. 

Plumkett. 

Cosa compiuta! 
L'arra aveste. 

Tristano. 

Impossible! 
Sapiate — 

Enrichetta. 

(Ciel! sarò perduta 
Se alla corte si saprà) . 

Nancy. 

(Guai se siete conosciuta. 
La Regina che dirà!) 

Tristano. 
Su, venite. 

(Volendo condur via le donne.) 

Plumkett 

(Opponendosi.) 

No, no, affatto ! 
Per un anno le serbiamo ; 
Lo sceriffo del contratto 
E garante; in dritto siamo. 

Tutti. 

Quando l'arra avrà accettata 
Una serva s' è legato. 
Non v' è scusa, non pretesto. 
Per un anno! il patto è questo 
Per un anno, un anno inter. 
Voi sarete in suo potori 

Lionello e Plumkett. 

Sì, v' è forza consentir 

A servir! 

Giovinette, siate oneste 

Fedeltà l'impon 

A segiure siate 

Preste chi di vien padron! 

(Plumkett e Lionello prendono le due donne e le conducono 
via; Tristano invano vorrebbe opporai; egli è condotto via 
dai fattori e dalle serve.) 



END OF THE FIRST ACT. 



24 



MARTHA 



ACT IL 


ATTO II. 


SCENE I, — The interior of Plunkett's farm-house 
Lionel, Plunkett, Lady Harriet and Nancy 


SCENA I. — Interno della fattoria di Plumkett. 
Lionello, Plunrikett, Lady Enrichetta e Nancy. 


Lionel & Plunkett. 


Lionello e Plumkett. 


This is your future dwelling; 
And travelling has an end. 


Siam giunte, o giovinette 
Al nostro casolar. 


Lady & Nancy. 

We're reaping for our folly 
Full measured punishment! 


Enrichetta e Nancy. 

(Fuggir non potrem mai 
Dovremo qui restar.) 


Lionel & Plunkett. 


Lionello e Plumkett. 


Our house and home are yours now, 
Their comfort you will share. 


Siam giunte, o giovenette 
Al nostro casolar! 


Lady & Nancy. 

Their house and home are ours now, 
we unhappy pair! 


Enrichetta e Nancy. 
Chi sa se troveremo 
Come di qua scappar? 


Lionel & Plunkett. 


Lionello e Plumkett. 


At dawn of day and morn's first glimpse 
Be up and stir about. 


Andiam, fateoi cor! 
Mettetevi al lavor. 


Lady & Nancy. 

What vulgar ways they make us take! 
Before the sun is out! 

More monstrous things they'll next command 
That we never heard about! 


Enrichetta e Nancy. 
Ahimè, ci siam, 
Non e' è chi far. 
Ahimè, ci siam, * 
C è forza lavorar. 


Lionel. 


Lionello. 


And extra crowns your purse will see 
Before the year is out! 


Non siate sì dolenti 
Si vive allegri qua! 


Plunkett. 


Plumkett. 


\onder door leads to your chamber. 


Questra camera e per voi. 


Lady 

(Starting towards it.) 

Humbly we — 


Enrichetta. 
A diman! 

(Congendandoli.) 


Nancy. 

Wish good night. 


Nancy. 

A diman! 


Plunkett. 


Plumkett. 


Not quite so fast. 

First prepare a light repast. 


Voi fate error; 

Pria servir e dormir poi. 


Lady & Nancy. 

Kitchen work! these barbarians! 


Enrichetta e Nancy. 

Ah! dal freddo tremo tutta! 


Lionel. 


Lionello. 


Why not let them? They are tired. 


Or dal sono cascan già. 


Plunkett. 


Plumkett. 


Too much kindness will not do. 


Che vuol dir questa pietà? 



MARTA 



25 



Nancy. 

(He will send us to the kitchen!) 


Nancy. 

Un capriccio ben paghiamo. 


Plunkett. 


Plumkett. 


Well — but stop! what names bear you? 


Ah! non so il vostre nome ancor? 


Lady & Nancy. 
We? 


Enrichetta e Nancy. 
Noi? 


Lionel. 


Lionello. 


Who else then? 


Si, voi. 


Plunkett. 


Plumkett. 


Yes, pray you! Smart ones are you! 


Sapere lo vogliamo. 


Lady. 

Martha is mine. 


Enrichetta. 

Marta è il mio. 


Lionel. 


Lionello. 


Martha? 


Marta? 


Lady. 
Yes. 


Enrichetta. 

Si! 


Plunkett 

(To Nancy.) 

Well, and yours? 


Plumkett. 

Ben, e il tuo? 


Nancy. 

(What shall I tell him?) 


Nancy. 

Che dirgli mai? 


Plunkett. 


Plumkett. 


Don't you know it? 


Che? no'l sai? 


Nancy. 
Julia. 


Nancy. 
E Betsy. 


Plunkett. 


Plumkett. 


Julia. You're proudly named, girl ! 

Julia! be kind enough — 

If your ladyship so please it — 

(Brusquely.) 

To take my hat and mantle off. 


Ah! Betsy? mi piace assai! 
Un bel nome! Vieni qui. 
To Betsy, fanciulla mia, 

(Bruscamente.) 

Togli via — questo mantello! 


Nancy 

(Pertly.) 

Do it yourself! 


Nancy 

(Indignata.) 

loi Giammai! 


Plunkett 

(Taken aback.) 

Bold ! by the prophets ! 


Plumkett 

(In collera.) 

Veder vorria! 


Lionel 

(To Plunkett.) 

Not so bluntly give your orders 
Rather wishes breathe, like me: 
Martha, take these things, prithee! 

(Lady Harriet looks at him indignantly and turns away.) 


Lionello 

(Trattenendolo.) 

Spaventare si potria. — 
Come io fo, dirai bel bello: 
Marta, prendi il mio cappello. 

(Lady Enrichetta gli volge le palle adognosimente.) 



26 



MARTHA 



Lionel & Plunkett. 

Surprised I am and astounded, 
And I can say no more; 
Such impudence unbounded 
Was never seen before. 

Lady & Nancy. 

Surprised they're and confounded 
And sorely puzzled is their brain; 
This blow has smartly sounded, 
May be they'll never try again? 

Plunkett. 

Quick now, fetch the spinning-wheels 
From out the comer ! 

Lady & Nancy. 

Do you want us then to spin? 

Lionel. 

Yes, most surely. 

Flunkett. 

Do you think 

That for talking we engaged you? 

Lady & Nancy. 

Ha, ha, ha! To see us spinning! 

Plunkett. 

Ha, ha, ha! To see you spinning! 
If you want your wages paid 
You must earn them first, my maid. 
Come and make then a beginning. 
Fetch the wheels now! 

Lady & Nancy. 

We obey. Sir! 
Lionel 

(To Plunkett.) 

Not SO harsh, you frighten them. 

(The Ladies fetch the wheels and place them in the fore- 
ground.) 

Plunkett. 

Pshaw! Begin then, I command it. 

Lady & Nancy. 

I cannot! 
Lionel & Plunkett. 

How? What? 

Sit down now! 

Lady & Nancy. 
We're seated. 

(Taking seats behind the wheels.) 



Plumkett e Lionello. 

(Che dissi mai! L'offendo? 
Son colmo di stupor, 
Io stesso noi comprendo, 
Ne son sopreso amor.) 

Enrichetta e Nancy. 

(Almeno mi difendo? 
Che credono costor? 
Sì presto non m' arrendo 
Ad un capriccio lor.) 

Plumkett. 

Presto, presto! andiam, prendete, 
Queir arnese. 

(Indicando il filatoio.) 

Enrichetta e Nancy. 
Filar! che! 

Plumkett. 

Certamente! ma perchè 
A servire vi ponete! 

Enrichetta e Nancy 

(Ridendo.) 

Noi filar! Ah! ah! ah! ah! 
Plumkett 

( Contraffacendole. ) 

Ah! ah! ah! si filerà! 

Credevate venir qua 

Per restar tranquille e a spasso? 

(Bruscamente.) 

Obbedite. 

Enrichetta e Nancy. 
Che fracasso! 

Lionello 

(A Plumkett.) 

Le vuoi dunque spaventar? 
Plumkett 

(Spingendole.) 

A filare entrambe, e tosto! 

Enrichetta e Nancy. 
Noi so. 

Lionello e Plumkett, 
Che? Noi sai? 
Sie di-e! 

Enrichetta e Nancy. 
Ci siam! 



MARTA 



27 



Plunkett. 

Turn the wheel ! brr, brr, brr ! 

(Imitating the noise of the machine.) 

Lady & Nancy. 
It will not turn! 

Lionel. 

With your thumb and your first finger 
Draw a thread and twist it round. 

Lady & Nancy. 

But the stubborn wheel won't move. Sir. 

Plunkett. 
Turn it! 

Lady & Nancy. 
It turns not. 

Lionel. 

Push then! 

Lady. 

It moves not ! 

Plunkett. 

Won't it? Can't you spin then? 

Lady & Nancy. 

Never learnt it. Teach us! 

Plunkett. 

Be attentive then! 

Lionel & Plunkett 

(Spinning.) 

When the foot the wheel turns lightly, 
Let the hand the thread entwine; 
Draw and twist it, neatly, tightly, 
Then 'twill be both strong and fine. 



Plumkett. 

Fatelo girar! Trr! trr! trr! 

(Imitando il rumor della ruota.) 

Enrichetta e Nancy 

(Fermandosi.) 

Non vuole andar. 

Lionello. 

La conocchia in mano abbiate, 
Tra le dita il lino va. 

Enrichetta e Nancy. 

Esser deggiono bagnate? 

Plumkett. 
Gira. 

Enrichetta e Nancy. 
Insiem? 

Lionello. 
Sì. 

Enrichetta e Nancy 

(Rallentando.) 

E che si fa? 

Plumkett. 
Presto! 

Enrichetta e Nancy 

(Girando.) 

Ancor? 

Plumkett. 

Cosi va ben! 

Enrichetta. 

Lo vorrei vedere almen! 

Plumkett. 
Si faco si! 

Plumkett e Lionello 

(Mostrando come si fila Plumkett fu girar il filatoio.) 

Mentre il pie la ruota gira, 
De la man pigliare il lino; 
Poi con garbo il torce e tira. 
Perchè venga forte e fino. 



DI VEDERLO — U7;^/yi CHARML\G OCCIPATIOS 




Qlaktet 



^- rfff-F 



;fe 




^fU^7 V > 



^ 



Di 



ve -der - Io, ah!. 



Ah ' lio-w dia rni-ingj ah! . 



fa pia- 
ah: 



28 



MARTHA 



«ff=^^ 



I 



crdòc. poro a poro 



p pm Tir^'t ij'i^^^-L^'^'^^ 1 ^ r'ipi;: ^^ 



^^ 



ce- re, ah! 



come ha fa* - to 
'Tis loocliarnt-ir.^^ 



Il t rpiilf?^ p-|| i'lp ff f?-iiÌMt- ^ ^ 



» P 



^ 



t^ 



i£:2 



per sa- pe-re si p^ra-zio-sq_e bel me-stier? ah! ali! ah! ah! ah! ah!. 

'its too cun-yiiìig.'Wliat a pleas-ant work is spin-ning! ah! ali! ali! ah! ah! ah!^ 



n — W — w y I p — w — p I w — p — p I p ■> — m \ m ^ » ' ^ — ~^~m 

tt " P I P f p I p r p I p y p 7^ g I F ^^f^ 




ah! ah!_ ah! ah! ah! ah!. 

ah! ah! ah! ah! ah! ah!- 



Di ve-der - lo, ah! 
'Tis too charm-ing, ah!. 



i^ 



'-l^ ì J^yfTì 



i^à 



^ 



i^^~m 



^M^ 



fei 



^^^ r^-"^^ 



fa pia-ce-re, ah! 

ah ! 



creòc. poco a poco 






come ha fat - to 
'Tis too cliarm-iìig! 



per sa - pe-re si gra-zio-so^e bel me-stier, ah! ahL 
'iis tuo cun-ning! What a pleas-ant work is spin-ìiing! Ah!. 



mJl 



È 



V 



^crirrjì|Frj^#£=^^£^ 



p^Efe^^^ 



ali! ah! ali! 

aliì ahi ahi 



ah! 
ah!. 



