(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Maryland"

.WLAND 






9f) f at W«t W 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/maryland27univ 



A-nO,i 



I e-s 



J A lUMMtre EBftO AlMT/J R T B«<0 

volumIi :*Qrft A W- i 

5JcTHE SW g<gJ|^YEAR 




University of Maryland cAlumni Publication 



Tfapp? Holidays att& .All (B006 Wishes for 1956 



^LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
COLLEGE PARK, MD. 




"The Voice 
With a Smile" 



Miss Service Representative 
'The Voice With a Smile" in the telephone Business Office 



One of the nicest things about telephone 
sen ice is "The Voice With a Smile." It runs 
all through the business. 

Millions of times a day the operators send 
it singing over the wires. You hear it when 
you visit the Business Office or telephone the 
service representative. 

The installer brings it to your home when 
he comes to put in telephones. The lineman 



has it as he works along the road or gives 
you the right of way at a busy intersection. 

In talking about telephone people and the 
way they go about their work, we'd like to 
say a good word for you, too. 

For it's your friendliness that helps us do 
the kind of job you want us to do. And that 
means better service for everybody ... all 
along the line. 



BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 






Vol, XXVII January-February, 1956 No. 1 




"Pu&ticati&t a/ t%c /ftummt* 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of 
Maryland, and entered at the Post Office, 
College Park, Aid., as second class mail mat- 
ter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 
1879. $3.00 per year — Fifty cents the copy. 



OFFICE OF PUBLICATION 

28 Symons Hall, 

University of Maryland, 

College Park, Md. 

WA. 7-3800, Ext. 249 or 394 



HARVEY L. MILLER, 
Managing Editor 



PATRICIA M. REIHM, 
Assistant Editor 



JOSEPH F. BLAIR 
Sports Editor 



SALLY L. OGDEN. Advertising Director 

EDITH A. ROSS, Advertising Sales 

HAZEL H. GOFF, Advertising Copy Chief 

— Advertising Offices — 
18 W. 25th Street 2500 Wise. Ave., N.W. 

Baltimore 18, Md. Washington, D. C. 

(HO 7-9018 (EM 3-2553) 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Officers 

J. Homer Remsberg '18, President 
Frank Block '24, Vice-President 
J. Gilbert Prendergast '33, Vice-President 
David L. Brigham '38, Exec-Secy. 

General Alumni Council 

AGRICULTURE — Clayton Reynolds '22, 

William Evans '26, J. Homer Remsberg 

•18. 
ARTS & SCIENCES— Virginia Truitt '52, 

Charles Ellinger '37, Ralph G. Shure '32. 
BUSINESS & PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION— 

Alvin S*. Klein '37, John Dyson '53, Roger 

L. Odette '52. 
DENTAL — Dr. Lawrence W. Blmestefer '34, 

Dr. Harry Levin '26, Dr. Gerald Devlin '23. 
EDUCATION — John P. Speicher '41, William 

Prigg '53, E. Louise Sudlow '50. 
ENGINEERING — S*. Chester Ward '32, John 

C. Dye '34, Col. O. H. Saunders *10. 
HOME ECONOMICS — Mrs. Robert Chaney 

'42, Miss Irene Knox '34, Mrs. William 

Kricker '31. 
LAW — J. Gilbert Prendergast '33, Stanford 

I. Hon* '34, G. Kenneth Reibllch '29. 
MEDICAL — Albert E. Goldstein '12, Thurs- 
ton R. Adams '34, Daniel J. Pessagno. 
PHARMACY — Frank Block '24, Frank Black 

'04. Samuel I. Raichlen "25. 
NURSING — Flora Street '38, Virginia Stack 

Simmons '33, Mary France Dennis '47. 

Alumni Clubs 

BALTIMORE — Frank Block, '24. 
CARROLL COUNTY— Dr. L. L. Leggett, '30. 
CUMBERLAND — Dr. J. Russell Cook '23. 
EASTERN SHORE — Otis Twtlly '21 
FREDERICK COUNTY — William E. Trail' '26 
"M" CLUB — Sam Sllber, '34. 
NEW ENGLAND — R. A. Cook, '05. 
NEW YORK — Miss Sarah E. Morris. "24 
PITTSBURGH — Charles Furtney, '37 
PRINCE GEORGE'S CO. — Ellwood R. Nich- 
olas, '28. 
RICHMOND — Paul Mullinlx, '36. 
SCHENECTADY— Mrs. Marie Esher. '45. 
TERRAPIN— James W. Stevens, '17. 

Ex-Officio 

Past President — O. H. Saunders '10 

Past President— Dr. A. E. Goldstein, '12 

Past President — Dr. A. I. Bell, '19 

Past President — C. V. Koons, '29 

Past President — T. T. Speer, '17. 

University President — Dr. Wilson H. Elklns 

Executive Secretary — David L, Brigham '38 




FOLLOW THE SUN TO A NEW 
ENGINEERING OPPORTUNITY! 

Get new enjoyment and satisfaction from your work in 
sunny, attractive Florida! 

Fairchild's new engineering facilities at St. Augustine com- 
bine two important attractions: Advanced research and 
development in all phases of aviation, and superb living 
conditions in one of America's most delightful areas. 

Openings exist for engineers who have experience, am- 
bition and talent to contribute to the Fairchild Research 
and Development programs in such fields as aerodynamics, 
structures, weights and design. 

Investigate this opportunity for a sunny, profitable future! 
Send your resume today to Walter Tydon, Chief Engineer. 

A Division of 
Fairchild Engine and Airplane Corporation 

^ FAIRCHILD 

AIRCRAFT DIVISION ■ HAGERST0WN, MARYLAND 

...WHERE THE FUTURE IS MEASURED IN LIG HT-YEARS I 



Maryland 



\«yvyrz 




Record Budget Requested 

$21,322,100 Asked For Expansion 
And Development. 

The University submitted a record estimated to cost $43,004. 

high budget request of $21,322,100, The record request was submitted to 

including funds to set up a new course the State Department of Budget and 

in nuclear engineering. Procurement. It will be screened by 

"To meet the need for men qualified this department, the Governor and the 

in the field of nuclear engineering in Legislature. 

co-operation with Government and pri- The request includes the operations 

vate agencies, the university is request- of the undergraduate school at College 

ing $13,620 to begin to offer an option Park, the professional schools in Balti- 

in nuclear engineering," said the re- more, University Hospital, Maryland 

port, signed by President Wilson H. State College at Princess Anne, agricul- 

Elkins. tural extension work, and the many 

"It is estimated that within a few special programs of education offered 

years the peacetime by the university, 

uses of nuclear pow- Last Year 

er will require at Last year the University asked— 

least ten per cent of a nd was granted— a sizable budget in- 

our trained en- crease to hire a larger faculty and im- 

gineering person- pr0 ve standards all along the line. 

I m nel." This year's proposals indicated the 

The new program, University hopes this trend will con- 

if approved, would tinue. It asked for funds to employ 

be offered by the 3354 persons, an increase of 334 over 

Glenn L. Martin Col- the 3 )52 o now on the pay roll, 

lege of Engineering For the current fiscal year, the Legis- 

a n d Aeronautical lature approved the employment of 343 

President Elkins Sciences. additional persons. 

, T !l e " niv f sit y' s To Cut Work Week 

proposed budget for the fiscal year In reference t th Universi t y Hos- 

begmning July 1, 1956 1S $2,488,415 , Dr Endns fo / funds 

or 13.2 per cent higher than the amount which wouW enable ^ .^ to ^ 

allocated for the current year. th<j wofk week for .^ nurges and other 

Increased Enrollment employees from 44 hours to 40. 

Growing enrollments and a program "The 1956-57 budget requests suffi- 

to improve many phases of the univer- cient additional personnel to achieve 

sity's operations were cited as reasons the 40-hours basis and thus reduce 

for the increase. nurse turnover and eliminate vacanies 

Four fifths, or $1,934,127, of the now existing," said the report, 

proposed budget increase would be "The seriousness of the shortage is 

drawn from the State's general funds. illustrated by the fact that during the 

Of the remaining increase, $533,298 year ended June 30, 1955, the actual 

would come from special funds (chiefly nursing hours per patient per day at 

student fees) and $20,990 from the Fed- University Hospital amounted to 2.9, 

eral Government. compared to a minimum standard of 

In addition to the new course in 3.5 recommended by the National 

nuclear engineering, the University of League of Nursing." 

Maryland's budget request includes: WJde R p 

1 A new "Office of the Director of The universit , s bud t , 

Endowment" to co-ordinate the urn- showed a wJde fa the annual 

vers.ty's efforts in obtaining grants, costg of educati full _ time stu dents 

scholarsn.ps, endowments and bequests in varif)us fields 
The $40,000 asked for this unit would 

include a director and a staff. Per Student Figures 

_ .. „ . Following are the average annual 

Counseling Center student cost fi g rted b 

2. A university-supported counseling the universit 

center, to run on a $39,419 appropria- ^^ of ^^ 41()6 

tion which would be virtually self- school of Dentistry 1.098.00 

supporting through special fees. College of Engineering , 957.77 

o . r • t-u r^n n Maryland State College 933.32 

3. A four-year course in the College college of Agriculture 886.82 

of Engineering leading to a degree in College of Education 723.26 

fire protection. The university said only j**ool ° f f ^StSf^^^^Z ™lls 

two other schools — one in the Midwest College of Home Economics 481.36 

and one on the Pacific Coast-offer such c °& at i°c.n ITnLn™™^. 428.15 

instructions. Cost of the new course College of Arts and Sciences 331.29 

was set at $11,064. According to the Co m i^ 8t ?ati^n SlneSS ™.f...™^..™" 321.93 

budget request, insurance groups are svhool of Law ""'.'.""/...I!.!""!""""" 320.87 

ready to award scholarships in the fire College of Military Science 142.57 

protection field. Courses which require smaller classes 

4. A course under the aegis of the and extensive laboratory work cost 
School of Medicine for the training of more than subjects presented, )argely 
physical therapists. This program was through lectures, 



Regent 




Udel Foto 
NEWLY APPOINTED 

Hon. Enos S. Stockbridge, appointed 
by Governor McKeldin to the Board 
of Regents, replacing Arthur O. Love- 
joy. Mr. Stockbridge is an alumnus of 
the School of Law. 



New Regent 



Governor Theodore R. McKeldin an- 
nounced appointment of Enos S. Stock- 
bridge, prominent Baltimore attorney 
and Maryland alumnus, to the Board of 
Regents of the University. 

Mr. Stockbridge, who has been di- 
rector and chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Correction for the State since 
1951, will fill the unexpired term of 
Dr. Arthur O. Lovejoy, resigned. The 
term expires in 1960. 

The 67-year-old attorney was gradu- 
ated from Amherst in 1908 and from 
the University of Maryland School of 
Law in 1910. Governor McKeldin said 
Mr. Stockbridge was recommended for 
the regency post by the Alumni As- 
sociation. 

Mr. Stockbridge's father, Henry 
Stockbridge, was a member of the 
Board of Regents and was an associ- 
ate judge of the Court of Appeals 
from 1911 until his death in 1924. 

In 1944, when Governor McKeldin 
was Mayor of Baltimore, Mr. Stock- 
bridge headed a commission to revise 
the city's charter. In 1951 the Governor 
named him to the Commission on Ad- 
ministrative Organization of the State 
and later elevated him to chairman 
after Simon E. Sobeloff, also a Mary- 
land Law alumnus, now U. S. Solicitor 
General, resigned as head of that 
group. 

****** 
LIBERTY 

Liberty is something you cannot 
have unless you give it to others. 



e 



Maryland 



HIGHER EDUCATION STUDY 



State Scholarships For 
Gifted Students. Minor- 
ity Dissents On Gover- 
nor's Commission. 

fey {jodepA (I. I. Sterne 
(The Baltimore Sun) 

On only one issue, State scholar- 
ships for gifted students, was 
there a significant split in the Gover- 
nor's commission to study the needs 
of higher education in Maryland. 

In the commission's new report, a 
majority of six urged State scholar- 
ships for needy top-ranking high school 
graduates to permit them "to attend 
any accredited collegiate institution 
within the State and to pursue any 
program of study leading to the bache- 
lor's degree." 

A three-member minority labeled 
such scholarships "simply an indirect 
public subsidy to non-public institu- 
tions of higher learning." State money 
could be better used, they argued, to 
reduce tuition costs and raise faculty 
salaries in public institutions. 

The new scholarship plan was en- 
a number of ways from the present 
State scholarship system, a system 
somewhat grudgingly accepted by the 
commission on the condition that it 
be thoroughly reviewed. 

Private Colleges 

Under the existing plan, the State 
provided a certain number of scholar- 
ships to several private colleges. 

The scholarships are awarded by 
State senators or the institutions them- 
selves to students who agree to take 
specific courses of study mainly in 
teaching. 

The commission indicated it felt that 
through this agreement the State is 
buying the services of private colleges 
to provide trained teachers and other 
specialists needed by society. 

Contrast 

In contrast, it was noted, the pro- 
posed new scholarships would be 
awarded directly to top-ranking high 
school graduates who could select any 
Maryland college, public or private, and 
take any course they desire. 

The new scholarship plan was in- 
dorsed by the spokesmen for all four 
private colleges represented on the 
commission, as well as Morgan State 
College and the Baltimore city schools. 

The majority held that the commis- 
sion made "reasonable provision" for 
the growing numbers of students who 
will double college enrollment within 
fifteen years by recommending a net- 
work of junior colleges and expansion 
of existing institutions. 

But emphasis must not be on num- 
bers alone, it was argued. 

There must be "some mechanism," 
the majority held, "whereby gifted 
youth may be assured of the very best 
kind of post-high-school education 



available within the State. It is obvious 
. . . that many of the most talented 
young people are not now going to 
college." 

As proof of this statement, the 
majority referred to a special com- 
mission study of Maryland's high 
school graduates in 1952. 

What Study Indicated 

This study showed: 

1. Of 14,580 graduates, only 4,677 
went on to college. 

2. Of the 8,894 students who did 
not go to college, 4,141 would have 
been recommended by their principals 
as warranting an opportunity to under- 
take college work. 

3. More than one quarter of the stu- 
dents with I.Q.'s of 120 or above did 
not pursue their education. 

4. Almost one half of students with 
I.Q.'s of 110 or above did not go on 
to college. 

The majority said the State scholar- 
ships would be available "only to ex- 
ceptional high school students, possibly 
limited to the upper 5 per cent or 10 
per cent of the graduating classes." 

Awards would be made on the basis 
of outstanding ability and financial 
need, varying in dollar amounts accord- 
ing to the costs of the institution se- 
lected. 

Example Given 

For example, a student attending a 
college close to home might receive 
$400 a year to cover tuition and fees, 
while a student going to college away 
from home might get $800 to pay for 
added costs of room and board. 

The minority attacked the new 
scholarship plan on many points, hold- 
ing that State support tends to under- 
mine the integrity of private institu- 
tions and that scholarships are an 
"education anachronism" of doubtful 
value. 

They argued: 

1. That the scholarships would be 
an indirect subsidy to private colleges, 
thus resulting in public support of a 
dual system of education. If this prin- 
ciple were extended to primary and 
secondary schools it could lead to "pos- 
sible elimination of the public school 
system." Cases in point are recent 
legally approved plans in South Caro- 
lina, Georgia and Mississippi to provide 
public support for non-public schools 
as a means of eliminating public 
schools (and thus evading the Supreme 
Court mandate barring race segrega- 
tion). 

2. That the public has met its obli- 
gation by establishing "academically 
and professionally adequate institu- 
tions" available to all who can profit. 
Private colleges should not exist merely 
to provide better education than in 
public schools. And the public has no 
moral right to offer "inferior educa- 
tion" to students in public institutions. 

Alternate Scheme Suggested 

3. That projected costs for the new 
scholarship system could be used "to 
remove all present tuition fees at the 



State-owned institutions of higher 
learning, to raise salaries to a respect- 
able degree, and to benefit thousands 
instead of a few hundred through 
scholarships.'" 

4. That the State has no right to 
assist any student to attend an educa- 
tional institution not available to all 
either because of high tuition costs 
or other admission restrictions. 

5. That favoritism frequently is a 
factor in awarding scholarships inas- 
much as methods of selection are 
"neither valid nor reliable." 

Inconsistent 

The dissenters conceded they were 
"inconsistent technically" in approving 
the continuance of the existing State 
scholarship plan while opposing the 
new one. 

But they held that the existing sys- 
tem is "more of a contractual relation- 
ship than public aid" to serve a definite 
function such as the training of teach- 
ers. 

In answer to the arguments of the 
minority, the majority members em- 
phasized a number of points. 

They contended, first, that the pro- 
posed plan would not tend to favor 
private as opposed to public institu- 
tions. "The diversity of interests, tal- 
ents and backgrounds represented by 
the student group would assure a more 
or less normal distribution," it was 
argued. 

"In any event," said the majority 
recommendation, "this plan is not de- 
signed to aid any institution but speci- 
fically and directly to aid the student." 

In answer to the argument that the 
plan, if extended to all levels of edu- 
cation, would undermine public edu- 
cation, the majority said "this ignores 
the realities of educational progres- 
sion. High schools are free and are 
available in any locality." 

Cost Defense Given 

To defend the costs of the scholar- 
ship plan, the majority said the public 
must completely support education 
offered in State colleges, while in pri- 
vate colleges endowments defray a good 
part of the educational expenses. 

Scholarship winners would receive 
the benefits of this private support, it 
was held. 

Those signing the majority report 
were Dr. Lowell S. Ensor, president 
of Western Maryland College; Dr. 
Martin D. Jenkins, president of Morgan 
State College; Dr. Otto F. Kraushaar, 
president of Goucher College; Dr. P. 
Stewart Macaulay, provost of the Johns 
Hopkins University; Judge Roszel C. 
Thomsen, former president of the Bal- 
timore city Board of School Commis- 
sioners, and the Rev. John E. Wise, 
S.J., of Loyola College. 

The dissenters were Dr. Thomas G. 
Pullen, Jr., State school superintendent 
and chairman of the commission; Dr. 
Earle T. Hawkins, president of Tow- 
son State Teachers College, and Dr. 
Wilbur Devilbiss. Former dean of the 
college of education, University of 
Maryland. Dr. Devilbiss did not speak 
for the University of Maryland. He 
is now President of Salisbury State 
Teachers College. 



Maryland 



3 



3from (feotevnav ^c^elbln 







Jtotfl 



^x£* v 



L ^etA { 



,u^ 




Executive Department 

Annapous. Maryland 



Peace hopes rise around the world as we enter this New 
Year - and happily we discover again that prosperity can be the 
companion of peace. 

Our economy expands on every hand. Established products 
are improved. New products are developed - and still we move 
ahead, and as we move we observe a challenging demand for skill 
and learning, covering all of the old fields of knowledge and 
embracing those that are new. 

To meet this grand challenge we turn to our great seats of 
learning - our colleges and universities. 

Here in Maryland - in one of the fastest growing of the 
States - we look with sincere pride on the part our great University 
is playing in this magnificent march of progress. With confidence 
we anticipate the even greater role it will have in the advancing years 

It is with this faith and confidence that I greet the University 
in this holiday season - its administration, its staff, its students 
and my fellow alumni. 

I send my best wishes to all for a 1956 of contentment, 
happiness and a continuing progress in the State, the Nation, and 
the world. 



Sincerely, 



Theodore R. McKeldin 
Governor 



TRMcK:Q/jth 




OfflCE 






Utfl 



vt 



*st 



•^ 



o* 



cov^ Gt 



ft** 



H^* 



HO 



n strong ■* Ajjrt gj^ 



.dsee 



It tnaV * *£ as * \°°^ aS 
in* 0X deS c 

,rds <***t oi tYve 



***?s* *•**"■ 



itvitvg 



et va 



de 



2n eto 



sW. 



grou 

atvd g°° 
At 






J**-". 7« tnatv^ 



for 



\tv 



itvd 



ti» 9 



vjotv 



•"""", P aso^ le " 
*e^f 1th V^ 



10 



**\*>P» 



cV one- 



fliaTV^ 



nd» 



ioitv 



■* A .ii:^we- 



rsM 



itid 



the 



Si^ ceT 



eW V 



OAitS, 



the 



be 



; ttertft' 



etvt 



oi 



the 






<3frt>m JIubge (Hole 



**« 



«j> 



<a 






g* 




■cgr 




UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



OFFICE OF THE 
BOARD OF REGENTS 



The Board of Regents is always delighted at this time each year 
to join in wishing you, the readers of "MARYLAND," a hearty 
"Merry Christmas and Happy New Year." 

As we look forward with hope to a new year, it is only natural 
also to look back upon the accomplishments of the old year. As we 
do, we note with excusable pride that our University has continued 
its ever increasing progress as one of the country's great educational 
institutions. Each and every one of you may be justly proud of 
our University, of its administrative personnel, its physical plant, 
its high scholastic rating, and the enviable reputation it enjoys in 
the field of student activities. The feeling of close personal contact 
with such an organization should be a source of deep satisfaction 
to you. 

But none of these achievements would have been remotely possible 
of attainment had it not been for the united efforts of the entire 
University family — President, faculty, alumni, students, and all 
employees alike. The governing board is proud of the enthusiastic 
response shown by all in striving toward the aims and purposes of 
our University as denned by the laws of our State. 

God willing, we shall continue in harmony and determination 
toward an even greater future. 

May God bless each of you in the coming year, 





Chairman, 

Board of Regents 



atv 



dg* a 






tvea 



to 



e *tetv 



.a * tV 



w,ae^ s 

to & e * . Aoc^^e- 



«£8& 



mess**; t^i-o^ w ° Ut 



a r)\ea sutC 



otv^se ** 



\t iS^fu, o^t £ *e\\J^ ce * ^a *\ *w tVve °™ _ A c0 tvs 



UK 



tet 



est ? e auca w ^ e 



at 



V x \„*ft \tv „ff Tt, ._>; a tv ^ 



B *v*? c J 



vJaV, 



vja s 



itvW 



^oO^r^tW^ « e t 



deep- 



Jtt V 



res t\ge 



.«*«*£ V *$*>* y oca tiotv 



o^ e 



be' 



; ttet 



,wcC 






t\ieit 9 



ess 



iP 



tVv^ T 

as"* 



VfV 



.tW * 



0^ 



catv 
ce 1 



\\ve .**' t\v\s 



ve tsVW...«c ot 



^TW ■ 



\tvs 



■ nA S?~*?^ 




^oiess^V v «* » 



or P^^'^^-'veat 



tW 



IS**** 



^\nttv^ 



Student Activities Building 




Danegger Foto 



OFFICIALLY DEDICATED 



The new Student Activities Building. The extension at the right houses the new swimming pool. Tennis courts are shown 
at the left. 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 
BUILDING DEDICATED 

Governor McKeldin, Judge Cole And 
President Elkins Speakers. 



With Maryland's Governor, Theo- 
dore R. McKeldin, as principal 
speaker and addresses by Judge Wil- 
liam P. Cole, chairman of the Board 
of Regents; University President Dr. 
Wilson H. Elkins; Dean J. Freeman 
Pyle and Student Government Presi- 
dent Charles Wickard, Maryland's 
gigantic Student Activities Building 
was formally dedicated. After that 
Coach Bud Millikan's basketball team 
walloped Virginia 67-55. 

Dedication ceremonies got under way 
when Judge Cole handed over the keys 
to President Elkins. Dr. Elkins, in 
turn, introduced student Charles Wick- 
ard who officially accepted the building 
on behalf of the student body. Prior 
to the ceremony, the Glee Club and the 
Red and White Band entertained. In- 
vocation was by Rev. Wm. C. Tepe, 
university chaplain. Dean Pyle acted 
as Master of Ceremonies. 



The "Ohs" and "Ahs" of 9,500 per- 
sons bespoke public approval of the 
Student Activities Building. 

In the ceremony, Gov. McKeldin 
praised the Student Activities Building 
as a long-needed addition to the Uni- 
versity's extra-curricular program. 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, University 
president, said the building would en- 
able the institution to better encourage 
the physical help and well-being of its 
students. 

Judge Cole stressed that the building 
"has not cost the taxpayers a penny." 
It is financed by self-liquidating bonds 
that are being paid off by a special stu- 
dent fee, he said. 

Besides organ selections, chorals by 
the glee club and the university band, 
the Terrapins' rooting section came up 
with something new — a color guard 
comprised of majorettes. 




Gov. McKeldin 



Judge Cole 



Big upset was that smoking is al- 
lowed in this new gym. 

Coach Bud Millikan had extended 
invitations to all former Maryland bas- 
ketball players. 

University presidents from Maryland 
and the District of Columbia and the 
Board of Regents had been invited to 
the ceremony and game by Dr. Elkins. 

James Tatum, University athletic di- 
rector, invited athletic directors from 
all Atlantic Coast Conference colleges 
as well as area schools. 

The new Student Activities Building 
is as wide as a football gridiron, a 



a 



Maryland 



third again as long, and stretches up 
to a height of 33 yards from the main 
floor to the rooftop. It has a perma- 
nent seating capacity of 12,004 and 
space for 4,000 additional seats, if 
needed. 

Actually, the coliseum is constructed 
more like an indoor amphitheater than 
the traditional college gymnasium. 
With the main floor sunk 33 feet be- 
low ground level, tiers of seats are 
arranged in a gigantic bowl around it. 
This feature alone lessened the build- 
ing costs considerably. The seats 
sparkle with the Maryland colors of 
red, gold, black and silver gray. The 
building contains numerous unusual 
features, which include sleeping facili- 
ties for visiting teams and combina- 
tion apartment-offices for visiting 
coaches. 

The building contains an administra- 
tive headquarters which houses the en- 
tire University Physical Education De- 
partment, the director of athletics' of- 
fice, a business office, a ticket office and 
three secretarial offices. Also includ- 
ed are a trophy room and classrooms. 
Immediately adjoining is a new swim- 
ming pool. 

The structure, Georgian in design, in 
keeping with the architectural motif 
of the campus, was used for 1955 
commencement exercises. 

A small gymnasium equipped for 
badminton, flycasting, volleyball, gym- 
nastics and special instructional facili- 
ties for boxing, wrestling and tumbling 
is included. 

Designed by Hall, Border & Donald- 
son, Baltimore architects, constructed 
by Baltimore Contractors, Inc., Mary- 
land's new coliseum means bigger and 
better facilities not only for sports 
but also for other activities. 

Paid for entirely w r ith student funds, 
the arena is surpassed in size on the 
Eastern seaboard only by New York 
City's Madison Square Garden. The 
$3.25-million auditorium was over five 
years in the planning, two and one- 
half years in the building. 



Impressive 



Enrollment 12,546 

Analysis of Enrollment as of No- 
vember 1, 1955, released by Associate 
Registrar Norma J. Azlein shows a 
total enrollment of 12,546 for 1955-56. 

Total for 1954-55 was 11,825. For 
1950-51 it was 11,009. 

1955-56 enrollment by colleges is as 
follows: — 

On Campus 

Agriculture 532 

Arts and Sciences 2279 

Business & Public Adm 1664 

Education 1066 

Engineering 1410 

Home Economics 461 

Military Science 117 

Nursing 132 

Physical Education 259 

Special & Cont. Studies 12 

Total, Undergraduate 7932 

Graduate 1521 

Total, On Campus 9453 




INTERIOR OF STUDENT ACTIVITIES BUILDING 
One newsman called it "breath taking." Another named it "Maryland's Madison 
Square Garden." 



Off Campus 

Business & Public Adm — 

Education 1 

Military Science 61 

Special & Cont. Studies 2551 

Total, Undergraduate 2613 

Graduate 480 

Total, Off Campus 3093 

Total, On & Off Campus 

Undergraduates 10545 

Graduates 2001 

GRAND TOTAL 12546 



Mrs. Whitehurst 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, vice chair- 
man of the Board of Regents, repre- 
sented the Board at the annual meet- 
ing of the National Association of 
Governing Boards of State Universities 
and Allied Institutions, in East Lans- 
ing, Mich. 

Mrs. Whitehurst, the only woman 
member of the Maryland Board on 
which she has served for more than a 
score of years, is a regional director 
of the association 
whose headquarters 
are in Burlington, 
Iowa. The only edu- 
cational group in 
the country whose 
members are re- 
gents, trustees, sup- 
ervisors and visi- 
tors, the association 
is primarily inter- 
ested in the prob- 
lems of laymen who 
serve the cause of 
higher education as 
board members. 




Subjects discussed included "Sug- 
gested Changes in Technological Edu- 
cation," "The Cost and Financing of 
Higher Education," "Academic Salar- 
ies," "The Contribution of Educational 
Foundations," "The Needs of Meeting 
Increased Enrollments," "Government- 
al Controls of Higher Education" and 
"The Place of Intercollegiate Athletics 
in Higher Education." 

From Michigan Mrs. Whitehurst 
went on a speaking tour that lasted 
a month and took her as far as Central 
America. 

She attended the National Asso- 
ciation of Parliamentarians' meeting at 
Houston, Texas, where she was one of 
the principal speakers. 

In Mexico City she addressed a group 
of women active in the field of edu- 
cation. 

From Mexico, the Baltimore club- 
woman, who is a former president of 
the General Federation of Women's 
Clubs, went to New Orleans to address 
the Louisiana federation of clubs on 
"Trends in Education." 

Before returning home Mrs. White- 
hurst visited Havana and Guatemala 
and addressed women in several Cen- 
tral American cities on educational 
problems. 



Dr. Weigand 



Mrs. Whitehurst 



Dr. George Weigand, Office of Dean 
of Students, recently appeared on the 
University of Maryland TV-MD pro- 
gram, speaking on remedial education 
and demonstrating reading techniques. 

Dr. Weigand attended a meeting of 
the U.S. National Students Associa- 
tion, in Philadelphia, in his capacity of 
Ford Foundation Advisor. 



Maryland 



Bevy Of Beauty 




HOMECOMING QUEEN CANDIDATES 

Before the University of Maryland Terrapins and the University of South Carolina Gamecocks took the field during the 
Homecoming game at College Park, the above-pictured student beauties vied for the title of "Miss Homecoming of 1955." 

The Homecoming candidates included, front row from left: Mary Jo Bossone, 19, a sophomore in music from Long Branch, 
N. J.; June Riddle, 19, a sophomore in home economics, from Hampton, N. J.; the winner, RUTH PETERSON, 18, a fresh- 
man in practical arts from Silver Spring, Md.; Barbara Snyder, 18, a sophomore in commercial art from Bethesda, Md; 
Polly Bropst, 21, a senior in home economics, from Silver Spring, Md.; Arline Beman, 21, a senior in English, from Bethesda, 
Md.; and Mickey Wetzel, 19, a junior in journalism from Front Royal, Va. 

Second row from left: Mary Ann Linscott, 18, a freshman in business and public administration, from Bethesda, Md.; Myra 
Rigor, 19, a sophomore in education, from Clinton, Md.; Barbara Burns, 19, a junior in sociology, from Dundalk, Md.; Carolee 
Stulman, 21, a senior in government and politics, from Baltimore, Md.; Rhea Mermelstein, 20, a senior in speech from Balti- 
more, Md.; Natalie Ackerman, 19, a sophomore in education from Washington, D. C; Rebecca Hamilton, 18, a freshman in 
nursing, from Oakland, Md. 

Third row, from left: Helena Day, 18, a freshman in drama from Davidsonville, Md.; Margot Lucey, 19, a sophomore in 
fine arts, from Colesville, Md.; Jary Flather, 21, a senior in home economics, from Washington, D. C; Betty Russell, 21, a sen- 
ior in sociology, from Allentown, Md.; Bobbie Dodd, 21, a senior in commercial art, from Silver Spring, Md.; Carolyn Kraus, 
19, a sophomore in childhood education, from Baltimore, Md.; Sara Jane Brandenburg, 18, a freshman in psychology, from 
Myersville, Md.; Sally Miller, 21, a senior in textiles and clothing, from Washington, D. C; Andi Richardson, 21, a senior in 
sociology, from Manhasset, N. Y. 



Homecoming '55 

Homecoming-1955 at the University 
of Maryland was celebrated by alumni, 
faculty, parents, friends and students 
at College Park, Maryland, Saturday, 
October 29, 1955. 

The day long program included a 
building dedication, a chapel service, 
an alumni luncheon, a band and float 
parade, a football game and concluded 
with the traditional homecoming dance. 

The university's new Student Union 
building, completed in September, 1954 
at a cost of $630,000, was presented 
to President Wilson H. Elkins by Judge 
William P. Cole, Jr., chairman of the 
Board of Regents. 

It was accepted from Dr. Elkins on 
behalf of the student body by Charles 
Wickard of Cumberland, Maryland, a 
senior in the College of Business and 
Public Administration and president 
of the Student Government Associa- 
tion. 



A chapel service was held at 10:30 
in Memorial Chapel. Reverend Henry 
Whiting of the National Lutheran 
Council of New York and on alumnus 
of the university, officiated. 

Alumni, friends and visitors attend- 
ed luncheon, which was described by 
the Homecoming Committee as free of 
speeches, but lots of fellowship. 

Prizes were awarded for the best 
decorated dormitory building, as well 
as the best decorated fraternity and 
sorority house. Floats were prepared 
by student organizations for the pre- 
game float parade and a prize was 
awarded for the best float. The theme 
for the house decorations and floats 
was "Traditionally yours, the Terps". 

All during the day alumni and vis- 
itors were taken on guided tours around 
the College Park campus. 

The program was climaxed with the 
homecoming dance, featuring Sauter- 
Finnegan's nationally famous orches- 
tra. 



In "Life" 

The Homecoming at Maryland re- 
ceived nationwide publicity in a LIFE 
magazine article. 

The 10-page pictorial spread entitled 
"Football Takes Over All Over," fea- 
tured scenes from various college foot- 
ball activities around the country on 
a typical weekend. 

The Maryland photos included a 
shot of Kappa Alpha Theta decorating 
its house on the Row, a close-up of 
Ruth Peterson and her escort as Home- 
coming Queen, and a picture of a Terp 
assistant football coach briefing the 
team during the game. 



The Senate 

The new faculty senate of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland met for the first 
time and elected seven members to an 
executive committee. 

The senate is part of a new faculty 
organization designed to give the teach- 
ing staff greater say in the operation 
of the school. 



8 



Maryland 



The faculty senate was chosen by a 
faculty assembly which included most 
members of the university staff. 

Those elected to the executive com- 
mittee were: 

Dr. Russell B. Allen, professor in 
the college of engineering; Dr. D. C. 
Smith, assistant dean of the school of 
medicine; Russell Reno, professor in 
the school of law; Dr. Leon P. Smith, 
dean of the college of arts and sci- 
ences; Dr. Carroll Cox, professor in 
the college of agriculture; Dr. Ronald 
Bamford, dean of the graduate school; 
Dr. Peter P. Lejins, professor in the 
college of arts and sciences. 

Serving on the committee will be 
Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, university pres- 
ident, and Dr. Harold Cotterman, Dean 
of the Faculty. 

A constitution for the faculty or- 
ganization approved by the Board of 
Regents provides that members of 
the executive committee cannot suc- 
ceed themselves more than one term, 
with the exception of the university 
president. 

At least two of the members must 
be from the staffs of the Baltimore 
professional schools, and there cannot 
be more than two members from any 
one school or college. 

At the initial meeting the senate 
decided against opening its meetings 
to the press. Information will be re- 
leased through the university's pub- 
licity-publication department, it was 
reported. 

The press is admitted to meetings 
of the full faculty assembly. 

The university's Student Government 
Association asked the Senate for per- 
mission to send a representative as 
an observer to its meetings. 

The group postponed action on this 
request until its next meeting. 



First Prize Winner 



Hall Of Fame 

Establishment of a Maryland "Hall 
of Fame" to honor the State's top 
athletes was announced by the "M" 
Club, composed of graduates who were 
letter wnnners. 

Joseph H. Deckman (Class of 1931) 
and Charlie Ellinger (Class of 1937) 



Decorations Winner 




KAPPA ALPHA'S MINSTREL FLOAT 
This showboat took first place in the fraternity float awards for Homecoming, 
1955. Lambda Chi rated second place with "The Terps Tug to Top" and the 
traditional Teke bell rang in the third place division for Tau Kappa Epsilon. 



will represent the "M" Club on the 
board who will select three living native 
Marylanders and one deceased star as 
the first "residents" of the Hall of 
Fame. 

Others on the committee are Gover- 
nor McKeldin, the honorary chairman, 
sports editors Rodger H. Pippen of 
The Sunday American and News-Post, 
Paul Menton of The Evening Sun, 
Jesse Linthicum of The Morning Sun, 
Bob Layton of the Cambridge Banner, 
and sportscasters Bailey Goss and Ed- 
die Fenton. 

Deckman, who is program chairman 
of the annual All-American banquet 
of the "M" Club, will head this group. 

Selections will be announced at that 
affair, slated Saturday, February 5, 
at the main ballroom of the Emerson 
Hotel. 

Nominations of Maryland-born ath- 
letes who excelled in any sport through- 
out the years may be sent to the "Mary- 
land Hall of Fame", c/o "M" Club, Box 
HH, University of Maryland, College 
Park, Md. 




HIGH the 



■ ■H 



Homecoming Greeting 




HOMECOMING 
Delta Gamma Sorority won first honors with the above pictured house decoration. 



QUEEN AND QUARTERBACK 

Ruth Peterson, Homecoming Queen, 
is greeted by Clifton E. Fuller, 1896, 
Maryland's first quarterback. 

The sparkle in her eyes made words 
unnecessary for this petite brunette 
freshman. Her joy was shared with her 
family, and with her Gamma Phi sisters. 

Miss Peterson is one of the cheer- 
leaders. She is also a Flight Angel. 

On campus Ruth lives in St. Mary's 
Hall. She is a Practical Arts major in 
the College of Home Economics with 
hopes of doing costume designing after 
graduation. 

The one dark spot in Ruth's big day, 
excluding the weather, was the fact that 
Midshipman Dennis Brooks, an Alabam- 
an, couldn't get leave from Annapolis 
to celebrate with her. 



Maryland 




Maryland's Oldest and 

Largest Furrier 

BALTIMORE 

^ [ ■) » ( « ) »« ( )» « < ) > ?< « ■ ^Kgfr^ 



For That Personal Touch 

merivale fashions 

4812 ROLAND AVENUE 
BALTIMORE 

— next to Delvale's — 



Adelaide DeVinny Weil 



HO 7-9551 




GEORGE H.STIEBER CO., 

FOOD SPECIALISTS 
TOWSON, MD. 



DANCE 
DRAMA 

Voice Culture 




Adults 
Children 




HILLTOP 
THEATRE 
SCHOOL 
of ARTS 

1006 N. CHARLES ST, 

BALTIMORE, MB, 

SA 7-2622 







$0L JJVL 

i/ 



By EDITH A. ROSS 



It's the exciting season of the year 
when our youngsters are coming home 
from College to gay holiday dates and 
parties — this wonderful, wonderful 
Christmas season, that we've looked 
forward to and planned for, for weeks 
past. 

There's Mary Lou's dinner dance and 
John and Harriet's egg-nog party — 
and Hi-Fi at Mildred's and on and on 
and on. Just one glamorous, thrilling 
event after another and then the ulti- 
mate, New Year's Eve. 

The fashions are magnificent and it's 
hard to choose, from the collection of 
Brocade, Lame, Satins and Silks. 

Foods and beverages come into their 
own along with the dazzle of the holi- 
days. There are so many tempting and 
appetizing gems that are so hard to 
resist, we promise the exercise will 
start all over again come January the 
second. 

Christmas is hardly over before the 
irresistible winter vacation season is 
in full swing — For those who can, 
there are exciting months cruising in 



The Gift For Epicures 
Smith field Ham 

For generations, Smithfield Horn 
has graced the holiday tables of 
those who appreciate fine foods. 

The Heidelbach Co. 

Complete Food Stores 
& Wine Merchants 
Catonsville - Roland Park 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



tropical waters, the Riviera, sunshine 
in Jamaica, the white sands of Florida 
— or skiing in Sun Valley. We drool 
at the beautiful cruise wear and fash- 
ions in general for this winter holiday. 

For we, who stay at home, we en- 
liven our winter with a series of small 
parties, attend the theatre, the opera 
and look forward to the first crocus. 

Whatever YOUR plans include for 
this season, the progressive business 
firms herewith will help to make your 
winter a happy one. 



Your holiday wardrobe is hardly 
complete without glamorous Mink from 
that fabulous collection of MANO 
SWARTZ. 

James Swartz, president of the firm, 
is an avid alumnus of the University 
of Maryland. He graduated from the 
School of Agriculture in 1917. Some- 
how he followed the trail of the little 
animals along the green pastures and 
decided Mink, Ermine, Persian Lamb 
and Chinchilla were more exciting than 
— Grain and Feed. 

The big decision had to be made — 
he joined the firm of Mano Swartz of 
which his father was president, a firm 
which had gained the reputation of 
being "Maryland's oldest and finest." 

"Jimmy," as we know him, can 
really tell you about furs. His collec- 
tion ranks among the most outstanding 
anywhere. 



Attention, MEN! Christmas shopping 
for her bothering you? Sit back and 
relax. The WARDROBE, at 1104 
North Charles Street (near the Belve- 
dere) has done your spade work for 
you. 




Bob Jones 



ARE MORE ELOQUENT THAN WORDS 



228 N. Liberty St. Baltimore, Md. 



PL 2-3737 



IMPORTERS AND GROCERS 

WINE AND LIQUOR MERCHANTS 

344-346 N. CHARLES ST. «» Mulberry Baltimore, Md. 

Tel.: MUlberry 5-0001 

Paily Deliveries to Most Sections of the City 
Gift and Fruit Baskets For AH Occasions 



Member Fruit Telegraph 



Charges Invited 



■WW^^W.II... UUL_ |. 






Start ticking off with ease that 
feminie list. Drop by and see for 
yourself the unusual Jewelry and many 
other gift suggestions. Perhaps a 
coat, a dress or lingerie to especially 
please the lady in your life. 

Another service for ye merry gentle- 
men — your gifts beautifully wrapped 
and ready to slip under the Christmas 
tree. 

So, for a MERRY CHRISTMAS, 
we'll see you at the WARDROBE. 



Juanita's BEAUTY LAND is truly a 
"land for beauty." Not only can you 
avail yourself of the newest hair style 
(the one most becoming to you), but 
you may also take advantage of Ju- 
anita's make-up service. It's smooooth! 

Then, while drying (under the mod- 
ern, cool, air-conditioned dryers), 
glance around the lovely salon and 
see the many wonderful gifts. 

For the color-conscious glamour girls, 
BEAUTY LAND is a magic land- 
just the personal touch you need when 
it comes to your hair coloring. All 
shades of blondes as well as the fasci- 
nating silver-blonde. 

Head to toe service by experts is. 
yours at Juanita's — 1216 North Charles 
Street, near the Belvedere. 



For the Arm Chair Traveler with a 
taste for foreign delicacies, a trip to 
the George H. Stieber Company, Food 
Specialist, of 531 York Road, Towson, 
Maryland, is truly a treat that is hard 
to describe. 

Just stop in this unusual store that 
for the last ten years has been im- 
porting foods and candy, personally, 
from all over the world. See for your- 
self this beautiful display. 

Such magnificent gift packages of 
the type pictured on this page can 
be shipped by their special service 
anywhere in the world. Over two hun- 
dred of these lovely gifts were sent 



EARLE KIRKLEY, INC. 




3413 6REENM0UNT AVENUE 
Boltlmore, Md. BEIment 5-0200 




to Europe last year. Also included is 
their special service for business 
houses. Exotic foods are always wel- 
come and, what with such delicacies 
to choose from as imported Swiss and 
Dutch cookies, Italian Chocolates (the 
finest candy made), Quail Eggs, Fried 
Worms, Fried Grasshoppers and Choco- 
late Covered Ants, need we say more! 
Fred Stieber, a Maryland graduate 
of the Class of 1933, has really thought 
of everything to please the gourmet's 
palate. His Smithfield Hams, cooked 
personally, must be tasted to be ap- 
preciated — no words can tell of such 
flavor. Stieber's own brand Smithfield 
Ham Spread made and packed by the 
firm, is tempting and delicious. 



If your brain is wracked by trying 
to think of the ten or twenty "Ab- 
solutely Original" ways of saying 
"Merry Christmas" to the giftees on 
your list. This is unnecessary. William 
P. Stein, Inc., has hundreds of original 
ideas to choose from. 

For a starter, see the Chippendale 
Batchelor Chest pictured here or per- 
haps someone on your list would like 
the lovely Queen Ann drop-leaf cock- 
tail table that I saw while browsing 
around the store the other day. Bet- 
ter still you stop by 409 North Charles 
Street and see such famous Norris 
reproductions as an authentic early 
American Hepplewhite Hunt Board. 
It's beautiful! 



= Open Mon., Wed., Fri. 'til 8 :30 == 

Holiday 
Parties 

Dresses for every occasion 
Street Dresses $18.95 up 

Eastern Star - Mother's Gowns 
Coats - Suits - Millinery 
SIZES 7-46 12^-24'/* 

Virginia Driskill's 

I0WS0N ^rracl 11 YORK RD. 

=EE Closed Thurs. - Parking Lot E== 



(Bounty 3jcuid 

for 

discriminating 

women 



1216 N. CHARLES STREET • BALTIMORE 
VErnon 7-9407 SAratoga 7-378? 




I This Christmas Give Famous $( 

« Norris Reproductions | 

£ From STEIN'S 

1 ^ 



Batchelor 

Chest 

Chippendale 

4 drawers 
with slide 

$160.00 



|Wm. P. Stein, Inc.! 



\ 409 N. Charles • LE 9-3384 S 
S Baltimore 

« Free Parking Just Around the Corner % 





A Sleighful of Goodies! 

FRUIT CAKES 

Fancy Holiday Ices 

Decorated Pound Cakes 

ROSEMARIE de PARIS 
LOUIS SHERRY CANDIES 



3>i&JuL 



CONFECTIONER 
CATERER 



1758 Park Ave. Baltimore MA 3-0931 



Gifts For The 
Lady in Your Life 

at 



BALTIMORE, MD. 

. . . and ladies, those beautiful 

Holiday Clothes are here. 

Free Parking Any Lot 




KARL M. GRAF 

& Company 

2220 N.CHARLES ST 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Furniture 
Interiors 




{ 'The Store of Highest 
Tradition and Prestige' 



Map Training Program 




CIVIL DEFENSE AGENCY 



Danegger Foto 



Members of the Federal Civil Defense Agency Staff College, who presented a 
5-day training program at the University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, 
for local and state leaders of Maryland. 

Front row, from left: Sherley Ewing, Director, Maryland Civil Defense Agency; 
Geraldine May, Chief Instructor Administration Course, Training and Education 
Office, Federal Civil Defense Administration; Judson D. Blakslee, Training In- 
structor, Training and Education Office, Federal Civil Defense Administration; 
Earl McKeel, Training Instructor, Training and Education Office, Federal Civil 
Defense Administration. 

Back row, from left, standing :James Ridgway, Training Instructor, Training and 
Education Office, Federal Civil Defense Administration; W. A. Ross, Chief, Exten- 
sion Activities, Training and Education Office, Federal Civil Defense Administra- 
tion; Richard H. Stottler, Director of Institutes, University of Maryland, College 
of Special and Continuation Studies. 



Librarians Attend 

Eleven members of the library staff 
attended the Baltimore Regional Meet- 
ing of the Maryland Library Associa- 
tion at Goucher College. "Libraries in 
the Life of Maryland" was the subject 



of the panel group to be on the after- 
noon program, and Dr. Virginia Can- 
field, Associate Professor of English, 
Goucher College, spoke at the dinner 
meeting. 

Maryland library staff members at- 



Distinguished Military Students 



tending the meetings were Betty Baehr, 
Lois Dewey, Eunice Disney, Margaret 
Donahue, Isabella Hayes, Hazel Pat- 
rick, Virginia Phillips, Christine Reb, 
Howard Rovelstad, David Turner, and 
Mary Urban. 



In CD Course 

Governor McKeldin wants every State 
department in Maryland to be repre- 
sented at a Civil Defense course to 
be held at the University of Maryland. 

This was revealed in a letter which 
the Governor has sent to all depart- 
ment heads requesting that they send 
a representative to attend the course. 

The five-day course, which was a 
"t'-aining program in Civil Defense 
administration for local and State lead- 
ers." 

The program was sponsored jointly 
by the University's College of Special 
and Continuation Studies and the Fed- 
eral and State Civil Defense Agencies. 

Instruction was by a traveling team 
of Federal Civil Defense experts. 



Panel Discussion 

Four foreign students of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland and four Eastern 
High School students held a panel 
discussion arranged by Miss Mary 
Parker, Head of Eastern's History De- 
partment, and Mr. Furman Bridgers, 
the university's foreign student ad- 
visor. 

The subject for the discussion was 
"Education in the United States as 
Contrasted with Education Abroad." 

Panelists from the University in- 
cluded Bahieh Mousa of Jordan, Aum- 
phai Phuangthong of Thailand, Nadir 
Valle of Italy, and Refayel Petrossian 
of Iran. 

Eastern High School panelists in- 
cluded: Patricia Peace, Elaine Wisner, 
Marjorie Hensler and Margaret Bodein. 




DMS MEDAL WINNERS 

Col. Joseph R. Ambrose, Professor of Air Science, is pictured presenting a DMS Medal to Cadet Col. Charles Johnson, 
Air Division Commander. 

The DMS Medal is presented to outstanding cadets for displaying high moral character, military aptitude, and leadership 
characteristics. 

Front row, left to right, James A. Brown, Jr., Business and Public Administration; Martin M. Burdick, Engineering; Har^ 
vey B. Gilbert, Jr., Education; Herbert E. Hunter, Engineering; Paul D. Lambridges, Arts and Sciences; Charles 0. Johnson, 
Engineering. 

Back row, left to right, John D. Miles, Military Science; Donald A. Montano, Arts and Sciences; William A. Neal, Busi- 
ness and Public Administration; James W. Pickett, Business and Public Administration; Richard A. Smith, Engineering; 
Charles E. WUkard, Business and Public Administration. 



12 



Mainland 



Be a MEAT EXPERT! 
Always say 



lagUALITY*# 



All-Meat Franks 

Every ounce of the pure beef and 
pork in Esskay's all-meat Franks 
is carefully selected by Esskay's 
experts, who season and spice 
these famous franks to wholesome, 
flavorful perfection. Be sure to 
ask for Esskay Franks — they're 
the finest made! 

WM. SCHLUDERBERG— T. J. KURDLE CO. 




L Jtoto Cttdravmqs 
for J^roarams 

— V aituons 

U 



an 



lazwcs 



Tl,e 

ADVERTISERS ENGRAVING COMPANY 

501-509 EAST PRESTON STREET 
MUlberry 5-2357 5-2358 



V.UMBEO 



For Every Purpose 

Walbrook Lumber Co. 

2636 W. North Ave. 
Baltimore, Md. 



Baltimore-Washington Express 
Company 

Daily Servic* 8*tw««n 

BALTIMORE - WASHINGTON - ANNAPOLIS 

lExIngten 9-1756 
HJ5 Rldgely $tr..t Balrimor* 30, Md. 



Farm Parley 



Approximately 150 Maryland Exten- 
sion workers met in Baltimore when 
members of Tau gathered for their 
annual conference. The session was 
geared to the theme, "Listen Together, 
Learn Together and Live Together." 

Preconference activities began when 
members of Tau Chapter, Epsilon Sig- 
ma Phi (Extension honorary organiza- 
tion) assembled. H. B. Derrick, county 
agricultural agent, Baltimore county, 
is chief of the organization. 

Paul E. Miller, director of extension, 
Michigan State University, East Lan- 
sing, addressed the first general ses- 
sion on "Adjusting to Changing Time." 
Dr. Gordon M. Cairns, dean of agricul- 
ture at University of Maryland, dis- 
cussed "A Look Ahead." In the after- 
noon State extension workers joined 
in a panel discussion, summarized by 
Dr. Miller. 

The group heard a progress report 
on working with families. Talks on 
"As Others Do It" were presented by 
John H. Holbert, county agent, and 
Crystal Summers, home economist, of 
Bedford county, Pa. 

There was an afternoon $64.00 Ques- 
tion Period. A reception and family- 
night program concluded the second 
day's meeting. 

The Maryland Home Demonstration 
Agents' Association and the Maryland 
County Agents' Association had their 
annual meetings. State specialists as- 
sembled to hear Glenn Dildine, of the 
National 4-H Club Foundation, Silver 
Spring, and John R. Pauling, United 
States Department of Agriculture Ex- 
tention agronomist. 

The conference concluded with a final 
luncheon meeting. "A Better World 
Begins at Home" was the topic of 
Mrs. J. Homer Remsburg, of Middle- 
town, Frederick county, president of 
the National Home Demonstration 
Council. 



New Road 



The new University Lane by-pass 
and a 1,000-foot spur road to Byrd 
Stadium will relieve a lot of traffic 
congestion. 

The four lane bypass will depart 
from Route 193 (University Lane) at 
Colesville Road west of the campus. It 
will intersect the Baltimore Boulevard 
one mile north of the North Gate at 
Greenbelt Road. 

The Route 1 interchange will be in 
a horseshoe design, with bypass traffic 
flowing through an underpass beneath 
Route 1. 

The Byrd Stadium spur will relieve 
much of the congestion experienced at 
football games, according to George 
Weber, University business manager. 

"The only University Lane traffic 
which will flow through University 
grounds after the by-pass is completed 
will be our own and southbound traf- 
fic," Dan Wiseman chief of University 
police, stated. 




BOVWEII 



NURSING HOME 

24'Hour Nursing Care 

for 

THE AGED AND 

CHRONICALLY ILL 

Under Supervision of 
Registered Nurses 

JUniper 9-6040 

COLESVILLE ROAD 
Silver Spring, Md. 



Murray Hardware Co. 

Your Hardware Department 
Store 

Open Daily 9 to 9 

LANGLEY SHOPPING CENTER 

UNIVERSITY LANE and 
NEW HAMPSHIRE AVE. 

SILVER SPRING, MD. 

HEmlock 4-3000 



Maryland 



13 



From Burma 



Gratitude 




THEY CHOSE MARYLAND 

Dr. Albin O. Kuhn, Assistant to the President; Charles Ba U, son of the Presi- 
dent of Burma and his wife Aimee. 



Burmese Couple 

Charles Ba U, son of the president 
of Burma, and his wife, Aimee, will 
receive their initial picture of Ameri- 
can life by attending the University 
of Maryland and keeping an apartment 
in West Hyattsville. 

The couple was steered through the 
school's registration process by uni- 
versity officials and Burmese repre- 
sentatives. 

Mr. Ba, 32, who has completed some 
undergraduate work at the University 
of Rangoon, was admitted as a special 
student in the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences to study government and politics. 
Government Service 

"He wants to enter government ser- 
vice in Burma later on," explained 
U Thant Gyi, educational attache to 
the Burmese Embassy here. 

Mrs. Ba, 29, and a graduate of the 
University of Rangoon, was entered as 
a graduate student at Maryland and 
will study philosophy. 

"I liked my former teachers," she 
said when asked to explain her prefer- 
ence for philosophy. 

Furman Bridgers, adviser to foreign 
students, at the university, said he ex- 
pects the two to have little trouble 
with the English language, owing to 
the British influence that surrounds 
their Rangoon home. The couple yes- 
terday, however, conversed with report- 
ers mostly through Mr. Gyi and U 
Kyi, officer of the president's household 
in Rangoon. 

"They are very tired from the trip, 
registration and are not used to Amer- 
ican reporters," Mr. Kyi explained. 

The new students arrived by plane 
in New York, after a four-day flight 



from Rangoon, via London. Both said 
their schedule left no time for collect- 
ing a first impression of either the 
United States or the university. 

When Mr. Ba was asked why he had 
chosen Maryland for study, Mr. Kyi 
replied that the school's proximity to 
the Burmese Embassy was a major de- 
ciding factor. 

William J. Sebald, Deputy Assistant 
Secretary of State for Far Eastern 
Affairs, had mentioned Maryland Uni- 
versity to Dr. Ba U, president of 
Burma, when Mr. Sebald was Ameri- 
can ambassador there from 1952 to 
1954. The favorable remarks of Mr. 
Sebald, an alumnus of the university's 
law school, made a deep impression, 
according to Mr. Kyi. 

At United Nations 

Dr. Ba has a son employed at the 
United Nations and another studying 
at Harvard, the household officer added. 

The new arrivals, married less than 
a year, were offered some housekeeping 
advice by Miss Adele Stamp, dean of 
women, who tried to explain the work- 
ings of a super-market during a tour 
through university offices. The Bur- 
mese students said this would be their 
first attempt at housekeeping. 

"I like to cook because I have to," 
said Mrs. Ba, when asked about her 
culinary abilities. 

Both said there is not a great deal 
of difference getween their Rangoon 
kitchen and the one in their two-bed- 
room apartment at Hyattsville. 

****** 
DEFINITION 

A small town is one in which a 
quartet can sing "Sweet Adeline 
sober. 




Col. Saunders 



For Enriched Lives and Developed 
Minds Brings Alumni Contributions 

fy 0. Jl. gau+ideM, 'fO 
(Past President,A lumni Association) 

Last evening in thumbing through a 
recent copy of the Alumnae Maga- 
zine of Vassar sent to the distaff side 
of my family, I found a thought-pro- 
voking idea in an article wherein five 
successful members of the alumnae 
told why they contributed to and sup- 
ported an unrestricted almunae fund. 

In general their thoughts covered 
a varied range of views, mainly inclu- 
sive of ideas of a warm thankfulness 
for the way the college prepared one 
■ for life and a sober 
■'rdesire to perpetuate 
the higher education 
the college provides. 
An oustandingly 
successful writer 
graduate expressed 
it very briefly by 
saying that the col- 
lege "is, after all, 
my alma mater," for 
whom she felt affec- 
tion: thinks of 
often; and to whom 
she owes much. 
Another expressed it as follows: 
"my four years there provided me 
with a background, both education- 
al and social, which I value deeply. 
It seems only natural to contribute 
to the fund so that others may 
have the same opportunities." 

Stress was laid on this matter of 
giving today so that those of tomorrow 
may profit therefrom, and thereby in- 
suring, as one put it: 

"that intellectual and moral equi- 
librium will win out over destruc- 
tion and intolerant thinking caused 
by fear and insecurity." 
One distinguished graduate from the 
period just after the turn of the cen- 
tury summed the matter up as: 

"our annual gesture of gratitude 
for enriched lives and developed 
minds," 
which the institution had made possible, 
and went on to stress that contribu- 
tions, are an investment that future 
graduates will give of their talents to 
the service of their communities. 

Perhaps graduates have many rea- 
sons for contributing to an Alumni 
Fund and we believe some may enjoy 
reading the above extract of testi- 
monials from elsewhere. 

It is hoped that the thoughts may 
stir reasons for continuing or even 
adding to previous generous contribu- 
tions, that are always deeply appreci- 
ated, and handled with scrupulous care 
and devotion to proper alumni pur- 
poses. 

****** 
TYPO ERROR 

"The general and his wife have no 
children. His hobby is golf." From 
the Miami Herald. 



14 



Maryland 



Dr. Elkins Praises 

President Wilson H. Elkins, hailed 
campus fraternal groups for their "good 
work" in the annual university clothing 
drive for Goodwill Industries. 

The student body, directed by the In- 
terfraternity Council collects discarded 
clothing, shoes, and household textiles 
and forwards them to Goodwill In- 
dustries where they are converted by 
handicapped workers into salable mer- 
chandise. Similar annual drives provide 
training and wages for about 200 per- 
sons during winter months. 



At Lansing 



President Elkins attended the annual 
meeting of the Association of Land 
Grant Colleges and Universities at 
Michigan State College. 

This year's meeting was concerned 
primarily with problems common to 
land-grant schools. 



At Hagerstown 

Speaking at Hagerstown, Dr. Wilson 
H. Elkins, president of the University, 
said Federal aid to education would 
only mean increased taxes and more 
Government control. 

He told the Hagerstown Rotary Club 
the burden of education should be kept 
at state and local levels and under 
local control. 

He said he does not believe the State 
should ever pay all the costs of a col- 
lege education — that reasonable tui- 
tions should be imposed. 

Dr. Elkins said "the individual can 
and should contribute toward his own 
preparation but the amount must not 
be so excessive as to eliminate a large 
number of deserving students." 

He told the club our complex social 
and technological society demands more 
education for all of the people and a 
higher education for those who can 
and will take advantage of it. 



Dr. Kuhn Speaks 

Dr. Albin O. Kuhn, assistant to the 
president of the University of Mary- 
land, addressed Howard County Po- 
mona Grange on the subject of "Look 
and See" at its annual banquet. Per- 
sons gathered to hear Dr. Kohn in- 
cluded many of whom had known him 
since his youth at Lisbon. 



New Chairman 

Six University of Maryland seniors 
were appointed to various chairman- 
ships in their class by Tom Lescalleet, 
class president. 

Vice President Herb Brubaker heads 
senior week activities, assisted by prom 
chairman Don Date, and banquet chair- 
man Rhea Mermelstein. 

Job placement chairman, Andrew 
Colimitra, publicity chairman, Charles 
Wickard, proposed faculty-administra- 
tion tea co-chairman, Priscilla Pilgrim; 
and Elizabeth DeMello. 




How a Baltimore Business Form 
keeps them selling 



AT ABERCROMBIE & FITCH CO. 
NEW YORK CITY 



Over the years, Abercrombie & Fitch 
Co., famous New York sports special- 
ty store, has worked closely with 
Baltimore Business Forms with one 
purpose paramount: improving the 
store's salesbpoks to reduce time con- 
sumed in filling them out, and to give 
the store's salespeople more time 
for actual selling. 

First improvement, made some time 
ago, was to redesign sales checks so 
that printing runs across the greatest 
dimension — eliminating the problem 
of filing tall, narrow slips. This has 
been further improved by the use of 
NCR paper, which permits writing 



copies without the use of carbon! Hands 
don't get smudged; no time is lost 
interleaving carbons — the salesperson 
completes the sales check more 
quickly and gets to the next customer 
sooner. 

What's the next improvement? 
That's hard to say, right now. But 
it's a cinch that Baltimore Business 
Forms will think of something! 
(Chances are, we can think of some- 
thing to help your forms problem, 
too. Often one suggestion from us can 
save literally thousands of dollars. 
Use the coupon below to write us 
today; there's no obligation, of course.) 



The B altimore Business Forms (oropanu 



(THE BALTIMORE SALESBOOK COMPANY) 



Saving time and reducing costs in business and industry 



Talbot T. Spier, '17 
President & General Manager 



Charles F. Ellinger, '37 
Special Representative 



The Baltimore Saletbeek Company, 3130 Frederick Avenue, Baltimore 29, Met. 
We are interested in seeing samples of Baltimore Business Forms. 



Name 



Company. 



Type of Business- 



Address- 



City- 



-Zone- 



. State- 



Maryland 



15 



University Hospital To Acquire Cobalt 60 

3,000;0.00 Volt Equivalent Radiation Equipment 
To Be Installed For Treatment Of Cancer. 



By VkoA. [J. iQfLuMznd 

Dr. John M. Dennis, Head of the 
Department of Radiology of the 
University Hospital in Baltimore, re- 
cently announced plans to increase the 
facilities of the X-Ray Department. 
Additional space and equipment will 
be provided for both the diagnostic and 
the therapy services of the department. 
A specialist in ir- 
radiation treatment 
of cancer — Dr. Fer- 
nando G. Bloedorn 
— was added to the 
staff of the depart- 
ment on September 
1, 1955. Dr. Bloe- 
dorn will be re- 
sponsible for use of 
this new radiation 
equipment, the "Co- 
balt 60" which pro- 
duces rays equiva- 
lent to those pro- 
duced by 3,000,000 volt x-ray equip- 
ment. 

Research in the past few years has 
indicated that superpower irradiation 
is an effective therapeutic tool in the 
treatment of malignant tumors. Con- 
ventional x-ray equipment for irradia- 
tion is capable of producing only 
200,000-250,000 volts. The "Cobalt 60" 
type of radiation produces gamma rays 
which have long been proven to be an 
effective weapon. Research indicates 
that voltages between 2-4,000,000 volts 




Dr. Bloedorn 



produce rays which are the optimum 
for irradiation therapy. 

With the installation of the new 
equipment it is necessary to have a 
radiation therapist trained in super- 
voltage irradiation. Dr. Fernando G. 
Bloedorn has been added to the staff 
of the hospital to supervise the treat- 
ment of cancer by irradiation and re- 
search in this field. His experience 
and training in irradiation thei-apy cov- 
ers several continents, South America, 
Europe and the United States. Dr. 
Bloedorn received his M.D. degree in 
1936 from the University del Litoral, 
Rosario, Argentina. He was certified 
by the American Board of Radiology 
in September 1951. The author of 
many articles on irradiation therapy, t 
he also has spent a year in studying j 
radiotherapy of cancer at the Christie 
Hospital, in Manchester, England; and 
in 1949-50 was at the Curie Institute, . 
Paris, France; the Radiostationen, Cop- 
enhagen, Denmark; and the Radium- 
hemmet, Stockholm, Sweden. Most 
recently he has been associate profes- 
sor of radiology, Postgraduate School 
of Medicine, University of Texas, Hous- 
ton, Texas. 

Malignant Tumors 

Dr. Bloedorn reports that in cases 
of malignant tumors which are diag- 
nosed in the early stages treatment 
by irradiation has been highly effec- 
tive. The "Cobalt 60" provides rays of 
optimal penetration and has additional 
advantages over previous equipment. 



'Cobalt 60' 




NEW EQUIPMENT 
This "Cobalt 60" will be added to the X-ray facilities of the University Hospital. 



Essentially the machine contains a 
radioactive isotope of cobalt, prepared 
by placing the pure cobalt in the 
atomic pile at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. 
The result of the bombardment of the 
cobalt by the radioactive pile is the 
radioactive isotope cobalt 60. It has 
a half life of 5.3 years, which means 
that 50% of its radiation power is di- 
minished in that time. The source of 
"Cobalt 60" will be replaced every 
three years to insure its constancy of 
radiation. 

Focus Critical 

When used for therapy, the patient 
is placed on a table and the rays of 
the machine are focused on the site of 
the tumor. The focusing is critical and 
an area the size of an ordinary postage 
stamp or as large as a saucer may be 
treated at one time. It is possible for 
the machine to revolve around the pa- 
tient so that the rays are constantly 
focused on the tumor and pass harm- 
lessly through the other portions of 
the body. In more conventional ma- 
chines the damage to normal tissue 
while irradiating a deep seated tumor 
has been a problem. The "Cobalt 60" 
overcomes this obstacle and patients 
tolerate the therapy to a greater ex- 
tent than with older methods. 

In order to safeguard the tech- 
nicians and the therapist using this 
equipment, it must be housed in a well 
shielded room. At the University Hos- 
pital the "Cobalt 60" will be installed 
in a basement room with walls of con- 
crete 18 inches thick. The equipment 
is operated entirely by remote control. 

Besides the addition of the "Cobalt 
60," Dr. Dennis states that the present 
floor space and facilities of the Rad- 
iology Department will be more than 
doubled. $190,000.00 has been provided 
by the State Legislature and $48,000.00 
from the Federal Government under 
the terms of the Hill-Burton Act, pro- 
viding financial assistance to hospital 
construction. Of these funds, $140,- 
000.00 will be used for the new con- 
struction and $98,000.00 for new equip- 
ment. At the present time the facili- 
ties of the X-Ray Department are 
handling 36,000 patients a year in the 
diagnostic service. This figure is more 
than double the number of patients 
ten years ago. The expansion of the 
department will make it possible to 
utilize to the fullest extent the value 
of x-ray diagnosis. The four full-time 
members of the department will be in- 
creased with the addition of a full-time 
physicist by July 1, 1956. At that time 
it will be possible to raise the num- 
ber of resident trainees from four to 
five. 

Important Phase 

Dr. Bloedorn points out that basic 
research will constitute an important 
phase of the new program. With the 
new equipment the treatment of cancer 
of the urinary bladder by radiation will 
be further investigated. This impor- 
tant area has been largely neglected 
in previous cancer research. Another 
research problem to investigate is the 
application of radium itself in the 
treatment of cancer. Dr. Bloedorn 



16 



Maryland 



states that "it is necessary to develop 
a system for calculating the exposure 
times and indications for its use." For 
this area of research he will use the 
University's $30,000.00 supply of rad- 
ium. Radium has been used in the past 
for irradiation of tumors and there is 
evidence that investigation will disclose 
further fields of application. 

When the installation and additions 
are completed the people in the State 
of Maryland will have available the 
newest type of irradiation facilities for 
the treatment of cancer. The National 
Institutes of Health has three super- 
voltage machines but their availabil- 
ity to people in Maryland is limited. 



Deferment 

College students interested in taking 
the Selective Service College Qualifica- 
tion Test had until midnight, Novem- 
ber 1, to submit application, it was 
announced by Dr. Donald K. Pumroy, 
test supervisor. The test center was 
Counseling Center, University of Mar- 
land. 

To be eligible to apply for the test, 
given to college students throughout 
the United States, November 17, a stu- 
dent must have intended to request 
deferment as a student, by satisfac- 
torily pursuing a full-time course of 
instruction, and must not have pre- 
viously taken the test. The purpose of 
the testing program is to provide evi- 
dence for the use of local boards in 
considering deferment of a registrant 
from military service as a student. 

The test was developed by Science 
Research Associates of Chicago and 
New York, one of the nation's leading 
publishers of educational testing, read- 
ing-improvement, and guidance ma- 
terials. 

Qualified students interested in tak- 
ing this test to qualify for possible 
draft deferment in order to continue 
their college education, were urged to 
get their applications at any Selective 
Service Local Board before the Novem- 
ber 1 deadline. 

For additional information, students 
consulted any Selective Service Board. 



Sesq 



Centennial- 
uicentennial 



David Brigham, alumni secretary 
and over-all coordinator for the Uni- 
versity's Centennial and Sesquicenten- 
nial, announced that the 15-month cele- 
bration will officially open March 3 
with an exhibit in the Student Activi- 
ties Building of 100 booths depicting 
the progress of schools and depart- 
ments of the University during the 
past 100 years at College Park. 

The exhibit will run through Tues- 
day, March 6, the day the College Park 
campus is 100 years old. 

Other events include a Charter Day 
observance to be held January 19, 1957, 
and a week of activities in June 1957 
in honor of the 150th anniversary of 
the establishment of the College of 
Medicine. 



STANLEY COAL 



HEATS THE 



University of Maryland 



STANLEY COAL CO 

WHOLESALE and RETAIL 



Creliin 



Maryland 



G00DB0DY & CO. 

Est. 1891 
Members N. Y. Stock Exchange 

RALPH A. BAIERL 

Reg. Representative 

10 N. JONATHAN STREET 
Hagerstown, Md. Phone 5301 




Dietrich & Gambrill, Inc. 

Frederick, Md. 

A Maryland Institution 



E. A. MAAS 
Owner 



VyiaoA 0iAj2£jiALiig OpJUciaru 



2 LOCATIONS 



13 SUMMIT AVE 

Hagerstown, Md. 

Phone 3480 



5 W. SECOND 

Frederick, Md. 

Phone MO 2-1451 



LONG VIEW 
NURSING HOME 

FOR CHRONIC AND CONVALESCENT PATIENTS 

KATES REASONABLE 
MRS. KATHLEEN M. TWIGG, R.N. 
Manchester, Md. 
PHONE HAMPSTEAD 6271 



Masser'S Mdtel & Restaurant 

Maryland's Outstanding 

MOTEL 

OPEN ALL YEAR 
FINE DINING ROOM 
AIR-CONDITIONED 
On U.S. Route 40 — 2 Miles West of Frederick, Md. 




SSEY - H 



5, SjoIsa, ojuL SeAvioL 



N. E. Kepauver, Jr. 
PHONE 30 MIDDLETOWN, MARYLAND SKYLINE 3-7481 
Hay - Straw - Tractors • Combines - Farm Implements 
Serving Frederick County Since 1935 



Maryland 



n 



Glenn L. Martin Passes 

University's Greatest Benefactor And Former 
Member of Board of Regents. 



Great Benefactor 



Glenn L. Martin, pioneer flyer and a 
pace setter for the development 
aircraft industry, died at University 
Hospital. He was 69 years old. 

He was one of the University's great- 
est benefactors and a former member 
of the Board of Regents. 

Released from the hospital less than 
two weeks previously after a bout with 
a respiratory infection, Mr. Martin 
suffered a cerebral hemorrhage. 

His contributions to the University 
totalled $2,839,215.51. 

Dr. W. Kennedy Waller, long Mr. 
Martin's physician, brought his patient 
back to the Baltimore hospital by am- 
bulance. Thus passed into history a 
legend in the modern miracle of flight. 

Founder and former president of the 
Glenn L. Martin Company, Mr. Martin's 
story is largely the saga of aviation as 
it grew up from perilous experimenta- 
tion to a giant enterprise challenging 
the very limits of space and basic in 
national defense. 

Dominated from childhood by a pas- 
sion for flight and endowed with me- 
chanical genius, Glenn Luther Martin 
combined vision with ability to estab- 
lish one of the country's most produc- 
tive aircraft factories and to produce 
a succession of new and revolutionary 
designs for flying machines. 

In alarm at his experiments with 
flight, a family friend in 1910 described 
Glenn Martin as a "wild-eyed, hallu- 
cinated visionary," begging that paren- 
tal influence be used to turn him to 
"substantial, feasible and profitable 
pursuits." 

But the visions, were rooted in 
shrewd observation and study, added to 
imagination and a will that would not 
be denied. 

Determined 

Although he went barnstorming and 
put on exhibition flights to get the 
financial backing he had to have, young 
Martin was by nature a cool-headed, 
careful man, confident and determined. 

He declined to accept limitations on 
the possibilities of flight and through- 
out his life looked ahead to fresh con- 
cepts and designs, predicting fabulous 
advances which had a way of becoming 
realities and being adopted by more 
conservative thinkers. 

