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Full text of "Maryland"

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*S!TY OF MARYIWI0 
)LLEG£ PARK, M& 



University, of Maryland cAlumni Puvlicatio. 



>L. XXVI, 
50c THE COi- ; 
$3 THE YEAR 





Mrs. Donald Cummings, Jr., and her young son Donald 



'I WASN'T ALONE ANY MORE 



Most of us know what it is like to have a 
telephone. But have you ever thought what it 
would be like if it wasn't there, even for a 
little while? 

Here are some good words along that line 
from Mrs. Donald Cummings, Jr. 

"When we moved into our new house," she 
told us a few weeks ago, "I felt a little strange— 
with a voung babv and all — and I couldn't seem 
to get a feeling of being settled and at home. 



"Then the telephone was put in. And sud- 
denly even thing seemed different. I could call 
people! I felt better about being bv myself in 
the house with the babv. I felt better about my 
mother who had been ill in Boston. And about 
my husband in uniform far away. 

"And then I realized that it wasn't just the 
telephone calls I could make — it was that 
people could call me if necessary. I wasn't alone 
any more." 



BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 

Reminding yon that someone, somewhere, would like to hear your voice today, ^^j » ~M 



Vol. XXVI January-February, 1955 No. 1 







: Published Bi-Monthlij at the University of 

Maryland, and entered at the Post Office, 

College Parle, Md., an second class mail mat- 

' ter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 

[ 1879. $3.00 per year — Fifty cents the copy. 



HARVEY L. MILLER, Editor of University 
Publications 



PATRICIA M. REIHM, Asst. Editor 

Department of Publications 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Md. 



SALLY L. OGDEN, Advertising Director 

Eighteen W. Twenty-fifth St. 

Baltimore 18, Md. 

HO. 7-9018 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Officers 

I 

| Col. O. H. Saunders '10, President 
I J. Homer Remsberg '18, Vice-President 
I J. Gilbert Pendergast '33, Vice-President 

I 

General Alumni Council 



AGRICULTURE — Clayton Reynolds '22, 
Abram Z. Gottwals '38, J. Homer Rems- 
berg '18. 
1 ARTS & SCIENCES — William H. Press '28, 
Charles Ellinger '37, Ralph G. Shure '32. 
BUSINESS & PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION — 
Alvin S. Klein '37, John Dyson '53, Roger 
L. Odette '52. 
\ DENTAL — Dr. Lawrence W. Bimestefer '34, 

Albert C. Cook '38, William E. Trail »26. 
'EDUCATION — John P. Speicher '41, William 

Prigg '53, E. Louise Sudlow '50. 
I ENGINEERING — S. Chester Ward '32, C. A. 

Wharten '08. Col. O. H. Saunders '10. 
HOME ECONOMICS — Katherine A. Longridge 
'29, Mrs. Paul Coppinger '30, Mrs. William 
Kricker '31. 
LAW — J. Gilbert Pendergast '33, J. Dudley 

Digges '36, G. Kenneth Reiblich '29. 
MEDICAL — Albert E. Goldstein '12, Thurs- 
ton R. Adams '34, William H. Triplett '11. 
1 PHARMACY — Frank Block '24, John Neutze 

'37. Samuel I. Raichlen '25. 
NURSING; — Flora Street '3, Virginia Stack 
'33, Martha Curtiss '48. 



Alumni Clubs 

BALTIMORE — Wm. H. Triplett, '11. 

CARROLL COUNTY — Dr. L. L. Leggett, '30. 
Sr. '24. 

CUMBERLAND — Dr. J. Russell Cook '23. 

EASTERN SHORE— Otis Twilly '21. 

"M" CLUB — Sam Silber, '34. 

NEW ENGLAND — R. A. B. Cook, '05. 

NEW YORK — Miss Sarah E. Morris, '24. 

PITTSBURGH— Charles Furtney, '37. 

PRINCE GEORGE'S' CO.— Ellwood R. Nich- 
olas '28. 

RICHMOND— Paul Mullinix, '36. 

SCHENECTADY — Mrs. Marie Esher, *45. 

TERRAPIN — James W. Stevens, '17. 



Ex-Officio 

Past President — Dr. A. E. Goldstein, '12. 
Past President — Dr. A. I. Bell, '19. 
Past President — C. V. Koons, '29. 
Past President — T. T. Speer, *17. 
University President — Dr. Wilson H. Elklns 
Executive Secretary — David L. Br'igbam, '38. 



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If you are one of a select group of men that can offer 
valuable contributions to its application and effects, 
why not look into Fairchild's career opportunities? 

You probably know that Fairchild is now producing 
the C-123 Avitruc, as well as the world-famous C-119 
Flying Boxcar. But did you know that reconnaissance 
aircraft ... jet fighters . . . and jet bombers and trans- 
ports are on the drawing boards too? These diversified, 
stimulating assignments increase the inventive chal- 
lenge to Fairchild's team of qualified aerodynamicists. 

Gracious country living only minutes away from urban 
Baltimore or Washington . . . paid pension plan ... an 
excellent salary with paid vacations ... an ideal work- 
ing environment . . . generous health, hospitalization 
and life insurance . . . and the many other benefits of 
a progressive company add to the pleasure of working 
with Fairchild. 

You'll be investing wisely in a secure future if you take 
time today to write to Walter Tydon, Chief Engineer, 
outlining your quali- 
fications. Your cor- 
respondence will be 
kept in confidence, 
of course. 



212415 



jg H ENGINE AND AIRfUNE CORPORATION 

I Fairchild II 

HAGERSTOWN, MARYLAND 

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Maryland 




1 EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 




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THEODORE R.^cKELDlN 
Governor ^^^^^^^^~ 



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■^1 his is the season of the year when we are most aware of spiritual values. The spirit of Christmas and (he prospect 
V»7 of a New Year seem to fill the hearts of men and women with kindness and good will. We are inclined to be tolerant 
and generous and to put away, the selfishness which so often characterizes mankind. It is indeed an attitude which must 
prevail at all times if we are to achieve peace of mind and peace among men. 

This is the time when we look forward with hope and optimism, leaving behind us the accomplishments and failures 
of the past year. It is a time when we so often resolve to accomplish more, to give up some bad habit, or rededicate 
ourselves to some worthy cause. Most important, however, for the improvement of human relations is a sincere desire 
to translate the spirit of the New Year into deeds. In these days of remarkable progress in material things, we must 
somehow or other come to a clear realization that spiritual welfare is more important than all of the inventions and 
discoveries of the past. And we must understand that things of the spirit do not become good deeds without effort any 
more than material progress is achieved without mental and physical activity. 

As we enter the year of 1955 may God help us to understand that individual happiness and lasting progress can be 
achieved only by the acts and expressions which come from the spirit. As we look forward with hope and optimism, may 
we realize that peace on earth must be attained, and can be attained only by people of good will. 

Kindness, understanding, generosity and love are expressions of good will which if effectual, must be present in our 
daily relations with family, friends, and associates. 



Long last the spirit of Christmas and the New Year! 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAN 

OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 



Sincerely 



WILSON H. 
President 



ELKINS 



Chapel Service Homecoming Feature 

At Homecoming's Festive Board. 




SPEAKERS' TABLE 



Al Danegger Foto 



Queen For A Day 



Left to right: — Hon. Harry N. Nuttle, Treasurer, Board of Regents; Fred W. Besley, '92; Colonel Geary P. Eppley, Dean 
of Men and Director of Student Welfare; Clifton E. Fuller, '96, Maryland's first quarterback; Dr. H. B. McDonnell, '88; 
Mrs. Harold F. Cotterman; Dr. Sumter Griffith, '80; Dr. Thos. B. Symons, member of Board of Regents, and Former Dean 
of the College of Agriculture; Judge William P. Cole, Jr., Chairman of the Board of Regents, speaking; Colonel O. H_ 
Saunders, U. S. Army (ret.), '10, President of Alumni Association. 

(November 6 Festivities Led 
By Veteran Alumni Griffith, 

I McDonnell And Fuller 
Bf jbcuud 2. Btiqkam 

Dr. R. Sumter Griffith, Dean of the 
returning alumni for the 1954 
J Homecoming celebration, made the trip 
(from Waynesboro, Virginia, just a few 
| months before he will celebrate the 
! i 75th anniversary of his graduation. 

A member of the class of 1880, Dr. 
Griffith joined Clifton E. Fuller of the 
1 class of 1896 in escorting the Home 
coming Queen around Byrd Stadium 
before a Homecoming crowd of more 
than 20,000. Mr. Fuller of Cumber- 
land was the first quarterback to rep- 
resent what is now the University of 
Maryland. The Homecoming Queen 
was Miss Nancy Mularkey of Kensing- 
ton, Maryland, a senior of the College 
of Arts and Sciences. 

Rev. John Baden, '39 (Agr.) of 
Monkton, contributed the sermon for 
the Homecoming Chapel service, at- 
tended by many alumni. Arrangements 
were made by University Chaplains and 
those participating in the service in- 
cluded Rev. James Bard, Rev. Jesse W. 
Myers, Rev. Otto Reinherr and Rev. 
William A. Beall, '49 (A&S). The 
Chapel choir under the direction of 
Prof. Fague Springmann added in- 
spiration to the service which set the 
theme for a perfect Homecoming Day. 

More than a 1,000 alumni attended 
the Homecoming Luncheon to hear 
President Wilson H. Elkins of the Uni- 
versity pledge himself to service to 
the Institution while expressing the 
hope that the Alumni Association 
would become an even stronger and 
more vital factor in the future of the 
University. Master of Ceremonies was 
Alumni President, O. H. Saunders, '10 
Engr. Special guests were Judge Wil- 




Al Danegger Fotos 



'54 HOMECOMING QUEEN 



Left: Beautiful Nancy Mullarkey, Tri-Delta, is crowned Homecoming Queen, 
1954, by University President Wilson H. Elkins. The 1954 "Miss Maryland" is an 
A&S senior from Kensington, Md. 

Right: Queen Nancy takes off for a ride around Byrd Stadium escorted, left, 
by Clifton E. Fuller '96, one time Terrapin quarterback, and Dr. R. Sumter 
Griffith, '80, veteran alumnus, who never misses a College Park function. 



liam P. Cole, Jr., '10 Engr., Chairman 
of the Board of Regents; Mrs. John 
L. Whitehurst, Vice-Chairman, and 
Mr. Harry H. Nuttle, Treasurer of the 
Board. 

Dr. Harold F. Cotterman, Dean of 
the Faculty, introduced the thirteen 



Deans who were present for the oc- 
casion. The Mens' Glee Club and the 
Women's Chorus rendered selections 
and introductions of older alumni fol- 
lowed. Among those receiving special 
attention, in addition to Dr. Griffith 
and Mr. Fuller, were Dr. H. B. McDon- 



Maryland 



nell, '88 (Med.) and long time faculty 
member; Mr. Fred W. Besley, class of 
'92 (Agr.) and former State Forester; 
Dr. L. J. Merritt, '97 (Med.) from 
Walden, New York; Grenville Lewis '97 
(A&S), former football great; H. G. A. 
Oberdick, class of '00 (Dental), of 
York, Pennsylvania; Lewis W. Lake 
'01, and Dr. James J. McCormick '01, 
(Dental) of Troy, New York. 

Dr. T. B. Symons, '02 (Agr.), who 
served the University as Dean of Agri- 
culture, Director of the Extension 
Service Acting President and is now 
on the Board of Regents, recalled his 
service as both Secretary and Presi- 
dent of the Alumni Association. Other 
alumni from classes prior to 1910 who 
attended were, Dr. E. P. Walls '03 
(Agr.), Admiral George W. Cairnes 
'03 (Engr.), E. R. Sasscer '04 (Agr.), 
and Dr. James P. Shreeve, Jr., '04 
(Dental), Dudley G. Roe '05 (Law), 
Herbert A. Weiller '05 (Engr.), J. M. 
Hunter '06 (Agr.), and J. J. T. Gra- 
ham '06 (A&S), Charles H. Harper 
'07 (Engr.), C. A. Warthen and Charles 
W. Sylvester, both '08 (Engr.), and 
from the class of 1909 R. M. Ager, 
Basil D. Spalding and William R. Mas- 
lin. 

Parade Of Floats 

Other functions for alumni by the 
Student Body and the University in- 
cluded a parade of floats, the crown- 
ing of the Homecoming Queen, an ex- 
cellent band performance in which 
each school was saluted, an organ re- 
cital, the Alumni Mixer and the Home- 
coming Dance. Faculty and students 
were on hand to greet those visiting 
campus departments and buildings. 

Of the fraternity floats paraded and 
judged, Lambda Chi Alpha's "Once 
Upon A Time" won top honors. Their 
float creation last year placed first 
also, along with Phi Sigma Kappa, this 
year's runner-up. 

The Tri-Delts built a mammoth Mus- 
keteer for each of their Deltas and 
copped first prize in the house decora- 
tions contest. Alpha Chi Omega soror- 
ity was second. 



An Open Letter 



President Speaks 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, President of 
the University of Maryland, was guest 
speaker at the dinner meeting held by 
the Maryland Chapter of the American 
Society for Public Administration on 
December 13, 1954. The subject of 
Dr. Elkins' address was "The Duties 
and Responsibilities of a State Uni- 
versity President." 

The objectives of the American 
Society for Public Administration are 
to advance the science, processes, and 
art of public administration; to facili- 
tate the exchange of knowledge and 
results of experiences among persons 
engaged in or interested in the field 
of public administration; and to en- 
courage the collection and dissemina- 
tion of information relating to the 
field. 



The following statement of Dr. 
William S. Stone, Director of 
Medical Education and Research, 
University of Maryland, appeared 
in the December issue of the uni- 
versity's Postgraduate Education 
Committee's new publication "News 
Service" as an open letter from the 
desk of Dr. Stone. 



Pens Statement 



During the recent political campaign 
the University of Maryland School 
of Medicine received considerable ad- 
verse publicity in conjectures and in- 
ferences drawn concerning the content 
of a confidential report of the findings 
of the team from the Council on Medic- 
al Education and Hospitals of the 
A.M.A. and the American Association 
of Medical Colleges that visited the 
medical school during November, 1953. 
The reports of these examining teams 
have a bearing on accreditation but are 
routine made to assist medical schools 
in the development of their programs 
by objective evaluations of their vari- 
ous operations. However, if indications 
of inadequate and improper operation 
of a medical school come to the atten- 
tion of the A.M.A. and the American 
Association of Medical Colleges, 
(through the many channels of educa- 
tion, licensing and interne and residen- 
cy training that are constantly being 
reported upon to them), a team is im- 
mediately sent to examine the institu- 
tion involved to determine whether or 
not it should be continued as an ac- 
credited school. The visit of the team 
to the University of Maryland Medical 
School came as a result of an invita- 
tion by the University of Maryland 
to have the routine visit coincide with 
the routine accreditation visit of the 
University as a whole by the Middle 
States Association of Colleges and Sec- 
ondary Schools. The report of the 
findings of the two groups were com- 
bined by agreement of all concerned 
to simplify the evaluations. Evalua- 
tions of this type go into considerable 
detail; and where the experience of 
other institutions in specific activities 
appear to be helpful in improving the 
activity within the university, such 
findings are cited and offered to the 
university for consideration in its fu- 
ture programs. Because of the detail 
of the reports they are published in 
detail for study in various parts 
of the university examined. This us- 
usually results in a large volume with 
discussions involving intimate detail 
of the university's operation. It is 
recognized that some of the opinions 
of the visiting team may be contro- 
versial because an examination in 
which activities can only be reviewed 




DR. WILLIAM S. STONE 

Director of Medical Education 
University of Maryland 

Presents facts regarding School of 
Medicine. 



superficially by a few days observa- 
tions may have an inadequate apprecia- 
tion of all the factors involved. For the 
above reasons, such detailed exami- 
nations are always considered confiden- 
tial in nature. Follow-up reeaxmina- 
tions are usually held at the end of a 
two year period to determine the 
benefits gained by such examinations 
and to assist the examining group to 
obtain a better appreciation of the 
factors involved in university opera- 
tions under conditions of the regional 
environment. It has always been the 
opinion that these confidential reports 
are too detailed for general publica- 
tion and might be misleading to in- 
dividuals without exact knowledge of 
their purpose and the problems in- 
volved. 

Many Problems 
The University of Maryland Medical 
School, like all medical schools, has 
been having many problems in obtain- 
ing adequate budgetary support due 
to the high cost of medical education 
and with many changes necessary in 
equipment and buildings needed to 
keep pace with new developments in 
medicine. For example, although the 
basic sciences have assumed an ever 



Maryland 



increasing role in providing the doc- 
tor with information and methods for 
meeting health problems, the Uni- 
vesity of Maryland has had very little 
state support in providing for these 
developments. Dr. Frank C. Bressler, 
an alumnus of the medical school, with 
great foresight, saw the need for pro- 
viding the medical school with research 
facilities to support its educational 
program and endowed the University 
with money for the construction of a 
modern research laboratory and con- 
tinuing funds to aid medical research. 
Due to the limited space available 
for basic science teaching in the med- 
lical school, the Bressler Research Lab- 
oratory has had to be used as a basic 
science teaching area for anatomy, 
physiology, pharmacology and clinical 
pathology thus markedly limiting re- 
search and inadequately housing the 
basic science teaching area. 
Built In '34 
The University Hospital was con- 
structed in 1934 with a bed capacity 
of 435 beds and 62 bassinettes. At that 
time the average length of time a 
patient stayed in the hospital before 
being discharged was 21 days. Since 
that time 250 beds have been added 
to the hospital by construction, and 
the average hospital stay has decreased 
'to 11.5 days due to rapid cures using 
new drugs like penicillin, etc. This 
means that the number of patients 
being treated in the hospital and out- 
patient clinics has doubled, but no 
increase in capacity has been pro- 
vided for hospital services such as 
X-ray, anesthesia, operating rooms, 
accident rooms, obstetrical delivery 
rooms. The service required has been 
: carried out hy longer hours of work in 
these departments, work on weekends 
and holidays. In spite of a superior 
'effort and fine support by loyal staff 
'and students, the work has been handi- 
capped by crowding and many at- 
tempts to improvise. These facts are 
I documented in the following tables: 
TABLE I 
University of Maryland 
Hospital 
1934 1944 

Hospital 

Admissions 6,363 10,179 
Accident Room 
'Admissions 14,478 19,246 
TABLE II 
Department of Radiology 

Total Total 

Number Number 

of 
Patients 
Year 

1941-42 10,174 

1947-48 14,063 

1952-53 20,144 

In addition to these problems that 
have been brought about through lack 
of adequate facilities, the faculty of 
the medical school has a large number 
[of key positions that must soon be 
filled because of retirement for age or 
death of incumbents. For instance, the 
dean is 67 years old; the professor of 
J Surgery, 65; the professor of Obstet- 
rics, 66; the professor of Preventive 



1953 



12,038 
26,030 



of 
Exami- 
nations 

16,360 
22,229 
33,448 



Medicine and Reconditioning, 67; the 
professor of Anatomy, 69; the profes- 
sor of Pathology, 65; the professor of 
Gynecology, 63. In addition the profes- 
sor of Opthalmology died during the 
spring of 1954. The salary structure 
at the University of Maryland Medical 
School is very low and the teaching 
effort has been carried on largely 
through loyalty of its faculty. To re- 
place adequately faculty vacancies due 
to retirement and to maintain the qual- 
ity of faculty, budgetary assistance 
must be obtained to raise the salary 
levels to at least the average being 
paid in medical schools elsewhere. 
Top Flight Attention 

At the present, these are all of the 
major problems facing the medical 
school. If they are provided for in the 
budget, the other minor adjustments 
that are necessary to ensure continued 
top flight medical education can be ex- 
pected to take place automatically. 

The following steps are being taken 
or have been taken to ensure the de- 
velopment of the school of medicine. 

1. Budgetary requests have been 
made for salary adjustments and the 
addition of a number of new faculty 
positions. These have been approved 
by the President and the Board of 
Regents and will next go to the Gov- 
ernor and Legislature. 

2. Construction funds have been re- 
quested to improve and enlarge the 
University's Hospital's operating rooms 
from 4 to 7, the X-Ray department, 
the obstetrical delivery rooms; to pro- 
vide for recovery rooms for surgery; 
to improve central sterile supply for 
the operating rooms; and provide a new 
treatment area for opthalmology. 

The State Planning Commission has 
approved this construction; and if the 
funds are obtained from the legisla- 
ture, matching funds under the Hill 
Burton Act will be resquested to pro- 
vide for improving the accident room, 
the pharmacy and the food service 
including the dietetic area. 

A new department of preventive 
medicine and rehabilitation has been 
created in the medical school. 

A director of medical education and 
research has been provided for and 
appointed. 

A new nursing school and residence 
has been provided for by appropria- 
tion and construction will start in the 
spring of 1955. 

Student Union 

Funds are being made available and 
plans are now being made for the con- 
struction of a student union. 

The new building for the school of 
pharmacy has been authorized and part 
of the funds for its construction ap- 
popriated. 

A new medical library is in the plan- 
ning stage, and need for it recognized 
by the State Planning Commission. 

A new laundry service has been ap- 
proved by the State Planning Commis- 
sion for the University Hospital in 
cooperation with the State Penal Sys- 
tem. 

Population trends in Maryland and 
the need for health services have been 



studied. These indicate the continuing 

need for a progressive educational and 
health service center at the site of the 
Baltimore Campus of the University of 
Maryland. A master plan for the fu- 
ture development of the University of 
Maryland Medical Center is evolving. 

The University of Maryland is an 

approved school fully accredited by Un- 
American Medical Association. It has 
had an illustrious past; it is operating 
with vigor at present and its future 
is bright. 



Re-Accredited 

President Wilson H. Elkins of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland announced at a re- 
cent meeting in Cincinnati, Ohio, of the 
Engineers Council for Professional De- 
velopment, the national engineering 
accrediting agency, the five curricula 
in the College of Engineering were 
re-accredited. These curricula are in 
Aeronautical, Chemical, Civil, Electri- 
cal, and Mechanical Engineering. Engi- 
neering colleges are re-inspected every 
five years. 

The inspection of the College of 
Engineering was made last November 
at the time of the inspection of the 
University as a whole by the Middle 
States Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools. The inspection com- 
mittee consisted of Dr. B. Richard 
Teare, Jr., Dean, College of Engineer- 
ing and Science, Carnegie Institute 
of Technology; Dr. William R. Sears, 
Director, Graduate School of Aero- 
nautical Engineering, Cornell Univer- 
sity; Dr. Ralph A. Morgen, Director, 
Engineering Experiment Station, Pur- 
due University; Professor Samuel T. 
Carpenter, Head, Department of Civil 
Engineering, Swarthmore College; and 
Associate Dean J. S. Potter, Stevens 
Institute of Technology. 



Food Fair Scholarships 

The Food Fair Stores Foundation 
has again provided the University with 
four new scholarships totaling $250 
each. 

The grants are available to incom- 
ing freshmen beginning in the school 
year of 1955. Selection of the scholar- 
ship winners is to be made by the 
Scholarship Committee of the Univer- 
sity, as in the case of all scholarships. 
Awards will be made on the basis of 
civic interest, leadership, and scholar- 
ship. Provisions have been made to 
also include a consideration of financial 
need. 

Any graduate of an accredited public 
or Catholic high school in Anne Arun- 
del County, Baltimore County or Balti- 
more City will be eligible. Application 
should be made directly to Dr. Harold 
F. Cotterman, dean of the faculty. 

Food Fair Stores Foundation's schol- 
arships for Maryland students at the 
University now totals eight. Four 
scholarships were provided by the 
Foundation last year for the school 
year 1954-55. 

Dr. Cotterman stated application for 
the awards should be made as soon as 
senior second semester high school 
grades were available. 



i Maryland 



Recommended Budget Increases For 1955-56 



The University of Maryland Board 
of Regents approved a university 
budget of approximately $25,878,268.00 
for the year 1955-56. The figure rep- 
resents an increase of approximately 
$2,489,978. 

Various Deans Consulted 

In preparation of the budget, the 
Budget Committee of the Board of 
Regents had previously met in an all- 
day meeting for the purpose of receiv- 
ing from the various deans and other 
administration officers the budget re- 
quests for their departments for the 
fiscal year beginning July 1, 1955. The 
state budget director, the chairman of 
the Senate Finance Committee, the 
chairman of the House Ways and 
Means Committee and the director of 
the Bureau of Fiscal Research were in- 
vited to sit with the Committee. Pre- 
liminary to the meeting the director of 
finance and business requested and re- 
ceived the requests of all deans and 
administrative officers, and the changes 
requested both in detail and in sum- 
mary form were made available to 



Board of Regents Recom- 
mend Boost of 
$2,489,978. 



those present. The report of the direc- 
tor of finance and business also in- 
cluded estimates of changes in income 
from various special and Federal fund 
sources. 

Careful Review 

The director of finance and business 
had carefully reviewed with deans and 
administrative officers the requests for 
1955-56 for the purpose of (1) elimi- 
nating increases in askings wherever 
it was possible to do so without seri- 
ously impairing the teaching or re- 
search programs, (2) adjusting the re- 
quests (in many instances upwards) 
for the purpose of providing sufficient 
personnel for an anticipated increase in 



enrollment, (3) for incorporating into 
the askings salary increases incident 
to raising the minimum salary of full 
professor to $6,600 in the requests 
the amounts required to increase the 
monthly stipend of graduate assistants 
from $120 to $135. 

Met With President 

The Budget Committee met with the 
president of the university and the di- 
rector of finance and business for the 
purpose of reviewing the recommenda- 
tions of the president. The director of 
medical education and research and the 
director of the University Hospital 
participated in the discussions concern- 
ing the requirements of the medical 
school and the University Hospital. 
After a careful review of all the re- 
quests received, including the reports 
presented by the deans to the commit- 
tee and after due consideration of the 
recommendations of the president, the 
Budget Committee recommended the 
increased budget to the Board of Re- 
gents. 



University of Maryland 

BOARD OF REGENTS 




JUDGE WW. P. COLE, JR. 
Chairman 



MEMBERS of the Board of Regents 
are appointed by the Governor of 
the State for terms of nine years each, 
beginning the first Monday in June. 

The President of the University of 
Maryland is, by law, Executive Officer of 
the Board. 

The State law provides that the Board 
of Regents of the University of Maryland 
shall constitute the Maryland State Board 
of Agriculture. 

A regular meeting of the Board is held 
the last Friday in each month, except 
during the months of July and August. 




Mrs. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 
Vice Chairman 



B. HERBERT BROWN 
Secretary 




HARRY H. NUTTLE 
Treasurer 



DR. LOUIS L. KAPLAN 
Asst. Secretary 






^•^^^ ' 


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EDMUND S. BURKE 
Asst. Treasurer 



C. EWINC TUTTLE 



EDWARD F. HOLTER 



ARTHUR 0. 10VEJ0Y CHAS. P. McCORMICK 



DR. THOS. B. SYMONS 



Maryland 



Budget 
Increases Recommended Pot Recommended 

State Supported Programs: 

Administration ...„$ 97,317 

Libraries „ ...... 39,650 

Educational Depts., College Park 353,977 

College of Agriculture and 

Agricultural Services . 407,838 

Professional Schools, Baltimore 423,936 

University Hospital _ 600,285 

Physical Plant Maintenance 

and Operation 186,341 

Maryland State College 22,696 

Regional Council for Education — 7,500 

Teacher's Retirement Fund 203,066 



Kstlmated 

Increase 

in 

Special Funds 


Recommended 
Increase 

from stut<' 
Appropriations 

For L955-56 


$ 18,363 

20,674 

318,437 


$ 78,954 
18,976 
35,540 


122,546 

87,703 

100,000 


285,292 
336,233 
500,285 




186,341 

22,696 

—7,500 

203,066 



Sub-Total State Supported Program 2,327,606 



667,723 



1,659,883 



Dedicated Fund Programs: 

College of Spec. & Cont. Studies 

Summer School 

Auxiliary Enterprises 

Other 

Sub-Total Dedicated Fund Program 162,372 



99,702 
16,756 
33,511 
12,403 



99,702 
16,756 
33,511 
12,403 



162,372 



Grand Total $2,489,978 



$830,095 



$1,659,883 



The proposed budget of $25,675,202 would be divided between State Appropria- 
tions and Other Funds as follows : 



Present 
Budget 

From State Appropriations $10,082,165 (43%) 

From Other Sources 13,306,125 

Total Budgets $23,388,290 



Proposed 
Budget 

$11,742,048 (45%) 
14,136,220 



Increase 

$1,659,883 
830,095 



$25,878,268 



$2,489,978 



The amounts as set forth above are 
I subject to adjustment for increase or 
1 decrease in items. No provision has 
been included in the foregoing for the 
employer's share of Social Security 
! cost. Although the Federal Congress 
has enacted legislation extending cov- 
erage to State Universities, participa- 
| tion in Social Security is now con- 
; tingent upon the passage of permis- 
. sive legislation by the State and also 
upon favorable action on a referendum 



submitted to all employees of the Uni- 
versity. 

The Budget Committee also reviewed 
the tuition and other charges made by 
the University had compared fees cur- 
rently charged with charges at similar 
institutions. Based on these analyses 
and also upon its effort to reduce to 
a minimum the requests for additional 
state appropriations, the board ap- 
proved the increases in the fee struc- 
ture as follows, on July 1, 1955. 



Present Proposed Recommended 

Fee Fee Increase 
Undergraduate Student Fees, College Park: 

Non-Resident Fee (annual basis) $150 $250 $100 

Advisory & Testing Fee — Psychology 

(annual basis) _ 15 4 

Engineering College Fee (per semester) 3 4 1 

Applied Music (per semester) „ _ 30 40 10 

Physical Education for Men (per semester) 

(similar fee now in effect for women) — 3 3 

Physics (Lecture-Demonstration) _ — 2 2 

Medical School: 

Resident fee (annual basis) 450 650 200 

Non-Resident fee (annual basis) 700 800 100 

An increase which went into effect immediately was an additional $2.00 charge 
per patient day for all patients of University Hospital. 



Dr. Elkins Honored 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, President of 
the University of Maryland, received 
an honorary doctor-of-laws degree at 
the annual fall convocation of Wash- 
ington College, Chestertown, Md. 

Dr. Elkins, in addressing the convo- 
cation, reviewed the contributions of 
higher education to society. 

Maryland 



Heads Watershed 

Dr. Thomas B. Symons, former act- 
ing president of the University of 
Maryland, former Dean of Agricul- 
ture, and now a member of the Board 
of Regents, has been named temporary 
chairman of a new citizens group aimed 
at protecting natural resources in the 
Rock Creek area. 



To be called the Rock Creek Water- 
shed Council, the new group is spon- 
sored by the Interstate Commission on 
the Potomac River Basin and will have 
a two-fold purpose. It will: 

1. Seek to prevent pollution of 
Rock Creek and erosion in the water- 
shed. 

2. Seek to more fully develop the? 
Rock Creek area for recreational pur- 
poses. 

One hundred persons representing 
Federal, state and local governments, 
citizens groups and conservation or- 
ganizations attended an organizational 
meeting of the Council in Bethesda- 
Chevy Chase High School. 

Dr. Symons was authorized by the 
group to select a five man organization- 
al committee. This committee will draw 
up by-laws and a program. 

A leading conservationist, Dr. Sy- 
mons said the Watershed Council had 
a big job facing it to "preserve this 
very wonderful natural resource, edu- 
cate people to its proper use, and to 
make the watershed an example for 
the rest of the nation." 



Band Day 



In an attempt to foster further in- 
terest in band work the University 
was host to 29 senior high school bands 
from the State of Maryland, Virginia, 
and from the District of Columbia 
during halftime of the Maryland- 
Clemson football game. 

Bands taking part were, from Mary- 
land: Sherwood High School, Sandy 
Spring; Belair High School, Belair; 
Glen Burnie H.S., Glen Burnie; Alle- 
gany H.S., Cumberland; Sparrows 
Point H.S., Sparrows Point; Hagers- 
tow.n H.S. Hagerstown; Suitland H.S., 
Suitland; Gaitherburg H.S., Gaithers- 
burg; Northwestern H.S., Hyattsville; 
Westminster H.S., Westminster; Rich- 
ard Montgomery H.S., Rockville; Fred- 
erick H.S., Frederick; Elkton H.S., Elk- 
ton; Oxon Hill H.S., Oxon Hill; Sur- 
rattsville H.S., Clinton; Towson H.S., 
Towson; Clarksville H.S., Clarksville; 
Fort Hill H.S., Cumberland; Frederick 
Sasscer H.S., Upper Marlboro; Doug- 
lass H.S., Upper Marlboro; Franklin 
H.S., Reisterstown; North Harford 
H.S., Pylesville; Annapolis H.S., An- 
napolis; Beall H.S., Frostburg; Cal- 
vert County H.S., Prince Frederick; 
Bruce H.S., Westernport; Bladensburg 
H.S., Bladensburg. 

From Virginia: George Washington 
H.S., Alexandria. 

From Washington, D. C: Calvin 
Coolidge High School. 

The twenty-nine representing Mary- 
land and Washington high schools, 
poured on the field at half time in a 
tide of color, music, and majorettes. 
Their featured number was "Stars and 
Stripes Forever," played in honor of 
the march king, John Philip Sousa, 
while they spelled out "Sousa" on 
the field. 



Mniverditu of, Maryland 

ALUMNI 

The University points with 
pride to the many Maryland 
alumni in various walks of life, 
some of whom are pictured on 
the opposite page, with posi- 
tions now or formerly occupied 
by them. 

They provide, convincingly, 
the answer to the question, 
"What is to be gained by a 
college education?" 

The value of any University 
may well be gauged by the ac- 
complishments of its alumni. 

"By their fruits ye shall know 
them." (Matthew 7:16). 

An additional layout of pic- 
tures appears on the following 
page. 

An alumnus is a person who 
has been exposed to the benign 
and stimulating teachings of his 
university, and who continues to 
reflect its influence throughout 
his life. 



NEWS FROM 



ALUMNI CLUBS 

Baltimore Alumni Club Entertain 
President and Mrs. Elkins 



The University of Maryland Alumni 
Club of Baltimore of which Dr. Wm. 
H. Triplett is President, enjoying the 
sixth year of its existence, opened this 
season's program with a reception hon- 
oring President and Mrs. Wilson H. 
Elkins. 

The Wedgewood Room of the Emer- 
son Hotel, while not extensively deco- 
rated for the occasion, presented an 
appearance of comfort while reflecting 
a great deal of warmth and enthusiasm. 

The guests ran well into the hun- 
dreds in number and happily the reg- 
ister revealed that all schools had been 
represented. Our new president and 
his charming wife brought with them 
all the evidence needed to satisfy 
everyone who met them that surely 
Texas had sustained a loss which we 
are very happy to gain. 

The means of getting acquainted 
program activity was purposely chosen. 
It is sincerely hoped we left with Dr. 
Elkins a good impression. We want him 
to know us better and especially do we 
want him to know our interest lies 
directly behind him as he goes about 
building our already great University. 




RECEPTION FOR THE PRESIDENT AT BALTIMORE ALUMNI CLUB 
Above: Dr. Louis L. Kaplan, member of the Board of Regents; Judge William 
P. Cole, Jr., Chairman of the Board of Regents; Mrs. Elkins; President Elkins; 
Dean Noel E. Foss of the School of Pharmacy and Mrs. Foss. 

Below: Dr. Frank Slama, Co-Chairman of the affair; Dr. William H. Triplett, 
Club President and Mrs. Triplett, and Dr. Frank Black, Co-Chairman. 



We want to lay only stepping stones 
in his path — never a stumbling block. 
We hope this function it has been our 
pleasure to sponsor will focus attention 
in our direction when alumni loyalty is 
needed. 

Alumni Club To Entertain 
Board of Regents 

The Board of Regents of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland will be the guests 
of the University of Maryland Alumni 
Club of Baltimore at a luncheon to 
be held at the Sheraton-Belvedere Hotel 
on Friday, February 25. 

Dr. Wilson Homer Elkins, newly ap- 
pointed President of the University, 
will be the guest speaker. The Honor- 
able Judge William P. Cole, Chairman 
of the Board of Regents, will talk on 
the Regents' Activities. Dr. William 
Triplett, President of the Baltimore 



Alumni Club, will preside. 

Alumni Club members will receive 
notices in the mail with invitations to 
members and guests. This meeting 
promises to be one of the outstanding 
events of the 1954-55 season. 

The Program Committee, headed by 
Co-Chairmen Dr. Frank Block and Dr. 
Frank Slama, is composed of Gretchen 
Van Slyke Welsh, Dr. B. Olive Cole, 
Alexander Ogrinz, Sam L. Silber, Dr. 
E. L. Pessagno, Charles Ellinger, Dr. 
Irwin P. Klemkowski, Sally Ogden and 
Beatrice Jarrett. 

In New England 

Membership is on the rise in New 
England. Under the direction of Dr. 
George Kerlejza of Worcester, Mass., 
President of the club, emphasis this 
fall has been on personal letters, per- 
sonal contact and an increase in club 
{Continued on Page 141 



"Maryland' 







"S-S-S-tuttering 
M-M-NI-Machine" 

Audio Signal Delay Unit In 
Use In Speech Department 

&f. Weldoa Wallace 

(Baltimore Sunday Sun) 

The University of Maryland has a 
machine that makes people stutter 
or mouth and distort their words in 
strange ways. 

The electronic device, now being used 
for research in the university's speech 
department at College Park, usually 
causes people to talk more loudly than 
usual; sometimes slower and some- 
times faster. 

The disruptions produced in their 
speech often causes subjects to become 
highly upset. They may perspire, 
tremble and breathe fearfully. A few 
grow so disturbed they snatch off the 
earphones that are part of the equip- 
ment and throw them to the floor. 
Used For Research 

The machine that throws the voice 
off its normal course is being used for 
research in various schools and in the 
armed services, according to Richard 
Hendricks, speech therapist at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

It is one of the newest aids in the 
scientific study of speech, he added. 

Experiments with the device bears 
out in practice what many psychol- 
ogists and speech experts have said for 
a long time — that people depend 
strongly on the sound of their own 
voice to feel adjusted to their environ- 
ment. 

Speech, Mr. Hendricks said, is one of 
the central factors in personality ad- 
justment. A person finds the sound of 
his own voice reassuring, and anything 
that disrupts it causes emotional up- 
set to a greater or less degree, de- 
pending on the individual. 

The instrument that makes people 
stutter is called an audio signal delay 
unit. Its principle is simple. The speak- 
er talks into a microphone. His words 
are recorded on tape and fed back to 
him through earphones at a slight de- 
lay after he speaks them. This delay 
is only a fraction a second more than 
normal, but it is enough to throw off 
the person's timing of his speech to 
such extent that he becomes hesitant, 
uncertain, bewildered and finally frus- 
trated, Mr. Hendricks explained. 
Organism Struggles 

These feelings cause him to speak 
strangely. His stuttering, loud talking 
or mouthing of words represent a 
struggle on the part of the organism 
to "get back in the groove," to find 
equilibrium, to feel adjusted to the 
environment. 

In normal speech, a person hears his 
own words about one one-hundredth 
of a second after he speaks them, and 
he is so used to this interval that he 



M-M-Makes You S-S-Stutter 




'A R-R-RAT N-N-NAMED 
AR-AR-ARTHUR' 
With the echo of her voice coming 
back to her ears, Mrs. Elkins struggles 
to read a test manuscript about 'Ar- 
thur, the Young Rat.' Like other 
normal-speaking persons, Mrs. Elkins 
seemed to be visibly shaken after run- 
ning through the tests. 



Washington Star Fotos by Abbott 
IT WILL MAKE YOU STUTTER 
Miss Marsha Oshrine, a speech major 
at the University of Maryland, handles 
the controls of a stuttering machine as 
Mrs. Earleen Elkins, speech instructor, 
prepares to begin. She read normally 
until an echo of her voice was fed back 
into the earphones. 



is not aware of any time lapse be- 
tween speech and hearing. 

The audio signal delay unit can hold 
back words for any desired period be- 
tween the time the speaker says them 
and the time he hears them. In present 
tests at the university, the delay has 
been set at four-tenths of a second. 

The machine makes it possible for 
the first time for persons of normal 
speech to have the experience of stut- 
terers, the deaf or the cerebral palsied. 
(Distortions produced in normal speech 
may fit any of those descriptions.) 

The person who speaks naturally be- 
comes painfully aware of the sound of 
his own words while using this machine 
— just as the stutterer may be pain- 
fully conscious of his own words at all 
times. 

Normal Speaker Reactions 

Normal speakers using the machine 
have reactions thought to be similar 
to the reactions of stutterers. These 
responses — physical and emotional — 
indicate that the person is really 
struggling. 

Some stutterers have less difficulty 
in talking on the machine than do nor- 
mal speakers because they are more 
used to the type of experience. 

When the signal delay unit was used 
on Alan Glick, a university student who 
stutters, he began to speak rapidly and 
his stutter disappeared. He explained 
later that his attention was distracted 
from his voice, and his thoughts were 
concentrated on "trying to beat the 
machine." 



Mr. Hendricks said it is hoped that 
some eventual use may be found for 
the audio delay unit in the treatment 
of stuttering, which afflicts nearly 
1,500,000 Americans, including one out 
of every 100 school children. 

Among noted stutterers of history 
have been Charles Darwin and Charles 
Lamb and, reputedly, Moses. Recent 
examples include Somerset Maugham, 
the late King George VI of England 
and the television star, Gary Moore. 

At present, experiment with the 
audio delay machine are at an early 
stage, and studies are not far enough 
along to indicate how successful the 
new device may be in treating speech 
disorders. 

Seek Basic Information 

The machine now is being used at 
the university and elsewhere to find out 
basic information about people's speech 
habits and how those habits affect 
attitudes, personal adjustment and ac- 
tivities. 

Even at this stage, however, it is 
obvious that the machine is a useful 
psychological tool in creating greater 
understanding between a stutterer and 
a speech therapist, for, said Mr. Hend- 
ricks, "when I am using the machine 
the stutterer knows I am actually stut- 
tering and that I can't help it." 

The stutterer is able to realize that 
the therapist has knowledge of the 
difficulty as one who has experienced 
it and not as an "outsider" with only 
a technical grasp of the problem. 



'Maryland?' 



*1 



Cancer Research 

Dr. Frank Figge Enthusias- 
tic Over "Brighter Experi- 
ment" 

Q>y Alexander Qi^id 

(The Baltimore Xews-Post) 

Expressing considerable hope that 
porphyrin, the substance that 
makes hidden cancers glow like neon 
lights under ultraviolet light, may aid 
further in the treatment of cancer by 
radium and X-ray, Dr. Frank H. J. 
Figge of the University of Maryland 
explained his past, present and future 
studies on the subject. 

The successful experiments on hu- 
man patients were announced by a 
member of Dr. Figge's research team, 
Dr. D. S. Rasmussen-Taxdal, Maryland 
alumnus, in Atlantic City. 

Credits Colleagues 

Dr. Figge gave his colleague full 
credit for initiating and carrying out 
the experiments on eighteen human 
patients in Baltimore. The full results 
of the operations cannot be evaluated 
for years, he said, but the patients are 
alive and apparent successes, surgical- 
ly. 

Explaining that the porphyrin, chem- 
ically known as hematoporphyrin be- 
cause it is made of blood, was used in 
eighteen operations to show doctors the 
definite limits of the tumor they were 
trying to remove, and also to make 
the nearby lymph nodes glow in the 
ultraviolet light so that they, too, could 
be removed, Dr. Figge said: 

"After many years of work, I con- 
fess to a great 'lift' in my spirits when 
I actually saw something which I had 
done only on animal subjects actually 
working out on human patients. 

"The operating surgeons, including 
Dr. Grant Ward of Hopkins, were en- 
thusiastic, too." 

His former student and associate, 
Dr. Rasmussen-Taxdal, is now on the 
staff of the University of California 
hospital in San Francisco, where he is 
hoping to get a new series of experi- 
ments on human patients started. 
A True Researcher 

Yet, Dr. Figge, a true researcher, 
already has his sights trained on the 
future. He said: 

"I am convinced that porphyrin has 
the effect of making tissues more sen- 
sitive to X-ray radiation and radium. 

"We know that porphyrin goes di- 
rectly to the site of cancer, and now 
we are working on a series of patients 
at the University of Maryland Hos- 
pital, to try to see if porhpyrin may 
not 'soften up' the cancerous tissues 
so that less radium and less radiation 
will kill them. 

"These results, like the ultraviolet 
light attempts, won't be really known 
for years, but we are making a start." 

Dr. Figge has, still further in the 
future, another line he is working on. 



it 



He has the theory that, since porphyrin 
goes direct to cancers, why not com- 
bine it with radioactive metals, thus 
using porphyrin plus the metals in 
radiation treatments within the cancer 
itself. 

The first metal used was a series of 
experiments with radioactive zinc in 
animals. Dr. Figg said: 

"The trouble was that the liver got 
rid of the zinc as fast as we could 
add it. 

"Now we are working with other 
metals, metals that the liver cannot 
handle. If we can get these metals 
into the cancers of animals, then we 
can get some radioactive ones from the 
Atomic Energy Commission and try 
them." 

He showed test-tubes in which were 
porphyrin mixed with silver, with gold, 
with tin, and said he was going to try 
them on mice. 

And he is hopeful that he can, event- 
ually, turn the trick. 



'54 Registration 

Mrs. Norma J. Azlein, associate reg- 
istrar, and her staff completed this 
year's statistical tabulation of the en- 
rollment at the University. The total 
enrollment for both the College Park 
and Baltimore campuses has reached 
the 14,884 mark for the first semester 
of the school year 1954-55. Enrollment 
for the same Deriod last year was 
11,178. 

Of this year's total 11,000 are men 
and 3,884 are women. 

At College Park, 8,792 men and 2,976 
women are enrolled for a total of 
11,768. Of this number 940 are seniors; 
1,057 are juniors; 2,138 are sopho- 
mores; 2,696 are freshmen; 112 are 
unclassified; 2,815 are part-time; and 
2,008 are graduate students. 

The College of Special and Continua- 
tion Studies leads the College Park 
schools with a total of 2,503 students. 
There are 2,122 in Arts and Sciences; 
2,008 in Graduate School; 1,561 in 
Business and Public Administration; 
1,205 in the College of Engineering; 
839 in the College of Education; 502 in 
the College of Agriculture; 474 in the 
College of Home Economics; 259 in the 
College of Physical Education and Rec- 
reation; 154 in Military Science; and 
141 in pre-nursing. 

The Baltimore Schools enrolled 3,116 
students which includes 2,208 men and 
908 women. The College of Special and 
Continuation Studies also leads the 
Baltimore schools with a total of 1,085. 
The School of Medicine is next with 435 
students. The School of Dentistry has 
430 students, the Graduate School has 
414, the School of Law has 387, the 
School of Pharmacy has 249, and the 
School of Nursing has 116. 



cial collection in the Engineering and 
Physical Sciences Library at the Uni- 
versity in College Park. 

Professor Born retired last year 
from his position as professor of 
physics at the University of Edinburgh 
and now lives in Western Germany. He 
shared the Nobel Prize in physics this 
year with Professor Walter Bothe of 
Heidelberg University. The award was 
granted for their research into the re- 
lations of matter and energy. 

Professor Born is especially known 
for his important contributions to the 
interpretation of quantum mechanics 
and for his definitive treatise on the 
theory of optics. 

This acquisition by the University 
will be of great value to the Univer- 
sity's recently expanded program in 
physics research and teaching. The col- 
lection will also be of great value to 
scientific historians. 



Max Born Library 

The University of Maryland has ac- 
quired the scientific library of the 
world famous physicist and recent No- 
bel Prize winner, Professor Max Born. 
The volumes in this collection, which 
total 1369, not including reprints and 
special papers, will be kept as a spe- 



Librarians Meet 

Selected trustees of nine county and 
city library systems were among the 
guests of the Maryland Library Asso- 
ciation at their regional dinner meet- 
ing held in the Main Dining Hall. 
The guest speaker was Dr. Wilson 
H. Elkins, President of the University, 
who spoke on "Education and Li- 
braries." 

The meeting was held as part of a 
State-Wide series of meetings planned 
by public and county librarians, accord- 
ing to Mrs. Mary Kenan Hadley, 
librarian of the Prince Georges County 
Memorial Library. The purpose of 
these meetings is to interest Mary- 
land citizens in the proposed state 
legislation to aid public libraries, and 
to encourage active participation at 
the grassroots level. Among the 
counties participating in the regional 
meeting are Prince Georges, Mont- 
gomery, Anne Arundel, Howard and 
Baltimore. 

In addition to Dr. Elkins, other 
speakers included: Miss Mary L. Huber, 
president of the Maryland Library 
Association, who introduced the trust-, 
ees; Miss Nettie B. Taylor, State 
Supervisor of County and Institutional 
Libraries who reviewed the "Present 
Status of Public Libraries," and Mrs. 
F. Cuniberti, who discussed, "What 
Future for Public Libraries in Mary- 
land?" 

"The success of University students 
depends on the habits and use of facili- 
ties offered by libraries," Dr. Elkins 
said. 

He added that colleges must empha- 
size the use of libraries, and that many 
"are guilty of spoonfeeding." In a 
period of educating more and more peo- 
ple, universities must require individ- 
uals to do more themselves. They need 
libraries and a knowledge of them. 

Speaking before the association also 
were: Mrs. Julia Cuniberti, trustee 
from St. Mary's County, Miss Nettie 
Taylor, supervisor of county and in- 
stitutional libraries, and C. Remley, 
trustee of Montgomery County. 

Maryland 



Maryland To Publish World Adas 




Dr. Van Iioycn 



The second volume of a monumental 
"Atlas of the World's Resources" 
prepared by the University of Mary- 
land geography department will reach 
the bookstalls this month. 

The latest book deals with agri- 
culture the world over. 

A previous volume, published in 1952, 
covered the world's mineral resources. 
Still in preparation is a third and final 
book on forest and fish resources. 
A Unique Inventoy 
Dr. William Van Royen, the Dutch- 
born geographer who is author-editor 
of the series, said 
the new atlas gives 
a unique inventory 
of the world's pro- 
duction and econom- 
ic potential. 

Nothing like it 
has been published 
since 1920, he com- 
mented, and the 1920 
volume was a skin- 
ny, incomplete af- 
fair in contrast with 
the new atlas. 
The Van Royen books are not merely 
a series of maps. Just as important 
is the wirtten matter which describes 
resources all over the world. 
A Language Barrier 
To compile this information, Dr. Van 
Royen and his staff had to gather in- 
formation from nations and their geo- 
graphical subdivisions around the 
?lobe. 

Frequently, material arrived written 
n difficult foreign languages. 

Even more of a hurdle than the 
anguage barrier were the various 
Measuring units used in foreign coun- 
tries. These units had to be converted 
nto United States equivalents. 

For example, Dr. Van Royen came 
across the Latin American version of 
;he acre. This unit — called a "tarea" — 
vas factored to fit the acre of the re- 
urns from one South American nation. 
Meant Something Different 
Dr. Van Royen was all set to use 
;he same formula in figuring out sta- 
;istics from another South American 
nation when he discovered that the 
econd country's "tarea" meant a dif- 
ferent quantity of land. 

"That was one of the problems we 
ran into," he commented. 

The Iron Curtain nations, especially 
Russia, presented a difficult problem, 
said Dr. Van Royen. The only detailed 
information on Russia came out in 
;hat nation's 1937 census. 

But by charting certain trends, and 
naking some calculated guesses, Dr. 
Van Royen came up with statistics 
Which he believed to be reasonably 
accurate. 

Siberian Wasteland 

He conceded that efforts to turn Si- 
Jerian wasteland into agricultural 
ireas, if successful, could quickly out- 
jlate his figures. But he also contend- 
id that a dry spell — which is not un- 

'Maryland" 



University To Issue Second 

Volume Of Atlas On World 

Resources. 

3y flodep/t /?. I. £te*ne 
(The Baltimore Bun ) 
usual in that arid area — could make a 
fiasco of the Soviet experiment. 

To complete the first two atlas vol- 
umes, Dr. Van Royen and the geogra- 
phy department had to spend painstak- 
ing hours making new maps. 

Many maps were of the dot variety 
with each dot representing a certain 
amount of rainfall, average production, 
financial yield or some other statistic. 
In a map with thousands of such dots, 
each mark must be counted and 
checked for accuracy. 

In Second Printing 

There also were pattern maps, origi- 
nal base maps and new graphs to be 
prepared. 

The 1952 mineral atlas sold all over 
the world, and is in its second print- 
ing, said Dr. Van Royen. Business 
men, libraries and Government officials 
were prime customers. 

The geographer expects a repetition 
of this sale with the agriculture vol- 
ume. 

The "Atlas of the World's Resources" 
is being produced without special funds 
either from outside foundations or the 
University of Maryland. Proceeds from 
the sale of the book will finance ex- 
pansion of the geography department's 
work. 



Terpolosophy 




A hot head is some- 
times followed by 
cold feet . . . The biggest 
thing some guys ever 
pulled off is their shirt 
. . . An Army surgeon 
performed a major oper- 
ation on a second lieu- 
tenant . . .The hotel 
keeper who could sit on his innstep had 
nothing on the boat-swain who could 
sit on his chest and smoke a pipe . . . 
A great many growl that they never 
get what is due them. They should be 
glad they don't . . . We know a cook 
who is so tender-hearted that he can't 
even whip cream or beat eggs. He 
even cries when he peels onions . . . 
A sailor carries a sea-bag. An elephant 
carries a trunk. A microbe cannes the 
grip. 



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13 



ALUMNI CLUB 

(Continued from Page 9) 
interests. The President, himself has 
already canvassed 350 prospective 
alumni and his goal is 500. Dr. Kerlejza 
aim is to be the hardest and most 
sincere worker in Massachusetts. 

It is anticipated that the next event 
of the club will be a reception for the 
new President of the University. 



BASKETBALL 

(Continued from Page 61) 

The winning basket was a running 
two-handed uppercut shot from under 
the backboard by Bob Kessler. It put 
the Millikanmen in front, 48-46, with 
two minutes to go. 

The Blue Devils, 115-54 conquerors 
of Clemson and a favorite to unseat 
North Carolina State as ACC cham- 
pion, broke up Maryland's freeze num- 
erous times but blew their best chances. 

John Sandbower came off the bench, 
the fourth Maryland player assigned 
to guard Duke's terrific Joe Belmonti 
Sandbower played an important part 
in Maryland's rather startling triumph. 

It was a tremendous early-season 
basketball game and was a tribute to 
the rival coaches, Bud Millikan of 
Maryland and Hal Bradley of Duke. 
They proved that two teams can please 
the spectators although scoring less 
than 100 points combined at a time 
when 100-point scores for a team are 
common. 

Wake Forest 62; Maryland 58 

Wake Forest staged a miraculous 
recovery in the last minutes and 50 
seconds of regulation time and went 
on to hand Maryland its first basket- 
ball defeat, 62-58, in overtime of an 
Atlantic Coast Conference game. Wake 
Forest was six points down with only 
1:50 left to play. 

The Terps, alternately brilliant and 
erratic, outscored Wake Forest from 
the floor, 24 to 18. But the Deacs 
ruined the Millikanmen from the foul 
line, making 26 out of 35 against the 
Terps' 10 out of 16. 

Maryland played its worst ball of 
the season during most of the first 
half. 




State's Attorney 

As authorized by the State's recent 
general election, Governor McKeldin 
appointed three new Circuit Court 
Judges, one of whom, State Senator 
Neil C. Fraley, Garrett County, is a 
University of Maryland graduate. 

Judge Fraley, 60, alumnus of the 
University's School of Law has prac- 
ticed in Oakland, besides being State's 
attorney (1935-1947), attorney to the 
board of county commissioners (1947- 
1951) and chairman of the draft board 
since 1946. 

Judge Fraley did not seek re-election 
to the Senate this year. He will serve 
on the 4th judicial bench. 



Orphan Guests 

One hundred orphans were guests of 
the University sorority and fraternity 
members at a tree-lighting ceremony 
and house parties. Supreme Court 
Justice Tom Clark turned the switch 
to light the 50 foot tree. 

A large Christmas tree was lighted. 
Then, the children went to five sorority 
houses for refreshments and games. 

Northwestern High School Band led 
the parade and the University Glee 
Club also took part. 

Participating sororities were Alpha 
Epsilon Phi, Gamma Phi Beta, Kappa 
Alpha Theta Pi Beta Phi and Sigma 
Kappa. 

Men from Delta Tau Delta, Lambda 
Chi Alpha, Phi Kappa Sigma, Phi Sig- 
ma Kappa and Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
Fraternities aided the coeds in enter- 
taining the orphans. 



Concert 

The University was host to the 
Washington Chamber Music Society of 
Washington, D. C. for a concert in the 
auditorium of the new Student Union 
Building. The program was sponsored 
jointly by the Music Committee of the 
Student Union, the Cultural Committee 
of the Student Government Association 
and the university's Department of 
Music. 

The Washington Chamber Music So- 
ciety was formed this season for the 
purpose of bringing a variety of cham- 
ber music to musical audiences of the 
Washington Area. 



From the "Old Line," '46 

"Why don't you bring your friend 
home once in a while? Are you ashamed 
of him?" 



Income Tax 

Professor S. M. Wedeberg of the 
University of Maryland College of 
Business and Public Administration 
and president of the Maryland Associa- 
tion of Certified Public Accountants, 
Inc., has announced that the annual 
Federal Income Tax Symposium of the 
association would be held on the Uni- 
versity's College Park campus. 

The program featured addresses and 
panel discussions by expert certified 
public accountants and attorneys from 
Washington and the State of Mary- 
land. 

Speakers for the afternoon session 




SUCCESSFUL MAGICIAN 

"Mr. Paynter was explaining how he 
could make a dollar disappear — when 
by golly, Sis, one of 'em did." 



at the University's Student Union 
Building included W. Gibbs McKen- 
ney, Leo C. Eckert, and George M. 
Zinkhan of Baltimore; Edward A. 
White of Washington, D. C; Guy S. 
Kidwell of Hagerstown, Md. and Pro- 
fessor Wedeberg. 

The evening session of the sym- 
posium was held at the University's 
dining hall and included addresses 
by G. B. Tall, assistant manager of 
the Baltimore Social Security' Office; 
Joseph A. Tarr, Louis J. Eberle and 
Ernest E. Wooden of Baltimore, Md. 

The Federal Income Tax Symposium 
is sponsored by the Maryland Associa- 
tion of Certified Public Accountants in 
cooperation with the University of 
Maryland and the District of Columbia 
Institute of Certified Public Account- 
ants. 



D. C. Appointments 

The Commissioners of the District 
of Columbia announce that competi- 
tive written examinations will be held 
during the week of January 10, 1955, 
to assist the Commissioners in select- 
ing individuals to: 

(1) Fill one (1) vacancy in the 
United States Military Academy, 
West Point, New York. 

(2) Fill two (2) vacancies in the 
United States Naval Academy, 
Annapolis, Maryland. 

(3) Compete, under Air Force sup- 
ervision, for the single District 
of Columbia appointment to the 
initial class of the United States 
Air Force Academy, temporarily 
located at Lowry Air Force 
Base, Colorado. 

These examinations will be held for 
the Commissioners by the Board of 
Examiners of the Board of Education 
and are open to all unmarried boys 
who are United States citizens and 
residents of the District of Columbia 
and who will not be less than seventeen 
nor more than twenty-two years of age 
on July 1, 1955. 

Candidates may secure application 
blanks to take the examinations from 
the office of the Secretary, Board of 
Commissioners. Applications will be 
received up to January 3, 1955. 



14 



Maryland 



dditorials 



HARVEY L. MILLER 

Editor 



"Vkat" Rep&d 



Reaction to publicity on the Middle 
States Accreditation Report has 
some of us who work at College Park 
fed up away up to here. 

It seems that all schools, from time 
,to time, are inspected and reported 
j upon by certain authorized units. 

Just like Junior at grade school, even 
if he's a red hot student, the best of 
schools — and in our work that category 
includes Maryland — do not always 
come home with a report card of all 
"A's." 

The Middle States Report consists of 
163 pages. Maryland was "marked 
down" in five subjects with recom- 
mendations for correction. Is that 
bad? 

Naturally, the publicity accorded this 
event disturbed Maryland's Board of 
Regents, the President, as well as 
alumni, faculty and student body. To 
fully understand typical Maryland re- 
action to any attack upon the Univer- 
sity or its activities one would have 
to completely appreciate the degree to 
which loyalty has been developed to 
a high traditional level. 

They know Maryland is a great 
i school, built upon the solid foundation 
of hard work, loyalty and leadership. 
They know Maryland is set to improve 
right along. 

Reports such as the one in question 
are usually kept confidential. Normally 
newspapers wouldn't be interested in 
isuch a subject. 

If any appreciable number of schools 
received perfect reports from their ac- 
creditation boards there would be no 
I need at all for such accreditation or- 
ganizations. 

If it hadn't been for the fact that 
ithe former President of the University 
'was standing for Governor of the State, 
ithe accreditation report would not have 
.made page two of the second news 
section even with the aid of two shoe 
| horns, an extra pair of pants and a 
trick mirror. 



A Lad From Texas 

Much printer's ink has been ex- 
pended in sports columns describing 
how college athletic coaches "go after" 
promising athletes. 

The following factual account of 
how a good athlete from a distant 
state came to matriculate at Maryland 
may be of interest. 

Mr. Dub Rhodes is a well known 
businessman of Abilene, Texas. 

His son, Ronald, was Texas State 
A.A.U. middleweight champion. Mr. 
Rhodes wanted the youngster to at- 

"Marytanf 



tend the best available college that 
helded a boxing team. So he looked 
them over. Accompanied by Mrs. 
Rhodes, the son and a daughter, they 
took a trip for the purpose of in- 
specting universities that had boxing 
teams. 

The first Maryland's boxing coach 
knew of the expedition was when Mr. 
Rhodes walked into the office and 
introduced himself. 

He was shown Maryland's boxing 
set-up in the same manner in which 
he had been shown at schools closer 
to home. 

The Rhodes' chose Maryland. Ron- 
ald boxed three years on Maryland's 
team, one year winning the Southern 
middleweight title, but always giving 
a great account of himself. 

In a letter, his Dad summed up, 
"Ronnie may not have done as well 
at boxing as we had hoped, but he had 
the privilege of attending a great Uni- 
versity which did him a great deal 
of good. We are deeply grateful for 
the University of Maryland." 

Of course Rhodes, like other athletes 
and coaches at Maryland, worked under 
a President, Dr. H. C. Byrd, who knew 
the value of athletics as a part of the 
general education program and taught 
that athletics at their tip-top best were, 
after all, but a means to an end. The 
same is true of Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, 
the new President who, like Dr. Byrd, 
was a great athlete. 

This educational evaluation of ath- 
letics goes back to Lord Wellington's, 
"The Battle of Waterloo was won on 
the playing field of Eton" and General 
McArthur's "Upon the fields of friendly 
strife are sown the seeds which in 
other years, on other fields, will bear 
the fruits of victory." 



Bokay 



From Dr. Thos. B. Symons, member 
of the Board of Regents, former Acting 
President and Dean of the College of 
Agriculture, comes a congratulatory 
letter regarding "Maryland." 

In part, Dr. Symons letter reads: 

"We are giving considerable thought 
to the tremendous work that you are 
doing and the excellence of the articles 
and lay-out that you prepare from 
time to time. Your interesting article 
on " Loyalty" (in the last issue) is a 
gem and illustrates your remarkable 
background and historical references 
that only a man of your ability is able 
to round up in a most satisfying and 
illuminating manner." 

We might add that Dr. Symons' ser- 
vices to the university exemplify ex- 
actly what we meant in the article on 
traditional loyalty at the University of 
Maryland. 





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15 



Dr. Cairns Receives 
National 4-H Alumni 
Recognition Award 

Dr. Gordon M. Cairns, dean of agri- 
culture at the University of Mary- 
land, received the 1954 National 4-H 
Alumni Recognition Award at the 33rd 
National 4-H Club Congress in Chicago. 
He was one of eight former 4-H 
Club members recognized. The award 
is designed to cite 
former 4-H Club 
members whose ser- 
vice records exem- 
plify effective com- 
munity, state or na- 
t i o n a 1 leadership, 
success in their 
chosen careers and 
interest in 4-H and 
similar worthy en- 
deavors. 

Dr. Cairns was 
recommended for 
the award by New 
York State. He was 
reared on a dairy farm in Delaware 
county, New York and was a 4-H club 
member. During his youth he was 
active in 4-H dairy work and won 
numerous state and national honors. 

Prior to college, Dr. Cairns operated 
the home farm for three and a half 
years. He is a graduate of Cornell 
and received his bachelor of science, 
masters and doctorate degrees from 
that institution. 

Dr. Cairns served as a summer as- 
sistant for two years in 4-H livestock 
work in Monroe county, New York, and 
later as a livestock specialist in the 
state. From 1939 to 1945 he served 
as professor and head of the animal 
industry department at the University 
of Maine. 

In 1945 Dr. Cairns came to Mary- 
land as professor and head of the dairy 
department. He was promoted to the 
position of dean of agriculture in 1950 
and has been active in agricultural 
affairs. 




Dean Cairns 



Heart Research 

Dr. Sidney Scherlis, assistant profes- 
sor of medicine at the University of 
Maryland School of Medicine, reported 
experiments resulting in a new ap- 
proach to the treatment of coronary 
disease. 

Dr. Scherlis, speaking before the 
Eastern section of the American Fed- 
eration of Clinical Research, said 
"clinical observation has suggested that 
there are factors other than arterio- 
sclerosis, related to heart attack, such 
as emotional stress and strain and 
other nervous influences." 

Speaking at the Clinical Center of 
the National Institutes of Health in 
Bethesda, Md., he reported on experi- 
ments which he, Dr. R. Adams Cow- 
ley and Dr. George Schimert of the 



University's department of surgery, 
had carried out on dogs in the labora- 
tory at the university medical school 
during the last few years. 

Dr. Scherlis said, "By stimulating 
the nerve going to the heart, Dr. Cow- 
ley and I found it possible to produce 
changes strongly resembling the 
change produced by heart attacks in 
human beings." 

He continued, "There are a great 
many people who are sclerotic but who 
do not have heart attacks. 

"Therefore, it seems that the ap- 
proach to the problem of heart attacks 
should be directed not only toward in- 
fluencing the nervous factors that af- 
fect the heart. 

"In accordance with this theory," he 
said, "Dr. Cowley operated upon three 
people thus far at the University Hos- 
pital, cutting these particular nerves 
going to the heart." 

He went on to say that it is too 
early to draw any far-reaching con- 
clusions, but that at present the op- 
eration seems to have helped the peo- 
ple in reducing the frequency of their 
attacks of heart pains or preventing 
the pain altogether." 

Dr. Scherlis concluded, "The work is 
of interest not only in the operative 
treatment, but because it emphasizes 
a different direction in the approach 
to the problem of precipitation and 
treatment of coronary heart disease." 

Youthful Patient 



tyQmWBurfH 




UP TO DATE 

"Why is he so pleased with himself?" 
"He's got chronic frontal sinusitis." 
"Good Lord! Where did he get that?" 
"From Reader's Digest. Read about 
it last month." 



UNDESIRABLE ART 

"And now, doctor, that I've told you 

I'm going to marry Ruth, there's one 

thing I'd like to get off my chest." 

"I understand, my boy. What is it?" 

"A tattooed heart with the name 

'Mabel' on it!" 




SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY CLINIC 



16 



Maryland 



School of 



Pharmacy 

Adele B. Ballman 



The Alumni Association of the School 
of Pharmacy recently contributed 
$400.00 to be awarded as scholarships 
to undergraduate students of the School 
of Pharmacy. The American Founda- 
tion for Pharmaceutical Education con- 
tributes a matching amount of $400.00, 
which may only be used for juniors and 
seniors who rank in the upper quarter 
of their class. The amount contributed 
by the Alumni Association is available 
to undergraduate students who as high 
school or college students maintain a 
rank in the upper quarter of their 
class. The generous donation of the 
Alumni Association, therefore, makes 
available $800.00 for scholarships in 
the School of Pharmacy. 

These scholarships are separate from 
the American Foundation for Pharma- 
ceutical Education Fellowships which 
are provided for graduate students ma- 
joring in pharmacy, pharmaceutical 
chemistry, pharmacology and pharma- 
cognosy, and are awarded by the 
Foundation, 1507 M Street, N. W., 
Washington 5, D. C. 

Dr. W. Paul Briggs, who received the 
Master of Science degree through grad- 
uate work in the School of Pharmacy, 
is Executive Director of the American 
Foundation for Pharmaceutical Educa- 
tion. "The Bridge Between" written as 
a Career Guidance Conference Address 
in March 1954, is comprehensive with 
regard to the many opportunities avail- 
able to the graduate in pharmacy in 
allied connections, as well as the prep- 
aration for conducting a retail phar- 
macy. Dr. Briggs was also a speaker 
at the Annual Refresher Course at the 
University of Texas on September 30, 
1954, and at that time the subject was 
"Look Twice," which also dealt with 
career guidance in recruiting pharmacy 
students. 

The addresses of Dr. Briggs, to- 
gether with the booklet of the Ameri- 
can Association of Colleges of Phar- 
macy "Shall I Study Pharmacy" are 
valuable contributions when planning 
the recruitment of pharmacy students. 
New Scholarship 

Dean Noel E. Foss has announced 
that the Board of Grants of the Ameri- 
can Foundation for Pharmaceutical 
Education and the Alumni Association 
of the Universitys pharmacy school, 
have made available eight new scholar- 
ships, worth one hundred dollars each, 
to sophomores, juniors and seniors. 

The scholarships will be awarded to 
applicants who have maintained an 
average of "B" or above and who have 
need for financial assistance to com- 
plete their schooling. 

Dean Foss stated that the awards 
will be available beginning the second 
semester of the current academic year. 

Applications should be made to the 
Scholarship Committee of the School of 
Pharmacy and should be filed in the 
dean's office. 

284 Students 

The School of Pharmacy began its 



one hundred and fifteenth year with 
an enrollment of 284 students, 35 of 
whom are graduates. Our undergradu- 
ate body, which was formerly com- 
posed preponderantly of Baltimoreans, 
now represents widely-scattered com- 
munities in Maryland and elsewhere. 
In the Class of 1958 there are stu- 
dents from Annapolis, Centreville, 
Glen Burnie, Hagerstown, Towson, 
Vienna, Mt. Airy, Denton, Aberdeen, 
Princess Anne, Easton, and Rock Hall. 
Out-of-state students (now mainly the 
husbands of Maryland girls) are from 
Washington, D. C, Ohio, Florida, 
Virginia, North Carolina, Pennsyl- 
vania, Maine, New Jersey, and West 
Virginia. 

In the present Freshman Class are 
many relatives of Maryland Alumni. 
Alvin Etzler's son, Edward; Louis 
Oken's son, David; Frank Swiss' 
daughter, Nancy; William B. Hayes' 
daughter, Patricia; Peyton Home's 
son William, are enrolled. Uncles 
and cousins are too numerous to 
mention. 

New Scholarships 

Through the generosity of the Board 
of Grants of the American Founda- 
tion for Pharmaceutical Education and 
the Alumni Association of the School 
of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland, eight new scholarships, 
worth one hundred dollars each, will be 
open to deserving Sophomores, Juniors 
and Seniors maintaining a scholastic 
average of "B" or above. The scholar- 
ships are in part available during the 
second semester of the current aca- 
demic year. Applications should be filed 
in the Dean's Office at the School of 
Pharmacy. 



Sez Testudinette: 

A man should 
listen and 
learn for 25 years, 
speak his mind for 
10, then shut up . . . 
Some people feel 
it's bull-headedness 
when you have it, 
and self-confidence 
when they have it 
. . . be wiser than 
other people if you 
can — but don't tell 
them so . . . most 
winning teams first 
learned why they 
lost . . . Will the fellows who tell us how 
they journey to the far comers of the 
globe please explain how come a globe 
has corners . . . The girl who insists 
she wants a man who is "square, up- 
right, and grand" is asking the im- 
possible. Try it on your piano. Can 
you. get a piano "square, upright and 
grand?" That's three pianos, and it 
takes three guys the same way . . . 
Ah ha! You tellum, bath tub, you've 
seen EVERYTHING! . . . George 
Washington was a lucky man. When 
Martha found a hair on his coat he 
could say it was from his wig. 




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"Maryland" 



17 



"Up and Down We Go" 




AUTHOR AND CONTRIBUTORS 

Left: — Maryland alumna, Ruth Paterson Chappell, one of the contributors 
to the book "Up and Down We Go," with 21 month old son, Chris. 

Center: — Mrs. Laura Pendleton MacCartney, author of the book, of which 
she is holding a copy. 

Right: — Mrs. Jack (Cecile) Barnes, Maryland graduate, who authored the 
ice cream song pictured top and bottom. 



College of 



Education 



Book For Kiddies 

Because much of the text and most 
of the art for "Up and Down We 
Go" was supplied by the University 
of Maryland students, Professor Edna 
B. McNaughton, Childhood Education, 
is justifiably proud of a review titled 
"EVEN SANTA WILL SING," under 
the by-line of critic Paul Hume, of 
the Washington Post Times Herald. 
The article follows: 

Even Santa Will Sing 
By Paul Hume 
" 'Up and Down We Go' is the name 
of a book of songs for young children. 



"Few sentences could give you less 
of an impression of the beauty and 
immense imagination to be found 
within the covers of a new, richly 
illustrated book, published recently by 
the Willis Music Company of Cin- 
cinnati. Laura Pendleton MacCarteney 
of Washington is responsible for the 
book, and she gives credit to the 
"Nursery School-Kindergarten Educa- 
tion students of the University of 
Maryland who have helped me to work 
out these patterns of language, music 
and design." 

"You may have seen the book during 
last week's Book Fair. Whether you 
did or not, it is a book that you will 
want for your children and grand- 
children. 

"Pushing 39 myself, I come back 
to it over and over with reactions I 
cannot quite date. I love it. It ha"s 
pictures from which you can sing 




the songs printed on the opposite page* 
without any reference to the actual 
notes at all. If you are clever, that is. 
Rhythm, relative pitch, intervals, and 
the whole essential shape and size 
of songs are reproduced in leaping 
sheep, bouncing clowns, draggin' wag- 
ons, and flying kites. 

"Signora Montessori would love it, 
too, for it is an amazing extension 
of her basic philosophy about bodily 
movements, rhythm, and spatial re- 
lationships. 

"This book should be under every 
Christmas tree, right next to Simon 
and Schuster's music box, The Chil- 
dren's Introduction to the Instruments 
of the Orchestra." 

Dr. Wilbur Devilbiss, Dean and Pro- 
fessor of the University of Maryland's 
College of Education 
since 1951, will suc- 
ceed Dr. J. D. Black- 
well as president of 
State Teachers Col- 
lege at Salisbury, 
effective in 1955, the 
State Board of Edu- 
cation has a n- 
nounced. 

Dr. Blackwell's 
request for retire- 
ment has been ap- 
Dr. Devilbiss proved for June 30, 
1955. 

Dean Devilbiss was born in Frederick 
County, January 15, 1904. He gradu- 
ated from Frederick High School in 
1921, Western Maryland College in 
1925 and later took graduate work at 
the University of Maryland. He re- 
ceived a master of arts degree in 1935 
and earned a doctor of education de- 
gree in 1946 at George Washington 
University. 

He began teaching at Mardela High 
School in Wicomico County in 1925. He, 
taught at Middeltown and Frederick 
High Schools and became principal of 
Brunswick High in September of 1932. 

Dr. Devilbiss became principal of 
Frederick High in 1939. In 1942 he 
joined the State Department of Edu- 
cation as supervisor of high schools 
and later as supervisor of teacher and 
higher education. From there he went 
to the University of Maryland, in 1951. 

Professor Byrne Speaks 

Richard Hill Byrne, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Education, Counselor Trainer, 
addressed the annual conference of 
Maryland Pupil Personnel Workers 
sponsored by the State Department 
of Education. His topic was "Pupil 
Personnel Relationships to Other Pu- 
pil Services," and his address was fol- 
lowed by a panel discussion of the 
topic. 

Prof. Byrne also has been appointed 
recently to a committee sponsored by 
the State Department of Education 
to weigh the nature of guidance phi- 
losophy and activities in Maryland's 
schools, which activity is to lead to 
the publication of a pamphlet describ- 
ing guidance procedures suggested for 
Maryland's schools. 



18 



Maryland 



Practice Teaching Begins 




STUDENT TEACHING, COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Left to right: Dean Wilbur Devilbiss, Associate Professor Glenn O. Blough, 
Elizabeth Foster, Phyllis Myers, Elizabeth Whetzel, Margaret King, Mary 
Melcher, and Ruth Lipsitz. 

With these six student teachers the University of Maryland began the 
practice teaching phase of its new undergraduate elementary education program. 
'Tt's hard work but I like it," said Miss Lipsitz. Miss Myers commented, "It's 
gratifying to see the children's progress." Similar comments from the other 
rospective teachers indicated that they too made wise decisions when they 
elected to teach in the elementary school. 

One hundred thirty-one students are currently enrolled in this new offering 
leading to a degree in elementary education. The University is establishing a 
urriculum and work laboratory for the use of these students in which they 
will become acquainted with the newest in text books and other curriculum 
materials, learn to perform science experiments, do construction work with tools, 
use art materials to express ideas in social studies and other learning areas 
and have other first-hand experience that will prepare them for successful 
aching. "It is one of our new ventures which will make the School of Education 
iter serve the needs of our State and generally help to alleviate the advantage 
f teachers in the elementary school," said Dean Devilbiss. 



On Arabia 

Dr. Donald Maley, Department of 
Industrial Education, addressed the In- 
dustrial Education Association meet- 
ing and described his recent trip to 
Saudi Arabia. Dr. Maley taught a 
three-week audio visual education 
course at Dhahran during the summer. 
While there, Dr. Maley gave three maj- 
or addresses before adult audiences in 
Lach of the three Arabian-American 
Dil Company centers. 

Elected President 

Dr. R. Lee Hornbake, Department 
•if Industrial Education, was recently 
elected president of the Maryland Vo- 
cational Association at its fall meeting 
Baltimore. 



Dr. Shoemaker 

: The brick wall along Baltimore 
Boulevard is being heightened. There 
will also be new insets. 
| Dr. Mark Shoemaker, University 
andscape architect explained that sign 
joards identifying the University will 
)e placed in these insets. 

Plans are also being made for gates 
so that students going to classes from 
Fraternity Row will no longer have 
to take a running start and hurdle the 
wall. 

Dr. Shoemaker, who is in charge of 
ill outdoor improvements also designed 
;he fountain setting in front of the 
lew Math Building. 

Maryland 



Yearbooks Wanted 

Efforts are still being made to com- 
plete a set of Yearbooks for the Alum- 
ni Office. This publication, started in 
1897, was first known as the "Reveille" 
and later as the "Terrapin." If there 
are any copies of these Yearbooks in 
alumni homes which are unused or 
not needed, rest assured they will be 
most welcome at the Alumni Office. We 
will gladly pay postage bills if you 
will either send them to us or let us 
know where they are available. 

The Library has also indicated a 
number of publications which they 
would like to have to complete partial 
sets. You can notify the Alumni Office 
if you have any of these available for 
the University. 

Bones, molars and briefs — 1901. 

"M" book— 1901 through 1953-54. 

Maryland alumni news — November, 
1942; May, 1953; September-October, 
1948, v. 19, No. 9; January-February, 
1950, v. 21, No. 2; and November- 
December, 1951, v. 23, No. 1. 

Old Line— v. 1-15; v. 16, No. 2, 3, 5; 
v. 17, No. 1, 3, 4. 

Reveille— v. 1, 1897; v. 3, 1899; v. 4, 
1900; v. 10 through 14, 1906-1910; v. 
18, 1915; and v. 27 through 29, 1928- 
1930. 

Terra Mariae— 1909; 1910; 1915; 
1925. 



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School of 



Medicine 

Dr. John Wagner 




Dr. Arnold 



President Wilson H. Elkins, and the 
Board of Regents have announced 
the appointment of Dr. James G. 
Arnold, Jr., formerly associate profes- 
sor of neurological surgery of the 
School of Medicine, to professor of 
neurological surgery and chairman of 
the department. 

Dr. Arnold is one of the pioneers in 
chemotherapy of infectious diseases of 
the central nervous 
system and an au- 
thority on surgery 
of the spine and spi- 
nal cord. 

Born in 1904 in 
Atlanta, Georgia, he 
received his prelimi- 
nary education at 
Furman University 
and the University 
of North Carolina 
from which he was 
graduated in 1925 
with an A.B. de- 
degree. Dr. Arnold received his doctor- 
ate in medicine from the Johns Hop- 
kins Medical School in 1929. 

Following his graduation he served 
one year as resident in tuberculosis at 
the Baltimore City Hospital which was 
followed by an assistant residency and 
residency in medicine at the same in- 
stitution. In 1932 he became interested 
in neurology and for the next three 
years served as a Hitchcock Fellow in 
neuropathology at the University of 
Maryland, becoming the first neuro- 
pathologist and one of the co-founders 
of this particular division of the 
School of Medicine. The new ap- 
pointee took his post graduate studies 
at the University of London at the 
National Hospital for Neurologic dis- 
eases in 1934. For a number of years 
he practiced clinical neurology and was 
very active in teaching this specialty. 
Dr. Arnold became interested in 
neurological surgery in 1939 and joined 
the resident staff of University Hospi- 
tal serving first as an assistant resident 
in general surgery and finally as resi- 
dent in neurological surgery. He com- 
pleted his training in 1944. 

The new neurological survery chair- 
man's scientific investigations have in- 
cluded some pioneer and original work 
concerning the use of sulfonamides in 
the treatment of pyogenic meningitis 
being one of the original contributions 
which heralded the chemotherapeutic 
era. In recent years his attention has 
been turned largely to problems of the 
spine and he has contributed a number 
of important papers and discussions to 
the knowledge of these complicated 
conditions. Dr. Arnold is also well 
known as an authority on neurological 
diagnosis and as a consultant. 

He is a member of the Medical and 
Chirurgical Faculty, the American 
Medical Association, the Southern Med- 
ical Association, the Harvey Cushing 
Society, the Southern Neurosurgical 
Society and the Southern Surgical As- 
sociation. 



20 



Dr. Woodward Honored 

Dr. Theodore E. Woodward has been 
awarded a doctor of science degree by 
the Board of Trustees of Franklin and 
Marshall College, his Alma Mater. 

Dr. Woodward's citation stated that 
the award had been made in recogni- 
tion of his accomplishments as a 
"physician, consultant, research spe- 
cialist, medical adviser, and above all 
as a teacher in the most benevolent of 
all medical areas — preventive medi- 
cine." 

Dr. Phillips, Franklin and Marshall 
secretary of the faculty, reading from 
the citation, said "Your many articles 
in leading medical journals and your 
contributions to significant textbooks 
provide ample evidence of your emi- 
nence in your field; your appointments 
as consultant to the Walter Reed Medi- 
cal Center, the Army Medical Service 
Graduate School, the Army Chemical 
Center and the Surgeon-General's Office 
as well as many civilian agencies attest 
to the high esteem with which you are 
held by your colleagues. And your 
most recent achievement, your appoint- 
ment as professor and head of the De- 
partment of Medicine of the University 
of Maryland, has come in recognition 
of your excellence as a teacher." 

Dr. Woodward's degree was con- 
ferred at the Founders Day Convoca- 
tion in celebration of the 168th year of 
the founding of Franklin and Marshall 
College at Lancaster, Pa. 

Birth Of A Baby 

The story of the greatest miracle 
of all, the birth of a baby, was told 
in detail on the University's School of 
Medicine TV series "TV-M.D." 

The staff recreated in full the events 
that take place from the time a pro- 
spective mother enters the hospital to 
have her baby until the baby is born 
and under care in the hospital nursery. 

Every effort was made to present 
the story in faithful detail and the 
program was one of the most absorb- 
ing in "TV-M.D.'s" serialized account 
of the growth and development of 
man. 

Kraut Scholarship 

Dean H. Boyd Wylie has announced 
that Dr. Arthur N. Kraut of Jersey 
City, has established a student loan 
fund of $5,000 at the School of Medi- 
cine. 

In a letter to Dr. Wylie, Dr. Kraut 
stated that he had set up the fund "as 
a tangible expression of my apprecia- 
tion for what the School of Medicine 
has done for me and as a memorial to 
my parents I wish to establish at the 
medical school a student loan fund to 
be knowTi as the William and Sarah 
Kraut Student Loan Fund." 

The Scholarship and Loan Commit- 
tee of the School of Medicine will be 
the administrator of the new fund. 
Drug Addiction Film 

The Federal Bureau of Narcotics and 
the Department of Pharmacology of 
the University's School of Medicine 
jointly produced a motion picture en- 
titled "Drug Addiction, A Medical 
Hazard." 

In ancient times, before the dis- 
covery of anesthesias, orientals dis- 
covered the pain relieving properties 

Maryland 



of opium. Later other narcotics were 
found to possess the same properties. 
While initially used to relieve pain nar- 
cotics present the tremendous problem 
of habitualness. Realizing the need for 
informational and educational improve- 
ment the University and the Bureau 
of Narcotics have attempted through 
the film to sound a forceful warning. 

Commissioner Anslinger and Dr. 
John Krantz, professor of pharma- 
cology at the university's School of 
Medicine conducted nearly two decades 
of experiments in narcotic education. 

A case was taken from the files of 
the Narcotic Commissioner of a man 
addicted to narcotic drugs. He becomes 
successful but owing to pressure of 
duties, unbridled ambition, desire to 
' succeed professionally and socially, 
some personality defect from which 
no one is entirely immune, nervous ex- 
haustion and physical fatigue, he re- 
sorts to the use of morphine. In addi- 
tion, he was obsessed with the idea that 
knowledge of the drug would allow him 
to remain victorious over it. He soon 
falls prey to the ravages of drug ad- 
diction, — his business disappears and 
his family becomes estranged. Then 
the long arm of the Federal govern- 
ment seizes him. He is sent to the 
narcotic rehabilitation hospital at Lex- 
ington, and released after one year of 
rehabilitation. His business gone, his 
family abandoned, he finds work as a 
garage attendant. This new occupation 
offered him no challenge and emotion- 
ally he could not forget the early days 
of drug addiction where anxiety was 
superimposed by a tranquility produced 
jby morphine. He obtained morphine 
through illicit channels, was caught 
stealing a doctor's book from a car, 
and sent to the penitentiary, where the 
film ends, showing the man in the 
horrors of the withdrawal syndrome. 
The film ends with the words of the 
Narcotic Commissioner: 

"Ladies and Gentlemen: This is not 
fiction, this is the actual course of 
events. This is the usual way in which 
persons become addicted. Stress, strain, 
overwork, drink, unbridled ambition, an 
attitude of being able to win in a battle 
in which there is no victory. These to- 
gether with some personality defect 
from which no one is immune, may lead 
to addiction; to no uncertain destruc- 
tion. There is only ONE cure for addic- 
tion — don't let it happen to you." 

Freshmen Reception 

The medical alumni and the School 
of Medicine were hosts to the freshman 
class. The reception was held in the 
j nurses' dining room. 

During the affair the students were 
j given an opportunity to meet Dr. Wil- 
liam S. Stone, director of medical edu- 
cation and research, Dean H. Boyd 
Wylie, department heads, and faculty. 

Dr. Doshay Speaks 

Dr. Lewis J. Doshay (M.D. '22) 
addressed the annual meeting of the 
Maryland Academy of General Prac- 
tice. His subject was Parkinsonism. 
iHe discussed anatomy, physiology, 
j course, and treatment of this disorder. 



Nursing Director 

Dr. William S. Stone, University of 
Maryland's director of medical edu- 
cation and research, announced that a 
position of director of nursing service 
had been created at University Hos- 
pital, and stated, "I am pleased to 
announce at this time the appointment 
of Miss Aurelia C. Willers, R.N., to 
the newly created position of director 
of nursing service." 

He said further, "Heretofore, the 
administrative positions of dean of 
the school of nursing and director of 
nursing service have been combined in 
one person. During the past ten years, 
the dual position has been held by 
Dean Florence N. Gipe. Since the 
advent of the four-year degree course 
in the School of Nursing, there has 
been an increasing realization by all 
concerned that responsibilities of the 
position of dean were such as to re- 
quire the full and undivided attention 
of one person. Toward this end," he 
concluded, "the position of director of 
nursing service was created." 

Miss Wilier is a native of Indiana 
and received her B.S. degree from 
Indiana Unversity. She was graduated 
from the Indiana University School of 
Nursing in 1930. Appointed as assis- 
tant head nurse at Riley Hospital in 
1930, she became head nurse in 1932. 
From 1932 to 1933 she was employed as 
clinical instructor at the Indiana Uni- 
versity School of Nursing. In 1938 
she assumed an additional assignment 
of Nursing Arts instructor. 

Between 1942 and 1943, Miss Willers 
was recruiting nurse at the General 
Hospital of the Indiana University 
University Medical Center. She be- 
came chief nurse No. 32 of the United 
States Army Nurse Corps in 1943 
and served in that capacity until late 
in 1945. For her distinguished foreign 
war record, a part of which was under 
enemy bombing, she was awarded a 
Bronze Star. 

The new appointee was employed 
as assistant director of nursing service 
at John Sealy Hospital in Galveston, 
Texas in 1946. She was appointed as 
director of that hospital's nursing ser- 
vice in 1947 a position she held until 
her present appointment. 

Miss Willers is a member of the 
Indiana State Nurses Association and 
the American Nurses Association. 



Coming Events 

Formal inauguration ceremonies for 
Dr. Wilson Homer Elkins, as President 
of the University of Maryland will 
be held on the College Park campus 
on Charter Day, January 20, 1955. 

Dedication of the Engineering group 
as the Glenn L. Martin Institute of 
Technology and ceremonies attendant 
thereto will be conducted on Maryland 
Day, March 25, 1955. 

Dedication of the Asphalt Institute 
on the College Park campus is planned 
for May 5, 1955. 



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Program Approved 

The Maryland Board of Examiners of 
Nurses has approved the program 
ox practical nursing in the School of 
Nursing. 

The Board stated that graduates of 
the University of Maryland program 
will be eligible to take the Maryland 
State Board examination "for licensure 
as practical nurses in Maryland." 

The practical nursing program is the 
first course of its type in the State of 
Maryland to be set up within a uni- 
versity. The one year curriculum will 
prepare students who wish to qualify 
as a licensed practical nurse. 

Student selection of the new school 
has and will be based on preliminary 
tests given by Mr. Albert Packard, 
psychologist, with regard to physical 
and mental stability and on the indi- 
vidual's interest in people. Completion 
of a high school course is desirable but 
experience will be evaluated. 

Dean Florence M. Gipe announced 
that twenty students from Baltimore 
City and one student from Glen 
Burnie, were accepted in the initial 
class of the Division of Practical 
Nursing of the university's School of 
Nursing. 

Volunteer Nurse Program 

With the approval of the Com- 
missioner of Health, Baltimore City 
Health Department Dr. Huntington 
Williams, the Bureau of Public Health 
Nursing has recently inaugurated a 
Volunteer Program. Realizing the ex- 
isting nurse shortage and in a sincere 
effort to keep its nursing services on a 
high level, interested citizens are being 
recruited and placed in clinic and 
school areas to assist the nurses with 
their most important and diversified 
duties. 

The program in addition to aiding 
the nurses will, it is hoped, produce 
a group of informed lay people who 
will be able to understand and interpret 
the city's health program. 

Very fine cooperation is being given 
the organization by representatives 
from the Volunteer Services of the 
American Red Cross, Baltimore Chap- 
ter, as well as by many other inter- 
ested and very efficient lay people. 

Groups of interested mothers give 
valuable service in the public schools 
by conducting the Massachusetts Vision 
Tests. Other types of surveys are 
conducted by groups of parents when- 
ever the need arises. 

More volunteers are needed as 
nurses-aides, clinical assistants and 
clerks. 

The program is under the chair- 
manship of Mrs. E. Elizabeth Hipp. 
Mrs. Hipp was E. Elizabeth Roth, 
Class of 1929. 

Any interested individuals or groups 
may call Mrs. Hipp at Pl-2-2000, 
Extension 405, for further information. 
To Seattle 

Miss Barbara M. Ardis, class of '45 
who has been stationed at Public 
Health Service Hospital, Baltimore, has 




Miss Ardis 



22 



been transferred to the USPHS Hospi- 
tal, Seattle, Washington, in the position 
of Evening Supervisor. 

After graduation she entered the 
Public Health Service in Baltimore and 
remained there for 17 months begore 
being transferred to Martha's Vine- 
yard, Mass. While there Miss Ardis 
received her Head 
Nurse rating. At the 
Vineyard, Miss Ar- 
dis had the oppor- 
tunity to work with 
one of the patients 
in an experiment 
with sawdust in 
treating of a decub- 
itus ulcer. The ex- 
periment was so 
successful it pre- 
cipated the article 
which was sub- 
mitted and published in The American 
Journal of Nursing. 

Miss Ardis has been the editor of the 
Nursing News for Maryland Maga- 
zine for the past two years. She is 
a member of the University of Mary- 
land Nurses Alumni, the District No. 2 
Maryland State Nurses Association, 
and of the University of Maryland 
Alumni Club of Baltimore. She has 
been very active in the University of 
Maryland Nurses Alumni and during 
the past year was chairman of the very 
successful bazaar when the nurses 
raised funds for scholarships. 

Air Stewardess 

Nancy Jo Kohlhoss, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles E. Kohlhoss, of 
Poolesville, Md., has become a steward- 
ess for American Airlines based in 
New York. She attended the Univer- 
sity of Maryland School of Nursing. 

Alumni News Notes 

Captain and Mrs. Donald W. Kimlin 
have two children, Jean, age seven, 
and Donald W., Jr., age six. Captain 
Kimlin is stationed at For Bragg, N.C. 
Mrs. Kimlin was Nellie Ferrell Gard- 
ner, Class 1940. Mrs. Nellie Ferrell 
Gardner, Class 1905, is the Mother of 
Mrs. Kimlin, and is living in the 
William's Home on Longhorne Road, 
Lynchburg, Va. 

Lt. Joan E. Bower, (N.C.) USN, 
Class 1949, writes us "I have recently 
returned from spending eighteen 
months in Japan, and it really feels 
good to be back in the U.S.A." Lt. 
Bower is stationed at the U.S. Marine 
Hospital, Quantico, Va. 

Captain and Mrs. Frank Baker, Jr., 
are stationed at Elmendorf Air Force 
Base. Mrs. Baker writes "This is lo- 
cated just outside of Anchorage, Alas- 
ka, and we are finding life up here 
real interesting, sorry we won't make 
the banquet this year." Mrs. Baker 
was La Rue Kenney, Class 1947. 

Mary Huddleson, Class 1952, is an 
Ensign in the U.S.N.R., and is sta- 
tioned with the U.S. Naval Hospital, 
Oceanside, California. 

Betty Lou Watts, Class 1950, writes, 
"I have been working with the govern- 
ment at the Gorgas Hospital on the 
Pacific side of the Canal since 1951, 

Maryland 



mainly in Pediatrics and Obstetrics. 
The hospital is quite beautiful, sur- 
rounded by coconut and palm trees, 
and overlooking the Pacific Ocean. 1 
love it." 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip D. Harcum are 
living at 2300 Washington Ave., New- 
port News, Va. Mrs. Harcum was 
Alice S. McKeel, Class 1933. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph E. Bankert, and 
their son, moved into their new home, 
410 Garland Road, Northwood, Wil- 
mington, Delaware, in October 1953. 
Mrs. Bankert was Eva Laigneil, Class 
1950. 

A little note from Mrs. Paul L. 
Heininger saying, "I am so sorry I 
can't be with you at the banquet, but 
my husband (Dr. Paul L. Heininger), 
has tc go in the Navy on May 17th. 1 
hope that you have a splendid time. 
My thoughts will be with you, and I 
send my best wishes to each and every 
one of you." Mrs. Heininger was Mary 
C. Green, Class 1946. 

Mrs. Dorothy Calaiforo, Class 1951, 
writes, "I left Baltimore Sept. 9, to an 
assignment at the U.S. Public Health 
Service Field Station in Kansas City, 
Mo., in the Communicable Disease 
Unit. I accepted an appointment as a 
Commissioned Officer in the Service 
following my graduation from the 
School of Public Health University of 
Minnesota this past June. My work 
here is as a Public Health Nurse in the 
epidemic control and investigation and 
research." 

Captain and Mrs. William Kaufman, 
and their young son Thomas William, 
returned in May from Japan, where 
they were stationed for two years. 
Thomas William was born on April 
2, 1954, in the Tokyo Army Hospital. 
The Kaufmans are stationed at Camp 
Stewart, Georgia. Mrs. Kaufman was 
Margaret 0. Stein, Class 1947. 

Mrs. Williams Sites Kiser, left 
Baltimore on October 18th, to join her 
husband 1st Lt. Kiser. Mrs. Kiser 
may be reached at the following ad- 
dress: c/o 1st Lt. William Sites 
Kiser, AO 2261657, Headquarters 7221 
- S. T. Support Squadron, APO 118, 
■ Box No. 18, c/o Postmaster, New 
York, N.Y. Mrs. Kiser graduated in 
1947. The former Jean Crow, she 
I was "Miss Maryland" in 1949. 
For Scholarship 

The Nurses' Alumnae Association 
engaged the entire capacity of the 
Vagabond Theater in Baltimore for two 
performances of "The Enchanted," a 
comedy by Jean Giraudoux. 

Ticket proceeds were used for the 

annual nurses' alumnae scholarship 

given to a University of Maryland 

nursing graduate for further work in 

!the field. 



Cello Concert 

A cello concert was held in the music 
room of the Students Activities Build- 
ing. Jointly sponsored by Music Com- 
mittee of the Student Union, the Cul- 
tural Committee of SGA and the uni- 
versity's Department of Music, the 
concert featured artists Jerome Jeli- 
nek, solo cellist for the Naval Academy 
and Thelma Stein, pianist. 

Maryland 



ncuuEST cAmpus 

ADDITIOn 
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. . . SPACIOUS NEW 
STUDENT ACTIVITIES BUILDING 



The steel backbone for the Student Activi- 
ties Building is a living testimony to the 
strength, beauty and versatility of steel. In 
this case ... as in so many other major jobs 
on the University of Maryland campus . . . 
the steel was fabricated and erected by 
Dietrich Brothers, Inc. 

The graceful steel arches span 241 feet and 
rise 95 feet from floor to crown. The building 
is 338 feet long . . . and provides a multi- 
purpose indoor area with 200,000 square feet 
of floor space. It will be used for large as- 
semblies, varsity athletics and many other stu- 
dent activities. 

Baltimore Contractors constructed the build- 
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Dentistry 

Dr. Jos. C. Biddix 
Gardner P. H. Foley 




Distinguished Alumni 

One hundred and eighty alumni 
staged a breakfast meeting 
during the 95th annual convention 
of the American Dental Association, 
Miami Beach, Florida. Among the 
former students of 
Maryland's dental 
school were schools 
of dentistry Deans 
Dr. Frank Houghton 
of Loyola Univer- 
sity, New Orleans, 
La.; Dr. Harry B. 
McCarthy of Bay- 
lor University; Dr. 
J. Ben Robinson of 
the University of 
West Virginia; and 
Dr. Myron S. Aisen- 
berg of the University of Maryland. 
A Maryland alumnus, Dr. Dan Lynch 
of Washington, D.C., was re-elected 
president. Meeting concurrently with 
the Dental Association at Miami Beach 
was the American College of Dentists. 
Dr. James H. Ferguson of Baltimore, 
Maryland, also an alumnus of Mary- 
land, was elected president. 

It was "Maryland Day" in Miami 
with two Maryland alumni elected 
presidents and four deans present who 
are Maryland alumni. 

Alumni Breakfast, Miami 
One hundred and twenty-six alumni 
attended the fourth in the series of 
annual breakfasts arranged by the 
National Alumni Association and held 
in conjunction with 
the meetings of the 
American Dental 
Association at Mi- 
ami. Like the pre- 
vious affairs held 
in Washington, St. 
Louis and Cleveland, 
the Miami event 
was marked by the 
enthusiastic gather- 
ing of the B.C.D.S. 
clan, who relished 
Dean Aisenberg heartily the fine op- 
portunity to review old acquaintances 
and make new friendships. Albert 
Cook '33, President of the National 
Alumni Association, presided. Among 
the many non-alumni guests were Mrs. 
E. Benton Taylor, of Baltimore, donor 
of the Luther B. Benton Scholarship; 
Miss Katharine Toomey, Administra- 
tive Assistant of the School and great 
contributor to the welfare of the Asso- 
ciation; Miss B. Olive Cole, Professor 
Emeritus of the School of Pharmacy; 
and Dr. Richard Leonard, of Balti- 
more, a graduate of Indiana who is 
an honorary alumnus of the B.C.D.S., 
where he has lectured on Public 
Health Dentistry for many years. 

The alumni present came from twen- 
ty-three states, Puerto Rico and the 
District of Columbia. Forty-one classes, 
from, 1905 through 1954, had at least 
one member on hand for this annual 




function, with both 1925 and 1951 
having delegations of nine. Maryland 
(48), Florida (21) and Puerto Rico 
(11) were particularly well repre- 
sented. The names, the Classes and 
present practice locations or service 
assignments of all who attended the 
breakfast are given below: — 

1905— John C. Allen, Wilbraham, 
Mass. 

1908^J. E. Funderburk, Cheraw, 
S. C. 

1911 — E. Harvey Richmond, Windsor 
Locks, Conn. 

1912 — Joaquin Fernandez-Carballo, 
San Juan, P. R. 

1914— Harry A. Dochelli, Peters- 
burg, Va.; J. Ben Robinson, Morgan- 
town, W. Va. 

1915 — James H. Ferguson, Baltimore. 

1917 — Coleman T. Brown, Tampa, 
Fla.; E. A. Coble, Easton, Md.; Morris 
Cramer, Baltimore; Frank J. Hough- 
ton, New Orleans, La. 

1918— Edwin G. Gail, Baltimore; C. 
F. Maristany, Ponce, P. R.; C. A. 
Thomas, Wilmington, N. C. 

1919— Arthur C. Muhlbach, Balti- 
more. 

1921 — Louis M. Cantor, New Haven, 
Conn. 

1922 — M. S. Aisenberg, Baltimore; 
Winfield J. Atno, Newark, N. J.; L. 
Lynn Emmart, Baltimore; John A. 
Sigler, Towson, Md. 

1923— W. V. Adair, Baltimore; Harry 
B. McCarthy, Dallas, Texas. 

1924 — Cristino Munoz, Juana Diaz, 
P. R. 

1925— E. E. Cosimi, San Juan, P. R.; 

B. A. Dickson, Marion, N. C; Clifford 

C. Higby, Clermont, Fla.; Daniel F. 
Lynch, Washington, D. C; Frank C. 
McCrystle, Towson, Md.; George 
McEvoy, Stamford, Conn.; George D. 
Resh, Hampstead, Md.; Louis Ulanet, 
Newark, N. J.; H. B. Wood, Cumber- 
land, Md. 

1926 — Walter L. Badger, Birming- 
ham, Ala.; Roy H. Bridger, Silver 
Spring, Md.; J. Harold Klock, Miami 
Beach, Fla.; Harry Levin, Baltimore; 
Ward Newell, St. Augustine, Fla. 

1927 — James Holdstock, Tampa, Fla. 

1928 — Benjamin A. Brown, Atlantic 
City, N. J.; Elmer F. Corey, Baltimore; 
Meyer Eggnatz, Miami Beach, Fla.; 
Francisca Guerra, Santurce, P. R.; A. 
Harry Ostrow, Washington, D. C. 

1929 — George B. Clendenin, Bethesda, 
Md.; Edward C. Dobbs, Baltimore; 
Fred S. Harold, New Haven, Conn.; 
Max N. Matzkin, Waterbury, Conn.; 
Kyrle W. Preis, Baltimore; John H. 
Sharpley, Baltimore; John V. D. Sher- 
lock, South River, N. J.; S. Lloyd Wolf, 
Shinnston, W. Va. 

1930 — John F. Maguire, Wilmington, 
Del. 

1931 — Christian L. Curry, Shippens- 
burg, Pa.; Jorge de Aldrey, San Juan, 
P. R.; Ernest B. Nuttall, Baltimore. 

1932 — Irving Abramson, Baltimore; 
Edgar L. Bessette, Cranston, R. I.; 
C. E. Broadrup, Frederick, Md.; Jesse 
Englander, Bridgeport, Conn.; John H. 
Michael, Baltimore. 

1933— Albert C. Cook, Cumberland, 
Md.; Lewis Goldstein, Jamesburg, N. 
J.; Charles E. McGarry, Essex, Md.; 
Leon Seliman, Baltimore. 



24 



Maryland 



1934— L. W. Bimestefer, Dundalk, 
Md.; Ernesto Davila-Diez, San Juan, 
P. R.; Arthur Josephson, Newport, 
R. I.; William Schunick, Baltimore. 

1935 — John Anzalone, Baltimore; Leo 
Minkoff, Miami, Fla.; Gerald Shoben, 
Baltimore. 

1936 — Eugene J. Dionne, Fall River, 
Mass. 

1937 — B. W. Miksinski, Baltimore. 
1938— James T. Cabler, Snow Hill, 
Md. 

1939 — Harry C. Grove, Hagerstown, 
Md.; W. Edgar Johnson, Berlin, N. H.; 
Max Miller, Los Angeles, Calif.; Al- 
bert W. Morris, Salisbury, Md. 

1940 — B. A. Dabrowski, Baltimore; 
Eugene L. Pessagno, Baltimore. 
1942 — Alvin H. Savage, Orlando, Fla. 
1943 — Harry W. Cooper (March), 
Baltimore; Lewis S. Libby, Jr. (March), 
Baltimore; Roy J. Sloat (November), 
Jacksonville, Fla. 

1944 — George A. Graham, Miami, 
Fla.; Henry V. P. Keilly, Key West, 
Fla.; John M. Mallow, Marlinton, 
W. Va.; Donald Michnoff, Miami Beach, 
Fla.; Artaldo U. Quinones, San Ger- 
man, P. R.; Murray Yavner, Boston, 
Mass. 

1945 — Arturo Benavent, Mayaguez, 
P. R.; Harry W. F. Dressel, Baltimore; 
Bob George, Mt. Airy, N.C.; Alan 
Jackson, Forest Hills, N. Y.; John 
McWilliams, DeLand, Fla.; James W. 
O'Hearn, Christie Clinic, Champaign, 
111. 

1946 — Joseph P. Cappuccio, Balti- 
more; Joseph P. San Clemente, South 
Braintree, Mass. 

1947— Samuel W. Johnston, Fort 
Lauderdale, Fla. 

1948— William R. Allen, Cumberland, 
Md.; Fernando E. Davila-Lopez, Jack- 
son Memorial Hospital, Miami, Fla.; 
Theresa A. Edwards, Beckley, W. Va.; 
! William T. Fridinger, Cumberland, Md. 
1950 — Arthur M. Bushey, Baltimore; 
i Francis L. Edwards, Beckley, W. Va.; 
! Clem Hahn, Hazard, Ky.; Manuel A. 
Rosso, Santurce, P. R. 

1951 — Simon Berenson, Portland, 

1 Me.; Enrique Blondet, Miami, Fla.; 

John J. Daub, Union City, N. J.; John 

T. Gorman, Cumberland, Md.; Stanley 

R. Mallow, Pasadena, Md.; Santiago 

Padilla, Mayaguez, P. R.; William L. 

! Ridinger, Miami, Fla.; Blair W. Stump, 

i Cumberland, Md.; Thomas E. Wolf, 

! Lancaster, Pa. 

1952— Alvin P. Friend, Oakland, Md.; 
i Robert J. Jozefiak, Bayonne, N. J.; 
I R. Brown Williams, Fort Lauderdale, 
; Fla. 

1953— Gilbert L. Koehler, Roanoke, 
I Va.; James A. Markwood, Naval Air 
Station, Key West, Fla. 

1954— John Ellis, Plant City, Fla.; 

j Henry Honik, Jr., Baltimore; Edwin 

I L. Maxwell, AFB, Smyrna, Tenn.; Ed- 

< gar Sweren, Hunter AFB, Savannah, 

Ga.; Nann Alix Wickwire, Tampa, Fla. 

District Of Columbia 

The Twenty-Third Annual Post- 
! graduate Clinic of the District of Col- 
umbia Dental Society will be held in 
March at the Shoreham Hotel. Of 
especial interest to the many Maryland 
alumni who annually lend strong sup- 
port to the meeting are the plans now- 
being made for the University of 



Maryland Breakfast that will be held 
in the Blue Room of the Shoreham 
at 8:00 a.m. on March 15. Dr. Frank 
Hurst '27, Suite 714, 1726 Eye St., 
N. W., Washington, is in charge of 
the arrangements for this attractive 
feature of the program. Last year's 
attendance of 53 has encouraged the 
committee to anticipate an even larger 
response in 1955. 

Personals 

Dr. and Mrs. Carlos J. Noya '50 
announce the birth of a son, Carlos 
Eduardo, on October 28. Dr. Noye is 
practicing in Santurce, P. R. 

Dr. Paul Rivas '54 has announced 
the opening of his office at 834 Cooks 
Lane, Baltimore 7, Md. 

Dr. and Mrs. William H. Langfield 
'50 announce the birth of their fifth 
child and third son, David, on Septem- 
ber 18. Dr. Langfield is practicing at 
1047 County St., Somerset, Mass. 

Dr. and Mrs. N. Jerome Chapin '52 
announce the birth of a daughter, Roni 
Ann, on November 12. Dr. Chapin is 
practicing in Woodlawn, Md. 

Dr. Donald R. Gorby '54 has opened 
an office in Naples, Fla. 

TV Dental Program 

A very important stage in the 
growth of children was presented on 
Maryland's TV-M.D. program over 
WBAL-TV. The subject of the half 
hour was the development and eruption 
of teeth, the sixth in the series on 
the growth and development of man. 

In addition to a presentation of the 
manner in which teeth are formed 
in chronological sequence , the pro- 
gram demonstrated certain anomalies 
resulting from improper tooth develop- 
ment. 

The program dealt with the influence 
of teeth and accompanying bone for- 
mation upon the facial appearance. A 
part of the program was devoted to a 
demonstration of the effects of poor 
nutrition, infections and upsets of 
metabolism upon teeth. 