% 



air j^rr j^ i f ^^ 




si ^ bel me-stier? 

Vé6,___ strong and fine. 



Lionel & Plunkett. 

Have observed you? 
Lady & Nancy. 

Yes, we have. 
Lionel & Plunkett. 

Comprehended ? 



Lionello e Plumkett. 
Lo vedete? 

Enrichetta e Nancy. 

Lo vediam. 
Lionello e Plumkett. 

Comprendeste ? — 



MARTA 



29 



Lady & Nancy. 
Yes, we have. 

(Nancy turns Plunkett's spinning-wheel over and runs off, 
followed by Plunkett.) 

SCENE II. — Lionel and Lady Harriet. 

Lady. 

Nancy! Julia! Oh, stay thee! 
Heavens! she leaves me here, alone! 

(Turns to follow Nancy.) 

LioneL 

Stay yet, Martha! 
Art afraid? 



Why this hurry? 



Lady. 

Of you? oh, no! 

Lady. 

To his eye, mine kindly meeting, 
Evil intent is unknown 
Yet mv heart is strangely beating 
Since I'm left with him alone. 

LioneL 

Her clear eyes with looks entreating, 
Speak to me in thrills unknown. 
And my heart is strangely beating 
Since I am left with her alone. 

LioneL 

Ah, how could I ever scold her. 
Ever speak in unkind tones ! 
Might I to my heart unfold her! 

Lady. 

(Whither, Nancy, hast thou fled? 
Ah, poor me, she tarries yet!) 

LioneL 

Martha! Let me then confess it: 

Ever since thine angel face 

First appeared before my vision — 

Lady. 

(Quite alarming is his gaze!) 

LioneL 

Martha! Martha! 

Lady. 

(He grows bolder!) 

LioneL 

See, my heart is good and true. 



Enrichelta e Nancy. 
Comprendemmo. 

(Nancy, annoiata, rovescia il filatoio e fuggi inseguita da 
Plumkett.) 

SCENA II. — Lionello e Lady Enrichetta. 

Enrichetta. 

Nancy — no, Betsy! deh! resta 
Ciel! mi lascia sola qui! 

(Per seguirla.) 

Lionello. 

Non fuggir. Marta! t'arresta: 
Hai timor? 

Enrichetta. 

Di voi? No — si — 

Enrichetta. 

\\ suo sguardo e dolce tanto 
Che conforto al cor mi da; 
In lui fido a lui d'accanto 
Di temer ragion non v'ha! 

Lionello. 

Qual arcano turbamento 
Palpiter il sen mi fa? 
A lei presso l'alma sento 
Che in dolce estasi sen va ! 

Lionello. 

Ah! non credermi crudele. 
Farò quel che pili vuoi tu. 
Al mio patto son fedele. 

Enrichetta. 

(E Nancy non torna più? 
Ah ! Nancy dove sei tu ! ) 

Lionello. 

M' odi, finger non poss' io; 
Io ti vidi, e nel mio cor 
S'accendea di te desio — 

Enrichetta. 

E Nancy non torna ancor! 

Lionello. 

Marta, ah! Marta! 

Enrichetta. 
Che volete? 

Lionello. 

Io gentil con te sarò. 



30 



MARTHA 



Lady. 


Enrichetta. 


Yes, you are a kindly master, 


Buon padrone voi sarete, 


Much more kind than I deserve. 


Io la serva far non so. 


Lionel. 


Lionello. 


You deserve? 


Come a dir? 


Lady. 


Enrichetta. 


I'm but a good for nothing 


Sempre ridente. 


Little body. Sir! Let me go; your idle ser- 


Non son buona che a scherzar; 


vant 


Ma pel resto, veramente. 


Cannot earn the bread you give her! 


Non son abile a far niente. 


LioneL 


Lionello. 


My heart would break should I send thee 


Io morrei senza di te! — 


away! 


Se il lavoro ti spaventa. 


No — no work shall e'er dismay you, 


Lascia star — non lavorar. 


But throughout the livelong day 


Io veder ti vo' contenta ; 


Sing you, to our work us cheering, 


Per distrarti puoi cantar. 


Many a gay, melodious lay! 


Va; t' ascolto. 


Sing a song to me! 






Enrichetta. 


Lady. 


In ver non oso — 


I'm too bashful. 






Lionello. 


LioneL 


Te ne prega il tuo padrone 


Let it be a people's lay. 


Una piccola canzone. 


Sent by God unto the poor. 






Enrichetta. 


Lady. 


Quale? 


Ah, no! 






Lionello 


Lionel 


(Vedendo la rosa che ella ha al corsalett».) 


(Taking a nosegay from the lady's bosom.) 


Questo fior qui ascoso 


I'll exchange this nosegay 


Sarà mio. 


For a song! 






Enrichetta. 


Lady. 


Rendete il fior! 


Ah, Sir, you jest! 






Lionello. 


Lionel. 


No, lo voglio. 


'Tis my will! 






Enrichetta. 


Lady. 


Il vuol! 


Your will? 






Lionello. 


Lionel. 


Ten prego! 


Nay, I entreat you. 






Enrichetta. 


Lady. 


Sia così; più non mi nego. 


Ah ! your entreaties I withstand not. 


(Canta.) 



MARTA 



31 



QUI SOLA, VERGIN ROSA— 'TIS THE LAST ROSE OF SUMMER 

Lady 

Larghetto 







^ ^''^J.) ri 



^^. 



Qui so - la,_ 

'Tis the last rose. 



ver -gin ro - sa, come puoi 

oj sitNi - tìier^ I^^ft bloort 



tu fio 



I7^g 



J r/ fl i r ^'y ni^r ^''U 



r=f 



rir? An - co - ra. 
Ione; Ali her love - ly . 



mez-zq_a-sco - sa, e — 

com - pan- ions Are. 



pres - so g^ia mo- 
fa - ded and 



cIjK" F r pir ^''^ L/ i i'" ^' M 



s 



rir! Non ha per-te ru - già - de, già — col - ta sei dal 

gone;— No flow-er of her kin - d red, No rose - bud is 



ad lib. 



a tempo 




II' ca - pò tuo già ca - de, Chi - no_ sul vti-de stel! 

nigh To re- fleet back- her blush- es. Or give sigh for sigh! 



I'll not leave thee, then lone one. 
To pine on the stem; 
Since the lovely are sleeping, 
Go sleep thou with them. 
Thus kindly I scatter 
Thy leaves o'er the bed — 
Where thy mates of the garden 
Lie scentless and dead. 

Lionel. 
Martha! 

Lady. 

Master ! 

Lionel. 

My lip confesseth 

What hath lived within my heart 

Ever since your eye smiled coyly 

To me on the Richmond mart. 

Martha! 

Lady. 

Let me! 



Sola, così, ignorata 
Languir nel tuo giardin, 
Dal vento tormentata! — 
Crudele è il tuo destin ! 
Sul cespite tremante 
Ti colgo, giovin fior. 
Sovra il mio core amante 
Così morrai d'amor 

Lionello. 
Marta! 

Enrichetta. 
Che? 

Lionello. 

Neil' alma mia, 

Il tuo sguardo penetrò. 

All' amore il cor s' apria. 

Per te sola viver^ vo'. 

Marta! 

Enrichetta. 
(Ciel!) 



32 



MARTHA 



Lionel. 

From the moment 
When I beheld you — 

Lady. 

No further! 

Lionel. 
Martha! 

Lady. 

Oh, cease thee ! 

Lionel. 

Martha! 

Lady. 
I go! 

Lionel. 

stay thee! 

Lady. 

1 go- 
Lionel. 

Stay and hear me 

Oh, accept in holy union 

Here my hand, O be my wife! 

Lcidy. 

God what hear I ! 

Lionel. 

See me prostrate — 

Lady. 

Fearful passion. 

Lionel. 

At thy feet I pray — 

Lady. 

(How can I elude him? — ) 

Sir, I'm not unfeeling. 

Yet I shall laugh to see you kneelin| 

Pardon me! ha, ha, ha, ha! 

Lionel. 

With our marriage at an ending 



Is all difference of birth! 



Lady. 



Pray excuse me, if offending. 
But this does increase my mirth! 



Lionello. 

Dall' istante 
Che ti vide — 

Enrichetta. 
Tacete ! 

Lionello. 
Marta! 

Enrichetta. 
Cessate! 

Lionello. 
M'odi! 

Enrichetta. 

No! 

Lionello. 

Deh, m'odi! 

Enrichetta. 
No! 

Lionello. 

Resta ancor! 

Se non vuoi che al pie ti mora, 

Non sprezzare quest' amor. 

Enrichetta. 

Ciel, che veggo! 

Lionello. 

Si mi prostro! 

Enrichetta. 

Che mai fate! 

Lionello. 

Mi prostro innanzi a te! 

Enrichetta. 

Ciel! voi prostrato a me? 
Ah! voi ridere mi fate, 
Ah, perdoni ha, ha, ha, ha! 

Lionello. 

Sino a me t' innalza amore, 
Non rammento chi sei tu. 

Enrichetta. 

(Sino a lui! L' ingenuo errore 
Mi fa ridere ancre più ! ) 



MARTA 



33 



AH, RIDE DEL MIO PIANTO — S7/£'S LAUGHING AT MY SORROW 
Lionel Andantino 



^'hir r r i pp r rirpf pip 



P 



Ah! ri - de del miopian-to, giuo-ca col mio do-lor, ed io mi 
Shes laugh-iiìg at my sor- row^ and at my deep dis-tress- She scorns my 



\)'ih P P 



jfoco animalo 



tei 



pi M F p r I f r '^ 1 ^' ^ r g 



±= 



strug-gojn-tan-to, di non com-pre-so_a-mor, non vuol, non vuol la sor-te 

soft ap-proach-eSf My lov - ing ten-der-ness To share my hum.-ble cot-tage 



kk 



rit. 



rit. cresa 



P=P=P 



È 



P F F M P 



J ^. Ym ^. 



* 



n t> F [7 [7 g 



g 



por fine al mio sof 
froud-ly the maid dis 



frir, mi res-ta sol la mor - te, per 

da ins, In vain my eye is weep - ing, in 



M 



Lady 



Poco piu mosso 



i y iJ I ^V 



tó 



sM 



m ^ 



^m 



^y i ^r^p-pr nt;^ 



* 



All! ri-der del suo pian-to, go - der del suo do-lor 

Ah, his eye of sor-row speaking, deep-ly pen - e -trates my heart. 



n.Mp Pr r—n r —u 



lei sa-prò mo 
vain my lip com 



- rir! 

- plfiins. 



ppp p ri'-dyr i ^Vp rp i r^^^^ix^? 



io non vor-rei,maJn tan - to dar-gli non pos-soa-mor! vor-rà,vor-rà la 

Sadfate that love so pure and true must live with-out re- ward. His woeful looks in- 



Non viiol la 
To share my 



34 



MARTHA 



r i ^F f Mr"p' ' r | ''F t' r^ '^ ^ 



i 



^ 



Sor - te 
vite rìie 



por fi-nejil suo mar-tir 
To share his hum-ble lot. 



in-vo-chi pur la mor-te,. 
heav'n pro-tect me kiìid- ly... 



hm 



p I ff - ll fl I' 



i' I p ''p T 1 7 [T r^ì^M^ 



É 



p 



sor - te por fi - ne al mio sof-frir, mi res - ta sol la mor-te 

hum-ble cot - tage proud-ly the maid dis-dains; in cani m,y eye is zn'Bep- ing^. 



i? , n lì f ft It 



«O f » Il r i , 

j V y V 



rr? 



^ 



^ 



?^ 



^ 



ma non vor- ra no, no, mo - rir! 
that he be-guile^be - guile me not. 



In- 
/ 



^^^^^ 



fe#=# 



t-t 



^ 



SEESS 



tzac 



2^ 



^ 



£ 



per lei, per lei sa-prò mo - rir! 
in vain my lip, my lip com,- plains. 



Per lei sa - prò mo 
Now hap - pi - ness^ J^^*"^ 



M 



m 



^ m p> 



f=y=F 



* 



vo - chi pur la mor-te, in - vo - chi pur la mor-te, ma non vor 

yeel -my bo-som yield-ing, I feel my bo-som yield-ing; pro- ted, pro- 



i i =F^ 



t i =r= f 



^eaEg 



^ 



^^ 



^ 



rir, 
■uelL 



mi re - 
fare- mell^ 



sta sol la 

now hap - pi 



ritard . 