Glenn Martin was born at Macks- 
burg, Iowa, on January 17, 1886, the 
only child of Clarence Y. and Arminta 
DeLong Martin. When he was 2 years 
old, the family moved to the little town 
of Liberal, Kan., where the father 
was a hardware merchant. 

Started Early 

Even as a very young child, the boy 



manifested his fascination with the 
wind and its powers. 

There is a story that he rigged one 
of his mother's sheets to his little red 
express wagon when he was only 4 
years old and that later he sailed on 
ice skates over the frozen pond and 
experimented with a sail on his bicycle. 

When Glenn was 6, he devised a box- 
kite model so successful that he put it 
into "production" on the kitchen floor 
and marketed the kites to his playmates 
for a quarter a piece. 

To Salina, Kansas 

From Liberal, the Martins moved to 
Salina, Kan., when the son was 9 years 
old. While he was in high school there, 
young Glenn got a job in a bicycle shop, 
using and developing his inherent flair 
for things mechanical. Later, with the 
coming of the automobile to Salina, he 
worked in a garage and obtained his 
basic understanding of the internal 
combustion engine. 

As a youth in Kansas, Glenn Martin 
became a crack shot, devoting most of 
his spare time to bird hunting. During 
those years, when the science of avia- 
tion was still unknown, the boy gave 
keen attention to the flight of the birds, 
to their takeoff and landing techniques, 
to the effectiveness of different wing 
spans — all observations of significance 
in his later life. 

Took Business Course 

After high school in Salina, young 
Martin took a two-year business course 
at Kansas Wesleyan University, an- 
other important part in his training for 
the career which was to come. 

For there he learned the funda- 
mentals of business administration es- 
sential for his guidance in combining 
his flying skill and mechanical genius 
with the management of his own indus- 
trial plants. 

A little of his early interest in the 
winds and in flight had been obscured 
for young Martin until there came the 
first published accounts of the historic 
flight of the Wright brothers in Kitty 
Hawk, N.C. 

Fired with excitement at the news, 
the youth rushed to his mother with 
the newspaper account and with the 
announcement that he, too, would fly. 

Mother's Faith 

Mrs. Martin's confidence and enthu- 
siam equaled his. Throughout her life — 
she died in 1953 — the mother gave her 
son limitless encouragement and faith. 

Always with the close collaboration 
of his mother, Glenn Martin set about 
building for himself a plane which 
would fly under power. He rented an 
abandoned church in Santa Ana, and 
worked there at night under the light 




GLENN L. MARTIN 

Former member of Board of Regents 
passes away. 



of a kerosene lamp held in his mother's 
hands. 

First Trial Flight 

The first Martin flying machine was 
fashioned of spruce, bamboo, muslin 
and wire, with a propeller Martin him- 
self had carved out of wood. The power 
came from a rebuilt four-cylinder, 12- 
horsepower Ford engine, set amid- 
ships. 

At dawn on August 1, 1909, the young 
designer and builder had the craft 
towed to a pasture at the edge of 
town for the first trial flight. 

He rose only 2 feet and covered only 
100 feet, for Glenn Martin had no 
flight training and knew he must teach 
himself to fly by cautious trial and err- 
or. The method was successful, and 
soon he was soaring 15 feet and cover- 
ing 100 yards, feeling his way with the 
controls. 

There began then a period of exhibi- 
tion flights at country fairs and other 
public gatherings, a barnstorming pro- 
gram that took young Martin all over 
the West and financed his further ex- 
plorations into the possibilities of flight. 

Crowds thought of Glenn Martin as 
a daredevil, and newspapers made 
spectacular headlines of his stunts, but 
behind all the fanfare was a serious, 
determined young man, thorough and 
cautious, putting on shows to make 
money for the manufacture and sale 
of commercial and military aircraft. 

Fame Spread 

As his fame spread with the expan- 
sion of his exhibition flights, a few for- 
ward-looking men commissioned him 
to build planes for them, and the first 
Martin Company, no longer housed in 
an abandoned church, was in operation. 



IS 



Maryland 



Among the many "firsts" which flash 
through the history of Martin exploits 
was his over-ocean flight in a seaplane 
from Newport Bay, near Los Angeles, 
to Catalina Island, 38 miles away. This 
happened in 1912 and focused world at- 
tention on the possibilities of sea- 
planes. Glenn Martin's interest in them 
never faltered. 

Glenn Martin transferred the center 
of his activities to Middle River, Md., 
in 1929, setting up a factory which 
during the war years mushroomed over 
wide acreage and which today has a 
$92,999,999 annual payroll. 
Trans-Oceanic 

Here the great Clipper ships, the 
transoceanic flying boats, were built 
for Pan-American Airways for the first 
trans-Pacific passenger service in the 
world. Here was designed the Mars, 
prototype for many other Navy craft. 

Many other fighting and commer- 
cial craft have been designed, built and 
tested at the factory, now designated by 
the Navy for a significant part in the 
vast space travel program of the 
future. 

In 1949 Glenn Martin resigned as 
president and general manager of the 
company which bears his name, and in 
1952 he stepped down as chairman of 
the board. He remained, however, a 
director of the company and was a 
regular attendant at meetings. 

Since he relinquished active manage- 
ment of the company, Mr. Martin has 
traveled widely, lecturing on the future 
of aviation in many cities. He predicted 
journeys to the moon within 25 years 
and flights at speeds of 25,000 miles an 
hour within half a century. 

Possessed of more leisure than he 
had enjoyed during his full and dra- 
matic life, Mr. Martin also had spent 
much time at Glenmar, his farm near 
Chestertown. 

A hunter and sportsman all his life, 
he had new opportunity in these latter 
years for the bird hunting so import- 
ant in his youth. 

He was for many years president of 
the League of Maryland Sportsmen, 
was a vice president of Ducks Unlim- 
ited, and an officer in the All American 
Amateur Baseball Association. 

Many Honors 

Glenn Martin's philanthropies were 
linked with the two dominating influ- 
ences in his life — aviation and his de- 
votion to his mother. 

Many honors came to Glenn Martin 
as his career developed in creative pro- 
duction. In 1933 he was given the 
Collier Trophy, one of the highest 
honors in the industry, for the greatest 
aeronautical achievement of the year. 

To the very end of his life, Mr. Mar- 
tin was willing to give of his limited 
time and limitless ability in the inter- 
ests of national defense. 

During his convalescence he said the 
fatigue that brought on his recent ill- 
ness probably was caused in part by 
some hard work for the Government 



on secret armament developments and 
an invention in the field of explosives. 

An industrialist as well as an in- 
ventor, flyer and designer, he faced a 
number of financial crises during his 
long career in manufacturing. Drastic 
changes in the economic life of the 
nation were reflected in his own busi- 
ness, and there were times when fresh 
capital was required. 

Nevertheless, the factory at Middle 
River became the largest privately 
owned aircraft-manufacturing plant in 
the world. 



Publicists Meet 

College publicists from five states 
and the District of Columbia met with 
representatives of the Washington and 
Baltimore press, radio and television 
organizations in a three-day confer- 
ence in Washington, D. C. 

One hundred men and women en- 
gaged in public relations and develop- 
ment work attended the fall meeting 
of district four of the American Col- 
lege Public Relations Association. They 
come from colleges and universities in 
the District of Columbia, Maryland, 
Virginia, North Carolina, West Vir- 
ginia and Delaware. 

Two major addresses were given dur- 
ing the conference. Bradford Ansley, 
national president of ACPRA, spoke 
at a dinner meeting. Arnold Wilkes, 
public service director of WBAL-TV 
in Baltimore, addressed a dinner meet- 
ing at the University of Maryland. 

During the conference, six panel dis- 
cussions were conducted; a magazine 
writers and editors panel, a special 
writers panel, a television panel, and 
panels on fund raising, sports, and 
campus public relations. 

The sports panel included: Merrill 
Whittlesey, sports reporter of the 
Washington Star; Jim Gibbons of 
WMAL-TV; Carroll Hall, sports pub- 
licist of George Washington Univer- 
sity. Moderator: Joe Blair of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

Conference chairman was Thomas 
Orpwood, assistant director of publicity 
at the University of Maryland. He did 
his usual good job. 



In Portuguese 

An article under the byline of Dr. 
Ernest N. Cory, State Entomologist and 
Head of Entomology, at the University, 
appears in "Orquida", the South Amer- 
ican Publication on orchids. The rais- 
ing and care of orchids has long been 
Dr. Cory's hobby and he enjoys an in- 
ternational reputation in that field. 

****** 
COMEDOWN 

After a tiff with his wife, a fellow 
we know declared that if women ever 
get equal rights it will be quite a come- 
down for them. 



© 



r'/arulandi only 
L^kints* f\*ttauranl 
ncomminatd oij Kjourmtt't 
Ljuld* to Lpoa (Latin f" 

HI HA I 

Charles St. below 25th 
BALTIMORE 18, MD. 

BEImonl 5-8744 



J>. 



i mm i. 



Serving the 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

OF BALTIMORE 

SYKESVILLE, MD. 



AMERICAN 

Office Equipment Co., Inc. 
COMPLETE LINE OF 

DESKS, CHAIRS, 

FILING CABINETS, 

SAFES 

ROOM AIR CONDITIONERS 
and OFFICE PARTITIONS 

nought, Sold & Exchanged 

Leather 

Upholstered Furniture 

NEW and USED 

309 N. CALVERT STREET 
Baltimore, Md. 

LExington 9-7529 

Member Baltimore Office Furniture Asso. 



«BE. 5-7135 Call 



HO. 7-6746* 



A & F nURSeS REGISTRV 

MALE — FEMALE 

RNS LICENSED PRACTICALS 

Lie. — Practicals - Maternity - Bonded 

Nurses 

Sarah Anderson 613 Homestead St. 

% Manager Baltimore 18, Md. • 



Maryland 



19 



Walter C. Summer 

Walter C. Summer, 70-year-old Gen- 
eral Service supervisor, was awarded 
a plague by SGA commending his many 
years of service to the University. 

Officially retired on November 30, 
he closed another phase of his many 
faceted career. Graduating from Penn 
State University in 1910, he began his 
career as an engineer for General 
Electric. 

Broadening his field, he held jobs 
in the Civil Conservation Corps, Re- 
construction Finance Corporation, and 
the grain elevator business. He served 
as a major in the Army during World 
War II. 

The plaque reads: "Awarded to Wal- 
ter C. Summer in appreciation for 
services to students at the University 
of Maryland. 



Boulevard Blunder 

Maryland students started their 
homecoming week end by turning a 
pep rally into a roadblock on Balti- 
more Boulevard and harassing police 
officers for more than an hour. It was 
not so good. 

Police were greeted with a crossfire 
of flying eggs and rolls of toilet paper. 

They said the students shouted: 

"We hate cops!" 

"We want tear gas!" 

Five men students were taken to 
the Hyattsville police station, charged 
with disorderly conduct and released 
on $28.50 collateral. 

A total of 10 county, State and uni- 
versity police cars were put into the 
struggle to disperse the crowd esti- 
mated at more than 1,000. 

Titled "Big Boulevard Blunder," the 
Diamondback commentted editorially, 

"This was not a Paris mob during the 
French Revolution. 

"The people in it are still living (it's 
a wonder that they are, but they are). 
They are 'students'. 

"They are not Egyptians, or Mexi- 
cans, or students from some other far 
away place rioting over an important 
political controversy. They are— and 
this pains us — University of Maryland 
'students' rioting for the sole purpose 
of giving the police a hard time, dis- 
turbing the peace, and making gen- 
eral nuisances of themselves in the 
eyes of the public. 

"In no way could that mess down on 
the Boulevard be termed school spirit 
or even 'runaway school spirit'. 

"It is not school spirit when 500 
Terps disrespectfully dash off while 
their Alma Mater is being played. 

"It is not school spirit to give the 
University a bad name and unfavorable 
publicity. 

"It is not school spirit to be arrested 
by the police and kicked out of school. 

"Just how those leaders of the well 
planned Boulevard melee got into 
school beats us. We certainly hope 
they're not around to read this. 

"There is a strong possibility that 
their actions will mean the end of pep 
rallies. Students were warned several 



times through Diamondback news stor- 
ies of the consequences of a Boulevard 
riot. 

"Besides that, it's reported that the 
police 'are really teed off'. Student 
opinion seems to indicate a feeling 
that the police should have sat back 
and enjoyed the whole exciting affair 
while traffic lined up from here to Bal- 
timore. 

"The mobsters might like to know 
that the very policemen they gave the 
hardest times to are the ones who have 
a record of consistently giving the stu- 
dent the benefit of the doubt. 

"Chanting 'We hate cops', throwing 
stones and eggs, and stealing hats are 
acts which certainly reflect a high level 
of intelligence! 

"That 'we don't give a damn' atti- 
tude toward other people is certainly 
appropriate for the great All-American 
school! 

"Press polls rated our Terrapins the 
No. 1 team in the nation. The Boule- 
vard escapade certainly rated several 
hundred other Terrapins No. 1 lame- 
brains for the way they chose to sup- 
port their team." 



UN Flag Waves 

Found: two flag poles and a solu- 
tion to the UN flag controversy. 

The University was presented with 
a United Nations flag to cele- 
bi-ate the third annual UN Day. An 
interfaith choir sang, the Chapel bells 
played "Finlandia," and the Pershing 
Rifles color guard led a procession to 
campus. 

But when the question of the position 
of the flag arose, the hubbub began. 
It was decided to fly the UN flag be- 
low the Maryland flag in front of the 
Armory. 

When an objection was raised the 
Washington papers picked it up and 
erroneously stated that the UN Day 
Committee wished to place the UN flag 
above the American flag which waved 
from the other pole. A bigger hub- 
bub developed. 

It was all settled, however, when 
someone remembered the flagpoles by 
the Administration Building. They now 
wave the two flags — the American and 
the UN — on separate poles, and at 
equal heights. 



No Drinking 



Calling attention to a regulation that 
has been "on the books" since 1914, 
President Wilson H. Elkins announced 
that the rule would hereafter be en- 
forced and that there must be no 
drinking of alcoholic beverages on 
campus. 

Addressing an Interf raternity Council 
ages on campus or in any fraternity 
or sorority or at any function by an 
organization sponsored by the Univer- 
sity. The Interfraternity Council voted 
to approve the administrations ban. 



The vote came after a near three- 
hour closed meeting attended by rep- 
resentatives of the 24 social fraterni- 
ties and Robert James, assistant dean 
of men. 

In a statement issued after the meet- 
ing, Larry Brant, I.F.C. president, de- 
clared this group would take "what- 
ever action is needed against any fra- 
ternity violating the no-drinking rule." 

"Action has always been taken when 
a violation has occurred in the past," 
the fraternity leader said. "Now we 
will be more stringent about it." 

Mr. James said that the rule "has 
always been enforced in the past with 
varying success." 

Dr. Elkins's statement merely gave 
more publicity to it, he said. 

President Elkins said that the Uni- 
versity could take no middle-of-the- 
road position in regard to drinking. 
"You're either against it or you con- 
done it," he said. He added that at 
the University there are "all kinds of 
people, with different backgrounds, in- 
cluding a vast number of minors." 

He said the University regulation 
was "a wisie regulation, based on 
knowledge and experience." 

The President said he was "not so 
naive as to think it can be enforced 
100 percent," but that it was the most 
effective method. 

He does not want to be "held re- 
sponsible — which I am in the final 
analysis — for a fraternity where drink- 
ing is permitted." 

Dr. Elkins said that if the admin- 
istration did not get the cooperation 
of the Greeks in enforcing the rules, 
he thought "they were probably wit- 
nessing the beginning of the end for 
fraternities at the University." 

The former fraternity man at the 
University of Texas added that he 
hoped Maryland would never face this 
alternative and that he believed "fra- 
ternities have something to offer both 
the individual and the University of 
which they are a part." 

In reply to the argument that "pro- 
hibition" would lead to the slaughter 
of students on the highway, the presi- 
dent said he didn't think it "holds any 
water." 

"That's an awfully low plane on 
which to pitch a university student." 



At Atlantic City 

Mrs. Norma J. Azlein, Associate 
Registrar, represented the University 
at the 69th Annual Conference of the 
Middle States Association of Colleges 
and Secondary Schools at Atlantic City, 
N.J. 

At a meeting of collegiate registrars 
and officers of admissions of the asso- 
ciation, Mrs. Azlein participated as a 
panelist in a discussion dealing with 
problems and procedures in the fields 
of registration and admission. 

Other panelists included Michael T. 
Boland, registrar at St. Josephs Col- 



20 



Maryland 



lege in Philadelphia and chairman of 
the meeting, and William J. Everts, 
registrar at Colgate University. 



Famous Piano 

In 1942, following the German defeat 
at El Alamein, Avner Carmi, an Israeli 
piano tuner then a truckdriver in a 
British transport unit, saw a strange 
looking piano, covered from top to 
bottom with a layer of plaster. Carmi 
was ordered to burn it as rubbish. But 
the piano wound up with a camp show 
and toured the Mediterranean. In Israel 
salvage disposed of it to a Tel Aviv 
junk dealer. 

Carmi had been discharged from the 
army and returned to his piano work- 
shop in Tel Aviv. 

Pounding had cracked off a small 
piece of the plaster and under it was 
revealed an exquisitely carved cherub 
beating a small drum. Carmi, struck 
by an idea, went to his desk and dug 
out an old picture of The Sena Piano- 
forte. There in front of him stood the 
Piano of the King of Italy — the piano 
that had been compared to the Harp 
of King David! 

Construction began on this piano 
around 1790 by the Marchesio family, 
harpsichord makers of Turin. In 1810 
it served as a wedding gift to Rebecca 
Mai'chesio and Antion Ferri of Siena. 
In 1852, Ferri's son carved the present 
case with wood taken from the pillars 
of an old church, which according to 
legend, had been removed from Solo- 
mon's Temple and brought to Italy by 
Titus after he destroyed Jerusalem. The 
instrument was exhibited as one of 
Siena's art treasures in Paris in 1867 
where it won several awards. In 1868 
it was presented to Umberto as a wed- 
ding gift and remained with the House 
of Savoy until it vanished mysteriously 
from the coronation palace, Monza, in 
1942. 



A Famous Piano 



'■CJ5? 






'■' is *§& 

• 


• • 

L 

I' £ 





SIENA PIANOFORTE 
Reginald Stewart plays the celebrated 
Siena Pianoforte for the first time on 
television before the WBAL-TV cam- 
eras. In the photo, Stewart is seen 
playing while Avner Carmi, who owns 
the piano, looks on. 



jQVG Dy IflQII! People in 48 States and 29 
Foreign Countries maintain growing 
savings accounts in this big, strong, insured savings 
institution. Liberal dividends, compounded semi-annually. 




PERPETUAL 

BUILDING ASSOCIATION 

MAIN OFFICE: 11TH AND E STREETS. N. W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

ASSETS MORE THAN $200,000,000 



'Perpetual's Army of Savers Exiend Clear Around fhe World. 




IMBASSf 



The Home of "GOLDEN GUERNSEY MILK" 

The Embassy Label on Dairy Products is 

A MARK OF QUALITY 

A SYMBOL OF PURITY, and 

AN EMBLEM OF EXCELLENCE 

For Dependable Service 

Call DUpont 7-1441 



1 620 FIRST STREET, N.W. 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 



S. D. MOSES, INC. 

Concrete Construction 



823 MILLS BUILDING 



NAtional 8-8586 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Maryland 



21 



C^ditorialt 



1IA11VEY I.. MILLER 

Editor 



1 
m 



|pghi of % Porib 

"Behold I am with you alway." 

<A ^nlt&ag Jiiitorial 



■Jrt ing in the New Year, 1956! 
c We ring it in just after observ- 
ing the anniversary of Him who said, 
"I am the Light of the World." How 
pitifully in need of that Light is the 
world of 1956! 

Three Great Reporters 

The Light of the world! Christmas! 
The birthday of the Babe of Bethlehem. 
History gives you three accounts of 
His life, written by three great histo- 
rians who, by today's newspaper stand- 
ards, would be rated as Grade A re- 
porters. 

Christmas Eve, the birthday of the 
Babe of Bethlehem. What does it mean 
to the world? What should it mean 
to the world? What did His life teach 
the world? 

It should mean a world at peace, a 
world of men of good will, the shared 
life, democracy, tolerance, appreciation, 
friendship and helpfulness, one toward 
another. 

Adherence to ideals which the Babe 
of Bethlehem taught and for which He 
lived and died is all the whole human 
race needs. 

His ideals apply to those who believe 
He was sent by God the Father, who 
believe that He literally calmed the 
seas, raised the dead, healed the sick, 
cast out devils and walked upon the 
surface of the deep. 

However, His ideals are just as right 
for those who believe Jesus of Naza- 
reth was but a human being like any 
other man; the son of Joseph and 
Mary, who died, was buried and stayed 
buried. 

Ideals of Major Importance 

The important fact to all mankind 
is that His ideals did not die and will 
not die, but have grown and will grow 
some more in spite of efforts to kill 
them and bury them. 

His teachings and His ideals were 
and are right. If they were not the 
millions of stained glass windows 
erected to His name would not be in 
existence the world over. As Julia 



Ward Howe so aptly wrote in the 
Battle Hymn of the Republic, "His 
Truth is marching on!" 

Here was a great Leader of men, a 
profound student of theology, a genius. 

At twelve years of age this prodigy 
astounded the High Priests of the 
Temple and His own parents by His 
profound knowledge and wisdom. 

As He taught, preached and urged 
the religion of a better way of life, 
tolerance, love and kindness to an ever 
growing following, a small group of 
men of power railroaded Him in the 
night, without trial or defense. When 
"the mob" had seen this Gentle Jew, 
the last of the great Hebrew prophets, 
die upon the cross on the Hill of Skulls 
they may have thought that was the 
last of Him. However, He had taught 
that no man or group of men, no 
nation, no national leader, no matter 
how powerful, is as great as the ideals 
expounded by Him. 

Which Of His Lessons Now? 

And so we pass another one of His 
birthday anniversaries with a new year 
facing a troubled world. 

Which of the many fine, decent, clean 
lessons He taught would you expound 
now for the world of 1956? 

With the globe as it is today, we'd 
suggest the world's finest lesson in 
TOLERANCE as illustrated by Him. 

It is a lesson that emphasizes the 
Golden Rule. It is needed today, among 
nations and among individuals, as it 
has always been needed. 

The lesson takes you to Jerusalem. 
There is the sturdy, young Nazarene 
carpenter, who had fashioned a whip 
with which He drove the money chang- 
ers and pigeon peddlers from the House 
of the Lord, to further antagonize the 
enemies who increased their schemes 
and efforts toward trumping up charges 
designed to do away with Him. 

Greatest Lesson In Tolerance 

If they could prove that this Man 
urged violation of the Laws of Moses 
that ought to accomplish their objec- 
tive. So, knowing Him for His kind- 
ness and tolerance, they called His at- 
tention to a woman of the streets; 
pushed her before Him where she stood 
miserably plucking at the hem of her 
tawdry gown. 

"Master," they said, "this woman 
has been taken in adultery, in the very 
act. Now Moses, in the law, com- 
manded us that such should be stoned. 
What sayest thou?" 

That was it? If He urged violation 
of the law of Moses they had Him! If 
he urged compliance with the law the 
stoning of the woman would conflict 
with His doctrine of tolerance, love and 
kindness. Thus He would lose His 
followers. He couldn't win. 



The Book tells us that Jesus did not 
immediately answer the question. He 
stooped down and, as though He had 
not heard them, He wrote on the 
ground with His finger. 

Then He looked up at them and said, 

"He that is without sin among you, 
let him first cast a stone at her!" 

A few moments later He turned to 
Mary Magdalene and asked, "Where 
are thine accusers? Hath no man ac- 
cused thee?" 

They had slunk out. Jesus and Mary 
Magdalene were alone. 

"No man, Lord," was her reply. 

Jesus said, "Neither do I condemn 
thee. Go and sin no more." 

That is the lesson for 1956. When 
it is quoted, attention is seldom called 
to the fact that in the Scriptures this 
lesson is immediately followed with 
Jesus' words, "I am the Light of the 
World!" 

Loyal Beyond All Others 

The Magdalene story of tolerance is 
one of the lessons that made Him the 
Light of the World. 

And how did this lesson affect Mary 
Magdalene? How did she react to this 
helpful advice, this chance to shoot 
straight from then on? 

The record is that she followed Jesus 
from that day until the one on which 
she saw the spikes cruelly driven 
through His hands and through His 
feet. 

With bowed head she stood with 
others as, from the height of the cross, 
He moaned His plea. "Father, forgive 
them for they know not what they do!" 

With the others she stood the vigil 
as the earth shook in darkness and the 
curtains of the temple were rent asun- 
der. As the others, one by one, turned 
away from the scene of this tragedy 
of the ages, Mary Magdalene, who 
might have, without Him, been stoned 
to death, stood guard at the sepulchre 
where they had placed Him, loyal 
beyond death and beyond all others. 

It was there that she was asked, 
"Woman, why weepest thou?" 

She replied, "Because they have 
taken away my Lord." 

Beside her stood a Man whom she 
mistook for the gardener. He asked, 
"Whom seekest thou?" Then He ad- 
dressed her, "Mary!" 

No One Has Taken Him Away 

With her reply, "Master!" came the 
realization that no one has taken Him 
away! No one ever has or ever will 
take Him away. He is here today, for 
those who will but see Him. His ideals 
are here for those who will abide by 
them. 

If the world but practiced the toler- 
ance taught by the lesson of Mary 
Magdalene it would be a grand old 




FOOTBALL EXPRESSIONS 
During the first half of the Clemson-Maryland thriller. 



22 



Maryland 



world in which to live. "He that is 
without sin let him first cast a stone." 

As the world is going now, in spite 
of the advice "that we love one an- 
other," the human race might try giv- 
ing the world back to the rabbits. Man 
has made a horrendous mess of it. 

Mary Magdalene, loyal from the 
market place to the grave and beyond, 
learned the lesson that all the world 
can learn, namely that no one has taken 
Jesus away from any one for, closely 
following the beautiful story of Mary 
Magdalene, the Book gives us, "I am 
with you alway. I am the LIGHT OF 
THE WORLD!" 



Music By States 

"Oklahoma has something on Mary- 
land and other states," wrote a promi- 
nent sports writer, "when the music 
plays for their football games. 

"Oklahoma has all that fine music 
from the stage hit 'Oklahoma!'" he 
concluded. 

It might be well to point out, in 
refutation, that at Maryland's foot- 
ball games, or any other college's foot- 
ball games, music is played, written 
by a Marylander in Maryland, dedi- 
cated to a flag made by Marylanders 
and flying over a Maryland fort. It's 
a well known and very popular tune, 
world wide. When it is played every- 
body stands at attention! 



Lesson Here 




WHY CAN'T WE BE LIKE THIS? 

"A dog and cat fight" is standard 
descriptive nomenclature. Cats fight 
dogs. Dogs fight cats. This picture 
is frojm a photograph in FORTUNE 
magazine advertising the Continental 
Can Company. 

The kitten and the puppy are not 
fighting each other. They enjoy peace 
and harmony. Know why? They 
haven't grown up and been taught to 
fight each other. 

Too bad individuals and nations have 
to grow up. Why can't we be like the 
two little guys pictured here. As the 
Teacher of Teachers said, "So that ye 
be as little children." 



Loneliness 

Lonliness is suffered by many older 
persons. These individuals seem to 
feel it is only because they have 
reached the years when they can't do 
as they once did. They feel they are 
no longer important to anyone — that 
they are in the way. 

Some seem to dread the thought of 
growing older; while others look for- 
ward to those years as being a time 
for more serene living. 

"Much though is being given to the 
person during older years," says Mrs. 
Jeanne S. Moehn, Extension family 
life specialist, University of Maryland. 
She adds a well-known fact, that indi- 
viduals are living longer today — hence, 
the necessity of focusing more atten- 
tion on the older-age group. 

Too many times, the specialist be- 
lieves, this loneliness takes a selfish 
turn. What do I receive? What do 
they think of me ? Why don't they 
consider my feelings ? Why don't they 
ask me what I think? 

How much happier we are, Mrs. 
Moehn suggests, if we forget ourselves 
and do something for others. KEEP 
BUSY! Do something for your church; 
cheer another person; give a child a 
happy smile (he'll return it and make 
you his friend). 

The specialist challenges, "Are you 
ever happier than when you are giving 
of yourself to make life's way a little 
easier for someone else?" 



Worthwhile Beauty 

The motivating factors which im- 
pel youngsters to select the University 
of Maryland for their college educa- 
tions are varied and many. 

Maryland students, faculty and 
alumni have, apparently, taken the 
beauties of the landscaping and archi- 
tecture of our campus pretty well for 
granted. That is not uncommon. 

So let us cite an instance which 
might have induced a well-known comic 
strip character to have exclaimed, 
'Dawggone! Now don't that'n take the 
rag off'n the bush!" 

A long distance phone call from a 
Pennsylvania town to the University's 
Department of Publications turned out, 
however, not to be one of the usual 
and numerous 'catalog calls'. 

This from the lady on the Pennsyl- 
vania end of the line, "My daughter 
has been awarded a scholarship to the 

University of However, 

she has made up her mind to sacrifice 
the scholarship and apply for admis- 
sion to the University of Maryland. 
This came about because, on a recent 
trip to Washington, we were so greatly 
impressed with the scenic and archi- 
tectural beauty of the College Park 
campus that we drove about the cam- 
pus for a rather thorough inspection. 
After that my daughter changed her 
mind. She wants to come to Maryland." 

If and when the young lady matricu- 
lates at Maryland, she will find she is 
sharing the scenic beauty of the cam- 
pus with many others, 




Fiction 

Non'Fiction 

Children's Boohs 

Educational Qames 
and Toys 

Stationery and 
Qreeting Cards 

Religious Books and 
Bibles 



"8ak 



(cultural ~Da, 



*/ Slo 



I WE Wfl 'OS */ Moil and phone orden shipped promptly 
ON ALL BOOKj \ Write (or Utt Book Cota , 09 




BOOK 


STORED 


516 N. CHARLES STREET 


Phone SA 


. 7-7280 




KLOMAN 

Instrument Co., 

Inc. 

Surgical Instruments 

Hospital & Physicians 

Supplies 

907 Cathedral St. LI. 9-1911 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

1822 Eye St., N.W. NA. 1-456* 

WASHINGTON. D. L 



F. A. Davis & Sons 

WHOLESALERS 

Cigars, Tobaccos, Sundries & Supplies 
Kitchen & Dining Equipment 
Soda Fountain Supplies 

119 S. HOWARD STREET 
Baltimore 1 , Md. 



Maryland 



College of 



Home Economics 

Laura Amos Bull '26 
Vera Klein Woods '32 



Baltimore Branch— H.E.I.H. 

The only group of "Home Economists 
in Homemaking" in Maryland was 
organized in the Fall of 1948 in Balti- 
more, and is affiliated with the Ameri- 
can Home Economics Association as 
one of their H.E.I.H. groups. Mrs. 
Florence (Rae) McKenney, U. of Md. 
'38, serves as chairman of it, and says 
they call themselves the "Homemakers' 
Section" of the Maryland Home Eco- 
nomics Association. Their membership 
lists some 75 names, of whom more 
than one-third are graduates of the 
University of Maryland. 

Because the membership is composed 
of brides, young matrons, career girls, 
and grandmothers, it is seldom that 
more than half the group can attend 
any one meeting. Mrs. Portia Malone 
Filbert '25, says their object is to 
promote better homemaking, for living 
that is happy, healthful, productive, 
and economical! She reports that their 
programs show a broad scope of inter- 
ests and activities. They have exhibited 
and discussed their hobbies and collec- 
tions, they have tested household pro- 
ducts in their homes for manufacturers, 
served as hostesses for Home Eco- 
nomics Teas, and even judged cake 
baking contests! In May, 1954, the 
group sponsored Miss Liselotte Kauff- 
man of Goslar, Germany, for her two 
weeks' stay in Baltimore. Miss Kauff- 
man was here under the Department 
of State program for German Women 
Leaders. The group usually meets in 



You're As Near 

To Us As Your 

Nearest 

Mailbox 




No Parking Problem 
No Waiting 



Midstate Federal Savings 

& Loan Association 

"Where Savings Are Safe" 



5304 YORK ROAD 



BALTIMORE! 2 



PLYMOUTH ELECTRIC 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

INCORPORATED 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 



the home of some member for lunch 
so that those still active in their pro- 
fession can attend. 

Perhaps, this enthusiastic group will 
encourage other such groups to organ- 
ize in other cities or towns. A picture 
of this Baltimore H.E.I.H. group, and 
a list of the U. of M. alumnae in it, 
will be published in a future issue of 
"Maryland". 

Our Homecoming Queen 

Ruth Peterson, pictured elsewhere 
in these pages, a Gamma Phi Beta 
pledge, and a Freshman in the College 
of Home Economics, was selected as 
Homecoming Queen! She hopes to 
major in Costume Design. It is becom- 
ing traditional for girls in this College 
to win such honors. Last year five 
Home Economics girls won such titles. 
Miss Peterson lives in Silver Spring 
and attended Montgomery Blair High 
School. Her brother, "Dick", is a senior 
at the University this year, being en- 
rolled as a pre-dental student. Ruth 
has just recently been elected as a 
member of the cheerleader squad, 
which honor she says she values highly. 
She is also a member of the Home Eco- 
nomics Club, and was chosen an 
"Angel" by the R.O.T.C. Flight Squad- 
ron. Our College is proud to salute 
these girls who are not only attractive 
and popular, but are also good aca- 
demic students. 

New Faculty Members 

We welcome to the Textile and 
Clothing Staff, Mrs Nancy Greig, who 
received her B.S. from the University 
of Vermont and has done graduate 
work at Cornell University. 

We are happy to introduce Miss 
Marilyn Archer, who is an alumna of 
the University of Maryland, '53. She 
received her M.S. degree from New 
York City University and has been 
employed in the Training Department 
at Woodward & Lothrop's Depart- 
ment Store in Washington, D.C. She, 
also, has joined the staff of the Textile 
and Clothing Department. 

Dr. Florence King comes to us as 
a lecturer in the Foods and Nutrition 
Department. She retired last July 
from the University of Vermont, where 
she was Head of the Department of 
Home Economics. Dr. King received 
her doctorate in biochemistry from In- 
diana University and has taught at 
the University of Chicago, the Univer- 
sity of California, and Oregon State. 
Dr. King is in the area to write a book. 
Previously she served as chief of the 
Food Utilization Section of the Bureau 
of Human Nutrition and Home Eco- 
nomics in Washington, D.C. 

Maryland is fortunate to secure the 
services of such outstanding women. 
In Memoriam 

The sympathy of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation and the Staff Members who 
served with her, is extended to the 
family of Mrs. Rhea Galloway, who died 
very suddenly early in November. She 
and her sisters attended classes at the 
University of Maryland, as well as both 
her daughters, who were graduated 
from the University of Maryland. She 
made her home in College Park, where 
she had a wide circle of friends. 



Borden Award 

The $300.00 cash award, offered by 
the Borden Company to the senior with 
the highest scholastic average and who 
has had two or more courses in Foods 
of Nutrition, was made to Dorothy 
Williams, the daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. LeRoy Williams, of Price Freder- 
ick, Maryland. Dorothy is a senior 
majoring in Home Economics educa- 
tion, a member of Mortar Board, and 
Omicron Nu. Her mother teaches Home 
Economics in high school in Calvert 
County. Congratulations to Dorothy 
Williams. 

Guests Of College 

Four women from the Indonesian 
Embassy, in native costume, visited 
classes in the College of Home Eco- 
nomics recently. They wanted to see 
the College in action. They were en- 
tertained at luncheon at the Faculty 
Club by the Textile and Clothing Staff 
Members. 

In Atlantic City 

Miss Ruth Parker, graduate of Wo- 
men's College, North Carolina, and 
instructor in Textiles and Clothing, 
recently represented the College of 
Home Economics at the annual "Con- 
ference for College Teachers of Tex- 
tiles and Cothing," held in Atlantic 
City, November 3rd to 5th. 

Research Project 

Miss Pela Braucher, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Food and Nutrition, a gradu- 
ate of Goucher, Masters degree from 
Penn State, and a nearly completed 
doctorate at Teachers' College Co- 
lumbia University, is doing another 
metabolic study on utilization of pro- 
teins. This is the fourth of a series 
of such human experiments conducted 
by her at the University of Maryland. 
The research is carried on each Fall 
with volunteer girls from the College 
of Home Economics. There has been 
great interest in this research project. 
Most of the $8,000.00 needed for this 
experiment being contributed by the 
regional Federal Government, the Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station, and the 
Fish and Wild Life Service of the De- 
partment of Interior. The results of 
this will be submitted for publication 
in the Spring. 

Grant College Meeting 
Miss Marie Mount, Dean of the Col- 
lege of Home Economics, was among 
those representatives of the University 
of Maryland attending the annual 
meeting of the association of Land 
Grant Colleges. This was held at 
Michigan State College, where the Col- 
lege was celebrating its Centennial 
anniversary. Mrs. Florence Low, Home 
Demonstration Agent Leader, Univer- 
sity of Maryland Extension Service, 
also attended. 

Do Plan To Be There 

The National Convention of the 
American Home Economics Associa- 
tion will be held in Washington, D.C. 
next June 26-29. It is hoped that all 
Home Economics graduates in this 
area will plan to attend. More about 
this later! 



24 



Maryland 



At Columbia 

Miss Sarah Morris, Class of 1924, 
represented Dr. Wilson Elkins, Presi- 
dent of the University, at the inaugu- 
ration of Dr. Hollis Caswell as Presi- 
dent of Teachers College, Columbia 
University. The inauguration was held 
at Riverside College, New York. She 
also attended the formal dinner at the 
Waldorf-Astoria the preceding eve- 
ning in honor of Dr. Caswell for which 
there were more than 1200 present. 



College of Home Economics 
Reporters 

Ye regular reporters have enlisted the 
services of others in various parts of 
the country to assist in getting to- 
gether nice juicy news items from time 
to time. We list some of them below for 
your convenience. Please send us your 
items each month, and if you represent 
a different region, please volunteer to 
serve as a reporter yourself for your area 1 . 
We would appreciate it, and all readers 
would enjoy the wider coverage. Everyone 
please send us a glossy print and any 
items you have about any alumna. "Thank 
vou in advance," say Betty A. Bull and 
Vera K. Woods! 

New York City — Miss Sarah Morris 
350 Fifth Ave., Room 7319 
New York 1, N.Y. 
Baltimore City — Mrs. Edwin Filbert 
3525 Newland Road 
Baltimore 18, Md. 
Cumberland Area — Mrs. Reford Aldridge 

Frostburg, Maryland 
Hagerstown Area — Mrs. Walter Bromley 

Smithsburg, Maryland 
Phoenix, Ariz. — Mrs. Victor Baumann 
1740 W. Mulberry Drive 
Phoenix, Arizona 
Eastern Shore, Md. — Mrs. Harry Wilson 
108 E. Brookletts Ave. 
Easton, Maryland 
Come on! We need other volunteers! 
Thank You. 
BETTY AMOS BULL, 
4312 Rowalt Drive, College Park, Md. 

VERA K. WOODS 
4003 Quintana Road, Hyattsville, Md. 



TYPO ERROR 

"Since this is their first visit to the 
Robinsons' mountain place, the Jar_ 
rells are anticipating a good time." 
Society Note in {the Atlanta; Ga., 
Journal. 




^ 



TOIPIN DOIBY MISHAP 
"Oh Shojley, dig Moitle toining 
toitle!" 



STANDARD 
ENGINEERING CO, 

INCORPORATED 

Engineers and Contractors 

REpublic 7-1343 

2129 EYE STREET, NORTHWEST 

WASHINGTON 7, D. C. 




Tennis Courts 

Hand and Volley 
Ball Courts 



**" Concrete Driveways 



MYERS & QUIGG, Inc. 

PAVING CONTRACTORS 

Office & Plant: 91 -O Street, Southeast 
Lincoln 7-2434 Washington 3, D. C. 






JJLL 



111 IffifllK i. 



^ 



2345 Sherman Ave., N.W. HU 3-5200 Washington, D. C. 

Specializing in all of the 
Great Brand Names in 

HIBH FIDELITY 

Visit Our Sound Room — Plenty of Free Parking 



RLLinnce PLumBinG & HeflTinc company 

PLUMBING AND HEATING CONTRACTORS 

72 PATTERSON ST., N. E. Executive 3-8341 

WASHINGTON 2, D. C. 



Maryland 



25 



BALTIMORE 




DON'T GUESS - 
GET -* 




quality 




MEATS 



BALTIMORE 




Co/)«0« of 



MBeti 



"siCf>lpof* Chip" 

POTATO 
CHIPS 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



King Bros., Inc. 

PRINTING A OFFSETTING 

SAratoga 7-5135 

208 N. Calvert Street 
BALTIMORE 2, MD. 




Special & Continuation 

Studies 



Law Enforcement Course 

Eighty-one law enforcement officers 
of the State of Maryland and sur- 
rounding area completed the third ses- 
sion of the sixth annual Law Enforce- 
ment Institute at the University of 
Maryland, College Park, Md. 

The training program for law en- 
forcement officer* consisted of ten 
weekly lectures on various problems 
encountered by law enforcement offi- 
cers. The program is under the direc- 
tion of the College of Special and 
Continuation Studies, in cooperation 
with the Maryland Law Enforcement 
Association, Maryland Municipal Lea- 
gue, Maryland State Police and the 
police departments of Maryland. 

Each officer registered for the pro- 
gram, upon successfully completing re- 
quirements of the course, received a 
certificate of completion. 

Enrolled in the institute: 

University of Maryland 
Lewis E. Brogan 
Henry J. Henel 
George R. Kiatta 
Randolph R. Payne 
William H. Williams 
Daniel B. Wiseman 

General Services Administration 
Theodore S. Allen 

Fairfax County 
Wlllard L. Bonnett 
David R. Eike 
Donald S. Hurst 
Grafton L. Wells 

Havre de Orace 
Paul P. Bungori 

National Rifle Association 
Emlle W. Clede, Jr. 

Baltimore City 
George W. Bowen 
John A. Gardner 
Robert T. Hall 
John P. Matthews 

Capitol Heights 
Stephen W. Gllllkln 
Earl L. Grimm 
US SC 
Frank R. Hackl 

Sparrows Point 
Marvin B. Hull 
Thomas T. James 
Harry E. Schulthels 

Baltimore Park 
Thomas A. Lane, Jr. 
James C. Robertson, Jr. 

United States Park 
Dalrl Bragg 
Eugene A. Gross 
Ronald R. Kerzaya 
Walter W. Lange 
T. S. Peele 
Howell C. Thomas 

Denton 
James T. Whitby 
North Beach 
Buford Pennell 
Wlllard C. Ward 

Montgomery County 
Thomas E. Hardesty, Jr. 
Calvert Hell 
George L. Hurd 
Jesse M. Jennings 
Guy V. Lewis 
Robert W. Lowry 
Meese L. Rider 
Samuel Splllers 
Joseph E. Stolz 
James White 

State Penitentiary 
Earl C. Potts 
Arthur B. Wilson 
Sheriffs Office, Rockville 
Olln G. Reavls 

Takoma Park 
Elliott M. Anderson 
Wilfred R. Ringer 

Aberdeen 
Chester Roberts 



Baltimore County 
John J. Hojnowskl 
Edward D. Shinnamon 
Harvey D. Young 
Prince Georges County 
Prank E. Andreson 
Prank E. Bishop 
Charles E. Blount 
James S". Branton 
Leo W. Bury 
Robert N. Cabral 
George E. Clements 
Robert P. Duncan 
Fred O. erris, Jr. 
Emmett F. G. Gray 
Lloyd E. Hill 
Earl J. Huber 
Everett G. Husk 
Bond B. Naecker 
Charles H. Nalley 
E. Lee Pumphrey 
Roscoe C. Sines 
Charles N. Thomsen 
William S. Welch, Jr. 

Military Police Company 
Joseph D. Kavanagh 
John S. Sawa 

Greenbelt 
Hubert L. Faulconer 
Austin R. Green 
James H. Williams 
Marshall H. Zoellner 

Morningside 
Charles W. Devoe 
Wilbur M. Price 

Nursing Institute 
"Working Together For Better Pa- 
tient Care" was the theme of the 
Second Annual Nursing Home Admin- 
istration Institute held at Kelly Mem- 
orial Building, Baltimore. 

Sponsored by the College of Special 
and Continuation Studies and the 
Maryland State Department of Health, 
program consisted of discussions led 
by leading experts in the fields of medi- 
cine, nursing, public health, home eco- 
nomics and social relations on problems 
of both state and private nursing home 
problems. 

In endorsing the program, Governor 
Theodore R. McKeldin stated, "Each 
year the proportion of the population 
over 65 has been increasing. Since the 
incidence of disability increases sharply 
with age, the problem of caring for 
the chronically ill increases with the 
number of citizens who live to the 
upper age brackets." 

He said, "The institute will play a 
major role in preparing nursing home 
operators to meet the responsibilities 
which they accepted when they entered 
this field of service." 

Participating with the College of 
Special and Continuation Studies was 
the University's Schools of Medicine 
and Nursing; the Maryland State Fed- 
eration of Nursing Homes; and the 
Maryland Association of Registered 
Nursing Homes. 



At Harvard 

The following graduates of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland were awarded 
advanced degrees at commencement 
exercises at Harvard University on 
June 16, 1955. The degree indicated 
in parentheses is that received from 
Maryland with the date it was given. 
The new degree from Harvard is 
given last. 

Paul Water (A.B. 1952) LL.B. cum laude. 
Felin S. Jacob (S.B. 1952) LL.B. 
Edward Miccio, Jr. (S.B. 1953) M.B.A. 
Frank J. Traversi (S.B. 1950) M.B.A. 
Jeffery O. Wellborn (S.B. 1954) M.P.A. 
John W. Cameron (S.B. 1953) M.BA. 



26 



Maryland 



Co//«ge of 



Education 



Dr. Maley, Speaker 

Dr. Donald Maley, Industrial Educa- 
tion, was the principal speaker at 
a meeting of the Maryland Vocational 
Agriculture Teachers. This meeting 
was held in Baltimore in conjunction 
with the Maryland State Teachers As- 
sociation Convention. Dr. Maley spoke 
on the "Effective Development and 
Utilization of Teaching Aids." Dr. 
Maley also was the speaker at the An- 
nual Meeting of the Pennsylvania In- 
dustrial Arts Association. The meet- 
ing was held at Hershey, Pennsylvania. 
The title of Dr. Maley's address was 
"The Improvement of Instruction 
Through Effective Teaching Aids." 

Training Directors 
Professor Glen D. Brown, Industrial 
Education, represented the University 
at a conference in Baltimore with offi- 
cials of the Maryland Society of Train- 
ing Directors to accomplish plans for 
a two-day institute on education and 
training in business and industry held 
on the campus at College Park. The 
Institute was programmed through the 
cooperative efforts of the College of 
Special and Continuation Studies, the 
Department of Industrial Education, 
the College of Business and Public Ad- 
ministration, and the Maryland and 
District of Columbia chapters of the 
American Society of Training Direc- 
tors. Attending along with Profressor 
Brown was Mr. Richard Stottler, Col- 
lege of Special and Continuation 
Studies. 

Attends Conference 

Dr. R. Lee Hornbake, Head of the 
Department of Industrial Education, 
recently attended a conference at the 
Mayflower Hotel sponsored by the Edu- 
cational Policies Commission. The topic 
for discussion was "Manpower and Ed- 
ucation" and centered on a Policies 
Commission statement on this topic. 
The statement is scheduled to appear 
in the spring of 1956. 

In Paper Industry 

Appointment of Emmett P. Kava- 
naugh, Westchester avenue, Ellicott 
City, as a sales technician servicing 
the paper industry was announced by 
Stein, Hall and Co., Inc. He will make 
his headquarters at the Company's 
Philadelphia Branch Office, calling on 
paper mills in Pennsylvania and parts 
of Virginia. 

For the past ten years, Mr. Kava- 
naugh was with Bartgis Brothers (II- 
chester), producers of paper board and 
specialties. He served as coating sup- 
erintendent for that firm and was con- 
cerned with technical supervision and 
research and development. 

A graduate of the College of 
Education '43, Mr. Kavanaugh is 
active in the Technical Association of 
the Pulp and Paper Industry (TAPPI) 
and the Boxboard Research and De- 
velopment Association. 



'£&£*& >*&£*< >£&*£*< }*&&£ >£&tt>*&tt>*&tt>*$^ 



*&&- 






®& 




*$e<« 



tf»* 



y|»% 





\ m 



from the TILGHMAN Packing Company 

CRABS OYSTERS 

Crab Cakes 12 Oz. Standard (frozen) 

Deviled Crabs 12 Oz. Select (frozen) 

Deviled Crab Cutlets Breaded Oysters 

Bite-Size Deviled Crabs and Fish Sticks! 
TIL-MADE 
"vp| Queen of the 
\Ji5) Chesapeake 



Pronounced "Til-Man' 




( jU$b*222&- 



PACKING CO. 



"Finest Chesapeake Seafoods For Over 58 Years" 

TILGHMAN ISLAND • TILGHMAN, MD. 

Phones 2101-2111-2121 



Also 

Institutional 

Sizes 






BANK OF 
CRISFIELD 

DEPENDABLE SERVICE SINCE 1892 

Marion Branch 

Phone 2381 
Uptown Branch 

Phone 312 
Main Office 

Phone 102 

Member 

Federal Deposit Insuranoe 

Corp. 

seafood ^ 

special $ 
fried 
chicken | 




£ ROUTE 13 SALISBURY, MD. | 



J.L 

WELLS 
CO., INC. 

CREOSOTED 
PRODUCTS 

— Telephones — 

Salisbury 2-2144 — 2-2145 

P.O. Box 312 

SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



A, PLANTATION 



"Scotch-bred' 
ANGUS BULLS 

Our TJ. of Md. supervised weigh- 
ing program proves Wye "Scotch 
as a Bagpipe" bulls average near- 
ly 3 lbs. gain per day. Big, fast 
growing, they'll get the same kind 
for you . . . Write for folders, 
data sheets, prices. 
Address : J. B. LINGLE, Mgr. 



WYE PLANTATION, Queenstow»,Md. 



J. MeKenny Willis & Son, v«c. 



GRAIN 

FEED 

SEED 



EASTON, MD. 
Phone 744 



Maryland 



27 



THE 

M. J. GROVE 
LIME CO. 

• Established 1859 • 

Crushed Stone • Limestone 

Industrial & Agricultural Lime 

Concrete & Cinder Block 

Cement - Sand - Pipe 

Transit Mixed Concrete 

Free State Masonry Mortar 

Street, Road, Bridge Construction 



PLANTS 



Stephen City, Va. 

Middletown, Va. 

Frederick, Md. 

Lime Kiln, Md. 



General Offices 

Lime Kiln 
Frederick Co., Md. 

PHONES 
Monument 3-3104 
Buckeystown 3511 



FARMERS COOPERATIVE 
ASSOCIATION, INC. 

Maryland's Largest Locally Owned 
and Operated Cooperative 

FEEDS 

SEEDS 

FERTILIZER 

LIMESTONE 

PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 
I 



FREDERICK 



Feed MO 3-3113 

Petroleum MO 3-5422 

THURMONT 3111 MIDDLETOWN 6 



Main Office: 



35 E. SOUTH ST. 
FREDERICK, MD. 



T. EDCIE RUSSELL 



General Contractor 



FREDERICK, MARYLAND 



Crown Oil & Wax Co. 

Distributors 

Shell Petroleum Products 

Phone MONUMENT 3-6381 

FREDERICK, MD. 



County Meetings 

Dr. Maley participated in two county 
meetings. He met with a group of 
teachers from Prince George County. 
His topic was "The Correct Utiliza- 
tion of Instructional Devices." 

Dr. Maley was the principle speaker 
at a Montgomery County meeting of 
principals, supervisors, and audio-visual 
specialists in the various county schools 
at Wheaton. Topic discussed by Dr. 
Maley was 'Why Audio- Visual'. 

I.L.S. Panel 

Dr. R. Lee Hornbake of the Indus- 
trial Education Department, Dr. Stan- 
ley J. Pawelek of the Baltimore 
City Department of Education, and 
Dr. Robert A. Goodell of the College 
of Business and Public Administration 
discussed "The Educational Implica- 
tions of Industrial Automation" as a 
panel at a meeting of Nu Chapter of 
Iota Lambda Sigma, National Profes- 
sional Industrial Education fraternity. 

Dr. Hornbake Travels 

Dr. Hornbake addressed the 18th 
Annual Convention of the New England 
Industrial Arts Teachers Association. 
Dr. Hornbake is nationally recognized 
as an authority and a leader in the 
field of Industrial Arts. He is intensely 
concerned with its future and he has 
taken every opportunity to lend his 
support to national committees and 
associations organized to promote in- 
dustrial arts on all levels. With his 
expansive background it is not hard to 
see that he chose "Industrial Arts For 
All" as his topic. 



Sigma Delta Chi 

Another national professional fra- 
ternity was added to campus with the 
admittance of the University Men's 
Press Club to Sigma Delta Chi, na- 
tional professional journalism fratern- 
ity. 

Joe Honick, president of the campus 
group, attended the fraternity's nation- 
al convention in Chicago with the peti- 
tion for membership unanimously 
accepted. 

The University Press Club began 
work on national acceptance in the 
fall of 1952, when it split up from a 
coed group into a men's club, a women's 
club, and a freshman-sophomore club. 

Alfred A. Crowell, head of the De- 
partment of Journalism attended the 
convention in Chicago. He presented a 
series of notes gathered at the con- 
vention to the club. 

The purpose of Sigma Delta Chi is 
to try to further the concept of pro- 
fessional journalism among undergrad- 
uates and professionals alike. 



At Minnesota 

In connection with the American 
Chemical Society meeting in Minne- 
apolis the Maryland Chemical Alumni 
held a luncheon in Minneapolis, Minn. 
About forty alumni were in attend- 
ance and participated in a very pleas- 
ant reunion. 



Kappa Delta Eta 

Kappa Delta Eta, University of 
Maryland Chapter, held an invitation 
and business luncheon at Hochschild 
Kohn's in Baltimore. 

The main topic of business was the 
selection of a project for the year 
in the field of business education. Mr. 
Henry Ercole, teacher of business edu- 
cation at Patterson Park High School 
in Baltimore, is project chairman. 

The Chapter's officers for this year 
are: Mrs. Mary E. Tronsue, Presi- 
dent, Mr. Wylie Burgess, Vice- Presi- 
dent, Mr. Wendell Sheets, Secretary- 
Treasurer and Professor Arthur S. 
Patrick, Advisor. 

Blood Drive 

Maryland students and faculty do- 
nated 961 pints of blood during the re- 
cent blood drive. 

Kappa Alpha Theta sorority, nearly 
hitting 100 per cent donation, and Phi 
Sigma Kappa, boasting 100 per cent 
donation, won trophies for turning out 
the most donors of all organizations. 

These two groups gained permanent 
possession of the trophies since they 
won the blood drive for three consecu- 
tive years. 

Pat Callahan and Mark Levine were 
co-chairman of the drive. The next 
drive is scheduled for March 8 and 9. 



College of 



Engineering 



School In North East 

A Regional Fire School for Firemen 
from Harford and Cecil Counties 
was held in North East, Maryland. 

This School was conducted as a pub- 
lic service activity in firemanship train- 
ing by the Fire Service Extension of 
the University of 
Maryland, Director 
Robert C. Byrus, in 
cooperation with the 
North East Fire 
Company and the 
Harford-Cecil Coun- 
ty Volunteer F i r e- 
men's Association. 

As a feature of 
this Regional Fire 
School, a three 
story building in 
down town North 

East was burned. 

Director Byrus -,-,. . - 

lure companies of 

the two counties were invited to partici- 
pate in the training activities during 
the two days, as well as to observe the 
behavior of the fire during the burning 
process. Thermocouples and register- 
ing pyrometers were used to graphical- 
ly show the rate of heat build-up, the 
maximum temperatures reached, the 
manner in which heat is propagated 




28 



Maryland 



throughout the structure, and the ef- 
fect of extinguishing agents and tech- 
niques. 

At Morgan State 

Professor G. S. S. Ludford, Institute 
for Fluid Dynamics and Applied 
Mathematics, gave an address, "The 
Sphere Theorem in Potential Theory," 
at Morgan State College, Baltimore, 
before the meeting of the Society for 
Industrial and Applied Mathematics. 

Delivers Address 

Professor Lawrence E. Payne, Asso- 
ciate Research Professor in the Uni- 
versity of Maryland's Institute for 
Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathe- 
matics, accepted an invitation from the 
Organizing Secretary for the First In- 
dian Congress on Theoretical and Ap- 
plied Mechanics to deliver one of the 
addresses at this congress. The meet- 
ing was held in Kharagpur, India. 

During the following week Dr. Payne 
gave a series of seminar talks at the 
Indian Institute of Technology in 
Kharagpur. 

Dr. Dryden 

The Institute for Fluid Dynamics and 
Applied Mathematics presented a lec- 
ture by Dr. Hugh L. Dryden, Director 
of the National Advisory Committee 
for Aeronautics on "Some Aspects of 
Transition from Laminar to Turbulent 
Flow". 

At Harvard 
Professor J. B. Diaz, Associate Re- 
search Professor in the Institute for 
Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathe- 
matics, delivered a lecture on "On La- 
place's Difference Equation and Non- 
Linear Networks", at Harvard Univer- 
sity, before the Division of Applied 
and Physical Sciences. 

Additional Tasks 

The annual meeting of the National 
council of State Boards of Engineering 
Examiners was held in Washington, 
D. C, and Maryland's Dean S. S. Stein- 
berg of the College of Engineering, as 
chairman and representative from the 
Maryland State Board of Registration 
for Professional Engineers and Land 
Surveyors, was re- 
appointed as a mem- 
ber of the Accredit- 
ing Inspection Com- 
mittee for Region II 
of the ECPD (En- 
gineers' Council for 
Professional Devel- 
opment, the national 
accrediting agency 
for engineering cur- 
ricula), which region 
covers engineering 
colleges in Metro- 
politan New York, 
New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, 
Maryland, District of Columbia and 
West Virginia. The Dean was also ap- 




Dean Steinberg 



Frederick Underwriters 

Incorporated 

General Insurance Agents 

EVERY KIND OF INSURANCE 
110 W. Patrick St. - Frederick, Md. 



WIELAND'S 

1 Mile East of Hagerstown 
on Route 40 

HAGERSTOWN, MD. 



RESTAURANT 




CRUISES 

European Tours 

ESCORTED & INDEPENDENT 




VIC miLLER 
TRAVEL fiGEIlCY 

Phone 6078 

49 SUMMIT AVE. HAGERSTOWN, MD. 



NORMAN S. 

EARLEY & SON 

General Contractors 
and Builders 

Plants — Homes — Stores 
Public Buildings 

638 FREDERICK STREET 
Hagerstown, Maryland 

= 1947 = 



VENICE MOTEL 
& RESTURANT 

U.S. ROUTE 40 
HAGERSTOWN, MD. 

"Air Conditioned" 
Italian Cuisine — Steaks and Seafood 
34 Modern Rooms Tel. 3982-M 



HICKORY SMOKED AGED 
HAMS 



WRITE Oil STOP BY 

Sojudthshn, J>cuim&, 

6 Miles North of Frederick 
on Route 71 at 

WALKERSVILLE, MD. 

Open Daily 8 to 5 Sunday 12 to 5 



DANZER 
METAL WORKS 

COMPANY 

SHEET METAL 
SPECIALISTS 

Hagerstown, Md. 

PHONE 1818 



MARYLAND'S FINEST FOOD 

The Coffee Room 
Anne Key's Kitchen 

j/w Francis Scott Key MoJt&l 

FREDERICK 



NALLEY'S 

NURSING HOME 

For the Aged, Chronic, Convalescent, 
Invalid and Retired Guests 

- 24 HOUR CARE — 

Hagerstown 7428 Funkstown, Md. 



USE THE COUPON ON 
THE LAST PAGE 



Maryland 



29 



pointed chairman of the new 18-mem- 
ber committee of the council on quali- 
fications for registration, which sup- 
plants the former committees on writ- 
ten examinations, oral examinations 
and qualifying experience. 
Looking Forward 

Names of more than 180 engineer- 
ing grads of the University have ap- 
peared in this column in biographical 
sketches prepared since the January- 
February, 1953, issue. That makes 
about 10 such items in each bimonthly 
copy. In the 3-year period, the twenty- 
five year Classes of 1928, 1929 and 
1930 have been canvassed and all replies 
received from engineers have been 
reported here. In addition, many other 
engineers have been written up. Soon 
we shall ask the 1931 engineers to 
furnish recent information as to them- 
selves and it is hoped that a prompt 
and ready response may be forthcom- 
ing. From reports reaching us, the 
short sketches of engineers who grad- 
uated twenty-five years ago, and also 
others, have been read with interest by 
many subscribers. 

A special attempt is being made to 
write up the four lady graduates of 
engineering but to date we have the 
correct present address of only one, 
namely, Mrs. Edwin E. Westerfield 
(nee Schellhas), C. E. '52. The other 
three are on our records as follows: 
Miss Evelyn B. Harrison, C. E. '32, 
304 W. Madison Avenue, Hyattsville, 
Md. — Returned, no such street No. 
Mrs. Marion K. Gerla, M. E. '44, 2425 



LIGHTHOUSE 
DinER 



Two Places to Eat 
Here and at Home 

open year Rouno 

• June to October 
• 24-Hour Service 

FINE FOOD and 
MIXED DRINKS 

8 Miles from Ocean City, Md. 
on Beach Highway 

Fenuiick Island, Del. 



Spring ~Miu 

PRIVATE SANITARIUM 

SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



• TELEPHONE SALISBURY BB94 • 




ENRICHED BREAD 

It's Delicious 

SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



Goodhope Road, S.E., Washington, 
D. C. — Returned, not at, and Miss 
Mattie G. Moorehead, Chem. E. '48, 
1214 Decatur Street, N. W., Washing- 
ton, D. C. — Returned, not here for 3 
years. Help in securing correct ad- 
dresses for the above would be ap- 
preciated. 

At Norfolk 
One of the twenty-five year class 
engineers, who was heard from too 
late to report on in earlier issues, is 
F. R. Lininger, who is a sales engineer 
at Norfolk, Virginia. He with his wife, 
Anne Mclnnes Lininger, and their two 
daughters, Kay, 16 years of age and 
Randy Anne, 5 years old, live at 411 
Brickby Road, Norfolk, Va. Lininger, 
who received his BS in EE degree from 
Maryland in 1930, is a past Secretary 
and Treasurer of the Richmond Sec- 
tion of ASEE and past program chair- 
man of the Electric League of Norfolk. 
Air Force Lieutenant Colonel 
Information has recently reached us 
from Lt. Colonel Lee R. Terrell, Head- 
quarters FAAF, Box 828, APO 925, 
San Francisco, California, that he is 
engaged in personnel management du- 
ties with the United States Air Force. 
Lt. Colonel Terrell received the de- 
gree of BS in MS in 1955. He has had 
19 years of military service. His family 
consists of Mrs. Olga B. Terrell, and 
three children, Lee R. Jr., 13 years; 
Joan Ellen, 10 years; and Roslyn, 7 
years of age. 

In West Virginia 
The Class of '39 in Engineering from 
the University has one of its members, 
LeRoy G. Willett, EE, employed as 
engineer for the Chesapeake and Po- 
tomac Telephone Company of West 
Virginia. Willett and his wife, Helen 
H. and their two children, Charles L., 
age 11, and M. Nadine, age 8 years, 
reside at 3302 Noyes Avenue, Charles- 
ton, West Virginia. 

With F.C.C. 
William H. Watkins, EE, '40 of 3210 
Quesada Street, N. W., Washington 15, 
D. C, is general electronic engineer 
for the Federal Communications Com- 
mission. Watkins holds membership in 
the Institute of Radio Engineers and 
has received the additional degrees of 
LLB and LLM from George Washing- 
ton University Law School in 1949 and 
1950, respectively. His military service 
from 1941 to 1946, included duty as a 
Lieutenant Colonel. He and his wife, 
Mrs. Ruth F. Watkins have two child- 
ren, Karen Elizabeth, 4 years of age 
and Warren Lee, 2 years old. 
In New York City 
From the Class of 1940, there is an 
Electrical Engineering graduate, Wil- 
bur M. Herbert, engaged in New York 
City as Electrical Engineer for a Con- 
sulting Engineering Firm. Herbert saw 
service as a Major, C. E., from 1942 to 
1945. He is a member of the New York 
Society of Professional Engineers. His 
wife is Mrs. Shirley P. Herbert, who 
was Miss H. Shirley Pfeiffer of the 
Class of 1942 from the University. The 
Herberts' have two daughters, Judith 
Lynn, 10 years old and Gail Cynthya, 5 
years of age. The home of the Her- 
berts is at 28 Louise Lane, Tenafly, 
New Jersey. 



30 



Patent Attorney 

John L. Hutchinson, a Chemical En- 
gineering graduate of 1942 who also 
obtained his LLB degree from George- 
town Law School in 1951, is now Patent 
Counsel for the Richardson Company of 
Melrose Park, Illinois. Prior to taking 
his present position he was an Associ- 
ate of the law firms of Robert V. Geib 
and Bacon and Thomas. 

Hutchinson, with his wife, Betty 
Brink and three young sons, John L. 
Jr., aged 11, Richard B, aged 7 and 
Larry S. aged ZYi years, live at 313 
Lorraine Road, Wheaton, Illinois. 

Hutchinson's military service included 
2 years as a Lieutenant in the Signal 
Corps. 

Is Westinghouse Engineer 

Clifford H. May, a mechanical en- 
gineering grad of 1950, when heard 
from was employed as an electro- 
mechanical engineer with Westinghouse 
Electric Company at Friendship Air- 
port, Maryland. 

May has seen military service to in- 
clude the rank of Lieutenant with the 
Army and Air Force and wears the 
Purple Heart and Bronze Star. 

He and his wife, Garnett H. May 
(nee Hinshaw) with two daughters, 
Penelope Anne, Wi years and Carolyn 
Amelia, 3 ears of age, give 512 Oak- 
wood Road, Glen Burnie, Maryland, 
as their address. 

Patent Examiner 

Douglas J. Drummond, graduate in 
1950 in Chemical Engineering, is now 
a Patent Examiner and reports David- 
sonville, Maryland, as his address. His 
family consists of his wife, the former 
Miss Alice M. Prigg, and two sons, Carl 
H., 5 years and Brian, 3 years of age. 
Mechanical Designer 

Donald M. Shipley, (BS of ME, '50) 
of 6715 Parkwood Street, Radiant Val- 
ley, Hyattsville, Maryland, is a mechan- 
ical designer for Schuttig & Co., Inc., 
of Washington, D. C. 

Shipley saw service with the Navy 
from 1944 to 1946 to include the Philip- 
pine Liberation. 

His family includes his wife, Mrs. 
Jessie H. Shipley and two children, 
Joyce, 7 years and Carol, 3 years of age. 

Heads Republic Steel 

Charles M. White, '13, has assumed 
the duties as Chief Executive Officer of 
Republic Steel. A monthly publication 
of the Corporation entitled "Republic 
Reports" presents a biographical sketch 
of this outstanding alumnus of the 
University. It recalls that Mr. White 
came to Republic in 1930 as Assistant 
Vice-President in charge of Operations. 
He was named Vice-President in 1935. 

During World War II, the new chief 
directed military production, super- 
vised construction of new facilities in- 
cluding the world's largest electric fur- 
nace steel plant at Chicago, new blast 
furnaces and facilities at Cleveland, 
Youngstown and Gadsden, Alabama 
and many other improvements and ex- 
pansions at steel and manufacturing 
plants and mines. 

Under Mr. White's direction ingot 
was increased 2K million tons a year 
or 34%. Since his election to the Presi- 
dency in 1945 the capacity has been 

Maryland 



With Republic 




CHAS. M. WHITE 
College of Engineering alumnus, 
Chief Executive of Republic Steel. 

increased by more than 10 million tons 
a year. Foremost in the mind of this 
executive has been the need to locate 
new iron ore sources. As a result ex- 
tensive interests have been obtained 
in the 30 million tons of rich ore in 
Africa and a one-sixth interest was 
acquired in a Canadian company where 
400,000,000 tons of high grade ore have 
already been proven. 

Mr. White assumes his new duties 
in the 25th anniversary year of the 
Corporation. 

Professor Kovasznay 

An applied mathematics and mech- 
anics lecture and discussion was held 
by the Institute for Fluid Dynamics 
and Applied Mathematics. 

Guest speaker for the program was 
Profesor Leslie S. G. Kovasznay of The 
Johns Hopkins University. 

Professor Kovasznay's topic was 
"Electronic Analogy to Supersonic 
Flow." 

An informal tea preceded the lecture 
and discussion. 

At Lansing 

Dean S. S. Steinberg represented the 
College of Engineering at the annual 
meeting of the Association of Land- 
Grant Colleges and Universities held 
at the Michigan State University at 
East Lansing. 

In Baltimore 

Harold A. Schlenger who graduated 
from the University in 1951 as a 
mechanical engineer, now lives at 4204 
Oakford Avenue, Baltimore 15, Mary- 
land, and is employed by H. Walton 
Redmile & Associates, Engineers of 
Baltimore. Schlenger and Mrs. Carolyn 
E., have one daughter, Carolyn Elaine. 

With U. S. Navy 

Fred Conrad Mattern, Jr., (BS of 
ME, '52) is with the U. S. Navy and 
was, when last heard from, engaged 
in the duties of Mines Officer at York- 



jk GCnCRflL 

W C0I1TRACT0RS 

PORTER COnSTRUCTIOn COmPAIIY 

INCORPORATED 

UNien 4-7472 
5104 BALTIMORE AVENUE HYATTSVILLE, MD. 



KENMAR 
STEEL 

CONSTRUCTION 
COMPANY 



structural steel erection 



setting reinforcing steel 



\ 2041 K St., N.W. 
; Washington, D. C 
) STerling 3-3290 



ARTIFICIAL MAMII 
(SCACLIOLA) 



ARTIFICIAL STONE 
FOR INTERIOR 



ARTIFICIAL 
TRAVERTINE STONE 



STANDARD ART MARBLE and TILE CO. 

SCASUOLA - MARBLE • MOSAIC - TERRAZZO 
TILE - CERAMIC - SLATE 

117 D STREET, NORTHWEST • WASHINGTON 1, D. C 

WI.»h«A. NAIUnol 1-741 J 



WALLOP and SON 



J. DOUGLASS WALLOP, JR. 
Clou of 1*19 



J. DOUGLASS WALLOP, 3rd 
Clou of 1942 



— INSURANCE — 

Fire • Automobile • Life - Accident • Liability • Bonds 

EVERY INSURANCE SERVICE — COUNTRY WIDE 
1101 VERMONT AVE., N.W.— Suit* 40S EXmuIIv* 3-1400 WASHINGTON 5, D. C. 



Maryland 



31 



Best for Baby . . . 



extra rich 
extra nourishing 
extra delicious 



GOLDEN GUERNSEY MILK 




KOONTZ 



■ (|ft flj 



DISTRIBUTED ON THE EASTERN SHORE BY 

KENNERSLEY FARM DAIRY 

and 

CITY DAIRY, Inc. 

First with the "Carriage" Trade! 



wicomico counTv frrhi 

BUREAU CO-QPERflTlUE 

INC. 

Feed - Fertilizer 

Seed 

Farm Supplies 

917 W. ISABELLA STREET 
Salisbury, Md. - Phone 4651 




Salisbury Milling Co. 


Incorporated 


FLOUR 




TABLE MEAL 


SALISBURY, 


PURINA & 


MARYLAND 


ECONOMY FEEDS 


: 1 ■ 




SALISBURY 



_^///|\\V^-S! 

CRISFIELD BERLIN 



USE THE COUPON ON 
THE LAST PAGE 



TUGHmnn ice & fuel co. 

ICE 
FUEL OIL 
KEROSENE 

Icing for Fishing Parties 

Blower Service for Trucks 

Delivery Service 

TILGHMAN 2821 
Tilghman, Md. 



THE 

FEDERALSBURG MILLING CO. 

manufacturers and distributors of 

B.B.L. FEEDS 

grain processors and brokers 

FEDERALSBURG, MD. I. B. MAUN, Mgr. 



EASTERN SHORE 
GLASS CO. 



SALISBURY BOULEVARD 
SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



DUNCAN BROTHERS, INC. 

CHEVROLET • OLDS • CADILLAC 
GMC TRUCKS • GREAT DANE TRAILERS 

Sales & Service 

"First In Service Because We Put Service First" 

Telephones 255 - 455 - 655 
POCOMOKE CITY, MARYLAND 



town, Va. His family consists of his 
wife, Mrs. Charlotte G. Mattern, and 
a daughter, Charlotte Rose Gurley. 
U. S. Geological Survey 

Donald William Lashley, a graduate 
of the Class of 1953 in Civil Engineer- 
ing was engaged as an hydraulic en- 
gineer with the U. S. Geological sur- 
vey. Lashley is unmarried when last 
heard from and holds a commission 
as 2nd Lieutenant in the Air Force 
Reserve. He was expecting a call to 
active duty when the information 
reached us. 

Scientific Conference 

Leading specialists in fluid dynamics 
of this country and several foreign 
countries met at the University for a 
research conference on transition and 
the oi-igin of turbulence. 

The purpose of the program was to 
present, discuss and appraise recent 
significant advances in the field of 
theoretical and experimental research 
of importance to reducing friction re- 
sistance and thus increasing the range 
of airplanes and missiles. 

Significant papers were contributed 
by scientists from the National Ad- 
visory Committee for Aeronautics, the 
National Bureau of Standards and 
other government agencies, by pro- 
fessors of leading United States and 
foreign universities and by representa- 
tives of industry. 

The conference was held in coopera- 
tion with the Air Force Office of Scien- 
tific Research of the Air Research and 
Development Command. 