Parents, especially, found the pro- 




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Furnishes Teachers 

The University of Maryland furnishes 
its share of Home Economics teach- 
ers throughout the state and the Dis- 
trict of Columbia. The supervisors as 
well as many of the teachers have re- 
ceived bachelor's or master's degrees 
from our College of Home Economics. 
The names of the supervisors and 
teachers are as follows: 
Supervisor of Home Economics Edu- 
cation — State Dept. of Education: 
Miss Evelyn Miller '33. 
County Supervisors — Home Economics 

— State Dept. of Education: 
Anne Arundel — Miss Doris M. Clem- 
ents, B.S. '42, M.S. '49. 
Montgomery — Miss Julia W. Watkins, 

M.S. '48. 
Prince George's — Miss M. Gladys Dick- 

erson, B.S. '29. 
Teachers — Home Economics in the 

Counties : 
Alleghany — Helen E. McFerran '34, Al- 
leghany; Ruth B. Engle '24 and '27, 
Beall; Yola V. Hudson '28, Fort Hill; 
Mrs. Florence Repp Whitworth '40, 
Mt. Savage. 
Anne Arundel — Mrs. Jean Jeffers Rez- 
as '50, Brooklyn Park Jr.; Frances 
Winant '53, Brooklyn Park Jr.; Mrs. 
Dorothy Stovis Pollard '34, Glen 
Burnie Jr. 
Baltimore — Mrs. Elsie Stratmann Finn 
'51, Dundalk; Nancy Lee Gum '51, 
North Point; Mrs. Nancy Daugherty 
O'Keefe '47, North Point; Mrs. Mur- 
iel Vincent Baublis '50, Stemmers 
Run Jr.; Agnes Soper '35 and '38, 
Stemmers Run Jr.; Mrs. Mary Dans- 
berger Phillips '51, Towson Sr. 
Calvert — Mrs. Alverta Miller Williams 

'29, Calvert. 
Cecil — Mrs. Selena Reynolds Mackee 

'33 and '34, Elkton. 
Charles — Mrs. Louise Boone Turner 

'51, LaPlata Jr.-Sr. 
Dorchester — Jane McAllister '52, North 

Dorchester High School. 
Frederick — Mrs. Grace Lighter Engel- 
brecht '29, Frederick; Roxie L. Mont- 
gomery '50, Middletown; L. Inez 
Lewis '41, Thurmont. 
Garrett — Mrs. Elizabeth Stephenson 
Randol '41 and '44, Southern Gar- 
rett County. 
Harford— H. Willette Bland '21, Havre 
de Grace; Mrs. Elaine Medford Harp- 
er '50, Edgewood. 
Howard — Margaret E. Dinkle '54, Elk- 
ridge Jr. 
Kent — Mrs. Estella Kersey Comegys 
'37, Chestertown; Ella J. Hadaway 
'29, Rock Hall. 
Montgomery — Ima M. Schindel '53, 
Bethesda-Chevy Chase; Mary K. 
Labbe '53, Eastern Jr.; Mrs. Betty 
Erickson Layman '53, Eastern Jr.; 
Elizabeth Joseph '52; Claudine Mor- 
gan '30, Gaithersburg; Mrs. Olive 
Edmunds Carr '28, Leland Jr.; Mrs. 
Lorna Lee Sween '37, Leland Jr.; 



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Joan Dynes '53, Poolesville; Mary 
Margaret Mueller '54, Sherwood; 
Mrs. Carolyn Hickman Heimes '51, 
Western Jr.; Catherine Kuehl '53, 
Western Jr. 
Prince George's — Mrs. Patricia Hale 
Jewell '51, Bladensburg Jr.; Mrs. 
Corilda Chaplin Keyser '50, Blad- 
ensburg; Mrs. Joseph Owen Thom- 
as '50, Greenbelt Jr.; Barbara David 
'54, High Point; Mrs. Marianna 
Trimble Keene '47, Hyattsville Jr.; 
Mrs. Lucille Traband Woodburn '48, 
Hyattsville Jr.; Mrs. Elizabeth Uh- 
ler Teeth '43, Md. Park Jr.; Mrs. 
Charlotte Reed Parulis '52, Md. Park 
Jr.; Mrs. Peggy Bowman Zirkle '52, 
Mt. Rainier Jr.; Mrs. Charlene Hard- 
ing Cumberland '47, Northwestern; 
Mrs. Evangeline Holladay Kroll '54, 
Suitland; Mrs. Rhea Morgan Gallo- 
way '44, Surrattsville; Mrs. Emily 
Hawkshaw Duley '31, Surrattsville. 
Somerset — Mrs. Rosabelle Somers Ty- 
ler '49, Crisfield; Mrs. Marguerite 
Jefferson Willey '38, Washington. 
Washington — Mrs. Elsie C. Jones Han- 
son '39, Boonsboro; Mrs. Gwendolyn 
Kendle Roulette '49, Clear Spring; 
Mrs. Doris Clopper Warfield '50, 
Hagerstown Sr. 
Washington, D.C. — Supervisor of Home 

Economics : 
Miss Ruth McRae '23 and '43; Miss 
Dorothy G. Miller '44, Assistant to 
Miss McRae, Head of Dept. 
Teachers : 

Mrs. Miriam Beall '31, Roosevelt 
High; Mrs. Erna Reidel Chapman '36, 
Roosevelt High; Mrs. Margaret 
Dodder '46, Tyler Elem.; Miss Jean- 
ette Giovannoni '43, Taft Jr.; Miss 
Irene Knox '34, Western High; Miss 
Lucy Knox '24, McKinley High; Mrs. 
Irene Sweeney '41, Coolidge High. 

Extension Service 
The College of Home Economics is 
also providing its share of Home Eco- 
nomics trained personnel for our Mary- 
land Extension Service. Your report- 
er found the following graduates now 
employed in this work: 
State Office: 

Miss Margaret T. Loar '41, Assistant 
Home Demonstration Leader for Md., 
formerly served as a district agent; 
Miss Charlotte Conaway '47, As- 
sistant State 4-H Club Agent, for- 
merly Home Demonstration Agent in 
Carroll County. 

Home Demonstration Agents: 

Miss Margaret Holloway '53, Home 
Demon. Agent, Baltimore City; Miss 
Virginia McLuckie '53 and '41, Home 
Demon. Agent, Harford Co.; Mrs. 
Marlet Leber '52, Home Demon. 
Agent, Howard Co.; Miss Elizabeth 
Skeats '53, Asst. Home Demon. 
Agent, Montgomery Co.; Miss Nancy 
Lee Joseph '54, Asst. Home Demon. 
Agent, Talbot Co.; Miss Charlotte 
Mitchell '52, Asst. Home Demon. 
Agent, Dorchester Co.; Miss Ethel 
Groves '27, Home Demon. Agent, 
Garrett Co.; Miss Helen I. Smith '48, 
Home Demon. Agent, Cecil Co.; Miss 
Ethel Regan '43, Home Demon. 
Agent, Prince George's Co.; Miss 
Ella Fazzalari '52, (on study leave 
at present). 



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Baltimore City — Supervisor of Home 
Economics Education — Dept. of Edu- 
cation — Miss Nellie S. Buckey '25 
(Columbia Univ.). 

Teachers: 

Miss Julia H. Burton, B.S. '39, M.A. 
'50, Eastern High; Mrs. Mary Har- 
baugh r 54; Miss Miriam Jones, B.S. 
'23, Western High; Mrs. Melva Beard 
Herzberg, B.S. '42, M.Ed. '48, Garri- 
son Jr.; Mrs. Frances Lemon Knight, 
B.S. '24, Garrison Jr.; Mrs. Lois Suit 
Butler, B.S. '43, Patterson Park 
High; Mrs. Vivian Getz Krawitz, 
B.S. '52, Hampstead Hill Jr.; Mrs. 
Sidney Nimmo Geister, B.S. '47, La- 
fayette Jr.; Mrs. Beverley Goldberg 
Mazer, B.S. '54, Gwynns Falls Jr.; 
Miss Alice Burdick, B.S. '28, Roland 
Park Jr.; Miss Ruth Dubb, B.S. '43, 
Benjamin Franklin Jr.; Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Crowthers Virdin, B.S. '23, Ben- 
jamin Franklin Jr.; Mrs. Marie E. 
Webb, B.S. '34, Fort Worthington; 
Mrs. Cora A. Schultz, B.S. '53, Alicia 
Crossland; Miss Marie D. Dippel, 
B.S. '40, Oliver Cromwell. 

Hostesses 

Among the Maryland ladies act- 
ing as hostesses for the National Home 
Demonstration Council Convention re- 
cently held at the Statler Hotel in 
D. C. were: Katherine Baker Bromley 
'26, who helped with the vesper ser- 
vice and convention publicity; Mar- 
garet Loar '41, who is assistant to 
Mrs. Florence Low, State Leader, and 
helped plan the arrangements; Mrs. 
F. L. Beill '26, who is a National 
Chairman and participated on a panel 
program; and Mrs. J. Homer Rems- 
berg of Middletown, who was elected 
National President. Many other Mary- 
land alumnae were seen among the 
more than 2,000 delegates from all 
over the United States. 

Fall Meeting 

The Home Economics Alumni Board 
held their fall meeting on Monday, 
October 25, at the Rossborough Inn 
as luncheon guests of their President, 
Mrs. Paul Coppinger (Carolyn Chesser) 
'30. Plans are being made for the an- 
nual spring meeting in May — the exact 
date to be announced later. 

Freshman Eleanor Smith was award- 
ed the "Gertrude Warren Scholarship" 
during the summer. Another fresh- 
man, Patricia Toms, was awarded the 
"Maryland Home Economics Associa- 
tion Scholarship," and very charming- 
ly and ably thanked the Association 
members at their annual state meet- 
ing in Baltimore on October 15. Pa- 
tricia was the second place winner in 
the state "Farm Queen" contest at 
Maryland State at Timonium in Sept. 

Verna Lichtenberg, freshman in Col- 
lege of Home Economics, was awarded 
the "Verna M. Kellar" scholarship by 
the Maryland State Council of Home- 
makers' Clubs. Her ambition — to be- 
come a Home Demonstration Agent and 
4-H Club Leader. 

Gladys Ball Baumann '31, is living 
in Phoenix, Arizona, where her hus- 
band (Dr. Victor Baumann) is super- 
visor of music at Phoenix College. The 



Hendlers 




First Name in Ice Cream 
For Nigh on 50 Years 



The 



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i PRINTERS 
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PERFECT COCKTAILS . . . served at 
our circular bar 

MODERATELY PRICED DINNERS ... In 

Homewood Room . . . dining room 

for private parties 

Charles St. at Twenty-Fifth 

BALTIMORE 18, MD. Ample evening parking 



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202 W. PRATT ST. 
BALTIMORE 1, MD. 
SAratoga 7-0748 



picture frame* 

made to order 

•Id 

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gliding 

restoring 



Gray 


Concrete Pipe 

Manufacturers of 
Concrete Pipe 

6315 EASTERN AVENUE 
Baltimore 24, Md. 


Co. 



28 



Maryland 








(jJ&dfL U)idsL JhavsiL 

PHONE ADAMS 2-8700 
2311 Calvert St., N.W. Washington 8, D. C. 



x- IK C. Ignition -^ 

Headquarters 

Inc. 

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authorized service: carburetors, startort, 
generators, all wipers, speedomoton, 
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Phone: NAtional 8-7038 
1 230 20th St., N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 



J 



WINDOW - ON - THE - KITCHEN 

JCiichidcAjicL 

SELF-SERVICE 
Delicious food ... All our desserts are 
home-made . . . popular prices . . . 
no tipping ... air conditioned 

BREAKFAST - LUNCHEON 

DINNER Quality Coffee, 5e a cup 

Open Daily and Sunday 
11th Street Entrance of 

HOTEL HARRINGTON 
11th & E Sis., N.W. Washington, D. C. 



Save 20% on Any Book in Print 

(Except Text & Technical) 

MEMBERSHIP $1 

Write for FREE Book List 

or Come in and Browse 

ALBINUS BOOK CLUB 

1617 CONNECTICUT AVENUE. N.W. 
Woshlngton 9, D. C. HUdson 3-5159 



Baumann's have three daughters and 
a son. 

Heads D.C. Home Ec. 

Miss Ruth McRae, B.S. '23, M.Ed. '43, 
was recently made Head of the Dept. 
of Home Economics in the Wash- 
ington, D. C. public schools. Previously 
she had served as principal of the 
Capitol Page School and before that 
as assistant principal of Central High 
School. She has served on the Board 
of Directors of Central High School, 
and as a former President of the Home 
Ec. Alumni of University of Md. A 
member of Omicron Mu, Phi Kappa 
Phi, Delta Kappa Gamma, N.E.A., 
Secondary School Principals, Zouta 
Service Club, Amer. Home Ec. Assoc, 
she has also served as a member of 
the Exec. Board of the Y.W.C.A., and 
as a former Treasurer and former 
President of the Regional Deans of 
Women Club. Ruth has done graduate 
work at G. W. University, Penn. State 
University, and Columbia Unversity as 
well as at the University of Md. She 
started her teaching career in D.C. 
as a vocational Home Ec. teacher and 
has gradually climbed upward until 
she now holds the top position there. 
Congratulations to Ruth McRae! 

Miss Evelyn Miller '33, who is study- 
ing for her Doctorate at Cornell Uni- 
versity, assumed full responsibility as 
State Supervisor of Home Economics 
Education for the State Dept. of Edu- 
cation last August, when Miss Eliza- 
beth Arnery, who had held the position 
for 26 years, retired. Evelyn was 
appointed by Dr. Thomas G. Pullen, Jr. 
in 1949 to this position, but did not 
assume the full responsibilities until 
this year. She previously had been 
employed in Alleghany County, first as 
a teacher and later as supervisor for 
the county. 

Reminder to all graduates: Please 
send us any change of address, or new 
name if married! Also, any news 
items about Home E. alumni anywhere 
in the country or world! The more 
news items from all classes — the more 
interesting our section "will be! We 
need your help. Do it today! Thank 
you. 

Miss Guevara Wins 

Carmen Guevara, senior Home Eco- 
nomics major, has been awarded the 
Borden Home Economics Scholarship 
Award. The three hundred dollars pres- 
entation is made each year to an out- 
standing student who has had two or 
more courses in nutrition in addition to 
the regular curriculum. Miss Guevara 
has maintained a scholastic average of 
3.787 out of a possible 4.0 during the 
last three years. 

A participant in many extra-curricu- 
lar activities, Miss Guevara is a member 
of the Women's Student Government; 
Mortar Board; and Omicron Nu, the 
home economics scholastic honorary so- 
ciety. 

She is majoring in institutional man- 
agement, a resident of the Philippine 
Islands, she became a naturalized citi- 
zen of the United States in 1952. This 
award is made annually to the senior 
with the highest average in the Col- 
lege of Home Economics. 



The 
Firsl Foderal 

presents 




CHRISTMAS 
CLUB 

When it's a good thought — don't 
delay. 

You can have your 1955 Christ- 
mas paid for in advance. The 
secret is regular saving — every 
two weeks. Select ttie class that 
fits your budget — $1, $2, $4, $5, 
$6, $10 or $20 — depending on your 
goal. 

Let First Federal welcome you 
into its Christmas Saving Club 
before January 31st . . . "the soon- 
er the better!" 

District 7-2370 

FmSlMlWRAL 

in Washington 

610 13th STREET, N.W. (Bet. F & G) 
Washington 5, D. C. 



J. NICHOLS 

— WHOLESALE — 

FANCY 
FRUITS & 
PRODUCE 

Lincoln 7-4888 

UNION MARKET TERMINAL 

1278 5th St., N.E. Washington 



Don't make a move . . 




without calling 




SMITH'S 




Phone NO. 7-3343 




SMITH'S STORAGE CO., 


INC. 


WASHINGTON, D. C. 





Maryland 



29 



SILVER 
SPRING 



A Sign 

In Silver Spring 

This sign marks the 
location of the best 
in banking service. 

Drive-In Banking 

Service 

JU.9--9000 



8701 Georgia Ave. Silver Spring 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 




Thomas E. Carroll 
& Son 

LANDSCAPE CONTRACTING 

Tret Moving 
Trees Shrubs 

Sodding Grading 

EVergreen 4-3041 

Colesville Pike, Route #3 
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 




POTATO CHIPS 



JUniper 5-8115 
10753 Colesville Road Silver Spring, Md. 



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College of 



Silver Medallion 




Dr. Byrus 



Special & Continuation 

Studies 



For Civil Defense 

The Fire Extension Service of the 
University of Maryland College of 
Engineering was host for the Fire Ser- 
vices Conference of Region 2 of the 
Federal Civil Defense Administration. 
Approximately 75 
representatives o f 
the states of Mary- 
land, Ohio, Virginia, 
West Virginia, 
Pennsylvania, New 
Jersey and Dela- 
ware met for lec- 
tures and discus- 
sion at the Fire 
Services Building at 
the University. 

Purpose of the 
conference was to 
develop procedures 
for fire defense in 
the event of enemy 
attack. A special demonstration was 
prepared for the fire protection experts 
by Mr. Robert Byrus, Director of Fire 
Extension, and his staff. The demon- 
stration consisted of instruction on the 
use of quick coupling pipe for moving 
large quantities of water. 

The entire program was under the 
direction of Milton Howell, Director 
of the Public Safety office for Region 
2 in conjunction with the University. 
Civil Defense Course 
Police officers of the State of Mary- 
land were offered a course on police 
activities in a civil defense emergency 
with emphasis on the practical aspects 
of coordinating police services, under 
emergency conditions, with the civil de- 
fense effort. The meeting was the third 
in a series of 10 monthly lectures being 
given by the College of Special and 
Continuation Studies' 1954 Institute for 
Maryland Law Enforcement Officers. 
Guest speakers for the program were 
Colonel Arthur L. Shreve, deputy direc- 
tor of the Maryland Civil Defense 
Agency; and Colonel A. E. Kimberling, 
director of the Police Services of the 
Federal Civil Defense Administration. 



A 
ft 






QUAINT ACRES 
NURSERIES 



Complete Line of Nursery Stock in 
wide variety. Landscape Service, 
Dormant Spraying, Transplanting, 
Tree Moving, Pruning. 



H. W. "Phoebe" 
Quaintance 
Class of '25 



Colesville Pike 
(U. S. 29) 
5 Miles from 
Georgia Ave. 
Silver Spring.Md. 
JUniper 9-5810 



THE MONROE DOCTRINE 



• ZJ-intsi Zxord ~3< 



ervice 



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1237 East West Hgwy. 



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COMPANY 

Silver Spring, Md. 




IN AUSTRIA 

Lt. Gen. William H. Arnold, (left) 
Commanding General, U. S. Forces in 
Austria, presents Maj. Norman D. 
Willems, HQ U.S.F.A., with a Silver 
Medallion from the University of 
Maryland for "Outstanding Scholar- 
ship" as an extension student during 
the academic year 1953-1954. Maj. 
Willems, a native of Warroad, Minn., 
was one of 43 student in a total of 
9,509 enrolled to achieve a Dean's List 
"A" average. The award was made 
at U.S.F.A. headquarters in Salzburg, 
Austria. 



From Pennsylvania 

Captain Emmett J. Donovan, Penn- 
sylvania State Police coordinator for 
police services, Pennsylvania Council 
of Civil Defense, spoke on the subject 
of "Police Action in Panic and Riot 
Control" at the Central Auditorium be- 
fore the Institute of Maryland Law 
Enforcement Officers. Captain Dono- 
van discussed methods used to quell 
panics and riots and special attention 
to the law enforcement officer's actions 
in establishing controls under emerg- 
ency and disaster conditions that may 
be brought about by enemy action or 
natural phenomena affecting a given 
area. 

Captain Donovan has been a member 
of the Pennsylvania State Polic for 
thirty-five years. 



IT'S DIFFERENT HERE 

Rafael Brenner, owner of Brenner 
Photo Company at 933 Pennsylvania 
Avenue, Washington, D.C., fled from 
Cologne, Germany in 1939 leaving be- 
hind three established Camera Shops 
in Germany and one in Rome, Italy, 
to escape Hitler's policy. 

Today he is the successful head of 
the firm that bears his name and 
working with him as Vice President 
of the company is his son, Norbert, 
who during World War Two was in 
the United States Photo Signal Corps. 

****** 

HERBERT HOOVER:— 

A splendid storehouse of integrity 
and freedom has been bequeathed to 
us by our forefathers. In this day of 
confusion, of peril to our liberty, our 
high duty is to see that this storehouse 
is" hdt robbed of its contents, . 



30 



Maryland 



Decorated 




IN KOREA 
Lt. Col. William O. Bradley, (Mili- 
tary Science, 1952), receives the 
Bronze Star Medal for meritorious 
service from Colonel John T. McKee, 
in Korea. Bradley distinguished him- 
self as quartermaster officer with IX 
Corps Headquarters. He entered the 
Army in 1952 and has been overseas 
since July 1953. He is a member of 
Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity. 



College of 



Military Science 



Flanked by a newly organized Saber 
Unit, Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, Presi- 
dent of the University, and Dr. Thomas 
B. Symons, former acting president re- 
ceived the rank of honorary Air Force 
ROTC colonel at ceremonies at the 
Clemson-Maryland football game. 

The awards were presented by Col. 
Joseph R. Ambrose, dean, in a semi- 
circle formed by members of the 
Pershing Rifles and the Saber Guard 
Unit. The unit, sponsored bfy the 
Scabbard and Blade, 
ROTC honorary, 
will become an in- 
dependent organiza- 
tion next year. 

Before the game 
the 18 squadrons of 
cadets preceded by 
the Angel Flight 
marched onto the 
field to salute the 
spectators. 

The 28 coeds were 
escorted by squad- 
ron company com- 
manders or their representatives who 
presented them to their respective 
squadrons. 

Following semaphore commands 
given from the press box the cadets 
saluted the Clemson and Maryland 
rooters. 

After the march-on the 2600 cadets 
circled the field and took their seats 
in the stands. 

Leading off the half-time ceremonies 
was a presentation of the Korean 
Distinguished Military Service Award 
to Captain Arthur W. Vanaman, Jr. 
of the Maryland faculty by the Korean 
ambassador, Dr. Yon Chan Yang. 




Col. Ambrose 



To welcome 
guests 





loft*" is o r*gtif*r«d trade-mark. 



Ice-cold Coca-Cola is 
such a sociable drink. 
Bring home several 
cartons when you shop. 



WMOtt AUfHoarr o» nm coca«xa cobmmt rr 



COCA-COLA BOTTLING WORKS 

JUniper 5-3100 Silver Spring, Md. 



STONE HOUSE 
INN 




. . . visit the Maryland Room 

where smart people gather 

for dining at its best 

table d'hote 



WASHINGTON 




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MARYLANEr 



SILVER 
SPRING 



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SILVER SPRING, MD. 

HIGHWAY 29 

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luncheons 

dinners 

banquets 

parties 




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PHOTOENGRAVERS OF 

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On Zinc, Copper and Triplemetal 

For Fast Pick Up and Delivery Service 

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USE THE COUPON ON THE LAST PAGE 



Maryland 



81 



Serving the 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

OF BALTIMORE 

SYKESVILLE, MD. 



At Office Management Conference 



"Electrically 

Our Coverage Of 

Maryland Is 

Complete" 



TRISTATE 



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ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION 

MATERIALS - SUPPLIES 

EQUIPMENT 

• 

OPERATING ON AN EXCLUSIVE 
WHOLESALE POLICY 



OFFICE FURNITURE 

Fine Executive Desks and Chairs 

Leather- Club Chairs and 

Davenports 

Steel Desks and Filing Cabinets 

THE JAMES T. VERNAY 
& SONS CO. 

5 E. LEXINGTON STREET 
PLaza 2-4220 Baltimore 2, Md. 



D. HARRY CHAMBERS, Inc. 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS 

Locatsd in the Center of the Shopping District 

326 NORTH HOWARD STREET 
MU. 1-1990 BALTIMORE, MD. 




MODERN EQUIPMENT 

Various types of modern office machinery were demonstrated at the Office 
Management Conference, held in the College of Business and Public Administra- 
tion. Here an Underwood Sanas Machine is shown. 

Left to right: Arthur S. Patrick, Head of Office Technique and Manage- 
ment; Marilyn Howard, Student; Lemuel J. Holt, W. A. Clarke Mortgage 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Georgine Wickenheiser ; Student; Ernest 
Pullen, Florence Pipe Foundry and Machine Company, Florence, New Jersey. 



College of 



Business & Public 



Administration 

_^a Egbert F. Tingley 



In Washington 

The faculty of the University of 
Maryland's Department of Govern- 
ment and Politics attended the Annual 
Conference of the District of Columbia 
Political Science Association, held 
in the Hall of Government of George 
Washington University. Three mem- 
bers of the University of Maryland's 
Department of Government and Poli- 
tics participated in the program. 

Professor Elmer Plischke, acting 
head of the department, served as 
chairman of a round table on "The 
Politics of Neutralism Abroad "; Dr. 
Don L. Bowen, associate professor, 
was a member of a round table discus- 
sion on "Ethics in Government "; and 
Dr. Guy B. Hathorn, instructor, was 
a member of a round table discussion 
on "The Political Outlook on the New 
Congress." 

Professor Plischke is a member of 
the Executive Council of the associa- 
tion. 

Tax Seminar 

Professor S. M. Wedeberg, recently 
elected President of the Maryland As- 



sociation of Certified Public Account- 
ants, served as Moderator at the In- 
come Tax Seminar at Eastern College 
of Commerce and Law in Baltimore. 
He also became a member of the Coun- 
cil of the American Institute of Ac- 
countants, and a member of the Board 
of Directors of the Middle Atlantic 
States Accounting Conference. 

At Johns Hopkins 

Dr. Francis R. Hama, Institute for 
Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathe- 
matics, University of Maryland, spoke 
at the Department of Aeronautics of 
the Johns Hopkins University. 

Final Speaker 

Gordon L. Lippitt, assistant director, 
National Training Laboratory in Group 
Development of the National Education 
Association, Washington, D. C, was 
the speaker for the final session of 
the three-day Seventh Annual Office 
Management Training Conference held 
at the University. 

Choosing "Good Office Leadership De- 
livers" as his topic, Mr. Lippitt sur- 
veyed human relations in the office 
from the manager's point of view. Mr. 
Lippitt commented that, "Office lead- 
ership has no factor to cope with which 
is more important nor more variable 
than the manager's relations with those 
above and below him." He stated that, 
"it is wise to review and reemphasize 
certain principles for developing and 
maintaining esprit de corps." 



32 



Maryland 



The Conference was held in the uni- 
versity's new Student Union Building 
where an exhibit of office machines and 
' the latest in office equipment will be on 
display. 

For Iowa 

Professor Donald W. Krimel pre- 
pared the section on public relations, 
public opinion, and propaganda in the 
Directory of Journalism Films, recent- 
ly published by the Iowa State College 
Press. Professor Krimel heads the 
public relations sequence in the De- 
partment of Journalism and Public Re- 
lations. 

In Japan and Italy 

Dr. Eli W. Clemens, professor of 
business organization and administra- 
tion and author of a book entitled "Eco- 
nomics and Public Utilities," has been 
advised by his publishers, Appleton- 
Century-Grofts, Inc., that permission 
has been granted to the Union Ripo- 
grafico-Editrice Torniese of Turin, 
Italy, to publish an Italian translation 
of the book. 

Originally published in 1950, Dr. 
Clemens' book is a survey text on 
economics, management and regulation 
of public utilities. 

The first volume of a two volume 
Japanese edition has already appeared. 
It was translated by Professor Tak- 
enaka of Kobe University and financed 
in part by the Tokyo Gas Company. 



Microcards 



The University Library at College 
Park has placed a subscription for 
microcards of all existing books listed 
in the American Bibliography by 
Charles Evans. The bibliography is a 
chronological dictionary of publications 
printed in the United States from the 
beginning of printing in 1639 until 
1799. The publication contains 35,854 
entries. 

Production of the microcards is cur- 
rently under the direction of C. R. 
Graham, librarian of the Louisville 
Public Library. The present schedule 
will produce about 2,500 cards per 
year, or approximately 100,000 pages 
of printing for each 2,500 cards. 

The Library of Congress owns about 
45 per cent of the items listed in the 
American Bibliography and is coop- 
erating in the project by making these 
items available for microcarding. The 
general Americana group owned by the 
Library of Congress will be the first 
to be photographed on microcards. Af- 
ter completing these items, arrange- 
ments will be made with other libraries 
owning material listed in the American 
Bibliography. 

The microcards will be kept in the 
Library's Periodical Room. 




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DAIRY PRODUCTS 



WESTERN MARYLAND DAIRY 

Division of National Dairy Products Corp. 




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DREDGING — ENGINEERING CONSTRUCTION 



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BALTIMORE ASPHALT 
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Maryland 




CONCRETE 

for 

EVERY PURPOSE 

SUPER CONCRETE 
CORPORATION 

3056 K STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON 7, D. C. 

Phone ME 8-3840 



PARK 
TRANSFER 
COMPANY 

Heavy Hauling 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 
NOrth 7-5753 



SeaJon'j C/teetingj 



9 



A. 



ITALIAN 
RESTAURANT 



ENJOY OUR DELICIOUS FOOD 

1837 M STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 
(Off Connecticut Avenue) 



SUNTILE 

A genuine Clay Tile 

■urnproof - Waterproof • Colorfast 
Call your SUNTILE Dealer at NO. 7-1725 

VICK TILE CO. 



2909 M St., N.W. 



Washington, D. C. 



College of 



Physical Education 
Recreation & Health 

— — =^^^^^^ Dr. Warren R. Johnson 




Dr. Johnson 



Off-Campus Course Offering Greatly 
Expanded 

During the past year, requests for 
health and physical education 
courses have taken professors of this 
college to distant parts of the state. 
This year more than 435 Maryland 
school teachers have taken courses 
provided by this college through the 
College of Special 
and Continuation 
Studies. Localities 
served have reached 
from Belair to the 
north, Prince Fred- 
erick to the south, 
Denton (Eastern 
Shore) to the east, 
and Grantsville (be- 
yond Frostburg) to 
the west. 

One or more 
courses have been 
provided, late after- 
noons or evenings,, in the following 
communities: 

Belair, Baltimore, Ellicott City, Den- 
ton, Frederick, Suitland, Edgewater, 
West Friendship, Cumberland, Grants- 
ville, Prince Frederick. 

(In addition, a five-week workshop 
on dance is being held in Montgomery 
County for teachers.) 

The majority of students in these 
classes have been elementary school 
teachers. However, about a third have 
been secondary school teachers. Sev- 
eral school principals, supervisors, and 
nurses have also enrolled. 

The marked expansion of this col- 
lege's off-campus offering has been 
due to a number of factors. For ex- 
ample, the University of Maryland only 
very recently began to provide much 
in the way of teacher training at the 
elementary school level. However, when 
it became clear that the demand for 
elementary teachers in the state is 
greatly outstripping the supply, the 
university undertook the task of pro- 
viding training at this level. In 1935 
Dr. James Humphrey, formerly of 
Michigan State University, was added 
to the staff of this college with the 
responsibility of developing and co- 
ordinating elementary school health 
and physical education curricula. Since 
that time requests for courses in vari- 
ous parts of the state have sometimes 
exceeded the ability of the seven pro- 
fessors who teach subjects at this level 
to service them. 

Most of the courses offered in Balti- 
more are a part of this college's long- 
standing program provided for teach- 
ers who are working towards advanced 
degrees in health, physical education, 
or recreation. The majority of these 
students specialize in this field in their 
own teaching at the secondary school 



Jack Blank 

Invites You To 
Test Drive The New 

19 5 5 
PONTIAC 

With Spectacular 

New Dual-Range 

Performance 

Arcade^ 
Pontiac 

1437 IRVING ST., N.W. 
ADAMS 4-8500 

Washington's Largest 
Pontiac Dealer 



R. | 
ROBINSON 



INC. 


owned and 

operated by 

Joseph H. Deckman 

Clan of '31 


FREE 
PARKING 

• 

FREE 
DELIVERY 


builder's supplies 

housewares 

appliances 

hardware 

feed 



2301 PENNA. AVE., N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

LUdlow 4-1400 



HUFFER SHINN 
Optical 
Company, Inc. 

Prescription Opticians 
Repairs - Replacements 

1413 L STREET. N.W. 

NAtional 8-1457 Washington, D. C. 



Harding Hardware, Inc. 

19Q5 MICHIGAN AVE., N.E. 

WASHINGTON IB. D. C. 

LA 6-566D 



34 



Maryland 



Furr Bros. 
Poultry Co M Inc. 

Washington's 

Leading 
Poultry 

Purveyor 

Phone: NAtional 8-4792 

1315-17 Maine Ave., S.W. 
Washington 4, D. C. 



THE 

HENRY B. GILPIN 

COMPANY 

Wholesale Druggists 
for over 100 years 

WASHINGTON 3, D. C. 

BALTIMORE 1, MD. 

NORFOLK 10, VA. 



WESTERN 

EXTERMINATING CO. 

TERMITE CONTROL 

Safe • Efficient - Economical 

Providing Protection from Intern and 

Rodents Destroying Fabric, Wood, Food 

FREE INSPECTION 

WITHOUT OBLIGATION 

MEtropolitan 8-1520 

1023 12th St., N.W. Washington 




level, whereas the majority of elemen- 
tary school teachers teach health and 
physical education activities along with 
their general program of instruction. 

The heightened interest in health and 
physical education courses is probably 
a reflection of a growing nation-wide 
awareness of the need for: (1) improv- 
ing the general health, (2) raising the 
level of physical fitness, and (3) in- 
creasing the leisure time skills and ap- 
preciations of the youth of America. 
More and more educators look upon 
these things as basic concerns of our 
schools and realize that physical and 
mental health throughout life are pro- 
foundly influenced by habits, skills, 
attitudes, and understandings acquired 
in childhood and youth. This realiza- 
tion focuses attention more closely 
than ever before upon the importance 
of good teaching in health, physical 
education, and recreation at the ele- 
mentary school level. 

The College of Physical Education, 
Recreation, and Health is pleased to 
play a part in extending and improving 
the offering of many of Maryland's 
schools in these fields which are so 
important to the vitality and strength 
of the state and the nation. 
Wins Wings 

Lt. Richard L. McKenzie '53 received 
his wings on October 27 at Weber Air 
Force Base in Texas. He is a member 
of the "M" club and at Maryland was 
on both the soccer and baseball teams. 



To Azores 

Aching arms were the order of the 
day for Gymkana members taking 
shots in preparation for a trip to the 
Azores. 

Eighteen of the thirty members of 
the troupe made the four day trip 
during the Christmas holidays. The 
troupe flew by Military Air Transport 
Service and members are required to 
get passports. 

The troupers, under the direction 
of Conrad E. Yunker, underwent ex- 
tensive practice to get this year's 
acts in order. They gave shows every 
Friday night in high schools in the 
area. 

Paul Simmers, Gymkana president, 
stated, "This year's troupe possesses 
real talent and the members are work- 
ing hard on their acts. We are look- 
ing forward to a great show this 
year." 

This is the ninth year Gymkana has 
been on the campus. During the first 
year, the troupe was an all-male 
activity, women were added later. 

Gymkana is supported by the Stu- 
dent Government Association funds 
and has as its purpose to provide 
wholesome recreation for the student 
body, to promote gymnastics and to 
serve as ambassadors of good will for 
the University. 

New members are welcome to the 
troupe at any time during the year. 

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DEFEATED TEN CONTENDERS 

Ten teams competed in the Southern Dairy Products Judging Contest at 
Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Blacksburg, Virginia, including Alabama, Clemson, 
Georgia, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina State, Oklahoma A & M, Texas 
Tech, Virginia Polytech, and West Virginia. 

Maryland's team was composed of: Dave Kuhn, Conrad Hemphill, Fred 
Heffner and Robert Nicodemus (Alternate). This team won First Place in judg- 
ing All Products, First Place in judging Ice Cream, First Place in judging Butter, 
Second Place in judging Milk and Fifth Place in judging Cheese. 

Fred Heffner and Conrad Hemphill tied for High Individual in All Products. 
Hemphill won First Place in Butter. Heffner won First Place in Ice Cream. Kuhn 
won Second Place in Butter. 

The Maryland team won: 3 trophies, 3 gold medals and 2 silver medals. 

Pictured is the Maryland Dairy Products Judging Team. Left to right: Robert 
Nicodemus (Alt.), Jack S. Conrad (Coach), Fred Heffner, Conrad Hemphill, Dave 
Kuhn, W. S. Arbuckle (Coach). 



College of 

Agriculture 

. Dr. Howard L. Stier 

In Korea 

First Lt. Charles T. Dennis, Agricul- 
ture '50, is now serving with I 
Corps in Korea. 

The I Corps, one of three in the 
Eighth Army, coordinates an intensive 
post-truce training program for UN 
units under its control. 

Lieutenant Dennis, is a food advisor 
in the quartermaster section of the 
corps headquarters. 

A member of Alpha Gamma Rho, he 
entered the Army in January 1951 and 
arrived in the Far East in October, 
1953. 

To New York 

The entire staff of the Department 
of Entomology attended a meeting of 
the Eastern Branch of the Entomologi- 
cal Society of America at the Hotel 
New Yorker in New York City. Dr. 
George S. Langford and Dr. Ernest 
N. Cory remained for a meeting of 
the Eastern Plant Board. 

Judging Team Wins 

The Southern Dairy Products Judg- 
ing Contest, held this year at Blacks- 
burg, Virginia where V.P.I, is located, 
was won by the team from the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. Eleven teams, all 
located within the Southern section 
of the American Dairy Science Associa- 
tion, participated in the contest. The 
members of the Maryland team were: 
Conrad Hemphill, College Park, Md., a 



senior who will graduate in February 
1956; Frederick Heffner, Altoona, Pa., 
who will also graduate in February; 
Dave Kuhn, Baltimore, Md., a junior 
scheduled to graduate in February 
1956; and Robert Nicodemus, Fred- 
erick, Md., a senior in the College of 
Agriculture who will graduate in June 
1955. 

The Maryland team placed first in 
all products and had the first and sec- 
ond highest scoring individuals in the 
contest. Conrad Hemphill was top scor- 
er in the contest and also was first in 
judging butter. Fred Heffner was the 
second high scorer in the contest and 
placed first in the judging of Ice Cream. 

At the National Dairy Judging Con- 
test held at Atlantic City the Maryland 
team placed 11th among 26 different 
teams that competed. 

The team was coached by Dr. Wen- 
dell S. Arbuckle, Professor of Dairy 
Manufacturing with assistance from 
other members of the Dairy Products 
Technology staff. 

Dad's Day 

The fathers of Maryland students 
and other visitors to the College Park 
campus on Thanksgiving (Dad's) Day, 
were able to obtain an excellent idea 
of the varied and important functions 
performed by the College of Agricul- 
ture from the exhibit that was pre- 
pared by the staff. The exhibit received 
many complimentary comments, even 
from graduates of other colleges of 
the University who saw the exhibit. 
The exhibit depicted the nature of Re- 
search., Educational (both Extension 
and resident teaching) and Service ac- 
tivities of the College of Agriculture. 



86 



Maryland 



The interrelationships of each of these 
activities was emphasized as well as 
their far reaching effects. 

Addresses Farm Hands 

Warren (Buddy) Myers, Howard 
County agent, recently gave a very 
interesting talk about his recent trip 
abroad with the Maryland Dairy Cat- 
tle Judging team. He described agri- 
cultural conditions which he observed 
in Great Britain and Western Europe 
and described some of the highlights 
of his trip. He was complimented high- 
ly for his effective and interesting 
representation. The Farm Hands is an 
organization of men and women in 
Washington, D. C, who are farm 
reared and are still actively inter- 
ested in farm affairs. They have met 
for lunch each Tuesday for the past 
thirty years without interruption, ex- 
cept for holidays. The group includes 
many people who are very prominent 
in agricultural affairs of the nation. 
With United Fruit 

N. C. Thornton '27, has been named 
Director of the Division of Tropical 
Research for the United Fruit Com- 
pany. His headquarters will be La 
Lima, Honduras, Central America. 

Dr. Thornton earned his Masters of 
Science degree at Maryland in 1928 
and a Doctor of Philosophy in Plant 
Physiology, at Cornell in 1933. He was 
on the staff of the Boyce Thompson In- 
stitute for Plant Research as a Plant 
Physiologist and Biochemist from 1929 
to 1945. 

He later became Technical Repre- 
sentative for the Fine Chemicals Di- 
vision of Carbide and Chemical Corpo- 
ration and joined the United Fruit or- 
ganization in 1948. 

Dr. Thornton was awarded the A. 
Cressy Morrison prize in Biology by 
the New York Academy of Sciences in 
1938 and served as a consultant to the 
Quartermaster Corps of the U. S. 
Army during the war. He is a member 
of the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science, the Ameri- 
can Chemical Society, American So- 
ciety for Horticultural Science, Ameri- 
can Botanical Society and the Phyto- 
pathological Society. 

Dr. Thornton married Louise Mc- 
Clellan in Cochranville, Pa., in 1936. 
They have four daughters, Ellen, Bar- 
rie, Mary Beth and Frances. They take 
an active part in community affairs, 
Dr. Thornton having served as presi- 
dent of LaLima Golf Club and Mrs. 
Thornton doing social work in the 
Ladies Welfare. 

Almost simultaneously came the an- 
nouncement of the birth of a son named 
Norwood Charles, Jr. The Thornton's 
now have a reason for a double cele- 
bration. 

Visited England 

Joseph Wm. "Baldy" Kinghorne '11, 
has let us know that he spent over 
;3 weeks in Europe this summer, visit- 
ing England, Scotland and France. A 
part of the time was spent in Edin- 
burgh, Scotland attending the 10th 
World's Poultry Congress. He was 
appointed an official delegate by the 
U. S. Department of State and also 
attended as Vice-President of the 
World's Poultry Science Association. 

Maryland 



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He was re-elected to this office for 
three years and begins a second term 
on January 1, 1955. 

The trip included a visit to the fam- 
ily's ancestral home at Kinghorn in 
Fifeshire. 

Agricultural Scholarships 

There is a variety of scholarships 
granted by commercial concerns, agri- 
cultural societies and foundations for 
agricultural students. Some are award- 
ed prior to entry as a freshman and 
some are awarded to upper classmen. 
The latter are generally rewards for 
superior scholastic and leadership ac- 
tivities. In addition agricultural stu- 
dents are eligible to all general scholar- 
ships and grants given for students 
who attend the University of Mary- 
land. All scholarships are under the 
supervision of the Scholarship Com- 
mittee of the University of which Dr. 
H. F. Cotterman, Dean of the Faculty, 
is Chairman. 

The following is a list of the major 
scholarships for College of Agriculture 
students, together with the present 
students holding the awards and their 
values: 

The Borden Agricultural Scholarship 
was awarded on December 15 to Don- 
aldson Frizzell, a dairy major whose 
home is at West Friendship, Howard 
County. This is a $300 award given 
annually by the Borden Company to 
the senior with the highest scholastic 
average, from among those students 
who have taken at least two dairy 
courses. 

The Dairy Technology Society makes 
an annual grant of $750 for scholar- 
ships to be awarded to Dairy Tech- 
nology majors. A freshman award of 
$250 is held by Walter Kinsey of 
Hyattsville, Prince George's County. 
Three scholarships of $125 each are 
held by Donald Dilg, a sophomore from 
Margate City, New Jersey, David 
Kuhn, a junior from Baltimore, and 
Robert Nicodemus, a senior from 
Frederick. Two scholarships of $62.50 
each are held by seniors, Frederick 
Heffner of Saxton, Pennsylvania and 
Conrad Hemphill of Hagerstown. 

Robert Parker, a sophomore of 
Salisbury, Wicomico County, holds the 
John H. Dulaney & Sons Scholarship. 
It is a four-year scholarship worth 
$650 in the freshman year and $450 
each of the last three years. The 
scholarship is for a student from 
Wicomico County who plans to enter 
the Commercial Processing of Horti- 
cultural Crops Curriculum, and is 
awarded on the basis of a competi- 
tive examination. 

The four Esso Scholarships are held 
by freshman William Powell III of 
Ellicott City, Howard County; sopho- 
more Spencer Street of Street, Har- 
ford County; Junior James Smith of 
Flintstone, Allegany County; and 
Senior Kenneth Roche of Sparks, 
Baltimore County. The scholarships 
are worth $100 a year for each of 
four years. They are granted by the 
Esso Standard Oil Company. Recipi- 
ents must have had outstanding records 
in 4-H Club work in Maryland prior 
to entering the College of Agriculture. 

James Riggleman, a senior from 




SONG WITHOUT WORDS 



Bristol, Anne Arundel County, holds 
the Peninsula Horticultural Society 
Award. It is an annual award of $200 
granted to the outstanding junior or 
senior in the Fruit and Vegetable 
Curriculum of the Horticulture De- 
partment. 

There are twelve Sears-Roebuck 
Foundation Scholarships held by Col- 
lege of Agriculture students. One is 
held by a junior, James Smith of 
Flintstone, Allegany County. This 
award is for $500 and was won by 
Smith in competition with the out- 
standing holders of the previous fresh- 
men Sears Award Winners in Colleges 
of Agriculture in the twelve North- 
eastern states. Smith had a scholastic 
average of 3.63 for his first three 
semesters at the University of Mary- 
land. He was also outstanding in his 
FFA and 4-H Club activities. A second 
award of $250 is held by a sophomore, 
Clyde S. Street of Street, Harford 
County. Street is the outstanding indi- 
vidual from last year's freshmen recipi- 
ents of Sears Awards. He had a 3.11 
average for his freshman year. The 
ten freshmen who each hold a $200 
award are: Louis Arrington of Sykes- 
ville, Howard County; Calvin Blades 
of Denton, Caroline County; Charles 
Coale Jr., of Forest Hill, Harford 
County; James Coen of Monkton, Har- 
ford County; Thomas Johnson of Cedar 
Grove, Montgomery County; Gerald 
Loper of Sykesville, Carroll County; 
Wayne McGinnis of White Hall, Balti- 
more County; William Powell III of 
Ellicott City, Howard County; Clar- 
ence Reeder of Frederick; and Norman 
Smith of Flintstone, Allegany County. 

Louis Edward Brown, Jr. a sopho- 
more of Salisbury, Wicomico County, 
is the present holder of the Wm. B. 
Tilghman scholarship. It is a four- 
year scholarship worth $250 each year 
and is given by the William B. Tilgh- 
man Company. It is awarded to the 
outstanding student planning to enter 
the College of Agriculture from the 
four lower Eastern Shore Counties. 

Charles Hunley of Easton, a sopho- 
more and Richard Pugh of Preston, a 
freshman, are present holders of the 
J. McKenny Willis & Son Scholarship. 
This is a scholarship of $500 a year 
for four years. A new scholarship is 
awarded each year to the outstanding 
vocational agriculture graduate from 
Talbot County who enters the College 
of Agriculture. 



38 



Maryland 



College of 



Arts and Sciences 



Lois Eld Ernest 



Delinquency Rise 

(From The Xeic York Time*) 

At the present rate of increasing 
delinquency, one of every five 
boys coming of military age "in a 
very few years" may have a juvenile 
court record, a nationwide meeting 
of prison and correctional officials was 
told today. 

This statement, coupled with a 
warning that the situation posed a 
serious problem of national dimensions 
with grave implications for the armed 
forces, was contained in a report 
submitted to the eighty-fourth annual 
Congress of Correction. 

The report wa prepared by Dr. Peter 
P. Lejins, Professor of Sociology at 
Maryland, and consultant at the Air 
Force personnel and training research 
center at Lackland Air Force base in 
Texas, and Lieut. Col. Van H. Tanner, 
chief of the special operations branch 
at the base's personnel research labora- 
tory. 

The report, based on a study still 
in progress, dealt with the military 
careers of 1,413 juvenile delinquents 
from Alabama. A major finding was 
that the armed forces would have to 
devise more scientific methods of 
screening out undesirable while making 
use of former delinquents who might 
be potentially valuable in the services. 

Of the men studied, it was found 
for example that on the negative side 
47.4 per cent had had a court-martial 
of one type or another; 36.1 per cent 
had a records of demotions; 45.4 
per cent had been absent without leave 
with time lost amounting to about 
eighty-seven days a man; and {hat 
35.44 per cent had spent some time 
in confinement while in the service, 
with an average of 177 days a man. 

Among the findings on the positive 
side were that 72.2 per cent of the 
group had been honorably discharged; 
that 42.6 per cent became noncommis- 
sioned officers, and of these that 22.22 
per cent reached the grade of sergeant. 

Summarizing the findings, the in- 
vestigators said: 

"While a complete barring of former 
juvenile delinquents from the armed 
forces is impracticable in view of the 
number of juvenile delinquents in our 
population, an indiscriminate accept- 
ance of juvenile delinquents is also out 
of the question on the basis of the 
experience with the group studied 
here." 

"The solution of this problem should 
very definitely be on the very immedi- 
ate agenda of the armed forces," the 
investigators added, "to insure a ra- 
tional utilization of all available man- 
power and at the same time to elimi- 
nate unnecessary waste." 

At Trinity College 

Dr. John S. Toll, professor and head 
of the Department of Physics partici- 
pated in a panel discussion of the 
Chesapeake Section of the American 

Maryland 




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Association of Physics Teachers at 

Trinity College. 

Dr. Toll was one of three speakers 
in a panel discussion on "Futures for 
Students of Physics." Other panel 
members were Dean Thomas M. Kil- 
lian of the Catholic University's School 
of Engineering and Architecture; and 
Dr. Gregory Hartman, technical direc- 
tor for research, at the Naval Ord- 
nance Laboratory. 

Meteorites 

The recent research of Dr. S. Fred 
Singer, associate professor of physics, 
has closed the baffling case of the 
origin and history of meteorites. Re- 
sults of his work appeared in an article 
in the "Scientific American." 

Since primitive times man has won- 
dered about falling objects from the 
heavens. It was not until 1803, how- 
ever, that Jean Biot proved to the 
French Academy that the objects came 
from outer space. Since the time of 
Biot, scientists have been diligently 
trying to "piece together" the mystery 
of the origin and age of meteorites 
through the composition of the mate- 
rial. 

Realizing that "before they crash to 
earth these stony or metallic objects 
are exposed to cosmic rays," Dr. Sing- 
er's work has proven that "helium pro- 
duced by this bombardment provides a 
new clue to the planetary castrophes of 
the past." 

In his article the scientist states, 
"Some four to five billion years ago a 
group of small protoplanets about 30 
to more than 500 miles in diameter 
formed from collections of dust be- 
tween Mars and Jupiter. After they 
condensed, their internal radioactivity 
heated them very rapidly. They melted, 
but soon thereafter began to solidify 
the planets' matter separated into 
the metallic and stony phases. 

"Eventually the protoplanets collided 
with one another and broke up into 
asteroids and meteorites. The new cos- 
mic-ray studies allow us to date these 
catastrophes — some seem to have taken 
place around 300 million years ago." 

A&S Faculty Notes 

Dr. S. Fred Singer, Physics Depart- 
ment spoke at a colloquium at the 
Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns 
Hopkins University in Silver Spring 
on "Minimum Artificial Satellite for 
Scientific Observations." 

Dr. Franklin D. Cooley, associate 
professor of English, was elected Vice 
President of the Maryland Association 
for Higher Education. 

Dr. Sherman K. Fitzgerald, Sociology 
Department, served as moderator of 
a panel appearing before the semi- 
annual meeting of the Fourth District 
of Maryland Federation of Women's 
Clubs. Rev. Jesse W. Myers, Director 
of the Westminster Foundation, was 
also on the panel. 

Chemistry Grant 

Upon recommendation of its Advis- 
ory Committee, the Board of Directors 



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of Research Corporation, 405 Lexing- 
ton Avenue, New York 17, New York, 
has given the University a $2700 Fred- 
erick Gardner Cottrell grant. The funds 
will be used to support a project of 
Dr. Charles E. White, professor in the 
University's Department of Chemistry. 
Dr. White's project is entitled "De- 
termination of Optimum Wave Length 
for Exciting Fluorescence and Deter- 
mination of the Fluorescence Specti-a 
for Various Chelate Compounds of 
Analytical Importance." 

Speaks At Easton 

Professor Peter P. Lejins of the De- 
partment of Sociology of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland College of Arts and 
Sciences, spoke at the annual conven- 
tion of the Maryland Municipal League. 
The meeting of mayors and city coun- 
cilmen of the State of Maryland who 
make up the membership of the league 
met at Easton, Maryland. 

The topic of Dr. Lejins address was 
"The Role of Municipal Governments 
in Combating Juvenile Delinquency." 

Toll On Panel 

The Chesapeake Section of the Amer- 
ican Association of Physics Teachers 
held a panel discussion on "Futures for 
Students of Physics," in Washington, 
D. C. Panel members were Thomas M. 
Killian, Dean, School of Engineering, 
Catholic University, John S. Toll, Pro- 
fessor and Head of Physics, University 
of Maryland, and Gregory Hartmen, 
Technical Director for Research, NOL. 

At Memphis 

From the Zoology Department at- 
tending the 29th Annual Meeting of 






After being promoted to Captain in 
Japan, Donald L. ("Smoky") Pierce 
(A&S '50), received the silver bars of 
his new rank from Colonel Robert J. 
Philpott, headquarters commandant, 
Far East Command. Captain Pierce, 
whose wife, Laura, is in Japan, has 
been with command headquarters since 
February 1953. A veteran of World 
War II, he returned, after graduation, 
to active duty during the Korean con- 
flict. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Russell U. Pierce of Beltsville. 



40 



Maryland 



the American Society of Parasitologists 
at Memphis, Term, were Dr. G. W. 
Wharton, Dr. George Anastos, Dr. 
David Lincicome, Captain Bryce Wal- 
ton, Captain Donald Price and Mr. 
Willard N. Smith. Dr. Wharton and 
Dr. Anastos both presented papers at 
the meeting along with Mr. Smith, who 
prepared his paper in conjunction with 
Mrs. M. B. Chitwood, USDA. 
Dr. Ross Elected 

Dr. Sherman Ross, Psychology De- 
partment, was elected to membership 
in the American Society of Naturalists, 
in recognition of his contributions to 
the field of animal behavior. Dr. Ross, 
who is a Scientific Associate of the 
R. B. Jackson Memorial Laboratory, 
Bar Harbor, Maine, delivered one of 
the summer lectures and participated 
in a conference on the role of the re- 
search laboratory in the training of 
science students during the 25th anni- 
versary celebration of this laboratory. 
Andrews Elected 

Dr. Thomas G. Andrews, Professor 
and Head of Psychology, was elected 
to serve as chairman of a technical 
advisory committee under the U. S. Air 
Coordinating Committee to aid in es- 
tablishing new visibility standards for 
marking and lighting tall broadcasting 
towers and other such hazards to com- 
mercial and military air navigation. 
At Williamsburg 

Dr. Thomas G. Andrews, Head of the 
Psychology Department, was the 
speaker at the annual meeting of the 
Illuminating Engineering Society Com- 
mittee on Aviation Ligting, at Wil- 
liamsburg, Va. 

In Baltimore 

Dr. Arthur W. Ayers, Department 
of Psychology, recently discussed the 
industrial use of Psychological Tests 
at a November meeting of the Safety 
Engineers Club in Baltimore. 
Addresses Dairymen 

Dr. Raymond N. Doetsch, Bacteriol- 
ogy Department, gave a lecture on 
"The Bacteriology of Starter Cul- 
tures" to the section cultured milk 
and cottage cheese manufacturing of 
the Tenth Annual Maryland Dairy 
Technology Conference held on campus. 
On Meteorites 

Dr. S. Fred Singer, Physics Depart- 
ment addressed the Philosophical 
Society of Washington on the subject 
of "The Age of Meteorites." 

Dr. S. Fred Singer is the author of 
an article on "The Origin of Meteor- 
ites," appearing in the recent issue of 
"The Scientific American." 

Fluorometric Analysis 

Dr. Charles E. White, Chemistry 
Department, delivered a paper on 
Fluorometric Analysis at an Interna- 
tional Symposium on Trace Analysis 
held at the Sloan Kettering Institute 
in New York. 

At Walter Reed 

H. C. Ellinghausen and Michael J. 
Pelczar, Bacteriology Department, 
spoke at a meeting of the Washington 
Branch of the Society of American 
Bacteriologists in the Sternberg Audi- 
torium of the Walter Reed Army 
Medical Center. They presented re- 
sults of research dealing with char- 
acterization of bacterial pigments by 



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application of ultra-violet absorption 
technique. 

At Johns Hopkins 

Dr. Otho Beall, English Department, 
was elected Secretary-Treasurer of 
the Chesapeake Chapter of the Ameri- 
can Studies Association at the Chap- 
ter's meeting at the Johns Hopkins 
Faculty Club in Baltimore. 

Dr. Lucius Garvin 

Dr. Lucius Garvin, Department of 
Philosophy, participated in a discussion 
of "In What Ways Can Philosophy 
and Operations Research be Mutually 
Beneficial" at the Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity Operations Research Institute, 
Chevy Chase, Maryland. Dr. Garvin 
also read a paper entitled "Emotivism, 
Expression, and Referential Meaning" 
at a meeting of the American Society 
for Aesthetics is Bloomington, Indiana. 

Appointed Referee 

The Association of Official Agri- 
cultural Chemists of Washington, D.C. 
announced the reappointment of Dr. 
Michael J. Pelczar, professor of bacteri- 
ology as associate referee on the 
subject media for disinfectant testing. 

As an associate referee, Dr. Pelczar 
will evaluate various new bacterio- 
logical media proposed for the purpose 
of standardization or evaluation as a 
disinfectant. 

To Connecticut 

Six University of Maryland geog- 
raphy students and their professor 
made a three day field trip to Con- 
necticut, for the purpose of studying 
industrial locations and developments 
at the Princeton Knitting Mills plants 
in Watertown, Waterbury, Torrington, 
Litchfield and Goshen. 

At the Princeton plants, the uni- 
versity students observed knitting, 
dyeing, and finishing operations. They 
were given the opportunity to inter- 
view employees, management per- 
sonnel and representatives of the 
Princeton Mills Employees' Associa- 
tion. 

In charge of the group was Dr. John 
C. Herbst, Jr. Students were Charles 
A. Seitz, Robert Giannetti, George 
Witcomb, Robert W. Keefer, Thomas 
A. Lillis and Miss Mary E. Bomberger. 

For Foreign Students 

Furman A. Burgers, assistant pro- 
fessor of foreign languages and for- 
eign student advisor, attended a re- 
gional conference on international stu- 
dent exchange, sponsored by the In- 
stitute of International Education and 
the regional representatives of the Na- 
tional Association of Foreign Stu- 
dent advisors at Williamsburg, Va. 

Representing the National Capital 
Area for the National Association of 
Foreign Students Advisors, Mr. Berg- 
ers also served as panel chairman of 
a discussion on the topic "Foreign Stu- 
dents on the Campus." Panel mem- 
bers included representatives of the 
Department of State, Department of 
Immigration, Institute of International 
Education and the National Associa- 
tion of Foreign Student Advisors. 



In Philadelphia 

The University's debating team par- 
ticipated in a debate at Temple Uni- 
versity, Philadelphia. Other universi- 
ties represented were Pennsylvania, 
Penn State and Princeton. 

Subject of the debate was this years' 
national debate topic, Resolved: The 
United States should extend diplomatic 
recognition to communist China. Ac- 
companied by H. Russell Gillis, director 
of debate forensics and instructor in 
speech at the University of Maryland, 
student debaters included Robert E. 
Farnell, Wilbur H. Harris, John C. 
Tracey and Andrew P. Reny. 
With Dow Co. 

Charles R. Pfeifer, who received his 
Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry in 1954, 
has commenced work with the Dow 
Chemical Company. He will serve as a 
chemist in the High Pressure Labora- 
tory. 

Award To Spalding 

Joseph P. Spalding, '39 A&S, re- 
cently received the Certificate of 
Achievement Award in a ceremony at 
the Diamond Ordnance Laboratory, 
Washington, D. C. 

The recognition came "for liaison 
with foreign scientific missions result- 
ing in more effective prosecution of 
development programs." Mr. Spalding 
has specialized in electronic engineer- 
ing since joining the Government ser- 
vice at the Naval Research Labora- 
tory in 1941. He was transferred to 
the National Bureau of Standards in 
1950 and the portion of the Bureau to 
which he was assigned, was transferred 
to the Ordnance Corps, Department of 
Army in September 1953. He became 
Assistant Chief of the Guided Missile 
Laboratory in December 1953 and at 
present is the Acting Chief of that 
Laboratory. 

From Walter Reed 

Dr. Samuel J. Ajl, chief of the sec- 
tion on microbial chemistry at the 
Army Medical Graduate School of Wal- 
ter Reed Army Medical Center, ad- 
dressed the students and faculty of the 
Department of Bacteriology. 

Topic of the address was "Terminal 
Respiration of Bacteria." 
Census Tract 

Thomas P. Imse, Department of So- 
ciology, was elected Chairman of the 
Permanent County Census Tract Com- 
mittee for Prince Georges County. Mr. 
Imse also was the cbairman of the 
Steering Committee for Census Tract- 
ing. 

Seminar Chairman 

Kennon F. McCormick, Counseling 
Psychologist, attended the 5th annual 
meeting of the Southern College Per- 
sonnel Association, where he was 
chairman of a seminar whose topic was 
"The University's Responsibility for 
the Gifted and Superior Student." 



IN CHICAGO 

F. A. Bridgers, Foreign Student Ad- 
visor, attended a meeting of regional 
representatives of the National As- 
sociation of Foreign Student Advisors 
in Chicago. He was the representa- 
tive from Delaware, Maryland, Vir- 
ginia and the District of Columbia. 



42 



Maryland 



Glenn L. Martin 
College of 



Engineering & 
Aeronautical Sciences 



Col. O. H. Saunders '10 
-A. Lawrence Guess '51 




Dean Steinberg 



Concrete Short Course 

The Ninth Annual Short Course on 
Aggregates and Concrete was held 
at the University. Sponsored jointly 
by the university's Glenn L. Martin 
Institute of Technology, the National 
Ready Mixed Con- 
crete Association 
and the National 
Sand and Gravel 
Association 
the course was 
under the direction 
of Dean S. S. Stein- 
berg of the College 
of Engineering. 

The program in- 
cluded lectures and 
demonstrations, with 
short course stu- 
dents having the 
opportunity to make a choice between 
sessions which place chief emphasis 
on laboratory testing and simultaneous 
sessions which deal with the propor- 
tioning of concrete and allied subjects. 
Purpose of the short course was to 
provide instruction to representatives 
of member companies of the two asso- 
ciations in basic and fundamental 
technical information on aggregates 
and concrete. 

Additional Teachers 
In addition to Dean Steinberg the 
teaching staff included association 
staff members Stanton Walker, direc- 
tor of engineering; Delmar L. Bloem, 
assistant director of engineering; 
James F. Shook, associate engineer; 
Richard D. Gaynor, assistant research 
engineer; and Herman L. Knoppel, Jr., 
laboratory technician. 

Featured Speakers 
Featured speakers during the four 
day meeting were Edward Kirby, pro- 
fessional engineer; Herbert Insley, 
consulting mineralogist; and W. J. 
McCoy, director of research of the 
Lehigh Portland Cement Company. 
In Canada 
Director Robert Byrus, Fire Exten- 
sion Service, spoke at two sessions of 
the Province of Ontario Dominion Fire 
Chief's Convention. The meetings, were 
for the purpose of training Canadian 
fire chiefs. 

Mr. Byrus spoke on the State of 
Maryland fire training program and 
on leadership. 

With Power Commission 
Louis Flax, (B.S. of Chem. E., '43 
and also LL.B., from George Wash- 
ington, Law — '51), whose address is 
4825 Illinois Avenue, N.W., Washing- 
ton 11, D. C, is Trial Attorney for 
the Federal Power Commission, Wash- 
ington, D. C. Formerly he was a Na- 
tural Gas Engineer with the same Com- 
mission. Flax is unmarried. 



In Europe And China 

His military service from February, 
1943 to October, 1947, covered duty in 
Central Europe and also in China. 

He is a Registered Professional 
Engineer in the District and also a 
member of the District of Columbia 
Bar. 

At Waynesboro, Va. 

M. P. Flory, (B.S. of M.E. '31), of 
128 Crompton Road, Waynesboro, Va., 
is engaged in practice in the Power 
Engineering field. His Navy service 
covered a period of three years and 
included duty in Tarawa, Siapan, and 
Tinian as ship salvage officer. For two 
years he was a Training Specialist 
with Veterans Administration. 

He and his wife, Mrs. Sarah B. 
Flory, have three children, Jeanette, 
Charlie and Peggy. 

Flory is a member of the Board of 
Directors of the Men's Club of Waynes- 
boro and also a member of the Engi- 
neers Club of his locality. 
Detroit Corporation 

H. Stanley Ford, (B.S. of C.E., '14), 
who resides at 840 Rivenoak Road, 
Birmingham, Mich., is Vice-President 
and General Manager of Bigelow Lip- 
tak Corporation, Detroit, Mich. 

Ford has been most successful in 
the engineering field and is ably pre- 
sented in "Who's Who in Engineering," 
"Who's Who in Commerce and Indus- 
try" and "Who's Who in the Middle 
West." 

Served In Navy 

Ford served with the Navy for 19 
months in World War I. 

The old M.A.C., from which Ford 
graduated in 1914 has seen many 
changes since he received his diploma 
here, and he may well be proud of his 
Old Alma Mater. 

On Okinawa 

Pvt. Edward Boyce, Engineering, '51 
is serving on Okinawa, where he is a 
construction inspector with the Oki- 
nawa Engineer District. The 26-year- 
old soldier, arrived on the island in 
September, '54. 

With U.S. Rubber 

W. I. Ford, (B.S. of M.E., '25), 
whose present address is 410 McKinley 
Road, Grosse Pointe Farms, Michigan, 
is a Tire Engineer with the U.S. Rub- 
ber Co., of Detroit. He was formerly 
with the Bates Valve Bag Company of 
Chicago, 111. 

Mr. Ford married Miss Julia Louise 
Behring, (B.A. '27, from U. of Md.). 
Her B. of A. was in Romance Langu- 
ages. Mr. and Mrs. Ford have two 
children, Mrs. Patricia Anne Ford 
Beyer, and a twenty year old daughter, 
Carol Louise. 

Various Chairmanships 

Ford is a member of the Society of 
Automotive Engineers and has held 
various committee chairmanships in the 
Society. Mrs. Ford has been president 
of the Detroit Alumnae group. While 
at Maryland, both were active in Greek 
Letter organizations. 

With Dayton & Co. 

Carl J. Fuhrmann, of the Class of 
1918 in Eelectrical Engineering, who 



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spent three years at College Park, now 
lives at 1057 Broadview Boulevard, 
Dayton, Ohio, and is in charge of "Area 
Development" for the Dayton Power 
and Light Company. The "Area De- 
velopment" program has been activated 
by the company to attract business and 
industry to the smaller communities 
in the territory served by the Power 
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mann, — "In the capable hands of Carl 
Fuhrmann, the robust Terrapin from 
the University of Maryland (Class of 
'18), we can feel confident that the 
program will continue to progress." 
"The World War I veteran . . . came 
here in 1929 by way of the Consumer's 
Power Company of Jackson, Michi- 
gan . . ." 

Fuhrmann was, for a time, Factory 
Representative for Colt-Noak Co., of 
Hartford, Conn. 

Fuhrmann married Miss Margaret 
M. Frazier, and they have four married 
children, the youngest of whom, Ed- 
ward, took Mechanical Engineering at 
Cincinnati University. The other chil- 
dren are, — Carl J, Jr., Glenn F. and 
Mercedes J. 

Fuhrmann served almost a year in 
the Infantry in World War I. He is 
active in veterans, fraternal and civic 
organizations, and is author of many 
articles and pamphlets dealing with 
electric meter engineering, farm light- 
ing, power and water systems, and 
other technical and non-technical mat- 
ters. 

In Connecticut 

Harold H. Franke, (B.S. of C.E., '39), 
who took his Masters degree at Colum- 
bia in Civil Engineering in 1940, now 
lives at Riveredge, Milford, Conn., and 
is a Structural Engineer with Fletcher- 
Thompson, Inc., of 211 State Street, 
Bridgeport, Conn. 

Mr. Franke and his wife, Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Graves Franke, have one daugh- 
ter, Fredrika Taylor Franke, aged four 
years. Franke is a Registered Connecti- 
cut Professional Engineer. 

Another In Connecticut 

Henry C. Gallagher, Jr., (B.S. of 
M.E., '40) whose address is Suffield, 
Conn., is Senior Engineer in the Prod- 
uct Research and Development De- 
partment of Bigelow-Sanford Carpet 
Co., Inc., Thompsonville, Conn. Before 
joining that company, he was a Layout 
Draftsman with the Glenn L. Martin 
Co., of Baltimore. 

Gallagher is married, and he and his 
wife, Mrs. Mary Eunice Gallagher, 
have one son, Richard Edwin, aged 
six years. 

Gallagher's military service was in 
the Ordnance Department for &Yi 
years, during which time he held the 
rank of Major and served in Iran on 
the Russian Supply Route, and then 
went to the Rhineland and Central 
Europe Theater. 

Gallagher is Chairman of the Zoning 
Board of Appeals of Suffield, Conn., 
and President of the Engineering So- 
ciety of Bigelow-Sanford Carpet Co., 
Inc. 

In New Jersey 

George W. Gibble, (B.S. of Chem. E,, 
'44), of 431 Main Street, Fort Lee, 
New Jersey, is Assistant Manager of 
the Manufacturing and Oil Supply De- 
partment of Arabian American Oil Co. 
Previously he was a Chemical Engineer 
overseas with Aramco: Design Engi- 
neer with H. K. Ferguson Co., of 
Cleveland, Ohio; Chemical Engineer 
with Hagan Corp., Pittsburgh, Pa.; 



and Chemical Engineer with Koppers 
Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

He and his wife, Peggy Jean, have 
two sons, George Ward, Jr. aged 5 
and Gregory Robert, aged three years. 

Gibble is a member of the American 
Chemical Society; American Institute 
of Chemical Engineers; and of Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon. He has published a 
paper entitled, "An Automatic Degas- 
ser for Steam Sampling," in ASME 
Transactions for July 1950, Vol. 72, 
No. 5. 

In Marine Corps 

William R. Gifford, (B.S. of M.E., 
'31) of 4215 Van Buren Street, Uni- 
versity Park, Hyattsville, Maryland, 
is an officer in the U. S. Marine Corps 
stationed at Marine Corps Headquar- 
ters. His wife, Elizabeth Mims (Kappa 
Delta) is also a graduate of the Arts 
& Science College of 1931. They have 
four children, — Ann, 16; Cynthia, 13; 
Linda, 11; and Susan, 6. 

During World War II, Colonel Gif- 
ford served in the Pacific Theater at 
Pelelieu and on Luzon. He has many 
decorations which include Letter of 
Commendation with ribbon; Presi- 
dential Unit Citation, (1st Marine Di- 
vision); and Philippine Presidential 
Unit Citation. 

Colonel Gifford is Past Master of 
Acacia Lodge No. 18 FAAM, Washing- 
ton, D. C, and also belongs to National 
Sojourners, Military Order of the Cara- 
bao, and American Legion. 
With U.S. Bureau 

Walter R. Hardisty, (B.S. of C.E., 
'19) residing at 1515 44th Street, N.W., 
Washington 7, D. C, is Chief of the 
Review Section, Design Division, U. S. 
Bureau of Public Roads. 

He and his wife, Jean Taylor Har- 
disty, have two children, — John 14 and 
Jean 9 years of age. 

Hardisty held a Reserve Commission 
for five years. He is a member of 
Kappa Alpha and also of the American 
Society of Civil Engineers. 
In Pennsylvania 

Cecil L. Harvey, (B.S. of E.E., '39), 
of 329 Center Street, Ridgway, Penn- 
sylvania, is with The Elliott Company, 
Ridgway Division, as Application Engi- 
neer for large electrical machinery. Mr. 
Harvey took additional studies at the 
University of Pittsburgh in 1950. Prior 
to going with the Elliott Company, he 
was Sales Engineer of Electrical Con- 
tacts with Gibson Electric Co. 

He and his wife, Mrs. Betty A. Har- 
vey, have two sons, — Bobby 8 and 
Billy, 4 years of age. 

Harvey saw military service as a 
Captain during the period from Febru- 
ary, 1941 to December, 1945, with duty 
in the European Theater, where he was 
awarded the Bronze Star Medal with 
two oak leaf clusters. 

He is a member of the American In- 
stitute of Electrical Engineers', Masons, 
and Toastmasters. 

In Baltimore 

Edward C. Hawkins, (B.S. of M.E., 

'41), living at 900 Evesham Avenue, 

Baltimore 12, Maryland, is Principal 

Mechanical Engineer with Bendix Radio 



44 



Maryland 



Division, Bendix Aviation Corp. Form- 
erly he was a Layout Designer with 
The Glenn L. Martin Company. 

Hawkins and his wife, Mrs. Martha 
W. Hawkins, have two children, — Vir- 
ginia A., four years and Edward C, 
Jr., 2 years of age. 

Hawkins is a member of the Ameri- 
can Society of Mechanical Engineers; 
United States Power Squadrons; and 
North East Baltimore Young Repub- 
lican Club. 

In California 
Charles B. Pinckney, (Eng. '51), is 
a member of the technical staff of the 
Radar Division, Hughes Research and 
Development, Culver City, Calif. He 
was formerly employed with the Bon- 
neville Power Administration. 
From Iowa 
Dr. William A. Pennington, has 
been appointed as professor, metal- 
lurgical option. 

Dr. Pennington received his doctor- 
ate from Iowa State College, Ames, 
Iowa in 1933 with his major in metal- 
lurgy and physical chemistry. He is 
national treasurer of the American 
Society of Metals and received the 
Henry Marion Howe Medal for the 
paper of the highest merit published 
in the 1946 Transactions of that 
society. He has been research engi- 
neer with the Armco Steel Company, 
Middletown, Ohio as a fellow in charge 
of research on foundry practice of the 
Mellon Institute, Pittsburg, Pa., and 
has had a number of years' experience 
as a teacher. He has published numer- 
ous scientific and technologic papers 
on metallurgy and on air conditioning, 
and holds patents in these fields. 

Dr. Wilbert J. Huff, chairman of 
the department of chemical engineer- 
ing, commenting on Dr. Pennington's 
appointment stated today, "We are 
happy to have Dr. Pennington with us, 
not only for the major responsibility 
in metallurgy, but also because of 
the stimulus his presence will give 
to the department's work in air con- 
ditioning." 

The new appointee was formerly 
chief metallurgist and chief chemist 
with the Carrier Corporation. His 
appointment will be effective on De- 
cember 1, 1954. 

Fluid Dynamics 

Mr. S. I. Pai, Institute for Fluid 
Dynamics and Applied Mathematics, 
delivered a paper "On Turbulent and 
Applied Jet Mixing of Two Gases at 
Constant Temperature" at the 1954 
Annual Meeting of the American 
Society of Mechanical Engineers. 

Mr. Alfred Huber, Institute for Fluid 
Dynamics and Applied Mathematics, 
spoke in Cambridge, Mass. at a meet- 
ing of the American Mathematical 
Society. Mr. Huber's topic was "On 
an Inequality of Fejer and Riesz." 

Engineering Panel 

A panel discussion on the subject of 
engineering, physical science, and edu- 
cation for industry was held in the 
auditorium of Symons Hall. 

John R. Thayer, a senior in the 
College of Engineering, presided over 
the panel. Panel members were Dr. 
John T. Cox, Jr., consulting and chemi- 




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cal engineer of Washington, D. C; 
John Poth, vice-president of engineer- 
ing of the Engineering and Research 
Corporation of Riverdale, Md.; Harry 
B. Shaw, chief engineer of the Wash- 
ington Suburban Sanitary Commission, 
Hyattsville, Md.; and Dr. Robert I. 
Sarbacher, a Washington, D. C, con- 
sulting engineer. 

New Book 

A book entitled "Fluid Dynamics of 
Jets" written by Dr. Shih-I Pai, as- 
sociate research professor in the In- 
stitute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied 
Mathematics has been published by 
D. Van Nostrand Company, New York. 

Dr. Pai's book is a comprehensive 
treatment of modern developments in 
fluid dynamics with particular em- 
phasis on the flow file of jets for engi- 
neers, researchers and graduate stu- 
dents. 

Gaseous Fuels 

Dr. Wilbert J. Huff, Professor and 
chairman of the Department of Chemi- 
cal Engineering, has been called upon 
by the Encyclopedia Britannica to con- 
tribute to the major revision of that 
encyclopedia the section on, "Gas 
Supply in the United States." Dr. 
Huff has for many years been author 
of the section of the Chemical Engi- 
neers Handbook which deals with gase- 
ous fuels. For the Gas Engineers Hand- 
book now in preparation, Dr. Huff is 
writing the chapter on Gas Purification. 

On Rural Education 

Dr. Clarence A. Newell, Professor of 
Educational Administration, spoke at 
one of the Division meetings of the 
Conference on Rural Education in 
Washington, D. C, and served on the 
findings committee to summarize the 
results of the conference. The con- 
ference, which is held once every ten 
years, was attended by approximately 
three thousand leading educators and 
citizens from all parts of the United 
States, as well as by representatives 
from many foreign nations. 

Dr. Janet A. Wessel 

Dr. Janet A. Wessel, Physical Educa- 
tion, served as a consultant for the 
State Department of Health, C.S.C.S., 
Baltimore to the Institute for Nursing 
Home Operators and presented a paper. 
Dr. Wessel was also a consultant in 
Physical Therapy at the recent United 
Cerebral Palsy Regional Convention 
in Richmond, Virginia, where she pre- 
sented a paper on Community Level 
Planning for Handicapped Children. 
Attend Conference 

From the College of Physical Educa- 
tion participants in the National Con- 
ference for Physical Education in 
Washington, D. C. were Dr. Dorothy 
Deach, Dr. Benjamin Massey, Miss 
Martha Haverstick, and Dr. Burris 
Husman. 

To Cincinnati 

Dean S. S. Steinberg, attended a 
meeting of the Engineers' Council for 
Professional Development, the national 
accrediting agency for engineering cur- 
ricula, in Cincinnati. 

Dr. Steinberg is a member of the 
Regional Inspection Committee of the 
Council. 

The Council includes engineering 
schools of the District of Columbia, 



Decorated 




RECEIVES LEGION OF MERIT 

Brig. Gen. Frank O. Bowman, Engi- 
neer, United States Army Forces, Far 
East, congratulates Major Turner G. 
Timberlake (Engr. '41), Chief, Main- 
tenance Branch, Supply Division, Engi- 
neer Section, AFFE, upon receiving the 
Legion of Merit for exceptionally mer- 
itorious service in Japan from 10 June 
1952 to 27 July 1954, as Mrs. Helen B. 
Timberlake looks on. 



Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, Vir- 
ginia, West Virginia and the metropoli- 
tan area of New York City. 
Legion Of Merit 

Major Turner G. Timberlake (M.E. 
'41) was presented the Legion of Merit 
for exceptionally meritorious conduct 
in the performance of outstanding ser- 
vices as Chief, Maintenance Branch, 
Supply Division, Engineer Section, 
Headquarters, United States Army 
Forces, Far East during the period 
10 June 1952 to 27 July 1954 in sup- 
port of the Korean Operation. 

The citation for the award read as 
follows: "Major Turner G. Timberlake 
0423392, Corps of Engineers, United 
States Army, distinguished himself by 
exceptionally meritorious conduct in 
the performance of outstanding service 
as Chief, Maintenance Branch, Supply 
Division, Engineer Section, Headquar- 
ters, Japan Logistical Command and 
Headquarters, United States Army 
Forces, Far East in Japan, from 10 
June 1952 to 27 July 1954. Demon- 
strating outstanding resourcefulness 
and technical proficiency, Major Tim- 
berlake performed outstanding services 
in the field of engineer equipment 
maintenance in direct support of com- 
bat forces in Korea. Through his clear 
understanding of logistical support re- 
quired for current and projected opera- 
tions and intimate knowledge of the 
technical aspects of engineer equip- 
ment, he overcame innumerable com- 
plicated problems inherent in main- 
taining a wide variety of repair parts 
necessary to maintain equipment in ex- 
cellent operating condition. Under his 
able management seventy-five million 
dollars' worth of material was rebuilt 
and restored to the depot stockpile. 
Further demonstrating his ingenuity 
and exceptional competence, Major 
Timberlake introduced new procedures 



46 



Maryland 



to implement a theater standardization 
program for engineer equipment, the 
effects of which have been reflected on 
a world wide basis and have resulted in 
tremendous savings to the United 
States Government. Major Timber- 
lake's efficient and successful control of 
maintenance support for combat forces 
aggressive actions, and notable achieve- 
ments furthered the United Nations' 
campaign against Communist aggres- 
sion, reflecting great credit upon him- 
self and the military service." 

While attending the University, 
Major Timberlake was active in many 
school activities including the Dia- 
mondback and the yearly freshmen 
"M" book. Timberlake was also a 
member of the Omicron Delta Kappa, 
Phi Delta Epsilon and other campus 
organizations. Timberlake is also mar- 
ried to a former Marylander, Helen 
Bryan Timberlake of Chevy Chase, 
Maryland and they have two daughters, 
Christine and Diana, ages 7 and 4 
respectively. 

Major Timberlake is returning to the 
Zone of Interior during November, 
1954 and will be discharged from active 
service. Upon becoming a civilian, he 
has been selected to direct the Engi- 
neer Maintenance Technical Office at 
the Granite City Engineer Depot under 
the direction of the Corps of Engineers. 

With I.B.M. 

S. S. Stabler, Jr., '39, has been pro- 
moted from Administrative Assistant 
to Department Manager with the In- 
ternational Business Machines Corpora- 
tion. Mr. Stabler recently moved to 
New York with his family and has 
been a member of two IBM 100% 
i clubs. He has qualified in a special 
sales event and has been with the 
i Corporation since July, 1949. He was 
formerly Washington Federal Special 
Representative, administrative assis- 
tant. 

Speaks On Caribbean 
Dean S. S. Steinberg addressed the 
Fifth Annual Conference on the Carib- 
bean at the University of Florida, 
Gainesville. He was the guest of the 
University of Florida and the Alu- 
1 minum Company of America. Dean 
| Steinberg presented a paper on " Engi- 
neering Education in the Caribbean," 
which is considered to include Mexico, 
' Central America, Colombia, Venezuela, 
I The Republics of the West Indies, and 
I the colonial mainland and island ter- 
I ritories. 

Nuclear Fission 
Dr. Wilbert J. Huff and Mr. Rich- 
ard Duffey, Department of Chemical 
' Engineering, attended the conference 
called by the Baltimore Chamber of 
| Commerce on Industrial Applications 
' of Nuclear Fission in Baltimore. 

Addresses Engineers 
Dr. William A. Pennington, who has 
been added to the staff of the Depart- 
ment of Chemical Engineering as Pro- 
fessor in charge of the Metallurgical 
Option, recently presented a paper be- 
fore the 50th annual meeting of the 
American Society of Refrigerating 
Engineers entitled "Vapor Pressure of 
Water Solutions of Lithium Bromide." 

Maryland 



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47 



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Stockings were invented in the eleventh century. They were discovered in the 
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PENN. A N v w 

RE. 7-2434 



Washington, D.C. 



The court ruled that, in a divorce 
action settlement, everything should 
be split right down the middle. Asked 
the wife, "How about the THREE 
kids?" "Go back to him for a year or 
so," advised the judge, "and when you 
have an additional child, divide them 
two and two." 

"Your Honor," chirped the better 
half, "if I'd depended on that four 
fiusher I wouldn't have the three I 
have." 

* * * 

Durned if it isn't getting so some 
fellers not only want the Government 
to guarantee them the pursuit of happi- 
ness but also want Uncle Sam to run 
interference for them while they pursue 

it. 

* * * 

Man on the Eastern sho' accused of 
bigamy — two wives. Explained that he 

had two jobs. 

* * * 

Cherivari band playing to serenade 
a West Virginia fellow on his birthday. 
The mountaineer opened the front win- 
dow and shot the drum major, explain- 
ing, "They were WRONG! It WASN'T 
my birthday." 

* * * 

Maryland senior just back from 
Korea making love to his wife in the 
back seat of a cab. The cabby glared 
disapproval. 

The senior asked, "Is it against the 
rules to make love to your wife in a 
cab?" 

"No, replied the taxi coxswain, "but 
it's sho' 'nuf against the odds." 

* * * 

Zim — "Do you read Kipling?" 
Zam — "No, but I eat his herring." 

* * * 

A little cockroach was running rapid- 
ly along the edge of the breakfast food 
box. Asked another little cockroach: 
"Why do run along the edge of the 
box so rapidly?" "Can't you read?" 
countered the first cockroach, "don't 
you see the sign on the box, "TEAR 
ALONG THIS EDGE!" 

* * * 

The ship was sinking and the captain 
called all hands aft. "Who among you 
can pray?" he asked. 

"I can," replied a young Maryland 
grad. 

"Then pray, shipmate," ordered the 
captain. "The rest of you put on life 
jackets; we're one short." 

* * * 

A small boy cried bitterly as a large 
friendly dog bounded up to him, licked 
his face and hands. 

"What is it?" asked his mother, "Did 
he bite you?" 

"Nd," sobbed the child, "but he 

tasted me." 

* * * 



"Docs your mother miss you since 
you went to college? 

"Not so much; she has a parrot that 
swears, a chimney that smokes, and a 
cat that stays out all night." 

Policeman: How did you knock him 
down? 

Motorist: I didn't. I pulled up to let 
him go across and he fainted. 

* * * 

Alumnus: I'll take the dollar dinner. 

Waiter: On white or rye, sir? 

* * * 

Ex-GI student, told by a Maryland 
traffic cop to cut down on his speed, 
tried to outsmart the minion of the 
law by showing off how he had been 
around. 

So he answered the policeman with, 
"Nanakuli bipikani halekaa liliokalani." 

"Look, Snorky," retored the police- 
man, "I used to be a Marine out on 
Oahu myself, 'Nanakuli' is a beach in 
Hawaii, 'bipikani' is a bull, 'halekaa' is 
a garage, 'Lilokalani' was the last of 
Hawaii's queens and if I ever catch you 
speeding again I'll run you up before 
a judge in Hyattsville who understands 
only Maryland." 

* * * 

Up near Frederick a scrappy young 

steer 
Who knew not the meaning of fear, 
Indulged in desire 
To horn a live wire 
(Most any old line would do here.) 

Who can remember away back when 

the comic pages were funny? 

* * * 

// just one method could be devised 
So a paycheck could be Sanforized! 

* * * 

A Communist never gets all that he 

wants or all that he deserves. 

* * * 

How about the war days when you 
put cigaret butts in the machine and 
money came out. 

* * * 

A mean combination would be rheu- 
matism and St. Vitus Dance. 

* * * 

You can drive a girl to Vassar but 
you can't make her think. 

* * * 

The dope had just purchased a post- 
age stamp. "Must I stick it on myself?" 
he asked. 

"Positively no," replied the clerk. 
"It will do more good if you stick it 

on the envelope." 

* * * 

"Dad's going to give us a check for 
a wedding present." 

"Then we'll have to have the cere- 
mony at noon instead of at 2 o'clock," 
replied the groom. 

"Why?" 

"The banks close at 2." 



48 



Maryland 



DISTRICT LITHOGRAPH COMPANY 



I N (' () R P R A T i: D 

1048 29th ST., N. W. • WASHINGTON 7, D. C. 

Phone STerling 3-7515 

PHOTO-OFFSET * PLANOCRAPHINC * LITHOGRAPHING 

Listed below are a few of the many diversified printed pieces we produce economically in black or color. 



DIRECT MAIL 
FOLDERS 
POSTERS 
BROCHURES 



CATALOGS 
REPORTS 
RECORDS 
CHARTS 



PHOTOGRAPHS 
STATISTICS 
LETTERHEADS 
PATENT DRAWINGS 



FACSIMILES 
OFFICE FORMS 
STATEMENTS 
MAPS 



What's the matter with Murphy; he 
looks worried?" 

"He is worried; he owes $200 and 
some guy owes him $20." 

"Gee, I don't blame him for being 
worried; $20 is a lot of money." 

"I could never see why they always 
called a boat 'she'." 

"Ever try to steer one?" 

Quoted from the daily press regard- 
ing a holdup killing: "Fortunately for 
the deceased, he had deposited all his 
money in the bank only the day be- 
fore. He lost practically nothing but 

his life." 

* * * 

The girl who slaps you may not want 
to hurt your feelings so much as she 
wants to stop them. 

* * * 

"I would like," said the lady, "a nice 
book for an invalid." 

"Yes, madam," said the clerk. "Some- 
thing religious?" 

"Er — no," replied the lady, "the doc- 
; tor told him this morning he was going 
to get well." 

"Your stocking seams are wrinkled." 
"I'm not wearing stockings!" 



The brisk, little man said he was a 
i butler. "Oh," asked an asker, "you work 
i for Mr. Walpole?" 

The brisk little man drew himself up 

' haughtily. "Certainly not. Mr. Walpole 

: works for me. He gets up at seven every 

morning and goes down to that dirty, 

stinking city to make enough money to 

keep this place and me going." 

Judge: "Have you been in tfiis court 
before?" 
Snorky: "Yes, Y'r Honor." 
Judge: "What suit?" 
Snorky: "Blue Serge." 



IN THE "OLD LINE' 

She — "Did you ever try 



selling 



ever 
vacuum cleaners?" 

He— "No." 

She — "You'd better give it a try. 
That's my husband coming up th& 
walk." 

Maryland 



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823 MILLS BUILDING 



NAtionol 8-8586 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 



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1433 P St., M.W. 



COMMERCIAL 
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MOTORS - PUMPS ■ MACHINERY 
DU. 7-SS27 



Washington, D. C 



CUSTOiH FLOORS, Inc. 

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2727 N. WASHINGTON BLVD. 

ARLINGTON, VA. JA 2-4989 



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WASHINGTON. D. C. Executive J 3837 



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Link Belt Company 

Power Transmission 

Supplies 

1244 NINTH STREET, N.W. 



"Pyrene" & 

"C-O-TWO" 

Fire Extinguishers 

WASHINGTON 1, D. C. 



"MSA'' Industrial 
Gas Masks. Canisters 
& First Aid Equipment 

HUdion 1-4430 



49 




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BALTIMORE, MD. 




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CONTRACTORS ■ BUILDERS - ENGINEERS 
Brick, Hollow Tile, Cinder Block Work 
Fire Brick Specialist 
Brick Boiler Settings, Furnaces, 
Ovens and Machinery Foundations 

BEImont 5-6449 
223 EAST 33rd STREET 

BALTIMORE 1 8, MD. 



d3ard- ^fuon S^chool 

Secretarial - Dramatic Art and Radio 
Day and Evening 

805 N. Charles St., VErnon 7-1155 
Baltimore, Md. 



60 




MARYLAND " 



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Nursing School Babies 

To Mr. and Mrs. Wm. C. Wroe, a 
son. Mrs. Wroe was Edith Ellen 
Viereck, Nursing '50. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Wm. J. Donnelly, 
a daughter, Martha Ellen. Mrs. Don- 
nelly was Jean Warfield, Nursing '48. 

To Captain and Mrs. Vannah E. 
Van Horn, Jr., a daughter, Debra Ann. 
Mrs. Van Horn was Frances Hicks, 
Nursing '47. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. McHenry, 
a son, Robert C. Jr. Mrs. McHenry 
was Pamela Watson, Nursing '52. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Monroe Eilers 
Fraleigh, a son, Peter Eilers. Mrs. 
Fraleigh was Dorothea A. Fenwick, 
Nursing '53. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Gluye, 
a son, Gary William. Mrs. Gluye was 
Patricia Wheeler, Nursing '52. 

To Captain and Mrs. William Kauf- 
man, a son, Thomas William, was born 
in the Tokyo Army Hospital. Mrs. 
Kaufman was Margaret O. Stein, Nurs- 
ing '47. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Carl D. Anderson, 
a daughter, Kathy Lou. Mrs. Anderson, 
Nursing '54. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Francis H. Miller, 
a son. Mrs. Miller was Amy Lee 
De Shane, Nursing '43. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Davis, a daugh- 
ter, Nina Lynn. Mrs. Davis was Janet 
G. Douglas, Nursing '53. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Homer J. Gerken, a 
son, John Logan. Mrs. Gerken was 
Anna Ruth Logan, '46. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Tilghman L. Ger- 
man, a daughter, Leslie Ann. Mrs. 
German was Doris Elizabeth Hicks, 
r 50. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Baily, a 
daughter, Barbara Lynn. Mrs. Baily 
was Ruth Hutchinson, '50. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Cockey, 
III, a son, William David. Mrs. Coc- 
key was Sara Jane Mays, '38. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Kenneth 
Pettit, a daughter. Mrs. Pettit was, 
Phyllis King, '48. 

To Dr. and Mrs. James Henry Shell, 
a daughter, Nancy Lee. Mrs. Shell was 
Ruth Elizabeth Forsythe, '43. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leroy Erling Esiason, 
a daughter, Koren Ingrid. Mrs. Esia- 
son was Ellen Louise White, '52. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Ira Leon McGill, 
a daughter, Deanna Lynn. Mrs. McGill 
was Nina Maureen Dellinger, '52. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Ireland, 
a daughter, Leslie Ann. Mrs. Ireland 
was Elizabeth Klevisher, '46. 



To Mr. and Mrs. John W. McCarley, 
Jr., a son, John Wallace, III. Mrs. Mc- 
Carley was Betty Jane Thompson, '47. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Jack T. Gibson, a 
son, Kurt Kyler. Mrs. Gibson was Ann 
Snowberger, '52. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Harry S. Davis, 
twin sons, James Erie and Noah Ed- 
ward. Mrs. Davis was Barbara Ann 
Riecks, '52. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Wm. F. Wells, a 
son, Paul Wilson. Mrs. Wells was Eli- 
nor Wilson, '46. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Raymond F. Pulas- 
ki, a son, Raymond Francis. Mrs. Pu- 
laski was Betty Jane Roughton, '47. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Duvall, 
a son. Mrs. Duvall was Dorothy Gladys 
Simpson, '46. 

A Peggy For Patsy 
A baby girl, Peggy Ellyn, their first 
child, was born to Mr. and Mrs. James 
W. Cochran (the former Patricia 
Wright, '47, College of Education), 
Saturday, October 23 at Cincinnati, 
Ohio. 




CABTOONS-OF-THt-MONTM 



MISCALCULATION 
"Not that we can't marry on $1,500, 
Alma — it's just that I figured you'd 
saved more." 




'ran^e 



(IMoisom f-^araat". 



Blackadar — Peregoy 

Ellen Ann Perogoy, School of Nursing 
to Paul F. Blackadar. 
Bronushas — Lewis 
Carolyn O'Neil Lewis, School of 
Nursing, to Dr. Joseph B. Bronushas. 
Bruce — Macnab 
Nancy Macnab to Dr. William A. 
Bruce, graduate Maryland Dental 
School. 



USE THE COUPON ON 
THE LAST PAGE 



Maryland 



Buckheister — Johnson 

Lila M. Johnson, School of Nursing, 
to Harry E. Buckheister, Jr. 
Crook — Demasi 
Jean Annette Demasi to Jesse 
Joseph Crook, Maryland student. 
Dilzer — Muir 
Mary L. Muir, School of Nursing, to 
Charles Dilzer. 

Dube — Nugent 
Stephanie Nugent, Maryland alumna, 
to Lt. Donald Edward Dube, Maryland 
graduate. 

Dures — Poupalos 
Maryland Poupalos, School of Nurs- 
ing, to John Dures. 

Ellis — Ismond 
Rima Ismond, graduate of Washing- 
ton Sanitarium School of Nursing, to 
Russell L. Ellis, Maryland student. 
Fraleigh — Fenwick 
Dorothea A. Fenwick, School of 
Nursing, to Monroe Eilers Fraleigh. 
Geis — Winn 
Dorothy Evelyn Winn to Robert 
Hammond Geis, Maryland alumnus. 
Johnston — Fleming 
Pamela Stoddard Fleming, School 
of Nursing, to Daniel Fulper Johnston. 
Lawrence — Elbourne 
Ella Startte Elbourne, School of 
Nursing, to Homer Lawrence. 
Marshall — Kranz 
Katherine Kranz to Donald Wayne 
Marshall, both Maryland graduates. 
Morgan — Ha ger 
Charlote Ariel Hager, School of 
Nursing, to Richard Lee Morgan. 




' 1934 CARTOONS C 

UNIVERSITY LANE HILL 
5:00 P.M. 



Murphy — Burchett 

Barbara Eileen Burchett, School of 
Nursing, to Barry D. Murphy. 
Naumowics — Gussin 
Charlotte Townshend Gussin to Ches- 
ter Frederic Naumowics, Jr., Maryland 
graduate. 

Patten/ — Watkins 
Esther Jeanne Watkins, School of 
Nursing, to Dr. David Hales Patten. 
Raymond — Andrews 
Both Maryland graduates, Dorothy 
Catherine Andrews to Lt. William John 
Raymond, U.S.A.F. 

Reeves — Brittain 
Bernice Elizabeth Brittain, School of 
Nursing, to Samuel Sprigg Reeves, Jr. 
Smith — Reiter 
Ivery Claire Reiter, School of Nurs- 
ing, to Dr. Milledge Glan Smith. 



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Electrical Construction and Maintenance 

1 767 CARSWELL ST. 
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E. L. STEBBINC 

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1 600 CLOUGH STREET 
BALTIMORE 1 3, MD. 



Acoustical treatments 
Lathing and Plastering 
Armstrong and 
Fiberglass distributors 
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Contact Mr. J. P. Coyle . . . LExington 9-6102 
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Styles — Howard 
Nancy Wood Howard, Maryland 
graduate, to Michael Hogan Styles. 
Ward — Eccles 
Both graduates of Maryland, Joan 
Eccles to Frederick Yates Ward. 
Wiles — Bowling 
Marie Doris Bowling, School of 
Nursng, to Leonard N. Wiles. 




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Baker — Raabe 

Both Maryland graduates, Mary 
Edith Baker to Lt. Charles T. 
Kaabe, U.S.A.F. 

Baehr — Spivey 
Both Maryland alumni, Sally Ann 
Baehr to Delmar Spivey. 

Boatner— Strett 
Edith Peake Boatner, Maryland 
alumna, to Capt. St. Clair Streett, Jr., 
U.S.A. 

Buddemeier — Wurzbacher 
Evelyn Virginia Buddemeier to Al- 
bert F. Wurzbacher, Jr., Maryland 
graduate, Delta Sigma Phi and Delta 
Sigma Pi. 

Burden — Mclntyre 
Constance Burden to Lt. Paul T. Mc- 
lntyre, U.S.A.F., Maryland alumnus. 
Campbell — Alers 
Flora Ann Campbell to Perry Bald- 
win Alers, Maryland graduate stu- 
dent. 

Carney — Haynie 
Chlaila Dee Carney to James Clinton 
Haynie, Maryland graduate. 
Coh en — A a ron s 
Sondra Delores Cohen to Private 
Hillel Ruven Aarons, graduate of Mary- 
land School of Pharmacy. 
Cohen— Pitler 
Elaine Phyllis Cohen to Pvt. Larry 
Pitler, Maryland alumnus. 
Dodson — Potter 
Jane Elizabeth Dodson, Maryland 
alumna, to Donald Ray Potter, Mary- 
land student. 

Epstein — Feinglass 
Elaine Maxine Epstein, Maryland 
graduate, Phi Sigma, to J. Leonard 
Feinglass. 

Hopkins — Gait 
Bettie Marie Hopkins to Dwight B. 
Gait, Jr., Maryland alumnus. 



52 



Maryland 



Katzman— Katz 

Roberta Sue Katzman to Isadore 
Katz, student Maryland Law School. 
Kehoe — Keating 
Rita Marilyn Kehoe, Maryland gradu- 
ate, to John Carroll Keating. 
MacCollum — Lynn 
Barbara Foster MacCollum to David 
Lynn, Jr., Maryland alumnus. 
Marietta — Melendey 
Josephine Marietta, Maryland alum- 
na to Edward E. Melendey, Georgetown 
graduate. 

Mathews — Wilton 

Pamela Mathews, student at Mt. 
Vernon Junior College, to Edward C. 
Wilton, Maryland alumnus. 
Miles — Kehoe 
Betty Lou Miles to Stirling Kehoe, 
Maryland graduate. 

Pardoe — Beckwith 
Sally Jane Pardoe, Maryland alumna, 
to Richard Allen Beckwith, Maryland 
student. 

Parker — Clarke 
Pearl R. Parker to Lt. (jg) Edward 
Owen Clarke, Jr., USNR, Maryland 
alumnus. 

Patrick — MacKenzie 
Kathleen Evelyn Patrick, Maryland 
student, to Lt. James Simon Mac- 
Kenzie, Jr., U.S.A. F., graduate of 
Maryland's College of Engineering. 
Pierson — Kelly 
Patricia Pierson, Maryland alumna, 
to Ted Kelly. 

Travers — Eitzel 

Isabelle Catherine Travers. Maryland 
graduate, to Richard Allen Eitzel. 
Sims — Beckett 

Kathryn Rae Sims, Maryland alum- 
na, to William W. Beckett, graduate 
of the Citadel and student at George 
Washington. 

Schmitt — Deibert 
Jean Annette Schmitt, Maryland 
graduate, to Leonard Robert Deibert. 
Schnaper — Statter 
Estelle Iris SchnapDer to I. Barry 
Statter, graduate of Maryland School 
of Pharmacy. 

Shapiro — Rosen 
Roberta Narda Shapiro, Maryland 
alumna, to Melvin Gerald Rosen. 
Strasburger — Baer 
Peggy Strasburger to Gustav Baer, 
Maryland graduate, Tau Epsilon Phi, 
Phi Kappa Phi. 

Torchia— Cole 

Edith May Torchia to Victor C. Cole, 
Maryland graduate. 

Van Devanter — Pevey 
Barbara Lee Van Devanter to Harold 
Arthur Pevey, Maryland alumnus. 
Vignal — Ostrander 
Suzanne Helene Vignal to John Ed- 
win Ostrander, Maryland student. 
Weinman — Rolph 
Both Maryland graduates, Nan Ellin 
Weinman to Samuel James Rolph. 
Whelan — Wohlgemuth 
Mary Honora Whelan, Maryland 
graduate, to George F. Wohlgemuth, 
Jr. 

Williams — Bow 
Garnett Williams, Maryland student, 
to Frank T. Bow, Yale student, '55. 

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Religious Programs 

The second in a series of University 
Religious Programs under the joint 
sponsorship of the Religious Life Com- 
mittee and the Student Religious Com- 
mittee was a Chanukah Program, in 
the Memorial Chapel, for students, 
faculty, and the public. 

Featured on the program were the 
University Chapel Choir, which pre- 
sented selections from Judas Macca- 
beus, by Handel. Professor Fague 
Spingmann, choir director, sang the 
aria "Lord, God of Abraham, Isaac 
and Israel," from Elijah by, Men- 
delssohn. 

Cantor Jacob Friedman of Congre- 
gation B'nai Israel of Washington, 
D. C, sang selections from Jewish 
liturgy and art music. Folk songs of 
Chanukah were presented by Mrs. 
Sidney Weiss and the Hillel Choir. Miss 
Rheda Greenberg, Gordon Becker, 
juniors, and Bill Weinstein, a sopho- 
more in the College of Arts and 
Sciences participated in a dramatic 
retelling of the story of Chanukah. 

Another program was arranged by 
the Religious Life Committee and 
also was held in the Memorial Chapel. 
The program featured a presentation of 
"The Messiah," by the Chapel Choir. 



A. A. C. P. 

The Maryland chapter of the Ameri- 
can Association of College Professors 
held its third meeting of the year in 
the Maryland Room. 

The meeting featured a panel dis- 
cussion of deans on the subject "Roll 
of the Deans and the Faculty in the 
University." Moderator was Dr. Lee 
Hornbake, professor of industrial edu- 
cation. Panel members included Dr. 
H. Boyd Wylie, dean, School of Medi- 
cine; Professor S. S. Steinberg, dean, 
College of Engineering, Dean Marie 
Mount, College of Home Economics; 
Dr. Wilbur Devilbiss, dean, College 
of Education; and Dr. Gordon Cairns, 
dean of Agriculture. 



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Karel F. de Rooy 

Karel F. de Rooy, 61, one of the food 
supervisors in the dining hall for 
the last six years, died at Washington 
Sanitarium. He lived at Landover 
Hills, Md. 

Mr. de Rooy was born in Rotterdam, 
Holland. He came to this country when 
he was 18 and worked in Richmond, 
Va. He married the former Susie B. 
Tapscott. 

Mr. de Rooy was a Pennsylvania 
Railroad dining car steward and work- 
ed at several of Washington's leading 
restaurants before he joined the uni- 
versity. 

A veteran of World War I, he was 
a member of the American Legion and 
Elks. 

Besides his widow he is survived by 
a son, Karl E., of the home address, 
and a daughter, Mrs. Barbara Lead- 
beter, Lanham, Md., and three grand- 
children. 

Morty Cohen 

By "GLIP" GOLDSTEIN 
(The Diamondback) 

Former track star and Men's 
League president Morty Cohen Has 
passed away. Nothing I can do or say 
will bring him back. That's what's so 
hard; I feel so helpless as I write 
this. 

I can recall the first time that I 
ever saw Morty Cohen. It was at the 
Georgetown-Maryland track meet, 1950'. 
It was the last event — the broad jump 
— and Maryland needed a first place 
to win the meet. On the third and 
final jump a big powerful runner 
made a desperation leap for a little 
white handkerchief that assistant 
coach Pat Redd had laid in the saw 
dust for him. He made it and Mary- 
land won the meet. This was typical 
of Morty Cohen. When the pressure 
was on he came through. 

He averaged 15 points a track meet 
against some of the best competition 
in the South and East. His University 
of Maryland broad jump record of 23 
feet hVi inches still stands. 

Track was not the only activity in 
which Morty participated. He was 
president of the "M" Club and the 
Men's League. He was a member of 
Tau Epsilon Phi, social fraternity, 
ODK and Who's Who in American 
Colleges. He graduated in 1953 with a 
solid three point average. 

When I was a freshman and a sopho- 
more, my teammates and I used to 
look with awe at the big powerful 
runner who won so many first places 
for Maryland. Little did we think 
that such a body would be stricken 
with leukemia two years later and 
become weaker and weaker until he 
died. 

Morty, wherever you are I am sure 
you will make good if you play the 
game like you played it here. 

"The Lord giveth and the Lord 
taketh away; Blessed be the name of 
the Lord." 



54 



Maryland 



Clarence Earl Stanton 

Clarence E. Stanton of Grantsville, 
Maryland died recently. He was a 
member of the class of 1907 having 
studied Agriculture. He continued in 
this field until his death. 

George P. Henderson 

George P. Henderson, age 77, Presi- 
dent of the Montgomery County Na- 
tional Bank, in Rockville, Maryland 
died following a heart attack. A former 
student at Maryland Agricultural Col- 
lege, he had been in the banking busi- 
ness more than 55 vears and President 
since 1932. 

He was a member of the Masons and 
the Rockville Presbyterian Church. He 
obtained a Law degree from Columbian 
University, now George Washington 
University. 

William B. McGlennon 

Dr. William B. McGlennon, '04 Medi- 
cine, died on October 11 at his home 
at Harrison, New Jersey. He was a 
staff member of St. James Hospital in 
Newark and West Hudson Hospital in 
Kearny. 

Dr. McGlennon was a prominent civic 
leader serving on the Harrison Board 
of Health and as Police and Fire Sur- 
geon for more than 25 years. During 
World War II, he was examining physi- 
cian for the County selective service 
board and was recognized by the Selec- 
tive Director, General Lewis B. Her- 
shey. 

He was a member of the Ancient 
Order of Hibernians and the Knights 
of Columbus. He is survived by five 
daughters and six grandchildren. 
Houghton Smith 

Dr. Houghton Smith, '03 Medicine, 
long prominent as a practicing physi- 
cian in Trenton, New Jersey, died on 
June 13. Word has just been received 
from his widow, Mrs. Ethel C. Smith 
of North Amherst, Massachusetts. 
Arthur G. McCall 

Dr. Arthur G. McCall, 79, inter- 
nationally known soil scientist and 
former professor of geology and soils 
at the University of Maryland, died 
October 19, at a nursing home at 01- 
ney, Maryland. He was a former resi- 
dent of College Park and had been a 
consultant with the Soil Conservation 
Service of the Department of Agricul- 
ture since his retirement in 1944. 

Dr. McCall was in charge of soil in- 
vestigations at the Maryland Agricul- 
ture Station from 1916-1927. He then 
became Chief of Soil Investigations of 
the Department of Agriculture and was 
with the Soil Conservation from 1936 
until his retirement. 

A past President of the American 
Society of Agronomy, Dr. McCall had 
served as United States Delegate to 
the International Congress of Soil Sci- 
ence. 

Dr. McCall served overseas after the 
World War I armistice in establishing 
an American Universitv in Europe for 
service men stationed there. He was a 
charter member of Alpha Zeta, hon- 
orary College Fraternity, a member of 
the Cosmos club and a member of the 
First Congregational Church. 

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NO ORANGE BOWL THIS YEAR 

So Duke was selected to. play Ne- 
braska in the Orange Bowl, the 
experts reporting one of the reasons 
for the selection being that Maryland 
would outclass Nebraska while the 
Blue Devils and the Cornhuskers 
would make a more even game. 

The Terps had a 7-2-1 season's tie 
with Duke, but were runners-up to 
Duke in league games, winning four 
but being tied by Wake Forest, 13-13, 
an ACC member. 



1954 RECORD 



20 


Kentucky 





i 


UCLA 


12 


13 


Wake forest 


13 


:;.". 


N. Carolina 





i 


Miami (Pia.) 





20 


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All-ACC Choices 

Three Maryland players— End Bill 
Walker and Backs Ronnie Waller and 
Dick Bielski — have been named to the 
All-Atlantic Coast Conference first team 




Walker 



Waller 



Bielsk 



Vereb 



Oklahoma is out of the picture too 
because Big Seven teams are not 
allowed to repeat. Similarly UCLA, 
rated 1 or 2 nationally and, on their 
home lot, only a shade better than 
Maryland, is out of the Rose Bowl 
because that conference doesn't allow 
repeaters either. 

Rules can get people all tied up. 
The logical post season bowl game, 
on performance and public interest, 
is Maryland vs. Duke. At least so think 
many folks in these here parts. 

Here's how AP voted Ohio State as 
1954 successor to Maryland as 1953 
National Champions, rating Maryland 
No. 8. 



SECOND TEN 

11. Miami (Pla.) 

12. West Virginia 

13. Auburn 

14. Duke 

15. Michigan 

16. Virginia Tech 

17. Southern Cal. 
IS. Baylor 

19. Rice 

20. Penn State 



FIRST TEN 

1. Ohio State 

2. UCLA 

3. Oklahoma 

4. Notre Dame 

5. Navy 

6. Mississippi 

7. Army 

8. Maryland 
!). Wisconsin 

10. Arkansas 

It is intei-esting here to note how 
the pre-season prognosticators stacked 
up. 

Look had picked Oklahoma, Notre 
Dame, Maryland to finish 1, 2, 3. 

Collier's had it Mississippi, Mary- 
land, Notre Dame, 1, 2, 3. 

Satevepost tabbed, 1, 2, 3, 4, Okla- 
homa, Georgia Tech, Notre Dame, 
Maryland. 



selected by the Associated Press. Mary- 
land's was the only team with three 
players on the first team. Guards John 
Bowersox and Bob Pellegrini and Cen- 
ter John Irvine made the second team. 

FIRST TEAM 
j.; — Hin Walker, Maryland 
E — Eil Stowers. Wake Forest 
T — Bob Bartholomew. Wake Forest 
T — Roland Perdue, North Carolina 
G — Frank Mincevieh, South Carolina 
G — John Polzer, Virginia 
C — Leon Cunningham, South Carolina 
OB- .Jerry Barger, Duke 
HB — Boh Pascal, Duke 
HB — Ronnie Waller, Maryland 
FB — Dick Bielski, Maryland 

SECOND TEAM 
E — Will Frye, North Carolina 
F — Scott Jackson, Clemson 
T — Harry Lovell, South Carolina 
G — John Bowersox, Maryland 
G — Bob Pellegrini. Maryland 
C — John Iryine, Maryland 
QB — Mackie Prickett. South Carolina 
HB — Carl Brazell, South Carolina 
HB — George Marinkov, North Carolina State 
FB — Bryant Aldridge, Duke 

HONORABLE MENTION 

Ends — S'onny Sorrell, Duke ; Harry Lodge, 
North Carolina State. 