^-^ 



iEEè 



j^ <z tempo 



t V i^ 



P "P M' p p I p .7=p=|^ 



ra 

Ac/ 



mo 

me. 



nr, . 



ma non vor-ra mo - rir! Vor-rà, vor 
that he be -guile me not! J lis eye of 



ritard. 




^ 



ff a tempo 



5S 



P T' M' p p I p ,7 p f p 



^3^ 



mor 



te 
fare 



sol, _ 
■well, 



per lei sa-pro mo - rir- Nonvoul, non 
now hap -pi -ness^ fare - well! If naught to 



MARTA 



35 



* 



-p" ^ r p 

rà la sor - te 
sor - row speak -ing^^ 



^ 



kw=^ 



m vrj 



i 



por f i - ne_al suo mar-tir, 

deep - ly pen - e - trates my heart, 



P I P llB H' 






& 



in-vo-chi pur la 
Sud fate that love so 



p' ^ r r^ 



P F F P F 



fe 



vuol la sor - te 
love can move her. 



por — fi-ne^al mio sof-frir, 
heaven move from me this spell! 



mi res-ta sol la 
lest I musi bid to 




0=W 



^ 



1^ 



^ 



^ 



^ 



EÈ 



^ 



ma non vor-ra mo - rir, ma non vor - ra, vor- ra mo - rir! 
pure and triie,^ Must go with-out re - ward^with-out re - ward,with-out re - zvardl 




^^ rit 



*^^ 



r'Tii'^P Mp i F ^ 



^^ 



2 



mor - te,_ 
hap- pi - ness. 



per lei sa-prò mo - rir, ah! si, per lei sa-prò mo-rir! 
andpeace a sad fare- well, a sad fare - well , a sad fare - well! 



SCENE III. — Enter Nancy, pulled in by Plunkett. 

Plunkett. 

Don't you try this game again, girl ! 
Where do you suppose she was? 
In the kitchen was the vixen 
Breaking bottles, glasses, dishes. 
And a good deal have I suffered. 
Till at last I caught the lass! 

Nancy. 

Let me go! Don't make me mad. Sir, 
Or some scratching you will see! 

Plunkett 

(Releasing her.) 

By the prophets! she has spirit! 
I confess, that pleases me! 

Nancy. 

Martha! Martha! 

Plunkett. 

Pooh! What's wrong with you now? 
Standing as if thunder-struck! 
Get yourselves to bed, ye idlers! 
Off with you my saucy Puck! 

Plunkett & Lionel. 
Midnight sounds! 

Lady & Nancy. 

Midnight sounds! 



SCENA III. — Plumkett inseguendo Nancy; i precedenti. 

Plumkett. 

T' ho raggiunta, sciagurata! 

(A Lionello.) 

Questa furia sai che fé'? 
La stoviglia ha fracassata. 
Tutto il vino mi perde; 
Ma in mia mano è capitata, 
Or r avrà da far con me! 

Nancy. 

Mi lasciate, se no il volto, 
Ve r aggiusto come va. 

Plumkett. 

Per S. Giorgio! è forte molto! 
Ma non deggio usar pietà. 

Nancy. 

Marta, Marta! 

Plumkett. 

Che vi manca? 
Ch' altro avete a domandar? 
La pazienza già si stanca. 
Vi potete ritirar. 

(Suona mezzanotte.) 

Plumkett e Lionello. 
Mezzanotte ! 

Enrichetta e Nancy. 
Mezzanotte! 



36 



MARTHA 



Lionel 
Andante 



DORMI TVR— CRUEL ONE, MAY DREAMS 



^A\ r: J) Jì 



2z: 



i 



m 



w 



e^ 



Dor-mi pur, ma il mio ri - pò - so, tu m'hai tol-tojin- gra -to 

Cru-el one^ may dreams trans - port thee To a f'^- ture rich and. 




^ 



te 



A 



i 



' ^ */ y V p 



E 



^2 



cor, ah, e spe - ra - re più non - o - so, un con-for-to al mio do -lor! 

blest! ah! And to - mor-roWjgent-ly yield- ing^ Smile up - on me! Sweet-ly rest! 



Plunkett 

(To Nancy.) 

Sleep thee well, and may thy temper 
Sweeter in our service grow; 
Still your sauciness is rather 
To my liking — do you know? 

Lady & Nancy. 

Yes, good night! such night as never 
We have lived to see before, 
Were I but away, I'd never 
Play the peasant any more. 

Plunkett & Lionel. 
Good night! 

Lady & Nancy. 
Good night! 

(Lady and Nancy retire into their chamber, Plunkett and 
Lionel exeunt by the large door, locking it after them. 

SCENE IV. — Lady Harriet and Nancy, coming out of their 
chamber again. 

Lady. 

Nancy! 

Nancy. 
Lady! 

Lady. 

What begin now? 

Nancy. 

What advise you? 

Lady. 

You say first! 

Nancy. 

Dead pf night, and no protector! 



Plumkett. 

Dormi pur, ma la stoviglia 
Che m' hai rotta, io piango ancor 
Sei d' un demone la figlia, 
Dall' inferno uscita fuor. 

Enrichetta e Nancy. 

(Del tormento che gli ho dato. 
Io rimorso non ho il cor. 
Un capriccio abbiam pagato 
E la pena dura ancor!) 

Plumkett e Lionello. 
Buonanotte ! 

Enrichetta e Nancy. 
Buonanotte ! 

(Lionello, Plumkett si ritirano.) 
SCENA IV. — Lady Enrichetta e Nancy, 

Enrichetta. 
Nancy ! 

Nancy. 

Ebbene? 

Enrichetta. 

Che facciamo. 

Nancy. 

Fuggiremo. 

Enrichetta. 

E bello a dir. 

Nancy. 

In che modo? dove andiamo? 



MARTA 



37 



(Archly.) 



Lady. 

And locked in, which is the worst. 

Nancy. 

What a fatal day has proved this! 

Lady. 

Fatal day, more fatal night! 

Nancy. 

Still — these folks are not unpleasant. 

Lady. 

Thy are honest — 

Nancy 

And polite. 

Lady. 

If the Queen should hear of it! 

Nancy. 

What rich stock for courtiers' wit! 

(A noise is heard from outside, near the window to the 
right.) 

Lady. 

What a noise this? What report? 

Nancy. 

Steps — a voice — there's succor near! 

Tristan 

(From outside.) 

Cousin! Cousin! 

Lady. 

Tristan ! 

Nancy. 

'Tis my lord! 

Lady. 

He will scold — I well deserve it! 
But he'll save us! 



3CKNE V. — Lady Harriet. Nancy : Tristan, entering 
through the window. 

Tristan. 

Yes! Here I am! 

Cousin! You — in this vulgar habitation! 

Nancy. 

Hush thee! You'll wake all earth 
With such loud talking! 



Enrichetta. 

Come fare per uscir? 

Nancy. 

Ah! che di, che dì funesto! 

Enrichetta. 

Commettemmo un grave error. 

Nancy. 

Buona gente son del resto. 

Enrichetta. 

Franco è il labbro — 

Nancy. 

Schietto il cor. 

Enrichetta. 

Se il sapesse la regina! 

Nancy. 

Ah! ne tremo al sol pensiero ! 

Enrichetta. 

Qual rumor? Chi s'avvicina !- 

Nancy. 

Una voce! — Un uomo è là. 



Tristano 



(A destro.) 



Lady! Lady! 

Enrichetta. 
Tristan ! 

Nancy. 

Come qua? 

Enrichetta. 

Oh! che viso! che figura! 
E furente! 



SCENA V. — Tristano,, e detta. 

Tristano. 

Che vi par ! 

Una dama! mia cugina! 

Nancy. 

Nella camera vicina. 
Dorme alcun. 



38 



MARTHA 



Lady. 

Come, away! 

Tristan. 

Lest we should be heard and taken, 
I have left my carriage waiting 
At the corner. 

Nancy. 

Let us fly then! 

Lady, Nancy & Tristan. 

Fly in haste we, softly treading, 
Night's her covering mantle spreading; 
Ere a bird heralds the day 
Are we off" and far away. 

(They depart through the window.) 
SCENE VI. — Plunkett, then Lionel, afterwards Peasants. 

Plunkett. 

Ho! this is downright dissipation! 
I don't think they've gone to bed yet! 

(The noise of carriage wheels is heard dying off in the 
distance.) 

List — a carriage — driving off^ — 
Ha! the window! Lionel, ho! 

Lionel 

(Entering.) 

Here! Didst call me? 

Plunkett. 

Robbed we are, yes robbed and — 
Stop! those servants! 

(Bursts open their chamber door.) 

Off" and gone! 

Lionel. 

She has gone, she, — my adored? 

Plunkett. 

And I was so kind to her! 

Lionel. 

Go, give chase, for my sake, brother, 
Give chase, hasten! 

Plunkett. 

If not quite for your sake, yet 
For the sake of law and order 
Will I try to fetch them back! 
Friends and neighbors! To assistance! 

(Rings the great door-bell vehemently.) 



Enrichetta. 

Zitti! partiamo! 

Tristano. 

Ho lasciato la vettura 
Poco lungi. 

Nancy. 

Ebbene, andiamo. 

Fuggiam presto, — andiamo via 
Pria che desto — alcuno sia; 
Quando lungi ne sarem, 
Al villaggio addio direm. 

(Partono.) 
SCENA VI. — Plumkett, poi Lionello, in ultimo i Contadini. 

Plumkett. 

Che susurro! che sventura 
Non poter dormire! 

(S' ode il rumore d' una carrozza che s* allentana.) 

ciel ! n rumor d' una vettura. 
A veder va un po', Lionel ! 

Lionello. 

Che avvien? parla — 

Plumkett. 

E non lo vedi? 

Le ragazze son fuggite ! 

Lionello. 

Sen fuggir! lei che adoro! 

Plumkett. 

Ah! per certo sen fuggir! 

Lionello. 

Ah ! colei che avoro. 
Non potrò più riveder! 

Plumkett. 

Ma si deggiono punir 
Inseguire le sapremo, 
A noi deggiono obedir! 
Chi garzoni presto! su! 



MARTA 



39 



Peasants 

(Entering confusedly.) 

Tell, what frightful thing has happened. 
That from out our sleep you call us? 

Plunkett. 

Our new servants have absconded. 
And I'll give one pound sterling 
To the man who brings them back! 

Chorus. 

One pound sterling he will give! 

Plunkett & Chorus. 

Rest not till they're apprehended 
Who their contract rashly broke! , 
Seek them out, the vile offenders, 
And restore them to their yoke! 

(All depart hurriedly.) 

END OF 



COTO. 

Qual tumulto! qual fracasco! 
Che vuol dir codesto chiasso? 

Plumkett. 

Le due serve son fuggite ! 
Do una lira in guiderdone 
A chi prender le saprà. 

Coro. 

Una lira dà il padrone! 

Plumkett e Coro. 

Presto! tutti le inseguite; 
Trascinate sieno qua, 
Sien legate, sien punite, 
Non vi sia per lor pietà. 

(Partono correndo.) 
THE SECOND ACT 



ACT III. 



SCENE I — A forest. On the left a small inn. Plunkett 
and Farmers sitting at a table covered with jugs and mugs. 



ATTO III. 



SCENA I.— Un' 



osteria. Plumkett, Contadini 
birra. 



bevendo- 



CANZONK DEL PORTER — PORTER SO^G 



Plunk KTT 
Anciante maestoso 



^^ 



j j^ H\rP \ T 7 r 7 



^'- ^ p i r p ^^ 



tt 



Chi mi di - rà di che il bic - chier col - ma - to va, per dar 
/ want to ask y(^u, Can you, not tell me, Tvhat tc our land^ the Brit 



pia - 
isli 



rr\^ 



(Holding up his inug) 



r FT r I r f r- 1 1^ . . r p 



^ 



cer, nes-sun 



lo 



nes - sun.'' 



strand gtvts life and fow- er? say!. 



e 


la be • 


- van 


- da gra- taji 


That 


IS old 


por 


- ier^ broun and 



^ 



» » 



^^ 



^ 



^3 



* 



^ 



£ 



^ 



ber, chejl cicl ci man - da ntl bic - chier e chejl Bri - tan - no 
stout, we may of it be just- ly proud, it guides John Bull where- 



r\ 



r F nrr 




-^j 



J^3-4 



¥r 



rcn 
'er_ 



de al- 
he 



^ 



^^ 



1 



m 



F r p V 



tier, e che^il_ Bri - tan 
be, thro' fogs and mists. 



no ren - da al 
o'er land and 



tier! 
sea; 



ah! 
Yes. 



am - 
llur- 



40 



MARTHA 



m 



p p- M I ^ 



^ 



è 



^ 




^ 



brosia è que - sta, vi - va^il 
rah! the hops and hur - rah 



bic-chier, 
the malt: 



vi - va la bir - ra, mes 
they are life's fla - vor 



è 



i=l 



te 



rf 



m 



m 



^^ 



fc^ 



^2 



ciam da ber, 


hur - 


rA! 