Participating scientists included Pro- 
fessor Henry Gortler, Freiburg Uni- 
versity, Germany; Professor Isao 
Imai, Tokyo University, Japan; Pro- 
fessor Rudolf Wille, Technical Univer- 
sity, West Berlin; Dr. G. B. Schubauer 
of the National Bureau of Standards; 
Dr. A. Busemann and A. E. von Doen- 
hoff of the National Advisory for 
Aeronautics; Drs. M. Scherberg and K. 
Pohlhausen of Wright Field; Dr. Th. 
Theodorsen of Republic Aviation Corp- 
oration; Mr. Warren Boyer of Northrop 
Aircraft Company; Professor P. A. 
Harrington of Rensselaer Polytechnic 
Institute; Professor C. C. Lin of the 
Mass. Institute of Technology; Profes- 
sor A. M. Kuethe of the University 
of Michigan; Professor M. Munk of the 
Catholic University; Dr. H. Bomelburg, 
Post. Doct. Fellow; Dr. Francis R. 
Hama, Asst. Res. Prof.; Dr. John R. 
Weske, Visit. Res. Prof.; Dr. Monroe 
H. Martin, Instructor-Engineering — of 
the University of Maryland Institute 
for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathe- 
matics; Mr. G. C. Sherlin, National 
Bureau of Standards; Brig. General 
Don Flickinger, Commander, Air Force 
Office of Scientific Research, ARDC; 
Dr. H. H. Kurzweg, Naval Ordnance 
Lab; Mr. F. N. Frenkiel, Johns Hopkins 
Applied Physics Laboratory, and Prof. 
L. Kovasznay of the Johns Hopkins 
University. 



TYPO ERROR 

"4-room house, hot-water heater, 
hardwork floors." Ad in the Chatta- 
nooga Times. 



32 



Maryland 



*" " 9 iJJfS 



When you buy a quart of milk, 
do you GET a quart? 

If it is in a GLASS BOTTLE 
yes! 

— The glass milk bottle is not 
merely a container; it is a 
MEASURE whose accuracy is 
controlled by Weights and 
Measures Authorities. 

—In a GLASS bottle you can 
SEE how much you have on 
hand. 

— Most discriminating people 
PREFER milk in GLASS bot- 
tles for the same reasons they 
drink most other beverages 
from GLASS . . . and 

MILK IS BETTER IN 
GLASS BOTTLES 



THE BUCK GLASS CO. 

FORT AVE. & LAWRENCE ST. 
Baltimore 30/ Maryland 

Originators of the Square 
Milk Bottle 



FRANK WELSH 

and his 

ORCHESTRA 

"FINEST MUSIC FOR 
ALL OCCASIONS" 

707 HIGHW00D DRIVE 
Baltimore 12, Md. 

ID. 5-8736 

Former Maryland Student 



College of 



Agriculture 

======= Dr. Howard L. Stier 

Borden Award 

The annual Borden Award of $300 
has been given this year to Dorothy 
Williams of the College of Home Eco- 
nomics. This award goes each year to 
the senior in home economics who has 
the highest scholastic average and who 
has taken two or more courses in foods 
and nutrition. 

Dorothy Williams has a 3.82 aver- 
age and is a major in Home Economics 
Education. 

She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Leroy B. Williams of St. Leonard, Md. 
Her family raises tobacco on their 
farm in that community. In addition, 
her mother teaches Home Economics in 
the local high school. 

During college Dorothy has been busy 
with many extra-curricular activities. 
She has been chairman of the Campus 
Academic Board and has served on the 
executive council of the Associated 
Women Students. Also she is a mem- 
ber of Mortar Board and Omicron Nu. 

Fertilizer Conference 

A conference for fertilizer manufac- 
turers, dealers and salesmen was held 
on the University campus, according 
to Frank L. Bentz, Jr., extension soil 
specialist. The program was held in 
the new student union building. 

Topics covered included the effect of 
liquid fertilizers on the fertilizer in- 
dustry ,nitrogen versus legumes, irri- 
gation effects of snap beans, the effect 
of cover crops on yield of tobacco, and 
other up-to-date information on fer- 
tilizer research. 

Departmental tours followed the 
meeting, which concluded at 3:30 P.M. 

Algae Farms 

Theoretically, farm and forest pro- 
duction could be from 10 to 20 fold 
higher — just theoretically. Actually, 
something like this may be achieved 
in "factory farms" not so far hence. 

As for the hard-pressed cow farmer 
a kind of green milk may be produced 
in these factory farms, probably a 
little better for babies or cake mixes 
than old-fashioned cow's milk. 

These and a lot of other possibilities 
of the sun energy age will not come to 
pass, of course, except in a better world 
where all problems of distribution are 
solved and nobody will be hungry or 
cold any more. 

It all depends on one of the lowliest 
of living things — some one-celled plant 
which is related closely to the organ- 
isms, that form green slime on stagnant 
water and to a minute fraction of the 
radiation from an inconsequential and 
aging star on which all life on earth 
depends. 

The organism is the blue-green algae 
of which there are more than 40,000 
known species. It grows everywhere, 
even in remote depths of the Antarctic 
Continent where there is no other life. 




BARTLETT company 

Eastern Shore Properties 
Water Front Farms 

OFFICE PHONE 1 18 

RESIDENCE 1784 

TIDEWATER INN EASTON, MD. 



Maryland 



33 




. . . the complete 
Floor Covering Institute 

• Rugs • Asphalt Tile 

• Carpel • Rug Cleaning 

• Linoleum • Repairing 

Everything in Floor Cover- 
ings featuring the Best in 
Service and Materials 

1500 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE, N.E. 

Washington, D. C. • HU 3-1700 



J. NICHOLS 

— WHOLESALE — 

FANCY 
FRUITS & 
PRODUCE 

Lincoln 7-4888 

UNION MARKET TERMINAL 

1 278 5th St., N.E. Washington 



LOVELESS ELECTRIC CO., Inc. 
£kjdbucoL Qordthadt&iL 

5207 COLORADO AVENUE, N.W. 
WASHINGTON 11, D. C. 

Phone RAndolph 3 4257 



'Hotel 

HEDIN HOUSE 

WASHINGTON'S NEWEST HOTEL 
Nearest the University 

Just three miles away and two 
blocks within the District line. 

Completely Air-Conditioned 

Phone 2902 Nbwton St., N.E. 

ADams 4-6060 (at R.I. Ave.) 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

• Make Your Reservations Early < 



Some of the major research on in- 
creasing the efficiency is being carried 
out at the University of Maryland. 
This was reported by Dr. Robert W. 
Krauss of the Maryland faculty, who 
said a socalled "recycling" system is 
being developed. The efficiency of the 
algae as a trapper of sunpower, he 
pointed out, is due in part to the large 
surface area of the single cell exposed 
to light compared to the total volume. 
A major problem is that as soon as 
a culture becomes crowded some algae 
shade the others so that they get little 
light. Under such conditions unre- 
strained growth of a culture soon would 
stop. 

The algae are removed from the cul- 
ture as soon as they reach harvesting 
size by a continuous centrifuge on the 
principle of a cream separator. At the 
same time, the water culture in which 
they are grown is used over and over 
again. This is quite close, Dr. Krauss 
said, to what would be necessary in 
desert regions where water is scarce 
and where algae "farms" may be most 
important. 

The Maryland workers have given 
special attention to the minerals which 
must be mixed with the water. They 
have found that algae, like most other 
forms of life, require such elements 
as rubidium, albuminum and cobalt in 
extremely minute amounts in order to 
thrive. The experiments may throw 
some light on the needs of these same 
elements, only recently suspected by 
higher organisms. 

4-H Clubs 

Nearly 15,000 4-H Clubs boys and 
girls in Maryland joined with 4-H'ers 
all over the nation in observing Na- 
tional Achievement Day. Hundreds of 
local volunteer leaders, parents and 
others who have contributed to the 
support of club work, shared the recog- 
nition. 

During the past year, Maryland's 731 
clubs have covered a variety of sub- 
jects such as producing and conserving 
food, feed and fiber; clothing; food 
preparation; improving and beautifying 
their homes; making their farms more 
efficient; stressing personal health and 
safety; protecting natural resources 
and wildlife; and cooperating in a wide 
variety of community services. 

Members of 4-H are boys and girls 
between the ages of 10 and 21, who 
carry on various farming, homemaking 
and community service. They "learn 
by doing," and strive "to make the 
best better." 

This year's 2,104,787 members in the 
nation belong to nearly 89,000 clubs in 
all 48 states, Alaska, Hawaii and 
Puerto Rico. 

Farm Success Tips 

Farmers must organize more ef- 
fectively to promote their own welfare 
in today's highly organized society. 
Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, president of the 
University of Maryland, told members 
of the State Grange at Easton. 

He pointed to the successful efforts 
of labor unions in getting what they 
want, efforts based on '"artificial de- 



velopments and not according to the 
law of supply and demand." 

The farmer operates according to the 
law of supply and demand, he said, 
without "artificial props." This puts 
him at a disadvantage in comparison 
with organized groups, Dr. Elkins said. 

"It seems to me," said Dr. Elkins, 
"that the farmer cannot afford to as- 
sume an individualistic role, even 
though by nature he might choose to 
do so." 

He said farmers were "independent 
in a dependent society." 

Ineffective organization, he said, is 
one reason why farmers do not have 
a specific program. 

"Lack of cohesiveness," he said, "has 
prec'uded agreement on a program and 
continuation of that program." 

The farmer is "not as well organized 
as he must be in order to influence 
those who legislate for him," Dr. Elkins 
added. 

The university President addressed 
200 Grange delegates to the eighty- 
first annual State meeting. He spoke 
following a luncheon in the basement 
hall of the Church of the Brethren at 
Easton. 

Maryland 4H Honors 

Maryland won the national 4-H dairy 
cattle judging championship at the 
Dairy Cattle Congress, Waterloo, la. 

Maryland's team score was 1,980 
points. New York was second with 
1,966 and Colorado third with 1,920. 

Members of the winning team are 
Franklin L. Walbert, 18, of Henderson, 
Queen Annes County; Eugene C. Bay, 
18, of White Hall, Baltimore County, 
and Ian J. Forrest, 16, of Ellicott City, 
Howard County. 

Alternate on the team is Patsy Mes- 
ser, 16, of Gaithersburg, Montgomery 
County, and coaches were John Mor- 
ris, Extension Service dairyman at the 
University, and William Buckel, assist- 
ant county agent of Baltimore County. 

Hopkins Appointed 

H. Palmer Hopkins has been ap- 
pointed assistant professor of agricul- 
tural education at the University of 
Maryland, Agriculture Dean G. M. 
Cairns announced. 

A native of Harford county, Hopkins 
was graduated from Oklahoma A & M 
College and earned a master of edu- 
cation degree from Maryland in 1948. 
He has taught vocational agriculture 
in Oklahoma, Pennsylvania and Mary- 
land. 

Hopkins was principal and vo-ag 
teacher at Dublin High SchooLin Har- 
ford county 1945 to 1950 when the 
school was consolidated with three 
other area high schools and Hopkins 
was made head of the new school at 
North Harford. 

The National Future Farmers of 
America executive committee recently 
nominated Hopkins as one of 25 teach- 
ers in the U. S. to receive the Hon- 
orary American Farmer Degree for his 
outstanding accomplishments in vo-ag 
work. 

Hopkins replaces Dr. Ray A. Mur- 
ray, who was transferred to the De- 



34 



Maryland 






partment of Agricultural Economics 
and Marketing. 

Heads Poultry 

Dr. Clyne S. Shaffner succeeds Dr. 
Morley A. Jull as Head of the Poultry 
Department. 

Dr. Shaffner, 41, 
was professor of 
poultry physiology 
and came to Mary- 
land from Purdue 
I University in 1947. 
Dr. Shaffner 
earned his Ph.D at 
Purdue University 
and his A.B. and M. 
A. at Michigan State 
^ College. He is re- 

Dr. Shaffner sponsible for devel- 
opment of the flight- 
less chicken and the Maryland medium 
white turkey. 

Flightless Chickens 

After seven years of research, the 
University's Physiology Department 
has developed a strain of flightless 
chickens. 

Dr. C. S. Shaffner, head of the de- 
partment, said that at present, none 
of the chickens are available to the 
public, and that the commercial ac- 
ceptability of the birds has not yet 
been determined. 

"The birds with the exception of 
the missing 22 flight feathers, appear 
to be perfectly normal," Dr. Shaffner 
said. "They appear to be somewhat 
more docile than most other birds be- 
cause of their inability to fly, and 
so far have had egg production rec- 
ords of average or above." 

In the hen house, nests must be 
placed close to the floor since the hens 
cannot jump more than a few inches. 

Dr. Shaffner said that it appeared 
that the flightless chicks should be use- 
ful to the small flock owners since they 
could be contained with a minimum of 
fencing. The Future Farmers of Amer- 
ica, with this new strain of chick, will 
not have to worry about erecting a 
high costly fence to enclose the flock; 
the birds can be enclosed with a fence 
only two feet high. 

Six years ago, research was begun 
at fhe University to study the effects 
of removing the area of the wing on 
the chicken which produced the large 
flight feathers. This treatment did not 
prove very satisfactory since it tended 
to impede the movements of the chick. 
For example, the birds would stumble 
into the water fountains, and fall over 
on their backs unable to get up. 

At about the time of the original 
research, a bird was found in the 
University's flock of New Hampshires 
which lacked the large flight feathers 
but whose wings were normal. 

This bird was saved and used in a 
project to determine if the condition 
was hereditary. The project proved to 
be a successful venture and the flight- 
less flock at Maryland now numbers 
about 300. 

Dr. Shaffner said he hopes to im- 
prove this strain of unusual birds in 
the future in order to obtain improved 
meat and eggs. 



s 



fyfo 

hopL 




»JIn.ITV«0 • 



CUSTOM-DESIGNED AND READY-TO-WEAR 

7409 BALTIMORE AVENUE UNion 4-0520 

COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 

ALTERATIONS FOR MEN AND WOMEN 



Nomina itudtnti and 

alumni of In* 

lAnivtriitu of 

ff/arulana for 



32 t** rt 



LusTine nicHOLSon 

QhswhobdL 

OldAmobiliL 

ykil oLuttint . . . 
itad of polk companitt 

Baltimore flue, on Route 1 
Hvattsville, ITld. 
Ulflrfleld 7-7200 



C. H. Lauison, Inc. 

— General Contractor — 

ROAD BUILDING and 
GRADING 

Field Office 

9072 BALTIMORE-WASHINGTON BLVD. 

Berwyn, Md. 

Phono WEbJter 5-5744 

Williamsburg, Va. 

Phone — Williamsburg 106 



PEOPLE'S SUPPLY CO. 

mc. 

Everything To Build Anything 
Building Supplies Of All Kinds 

LUMBER, MILLWORK 
and MASONRY 

3004 KENILW0RTH AVENUE (Bladensburg) 

P.O. HYATTSVILLE, MD. 
Phon. WArtUld 7-2105 




SALES 
INSURANCE 
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 

Near University of Maryland 
WArfield 7-1010 & 7-0321 
6037 Baltimore Boulevard 

RIVERDALE, MD. 



PARKWOOD 
OPTICIANS 

DISPENSING OPTICIANS 

QUALITY - SERVICE & COURTESY 
in HYATTSVILLE 

WArfield 7-1880 

5620 BALTIMORE AVE. 

8248 GEORGIA AVE., SILVER SPRING, MD. 

Silver Spring Office by App. Only 

1760 K ST., N.W., WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Sterling 3-8553 



24 -HOUR TOW1NQ SERVICE 



WArfield 7-9710 



7505 BALTIMORE AVENUE 
COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 



ANDERSON ELECTRIC CO. 



SALES ft 
SERVICE 

1433 P St., N.W. 



MOTORS 



PUMPS - MACHINERY 
DU. 7-5527 



COMMERCIAL 
INDUSTRIAL 

Washington, D. C 



Maryland 



?B 




Just eight miles from Washington, 
near the University of Maryland, 
you'll find complete comfort and 
conveniences. 

Rooms & Cottages 

Phone WArfield 7-8324 
For Reservations 

THE 

LORD CALVERT 

HOTEL & COTTAGES 

Free Parking 

On U. S. Highway No. 1 

7200 Baltimore Avenue 

COLLEGE PARK. MD. 



C.&W. Sport Shop 

Complete Sporting Goods 

Rawlings — Spalding — Wilson 

HUNTING LICENSES 

QUEENS CHAPEL SHOPPING CENTER 
WEST HYATTSVILLE, MD. 



COLLEGE PARK 

CABINET & MILLWORK CO., INC. 

Custom Kitchen Cabinets — Bookcases 

Window — Porch Screens 

Formica Sink Tops 

APpelton 7410 - 50th Ave. 

7-3011 College Park, Md. 



IHEATING WArfield 7-8531 

PLUMBING 
REMODELING 
NOBBING A SPECIALTY 

ROBERT F. HOFF 

I&313 - 46th Ave. Riverdale, Md. 



DEL HAVEN WHITE HOUSE COTTAGES 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 
Baltimore-Washington Boulevard 

Two Miles North — University Maryland 
Hot Water Heated 50 Brick Cottaget 

Tile Baths 
F. M. Ibwin, Prop. WEbster 5-4852 



Hamsters Aid Science 

For the first time a strain of the 
common cold virus has been transmitted 
to hamsters. 

The underlying value in such a find- 
ing — if it survives critical analysis — 
is that science would have a cheap, 
readily available laboratory animal 
with which to study the common cold. 
The common cold virus — or what has 
been guessed to be the virus — has 
steadfastly refused to be transmitted 
to animals other than the chimpanzee. 

Reporting the finding from the virus 
laboratory of the university's Live 
Stock and Sanitary Service, were Drs. 
Reginald L. Reagan, Francis Yancey, 
Sing Chen Chang and A. L. Brueckner. 
Dr. Eddy Palmer, of Walter Reed Army 
Medical Center, assisted in the proce- 
dure. 

Said Dr. Reagan, "many research 
workers, ourselves included, have at- 
tempted to introduce the cold virus 
into a number of mammals, and all 
results were negative." 

The scientists obtained washings 
from the nose and throat of a young 
woman two days after she came down 
with what they described as "the com- 
mon cold." 

"Three days after exposure to the 
cold virus suspension," Dr. Reagan 
went on to say, "the hamsters showed 
cold virus symptoms. The hamsters 
which received normal nose and throat 
washings showed no cold symptoms." 

The infective cold virus material 
was installed nasally into a human 
volunteer. 

"The human volunteer," Dr. Reagan 
stated, r 'who received nose and throat 
washings from the infected hamsters 
"showed common sold symptoms. . . " 

Another volunteer who received 
washings from the hamsters showing 
no signs of a cold also showed no evi- 
dence of a cold. 

With Campbell Soup 

George C. Morris, Agr. '50, has been 
appointed Supervisor of Extension, 
Camden Plant, of the Campbell Soup 
Company. Mr. Morris joined the Camp- 
bell Company in 1950 and was on a 
military leave of absence from 1951 
to 1953. 

William E. Jarrell, Jr., Agr. '39, has 
appointed Area Field Supervisor, Cam- 
den Plant of the Campbell Soup Com- 
pany. Mr. Jarrell started with the 
Campbell Soup Company in 1946 and 
became Senior Fieldman in 1951. 

At Penn State 

James F. Keefer, Agr. '53, has been 
reappointed to the agricultural exten- 
sion staff of Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity as assistant county agent. 

Keefer first served as assistant 
county agent in Lehigh county when 
he started at Penn State and was called 
to military service in January, 1954, 
and served as a 1st Lt. with the U.S. 
Air Force. 

While in college he was president of 
the Agriculture Student Council, treas- 
urer of Alpha Gamma Rho fraternity, 
a member of Omicron Delta Kappa, 
sang in the University's Men's Glee 



Club and was active in the Economics 
Club and the Campus Grange. Mr. 
Keefer is listed in "Who's Who in 
American Colleges and Universities," 
was commanding officer of Arnold Air 
Society and is active in his church 
work. 

He received the Maryland Grange 
award for outstanding leadership in 
the field of agriculture; was awarded 
the Arnold Air leadership award and 
held scholarships from Sears Roebuck, 
University of Maryland and Maryland 
State Senate. 

Mr. Keefer is the son of John W. 
Keefer, of Westminster, Md. and is 
married to the former Mary Belle 
McCoy, daughter of Louis T. McCoy, 
of Dundalk, Md. 

At Massachusetts 

The College of Agriculture of the 
University of Massachusetts announced 
the appointment of Dr. Frank E. Potter 
as assistant professor with teaching 
and research duties in the subject 
matter area of ice-cream, butter and 
dairy chemistry. Dr. Potter is a native 
of Maine and received his B.S. degree 
at the University of Maine in 1942, an 
M.S. degree at the University of Mary- 
land in 1948, and a Ph.D. from Pennsyl- 
vania State University in 1955. He 
was employed for two years as research 
technologist by the Federal Bureau of 
Dairy Industry and for three years as 
instructor at Texas A & M. 

At Penn State 

Dennis Franklin Abe, '53 Agr., of 
West Hyattsville, has been appointed 
to the Pennsylvania State University 
staff as assistant county agent and to 
Chester and Delaware counties. 

Native of Oldtown, Maryland, Abe 
was educated at University of Mary- 
land. He majored in agricultural edu- 
cation and was active in the campus 
4-H and FFA Clubs, served on Stu- 
dent Council and played soccer. He 
also has done graduate work in fruit 
processing. 

He is a member of Alpha Zeta fra- 
ternity and Lions International. He 
is active in boys' club work and sports. 
During World War II he served with 
the U. S. Signal Corps from 1942 to 
1945. Recently he has been engaged 
in the mercantile business. 

4-H Winner 

Spencer Streett, junior in Agricul- 
ture, is state 4-H boys' achievement 
record winner. 

As to his many achievements, his 
county agent says, "Here is a young 
man who has done so much for 4-H 
that it would be hard to single out 
any one thing that would be outstand- 
ing." 

Spencer gained a personal honor this 
year when he was named to the All- 
Stars, 4-H honorary organization. 

Dr. Brueckner Honored 
Dr. A. L. Brueckner, director of the 
Livestock Sanitary Service, University 
of Maryland, was elected at a meeting 
in New Orleans as president of the 
National Livestock Sanitary Associa- 
tion. 



36 



Maryland 



The Confederate Flag 




HONORING DIXIE 



Al Danegger Foto 



The "card section is 29 seats wide and 27 seats high. Students are forming the Confederate Flag design by holding up 
in front of them the colored cards they had been keeping in their laps. For eight years these performances at half time have 
been popular features of the Terrapins' home football games. Not only are elaborate pictures made, but a great variety 
of slogans is spelled out with the cards. 



Maryland's Card Section 

A Great Deal Of Work And Organization 
Precedes The Flashy "Motion Pictures." 



By. RalpJt deppcd 

(Baltimore Sunday Sun) 

Spectacular features of Maryland's 
home football games are the de- 
signs formed in the stands by students 
flashing large cards of various colors. 
A Maryland or Confederate flag, in 
full color, may be formed, or a foaming 
full color, may be formed, or some 
slogan or other may be spelled out. 

Seem Endless 

The students who form these de- 
signs number 783, and their repertoire 
seems endless. Yet they've never spent 
as much as a minute in practice. More, 
even while they're holding up their 
cards and forming a picture, they 
don't know what the picture is. 

The whole thing's done from written 
instructions, which the students get 
only a few minutes beforehand. And 



it's all the idea, and the work, of five 
students from Baltimore. 

Morton M. Libov, a junior in busi- 
ness administration, is chairman of this 
'"card section." Arthur Kupfer and 
Joseph Weinstock, seniors, and Irv 
Layton and Steve Sakin, sophomores, 
assist. When one of the five gets a 
good idea for a picture he talks it 
over with the others. They make a 
rough sketch, hash it over, and per- 
haps re-do the sketch a few times. 

Block Design 

Then when it is acceptable to all, 
they convert it into a block design on 
a piece of graph paper which is 27 
blocks tall and 29 blocks wide. Finally 
they color in their figure and the back- 
ground, choosing colors which give 
them the most vivid contrast. 

The graph paper corresponds to an 
area of permanently numbered seats 



in Section 6 at the College Park sta- 
dium. The area, 29 seats wide and 
27 seats high, is near the 50-yard line 
and runs from Row J up to Row KK. 
The biggest job is the clerical job, 
which comes next. A sheet of instruc- 
tions must be prepared for every seat 
in the section. Each sheet carries num- 
bers from 1 through 10. That's the 
number of tricks used in a game. Be- 
side each number is a spot of color. 
That's the color the seatholder is to 
flash when the number of that trick 
is called out. When the sheets of in- 
structions are prepared, the card sec- 
tion is set up for a game. 

783 Seats 

The 783 seats in the card section 
are premium seats, and fill quickly. 
Many students come to games two or 
three hours early to get them. Fra- 
ternities, sororities and dormitory 
groups like to sit together there. More- 
over, the card section is hard by the 
50-yard line and a seat there assures 
a good view of the game. 

The only requisites for getting into 
the section are to get there in time 
and to be dressed in white, or at least 
in light-colored clothing. 

Five minutes before halftime, Libov 
has a squad of Boy Scouts distribute a 



Maryland 



87 



All Together 



111 




JOE WEINSTOCK 
He signals for the next display. 



set of three ll-by-4-inch color cards 
to each seat in the section. One card 
is red on one side, white on the other. 
The other cards have gold, black, blue 
and green sides. At one time these 
cards were distributed at the beginning 
of the game, but that was discontinued. 
Too many cards got torn up or thrown 
away in the excitement of the first 
half. 

Instruction Sheets 

Weinstein and Layton then go 
quickly through the section with the 
instruction sheets, making sure each 
student there gets the sheet worked 
out for his particular seat. 

To bring the section into bloom with 
a picture, Libov calls out the number 
of the trick he wants. One of his 
assistants also holds up a huge card 
bearing the number of the trick. The 
students in the section quickly consult 
their instruction sheets, then get ready 
with the color they are to hold up. 

When another of Libov's assistants 
holds up a giant card which says "Up," 
each student brings up a card of the 
prescribed color, and holds it in front 
of his face, the top edge of it at eye 
level. The students never know what 
picture they are making, but they can 
tell by the immediate applause that 
it is a good one. After 30 seconds, 
Libov or his assistants hold up the 
"Down" card, and the picture dis- 
appears. 

Some days, Libov says, the section 
works like a well-oiled machine. On 
other days it has to be watched every 
minute. There are always a few stu- 
dents in the section who sneak out 
at half-time for hot dogs and soft 
drinks. As these vacant seats are 
spotted they must be quickly filled by 



Boy Scouts, cheerleaders, or sometimes 
by surprised spectators. 

Some of the pictures are nearly fool- 
proof," Libov says. "If we're showing 
a big block-letter M, two or three 
people, or maybe even half a dozen 
can goof off without spoiling the pic- 
ture. If we're doing a picture of a 
turkey, or a terrapin or something 
tricky like that, one or two goof-offs 
can kill the whole effect." 

A number of spectacular effects have 
been considered by the card section 
leaders, but discarded because they 
would require perfect timing and co- 
ordination — something that couldn't be 
achieved without a lot of practice. Once 
the picture of a locomotive, with real 
'"smoke," was planned. The "smoke" 
was to be provided by several students 
carrying containers of water and 
chunks of dry ice, which gives off a 
heavy white vapor when dropped into 
water. This was discarded for safety 
reason; dry ice, unless handled care- 
fully, can inflict a painful burn. 
Will Be Better 

Libov thinks the card section at 
the university will become better and 
better with the passing years. 

At the University of Illinois and 
at U.C.L.A. the card sections use be- 
tween 1,500 and 2,000 students, he says. 

'"In a square that large," he ex- 
plains, "you can not only do a lot more 
elaborate pictures, but you can also 
animate pictures. Illinois does a fine 
picture of a train, and has the train 
move from one side of the square to 
the other. I'd love to see something 
like that at Maryland sometime." 

In the meantime, Maryland's card 
section seems to be doing very well, 
despite its small size. It must be, to 
get ovations only slightly softer than 
those given touchdowns. 



From Senator Beall 

Hon. J. Glenn Beall, U. S. Senator 
from Maryland requested that 
these pages print the following mes- 
sage: — 

"An indignant Canadian protests: 
'We note your concern over the re- 
cent increase of $5 per ton on Canadi- 
an newsprint. 



Block "M' 




PLANNING 
Morton M. Libov, left, and Steve 
Sakin work from a diagram of the 
entire 783-seat "card section" in design- 
ing a trick. 



'Surely you do not grudge this small 
boost to our economy . . ." 

"A man from Vermont feels differ- 
ently, however, and he writes: 

'I read about the rise in newspaper, 
and you are going to make a study. 

'Good for you. We are too easy with 
everybody." 

"Such letters — the complaint of the 
critic in Saskatchewan, and the com- 
ments of the man in Bennington— are 
typical of the diverse reactions which 
have been expressed concerning my 
interest in the recent price boosts an- 
nounced by Canadian newsprint manu- 
facturers. 

"The situation, basically, is this: 

'1. Despite reported prosperity in 
their industry, the Canadian newsprint 
companies are raising the costs of 
their product. 

'2. United States publishers, who 
buy more than three-quarters of their 
newsprint from Canada, have said that 
the increased costs will probably have 
to be passed to the readers of this 
nation's 12,381 newspapers. 

'3. Faced by such higher prices at 
newsstands and subscription counters, 
the public might ultimately turn away 
from one of its foremost sources for 
obtaining current facts. The result 
would obviously be a less informed 
citizenry. 

"The problem is a serious one, and 
I am seeking information from num- 
erous authorities in an effort to help 
find an answer. 

"My study, although focused primari- 
ly on the national newspaper business, 
has also had the secondary effect of 
making me reflect on my own personal 
relations with the press. 

"Thus far, during my entire public 
life, the reporters with whom I have 
had contact have been both objective 
and friendly. I would not ask for 
more. 

"Furthermore, they have consistently 
exhibited a sense of true humor which 
belies the persistent accusation that 
cynicism is a trade-mark of their occu- 
pation. I mention this now to introduce 
several paragraphs of "A Journalist's 
Prayer," a copy of which was given to 
me recently by a newspaperman. It 
goes: 

'St. Francis, dear patron of a har- 
rowed tribe, grant us thy protection. 

'Bestow on us, thy servant, a little 
more of thy critical spirit, and a little 
less on our readers. 

'Confer on our subscribers the grace 
of condescension in overlooking our 
faults, the grace of light in acknowl- 
edging our merits, and the grace of 
promptitude in paying our bills. 

'Give us beautiful thoughts, brave 
thoughts, so that we, thy children, may 
have the courage to write as we think 
and our readers the docility to think 
as we write . . . 

"In behalf of my friends on news- 
papers, I'll add a sincere 'Amen.' 



Maryland 



Graduate School 



With Atlantic Research 

Dr. Arch C. Scurlock, President of 
the Atlantic Research Corpora- 
tion, Alexandria, Virginia, has an- 
nounced the establishment of the 
Applied Mathematics and Interior 
Ballistics Division as an additional 
major unit of the organization. Mr. 
Millard Lee Rice has been named dir- 
ector of the new Division. 

The new division brings to four the 
major organizational units of the com- 
pany. Other previously established 
divisions consist of the Chemistry, En- 
gineering, and Electromechanical divi- 
sions. Previously in existence as a 
project in the com- 
pany, the establish- 
m e n t of division 
status for the ap- 
plied mathematics 
and interior ballis- 
tics group is a re- 
flection of the in- 
creased number and 
size of contract ac- 
tivities in this sector 
of the company's 
operations, said Dr. 
Scurlock. 

Mr. Rice received 
a Bachelor of Arts degree in Mathe- 
matics and Physics from Western 
Maryland College in 1948, and did 
graduate work in mathematics at the 
University of Maryland. Mr. Rice 
has been a member of the Atlantic 
Research technical staff since July 
1950, and has directed the activities 
of the Applied Mathematics and In- 
terior Ballistics group since its in- 
ception in early 1954. During his 
association with Atlantic Research, 
Mr. Rice has performed or directed 
numerous mathematical studlies re- 
lating to rockets, guns, and ordnance 
devices, some of which have contributed 
new approaches of significant value 
to the field. Experimental project 
experience has been principally in gun 
and propellant-actuated devices. 




Mr. Rice 



School of 



Nursing 

Helen E. King 

First Institute 

The Division of Practical Nursing 
graduated its first class at the Uni- 
versity's Psychiatric Institute. 

President Wilson H. Elkins was the 
speaker at the exercises. 

Graduates were:— Anne M. Adams, 
Olga H. Cox, Anne M. Cromwell, Vir- 
ginia B. Donaldson, Ellen V. Durnell, 
Anne B. Gentner, Anne N. Habib, 
Eleanor P. Ireland, Hortense L. Jack- 
son, Margaret C. Johnson, Mary H. 
Jones, Elizabeth Kelly, Mattie L. Pol- 
lard, Dorothy M. Rossi, Margaret B. 
Svitak and Elsie E. Weaver. 



QoikqsL (PjcuJlSl, VUuvsaL 

ABBY MERCURY, INC. 

8320 BALTIMORE BOULEVARD 

25 Years' Experience in 

SALES & SERVICE 

ABBY ROSENDORF TOwer 9-6000 

President College Park, Md. 



The practical nursing program pro- 
vides for instruction not only in the 
classroom but also supervised work in 
which the student works directly with 
patients. 

Applications for the new program 
are being accepted until March, 1956, 
when the next course begins, it was 
announced by Dean Florence M. Gipe, 
of the School of Nursing, and Director 
Helen Troy, of the Division of Practical 
Nursing. 



Career Week 

Hundreds of job-conscious Maryland 
students, many undecided about their 
vocation or profession, attended Career 
Week forums. 

Primary purpose of the annual affair 
is to provide students with an idea of 
job opportunities available and the 
usual prerequisites for hiring. 

Regardless of one's major, the most 
important factor is the individual, re- 
cruiters stressed. Favorable personal- 
ity, attitude, and good appearance were 
held necessary in any job seeking ex- 
pedition. 

Forum speakers were almost unani- 
mous in impressing upon the student 
the advisability of thinking in terms 
of the type of business and types of 
companies they would like to work for. 
There is a tendency on the part of 
many students to say, "I don't care 
who I'll work for," said Lewis M. 
Knebel, assistant dean of men in charge 
of placement. 

"A company will make room for a 
person who really seems interested," 
he said. 

Thirty three speakers were present, 
representing as many fields. 

The ability to communicate was 
stressed for all students, regardless of 
the type of work they may enter, ac- 
cording to Mr. Knebel. Poor speaking 
and writing skills are especially evident 
in many engineering and technical stu- 
dents, according to forum speakers. 

Speakers from nearly every major 
field were repesented. The presenta- 
tions were broken down into college 
units. They included Physical Educa- 
tion, Business and Public Administra- 
tion, Arts and Sciences, Agriculture, 
English, Engineering and Home Eco- 
nomics. 

Broken down further into career 
fields, representatives were present 
from public utilities, radio and tele- 



We Invite You 
To Inspect Our 

RESiDEnTiRL communis 

of 

RAV PARK 

— Featuring — 

j/ul cm- C°<l 

JhsL Split. cZw&L 
JhsL JhL-dtswsiL 

and 

JhsL QototuaL 

— the finest in homes 
of enduring value 

HARRY R. BOSWELL CO., Inc. 

REALTORS 

3718 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE 

MT. RAINIER, MD. 
AP. 7-1111 



See the NEW Better Than Ever 



SALES 



ztfad' 



SERVICE 



PALMER FORD, INC. 

3110 Hamilton Street 

HYATTSVILLE. MD. 

Phen* WArfi.ld 7-0900 



vision, service industries, government, 
publications and public relations, trans- 
portation, agriculture and the technical 
fields. 



TYPO ERROR 

"Two Frights Daily . . ." From a 
Pioneer Air Lines ad in the Waco, 
Texas, Times-Herald. 



Maryland 



39 



First Prize Winners 

■■■Hn 




PHI DELTA CHI 

Phi Delta Chi Fraternity of the School of Pharmacy won first cash prize and the Bernard Cherry Cup for one year at 
the Frolic of the Alumni Association at the Alcazar. 



School of 



Pharmacy 

B. Olive Cole 
.Adele B. Ballman 



Annual Frolic 

The Ninth Annual Frolic of the Alum- 
ni Association of the School of 
Pharmacy of the University of Mary- 
land was held at the Alcazar, Balti- 
more, Maryland, on November 3rd, 
1955. The affair was attended by 450 
persons, including students, their par- 
ents and friends, faculty, fraternities, 
sorority and alumni — a happy and 
friendly assemblage. 

The entertainment consisted of com- 
petitive skits by the fraternities and 
and sorority, and also by individual 
vocalists and pianists — all students of 
the School of Pharmacy. 

Prize Winners 

The following captured the prizes, 
with the resounding applause of the 
students and their friends: 

Phi Delta Chi Fraternity — First cash 
prize and the Bernard Cherry 
Cup for one year. 

Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity — Sec- 
ond Cash prize. 

Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority — 
Third cash prize. 

Michael B. Rodell, Pianist — First in- 
dividual cash prize. 

Charles V. Keller, Jr., Vocalist — Sec- 
ond individual cash prize. 

The judges were: Bert Hanauer, 
Program Director, Radio Station 



WFBR; Bernard F. McManus, Repre- 
sentative of Muth Brothers & Co.; 
Samuel J. Waddell, Representative of 
H. B. Gilpin Company. 

President Gordon Mouat welcomed 
the guests and awarded the prizes. 

Norman J. Levin was Master of 
Ceremonies. Bernard Cherry presented 
the Cherry Cup to the winning fra- 
ternity. Dean Noel E. Foss expressed 
thanks to the Alumni Association for 
the evening's entertainment. Music for 
the entertainment and for dancing was 
by the Dick Metz Orchestra — students 
of the School of Pharmacy. 

Silver Dollars 

Tickets were provided for registra- 
tion upon entering the hall and 50 
persons holding duplicate numbered 
tickets were each given silver dollars. 

Refreshments were served. Ice cream 
was provided by Borden's Ice Cream 
Company, delicious peanut butter 
crackers by the Austin Packing Com- 
pany, Cigars by F. A. Davis & Sons. 
Coca Cola, cider and doughnuts were 
also served. The refreshments were 
popular during the intermission and 
also during the dancing. 

The Chairmen of the committees in 
charge of the affair included — Samuel 
Portney, Tickets; Sam A. Goldstein, 
Place and Arrangements; Morris Coop- 
er and Frank J. Slama, Entertainment; 
Victor Morgenroth, Publicity, and 
Frank L. Black, Reception. 

Francis S. Balassone as the newly 
appointed Chief, Division of Drug Con- 
trol, State Department of Health, who 
succeeds Dr. L. M. Kantner, was pre- 



sented to the group; as was also Alex- 
ander J. Ogrinz as the new member 
of the Board of Pharmacy, who suc- 
ceeds T. Ellsworth Ragland. The new 
appointees have the best wishes of 
their fellow pharmacists. 

Dr. Charles W. Foreman 

The School of Pharmacy is happy 
to announce the addition to the Fac- 
ulty of Dr. Charles W. Foreman as As- 
sistant Professor of Zoology. Dr. 
Foreman received his A.B. and MA. 
degrees from the University of North 
Carolina and his Ph.D. from Duke Uni- 
versity. Before coming to Maryland, 
he taught at Wofford College, S. C. In 
addition to his courses in zoology, Dr. 
Foreman is teaching physiology to the 
Sophomore Class. 

State Drug Commissioner 

Mr. Francis S. Balassone, an alum- 
nus of the School of Pharmacy, Class 
of '40, has been appointed to succeed 
Dr. L. M. Kantner as Drug Commis- 
sioner for the State of Maryland. Mr. 
Balassone, a native of West Virginia, 
was on the Faculty of the School of 
Pharmacy from 1946 to 1950 teaching 
Dispensing and Manufacturing Pharm- 
acy as well as History of Pharmacy. 

Mr. Balassone has had wide experi- 
ence in pharmacy, serving for four- 
teen years as pharmacist, General 
Manager and Executive Vice-President 
of the Yager Drug Company. For the 
past three and a half years he has been 
owner of the Overlea Pharmacy on Bel- 
air Road. 

Mr. Balassone, who served during 
the war in the Marine Corps, is married 
and is the father of four sons. 



40 



Maryland 



Glassblowing At The University 




CLASS IN GLASSBLOWING 

In these days of automatic machines and speed-up production, John T. Car- 
ruthers of Chevy Chase, Md., is content to practice glassblowing, a craft that 
calls for a lot of high manual skill and is at least 2,300 years old. Mr. Car- 
ruthers, who has been a glassblower for 17 years, is now quietly passing secrets 
of the ancient Assyrian-Egyptian art along to 15 pupils at the University of 
Maryland. His shop in the school's new chemistry building probably is the most 
complete college glassblowing lab in the country. It is fitted with $15,000 worth 
of equipment, including strain analyzer, annealing oven, grinding plate, glass 
saws and glass lathes. "It's too bad more people aren't interested," says 
Carruthers. "There's really a demand for good glassblowers." 

Here, Mr. Carruthers demonstrates the sealing of a stopcock to a 3-necked, 
5-liter flask to students Beverly Russell and William Klein at the University 
of Maryland. 



Co//ege of 



Arts and Sciences 



Lois Eld Erneat 



Weather Forecasts 

Earth satellites which may be circling 
the globe within two years will 
give weather men important and hith- 
erto unobtainable data for more pre- 
cise forecasting. 

This prediction was voiced by Dr. 
S. Fred Singer, University of Mary- 
land physicist and one of the first to 
design a feasible man-made moon. 

In a talk before the Engineers Club 
of Baltimore, Dr. Singer said improved 
long-range weather forecasts could 
raise living standards throughout the 
world. 

"This," he said, "may be one of the 
most valuable and practical contribu- 
tions of the earth satellites." 

Dr. Singer explained that meterolo- 
gists today must make their predic- 
tions with very little data. 

Weather observations, he continued, 
now are made from only five per cent 
of the earth's surface, with some help 
from weather ships and airplanes. As 



a result, there are huge storms far 
out at sea which often go undetected. 

But with earth satellites traveling in 
an orbit around the poles, the entire 
surface of the globe could be scanned 
at frequent intervals, said the scien- 
tist. 

In Dr. Singer's opinion this is how 
weather information could be obtained 
by the satellites and radioed to rae- 
terologists. 

The earth's surface reflects surpris- 
ingly little light — approximately 5 per 
cent from bodies of water and 12 per 
cent from land areas, he noted. In con- 
trast, clouds reflect a great amount of 
light. 

200 Above Sea Level 

Satellites moving 200 miles above 
sea level could record changes in light 
reflection, which, said Dr. Singer, would 
be of great value in both long-range 
and short-range weather forecasting. 

On a long-range basis, any increase 
in the earth's cloud coyer would mean 
that the climate will be colder. Con- 
versely, if the satellites detect a les- 
sening of the cloud cover, it could be 
predicted that the earth's mean tem- 
perature would go up. 

Such information, Dr. Singer ex- 
plained, would be of great help to 



Drink 

MILK 

For 

Goodness Sake! 

You Get So Much 
For So Little 

V PROTEIN for BODY BUILDING 

V RIBOFLAVIN for EYES & SKIN 

V CALCIUM for TEETH & BONES 

V NIACIN for NERVES 

V CALORIES for ENERGY 

Harvey Dairy, Inc. 

Serving the 

COLLEGE COMMUNITY 

since 

JANUARY 

NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 

BRENTWOOD, MD. 



College Park Record Center 



Complete Line 

Popular 
Classical & 
Hillbilly Records 

Phonographs 
Greeting Cards 

In the Heart of College Park 
7406 Baltimore Blvd. WA 7-4102 



NELSON MOTORS 

— STUDEBAKER — 

Authorized Sales & Service 
Auto Repairs — All Makes of Cars 
3 blocks from U. of M. on Route 1 

USED CARS UNion 4-8600 

7211 BALTIMORE BLVD. • COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



• W. W. LEWIS • 
dhudttfu 

HEmlock 4-3500 

Eves. WA. 7-1231 

2020 UNIVERSITY LANE 

^ Lewisdale Office, Hyattsville, Md. ^ 



Maryland 



41 




3>ea?on s (greeting?! 

Hoiv ivonderful it would he if we 

could keep the Christmas Spirit 

alive the year long. 

JOHN M. WALTON 
DENNIS W. MADDEN 




OXYGEN COMPANY 

® COMPRESSED GAS MANUFACTURER 
ANESTHETIC & THERAPEUTIC 

GASES and EQUIPMENT 
RESUCITATION EQUIPMENT 

RENTAL and REPAIR SERVICE 

2900 Kenilworth Ave. — Bladensburg, Md. — UNian 4-2345 



McLeod & Romberg 
Stone Co., Inc. 

CUT STONE 

— • — 

Bladensburg, Maryland 



PHONE UNION 4-5100 B. SUGRUE— PREJ. 

NORMAN MO TOR C OMPANY, Inc. 

SALES ^^^h SERVICE 

8320 WASHINGTON-BALTIMORE BLVD. • COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



42 



farmers in planting their crops, to 
contractors in scheduling construction 
work, and to industry in forecasting 
business trends. 

On a short-range basis, the satellites 
could pick up massive cloud movements 
which may be the forerunner of devas- 
tating storms, he said. 

"We can't control the weather — al- 
though eventually we might even do 
that — but this information could help 
people prepare for severe storms," he 
declared. 

Speaks At Hillel 

Dr. Robert Herman, visiting Profes- 
sor of Physics, spoke on "Science Looks 
at Creation" before the B'nai B'rith 
Hillel Foundation at the University. 

Professor Herman, one of the out- 
standing physicists in the United 
States, came to the University of Mary- 
land from the Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity Applied Physics Laboratory. He 
is the author of 60 scientific publica- 
tions and is considered an authority 
on various phases of physics, among 
them cosmology, origin of the ele- 
ments, astrophysics, solid state, spec- 
troscopy, and molecular structure. 

Professor Herman did his undergrad- 
uate work at the College of the City 
of New York and received his Ph.D. 
at Princeton in 1940. 

In Mexico City 

Four faculty members of the De- 
partment of Physics gave papers on 
research done at the University of 
Maryland at a meeting of the Ameri- 
can Physical Society held in Mexico 
City. 

They were Drs. Richard A. Ferrell, 
Renfrey Potts, L. L. Marton, Albert 
W. Saenz. Other members of the 
faculty from the Department of 
Physics attending the meetings were 
Drs. James L. Anderson, Richard H. 
Tredgold and S. Fred Singer. 

The fascinating story of how the 
weatherman will be able to give long- 
range predictions, perhaps telling us 
what the weather will be like six 
months or a year ahead, through data 
obtained from the proposed "earth 
satellite" was described by Dr. Fred 
Singer in a talk in Baltimore. 

Dr. Singer was_ the guest of the 
Engineers Club of Baltimore at a 
special meeting and the en- 
gineers, thrilled by his story of what 
the satellite will be like, fired question 
after question at him at the close of 
his talk. 

The University of Maryland physi- 
cist, first to suggest a tiny satellite 
around the earth, fired by man into 
outer space said: 

"To me the possibility that the satel- 
lite will give people on earth data that 
the meteorologists can translate into 
more accurate long-range weather fore- 
casts is one of the most fascinating 
attainments of the satellite. 

"Few people realize how little of the 
earth's surface is under weather ob- 
servation at the present time; actually 
only about 5 per cent. 

Maryland 



in 

electrical 
engineering 
it's . . . 

E. C. Ernsti 

INCORPORATED 

ELECTRICAL 

CONTRACTORS 

1 624 1 4th STREET, N.W. 
WASHINGTON 9, D. C. 

Over Half Century of Continuous Service 

R. B. PHELPS 
STORE CO. 

CUT STONE CONTRACTORS 

Limestone 
Granite Marble 

NOrth 7-1508 2501 Ninth St., N.E. 
Washington IS, D. C 




Thomas E. Carroll 
& Son 

LANDSCAPE CONTRACTING 

Tr»# Moving 
Trooi Shrubi 

Sodding Grading 

EVorgroon 4-3041 

Colesville Pike, Route #3 
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 



Hilliard C. Myers & Son 

Roofing Specialist* 

FIREPLACES and CHIMNEYS 

CLEANED and REPAIRED 

Incinerator Scroon Topi Mad* to Order 

3540 14th ST., N.W. WASHINGTON, D. C 

RAndolph 4-1344 



McNeill Surveys, Inc. 

LAND PLANNING AND SUBDIVISION 
6480 SLIGO MILL ROAD 

TAKOMA PARK, MD. 
Telephone: JUnlper 9-750S 



"Outside of the United States and 
Canada, and Western and Northern 
Europe, there is no weather observing 
at all. 

"The Weather Bureau sometimes is 
able to operate weather ships, but in 
the main all the ocean space is not 
observed. 

"The satellite, its orbit going around 
the earth in line with the poles, and 
with the earth revolving under it,, 
would observe and scan the whole 
earth's surface every day or so. 

"It would be equipped with a photo- 
electric cell, which would be able to 
measure the reflected light from the 
earth. 

"The earth, that is the land mass, 
reflects only a small percentage of 
light, but the most reflective material 
is the cloud mass. 

"By measuring the amount of re- 
flected light, over the whole earth, 
from day to day, the satellite could tell 
us accurately how great the cloud mass 
was, where it was, and how concen- 
trated. 

"The cloud mass is the most impor- 
tant factor in determining climate, for 
on the amount of clouds depends 
whether temperature is up or down. 

"Once when a volcano erupted over 
the South Pacific, the whole atmosphere 
was filled with dust particles, which 
remained in position for about two 
years. 

"This had a definite effect on the 
climate for that entire period. 

"The satellite, by being able to 
observe the whole earth's surface, and 
give accurate reports on the cloud mass 
situation, would give weather fore- 
casters data of the reatest value. 

"Already the Weather Bureau pre- 
dicts weather 30 days ahead, and there 
are private concerns which predict six 
months to a year in advance, and these 
forecasts are of tremendous value. 

"This additional data from the satel- 
lites would be added to what we al- 
ready have by looking upward, and 
would make these long-range predic- 
tions far more accurate than they can 
be now." 

At Washington 

Professor Howard Rovelstad, Direct- 
or of Libraries, represented the Asso- 
ciation of College and Reference Li- 
braries at the annual meeting of the 
American Council on Education held 
at the Statler Hotel in Washington, 
D. C. 

Presents Paper 

Dr. R. McKelvey, Post-Doctoral Fel- 
low in the Institute for Fluid Dynamics 
and Applied Mathematics, presented a 
paper entitled "Solution About a Reg- 
ular Singular Point of a Second Order 
Linear Ordinary Differential Equation 
Involving A Large Parameter," at the 
recent meeting of the American Math- 
ematical Society here at the Univer- 
sity. 

Represents Ecological Society 

Dr. J. Frances Allen, Department of 
Zoology, recently represented the Eco- 
logical Society of America at three con- 
ferences held in Washington, D. C, 
entitled: Agricultural Research Insti- 



THE 

HENRY B. GILPIN 

COMPANY 

Wholesale Druggists 
for over 100 years 

WASHINGTON 3, D. C. 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

NORFOLK 10, V A. 



WINDOW - ON - THE - KITCHEN 

JiiixdfudsudjDL 

SELF-SERVICE 
Delicious food ... All our desserts are 
home-made . . . popular prices . . . 
no tipping ... air conditioned 

BREAKFAST - LUNCHEON 

DINNER Quality Coffee. Sc a cup 

Open Daily and Sunday 
tlth Street Entrance of 

HOTEL HARRINGTON 
Uth & E St*., N.W. Washington, D. C. 



modern 
machinists co. 

General Machine Work 

MACHINE DESIGNING 

MAINTENANCE - AUTOMOTIVE 

INDUSTRIAL - AIRCRAFT 

774 Girard St., N.W. 

Washington, D. C 



WESTERN 
EXTERMINATING CO. 

TERMITE CONTROL 
Safe - Efficient - Economical 

Providing Protection from Insects and 

Rodents Destroying Fabric, Wood, Food 

FREE INSPECTION WITHOUT OBLIGATION 

— New Address — 

4904 WISCONSIN AVE., N.W. 

WASHINGTON 16, D. C 

EMerson 3-9660 



HILLYARD SALES CO. 




Divisional 



Maryland 



43 



METROPOLITAN 
POULTRY Co., Inc. 




Serving the Best Foods 
To the Finest Institutions 

Poultry - Frosted Foods 

Butter - Cheese 

Shortenings 

425 11th STREET, S.W. 

Phones District 2044 to 49 

WASHINGTON 4, D. C. 



SUNSHINE PARK 

RACING 

ASSOCIATION 

Zp 1 idv SHARE 

Prospectus Free Upon Request 

C. J. RLIEDUNG 

915 EYE STREET, N.W. 
WASHINGTON 1, D. C. 

NA. 8-7358 



SEASON'S GREETINGS 
Enjoy Our Delicious Food 



9 



A 



!% 



ITALIAN 
RESTAURANT 



1837 M STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 
(Off Connecticut Avenue) 



j MOTORISTS- 




If you wish to save 


fuel, take 


your 


car to A. J. Buell. 


He can 


tune 


your motor, too, so, 


it will run 


just 


like new. 






BUELL'S CARBURETOR & 


IGNITION SERVICE 


811 10th Street, N.W. 


ME. 8-5777 


Washington, 


D. C. 





c. 


Engel's Sons 




Incorporated 




Established 1850 


Fruits and Vegetables 




District 7-0995 


522 - 


1 2th STREET, S.W. 




Washington, D. C 



USE COUPON ON LAST PAGE 



Publish Book 




CARTOON TREASURY 



"Cartoon Treasury" is the title of a 
book compiled and edited by Pyke 
Johnson (A&S '37) and his wife, Lucy 
Clark Johnson, pictured above. 



tute and Agricultural Research Board 
of the National Research Council; Na- 
tional Conference on Pesticides; and 
the International Conference on the use 
of Antibiotics in Agriculture. 

Attends Conference 

Professor Reuben G. Steinmeyer, 
Department of Government and Poli- 
tics, attended the annual conference 
of the Far Eastern Council of Com- 
merce and Industry held in New York 
City. 

Physics Address 

An address based on Stanford Uni- 
versity experiments on high energy 
electron scattering was given at the 
University of Maryland by Dr. Leonard 
Schiff, Professor and Chairman of the 
Stanford Department of Physics. 

According to Dr. John Toll, Pro- 
fessor and Chairman of the University 
of Maryland's Physics Department, the 
high energy electron scattering experi- 
ments now being conducted at Stan- 
ford have provided much valuable in- 
formation about the distribution of elec- 
tric charge within the atomic nucleus. 
Professor Schiff reported on these ex- 
periments and on the related theoret- 
ical research that he and other mem- 
bers of his department have conducted. 

Promoted 

Dr. Roy S. Anderson of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland's Department of 
Physics, has been promoted from as- 
sistant professor to associate professor. 

Dr. Anderson received his A. B. de- 
free from Clark University in 1943, 
after which he served for three years 
as lieutenant in the United States 
Naval Reserve. He then returned to 
Dartmouth College for graduate work 
in physics, receiving his Masters' de- 
gree in 1948. He completed his Ph.D. 
degree at Duke University in 1951. 
Before coming to the University of 
Maryland, he served for one year on 
the research staff of the Stanford Re- 
search Institute in Stanford, Califor- 
nia. He has served as Assistant Pro- 
fesor of Physics at the University of 
Maryland since 1952. 

Paris Degree 

Professor A. Owen Aldridge, of the 
Department of English, has been grant- 
ed the degree of Docteur de l'Universite 
at Paris. 



44 



Professor Aldridge, who was on sab- 
batical leave from Maryland, received 
the degree at the Institute of Compara- 
tive Literature of the Sorbonne for 
studies in French-American literary re- 
lations which were written in French 
and will shortly be published in France. 
This is a second doctorate for Pro- 
fessor Aldridge, who received a Ph.D. 
in English literature in 1942 at Duke 
University. 

Chemists' Award 
William J. Bailey, Research Profes- 
sor, and William N. Turek, of the De- 
partment of Chemistry, University of 
Maryland, have received the first Fatty 
Acid Producers Research Award of the 
Association of American Soap & Gly- 
cerine Producers, Inc., for research on 
the "Synthesis and Purification of Fatty 
Acids by the Pyrolysis of Esters." The 
award, a scroll and $500, is adminis- 
tered by the American Oil Chemists' 
Society and was presented at their 
annual meeting in Philadelphia, Pa. The 
winning manuscript will be published 
in the Journal of the American Oil 
Chemists' Society. 

This award was established to en- 
courage research at educational institu- 
tions on the chemistry of fatty acids 
and their derivatives. 

Fisheries Staff 
Dr. G. W. Wharton, head of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland's Department of 
Zoology, announced the appointment of 
Dr. Melvin A. Benarde, Dr. Daniel A. 
Livingstone and Dr. Howard E. Winn 
as assistant professors. 

Dr. Benarde received his Ph.D. in 
bacteriology at Michigan State College 
in 1954 and was formerly associated 
with the commissary research division 
of the Naval SupplylResearch and De- 
velopment Facility, Fayonne, N. J. 

Dr. Benarde will serve as food tech- 
nologist at the Sea-food Processing 
Laboratories, Crisfield, Md., and will 
help train graduate students in this 
field. 

Dr. Livingstone, a native of Canada, 
joins the staff from his position of 
postdoctoral fellow at Dallousie Uni- 
versity, Halifax, Nova Scotia. 

He received his Ph.D. at Yale Uni- 
versity in 1953 and held a postdoctoral 
overseas fellowship in Cambridge, Eng- 
land, in 1953-54. Dr. Livingstone will 
teach ecology, limnology and marine 
zoology. 

Dr. Wilson received his Ph.D. at 
the University of Michigan in 1955 
and joins the staff from his former 
position at the American Museum of 
Natural History, where he was engaged 
in a research project on fish locomo- 
tion. 

The new appointees will augment the 
university's fisheries biology program. 
Biology Teaching 
Dr. G. W. Wharton, Department of 
Zoology, participated in a conference 
on the problems of biology teaching on 
the high school and college levels. The 
conference was held under the auspices 
of the Washington Academy of Sci- 
ence and the National Science Founda- 
tion, at the District of Columbia Teach- 
ers College. 

Maryland 



f D. C. Ignition -^ 

Headquarters 
Inc. 

• Complete Analysis . . . 

for difficult electric and motor trouble* 

• Tune up . . . 

• Specialty repairs . . . 

• United Motors . . . 

authorized service: carburetors, starters, 
generators, all wipers, speedometers, 
heaters, fuel pumps. 



^. 



Phone: NAtional 8-7038 
1 230 20th St., N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 



J 



Jfuller 8c b'^ibett 



INCORPORATED 



suppling 

EVERY 
PHOTOGRAPHIC 

NEED 



Since 



1920 



Phone— Executive 3-8120 

815 TENTH STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



FOR CHRISTMAS 

Flowers by 




FLORISTS 



Serving Discriminating 
Washlngtonlans 

For 22 Years 

2500 14th ST., N.W. WASHINGTON, D. C 

DUpont 7-7121 Open Evenings & Sundays 



ADVERTISERS 
Mat Service 

Plastic Printing Plates 

Stereotype and 
Rubber Printing Plates 

416 EYE STREET, N.W. 

Washington, D. C Executive 3-5264 



At Johns Hopkins 

Dr. E. A. J. Johnson, Department of 
Economics, spoke to the Johns Hop- 
kins Faculty Seminar in Political Econ- 
omy on "Forced Economics Develop- 
ment in Yugoslavia." 

In Kansas 

Professor Homer Ulrich, Department 
of Music, attended the three-day an- 
nual meeting of the National Associa- 
tion of Music Executives in State Uni- 
versities held at the University of 
Kansas. 

Flight Training 

A first solo flight has been made at 
the Whiting Field U. S. Naval Auxili- 
ary Air Station, Milton, Fla., by Naval 
Aviation Cadet Charles H. Kinney, who 
attended the University (A&S) before 
entering the Naval Aviation Cadet Pro- 
gram through the Anacostia Naval Air 
Station at Washington, D. C. 

With this initial phase of Naval 
Aviation flight training completed he 
will receive instruction in precision air 
work along with his regular solo flights 
as another step toward earning his 
Navy "Wings of Gold". 

In Chicago 

Dr. S. Fred Singer, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Physics, participated in a 
space flight symposium at the 25th 
Anniversary Annual Meeting of the 
American Rocket Society at Chicago. 

In addition to the space flight sym- 
posium, the meeting featured forty 
technical papers covering high alti- 
tude research, liquid and solid rockets, 
hypersonic aerodynamics, space medi- 
cine, combustion, control, high tempera- 
ture materials and heat transfer. 

Participating in the symposium with 
Dr. Singer were Krafft A. Ehricke, 
Convair; Andrew G. Haley, Haley, Doty 
& Wollenberg; Herman Lagow, Naval 
Research Laboratory; Norman V. Pet- 
ersen, Sperry Gyroscope Company; 
William G. Purdy, Glenn L. Martin Co.; 
Kurt Stehling, Bell Aircraft Corp.; and 
Ernst Stuhlinger, Redstone Arsenal. 

At Crisfield 

A study of the factors that cause 
spoilage in crab meat has been 
launched at Crisfield by the new sea- 
food processing laboratory of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

The spoilage study is the first in 
what is expected to be a long series of 
projects undertaken by the laboratory 
in connection with Maryland seafood 
and the seafood industry. 

The new fully equipped laboratory is 
headed by Dr. L. A. Littleford, who 
established the experimentation sched- 
ule. Dr. Charles Benarde, a bacteriolo- 
gist and food technologist, is assisting 
Dr. Littleford. 

The primary purpose of the labora- 
tory is to serve the seafood interests 
of the State, University of Maryland 
officials said. 

In a letter to seafood packers 
throughout the State, Dr. G. W. Whar- 
ton, head of the department of zoology 
of the University of Maryland, noted 
that the "number of problems that the 
laboratory can probably undertake in 
carrying out its work is limitless." 



Wm. H. Singleton 

COMPANY, INC. 



Heating 

Ventilating 

Plumbing 

Air Conditioning 



Power Plants 
Process Piping 
Welded Piping Systems 
Automatic Sprinkler 
Systems 



1240 Jefferson Davis Hwy. 

ARLINGTON, VA. 

RICHMOND, VA. 
ATLANTA, GA. 




WASHINGTON'S 

ONLY 



"DRIVE THRU" 

LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANERS 

Where You Save Up To 20% 

Drive In 

Hand In Your Bundle 

Drive Out 

QUICK SERVICE 

LAUNDRY, DRY CLEANERS 

1016 Blodensburg Road, N.E. 

Washington, D. C. 

(Across from Sears-Roebuck) 



• REFRIGERATION SUPPLY CO., Inc. 4 

WHOLESALE ONLY 

1612 FOURTEENTH ST., N.W. 

Complete — 

AIR CONDITIONING, REFRIGERATION, 
PARTS AND SUPPLIES 

Serving — 

THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, MARYLAND, 
VIRGINIA AND WEST VIRGINIA 
Member A.R.W. 

HO. 2-2600 

• WASHINGTON 9, D. C. , 



American Disinfectant Co. 

Pest Control Service 
928 EYE STREET, N.W. 

Washington 1, D. C. NAtional 8-6478 



Maryland 



45 



Jack Blank 

Invites You To 

Test Drive The New 
1 956 

PONTIAC 

With Spectacular 

New Dual-Range 

Performance 

Arcade*" 
Pontioc 

1437 IRVING ST., N.W. 
ADAMS 4-8500 

Washington's Largest 
Pontiae Dealer 



PARK 
TRANSFER 
COMPANY 

Heavy Hauling 

WASHINGTON, D. C 
NOrth 7-5753 



Anchor Fence 

Anchor Post Products, Inc. 

1317 HALF STREET, S.E. 

Lincoln 3-6660 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



SUNTILE 

A genuine Clay Tile 

Burnproof • Waterproof - Colorfast 
Call your SUNTILE Dealer at NO. 7-1725 

VICK TILE CO. 

2909 M St., N.W. Washington, D. C. 



Dr. Wharton said it was important 
that packers have a voice in the type 
of work done by the laboratory, and 
suggested the packers might have con- 
siderable information which would aid 
the unit in establishing a research 
schedule. 

He said the early program set for the 
laboratory can be changed if such 
changes are in the best interests of 
those who make their living from sea- 
food products of the Maryland area. 

Dr. Wharton, who recently made a 
personal visit to the laboratory, told 
seafood packers he hoped to arrange 
meetings with them concerning the 
unit's activities. 

A second project which the labora- 
tory is undertaking this year is an 
analysis of the methods for grading 
seafood, to determine if some standard 
can be set similar to that for the grad- 
ing of meats. 

One suggestion which the seafood 
packers have already given the labora- 
tory is a request for a study of the 
protein and vitamin content of oysters 
and crabs, so that these can be placed 
on packages. 

This project wil be included on the 
increasing list of seafood problems 
which the laboratory hopes to study, 
officials of the research unit said. 
On Radio WTOP 

Professor Carl Bode of the English 
Department spoke on the radio pro- 
gram "Invitation to Learning", on 
Station WTOP. The subject was "The 
Poetry of Edwin Arlington Robinson". 

At C .TJ. A. 

Dr. S. Fred Singer, chief developer of 
the "Mighty Mouse" rocket now used 
by the Navy for experimentation and 
weather observation, spoke at Catholic 
University School of Engineering. His 
subject: "Some Engineering Problems 
in Connection With Satellite Vehicles." 

Ed Rider Promoted 

Edward M. Rider, A & S '47, of 
Arlington, Virginia, has been appointed 
to the staff of the National Association 
of Margarine Manufacturers. He serves 
as Assistant to the President, Siert F. 
Riepma, with headquarters in Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Rider, a native of Maryland, was 
employed from 1947 to 1951 as all 
information specialist by the Maryland 
State Soil Conservation Committee in 
cooperation with the Agricultural Ex- 
tension Service at the University of 
Maryland. In 1948, as part of his official 
duties, he served as publicity director 
for the Maryland Conservation Field 
Day, a spectacular one-day renovation 
of Mrs. Nellie Thrasher's Frederick 
County farm which attracted 50,000 
spectators from this area and was 
given nationwide coverage. 

Mr. Rider served as a combat platoon 
leader with the 71st Infantry Division 
in France, Germany and Austria dur- 
ing World War II. He served as presi- 
dent of his graduating class and is also 
a past president of the College or Arts 
and Sciences Alumni Association. 

With Mutual Life 
James P. Garrity, A & S '55, 6 Elwyn 
Court, Silver Spring, has completed the 



home office phase of the Connecticut 
Mutual Life Insurance Co.'s sales man- 
agement training program and has 
been assigned to the Barrett-McElfresh 
agency of Washington, D. C, for three 
years' field work. 

Garrity, is one of six trainees 
selected from 300 candidates last year 
for the training program. For the 
past four months, the six trainees 
have been at the home office in Hart- 
ford, for intensive training in the 
principles and functions of the insur- 
ance industry and the operation of the 
Connecticut Mutual. 

They will serve the next eight months 
as policyholder service representatives 
in the field and will assist the general 
agents in the operation of their offices. 
Then they will be assigned to actual 
sales work for three years, after which, 
if qualified, they will be appointed 
agency supervisors and later to general 
agent or home office management po- 
sitions. 

To Langley AFB 

Col. Cecil L. Propst (A & S '27), Ful- 
ton, Md., is Chaplain for Tactical Air 
Command headquarters at Langley Air 
Force Base, Va. 

He was first commissioned in 1927 
in the Infantry Reserve upon gradua- 
tion from the University of Maryland. 
Following his graduation from Capitol 
University Lutheran Seminary as a 
clergyman, he was transferred to the 
Army Chaplain Corps in 1930. 

In 1940, Chaplain Propst was called 
to active duty with the Ninth Infantry 
Division and served with it during the 
campaigns in Africa, Sicily, France and 
in Belgium during the Battle of the 
Bulge. He was one of the first chap- 
lains to enter Germany, and later 
served in the Army of Occupation 
there. 

Following the war, he attended the 
Chaplain School at Fort Oglethorpe, 
Ga., and upon graduation in 1947 was 
transferred to the United States Air 
Force. 

His latest overseas assignment was 
as staff chaplain with the Far Eastern 
Air Forces and during which he trav- 
eled more than 100,000 miles. 

He was assigned to TAC upon his 
return to the United States. 

Among his decorations are the Le- 
gion of Merit, the Bronze Star, Com- 
mendation Medal and the Belgian 
Fourragere. 

Whitlock Wins 

A Maryland student was named 
winner of the first annual State Junior 
Chess Championship. 

Howard W. Whitlock (A&S), a 
member of the university's chess club, 
edged 24 contenders from throughout 
the State for honors. 

Second and third place in the compe- 
titions, open to players under 21, went 
to Milton Goldinger, Baltimore Junior 
College, and Roll Benzinger, Johns 
Hopkins University, respectively. 
Gold, silver and bronze medals to the 
top three. 

Letter From Bill 

William A. Stokes '55 writes as follows: 
"I was very happy to have received 



46 



Maryland 



a notice from the Alumni Association 
concerning membership and subscrip- 
tion to the alumni magazine. May I 
say that I am more than pleased to 
accept both of them. 

If you recall, prior to graduation in 
June, 1955, I was drum major of the 
University Red and White Band for 
4 years. Being out there with the 
band for so long and not being able 
to be back this year is going to be hard 
to take. I would appreciate it if you 
could keep me posted on their activities 
and let me know how things are going 
with them now and then. Also, if I 
could be of any assistance to you in 
formulating some sort of a band 
alumni club I would be more than 
happy to start such a project. 

At present I am the drum major of 
the U. S. Air Force Academy Band here 
in Denver. My duties are much the 
same here as they were at Maryland 
in that I'm planning and staging half- 
time shows for the Academy football 
games. By the way, we have George 
Washington University on our schedule 
for next year. 

If I can be of any help to you in 
Alumni activities out here in the West 
or with the Band or College of Edu- 
cation, be sure and let me know." 

Music 

The Department of Music presented 
the Pro Arte Society, John A. Gosling, 
conductor, in a concert at the Student 
Union Lounge. 

Offered in cooperation with the Cul- 
tural Committee of the university's Stu- 
dent Government Association, the pro- 
gram included: Brandenburg Concerto 
No. 4, in G Major, by Bach; Verklarte 
Nacht, for string sextet, by Schoen- 
berg; Symphony No. 2, Opus 36, in D 
major, by Beethoven. 

The following evening the combined 
choruses of the university performed 
Samuel Barber's Prayers of Kierke- 
gaard, with the Baltimore Symphony 
Orchestra, at the Lyric Theatre in Bal- 
timore. 

Richard A. Ferrell, Physics Depart- 
ment spoke on "Annihilation of Posi- 
trons in Solids" at the Navy Research 
Laboratory. 

Dr. Archer Futch, Physics Depart- 
ment, resigned to accept a position as 
Staff Physicist for the DuPont Corpora- 
tion with the Savannah River Atomic 
Energy Research Group. 

Dr. Sumner 0. Burhoe, Zoology De- 
partment, spoke to the Capital City 
Cocker Club on the topic Inheritance in 
the Cocker Spaniel. 

W. Gordon Zeeveld, English Depart- 
ment, was speaker at the Brotherhood 
of Washington Hebrew Congregation. 
Professor Zeeveld's topic was "Shake- 
speare and the Jews". 

Limnologist 

Waldemar Ohle, distinguished Ger- 
man limnologist (fresh water life), who 
has spent three weeks in consultations 
with lake and stream experts of the 
Indiana University zoology department, 
lectured at the University of Maryland. 
His American tour was sponsored by 
the American Society for Limnology 
and Oceanography, 

Maryland 





Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co. 
Silver Hill Concrete Co. 




Phone 

for 

CONCRETE 

RE 

6-8400 


Producers and Distributors of 

WASHED SAND & GRAVEL 
TOP SOIL • ROAD GRAVEL 
READY-MIXED CONCRETE 


Phone 

for 

SAND & 

GRAVEL 

RE 
6-7100 






WASHINGTON 20, D. C. 





JAMES D, KEMPER 

BUILDING PRODUCTS 

Miracle Adhesives 
• Finish Lime 

• Rockwool Insulation 

• Penn Metal Lath and Accessories 

• Keystone Roofing and Waterproof Papers 
EMerson 3408 WISCONSIN AVE., N.W. 

3-2345 WASHINGTON, D. C. 




EQUITABLE 



CO-OPERATIVE BUILDING ASSOCIATION 

"Organized 1879" 

• SHARE SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 

• LIBERAL DIVIDENDS 

• ACCOUNTS^ INSURED UP TO $10,000 FOR BUILDING 

REMODELING - REPAIRS 



HOME LOANS 



BY FEDERAL SAVINGS 
INSURANCE CORP. 



& LOAN 



915 F N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 

NAtional 8-1741 



Wheaton Branch 

11433 Georgia Ave. 

Silvor Spring, Md. 

LOckwood 4-0001 



|PH 


BERGMANN'S LAUNDRY 


^ ife ** t 


"Became 2ualUy C&nddtuiA" 


>'% £*, 


PLANT: 621-27 G ST., N.W. MEtropolitan 8-2220 




WASHINGTON, D. C. 


■ ^, ^0&*^^ 


BRANCH OFFICE: HYATTSVILJ.E, MD. WArfield 7-0880 



ROUSE, BREWER & BECKER 

INVESTMENT BANKERS 

Member Philadelphia and Baltimore Stock Exchange 
WY\TT BUILDING 8616 GEORGIA AVE. ARLINGTON TRUST BLDG. 

777 14th Street, N.W. Silver Spring, Arlington, 

Washington, D. C. Maryland Virginia 

STerling 3-5800 JUniper 7-9500 JA 5-5300 



NATIONAL EQUIPMENT & SUPPLY CO Inc. 



Link Belt Company 

Power Transmission 

Supplies 

1244 NINTH STREET, N.W. 



"Pyrene" & 

"C-O-TWO" 

Fire Extinguishers 

WASHINGTON 1, D. C. 



"MSA" Industrial 
Gas Masks. Canisters 
& First Aid Equipment 
HUdson 3-4430 



4H 



San Francisco Breakfast 




SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY ALUMNI MEET 

Seated: Drs. Preis, McCarthy, Lynch, Bimestefer, Robinson, Houghton, Ferguson, Cappuccio. Standing: Drs. Davenport, 
Lyon, Nuttall. 