Tackles — Tommy Mattos and Clyde White. 
Clemson; Sid Deloatch, Duke; Carlton 
Schelhorn, Virginia. 

Guards — Dick Desimone, Clemson ; Al D'An- 
gelo, North Carolina State ; Gerald Huth, 
Wake Forest. 

Center — Johnny Palmer. Duke. 

Backs — Don King anil Joel Wells. Clemson ; 

Mike Caskey anil Bill Wohrman, South Caro- 
lina ; Worth Lutz, Duke. 

'55 Captains Chosen 

Maryland football players elected 
their 1955 co-captains naming Bob 
Pellegrini, a guard from Yatesboro, 
Pa., and Ed Vereb, a halfback from 
Pittsburgh. 



56 



Maryland 




It has T)een tne Terps' custom for 
years to elect a lineman and a back. 
For 1954 it was Center John Irvine and 
Fullback Dick Bielski. 

Pellegrini finished fast this year 
after starting the season as a second 
stringer. His reputation as a blocker 
spread through the Atlantic Coast Con- 
ference. He is a fine defensive player. 
He is 6-foot-2 and weighs 200. 

Vereb, a 185-pound 6-footer, is tops 
among Coach Jim Tatum's wealth of 
halfbacks for next year. He carried 
only 17 times this year but averaged 
7.9 yards per try. 

Only Bielski 

Of the 24-man All-South senior 
squad picked for the Senior Bowl game 
against the North in Mobile, 8 January, 
only one Maryland player was selected, 
i.e. Dick Bielski. 

FOOTBALL 

Miami 9; Maryland 7 

aryland dropped another 
,real close one. This time 
to Miami 9-7. 

Miami's first touch- 
down came with only 10 
seconds remaining in the 
first half. Boxold fum- 
bled and Miami recover- 
ed on the 48. 

Runs and passes, with the final of 
the latter into the end zone provided 
the initial shot of quinine for the 
Terps. 

In the third period another Boxold 
fumble set the stage for Miami's mar- 
gin of victory on the Terp 31. 

Miami in four plays moved to the 9 
where Boxold redeemed himself by 
intercepting a pass and running out to 
the Maryland 1. However, on Mary- 
land's next play, Miami rushed in to 
stop Ronnie Waller behind the Mary- 
land goal line for a safety. 

In the final quarter a Terp touch- 
down drive had our boys look like the 
'53 team, when Terp back Dave Nusz 
quelled Miami threat by intercepting 
an aerial on his own 3. Maryland pro- 
ceeded 97 yards for its touchdown. 

Waller ran right end for gains of 
29 and 13 yards. Joe Horning picked 
up 11, Dick Bielski hit the line 3 times 
in a row netting 19 more. 

Finally Bielski smashed over center 
from a foot out to register Maryland's 
lone touchdown. Bielski completed the 
days scoring with an extra point boot. 
Control was Miami's key to success. 
The Hurricanes maintained possession 
for 76 plays compared to Maryland's 
41. 

Pellegrini Honored 
Maryland Guard Bob Pellegrini, a 
record-breaking tackier against Miami, 
was The Washington Post and Times 
Herald's College Player of the Week, 
with 12 tackles and five assists. That 
broke the stadium record of nine tackles 
in one game by Holy Cross' Guard 
Buonpane. 

In the first quarter, Pellegrini stop- 
ped a 75-yard Miami drive 3 yards 
short of the goal. 

In the fourth quarter, he made the 



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key tackle which gave Maryland the 
ball for its only scoring march. 

His tackles took the steam out of the 
Miami rally and Maryland took over 
on the 3 and drove 97 yards for their 
score. 

Pellegrini is a cinch to be All-America 
next year, says Assistant Coach Bob 
Ward, who was Maryland's first All- 
America as a guard in 1951 and '52. 

"He's bigger, stronger and faster 
than I was," said Ward. "He's the best 



tackier on the team and he does things 
easier than I did." 

The 6 foot 2 inch, 220-pound Pelle- 
grini, a native of Yatesboro, Pa., backs 
up the line the same way Joe DiMaggio 
used to play centerfield, seemingly re- 
laxed, effortless and with an uncanny 
sixth sense. 

Halfback Joe Horning says it's a 
revelation to play defense near Pelle- 
grini. "He anticipates every play as if 



Maryland 



57 



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busts the play up." 

Maryland 20; S. Carolina 

Frank Tamburello quarterbacked the 
Terps to a 20 to win over Coach Rex 
Enright's South Carolina Gamecocks. 
Tamburello guided the Terps on scoring 
drives of 64, 82, and 48 yards and 
scored twice himself on keeps of 5 and 
3 yards. 

No. 1 Quarterback Charlie Boxold sat 
this one out with a sore right shoulder. 

Tamburello played nearly 50 minutes 
with relief only from Lynn Beightol. 
The Terps lost the ball on a fumble 
only once, and that was when Tam- 
burello was on the bench. He played a 
sure handed game. No Maryland passes 
were intercepted either. 

In their finest game of 1954 to date, 
the Tatumites handed South Carolina 
its first shutout in 42 games, a streak 
dating back to early 1950. 

That was secure in the last 50 seconds 
when Terp fullback Gus Albrecht fell 
on a South Carolina fumble 1 yard 
from the Maryland goal line. 

Maryland's first touchdown came near 
the end of the second quarter on a 
64-yard drive that began when Mc- 
Luckie plucked in midair a fumble by 
Carolina's Carl Brazell. Tamburello 
completed two short key passes in this 
drive, one to Waller for 10 yards, and 
another to Howie Dare for 9 yards. 

Tamburello scored from the five. 

The Tatumterps second touchdown 
came in the fourth quarter on an 82- 
yard drive with Horning picking up 
30 and 19 yards in two quick bursts 
and Waller putting the Terps 6 yards 
away on a 9-yard run. Bielski dove 
over from the 2 for this one. 

The last score came after a drive of 
48 yards with Bielski setting it up on 
an 8-yard run and Waller following up 
with a 21-yard gain. Tamburello scored 



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58 



this one from the 3. 

Tamburello's performance would seem 
to indicate that Maryland will have 
no quarterback worries for the next 
couple of seasons. 

Maryland 42; N.C.S. 14 

As a homecoming gift the Terp- 
tatums presented the alumni, student 
body ana faculty with a 42-14 win over 
North Carolina State. Long passes 
were the pattern for the lopsided win. 
Halfback Ronnie Waller scored in 
the early moments when he returned 
a punt 69 yards for a touchdown. 

The second Terp scoring drive cov- 
ered 85 yards as end Dennis nabbed 
a pass from Boxold and went over 
after a 34-yard play. 

Vereb's 2-yard scoring smash over 
left guard from the 2 helped make it 
21-0 with Boxold passes of 19 yards 
to Dare and 15 yards to Walker setting 
it up. 

For the fourth score Dave Nusz was 
away for a big gain when he was hit 
hard. The ball jarred loose but Dare 
snared it in midair and he went over 
with it the rest of the way untouched. 
Tamburello scored from the 2 after 
Waller's 41-yard run set it up and Al- 
brecht accounted for another after 
picking off a N.C.S. pass. Albrecht 
and Selep each kicked three extra 
points. 

The ailing Dick Bielski made a token 
appearance early in the fourth quar- 
ter, trying a field goal from State's 
48. The ball fell short but had the 
effect of a good punt, and led to Al- 
brechts interception and score. 

Maryland's triumph was not without 
its moments of glory for N.C.S. Their 
14 points were the most scored against 
Maryland since Alabama scored 27 in 
1952. 

Eddie West, N.C.S. quarterback, 
engineered both State touchdowns on 
identical screen passes. 

The first one came on a 49-yard pass 
to Langston after the Terps had run 
up a 21-0 halftime lead. The final 
came on a 19-yard flip to Meadlock 
with the Terps already in front, 42-7. 
Maryland 16; Clemson 
Said Head Coach Frank Howard, 
"Clemson could have won that game. 
I've never seen us play so well and 
get beat," he added. 

Ronnie Waller delivered two touch- 
down plays of 61 and 56 yards. They 
ruined Clemson's great stand as Mary- 
land triumphed, 16-0. 

There were 31 seconds remaining in 
the first when Waller took a handoff 
from Frank Tamburello for a 61-yard 
touchdown dash. The conversion at- 
tempt failed. The clock ran out at 
halftime with Waller still moving on 
his 56-yard move for the second score. 
The latter touchdown started as a 
screen pass from Charley Boxold to 
Waller, who picked his spots on one 
of the most spectacular runs seen at 
Maryland. 

Bielski Converted 

Bielski also booted a field goal from 
the 39-yard line with a couple of 
minutes to go. The Terps did not 
generate a great offense against the 
Tigers. 

Maryland 



Clemson rolled up 18 first downs to 8 
and 325 yards to 202 for Maryland in 
total offense. It was difficult to realize 
Clemson had not only lost the game, 
but had been held scoreless. 

Of course nothing counts but the 
score-board and it only takes one man 
and one play to beat a good ball team. 
The Terptatums can certify to that too. 

Clemson brings real spirit to College 
Park. The Tiger rooters seemed to 
have the Tigers "up." 

Dick Bielski played only a little 
more than two minutes because of a 
pulled muscle near his ribs. He raised 
1 his scoring total to 36 points for the 
season with his field goal and point 
after touchdown. 

Joe Horning had a big day. He had 

i an 18-yard return with a pass inter- 

I ception, led in kickoff and punt returns, 

threw a big block for Waller, and 

knocked down passes. 

In praising Waller for his long 
touchdown runs, Jim Tatum, paid trib- 
' ute to Clemson. 

"We stopped their passing attack 
but that running game almost ran 
us out of the park," Tatum said. 

Clemson entered the game as the 
No. 1 team in the Nation on rushing 
defense. Waller became the first player 
to gain more than 20 yards against 
the Tigers on any one play. 

There was a scout from Nebraska 
in the stadium indicating that they 
considered the Terps or Clemson an 
Orange Bowl threat. 

Maryland 48; Geo. Washington 6 

Game George Washington was no 
match for Jim Tatum's Terps, as the 
Colonials wound up on the short end 
of a 48 to 6 tally. 

Sophomore quarterback Frank Tam- 
burello piloted the first four touch- 
downs. The sturdy Baltimorean passed 
76 yards to Paul Kramer and 37 yards 
to Jim Parsons for the first two scores 
in the first and second quarters. 

In the third quarter Tamburello 
pitched out to Joe Horning on a 40 
yard play and handed off to Ronnie 
Waller for the next two scores. 

Charlie Boxold took over for the 
next two, pitching out to Ed Vereb 
for a 39-yard touchdown run, and 
passing 12 yards to End Bill Walker 
in the end zone. Lynn Beightol passed 
27 yards to End Tim Flynn for the 
final six pointer. Dick Bielski and Gus 
Albrecht each converted twice and a 
safety was thrown in for good measure. 
The score in the final quarter was 
48 to when the Colonials scored after 
a 56 yard punt return. 

Maryland quarterbacks had a fine 
day passing for touchdowns. All three 
signal callers connected for touch- 
downs. Tamburello passed for the first 
two scores. Charlie Boxold and Lynn 
Beightol passed for one score each, giv- 
ing the Terps four touchdown passes 
in five completions. 

Ronnie Waller delivered the most 
exciting play, when he took a pitch- 
out midway in the second quarter and 
darted 30 yards into the GW secondary. 
He was hit on the 20. As he fell he 
spun and heaved a perfect lateral to 




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Dick Bielski who went over the goal 
untouched. However, a penalty nulli- 
fied the score. 

The Terps voted the game ball to 
Joe Horning, playing his fourth year, 
the first time the 155-pounder was 
voted the honor. In four carries, Horn- 
ing averaged 18.7 yards per carry, 
scoring one touchdown and setting up 
another with a run from midfield. 

A total of 6300 high school seniors 
from 103 Maryland and District area 
schools were in the stands as guests 
of Maryland. The kids also were 
treated to a tour of the Terp campus 
and a lunch. 

Maryland 74; Missouri 13 

Closing the season with a Thanks- 
giving Day game Maryland swamped 
Missouri, 74 to 13. 

It was the worst setback in Missouri 
history. The Tigers' coach, Don Faurot, 
said, "Maryland certainly has an ex- 
cellent team. They outplayed us more 
than any team has done all year." 

Ten players scored for Maryland 
on plays ranging from fullback Dick 
Burgee's 90-yard dash, the longest 
ever made by a Terrapin from the 
scrimmage line. 

The Terps rolled up an astounding 
601 yards passing and rushing. 

It was the Tatumterps greatest per- 
formance of the season. 

So impressive was Maryland's of- 
fense that the Terps went all the way 
11 of the 13 times they got their hands 
on the ball. 

Here's how Maryland scored: — Full- 
back Dick Bielski smashed three yards 
for score after 52-yard drive and con- 
verted, 7-0. 

Quarterback Frank Tamburello inter- 
cepted a pass and raced 70 yards for 
a touchdown behind great blocks by 
Bielski, End Paul Kramer and Half- 
back Ronnie Waller. Bielski converted, 
14-0. 

Quarterback Charlie Boxold pitched 
out to Halfback Dave Nusz on a right 
end option sweep for seven-yard scor- 
ing run climaxing 70-yard march. Gus 
Albrecht converted, 21-0. 

Boxold passed to Kramer, who 
dodged one defender, got a block from 
end Bill Walker and scored on 35-yard 
play, 27-0. 

Bielski went over the middle from 
the Missouri 31, cut to the left and 
outsprinted quarterback Vic Eaton to 
the goal line Bielski converted, 34-7. 

Tamburello faked to Bielski, handed 
to Waller who darted 80 yards straight 
ahead for touchdown. Bielski con- 
verted, 41-7. 

Boxold piloted the Terps 40 yards 
and at the 5, pitched back to Howie 
Dare on a left end option and Dare 
scored. Albrecht converted, 48-13. 

Albrecht drove over the middle from 
the 5 to climax a 45-yard push, 54-13. 

Selep went over left guard from the 



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2 to score after 27-yard drive, and 
converted, 61-13. 

Skarda intercepted a pass in and 
raced 27 yards for touchdown, 67-13. 

Burgee took a handoff from quarter- 
back Lynn Beightol, shook off two 
tacklers at the line of scrimmage 
burst into the clear, and went 90 yards 
for the touchdown. Skarda converted, 
74-13. 

Only two Missouri touchdowns inter- 
rupted the above sequence, and both 
came when the Tigers had to abandon 
the split-T formation which Faurot 
invented. 

From a spectacular spread formation 
which sometimes saw its linemen 
spaced out across the breadth of the 
field, No. 2 quarterback Tony Scardino 
passed for the two scores. The first, 
at the end of the second period, came 
on a pass of seven yards to fullback 
Bob Bauman. The second, in the third 
quarter, came on a toss of 11 yards 
to halfback Bill Curley. 



BERNIE HOME 

Maryland's Bernie Faloney, who quar- 
terbacked Edmonton to the biggest up- 
set in 45 years of Canadian football 
history returned home after what he 
said was a "wonderful experience." 
However, under present plans it will be 
his last year of pro football. 

The Faloneys are expecting, and that 
might influence Bernie's decision about 
football next year. If he gets a teach- 
ing or coaching job that will enable 
him to support a family, he'll stay 
here. Otherwise, he might play another 
year with the Eskimos. 

****** 
TRUTH 

Believing and practicing the theory 
that if the other fellow can do it, we 
can, is the solution to more successes 
than is apparent to the casual observer. 



60 



Maryland 



Note From Bill 

The many friends of William H. Hot- 
tel, long time publicity director for the 
University, will be interested to know 
that he is making progress after a long 
illness and that he is still keenly inter- 
ested in the University and its affairs. 
Recently he sent with a great deal of 
pride, a clipping taken from the Co- 
lumbia, S. C., paper. He suggested 
excepts should go in "Maryland" and 
we agree. 

After making reference to the at- 
tendance of Maryland representatives 
and the highly favorable impression 
they made at the football game with 
South Carolina, the article stated 
"South Carolinians were very much 
pleased with the manners of the visi- 
tors and their good attitude. Maryland 
won the game because Maryland de- 
served to win. But it won more than 
a game — it was a hearty invitation to 
come again and bring along the band 
and the students." 

This is high praise from a good com- 
petitor and we express an appreciation 
of the University for these words. Our 
thanks also to Bill Hottel and a sincere 
hope that he continues to recover 
rapidly. He is indeed a very important 
part of the University of Maryland. 

BASKETBALL 



*/)(T. 

*Dec. 
I *I)ec. 
Dec. 
: Dec. 
. Dec. 
. Dec. 

*Jan. 
*Jan. 

.Inn. 
i Jan 
I "Jan. 

i Jan. 

Jan. 

I Feb. 

*Feb. 

, *Feb. 

! *Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 
, Feb. 



10 
13 

18 
29 



— A III in » i 

Georgetown University 
Duke University 

Wake Forest College 

Virginia 

Duke University 
— North Carolina 
30 — All-America City 

Tournament ; Owensboro 
— South Carolina 
— Virginia 
— Clemson College 
— S'outh Carolina 
— North Carolina Stale 

George Washington 

Navy 

— William & Mary College 
— George Washington 
— North Carolina 
— Clemson College 
— North Carolina State 
— Wake Forest 
— Georgetown University 




* Home Games at College Park. 

Maryland 60; Georgetown 43 

aryland scored 12 points 
to Georgetown's one in 
the last four minutes 
in the season's opener 
as the Millikanmen 
opened their basketball 
schedule with a 60-43 
win over the Hoyas before a noisy, 
standing-room-only crowd of 4,200 in 
Ritchie Coliseum. 

A tremendous individual perform- 
ance by Bob Kessler, who posted 26 
points despite nine misses from the 
free-throw line, helped the Terps main- 
tain a lead that never was less than 
six points in the second half. 

Maryland completely dominated the 
backboards and, with some good de- 
fensive tactics, held Warren Buehler, 
Georgetown's all-time record-scorer to 
five points. 

Maryland 49; Duke 47 
The Terps came from behind in the 
last two minutes and conquered Duke, 
49-47, in an Atlantic Coast Conference 
basketball game before 4200 screaming 
fans. 

(Concluded on Page 14) 



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SOCCER 




Maryland 3; N. C. S. 3 

aryland, trailing by two 
goals, and with its six 
year string of unde- 
feated games in confer- 
ence play rapidly be- 
coming a thing of the 
past, Coach Doyle Roy- 
al's soccer team came 
from behind to gain a 3-3 tie with sur- 
prisingly strong North Carolina State. 
Navy 3; Maryland 1 
Navy avenged last year's loss to 
Maryland by coming from behind to 
down the Terps, 3-1. 

Navy tied up the game after Mary- 
land had gone ahead on a goal by Mike 
Finchi on a long shot from outside 
the penalty area. Navy scored on a 
penalty kick. Navy wrapped it up in 
the second quarter. 

Maryland 3; Hopkins 

Maryland's soccer team defeated 
Johns Hopkins 3-0 at College Park. 
The Royalists outplayed Hopkins 
throughout the game, and failed to 
boost the score higher due to several 
spectacular saves by the Hopkins 
goalie. 

As usual the Terps one-two scoring 
punch of Otto Winckelmann and Joe 
Hagedorn led the attack. The former 
scored twice, the latter once. 

Coach Doyle Royal emptied the 
bench in the last period to give his re- 
serves some experience. Hopkins had 
three shots at the goal in the last 
period they failed to score. The game 
ended 3-0 in favor of the Terps. 

Maryland 4; No. Carolina 1 

Otto Winckelmann played a record 
game against North Carolina, scoring 
all four of Maryland's goals; one in 
the second quarter, two in the third 
and one in the fourth. 

The Terps had 24 shots at the goal 
to the Tarheels' 15, the latter scoring 
only once. 

Connecticut 1; Maryland 

Against Connecticut University the 
Terps were shut out, 1-0, on their 
farthest northern trip of the season. 

Although the Liners had possession 
of the ball nearly 90 per cent of the 
fourth quarter, the home team's one 
goal in the third was enough to win. 

Terps Take Title 

Maryland's soccer team again won 
clear title to the Atlantic Coast con- 
ference championship by blanking Vir- 
ginia 7-0. 

Coach Doyle Royal's Terps previ- 
ously had defeated North Carolina and 
Duke in ACC competition, but were 
tied by N. C. State. Virginia had gone 
unbeaten in three earlier conference 
games, but two were ties. 

Maryland 0; W&L 

Neither team could score in the 
Maryland-Washington & Lee game in 
spite of two overtime periods. W&L 
fielded a powerful team, their number 
1 sports unit since they had no foot- 
ball team. They lost only one game 
all season. 




Otto Winckelmann, Maryland's high 
scorer, was not able to play for the 
first time in three years, due to an 
infected leg. His offensive punch was 
sorely missed. The Terps did well in 
getting 16 shots at the goal compared 
to only 8 for W&L. 

Otto Winckelmann was the leading 
ACC scorer with 8 goals in conference 
competition and 12 for the season. This 
was Maryland's second straight ACC 
championship. Have never lost a con- 
ference game in 6 years. 

Coach Doyle Royal's lads finished 
with a 5-3-2 record. 



RIFLE 



Riflemen Win 

a r y 1 a n d ' s National 
championship rifle team 
shot to victory over two 
visiting teams and the 
local ROTC squad. 

Firing against Drexel 
University and La Salle 
College with the AF- 
ROTC team to boot, the Liners scored 
1,408 points out of a possible 1,500. 
Leading the Marylanders was Lynn 
Savage who totaled a steady 286 out 
of 300. Teammates Ernie Reddle and 
Bud Barton, with identical marks of 
283, were right behind. 

High man for the evening, however, 
was Larry Lomolino with 288. Shooting 
for the ROTC Lomolino is ineligible for 
varsity competition. 

Trailing in team score were the 
ROTC, 1,390; Drexel, 1,332; and La 
Salle with 1,306. 

To Venezuela 
Lt. Arthur Cook, Maryland alumnus 
and rifle coach who won both the na- 
tional and world Olympic titles was 
among five . 22-caliber rifle sharp- 
shooters who were named to represent 
the United States in the world rifle and 
pistol championships at Caracas, Vene- 
zuela. 

Rifle and pistol marksmen were se- 
lected by the National Rifle Associa- 
tion of America. 



RIFLE 

*Oct. 29 LaSalle College 
Drexel Institute 

*No-v. 6 Georgetown University 

Nov. 20 Georgetown University 

Feb. 12 Virginia Military Institute 

•Feb. 19 V. S. M. A. 

Mar. 5 U. S. N. A. 

*Mar. 12 Virginia Military Institute 

*Mar. 19 N.R.A. Sectional Meet 



* Home Meets at College Park. 
****** 

IN THE "OLD LINE" 

The psychologist had finished his 
lecture and was answering questions. 
A meek little guy asked, "Did you say 
that a good poker player could hold 
down any sort of executive job?" 

"That's right. Does it raise a ques- 
tion in your mind?" 

"Yes," came the reply. "What 
would a good poker player want with 
a job?" 



62 



Maryland 





WRESTLING 




'Dec. 


11 — Wake Forest 




•Dec. 


16 — Virginia 




Jan. 


18— Penn State 




Feb. 


5 — Navy 




•Feb. 


11 — V. M. I. 




Feb. 


18 — Duke 




Feb. 


19 — University of N. C. 




•Feb. 


25 — North Carolina State 
e Matches at College Park. 




•Horn 






BOXING 






aryland's boxers face as 
rough a schedule as any 
team in the nation this 
year. However, Coach 
Frank Cronin, who is 
currently president of 
the National Intercol- 
legiate Boxing Associa- 
tion, thinks they have the team to do it. 
This might take some doing, but 
Maryland was Eastern Intercollegiate 
Champion last year and lost the na- 
tional title by only two points. An 
indication of the esteem in which Mary- 
land is held nationally is the fact that 
they have been invited to participate in 
the Sugar Bowl at New Orleans in 
January. Twice before the Terps have 
appeared in the Sugar Bowl, where they 
are undefeated, having beaten Michigan 
State in 1948 and tied Syracuse in 
1952. This year their opponent will very 
likely be L.S.U. 

Seven lettermen are returning, led 
by Gary Garber, National 125 pound 
champ, Vinnie Palumbo, National 132 
pound title holder, and Leo Coyne, 
Eastern Heavyweight champ who this 
year will be fighting as a 175 pounder. 
Other returnees are Guido Capri, whom 
Cronin terms one of the most improved 
men on the squad, Eric Heintze, Royd 
Smith, and Gary Fischer. The latter 
returns after a year's absence. 

Up from last year's freshman squad 
are Gene Waters and Jack Davis, one 
of whom Cronin expects to be the regu- 
lar heavyweight. Gary Jawish, who 
according to Cronin is one of the out- 
standing collegiate heavyweights in the 
country, will be returning in February. 
The Eastern Intercollegiate Cham- 
pionships will be held here at College 
Park in March. After two dual matches 
apiece with Syracuse and Virginia, and 
single encounters with L.S.U., Army, 
and Michigan State, the team will also 
compete in the national championships 
at Idaho State in April. 

BOXING 



Dee. 28— L. S. U. 

Jan. 15— Syracuse 

Jan. 29 — Michigan State 

•Feb. 11 — Virginia 

Feb. 19 — Army 

•Feb. 26 — Syracuse 

Mar. 5 — Virginia 



* Home Matches at College Park. 




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WHAT GOES ON AT OUR ALMA MATER? 

WHAT OF OUR CLASSMATES? WHAT'S THE ALUMNI 
NEWS? THE SPORTS NEWS? 

Clip this ad and coupon and send it in. You can use the coupon for 
renewals too. Make your overall alumni contribution with $3.00 of it going 
for "Maryland" magazine. 

Please pass this message along to non-subscribers 



CUT IT OUT NOW!" :$ 




vlv SECRETARY, ALUMNI ASSOC! 

1% UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

Enclosed herewith is $ , my contribution to the 

Alumni Fund. $3.00 of this amount is for a subscription to "MARYLAND" 
for one year. 




TRACK 

Carter Wins 

ervin (Tex) Carter, who 
won letters as a hurd- 
ler at Maryland in '51 
and '52, scored 5,330 
points and defeated ten 
rivals, to win the 
A. A. U. Ail-Around 
Championship at Druid Hill Par, Balti- 
more. 

Carter won two events — the pole 
vault with a jump of 11 feet (856 
points) and the high hurdles with a 
time of :15.5 (1,015 points). 
Terps Take Duke 

Maryland's cross-country team and 
sophomore Tommy New reached their 
peaks as the Terps shellacked Duke, 
15-55. 

New won his first varsity meet with 
a 17 :07 performance over the three and 
a half mile course, ahead of teammate 
Burr Grim who ran the distance in 
17:08, finished one-two in every Terp 
meet thus far this season. 

All eight Maryland runners finished 
in front of Duke's first man. The other 
six Terps finished in their respective 
order were Ben Good, Carl Party, Ray 
Horsley, Jerry McGee, Larry Faass 
and Paul Hower. 

Terps Take Triangle 

Maryland's top cross-country man, 
Burr Grimm, was defeated for the first 
time by North Carolina's Beatty. How- 
ever, both broke the four mile course 
record with times of 19:42 and 19:48 
respectively. 

Jim Kehoe's Terps won the triangu- 
lar meet at Chapel Hill. The score: 
Maryland 24, North Carolina 35, and 
Wake Forest 95. 

Terps Take Cavaliers 

Maryland's cross-country team shat- 
tered the old course record as they 
shellacked Virginia 15-55. 

This was by far the best perform- 
ance for the Terps this year as five 
men broke the 3.8 mile course record 
at 19:18. The old record was set by 
Burr Grim earlier this year in a meet 
with Navy. 

Grim led the Terrapins with a win- 
ning record time of 18:40. This was 
an improvement of 38 seconds over 
his old record. 

All of the Terrapins finished ahead 
of the first Virginia fan. The other 
Terps who broke Grim's old record 
were Ben Good, Tommy New, Carl 
Party and Ray Horsely. 

Maryland's romp was complete when 
Jerry McGee, Larry Faass and Paul 
Hower finished in the last three posi- 
tions. Virginia was led by Bob Greer 
who was 48 second behind the last 
Maryland runner. 

INDOOR TRACK 

Jan. 21 — Philadelphia Inquirer 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Jan. 22 — Washington Evening Star 

Washington, D.C. 

Feb. 5 — Millrose A. A. NewYork, N.Y. 

Feb. 12 — New York A. C. New York, N.Y. 

*Fcb. 19 — Navy College Park, Md. 

Feb. 26 — Atlantic Coast Conference 

Chapel Hill, N.C. 



* Home Meet at College Park. 



64 



Maryland 





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'OL. XXVI, NO. 2 
iOc THE COPY 
3 THE YEAR 



that will command respect, attract recognition and 
justify pride.'' 

"I accept the office with humility, gratitude and 

Confidence. " — From Inaugural Address of 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 



MARCH-APRIL 
1955 





c4t Presidential 3nau.gu.ral Ceremonies 

Left to right: His Excellency, Theodore R. McKeldin, U.B., LL.D., Governor 
of Maryland. 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, B.A., M.A., Litt.B., D.Phil., President, University of Mary- 
land. 

Judge William P. Cole, Jr., LL.B., Chairman, Board of Regents, University of 
Maryland. 



DANEGGER FOTO 




WHILE 



I N 



WAS H I N G TO N 

visit the beautiful 

new home of America's 

outstanding 

savings and loan 




PERPETUAL 

KUILDIIMG ASSOCIATION 



Edward C. Baltz, President 

1 1TH & E STREETS, N. W. 

OTHER OFFICES IN SILVER SPRING 
AND BETHESDA. MARYLAND 

RESOURCES: over $ 185,000,000 



&J!8fr, 




Vol. XXVI 



March-April. 1955 



No. 2 




l&u&ticaUoH <U (oc /riutwtiS 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of 
Maryland, and entered at the Post Office, 
College Park, Md., as second class mail mat- 
ter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 
1879. $3.00 per year — Fifty cents the copy. 



OFFICE OF PUBLICATION 

28 Symons Hall. 

University of Maryland, 

College Park. Md. 

WA. 7-3800, Ext. 24ft or 394 



HARVEY L. MILLER, 
Managing Editor 



PATRICIA M. REIHM, 

Assistant Editor 



JOSEPH F. BLAIR, 

Sports Editor 



SALLY L. OGDEN, 

Advertising Manager, 

18 W. 25th Street 

Baltimore 18. Md. 

(HO. 7-9018) 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

OHicers 

Col. O. II. Saunders '10, President 
J. Homer Remsherg '18, Vice-President 
,T. Gilbert P.-ndergnst *33. Vice-President 
David L. Brigham '38, Exec- Secy. 

General Alumni Council 

AGRICULTURE — Clayton Reynolds '22, 

Abram Z. Goltwals '38, .1. Homer Items- 

berg '18. 
ARTS' & SCIENCES— William H. Press '28, 

Charles Elllnger '37, Ralph G. Shure '32. 
RUSINESS & PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION— 

Alvin S. Klein '37, John Dyson '53, Roger 

L. Odette '52. 
DENTAL — Dr. Lawrence W. Rimestefer *34, 

Albert C. Cook '38, William E. Trail '20. 
EDUCATION — John P. Speicher '41, William 

Prigg '53, E. Louise Sudlow '50. 
ENGINEERING — S. Chester Ward '32, C. A. 

Warthen '08. Col. O. H. Saunders '10. 
HOME ECONOMICS — Katherlne A. Longrtdge 

'29, Mrs. Paul Coppinger '30, Mrs. William 

Krlcker '31. 
LAW — J. Gilbert IVndergast '33, J. Dudley 

Digges '.'Mi, G. Kenneth lteiblich '29. 
MEDICAI Albert E. Goldstein '12, Thurs- 
ton R. Adams '34, William H. Triplett "11. 
PHARMACY— Frank Block '24, John Neutze 

'37. Samuel I. Raichlen '25. 
NURSING — Flora Street '3, Virginia Stack 

'33, Martha Curtiss '48. 

Alumni Clubs 

BALTIMORE — Win. II. Triplett, "11. 

CARROLL COUNTY— Dr. L. L. Leggett, '30. 
Sr. '24. 

CUMBERLAND— Dr. J. Russell Cook "23. 

EASTERN SHORE — Otis Twllly '21. 

"M" CLUB — Sam Silber, '34. 

NEW ENGLAND — R. A. B. Cook, '05. 

NEW YORK — Miss Sarah E. Morris, '24. 

PITTSBURGH — Charles Furtney, '37. 

PRINCE GEORGE'S CO.— Ellwood R. Nich- 
olas '28. 

RICHMOND— Paul Miillinlx, '30. 

SCHENECTADY— Mrs. Marie Esher, '45. 

TERRAPIN — James W. Stevens, '17. 

Ex-Officio 

Past President — Dr. A. E. Goldstein, "12. 
Past President — Dr. A. I. Bell, 'Jl>. 
Past President — C. V. Koons, '29. 
Past President — T. T. Speer. '17. 
University President — Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 
Executive Secretary — David L. Brigham, '88. 



The State And The University 



ii 



". . . The Challenge Of Providing Leadership In A Pro- 
gram That Will Command Respect, Attract Recognition 

And Justify Pride." 
"The University Is The Rear 
Guard And Advance Agent 
Of Society. It Lives In The 
Past, The Present, And The 
Future." 

The Inaugural Address 
fey Wildon Jl. ZUzIhA- 

B.A., M.A.. Litt. B., D. Phil. 
President, University of Maryland. 



'hen the people of 
this proud and 
historic State estab- 
lished the University of 
Mary land, 
they envi- 
sioned an in- 
stitution o f 
higher learn- 
i n g that 
would serve 
t o promote 
prosperity, 
democracy and individuality. They en- 
trusted their high hopes to a govern- 
ing board and, among other things, 
delegated the power to appoint an 
executive officer called the President. 
That power has been exercised infre- 
quently (which is a pleasant thought) 
and I am delighted that after the cus- 
tomary initiation period the Chairman 




of the Board of Regents has confirmed 
my election, and has honored me with 
the prhilege of providing leadership 
in the advancement of the University. 
I accept the office with humility, grati- 
tude and confidence. 

Asks Divine Guidance 

My humility comes from a realiza- 
tion that no man is self-made, that 
there is a Power higher than mankind 
whose many blessings I have enjoyed 
and whose divine guidance I beseech 
for my administration. I realize that 
no person can attain a high and re- 
spected place without the help of many 
people, nor can he maintain it unless 
he has the support of those who are 
associated with him. I stand humbly 
in the shadow of magnificent contribu- 
tions by my predecessors, and in the 
presence of a host of men and women 
who have given time, toil and talent, 
with little thought and still less hope 
of adequate reward. I am grateful to 
numerous friends who have contributed 
to my advancement by their loyalty and 
encouragement. I am indebted especial- 
ly to my wife and children whose love, 
patience and criticism have furnished 
me with inspiration and balance. 

My confidence in the future is 
strengthened by a sympathetic and en- 
lightened Governor and General As- 
sembly, by a Board of Regents whose 
courage in bringing a Texan to Mary- 
land cannot be questioned, and whose 
foresight, I trust, will be equally evi- 
dent with the passing of time. I am 



In The Spacious Armory 




A SECTION OF THE CROWD 
At Inaugural and Charter Day exercises. 



DANEGGER FOTO 



Inaugural Address 

Mr on 




DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 

B.A., M.A., Ldtt.B., D.Phil. 

President 

University of Maryland 

"The challenge of providing leader- 
ship in a program that will command 
respect, attract recognition and justify 
pride." 

"I accept the office with humility, 
gratitude and confidence." 



confident that the Faculty and Staff 
of the University are devoted to the 
cause they serve, and that they will 
respond to a sincere desire on my part 
to work in harmony and to cooperate 
in achieving common objectives. 

Enviable Reputation 
I refer to the objectives which have 
motivated men and women for centur- 
ies in the development of colleges and 
universities. Although the early Amer- 
ican institutions were characterized by 
a narrow curriculum and an artisto- 
cratic attitude, they pioneered a pro- 
gram which served society by providing 
leadership in the recognized profes- 
sions of their day. Unsupported by the 
State, they did not have an obligation 
to serve all of the people, whose phi- 
losphy was far less democratic than 
that which was to develop in the years 
ahead. The modern counterparts of 
these early institutions, whose repre- 
sentatives honor us today, have estab- 
lished an enviable reputation in the 
educational world. 

The state university gradually 
evolved with the demand of the masses 
for equality of opportunity, a fuller 
participation in the affairs of govern- 
ment, a large share in the benefits of 
an expanding economy, and the spread 



Maryland 



University Marshal 



Welcome to the Old Line State 




NEW MACE 

The mace presented to the University 
by the Alumni Association is carried 
by University Marshal, Dr. Allan G. 
Gruchy, Professor of Economics. 



of the population to the western terri- 
tory where private funds were inade- 
quate to support education. As the 
democratic trend advanced and the 
economy of the country demanded more 
technical and general training, the 
state universities and colleges increased 
in number and expanded their pro- 
grams. The Land-Grant Act of 1862 
provided a stimulus which influenced 
both the rise and development of these 
institutions, but neither this Act nor 
subsequent Acts could have been passed 
and made effective in the absence of 
an underlying philosophy that the state 
had an obligation to provide opportuni- 
ties for all who sought to improve 
themselves through education. 



Alumni Gift 




*'^-. 




DANEGGBB FOTO 



ON CHARTER DAY 
Dr. Elkins, left, is greeted by Governor and Mrs. Theodore R. McKeldin. 



The University of Maryland, as we 
know its present compositon, was a 
later comer. For various reasons the 
forerunners of the existing University 
were not brought together until 1920. 
With due credit to the remarkable con- 
tributions of the College of Medicine 
and the other professional schools in 
Baltimore, to Maryland Agricultural 
College, and the college at Princess 
Anne, suffice it to say that their work 
was carried on without substantial sup- 
port by the State until after the Gen- 
eral Assembly responded to the call 
for consolidation. Since that time, and 
particularly since 1935, the growth has 
been phenomenal and the service ren- 
dered has justified the claims of those 
who sought to extend the benefits of 
higher education in Maryland. 

"Never Will Be" 

When Thomas Jefferson wrote -"If a 
nation expects to be ignorant and free 
in a state of civilization, it expects 
what never was and never will be," he 
was thinking about the necessity of 
universal education to secure the bless- 
ings of liberty and he was advocating 
the support of public, as well as priv- 
ate schools. While addressing himself 
to the requisites of intelligent citizen- 
ship, he was keenly aware of the rela- 



tion of education to economic prosper- 
ity. His controversial views gained 
more and more support, and by the 
time this University was organized in 
its present form, they were accepted 
generally. Doubtless, they were recog- 
nized by the representatives of the 
people of Maryland when they acted 
to provide more extensive service. The 
purposes of the University, expressed 
and implied, were to provide profes- 
sional and vocational training, and 
thereby enable the individual to make 
a living and contribute to the economic 
well-being of others; to improve citi- 
zenship and thereby strengthen the 
principles of freedom and the insti- 
tutions of a free people; and to pre- 
serve and enrich our cultural heritage 
and thereby enable the citizens to live 
more happily and promote the advance- 
ment of civilization. 

State Interest 

In this expression, which called for 
support by all of the people, the State 
sought to make available the benefits 
of higher education in accordance with 
ability and interest — and with as little 
regard as possible to the individual's 
financial condition. Nevertheless, edu- 
cation was considered a privilege which, 



< * » » ; » > > » i — fr iii 




NEW UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND MACE 
A gift of the Alumni Association, the mace was carried for the first time at the inaugural ceremonies by University 
Marshal Dr. Allan G. Gruchy. 



Maryland 



Inaugural Luncheon 




PRIOR TO INAUGURATION 
A section of the University's spacious Dining Hall on the occasion of the Charter Day Inauguration of President Elkins. 



if enjoyed, required the recipient to 
plan, to work, and to demonstrate abil- 
ity. There were financial limitations 
and individual differences which pre- 
cluded the making of facilities avail- 
able to all in a like manner. Higher 
education, (which would not be higher 
if designed for everyone), could not be 
distributed equally unless somehow in- 
dividual differences were eliminated. 

The representatives of the state saw 
the fallacy in the theory that a demo- 
cratic society should enable all indi- 
viduals to enjoy the same benefits or 
one individual to accomplish as much 
as any other. Although there has been 
some progress toward providing op- 
portunity according to ability, re- 
sources are so limited and varied that 
the outlook is not bright for achieving 
this ideal of democracy. 

State Obligation 

Another obligation which the State 
has assumed is to maintain a first-class 
program. At the University of Mary- 
land the extent of the program must 
be determined by the needs and de- 
mands of the people and may be lim- 
ited by their resources and attitude to- 
ward additional taxation. This, how- 
ever, can be influenced by aggressive 
and enlightened leadership which places 
a heavy responsibility on those who ac- 
cept the trust of the electorate. What- 
ever the limitations may be, the pro- 
grams which are authorized should be 
adequately supported. To do this 
buildings and equipment are necessary, 
particularly in this scientific age, but 
of primary importance are men and 
women of integrity, efficiency and ex- 
perience. They comprise the commu- 
nity of teachers, scholars, administra- 
tors, and supporting personnel who 



Reception Line 




DANEGGEIt FOTO 



DISTINGUISHED GUESTS 



Governor Theodore R. McKeldin. Mrs. Elkins, President Elkins, Colonel Joseph 
R. Ambrose, USAF, Dean, College of Military Science, receive distinguished guests. 



Maryland 



Chairman 




DR. LEON P. SMITH 

A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 
Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 

Presiding Chairman, Inaugural and 
Charter Day Exercises. 



perform the functions of a modern 
university. 

In order to attract and retain indi- 
viduals who will provide guidance, in- 
struction and research of a high qual- 
ity, it is necessary to compete with 
other institutions, many of whom have 
recognized the value of attractive sal- 
aries. The cold and hard fact is that 
we are going to have to pay for what 
we get in education. Obviously, there 
are other factors which contribute to 
effective work, but Maryland cannot 
escape (although it nay be slow to 
fulfill) the responsibility of providing 
means to maintain a program which 
will stand any reasonable test. 

Teaching And Research 

Since coming to Maryland, I have 
been questioned about the relationship 
of teaching and research and how much 
research should be done by a state 
university. These are questions which 
must be answered by individual states 
and institutions. The University of 
Maryland's primary function is teach- 
ing, but it has a strong secondary func- 
tion in research. 

All knowledge goes back to some 
kind of research and unless we are con- 
tent to stand still while others pass 
by or to depend upon the other person 
for progress, the State must provide 
funds to supplement private and fed- 
eral grants. Each department of the 
University should be required to justify 
the amount requested by showing evi- 
dence of projects and problems the 
completion, study or solution of which 
may be useful to society, just as each 
department is requested to justify 
amounts required for teaching in terms 



01 the number of students enrolled. 
The consensus that teaching should 
not be neglected for any other activity 
argues strongly for separate funds to 
allow a reduction of the teaching load 
for selected individuals. In urging the 
State to consider this need, it is well 
to be reminded that a denial of funds 
may and often does result in neglect 
of the teaching function of a Univer- 
sity since scholars will carry on re- 
search regardless of adequate support. 
An investment in research is an in- 
vestment in the progress of our State 
and country. 

"Most Efficient Way" 

The area of administration is always 
recognized by the state, but inasmuch 
as it deals more directly with the poc- 
ketbook, it is sometimes suspected by 



Student Pledge 




REYBURN E. BROWNING 

President, Student Government 

Association 

"We pledge student support in a new 
chapter for the University." 



legislatures and others, (and I might 
add that the faculty occasionally sus- 
pects a niggardly policy on the part 
of the administration). Notwithstand- 
ing any attitude which may exist, the 
administration is at least a necessary 
evil in a modern university where the 
log of Mark Hopkins has been con- 
verted to an atom smasher. The gov- 
erning board and their representatives 
should be kept in a position to carry 
out, in the most efficient way, the pur- 
pose of the institution. The University 



of Maryland is a large and complex 
organization which has no counterpart 
in the business world, and unless this 
is recognized by appropriate regula- 
tions which safeguard both the ad- 
ministration and the representatives 
of the people, the University will cease 
to be an institution worthy of its name. 
Where the abstract and the concrete 
mingle imperceptibly, where highly 
specialized individuals are engaged in 
the development of ideas and the dis- 
covery of new truths, where the com- 
fort and morale of thousands of stu- 
dents must be considered, where sup- 
plies and equipment range from a bee 
to an electron microscope, it is desir- 
able to have considerable latitude in 
the formulation of policies, in the ad- 
ministration of the resultant programs 
and activities, and in the management 
of the physical properties. 

Many Responsibilities 

If the State has assumed the fore- 
going obligations, certainly the Univer- 
sity has many responsibilities and du- 
ties. First of all, it is charged with 
the responsibility of carrying out legis- 
lative enactments and abiding by re- 
strictions. If it engages in permissive 
programs, it should do so only after a 
full investigation has shown a real need 
and assured adequate support. Too 
many institutions, under the guise of 
serving all of the people but actually 
suffering from the dread disease of 
empire building have spread their ef- 
forts so far that they are shallow and 
watery. Maryland, as a Land-Grant in- 
stitution and the State University, 
should continue to offer a broad pro- 
gram in such fields as Agriculture, 
Engineering, Home Economics, Military 
Science, Education, the Liberal and Ap- 



F acuity Welcome 




DR. CHARLES E. WHITE 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 
Professor of Chemistry 

"The faculty has been deeply im- 
pressed by Dr. Elkins' performance." 



Maryland 



plied Arts and Sciences, Business, and 
professions dealing with health and 
justice, but it must be guided by prac- 
tical as well as idealistic considera- 
tions. (This administration may have 
to be reminded that oil is not gushing 
from the Chesapeake Bay and that 
Maryland is richer in human resources 
than in the natural elements). 

With this in mind, the University is 
obligated to perform its function as 
economically as sound educational 
practices will permit. On the non- 
academic side, the administration must 
not confuse means with ends by build- 
ing a staff of disproportionate size. In 
academic divisions there is need for a 
continuous study of the curriculum to 
guard against duplication and the mul- 
tiplication of courses by the tendency 
of specialists to over-specialize. With 
enrollment increasing and unmistak- 
able signs pointing to a much larger 
increase, the University must display 
the same ingenuity and enthusiasm in 
finding ways to economize as it does 
to show the needs of values of educa- 
tion. 

"Best Work Possible" 
The University should be expected 
to maintain conditions conducive to the 
best work possible within available 
means. Recognizing that money is an 
important factor in the employment 
and encouragement of faculty and staff, 
it must be ever mindful of the fact 
that money does not guarantee a great 
seat of learning. Morale, spirit, and 
teamwork are determined by other 
factors such as proper recognition and 
the satisfaction which comes from 
being a vital part of an organization. 
In the selection of instructors careful 
attention should be given to potentials, 



Alumni Welcome 




COLONEL OSWALD H. SAUNDERS 

U.S.A. (Ret.) B.S., LL.B. 

"We pledge more active alumni par- 
ticipation." 



both personal and professional, so that 
promotions in rank and salary may be 
made on a basis of merit and not sym- 
pathy. We must be mindful of the 
prevailing criticism that higher sal- 
aries do not assure better education 
but, under certain circumstances, mere- 
ly mean increases for the mediocre and 
incompetent. To justify our requests 
we must assure the public that facul- 
ties do not clamor for academic free- 
dom and tenure in order to hide dis- 
loyalty and deficiencies. 

Student Problems 

Turning to the student and related 
problems which confront a public in- 
stitution, we are reminded that the 
prevailing philosophy would provide 
opportunity for those who are capable, 
industrious and ambitious. A state 
university, supported by all of the peo- 
ple, cannot be highly selective in the 
admission of high school graduates. It 
admits, and in my judgment will con- 



Governor's Welcome 



Regents' Presentation 




JUDGE WILLIAM P. COLE, JR. 
LL.B. 

Chairman of the Board of Regents 

"Universities must be led by capable, 
honest, conscientious administrators. 
The Board of Regents feels it has such 
a leader in the gentleman I have the 
honor of presenting." 



tinue to admit, a heterogeneous group. 
While the citizen will demand a chance 
for his son or daughter, he will, I 
think, allow and even favor the main- 
tenance of a reasonably high standard 
of performance in the University. The 
right to require and maintain such a 
standard must be defended with cour- 
age and guarded with vigilance if the 
University would avoid educational 
mediocrity. In this connection, there 
is considerable danger in the offering 
of sub-college level courses. By doing 
this we say in effect that if the stu- 




His Excellency 

THEODORE R. McKELDIN 

LL.B., LL.D. 

Governor of Maryland 

"I here and now pledge Dr. Elkins 
all proper support ... to make the 
University even greater as an institu- 
tion of learning." 



dent does not prepare properly in high 
school, the University will repeat 
courses, using professors whose time 
should be devoted to what we like to 
call higher learning. There are some 
secondary level science courses which 
may be justified on the grounds that 
they cannot be offered in every high 
school, but the repetition of basic Eng- 
lish and Mathematics involves a ques- 
tionable practice as it is not the re- 
sponsibility of the University to pre- 
pare students for admission. 

Society's Well-Being 

Any institution which is created and 
maintained by the people should con- 
cern itself with those subjects, atti- 
tudes and ideals which contribute to 
the well-being of a free society. This 
is part of a liberal education about 
which we read so much and understand 
so little. A liberal education, by most 
definitions^ .is somewhat different to- 
day thafT'rfAvas in ancient Greece 
where tlfe educated did not have to 
make a living. It prepares the indi- 
vidual to make a satisfactory adjust- 
ment to society, and to aid in the im- 
provement of society. For the aver- 
age student this means that he should 
be given the courses and kind of in- 
struction that will help him to make 
a living, to live usefully and happily. 
Since making a living cannot be de- 
layed indefinitely, only a limited num- 
ber of subjects can be included in the 
course of study. While content is im- 



Maryland 



portant it is often less effective than 
method in the process of developing 
the whole individual. If we accept the 
proposition that a liberally educated 
person is one who has a proper sense 
of values, the ability to get along with 
others, the ability to think, and the 
will to think about matters of import- 
ance to self and society, the develop- 
ment of these qualities may be and 
should be part of any course of study 
and depends more upon the instructor 
than the content. I submit to you that 
values and attitudes developed in activ- 
ities outside the classroom, including 
football, are important elements of a 
liberal education. 

Agent Of The People 

By way of summary, emphasis, and 
conclusion, the State University is an 
agent of the people dependent upon 
the representatives of the people for 
financial support. Although dependent 
for material existence and progress, 
the University must be independent 
within a circumscribed sphere, a sphere 
that includes the search for truth and 
the freedom to deal with any subject 
as long as this is done with a view to 
arriving at the truth or a logical con- 
clusion. It must be independent of 
group pressure, political expediency, 
and individual whims. 

The University is the rear guard and 
the advance agent of society. It lives 
in the past, the present and the future. 
It is the storehouse of knowledge; it 
draws upon this depository to throw 
light upon the present; it prepares peo- 
ple to liva and make a living in the 
world of today; and it should take the 
lead in expanding the intellectual hori- 
zons and the scientific frontiers, thus 
helping mankind to go forward — al- 
ways toward the promise of a better 
tomorrow. 

State And University Interwoven 

The State and the University are 
inextricably interwoven, and there 
should be no basic conflict if there is 
understanding. One derives its author- 
ity directly from the people, the other 
indirectly through the representatives 
of the people, and both are expected 
to serve the welfare of the people. Each 
must justify its existence by an ac- 
count of its services. So long as the 
State remains the servant of the peo- 
ple, it will survive and grow more use- 
ful to a complex society. In this 
growth it will give additional support 
to institutions which are dedicated to 
the building of better citizens and the 
promotion of their prosperity and hap- 
piness. 

As President of the University of 
Maryland, I look forward to the chal- 
lenge of providing leadership in a 
program that will command respect, at- 
tract recognition, justify pride, and 
merit the compliment you have paid 
this institution by your presence here 
today. 



INAUGURAL 
EXERCISES 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, star athlete 
and doctor of philosophy, was 
inaugurated as fourth president of the 
University of Maryland on January 20, 
1955. 

Wearing the soft blue and red gown 
of an Oxford doctor of philosophy. Dr. 
Elkins was formally installed as head 
of the university he has directed since 
last September. 

A crowd close to 3,000 filled the 
Armory to witness the colorful cere- 
mony. Representatives of 300 colleges 
and universities, led by Harvard, 
marched in the academic procession, 
led off for the first time by a shining 
new university mace, gift of the 
Alumni Association, carried by Univer- 
sity Marshal Dr. Allan G. Gruchy, Pro- 
fessor of Economics. 

Political Leaders 
A large delegation from the Mary- 
land General Assembly, members of 
Maryland's Congressional delegation, 
diplomats, representatives of learned 
societies and scholars attended. 

They heard Dr. Elkins outline his 
views on the administration of a uni- 
versity, as printed in full in the lead 
article in these pages. 

Dr. Elkins's predecessors were Dr. 
Albert F. Woods, until 1926; Dr. Ray- 
mond A. Pearson, from 1926 to 1937, 
and Dr. Byrd, from 1937 until January 
2, 1954, when Dr. Thomas B. Symons, 
former dean of agriculture, was ap^ 
pointed acting president. 

Of the four presidents, Dr. Byrd and 
Dr. Symons were Marylanders. Dr. 
Woods came from the University of 
Minnesota, and Dr. Pearson was presi- 
dent of Iowa State College prior to 
his Maryland appointment. 

Governor McKeldin 
Governor Theodore R. McKeldin 
stated in an address welcoming Presi- 
dent Elkins, that provisions have been 
made in his current budget proposals 
"to effect accreditation" of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland." 

"I here and now pledge Dr. Elkins all 
proper support within available State 
resources in whatever project he may 
undertake to make the university even 
greater as an institution of learning," 
the Governor promised. 

"The State administration can at 
best play no more than the part of a 
willing and enthusiastic lieutenant in 
this work, which must be accomplished 
for the most part within the univer- 
sity," the Governor said. 

He did not specifically outline all the 
financial outlays he has proposed in 
his budget to be presented to the 
General Assembly, but an aide said 
$2,200,000 is proposed for a new 
library. 

The Governor said the university 
fund proposals were worked out with 
Dr. Elkins, who has said all areas of 
criticism can be cleared up by either 
appropriations or by orders from his 
office. 



"I take pride in the fact that wo 
are offering Dr. Elkins physical facili- 
ties comparable to any in the country," 
the Governor said, "but I do not cherish 
the delusion that possession of a su- 
perb physical plant is enough to assure 
him that he may be at ease in Zion." 

He called Dr. Bryd's tenure — and 
that of Acting President Thomas B. Sy- 
mons — great examples of "ability, in- 
dustry and fidelity." 

Gov. McKeldin said he does not be- 
lieve the people of the State expect 
the school under Dr. Elkins to exceed 
or equal its rapid expansion of recent 
years. 

"What we do hope from his admini- 
stration is that it may set a record 
in scholarship comparable to the physi- 
cal growth of the university," the 
Governor said. 

Judge William P. Cole, Jr. 

Following Governor McKeldin's ad- 
dress Judge William P. Cole, Jr., chair- 
man of the Board of Regents, referring 
to the academic and athletic back- 
grounds, as well as his family life, 
spoke in highly laudatory terms of Dr. 
Elkins and then presented the new 
president and administered to him the 
charge of office. 

"As we assemble on this 148th an- 
niversary of the charter of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland to give special and 
appropriate recognition to the entrance 
of a new President, we recall those 
who so ably served us in the past, only 
two of whom — Dr.- Byrd and Dr. Sy- 
mons — are living. The contribution of 
our former Presidents to the up-build- 
ing of this institution will live for- 
ever as a monument to their industry, 
ability, and fidelity," said Judge Cole. 

"The responsibilities of the office of 
President of any University are great. 
In the case of our state Universities," 
Judge Cole went on to say, "recognized 
as the land grant colleges by the Fed- 
eral Government, they are tremendous. 
Practically every known phase of edu- 
cation is present, with their many 
ramifying and complex problems. Like- 
wise, agriculture, in all its might, looks 
for solution of its increasingly impor- 
tant needs. Such Universities are, 
therefore, the states' most vital organ. 
They must be strong in every Depart- 
ment and led in their daily effort by 
capable, honest, and conscientious ad- 
ministrators. 

"The Board of Regents," Judge Cole 
concluded, "feels that it has such a 
leader in the gentleman I have the 
honor of presenting." 

Dean Leon Smith, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., 
presiding officer, introduced a number 
of university figures in speeches of 
welcome. 

Reyburn E. Browning 

Reyburn E. Browning, of Mount 
Airy, student body president, pledged 
student support of Dr. Elkins in writ- 
ing "a new chapter" for College Park. 

Colonel O. H. Saunders 

Col. Oswald H. Saunders, B.S., LL.B., 
president of the alumni association, 

Maryland 









said he was glad Dr. Elkins was taking 
a stand for a "more active alumni 
participation" in his administration. 
Only about 4,000 to 5,000 actual gradu- 
ates are now taking part out of a 
prospective almuni reservoir of 40,000, 
Colonel Saunders revealed. 

"We shall try to give you maximum 
support," Colonel Saunders said, ad- 
dressing Dr. Elkins, "and may I say 
that I feel that thousands of gradu- 
ates are supporting me here to make 
sure that you are appropriately and 
properly welcomed. I am happy to re- 
port that many graduates have ex- 
pressed themselves to me in enthusias- 
tic terms to the effect that they have, 
from what they have seen of you, the 
highest confidence that you will meet 
the University's problems with cour- 
age and solve them with vision. The 
graduates of this University and its 
component schools take great pride in 
their diplomas. They value those docu- 
ments. 

Farther In The Future 

"We feel sure," the Colonel went on 
to say, "that with the support of the 
Governor and General Assembly and 
the guidance of the Board of Regents, 
together with the intimate help of the 
Deans, the Administrative personnel 
and all members of the Faculty, you 
will, with a firm hand at the helm, 
steer a course to ever higher accomp- 
lishments in all fields of endeavor of 
this University. 

"It is the wish," Colonel Saunders 
concluded, "the hope and the confident 
belief of the Alumni that, as 'head 
schoolmaster' of this great University 
you are entering upon a long, a happy 
and a fruitful administration. We wish 
you every success." 

Dr. White, Faculty 

Dr. Charles Edward White, B.S., 
M.S., Ph.D., professor of chemistry wel- 
coming President Elkins in behalf of 

| the faculty, reported that the faculty 
was deeply impressed by Dr. Elkins' 
performance of the last few months. 
Bunting and flowers decorated the 

I armory on an occasion also in honor 
of the university's one hundred forty- 
eighth anniversary. 

Several selections were rendered by 
the chapel choir, Director Fague 
Springmann. 

Reverend Nathaniel Acton, St. An- 
drew's College Park, rendered the in- 
vocation and Rabbi Meyer Greenberg, 
campus chaplain, the benediction. 

Since 1807 

The inaugural ceremonies took place 
on the charter day of the University, 
which has been celebrated since Janu- 
ary 20, 1807, at which time Dr. John 
Beale Davidge and several of his as- 
sociates petitioned for and received a 
charter for the College of Medicine of 
Maryland. This was later to become 
the University of Maryland's School of 
Medicine. The School of Medicine, one 
of the oldest medical schools in the 
United States, became a part of the 
University of Maryland in 1812 by 
action of the legislature. In 1920 the 



Maryland College of Agriculture in 
College Park was combined with the 
Baltimore schools under the name of 
the University of Maryland, to become 
a state university. 

From Texas 

The new president gained his sec- 
ondary education in Brackenbridge 
High School, San Antonio. He attended 
Shreiner Institute, Kerrville, Texas 
from 1925 until 1927, and the Univer- 
sity of Texas from 1928 until 1932, 
where he received B.A. and M.A. de- 
grees. 

Dr. Elkins taught at Cisco High 
School from 1932 until 1933. In the 
latter year he was awarded a Rhodes 
Scholarship to Oxford University, 
where he received Bachelor of Litera- 
ture and Doctor of Philosophy degrees 
in 1936. 

At San Angelo 

An instructor in the department of 
history at the University of Texas 
from 1936 until 1938, he next became 
president of San Angelo Junior College 
where he remained until 1948. It was 
in 1949 that he became president of 
Texas Western College, El Paso, Texas 
(a branch of the University of Texas) 
a position he held until his present as- 
signment. 

At the University of Texas Dr. El- 
kins, a four sports star, was known 
as "Bull" Elkins and is oftimes rated 
as "the University of Texas' greatest 
athlete." 

President Elkins married Dorothy 
Blackburn, also a Texan, in 1937. They 
have two children, Carole Ann, age 13, 
and Margaret Elise, age 8. 

Following the inaugural ceremonies 
in the Armory, a reception was held 
in the impressive Student Union Build- 
ing in honor of Dr. Elkins and the 
charming Mrs. Elkins. 

Schools Represented 

Universities and Colleges were rep- 
resented by delegates as listed herein- 
after with dates of foundation of re- 
spective schools, viz: — 

1636 Harvard University, Paul Plummer 
Sweet, Jr., S.I'.. 

1693 College of William and Marv, Thomas 
G. Pullen, Jr., Ed.D., LL.D., L.H.D. Ped.D. 

1696 Saint John's College, President Rich- 
ard D. Weigle, Ph.D. 

1701 Yale University, Cooper Walker, B.A. 

1740 University of Pennsylvania, Adolf E. 
Zucker, Ph.D. 

1746 Princeton University, George Gross 
Finney, M.D. 

1754 Columbia University, J. Allan Cook, 
Ph.D. 

1766 Rutgers University, President Lewis 
Webster Jones, Ph.D., LL.D., L.H.D. 

1769 Dartmouth College, F. Jordan Mc- 
Carthy, B.S. 

1773 Dickinson College, President William 
W. Edel, D.D., S.T.B., L.H.D., LL.D., D.Hu. 

1776 Hampden-Sydney College, William 
S'wan Formwalt, B.S. 

1782 Washington College, President Daniel 
Z. Gibson, Ph.D. 

1787 Franklin and Marshall College, Rich- 
ard H. Byrne, Ed.D. 

1787 University of New Brunswick, John 
D. Babbitt, Ph.D. 

1789 Georgetown University, Very Reverend 
Edward B. Bunn. S.J., President, Ph.D., LL.D. 

1789 University of North Carolina, Robert 
Burton House, LL.D. 

1791 University of Vermont, Howard A. 
Prentice, D.Ed. 

1793 Williams College, Kurt G. Weber, 
Ph.D. 

1794 Bowdoin College, The Honorable Rob- 
ert Hale, B.A. (Oxon.), LL.D. 

1795 Union College, Rexford George Moon, 
Jr., M.A. 

1798 University of Louisville, Mrs. Harri- 



son Houghton, B.A. 

1800 Mlddlebury College, Itnlpli I.. De 
Groff, its. 

1802 United Btatei Military Academy, Wil- 
liam • '. Westmoreland, B.8., Brigadier Sen 
eral, USA. 

1808 Mount Balnl Mary'i College, Right 
Reverend John L. Bberldan, President, a m 
LL.D. 

1809 Miami University, Lynn H. Bum- 
baugh, Ph.D., D.Sc. 

1812 Hamilton College, Scot) Bldge Brew 
er, Jr., Alt. 

1H12 Lycoming College, Beverend J. Mil 
ton Rogers, A. it.. D.D. 

1818 Colby College, Harold i:. Donnell, 

A It. 

iki.-. Allegheny College, Karl L. tireen, 
Ph.D. 

isi7 University of Michigan, George H. 
Roderick, lt.s. 

1818 Dalliinisle I'nlverslty, .lames For- 
rester Davison, LL.M., B.J.D. 

1H19 University of Virginia, Eugene 8. 
Williams. LK.lt. 

1 Slil Amherst College, Enos Smith BtOCk- 
brldge, LL.B. 

1821 George Washington University, Presi- 
dent Cloyd Heck Marvin, Ph.D., LL.D. 

1N21 Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and 
science, President Ivor (irllllth, Sc.D., 
F.R.S.A. 

1823 Trinity College (Hartford, Connecti- 
cut), William Henry Gorman, II, B.A. 

1824 Kenyon College, Jackson E. Betts, 
B.A., LL.B. 

1824 Lafayette College, Robert D. Coff- 
iiiun. A.B., B.C.S. 

1824 Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Wil- 
liam H. Cravens, E.E. 

1825 Jefferson Medical College and Medi- 
cal Center, Harold L. Stewart. M.D. 

1830 Randolph-Macon College, Lambuth 

1839 Boston University, William Edward 
Smith, S.T.B., Th.D. 

1839 Virginia Military Institute, Ludwell 
Lee Montague, Ph.D. 

1841 Fordham University, George W r . Mar- 
key, Jr., A.B., LL.B. 

1841 Queen's University, Alfred Burton 
Dixon, M.D., CM. 

1842 The Citadel, the Military College of 
South Carolina, Harry K. Pickett, B.S'.. Major 
General, USMC (Ret.). 

1842 Mary Baldwin College, Nancy C. 
Kirchner, M.A. 

1842 Ohio Wesleyan University, Philip L. 
Edwards, M.A., D.D. 

1842 Villanova University, John J. Kelley, 
B.S. In E.E. 

1845 Mary Hardin-Baylor College, Mrs. 
Wilbur J. Cohen, B.A. 

1845 United States Naval Academy, Edwin 
S. Miller, B.S., Captain, USN. 

1845 Whittenberg College, John A. Mc- 
Iutire, LL.D. 

1846 Beloit College, William H. Stead, 
B.A. 

1846 Bucknell University, John P. Gates, 
M.A., B.D. „ ,_ „. 

1846 University of Buffalo, John W. 
Wrench, Ph.D. 

1847 College of the City of New York, 
Joseph M. Stone, B.S.S., LL.B. 

1847 State University of Iowa, \ lctor M. 
Jones, Ph.D. 

1847 Otterbein College, Henry W. Olson, 
Ph.D. 
McGeehee Clarke, M.A. 

1830 University of Richmond, President 
George Matthews Modlin, Ph.D., LL.D. 

1831 University of Alabama, J. Ross Veal, 
M.D. „ _ „ 

1831 Denison University, George C. Mc- 
Connaughey, Ph.B., LL.B. 

1831 New York University, Harold O. 
Voorhis, LL.D. 

1832 Gettysburg College, President Walter 
Consuelo Langsam, Ph.D., LL.D. 

1832 Wabash College, John V. Beamer, 
A B 

1833 University of Delaware, President 
John A. Perkins, Ph.D. 

1833 Haverford College, James Carey, III, 
A.B., LL.B. ., , 

1833 Oberlin College, Dean E. Bair, M.A. 

1834 Tulane University, Harry Aloyslus 
Monroe, Jr., B.B.A. 

1834 Wake Forest College, Gerald White 
Johnson, D.Litt.. LL.D., D.C.L. 

1836 Alfred University, Elizabeth Geen, 
Ph.D., LL.D. 

1836 Emory University, Hunt Clement, Jr., 
Ph.B. 

1836 Wesleyan College, Mary Gray Munroe 
Cobey, A.B. 

1837 Davidson College, Marshall A. Thomp- 
son, M.A. 

1837 DePauw University, Jack H. Bryan, 
M.A. 

1837 Marshall College, J. M. Chambers, 
LL.B., LL.D., Colonel USMC (Ret.) 

1838 Acadia University, Harold M. Ban- 
nerman, Ph.D., F.G.S.A. 

1838 Duke University, Charles S. Murphy, 
A.B., LL.B. 

1838 Medical College of Virginia, R. Black- 
well Smith, Jr., Ph.D. 



Maryland 



1848 Geneva College, Glenn R. Moltrup, 
B.A. 

1848 University of Mississippi, Guy B. 
Hathorn. Ph.D. * 

1848 Muhlenberg College, Ira F. Zartraan, 
Ph.D. 

1848 University of Wisconsin, J. Kenneth 
Little, Ph.D., LL.D. 

1849 University of Utah, Ralph W. Huber, 
M.S. 

1850 University of Rochester, Gerald A. 
Smith, M.A. 

1850 Woman's Medical College of Penn- 
sylvania, President Burgess Lee Gordon, 
M.D., LL.D. 

1851 Coe College, Alice M. Sundberg, B.A., 
R.N., M.P.H. 

1851 Miner Teachers College, President 
Matthew J. Whitehead, Ed.D. 

1851 University of Minnesota, Victor 
( hristgau, B.S. 

1851 Northwestern University, Vernon H. 
Brewster, B.S., LL.B. 

1851 Rlpon College, William Frederick 
Meggers, Ph.D., Sc.D. 

1852 Mills College, Elizabeth Ramsey 
Klagsbrunn, M.D. 

1852 Westminster College, Glenmer Ram- 
sey Law, B.Sc, LL.B. 

1853 Antioch College, Frank M. Kleller, 
A.B. 

1853 Beaver College, Ruth L. Hlggins, 
Ph.D., LL.D. 

1853 University of Florida, Donald Ray 
Matthews, M.A.E. 

1853 Manhattan College, Brother C. Luke 
S'alm, F.S.C., M.A., S.T.L. 

1853 Washington University, Morris Mill- 
er, LL.B., M.A. 

1854 Hamllne University, J. Harold Gold- 
thorpe, Ph.D. 

1854 Lincoln University, Joseph C. Waddy, 
A.B., LL.B. 

1855 Berea College, Reverend C. Leslie 
Glenn, D.D., S".T.D. 

1855 Elmira College, Eleanor Miller Cox, 
A.B. 

1855 Michigan State College, Lyman J. 
Brlggs, Ph.D., LL.D., D.Eng., D.Sc. 

1855 Pennsylvania State University, Henry 
B. McDonnell, M.D. 

1856 Albright College, President Harry 
Victor Masters, Ph.D., LL.D., D.Ped. 

1856 Saint Lawrence University, Halsey 
Myron MacPhee, Ph.D. 

1857 Florida State University, Hilda Jane 
Walters, M.D. 

1857 University of the South, The Rever- 
end Hunter Wyatt-Brown, Jr., B.A. 

1858 Iowa State College of Agriculture 
and Mechanic Arts, J. C. Hempstead, M.A., 
C.E., Major, USA.F. 

1858 Susquehanna University, Mildred E. 
Winston, Lltt.D. 

1859 The Cooper Union, Carlyle W. Miller, 
B.S., E.E. 

1860 Louisiana State University and Agri- 
cultural and Mechanical College, Hubert Agee 
Mike Flanakin, B.C.E., C.E. 

1860 Wheaton College, Kenneth P. Landon, 
Th.B., Ph.D. 

1861 Massachusetts Institute of Technol- 
ogy, E. C. Payson, M.B.A. 

1861 State Teachers College (Edinboro, 
Pennsylvania), Dean Stambaugh, M.Ed. 

1861 State Teachers College (Oswego, New 
York), Stanley Drazek, Ed.D. 

1861 Vassar College, Mrs. Arthur T. Had- 
ley, II, A.B. 

1863 Boston College, Reverend Daniel F. 
Ryan, S.J., Ph.D. 

1863 Kansas State College, Charles F. Kin- 
man, B.S. 

1863 University of Massachusetts, Sum- 
ner O. Burhoe, Ph.D. 

1864 Bates College, Clifton Todd Perkins, 
M.D., LL.D., ScD. 

1864 University of Denver, Warren R. 
Johnson, Ed.D. 

1864 Marquette University, Thomas A. 
Ziebarth, Ph.B. 

1864 Swarthmore College, Walter Thor- 
wald Skallerup, Jr., B.A., LL.B. 

1865 Cornell University, J. Gustav Re- 
quardt, C.E. 

1865 University of Kansas, Remington 
Kellogg, Ph.D. 

1865 University of Kentucky, Lewis Fras- 
er Colbert, C.P.M. 

1865 University of Maine, Omar F. Tarr. 
B.S. 

1865 Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Bur- 
ton W. Marsh, B.S. 

1866 Lebanon Valley College, Alice M. 
Brumbaugh, M.A. 

1866 University of New Hampshire, Donald 
F. Bent, M.S. 

1866 State Teachers College (Kutztown, 
Pennsylvania), John J. Jacobs, M.A. 

1866 State Teachers College (Towson, 
Maryland), President Earle T. Hawkins. 
Ph.D., LL.D. 

1866 Thlel College of the Evangelical Luth- 
eran Church, Ethel S. Vierheller, A.B. 

1867 Howard University, President Morde- 
cal W. Johnson, S.T.M., D.D., LL.D. 

1867 University of Illinois, Martin L. 
Mlllspaugh, B.S. 



1867 Morgan State College, President Mar- 
tin David Jenkins, Ph.D. 

1867 West Virginia University, J. Ben 
Robinson, D.D.S., D.Sc. 

1868 Oregon State College, John H. Mar- 
tin, Ph.D. 

1868 Wells College. Mrs. Everett B. Wil- 
son, B.A. 

1868 Western Maryland College, President 
Lowell S. Ensor, D.D., L.H.D. 

1869 Pennsylvania College for Women. 
Ruth J. Spicer, A.B. 

1869 Purdue University, Burdette S. 
Wright, D.Eng. 

1869 Trinity University. Archibald T. Mc- 
pherson, Ph.D. 

1869 Wilson College, Helen Segner Thom- 
as, A.B. 

1870 University of Akron, Margaret F. 
Fanning, A.M. 

1870 Colorado Agricultural and Mechani- 
cal College, Erwin L. LeClerg, Ph.D. 

1870 Ohio State University, James Rus- 
sell Foster, Ph.D. 

1870 Stevens Institute of Technology, 
George W. Wassmer, M.E., M.Sc. 

1870 Syracuse University, Robert Dixon, 
Ph.D. 

1870 Wellesley College, Mrs. A. Nelson 
Sayre, A.B. 

1871 State Teachers College (Shippens- 
burg, Pennsylvania), Edwin H. Sponseller, 
Ph.D. 

1871 Slnith College, Margaret Hammond 
Cam, B.A. 

1872 Alabama Polytechnic Institute, Wil- 
liam W. Pate, M.S. 

1872 University of Oregon, Clyde B. 
Aitchison. Ph.D., LL.D. 

1872 Vanderbilt University, James M. 
Soubv. B.A., LL.B. 

1872 Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Louis 

A. Pardue, Ph.D. 

1873 College of Notre Dame of Maryland, 
Elizabeth Morrissy, Ph.D. 

1873 Texas Christian University, Sterling 
W. Brown, Ph.D. 

1873 Wilson Teachers College, Paul O. 
Carr, Ph.D. 

1874 Ontario Agricultural College, J. F. 
Sykes, Ph.D. 

1875 Brigham Young University, Ray C. 
Colton, Ph.D. 

1875 George Peabody College for Teach- 
ers. Rebecca Catherine Tansil. Ph.D. 

1876 University of Colorado. Charles J. 
Ribar, A.B., LL.B. 

1876 Grove City College, The Reverend 
Llovd G. Brown, A.B., Th.B. 

1876 Johns Hopkins University, G. Wilson 
Shaffer, Ph.D. 

1876 Juniata College, Morley J. Mays, 
Ph.D. 

1876 Agricultural and Mechanical College 
of Texas, Gustave Boirmeister, M.B.A. 

1877 University of Manitoba, Mrs. F. D. 
Mott, B.A. 

1878 Mississippi State College, Alfred 
Benjamen Butts, Ph.D. 

1878 University of Western Ontario, C. V. 
Simpson, M.D. 

1880 University of Southern California, 
Charles E. Hutchinson, Ph.D. 

1881 University of Connecticut, Jane P. 
Middaugh, B.S. 

1881 Newark College of Engineering, Wil- 
liam Russell Ackor, B.S'., E.E. 

1881 South Dakota State College, Orman 
E. Street, Ph.D. 

1883 University of North Dakota, Lawrence 

B. Slater, B.A. 

1883 Wagner Lutheran College, Gwynne 
B. Swartz, Ph.D. 

1885 University of Arizona, Eula Under- 
wood Harvey, B.A. 

1885 Bryn Mawr College, Mrs. Peter P. 
Rodman, M.S. 

1885 Goucher College. President Otto F. 
Kraushaar, Ph.D., LL.D.. LittD. 

1885 Rollins College, Robert Anton Spurr, 
Ph.D. 

1885 Springfield College, Gordon Lippitt, 
Ph.D. 

1885 Stanford University, Philip A. Ray, 
A.B., LL.B. 

1886 University of Chattanooga, John Pat- 
ten Abshire, LL.M. 

1886 University of Wyoming, Harold Wayne 
Hobbs, St., M.S. in C.E. 

1887 Clark University, Wallace Walter 
Atwood, Jr., Ph.D. 

1887 Occidental College, John Parke Young, 
Ph.D. 

1887 Pratt Institute, Rice Estes, M.L.S. 

1888 Utah State Agricultural College, H. 
Aldous Dixon, Ed.D. 

1889 Barnard College, Mrs. Alton Meister, 
M.S. 

1889 Clemson Agricultural College, Presi- 
dent Robert Franklin Poole, Ph.D., D.Sc, 
LL.D., Lltt.D. 

1889 University of Idaho, J. E. Buchanan, 
C.E., Sc.D. 

1889 University of New Mexico, Frank G. 
Anderson, Ph.D. 

1889 North Dakota Agricultural College, 
J. Allen Clark, M.S. 



1889 Pomona College. Carl B. Swisher, 
Ph.D., LittD. 

1890 Keuka College. Esther Coker Laffer. 
B.A. 

1890 Mount Saint Agnes College, Albert 
W. Tiedemann, Jr., M.A. 

1890 North Texas State College, David 
Shelby Phillips, M.S. 

1890 University of Oklahoma, Joseph H. 
Clements, Ed.D. 

1890 State College of Washington, John 
Clifford Folger, M.S. 

1891 California Institute of Technology, 
Albert E. Lombard. Jr., Ph.D. 

1891 University of Chicago, Charles O. 
Appleman, Ph.D. 

1891 Drexel Institute of Technology, Harry 
L. Bowman, S.M. in C.E. 

1891 Hardin-Simmons University, Gilbert 

B. Sandefer, B.S. 

1891 Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechani- 
cal College, Fred J. Beard, Ph.D. 

1891 Randolph-Macon Woman's College, 
Lucy Somerville Howorth, A.B., LL.B. 

1892 University of Rhode Island, Presi- 
dent Carl Raymond Woodward, Ph. D., LL.D., 
LittD., Ed.D., Sc.D. 

1893 American University, President Hurst 
Robins Anderson, LL.D. 

1893 Hood College, President Andrew G. 
Truxal, Ph.D., LL.D. 

1893 Montana State College, W. Hardy 
Tharp, Ph.D. 

1893 — Montana State University. Robert 

C. Guthrie, B.A., D.S. 

1896 Adelphi College, Mrs. John McManus. 

1896 Bradley University, Albert F. Slepert, 
B.A. 

1897 Trinity College (Washington, D. C), 
Sister Columba, Ph.D. 

1899 Elizabethtown College, President A. 
C. Baugher, Ph.D., LL.D. 

1899 Simmons College, Stephen Russell 
Deane, Ph.D. 

1899 Southwest Texas State Teachers Col- 
lege, Richard B. Henderson, A.M. 

1900 Carnegie Institute of Technology, 
S. N. Foner, D.Sc. 

1901 Coppiu State Teachers College, Presi- 
dent Miles W. Connor, Ph.D. 

1901 Sweet Briar College, Mrs. Herbert 
W. Dowd, A.B. 

1902 State Teachers College (Frostburg, 
Maryland), President R. Bowen Hardesty, 
M.A. 

1906 Abilene Christian College, John Wat- 
son Holton, B.A., LL.B. 

1907 University of Hawaii, Mark West- 
gate, Ph.D. 

1908 State Teachers College (Upper Mont- 
clair, New Jersey), Raymond W. Young, 
Ph.D. 

1909 University of Redlands, Donald Sham, 
Ph.D. 

1910 Mississippi Southern College, John 
Fletcher Allums, Ph.D. 

1910 West Texas State College, Ben H. 

Gum, b.s. 

1911 Connecticut College for Women, Mrs. 
Ranice W. Davis, A.B. 

1911 Reed College, Harry E. Wolf, M.S. 

1912 Rice Institute, Edward Preble Offutt, 
Jr., Ph.D. 

1913 Texas Western College, Acting Presi- 
dent A. A. Smith, M.A. 

1916 University of British Columbia, Don- 
ald S\ Watson, Ph.D. 

1918 Seton Hill College, Mrs. Gilbert A. 
Cuneo, A.B. 

1920 Immaculata College, Right Reverend 
Monsignor Vincent L. Burns, President, Ph.D., 
Sc.D. 

1921 Sull Ross State Teachers College, 
Mrs. George Lister, M.A. 

1923 Texas Technological College, Burnls 
Walker, B.A., B.L.S. 

1925 University of Baltimore, President 
Theodore Halbert Wilson, S.T.B., Ed.D. 

1925 Bennington College, Mrs. Robert C. 
Ender, A.B. 

1926 Sarah Lawrence College, Elizabeth 
1'otts Anderson, B.A. 

1935 Dunbarton College of Holy Cross, 
lOdward Cashman, M.A. 

1941 Fairleigh-Dickinson College, Presi- 
dent Peter Sammartino, Ph.D. 

1945 Roosevelt University, Mrs. Max M. 
Kampelman, B.A. 

1946 Hagerstown Junior College, Atlee C. 
Kepler, M.A. 

1946 Montgomery Junior College, Eric N. 
Labouvie, Ph.D. 

1947 Baltimore Junior College, Chester H. 
Katenkamp, Ed.D. 

Organizations 

Various educational organizations 
were represented as follows: — 

The Association of Laud-Grant Colleges 
and Universities, Lewis Webster Jones, Ph.D., 
LL.D., L.H.D. 

The Association of American Colleges, 
Hurst R. Anderson, LL.D. 

American Association of Colleges for Teach- 
er Education, Walter E. Hager, Ph.D. 

United States Office of Education, J. Ken- 
neth Little, Ph.D. 



Maryland 



American Association of University Pro- 
fessors, George Pope Shannon, Ph.D. 

American Association of University Wom- 
en, Katherine A. Frederic, Ph.D. 

Phi Beta Kappa, Guy fe'tanton Ford, Ph.D. 

Phi Kappi Phi, Frank D. Kern, Ph.D., 
Sc.D. 

Alpha Zeta, Lindley H. Dennis, D.Voc.Ed. 

Alpha Omega Alpha, Howard T. Karsner, 
M.D. 

The Tau Beta Pi Association, Russell B. 
Allen, B.S. 

American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science. Raymond L. Taylor, Sc.D. 

Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies, 
Ralph T. Overman, Ph.D. 

American Council on Pharmaceutical Edu- 
1 cation, Leahmer M. Kanter, Phar.D. 

American Dental Association, Daniel F. 
j Lynch, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 

American College of Dentists, James H. 
Ferguson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D. 

American Pharmaceutical Association, Just- 
1 ice L. Powers, Ph.D. 

American Bar Association, William C. 
Walsh, LL.D. 

The National Institutes of Health. Harold 
Leroy Stewart, M.D. 

United States Department of Agriculture 
Graduate School, T. Roy Reid, Ph.D. 

The National Bureau of Standards, Allen 
V. Astin, Ph.D., D.Sc. 

The Naval Ordnance Laboratory, Gregory 
K. Hartman, Ph.D. 

The Smithsonian Institution, Leonard Car- 
michael, Ph.D., LL.D., D.Litt. 

Maryland Department of Education. Thom- 
as G. Pullen, Jr., Ed.D., LL.D., L.H.D , 
Ped.D. 

District of Columbia, Board of Education, 
Hobart M. Corning, Ed.D. 



That" Report 



Maryland will be able to correct 
all the deficiencies noted in the 
accreditation report of the Middle 
States Association if the General As- 
sembly this year appropriates the 
necessary funds to support the medical 
school, hospital and library. 

This statement by Dr. Wilson H. 
Elkins, president of the university, was 
laid upon the desks of legislators as 
they met to receive the theretofore 
confidential evaluation report. 

Dr. Elkins said it would be unfair to 
the Legislature and to the people to 
ignore this report, but declared, on the 
other hand, that "it would be unfair 
and misleading to emphasize it." 

Letter To Governor 

His comments of the accreditation 
report were a part of a letter to Gover- 
nor McKeldin, printed as the frontis- 
piece of a brochure entitled "A Report 
of Your State University." 

"During the last year," Dr. Elkins' 
letter said "the university has been 
examined by the Middle States Asso- 
ciation of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools, the highest accrediting agency 
of this region. 

"The so-called accreditation report 
has been the subject of controversy and 
much discussion. It would be unfair to 
the Legislature and the people of Mary- 
land to ignore this report; it would 
also be unfair and misleading to em- 
phasize it. 

"The association retained the univer- 
sity on the fully accredited list with 
many commendations, but informed the 
administration that they had found 
weaknesses in many areas which could 
and should be corrected. 

"The association pointed out that 
changes and corrections should take 
place by April, 1956, to justify a re- 
affirmation of accreditation. 

"University officials have taken steps 



to conform to association requirements, 
and if additional funds are made avail- 
able during the 1955 session of the 
General Assembly to support the medi- 
cal school, hospital and library the 
deficiencies and alleged weaknesses will 
be corrected. 

Intended To Help 

Dr. Elkins said the association re- 
port was intended to help the univer- 
sity, and added that "there is little 
doubt that this purpose will be ac- 
complished." 

At Annapolis, after the Middle States 
report had been made public, Dr. Elkins 
said, "There is nothing in it that will 
hurt us," emphasizing that the univer- 
sity is taking steps to conform to as- 
sociation requirements in the relatively 
few premises in which the report criti- 
cized the school. 

In his annual report distributed to 
the Legislature, Dr. Elkins stated that 
if the General Assembly will support 
budget appropriation requests for the 
medical school, hospital and library, 
"the deficiencies and alleged weak- 
nesses will be corrected." 

He stated that he made a verbal 
progress report to the Middle States 
Association in Atlantic City during the 
Thanksgiving holiday and felt the re- 
action was favorable. 

"If the Legislature is cooperative," 
Dr. Elkins added, "there is a possibil- 
ity that our accreditation can be 
straightened out this year." 

The Middle States report was chiefly 
critical of inadequate library facilities 
in College Park and Baltimore, the 
School of Medicine, and over-emphasis 
on athletics. 

Excellent Impression 

In his initial address to the General 
Assembly at Annapolis, President El- 
kins made an excellent impression. 
Seconds after hearing him the Senate 
Finance Committee killed a bill in- 
tended to repeal the university's self- 
governing powers. 

No one would second the bill. The 
committee then adopted a report rec- 
ommending the continuance of the Uni- 
versity's autonomy. 

It was a striking victory for the 
President's first appearance before the 
legislature. 

When he walked into the committee 
hearing room he was a man on the 
spot. 

For more than an hour Dr. Elkins 
answered a barrage of questions. "The 
University of Maryland is fundamental- 
ly sound," he said. 

Dr. Elkins pointed out that thousands 
of students and alumni are concerned 
about university standards and ne 
wanted to assure them that their de- 
grees and credits were not in jeopardy. 

"The decision of the Middle States 
Association not to reaffirm the status 
of the university did not mean at all 
that the university has been dropped 
from the roll of the association," he 
declared. 

The committee making the survey 




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for the Middle States Association con- 
sisted of 60 members. They spent ap- 
proximately three days on the campus. 
The Committee's report covers 165 
pages. The report of the Middle States 
Association, with the five critical fea- 
tures, was a two page letter. 

Only One Standard 

At a press conference Dr. Elkins 
again emphasized that there are only 
two levels of accreditation, i.e. "ac- 
credited" and "not accredited" and 
that the rating applies to the whole 
university. 

"Many deficiencies already have 
been corrected," he added. 

"I am sure," Dr. Elkins said, "that 
the investigators would not be held 
responsible for all the comments made. 
They were rather free in their com- 
ments and criticisms because they feR 
it would be confidential." 

A special 20 man faculty reorganiza- 
tion committee has set about to cor- 
rect the weaknesses cited, Dr. Elkins 
announced. 

The committee, headed by Dr. Car- 
roll Cox, professor of botany, is seek- 
ing to reorganize the faculty on a 
basis which will permit it to partici- 
pate fully in the educational program, 
eliminating the complaint that the Uni- 
versity had been operated under too 
tight administrative centralization. 

The Cox committee is expected to 
recommend regarding on admissions, 
curriculum, academic requirements and 
the like during their study, Dr. Elkins 
said. 

Committee To Function 

A faculty committee of about 100 
members representative of the univer- 
sity's various schools and departments 
also will be established and will hold 
regular meetings with the university 
president and board of regents, he 
added. 

Dr. Elkins said he understood that 
the Board of Regents refusal to re- 
lease the Middle States report had 
brought on the move to repeal the 
Autonomy Act. 

He said he had difficulty clarifying 
the relationship between the release 
of the report and the Autonomy Act. 

"As I read it, the so-called Autonomy 
Act gives a more specific right to the 
General Assembly to inquire into uni- 
versity affairs than it might have had 
in the absence of the act," he declared. 

Dr. Elkins said the regents had been 
reluctant to release the Middle States 
report because it had been given to 
the university on a confidential basis. 

He explained that the autonomy stat- 
ute is mainly designed to help the uni- 
versity operate more efficiently in its 
purchasing, building and personnel op- 
erations. 

"We have no desire to keep affairs 
of the university to ourselves," he re- 
marked. "I do not feel the act puts 
us in an autonomous position. Its pur- 
pose is to help us act more expeditious- 
ly, economically and efficiently." 



Not Unlike Others 

In comparison to other State univer- 
sities, he continued, the University of 
Maryland regents do not have extra- 
ordinary powers. 

He noted that there is scarcely a 
university in the country which does 
not appoint its own personnel; that 
many institutions have more freedom 
in this regard than Maryland; that in 
the field of construction practically all 
state universities have more freedom 
of action than Maryland; that in pur- 
chasing matters, some universities use 
the state purchasing agency, while 
others do all of their own purchasing. 
Maryland's policy is to use both chan- 
nels as conditions warrant. 

Near the end of the hearing, Dr. 
Elkins was asked if he would correct 
administrative weaknesses cited by the 
Middle States report. 

"I feel certain I will," he replied. 

As to football, Dr. Elkins said, "I 
am not aware of any rules or regula- 
tions of the NCAA or the AC having 
been broken." 

"Pitiless Publicity" 

Ewald B. Nyquist of New York Uni • 
versity, chairman of the Middle States 
Association of Colleges which made the 
evaluation, stated in a letter to Gov- 
ernor McKeldin, "It is a question of 
some moment whether the 'pitiless 
publicity' given the University of 
Maryland as a direct result of a re- 
lease of its evaluation report to the 
press has not resulted in much dam- 
age in a variety of directions, includ- 
ing misinterpretation and distortion of 
the facts, injury to the university's dig- 
nity and standing as an institution of 
higher learning, and adverse effect upon 
the association which I represent." 

Replying to Dr. Nyquist, State Sena- 
tor Robert Kimble (R. Allegany) 
stated, "I do not agree the university 
has been harmed one bit. It's been 
strengthened. We rendered a service 
by asking for the report and the press 
rendered a service by telling the true 
story. 

"Everybody is satisfied now that the 
university is going to be just as sound 
as prior to release of the report. 

"I think we did the university a 
favor. A lot of people thought it was 
worse than it is and so did we legis- 
lators." 

How About Others? 

At Annapolis Senate President Louis 
L. Goldstein, alumnus of Washington 
College stated that he plans to ask 
evaluation reports, similar to that on 
Maryland, also be submitted to the 
Legislature and be made public by 
four other state institutions, Johns 
Hopkins, St. John's, Western Mary- 
land and Washington. 

All four of the institutions he named 
have received scholarship aid from the 
State and in recent years, Hopkins, 
Western Maryland and Washington 
have been allocated bond money con- 
struction. Each has appropriations 
listed in the current budget. 



"What's fair for one is fair for the 
other," said Mr. Goldstein. 

"Now that the report has been made 
public on Maryland, I feel the others 
should do the same thing," he went on 
to say, adding that he thought the 
public was entitled to know how Mary- 
land was sized up by evaluators from 
other schools and feels the same should 
apply to the others and that the Legis- 
lature can better evaluate what school 
needs are if it knows of any weak- 
ness which may exist. 

It is generally conceded that the 
accreditation report received publicity 
out of all proportion to its significance 
and that, if it were not for the fact 
that former president of the univer- 
sity was standing for Governor, the 
report would not have made page one 
in the press even with the aid of Hou- 
dini and Blackstone. 




No Over Emphasis 

Quotations from an editorial in the 
Baltimore Sun: — 
"It is pleasant to note that, in his 
well-considered address at his inaugu- 
ral ceremonies, Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, 
president of the University of Mary- 
land, said a good word for football. 

" 'Values and attitudes developed in 
activities outside the classrooms, in- 
cluding football,' said Dr. Elkins, 'are 
important in a 
■■■■■nBI liberal education.' 
"A truer word 
was never spok- 
en. Boys like to 
play football. 
Girls admire 

t|M I good players. The 

^^ j alumni and their 
| friends enjoy the 
■Mpt-- games. Everyone 

fW ml*mt^«* t concerned takes 

^L ^^r""^^^^ winning team. A 
A a I ?- I w e 1 1 - p 1 a y e d 

• : :--: ; ^ V I '••■'! match is a dra- 
^ ■ matic show. 

"As in so many 
pleasant human 
undertakings, the problem is one of 
keeping things in proportion. In the 
great complex of human responsibili- 
ties, football necessarily plays a minor 
role, however important it may seem 
at the moment. In an educational in- 
stitution, it is necessary to keep this 
obvious truth in mind. 

Maryland is committed to a strong 
sports program and will continue to 
try to attract good athletes, yet will 
maintain its scholarship program with- 
in proper balance. 

"We will continue — as others do — 
trying to interest athletes to come to 
the University," Dr. Elkins said. 

"We are not trying to destroy ath- 
letics," he emphasized. "I subscribe to 
this philosophy— I think an institution 



Dean Eppley 



10 



Maryland 



can be fine academically and still have 
a fine athletic program. They are not 
irreconcilable." 

Strong Sports Program 
"We feel we can have a strong ath- 
letic program and that it will contrib- 
ute to the welfare of the institution." 
Dr. Elkins went on to say, "We are 
opening up additional scholarships next 
year for non-athletes in the amount of 
$10,000— worth $1,000 each. These are 
state scholarships which formerly went 
to athletes." 

"I hope athletic scholarships will stay 
about the same," Dr. Elkins said. 
"Sports will have to depend more on 
sports funds and from outside help." 

Such as the Terrapin Club's Educa- 
tional Foundation, it was pointed out. 

It is, of course, a general and com- 
mon practice for alumni and other in- 
terested individuals to contribute schol- 
arships and designate what they are 
to be used for. From the Ivy League 
to the Big Ten. It is proper so long 
as the scholarships are handled by the 
faculty's scholarship committee. At 
Maryland this committee is headed by 
Faculty Dean Harold F. Cotterman. 

In defense of criticism directed at 
athletes, Dr. Elkins said, "We won't 
expect athletes to have higher — or 
lower marks than other students." 

"We will expect people on athletic 
scholarships — and non-athletic scholar- 
ships — to progress toward a degree in 
a normal manner, the same as an aver- 
age student and in four years. 

"Otherwise no scholarship can be 
held, barring, for example, a student 
taking a more difficult course such as 
engineering. Then it would depend on 
the student's past record of marks. 

Noting Maryland had been com- 
mended for not being harassed by out- 
side control, the president said he 
nevertheless encouraged outside inter- 
est and contributions "as long as there 
is no pressure in connection with schol- 
arships given. 

Unfair Criticism 

"And there is as little outside pres- 
sure here as at any college I know." 

Dr. Elkins termed as "unfair criti- 
cism" the charge that there were not 
enough faculty members of the Ath- 
letic Council. "A study comparing ours 
with others in the country would show 
we have more," he asserted. 

Dr. Elkins stressed, however, that 
"coaches cannot authorize scholarships 
or grants in aid. They may talk to a 
boy and make recommendations about 
him. 

"But all scholarships and grants will 
be awarded by the scholarship commit- 
tee without pressure from anyone in 
athletics . . . only to individuals who 
are qualified. 

"If they find an undesirable they will 
have the responsibility of turning the 
boy down, regardless of his other rec- 
ommendations. 



"Positively no exceptions will be 
made for any athlete — or anyone else — 
if he cannot meet the requirements." 

"Let us encourage the University 
of Maryland to build up a football 
team by all legitimate means, taking 
due care to keep the sport in its proper 
place." 

Misconstrued 

In the premise above referred to 
Dean Geary F. Eppley, chairman of 
the Council on Intercollegiate athletics 
said, in a final rebuttal to charges of 
recruiting violations by the Middle 
States Association, that "investigation 
shows no case of anyone on the ath- 
letic staff guilty of violating such 
rules." He added that the report was 
"misconstrued." 

He cited the NCAA and conference 
rule that "no member of an athletic 
staff or other official representative of 
athletic interests shall solicit attend- 
ance at his institution of any prospec- 
tive student with offers of financial aid 
or equivalent inducements not per- 
mitted by his institution." 

Eppley's statement was given added 
substance by pronouncements by the 
heads of the Atlantic Coast Conference 
and National Collegiate Athletic As- 
sociation. Dean A. B. Moore, presi- 
dent of the N.C.A.A. when the report 
was being formulated, has said, "No 
one has ever complained about Mary- 
land," while Jim Weaver, commission- 
er of the A.C.C., gave a similar state- 
ment. 

Football Is Target 

Coach Jim Tatum believes that big- 
time football and Maryland's success 
in it was the target of the report, but 
he says Maryland probably has the 
cleanest record in the country. 

He quotes Dr. H. C. Byrd, former 
head of the university, when he says 
"they just don't know the difference 
between success and overemphasis." 

The Board of Regents took more 
steps to launch a systematic search for 
scholarship and endowment funds, first 
carefully divorcing it from athletics. 

Board members voted to set up a 
special committee which will deter- 
mine the best way to get the program 
started. 

Initial studies into such a plan were 
made by the Regent's Athletic Com- 
mittee under B. Herbert Brown, a mem- 
ber of the board. 



Budget 



Governor McKeldin told the Board 
of Regents his State budgot for 
1956 "is all locked up." 

Governor McKeldin told the Board of 
Regents his State budget for 1956 "is 
all locked up." 

"We face a tremendous tax prob- 
lem," the Governor told the regents. 
He outlined it this way: 

"We are about $28,000,000 shy. 



"We will have about $ 1.0,000,000 l< 
money to work with next year. This is 
because taxes will produce aboul 
$5,000,(100 less and we will oo1 have the 
$5,000,000 surplus we carried ovei 

year. 

Some Is Mandatory 

"About $12,1)00.000 of this is for 
schools and is mandatory. 

"About $1,5000,000 is for the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 

"About $1,500,000 is for welfare. 

"About $1,500,000 is for mental hos- 
pitals. 

"And about $1,500,000 for the Health 
Department." 

The Governor already has suggested 
increases in the income and sales ta 
will be needed to meet the $28,000,000 
deficit. He also would provide part of 
the money by starting a withholding 
system for income taxes. 



Lane Appointed 

President Eisenhower has appointed 
W. Preston Lane, Jr., Hagerstown, 
Ex-Governor of Maryland, (LL.D. Md.), 
a member of the Committee for the 
White House Conference on Education. 

Neil H. McElroy, president of Proc- 
tor & Gamble Co., Cincinnati, Ohio, 
chairman of the Committee, said Gov- 
ernor Lane was one of 32 appointed 
by the President to conduct a national 
conference on the Nation's educational 
problems. 

The White House Conference is part 
of a national plan to enlist citizen ac- 
tion to improve education. Congress 
authorized the program in response to 
the President's recommendation in 
which he spoke of "seriously neglected" 
youth education, and called for a na- 
tionwide program of State conferences 
on educational problems, to culminate 
in a national conference. Congress ap- 
propriated $900,000 for the purpose, 
with $700,000 allotted to help States 
finance their conferences. 



'It's The Greatest!' 

(Editorial in The Diamondback, 
Hii "QUp" Goldstein) 

Recently, while traveling through the 
South, I heard many comments 
about the University of Maryland. Be- 
lieve it or not, they were good. Usual- 
ly all one ever hears about the Uni- 
versity in the newspapers or on the 
streets is something cynical. 

The local newspapers and sometimes 
our own school newspaper seem to 
take great delight in pi'inting the black 
side of life at the University. 

The thing I heard that I think is 
of the greatest importance is that all 
over the country, in the Armed Serv- 
ices, at other graduate schools, and in 
various jobs, Maryland graduates are 
holding their own or doing better than 



Maryland 



11 



New Wall Insets 







Danegger Photo 



MADE BY A SHOEMAKER 



Of course, Dr. Mark Shoemaker, University landscape architect, was assisted 
by masons, carpenters and painters. Signs such as pictured above now "break" the 
brick walls along Highway No. 1. 

Plans are also being made for gates so that students going to classes from 
Fraternity Row will no longer have to take a running start and hurdle the wall. 

Dr. Shoemaker, who is in charge of all outdoor improvements also designed 
the fountain setting in front of the new Math Building. 



boys from schools such as compose the 
Ivy League and the Big Ten. 

I heard many comments on how 
beautiful the school is, how friendly 
the students are. Someone even told 
me that we had a good school spirit. 

No "Harry Hi" 

What I am trying to say is that 
there are a lot of things wrong with 
our school. I know we need a library, 
Phi Beta Kappa, etc., but I'm tired 
of hearing about the bad things ; aren't 
you? How about the good things? It's 
about time we got some good publicity 
around here. There is an old saying 
that the grass is greener in the other 
guy's field. But haven't you noticed 
when you get to the other guy's field 
the grass suddenly turns brown. 

I'm not trying to sound like "Harry 
Highschool," or give a pep talk, but 
facts are facts. This is your school. It 
has growing pains. It has the physical 
plant, the location, the new president. 
Its potential is great! 

Others are going to criticize us be- 
cause we are getting as good as they 
are. They are going to pick out the 
bad spots which are numerous. It is 
up to us to bring out the good points 
and not tear down our school because 
when you tear down your school you're 
tearing down yourself. After all, you 
go here. 

To me, despite the lack of a new 
library, no Phi Beta Kappa, and all the 
bad publicity, this school is the great- 
est. Isn't it to you? 



12 



Pay Raise? 



(Editorial in the Baltimore Evening Sun) 

Shortly after taking office last fall, 
President Wilson H. Elkins stated 
his intention of strengthening the fac- 
ulty of the University of Maryland by 
bringing in, as vacancies occurred, 
teacher-scholars of already demon- 
strated standing, whose eminence 
would raise the university's academic 
reputation. But it is unrealistic, he 
warned, to expect such persons to come 
to College Park at a financial sacrifice. 
Regrettably, perhaps, but definitely, 
there is an element of competitive 
bidding on even the most rarified 
planes of faculty selection. And, Dr. 
Elkins added, salary levels at the U. of 
M. in many respects compared un- 
favorably with those at other large 
state universities, let alone the private- 
ly endowed institutions. 

The natural followup of this analysis 
of future directions for the U. of M. 
faculty is an effort to raise thos'e 
salary minimums. Accordingly, Dr. 
Elkins has urged that an increase of 
$600 yearly in full-professor minimums 
be authorized by the General Assembly. 
At the same time, he makes plain the 
university's intention to have no 
"Teachers' lobby" at Annapolis these 
next three months. 

The method that Dr. Elkins is using 
here is to state a logical, open case, 
and to enlist public opinion in its 
support. If the necessary money is 
now authorized for the university, and 
the case he makes for it is a good one, 



the university should end up with not 
only a stronger faculty but an in- 
creased measure of public esteem. 

President's Opinion 

President Elkins' convictions in the 
premise referred to in the Sun edi- 
torial, are clearly set forth in the fol- 
lowing quotations from his letter trans- 
mitting a 1953-1954 financial report to 
Governor McKeldin and the Maryland 
Assembly, viz: — 

"As the teaching faculty determine, 
in a large measure, the success and 
recognition of any educational institu- 
tion, considerable attention has been 
given to conditions at the University 
of Maryland which affect the morale 
and comfort of faculty members. There 
are many factors which contribute to 
faculty welfare, but the basic factor is 
economic. In order to attract, maintain 
and retain a faculty of the first class, 
salaries must be comparable to those 
which are paid by high ranking insti- 
tutions where the cost of living is 
about the same as it is in College Park 
and Baltimore. To compare the Uni- 
versity of Maryland with institutions 
located in lower cost of living areas 
would be misleading and unfair. An 
examination of faculty salaries at 
Maryland reveals a condition that 
places the University in an unfavorable 
position. At the instructor and as- 
sistant professor levels the compari- 
son is generally satisfactory, but in 
the higher rank of associate and full 
professor the salaries are considerably 
below "average". This can mean only 
that we are handicapped in the selec- 
tion and retention of faculty members, 
and that we are unfair to those who 
have elected to remain regardless of 
financial sacrifice. If the University 
of Maryland is to take its proper place 
among the great universities of this 
country, a substantial adjustment must 
be made in salaries for associate and 
full professors. To this important sub- 
ject we invite your attention, believing 
that an objective study will bring about 
the correction of a serious deficiency. 

"Although this report does not per- 
tain to the current academic year of 
1954-55, it is appropriate to mention 
that there has been an increase in the 
fall enrollment, particularly freshmen, 
as compared with the fall of 1953-54. 
There are indications of a gradual in- 
crease to 1957-58, and after 1957-58 an 
accelerated growth due to the greater 
number of students now enrolled in 
high school and elementary grades. 
The birth rate which began to show a 
rise in 1941 has continued to increase 
and is currently at an all-time high. 
Regardless of any change which may 
be made in the pattern of higher edu- 
cation in Maryland, the State Univer- 
sity will be required to serve a larger 
number of students." 



TRIED TO PROVE IT 

The inquisitive guy approached the 
camel and gently placed a tiny straw 
on the camel's hack. 

Nothing happened. "Wrong straw," 
said the i.g. 



Maryland 



Our Poised Economy 

A "Post Election Look" At National and State Economic 
And Business Conditions. 




Dr. Cover 



Director, Bureau 0/ Business and 
Economic Research 

Under the title, "Our Poised Econ- 
omy," the Bureau of Business and 
Economy Research of the University 
of Maryland published a "post-election 
look" at current tendencies in economic 
and business condi- 
tions for the United 
States and the 
Maryland region. In 
addition to evidence 
of long-time healthy 
growth of most 
barometric series, 
the analysis esti- 
mates the present 
position of the busi- 
ness cycle and the 
probable tendencies 
in 1955. 

In offering conclusions and predic- 
tions, it is important that analysts 
specify their assumptions and their 
methods. Two basic grassroots propo- 
sitions underlie this present analysis: 

Human patterns of behavior are well- 
established, have discernible relation- 
ships, and change reluctantly. The 
month with the greatest total of wed- 
dings is June. We expect a large sale 
of ham for Easter. Friday is fish day. 
Merchants cannot compute Christmas 
sales until after the post-Christmas ex- 
changes. To a family budget many per- 
ishable goods are essential, while the 
purchase of durable goods can be post- 
poned. 

Sequented Relationship 
What is past is prologue; there are 
casual relationships in time sequence. 
The maturing periods of hogs and of 
cattle differ considerably in length. 
There is a sequential relationship be- 
tween consumer demand, retail orders, 
wholesale stock, manufacturing produc- 
tion, and the demand for capital goods. 
At this point it is important to indi- 
cate evidence of the maturity in the 
Maryland industrial pattern: 

Major types of economic activity are 
represented in the State. 

The bulk of transactions — and the 
system is complex — is between indus- 
tries rather than between the ultimate 
consumer and industry. For instance, 
the Maryland coal industry is regarded 
as of little significance currently. Yet, 
out of a production of about two million 
tons more than $4 million would be 
distributed to labor, $3 million to man- 
agement and capital, $180,000 to light 
and power, etc. These are purchases 
by the Maryland coal industry of re- 
sources from the total economy. 

Maryland's service industries (re- 
tailers, wholesalers, sellers of personal, 
professional, banking, financial, amuse- 
ment, advertisement, and repair serv- 
ices) perform more significant and es- 



sential economic functions than are 
generally attributed to them. Specifical- 
ly, they create more income payments 
to individuals than does any other type 
of activity in the State, not excluding 
manufacturing, which falls into second 
place. 

Conclusions 
Included in a "summary evaluation 
of evidence" are the following con- 
clusions: 

1. Per capita disposable income in 
the United States has been declining 
since the second quarter of 1953. When 
adjusted for the index of consumer 
prices the decline in purchasing power, 
or real income, has been still more 
significant. 

Examination of categories of income 
payments to individuals indicates that 
wage and salary payments have fallen, 
while interest and dividend incomes 
have risen. This suggests a probable 
redistribution of income counter to the 
pattern prevailing in the postwar 
period, at least through 1950. In- 
terest and dividend payments are not 
characteristic of sources of receipts 
by lower income groups but rather of 
the higher-salaried person, the pen- 
sioner, and of the investor living upon 
rental, enterpreneural income, and 
profits. 

2. Changes in the patterns of con- 
sumer purchases are related not only 
to the actual amount of family income 
but, in addition, to changes in prices 
of commodities and services included 
in the consumption pattern. 

Changes in expenditures for foods, 
the major necessity, tend to be gradual 
and moderate. The impact upon con- 
sumers of food prices may be illustrated 
by the different categories of food 
consumed in the home. In the past 
twelve months cereals and bakery 
products have increased. Meats, poul- 
try, fish, and dairy products have de- 
creased. Fruits and vegetables in- 
creased. Consequently, with a reduced 
real income, a family has the problem 
of meeting nutritional needs from a 
basket of food whose components are 
varying in price in opposite directions. 
Similar To Food 

Among costs of housing equipment 
and operation the diversity of move- 
ments has been similar to food. From 
September, 1953, to September, 1954, 
rent, basically a contractual price, rose 
from 126.0 to 128.8. Gas and electricity 
rose less than one per cent, while solid 
fuels and fuel oil dropped 1.8 per cent. 
Prices of house furnishings fell 1.9 
per cent, while general household op- 
eration increased 1.2 per cent. 

Similarly, transportation and recrea- 
tion have fallen 3.3 and 1.2 per cent 
respectively, while medical care and 
personal care have increased respec- 
tively 2.5 and 0.5 per cent. 

3. Failure of employment and earn- 



ings in the consumer goods and service 
industries to increase suggests not only 
reduced demand by the ultimate con- 
sumer, but, in addition, probable post- 
ponement of orders for capital goods 
by manufacturers, assuming the rela- 
tion of past behavior. 

In sequence, orders for capital goods 
follow demands for consumer goods 
with varying time lags. When new or- 
ders for consumer goods reach a high 
percentage of manufacturing capacity, 
new orders for capital goods respond 
for a considerable period of months. A 
decline in consumer goods orders, leav- 
ing a large proportion of plant capacity 
unused, results in minimizing new or- 
ders for capital goods. 

When inventories of consumer dur- 
able and semi-durable goods have 
reached low levels, orders for stock are 
issued, but cautiously, in limited quant- 
ity, and after a review of available new 
and substitute articles. 

Peak Prior To '54 

Production of much of our capital 
goods and many items of durable con- 
sumer goods reached their peaks prior 
to the year 1954. For instance, agri 
cultural machinery reached the high- 
est point of production in 1951, con- 
struction machinery in 1952, heavy 
electrical equipment and the aggregate 
of capital goods in 1953. 

Among durable consumer goods, 
radios, vacuum cleaners, and ironers 
had maximum sales in 1947, since 
which there have been declines. The 
year 1948 recorded the largest sales 
for washing machines. Peaks of sales 
of electric ranges, gas ranges, refrig- 
erators, and television sets were 
reached in 1950, together with maxi- 
mum production of automobiles and of 
lesidential construction. Maximum sales 
of home freezers, clothes dryers, and 
room air conditioners occurred in 1953, 
in which year the maximum of total 
value of construction, as adjusted by 
an index of construction costs, was also 
recorded. 