_ tra 


la 


la la la la la 


la 


hur- rà! 


and life's salt^ , 


Hur ' 


rahl 


_ la, 


ifl. 


la, la, la, la, la, 


la, 


hur -rah! 



Plunkett. 

And that explaineth where'er it reigneth 

Is joy and mirth! At every hearth 

Resounds a joyous song! 

Look at its goodly color here! 

Where else can find you such good beer? 

So brown and stout and healthy too! 

The Porter's health I drink to you! 

Plunkett & Chorus. 

Hurrah the hops and hurrah the malt! 
They are life's flavor and life's salt! hurrah! 

(Horns sound to the chase.) 

Chorus. 

Hark! the merry horns resounding! 

Plunkett. 

Yes, the Queen she hunts to-day 
With her ladies, light and gay. 
Through this forest, game abounding. 

Chorus. 

To the chase invites their playing! 

Plunkett. 

Go then, while mine host I'm paying! 

<Exeunt Chorus to the right — Plunkett goes into the inn.) 
SCENE II. — Enter Huntresses, afterwards Nancy. 

Chorus. 

Ladies we — with hunter's glee 
Are chasing a game — 
Tra, la, la, la! 
Cunningly and stealthily, 
And deadly our aim. 
Ha, la, la, lee! 
Our brave huntsmen are the game 
We smartly pursue daily anew! 



Plumkett. 

Di voi chi vuol — sapere ancor 

Bandir chi suo! — il nostro duol? 

Ciascun lo vuol, ciascun 

E la bevanda — grata a ber. 

Che il ciel ne manda — nel bicchier, 

E che il britanno rende altier. 

Plumkett e Coro. 

Ambrosia è questa! Viva il bicchier. 
Viva la birra! — Mesciam! da ber! 

(S' ode il corno dar il segnale di richiamo ai cacciatori.) 

Coro. 

To'! il segnale della caccia. 

Plumkett. 

Sì, mi parve di veder 
La regina e i cavalier' 
Del camoscio sulla traccia. 

Coro. 

Alla caccia andiam pur noi. 

Plumkett. 

Pria si paghi, a caccia poi. 

(Partono.) 
SCENA II. — Dame in abito da caccia, indi Nancy. 

Coro. 

Anche noi del cacciator 
Abbiamo l'ardor 
E il nobil cor. 
Anche noi chiama il segnai, 
E il colpo mortai 
Sfuggir non vai. 
Ed invano ei va, contano, 



MARTA 



41 



By our eyes they're hit and laid 


L'agii pie, la pronta mano, 


With arrows fleet low at our feet. 


Lo raggiunge, lo colpisce, 

Lo ferisce vinto egli 

E dalla caccia dell' amor; 


Now we awe them and subdue them, 
Now we coax them and allure them. 


Now pursue them to the nets. 


Till in the snare the poor thing frets: 


Vi guardate, o cacciator. 


That's our sport and our delight. 




Nancy. 


Nancy. 


My heart knows not 


(Esser mesto il mio cor non sapria 


What it is to be melancholy; 


La tristezza non nacque per me; 


Sadness was never made for me; 


Il sospiro non so cosa sìa 


Of sighing I know nothing! — 


Sospirar a vent' anni! E perchè? 


Why should one sigh at twenty? — 


Pure io sento una voce nel cor 


Yet I hear a voice whispering within! 


Che vuoi dal cor 


What wouldst thou with my heart 


Voce d'amor? 


Thou voice of love? 


La vita è un fiore 


Life is a flower, and love is its perfume! 


L'olezzo è amor — 


Yes, one may sigh, if it be for love. 


Sospirare si può per amor!) 


(The Ladies advance and repeat the Chorus.) 


(Le Dame le si avvicinano, e ripetone il Coro.) 


Chorus. 


Coro, 


Ladies we, &c. 


Anche noi del cacciator, etc. 


Nancy 


Nancy. 


Huntress fair hastens where 


Il tuo strai nel lanciar, 


She is game detecting. 


Gio vin caccia atrice. 


And her dart wounds the heart 


Non tardar, non tremar. 


That was unsuspecting. 


Titubar non lice. 


Restlessly wanders she. 


Del colpir, del ferir 


And is never tired; 


La belva ed il core. 


Takes good aim, till the game 


Trionfar, preda far 


Is with love inspired. 


De caccia è d'amore, 


Cupid like the rogue he is 


Le l'amor un cacciator. 


Shot the dart, did not miss. 


Il suo strai sa lanciar; 


Cupid, like a rogue 


Ma se impiaga. 


Shot the dart, did not miss. 


Sa quel duol alleggiar. 


From her dart — is the heart 


Né mortai — è il suo strai, 


Always sorely bleeding; 


La piaga è leggera; 


Then she heals — for she feels 


Colpo tal — non fa mal; 


It is comfort needing. 


Nel soff"re chi spera. 


What a look — from him took 


Nel ferir — sa guarir. 


Has a look restored; 


Non toglie in vita. 


Gone is pain — and again 


Sa sopir — sa fenir 


Mounts it where it soared. 


La dolce ferita. 


SCENE III. — Enter Plunkett, at back. — Seeing the Ladies, 


SCENA III.— Plumkett, le Precedenti.— Plumkett, nel 


he stops. 


veder le donne, si arresta in fondo. 


Plunkett. 


Plumkett. 


There seems to be good game afoot here; 


Buona caccia e' è da far. 


I'll see if I can't catch one or two! 


Una o due ne vo' acchiappar. 


Nancy 


Nancy 


(Looking around.) 


(Guardando intorno.) 


Where can the Countess be? 


Dov' è andata la Contessa? 



42 



MARTHA 



She seeks solitude. 

And seems very unhappy, 

And has been so ever since — 

My good friend, can you tell me — 

Plunkett. 

What, Julia, in huntress' gear? 

Nancy. 

Well, my friend? 

Plunkett. 

I am not your friend. 

You wait! I'll make you pay 

For your headlong running away! 



Nancy. 
You 



lad! 



Plunkett. 

Fibs are of no use; 
Come home with me! 

Nancy. 

Help ! Assistance ! 

Plunkett. 

What wickedness! 

Nancy. 

What impudence! 

(The Ladies re-enter.) 

Here's a game for you, my ladies! 
Let's see how he will like your spears! 

(All the Ladies surround Plunkett, threatening him.) 

Chorus. 

You have fallen into our hands. 

You will vainly attempt to fly; 

Let him feel the keen points of our weapons ; 

Let him prepare to die! 

Plunkett. 

Gently, gently — hold! 
-Hold your hands — 

I already feel the points of their weapons! 
By St. George and Beelzebub, 
Fair dames, ground your arms! 

(He rushes off hastily.) 

Chorus. 

Let him feel the points of our lances ; 
Let him die without delay! 

(They rush after him in pursuit.) 



Sola sola se ne sta 
Né contento — v' ha per essa 
Da quel dì da, quel momento 
Che l'amico! udite qua! 

Plumkett. 

Betsy! alla caccia che fai qua! 

Nancy. 

Ehi l'amico! 

Plumkett. 

Amico niente affatto! 

Lo sceriffo saprà darti 

Lo lezìon! Di qui non parti! 

Nancy. 

Fate orror. 

Plumkett. 

Tornar dovrai 
A servirmi. 



Nancy. 
Che! 



a servir! 



Plumkett. 

Sì, ribalda. 

Nancy. 

Or or vedrai ! 

(Additandolo alle amiche.) 

Una belva, amiche, è qua 
Buona caccia si farà. 

(Tutte le Donne lo circondano, minacciose.) 

Coro. 

Capitasti in nostra mano. 
Di fuggire tenti invano? 
Meta sia dei nostri dardi; 
Non si tardi, — dee morir. 

Plumkett. 

Piano, piano! che mai fate 
Aspettate — non tirate — 
Sento già le loro lance 
Che mi sfiorano le guance — 
Per San Giorgio e Belzebù, 
Belle mie, quell' armi giù. 

Coro. 

Meta sia dei nostri dardi, 
Non si tardi — dee morir! 

(Fugge. Le Cacciatrici lo inseguono.) 



MARTA 



43 



SCENE IV. — Enter Lionel, pale and dejected. 

Lionel. 

"I will detach thee 

From thy frail trembling stem. 

And place thee on my heart; 

There shall thou die, sweet flower!" 

Where am I? I feel that I am near her! 

She who has become the arbitress of my 

destiny ! 
All brilliant now I see her. 
With her beautiful virginal smile. 
Which, for me, changed earth into heaven ! 



SCENA IV. — Lionello, pallido e come crasognato. 

Lionello. 

"Dal cespite tremante 

Ti colgo, a giovin fior; 

Sovra il mio core amante 

Cosi morrai d'amor!" 

Ove son io! Lo sento! — A lei vicino! 

Arbitra omai si fé del mio destino. 

Sfolgorante la veggio 

Del suo celeste e virginal sorriso 

Che mi cangia lo terra in paradiso! 



Lionel 
Allegro moderato 



M'APPARI —LIKE A DREAM 



^ 



w 



cj-r \ Oq \ 



M'ap-pa - ri tult' a - mor, il mio sguar-do l'in - con 

Like a dream bright and fair, Chas-ing ev - 'ry thought cf-^ 



JiJ U^p^ 



zc 



p 



^ 



È 



trò, Bel- la — si che^il mio cor an- si-o - so^a lei vo - lo, 

care. Those sweet hours fass'd with thee Made the world all joy for me, 



^ P^r^irp riF^F m^ p^'F i r f ^ ir ^ 



mi f e - ri, m'in-va-ghì quell' an - ge -li-ca bel-tà, scul-tajn cor dall' a- 
But a- las! thou art gone, And that drear.i of bliss is o'er, ah, I hear now the 

1., 



5 



r p-P i Pr J'riff^pp i r rn r'T'ip i^ 



^m 



P 



^ 



mor can-eel - lar si non po-trà, il pen-sier di pò - ter pal- pi - tar con lei d'a- 
tone of thy gen-tle voice no more- oh! re - lurn^hap-py hoursj'ro't withhope,withhope so 



uJv'T' i F i r P'Pir Pj i 'i 



^- p I r" r 



2 



mor può so - pir il mar-tir che m'af- fan-naje stra-ziajl cor, e stra-ziajl 
bright, come a - gain, come a - gain, Sun-ny days of pure de - light, of pure de - 



m 



^ 



p 



cor. _ 
light! 



M'ap-pa 
Like a — 



tutt' a - mor, 
dream, bright and f^i^, 



il mio sguar-do 

chas- ing ev - 'ry 



44 



MARTHA 



S 



^ 



m 



ÈE2 



l'in - con 
thought qf^ 

ad lib 



- trò, Btl - la 

care, those sweet 

Più animato 



SI 

hours 



chejl mio 
pass'd with 



cor- 
thee . 



an - SI - 
■made the 



^=5 



S 



^m 



è 



^m 



^ì 



È 



o- soji lei ve - lòj 
world ali Joy Jor me. 



Mar - tà, Mar-ta, tu spa - ri - sti, ejl mio 

Fleet - ing vi- sion, clvth'd in. bright-ness^ where-fore 



^ 



^'ir V' 



JE^3E^ 



m 



^ 



E 



ti^ 



cor col tuo n'an- dò! 
thus, so soon de - part? 



tu_ la pa- ce 
O'er my path -way 



t r F i f p 



é 



mi_ ra - pi - sti, 
shed thy light-ness 



di do- 

once a - 



^ 



fee 



^ 



i 



;^ 



fc:5: 



lor io mo ri - rò, 
gain, and glad my heart. 



ah, di do- lor mor-rò, si, mor - rò! 