School of 



Dentistry 

Dr. Gerson A. Freedman 
Gardner P. H. Foley 



Breakfast In San Francisco 

Sixty-four alumni attended the fifth 
in the series of annual breakfasts 
arranged by the National Alumni Asso- 
ciation held in conjunction with the 
meetings of the American Dental Asso- 
ciation. Like the previous affairs held 
in Washington, Saint Louis, Cleveland 
and Miami, the San Francisco event 
was characterized by a fine spirit of 
fraternization. Thirty-seven classes 
were represented, varying from 1895 
through 1955. Those present came from 
fourteen states, the District of Co- 
lumbia, and Puerto Rico, with Mary- 
land having the top showing of twenty- 
two. 

A customarily impressive feature of 
the breakfast was the presence of a 
number of distinguished leaders in the 
profession, including Daniel Lynch 
'25, past President of the American 
Dental Association; James Ferguson 
'15, President of the American College 
of Dentists; three graduates who are 
now serving as Deans of dental schools: 
J. Ben Robinson '14, retired Dean of 
the B.C.D.S. and the present Dean of 
the West Virginia University Dental 
School; Frank Houghton '17, Dean of 
the Loyola University Dental School; 
and Harry McCarthy '23, Dean of the 
Baylor University Dental School. 

Among the other prominent alumni 
present were J. Martin Fleming '95, 
venerable contributor to North Caro- 
lina dentistry; Ernesto Davila-Diez '34, 
Chairman of the Puerto Rican Board 
of Dental Examiners; Edgar Bessette 
'32, President of the Rhode Island 
Dental Society; Kyrle Preis '29, Presi- 
dent of the Maryland State Dental 
Association; and George Clendenin '29, 



President of the Maryland State Board 
of Dental Examiners. 

Lawrence Bimestefer '34, President 
of the National Alumni Association, 
presided. Larry deserves a great deal 
of the credit for the excellence of the 
arrangements that were made not only 
for the breakfast but also for the 
hospitality room which was the central 
gathering place for the alumni during 
the meeting. Arthur Davenport kindly 
arranged for the taking of the picture 
that accompanies this report. 

In the listing below are given the 
names, the classes, and the present 
practice locations or service assign- 
ments of the sixty-four who attended 
the breakfast. 

1895 — J. Martin Fleming, Raleigh, 
N.C. 

1909— C. J. Carballo, Tampa, Fla.; 
David A. Weinberg, Baltimore. 

1910 — Arthur L. Davenport, Balti- 
more. 

1911— Allen G. T. Twigg, Cumber- 
land, Md. 

1914— J. Ben Robinson, W. Va. 

1915 — James H. Ferguson, Balti- 
more; Conrad Inman, Baltimore. 

1916— Max Baklor, Baltimore; Wil- 
bert Jackson, Clinton, N. C. 

1917 — Milton B. Acorn, Olympia, 
Wash.; O. E. Culler, Baltimore; Frank 
J. Houghton, New Orleans. 

1919— Francis C. Webster, Sea Cliff, 
N. Y. 

1922 — Lynn Emmart, Baltimore. 

1923— Howard T. Koon, Seattle, 
Wash.; Harry B. McCarthy, Dallas, 
Texas; Clement J. McGrail, New Haven, 
Conn.; George W. Young, Harrisburg, 
Pa. 

1924 — Pilcher Bradshaw, Norfolk, 
Va.; James W. McCarl, Greenbelt, Md. 

****** 

UNLIKE MIRRORS 

A mirror reflects without speaking. 
Some men speak without reflecting. 



1925 — Daniel F. Lynch, Washington, 

D. C. ; George D. Resh, Hampstead, 
Md.; R. E. Williams, Goldsboro, N. C. 

1926 — James. E. Pyott, Baltimore; 
Allan L. Watts, Shippensburg, Pa. 

1927 — James Holdstock, Tampa, Fla.; 
Alexander T. Jennette, Washington, 
N. C. 

1928— Howard G. Bristol, Hartford, 
Conn.; B. Mehring, Silver Spring, Md. 

1929 — George Clendenin, Bethesda, 
Md. ; Kyrle W. Preis, Baltimore. 

1930 — Norman P. Chanaud, Centre- 
ville, Md. 

1931— Earnest B. Nuttall, Baltimore. 

1932 — Edgar L. Bessette, Cranston, 
R. I.; Jesse Englander, Bridgeport, 
Conn. 

1933— M. B. Bowers, Dallas, Texas. 

1934— L. W. Bimestefer, Dundalk, 
Md.; Ernesto Davila-Diaz, San Juan, 
P. R.; Milton L. Taubkin, Hawthorne, 
Calif. 

1936— M. R. Evans, Chapel Hill, 
N.C. 

1937 — I. Walter Sloan, Santa Monica, 
Calif. 

1938 — Eugene D. Lyon, Baltimore; 
Ford A. Stewart, Erie, Pa. 

1939 — Naomi F. Dunn, New Britain, 
Conn.; I. W. Eichenbaum, New Britain, 
Conn.; Max Miller, Los Angeles, Calif.; 
Albert W. Moms, Salisbury, Md. 

1941 — Frank A. Marano, Los An- 
geles, Calif. 

1943— Fred S. Blake, Paterson, N. J.; 
Roy J. Sloat, Jacksonville, Fla.; Riley 

E. Spoon, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

1944 — George Graham, Miami, Fla.; 
William F. Marano, Inglewood, Calif.; 

1945— Charles P. White, Seattle, 
Donald Michnoff, Miami Beach Fla. 
Wash. 

1946 — Joseph P. Cappuccio, Balti- 
more. 

1950— Cloyd C. Shultz, Lebanon, Pa. 

1951— Blair W. Stump, Cumberland, 
Md. 

1952— Alvin P. Friend, Oakland, Md. 

1953 — George E. Garrington, San 
Francisco, Calif. 



48 



Maryland 



1954 — Samuel Toovy, Monterey, 
Calif. 

1955 — Mary E. Pate, San Francisco, 
Calif.; Luis Toro, El Paso, Texas. 
Chairmen, Class Reunions 
The returning members of the Gold- 
en Reunion groups will be the guests 
of the National Alumni Association at 
the Alumni Dinner to be held at the 
Lord Baltimore Hotel on March 1. The 
reunions of the other five-year classes 
will be held on March 2. The several 
chairmen will communicate with each 
member of their respective classes. 
1906 B.C.D.S., U. of Md., and B.M.C.— 
Leicester D. Samuel, 2515 Gar- 
rison Ave., Baltimore 16. 
1911 B.C.D.S., U. of Md., and B.M.C.— 
Lowell P. Henneberger, Medi- 
cal Arts Building, Baltimore 1. 
1916 B.C.D.S.— Kyle T. Lee, Suite 509, 
Medical Arts Building, Roan- 
oke, Va. 
U. of Md.— Albert Z. Aldridge, 
4122 Edmondson Ave., Balti- 
more 29. 
1921 B.C.D.S.— Richard W. Schafer, 
304 Medical Arts Building, Bal- 
timore 1. 
U. of Md.— Neil E. Thalaker, Har- 
ford Rd. and Abbottson Street, 
Baltimore 18. 
1926 U. of Md.— Harry Levin, 3429 
Park Heights Ave., Baltimore 
15. 
1931 U. of Md.— Frederick F. Smyth, 
110 East 33rd Street, Baltimore 
18. 
1936 U. of Md.— Stuart G. Buppert, 
Medical Arts Building, Balti- 
more 1. 
1941 U. of Md.— Jerome S. Cullen, 828 

Park Ave., Baltimore 1. 
1946 U. of Md. — Joseph P. Cappuccio, 
1010 Saint Paul Street, Balti- 
more 1. 
1951 U. of Md.— Benjamin S. Crosby, 
Jr., 6007 York Rd., Baltmore 
12. 

Second Triennial Meeting 

The second Triennial Meeting spon- 
sored by the National Alumni Asso- 
ciation will be held at the Lord Balti- 
more Hotel on March 1 and 2, 1956. 

The program for the first day will 
include a morning session featuring 
discussions by three leading members 
of the medical profession on subjects 
related to the health of the dentist; 
a luncheon, with Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, 
President of the University, as the 
speaker; a luncheon and style show 
for the ladies; eight clinics on various 
phases of dental practice; a cocktail 




COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND 

That's what you get whenever you prescribe a CO-OPERATIVE 
Restoration. 

For over 45 years dentists all over the country have entrusted CO- 
OPERATIVE with their prosthetics. We cordially invite a trial case 
so that you may know of the dependable craftsmanship which you 
can expect from CO-OPERATIVE. 



(M HftltT I. » £■■»•?!, INC., H »*T. N ■ 
o-operative 
I Dental Laboratories 

*UWH •/ Dtrtltl PriltHlfm 
12 Wax Modaai Str»«i 
BALTIMORE. MARYLAND 




SERVING THE DENTAL PROFESSION 
WITH DISTINCTION SINCE 1910 



BETTER BUY 

BUICK 

FROM 

BROOKS-PRICE 



BALTIMORE 




JJm TflirfAopoliian JoWuAi tympany 

FOR THE BEST IN TRAVEL EVERYWHERE AT NO EXTRA COST 



STEAMSHIPS 
CRUISES 



AIRLINES 
TOURS 



RESORTS 
HOTELS 



1 1 1 5 N. CHARLES ST. BALTIMORE 1 , MD. VErnon 7-4360 

Personalized Travel Service Since 1923 



THE 4-H'ers 
"And thank you Mr. Wilson for 
giving us a lift to the campus!" 



party for the alumni and their wives; 
and a banquet that will be highlighted 
by the first presentation of the Dis- 
tinguished Alumni Award. 

The second day's program will in- 
clude another group of eight clinics; a 
luncheon for the alumni and their 
wives, at which there will be presented 
the portrait of Miss Katherine Toomey, 
now in her thirty-eighth year of 
notable service to the School; a series 
of projected clinics; and reunion din- 
ners for the five-year classes. 

Over 800 alumni attended the 1953 
Triennial Meeting; the committee 
hopes to better that fine record in 
1956. In December a preliminary pro- 
gram will be sent to every alumnus. 



Early in January each alumnus will re- 
ceive reservation cards. The January 
issue of the Journal of the B.C.D.S. 
will carry the program of the meeting 
in final form. 

State Board Notes 

One hundred and five candidates, the 
largest number since the Board's 
founding in 1884, took the Maryland 
State Board of Dental Examiners' test 
in June. Nine applicants took the ex- 
amination for dental hygienists. 

Dr. George B.. Clendenin '29, of 
Bethesda, appointed in 1953, is the 
newly elected President of the Board. 
Dr. Harry Levin '26, of Baltimore, ap- 
pointed in 1945, continues as the Secre- 
tary. The other continuing members 



Maryland 



49 




ARUNDEL FEDERAL 
SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION 

direct reduction horn* leant 
•avlng* account* - liberal dividend* 

• 
Intured up to $10,000 by the Federal 
Saving* and Loan Iniurante Cera. 

• 
ChrUtma* Club* — Safe Doped! ••«•» 
Community Hall for Rent 

Hour*: 

9 to 2 dally 

7 to 9 Tueiday evening 

PATAPSCO AVENUE & FOURTH STREET 
Baltimore 25, Md. CUrtls 7-1112 



Deutsches Haus, Inc. 

1212 CATHEDRAL STREET 
Baltimore, Md. 

GERMAN SPECIALTIES 

IMPORTED BEERS t WINES 

Dinners Served from 5 p.m. -9 p.m. 

Sundays from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. 

ALA CARTE until 1 a.m. 

Mondays Closed 

Hall* and Room* for Private Partie*, lanquett 
and Wedding*— Call LE. 9-45*5 

Wednesday 'til Sunday in Rath$keller 
Dance and Entertainment from p.m. 



H0PW00D 
Transportation Co. 

DAILY SERVICE 

BALTIMORE WASHINGTON 

ALEXANDRIA 

Towson t Beaton Street* 

PL. 2-0433 BALTIMORE 



PURITAN 

COMPRESSED 

GAS 

CORPORATION 

RACE t McCOMAS STS. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



are Dr. C. Adam Bock '22, of Balti- 
more, appointed in 1949; Dr. Wilbur 
D. Burton '37, of Baltimore, appointed 
in 1953; and Dr. Luther Lynn Emmart 
'22, of Baltimore, appointed in 1951. 

The retiring member, Dr. William E. 
Trail '26, of Frederick, appointed in 
1943, has been replaced by Dr. Albert 
W. Morris '39, of Salisbury. 

Personals 

Dr. Dean H. Hausrath '52, announces 
the opening of his office at 663 North 
Santa Cruz Avenue, Los Gatos, Cali- 
fornia. Dr. Hausrath states that in his 
general practice he will take a special 
interest in pediodontia. 

Dr. John Hoffman Wooden, Jr., '39, 
has announced the reopening of his 
office at 3902 Greenmount Ave., Balti- 
more 18. Dr. Wooden served two years 
with the U. S. Army. 

Dr. Sanford Wilbur Aronson '52, has 
announced the opening of an office at 
482 Main St., Spotswood, N. J. 

Dr. Barbara E. Seifert '54, has an- 
nounced the opening of an office for 
the practice of dentistry for children 
at 5706 Bellona Ave., Baltimore 12. 

Dr. George A. Lowander '40, has an- 
nounced the reopening of his office in 
East Setauket, N. Y. Dr. Lowander 
recently returned from service with the 
United States Army. 

In Denver 

Air Force 1st Lt. Arnold S. Feldman, 
A&S '52 and DDS '55 is taking his 
internship in dentistry at Fitzsimons 
Army Hospital, Denver. Lieutenant 
Feldman entered the Air Force in 
June, 1955. 

****** 
TYPO ERROR 

"To have prize-winning blooms you 
must use Bordeaux mixture and pray 
regularly." From a garden-club maga- 
zine. 



OiCC 1WCHE TOE TCHJ? Stt> 



School of 




D 



! espite the soap 
box orators, dirty 
politics still persist. 
. . . Keeping husbands 
in constant hot water 
does not make them 
tender . . . Too many 
people quit looking for 
work when they find 
a job . . . He's the kind of a guy you 
call by the first name — that pops into 
your head ... If you lose your head, 
hold your tongue ... A waiter is a 
man who believes money grows on 
trays . . . Wasted time makes a rotten 
egg . . . Visits always give pleasure — 
if not the coming, then the going . . . 
A real garden romance — a dead beat 
and an old tomato . . . Many a woman 
thinks she bought a gown for a ri- 
diculous price when in reality she 
bought it for an absurd figure . . . 
Great minds converse about ideas — 
average minds discuss events — small 
minds talk about people. 




Dean Stone 



"Dr. William S. 



Medicine 

Dr. John Wagner 

Man, Environment 

The following, out of Baltimore, is 
by Bob McHugh, Associated Press: 
"The doctor who can't see his patient 
for the gall stones is not the sort the 
University of Maryland likes to equip 
with a diploma and a stethoscope and 
send out to treat ailing humans. 

"Consequently, the university's school 
of medicine has added to its curricu- 
lum a course believed to be the only 
one of its kind in medical education. 
"The course, called 'Man and his 
Environment,' is a stimulating catch- 
all patch work of thought designed to 
broaden the outlook of the student 
doctor and help him 
to become more than 
a mere mechanic of 
the human body. 

"It slashes across 
the dividing lines of 
educational depart- 
ments and gives the 
embryo physician re- 
lated information in 
anthropology, eco- 
nomics, history 
p h y s ic s , genetics, 
psychology and 
other subjects. 
Stone, dean of the 
school of medicine, says it should give 
perspective to the student's view of 
humanity. It is expected to arouse 
his interest in the many different forces 
which influence the origin, growth, 
functions and attitudes of a human 
being. 

"It should extend the range of the 
medical student's general educational 
background acquired in undergraduate 
days in college. 

"The course is taught in the fresh- 
man year and is required of all stu- 
dents. It consists of two-hour sessions 
of lectures and panel discussions each 
Saturday by experts in widely varied 
fields. 

"Dr. Stone maintains that the stu- 
dent in medical school concentrates so 
intensely on the details of human 
structure and function that he may 
fail to develop over-all perspective on 
the subject of his chosen work — man. 

"The series of 31 lectures and panel 
talks, it is hoped, will aid the student 
to constructive curiosity about human 
problems and their solutions. 

"The basic idea is that a doctor is 
far better equipped if he considers not 
only the diseases he must treat but 
the sort of individuals his patients are 
and the factors which might have in- 
fluenced their illnesses. 

"The experts who will appear before 
the freshmen medical students come 
from educational and governmental in- 
stitutions throughout the area. 

"The course was developed by a com- 
mittee of medical men headed by Dr. 
Walter Van Buskirk." 

Friedenwald Lecture 
Dr. Russell S. Boles, professor of 
clinical medicine at the University of 



50 



Maryland 



Pennsylvania, delivered the ninth an- 
nual Friedenwald Memorial Lecture at 
the University of Maryland School of 
Medicine. 

The lecture was on "An Appraisal of 
the Medical Versus the Surgical Treat- 



tUkv 



MITCHELLS 



is 



mflRYiflno's FinesT com 

Mitchell's Premium Corn tastes like 
it was just cut from the cob . . . the 
result of Mitchell's own process- 
ing that cooks and seals the 
corn in cans with- 
in the hour it is 
pulled from the 
stalk. 



jttTCHEifji 



SHOE PEG 




;SUIffT 



^GOLDEN SWEET 



- Packed by — 

F. 0. miTCHELL & BRO., Inc. 

FERRYMAN, MD. - KENNEDYVILLE, MD. 

Main Office, Perryman, Md. 

Phone Aberdeen 621 -J 

•KflTHERine ROBB 

Hursing Home 

REST HOME 

for Aged and Convalescent 
ESSEX ROAD near LIBERTY ROAD 

• HUnter 6-5656 BALTIMORE, MD. . 



SEASON'S GREETINGS 



MARIA'S 
300 



Serving Baltimore's Finest 

Italian Cuisine 

Open 11 a.m. to 4 a.m. — Closed Mondays 

300 Albermarte St. MU 5-2811 



Baltimore 2, Md. 



MU 5-2812 



* RRTCRRFT ELECTRIC * 

supply co. of mo. 

Wholesale Distributors of 

Electrical Supplies and 

Appliances 

.Phon. SALISBURY 6151 SALISBURY, MD., 



USE THE COUPON ON 
THE LAST PAGE 



ment of Gastro-Intestinal Affections." 
The memorial lectures were estab- 
lished in 1941 in tribute to Dr. Julius 
Friedenwald, who was professor of 
gastroenterology at the school of medi- 
cine. 

All members of the Baltimore City 
Medical Society, the Maryland Acad- 
emy of Medicine and Surgery and other 
physicians are invited to attend these 
lectures. 

On TV:— Articulation 

Articulation, denned by speech clini- 
cians as the omission, substitution and 
distortion of speech sounds, was the 
subject of TV-M.D. program over 
WBAL-TV. 

According to Director Richard Hen- 
dricks of the university's speech clinic 
at College Park, Maryland, articulation 
is a problem of approximately a mil- 
lion and a half children this year in the 
United States. 

"In that this is the most frequently 
encountered speech problem," he said, 
"our staff demonstrates the actual 
treatment given to children with articu- 
lation difficulties in our clinic. We also 
effectively give parents important do's 
and don'ts and explain the pitfalls of 
home correction." 

Dorothy Craven, instructor in speech 
and assistant director of the speech 
clinic; Sally Condon, instructor, and 
Earleen Elkins, junior instructor, in 
speech therapy, gave an insight into 
the university's speech clinic operation 
— what it is, to whom it is available, 
and the work that is carried on in 
treatment, training of students and 
research. 

A part of the program threw light 
in public misconceptions which bring 
about the tendency for people to iden- 
tify speech problems with inferior in- 
telligence. 

Family Doctors 

Some 200 Maryland "family doctors" 
wound up their seventh annual scien- 
tific assembly in Baltimore with talks 
on general practice, psychiatry, surgery 
and rehabilitation. 

They attended the two-day meeting 
of the Maryland Academy of General 
Practice — second largest medical group 
in the nation. 

Among the speakers were Dr. Elmer 
C. Bartels of Boston, Dr. Henry P. 
Laughlin of Washington, Dr. George L. 
Kelly of Augusta, Ga.; Dr. C. Reid 
Edwards and Dr. J. E. Finesinger, both 
of the University of Maryland School 
of Medicine. 

Dr. Nathan E. Needle of Baltimore 
was elected president of the organi- 
zation, succeeding Dr. Merrill M. Cross 
of Silver Spring. 

The physicians were told by one 
speaker that "confidence and trust" in 
them by their patients often are as 
important as the latest "wonder drug." 

Dr. Mac F. Cahal, executive secre- 
tary of the national organization, 
pointed out that the general practi- 
tioner is "equipped to minister to 85 
per cent of all illnesses," and that 
GP's and specialists should work to- 
gether. 




OFFICE FURNITURE 

Fine Executive Desks and Chairs 

Leather Club Chairs and 

Davenports 

Steel Desks and Filing Cabinets 

THE JAMES T. VERNAY 
& SONS CO. 

5 E. LEXINGTON STREET 

PLaza 2-4220 Baltimore 2, Md. 



Mama Emma's 


ROMA 


Famous Italian Cuisine 

in "LITTLE ITALY" 


900 FAWN ST. SA. 7-8990 
231 S. HIGH ST. LE. 9-8965 


(Two Entrances) Baltimore, Md. 



See The World's Finest Above 

Knee Prosthesis 

at 

THE COMFORT LIMB & BRACE CO. 

602 N. Eutaw St. Baltimore 1, Md. 



Maryland 



51 



University Book Store 

Specializing In 

Medical Books 

World-Wide Mail Order Service 

519 W. Lombard Street 

LE 9-4315 

Baltimore, Md. 



[Another First for the Pimlico Hotel, 

Old Time 
Barbecue Treats 

Tantalizing barbecue dishes in the grand 
manner! Choice, tender meat turned 
slowly on a spit over a blazing fire, to 
a golden brown. Basted with a pungent, 
thick, mouthwatering sauce, prepared from 
an old recipe by our own expert chefsl 

Nate's and Leon's 



imlico 

HOTEL 



Open 'til 2 a.m. - Saturday 'til 3 
5301 PARK HEIGHTS AVE. BALTIMORE 



For the Finest in Outboard 

CRUISERS and UTILITIES 



Manufacturing Company 

ARNOLD, MD. 



Baltimore Boat Show 
Feb. 21 thru 26, 1956 



MRS. ALICE STUDLEY 

SWEDISH MEDICAL MASSEUSE 
AT HOSPITALS and HOMES 

By Appointment Only 



Baltimore, Md. 



BE 5-2569 



THE LAST PAGE 
USE THE COUPON ON 



Remedial Education 

Televiewers were given an appor- 
tunity to find out just how well they 
read on TV-M.D. over WBAL-TV. 

The actual reading test given to 
remedial education students at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland as a part of the 
university's counseling service, was 
presented in such a manner as to allow 
the audience to participate. Viewers 
were able to test their reading skill 
from the elementary level to the col- 
lege level. 

Under the direction of Dr. George 
Weigand, psychologist and assistant 
dean of students, the program was 
devoted to an explanation of remedial 
education — what it is and to whom it 
is available. 

Dr. Weigand demonstrated good and 
bad study habits and explained how 
good study habits can be developed 
through proven methods. 

The program was another in the 
University of Maryland's weekly series 
of TV-M.D. designed to bring a first 
hand report on research. 

TV-M.D., one of the major television 
medical programs in the United States, 
returned to the air over WBAL-TV, 
marking the start of the University 
of Maryland Medical School's fifth year 
before the TV cameras. 

This year's series has been built 
around an ambitious purpose. Basically 
the program will be devoted to answer- 
ing a multitude of questions — questions 
of health which occur to individuals 
throughout their lives or when they 
are troubled by specific conditions. 

Given the questions, the doctor on 
television will provide the answers and 
explain what is happening in that par- 
ticular field of medicine and what the 
outlook is for the future. 

The first program was devoted to 
the function of the lungs. Dr. Vernon 
Krahl of the Department of Anatomy 
covered many points in connection with 
the lungs, including their relation to 
polio. 

This program, like the rest of the 
series, is built around another basic 
motive — to help people take better care 
of themselves. 

The series is under the direction of 
Dr. E. Rodrick Shipley, representing 
the Post Graduate Education Commit- 
tee of the University, and Mr. Arnold 
Wilkes, Director of Public Affairs and 
Education for WBAL-TV. 

At Pensacola 

The conquest of infectious diseases 
through modem drugs has brought 
about such increases in population that 
everyone could be reduced "to the Asi- 
atic standard of living in another half 
century," according to Dr. John C. 
Krantz, Jr., professor of pharmacology 
at the University of Maryland, Balti- 
more. 

In a talk before the Gulf Coast Clini- 
cal Society at Pensacola, Fla., Dr. 
Krantz declared that the antibiotics, 
while solving many medical problems, 
"have posed socio-economic problems 
that are crucial" and have "aggravated 
the salient difficulty of the human race 
— too many people."' 



52 



Dr. Young Appointed 

Dr. William S. Stone, dean of the 
University of Maryland School of Medi- 
cine, announced the appointment of 
Dr. John D. Young, Jr., as professor 
of urological surgery. 

The appointment fills the vacancy 
created by the retirement of Dr. W. 
Houston Toulson. 

Dr. Young obtained his medical de- 
gree from the University of Maryland 
in 1941. He completed his urological 
training at the University of Rochester 
in 1950. 

Between July, 1944, and September, 
1946, he served in the Army and was 
discharged as a captain in the medical 
corps. The new appointee has been on 
the staffs of University and Johns Hop- 
kins hospitals in urology. 

68V2 Years' Practice 

A doctor who may have practiced 
medicine longer than any other doctor 
now living in the United States retired 
at Winchester, Va. 

Dr. Emmett Christopher Stuart, who 
began the practice of medicine in Balti- 
more in April of 1887 and joined the 
staff of the hospital in Winchester in 
1919, closed his office door for the last 
time. 

Dr. Stuart, who is 90, has completed 
68% years of active practice. As to the 
future, he said he had no definite plans. 

A native of nearby Clarke County, 
Dr. Stuart received his early education 
in Martinsburg, W. Va., and enrolled 
in the University of Maryland medical 
school in 1885. While an undergradu- 
ate he worked on the family farm at 
White Post, Va., to pay his tuition. 

No special celebration took place for 
Dr. Stuart's birthday. However, he was 
honored in quiet ceremonies by members 
of the Winchester hospital's staff. 

When his 88th birthday was observed 
two years ago, the American Medical 
Association said it knew of no other 
living doctor in this country with as 
long a record of medical service. 

To South Carolina 

Dr. Louis G. Llewelyn, of Pocomoke 
City, has accepted a newly created 
post as medical director for one of the 
nation's leading textile manufacturing 
firms, the Springs Cotton Mills in Lan- 
caster, South Carolina. 

Springs Cotton Mills employs 13,000 
persons in seven plants within a fifty- 
mile radius of Lancaster. Present plans 
are to develop the first company spon- 
sored medical center in the textile in- 
dustry, a plan which is being carefully 
watched by others in the industry. 

Dr. Llewelyn will head the medical 
staff of five or six doctors as medical 
director and establish a health and 
safety program for employees in all 
seven plants. Included in the clinic will 
be a program for preventative medicine, 
periodic physical examinations for all 
employees, diagnostic treatments, x- 
ray and emergency treatment for acci- 
dent victims. 

A native of Baltimore, Dr. Llewelyn 
came to Pocomoke City in 1940 as 
Public health officer for Worcester 
County. He served in this capacity for 
almost six years, entering private 
practice in December of 1945. 

Maryland 



He earned his M.D. in 1935 from the 
School of Medicine, University of Mary- 
land. Following three years service in 
the United States Navy he entered the 
public health service in 1939. 

Coronary Thrombosis 
One out of every two persons die of 
heart disease. Of this number 65% die 
of coronary thrombosis. 

Dr. R. A. Cowley, chief of chest 
dissurgery at University Hospital, dis- 
cussed coronary thrombois on the uni- 
versity's TV-M.D. program over WBAL. 
Through the use of animated car- 
toons and discussion he explained what 
coronary thrombosis is, how it develops, 
where it is found, and the damage it 
causes to the heart wall. He explained 
how the condition is treated surgically. 
A portion of the program was de- 
voted to interviews with former pa- 
tients who have undergone surgery. 
They discussed symptoms prior to be- 
ing operated upon and reported on their 
progress since surgery. 

It was another in the series on the 
theme of "Dr., What Does It Mean?" 
Over 68 Years 
Dr. Emmett Christopher Stuart, M.D. 
1887, has closed his office doors for the 
last time after 68% years of active 
practice. Dr. Stuart, a resident of 
Clarke County, Virginia is 90 years old 
and has probably practiced medicine 
longer than any other doctor now living 
in the United States. 

Dr. Stuart received his undergradu- 
ate work in Martinsburg, W. Virginia 
and enrolled in the University of Mary- 
land Medical School in 1885. He worked 
on the family farm at White Post, 
Virginia to pay for his education. Dr. 
Stuart has gone into retirement as of 
October 31, 1955 and says he has no 
definite plans for the future. 
Hear Dr. Steinmeyer 
Members of the Mount Washington 
Club, Baltimore, had as guest speaker, 
Dr. R. G. Steinmeyer, who spoke on 
"Can We Stop Communism Through 
Economic Aid?" 

Dr. Steinmeyer is professor of gov- 
ernment and political science. He is 
first vice president of Washington 
Chapter, American Political Science 
Association. 

Proctology 
Proctology, the study of diseases of 
the bowel and rectum, was the subject 
of TV-M.D. over WBAL-TV. 

Four of the top physicians in the 
field took part in a panel discussion 
on the problem. 

The panelists described the general 
anatomy of the rectal area, symptoms 
and diagnosis and the most common 
disorders. The proctoscope used for 
minor surgical treatment was demon- 
strated and its use explained. 

Panel members of the School of 
Medicine participating on the program 
included Dr. Monte Edwards, profes- 
sor of proctology and moderator for 
the panel; Dr. Thurston Adams, as- 
sistant professor of surgery and proc- 
tology; Dr. Raymond Cunningham, as- 
sociate in proctology and instructor in 
anatomy, pathology and surgery, and 
Dr. William Supik, associate in proc- 
tology. 




CUSTOM BUILT ORTHOPAEDIC APPLIANCES 

(by prescription) 

STOCK APPLIANCES 
ORTHOPAEDIC APPLIANCE CORPORATION 

220 W. 28th STREET Phone BEImont 5-9645 BALTIMORE 11, MD. 




Staffer's 

CONVALESCENT RETREAT 

Situated on a knoll in the center of a 10-acre lawn, 
beautiful shade trees and landscape grounds 

ELLICOTT CITY, MARYLAND 

25 minutes to downtown Baltimore — 30 miles to Washington 
Phone Ellicott City 206 




Equipment ana Supplies tor: 

Physicians ana Surgeons * Hospitals 

Laboratories * Industrial Clinics 



.Murray- JBaumgartner 

SURGICAL INSTRUMENT COMPANY, INC. 



I 5 West Chase Street • SAratoga 7-7333 
Baltimore 1, Maryland 



D. HARRY CHAMBERS, Inc. 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS 

Located In the Center of the Shopping District 

326 NORTH HOWARD STREET 
M«. 5-1990 BALTIMORE, MD. 



( lsssssssssssssssssssssssss& 



SAratoga 7-6418 




louis $&lg$utik & SONS 


fflb 


— WHOLESALE MEATS — 


320 S. EUTAW STREET BALTIMORE 1, 


MD. ^«— ' 



Maryland 



53 



T 



OWSON 

ELEPHONE 

SECRETARIES 

Mbs. Flanagan, Owner 

WE ANSWER YOUR PHONE 
VAIley 5-1300 

24 Hours A Day Every Day 
TOWSON 

Month to Month Basis, Order By Phone 

For Information Call VAIley 5-1300 

107 YORK ROAD 



If you cannot sell fluid milk, 
separate it and sell your cream 
to us. We will buy it year 'round. 
Write for particulars. 

Chesapeake Creameries 

INCORPORATED 
Baltimore 23, Md. 

OR CALL EDmondson 6-5300 



Wise & Volker, Inc. 

Prescription 
Opticians 

1 E. CENTRE (at Charles) 

BALTIMORE 7, MD. VErnon 7-4030 



BEImont 
5-6607 



Ret. TUxedo 
9-0851 



Virginia Bowen 



K*al C^ilaU 



2434 MARYLAND AVE. 
BALTIMORE 18, MD. 



• REEDY'S FflRHI SUPPLY . 
FEEDS §|ll|p SKDS 

JARRCTSVILLE ySjESimf PARKT0N 
4000 v/ 2421 

• ROCKS, MD. PARKTON, MD. • 



WHOLESALE STATIONERY 

The Handy Line 

Baltimore, Md. 



School of 



Law 



G. Kenneth Reiblich '29 




Mr. Miles 



Resigns From Orioles 

Clarence W. Miles, University of 
Maryland School of Law Alumnus, 
'19, who once said he would rather be 
president of the Baltimore Orioles than 
be United States Senator — a post to 
which he is believed to aspire — resigned 
as Oriole's president. 

Miles denied that political ambitions 
had anything to do 
with his resignation 
and said the "impell- 
ing reason" in his 
decision to quit "is 
| my deep-rooted con- 
I viction that the ser- 
vices of an exper- 
ienced baseball ex- 
ecutive brought to 
Baltimore would 
greatly improve the 
chances of the Or- 
ioles for rapid ad- 
vancement." 
The 58-year-old lawyer played the 
leading role in bringing major league 
baseball back to Baltimore in 1953 
after a 50-year absence. 

Miles, a prominent Maryland Demo- 
crat, has long been mentioned as a 
possible candidate for the Senate. 

A few months ago Mr. Miles had 
stated that he would rather be pres- 
ident of the Orioles "as winners of the 
American League pennant than have 
any office within the gift of the people. 

Distinguished Achievement 

Wendell D. Allen, Baltimore at- 
torney, was awarded an Alumni Cita- 
tion for distinguished achievement in 
the field of law by the Washington 
College Alumni Association at that 
school's Homecoming Banquet in Ches- 
tertown. 

The association singles out each year 
several graduates for citation "in 
recognition of outstanding achieve- 
ments and services" in their chosen 
fields of endeavor. This is the highest 
honor the alumni body can accord its 
members. 

Mr. Allen, who is senior member of 
the Baltimore law firm of Allen, Burch, 
& Allen, has figured prominently in 
Maryland legal affairs for years. 

A graduate of Washington College, 
A.B. 1913, he received the A.M. degree 
there in 1916. He received the L.L.B. 
degree from the University of Mary- 
land in 1916, and was studying at Har- 
vard Law School in the fall of 1916 
when he left to join the armed forces. 
He served overseas as an officer in the 
Second Infantry Division during World 
War I. 

In 1922 and 1923 he was an Assis- 
tant Attorney General of Maryland. 
From 1928 until 1943 he taught Surety- 
ship Pleading at the University of 
Baltimore Law School, and in 1942 
was vice-president of the Baltimore 
Bar Association. President of the 
Maryland State Board of Education 
since 1953, he has been a member of 
that body since 1945. 



64 



Master Mariner 

Arthur E. Tarantino, class of 1942, 
has announced his resignation as 
Counsel, Chief, Ship Sales and Vessel 
Transfer Branch, Office of the General 
Counsel, United States Maritime Ad- 
ministration, for the purpose of engag- 
ing the general practice of law before 
the U. S. Government Departments and 
Agencies as well as the courts. 

Mr. Tarantino is a graduate of the 
United States Naval Academy and of 
the University of Maryland Law 
School. He is Master Mariner and 
holds an unlimited ship captain's li- 
cense for service on board merchant 
vessels of any tonnage and on the 
waters of any ocean. During World 
War II, he served as a Commander in 
the U.S. Maritime Service where he 
was in charge of training and assign- 
ing seamen for service on board mer- 
chant vessels of the U.S. 

While with the Maritime Administra- 
tion, Mr. Tarantino handled shipping 
transactions involving the sale, mort- 
gage and transfer of ships between 
citizens of the U.S. and to Foreign 
purchasers as well as the transfer of 
vessels between foreign purchasers 
were subject to Maritime Administra- 
tion mortgages. 

Heads P. S. C. 

State Senator Stanford Hoff, of Car- 
roll county, was appointed chairman 
of the Public Service Commission by 
Governor McKeldin. 

The 44-year-old Republican succeeds 
John H. Hessey, a Democrat, in the 
$9,000-a-year post. His term will ex- 
pire June 1, 1961. 

Mr. Hoff was born in Westminster, 
and was educated in Carroll county 
public schools, Western Maryland Col- 
lege and the University of Maryland 
School of Law. 

He became a member of the bar in 
1935, and has engaged in private law 
practice in Westminster since that 
time. 

From 1939 until 1942, he repre- 
sented his county in the Maryland 
House of Delegates. This was fol- 
lowed by five years in the army during 
World War II, during which time he 
rose from a first lieutenant to a lieu- 
tenant colonel, while serving in the 
Pacific theater. 

While serving with the 36th Field 
Artillery and the 77th Division Ar- 
tillery, Mr. Hoff was decorated with 
the American Campaign Medal, the 
American Defense Service Medal, the 
Philippine Liberation Medal, the Phil- 
ippine Presidential Unit Citation Badge, 
the Asiatic Pacific Service Medal, the 
Air Medal, the Bronze Star with one 
Oak-Leaf Cluster, the Occupation Medal 
Japan, and the World War II Victory 
Medal. 

After his election to the Senate in 
1946, Mr. Hoff took on the added post 
of Republican State chairman from 
1948 to 1950. He held the latter job 
during the 1948 presidential campaign, 
when Maryland went Republican. 

Early in 1953, he was offered the 
post of United States attorney for 
Maryland, but turned it down because 
he would have been forced to give up 
his private law practice. 

Maryland 



Mr. Hoff has served on many com- 
mittees — appointed both by the Legis- 
lature and the Governor — to look into 
such problems as public welfare and 
health financing, absentee voting for 
service men, general election laws and 
court reform. 

He is vice-president of the alumni 
association of the University of Mary- 
land School of Law, a former chairman 
of the Carroll County Bar Association 
and the Carroll County Red Cross 
chapter, and is a member of the Ro- 
tary Club of Westminster, the Bar As- 
sociation of Maryland, the American 
Legion, the Veterans of Foreign Wars 
and the Merchants Club. 

Mr. Hoff is married and has two chil- 
dren. 

At Ellyson 

Assigned to duty at the Ellyson Naval 
Auxiliary Landing Field at Pensacola, 
Fla., is Ensign John P. Hull. He re- 
ceived his law degree from Maryland. 

Watkins Appointed 

President Eisenhower made recess 
appointment for the post of United 
States district judge for Maryland. 

He presented R. Dorsey Watkins as 
an interim appointment for the Fed- 
eral judgeship vacancy for the District 
of Maryland. 

Watkins is a Republican and one of 
the leaders of the bar in Baltimore. 
He has been in private practice since 
he was graduated from University of 
Maryland Law School. 

Judge Watkins attended the public 
schools of Baltimore and graduated 
from City College in 1918 receiving a 
scholarship to Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, where he received his A.B. De- 
gree in 1922. He 
took post-graduate 
work, majoring in 
Political Science and 
Political Economy 
and attended the 
University of Mary- 
land simultaneously, 
receiving his Ph.D. 
and LL.B. in 1925. 

He began the 
practice of law as an 
associate to Piper, 
Carey and Hall and 
became a partner of 
that firm in 1930. 
Then in succession he became a partner 
in the firm, Piper, Watkins, and Avi- 
rett, and later the firm, Piper, Watkins, 
Avirett and Egerton, and still later 
the firm, Piper, Marbury. He was a 
member of the committee on revising 
of the Supreme Bench Rules and Pub- 
lic Service Commission Laws; presi- 
dent of the Baltimore City Bar Com- 
mittee during 1947-48 and Director 
and Vice-President of the Mental Hy- 
giene Society of Greater Baltimore, all 
of which qualified him for the appoint- 
ment to United States District Judge. 

Judge Watkins was married July 1, 
1933 to Marion Turmer of Wallasey, 
England. Judge and Mrs. Watkins 
have one daughter. 




Judge Watkins 



DOES YOUR WILL REFLECT 
TODAY'S CONDITIONS? 

A birth, a death, disposition or acquisition of 
certain property, increase or decrease of net 
worth, changes in tax laws are a few of the 
reasons that make it vital to examine your 
will periodically and keep it up-to-date. 

Revisions are often necessary, and sometimes 
a new will is advisable. The fee charged by 
your attorney will prove a sound investment 
for you and your family. 

Our officers will be glad to explain how, as 
Executor or Trustee, First National will carry 
out your plans. 



The FIRST NATIONAL 
BANK of BALTIMORE 

Capital, surplus and profits in excess of $21,000,000. 





For Men and 
Women 

Secretaries, Clerics, 
Stenographers, 
Typists, Accountants, 
Bookkeepers 



For 
Employers 

A Free Monthly Bulletin 

Listing Employees and 

Their Qualifications. 



hit. VERnon pLflcemenT service 

101 E. REDWOOD STREET BALTIMORE, MD. 



Get in touch with us regarding 
the affair you are planning 



Bus. LExington 9-8400 — Ext. 216 
Res. MUlberry 5-6523 



BALTIMORE CHECK ROOM SERVICE 

CHECKING FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

(no function is too large or too small) 

CHECKING FOR HOMES OR HALLS 

DAN MORACO Office Lord Baltimore Hotel Check Room 



Maryland 



56 



J. E. GREINER CO. 



CONSULTING 



ENGINEERS 



1106 NORTH CHARLES STREET 
BALTIMORE 1, MARYLAND 



HAMMOND CHORD ORGANS 
WORLD FAMOUS GULBRANSEN PIANOS 



Open Mon. & Thurs. Nights 




206 N. Liberty St. at Lexington BALTIMORE PL. 2-6737 



College of 




Get 
the 
best 



get 



WESTERN MARYLAND DAIRY 

Division of No'ionof Dairy Products Corp. 



DAIRY PRODUCTS 



WE ARE CLOSER THAN YOUR NEIGHBOR 

ARMSTRONG'S PHARMACY 

Thos. H. Caldwell, Prop. 
Prescription Specialists 



Dial 



ORIeans 5 
9318 



Belair Road and Clifton Park Terrace 

Accuracy in Compounding Prescriptions -f- Dependable Service 

SAVE TIME — Have your physician phone your prescription 

2-Way Radio Phone Service FREE DELIVERY Established 1904 




Miss Terry 



Physical Education 
Recreation & Health 



The Open Door Approach To Health 

Education For The University 

Of Maryland Co-ed 

Instructor in Health Education 

The inherent wealth of any nation 
ultimately depends upon the good 
health of its people. It cannot be as- 
sumed that this state of being just 
happens. Good health is not a gift 
that can be bestowed by any agency 
or any person. It must be brought 
about through the conscious efforts of 
the individual in observing basic health 
practices. It is the responsibility of 
each person to use 
his inheritance and 
his environment in 
such a manner as to 
produce for him the 
highest level of 
health that he can 
achieve. The ques- 
tion arises then as 
to how the end re- 
sult may best be 
achieved. There is 
no clear-cut answer, 
but the open door 
of education can 
give the approach needed to find one. 
Health Education has been in exist- 
ence for thousands of years but has 
often traveled under an assumed name. 
It is for us in this modern era of 
medical advancement to focus atten- 
tion upon its proper value. Instruc- 
tion, as such, is one valuable means 
of throwing more light upon the sub- 
ject. To present correct knowledge, 
however, without the correct method 
of application is of little value. A 
solid foundation of subject matter with 
a practical use can lead to better and 
more positive attitudes concerning 
health. The College of Physical Educa- 
tion, Recreation and Health of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland has been attempt- 
ing for some time to give to its women 
students this "open door" approach. 
The University requires of all its fresh- 
man women a one year course in Per- 
sonal and Community Health which 
counts as credit toward graduation. It 
is felt that these women will compose 
a part of the future homemakers and 
career girls of our nation, and as its 
responsibility to them, the Department 
of Physical Education for Women has 
set up a course of study that is both 
enjoyable and practical. The objec- 
tives may be summed up as follows: 

a. To present to the student those 
broad aspects of health, bringing 
the mental, social and emotional 
components into focus as well as 
the physical. 

b. To develop knowledge, under- 
standings, appreciations and atti- 
tudes of desirable individual 

health practices. 



56 



Maryland 



c. To orient the student to the fa- 
cilities and offerings of the Uni- 
versity which serve to promote 
good individual health. 

d. To help the student become more 
aware of the facilities that con- 
tribute to total health that are 
in constant operation in the com- 
munity. 

In attempting to realize these objec- 
tives, the content of the course is care- 
fully considered. College students as 
a group have certain health needs and 
interests. In order to teach a function- 
al health course, the immediate as well 
as the future needs of the students are 
considered. A health knowledge test 
is given at the beginning of each school 
year to provide a basis for determining 
specific areas in which the individuals 
need information and guidance. Aside 
from a lack of general overall knowl- 
edge, it has been found that the fresh- 
man women at the University are on 
the whole, extremely uninformed in 
three specific areas: mental health, sex 
education, and nutrition. Since this 
same lack of knowledge is apparent 
nationally, course content is built to 
offer concentrated study in these fields. 

To enrich the core of the program, 
extensive information is added concern- 
ing heredity, effective family living, 
preparation for marriage, rest, relaxa- 
tion, fatigue, and the like. Other health 
needs are treated with consideration 
as they arise and time is allotted dur- 
ing the year to cover health subjects 
of a general nature. 

Since the types of information need- 
ed seem to group themselves into two 
distinct categories, the health educa- 
tion course is divided into two semes- 
ters, Personal Health as previously de- 
scribed, and the other stressing Com- 
munity Health. This allocation of in- 
formation pertinent to the community 
is given because freshman women in 
general have little conception of the 
magnitude of community health prob- 
lems other than prevention and con- 
trol of disease. A semester allows time 
to present and discuss with the stu- 
dents such areas as consumer health, 
problems of the aging, stimulants and 
depressants, communicable and degen- 
erative diseases, wise selection of 
health services and health services on 
the national, state and local levels. It 
is the hope of the University that 
through these courses the student will 
carry with her a fund of correct health 
knowledge, not to be applied upon oc- 
casion, but for effective everyday liv- 
ing. 



Gymkana Shows 

Gymkana gave a series of perform- 
ances at five Armed Forces installa- 
tions. 

The troupe opened its 10th season 
with shows at Dover (Del.) Air Force 
Base, Bainbridge Naval Station, Valley 
Forge Hospital, Chincoteague Naval 
Air Base and Annapolis Naval Air Sta- 
tion. 

The first home show by Gymkana 
was at the Varsity-Alumni basketball 
game December 5. 



A gracious Baltimore tradition 

"WssL miL aLihs, 

ShehaJtotL-SslvedeM. . . . 

■TERRACE DINING ROOM 
• JUBILEE ROOM 

. . . and of course, the ever popular 



// 



LOUNGE BAR 



COFFEE SHOP 



S heraton- 
belvedere 



Viainor Tile 

DL WJL WoA BeaulifJ 

ItOOl 



MADE EXCLUSIVELY BY 

MANOR TILE CO. 

s4 f^trmanent Znl* in a Varitli) of L,olori 

VAIley 5-3393 BALTIMORE 4, MD. 




— SCOTT MOTORS, Inc. — 

CHRYSLER - PLYMOUTH 
2630 Sisson St. HO 7-9579 Baltimore 11, Md. 



PREFERRED 
EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 

ARLINE STALLINGS, Mgr. ESTABLISHED 1 928 

• SALES • TECHNICAL 

• CLERICAL • EXECUTIVE 

• ADMINISTRATIVE 



SAratoga 7-6678 

TOWER BUILDING 
GUILFORD AVE. & BALTIMORE ST. 



BALTIMORE, MD. 



Maryland 



57 



school teachers!— 

The Standard 
Duplicator 

Is ESSENTIAL For 
Modern Instruction 

No Ink! No Stencil! 
No Gelatin! 

Phone-NAtional 8-4262 

STANDARD 

DUPLICATING 

MACHINES 

AGENCY 

1737 DeSales St., N.W. 
WASHINGTON 6, D. C. 



VICTOR 

CUSHWA 

& SONS 

Manufacturers of 

"CALVERT" 

COLONIAL FACE 

BRICK 

Main Olflc* and Plant 

WILLIAMSPORT, MD. 

Offlc* and Wartheus* 

1 37 INGRAHAM ST., N.E. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Salet Representatives in 
Principal Eastern Citisu 



Washington 

STAIR & ORNAMENTAL 
IRON WORKS, INC. 

ORNAMENTAL IRON - ALUMINUM 
STAINLESS STEEL - BRONZE 

2014 Fifth St., N.E. 
Washington, D. C. 

DUpont 7-7550 



College of 



Business & Public 
Administration 



Egbert F. Tingley 



Wins Sun Scholarship 

The Baltimore Sunpapers have estab- 
lished a $500 annual scholarship in 
the Department of Journalism & Pub- 
lic Relations, to encourage scholarship 
in the study of journalism* Miss 
Amelia E. Raila, a Baltimore senior 
in the department, was chosen to 
receive the first scholarship from this 
grant by the Sun. 

Fred I. Archibald Speaker 
National Newspaper Week was ob- 
served by an address at the University 
of Maryland sponsored by the Mary- 
land Press Association and the Depart- 
ment of Journalism & Public Rela- 
tions. 

MPA chose Fred I. Archibald, pub- 
lisher of the Baltimore News-Post, 
to speak on "Opportunities For Ca- 
reers In Journalism And Public Rela- 
tions." 

From Wisconsin 
Donald W. Krimel, associate profes- 
sor of public relations, received his 
Ph.D. in political science from the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin. 

Dr. Krimel's dissertation was titled, 
"Public Communications Phases of the 
Executive Branch of the Federal Gov- 
ernment." _ ^ i 
New Publication 
"A Bibliography of Industrial Jour- 
nalism, 1913-1954," is ready for dis- 
tribution by the department, in co- 
operation with the International Coun- 
cil of Industrial Editors, by the end of 
December, 1955. 

It is a 60-page mimeographed project 
listing Industrial Arts Index citations 
of typical articles in the business press, 
as well as books, speeches, studies, etc. 
The bibliography is designed primarily 
for research in large libraries contain- 
ing most of the back issues of the 
American trade or business periodicals. 
Copies may be obtained by address- 
ing the department at Maryland, or the 
journalism department at Oklahoma 
A & M College, Stillwater, where ICIE 
maintains a depositary of industrial 
journalism literature. 

Political Scientists 
A political science seminar was held 
at the University for political scientists 
of the Washington and Baltimore area. 
Guest speaker for the meeting was 
Dr. George B. Galloway, senior special- 
ist in American Government at the 
Library of Congress and well known 
author. 

The subject of the seminar was 
"Congressional Reform Re-visited." 

The program was sponsored by the 
University's Department of Govern- 
ment and Politics and the Bureau of 
Governmental Research. 

According to Dr. Don Bowen, direc- 
tor of the research bureau, the seminar 
was the first in a series of programs 



to be held at the University "on public 
affairs problems of long range signifi- 
cance." 

New Faculty 

Four new faculty members have been 
appointed to the Department of Eco- 
nomics at the University of Maryland, 
it was announced by Dr. Dudley Dil- 
lard, head of the department. 

They are Drs. Edgar A. J. Johnson, 
John H. Dalton, George Donald Shelby 
and Thomas J. Leary. 

Dr. Johnson, who will be a visiting 
professor, received his M.A. and Ph.D. 
degrees from Harvard and did post- 
doctoral studies at Oxford and Cam- 
bridge Universities. 

In addition to being the founder of 
the Economic History Association, he 
has been a member of the faculties of 
Harvard, Cornell and New York Uni- 
versities and the University of Cali- 
fornia. He will teach courses in eco- 
nomic development. 

Dr. Dalton received his A.B. and 
Ph.D. degrees from the University of 
California. He has been a member of 
the University of San Francisco and 
the University of California faculties. 
Dr. Dalton, who has been named as 
assistant professor, is a specialist on 
the economic development of Africa. 

Dr. Shelby, who has been appointed 
instructor, received his B.A. degree 
with highest honors from the Uni^ 
versity of Cincinnati and his Ph.D. 
from the University of California. He 
is a member of Phi Beta Kappa. 

Also appointed as instructor is Dr. 
Leary. He received his Ph.D. from 
Ohio State University. After teaching 
for a year on the College Park campus, 
he will go to Europe to teach in the 
Overseas Program of the University 
of Maryland. 

Dr. Van Royen, Speaker 

Dr. William Van Royen, professor 
and head of the Department of Geog- 
raphy, was guest speaker at the De- 
cember meeting of Middle Atlantic 
Division of the Association of Ameri- 
can Geographers. 

The meeting was held at the Depart- 
ment of the Interior in Washington, 
D.C. 

Dr. Van Royen's address was entitled 
"Graduate Study in Geography." 

In Journalism 

Dr. Carter Bryan, newest addition to 
the Journalism Department, received 
his B.A. degree from 
the University o f 
California and his 
Ph.D. from the Uni- 
versity of Vienna, 
Austria. 

Dr. Bryan c o m- 
pleted the require- 
ments for Doctor's 
and Bachelor's de- 
gree in five and a 
half years. 

While in Vienna, 
he wrote a column 
for the Peoria Jour- 
nal Transcript. Soon after he was hired 
as a staff member for AP. This led to 
positions as correspondent of the Lon- 
don Times, the New York Times, and 
INS. 




Dr. Bryan 



58 



Maryland 



Dr. Bryan returned to the United 
States and, in 1940 became the first 
editor of the Commerce Department's 
Foreign Commerce Weekly. 

During World War II, he was em- 
ployed as an economist with the For- 
eign Economic Administration in Wash- 
ington and Europe. 

Shortly after the war, he became the 
Economic Editor of World Report, but 
in August of 1946 he was sent to 
Korea to be in charge of foreign trade 
there. From Korea he was sent to 
Japan as head of the printing and 
publishing industries. 

In 1948 he came home but was sent 
by the Army as chief of political and 
economic intelligence for the European 
Command. 

Upon his return to the U. S. in 
1950, Dr. Bryan joined the Planning 
and Review Staff of the National Pro- 
duction Authority. 

Before coming to the University to 
teach, Dr. Bryan worked as a public 
relations investment counsellor. 

Bob Bradley 

Bob Bradley, son of a well-known 
and long-established Hyattsville family, 
and known also to patrons of the 
Shoreham Hotel and the Neptune 
Room, is nightly entertaining at the 
Hedin House, Washington, D.C., on the 
piano and organ. 

Mr. Bradley, who was raised in 
Hyattsville and attended local schools, 
is the son of Hyattsville Councilman 
and Mrs. John W. Bradley. Mrs. Brad- 
ley, last year, was feted on her retire- 
ment after teaching at the Hyattsville 
Elementary School for 34 years. 

An accomplished musician, Mr. Brad- 
ley graduated from the University of 
Maryland in 1939 with first honors in 
Accounting. He also earned a letter 
in boxing during his college career. 



THE 

JEPSEN HOTEL 

SUPPLY COMPANY 



Wholesale Meats 
and Provisions 



Serving 

HOTELS - INSTITUTIONS 

RESTAURANTS 

Harry T. Whitlock 
General Manager 

1121 F STREET, S.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

I ! 



The Difference Spent Is All That Counts 

HUNDREDS OF DOLLARS SAVINGS 




lerj 



eeier.inc. 



.CHRYSLER CITY 



CHRYSLER 
PLYMOUTH 
IMPERIAL 



Largest Metropolitan Washington Dealer 
BETTER TRADES — FINEST SERVICE 

ENTIRE 4800 BLOCK WISCONSIN AVENUE, N.W. 



Washington, D. C. 



EMerson 3-4800 



Closed Sunday 



T INVESTMENT^ 
FACTS 



A MUST for Investors- 
compiled by the New York 
Stock Exchange — Indi- 
cates over 291 Listed 
Stocks which have paid 
cash dividends every year 
for 25 years or longer. 

Call or write for free copy 

Jones, Kreeger & Hewitt 

Members N. Y. Stock Exchange 



1625 Eye St., N.W. DI. 7-5700 

Washington, D.C. 

Established 1930 



I 




SAVILE BOOK SHOP 

3236 P STREET 

French, Politics, History, Fiction, 
Philosophy, Drama, Art 

Washington 7, D. C. 
Georgetown 

Phone ADams 2-3321 



BLAYDES SAFE & LOCK CO. 

Wholesale Distributor 
2809 14th St., N.W. 
Washington 9, D. C. 

CO 5-3122 



^iiniiiimiimuiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiimiiiioimiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiiir^ 



| PAVILION l 

5 Chinese & American Restaurant § 
1 - 

| Special Lunch - Dinners 

g I 

= PRIVATE DINING ROOMS FOR SPECIAL PARTIES % 
I SPECIAL ORDERS TO TAKE OUT 



| 612 H STREET, N.W. WASHINGTON 1, D.C. = 
I Phone: STerling 3-8379 Air-Conditioned | 

^llimUIIIIIIIIIIIICllllimilllOIIIHIIIIIOIIIIIIIIIIOIIIIIIIIIIOinillllH 



WASHINGTON'S FIRST UPTOWN BUICK DEALER 


• BEST TRADES YET 


• FineST SERVICE 


n en k r 


BUICK C 


INC. 


SALES — 4505 Wisconsin Ave. 


SERVICE — 4555 Wisconsin Ave. 


EM 2-2000 



SOUTHEAST TITLE CORP. [- 



Chas. T. Clayton, President 
25 Years Experience 
COMPLETE SERVICE 

Washington, D. C. t, Maryland 

Settlements - Escrows 

Real Estate Examinations 

and Title Insurance 

1343 Good Hope Rd., S.E., Washington, D.C. 
LUdlow 1-3200 



of 

(Pauujl tjsuftqsLiL. Qowdi^, Qjwl. 

COMPLETE LAND TITLE SERVICE 
4312 HAMILTON STREET 2412 MINNESOTA AVE., S.E. 

Hyattsville, Maryland APpleton 7-6464 Washington, D. C. 

HUBERT K. ARNOLD, Pres. & Counsel HAROLD S. WANNER, 

Class of 1935 vice Pres.-Treas. 



Maryland 



59 



CERTIFIED BUILDERS 



INC. 




General 
Contractors 




2662-64 KENSINGTON-WHEATON ROAD 
SILVER SPRING, MARYLAND 



Telephone: 

LOckwood 

4-8400 







STONE HOUSE 
INN 



. . visit the Maryland Room 

where smart people gather 

for dining at its best 

table d'hote 



WASHINGTON 




SILVER 
SPRING 



BETHESDA 



U. OF 
MARYLAND 

JUniper 9-1459 



Dale Music Co. 

Complete Music Center 

Open Mon., Thurs. & Fri. 
Evenings 'Til 9 P.M. 

8240 Georgia Avenue 

Silver Spring, Md. 



FOUR CORNERS 

SILVER SPRING, MD. 

HIGHWAY 29 

JUniper 8-9700 



a la carte 

luncheons 

dinners 

banquets 

parties 



In Montgomery County 

Farmers Supply 




McCormick-Deering Farm 
Equipment 

GAITHERSBURG, MD. GAITHERSBURG 777 



USE THE COUPON ON THE LAST PAGE 



Wood Floors 
Asphalt Til* 
Linoleum 



Rubber Tile 

Cork Tile 

Acoustic Tile 



SOUTHEASTER!! FLOOR EO. 

4935 Bethesda Avenue 
Bethesda 14, Md. 



He has been playing professionally 
since 1941. From 1951 to 1955 he 
played at the Empress Hotel in Miami 
Beach and last summer played the 
harpsichord in the summer show on the 
Shoreham Terrace. He has just com- 
pleted 12 weeks at the Neptune Room. 

Married, he makes his home in Silver 
Spring. 

Hear Dr. Rinn 

The Baltimore Chapter of the Na- 
tional Office Management Association 
had as its guest speaker Dr. William 
Alexander Rinn, Baltimore psychiatrist, 
instructor in the department of neur- 
ology. He is also on the visiting staff 
of Seton Institute, and director of the 
clinic of the House of the Good Shep- 
herd. 

Dr. Rinn discussed "Have You Seen 
a Psychiatrist Lately?" 

Dr. Stemmeyer 

Dr. Reuben G. Steinmeyer, spoke on 
"Economic Pressures and World Poli- 
tics" at the "Woman's Forum on In- 
ternational Affairs" of the Baltimore 
District, Maryland Federation of 
Women's Clubs, in the Enoch Pratt 
Library. 

Donald W. Swain 

Donald W. Swain, BPA '55, has been 
appointed Sales Promotion Represen- 
tative for the new Accident and Sick- 
ness Department of the Hartford Acci- 
dent and Indemnity Company. Mr. 
Swain, who recently completed a com- 
prehensive Home Office training pro- 
gram in Accident and Sickness cover- 
ages, has been assigned to the Com- 
pany's Baltimore Office. He will assist 
Company agents in developing sales 
and servicing Accident, Hospitalization 
and Group Insurance. Mr. Swain served 
in the Army for nearly three years and 
was stationed in Korea and Austria. 



TYPO ERROR 

"Wanted, young man and two young 
women for Propagating Dept.; must 
be willing to work overtime when 
necessary. Apply Rivermead Nurser- 
ies." From an ad in the Surrey Herald 
and News. 



Phone OL. 2-2112 




POSITION 

Elaine: "In what position does your 
boy friend play on the football team?" 

Inane: "Oh, sort of leaning way 
forward and all hunched up." 



60 



Maryland 



«| MARYLAND 




^^^^■^^^^" By Clay, Keetie B>&utaAd 



I Hole* 




Ataryland 

MARRIAGES 



Bergmann — Allensworth 

Lucy Ann Allensworth, Maryland 
alumna, to Carl Kenzig Bergmann. 

Bernstein — Singer 
Both Maryland graduates, Gloria H. 
Singer to Alvin Socks Bernstein. 
Briscuso — Dunlap 
Virginia Lee Dunlap, Maryland grad- 
uate, to Raymond Joseph Briscuso, 
Maryland alumnus. 

Caldwell — Zitzewitz 
Margaret Caldwell to Frank Zitze- 
witz, Jr., Maryland graduate. 
Clarke— Pickett 
Jane Sylvia Pickett, American Uni- 
versity student, to Allen Greene Clarke, 
Maryland alumnus. 

Dana — Tilghman 
Ellen Tilghman to Ernest Stewart 
Dana, Maryland graduate. 

DeSando — Baxter 
Mary Francis Baxter, Maryland 
graduate, to Carlo DeSando. 
Eberhard — Houghton 
Elizabeth Ann Houghton, Maryland 
graduate, to Donald L. Eberhard, grad- 
uate of California State Poly. 
Flowers — Toleman 
Juanita Josephine Toleman, Maryland 
alumna, to Ensign Walter Raymond 
Flowers, U.S.N., Naval Academy grad- 
uate. 

Hopkins — Chesney 
Robin Ann Chesney, graduate of 
Wesleyan College, Macon, Ga., to 
William W. Hopkins, Maryland grad- 
uate who served in World War II and 
in Korea as a lieutenant. 

Israel — Rubenstein 

Maryland graduates, 

Rubenstein to Jules 



Mona 
Ruben 



Both 
Natalie 
Israel. 

Jennings — Pazakis 
Diana Pazakis, Hyannis, Mass., to 
John K. Jennings, Jr., D.D.S., Dentistry 
graduate, '54. 

Johnson — Gardner 
Sarah Elizabeth Gardner, Maryland 
graduate, to Lt. (jg) Frank Jamison 
Johnson, U.S.N. R., Johns Hopkins 
graduate. 

Jozefiak — Craig 
Dorothy Claire Craig to Dr. Robert 
J. Jozefiak, Dentistry graduate. 
Kulsrud — Steinman 
Helene Steinman to Russell Marion 
Kulsrud, Maryland graduate. 
Luckey — Schultz 
Beverly Ann Schultz to Stephen E. 
Luckey, Maryland student. 
Lussier — Bilodeau 
Madeleine Solange Bilodeau, Man- 



chester, N. H., to Dr. Maurice G. Lus- 
sier, School of Dentistry, '55. 
Poerstel — Lorenz 
Jocelyn Lorenz, George Washington 
alumna, to Kenneth Poerstel, Maryland 
alumnus. 

Richards — Lineman 
Janet Elsie Lindeman, Maryland 
graduate, to Jack Prentiss Richards, 
Maryland student, B & PA. 
Shipley — Heston 
Eleanor Heston, Hood College stud- 
ent, to Richard L. Shipley, Maryland 
student. 

Slaby — Bonnar 
Jean Alice Bonnar, Maryland alumna, 
to Warren Slaby. 

Tamburello — Bonaventura 
Gina Bonaventura to Frank Tambur- 
ello, quarterback of Maryland's star 
football team. 

Waesche — Walker 
Gloria Mae Walker, Maryland alum- 
na, to Charles Stewart Waesche, Jr., 
Maryland student. 

Williams — Reynolds 
Daphen Reynolds, Maryland gradu- 
ate, to Ellis T. Williams. 




Maryland 

ENGAGEMENTS 



Connell — Bathon 

Joan Catherine Connell, Mt. St. Agnes 
College, to Bernard N. Bathon, Med- 
ical School student. 

Drewry — Barr 
Nancy Lee Drewry, Baltimore In- 
stitute alumna, to Robert W. Barr, 
Maryland alumnus. 

Eppel — Leberman 
Shirley Ann Eppel, Nursing gradu- 
ate, to Sigmund Joseph Leberman, 
University of Florida graduate. 
Fox — Kahn 
Susan Fox, Maryland sophomore, to 
Jerome Kahn, University of Pennsyl- 
vania student. 

Greenberg — Becker 
Both Maryland students, E. Rheda 
Greenberg to Gordon Becker. 
Gadd— Doehler 
Janet Denwood Gadd, Maryland 
alumna, to Major William Francis 
Boehler, Jr., U.S.M.C. 

Grossman — Levine 
Jean Grossman, Towson State Teach- 
ers, to Milton Levine, Pharmacy gradu- 
ate. 

Guertin — King 
Jacqueline Guertin, Nice, France, to 
Al/C William Allen King, student, Uni- 
versity of Maryland in Casablanca, 
French Morocco. 



UlLLfl RGEnCV 

Licensed and Certified 

Specially Trained Adult Baby Sitters 

Bonded For Your Protection 

Call MYRA P. FULD 

WILKINS 5-8919 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



Hendlers 




First Name in fee Cream 
For 50 Years 




rotned 
i June 



Better Mo 
1 1 fodern f\ancn ^Jupt 
fijunaalou/3 C7" i^ottaaei 
S^tone and ^5 rich 

"NOTHING FINER ANYWHERE" 

For Complete Information 

Call CH. 3-2550, RO. 4-3775 or 

Evenings OL. 3-5275, 01. 3-4661 

SEYMOUR RUFF, Builder 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



Maryland 



61 



Hassencamp — Lynch 

Paula K. Hassencamp, Goucher Col- 
lege, to Francis H. Lynch, Maryland 
graduate. 

Herbert — Muth 

Frances Patricia Herbert to Robert 
Gabriel Muth, senior, School of Medi- 
cine. 

Holt— Tschantre 

Rachel Holt, Maryland alumna, to 
Kenneth Hall Tschantre. 

Jensen — Beese 

Mildred Elizabeth Jensen, graduate of 
the Institute of Notre Dame and Mercy 
Hospital School of Nursing, to James 
C. Beese, graduate of Maryland where 
he was President of Phi Kappa Sigma. 



Delta Gamma Wins 



SILVER 


SPRING 


NURSES REGISTRY 


CHRISTELL D. EMERY, Registrar 


NURSES 




General 

and 


£% 


Obstetrical 


Male & Female 


j "*^r 


Experienced 


v ' /^S» 


Licensed By 




State of Maryland 




Interviews By Appointment Only 


JUniper 


9-7671 


If No Answer Call JUniper 9-3929 

^ 



QUALITY 
REmODELIIIG 

Distinctive Kitchens 

"Rec" Rooms 

Jalousies 

Additions 

SECO SALES EnGMEERS 

617 SLIGO AVE. JU 8-3010 
SILVER SPRING, MD. 



JKlK 



* ffimwhtemej 



KING OF AMIRICA'S 

doughnuts 



8000 Georgia Ave. JU 5-7500 
SILVER SPRING, MD. 

SinGER SEWIAG mRCHIRE CO. 

8670 Colesville Rd. 

SILVER SPRING, MD. 

JU 9-8844 




SORORITY OF THE YEAR AWARD 

Left to right: Dottie Cordas, President Delta Gamma; Oscar W. Mueller, Presi- 
dent Delta Tau Delta; Elizabeth Hanoauer, Soc. Chairman Delta Gamma. 



Keller — Iwantch 

Mary Elizabeth Keller, graduate of 
St. Joseph's Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, to Alfred E. Iwantch, graduate of 
the School of Medicine. 

Kessler — Aarons 

Marlene Joyce Kessler to Hillel R. 
Aarons, Pharmacy graduate. 

Koessler — Rettberg 

Elizabeth Margaret Koessler to 
Charles Clayland Rettberg, Jr., Law 
graduate. 

Kirk — Gonyea 

Helen Frances Kirk, graduate of the 
Convent of the Holy Child, Sharon 
Hill, Pa., to George G. Gonyea, who 
received his master's degree from 
Maryland. 

Landzert — Stickell 

Marjorie Madeline Landzert to Rob- 
ert Joseph Stickell, Maryland gradu- 
ate. 

Lucas — Evans 

Phyllis Ann Lucas, Maryland alumna, 
to William John Evans. 

Margolis — Hoffman 

Judith Phyllis Margolis to Alvin 
Landy Hoffman, Maryland alumnus. 

McCoy — Wesson 

Gloria Claire McCoy, University of 
Georgia, to Dr. Jack Elliott Wesson, 
Maryland alumnus. 

McDill— Day 

Phyllis McDill, Mt. Vernon Semi- 
nary graduate, to Willard Farnsworth 
Day, Jr., Maryland alumnus. 

Moresberger — Lacher 
Mardie Moreland Morsberger to Dr. 



Lacher, Dentistry 



George Milton 
graduate. 

Nathanson — April 

Shirley Nathanson to Reuben April, 
Maryland graduate. 

Palvechek — Rathner 

Norma Louise Palvechek, Purdue 
graduate, to Maurice Rathner, Mary- 
land graduate. 

Prince — Bratt 

Doris Mae Prince, Maryland alumna, 
to Morris Paul Bratt, University of 
Virginia. 

Schluman — Schuster 

Wilma Schulman, Maryland gradu- 
ate, to Arthur Schuster, senior in the 
School of Dentistry. 

West— Baker 

Priscilla Ruth West to James Hallett 
Baker, Maryland alumnus. 

Wilkinson — McWilliams 

Ruth Ann Wilkinson to Lieut. Donald 
J. McWilliams, U.S.A.F., Maryland 
graduate. 

Wills — Protzman 
Nancy Marie Wills to Charles Wil- 
liam Protzman, Jr., Maryland alumnus. 

Wolman — Rozansky 

Both Maryland students, Joann Wol- 
man to Allan E. Rozansky. 

Yessen — Matusky 

Rose Marie Yessen, Maryland alum- 
na, to Andrew C. Matusky. 

Zirkler— Ruff 

Hermine Emma Zirkler, Goucher 
College student, to Arthur Frederick 
Ruff, Maryland student. 



Maryland 




ITSY~J?ITSY 

TERRAPIN K 105 

Tiny Net Star 



Michael James Grogan, at James- 
town, New York. Dad is the form- 
er tennis star Robert M. Grogan, Jr., 
BPA '49. 

Little Gustavo 
Dr. and Mrs. Gustavo A. Oduber '53 
announce the birth of a son, Gustavo 
Adolfo, Jr. Dr. Oduber is practicing 
in Oranjestad, Aruba, N. W. I. 

More Babies 

Dr. and Mrs. John Norman Grabner 
'51 announce the birth of a son, John 
Norman, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Irving Jacobs '45 an- 
nounce the birth of a daughter, Eileen 
Lynn. 



Delta Gamma Wins 

The Year Award was presented to 
Delta Gamma Sorority by Delta Tau 
Delta's President Oscar W. Mueller to 
DG Prexy Dorothy Cordas and Social 
Chairman Elizabeth Hanauer. (See pic- 
ture on opposite page.) 

Thus began a new tradition on the 
Maryland campus, and another page 
in the history of our University was 
started. While for years, there has been 
an award to the "Outstanding" Fra- 
ternity on campus, there has never been 
any recognition to the sororities, and 
the Maryland Delts have decided to rec- 
tify the situation. In this, they have 
more than succeeded, for more interest 
was germinated among the sororities 
before the presentation than has ever 
before been noticed for any trophy. 

The award is a tremendous trophy 
of mahogany and gold, and stands 
forty-two inches high — the largest ever 
presented by an independent group at 
Maryland. 

Judging for the award was based on 
four points; group participation in 
campus functions, individual partici- 
pation in campus activities, athletic 
prowess in inter-sorority competition, 
and individual participation in campus 
publications. Numerical points were 
awarded for many sub-headings in each 
of these four divisions, and the sorority 
with the greatest number of points was 
selected the winner. The judging com- 
mittee consisted of the Assistant Dean 
of Women, Mary Handy; the President 
of the Associated Women's Students, 
Anna Karavangelos; the President of 
Delta Sigma Chapter of Delta Tau 
Delta, Oscar W. Mueller; and the 
Awards Chairmen of the Maryland 
Delts, Richard F. Ross. 

The award will be kept by the win- 
ning sorority for the remainder of the 
school year, when once again, the 
points will be totaled in anticipation of 
next year's winner. Any sorority win- 
ning the award five times, not neces- 
sarily in succession, will retire the 
trophy, at which time Delta Tau Delta 
will purchase another similar one, and 
the cycle will begin all over again. 