4. Capital expenditures are declining 
in most industries and will continue 
downward in 1955. Public utilities' ex- 
penditures on new plant and equip- 
ment, as well as railway expenditures, 
have decreased significantly through- 
out the year. 

5. Construction activity in the ag- 
gregate in the United States has been 
increasing recently despite the high 
construction costs. For the individual 
desiring to purchase a home, lower 
initial payments, extended periods for 
liquidation of mortgages, and increased 
limit on upper values are proposed as 
favorable factors. Unfavorable are the 
experience of inflated valuations and 
the extended period in which the in- 
dividual remains a debtor. 

Tax Easements 

Applicable to construction for in- 
vestment or speculation are the tax 
easements and the accelerated depreci- 
ation and obsolescence deductions per- 
mitted. Among the weaker phases are 
the limited private equity capital in- 
vested in multiple dwelling develop- 
ments, the limited interest displayed 
in profit through efficient management, 



Maryland 



13 



and the tendency to shift the entire 
risk burden to the Government. 

6. The common expectation is that 
Federal Government spending will con- 
tinue to decrease but that state and 
local government procurement will in- 
crease, perhaps approximating an off- 
set. Here again the deciding factors 
may be military purchases. Contracts 
in this category are continually in 
process of approval, completion, re- 
newal, or of extension. At any time 
the level of these expenditures may be 
relatively high or low as payments are 
processed. The important question 
seems to be whether an expanded pro- 
gram of military development may 
soon be authorized. 

It would be most unfortunate to use 
military procurement as an offset to 
declines in the national economy. First, 
the time schedule of a national de- 
fense program should be consistent 
with basic defense requirements. More- 
over, the equipment is highly special- 
ized and its manufacture requires con- 
version of industrial processes. Sec- 
ond, Government spending for stabiliz- 
ing employment and stimulating the 
economy is more logically directed to- 
ward roads, schools, hospitals, slum 
clearance, and similar capital outlays 
for civilian purposes. 

7. The speculative gyrations of the 
stock market leave no confidence as to 
adequate control, or as to the degree of 
firm investment represented in the 
daily exchange of shares. It has been 
too suggestive of a portion of the 1929 
pattern. 

8. With the extensive experience of 
the United States in using the com- 
petence and funds of Government, a 
comprehensive program should be de- 
veloped and publicly announced, and 
special purpose funds appropriated for 
constructive use. It would be fateful 
indeed if we should successfully guide 
undeveloped countries in their planning 
but be deficient at home. 

In view of the diverse and partisan 
statements by political candidates for 
public office, the Bureau felt it was im- 
portant to analyse factual data in an 
objective, impartial manner. In closing 
the study, the report states: "As with 
any relation of the whole with its 
parts, aggregate data for the United 
States provide a composite of indi- 
vidual series representing similarities 
or divergencies of regions. Maryland 
economic life is closely interrelated 
with the welfare of the Nation. Levels 
of income and rates of economic 
growth depend upon national develop- 
ments more than upon any local factor. 
Therefore it is essential to observe in 
detail all tendencies and to attempt 
recognition of all factors affecting the 
Nation or the State." 



Expanded Safety Education 




Swimming Pool 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, University 
President, reported to the Board of 
Regents that work will start shortly 
on a new $344,000 swimming pool at 
College Park. 



An Offering Of The Col- 
lege Of Physical Education, 
Recreation And Health. 

Sy. ^Itesum A. 'IcMnpkitoi 
Associate Professor, Physical Education 

Due to the acute shortage of driver 
education teachers in the second- 
ary schools of Maryland, the College 
of Physical Education, Recreation, and 
Health has been compelled to initiate 
driver education for teachers as part 
of the Safety Education Curriculum. 
We have done so, with the sanction of 
the Maryland Department of Educa- 
tion, and State Drivers' Education 
Association. Students in the College 
of Education, Physical Education, or 
Industrial Education 
may now obtain a 
minor in Safety Ed- 
ucation, after satis- 
factorily completing 
y the safety education 
|j curriculum. 

Today's mount- 
ing accident toll and 
complex traffic prob- 
lems demand that 
an all-out effort be 
made to protect the 

nation's future driv- 
Mr. Tompkins -,,t 

ers. We can no 

longer afford to place a driver behind 
the wheel of a motor vehicle without 
first giving him the opportunity to 
learn to operate it safely and efficient- 
ly. Each young person of driving age 
must be given an opportunity to learn 
to operate a motor vehicle through 
approved driver education courses 
under the supervision of qualified in- 
structors. 

Logical Areas 

The high schools of this nation are 
the most logical training areas and 
are strategically situated to make a 
major contribution to the teaching of 
driver education. On a growing scale 
the high schools of the nation are 
accepting the responsibility to provide 
such training and are hiring special- 
ists in this field to teach young people. 

The future drivers must be able to 
receive a complete driver education 
course which is intended to make them 
capable and cooperative drivers and 
pedestrians. It should further attempt 
to develop an appreciation of law and 
order and a wholesome respect for the 
dignity and worth of the individual 
citizen. It also provides an excellent 
medium for the development of self- 
control and good judgment. 

In October of last year the National 
Safety Congress meeting was held in 
Chicago, Illinois and was attended by 
persons interested in Safety Education. 
Emphasis was placed on an educational' 
program in Safety Education, includ- 
ing Driver Education, for teacher train- 
ing purposes in colleges and univer- 
sities throughout the country. The 
trend is to establish an educational 
program in Safety Education, encom- 



passing basic educational principles, 
techniques, and methods in all aspects 
of Safety Education. As a result of 
this National Safety Congress many 
colleges and universities are under- 
taking to upgrade the course in Safety 
Education, including Driver Education, 
for the purpose of better preparing 
teachers of Safety Education for the 
secondary schools and colleges. 

The State of Maryland now has 85 
high schools teaching driver education. 
It is planned that every high school 
of the State will be offering Driver 
Education as soon as qualified teachers 
are available. In order that we might 
serve the schools of the State in sup- 
plying qualified teachers of Driver 
Education, we have already initiated 
a curriculum of Safety Education which 
will enable teachers to qualify for 
a certificate for teaching safety edu- 
cation in the public schools. 
Courses 
In the new curriculum all require- 
ments were made as proposed at the 
National Safety Congress in Chicago. 
The courses are as follows: First Aid 
and Safety, Safety Education, The 
Driver, his Characteristics and Im- 
provement, Basic Driver Education, and 
Advanced Driver Education. 

Four of the above courses will be 
offered during the 1955 summer school. 
The first three courses will be avail- 
able to teachers who would like to 
teach driver education but have had no 
training in the subject. "Advanced 
Driver Education" is designed for those 
teachers who are already teaching 
driver education and would like to in- 
crease their knowledge in this field. 
There is a demand for driver educa- 
tion teachers from the high schools 
of the State of Maryland, and at the 
present time we cannot supply their 
needs. We feel with the above pro- 
gram we can accelerate the prepara- 
tion of teachers, and help to get at the 
root of the highway safety problem. 



At Johns Hopkins 

Johns Hopkins University announced 
it will confer a doctor of laws degree 
February 22 on Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, 
president of the University of Mary- 
land. 

He will deliver the principal address 
at commemoration day ceremonies, 
marking the 79th anniversary of the 
founding of Johns Hopkins. 



Shipmates Near Home 

The executive officer of the Naval 
Air unit at Anacostia, D. C, is Com- 
mander Robert W. Slye, USN, (U. of 
Md. Ed. '36). He has been in the serv- 
ice since 1936. 

The executive officer of the Naval 
Air Reserve Training Unit at Ana- 
costia, D. C, is Commander Lyman R. 
McAboy, USN, (U. of Md. A & S '36). 
He has been in the service since 1936. 



14 



Maryland 



; 

J 




All-Americans 
D 

|\ ead this list of names, viz.: — 



John J. McVeigh 
Toni Stein 
Frank B. Witek 
Jose F. Valdez 
Anton L. Krotiuk 
Edward .1. Moskala 
Walter C. Wetzel 
Charles N. 

DeGlopper 
Dirk J. Vlug 
Alejandro Renteria 
Harold O. 

Messersehmidt 
Joseph J. Sadowski 
Paul J. Wiedorfer 
Raymond Zussman 
Donald J. Gott 
William B. Metger 
Jose M. Lopez 
Joseph K. Schaefer 
Gino J. Merll 
Ellis R. Weieht 
Marcario Garcia 
Silvestre S. Herrera 
Charles A. 

MaeGilllavary 
Dexter J. 

Kerstetter 
John P. Thorson 
Emile Deleau 
Nicholas Oresko 
( haristos H. 

Karaberis 
John C. Sjogren 
William A. 

Soderman 
Cleto Rodriguez 
Mike Colalillo 
Veto R. Bertoldo 
Ysmael R. Villegas 
Leonard C. 

Brostroni 
David M. Gonzales 
Joseph J. Clcchetti 
Manuel Perez 
Harold Gonsalves 
Richard K. 

Sorsenson 

The above is neither a muster list 
of the United Nations conference nor 
a release of Notre Dame's football 
roster. 

It is a list of star-spangled Yankee 
Doodle Americans. 

To be a descendant of the Americans 
who came over on the Mayflower or to 
be a son or daughter of the American 
Revolution, is something to inspire 
justifiable pride. 

But the list above includes only 
Americans and descendants of Ameri- 
cans who became Americans by choice, 
not by the accident of birth. 

In the above list of names are repre- 
sented the frightened, pioneers strang- 
ers from another country, going 
through the pain of not being under- 
stood in a new country. 

Some of their parents never learned 
the American language. Many lived 



John Basilone 
Luis J. Cukela 

Sada S. Munimorl 
Jose Calugas 
Willibald ('. Biachl 
William G. 

Fournier 
Kenneth E. 

Gruennert 
John L. Jerstad 
Ralph Cheli 
Joe P. Martinez 
Frank J. Petraca 
Charles E. Kelly 
Junior Van Noy 
Nicholas Minue 
Floyd K. Lindstrom 
Alton W. 

Knappenberger 
Walter E, Truemper 
Archibald Matheis 
Joe C. Specker 
Henry Gurke 
Arnold L. 

Bjorkklund 
Forrest L. Vosler 
Arlo L. Olson 
Paul F. Rlordan 
John W. Dutko 
Henry Sthauer 
Walter D. Ehlers 
Arthur F. DeFranzo 
Ernest H. 

Dervishian 
Truman O. Olson 
Emil Bloch 
Raymond O. 

Beaudoin 
Peter Toniich 
Harold C. Agerholm 
Anthony P. 

D'Amato 
Jefferson J. 

De Blanc 
John J. Tomiuac 
William H. O'Brien 
Gerald L. Endl 



in ghettos and shantytowns all their 
lives. Here are Czech and Yugoslav, 
Japanese, Austrian, Greek, German, 
Italian, Irish, French, Scandinavian, 
Armenian, Mexican. The Japanese 
name in the list above represents a 
very large group of Americans of 
Japanese descent who had something 
to prove and did so. 

The German names in the above list 
represent what Robert Moses once 
called the "Beiunsnichts" (Bei, uns 
nichts gut in Europa; aber hier ist 
es besser"). 

The children of such Americans are 
moulded in the American system. They 
become great Americans. 

We hear and read much of intoler- 
ance, or condemnation of the fellow 
who is of another race, another color, 
another religion. 

What would constitute a great test 
of their right to be Americans? We'd 
say service in uniform; the willingness 
to fight and to die for the United 
States. 

And for such service the very great- 
est honor this country can bestow lies 
in winning the Congressional Medal 
of Honor, the nation's top flight, grade 
"a" award that comes only to the 
biavest of the heroic Americans who 
rendered service above and beyond the 
call of duty. 

The foreign sounding na/mes of the 
Americans listed above are called at 
random from a list of the winners of 
the CONGRESSIONAL MEDAL OF 
HONOR! 

On the other hand, consider the name 
of Ernest Childers. He dates back to 
long before the Mayflower. When he 
won from this nation the Congres- 
sional Medal of Honor he also won a 
similar award from another nation. 
The Osage nation. Childers is a full 
blooded Osage Indian who was decor- 
ated with the Necklace of the Horses 
Teeth, which goes only to the great 
warriors among the Osages; something 
on a parity with the Medal of Honor. 

That recalls the experience of a 
draft board which, in the routine course 
of its duties, sent one of its "greeting" 
cards to a young buck on a nearby 
Indian Reservation. 

The next day a cloud of dust down 
the main stem signalled the approach, 
on horseback, of the old chief, followed 
by a great number of young bucks, all 
in war paint. 

With a challenging gesture of dis- 
dain the old chief approached the desk 
of the draft chairman, tossed the card 
on the desk, stepped back, folded his 
arms, and demanded, 

"Since when is it necessary to draft 
a Sioux to fight for his country?" 



Definitions 

An optimist is a person who thinks 
the future is definitely uncertain. 
A pessimist is a person who is afraid 
the optimist is right. 

An economist is a man who can 
make a simple subject complex, a 
complex subject simple; in other words, 
an economist is simply simple. 



His Name Remains 

No such crackpot reformer as this 
pieacher had come along the pike 
in years, many Americans were de- 
claring in the 1980's. Of course a par- 
son was expected to try to improve 
morals, but this one was all excited 
about health which he should have left 
to the doctors. 

He was a temperance advocate. He 
proclaimed that the average American 
not only drank like a fish but he ate 
like a horse; that he ate too much, too 
fast and the wrong foods. "Downright 
gluttony" killed about 100,000 Ameri- 
cans a year, he believed — twice as 
many as alcoholism. Lecturing and 
writing busily, he advised his country- 
men that they ought to ventilate their 
bedrooms at night and take more than 
one bath a month — three a week, in 
fact. He even dared to tell the ladies 
not to lace so tightly. 

So many people were suffering from 
indigestion, dyspepsia, and similar 
miseries in the midriff that the re- 
former's food campaign succeeded in 
a large way. Horace Greeley, who 
never could remember when it was 
mealtime any way, supported him edi- 
torially and personally. Special board- 
ing houses were opened to serve the 
recommended diet only. 

Featured on his regimen was bread 
made from whole wheat, unbolted 
and coarsely ground. It is that item 
of his diet which keeps his name on 
the tip of many tongues today. When- 
ever you ask for graham bread or 
graham crackers, you are paying at 
least lip service to the celebrity of 
Rev. Sylvester Graham. 



Maryland 



Old Time Advice 

The male student body at Maryland 
includes a great many men who 
aspire to win commissions in the regu- 
lar Services or in the reserve forces. 

As such they will be expected to be 
leaders. They will have to lead enlisted 
men. 

Probably some advice in that premise 
will not be amiss. 

The enlisted men judge officers in 
much the same way that younger offi- 
cers judge their seniors. 

The foundation stone of American- 
ism is uniform justice to all ; the square 
deal. That is all the enlisted man ex- 
pects. That is what appeals to him. He 
is the finest soldier in the world and 
it is a great privilege to command 
him. Remember he sometimes comes 
from a home where he had only a few 
advantages and opportunities. Don't 
expect too much at first. He presents 
himself to be shown, to be instructed, 
to be molded properly. Have patience 
with him. Remember that many things 
which are an old story to you are new 
to him. Show him a thing clearly be- 
fore you question him about it. If you 
are fair and square and interested in 
the general welfare of your men, you 
will appeal to them and they will fol- 
low your guidance willingly. 
(Continued on Page 24) 



IS 



Regional Director 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, vice chair- 
man, Board of Regents, has been ap- 
pointed as regional director for the 
Association of Governing Boards of 
State Universities and Allied Instruc- 
tion. 

As a regional director, Mrs. White- 
hurst will represent the association at 
official functions, handle grievances and 
complaints within the area, secure new 
member organi- 
zations, and serve 
as a source of in- 
formation about 
the association to 
private colleges 
as well as to 
members of the 
association. 

The Associa- 
tion of Govern- 
ing Boards of 
State Universi- 
ties and Allied 
Instruction is the 
only educational 
association in America whose members 
are regents, trustees, supervisors, 
visitors and other board members. It 
is an association primarily interested 
in the problems of laymen who serve 
the cause of higher-education as board 
members. Its membership includes 
members in the United States, Alaska, 
Hawaii and Puerto Rico. 

Mrs. Whitehurst has been one of 
the most active club women and civic 
leaders in the United States. She has 
served on the Board of Regents for 
over 22 years in the capacities of sec- 
retary, chairman of the budget, chair- 
man of the medical school, hospital and 
nursing school committee and is now 
serving as vice-chairman of the Board. 



School of 



Dr. John Wagner 




Mrs. Whitehurst 



Dr. Byrd Better 

Dr. H. C. Byrd, president emeritus 
of the University of Maryland, is re- 
ported making good progress at Uni- 
versity Hospital, where he underwent 
a minor operation. 

"His condition is entirely satisfac- 
tory and it is just a matter of time," 
Dr. Adams said. "He 
is alert and cheerful. 
His temperature is 
normal." 

Dr. Adams and his 
associates main- 
tained restrictions 
against visitors, but 
close friends on the 
hospital and Medi- 
cal School staff drop 
in on him frequent- 
ly. 

As we go to press, 
Dr. Byrd Dr. Byrd is reported 

well on the road to recovery and in a 
matter of days will again be at his 
home in College Park. His many alum- 
ni friends send an expression of hope 
that he will soon be completely well. 

On February 12 Dr. Byrd observed 
his 66th birthday. 





Dr. Wylie Retires 

Dr. Hamilton Boyd Wylie, 67, dean 
of the University's School of Medi- 
cine in Baltimore and a member of 
the faculty since 1913, will retire next 
July 1. 

His retirement notice was accepted 
"with regrets" by the Board of Re- 
gents recently. 

During his 41 years at the medical 
school, Dr. Wylie taught and counseled 
approximately 5,000 students. At one 
point in the 1940's 
he wore three hats 
at once: acting dean, 
head of the depart- 
ment of biochemis- 
try, and chairman of 
the admissions com- 
mittee. 

He was appointed 
dean of the medical 
school on June 15, 
19 4 8, succeediing 
Dr. Robert P. Pat- 

~ ^ ,. terson. 

Dr. Wylie _. TT7 ,. 

Dr. Wylie was 

granted the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine in 1912 by the Baltimore Medical 
College, an institution which has since 
become a part of the University of 
Maryland School of Medicine. 

He married Nina B. Landragan in 
1912, and has two children, Mrs. Her- 
bert M. Reedy, Jr., and Hamilton Boyd 
Wylie, Jr. 

Dr. Wylie began his career at the 
School of Medicine of the University 
of Maryland in 1913 as Associate in 
Physiological Chemistry and Pharma- 
cology. He served successively as As- 
sistant in Clinical Pathology and 
Pharmacology; Demonstrator of Clini- 
cal Pathology and Pharmacology; As- 
sociate in Physiological Chemistry, 
Pharmacology and Clinical Pathology; 
Associate Professor of Physiological 
Chemistry and Pharmacology, and As- 
sociate Professor of Clinical Pathology 
and Physiological Chemistry until 1919 
when he was appointed Professor of 
Biochemistry. 

He is a member of: the American 
Chemical Society, the Medical and 
Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland, the 
American Medical Association, the 
Medical Advisory Committee of the 
Baltimore City Hospitals and the Medi- 
cal Advisory Council for Medical Serv- 
ices of the Department of Public Wel- 
fare of Baltimore, Chairman of the 
Dean's Committee of Maryland Co- 
operating with the Veterans Admin- 
istration, and a member of Sigma Xi. 

Anesthesiology Approved 

Dr. William S. Stone, University di- 
rector of medical education and re- 
search, announced that Dr. Robert B. 
Dodd, professor and head of the Uni- 
versity's Department of Anesthesiology 
had received notification that the two 
year residency program in anesthesi- 
ology has been approved by the Coun- 
cil on Medical Education and Hps- 



pitals and the American Board of 
Anesthesiology. 

Dr. Dodd, who is largely responsible 
for the present training program, is a 
graduate of the University of Nebras- 
ka. He came to the University of Mary- 
land in February, 1953 from the South- 
western Medical School of the Uni- 
versity of Texas in Dallas, Texas 
where he was instructor and later 
clinical associate professor. He took 
post-graduate work at Massachusetts 
General Hospital in Boston, Mass., and 
hs also served as director of anesthesia 
at Columbia Hospital in Milwaukee, 
Wis. 

Other full-time members of the Uni- 
versity Hospital's anesthesiology team 
who have also made large contributions 
to the success of the training program 
are Drs. Paul R. Hackett, associate 
professor and Howard S. Liang, in- 
biructor. In addition, there are now 
seven part-time faculty members who 
complete the attending staff. 

At the present time there are two 
residents in their first year of training 
in anesthesiology at University Hos- 
pital. Dr. Dodd and his staff plan to 
expand the program to three first year 
and three second year residents for the 
year 1955-56. 

The notification of approval was re- 
ceived by Director George Buck, of 
University Hospital, from Dr. Edward 
Leveross, director of the American 
Medical Association. Dr. Leveroos 
stated in his letter, "The residency pro- 
gram in anesthesiology at University 
Hospital has been approved for two 
years of training by recent action of 
the Council on Medical Education and 
Hospitals in concurrence with the 
American Board of Anesthesiology. 
With best wishes for the success of 
this program." 

Disaster Evacuation 

The Maryland Ambulance and Rescue 
Association's committee charged with 
making plans for the evacuation of in- 
dividual hospitals in the event of a 
disaster in the State of Maryland met 
at the Baltimore Medical Society. 

Kurt Nork, assistant director of Uni- 
versity of Maryland's University Hos- 
pital and chairman of the committee 
called the meeting for the purpose of 
investigating how such evacuations 
should be directed and what areas of 
the state the operation would cover. 

Appointed by Dr. Howard M. Bubert, 
director of the ambulance association, 
the committee includes Chief John A. 
Purkey, Sr., of the Violetville Volun- 
teer Fire Department; Chief G. E. 
Heckathorn of the Arbutus Fire De- 
partment; and Mr. William J. Amber- 
man of the Maryland State Police. Dr. 
William S. Stone, director of medical 
education and research of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland School of Medicine 
will serve as advisor to the committee. 

Dr. Bubert stated that the committee 
was appointed as a result of the re- 
cent Chestertown, Maryland disaster. 
He said, "The committee will work out 
such problems as the direction of each 
individual hospital's evacuation, the 
assembling of equipment such as am- 



16 



Maryland 



bulances, and the procuring of walkie- 
talkies. In the event of a national dis- 
aster, Dr. Bubert continued "our or- 
ganization would work in cooperation 
with the state director of Civil De- 
fense. 

The association director declared 
further, "The association is concerned 
over the lack of planning for local dis- 
asters, not only in Baltimore City but 
over the entire state." 

Mycology Laboratory 

A new mycology laboratory has been 
opened at the School of Medicine. The 
laboratory is a sub-division of Der- 
matology under the direction of Dr. 
Harry M. Robinson, Jr. Its major pur- 
pose, research in dermatology, to deter- 
mine the value of treatment of fungus 
diseases. 

Dr. Stanley N. Yaffe has been as- 
signed to the project as a research as- 
sistant and Miss Marjorie Huck has 
been appointed full-time special re- 
search assistant. 



Old Line Award 

An award of $25.00 is being offered 
to the student on the College Park 
campus, who writes the best 1000- 
2000 word essay on the subject: "Why 
Read." This award is being donated 
by the "Old Line," student publica- 
tion, edited by Stanley L. Harrison. 
In addition to the cash award, the 
"Old Line" will publish the winning 
essay in its final issue of the year. 

The $25.00 prize is being added to 
the original prizes offered to the win- 
ning student by the Peter Pauper 
Press, of Mount Vernon, N. Y., spon- 
sors of the contest in cooperation with 
the library of the University. 

This is the third year the essay 
contest has been sponsored on the 
College Park campus. In 1952, the 
Press offered to colleges and univer- 
sities throughout the nation copies of 
their finely printed and bound books as 
prizes. Winner of the first prize was 
to receive ten books from their Col- 
lector's Editions, and the second prize 
winner was to receive five of the Col- 
lector's Editions. This year, the Press 
is also offering two books each to two 
Honorable Mentions. 

The first prize winner in the 1952- 

1953 contest was Richard W. Manning, 
who wrote on the subject: "Book(s) 
In My Life." Last year's winner was 
Jean Spencer, whose essay was on the 
subject "Most Unforgettable Person 
I've Met in Books." Miss Spencer is 
now managing editor of the "Old Line." 

Judges of the essays, members of 
the faculty, are: Dr. Franklin D. 
Cooley, of the English Dept.; Dr. Don- 
ald C. Gordon, of the History Dept.; 
and Mrs. Harold Hayes, of the Library. 

The contest began on December 15, 

1954 and ends April 1, 1955. Awards 
will be made in May. 




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17 



School of 



Dentistry 

Dr. Gerson A. Freedman 
Gardner P. H. Foley 




Dean Houghton 



Dean At Loyola 

Frank J. Houghton, D.D.S., Dean of 
the Loyola University School of 
Dentistry of New Orleans, is one of the 
University of Maryland School of Dent- 
istry's most distinguished alumni. 

He was born in Jersey City, New 
Jersey and graduated from Seton Hall, 
South Orange prior 
to entering the Bal- 
timore College of 
Dental Surgery 
from which he grad- 
uated in 1917. 

Dr. Houghton was 
President of the 
Hudson County 
(N. J.) Dental So- 
ciety in 1929, and 
President of the 
New Jersey State 
Dental Society in 
1939. 

He was a delegate to the American 
Dental Association from the State of 
New Jersey for a period of fifteen 
years. 

Dr. Houghton has been a Dental 
Director at the Jersey City Medical 
Center for thirty years, having car- 
ried on a dental health program for 
the entire city, which included the chil- 
dren of both the public and parochial 
schools, plus the people confined to the 
Hospital and those who came to the 
clinic for service. 

He retired from the Jersey City 
Medical Center in 1949 and in 1950 
joined the Faculty of Loyola Univer- 
sity. 

Dr. Lynch Speaks 

The Gorgas Odontological Honor So- 
ciety held a meeting at Gordon Wilson 
Hall on the university's Baltimore 
campus. Guest speaker for the oc- 
casion was the President of the Ameri- 
can Dental Association, Dr. Daniel 
Lynch of Washington, D. C, a Mary- 
land alumnus. 

Lucian Coble Acclaimed 

During his forty-six years of dental 
practice Dr. Lucian G. Coble '08 (B.C. 
D.S.), of Greensboro, N. C, has sought 
constantly to improve the methods and 
the armamentarium of his practice. He 
has also been continually active in con- 
tributing to the progress of his pro- 
fession by making his findings and de- 
velopments known to his fellow prac- 
titioners through the presentation of 
clinics and papers. A diplomate of the 
American Board of Prosthodontics, a 
member of the F.D.I., and Clinical 
Professor of Prosthodontics of the 
University of North Carolina School of 
Dentistry, Dr. Coble has achieved wide 
recognition for his outstanding work 
in the field of prosthetic dentistry. 

In 1953 Dr. Coble made a contribu- 
tion that has brought him internation- 
al acclaim in another field of achieve- 



ment. In collaboration with a Greens- 
boro physiotherapist, Dr. Coble opened' 
a wide new area of activity for Mrs. 
Ann Adams, a polio patient. By devis- 
ing a plastic mouthpiece with an at- 
tached stick, Dr. Coble enabled this 
severely handicapped patient to use a 
typewriter with racility. The use of j 
this device proved to be so successful 
that it was selected by the Bellevue 
Hospital Rehabilitation Center for in- 
clusion in its permanent exhibit of 
aids for handicapped persons. In Aug- 
ust of 1954 it was exhibited at medical 
meetings in Edinburgh, The Hague, 
and Rome. The instrument developed 
by Dr. Coble is now being used by 
handicapped people throughout the 
world. In providing them with a med- 
ium of usefulness Dr. Coble has con- 
tributed greatly to their happiness and 
welfare. 

Musical Dentist 
Dr. Hans Ernest Weise, of Ridge- 
wood, N. J., was the subject of the 
"Picture of the Month" in the Oral 
Hygiene of March, 1954. The picture 
shows Dr. Weise rendering a typical 
service to a child patient to the ac- 
companiment of music supplied by the 
operator. Dr. Weise's unique procedure 
in dental practice was also the sub- 
ject of an article in the New Yorker of 
May 29. With the assistance of a 
simple appliance, Hans is able to play 
the harmonica while working on his 
patients. His renditions of classical, 
light classical and popular music are 
enthusiastically enjoyed by both adult 
and child patients. For home use he 
has a piano, an organ, and a musical 
saw with which he entertains his own 
collection of four children. 

Receive Promotions 

Dr. Ronald Cross Dove '22 (B.C.D.S.) 
was recently promoted to the grade 
of Captain in the Dental Corps of the 
U.S.N.R. Captain Dove was commis- 
sioned in the Navy Dental Corps in 
1944. During World War II he served 
at the U.S.N.T.C. at Sampson, N. Y. 
During the Korean War he was as- 
signed to the Charleston Naval Ship- 
yard. He is presently assigned to duty 
aboard the repair ship USS Amphion 
(AR-13), c/o Fleet P.O., New York, 
N. Y. Dr. Dove entered the B.C.D.S. 
from Westerly, R. I. He was the Class 
Secretary in his junior year and is a 
member of Xi Psi Phi. 

Dr. William Basil Johnson '38 was 
recently promoted to the grade of Cap- 
tain in the U.S.N. Dental Corps. Cap- 
tain Johnson was commissioned in the 
N.D.C. in 1939. During World War II 
he served on the cruiser USS Quincy 
and the aircraft carrier USS Randolph. 
The Randolph participated in raids on 
Tokyo, the invasions of Iwo Jima and 
Okinawa, and the last raids on Japan. 
Basil is presently assigned to the 
U. S. Naval Hospital at Quantico, Va. 
He completed his predental work at 
the University of Maryland in Balti- 
more. He was Vice-President of his 
predental class and Secretary in his 
freshman dental year. 

Tarheel Notes 

Recent activities of the dental socie- 
ties of North Carolina reflect the prom- 



inent parts taken by several of our 
lalumni in the affairs of their associa- 
tions. 

Dr. Z. Vance Kendrick '32, of Char- 
Motte, served as President of the Second 
'District Society, 1953-54. 

Dr. D. T. Waller '13 (U. of Md.), of 
Charlotte, presented a table clinic at 
the October meeting of the Second Dis- 
trict Society. Dr. Waller was elected 
President of the Charlotte Society in 
1930. 

Dr. Lucian G. Coble '08 (B.C.D.S.), 
of Greensboro, discussed "Centric Re- 
lation" at the October meeting of the 
Fourth District Society. 

Dr. Zeno Edwards, Jr., '52, of Wash- 
ington, attended the postgraduate 
course in Dentistry for Children at the 
University of North Carolina School of 
Dentistry. 

Dr. R. R. Sappington '53 is practic- 
ing in Fayetteville, in association with 
Dr. W. G. Nimocks. 

Dr. Marvin R. Evans '36, of Chapel 
Hill is the new Editor of the Journal 
of the North Carolina Deii.tal Society. 
Dr. Evans is a member of the faculty 
of the University of North Carolina 
School of Dentistry. 

Dr. D. C. Woodall '35, of Erwin, 
served as Vice-President of the Fourth 
District Society. 

90th Birthday 

While not the oldest of our alumni, 
Dr. George Ezra Shattuck has joined 
that very select and highly respected 
coterie of B.C.D.S. nonagenarians. He 
celebrated his ninetieth birthday in 
September at his home in Norristown, 
Pa. 

Dr. Shattuck was born in Sparta, 
Wisconsin, of pioneer parents who had 
come west from New England. At 22 
he also went west — to California, where 
he worked for several years with the 
purpose of saving enough money to 
enable him to study dentistry. To ful- 
fill his guiding ambition he traveled 
clear across the country to enter the 
B.C.D.S., from which he graduated in 
1894. 

Dr. Shattuck had a rich experience 
in his 53 years of practice and became 
one of the most respected citizens of 
the Norristown area. Retired since 
1947, he maintains a keen interest in 
dentistry and in his alma mater. Still 
attending Church and Sunday School 
regularly, Dr. Shattuck reads his Bible 
daily and has read it completely sev- 
eral times. He also enjoys walking, 
reading, gardening and correspondence 
with his friends. 

Dr. Shattuck married Lillie B. Rink- 
er of Wilmington, Del., in 1899. They 
had enjoyed over 50 years of happy 
marriage before the death of Mrs. 
Shattuck two years ago. They had four 
children: G. lEdgar, of Poultney, Vt.; 
Mrs. Alice Detwiler, of Pleasantville, 
N. J.; Mrs. Anna Alexander, of Salina, 
Kansas; and Sarah, who teaches at the 
Tropper School. 

The National Alumni Association 
congratulates Dr. Shattuck on a long 
career of service that has been highly 
creditable to himself, his profession 
and to his school and wishes for him 
many more pleasant years in well 
earned retirement. 



18 



Maryland 



J. D. Haggerty, '96, Retires 
Dr. John D. Haggerty, of the B.C.D.S. 
Class of 1896, has announced his re- 
tirement after fifty-six years of prac- 
tice in Sussex, N. J. "Forced into re- 
tirement" by failing eyesight, the vet- 
eran practitioner now devotes his time 
to the hundreds of prints and photo- 
graphs in his collection and to the rais- 
ing of flowers, fruit and tobacco. Dr. 
Haggerty entered the office of Dr. Ed- 
ward C. Tuttle, of Sussex, soon after 
his graduation from Blair Academy. 
His preceptorial experience encouraged 
him to seek formal training in Balti- 
more. He practiced in New York for 
two years before returning to Sussex 
to purchase the practice of his former 
tutor. Over the years he has been ac- 
tively engaged in a variety of civic af- 
fairs. He served as a borough council- 
man for two terms and once lost a 
mayoralty election to his best friend 
by one vote. Dr. Haggerty will also 
figure in local history as the operator 
of the first movie shown in Sussex. To 
Dr. Haggerty at 81 we express the 
heartfelt wishes of his fellow alumni 
for many more years of the pleasant 
occupation that has meant so much to 
him during the fruitful years of the 
past. 

Heads Delaware Society 

The latest addition to the long roll 
of over 300 B.C.D.S. graduates who 
have been elected to the presidencies 
of their state societies is Dr. Robert 
Alton Reed '37, now serving as Presi- 
dent of the Delaware State Dental So- 
ciety. 

Entering the School as a member of 
the predental class, he demonstrated 
early in his student career a fine ca- 
pacity for dependable performance. In 
his senior year he was the Treasurer 
of the Gorgas Odontological Society 
and also of his fraternity, Delta Sigma 
Delta. Following his graduation in the 
Class of 1937 he interned in the United 
States Public Health Service at Staple- 
ton, Staten Island, New York. 

Dr. Reed began practice in Milford, 
his home town. In 1942 he was called 
to service in the Army Dental Corps. 
During the next four years he was as- 
signed to the Lovell General Hospital, 
Fort Devens (Mass.) and Ashford Gen- 
eral Hospital (W. Va.). On his sepa- 
ration he resumed his practice in Mil- 
ford. 

He received excellent training in the 
administration of dental society af- 
fairs through filling the offices of Sec- 
retary and President of the Kent and 
Sussex Dental Society. On becoming a 
member of the Executive Council of 
the State Society in 1949, Dr. Reed be- 
gan to impress the membership with 
his promise as a leader in the state- 
wide activities of his profession. After 
completion of his Council term he was 
elected Second Vice-President in 1952, 
First Vice-President in 1943, and Presi- 
dent in 1954. He was also recently 
honored by election to the Pierre 
Fauchard Academy. 

Dr. Reed and Mrs. Reed, who were 
married in 1940, have two children: 
Kathleen, who is ten, and George T. Ill, 
who is five. 



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USE THE COUPON ON THE LAST PAGE 



Chairmen Of 1955 Reunions 

1905 — The returning members of the 
Golden Reunion groups will be guests 
of the National Alumni Association at 
the Alumni Luncheon to be held at the 
Lord Baltimore Hotel on June 3. The 
reunion dinners of the other classes 
will be held on the night of June 3. 
The several chairmen will communicate 
with each member of their respective 
classes. The May issue of the Journal 
will carry the complete program of 
the Commencement Activities. 

U. of Md. — J. Stephenson Hopkins, 

Bel Air, Md. 
B.C.D.S.— Karl P. Heintz, 121 Bed- 
ford Street, Cumberland, Md. 
B.M.C. — Oscar S. Benson, Profession- 
al Building, Baltimore 1, Md. 
1910— JU. of Md.— Arthur L. Daven- 
port, Baltimore Life Bldg., Balti- 
more 1, Md. 
1915— B.C.D.S.— James H. Ferguson, 
Medical Arts Bldg., Baltimore 1, 
Md. 
1920 — (Information unavailable at 

present.) 
1925— Daniel F. Lynch, 1149 16th 
Street, N.W., Washington 6. D. C, 
Harold Golton, 2408 Eutaw Place, 
Baltimore 17, Md. 
1930— Norman P. Chanaud, Center- 
ville, Md.; Lawrence L. Leggett, 
Mt. Airy, Md. 
1935— Gerald Shoben, 2249 Eutaw 

Place, Baltimore 17, Md. 
1940— Theodore F. Chapin, 7301 York 

Road, Towson 4, Md. 
1945— Walter I. Levine, 809 Cathe- 
dral Street, Baltimore 1, Md. 
1950— Michael H. Ventura, 2069 E. 
Belvedere Ave., Baltimore 12, Md. 

Honored By North Carolina 
Dr. Daniel Turner Smithwick '90 
(B.C.D.S.) was the honor guest at 
the ninety-eighth meeting of the North 
Carolina Dental Society held at Pine- 
hurst in May. Born in Warren County 
on March 20, 1867, Dr. Smithwick at- 
tended Wake Forest College before 
entering the B.C.D.S. He began prac- 
ticing in Smithfield, N. C. Five years 
later he removed to Louisburg, where 
he practiced continuously for oveY 
fifty years. 

A pioneer in the establishment of 
dental services in penal institutions, 
Dr. Smithwick was appointed by Gov- 
ernor Bickett as Chief Dental Surgeon 
to the State Penal Institutions. In 
1899 he began his half century of 
affiliation at the Thomasville Orphan- 
age, where he gave his services gra- 
tuitously to hundreds of the children 
in need of dental care. 

Dr. Smithwick has exercised a keen 
interest in various civic and cultural 
affairs of his town, county and state. 
He was historian for Franklin County, 
1929; vice-president of the North Caro- 
lina Literary and Historical Associa- 
tion, 1928; Vice-President of the Socie- 
ty of the Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion, South Atlantic District, 1930; 
president of the North Carolina Folk 
Lore Society, 1934-36; Charter Mem- 
ber of the Franklin County Board of 
Health, of which he was made a life 
member in 1953; Member of the Board 



20 



Maryland 




if tariff and t onfij 
C hintie l\4ilaurant 
rtcomm.ina.ta bu Lfourmtt't 
Cjuidt to yjood C-atin f " 

Wu's 

fll 




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Experts Agree . . . 
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Guaranteed pure and wholesome— 
selected beef and pork . . . seasoned 
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POTATO 
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BALTIMORE, MD. 



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Transportation Co. 

DAILY SERVICE 

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PL. 2-0433 BALTIMORE 



WHOLESALE STATIONERY 

The Handy Line 

Baltimore, Md. 



of Directors of the State Hospital at 
Raleigh; President of the North Caro- 
lina Society of County Historians, 1946; 
member of the Advisory Committee of 
the National Rivers and Harbors, 1951; 
and member of the Board of Trustees 
of the Fayetteville State Normal 
School, 1931. 

Dr. Smithwick returned to his alma 
mater in 1950 to celebrate the six- 
tieth anniversary of his graduation. 
He also attended the commencement 
exercises of 1952 to honor the gradua- 
tion of his grandson, Dr. Wilbur G. 
McFarland, Jr. The National Alumni 
Association congratulates Dr. Smith- 
wick on his many years of faithful 
service in the professional field and in 
other areas of activity. The Associa- 
tion is particularly pleased to learn 
that Dr. Smithwick has received from 
his state society the recognition that 
he so richly merits. 



At Pennsylvania 

John L. Moore, who has served suc- 
cessively as comptroller and business 
manager of the University of Penn- 
sylvania, has been elected business 
vice-president of the University. 

A graduate of Villanova from which 
he received the degree of bachelor of 
arts in 1926, Moore also studied at 
Pennsylvania State University, the 
University of Maryland, and West 
Chester State Teachers. 



Poly Speaker 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, University of 
Maryland President, was the guest 
speaker at the annual father and son 
dinner of the Polytechnic Institute, Bal- 
timore. 



Research Projects 

The Board of Regents approved a 
list of 15 projects with private indus- 
tries, trade groups, foundations and 
the armed forces offering the univer- 
sity $486,000 to work on various re- 
search problems. 




NOT SINGULAR 

Department Head: — "Well, it cer- 
tainly took you long enough to find me. 
Didn't the Personnel Office tell you 
how to recognize me?" 

Berwyn Bessie: — "Yes sir, but there 
were several men around here with 
large stomachs and red noses." 






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School of 



Law 




Judge Fraley 



— G. Kenneth Reiblich '29 
Judge Neil C. Fraley 

One of Maryland's most prominent 
alumni is Circuit Judge Neil C. 
Fraley, of Oakland, Md. 

He was born in Oakland, on April 
18, 1894 and attended public schools 
of Garrett County. He graduated from 
the Oakland High School. 

Judge Fraley matriculated at the 
Law School of the University of Mary- 
land in 1915, attended for two years 
and then left to 
enter the Army. 

He was admitted 
to the Maryland bar 
in March, 1931 and 
has practiced con- 
tinuously since then 
in Oakland. He was 
elected State's At- 
torney for Garrett 
County in 1934 and 
served as such for 
twelve years. Judge 
Fraley was Attor- 
ney to the Board of 
County Commissioners of Garrett 
County for eight years and appointed 
to the Maryland Senate in 1949. He 
was elected in 1950 for a four year 
term. Judge Fraley served as Gov- 
ernment Appeal Agent to the Local 
Selective Service Board from 1941 to 
1946 and as Chairman of the Local 
Board from 1946 to the present. 

As authorized by the State's 1954 
general election, Governor McKeldin 
appointed three new Circuit Court 
Judges, one of whom was Judge Fraley. 
He did not seek re-election to the 
Senate this year. He will serve on the 
4th judicial bench. 

Attorney-General 
C. Ferdinand Sybert has been sworn 
in to the State attorney general's of- 
fice he won in the 1954 State election. 

The 54-year-old Ellicott City lawyer 
defeated Republican Attorney General 
Edward D. E. Rollins by 35,000 votes. 
Mr. Sybert, a 
graduate of the 
University of 
Maryland School 
of Law, 1925, 
represented How- 
ard County in the 
House of Dele- 
gates for four 
years and was 
rounding out a 
four-year term in 

the State Senate 
Mr.Syoert when he made 

the race for attorney general. 

A resident of Elkridge, he was born 
September 16, 1900. Mr. Sybert at- 
tended grade school at Elkridge, Md.; 
graduated from Loyola High School, 
Baltimore, 1918; from Loyola College, 
Baltimore, A.B., 1922. He was a re- 
porter for the Baltimore News-Post, 
1922-1925 and engaged in active prac- 
tice of law ever since, with offices at 
Ellicott City. He served as counsel 
to the Board of County Commissioners 
of Howard County, 1931-1934, and as 




State's Attorney for Howard County 
for three terms, 1934-1946. 

Elected to Maryland House of Dele- 
gates, 1946, he served as speaker there- 
of from 1946 to 1950. Elected to State 
Senate from Howard County in 1950 
he served as a member of Senate Fi- 
nance Committee and as Chairman of 
Senate Committee on Executive Nomi- 
nations. 

He was president of the Howard 
County Bar Association, 1945-1948. 
Member State Bar Association, Vice- 
President for Fifth Judicial Circuit, 
1952-1953. President, University of 
Maryland Law School Alumni Asso- 
ciation, 1952-1953. Member Knights of 
Columbus. 

Attorney-General Sybert married the 
former Miss Elizabeth J. Johnson of 
Howard County in 1927; have three 
children and one grandchild. 

Deputy County Solicitor 

Baltimore county commissioners ap- 
pointed one of their foremost critics 
to the post of deputy county solicitor. 

Named to the job was George M. 
Berry, Maryland Alumnus, School of 
Law '32 Towson attorney and counsel 
to the previous Board of County Com- 
missioners. 

In announcing the appointment of 
Mr. Berry to the county's second high- 
est legal post, Michael J. Birmingham, 
board president, speaking for himself 
and the other two commissioners, 
Robert B. Hamill and Augustine J. 
Muller, said: 

We are pleased to announce that 
upon the recommendation of the county 
solicitor, Carroll W. Royston, we have 
appointed George M. Berry as deputy 
county solicitor. 

"Mr. Berry brings to the legal staff 
a sound background of professional ex- 
perience and a thorough knowledge of 
county affairs which will be of great 
value to the county government in the 
many difficult problems which lie 
ahead." 

Mr. Berry, who is 47, was born in 
Lutherville and has lived in that com- 
munity all his life. 

He was the principal author of Balti- 
more county's zoning laws as first 
adopted in 1945 and is a past president 
of the Baltimore County bar Associa- 
tion. 




"You see — I told you this outfit is 
one of the biggest law firms in the 
country !" 



22 



Maryland 



Mr. Berry has been prominently 
mentioned by his friends as a logical 
candidate for election to the new judge- 
ship of the Circuit Court for Baltimore 
county in 1956. He and Mrs. Berry are 
the parents of two sons. 

Medico-Legal Course 

Dr. Roger Howell, Dean of the School 
of Law, announced that the University 
now offers a new law course on medico- 
legal problems. The problem is under 
the direction of Professor L. Whiting 
Faircholt, Jr., of the School of Law. 

Commenting on the necessity for 
such a course in schools of law Dean 
Howell stated, "The interrelationship 
of law and medicine has been the sub- 
ject of increased attention on the part 
of both professions in recent years, but 
comparatively little has been done in 
the law schools to present medico-legal 
problems to their students." 

Material for the new subject covers 
such problems as basic psychiatry in 
relation to law, the commitment of the 
mentally ill, expert testimony, criminal 
responsibility, psychopathic offenses, 
medico-legal aspects of personal injury 
litigation, medical malpractice and re- 
lated problems in the medico-legal field. 

Lecturers for the new course include 
Dr. Jacob E. Finesinger, director of 
the university's Psychiatric Institute; 
Dr. Manfred S. Guttcaher, chief medi- 
cal officer of the Supreme Bench of 
Baltimore City; and Dr. Russell S. 
Fisher, chief medical examiner of Bal- 
timore City and professor of legal med- 
icine at the University of Maryland 
School of Medicine. 

Registration for the course began on 
February 2, 1955. 

Alumni Banquet 

The annual banquet of the Law 
School Alumni Association will be held 
on Saturday evening, April 30, 7:00 
p.m., at the Emerson Hotel, Baltimore. 
Dr. Wilson H. Elkins will address the 
group in his formal appearance before 
the Law Alumni. His recent appoint- 
ment as President of the University 
of Maryland has been of major interest 
to all, and this meeting will enable 
many to know him personally. 

Guests of honor will include Gov. 
Theodore R. McKeldin '25, Solicitor 
General Simon E. Sobeloff '15, Senator 
John Marshall Butler '26, Honorable 
William P. Cole, Jr. '10, Chairman of 
the Board of Regents, Attorney Gen- 
eral C. Ferdinand Sybert '25, Honor- 
able Morris Soper '95 and Honorable 
W. Calvin '94. 

Nominations 

The Nominating Committee appoint- 
ed by the President, Honorable J. 
Dudley Digges '36, under the Chair- 
manship of past President Edwin Har- 
lan, Esq. '34, has presented to the 
Secretary "the following list of officers 
for the year 1955-56 to be elected by 
ballot at the banquet: 

President, J. Gilbert Prendergast '33, 
Baltimore; First Vice-President, Hon- 
orable Stanford I. Hoff '34, West- 
minster; Second Vice-President, Leon 
H. A. Peirson '23, Baltimore; Third 
Vice-President, Benjamin B. Rosen- 
stock '25, Frederick and Secretary- 
Treasurer, G. Kenneth Reiblich '29, 
Baltimore. 




"Our S5th Year" 

It's LENT AGAIN . . . 

and time In enjoy our delicious OYSTERS on the 
half Hindi and our delectable sea food dlnnero 

The original in alwui/x the hrtt — 
You can be SI in: at 

the WALKER-HASSLINGER 

RESTAURANT-COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

1701-5 N. CHARLES ST. BALTIMORE, MD. 

rwo convenient parking minx opposite our doom 

ACBOSS EfBOM PBNN Station PHONK VKiiniin 7'JIIii 

Open 'Til Midnight 




When the job calls for steel . . . 
on the U. of M. campus and on 
important projects everywhere 
. . . leading builders and con- 
tractors call on Dietrich Brothers, 
Inc. 

BALTIMORE 18, MD. 
HOpkins 7-9700 

WASHINGTON, 0. C. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

1408 Insurance Building 

Phone 5623 



STEEL 

for the 

KAPPA KAPPA 

GAMMA HOUSE 

by 



DIETRICH 
BROTHERS 



E. L. STEBBINC 

AND COMPANY 

1 600 CLOUGH STREET 
BALTIMORE 1 3, MD. 



Acoustical treatments 
Lathing and Plastering 

Armstrong and 
Fiberglass distributors 
and contractors 
Dickens 2-6825 



EARL H. HAMMOND COMPANY 

FLOOR COVERING CONTRACTORS 



BEImont 5-7791 



4315 YORK ROAD 
BALTIMORE 12, MD. 



Executive Committee: Miss Mary 
Arabian '44, Baltimore; Honorable 
Joseph L. Carter '25, Baltimore; 
Thomas G. Finan, Jr. '39, Cumbebrland; 
T. Hughlett Henry, Jr. '35, Easton; 
Layman J. Redden, Esq. '34, Denton; 
Honorable Charles Awdry Thompson 
'40, Cambridge; Doris Peterson Scott 
'49, Elkton; Honorable Thomas N. 
Biddison '31, Baltimore; William A. 
Loker '33, Leonardtown and Honorable 
Emory H. Niles '17, Baltimore. 
Buffet Supper 

A Buffet Supper with dinner music 
and dancing was held for the Law 



School alumni, their wives, husbands 
and friends on Friday, January 28, 
1955. The supper followed a meeting 
of the Committee on Continuing Legal 
Education of the Maryland State Bar 
Association, at the Sheraton-Belvedere 
Hotel in Baltimore. Honorable J. Dud- 
ley Digges is the President of this com- 
mittee and felt that the mid-winter 
meeting of the Bar Association, would 
bring together a number of Alumni 
who would enjoy such an affair. His 
idea proved a success and consideration 
will be given to making this an annual 
affair. 



Maryland 



23 



Furr Bros* 
Poultry Co,, Inc. 

Washington's 

Leading 
Poultry 

Purveyor 

Phone: NAtional 8-4792 

1315-17 Maine Ave., S.W. 
Washington 4, D. C. 




CONCRETE 
for 

EVERY PURPOSE 

SUPER CONCRETE 
CORPORATION 

3056 K STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON 7, D. C. 

Phone ME 8-3840 



HAIL THE 

GOOD HUMOR 

MAN! 








FOR QUALITY 
ICE CREAMS 



College of 



Military Science 



63 To Be Commissioned 

Reserve commissions were awarded 
to 63 ROTC cadets in February. 

Forty-five of these men will go im- 
mediately into pilot training for fly- 
ing duty and two will become observ- 
ers. 

The National Guard will accept 15 
men who will be trained by the Air 
Force for three years' active duty and 
three years' inactive. 

Men entering the National Guard 
were required to pass a general serv- 
ice physical and will serve in a non- 
specialized, non-flying capacity. 

Three cadets received category two 
commissions. These are awarded stu- 
dents in scientific or engineering fields. 

Second lieutenant bars this semester 
will be announced February 10, after 
their grades are released. 

The policy of allowing cadets to enter 
the National Guard if they fail to pass 
requirements for flying or observer 
duty will be continued until further 
notice. 
. The following named students have 
successfully completed the Advanced 
AFROTC course and were tendered ap- 
pointments as Second Lieutenants, 
USAF Reserve: 

Allen, Ronald C, Jr., Ed. 

Koxold, Charles M., BPA. 

Brooks, Ronald J., BPA. 

Brown, Alan D., Ed. 

Brown, Ralph L.. Ag. 

Chase, John P., BPA. 

Colleran, Robert J., Engr. 

♦Dedinas, Joseph V., Distinguished Mil. Grad- 
uate, BPA. 

Fischer, William Ernest T., AS. 

Plynn, Matthew J., AS. 

Frizzell, Donaldson D., Ag. 

Gates, James A., AS. 

Glazer, Lowell R., BPA. 

Griffin, Michael E., Engr. 

Gross, Bernard J., BPA. 

Harter, Seth W., Jr., BPA. 

Heffner, Frederick G. F Ag. 

Hennick, Charles R„ AS'. 

Hilbish, Philip L., AS. 

Hoelzer, Ronald N„ AS. 

Hughes, Harry L., Jr., BPA. 

Kelly, Howard H., Jr., AS. 

Kepler, Paul E., BPA. 

Keys, Oscar M., Jr., Engr. 

Kuprenas, Algimantus J., Engr. 

Leineweber, Kenneth C, BPA. 

Lizzio, Anthony M., Engr. 

Lvnn, Harvey R., Engr. 

Magtutu, Paul W., PE. 

Markowitz, Daniel, Ed. 

MeGroarty, Robert P., BPA. 

Miller, John B., Jr., BPA. 

Milligan, Ernest B., AS. 

Morris, Wayne H., AS. 

Naramore, Leonard R., Ed. 

♦Nowland, Benoni IV, Distinguished Mil. 
Graduate, BPA. 

Packel, Lawrence M., AS. 

Palmleri, Louis A., Jr., BPA. 

Porter, Roger M., AS. 

Power, Edward J., Jr., AS. 

Riede, Philip J., BPA. 

Rudolph, Robert E., Engr. 

Sanders, William H., BPA. 

S*pivey, Delmar B., MS. 

Warden, Beryl E., Jr., BPA. 

•Weiner, Arthur C, Distinguished Mil. Grad- 
uate, AS. 

Williams, Major A., Jr., BPA. 

Wolf, Jack A., MS. 

Wright. Donald D., Jr., BPA. 

Zamsky, Robert I., BPA. 

To National Guard 

The following named AFROTC Ca- 
dets successfully completed the Ad- 
vanced AFROTC course and were tend- 
ered appointments as Second Lieuten- 
ants, ANGUS: 
ISeckwith, Richard A., BPA. 
Blake, Richard H., BPA. 



Cadle, William R., Jr., Ed. 
Delphey, Ray G., Jr., AS. 
Drake, Robert G., BPA. 
Faass, Lawrence J., AS. 
Feldman, Herbert F., BPA. 
Huyett, Melvin A., Ed. 
Jackson, Allen C, AS. 
Lebowitz, Morris M., AS. 
Morrow, Ralph B„ Jr., BPA. 
Schief, William R., AS. 
Schukraft, Richard C, Ag. 

Awarded Certificate 

The following named AFROTC Ca- 
dets successfully completed the Ad- 
vanced AFROTC course and were 
awarded Certificates of Completion. 
After the obligation of Selective Serv- 
ice have been met, they may apply for 
USAF Reserve Commissions: 
Caldwell, Frank Rupp, Jr., Engr. 
Hemphill, Conrad Wayne, Ag. 

Medal Of Freedom 

Charles R. Stein, (Military Science 
'51) received the Medal of Freedom for 
exceptionally meritorious service as a 
military intelligence specialist, J-2 Di- 
vision, Headquarters, Far East and 
United Nations Commands in Tokyo. 
The award was presented by Maj. Gen. 
Ridgely Gaither, Assistant Chief of 
Staff of the J-2 Section, during a re- 
cent office ceremony. 

The citation stated that "Mr. Stein 
skillfully reviewed the United States 
national security policies to determine 
applicability to the Far East Command, 
and assisted in formulating policies 
governing security procedures. His 
exceptional ability to analyze and re- 
solve security problems reflect credit 
upon himself and the Department of 
the Army." 

Mr. Stein has served on active duty 
as a captain. 

Mr. Stein recently married the form- 
er Miss Barbara Kinne, Webster City, 
Iowa, a former first lieutenant in the 
Women's Air Force, stationed in Tokyo. 



OLD TIME ADVICE 

(Concluded from Page 15) 

Here and there you will find an un- 
desirable. If he is incorrigible and un- 
fit from the standpoint of character 
eliminate him quickly. 

We must not tolerate any officer or 
enlisted man who cannot be trained to 
live up to very high standards. As you 
grow older, you will probably find that 
you have greater patience with an en- 
listed man who fails than with an offi- 
cer who does not come up to the stand- 
ard. After spending time and money 
in training an officer, top results may 
be expected. 

Be natural in dealing with men. They 
will never attempt familiarity with 
you if you conduct yourself with dig- 
nity. Don't attempt to joke with them, 
but at the same time your manner 
should be tactful, kindly, and above 
all, helpful. 

In this day and generation men must 
be led and not driven. The old days 
of drastic discipline sustained by court 
martials and office hours have gone 
forever. The court cannot make your 
organization for you. Good discipline 
results from mutual respect among 
good men. 



24 



Maryland 



TRAILWAYS ALWAYS 



NOW OPEN.' 

College Park Terminal 

and information center. 

For departures, fares, and 

charter coach rates, call 

COLLEGE PARK RECORD CENTER 

7406 BALTIMORE AVENUE 
WArfield 7-4102 

featuring Thru Express Service 
via Neu> Jersey Turnpike to 
Philadelphia and New York. 

FREQUENT DEPARTURES CHARTERS 
PLEASURE-PLANNED TOURS 




WMSMTRQILWQVS 



Years ago an officer was quoted as 
saying that the "Services would be 
fine places if it were not for the en- 
listed man." But the enlisted man 
is the Service. It is still the human 
mass that wins battles. Officers are 
needed here and there throughout the 
mass in order that it may be maneuv- 
ered. In times of peace we hear a 
great deal about machines and new in- 
ventions of all kinds which are going 
to do away with the importance of 
man power. But war comes and it is 
the same old problem — the nation which 
has allowed its manpower to weaken 
goes down in defeat unless it is saved 
by its allies. 

Your ability to handle the Ameri- 
can enlisted man will be the measure 
of your efficiency as an officer. 

Never give an enlisted man a rank- 
ing better than he deserves. Remem- 
I ber that you can be just as dishonest 
I in handling a personnel question as in 
1 handling government funds or prop- 
j erty. Here and there we even find 
seniors in all Services who do not un- 
derstand this. 

Take an interest in your men, listen 
to their troubles, assist them here and 
, there individually in their instruction, 
and make them better men because they 
have had the good luck to be assigned 
j to your command. It is a great re- 
sponsibility, this Service game, both 
in peace and war. 

Two outfits on two different stations. 
The material issued to them is the same. 
The recruit's assigned to them come 
from the same citizenry. Both units 
are serving under exactly the same con- 
ditions. Why are they so often quite 
different in efficiency ? Only because of 
! the difference in the ability of their 
; leaders. 



MT. VERNON 

CLAY 
PRODUCTS CO. 

• 

JSuildiny 1 1 lateriats 

• 

800 HAMLIN STREET, N.E. 
WASHINGTON 17, D.C. 

• 

DEcatur 2-6267 

J. E. SAIED, SR. # President 



The keystone of military efficiency is 
loyalty. Loyalty up and loyalty down. 
An officer deserves only to receive the 
same measure of loyalty he accords 
those under him in rank. Lack loyalty 
down and you are "just another lieu- 
tenant." Understand loyalty to your 
men, keep them from fretting (passed 
along from you) all the annoyances 
thrust upon you, and you have become 
a leader! Your men will follow you 
through a maneuver, into battle, or 
through even hotter places. 




LORD CALVERT 
HOTEL & COTTAGES 

Just 4 miles to Washington, D. C. Line 
near University of Maryland 

Free Parking 

Convenient Dining Facilities 

For Reservations 

Call WArfield 7-8324 

DN U. S. HIGHWAY Na. 1 
72DD BALTIMORE BLVD. 

College Park. Md. 



At Philadelphia 

Dr. George Weigand, Assistant Dean 
of Students, attended a meeting of the 
Ford Foundation Advisors to the 
United States National Student Asso- 
ciation in Philadelphia. Dr. Weigand 
was also guest speaker at the recent 
annual Women's Student Government 
convention held at College Park. 



Maryland 



25 



M 
P 



I 



poured Gypsum, 
Cemesto Board and 
Insulrock roof decks 

sprayed on asbestos 
fireproofing and 
insulation 

► Acousti-Celotex 
acoustical treatments 

lathing & plastering 
contractors 

330 W. 24th St. 
Baltimore 11, Md. 
HOpkins 7-3970 



The 

Uown JrouJe 

RESTAURANT-COCKTAIL BAR 
LOUNGE 

• 

featuring unuiual and flavorful 
dishes from original recipes 

• 

HOWARD at 27th STREETS 
BALTIMORE, MD. HO. 7-5191 



^^ 



HOTEL 



'PLY CO. 



C»T. 



Purveyor! of Fine 1927 

MEATS • POULTRY 

Frozen Foods 
Food Specialties 

To Hotels, 

Institutions. Snini 

Clubs. Etc. 



LExington 9-7055 

Night Service HO. 7-6817 

227 S. 

HANOVER ST. 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



Printers and 
Publishers of fine 
Books • Catalogs 
Viewbooks - etc. 

THE 

COLLEGIATE 
PUBLISHING 

COMPANY 

Gilmor 5-3517 

646 S. Longwood Street 

Baltimore 23, Md. 



School of 



Nursing 

Helen E. King 



Accredited 

The School of Nursing has been given 
continued approval for 1955 by a 
top accrediting agency, Dean Florence 
M. Gipe announced. 

The approval came from the Col- 
legiate Board of Review of the De- 
partment of Baccalaureate and Higher 
Degree Programs of the National 
League for Nursing. 

Dean Gipe also reported the nursing 
school received an excellent rating from 
the Middle States Association of Col- 
leges and Secondary Schools. 

Dean Gipe said the School of Nurs- 
ing received special praise from tbe 
accrediting group for the background 
of its teachers and the excellence of 
its clinical facilities. 

Under the school's new four-year 
program, students spend two years at 
College Park for general courses; then 
28 months in Baltimore for specialized 
nursing training. 

Upon graduation they are eligible to 
take State board examinations. Dean 
Gipe said all eleven students who have 
graduated to date under this program 
have passed their boards. 

There are 178 students now in the 
nursing school program. 

Personal Notes 

Velma Kish, 1923, resigned as Edu- 
cational Director of the Los Angeles 
Hospital, on account of ill health. After 
five months of rest she has accepted 
a position with the Children's Hospital 
in Los Angeles, as Assistant Director 
of Nurses. 

>Ruth Clements, 1920, resigned as Di- 
rector of Nurses at the Frederick City 
Hospital, Frederick, Maryland, and ac- 
cepted a position in charge of the 
Health Program. She is teaching Psy- 
chology and Sociology at Ferrum Jun- 
ior College, Ferrum, Va. 

Mrs. Charles G. Morgan, the chil- 
dren, and her father, Dr. John F. Lutz, 
joined her husband M/Sgt. Morgan, in 
Japan. Mrs. Morgan was Anne Caro- 
line Lutz, 1946. They like Japan. Their 
address: Mrs. Charles G. Morgan, c/o 
M/Sgt. Charles G. Morgan, A.F.— 
19336233, 6160 M.T.N. Squadron, APO 
244, c/o P.M. San Francisco, Cal. 

Major and Mrs. George W. Flager, 
their two girls and two boys, are sta- 
tioned in Heidelberg, Germany. Mrs. 
Flager was Ingrid E. Selkamaa, Class 
1938. Their address: c/o Major George 
W. Flager, G.I. Division Headquarters, 
USAREUR, APO 403, c/o P.M. New 
York, N. Y. 

Helen W. Winks, Class 1951, writes, 
"I am married to Mr. Thomas Wright 
Valentine. I met my husband at the 
University of Miami where he and I 
received our degrees in June. He is 
with the Dade County Board of Public 
Instruction and I am the Instructor in 
Pediatric Nursing in the University 
of Miami Department of Nursing." 

Mrs. B. Tex Lindsey is superintend- 
ent of the Washington County Hospital 




Mi»8 Yingling 



in Plymouth, North Carolina. Mrs. 
Lindsey was Vivian Wynne, 1933. 

Mrs. James B. Nuttall writes us, 
"We are now stationed in Wiesbaden, 
Germany. I like it here much better 
than in England. This is possibly be- 
cause we are among many old friends, 
which tends to make us forget we are 
so far from the U.S.A. We have about 
two more years before we return." 
Their address: Lt. Col. James B. Nut- 
tall, 7112 Central Medical Group, APO 
633, New York, N. Y. Mrs. Nuttall 
was Virginia Belle Richardson, Class 
1939. 

First Fellowship 

The first Commonwealth Fellowship 
in the Southern Regional Education 
Board's area toward a doctorate in 
education with a major in nursing has 
been awarded to Miss Doris B. Ying- 
ling, currently enrolled in the univer- 
sity's graduate school. She was award- 
ed the fellowship for the purpose of 
completing require- 
ments for a doctor 
of education degree 
at Maryland, where 
she is engaged in a 
full time education- 
al program. 

Miss Yingling is 
a graduate of the 
Union Memorial 
Hospital School of 
Nursing, received a 
bachelor of science 
degree from Oregon 
and a master of 
arts degree from Maryland. She has 
pursued her graduate work under the 
direction of Dr. Lee R. Hornbake, pro- 
fessor in the College of Education and 
Dean Florence M. Gipe of the School 
of Nursing, under whose guidance she 
is completing an internship in nursing 
education administration. 

Prior to taking her graduate pro- 
gram, Miss Yingling was executive sec- 
retary of the subcommittee on the Sur- 
vey of Nursing Needs of the Committee 
on Medical care for the Maryland State 
Planning Commission which published 
the report on nursing needs in Mary- 
land in 1953. She has also been an 
educational coordinator at Franklin 
Square Hospital's School of Nursing. 

To Chicago 

Florence M. Gipe, Ed.D., Dean, 
School of Nursing, represented the 
University at the meeting of the Na- 
tional League for Nursing, Department 
of Baccalaureate and Higher Degree 
Program, University of Chicago, Dec. 
8-1 lth inclusive. Maryland was elected 
to this organization when the nursing 
school became an independent school 
of the university in December 1952. 

Practical Nursing 

A new one year class in practical 
nursing organized in the Division of 
Practical Nursing of the University of 
Maryland School of Nursing, will begin 
on the Baltimore campus in March. 

Although the applications will be 
evaluated on an individual basis, it is 
expected that applicants will present 
high school diplomas and be within the 
18-50 age group. A qualifying test 



26 



Maryland 




"I never realized there 

could be such a difference 

in home heating" 

Every family that changes to Natural Gas Heat enjoys a happy 
new experience in home heating. Some enthuse over its greater cleanli- 
ness. Others say that its trouble-free operation makes a hit with them. 
But its over-all low cost is something that delights everyone. 

You'll be dollars ahead by replacing old, inefficient home heating with efficient, 
economical Natural Gas Heat. From every angle, Natural Gas Heat is home heating at 
its best. The Gas & Electric Co., Baltimore. 



It costs nothing to get full information and an estimate on 
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will be used in the selection of students 
for the course. 

Dean Gipe advised that inquiries 
should be directed to Mrs. Ethel Troy, 
director of the Division of Practical 
Nursing, School of Nursing, University 
of Maryland, Baltimore 1, Maryland. 

Personal Notes 

Mr. and Mrs. James B. MacDermott, 
Jr., have moved to West Palm Beach, 
Fla., where Mrs. MacDermott has 
charge of nursing in the Pediatric De- 
partment in the Good Samartian Hos- 
pital in West Palm Beach. Mrs. Mac- 
Dermott was Marjorie Withington, '48. 

Rita Malek, '49, is working at the 
National Institute of Neurological Di- 
seases and Blindness, National Insti- 
tutes of Health in Bethesda. She heads 
one of the two Clinical research units. 
She says, "It is a very challenging po- 
sition and I love it." 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Kline, and 
their two daughters, Denise, age two 
years, Debra Sue, age three months 
live in Wrightville, Pa. Mrs. Kline was 
Janet Eyster, '52. 

Dr. and Mrs. Howard N. Taylor, are 
residing in Houston, Texas, where he 
is practicing. Mrs. Taylor was Doris 
Wahlo, '45. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Culp reside 
at Willoughby Beach, Edgewood, Md. 
Mrs. Culp was Iva Tharpe, '38. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Menees, Jr., 
live in Houston, Texas. Mrs. Menees 
was Margaret Reynolds, '41. 

Dr. and Mrs. Joseph F. LiPira, and 
family, are residing at 8400 Loch Rav- 
en Blvd., Baltimore. They returned to 



Baltimore after Dr. LiPira finished his 
tour with the Army. Mrs. LiPira was 
Ellen M. Sirman, Class '46. 

Mary Sue Laign, '52, has a position 
in the Obstetrical Department at Cor- 
nell Hospital, in New York City. 

Mrs. Robert C. Hunter, nee Grace 
M. Colburn, '48, and husband, Dr. Rob- 
ert C. Hunter, live in Akron, Ohio. He 
has finished his training and military 
obligations. Dr. Hunter is with the 
Anesthesiology Associates of Akron. 



Terpolosophy 




A lot of them don't 
know it, but no 
woman ever made a 
permanent hit with a 
man by pretending to 
be something she isn't. 
. . . Reformers wouldn't 
be so bad if they did not 
want to uplift those who 
are happier the way they are . . . Time 
kills one who kills time . . . Some folks 
do more than their bit, while others 
just sit by and rest . . . There are few 
men who are strong enough to laugh 
at their own weaknesses . . . It isn't 
taxes that people object to — it's hav- 
ing to pay them . . . In the domestic 
orchestra it's the "eternal triangle" 
that makes the discord . . . The mod- 
ern girl seems to think that "the thin 
veneer of civilization" can be helped a 
lot by a coat of paint. 



Kjerstine Kelly, '47, resigned her po- 
sition with the Irene Kaufman Settle- 
ment, in Pittsburgh, Pa., entered the 
A.N.C. as Captain, and is now stationed 
at Walter Reed General Hospital, 
Washington. 

Charlene Hibberd, Class '54, accepted 
a position in the Obstetrical Depart- 
ment in the Coleman Hospital, Indiana 
University Medical Center, Indianapo- 
lis. 

Darlena Trostle, '48, was married on 
June 20, 1954, to Kenneth W. Walcott 
of Tiffin, Ohio, a student at Ohio State, 
majoring in Psychology. Darlene ex- 
pects to do general duty nursing in 
Athens, Ohio until the School Session 
is over. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Kohlhafer, moved 
into their new home at 6508 75th St., 
in Cabin John, Md. Mrs. Kohlhafer was 
Frances Kershner, '47. 

Dr. and Mrs. Paul L. Heininger are 
in the Navy. The address is 8255 Si- 
mons Drive, Norfolk 5, Va. Mrs. Hein- 
inger was Mary Catherine Greene, '46. 

Mrs. Paul A. Moore is living at home 
in Scotland Neck, N. C, while Dr. 
Moore is serving on the USS Albany. 
She expects to join him in Naples for 
several weeks. Mrs. Moore was Ernes- 
tine Johnson, '44. 

Dana L. Day, '51, has a position in 
Greeley, Colorado. 

Margaret Richards, '32, has been pro- 
moted to Lieutenant Commander in the 
Navy Nurse Corps. She is stationed 
at USN Hospital, Bethesda, Md. 



Maryland 



27 



For Indoor Events 





Gymkana Trip 

The University Gymkana troupe 
traveled far to entertain the troops 
stationed at Lajes Field on the Por- 
tuguese island of Terceira in the 
Azores. Accompanying the 18 mem- 
bers of the troupe were their chap- 
erones, Vivian C. Courtney; Al Daneg- 
fier, University photographer; and* 
Joan Wolle, free-lance writer for the 
Baltimore Sun. 

The troupe left Andrews Air Force 
Base for Westover Air Force Base, 
Mass., where they spent the night. 



During the 12 hours' flight over the 
Atlantic the next day, the troupe 
spent part of the time performing for 
the passengers on board. At Lajes 
they were met by their host, Major 
William E. Bullard. 

Gymkana gave its first performance 
the following evening in the station 
theater. They were a sensational hit. 

The following day the troupe toured 
the small picturesque island by bus. 
That night some of the special acts 
performed at the Officers, the Non- 
commissioned Offiaers and Airmen's 
Clubs, as well as at the station hospital. 



HOUSES PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The practically completed Activities 
Building and "New Coliseum." En- 
trance is at ground level with seats 
in a horseshoe formation as shown in 
the lower picture. 

The building is designed for the pre- 
sentation of boxing, Basketball and 
other indoor sports as well as for com- 
mencement exercises, convocations and 
similar events. Seating capacity is 
15,000. 

The building will house training and 
locker rooms for various indoor sports 
and will also accommodate the head- 
quarters and offices of the College of 
Physical Education, Health and Recrea- 
tion. 



Attend Conference 

Dr. Dorothy Deach, Dr. Warren John- 
son, Dr. Elsie Roush, Miss Josephine 
Hubbell, and Miss Doris Terry from 
the College of Physical Education, 
Recreation, and Health were partici- 
pants in the National Conference on 
the Undergraduate Health Education 
Minor, sponsored by the American As- 
sociation for Health, Physical Educa- 
tion and Recreation at Washington, 
D. C. 



At Rutgers 



Howard Rovelstad, Director of Li- 
braries, was one of the speakers at 
the Conference on Recruiting for Li- 
brary Service held at the Graduation 
School of Library Service, Rutgers 
University. Mr. Rovelstad spoke on 
under-graduate library education. 



28 



Maryland 



At Indianapolis 








AT ELI LILLY PLANT 

Members of the senior and junior classes of the School of Pharmacy visited Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, 
inspected the Lilly Research Laboratories and toured pharmaceutical, biological, and antibiotic production facilities. 

Representing the school faculty with the group was Dr. C T. Ichniowski (first row, third from left). 

Among the students in the group were, I. William Grossman (first row, fifth from left), president of the junior class; How- 
ard R. Shin" (first row, fourth from right), vice-president of the junior class; Thaddeus P. Pruss (first row, fifth from right), 
treasurer of the junior class; M. Lee Dorsey (first row, third from right), junior class historian; and Barbara Miller (first 
row, extreme right), senior class secretary. 

A. G. Leatherman, Lilly representative in Baltimore, accompanied the group to Indianapolis. He and his wife are at the 
extreme left of the first row. Mr. Leatherman is a graduate of the University of Maryland with the class of 1920. 



They 



School of 



Pharmacy 

Adele B. Ballman 



Isotope Pharmacy 

Anew course in "Istope Pharmacy" 
has been added at the Southern 
College of Pharmacy in Atlanta to 
teach future pharmacists "who should 
know how to deal with radioactive 
drugs which have been introduced into 



medicine only recently." 

Teacher of the new course is a 
scholarly, Chinese pharmaceutical chem- 
ist, Dr. Wei-Chin Liu, Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, who was cut off from 
his home and family in Soochow, China, 
by the Communist seizure of power. 
He has been in this country seven 
years. 

In describing the new course, he 
said there are a number of schools now 
teaching the physics and chemistry of 
isotopes — but this is the first to teach 
the pharmacy of isotopes. 



Noting that radio isotopes are "like 
ordinary elements except they have 
radioactivity," Dr. Liu said they usual- 
ly are handled with a long instrument 
known as a remote pipette, for the 
safety of the handler. 

Dr. Liu said subjects to be covered 
in the course include theoretical aspects 
of radioactivity, the safe storage, dis- 
pensing and disposal of radio isotopes, 
the design of a radio-chemical pharm- 
acy laboratory and the pharmacists' 
role in this nuclear energy age. 



y^ioverland 

oUairu 
* 

f-^roductd 
WatcU 

h 

Service 




Maryland 



29 



At Old Heidelberg 



1 


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GRADUATION EXERaSES, 1954 
University of Maryland Graduation Exercises in the Historic "Aula" of Alt Heidelberg University, ancient site 
of German culture, now headquarters for Maryland's widespread Overseas Educational Program. 



College of ==^=^^^= 

Special & Continuation 
Studies 

Armed Services Conference 

The University of Maryland, in co- 
operation with the Armed Services, 
co-sponsored the Second Annual Armed 
Services Education Conference, held in 
Baltimore. 

The conference program was planned 
by representatives from seven uni- 
versities, the various branches of the 
Armed Services and the Committee on 
Civilian Higher Education for Mili- 
tary Personnel of the American Council 
on Education. 

The annual conference had to do 
with various phases of the Armed Serv- 
ices education programs that are con- 
ducted in cooperation with colleges and 
universities. 

In addressing the assembly Dr. Wil- 
son H. Elkins, University President, 
stated that he is particularly con- 
cerned in seeing that courses offered 
military personnel in the off-campus 
program are on a parity with those 
given at College Park. The Univer- 



sity President stressed that maintain- 
ing off-campus teaching standards is 
vital so that credits gained will be 
fully transferable toward baccalaureate 
degrees. More intensive and extensive 
courses are to be offered to service 
men, he said, in spite of various vex- 
ing problems and difficulty in obtaining 
teachers. 

Commenting on the purpose of the 
program Dr. Ray Ehrensberger, dean 
of the College of Special and Continua- 
tion Studies, stated, "Cognizant of the 
fact that there are over three million 
men in uniform, institutions of high- 
er learning are aware of their re- 
sponsibility and obligation toward edu- 
cation of the armed forces. Discussions 
of mutual problems and exchange of 
ideas results in the establishment of 
a sounder basis for future education 
programs. We feel that much was 
gained by the conference, where infor- 
mation was exchanged between the 
military and civilian educators." 

Among the leading institutions par- 
ticipating with Maryland on the pro- 
gram was Syracuse, University of Day- 
ton, Rutgers, George Washington, 
Massachusetts, and Florida State. 

Military personnel included represen- 
tatives of the Armed Services from all 
over the world, dealing with the day 



to day problems of education for Amer- 
ican service men. 

General Gruenther, Speaker 
University President Wilson H. El- 
kins, announced that General Alfred 
M. Gruenther, supreme allied comman- 
der Europe, accepted an invitation to 
speak at the commencement exercises 
for the Maryland 
Overseas Program. 
The ceremony will 
be held in the his- 
toric "aula" of Heid- 
elberg University in 
Germany, ancient 
seat of German cul- 
ture, on May 27, 
1955. 

Dr. Elkins, who 
will be accompanied 
by Col. Joseph R. 
Ambrose, U.S.A.F., 
dean of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland College of Military 
Science, will present diplomas to over 
50 students who will have satisfactorily 
completed their college requirements. 

Gov. Theodore R. McKeldin was 
tendered and accepted an invitation 
from the Board of Regents to fly to 
Heidelberg, Germany, and participate 
in the graduation exercises in company 
with Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, University 
President. 




Gen. Gruenther 



30 



Maryland 



Law Enforcement 

Colonel Arthur L. Shreve, deputy 
director of the Maryland Civil Defense 
Agency and Captain Martin M. Puncke 
of the Maryland State Police presented 
a program at the fifth session of the 
Institute for Maryland Law Enforce- 
ment Officers held at the University. 

Highlight of the meeting was a dis- 
cussion on the civil defense highway 
system and the methods to be used by 
the Maryland State Police in control- 
ling all vehicular traffic on the high- 
ways during an emergency. 

The institute was organized five 
years ago by the College of Special and 
Continuation Studies through the coop- 
eration of Chief Daniel B. Wiseman of 
the university's campus police; the 
Maryland Municipal League, the Mary- 
land Police Association, Inc., and the 
Maryland State Police. It affords offi- 
cers in the State of Maryland an op- 
portunity to better understand public 
relations within departments and to 
improve individual efficiency ratings. 
Additionally, the program is aimed to- 
ward a better understanding of the 
psychology of dealing with people, en- 
couraging cooperation with citizen 
groups in the development of commun- 
ity-wide programs of delinquency pre- 
vention and dealing more effectively 
with the special problems of law en- 
forcement. 

The sessions of the institute are held 
monthly and an official certificate, at- 
testing to participation in the insti- 
tute, and counter-signed by appropri- 
ate officials of the University of Mary- 
land will be awarded to Maryland law 
enforcement officers successfully com- 
pleting the course. 



Sez Testudinette: 




W 



hat most men 
need is a men- 
tal strainer to keep 
out second-r ate 
thoughts. But that 
doesn't mean you 
should have a brain 
like a sieve . . . 
Economy is some- 
thing that every- 
body preaches and 
nobody practices un- 
less he can't help 
himself ... A new 
baby upsets a house- 
hold, and a new car 
often does the same thing . . . Some 
men save money and others can hard- 
ly save their breath . . . Probably no 
woman ever understood how a man 
can be happy when he's alone ... A 
"gay blade" always thinks he puts a 
wide swath . . . And quite as often, 
two's a crowd and three's company. 



FOUNDED IN 1611 

The University of San Tomas, Ma- 
nila, Philippine Islands, founded by the 
Spanish in 1611, is about 25 years older 
than Harvard University in the United 
States. 



SINCE 




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Maryland 



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USE THE COUPON ON 
THE LAST PAGE 



of the University by Dr. Wilson H. 
Elkins, President, and the Board of 
Regents of the University. 

Dr. Fierz is on leave from his posi- 
tion as Professor of Theoretical Phys- 
ics at the University of Basel, Switz- 
erland, and will be at the University 
of Maryland. While at the University 
of Maryland he will give a course in 
the Physics Department on the foun- 
dations of statistical mechanics and 
will conduct seminars in theoretical 
physics. He will also work closely 
with the research groups in theoretical 
physics, especially those in the fields 
of elementary particle theory and 
solid state theory. 

Professor Fierz has made funda- 
mental contributions of considerable 
importance to at least three widely 
different fields of physics: statistical 
mechanics, quantum field theory, and 
nuclear physics. With the Nobel Prize 
winner, Wolfgang Pauli, he made a 
fundamental contribution to the theory 
of quantum statistics. He has developed 
the theory of particles of arbitrary spin 
and has published many important 
papers in meson theory and the theory 
of nuclear physics. Professor Fierz 
also serves as editor of Helvetia Phys- 
ica Acta, the leading Swiss scientific 
journal in theoretical physics. 
Graphic Art Collection 
Professor James P. Wharton, head 
of the Department of Art, has an- 
nounced that a collection of graphic 
art by American artists of the 20th 
Century has been presented to the 
university by Martin W. Brown of 
Silver Spring. 

Mr. Brown spent ten years in put- 
ting his collection together. Pieces 
were acquired from all over the United 
States, from galleries, auctions and 
artists themselves. The group pre- 
sented to the university contains 114 
examples of the work of over 60 dif- 
ferent artists working in all graphic 
arts, media and techniques. The collec- 
tion contains works of such well-known 
artists as Soyer, Benton, Curry, Hurd, 
Bellows, Rembrandt and Hart. 

The scope and variety of the graphic 
art group make it particularly valuable 
to an educational institution. 
Ordained 
The Reverend Lathrop Palmer Utley 
was ordered a Priest in the Holy 
Catholic Church by the Right Rev- 
erend Benjamin Martin Washburn, Bis- 
hop of Newark, in Trinity Cathedral, 
Newark, N. J., on December 18, 1954. 
At Durham, N. C. 
A. M. Fort, Jr., (A&S '51) of Co- 
lumbia, S. C, has been appointed man- 
ager of the Durham, N. C. branch of 
the Pure Oil Company. 

Fort comes to Durham from Pure's 
Columbia branch. Prior to his em- 
ployment by Pure Oil he was con- 
nected with the Shell Oil Company. 
From South Carolina 
Professor Tomlinson Fort of the Uni- 
versity of South Carolina lectured at 
College Park, on February 14, 15, and 
16. 

The lectures and informal discus- 
sions of the three day program includ- 
ed the topics "Common Error in the 
First Course in Calculus," "Elementary 




Comdr. Callegwry 



Finite Differences with Emphasis on its 
Importance in Modern Mathtmatics," 
"Analytic Geometry as Presented by 
Descartes and Faults in the Usual Pre- 
sentation of Trigonometry." This was 
part of a lecture tour being made by 
Professor Fort, sponsored by the 
Mathematical Association of America, 
for the purpose of stimulating interest 
in Mathematics and to improve upon 
its teaching. 

Commands D A V 

Claude L. Callegary completed the 
7th grade and left school at the age 
of 13 in the year 1935. His early em- 
ployment was as a clerk, an assistant 
manager of a hardware store, and two 
years as a truck driver. In 1941, at 
the age of 18, he volunteered for army 
service. 

Today, Mr. Callegary is a graduate 
of the University's College of Arts & 
Sciences and the Law School in the 
class of 1950. He is senior partner of 
a law firm bearing 
his name in Balti- 
more. While in the 
Army, he took the 
general educational 
development test 
and his grades were 
high enough for him 
to be awarded a 
high school diploma 
by the State of 
Maryland. The Uni- 
versity ruled he was 
eligible to enter at 
College Park on the 
basis of certificate No. 45 from the De- 
partment of Education. 

This year, Mr. Callegary is serving 
as State Commander of the Disabled 
American Veterans. He is vice-chair- 
man of the Junior Bar Conference of 
the American Bar Association covering 
16 states. He has taken advanced Law 
courses in medical legal law in New 
York, Richmond, and Chicago. 

World War II service for Mr. Calle- 
gary included the Aleutians, New 
Guinea, and the Netherlands East In- 
dies. On a flight from Owi to Biak 
in the Netherlands East Indies, a plane 
crash took the lives of 11 of the 14 on 
board. Mr. Callegary was hospitalized 
as a result until his discharge. For 
military service he was awarded the 
American Defense Ribbon, Asiatic 
Pacific Campaign Ribbon with three 
battle stars, and World War II Vic- 
tory Medal. 

Under a special ruling of the Mary- 
land State Bar Association, he was al- 
lowed to take the State Bar examina- 
tion a year before graduation and was 
passed in 1949. He is also eligible to 
practice in the courts in Baltimore 
City, District Court, District of Mary- 
land and the U. S. Circuit Court of 
Appeals. 

At College Park, in his undergradu- 
ate years, Mr. Callegary was president 
of the Mens' League, served as a mem- 
ber of the Student Government Asso- 
ciation for two years, was President of 
the Independent Student Association 
and was co-founder of the Veterans 
Organization, which at one time, had 
over 5,000 members on the campus. 



34 



Maryland 



He was Judge Advocate of the Dis- 
abled American Veterans for three 
years, Senior Vice-Commander for one 
year and now Commander. He is also 
a member of the American Legion and 
was recently appointed associate editor 
of NACCA Law Journal, which is the 
top level organization in the United 
States devoted to the interests of 
plaintiffs or injured people. 

Mrs. Callegary is the former Cath- 
erine L. Briggs '46, who has also tak- 
en graduate work at the University of 
Chicago and a former teacher of Engi- 
neering math at the University of 
Maryland. There are four children who 
are proud of the Father whose career 
brought him from the status of a truck 
driver to a leader in the field of Law 
and Civic service. 



College of 



Education 



"Having Fun" 

Miss Anne Sugar was recognized in 
a recent issue of "The Instruc- 
tor," published in Dansville, New York. 
She was author of a unit titled "Hav- 
ing Fun," which concerned her class of 
slow learners with mental ages begin- 
ning at 4 years. Reference was made 
to visits to various points of interest 
in the city of Baltimore, designed to 
help her pupils enjoy now and later, 
in adult life, these recognized centers. 
Stories were written, pictures drawn, 
and songs and dances learned to pre- 
pare children for wise use of leisure 
time considered so important in pres- 
ent day living. 

Miss Sugar is a teacher of the Op- 
portunity Class in Betsy Ross. 

At Hagerstown 

R. Karl Shank, (Ed. '36), is now serv- 
ing as President of the Hagerstown 
chapter of National Association of Cost 
Accountants. 

At Anacostia 

The executive officer of the Naval 
Air unit at Anacostia, D. C, is Com- 
mander Robert W. Slye, USN, (U. of 
Md. Edu. '36). He has been in the 
service since 1936. 



With Phone Company 

The Chesapeake and Potomac Tele- 
phone Company in its publication the 
Transmitter, has recognized a number 
of University of Maryland graduates 
in the employ of this company. In- 
cluded were: F. K. Peacock, '41, audi- 
tor of receipts; E. R. Burtner, '52, staff 
assistant for methods and results; John 
F. Durke, '52, acting supervisor of IBM 
processing; R. J. O'Brien, '48, traffic 
engineer; and F. A. Carleton, '50, traf- 
fic supervisor. 



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DISCUSS NEW JOURNALISM BUILDING 



Danegger Photo 



Plans for the University's new journalism building were discussed December 
3, 1954, when the journalism committee of the Maryland Press Association met 
in annual session at the University of Maryland- Left to right: Elmer M. Jack- 
son, Jr., chairman, vice-president and general manager, Capital-Gazette Press, 
Annapolis; Alfred A. Crow ell, head, Department of Journalism and Public Re- 
lations; Joe K. Phipps, instructor of feature writing; Dr. J. Freeman Pyle, dean, 
College of Business and Public Administration; Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, president 
of the University of Maryland; J. Russell Wiggins, managing editor, Washington 
Post and Times Herald; Donald W. Krimel, associate professor of public rela- 
tions; Robert Carey, assistant professor of journalism; Philip Geraci, instructor 
of press photography; Alfred Danegger, assistant professor of press photography. 
Not pictured: John W. Coffman, Jr., publisher, Takoma Park Journal; Eugene 
Gunning, managing editor, Cumberland Times. 



College of ^=^==^=^= 

Business & Public 
Administration 

— Egbert F. Tingley 

Marine Corps Flyer 

Qualified as a carrier pilot after 
six landings abroad the light air- 
craft carrier USS Monterey in the Gulf 
of Mexico is Marine 2nd Lt. Jack B. 
Watson, who attended B & PA '48-'50, 
both inclusive. 
The landings completed a stringent 
schedule in military, 
academic, physical 
and flight training 
at the U. S. Naval 
Air Station, Pensa- 
cola, "The Annapolis 
of the Air." 

A course of in- 
struction in instru- 
ment flying at the 
Corry Field U. S. 
Naval Auxiliary Air 
Station at Pensa- 
Lt. Watson cola, Florida is his 

next step towards 
earning the coveted Navy "Wings of 
Gold." 

In Philadelphia 
Dr. Howard W. Wright, C.P.A., Pro- 
fessor of Accounting, spoke before the 
Philadelphia chapter of the Federal 
Government Accountants Association 
at the Poor Richard Club on January 7. 

B & PA Faculty Notes 

Dr. William Van Royen, Geography 
Department, has returned from a series 
of conferences in Ottawa with Canadian 
government bureaus and officials in con- 




nection with the preparation of Volume 
III of the "Atlas of the World's McGill 
University. 

Dr. Charles Y. Tu, Professor of 
Geography, initiated the Winter Ser- 
ies of public lectures of the Pratt Li- 
brary at Baltimore. The topic of his 
talk was: "Tension in Southeast Asia." 
Transportation Scholarship 

The third $500 scholarship which is 
available to a junior in the College of 
Business and Public Administration 
majoring in transportation with an in- 
terest in motor transportation has been 
established. Pilot Freight Carriers, 
Inc., of Winston-Salem, North Carolina, 
which operates through Maryland, has 
established this latest scholarship. 

The Davidson Transfer and Storage 
Co. of Baltimore and the Maryland 
Motor Truck Association also provide 
$500 scholarships. The course in Com- 
mercial Motor Transportation is taught 
by Dr. Charles A. Taff, who is the 
author of the textbook, Commercial 
Motor Transportation. 



Rhodes Scholarships 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, president of 
the University served on a committee 
which selected two candidates from 
the Maryland-D.C. area for Rhodes 
Scholarships to be awards for next 
year. 

Otto F. Kraushar, president of 
Goucher College, is chairman of the 
Maryland-District of Columbia selec- 
tion committee. Other members include 
Stanley K. Hornbeck, former ambassa- 
dor to the Netherlands; Ernest K. 
Lindley, chief of the Washington bur- 
eau of Newsweek, and Maj. Gen. James 
McCormack, Jr., Air Force director of 
research and development. 



Maryland 



NEWS FROM 

ALUMNI CLUBS 

Pittsburgh Alumni Meet 

Zero weather, icy roads and a recent 
snow failed to dampen alumni in- 
terest in a banquet at the University 
Club on February 4. The 4th annual 
gathering including Dean Geary Epp- 
ley, Coaches Jim Tatum, Jack Henne- 
mier and Ed Kinsler. Also present 
were Alumni President O. H. Saunders, 
W. W. Cobey, graduate manager of 
Athletics and Alumni Secretary Dave 
Brigham. 

Dean Eppley addressed the meeting, 
giving a detailed account of the devel- 
opment of the University and answer- 
ing many of the newspaper comments 
concerning the status of the institution. 
Coach Tatum introduced a number of 
the Maryland football stars from the 
area who are now on the Maryland 
team or playing professionally. 

In his annual report, Mr. Furtney 
pointed to the interest the University 
has demonstrated in the Pittsburgh 
club and reviewed the organization and 
functions of the club during its four 
years of activity. Special praise was 
given former Presidents Burt Eby, 
Gordon Kessler and Martin Brote- 
markle. The steering committee with 
these three as members and A. B. Fish- 
er, Jr., as Chairman, was called the 
motivating force in the organization 
with responsibility for establishing pol- 
icy and promoting activities. 



First Concert 

The University of Maryland Sym- 
phony Orchestra, newly organized, held 
its first concert of the year on January 
18, 1955 : . The program was presented 
in the auditorium of the Student Union 
Building. The orchestra was assisted 
by the University's Chapel Choir and 
the Men's Glee Club under the direction 
of Professor Fague Springman. 

In addition to performing several, 
well known overtures and symphonies 
the orchestra, under the direction of 
Bryce W. Jordan, assistant professor 
of music, accompanied the choral 
groups. 

Aids Boys Clubs 

Colonel Harvey L. Miller, Editor of 
University Publica- 
tions, has been re- 
appointed for the 
third year as chair- 
man of the Pro- 
gram Committee 
of the Metropoli- 
tan Polio Boys 
Clubs, D. C. in 
charge of the pro- 
gram of athletic 
and industrial arts 
and crafts activi- 
ties. He is a mem- 
ber of the MPBC's 
Board of Gover- 
nors as well as of the Executive Com- 
mittee. The clubs service close to 
28,000 boys. 




Col. Miller 



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38 



College ot 

Agriculture 

====== ^ = Dr. Howard L. Stier 

To New Mexico A & M 

Dr. Roger B. Corbett, former associ- 
ate Dean of Agriculture at Mary- 
land who, for the last six years, was 
agricultural counsel for the National 
Association of Food Chains, has been 
named president of the New Mexico 
College of Agriculture and Mechanic 
Arts, Las Cruces, New Mexico. 

Born 54 years ago at Morgantown, 
W. Va., Dr. Corbett attended Cornell 
where he received his bachelor of sci- 
ence degree in 1922, his master of sci- 
ence degree in 1923 and his doctorate 
of philosophy in 1925. He went to the 
Rhode Island Experiment Station in 
1925 and remained there until 1935. 

For a year and a half, he was with 
the Agriculture Department Extension 
Service. In 1937, he became director 
of extension for the University of 
Connecticut and in 1940 he was made 
dean of agriculture there. He came to 
Maryland that year as director of the 
Agricultural Experimental Station. He 
left Maryland in 1943 to serve four 
years as secretary-treasurer of the 
American Farm Bureau Federation in 
Chicago. In 1947 he returned to Mary- 
land. 

Shoemaker Testimonial 
More than 900 persons recently at- 
tended a testimonial dinner for Henry 
R. Shoemaker, '17, who has been Fred- 
erick County Farm Agent since 1926. 
A schoolmate and the Vice-President 
of the Alumni Council, J. Homer Rems- 
berg, was program chairman for the 
occasion. 

Mr. Shoemaker was presented a 21- 
inch television set and many tributes 
by the friends who had known him as 
an Agricultural teacher and Farm 
Agent. His response 
was, "If I had my 
life to live over, I 
would choose this 
same type of work 
—I love it." Mr. 
Shoemaker has long 
been recognized as a 
leader and a friend 
of both rural and 
urban people. The 
unique dinner was 
presented to a man 
who is continuing in 
an extremely active 
capacity with "His Folks" of Frederick 
County. 

The County Agent was referred to 
as quiet, efficient and popular. Mr. 
Remsberg said, "He has earned the 
love and respect of many thousands of 
people and his sincere personal inter- 
est in the development of both people 
and agriculture seem to strengthen as 
the years pass." 

Mr. Shoemaker was born in Ashton, 
Montgomery County and attended 
Sherwood High School at Sandy 
Spring. In addition to his B.S. degree 
from Maryland, he received his Mas- 




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ters degree in 1926. At Maryland, he 
was editor of the Diamondback, Associ- 
ate Editor of the Yearbook, was the 
first lecturer of the Student Grange 
and received the highest award for 
scholastic achievement in the Agricul- 
tural Department. 

Mr. Shoemaker served in World War 
I with the 79th division and saw action 
in the Montfacon and Argonne offen- 
sives. 

In 1946 in Chicago, he received from 
the National Association of County 
Agents, the first distinguished service 
award ever given a Maryland agent. In 
October of last year, he received the 
first full professorship ever awarded to 
field personnel of the Maryland Ex- 
tension Service of the University of 
Maryland. 

Community activities have included 
work with his Church and the Grange. 
He is past president of the Kiwanis 
Club and director of the Farmers and 
Mechanics Citizens National Bank. The 
Alumni Association joins in hearty con- 
gratulations to an outstanding alum- 
nus. 

Roadside Nursery 

A new company has been formed by 
J. Wilton Anderson, Agr. '52, and Bar- 
tow H. Bridges, Jr., Agr. '53. Mr. 
Bridges had served as an employee of 
the concern since his graduation and 
Mr. Anderson has just completed serv- 
ice as an Air Force Lieutenant in Lab- 
rador. In October, 1954, they joined 
forces to form the new owners of the 
Roadside Nursery Co., located at Vir- 
ginia Beach, Virginia. 

William R. Pole 

William R. Pole, Agr. '48, has sent 
word that his appointment as Con- 
troller of Merritt-Chapman & Scott 
of Cuba, Inc., has taken him to Havana, 
where he is engaged in the extension of 
the nickel processing facilities for the 
Cuban Nickel Company. This project 
is a joint venture with the Frederick 
Snare Corporation. 

Vegetable Irrigation 

Dr. Charles W. Reynolds of the 
horticulture department was one of 
six irrigation experts to discuss vege- 
table irrigation at the annual meet- 
ing of the Peninsula Horticultural So- 
ciety at Capital Grange Hall, Dover, 
Delaware. 

Others were A. Lee Towson, presi- 
dent of the Vegetable Growers Asso- 
ciation of America; E. M. Abbott, Jr., 
a farmer from Laurel, Del.; Walter 
Qibe, also a vegetable farmer, from 
Smyrna, Del.; Jame R. Dodson, an 
irrigation engineer with one of the na- 
tion's leading chemical companies; and 
D. J. Fieldhouse of the University of 
Delaware. 

Dr. Reynolds described irrigation 
tests on tomatoes, white potatoes, snap 
beans and cucumbers. 

Beef Producers Elect 

The election of a board of directors 
was the main item of business at the 
first annual meeting of the Maryland 
Beef Cattle Producers, Inc., held at 
West Friendship. 

Amos R. Meyer, livestock marketing 
specialist in the University's depart- 
ment of markets, announced results of 
the election. 



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C. Engel's Sons 

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Officers of the board are Irvin 0. 
Wolf, Westminster, president; Fred C. 
Downey, Williamsport, vice-president; 
and Hershel H. Allen, Jr., Phoenix, 
secretary-treasurer. 

Other members of the nine-man 
board are William A. Davidson, Bowie; 
Fred Ernst, Clearspring; Thomas S. 
Gordon, Westminster; Arthur Mac- 
Arthur, Port Deposit, William E. 
Powel, Ellicott City; Arthur B. Ship- 
ley, Sykesville. 

With two exceptions all of these 
men were elected to offices which they 
have filled since the organization was 
created in January, 1954. At that time, 
the board of directors was appointed 
to serve until the organization was 
registered with the state tax commis- 
sion of Maryland. 

At Hancock 

Dr. Benjamin L. Rogers has been ap- 
pointed extension assistant horticultur- 
ist at the University of Maryland Fruit 
Experimental Laboratory at Hancock. 
The appointment was announced by 
Dr. James W. Gwin, director of ex- 
tension. Dr. Rogers received his doc- 
tor's degree from Maryland in 1950. 
Since then he has been with the De- 
partment of Agriculture's fruit labora- 
tory at Wenatchee, Wash. 

Dr. Rogers succeds C. O. Dunbar, 
who died in May, and who was widely 
known for his service to fruit growers 
of the State. 

Dr. Rogers is a native of Roebuck, 
S.C., and received his bachelor's degree 
from Clemson College in 1943. He then 
spent three years in the Navy where 
he was cited for outstanding service. 

He came to the University of Mary- 
land in 1947 as a graduate assistant 
in horticulture. 

His work at Wenatchee with chemi- 
cal thinning, nutrition and other phases 
of tree fruit research is considered 
outstanding. 

"We feel extremely fortunate in 
securing a man of Dr. Rogers's train- 
ing and experience for this position," 
Dr. I. C. Haut, head of the university 
horticultural department, said. 

"It will assure continuance of the 
high quality of the trained guidance 
and assistance to the Maryland fruit 
industry so ably carried on by the late 
Mr. Dunbar, Dr. Haut added. 




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ASPHALT INSTITUTE 



Headquarters staff of the Asphalt Institute has been transferred 
from New York City to the University's College Park campus as new 
building is commissioned. 



Glenn L. Martin — 

College of 

Engineering & 
Aeronautical Sciences 



Col. 0. H. Saunders 10 
- A. Lawrence Guess '51 



Asphalt Institute 

Executive offices and laboratories of 
the Asphalt Institute have moved 
from New York to the University cam- 
pus. 

In an announcement of the change, 
Institute President J. E. Buchanan said 
it permits expansion of its research 
and engineering operations and pro- 
vides larger and more modern facilities. 

The new national headquarters at 
College Park also is more convenient 
to Government agencies and other in- 
terested groups situated in Washing- 
ton. 

"After 35 years with headquarters in 
New York," said Mr. Buchanan, "the 
move to Maryland represents a major 
change in institute operations and one 
with the promise of handsome returns 
in efficiency, research and development, 
improved liaison and general effective- 
ness." 

Among other things, he said, the in- 
stitute has four acres of ground for 
outside testing — something not possible 
under New York conditions. 

Mr. Buchanan said the institute will 
work in concert with University labora- 
tories, libraries and the engineering 
faculty. The institute staff will enjoy 
faculty privileges. 

The executive offices and laboratories 
of the institute occupy a new building, 
constructed especially for it and leased 
to it by the university. It is one of the 
Glenn L. Martin Institute of Tech- 
nology group. 

The Asphalt Institute is an interna- 
tional non-profit association supported 
by companies that produce and refine 
asphalt products. It is described as 
the trade association and spokesman 
for the asphalt industry, serving pro- 
ducers and users of asphaltic materials. 
It was organized in 1919. 



"No other organization carries on the 
same kind of promotional effort," said 
Mr. Buchanan, "nor does the institute 
overlap in its activities the work of 
any other organization. Its entire func- 
tion is to represent a unified asphalt 
industry in its assumption of leader- 
ship in highway construction and other 
related fields for the benefit of the in- 
dustry itself, and for the public good." 

Mr. Buchanan said the institute staff 
at College Park will be expanded to 
enable it to move ahead quickly with 
its enlarged research program. 

Concurrent with the transfer, the in- 
stitute's division office in Washington 
was closed and a new office, known as 
the Atlantic-Gulf Division office, was 
opened. 

Personnel transferred to College 
Park from New York includes Mr. 
Buchanan, Chief Engineer A. S. Well, 
born, J. M. Griffith, research engineer; 
R. C. Dressner, acting director of in- 
formation; C. A. Mayer, office engineer, 
and J. E. Hittle, assistant research 
engineer. 

In Pennsylvania 

Malcolm Hickox, (B.S. of E.E., '27), 
of 601 Lenox Avenue, Pittsburgh 21, 
Pa., is Air Conditioning Design Engi- 
neer for G. C. Murphy Co., of Mc- 
Keesport, Pa. During the period of 
December 1942 to November 1945, 
Hickox was in the Navy and held 
the rank of Lieutenant Commander. 
During part of that period he taught 
Diesel Engineering at the Naval Diesel 
Unit at Cornell University, Ithica, 
N. Y. He is a member of A.S.H., V.E., 
and a registered professional engineer 
in Pennsylvania. 

Hickox and his wife, Louise Wild- 
man Hickox, have two children, Miss 
Evelyn Louise and Richard Malcolm. 

Mr. Hickox has been a regular sub- 
scriber to the magazine "Maryland" 
for the past several years, since 1947. 
With U. S. Navy 

Horace R. Higgins, (B.S. of M.E., 
'33), who resides at 5811 Potomac 
Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C., is an 
Industrial Specialist with the U.S. 
Navy Department. Previous to his 
present connection he has been Head 
Statistician of the U. S. Navy Depart- 
ment and of the Veterans Administra- 
tion and also a Mechanical Engineer 
with the National Bureau of Standards. 



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41 



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Higgins served with the Ordnance 
Department as a Lieutenant Colonel 
during the period of 1940 to 1946, and 
saw service in the Far East and Philip- 
pines. 

Higgins and his wife, Mrs. M. Vir- 
ginia Eby Higgins have one charming 
little daughter, Jeanette Lucille, two 
years of age, having been born 19 
April, 1953. 

Higgins is Past President of the 
Washington Chapter of the Society of 
Automotive Engineers, and is an active 
32° Mason and Shriner. 

Colonel Higgins has been a regular 
subscriber of the magazine "Maryland" 
since 1948. 

In Florida 

William B. Hill, (B.S. of C.E., '24), 
whose home address is 39 Fullerwood 
Drive, Saint Augustine, Florida, is 
Construction Engineer for the Florida 
East Coast Railway Co. 

Since graduation, Mr. Hill has been 
with various Contracting Firms and 
in private contracting business as well 
as in Federal Government Service. 

His military service covers a period 
of 12 years during which time he 
attained the rank of Colonel and saw 
service in the Ryukus and in Japan, 
and was awarded the Bronze Star. 

Hill is a member of the American 
Society of Civil Engineers, and several 
other professional organizations, and 
also belongs to the American Legion 
and is a Vestryman of his church. 

Mr. Hill and his wife, Mrs. Louise 
Zantzinger Hill have three teen aged 
children. 

The Alumni records show that Hill 
has been a regular subscriber to the 
magazine "Maryland" since October, 
1950. 

In California 

Charles Fiske Hochgesang, (B.S. of 
E.E., '43), of 255 Buckingham Way, 
San Francisco 27, California, is a 
Project Electrical Engineer with the 
Bechtel Corporation of San Francisco. 
Previously he has been with the 
General Electric Co.; the Kelley Corp.; 
and Carbide and Carbon Chemicals 
Corp. 

Hochgesang is married, his wife 
being Mrs. Jean H. Hochgesang. 
With U. S. Air Force 

Lawrence J. Hodgins, Jr., (B.S. of 
C.E., '41), whose last reported address 
was 3576th Pilot Training Squadron, 
Vance Air Force Base, Oklahoma, is 
a regular officer with the U. S. Air 
Force, and has served as Operations 
Officer of the 3576th Pilot Training 
Squadron. From June, 1941 to Febru- 
ary, 1942, Hodgins was a Junior Engi- 
neer with the U. S. Engineers in the 
Pittsburgh District. 

Major Hodgins served in Brazil in 
1946 and 1947. His most recent over- 
seas service was for 2V 2 years from 
June '50 to Jan. '53 in the Azores 
with the Military Air Transport Ser- 
vice. During World War II he was 
in the European Theater of Operations 
from October 1943 to January 1945, 
and was decorated with the Silver 
Star and the Distinguished Flying 
Cross, and his Air Medal has 17 clasps. 
His service in World War II was 
with the 9th Air Force, 362nd Fighter 
Group. 



42 



Maryland 



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He and his wife, Mrs. Carrie Mc- 
Dougald Hodgins, have no children. 

Hodgins is a member of Phi Delta 
Theta Fraternity and a Junior member 
of the American Society of Civil Engi- 
neers. 

Hodgins has been a subscriber to 
the magazine " Maryland" in the past 
and his father, Prof. L. J. Hodgins, 
long time member of the Engineering 
faculty of this University, has just 
renewed his subscription for him. 
In New Jersey 

M. H. Howard, (B. S. of M.E., '24), 
of 425 Birch Avenue, Westfield, New 
Jersey, is Executive Engineer of the 
Equipment Division of Foster Wheeler 
Corp., 165 Broadway, New York 6, 
N. Y. Starting with August 18, 1924, 
Mr. Howard has continued with the 
same company to the present, and has 
held several positions with them, among 
which are Assistant Manager of the 
Construction Department prior to June, 
1945, and Manager of the Service De- 
partment from the above date to 
January, 1953, since which time he nas 
held his present position. 

Mr. Howard and his wife, Mrs. Jessie 
Kentzler Howard have two grown 
children — Marita F. Howard and Mar- 
shall H. Howard. 

Howard has held memberships in 
Sigma Nu; President of Phi Mu Local 
later Tau Beta Pi; Phi Kappa Phi: and 
A.S.M.E. 

In 1950 he published Paper No. 
49-A-118 entitled Furnace Heat Ab- 
sorption in P.C.F. Steam Generator 
Using Turbulent Burners which ap- 
peared in A.S.M.E. Transactions of 
October, 1950, Vol. 7, No. 7. 

Howard has been a regular sub- 
scriber to the "Maryland" magazine 
for the past seven years. 
In Baltimore 

Louis K. Hennikhausen, (B.S. of 
M.E., '40), residing at 1811 Rushley 
Road, Baltimore 34, Maryland, is Senior 
Weight Engineer for the Gleen L. 
Martin Co. 

He and his wife, Mrs. Ida Belle 
Hennighausen have two daughters — 
Janet Lee, 7 years of age and Nancy 
Covel, three years of age. 

Hennighausen saw service in Central 
Europe and held the rank of Lieutenent 
Colonel in World War II, and earned 
the Combat Infantry Badge, and also 
the Bronze Star with oak leaf cluster. 
He wears the American Defense rib- 
bon; the E.T.O. ribbon; the Pearl 
Harbor ribbon; and also the German 
Occupation ribbon. 

He is Past Chairman of the Balti- 
more Chapter of the Society of Ameri- 
can Weight Engineers; Vice President 
of the Pyramid Building & Loan Asso- 
ciation; and Commanding Officer of 
the 318th Infantry Reserve Regiment. 

We cannot find that he has been 
a subscriber to the magazine, "Mary- 
land." 

At Thurmont, Md. 

H. Lloyd Hoke, (B.S. of E.E., '32), 
of Thurmont, Maryland, is owner of 
Hoke Wood Products Co., manufactur- 
ing furniture at Thurmont. 

After graduation, Mr. Hoke was a 
General Motors Engineer; a sales engi- 
neer and sales manager with Firestone 



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Tire & Rubber Company, and also spent 
five years with the U. S. Signal Corps 
working on Radar development. All 
of his military service was spent in the 
United States. 