Once a - gain, and glad my heart, yes, glad my heart! 



SCENE V. — Sir Tristan and Lady Harriet. 

Tristan. 

The ladies are far away. Why, cousin, 
Have you left the Queen's side? 

Lady. 

To remain alone. 

Tristan. 

With me? 

Lady. 

With you? 

Alone or with you 'tis just the same. 

I am melancholy; my heart is ever sad! 

Tristan. 

What say you? 

Lady. 

And this sadness 

Is a mystery even to myself. 

Tristan. 

But to remain alone in this secluded spot- 



SCENA V. — Sir Tristano, Lady Enrichetta. 

Tristano. 

Le dame lungi son. Perchè, cugina. 
Lasciaste la Regina? 

Enrichetta. 

Per restar sola. 

Tristano. 
Meco? 

Enrichetta. 

Con voi? — Sola 
con voi vai lo stesso 
Mesta son sempre, e sempre ho il core 
oppresso. 

Tristano. 

Che mai dite? 

Enrichetta. , 

Un' arcana 
Mestizia è in me. 

Tristano. 

Ma sola in questo loco 



MARTA 



45 



Lady. 

I wish it. Adieu! 

Tristan. 

I will soon return. 

(Exit.) 

Lady. 

Here in deepest forest shadows. 
Under drooping whispering boughs 
May confess I my deep sorrow, 
Dream of love's enchanting vows. 
Oh, my heart is mourning sadly! 
Were but the beloved one nigh! 
Now I left the crowd so gladly. 
To the silent woods to hie. 



SCENE VI. — Lady Harriet and Lionel. 



Lionel 



Ah, that voice! 



(Entering.) 



Lady. 

Heaven! whom do I see? 

LioneL 

A lady!— 

Lady. 

What! he here! 

LioneL 

Martha! — Martha! 

Lady 

How shall I 
Escape this danger? 

LioneL 

Ah! thou hast returned! 

Thanks, kind Heaven ! 

Ah! 'tis you — you who fled from me!- 



( Aside.) 



Lady 



What a trial! 



(Aside.) 



LioneL 

Before mine eyes beheld thee. 
My heart recognized thee! 

Lady. 

Recognized me! you are mistaken. 



Enrichetta. 

Lo voglio. Addio! 

Tristano. 

Ritornerò fra poco. 

(Via.) 

Enrichetta. 

Qui tranquilla almen poss'o 
Una lagrima versar 
Qui sfogar il dolor mia 
Qui lagnarmi e sospirar. 
Sguardo qui non v'ha profano 
Che il mio duol possa spiar, 
Del mio core il mesto arcano 
Posso all' aura almen fidar. 



SCENA VI. — Lady Enrichetta, poi Lionello. 

Lionello. 

Oh! qual voce! — 

Enrichetta. 

Ciel! che vedo? 

Lionello. 

Una dama! — 

Enrichetta. 

Che! egli qui! 

Lionello. 

Marta! — Marta! — 

Enrichetta. 

(Dal periglio 
Come uscir?) 

Lionello. 

Ah! qui tornasti! 

Ti son grato amico ciel. 

Ah! sei tu che mi lasciasti! — 

Enrichetta. 

(Qual cimento!) 

Lionello. 

Più che il ciglio 

Il mio cor ti ravvisò. 

Enrichetta. 

Ravvisarvi ! Erraste. 



46 



MARTHA 



Lionel, 
No. 

Those features, those lovely features, 
Are graven on my heart! 
It is thy voice, Martha, which I hear; 
I am not the victim of an error. 

Lady. 

You are dreaming! 

Lionel. 

If it be a dream. 
Oh, let me not awake from it! 
Ah, I would still dream thus; — 
Disturb not so sweet a slumber. 

Lady. 

Hence, away! 

Lionel. 

No, no: in my dream 
Let me take thy hand. 
And imprint a kiss upon it. 
To express the love I feel. 

(He kisses her hand.) 

Lady. 

Ah, I can no longer tolerate 
Such gross impertinence! 

Lionel. 

Wherefore this pretence of ignorance? 

Lady. 

Hence, peasant, and be silent! 

Lionel. 

I a peasant! — I am your master; 
Mildness is lost upon you; 
I have hitherto spoken to you with amenity, 
But now I command that you come with me! 

Lady 



(Calling.) 



Help, Tristan! 



SCENE VII.— Enter Sir Tristan, afterwards followed by all. 

Tristan 

(Rushing on.) 

What has alarmed you? 

Lady. 

Help me! aid me! 

Tristan. 

Who dares to — 



Lionello. 

No - . 

II tuo volto, il tuo bel volto 
E scolpito nel mio cor. 
La tua voce, Marta, ascolto 
Non son gioco d' un error 

Enrichetta. 
Sognerà! — 

Lionello. 

Se un sogno è il mio 
Deh! nen farmi ridestar! 
Ah! sognar così vogl' io, 
Sì bel sonno non turbar. 

Enrichetta. 
Via di qui. 

Lionello. 

No, no: sognando. 
La tua mano prenderò. 
Ed un bacio ad essa dando, 
L' amor mio ti svelerò. 

(Le bacia la mano.) 

Enrichetta. 

Ah! siffatta impertinenza 
Tollerar non posso più! 

Lionello. 

Perchè tanta sconoscenza? 

Enrichetta. 

Via villan! — tacer vuoi tu? — 

Lionello. 

Io villan! — son tuo padrone; 
La dolcezza spiace e te, 
T' ho parlato con le buone. 
Or venir tu dei con me. 

Enrichetta. 

A me, Tristano! 

(Chiamando.) 
SCENA VII. — Sir Tristano, I Precedenti, poi Tutti. 

Tristano 

(Arrivando.) 

Che v' atterrisce? 

Enrichetta. 

Soccorso! aita! 

Tristano. 

Chi tanto ardisce! 



MARTA 



47 



Lionel. 

My lord, this is my servant. 

And I have a right to take her hence. 

Tristan. 

Was there ever such brazen impudence ? 
It fairly makes me shudder. 
It is most unheard-of audacity ! 
This way — hither, sirs! 

(Calling his friends.) 

Chorus 

(Entering.) 

What audacity! 
A peasant dare to insult you ! 
Let so scandalous an outrage 
Be punished without delay. 

Lionel. 

Such audacity! — I'm astonished! 
But I recognized you at once. 
No one shall dare to take her from me; 
She shall return with me. 

Lady. 

What torture! What an embroilment! 
I am paying dearly for a few moments' pleas- 
ure! 
They will laugh at me! 
What shall I reply? — what shall I do? 

Plunkett 

(Entering.) 

Whence comes all this noise? 

Lionel. 

Defend me! 
Nancy 

(Entering.) 

What is the matter? 

Plunkett. 
She, too! 

Nancy. 

Keep up your courage, my lady. 

Lionel 

(Overhearing the words "My lady.") 

Ah! 

Now I comprehend all: 

That candor, that winning affability, 

Was naught but a cruel jest, a heartless joke! 

Ah! just Heaven, canst thou permit this? 

Tristan. 

Arrest that madman! 



Lionello. 

Milord, costei è serva mia; 
Di trarla via — diritto è in me. 

Tristano. 

Piti sfrontata oltra cotanza 
Chi mai vide! Io fremo in cor 
Tanto ardir ogni altro avanza, 
Accorrete qui signor' ! 

(Chiamando gli Amici.) 

Coro 

(Arrivando.) 

Qual audacia! ed un villano, 
D' insultarci avea 1' ardir! 
Uno scandalo sì strano 
Affrettiamoci a punir. 

Lionello. 

Tant' audacia mi sorprende, 
Ma ti seppi ravvisar. 
Pili nessun me la riprende. 
Dovrà meco ritornar — 

Enrichetta. 

Qual tormento! qual affanno 
Un piacer dovrò scontar! — 
Di me ridere dovranno 
Che rispondere! — che far! — 

Plumkett. 

Donde vien tanto rumore? 

Lionello. 

Mi difendi! 

Nancy 

(Arrivando.) 

Che mai fu! 

Plumkett. 
Essa pur! 

Nancy. 

Fatevi core, 
milady. 

Lionello 

(Alla parola "Milady.") 

Ah ! tuoto or se 

Quel candor, quel caro accento 
Un capriccio eran crudel. 
Un crudel divertimento! — 
E tu il sofiFri, giusto ciel ! 

Tristano. 

Arrestate questo matto. 



MARTHA 



Plunkett & Lionel. 


Lionello e Plumkett. 


A i him! 
^'"^^^ t me! 


Arrestato ! 




Enrichetta e Nancy. 


Lady & Nancy 

(Aside.) 


(Qual martir!) 


What torture! 






Lionello. 


Lionel. 


Ma se un patta— è .stato fatto 


But if an engagement has been made 


Da costei ! 


By her— 






Enrichetta 


Lady 


(So'tto voce a L>.o?aik>.) 


(Aside, to Lionel.) 


Pietà! no 1 d'r! 


For mercy's sake, be silent. 






Lionello. 


Lionel. 




She accepted the earnest money; 
She has bound herself tt> serve me. 


La caparra essa accettò, 
A servire sì obbligò. 


Chorus. 


Coro. 


Ha! ha! 'tis laughable! 


Ah! ah! ah! rider ci fa! 


Lady. 


Enrichetta. 


Let him be treated with clemency 


Per costui parla dovria, 


He demands our pity; 


La clemenza, la pietà; 


He has evidently lost his senses. 


La ragione lo tradia. 


But he is not knowingly culpable. 


Ma delitto in lui non v' ha. 


Lionel. 


Lionello. 


Oh! 'tis infamous! 


Qual infamia! — 


Nancy 


Nancy. 


(Aside.) 

Poor fellow! 


(Poverino!) 


Plunkett 


Plumkett 


(To Lionel.) 


(A Lionello) 


Hear me one moment — 


Stammi a udir. 


Tristan. 


Tristano 




(A Plumkett) 


Away with you! 


Va via di qua. 



AH! CHE VOI PERDONI IDDIO— HEAVEN MAY FORGIVE YOU KINDLY 
Quintet 



fe ^ ^ 



^ 



* 



^ 



t 



g 



SEE 



È 



È 



T 



Ah! chea voi 

Heito - en may 



per-do-ni Id- di - o, 
for - ^ive you kind - ly^ 



la mia pena, il mio do- 

bit - ter an - guisli thai you 



t* 



s 



g 



12ZL 



rm 



^ 



^ 



^ 



2 



^ 



^ 



£ 



lor: e-rijl so - lo mio de - si - o, 

wrought in this heart, uhich trusl-ing blind-ly, 



mi— fa - ce-sti^a bra-mjl 
love and kind-ness in — yòu 



MARTA 



49 



±±: 



^ 



^ 



cor! 

ought 



Ah! dal 
Lore, uhich 



ren 
uan 



-Jl 



^ 



P 



=^=^ 



der mi in-fe - li - ce 
ion- ly you kin - dledj 



=4^ 

qiial con 
A o^e niy 



^ 



5^ 



2 



£ 



e 



ten - to ven-ntjn te? 

heart — did fond - ly nurse 



Que-stV»f - fan - no as 
ali has gone, I'm 



sai ti . 

left— in 



B 



i 



s 



i 



di - ce, quan-tjì - mor. 
dark - ness, crus/i'<i fc^ your 



na - see - vajn me 

blind fcl - ly's curse, 



quan-toa- 
crush'd by 



^ 



JT 



* 



^ 



È 



^ 



W 



B 



mor na-scc-vajn me! — 

your blind fai - ly's cursef— 



Ah! AhJ che^a voi per - do- nij[d- 

Ah, Ileav - en may for -gire you 



^ 



"p r p I ^ 



s 



zz: 



e 



2 



di - o, 
kind - ly. 



bit 



mia pena, il mio do - lor, e - rijl 

ter an - guish that you wrought in this 



i^ 



l ì' p p p-^f^ 



^ 



^ 



^m 



È 



^^ 



SO - lo mio de - si - o, mi_ fa- ce - stiji brarnijl^ cor! 

heart uhich trust -ing blind - ly love and kind - ness in you sought! 



The others. 