To welcome 
guests 




Ice-cold Coco-Cola is 
such a sociable drink. 
Bring home several 
cartons when you shop. 



•onto «w AVtaoan Of na coe»-<ot» com ant «t 



COCA-COLA BOTTLING WORKS 

JUniper 5-3100 Silver Spring, Md. 










-LELAND L FISHER, Inc.- 

LUMBER - MILLWDRK - PAINT 
Rockville, Md. POplar 2-6123 



THE MONROE DOCTRINE 



• ZJ-intit Zrord «3< 



trvic* 



MONROE 

1 237 East West Hgwy. 



mni 



COMPANY 

Silver Spring, Md. 



• WE SPECIALIZE IN RENTALS 



HANNES FORMAL WEAR 



TUXEDOS & FORMALS 
JUniper 9-0505 
PARKING FACILITIES 



"First in Silver Spring" 

8229 GEORGIA AVE. 
SILVER SPRING, MD. 
Diagonally across from Suburban Trust Co.* 



Maryland 



Stock Commentary 

Our letter discussing 
the trend of the market 
and the current position 
of individual stocks, 
will be sent upon re- 
quest without obliga- 
tion. 



W. E . HUTTON & CO. 

Established 1886 

Members New York Stock Exchange 
and other leading exchanges 

608 First National Bank Bldg. 

Baltimore 2, Md. 

New York Cincinnati 



The 



Maurice 

Leeser Co. 



, i PRINTER^ 
I PUBLISHERS 

Virlcvr )'. Skruck, Pfes. 

336 W. PRATT ST., KALTIMORE 1 
SAraloga 7-4446 

/// Our Second Generation 
<>i OtinlilY and Service 



George H. 
Dashiells & Sons Co. 

CONTRACTORS - BUILDERS - ENGINEERS 
Brick, Hollow Tile, Cinder Block Work 
Fire Brick Specialist 

Brick Boiler Settings, Furnaces, 
Ovens and Machinery Foundations 

BEImont 5-6449 
223 EAST 33rd STREET 

BALTIMORE 1 8, MD. 



Just saw a tall blonde Terpette, name o' Julia. Glory, Glory, Hallelujah. 



If a woman's toes stick out of the 
fronts of her shoes, she's fashionable. 

If a man's toes stick out, he's a bum. 

* * * 

A successful city businessman took 
up farming as a side line. After two 
years a friend asked him how things 
were going. "Well, I made $10,000 on 
the farm last year," the businessman 
said. 

"10,000?" repeated the friend incred- 
ulously. 

"Yes, sir," said the businessman 
firmly. "I lost only $22,000. The first 

year I lost $32,000." 

* * * 

Sign on a highway in Tennessee: 
"When this sign is under water this 
road is impassable" ... At the Naval 
Air Technical Training Center, Corpus 
Christi: "LABORatory, not labORA- 

TORY." 

* * * 

Why is it a woman is afraid of a 
mouse; yet she will get into a car with 

a wolf? 

* * * 

Barber: "Haven't I shaved you be- 
fore?" 

Ex-Lieutenant: "Nope, I got that 

scar in Korea!" 

* * * 

Patient: "How do you do?" 
'Nother One: "So, so. I'm aching 

from neuritis." 

First Patient: "I'm Nussbaum from 

Baltimore." 

Movie stars wear their dark glasses 
even to church. They're afraid God 

might ask them for autographs. 

* * * 

A teacher, making a trip with a group 
of children, stopped from lunch at a 
restaurant where there were slot ma- 
chines. She launched into m lecture on 
the evils of gambling. To emphasize 
the futility of trying to get something 
for nothing, she marched up to the ma- 
chine, put in a nickel, pulled the handle 
and hit the jackpot. 

* * * 

Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes once 
mistook a mental hospital for a col- 
lege. Realizing his mistake, he ex- 
plained to the gatekeeper, and com- 
mented good-naturedly, "I suppose, af- 
ter all, there is not a great deal of 
difference." 

"Oh, yes there is," replied the guard. 
"In this place you must show some im- 
provement before you get out." 

* * * 

Salty: Do you neck?" 
Sweety: "That's my business." 
Salty: "Oh, a pro, eh?" 

* * * 

Him: "Did that kiss I just gave you 
make you long for another?" 

Her: "It sure did, but he's away in 
the Service." 



Snorky Ortingale, invited on a deer 
hunt, came back to camp after two 
hours in the forest and asked: "Are all 
the others out of the woods?" 

"Yup!" 

Said Snorky, "Then I've shot a deer." 

* * * 

The Nation's hens go blithely on 
And daily do their stuff, 
For hens are hens, and every hen 
Must lay on, like MacDuff. 

* * * 

A rich man is one who isn't afraid to 
ask the clerk to show him something 

cheaper. 

* » * 

Winter is the season when we try to 
keep the house as hot as it was in 
the summer, when we griped about the 

heat. 

* * * 

Conscience is the still small voice 
that makes you feel still smaller. 

A statistician is a man who draws 
a mathematically precise line from an 
unwarranted assumption to a foregone 

conclusion. 

* * * 

Tact is the unsaid part of what you 
think. 

Poise is the art of raising the eye- 
brows instead of the roof. 

An Indian Chief rode his horse up 
the canyon trail, his wife trudging 
along behind him. 

"Why is it," asked a tourist, "that 
you ride and your wife walks?" 

"Because," replied Big Chief Stands- 
in-the-Middle-of-the-Room - and - Tells - 
His-Own-Name, "she no gottum horse." 

Mother: "Isn't this rather a compli- 
cated toy for a small child?" 

Clerk: "It's an educational toy de- 
signed to adjust a child to live in the 
world of today. Any way he puts it 
together is wrong." 




THIRTY YEAR JOB 
"Perhaps we can help you make the 
payments. There's a part-time stu- 
dents' dorm job open at the Univer- 
sity. See Mr. Bob James." 



64 



Maryland 



wherever good 
friend J gather . . • 



10 other 
Popular Flavors 

and 
Club Soda 




Popular Club Beverage Co., Inc. 

MlddU River 20, Md. 



give to the 
MARCH Of 

DIMES 




WILLIAM F. STONE, JR. 

2612 N. Charles Street 

Baltimore 1 8, Md. 



Ei 



Going Into 
Business? 

Let our welt-trained staff 
assist you in planning 
your office layout. 



Free Consultation 

Ask about 

Time Payment Plan 



MODERN 

STATIONERS 

17 S. CHARLES ST. BALTIMORE 1, MD. 

MUlberry 5-4377 



Her: "How about giving me a dia- 
mond bracelet?" 

He: "My dear, extenuating circum- 
stances perforce me to preclude you 
from such a bauble of extravagance." 

She: "I don't get it." 

Him : "That's what I just said." 

* * *■ 

A very young combat Marine was 
asked where he was from. "I was born 
in Silver Spring," he replied, "and 
raised on Guadalcanal, Iwo Jima and 

Saipan." 

* * *• 

A woman walked into a Baltimore police 
station and gave the desk seregeant a 
detailed description of a man. who had 
dragged her by the hair down three 
flights of stabs, threatened to choke 
her to death and finally beat her up. 

"With that description, we'll have 
him arrested and put in jail in prac- 
tically no time," said the desk sergeant. 

"But I don't want him arrested," she 
replied. "Just find him. He promised to 
marry me." 

* * *• 

Susan : "My roommate says there 
are things a girl should not do before 
twenty." 

Suzanne: "Well, personally, I don't 
like a large audience either." 

* * *■ 

One of the pillars of the church had 
gone fast asleep within two -minutes 
after the pastor begins to preach. He 
had done that for 20 years. One Sunday 
morning the usher asked graciously, 
"Ed, would you like an upper or a 
lower?" 

* * *• 

"You remind me of the ocean." 
"Wild, romantic, and restless?" 
"No, you make me sick at my stom- 
ach." 

* * *• 

Maw -."What's the reason for your 
coming home at 5:00 in the morning?" 
Paw: "Breakfast." 

* * *• 

"Honey, I'll give you a ring some- 
time. What's your number?" 

"Oh, darling, you wonderful, won- 
derful boy! Four and a half." 




ERRATUM 
"She shouldn't have married the guy. 
But she did. Now she realizes her 
error. Every morning she awakens 
with a jerk." 



Pre-Planned 
MOVING 

with Care, 
Everywhere 



DflVIDSOIV 

TRANSFER & STORAGE CO. 



• Clean Sanitized Vans 

• Expert Packing 

• Modern Storage 

- IN BALTIMORE, CALL 

BRoadway 6-7900 

- IN WASHINGTON, CALL 

TAylor 9-5200 



* Jhsi dioland fiahli 

faalkj. 

Company 

Member 

Real Estate Board of Baltimore 

Multiple Listing Bureau 

JOHN McC. MOWBRAY 
President 

B. FRANKLIN HEARN, JR. 
Vice-President in Charge of Sales 

NORMAN F. GORSUCH 
Vice-President 

4810 Roland flue. TUxedo 9-9600 
• Baltimore 10, Hid. • 



MARYLAND BRASS 
& METAL WORKS 

Non-Ferrous Castings 

Everdur Pipe Fittings 

To Standard Specifications 

Since 1 866 



MUrdock Stanley I?. 
Gisriel, 
Pres. 



6-9424 



PULASKI HIGHWAY 

Baltimore, Md. 



Maryland 



65 




CHinESC-nmcmcnn mstauraiit 

Chinese Food at Its Best 

320 PARK AVENUE 

1308 PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE 

Baltimore 17, Md. 

CHINESE GROCERY STORE 

205 W. Mulberry St. — Baltimore, Md. 



Be Different — Be Original 
PERSONALIZED 

CAKES Sk. $6.45 

Serves 15 to 20 People 

PARENTS— STUDENTS . . . Remember 

Birthdays and Anniversaries 

Send Check or Money Order 
(allow 10 days for delivery) 

JORDAN'S BAKERY 

BELLONA at YORK ROAD 
Baltimore 12, Md. ID 3-2441 



"CLOTHES OF CHARACTER" 

EDDIE^fjACOBS 

Charles St. at Redwood 
Baltimore, Md. 



LEilngton 

9-2105 V" 



MS 



. VAlley 

~Z 3-4853 



WEST & CO. 



GlRBBTT L^f?^ M5lirt ^jBAI/riMORB 

Bldo. ^~^-^^^^ 2, Md. 

MULTIPLE LISTING REALTORS 

Specializing in 

NORTHERN PROPERTIES 



(HapH 



S. J. STACKHOUSE & SON 

We Served Your Parents 

— And Grandparents 

SALES - RENTALS 

MORTGAGES - MANAGEMENT 

20 E. Lexington St. SA. 7-6789 

Baltimore, Md. 



Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 

Consulting Engineer 

1701 SAINT PAUL STREET 
Baltimore 1, Md. 



VICTOR'S mflRKET, Inc. 

Exclusive Distributors 

for 
S. S. PIERCE PRODUCTS 



4804 ROLAND AVE. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



HO 7-0826 



Richard Brenner 

Richard Brenner, 37, assistant gen- 
eral counsel of the international 
Monetary Fund, died at Johns Hopkins 
Hospital in Baltimore. 

Mr. Brenner, who lived at 4201 Mas- 
sachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, 
D. C, had served as acting general 
counsel of the Fund from November, 
1954, until last month. 

Born in Baltimore, he received his 
bachelor of science degree from Johns 
Hopkins University and his bachelor 
of law degree at the University of 
Maryland in 1941. 

From then until 1948, he served as 
an attorney in the Treasury Depart- 
ment before joining the International 
Monetary Fund as a counsel. 

Mr. Brenner attended the Bretton 
Woods Monetary Conference as a mem- 
ber of the United States delegation in 
1946, he attended the inauguration of 
the boards of governors of the Inter- 
national Monetary Fund and the In- 
ternational Bank for Reconstruction 
and Redevelopment at Savannah, Ga. 

He was appointed assistant general 
counsel of the Fund in 1949. 

Mr. Brenner is survived by his 
mother, Mrs. Sol Brenner; by a brother, 
Morton Brenner, both of Baltimore, 
and by a sister, Mrs. Robert Dobries 
of Woodbury, N. J. 

Dr. Arthur M. Shipley 

The death of Dr. Arthur M. Shipley 
marks the passing of a major figure 
in the medical history of Baltimore city 
and the State of Maryland. The fact 
that Dr. Shipley had been in retire- 
ment for a number of years should not 
make us forget the important services 
he has rendered his native state and 
indeed the whole nation. He was an 
outstanding contributor to the develop- 
ment of surgery, a great clinical teach- 
er and a practitioner of his calling 
who probably knew more doctors and 
had more patients scattered over the 
whole State than any other surgeon 
ever had. His greatest achievement 
was the rehabilitation and moderniza- 
tion, with the help of devoted asso- 
ciates, of the University of Maryland 
School of Medicine. By so doing, he 
was largely instrumental in securing 
a continuous production of well-trained 
doctors many of whom located for their 
life work in Maryland. Dr. Shipley 
combined unusual intellectual gifts with 
great force of character, high stand- 
ards of personal and professional 
ethics, and lofty and sustained pur- 
pose. He deserves the grateful re- 
membrance of this community. 

Dr. Shipley, who was seventy-seven, 
was long remembered as one of Mary- 
land's most distinguished surgeons. 

He had been in retirement since 
1948. From 1911 until 1948 he was 
also surgeon in chief at City Hos- 
pitals. 
Born in Harmons, Anne Arundel 



County, of a family which was prom- 
inant in the State, he attended Friends 
School for a time, then went to the 
University of Maryland, getting his 
medical degree in 1902. 

Already an extremely competent and 
practiced surgeon, he went to France 
in 1918, did important service with 
an evacuation hospital and returned 
with the rank of lieutenant colonel. 

He was made professor of surgery 
at the University of Maryland on his 
return. 

In 1909 he married Miss Julia Jones, 
who since has become well known as 
a poet, with hundreds of published 
verses. There were no children. 
W. L. Champion 

Dr. W. L. Champion, the oldest prac- 
ticing physician in Atlanta and the 
first urologist in Georgia, died at an 
Atlanta hospital. 

He was 88. 

Beginning his practice in Atlanta 
in 1893, he continued active until he 
became ill some weeks ago. 

Dr. Champion was born in Greene 
County and was reared in Eatonton. 
He practiced for a year in Eatonton 
after his graduation in 1891 from the 
University of Maryland at the age 
of 23. 

The one time "horse and buggy" doc- 
tor moved to Atlanta in 1893. 

He gave up general practice in 1896 
to specialize in urology after graduate 
study in New York, France and Ger- 
many. He was Atlanta's and Georgia's 
first urologist. 

The merry-eyed goateed physician 
was honored numerous times over the 
years by his associates. 

He had served several generations 
of Atlanta families. 

Dr. Champion served as first pres- 
ident of the Atlanta and Georgia Uro- 
logical Society. He also had served as 
president of the Fulton County Med- 
ical Society. 

His professional memberships also 
included the American Southern Med- 
ical Associations and the American 
Urological Association. 

He was a 33rd degree Mason, a 
member of Palestine Lodge, F. & A. M., 
Knights Templar and was a Shriner. 

His wife is the former Miss Sue Lou 
Harwell. 

Also surviving is a daughter, Mrs. 
Gene Nardin, wife of Dr. Gene Nardin 
of Atlanta, two grandchildren, Gene 
Nardin, Jr. and Leonne Nardin, both of 
Atlanta, and a sister-in-law, Mrs. Jesse 
Champion, of Eatonton. 

Mrs. John A. Sells 

Mrs. John A. Sells, 49, former assist- 
ant dean of women and social director 
of the University of Maryland, died 
in Seattle. 

The former Alice Howard, Mrs. Sells 
was at the University of Maryland 
from 1937 through 1940. 

Dean of Women, Adele Stamp, said 
she knew of no one at Maryland more 
beloved or popular than Mrs. Sells. 

Mrs. Sells was born on a college 
campus in Oregon, where her father 
was dean. She came from a family of 
educators, clergymen and attorneys. 

Her grandfather figured in the early 



66 



Maryland 



history of Oregon before it became a 
State. A Methodist circuit rider, Mr. 
Howard traveled by horseback, serving 
isolated mining and trapping commu- 
nities. 

She was a member of Phi Beta 
Kappa, Kappa Kappa Gamma and the 
Mortar Board, a national senior hono- 
rary society for women. She also was 
active in the American Association of 
University Women. 

Besides her husband, Mrs. Sells is 
survived by a 2-year-old son. 
Richard Brenner 

Richard Brenner, 37, assistant gen- 
eral counsel for the International Mon- 
etary Fund, died in Baltimore, after 
several months' illness. 

Mr. Brenner joined the Monetary 
Fund in 1946 as a counselor after five 
years as an attorney with the Treasury 
Department. 

Mr. Brenner attended the Bi-etton 
Woods Monetary Conference in the 
summer of 1944 as a member of the 
United States delegation. He also at- 
tended the inaugural meeting of the 
Boards of Governors of the Fund and 
the International Bank for Reconstruc- 
tion and Development held in Savan- 
nah, Ga., in 1946. 

Between November, 1954, and last 
month Mr. Brenner acted as general 
counsel of the International Monetary 
Fund until one was appointed. 

A native of Baltimore, Mr. Brenner 
received a law degree from the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

A bachelor, Mr. Brenner is survived 
by his mother, Mrs. Sol Brenner, and 
a brother Morton, both of Baltimore, 
and a sister, Mrs. Robert Dobries, of 
Woodbury, N. J. 

Edwin S. Holloway 

Edwin S. Holloway, 69, who retired 
in 1950 after 25 years with the Dicta- 
phone Company of Bridgeport, Connec- 
ticut, died in Providence Hospital, in 
Washington. 

Mr. Holloway was manager of the 
Baltimore branch of the Dictaphone 
Company when he retired. 

A native of Baltimore, he was a 
1908 graduate of Maryland. He was 
an instructor at the New York Mili- 
tary Academy and later worked with 
firms in Atlanta, Ga. 

He was active in church, civic, agri- 
cultural and social affairs of Upper 
Marlboro. He was a member of the 
vestry of Trinity Episcopal Church in 
Upper Marlboro; a director of the 
Southern States Co-Operative and a 
member of the Merchants Club of Bal- 
timore, Baltimore Country Club, the 
Rotary and the Vansville Farmers Club. 
He was the first president of the Marl- 
boro Hunt Club. 

He is survived by his widow, the 
former Josephine Hoffman, whom he 
married in 1924. 

Dr. Henry Clapp Sherman 

Dr. Henry Clapp Sherman, 80, one 
of the Nation's leading nutritionists, 
who essayed to "debunk" spinach as a 
health food, died in East Greenbush, a 
suburb of Albany, N. Y. 

Dr. Sherman was professor emeritus 
of chemistry at Columbia University, 
where he got his master's degree and 




ORDER YOUR 



Cloverland 

EGG NOG NOW 



87c 



Per Quart 



ASK YOUR CLOVERLAND SALESMAN 

or CALL LAfayette 3-4920 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



PgcUiiicA fl&i, 
AsuinwfL dinnsUtL. & JbanquriA. 

maruland seafood at it's finest 
dining room open daily 



marling house 
20 e. fayette 



m 




SA 7-4460 



Baltimore, md. 



CAREY MACHINERY & SUPPLY COMPANY, Inc. 

Industrial Mill Supplies/ Machine Tools, Pumps & Air Compressors 

SAFETY SUPPLIES 
3501 BREHMS LANE - BALTO. 13, MD. - BRoadway 6-1600 

(near Intersection Edison Highway and Erdman Ave.) 



THE COGSWELL COflSTRUCTIOn CO. 

513 PARK AVENUE BALTIMORE 1, MD. 



Maryland 



67 



Ph.D. He received his bachelor of 
science degree from Maryland in 1898 
and was assistant in chemistry there 
for the next two years. 

In 1898 he assisted in nutrition in- 
vestigations for the Agriculture De- 



PARADISE 
II NURSING HOME 

QUIET, RESTFUL SURROUNDINGS 

24-Hour Nursing Service 

Automatic Fire Spuinkli.no System 

MARGARET C. SHERRICK 

PARADISE and ALTAMONT AVES. 

CATONSVILLE, MD. 



TROY E. AUVIL 

Est. 1913 

ARTIFICIAL LIMBS 

Trusses - Shoes - Braces - Arch 
Health and Surgical Supports 
2117 E. NORTH AVE. BRoadwoy 6-0843 

Baltimore, Md. 



Russell W. Smith 

General Insurance 

1003 MERCANTILE TRUST BLDG. 

Baltimore 2, Md. 
LExington 9-0020 



"Crawford retreat • 

Interested in Problem Cases 

Henriette L. Nestlek, Director 

Elizabeth Meyer, Supr. of Nursinff 

WILKINS 7-0704 

• 2117 DENISON ST. BALTIMORE 16, MD. • 



FIRST 



IN FUEL OIL AND 
BURNER SERVICE 



C. HOFFBERGER CO. 

MONUMENT and FORREST STREETS 
Phone MU 9-1400 Baltimore, Md. 




(I5ard - s^ri/on School 

Secretarial - Dramatic Art and Radio 

Day and Evening 
805 N. Charles St. VE. 7-1155 

Baltimore, Md. 



Famous Brands of 
EXERCISE - MASSAGE & REDUCING EQUIPMENT 

Qyro - Niagara - Exercycle - Health-A Lator 
Battle Creek - Portable Steam Cabinets 

JObcdih- £qjuipjminL Company. 

Sales and Service 

623 W. North Ave. Baltimore, Md. LA 3-0011 



partment and later was a research 
associate at Carnegie Institution. 

Dr. Sherman was chief of the Bureau 
of Human Nutrition of the Agriculture 
Department in 1943 and 1944. 

He had written numerous books. In 
1943 in a book, "The Science of Nu- 
trition," he termed spinach "an unfor- 
tunate choice" as a health builder be- 
cause its oxalic acid made its calcium 
useless. 

Dr. Sherman was formerly a mem- 
ber of the committee on food and nu- 
trition and chairman of the subcom- 
mittee on human nutrition of the Na- 
tional Research Council. He was for- 
merly president of the American Insti- 
tute of Nutrition and chairman of the 
committee on nutritional problems of 
the American Public Health Associa- 
tion. He had been an officer of the 
American Chemical Society and the 
American Society of Biological Chem- 
ists. 

Dr. Sherman was a native of Ash 
Grove, Va. 

Arthur C. Bready 

Arthur C. Bready, 55, of Kensing- 
ton, Montgomery County attorney and 
former schoolteacher, died at Emer- 
gency Hospital, in Washington, after 
a month's illness. 

A native of Oakdale, Md., Mr. Breaay 
was closely associated with the de- 
velopment of the county, particularly 
the growth of Silver Spring. 

He received his master's degree at 
Maryland. 

For 20 years he was a public school 
teacher and administrator at Damas- 
cus, Fairland and Silver Spring schools. 
He was admitted to the bar in 1938 
in both Montgomery County and the 
State of Maryland. 

In 1941 he was one of the organiz- 
ers and first president of the Mont- 
gomery Title Company. He was ap- 
pointed Silver Spring trial magistrate 
in 1946, was a charter member and 
past president of the Silver Spring 
Rotary Club, and a member of the 
Silver Spring Board of Trade. 

Survivors are his wife, Helen Price 
Bready; a sister, Mrs. I. H. Morrison, 
Takoma Park, and a brother, Charles 
Franklin Bready, Oakdale, Md. 
Mrs. Ralph L. Vitale 

Mrs. Ralph L. Vitale, mother of two 
Maryland students, died in Washington 
Sanitarium. She was 52. 

Her two sons, Donald, 21, and Ralph, 
Jr., 17 attend the University of Mary- 
land. 

The Vitales came from New York in 
1934 when the father, Ralph L. Vitale, 
joined the housing group as one of its 
original employees. He is now deputy 
controller in the division. 

In addition to her husband and sons, 
Mrs. Vitale is survived by her mother, 
Teresa Valente; two sisters, Caroline 
Dougherty and Amelia Fusco; and two 
brothers, Joseph and Jeremiah Valente, 
all of New York City. 

S. D. Summers 

Samuel Dewey Summers, 57, consult- 
ing electrical engineer at the Naval 
Research Laboratory since 1945, died 
at his home. 

Mr. Summers formerly was an elec- 



trical engineer for the Commonwealth 
and Southern Corp. in Jackson, Mich., 
and Birmingham, Ala. For 13 years 
he taught at Tri-State College, Angola, 
Ind., the last five of which he was 
head of the department of electrical 
engineering. 

Mr. Summers was bom in Hornbeak, 
Tenn. He was educated at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, Tennessee State 
Normal College, Tri-State College, 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
and the University of Michigan. 

He was a member of the Student 
Army Training Corps during World 
War I. During World War II he was 
a lieutenant commander in the Navy. 

Mr. Summers was active^ in the 
American Institute of Electrical Engi- 
neers, having served as chairman of 
the Fort Wayne (Ind.) Chapter and 
with many national committees of the 
group. He was a registered profes- 
sional engineer and a trustee of Tri- 
State College. He was a member of 
numei'ous organizations, including the 
Lions Club and American Legion and 
had been active in the Methodist 
Church. 

Survivors are his widow, Mrs. Mary 
Coutts Summers: a daughter, Mrs. 
Jane Stanhope, of the home address; 
four sisters and two brothers in Ten- 
nessee and Texas and a granddaughter. 
James C. Wynkoop 

Dr. James C. Wynkoop, 88, who 
practiced medicine in Washington, D. C. 
for 51 years, died at his family home, 
Wynwood, Leesburg, Va., after a short 
illness. 

A native of Leesburg, he was gradu- 
ated with a bachelor of arts degree 
from the University of Virginia in 
1888 and from the University of Mary- 
land School of Medicine in 1892. 

He practiced for eight years in Hills- 
boro, Va., before he came to Washing- 
ton. 

Dr. Wynkoop was well known as a 
staff member of such hospitals as Gar- 
field, Columbia, Sibley, Providence and 
Georgetown, before his retirement four 
years ago. Since then, he had been 
living at Wynwood. 

Dr. Wynkoop was a member of the 
Southern Medical Society, the Ameri- 
can Medical Association and the Dis- 
trict Medical Society. He was a past 
president of the Washington Gun Club. 

Survivors are his widow, Mrs. Bessie 
DeButts Wynkoop, of Wynwood; three 
sons, James C. Wynkoop, Jr., Thomas 
Kelley Wynkoop and Dr. John DeButts 
Wynkoop, all of Washington, and two 
daughters, Mrs. Nancy W. Warner, of 
Leesburg, and Miss Katharine C. Wyn- 
koop, of Wynwood. There also are 
three grandchildren. 

Kenneth B. Boyd 

Dr. Kenneth B. Boyd, gynecologist 
and obstetrician who devoted more 
than twenty years to the practice of 
his specialties in Baltimore, died at 
his home. He had been ill for almost 
a year. 

Dr. Boyd, an active member of the 
staff of seven hospitals, was for fifteen 
years chief of obstetrics at Maryland 
General, a post he relinquished about 
five years ago. Until his illness halted 



68 



Maryland 



his practice, he was active at Maryland 
General and at Mercy, Franklin Square, 
University, Church Home, Lutheran 
and Woman's hospitals. 

Born in Baltimore in 1901, Dr. Boyd 
attended the Cathedral Parochial 
Church and Calvert Hall College until 
he went on to take his medical degree 
from the University of Maryland. 

The specialist interned at the Hospi- 
tal for the Women of Maryland. His 
career also included a period as resi- 
dent in gynocology at University Hos- 
pital. 

A member of the American Medical 
Association, the Baltimore City Medi- 
cal Association, the Baltimore City 
Medical Society, and the Medical and 
Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland, Dr. 
Boyd was also a Fellow of the Ameri- 
can College of Surgeons and a diplo- 
mate of the American Board of Gyne- 
cology and Obstetrics. 

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. 
Hallie A. Boyd; his mother( Mrs. Annie 
B. Boyd;) his brother, Harry R. Boyd; 
and a niece, Ann Marie Boyd. 
H. Whitman Newell 

Dr. H. Whitman Newell,, associate 
professor of psychiatry at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland School of Medi- 
cine and director of the child guidance 
clinic at the University's Psychiatric 
Institute, died at his home in Balti- 
more. 

He was well known for his work in 
child guidance and had worked in that 
field in Richmond, Va., and Cleveland 
before he came to Baltimore in 1933. 
He was with the child guidance clinic 
sponsored by the Community Chest 
before he became associated with the 
clinic later established by the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 

Dr. Newell, 57, was born in Japan, 
the son of Congregational missionaries. 
He was a graduate of Amherst College 
and of the Western Reserve University 
Medical School. 

A member of many professional 
groups, he was a past president of 
the American Orthopsychiatric Asso- 
ciation. 

He was with a volunteer ambulance 
unit for 22 months in World War I in 
France and served with the 142d Uni- 
versity of Maryland medical unit in 
World War I in the Fiji Islands and 
India. 

In 1927 he was married to Pauline 
Cozad. They had two daughters, Marcia 
and Jocelyn. Survivors also include a 
sister, Mrs. Harriet Hunter, of Clare- 
mont, Cal. 

Col. John I. Meagher 

Col. John I. Meagher, 65, retired 
fi-om the Army Medical Corps and 
former assistant medical director at 
the University of Maryland, died in 
Walter Reed Hospital. He lived in 
Silver Spring, Md. 

Col. Meagher was on the Army Re- 
tiring Board when he retired from the 
Medical Corps. Afterwards, he was 
assistant medical director at Maryland 
University until last September. 

Col. Meagher was born in New Jersey 
and was a 1913 graduate of Fordham 
Medical School. He was commissioned 
in the Medical Corps in 1917. During 



I 

WASHINGTON ALUMINUM CO., Inc. 

Baltimore 29, Md. • Arbutus 2700 



ALUMINUM FABRICATORS 

Our products include: 

Marine Accommodation 
Ladders 

Gangways and Hatch Covers 

Marine and Industrial Gratings 

Loading Platforms 

Industrial Gin Poles 

Stop Plates and Guides 

Pressure Vessels and Tanks 



They're 

NEW! 

Taste 'em 

NOW! 




pHUllPS 

* DELICIOUS" 



CONDENSED 



^3 



Try 'Em All: 

Tomato 

• 

Chicken 

Noodle 

• 

Vegetable 

• 

Vegetable 

Beef 



Chicken 
With Rice 



Now made from new, improved recipes, 
Phillips Delicious soups are really good 
eatin' — every one! 

NOW YOU CANT BUY BETTER-TASTING 
SOUP — AT ANY PRICE! 



Kefauver Lumber Company Inc. 

LUMBER, MILLWORK, BUILDING SUPPLIES 
BRICK and BLOCKS 

T.Uphone; JARRETTJVIUE 4601 

Bel air 874 FOREST HILL, MD. 



THE BALTIMORE ENVELOPE 


CO. 


MANUFACTURERS AND PRINTERS OF ENVELOPES 




600-608 EAST LOMBARD STREET 




Phent MUlbtrry 5-6070 


Baltimore 2, Maryland 



Maryland 



69 



Edward H. Curlander 

Pictures of 
Every Description 

DISTINCTIVE FRAMING 

525 N. CHARLES STREET 

Baltimore, Md. 
LExington 9-4716 



JhL BARN 

Restaurant and 
Sportsman's Bar 

Gateway to the Famout 
Cheiapeake Bay Country. 
Facing on Routes 
2 and 301. 

GLEN BURNIE MD. 

Firil and Still 
Foremost Restaurant 
on Governor Ritchie 
Highway 





PAUL J. EISEL 

1015 N. Charles St. Baltimore 1, Md. 

OLD & SCHOLARLY 

BOOKS 

Bought and Sold 



JACQUELINE JOYES 

Multiple Listing Realtor 

SALES — RENTALS 
Property Management 

J520 N. CHARLES STREET HOpklns 7-2322 

Baltimore, Md. 



LUDWIG 
KATZENSTEIN 

202 W. PRATT ST. 
BALTIMORE 1, MD. 
SAratoga 7-0748 



picture frames 

made to order 

old 

prints 

gilding 

restoring 



ALCAZAR 


CATHEDRAL and MADISON STS. 


Phone VErnon 7-8400 


Baltimore, Md. 



For The Best In : 

■ 

PLATING SERVICES j 
STANDARD PLATING CO. i 

411 N. EXETER ST. SA 7-4257 ■ 

Baltimore 2, Md. 



World War I, he was stationed at Fort 
Jay in New York Harbor and also in 
Hawaii. 

Later he was commandng officer of 
Fort Totten, N.Y., and surgeon at Fort 
Slocum, N.Y. 

During World War II he was in 
command of the 7th Evacuation Hos- 
pital in Tonga in the Friendly Islands 
in the South Pacific. 

Before he was on the Army Retiring 
Board, Col. Meagher was on the Army 
Physical Evaluation Board at Walter 
Reed Hospital. 

Survivors are his widow, the former 
Jane Hory; a son, Air Force Maj. John 
G. Meagher stationed in Scotland, two 
daugters, Mrs. Williams Waters, 9017 
Manchester road, Silver Spring, Md., 
and Mrs. Roger Fisher, Seattle, Wash.; 
two brothers, Dr. William C. and Ed- 
ward C, and two sisters, Miss Mary 
J. Meagher and Miss Nancy Meagher, 
all of Brooklyn. 

Dr. L. H. Binkley 

Dr. Leavitt H. Binkley, 50, proprietor 
and pharmacist of the Main Street 
Pharmacy in Laurel, Md., since 1936, 
died in San Francisco. 

Dr. Binkley had flown to the West 
Coast and had boarded the SS. Lurline 
enroute to Hawaii on a visit. He was 
found unconscious in his stateroom by 
a steward before the ship sailed and 
was taken to a hospital. He had been 
in failing health for some time. 

Dr. Binkley lived in University Park. 

He was a native of Hagerstown, Md., 
and a graduate of Temple University 
in Philadelphia and the University of 
Maryland School of Pharmacy. 

Dr. Binkley is survived by his wid- 
ow, Mrs. Elizabeth Johnson Binkley; 
a daughter, Mrs. Grace Hill; his father, 
Edward Lee Binkley; two brothers and 
a sister, Dr. Owen H. and Paul S. Bink- 
ley, and Mrs. Ray Hoffman, all of 
Hagerstown, and a week-old grand- 
daughter. 

Richard E. Gibson 

Richard E. Gibson of Leetonia, 
Ohio, 20 year old B. & P.A. sophomore 
was stabbed to death. Gibson and his 
brother Robert, 23, were sitting in the 
living room of their apartment when 
they heard a car start. 

They saw someone drive off in Rob- 
ert's car, and ran to Richard's auto, 
parked nearby. 

They pursued the fleeing auto to 
University Lane and New Hampshire 
Ave., where the stolen car was forced 
to halt for a red light. The driver, Ed- 
ward V. Marcionette, got out and fled 
along the highway. 

Gibson and his brother jumped from 
their car and gave chase. The victim 
was the first to reach the fleeing youth. 

Richard grabbed the car thief. They 
tussled for a moment, then Richard 
staggered and fell. The car thief ran. 
He was captured by police in a Wash- 
ington hotel. 

Gibson, a Phi Sigma Kappa pledge, 
donated blood for his fraternity the 
day he was killed, thereby making 
it possible for the Phi Sigs to win the 
trophy for donating the most blood. 



His fraternity brothers described Rich- 
ard as a reserved, pleasant boy, always 
willing to participate in activities. 
John W. Abbitt, M.D. 

Dr. John W. Abbitt, M.D. '10, died 
very suddenly of a heart attack. After 
completing his medical education at the 
University of Maryland Medical School, 
he interned at the King's Daughters' 
Hospital and from there he began his 
own practice in Portsmouth, Virginia. 
Dr. Abbitt was active in nearly every 
phase of community activity and was 
a leader in the medical profession. 
He was one of the 10 physicians who 
organized the Parrish Memorial Hos- 
pital; he was chief of surgery at Mary- 
view Hospital and chief of staff of that 
same hospital. He was also a past presi- 
dent of the medical staff of King's 
Daughters' Hospital. 

Arthur W. Browning, M.D. 

Following an illness of several months, 
Dr. Arthur Wolfe Browning died in 
the Orangeburg, S. C. Regional His- 
pital. Dr. Browning, one of the most 
outstanding and prominent physicians 
in South Carolina, graduated from the 
University of Maryland Medical School 
in 1897 and was the president and 
vice-president of his class. He interned 
at the Maryland General Hospital and 
from there took post graduate work 
at the Post Graduate Hospital in New 
York and the Chicago Polyclinic. He 
began his practice as a country doctor 
using a horse and buggy and some- 
times just a horse with saddlebag for 
transportation. For many years he 
represented So. Carolina on the Na- 
tional Committee for the Extension of 
the Practice of Rural Medicine and has 
written and published a number of 
articles pertaining to "Rural Health 
and Medicine" and "Rheumatic Fever". 
Dr. Browning was a member of many 
societies and organizations including 
the Edisto Medical Society, the S. C. 
Medical Society and the American 
Medical Association. His four surviving 
children are Miss Pearle Browning, 
Mrs. James C. Weir, Mrs. Charlie 
Spell and Mrs. John Frank Chick. 

Fred A. Ford, D.D.S. 

Dr. Fred A. Ford, D.D.S. 1892, died 
at the age of 84. He practiced dentistry 
for 25 years in Cazenovia, New York 
and then 32 years in Syracuse and had 
been retired 6 years at the time of his 
death. 

Wm. A. Hood, M.D. 

Dr. Wm. A. Hood, died after a nine 
week illness. He attended Wofford Col- 
lege and was an honor graduate of 
College of Physicians and Surgeons 
in Baltimore which later combined with 
the University of Maryland. Dr. Hood 
had lived in Hickory Grove, S. C, for 
50 years and practiced medicine for 
62 years in that vicinity. He is survived 
by his wife, Mrs. Sallie Plexico Hood; 
two daughters, Mrs. S. H. Wilkerson 
and Mrs. Mary Inman Meek; three 
sons, J. H. Hood, Dr. E. C. Hood and 
Dr. W. P. Hood. Dr. Hood leaves to the 
medical profession a son who is super- 
intendent of a T.B. sanatorium, one 
son and a grandson who are druggists, 
and two grandsons who are pre-medical 
students. 



70 



Maryland 



W. Herdman Schwatka 

W. Herdman Schwatka, 67, attorney 
with the Internal Revenue Service for 
15 years until his retirement in 1953, 
died of a heart attack at his home in 
Silver Spring. A native of Baltimore, 
he came to the office of the chief coun- 
sel at the Revenue Bureau in 1938. 

Before that he had been in the city 
solicitors office in Baltimore and in 
private law practice there. 

Mr. Schwatka received his law degree 
from the University of Maryland. 

He is survivevd by his wife, Adriana 
Louge; one son, W. Herdman Jr., and 
two grandchildren. 

James A. Latane 

James Allen Latane, master of chan- 
cery for the equity courts of Baltimore 
and former chairman of the Maryland 
Racing Commission, died in Baltimore. 
He was 75. 

Mr. Latane served as racing chair- 
man from 1921 to 1931, resigning to 
accept the court post he held until his 
death. 

Born in King and Queen County, Va., 
in 1880, he lived in Baltimore all but 
the first few months of his life. He 
received his law degree from the Uni- 
versity of Maryland and was admitted 
to the bar in 1901. 

He served as Assistant State's At- 
torney for Baltimore from 1903 to 1911 
and assistant United States Attorney 
for the Maryland district from 1915 to 
1920. 

John S. Strahorn 

John Sentman Strahorn, Jr., profes- 
sor of criminal and domestic relations 
law at the School of Law, was found 
in his office dead from a gunshot wound. 

Dr. William Lovett, Assistant Medi- 
cal Examiner, said the death was 
apparently suicide. He added that Pro- 
fessor Strahorn had been shot one time 
through the heart. He was fifty-three 
years old. 

He was regarded as one of the 
country's leading authorities on evi- 
dence, criminal law and the law of 
domestic relations and was popular 
with his students for his wit and good 
humor. They said he was almost al- 
ways in a pleasant mood. 

Dr. Strahorn was also widely known 
in legal circles throughout the State 
as editor of The Maryland Law Re- 
view. Member of an old Maryland 
family, he was the son of a judge and 
had an extensive background of legal 
education. 

He was the author of several books 
and numerous papers on his specialty. 

He was born at Elkton, Md., in 1902. 
His father, John S. Strahorn, Sr., later 
became a judge at Annapolis and legal 
advisor, it was said, to one of the Pres- 
idents. His mother, Mrs. Juliet Stra- 
horn, had been a court clerk. 

He was admitted to the bar in 1926 
and from then until 1931 he was an in- 
structor, an assistant professor at the 
University of Arkansas. He came to 
the University of Maryland in 1931 as 
an associate professor and was made 
professor in 1932. 

Besides teaching evidence and crim- 
inal and domestic relations law he also 
lectured on denta.1 law. 



The RRURDEL C0RP0RRTI0I1 

BRLTimORE 2, ITID. 



DREDGING — ENGINEERING CONSTRUCTION 



SAND GRAVEL STONE 



COMMERCIAL SLAG 



PESTS? 



"Call 7U 



TERMITES? 



Rode Man" 




PEST CONTROL SINCE 186 



C. Walter Porter, Mgr. 

SAratoga 7-6118 

22 W. FRANKLIN STREET 

Baltimore 1, Md. 





PLY CO. 



HOTEL 

EST - Purveyors of Flnt 19 « 

MEATS • POULTRY 

Frozen Foods 
Food Specialties 

Te Hotels. 

Institution!, Snips. 

Clubs, Etc. 



LExington 9-705S 

Night Service HO. 7-6817 

227 S. 

HANOVER ST. 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



James Posey & Associates 

Consulting Engineers 

10 E. PLEASANT ST. 
Baltimore 2, Md. 



MARYLAND OFFICE SUPPLY CO. 


Complete line of 


Visit our fine 


Office Supplies & 


Greeting Card 


School Supplies 


Department 


PLaza 


2-7615 


111 W. BALTIMORE ST. 


BALTIMORE 1, MD. 



Ma/rylam4 



71 



ationuiide 

PCRSonncL specialists 

Our expert career counselors can 
help you make the best use of 
your talents in today's market 

HOWARD STANSBURY, Mgr. 

nnnonujiDE seruicc 
empLovmenT nGEncv 

1133 MATHIESON BUILDING 
BALTIMORE 2, MO. 



GULF 


MOTEL 


U. S. ROUTE 1 at 


MARYLAND ROUTE 152 


4 Miles South of Bel Air 


1 8 Miles North of Baltimore 


FALLSTON, 


MARYLAND 




A 



Designers & Printers 
BOOKS - PERIODICALS 



DANGARY PUBLISHING CO. 

2807 W. Belvedere Ave. - Baltimore 15, Md. 

Printers of Maryland Magazine 



we are the MARYLAND and D. C. 
central distributors for 

AMERICAN BOSCH 

DIESEL 

Fuel Injection Equipment. 

Our Service facilities include genuine American Bosch parts, factory trained 
mechanics, factory designed and built service tools and testing equipment. 

PARKS & HULL Automotive Corp. 



1033 Cathedral St. 



SAratoga 7-8383 



Baltimore 1/ Md. 



J. George R. Graham 

J. George R. Graham, M.A.C. '97, 
residing at East Orange, N. J., died 
at the Orange Memorial Hospital, after 
a long illness. 

Until his retirement three years 
ago, he was a partner in the firm of 
James E. Bennett & Company, a New 
York brokerage house. At the time of 
his death he was chairman of the 
board of Old Hickory Copper Company 
in New York. Before coming to East 
Orange more than 20 years ago he 
was in the brokerage business in Chi- 
cago, where he was president of the 
firm of Simons, Day and Company. 

Mr. Graham was a native of Ingle- 
side on the Eastern Shore of Maryland 
and was graduated from the old Mary- 
land Agricultural College in the class 
of 1897. He took an active part in 
college affairs during his collegiate 
days and was a member of the editorial 
board which prepared the first edition 
of the year book "Reveille." He was 
Captain of Company "A" of the cadet 
battalion and his company won the 
competitive drill of that year and he 
was presented a sword by the Com- 
mandant of Cadets, Lieutenant Clough 
Overton. 

He is survived by his wife, the for- 
mer Miss Mary C. Ashby of Baltimore, 
and a son, George Ashby Graham of 
East Orange. He is also survived by 
a brother, J. J. T. Graham, Bowie, Md., 
class of 1906, and a sister, Mrs. J. 
Fred Stevens of Stevensville, Md. 

Howard R. Devilbiss 

Howard Roland Devilbiss, 65, who 
retired in June as deputy chief engi- 
neer of the Washington Suburban San- 
itary Commission, died at Prince 
George Hospital. 

Mr. Devilbiss was bom in New Wind- 
sor, Md., and was graduated in 1911 
from Maryland Agriculture College. 
He lectured there afterwards on mu- 
nicipal sanitation. 

When Mr. Devilbiss joined the com- 
mission in 1919, a year after it was 
established, there were no more than 
a dozen employees and the only equip- 
ment was two Model T Fords. The 
same year Mr. Devilbiss supervised 
the laying of the commission's first 
pipeline. He also supervised construc- 
tion of the commission's first water 
treatment plant and pumping station 
and the Burnt Mills and Brighton 
dams. 

Mr. Devilbiss was a construction di- 
vision engineer in charge of construc- 
tion of water mains, sewers and water 
treatment plants and pumping stations . 
until he was made deputy chief engi- 
neer in 1951. 

Before joining the commission, Mr. 
Devilbiss was employed by the Mary- 
land State Roads Commission, the 
Jacksonville (Fla.) Water and Sewer 
Board, the Baltimore Sewerage Com- 
mission and the Maryland Board of 
Health. 

He was a charter member of the 
Delaware-Maryland Water Sewerage 
Association, a life member of the 
American Water Works Association 
and a member of the Prince Georges- 
Montgomery Engineers Society. 



72 



Maryland 



Terrapins Go To Orange Bowl 

Season Of 10 Straight Wins Puts 
Maryland In Against Oklahoma. 
Terps Take Soccer And Cross-Country Titles. 



Collier's Choice 



By {J&depk tf-. felaiA 

(Director of Athletic Publicity) 

Maryland's Terrapins, one of the 
few teams in the country with 
an undefeated record, are bound for 
the Orange Bowl to meet mighty Okla- 
homa. 

As the season 
closed, Oklahoma 
was rated No. 1 with 
Coach Jim Tatum's 
crew close to them 
at all times. 

The Terrapins' 
season consisted of 
wins over Missouri, 
UCLA, Baylor, 
Wake Forest, North 
Carolina, Syracuse, 
So. Carolina, LSU, 
Clemson, and Geo. 
Washington. 
The first five games were covered 
in the last issue of "Maryland." 
All- America 
Maryland's great All- America center, 
a unanimous 1955 All-America with 
the Associated Press, the latest to an- 
nounce his selection, capped a great 
season by winning the Walter Camp 
Memorial Trophy, given annually by 
Collier's to the outstanding college 
football player of the season. The 




Mr. Blair 



trophy is awarded in honor of the 
Yale coach who originated the All- 
America selections. 

Three other Terps received All- 
America consideration. They were 
halfback Ed Vereb, quarterback Frank 
Tamburello, and end Bill Walker. 

Pellegrini will face the man selected 
beside him by Collier's in the Orange 
Bowl. Oklahoma's Bo Bolinger was 
given a guard All-America spot. 

Pellegrini is the first Terp player 
ever to receive "Player Of The Year" 
honors. Former Terp stars have been 
selected as "Back of the Year" and 
"Lineman of the Year," but never 
"Player of the Year," the tops in all 
selections. 

The choice was made by the Ameri- 
can Football Coaches' Association. Pel- 
legrini received the award before a 
national television audience as he ac- 
cepted the trophy on the Ed Sullivan 
show. 

Another trip to New York and a na- 
tional TV show came his way as he 
appeared on Jackie Gleason's Show as 
a member of Look's 1955 All-America 
squad. 

Pellegrini And Vereb 

Bob Pellegrini and Ed Vereb, Mary- 
land co-captains, were selected in the 
first round of the professional football 



This Is It 





PLAYER OF THE YEAR 

Bob Pellegrini, Maryland center and 
co-captain, capped a great season by 
receiving the Walter Camp Memorial 
Trophy given annually by Collier's to 
the outstanding college football player 
of the season. The trophy is given in 
honor of the Yale coach who originated 
the Collier's Ail-American selections. 

Pellegrini is the first Maryland play- 
er to receive the Walter Camp Mem- 
orial Trophy. The selection was made 
from players at every position. 

The Collier's All-Americans were se- 
lected by the American Football 
Coaches Association. Pellegrini also 
made the Look All-America team, the 
UP team and others. 



THE ORANGE BOWL 
The above foto shows the Orange Bowl at Miami, '55. 

For January 2, 1956 Maryland meets Oklahoma here in the top bowl game 
with the nation's two top teams facing each other. 



draft. Pellegrini was grabbed by the 
Philadelphia Eagles. 

Vereb surprised by being the first 
choice of the Washington Redskins. 

For Pellegrini it was but one of 
many honors heaped upon him. Bob 
was named on Collier's Ail-American 
and received the Walter Camp Memor- 
ial Trophy as the nation's outstanding 
collegiate player. He also was selected 
on Look's Ail-American, the INS All- 
American and Frank Leahy's All- 
American, as well as the AP. 

He appeared on TV on both the Ed 
Sullivan and Jackie Gleason shows. 

Vereb, unheralded before the sea- 
son, became one of Maryland's stand- 
out players. He was called on con- 
sistently for vital yardage and seldom 
failed. He broke the Atlantic Coast 
Conference scoring record and missed 
Maryland's all-time scoring mark by 
one point, finishing the season with 96 
points. The record is held by Shoo- 
Shoo Shemonski with 97. 

Boost For Tatum 

We quote from Edwin H. Brandt, 
in the Baltimore Morning Sun : "At the 
risk of being called a Maryland apolo- 
gist, we'll say that the biggest reason 
for Terp success is the ability of Tatum 
as a coach. Maryland won three games 
in 1946 and seven in 1947, Tatum's 
first year. Maryland got its first bowl 
bid and tied Georgia in the Gator Bowl. 



Maryland 



73 



TAZE AND HEWITT 

SALES ENGINEERS 
33 E. 21st Street - Baltimore 18, Md. 

HEATING • VENTILATING 
COOLING EQUIPMENT 

Phone: BElmont 5-5895 — 5-5896 
Ed Taze "Rip" Hewitt 



• LEOnflRD 
• COLLECTION 
• AGEnCY 

Specializing in Collections 
for Medical Men 



882 PARK AVE. IE 9-6909 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



PENNIMAN & 
BROWNE, INC. 

Chemists 

Engineers 

Inspectors 

• 

Testing Laboratories 
Baltimore Washington 



DISTINCTIVE FORM FIT UNIFORM 

Regulation Nurses Uniforms 

To Measure 

120 FOREST DRIVE 



Rldgoway 7-6575 



BALTIMORE 28, MD. 



LIBERTY RADIO & 
TELEVISION SERVICE 

HIGH FIDELITY 

Music Systems for Home and Office 

4908 PARK HEIGHTS AVE. 

Baltimore, Md. Liberty 2-9457 



MEDICAL 



EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 

Mrs. E. M. Hanrahan 
DENTAL — INDUSTRIAL 
MEDICAL — PHARMACEUTICAL 

28 E. 20th St. 
HOpkinS 7-8931 Baltimore, Md. 



Great Coach 




BIG JIM TATTJM 

Maryland's football coach and Director 
of Athletics 



"Tatum didn't have time to 'bring 
the boys in,' and he won with material 
that lost six games the year before. 

"The second reason why Maryland 
wins is that Tatum knows how to re- 
cruit and he does it on a large scale. 
But not the way plenty of people 
would like to believe; that is, sending 
his scouts far and wide with a fist- 
ful of cash and an ironclad contract. 

"Instead, Tatum assigns his assistant 
coaches a territory, usually in their 
own neighboi-hoods, and the coaches 
contact former Terp players, friends, 
Maryland alumni, and high school 
coaches in their search to fill Mary- 
land's coming needs. 

"This year, for instance, they may be 
looking for ends, next year backs, and 
so on. It is the same type of recruiting 
that every major football school in the 
country uses. 

"After deciding on a particular boy, 
the coach will talk to him, his coach 
and his parents and examine his high 
school record. If the boy is desirable, 
the coach will ask an alumnus or the 
boy's parents to bring him to College 
Park, where he is shown the advant- 
ages of attending the University of 
Maryland. 

The coaches help him to enter Mary- 
land, obtain a scholarship, and anything 
else the boy might need to become es- 
tablished. After the boy has entered 
and if he falls behind on his marks, 
the athletic department will see that 
he is tutored, the fees coming out of 
the gate receipts and not taxpayers' 
pockets. 

"In other words, the prospective 
Maryland football player receives much 
personal attention in solving his prob- 
lems and he pretty nearly always grad- 
uates as a credit to himself and his 
school. 



"Tatum loses few boys because of 
low grades, not because they get auto- 
matic passing grades because they are 
football players, but because Tatum 
chooses boys who are not likely to 
flunk out and the fact that they are 
aided with tutoring by the athletic de- 
partment. After all, it is an investment 
by both the boy and the school, and 
what's the matter with that ? 

"The last reason for Maryland success 
could easily be first. That reason, of 
course, is work, something most people 
don't like but Tatum believes in, not 
necessarily because he likes to work, 
but because it is necessary for success, 
as any winning coach will say. 

"Believe it or not, Tatum does more 
with less scholarships. Maryland gets 
about 25 new scholarships each year, 
but due to various reasons seldom has 
more than 88 boys on the entire squad. 
The Southeastern Conference last year 
raised its scholarship limit to 55 per 
year and other conferences have a high- 
er limit than the Atlantic Coast Confer- 
ence. 

"About that 'bringing the boys in : 
baloney again, Maryland has more 
State players on its squad now than it 
did before Tatum. In fact, Tatum is 
trying to get more State football play- 
ers to attend Maryland, and the chief 
roadblock is that there are so few foot- 
ball-playing high schools in this State.' 1 

Maryland 25; North Carolina 7 

Each time Maryland moved within 
North Carolina's 10-yard line, Frank 
Tamburello gave the ball to Ed Vereb 
with instructions to provide a touch- 
down. 

Like the execellent co-captain that 
he is, Vereb obliged. He scored three 
touchdowns and passed nine yards for 
another as the Terps beat North Caro- 
lina, 25-7, before 30,000 homecoming 
fans at North Carolina. 

The Terps were sufficient as they 
scored 19 points in the first half and 
then labored through a second half 
marred by a succession of penalties 
that finally added to 90 yards for each 
team. 

The touchdown the Tar Heels scored 
surprised everybody in the stadium, but 
most of all quarterback Tamburello. 
Tambo was standing on his own 35 
with the ball on his hip, looking for 
somebody to throw to, when all of a 
sudden he didn't have the ball. 

Otherwise the Tar Heels, alternating 
their three sophomore quarterbacks, 
never seriously threatened. 

Yield 18 Yards Rushing 

Carolina gained only 18 yards rush- 
ing. It was the same terrific twosome, 
Bob Pellegrini and Mike Sandusky, in 
starring roles, but all the way across 
the line the Terps were tough. 

Tamburello had another of his fine 
days of play-calling as the Terps won 
their 10th straight, tying their second 
longest winning streak under Jim Tat- 
um. 

He piloted the Terps 75 yards to a 
touchdown in 14 plays the first time 
they had the ball. After Carolina 
scored in the second half, Tambo moved 
the Terps 89 yards in 14 plays. 



74 



Maryland 



! 



Draft Choice 




ED VEREB 
Chosen on the first draft of the foot- 
ball professionals, Ed was the choice 
of the Washington Redskins. 



Tamburello was the play-caller on 
all of Maryland's touchdowns, and af- 
ter the game Coach George Barclay of 
the Tar Heels said he was the finest 
quarterback you could hope to see. 

Maryland's pass defenders had an- 
other profitable day, grabbing off five 
Carolina aerials, two of which set up 
touchdowns. 

Maryland 34; Syracuse 13 

It appeared that Maryland was going 
for the real big numbers on the score- 
board when it held a whopping 27- 
point lead over Syracuse midway of the 
third period, but then came the let- 
down which kept the final score, 34-13, 
within reason. 

32,500 saw the game at Syracuse. 

Maryland had far too much football 
team as it rolled up its 11th straight 
victory. 

The Terps, deep in star performers, 
were led again by Ed Vereb, who scored 
a touchdown, passed for another and 
for a tremendous afternoon's work 
piled up 132 yards with his twinkling 
feet. The other halfback, Jack Healy, 
carried off the field on a stretcher in 
the first half, came back to score twice 
in the early moments of the third 
quarter. 

And Phil Perlo, replacement for Fred 
Hamilton, the injured fullback, had a 
good day. 

The line stalwarts who held Syra- 
cuse to 27 yards on the ground for 
three periods were topped again by 
Center Bob Pellegrini, who must have 
won more All-America votes from the 
critical New York reporters. 

After a full day of smacking down 
passes, causing fumbles with his jar- 
ring tackles and blocking the Syra- 
cuse players off their feet, Pellegrini 
received the final compliment from a 
Louisiana State scout who yelled, 
"Let's be thankful that guy has only 
one more year of college ball." 



THE 



BALTIMORE ASPHALT 
BLOCK and TILE CO. 



BABCO 
HOT ASPHALT PAVEMENTS 

• private driveways 
e industrial yards 
for e service stations 
e playgrounds 
e parking areas 



general 
contractors 



1320 N. MONROE ST. 
Call: MAdison 3-4346 



BALTIMORE 17, MD. 




MASSEY-HARRIS DIVISION 

BALTIMORE BRANCH 

YORK & TIMONIUM ROADS 
TIMONIUM, MARYLAND 

Look For our Local Dealer in Your Community 



MARYLAND INN 




In HISTORIC ANNAPOLIS, MD. 

18th CENTURY HOSTELRY with 
20th CENTURY COMFORTS 

Air Conditioned 
Roomi and Apartments 
CHURCH CIRCLE & MAIN STREET 
Colonial 3-2641 



THE 

E. II. KRESTI1ER 

CORIPRIIY 

DAIRY 4. CREAMERY 
APPARATUS 

6401 PULASKI HIGHWAY 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



Maryland 



75 



These Children will 
be at Maryland one 
day — 




thanks to 

our savings accounts 

at FIRST FEDERAL 

where it pays to save. 

District 7-2370 



Brst 




DERAL 



IN WASHINGTON 

610 13th STREET, N.W. (Bet. F & G) 
Washington 5, D. C. 



OLiver 6-3923 

BETHESDA BRANCH OFFICE 

8216 WISCONSIN AVE., N.W. 



HUFFER SHINN 
Optical 
Company, Inc. 

Prescription Opticians 
Repairs - Replacements 

1413 L STREET. N.W. 

NAtional 8-1457 Washington, D. C. 



Bon Ton 

SARATOGA CHIPS 

distributed by 
BON TON SARATOGA 
CHIP DISTRIBUTORS 

Rear— 1229 D St., S.L . 

LI. 1-4141 Washington 




Guard Jack Davis and tackle Mike 
Sandusky were tremendous up front 
for the Terps. 

Maryland 27; South Carolina 

Inspired by another spectacular three 
touchdown performance by Ed Vereb, 
Maryland rolled over South Carolina, 
27-0, an appreciative homecoming- 
crowd of 23,000 in Byrd Stadium. 

The Terps made it 12 in a row. The 
Gamecocks, who had the ball for a 
considerable portion of the afternoon, 
never moved it inside the Maryland 
20-yard line. 

Vereb boasted a new Atlantic Coast 
Conference scoring record with 11 
touchdowns for the year as he rolled 
up 111 yards in 13 trips, completed the 
only pass he threw for a 16-yard gain, 
and sped 32 yards with an intercepted 
pass. 

The fleet co-captain took handoffs 
from Frank Tamburello for touchdown 
bursts of 3 and 10 yards and went wide 
with a pitchout for 19 yards on his 
other touchdown. He tore through 
holes opened by the Terps' forwards, 
and on his two long runs of the day 
picked up his downfield blockers and 
made the most of them. 

Both the Maryland first and second 
teams scored the first time they laid 
hands on the ball for a two-touchdown 
lead at the end of the first quarter. 
The Terps added one in each of the 
last two periods,, with two of their 
four intercepted passes setting up the 
second-half touchdowns. 

Maryland rolled up 249 yards on the 
ground as it stuck mostly to its run- 
ning attack. Tamburello didn't throw 
a pass all day and the Terps tried only 
seven, four by their halfbacks. 

Maryland protected its rank by hold- 
ing the Gamecocks to 71 yards, with 
Bob Pellegrini playing his usual major 
role. The Terps' All-American center 
crashed through time and again. 

Maryland 13; LSU 

Outplayed in the first half Mary- 
land had poise enough to throw a pair 
of 10-play touchdown drives against 
Louisiana State and beat the Tigers, 
13-0, scoring one point for each vic- 
tory in the second longest winning 
streak in major college football. 

A cold and windswept crowd of 28,000 
in Byrd Stadium had few occasions to 
cheer the Terps offensively except 
when Frank Tamburello and Jack 
Healy clicked on a 31-yard touchdown 
pass play in the second quarter and 
when Ed Vereb made a four-yard 
scoring thrust in the third. 

Defensively, the Terps posted their 
third shutout of the season and their 
second straight, permitting the Tigers 
to advance inside their 30-yard line 
only twice. 

When the second team was in there, 
Tatum was huddling with the first- 
stringers on the sidelines, an unusual 
sight, and it paid off when Tamburello's 
club took over in the second quarter. 
They had the ball on their own 44, and 
Maryland fans were pleading for 
action. 

Vereb, who was led off the field with 



a leg injury shortly after the game 
started, gained nine yards, and Tam- 
burello made the Terps' second first 
down of the game on the LSU 44. 
Four more plays netted another first 
down, and, after the halfback pass was 
long, Tambo sneaked for another yard. 

Tamburello had an 0-for-4 passing 
record when he hit for the big one. 
From the LSU 31 he evaded the rush- 
ing linemen and pitched to Healy, who 
caught the ball on the 12 and romped 
for a touchdown without a hand laid 
on him. Bob Laughery converted for 
a 7-0 lead, and that stood up for the 
half. 

In the second half the Terps took 
possession on their own 47 and ground 
it out. Vereb made nine and Tam- 
burello, bottled up, managed to get a 
pass away to Jim Parsons for 13 yards 
and a first down on the LSU 33. 

Vereb made four more and Phil Perlo 
juggled a pitchout but held it for a 
first down. Perlo, Vereb and Healy 
alternated in another first down to 
the 11, and Perlo smashed through to 
the 4-yard line. 

Vereb was the obvious call here and 
that was it. He took a handoff from 
Tamburello and quicker than the eye 
he was in the end zone for his 12th 
touchdown of the year. This time 
Laughery's try for the point was 
blocked. 

Maryland's greatest asset on defense 
was rising to the occasion when LSU 
had third down and short yardage for 
a first. Each time Bob Pellegrini, Mike 
Sandusky or Jack Davis would smash 
through and halt the advance, forcing 
a punt. 

The Terps were back on the move af- 
ter Tamburello and Russell Dennis 
clicked on a 25-yard pass. 

Again Maryland was in scoring po- 
sition when Howie Dare made a mag- 
nificent play to intercept a pass. 

Maryland 25; Clemson 12 

Maryland's Terps proved their calibre 
by coming from a 0-12 deficit to whip 
a fired-up Clemson team, 25-12, an< 
ride into Miami's Orange Bowl on New 
Year's Day. 

An overflow homecoming day crowc 
of 30,000 saw the Tigers strike quickly 
for touchdowns in the first and sec- 
ond periods to hold a 12-0 lead over 
the favored Terps. 

Maryland came back in the secon( 
for one, went ahead 13-12 in the 
third, then hung on two clinching touch- 
downs in the fourth period over the 
tiring Tigers. 

Maryland's reserve strength was the 
difference. Jim Tatum substituted free 
ly and his second team proved worthy 
of the job. 

The Tigers sent the big crowd into 
ecstasy by taking the opening kickof 
and marching 84 yards in 10 plays to 
score. 

Maryland could not get its offense 
going and Clemson got a break when 
Jack Healy fumbled and Bill Hudson 
recovered on Clemson's 38. The Tigers 
marched down to Maryland's 13, but 



76 



Maryland 






Fred Tullai stopped it by intercepting 
King's pass on the Terp 5. 

Opening the second period the Tigers 
struck swiftly. Joel Wells, one of the 
nation's finest backs, took the ball at 
midfield on a triple handoff and raced 
50 yards right up the middle to score, 
outrunning Healy and Fred Hamilton 
the last 10 yards. Charlie Bussey's 
try for point failed and the Tigers 
were rolling, 12-0. 

Maryland put Clemson in a hole 
when Bill Walker punted dead on the 
Tiger one. Pagliei kicked it back to 
the 41, where Healy fumbled the punt. 
Clemson was penalized 15 yards for 
piling on as the Tigers scrambled for 
the ball. 

With the ball on Clemson's 36 by the 
break, Maryland went to work. Healy 
scooted up the middle for 24 to the 6 
after Hamilton had made 5. On third 
down Ed Vereb plunged over for the 
TD. Bob Laughery's try for point was 
wide and Clemson still led, 12-6, hold- 
ing this margin as they went out at 
halftime. 

Maryland lost no time in the third 
period. The Terps took the kickoff and 
went 73 yards in 9 plays to score and 
take the lead. A 31-yard pass from 
Lynn Beightol to Healy was a big 
ground-gainer. 

The Terps plugged on down with 
Beightol firing a 17-yarder to Vereb, 
who caught it on the one and fell 
over for the touchdown. Laughery's 
important kick was good, although 
Wells blocked it. 

Clemson started a good drive open- 
ing the fourth quarter from its own 
17, but it fizzled at midfield. 

Tamburello passed to Healy for 27 
to put it on the Clemson 9 in the big 
play. Tamburello twisted over for the 
TD. Laughery's try for point failed 
and the Terps were in front, 19-12. 

Clemson missed a good chance when 
Dick Burgee fumbled Pagliei's punt at 
midfield and the ball bounced crazily 
past a group of Tigers, Paul Tonetti 
recovering for the Terps. 

Taking the ball at midfield, Mary- 
land went quickly for its clincher. 
Tamburello picked up 25 for a first 
down after the Terps had been pen- 
alized. 

Nusz broke loose for 18. A penalty 
called back Vereb's 11-yard twister to 
score, but Walker made a great catch 
of Beightol's pass over Paglieli for 
the touchdown with 4:02 minutes left. 
Vereb's kick failed and the day's scor- 
ing was done, 25-12. 

Maryland 19; George Washington 

Maryland wrapped up its third per- 
fect football season in the last five 
years with a rather routine 19-0 vic- 
tory over George Washington before 
17,000 heavily-bundled spectators in 
Byrd Stadium. 

The Terps thus swept their 1955 
schedule and extended their winning 
streak to 15 straight. 

Maryland scored its three touch- 
downs in the first half, and then 
watched GW control the ball and the 
ball game in the second half. But the 
Colonials biggest scoring threat ended 
a foot short of a touchdown after an 











_l 


. 








1 r 


-.fft^ '"-' 


15N- 


- 'J 






'•"ffVj 




orrttr ■»*+•'**» * 




-. 




if )fc 1 ■ 




JlUi! 


"•iri. 'V ;, !C-i. 



NOW IN OUR NEW BUILDING 

Better than ever equipped to handle your 
photo offset printing in black and color. 

KIRBY LITHOGRAPHIC CO., Inc 

409-15 Twelfth St., S.W. Washington 24, D. C. 
NAtional 8-6239 



r 



*>. 



Johnston, Lemon & Co 



MEMBER PHILADELPHIA-BALTIMORE STOCK EXCHANGE 



INVESTMENT SECURITIES 



SOUTHERN BUILDING 

Washington 5, D. C. 

STerling 3-3130 



115 N. ST. ASAPH 

Alexandria, Va. 

King 8-6600 



V. 



CITRUS FRUIT SPECIALS 

Gift Boxes & Baskets 
Expressed to anywhere in United States 



. VAafFROCHUCH'S 



3700 So. Dixie • Phone 3-7553 • West Palm Beach 



Phone, NAtional 8-3660 



Night Phones: LUdlow 2-7916 — JOrdon 8-2377 



Established 1915 



Central Armature Works, Inc. 

625 D STREET, N.W. 

Rewinding — Generators — Motors — Transformers — Power Installations 

Construction 

Complete Line Motors and Electrical Supplies 

Century & General Electric Motors — Telechron, Revere, General Electric and all makes Clocks 

Switchboards, Field Coils, Armature Coils, Vee Belts and Sheaves Leather and Rubber Belting 



Maryland 



77 



ROHAN KA 



a 



ERVICI 



INC. 



Washington's Oldest 

OLDSMOBILE 

Dealership 




Serving 
Maryland 
Alumni 

for many years 

1126 20th ST., N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

EX 3-8300 



IMPORTERS EMERSON 2-2732 

WHOLESALE-RETAIL 

ANTIQUES 
Penny's Treasure Chest 

Formerly of Berlin, Germany 
2311 Wisconsin Ave., N.W. Washington 7, D.C. 

Fine Meissen — Dresden — Porcelains — Ivories 
Figurines — Colored Stemware — Bric-a-Brac 



HUGH C. GARDNER, Jr. 

SALES — SERVICE a 

TRACTORS-FARM SUPPLIES HI 
REFRIGERATORS 

Faulkner, Md. Phone LaPlota 5441 



89-yard march, and in halting that 
drive the Terps made possible their 
fourth shutout of the season. 

Ed Vereb, who needed 14 points to 
break the Maryland scoring record, 
shoved across two touchdowns in a 
productive day that included 78 yards 
rushing, but he missed an extra-point 
try and failed by a point to tie the 
record of 97 set by Bob Shemonski in 
1950. 

Vereb smashed over from the one 
after setting up a touchdown in the 
first period, and with 17 seconds to go 
until halftime cut through from four 
yards out for his 96th point of the 
season. It appeared early in the third 
period when the Terps needed a yard 
for a first down on the Colonials' 11, 
but they didn't get the yard, and never 
were close after that. 

Maryland, which has had fewer 
home-run touchdowns than any of 
Coach Jim Tatum's teams, scored on 
their longest touchdown play of the 
season the first time they had the ball. 

It was a 41-yard pass play from 
Quarterback Lynn Beightol to Russell 
Dennis. Beightol waited behind his 
best protection of the day and floated 
a beautiful pass that Dennis caught 
on the three-yard line and stepped 
over, having raced behind Bob Sturm 
and Bill Weaver, who were supposed 
to be guarding him. 

But after that GW tightened its pass 
defense. 

The Terps were doing a tremendous 
defensive job on GWs brilliant Mike 
Sommer until the Colonials outsmarted 
them in the third period and shook 
Sommer loose on a 40-yard ramble 
from a fake kick formation. 

In nine other tries Sommer made 28 
yards to trail Vereb by eight as the 
leading ground gainer of the day. With 
Sommer completely bottled up in the 
first half, GW netted only three yards 
and did not complete a pass, thus 
winding up with a three-yard plus 
figure in total offense. Sommer netted 
68 yards of the 69 made by GW. 

Russian Visitors 

Here's what Russians think of Amer- 
ican football and one of the nation's top 
teams: 

"In American football apparently you 
are permitted to take your adversary's 
hand or leg and throw it away. This 
is not only painful to the player but 
unpleasant to look at." 

"It's probably a game for men only." 

"A lot of muddy men . . ." 

Eleven Russian construction experts 
were guests for a brief campus tour 
and a "speedy" homecoming football 
game. 

Football wasn't the only thing they 
noticed. 

With obvious reference to the lavish- 
ly gowned Homecoming queen candi- 
dates who highlighted the pregame 
ceremonies, one of the party com- 
mented: 

"But we like the girls here too!" 

The Russians, who have been touring 
this country for about 8 rnonth, were 



guests for the day of the Home Build- 
ers' Association of Metropolitan Wash- 
ington. Dr. S. S. Steinberg, dean of 
the College of Engineering briefed the 
Russian builders on how the University 
operates and led them on a short tour 
through some of the engineering labor- 
atories. 

The Russian party was told about 
the American system of grading and 
they chuckled when the question was 
discussed of how a student can flunk 
out of college. The Russkies were also 
interested in how an engineer graduate 
gets his. certificate of practice and 
"what is the organization of deans and 
how does it work?" 

Like most Americans who tour the 
continent, the Russians had cameras 
and probably took more pictures at the 
grid contest than the sports photog- 
raphers covering the game. 

A reverse tour, with the possibility 
that American construction men can 
sample Russian football, is in the offing 
with an invitation already extended 
for a United States group to visit the 
U.S.S.R. There they play soccer. 

ACC Soccer Title 

Coach Doyle Royal's Maryland soc- 
cer team captured its third straight 
Atlantic Coast Conference champion- 
ship this season. 

The Terps, finishing with an 8-2 
record, were scored on only once in 
ACC play. Their 
league mark for the 
title was 4-0 and 
the Duke Blue Dev- 
ils were able to 
score only once 
against the strong 
Terp pitchmen. 

As the records 
stand, this is the 
10th year that a 
Liner soccer team 
has completed its 
log without a loss 
in loop competition. 
This, of course, in- 
cludes the old South- 
ern Conference. 
Several players were prominent in 
the scoring during the year. Sophomore 
Andy McDonald led the scorers with 
12 tallies, followed by Mike Finci. Roy 
Beauchamp turned in an outstanding 
effort all season. 

The best bet for All-America and 
All-Conference choice will be outside 
right Ronnie Shock. If Shock comes 
through with some of these honors, it 
will mark the second straight year 
that a Terp lineman receives the honors. 
Last season it was Otto Winkelman 
who made the Conference team. 

Carroll Reynolds and Ed Grudn, the 
two goalies, also will receive commen- 
dation for the outstanding perform- 
ances they gave Royal's squad this 
fall. 