Hoke is married, his wife was Miss 
Clara May Hill of Memphis, Tenn., 
and they have four children, namely — 
Ronnie, 12 years old; Nancy, 9 years 
old; Peggy, 7 years old; and Suzan 
3 years old. 

Mr. Hoke is a member of the Lions 
Club; Forest Products Research So- 
ciety; and other organizations and 
associations of his community. Mr. 
Hoke is not at present one of the 
subscribers to the magazine "Mary- 
land." 

In Tennessee 

Addison E. Hook, (B.S. of C.E., '25), 
whose address is 12 Maplehurst Park, 
Knoxville 16, Tenn., is now self-em- 
ployed in civil engineering work. Mr. 
Hook, after his graduation from the 
University has held positions of Field 
Engineer for J. E. Greiner Co.; Engi- 
neer for Parson, Klopp, Brinckeroff & 
Douglass; Cost Engineer for the 
Arundel Corp.; and Assistant Chief 
Estimator for the Tennessee Valley 
Authority. 

In 1937, Mr. Hook received the de- 
gree of L.L.B., from the John R. Neal 
College of Law. 

He and his wife, Mrs. Nancy Hale 
have a young daughter, Lydia Alice, 
three years of age. 

Hook is a member of the American 
Society of Civil Engineers; the Ten- 
nessee Society of Professional Engi- 
neers; and is Treasurer of the Knox- 
ville Technical Society. 

During World War II he was a 
Field Director with the American Red 
Cross in the Philippines. We cannot 
find that he has been a subscriber to 
our magazine, "Maryland." 

Trophy Honors Bowen 

Dr. S. S. Steinberg, Dean presented 
a trophy to the University at an as- 
sembly program, honoring Gait S. 
Bowen, an engineering student. 

The trophy was presented to the 
school as a result of honors won by 
young Bowen in the 1954 Fisher Body 
Craftsman's Guild model car competi- 
tion. 

He received first place in the senior 
age division for the state and then 
scored first place for the region com- 
prising West Virginia, Virginia and 
Washington, D.C. 

Young Bowen was one of 20 senior 
division winners to be given an ex- 
pense-free trip to the Craftsman's 
Guild convention in Detroit where his 
model car competed for national 
honors. 

The Fisher Body program is designed 
to interest boys in fine craftsmanship 
and to drill them in its practice by 
means of model-building competitions 
in which generous cash awards and 
university scholarships to national 
winners serve as powerful incentives. 

Faculty Notes 
Professors Charles A. Shreeve, Jr., 
Morris S. Ojalvo, and Ralph H. Long, 
Jr., College of Engineering, attended 



the Annual Meeting of the American 
Society of Mechanical Engineers in 
New York. Dr. Long presented a 
paper on "Experimental and Theoreti- 
cal Study of Transverse Vibration of 
a Tube Containing a Flowing Liquid." 

At Langley Field 

Edward L. Hoffman, (B.S. of M.E. 
Aero., '44), of 418 Seminole Road, 
Hampton, Virginia is now an Aero- 
nautical Research Scientist at N.A.C.A.,j 
Langley Field, Va. 

He and his wife, Mrs. Mae H. Hoff- 
man, have a daughter, Barbara L.,i 
seven years of age. 

We hope to welcome Mr. Hoffmanj 
as a subscriber to the magazine "Mary-' 
land." 

In New York 

The University's Fire Extension 
Service was represented by Robert C. 
Byrus, director of the service, at meet-i 
ings of committees of the National, 
Fire Protecting Association held in 
the Belmont Plaza Hotel, New York; 
City. 

Director Byrus served as chairman 
of a sub-committe to develop standards 
and specifications of fire extinguishers 
for installation in aircraft. Additional- 
ly he reported on the fog nozzle studies 
conducted at the University last fall. 
He also served as a member of a com- 
mittee to develop standards for train- 
ing aircraft rescue and fire fighting 
personnel. 

Aeronautical Engineering Dept. 

Professor Rivello of the Aeronauti- 
cal Engineering Dept. presented a 
paper on "Aircraft Structural Prob- 
lems Resulting grom Aerodynamic 
Heating" at a meeting of the Applied 
Mechanics and Machine Design Di- 
vision of the Washington Chapter of 
the American Society of Mechanical 
Engineers. The meeting was held in 
the Engineering Building at the Uni- 
versity. Following the meeting, the 
group toured the wind tunnel facilities. 
The Aeronautical Engineering seniors 
recently made tours of the Fairchild 
Aricraft Company in Hagerstown, Md., 
and of the Glenn L. Martin Co. in Bal- 
timore. These tours are now an intri- 
cate part of the course in Airplane 
Fabrication. 

Civil Engineering Dept. 

Professor Russell Allen was recent- 
ly elected for the 7th term as treas- 
urer of the National Society for Pro- 
fessional Engineers. Professor Allen 
has also been appointed to a team that 
will inspect the College of Engineer- 
ing at Howard University prior to the 
granting of a Tau Beta Pi charter to 
this school. 

Student Societies 

A joint meeting of all the student 
societies was held in the College of 
Engineering Classroom Building. The 
group was addressed by J. W. Gore, 
president of the National Council of 
State Boards of Engineering Exam- 
iners. Mr. Gore spoke on "Registration 
and the Engineering Profession," em- 
phasizing the importance of registering 
as soon as possible after graduation. 
Approximately 60 students were pres- 
ent at this meeting. 



44 



Maryland 



A joint meeting of the A.S.M.E. and 
the I.A.S. student branches was held 
at the Naval Ordnance Laboratory. 
The program for the meeting consisted 
of inspection, demonstration and ex- 
planation of the Naval Ordnance Lab- 
oratory supersonic wind tunnel, hyper- 
sonic wind tunnel, ballistics range and 
shock tube wind tunnel. 

The A.S.M.E. held their mid-year 
election for new officers. The slate for 
the next year is as follows: 

President, Fred Wybenga; Vice- 
President, Jack Goeller; Secretary, Joe 
Workman; Treasurer, Walter Whaley. 
Road Engineers Course 

Dean S. S. Steinberg has been in- 
strumental in establishing a course for 
road engineers in the College of Special 
and Continuation Studies. The course 
is set up as a means to supplement a 
shortage of graduate highway engi- 
neers. The training will cover a three 
year period and upon completion of the 
curriculum the highway personnel stu- 
dents taking the course will be given 
credit equivalent to one year of college. 
Address By The Dean 

Dean S. S. Steinberg addressed the 
5th annual Congress on the Carribean 
which met at the University of Florida. 
Dean Steinberg presented a paper on 
"Engineering Education in the Carri- 
bean," which is considered to include 
Mexico, Central America, Columbia, 
Venezuela, the Republic of the West 
Indies, and the Colonial Mainland and 
Island Territories. 

February Graduation 

The College of Engineering expects 
to graduate 26 undergraduate students 
in February. Included in this group 
are 1 Aeronautical Engineer, 15 Civil 
Engineers, 1 Chemical Engineer, 2 
Electrical Engineers, and 7 Mechanical 
Engineers. 

Redecoration Of The Engineering 
Classroom Building 

The interior of the Engineering 
Classroom Building is in the process of 
being repainted. The walls are being 
painted a light green which should 
blend nicely with the green blackboards 
in the classrooms. 

News Of Alumni 

Fred C. Philpitt '47, spent three 
years as a patent examiner after grad- 
uation in the U. S. Patent Office. He 
left the patent office in 1950 as a 
registered patent attorney (due to 
three years of night law school at 
G. W.) and went to work for the At- 
lantic Refining Company at Phila- 
delphia. Several months ago, he left 
the Atlantic Company and opened his 
own office in Washington, D. C. for the 
practice of patent law. He is still 
single and now lives at 4722 48th St., 
N.W., Washington 16, D. C. 

Addresses Engineers 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, president of 
the University, was the principal 
speaker at a meeting of the American 
Society for Engineering Education. 
The subject of his address was "Uni- 
versity-Industry Relations." 

The program was held in the class- 
room building of the Glenn L. Martin 
Institute of Technology. 

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Engineering Education are Catholic 
University, George Washington, Johns 
Hopkins, Howard University, U. S. 
Naval Academy and Maryland. 

Winter Meeting 

The winter meeting of the Engineer- 
ing Alumnae Board was held on Janu- 
ary 31, 1955 at the University of Mary- 
land Dining Hall. Present at the meet- 
ing were Dean S. S. Steinberg, C. A. 
Warthen, J. C. Deckman, Chester 
Ward, O. H. Saunders, Dave Brigham, 
John Dye, and Larry Guess. The Board 
discussed plans and preparations for 
the Glenn L. Martin Institute of Tech- 
nology dedication ceremony to be held 
on March 25th. The dedication cere- 
mony promises to be a very impressive 
affair at which many outstanding peo- 
ple in the engineering profession will 
be present. 

The Job Opportunity Committee sub- 
mitted a plan for handling the many 
requests for jobs that are available for 
Maryland engineering graduates. The 
Dean informed the group of several 
industrial scholarship plans and also 
presented some advanced information 
on several aeronautical courses that 
are to be offered at the Fairchild Air- 
craft Company. 

Belvoir Course 

Pvt. Robert G. Schwartz, (Engr. '54) 
graduated from the Army's Engineer 
School at Fort Belvoir, Va., after com- 
pleting the engineer equipment main- 
tenance course. He completed basic 
training at Camp Gordon, Ga. 

William Johnson 

William Johnson, Engr. '36, is now 
playing in the current Broadway hit, 
Kismet, after having spent some ten 
years touring England where he 
starred in such hits as "Annie Get Your 
Gun" and "Kiss Me Kate." Some of 
his previous appearances here were 
"Something For The Boys" and "Banjo 
Eyes." 

While studying engineering at Mary- 
land, he became a popular crooner with 
the college band and from there he 
climbed the ladder of success to New 
York where he found a future in the 
entertainment world. His first appear- 
ance on Broadway was in "Two For 
The Show" after which he starred in 
two Hollywood films, "Keep Your Pow- 
der Dry" and "It's A Pleasure." Mr. 
Johnson's great success in London, is 
topped by the fact that during the 
Korean War, the British War Office 
requested him to entertain British- 
American troops, serving in that area. 

John A. Russell 

John A. Russell, Jr., Engr. '51, is now 
an Associate Development Engineer 
with the Oak Ridge National Labora- 
tory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. 

Richard M. Jansson 

Richard M. Jansson, Engr. '54, has 
been employed as a junior engineer in 
the Armament Radar Engineering De- 
partment of the Sperry Gyroscope 
Company, in Great Neck, New York. 
Mr. Jansson was employed by this 
Corporation following his graduation in 
June, 1954, and is a member of the 
A.S.M.E. 



46 



Maryland 




By Clay Keene B&uiaid 




Baker — Small 

Rosalind Jane Small, Nursing, to 
Frank J. Baker. 

Beckwith — Pardoe 
Both Maryland alumnus, Salley Jane 
Pardoe, to Richard Allen Beckwith. 
Bjorklund — Jones 
Thelma Jones, Nursing, to B. J. 
Bjorklund. 

Bowie — Brown 
Both Maryland alumni, Patricia Hur- 
ley Brown to Benjamin H. C. Bowie, 
3rd. 

Brande — Scherrer 
Shirley Mae Scherrer to Fletcher R. 
Brande, Maryland alumnus. 
Brothers — Keane 
Mary Anne Keane, B.S., Georgetown 
School of Nursing and alumna of Holy 
Cross Academy, to Donald W. Brothers, 
Army veteran and Maryland alumnus. 
Cooper — Tiffany 
Joan Kay Tiffany to Jack Winton 
Cooper, Maryland alumnus. 

Enterline — Sandbower 
Both Maryland students, Jo Anne 
Sandbower to Robert Heistand Enter- 
line. 

Donofrio — Richardson 
Nancy Jane Richardson to Lieuten- 
ant Harold C. Donofrio, (Phys. Ed. 
'51), Korea veterans and member of 
the varsity boxing team, '46 and '47. 
Galloway — Van Doren 
Margaret Virginia Galloway to Ches- 
ter Arthur Van Doren, in Ridgewood, 
New Jersey. Maggie is a Maryland 
alumnus, class of '51, member of Kap- 
pa, Kappa Gamma and Chet is an alum- 
nus of Colgate University. 
Gostisha — Roach 
Major Rowena Roach, A.N.C., Nurs- 
ing, to Franz Gostisha. 

Ha mm — Widman 
Elaine Grace Widman, Nursing, to 
Edward L. Hamm. 

Horn — Wong 
Florence Wong, Nursing, to Edward 
Wilson Horn. 

Kramer — Ziemak 
Theresa Christine Ziemak, Maryland 
student, to Dr. Howard Calvin Kramer, 
Maryland Medical School graduate. 
Mackenzie — Patrick 
Kathleen E. Patrick, Maryland (Ed.) 
senior, daughter of Professor Arthur 
S. Patrick, (B & PA) to Lieut. James 
S. Mackenzie, Jr., Maryland graduate 
(Engr. '54) now on duty at the Air 
Force Academy, Colorado Springs. The 
wedding took place in the Memorial 
Chapel. 

Merrill — Rawley 
Jane Louise Rawley, graduate of 
University of Pennsylvania School of 



Nursing, to John H. Merrill, Maryland 
senior. 

Potter — Dodson 
Jane Elizabebth Dodson and Donald 
R. Potter, both Maryland alumni. 
Pusey — Fitzgerald 
Emily Webster Fitzgerald, Nursing, 
to Clarence E. Pusey. 

Raabe — Baker 
Both Maryland graduates, Mary 
Edith Baker, Home Economics, to Lt. 
Charles T. Raabe, Engineering. 
Speers — Swint 
Katherine Virginia Swint, Nursing, 
to Herbert K. Speers. 

Smith — Houlton 
Both Maryland students, Beverly 
Stuart Houlton to Royd R. Smith, Mr. 
Smith was a member of the boxing 
team. 

Thorup— Stovall 
Shirley Shawn Stovall, Maryland 
graduate, to Ken D. Thorup, Virginia 
graduate, Marine Corps veteran of 
Korea. 

Townsend — Gardner 
Both Maryland alumni, Suzanne Gard- 
ner to Joseph Botaman Townsend. 
Valentine — Winks 
Helen Winnifred Winks, Nursing 
graduate, to Thomas Wright Valentine. 
White — Pester 
Lois Pester, Maryland graduate, to 
Lt. Gus Barrett White, 3d. 
Wolcott— Trostle 
Daiiena Trostle, Nursing, to Kenneth 
W. Wolcott. 




SY BITSY 

RQPlNKKv 




Nursing School Babies 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter B. Morgan, a 
son, Melvin Sanford, on June 3, 
1953. And a son, John Henry, on July 
31, 1954. Mrs. Morgan was Arra Burn- 
ette, '33. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Kline, a daug- 
ter, Debra Sue, on October 1, 1954, who 
has a sister, who will be two years 
old on April 18, 1955. Mrs. Kline was 
Janet Eyster, '52. 

Mr. and Mrs. William C. Wroe, a 
son, Tracy, on August 12, 1954. Mrs. 
Wroe was Edith Ellen Viereck, '50. 

Mr. and Mrs. Owen Wood, a son, 
December 31, 1954. Mrs. Wood gradu- 
ated in 1953. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence H. Ey, a son, 
David Danaher, on January 7, 1955. 
Mrs. Ey was Thelma N. Hause, '47. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Besett, Jr., 
a daughter, Mary Colleen. Mrs. Besett 
was Mary Catherine Byrnes, 1946. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Durney, 
a son, Thomas Edward. Mrs. Durney 
was Lillie F. Porter, 1951. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Edward 
Larsen, a son, Lawrence Michel. Mrs. 
Larsen was Rita D. Schwinger, 1943. 



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To Mr. and Mrs. Edward Joseph Di 
Carlo, a daughter. Mrs. DiCarlo was 
Dorothy E. Koerner, 1949. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Michael 
Litrenta, a son, Ernest Michael, Jr. 
Mrs. Litrenta was Gilda Iruretagoyena, 
1949. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Wm. W. Roemer, 
a son, Paul Craig. Mrs. Roemer was. 
Joan M. Seiders, 1949. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur D. Bough- 
ter, a daughter, Barbara Allen. Mrs. 
Boughter was Dorothy Ellen Studley, 
1947. 

To Dr. and Mrs. John Phillip White, 
II, a daughter, Susan Ethel. Mrs. 
Geraldine Kilbv White was in the Class 
1952. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Paul D. McCoy, a 
son, Donald Wilson. Mrs. McCoy was 
Joanne Wilson, 1951. 

To Major and Mrs. George W. Flag- 
er, a daughter, Nancy Elsie, in Heidel- 
berg, Germany. (This makes two 
daughters and two sons). Mrs. Flager 
was Ingrid E. Selkamaa, 1938. 
"Here's Roni Ann!" 

Dr. and Mrs. N. Jerome Chapin 
(D.D.S. '52), are pleased to announce 
the arrival of their daughter, Roni 
Ann, on Friday, November 12, 1954. 
Nancy's Baby 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Robert De- 
Stefano, 1953 a son, William Chester. 
Mrs. De Stefano was Nancy Harrison, 
1954. 




Ball — Burns 

Nancy Elizabeth Ball to Bernard 
Norcum Burns, Maryland alum- 
nus. 

Bicknell— Mitchell 
Beverly Ann Bicknell, George Wash- 
ington graduate to Lloyd G. Mitchell, 
Maryland graduate. 

Bird — Riede 
Both Maryland students, Elinor Lea 
Bird to Philip James Riede. 
Blair — Copeland 
Ernestine Blair, Letcher, Ky., to 
Charles R. Copeland, Maryland senior. 
Bogat — Norton 
Iris Leona Bogat, Maryland alumna, 
to Gerald Lewis Norton, student Mary- 
land School of Pharmacy. He is a mem- 
ber of Phi Alpha Fraternity. 
Bokey — Everett 
Both Maryland students, Mary Eliza- 
beth Bokey to Donald Allen Everett. 
She is a member of Delta Gamma So- 
rority and he a member of Phi Kappa 
Tau Fraternity and Arnold Air Society. 
Booth — Porter 
Both Maryland students, Louise 
Tilghman Booth to Rodger MacLain 
Porter. 

Bost — Croyle 
Barbara Anne Bost, Maryland stu- 
dent, to James Robert Croyle. 
Bowie — Gray 
Both Maryland alumni, Beverly Ann 
Bowie to James Gustavus Gray, III. 
Brotman — Jolles 
Frances Brotman to Gabriel Jolles, 
Maryland student. 

Briley — Stewart 
Patsy Louise Briley to Theodore R. 



48 



Maryland 



Stewart; both Maryland students. 
Burkina — Engel 
Ethel Virginia Burkins to Henry 
Charles Engel, Jr., student, Maryland 
School of Law. Mr. Engel is a member 
of Phi Delta Theta and Gamma Eta 
Gamma Legal Fraternity. 
By gate — Ryan 
Judith Ann Bygate, Maryland stu- 
dent, to James Richard Ryan. 
Carroll — Riggleman 
Both Maryland students, Gloria Ruth 
Carroll to James Dale Riggleman. 
Clagett — Checkering 
Both Maryland graduates, Shirley 
Clagett to Lieut. David C. Chickering. 
Cohen — Brodie 
Jackee Sue Cohen to David Don 
Brodie, Maryland Law School student. 
Coppel — Kruger 
Mollee Coppel, Maryland graduate, 
Motor Board and Pi Delta Epsilon 
(journalism) to Dr. Jerome Kruger, 
Georgia Tech and University of Vir- 
ginia (Ph.D.) graduate; Phi Eta Sigma, 
Tau Beta Pi, Alpha Epsilon Pi, now at 
Naval Research Laboratory, White 
Oaks. 

Cullen — Daniel 
Mary Elizabeth Cullen to Lucius F. 
Daniel, Maryland '54. 

Corbin — Estes 
Virginia Lea Corbin to Lieut. Fred- 
eric D. Estes, U.S.A.F., Maryland grad- 
uate. 

Curtis — Brooks 
Patricia Ruth Curtis, Maryland 
alumna, to Ronald John Brooks, Mary- 
land graduate. 

Essex — Camp 
Both Maryland students, Ann Carol 
Essex to Ronald Camp. 

Freedman — Schiff 
Beverlee Freedman, Maryland stu- 
dent, to Walter Leo Schiff. 
Freer — Love 
Helen Elizabeth Freer to Robert 
Alden Love, Maryland student. 
Feldman — Freedman 
Barbara Rhona Feldman, Maryland 
alumna, to James Alan Freedman. 
Gleiman — Bressler 
Carolyn Harriet Gleiman to Eli Leon 
Bressler, student, Maryland School of 
Pharmacy. 

Golberg — Sweren 
Audrey Sandra Golberg, Maryland 
student, to Ellwood Lionel Sweren. 
Goldstein — Simons 
Etta Harriet Goldstein, Maryland 
student, to Lt. Benton Richard Simons, 
U.S.M.C. 

Grove — Jackson 
Jane Ann Grove to Glenn Robert 
Jackson, Maryland alumnus. 
Halpert — Berman 
Mala Halpert to Fred S. Berman, 
Maryland student. 

Harter — Zanner 
Barbara Alice Harter to Albert Wil- 
liam Zanner, Jr., School of Dentistry 
student. 

Horst — Smith 
Mary Jane Horst, Mount St. Agnes 
alumna, to William Zile Smith, Mary- 
land alumnus. 

Hodgson — Whaley 
Eleanor Ruth Hodgson, Maryland 
alumna and faculty member, to William 
R. Whaley, Navy veteran, Maryland 
senior, formerly at Vanderbilt. 



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MONUMENT and FORREST STREETS 
Phone MU 5-8400 Baltimore, Md. 



Houlton — Smith 

Beverly Houlton to Royd Raymond 
Smith, Maryland student. Mr. Smith is 
a member of the University's boxing 
team. 

Howenstine — Hottel 
Mary Lee Howenstine, Maryland stu- 
dent, to Robert R. Hottel. 
Hunt — Dodge 
Barbara Standish Hunt to David 
Walbridge Dodge, Maryland alumnus. 
Hutcheson — Werth 
Evelyn Hutcheson, Maryland student, 
to Matthew Fontaine Maury Werth, Jr. 
Kurcias — Rosenbach 
Joan Beryl Kurcias to Hans Rosen- 
bach, graduate of Maryland School of 
Pharmacy. Mr. Rosenbach is a mem- 
ber of Phi Chi and Alpha Zeta Omega. 
Leonard — Smith 
Patricia Jean Leonard to Mason 
Paul Smith, Maryland graduate. 
Lipsitz — Butler 
Marlene Lipsitz to H. Carl Butler, 
Maryland School of Law graduate. 
Lodge— Thiele 
Helen Gale Lodge to George H. 
Thiele, Maryland alumnus. 

Longfellow — Hearn 
Mary Alice Longfellow, senior in 
Home Economics Delta Gamma, to 
B. Carter Hearn, Jr., Wesleyan (Conn.) 
alumnus, grad student at Johns Hop- 
kins, Delta Tau Delta. 

Loux — Myers 
Shirley Jane Loux to William F. 
Myers, Maryland student. 

Mathews — Levier 
Nancy Helen Mathews, Baltimore 
Junior College alumna, to Vernon A. 
Levier, Maryland senior. 

Mayhew — Skubitz 
Betty Jane Mayhew, secretary to 
Senator Wm. F. Knowland, to Daw J. 
Skubitz, Maryland graduate. 
McLaury — Kline 
Ann McLaury, Maryland alumna, to 
William Merle Kline, Jr., Maryland 
student. 

Menadier — Cromwell 
Mary Menadier, senior, Albertus 
Magnus College, to M. Jenkins Crom- . 
well, attending the School of Law. He 
is a Yale graduate and Navy veteran. 
Mitchell — Pearce 
Elizabeth Towner Mitchell to Wil- 
bur Brown Pearce, Maryland alumnus 
and member of Kappa Alpha fratern- 
ity. 

Neville — Williams 
Both Maryland graduates, Mary 
Frances Neville to Edward W. Wil- 
liams. 

Norris — Benson 
Annie Mae Norris to Edward Everett 
Benson, Maryland alumnus. 
O'Briant — Elkins 
Nancy Carolyn O'Briant to William 
Henry Elkins, Maryland alumnus. 
O'Brien — Baylor 
Susan O'Brien, Miami (Ohio) stu- 
dent, to Robert Baylor, alumnus of 
Maryland's Glenn L. Martin College of 
Engineering. 

O'Connell — Kilbourne 
Carolyn O'Connell, S.M.U. graduate, 
to Walter H. Kilbourne, Jr., Maryland 
alumnus, World War II Navy veteran 
and Korea Army veteran. 

O'Hagen — Henderson 
Patricia Carlene O'Hagen, Maryland 



alumna, to Ronald L. Henderson, Mary- 
land senior. 

Orr — Elmore 
Both Maryland students, Patricia 
Ann Orr to John S. Elmore. 
Pruyne — Smyser 
Jean Pruyne, University of Mas- 
sachusetts, Kappa Kappa Gamma, to 
Charles F. Smyser, Jr. Maryland '50, 
Connecticut '52, Delta Tau Delta. 
Pinto — Regan 
Katherine Teresa Pinto, Maryland 
graduate, to Frank Joseph Regan, Jr. 
Rawley — Merrill 
Jane Louise Rawley to John H. Mer- 
rill, Maryland student. 

Richtmyer — Gibson 
Carolyn Richtmyer to James Stewart 
Gibson, Jr., Maryland graduate. 
Row — Fitzhugh 
Elizabeth Ann Row, Maryland alum- 
na, to Lieut. Clark Seal Fitzhugh, Jr., 
Maryland graduate. 

Satchwell — Keiper 
Shirley Anne Satchwell, Randolph- 
Macon, to Pfc. Tilghman H. Keiper, 
Maryland alumnus. 

St. Louis — Rinteln 
Mary Josephine St. Louis to Ensign 
Victor A. von Rinteln, U.S.N.R., Mary- 
land School of Law graduate. 
Santilli — Hawley 
Gloria Hope Santilli, Maryland School 
of Nursing student, to Chauncey Bald- 
win Hawley. 

Schaefer — Sager 
Sandra Barbara Schaefer, Maryland 
student, to Irving Sager. 
Shapiro — Rosen 
Roberta Narda Shapiro, Maryland 
alumna, to Melvin Gerald Rosen. 
Slater — Montgomery 
Karen Elizabeth Slater, Maryland 
student, to Harry Ellsworth Mont- 
gomery. 

Slater— Wilkins 
Both Maryland students, Lorna Caro- 
lyn Slater, to Wayman P. Wilkins. 
Smith — Naviasky 
Geryl Helene Smith to Frank Nav- 
iasky, Maryland alumnus. 

Somerville — Chadduck 
Jacqueline Somerville, Holton-Arms 
Junior College, to Harry W. Chadduck, 
III, Maryland student and Army 
veteran. 

Steward — Ways 
Lydia C. Steward, '53 Homecoming 
Queen, (Home Ec. senior) to Midship- 
man Raymond A. Ways, U.S.N. 
Stone— Miller 
Caryle Sue Stone, Maryland student, 
to Pfc. Michael Aaron Miller, Maryland 
alumnus. 

Suls— Getz 
Elaine Suls to Payson Getz, Mary- 
land graduate. 

Summers — Livingston 

Both Maryland seniors, Gail Ricks 
Summers, Gamma Phi Beta to John 
R. Livingston, Phi Kappa Sigma. 
Tendick — Burman 

Joan Elizabeth Tendick to John R. 
Burman, Maryland alumnus. 
Trible— Franklin 

Carol Joan Trible to William Grady 
Franklin, Maryland School of Dentis- 
try student. 

Wahlstrand — Sisson 

Carol Louise Wahlstrand, Maryland 



50 



Maryland 



alumna, to Jerry Richard Sisson, Mary- 
land student. 

Ward— Hamill 

Sally Ward, Maryland alumna, to 
George Hamill. 

Weber — Miller 
Susan Mary Weber, Immaculate Con- 
ception alumna, to John B. Miller, 
Maryland student. 

Whittemore — Kennedy 
Jill Shadle Whittemore, Maryland 
alumna, to Michael Kennedy, Jr. 
Wilken — Anderson 
Barbara Wilken, Maryland student, 
to Donald L. Anderson. 




George C. Basil, Jr., M.D. 

Dr. George Chester Basil, Jr., 52, 
University of Maryland, Pharmacy 
'23 and Medicine '27, physician and 
surgeon, who practiced his profession 
in Annapolis and Anne Arundel County 
for the past 22 years, died unexpected- 
ly at his home in Annapolis of a 
coronary thrombosis. 

Apparently in good health he had 
watched a TV show until 11 p.m. He 
died shortly thereafter. 

Dr. Basil was prominent in county 
and state medical circles and was active 
in Annapolis civic affairs. 

A son of George C. Basil, Sr., and 
the late Mrs. Margaret Iola Purdy Bas : 
il, he was born in Annapolis on Sept. 
28, 1902. 

He interned at the Mercy and Bon 
Secours Hospitals in Baltimore City. 
He was married in December, 1928, to 
Miss Maude Stanley. 

He and his wife went to China in 
1928, where Dr. Basil was superin- 
tendent of the Syracuse-in-China Hos- 
pital at Chungking until 1932. While 
in China he did research work in foot 
and mouth disease and in intestinal 
parasites. 

Dr. Basil returned to Annapolis in 
September, 1932, and started to prac- 
tice there. In 1940, drawing on his ex- 
periences in China, he wrote a book, 
"Test Tubes and Dragon Scales." 

In 1933 he did post-graduate work 
in medicine and surgery at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. He was appointed 
assistant dispensary physician at the 
Johns Hopkins Hospital and later be- 
came assistant in medicine there. 

He was a member of the medical 
staff of the Anne Arundel General Hos- 
pital and of the Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity faculty. 

Dr. Basil was a member and past 
president of the Anne Arundel County 
Medical Society, and a member of the 
American Medical Society, the South- 
ern Medical Society and the Randolph- 
Winslow Surgical Society. 

He was a director of the Farmers 
National Bank and vice president and 
a director of the Coca Cola Bottling 
Company of Annapolis. 

Dr. Basil was a 32-degree Mason, 
a member of the Boumi Temple Shrine 
and The Royal Order of Jesters. He 



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was a member of and fleet surgeon of 
the Annapolis Yacht Club. He also 
was a member of the Annapolitan Club, 
the Elks, Knights of Pythias, Knights 
Templars and the Annapolis Chamber 
of Commerce. 

His hobbies were hunting and play- 
ing the organ. 

Dr. Basil is survived by his wife, 
Mrs. Maude Basil; his father, George 
C. Basil, Sr.; a daughter, Mrs. William 
G. Brendle; a son, John Stanley Basil, 
and two grandchildren. His son is in 
the Marine Corps in Naples, Italy. 
Henry Waldschmidt, M.D. 

Henry Waldschmidt, M.D., died re- 
cently in Baltimore. 

The son of the late George and Eliza- 
beth Waldschmidt, he was a graduate 
of the School of Pharmacy and the 
School of Medicine, University of 
Maryland. He was 75. 

A practicing physician in Baltimore 
since 1910, Dr. Waldschmidt was on 
the staff of the General German Aged 
Peoples Home from 1936 through 1950. 

He was a member of the Baltimore 
Medical Society and the Medical and 
Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland. 

He was a specialist in allergies and 
in cardiac vascular diseases. 

Dr. Waldschmidt is survived by two 
brothers and one sister. They are: 
Albert and Arthur Waldschmidt and 
Miss Lily Waldschmidt, all of Balti- 
more. His wife, the former Katherine 
Krausz of Baltimore, died in 1948. 
Colonel Thos. J. McQuade, U.S.M.C. 

Colonel Thomas Jackson McQuade, 
U. S. Marine Corps (Ret.), a football 
star at Maryland in the 1920's, under 
Coach H. C. Byrd, was found dead in 
the yard of his home at Charleston, 
W. Va. 

Colonel McQuade, 52, had lived in 
Charles Town since the end of World 
War II, when he retired from active 
duty. Death was caused by a heart 
attack. 




TOM McQUADE 
1924 Football Foto 

Jack McQuade played on the Mary- 
land varsity from 1920 to 1924 and was 
rated as one of Maryland's all-time 
greats, and was on the all-time Byrd- 
coached first team. 



He was a fullback and excelled at 
field goals. 

After graduation McQuade enlisted 
into the Marine Corps where he con- 
tinued his football playing in between 
assignments in Nicaragua. He won a 
trophy presented by President Coolidge 
as the outstanding player on one of the 
President's cup games. 

Colonel McQuade became a pilot and 
remained in aviation throughout the 
rest of his service, piloting everything 
from the open cockpit biplane to the 
big military transports of World War 
II. 

During World War II, he served in 
the Pacific as commander of a com- 
bined Army, Navy and Marine Corps 
air unit. 

Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Edna 
May McQuade, and his mother, Mrs. 
Thomas Joseph McQuade, both of 
Charles Town; a son, Lt. Thomas J. 
McQuade, Jr., of Camp Gordon, Ga., 
and a daughter, Mrs. R. Samuel Berry 
of Clarksburg, W. Va. 

Charles C. Reed, Jr. 

Charles Clifton Reed, Jr., 34, Mary- 
land alumnus (A&S 1952-53) admin- 
istrative aide at Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity Applied Physics Laboratory in 
Silver Spring, Md., died in Baltimore. 

Mr. Reed, a lifelong resident of 
Montgomery County, was on a field 
trip there for his laboratory when he 
was stricken. 

Death was attributed to a cerebral 
hemorrhage. 

Mr. Reed's home was in Glenmont. 
He is survived by his widow, Mrs. 
Leona Reed; two children, Charles C. 
Reed, III, 12, and Sharon Lynn Reed, 8, 
and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
C. Reed, Sr., of Silver Spring. 

Mr. Reed was born in Gaithersburg. 

Besides his immediate family and 
parents, he is survived by five sisters, 
Mrs. Margaret Duffy, Mrs. Ruth M. 
Lone, Mrs. Katherine B. Renfrow, Mrs. 
Helen Bosonic and Mrs. Shirley Miles, 
and three brothers, William R., Harold 
J. and Robert Reed. 

Col. Edward B. Jacobs 

By NEAL DURGIN 
Editor-in-Chief, Diamondback 

The University's oldest alumnus is 
dead. 

Col. Edward B. Jacobs, who attended 
Maryland Agricultural College when 
President Ulyssess S. Grant was in the 
White House, died at his home in Ber- 
lin, Md., January 2. His death took 
place at the same farmhouse where he 
was born 103 years ago on April 7, 
1851. 

On his 100th birthday the Colonel 
was interviewed by members of the 
press who witnessed a remarkably 
healthy man, who liked to recall fond 
memories of his year while attending 
Maryland. 

One of his favorite stories con- 
cerned his trip with another student to 
Washington and the White House. A 
short gentleman with a beard came to 
the gate, he recalled, and asked if he 
and his companion were interested in 
horses. They replied that they were 
and the friendly guide showed them 
through the private stables of the 
White House. The "guide' 'turned out 



Maryland 



' 



to be President Grant. But those were 
the days, the Colonel recalled, when 
the White House had no secret service. 

Colonel Jacobs was the son of Cur- 
tis W. Jacobs, a Worcester County 
Democratic leader and slave-owner. 
His brother, William Holland Jacobs, 
served with an Alabama cavalry 
squadron in the Confederate Army dur- 
ing the Civil War. 

The late Colonel was a descendant 
of Isaish Briddell, a Hugenot refugee 
from France, who settled in Worcester 
County in 1685. 

He received his rank of Colonel from 
Governor William T. Hamilton of 
Maryland in 1879, when he was ap- 
pointed a member of the newly-elected 
Governor's staff. 

Ralph Almond Judd 

Ralph Almond Judd, 64, retired 
Washington, D.C. pharamacist, died at 
Luray, Va., of heart disease after an 
illness of two weeks. 

He had retired to Luray in 1940, 
after having operated Judd's Pharmacy, 
at Seventh and F streets S.W., for 
many years. His father, the late Theo- 
dore A. T. Judd, had operated the 
store before him. His mother was tne 
late Elizabebth Almond Judd. 

Mr. Judd was a Maryland alumnus. 

He was a vice president of the 
Enterprise Federal Savings and Loan 
Bank and was a member of the board 
of directors of the Washington Whole- 
sale Drug Exchange. He also served 
as a member of the board of directors 
of the Page Valley National Bank 
of Luray. 

Surviving are his widow, Mrs. Gladys 
Howard Judd and a sister, Mrs. Blanche 
Dieter. 

Chief Judge Joseph D. Mish 

Chief Judge Joseph D. Mish, (School 
of Law, '26), of the fourth Judicial 
Circuit, died in Hagerstown. 

He had been in the hospital for 
two months, after he suffered a heart 
attack while returning from Baltimore 
where he had presided for several 
weeks in a branch of Circuit Court. 

Before his appointment to the bench 
in December, 1940, Judge Mish served 
in both houses of the General Assembly 
and was a former member of the Demo- 
cratic State Central Committee of 
Washington County. 

Shortly after admission to the bar, 
Judge Mish joined in legal partnership 
with former Gov. William Preston 
Lane, Jr. They remained law partners 
until Judge Mish's elevation to the 
bench. 

A former president of the Washing- 
ton County Bar Association, Judge 
Mish was a member of the State and 
American Bar Association. 

Surviors include his wife, Edith; two 
sons, Joseph D. Mish, Jr. and Frederick 
C. Mish; a brother Frank W. and two 
sisters, Mrs. Jesse Franklin Hakes, 
and Mrs. Sara Mish Medford of 
Hagerstown. 

Fayette S. Spratt, D.D.S. 

Dr. Fayette S. Spratt '16 (B.C.D.S.), 
died at Island Falls, Maine. Born in 
New Limerick, Maine, on June 2, 1887, 
he attended school in Island Falls. 
After his graduation from the B.C.D.S. 



* 1905 50tk -Annivenary 1955 

CALL CARL 

Incorporated 

ANNOUNCES 

Occupancy of their New Building 
Main Plant and General Offices 

1250 24th STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

District 7-2775 

Automotive Repairs and Street Call Service 

Serving the Washington Metropolitan Area 
for 50 Years 24 Hours a Day 

• 

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HU. 3-3900 01. 4-2121 

1801 WEST VIRGINIA AVE., N.E. — IA. 6-4700 

• 8511 COLESVILLE ROAD, SILVER SPRING, MD. — JU. 9-4400 • 



ARTIFICIAL MARBLE 
(SCAGLIOIA) 



ARTIFICIAL STONE 
FOR INTERIOR 



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STANDARD ART MARBLE and TILE CO. 

SCAGLIOLA - MARBLE - MOSAIC - TERRAZZ0 
TILE - CERAMIC - SLATE 

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Telephone NAtlonol 8-7413 



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SELF-SERVICE 
Delicious food ... All our desserts are 
home-made . . . popular prices . . . 
no tipping ... air conditioned 

BREAKFAST - LUNCHEON 

DINNER Quality Coffee, 5c a cup 

Open Daily and Sunday 
11th Street Entrance of 

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11th & E Sts., N.W. Washington, D. C. 



• REFRIGERATION SUPPLY CO., Inc. 9 

WHOLESALE ONLY 

1612 FOURTEENTH ST., N.W. 

Complete — 

AIR CONDITIONING, REFRIGERATION, 
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# WASHINGTON 9, D. C. • 



INSURANCE — BONDS 

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53 




STONE HOUSE 
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Silver Spring, Md. 



NATIONAL EQUIPMENT & SUPPLY CO., 


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Dr. Spratt began practice in Orono 
where he remained for fourteen years. 
He then removed to Island Falls, where 
he practiced for the next ten years. He 
had been a funeral director during the 
last several years of his life. A vet- 
eran of World I, he was a member 
of the American Legion and of 40 and 
8. He also held memberships in Psi 
Omega, the Knights of Pythias, and the 
Masonic Lodge. He was vice-president 
of the local branch of the Katahdin 
Trust Company. Surviving are his wife, 
Mrs. Theresa Schneider Spratt and a 
son, Aubrey, of Mattawamkeag, Maine. 

Edgar J. Jacques 
Dr. Edgar J. Jacques '17 (B.C.D.S.), 
died at Manchester, N. H. Born in Man- 
chester on August 1, 1895, Dr. Jacques 
received his early education in the pa- 
rochial and public schools of that city. 
He received his high school training at 
the St. John's Preparatory School in 
Danvers, Mass. During his course at 
the B.C.D.S. he was a member of the 
Glee Club and of Xi Psi Phi. Shortly 
after beginning his practice in Man- 
chester he was commissioned as a First 
Lieutenant in the Officers Reserve 
Corps, Army of the United States, on 
August 25, 1917. He reported for 
active duty at Camp Dix, N. J., October 
30, 1918. After receiving his discharge 
in August of 1919, Dr. Jacques re- 
sumed his practice in Manchester, 
where he achieved well-merited recog- 
nition as an outstanding member of 
tke profession and as a valuable citi- 
zen of his native city. In 1941 he 
again answered his country's call to 
service, reporting for duty on March 
10 with the rank of captain. In April 
of 1944 he sailed for England. There 
followed tours of duty in Northern 
France and the Rhineland. Before his 
separation on February 2, 1946 with 
the rank of colonel, he had been Chief 
of Dental Services, 99th Station Hos- 
pital. Always a firm believer in the 
values of dental organization, Dr. 
Jacques supplemented his memberships 
in the national, state and local socie- 
ties by affiliations with the Northeast- 
ern Dental Society and the New Eng- 
land Prosthetic Study Club. He was 
also a member of the American Legion 
and the Knights of Columbus (Fourth 
Degree). One of the most active mem- 
bers of our legion of New England 
alumni, he gave consistently strong 
support to the Alumni Association and 
rendered a valuable service to his 
alma mater by influencing a large num- 
ber of New Hampshire men to enter 
the B.C.D.S. There are several grad- 
uates in the granite state who are par- 
ticularly grateful to Dr. Jacques for 
the financial aid he gave to them during 
their undergraduate years. For the 
past ten years he has donated to the 
School a cash prize to be awarded an- 
nually to a member of the graduating 
class for Meritorious Work in Oral 
Surgery. The Alumni Association was 
represented at Dr. Jacques' funeral 
by Dr. Matthew Macek '45, Dr. James 
Langley '47, Dr. Harold Goodman '43, 
Dr. James J. Sullivan '12, and Dr. 
Roger E. Houle '54. 



54 



Maryland 



Good Soldier 




AT TACHEN 
Colonel Robert L. Walton, U.S.A., 
(Md. '37), DSC, Silver Star, World War 
II. Former star athlete in Tachen evac- 
uation. 

STILL PUNCHING 



"The Battle of Waterloo was won on 
the playing field of Eton." 

— Lord Wellington 
"Upon the fields of friendly strife 
are sown the seeds which in other 
years, on other fields, will bear the 
fruits of victory." 

— General MacArthur 



Bob Walton, Great Mary- 
land Athlete, World War 
II Decorated, Evacuated 
Under Fire From 
Tachen. 

£y Pa£iy McZlMuf. 

Colonel Robert L. Walton, U. S. Army 
(Engineering, U. of Md. '37) is 
still in there, pitching. 

He was one of two Yankees evacu- 
ated from the Tachen Islands. 

For what is meant by the colonel 
being still in there, pitching, we take 
you back to 1937 and the University of 
Virginia gymnasium. Maryland versus 
Virginia in boxing. That was red hot. 
Campus Leader 

Bob Walton, a star at football and 
lacrosse and a student government 
leader, had turned out for boxing. He 
was new at it. But he learned rapidly, 
particularly in the artful use of on 
balance counter punching. He could 
belt! 

In the opposite corner was Vir- 
ginia's Morty Caplin, experienced New 
York amateur, nephew of Hymie Cap- 
lin, well known boxing manager. 

"I don't belong in here with Cap- 
plin," Walton commented. He was 
right. 



He was told that if Morty made any 
mistakes, Walton's chance rested on 
the fact that he could hit. Bob had 
faith in his ability as well as in 
Maryland's coach, Heinie Miller. As 
the final round ran toward its conclu- 
sion the Virginia lad was ahead on 
points from Kamchatka to Madagascar, 
via Patagonia yet. Then, with only sec- 
onds to go, Caplin made his one mis- 
take. He drew his left back too far, 
intent upon a finishing left hook. Wal- 
ton stepped inside of Caplin's left and 
smashed home a devastating right 
hand inside cross counter. That's all 
there was; there wasn't any more. 
Maryland won the meet 5 bouts to 3. 

Getting back to 1955 and the Tachen 
Islands, Walton and Sergeant Charles 
Evans escaped from Tachen in a Chin- 
ese junk manned by guerillas "armed 
to the teeth," taking off about 2:30 in 
the morning. F-86 Sabrejets flew cover 
for the evacuation. 

With Advisory Group 

Colonel Walton and Sergeant Evans 
were members of the American Mili- 
tary Advisory Group in the Tachens. 

The Colonel said he emerged from 
his bomb shelter after an especially 
heavy barrage and was unable to see 
"anything but dust." He estimated the 
dust screen kicked up by Red bombing 
covered the entire Tachens to a height 
of 100 feet. 

Since his graduation, Walton has 
been in the Army. His combat service 
in France during World War II brought 
him the Distinguished Service Cross 
and the Silver Star as well as numer- 
ous lesser decorations. He was a 
battalion commander in General Pat- 
ton's 95th Division. He was wounded 
in the attack on Metz. 

Walton was born in the house in 
which his parents still live in Chevy 
Chase, D. C. 

In 1940, he married his former Chevy 
Chase High School sweetheart, Shirley 
Shaw. They have four children, Ann 
Pelham, 13; Barbara Ogden, 11; Rose- 
mary Alden, 10; and Robert Ayres, 8. 
Mrs. Walton and the children have 
been living in Monterey, California, 
since Colonel Walton's assignment to 
overseas duty. 

Maryland Family 

Colonel Walton has two brothers, 
both engineering graduates of Mary- 
land, and a sister who is also a Mary- 
land graduate. They are Pelham A. 
Walton, of Columbia, S. C; Hugh Mc- 
Kelden Walton, on active army duty in 
Austria; and Mrs. Ruth Walton Reed 
of San Antonio, Texas. Both brothers 
saw combat service in World War II. 
Both are majors. 

The point of this story is to illustrate 
how a courageous and resourceful box- 
er who got out of a tight spot, in the 
ring, achieved the same result, years 
later, under life and death circum- 
stances at some disputed barricade, a 
half a world away. There are those 
who believe athletics teach such things. 








PHONE ADAMS 2-8700 
2311 Calvert St., N.W. Washington 8, D. C. 



Over Half Century of Continuous Service 

R. B. PHELPS 
■ STODE CO. 



CUT STONE CONTRACTORS 

Limestone 
Granite Marble 



NOrth 7-1508 2501 Ninth St., N.E. 
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ALUMINUM 
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2014 Fifth St., N.E. 
Washington, D. C. 

DUpont 7-7550 



Maryland 



55 



Edward 

Boker 

Frosted 

Foods, 

Inc* 



SERVING 

HOSPITALS 

AND 

INSTITUTIONS 

James T. Doukas, Mgr. 
LAwrence 6-8350 

1480 OKIE STREET, N.E. 
WASHINGTON 4, D. C. 



$ 



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your dimes 

and 

dollars 

help 



$ 



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to the 

CANCER FUND 



F. S. CO. 



Miller Manufacturing Co., Inc. 

Stockton Stroot — 4th to 7th 

Richmond, Virginia 

Manufacturers of 

MILLWORK 
BOXES & SHOOKS 

Fabricated in accordance with 
your specifications 



SUNTILE 

A genuine Clay Tile 

Burnproof - Waterproof ■ Colorlait 
Call your SUNTILE Dealer at NO. 7-1 725 

VICK TILE CO. 

1909 M St., N.W. Washington, D. C 




There are three classes of women: The in 

hat is the plural of hippopota- 
mus?" 

"H-i-p-p-o — aw, who wants more 
than one of those things?" 



"W 



Suggested traffic sign for the "big 
corner," "DRIVE CAREFULLY, 
WALK CAREFULLY, DON'T BE- 
COME A STATISTIC!" 

* * * 

"Do insects ever get in your corn out 
here?" 

"Yeh, but we just fish 'em out and 

drink it anyway." 

* * * 

The newcomer placed his hand on 
the shoulder of the convict before him 
and began the rhythmic lockstep back 
to the old pokey. He leaned forward a 
little and whispered to the tired convict 
ahead: 

"Is this all there is to this rock 
splitting job?" 

"Ain't fourteen hours a day enough?" 

"Nothing to it." 

"Seven days a week! Bad food! Hard 
beds!" 

"It's a breeze!" 

"Say, where did you come from?" 

"I was a college professor!" 

* * * 

There are four stages of Brandy and 
Water. The first is "Brandy and 
Water." The second is "Branny and 
Warwer." The third is "Bran War." 

The fourth, "Brraorr." 

* * * 

One of our Home Ec girls, driving in 
Baltimore, had stopped for a traffic 
light. When the light turned green she 
had trouble getting the old bus to roll. 
The light changed to yellow, to red, to 
green and back again. This went on 
twelve times while the gal jiggled with 
the gadgets. Finally a traffic cop poked 
his head in her car window and asked, 
"Look, leddy, ain't Baltimore got no 
colors you like?" 

* * * 

It takes the eyes only one fortieth 
of a second to wink. It's the world's 

quickest way to get into trouble. 

* * * 

Instructor, "This rifle weighs 8.6 
pounds. After the first mile the deci- 
mal point drops out." 

* * * 

Judge: "You've known the. defendant 
all your life. Would he steal?" 

Witness: "How much was it?" 

* * * 

In the inner, deeper, and darker re- 
cesses of the library at Dartmouth is a 
statut eof General Howe. When the 
boys have their girls up for week-ends 
they take them to the library and show 
them Howe. 



"I ought to know; didn't I go to col- 
lege, stupid?" 

"Yes, and you came home that way, 
too." 



tellectual, the beautiful, and the majority. 

Batchy Coogan says the girl he'll 
marry isn't born yet and her mother's 
dead. 

* * * 

Fellow in Maine named his humble 
lobster boat the "Floating Kidney" in 
honor of his mother-in-law's pet sick- 
ness. 

* * * 

A "conservative" is a guy who is 
afraid to fight and too lazy to run. 

* * * 

The hottest saxophone players are 
the ones who play the fly specks along 
with the notes. 

* * * 

The parson had really explained the 
ten commandments to his congregation. 
One miserable sinner expressed some 
hope for himself with, "Well, I ain't at 
least never had no graven image." 

* * * 

He who laughs laughs laughs laughs. 

* * * 

We shuck our own corn. 

* * * 

Stud who had just lost his field jac- 
ket, "Looks like some guys are major- 
ing in kleptomania around here." 

* * * 

A teacher illustrated the meaning of 
the word "slowly" by walking across 
the floor. 

When she asked the class to tell how 
she walked, a boy in the back of the 
room yelled: "Bow-legged!" 

* * * 

Young man: "Your daughter prom- 
ised to marry me." 

Father : "What did you expect, hang- 
ing around our house every night." 

* * * 

As the scientist said after a hard day 
over the test tubes: "Oh, my aching 
bacteria." 




"I'm going to prescribe light exer- 
cise. Get rid of that car of yours — get 
one without power steering, power 
brakes, electric windows, automatic 
shift—" 



56 



Maryland 



Open the Gate to 

Qhwum and ^oodjood 
LUNCH - DINNER 

Just Real Good Food 

Formerly the stables of 
Gen. Miles 
1 734 N ST., N.W. 

GATE Washington, D. C. 

Open Daily ME. 8-5179 
INN Free Pa " v Roorm 




WESTERN 
EXTERMINATING CO. 

TERMITE CONTROL 
Safe - Efficient - Economical 

Providing Protection from Insects and 

Rodents Destroying Fabric, Wood, Food 

FREE INSPECTION WITHOUT OBLIGATION 

— New Address — 

4904 WISCONSIN AVE., N.W. 

WASHINGTON 16, D. C. 

EMerson 3-9660 




Your wisest move 
when you move 
... a call to 



TUckerman 2-6881 

Cannon Ball 

TRANSIT CO. 

327 CARROLL ST., N.W. 
WASHINGTON 1 2, D. C. 

Local and Long Distance Moving 




American Disinfectant Co. 

Pest Control Service 

928 EYE STREET, N.W. 

Washington 1. D. C. NAtlonal 8-6478 



Don't make a move . . 




without calling 




SMITH'S 




Phone NO. 7-3343 




SMITH'S STORAGE CO., 


INC. 


WASHINGTON, D. C. 





CUST0H1 FLOORS, Inc. 

ASPHALT, TILE and LINOLEUM FLOORS 

Work Guaranteed • Estimates Free 

2727 N. WASHINGTON BLVD. 

ARLINGTON, VA. JA 2-4989 



"Oh, Mercentwill," she said, "I sup- 
pose you actors hate boos more than 
anything else." 

"Well, madam," he replied, "it all de- 
pends on the label on the bottle!" 

* * * 

"Bob went blind from drinking cof- 
fee." 

"How did it happen?" 

"He left his spoon in the cap." 

* * * 

Then there was the pilot who, 50,000 
feet up, remarked to his co-pilot, "I'm 
forgetting women up here." And the 
co-pilot nodded in approval and said, 
"Yeah, I'm for getting women up here, 

too!" 

* * * 

"Waiter, there's two flies in my 
soup." 

"Eh? Heh, so he finally caught up 

with her." 

* * * 

"If this storm continues," said the 
yachtsman, "I'll have to heave to." 

Seasick passenger: "What a horrid 
way of putting it." 

* * * 

Swede Hanson in a poker ga/rne. The 
Swede had four aces. He layed them 
down while he ordered a sandwich. 
Upon picking up the hand he discov- 
ered he now had six cards, some kind 
friend having transferred one in ex- 
cess of the allowed complement. The 
Swede stuck the little stranger in 
among the sandwich and ate it. 

* * * 

Heard on the campus. "She shouldn't 
have married the guy. But she did. 
Now she realizes her error. Every 
morning she awakens with a jerk." 

Definition of the word "Auditorium." 
From "audio" — to hear — and "taurus" 

— the bull. 

* * * 

GI: "I have tickets for the theatre." 
Mrs. GI: "Swell, I'll begin to dress." 
GI: "That's fine. The tickets are for 
tomorrow night." 

* * * 

"In the Army we were bunkies; we 
believed the same bunk." 




■46rs*c 




•NT- 



SLOW PROGRESS 
"How far did the little fellow go in 

Sunday school?" 

"Right now he's up to original sin." 
"Gosh, I thought that by this time 

he'd be past redemption." 



Montgomery-Stubbs 
Motors, Inc. 




OIERCURY 



SALES and SERVICE 

1200 EAST WEST HIGHWAY 

Silver Spring, Maryland 

JUniper 9-8040 



General Glass & 
mirror Co., Inc. 

Mirrors and All Kinds 
of Glass 

Roger F. Rowley, President 
2121 Eighteenth St., N.W. 
Washington 9, D. C. 



modern 
machinists co. 

General Machine Work 

MACHINE DESIGNING 

MAINTENANCE • AUTOMOTIVE 

INDUSTRIAL • AIRCRAFT 

774 Girard St., N.W. 

Washington, D. C. 



Harding Hardware, Inc. 

19D5 MICHIGAN AVE.. N.E. 

WASHINGTON IB. D. C. 

LA 6-566D 



THE I 



Pf- IHRTHY COmPRIlY 

SHEET METAL CONTRACTORS 

01. 7-2347 1915 H ST., N.W. 

Washington, D. C. 



Hilliard C. Myers & Son 

Roofing Specialists 

FIREPLACES and CHIMNEYS 

CLEANED and REPAIRED 

Incinerator Screen Tops Made to Order 

3560 14th ST., N.W. WASHINGTON, D. C. 

RAndolph 6-1366 



Maryland 



57 



THE 

M. J. GROVE 
LIME CO. 

* Established 1859 * 

Crushed Stone • Limestone 

Industrial & Agricultural Lime 

Concrete & Cinder Block 

Cement - Sand - Pipe 

Transit Mixed Concrete 

Free State Masonry Mortar 

Street, Road, Bridge Construction 



PLANTS 



Stephen City, Va. 

Middletown, Va. 

Frederick, Md. 

Lime Kiln, Md. 



General Offices 

Lime Kiln 
Frederick Co., Md. 

PHONES 
Monument 3-3104 
Buckeystown 3511 



FARMERS COOPERATIVE 
ASSOCIATION, INC. 

Maryland's Largest Locally Owned 



| and Operated Cooperative 




FEEDS 






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FERTILIZER 






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PETROLEUM 


PRODUCTS 




Feed MO 
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3-3113 
3-5422 


THURMONT 3111 


MIDDLETOWN 6 



Main Office: 



35 E. SOUTH ST. 
FREDERICK, MD. 



RELAYS 

for 

MILITARY and 
COMMERCIAL USE 

PRICE ELECTRIC CORP. 

FREDERICK, MARYLAND 



Crown Oil & Wax Co. 

Distributors 

Shell Petroleum Products 

Phone MONUMENT 3-6381 

FREDERICK, MD. 



THE S/#/f FACTS 

ON TERRAPIN SPORTS 

Sy, foe Mlair 




Terrapin Teams In National Holiday Sports Classics. 

Maryland Gridmen Star On Winning Teams, North Or South. 

Basketball Team Wins Ail-American City Title. 

Boxers Lose To L.S.U. In Sugar Bowl 

IBAA Boxing Tournament At Maryland, March 11-12. 

Freishtat Nosed Out In Eastern Junior Tennis Tourney. 



FOOTBALL 



At Miami 

aryland's Dick Bielski 
was unanimously voted 
as the game's most val- 
uable player by sports 
writers after the 
South's 20-17 win over 
the North at Miami on 
Christmas Day. 

Miami's Garrigus, Bielski and Ron- 
nie Waller of Maryland, pulled the 
game out of the first for the South, 
outscoring the North two touchdowns 





Waller 



Bielski 



to one in the final period for a 20-17 
victory. Waller got one on a 1-yard 
smash and Garrigus the other on a 
2-yard sneak. Garrigus' interception 
of a pass and Bielski's terrific running 
set up the second. 

Bielski and Waller carried the ball 
most of the way to the North 2 before 
Garrigus slipped across on a keep play. 

Bielski's line smashes also sparked 
an 80-yard Rebel 
drive for a touch- 
down, going over 
from the 14 on the 
final play of the 
second period. 

Bielski's smashing 
play was one of the 
highlights of a game 
punctuated by thrills 
as he cracked the 
middle of a big 
Yankee line for a 
net gain of 105 
yards in 24 tries. 
Wisconsin's F u 1 1- 
back, Alan Avneche, 
winner of the Heis- 
man Award as the 
outstanding college player of the 1954 




Coach 'In tn in 



season, was used less frequently, gain- 
ing 84 yards in 14 lunges. 

The South's winning team was co- 
coached by Maryland's Jim Tatum and 
Miami's Andy Gustafson. 
At Montgomery 
At Montgomery, Alabama, two Terps, 
Dick Shipley and Tom McLuckie, were 
in the Blue line-up in the Blue-Gray 
game, won by the Blue, 14-7. 

Maryland tackle Dick Shipley made 
both conversions. 

It was the Yankees' first triumph 
since 1948 and broke a string of five 
consecutive Confederate victories. 

A crowd of 18,000 witnessed the show 
along with millions of television fans. 
No State TV 

At Annapolis Maryland's Director of 
Athletics and head football coach Jim 
Tatum, talked a legislative committee 
out of passing a resolution to seek tele- 
casting of all football games at the 
University. 

He said it would prove embarrassing 
to the University as a member of the 
NCAA and probably would prove un- 
profitable. 

"If we televised without approval of 
the NCAA they could tell other teams 
not to play us," Tatum explained. 

He also said the amount sponsors 
would pay for television rights of ordi- 
nary games probably wouldn't compen- 
sate for the drop in attendance. 

Coach Tatum said, one of his big- 
gest disappointments at Maryland has 
been low home attendance. It aver- 
aged about 15,000 last season. 

He also urged resumption of games 
with Navy. 

The two major teams in Maryland 
played for three years starting in 1950, 
but Navy declined to continue the ser- 
ies. 

"The Navy-Maryland game ought to 
be played every year in Baltimore," 
said Tatum. 

He gave the legislators a glowing 
picture of prospects for next season. 

"We'll have the best team I've had 
at Maryland," he predicted going into 
his ninth season. "We've got two ex- 
perienced men at every position except 
center." 

Hennemier To Canada 

"Scrappy Jack" Hennemier, line 
coach at the University of Maryland 
since 1949, has resigned to become 
head coach of the Calgary Stampeders 
in the Canadian Pro Football League. 

Hennemier is credited with major 



58 



Maryland 



responsibility for the sparkling defense 
Maryland football teams have usually 
put up, particularly when they were 
voted the nation's No. 1 team in 1953. 

He has a one-year contract at Cal- 
gary but salary terms were not dis- 
closed. 

Hennemier was an All-Conference 
center his senior year at Duke in 1935 
despite the fact he weighed in at only 
150. He went to Washington and Lee. 
as line coach in 1939 and into the Navy 
after the 1941 season, coaching and 
playing on the football team at the 
Pensacola, Fla., Naval Air Station. Af- 
ter his discharge he went to Duke as 
assistant line coach. 

Kensler and Dovell 

Coach Jim Tatum completed his 
coaching staff for 1955 by adding ex- 
Marine Ed Kensler and Whitey Dovell 
the first changes on the Maryland 
staff since Eddie Teague replaced Den- 
ver Crawford three years ago. 

Kensler, All-Southern Conference 
guard on the Sugar Bowl champions 
of January 1, 1952, has been assistant 
coach at Washington and Lee and 
V.M.I. He is a Marine Corps veteran. 

Kensler married a Maryland co-ed. 
They have two children. Kensler is 
from Lawrenceville, 111. 

Dovell, freshman line coach in 1952, 
and graduate assistant in charge of 
the freshman team the past two years, 
will become a full-fledged member of 
the staff. 

Attractive Schedule 

Maryland will play one of its most 
attractive home schedules in 1955 ac- 
cording to the slate released by Coach 
Jim Tatum. 

Highlighting the five home games 
will be the return game with the UCLA 
Bruins. It was the UCLANS who beat 
the Terps in the Los Angeles Coli- 
seum last September, 12-7. The Terps 
were winning 7-6 late in the game 
when a mechanical mistake gave them 
the ball on the Terp 14-yard line and 
it was an easy touchdown from there. 

The schedule: 
Sept. 17 — Missouri 
•Sept. 24 — UCLA 



Oct. 


1 — Baylor 


•Oct. 


8 — Wake Forest 


Oct. 


15 — North Carolina 


Oct. 


22 — Syracuse 


•Oct. 


29 — South Carolina 


•Nov. 


5—LSU 


Nov. 


12 — Clemson 


•Nov. 


19 — George Washington 



•Home (lames at College Park 

Professional Selectees 

Again this year in the annual pro- 
fessional draft of collegiate players, 
the genius and respect of Maryland 
Coach Jim Tatum was recognized as 
ten of the seniors were picked off in 
the pro draft selections. With quarter- 
back Charlie Boxold and tackle Ralph 
Baierl drafted last year, it brought the 
total to twelve that played on the 1954 
eleven. Boxold was the fourth choice 
of the San Francisco 49'ers and Baierl 
the 18th pick of the Green Bay Pack- 
ers. 

Leading the draftees into the "play 
for pay" game were fullback Dick Biel- 
ski and halfback Ronnie Waller, both 
outstanding stars during the season 
and in post-season games. Bielski was 
a first choice of the Philadelphia Eagles 

Maryland 



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and Waller was snapped up on the sec- 
ond round by the highly regarded Los 
Angeles Rams. 

The Eagles also chose center Don 
Brougher and guard George Palahunik. 

The Chicago Cardinals took a trio 
of Terps in guard Jack Bowersox, 
sixth; center John Irvine, eighth; and 
guard Tom McLuckie, 13th. 

George Albrecht, fullback, and end 
Bill Walker were drafted by the De- 
troit Lions. Walker, although having 
another year of eligibility to play for 
the Terps qualified for the draft since 
his matriculation started four years 
ago. Quarterback Lynn Bieghtol, who 
comes under the same category as 
Walker, was a high choice of the Green 
Bay Packers. 

BASKETBALL 



Maryland Wins All-America City Title 

aryland's basket tossers 
defeated Cincinnati in 
the All-American City 
Tournament at Owens- 
boro, Kentucky, 78-61. 

High scorers for the 
Millikanmen were Bob 
Everett 24, Bob Kessler 20, and Bob 
O'Brien 16. 

With eight minutes gone the Terps 
led, 13-6. 

Just as Maryland had run up the 
early lead by grabbing off the re- 
bounds, Cincinnati pulled up to a 23-21 
count midway in the first half. 

Everett scored on a drive shot and 
O'Brien a set, and 
Kessler on another 
drive, as the Terps 
ran the count to 29- 
21. Everett hit on 
two fouls and with 
about four minutes 
to go in the half, 
the Terps had a 10- 
point lead, 31-21. 

Maryland jumped 
its 32-27 halftime 
advantage to 52-35 
within the second 
half. 

Superb Maryland defense cleared 
the boards and choked off the previ- 
ously high-powered Cincinnati attack. 
Rhode Island Downed 
With a strong second-half surge, 
Maryland trounced Rhode Island State, 





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83-66, in the semi-finals. 

Rhode Island, the original race-horse 
team, was slowed to a walk by Mary- 
land's play. 

Texas Tech Falls 

Maryland edged from behind in the 
second half in the quarter-finals to de- 
feat Texas Tech, 58-54. 



59 



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Maryland 72; Virginia 69 

Maryland's basketball team had top 
scoring performances from Frank 
Fuqua, John Sandbower and Bob 
O'Brien — and just in time — as the 
Terps defeated Virginia, 72-69 in 
Charlottesville. 

When Maryland fell nine points be- 
hind Fuqua, Sandbower and O'Brien 
started coming through and Virginia 
couldn't combat the Millikanmen's all- 
around strength. 

The three Maryland players scored 

14 points each. 

Duke 63; Maryland 61 

Duke avenged an early season 49-47 
loss to Maryland, by defeating the 
Terps, 68-61, in an Atlantic Coast Con- 
ference basketball game at Durham. 

Maryland led briefly in the sloppy 
game at 6-2, but Duke was in com- 
mand the rest of the game. 

Duke led at one time in the second 
half by 15 points, at 56-41. The closest 
the Terps could come was 63-58 with 
about a minute and one-half remaining. 

Maryland came up with its worst 
shooting percentage of the year, hit- 
ting on only 16 of 62 shots, for a 25.8 
percentage. 

Duke scored on 26 of 73 attempts, 
for a 35.6 percentage. Duke had a 
52-44 edge in rebounds. 

Time after time, the Maryland play- 
ers drove by the Duke man-to-man de- 
fense, but missed easy shots. 

Maryland drew close at the end of 
the half, 38-33, but a scoring drought 
at the start of the second half put the 
Terps in the hole again, and they never 
could catch Duke. 

Maryland 70; N. Carolina 60 

Maryland held on for a 70-60 victory 
over North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 
slowing down the second half after 
running up a 37-16 halftime lead. 

A crowd of 4,000 watched as the 
Terrapins limited the Tar Heels' scor- 
ing ace, 6-foot-5 Lennie Rosenbluth to 

15 points. He had averaged 35 points 
in North Carolina's four previous 
games. 

Bob Everett of Maryland, 6-foot-6 
senior, largely was responsible for a 
close guarding job on Rosenbluth, with 
occasional help from Frank Fuqua. 
Everett's tough defensive assignment 
did not interfere with his scoring. He 
led Maryland with 20 points. 

Maryland 68; South Carolina 52 

Maryland exploded a close ball game 
into a near rout with brilliant second 
half shooting to defeat South Caro- 
lina, 68-52 in Columbia, S. C. The win 
was the Terps' eighth in a row and 
gave them a 7-2 Conference record. 

The Terps, leading by a scant 26-24 
margin at halftime, began hitting from 
the outside with remarkable accuracy 
in the second half. Leading the on- 
slaught was soph set-shot artist Bob 
O'Brien. He connected for six of his 
eight goals after the intermission. Dur- 
ing the first five and a half minutes of 
the second half, the Terps scored 16 
points while holding the Gamecocks 
to three and held a 42-27 lead. They 
maintained that margin the rest of the 
way. 



Bob Kessler again was the leading 
scorer with 18 points. O'Brien and Bob 
Everett each came up with 16 points. 
Leading point-maker was South Caro- 
lina's Joe Smith with 20. 

Maryland 78; Virginia 65 

Maryland won its sixth straight and 
fifth Conference win as Bud Millikan's 
highly touted five defeated Virginia 
for the second time this season, 78-65. 

Leading 44-17 at halftime and 52-18 
shortly after the start of the second 
half, the Terps saw their lead hacked 
away at by the Cavaliers' star, Buzzy 
Wilkinson. At one stretch, Wilkinson 
netted 20 straight points and then five 
more. With one minute and forty-five 
seconds remaining, the score was nar- 
rowed to 71-65. 

Frank Fuqua, an uncertain starter 
until game time because of the death 
of his father, was the scoring star for 
the Terps with 21 points. 

Maryland 71; Clemson 63 

Playing without the services of its 
ace rebounder, Frank Fuqua, the Mary- 
land Terps defeated the Clemson Tig- 
ers 71-63 for their seventh straight 
win. 

The Terps' scoring leader, Bob Kess- 
ler, came up with his highest point 
total of the season with 31 important 
points. His performance was some- 
what overshadowed by the Tigers' lit- 
tle Bill Yarborough, a thorn in the 
Terps' side all night, who came up with 
33 markers. 

Bud Millikan's team had to come 
from behind to take a 35-34 halftime 
lead. When the second half opened, 
Kessler scored two goals and Bob Dil- 
worth and Bob O'Brien each added a 
goal to give Maryland a 43-34 advan- 
tage they never relinquished. 

O'Brien came up with 17 points while 
Bob Everett had 14. 

Maryland 68; South Carolina 51 

Eleventh ranked Maryland won its 
fifth straight basketball victory and 
its fourth in the Atlantic Coast Con- 
ference as the Terps defeated South 
Carolina, 68-51 

Again, it was junior Bob Kessler 
who was high scorer with 25 points. He 
picked these up before he suffered a 
slight sprain to his ankle, with six 
and a half minutes left to play. Frank 
Fuqua was runner-up with 17 points. 

The Terps led from early in the 
first half and were never headed in 
making their overall record 8-2 and 
their conference mark, 4-2. 

Maryland 68; N. C. State 64 

The magnificent Terrapins of Coach 
Bud Millikan put the pressure on big- 
time North Carolina State early in the 
game and then came from behind with 
four minutes left to play and scored 
a stunning 68-64 upset over the second- 
ranked Wolfpack. 

The victory was hailed as Millikan's 
finest in his five year collegiate coach- 
ing career and certainly one of the 
finest in Terp basketball history. 

Bob Kessler, the smooth-working, 
ball-hawking junior demon from near- 
by Alexandria, Va., and Bob O'Brien, 
a dead-eye set shot, took charge as the 



60 



Maryland 



Terps chalked up their ninth victory in 
a row and ran their season record to 
12-2. It brought their ACC record to 
8-2. State was suffering its second 
loss of the season in 16 starts and first 
league loss. 

History was made for Maryland bas- 
ketball in another respect also as stu- 
dents and fans flocked to Ritchie Coli- 
seum starting at 4:30 in the afternoon. 
At 6:15, two hours before game time, 
they stopped selling tickets. Officials 
estimated several thousand were turned 
away and even more stayed away 
knowing that if they were not in line 
early, they had no chance of admission. 

The final four minutes were as hectic 
and exciting as any game ever played 
in Ritchie Coliseum. With five min- 
utes remaining, and State working on 
a 59-50 lead, Kessler took over per- 
sonal charge of the game. Fouled, he 
swished both free tries. Fouled 10 sec- 
onds later, he added one. Then he got 
control of the ball, drove down-court 
and in for a basket. That made it 
59-57. He then fed a pass to O'Brien 
who hit for the tie. O'Brien then set 
from 35-feet out to put the Terps 
ahead. After being tied twice again 
at 61 and 63 all, the dead-panned 
O'Brien hit on another long one to give 
the jubilant Terps the lead they clung 
to. John Sandbower, a tower of 
strength on defense added two free 
throws and Kessler a singleton to ice 
the great win. 
George Washington 75; Maryland 53 

Buzz Ciriello, unsung member of 
George Washington's basketball team, 
delivered the key tallies to crumble 
University of Maryland's nine-game 
winning streak and its sixth-place na- 
tional rating, as the Colonials defeated 
the Terps, 75-53 in the hoodooed Uline 
Area. 

Ciriello, in pumping through 24 
points, was especially effective from 
outside and ball hawked all the way 
until he fouled out near the end. 

Bob Kessler and Bob O'Brien, both 
of whom riddled NC State, couldn't find 
the range against the Colonials. Kess- 
ler did deliver 21 counters, but only 
six came in the closing 20 minutes. 
O'Brien went 11 minutes without a shot 
and could get only two field goals for 
the evening. 

The loss gave the Terps. a 12-3 rec- 
ord. The game was played to a ca- 
pacity house of 6500 with an estimated 
2000 fans turned away. 

Maryland 60; Navy 54 

The eighth-ranked Maryland Terra- 
pins made their annual visit to the 
Naval Academy's Dahlgren Hall and 
won their second straight from the 
Middies after a good scrap, 60-54. 

The Terps jumped off to an early 
9-0 lead in the first four minutes with 
high scoring Bob Kessler tallying sev- 
en of them before the Middies cashed 
in on a pair of free throws. Coach Bud 
Millikan's boys maintained a seven to 
nine point advantage until near the 
close of the half when Navy whittled 
the half-time Terp advantage to five 
points. 

Harassing the Terps with football- 
like tactics in an effort to offset their 



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heighth disadvantage, Ben Carnevale's 
team hacked away at the Terp lead in 
the second half until they went ahead 
40-38. After another exchange of ties, 
the Middies went ahead at 44-42. Bob 
Dilworth, playing an outstanding game 
throughout, tied it up with his jump 
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Kessler, who missed most of the sec- 
ond half with four fouls, came back 
into the game and cashed in on two 
free throws to give him 21 points, high 
for the game. 

Maryland 67; W & M 62 

Paced by John Sandbower and Bob 
Dilworth, Maryland's basketball team 
led all the way to conquer William and 
Mary, 67-62. 

Sandbower had his best night of the 
year, scoring 18 points. Dilworth added 
13 more to the Terps' cause. 

The Terps No. 1 scorer, Bob Kessler, 
played less than half the game and 
scored 12 points. He sat on the bench 
to rest an injured foot. 

G.W.U. 73; Maryland 67 

George Washington emerged a 73-67 
victor over Maryland and carried off 
the Big Three Cup. 

Terp Bob Kessler tried hard to lead 
Maryland to victory with his play- 
making, rebounding and sharp shoot- 
ing which gave him scoring honors for 
the Terps with 21 points. 

However, with Frank Fuqua missing 
from the lineup because of scholastic 
difficulties and Bob Dilworth out on per- 
sonal fouls with about five minutes to 
go, the challenge was too much for the 
Millikanmen. 

Kessler did get hot in the second half. 
With eight minutes to go he put the 
Terrapins in the lead with two fouls 
after having tied it up with a field 
goal. 

Petcavich, G.W.'s star, however, kept 
pecking away with his uncanny foul 
shooting to put GW ahead to stay at 
65-63. 

Maryland 63; N. Carolina 61 
Terp Bob Kessler, with the score tied 
and two seconds to play, flipped in a 
soft jump shot that gave the Terps a 
thrilling win over North Carolina, 63- 
61. 

It was a sensational finish in which 
Maryland's two five-point advantages 
were the biggest leads for either team. 



MAIL YOUR ORDER NOW — 

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Enclosed is check or money order for 

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The game was tied 14 times. It was 
58-58 with three minutes to go in a 
smash-bang even up battle. 

The victory gave the Millikanmen a 
tie for the ACC lead with N. C. State, 
which defeated South Carolina. Mary- 
land and N.C.S. have 9-2 season rec- 
ords in the ACC, the Terps having an 
overall 15-4 record. 

Kessler lost the scoring duel with 
Lenny Rosenbluth of the Tar Heels, 
31 to 24. 

The Terps won despite a tremendous 
performance by Rosenbluth, the 6- 
foot-5 sophomore from New York, whp 
is among the Nation's leading scorers 
with a 25-plus average. 

BOXING 

IBAA Ring Meet, March 11-12, Sees 
Terps Defend Title 

aryland's boxing team 
will defend the Eastern 
(IBAA) championship 
at College Park on 
March 11 and 12, 1955, 
IBAA President W. W. 
Cobey (U. of Md.) has 
announced. 
Coach Frank Cronin's fisticians won 
last year's title at Charlottesville and, 
this year, will defend against challeng- 
ers from the same 
teams they engaged 
in the 1954 titular 
meet, ie., U. S. Mili- 
tary Academy, Syra- 
cuse, Virginia, Penn 
State and Catholic 
University. 

Colonel Harvey L. 
Miller, former Mary- 
land boxing coach, 
will act as tourna- 
ment director. 
Tickets are now on 
sale and should be ordered from Ben- 
nie Robinson, c/o Athletic Department, 
University of Maryland, College ParR, 
Md. ( Use coupon at left) . 

L.S.U. 7; Maryland 1 

Maryland's boxing team lost 7-1, to a 
highly polished Louisiana State squad 
in the fifteenth annual Sugar Bowl 
championships at New Orleans. 

Only Gary Fisher, 156, back after 
a year layoff scored a victory for Mary- 
land. Fisher displayed a fine defense 
and was hardly hit 
t [ in his win over Bill 

] Clayton. 

Terp Freshman 
Heavyweight Cor- 
bett Kerin clearly 
outpointed L S U's 
L o e Deutschmann, 
but the bout was 
* 4 -g forfeited earlier be- 

lli cause Kerin, a frosh, 
was ineligible. Both 
are football players. 
Maryland's 13 2- 
pound national 
champion, V i n n i e 
Palumbo, lost to 
John Stiglets. Pal- 
umbo was far off his form of a year 
ago. 




Mr. Cobey 




Coach Cromn 



62 



Maryland 




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Palumbo beat Siglets in the finals of 
the NCAA championships last spring. 

Terp Pat Duffy was stopped in 56 
seconds of the second round by Gary 
Bowden. 

Lightheavy Leo Coyne, who was an 
Eastern champ for Maryland last year, 
was outpointed hy Crowe Peele. 

Guido Capri, Joe Madden and Eric 
Hintze all lost by decisions to Bobby 
Freeman, Andy Sceanbra and Bob Pisa- 
rich, respectively, at 125, 139 and 147. 
None of these three decisions were 
close. 

The loss was Maryland's first in 
Sugar Bowl competition. Previously 
Maryland had beaten Michigan State 
(1948) and tied Syracuse (1952). 

"At least we lost to an outstanding 
team," Terp Coach, Frank Cronin, 
sighed. "LSU is the best I've seen in 
a long time. Nobody is going to stop 
that outfit and I have a hunch that 
several of their boxers will wind up 
with individual national championships. 
My fellows tried, gosh knows, but we 
weren't in it from the beginning." 

Maryland G'/i; Virginia 2'/2 

The University of Maryland's box- 
ing team has come up with a number 
of good new men judging by the 
strength of the Terrapins in defeating 
Virginia. 

Joe Madden, a fast 139-pound sopho- 
more; Tony Esposito, a combination 
boxer and hitter at 147 pounds, and 
Tom Sullivan, a real solid slugger at 
165 pounds, were among the bright new 
men put on display by Coach Frank 
Cronin. Sullivan is a senior, but this is 
his first year with varsity boxing. 

All three were winners as the Terra- 
pins scored a 6%-2% victory over the 
Cavaliers. 

Sullivan's performance was the most 
spectacular as he stopped Steve Hoffer 
in the third. Tom had to score a 
knockout to win after losing the first 
two rounds. 

Madden won all three rounds of a 
fast-punching win over Bro Kinlock 
and displayed all-around ring ability 
in doing so. Esposito made use of his 
defensive skill and solid punching to 
score a technical knockout over Billy 
Young, who was not floored but was 
badly battered. 

Gary Fisher, Maryland's 147-pounder 
lost the closest fight of the night when 
a 29-28 decision went to Bob Rush, 
veteran on the Cavalier team. 

Leo Coyne, the Eastern heavyweight 
champion, fought at 178 pounds and 
won over Norman Vissering, football 



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player at Virginia, by putting Vissering 
on the floor just before the final bell. 

Maryland's Guido Capri scored a 
technical knockout over Elliott Rein- 
hardt, 3d round. 

Maryland's Eric Hintze registered a 
technical knockout over Chris Wester- 
man, 2d round. 

Tony Esposito (Md.) scored a tech- 
nical knockout over Billy Young, 2d 
round. 

At 156 pounds Tony DiBiase (Va.) 
scored a technical knockout over Mary- 
land's Al Soucy, 2d round. 

Pat Duffy, Maryland's 165 pounder, 
and Preston Quesenberry fought to a 
draw. 

Michigan State 6'/2; Maryland l'/i 

Another heavily loaded team, Michi- 
gan State, including Johnny Butler, 
sophomore who won the 1953 National 
Golden Gloves title, was too much for 
Maryland's home grown talent, the 
Spartans winning, 6V2 to 1% at East 
Lansing. 

All the relatively inexperienced 
Terps could salvage was Leo Coyne's 
easy decision in the light-heavyweight 
class and Gary Fisher's draw at 156. 

The top bout of the card was the 
battle at 132 pounds between Vince Pal- 
umbo, Maryland's reigning NCAA 
champion and Butler, a sophomore in 
his first college action. Butler, a 
stocky slugger, took a debatable two- 
point decision, 30-28, after a roaring 
battle right down to the wire. 

Gary Fisher and State's Bob Mullins 
were a fine contrast in styles and 
fought through three stirring rounds. 
Fisher, a fine boxer, had all the better 
of it at the college style of boxing, 
but Mullins got inside frequently 
enough to gain a draw decision in the 
opinion of the referee, Lou Jallos. 

Coyne, Eastern Intercollegiate champ, 
gave State's veteran Bill Greenway a 
grade AA boxing lesson. Greenway 
was game but couldn't fathom Coyne's 
southpaw style. Leo won all three 
rounds handily. 

Terp Pat Duffy went through the 
ropes after catching a flurry of solid 
punches from State's George Sissini in 
the 165 pound bout. It was stopped in 
the second. 

Andy Ronie, another talented Spar- 
tan sophomore, made short work of 
Terp Jim Parsons in the heavyweight 
match. He landed often and power- 
fully from the opening bell. Parsons 
went down at 1:59 of the first round. 
Coach Frank Cronin signaled the ref- 
eree to stop it. 

At 125 Choken Maekawa, star Ha- 
waiian experienced youngster, decision- 
ed Maryland's green Dave Sommers. 

At 139 Carroll Traham decisioned 
Maryland's Tony Esposito, while at 
147, Maryland's Eric Hintze lost the 
nod to State's Herb Odom, another na- 
tional rep amateur before coming to 
State. 

Maryland 5; C.U. 3 

Catholic University spotted Mary- 
land one point and considerable experi- 
ence but still made it exciting for the 
1100 fans who welcomed boxing back 



to C.U. after two years as Coach Frank 
Cronin's octet took Coach Eddie La- 
Ford's mittsters, 5 to 3. 

The show ended with the crowd on 
its feet yelling as Catholic's Tom De- 
Cicco, and Jim Parsons, a football end 
at Maryland, slugged it with DeCicco 
winning, 30-28. 

Mo Greenberg, 165, won over Mary- 
land's green Pat Duffy in a wild-swing- 
ing match that saw Duffy floored sev- 
eral times. 

C.U.'s Jack Daly, 139, decisioned 
Terp Joe Madden, 30-27. 

Mike Fahey, Catholic's 132-pounder, 
lost to Vince Palumbo, Maryland's de- 
fending national champion, 30-24. 

Palumbo did not keep up the pres- 
sure after he dropped Fahey in the 
first round. 

At 125 pounds Catholic U. forfeited. 

At 139 pounds, Catholic. 

At 147 pounds Eric Hintze, Maryland, 
won over Doug Borchard. Referee 
stopped bout after second round be- 
cause of eye injury. 

Gary Fisher, Maryland, easily de- 
cisioned Gene Maticko, 30-25, at 156. 

Leo Coyne, Maryland, decisioned Al 
Greene, 30-27 at 175 with plenty to 
spare. 

Syracuse V/i; Maryland 3'/: 

A debatable draw decision in the 
bout between Terp Bob Scali, 165, and 
Gil Granger, cost Maryland a tie with 
Syracuse, as Coach Ray Simmons 
Orangemen oontzed out the Cronin 
clouters, 4% -3% at Syracuse. 

An unexpected 29-28 nod went to 
Syracuse's Frank Guelli, 125, over 
Maryland's Gary Garber, NCAA and 
former All-Army champion. Not in 
mid-season shape Garber tired toward 
the finish. 

Terp Vince Palumbo, 132 national 
champion, stopped Garo Taft in round 
two. 

At 139 Syracuse's stellar John Grang- 
er shaded Maryland's Tony Esposito, 
30-25. 

Classy Gary Fisher, 147, won for 
Maryland by outboxing Bob Rigolosi, 
30-27. 

At 156 Orangeman Gus Fiacco out- 
classed green Pat Duffy to stop him in 
the first stanza. 

At 165 Maryland's Bob Scali boxed 
a draw with Gil Granger. 

Classy southpaw Leo Coyne glitched 
in to make it a win for the Terps by 
outpointing Lou Iannicello, 30-26. 

Syracuse heavyweight Nick Georgi- 
ade had too much on the ball for ver- 
dant Jim Parsons, Coach Cronin asking 
the referee to halt it in round one. 

Steece Brubaker refereed. 

What Of Boxing? 

The situation in College boxing 
seems to indicate that a change in 
eligibility rules is essential, if this 
time honored sport is to be salvaged. 

As college teams go Maryland has a 
good team, mostly up from the campus 
and coached by a good coach, Frank 
Cronin, who himself came up from the 
campus as a result, largely, of being 
coached by a good coach. 



64 



Maryland 



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Maryland a similar one-sided defeat. 
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TENNIS 



Freishtat Loses 

aryland's freshman net 
star, Dave Freishtat, 
lost to New York's 
George Mandel, in the 
(Eastern Indoor Junior 
Tennis championship 
finals, held in New 
York, 6-4, 2-6, 3-6, 9-11. 

Mandel, teamed with Tony Lieber- 
man of Philadelphia, won the doubles 
from Freishtat and Richard Katz of 
Baltimore, 8-6, 7-5. 

Freishtat led the field in the quarter 
finals with an 8-6, 6-4 victory over 
Steve Bank of New York. 

In the semi-finals Freishtat elimi- 
nated Dave Brechner of Brooklyn, 6-1, 
4-6, 6-1. 





« jyMMF, im TEH? S£Z> 

Maryland coed Le- 
oma Naughton 
won the honor of be- 
ing selected "Miss 
Football, 1954." 

Maryland coed Clay 

Keene Bernard won 

the honor of being 

selected "Miss Boxing 

I, 1953-1954." 

Miss Naughton was selected by a 

committee in California and was 

crowned in California. 




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Miss Bernard was nominated by 
the State of Nevada, selected by a 
committee in Hollywood, approved by 
unanimous vote of the National Boxing 
Association and crowned at Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin. 

The two young ladies are not only 
both Maryland students but were 
also previously schoolmates at Holton- 
Arms School, Washington, D. C. 

TRACK 

V.M.I. Relays 

aryland runners set two 
new marks at the V.M.I, 
winter relays. The 
Terps took the two and 
four-mile events in rec- 
ord time. 

Maryland, which took 
five relay titles last year, didn't garner 
its first one at V.M.I, until Alva Grim, 
Carl Party, Larry Faass and Horsley 
won the two-mile relay in record-set- 
ting time of 8:15.6 — a good 10.8 sec- 
onds faster than the previous record 
clocking of 8:26.4 set by the Terps in 
1954. 

Later, Grim, Party and Faass came 
back to team with Dick McGee in a 
record four-mile relay. The foursome 
covered the distance in 18 minutes 43.5 
seconds to better their 1954 relays rec- 
ord of 19:05.2 by a walloping 21.7 sec- 
onds. 

Results of other events in which Jim 
Kehoe's Marylanders took part: — 

THREE-MILE RUN— 1. Pitkethly, VMI ; 
2. Bourke. VMI: 3, Draper. Maryland; 4, 
Ha iiner, Duke. Time — 16 :22.9. 

FRESHMAN MILE RELAY — 1, George- 
town (Davis, Risbee, Procter, Nelson) : 2, 
Duke ; 3, Maryland : 4. Virginia Tech. Time — 
3 minutes. 34.0 seconds. (New relays record. 
Old record 3 :40.1 set last year by Virginia 
Tech. ) 

SPRINT SHUTTLE RELAY — 1, VMI (Hop- 
kins, Moody. Valentine, Wilson) ; 2, tie, Duke 
and Maryland ; 4, Davidson. 

FRESHMAN THREE-QUARTER MILE 
RUN — 1, Carney, Georgetown ; 2, Williams, 
North Carolina : 3, Schwinkler, Maryland : 
4, Beloor, Virginia. Time — 3 minutes, 22.3 
seconds. 

POLE VAULT — 1, tie. Schwartz, Mary- 
land : Yardhorough, North Carolina, and 
Sltenhoff. Georgetown : 4. tie, Goode, Lynch- 
burg ; Flaherty. Georgetown, and Duval, 
Maryland. Height — 12 feet, 6 inches. 

Edged Out In Millrose 

Maryland's mile relay team composed 
of Joe Hemler, Paul Hower, Dave Leas 
and Burke Wilson, in that order, were 
nipped at the tape by Fordham in New 
York's annual Millrose relays. Both 
teams were clocked in the same time, 
a fast 3:26.5. Teams in the race be- 
sides Fordham and Maryland were 
Holy Cross, Brown, and Providence, 
in that order. 

Teams Set Records 

Coach Jim Kehoe's two and four- 
mile relay teams broke their own rec- 
ords in the V.M.I. Relays at Lexing- 
ton. The two mile team of Burr Grim, 
Carl Party, Larry Faass, and Ray 
Horsley lowered the record to 8:15.6. 
In the four-mile relay Grim, Party, 
Jerry McGee and Faass lowered the 
four-mile relay record to 18:46.3. Mel 
Schwarz, Maryland's conference champ 
in the pole vault, cleared the bar at 




12-6 which was good for a first place 
tie. Bill Draper of Maryland was 
third in the three-mile run. 

Party Wins NYAC Race 

Maryland's Carl Party won the 2- 
mile handicap run at the New York 
AC games at Madison Square Garden. 

Party, timed in 9:20.7, finished 2 
yards ahead of Bob Johnson of the 
New York AC. 

Navy and Maryland ran second and 
third behind Syracuse in the college 
mile relay. Rhode Island was fourth. 
Maryland runners were Joe Hemler, 
Paul Hower, Dave Leas and Burke Wil- 



WRESTLING 



Maryland 15; Virginia 9 

ike Sandusky, who could 
become Maryland's first 
three-letter athlete 
since Tommy Mont 
('47), made his wrest- 
ling debut a success- 
ful and important one 
at Ritchie Coliseum. 

The 2 3 5-pound 

football tackle, who 

m also is a weightman 

| — .^^JH on tne track team, 

, *2r^ ^9 scored a 5-3 decision 

over University of 

Virginia's tough 

Henry Jordan t o 

give Coach Sully 

Krouse's grapplers 

a 15-9 victory in its 

wrestling opener. 

123 Pounds — Colin Steele (Virginia) de- 
cisioned John McHugh. 

130 Pounds — Carl Longnecker (Maryland) 
decisioned Charles Young. 

137 Pounds — Ronnie Carroll (Maryland) 
decisioned Dan Brown. 

147 Pounds — Danny Little (Maryland) de- 
cisioned Gordon Trapnell. 

157 Pounds — Dean Gladfelter (Maryland) 
defeated Lee Maston. 

167 Pounds— Kirk McWilliams (Virginia) 
decisioned Al Hair. 

177 Pounds — Bernard Schwab (Virginia) 
decisioned Mayer Littman. 

Heavyweight — Mike Sandusky (Maryland) 
decisioned Henry Jordan. 

Maryland 34; Wake Forest 

Coach William E. "Sully" Krouse's 
matmen registered a rarity in collegi- 
ate wrestling as they whitewashed the 
Wake Forest Demon Deacons, 34-0. 
This was the first intercollegiate match 
for Wake Forest. 

Sophomore Dean Gladfelter, senior 
Mayer Littman, and sophomore Mike 
Sandusky registered falls for the 
Terps. 

The summaries: 

123 Pounds — John Mcllugh (Maryland) 
decisioned Bill Jones. .VO. 

130 Pounds — Maryland's Beryle Cohen won 
l>v forfeit. 

137 Pounds — Maryland's Roney Carroll 
wcui by forfeit. 

147 Pounds — Danny Little (Maryland) de- 
cisioned Chuck Doggett, 5-0. 

157 Pounds — Dean Gladfelter (Maryland) 
pinned Clark Drake, 2:24. 

167 Pounds — Alfred Hair (Maryland) de- 
cisioned Ronnie Stanley, 3-0. 

177 Pounds — Mayer Littman (Maryland) 
pinned Bill Noel, 7 :58. 

Unlimited — Mike Sandusky (Maryland) 
pinned Don Garrison, 2 :10. 




66 



Maryland 



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Maryland 5; Penn State 25 

Unbeaten in two previous starts, the 
Maryland wrestlers bumped into one 
of Penn State's all-time best teams and 
took only one match, losing 25-5. 

Alfred Hair, of Patuxent River, Md., 
scored the Terps only win in the 167- 
pound class when Lion Ed Pasko struck 
his head in a fall to the mat and the 
match was stopped. 

Keenest bout on the program was 
the heavyweight duel in which Bill 
Oberly of Penn State edged previous- 
ly unbeaten Mike Sandusky, 6-4. 

The summaries: 

12:! Pounds — Nodland (Penn State) de- 
feated John McHugh, decision. S — 5. 

130 Pounds— Bob Homan (Penn State) de- 
feated Carl Longenecker, default, second per- 
iod. 

137 Pounds — Larry Fornieola (Penn State) 
defeated Roney Carroll, decision, 3 — 0. 

147 Pounds — John Pepe (Penn State) de- 
feated Danny Little, decision, 8 — 2. 

157 Pounds — Dave Adams (Penn State) 
defeated Dean Gladfelter, default, 8 — 2. 

107 Pounds — Alfred Hair (Maryland) de- 
feated Ed Fasko, default, second period. 

177 Pounds — Joe Krufka (Penn State) de- 
feated Mayer Liftman, decision, 3 — 0. 

Heavyweight — Bill Oberly (Penn State) 
defeated Mike Sandusky, decision, 6 — 4. 

Navy 21; Maryland 7 

More than 2500 fans crammed in and 
more than a thousand were turned 
away as Navy wrestlers outclassed 
Sully Krouse's grapplers, 21-7. 

It wasn't until the last two matches, 
when Navy heroes Joe Gattuso and 
Pete Blair scored decisions that Navy's 
rooters shook the rafters. 

Maryland with only two seniors on 
the squad, lacked the experience of the 
Middies and it showed as the match 
progressed. 

The Terps were as willing as the 
Middies, but, as Winston Churchill once 
said, "Courage is not enough." 

Maryland's only winner came in the 
opening match when Johnny McHugh 
decisioned Leo Sheehan in the 123- 
pound class. 

Terps' Berl Cohen and Roney Carroll 
wrestled to a draw as did Navy's Rich- 
ard Tucker (130) and Fred Thomas 
(137). 

For three Navy wins Bob Daughen- 
baugh (147) decisioned Danny Little, 
10-2; Larry Marr (157) beat Dean 
Gladfelter, 10-3, and John Brainerd 
pinned Alfred Hair in 7:12 minutes. 

Jo-Jo Gattuso, Navy's football full- 
back, star of the Sugar Bowl, took Terp 
Mayer Littman, 7-2. 

In a heavily publicized match, Navy's 
national 191-pound champion, Pete 
Blair, defeated Maryland's Mike San- 
dusky. Blair was on top throughout. 

Maryland 19; V.M.I. 8 

Maryland, ACC champion, defeated 
Virginia Military Institute, Southern 
Conference titlist, 19-8. 

Mike Sandusky, football tackle, de- 
feated Nick Servidio, 6-3, while his 115 
pound roommate, Johnny McHugh, 
scored the only pin for the Krouse- 
krushers when he threw Ray McKay. 

123 Pounds — John McHugh (Md.) pinned 
Kay McKay. Time 4 :40. 

130 Pounds — Ronnie Bryan (VMI) deci- 
sioned Beryle Cohe. 2-0. 

137 Pounds — Roney Carroll (Md.) deci- 
sioned Harry Wainer. 11-5. 

147 Pounds — John Little (Md.) decisioned 
Stu Jones. 6-4. 

157 Pounds — Dean Gladfelter (Md.) de- 



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You Just SHOULDN'T Be 

The Fellow At The Left!" 



WHAT GOES ON AT OUR 
ALMA MATER? 

What of our Classmates? 
What's the Alumni News? 
The Sports News? 

The Alumnus at the left made 
the mistake of not subscribing to 
"Maryland." 

He should tear out this ad and 
coupon and send it in. You can use 
the coupon for renewals too. Make 
your overall alumni contribution 
with $3.00 of it going for "Mary- 
land" magazine. 




ELMER Q. 
BUSMISSER : — 

"Whatever became 
of—t" 

"What was the 
score — t" 

'What's this rumor 
I hear about all 
this expansion 
at College Park 
and in Balti- 
more?" 

'Oosh, I never know 
what goes on?" 



HOMER J. 
UPTODATE : — 
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under my arm. 
Read 'Maryland,' 
Use the coupon 
printed below. I 
have all the news 
of all the Univer- 
sity all the time." 



Please pass this message along to non-subscribers 




i "CUT IT OUT NOW!" M 



•>'•> secretary, alumni associ 

:•:•:•: university of Maryland, college park, md. 

Enclosed herewith is $ , my contribution to the 

Alumni Fund. $3.00 of this amount is for a subscription to "MARYLAND" 
for one year. 




cisioned Jim Mnssic. 4-3. 

167 Pounds — Tom Massic (VMI) decisioned 
Jim Keating. 4-0. 

177 Pounds — Mayer Littman (Md.) and 
Jim Thonton drew. 3-3. 

Heavyweight — Mike Sandusky (Md.) de- 
cisioned Nick Sevvidio. 6-3. 



RIFLE 

Terp Rifles Win 

aryland riflemen again 
won the National Air 
Force ROTC Champion- 
ship with 940 points of 
1,000 possible. The 
Terp shooters first won 
the Hearst trophy in 
1953 as well as two previous national 
championships. 

Members of this year's championship 
five, and their scores, are: Cadets Rob- 
ert D. Matorana, 190; Merrill A. Sauer- 
eri, Jr., 191; Lawrence N. Lomolino, 
Jr., 191; Joseph T. Burkhalter, 190, 
and John Schmidt, 178. 
The top ten: — 

Maryland 940 

Notre Dame 939 

Oklahoma 933 

Ohio State 937 

Oklahoma A. & M 936 

Penn State 935 

The Citadel 934 

Kansas 931 

Kentucky f 931 

Iowa 929 

V.M.I. 1407; Maryland 1388 
Maryland's varsity team (not the 

ROTC team) lost to Virginia Military 

Institute, 1407-1388. 

The Terps were simply not good 

enough for the Kaydets crack outfit. 
The Maryland shooters returned 

from Lexington highly praising the 

courteous treatment accorded them at 

Lexington. 




SECRET CODE 

Kunigunde: — "I just couldn't make 
my check book balance. I had every 
item entered too "Milkman, $11.25; 
cleaners, $4.65, ESP $24.56." 

Ermintrude: — "What does ESP 
mean?" 

Kunigunde: — "Error some place." 



WATT? WATT? 

,4s the one electrician said to the 
other as the latter staggered in late, 
"Watts, wire you insulate?" Watts 
replied, "Well Ampere, you should be 
glad I'm Ohm." 



68 



Maryland 




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Vol. XXVI 



May-June, 1955 



No. 3 




^S&s^&tyw 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University •/ 
Maryland, and entered at the Post Office, 
College Park, Md., as second class mail mat- 
ter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 
1879. $3.00 per year — Fifty cents the copy. 



OFFICE OF PUBLICATION 

28 Symons Hall, 

University of Maryland, 

College Park, Md. 

WA. 7-3800, Ext. 249 or 394 



HARVEY L. MILLER, 
Managing Editor 



PATRICIA M. REIHM, 
Assistant Editor 



JOSEPH F. BLAIR, 
Sports Editor 



SALLY L. OGDEN, 

A dvertising Manager, 

18 W. 25th Street 

Baltimore 18, Md. 

(HO. 7-9018) 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Officers 

Col. O. H. Saunders '10, President 
J. Homer Remsberg '18, Vice-President 
J. Oilhert Pendergnst '33. Vice-President 
David L. Brigham '38, Exec- Secy. 

General Alumni Council 

AGRICULTURE — Clayton Reynolds '22, 
Abram Z. Gottwals '38, J. Homer Rems- 
berg *18. 

ARTS & SCIENCES— William H. Press '28, 
Charles Elllnger '37, Ralph G. Shure '32. 

BUSINESS & PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION— 
Alvln S. Klein '37, John Dyson '53, Roger 
L. Odette '52. 

DENTAL — Dr. Lawrence W. Bimestefer '34, 
Albert C. Cook '38, William E. Trail '26. 

EDUCATION— John P. Speicher '41, William 
Prlgg '53, E. Louise Sudlow '50. 

ENGINEERING — S. Chester Ward '32, C. A. 
Warthen '08, Col. O. H. Saunders '10. 

HOME ECONOMICS — Katherlne A. Longrldge 
'29, Mrs. Paul Coppinger '30, Mrs. William 
Kricker '31. 

LAW — J. Gilbert Pendergast '33, J. Dudley 
Digges '36, G. Kenneth Relbllch '29. 

MEDICAL — Albert E. Goldstein '12, Thurs- 
ton R. Adams '34, William H. Trlplett '11. 

PHARMACY — Frank Block '24, John Neutze 
'37, Samuel I. Ralchlen '25. 

NURSING — Flora Street '3, Virginia Stack 
'33, Martha Curtiss '48. 

Alumni Clubs 

BALTIMORE— Wm. H. Trlplett. '11. 

CARROLL COUNTY— Dr. L. L. Leggett, '30. 
Sr. '24. 

CUMBERLAND — Dr. J. Russell Cook '23. 

EASTERN SHORE— Otis Twllly '21. 

"M" CLUB — Sam Sllber, '34. 

NEW ENGLAND — R. A. B. Cook, '05. 

NEW YORK — Miss Sarah E. Morris, '24. 

PITTSBURGH — Charles Furtney, '37. 

PRINCE GEORGE'S CO. — Ellwood R. Nich- 
olas '28. 

RICHMOND— Paul Mullinlx, "36. 

SCHENECTADY — Mrs. Marie Esher, '45. 

TERRAPIN — James W. Stevens, '17. 

Ex-Officio 

Past President — Dr. A. E. Goldstein, '12. 
Past President — Dr. A. I. Bell, '19. 
Past President — C. V. Koons, '29. 
Past President — T. T. Sfpeer, '17. 
University President — Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 
Executive Secretary — David L. Brigham, '38. 



Mart/land 




GLENN L. MARTIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY DEDICATED 



Manilanrl Air I'liolo Service 



Background: Chemistry, Chemical Engineering. Foreground: Physics, Mathematics, Engineer Classrooms and Lahoratories. 

Insert: Wind Tunnel. 

Glenn L. Martin Institute Dedicated 



Dr. DuBridge Speaks Of 

Lead Role of Maryland 

In Technology 

On Maryland day, March 25, 1955, 
the University of Maryland dedi- 
cated its Glenn L. Martin Institute of 
Technology, the modern eight-unit sci- 
entific center. 

Principal speaker at ceremonies in 
the university armory was Lee A. Du- 
Bridge, president of California Insti- 
tute of Technology, who said Maryland 
now has an opportunity to play a key 
role in the Nation's technological de- 
velopment. 

Dr. DuBridge sharply rebuked Fed- 
eral policymakers for not seeking more 
scientific guidance. 

"We must face the fact," said the 
California scholar, that there is "no 
place in the top structure of govern- 
ment where scientists and engineers 
are brought into contact with policy or 
executive decisions." 

A Darker Side 
While 50 per cent of the scientists 
and engineers in the country work for 
government defense programs and in 
other fields, there is a darker side of 
the picture, he declared. 

"There are only two members of 
the Congress who have had a scientific 
or engineering education," he reported, 
adding that the Defense Department 
has only two or three technologists in 
its whole top structure. 

Dr. DuBridge said he hopes Maryland 
is creating "M. I. T. No. 2" in the 
Martin Institute. 

"It has always seemed to me that a 
very special opportunity lies with the 
University of Maryland; indeed, almost 
a special obligation. Here you are 
within a stone's throw of the nation's 
capital city — the city in which decisions 
are daily being made which affect in a 



vital way the future of the nation. The 
heart and mind of the whole free world 
indeed lie almost at your doorstep," 
said Dr. DuBridge. 

Vast Changes 

" It is a truism," Dr. DuBridge went 
on to say "whose truth is not yet fully 
realized on the banks of the Potomac, 
that developments in pure and applied 
science over the past 50 years — indeed 
over the past 20 — have vastly changed 



the nature of the problems with which 
Washington is concerned. The time 
was, not long ago, when government 
officials and legislators could be bliss- 
fully unaware of the advance of science 
and— still better — of the existence of 
scientists. The first horseless carriage, 
the first electric lights, the first air 
conditioning and the coming of tele- 
vision also made important changes in 
the living and working habits of Wasb- 
ingtonians. But that day when a Con- 



Dedication Ceremonies 




MARTIN INSTITUTE EXERCISES 



ai Danegger Foto 



The speakers' platform and part of the crowd at the dedication ceremonies of 
Glenn L. Martin Institute of Technology. 



Maryland 



Eminent Scientists Honored 







*\ 






v. 



/>/■. DuBridge 



Dr. Mori 




Dr. Van Vleck 



Dr. Drt/drn 



RECEIVED HONORARY DEGREES 



Four honorary doctor of science degrees and one honorary doctor of engineering degree were conferred during the dedication 
of the Glenn L. Martin Institute of Technology. Receiving doctor of science degrees were Dr. Lee A. DuBridge, President 
of the California Institute of Technology and principal speaker for the dedication ceremony; Dr. H. Marston Morse, Professor 
of Mathematics at Princeton Institute for Advanced Study; Dr. John H. Van Vleck, Dean of the Division of Applied Science 
at Harvard University, and Dr. John C. Warner, President of the Carnegie Institute of Technology. Dr. Hugh L. Dryden, 
Director of the National Advisor Committee for Aeronautics, received a doctor of engineering degree. 



gressional committee called in a couple 
of nuclear physicists to give lectures 
about neutrons and protons and ur- 
anium fission was a signal that a new 
age had arrived with which Washington 
was unprepared to cope." 

"Such signals of unpreparedness had 
appeared before. In 1939 a war began 
in Europe which, it was clear, might 
some day involve the United States. 
The possibility of trouble had indeed 
been apparent for several years. But, 
as late as the spring of 1940, there was 
no mechanism whereby the government 
could call on the scientific community 
for help in preparing the United States 
defenses. Even then it was a private 
individual — who, by some providential 
combination of circumstances, had re- 
cently moved to Washington — who 
initiated such an effort. Dr. Vannever 
Bush called together a small group of 
men who offered their services in get- 
ting a defense research organization 
started. The way in which the Office of 
Scientific Research and Development — 
OSRD — became a decisive factor in 
winning the war is now history. It is 
as convincing an argument as I can 
think of for having some good scien- 
tists and engineers always close to 
Washington," Dr. DuBridge continued. 

In Washington 

"Today," the speaker went on to say, 
"the government has literally hundreds 
of scientists and engineers in its em- 
ploy in and around Washington. They 
are at the National Bureau of Stand- 
ards, the Naval Research Laboratory, 
the National Institutes of Health of the 
Public Health Service and many other 
places. What can the University of 
Maryland add to this picture ? Many 
things." 

"The task of the university is not to 
invent weapons, but to seek basic 



knowledge. And that represents a 
prime obligation of this and every 
other university. The University of 
Maryland will, I hope, become an ever 
growing and thriving source of new 
knowledge in many fields of science and 
engineering. What the government and 
the country can do in the future in 
applying new knowledge to increase the 
nation's welfare and security depends 
on what new knowledge the universi- 
ties discover today and tomorrow," Dr. 
DuBridge said. 

"A second function of a university is 
to teach," the speaker continued, "and 



Heads Engineering 




DEAN S. S. STEINBERG 

Dean S. S. Steinberg, heading the 
Glenn L. Martin Institute's College of 
Engineering. 



here is where your greatest contribu- 
tion to national welfare will doubtless 
be. Washington and the nation need 
many scientists and engineers. There 
are not nearly enough first-class insti- 
tutions in this area to meet the need. 
We need in this immediate vicinity the 
finest minds to be found anywhere in 
the world — minds sharpened by the 
finest educational experience that any- 
one knows how to supply. Why should 
one have to go all the way to Boston — 
or Pasadena — to fill this need ? Why 
should it not be filled right here on this 
campus ? What an opportunity you 
have to make a major contribution 
over the next 50 years to the scientific 
competence and effectiveness of the 
government of the greatest technologi- 
cal country on earth! 

A Third Area 

"There is still a third area," Dr. 
DuBridge explained, "in which the 
University of Maryland, because of its 
location, can be of outstanding service 
to the federal government. This is the 
task of providing scientific and techni- 
cal advice, on a part-time basis, to the 
various agencies of government. In 
order to explain the opportunity here, 
I ask your indulgence while I go back 
a bit and review the elements of this 
problem. 

"Many departments of government 
could make more effective use of 
scientific advisory boards. A number 
of very successful scientific advisory 
groups have existed for some years in 
various parts of the Department of 
Defense and the Atomic Energy Com- 
mission," Dr. DuBridge said. 

"One difficulty with such advisory 
committees as exist in government is 
that their members are scattered far 
and wide throughout the country and 
it is exceedingly difficult to bring them 
together frequently to keep them in- 



M dryland 



formed. If even one member of each 
such group lived in, or close to, Wash- 
ington the situation would be vastly im- 
proved," the speaker continued. 

"Here is where the University of 
Maryland comes into the pictux-e. 1 
would like to express the hope," Dr. 
DuBridge went on to say, "that over 
the next five or ten years Maryland will 
attract to its faculty some of the out- 
standing scientists and engineers in 
the country who have had experience 
in governmental affairs. They will 
stimulate among their students and 
colleagues further interest in such 
affairs and this university could even- 
tually become a key factor in bringing 
the talents and experience of the na- 
tion's entire scientific community into 
contact with the government and into 
effective collaboration in solving some 
of the government's key problems. 

"I congratulate all those who have 
helped to make this event possible; who 
have contributed to the creation of the 
Glenn L. Martin Institute. I wish the 
Institute and the University many 
centuries of conspicuous success," Dr. 
DuBridge concluded. 

The ceremonies included remarks by 
Gov. Theodore R. McKeldin, Univer- 
sity President Wilson H. Elkins and 
Glenn L. Martin, aircraft manufacturer. 