Ah! may Heaven pardon j * 

For the grief and misery inflicted on him! 
I was , . , , 
You were ^'^ «"^y ^«P^' 



•1 



And -j „^„have broken his heart! 
( yob 

Alas! what have i gained 

By rendering him unhappy? 
Let his present anguish tell 

Tell how much he loved j you' 



Gli Altri. 

Ah! che a ] ^^j perdoni Iddio. 
La sua pena, il suo dolor, 

Foste \ ^^ ^'^^^ *"® desio. 

Gli facester ) , . ., , 

Io gli feci \ ^ ^^^"\^^ ^«^- 

Ah! dal renderlo infelice, 

_, - { potea trar 

Qual contento | ^- ^^^ ^^3^, 

mi 
vi 



Il suo pianto assai ] '^* dice. 



Che il mesch 



H 



mi 
• seppe amar. 



50 



MARTHA 



Tristan 

(Aside.) 

She now sees the folly of her caprices, 
She despised my counsels, 
And now vainly attempts to repair her error. 
By her grief I am avenged ! 

Chorus. 

Let us quickly punish the impostor. 
This has already been endured too long! 
Hasten we back to the chase ! 

(Trumpets are heard.) 

The Queen is approaching this way. 

Lionel. 

And with her my hopes revive! 

(Takes a ring from his finger, and gives it to Plunkett.) 

Take this ring which my father gave me, 
Thou knowest for what purpose; — 
I will not believe myself utterly abandoned 
As long as this gage remains! 

Chorus of Ladies 

(Entering.) 

From the summit of the hill, 
And the neighboring valley. 
The trumpets recall us to the chase. 
The sun is already declining. 
But the bold hunter still continues the pur- 
suit. 

Chorus of Men. 

We are on the track of the stag! 

Pursue him, over the hill 

And through the valley. 

In the wood and through the ravine! 

(Lionel is taken away. — The Hunters disperse.) 



Tristano. 

(Del capriccio ella s'avvede, 
Il consiglio disprezzò. 
Ripararlo invano chiede • 
Il suo duol mi vendicò ! ) 

Coro. 

Affrettiamo la sua pena. 
Sia punito r impostor. 
Durò troppo questa scena, 
Si ritorni a caccia ancor! 

(S' odo la tromba.) 

E la Regina che qui s'avanza, 

Lionello. 

Con lei ritorna la mia speranza. 

(Si toglie dal dito 1' anello, e lo dà a Plumkett.) 

Quest' anel del padre dono 
Teco prendi, e sai perchè — 
Non mi credo in abbandono, 
Se quel pegno resta a me! 

Coro, di Donne. 

Dal ciglion della collina. 

Giù nel vallon. 

Ci chiama il suon. 

Ecco il sol che già dechina, 

Ma corre ancor 

Il cacciator. 

Gli Uomini. 

Del camosico abbiam la traccia! 
Proseguita sia la caccia 
Sulle balze, nel vallon. 
Tra le macchie e nel burron. 

(Lionello è condotto via. — ì Cacciatori si disperdono.) 



END OF THE THIRD ACT. 



ACT IV. 

SCENE I. — Interior of Plunkett's Farm-house, as in Sec- 
ond Act. — Plunkett discovered, alone. . 

Plunkett. 

Poor Lionel ! he sighs, he laments 

He flies from his friend; 

He is beside himself with love 

Accursed be the hour 

When first we saw that girl. 

When first we brought her beneath our roof! 



SCENA I. 



ATTO IV. 

-Interno della Fattoria di Plumkett, come nel 
Secondo Atto. — Plumkett, solo. 



Plumkett. 

Povero Lionel! geme, sospira. 

Fugge l'amico suo, d'amor delira — 

Momento maledetto. 

Che sotto il nostro tetto 

Fu quella donna accolta. 

Che Marta ei vide per la prima volta ! 



MARTA 



51 



IL MIO LIONEL PERIRÀ— SOON WILL MY LIONEL DIE 

Pl.UNKETT 



^i^^ P M F p ^ 



ff I f I r 



£ 



È 



p r '' I M 



Stji mico il ciel non a ■ 
If no aid conte from on 



11 mio Lio - nel pe - ri - rà_ 

Soon will my Li - o -nel die,. 



.., 1 , f~rr iff t i ^is 



p=^' 



^^ 



V ra ; . 



In fau-sto^il di che I'a - mor. 
Fa -tal, iin - hap-py the hour 



S'ini- pa- dro 
Whtii first his 



È^ 



^ 



p I r- I r 



p M^ I p r 



ni del suo 



cor: 



heart felt love's pow'r,. 



Pian- gen- do vo me-stoje 
\Veep-Ì7ig he uan-dt rs in 



sol, _ 



n r fp ^h r ^ 



«e 



^^ 



If: k 



f f r . ^fT^f 



Tre - gua non ha il suo 
Naught to his fain brings re 



duol; 



Pie -to -SO ciel, salvo il 
Mtr- ci -fui God^ hear my 



^m 



r if I r r 



cv 



^ 



^ 



^ 



^ 



ta,. 
cry 



II mio Lio - nel ne mor 
Else musi my Li - - nel 



rà! 


Pie - 


lo - SO 


ciel, 


die! 


Mer- 


ci -fui 


God 



^ 



^ 



f f- I f • | f IT ^^^ 



£ 



E 



Deh 

oh, 



salvo il 


ta, 


il 


mio 


Lio 


- nel 


di 


duol mor 


hear my 


cry. 


let 


not 


with 


g^^^f 


Li 


- - ne/ 



Oi 



^ 



S: 



2 



MB 



rf.s.' 



m m 



Y i ^rrr 



E 



tfc=tfc=ti 



^^^ 



g 



pie 
Mer 



to -so ciel, dell, salvo il fa, 

et -fui God, oh, hear my c>^y, 



pie - to - so ciel, 
mer- ci - fui God, 



pie - to - so 
mtr -ci -fui 



t»:i f I f rf 



\e. ft lie'^e,^-. 



/TS 



ffrrf^lFp f ^f^=^ 



ciel, deh, salvo il tà,. 

God, oh, hear my crjy^ 



deh, salvo il la! 

oh, hear my cry. 



52 



MARTHA 



Say, is this love's hidden fire 

That doth my bosom inspire? 

Nancy my thoughts do pursue, 

Say, must I suffer then too? 

If this be love who can tell ! 

Must I then yield to its spell? 

Let me then tell her I love; 

Pity her bosom shall move, 

She'll not reject my proffered love. 

My earnest prayer her soul will move. 

SCENE II. — Enter Harriet and Nancy. 

Plunkett. 

Here they both come! 
Lady. 

My friend, I wish to see you 

Nancy has made you acquainted with my de- 
sign. 

We will save Lionel ! 

Plunkett. 

May Heaven grant it! 

Lady. 

Leave me for a short time. 

(Exit Nancy and Plunkett.) 

Let me try if my song will not make 
The same impression on him that it formerly 
did. 

(Sings.) 

April returns, crowned 

With verdure and with flowers! 

More bright appears the day, — 

More brilliantly shines the sun! 

The earth is clothed with green; 

The flowers sit smiling on their stems, 

And the nightingale pours forth to heaven 

Her sweet song of love. 

SCENE III.— Enter Lionel 

Lionel. 

Heaven! 'tis her voice! 

Lady. 
Lionel ! 

Lionel. 
Ah! 

You wish that I should die, traitress! 
Iniquitous siren, cease that song, 
Which brings me naught but misery and 
death. 

(Throwing away flowers.) 

Behold these flowers 

Which thou gavest me, crushed and withered ! 



Spiegar non so se amo. 
Furtivo entrò nel mio cor; 
So che a Nancy penso ognor, 
Soff"rir così deggio ancor. 
Se questo e amor non lo so 
Se dee durar ne morrò! 
Le parlerò, dirle vuo 
Ti sposerò, e il farò! 
Accetterà, non dirà no. 
Se m'amerà, la sposero. 

SCENA II. — Lady Enrichetta, Nancy. Plumkett. 

Plumkett. 

Eccole entrambe! 

Enrichetta. 

Amico, vi desio. 

Nancy, il disegno mio 

Noto vi fece. Vo' salvar Lionello. 

Plumkett. 

V ascolti il ciel! 

Enrichetta. 

Lasciatemi brev' ora. 

(Plumkett e Nancy partono.) 

Proviamo se il mio canto 

Vale ad oprar su lui l'usato incanto. 

Già r Aprii — fa ritorno 

Cinto il crin — d' erbe e fior! 

Più gentil — ride il giorno. 

Manda il sol — più splendor! 

Covre il suol — verde ammanto, 

Ride it fior — sul suo stel, 

L'usignuol — dolce canto 

Tutt' amor — manda al ciel. 

SCENA III. — Lionello e Detta. 

Lionello. 

Ciel! la sua voce! 

Enrichetta. 

Lionello! 
Lionello. 

Ah! vuoi! 

Ch' io mora, o traditrice! 

Sirena iniqua, cessa il canto omai, 

morte con quel canto a me darai 

(Getta il fiore.) 

Mira, il fior che mi désti, è al suol sfogliato. 



MARTA 



53 



Lady. 

Ah! hear me, hear me! 

Lionel. 

I know too well 

Thy seductive and enchanting words. 
They fascinate and charm. 
But they prove mortal to whoever listens to 
them. 

Lady, 

Mercy, Lionel I 

LioneL 

Mercy for thee ! Never ! 
To insult and shame thou hast added con- 
tempt. 

Lady. 

Let the remorse I feel. 
Let these tears, stay thy reproaches! 
I have wrought a change in thy destiny: 
I myself presented to the Queen the ring 
Which thy dying father bestowed on thee. 
Thou are the son of Count Derby, 
Who was unjustly banished from this coun- 
try! 

Lionel. 

Oh, my father! 

Lady. 

And the Queen would make reparation to 
thee. 

For the unjust exile of thy parent. 

Thou art Count Derby, and on thy brow 

Mayst place the coronet of a peer of Eng- 
land! 

Lionel. 

I — Count Derby! 

Lady. 

Yes, and this hand, 

Which restores thy heritage, is now offered 

to thee. 
In pledge and token of unceasing love! 

Lionel. 

This hand, which presented the cup of 

anguish — 
Which could wound even while caressing — 
Which inflicted outrage on me. 
Which brought me dishonor. 
And which has prepared for me a tomb. 



Enrichetta. 

Ah! m' odi, m' odi — 

Lionello. 

Il so, la tua parola 
Seduce, ammalia, incanta, 
Fascinatrice eli' è, ma insiem fatale! 
Per chi 1' ode è mortale. 

Enrichetta. 

Pietà, Lionel ! 

Lionello. 

Pietà, per te! Giammai! 

Tu che l'onta al dispregio unir potesti! 

Enrichetta. 

Il mio rimorso, il pianto mio t' arresti! 
Io cangiai la tua sorte, il tuo destino. 
Volli recar io stessa 
Alla Regina quell' anel che il padre 
Morente a te lasciò. Tu sei figliuolo 
Del Conte di Derby da questo suolo 
Bandito ingustamente ! — 

Lionello. 

Oh! padre mio! 

Enrichetta. 

In te vuol la Regina 
L' esilio riparar del genitore 
Derby voi siete, alta portar la fronte 
Potete, paried' Inghilterra e conte! 

Lionello. 

Io conte di Derby! 

Enrichetta. 

Si, questa mano, 

Che il nome tuo ti rende. 

S'offre alla tua, pegno d' eterno amore — 

Derby, l'accetta; e con la mano il core! 

Lionello. 

Questa man che d' amarezza, 
A me il nappo presentò, 
Che ferisce se carezza, 
Che m'offese e m' oltraggiò, 
Questa man che disonora. 
Che la tomba mi scavò, 



54 



MARTHA 



Dost thou dare to offer it? 

(With energy.) , 

Such a hand — I refuse it! 

Lady. 

Heavenly powers! 

Lionel. 

With mortal hatred ! 

This woman was my bright star of love; 

For her I would have given my life; 

She has robbed me of every joy on earth, and 

now 
She is but the baneful star of my unhappi- 

ness ! 

Lady. 

Ah, read my heart — I am repentant ; 

Let us be united! 

Let my love for thee plead my forgiveness! 