Maryland's eight wins were over 
Salisbury State Teachers, North Caro- 
lina, North Carolina State, Johns Hop- 
kins, Duke, Washington and Lee, Vir- 
ginia, and Georgetown, Their two losses 
were to Penn State and Navy, 




Coach Royal 



78 



Maryland 



Cross-Country Champs 

Another Conference title was added 
to the Maryland records this fall when 
Jim Kehoe's cross-country team copped 
the Atlantic Coast Conference trophy 
for the third consecutive year. 

For the first time, the league title 
was determined on a won-lost basis in 
conference meets. 
K e h o e's harriers 
met and defeated 
N. Carolina State, 
N. Carolina, Duke, 
Wake Forest, and 
Virginia without 
suffering a loss. A 
28-29 loss to Navy 
was the team's only 
loss during the 1955 
campaign. 

In the meet held 
at North Carolina 
State College to d3- 
termine individual 
honors after the 
Terps' had the 
crown won, North 
Carolina's Jim Beatty came in first. 
Carl Party and Ben Good, Maryland's 
mainstays during the season, finished 
second and third. The Terps' great 
young star, Burr Grim, was hampered 
all season by a back injury. 




Coaclt Keltoe 





BASKETBALL 




December — ■ 




2 — Virginia 


Home 


(Dedication — doors open 6 p.m.) 


•5 — Alumni 


Home 


8 — William & Mary 


Home 


10 — Wake Forest 


Home 


1") — Kentucky 


Home 


17 — North Carolina 


Home 


•29-30 — Mid Winter Festival 


Home 


(Mich. State. George Wash., 




St. Francis, Maryland) 




■/miliary — 




."5 — South Carolina 




5 — George Washington 


Home 


7 — Clemson 


Away 


9 — South Carolina 


Away 


12 — North Carolina State 


Home 


14 — Duke 


Away 


16 — North Carolina 


Away 


21 — Georgetown 


Away 


February — ■ 




4 — Navy 


Home 


7 — Duke 


Home 


11 — George Washington 


Awav 


14 — Clemson 


Home 


IS — North Carolina State 


Away 


2<y— Wake Forest 


Away 


23 — Virginia 


Away 


2:> — Georgetown 


Home 



Murrh- 

1-2-3 — A.C.C. Tournament Raleigh 

•Not included with season ticket. 

Maryland 67; Virginia 55 
Bob Kessler made basketball his- 
tory at Maryland, scored the first point 
and the most points, 23, as Bud Milli- 
kan's Terrapins christened their new 
field house with a 
67-55 victory over 
Virginia. 

Playing with the 
knuckles of his right 
hand jammed from 
a practice injury, 
Kessler still was the 
big figure for Mary- 
land as he out-re- 
bounded the opposi- 
tion and scored 
eight straight points 
midway in the sec- 
ond half to give 
Maryland a 51-42 lead before he left 
the game. 




Couch MiUikan 



For Your 

Enjoyment 

MEADOW GOLD ICE CREAM 

• Rich, smooth, 
Delicious . . . 
A Taste Treat 
for every Occasion. 

Meadow Gold Products Co. 

Ask For Our Flavor Of The Month 





DRUMMOND & CO., INC 



• KOTALIZED 

ALL-WEATHER TENNIS COURTS & 
PLAY AREAS 

• KOTALIZED BITUMINOUS CONCRETE 
HEAVY DUTY INDUSTRIAL ROADS, 
PARKING LOTS AND DRIVEWAYS 

• CONCRETE 

WORK 



HUnter 6-7900 

WESTERN MD. RR & MILFORD MILL RD. 
PIKESVILLE 8, MARYLAND 




INSURANCE — BONDS 

FOR COMPLETE INFORMATION ON THE FOLLOWING: 

FIRE BONDS (Fidelity, Estate, 

LIABILITY (All Kinds) Contractor) 

JEWELRY & FUR LIFE (Estate, Mortgage) 

^. CALL District 7-1100 

THE &hiverJ INSURANCE AGENCY, Inc. 

1010 VERMONT AVE./ N.W. WASHINGTON, D. C. 



--.- J ■ 



Maryland 



79 



ECKINGTON BUILDING SUPPLY CO. 

657 A STREET, S.E. — WASHINGTON, D. C. 

LI 7-2122 

Complete Line of 
Building Materials • Plastering Materials • Brick • Cinder Block 
Mortar • Cement • Rough Hardware and Steel Tubular Scaffolding 

Sales and Rentals 

Warehouse: 1919 5th STREET, N.E., WASHINGTON, D. C. 



"OH, DAWGUNIT! 
I COULD HAVE 
BEEN READING 



ALL THESE 
MONTHS! 




"HE JUST 
MISSED THE 
I BUS, THASSALL1' 

WHAT GOES ON AT OUR ALMA MATER? 

WHAT OF OUR CLASSMATES? WHAT'S THE ALUMNI 
NEWS? THE SPORTS NEWS? 

The Alumnus above made the mistake of not subscribing to "Maryland." 

If YOU are like the fellow pictured above, tear out this ad and coupon 
and send it in. You can use the coupon for renewals too. Make your overall 
alumni contribution with $3.00 of it going for "Maryland" magazine. 

Please pass this message along to non-subscribers 



CUT IT OUT NOW!" $ 




MM 



'>:<: secretary, alumni associ 

:♦&: university op Maryland, college park, md. 

Enclosed herewith is $ my contribution to the 

Alumni Fund. $3.00 of this amount is for a subscription to "MARYLAND" 
for one year. 



As the second half opened nobody 
but Kessler or O'Brien scored for 
Maryland until about 10 minutes 
elapsed and the Terrapins had built 
their advantage to 51-42. 

Varsity 75; Alumni 61 

Maryland's basketball team failed to 
take the alumni seriously before the 
varsity finally won, 75-61. 

The game proved that Bozey Berger, 
Maryland's first Ail-American, became 
the first player to have played competi- 
tive basketball in all three of Mary- 
land's gyms. 

He played in old gym-armory, in 
Ritchie Coliseum and in the new field- 
house. Berger scored two field goals, 
too, so he has scored in all three gyms. 

The Alumni had a pretty good ball 
club, with most of the players in pretty 
good condition, and led, 35-34, at half- 
time. Bob Everett, Bob Dilworth, Dave 
Webster, Morris Levin and Lee Braw- 
ley clicked as a unit and scored 53 of 
the points. 

Bob O'Brien hit for 25 for the var- 
sity, making nine out of 14 shots and 
seven out of eight from the free-throw 
line. Bob Kessler and John Sand- 
bower added 14 and 12 points and were 
the top men off the back-boards. 



RIFLE 



Wins International 

I aryland's rifle coach 
Lieutenant Arthur 
Cook, 1948 Olympic 
world small bore cham- 
pion and repeatedly na- 
tional champion, added 
to his shooting laurels 
at Camp Perry, Ohio 
by taking the .22 calibre international 
free style match, scoring 1,147 out of 
a possible 1,200. 



1956 WRESTLING SCHEDULE 




December — 

10 — Virginia 

January — 

8 — Wake Forest 
18 — Penn State 

February — 

5 — Navy 
12 — V.M.I. 
18 — Duke 

19 — North Carolina 
25 — N. C. State 



Home 8 :00 P.M. 

Home 3 :00 P.M. 
Away 7:30 P.M. 



Away 4 :00 P.M. 
Home 6 :00 P.M. 
Away 8 :00 P.M. 
Away 8:»0 P.M. 
Home 8 :00 P.M. 



80 



Young wife to ardent soldier husband 
running toward her in the station: 
"Please, George, count up to ten — Ethel 
Smith's husband broke three of her 
ribs !" 

Maryland 




visit our complete 
modern showroom 

. . . for modern plumbing and heating supplies. 
We offer the finest selection, best quality . . . 

• plumbing & heating supplies 

• pipes • valves 

• fittings 

plumbing and heating specifications 
available for architects, builders. 



JAMES A. >II SSII5 CO. 



office and 1 206 K Street, N.W. 

showroom Washington, D. C. 

warehouses 4th & Channing Streets, N.E. 

1206-8 K Street, N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 

branch 8216 Georgia Avenue 

Silver Spring, Maryland 

branch lo80 ciough Street 

Baltimore, Maryland 




R. D. WATSON, President 

CLASS 1917 



■ 



AIR 



www 

AND 



cu 

01 

w 

s a 

«S • 3 

s* c n, 

-Q +» 3 
■H P (I 
-J < CJ 




« A" 



*** f\ 



■Z^Bf- # 



s . *■ * 






A SECTION OF 
THE "OLD" CAMPUS 



i?i ih 


»« 




ftt 


^■■HM* * 




/ J K 




HMP 


• 


! 


'" t 


4* 

1 


nUk^ 






1 


41 * 


- - 








-^P3l^flkfiitf t ' 



W»w 



University, o$ Maryland cAlumni Publicati 






VOL XXVII, NO. 

copy 



WASH I NGTON'S NEWEST, MOST MODERN HOTEL 




HOTEL DUPONT PLAZA 

COMPLETELY AIR CONDITIONED 

Meeting and Banquet Facilities 

DUPONT CIRCLE WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Alvin L. Aubinoe, Pres. John J. Cost, Gen. Mgr. 



ALVIN-L-AUBINOE-Inc- 



Build 



er 



1515 19th Street, N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Phone: 
HUdson 3-6025 



■a \W*%2ja==* =!S ^ 



Sep' 



1 tem° er 



13: 



W55 



SHI IS 
HINT 

3 Scape Motel 

lis Of 

xessful Advertising 



001166 „ the a^^?^ **• 

Gentled P^f?/^ ***" "" ,. apP reci^ 

adver^^"8 ce for 7 

Th ar*i^ * in 
^ re maVn 

_ truw y our8 ' 



DRYLAND MAGAZINE 



ivertising in MARYLAND Doesn't cost -IT PAYS 



YOUR Advertisement in MARYLAND Magazine Will Bring 



The Same Results 



Maryland 



time 

for a 




Bring about that important change in your 
working climate. See where you fit in this 
list of outstanding career opportunities at 
Fairchild to assist in the engineering of sev- 
eral airplane prototypes now scheduled. 

Aircraft Engineers with supervisory experi- 
ence in one or more of these positions: 

Design Project Engineers 

Design Coordinators 

Design Engineers for Sheet Metal 
Structure, Hydraulic Systems, Landing 
Gears, Control Systems, Equipment 
and Furnishings, Electrical and 
Electronics Installations, Power Plant 
Installations 

Stress Engineers for both Sheet Metal 
Structures and Mechanical Systems 

Weight Control 

Layout Designers and Draftsmen 
Project Coordinators and Administrators 

Investigate the many advantages of working 
at Fairchild, and living in Hagerstown, Mary- 
land—excellent housing, schools, recreational 
facilities . . . close to urban Baltimore and 
Washington. 

Send your resume today to Lou Fahnestock. 
Director of Engineering. 

A Division of Fairchild Engine 
and Airplane Corporation 



. . .WMCM TMt FUTURE IS MEASURED IN LIOHT-VEARS! 

FAIRCHILD* 

A I ft C ft A F T DIVISION • HAGERSTOWN, » A R Y I A N 



Vol. XXVII 



March-April, 1956 



No. 2 




*4ȣ&fa*w 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of 
Maryland, and entered at the Post Office, 
College Park, Md., as second class mail mat- 
ter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 
1879. $3.00 per year — Fifty cents the copy. 



OFFICE OF PUBLICATION 

28 Symons Hall, 

University of Maryland, 

College Park, Md. 

WA. 7-3800, Ext. 249 or 394 



HARVEY L. MILLER, 
Managing Editor 



PATRICIA M. REIHM, 

Assistant Editor 



JOSEPH F. BLAIR, 
Sports Editor 



SALLY L. OGDEN, Advertising Director 

EDITH A. ROSS, Advertising Sales 

HAZEL H. GOFF, Advertising Copy Chief 

— Advertising Offices — 
18 W. 25th Street 2500 Wise. Ave., N.W. 

Baltimore 18, Md. Wnshlngton, D. C. 

(HO 7-9018) (EM 3-2553) 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Officers 

J. Homer Remsberg '18, President 
Frank Block '24, Vice-President 
J Gilbert Prendergnst '33, Vice-President 
David L. Brlgham '38, Exec-Secy. 

General Alumni Council 

AGRICULTURE — Clayton Reynolds '22. 

William Evans '2G, J. Homer Remsberg 

'18 
ARTS & SCIENCES— Virginia Trultt '52, 

Charles Elllnger '37, Ralph G. .Shore '32. 
BUSINESS & PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION— 

Alvln S*. Klein '37, Jobu Dyson 53, Roger 

L. Odette '52. 
DENTAL — Dr. Luwrence W. Blmestefer 34, 

Dr Harry Levin '26, Dr. Gerald Devlin 23. 
EDUCATION — John P. Spelcher '41, William 

Prlgg '53, E. Louise Sudlow '50. 
ENGINEERING — S*. Chester Ward '32, John 

C. Dye '34, Col. O. II. Saunders '10. 
HOME ECONOMICS — Mrs. Robert Chaney 

'42, Miss Irene Knox '34, Mrs. William 

Kr'tcker '31. ,„„ _. . _. 

LAW — J. Gilbert Preadergast 33, Stanford 

I Hoff '34, G. Kenneth Relbllch '29. 
MEDICAL— Albert 10. Goldstein '12, Thurs- 
ton R. Adams '34, Daniel J. Pessagno. 
PHARMACY — Frank Block '24, Frank Black 

'04, Samuel I. Ralchlen '25. 
NURSING — Flora Street '38, Virginia Stack 

Simmons '33, Mary France Dennis '47. 

Alumni Clubs 

BALTIMORE— Frank Block, '24. 
CARROLL COUNTY— Dr. L. L. Leggett, 80. 
CUMBERLAND — Dr. J. Russell Cook 23. 
EASTERN SHORE— Otis Twillly, '21. 
FREDERICK COUNTY— William E. Trail '26. 
"M" CLUB — Sam Sllber, "34. 
NEW ENGLAND— R. A. Cook, '05. 
NEW YORK — Miss Sarah E. Morris, '24. 
PITTSBURGH — Charles Furtney, '37. 
PRINCE GEORGE'S CO.— Ellwood R. Nich- 
olas, '28. 
RICHMOND — Paul Mulllnlx, '36. 
SCHENECTADY — Mrs. Marie Esher, 45. 
TERRAPIN — James W. Stevens, '17. 

Ex-Officio 

Past President — Col. O. H. Saunders, '10 
Past President — Dr. A. E. Goldstein, '12. 
Past President — Dr. A. I. Bell, '19. 
Past President — C. V. Koons, '29. 
Past President— T. T. Speer, '17. 
University President — Dr. Wilson H. Elklns 
Executive Secretary — David L. Brigham, '38. 



Maryland 



L 




THE GENERAL ALUMNI COUNCIL— 1955-56 

1st Row: Paul Mullinix, Miss Virginia Truitt, David L. Brigham, Dr. Frank Block, J. Homer Remsberg, Dr. Wilson H. 
Slkins, Mrs. Mary F. Dennis, Miss Sarah E. Morris, Mrs. William Kricker and Miss Flora M. Streett. 

2nd Row: Dr. Frank Black, Dr. William E. Trail, Dr. G. Kenneth Reiblich, Ellwood R. Nicholas, Dr. L. L. Leggett, Clay- 
on Reynolds, S. Chester Ward, Dr. Harry Levin, Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, and Samuel I. Raichlen. 

3rd Row: Stanford I. Hoff, William Evans, Dr. William H. Triplett, Charles Ellinger, James Stevens, Sam Silber, Ralph 
5hure and C. V. Koons. 



President's Report 

\ Letter To The Governor 
and State General 
Assembly 

n a letter of transmittal addressed 

to the Governor and General Assem- 
ily, University President Wilson H. 
Slkins submitted a report of progress 
nd costs, viz: — 

"It is a pleasure to submit this report 
m the affairs of the University of 
Maryland for the the fiscal year ending 
[une 30, 1955. The report refers 
nainly to financial operations, enroll- 
nents, programs, et cetera, and one 
ould read it and still not know much 
ibout the educational effectiveness of 
he University and the spirit of its 
lersonnel. 

"I can assure you, however, that we 
lave made real progress as an insti- 
ution of higher learning; our teaching 
las improved, research has been broad- 
;ned, and our services throughout the 
state have been extended. Improve- 
nent in the educational effectiveness 
if the whole institution was recog- 
lized last May when we were notified 
hat the Middle States Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools had 
eaffirmed accreditation. 

Increased Salaries 

"The University of Maryland, like 
ither universities, cannot be stronger 
han its faculty. In oi'der to strengthen 
his most important element, we have 
ncreased salaries wherever possible, 
ind we have encouraged the employ- 
nent of new members who possess high 
>ersonal and professional qualifica- 
;ions. We have made it possible for 
he faculty to participate in the formu- 
ation of educational policies by adopt- 
ng a Plan or Organization for the 
Faculty. This I consider to be the 
nost important single development 
since the beginning of my administra- 
;ion. It means that we shall take ad- 
vantage of the vast amount of knowl- 
edge and experience in our whole 



faculty, and it will also mean the im- 
provement of morale which is so im- 
portant to any organization. 

"For much of the improvement which 
has been made we must give full credit 
to an understanding Governor and Gen- 
eral Assembly. You have provided ad- 
ditional facilities, including an adequate 
library at College Park, (now in the 
last stage of planning), and you have 
made possible, through increased ap- 
propriations, marked progress in cer- 
tain areas of the University. I refer 
particularly to the Medical School and 
the University Hospital. 

Much To Be Done 

"There is still much work to be done 
as there is in any growing and dy- 
namic institution. Enrollment is in- 
creasing and this will require addi- 
tional faculty, staff and facilities. The 
people of the State are asking for 
additional services, and while all can- 
not be provided at this time, we shall 
continue to study the extent of the 
services which should be rendered by 
the University, and make recommen- 
dations to you. 

"The University of Maryland is ren- 
dering a service at home and to our 
servicemen abroad of which we can be 
proud. Your leadership and under- 
standing has made this possible." 



Centennial Celebration 

March 6, 1956 will mark the 100th 
anniversary of the issuance of a Chart- 
er to Maryland Agricultural College. 
From this foundation, came the Col- 
lege Park campus and the consolidation 
in 1920 of the professional schools 
which now comprise the total Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 

Launching the joint Centennial Ses- 
quicentennial celebration period will be 
more than 100 extensive exhibits and 
displays prepared by 14 colleges of 
the University, many of the more than 
50 departments of the institution and 
the student body. Exhibits will follow 
a "then" and "now" theme depicting the 
development of the institution and its 
component parts. The Medical School 



founded in 1807 holds the distinction 
of being the oldest of the many schools. 
Founded in 1807 it serves as the basis 
for the Sesquicentennial portion of the 
commemorative period. 

Exhibit Headquarters will be the 
mammoth Activities Building on the 
College Park Campus. The show will 
commence on March 3 and will con- 
tinue through March 6. Doors will 
open at 2:00 p.m. each afternoon and 
will close at 9:00 p.m. 

No charge will be made for the show 
which will be open to the public. Mr. 
Amos Meyer of the College of Agri- 
culture is directing the exhibition. 

A luncheon commemorating the 
founding of Maryland Agricultural 
College is planned for March 6. Other 
events during the four days include an 
evening session and tour on March 3, 
for alumni of the Prince George Coun- 
ty and D. C. area; and an open house 
for Business and Public Administra- 
tion alumni from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. on 
Sunday, March 4, 1956. 



Record Budget 

The University of Maryland asked 
State Legislature to approve a budget 
of $20,665,856 for the next fiscal year. 

This would be $1,832,171 more than 
the university's current budget. 

The State would be expected to ap- 
propriate only about 60 per cent of 
the budget, however. The rest comes 
from fees and Federal contributions. 

It breaks down this way: State ap- 
propriation, $12,598,707; special funds 
(mostly student fees and tuition, 
$7,311,709, and Federal contributions, 
$755,440. 

Part of the increase the university 
is requesting in the budget Gov. Mc- 
Keldin presented to the Legislature 
would go for 316 new positions, includ- 
ing 68 new faculty members at College 
Park. 

Among the new positions asked is 
that of civilian dean for the College of 
Military Science "to assure administra- 
tive continuity." 



Maryland 



3 



Most of a recommended $259,718 in- 
crease in agricultural services would go 
for the State's portion of the cost of 
a cooperative program of mosquito 
control. Initially this project will be 
concentrated in Worcester, Anne Arun- 
del and Calvert Counties. 

The University of Maryland also fig- 
ures prominently in the capital im- 
provements budget the Governor pre- 
sented. This includes $1,596,840 in 
building projects for the university. 
Last year's Legislature gave the uni- 
versity funds for a new library at Col- 
lege Park. 

The capital budget also asks $200,000 
in additional funds for a new admin- 
istration building in College Park, 
$70,000 to plan a new College of Busi- 
ness building, and $40,000 to equip the 
new journalism building now being con- 
structed at College Park. 



Addresses Women's Club 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, president of 
the University of Maryland, spoke on 
"What Does the State University Owe 
the Taxpayer?" at a meeting of the 
Baltimore Section, National Council of 
Jewish Women. 

Mrs. John B. Ramsay, Jr., former 
president of the League of Women Vot- 
ers, acted as moderator for the panel, 
made of the following high school stu- 
dents who interrogated Dr. Elkins on 
his subject: 

Caroline McDermott, Eastern High 
School, Linda Cohen, Forest Park High 
School; Carl Hickey, City College; and 
George Isaacs, Park School. 



Social Security 

The University's Faculty Assembly 
asked Gov. Theodore R. McKeldin to 
provide funds in his 1956-1957 budget 
to bring members of the teachers re- 
tirement system under the Social Se- 
curity System. 

The Board of Regents indorsed the 
request. The motion also asked that 
participation be retroactive to January, 
1955. 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, president of 
the University, presided at the meeting, 
the first under the new faculty organi- 
zation. 



To Orange Bowl 

Mr. B. Herbert Brown, member of 
the University of Maryland Board of 
Regents, was designated by Governor 
Theodore R. McKeldin, as official rep- 
sentative of the 
I State of Maryland 
to the Orange Bowl 
Game b etween 
Maryland and Okla- 
homa. In a letter to 
Mr. Brown, Gover- 
nor McKeldin stated 
- that official duties 
^^1^- ^|| m Annapolis would 
p/% ^k I prevent him from 
■ ^^ ML I attending the game. 
Mr. Brown, who 
Mr. Brown j s Chairman of the 

Athletic Committee of the University's 
Board of Regents, represented Gov- 




ernor McKeldin at two other Bowl 
games in which the University of 
Maryland participated. They were the 
Sugar Bowl in New Orleans on Janu- 
ary 1, 1952 and the Orange Bowl on 
January 1, 1954. 



Dr. Cotterman Elected 




Dean Cotterman 



Dr. Harold F. Cot- 
terman, Dean of 
the University of 
Maryland Faculty, 
has been elected to 
the Presidency of 
the Maryland Asso- 
ciation for Higher 
Education. 

The secretary- 
treasurer is Lavinia 
C. Wenger, College 
of Notre Dame of 
Maryland, Balti- 
more. 



To Honor Dean Stamp 

The women alumnae of the Univer- 
sity and many men as well, are plan- 
ning to pay tribute to the Dean of 
Women, Miss Adele Stamp, at a special 
recognition dinner in her honor on 
Tuesday, May 8th, 
7:00 PM at the Uni- 
versity Dining Hall. 

Everyone is in- 
vited! The annual 
May Day celebration j 
will be held that j 
afternoon, followed | 
by Mortar Board ' 
"tapping" and in- 
stallation. Plan to I 
come for the whole 
day! 

Send dinner reser- 
vation checks, $2.50 
per person, to the Adele Stamp Dinner 
Committee, c/o Alumni Office, Univer- 
sity of Maryland, College Park, Mary- 
land. Contact either Nellie Buckey or 
Betty Amos Bull regarding other de- 
tails of the Recognition Fund or pro- 
gram. They may be addressed in care 
of the Alumni Office. 




Dean Stamp 



Addresses Bankers 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, president of 
the University of Maryland, was the 
principal speaker at the annual ban- 
quet of the Baltimore Chapter, Ameri- 
can Institute of Banking. 

Dr. Elkins' subject was "Recogni- 
tion of Education by Management." 

Approximately 800 bankers attended 
the banquet, which was presided over 
by B. Carter Randall, of the Equitable 
Trust Company, president of the chap- 
ter. 

Among the guests at the speakers' 
table were Governor McKeldin, Mayor 
D'Alesandro, William H. Kirkwood, Jr., 
bank commissioner of Maryland; Jos- 
eph N. Shumate, president, Maryland 
Bankers Association; Robert G. Mer- 
rick, president, Equitable Trust Com- 
pany; W. Bladen Lowndes, president, 
Fidelity-Baltimore National Bank and 
Trust Company; Alfred E. Cross, presi- 



dent, Metropolitan Savings Bank; Sam- 
uel P. Cassen, president, Towson Na- 
tional Bank, and William B. Elliott, 
secretary, Maryland Bankers Associa- 
tion. 

At the special guests' table were 
Edward C. Travers, president, Wilm- 
ington A.I.B. chapter; Marshal C. Tyn- 
dall, associate councilman, A.I.B. ; Olen 
F. Thompson, Washington chapter; 
Charles M. Hollis, president, Sussex 
County chapter; R. David Conner, pres- 
ident, Philadelphia chapter; Coleman 
McGehee, president, Richmond chapter, 
and Hezzie Brown, Jr., president, Nor- 
folk-Portsmouth chapter. 



Seek New Dorms 

The Board of Regents authorized its 
building committee to sponsor a Gen- 
eral Assembly bill providing for con- 
struction of dormitories through sale 
of self-liquidating bonds. 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, university 
president, said he is in favor of hav- 
ing the State finance the construction, 
but expressed doubt that this could be 
accomplished under the $10,000,000 
capital improvement ceiling to which 
the Planning Commission has been ad- 
hering in recent years. 

The board agreed with him and left 
it up to the building committee to in- 
vestigate the possibility of outright 
State financing as opposed to the self- 
liquidating plan. 

It also expressed itself as being 
strongly in favor of making every pos- 
sible attempt to have State credit used 
to back up any self-liquidating bonds 
authorized. It was explained that this 
would reduce the interest rate ma- 
terially. 

Some board members objected to the 
self-liquidating plan on the grounds 
that: 

1. Similar construction at State 
teachers colleges is financed by 
the State. 

2. If for any reason the dormitories 
were not filled during the liqui- 
dating term the university would 
be faced with a difficult financial 
problem. 

Dr. Elkins said, though, that stu- 
dents will have to be turned away next 
year because of a lack of dormitories. 
He added that until some indication is 
given as to how the university is ex- 
pected to meet this problem, no firm 
and intelligent plans can be made. 






Dr. Cory Reappointed 

Governor Theodore R. McKeldin has 
re-appointed Dr. Ernest N. Cory, State 
Entomologist, Head of the University's 
Department of Entomology, and As- 
sistant Director of Extension Service 
to the State's Department of Research 
and Education for a period of five years 
from June 1, 1955. 

The Governor wrote: "It gave me 
great pleasure to reappoint you, be- 
cause I recognize the valuable service 
you already have rendered to the State 
and its people and I am confident that 
you will continue your unselfish devo- 
tion to the public interest." 

Maryland 






Higher Scholastic Standards 

President Elkins Speaks At Baltimore Panel 




Pres. Elkins 



Higher scholastic standards are ex- 
pected to be instituted at the Uni- 
?rsity of Maryland sometime during 
le next academic year. 
Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, president of 
le University, said the school "will 
robably raise academic requirements 
for students in at- 
tendance" in the lat- 
ter part of 1956. 

The plan, he said, 
under study by a 
faculty committee, 
will permit mainten- 
ance of the State 
University program 
"in a first-class man- 
ner," while continu- 
ing relaxed admis- 
sion practices. 

At the same time, 
he told the Balti- 
lore section of the National Council 
f Jewish Women, instruction at the 
Jniversity must be geared up to meet 
n improved educational climate. 
In an address and panel discussion 
e urged that students, once admitted, 
we it to the taxpayers to compensate 
or State-supported training by "work- 
rig hard." 

"We should insure that the individual 
fho stays at the University is one who 
fill contribute to the society which has 
elped supply the means for his edu- 
ation," he declared. 

In order to protect the investment 
f Maryland taxpayers in their State 
Jniversity, emphasis will be placed 
m higher standards after admission 
nstead of tightening up entrance re- 
tirements, Dr. Elkins indicated. 
Answers Panel Questions 
We still have the function to pro- 
vide the opportunity for higher educa- 
ion to the high-school graduates of 
his State, he maintained. 

Following his talk, Dr. Elkins an- 
swered questions posed by a panel of 
our high-school honor seniors. 

Linda Cohen of Forest Park High 
school asked what effect the $500,000,- 
)00 Ford Foundation grant to private 
:olleges had on Maryland. 

In response, Dr. Elkins said that 
Princeton University, for example, de- 
moted its entire grant to increase sal- 
aries. "If we are to maintain our staff 
t will be absolutely necessary for 
Maryland to increase salaries in some- 
what the same manner." 

Need For Baltimore Program 
Dr. Elkins mentioned that the Uni- 
versity would not consider advancing 
an instructor to assistant professor 
without a doctorate or is equivalent. 
"To keep this caliber of faculty," he 
stressed, "our salaries must be greater 
than others are willing to offer." 

Salary increases are in the province 
of the Legislature, he noted. 

In answer to Carl Hickey, of City 
College, who asked whether there 
should be a Baltimore City branch of 
the University of Maryland, Dr. Elkins 



said "there is considerable need for a 
junior college program in Baltimore." 
He added, however, that additional 
study is necessary to determine who 
should operate the system, the Uni- 
versity or the City. 

Mrs. John B. Ramsay, vice-president 
of the Urban League, was moderator. 

To a question directed from the floor 
Dr. Elkins said the University athletic 
program would never detract from the 
academic curriculum. 

He said athletic grants to out-of- 
State students come from sources that 
would not ordinarily be available to 
Maryland high-school graduates. 



Student 'Screen' 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, president of 
the University of Maryland, said that 
the University now faces the problem 
of whether to admit Maryland high 
school graduates on a selective basis 
as opposed to the current policy of ac- 
cepting all applicants. 

Based on the assumption that Uni- 
versity enrollment will continue to in- 
crease at its present pace, Dr. Elkins 
envisioned a possible "screening ex- 
periment" in the near future to sep- 
arate deserving applicants from stu- 
dents with poorer academic records. 

He predicted an increase of 100% 
over the current enrollment of 10,000 
undergraduates, within the next fifteen 
years. 

The educator also said that academic 
requirements at the College Park cam- 
pus are "probably too low now and 
will probably have to be raised." 

Dr. Elkins feels that Maryland will 
have to continue to charge students 
for a part of the total cost of their 
education. 

In his opinion, this would help keep 
out "window-shoppers" who merely 
spend a year or so on the campus and 
then depart without fulfilling diploma 
requirements. 

Dr. Elkins said he favored the re- 
tention of awarding scholarships, but 
limiting them to "worthy people who 
will give value received." 

Under current conditions, the Uni- 
versity of Maryland automatically ac- 
cepts all high school graduates in the 
State who have achieved a "C" average 
or better. 

Those lacking this qualification are 
required to take an entrance examina- 
tion, and the students who pass this 
test then are accepted for admission 
without qualification. 

If they fail this exam, the university 
advises against their enrolling for 
study. However, existing policy allows 
them to be admitted on a trial basis, 
wherein they have to pay a "guidance 
fee." 

Dr. Elkins said that students having 
the capacity are certainly entitled to 
an education but they should perform 
satisfactorily, be able to graduate, and 



afterward make a definite contribution 
to society. 

The university president said he and 
his colleagues must find a way to give 
young persons a chance to develop their 
potential. 

"We might well judge initiative, en- 
ergy, ambition, and ability in select- 
ing students for admission," he said. 

Dr. Elkins said that the University 
is a land-grant college, and serves as 
the official Department of Agriculture 
for the State. 



$2,000,000 Bequest 

Glenn L. Martin Leaves 
Additional Funds To 
University. 

Glenn L. Martin, airplane manu- 
facturer, former member of the 
University's Board of Regents, be- 
queathed $2,000,000 to the University 
for aeronautical research and a total 
of $1,625,000 additional to a number 
of educational, religious and sporting 
institutions. 

$100,000 was left to the University 
Hospital. 

Executed September 1 

The sum left to the University of 
Maryland is to be added to the Minta 
Martin Aeronautical Research Foun- 
dation and is "to be used for general 
purposes of said fund." Mr. Martin's 
will was executed last September 1. 

The plane maker left $250,000 to the 
Institute of the Aeronautical Sciences, 
of New York City, to be added to the 
Minta Martin Aeronautical Students 
Fund. 

A third bequest of $75,000 went to 
Washington College, Chestertown, Md., 
to be added to the Minta Martin Fund. 

The testator left a total of $119,500 
in bequests to individuals, including 
$50,000 trust for the benefit of a sis- 
ter, Miss Delia Martin, of Monterey 
Sanitarium, South San Gabriel, Cal. 

Funds remaining in the trust will 
go, at her death, to the University of 
Maryland. 

Mr. Martin directed that the residue 
of the estate be distributed under 
Maryland law as if he had died with- 
out leaving a will. 

Legal Technicalities 

Mr. Martin left securities valued 
airplane builder left securities valued 
at $14,293,688.50, a partial inventory of 
his estate showed. 

Major item in the inventory filed in 
Baltimore Orphans' Court consisted of 
281,604 and 15/20 shares of the Glenn 
L. Martin Co., valued at $9,339,891.82. 

The inventory included appraisals of 
stocks and bonds, but no real estate, 
other properties or cash. 

Major Stockholdings 

Major stockholdings included 1600 
shares of E. I. duPont de Nemours, 
valued at $362,666; 3500 shares of 
Minneapolis-H o n e y w e 1 1 Regulator, 
$208,177; 2941 shares of Warren Petro- 
leum Corp., $191,042; 3060 shares of 



Maryland 




THE MEDICAL SCHOOL BUILDING 
An old wood cut of Maryland's original Medical School Building, the oldest in the United States from which 
classes have been graduated continously since the buildings erection. 






Also $453,905 worth of State of 
Maryland bonds, $197,500 worth of 
Baltimore City bonds, $101,725 in 
University of Maryland bonds and 
$105,291 in railroad bonds. 

Mr. Martin's will left charitable gifts 
totaling $3,625,000, more than half of 
which went to Maryland University. 
His only survivor, a sister, Miss Delia 
Martin of South San Gabriel, Calif., 
received a $50,000 trust fund. 

Judge William P. Cole, Jr., chairman 
of the University's Board of Regents, 
reported that papers relative to be- 
quests to the university from the late 
Glenn L. Martin had been tui'ned over 
to the attorney general. 

He explained that legal technicalities 
had arisen when four cousins of Mr. 
Martin put in claims for a share in 
the estate and when a request was 
received to begin immediate payments 
to Mr. Martin's sister from a $50,000 
trust fund, the residue from which is 
to go to the university. 



their regular weekly luncheon. 

The program chairman was Parker 
Sheppard. Charles Ensor is club presi- 
dent. 



To Europe 



On Superconductivity 

Dr. B. T. Matthias, of the Bell Tele- 
phone Laboratories, spoke at the Uni- 
versity on "Recent Experimental De- 
velopments in Superconductivity", and 
Dr. Harold Lewis, also of the Bell 
Telephone Laboratories, spoke on "Re- 
cent Theoretical Developments in 
Superconductivity". 



Terpolosophy 



To Commission 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins has been named 
to the Commission on Pre-Professional 
Education by the Association of Amer- 
ican Colleges. 

Arthur G. Coons, president of the 
Association, announced the appoint- 
ment during the Association's forty- 
second annual meeting in St. Louis. 




Dr. Elkins, Speaker 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, president of 
the University of Maryland, addressed 
the Exchange Club of Baltimore at 



modern "pioneer is 
the mother who 
manages to get through 
a stormy Saturday with 
the television set out of 
order ... 7/ Adam came 
to earth again the only 
thing he would recognize 
would be the jokes . . . 
A good healthy damn is 
better than a continuous 
. Nothing improves a per- 
son's driving as much as having a traf- 
fic cop right behind . . . Archaeologists 
dig up many things that no one knew 
were lost . . . Friendship, business, de- 
mocracy, hash — all depend upon man's 
faith in his fellowmen . . . Give some 
people an inch and they get the idea 
they are a ruler . . . One horse shoe is 
good luck — but a truck load is junk. 



sometimes 
grumble 



Dr. Elkins secured the approval of 
the Board of Regents to have Governor 
McKeldin accompany him to the gradu- 
ation exercises at the university's Heid- 
elberg, Germany, school, and on a tour 
of all European establishments where 
the university is engaged in teaching. 

It was emphasized that no State 
funds will be used for this purpose, 
since the extension schools are on a 
self-supporting basis. 

Exchange Ideas 

Associated Women Students repre- 
sentatives from eight area colleges met 
at the University to exchange ideas on 
their part in campus government schol- 
arship, culture, and social programs. 

The guest speaker was Mrs. Irma 
Renney from the American Federation 
of Women's Clubs, speaking on "How 
college women can be effective in the 
community." She said, "College women 
should learn how to get the idea be- 
hind things to be of value in securing 
world peace and security." 

Three panel discussions concerned 
the functions of AWS, social, legis- 
lative and judicial, and academic. 

Pat Callahan, vice-president of AWS, 
said after the conference, "We think it 
was a big success, because we feel in- 
terest in AWS is spreading." 

****** 
FIRE PREVENTION 

"And it is commanded them that they 
should not hurt the grass of the earth, 
neither any green thing, neither any 
tree; . . ." — Revelation 9:4. 



Maryland 



Technicians To Study Polar Rays 

Grant Of $111,000 Is Made For Research At Poles 



By %leUo«. Wallace 

(The BatUmore Sun) 

The University of Maryland has re- 
ceived Federal grants of more than 
$111,000 to conduct studies of cosmic 
rays in the Arctic and Antarctic. 

This work, requiring about two years, 
will be launched as part of the Inter- 
national Geophysical Year, a project 
in whidh scientists are using the entire 
world as a laboratory to investigate 
various phenomena of the universe. 

While Maryland is making its ob- 
servations at the poles, other scientific 
groups will be investigating cosmic 
rays elsewhere. The findings of all will 
be co-ordinated. 

To Design Instruments 

It is the hope that these students 
will increase man's knowledge of the 
atom, the primary cosmic rays are 
streams of electrically charged parti- 
cles, most of which are protons, the 
kind of particles that form the nucleus 
of the hydrogen atom. 

It could be that the findings will aid 
in building better cyclotrons. 

Instruments for the University of 
Maryland's polar studies will be de- 
signed and made by staff and students 
of the department of physics, under the 
direction of Dr. S. F. Singer, professor 
of physics. Dr. John S. Toll is head of 
the department. 

The department will consist of Gei- 
ger counters arranged in such ways as 
to provide the most sensitive areas for 
the detection of cosmic rays, Dr. Sing- 
er explains. 

Part of this equipment will be used 
on the ground, and smaller instru- 
ments will be used in trial balloon 
flights. 

The University's assignment will be 
to keep a continuous record of the in- 
tensity of cosmic rays under changing 
conditions of the sun and the earth's 
magnetic field. 

Cosmic rays bombard the earth all 
the time, and they come from every 
direction. Their existence has been 
known for half a century, but many 
important facts about them still puz- 
zle science. The biggest question is: 
Where do they originate? Apparently 
they come from outer space, but do 
they start from the sun? From stars? 
From some process taking plade in 
space ? 

Cosmic rays of high energy reach 
the earth at all points, but when rays 
of low energy enter the earth's mag- 
netic field — that is, when they come 
within the range of the earth's mag- 
netic influence — they are deflected from 
central regions and chiefly come in 
near the magnetic poles. 

To Check Origin Theory 

The cosmic rays that are principally 
affected by changing conditions of the 
sun are the rays of low energy. There- 
fore the University of Maryland's read- 



ing at the poles may prove of especial 
value in checking the theory that some 
of the cosmic rays originate at the sun. 

There is strong evidence that the sun 
acts as a giant cyclotron — that it ac- 
celerates nuclear particles until they 
attain the energy level of cosmic rays. 

Studies of cosmic rays have contrib- 
uted most of the basic knowledge about 
various kinds of high-energy particles 
and have aided greatly in man's un- 
derstanding of nuclear forces. 

The earth's magnetic field originates 
at the core of the earth and extends 
outward into space. Changes in the 
magnetic field are produced by electri- 
cal currents flowing above the at- 
mosphere. 

To Be Ready By Summer 

Those currents are especially strong 
around the poles. The changes they 
produce in the magnetic field affect 
cosmic rays. 

In the University of Maryland's 
project, equipment will be sent up in 
trial balloons to secure a record of the 
cosmic rays when electrical currents 
produce storms in the earth's magnetic 
field. 

All the University's equipment is ex- 
pected to be ready by summer. The in- 
struments that are going to the South 
Pole will be sent via the Navy to Ad- 
miral Byrd's expedition. 

During the two years that the studies 
are expected to take, technicians sent 
by the university will man the equip- 
ment at each pole. 



In "Who's Who" 

Thirty outstanding students have 
been selected to represent the Univer- 
sity in the annual "Who's Who in 
American Colleges and Universities." 

Those who appear in "Who's Who" 
have been chosen on the basis of out- 
standing service to the University. Con- 
sideration was also given those who 
have gained recognition for the Uni- 
versity in off-campus activities. 

In making the selections a student 
committee drewup a list of 30 names, 
while a faculty group compiled their 
own list. 

The thirty students selected are as 
follows: 

Bruce Berlage, Herbert Brubaker, 
Jerome Carroll, Barbara Dodd, Car- 
men Ebandjieff, Paul Eckel, Rheda 
Greenberg, Anna Mae Jacquette, Dale 
Jarvis, and Wendell Johnson. 

Also included are: Anna Karavan- 
gelos, Patricia Killingsworth, Paul 
Lambrides, Thomas Lescallett, Rhea 
Mermelstein, Audrey Nicoloudis, Vin- 
cent Palumbo, Judith Peterson, Gab- 
riel Phillips, and David Rudow. 

Others named to the list are: Thom- 
as Shipley, David Singleton, Sandra 
Sowder, Beverly Stubbs, Jules Suss- 
man, William D. Walker, Charles Wick- 
ard, Charles Wicker, Dorothy Williams, 
and Cecilia Woods. 



Be a MEAT EXPERT! 
Always say 



ZSSKAV 

HQUALITYflT 



All-Meat Franks 

Every ounce of the pure beef and 
pork in Esskay's all-meat Franks 
is carefully selected by Esskay's 
experts, who season and spice 
these famous franks to wholesome, 
flavorful perfection. Be sure to 
ask for Esskay Franks — they're 
the finest made! 

WM. SCHLUDERBERO— T. J. KURDLE CO. 



uiicomico counrv FRtun 

BUREAU C0-0PERRTIUE 

INC. 

Feed • fertilizer 

Seed 

Farm Supplies 

917 W. ISABELLA STREET 
Salisbury, Md. • Phone 46S1 





RRTCRRFT ELECTRIC 
SUPPLY CO. of IHD. 

Wholesale Distributors of 

Electrical Supplies and 

Appliances 

# Phen« SALISBURY 61 SI SALISBURY, MO, 



THE 

FEDERALSBURG MILLING CO. 

manufacturers and distributors of 

B.B.L. FEEDS 

grain processors and brokers 
FEDERALSBURG, MD. L. B. MAUN, Mgr. 



' » 

Salisbury Mi 

Incorpora 
FLOUR 
TABLE MEAL 
PURINA & 
ECONOMY FEEDS 


King Co. 

ted 

SALISBURY, 
MARYLAND 




ENRICHED BREAD 

IT'S DELICIOUS 

SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



Maryland 



Lafayette Stopped Here 




TWO EARLY SHOTS" OF ROSSBOROUGH INN 

Erected in 1798, the oldest building on the Campus. Lafayette, Washington, and practically all colonial leaders 
stopped here. This was the first stop on the Old Post Road, Alexandria to Philadelphia, New York and Boston and, 
later, from Washington to Baltimore. 

Rossborough was the first building on the campus of the second agricultural college in the Western Hemisphere, 
established in 1856, and was the home of the first Agricultural Experiment Station to be established in the United 
States in 1888. When the old building was remodeled in 1938, huge white letters painted on the ends of the building 
proclaimed it as the "Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station." 

"My Son John Went Out to Ross's to Meet General Lafayette," wrote John Quincy Adams, President of the United 
States. 

Before Restoration 




ROSSBOROUGH INN 
In the days when it served as the first Agricultural Experiment Station in the United States. 



Lecture In India 

Prof. Lawrence E. Payne, associate 
research professor in the University 
of Maryland's Institute for Fluid Dy- 
namics and Applied Mathematics, ac- 
cepted an invitation from the organiz- 
ing secretary for the First Indian Con- 
gress on Theoretical and Applied Me- 
chanics to deliver one of the addresses 
at this congress. 

The meeting was held in Kharagpur, 
India, the week of November 1. 



String Trios 

A program of string trios was pre- 
sented by the Washington Chamber 
Music Society at the University of 
Maryland Student Union League. 

Musicians of the society included 
Allen Olmes, violin; Louise Payler, 
viola; and Jerome Jelinek, cello. 

The program was sponsored by the 
University's Department of Music and 
consisted of Beethoven, op. 9, no. 3; 
Hindemith, op. 34; and Dohanyi, op. 10. 



At Victorville, Cal. 

Jim Brasher, former Maryland foot- 
ball center, is now head football coach 
at Victor Valley High School, Victor- 
ville, California. 

Mrs. Brasher, the former Mary Sea- 
lock, Arts and Sciences graduate, is 
teaching third grade in Apple Valley, 
California. 

Little Linda Brasher is reported 
"growing like mad." 



8 



Maryland 



CdiloricilL 



HARVEY I- MILLER 

Editor 



100% American 

The fact that the University of Mary- 
land sponsors one of America's larg- 
est Air Force ROTC units is quite in 
keeping with both the practical and 
poetic traditions of the Old Line State. 

It is part of the policy of the Uni- 
versity to maintain its position in the 
forefront of modern development in all 
lines of study without surrendering 
reverence for the history of the State 
as one of the thirteen original colonies. 

Thus, required instruction in Ameri- 
can Civilization occupies its place in 
the curriculum along with instruction 
in the latest developments in Air Sci- 
ence and Tactics. There is scant op- 
portunity for mixed metaphors in re- 
ferring to the University's stand on 
Americanism for the University is 
truly "as American as Maryland." 

The University's Memorial Chapel is 
dedicated to the hundreds of former 
Maryland students who gave their lives 
in their country's services. The list of 
these honored dead includes the names 
of some of Maryland's most brilliant 
students as well as some of the Uni- 
versity's greatest athletes, their names 
associated, down through the corridor 
of years, with such scenes of action as 
Belleau Wood, Soissons, Bataan's Death 
March, the flak-studded skies over Ber- 
lin, the Burma Road, and Korea's Inch- 
on. 

Such "last full measures of devo- 
tion" are quite in keeping with the 
early colonial incident which won for 
Maryland troops the accolade "The 
Old Liners." During the Battle of 
Long Island the Continental troops 
were being sorely pressed by the en- 
emy. The left and right flanks were 
being driven back and the command 
was given to drop back and establish 
a new line. 

However, Colonel Smallwood, com- 
manding a Maryland outfit, noting that 
the center of the line did not recede, 
exclaimed, "See, the old line holds!" 

The flanks fought back to abreast 
of the Maryland position and from that 
time on Colonial troops of the various 
states referred to the Marylanders as 
"The Old Liners." 

Action at sea showed Marylanders 
keeping pace with Old Line soldiers. 
The British referred to Baltimore har- 
bor as the "Hornet's Nest" and Fort 
McHenry withstood bombardment as 
a Marylander wrote our National An- 
them. 

That the Old Line still holds, true 
to the old traditions but in ultra mod- 
ern style, is evinced by Maryland's 
Air Force ROTC, a part of the Air 
University, which, when it assumed 
responsibility for the AFROTC pro- 
gram in 1952, initiated a vigorous pro- 



jQVG Dy If lUll • People in 48 States and 29 
Foreign Countries maintain growing 
savings accounts in this big, strong, insured savings 
institution. Liberal dividends, compounded semi-annually. 




PERPETUAL 

1 BUILDING ASSOCIATION 



MAIN OFFICE: 11th AND E STREETS. N. W. 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 

ASSETS MORE THAN $200,000,000 



'Perpetual's Army of Savers Exfend Clear Around ihe World. 




McNeill Surveys, Inc. 

LAND PLANNING AND SUBDIVISION 
6480 SLIGO MILL ROAD 

TAKOMA PARK, MO, 
Telephone: JUnlper 9-7508 



sinGER seuuinG mncHine co. 



8670 Colesville Rd. 

SILVER SPRING, MD. 

JU 9-8844 



• WE SPECIALIZE IN RENTALS 



HANNES FORMAL WEAR 



TUXEDOS & FORMALS 
JUniper 9-0505 
PARKING FACILITIES 



"First in Silver Spring" 

8229 GEORGIA AVE. 
SILVER SPRING, MD. 
Diagonally across from Suburban Trust Co.j 



Maryland 



ft*S«SS8«3SSSS8S8SSSSSSSSSS5=& 



Cavern ^Jable \Jverlooh 
r 9 



fe) 



f^iclureinue {^.ounlmside 



■ta*TF£ 



OJney Inn 



"OLD PLANTATION RECIPES" 

LUNCHEON - DINNER 
COCKTAILS 

NOON to 9:30 P.M. DAILY 
(Closed Mondays) 

ACCOMMODATIONS FOR BRIDGE PARTIES, 
WEDDINGS, BANQUETS, CLUB MEETINGS 

ON STATE ROUTE 97 
OLNEY, MARYLAND 

- — Ample Parking Space — 
PHONE Whitehall 6-5757 

Gbrtiuidb Allison Rubwbter, Owner 



MARYLAND INN 




In HISTORIC ANNAPOLIS, MD. 

lKlh CENTURY HOSTELRY with 

20th CENTURY COMFORTS 

Air Conditioned 

Rooms and Apartments 

CHURCH CIRCLE & MAIN STREET 

COIonial 3-2641 



FRANK WELSH 

and his 

ORCHESTRA 

"FINEST MUSIC FOR 
ALL OCCASIONS" 

707 HIGHWOOD DRIVE 
Baltimore 12, Md. 

ID. 5-8736 

Former Maryland Student 



FIRST 



IN FUEL OIL AND 
BURNER SERVICE 

C. HOFFBERGER CO. 

MONUMENT and FORREST STRUTS 
Phono MU 3-8400 ■alllmara, Md 



gram to break down the time honored 
barriers that specialists should and 
could be turned out of the AFROTC 
program, who required little indoctri- 
nation when they went into active 
military service. 



History 



In 1807, seven years before Francis 
Scott Key wrote "The Star-Spangled 
Banner" at Fort McHenry, the Univer- 
sity of Maryland was founded in Bal- 
timore as the college of Medicine, the 
Nation's fifth medical school. 

In 1856, a group of Maryland people 
prevailed upon the General Assembly 
of Maryland "to establish and endow an 
agricultural college in the State of 
Maryland." Thus the second institution, 
first called the Maryland Agricultural 
College, came into being at College 
Park. 

In 1862, the Congress of the United 
States passed the Land Grant Act and, 
by action of the Legislature, the Mary- 
land Agricultural College became the 
Land Grant College of the State. In 
1916, the Maryland Agricultural Col- 
lege became Maryland State College 
and in 1920, the property of the Old 
University of Maryland of Baltimore 
was given to the Maryland State Col- 
lege and the two institutions became 
the present University of Maryland. 

The University flies the Maryland 
State flag, the oldest flag in America, 
authorized in 1632 by Charles I when 
he established Maryland colony under 
Caecilius Calvert, Baron of Baltimore. 

The University's seal is similarly 
based upon the State seal, the oldest 
in the United States. 

Travelers of the Baltimore-Washing- 
ton Boulevard recall a sparsely dotted 
hill west of the highway and a piti- 
fully small stadium and field house to 
the east. These, with a few out-moded 
professional buildings at Baltimore, 
constituted the bulk of the University's 
physical plant and were adequate for 
its 2,500 students. 

Today more graduates are awarded 
diplomas annually than double the en- 
tire student bodies of both Baltimore 
and College Park schools before con- 
solidation was effected. 

The University is proud of one of the 
finest physical plants in the field of 
higher education, offering a solidly 
planned curriculum centered in the 
various under-graduate colleges at Col- 
lege Park and the professional schools 
in Baltimore. 



Poison Ivy 

Editorial in the Diwmondback 

Appropriate for comment is an Ivy 
League college feature appearing 
in the Holiday magazine. 

This is the article in which Henry 
Morton Robinson (Columbia '23) labels 
Ivy League graduates "naturally su- 
perior" to less fortunate students from 
other schools, and charges the "edu- 
cational rabbit-warrens known as state 
universities" with trying to "demo- 
cratize" the B.A. degree by bringing 
it down to the level of a "vaccination 
certificate." 



We're sure the vaccinated Maryland 
alumni will have a certain feeling of 
security — just as one vaccinated has a 
feeling of security in the midst of dis- 
ease. They need not fear coming down 
with snobitis or narrowmindjitis or 
feudalitis. They realize that the vacci- 
nation is a modern discovery which has 
been of immeasurable benefit to man- 
kind. 

State universities should not be 
ashamed of the '01, '23, or for that 
matter '55 stamped on their vaccina- 
tion certificates. And at no time 
should we regret giving opportunity 
to the many rather than the few! 

The University of Maryland has had 
its ups and downs, but the words of 
commencement speaker Paul McNutt 
are as timely now as they were in 
1941: 

"I see no overstuffed Gothic, rearing 
false buttresses to imitate a tradition 
that never belonged to Maryland. I 
see crisp Georgian . . . 

"I see no moss-festooned, gnarley 
and age-weary trees, dustily darkening 
your walks. I see a rolling sun- 
drenched campus, trees standing 
straight to the sky . . . And scarred 
earth that tells of a university still 
in the process of growing. 

"No ivy-darkened cloisters shield 
your college from the road. The tran- 
sient world that travels U. S. Route 1 
can look at you . . . And you can 
(look at) the transient world . . . 

"Your buildings rise, not to com- 
memorate, but to serve. Your univer- 
sity exists to contribute to knowledge, 
the welfare and the opportunity of 
your state and nation." 

This is no poison ivy-entangled con- 
centration camp. 

Thank heavens this campus has 
grown so much there's no room for 
cloisters. 



Sez Testudinette: 




u 



\p in Maryland's 
northwest cor- 
ner, television is still 
a novelty. Fact is, 
some folks up yon- 
der are still waiting 
for something good 
on radio . . . This is 
cute. Mother is away 
on a vacation, won- 
dering if her young- 
sters were missing 
her. Then she re- 
ceived a letter from 
her youngest daugh- 
ter. "Dear Muzzy — Since you went 
away this is the biggest house in the 
world . . . Money values these days 
rate a dime as a good screw driver, 
while "In God we Trust" appears on 
coins for the benefit of durned fools 
who use 'em as fuses ... A fellow so 
smart that he can tell you how to run 
your business and too dumb to start 
one of his own is called an "Efficiency 
Expert." 



JO 



Maryland 



To Pi Sigma Alpha 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins will be initiated 
into Pi Sigma Alpha, political science 
honorary, as an honorary member. 

Also to be initiated with Dr. Elkins 
are William Neal, Priscilla Pilgrim, 
Robert Lynch, Steve Oberg, William 
Graves, John Tucker and Wendell 
Wheatley. 

New graduate candidates are: Roy 
C. Allen, Allison A. Conrad, Charles 
C. Fishburne, Annie V. Gardner, Ernest 
B. Glynn, Norbert J. Krieg, John Lovett, 
Evarice C. Mire, Jr., Regina U. Wex- 
ler and Edward H. Wynn. 

Pi Sigma Alpha is a national honor- 
ary political science fraternity and its 
membership is extended to students 
who have completed ten semester hours 
of work in the field of political science. 
Additionally, the students must have 
maintained a "B" average or higher in 
their academic work. 



Faculty Senate 

The University's Faculty Senate 
voted overwhelmingly to invite four 
student representatives to its future 
meetings. 

The Student Government Association, 
Associated Women Students, and Men's 
League at College Park, as well as the 
Baltimore SGA, were each allotted a 
non-voting delegate to sit in on all 
but executive sessions of the Senate. 



Music Lauded 

Wrote Paul Hume, Washington Post, 
Times-Herald:: 

"There are other things on the cam- 
pus of the University of Maryland be- 
sides the biggest time football. Music 
for instance. 

"The University's Student Union 
Lounge housed a top-notch concert by 
some of the finest wind players in this 
part of the country. Drawn from sev- 
eral of the service bands, they worked 
out under knowledgeable direction of 
John Gosling, conductor of the Pro 
Arte Society. 

"For all its specializing, Maryland 
is a liberal arts institution, and in the 
history of education in past centuries, 
music has been considered, not only 
one of the arts, but ranked with phi- 
losophy as one of the essentials for 
the well-educated man. 

"Those in attendance at Maryland 
ought to give the matter more thought. 
This was a first-class concert. It was 
free, and it had been well announced. 
The audience should have been larger. 

"Many times I am told by men and 
women who have been through college, 
'I wish I had had some chance to hear 
some music while I was in school. I 
feel as if I did not know anything 
about it.' Well, listening to music is 
one of the best ways to become well 
acquainted with it. 

"For all the easy informality of the 
occasion, the performances were ex- 
pert. A Divertimento for band by Vin- 
cent Persichetti brought out some of 
the most skilled and entertaining use 
of colors and textures of brass and 
woodwinds of any composer writing 
for the combination. 

Maryland 



"The 1st Suite of Gustav Hoist is a 
bit dated, but its open Britishisms are 
easily enjoyed. As for the set of Old 
American Dances by Robert Russell 
Bennett, they are in the best "Okla- 
homa!" vein, by the top Broadway 
arranger today. 

"It is about five or six years since 
Paul Hindemith led the Army Band in 
his own Symphony for Band. Since 
then, the music has grown on us. It 
is a high example of the art of music 
written with a specialist's knowledge 
of the techniques and capabilities of 
the winds. The players and Conductor 
Gosling deserve great commendation 
for including it and so well done on 
their program. And all free yet!" 

NEWS OF 

ALUMNI CLUBS 

Baltimore 

Plans are being readied by the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Alumni Club of 
Baltimore for the annual Board of 
Regents' luncheon, at which the Balti- 
more Club plays host to the governing 
body of the University. 

This year's luncheon is scheduled to 
be held Friday, February 24th, at the 
Southern Hotel, and promises to be the 
highlight of the winter meetings of 
the club. 

Judge William P. Cole, Chairman of 
the Board, will be the principal speaker. 
Dr. Wilson Homer Elkins, president 
of the University, and members of the 
Board have been asked to talk on 
activities that are in progress which 
are of interest to the Baltimore group. 

Dr. Frank Block is the president of 
the Baltimore Club. His Program Com- 
mittee is headed by Dr. Frank Selma 
and Dr. Samuel A. Goldstein who are 
being assisted by Dr. B. Olive Cole, 
Chester W. Tawney, William J. Huck- 
soll, Frances Jannerson, Sam L. Sil- 
ber, Beatrice Jarrett, Dr. William Trip- 
lett, Dr. Eugene Pessagno, G. Kenneth 
Reiblich, Charles Ellinger, Ethel Troy, 
Seymour Ruff, and Sally Ogden. 
New York Club 

John Warhol, Jr., has been elected 
President of the University's Club of 
Greater New York. He is a graduate of 
both the College of Arts and Sciences 
in 1935 and the Law School in 1937. 
Other offices were filled by Miss Sarah 
E. Morris '24, Home Ec, Vice-Presi- 
dent; Eileen Bonner, who received a 
Master's degree in Education in 1954, 
Secretary; and Marshall H. Howard 
'24, Engineering, Treasurer. At the 
time of the last meeting which was 
attended by Alumni President, J. Hom- 
er Remsberg, over 50 members had 
sent in dues and future meetings were 
in the planning stage. 



Phi Kappa Phi 

Phi Kappa Phi, national senior 
scholastic honorary, elected 75 mem- 
bers from the top 10 per cent of the 
senior class of the University of Mary- 
land, College Park, Maryland. 

Among the 75 students elected were, 



from the College of Arts & Sciences: 
Shirley Read, Beverly Dobrovolny, 
Frances M. Schoenberg, Franklyn R. 
Hayden, Bill A. Courtney, John J. 
Brehm, Jr., James C. Simms, Barbara 
L. Fiock, Carol L. Funk, Patricia Wat- 
kins, William A. Neal, Elizabeth J. 
Brown, Patricia J. Garner, Priscilla V. 
Pilgrim, Anne R. Wiederhold, William 
B. Zeleny, Louis Isaacson, Michael D. 
Kudlick, Elaine R. Coover, Geraldine 
S. Tate, Patricia A. Anderson, Jerry 
W. Canning, Donald C. Davis, Dolores 
M. Gambino, Ellis G. MacLeod, Lyla 
Norris Erb, Josephine S. Shipley, Lar- 
ry G. DeShazer, Anne Cronin, Philip 
Handwerger, Rheda Greenberg, Rhea 
Mermelstein, Laurie Sollish, and Shir- 
ley Politzer. 

From the College of Business and 
Public Administration: John Cherrix, 
Richard G. Petzold, James Pickett, 
John W. Wagner, Jr., and Charles E. 
Wickard. 

From the College of Education: 
Anita R. Wilson, Ann F. Russell, Paul 
G. Imhoff, John R. Merkel, and Leon- 
ard Goldinger. 

From the College of Engineering: 
Stanley D. Fishman, Jules P. Sussman, 
James R. Gouge, Jr., Gerald E. Fried- 
man, David F. Murray, Juri Kork, Phil- 
ip K. Mondon, David Carpenter, Mar- 
tin M. Burdick, and Frank A. Fialkow- 
ski, Jr. 

From the College of Home Econom- 
ics: Barbara A. Dodd, Maretta J. Long, 
Barbara E. Baker, Ann M. Rothenhoef- 
er, and Dorothy Williams. 

From the College of Military Sci- 
ence: Ellis Anderson, H. A. Crosby, 
James Peightel, Lawrence Conques, 
Roy Meachum, David Morgan, and Al- 
fred Collins. 

From the College of Physical Educa- 
tion: Suzanne L. Karstens. 

From the College of Agriculture: 
James C. Smith and Elmer L. Cooper. 

From the School of Pharmacy: How- 
ard R. Schiff and I. William Grossman. 



College of 



Special & Continuation 

Studies 



224,000 Miles 

Mr. Lucian W. Kemper, a former 
German citizen who later became 
an American GI in Germany, obtained 
his U.S. citizenship and traveled nearly 
a quarter of a million miles to attend 
University of Maryland classes in the 
Overseas Program. 

He is looking forward to taking grad- 
uate work in either Business or His- 
tory on the University's campus at 
College Park, Md. His course last 
summer was Office Management. 

Kempner is stationed in Berlin as 
a civilian employe of the Army. The 
courses needed to complete his degree 
requirements are available in Frank- 
furt. 

For months he has taken advantage 
of the American airlift between Frank- 
furt and Berlin by grabbing plane pas- 
sage on a "space available" basis. Be- 
ll 



ing assigned to duty in Berlin, his job 
actually requires that he shuttle back 
and forth between the German capital 
and Frankfurt. 

Two years later he escaped and was 
able to join his father in Nurnberg in 
1946. He emigrated to this country, 
signed up as a GI and, the following 
year, returned in that khakied capacity 
to Germany. He finally obtained U.S. 
citizenship by being assigned as one 
of an honor guard for American dead 
being returned to the United States. 

In 1950, once more back in Germany, 
he was discharged from the Army and 
took on his civilian job with the Army 
in Frankfurt. At that time he enrolled 
in the University's Overseas Program. 



Cotlmg* of 



Education 



Graduate Music 

The University's new graduate pro- 
gram in the Department of music 
and the College of Education, repre- 
sents an expansion of graduate music 
training. 

With the exceptions of New York 
and a limited amount of work in North 
Carolina, this degree is not available 
in any school between Boston and Tal- 
lahassee. The training is necessary not 
only for advanced work in music, but 
is required for music supervisors in 
the State of Maryland. 

The graduate work in music educa- 
tion will lead to the degree of Master 
o f Education o r 
^_ Master of Arts. 
Qualified students 
may take sequences 
of courses in the 
College of Educa- 
W& fe tion and the Depart- 
fV ment of Music in the 
:^BB|* « fields of education, 
^^M **~~ ^ administration and 
^ supervision, vocal 
' Br ^k I music, instrumental 
JP I music, and music lit- 
erature and theory 
Prof. Ulrich as partg of a broad 

program. 
The requirements for the degree of 
Master of Education include thirty se- 
mester hours in specified groups of 
courses in Education, Music Education, 
and Music or a related field. 

The requirements for the degree of 
Master of Arts include at least twenty- 
four semester hours of course work 
in those groups, and the writing of a 
thesis for which a maximum of six 
semester hours of credit may be 
granted. 

Before registering for graduate 
work, the student will take an exam- 
ination administered by the Music Ed- 
ucation graduate faculty, designed to 
guide him in his selection of courses, 
and related to his area of undergrad- 
uate specialization. 



The program is designed to meet the 
needs of teachers in service as well 
as resident students. The basic courses 
which are listed below will be offered 
late afternoons, evenings or Satur- 
days. Those courses and many others 
will also be available in the summer 
season. 

According to Professor Homer Ul- 
rich, head of the Department of Music, 
in the next five years there will be a 
100% deficiency in the State of Mary- 
land for music teachers. 

The courses include String Teaching 
in the Public Schools, Research Meth- 
ods in Music and Music Education, Ad- 
ministration and Supervision of Music, 
Current Trends in Music Education, 
Seminar in Vocal Music in Elementary 
Schools, Choral Conducting and Reper- 
toire, Seminar in Vocal Music in Sec- 
ondary Schools, The Teaching of Music 
Appreciation, Seminar in Instrumental 
Music, and Seminar in Advanced Or- 
chestration and Band Arranging. 

The interesting thing about the pro- 
gram is that the university's Depart- 
ment of Music has expanded since 
January 1954 under the direction of 
Professor Homer Ulrich from five 
faculty members to twelve. 

The faculty: — Professor Homer Ul- 
rich; music history and literature, head 
of the department; Professor Rose 
Marie Grentzer; music education, grad- 
uate advisor; Professor B. Harlan Ran- 
dall; voice and opera literature; Asso- 
ciate Professor Fague K. Springmann; 
voice, director of the Chapel Choir and 
Men's Glee Club; Assistant Professor 
Hubert Henderson; brass instruments, 
music education, co-director of the uni- 
versity bands; Assistant Professor H. 
Bryce Jordan; music history, theory, 
director of the university orchestra; 
Instructor Glenn Carow; piano and or- 
gan; Instructor Fred H. Denker; piano 
and theory; Instructor Charles A. Has- 
lup ; piano, theory and music education ; 
Instructor Mary F. Kemble; music ed- 
ucation, undergraduate advisor; In- 
structor Charlton Meyer; piano, organ 
and theory; Instructor Louise C. Pay- 
ler; music theory, string instruments, 
and director of the Women's Chorus. 

From Egypt 
Dr. Salah El Din Tewfik who re- 
ceived his Masters degree from Mary- 
land in 1947 has returned to Washing- 
ton as Director of the Egyptian Educa- 
tion Bureau for the Egyptian Ministry 
of Education. He says, "My graduate 
days at the University of Maryland 
are always pleasant recollections and 
our joy in seeing so many of our old 
friends and acquaintances of the 'good 
old days' is indeed gratifying to Mrs. 
Tewfik and me." 

The new Director has offices at the 
Egyptian Embassy and lives in Silver 
Spring. He taught in secondary schools 
in Egypt, was an instructor and as- 
sistant at the College of Agriculture, 
Alexandria University, Egypt and is 
now on leave from this institution to 
assume duties which also include Chief 
Agricultural advisor to the Liberation 
(Tahreer) Province Authority. There 



are two children in the family, Magda 
and Naira. 

To Real Estate Board 

Williard E. Beers, '37, was recent- 
ly elected President of the Montgom- 
ery County Real Estate Board. A resi- 
dent of Silver Spring, and an out- 
standing track man who held the broad 
jump record at the University and 
was a Southern Conference champion, 
Mr. Beers is a member of the Ameri- 
can Institute of Real Estate Apprais- 
ers, National Institute Brokers and the 
Board of Governors of the Maryland 
Real Estate Association. 



College of 



Physical Education 
Recreation & Health 



Recreation 

Recreation and conditioning facilities 
are available for male faculty and 
administrative members in the Student 
Activities building. 

Faculty members are invited to 
engage in basketball, volleyball, bad- 
minton, weight lifting, tennis, and 
gymnastics on Tuesday and Thursday 
mornings at 11. 

According to Dr. Lester M. Fraley, 
dean of the College of Physical Educa- 
tion, Recreation and Health, "These 
play periods are designed to provide 
activities in which the participants 
can release pent-up energy." 

Separate shower and locker facilities 
are located adjacent to the pool. 

The facilities of the new men's 
swimming pool are also available for 
faculty use. Additional hours will be 
reserved for the faculty recreation 
providing there is sufficient interest. 
"Spectatoritis" 
Americans eat too much, exercise too 
little and are rapidly becoming "soft- 
ies," according to Dr. Warren Johnson, 
Dr. Burris Husman, Dr. Benjamin Mas- 
sey and Boxing Coach Frank Cronin 
of the university's athletic department. 
Stating that "too many Americans 
sit on the sidelines instead of partici- 
pating in some sport," the four men 
suggested that "spectatoritis victims 
get out of the grand- 
stands and on the 
playing fields." 

Dr. Johnson, prov- 
ing the point that 
Americans don't ex- 
ercise enough stat- 
ed: 

"Autopsies on Kor- 
ean and American 
soldiers showed a 
much greater accu- 
mulation of fats in 
blood vessels and 
around the hearts of 
American boys than the Koreans." 
He added: 

"In Europe, families plan bicycle 
trips on a week end or go for a hike. 
Here, it's a matter of going to sit and 
watch a football or baseball game or 




Dr. Johnson 



12 



Maryland 



New Wings 




FLYING TERRAPINS 

Left to right: Clarence D. Gaddy, Jr., Robert E. Engle, Chas. W. Hohman, Richard E. Cox, Chas. R. Eveland, Clark S. 
Fitzhugh, Jr., and Richard R. Rollins. 

The seven AFROTC graduates of the University of Maryland take time out for a "picture after making the final inspection 
on a B-25 type aircraft in which they took their basic multi-engine pilot training at Reese Air Force Base, Texas. 

All received their commission in October 1954 after completing AFROTC work at Maryland. (Air Force Photo) 



taking the family for a ride in an 
automobile." 

Dr. Burris Husman explained: 
"A study by Kans Kraus, a recog- 
nized authority on physical fitness, 
shows that European children are more 
fit than American ones. 

"What is happening here is that 
children don't use their muscles enough. 
Television is a favorite means of 
recreation. 

"Instead of releasing their pent-up 
energy in games and sports, they sit 
before a TV screen for three or four 
hours. Children should be exposed to 
a variety of physical skills in elemen- 
tary school rather than learning them 
in college." 

Dr. Massey pointed out, "It's not 

only a matter of exercise, but proper 

diet and rest that 

bring about bodily 

efficiency." 

Mr. Cronin added: 
"Periodic exercise 
should be a part of 
living. People in 
their late 30's and in 
the 40's and 50's 
B / ^\ . should exercise sys- 

j tematically." 

"Activities like 
bowling, golf, bad- 
m i n t o n, tennis, 
swimming, shuffle- 
board and table ten- 
nis are recommend- 
ed. 
"The purpose of exercise is to aid a 
person physically and psychologically 
in regular doses." 

He pointed out: "It's good to exer- 
cise 15 minutes a day. Calisthenics are 
fine but walking to the nearby grocery 
store or mailbox will substitute in- 
stead of driving the car. 

"The important thing is to exercise 
systematically and not to limit one's 
recreation to sitting on a soft sofa 
watching a late TV show." 
University of Florida. 

Maryland 



College of 



Arts and Sciences 



— Lois Eld Ernest 




Coach Cronin 



Handicap 
// A graduate student is handicapped 

j\ when married," states Dr. Rob- 
ert Hoffsommer, head of the sociology 
department. 

"This is not true for all," he adds, 
"but grades do suffer when a student 
is striving for a higher degree and 
trying to maintain a wife and family 
when the GI benefits have run out." 

Continuing, he said: 

"Most fellows have a terrible time 
getting their masters and doctors de- 
grees. Instead of studying full-time, 
they're trying to work and squeeze in 
studying at the same time." 

For undergraduates, Dr. Hoffsommer 
favors marriage. He points out that 
marriage tends to make a student more 
stable, serious and sincere when strug- 
gling for that first degree. 

"After four years, though," said Dr. 
Hoffsommer, "the money stops coming 
in from the Government, and the mar- 
ried student, in most cases has acquired 
a family by then. 

"He decides to go into graduate work 
and when the going gets rough, shift- 
ing between work and study, he com- 
plains to the faculty that they don't 
realize he has a family to look after." 

Reflecting on the dilemma, Dr. Hoff- 
sommer, said: 

"I don't know the answer. I wish I 
did. But if a student wants a degree 
to mean something, he has to work for 
it, or the diploma is worthless." 

At Florida 

Dr. S. Fred Singer, associate profes- 
sor of physics at the University of 
Maryland, presented two scientific 
papers at a meeting of the Interna- 
tional Scientific Radio Union at the 




Dr. Pelczar 



Dr. Singer's papers were entitled 
"Rockair: A New Method For Upper 
Atmosphere Research" and "Experi- 
ment on the Day Airglow." 

Elected President 
Dr. Michael J. Pelczar, professor in 
the University of Maryland's Depart- 
ment of Bacteriol- 
ogy, has been elect- 
ed president of the 
Washington Branch 
of the Society of 
Bacteriologists. 