Mr. Martin said his main purpose in 
endowing the university's technical 
center was technical improvement. 

"Today we are more certain than 
ever that we must do everything in 
our power to help the technical schools 
develop our children for the problems 
of tomorrow" he said. 

Tour Of Buildings 

Following the formal exercises 
guests toured the various buildings. 

Some of the things they were in- 
vited to see included: 

A supersonic wind tunnel which 
blasts air through a gigantic piece of 
equipment, then projects shock waves 
on mirrors. 

The absolutely shockless basement of 
the Institute of Molecular Physics 
where delicate measurements are made 
and where even a seismograph cannot 
record a Highway 1 truck rumble or 
bounce. 

Vaults of the National Sand and 
Gravel Association where huge chunks 
of concrete are chilled, then drenched 
in fog for testing purposes. 

A device which blows up the tip of 
a phonograph needle to the size of a 
tangerine. 

Acres of machinery. 

The still in the Chemical Engineer- 
ing Building. 

A busy staff was on hand to explain 
some of the more spectacular pieces 
of equipment. Some of which had just 
arrived from Holland's machine tool 
plants and one of which cost $90,000. 

Erected at a cost of eight and one 
half million dollars, the Institute is 
made up of eight buildings, houses the 
entire College of Engineering under 



Dean S. S. Steinberg and many of the 
academic and research departments of 

the College of Arts and Sciences. 

The source of funds for the Institute 
included an original gift of $2,800,1)00 
by Glenn L. Martin, $5,678,455.15 from 
the State of Maryland, and $142,946.52 
from the Office of Naval Research and 
Bureau of the Department of Defense 
Ordnance. 

Additionally, Mr. Martin established 
a sum of $539,215.51 in the Minta 
Martin Research Fund of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 

Engineering Classroom And 
Laboratory Buildings 

The College of Engineering, the cen- 
tral unit of the Institute contains the 
five departments of Aeronautical, 
Chemical, Civil, Electrical and Me- 
chanical Engineering, the Institute for 
Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathe- 
matics, the Wind Tunnel, the depart- 
ment of Fire Service Extension and 
extension instruction in Mining in the 
western part of the State. 

The Classroom Building has a total 
of 119,680 square feet of floor space. 
It was constructed in 1949 at a cost 
of $1,423,298.11. The Laboratory Build- 
ing also completed in 1949, was erected 
at a cost of $1,036,123.22. 

The Classroom Building houses the 
administrative offices of Dean Stein- 
berg, classrooms, drafting rooms, and 
smaller laboratories both for instruc- 
tion and research. 

The Laboratory Building houses the 
principal laboratories of the depart- 
ments of aeronautical, civil, electrical, 
and mechanical engineering. 

Chemical Engineering 

The Chemical Engineering Build- 
ing with a total of 43,466 square feet 
was built at a cost of $591,791.14. A 
department of the College of Engi- 
neering it is under the direction of 
Dr. Wilbert J. Huff. 

The Chemical Engineering building 
contains lecture rooms, library, lab- 
atories, storerooms and offices equipped 
for the full range of Chemical Engi- 
neering, Industrial Chemical and Metal- 
lurgical studies. Laboratories are main- 
tained for General Testing and Control, 
Unit Operations; Unit Processes, Elec- 
trochemical Engineering, Metallurgy, 
Gas and Fuel Analysis; Cooperative 
Research, and Graduate Research. 

Aeronautical Laboratory 

The Wind Tunnel Operations Depart- 
ment performs research and develop- 
ment on aeronautical projects on a year 
round basis. Projects are sponsored by 
such organizations as The Naval Ord- 
nance Laboratory, Camp Detrick, Glenn 
L. Martin Company, McDonnell Air- 
craft and Chance Vought Aircraft. The 
sponsors pay for the services of the 
wind tunnel at the rate of approxi- 
mately $100 per hour, which yields 
sufficient income to meet all of the 
financial needs of the laboratory. 

Department of Chemistry 

The Department of Chemistry, 
headed by Dr. Nathan L. Drake, a 
part of the College of Arts and Sci- 



ences, lias a total of 125,000 square 
feel and was completed in 1051 at a 
cost of $1,779,558.26. 

Some idea of the size of the chem 
istry operation may he gained by con- 
sidering the legist ration figures for 
the fust semester of the current year. 
Undergraduate course registration 
totalled 2301, and graduate registration 
totalled 2<is. Each student is provided 
with laboratory space and equipment 
for his individual use. 

The Chemistry department has a de- 
partmental library, a part of the uni- 
versity's library system, has a collec- 
tion of 2559 books on chemistry and 
related subjects. 

Institute Of Molecular Physics 

The Institute of Molecular Physics, 
built by the University at a cost of 
over $501,000 is one of the newer lab- 
atories on the campus and is ideally 
adapted for research on matter under 
high pressures. The establishment of 
this laboratory is an attempt to bring 
to this country the excellent techniques 
and "know-how" of Professor A. F. 
Michels, director of the van der Waals 
Laboratory in Amsterdam. Professor 
Michels is a part-time member of the 
University faculty and has played 
an important partin planning the new 
laboratory and in the procurement of 
apparatus. The operations began offi- 
cially in the new laboratory January 1, 
1955. Visiting professors from Holland 
have aided in both theoretical and ex- 
perimental work as the operations has 
progressed. 

Physics 

The Physics Building was completed 
in the fall of 1952 at a cost of $967,- 
740.99. It provides facilities for the 
teaching and research of the Physics 
Department under Dr. John Toll. 

Master and doctorate degrees are 
offered in many fields of experimental 
and theoretical physics including solid 
state, molecular physics, elementary 
particle theory, gaseous discharges, 
hydrodynamics, mathematical physics, 
microwaves, cosmic waves, statistical 
mechanics and nuclear physics. 

The staff of 76 scientists who make 
up the faculty come from all parts 
of the worfd. 

The work of the department is sup- 
ported by the Air Research Develop- 
ment Command, the Office of Naval 
Research and the National Foundation. 

Mathematics 

The Mathematics Building has three 
major organizations operating in vari- 
ous sections of the building. The build- 
ing was completed in 1954 at a cost of 
$908,098.55. It houses the Department 
of Mathematics, the Institute for Fluid 
Dynamics and Applied Mathematics, 
and the Engineering and Physical Sci- 
ences Library. 

The Foucault Pendulum which occu- 
pies the center of the lobby, provides 
a touch of scientific interest. After 
watching it for a while, one mystified 
student inquired, "How do they make 
the building turn?" 



Maryland 



The second floor of the west wing of 
the Mathematics building is devoted to 
offices for the Mathematics Department 
of the College of Arts and Sciences, 
under Dr. Stanley Jackson. 

Founded in 1949, the Institute for 
Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathe- 
matics is devoted to research and ad- 
vanced training in the broad fields of 
Applied Mathematics and Fliud Dy- 
namics. 

The Institute under Dr. Monroe Mar- 



tin, brought to the Washington area 
distinguished scholars from all over the 
globe to maintain contact with the re- 
search going on at other centers. 

In its six years of existence the 
Institute has become a center for study 
and research. It is housed in the Mathe- 
matics Building and its laboratories 
are located in the Physics Building. 

The Engineering and Physical Sci- 
ences Library serves the Physics, 
Mathematics, and Industrial Education 
Departments, and the College of Engi- 



neering including the Mechanical, Civil, 
Aeronautical, Electrical, and Chemical 
Engineering Departments, as well as 
the Institute for Fluid Dynamics and 
Applied Mathematics, and the Aero- 
nautical Laboratory. 

Designed as a branch part of the 
University of Maryland Library sys- 
tem, this library contains space for 
over a hundred thousand volumes and 
consists of three floors of stacks over 
a large reading room on the first floor. 



Glenn L. Martin, Flyer And Builder 



Maryland Benefactor, Great 
Flight Pioneer, Air Ace And 
Builder Of Aircraft . . . 

Glenn L. Martin, in whose honor 
the University of Maryland's 
Glenn L. Martin Institute of Technol- 
ogy has been dedicated, was born at 
Macksburg, Iowa, on January 17, 1886. 
Two years later his family moved to 
Liberal, Kansas, where his father con- 
ducted a wheat farm and a hardware 
shop. 

When Glenn Martin was six years 
old he had his first experience with 
aerodynamics and business procedures. 
He learned how a build and fly box 
kites more successfully than any other 
boy in the neighborhood. What's more, 
he uncovered a market for them and 
began his first production line on the 
floor of his mother's kitchen. The 
charge was twenty-five cents per kite. 

Following this successful venture 
there never was a time when he wasn't 
interested in sails and lifting surfaces 
and developed the unshakable convic- 
tions that he could build and fly a man 
carrying airplane. 

In Kansas 

He took a two-year business course 
at Kansas Wesleyan University, and 
with his love of things mechanical he 
promptly promoted himself a job as 
garage hand with the first automobile 
business in town. 

In 1905 the family moved to Santa 
Ana, California. Glenn started a gar- 
age of his own. It was a few months 
later that he read of Orville Wright's 
hundred-second flight at Kitty Hawk, 
N. C. 

Glenn Martin knew that he also 
would fly some day, but his first steps 
toward realization of this desire were 
taken with the thoroughness and cau- 
tion which have characterized his en- 
tire life. He built a biplane glider and 
for months practised gliding from the 
hills near Santa Ana. But only after 
he felt completely at ease in his giant 
kite did he rent an abandoned church, 
and begin construction of a biplane 
with a motor and a propeller. 

There were no text books for refer- 
nece no blue prints or past experiences 
to guide him. Everything he did was 
experimental. Working during the day 



Flyer, Builder 




GLENN L. MARTIN 

Maryland's Glenn L. Martin Insti- 
tute is named in honor of this Pioneer 
who grew up from boyhood boxkite 
era to design the most advanced air- 
craft. 



as an automobile salesman and repair- 
man he labored at night on his air- 
plane, aided by light from a kerosene 
lamp held by his mother, who had 
complete faith in his objectives from 
the very start. 

First Aircraft 

After two years of work, which cost 
more than $2,000, Glenn Martin's first 
aircraft was ready for flight. Again 
there was no headlong rush into the 
unknown. He taxied for days to get 
the feel of the plane. Finally in Au- 
gust, 1909, he made his first flight, 
covering one hundred feet at a two 
foot altitude. The instant he felt the 
plane was off the ground, he brought 
it down. Continuing for weeks to make 
these low flights, he did nothing for 
fun or vain glory. Every hop resulted 
in a study period and very often in 
the necessity for adjustment. Little 
by little he increased the altitude of 
his hops until he reached fifteen feet 
and stretched the distance flown to a 
hundreds yards. And still he continued 



working at his automobile business to 
earn money for maintenance and im- 
provement of his airplane. 

Not until the summer of 1910 did 
young Martin begin to feel satisfied 
with his plane and in the fall of that 
year the Los Angeles Times printed 
a picture of him and the plane, adding 
cautiously that "he is reputed to have 
flown on the mesa near Santa Ana." 
In November of the same year his first 
advertised exhibition flight took place 
at Santa Ana and The Times did an 
about-face. Newspaper accounts of the 
flying attracted large crowds to Santa 
Ana and the local Chamber of Com- 
merce decided to help him. The plane 
was put on exhibition, tickets were sold 
and several hundreds dollars were 
raised which Martin used as a nest 
egg toward building his second plane. 

The next year he began to make 
real money. He and his aircraft were 
in great demand at county fairs and 
local celebrations. A two-day exhibi- 
tion at Brawley, for example, fattened 
his bank-roll by $750. 

Well Known In 1911 

By 1911, Glen L. Martin was one 
of the best known fliers of the entire 
country and went barnstorming all 
over the West. The crowds rated him a 
daredevil who thought little of his 
life, but the risks he ran were mini- 
mized by the extraordinary precautions 
he always took before and during a 
flight. 

He attracted world-wide attention on 
May 10, 1912 by flying a seaplane 
thirty-eight miles away, and back. 

He was the first to deliver the mail 
by plane; first to deliver newspapers by 
plane; first to drop a baseball into a 
catcher's mitt from an airplane; he 
tossed a bouquet into a May Queen's 
lap by plane; bombed a sham fort by 
plane; used his flying machine to hunt 
coyotes, to hunt escaped convicts, to 
pick up a passenger from a boat, to 
search the ocean for lost aviators, 
the first flyer to fly his own mother, 
first to take motion pictures from a 
plane, first to shower the public from 
the air with department store adver- 
tising and merchandise coupons. 

And as far as young Martin was con- 
cerned, all of this was important only 
because it served to advertise and 
create demand for the planes being 
built in his infant factory. 



6 



Maryland 



Some California capitalists overcame 
their timidity about financing Martin's 
company and lent support to the proj- 
ect. Soon, however, they became con- 
vinced that the possibilities of flying 
had been completely explored and they 
began to consider their investments 
unsoundly placed. Dismayed but mo- 
mentarily, Glenn Martin, with the aid 
of a wealthy local sportsman bought 
out his partners and again became the 
sole owner of his business. 

Won In Chicago 
He continued his public appearances 
and in 1912 at an international meet 
in Chicago he won more events than 
any other entrant. 

This same year he moved his factory 
to Los Angeles and started a flying 
school, in which many future leaders 
in aviation were trained. 

The next year he put out a four- 
passenger seaplane which exhausted 
the phrase-making capacity of the avia- 
tion reporters of the day. 

Early in 1913, using a bomb-sight 
of his own design Martin made the 
first real bombing test ever made from 
an airplane while an Army officer 
checked the results from the ground. 
Other inventions sprang from his agile 
mind. He invented the first parachute 
to open automatically and among the 
year's top sensations were the para- 
chute jumps made by Miss Tiny Broad- 
wick from airplanes piloted by Glenn 
Martin. 

Forseeing the entrance of the United 
States into World War I, he merged his 
own interests with those of the Wrights 
in 1917, the new company being called 
the Wright-Martin Aircraft Corpora- 
tion. Due to conditions beyond the 
control of the partners, the new organ- 
zaition was shortlived and Glenn 
Martin with financial aid from a group 
of Cleveland capitalists once again 
organized his own company, this time 
in Cleveland, Ohio. 

In World War I 

In January, 1918, he went to Wash- 
ington with his plans for a new bomb- 
er and got a green light to proceed 
with the building of a few models. The 
first of them rolled out of his plant 
only six months later — an unbelievable 
accomplishment. It was a twin-engined 
biplane carrying a bomb load of 1,500 
pounds and years ahead of its time in 
performance. A large order for the 
bomber was immediately forthcoming, 
but it was too late to help win the war. 
The first shipment had been scheduled 
for December, 1918 and the war ended 
a month earlier. 

With World War I successfully over, 
Mr. Martin's Cleveland backers dis- 
closed that they were interested only 
in winning the war, not in financing 
a permanent aircraft business. And for 
the second time, Martin bought out his 
associates and became the sole owner 
of his business. 

Under his administration, the busi- 
ness flourished and in a few years 
Martin aircraft were in such demand 



that his Cleveland plant could no longer 
accommodate the activity. In 1929, 
Martin moved his business in its en- 
tirety to a 1,260 acre tract at Middle 
River, Md., just 12 miles from Haiti- 
more. The city fathers welcomed him 
with open arms and while speaking 
before a civic gathering Mr. Martin 
predicted that within a few years he 
would be utilizing the services of ten 
thousand employees. During World 
War II employment totals exceeded 
fifty thousands and more than a year 
after V-J Day. 

The Mars 

During the war years, the Mars, the 
largest seaplane in the world, was 
built by Martin largely at his own ex- 
pense. The original Mars and its suc- 
cessors were purchased by the U. S. 
Navy and performed seemingly im- 
possible tasks in the Naval Transport 
Service. 

After the launching of the Mars, Mr. 
Martin announced that he had com- 
pleted designs for building a 250,000 
pounder and that he was ready to start 
on still another seaplane of twice this 
weight, one half million pounds. 

With the long range vision and fore- 
sight which the world has come to ex- 
pect of Glenn Martin, he announced 
shortly after the close of World War 
II that his company would embark 
for the first time on a program of 
passenger and cargo plane construction. 

So well received were the new Martin 
Models, that orders were received for 
them by many domestic and foreign 
passenger airlines and domestic cargo 
operators. Commercial and warplane 
orders held by the Martin Company 
reached the astounding peacetime total 
of $196,000,000, the greatest of any air- 
craft manufacturer in the world. 

Competitors 

Many of Martin's greatest competi- 
tors are old employees of his. Glenn 
Martin is one of the few pioneer fliers 
of America who is guiding the destinies 
of his own company. 

He has been honored for his work on 
many occasions including doctor's de- 
grees from three American Universi- 
ties; was awarded The Collier Trophy 
by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 
1932 for the greatest aeronautical 
achievement in America; and was pre- 
sented the Guggenheim Medal by the 
Institute of the Aeronautical Sciences 
in 1941 for his contribution to aero- 
nautical development. 



Easter Seals 



Y.M.C.A. Conference 

A pre-legislative conference in which 
225 boys and girls representing YMCA 
units of the State of Maryland took 
part was held at the University. Dr. 
Don Brown, director of the Univer- 
sity's Bureau of Governmental Re- 
search and chairman of the confer- 
ence said that the conference was de- 
signed to give the boys and girls of 
Maryland an opportunity to partici- 
pate in the state governmental struc- 
ture as it exists at Annapolis. 




FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN 

Little Ronnie Baker, left, came all 
the way from Baltimore to the Univer- 
sity of Maryland to present an Easter 
seal corsage to Mrs. Wilson H. Elkins, 
wife of Maryland's President. The oc- 
casion was the kick-off of the Maryland 
Easter seal campaign, sponsored by the 
Maryland Society for Crippled Children 
and Adults. The corsage is made of the 
traditional Easter seals and ribbon. 



Highlights of the meeting were the 
election of a boy governor and the 
actual functioning of a legislature com- 
plete with committee assignments. Joel 
Downey, of Frostburg, was the Gov- 
ernor. 

Assisting Dr. Bowen in the presenta- 
tion of the program were many Mary- 
land state officials, civic leaders, high 
school and junior college representa- 
tives, as well as YMCA leaders. 

University President Wilson H. Elk- 
ins addressed the gathering. 

Dr. Robert S. Friedman, of the Uni- 
versity's Bureau of Governmental Re- 
search, presided at the Senate meeting. 

Mati Tammaru, Senior in City Col- 
lege, Baltimore, who entered the United 
States five years ago as a displaced 
person from Estonia, was elected gov- 
ernor. 

The 18-year-old carpenter's son re- 
ceived a standing ovation from 200 
students representing 24 high schools 
at the pre-legislative conference. 

Mati left Estonia with his parents, 
two brothers, and two sisters, just be- 
fore the Russian occupation during 
World War II. He came to the United 
States from Linz, Austria, where he 
lived for five years in camps for dis- 
placed persons. The family is waiting 
to be sworn as United States citizens. 

Mati, an honor student, is chairman 
of the HI-Y Council in Baltimore, vice- 
president of his high school student 
body, member of the publications staff 
and a varsity letter holder in cross 
country and track. 



Maryland 



Why An Alumni Association? 




f ul 

p 1 



Saunders 



Bf Gdcwd O.yf. Mounded, '/O, 
President, Alumni Association 

A question of "Why do we have an 
Alumni Association?" has been 
asked more than once at Alumni Coun- 
cil meetings. Usually it has been left 
unanswered, as it was thought that the 
question was brought up in a facetious 
way. The word "facetious" carries a 

meaning of 
1 a y- 
and 
e a s- 
ant; harm- 
lessly mis- 
c h i e - 
vous; teas- 
iing." Since 
it was 
thought that 
everyone in 
the Council 
had a clear 
idea of why 
we have an 
Alumni As- 
s o c i a - 
ti o n , the 
matter r e- 
ceived scant comment. However, it 
has come about that the repetition of 
the question, may be more harmful 
than harmless to the Council and the 
Association, hence an answer seems 
to be in order. 

My thoughts as to a possible an- 
swer are presented below. If you, my 
reader, have some other and addition- 
al thoughts, please send them to the 
editor, and I am sure he will give them 
space. 

The Constitution 
First, let me quote from the Con- 
stitution of the University of Mary- 
land Alumni Association. ". . . The ob- 
jects of this association shall be to 
promote the interests and welfare of 
the University of Maryland and to as- 
sist in furthering mutally beneficial 
relations between the University of 
Maryland, the people of the State, and 
its alumni." 

That seems to indicate a public re- 
lations job on its face. Since the Coun- 
cil is the governing body of the Alumni 
Association, it may be best to point 
out some seeming limitations upon its 
public relations efforts and activities. 

Two limitations that seem quite rea- 
sonable are that the Association, 
through its Council and magazine, 
should avoid even the appearance of 
dictating to the constituted authorities 
charged with setting the policies of, 
and carrying out the tasks of the Uni- 
versity, and that the Council and its 
magazine should avoid any politics of 
any kind. Other limitations might be 
mentioned, but these seem enough to 
indicate the field. 

Since the Association, its Council 
and its magazine should avoid becom- 
ing spring boards or sounding places 
for political advancement or pet ideas, 
then what are some of the things that 



the Association, through its Council 
and magazine, may do to enhance the 
value of the diploma that each grad- 
uate has received? 

Those diplomas are valuable docu- 
ments. It seems axiomatic that every 
graduate of the University should be 
foremost among the Guardians of the 
good name of the University. To give 
expression to thoughts along this line 
would seem to be real reason for an 
Alumni Asociation. 

The University is an outstanding ed- 
ucational institution and is being im- 
proved upon even now. It has made 
its name in many fields, educational 
as well as athletic, and graduates have 
every belief and assurance that it will 
go on to greater things in research 
and other fields. 

It should be a pleasure and a labor 
of love on the part of every gradu- 
ate to defend the good name of each 
component part of the University and 
of the schools as a whole, be they in 
Baltimore or at College Park or else- 
where. The individual satisfactions to 
be gotten from some service, or con- 
tribution, be that service or contribu- 
tion large or small, or even only a good 
word planted at the right time and in 
the right place, make such satisfac- 
tions of a nature that no value mark 
can rightly be set on them. 
Clear Of Politics 

To refer back to the question of 
"Why do we have an Alumni Asso- 
ciation," it seems to me that we have 
it to enable the graduates to have a 
central organization through which to 
make known and felt their ideas and 
efforts as Guardians of the good name 
of the University. 

While avoiding political action and 
staying clear of policies for the Uni- 
versity, it seems that the Council will 
be wisely advised to work for the 
strengthening of the University by en- 
couraging monetary contributions for 
scholarships of all kinds; to endeavor 
to increase membership in the Alumni 
Association and subscribers to the mag- 
azine; to increase the dignity and 
standing of the magazine and its 
worth; and to administer and super- 
vise the business and funds of the 
Alumni Association with the highest 
sense of devotion and trust. 

This should give plenty of work to 
members of the Alumni Association, 
the Council, the magazine, and be, 
in some ways, a fitting answer to why 
we have an Alumni Association. 



Blood Drive 

For the Red Cross Drive on campus 
Patricia A. Killingsworth, Home Eco- 
nomics, and Monroe R. Sandberg, A&S, 
did a magnificent job and deserve a lot 
of credit for the month of planning 
and organizing which made the drive 
so successful. 

Over !)44 students ofFered blood and 
of these 887 were successful donors. 
The quota set for us by the Red Cross 
Unit in town was about 550, so you 
can see how enthusiastically the stu- 



dents worked and how far over the 
top they went. The job of scheduling 
and handling over 400 donors a day 
was also a huge one, and yet the day 
went like clock-woi-k. Pat had about 
50 girls to help her each day. 

Monroe was especially helpful in 
publicizing the Drive in all the sorori- 
ties, fraternities, and dormitories, and 
also worked to make things go smooth- 
ly the two days of the actual Drive. 

A project like this is difficult to 
execute. It was beautifully handled 
from beginning to end. Pat's sorority, 
Alpha Omicron Pi, and Monroe's fra- 
ternity, Tau Epsilon Phi, received the 
awards for the largest percentage of 
donors, which was very fitting. 



Library Conference 

Howard Rovelstad, Director of Li- 
braries, attended the Association of 
College and Research Libraries' Build- 
ing Plans Institute held at Wayne Uni- 
versity in Detroit. Mr. Rovelstad also 
attended the mid-winter conference of 
the American Library Association in 
Chicago. 



At Purdue 

Miss Adele H. Stamp, Dean of Wom- 
en, attended the Council Meeting of the 
Association of College Honor Societies 
at Purdue University. Miss Stamp rep- 
resented Alpha Lambda Delta on the 
council. 



A Modest Miss 




HEADS BLOOD DRIVE 
It was purely by chance that a tip 
came to the Maryland Magazine office 
that Pat Killingsworth, pictured above, 
junior in the College of Home Eco- 
nomics and co-chairman of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland's Red Cross Blood 
drive had really master-minded a suc- 
cessful blood drive campaign. Pat's 
committee accounted for 886 pints of 
blood from student and faculty donors 
in two days. Their quota was 640 pints. 



S 



Maryland 




"Not a man in sight 



•>•> 



As I was driving along a country road with lour other women 
as my guests a tire went Hat. My near! sank with it, lor my 
tire-changing experience was nil and the mad was empty of 
aid. Pulling lo I lie side, I limited out the tools, remarking as 
I did so: 

Not a man in sight, ol course. \\ hat we need is an angel 
Irom heaven! 

Imagine our astonishment when a cheery voice above our 

heads said, I II he down in a minute, lady. Unknowingly, I 

had stopped beside a telephone pole at the top of which sat 
our "anger —a line repairman. 



From (tie ReaJcrs Digest feature. Life in these 
United Slates . . . ' (rue stories showing appealing 
or humorous sidelights on the American scene. 



A Friend in Need 



We got a chuckle out of that little story and 
we hope you did too. Best thing about it is 
that it isn't an isolated case. 

Many a time each day, telephone men and 
women go out of their way to help someone 
in trouble. Their friendly, neighborly spirit is 
one of the nice things about telephone service. 



BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 




Maryland 



From Johns Hopkins 




MARYLAND PRESIDENT HONORED 

President Wilson H. Elkins receives an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from 
The Johns Hopkins University tendered by, at left, President Lowell J. Reed 
of Johns Hopkins. 



At Johns Hopkins 

//^Phe ingenuity of man in harnessing 
the forces of nature has been 
phenomenal, but man has not distin- 
guished himself by the conquest of 
forces which determine the use of ma- 
terial inventions and discoveries," Dr. 
Wilson H. Elkins said at the seventy- 
ninth commemoration day exercises of 
Johns Hopkins University. 

Dr. Elkins, president of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, was one of three in- 
dividuals given honorary degrees at the 
ceremonies. He was awarded the hon- 
orary degree of doctor of laws. 

Others similarly honored were Dr. 
Samuel J. Crowe, professor emeritus of 
laryngology and otology at the Johns 
Hopkins School of Medicine, and Dr. 
Millicent Carey Mcintosh, president 
of Barnard College of Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

Our Duty 

Discussing the role of "The Indi- 
vidual in a Complex Society," Dr. El- 
kins declared: "It is our duty to defend 
principles and practices which have 
contributed to human welfare, and at 
the same time to admit deficiencies and 
weaknesses which, if corrected, will 
help the individual to live in a society 
demanding utmost efficiency and under- 
standing." 

Dr. Elkins traced chronologically the 
role of the individual in American so- 
ciety from the last century through to 
the midpoint of the Twentieth Century, 
pointing out the increasing complexity 
of life as the years have passed, 



"In the not too distant past the life 
of the individual was relatively simple," 
he said. "Fundamental requirements, if 
not easily obtained, were less numerous 
and involved physical effort to a much 
greater extent than mental exertion." 

"They depended more on nature, and 
while nature was cruel, it supplied sim- 
ple needs and left the individual to 
enjoy an unregimented existence. In 
this state of being, the conflicts be- 
tween man and the elements were 
easily recognized and seldom produced 
ulcers." 

At this time there was no conflict 
between a "maximum amount of indi- 
vidual freedom" and the commonweal. 

"The controversial issue of the social 
function of the state, which involves 
the propriety of laws to regulate hours 
and conditions of work, the control of 
production, and the taxation of income 
was only in the embryonic stage." 
Different Today 

But today things are different. 

"While food and shelter remain pri- 
mary requisites, the individual seeks a 
multitude of conveniences which were 
unknown a century ago." Dr. Elkins 
said, adding that "an assortment of 
clothing, however uncomfortable, de- 
mands a sizeable part of the income. 
Electric lights, Frigidaires, television, 
automobiles, airplane transportation 
adequate medical care, frozen foods, 
telephones and all kinds of entertain- 
ment are but a few of the things re- 
quired for happiness." 

In this changing society, which in- 
creased Government expansion and 



growth of the country with its tech- 
nological and scientific and social ad- 
vances has rendered more complex, Dr. 
Elkins listed what he termed the 
'fundamental requirements" in the 
preparation of the individual for a 
changing society. 

"I submit to you that the most im- 
portant are health, the tools of learn- 
ing, character, a philosophy of life, an 
understanding of democracy coupled 
with a sense of responsibility, and the 
means of making a living," he said. 
Making A Living 

Regarding the means of making a 
living, Dr. Elkins declared that "how- 
ever important this may be (viz: mak- 
ing a living) it is incidental to condi- 
tions which must exist for life to be 
worth living. If conditions are con- 
ducive to well-being and facilities are 
available, professional and vocational 
preparation will take care of itself be- 
cause of the natural instinct of self- 
preparation. The main problem here is 
not motivation but the identification of 
aptitudes and the encouragement of 
individuals to seek the level of their 
abilities." 

Encouraging individuals to seek the 
level of their abilities is not as easy a 
task as it appears, Dr. Elkins noted, 
explaining that college degrees have 
been so "glorified" out of all proportion 
to their worth that manual labor has 
fallen into disrepute. 

"We have so glorified the college 
degree that many seek it who could 
better use something else, and we have 
dignified the professions to such an 
stances recognized by the committee, 
extent that manual labor or jobs not 
requiring a degree are without social 
prestige," Dr. Elkins said. 

"In a democracy there must be di- 
versity of position and economic status, 
but it does not follow that the dignity 
of any person should suffer. There is 
a real need for a change of attitude in 
order to render effective vocational 
guidance," he concluded. 



Scholarships 



For the benefit of high school stu- 
dents who are interested in applying 
for scholarships and grants at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, the university's 
Scholarship Committee of which Dr. H. 
F. Cotterman, Dean of the Faculty, is 
chairman, requires 
the following stand- 
ards, viz: — 

A student to be 
eligible for a schol- 
arship on Univer- 
sity funds or on 
funds accepted by 
the University for 
scholarships must 
have an average 
mark of "B" from 
high or secondary 
school from which 
he enters. 

To retain such a scholarship a stu- 
dent must rank in the upper half of 
his class. 

A student who falls below the above 
rank, except for extenuating circum- 




Dran Cottrnnan 



10 



Maryland 



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USE THE COUPON ON 
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will have his scholarship withdrawn 
and will be notified as early in the sum- 
mer as the issuance of grades from the 
Registrar's Office will permit. 

A student who drops below the mini- 
mum standard one year and succeeds 
in raising- his average to an acceptable 
standard in a succeeding year may be 
reconsidered for scholarship help. 

A student transferring from another 
institution requesting scholarship aid 
must meet the same general require- 
ments as students in the University of 
Maryland. 

Should a high school graduate desire 
aid to help defray living expenses at 
the university he may apply for a 
grant under the following conditions. 

A student to be eligible for a grant 
on university funds or on funds ac- 
cepted by the university for a grant 
must have an average mark of "C" 
from the high school or secondary 
school from which he enters. This 
would include all out-of-state students 
and all students within the State clas"si- 
fied as "A" from the standpoint of ad- 
mission. It would likewise include stu- 
dents from the State of Maryland who 
have been sufficiently high on entrance 
tests to be classified as "B." Students 
from the State of Maryland who are 
low in entrance tests and are classi- 
fied as "C" will not be eligible for 
grants from the university or for 
grants from funds accepted and spon- 
sored by the University. 

For retention of a grant, a student 
must make normal progress toward a 
degree in four or five years depending 
upon the course of study. 

Grants will be withdrawn from a 
student who does not attain such 
progress unless it can be shown that 
his deficiency is due to some extenuat- 
ing circumstances recognized by the 
committee. 

A student may be reconsidered for 
a grant, should he raise his scholastic 
standing to the level required for sat- 
isfactory progress toward a degree. 



Enrollment '55 

Norma J. Azlein, associate registrar, 
announced the enrollment figures for 
the University as of the close of the 
first week of classes on Saturday, 
February 12, 1955. 

At College Park 6391 full-time un- 
dergraduates and 2669 part-time and 
graduate students making a total of 
9060 students had registered. 

For the same period last year the 
College Park campus ponulation totaled 
8265 with 5835 at the full-time under- 
graduate level with 2430 as part-time 
and graduate students. On the Balti- 
more campus last year the total stu- 
dent body was 2868, which represented 
1406 as full-time undergraduates and 
1462 registered as part-time and grad- 
uate students. 

The comparison for the total Reb- 
ruary registrations represents an in- 
crease of 8.4% over last year for the 
combined College Park and Baltimoi'e 
campuses. 






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11 



Life With African Tribes 



With Deshlers In Africa 




STARVING CATTLE 
Calamity in Karamoja; drought-starved cattle at a dry 
water hole. Chiefly grain eaters, the people depend on 
cattle as insurance against famine. 



"WHEN IN ROME . . ." 
EVERYBODY SQUATS 
Nancy Deshler with native youngsters. When 2 1 : years 
old, she spoke the Swahili tongue as well as English. 



Baltimore Sunday Sun 

Walter Deshler, a University of 
Maryland graduate student with 
a Fulbright scholarship, journeyed half- 
way around the world to corners of 
East Africa which few white men have 
explored — and took his wife and 
daughter with him. 

For a year and a half the family 
lived alternately among one of the 
northern Karamojong tribes in Uganda 
and among Bajun on the shore of the 
Indian Ocean near the Kenya-Italian 
Somaliland border. 

In Uganda they slept in thatched 
shelters, killed their own small game, 
watched mimetic tribal dances, got too 
close to hyenas for comfort, and dis- 
covered what it is like to be miles 
from any form of communication with 
the outside world. 

In Arab Dhows 

In Kenya they sailed in Arab dhows, 
visited pillar tombs and shells of what 
once were probably mosques, and 
climbed over raised and undercut coral 
islands in the Indian Ocean. 

In neither the remote Karamoja 
district of Uganda nor along the coast 
was Deshler able to use English. He 
and his wife, Ila, had a few lessons in 
Swahili (a combination of Arabic and 
Bantu tongues) shortly after their ar- 
rival in Kampala, which is the com-. 



With His Wife And Daughter Walter Deshler, Maryland 
Graduate Student, Spends 19 Months On Dark Continent. 



mercial center of Uganda, and "took 
the cold plunge" when they left for 
the interior. 

Daughter Nancy picked up Luganda 
(a Bantu language) from her nurse 
in Kampala and soon mastered Swahili 
besides. Until she was 2 1 / / 2 , she spoke 
Swahili as well as English. 

Deshler's aim in going to Africa 
was to study how the Karamojong 
and Bajun solve the universal environ- 
mental problems of food, clothing and 
shelter. He was especially interested 
in how they adapt to the semi-arid 
climate that prevents them from earn- 
ing a living solely from agriculture. 

During their stay in Africa (October, 
1952, to May, 1954) the family did not 
remain in one place for more than 
two months. 

For Kenya 

When the harvest season ended in 
Karamoja, Deshler headed for the 
Kenya coast. When activity slowed 
there he hurried back to the interior. 

Ila and Nancy, who was just a year 
old when she got her first look at the 
green hills of Africa, were on hand 
for the field trip to the Kenya coast 
but didn't go on all those to Karamoja. 

Some of the time they were in 
Kampala, and Ila worked briefly at 



Makerere College there. But they did 
camp out in the bush country of Kara- 
moja long enough to enable Ila to 
become an old pro at butchering game 
and Nancy to make friends with Kara- 
mojong youngsters who had never be- 
fore seen a white child. 

As it turned out, Nancy was less 
of a curiosity than her toys, especially 
a teddy bear, which the Karamojong 
at first feared was alive. 

Thatched Shelter 

In Karamoja the Deshlers lived in 
a thatched shelter that was open on 
the sides. A fire had to be kept burn- 
ing at the front nightly as protection 
from hyenas and leopards, and the 
bones and entrails of the game they 
ate had to be carried 100 yards away 
so that the scent would not lure the 
animals. 

One evening a hired hand failed to 
carry the bones that distance, with 
the result that a 200-pound hyena 
started to come in under the side of 
the shelter. 

"As I look back on the incident," 
DeshM- says, "it was really low 
comedy. Ila awoke first and gave me 
the word. I lurked around to the 



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snagged the dhow in which the Deshler 
family sailed up the African coast 



front with a 16-gauge shotgun and 
spotted him behind a tree. When he 
scatted out into the moonlight I fired, 
but hit him too low to kill him outright. 

"While he was spinning around, 
tearing at his own insides, two of his 
hyena friends appeared and attacked 
him with the deepest, most obscene 
gurgling sound I've ever heard. They 
finally dragged him over the edge of a 
bluff." 

Aside from the session witTi the 
hyena, Deshler's biggest scare came 
when Nancy shouted 'M'dudu!" (the 
Swahili word for insect) and pointed 
with enthusiasm at a scorpion which 
she was about to pick up. 

Scorpion Bites 

"Scorpion bites are rarely fatal, I'm 
told," Deshler says, "but I was terri- 
fied, none the less. During the rains 
there were many scorpions in and 
around our shelter, and it got so that 
we never went to bed without search- 
ing between the sheets. 

"Malaria was the real hazard. Nancy 
had it twice and Ila once, but for- 
tunately, both of them were in Kampala 
at the time. The nearest doctor to 
our Karamoja camp was 100 miles 
away, and he covered an area of 10,000 
square miles." 

Karamojong are a remarkably tall 
Nilo-Hamitic people with either black 
or dark red skins. Their dominant 
interest is cattle. 



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13 



Among The Bajun And Karamojong 




SPOTTED TROPHY 
Walter Deshler, on left, shows Dr. Donald Patton and 
Dr. John Augelli a leopard skin presented to him by an 
African. 



HOME SWEET HOME 
During the 19 months spent in Africa Deshler, lived 
in shelters like this with his wife and little daughter. 
One night a hyena had to be driven out. 



Far From College Park Campus 




■ 



MEET WILSON 
Deshler and an assistant, Wilson — 
the native got that name while a mis- 
sion-school student. 



ENROUTE 

Walter's wife, Ila, and his daughter, 
Nancy, snapped on a dhow sailing up 
the Kenya coast. 



GAME 
The family lived on bread Ila baked 
and game Deshler shot — orbis, dikdiks 
and fowl. 



The men wear elaborate headdresses, 
many beads and possibly a cloth thrown 
over their shoulders. Calfskin skirts 
and dozens of wire neck rings are 
standard apparel for married women; 
young girls are clothed in aprons of 
chain-mail. 

Both sexes have two teeth extracted 
from their lower jaws to make room 
for ivory or aluminum lip-plugs. 

The Karamojong don't kill their 
cattle lightly, preferring to hold them 
as insurance against famine. They are 



primarily grain eaters but also prize 
blood, which they draw from the necks 
of animals and drink pure, mix with 
milk or use in soup. 

Raw blood was one Karamojong 
delicacy that the Deshlers couldn't 
bring themselves to sample. Their 
staple foods were oribi (small ante- 
lope), dikdik (small buck) and fowl, 
which Deshler hunted himself, and 
bread that Ila baked. 

Canned goods occasionally were 
available at Loyoro, the tiny settle- 



ment (four or five country stores) from 
which Deshler based his Karamoja 
study. Once Ila was able to find a 
jar of jam that a merchant had bought 
years before but hadn't been able to 
sell. 

Plural marriage is common among 
Karamojong; it is a man's social duty 
to have two or three wives, a reason- 
able herd of cattle and many children. 
(One third of Karamojong die before 
they are 10 years old.) 

"I wasn't considered quite human in 



14 



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Karamoja," Deshler says, "until Ila 
and Nancy came up from Kampala. 
When they arrived I achieved some 
status, but not much, for I had only 
one wife, one child and no cattle." 

The section of Karamoja where he 
camped never had been studied by any 
scholar. "It's like the end of the earth," 
he says, "for there has been almost no 
penetration by white men, and few 
game hunters have been through to 
mar the place." 

The Kiunga Archipelago of Kenya, 
on the other hand, was familiar ground 
to Deshlei-. He had served as a ge- 
ographer for an Oxford University ex- 
pedition there in 1951, and the pre- 
liminary study of the area which he 
made at that time served as the subject 
for his master's thesis at the University 
of Maryland. 

The study he made on his second 
visit to Kenya coast, together with the 
one on Karamoja, will be used in the 
dissertation for his doctorate. 
Mixed Groups 

The Bajun who live along the Kiunga 
Archipelago are a mixed ethnic group 
who range in color from pale yellow to 
black. Their hair may be kinky or 
straight, their features negroid or aqui- 
line. Their origin can be traced in part 
to Persians, who are believed to have 
colonized the coast from the Eleventh 
to the Fourteenth centuries; to Arabs 
who have traded there for at least 
2,000 years, and to Hamitic-Galas, 
Somalis and Bantus. 

Like the Karamojong, the Bajun get 
only low crop yields from their parched 
soil. 

Whereas the Karamojong raise cattle 
to supplement their crops, the Bajun 
fish. 

"People in both study areas have a 
very tough time," Deshler says, "but 
they solve their problems pretty well 
in the short run. 

"We Americans in our foreign-aid 
program make the easy assumption 
that people in backward countries 
don't know what they're doing. The 
assumption is generally that we're go- 
ing to show them how to do it. 

"I'm convinced that we cannot help, 
or even know if we as Westerners 
should interfere with Karamojong or 
Bajun, until we know more about their 
cultures than we do today." 
Devout Moslems 

The Bajun are devout Moslems and 
it was some time before Deshler saw 
the face of a Bajun woman. In pub- 
lic, the women are always veiled. 

After he and Ila had been in Kiunga 
for a while they were invited to the 
home of the Mudir, the administrative 
chief of the area, and they went back 
often to listen to his radio. 

"It was in her own home," Deshler 
says, "that I first saw the Mudir's wife 
without a veil. 

"For a long time I neved did see the 
wife of the Sheikh. Then one day she 
was bothered by a toothache and for 
some reason I was asked to examine 
her mouth. I probed around, finally 
gave her some pain-killer and lots of 
comfort, and we became good friends." 

Bajun children proved to be much 
better playmates for Nancy than the 




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HE MADE IT 
"Took an aptitude test at the Uni- 
versity today. Good thing I'm the 
Dean !" 



Karamojong had been. They knew what 
play was and had toy dhows and spin- 
ning tops. 

Ila often had tea with the women 
of Kiunga either in their homes or at 
the British Government rest house on 
the edge of the village in which she 
and her family stayed. Because Bajun 
women don't like to be seen in town 
in daylight, Ila's guests literally 
sneaked around the outskirts of the 
town to visit. 

With the Fulbright grant due to ex- 
pire last June, the Deshlers left East 
Africa in the spring and sailed for 
home from London in June. 

In addition to working toward his 
doctorate at the University of Mary- 
land, Deshler is assisting with re- 
search for a new atlas the university's 
geography department is preparing. 

The doctorate is still about two years 
off, Deshler figures. When it is out 
of the way, he would like nothing bet- 
ter than to go back to East Africa. 

"There isn't much money in being a 
geographer," he says, "but, if I had 
money, I know that I would pay to 
be able to do the work I did in Uganda 
and Kenya. 

"To me, one of the most exciting 
and delightful experiences imaginable 
is that of living on the fringe of 
someone else's society for a time. I had 
such an opportunity in Africa." 




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17 



Returning Home 




Maryland's College of Physical Educa- 
tion and Health, representing camps 
for the handicapped. 



Baltimore Sun Foto 

DISCHARGED FROM HOSPITAL 
After a lengthy sojourn in the University Hospital, Dr. H. C Byrd, President 
Emeritus, University of Maryland, is shown as he leaves the hospital. With him 
is his daughter, Mrs. Evalyn Byrd Jackson. 



Governor Speaks 

The "Challenge of Leisure" was the 
theme of Governor Theodore R. Mc- 
Keldin's Conference on Recreation held 
at the Student Union Building at Col- 
lege Park. 

Beginning at 9 
a.m. recreation lead- 
ers from many parts 
of the State of 
Maryland registered 
for a series of panel 
discussions. Subjects 
discussed by out- 
standing experts in 
the field of recrea- 
tion included: — 
"Public Relations 
Facilities in Mary- 
land," 
"Legislative Needs 
in Recreation," 
"The Latest in Leadership," 
"Are Your Public Relations Showing," 
"Citizen Participation in Recreation," 
"The Church's Role in Recreation," 
"The Forward Look in Recreation for 
hospitals and Institutions in Mary- 
land," 
"The School-recreation Center and 
Camping in the Recreation Program." 
In his letter announcing the con- 
ference date and theme of the conven- 
tion Governor McKeldin referred to his 
speech to the conference last year in 
which he said, "In America we are free 
to choose our jobs, our religions, our 
friends, and our way of life in general 
so long as we do not transgress upon 
the rights of others. We also should 



be able to enjoy the recreation of our 
choice." 

In its fourth year, the annual con- 
ference was co-sponsored by the Mary- 
land Recreation Society. 




Gov. McKeldin 



Camping Forum 

The College of Physical Education, 
Recreation and Health, and the College 
of Special and Continuous Studies in 
cooperation with the Capitol Section 
of the American Camping Association 
conducted an evening forum devoted 
to camping opportunities for young 
men and women. Held in the Student 
Union Building, the "Forum on Oppor- 
tunities in Camping" was presented 
by an outstanding panel of experienced 
camping personnel representing pri- 
vate, agency day camps and camps for 
the handicapped. 

The forum was conducted under the 
chairmanship of Assistant Professor 
Elizabeth Flinchbaugh,, Chairman of 
the Camping Committee of the Uni- 
versity's College of Physical Educa- 
tion, Recreation and Health. 

The forum included the panel mem- 
bers Mr. William Bartlett, Secretary 
of the Recreational Group Work of 
the Washington, D. C. United Com- 
munity Services, representing agency 
campus; Miss Loretta Stallings, of 
George Washington University, repre- 
senting private camps; Mr. Ray Brown 
Supervisor of Day Camps of the De- 
partment of Recreation for Washing- 
ton, D. C, representing day camps; 
and Dr. Janet A. Wessel, Chairman of 
the Physical Therapy Curriculum of 



Dr. Byrd Home 

Dr. H. C. Byrd, president emeritus 
of the University of Maryland, was 
released on March 26th from University 
Hospital after long seige of illness in 
connection with a hernia operation. 

The hospital had announced earlier 
he would be discharged. He returned 
to his home at College Park. 

Dr. Byrd has been at the hospital 
since mid-January, when he underwent 
the hernia operation. An infection set 
in and for several days he was grave- 
ly ill. Recovery was slow until late 
February when he started making a 
steady improvement. 

Two minor operations were per- 
formed to drain the wound and close 
it. 

He celebrated his sixty-sixth birth- 
day in the hospital on February 12. 

Dr. Byrd left for Camp Lejeune, 
N. C. to spend some time with his 
daughter, Evalyn, and son-in-law, Maj- 
or Jackson, of the Marine Corps. 




UiSB Jameson 



Assistant Dean 

President Wilson H. Elkins an- 
nounced the appointment of Miss M. 
Margaret Jameson as assistant dean of 
women in charge of the university's 
dormitory residences. 

A native of South Carolina, Miss 
Jameson received her A.B. degree in 
Mathematics at Winthrop College and 
her master's degree 
in student personnel 
at Syracuse Univer- 
sity. She continued 
with further gradu- 
ate work at Duke 
University and 
North Carolina 
State College. Her 
early experience in- 
cludes teaching 
mathematics in high 
school in North 
Carolina and work- 
ing as a research 
assistant at Pratt and Whitney, Hart- 
ford, Connecticut. From 1948 to 1952 
Miss Jameson served as Assistant Dean 
of Women at Vanderbilt University, 
and from 1952 to 1955 as Dean of 
Women at Texas Western College. She 
is a member of the American Associa- 
tion of University Women, the National 
Association of Deans of Women, and 
the American Personnel and Guidance 
Association. 



THE TOITLE 

Jim Braddock, Jerseyite who won the 
world's heavyweight title from Max 
Baer, tells one that might be titled 
"The Verce of the Toitle." After he 
defeated Baer he phoned Mrs. Brad- 
dock, "Keep the kids up! I'm bringing 
home the title." As Jim burst into the 
room he greeted Mrs. B. with, "Well, 
I'm champion of the world!" The kids 
began to cry, asking, "Pop, but where's 
the toitle. You said you were bringing 
home a toitle." 



18 



Maryland 



Maryland's Flying Dutchman 



He Flies 25,000 Miles Yearly Between Jobs In 
Holland And Maryland. 




feu, jju+ie Qiant 

{The Baltimore Sun) 

Antonius M. J. S. Michels is a high- 
pressured flying Dutchman. 
In the course of a year Professor 
Michels travels about 25,000 air-miles 
commuting between the van der Waals 
molecular physics laboratory at the 
University of Amsterdam and its 
American counterpart at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 

As director of the Amsterdam lab- 
oratory and a staff member of the one 
at College Park, he charts research 
which it is hoped will explain why 
molecules (groups 
of atoms) behave as 
they do under 
changing tempera- 
tures and under 
pressures up to 3,000 
atmospheres (42,000 
pounds per square 
inch). 

His two jobs on 
two continents make 
him perhaps the 
only college profes- 
sor who flies the At- 
lantic as a routine part of academic 
life. 

The College Park laboratory, still 
not completely finished but already 
functioning in a limited way, is basical- 
ly a larger and more modern edition 
of the Amsterdam laboratory, which 
Professor Michels has headed since 
its inception twenty years ago and 
which until now has been the only 
thing of its kind in the world. 

Few Meet Him 

Few University of Maryland stu- 
dents will ever meet Professor Michels. 
For one thing, he visits College Park 
only about four times a year; then he 
stays a month and flies back to Hol- 
land. When he is on the campus he is 
usually deep in lab work with fellow 
professors and graduate students. He 
has no regular classes, delivers no lec- 
tures. 

Antonius Michels (pronounced Meek- 
uls) has been preoccupied with science 
for most of his 64 years, and with 
molecular physics in particular since 
he was an undergraduate at the Uni- 
versity of Amsterdam. 

At the time he began probing its 
mysteries, this field was virtually un- 
explored. In those days most young 
physicists turned to optics. (The swing 
to nuclear fission came later.) 

The thing about molecular physics 
which intrigued Michels was the fact 
that many of its theories were largely 
untried. 

"Instructors would give you a form- 
ula," he recalls, "and say, 'Here it is.' 



But I wanted to know why. It seemed 
to me that nature doesn't do anything 
without a reason." 

After four years of World War I 
duty as a lieutenant in the Dutch 
Army, Michels returned to the Univer- 
sity of Amsterdam as a graduate stu- 
dent. He was awarded his doctorate in 
1924. 

On His Own 

Meanwhile, he had started conduct- 
ing high-pressure experiments on his 
own. To earn enough money to finance 
them he coached students and gave 
lectures — anywhere from 40 to 70 a 
week — at various universities. (Twelve 
lectures is the weekly average for col- 
lege professors in the United States.) 

He went on like that until 1928, 
when Imperial Chemical Industries, a 
British firm, offered to underwrite his 
experiments, provided he would per- 
sonally train two of its men. This 
meant that he could stop lecturing and 
concentrate on research. 

But two years later he was back at 
the lectern. An invitation to join the 
faculty of the University of Amster- 
dam was too good to turn down. In 
1935 the university opened its van 
der Waals laboratory of molecular 
physics, named after the Nobel prize- 



winning scientist. Professor Michels 
has been its director from the start — 
with time out for World War II service 
in the Dutch underground. 

At the war's end, a number of 
American scientists, including several 
from the Naval Ordnance Laboratory, 
went over to Amsterdam to work with 
Professor Michels. From this coopera- 
tion came the idea for a similar lab- 
oratory on this side of the Atlantic 
which has resulted in the Institute for 
Molecular Physics at the University of 
Maryland. 

Although the institute will not be 
fully equipped and staffed for at least 
six months yet, it is operating now 
with a skeleton crew of four scientists, 
four graduate students and a dozen 
technicians, part Dutch and part 
American. 

PVT Work 

In the beginning most of the re- 
search to be done at College Park will 
be what physicists call PVT work — 
pressure, volume and temperature — 
and how they affect the physical prop- 
erties of matter. Temporarily, the ex- 
periments will be limited to gases. 
Study of liquids and solids will follow 
later. 

Professor Michels himself designed 
much of the precision equipment in- 
stalled in the laboratory, and collabo- 
rated on other parts of it with his long- 
time University of Amsterdam friend, 



One End Of Long Hop 




and 



LABORATORY IN HOLLAND 
Prof. Antonius Michels commutes by air between this laboratory in Holland 
one at College Park. 



Maryland 



19 



J. P. H. Wassenaar. He even designed 
some of the storage cabinets, out of 
Dutch thrift and with an eye for 
beauty. 

"I can't see buying things that are 
ugly," he says, "on the theory that 
their practicalness makes up for their 
ugliness. That doesn't make sense. Af- 
ter all, a storage cabinet for laboratory 
work can be functional and handsome 
at the same time." 

In off hours, Professor Michels turns 
out furniture for the home, and he 
shyly admits that on occasion he has 
designed clothes for his wife, Chris- 
tina, who once was one of his students 
at the University of Amsterdam. 

An intense man with boundless en- 
ergy, he stores a portable tape-recorder 
in his car so that he can dictate letters 
while he drives. And he may be the 
only trans-Atlantic passenger who al- 
ways travels without luggage. To 
avoid the bother of a suitcase he keeps 
a closetful of clothes in the small cot- 
tage in Silver Spring, where he lives 
during the four months a year he is 
in this country. The rest of his ward- 
robe is in his real home in Amsterdam. 
There are also six sons and three 
daughters, ranging in age from 5 to 22. 



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Editorials 



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HARVEY I.. MILLER 

Editor 



About Editors 

(An essay on editors is hitting the type 
lines these days ostensibly written by "A 
Little Girl in Wisconsin." Take it or leave 
it, it goes like this.) 

My Pa says he does not know how 
magazines and books got into 
this world and he does not think God 
knows , Pa says, because God ain't got 
nothing to say about magazines in the 
Bible. Pa says the missing link there is 
probably an editor who managed to stay 
in business during and after the flood 
and then wrote the thing up and that 
kept him and other editors busy ever 
since. 

Pa says, "If an editor makes a mis- 
take folks say he should be put in a 
gas chamber with the gas turned on 
but the editors say that if a doctor or a 
druggist makes a mistake they Just 
bury the mistake and let it go at that," 
Pa says. Doctors and druggists write 
to each other in Latin so no one can 
understand what they write or check up 
on them if they make a mistake," Pa 
says. 

When an editor makes a mistake 
there are letters from readers and, 
sometimes Pa says, even Lawsuits and 
swearing and fussing. But if a doctor 
makes a mistake, Pa says, there is a 
funeral with flowers and plenty of 
silence. A doctor, Pa says, can use 
words three feet long without him or 
anybody else knowing what he said but 
if an editor wishes to use a long word 
he has got to spell it out. 

If a doctor, Pa says, goes to see 
another man's wife he charges money 
for the call but if an editor pays such 
a visit he is liable to get hurt with a 
charge of buckshot. 

Any college, Pa says, can turn out 
doctors and druggists and dentists and 
lawyers, but an editor, Pa says, has to 
be born. Pa is an editor. 



What Is an Executive? 

There are many definitions of what 
constitutes an executive, but here is 
one of the cleverist we've seen: 

"As everybody knows, an executive 
has practically nothing to do except to: 

1. Decide what is to be done; 

2. Tell somebody to do it; 

3. Listen to reasons why it should 
not be done, why it should be done by 
someone else, or why it should be done 
in a different way; 



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4. Follow up to see whether it has 
been done; 

5. Discover that it has not been 
done; 

6. Inquire as to why; 

7. Listen to excuses from the person 
who should have done it; 

8. Follow up again to see whether 
the thing has been done, only to dis- 
cover that it has been done incorrectly; 

9. Point out how it should have been 
done; 

10. Conclude that as long as it has 
been done, it may well be left where 
it is; 

11. Wonder whether it is not time to 
get rid of a person who cannot do a 
thing right; to reflect that he probably 
has a wife and a large family and that 
certainly his successor would be just 
as bad and maybe worse; 

12. Consider how much simpler and 
better the thing would have been done 
if one had done it oneself in the first 
place; 

13. Reflect sadly that one could have 
done it right in twenty minutes and, as 
things turned out, one has to spend two 
days to find out why it has taken three 
weeks for somebody else to do it 
wrong." 



Efficiency 



The word "efficiency" has come to im- 
ply, to a great many people, the 
highest praise. To be efficient, to know 
how to accomplish a given task in the 
most skillful way, with promptness, 
and with least effort, seems the first 
stepping-stone to modern success. Yet 
a criminal may be efficient in the high- 
est degree, achieving his crimes with 
reasoned system, speed, and a minimum 
of peril to himself. 

Efficiency alone may be a handicap to 
a man's real value to himself and to 
society. But efficiency, linked with trie 
will to do right, developed for duty's 
sake, is a jewel in the crown of man- 
hood. 

The man whose work is worthwhile, 
who can be relied upon to do his work 



o^% 



aildkis'*— 




LOOK WHO'S TALKIN'! 
"Gosh, Flo, you sure got out of the 
wrong side of bed — coffee no good, 
toast not done, forgot to bring in the 
paper, hair hanging down in your 
face—" 



20 



Maryland 




BAD, BAD BOY 

"Nothing but wrong answers! So it 
can stand in the corner for the rest 
of the day!" 



with readiness and skill, and whose 
faith and honor are matters of course, 
is a pillar of strength in emergency, a 
bulwark in the storm of danger, a rock 
of defense against confusion. 



Bulletin Board 

On the bulletin board of one of the 
University's administrative offices 
appeared the following earth shaking 
pronunciamento, i.e. to wit, namely, 
e.g. and viz.: — 

"Due to the ever-present work back- 
log and a desire to retain our present 
employee level, it has become necessary 
to institute a new policy. 

"Somewhere between starting and 
quitting time and without infringing 
too much on the time usually devoted 
to breakfast and lunch periods, coffee 
breaks, rest periods, story telling, news- 
paper reading, vacation planning and 
the rehashing of the Middle States 
Report rhubarb, each University em- 
ployee should endeavor to find some 
time that can be set aside and known 
as the 'work break'." 



Discipline 

Not long ago we were asked to 
speak at a Kiwanis Club luncheon. 
As we sat at the table, looking over 
some pretty high class fellows who 
were accomplishing things in their 
various professions, our thoughts drift- 
ed back to a Colonel we knew. He could 
learn something from a Kiwanis club. 
This Colonel had one of his Battalion 
Commanders on the carpet for not 
having enough men on the report. His 
diatribe went, "Do you mean to tell me 
that in a whole month not a single man 
has been up for office hours ? You 
have no more discipline in that bat- 
talion of yours than the Kiwanis Club!" 
That was supposed to be funny. To this 
writer it was about as funny as the 
time the Maine blew up or the time our 
best pal fell in a coal lighter and broke 
his leg. 

Of course there was not much use in 
arguing with an opinionated guy like 
that. The military-naval services are 



full of high grade fellows who are 
pretty well up on just about everything 
that goes on. However, every now and 
then you run across a self anointed 
hombre who labors under the handicaps 
of a trans-Siberian mind, — single track 
all the way to Vladivostok. He knows 
HIS stuff only and can be signed off 
with Poe's 'RAVEN,' "Only this— and 
nothing more." 

No use telling a guy like that that 
"discipline" and "disciplinary punish- 
ment" constitute direct opposites; that 
a perfectly disciplined outfit IS one 
with no reason for disciplinary punish- 
ment because there have been no 
offenses committed. 

So we could not help noting that 
here at a Kiwanis Club luncheon we 
met up with men from all walks of life 
who had left their businesses when they 
probably should not have done so, to 
listen to a speech they did not particu- 




O^ 



PRACTICAL GAL 

"On these long financial reports, 
wouldn't omitting the figures tend to 
shorten them?" 



larly care to hear after a luncheon they 
did not particularly want, all of it for 
"the good of the ship." It came home 
rather forcibly that the Kiwanis Club 
operated on a very high level of disci- 
pline indeed, while our ranting Colonel 
seemed to be clicking along under the 
firm conviction that 2 plus 2, somehow, 
totals 3. 



Opportunity 



The value of the determination to 
deliver the goods even when under- 
equipped is beautifully set forth in 
the poem, "Opportunity," by Ed- 
ward Rowland Sill. Not a bad bit of 
verse to memorize. The poem fol- 
lows: 



And underneath the cloud, or on it, 

raged 
A furious battle, and men yelled) and 

swords 
Shocked upon swords and shields. A 

prince's banner 
Wavered, then staggered backward, 

hemmed by foes. 
A craven hung along the battle's edge. 
And thought, "Had I a sword of keener 

steel — 
That blue blade that the king's son 

bears, — but this 
Blunt thing — ! he snapt and flung it 

from his hand, 
And lowering crept away and left the 

field. 
Then came the king's son, wounded, 

sore bestead, 
And weaponless, and saw the broken 

sword, 
Hilt-buried in the dry and trodden 

sand, 
And he ran and snatched it, and with 

battle shout, 
Lifted afresh he hewed his enemy 

down, 
And saved a great cause that heroic 

day." 



THIS AND THAT 

Here is a tricky little puzzle, so don't 
let it fool you. If you drive an auto- 
mobile one mile at the rate of 60 miles 
per hour, and another mile at the rate 
of 30 miles per hour, what will be your 
average speed for the two miles? 

You'll get the wrong answer unless 
you think clearly. So don't just guess 
before reading the answer which is in- 
verted beneath. 

(unoq aad S3[iui 

OF JO 93BJ9AB UB JO S31JUI OAV} 9AUp 0} 

sa^nuiui aajqq. jjoo; ^t ajoja^aqx "sa^n 
-uiui oav} ut aiiux puoaas aqi pue a;n 
-uiui auo ui ajiui ^sjy aq^ aAup no^tj 

* * * 

Maryland alumnus on train from 
Boston, "Porter, will you tell me when 
we cross the Massachusetts State line? 
I have a book I want to read." 



A neckerchief is not the head of a 
sorority house. 



This I beheld, or dreamed it in a 
dream: 
There spread a cloud of dust along a 
plain; 




REVERSE PRIORITY 
"He's next — I was here before him!' 



Maryland 



21 



The 'Mouse' That Flies Like A Moon 



Artificial Satellite 




Dr. S. Fred Singer, associate 
professor of physics, diagrams 
the behavior of an artificial 
earth satellite he has worked out, 
to gather data on outer space. 
Insert at right shows the "mouse," 
as the thing is called. 

The MOUSE would not be free 
of the earth's atmosphere, as the 
moon is. After a few days it 
would pull into a tighter orbit 
around the earth, enter dense at- 
mosphere again. The friction 
would burn it up. 



A physicist at the University of 
Maryland has worked out con- 
struction details and plotted the orbit 
for a new moon. 

In fewer than five years, he believes, 
it will have been built and launched 
into space. 

At a height of 200 miles and at a 
speed of 17,280 miles an hour, it would 
whirl about the earth for days, per- 
haps weeks. Instruments aboard it 
would gather and record valuable 
data that high-altitude rockets have 
not yet been able to. A radio set in 
the man-made moon would send the 
data to earth. 

The new moon would be expendable. 
When it finally faltered and fell back 



into the earth's atmosphere, to burn 
up like a meteor, another would be 
launched to take its place. And after 
that another, and another, until sci- 
entists had gathered the information 
they now seek. 

The moon would be a disappointing 
thing, compared to what science-fiction 
writers feel a space outpost should be. 
It would have no one aboard. It would 
have no interplanetary use. It could 
hardly be seen from the earth at all. 

Close up, its appearance wouldn't be 
very imposing, either. Resembling a 
short, squat rolling pin, it would have 
a body no larger than a basketball, 
and would weigh less than 50 pounds. 
A man could easily carry it under his 
arm. 



It's The Idea of A Maryland 

Professor For Investigating 

Outer Space. 

(The Baltimore Sun) 

Officially, the proposed new moon is 
known as the MOUSE. MOUSE stands 
for Minimum Orbital Unmanned Satel- 
lite of the Earth. 

It is an idea that began taking form 
eight years ago in the imagination of 
S. Fred Singer, now an associate pro- 
fessor of physics at the university. The 
idea gained international attention this 
year when he presented it before a 
symposium on space travel at the Hay- 
den Planetarium, at the American 
Museum of Natural History in New 
York. 

Data Gathering 

From the beginning, he has visu- 
alized the MOUSE not as an end in it- 
self, but merely as a data-gathering 
device that would extend high-altitude 
research. 

A former resident of Phoenix, Ariz., 
the physicist received his bachelor's 
degree in electrical engineering at Ohio 
State University, did graduate work 
in physics at Princeton and then en- 
tered the Navy. Mustered out in 1946, 
he went to work at the Johns Hopkins 
University Applied Physics Laboratory 
in Silver Spring, concentrating there 
on rocket research in the upper at- 
mosphere. 

It was at this post that he first 
saw ihe need for something like the 
MOUSE. High-altitude rockets at that 
time had instruments for recording 
data on solar radiation, cosmic rays, 
auroral particles and many other 
things, but they stayed outside the 
earth's atmosphere for only three to 
five-minute periods. The MOUSE 
would, as mentioned, remain outside 
the atmosphere for days or weeks. 

In 1950 

In 1950 Professor Singer left the 
Hopkins laboratory and became sci- 
entific liaison officer with the Office of 
Naval Research at the American Em- 
bassy in London. He finished that tour 
of duty last year, and came to the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

Meanwhile he had continued to de- 
velop his ideas for the MOUSE, and by 
this year they were well enough or- 
ganized for him to present them before 
the Hayden Symposium on Space 
Travel. 

Basically, the ideas are these: 

The MOUSE would be a 12-by-12- 
inch cylinder of light metal. Extending 
from each end, like the handles from 
a rolling pin, would be a short metal 
tube. The tubes would serve as anten- 
nas, and would also contain gamma ray 
counters, cosmic ray counters and other 
instruments. 



22 



Maryland 



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In a compact arrangement inside the 
cylindrical body numerous other fact- 
finding- instruments, a telemetering de- 
vice, and a small solar battery to op- 
erate it would be placed. Windows, 
with various types of ray filters, would 
be situated in the ends of the poles 
and at various places in the "skin'' of 
the cylinder; through these the instru- 
ments would gather their information. 

A three-stage rocket would be re- 
quired to get the MOUSE into space. 
A modified V-2 would provide the 
initial blast, hurtling the device some 
50 miles straight up and attaining a 
speed of 7,200 miles an hour. When 
the V-2 finished its work and dropped 
off, the second rocket would take over 
and increase the speed to 12,600 miles 
an hour, curving off into nearly hori- 
zontal flight some 200 miles above the 
earth by the time it burned out. The 
third rocket would boast the MOUSE 
into its 17,280-mile-an-hour orbital 
speed. 

Around The Earth 

As soon as the third rocket burned 
out, the MOUSE would be ejected, 
spinning on its extending tubes, from 
the rocket's nose. And there it would 
whirl around the earth in an orbit 
perpendicular to the equator, crossing 
the North and the South poles. Its 
own velocity and the earth's gravity 
would keep it in its orbit. It would be 
a miniature, man-made moon, covering 
its orbit every 90 minutes. 

Once the MOUSE moved above the 
atmosphere, the instruments aboard 
would begin recording things. Continu- 
ous radio transmission of these data 
would require more electrical power 
than the little satellite could carry. 
So the instruments could be set to keep 
records on magnetic tape. Patrol 
planes operating in both polar regions 

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could "query" the MOUSE as it passed 
over. 

The MOUSE would be easy to track, 
either by radar or by a trail of sodium 
released from it. When it passed 
overhead, the plane would send an in- 
terrogating radio signal. That would 
serve as a trigger to the MOUSE'S 
radio transmitter and in a 30-second 
broadcast that would send out, in com- 
pressed form, its findings of the last 
45 minutes. This broadcast would be 
recorded by the plane. 

Not Like Moon 

The MOUSE would not be free of 
the earth's atmosphere, as the moon is. 
After a few days — perhaps as much as 
three weeks — it would begin to pull 
into a tighter and tighter orbit around 
the earth. Finally it would enter the 
dense atmosphere again; soon, then, 
friction would burn it up. 



The MOUSE, says Professor Singer, 
isn't the only proposed man-made sat- 
ellite which is possible and even plaus- 
ible in theory. But it is unique, he 
says, in its financial practicability. A 
much discussed space station would 
run into an estimated $4,000,000,000. 
A cheaper model that has been dis- 
cussed would cost about $1,000,000,000. 

The MOUSE and its instruments 
could be constructed and assembled 
for about $50,000. Professor Singer 
estimates. The rocket to get it out 
Tnto space would bring the cost up to 
about $1,000,000. But he prefers to 
think of financing in terms of ten 
MOUSE expeditions, at a total cost 
of $10,000,000, to allow for launch- 
ings and development costs. 

That's not a lot of money, he says, 
compared to many military expendi- 
tures for experiments. It is only about 
two thirds of the cost of a large 
bomber, for example. Considering the 
progress which could be pioneered by 
the MOUSE, he says, $10,000,000 isn't 
much more than a shoe-string expendi- 
ture. 




WRONG WAV 

'The way you're going Smokey, you'll 

need this road map!" 



23 



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CAMPUS CHEST CAR WASH 



Frank Shull, Maryland sophomore, isn't taking any chances on the outcome of 
the 50 cent carwash being meted out by four Alpha Omicron Pi sorority members 
at Chaney's Garage in College Park. 

All proceeds from the one day endeavor, undertaken by all sororities at the 
University, went to the campus chest, nationwide college equivalent of the Com- 
munity Chest. Here, Shull supervises the hose wielding activities of Mary Fletcher, 
Sue Weintraub, Anne Netflen, and Martha Goldsborough. 



The Maryland Room 

fey ViAsfiaia PkUii^i, liiviasuan 
In Charge of Maryland Collection 

Everyone has a hobby and the Uni- 
versity Library at College Park is 
no exception. Everyday we collect books 
and other printed materials for student 
and faculty use, but our hobby collec- 
tion is Marylandiana (fancy name for 
books, periodicals, newspapers, maps, 
phamplets, archieves, theses, newspap- 
ers clippings, state and local govern- 
ment publications about Maryland — its 
university, people and government). 
Like other collectors, whenever we have 
a spare dollar — and there have been 
very few of those recently — we pur- 
chose books for the Maryland Room. 
We accept gifts very readily. 

The still small Maryland Room has 
been enlarged twice in as many years. 
Newspaper clippings are in the Loan 
Office. Theses and faculty reprints are 
in the locked stack area. Some bound 
volumes of the Sunpapers are stored 
in the Engineering and Physical Sci- 
ences Library. In the proposed new li- 
brary, all of this material will be to- 
gether in the Maryland Room. 



Our hobby collection is useful in pre- 
paring speeches, briefs, and papers. 
A freshman in speech needs informa- 
tion for a four minute talk on Testudo. 
With the aid of a football program, 
the Diamondbacks and Terrapins, and 
newspaper clippings, he could give a 
complete biography. Prelaw students 
use Maryland court reports, laws, and 
House and Senate Journals for writing 
sample briefs. 

If your church, chamber of com- 
merce, or organization publishes a 
booklet, please send a copy to the 
Library, University of Maryland, Col- 
lege Park, Maryland. If you find old 
programs or publications about Mary- 
land, send them to the Library. Your 
help in collecting material for our hob- 
by collection will be appreciated. 



Annual Band Day 

About 4,000 young musicians, rep- 
resenting 46 schools from various lo- 
calities in Maryland, took part in the 
annual band day at the University. 
Performance was not on a competi- 
tive basis but rather for the purpose 
of correction toward improvement as 
well as deriving benefits by various 
bands observing the performances of 
others. 



24 



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Dr. Symons, Speaker 

Dr. Thos. B. Symons, former Acting 
President of the University and now 
a member of the Board of Regents, 
spoke at a special meeting of the Ki- 
wanis Club in Hagerstown when they 
entertained a large group from the 
farming interests of Washington Coun- 
ty. 

Dr. Symons emphasized the oppor- 
land, particularly 
to the scenic sec- 
tions of our west- 
ern counties. He 
advocated the 
lighting of Route 
40 from4() from 
Hagerstown 
to Oakland, point- 
ing out that this 
would be a good 
advertising feature 
and also to pro- 
mote safety dri- 




Dr. Symons 



ving. 



tunity for drawing tourists to Mary- 
land, particularly to the scenic sec- 
tions of our western counties. He ad- 
vocated the lighting of Route 40 from 
Hagerstown to Oakland, pointing out 
that this would be a good advertising 
feature and also to promote safety 
driving. 

Other suggestions advanced by Dr. 
Symons were to boost Hagerstown, 
Washington County and the state; 
make a study of our water resources — 
for industry and farming purposes; en- 
courage the conservation of soil and 
water resources; promote an inter- 
change of views between city and coun- 
try people; study the educational needs 
of Washington County in the light of 
the growing increase in population; en- 
courage the establishment of an adult 
public speaking and personality im- 
provement course by our University in 
Hagerstown; encourage research in 
agriculture as well as industry, espe- 
cially in relation to atomic power; 
make greater use of the Extension and 
other departments of the University 
of Maryland; promote a conference to 
consider the many problems of living in 
later years. 



Flunking Out 

Two theories were offered to ex- 
plain an increase in the number of stu- 
dents flunking out of the University 
of Maryland. 

One came from the students and the 
other from the administration. 

Figures show 339 full-time students 
were dropped at the end of the first 
semester because they were not doing 
satisfactory work. This was 95 more 
than a year ago and represented 5.9 per 
cent of the full-time undergraduate 
student body. 

Diamondback said in an editorial that 
some professors have taken the words 
of Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, university 
president, on improving academic 
standards too literally. 



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It said they are "overburdening stu- 
students with exams, term papers, book 
reviews, and other projects." 

Dr. Elkins said the increase was more 
likely caused by a larger number of 
students admitted "on trial" last fall. 
These were students whose high school 
records were not up to university 
standards, but who won admission on 
a probationary status. 

"The requirements for staying in 
school are just the same," Dr. Elkins 
said. A program to bring about higher 
academic standards has not yet been 
developed, he said. 



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26 




OLD TIMERS FETED 
Arrow indicates Ed Smith, honored for 47 years of service to Maryland. At 
the dinner in honor of their service to the University of Maryland are, from left 
around the table, Adelaide Belbin, hospital admitting office; William G. Harne, 
pharmacology; Joseph Stone, bacteriology; Ed Smith, pathology; Dorothy Dorsey, 
hospital dispensary; and Louis A. Sager, Pathology. 

Old Timers Honored 



Ed Smith, With 47 Years Of 

Service, Heads Veteran 

Employees 

Ed Smith in the Department of Path- 
ology at the Medical School, along 
with a number of other state em- 
ployees, was presented with a Bulova 
watch, which was awarded for 47 years 
of service to the state. 

This presentation was made by his 
Excellency, Theodore R. McKeldin, as- 
sisted by Mr. Davis, Commissioner of 
Personnel of State of Maryland. 

At a dinner meeting held at Univer- 
sity Hospital, along with 40 other 
University employees who were pre- 
sented pins and merit award certifi- 
cates by Director George H. Buck of 
the University Hospital, Ed Smith was 
also presented a merit award certificate 
by Judge William Cole, hairman of the 
Board of Regents. 

Born In 1892 

Born in Baltimore, at High and 
Gramby Sts., on August 7, 1892, Ed 
moved to West Baltimore at age of 
four; attending the public schools and 
St. Martin's Academy; and while in 
his teens he began working for Uni- 
versity of Maryland School of Medi- 
cine in the Department of Physiology 
on September 29, 1907, while continu- 
ing his studies at Deichman's Prepara- 
tory School in the evening. Incidental- 
ly, the University of Maryland was 
the first to give a practical laboratory 
course in Physiology. The laboratory 
was completely equipped and financed 
by the late John C. Hemmeter, Pro- 
fessor of Physiology. 

In the latter part of 1908, Ed Smith 
took the position of technician in the 
Department of Pathology, filling the 
vacancy left by Harry Stoner who was 



a medical student and technician in 
that Department, but had graduated. 
Ed was also connected with the science 
laboratories in the Schools of Dentis- 
try and Pharmacy, and the Clinical 
Laboratory in the University Hospital 
until 1920, at which time he took over 
full-time duties in the Department of 
Pathology, where he is working at 
the present time. 

Ed married the former Eileen Con- 
nor in 1911. He has one son, Edmund 
Dorsey, two daughters, Mrs. Herbert 
Ball and Mrs. Walter Martin, and six 
grandchildren. 

Fraternity Member 

Mr. Smith is a member of the Ma- 
sonic Fraternity, holding membership 
in the Tuscan Lodge, No. 202; A.F. & 
A.M.; and Tuscan Chapter R.A.M.; Md. 
Commandery, No. 1, K.T.; and Boumi 
Temple. 

He was five years Vice-President of 
the Md. Classified Employees Associa- 
tion Chapter at the University, and its 
President for two years. He is at 
present a member of the Executive 
Committee of the parent organization. 
Also has earned a certificate in Bac- 
teriology from the University, about 
the year 1918. 

Other employees who were also hon- 
ored included: 

30 Years Service Or Over 



Adelaide C. 




Mary C. Reed 


31 


Belbin 


30 


William G. 




Joseph Klllian 


30 


Harne 


32 


William Kelly 


31 


Margaret D. 




Gertrude Jones 


31 


Kohler 


32 


Gertrude 




Lloyd Willev 


33 


Anderton 


31 


Loretta Hogan 


33 


Dorothy Dorsey 


31 


Abhie Haines 


34 


Mary O. 




Louis Jager 


35 


Feddeman 


31 


Katherine 




W. Victor 




Toomey 


37 


Maconachy 


31 


Joseph Stone 


37 


29 Years 


Of Service 




Fahey, Rita B. 




Szczypinski, Adair 


i 


Latndy, Lee 








28 Years 


Of Service 




Pridgen, Joshua 




Zapf, Evelyn 






Maryland 




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MORTGAGES - MANAGEMENT 

20 E. Lexington St. SA. 7-6789 

Baltimore, Md. 



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come out in the open. 

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Constituent: An expert who knows 
how his Senators should vote on every- 
thing — but doesn't know the name of 
either one of his Senators. 



27 Years Of Service 
Gleason, Myrtle Klein, Minnlp F. 

2fi Years Of Service 

Thornton, Aubrey 

25 Years Of Service 
Webb, Sadie Carrington, Knlaml 

21 Years Of Service 
Riley, Elva Stafford, Florence 
Blfoadbelt, Kuih B. Wyatt, Lillian R. 
Fitzpatrlck, Mary G. Curtis, Margaret 
Ridges, Lavenla 

23 Years Of Service 
Day, Alberta Sandy, Tirzah 

Joyner, Jasper Rasbv, Anne C. 

22 Years Of Service 
Charles E. Harriott, Beatrice 

Mary A. 

21 Years Of Service 
Riylan.dk Mary B. Green, Cleveland 
Brown, Nellie 

20 Years Of Service 
Jordan, Violet G. Stack, Virginia 

Mitchell, Sadie Thomas, Peggy B. 

Riffel, Margaret 

19 Years Of Service 
Davenport, Catherine 

18 Years Of Service 

Marino, Henry Gue, Daisy E. 

Readllng Helen R. Kirk, Florence R. 

Carman, Denyse R. Booker, Eva B. 

17 Years Of Service 

17 Years Of Service 
Alfred Underwood, 

Emma Katherin© L. 

16 Years Of Service 

Weiler, Margaret Mueller, Carl 

Burkhardt, Snyder, Delores D. 

Catherine L. 

15 Years Of Service 

Hellman, Anna M. Queensbury, Alvin 

Kellner, Arnold W. 

14 Years Of Service 

Butler, Sidney Sehnader, Cathyrn 

Bond, Christiana Copeland, James L. 

Prout, Leah M. McFaul, Mabel H. 

13 Years Of Service 

Ryerley, Dorothy E. Perpgoy, Dorothy P. 

Fisher, Mildred JPindejr. Wilbur I/., 

Miller, Edith H. Robinson, Wilbert 

Neel, Catherine 

12 Years Of Service 



Ambrose, 
Winship, 



Hartka, Bertha 
MeCloud, Robert 
Michael. Lillian 
Onley, Cora D. 
Godwin, Marguerite 
Ryland, Marie E. 



Saulsbury, Mary B. 
Shaw, Grace E. 
Dean, Elva 
Kane, Mary Ellen 
Powell, Robert 
Studley, Florence 
11 Years Of Service 

Jackson, eitha Christis, Mary F. 

Jacobs, Fannie Conway, Eoretta M. 

Armstrong, Nellie B. Darley, Eva F. 

Bauer, Grace Berry, Bessie B. 

10 Years Of Service 

Coison, Marie J. Moore, Hilda 

Culver, Mary Tignall, Charles J. 

Davis, Sarah Weinacht. Robert 

Finch, Sarah Boyle, Emily R. 

inch, Annie Hamm, Eenora 

Loose, Marian 



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millionaire stop, look, and loosen. . . . 
Honesty is the test policy . . . He who 
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College of 



Special & Continuation 

Studies 



Overseas Travails 

How's the life of an Overseas Mary- 
land professor? 

"Anything but settled," says Dr. 
Larry Grosser of the speech depart- 
ment, who joined the European Pro- 
gram in 1951 and apparently thrives on 
its unusual routine. 

After his arrival in Germany and 
following his initial request for fre- 
quent changes in assignments, Dr. 
Grosser taught in five different coun- 
tries during his first year. Subsequent 
changes of station came every two 
months for three years. 

"Living out of a suitcase presents 
some minor problems but one soon be- 
comes an expert at packing, learns not 
to accumulate things, and travels 
light," he explained. 

The matter of adjusting to various 
climates which may range from arctic 
winter to desert summer is trying. The 
greatest range is in the area of national 
food preferences. Dr. Grosser's dietetic 
jumps — within the space of a few days 
flying time — have ranged from the 
wiener schnitzel of Austria to raw fish 
in Iceland; from pig hocks and sauer 
kraut in Bavaria to roasted whole sheep 
in Arabia. 

The most interesting assignment dur- 
ing this period, he believes, was a 
summer spent in Paris. There were no 
billets available. He and his wife 
finally found space with a French fam- 
ily. They spoke no English; the Gros- 
sers no French. From the point of 
view of speech pedagogy the use of 
gestures was magnificent. 

The biggest obstacle at first to an 
eventual warm friendship lay not in the 
language but in Monsieur's love of com- 
pany at his favorite hobby: walking. 
The Grossers were game, but often had 
to decline afternoon jaunts of 40 kilo- 
meters. 

In Munich 

The University is conducting a pro- 
gram in Munich, Germany, which is 
unique in the field of higher education. 

In this picturesque Bavarian city, 
Maryland has established a daytime 
program for dependents of military and 
civilian personnel who are entitled to 
logistical support. Classes are held at 
McGraw Kaserne and are designed to 
meet the freshman and sophomore Arts 
and Science requirements of American 
universities. 

There are 101 students enrolled. They 
live in dormitories which are supplied 
by the Army. In addition to attending 
classes, Munich students have formed 
their own student council, men's and 
women's basketball teams, and a glee 
club. 

Credit for the initiation of the Mu- 
nich Daytime Program rests entirely 
with the Army. 

The Overseas Program of the Uni- 
versity originally contemplated only 




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28 



Maryland 



I Mm if 






service 






evening' courses to be given for the 
benefit of soldiers and officers abroad. 
By 1949 it was found, however, that 
the dependents of servicemen abroad 
also sought the benefits of the pro- 
gram's educational facilities. 
Penitentiary Class 

Not all of the University's CSCS stu- 
dents are clad in Army khaki, Navy 
blue, Air Force tan and civilian heaven- 
knows-what-all. 

The prison gray set may constitute 
one of the smallest classes, but it is 
certainly one of the most earnest. 

This group consists of the score or 
so inmates of the Maryland State Pen- 
itentiary in Baltimore. 

From a spell of crime, these men 
have turned to a life — or some frac- 
tion thereof — of learning during their 
commitments. 

Mr. John Portz, who teaches this 
class when not engaged in tutoring 
Maryland students who have no walls 
around them, has the highest of praise 
for the inmate-students. 

"The Penitentiary Class," Mr. Portz 
said, "is far superior to any group I 
am currently teaching." The faculty, 
he added, could "anticipate an extra- 
ordinarily high set of grades." 

Mr. Portz made it plain that he does 
not speak derogatorily of the non-Pen 
student. He acknowledges that his 
prisoner class has more time to devote 
to its studies. 

But he cannot help admiring the 
prisoners' keen desire. The subjects 
have ranged from interstate commerce 
transportation laws through techniques 
in oil painting to Near Eastern history. 
Freud, Shakespeare, Aldous Huxley, 
John O'Hara, Jack London and Raphael 
Sabatini are some of the favorite au- 
thors. 

English composition, grammar and 
literature are the courses offered the 
inmates pnce each week during after- 
noon hours. The students range in age 

Maryland 



from 19 to 41 years. The course is part 
of a rehabilitation program. 

Mr. Portz seems to relish teaching 
this sort of class. "At times," he re- 
ported, "their frank speech makes 
classroom discussion quite electric." 

The "Freshman Class" of the Peni- 
tentiary branch not long ago expressed 
its gratitude to the University this 
way: 

"By this letter the members of the 
Freshman English Class in the Mary- 
land Penitentiary wish to express their 
appreciation for your efforts in their 
behalf. We have worked hard and 
have tried earnestly to fulfill your con- 
fidence in us. It is our sincerest wish 
that we have succeeded in this respect. 
We hope very much to merit your con- 
tinued interest in us." 

Juvenile Delinquency 

Not only the large cities but also 
small communities are plagued by crim- 
inalistic activities of juvenile gangs. 
This problem was the subject of a ses- 
sion of Maryland's Institute of Mary- 
land Law Enforcement officers on Tues- 
day, March 8, 1955 at 7 p.m. The 
featured speaker was Dr. Peter P. 
Lejins, professor of sociology and a 
nationally known authority on juvenile 
delinquency and criminology. 

During the meeting special attention 
was devoted to the control of juvenile 
gangs. 

The session was designed to afford 
the officers of the State of Maryland 
an opportunity to encourage coopera- 
tion with citizen groups in the develop- 
ment of a community-wide program of 
delinquency prevention, to better under- 
stand public relations within depart- 
ments and to improve individual effi- 
ciency ratings. Additionally the pro- 
gram was aimed toward a better under- 
standing of the psychology of dealing 
with people, and dealing more effec- 
tively with the special problems of law 
enforcement. 



Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 

Consulting Engineer 

1701 SAINT PAUL STREET 
Baltimore 1, Md. 



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ESSEX ROAD near LIBERTY ROAD 

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29 



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3004 KENILWORTH AVENUE (Bladensburg) 

P.O. HYATTSVILLE, MD. 
Phone WArfield 7-2205 



College of 



Home Economics 

Laura Amos Bull '26 
■ Ella M. Fazzalari '52 



COLLEGE PARK 

CABINET & MILLWORK CO., INC. 

Custom Kitchen Cabinets — Bookcases 

Window — Porch Screens 

Formica Sink Tops 

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Dates To Remember 

April 28, 1955 — Annual Open House 
from 3 to 10 p.m. features "Home 
Economics In Action." Home Ec. Edu- 
cation and Extension Service will have 
exhibits. These will be of special in- 
terest to prospective students and their 
parents. Practical Art department will 
feature Puppets. The textile and cloth- 
ing- department will have exhibits as 
well as conduct Informal Modeling 
throughout the building. The Foods 
and Home Management Departments 
will have exhibits in their respective 
laboratories. Come! See! 

May 14, 1955 — Annual Spring Meet- 
ing from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Maryland 
Room. These are the highlights: 

— Grand reunion of all graduates and 
former students. 

— Excellent program being planned 
by the Practical Art Department 
showing the importance of all 
phases of Art both "in living and 
in earning a living." Design in 
clothing, in interior decorating, in 
decorating, in advertising, in dis- 
plays, etc. All the crafts — weav- 
ing, ceramics, metallry and the 
like will be considered. 

— Annual Business Meeting. 

— Election of New Board Members. 
Candidates are: Irene Knox '34, 
Martha Ross Andrews '31, and 
Marianna Grogan Doores '41 — 
from College Park, Cambridge and 
Bethesda, respectively. They will 
be elected for a three year term. 

— Some very special announcements, 
awards, surprises, etc., and much 
good fellowship and fun. 

— Dont' miss it! Bring your daugh- 
ters and Mothers. 

Along The Personal Side 

Mary Ann Elting Warren, '53, has a 
new address, 608 % 7th Ave., South 
Clinton, Iowa. Her husband is with 
the DuPont cellophane plant there. 

Suzi Miller Whittle '52 writes that 
she is enjoying homemaking in the 
Oak Ridge, Tenn. community. Her two 
sons keep her busy but she still finds 
times for Adult Education classes in 
Art. 

Ada Peers, former Acting Head of 
the Department of Foods and Nutri- 
tion, now in Chicago, 111., where her 
husband is teaching college, received a 
call from a former student, Amy Fry 
Leber, '52. Amy was in Chicago with 
the Maryland 4-H delegate to the Na- 
tional Cherry Pie Baking Contest in 
February. 

Joan Ricketts Moore '51 is teaching 
Home Economics at Milford Mills in 
Baltimore County. Joan worked in 
Charlotte, N. C, before returning to 
Maryland. 



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Mr. and Mrs. Peter Campanelli (A&S 
'53 and Home Ec. '52) of Chicago an- 
nounced the birth of a son Robert in 
December. Pete is finishing his work 
on his Doctorate at Northwestern. Joan 
resigned from her position with the 
telephone company to become full-time 
homemaker. 

Miss Eleanor Hodgson, a graduate 
of 1954 and a new member of the Home 
Economics staff, had five pieces of 
ceramics and enameled medals ac- 
cepted for exhibit at the Annual Po- 
tomac Craftsmen's Guild show. This 
was held as usual at the Corcoran Gal- 
lery in Washington, D. C. 

We hear that Virginia Rustin Elt- 
ing is quite busy with a new home and 
three children! 

Catherine Compton Bossi who has 
a son is taking time to serve on the 
Central Coast Homemaking Teacher's 
Administrative Council at Gonzales, 
California. Good work! 

We hear that Miss Stella Rudes '47 
is now living in New Jersey. 

Margaret Galloway married Chester 
Arthur Van Doren. They are now liv- 
ing in New Jersey. 

Who's Working Where 

Amelia Catakis who graduated in 
February '55, has accepted a position 
with the Fish and Wildlife Service. 

Felicitas Tacheras Viacnico sends 
word from her home in the Philippines 
that she is working with the Bureau 
of Agriculture Extension Service help- 
ing in community development. 



30 



Maryland 



Did we get in that Nancy Joseph '54 
is working- for the Maryland Extension 
Service in Talbot County and Betty 
Skeats '53 in Montgomery County ? 

Marilyn Archer '52 is with Wood- 
ward and Lothrop's in the training di- 
vision. 

Shirley Mularkey Lahey '52 is work- 
ing with the "ALL" Company as their 
representative in this area. 

Mary Anne Levin Gwynn is now liv- 
ing on the Eastern Shore where she is 
teaching one day a week at the Easton 
Memorial Hospital. After graduation 
from Maryland Mary interned at Johns 
Hopkins in Baltimore. 

A recent visitor to the College of 
Home Economics was a graduate of 
two years ago James Al linger. Mr. 
Allinger spoke to some of the classes 
concerning his work as Foreman 
(Dietitian) of Food Preparation of the 
DuPont Hotel, Wilmington, Del. 

After finishing his work at Maryland 
James went to Florida State Univer- 
sity where he took his internship. At 
the DuPont Hotel he is responsible for 
many different types of meals. 

Field Trips '55 Style 

Miss Josephine Blandford, '29 who is 
teaching Textile Testing at the Univer- 
sity this semester, took her textile class 
on a field trip to the National Bureau 
of Standards, Department of Com- 
merce. The students were briefed in 
all the various phases of the research 
program in textiles. 

Professor T. Faye Mitchell, Head of 
the Department of Textiles and Cloth- 
ing, recently took her class on a tour 
of one of the largest and most modern 
cotton mills in the country — the Dan 
River Cotton Mills, Inc., of Danville, 
Virginia. It represents the largest 
single city unit of textile mills in the 
world! The students saw all the pro- 
cesses from the bale of cotton to the 
finished product. They learned what 
makes quality in fabrics, how the cot- 
ton is graded, conditioned, controlled 
and manufactured. They were amazed 
to find that the mill has a production 
capacity of 200 million yards of fab- 
ric per year, which is 12,233 miles of 
fabric, or enough to go around the 
world 4% times at the equator! While 
there the students were tremendously 
interested in observing the excellent 
training given the various workers, 
and unusually fine conditions under 
which they work. It was a splendid 
lesson in human relations as well as 
in textile manufacturing. 

Miss Nancy Mearig and Mrs. Isa- 
bel McGovoran, Instructors in Home 
Management loaded 96 students on 
buses and took them on a tour con- 
ducted by representatives of the Na- 
tional Capitol Housing Authority and 
the Washington Housing Association. 
The purpose was (1) to observe condi- 
tions under which families of low in- 
come are housed in the older sections 
of D. C, (2) to note the effects of 
efforts of public and private agencies 
to remedy or ameliorate conditions in 
central slum areas and (3) to examine 
the work performed in these areas by 
the National Capitol Housing Author- 



ConqhidulaJtionA, 
ClaAA, i>f>. '55 



. . . as you take your 

places in your community 

and throughout the 

land. We sincerely 

Irish you all . . . 

success and 

happiness 

today and 

in the 

years 

ahead 

JOHN M. WALTON 
DENNIS W. MADDEN 

3510 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE 
MT. RAINIER, MD. 





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students could scarcely believe that 
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der such conditions as they observed. 
The central outdoor water spigot, the 



outdoor lavatories, and the like made 
quite an impression on the student, 
helping them to more readily under- 
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relations, health and sanitation, juv- 
enile delinquency, lack of recreation 
facilities and the like. 



Maryland 



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One of the most interesting of all 
tours was planned by Miss Irene Eno 
for her students of Interior Design. 
They visited the famous DuPont Mu- 
seum near Wilmington. This is a 
privately owned museum famous in 
American Design and Home Furnish- 
ings. The appointment was made sev- 
eral months in advance in order that 
the class have an opportunity to study 
there part of a day. 

On The Move? 
If you have moved PLEASE send us 
your name and address so that our 
mailing lists can be kept up to date and 
correct. If you don't — don't blame 
us if you miss out on exciting notices! 
Interested in Public Health Service? 
$3,000 Scholarships? Here is great 
news — for graduates of any age who 
are interested in an advanced degree: 
Three fellowships of $3,000 each are 
now available to students or graduates 
in Public Health Nutrition, according to 
Dr. A. Hughes Bryan, Professor of 
Public Health Nutrition, University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The 
fellowships, which are to be awarded 
before the summer months, are ample 
for both living expenses and tuition, 
and lead to a Master's degree in Public 
Health or a Masters of Science degree 
in Public Health. Write immediately 
f;or application blanks to: Dr. A. 
Hughes Bryan address above. 

Miss Pela Braucher, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Foods and Nutrition says 
there are several other similar scholar- 
ships available from Michigan State 
and other colleges in the field of Pub- 
lic Health Service. Write Miss Brauch- 
er if you are interested. 

From Germany 
Amy Heckinger, '50, writes from Bad 
Nauheim, Germany to tell of her recent 
activities and interests. She is now 
on her first European special service 
assignment in the Kirch Goens Service 
Club. The Ayers Kaserne is situated 
about 65 miles from Frankfurt, Ger- 
many and that Amy commutes about 
45 minutes to and from Bad Nauheim, 
where she now lives. A major part 
of her special services work has been 
devoted to entertaining troops abroad. 
She has spent much time in the Pacific 
theatre and now is taking a turn at 
Europe. She has traveled through 
Nurnberg for Orientation and from 
there to the Bavarian Alps region. 
She states her club directorship is 
keeping her very busy but that she is 
enjoying her first experience of work- 
ing under peace time conditions. She 
says, "I am amazed at the miraculous 
rebuilding that has taken place since 
I was stationed here as a WAC ten 
years ago." 

On board ship, in route to Bremen, 
she helped produce a show for the 
personnel and in addition to the sum- 
mary of that presentation, she in- 
cluded a message from the ships 
Chaplain, which we repeat here, since 
the inspiration will be beneficial to all. 
The Chaplain was M. W. Howard and 
he write as follows: 

"I am standing upon the seashore. 
A ship nt my side spreads her white 
sails in the morning breeze and starts for 
the lilue ocean. S'he is an object of beauty 



JOB OPPORTUNITIES 

Any graduate, recent or not-so- 
recent, wishing a job or to change 
jobs, or a good part-time summer or 
camp position or considering a new 
field of Home Economics work. 

— WRITE — 
Miss Marie Mount, 
Dean of College of Home Eco- 
nomics, 
College Park, Maryland 

Openings At Present As Follows 

—Public Utilities 
— Extension Service 
— Food Services 
— Department Stores 
— Commercial Companies 
— Camp or part-time summer po- 
sitions 

Note: Let Miss Mount know 
WHEN, WHAT TYPE job you de- 
sire and WHERE. Usually, she has 
just the request you want, if not, 
she will hold it until that job comes 
up. 



and strength, and I stand and watch her 
until at length she is only a ribbon, or 
white cloud, just where the sea and sky 
come to mingle with each other. Then 
someone at my side says ; 'There ! She's 
gone!' Gone where? Gone from my sight — 
that is all. She is just as large in mast 
and hull and spar as she was when she 
left my side, and just as able to bear her 
load of living freight — to the place of 
destination. Her diminished size is in me, 
not in her; and just at the moment when 
someone at my side says ; 'There. She's 
gone !' there are other voices ready to 
take up the glad shout, 'There she comes !' 
All through life we walk side by side 
with our loved one and then someday God 
the creator calls each of his creations home 
and what a joy there is in knowing that 
there are loved ones there to say, 'There 
she comes.' or 'There he comes.' We too 
shall then take our place and welcome 
loved ones left behind. 

'So death where is thy sting?'" 

Tour Slums 
Ninety-six junior and senior Home 
Economics students made a tour of 
slum and redevelopment areas of Wash- 
ington, D. C. The three hour tour was 
conducted in connection with study be- 
ing carried on in the Home Develop- 
ment Department of the College of 
Home Economics under the direction 
of Instructor Isabelle McGovern and 
Miss Nancy Mearing, director of the 
university's home management house. 

The students were guests of the Na- 
tional Capital Housing Authority and 
the Washington Housing Association. 




SALES 

INSURANCE 
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 

Near University of Maryland 
WArfield 7-1010 & 7-0321 
6037 Baltimore BouUvard 

RIVERDALE, MD. 



32 



Maryland 



College of 



Business & Public 



Administration 

^^^ Egbert F. Tingley 



Inc. 
out- 

the 



Motor Freight Conference 

A regional conference on Selling 
Motor Freight Service was held 
in the Student Union Building. The con- 
ference, which stressed the fundament- 
als of motor freight selling, was con- 
ducted for motor carrier salesmen in 
Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, 
Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey 
and the District of Columbia. It was 
sponsored by the College of Business 
and Public Administration. Maryland 
Motor Truck Association, Inc.; and the 
Customer Relations Council of the 
American Trucking Associations, 

Instruction was furnished by 
standing representatives from 
motor carrier industry and the College 
of Business and Public Administration. 
Luncheon speakers for the two days 
were Mr. John V. Lawrence, Manag- 
ing Director of the American Trucking 
Associations, Inc., and Mr. Thomas 
Widerman, General Manager of the 
Maryland Motor Truck Association. 

The course director was Dr. Charles 
A. Taff, Associate Professor of Trans- 
portation. A certificate was awarded to 
those attending the course by the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

Tal Speer Honored 

Talbot T. Speer, '17, a Past Presi- 
dent of the University Alumni Asso- 
ciation was selected to present the 
Family Heritage Awards for the Free 
Enterprise Awards Association in New 
York. The presentation was made on 
March 15 at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel. 
This is the second year Mr. Speer has 
been so honored. He is publisher of 
five newspapers and President of the 
Baltimore Salesbook Company. 

In selecting Mr. Speer to make the 
presentations, the Free Enterprise 
Awards Association selected "A Cham- 
pion who has fought for twenty years 
in behalf of Free Enterprise in Ameri- 
ca." In his publications and public 
appearances as well as in his business 
and social life, Mr. Speer has contended 
that the best interests of all Americans 
lies in free enterprise for business and 
that "All American business should be 
free, and that the money earned by 
business would be used as business de- 
sires — to expand, to create better busi- 
ness, make better and more jobs for 
American individuals, and build a bet- 
ter standard of living for everyone in 
the nation." 

In Oklahoma 

Robert E. Williams, Jr. '50, has re- 
cently been employed by the Stanolind 
Oil and Gas Company at Tulsa, Okla- 
homa. He has been assigned to Hous- 
ton, Texas where he will serve as a 
Jr. Accountant. 

In The Navy 

Jane C. Alexander, '54 of Laurel, 
Maryland, was one of the first group of 
women to complete successfully, the 



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COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



DEL HAVEN WHITE HOUSE COTTAGES 

COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 
Baltimore-Washington Boulevard 

Two Miles North — University Maryland 
Hot Water Hen ted 50 Brick Cottages 

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Maryland 



83 



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One of the Largest Imported and 

Domestic Wine Lists in the Country 

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320 PARK AVENUE 

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Baltimore 17, Md. 

CHINESE GROCERY STORE 

205 W. Mulberry St. — Baltimore, Md. 



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Furniture 

Interior Decorating 

Furnishing and Decorating Maryland 

Home* and Institutions for 

over 58 years 

BENSON 

CHARLES STREET at Franklin 
MU. 5-4510 Baltimore, Md. 



FIRST 



IN FUEL OIL AND 
BURNER SERVICE 

C. HOFFBERGER CO. 

MONUMENT and FORREST STREETS 
Phone MU 5-8400 Baltimore, Md. 



WHOLESALE STATIONERY 

The Handy ' Line 

Baltimore, Md. 




Navy's new six weeks Officer Candidate 
— Officer Training Program at the 
U. S. Naval Station, Newport, Rhode 
Island. Following graduation in late 
October, Ensign Alexander was as- 
signed to duty at the Naval Ordnance 
Laboratory at White Oak, Maryland. 
To Seaway Commission 

Dr. Charles A. Taff, associate pro- 
fessor of transportation, was named 
to the American Tolls Committee of 
the St. Lawrence Seaway Development 
Corp. 

A consultant to the Defense Depart- 
ment, Dr. Taff was appointed by the 
American and Canadian seaway offi- 
cials at a meeting in the Pentagon. 
In Rochester, N.Y. 

W. L. Ellis (B. &P.A.), former Ad- 
ministrative Assistant in the Office 
of the President, has been promoted 
to EAM Manager in the Rochester 
office. 

He started with the company in 1946 
as an Assistant Sales Representative 
in Washington, D.C. He was made 
an EAM Sales Representative and was 
advanced in 1948 to Special Repre- 
sentative in the Wholesale Department 
and then the Retail Department. The 
following year he was assigned to the 
New York Uptown office as an EAM 
Sales Representative and, in 1952, as 
Instructor in the Department of Edu- 
cation as Endicott. He subsequently 
served as an Administrative Assistant 
at WHQ in the Future Demands and 
Market Analysis Field Testing Depart- 
ments and he was named Administra- 
tive Assistant in the Office of the Presi- 
dent in May 1953. 



College of 



Arts and Sciences 



Lois Eld Ernest 



In Indiana 

John C. Goossens has joined the staff 
of the Whiting Research Laborato- 
ries of the Standard Oil Company in 
Indiana. He is scheduled to receive his 
PH. D. in Chemistry in June from the 
University and is a member of the 
American Chemical Society. 

With Dow Chemical 

Robert L. Hudson, who received his 
Ph. D. in Organic Chemistry from the 
University, has recently been employed 
by the Dow Chemical Company at Mid- 
land, Michigan. He is classified as a 
chemist and began employment in late 
February in the Saran Development 
Laboratory. 

With Air Lines 

Marianne H. Allen, '54, became a 
United Airline Stewardess in late Oc- 
tober of 1954. She writes to tell us 
that Betty Woodward of the same 
class is also active in the same capacity 
and is based in San Francisco. Mari- 
anne writes from Salt Lake City, Utah, 
which she states is a temporary ad- 
dress, and notes that she is still single. 
In Army Chemical Center 

Max L. Reuss, Jr. has been assigned 
to the Army Chemical Center in Mary- 
land. He graduated in 1952 as a Physi- 



cist and will serve in that capacity in 
the Chemical and Radiological Labora- 
tories. Before entering the Army last 
August, he was a physicist for the 
Microwave, Antennas, and Components 
Branch of the Naval Research Labora- 
tory in Washington. 

During basic training, he qualified 
for the Army Scientific and Profession- 
al Program, a plan designed to insure 
maximum utilization of soldiers with 
technical education and experience in 
Army research. Under that program, 
he was assigned to the Chemical Cen- 
ter for research and development work, 
located 25 miles north of Baltimore. 

At Columbia 

John Robert Tucker, class of 1951, 
will receive his Masters of Internation- 
al Affairs degree from the school of 
International Affairs, and a certificate 
from the East Asian Institute, at 
Columbia University on June 1 of this 
year. He will then begin in a profes- 
sional career at the Central Intelligence 
Agency in Washington. 

Bob was awarded the Governor's Cup 
by Governor McKeldin and the Scab- 
bard and Blade Cup and College of Air 
Science Award on University of Mary- 
land Armed Services Day in May, 1951. 
His squadron won the annual spring 
competitive drill. 

The former soldier is now a 1st Lieu- 
tenant in the Air Force Reserve Intelli- 
gence Organization. After a year and 
a half in the Air Force he spent 6 
months in Chicago doing part time 
evening graduate work in psychology 
at Northwesetern University and 12 
months at 5th Air Force (Rear) Head- 
quarters, Tageu, Korea. Separated on 
rotation from Korea, he attended the 
Graduate School of Arts and Sciences 
at Harvard University in September, 
1953 to start the program he wil finish 
in June. 

At Maryland, he was a member of 
Company 1-3 of Scabbard and Blade 
and became 1st Corps Area Inspector. 
He was also a distinguished Military 
Graduate and a Proctor of Calvert "C" 
and active in the Philosophy Club. 

To Health Center 

Dr. Norman R. Roth, Assistant Pro- 
fessor in Sociology has been appointed, 
for a three year term, as board mem- 
ber of the Advisory Board of the 
Mental Health Study Center, a field 
station of the Community Services 
Branch of the National Institute of 
Mental Health. The function of the 
Community Service Branch is to study 
mental health problems at the local 
level. 

A & S Faculty Notes 

Dr. S. Fred Singer, Mr. Wentworth 
and Mr. Shen, Physics Department, 
presented papers at the Baltimore 
Meeting of the American Physical So- 
ciety. 

Physics Department graduate assist- 
ants John Davis and James Knight 
have been selected in national competi- 
tion as National Science Fellows for 
the academic year 1955-56. Five other 
graduate students in physics who en- 
tered the competition and received hon- 
orable mention were: Robert Ayres, 



34 



Maryland 



John Dawson, David Goldman, John 
Quinn, and John Warren. 

Professor Carle Bode, English De- 
partment, attended the College Eng- 
lish Association Institute in Schenec- 
tady, as chairman of one of the dis- 
cussion groups. 

Dr. F. G. Brickwedde, Physics De- 
partment, served as a member of the 
Advisory Committee on the American 
Society for Engineering Education, Na- 
tional Science Foundation, Thermo- 
dynamics Conference at Purdue. 

Dr. Ladislaus L. Marton, Lecturer in 
the Physics Department, has received 
the Department of Commerce Gold 
Medal for exceptional service, for maj- 
or contributions to the science and tech- 
nology of electron optics in creating 
and developing the electron interfero- 
meter and the electron optical method 
of mapping electrostatic and magnetic 
fields. 

Dr. Spencer M. Smith, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Economics, gave testimony on 
the Echo Park project for the develop- 
ment of the upper basin of the Colorado 
River to the Senate Subcommittee on 
Interior and Insular Affairs. 

Dr. Robert T. Spurr attended the 
conference on Analytical Chemistry and 
Applied Spectroscopy at Pittsburgh, 
where he was co author of a paper 
with Mr. Franklin Buyers. 

At M.I.T. 

Dr. Ferdinand G. Brickwedde, Phys- 
ics Department, will serve as one of 
the leaders of a special summer pro- 
gram on low temperature research, 
which will be held at the Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology in Au- 
gust. 

R. J. Dixon, Jr., Government and 
politics, testified before Mie Kefauver 
Sub-Committee of the Senate Judiciary 
Committee. The topic was the revision 
of the presidential election system. 

Dr. Wesley Gewehr, History Depart- 
ment, spoke before the Workshop on 
Social Forces Influencing the Second- 
ary Curriculum at Eastern High School 
in Baltimore. His topic was "What 
are the Critical Foreign Policy Issues 
We Face?" 

Carnegie Medal 

Frank B. Wise ('35 A&S), has been 
awarded the Carnegie medal for his 
bravery in breaking up the shooting 
spree in the House of Representatives 
in March, 1954. It will be recalled he 
grappled with the armed Puerto Rico 
fanatics and helped hold them until 
police arrived. The presentation was 
made at a meeting of the American 
Trade Association Executives in Wash- 
ington, D.C. 

****** 

OLD STUFF 

Outlawing all atomic weapons would 
be a high-minded gesture, although we 
do recall that in '63 Gettysburg had a 
local ordinance Iforbidding the dis- 
charge of any firearm. 



Another Dietrich Brothers job 
for mflRYLflno . . . 




Power House Addition to Control Heating Plant 



Construction by 

Porter Construction 

Co., Inc., 

Hyattsville, Md. 



STEEL 

BY 



Egli and Gomph 
Baltimore, 
Mechanical 
Engineers 



Van Rensselaer 
P. Saxe, 
Structural 
Engineers 




BRIDGS mORE 

POWER! 

TO THE CfllTIPUS 

FOR STEEL FABRICATING and WAREHOUSING 
CALL DIETRICH BROTHERS, INC. . . . 



BALTIMORE 18, MD. 
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WASHINGTON, D. C. 



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Phone 5623 



Maryland 



35 



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Alumni Council Action 

Recent Activities And Decisions Of The General Alumni 

Council Are Printed Herewith For The Many Alumni 

Interested In The Broad Alumni Program. 



The University Development Fund — 
Under the Chairmanship of Dr. 
Thurston Adams, steps are being taken 
to establish a University Development 
Program. Under the program, funds 
are to be raised for scholarships, re- 
search, graduate study, additions to the 
physical plant, as well as for the gen- 
eral development of the Institution. The 
committee has authorized to solicit 
and borrow $500.00 from each of 20 
individual alumni. The loan is to be 
without interest and the total to be 
$10,000.00. Loans are to be repaid from 
initial receipts under the program or 
in accordance with early payment ar- 
rangements by the President of the 
University. 

In the event the committee is suc- 
cessful in its efforts to raise the full 
amount of $10,000.00, the Alumni Coun- 
cil will back the project to the extent 
of an equal amount which is to be re- 
paid in like manner. 