Thou, Lionel, canst open heaven to my 

view ! 
Ah, yield, and have pity on my anguish ! 

Lionel. 

Hence, and hide thee from my fury ! 
Lady. 

In mercy, give me back thy love ! 
Lionel. 

Eternal hatred reigns in my heart! 

(Exit Lionel.) 
SCENE IV.— Enter Nancy and Plunkett. 

Nancy. 

Well, my lady? 
Plunkett. 

He hath fled. 

His heart is filled with hatred and fury. 

(Aside.) 

She has been proud and naughty with Lionel, 
But now he returns it to her a thousand fold. 

Lady. 

Ah, no more — I will persevere in the at- 
tempt ! 
My friends, my hopes now are in you. 
Yes, he whom this heart adores 
Must again be brought to my feet! 

(Exit Harriet.) 
SCENE V. — Plunkett and Nancy. 

Nar Y & Plunkett. 

know well! — But what is to be done? 



Tu d'offrirla ardisci ancora! — 

(Con forza.) 

Questa mano — Io non la vò. 

Enrichetta. 

Dio possente I 

Lionello. 

Odio mortale! 
Era r astro dell' amor. 
Per lei dato avrei la vita. 
Ogni gioia m' ha rapita. 
Oggi è r astro del dolor! 

Enrichetta. 

Mi leggi in core — pentita in sono. 
Uniti insiem — esser dovrem. 
Mi dia r amore — il tuo perdono. 
Tu puoi, Lionel, — schiudermi il ciel! 
Ah ! ti piega al mio dolor — 

Lionello. 

Va t' invola al mio furor! 

Enrichetta. 

Per pietà, mi rendi il cor. 

Lionello. 

Odio eterno avrò nel cor. 

(Lionello parte.) 
SCENA IV. — Lady Enrichetta, Nancy, Plumkett. 

Nancy. 

Ebbene, milady! 

Plumkett. 

Egli s' invola. 

L' odio, il furor — porta nel cor. 
(Prima miladi sola era altera 
Oggi, Lionello, più altero è ancor.) 

Enrichetta. 

Ah! non piiì — si tenti ancora! 
Or, amico, io spero in te! 
Sì, colui che il core adora. 
Dee tornare a questo pie. 

(Parte.) 
SCENA V. — Plumkett e Nancy. 

Nancy e Plumkett. 

Lo so bene! ma che fare! 



MARTA 



55 



Plunkett. 


Plumkett. 


Do you know what to do? No? — Nor I 


Lo sai tu? no? nemmen io. 


neither. 






Nancy. 


Nancy. 


D' appagare il suo desio 


We must both of us try to effect 


Ambedue dobbiam cercare. 


That which she desires, 


Finche il nuovo tuo signor, 


Until our new master relents. 


Abbandona il suo rigor. 


Plunhett. 


Plumkett. 


Yes, but afterwards? 


Sì, ma poi! — 


Nancy. 


Nancy. 


What? what then? 


Ma poi? poi che? 


Plunkett. 


Plumkett. 


I shall find myself in a state of embarrass- 


Sto in impaccio ancor. 


ment. 


Nancy. 


Nancy. 


Perchè? 


But why? 


Plumkett. 


Plunkett. 


Solo allor restar degg' io, 


Because I shall then 


Neil' umìl tugurio mio. 


Be alone in my house, 


Nel deserto casolar, 


And sit and sigh in solitary melancholy, 


Presso il fuoco a sospirar. 


In my poor dwelling. 


Nancy. 


Jy ancy. 


Hai ragione, è tristo assai! 


You are right; 


Starne solo \xi dovrai. 


It will be melancholy enough! 


Nel deserto casolar 


You will have to sit and sigh 


Presso al fuoco a sospirar. 


Alone in your solitary dwelling. 


E crudele! 


It is hard! 






Plumkett. 


Plunkett. 


T^ ' . ^ t 


I'm to be pitied! 


ra pietà! 


Nancy. 


Nancy. 


If you could — 


hi potria — 


Plunkett 


Plumkett. 


(Aside.) 


(Che mai dirà!) 


What is she going to say? 




Nancy. 

You should get a little wife! 
Consult your heart, now. 


Nancy. 

Vi bisogna una sposina — 
Consultate il vostro cor. 




Plunkett. 


Plumkett. 


True — I know a neighbor. 


Sì, conosco una vicina. 


A farmer's daughter! 


La figliuola del fattor. 


Nancy. 


Nancy. 


Oh, really! You have a neighbor, 


Ah! davver! vostra vicina 


A farmer's daughter! 


E la figlia del fattor! 


Well, take her. 


La prendete. 



56 



MARTHA 



Plunkett. 

No, I won't! 

Nancy. 

And why not? 

Plunkett. 

I don't love her. 

Nancy. 

But you will find plenty of other 
Young and handsome lasses. 

Plunkett. 

The more I search, the less I find — 
Anne won't suit me. 

Nancy. 

The more he searches, the less he finds — 
Anne won't suit him! 
Are there no others? 

Plunkett. 

Who? where? 

Nancy. 

I don't know. 

Plunkett. 

Ah ! listen to me. 

I know a young girl, a lovely lass, 

With an excellent heart — but what good is 

that? 
She does not know how to do anything! 
She is only fit to be the wife of a rich man ; 
She can't knit or spin; 
She can do nothing but laugh and joke! 
But still, though so ignorant, she has known 
How to make me fall in love with her! 



Nancy. 


Nancy. 


The portrait resembles me: 


II ritratto mi somiglia: 


You would flatter me. — 


Mi voleste lusingar — 


But no one advised you 


Ma nessuno vi consiglia. 


To marry such a girl. 


Questa donna di sposar — 


Yet, if she were quickly to learn 


Pur, se apprendere potesse. 


How to knit and spin. 


A cucire ed a filar — 


You might, perhaps. 


Se in brev' ora lo facesse, 


Be content to have her. 


Vi potrebbe contentar. 


Plunkett. 


Plumkett. 


Indeed? 


Si? 


Nancy. 


Nancy. 


Most certainly. 


Ma certo! 



Plumkett. 

Non la vo'. 

Nancy. 

E perchè? 

Plumkett. 

Non r amerò. 

Nancy. 

Ma donzelle — buone e bello, 
Troverete in quantità. 

Plumkett. 

Fììi ne chiedo — ^men ne vedo. 
Anna a genio non mi va. 

Nancy. 

Più. ne chiedo — men ne veda. 
Anna a genio non gli va. 
Non e' è un' altra? 

Plumkett. 

Dove? che? 

Nancy. 

Non lo so. 

Plumkett. 

Ah! udite qua. 
Io conosco una fanciulla 
Tutta grazia, tutta cor. 
Ma che vai! non sa far nulla, 
Buona è sol per un signor. 
Non sa in man tener la rocca, 
Sa sol ridere e scherzar. 
Ma benché sia tanto sciocca 
M' ha saputo innamorar. 



MARTA 



57 



Plunkett. 

Do you mean to tell me — 

Nancy. 
What? 

Plunkett. 

No, Lionel must first be saved! 
First let us arrange that affair, 
And then we can settle about this. 

Nancy. 

If we can! 

Plunkett. 

Lionel first — 

I am faithful to my friend. 

Plunkett & Nancy. 

Friendship claims j him- 

We will afterwards speak of other claims. 

Then we may be permitted 

To think of that gentle voice 

Which whispers to my heart. 

Nancy. 

What is the voice which whispers to your 
heart? 

Plunkett. 

It is the voice of love! 

SCENE VI. — Lady Harriet's Park. — Booths, benches, Ac. 

arranged as in the First Act. — Farmers, Servants, &c. 
Lady Harriet and Nancy are with them, dressed as Ser- 
vants. 

Chorus. 

Arrange the benches in two rows; 
Bring the arm-chair for the beadle. 
Here, the other seats, all placed 
In the same position as they were at Rich- 
mond. 
Here, the servants — there, the farmers, 
The housekeepers, and the hucksters. 
The sheriff will sit here, 
To ratify the contracts. 

Lady 

(To Chorus.) 

Have you obeyed all my orders? 

Chorus. 

Everything is ready. 

There are two rows of benches, &c. 



Plumkett. 



Dir 



mi VUOI J 



Nancy. 
Che?— 

Plumkett. 

No, pria Lionel salvar! 
Liberar lo deggio e poi. 
Pensar posso a quest' a£far. 

Nancy. 

Si potrìa! — 

Plumkett. 

No, pria Lionel. 
All' amico son fedel. 

Plumkett e Nancy. 

L' amicizia j ^- reclama, 
Poi parlar potrò a chi m' ama 
Implorar ] y' è dato allor. 
Un accento dolce al cor? 

Nancy. 

Qual sarà sì dolce al cor? 

Plumkett. 

La parola dell' amor. 

SCENA VI. — Parco di Lady Enrichetta. — Sì figura il mer- 
cato a Richmond come neh' Atto Primo. — Panche 
scranne, fattori, e poi tutti. 
. Lady Enrichetta e Nancy saranno, vestite da Contadine. 

Coro. 

Qua le panche su due file, 
Per r usciere là il sedile, 
Qui le scranne pronte son, 
Come stavano a Richmond 
Qua le serve, là i fattori, 
Le fantesche, gli avventori. 
Le sceriffo lì sarà, 
I contratti approverà. 

Enrichetta 

(Al cor.) 

Obbediste al cenno mio? 

Coro. 

Ogni cosa è pronta qui. 
Là le panche su due file, ec. 



58 



MARTHA 



Nancy 


Nancy 


(Looking off behind.) 


(Guardando dentro.) 


He comes, sad and sorrowful 


Egli vien triste, dolente. 


He looks like one that is dying, 


Ha r aspetto d' un morente. 


Scarcely raising his eyes from the earth! 


Ma fra poco sul suo viso, 


He will smile soon! 


n sorriso — tornerà. 


(The clock is heard to strike.) 


(Sui va la compana.) 


'Tis midday, — the clock has struck; 
Now begin! 


E mezzodì, — venite qui : 


L' ora suonò, — parlar si può. 


Chorus of Servants. 

I can cook, I can embroider, &c. 




Coro di Serve. 


(As in first act.) 


Io cucino, io il racamo. 


Others. 


(Come neir atto L) 


I can make tarts and wine, &c. 


Riposare mai non bramo, ec. 


Others. 


Alt. 


I can take care of poultry, &c. 


Fo le torte, f o il vin mosto, ec. 


I am never idle, &c. 


Curo i polli, io il bucato, ec. 


Plunkett 


Plumkett 


(To Lionel.) 


(A Lionello.) 


Come hither! 


Vieni qui. 


Lionel 


Lionello 


(As if delirious.) 


(Come in delirio.) 


What mean those voices? 


Quai voci son? 


Plunkett. 


Plumkett. 


They are Richmond servants. 


Son le serve di Richmond. 


(Addressing himself to Lady Harriet.) 


(Vogendosi a Lady Enrichetta.) 


Martha, say what can you do? 


Marta, di che sai tu far! 


Lionel 


Lionello 


(Perplexed.) 


(Perplesso.) 


Martha! Heaven! do I dream? 


Marta! ciel! parmi segnar. 


(He looks at her, recognizes her. and seems overwhelmed 


(Guarda Marta, la riconosce, rimane estatico. Marta. 


with joy. — She approaches him, takes his hand, and 


gli va vicino, gli prende la mano, e dice con pas- 


addresses him with much emotion. 


sione. 


Lady. 


Enrichetta. 


My dreams of wealth and gold 


I sogni d' or — della ricchezza 


I can forget, I can despise. 


Posso obbliare, — posso sprezzar; 


I only retain the recollections 


Solo r amor, — la tenerezza, 


Of love and tenderness. 


Vo rammentare — voglio serbar. 


Lionel. 


Lionello. 


Is this delirium? — am I awake, or dreaming? 


Delirio è questo? — Sogno, o son desio? 


Plunkett 


Plumkett 


(To Nancy.) 


(A Nancy.) 


And you, what can you do, my lass? 


E tu dì, che sai, fanciulla? 


Nancy. 


Nancy. 


I can cook, I can bake. 


La cucina ed il bucatto. 


Plunkett 


Plumkett 


(Laughing.) 


(Videndo.) 


You're jesting! you can do nothing. 


Vuoi scherzar! non sai far nulla. 



MARTA 



59 



Nancy. 