The Society of 
Bacteriologists holds 
six meetings a year. 
Each meeting con- 
sists of scientific 
papers given by aca- 
demic, government- 
al and industrial in- 
vestigators working in bacteriology lab- 
oratories in the Washington area. 
Social Psychology 
A day long psychology program en- 
titled "New Horizons in Social Psy- 
chology" was presented at the Uni- 
versity. 

Sponsored jointly by the psychology 
departments of the University of Mary- 
land and Catholic University of Amer- 
ica, and the Veterans Administration, 
the meeting consisted of presentations 
of scientific papers, small group meet- 
ings and a general session. 

Dr. Thomas Andrews, professor and 
head of the University of Maryland's 
Department of Psychology, was chair- 
man of the program. 

Scientific papers were presented by 
Dr. H. Max Hourchens, chief, consult- 
ing psychology, Veterans Administra- 
tion, Central Office; Dr. Peter Hof- 
staetter, associate progressor, Depart- 
ment of Psychology and Psychiatry, 
at Catholic University; Dr. Marian 
Radke-Yarrow, social psychologist, 
Laboratory of Social Environmental 
Studies, National Institute of Mental 
Health. 

13 



Wins Award 

Assistant Professor Herman Maril of 
the Department of Art received a 
painting award at the tenth Annual 
Area Exhibition of the Corcoran Gal- 
lery of Art. 

His work entitled "Midnight Snack," 
was selected by Karl Knaths, ,the judge 
of the painting division. Also his 
casein painting "Deserted Beach" was 
purchased for the permanent collection 
of the Corcoran Gallery. 

"If you ever get to Europe," advised 
Dr. William T. Avery, head of the 
new Department of Classical Lan- 
guages and Literature, "don't miss 
Pompeii and Herculaneum. It's like 
entering another world; you can real- 
ly get the feeling of the past." 

Dr. Avery's statement that "There 
has been a rebirth of interest in the 
United States in matters having to do 
with classical antiquity" was supported 
by the comparatively large turn-out at 
a student-faculty coffee hour. "The 
Destruction of Pompeii and Hercu- 
leaneum by the Eruption of Mount 
Vesuvius in A.D. 79" was the subject 
he discussed. 

He opened by vividly describing the 
catastrophe as it was told by an eye- 
witness and recorded by a Roman his- 
torian. 

Pompeii and Herculeaneum and their 
inhabitants were buried by ash, peb- 
bles, and mud which were by-products 
of the volcanic eruption. In the hard- 
ened core of this mud was found a 
hollow area. Here perfect men, women, 
dogs and chickens have been preserved 
in precisely the attitudes in which they 
were trapped 2000 years ago. 

The amphitheatre, a stadium for 
gladitorial combat," Dr. Avery con- 
tinued, "has been remarkably well- 
preserved." He elaborated on a specific 
occasion when, during a gladitorial 
combat, the people of Pompeii became 
so incensed that they massacred the 
people who were visiting the amphi- 
theatre from a neighboring town. The 
Emperor Nero subsequently ordered 
the combats cease for the next 10 
years. 

Faculty Notes 

Professor Ferdinand G. Brickwedde 
and Mr. Olin S. Lutes, Physics Depart- 
ment, delivered papers before the Na- 
tional Science Foundation Conference 
on low temperature physics at Louisi- 
ana State University. 

Mary L. Andrews, English Depart- 
ment, spoke at a meeting of the Twen- 
tieth Century Club in Washington on 
"Some Poetry in the Old Testament." 

Dr. Robert A. Littleford and Dr. J. 
Frances Allen, Zoology Department, 
were guests of the Chesapeake Bay 
Seafood Packers Association at the 
Carvel Hall Hotel in Annapolis. Dr. 
Littleford, in charge of the Seafood 
Processing Laboratory at Crisfield, de- 
livered the address. 

Professor G. S. S. Ludford, Institute 
for Fluid Dynamics and Applied 
Mathematics, has been invited to de- 
liver a paper on "Integral Operators 
in the theory of compressible fluids," 
before the Mathematics Colloquium at 
Michigan State University. 




Col. Wharton 



Polymer Tempera 

Certain to revolutionize the art world 
is a new medium — polymer tempera — 
which is being used at the University 
of Maryland this year for the first 
time. 

It is a plastic derivative which is 
milky-white in appearance and paint- 
ings done in it will look as if freshly 
painted for 1,000 
years or more, ac- 
cording to Col. 
James P. Wharton, 
head of the univer- 
sity's art depart- 
ment. 

Some of polymer 
tempera's miracle 
qualities are these: 

1. It is unaffected 
by light, heat or 
weather and.will not 
crack, yellow or 
darken with age. 

2. It is nonoxidizing, permanent, 
unaffected by mold bacteria, milk al- 
kalis, acid or petroleum solvents. 

3. It is noninflammable and non- 
toxic. 

4. It is rapid drying but can be 
slowed down to achieve painting of 
water color and oil effects. 

5. Polymer tempera paintings are 
insoluble in water and can be cleaned 
with a damp cloth. 

6. It can be used in sculpture as 
well as in painting. The weight of 
sculptures in polymer tempera are re- 
duced by one half. 

7. It may be modeled, cast, sawed, 
chiseled or additionally modeled at any 
stage. 

8. It can be sanded, polished or 
glazed. 

Besides its use in painting and sculp- 
ture, with the most permanent quali- 
ties ever found in any art medium, 
polymer tempera can be used to simu- 
late stain glass. 

In Florida 

Colonel Wharton, who went to the 
chemist's studio in Florida to learn 
about the amazing qualties of polymer 
tempera and its many uses, said: 

"This new medium which very few 
people know about lends itself to the 
most creative arts. 

"If the masters had used it, their 
paintings would be the same today as 
when they applied the last stroke to a 
canvas." 

Polymer tempera's versatility in 
achieving a water color or oil painting 
effect was displayed last summer when 
one of Colonel Wharton's pupils, Hilde- 
garde Iskraut, captured first prize in 
the National Water Color Show in 
Washington's National Museum. 

Colon Wharton laughed as he said: 

"The judges didn't know that the 
water color was done with polymer 
tempera. They just gave the painting 
first prize and then asked what it 
was." 

Another of Colonel Wharton's stu- 
dents, George Bayliss, has been ex- 
tremely successful in this new medium. 
One of his paintings was purchased 
by the Corcoran School of Art in Wash- 
ington. 



Polymer tempera, which looks and 
smells like cream, is manufactured by 
the chemist-inventor in Massachusetts 
and comes in gallon jugs. 

"It costs the same as a decanter of 
whisky," said Colonel Wharton, "but 
it lasts much longer and it's more fun." 
Joins USIA Staff 

William J. Handley, (A&S '42), of 
Tompkinsville, Md., has been appointed 
chief of the U.S. Information Agency's 
Near East Policy Staff in Washington. 

He has been associated with Near 
East affairs since 1944, and recently 
returned to the United States after 
four years in New Delhi, India, where 
he was the Information Agency's dep- 
uty country public affairs officer. 

In his new post, Mr. Handley will 
supei-vise policy matters pertaining to 
countries in the Near East, South Asia 
and Africa. Before joining the U.S. 
overseas information program in 1951 
he served with the State Department, 
first as labor attache for the Near 
East, from 1944 to 1949, then as labor 
advisor to the Assistant Secretary of 
State for Near Eastern Affairs. From 
1945 to 1948, he was stationed in Cairo, 
Egypt. 

Mr. Handley entered government 
service with the War Production Board 
in 1942, and a year later joined the 
Foreign Economic Administration. He 
was born of American parents in Dutch 
Guiana, and graduated from the Uni- 
versity of Maryland in 1942. Before his 
government service he was employed 
as an announcer and script writer by 
a radio station in Georgetown, British 
Guiana. 

The Mentally III 

Dr. Norman R. Roth, assistant pro- 
fessor of sociology, served as chair- 
man of a panel discussion on the sub- 
ject "Problems of the Mentally 111: 
Meeting the Problem on the County 
Level," presented by the Mental Health 
Study Center of Prince George's Coun- 
ty and held at the Center. 

Panel members participating with 
Dr. Roth included Rev. Alfred W. 
Burns, St. Matthew's Parish, Pinkney 
Memorial Episcopal Church; Dr. Nor- 
man D. Comeau, Prince George's Coun- 
ty Medical Society; Miss Virginia Fon- 
taine, Director, Prince George's County 
Welfare Board; and Miss Marian Lob- 
dell, Supervisor, Pupil Personnel De- 
partment, Prince George's County 
Board of Education. 

To Guggenheim Memorial 

Dr. Raymond D. Doetsch, associate 
professor of bacteriology, has been ap- 
pointed a Fellow of the John Simon 
Guggenheim Memorial Foundation for 
1956. 

He will work principally at the 
Rowett Research Institute at Bucks- 
burn, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, with 
Dr. A. E. Oxford, internationally known 
scholar in the field of rumen micro- 
biology. Rumen microbiology is the 
study of microbes and their activity in 
the complex reactions produced by 
micro organisms in such animals as 
cows and goats. 

The Bacteriology Department has 
been carrying on a rumen research 
project for the past six years in co- 



U 



Maryland 



Department. During the period it has 
become a center in the field for in- 
vestigators of industry, universities 
and colleges and governmental agen- 
cies. 

Dr. Doetsch is one of two Fellows 
appointed by Guggenheim Foundation 
in tbe field of bacteriology out of a 
total of 288 Fellows in all fields. 

The Maryland professor has partici- 
pated in the joint authorship of four 
textbooks and has written over fifty 
scientific papers. He has been a mem- 
ber of the faculty since 1945 and holds 
degrees from the University of Illi- 
nois and Indiana University. 

In addition to working at the world 
famous Rowett Institute where he will 
collaborate with Dr. Oxford, Dr. 
Doetsch will consult with investigators 
at the Universities of Cambridge, Shef- 
field and Reading. 

At N. O. L. 
Dr. R. D. Myers, Physics Department, 
gave a talk at the Naval Ordnance Lab- 
oratory on the subject "Extensions of 
Lindhard Theory of Stopping of Elec- 
trons by an Electron Gas". 
In New York 
Dr. S. Fred Singer, Physics Depart- 
ment, attended a meeting of the Amer- 
ican Astronautical Society, Inc., in New 
York. Dr. Singer was the speaker at 
the banquet. His topic was "Economic 
Aspects of the Unmanned Satellite Ve- 
hicle". 

At Virginia Beach 
Dr. J. Frances Allen and Dr. Gordon 
M. Ramn, Department of Zoology, at- 
tended the annual meeting of the At- 
lantic States Marine Fisheries Com- 
mission at Virginia Beach. A report, 
"The Gonads of the Striped Bass in 
Chesapeake Bay", prepared by Dr. 
Allen and Dr. Robert A. Littleford, 
also of the Zoology Department, was 
presented. Dr. Allen and Dr. Littleford 
attended the meetings of the Atlantic 
Estuarine Research Society in Anna- 
polis. 

In New York 
The following members of the Phy- 
sics Department presented papers at 
the Annual Meeting of the American 
Physical Society in New York City: Mr. 
Jack Dixon, Dr. Richard Ferrell, Mr. 
Archer Futch, Mr. David Goldman, Mr. 
John Quinn, Dr. Frank Grant, Dr. John 
Toll, Dr. William Visscher, Mr. John 
Warren, and Mr. David Wong. 
Marjorie Gates 
One of the busiest students on cam- 
pus is Marjorie Gates of Annapolis. 

Holder of a Food Fair Foundation 
scholarship, Marjorie, in addition to 
being a whirlwind in extra-curricular 
activities, has an academic average of 
3.3 of a possible 4.0. 

The scholarship holder is a sopho- 
more in the university's College of 
Arts and Sciences, majoring in For- 
eign Service. 

Among her many activities she holds 
an associate editorship of Maryland's 
student magazine "The Old Line"; and 
a vice-presidency of Alpha Lambda 
Delta, freshman honorary. 

The attractive brunette can be found 
Saturday afternoons during the foot- 
ball season twirling a baton as one 
of the majorettes with the university's 

Maryland 



big Red and White, 100-member, Band. 
A member of Alpha Omicron Pi so- 
rority, she was recently elected as a 
junior representative to the Panhellenic 
Council, an organization made up of 
representatives of campus sororities. 
Traditionally, the position entitles the 
holder to be senior president of the 
organization the following year. 

Besides holding a part-time job as a 
receptionist in St. Mary's Hall, her 
campus residence, Marjorie manages 
to get eight hours sleep a night. This 
semester she was elected secretary of 
her dormitory organization. 

As for marriage, Marjorie states: 
"I'm definitely a career woman, how- 
ever, I do like to date." 

The Maryland sophomore, whose 
hobby is dancing, is a graduate of 
Annapolis High School, where she was 
editor of the high school newspaper 
"Tally Ho." 

Through Europe 
To a large percentage of any col- 
lege campus, the world probably re- 
mains as flat and empty as it was once 
commonly believed to be. But to Gerry 
Rolph, an instructor in the University's 
Foreign Languages Department, it has 
assumed the same life and personality 
that our campus has to the rest of us. 
Rolph, whose Swiss motorcycle and 
European-type riding habit are a fa- 
miliar sight on the campus, came to 
Maryland in 1954, received his master's 
degree last spring, and is now reaching 
for his doctorate. 

Like many of us, Rolph can boast 
of having been on Uncle Sam's pay- 
roll. Unlike most of us, however, he 
can add that he wore both Army brown 
and Navy blue. In 1945, when the Nav- 
al Air Force's pilot training program 
collapsed, Rolph, steadfastly refusing 
to keep both feet on the ground joined 
ther army paratroopers and soon after 
was sent to Japan. 

Returned To States 
In 1948 he returned to the states, 
accepted a discharge, and for a year 
docilely attended classes at North- 
western. The summer of 1949, how- 
ever, found Rolph going the opposite 
direction. With a tent, a sleeping bag, 
and an ever stronger pair of legs he 
pedaled through France, Germany, 
Switzerland, and England. The follow- 
ing summer he exchanged his bike for 
a motorcycle, scornfully surveyed the 
tourists going south, and spent the 
summer roughing it through the Scan- 
dinavian countries. 

Rolph journeyed south to Switzer- 
land, where he passed his junior year 
at the University of Zurich, under the 
Maryland junior year abroad program. 
In 1951 he dutifully returned to 
Northwestern to take his bachelor of 
arts degree in history, and in 1954 
travelled to Maryland to study and 
teach simultaneously. 

Plans for another trip had been 
brewing. He completed a huge circle: 
east through northern Italy to Yugo- 
slavia, then through Greece, Turkey, 
Syria, and the Lebanon. In Beirut they 
boarded a boat and enjoyed a six day 
Mediterranean cruise— deck class — to 



Busy Girl 




HERE'S MARJORIE 
One of the busiest young ladies on 
the campus is Marjorie Gates, of An- 
napolis. (See adjacent story.) 



Genoa and then a short cycle ride back 
to Zurich. 

High School Math 

More than 900 freshmen are taking 
high school mathematics at the Uni- 
versity, Dr. Stanley Jackson, head of 
the mathematics department, disclosed 
today. 

Three courses are offered, two of 
which are strictly remedial. The third 
course is solid geometry which Dr. 
Jackson said may not have been in 
the curriculum of some high schools. 

Dr. Jackson said: 

"A total of 25 classes are scheduled 
for the three courses, 20 in definite 
remedial math and five in high school 
solid geometry." 

This statement by Dr. Jackson re- 
sulted from facts released by Dean 
Leon P. Smith, College of Arts and 
Science, and Dean S. S. Steinberg, Col- 
lege of Engineering, stating many high 
school graduates were inadequately 
trained for college work. 

Wins Art Contest 

B. Warren Allin, A&S junior, was 
the University's winner in a Christmas 
painting contest sponsored by the 
Washington Post and Times Herald. 

Allin's painting was chosen from six 
Maryland entries and was reproduced 
in color in the Post. He received $50 
for reproduction rights. 

An honorable mention was awarded 
to Roberta J. Eddleman, another Mary- 
land entrant. Miss Eddleman's paint- 
ing was a late entry and was sent to 
the Post in addition to the five origi- 
nally chosen to represent the Uni- 
versity. 

15 



Egyptian Champ 

A former Egyptian swimming cham- 
pion is still winning prizes in her 
bathing suit, but in a different way. 
Margo Lucey, 
19, a sophomore 
has won three 
of the four 
beauty contests 
she has entered 
this year and 
finished third in 
the other. In 
1950 Margo was 
the backstroke 
champion of 
Egypt and fin- 
ished second in 
It h e country's 
diving competi- 
tion. 

In her first 
pulchritude con- 
test this year, 
Margo finished 
third in the 
Miss Glen Echo 
c o m p e t i- 
tion. Since then, 
she was chosen 
Miss Langley 
Park, Miss 
Drum Point and 
Miss Dominion 
Speedway, be- 
ing selected the 
fairest of them 
all from more 
than 150 shape- 
ly competitors 
in the three 
contests. 

The long- 
stemmed beau- 
ty is as Ameri- 
can as ham and 
eggs, but her 
father was an 
overseas a i r- 
lines navigator. 
That's how she 
came to win 
swimming titles 
in Egypt. 
Miss Lucey "My family 

went abroad in 
1946 and I went with them," she ex- 
plains. "We were in Italy for a while, 
then moved to Cairo. I lived there for 
seven years. 

At Maryland, Margo has resumed 
her swimming and is studying water 
ballet. A fine arts major, she wants 
to be a magazine illustrator or an 
actress. 

Competitions have been a profitable 
sideline for Margo. In the Miss Drum 
Point Beach contest, she won $3,500 in 
prizes, which included trips to Ber- 
muda and New York, a television set 
which she gave to her dormitory, 
an $1,800 lot at the beach, modeling 
and dancing courses, a $300 wardrobe 
and an oil portrait of herself. 

The Dominion Speedway title earned 
Margo another trip to Bermuda. The 
Miss Langley Park crown was worth 
a $100 Savings Bond, a fur coat and 
more than 20 gifts from merchants, 



including a lamp, jewelry, perfume 
and 12 grease jobs for the family car. 
Miss Lucey was crowned queen of the 
D.C. Auto Show after being chosen 
from a group of finalists at the Na- 
tional Guard Armory. She received a 
$50. savings bond. 

With N. O. L. 

Gilbert C. Bowen, who graduated 
from the College of Arts and Sciences 
with a B.S. in chemistry In 1942, has 
been with the Naval Ordnance Labora- 
tory since 1942 and is now Project 
Manager. 

He began at N.O.L. on gun primers 
and then angled arrow projectiles until 
1953. In conjunction with the work on 
projectiles, he also did research on 
rockets. He was then made Chief of 
the Basic Warhead Branch and spent 
two months during 1954 in England in 
connection with the warhead program. 
His permanent title at present is Dep- 
uty Chief of the Missiles Division, and 
he has been acting chief quite frequent- 
ly- 

Mr. Bowen first worked at the Cel- 
anese Corporation, Cumberland, Md. 
He worked there for a year as control 
chemist and also trained new em- 
ployees. In 1943 he went to work for 
George Washington University in their 
Jet Propulsion Research Laboratory. 
In this job he worked part of the time 
at Indianhead, Md., and also at the 
Allegany Ballistics Laboratory in Cum- 
berland. His work was mainly in con- 
nection with mortars, flame throwers, 
and rockets. 

After the war, in December, 1945, 
the program at G. W. U. was turned 
over to the Hercules Powder Company. 
Mr. Bowen then went to the Dugway 
Proving Grounds, near Tooele, Utah, a 
facility of the Army Chemical Corps. 
In June of 1947 he rode his motorcycle 
back to Washington, D. C, to start 
work on his job at N.O.L. 

Wins Wings 
Second Lieutenant Leroy C. Blank- 
enship (A&S, 1954) has completed 
basic multi-engine pilot training at 
Goodfellow Aii- 
Force Base, San An- 
gelo, Texas. He was 
awarded his silver 
pilot wings in cere- 
monies held at 
Goodfellow. 

Lieut. Blankenship 
was graduated with 
the degree of Bache- 
lor of Science in 
Bacteriology from 
the University of 
Maryland. He was 
an active member in 
Delta Tau Delta Fraternity, and re- 
ceived his commission through the Air 
Force ROTC program at Maryland 
University. 

To Board Of Directors 

Dr. S. Fred Singer, Associate Pro- 
fessor, Physics Department, to the 
Board of Directors of the American 
Astronautical Society, Inc. Dr. Singer 
was elected to a three-year term. 

Dr. Singer was guest Dinner Speaker 
at the 2nd Annual Meeting of th& 




Lt. Blankenship 



American Astronautical Society, held 
at the American Museum of Natural 
History in New York. His subject was 
"Economic Aspects of the Unmanned 
Satellite Vehicle". Additionally, Dr. 
Singer's paper, "The MOUSE, A Min- 
imum Orbital Unmanned Satellite of 
the Earth for Astrophysical Research", 
was published in the Fall issue of the 
Journal of ASTRONAUTICS, the 
technical publication of the AAS. 
Honorary Legionaire 

Ralph W. Powers, A. & S., 1928, who 
was a World War II spy chaser — and 
now honorary private in the French 
Foreign Legion — is president of the 
Prince Georges County Chamber of 
Commerce. 

Powers, a member of the Chamber 
of Commerce since he got out of law 
school in 1931, went into Army intel- 
ligence in 1942 after six years in the 
Maryland House of Delegates. 

Starting as a lieutenant, Mr. Powers 
went overseas to North Africa. As 
chief of counter-intelligence in Oran, 
he worked closely with his counter- 
parts in the Foreign Legion. 

When he left Oran Mr. Powers re- 
ceived an official diploma — which hangs 
on his office wall — making him an hon- 
orary private, first class, in the Foreign 
Legion. In 1945 he left the Army — as a 
lieutenant colonel. 

Mr. Powers was president of the 
Chamber of Commerce once before in 
1935-36. But it has been in the last 
several years that the group has active- 
ly encouraged industrial development 
in Prince Georges. 

As chairman of the legislative com- 
mittee, Mr. Powers helped get approval 
for an 11-man industrial development 
committee from county and State offi- 
cials. 

Mr. Powers grew up in Hyattsville. 

In 1936 Mr. Powers, a Democrat, was 
elected to fill an unexpired term in the 
Maryland House of Delegates. He was 
elected again with the Democratic 
slate in 1938 to a four-year term. In 
1941 he was chairman of the Prince 
Georges delegation. 

Mr. Powers was associate general 
counsel for the Maryland-National Cap- 
ital Park and Planning Commission 
from 1952 to 1954. He is now solicitor 
for the city of Greenbelt. 

Mr. Powers has a 150-acre farm or. 
Largo road outside Upper Marlboro 
where he raises tobacco and cattle. He 
also breeds horses. 

Former Chief of Hunt Club 

For several years Mr. Powers was 
president of the Marlboro Hunt Club. 
He was the club's whip at one time but 
has given up riding to work around 
his 12-room Georgian brick home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Powers have three 
children — Leclaire, 18, a freshman at 
the University of Maryland; Beryl, 16, 
a junior at Holton Arms, and Ralph, 
Jr., 13, who attends the Woodside 
School. 

A former president of the Prince 
Georges County Bar Association, Mr. 
Powers, 49, is now a vice president of 
the Maryland Bar Association. From 
1948 to 1952 he was a member of the 
Governor's commission to revise Mary- 



16 



Maryland 



land's corporation laws. He is a vestry- 
man of St. Barnabas Episcopal Church 
at Leland. 

In Social Work 

Dr. Norman R. Roth, Social Work 
Education Department of Sociology, 
participated in the annual program 
meeting of the Council on Social Work 
Education, a national professional asso- 
ciation coordinating the undergraduate 
and graduate education in colleges and 
universities offering specialized pro- 
grams in social work. 

Dr. Roth served as chairman of a 
section meeting of the Undergraduate 
Division. Speakers at the meeting in- 
cluded Mrs. Lucille Barber of Michigan 
State University; Miss A. Katharine 
Lloyd of the University of Manchester, 
England; and Mr. John J. Baldi of 
Scranton University. 

Elected Director 
Liggett & Myers Tobacco Company 
announced the election of Dr. F. R. 
Darkis, A. & S., '24, as Director. 

Dr. Darkis, who will continue to 
serve as the Company's Director of 
Research, originally came to Liggett 
& Myers in 1928. In 1933, he went to 
Duke University as tobacco research 
associate in the Chemistry Department, 
and returned to Lig- 
gett & Myers in 
1947 as Director of 
Research. Today, he 
directs a staff of 45 
highly specialized 
scientific personnel 
in the Company's 
ultra-modem, mil- 
ion-dollar Research 
Laboratories in Lur- 
ham, North Caro- 
lina. 

Dr. Darkis, who 
comes from Fred- 
erick, Maryland, received his B.S., M.S. 
and Ph.D. degrees at the University 
of Maryland. During this period, he 
served with the state of Maryland (ag- 
ricultural) Control Laboratory, with 
the University as an instructor in 
chemistry and with the Florida Citrus 
Experimental Station. Dr. Darkis is a 
member of the Advisory Committee on 
Tobacco to the Secretary of Agriculture, 
the American Chemical Society, the 
American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science, the honorary science 
society of Sigma Xi, The Torch Club 
and the North Carolina Academy of 
Science. 

Win Wings 
Frederick D. Dallam and John D. 
Powell, both graduates of A&S, 1955, 
have received their commissions as 
Ensigns, U. S. Naval Reserve on No- 
vember 22nd, 1955 at a ceremony fol- 
lowing completion of the Naval Pre- 
Flight School at Pensacola, Florida. 

Powell and Dallam entered the 
Navy's Aviation Officer Candidate pro- 
gram from the Office of Naval Officer 
Procurement, Washington, D.C. soon 
after their graduation from Maryland. 
Their 4 months pre-flight training com- 
pleted, they have been assigned to the 
U. S. Naval Auxiliary Station, Whit- 
ing Field in Milton, Florida. After 
8 months of basic and 6 months of ad- 




Dr. Darkis 



vanced flight training, they will re- 
ceive their gold wings as a Naval 
Aviator and be assigned duty with the 
fleet. 

From Thailand 

From Bangkok, Thailand comes a 
subscription to the Alumni magazine 
and a message from Among Nilubol. 
"I was so pleased and happy to hear 
what is going on at the University. 
Please accept my sincere thanks for 
sending me this nice message. Wishing 
you the best of luck and please convey 
my best regards to all Alumni mem- 
bers." 

Ordained 

Joseph Emerson James, A&S '52, was 
ordained to the sacred Priesthood Sat- 
urday, December 17th, 1955. The serv- 
ices were held in the Christ Episcopal 
Church in Easton, Maryland by The 
Rt. Rev. Allen J. Miller, Ph. D.D.D. 
Wins Scholarship 

Miss Rosemarie Phyllis Grace, a jun- 
ior in A. & S., was announced as winner 
of the annual scholarship awarded by 
the Women's Advertising Club of 
Washington. 

The $200 scholarship, which goes 
each year to a college student in- 
terested in advertising or its related 
fields, is awarded on the basis of 
scholarship, interest and activities. 



College of ■ 

Business & Public 
Administration 

— Egbert F. Tingley 

European Coal, Steel 

The European Coal and Steel Com- 
munity is an impressive internation- 
al economic experiment, which has suc- 
cessfully added to the strength of the 
free world, according to a study pub- 
lished by the Bureau of Business and 
Economic Research of the University. 

"The European Coal and Steel Com- 
munity," of which Part 1 has been 
published concludes that this coopera- 
tive effort, usually known as the Schu- 
man Plan, has demonstrated the prac- 
ticality of economic unification of 
Europe. The mere existence of the 
Community offers strength and hope 
to those Europeans who struggle for 
a United States of Europe. 

As the major exporter of steel, the 
Community also has a direct bear- 
ing upon the export intei'ests of the 
American steel industry. However, the 
majority of the representatives of maj- 
or American steel companies accept the 
Community as an element of strength 
in United States foreign policy. Ameri- 
cans may find valuable suggestions in 
the cooperative European methods of 
adjustment in a changing world. 

The report recommends that the 
United States continue to support 
fully the European Coal and Steel Com- 
munity in its reconstruction of the 
European economy and that the Com- 
munity make every effort to eliminate 
the elements of monopoly which re- 
main in its common market. 



Part 2 of the study is scheduled for 
an early release. 

"Delgadina" 

At a meeting of the American folk- 
lore society a paper presented by Dr. 
Frank Goodwyn, concerned "The Ballad 
of Delgadina." The heroine dies of 
thirst and anguish while repulsing the 
incestuous proposal of her father, a 
king, who has her locked away when 
she denies him. Delgadina is a bit of 
folklore from the Southwest. 

About 75 society members, virtually 
all college professors, are attending 
the meeting in the Library of Congress. 
Dr. Steinmeyer Lectures 

Dr. Reuben Steinmeyer gave a lec- 
ure in the current series of "The 
Woman's Forum on International Af- 
fairs" offered by the Baltimore District, 
Maryland Federation of Woman's 
Clubs. 

Members of the Town and Country 
Woman's Club and the women's clubs 
of Lochearn and Dundalk were hos- 
tesses. 

To New York 

Dr. John P. Augelli, Department of 
Geography, was invited to be one of 
the four panelists who participated in 
a symposium entitled "The Case for 
a British Caribbean Federation". This 
symposium was held at the American 
Geographical Society, New York City, 
on the occasion of the 1956 Divisional 
Meeting of the Association of American 
Geographers. 

Dr. Bo wen Elected 

The staff of the Government and 
Politics Department attended the Ninth 
Annual Convention of the District of 
Columbia Political Science Association 
held at George Washington University. 
During the business meeting that fol- 
lowed the Convention, Dr. Don Bowen 
of the Department was elected to the 
Executive Committee of the Associa- 
tion. He replaces Dr. Elmer Plischke, 
Head of the Department of Govern- 
ment and Politics, whose term on the 
Executive Committee expires this year. 
In Uganda 

Walter W. Deshler, Geography De- 
partment, spoke on "Making a Living 
in Karamoja Uganda" in the Com- 
munity Room of the Washington Post 
and Times-Herald, under the sponsor- 
ship of the Institute of African-Amer- 
ican Relations. Mr. Deshler also gave 
a color slide talk outlining the problems 
of pastoral peoples who make their 
living in the dry grasslands of East 
Africa. 

On Waterways 

Dr. Donald Patton, Geography De- 
partment, published an article entitled 
"The Traffic Pattern on American In- 
land Waterways" in Economic Geogra- 
phy. This article is based partly on 
research in which Dr. Patton is now 
engaged for the Office of Naval 
Research. 

Journalism Scholarship 

The Baltimore Sunpapers have es- 
tablished a $500 annual scholarship in 
the Department of Journalism & Public 
Relations. Miss Amelia E. Raila, a Bal- 
timore senior in the department, was 
chosen to receive the first scholarship 
from this grant by the Sun. 



Maryland 



17 



A new course in Newspaper Ty- 
pography has been approved by the 
university curriculum committee. It 
will be offered for the first time next 
fall when the new journalism building 
will be completed. 

"A Bibliography of Industrial Jour- 
nalism, 1913-1954," will be ready for 
distribution by the department, in co- 
operation with the International Coun- 
cil of Industrial Editors, by the end of 
December, 1955. 

A display of 100 prize pictures pub- 
lished recently were on exhibit in the 
journalism building, titled "1955 Prize 
Pictures." The exhibit consisted of win- 
ners in the 12th annual competition of 
news and features pictures sponsored 
by the University of Missouri. 

The best pictures of 1955, complied 
by the National Press Photographers 
Association, will be exhibited next 
March by the Department of Journal- 
ism and Public Relations. 

With Montgomery Ward 

Louis J. Phoebus, BPA '51, is present- 
ly holding a management position in 
the Eastern region of Montgomery 
Ward's Retail Division. Phoebus was 
employed by Montgomery Ward July, 
1954 as an Assistant Manager, Pots- 
dam, New York and is making a sub- 
stantial contribution to the success of 
the company. 

Wins Trophy 

The annual Maryland Leader's 
Trophy was awarded to A. Samuel 
Koski, BPA '49, at the annual dinner 
of the Baltimore Agency of the State 
Mutual Life Assurance Company on 
January 3rd, 1956. 

Mr. Koski has been associated with 
State Mutual for about 5 years and 
resides in Dundalk with his wife and 
3 children. During World War II he 
served with the U. S. Naval Air Corps 
and was decorated for heroism twice. 
He is also a member of the Honor 
Society of Phi Kappa Phi. 

With Advertising Firm 

Jack D. Lewis, President of Advertis- 
ing Associates, Inc., Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, has just been named Chairman 
of the Board of Directors of this com- 
pany. Following graduation he spent 
12 years in radio and television before 
entering the Advertising Agency field. 
He is secretary of the Advertising Club 
of that city and is active in other civic 
and political groups. 



College of 



Home Economics 

Laura Amos Bull '26 
Vera Klein Woods '32 



Textiles And Clothing 

The Textile and Clothing Seniors of 
College of Home Economics of the 
University of Maryland sponsored the 
fourth annual fabric festival, "Tex- 
styles on Parade", in the Student Union 
Building. 

Clothing for the entire family was 
featured. These exhibits included cloth- 
ing for children, a campus to career 
wardrobe, and an exhibit "With A Man 
in Mind". 



A panel, "Care for Family Wear", 
was presented with speakers promin- 
ent in their fields. Dr. Dorothy S. Lyle, 
Director of Consumer Relations, from 
the Institute of Cleaning, Silver Spring, 
spoke on the topic, "The Dry Cleaner 
Looks at Today's Fabrics". "I Do the 
Family Wash" was presented by Mrs. 
Eleanor Young, homemaker and 1955 
Home Economics graduate. Mrs. June 
Wilbur, Associate Professor of the Tex- 
tiles and Clothing Department, re- 
ported on "Selecting Family Clothing 
With Care in Mind". 

"From Beginning to End" was the 
title of a fashion show which gave the 
students an opportunity to show the 
garments they had made. Formals to 
night clothes were shown, as well as 
some children's and men's clothing. 

Elected President 

Professor Jane Crow, College of 
Home Economics, has been elected 
President of the Maryland Home Econ- 
omics Association. Professor Crow also 
recently attended a family life con- 
ference honoring the Merrill-Palmer 
School on its 35th Anniversary at 
Detroit. 

Alumni Day Set 

Saturday, May 5, 1956, has been set 
for the annual Alumni Day Home- 
coming for all graduates, seniors, par- 
ents, professors, etc. It will be held 
as usual in the "Maryland Room" in 
the Home Economics Building, now 
known as Margaret Brent Hall. Those 
who have not yet seen the lovely por- 
trait of Miss Marie Mount, our be- 
loved Dean of the College of Home 
Economics, and the newly refurnished 
and refinished "Maryland Room" have 
a real treat in store! At present, there 
is a most interesting exhibit on dis- 
play in the exhibit windows there of 
costumes from the collection of Mrs. 
Harry J. Patterson, wife of the former 
Dean of the College of Agriculture and 
Director of the Experiment Station, 
and at one time Acting President of 



President 




W 



'lii 



HEADS ECONOMISTS 

Florence Rae Mc Kenney 

President— Md. H.E.I.H. 



the University. The costumes are beau- 
tiful silks and cottons, made mostly by 
hand, of the early 1800's and 1900's. 
"Open House" April 26 

Mark Thursday, April 26, on your 
calendars now! On that day the Col- 
lege of Home Economics will hold 
"Open House" from 3 to 10 p.m. The 
broad scope of Home Economics work 
today will be shown by the exhibits 
and demonstrations in all departments 
of the College: (1) Clothing and Tex- 
tiles, (2) Foods and Nutrition, (3) Re- 
search projects underway, (4) Home 
and Institutional Management, (5) Art 
in Advertising, (6) Interior Design, (7) 
Costume Design, (8) Photography, (9) 
other aspects of Practical Art and 
Craft, and the like. Each year this 
open house attracts larger numbers of 
visitors, especially senior high school 
girls and their parents from all over 
the state, who are interested in en- 
rolling in the college. Many high school 
home economics teachers bring whole 
classes by bus. 

Centennial Exhibit 

The College of Home Economics and 
the Home Economics Extension Serv- 
ice will join forces and put up fine ad- 
joining exhibits for the beginning of 
the University's Centennial Celebra- 
tion on March 6 in the new Activities 
Building. Be sure to look for these 
when you come to the campus that 
day! 

Congratulations — Jane Crow! 

Professor Jane Crow is the new 
President-elect of the Maryland Home 
Economics Association. She will be- 
gin her term in the spring, succeeding 
Margaret Holloway, the incumbent. 
Maryland Chapter— H.E.I.H. 

Eighteen universities and colleges 
are represented in the Baltimore, Mary- 
land group of H.E.I.H. Home Econo- 
mists in Home Making of which graci- 
ous, gifted Florence Rae McKenney has 
been chairman since its organization 
in 1948. 

After graduation (Home Ec. 1936) 
Florence taught Home Economics in the 
Public Schools of Baltimore, Maryland 
from September 1936 to June 1940, in 
the Public Schools of Washington, D.C. 
from September 1940 to June 1946. 

At present she gives generously of 
her time and talents to a board field of 
Social Services as: 

Secretary — Woman's Society of 
Christian Service, Grace Methodist 
Church, Baltimore, Md. 

Vice-Chairman — Food and Nutrition 
Services, Baltimore Chapter, American 
Red Cross. 

Home Making Chairman — Maryland 
Home Economics Association. 

National Chairman of Alumni By- 
Laws — Tri Delta Sorority. 

Meantime Floi*ence has been heard 
on radio and seen on television while 
substituting on programs dealing with 
professional home economics and hav- 
ing her most cherished role in life as 
the devoted wife, traveling companion 
and homemaker for her lawyer hus- 
band, Mr. W. Gibbs McKenney. 
News And Gossip 

Alice Davey '46, is teaching Foods 
and Nutrition at the University of 



IS 



Maryland 



Connecticut, College of Home Econom- 
ics. 

Ann Sipp Ross is living in Monterey, 
Cal., with her Navy husband and two 
boys. 

Betty Ann Levin Gwynn reports that 
she and her husband are building a 
house on their 97 acre farm at Quaker 
Neck, Md., near Chestertown. She is 
engaged in social work there. 

Audrey Dugdale Hatry and her 
Army husband, Ralph, are stationed in 
Germany. Address: Dept. of Army — 
Det. A— APO 742— c/o Postmaster, 
New York City. 

Roxie Montgomery '50, was married 
in September to John Underwood, a 
chemist, stationed at Camp Detrick, 
Frederick, Md., where they reside. 

Gwendolyn Kendall '49, now Mrs. 
Paul Roseletti, is the proud mother of 
a baby daughter. 

Judith Messinger '51, now Mrs. 
James Wood, is the mother of a son, 
Ronald. "Judy" served as Assistant 
Home Demonstration Agent in Wash- 
ington County for a year before her 
marriage, and is now teaching cloth- 
ing and related subjects at the South 
Potomac Junior High School in Hag- 
erstown, Md. 

Doris Clopper Warfield '50, and her 
husband, Frank Warfield '49, have an- 
nounced the birth of Paul Noel on 
Dec. 19. Doris has taught clothing for 
five years — one in Clear Spring High 
School and four years in Hagerstown 
High School. Frank is employed at 
Fairchild Aircraft Corporation. They 
live near Leitersburg, but address is 
Hagerstown, Route 5. 

Betty Amos Bull '26 (Mrs. Fred L.) 
reports "most wonderful thing that 
has ever happened to me" — "now a 
grandmother," courtesy of son Robert 
L. Bull (Cornell '52) who is at the 
University of Delaware, Newark, Dela- 
ware. 

Christens Liner 

Delta Air Lines have begun service 
from southern cities through Washing- 
ton to New York. 

Members of Congress and Govern- 
ment aviation officials were on hand for 
ceremonies marking the event. 

Miss Leoma Naughton, Home Ec. 
junior, beauty queen, and Delta Delta 
Delta Sorority, smashed an over-size 
coke bottle on the DC-7 airliner mak- 
ing the first flight. 



A STAY IN GERMANY 

By Mm. framed- cttavudtm PatteAAxtn 



(Home Ec '30) 

In April of 1952, my husband, Lt. 
Colonel Thomas D. Patterson, Quar- 
termaster Corps, U. S. Army, received 
orders to leave for Germany. We were 
delighted as we had hoped that when 
the time came for him to go overseas 
again that it would be to Germany. He 
had spent three and a half years as 
a prisoner of the Japanese during the 
war and did not want to return to that 
area. We had bought a home in Vir- 
ginia, looking forward to retirement; 
so we went there and spent his leave. 
He was assigned to the Giessen Quar- 



termaster Depot as Chief of Stock Con- 
trol and had been given an apartment 
in the American Housing Area. 

Giessen is a city of about 35,000 pop- 
In Hesse 
ulation, located in the state of Hesse. 
It was very badly bombed during the 
war; about 85% of the city was com- 
pletely destroyed. In the year and a 
half that we were there the amount of 
rebuilding was amazing. I was tre- 
mendously impressed by the amount 
of work done. I had an opportunity 
to meet and know quite well many of 
the people in Giessen as I became ac- 
tive in Die Briicke, an organization of 
German and American women working 
together to establish a better under- 
standing and trying to show them the 
democratic way of life. The name 
means "The Bridge." The most difficult 
part of the whole thing was the lan- 
guage barrier. Many of the German 
ladies spoke English, but only one of 
the American ladies spoke German. 
There were times when the meetings 
became a little tiresome, due to the 
time expended in translation. We had 
wonderful parties with our husbands 
in the evenings, at which time we raised 
money for our philanthropic work. My 
other big interest in Giessen was the 
American Women's Club, which I 
served as President and Welfare Chair- 
man. Our programs tried to bring to 
the American women various aspects 
of Germany. We had Herr Giesen- 
dorffer, from Rottenberg, with his 
etchings of that town. Rottenburg is 
one of the oldest towns in Germany, 
dating back to medieval days. It was. 
declared an open city during the war 
so that it might be preserved. Herr 
Giesendorffer brought with him a zither 
player and singer in native costume, 
and he told the history of the town 
and a lot of interesting anecdotes of 
the people and their customs. 

Rosenthal China 

At another time we had an authority 
on the manufacture of china and had 
a display of Rosenthal china. We had 
a fashion show put on by one of the 
local shops, using our own ladies as 
models. Germany is fast coming to the 
front in the fashion world. In our wel- 
fare program, we helped the orphan- 
ages and took over the Baby Clinic of 
the Refugee Camp. This camp was one 
of the many scattered throughout Ger- 
many, where the Germans escaping 
from East Germany were brought to 
be screened, but usually the babies and 
small children would come in with 
pneumonia. At the time this camp 
opened, they had nothing with which 
to take care the children. We furnished 
it. 

I was very fortunate to be able to 
attend the conference on American 
Women's Activities in Europe held at 
Berchtesgaden. This is a semi-annual 
affair to bring together American 
Women from all the countries where 
the Armed Forces are stationed. Dis- 
cussion groups are held and ideas ex- 
changed. Very fine speakers are brought 
in order to give the whole European 
picture. 



Berchtesgaden was Hitler's strong- 
hold and high above the town on a 
mountain top. Halfway between the 
town and the Eagle's Nest is Obersalz- 
burg, where he had his home. 

Bavaria, where Berchtesgaden is lo- 
cated, is a wonderful section of Ger- 
many. Munich, the capital, is the larg- 
est industrial city of Germany. It too 
has rebuilt rapidly after the bombing 
which left practically nothing of the 
main part of the city. After Munich, 
Bavaria is a country of lakes, moun- 
tains and small picturesque hamlets, 
each with an onion steeple on its 
church. This is the land of Ludwig II, 
the mad king and his fairy castles, of 
Oberammergau and its Passion Play, 
of Garmisch, with its winter sports — 
truly a fairy land. 

In Austria 

We drove through the East Zone 
of Austria to the four powered city 
of Vienna. This was before the peace 
treaties with Austria were signed and 
it was still a divided country. We 
were there at the time the Americans 
turned over the rule to the British. 
This was quite a ceremony. Vienna is 
a beautiful city and my favorite of the 
capitals of Europe that I saw. My 
only disappointment was the Vienna 
Woods, which was nothing like I had 
expected. We were told that the loveli- 
est part of the Woods were in the 
East Zone where we were not allowed 
to go. 

To Berlin 

The most outstanding experience of 
our stay in Germany was a trip to Ber- 
lin. The tour through East Berlin is 
a wonderful lesson for Democracy and 
against Communism. There is only a 
street between East and West Berlin, 
physically, but there is a whole world 
between them, otherwise. West Ber- 
lin stores are modern and filled with 
almost anything one would want. Food 
is plentiful. Across the street in East 
Berlin, there is nothing. The only re- 
building that has been done there is 
Stalin Allee, which is a front. Looking 
down the length of the Allee (formerly 
Unter Den Linden), you see for blocks 
and blocks the beautiful new build- 
ings, stores and apartments. How- 
ever, as you ride along, you can look 
through them to the rubble in back. 
The rent for these apartments is low 
in cost, but you must belong to the 
party in order to rent one. The peo- 
ple are poorly dressed and hungry 
looking. All stores are State owned 
and prices are exorbitant. West Ber- 
lin does a flourishing antique business, 
and we were told that the people of 
East Berlin bring their possessions 
over to sell for West German marks, 
buy a few things to eat and take 
these things back with them. The 
West mark is about four to the dollar, 
where the East mark is two to one 
West mark, and they are not transfer- 
able. The highlight of the East tour 
is The Garden of Remembrance, a 
Russian cemetery built with German 
money as a memorial to the Russian 
soldiers who died to "liberate" the 
German people from the Nazis. At one 



Maryland 



19 



end is a statue, "Mother Russia," at 
the other end a statue of a Russian 
soldier with a child in his arms and a 
sword pointed to a Swastika. Sep- 
arating the Garden from the cemetery 
are two huge Russian flags made from 
red marble taken from the floor of Hit- 
ler's Chancerlery. It was an awe in- 
spiring sight. 

Germany is full of many interest- 
ing places. The Black Forest, where 
the people do the wonderful wood 
carving in winter. Heidelberg, with 
its University and The Red Ox, where 
the operetta, "The Student Prince," 
took place. Marburg, another Uni- 
versity city, noted for its part in the 
Reformation and the First Protestant 
Universiy in the world. Frankfurt is 
the largest city in West Germany, with 
its extremely modernistic new build- 
ing program. Weisbaden, Headquar- 
ters for our Air Force in Europe, is 
the largest spa in Germany. The Rhine 
River with its many fascinating towns 
and ruins of medieval castles, was one 
of our favorite drives. 

To France 

After a year and a half in Giessen, 
Pat was transferred to the Metz Quar- 
termaster Depot, Metz, France, as As- 
sistant to the Commanding Officer for 
Supply Operations. We were quite 
lucky as he had an office in Paris and 
one in Fontainbleau; so we made a 
trip there about every two or three 
months. Here again I was active in 
the Women's Club, serving as Presi- 
dent. Although our club was much 
smaller than the one in Giessen, we did 
a great deal of welfare work. 

We had two weeks in Italy, which 
were wonderful. Both of us being in- 
terested in food, we had practically 
eaten our way through Europe. Italy 
was the crowning point as we found 
that a steady diet of Italian food was 
much easier to take than any of the 
others. 

Just before returning to the states 
we took a trip through Luxembourg, 
Belgium and Holland. We loved every- 
thing about these countries and found 
the people to be more like we are than 
in any of the other countries we had 
visited. 



College of 



Agriculture 

Dr. Howard L. Stier 



Brucellosis 

The State Legislative Council in- 
dorsed a University of Maryland 
plea for extra funds to support the 
current Federal-State campaign against 
the Bang's disease in cattle. 

At the request of Dr. Wilson H. El- 
kins, university president, the council 
passed a resolution asking Governor 
McKeldin to provide a deficiency ap- 
propriation for the program in his bud- 
get. 

Dr. Elkins told the legislators that 
the program would have to be halted 
unless the university received "reason- 
able assurance" of extra funds totaling 
$94,000. 



He explained that Bang's disease 
or brucellosis causes undulent fever in 
humans who drink unpasteurized milk 
from infected cows or who handle in- 
fected livestock on the farm or in 
slaughtering houses. 

The Baltimore city and Washington 
health departments require that pro- 
ducing herds be free of this disease, 
Dr. Elkins added. 

He noted that under the Federal- 
State program, farmers whose stock 
are slaughtered receive compensation 
ranging from $25 to $50 for each ani- 
mal. 

Under a sharply curtailed federal 
program, the university's appropria- 
tion of $110,000 for the 1955-56 fiscal 
year was quickly used, said Dr. 
Elkins. Emergency funds totaling $71,- 
000 plus $30,000 transferred from oth- 
er Livestock Sanitary Service work 
kept the program going until the end of 
the year. 

But after this, said Dr. Elkins, an 
added $94,000 was needed to carry on 
the work until the end of the fiscal 
year. 

He testified that brucellosis is most 
prevalent in Montgomery, Baltimore 
and Frederick counties. 

Dr. Willard Green 
Dr. Willard W. Green, Animal Hus- 
bandry, attended the annual meeting 
of the American Society of Animal 
Production and participated as a mem- 
ber of the Committee on Research of 
that organization. 

Dr. Cairns Cited 
Dr. Gordon M. Cairns, University of 
Maryland dean of agriculture, is one of 
four men to receive the 1955 award 
for "Man of the Year in Service to 
Agriculture," presented by the pro- 
gressive Farmer magazine. 

The magazine honors men each year 
"whose devotion and contributions to 
agriculture have gone far beyond the 
line of duty." Dr. Cairns was honored 
for six distinct seivices. 

The first service is in the field of 
specialized farming. 
"Under his leader- 
ship, the college of 
agriculture is striv- 
ing to better serve 
the ever-increasing 
trend toward farm 
specialization," the 
magazine says. 

Dean Cairns is 
also cited for 
"greater speed in 
putting new infor- 
mation into prac- 
tice," and for insist- 
ing "that his staff keep up to date with 
latest developments in their fields. 

Better marketing is the fourth ser- 
vice for which Dean Cairns is cited. He 
has "encouraged programs to show the 
city housewife why she should and can 
afford to buy more foods from the 
farm." The fifth distinct service is his 
"fine leadership to the dairymen of the 
state in developing more profitable 
herds." Dr. Cairns was head of the 
university's dairy department from 
1945 to 1950. 

The sixth service is Dean Cairns' 




Dean Cairns 




"keen interest in farm young people. 
At age 21 he won a $500 4-H college 
scholarship which he used to enter 
college." In 1954 Dean Cairns went 
with the Maryland 4-H club national 
dairy cattle judging champions to the 
international judging contest in Eng- 
land. 

The magazine article continues, "The 
line between finding the answer to a 
farm problem in the research labora- 
tory and putting that answer into ex- 
tension has become so thin that it has al- 
most disappeared in Maryland. His con- 
ception of the college's role is that it 
serves as an active, dynamic partner 
of the man behind the plow. The dean 
personifies this partnership approach, 
which points to a bright day in Mary- 
land agriculture." 

Heads Agronomy 
Dr. Robert Earl Wagner has been ap- 
pointed Professor and Head of the Uni- 
versity's Department of Agronomy. 

The vacanacy of department head 
was brought about by the elevation of 
Dr. Albin O. Kuhn, 
former head, to as- 
sistant to the presi- 
dent. Dr Kuhn was 
succeeded by Dr. 
Russell G. Rothgeb 
who will serve as 
acting head until 
Dr. Wagner's ap- 
pointment is effec- 
tive on April 1, 
1956. 

The University of 
Maryland's Depart- 
ment of Agronomy 
functions in two major areas; namely, 
crop production and soils, and carrying 
out work in teaching, research, exten- 
sion, and services and controls. 

The department has both active un- 
dergraduate and graduate programs. 

Dr. Wagner received his B.S. degree 
from Kansas State College in 1942 and, 
from the University of Wisconsin, M.S. 
in 1943 and Ph.D. in 1950. 

Positions held elsewhere: Forage 
Crops Specialist, Fort Hays Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station, Hays, Kan- 
sas—October 1943 to April 1945; As- 
sistant Project Leader and Project 
Leader, U. S. Department of Agricul- 
ture — April 1945 to present. 

Military Service: Aviation Cadet — 
July 1943 to November 1943. 

Professional Societies: American So- 
ciety of Agronomy, American Society 
of Range Management. 

Fraternities: Sigma Xi, Phi Kappa 
Phi, Gamma Sigma Delta. 

Listed In: American Men of Science. 

4-H Awards 
Four University students have been 
awarded scholarships by the Esso 
Standard Oil Co. 

Heni-y F. Comegys, Queen Annes 
County 4-H Club member, received a 
four year scholarship with the stip- 
ulation that he maintain his scholastic 
average. 

James Smith, Spencer Street, and 
William Powell III each received one 
year grants. 

Thirteen 4-H Club members who 
won honors in state projects have 



Dr. Wagner 



20 



Maryland. 



received their awards at the 4-H Older 
Youth Conference. 

Also honored are two leaders who 
were winners in the national 4-H alum- 
ni recognition pi'ogram. They are 
William G. Baker, Thurmont, and Wal- 
ter Harmsen of Royal Oak, Talbot 
County. 

At Atlanta 

Dr. J. C. Shaw, Dairy Department, 
presented a symposium paper in collab- 
oration with Dr. S. Lakshmanan, also 
of the Dairy Department, at Atlanta, 
Georgia. This paper was by invitation 
of the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science and the Oak 
Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies, 
who sponsored the symposium "Atomic 
Energy and Agriculture". The title of 
this particular paper is "Lactation and 
Hormons". 

At Michigan State 

Dr. Shaw also spoke on Radioactive 
Isotopes in Aigriculture at Michigan 
State University at which he presented 
a paper, "The Foundation of Milk 
Fat'" and acted as Discussion Group 
leader for the Symposium on Lactation. 

He also presented a paper at the 
annual meeting of the Ontario Veteri- 
nary Association at Toronto, Canada, 
on "Our Present State of Knowledge of 
the Etiology, Prevention and Treat- 
ment of Bovine Ketosis." 

Farmers Warned 

Southern Maryland farmers are in 
for a "dismal" future if they keep all 
their economic eggs in one basket by 
overemphasizing tobacco production, a 
State farm expert warned. 

Dr. Paul E. Nystrom, University of 
Maryland, State extension director, is- 
sued the warning in a speech to the 
Maryland Tobacco Growers' Associa- 
tion, in conjunction with the annual 
convention of the Maryland Farm Bu- 
reau. 

Dr. Nystrom stressed the need for 
diversification of crops to help farmers 
>ut of the cost-price squeeze. 

At the Maryland Vegetable Growers's 
Association meeting, convention dele- 
gates were told by Dr. Paul R. Poffen- 
ierger the squeeze "has been becoming 
more severe in recent years and pros- 
pects are that it may continue at about 
the same degree of severity for at 
east another year." 

Dr. Poffenberger is acting head of 
:he Department of Agricultural Econ- 
>mics of the University of Maryland. 
Dairy Open House 

Of special interest to farmers and 
illied agricultural interests visiting the 
University of Maryland Centennial and 
3esquicentennial anniversary celebra- 
tion March 2 through 6, will be the 
'Dairy Open House" and the 24th 
innual Maryland Poultry Products 
ihow. Both events will be March 6. 

The events mark the 100th year of 
;he College of Agriculture, founded 
n 1856 and the 150th year of the Col- 
ege of Medicine, opened in 1807. 

An open house, with a milk bar, will 
>e ready for all visiting dairymen, 
rours will be conducted through the 
iairy plant, milk plant and barns and 
:o the artificial breeding headquarters. 

The tours will include demonstrations 



Best for Baby ♦ . . 



extra rich 
extra nourishing 
extra delicious 



GOLD! GUERNSEY MILK 

DISTRIBUTED ON THE EASTERN SHORE BY 




KOONTZ 



jv^jJ^^ 



KENNERSLEY FARM DAIRY 

and 

CITY DAIRY, Inc. 

First with the "Carriage" Trade! 




everything 

needed 

for 

building ** 



Phone 3171 
Salisbury, Md. 



J.L 

WELLS 
CO., INC. 

CREOSOTED 
PRODUCTS 

— — Telephones — 

Salisbury 2-2144 — 2-2145 

P.O. Box 312 

SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



THE 

NATIONAL BANK 
OF CAMBRIDGE 

Complete 
BANKING SERVICE 

Organized 1880 

SAFETY DEPOSIT 
DEPARTMENT 

Cambridge, Maryland 



JueliclouJ 




BAKED TO STAY FRESH 



Maryland 



21 



Prize Winners 




FIRST PLACE POULTRY JUDGING TEAM 

Left to right: Louis Arrington, Sykesville; George Marvin, Falls Church, Vir- 
ginia; Paula Schlatre, Reisterstown; Herbert Hochreich, Washington, D. C; and 
Professor George D. Quigley, Poultry. 



of techniques used in research such as 
the mechanical cow, radio-active count- 
er, blood' sugar determinations and 
others. All milk plant equipment will 
be in operation and labeled. Demon- 
strations of tests such as the detection 
of adulteration of dairy products will 
be in progress. 

For many years, the Poultry Pro- 
ducts show has been held in Baltimore, 
but will be held in the Student Activi- 
ties Building on the College Park 
campus this year in honor of the cen- 
tennials. It is sponsored by the Mary- 
land State Poultry Council, the Mary- 
land State Fair Board, and the Exten- 
sion Service of the College of Agri- 
culture. 

Gold Medal Winner 
Creston Grand Master, a registered 
Holstein bull of the Maryland Artifi- 
cial Breeding Cooperative at the Uni- 
versity has been designated a Gold 
Medai sire by the Holstein-Friesian 
Association of America. 

To qualify for the Gold Medal award 
the bull had to meet both production 
and type requirements, according to 
Dr. E. J. Weatherby, manager of the 
Maryland ABC. The daughters of this 
bull must also reach a high peak of 
body conformation. The award is the 
highest honor a Holstein-Friesian sire 
can attain. 

Eight of Grand Master's 34 daugh- 
ters which have been classified for type, 
were rated "very good," the second 
highest rating a Holstein can achieve. 
The average for all classified daughters 
was 82. One hundred points is perfect. 
They produced 13,841 pounds of 
3.8 per cent milk and 524 pounds of 
butterfat. 

Dr. Kramer, Speaker 
Dr. Amihud Kramer, Baltimore-born 
professor of horticulture, was guest 



speaker at Beth Jacob Congregation. 

Recently returned from a year's leave 
of absence in Israel on a mission for 
the United Nations, Dr. Kramer spoke 
on "Israel 1 Today in Pictures," illustra- 
ted with color slides. 

Tobacco Loss 
Rejection of the Federal price-sup- 
port program cost Southern Maryland 
tobacco growers $11 million in four 
years, according to a report of the 
University of Maryland's agricultural 
economics department. 

The average farmers lost $2,000 in 
the period 1951 through 1954, said the 
report, compiled after a lengthy sur- 
vey. 

In the four-year period on which 
the study was based, Maryland tobac- 
co growers, the economists said "lost 
$11 million by not voting in quotas 
for every year of the four. This loss 
averages $3.6 million per year for 1951, 
1952 and 1954." Quotas were in effect in 
1953. 

In Ecuador 

Dr. Glen H. Beck, head of the Dairy 
Department, returned from a trip to 
Quito, Ecuador, where he was the third 
Marylander to judge a cattle show. He 
said it was through the recommenda- 
tion of Dean Cairns, and Homer Rems- 
burg, a Maryland dairy cattleman and 
President of the Alumni Association, 
that Ecuador selected him for the 
honor. 

While in South America, Dr. Beck 
lived at a ranch owned by Galo Plaza, 
ex-president of Ecuador and alumnus 
of the University of Maryland. Senor 
Plaza is a staunch supporter of the 
University. 

Senor Plaza has a 1300 acre ranch 
which employed 140 indians and had a 
milk and ice cream plant. 

Dr. Beck was impressed by the tre- 



mendous potential for development 
in the livestock industry in Ecuador. 
The ranchers, he noted, highly praised 
the previous work done there by Dean 
Cairns and others. 

Many ranchers in Ecuador purchase 
their breeding cattle in the U.S. 

Poultry Judging Champions 
The Poultry Judging team repre- 
senting the University of Maryland 
won first place at the 32nd Annual 
Eastern Intercollegiate Poultry Judg- 
ing Contest, held at Rutgers Univer- 
sity. A total of eight teams competed 
for top eastern honors, and they placed 
in order of Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity second, Cornell third, Con- 
necticut fourth, Delaware fifth, New 
Hampshire sixth, West Virginia sev- 
enth, and National Agricultural Col- 
lege eighth. 

The Maryland team was awarded a 
handsome gold loving cup for its vic- 
tory. A measure of the Maryland 
teams' victory is revealed by the fact 
that they scored 3,660 points, 180 
points over their nearest rivals, where- 
as the next five teams were closely 
bunched and separated by a total of 
only 90 points. 

Top individual judging honors were 
also won by Maryland students, Louis 
Arrington winning first place with 
1280 out of 1400 points for a gold cup 
and a cash award of $35.00. George 
Marvin, a Maryland Junior specializ- 
ing in Agricultural Education, was sec- 
ond with 1220 points, and Ken William- 
son was third with 1210 points. 

Chemicals Conferences 

The third annual University of 
Maryland Agricultural Chemicals Con- 
ferences was held over three one-day 
meetings in different sections of the 
state, Dr. L. O. Weaver, Extension 
plant pathologist and committee chair- 
man said. 

February 6 saw a meeting at Easton 
for the Eastern Shore area; February 9 
at LaPlata for the southern Maryland 
area; and February 10, Frederick for 
central and western Maryland. 

The meetings provided a means for 
county agents, commercial fieldmen, 
pesticide dealers and others interested 
in agricultural chemicals to get togeth- 
er and discuss crop pest control recom- 
mendations. 

The program was essentially the 
same for all three areas. However, 
the morning sessions at LaPlata con- 
centrated on tobacco disease, weed and 
insect control. Speakers for these ses- 
sions were H. S. McConnell and Drs. 
O. D. Morgan and J. H. Hoyert. 

Topics covered at the Easton and 
Frederick morning sessions included 
controlling insects on hay and grain 
crops, field crop weed control and live- 
stock pest control. Speakers included 
T. L. Bissell, and Drs. Paul Santel- 
mann and George Langford. 

Afternoon topics, the same for all 
three meetings, include pest control 
on vegetables; insect and disease con- 
trol on ornamentals and a general dis- 
cussion on spray residues and other 
chemical subjects. 

Speaker^ for the afternoon programs 



22 



Maryland 



were Bissell, A. A. Duncan and Dr. 
Weaver. All speakers for the three day 
meetings were from the university. 
With Campbell Soup 

Leonard J. Meyer, Jr., Agr. '50, has 
been appointed Assistant General Fore- 
man of the Can Plant, Camden Plant 
of the Campbell Soup Company. Mr. 
Meyer joined the Campbell Company 
as a management trainee in the Cam- 
den Plant on May 4, 1954. He became 
Assistant to the Superintendent, Can 
Department, in February 1954 and was 
promoted to Foreman, Can Assembly 
in March, 1955. 

Record Service 

In the fall of 1955, L. J. Houston, 
Jr., a member of the class of 1898, 
Maryland Agricultural College, said 
farewell to an activity which reported- 
ly set a world record. Mr. Houston 
served as City Manager for Fredericks- 
burg Virginia exactly 37 years to the 
day. 

Now 78 he stepped down to become, 
"City Manager Emeritus." In parting 
he urged his successor to tell the world 
more about America's most historic 
city. He was a man not given to poli- 
tics but rather to carrying out the di- 
rectives of his City Council. The city 
has provided an office for his use in 
order that he may continue his service. 
Primarily this will be devoted to ad- 
vertising Fredericksburg. 

Under City Manager Houston, Fred- 
ericksburg grew from a one store town 
with a four man police force, a one 
truck fire department, 26 public school 
teachers and unpaved streets, illumi- 
nated by 130 street lights to a sizable 
town with all modern improvements 
which maintains a small town atmos- 
phere. 

The record breaking City Manager 
was hired as a 40 year old engineer who 
had been building wooden ships at 
Quantico. This had been preceded by 
railroad construction in Canada, the 
laying of a sewer system under Balti- 
more and a tour as Chief Engineer and 
Assistant Manager of the war time 
shipyard in that city. 

Mr. Houston came on a one year con- 
tract, feeling that he might not like 
the people of Fredericksburg or they 
in turn might not like him. The con- 
tract was renewed each year by the 
Council and any doubts Houston may 
have had about liking Fredericksburg 
have long since vanished. 

Stockton, Maryland gave Mr. Hous- 
ton to Fredericksburg. He was the 
youngest of 7 children and his father 
ran a store, two farms, a saw mill, a 
grist mill and an oyster packing busi- 
ness. He lacked a high school educa- 
tion but had sufficient background to 
enter the Sophomore class of Maryland 
Agriculture College. He was manager 
of the MAC baseball team and as he 
recalls it an Easter trip saw MAC lose 
to Fredericksburg by a score of rough- 
ly 15 to 1. In order to finish school 
rapidly, he took a double load of 35 
hours in his last term while obtaining 
a Civil Engineering degree from Cor- 
nell after A.B. at Maryland. 

Mr. Houston married a Baltimore 



C. C. OLIPHANT & SON, INC. 

ESTABLISHED 1921 

ROOFING and SHEET METAL CONTRACTORS 

Heating - Ventilating - Air Conditioning 
"BARRETT" - BONDED ROOFERS - "CAREY" 



Telephones : Day 7555 - Night 3789 



LAUREL, DELAWARE 



S&winq. ihsL J>ojwl Sinai 1913 
The Shore's Finest Fertilizer 

THE WORCESTER FERTILIZER COMPANY 

SNOW HILL, MD. 




Chas. E. Holloway Nursery 
Delmar-(88)-4401 

S. SECOND ST. DELMAR, DEL. 



ROBERTS CRR1BRIDGE 

SHIPYARD 

Chrii -Craft 

Marine Railway 

Repairs A Specialty 

mflRine hardware 

WET & DRY STORAGE— INSIDE and OUT 

MARYLAND AVENUE — CAMBRIDGE, MD. 



/. C. BANTUM 

• Canvas and 
Flexalum 
Aluminum 
AWNINGS 
• UPHOLSTERING 
Work Called For and Delivered 
1 HIGGINS ST. PHONE 

EASTON, MD. 635 J 




"Scotch-bred" 
ANGUS BULLS 

Our U. of Md. supervised weigh- 
ing program proves Wye "Scotch 
as a Bagpipe" bulls average near- 
ly 3 lbs. gain per day. Big, fast 
growing, they'll get the same kind 
for you . . . Write for folders, 
data sheets, prices. 
Address : J. B. LINGLE, Mgr. 



WYE PLANTATION, Queenstoi/vn,Md. 



RICHARDSDN MANDR 



49th STREET & BEACH HIGHWAY 

OCEAN CITY. MD. 

1-2 & 3 BEDROOM APARTMENTS 
PRIVATE GUARDED BEACH Phon. 1123 



Maryland 



23 




MRS. ALICE STUDLEY 

SWEDISH MEDICAL MASSEUSE 
AT HOSPITALS and HOMES 

By Appointment Only 



Baltimore, Md. 



BE 5-2569 



DISTINCTIVE FORM FIT UNIFORM 

Regulation Norses Uniforms 

To Measure 

120 FOREST DRIVE 



Rldgawoy 7-657S 



BALTIMORE 21, MB. 



V^A**M^A^^*W^S«^^V%A^'WMW***' l V*^%*l'W' 




Mr. Oottwalla 



girl, Miss Mary Wilmer and on last 
December 17, they celebrated their 
52nd wedding anniversary. 

The three children all live in Fred- 
ericksburg with their family where 
Lem W. is city Postmaster, Levin J., 
Ill, is an assistant Professor in the 
Mary Washington College music de- 
partment. The third is their daughter 
Mrs. F. Key Howard. 

The University of Maryland takes 
this opportunity to add its best wishes 
for many happy years to this illustri- 
ous alumnus. 

Elected President 

Abram Z. Gottwalls (Abe) another 
member of the class of '38 was recent- 
ly elected president of the Association 
of Bank Agricultur- 
al Representatives 
for the Fifth Fed- 
eral Reserve Dis- 
trict (Maryland, 
Virginia, West Vir- 
ginia, North and 
South Carolina and 
D. C). Abe who is 
well known in Alum- 
ni circles of the Uni- 
versity is also chair- 
man of the Agricul- 
ture Committee of 
the Maryland Bank- 
ers Association. He is currently em- 
ployed as Farm Representative of the 
First National Bank of Southern Mary- 
land. An active member of the Uni- 
versity's Alumni Council, Abe is cur- 
rently serving as chairman of the Coun- 
cil's important committee on Student- 
Faculty Relations. He is active in 
many other civic and service organi- 
zations. 

In Animal Husbandry 

Dr. Francis C. Wingert has been ap- 
pointed assistant professor of animal 
husbandry. 

A native of Good Thunder, Minn., he 
received both his B.S. and Ph.D. de- 
grees from the University of Minne- 
sota. 

Dr. Wingert's college training was 
interrupted by 3% years in the Army. 
Personals 

William M. Allenberg '50 — Promoted 
from Asst. Co. Agent to Assoc. Co. 
Agent in Carroll Co. in November 1954. 

Charles E. Anthony '51 — Teaching 
science in Centreville High School af- 
ter spending three years in Army as a 
2nd Lt. 

Kenneth W. Baker '31— Vice-Presi- 
dent of O. A. Newton & Son Co., and 
Corporation Secretary of Newton 
Chemical and Supply Co., Bridgesville, 
Delaware. 

Gerald A. Briggs '31 — Dairy and 
Beef Cattle Farming, McConellsburg, 
Pa., was elected President of Pa. Farm 
Bureau in 1954. 

, W. Harland Biggs '33— Brother of 
Gerald. Teaching Vocational Agricul- 
ture at Hagerstown. 

John P. Bruce '50 — Farming at Cono- 
wingo, Md. with father, after spending 
two years in Armed Services. 

Robert L. Cain '49 — Field Represent- 
ative of Holstein-Friesian Association, 
Knoxville, Tenn. 



Richard L. Clem '52 — Became Asst. 
Co. Agent in Carroll Co. last Novem- 
ber. 

Manville Coblentz '32 — Farming near 
Middletown, Md. 

Howard G. Crist, Jr. '40 — Owner and 
operator of Farm and Home Service, 
Sykesville, Md. 

Mylo S. Downey '27 — Assoc. Leader of 
4-H Club and YMW Programs, U.S.- 
D.A. 

Thomas V. Downing '20 — Asst. Sup- 
ervisor of Vocational Agriculture in 
Virginia. 

Raymond R. Fishpaw '32 — Moved to 
Preston, Md. as Teacher of Vocational 
Agr. July 1954 after having taught Vo- 
cational Agriculture at Manassas, Vir- 
ginia since graduation. 

Horace W. Fuller '50— Transferred 
in 1955 from teaching Voc. Agr. at 
Smithsburg to Asst. Co. Agent in 
Washington County. 

D. Vernon Holter '31— Asst. Sec- 
Treas., Federal Land Bank Assoc, and 
Production Credit Assoc, Frederick, 
Md. 

George Hughes, Jr. '29 — Branch 
Manager of Lucerne Milk Co., Denver, 
Colorado. 

Richard N. Jones '43 — Received his 
Ph.D. in Agr. Edu. at Penn State Univ. 
August 1954. Is currently an in- 
structor in Agr. Engineering at Penn 
State Univ. 

William R. Kent, Jr. '50— Teaching 
Vocational Agriculture at Newark, Del. 
Left a similar position in Talbot Coun- 
ty when he moved to that position. 

Conrad H. Linden '42 — Administra- 
tive Officer for the British Guiana Proj- 
ect (Univ. of Md. has a contract to 
develop Agr. in that country). Offices 
at the U. of Md. 

Milton K. Martin '50— Field Repre- 
sentative in Eastern Virginia for Allis- 
Chalmers. 

T. C. Martin, M.A. '26— Superin- 
tenden tof Schools in Charles County. 

William McDonald '22— Soil Con- 
servation Technician, Bristolville, Ohio. 
(Brother to H. M. McDonald, '20, State 
Supervisor of Agr. Edu.) 

G. Austin Miller '31— Supt. of 
Grounds, Baltimore City Hospital. 

J. Grafton Osborn '42 — In business 
at Aberdeen, Md. operating cannery 
and farming. 

Robert K. Remsburg '30 — Farm ma- 
chinery dealer, Thurmont, Md. 

R. W. Roberson '51 — Field repre- 
sentative in Delaware for John Deere 
Plow Co. 

Charles W. St. Claire '43— Vice-Pres- 
ident of D. E. Foote Canning Co., Bal- 
timore. 

Thomas H. Schultte '43 (M.S. '54)— 
Teaching Voc. Agr. Newcastle, Pa. 

Harley H. Spoerlein, '30— Teaching 
Voc. Agr., Dillsburg, Pa. 

Monroe E. Stambaugh '47 — Asst. 
Manager, Armour Fertilizers, Balti- 
more. 

John L. Thompson '51 — Teacher of 
Voc. Agr., Middletown. 

James A. Weamert, '52 — Asst. Co. 
Agent of Allegany County. 

Everett Weitzell '34 — Program Anal- 
yst, Rural Electrification Adm. USDA. 



24 



Maryland 



Van R. Whiting 1 '49 — Field represen- 
tative on Lower Eastern Shore for John 
Deere and Company. 

Harland C. Williams '51— Field agent 
for the FBI. 

John R. Williams '43 (M.S. '49) — 
Received his Ph.D. in Agr. Edu. in 
June 1953. Two years with the Near 
East Foundation in Iran aiding in de- 
veloping an Agr. Edu. program for 
that country. 

Norman Pennington '30 — Milk in- 
spector for Montgomery County Health 
Dept. 

Robert Johnson '29— With Eastern 
Shore Nurseries, Easton, Md. 

E. Sam Hemming '30— Head of East- 
ern Shore Nurseries, Easton, Md. 
In The Navy 

A recent visitor to Washington, D. C. 
was John Lovell class of 1938. After 
serving in the Navy during World War 
II he was in the insurance business for 
one year and then returned to the Navy. 
He is now serving as Executive Officer 
on the Ingersoll. He holds the rank 
of Commander and is currently some- 
where in the Far East. 