Alumni Headquarters — President 
Elkins has advised Alumni President 
Saunders concerning plans for moving 
the Alumni Office to the third floor of 
the Administration Building. There is 
a possibility the move may be made 
prior to the Commencement Reunions, 
scheduled for the first week in June. 

Student Union for Baltimore — Com- 
mittee Chairman, Frank Block, has in- 
dicated an enabling act is before the 
Legislature to insure necessary hous- 
ing facilities and authority in connec- 
tion with a Student Union in Baltimore. 
It now appears work will begin on or 
about September 1 with a partial 
domitory being planned. It is estimated 
the structure will house 400 students 
and will include a cafeteria, lounge, 
conference and study rooms, a stu- 
dent supply store and other necessary 
recreational facilities. 

Alumni Budget — The Alumni Council 
has adopted a complete budget for the 
operation of the Alumni Association 
and has taken steps to establish the 
Alumni publication "MARYLAND" on 
a sound financial basis. 

Resolution of Sympathy — The fol- 
lowing Resolution was adopted and we 
know will be of interest to his many 
friends. "The Alumni Council sends 
deepest regards and most sincere wish- 
es for a speedy and complete recovery 
to Dr. H. C. 'Curley' Byrd,: without 
whose enterprise, ability, and vision, 
Maryland would never have been of 
National importance." 

Alumni Clubs — Through Chairman 
Gottwals, contact has been made with 
all alumni clubs and their activities 
have been reviewed. Interest is strong 
for a quarterly bulletin for club mem- 
bers and approval was given for the 
issuance of an initial bulletin. Officers 



of each club will distribute the bulletin 
to the club membership. Efforts will 
be made to strengthen the existing 
clubs and the immediate future to un- 
dertake the establishment of an organ- 
ization in Frederick County. It is gen- 
erally felt two meetings a year are 
sufficient for a club and the limitation 
should be adhered to unless Club mem- 
bers feel additional meetings could be 
successful. 

Centennial — The Alumni Association 
will work closely with University Offi- 
cials to assure an outstanding Centen- 
nial celebration in 1956 and a Sesqui- 
centennial celebration for the entire 
University in 1957. It has been pro- 
posed that all alumni clubs meet on 
January 20, 1957 which is Charter 
Day for the University. Among the 
celebration considerations were such 
functions as seminars, convocations, 
banquets, a preparation of a University 
History, a fund raising program, and 
possibly a Centennial postage stamp. 



Speaks at A.A.U.W. 

Insufficient funds, lack of teachers and 
a general lowering of academic 
standards were cited by Dr. Wilson H. 
Elkins, Maryland University's presi- 
dent, as a direct result of U. S. educa- 
tors' efforts to educate the large group 
of aspiring university students today. 

Dr. Elkins, who spoke before the 
college branch of the American Asso- 
ciation of University Women in Wash- 
ington, said, "We have reached the 
crossroads where we have to determine 
who is to be admitted to colleges and 
universities and who will be allowed 
to remain." To keep the level of col- 
lege performances high, "absolute" 
standards (for admission) rather than 
"relative" must be determined, he said, 
adding, it is the obligation of the uni- 
versity to establish these standards. 

To effect the change, Dr. Elkins sug- 
gested that by giving greater "social 
prestige and dignity" to employment of 
all kinds, we can encourage a larger 
number of young people to enter their 
chosen fields immediately after high 
school graduation, leaving college open 
to those better qualified for profes- 
sional training. A change of attitude 
among young people must be developed, 
and those with lower aptitudes must 
feel encouraged, not discouraged, about 
employment rather than college. 

Dr. Elkins said the task before U. S. 
educators today is a most difficult ex- 
periment, and that the increase in the 
numbers of students has brought a 
lower level of performance on the part 
of the universities. 



36 



Mary land 



College of 



Military Science 



In Japan 

Major Theodore E. Blakeslee, (Mil. 
Sc. '52), is a member of the 
406th Medical General Laboratory at 
Camp Tokyo, Japan. Major Blakeslee 
is an entomologist at the laboratory. 
He graduated from Ohio State in 1941 
and from Maryland University in 1952. 
Blakeslee entered the Army in 1942. 
He arrived overseas in January, 1954. 
Arnold Society 
Maryland's Frank P. Lahm Squad- 
ron of the Arnold Air Society was host 
to the Sixth Annual National Conclave 
More than 800 cadets from 166 
squadrons located throughout the coun- 
try and in Hawaii attended the con- 
clave held at the Statler Hotel in 
Washington. 

Mr.Harold E. Talbot, Secretary of 
the Air Force, addressed the delegates, 
representing the squadrons of the so- 
ciety. The list of dignitaries also in- 
cluded Lt. Gen. Emmett (Rosie) O'Don- 
nell, Deputy Chief of Staff Personnel, 
USAF; Major Gen. William E. Hall, 
Assistant Chief of Staff for Reserve 
Forces, USAF; Major Gen. Matthe K. 
Deichelmann, Commandant, Headquar- 
ters, AFROTC; Major Gen. Norris B. 
Harbold, Director Personnel Procure- 
ment and Training; and Colonel Jo- 
septh R. Ambrose, Professor of Air 
Science at the University of Maryland. 
Miss Gertude S. Garraway, President- 
General of the Daughters of The Amer- 
ican Revolution was one of the speak- 
ers. 

The Arnold Air Society is an hon- 
orary society of advanced air force 
R.O.T.C. cadets, founded in 1947 with 
the support of the late General H. H. 
Arnold, the first honorary president. 
General James Doolittle is currently 
honorary president. The society has 
been affiliated with the Air Force As- 
sociation for a number of years. 
For Service Wives 
Maryland is educating coeds as to 
the part they might be called upon to 
play as military wives. 

They are being orientated on the 
customs encountered in the armed 
forces. 

Eight weeks of meetings terminated 
when the students traveled to Boiling 
Field. 

The class attendance has jumped 
from an initial 35 to 80. 

Major William F. Streit took over 
the responsibility of contacting the 
wives of service personnel to speak 
to the group. Meetings dealt with top- 
ics such as uniforms, pay, leaves, 
passes, and living on a base, either 
overseas or in this country. 

Legal subjects were discussed, as 
well as transportation arrangements, 
and facilities such as a chapel, school, 
and commissary. 

Students expressed amazement at 
learning how vital their social role 
would be in their husbands' service ca- 
reers. 



the smart set's guide 
to dining and dancing 

Palladian Room 

SANDE WILLIAMS and his or- 
chestra offer music that is an 
invitation to dance. Dinner 
from 6; dancing from 9:30 p.m. 

Blue Room 

BARNEE, his orchestra, plus a 
large and talented cast in two 
different shows nightly, 9:45 
and 1 1 :30. 



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Maryland 



37 




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TENTH IS LUCKY FOR HIM 

Joseph V. Dendinas, recently commissioned as a second lieutenant in the United 
States Air Force Reserve, now believes that the 10th day of the month is a day 
for things to happen. A native Lithuanian, he arrived in this country on October 
10, 1949. He received his United States citizenship on January 10, 1955. On 
February 10, 1955 he was commissioned, with distinguished military honors, among 
63 other University of Maryland students. 

Left above is Colonel Joseph R. Ambrose, USAF, Dean, College of Military 
Science. At tht right is Colonel Henry C. Stanwood, US Army, (Ret.) State Direc- 
tor, Maryland Selective Service. 



The most popular feature was the 
discussion period. One member sug- 
gested that the group organize a club 
to become a permanent fixture among 
campus activities. 

The course will be repeated next year 
if enough students express a desire for 
it. 



College of 



Agriculture 



Dr. Howard L. Stier 



Urges Alumni Help 

Appealing to the alumni to attract 
good students to the school, Presi- 
dent Wilson H. Elkins called the alum- 
ni organization "perhaps the best of 
our public relation media." 

In an address at the annual con- 
vocation at the university's College of 
Agriculture, Dr. Elkins said the enroll- 
ment of the agricultui'e school has not 
'increased in proportion with the uni- 
versitys overall enrollment in the last 
few years. 

He told the alumni present "you 
ought to advertise agriculture" to pro- 
spective students. 

"If necessary," he said, "give them 
financial assistance to come here." 

Commenting on the school's academic 
standing, Dr. Elkins said, "The state of 



the university as a whole is unquestion- 
ably good, and the state of the College 
of Agriculture is unquestionably excel- 
lent." 

Awards 

Before Dr. Elkins' talk, scholarships 
and awards were presented to outstand- 
ing students in the College of Agricul- 
ture. Klaus Meyer, of Brookline, Mass., 
received the National Block and Bridle 
Club award. 

Sears Roebuck scholarships went to 
Louis Arrington, Calvin Blades, 
Charles Coale, James Coen, T. LeRoy 
Johnson, Gerald Loper, Wayne McGin- 
nis, William Powel, Norman Smith, 
Clarence Reeder, and Spencer Streett. 
Prizes For Judging 

Prizes for the livestock and dairy 
judging contest went to Ronald Wade, 
Nancy Sears, George Arnold, and Ed 
Vincent. 

Miss Sears also won the freshman 
prize in the judging competition. 

Ronald Jones won the Danforth 
scholarship. The State Grange award 
went to Lucius Daniels. 

Dairy Technology Society scholar- 
ships were presented to Walter Kinsey, 
Robert Nicodemus, Donald Dilg, David 
Kuhn, Conrad Hemphill, and Fred Neff- 
ner. 

Mr. Kuhn also won the Virginia Dare 
award. 

James Noppenberger won a special 
award for a student who has done work 
with Maryland nurserymen. 



38 



Maryland 



Donald Delauter, was given the Wall 
Street Journal award. 

Agriculture Student Council keys 
went to Robert Raley, Robert Downey, 
Adrian Remsberg, John Browning, 
James C. Smith, Ronald J. Jones, Klaus 
M. Meyer and Robert Minor. 
Plaques To 4-H Clubs 

Twelve Maryland 4-H Clubs received 
placque awards for excellence in pro- 
gram work and achievements, accord- 
ing to W. Sherard Wilson, State 4-H 
Club Agent. 

They were the Laytonsville 4-H Club, 
Montgomery county; Ballenger 4-H 
Club, both of Frederick county; Hebb- 
ville Sr. 4-H Club and Fifth District 
4-H Club, Baltimore county; Willing 
Workers 4-H Club, ecil county; David- 
sonville 4-H Club, Anne Arundel 
county; Elizabeth C. Hernich 4-H Club, 
Prince Georges county; Price 4-H Club, 
Queen Anne's county; Four Leaf Clover 
4-H Club, Dorchester county; Hebron 
4-H Club and Allen Junior 4-H Club, 
Wicomico county. 



College of 



Physical Education 
Recreation & Health 

■ Dr. Warren R. Johnson 



Camping Forum 

The University through the College 
of Physical Education, Recreation 
and Health and the College of Special 
and Continuation Studies in coopera- 
tion with the Capitol Section of the 
American Camping Association con- 
ducted an evening forum devoted to 
camping opportunities for young men 
and women. 

The forum was presented by an out- 
standing panel of experienced camping 
personnel representing private, agency 
day camps and camps for the handi- 
capped. 

The forum was conducted under the 
general chairmanship of Assistant Pro- 
fessor Elizabeth Flinchbaugh, Chair- 
man of the Camping Committee, Col- 
lege of Physical Education, Recreation 
and Health. 

Ample opportunities were provided 
for "buzz" groups, specific questions 
and discussion periods with members 
of the panel. 

Speakers included Dr. Lester M. Fra- 
ley, Dean, College of Physical Educa- 
tion, Recreation and Health; Lenora 
Mann, President, Capitol Section, 
American Camping Association; Eliza- 
beth Flinchbaugh, Chairman of Leader- 
ship Training, Capitol Section, Ameri- 
can Camping Association; William 
Bartlett, Secretary, Recreational Group 
Work, United Community Services, 
Washington, D. C; Miss Loretta Stal- 
lings, Instructor, George Washington 
University, Washington, D. C; Mr. Ray 
Brown, Supervisor, Day Camps, De- 
partment of Recreation, Washington, 
D. C; Dr. Janet A. Wessel, Chairman 
of the Physical Therapy Curriculum, 
College of Physical Education, Recrea- 
tion and Health. 



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40 



Twenty-Five Years Ago 

For a few years now, it has been our 
practice to write to all of the Engi- 
neering graduates of the 25 year Class 
and invite them to send in information 
as to themselves so that we may give 
brief biographical sketches of each in 
issues of the "Maryland" during the 
summer and fall before the Homecom- 
ing meeting. The Class of 1930, ac- 
cording to the records available here, 
had 37 engineers as graduates. We 
have, at this writing, biographical in- 
formation on only eight of these. Here 
is a roster of the engineers of that 
Class with the addresses as we know 
them and with sketches as to some of 
the members. 

Ahalt, C. A. — reported as at Wright 
Air Force Field, Dayton, Ohio — ad- 
dress: c/o Mr. Albert Ahalt, Middle- 
town, Maryland. 
Betts, J. W.— Rt. No. 1, Salisbury, Md. 
Bishop, C. B. — Unknown. 
Boablitz, H. D.— 1300 Morning Ave- 
nue, Baltimore, Md. 
Cameron, J. M. — Northeast, Md. 
Carter, R. M. — Holmes Avenue and 
Intervale Road, Glenbrook, Conn. See 
sketch as to him below. 
Cerrito, A. F. — 29 Aberdeen Avenue, 

Aberdeen, Md. 
DeMarr, J. D.— 9624 Old Bladensburg 
Road, Silver Spring, Md. His biog- 
raphy was written on page 36 of the 
November-December, 1953 issue of 
this magazine. 
Dodson, C. R. — Reported with National 

City Bank of New York, N. Y. 
Epple, Richard J.— 126 Hope Street, 

Ridgewood, N. J. 
Fifer, W. H.— 3801 Connecticut Ave- 
nue, N. W., Washington, D. C. See his 

biography below. 
Gordon, J. M. — 400 Oxford Road, East 

Lansing, Mich. 
Harper, Luther— 2205 40th St., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 
Hempel, W. C— Rt. No. 1, Mountain 

Street, Camden, Me. 
Hine, H. H. — 5557 Oregon Avenue, Bal- 
timore 27, Md. 
James, Carroll S. — 56 Mealey Parkway, 

Hagerstown, Md. 
Jarvis, H. A. — c/o Creole Petroleum 
Corp., Refining Dept., Apartado 889, 
Caracas, Venezuela. See biography 
below. 
Jarvis, K. P. — Berlin, Md. 
Letvin, Samuel — c/o Todd Combustion 
Equipment Co., 601 W. 26th St., 
N. Y. C. 
Lininger, F. R. — 411 Brickby Road, 

Norfolk, Va. 
Lipphard, F. E. — 67 Hillcrest Terrace, 

Trenton, N. J. 
Lloyd, M. E. — Standard Vacuum Oil 
Co., No. 6 Church Lane, Calcutta, 
India. 
Lockridge, R. W. — Unknown. 
Lombard, Herman G. — 1623 Upshur 

Maryland 



Street, N.W., Washington, D. C. See 

sketch below. 
Perham, J. E. — 1815 Heisterboro Road, 

Hagerstown, Md. 
Phipps, G. T.— 1407 Rimsack Road, 

Billings, Mont. 
Price, Milton M.— 33 Woodhaven Blvd., 

Bethesda, Md. 
Quinn, R. F. — Reported as at 1131 

Adams Road, Schnectady, N. Y. 
Roberts, E. J. — 1315 Underwood Street, 

N.W., Washington 12, D. C. See 

sketch below. 
Sehorn, H. F. — 217 Eastwood Avenue, 
Northwood Park, Silver Spring, Md. 
Schoefield, Wm. C. — 64 Archer Drive, 

Bronxville 8, N. Y. 
Tansill, R. B.— 31 E. Myrtle Street, 

Alexandria, Va. 
Stephens, Francis D. — 1714 Summit 

Place, N.W., Washington, D. C. 
Taylor, N. L.— 210 Glenn Avenue, Sal- 
isbury, Md. 
Wallace, J. M.— P.O. Box 880, Hunting- 
ton 12, W. Va. His biography was 

written on page 40 of the May-June 

1954, issue. 
Willmuth, C. A.— 8705 Defense High- 
way, Lanham Md. See sketch below. 
Wilson, W. S.— Bel Air, Md. 
Patent Advisor 

Ray M. Carter, (M.S. Chem. '30) 
whose address is Holmes Avenue and 
Intervale Road, Glenbrook, Conn., is 
Patent Advisor for National Distillers 
Products Corp., of New York. Previ- 
ously he was a research chemist with 
U. S. Industrial Chemicals, Inc., and 
also Patent Advisor for that concern. 

Carter and his wife, Mrs. Bertha 
Lewis Carter, have two adult children, 
Jean L., and Nancy L. 

Carter is a member of the Ameri- 
can Chemical Society. We hope that 
he will be present at College Park at 
Homecoming time this Fall. 

With Navy Department 

William H. Fifer, (B.S. of E.E. '30, 
E.E. '34) lives at 3801 Connecticut Ave- 
nue, N.W., Washington 8, D. C, and is 
now Engineer in charge of Electric 
Propulsion, Submarine, Magnetic De- 
fense and Electric Battery Sections of 
the Electrical Branch of the Bureau 
of Ships, Navy Department. 

Prior to his present assignment, he 
was a Junior Marine Engineer with 
Westinghouse Electric; an Engineering 
Aide at the U.S.N. Experiment Sta- 
tion, and Assistant Physicist at the 
Naval Research Laboratory. 

Fifer and his wife, Mrs. Ruth A. 
Fifer, have one son, William Clifford 
Fifer, aged 20 years. 

On December 4, 1945, Fifer re- 
ceived the U.S. Navy Distinguished 
Civilian Service Award. He is a Fel- 
low, American Institute of Electrical 
Engineers; Civil member, American 
Society of Naval Engineers; and mem- 
ber of West River Sailing Club. 

He furnished some very helpful in- 
formation as to the present addresses 
of members of his Class. 
In Venezuela 

Harry A. Jarvis, (B.S. in Engineer- 
ing, '30), whose address is, care of — 
Creole Petroleum Corporation, Apart- 
ado 889, Caracas, Venezuela, is Execu- 
tive Vice President and Director of 
Creole' Petroleum Corporation, Caracas, 
Venezuela. 

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Mr. Jarvis 



Immediately upon receipt of the letter 
asking him for in- 
formation as to him- 
self, he sent an Air- 
Mail reply, which is 
much appreciated 
and quite helpful in 
preparing these 
short biographies. 
He also gave ad- 
dresses for two 
classmates in the 
States for whom we 
had no forwarding 
information. 

After graduation 
from Maryland in 1930, he was a stu- 
dent engineer with Standard Oil Co., 
(N. J.) at Linden, N. J., until January, 
1931. From that date to December, 
1946, he was a Junior Engineer to Pres- 
ident and General Manager of Cia. 
Nativa de Petroleo, Ltd., in the Repub- 
lic of Argentine. From January 1947 
to the present, he has been with Creole 
Petroleum Corporation, of Caracas, 
Venezuela as Assistant Manager of Re- 
fining Department, Director, Member of 
Executive Committee, and now in his 
position of Executive Vice-President 
and Director as stated above. 

In 1947 he took an advanced manage- 
ment course at Harvard Business 
School. 

His wife was Miss Lillian Clarkson, 
of Bradford, England, and they have 
two children, Harry A. Jarvis, Jr., 18, 
and Gail Jarvis, 16 years of age. 

In his letter he says: "I hope to be 
at Homecoming, College Park this fall. 
However, I am not definitely sure at 
this time whether I can make it or not. 
I am enclosing a snapshot." 

We hope that he will be on hand on 
the last Saturday of October, namely, 
29 October, which has been set as 
Homecoming date. 

Patent Attorney, And Inventor 

Herman G. Lombard, (B.S. of M.E. 
'30), of 1623 Upshur Street, N.W., 
Washington 11, D. C, is engaged in 
practice as a Patent Attorney with 
offices in the National Press Building, 
Washington, D. C. 

Lombard, who is unmarried, attend- 
ed George Washington University for 
the study of law in 1931, and, later, in 
1932 to 1934 inclusive, studied law at 
American University, receiving his de- 
gree of LL.B. in 1934. 

Lombard is a Commander in the 
U. S. Naval Reserve, and saw service 
from February 1942 to January 1946, 
to include the Philippine Liberation 
Campaign, in the Asiatic-Pacific Thea- 
ter of Operations. 

Lombard has been granted at least 
twenty U. S. patents on inventions. 

He is a member of the District of 
Columbia Bar; the Court of Appeals; 
and of the American Bar Association. 

Another Patent Attorney 

Eugene J. Roberts, (B.S. of E.E. '30) 
of 1315 Underwood Street, N.W., Wash- 
ington 12, D. C, who received an LL.B. 
from George Washington University in 
1937 in the field of Patent Law, is now 
a member of the firm of Pierce, Scheff- 
ler & Parker, of Washington, D. C, 



specializing in the practice of Patent, 
Trade-mark and Copyright law. Since 
1950, he has been the Legislative Edi- 
tor of the Bulletin of the American 
Patent Law Association. 

Before becoming established in his 
present connections he had been em- 
ployed with the Potomac Electric Pow- 
er Co., of Washington, D. C; a Patent 
Attorney with Westinghouse Electric 
Corp.; and in a similar position with 
the Navy Department from 1941 to 
1945, since which lattter date he has 
been with his present firm. 

Roberts married Louise E. Crosby, 
and they have two children, Nancy, 17 
years old and Neil, 12 years of age. 

Roberts is a member of Gamma Eta 
Gamma legal fraternity and also of 
the American Patent Law Association. 

Patent Examiner 

Charles A. Willmuth, (B.S. of E.E. 
'30), of 8705 Defense Highway, Lan- 
ham, Maryland, is a Patent Examiner 
with the U. S. Government. In 1933 he 
received the degree of LL.B. from 
the Washington College of Law. 

He and his wife, Mrs. Kathryn Will- 
muth, have one son, John Charles Will- 
muth, 11 years of age. 

From Harvard 

Dr. Sidney Goldstein, a Gordon Mc- 
Kay visiting lecturer from Harvard 
University and a professor of applied 
mathematics at the Israel Institute 
of Technology, spoke at the Institute 
for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Math- 
ematics. 

The subject of the address was 
"Some Developments of Boundary 
Layer Theory in Hydrodynamics." 

Fire Inspectors' Course 

The Fourth Annual Short Course for 
Fire Inspectors at the University was 
sponsored by the University's Fire 
Service Extension, (Robert C. Byrus, 
Director), and State Fire Marshal 
Charles L. Jackson, Insurance Com- 
missioner. 

Speakers included: Frank Trenner, 
Deputy Chief, Baltimore City Fire De- 
partment; Benjamin R. Benson, III, 
Special Investigator State Fire Mar- 
shal's Office; Joseph F. X. Mayhew, 
Chairman, Training Committee, Mary- 
land State Firemen's Association; O. A. 
Cavanagh, Service Engineer, Under- 
writers', Chicago; George F. Prince, 
Superintendent, Fire and Safety, Kop- 
pers Chemical Plant, Monaca, Pa.; Ho- 
ratio Bond, Chief Engineer, National 
Fire Protection Association, Boston, 
Mass.; Edward Pugh, Assistant Man- 
ager, Maryland Fire Underwriters Rat- 
ing Bureau; John L. Bryan, Senior In- 
structor, Fire Service Extension. Uni- 
versity of Maryland; John L. Meyers, 
Special Investigator, State Fire Mar- 
shal's Office; Charles H. Howe, Jr., 
Fire Marshal, Montgomery County; 
Hylton R. Brown, Senior Engineer, 
U. S. Bureau of Mines, College Park; 
Lawrence R. Woltz, Fire Marshal, 
Prince George's County; Robert C. 
Byrus, Director, Fire Service Exten- 



42 



Maryland 



sion, University of Maryland, and R. 
W. Batchelder, Special Agent, Factory 
Insurance Association, Baltimore. 

There is no charge for attendance 
at this Short Course, since this is an 
activity conducted in the public inter- 
est by the University of Maryland Each 
arranges for his own accommodations 
and subsistence. 

At Ohio State 

William G. Cline, (B.S. Engr. '50), 
received a degree in March as Master 
of Business Administration, from Ohio 
State University. 

Sand And (iravel Association 

The second annual conference on use 
of sand and gravel in bituminous mix- 
tures was sponsored by the University 
and the National Sand and Gravel As- 
sociation. Its objective is to provide 
sand and gravel producers with in- 
formation pertinent to the use of their 
products in bituminous construction. 
Sessions consisted principally of dis- 
cussions led by engineers who have 
had broad experience in the field of 
bituminous mixtures. 

Staff and lecturers included Dean S. 
S. Steinberg, Maryland, College Park, 
Maryland; Stanton Walker, Director 
of Engineering, National Sand and 
Gravel Association, Washington, D. C; 
J. E. Buchanan, President, Asphalt In- 
stitute, College Park, Maryland; J. E. 
Hittle, Assistant Engineer of Research, 
Asphalt Institute, College Park, Mary- 
land; Harry M. Rex, Highway Research 
Engineer, Physical Research Branch, 
Bureau of Public Roads, Washington, 
D. C; Paul F. Critz, Highway Re- 
search Engineer, Physical Research 
Branch, Bureau of Public Roads, Wash- 
ington, D. C; W. N. Carey, Jr., Project 
Engineer, Highway Research Board, 
National Research Council, Washing- 
ton, D. C; A. Duke Morgan, Materials 
Research Engineer, N. C. State High- 
way and Public Works Commission, 
Raleigh, North Carolina; John M. Grif- 
fith, Engineer of Research, Asphalt In- 
stitute, College Park, Maryland; 
George H. Dent, Assistant Chief Engi- 
neer, Asphalt Institute, College Park, 
Maryland. 

Danforth Foundation 

Professor Rerfield W. Allen of the 
Mechanical Engineering Department 
has received the nod for a teachers' 
grant from the Danforth Foundation of 
St. Louis, Mo. The grant allows for 
a year of graduate study toward the 
Doctorate at a stipend of % regular 
pay plus tuition and official fees at *he 
University of the recipient's choice. 
Professor Allen is one of 51 college 
faculty members from across the coun- 
try to receive such a grant and he 
is one of two to receive the grant for 
study in engineering. Congratulations! 

Ground Breaking 

Professor Russell B. Allen of the 
Civil Engineering Department was one 
of a party of three who recently par- 
ticipated in the ground breaking cere- 
monies for the new National Head- 
quarters Building for the National 
Society for Professional Engineers to 
be constructed at 2019 K St., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. The other two mem- 

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bers of the party were Clarence Shoch, 
President of the NSPE and Paul Rob- 
bins, Executive Director of the NSPE. 
Professor Allen is the treasurer of the 
society. 

Fluid Dynamics 
The Institute of Fluid Dynamics and 
Applied Mathematics and the office of 
Scientific Research, Air Research and 
Development Command jointly spon- 
sored a "Conference on Differential 
Equations." 20 papers were presented 
at the conference and the following 
papers were presented by University 
of Maryland Professors. 

"The Euler Poisson Darbobux 
Equation and the Method of De- 
scent," J. B. Diaz and G. S. S. 
Ludford. 

"Some Results on Generalized 
Axially Symmetric Potentials," A. 
Huber. 

Banquet Speaker 
Professor A. Weinstein of the Insti- 
tute of Fluid Dynamics and Applied 
Mathematics was one of the principal 
speakers at the conference banquet 
held in the Rotary Room of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

Sand And Gravel 
The second annual conference on 
The Use of Sand and Gravel and 
Bituminous Mixtures was held at the 
University. The conference was spon- 
sored by the University of Maryland 
and the National Sand and Gravel 
Association and was designed to pro- 
vide sand and gravel producers with 
information pertinent to the use of 
their products in bituminous construc- 
tion. Approximately 70 persons were 
in attendance. 

Highway Conference 
A regional advanced highway train- 
ing course was recently offered by the 
College of Engineering, to personnel 
in the highway departments of Mary- 
land, Delaware, the District of Co- 
lumbia, Virginia and West Virginia. 
The course ran for two weeks with 
25 persons in attendance. The course 
dealt primarily with the geometric 
design of highways. 

Motor Fleet Supervisors 
The 8th Annual Training Course 
for Motor Fleet Supervisors was 
offered by the University in coopera- 
tion with many national and state 
organizations interested in conserva- 
tion and safety. It was open to state 
organizations interested in conservation 
and safety. It was open to fleet 
owners and operators, safety and per- 
sonnel directors, fleet supervisors and 
safety engineers. The purpose of 
the course was to develop supervisory 
personnel capable of relieving top 
management of details of planning and 
administering an adequate plan for re- 
ducing accidents, lowering insurance 
costs and building better public rela- 
tions within the Motor Vehicle Fleet. 
Dean S. S. Steinberg welcomed to the 
University, the 62 persons in attend- 
ance and addressed the group on 
"Human Relations" at the graduation 
luncheon. The instructors for the 
course included nationally recognized 
authors, Maryland experts in the vari- 



ous phases of safety practices, and 
faculty members of the University. 

Engineers' Week 

The week of February 20, 1955 was 
celebrated throughout the country as 
National Engineers' Week, so named 
in honor of George Washington whose 
birthday is celebrated that week and 
who is considered our first engineer 
and land surveyor. During that week, 
Dean S. S. Steinberg addressed the 
Engineers' Club of Baltimore on the 
subject, "The College of Engineering 
at the University of Maryland." Fol- 
lowing this, he gave an illustrated 
talk on WBAL-TV on the "Engineering 
Profession," as a representative of 
the Maryland Society of Professional 
Engineers. 

The Dean also participated in a for- 
mal dinner celebrating the golden anni- 
versary of the Engineers' Club of 
Baltimore. 



School of 



Nursing 

Helen E. King 



Regional Board Meets 

The School of Nursing, a member of 
the Southern Regional Board on 
Graduate Education and Research in 
Nursing was host to the Board for 
the eighth meeting of the seminar 
on graduate education and research in 
nursing in Baltimore. 

Purpose of the seminar was to dis- 
cuss the underlying concepts in public 
health nursing and psychiatric nursing 
for graduate programs in nursing. 

Participating on the program were 
Deans of Nursing, Ada Fort of Emory, 
Majorie Barthoolf of Texas, Florence 
M. Gipe of Maryland, Julie Hereford of 
Vanderbilt, Florence Hinson of Ala- 
bama, and Elizabeth L. Kemble of 
North Carolina. Other participants 
included Miss Esther Garrison and Mrs. 
Lucile P. Leone of the Public Health 
Service; Dr. Ruth Freeman of The 
Johns Hopkins School of Public Health; 
Miss Mildred Tuttle, director, and Miss 
, Amy Viglione, associate director of 
J nursing of the Kellogg Foundation; 
Miss Caroline Randolph, public health 
] associate, of the Commonwealth Fund; 
I and Consultant Genevieve K. Butler 
, of the Southern Regional Board and 
board member of the National Board 
of Nursing of New York. 

In 1950 the University of Maryland 
as a regional school was selected to 
specialize in psychiatric nursing and 
nursing of children. As a highlight of 
the four day program, a conducted 
tour was made of the university's 
Psychiatric Institute. 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, President of 
the University and Dr. William S. 
Stone, Director of Medical Education 
and Research, greeted the deans and 
faculty members from the six regional 
schools. 
Alabama — Dean Florence Hixson 
North Carolina — Dean Elizabeth 
Kemble 

Texas — Dean Marjorie Batholf 
Vanderbilt — Dean Julia Hereford 



44 



Maryland 



Emory — Dean Ada Fort 
Maryland — Dean Florence M. Gipe 
In 1952 these six regional schools of 
the South were chosen from a group 
of sixteen others to offer graduate work 
in certain specialities. The University 
was selected to offer Nursing in Psychi- 
arty and the Nursing of Children. 
During the sessions Dr. Maurice Green- 
hill led the group in discussing new 
trends in graduate teaching in medical 
and in nursing schools. Misses Elsie 
Ho, Theresa Fernandez and Marcella 
Zaleski, all of the faculty of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland School of Nursing, 
assisted Dr. Greenhill in interpreting 
the program in basic Psychiatry Nurs- 
ing. Miss Florence Burnette and Dr. 
Ruth Freeman discussed graduate pro- 
grams in Public Health Nursing. 

To Psychiatry 

Frances McBain, Georgianne Hinely 
and Anne Schuck, three year students 
who have completed their clinical 
specialties have been selected by the 
faculty to serve in the psychomatic 
research work, Psychiatric Institute 
University Hospital. As a new experi- 
ence these nurses are assigned as nurse 
internes and will assist Dr. Maurice 
Greenhill and Instructor Elsie Ho, in 
gathering research data. 

Practical Nursing 

The program in Practical Nursing 
directed by Mrs. Ethel M. Troy, a 
graduate of the School of Nursing, 
now has a student census of thirty- 
four students. A unique feature of 
this new educational venture is that 
experience in nursing in the home 
will be a part of the curriculum as 
well as eight weeks experience in 
nursing in psychiatry. The Division 
of Practical Nursing, School of Nurs- 
ing, is being administered by the 
Dean of the School of Nursing, Flor- 
ence M. Gipe, and nursing school 
faculty. 



School of 



Pharmacy 

Adele B. Ballman 



Class Of '59 

Twenty-eight applicants for admis- 
sion to the School of Pharmacy 
appeared for entrance tests and inter- 
views with Faculty members. The 
processes for screening prospective 
students have been refined, augmented, 
and improved from year to year. Last 
year a group of students from the 
Class of 57 suggested to the Admis- 
sions Chairman, Dr. A. W. Richeson, 
the idea of student assistants in this 
part of the pre-orientation program. 
This student committee is headed by 
President Bernard Heyman and Vice- 
President Donald Ullman of the Sopho- 
more Class, and was assisted by Gil- 
bert Berman, Sheldon Barke, and Sue 
Goldman, all of the Class of 1957. 
Sheldon Barke, Sue Goldman and Dr. 
Adele B. Ballman made sandwiches and 
served cokes and cookies to a group of 
fifty students and faculty. 

The following named boys and girls 
took the tests: 



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The 1955 Terra Mariae 
The TERRA MARIAE for 1955 has 
gone to press. The book is bigger and 
more elaborate than it has been in a 
number of years owing to the enthusi- 
astic leadership of Editor-in-Chief, 
Murray Rubin, and Associate Editor, 
Melvin Rubin. The business staff, 
headed by Stanley Klatsky, who also 
did an outstanding job, wishes to thank 
the many alumni who assisted in 
making this year's book a more opulent 
production. 

Alumni Frolic 
The eighth annual Alumni Frolic 
sponsored by the Alumni Association 
was held at the main ballroom of the 



Alcazar. In the competition between 
the organizations, Lambda Kappa 
Sigma Sorority, for the second time in 
three years, won possession of the 
Cherry Cup with their skit depicting 
the life of the female pharmacy stu- 
dent. Phi Alpha placed second; the 
Newman Club third; Phi Delta Chi 
fourth; and Alpha Zeta Omega fifth. 
In the individual competition, Demet- 
rios Lambros, comedian, won first 
prize; followed by Ben Prag, vocalist; 
Mike Rodell, pianist; and Charles Kel- 
ler, vocalist. In all cases competition 
was sharp and the three gentlemen sent 
to us by WBAL and WBAL-TV had no 
easy time in making a decision. Since 
its conception, this affair has grown 
progressively bigger until it is an an- 
nual event eagerly awaited by both 
alumni and students. 

Annual Entertainment 

The Annual Entertainment and 
Dance of the Alumni Association of 
the School of Pharmacy was held in 
the Emerson Hotel, Baltimore. 

President Louis Davidov welcomed 



Prize Winner 




PHARMACY EXHIBIT jekome pine foto 

The School of Pharmacy took second place in National Pharmacy Week awards 

for a display contest held for colleges of pharmacy by the Committee on Public 

Relations of the American Pharmaceutical Association. 
The display was set up by a student group headed by JoAnne Enterline. Other 

members of the Committee were: Barbara Miller, Jean Chow, Sue Brotman, 

Jerry Fine, Curtis Bowen, Irv Barshack and James Edelen. 



46 



Maryland 



the alumni and friends, who numbered 
more than three hundred. He thanked 
the advertisers in the souvenir pro- 
gram for their continued and substan- 
tial financial backing, which makes it 
possible to have each year a Fall Frolic, 
an annual dance in February and a 
banquet in June for the graduates of 
the School of Pharmacy. He also stated 
that he was not only thrilled, but 
thankful, when it was his pleasure in 
behalf of the Alumni Association to 
present to the University of Mary- 
land School of Pharmacy a grant of 
four hundred dollars to be used as 
scholarships in the School of Pharmacy. 
Mr. Gordon A. Mouat was General 
Chairman of the affair. Mr. Samuel 
Portney was Chairman of the Program 
Committee soliciting the advertise- 
ments and supervising the printing of 
the seuvenir program. Mr. John 
Neutze was Chairman of the Ticket 
Committee. 

Mr. Victor Morgenroth was Chair- 
man of the Entertainment Committee, 
and every one was well pleased with 
the Ted and Judy Accordion, Dance 
and Song Variety, under the super- 
vision of the Biber Theatrical Agency. 
We understand that Ted and Judy are 
students at the University of Mary- 
land, College Park. 

Three door prizes, consisting of a 
Fifty Dollar Federal Bond, a portable 
record player with records, and a clock 
radio, were awarded to those holding 
the lucky numbers. 

Plans are being made by the Execu- 
tive Committee of the Alumni of the 
School of Pharmacy for the banquet at 
the Emerson Htel, at which time the 
graduates f 1955 will be guests of the 
Alumni Association. The date is June 
2d at seven o'clock. 

A new innovation this year is a meet- 
ing of the Alumni Asociation on Sun- 
day, May 22, 1955, at the Kelly Memo- 
rial Building, at which time reports 
will be given by the officers and differ- 
ent committees of the Association, cov- 
ering the work of the past year. The 
meeting is called for 6:30 p.m. Light 
refreshments will be served and the 
ladies are invited. 

Dr. George P. Hager, Jr. is Secre- 
tary of the Association and Mrs. Frank 
M. Budacz is Treasurer. 

The officers and members of the com- 
mittees are very proud of the work 
accomplished for the Alumni Associa- 
tion this year. 

Letter From Norman Levin 
Following is a letter (see accompany- 
ing picture) to Dr. Estabrook from 
Norman Levin, a popular member of 
the Class of 1954, who was called to 
serve his country before he had finished 
his Pharmacy course: 
"Dear Dr. Estabrook: 

"I hope this letter finds you in good 
health. Please excuse my laxity in 
writing sooner, but it has been physic- 
ally impossible to do so. I am now 
stationed at Tokyo Army Hospital — a 3 
minute walk from the Ginza, the Times 
Square of the Orient. To help familiar- 
ize you with events of the past, I have 
prepared a chronological list of events 
since my last letter: 
1) Aug. 16 — Pvt. Levin put on alert 
orders, destination unknown. 

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The former Maryland student carries out a routine part of his job innoculating 
natives. Says Captain Robert C. King of the Troop Information and Education 
Section at Tokyo Army Hospital and a graduate of CSCS in '52 "Levin (in 
addition to his regular duties) is one of the best, and gives practically all the 
technical training talks in the system I head up. It has been a distinct pleasure 
to serve with him in Tokyo, and I will recommend him anytime-anywhere as 
top-drawer." 



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2) Aug. 16 — Pvt. Levin is airsick while 

in Globemaster airplane on route 
to 'East Pakistan. 

3) Aug. 20 — After brief stops at Japan, 

Iwo Jima, Manila, and Thailand, 
the plane landed in Decca, E. 
Pakistan. 

4) Aug. 23-Sept. 25 — Operation Mercy. 

5) Sept. 29 — Globemaster returned 

from E. Pakistan with Shab Levin 
who specialized in subcutaneous 
injections. 

6) Oct. 2 — PC Levin ordered to report 

to new station in Japan. 

7) Oct. 10— PFC slept in bed with 

sheets and pillow at new station — 
Army Hospital in Tokyo. 

"At Tokyo Army Hospital I was 
interviewed and placed in my new job 
— Troop Information and Education, 
non commissioned officer of the En- 
listed Detachment. My duties are many 
and interesting and I find plenty to do 
to keep busy. One of my big jobs is 
to promote after-duty studying, and 
being in a place as lively as Tokyo it 
proves to be a bit of a problem. My 
working hours and working conditions 
are wonderful. And if I possessed the 
power to accumulate the 8,800 and some 
odd miles that separate Baltimore from 
Tokyo, I could really say that my Army 
days are happy «nes. 

"I want to thank you for your 
thoughtfulness in sending me a copy 
of the school's yearbook. I enjoy read- 
ing about the friends I have at Phar- 
macy School — and feel that I have 
never left there. In fact, you may put 
aside a pick and shovel for me as I 
hope to see you shortly. 
To Dentistry 

One of the most popular members 



Maryland 



of the Pharmacy faculty, Dr. Frank A. 
Dolle, Instructor in Zoology, will leave 
the teaching staff of the University to 
become a dental student. 

Dr. Dolle, who was born February 3, 
1923, is a graduate of the University 
of Maryland, having received his B.S. 
in 1948. In 1950 he obtained his 
Master's degree for his paper on "Dead 
Air Spaces" and for his work on "Res- 
piratory Rates and Volumes" received 
his Ph.D. in 1954. 

Long Honor Roll 

The longest honor list ever to be 
issued by the School of Pharmacy was 
released by Dean Noel Foss. 

Among the students achieving meri- 
torious scholarship was one-third of 
the freshman class. The honor list 
included: 

First Year: Harry Bass, Pearl Chan, 
William Clinger, Conrad Dorn, Edward 
Etzler, William Foley, Melvin Fried- 
man, Patricia Hayes, Antoinette Mala- 
nowski, James Mellonee, David Oken, 
Herbert Oster, Thomas Palmer, Eugene 
Reier, Michael Rodell, Alan Rosenstein, 
Miles St. John, Malcolm Snyderman, 
Nancy Swiss. 

Second Year: Geraldine Austraw, 
Raymond Behr. 

Third Year: Alfred Abramson, Wil- 
liam I. Grossman, Douglas Holt- 
schneider, William H. Leonard, Howard 
Schiff, Ralph Engel. 

Fourth Year: Anda Baikstis, Sydney 
Burgee, David Hoff, Stanley Karmiol, 
Burton Katz, Barbara Miller, R. 
Rosenberg, J. Enterline, William Sati- 
sky, David Seff, Gary Taylor, Marvin 
Venick. 

Rho Chi Elects 

Omicron Chapter of Rho Chi elected 
to membership undergraduate students 
Reuben Rosenberg, Sue Brotman, I. 
William Grossman and Howard Schiff, 
as well as graduate students Stella 
Gergel, Mario Aceto and John Roskos. 

The undergraduate students have ob- 
tained a scholastic average of "B" or 
its equivalent in not less than 75 se- 
mester credit hours towards the Bache- 
lor of Science degree in Pharmacy, 
and have met the requirements per- 
taining to scientific achievement, char- 
acter, personality and leadership, and 
have been approved by the Dean of 
the School. 

The graduate students majoring in 
pharmacy or allied science, have com- 
pleted not less than 15 semester cred- 
it hours towards an advanced degree 
and have met all the other require- 
ments. 

The sophomore student with the 
highest scholastic average, Geraldine 
Austraw, was the recipient of the Rho 
Chi annual award for this achievement. 
The award was "Remington's Practice 
of Pharmacy." 

Simon Solomon was elected to alum- 
ni membership in the Society for his 
creditable contributions in the profes- 
sional and interprofessional fields. 
Addresses A.C.S. 

Dr. Francis M. Miller of the Chem- 
istry Department, School of Pharmacy, 
spoke on "Some Condensation Reac- 
tions of Oxindole and its Alkyl De- 



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rivatives" at the national meeting of 
the American Chemical Society in Cin- 
cinnati, March 29-April 7. 



School of 



Law 



G. Kenneth Reiblich '29 



With Maryland Casualty 

Walter L. Taylor, Jr., Assistant 
General Counsel of Maryland 
Casualty Company since 1947, was 
elected General Counsel at a meeting 
of the Board of Directors. Mr. Taylor 
succeeds Austin J. Lilly, Sr., who is 
retiring on May 1. 

Mr. Taylor earned his LL.B. degree 
at the University of Maryland Law 
School in 1922. After eight years as 
an attorney representing a commercial 
firm, he joined The Maryland Casualty 
Company as an attorney specializing 
in mortgages. In 1942 he was trans- 
ferred to the Legal Division, and five 
years later was appointed Assistant 
General Counsel of the company. 

Mr. Lilly, General Counsel since 1943, 
has been associated with the company 
for 45 years. After serving as man- 
ager of the Claims Divisions in Okla- 
homa City and Charlotte, in 1915 he 
returned to the home office, where he 
was assigned to the Legal Division. He 
is also a graduate of the School of Law. 

In 1943 Mr. Lilly was appointed As- 
sistant General Counsel of Maryland 
Casualty, and nine years later was 
elected General Counsel. 

With Johns Manville 

Wilbur S. McKay, Jr. class of 1953, 
a sales representative for the Johns 
Manville Industrial Products Division, 
of the Cleveland District, graduated 
from an advanced training course in 
modern sales techniques. He was one of 
86 trainees from sales locations of the 
Company, located in the United States 
and Canada for this selective course. 
This training will enable him to render 
greater sales promotion and technical 
service to the Company's Industrial 
Products customers. Mr. McKay is a 
member of the Ohio Society of Pro- 
fessional Engineers, the American 
Water Works Association and is a reg- 
istered, professional engineer in five 
states. He served with the U. S. Army 
Air Corps during World War II, is 
married and has two children. 



School of 



Medicine 

Dr. John Wagner 



Schering Award 

Three medical students have won 
special mention in the national 
Schering Award competition for 1954. 
Receiving certificates of honorable 
mention for original manuscripts were 
sophomores Ronald R. Berger and 
Virginia E. Young and junior Harold 
I. Rodman. 



At Philadelphia 

Six members of the faculty pre- 
sented papers at the Annual Meeting 
of the American Association of Anat- 
omists in Philadelphia. 

Drs. Frank H. J. Figge, H. Pater- 
son Mack, George C. Peck and William 
Holbrook presented a joint paper en- 
titled "Porphyrins to Delineate Norm- 
al and Abnormal Anatomical Struc- 
tures." Dr. Vernon E. Krahl pre- 
sented a paper entitled "A Demonstra- 
tion of the Continuous Alveolar Epi- 
thelium in the Lungs of Mice." A paper 
entitled "Passage of injected P32 
from the Anniotic Fluid of the Fetal 
Mouse" was presented by Robert E. 
McCafferty. 

A.M.A. Winter Session 

Under the capable leadership of 
Dr. Daniel 0. Hammond, '45, some 30 
members of the Medical Alumni As- 
sociation, including local alumni and 
those at the American Medical Asso- 
ciation Clinical Session, attended the 
Sans Souci Hotel, Miami Beach. 

Greetings were by Dr. Louis H. 
Douglass, Professor of Obstetrics and 
Chairman of the Board of Directors 
of the Medical Alumni Association. 

Those present included Dr. and Mrs. 
Lee W. Elgin, Sr. of Miami, Florida, 
Dr. Oliver Winslow of Miami, Florida, 
Dr. and Mrs. William Guthrie of 
Huntington, W. Va., Dr. and Mrs. Lit- 
tleton Bunch of Alamosa, Col., Dr. 
and Mrs. Morton Hammond of Miami 
Beach, Fla., Dr. and Mrs. Stanley 
Schwartz of Miami Beach, Fla., Dr. 
Howard M. Bubert of Baltimore, Dr. 
James A. Vaughn of South Miami, 
Fla., Dr. Phyllis Vaughn of South 
Miami, Fla., Dr. and Mrs. Albert B. 
Kump of Bridgeton, N. J., Dr. and 
Mrs. Frank J. Rolroyd of Princeton, 
W. Va., Dr. and Mrs. Samuel Arno- 
vitz of Miami, Fla., Dr. Taylor Lewis 
of Miami, Fla., Dr. John A. Wagner 
of Baltimore, Dr. Richard Schindler of 
Baltimore, Dr. William H. Hatfield of 
Knoxville, Tenn., Dr. Elias Freidus of 
Miami Beach, Fla., Dr. Mortimer 
Abrashkin of Miami Beach, Fla., Dr. 
and Mrs. Reuben Rochkind of Miami, 
Fla., Dr. and Mrs. Daniel Stone of 
Miami Beach, Fla., Dr. and Mrs. Mur- 
ray Reckson of Miami Beach, Fla., 
Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Scott of Miami, 
Fla., Dr. Theodore Kardash of Balti- 
more, Dr. Louis H. Douglass of Balti- 
more, Dr. and Mrs. Daniel 0. Ham- 
mond of Miami, Fla. 

Heads National Institute 
Dr. Leonard T. Kurland, '45, was 
named Chief Epidemiology Branch of 
the National Institute of Neurological 
Diseases and Blindness in Bethesda, 
Maryland. Dr. Kurland was a guest 
lecturer at the School of Medicine 
speaking on the subject "The Etio- 
logical Significance of Multiple Scle- 
rosis and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclero- 
sis in North America and in the 
Micronesian Islands." 

In Philadelphia 
In order to take arms against the 
many diseases of the lung, physicians 
and surgeons must learn more about 
how this complicated organ is con- 
structed. In Philadelphia, a young 
University of Maryland scientist shed 



50 



Maryland 



some light on some of the lung's 
deepest mysteries. 

Not only did Dr. Vernon E. Krahl, 
associate professor of anatomy, help 
to prove the existence of an elusive 
tissue called the alveolar membrane 
but he explained a research technique, 
developed by himself, that makes it 
possible to make a microscopic study 
of lungs that have been freshly re- 
moved from a newborn mouse. 

Dr. Krahl's research was described 
at the Eighth Annual Course on Dis- 
eases of the Chest, meeting in Phila- 
delphia under the auspices of the 
American College of Chest Physicians 
and the Laennec Society of Philadephia. 
Sex Disharmony 

A program of major importance 
dealing with "Preparation for Marri- 
age" was presented in "TV-MD" over 
WBAL-TV. 

With one sixth of the marriages in 
this country ending in divorce and the 
chief factor of American divorce known 
to be sex disharmony, the medical 
profession places major emphasis on 
the need for pre-marital instruction. 

The program contained a wealth 
of information and advice given to 
young couples before marriage. 

Dr. Howard B. Mays, Associated 
Professor of Urology, and Dr. Ernest 
I. Cornbrooks, Jr., Associate Professor 
of Gynecology, joined Dr. Laureston 
L. Keown in presenting the program. 
Rheumatic Hearts 

It was not too long ago that children 
and young adults had little if any hope 
of recovery from rheumatic heart con- 
dition. As a result of tremendous 
progress in research in recent years, 
however, many youngsters, who would 
have had little chance of survival a 
few short years ago, are now enjoying 
happy, healthy lives. The University 
of Maryland's TV-M.D. telecast brought 
viewers an insight into the new ad- 
vances that have been made in the 
diagnosis and surgical correction of 
rheumatic heart disease. 

Dr. William S. Love, professor of 
clinical medicine at the university's 
School of Medicine and president of 
the Maryland Heart Association spoke, 
to acquaint parents with some of the 
do's and don'ts relative to rheumatic 
heart conditions. Dr. R. Adams Cowley, 
one of the foremost heart surgeons, 
also spoke. 

A rheumatic heart condition can be 
corrected surgically and part of the 
program was devoted to describing 
just how the heart can be treated in 
this manner. 

On WBAL-TV 

The Department of Surgery through 
the cooperation of WBAL-TV brought 
the parents of Baltimore a special pro- 
gram dealing with the most common 
surgical conditions in the adolescent. 

Through the use of slides, charts, 
and frank discussion on such subjects 
as appendicitis, hernia, or rupture, and 
common tumors of the female breast, 
TV-M.D. unraveled another important 
chapter in the growth and development 
of man. 

Such questions as how to recognize 
these conditions, when are they most 



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FOR RESEARCH 

Dr. William S. Love presents a check in the amount of $5,000 on behalf of 
the Maryland Association to Dean H. Boyd Wylie, of the University of Maryland 
School of Medicine. The gift will be used to finance research project under the 
direction of Dr. Sidney Scherlis, assistant professor of medicine, and Dr. S. Adams 
Cowley, assistant professor of surgery. The research team will make further 
studies in the treatment of coronary disease at the University of Maryland. 

From left, Dr. Scherlis, Dean Wylie, Dr. William S. Stone, director of the 
University's medical education and research and Dr. Love. 



likely to occur, and what to do about 
them were answered in an easily under- 
stood fashion. 

TV-M.D., Baltimore's only educa- 
tion program on medicine, is seen over 
WBAL-TV at 3 p.m., Sundays. 
For Service Folk 

In ancient times there was little 
thought given toward the day to day 
health of fighting men. 

The health of our young servicemen 
and women in a comparatively modern 
concern and was another subject of the 
School of Medicine's serialized story. 

To tell the story Dr. William S. 
Stone, director of medical education and 
research and former commander of 
Walter Reed Army Medical Center's 
Army Medical Service Graduate School. 
Dr. Stone brought first hand informa- 
tion to the parents of Baltimore regard- 
ing health and its importance in the 
service. 

Three questions formed the basis of 
the program: 1. How is the Health of 
the Armed Forces protected? 2. What 
is being done to protect the health of 
the individual during an emergency ? 
3. How do Medical schools and civil 
medicine work with the Armed Forces 
Medical Services ? 

Perchik Display 

The University of Maryland's Uni- 
versity Hospital displayed the paint- 
ings of Bernard and Harriet Perchik 
entitled the "flowering trees of the 
Caribbean." The group of twenty-nine 
paintings in tempera were shown on 
the first floor rotunda of the hospital. 

An informational pamphlet about the 
group stated, "The Perchik's were com- 
missioned by the Alcoa Steamship Com- 
pany in 1950 to paint a representative 



group of the brilliant flowering trees 
found in the Caribbean region. The 
collection of flowering tree paintings, 
the Perchiks first major art work, has 
won increasing admiration in this coun- 
try and abroad ever since its introduc- 
tion to the public." 

Further attention was called to the 
collection as a result of their recent 
reproduction in Holiday magazine. 
Wisconsin Dean 

Dr. John Z. Bowers of the class of 
1938, and until recently Dean of the 
School of Medicine of the University 
of Utah has been nominated Dean of 
the School of Medicine of the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin at Madison and 
will assume his new duties as of July 
1, 1955. 

Personal Items 

Dr. Jerome Pleet, ,49, has returned 
from military service and has opened 
his office for the practice of obstetrics 
and gynecology at 301 East Chase 
Street, Baltimore. 

Dr. William G. Thuss, Jr., '48, is 
currently enrolled in a graduate course 
in Industrial Medicine at the Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati. Dr. Thuss will 
complete his studies in 1956. 

Dr. Stanley E. Schwartz, '41, has 
been certified by the American Board 
of Surgery. Dr. Schwartz practices 
surgery at 420 Lincoln Road, Miami 
Beach. 

Dr. Richard J. Brown, '41, is serving 
as a resident in anesthesiology at the 
Grace-New Haven Hospital, New 
Haven, Conn. 

Nylon Arteries 

Doctors at University Maryland sub- 
stitute arteries out of nylon cloth and 
stitch them into human patients. 



52 



Maryland 



Sometimes the replacement arteries 
of nylon are made to exact size on 
sewing machines just outside the oper- 
ating room, while the surgeons wait 
for the needed product. 

One such artery substitute now in 
use in a human resembled a miniature 
pair of pajamas. It was sewn to size 
and shape to replace a damaged sec- 
tion of the aorta, main trunk-line artery 
of the body, where the aorta branches 
off into the two arteries which carry 
blood to the legs. 

Dr. R. Adams Cowley, of the Uni- 
versity Hospital, reported the work at 
a scientific session in Washington. 

He spoke as a participant in a panel 
discussion on peripheral vascular dis- 
ease, at the opening day meeting of the 
Mid-Atlantic Division Regional Con- 
ference, International College of Sur- 
geons. 

University surgeons turned to nylon 
cloth, Dr. Cowley explained, because 
they found it too difficult to obtain 
human artery grafts of exact size, 
the arteries they had preserved in 
blood banks being either too big or too 
little. 

The sewing machine-fashioned tub- 
ings of nylon cloth are surgically 
stitched at their open ends to the 
healthy ends of the patient's artery 
after the surgeons have cut out the 
diseased sections. One such nylon artery 
installed in a 14-year-old boy was more 
than 6 inches long. 

Such substitutions are made to repair 
aneurisms, in which weakened arterial 
walls balloon out and threaten to burst, 
and dangerously dam continuous full 
flow of blood through major arteries. 

Nylon is used as a permanent re- 
placement for diseased artery sections. 
The body lines the interior of the cloth 
with a slippery inner-lining, forming 
a more natural channel for blood flow. 

In Memphis 

Paul R. Hackett, associate professor 
of anesthesiology at the University of 
Maryland, presented a paper at a meet- 
ing of the Southern Society of Anes- 
thesiologists in Memphis, Tennessee. 

The subject of Dr. Hackett's paper 
was "Anesthesia for Bilateral Thoraco- 
Lumbar Sympathectomy and Adre- 
nalectomy in Malignant Hypertension." 



At Maryland State 

Miss Sarah Gibson Blanding, presi- 
dent of Vassar College, spoke at the 
Maryland State Colleges honors convo- 
cation before an overflow audience. 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, vice chair- 
man of the Board of Regents of the 
University of Maryland, introduced 
Miss Blanding, Dr. John Taylor Wil- 
liams, president of Maryland State, was 
host at a luncheon afterward. 

Visitors at the college for the occa- 
sion included Dean Florence L. Gipe, 
of the University of Maryland School 
of Nursing; Dean Adele H. Stamp, dean 
of women at the University, and Mrs. 
Ethel M. Troy, director of the univer- 
sity's practical nursing division. 



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New England Honors 




(Photo by Worcester Telcqram) 

ORCHIDS FOR MISS TOOMEY 

Miss Katherine Toomey, administrative assistant to the Dean of the Dental 
School was honored by the New England Alumni Club. Dr. Joseph C. Carvalho, 
Treasurer of the Club watches as a corsage is pinned by the President, Dr. 
George J. Kerlejza at Worcester, Mass. 



School of 



Dentistry 

Dr. Gerson A. Freedman 
Gardner P. H. Foley 



Dr. Lynch Honored 

Daniel F. Lynch, D.D.S., of Washing- 
ton, D. C, president of the Ameri- 
can Dental Association was honored at 
a testimonial dinner for his work in 
denistry, both nationally and inter- 
nationally. 

Dr. Lynch, a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland's School of Den- 
testry, is in private practice as an oral 
surgeon. He recently was installed as 
president of the national group. He is 
a member and former head of the Dis- 
trict Dental Society. 

The principal speaker was Dr. Harold 
Hillenbrand, secretary of the American 
Dental Society. He 
said the role played 
by Dr. Lynch in 
modern dentistry 
was of major im- 
portance. Dr. Hillen- 
brand also pointed 
out that under Dr. 
Lynch's administra- 
tion the membership 
of the American 
Dental Association 
has risen to a record 
fo 82,000 members. 
Dr. Karl Hayden 
Wood, president of the District society, 
presented Dr. Lynch with a testimonial 
scroll and an engraved watch on behalf 
of the dentists of Washington. Dr. 
David J. Fitzgibbon, chairman of the 
dinner, acter as toastmaster. 

Dr. Robert W. Bolwell, dean of the 




Dr. Lynch 



Graduate School at George Washing- 
ton University, pointed out last night 
that the Dental Reserve Officers Group 
of the Navy has also recognized Dr. 
Lynch. They presented him with a 
plaque in recognition of "his faithful 
service and contributions to dentistry 
while in the Navy during World War 
II." 

Alpha Omega Award 
Dr. Myron S. Aisenberg '22, Dean 
of the School of Dentistry, was the re- 
cipient of the Alpha Omega Achieve- 
ment Medal for 1954. 
Presented annually 
by the national den- 
tal fraternity "For 
Meritorious Contri- 
butions to Dentistry 
and Its Allied Sci- 
ences," the Achieve- 
ment Medal has 
been awarded to 
only six dentists 
since its inception in 

1936. Dr. Aisenberg 
Dr. Aisenberg • .. j i 

was given the medal 

during the Award Night that climaxed 

the 47th Annual Convention of Alpha 

Omega held in Detroit in December. 

Dr. J. Ben Robinson '14, Dr. Aisen- 
berg's predecessor as Dean, received 
the Award in 1941. Dr. Aisenberg is 
a Past National President of Alpha 
Omega. 

In Denver, Colo. 

Lt. Col. Paul W. Holter, (D.D.S. '33), 
is on duty at Fitzsimons Army Hos- 
pital in Denver, Colo. 

Miss Toomey Honored 

Miss Katharine Toomey, Adminis- 
trative Assistant of the School of 
Dentistry, was the guest of honor at 
two recent meetings of dental alunmi 
groups held in Puerto Rico and Massa- 
chusetts. Now in the thirty-eighth 
year of her association with the School 




54 



Maryland 



Miss Toomey has earned the profound 
respect and deep appreciation of hun- 
dreds of graduates, who have honored 
her on many occasions. 

The Dental Alumni Section of the 
University of Maryland Alumni of 
Fuerto Rico entertained Miss Toomey 
at a luncheon in San Juan. Dr. Carlos 
J. Noya '50, President of the chapter, 
presided. Orchids and other gifts were 
presented to Miss Toomey. The alumni 
present were Guillermo T. Calderon '4G, 
Eugene E. Cosimi '25, Ernesto Davila- 
Diaz '34, Provi V. deSota '25, Manuel 
Fossas '50, Pedro J. Gonzalez '25, 
Paquito Guerra '28, Aurea Mora Mar- 
garida '18, Guillermo E. Orraca '50, 
Francisco Padilla '19, Mario F. Ramirez 
'42, Pedro Rivera-Torres '53, Pilar Re 
guero '52, and Manuel A. Rosso '50. 
Mr. Luis Toro, a member of the Class 
of 1955, also attended the luncheon. 

Miss Toomey was also the guest of 
honor at the dinner of the New Eng- 
land University of Maryland Alumni 
Club held in Worcester. Dr. George J. 
Kerlejza '25, President of the Club, pre- 
sided. Miss Toomey was enthusiasti- 
cally greeted by her old New England 
friends who remembered well her many 
kindnesses and her perpetual interest 
in their welfare. Miss Toomey was 
presented with a corsage and several 
other attractive gifts. The graduates 
present were George J. Kerlejza '25, 
John E. King '10, Joseph A. Michnie- 
wicz '29, Lewis H. Shipman '36 and 
John E. Tyler '17, of Worcester, Mass.; 
John C. Carvalho '43, Joseph C. Car- 
valho '14, Roland A. Chouinard '47, Eu- 
gene J. Dionne '36, T. C. Sousa '25 and 
Gilbert Vincent '54, of Fall River, 
Mass.; J. L. Alpert '25, Carl P. Brigada 
'51, Harry H. Kelley '24, George E. 
Mannix '50, Joseph S. Mitchell '53, and 
Richard F. Mitchell '52, of Springfield, 
Mass.; Byron R. Branch '28 and Alex- 
ander H. Maclsaac '53, of Watertown, 
Mass.; John J. Morley '52, of Dedham, 
Mass.; William F. Decesare '36 and 
Thomas L. Payne '52, of Providence, 
R. I.; Ralph G. Gilman '52, of Green- 
field, Mass.; L. Rodger Currie '52, of 
Chelsford, Mass.; Ernest J. Crowley 
'51, of Hanson, Mass.; William H. 
Langfield '50, of Swansea, Mass.; Roy 
T. Durocher '50 and Clifford O. Hills 
'35, of West Hartford, Conn.; Joseph T. 
Gorski '47 and Joseph L. Vajcovec '32, 
of Webster, Mass.; Joseph P. San 
Clemente '46, of South Braintree, 
Mass.; Carl L. Catani '44, of Milton, 
Mass.; Arthur H. Lepine '14 and Ar- 
thur J. Lepine '43, of Holyoke, Mass.; 
Robert H. Bernert '42, James L. Cor- 
thouts '36, Erwin Shea '39 and Robert 
W. Whitcomb '26, of Hartford, Conn.; 
ranklyn J. Bergen '29, Kenneth E. 
Blanchard '36, James P. Lawlor '29 and 
Max N. Matzkin '29, of Waterbury, 
Conn.; William G. Beland '14 and Ralph 
R. Racicot '36, of Southbridge, Mass.; 
John J. Houlihan '35, of Winsted, 
Conn.; Robert J. Craig '35, of Cheshire, 
Conn.; Merrill C. Hills '32, of Wethers- 
field, Conn.; Jorn D. Corrigan '32, of 
Quincy, Mass.; Edward P. Gannon '26, 
of Clinton, Mass.; and R. W. Delaney 
'25, of Cambridge, Mass. Among the 
alumni who were unable to be present 



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but gave their support to the dinner 
meeting were Theodore H. Craig '44, of 
Wallingford, Conn.; M. C. Fancher '29, 
of Manchester, Conn.; Samuel Forna- 
rotto '31, of Hartford, Conn.; Raymond 
W. Gillespie '34, of West Hartford, 
Conn.; John Wm. Gourley '35, of East 
Weymouth, Mass.; Matthew C. Holmes 
'14, of Springfield, Mass.; Richard A. 
Soja '35, of Fall River, Mass.; William 
T. Walsh '36, of St. Johnsbury, Vt.; and 
George A. Weir '51, of Providence, R. I. 

Dr. Joseph C. Carvalho, Miss Katha- 
rine Toomey and Dr. George J. Ker- 
lejza at the New England Alumni 
Meeting. 

Massachusetts Presidents 

A recent communication to the editor 
presented the information that Eugene 
J. Dionne '36 is the first alumnus to 
serve as President of the Massachusetts 
Dental Society. The alumni records 
show that while Dr. Dionne, who be- 
came President in 1953, was the first 
alumnus elected since 1900, he was 
preceded in the office by three stalwart 
B.C.D.S. graduates. 

Dr. Luther Dimmick Shepard (1838- 
1911)) '61 began his administration in 
1878. One of the alumni greats, Dr. 
Shepard received many fine honors 
during his long career. He was a mem- 
ber of the Harvard Dental School 
faculty from 1868-1882, as Adjunct 
Professor and as Professor of Opera- 
tive Dentistry. An organizer of the 
Connecticut Valley Dental Association, 
1863, he was its first Secretary, 1863- 
66, and its President in 1866. He was 
President of the American Dental 
Association, 1879, and President of the 
World's Columbian Congress of 1893. 
A member of the Massachusetts Board 
of Dental Examiners, 1887-92, he 
served as President of the National 
Association of Dental Examiners, 
1891-92. Dr. Shepard pioneered in the 
practice of sitting while operating. 

Dr. Charles G. Davis (1825-1890) '50, 
of New Bedford, succeeded Dr. Shepard 
in the office, 1879. Dr. Davis also was 
President of the Old Colony Dental 
Association and the Merrimac Valley 
Dental Association. He was a member 
of the faculty of the Boston Dental 
College as Adjunct Professor of Dental 
Science and Operative Dentistry. 

Dr. John F. Dowsley (1854-1911) 
'84, of Boston, was elected President 
of his state society in 1900. Known 
as the father of dental legislation in 
New England, Dr. Dowsley was ap- 
pointed to the first State Board in 
1887 and continued to serve on it for 
27 years. He was President of the 
New England Association of Dental 
Examiners, the National Association 
of Dental Examiners and the North- 
eastern Dental Association. As a 
Trustee of the Forsyth Dental In- 
firmary for Children, Dr. Dowsley 
accepted the key at its dedication in 
1914. 

(The Alumni Records, a project in- 
stituted by the Department of Dental 
Literature in 1950, show that over 
300 of our graduates have served as 
Presidents of their State Societies.) 
Rhode Island Prexy 

Dr. Edgar L. Bessette '32 of Crans- 
ton, R.I., has been elected President 



of the Rhode Island Dental Society. 
He is an active member of the New 
England Alumni Club. 

ADA Councils 

Dr. Clarence E. Peterson '19 (U. of 
Md.), of Rockville, Conn., is the Chair- 
man of the Council on Insurance. He 
received his appointment from the 
Board of Trustees in 1953. 

Dr. Ernest B. Nuttall '31, Professor 
of Fixed Partial Prosthesis at the 
B.C.D.S., was appointed to the Council 
on Dental Health in 1953. 

Dr. Harry B. McCarthy '23, Dean 
of the Baylor University College of 
Dentistry, was re-elected to the Judi- 
cial Council in 1953. 

Dr. Eugene Pessango '40, of Balti- 
more, was re-elected to the Council 
on Relief in 1953. 

Personals 

Dr. Charles B. Ledbetter '53 has an- 
nounced the opening of an office for 
the general practice of dentistry at 
217 Bryan Building, Cameron Village, 
Raleigh, N.C. 

Dr. Raymond J. Vassar, Jr., '52 re- 
ported to the Medical Field Service 
School at San Antonio, Texas, on Janu- 
ary 5. His class of 50 include 5 others 
from Maryland: Constant J. Georges 
'54, Pedro H. Hernandez '49, Ernest 
A. Johnson, Jr. '54, Charles M. Kramer 
'45, and Robert J. Tyler '54. Later 
information indicates that Vassar has 
been assigned to Carlisle Barracks, 
Pa.; Hernandes and Tyler to the Far 
East; and Johnson, to Alaska. 

Dr. and Mrs. Eugene Allen Leather- 
man '54 announce the birth of a son, 
Eugene Allen, Jr., on January 30. Dr. 
Leatherman is stationed at the Lake 
Charles (La.), AFB. 

Dr. and Mrs. Richard Axman '52 an- 
nounce the birth of a daughter, Andrea, 
on February 12. Dr. and Mrs. Robert 
Axman '52 announce the birth of a 
son, Mitchell, on December 10. The 
Axmans, who are identical twins, are 
practicing together at 5510 Park 
Heights Avenue, Baltimore. 

Dr. Russell Wilson Combs '53 mar- 
ried Marcelle Aziza, of Nouasseur, 
French Morocco, on February 19. Cap- 
tain Combs is stationed at the 728th 
U.S.A.F. Hospital in Nouasseur. 

Dr. George Richard Minnick '54 has 
announced the opening of an office for 
the general practice of dentistry at 
5100 West 38th Avenue, Denver, Col- 
orado. 

Dr. John J. Swalec '52 married 
Catherine Crossin, of Hazleton, Pa., on 
June 26, 1954. 



(iiajia 



Harry C. Robertson, D.D.S. 

Harry C. Robertson (U. Md. DDS 
'08), a retired Princess Anne den- 
tist, died following a heart attack. 

In his 80th year, Dr. Robertson, had 
been failing in health for some time. 
He was born in Nanticoke on Aug. 2, 
1875. 

He practiced in Salisbury until 1918 
when he moved to Princess Anne. Due 



56 



Maryland 



to ill health in 1951, Dr. Robertson 
gave up his practice. 

During World War I he was a mem- 
ber of the Medical Advisory Board. 

He served as Princess Anne town 
commissioner from 1941 until 1948. He 
was a member of the Antioch Metho- 
dist Church, and a director of the 
church choir for 15 years. 

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. 
Grace Todd Robertson of Princess 
Anne; a son, H. Carlton Robertson of 
Baltimore; three sisters, Mrs. George 
North of Baltimore, Mrs. E. B. Claxton 
and Mrs. W. B. Brigham of Dublin, 
Ga., and a brother; Dr. L. J. Robertson, 
of White Haven; two grandsons, Rob- 
bie and Wayne, also survive. 
Milton M. Price 

Milton M. Price,50, Bethesda, (Un. 
Md., Engr. '30), civil engineering con- 
sultant, died of a heart attack in Be- 
thesda a week after his wife died of a 
heart attack at their home. 

Mr. Price was returning to his home 
with his son from church when he com- 
plained of chest pains, a day after he 
had undergone a physical checkup. 

A native of Washington, Mr. Price 
was the son of the late James M. and 
Mildred Price. 

Mr. Price went to McKinley High 
School and was All-High quarterback. 
At Maryland he played lacrosse and 
football. 

During World War II he was a cap- 
tain in the Army and afterwards 
started a private consulting practice. 

He was a founder and first president 
of the Reciprocity Club of Bethesda. 
He was a past president of the Mary- 
land Association of Engineers and a 
member of the American Congress on 
Surveying and Mapping, the Prince 
Georges-Montgomery County Engineer- 
ing Society and Kenwood Country Club. 

His wife was the former Margaret 
Armentrout of Charlottesville, Va., who 
was active in church and civic affairs. 

Survivors are his son, Milton, Jr., 
17, and daughter, Betty Lynn, 12; a 
brother, James V. Price, and a sister, 
Mrs. William H. Strobel. 

Mrs. Thos. N. Loveless 

Mrs. Thomas N. Loveless, 56, known 
as "Aunt Maye" to the children at 
Melwood, Nottingham and Edmondston 
Schools in Prince Georges County died 
at Providence Hospital. She lived in 
Forestville, Md. 

The former Mary Griffith, Mrs. Love- 
less retired two years ago after 32 
years as a Prince Georges teacher ard 
principal. Her last position was at Ed- 
monston Elementary School. She be- 
gan her career at Melwood on the Marl- 
boro Pike and Nottingham in a fishing 
village on the Patuxent River, both 
one-room schools. 

She was educated at Surrattsville 
High School and the University of 
Maryland. 

Survivors are her husband, and a 
brother, Herbert P. Griffith, Forestville. 

Fernando Travieso, D.D.S. 

Dr. Fernando Travieso '06 (B.C.D.S.) 
died on October 25, 1954, in Barcelona, 
Spain. Dr. Travieso had resided in 
that city for forty-six years. 



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A Maryland Institution 



Thos. H. Charmbury, D.D.S. 

Dr. Thomas H. Charmbury '00 
(B.M.C)., of Baltimore, died on Decem- 
ber 18, 1954. 

Howard E. Topping, D.D.S. 

Dr. Howard Emory Topping '13 
(B.M.C), of Staunton, Va., died on 
January 24. He was born in Amburg, 
Va., on December 4, 1891. Following 
his graduation from the Dental Depart- 
ment of the Baltimore Medical College, 
he practiced for four years in Roanoke. 
On April 3, 1917 Dr. Topping enlisted 
in the Vh'ginia National Guard. Shortly 
thereafter he secured his discharge in 
order to enlist in the Regular Army 
Medical Corps. Alter an assignment to 
Fortress Monroe, he was transferred 
overseas where he served with the 
120th Infantry of the 30th Division 
and the 338th Infantry of the 85th 
Division at Le Mans, France. 

Dr. Topping was wounded by shrap- 
nel near Brancourt, just one month 
before the armistice was signed. In 
1920 he opened an office in Staunton, 
where he practiced for twenty years. 
During World War II he served with 
the 3l7th Station Hospital in Europe. 
On his return to the States in 1945 
he became a patient at the former 
Woodrow Wilson General Hospital at 
Fisherville. 

In 1947 he was retired with the rank 
of Colonel. Colonel Topping is sur- 
vived by his wife, Mrs. Sibyl Johns- 
ton Topping; a son, Howard E. Top- 
ping, Jr., of Staunton; a sister, Mrs. 
William W. Folkes, of Richmond; and 
two brothers: Franklin E. Topping, of 
Richmond; and Dr. John E. Topping, 
of Roanoke, who graduated with his 
brother in the B.M.C. Class of 1913. 
The honorary pallbearers included Dr. 
Frank A. Lasley '38, Dr. James C. 
Rutherford '21 and Dr. A. Hume 
Sprinkel '91, all practicing in Staunton. 

Dr. Charles Godfrey Lynch '02 (U. 
of Md.), of Rochester, N.Y., died on 
January 16. A past president of the 
Seventh District Society and honor- 
ary life member of the Rochester Medi- 
cal Society, Dr. Lynch had practiced 
in Rochester for over forty years. Dr. 
Lynch had specialized in prosthetics 
and was widely known for his clinic 
presentations before a large number of 
dental socities in many states. He is 
survived by two sisters: Miss Mary 
Lynch and Mrs. John S. Rauber, of 
Rochester; and two daughters: Mis. 
Kathryn Austin, of Rochester, and Mrs. 
Marcia Daley, of Broxville. 
Thos. F. Cummings 

Dr. Thomas F. Cummings '09 (B.C. 
D.S.), of Bridgeport, Conn., died on 
November 10. Dr. Cummings was a 
member of Xi Psi Phi. 

Dr. Reed T. Goe '38 died in Indo- 
China in February. According to in- 
formation received by the Journal, 
Major Goe, who was stationed in Tokyo 
as a member of the Army Dental Corps, 
was elephant-hunting in Indo-China 
with fellow officers at the time of his 
death, which was attributed to natural 
causes. Hailing from West Virginia, 
Dr. Goe attended Staunton Military 
Academy and West Virginia University 
prior to his entering Maryland. He 
was a member of Psi Omega and 



the Gorgas Odontological Society. Fol- 
lowing graduation, he began practice 
in Raleigh, N.C. Dr. Goe is survived 
by his wife; Mrs. Ellen Radabaugh 
Goe; two daughters, Sandra and Mary 
Ellen; and a son, Reed T., II. 
Crown O. Diehl, D.D.S. 

Dr. Crown Oscar Diehl '18 (U. of 
Md.), of Hagerstown, Md., died on De- 
cember 30. During his undergraduate 
years he was a member of the Gorgas 
Odontological Society, President of his 
class, and Editor of the Terra Mariae. 
following his graduation from Maryland, 
he was commissioned a first lieutenant 
in the Army Dental Corps. Upon his 
separation from the service Dr. Diehl 
began practice in Hagerstown. He 
was a Past President of the Washing 
ton County Dental Society and of the 
Maryland State Dental Association. 
He also was a Fellow of the Ameri- 
can College of Dentists and of the 
Pierre Fauchard Academy. For many 
years he was a member of the Wash- 
ington County Public Health Board. 
As a long-term chairman of the 
County's Christmas seal campaign, 
Dr. Diehl was largely responsible f.r 
the very effective public support cf 
the County's tuberculosis control activi- 
ties. During World War II, he enlisted 
in the Maryland State Guard, receiving 
a captain's commission and assuming 
the command of Company A of Hagers- 
town. Later Dr. Diehl was transferred 
to headquarters of the Eighth Battalion 
as executive officer with the rank of 
major. His survivors include his wif 
Mrs. Margaret Roessner Diehl, and 
two sons: Captain Robert C, of Fort 
Knox, Ky.; and David C, of the U.S. 
Navy, Quonset, R.I. 

Holly Smith, D.D.S. 

Dr. B. Holly Smith '08 (B.C.D.S.), 
cf Baltimore, died on March 3. Born 
in Baltimore in 1885, Dr. Smith at- 
tended the Tome School and received 
the A.B. degree from Johns Hopkins 
University. As an undergraduate at 
the B.C.D.S. he was President of the 
Senior Class and a member of Delta 
Sigma Delta. In his junior year he 
was awarded the Deeley Prize and 
graduated second in his class. Fol- 
lowing his graduation he began practice 
in Baltimore where he was a leading 
practitioner for 46 years. For several 
years he served on the faculty of his 
alma mater. He was President of the 
Baltimore City Dental Society (1925- 
26) and was a member of the Maryland 
Board of Dental Examiners (1929-35). 
A member of the Baltimore Country 
Club, Dr. Smith was an ardent sports- 
man. Formerly a keen competitor in 
tennis, golf and badminton, he main- 
tained a special interest in upland game 
shooting. Surviving are his wife, Jane 
Salter Smith; two daughters: Mrs. 
Geoffrey Osier, of New York, and 
Mrs. C. Robert Leach, of Lutherville, 
Md.; a stepdaughter, Mrs. John Enga- 
litcheff, Jr., of Gibson Island, Md.; 
and two brothers: Dr. F. Janney Smith, 
a physician in Detroit; and Dr. F. 
Noel Smith '23, of Baltimore, who is 
a veteran member of the B.C.D.S. 
faculty. Dr. Smith was the son of 
Dr. B. Holly Smith '81 (B.C.D.S.), 
who died in 1920 after a remarkably 



58 



Maryland 



versatile and important career that 
brought him local, national and inter- 
national honors in recognition of his 
valuable contributions to his profession 
in the areas of education, literature, 
and organization. 

George E. Purnell '84 
Dr. George Edward Purnell received 
is D.D.S. degree from the University 
of Maryland in 1884 as a member of the 
first class to complete the full course 
offered by the University's Department 
of Dentistry, established in 1882 with 
Dr. Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas as Dean. 
The career of Dr. Purnell illustrates 
well the color and the interest to be 
derived from a study of the Alumni 
Records. The sons of the B.C.D.S. have 
gone forth into every state and to most 
of the countries of the world to practice 
their profession and to spread the fame 
of the world's oldest dental college. 
They have been important factors in 
the establishment of other schools of 
dentistry; they have served on the fac- 
ulties of many schools and at least 26 
of them have become deans. 

At 92 Dr. Pernell has for several 
years made his home with his daughter 
and son-in-law in Sierra Madre, Cali- 
fornia. Few dental careers have pro- 
vided more interesting experiences than 
that of Dr. Purnell. In 1891 he settled 
inQuadalajara, Mexico. As a preceptor 
he trained several young Mexicans in 
the art of dentistry. Upon his urging 
three of his students came to the Uni- 
versity of Maryland to complete their 
studies. Two of them returned to Guad- 
alajara to practice. These men, with 
the aid of Dr. Purnell, founded the 
school of dentistry of the University 
of Guadalajara. 

Dr. Purnell continued to practice in 
Quadalajara until his retirement a few 
years ago. Perhaps the highlight of 
his Mexican experiences was his cap- 
ture by bandits. Lured into the wilds 
to treat a patient who could not be 
moved, Dr. Purnell became the victim 
of a ransom plot. The case was an inci- 
dent of international importance be- 
cause of the American dentist's reputa- 
tion in the Mexican city. He was able 
to outwit and escape from his captors 
through the help of a woman who had 
been one of his patients. Dr. Purnell 
still makes frequent flights -to Guada- 
lajara to look after his interests there. 
The Alumni Association congratu- 
lates Dr. Purnell for his long span of 
practice and wishes him many more 
happy years in retirement. Dr. Purnell 
is the uncle of Dr. George E. P. Truitt 
'07 (U. of Md.), of Baltimore. 
Judge James Clark 
Judge James Clark (Law '07), who 
retired as a judge of the State's fifth 
judicial circuit on his seventieth birth- 
day last October, died in his sleep. 

He seemingly had been in good health 
and had resumed his law practice after 
retiring from the bench. 

Soon after his retirement in October, 
leaders of the bar from all parts of 
the state tendered him a testimonial 
dinner in Baltimore. 

Former Gov. Herbert R. O'Connor 
appointed him to the bench in 1942. 
Two years later he was elected to a 
15-year term, cut short by his reach- 



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1947 



ing mandatory retirement age after 12 
years of service. 

Associates often remarked he seldom 
missed a day at the Howard County 
courthouse during that 12 years and 
often worked on Sunday. 

Judge Clark was president of the 
Maryland State Bar Association at the 
time he was named to the bench. 

He was born in Howard County and 
began his life-long law practice here 
after getting his degree from the Uni- 
versity in 1907. 

He was married in 1912 to Alda Ty- 
son Hopkins, a descendant of Balti- 
more famed Johns Hopkins. She and 
their three sons survive. John L. is 
attorney here, James, Jr. operates 
farms in the county. Joseph is a con- 
tractor. 

Judge Clark was a vestryman at 
St. Johns Episcolpal Church, president 
of the board of trustees of St. Johns 
Cemetery, and chairman of the board 
of managers of Springfield State Hos- 
pital. 

He also was a charter member and 
first president of the Ellicott City 
Rotary Club. 

J. W. Massey 

Dr. J. W. Massey, a graduate of the 
University's Dental School, is dead at 
the age of 79. Death came at his home 
in Fredericksburg, Virginia on January 
10 of this year. He was a dentist, farm- 
er and former holder of numerous pub- 
lic offices, having served as Treasurer 
of Spotsylvania from 1912-1920 and a 
member of the Virginia House of Dele- 
gates at its 1920 and 1924 sessions. He 
was also Commissioner of Revenue in 
part of 1943 and 1944. 

In World War I, Dr. Massey served 
as Area Food Administrator under 
Herbert Hoover and had been a County 
Democratic Chairman, a School Board 
member from 1928 to 1932 and from 
1929 to 1954, Commissioner of Ac- 
counts. He was also Commissioner of 
Chancery for more than 20 years, a 
member of the County Board of Health 
and a member of the Selective Service 
Board in World War II. He was a 
former Vice-President of the Old Farm- 
ers and Merchants Bank. 

Dr. Massey graduated in 1901, fol- 
lowing previous study in Engineering 
at the V.P.I. He retired about 25 years 
ago from active practice to devote his 
time to farming. 




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Maryland 



59 



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Allen — Schroeder 

Patricia Waits Allen Maryland grad- 
uate, to Robert R. Schroeder, former 
Navy lieutenant and Baldwin Wallace 
graduate. 

Anglin — Carter 
Louise Ruth Anglin, Maryland alum- 
ni to A/2c Paul E. Carter, Keesler 
AF Base, Mississippi. 

Baer— Wolf 
Joanne Baer, Maryland alumna, to 
Allan D. Wolf. 

Bivens — Tack 
Evelyn Normalee Bivens to Edvin 
Van Dyke Tack, Maryland student. 
Bowie — Fray 
Beverly Ann Bowie, Maryland alum- 
na, to James Gustavus Gray III, Mary- 
land alumnus. 

Brown — Foster 
Lois Melville Brown, Marjorie Web- 
ster Junior College, to Lieutenant John 
J. Foster, U.S.N.R., graduate of Mary- 
land the School of Law. 

Cave — Semler 
Virginia Ann Cave to Harry Edwin 
Semler, student Maryland Dental 
School. 

Conover — Edwards 
Constance Conover to Randolph J. 
Edwards, Maryland student. 
Cullen — Daniels 
Mary Elizabeth Cullen to Lucius 
Forbes Daniels, Maryland student. 
Darby — Bourke 
Joyce Darby, Maryland graduate, to 
Edward A. Bourke, Boston University 
graduate. 

Deputy — Melamet 
Sarah Anne Deputy, Hannah More 
Academy and Bard Avon graduate, to 
Carl Metamet, Jr., World War II vet- 
eran and Maryland graduate. 
Dopkin — Lunitz 
Sondra Joy Dopkin, Maryland stu- 
dent, to Monroe Lunitz. 

Dor man — Lentz 
Both Maryland graduates, Barbara 
Dorman to Richard C. Lentz. 
Fishback — Levin 
Helen Fischback to Lieut. Samuel M. 
Levin, Maryland graduate. 

Flowers — Brotemarkle 
Anna Belle Flowers to Lieutenant 
David C. Brotemarkle, USAF. Both 
are Maryland alumni. 

Gantz— Mitchell 
Betty Ann Gantz, Maryland alumna, 
to George Hunt Mitchell. 

Gilmore — Bennett 
Charlene June Gilmore, Davis-Elkins 
graduate, to Robert M. Bennett, gradu- 



ate in B & PA, Maryland. 
Glascock — Smith 
Sarah Elizabeth Glascock, Maryland 
student, to Donald Kaye Smith, Mary- 
land graduate. 

Godfrey — Andersen 
Ardyth Ann Godfrey to Dr. William 
A. Anderson, Maryland School of Medi- 
cine. 

Green — Weismiller 
Sara Ann Green, Maryland student, 
to J. Donald Weismille, Maryland grad- 
uate now in the Army Medical Corps. 
Gross — Bailey 
Joan Catherine Gross to Brian Howe 
Bailey, Maryland alumnus. 
Grove — Jackson 
Jane Ann Grove to Glenn Robert 
Jackson, Maryland alumnus. 
Gunderson — Spencer 
Judith Ann Gunderson, Maryland 
alumna, to Lt. Claude W. Spencer. 
Hart — Forman 
Susie Hart, student Maryland Exten- 
sion School in Munich, to Second Lt. 
Robert C. Forman. 

Hayes — Bayce 
Patricia Anne Hayes, Maryland 
graduate, to George J. Bayce, George 
Washington law student. 
Hayes — Boyce 
Both Maryland alumni, Patricia 
Anne Hayes to George Julian Boyce. 
Hobbs — Martin 
Shirley Hobbs, Maryland alumna, to 
Donald Ordway Martin, Maryland stu- 
dent. 

Holmes — Cordle 
Meta Katherine Holmes, Towson 
State Teachers graduate, to Pfc. James 
L. Cordle, U.S.A., Maryland alumnus. 
Hoxie — Granger 
Patricia Hoxie, Maryland alumna, to 
Clifford Granger. 

Huebner — Garritty 
Lala Eulene Huebner, to James P. 
Garritty; both Maryland students. 
Kahn— Silbert 
Patricia Rochelle Kahn, Maryland 
student, to Bernard L. Silbert, alumnus 
of Western Maryland. 

Kr a m er — Goldber g 
Beverly Kramer, Maryland student, 
to Ronald Goldberg, USN, George 
Washington alumnus. 

Kramer — Goldberg 
Beverly Kramer, Maryland student, 
to Ronald Goldberg. 

Kuehl — Layne 
Katherine Ellen Kuehl, Maryland 
graduate, to Lt. Edward B. Layne, 
USMC. 

Le Klohr — Lehmann 

Louise Lehmann to Dr. Edward S. 

Le Klohr, Jr., Medical School graduate. 

Livingston — Irvin 

Elizabeth Anne Livingston, Maryland 

graduate, to Samuel John Irvine III, 

Maryland student. Mr. Irvine was co- 



60 



Maryland 



captain of the 1954 football team. 
Both Miss Livingston and Mr. Irvine 
were elected to Who's Who Among 
Students in American Universities and 
Colleges. 

Lodge — Thiele 
Helen Gale Lodge to George H. 
Thiele, Maryland alumnus. 
Mac kail — Sasscer 
Anne Green Mackall to Lansdale 
Ghiselin Sasscer, Maryland Law School 
graduate. 

McDougal — Hadley 
Louise Adair McDougal, Maryland 
student to Lieut. Hunter B. Hadley, 
U.S.M.C, Duke graduate. 
Mirman — Gelb 
Anne Mirman, Maryland graduate, 
to Joseph D. Gelb, George Washington 
University graduate, School of Law, 
and University of Scranton. 
Morris — Bransford 
Dorothy Ellen Morris, Salisbury 
State Teachers alumuna, to Allan Dean 
Bransford, Maryland alumnus. 
Norford— Hubbell 
Jean Norford, George Washington 
student, to John H. Hubbell, Graduate 
School Maryland, a graduate of Uni- 
versity of Michigan. 

Peirez — Sax 
Irene Peirez to Albert Morton Sax, 
Maryland Medical student. 
Pond— Griffin 
Barbara Jane Pond, Maryland stu- 
dent, to Lieutenant Michael E. Griffin, 
U.S.A.F., Maryland graduate. 
Porlino — Hochheimer 
Josephine Margaret Porlino, Mary- 
land graduate, to Bernard F. Hoch- 
heimer. 

Richards — Spath 
Mary Elizabeth Richards to Frank 
Wilbur Spath III, Maryland alumnus. 
Rogers — Kearney 
Both Maryland students, Rita Anne 
Rogers, to Philip Charles Kearney. 
Romborg — William 
Jean Ellen Romborg, Maryland stu- 
dent, to Lieut. Major A. Williams, 
U.S.A.F.R., Maryland graduate. 
Ronchi — Nees 
Beverly Ann Ronchi, Maryland alum- 
na, to Bernard H. Nees, Army veteran 
and Maryland student. 

Shabdach— Seifert 
Mary Linda Shabdach, Villa Julie 
graduate, to John R. Seifert, graduate 
of the School of Law. 

Shu gar — Lenovitz 
Iris Elaine Shugar to Allen J. Leno- 
vitz, Maryland student. 

Solnitzky — Milligan 
Carolyn Ann Solnitzky, Maryland 
student, to Lieutenant E. Byron Milli- 
gan, U.S.A.F., Maryland graduate, who 
was elected to Who's Who Among 
Students in American Universities and 
Colleges. 

Sorrell— Dent 
Anne Elizabeth Sorrell, Maryland 
graduate, to Ensign James Harold 
Dent.. 

Stapf — Glaser 
Both Maryland students, Adalyn 
Naomi Stapf, Delta Gamma, to John 
Donald Glaser, Jr., Phi Kappa Sigma. 
Thorn ander — Cullen 
Britt Thornander to James Kimmey 
Cullen III, Maryland graduate. 



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MILITARY WEDDING 

A chapel wedding united a Maryland co-ed senior and a Maryland graduate. 
Lieutenant and Mrs. James MacKenzie, Jr., pass through (he traditional arch of 
sabres formed by the members of the Vandenberg Guard, a unit of the AF-ROTC, 
University of Maryland. 

Lt. MacKenzie received his commission in June 1954 upon completing his degree 
requirements in civil engineering and successfully completing four years of 
AF-ROTC. He is on active duty with the construction unit at the new Air Force 
Academy, Colorado Springs, Col. 

Mrs. MacKenzie, the former Kathleen E. Patrick, is the daughter of Professor 
and Mrs. Arthur S. Patrick of the University of Maryland's College of Business 
and Public Administration. She is presently completing her requiremtnts for 
graduation in June '55 and will then join her husband. 



Trump — Thomas 

Billie Jean Thomas, Maryland gradu- 
ate, to Blois C. Trump, graduate of 
Capitol Radio Engineering Institute. 
Walker — Anderson 

Alice Elaine Walker, Maryland alum- 
na, to William C. Anderson, North 
Dakota State. 

Watkins — Palmer 

Nina Eileen Watkins, daughter of 
Utah's Senator Arthur V. Watkins and 
Mrs. Watkins, Brigham Young gradu- 
ate, to William Martin Palmer, senior, 
School of Medicine, University of 
Maryland. 

Williams — Skarda 

Mildred Louise Williams to James 
Thomas Skarda, Maryland students. 



Zieber — Brice 

Betty Jane Zieber, Maryland alumna, 
to James D. Brice, Maryland student. 




At Quantico, Virginia a little Ma- 
rine landed on March 25, in the 
person of Thomas McCoy Fields, Jr. 
He's the real McCoy, son of Major and 
Mrs. Thomas M. Fields, U.S.M.C. 

The proud pater, one of Maryland's 
greatest all time track stars, predicts 
the little fellow will win the ACC two 
mile championship in 1975. 



62 



Maryland 




Maryland 

MARRIAGES 



Bosley — Hunker 

Phyllis Bunker to Lt. Kenneth T. 
Bosley, Maryland '51, Agr., M.A. 
'52. Mrs. Bosley received her B.A. de- 
gree in Home Economics and Speech 
from Southwestern College, Kansas, 
in 1953 and will receive her M.A. from 
University of Nebraska this May. Lt. 
Bosley is from Sparks, Maryland and 
is now on the University of Nebraska 
faculty. 

Brooks — Curtis 
Patricia Ruth Curtis to Lt. Ronnie 
Brooks, both Maryland graduates. 
Brothers — Keane 
Mary Anne Keane, Georgetown 
School of Nursing graduate, to Donald 
W. Brothers, Army veteran and Mary- 
land alumnus. 

Croyle — Bost 
Barbara Anne Bost, former Maryland 
alumna, to James Robert Croyle. 
Culp — Houston 
Barbara Ann Houston to Richard 
Carsan Culp, both Maryland students. 
Herbert — Rohe 
Katherine Barbara Rohe, Institute of 
Notre Dame and Towson State Teach- 
ers College, to First Lieutenant Thos. 
F. Herbert, U.S.A.F., graduate of the 
School of Medicine. 

Hoffman — Vandoren 
Margaret Vandoren, Maryland alum- 
na, to James P. Hoffman, Maryland 
graduate. 

Howard — Leggett 
Suzanne Margaret Leggett, Mary- 
land student to Airman 3/c George 
Noel Howard. Mrs. Howard is the 
daughter of Dr. L. L. Leggett, Presi- 
dent of the Carroll County Alumni 
Club. 

Huyett— Taylor 
Barbara Jean Taylor to Melvin Artz 
Huyett, both Maryland graduates. 
Lawther — Johnson 
Ellen Marie Johnson, Maryland 
alumna, to Lt. John Wheeler Lawther. 
McCluskey — Fowke 
Jane Fowke, Maryland graduate, to 
Captain Clovis V. McCluskey, Korea 
veteran and California graduate. 
M u r ph y — J oh n son 
Phyllis Ruth Johnson, Maryland 
alumna, to Lt. Joseph G. Murphy. 
Rome — Grosner 
Mrs. Frances Kahn Grosner to H. 
Paul Rome, alumnus of the Univer- 
sity's School of Law. 

Potter — Dodson 
Jane Elizabeth Dodson to Donald 
Ray Potter, both former Maryland stu- 
dents. 

Thorn pson — Wilson 
Julianna D. Wilson, '50, A&S to 
William F. Thompson. 

Smith — Callison 
Mary Frances Callison to Lt. Theo- 
dore Hunter Smith, Maryland graduate. 
Spivey — Baehr 
Sally Ann Baehr, Maryland alumna, 
to Delmar Baen Spivey, College of 
Military Science. 



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Sometimes a woman spends a great deal of time looking for a husband after she 

has secured him. 



One of Lieutenant Dan Wiseman's 
minions of the law halted a truck 
driver who had violated a campus 
traffic regulation. 

"What's your name?" he queried. 

"It's painted on the side of the 
truck," replied the truck driver, causti- 
cally, "Cant you see it?" 

"It's obliterated," said the officer. 

"Yer crazy," exploded the driver, 'it's 

O'Brien.' 

* * * 

A thief broke into the party head- 
quarters of a Soviet satellite and got 
away with an unusually valuable haul. 
He made off with th election returns for 
the next three years. 

* * * 

Notice in Scotch church: "Those who 
wish to put buttons in the collection 
plate will please furnish their own and 
not use the buttons from the pew seat 
cushions." 

* * * 

Farmer up near Walkersville bought 
a horse at auction and found that he 
would neither eat nor drink. "By 
golly," mused the new owner, "I've got 
a real bargain — if he's a good worker." 

* * * 

Marriage is like poker. Takes a pair 
to open. He leads with a diamond. She 
shows a flush. They wind up with a 
full house. 

* * * 

"Before coming to Maryland I work- 
ed in Des Moines." 
"Copper or coal?" 

* * * 

Mrs. Schnattergans : "I'd like to in- 
quire about bonds?" 

Guy in the bank: "Subscription, re- 
demption or conversion?" 

Mrs. Schnattergans: "What is this? 
A bank or a church?" 

* * * 

In high gear, dashing to make the 
bus,, one of our Phys Ed seniors 
tripped and fell flat on his profile. 

"Are you hurt?" asked a sweet young 
Home Eecer, helping him up. 

"Naw," replied our hero, "I was 
wearing my light fall suit." 

* * * 

The teacher of a class of itsy bitsy 
girls noticed a puddle on the floor at 
the entrance to the cloak room. 

"We do not wish to embarrass the 
young lady who caused that," teacher 
explained, "particularly since, when 
she grows up to be a lady we do not 
wish to have any of her classmates 
tease her about it." 

"So," the teacher went on to say, 
"we will all pledge to bow our heads, 
keep our eyes closed and not peek and, 
when we open our eyes we expect the 
puddle to be cleaned up." 



So the class bowed heads, closed 
eyes, did not peek. There was the 
pitter-patter of tiny feet, a short in- 
terval and then another pitter-patter. 

Then the class opened eyes and, lo 
and behold, two puddles under a 
chalked message on the wall, "The 

Phantom Strikes Again!" 

* * * 

A Maryland alumnus who had 
learned to share taxis in crowded 
Washington went to Boston on busi- 
ness. At the station he jumped into a 
cab with a Harvard alumnus, having 
heard the first fare give a destination 
close to his. He sat back with a cheery 
smile, turned to the other passenger 
and said pleasantly?, "My name's John- 
son.' 

"Mine," retorted the Harvard fellow 
frigidly, "is not." 

* * * 

A psychiatrist is a man who, when 
a beautiful girl enters the room, 
watches everybody else. 

* * * 

"What have I got to be happy 

about? I can't pay my bills." 

"Well, then, be happy you're not 
one of your creditors." 

* * * 

The old narrow roads where two 
cars could barely pass are being re- 
placed by splendid wide highways on 
which six or eight cars can collide at 
once. 

* * * 

Psychiatrist: "Are you troubled by 
wicked thoughts?" 

Patient: "No. I kinda enjoy 'em." 

* * * 

Home Ec: "Is anyone looking?" 

B&PA: "Not a soul." 

Home Ec: "Then I won't fix my 

stocking." 

* * * 

In a Western Pennsylvania town a 
little girl who, holding her Mutter by 
the hand, watched the passing of a 
long freight train with a caboose on 
the end, and asked, "Ain't so, Maw, 
when, the little red house on wheels 
goes by the train all?" 

* * * 

One of the boats in a water carnival 
was fixed up as a pirate craft, Jolly 
Roger flying. Pointing to the skull 
and cross-bones Papa asked Junior, 
"Can you name that Flag?" 

"Sure," replied the little guy, 

"iodine." 

* * * 

Bowlegged guy standing on the curb 
like this ( ) , watching a parade. Ner- 
vous guy behind him finally walked up 
to the bowlegged fellow and shouted, 
"If you're gonna jump, buddy, for the 
love of Mike, JUMP!" 



64 



Maryland 



For Sale — Piano, by young lady with 

carved mahogany legs. 

* * * 

Two young men wanted — To run a 
pool room out of town. 

Mattress For Sale — By lady stuffed 
with feathers. (Betcha she's tickled to 
death.) 

* * * 

Apartment to Let — By young lady 
with both kinds of gas. 

Bulldog For Sale — Will eat any- 
thing. Very fond of little children. 

The trouble with emphasizing young 
men to replace older men lies in the 
fact that in order to gain valuable ex- 
perience you also gain gray hair, Selah! 

* * * 

An alumnus says medicos do not like 
to be called "Doc," squelches kids who 
called him "Doc," with "Don't be so 
formal. Just call me Butch." 

Student: "I'll take pork chops, but 
make them lean." 

Waitress: "To the left or the right." 

"Is that a genuine bloodhound?" 
"It sure is lady. Come here, Oscar, 
and bleed for the lady." 

Scotchman with a broken arm. He 
had been socking one of those machines 
labeled, "Your penny back if you 
punch hard enough." 

There is always a tie between father 
and son — and the son wears it. 

Two school teachers; one had no 
principal and the other had no class. 

* *• * 

Here's where I cut a good figure, 
said the co-ed as she sat on a broken 
bottle. 

* *• * 

"George, you took the wrong baby 
carriage. That's not our baby!" 

"Aw shaddup, this one has new rub- 
ber tires." 

* *• * 

Virtues are learned at your mother's 
knee; vices at some other joint. 

* *• * 

Flat feet are an arch enemy. 

* *■ * 

A night owl knows a lot about bats. 

* *• * 

"You've got a hearth of stone," he 

said as he looked at her fireplace. 

* *■ * 

The play ran one week — the author, 
three. 

* *■ * 

The car was so old, it needed both 

upper and lower plates. 

* *• * 

To keep a horse from drooling teach 
him to spit. 

* *• * 

All work and no play makes jack the 
dull way. 

Don't file your finger nails. Cut 'em 
off and throw 'em away. 



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Terp Boxers Again Take Eastern Meet. 
Coyne, Fisher, Palumbo, Garber Win Titles. 
Rifle Team Loses National Title. 
Maryland Drops Varsity Boxing. 
Palumbo Repeats National Title. 
Alumni Defeats Varsity Gridders. 




ALL-AMERICA DINNER 



The Fourth Annual "M" Dinner was 
held in the Main Ballroom, Emerson 
Hotel, Baltimore. 

The main speaker of the evening 
was Dr. Wilson Elkins, president of 
the University. Dr. Elkins' talk was 
of interest to everyone because the 
future University athletic policies will 
be predicated upon his requests, ideas, 
and efforts. Fortunately, for the Uni- 
versity, Dr. Elkins is not only a strong 
advocate of the best education and re- 
search but believes a strong athletic 
program is vitally necessary. 

Dr. Lawrence Smallwood, of Wash- 
ington, D. C, was the Master of Cere- 
monies. Dr. Smallwood has a very 
unique style and is noted for his 
ability to keep a program moving. 
There are no dull moments with Dr. 
Smallwood as toastmaster. 

Jim Tatum, Athletic Director and 
football coach presented the Awards 
to Maryland's AU-Americans. 

1. Gary Garber— 119 pound NCAA 
Boxing Champion 

2. Vince Palumbo— 132 pound NCAA 
Boxing Champion 

3. George Corrigan — All-American 
Lacrosse Attackman 

4. Ellwood R. Barton — All-American 
Rifleman 

5. James Wells — All-American Rifle- 



man 
6. Ray Martorano 
Rifleman. 



All-American 



Maryland came up with its second 
straight National Championship rifle 
team, when Sgt. Barnes again directed 
the Old Line Sharpshooters to the 
NCAA crown. 

In addition to the "All Americans: 
Three special awards were presented to 
athletics whose performance were very 
outstanding. 



Talbot T. Speer Award 

This award went to Gene Shue in 
recognition of outstanding performance 
in basketball— 1950-1954. Gene Shue 
displayed remarkable leadership and 
scholastic standing along with his bas- 
ketball record. 

He made several All American teams 
and was in the official NCAA second 
team. He established or broke every 
scoring record at the University and 
now plays for New York Knicker- 
bocker Professional Basketball Team. 
It was said by Bones McKinney, the 
old "pro" and coach of Wake Forest, 
that Gene is the best basketball player 
he ever saw. 

The Talbot T. Speer Award is pre- 
sented by Talbot T. Speer, successful 
and well known business executive, a 
former star halfback of football team 
and past president of General Alumni 
Association, national figure in every 
worthwhile charitable organization, and 
activities that cover three pages in 
Who's Who. 

McCormick Award 

Presented by Charles P. McCormick, 
well known Baltimore business indus- 
trialist, and member of the Board of 
Regents, to Richard Bielski, the Balti- 
more area boy who contributed most 
to athletics at Maryland in 1954. 

Bilski was plagued by injuries early 
in the football season and did not come 
up to his real standard until late in 
the season. In the last game of the 
season before a nationally broadcast 
and televised game, Tom Harmon 
called Bielski "the best fullback in the 
United States." His leadership and 
spirit still prevailed throughout the 
year even though Bielski was hampered 
by injuries. At the close of the football 
season Bielski was voted by the sports- 
writers North-South game as the out- 
standing player on the field, over- 
shadowing the All American fullback, 
Alan Ameche. 

Delmarva Award 

This award went to "Ronnie Waller" 
star halfback, now property of the 
Los Angeles Rams. He hails from 
Laurel ,Delaware and has been a 
standout on the football team for the 
last three years. 

A. V. Williams, president of a local 
construction company with residence 
in Baltimore County and Nanticoke, 



66 



Maryland 



Md., a former "M" Club president and 
star center of football team, pre- 
sented this award, which will be annu- 
ally awarded to a University of Mary- 
land athlete from eastern shore Mary- 
land and Virginia or the State of 
Delaware. 

"M" Club Dinner 

The "M" Club Dinner was estab- 
lished in 1952 with the main purpose 
of annually honoring the "All Ameri- 
cans" or any athlete of the University 
of Maryland or any team nationally 
recognized by the National Collegiate 
Athletic Association, together with 
other citizens who have achieved na- 
tional prominence in all walks of life. 

Honorary membership in the "M" 
club is an award given to men who 
are selected for their notable achieve- 
ments in the political, professional 
and business worlds. 

This year such awards went to 
Roger Pippen, Sports Editor — Sunday 
American and News-Post; Jesse Linthi- 
cum, Sports Editoi- — The Morning 
Sun; Paul Menton, Sports Editor — 
The Evening Sun.. 

Deans Honored 

These three deans of Baltimore 
sports world were lauded for their un- 
tiring efforts over the years to pro- 
mote and praise, and suggest, when 
necessary, the sports at the University. 
Each one has achieved national promi- 
nence in one way or another. 

"M" Club, Officers, 1955-56, are:— 
President, Albert B. Heagy, College 
Park; Vice-Presi- 
dent, Charles F. 
Ellinger, Balti- 
more; Secretary, 
Robert C. James, 
College Park; 
Treasurer, Joseph 
H. Deckman, Coi- 
lege Park. 

Sports 
Representatives 

Football, Elmer 
Wingate, Balti- 
more; Baseball, 
Ford Loker, Bal- 
timore; Basketball, George Knepley, 
Hyattsville; Lacrosse, Henry Lowry, 
Baltimore; Track, Chester Ward, Col- 
lege Park; Boxing, Robert Hafer, Hy- 
attsville; Rifle, Albert Woods, Hyatts- 
ville; Cross Country, Earl Thomson, 
Hyattsville; Tennis, Edward LaBerge, 
Baltimore; Soccer, James Belt, Reis- 
terstown; Wrestling, Robert Marsheck, 
Baltimore; Golf, Frank Cronin, College 
Park. 

Representatives at Large 

Sam Silber, Baltimore; Eugene Kin- 
ney, Washington; Lawrence Smallwood, 
Washington; Milton Vandenberg, Balti- 
more; Hanlon Murphy, Baltimore; 
Charles Miller, Baltimore; Hotsy Al- 
perstein, Washington; William Larash, 
Baltimore; Julie Radice, Washington. 

Nominating Committee 

Hanlon Murphy, Chairman; Chester 
Ward; Earl Thomson. 




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Ten Games For 1955 

aryland's ten games to 
be played this fall will 
be top attractions each 
Saturday, both home 
and away. Besides our 
four Atlantic Coast 
Conference games with 
Wake Forest, North 
Carolina, South Carolina, and Clemson, 
we meet teams that represent six other 
major conferences in the NCAA. These 
are Missouri, Big Seven, UCLA, Pacific 
Coast; Baylor, Southwest; Syracuse, 
Eastern; LSU Southeast; and George 
Washington, Southern. 

Our five home games present an 
outstanding football package for Mary- 
land supporters. UCLA, 1954 National 
Champions, needs no introduction as 
our September 24 opener in Byrd Sta- 
dium. Ironically, our next home game 
is with Wake Forest, another '54 
spoiler. 

Following games at Chapel Hill with 
George Barclay's Tar Heels and our 
trip North to play Syracuse, we return 
to Byrd Stadium for two big games 
with South Carolina and LSU. Rex 
Enright will have one of his finest 
teams this fall and one of the Nation's 
best quarterbacks in Mackie Prickett. 
The Tigers of LSU will be an outstand- 
ing national attraction, as always. They 
are being coached by one of Red 
Blaik's top men this year, Paul Dietzel. 
We close out the home schedule No- 
vember 19 with opr cross town rival, 
George Washington. Coach Bo Sher- 
man always has a fine squad, and, as 
you know, delights in giving us their 
top effort of the year. 



Sept. 17 
Sept. 24 
Oct. 1 

*Oct. I 

*Oct. IE 
Oct. 22 

*Oct. 2f 
Nov. ! 

*Nov. Vi 
Nov. 19 

♦Conferen 



The Schedule 

Missouri at Columbia, Mo. 

U.C.L.A. at College Park 
— Baylor at Waco 
! — Wake Forest at College Park 
— North Carolina at Chapel Hill 
I- — Syracuse at Syracuse 
> — South Carolina at College Park 
i — L.S.U. at College Park 
— Clemson at Clemson 
— George Washington at College Pk. 
ce Games (A.C.C.). 