Nancy. 




If my master is obstinate. 


Se il padron fa 1' ostinato 




I can bring him to reason. 


Te r aggiusto come va. 




Plunkett. 


Plumkett. 




You will suit me — come along. 


Mi convieni, — meco vieni. 




Nancy. 


Nancy. 




There, take that as an earnest ! 


Prendi in pegno questo qua! 




(She boxes his ears.) 


(Gli dà uno schiaffo.) 




All 


Tutti 




(Laughing.) 


(Ridendo.) 




The retort was well merited — 


La caparra è meritata. 




And was given heartily. 


E fu data — con amor. 




Plunkett. 


Plumkett. 




My cheek receives it 
As a token of afifection! 


Sulla guancia serbo il segno 
Come pegno — dell' amor. 




Lady 


Enrichetta 




(Resuming her former song. — Lionel seems as if recover- 
ing and awaking from a dream.) 


(Ricontando la sua canzone, Lionello sembra ridestarsi 
un sogno. 


da 


April returns, crowned 


Già r aprii — fa ritorno. 




With verdure and with flowers! 


Cinto il crin — d' erbe e fior. 




More bright appears the day. 
More brilliantly shines the sun! &c. 


Più gentil — ride il giorno. 
Manda il sol — più splendor! ec. 




All 


Tutti 




(With joy.) 


(Con gioia.) 




The happy hour is at last arrived! 


Giunta è 1' ora del piacer, 




Let me think only of pleasure! 


Non si pensi che a goder. 





(CURTAIN) 



iB l 

BOOKS ON THE VOICE 



YOUR VOICE AND YOU 

(What the Singer should do) 
By Clara Kathleen Rogers (Clara Doria) Qoth, $1.75 net 

PREPARATORY COURSE TO THE ART OF VOCALIZATION 

Soprano, Mezza Soprano, Alto, Tenor, Baritone, Bass 
Edited by Eduardo Marzo Each book, paper, $1.25 net 

THE ART OF VOCALIZATION 

Soprano, Mezzo Soprano, Alto, Tenor, Baritone, Bass 
Edited by Eduardo Marzo Three books to each voice — each, paper, $1^5 net 

THE HEAD VOICE AND OTHER PROBLEMS 

By D. A. Clippinger Qoth, fl.25 net 

RESONANCE IN SINGING AND SPEAKING 

By Dr. Thomas Fillebrown Cloth, $1.50 net 

SIMPLE TRUTHS USED BY GREAT SINGERS 

By Sarah Robinson Duff Cloth, $1.50 net 

SOME STACCATO NOTES FOR SINGERS 

By Marie Withrow Cloth, $1.00 net 

THE COMMONPLACES OF VOCAL ART 

By Louis Arthur Russell Cloth, $1.25 net 

ENGLISH DICTION FOR SINGERS AND SPEAKERS 

By Louis Arthur Russell Cloth, $1.25 net 

FRENCH DICTION FOR SINGERS AND SPEAKERS 

By William Harkness Arnold Cloth, $1.25 net 

THE TRAINING OF BOYS' VOICES 

By Claude Ellsworth Johnson Cloth, $1.25 net 

TWELVE LESSONS ON THE 
FUNDAMENTALS OF VOICE PRODUCTION 

By Arthur L. Manchester Cloth. $1.25 net 



BOSTON: OLIVER DITSON COMPANY 

New York: CHAS. H. DITSON & CO. Chicago- LYON & HEALY, Inc. 

Order of your local dealer 



OPERA SCORES 

All the vocal scores have English text together with the foreign text men- 
tioned below. Unless otherwise specified, these books are bound in paper. 



GRAND OPERAS 



AIDA Giuseppe Verdi 2.50 

In four acts. Italian text 

BOHEMIAN GIRL....MichaeI W. Balfe 2.00 

In three acts 

CARMEN Georges Bizet 2.5Q 

In four acts. French text 

CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA 

Pietro Mascagni 2.00 

In one act. Italian text 

FAUST Charles Gounod 2.00 

In five acts. French text 



LAKMÉ Leo Delibes 3.00 

In three acts 

MARITAN A. . . .William Vincent Wallace 2.50 

In three acts 

MIGNON Ambroise Thomas 2.50 

In three acts. Italian text 

i 

SAMSON AND DELILAH 

In three acts Camille Saint-Saens 2.50 

TROVATORE, IL Giuseppe Verdi 2.00 

In four acts. Italian text 



LIGHT OPERAS 



BELLS OF CORNEVILLE, THE; or, THE 
CHIMES OF NORMANDY 
In three acts Robert Planquette 2.50 

BILLEE TAYLOR; or, THE REWARD 

OF VIRTUE Edward Solomon 1.50 

In two acts 

BOCCACCIO; or, THE PRINCE OF 

PALERMO Franz von Suppé 2.50 

In three acts 

DOCTOR OF ALCANTARA, THE 

In two acts Julius Eichberg 1.50 

FATINITZA Franz von Suppé 2.50 

In three acts. German and Italian text 



MARTHA Friedrich >on Flotow 2.50 

In four acts. German and Italian text 

MASCOT, THE Edmond Audran 2.50 

In three acts 

OLIVETTE Edmond Audran 2.00 

In three acts 

PINAFORE, H. M. S.; or, THE LASS THAT 
LOVED A SAILOR 

In two acts Sir Arthur Sullivan 1.50 

SORCERER, THE. ...Sir Arthur Sullivan 1.75 

In two acts 

STRADELLA Friedrich von Flotow 2.00 

In three acts 



Send for Descriptive Circular P — Oratorios, Cantatas, Operas and Operettas. 



m m OLIVER DITSON COMPANY s u 



1 


Standi 


\ 


rd Opera I .il 


Drettos 


Ali librettos have E 


nglish text. Additional texts are indicatec 


: by Italic letters, as 


follows: /, Italian; 


6\ 


German; F, French. Those marked with (*) contain no 


music. All the others 


have the music of the principal airs. 








PRICE, 30 CENTS, EACH 








G Z 




Title 


Text 


Compoter 


Title 


Ir.tt Cumpotet 


Grand Duchess of 






Otello 


/ Giuseppe Verdi 


Gerolstein, The 


F 


Jacques Offenhach 


Pagliacci, I 


! R. Leoncavallo 


* Hamlet 




Ambroise Thomas 


Parsifal 


G. Richard Wagner 


Jewess, The 


I. 


Jacques F. HaUvy 


Pinafore (H. M.S.) 


Sir Arthur S. Sullivan 


Konigin von Saba 






Prophète, Le 


1. Giacomo Meyerbeer 


(Queen of Sheba) 


G. 


Karl Goldmark 


Puritani, I 


L Vincenzo Bellini 


Lakmé 


1. 


Leo Delibes 


Rheingold, Das (The 




Lily of Killarney, The 


Sir Jules Benedict 


Rhinegold) 


G. Richard Wagner 


Linda di Chamounix 


I. 


Gaetano Donizetti 


Rigoletto 


7. Giuseppe Verdi 


Lohengrin 


0. 


Richard Wagner 


Robert le Diable 


I. Giacomo Meyerbeer 


do. 


I. 


do. 


Romeo et Julietta 


F. Charles Gounod 


*Lovely Galatea, The 




Franz von Suppé 


Romeo e Giulietta 


L do. 


Lucia di Lammermooi 


I. 


Gaetano Donizetti 


Ruddigore 


Sir Arthur S. Sullivan 


Lucrezia Borgia 


I. 


do. 


Samson et Dalila 


F. Camille Saint-Saens 


* Madame Favart 




Jacques Offenbach 


Semiramide 


I. Gioacchino A. Rossini 


Manon 


F. Jules Massenet 


Siegfried 


G. Richard Wagner 


Maritana 




Wm. Vincent Wallace 


Sonnambula, La 


L Vincenza Bellini 


Marriage of Figaro 


I. 


W. A. Mozart 


*Sorcerer, The 


Sir Arthur S. Sullivan 


Martha 


I. 


Friedrich von Flotow 


'''Spectre Knight, The 


Alfred Cellier 


Masaniello (Dumb 






''Stradella 


Friedrich von Flotow 


Girl of Portici) 


J. 


D. F. E. Auber 


Tannhauser 


G. Richard Wagner 


*Mascot, The 




Edmond Audran 


Traviata, La 


L Giuseppe Verdi 


Masked Ball 


I. 


Giuseppe Verdi 


Tristan und Isolde 


G. Richard Wagner 


Meistersinger, Die 






Trovatore, Il 


7. Giuseppe Verdi 


(The Mastersingers) 


G. 


Richard Wagner 


Ugonotti, Gli (The 




Mefistofele 


I. 


Arrigo Boito 


Huguenots) 


I. Giacomo M eyerbeer 


Merry Wives of 






Verkaufte Braut, Die 




Windsor, The 




Otto Nicolai 


(The Bartered Bride) G. Friedrich Smetana \ | 


Mignon 


I. 


Ambroise Thomas 


Walkiìre, Die 


G. Richard Wagner 


Mikado, The 


Sir Arthur 8. Sullivan 


William Teli 


I. Gioacchino A. Rossini 


*Nanon 




Richard Genée 


Zauberflote, Die (The 




Norma 


I. 


Vincenzo Bellini 


Magic Flute) 


0. W. A. Mozart 


*01ivette 




Edmond Audran 






Orpheus 




C. W. von Gluck 






BOSTON 


• 
• 


OUVER DITSON COMPANY 


New York: Chas. 


H. Ditson & Co. Chicago: 


Lyon & Healy 






Order of your local dealer 




Made is U. S. A. 






! 



SONGS FELOM THE OPERAS 




Edited by H. E. KREHBIEL 

"^ound in paper, cloth back, $2.^0 each. 
In full cloth, gilt . . . 3. 50 each, 




In these volumes of The Aiuskians Library the editor has presented in chron- 
ological order the most famous arias from operas of every school. Begin- 
ning with songs from the earliest Italian produaions, a comprehensive 
view of operatic development is given by well-chosen examples from Get 
man, French, and later Italian works, down to contemporary musical drama. 

Each song or aria is given in its original scriptive, and interpretative notes on each 

key with the original text, and a faithful song. 

and singable English translation. Portraits of the most noted composers 

Each volume contains an interesting pref- represented are given in each volume, 

ace by Mr. Krehbiel, with historic, de- Size of each volume, 9V2X l2Vz inches. 

SOPRANO SONGS FROM THE OPERAS 

Contains twenty-three numbers by nineteen composers. The music covers 188 pages, 
the prefatory matter 25 pages. Portraits are given of Beethoven, Bellini, Gluck, 
Gounod, Meyerbeer, Mozart, Rossini, Verdi, and Weber. 

MEZZO SOPRANO SONGS FROM THE OPERAS 

Contains thirty numbers by twenty-five composers. The music covers 186 pages, the 
prefatory matter 29 pages. Portraits are given of Auber, Bizet, Donizetti, Handel, 
Massenet, Saint-Saens, Spontini, Thomas, and Wagner. 

ALTO SONGS FROM THE OPERAS 

Contains twenty-nine numbers by twenty-two composers. The music covers 176 
pages, the prefatory matter 20 pages. Portraits are given of Glinka, Gluck, Handel, 
LuUy, Meyerbeer, Purcell, Rossini, Thomas, and Verdi. 

TENOR SONGS FROM THE OPERAS 

Contains twenty-nine numbers by twenty-one composers. The music covers 192 
pages, the prefatory matter 27 pages. Portraits are given of Beethoven, Bizet, Gluck, 
Gounod, Mascagni, Massenet, Verdi, Wagner, and Weber. 

BARITONE AND BASS SONGS FROM THE OPERAS 

Contains twenty-seven numbers by twenty-four composers. The music covers 188 
pages, the prefatory matter 20 pages. Portraits are given of Bellini, Bizet, Cherubini, 
Gounod, Halévy, Handel, Mozart, Ponchielli, and Tchaiikovsky. 



BOSTON: OLIVER DITSON COMPANY 

NEW YORK: CHAS. H. DITSON & CO. CHICAGO: LYON & HEALY. INC 

Order of your local deahr 



■ 



u.c. BERKELEY LIBRARIES 

■llllllll 

BDD113b^S^ 



DATE DUE 



Music Library 

University of California at 

Berkeley 



lllllillilliilllillllllillilllilli^