Alumni 19; Varsity 12 

Maryland Varsity had a two touch- 
down lead over the Alumni yesterday, 
but the "old pros" won 19-12 before the 
biggest crowd to see the fifth game 
in the Alumni-Varsity series, 11,700. 
The Varsity was marching desperately 
for that tying touchdown as the game 
ended. 

Four of the five touchdowns came 
on passes, two by Jack Scarbath of the 
Redskins and one each by next year's 
quarterbacks, Frank Tamburello and 
Lynn Beightol. The fifth was on a one- 
yard slash by Chet Hanulak of the 
pro-champion Cleveland Browns. 

Alumni had many good football play- 
ers, and even though a few were on 
the pudgy side, it probably could have 
beaten any college team. 

A pass interception by Joe Horn- 
ing set up the first Alumni touch- 
down with Chet Hanulak and Dick 
Bielski starring in a 35-yard drive 
and Hanulak carrying over from the 



one. Bernie Faloney was the quar- 
terback. 

Alumni marched 91 yards to go 
ahead 13-12 in the fourth quarter with 
Scarbath throwing a strike to Hanulak 
in the end zone from 22 yards out, 
Hanulak catching the ball virtually 
in Ed Vereb's arms. 

Alumni added an insurance touch- 
down with 30 seconds to play when 
Scarbath hit Lou Weidensaul with a 
23-yard scoring pass. Weidensaul was 
all alone in the end zone. The only 
point after touchdown was Dick Biel- 
ski 's after the first Alumni score. 

Four Alumni Heroes 

Offensively, the Alumni heroes were 
Faloney who as always proved he can 
do everything; Scarbath, Hanulak and 
Dick Nolan. 

Hanulak was terrific. He was the 
top ground gainer for the Alumni and 
scored twice. 

Varsity had a 12-0 lead at the end 
of the first quarter and Alumni had 
the ball only three times for six plays 
in that stretch. After being stopped 
on the 4-yard line, Varsity came back 
when Tamburello passed down the mid- 
dle to Selep for seven yards and a 
touchdown. 

Varsity with Beightol quarterback- 
ing the Varsity came back 35 yards 
for a touchdown with Lynn leading 
Dave Nusz and then hitting him in 
the corner of the end zone with a 18- 
yard touchdown pass. 

Tamburello's performance indicated 
that he will give UCLA, Baylor, LSU, 
and the other Maryland opponents 
plenty of trouble. 

When Varsity was on the Alumni 7, 
the Alumni put in Bob Morgan, Bob 
Dean and Ray Krouse in the middle of 
the line. Two plays later Tambo passed 
to Selep for the touchdown. 
SQUAD ROSTERS 
Varsity 

Left Ends— Dennis, Porter, Turner, Waters. 

Left Tackles— Heuring, Wharton, Poly- 

aD Left Guards— Dyson, Kolaree, Suchy. 
Centers — Pellegrini, Tullnl, Aldertong. 
Right Guards— Davis, Athey, DeCicco 
Right Tackles — Sandusky, Don Healy, Stefe. 
Right Ends — Parsons, Flynn, Alexander. 
Quarterbacks — Tamburello, Beightol, Haw- 

' Left Halfbacks — Vereb, Nusz, McVlcker, 

Right Halfbacks — Dare, Hamilton, Healy, 
Perlo. , _ , 

Fullbacks — Selep, Skarda, Komlo. 

Alumni 

Left Ends — Crytzer, Colteryahn, F. Davis. 

Left Tackles — Morgan, Shipley, O'Connor, 
Krouse, Modzelewski, D. 

Left Guards — Dean, Bowersox, Maletzky, 
Kramer, Staffieri. 

Centers — Irvine, Cosgrove, Brougher, 
O'Donnell, Keith, Martine. 

Right Guards — Palahunik, Ladygo, McLuc- 
kie, Kramer. 

Right Tackles — Jones, Baierl, Ed Poblak, 
Gierula. 

Right Ends — Weidensaul, J. Alderton, Nes- 
tar, Simler. 

Quarterbacks — Faloney, Scarbath, Boxold. 

Left Halfbacks — Hanulak, DeStefano, T. 
Seibert, Fullerton. 

Right Halfbacks — Nolan, Horning, L. Dav- 
is, Kutcha. 

Fullbacks — Felton, Bielski, Albrecht. 

Seibert Leaves 

Assistant coach Vern Seibert, spe- 
cialist in teaching defense to the backs 
at Maryland, will not be back for the 
coming season. 



68 



Maryland 




Seibert, who also is in charge of 
concessions for the athletic depart- 
ment, is leaving to take a public re- 
lations position with a firm in Balti- 
more, his home town. Seibert played 
halfback four seasons at Maryland. He 
coached football and lacrosse at Balti- 
more Junior College for one year be- 
fore coming back to Maryland in 1951. 

BOXING 

Terps Take Title 

ary land's boxing team, 
ably coached by Frank 
Cronin, successfully de- 
fended the Intercollegi- 
ate Boxing Association 
(Eastern) championship 
for 1955 repeating their 
1954 victory. 

Leo Coyne, boxing at 178, and Gary 
Garber, 1?5, repeated their 1954 titles. 
Gary Fisher at 147 and Vince Palumbo 
at 132 annexed two more for Mary- 
land. The victory gave the Terps 
mother year's possession of the Ed 
Neil trophy and Gary Fisher also won 
the outstanding boxer's trophy. Mary- 
land's four titles are 50% of the eight 
available. 

The two day meet started as a tri- 
angular battle between Army, Syra- 
cuse, and Maryland, with Virginia, 
Georgetown and Catholic University 
also represented by "Short" teams, 
it settled down to a dual battle, in 
the stretch, between Syracuse and the 
Terps. 

Maryland finished with 39 points, 
Syracuse 35, Army 24, Virginia 12, 
Georgetown 11, Catholic University 5. 

Only six Marylanders competed. 
Syracuse and Army fielded full eight 
man teams. 

To cop the light-heavy title Coyne 
defeated Army's Ernest Wilson in the 
finals, Virginia's Lee Ribble in the 
semi-finals and Catholic University's 
Al Greene in the quarter finals. 

To gain the 147 pound title Gary 
Fisher took a nip and tuck decision 
over Bob Rigolosi of Syracuse in the 
finals. In the semi-final Fisher de- 
cisioned Felix Salerno, of Georgetown 
and, in the quarter-final, Fisher stopped 
Doug Borchard of C.U.A. 

At 132 Maryland's Vincent Palumbo 
easily decisioned game Billy Wham, 
of Syracuse. In the semi-finals Virginia 
forfeited to Palumbo and, in the quar- 
ter finals Palumbo stopped Mike Fahey, 
of Catholic University in round one. 

In the 125 pound dual Maryland's 
Gary Garber won in a hectic melee over 
Frankie Guelli, of Syracuse. Garber 
had advanced into the finals on a bye. 

Maryland had no heavyweight entry. 

At 165 Terp Bob Scali lost to Fiacco 
of Syracuse, after having won over 
C.U.A.'s Maurice Greenberg in the 
semi-finals. 

At 156 Maryland's Dick Soucy 
dropped out due to injury. 

At 139 Terp Tony Esposito lost, in 
the semi-finals to John Granger, na- 
tional champion from Syracuse. 



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The new Eastern champions: — 

125— Gary Garber, Maryland 

132 Vin.v Palumbo, Maryland 

139 — John Granger, Syracuse 

147 — Gary Fisher. Maryland 

156 — Tony DIBiase, Virginia 

165— Gua Piacco, Syracuse 

178 — Loo Coyne, Maryland 

Heavyweight - Tom Quinn, Georgetown 

The tournament concluded the year 
in office of W. W. Cobey, Maryland's 
graduate manager of athletics, as 
President of the I.B.A.A. He will he 
succeeded by Robert Hoskins, of Vir- 
ginia. 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, Maryland's 
President, presented trophies and 



medals to the winners. A special gold 
plaque from the University was pre- 
sented to Colonel Heinie Miller in 
recognition of his many years in box- 
ing. He was the tournament director. 
The summary: — 

FINALS 

12-"> pounds — Gary (Maryland i decisioned 
Prank Guelli (Syracuse), 2-1. 

132 pounds — Vinnie Palumbo (Maryland) 
decisioned Kill Wham (Syracuse). 3-0, 

139 pounds — John Granger (Syracuse) 

won by TKO over Haywood Hansel! (Army. 
bout stopped between second and third 
rounds. 

147 pounds — Gary Fishei' (Maryland) de- 
cisioned Bob Rigolosi ( Syracuse). 2-1. 

156 pounds — Tony DiBiase (Virginia) de- 
cisioned Luciano Salamone (Army), 2-1. 



165 pounds — Gus Fiaeo (Syracuse) de- 
cisioned Boh Scali (Maryland), 2-1.' 

ITS pounds — Leo Coyne (Maryland) de- 
cisioned Ernest Wilson (Army), 3 0. 

Heavyweight — Tom Quinn (Georgetown) 
won by TKO over Don Shannon (Army), 
1 :.">(> of second round. 

S KM I FINALS 

132 pounds — Vinnie Palumbo I Maryland) 
won by forfeit from Bob Greer I Virginia) : 
Bill Wham (Syracuse) decisioned Mike 
Stevenson (Army i. 3-0. 

139 pounds — John Granger (S.) decisioned 
Tony Ksposito (M.). 3-0; Haywood Hansell 
(A.) decisioned Kd Ryan (Georgetown), 3-0. 

147 pounds — Gary Fisher i.M.) decisioned 
Felix Salerno (G.), 3-0; Bob Kigolosi (S.) 
decisioned Bob Rush (V.), 3-0. 

165 pounds — (Jus Piacco IS.) decisioned 
Clyde Massey (A.), 3-0; Bob Scali (M.) 
decisioned Maurice Greenberg (Catholic), 
3-0. 



* 



MARYLAND RING CHAMPIONS 

These 17 Terrapins Won Titles Through The Years 



• 




Stewart McCaw Ivan Nedomatsky Benny Alperstein Tom Birmingham Frank Cronin 



Newton Cox 



17.">, Southern Champ. 135-145 135-125 127, Southern Champ. 155, Southern Champ. ii;, - }, Southern Champ. 

Nat ion ill Champ. '37 '39 '39 



'34, *35 



Southern Champ. 
'35, '36, '37 



'37, '3S 

Southern Champ. 

•38, '39 




Herb Gunther Eddie Rieder Kenny Malone 

175, Southern Champ. l.">.j. Southern Champ. Unlimited, southern 
'41 '47-'48 Champ. '47 



Don Oliver Spencer Hopkins Ronnie Rhodes 

155-156, Southern 130, Southern Champ, it;."). Southern Champ. 
Champ. '50-'51 '49 '52 






Cal Quenstedt 
I nlimited, Eastern 

Champ. '53 



Gary Garber 
125, National Champ. 
'5 1 : Eastern Champ. 

'■"> l and '55 



Leo Coyne 

/unlimited, '54; 178, 
'55 Eastern Champ, 



Vinnie Palumbo Gary Fisher 

132, National Champ. 147. Eastern Champ. 
'•"i4. '55 : Eastern '55 

Champ. '55 



7P 



Maryland 



178 pounds — Ernpst Wilson (A.) drcisionrd 
Lou Iannicello (S.), .'5-0; Leo Coyne (M.) 
decisioned Watkins Kibble (Va.), 3-0. 
QUARTERFINALS 

125 POUND CLASS — Guelli, Syracuse, won 
by TKO over Weinstein, Army, 1 :39, third 
round. 

132-POUND CLASS — Palumhn. Maryland, 
won by TKO over Fahey, Catholic U., :54. 
first round. 

139-POUNI) CLASS — Ryan, Georgetown, 
decisioned Young, Virginia. 

147 POUNT) CLASS — Fisher, Maryland, 
won by TKO over Borchard, Catholic U., 
1 :10, second round ; Rigolosi, Syracuse, de- 
cisioned Rundle, Army. 

l56rPOTTNn CLASS — DiJBiase, Virginia, 

won by TO over Collier, Syracuse, 1 :30, first 
round. 

165-POUNI) CLASS — Massey. Army, won 
by TKO over Quesenberry, Virginia, o :45, 
first round. 

178-POUND (LASS' Coyne, Maryland, de- 
cisioned Green. Catholic U. 

HEAVYWEIGHT— Khaiuinn, Army. de- 
cisioned Decicco, Catholic U. : Quinn, George 
town, decisioned Georgiade, Syracuse. 
Girl Sponsors Too 

Reviving an old Southern Conference 
custom the boxing teams taking part 
in the Intercollegiate Boxing Associa- 
tion Tournament at College Park, spon- 
sored by young ladies elected by the 
Maryland boxing team. Sponsorship of 
competing contestants goes back to the 
knights of old and miladys glove. 

Syracuse was sponsored by Barbara 
E. Baker, of Massapequa, Long Island, 
N. Y. Kappa Kappa Gamma, a junior 
in the College of Home Economics, 
University of Maryland. In 1953, she 
went to the finals as Maryland's repre- 
sentative in the National Campus 
Queen contest conducted by the New 
York Journal American. 

Joan K. Obaugh, of Onancock, Vir- 
ginia, sponsored the Virginia team. A 
senior in Maryland's College of Home 
Economics, Kappa Delta, Miss Obaugh 
is secretary of the student government 
association. 

A truly representative "Army brat" 
sponsored the West Point team. She 
is Sarah B. Harmony, President of 
Delta Gamma, senior in Maryland's 
college of Arts and Sciences. Miss 
Harmony's father is Brigadier General 
John W. Harmony, U. S. A., former 
captain of the West Point boxing team 
and, while stationed with Maryland's 
ROTC, for four years coach of the 
Terrapin boxing teams, 1933-1936. She 
had the honor not only of sponsoring 
the Army team but also her distin- 
guished father. 

Little Miss Mary Jean LaFond spon- 
sored Catholic University's ring team. 
She is the daughter of Eddie LaFond, 
former Cardinal boxer, now C. U.'s box- 
ing coach and director of athletics. 

The boxers from Georgetown Uni- 
versity were sponsored by Mary Karen 
O'Kane, a sophomore in Georgetown's 
school of nursing and hails from Wells- 
ville, N. Y. 

"Miss Boxing Glove I, U.S.A.," 1953- 
1954, elected bv the National Boxing 
Association, after nomination by the 
State of Nevada and Hollywood judges, 
a Home Economics freshman at 
Maryland, sponsored the Terrapin 
fisticians. She is Clay Keene Bernard 
who, from 1937 to 1940, was mascot of 
Terp boxing teams and who, in 1948, 
was chosen "Sweetheart of the Dixie 
Boxing Tournament" in Columbia, S. C. 
She is an accomplished skater, swim- 
mer and horsewoman and in, both 1948 
and 1949, was a Princess in the Presi- 
! dent's Cup Regatta. 




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Top:— 

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No More Like It 

The tournament provided Maryland 
with its last laurels in boxing. About 
a week following the meet the Ath- 
letic Council announced that Maryland 
was dropping the sport. There was 
little else to do. No opponents, no 
schedule. Other schools set the prece- 
dent, viz: — North Carolina and North 
Carolina State, V.M.I. , Duke, Miami, 
Western Maryland, Minnesota, and 
others. Virginia dropped boxing after 
Maryland's action. 

Boxing at Maryland started on an 
impromptu basis in 1910. The late 
Original Kid Sullivan (Harry Sheehy), 
who then lived in Berwyn, was asked 
by students to teach them how to box. 
The kid, who fought such as Battling 
Nelson and Jimmy Britt, used to say, 
"The boys chipped in and paid me $5.00 
a night for teaching them." 

Maryland fielded a varsity team first 
in 1931 and 1932 under Coach Billy 
Whipp. 

Captain Jack Harmony, now a Briga- 
dier General, U.S.A., coached from '33 
to '36 and under him Maryland boxing 
began to ascend, being barely nosed out 
for the Southern Conference in 1936. 

The next year Colonel Heinie Miller, 



in his youth three times a Navy 25 
round champion, took over. Maryland, 
in '37, came through with its first Con- 
ference title. Building in '38 a Miller- 
coached team again won the title fh 
'39. Miller coached until '40 when he 
went on active duty in the Marine 
Corps. 

Mike Lombardo, who boxed under 
Harmony and Miller, coached in 1941. 
He then entered the Marine Corps. 

Bobby Goldstein, former Virginia 
boxer, coached in 1942 and piloted the 
team to the Eastern title. Goldstein 
joined the Army. 

He was followed, in 1943, by Tom 
Campagna, of Chicago, who also joined 
the Army. 

Fausto Rubini, former Wisconsin 
boxer and coach, took over for 1944 and 
later joined the Navy. 

Paddy Kane of Chicago coached in 
1945. 

After over five years in the Marines 
Heinie Miller returned from the Pacific 
to coach in 1946. 

In 1947 his team again won the 
Southern Conference title. 

Miller coached until 1950 when Frank 
Cronin, who had been a member of tne 



72 



Maryland 



great '39 team, took over, piloting the 
Terps to the Eastern title in 1954 and 
1955. He did a grand job and may 
always rest on the laurels of being on 
top with two title teams right down to 
the finish line. 

Boxing at all levels has suffered. 
Millions of fans have been converted 
to boxing due to TV but they have also 
been educated to expect that boxing is 
furnished for free at the turn of the 
nearest TV knob. 

Through the years the Terps won six 
team titles. Miller's teams won three; 
Cronin's teams took two; Goldstein's 
team won one. 

Seventeen Terp boxers won indi- 
vidual titles, as pictured adjacently. 

Palumbo Wins Title 

Maryland's Vince Palumbo, '54 Na- 
tional and Eastern champ successfully 
defended his title in the NCAA Nation- 
al tournament at Pocatello. 

In the finals he handsomely took 
the measure of Michigan State's classy 
Johnny Butler. 

In the semi finals Palumbo won over 
Dan Axtman, Idaho State. In the quar- 
ter-finals Palumbo decisioned Cyril 
Okamoto, Hawaii. 

Nice going for Coach Frank Cronin 
too. He closes the book with two East- 
ern titles teams and three national 
titles. Won by Palumbo in '54 and '55 
and by Gary Sailer in '54. 

Coyne Loses 

At 178 in the national tourney Mary- 
land's Leo Coyne was well ahead on 
points on all three score cards when 
he walked into a round house left 
swing tossed by San Jose State's Dave 
Fanner that spelled sunset over Paint 
Branch. 

Michigan State won the national 
team title. 

Maryland — 6 Vi ', Virginia — 2 ' > 

In the dual meet finale for both 
squads, the Terp boxing team over- 
powered Virginia's mittmen, 6Vk to 2%, 
at Memorial Gymnasium, Charlottes- 
ville, Va. 

Gaining a forfeit in the 125 pound 
class the Marylanders started rolling 
and swept through three straight 
matches before the home team gar- 
nered a point. 

To open up the affair Vinnie Palum- 
bo, Maryland's national collegiate 
champion at 132 pounds mauled Bob 
Greer to win by a wide margin. Then 
139 pound entry Tony Esposito slipped 
by the Cavalier's Young, 30-28 before 
the host could chalk up a score. 

With two matches scheduled in the 
147 pound class Vh-ginia's Joe Madden 
and Bob Rush took identical, 28-27, 
wins over Chris Westerman and Gary 
Fisher. The Cavaliers scored again 
and almost closed the earlier Terp 
margin when Tony Dibiase outclassed 
Dick Soucy and forced the fight to be 
stopped in the third round. 

At 165 pounds, Bob Scali, put the 
visitors back on the win road with 
a, 30-26, decision over Dave King. 
Clinching the dual meet for the Liners 
was Leo Coyne in the light heavy- 
weight division. He took a first round 
TKO over Lee Ribble with his furious 



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attack to the mid-section. 

The heavyweights figured in an ab- 
breviated bout when the Terp's Jean 
Waters was forced to retire because 
of a cut over the right eye in the first 
round. The bout was automatically 
scored a draw. 



BASKETBALL 

Maryland 68; Clemson 66 

aryland's basketballing 
Terps had to overcome 
a 14-point second-half 
deficit, before finally 
edging Clemson 68-66, 
and winning their 16th 
game in 20 starts. 
With six-and-a-half 
minutes gone in the final half, Clem- 
son, which had won only one game in 
18 starts, had built up a 54-40 lead. 
Then Bob Kessler and sophomore sub- 
stitute Drew Schaufler took charge, 
outscoring Clemson 20 to five in seven- 
and-half minutes. Bob O'Brien's hook 
shot put the Terps ahead for good at 
62-61. 

The win enabled the Terps to remain 
tied with North Carolina State for the 
lead in the Atlantic Coast Conference. 
Each have 10-2 records. 

Little Billy Yarborough of Clemson 
was high scorer with 26 points, to 
maintain his place as the Nation's fifth 
highest scorer. Bob Kessler, with 22, 
was high for Maryland. 

North Carolina State 78; Maryland 58 

A fired-up N. C. State Wolfpack, 
seeking revenge for an early season 
68-64 loss to Maryland, rolled over the 
Terps, 78-58, and moved into undis- 
puted first place in the Atlantic Coast 
Conference basketball race. 

The Terrapins never came close as 
State roared from the opening gun, 
building up an insurmountable 46-21 
halftime lead, and then proceeded to 
score the highest point total of the year 
against Maryland. 

The Terps were cold, scoring only 
two field goals in the first 13 minutes, 
enabling State to pull away to an 11-2 
conference record. The loss left Coach 
Millikan's hoopsters with a 10-3 con- 
ference slate and a 16-5 overall record. 

Bob Kessler again led the Terps in 
scoring with 23 points, followed by 
senior captain Bob Everett's 18. Phil 
DiNardo had 20 and Ronnie Scheffel 
18 for the Wolfpack. 

Wake Forest 75; Maryland 71 

The Demon Deacons of Wake Forest 
proved to be just that, as they scored 
their second triumph of the year over 
the Terps, 75-71. The Deacons had beat- 
en the Terps 62-58 in overtime earlier. 

As was the case in the first game, 
Wake Forest had to come from behind 
in the late minutes to gain the victory. 
Again the Terps held Dick Hemric, the 
Deacs All-American center to 11 points 
his lowest point total of the year, only 
to have sophomore guards Ernie Wig- 
gins and Jackie Murdock to beat them 

Maryland trailed three-fourths of the 
game, but managed to build up a five- 



point lead, 68-63, with 4:10 remaining 
on the shooting of forward Bob Kessler 
and Guard Bob O'Brien. 

Then Murdock and Wiggins went to 
work, scoring and stealing the ball, 
and with a little more than a minute- 
and-half left, Wake had a 69-68 lead. 
Murdock hit on two layups as the Dea- 
cons were playing a delaying game, 
to ice the game. 

The loss dropped the Terps record to 
16-6 and to third place in the ACC. 

Maryland 57; Georgetown 49 

Maryland had to work overtime, in 
fact two overtime periods, before end- 
ing the regular season with a 57-49 win 
over local rival Georgetown. 

After being tied 24-24 at halftime, 
the two teams were still tied 46-46 at 
the end of regulation play, and 48-48 
at the end of the first overtime session. 
Then Bob Everett and John Sandbower 
pulled the Terps safely away to their 
17th win of the season. 

Both teams had poor shooting nights, 
and the Terps were handling the ball 
loosely, losing possession at several 
key spots. But Coach Bud Millikan's 
boys had it in the clutch, outscoring 
the Hoyas nine to one in the second 
overtime. 

Bob Kessler led the scorers with 20 
points. Everett had 14, while Bob 
O'Brien scored 13 to add to the Terp 
point total. 

Virginia 68; Maryland 67 

After finishing third in the Atlantic 
Coast Confrence basketball race, Mary- 
land fell victim to Virginia in the 
opening round of the ACC tournament. 
Led by the brilliant Buzz Wilkinson, 
Virginia upset the Terps 68-67 in a 
bitter battle. 

Neither team could get more than 
a two-point margin in the second half 
as the regulation time ended 59-59, 
aftr Virginia's Bill Miller missed a last 
second field goal attempt. 

Virginia pulled ahead by seven points 
in the overtime, but the Terps almost 
caught Virginia just before the final 
seconds ticked away. But the Virginia 
cushion proved to be just enough. Bob 
Everett and Bob O'Brien led the brief 
Terp surge late in the overtime. 

It was Buzz Wilkinson, the great 
Cavalier guard, who really did the 
damage to the Terps. The "Buzzer" 
scored 30 points, held Bob Kessler, the 
Terps top scorer to seven points, and 
put on a freeze with his dribbling late 
in the ball game to keep the ball away 
from the Terps. 

The loss was the first that a Millikan 
coached team had dropped to Virginia. 
Millikan-led teams had beaten the Ca- 
valiers 10 straight times, including two 
this season. 

While the Terps lose the service of 
seniors Bob Everett and Bob Dilworth 
who scored 16 and 18 points respective- 
ly against Virginia in the tournament, 
for next year, the prospects are still 
bright. Bob Kessler returns, as does 
Bob O'Brien, Drew Schaufler and John 
Sandbower. Up from the freshman 
team will be a great prospject in Nick 



74 



Maryland 



Davis, who averaged 20.3 points and 
put on great dribbling exhibitions. John 
Nacincik and John Urbanik should also 
give Millikan good material for next 
year. 



LACROSSE 



Maryland 16; Dartmouth 6 

[aryland swept over the 
Dartmouth lacrosse 
squad 16-6 with attack- 
man J i m Strott ac- 
counting for five of 
Maryland's goals in the 
opening game of the 
season. 
Dartmouth had only one shot at the 
goal in the first 9M> minutes. Maryland 
built up a 6-0 lead before Dartmouth 
scored. 

Maryland took 50 shots at the goal. 
Dartmouth's Clem Malin made a ter- 
rific stand at goal, racking up 27 saves. 
By comparison, Maryland's two goal- 
ies, Sal Cavallaro and Jim Kappler, 
had to make only nine saves between 
them, seven by Cavallaro. 

Maryland's Charlie Wicker had 
seven assists and two goals; Rennie 
Smith had four assists and a goal and 
Jim Keating scored three goals. 

Lacrosse Schedule 




B%t 


5 Opponent 


Place 


Apr. 


2 — Dartmouth 


Home 


Apr. 


6 — Princeton 


Home 


Apr. 


7 — Harvard 


Home 


Apr. 


9 — Williams 


Home 


Apr. 


14 — Loyola 


Away 


Apr. 


16 — Washington & Lee 


Home 


Apr. 


23 — Duke 


Home 


Apr. 


.30 — Navy 


Away 


May 


7 — Army 


Away 


May 


14 — Virginia 


Home 


May 


21 — Hopkins 


Home 


GOLF 









Georgetown 5; Maryland 2 

aryland was defeated by 
Georgetown's golfers, 
5-2, at Prince Georges. 
Low man of the day 
was Georgetown's John 
Farrell with a one-over 
par 73 while Dwight 
Mock had 74 for Maryland. 

Perky Cullinane (G) defeated Jim DePiro, 
2 and 1 ; Ray Bellamy (M) defeated Gene 
Howard, 4 and 3; Marion Vickers ((J) de 
feated Marty Parks. 1-up in 19 holes ; Charles 
Slicken (G) defeated Dave Weinberg, 5 and 
3; Dwight Mock (M) defeated Dick Quinlan, 
5 and 4 ; John Farrell (G) defeated Bill 
Biggins, 7 and t> ; John Sheahan (G) defeated 
Bob Moran, 1 up in 19 holes. 








Golf Schedule 




Date 


Opponent 


Place 


Apr. 


4- 


-Georgetown 


Home 


"Apr. 


12- 


-South Carolina 


Home 


'Apr. 


15- 


-N.C. State 


Away 


'Apr. 


16- 


-Wake Forest — N. C. U. 








Chapel Hill 


*Apr. 


25- 


-University of North 








Carolina — Virginia 


Away 


Apr. 


27— 


-George Washington 


Home 


'Apr. 


29- 


-Duke 


Home 


'Mai/ 


2_ 


-Virginia Clemsou Chai 


lottesville 


May 


4- 


-Navy 


Away 


May 


6- 


-Hopkins 


Home 



* Atlantic Coast Conference Match 



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To Texas Relays 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, president of 
the University of Maryland returned 
by plane to Austin, Tex., where the 
Texas Relays were dedicated to him. 

The Relays each year are dedicated 
to a prominent person. This year's 
running' was the 29th. 

Dr. Elkins was a three-sport star 
at Texas, track being one of them. He 
also taught at Texas before being 
named president of Texas Western. 



BASEBALL 

Shipley, 33rd Year 

aryland announced a 22- 
game baseball schedule 
as H. Burton Shipley, 
dean of all Maryland 
coaches, began his thir- 
ty-third year as Terp 
baseball coach. 

The Terps play 11 
home games and 11 on the road. The 
schedule, lists 15 Atlantic Coast Con- 
ference games. 

Shipley's team finished second to 
Clemson last season in the conference. 
It had an overall record of 15 vic- 
tories, nine losses and a tie. 

The Terps lost three outstanding 
players in All-Conference stars Chet 
Hanulak, center field; Eddie Miller, 
third base and pitcher Connie Hemp- 
hill. Shipley hopes that veterans 
Russell Duffey and Bob Weiss will take 
care of most of his pitching chores. 
Returning are Bill Walker, second- 
team All-America end on Jim Tatum's 
football team last fall, in right field; 
Ernie Berliner at first, and Jack Mor- 
gan, third base. 

Maryland 9; Virginia 7 
Terp Jack Doane's grand-slam home 
run in the seventh inning and some air- 
tight relief pitching by lefty Bob Weiss 
gave Maryland a 9-7 victory over Vir- 
ginia at Charlottesville. The hit cleared 
the left-center field fence, 335 feet 
away. 

Weiss came on in the seventh to 
pitch for the Terps, and threw hitless 
ball for the last three innings while 
fanning eight. Doane and Bill Walker 
each had two hits for Maryland. 

No. Carolina 10; Maryland 5 

North Carolina got all of their runs 
in three innings to score a 10-5 victory 
over Maryland in an Atlantic Coast 
Conference game. 

The Tar Heels scored three runs 
in the opening inning to wipe out a 
two-run deficit, added three more in 
the second and concluded with four in 
the eighth. 

The Shipleymen jumped into a two- 
run lead on Jack Doane's single, a 
stolen base, error, sacrifice fly and Bill 
Walker's 400-foot homer but the Tar 
Heels came back to grab the lead. 

Stanley Bobb took over for Mary- 
land in the third and pitched two-hit 
ball until the eighth when Carolina 
pushed across four runs. 



Wake Forest 6; Maryland 2 

Wake Forest took a 6-2 victory over 
the Terps. 

Wake Forest's Lefty Davis had a 
four-hit shutout working with two out 
in the eighth when an error and con- 
secutive doubles by Ernie Berliner and 
Bill Walker gave Maryland its two 
runs. 

Maryland 8; W. & M. 7 

Terp first baseman Ernie Berliner's 
bases-loaded triple in the ninth inning 
capped a five-run rally that gave Mary- 
land an 8-7 victory over William and 
Mary. 

With none out, Berliner hit the first, 
and only, pitch of John Harvey who 
relieved Terry Slaughter after he had 
allowed two runs and loaded the bjases 
with none out. 

Baseball Schedule 



Dat 


B 


Opponent 


Place 


*Mar. 


29- 


-Virginia 


Away 


*Apr. 


1- 


—North Carolina 


Away 


•Apr. 


2— 


-Wake Forest 


Away 


Apr. 


5- 


-William & Mary 


Home 


•Apr. 


8- 


—South Carolina 


Away 


*Apr. 


9- 


—South Carolina 


Away 


*Apr. 


11- 


—Clemson 


Away 


*Apr. 


12- 


—Clemson 


Away 


Apr. 


15- 


—Georgetown 


Home 


*Apr. 


16- 


-Virginia 


Home 


*Apr. 


18- 


-N.C. State 


Home 


Apr. 


21— 


-V. P. I. 


Home 


*Apr. 


25- 


-Duke 


Home 


Apr. 


29- 


-W. & L. 


Home 


•-4/;/'. 


30- 


—North Carolina 


Home 


•May 


2- 


-Wake Forest 


Home 


May 


3- 


-Richmond 


Home 


May 


r_ 


—Navy 


Away 


•May 


7- 


-N. C. State 


Away 


•Matt 


9- 


-Duke 


Away 


M.-iv 


11- 


-Hopkins 


Home 


May 


17- 


-Geo. Washington 


Away 




* Atlantic Coast Conference Game. 



TRACK 



Navy 

aryland, striving to keep 
runners at their peak 
for the ACC indoor 
games saw Coach Jim 
Kehoe schedule an in- 
formal dual meet with 
the Naval Academy at 
College Park. The Terps 
breezed by the Middies with five wins 
in nine of the events. 

Running in a special % mile event 
the University's sophomore star, Carl 
Party, turned in the good time of 3:09.6 
to nose out William Smith of Navy. 
In another photo-finish Terp senior, 
Burke Wilson, beat Navy's Len Mos- 
sops to the wire in the 660 yard run 
with a 1:25.6 performance. 

Along with the varsity the Maryland 
frosh won all six of its events against 
the Plebes. Yearling sensation Perry 
Moore took the high and low hurdles 
as well as the high jump contest. 

Atlantic Coast Conference 

Attempting to defend its conference 
team title the University track team 
was nosed out by North Carolina by 
one-half point 36 to 35 V>, in the second 
annual ACC indoor games at Chapel 
Hill, N.C. 

The Carolina victory hinged on the 
final event, the one-mile relay, in which 
they needed a third place to obtain 



76 



Maryland 



one-half point and the final margin of 
success. Maryland's relay team of 
Hemler, Messersmith, Less and Wilson 
swept the event with plenty to spare 
but a last second burst by NC anchor 
man, Don Wright, pulled the eventual 
champs into third place and the title. 

Other than the relay entry the only 
other Liner first places were Burke 
Wilson's win in the 440 yard run over 
defending champ Joe Hemler, Mary- 
land, in the time of 51.8, and Mel 
Schwarz's pole vault victory at 13 
feet. 

The speedsters closed out Kehoe's 
eighth indoor campaign with a typical 
team scoring effort. Capturing three 
gold medals the Terps racked up points 
by two second place finishes and a 
second place tie backed by five third 
place and two fourth place results. 

Jim Beatty, UNC, finished the two- 
mile run in 9:25.5, surpassing the old 
mark of 9:34.5 set by Field of Mary- 
land in 1940. 

Other conference points were divided 
among Duke, 24, South Carolina, 14, 
NC State, 9, Virginia 7' > and Clemson 
6. 

Maryland's frosh squad won the 
freshman division with 19 points. The 
closest contenders were North Caro- 
lina, 13, and Duke 11. 

Track Schedule 

Mar. 26 — Florida Relays Gainesville, Fla. 

Apr. 2 — Virginia Charlottesville, Va. 

Apr. 9 — Quantioo Quantico, Va. 

Apr. 16 — North Carolina Home 

Apr. 23 — Navy Annapolis, M<1. 

Apr. 29-30 — Penn Relays Philadelphia, Pa. 

May 3 — D.C.A.A.U. Home 

May 7 — Maryland Field Day Home 

May 10 — Georgetown Home 

May 13-14 — Atlantic Coast Con- 
ference Meet Chapel Hill, N.C. 

May 27-28 — I.C.A.A.A. New York, N.Y. 

Florida Relays 

Maryland opened the 1955 outdoor 
track season by sending six entries 
to the Florida Relays at the University 
of Florida. 

The mile relay team, defending 
champions of the event, finished second, 
behind Conference member South Caro- 
lina, as did the Terps' sprint medley 
team. It took record performances 
by the Gamecocks to beat the Terps 
in both events. They won the mile 
relay race in 3:19.7, four seconds faster 
than the Terps' 1954 team. 

Dave Leas, Burke Wilson, Joe Hem- 
ler and Bob Messersmith ran for Mary- 
land in the mile. It was Paul Howee, 
Larry Faass, Wilson and Hemler for 
the Terps in the sprint medley which 
South Carolina won, 3:30.5. 

Maryland 86; Virginia 44 

Maryland's track team, scoring 
heavily in the middle and long distance 
events won an easy 86-44 over Virginia 
here today. 

The Terps made a clean sweep of 
the quarter mile, half mile, mile and 
two-mile runs and also swept the broad 
jump in the Atlantic Coast Conference 
meet at Lambeth field. 

Burr Grim, Maryland's smooth-strid- 
ing distance runner was a double win- 



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ner, coming home in front in both the 
mile and two-mile runs. 

Each team gained seven first places, 
but the Terps monopolized the seconds 
and thirds. 

100 Yard Dash: 1 — Russell (V); 2 — Ah 
dull (M) ; 3 — Baynes (M). 10.2 seconds. 

220-Yard Dash: 1 — Russell (V); 2 — Wil- 
son (M) : 3 — Baynes (M). 22.3 seconds. 

440 Yard Dash : 1 — Wilson (M) ; 2 — Leas 
(M) : 3 — Hower (M). 50.3 seconds. 

880-Yard Run : 1 — Faass (M) : 2 — Horsier 
(Ml : 3 — Brund (M). 1 :58.6. 

Mile Run : 1 — Grim (M) : 2 — Faass (M) : 
3 — Good (M). 9 :56.8. 

120 Yard High Hurdles: 1 — Stassen (V) ; 
2 — Brown (V) ; 3 — Fellows (M). 16.8 sec- 
onds. 

220 Yard Low Hurdles : 1 — Buchelew (V) : 
2 — Fellows (M) ; 3— Stubln (M). 27.1 sec- 
onds. 

Shotput : 1 — Lawyer (V); 2 — Grove (M) ; 
3 — Ackerly (V). Distance — 42 feet 3 inches. 

Javelin: 1 — Bonney (V); 2 — Ricks (M) ; 
3 — Baynes (M). 173 feet. 

High Jump: 1 — Tie. Quillen (V) and Hog- 
nn (M) : 3 — Poetzman (M). 5 feet 10 inches. 

Disc-us : 1 — Kaufman (V); 2 — Grove (M); 
3 — Ackerly (V). 118 feet 5 inches. 

Broad Jump: 1 — Messersmith (M) ; 2 — 
Lloyd (M) : 3— Hogan (M). 21 feet 11% 
inches. 

Pole Vault: 1— Tie, Schwartz (M) and Du- 
val (M). No third. 12 feet 6 inches. 

Mile Relay: 1 — Maryland (Hower, Messer- 
smith, Horsley, Leas). 3.28.9. 



Christensen Stars 

Edith Christensen of College Park, 
Maryland graduate and Government 
chemist, shot a three-game score of 
420 to become the outstanding figure 
in the National Duckpin Bowling Con- 
gress championships, which will con- 
tinue through May 1 at Pawtucket, 
R. I. 

It was one of the highest scores 
ever rolled in the women's single of the 
25-year-old tournament ?jid only 11 
pins under the singles record set by 
Lorraine Gulli in 1951. 

Miss Christensen's score was also 
the biggest ever rolled by a southpaw 
in the women's national singles. Her 
games were 138, 138 and 154. 



RIFLE 

Terps Lose Title To California 

aryland, defending cham- 
pions, finished 17th with 
1,402, as the University 
of California won the 
National Intercollegiate 
rifle championship over 
85 schools firing at 16 
different places through- 
out the nation. 

California fired a 1,442 score, tying 
the record set by Maryland in 1953. 
California's No. 2 team was second with 
1,433, followed bv Oklahoma A&M, 
1,424. 

Navy outscored the teams that fired 
at Annapolis and College Park with 
1,422 to 1,416 for Navy's No. 2 team. 
VPI was third with 1,403 and Maryland 
fourth at 1,402. 

Individual winner at Maryland was 
Larry Lomolino of the Terps with 288, 
followed by H. H. Chandler. 

Terps Down Hoyas 

Maryland's rifle team rolled up a 
total of 1427 to beat Georgetown and 
Virginia Military in a triangluar meet. 

Georgetown finished second with 




1395 points and VMI had 1389. Mary- 
land was led by Len Savage's score of 
291 out of a possible 300. 

Cook Wins 

Art Cook, Maryland rifle coach, won 
the Middle Atlantic small-bore rifle 
championship at the National Shooters' 
Club at Laurel. 

Cook had the same 791x800 score 
as Arthur Jackson, second in the re- 
cent Pan American Games champion- 
ship, but took first place because of a 
better standing total. 



WRESTLING 

Maryland 25; Duke 3 

aryland, maintaining its 
fast pace in Atlantic 
Coast Conference dual 
matches, swept to a 25- 
3 decision over Duke 
University. 

The win enabled the 
Terp wrestlers to keep 
their conference slate clean, with 
three victories in as many tries. 

123 pounds: John McHugh (Md.) won by 
forfeit. 

130 pounds: Tom Woolen (D) declsloned 
Beryle Cohen (M). 

137 pounds : Ronney Carroll (M) won 
by forfeit. 

147 pounds : Dan Little (M) decisioned 
Don King (D). 

157 pounds : Dean Gladfelter (M) de- 
cisioned Jerry Chadwick (D). 

167 pounds: Al Hair (M) declsloned 
Fred Sheipard (D). 

177 pounds : Mayer Llttman (M) de- 
cisioned George Warlick (D). 

Heavyweight : Mike Sandusky (M) de- 
cisloned Hal McElhaney (D). 



OS 



Maryland 22; North Carolina 6 

Maryland's wrestling team captured 
six of eight matches to down North 
Carolina, 22-6. 

The victory was the fourth of the 
season for the Terps against A.C.C. 
competition and allowed them to keep 
undisputed possession of first place. 

Two pins were recorded — both by 
Maryland. Heavyweight Mike San- 
dusky's pin came in only 57 seconds 
over Carolina's Roger Dalehite. Al 
Hair scored the other pin. 

North Carolina's only points came in 
the 130 and 177 pound classes. 

123 pounds: McHugh, (M), decisioned 
(J ray, 6-0. 

130 pounds: Cowan (NC), decisioned 
Cohen. 5-3. 

137 pounds: Carroll (M), decisioned 
Wagner, 5-0. 

147 pounds: Little (M), declsloned 
McGehee, 7 I. 

157 pounds: Gladfelter (M), declsloned 
IT. Gregory, 8-6. 

167 pounds: Hair (M). pinned Barwlck, 
7 :T9. 

177 pounds: M. Gregory (NC), decisioned 
Littman, 5-3. 

Hvyweight: Sandusky (M), pinned Dale- 
hite. 57 seconds. 

Maryland 25; N.C. State 3 

Winning its fifth straight Atlantic 
Coast Conference match and with it 
the regular season championship, the 
Terp matmen defeated North Carolina 
State, 25-3. 

The Terps took all but one of the 
eight events, with State able to win 
only in the 177-pound class. Roney 
Carroll and Dean Gladfelter pinned 
their opponents in the 137 and 157 
pound classes respectively. 



78 



Maryland- 



The victory gave Maryland a 5-0 
conference mark and a 7-2 overall slate. 

123 lbs. — McHugh (M) decisioned Lutz 
(NCS), 6-0. 

130 lbs. — Cohen (M) decisioned Clawson, 
30. 

137 lbs. — Carroll (M) pinned Hershey, 
48 seconds. 

147 lbs.— Little (M) decisioned Tomlin 
(NCS), 8-3. 

157 lbs. — Gladfelter (M) pinned Cross- 
land (NCS), 4:37. 

167 lbs.— Hair (M) decisioned (NCS), 4-2. 

177 lbs. — Henry (NCS) decisioned Lift- 
man (M), 3-0. 

Heavyweight - Sandusky (M) decisioned 
Riden, 9-0. 

Atlantic Coast Conference Tournament 

Maryland's defending Terps cap- 
tured three individual titles in the 
Atlantic Coast Conference's first wrest- 
ling tournament. No official team title 
was declared on the basis of the tourna- 
ment, but the Terps were recognized 
as the champions, due to their unde- 
feated dual meet record. 

Danny Little, the Terps 147 pound 
star, was voted the tournament's out- 
standing wrestler, as he advanced to 
win the 147 pound title. Other Terps 
to win championships were Mike San- 
dusky in the heavyweight class, and 
Roney Carroll at 137 pounds. 

The tournament spectators saw the 
final appearances of two University 
wrestlers, while two others completed 
their eligibility. Biggest losses were 
1954-55 captain Danny Little and 177 
pound grappler Mayer Littman. In 
addition, Don Gray and Thommy Kern, 
both of the 147 pound class ended col- 
lege careers. 

Maryland, as a team, was unbeaten 
in the AC and won the conference dual 
meet championship for the second 
straight year. Carroll, Little, Glad- 
felter and Sandusky remained unbeaten 
throughout all ACC dual matches. 

RESULTS : 
Elimination Round — 

130 lbs. — Cohen (M) decisioned Claw- 
son (NCS). 

157 lbs. — Chadwick (Duke) decisioned 
Gladfelter (M). 

123 lbs. — McHugh (M) decisioned Lutz 
(NCS). 

130 lbs. — Cowan (NCU) decisioned Cohen 
(M). 

137 lbs. — Carroll (M) decisioned Jarrell 
(Duke). 

147 lbs. — Little (M) decisioned Marston 
(V). 

167 lbs. — Stanley (WF) decisioned Hair 
(M). 

177 lbs. — M. Gregory (UNC) decisioned 
Littman Littman (M). 

Hvyweight — Sandusky (M) pinned Dale- 
hite (UNC) 15 seconds. 
Final Consolation — - 

130 lbs — Cohen (M) won by forfeit over 
Young (V). 

157 lbs. — Gladfelter (M) decisioned Mc- 
Williams (V). 4-2. 

167 lbs. — Hair (M) decisioned Bagetti 
(NCU), 3-0. 

177 lbs. — Pettrilli (V) decisioned Litt- 
man (M), 4-0. 
Championship Finals — 

123 lbs. — Steele (V) decisioned McHugh 
(M), 3-1. 

137 lbs. — Carroll (M) decisioned BTOwn 
(V). 6-1. 

147 lbs. — Little (M) decisioned Tomlin 
(NCS), 6-4. 

Hvyweight — Sandusky (M) won referee's 
decision over Jordan (V). 

Four D.C. Titles 

Maryland dominated the annual D.C. 

. A.A.U. wrestling tournament at the 

Naval Receiving Station as Charles 

Kerber, Alax Spellman, Jerry Ogurkis 

and Charles Bowler won titles in the 

; 123, 130, 147 and 167 pound classes to 

| give Maryland four of the eight crowns. 




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WHAT GOES ON AT OUR ALMA MATER? 
WHAT OF OUR CLASSMATES? WHAT'S THE ALUMNI 
NEWS? THE SPORTS NEWS? 

Clip this ad and coupon and send it in. You can use the coupon for 
renewals too. Make your overall alumni contribution with $3.00 of it going 
for "Maryland" magazine. 

Please pass this message along to non-subscribers 




CUT IT OUT NOW!" W. 




SECRETARY, ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

Enclosed herewith is $ , my contribution to the 

Alumni Fund. $3.00 of this amount is for a subscription to "MARYLAND" 
for one year. 



TENNIS 




Maryland 5; Georgetown 4 

aryland defeated George- 
town, 5-4. Dave Freish- 
tat, playing his first 
varsity match for Doyle 
Royal's netsters deci- 
sively defeated George- 
town's No. 1 player 
VonUrff, 2-6, 6-2, 6-1. 

SINGLES — Dave Freishtal (Maryland) de- 
feated Herb Von Urff (Georgetown), 2 — 1>. 
(i— 2. i> — 1. Troy Valenti (Georgetown) de- 
feated Jack Clifford (Maryland), <i — 1, »i — 0. 

Al McNabb (G "getown), defeated Bud 

[ieightheiser (Maryland), 4 — <>. 7 — 5, <> — 3. 
Paul Eikel (Maryland), defeated John Toolan 
(Georgetown), 6 — 0, 1 — f>. <> — 1. Dick Wills 
(Maryland), defeated VonTeuber (G 'ge- 
town), 6—6, 1 — <>. I ><«ii Reamer (Maryland), 
defeated Hick McGinpsy (Georgetown), <> — 4, 
r,—7, 6—1. 

DOUBLES — VonUrff and Valenti (George 
town) defeated Freishtal and Clifford (Mary- 
land), B — 8, 6 — 1, 6 — 4. Eikel and Leigh t- 
heiser (Maryland) defeated Bob .Ionian and 
McNabb (Georgetown), <> — 3, (J — 0. Jim 
Glynn and Toolan (Georgetown) defeated 
Wills and Reamer (Maryland), o — 4, 1 — 0, 
(i — 2. 

Tennis Schedule 



Apr. 


2- Georgetown 


Away 


'Apr. 


12 — South Carolina 


Home 


•Apr. 


15 — North Carolina 


Away 


*Al»: 


16 — Wake Forest 


Away 


Apr. 


19— Penn Stale 


Home 


•Apr. 


22 — N. < . state 


I Tome 


*Apr. 


23 — Duke 


i [ome 


Apr. 


2<; — Washington iV Lee 


Home 


Apr. 


27— V.M.I. 


Home 


*Ai>r. 


30 — Virginia 


Away 


•\fnn 


2 — Clemson 


Home 


May 


7 — Navy 


Awav 


May 


1(1 — Hopkins 


Away 


May 


12-13-14 — ACC Tourna- 






ment 


Chapel Hill 



•Atlantic Coast Conference Match 



Sez Testudinette: 

It is the simple 
things in life that 
attract girls — that's 
why they like men 
. . . The wag of a 
clog's tail is far 
friendlier than the 
smile of some people 
. . . Women are di- 
vided into two main 
classes — those who 
don't believe every- 
thing their husbands 
tell them, and tliosc 
who haven't any 
husbands . . . A fac- 
ulty is more than just so many mem- 
bers . . . The mind is like the stomach. 
It is not how much you put into it that 
counts, but how much it digests . . . A 
real friend is a fellow who knows all 
your faults and doesn't give a damn 
. . . The best angle from which to ap- 
proach a, problem is the try c.ngle . . . 
The best way to make a suitor stop 
spending too much money on you is to 
marry him . . . Those who continue to 
shrink from responsibility — continue to 
shrink . . . Opportunity merely knocks 
but temptation kicks the door in ... A 
wedding ring is like a tourniquet — it 
stops circulation. 




80 



Maryland 



SOMETHING NEW HAS SEEN ADDED 
STflnDflRD ART DESIGPS th* £iq and tfot Ssaidtftd 




THE FOUCAULT PENDULUM IN THE NEW MATHEMATICS BUILDING 

In the new Mathematics Building on the Campus of the University of Maryland, a group of 
students lean over this circular railing their gaze fixed on the 

FOUCAULT PENDULUM which occupies the center of the lobby . . . anticipation, yes, wonder- 
ment in their eyes as it slowly turns, with a sensation of the whole building actually revolving! 

The Mathematics Building is Making Scientific History — a building with a sense of science — set- 
ting new standards in this important study and scientific research. The "down-to-earth" story of 
our Foucault Pendulum- is for the students but its design and beauty are something to be seen 
and treasured for generations. 

A SCIENTIFIC ACHIEVEMENT 

The engineering of the Foucault Pendulum required perfect precision and the pen- 
dulum is within one-millionth of an inch of perfection. 

Just another phenomenal creation of the staff of Standard Ai"t's craftsmen whose 
"know hoiv" ivill do the job better. 

When the Accent Is On QUALITY, Remember 

Standard Art, Marble and Tile Co< 



INCORPORATED 



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OF PERPETUAL'S FRIENDS IN FRANCE 



One might think the gaiety of la vie Parisienne would diminish the common-sense of those 

Perpetual customers who are now Americans in Paris. Au contraire . . . quite the opposite! These folks saved 

with us on a systematic basis while in the U. S. A.. And they're doing the same in France, mailing 

back regular sums to Perpetual, to build bigger balances and brighter futures for themselves. 

We like to think that their consideration of the years ahead makes the present even more pleasant for 

our friends in the beautiful City of Light. Naturally, we are proud to observe that our 

patrons in France, like all of Perpetual's nearly one hundred thousand savers, know that, no 

matter how far their money has to travel, it's safe and secure in 

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JULY-AUGUST 1955 
VOL. XXVI No. 4 
50c THE COPY 
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Vol. XXVI 



July-August, 1955 



No. 4 




PutticatioH o£ me AfawUS^^^ 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of 
Maryland, and entered at the Post Office, 
College Park, Md., as second class mail mat- 
ter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 
1879. $3.00 per year — Fifty cents the copy. 



OFFICE OF PUBLICATION 

28 Symons Hall, 

University of Maryland, 

College Park. Md. 

WA. 7-300, Ext. 249 or 394 



HARVEY L. MILLER, 
Managing Editor 



PATRICIA M. REIHM, 
Assistant Editor 



JOSEPH F. BLAIR 

Sports Editor 



SALLY L. OGDEN. Advertising Director 

EDITH A. ROSS, Advertising Sales 

HAZEL H. GOFF, Advertising Copy Chief 

— Advertising Office — ■ 

18 W. 25th Street 

Baltimore 18, Md. 

(HO. 7-9018) 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Officers 

Col. O. H. Saunders '10, President 
J. Homer Remsberg '18, Vice-President 
J. Gilbert Pendergast '33, Vice-President 
David L. Brigham '38, Esec.-Secy. 

General Alumni Council 

AGRICULTURE — Clayton Reynolds '22, 
Abram Z. Gottwals '38, J. Homer Rems- 
berg '18. 

ARTS' & SCIENCES — William II. Press '28, 
Charles Ellinger '37, Ralph G. Shure '32. 

BUSINESS & PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION — 
Alvin S'. Klein '37, John Dyson '53, Roger 
L. Odette '52. 

DENTAL — Dr. Lawrence W. Bimestefer '34, 
Albert C. Cook '38, William E. Trail '26. 

EDUCATION — John P. Speicher '41, William 
Prigg '53, E. Louise Sudlow '50. 

ENGINEERING — S. Chester Ward '32, C. A. 
Warthen '08, Col. O. H. Saunders '10. 

HOME ECONOMICS— Katherine A. Longridge 
'29, Mrs. Paul Coppinger '30, Mrs. William 
Kricker '31. 

LAW — J. Gilbert Pendergast '33, J. Dudley 
Digges '36, G. Kenneth Reiblich '29. 

MEDICAL— Albert E. Goldstein '12, Thurs- 
ton R. Adams '34, William H. Triplett '11. 

PHARMACY — Frank Block '24, John Neutze 
'37, Samuel I. Raichlen '25. 

NURSING — Flora Street '3, Virginia Stack 
*33, Martha Curtiss '48. 

Alumni Clubs 

BALTIMORE — Wm. H. Triplett, '11. 
CARROLL COUNTY — Dr. L. L. Leggett. '30. 
CUMBERLAND — Dr. J. Russell Cook '23. 
EASTERN SHORE— Otis Twilly, '21. 
"M" CLUB — Sam S-ilber, '34. 
NEW ENGLAND — R. A. Cook, '05. 
NEW YORK — Miss Sarah E. Morris, '24. 
PITTSBURGH— Charles Furtnev, '37. 
PRINCE GEORGE'S CO. — Ellwood R. Nieh- 

olas '28 
RICHMOND— Paul Mullinix, '36. 
SCHENECTADY— Mrs. Marie Esher. '45. 
TERRAPIN— James W. Stevens, '17. 

Ex-Officio 

Past President — Dr. A. E. Goldstein, '12. 
Past President — Dr. A. I. Bell, '19. 
Past President — C. V. Koons, '29. 
Past President — T. T. Speer, '17. 
University President — Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 
Executive Secretary — David L. Brigham, '38. 





WHILE 



I N 



WASH I N GTO N 

visit the beautiful 

new home of America's 

outstanding 

savings and loan 




PERPETUAL 

BUILDING ASSOCIATION 



Edward C. Baltz, President 
1ITH&E STREETS, N. W. 

OTHER OFFICES IN SILVER SPRING 
AND BETHESDA. MARYLAND 

RESOURCES: OVER $ 1 85,000,000 



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Maryland 



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\ i ' :■ 



Al Dancgger Photo 



1955 COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES 
The initial event in the impressive new Activities Building. 



1,992 Receive Maryland Degrees 

1,596 Graduate From College Park Colleges; 396 From Baltimore Schools. 49 At 
Heidelberg. 
Yale University's Dr. Vernon W. Lippard, Commencement Speaker. 




Commencement exer- 
cises on June 4, 
initiating the Univer- 
sity's new Activities 
Building, brought the 
number of Maryland 
graduates for the year 
to 1992, including 339 
higher degrees, 396 professional de- 
grees, 259 bachelors of arts and 998 
bachelors of science. 

1596 received degrees from ..College 
Park schools in colleges as follows: 

Graduate School 
Doctor of Philosophy 69 

Doctor of Education 10 

Master of Arts 61 

Master of Science 73 



Master of Education 


114 


Master of Business Administration 


7 


Master of Foreign Study 


5 


TOTAL 


339 


Undergraduate Degrees 




Agriculture B.S, 


69 


Arts and Sciences B.A. 


227 


B.S. 


82 


Business & Public Admin, B.S. 


208 


Education B.A. 


26 


B.S, 


127 



B.S. 


97 


B.S. 


69 


B,S. 


295 


B.S. 


50 


B.A. 


6 



Engineering — Professional Degree 

of Civil Engineer 
Engineering 
Home Economics 
♦Military Science 
Physical Education 
** Special & Continuation Studies B.A. 

396 degrees were awarded by Balti- 
more Schools as follows: 

Baltimore Degrees 

School of Dentistry 

Doctor of Dental Surgery 

School of Law 

Certificates of Proficiency 

School of Law Bachelor of Laws 

School of Medicine....Doctor of Medicine 

School of Nursing B.S. 

S'chool of Nursing.. Graduate in Nursing 
School of Pharmacy B.S. 



104 

1 
80 
100 
13 
41 
57 

The 1955 class of 1992 graduates 
is 53 less an the class of 1954, which 
totaled 2045. 



* Includes 45 who received degreeg 
at Heidelberg. 

"""Includes 4 who received degrees 
at Heidelberg. 



Judge Cole Absent 

President Wilson H. Elkins presided, 
introducing all speakers and confer- 
ring all degrees. He spoke briefly in 
tribute to Maryland's Overseas Serv- 
ice program. 

President Elkins noted the absence 
due to illness of Judge William P. 
Cole, Jr., chairman of the Board of 
Regents. This was the first commence- 
ment that Judge Cole had missed in 
25 years. 

The Deans of the various colleges 
presented the diplomas for their re- 
spective schools. 

Extracts From Commencement 
Address 

An increased emphasis on a humani- 
tarian program to raise social and eco- 
nomic standards throughout the world 
was called for by Dr. Vernon W. Lip- 
pard, dean of the Yale University 
School of Medicine, the commencement 
speaker. 



Maryland 



Commencement Speaker 




Albitrtus Yale Foto 

DR. VERNON W. LIPPARD 

Dean School of Medicine. 

Yale University 



"To be invited to deliver the com- 
mencement address at a university 
which can boast of the antiquity and 
I prestige of Maryland is a stimulus to 
one's ego that few would be modest 
I enough to deny," said Dr. Lippard. 

"The University of Maryland has 
! many reasons for being concerned with 
medical education, not the least of 
! which is the fact that it was one of 
the first in this country to offer in- 
struction in this field," said Dr. Lip- 
pard, and the major portion of his ad- 
,j dress was on the subject of medicine. 
\, "No one could fail to be impressed," 
I the speaker went on to say, "by the 
i magnificent physical plant which has 
been developed here at College Park 
or fail to view with envy the new Glenn 
| L. Martin Institute of Technology and 
! the achievements of your extension 
't ' services in agriculture and other fields 
> i close to the hearts of the people of 
[! the state." 

Noble Traditions 

"What should the State of Maryland 
expect of a university with such a 
I noble tradition and impressive facili- 
ties?" Dr. Lippard continued. "Edu- 
cational opportunities? — obviously, but 
\ with limitations. It is the responsibil- 
1 ity of our universities to offer such 
opportunities without regard to creed, 
racial origin, social or economic stat- 
1 us but with definite limitations as to 
capacity to take advantage of them. 
Although it has become socially ad- 
vantageous to be identified as a uni- 
! | versity alumnus, we can ill afford to 
dissipate our resources on those who 
lack either the native talent or the 



motivation to exploit to the fullest ex- 
ent the educational opportunities the 
community has provided." 

"Research?" Dr. Lippard asked, "of 
course, but not necessarily because it 
is of provincial or of practical value. 
The advancement of knowledge in all 
fields, theoretical and practical, is just 
as much the function of a university 
as instruction. Without it, the quality 
of instruction falls to a level of med- 
iocrity and a so-called institution of 
higher learning becomes little more 
than a trade school. 

"Service?" the speaker said, "yes, 
but with discretion. The temptation to 
expend the resources of a university 
on service to the farmer, the business 
man, local industry, etc., is particularly 
strong when the institution is sup- 
ported by taxation. The results are 
immediate and tangible and they ap- 
peal to the legislator who doles out 
the appropriations." 

"Let us consider," the speaker went 
on to say, "how these broad responsi- 
bilities and their limitations apply to 
a school of medicine. 

Rapid Growth 

"The roots of medicine extend into 
the social and behavioral sciences and 
the humanities. During the rapid 
growth of scientific medicine, there 
was a tendency to consider anything 
that could not be measured in a test 
tube or recorded by an electronic de- 
vice as unscientific and beneath the 
dignity of a scientific physician. It is 
now realized that a patient is not just 
a series of chemical reactions, but a 
human being in society whose well- 
being is influenced by social and psy- 
chological factors as powerful in their 
action as drugs or bacteria," Dr. Lip- 
pard said. 

"There have been many advances," 
the speaker continued, "in the quality 
of medical education and a tremendous 
increase in the breadth of responsibil- 
ity of American medical colleges over 
these past fifty years. The day when 
the medical school could fulfill its ob- 
ligation to the community as an iso- 



Honorary Degrees 



lated vocational institution is long 
passed. Nor is the mere production 
of a certain number of physicians rea- 
sonably conversant with the prevailing 
methods of diagnosis and therapy a 
satisfactory fulfillment of its responsi- 
bilities." 

"The maintenance of a balance be- 
tween three functions, teaching, re- 
search, and medical care, represents 
one of the most seriou.s problems faced 
by the modern medical school. In- 
struction, not only for the M.D. degree 
candidate but also for other health 
personnel and for men in advanced 
training for specialization and research 
in the medical sciences, does not al- 
ways receive the attention it deserves," 
Dr. Lippard continued. 

"Organization of the faculty," the 
speaker went on to say, "may require 
more support than has been afforded 
in the past. To view the situation 
practically, competent physicians and 
scientists cannot be attracted and held 
without adequate salaries and labora- 
tories in which to work. No school 
is any better than its faculty. 

Population Increase 

"The current increase in population 
of this country," Dr. Lippard pointed 
out, "has few parallels in the history 
of the world. Approximately two mil- 
lion in 1953. Over the same period, 
advances in medical science, primarily 
in control of infectious diseases by 
chemotherapeutic and antibiotic agents, 
has led to an increase in life expect- 
ancy. 

"These advances force upon us more 
concern for the happiness and produc- 
tivity of people as well as saving lives. 
We can no longer be concerned only 
with the prolongation of life but must 
also be concerned with the restoration 
to maximal usefulness by medical and 
social rehabilitation of those whose 
lives have been preserved," he said. 

"Despite the enormous expenditure 
of money and effort in medical re- 
search over the past few years, the 
greatest progress has not been made 




HONORS CONFERRED AT 1955 COMMENCEMENT 



The Honorable 
William Steenken 

Doctor of Science 



The Honorable 
Harry Anslinger 

Doctor of Laws 



The Honorable 
Bruce Cattoji 

Doctor of Letters 



His Excellency 
Abba Eban 

Doctor of Laws 



An Honorary Degree as Doctor of Science degree was also, awarded to 
Dr. Vernon W. Lippard, pictured at left above. 



Maryland 



A Future Graduate 




JUNIOR TERRAPIN 
Malcolm A Simms, President of the Maryland Chapter of Tau Kappa Epsilon, 
who graduated with the 1955 class from the College of Business and Public 
Administration, and Mrs. Simms, the former Ruth Katherine Bauer, Kappa Alpha 
Theta and Maryland alumna, proudly present their five month old son, Michael 
Joseph, with the hopes that the cap and gown tailored for the occasion by Mrs. 
Simms foreshadows the young man's future. 



in some of the areas where the need 
is most acute," the speaker continued. 
"In considering the extent of our re- 
sponsiblities over the next few years, 
we can ill afford to disregard the op- 
portunity to extend our assistance in 
raising the social and economic status 
of people through the world. But the 
ideology of democracy, which is of 
greater importance, cannot be bought 
with bread alone. If this challenge is 
to be met, health and education must 
play a dominant role and in the de- 
velopmental stage of this program, the 
universities of this country must make 
the major contribution by training the 
teachers who will develop the centers 
for diffusion of knowledge in their own 
countries," Dr. Lippard went on to say. 

Defense Needed 

"I am not such a visionary as to be- 
lieve that the defense of this or other 
countries can be neglected under exist- 
ing circumstances. I only ask that 
some reasonable portion of our efforts 
and resources be directed toward such 
humanitarian pursuits as may bring 
peace and well-being to the peoples of 
the world over the next generation," 
Dr. Lippard emphasized, adding "bat- 
tleships are essential but the wide- 
spread development of education and 
research in science and the liberal 
arts is equally essential if life as we 
know it is to survive." 

"It is customary and appropriate for 
a commencement speaker to call to the 
attention of the graduating class that 
most significant principle of democracy 
— that greater privileges accorded to 
those whose native talents have mad? 



it possible for them to rise above 
the average level impose upon them 
greater obligations to society. If the 
only reward for your efforts is to be 
a 200 rather than a 100 horsepower 
automobile or a big house on a hill 
rather than a small house in a valley, 
you are destined to be frustrated. If 
you have the satisfaction of approach- 
ing the true values, you will be amply 
rewarded. The values to which I refer 
are not easily defined and have been 
the subject of discourses by more 
learned men. I would include among 
them such simple but significant vir- 
tues as honesty in one's thinking, will- 
ingness to live up to moral as well as 
legal obligations, concern for the well- 
being and sensitivities of one's neigh- 
bors and the power of appreciation. 
These are values that money cannot 
buy," Dr. Lippard said. 

Engineers And Businessmen 

"I speak most directly to the engi- 
neers and businessmen who, in this 
technical age, hold the destiny of our 
country and the world in their hands. 
You must have the broader horizons 
because you will have the power. The 
easy way is to be concerned only with 
production and profits — but of what 
value are these profits in a disintegrat- 
ing world? You are the ones upon 
whom we must rely for the support of 
those ideas and ideals on which the 
peace and stability of the world de- 
pends — including such positive forces 
as the United Nations. I refer also to 
the preservation of freedom of speech 
and thought within our own country 
which has been so seriously threatened 



within the last year," the speaker went 

on to say. 

"If you leave here apathetic and in- 
different to these ideals and concenred 
only for your individual and provincial 
interests," Dr. Lippard concluded, "you 
have failed to grasp the significance 
of this great university. If you leave 
prepared to face with fortitude your 
responsibilities as citizens of the world 
as well as skilled technicians in your 
respective fields, the investment the 
people of Maryland have made in your 
education will have paid large divi- 
dends." 

Commencement Speaker 

Dr. Vernon W. Lippard, Dean of 
Yale University School of Medicine, 
Maryland's 1955 commencement speak- 
er, received both his undergraduate 
and medical training at Yale, his 
bachelor of Science Degree from Yale's 
Sheffield Scientific School, 1926. At 
Yale's School of Medicine, he received 
the Parker Prize, given annually to the 
outstanding student "who has shown 
the best qualifications for a successful 
practitioner." 

After internship in New Haven, Dr. 
Lippard became Assistant Resident and 
later Resident at the New York Nurs- 
ery and Child's Hospital. He was 
Resident Pediatrician at the New York 
Hospital, and for five years an instruc- 
tor and associate in pediatrics at Cor- 
nell. In 1939 he became Assistant Dean 
of the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons at Columbia University. 

Dr. Lippard served in the U. S. 
Army Medical Corps as Executive Offi- 
cer and later as Director of the Lab- 
oratory of the 9th General Hospital as 
well as Chief of Medical Personnel in 
the Western Pacific with headquarters 
in Manila. 

In 1938-39 he was Director of Study 
of the Commission for Study of Crip- 
pled Children in New York City. In 
1948, while Dean at Louisiana State, 
he conducted a study for the State of 
Florida in preparation to the establish- 
ment of a state medical school. Three 
years later New Jersey asked him to 
conduct a similar study. 

In 1949 he spent three months in 
Italy as a member of a 12-man com- 
mission to study health services and 
make recommendations for improve- 
ment to the Italian Government. Each 
member of the commission was as- 
signed a noted Italian medical leader 
as guide and colleague. Dr. Lippard's 
companion was Dr. Vittorio Puntoni, 
Dean of the faculty of medicine of the 
University of Rome. 

Governor McKeldin 

"You have won for yourselves a re- 
spected and privileged position in the 
world," said Maryland's Governor The- 
odore R. McKeldin in addressing the 
graduates, "but never forget that you 
have also acquired responsibilities 
more important than your privileges. 

"Events, have forced us into leader- 
ship of half the world. All the brains 
and character we can muster will be 
none too much for this prodigious feat. 






Maryland 






His Excellency 




ADDRESSES GRADUATES 
Governor Theodore Roosevelt McKeldin 



"Where this generation's fathers 
guarded a nation, they must guard 
a civilization!" The Governor con- 
tinued, adding, "while I have sympathy 
for young American's, I am not sorry 
for them because the reward they may 
win is commensurate with the great- 
ness of the task. The rising generation 
in this country has a fair chance to 
achieve what has been the dream of 
every statesman since Alexander the 
Great, — the dream of a world, organ- 
ized to establish equal justice under 
law from pole to pole. 

True Brotherhood 

"If we are brothers in the last 
extremity, who will have the hardi- 
hood to assert that the relation begins 
only in the shadow of death? I dare 
not say that the coming generation 
will achieve worldwide brotherhood, 
but I do say that the chance exists 
and to have even a chance of so great 
an accomplishment is a fair destiny 
indeed. To be compelled to be great 
is not a misfortune; and the next gen- 
eration of Americans will either be 
great or perish," His Excellency went 
on to say. 

"I welcome you graduates into the 
world of affairs", the Governor con- 
cluded, "even though at this moment 
it is a dark and chaotic world. Since 
the beginning of this century we have 
come through what I know is the blood- 
iest and suspect is the blackest period 
that western civilization has endured 
since the Hundred Years' War. I will 
not insult your intelligence by hinting 
that all is well, for it isn't. The wisest 
man among us can hardly see more 
than one step ahead. But a suggestion 
of dawn is in the air, and before you 
have had time to settle fairly into 
your duties as citizens you will find 
that 

'Night's candles are burnt out, 

and jocund day 
'Stands tiptoe on the misty 
mountain-tops' " 



From Dr. Elkins 

In a message to the '55 graduating 
class University President Wilson H. 
Elkins said, "The University of Mary- 
land is placing a stamp of approval on 
you. We have reason to believe that 
our confidence has not been misplaced, 
and we shall follow your career with 
more than a little interest. We trust 
that you will bear the mark of an edu- 
cated person, and that you will accept 
the responsibilities as well as the privi- 
leges of citizenship in a free society. 

"We hope that you will have a warm 
place in your heart for the University 
of Maryland and that you will pro- 
mote the interests of your alma mater 
by becoming an active alumni. 

"I wish for you all the success and 
happiness you deserve — and may you 
deserve everything that is good. 

"Finally, let me thank you for the 
contributions you have made to the 
University, and to express the hope 
that they have been a source of satis- 
faction to you. 

"My best wishes follow wherever 
you go." 

Honorary Degrees 

Five honorary doctorates were con- 
ferred. 

Dr. Vernon W. Lippard, Dean of 
the Yale University School of Medi- 
cine and featured speaker of the pro- 
gram, received a Doctor of Science De- 
gree. 

Dr. Lippard was presented by Dean 
H. Boyd Wylie, School of Medicine. 

A Doctor of Science Degree went to 
Mr. William Steenken, Jr., Director 
of Trudeau Laboratory, Trudeau, N. Y. 
He was presented by Dr. Milton S. 
Sacks, School of Medicine. 

Doctors of Laws Degrees were con- 
ferred upon His Excellency, the Am- 
bassador of Israel to the United States, 
Abba Eban; and Mr. Harry Anslinger, 
U. S. Commissioner of Narcotics. 

Dr. Anslinger was presented by Dr. 
C. Jelless Carr, Professor of Pharma- 
cology, while Ambassador Eban was 
presented by Faculty Dean Harold F. 
Cotterman. 

Bruce Catton, Editor of American 
Heritage, author of "War Lords of 
Washington," "L i n c o 1 n's Army," 
"Glory Road," "A Stillness At Appo- 
matox," and "U. S. Grant and the 
American Military Tradition," received 
Doctor of Letters Degrees. 

Dr. Catton was presented by Dean 
Leon P. Smith of the College of Arts 
and Sciences. 

Certificates Of Merit 

Honorary Certificate of M e ri t 
Awards in Agriculture were presented 
to one Maryland homemaker and three 
Maryland farmers, the five candidates 
being presented by Dr. James M. Gwin, 
Director of Extension Service. 

Farmers who received the awards 
were Otis Grafton Esham of Parsons- 
burg, Wicomico County; Solomon L. 
Hoke, Sr., of Westminster, Carroll 
County; and Robert Newell Stagg, 
RFD No. 2, Snow Hill, Worcester 
County. 



Mrs. Elva Dorsey lglehart Hill, 
Woodbine, Howard County, is the hon- 
ored homemaker. 

Mr. Esham received his award in 
recognition of his activities as a poul- 
try industry leader and for his active 
participation in civic affairs. He op- 
erates a feed mill and hatchery, and is 
a Director of the Pittsville bank. 

Mr. Hoke received his for accomp- 
lishments as a leader in agricultural 
and civic affairs. Especially successful 
in encouraging farmers to practice 
soil conservation, he is a supervisor in 
the Soil Conservation District in Car- 
roll County, active in Farm Bureau 
work. 

Recognition went to Mr. Stagg for 
achievements as a farmer and farm 
leader in his county, and for his ac- 
tive part in developing improved milk 
marketing methods for dairy farmers. 
He has also been a leader in com- 
munity and civic affairs. 

The merit award was presented to 
Mrs. Hill for her leadership in home- 
making and community affairs. She 
has been active in homemakers' work 
for 28 years, and has served as Coun- 
ty Council president and 4-H Club ad- 
visor, active in church as well as PTA 
and Farm Bureau work. 

Dr. Griffith Honored 

Dr. R. Sumter Griffith, 94, returned 
to Commencement as the first and only 
alumnus to return to College Park for 
his diamond reunion. 

Dr. Griffith, whose father was one 
of the founders of the Maryland Agri- 
cultural College, which later became 
the College of Agriculture, is a resi- 
dent of Waynesboro, Virginia. 

The veteran alumnus received a cer- 
tificate of commemoration and cuff 
links with diamond chips at the ban- 
quet concluding the Alumni Reunion. 



Class of '80 




94 YEARS YOUNG 

Dr. R. Sumter Griffith, receives pro- 
gram from Joan Gladman, School of 
Nursing graduate. 



Maryland 




Mrs. Ditman 



Young At Heart 

Mrs. Helen Conner Ditman, mother, 
grandmother, and housewife, added a 
new title — bachelor of laws, to her de- 
grees, B. S. in Entomology, '27, Mas- 
ter in '27, both Maryland. 

The 49-year-old Mrs. Ditman, trim 
and youthful, received her degree with 
the 1955 class. 

She'll take the Maryland Bar exami- 
nation this summer and hang out her 
shingle "somewhere in Prince Georges 
County," thus car- 
rying on a tradition, 
the third generation 
of her family to 
> j| ^ .W^ practice law. 

Slender, attractive 
and poised, Mrs. 
Ditman, young at 
heart and with am- 
bition worthy of 
blooming youth, 
raised two sons and 
then sought further 
outlet for commend- 
able energies. With 
encouragement from her husband, Dr. 
Lewis P. Ditman, research professor 
of entomology, she embarks upon a 
new career. 

Sixty fellow students were vitrually 
young enough to be her children. She 
was accepted as one of them. 

"I had no readjustment problem. 
More women should seek activity after 
their families are raised," she com- 
mented. 

Mrs. Ditman became president of 
her local parent-teacher association 
and helped form the Prince Georges 
County Council which she headed for 
two terms. 

Active interest in library affairs led 
to her appointment by former Governor 
O'Conor to the Board of Trustees of 
the County Memorial Library. She was 
reappointed by Governor Lane. 

Mrs. Ditman's father was an attor- 
ney as was also her mother's father. 

Her oldest son, Joseph, is married 
and has three children and the young- 
est, John, is majoring in electrical engi- 
neering at Maryland. 

Like Father — Like Son 

Among the graduates of the School 
of Pharmacy was Martin Wolfovitz, 
the son of Samuel Wolfovitz, who grad- 
uated from the School of Pharmacy in 
1930; and Alan Lee Settler, son of 
Mr. Martin Settler, who graduated in 
1929 from the School of Pharmacy. 

Brothers In Pharmacy 

Milton Schwartz, a 1955 graduate, 
is the brother of Nathan Schwartz, 
who was graduated in 1943. 

From Abroad 

Two students who came to this coun- 
try as refugees, received degrees from 
the School of Pharmacy. They are My- 
ron Dobrowolskyj, who was born in the 
Ukraine and came to this country to 
study at the School of Pharmacy, and 
Mrs. Anda Baiktis, who was born in 
Latvia and received part of her educa- 
tion in Germany. Mrs. Baikstis has a 



6 



record of distinguished scholarship, 
ranking among the first three in her 
class. She received the Andrew G. Du- 
Mez medal for proficiency in pharmacy, 
and the Dean's medal for outstanding 
scholarship. 

Alumni Reunion 

Commencement also featured a re- 
union of the College Park School's 
Alumni Association. The Alumni pro- 
gram included a luncheon, campus 
tours and class reunions, for the years 
1905, 1910, 1915, 1920, 1925, 1930, 1935, 
1940, and 1945, and was concluded with 
an Alumni banquet and reception. 

This event will be covered in detail 
in the next issue of "Maryland," in- 
cluding results of election of officers. 

From Overseas 

The international reputation of the 
University of Maryland as an institu- 
tion of higher learning was reflected 
by thirty-four resident students from 
sixteen foreign countries, who gradu- 
ated with the class of 1955. 

"While the primary function of the 
University of Maryland is to offer edu- 
cational facilities to residents of the 
State of Maryland," commented Presi- 
dent Elkins, "we are naturally very 
proud of the enrollment from coun- 
tries far beyond the borders of the 
United States." 

"The presence of these out-of-state 
students from foreign countries," Dr. 
Elkins went on to say, "actually con- 
tributes to the education of Maryland 
state students in that an important 
feature of higher education consists 
of teaching students to live with 
others." 

Graduates included one from Burma, 
one from Colombia, five from Egypt, 
one from England, three from Ger- 
many, two from India, four from Iran, 
two from Iraq, one from Jordan, one 
from Lebanon, three from Lithuania, 
four from the Netherlands, one from 
Poland, one from Thailand, two from 
Turkey, and two from Venezuela. 

The enrollment of foreign born stu- 
dents, classes of 1955 to 1957, totals 
223 from 49 countries as follows: 



Egypt 


11 


Turkey 


4 


Philippines 


7 


Jordan 


6 


Iraq 


11 


Brazil 


2 


Venezuela 


6 


Belgium 


1 


Burma 


1 


Israel 


3 


Iran 


10 


Thailand 


5 


Colombia 


11 


Switzerland 


1 


Greece 


5 


Pakistan 


2 


Germany 


15 


Austria 


1 


Syria 


1 


France 


3 


Afghanistan 


1 


Japan 


4 


India 


8 


Ukraine 


1 


Poland 


4 


Estonia 


3 


Norway 


1 


Bolivia 


2 


Latvia 


5 


Nicaragua 


4 


Lebanon 


2 


Sweden 


1 


Cuba 


3 


Ecuador 


2 


Iceland 


1 


Italy 


3 


England 


11 


Ceylon 


1 


Lithuania 


5 


Panama 


5 


Czechoslovakia 


6 


Korea 


1 


Peru 


1 


Spain 


1 


China 


21 


Denmark 


1 


Canada 


9 


Costa Rica 


1 


Netherlands 


9 







To The Service 

97 graduates received commissions 
in the U. S. Air Force Reserve, the 
ceremony being concluded by Colonel 
Joseph R. Ambrose, U.S.A. F., Dean 
of the College of Military Science. 



10,000 Attended 
The 10,000 attendance did not fill 
the available seats in the vast new 
Activities Building. 

Husbands And Wives 

The graduating class, included hus- 
band-and-wife team, Mr. and Mrs. 
Lawrence Laser, who were married 
in May of last year. Mrs. Laser is 
taking a Government job now that 
she has her diploma in business and 
public administration. Her husband is 
staying on at Maryland to work for his 
master's degree in Spanish. 

A romance culminated at Commence- 
ment when the former Miss Jo Anne 
Sandbower received her degree from 
the School of Pharmacy, and her hus- 
band, Robert H. Enterline, received his 
from the School of Dentistry. They 
met at the Pharmacy-Dental School. 
Mrs. Enterline has had a distinguished 
record in scholarship and in extra- 
curricular activities. She received the 
Beta Chapter, Phi Alpha Fraternity 
Cup, awarded annually to the senior 
student selected by the faculty for 
outstanding qualities of character and 
leadership. She also received the Stu- 
dent Alliance's medal for participation 
in extra-curricular activities. 

Music 

The University Chorus, under the 
Professor Fague K. Springmann, rend- 
ered Beethoven's Hallelujah chorus 
and Wagner's Pilgrims chorus from 
Tannhaiiser. 

Incident organ music was by Glenn 
Carow, University organist. 

Professor Harlan Randall led the 
audience in "The Star Spangled Ban- 
ner" and "My Maryland." 

The Reverend Alban Maguire, 
O.F.M., Holy Name College, pro- 
nounced the Invocation and the Bene- 
diction. 

Leading the processional march of 
the graduates and faculty as grand 
marshal was Dr. Allan G. Gruchy, 
professor of economics. 

Activities Building 

The commencement exercises initi- 
ated the Student Activities Bulding, 
just completed at a cost of $3,500,000. 
Designed for athletic events, the build- 
ing is also suited for commencement 
exercises and convocations. The stand's 
seating capacity is 12,500, which, with 
floor chairs, can be augmented to 
22,000. The building also houses the 
headquarters of the College of Physical 
Education, Recreation and Health. 

Photography 

In connection with the commence- 
ment exercises still and motion picture 
photographers were interested in a 
series of tests recently conducted by 
Al Danegger, the University's staff 
photographer. 

Using an ASA film rating of 200 
TriX film, a good picture was obtained 
at 1/50 of a second at f. 8 using only 
the available lighting used during the 
ceremonies. The hiain floor of the 
Activities Building was illuminated 
with 600,000 watts of lighting; 



Baccalaureate 

The Reverend George M. Docherty, 
of the New York Avenue Presbyterian 
Church, Washington, D. C, delivered 
the 1955 baccalaureate address, speak- 
ing on "Ambition." 

HONORS & AWARDS 

School Of Dentistry 

University Gold Medal for Scholar- 
1 ship to Peter Raymond Reiner 

School Of Medicine Award 

University Prize Gold Medal to Mur- 
ray M. Kappelman. 

Scholastic And Special Awards 
(Baltimore) 

Kappa Chapter, Alpha Zeta Omega 
Fraternity Prize to Barbara L. Miller. 

Alumni Association Medal to Jerome 
D. Bauxbaum and Harris J. Kohn. 

Elizabeth Maxwell Carroll Chesnut 
Prize to Charles C. Rettberg, Jr. 

Isaac H. Davis Memorial Medal to 
Peter R. Reiner. 

Herbert Friedberg Memorial Award 
to Raymond C. Dilzer. 

Andrew G. DuMez Memorial Prize 
to Anda Baikstis. 

Edgar J. Jacques Memorial Award 
to Arnold P. Arseneaux. 

David Fink Memorial Prize to Thom- 
as E. Patrick. 

Doctor A. Bradley Gaither Memorial 
Prize to George E. Gifford, Jr. 

Leonard M. Hummel Medal and Cer- 
tificate of Proficiency in Internal Medi- 
cine to Murray M. Kappelman. 

Harry E. Kelsey Memorial Award to 
William P. Brodie. 

Harry E. Latcham Memorial Award 
to Hunter A. Brinker, Jr. 

Lawyers Title Insurance Corporation 
Prize to Charles C. Rettberg, Jr. 

James J. McCormick Award to Rob- 
ert L. Heldrich. 

Alexander H. Paterson Medal Me- 
morial to Luis A. Roman. 

Beta Chapter, Phi Alpha Fraternity 
Prize to Jo Anne S. Enterline. 

William Simon Memorial Prize, Syd- 
ney L. Burgee, Jr. 

U. S. Law Week Award to Charles 
S. Atas. 

Conrad L. Wich Botany and Phai-ma- 
cognosy Prize to Stanley B. Karmiol. 

L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy 
Prize to Reuben Rosenberg. 

William D. Wolfe Memorial Prize 
and Certificate of Proficiency in Der- 
matology to Everard F. Cox. 

Pharmacy Awards 

Gary Louis Taylor— Gold medal for 
General Excellence. 

Reuben Rosenberg, Anda Baikstis, 
and Sydney Lanier Burgee, Jr. — Cer- 
tificates of Honor. 

Sydney Lanier Burgee, Jr. — William 
Simon Memorial Prize for superior pro- 
ficiency in the field of practical and 
analytical chemistry. 

Anda Baikstis — Andrew G. DuMez 
Medal for superior proficiency in phar- 
macy. 



AN OLD PROVERB 



'He loses all . 




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t \ 




who loses 

the right moment 




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Maryland 



Reuben Rosenberg — L. S. Williams 
Practical Pharmacy Prize for having 
the highest general average through- 
out the course in practical and dispens- 
ing pharmacy. 

Stanley Bennet Karmiol — Conrad L. 
Wich Botany and Pharmacognosy Prize 
for exceptional work throughout the 
course in Botany and Pharmacognosy. 

Thomas E. Patrick— David Fink Me- 
morial Prize for proficiency in the gen- 
eral practice of pharmacy. 

Jo Anne Sandbower Enterline — Beta 
Chapter, Phi Alpha Fraternity Prize 
for having exhibited outstanding quali- 
ties of character and leadership. 

Barbara Leigh Miller — Kappa Chap- 
ter, Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity 
Prize for proficiency in pharmacology. 

Richard E. Myers — A set of valuable 
reference books from Merck & Com- 
pany, Rahway, N. J., awarded for at- 
taining a high standing in pharmacy. 

David J. Seff — A set of valuable ref- 
erence books from Merck & Company, 
Rahway, N. J., awarded for attaining 
a high standing in pharmaceutical 
chemistry. 

Alan Lee Settler — Bristol Labora- 
tories, Inc., award for contributing the 
most to pharmacy thorugh extra-cur- 
ricular activities. 

College Park 

Alpha Rho Chapter of Alpha Chi 
Sigma Award to the graduating senior 
in chemistry or chemical engineering 
with the highest scholastic standing to 
Maxine V. Moffett. 

Alpha Lambda Delta Award to the 
senior member of the group who has 
maintained the highest average for the 
past three and one-half years. She 
must have been in attendance in the in- 
stitution for the entire time to Helen 
J. Shea. 

Alpha Lambda Delta Senior Certifi- 
cate Award to the senior members who 
have maintained the Alpha Lambda 
Delta average, 3.50 to Nancy J. Kelly, 
Helen J. Shea, Barbara A. Scher, Son- 
dra Schucalter. 

Alpha Zeta Award to the agricultur- 
al student in the freshman class, who 
attains the highest average record in 
academic work to Charles S. Gue. 

American Association of University 
Women Award to the senior girl for 
scholarship and community leadership 
to Joy L. Covert. 

Chemists' Award 

American Institute of Chemists 
Award for outstanding scholarship in 
chemistry and for his high character 
to Clifford F. Thompson. 

American Society of Civil Engineers 
Award offered by the Maryland Sec- 
tion of the American Society of Civil 
Engineers to the senior in the Depart- 
ment of Civil 'Engineering who, in the 
opinion of the faculty of the Depart- 
ment, is the outstanding student in his 
class to David H. Carpenter. 

Associated Women Students Awards 
for outstanding achievement, character, 
and service to the University to Mary 
Lou Baluta, Dorothy Delany, Virginia 
Dunlap, Carmen Guevara, Joan Ham- 
burger, Barbara Hammond, Anna Kar- 



avangelos, Patricia King, Judy Levin, 
Nancy Rankin, Sondra Scheir, Judith 
Spencer, Mary Jo Turner, Dorothy 
Williams. 

Dinah Berman Memorial Medal to 
the sophomore who has attained the 
highest scholastic average of his class 
in the College of Engineering. Awarded 
by Benjamin Berman to Charles G. 
Pettit, IV. 

B'nai B'rith Women of Prince 
Georges County Book Award for ex- 
cellence in Hebrew studies to Mrs. 
Leiba L. Brown, Linda Z. Fishman, 
Millie Korn, Marilyn R. Weidenbaum, 
Ellen M. Weinstein. 

Ernie Coblentz Memorial Trophy, 
offered to the most outstanding fresh- 
man for work done on student publica- 
t.ons to Charles J. Rayman. 
Engineers Award 

Bernard L. Crozier Award, offered 
by the Maryland Association of Engi- 
neers to the senior in the College of 
Engineering who, in the opinion of the 
faculty, has made the greatest im- 
provement in scholarship during his 
stay at the University to John K. 
Thayer. 

Delta Delta Delta Scholarship Award 
to a woman student selected for her 
worthiness to Suzanne Karstens. 

Delta Delta Delta Sorority Medal to 
the girl who attains the highest aver- 
age in academic work during the first 
semester of the sophomore year to 
Betty M. Zucker. 

Delta Gamma Scholarship Award to 
the woman member of the graduating 
class who has achieved the highest 
scholastic average for her entire 
course to Helen J. Shea. 

Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship Key to 
a member of the graduating class who 
has maintained the highest scholastic 
average for the entire four-year course 
in the College of Business and Public 
Administration to Elbridge O. Hurlbut, 
Jr. 

The Education Alumni Award to the 
outstanding senior man and senior 
woman in the College of Education to 
Grace Patricia Regus and Wesley Irv- 
ing Sauter, Jr. 

Goddard Medal 

James Douglas Goddard Memorial 
Medal, offered by his sister, Mrs. Anna 
K. Goddard James, to the senior from 
Prince Georges County for excellence 
in scholarship and moral character to 
William F. Falls, Jr. 

Grange Award, offered by the Mary- 
land State Grange to the senior who 
has excelled in leadership, scholastic 
attainment, and has contributed mer- 
itorious service to the College of Agri- 
culture to Lucius F. Daniels. 

Mahlon N. Haines Art Award, of- 
fered to the student in the Fine Arts 
Department for outstanding work in 
the painting classes to Hildegarde Is- 
kraut. 

The Charles B. Hale Dramatic Award 
to the man and woman members of 
the senior class who have done most 
for the advancement of dramatics at 
the University to Mary E. Bomberger 
and John D. Powell. 



The Home Economics Alumni Award 
to the student outstanding in applica- 
tion of Home Economics in her present 
living and who shows promise of car- 
rying these into her future home and 
community to Peggy Culbertson. 

William H. Hottel Award to the 
most outstanding senior for work done 
on student publications during his col- 
lege career to Stanley Harrison. 

Men's League Awards, for out- 
standing achievement, character, and 
service to the University to Anthony 
A. Abato, Raymond C. Ashley, Leo M. 
Cavanaugh, Bernard J. Faloney, John 
Irvine, James E. Kenkel, Bernard E. 
Leightheiser, Gabriel Phillips, Paul M. 
Rubin, Mark Schweizer, Harry D. 
White, Jr., and Joseph B. Workman. 

Men's League Cup to the graduating 
male senior who has done the most 
for the male student body to Robert R. 
Winkler. 

Omicron Nu 

Omicron Nu Sorority Medal to the 
freshman girl in the College of Home 
Economics who attains the highest 
scholastic average during the first 
semester to Natalie Jewett. 

Epsilon Chapter of Phi Alpha Fra- 
ternity to the man in the junior class 
who attained the highest scholastic 
average during his first two years at 
the College Park Colleges of the Uni- 
versity to Stanley D. Fishman. 

Pi Delta Epsilon National Medal of 
Merit Awards, offered by the National 
Council of Pi Delta Epsilon to the out- 
standing senior woman and the out 
standing senior man in each local Pi 
Delta Epsilon Chapter to Adele Chida- 
kel and George R. Park. 

Fred Hays Award 

Pi Sigma Alpha Fred Hays Memor- 
ial Award, given by an alumnus to the 
senior in Government and Politics hav- 
ing the highest average in Depart- 
mental courses to Charles W. Rollins. 

Sigma Alpha Omicron Award to the 
senior student majoring in Bacteri- 
ology, for high scholarship, character, 
and leadership to Thomas M. Cook. 

Sigma Chi Award to the man in the 
freshman class who makes the highest 
scholastic average during the first 
semester to Milton H. Buschman, Jr. 

Algernon Sydney Sullivan Awards, 
offered by the New York Southern 
Society of the City of New York in 
memory of Mr. Sullivan in recognition 
of fine spiritual qualities practically 
applied to everyday diving to Joan C. 
Hinchman and Joseph B. Workman. 

The Maryland Beta Chapter of Tau 
Beta Pi Award to the junior in the 
College of Engineering who, during 
his sophomore year, has made the 
greatest improvement in scholarship 
over that of his freshman year to 
Martin M. Burdick. 

Women's National Airport Club 
Award to the outstanding student in 
Transportation to Max J. Dex, Jr. 
Citizenship Awards 

Citizenship Prize for Men, presented 
annually by President Emeritus H. C. 
Byrd, a graduate of the Class of 1908, 
to the member of the senior class who, 



8 



Maryland 



during his collegiate career, has most 
nearly typified the model citizen, and 
has done most for the general ad- 
vancement of the interests of the Uni- 
versity, to Robert R. Winkler. 

Citizenship Prize for Women, pre. 
sented annually as a memorial to Sally 
Sterling Byrd, by her children to that 
girl member of the Senior Class who 
best exemplifies the enduring quali- 
ties of the pioneer women. These 
qualities should typify self-depend- 
ence, courtesy, aggressiveness, mod- 
esty, capacity to achieve objectives, 
willingness to sacrifice for others, 
strength of character, and those other 
qualities that enabled the pioneer 
woman to play such a fundamental 
part in the building of the Nation to 
Joy L. Covert. 

Athletic Awards 

Louis W. Berger Trophy to the out- 
standing senior baseball player to Ern- 
est Berliner. 

The Tom Birmingham Memorial 
Trophy to the outstanding member of 
the boxing team to Vincent Palumbo. 

William P. Cole, III, Memorial La- 
crosse Award to the outstanding Uni- 
versity of Maryland Midfielder to Ben- 
jamin R. Goertemiller. 

Halbert K. Evans Memorial Track 
Award to the outstanding graduating 
senior trackman to Burke L. Wilson. 

Gate and Key Award to unsung foot- 
ball hero at Homecoming to Robert 
F. Pellegrini. 

Charles Leroy Mackert Trophy to 
the Maryland student who has con- 
tributed most to wrestling at the Uni- 
versity to John D. Little. 

The Maryland Ring to the Maryland 
man who is judged the best athlete 
of the year to C. Rennie Smith. 

Anthony C. Nardo Memorial Tro- 
phy to the best football lineman of 
the year to Robert F. Pellegrini. 

Edwin E. Powell Trophy to the 
player who has rendered the great- 
est service to lacrosse during the year 
to Charles E. Wicker. 

Silvester Watch for excellence in 
athletics to the man who typified the 
best in college athletics to Burke L. 
Wilson. 

The Teke Trophy to the student who 
during his four years at the Univer- 
sity has rendered the greatest service 
to football to S. John Irvine. 

Dixie Walker Memorial Trophy to 
the boxer who shows the most im- 
provement over the preceding year to 
Anthony C. Esposito. 

Gold Awards — 1955 

To seniors who have been on the 
squad during the full period of eligi- 
bility at Maryland. 



Baseball 
Ernest Berliner 

Basketball 
Robert Dilworth 
Robert Everett 
Robert Thurston 

Boxing 
Leo Coyne 
Gary Fisher 
Garry Garber 
Robert Karns 
David Somers 

Football 
George Albrecht 



Lacrosse 
Charles Longest 
C. Rennie Smith 
William S*pies 

Rifle 
Lawrence Lomolino 
Linn Savage 
Merrill Sauerbrel 

Soccer 
Jose Hagedorn 
Wendell Johnson 
John Naegele 
James Relder 
Otto Winckelmann 



Maryland 



Ralph Baierl 
Richard Bielskl 
Donald Brougher 
Dave Easton 
Joseph Horning 
John Irvine 
Thomas McLuekle 
CJeorge Pnlnhiinlk 
Richard Shipley 
Ronald Waller 

OolJ 
Raymond Bellamy 
Edward Fitzgerald 



Tennis 
John Clifford 
William Hmirk 
Bernard 

LelghtheiHer 
Track 
Larry Faass 
Ray Horsley 
Robert MesBersmith 
Karl Rubach 
Burke Wilson 

Wrestling 
John Little 
Mayer Littman 



Band Awards 

Gold Cups presented to persons who 
have faithfully served four years in 
the band. 



Ann Evans 
liernadette 
McKeldin 



Teddy Mercer 
Edward O'Toole 
William Stokes 



Gold Keys awarded to persons who 
have faithfully served three years in 
the band. 



Barbara Dickie 
Robert Dreschler 
Fred Froehlich 
Tom Fugate 
Nancy Groman 
Judy Habich 



Jerry Hammond 
Judy Lewis 
Jimmy Noland 
Tom Rizer 
Tom Shipley 
Beverly J. Stubbs 



Donald Powers 

Mark Schaffer 

Edith Stimpson 

Dick Street 

Al Tase 

S'herry Williamson 



Sweaters awarded to persons who 

have faithfully served two years in 

the band. 

Gordon Bell 
Robert Benner 
Rhonda Bibler 
Barbara Bolgiano 
Len Cleaveland 
Russell Davis 
Joan Hubble 

Special Award, given in appreciation 
of his outstanding service to the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Band to William 
A. Stokes. 

Special Award, given for outstand- 
ing service as Head Majorette, to 
Bernadette McKeldin. 

Special Award, to the most out- 
stand band member with over two 
years of faithful service, to Teddy 
Mercer. 

Publications Awards 



Diamondback 
Harold Burdett 
Barbara Dodd 
Neal J. Durgin 
Carmen Ebandjieff 
James Garritty 
John R. Giffen 
Allen Jeweler 
Roger Keith 
Barbara Marshall 
George R. Park 
Lois Wetzel 

"M" Book 
Barbara Dodd 
Stanley Harrison 
Jean Spencer 



Old Line 
Bruce Berlage 
Loretta Bickford 
Adele Chidakel 
Peggy Culbertson 
Stanley Harrison 
Victor Holm 
Charles Rayman 
Frank Weedon 

Terrapin 
Raymond Ashley 
Stanley Harrison 
Victor Holm 
Boyd Madary 
Frances Schoenberg 
Sandra Sowder 
Barbara Stark 
Charles Wickard 



AF-ROTC Awards, 1955 

Some 3,000 attended the day-long 
program for AF-ROTC day which in- 
cluded the awards assembly. 

Visitors included Major Gen. Milton 
A. Reckord, Adjutant General of 
Maryland; Louis L. Goldstein, presi- 
dent of the State Senate; and Brig. 
Gen. S. 0. Ross, commander of Boiling 
Air Force Base. 

NIKE, an air defense guided missile, 
was one of the featured displays. Also 
shown were four 16 mm. anti-aircraft 
guns weighing 16 tons each, two 
helicopters, and a display of Arctic 
survival equipment. 

Exhibition drills by the Pershing 
Rifles, and the USAF Drum and Bugle 
Corps also took place. 

The Governor's Cup, to the best 
drilled Squadron, presented by Dr, Wil- 




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USE THE COUPON ON 
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son H. Elkins, President, University 
of Maryland, to Squadron M, Cadet 
Captain Donald A. Everett. 

Alumni Cup, to the best drilled 
Flight, presented by Dr. Harold F. 
Cotterman, Dean of Faculty to 3rd 
Flight, B Squadron, Cadet 1st Lieuten- 
ant Theodore S. Gochenour, Jr. 

Air Force Association Metal, to the 
outstanding Advanced AF-ROTC Cadet 
based on scholastic grade, both general 
and military, individual characteristics 
and performance at Summer Camp, 
presented by Colonel Willard W. Milli- 
kan, Com. 113th Fighter Bomber Wing, 
D.C., Air National Guard, to Cadet 
Captain Paul D. Lambrides. 

ROA Award 

Reserve Officers Association Medals 
to the top three senior cadets demon- 
strating outstanding academic achieve- 
ment in AFROTC, presented by Col. 
Thomas H. King, Air Force Reserve, 
Past National President of the Reserve 
Officers Association, to Cadet Captain 
Lawrence C. Sween, Cadet Capt. Robert 
R. Winkler, Com., Preshing Rifles, and 
Cadet Lt. Col. Donald L. Gray. 

William Randolph Hearst, National 
Championship Trophy ROTC Rifle com- 
petition is awarded to the ROTC team 
making highest score in national com- 
petition (individual medals to each 
team member), presented by A. R. 
Bird, Special Events Editor, Baltimore 
Sunday-American, to Cadet 1st Lt. 
Merrill A. Sauerbrei, Captain of the 
University Rifle Team, with medals to 
Cadet 1st Lieutenant Sauerbrei and 
Cadet John D. Schmidt. 

The Pershing Rifle Award to the best 
drilled Cadet in the Corps who is not a 
member of Pershing Rifles, presented 
by Colonel Henry Dittman, Chief of 
Staff", Headquarters, AFROTC to Cadet 
Richard L. Thompson. 

Sun Newspaper Award, to the best 
drilled cadet in the Corps, to Phillip 
D. Slade. 

Scabbard and Blade Coblenz Memor- 
ial Cup to the Senior Advanced Cadet 
who has contributed most to advancing 
the interest and activities of AFROTC 
through Scabbard and Blade, presented 
by, General Milton A. Reckord, TAG, 
Maryland, to Cadet Lt. Col. Henry R. 
Passi. 

Armed Forces Communication and 
Electronics Association Awards Gold 
Medal, to the best Engineering student 
who is in AFROTC, presented by, Col. 
A. Paul Fonda CAP, Maryland to' Cadet 
Capt. Dale A. Jackson. 

Pershing Rifle Medals 

Pershing Rifle Medals to members 
of Pershing Rifles who have been out- 
standing in service to the organization. 
Also 5th Regimental Headquarters 
Awards a medal to the outstanding 
Pershing Rifle Unit Commander in 
their area. 

National Headquarters, Pershing 
Rifles, presented another to the out- 
standing Unit Commander, locally. Pre- 
sented by Brig. Gen. Stoyt 0. Ross, 
Com., Boiling Air Force Base Gold 
Medal to Cadet Capt. Robert R. Wink- 



ler; Silver Medal, Cadet Edward R. 
Evans; Bronze Medal, Cadet Edward G. 
Cox, Regional Award, Cadet Richard E. 
Donnelly, National Headquarters Persh- 
ing Rifle Medal, to Cadet Richard E. 
Donnelly, Silver Spring, Md. 

Glenn L. Martin Aeronautical Engi- 
neering Award to the Senior Advanced 
Cadet who has attained excellence in 
the field of Aeronautical Enigneering 
and applied for flight training in the 
United States Air Force, presented by 
Bastian Hello of the Glenn L. Martin 
Company, to Cadet Captain Niels P. 
Frandson. 

DAV Award 

Disabled American Veterans Gold 
Cup to the Senior Advanced Cadet who 
has displayed outstanding leadership, 
scholarship and citizenship, presented 
by Frederick I. Ricketts, Commander, 
Hyattsville Chapter 23, Disabled Ameri- 
can Veterans, to Cadet Lt. Col. John 
R. Livingstone. 

Consolidated Vultee Air Craft Cor- 
poration Award to the Sophomore cadet 
displaying outstanding leadership and 
scholastic qualities and who has been 
selected for Advanced AFROTC in 
Flying Category, presented by Col. 
Russell F. Fisher, Chief, AFROTC 
Branch Headquarters USAF, to Cadet 
Lawrence G. Larkin. 

Maryland State Society, Daughters of 
Founders and Patriots of America 
Award to the Basic Freshman Cadet 
who has attained the highest overall 
academic grade during the first sem- 
ester, presented by Mrs. John Collinson 
President, Maryland State Society 
Daughters of Founders and Patriots of 
America to Cadet Terrell L. Holliday. 

The National Defense Transporta- 
tion Association Award citation in 
recognition of leadership qualities dis- 
played, academic standing, aptitude 
for military service and meritorious 
achievement. Noteworthy service in 
furtherance of the aims and objectives 
of the Association in the promotion of 
preparedness for national defense, pre- 
sented by Colonel Thomas J. Weed, 
National Vice President, NDTA, to 
Cadet Lt. Col. Henry R. Passi. 

Legion Award 

American Legion Award, a set of 
Second Lieutenant Bars to the Senior 
Cadet displaying outstanding leader- 
ship and contributing most to the Corps 
of Cadets, presented by Robert E. 
Grieshamer, Commander, American Le- 
gion Post No. 217, College Park, to 
Cadet Colonel Lee M. Tigner. 

Cherry Blossom Festival Award for 
winning second place in the National 
Drill Competition, presented by Colonel 
Carl Swyter, PAS, AFROTC Detach- 
ment No. 140, George Washington, 
to Cadet 1st Lieutenant Harry D. 
White, CO. 1st Plat. Pershing Rifles. 

Distinguished Military Student 
Award, to Senior Cadets who have been 
outstanding in AFROTC and in their 
academic major field, presented by 
Colonel Joseph R. Ambrose, PAS, Uni- 
versity of Maryland, to Cadet 1st Lt. 
Robert C. Hur, Cadet Major Nelson 



C. Kulda, Cadet Captain Andrew N. 
Sherling, and Cadet Major William A. 
Cusimano. 

Hamill Memorial Plaque, awarded by 
Theta Chi Chapter to the best Sopho- 
more Cadet excelling in leadership and 
scholarship, presented by Cadet Cap- 
tain William G. Hamill, to Cadet Ken- 
neth G. Yeager. 

Arnold Air Society Award to Senior 
Advanced Cadet who has contributed 
the most to the advancement of 
AFROTC through activities of the 
Arnold Air Society presented by Brig. 
Gen. Raymond J. Reeves to Cadet 
Lieutenant Colonel John R. Livingstone 

Reserve Officers Association Ribbons, 
to the five outstanding Freshmen, five 
outstanding Sophomores, and members 
of the best drilled squad, presented by 
Colonel H. E. Todd to Freshmen: 
Michael Hathaway, Louis Koschmeder, 
Francis J. O'Brimski, Richard L. Mor- 
gan, and Terrell L. Holliday. Sopho- 
mores: John A. Bates, Paul A. Brown, 
Paul J. Gillis, Peter J. Gillis, and Ron- 
ald J. Lynn. Best Drilled Squadron, 
3rd Squadron, 3rd Flight, F. Squadron: 
Wallace I. Murphy, Maxwell H. Cov- 
ington, Hal W. Williamson, Edward M. 
Friedman, Richard W. Baxter, Walter 
G. Lazuski, John A. Peters, James A. 
Eckelsberger, and Carl H. Fost. 

Vandenberg Saber 

Vandenberg Guard Saber to the 
member of the Vandenberg Guard who 
submitted the emblem selected to repre- 
sent the Vandenberg Guard, presented 
by Colonel Joseph R. Ambrose to 
Cadet Joseph C. Mayhew. 

AFROTC Angel Flight Award to the 
outstanding member of the AFROTC 
Angel Flight presented by Colonel 
Joseph R. Ambrose to Nancy S. Sig- 
man. 

Arnold Air Society Sweetheart, 
Member of the AFROTC Angel Flight 
selected by members of the Cadet 
Corps as Division Sweetheart, pre- 
sented by Lieutenant Colonel John R. 
Livingstone, Commander, Frank P. 
Lahm Squadron, Arnold Air Society 
to Gale A. Perry. 

Honorary Colonel's Commission for 
outstanding sup- 
port and extensive 
contribution 
to AFROTC inter- 
ests, presented by 
Colonel Joseph R. 
Ambrose to Dr. 
Harold F. Cotter- 
m a n, Dean of 
Faculty. This 
award received the 
greatest hand from 
the audience. 
Air Medal for 
meritorious achievement in aerial flight 
during operations against the enemy, 
presented by Dr. Leon P. Smith, Dean, 
College of Arts and Sciences to Cap- 
tain Bernard Reilley. 

Air Medal for meritorious achieve- 
ment while participating in aerial flight 
presented by Colonel Frank Kurtz, to 
First Lieutenant Thomas T. Mounts. 




Dean Cotterman 



10 



Maryland 



Ten To O.D.K. 

Ten Maryland students tapped for 
membership in Omicron Delta Kappa, 
national collegiate honorary fraternity. 

They are Ernest Berliner, Robert 
Giffen, Donald Gray, Richard Holmes, 
Richard Park, Clifford Thompson, Burke 
Wilson, Reyburn Browning, John Little, 
and Thomas Shipley. 

Charles Wickard was elected presi- 
dent. Edward Gantt is vice president, 
and Tom Shipley is secretary. 



Queen Of The May 



Journalism Honors 

George Richard Park and Adele 
Chidakel journalism seniors, were 
awarded Pi Delta Epislon medals of 
merit for their work on student pub- 
lications. 

Stanley L. Harrison received the 
William Hottel award as the outstand- 
ing senior on campus publications, and 
Charles J. Rayman won the Ernest A. 
Coblenz Memorial Cup as the out- 
standing freshman on publications. 

The awards were made at a banquet 
sponsored by Maryland chapter of Pi 
Delta Epsilon, national collegiate hon- 
orary fraternity. 



Beta Omega 



Maryland's Beta Omega Chapter of 
Phi Alpha Theta, the national honor 
society in history, inducted nine new 
members into the local chapter. They 
are: Janice M. Brewer, Barbara G. 
Hammond, James E. Cabin, C. Edward 
Herzer, Robert Evans, Richard Matt- 
ingly, James K. Owens, Gerald C. 
Herdman, and Joseph F. Kenkel. 

The new members bring the Beta 
Omega Chapter membership to 177 
members. 



Princess 




SARAH B. HARMONY 

A & S senior, Delta Gamma, "Sally" 
was chosen as the University of Mary- 
land's Princess in the Queen's Court 
at the annual Apple Blossom Festival 
at Winchester, Va. 

At the 1955 Eastern Intercollegiate 
Boxing Tournament Sally sponsored 
the West Point Team. She is the 
damghter of Brigadier General John W. 
Harmony, former West Point boxer and 
former Maryland boxing coach. 

Miss Harmony was also elected one 
of the AF-ROTC's Flight "Angels." 




jmL^tmm -4Mb i >*» / 

CORONATION OF QUEEN CARMEN 



Jack Knight Foto 



Carmen Guevara is crowned Maryland's May Queen by Patricia Killingsworth, 
the Day's chairman. 

In the foreground are some of the May Queen's junior court attendants, left 
to right, Kathy Bell, Barbara Ann Katzenberg, Russell Brown, Ralph Simmons, 
Paula Hammett and Katherine Johnson. 

This was the 33rd year in the history of the University in which the Junior 
Women honored the graduating Senior Women on May Day. In 1923, the 
seventeen Senior women witnessed the festivities and coronat