College of . 



Engineering 

Col. 0. H. Saunders '10 
:^s^^^^=; A. Lawrence Guess '51 
Martin Scholarship 

A $500 scholarship in aeronautical 
engineering has been set up in 
memory of Glenn L. Martin by the 
Texas-Adams Oil Company of New 
York. 

In a letter from William McCarthy, 
president of the oil firm, to Bill Rut- 
ting, administrative assistant to the 
late Mr. Martin, it was pointed out 
that the scholarship (which may be 
made an annual memorial with increas- 
ing benefits) is being posted to enable 
"some deserving youth" to benefit from 
such studies next fall. 

The letter cited the scholarship as 
"our tribute that might approximate 
that deathless monument to America's 
future which Glenn L. Martin himself 
personified." 

Satellite Expert 

The Glenn L. Martin Co. announced 
appointment of a 31-year-old Univer- 
sity of Maryland graduate as opera- 
tions manager for "Project Vanguard," 
the world"s first man-made earth satel- 
lite. 

N. Elliott Felt, Jr., who joined the 
Martin Company in 1951 as an elec- 
trical engineer, will direct planning, 
design and manufacture of the three- 
stage rocket which will carry the satel- 
lite into space. 

Mr. Felt was responsible for de- 
signing the guidance system of Mar- 
tin's Viking rocket which set the 
world's altitude record for single stage 
rockets when it climbed 158 miles 
above the New Mexico desert. 

After graduating from Maryland, 
Mr. Felt completed his graduate studies 
in electrical engineering at Georgia In- 
stitute of Technology. He is a native 
of Philadelphia, 




®5 J 






CJvL&ap&aJvL 



<ix^ 



m 



P 




2&* 




10% 




m 



1 *>''$& , 2§ 



, ytvV> 



from the TILGHMAN Packing Company 

CRABS OYSTERS 

Crab Cakes 12 Oz. Standard (frozen) 

Deviled Crabs 12 Oz. Select (frozen) 

Deviled Crab Cutlets Breaded Oysters 

Bite-Size Deviled Crabs and Fish Sticks! 
TIL-MADE 
Queen of the 
Chesapeake 



m 



Pronounced "Til-Man" 




ffi$£*2£^ 



m 



PACKING CO. 



Also 

Instltutiona 
Sizes » 






m. 



"finest Chesapeake Seafoods For Over 58 Years' 

TILGHMAN ISLAND • TILGHMAN, MD. 

Phones 2101-2111-2121 



Sfiyfi^T:ra^7<R^7<^^ 




J. McKenny Willis & Son, inc. 



GRAIN 

FEED 

SEED 



EASTON, MD. 
Phone 744 



"Bill" Oehlrlch, Prop. 



410 E. Dover St. 




BILL'S 
STEAK HOUSE 

dun Spucialhf 
STEAKS 



PHONE 790 EASTON, MD. 

5/10 Mile Off Route 50 
Air Conditioned (Closed Sundays) 



EASTERN SHORE 
GLASS CO. 

SALISBURY BOULEVARD 
SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



TUGHmnn ice & fuel co. 

ICE 
FUEL OIL 
KEROSENE 

Icing for Fishing Parties 

Blower Service for Trucks 

Delivery Service 

TILGHMAN 2821 
Tilghman, Md. 



. Spring J4UI 

PRIVATE SANITARIUM 

SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



TELEPHONE SALISBURY 5594 



Elliott E q u i p m e n t Compflnv 



INCORPORATED 



NORTH AURORA STREET 
McCormick-Deering Farm Machinery 
and Refrigeration 




EASTON, MD. - Telephone 742 
International Motor Trucks 



Maryland 



26 



ALL ROADS LEAD TO 



HOTEL 




SALISBURY • MARYLAND 
Corner Division and Main Sts. 



Baltimore. Frederick 

Annapolis. Washington 

and the West 



N«W IHBL AND NEW YORK. 

Philadelphia. Wilmins. 
TON. Oik. and the North 




Norfolk. Newport news 
and the South 






American 
Hotels 

Corporation 



■h^r^i 



FAMILY RATES 

(Children Frpp) 
Our Famous 



EASTERN SHORE 
CUISINE 

TRUE SOUTHERN 
HOSPITALITY 



LIGHTHOUSE 
DII1ER 

Two Places to Eat 
Here and at Home 

open year Rouno 

• June to October 

• 24-Hour Service 

FINE FOOD and 
MIXED DRINKS 

8 Miles from Ocoan City, Md. 
on Beach Highway 

Fenuiick Island, Del. 



REEDY'S FRRITI SUPPLY 



FEEDS 

JARRETSVILLE 
4000 

# ROCKS, MD 




SEEDS 

PARKTON 
2421 

PARKTON, MD. • 



Mr. Felt is a member of the Ameri- 
can Rocket Society, the American In- 
stitute of Electrical Engineers and sev- 
eral honorary engineering societies. 

Martin holds the primary Navy con- 
tract for construction of the satellite's 
launching system. 

Fire Study 

Delegate Ira Bird Kirkland, Demo- 
crat of Anne Arundel, announced that 
the University of Maryland has asked 
for funds to set up a special course 
in fire-prevention engineering. 

Mr. Kirkland, chairman of the coun- 
ty's delegation, told the West Anna- 
polis Fire Company that University 
President Wilson H. Elkins has re- 
quested $11,064 to set up the accredited 
four-year course leading to a bachelor 
of science degree in fire prevention. 

He said prominent industrialists in 
the State have assured him that there 
will be many job opportunities for the 
graduates of such a course. 
In California 

Richard E. Miller, B. S. E. E., '55, 
is now a member of the Field Engineer- 
ing Division, Hughes Aircraft Com- 
pany, Culver City, California. He was 
formerly affiliated with the Diamond 
Ordnance Fuze Laboratories. 
Ahrendt Honored 

The first distinguished service 
plaque, given by the Prince Georges 
Junior Chamber of Commerce to the 
person selected as the "outstanding 
young man" of the County, went to 
William R. Ahrendt, who at 36 is 
president of the Ahrendt Instrument 
Co. of College Park, and the author 
of authoritative textbooks on electron- 
ics. 

Mr. Ahrendt is also an instructor at 
the University of Maryland, chairman 
of the board of Copar, Inc. of Laurel, 
and vice president of Litton Industries. 
He has written two textbooks on elec- 
tronics, and has found time to be active 
in County Community Chest campaigns, 
in the College Park Rotary Club, and in 
the recent organization of the College 
Park Unitarian Church. 



BANK OF 
CRISFIELD 

DEPENDABLE SERVICE SINCE 1892 

Marion Branch 

Phone 2381 
Uptown Branch 

Phone 312 
Main Office 

Phone 102 

Member 

Federal Deposit Insurant* 

Oorp. 



In Texas 



MASSEY-HARRIS 

Sales - Service - Parts 

LUTHY 

FARM MACHINERY CO. 

CAMBRIDGE 838 CAMBRIDGE, MD. 




V.S.A.F. FotO 

NAVIGATION MISSION 
Lieutenant Norman D. Frank, (Engr. 
'54), checks a periscopic sextant be- 
fore flying a navigation mission in the 
T-29 "flying classroom" in background 
at Harlingen Air Force Base, Texas. 

He received his degree in aeronauti- 
cal engineering from the University 
of Maryland. 



Starting his own business in 1948, 
on the proverbial "shoestring", Mr. 
Ahrendt has seen it expand phenomen- 
ally to it present 33,200 sq. feet of 
modern, air-conditioned plant, and 200 
employees. Last year the firm grossed 
$1.7 million in sales. 

His rapid rise in his field prompted 
Fortune magazine to publish a thumb- 
nail sketch of him in which he was 
cited as "an example proving how far 
self-confidence will take a man in the 
U. S. business world:" 

He is the founder of the Ahrendt 
Fund, a charitable foundation to which 
he regularly contributes funds which 
are in turn distributed to worthy char- 
itable drives and organizations. 
1 Gershwin Winner 

A civil engineer, the son and grand- 
son of Maryland Episcopalian minis- 
ters, won the eleventh annual George 
Gershwin memorial contest for the 
best original unpublished composition 
by a young American composer. 

The prize went to Reginald H. Hall, 
a graduate of the University of Mary- 
land (Engineering '48) and a resident 
of this State for most of his 29 years. 

Mr. Hall's "Elegy for Orchestra" 
took first place among 72 works, a rec- 
ord number of entries for this contest. 

The composer receives a cash award 
of $1,000, and his winning composition 
will be played this season by the New 
York Philharmonic Symphony Orches- 
tra, under the direction of Dimitri Mit- 
ropoulos. 

In addition, Mr. Hall will receive a 
week's visit to New York as a guest of 
B'nai B'rith's Victory Lodge, which 
sponsors the award. 

His "Elegy" will be included in the 



26 



Maryland 



rental library of Chappell and Com- 
pany and he will receive the custom- 
ary author's royalties. 

The winner is the son of the Rev. 
Reginald Foster Hall and Mrs. Hall. 
The Rev. Mr. Hall is rector of St. 
Philip's Episcopal Church, Laurel. The 
composer's grandfather, the Rev. Per- 
cy Foster Hall, was rector of St. Tim- 
othy's Episcopal Church at Catons- 
ville for nineteen years, beginning in 
1894. 

At 15, Hall was struck down by 
polio and spent more than a year hos- 
pitalized. He recovered without after- 
effects. 

His early interest in music was in 
the popular variety. He studied piano, 
played with dance bands and had his 
own orchestra, members of which in- 
cluded two younger brothers. 

His band activities paid a good deal 
and helped at the University of Mary- 
land on a scholarship in engineering. 
During his junior year he became in- 
terested in serious music and deter- 
mined that he would study it. For four 
years he worked as a highway engineer 
in Prince George's County, and at night 
and in his spare time studied music. 
He had a brief summer course at the 
Peabody Conservatory, and he sang 
with the Washington Choral Society. 

In February, 1952, he entered the 
University of Michigan to study com- 
position, receiving his bachelor's de- 
gree in music in February, 1954, and 
his master's in composition last Aug- 
ust. He also studied for a summer at 
the University of Southern California. 
Today Mr. Hall works full-time for 
an engineering firm. 

He expressed himself as being "sur- 
prised and elated" to win the Gershwin 
memorial award. As to whether he 
will continue to work as an engineer 
and have music for an avocation, or 
whether he will seek to earn his liv- 
ing as a composer — will depend "on 
future opportunities." 

"But one thing is certain," he said, 
"'I will always be involved in music." 
To Far East 
Col. William I. Russell, Eng. '29, 
General Staff Officer at Fort Benning, 
Ga., left there early in February to 
go to Manila, Philippine Islands. Col. 
Russell, a native of Chevy Chase, 
Maryland, and Mrs. Russell visited 
Washington before going to Manila 
and their 19 year old daughter, Sally, 
who is a sophomore at the University 
of Alabama, enrolled in the University 
of Maryland at that time. 

Col. Russell went to the Far East in 
1949, serving with the Counter In- 
telligence Corps in Japan. He com- 
manded a guerilla warfare and intelli- 
gence unit in Korea from April to 
December 1951 and went to Fort Ben- 
ning in 1953 as Commander of the 
Second Student Regiment and in March, 
1954, was assigned to the office of the 
Deputy Commanding General and later 
the General Staff. 

His decorations include the Legion 
of Merit, Bronze Star Medal and Com- 
bat Infantryman Badge. 

With Geological Survey 
Robert Leroy Pumphrey, (B.S. of 



STANDARD 
ENGINEERING CO, 

INCORPORATED 

Engineers and Contractors 

REpublic 7-1343 

2129 EYE STREET, NORTHWEST 

WASHINGTON 7, D. C. 




Tennis Courts 

Hand and Volley 
Ball Courts 



*& Concrete Driveways 



MYERS & QUIGG, Inc. 

PAVING CONTRACTORS 

Office & Plant: 91 -O Street, Southeast 
Lincoln 7-2434 Washington 3, D. C. 






P 



jjju.. 



m 




<^$L 



2345 Sherman Ave., N.W. HU 3-5200 Washington, D. C. 

Specializing in all of the 
Great Brand Names in 

HIGH FIDELITY 

Visit Our Sound Room — Plenty of Free Parking 



WALLOP and SON 



J. DOUGLASS WALLOP, JR. 
Class of 1919 



J. DOUGLASS WALLOP, 3rd 
Class of 1942 



— INSURANCE — 

Fire • Automobile - Life - Accident - Liability - Bonds 

EVERY INSURANCE SERVICE — COUNTRY WIDE 
1101 VERMONT AVE., N.W. — Suite 405 Executive 3-1400 WASHINGTON 5, D. C. 



Maryland 



27 



C.E. '53), of 2841 27th Street, N.E., 
Washington 18, D.C., is a hydraulic 
engineer with the U.S. Geological Sur- 
vey. His wife is former Miss Carole 
Jean Williams who attended Mary- 
land in the year 1949. They have no 
children. Pumphrey is a 2nd Lieut, of 
U.S. Air Force Reserve; Member of the 
American Society of Civil Engineers; 
and of Naval Lodge No. 4, FAAM (Ma- 
sonic) Washington, D.C. 

Metallurgist, U. S. Navy 

Harold Bernstein, who obtained his 
M.S. in Metallurgy in 1953 in the Engi- 
neering School of Maryland is now a 
metallurgist with the U. S. Navy. He 
and his wife, Sylvia have two chil- 
dren, Paul Morly, 7, and Janet, nearly 
5 years of age. The Bernsteins live 
at 3300 Buchanan Street, Mt. Rainier, 
Md. Bernstein has written articles for 
the Journal of Metals, the American 
Society of Metals, and Iron Age. He is 
a member of the Washington Chapter 
of the American Society for Metals. 
Electronics Scientist 

Harold Jackson Peake, (M.S. of E.E., 
'53), is an Electronics Scientist and in 
addition is a part-time Instructor at 
George Washington University. He and 
his wife, Mariellyn, live at 945 Swarth- 
more Drive, Alexandria, Va. Peake 
was a Lieutenant, USNR, with active 
service in 1944 and 1945. He is the 
author of scores of papers on radio and 
Electronics matters and has lectured 
extensively on those subjects. Peake 
is a senior member of the Institute of 
Radio Engineer and a member of the 
Research Society of America. 
Research Engineer 

Wallace Kemp Lehmann, (B.S. of 
Chem. E. '53), is a Research Engineer 
and member of the Board of Directors 
of C. M. Kemp Mfg. Company. The 
records available to us show him as 
unmarried and residing at 5606 Pimlico 
Road, Baltimore 9, Md. 

Automobile Engineer 

Michael Francis Schuncke, (B.S. of 
M.E. '52), is an engineer with a De- 
troit Chevrolet Gear and Axle con- 
cern. He and his wife, Mary Jane, and 
two children, Susan 4, and George Wil- 

.!_SmiTH UlELDinG-!, 

COMPANY 

PORTABLE EQUIPMENT 

4803 Rhode Island Ave. 
Hyattsville, Md. 



Airman 



modern 
machinists co. 

General Machine Work 

MACHINE DESIGNING 

MAINTENANCE • AUTOMOTIVE 

INDUSTRIAL - AIRCRAFT 

774 Girard St., N.W. 

Waihlngton, D. C 




AT WACO, TEXAS 
First Lieutenant James J. Rast, 
(Engr. '53), completed the Advanced 
Observer Intercept training program 
at James Connally Air Force Base, 
Waco, Texas. 

Students in this program receive ad- 
vanced training in B-25 aircraft, lead- 
ing to specialization in all-weather jet 
interceptors. From James Connally 
AFB, these officers are assigned to Air 
Force installations throughout the 
world, serving with the Air Defense 
Command. Their training period here 
lasts for sixteen weeks. 

Lt. Rast attended the University of 
Maryland, where he was a member of 
the AFROTC Unit, receiving his Bache- 
lor of Science degree in Aeronautical 
Engineering in 1953. He entered the 
Air Force in November of that year 
and trained at Ellington Air Force 
Base, Houston, Texas, before transfer- 
ring to James Connally. 



liam 3, reside at 16581 Mendota, De- 
troit 2, Michigan. Schuncke saw active 
military service from 1946 to 1948 in- 
clusive. 

Design Engineer 

John Byrnes Evans, (B.S. of M.E. 
'52), is a design engineer in develop- 
ment engineering with the Internation- 
al Business Machines Corp. at Endi- 
cott, N. Y. He had military service 
overseas in Europe and was awarded 
the Bronze Star Medal. He is a mem- 
ber of the American Society of Me- 
chanical Engineers and gives 12 Dela- 
ware Avenue, Endwell, N. Y., as his 
address. 

With Bethlehem Steel 

George Ernest Wieland, Jr., (B.S. of 
Chem. E. '52), is a chemical engineer 
in the Research Department of Bethle- 
hem Steel at Bethlehem, Pa. He and 
his wife, Doris, reside at 703 Maple St., 
Bethlehem, Pa. 

Field Engineer 

Kenneth D. Allen, (B.S. of M.E. '50), 
is a field engineer with Lear, Inc., of 
Grand Rapids, Michigan. He was for- 
merly with the Sperry Gyroscope Com- 
pany. His naval service covered about 
one year. He gave his addess as 1245 
E. Baltimore Avenue, Baltimore 12, Md. 



28 



Sales Manager 

Charles H. Berry, (B.S. of M.E. '34), 
is sales manager for Kearfelt Co., of 
little Falls, N. J. Prior to his present 
position he was a chief engineer with 
the Coca-Cola Co.; Field Engineering 
Supervisor for the Eclipse Pioneer Di- 
vision of Bendix, Aviation; and As- 
sistant General Purchasing Agent for 
Mathieson Chemical Co. He and his 
wife, Ruth, and their three children, 
Ruth, Barbara, and Charles H. Jr., 
reside at 56 Edgewood Drive, Hobokus, 
N. J. 

With Federal Civil Defense 
Administration 

Fred Cutting, (B.S. of C.E. '34), is 
an Examiner of Organization and 
Methods with the Federal Civil De- 
fense Administration. Prior to his 
present occupation he occupied a simi- 
lar position with the Veterans Admin- 
istration. He received a degree in 
Public Administration from American 
University in 1946. His military serv- 
ice included duty in the Pacific Theater 
in the rank of Major and covered four 
years. He and his wife, Winifred, have 
three children, Winifred, Luida, and 
James. His address is 4612 Fordham 
Road, College Park, Md. Cutting is 
active in Alumni matters and is Past 
President of the Engineering Alumni 
Board and has served on various Com- 
mittees of that Board, especially on 
the Job Placement Committee, where 
his administrative experience and know 
how has been of the greatest value. 
The Engineering Alumni can well be 
proud of Fred Cutting and hope for 
his continued close interest in alumni 
matters. 

With General Services 

Wilbur B. Montgomery, (B.S. of C.E. 
'23), who resides at 1620 Roxanna 
Road, N.W., Washington 12, D. C, is 
manager of the West Area Buildings. 
Management Division of General Serv- 
ices Administration of the Federal Gov- 
ernment, Washington, D. C. He and 
his wife, Clara, have two grown chil- 
dren, Robert and Jean. Montgomery 
saw some military service in World 
War I. He has occupied various engi- 
neering positions prior to assuming 
his present position and served for a 
time with the National Park Service. 
Language Analyst 

Preston L. Peach is a most dis- 
tinguished member of the Engineering 
School of Maryland. His degrees in- 
clude B.S. of M.E. '03, and M.A, in 
Education from Maryland in 1932. He 
also received the degree of M.M.E. 
from Cornell in 1913. He is a language 
analyst with the Defense Department. 
Dr. Peach has had an extensive career 
as a teacher and administrator of In- 
dustrial Arts and as an Educational 
Missionary in Malaya where he headed 
for many years the schools of Kuala 
Lumpur, Malaya. 

Dr. Peach is an ordained minister of 
the Methodist Church and an outstand- 
ing educator of whom Maryland has 
every reason to be proud. 

He and his wife, Mrs. Nora Nelson 
Peach have three adult children, Nelson 

Maryland 



Lihlepage Peach; Robert Marvin Peach 
and Elizabeth Wellford Peach. 

Dr. Peach is a member of the Ma- 
sonic Fraternity and has held many 
high civil positions to include that of 
membership on the Board of Directors 
of the Rotaiy International. He now 
lives at 3472 So. Utah St., Arlington, 
Va. 

In Kuala Lumpur 
The writer of this sketch wishes to 
pay high tribute to Dr. Peach and to 
remind him of an incident that he may 
well have forgotten long since. The 
writer tried to make a personal call 
on Dr. Peach in Kuala Lumpur in De- 
cember of 1938 only to find that the 
doctor was in the States but had left 
word for his California-born Assistant 
to "show the sights" of that most in- 
teresting oriental city to include the 
tin mines and other activities. As a 
result of this attempted visit, Dr. 
Peach, on his return via the Philippine 
Islands to the Far East, stopped off 
in Manila to return the call of this 
writer and thereupon a temporary Ma- 
nila Chapter of the Maryland Engi- 
neering Alumni came into existence for 
a brief period of a day or two with 
Dr. Peach as first and only President 
thereof. However, to return to the 
incident that might be brought to Dr. 
Peach's memory; it was the pleasure 
and privilege of this writer to entertain 
Dr. and Mrs. Peach at lunch in Army 
Quarters at Military Plaza just off 
Manila Bay on the day they were due 
to sail for Singapore. A leisurely 
lunch in tropical manner was being 
thoroughly enjoyed by the Peaches, the 
host's wife and ye host and the hour 
of three o'clock in the afternoon came 
without anyone seemingly being aware 
of the passage of time. Suddenly, Mrs. 
Peach inquired in her delightfully quiet 
way, "Preston, does our ship sail at 
3:00 o'clock or 4:00 o'clock?" There- 
upon, Dr. Peach went to the telephone 
and called Pier 6 and below is a part 
of the conversation as overheard after 
the connection with the Ship's Captain 
had been made and the preliminary 
questions put as to when the ship was 
to sail from Manila to Singapore. 
Please remember that Singapore was 
a goodly 1500 miles away, and also 
that at that moment it was 3:00 o'clock 
in the afternoon with Dr. Peach far 
from the piers. Dr. Peach speaking un- 
der the stress of the moment in al- 
most a British accent, as he had lived 
for many, many years with the British 
in Malaya. 

"But my de-aR Fell-ow, you cawn't 
sail at 3:00 o'clock as I am a pas- 
senger on your ship and I'm not 
there." 

Held The Ship 
At least the latter part of this state- 
ment was a very definite fact. The up- 
shot of it all was that finaly the Cap- 
tain agreed to hold the ship until 
4:00 p.m., to allow Dr. and Mrs. Peach 
to arrive. 

You never saw such scurrying, as Dr. 
Peach, in this writer's automobile, had 
to pick up some hand baggage from a 
Manila Hotel ten blocks away, while 
this writer rushed by other conveyance 



jk GEIURflL 

W C0I1TRACT0RS 

\ 

PORTER COnSTRUCTIOn COmPAllY 

INCORPORATED 

UNIon 4-7472 
5104 BALTIMORE AVENUE HYATTSVILLE, MD. 



■Swerving students and 

alumni of the 

University of 

ff/arytand 

32 years 

LUSTine nicHOLSon 

OldAmobilsL 

f^hil cJLustine . . . 
head of both companies 

Baltimore flue, on Route 1 
Huattsuille, Rid. 
UJflrfield 7-7200 



RESTORFF MOTORS 

Sales JyCi^rt Service 

7323 BALTIMORE BLVD. • AP 7-5100 
COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



JOuwWl dtoUtdwahSL 
& Supply* 

Hardware - Plumbing 

Purina Feeds - Sporting Ooods 

8204 Baltimore Blvd. TOwbb 9-6060 

College Park, Md. 

Open Sunday 10 A.M. to 2 P.M. 




SALES 
INSURANCE 
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 

Near University of Maryland 
WArfield 7-1010 & 7-0321 
6037 Baltimore Boulevard 

RIVERDALE, MD. 



(HEATING WArfleld 7-B33I 

PLUMBING 
REMODELING 
NOBBING A SPECIALTY 

ROBERT F. HOFF 

|»313 - 46th Av«. Rlvordalo. Md. 



DEL HAVEN WHITE HOUSE COTTAGES 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 
Baltimore-Washington Boulevard 

Two Miles North — University Maryland 
Hot Water Heated 60 Brick Cottages 

Tile Baths 
F. M. Ibwin, Prop. WDbster 0-48B2 



USE THE COUPON ON 
THE LAST PAGE 



KIDUIELL & KIDUJELL, Inc. 

Plastering - Dry Wall 
Installation 

BOX 266 COLLEGE PARK 

WEbster 5-4500 MD. 



Sales 

Service 

Rentals 

supplies 



ROYAL TYPEWRITERS 
CLARY OFFICE MACHINES 

PRINCE GEORGES 
OFFICE MACHINES CO. 

4505 Queensbury Rd. Riverdale, Md. 

UN 4-9400 



Maryland 



29 



50th ANNIVERSARY 



1906 



1956 




ARUNDEL FEDERAL 
SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION 

direct reduction home loam 
laving! accounts - liberal dividends 

• 
Insured up to $10,000 by the Federal 
Savings and Loan Insurance Cor*. 

• 
Christmas Clubs — Safe Deposit Boxes 
Community Hall for Rent 

Hours: 

9 to 2 dally 

7 to 9 Tuesday evening 

PATAPSCO AVENUE & FOURTH STREET 
Baltimore 25, Md. CUrtls 7-1112 



poured Gypsum, 
Cemesto Board and 
Insulrock root decks 

sprayed on asbestos 
fireproofing and 
insulation 

AcoustrCelotex 
acoustical treatments 

lathing & plastering 
contractors 

330 W. 24th St. 
Baltimore 11, Md. 
HOpkins 7-3970 



A 

M 
P 



I 



Russell W. Smith 

Genera/ Insurance 

1003 MERCANTILE TRUST BLDG. 

Baltimore 2, Md. 
LExIngton 9-0020 



•BE. 5-7135 



Call 



HO. 7-6746* 



ft & f nURSCS REGISTRY 

MALE — FEMALE 

RNS LICENSED PRACTICAL* 

Lie. — Practicals - Maternity - Bonded 

Nurses 

Sarah Anderson 613 Homestead St. 

• Manager Baltimore 18, Md. * 



to Pier 8 to gather up the Peachs' 
heavy luggage from that Pier to have 
it handcarted by a half dozen shouting 
Filipinos over to Pier 6 for proper stor- 
age. 

The result was a triumphal depar- 
ture for Dr. and Mrs. Peach from Ma- 
nila at 4:00 p.m., on a ship advertised 
to sail at 3:00 p.m. That's the Far 
East for you and will indicate to you 
the powers of persuasion of Dr. Peach. 

We of the Engineers do honor to a 
splendid gentleman, educator and engi- 
neer of the old school of Maryland. 
May Dr. Peach have many years of 
happiness and health is our sincere 
wish. 

In Florida 

Samuel E. McGlathery, Jr., '33, writes 
to send a contribution to the Alumni 
Fund and to tell of recent business 
activities. For the past three years 
he has been employed by the boiler 
division of Babcock and Wilcox Com- 
pany. He has been with the St. Peters- 
burg Engineering Section in Florida 
preparing detailed plans for large cen- 
tral station steam boilers. Following 
graduation, Mr. McGlathery was with 
the Farm Security Administration as 
a construction engineer at Greenbelt, 
Md. He also served as a field engineer 
for the Portland Cement Association 
and was associated with Holland Sur- 
veys in Alexandria, Virginia. He is 
married and has one daughter. 

Professor Resler Appointed 

Professor Edwin L. Resler of Mary- 
land's Institute for Fluid Dynamics and 
Applied Mathematics, has been ap- 
pointed to the National Advisory Com- 
mittee for Aeronautics for the year 
1956. 

In the planning of scientific labora- 
tory research programs in aeronautics, 
the main committee of the NACA is as- 
sisted by twenty-eight technical sub- 
committees comprising more than 400 
specialists whose collective talents rep- 
resent leadership in nearly every 
branch of the aeronautical sciences. 

Serving without compensation, the 
members of the subcommittees are se- 
lected because of their technical knowl- 
edge, demonstrated ability, and leader- 
ship in their special fields. 

They will assist the NSCA by in- 
itiating research programs, by advising 
upon problems within their technical 
fields, by reviewing current research 
throughout the nation, by recommend- 
ing new areas of research and by co- 
ordination of research programs. 

Dr. Resler will serve on the Sub- 
committee on Fluid Mechanics. 

School of :^==^=== 



Law 



- G. Kenneth Reiblich '29 

Mental — Legal 

New developments in the law govern- 
ing mental disorders as a defense 
in criminal cases was explained a 
lecture given by Professor Henry 
Weihofen, of the University of New 
Mexico College of Law, at Baltimore. 

Professor Weihofen is a noted au- 
thority in the field of criminal law and 



a Baltimorean, was 

the Fourth Circuit, 

Maryland, West Vir- 

North Carolina and 



psychiatry and came to Baltimore 
from Philadelphia where he delivered 
the Isaac Ray Lectures. 

He is co-author with Dr. Manfred 
F. Guttmacher, Chief Medical Officer of 
the Supreme Bench of Baltimore, of 
"Psychiatry and the Law," generally 
regarded as a classic in the medical- 
legal field. 

The lecture was jointly sponsored by 
the School of Law and the Psychiatric 
Institute of the University of Maryland. 
Arrangements for the lecture were 
made by Professor L. Farinholt, of the 
law school. 

Federal Circuit Judge 
President Eisenhower nominated the 
United States Solicitor General, Simon 
E. Sobeloff, to be a Federal circuit 
judge. 

Mr. Sobeloff, 
nominated for 
which includes 
ginia, Virginia, 
South Carolina. 

The President had nominated Mr. 
Sobeloff for the post at the last session 
of Congress, but the 
Senate took no ac- 
tion on the appoint- 
ment until adjourn- 
ment. 

A lifelong Repub- 
lican, Mr. Sobeloff 
was born in Balti- 
more and attended 
University of Mary- 
land School of Law. 
After starting a 
private practice of 
law he went into 
public life, becoming 
an assistant city solicitor, a United 
States district attorney and chief judge 
of the Maryland Court of Appeals. 

He was made Solicitor General of 
the United States at the outset of the 
Eisenhower Administration. 

While in the post, he has represented 
the Government before the Supreme 
Court in far-reaching decisions, includ- 
ing the one which led to the recent 
decision that the nation's public schools 
must make a "prompt and reasonable" 
start toward desegregation. 

His nomination is subject to Senate 
confirmation. 

Annual Banquet 
The annual banquet of the Law 
School Alumni Association will be held 
on Friday evening, April 27, 7:00 p.m. 
at the Emerson Hotel, Baltimore. 
Guests of Honor will include Governor 
Theodore R. McKeldin, Judges of the 
Court of Appeals of Maryland, the 
Federal Judges for this Circuit, Solici- 
tor General Simon E. Sobeloff, Hon. 
William P. Cole, Chairman of the Board 
of Regents and President Wilson H. 
Elkins. The graduating class of the 
law school will attend as guests and 
Dean Howell will present honors and 
awards. 

The Nominating Committee, appointed 
by the President, J. Gilbert Prender- 
gast, Esq., has presented to the Sec- 
retary the following list of officers for 
the year 1956-57, to be elected by bal- 
lot at the banquet: 




Judge Sobeloff 



30 



Maryland 




X Jtoto iLn 



for Lroa 



naraxma* 



\rams 



— \**Woiit 



a jMa 



3 



3 



azincs 



I 



Tl.« 

ADVERTISERS ENGRAVING COMPANY 

501-509 EAST PRESTON STREET 
MUlberry 5-2357 5-2358 



FAIRHAVEN 

FARMS 

DAIRY 



SYKESVILLE, 
MARYLAND 



PESTS? 



"CaWjAe 



TERMITES? 

Rod* Man' 




C. Walter Porter, Mgr. 

SAratoga 7-6118 

22 W. FRANKLIN STREET 

Baltimore 1, Md. 



President — Hon. Stanford I. Soff, '34, West- 
minster. 
First Vice-President — Leon H. A. Plerson, 

Esq., '23, Baltimore. 
Second Vice-President — Benjamin B. Rosen- 
stock, Esq., '25, Frederick. 
Third Vice-President — Hon. Emory H. Niles, 

'17, Baltimore. 
Secretary -Treasurer— G. Kenneth Relbltch, 
Esq., '29, Baltimore. 
Executive Committee : Hon. Thomas N. 
Biddison, '31, Baltimore ; Clayton C. Carter, 
Esq., '46, Centreville; Hon. Joseph L. Carter, 
'25, Baltimore ; J. Harold Orady, Esq., '42, 
Baltimore ; William A. Loker, '33, Leonard- 
town ; \V. Albert Menehine, '29, Baltimore 
County; Hon. Layman J, Redden, '34, Den- 
ton ; J. Hodge Smith, Esq., '39, Roekville ; 
Doris P. Scott, '49, Elkton ; Hon C. Awdry 
Thompson, '40, Cambridge. 

The Nominating Committee : James J. Mc- 
Grath, Esq., '36 ; Francis X. Gallagher, Esq., 
'52 ; Theodore C. Waters, Jr., Esq., '50 ; Wil- 
liam Taft Feldman Esq., '33 ; George Gump, 
Esq., '33, Chairman. 

Any additional nominations are re- 
quired under the Constition to be sub- 
mitted by petition signed by ten mem- 
bers and mailed to the Secretary, G. 
Kenneth Reiblich, at the School of Law 
at least thirty days prior to the date 
of the banquet. 



School of 



Pharmacy 

B. Olive Cole 
.Adele B. Ballman 




Mr. Nave 



With Eli Lilly 

Jackson M. Nave, '49, has been named 
the new representative of Eli 
Lilly and Company in the Salisbury, 
Maryland territory. 
In addition to south- 
eastern Maryland, 
the territory in- 
cludes eastern Vir- 
ginia and southern 
Delaware. 

Since 1953, Nave 
has been employed 
by the Peninsula 
General Hospital in 
Salisbury, also 
working as a relief 
pharmacist at the 
Peninsula Pharm- 
acy, Church Street Pharmacy and Salis- 
bury Drug Store. 

Mr. Nave is a member of the Ameri- 
can Pharmaceutical Association, Amer- 
ican Society qf Hospital Pharmacists, 
Eastern Shore Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion and the' professionl pharmacy- 
chemistry fraternity, Phi Delta Chi. 
Prefer Baltimore 
The University's Bogird of Regents 
heard pharmacists urge reconsideration 
of a plan under which pharmacy stu- 
dents would spend the first two years 
of their five-year course studying gen- 
eral subjects at the university's College 
Park campus and the last three years 
at the pharmacy school 19 Baltimore. 

Dr. Lloyd N- Richardson was chair- 
man of the pharmacists' committee. 
Other members who spoke were Dr. 
H. A. B. Dunning, Dr. Joseph Cohen 
and Dr. Robert L. Swain. 

They urged that the program be 
changed to provide for one year of 




Fiction 

Noii'Fiction 

Children's Books 

Educational Qames 
and Toys 

Stationery and 
Qreeting Cards 

Religious Books and 
Bibles 

'* Cultural UJtparlmtnt ~>to 

1 Wl rV W^ , / Mail and pliant orders shipped promptly 
ON AU.tO *' \ Wf|t# |„ fttt | ook Co , | , 




BOOK STORE 

516 N. CHARLES STREET 
Phone SA. 7-7280 



PENNIMAN & 
BROWNE, INC. 

Chemists 

Engineers 

Inspectors 

• 

Testing Laboratories 
Baltimore - Washington 



H0PW00D 
Transportation Co. 

DAILY SERVICE 

BALTIMORE WASHINGTON 

ALEXANDRIA 

Towson & Beason Streets 

PL. 2-0433 BALTIMORE 



Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 

Consulting Engineer 

1701 SAINT PAUL STREET 
laltlmore 1, Md. 



Maryland 



81 



MITCHELLS 



18 



Ulhv 



mRRYLflllD'S FinEST COM 

Mitchell's Premium Corn tastes like 



it was just cut from the cob . . 
result of Mitchell's own process- 
ing that cooks and seals the 
corn in cans with- 
in the hour it is 
pulled from the 
stalk. 



wrcHEm, 



SHOE PEG 



the 




POTE SWEET 



•dGOLDEN SWEET 



- Packed by — 

F. 0. miTCHELL & BRO., Inc. 

FERRYMAN, MD. - KENNEDYVILLE, MD. 

Main Office, Perryman, Md. 

Phone Aberdeen 621 -J 



OFFICE FURNITURE 

Fine Executive Desks and Chairs 

Leather Club Chairs and 

Davenports 

Steel Desks and Filing Cabinets 

THE JAMES T. VERNAY 
& SONS CO. 

5 E. LEXINGTON STREET 

PLaza 2-4220 Baltimore 2, Md. 



Easter Greetings 

from the 

G. B. MACKE CORP. 

Serving Maryland University 
with all types of 
Vending Machines 



LExlngton VAlley 

9-2106 \ M-5> / 3-48B3 



WEST & CO. 



Garbbtt [ ( ^«»MJ Baltimore 

Bldo. ^-~--^-^^ 2, Md. 

MULTIPLE LISTING REALTORS 

Specializing in 

NORTHERN PROPERTIES 



general study and four years of special- 
ized pharmacy, and that, if possible, 
all of it be given in Baltimore. 

A large percentage of the pharmacy 
students, they said, come from the 
Baltimore area, and many of them can 
not afford to go to College Park. 

The Board of Regents voted to take 
the matter under advisement. 

With Parke, Davis & Co. 

A Maryland graduate field manager 
has been appointed in the Baltimore 
branch of Park, Davis & Company. He 
is Earl Lowery, 30, 
and will work under 
S. N. Dripps, Balti- 
more branch man- 
ager. 

Lowery joined 
Parke-Davis as a 
sales and medical 
service representa- 
tive in Western 
Maryland after 
graduating from the 
University of Mary- 
land in June, 1950. 
The veteran of 3Y Z 
years with the Navy Medical Depart- 
ment recently married the former Miss 
Eleania T. Humphries. They will make 
their new home in Philadelphia. 




Mr. Lowery 



School of 



Nursing 

Bessie M. Arnurius 
^^ Helen E. King 



Scholarship Grant 

The Commonwealth Fund of New 
York, for the third consecutive 
year, has awarded a scholarship grant 
of $12,000 to the School of Nursing for 
graduate nursing education. 

The scholarships will be awarded to 
nurses holding baccalaureate degrees 
who desire to undertake master's de- 
grees in psychiatric nursing. 

Renewal of financial support of the 
Southern Regional Education Board's 
nursing project by the Commonwealth 
Fund was announced by Dr. Genevieve 
K. Bixler, head of the SREB project. 

The funds from Commonwealth, 
which amount to $85,150.00, are divided 
between the periodic seminars of the 
regional board and allocations toward 
fellowships in the six schools that 
make up the Southern Regional Pro- 
gram of Graduate Education in Nurs- 
ing. The member schools at Maryland, 
Texas, Alabama and North Carolina, 
Vanderbilt and Emory, receive $12,000 
each per year for graduate fellowships 
in nursing. 

Candidates wishing to apply for 
scholarships in nursing at Maryland 
must hold a bachelor's degree from an 
accredited college or university and 
must have had basic preparation in 
psychiatric nursing and field work in 
an approved public health agency. 

The applicant for a nursing scholar- 
ship is also required to meet admis- 
sion standards of the University's 
graduate school. 

Personals 

Second Lieut. Peggy J. Feiser, 1951, 



is stationed with the Tact. Hospital 
(SAC) at Loring Air Force Base in 
Limestone, Maine. 

Mrs. Anita Jones Marshall, 1943, 
writes that she is eagerly looking for- 
ward to the news in the magazine. Mrs. 
Marshall was quite surprised to find 
several of our nurses living in the 
Arlington area. She says, "We see the 
Poffenberger's frequently (Gladys 
Leonard, 1942). They have a nice home 
in Silver Spring — two lovely daughters 
ages five and one-half and one and one- 
half." 

Mrs. Marshall has lived in Arling- 
ton since leaving Chicago four years 
ago and says, "We are looking for- 
warl to the completion of our new home 
in Fairfax by spring." Although Mrs. 
Marshall has had little contact in the 
field of nursing for the past six years, 
she is enjoying serving as health 
chairman for her daughter's kinder- 
garten and says she is amazed at how 
much she has forgotten about pedi- 
atrics and communicable diseases. 
In Idaho Falls ' 
Mrs. Hamilton R. Fishback, nee Car- 
olyn Doris Zeller, 1941, writes, "Our 
Idaho Falls Medical Auxiliary has or- 
ganized a future Nurses Club in the 
Senior and Junior High Schools. Nurse 
recruitment has been an active pro- 
gram here." Mrs. Fishback resides at 
268 8th St., Idaho Falls, Idaho. 

Miss Ethel Andrea Sellers, 1952, 
started as Night Teaching Supervisor 
at Roosevelt Hospital in New York 
City on September 19, 1955. Miss 
Sellers writes, "It is one of the Big 
Six here, about the size of the Uni- 
versity. I have all services, except 
Obstetrical and the Operating Rooms, 
and I find it a valuable challenging 
experience, with the feature of keep- 
ing up with all phases of the hos- 
pital nursing." I find further that my 
Maryland training and Roosevelt pro- 
cedure books together have solved the 
problems of being on the faculty at a 
School of Nursing not my own. In 
addition I am going back for my Mas- 
ter's degree at Columbia University. 

"Although I am sure all of you back 
there are proud and sure of our own 
School of Nursing, I feel you will be 
gratified, as I have been, at the ex- 
cellent reputation our School has even 
this far." 

In Tiffin, Ohio 
Dr. and Mrs. Robert K. Arthur, Jr., 
and their new adopted daughter, Mar- 
garet Carol, are residing at 415 Miami 
Street, Tiffin, Ohio. Dr. Arthur has 
entered into partnership with another 
Obstetrician and Gynocologist in that 
town. Mrs. Arthur writes, "Please give 
my best regards to Ike, Mrs. Goeb and 
all the others." Mrs. Arthur was Dor- 
othy M. Bechtold, 1949. 

Mr. and Mrs. Calvin E. Zimmerman, 
and their two children moved into their 
new home at 410 Nancy Ave., North 
Linthicum, Md., in May 1955. Mrs. 
Zimmerman was Genevieve Boone, 
Class 1946. 

Mrs. Derek Dorey, nee Miriam Heck, 
Class 1952, writes, "My husband and I 
returned from Kayoto, Japan this past 



32 



Maryland 




g&L . . . 

BEAUTIFUL 
LAWNS 




WM. G. SCARLETT & CO. 
BALTIMORE 2, MD. 



T 



OWSON 

ELEPHONE 

SECRETARIES 

Mrs. Flanagan, Owner 

WE ANSWER YOUR PHONE 
VAIley 5-1300 

24 Hours A Day Every Day 

T0WS0N 

Month to Month Basis, Order By Phone 

For Information Call VAIley 5-1300 

107 YORK ROAD 



June. It was quite an experience liv- 
ing there. I had the opportunity to go 
through Kyoto University Hospital and 
it was something I wish I could have 
shared with you all. At present my 
husband is on the Employee Relation 
Training Program of the General Elec- 
tric Company, and we are here in Hol- 
land, Michigan for an assignment." 

Mr. and Mrs. George F. Pollock, of 
Sargon, Viet Nam, arrived in the States 
on June 1st and left November 1st to 
return to Sargon, Viet Nam. Mr. Pol- 
lock is Assistant Public Health Ad- 
ministrator attached to the American 
Embassy. Mrs. Pollock, the former 
Dorothy Toom, graduated in 1937. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Walston are liv- 
ing in their new home at 1305 Walton 
Avenue, LaPorte, Ind. Mrs. Walston 
writes, "I am working as a reception- 
ist in a Doctor's office four afternoons 
a week. I am off Wednesdays, Satur- 
days and Sundays, so I have very 
choicy hours." She also says, "Every- 
one loves my cap. They never saw any- 
thing like it." (Naturally.) Mrs. Wal- 
ston was Daphne Barclift, Class 1933. 
In England 

Mrs. E. Edward Burr writes us that 
her daughter, Mrs. Craig W. Wayman, 
and her family are living at the fol- 
lowing address in England, 53 New 
Street Hill, Bromley, Kent, England. 
The Waymans have two children, Reid, 
three years old, and Peggy, two. Mrs. 
Burr says, "Meg has been just about 
everywhere and is having a wonderful 
life." Mrs. Wayman was Marguerite 
Burr, Class 1943. 

Lt. (jg) Britta H. Fris (NC) USNR 
1952, was recently transferred from 
U.S. Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton, 
Calif., to the Naval Hospital, Pensa- 
cola, Florida. 

Mrs. George H. Heller, nee Ada 
Brown, 1943, writes, "Thank you for 
your nice letter. I have been married 
since July 20, 1949, and have two 
children, a girl, age four, and a boy, 
age two. My sister, Rebecca Brown, 
Class 1943, is an anesthetist at Charles- 
ton General Hospital, Charlestown, W. 
Va. She studied at Wesley Memorial 
Hospital in Chicago, 111." 

In Marion, Ohio 

Margaret Mae Kesler, Class 1952, 
accepted a position with the new Mar- 
ion General Hospital in Marion, Ohio, 
as supervisor of the operating room, 
and the central supply and recovery 
rooms, Miss Kesler says, "I have been 
here only six weeks but I love it and 
the people here are so wonderful." 
Miss Kesler had charge of the op- 
erating room for three years at Ohio 
State Hospital. 

Dr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Clary are 
stationed in Oahu, T.H. They arrived 
there about the middle of November. 
They were accompanied to California 
by Mrs. Clary's mother, Mrs. J. B. 
Magruder. Mrs. Clary was Louise 
Dukes Magruder, 1942. 

Word has been received that on or 
about the 10th of January 1956 the 
J.F.B. Johnston's, Margaret Beall, '39, 
are expecting to be on their way to 
Japan. Bon Voyage! 



W 



in Baltimore 
it's the 



for banquets 

parties 

special meetings 



STAFFORD III 

Visit Our New Mt. Vernon Bar 



CHARLES & MADISON 
BALTIMORE 1, MD. 
MUlb.rry 5-0990 



W 



THE 

E. fl. KRESTDER 

COmPRIlY 

DAIRY & CREAMERY 
APPARATUS 

6401 PULASKI HIGHWAY 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



King Bros., Inc. 

PRINTING & OFFSETTING 

SAratoga 7-5835 

208 N. Calvert Street 
BALTIMORE 2, MD. 



"CLOTHES OF CHARACTER" 

EDDIE^?JACOBS 

Charles St. at Redwood 
Baltimore, Md. 



PAUL J. EISEL 

1015 N. Charles St. Baltimore 1, Md. 

OLD & SCHOLARLY 

BOOKS 

Bought and Sold 

See The World's Finest Above 

Knee Prosthesis 

at 

THE COMFORT LIMB & BRACE CO. 

602 N. Eutaw St. Baltimore 1, Md. 



Maryland 



33 




\fs 



Est. Since 1935 

BALTIMORE 

NURSES 
EXCHANGE 

Licensed By 
State of Md 



GRADUATE - UNDERGRADUATE 
AND PRACTICAL NURSES 

FOR HOSPITAL & HOME 

Hourly Work 

Alice Weber, Director 

(Daughter of the Late Alice Foos) 

s. AtheiAv. LOng wood 6-6144 



• LEOnDRD 

• COLLECTIOn 
• RGEP.CY 

Specializing in Collections 
for Medical Men 



882 PARK AVE. IE 9-6909 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



TAZE AND HEWITT 

SALES ENGINEERS 
33 E. 21st Street - Baltimore 18, Md. 

HEATING • VENTILATING 
COOLING EQUIPMENT 

Phone: BElmont 5-5895 — 5-5896 
Ed Taze "Rip" Hewitt 



TROY E. AUVIL 

Est. 1913 

ARTIFICIAL LIMBS 

Trusses - Shoes - Braces - Arch 

Health and Surgical Supports 

2117 E. NORTH AVE. BRoadway 6-0843 

Baltimore, Md. 




Printers and 
Publishers of fine 
Books - Catalogs 
Viewbooks - etc. 



COLLEGIATE 
PUBLISHING 

COMPANY 

546 S. Long wood Street 

Baltimore 23, Md. 

Gilmor 5-3517 

34 



To Be Built 




NEW NURSES RESIDENCE AND SCHOOL 

The new nurses residence and School of Nursing is pictured above. 

The new building will be located in the 600 block Lombard Street, Baltimore, 
and will take 300 calendar days for completion. It will be adjacent to the existing 
nurses residence. 

The three-story building will "be of fire resistive brick and masonry back-up, and 
all subfloors, stairs and roof slap will be of reinforced concrete. 

The building will contain three classrooms, a conference room, two laboratories, 
seven offices, twelve double bedrooms, two single bedrooms, a bedroom-living room- 
bath suite and a recreation room-lounge. 

Composition tile floor surfaces will be used in most areas, and accoustical tile 
ceilings will be used in corridors, classrooms, laboratories and offices. 



Helen W. Winks, Class 1951, writes 
us, "I was married to Mr. Thomas 
Wright Valentine, on January 30, 1954. 
I met my husband at the University 
of Miami where he and I received our 
degrees in June of this year. He is 
with the Dade County Board of Public 
Instruction (Miami) and I am the In- 
structor in Pediatric Nursing in the 
University of Miami Department of 
Nursing." 

Mrs. B. Tex Lindsey is Superinten- 
dent of the Washington County Hospi- 
tal in Plymouth, N. C. Mrs. Lindsey 
was Vivian Wynne, Class 1933. 

Mrs. James B. Nuttall writes us, 
"We are now stationed in Wiesbaden, 
Germany, and I must admit I like it 
here much better than in England. 
This is possibly because we are among 
many old friends, which tends to make 
us forget we are so far from the 
U.S.A. We have about two more years 
before we return." 

In Seattle 

Miss Barbara M. Ardis, Class 1945, 
was transferred from the U.S.P.H. 
Hospital in Baltimore the latter part 
of October 1954 to the U.S.P.H.S. Hos- 
pital in Seattle, Wash., where she is 
Assistant Director of Nurses. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry S. Ferguson 
moved to Trussville, Ala., the first of 
September, 1954. Mrs. Ferguson was 
Hazel Phyllis Ellicott, Class 1947. 

Mr. and Mrs. James B. MacDermott, 
Jr., moved to West Palm Beach, Fla., in 
the early spring. Mrs. MacDermott has 
charge of nursing in the Pediatric De- 
partment in the Good Samaritan Hospi- 
tal in West Palm Beach. Mrs. Mac- 
Dermott was Marjorie Withington, 
Class 1948. 

Miss Rita Malek, Class 1949, writes 
us, "Since November 1954, I have been 
working at the National Institute of 



Neurological Diseases and Blindness, 
National Institutes of Health in Bethes- 
da. I head one of the two clinical re- 
search units." 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Kline and their 
two daughters — Denise, age two years, 
Debra Sue, age three months — moved 
into their new home in Wrightsville, 
Pa., January 1955. Mrs. Kline was 
Janet Ester, Class 1952. 

Dr. and Mrs. Howard N. Taylor are 
residing in Houston, Texas, where he 
is practicing. Mrs. Taylor was Doris 
Wahle, Class 1945. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Culp have 
moved into their new home at Wil- 
loughby Beach, Edgewood, Md. Mrs. 
Culp was Iva Tharpe, Class 1938. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Menees, Jr., 
moved into their new home in August 
1954, in Houston, Texas. Mrs. Menees 
was Margaret Reynolds, Class 1941. 

Dr. and Mrs. Joseph F. LiPira, and 
family, are residing at 8400 Loch Raven 
Blvd., Baltimore 4, Md. They returned 
to Baltimore after Dr. LiPira finished 
his tour of duty with the Army. Mrs. 
LiPira was Ellen M. Sirman, Class 
1946. 

In New York City 

Mary Sue Laign, Class 1952, has a 
position in the Obstetrical Department 
at Cornell Hospital in New York City. 

Mrs. Robert C. Hunter, nee Grace M. 
Colburn, Class 1948, writes us, "My 
husband, Dr. Robert C. Hunter, has 
finished his training and military obli- 
gations so we can at last make a per- 
manent home for ourselves and chil- 
dren. Akron is a pleasant uncrowded 
city with booming Cleveland only 
thirty-five miles away. Bob likes his 
work very much with the Anesthesi- 
ology Associates of Akron." 

Kjerstine Kelly, Class 1947, resigned 
Jier position with the Irene Kaufman 



Maryland 



Settlement in Pittsburgh, Pa., and en- 
tered the A.N.C. as Captain, and is now 
stationed at Walter Reed General Hos- 
pital, Washington, D.C. 

Miss Charlene Hibberd, Class 1954, 
accepted a position in the Obstetrical 
Department in the Coleman Hospital, 
Indiana University Medical Center, In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 

Darlena Trostle, Class 1948, writes, 
"I was married on June 20, 1954, to 
Mr. Kenneth W. Walcott of Tiffin, Ohio. 
My husband is a student at the Ohio 
State University and is majoring in 
Psychology. I am not working at 
present but expect to do general duty 
nursing in Athens (Ohio) for several 
months until the school session is over." 
In The Navy 

Mrs. Paul L. Heininger writes, "This 
will be my address for the next year 
because my husband (Dr. Paul L. Hein- 
inger) is in the Navy at the present 
time." The address is 8255 Simons 
Drive, Norfolk 5, Va. Mrs. Heininger 
also writes, "I met Ernestine Johnson 
Moore at a luncheon here and had a 
wonderful visit with her." Mrs. Hein- 
inger was Mary Catherine Greene, 
Class 1946. Mrs. Moore graduated in 
1944. 

A note from Mrs. Paul A. Moore 
telling us, "I am living at home in 
Scotland Neck, N. C, while Dr. Moore 
is aboard the USS Albany. They will 
make a Mediterranean cruise in the 
spring and I expect to join him in 
Naples for several weeks. With best 
wishes to the Nurses' Alumnae Asso- 
ciation." Mrs. Moore was Ernestine 
Johnson, Class 1944. 

Miss Dana L. Day, Class 1951, has 
a position in Greeley, Col. 

Margaret Richards, Class 1932, has 
been promoted to Lieutenant Com- 
mander in the Navy Nurse Corps. She 
is stationed at USN Hospital, Bethesda, 
Md. 

Second Lt. Peggy J. Feiser, Class 
1951, is stationed with the Tact. Hos- 
pital (SAC) at Loring Air Force Base 
in Limestone, Maine. 

In Arlington 

Mrs. Anita Jones Marshall, Class 
1943, was quite surprised to find several 
of our nurses living in the Arlington 
area. She says, "We see the Poffen- 
bergers frequently (Gladys Leonard, 
Class 1942). They have a nice home 
in Silver Spring — two lovely daughters, 
ages five and one-half and one and 
one-half." Mrs. Marshall has lived in 
Arlington since leaving Chicago four 
years ago and says, "We are looking 
forward to the completion of our new 
home in Fairfax by spring." Although 
Mrs. Marshall has had little contact in 
the field of nursing for the past six 
years, she is enjoying serving as health 
chairman for her daughter's kinder- 
garten and says she is amazed at how 
much she has forgotten about pedi- 
atrics and communicable diseases. 

Mrs. Hamilton R. Fishback, nee Caro- 
lyn Doris Zeller, Class 1941, writes us, 
"Our Idaho Falls Medical Auxiliary 
has organized a future Nurses Club in 
the Senior and Junior High Schools. 
Nurse recruitment has been an active 
program here." Mrs, Fishback resides 

Maryland, 



They're 

NEW! 

Taste 'em 

NOW! 




? DELICIOUS^ 



CONDENSED 



soups 



Try 'Em AIL 

Tomato 

• 

Chicken 

Noodle 

• 

Vegetable 

• 

Vegetable 

Beef 

• 

Chicken 

With Rice 



Now made from new, improved recipes, 
Phillips Delicious soups are really good 
eatin' — every one! 

NOW YOU CANT BUY BETTER-TASTING 
SOUP — AT ANY PRICE! 



faalitieA £&l 
AJUinwtL duuWiL, &- 6rutqwdJL 

man/land seafood at it's finest 
dining room open daily 



marling house 
20 e. fayette 



m 




SA 7-4460 



baltimore, md. 



A 



Designers & Printers 
BOOKS - PERIODICALS 



DANGARY PUBLISHING CO. 

2807 W. Belvedere Ave. - Baltimore 15, Md. 

Printers of Maryland Magazine 




Inefficient home heating equipment 
wastes more dollars than you think! 



Make sure you get the most for the least 
from your home heating equipment 



. . . INSTALL NATURAL 




Natural GAS HEAT is your 

best buy . . . over 100,000 

Gas Heat installations prove it. 

Get all the facts from your 
GAS HEATING CONTRACTOR 



many of your friends and neighbors 
have it . . . ask them how they like it! 




BALTIMORE GAS AND ELECTRIC CO. 



•tofrtM 



There are good reasons why Natural Gas Heat gives you 
greater value for every heating dollar you spend. 

1 . Natural Gas Heat comes to you ready to burn and 
burns completely . . . leaves no soot, ash or film. 
Liquid and solid fuels have to be converted to a gas- 
eous state before they are capable of producing heat. 

2. Gas Heating Equipment is designed to quickly ab- 
sorb the heat from burning gas ... to give maximum 
heat with minimum heat loss. 

3. Gas Burners have only one moving part. There is 
nothing to wear or get out of order. The equipment 
has exceptionally long life and you save on service 
costs. 



m 



USE THE COUPON ON 
THE LAST PAGE 




76 TORO PROFESSIONAL 
CUTS 1 5-20 ACRES A DAY 

A Mower for Every Need: 

REELS - ROTARYS 

Complete Turf and Garden 
Equipment 

BALTIMORE TORO CO. 
Distributor 

2205 JOPPA ROAD 
BALTIMORE 14, MD. 
Phone NO 8-0500 

Sales and Service 



at 268 8th Street, Idaho Falls, Idaho. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Tawney moved 
from Gettsburg, Pa., to Shippensburg, 
Pa. Mrs. Tawney has a position in a 
doctor's office in Shippensburg. Mrs. 
Tawney was Margaret Rothhaupt, 
Class 1944. 

Mrs. Florence Meredith Hicks, Class 
1915, spent the winter with her sister 
at 106 West University Parkway, Bal- 
timore, Md. She will spend the re- 
mainder of the year with her son at 
302 Park Avenue, Lagrange, Ga. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Gilbert, Jr., 
of Frederick, Md., have three girls. 
They are moving in June to Monacacy 
Village, Frederick, Md. Mrs. Gilbert 
was Frances Schroeder, Class of 1947. 
In Virginia 

Roberta Susan Pinkard, Class 1915, 
resigned her position with the Balti- 
more Health Department, and is living 
in Kilmarnock, Va. 

Miss Emily Elizabeth Kenney, Class 
1917, who was superintendent of the 
operating room at the Cooley Dickin- 
son Hospital in Northampton, Mass., 
for nineteen years, retired on June 1, 
1955. At a surprise ceremony during 
the lunch hour on June 1, Miss Kenney 
was presented with a television set 
and a purse of money from her asso- 
ciates and members of the hospital 
staff, as tokens of the esteem in which 
she was held. 

Betty Jane Lacey, Class 1947,, is on 
the staff at the Indiana University 
Medical Center. She is going to school 
in 'September at Indiana University in 
Bloomington, Ind. 

Nancy Jo Kohlhoss, Class 1953, was 
a stewardess with the American Air 
Lines for fifteen months. She resigned 
in July 1955 to be married. 



36 



Mr. and Mrs. Albin P. Davis, Jr., 
and children moved to Los Angeles, 
Cal., in October 1955. Mrs. Davis was 
Martha Charlene Wilson, Class 1941. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Rasmussen are 
living in their new home at Brooklyn 
Bridge Road, Laurel, Md. Mrs. Ras- 
mussen was Delia Riley, Class 1936. 
Since Mrs. Rasmussen's return to 
Maryland she has been doing civilian 
nursing at Fort George Meade, Md. 

Miss Ruth Frothingham, Class 1930, 
is Chief Nurse at the Veterans Hos- 
pital at Fort Howard, Md. 

Miss Marguerite Foster, Class 1939, 
is Director of Nursing Service at the 
Montebello Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 
In New York City 

Miss Ethel Andrea Sellers, Class 
1952, started as Night Teaching Super- 
visor at Roosevelt Hospital in New 
York City, on September 19, 1955, Miss 
Sellers writes, "It is one of the Big 
Six here, about the size of the Uni- 
versity. I have all services, except Ob- 
stetrical and the Operating Rooms, and 
I find it a valuable challenging experi- 
ence, with the feature of keeping up 
with all phases of the hospital nursing. 
I find further that my Maryland train- 
ing and Roosevelt procedure books to- 
gether have solved the problems of 
being on the faculty at a school of 
nursing not my own. In addition I 
am going back for my Master's degree 
at Columbia University. Although I 
am sure all of you back there are 
proud and sure of our own School of 
Nursing, I feel you will be gratified, 
as I have been, at the excellent repu- 
tation our school enjoys." 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert K. Arthur, Jr., 
and their new adopted daughter, Mar- 
garet Carol, are residing at 415 Miami 

Maryland 



Street, Tiffin, Ohio. Dr. Arthur has 
entered into partnership with another 
obstetrician and gynecologist in that 
town. Mrs. Arthur writes, "Please give 
my best regards to 'Ike,' Mrs. Cobb 
and all others." Mrs. Arthur was 
Dorothy M. Bechtold, Class 1949. 

Mr. and Mrs. Calvin E. Zimmerman 
and their two children moved into their 
new home at 410 Nancy Avenue, North 
Linthicum, Md., in May 1955. Mrs. 
Zimmerman was Genevieve Boone, 
Class 1946. 

In Japan 
Mrs. Derek Dorey, nee Miriam Heck, 
Class 1952, writes, "My husband and 
I returned from Kyoto, Japan, this 
past June. It was quite an experience 
living there. I had the opportunity to 
go through Kyoto University Hospital 
and it was something I wish I could 
have shared with you all. At present 
my husband is on the Employee Re- 
lation Training Program of the General 
Electric Company, and we are here 
in Holland, Mich., for an assignment." 
Mr. and Mrs. George F. Pollack, 
of Saigon, Viet Nam, arrived in the 
States June 1 and left November 1 
to return to Saigon, Viet Nam. Mr. 
Pollock is Assistant Public Health Ad- 
ministrator attached to the American 
Embassy. Mrs. Pollock, the former 
Dorothy Toom, graduated in 1937. 
Hospital Study 
The University of Maryland's Uni- 
versity Hospital and Sinai Hospital, 
participated in a study of nursing care 
which was conducted by the American 
Hospital Association and the U. S. Pub- 
lic Health Service. The two Baltimore 
hospitals were selected among 75 hos- 
pitals which participated in the study. 
In a letter to Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, 
President of the University, Faye G. 
Abdellah, Chief, Nursing Education 
Branch, Division of Nursing Resources, 
U. S. Public Health Service, stated: 
"The purpose of the study is to find out 
what factors, such as hours of nurs- 
ing care provided for patients, are re- 
sponsible for variation in patient and 
personnel satisfaction." 

A team of the U. S. Public Health 
Service visited the University Hospital 
to present four orientation sessions for 
the purpose of acquainting the nursing 
staff, the medical staff and the attend- 
ing professional staff with the survey 
that was made on the following day. 
Heads Pediatrics 
Miss Gladys Sellew has been ap- 
pointed Professor of Pediatrics, School 
of Nursing. 

Miss Sellow received her A.B. and 
B.S. degrees at the University of Cin- 
cinnati in 1920 and 1921 and her 
Ph.D. from Catholic University of 
America in 1920. 

Registered Nurse, School of Nursing 
and Health; Graduate Nurse, Cincin- 
nati 1920; Other Graduate Work: Six 
weeks summer course — Sociology and 
Nursing,, University of Chicago, 1938. 
Positions held: Supervisor Pediatrics 
Nursing— University of Cincinnati, 
School of Nursing and Health — 1920- 
1925. Assistant Professor of Nursing — 
Western Reserve University, School of 
Nursing— 1925-1928. Assistant to the 



Dean and later 1st Assistant to the 
Dean, Pediatric Nursing-Illinois Train- 
ing School for Nurses— 1928-1933. In- 
structor and Assistant Professor, De- 
partments of Sociology and School of 
Nursing — Catholic University of Amer- 
ica — 1933-1942. Director, Department 
of Nursing — College of St. Catherine — 
1942-1946. Associate Professor and 
Professor and Chairman, Department 
of Sociology, Rosary College, River 
Forest Illinois — 1946 to present. Visit- 
ing Professor, Nursing Education — 
University of Maryland — Summer 
School. 

Professional and Learned Societies: 
National League for Nursing, Catholic 
Sociological Society, American Socio- 
logical Society, Representative of Ros- 
ary in the Welfare Council of Oak 
Park & River Forest, On Nursing 
School Committee of the Oak Park Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, On Editorial 
Committee of the Illinois State Nurses' 
Association. 

Listed In: The American Catholic 
Who's Who, Name accepted for: Ameri- 
can Men of Science and Who's Who in 
American Education. 



School of 



Dentistry 

Br. Gerson A. Freedman 
Gardner P. H. Foley 



Luncheon At New York 

For the first time in the history of 
the Greater New York Meeting, the 
atending B.C.D.S. alumni got together 
for a Maryland Luncheon. Under the 
direction of Abbe Selman '44, assisted 
by Nick Santaniello '43, Ed Zucker- 
man '43, Jack Cockayne '44, and Joe 
Cohen '45, Maryland men representing 
four classes initiated the Greater New 
York series of alumni gatherings at 
the Hotel Governor Clinton on Decem- 
ber 7. Forty-two alumni from four 
classes made up the group participat- 
ing in the inaugural affair. In the 
future, members of other classes will 
be informed in advance of the Mary- 
land Luncheon so that it may become 
more extensively an important Mary- 
land event. 



VENICE MOTEL 
& RESTURANT 

U.S. ROUTE 40 
HAGERSTOWN, MD. 

"Air Conditioned" 
Italian Cuisine — Steaks and Seafood 
34 Modern Rooms Tel. 4427 



NALLEY'S 

NURSING HOME 

For the Aged, Chronic, Convalescent, 
Invalid and Retired Guetts 

- 24 HOUR CARE — 

Hagerstown 7428 Funlutown, Md. 



TOURS & CRUISES 



KIR, STEflmSHIP. RRIl 



Agents For 

All Domestic & Foreign 
Tour Operators & Carriers 

VIC miLLER 
TRAVEL AGEI1CY 

Phone 6078 

49 SUMMIT AVE. HAGERSTOWN, MD. 



G00DB0DY & CO. 

Est. 1891 
Members N. Y. Stock Exchange 

RALPH A. BAIERL 

Reg. Representative 

10 N. JONATHAN STREET 
Hagerstown, Md. Phone 5301 



E. A. MAAS 
Owner 



Wjcuu (DJApcnAinq OfdidanA 



1 LOCATIONS 



13 SUMMIT AVE 

Hagerstown, Md. 

Phone 3480 



5 W. SECOND 

Frederick, Md. 

Phone MO 2-14S1 



NORMAN S. 

EARLEY & SON 

General Contractors 
and Builders 

Plants — Homes — Stores 
Public Buildings 

638 FREDERICK STREET 
Hagerstown, Maryland 

= 1947 = 



Maryland 



37 



Masser's Mdtel & Restaurant 

Maryland's Outstanding 



OTEL 



OPEN ALL YEAR 
FINE DINING ROOM 
AIR-CONDITIONED 
On U.S. Route 40 — 2 Miles West of Frederick, Md. 




THE 

M. J. GROVE 
LIME CO. 

• Established 1859 • 

Crushed Stone • Limestone 

Industrial t Agricultural Mm* 

Concrete t Cinder Hock 

Cement • Sand - Pipe 

Transit Mixed Concrete 

Free State Masonry Mortar 

Street, Road, Irldge Construction 



PLANTS 



Stephen City, Va. 

Mlddletown, Va. 

Frederick, Md. 

Lime Kiln, Md. 



General Offices 

Lime Kiln 
Frederick Co., Md. 

PHONE 
Monument 3-3104 



FARMERS COOPERATIVE 
ASSOCIATION, INC. 

Maryland's Largest Locally Owned 
| and Operated Cooperative 

FEEDS 
SEEDS 

FERTILIZER 

LIMESTONE 

PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 
J 



FREDERICK 



Feed MO 3-31 13 

Petroleum MO 3-5422 

THURMONT 3111 MIDDLETOWN 6 



Main Office: 



35 E. SOUTH ST. 
FREDERICK, MD. 




Dietrich & Gambrill, Inc. 

Frederick, Md. 

A Maryland Institution 



In Montgomery County 

Farmers Supply 




McCormick-Deering Farm 
Equipment 

GAITHERSBURG, MD. GAITHERSBURG 777 



HICKORY SMOKED AGED 
HAMS 



WRITE OR STOP BY 

Soutfwut. J>wunA. 

6 Miles North of Frederick 
on Route 71 at 

WALKERSVILLE, MD. 

Open Dally 8 to 5 Sunday 12 to 



LONG VIEW 
NURSING HOME 

FOR CHRONIC AND CONVALESCENT PATIENTS 

RATES REASONABLE 
MRS. KATHLEEN M. TWICC, R.N. 
Manchester, Md. 
PHONE HAMPSTEAD 4271 



Frederick Underwriters 

Incorporated 

General Insurance Agents 

EVERY KIND OF INSURANCE 
110 W. Patrick St. Frederick, Md. 



Crown Oil & Wax Co. 

Distributors 

Shell Petroleum Products 

Phone MONUMENT 3-6381 

FREDERICK, MD. 



USE THE COUPON ON 
THE LAST PAGE 



38 



Those in attendance are listed by 
class: — 

1943 (March): Murray Birgenthal, 
Howard Hauss, Joseph Kleein, and Ber- 
nard Lebow (Liebowitz). 

1943 (November): Robert Bernert, 
William Bisgeier, Fred Blake, Harry 
Camp, John Famulari, Alfred Frost, 
Leon Horwitz, Robert Kahn, Joseph 
Kessler, Stanley Lipman, Albert Reit- 
man, Morton Samet, Nicholas Santa- 
niello, Emil Scheinberg, Robert Smith, 
Walter Wodka, and Edward Zucker- 
man. 

1944: William Blumenfelld, Lloyd 
Church, John Cockayne, Donald Fales, 
Saul Goodman, Charles Hennesey, 
Howard Hester, Sumner Hirshberg, 
Joseph Massucco, Eugene Moss (Mos- 
kowitz), Edward Quat, Herman Rock- 
off, Daniel Savini, Abbe Selman, Rob- 
ert Shapiro, Casimir Sheft, Harvey 
Soloff, Charles Stagg, and Vincent 
Vente (Ventriglia). 

1945: Norman Bianco and Joseph 
Cohen. 

Washington Alumni Breakfast 
The Twenty-Fourth Annaul Post- 
graduate clinic of the District of 
Columbia Dental Society will be held 
in March at the Shoreham Hotel. Of 
special interest to the Maryland alumni 
who annually attend this meeting are 
the plans now being made for the 
University of Maryland Breakfast that 
will be held at the Shoreham at 8:00 
a.m. on March 13. Fifty-five alumni 
attended the 1955 Breakfast and the 
committee is anticipating another fine 
attendance at the 1956 Breakfast. 
Edgar L. Bessette '32 
Dr. Edgar L. Bessette, of Cranston, 
is the sixteenth graduate of his alma 
mater to serve as President of the 
Rhode Island State Dental Society. The 
Alumni Records show that Dr. Bes- 
sette has been preceded in the office 
by these sons of the B.C.D.S.: Walter 
R. Mclntire (U. of M. '05), of Provi- 
dence, 1913; Frank P. Duffy (B.C.D.S. 
'06), of West Warwick, 1914; James F. 
Clark (B.C.D.S '03), of Pawtucket, 
1916; William R. Burke (B.C.D.S. '07), 
of Providence, 1920; Ernest A. Char- 
bonnel (U. of M. '97), of Providence, 
1921; Frederick L. Miller (B.M.C. '00), 
of Woonsocket, 1923; Henry A. Martin 
(B.C.D.S. '05), of Newport, 1925; B. 
Cecil Burgess (U. of M. '06), of Provi- 
dence, 1928; Frank H. Ackrill (U. of 
M. '14), of Providence, 1930; Edward 
F. Gill (B.M.C. '09), of Providence, 
1932; Morris R. Lebow (B.M.C. '121), 
of Providence, 1935; Philip J. Conley 
(B.C.D.S. '22), of West Warwick, 1938; 
Edward C. Morin (U. of M. '20), of 
Pawtucket, 1939; Edwin K. Devine (U. 
of M. '23), of Providence, 1941; and 
Michael B. Messore '30, of Providence, 
1949. The B.C.D.S. men have made 
impressively valuable contributions to 
the development of dentistry in Rhode 
Island, especially in the past half 
century. 

Dr. Bessette was bom in Providence 
on June 27, 1904. He obtained his 
predental training at Assumption Col- 
lege, of Worcester, Mass., where he 
received his Bachelor of Arts degree 
in 1927. Following his graduation in 

Maryland 



the Class of 1932 at Maryland he 
opened an office in Cranston. Ed has 
been consistently active in many areas 
of dental interest. He is chief of dental 
service at the Rhode Island Hospital 
and is a member of the staffs at the 
Saint Joseph and Lady Fatima Hos- 
pitals. He is a Consultant of the Rhode 
Island State Welfare Department of 
Dentistry. With a fellow alumnus, 
Mike Messore, he has been an impor- 
tant participant in the organization 
of that department. The Rhode Island 
Welfare Program is recognized as one 
of the best of its kind in the country. 

Dr. Bessette has served in all the 
offices of the State Society. For the 
past six years he has represented his 
state in the A.D.A. House of Delegates. 
In 1954 he was Secretary and in 1955 
President of the State Officers Con- 
ference at the A.D.A. In 1949 he 
was elected President of the Provi- 
dence District Dental Society. His pro- 
fessional memberships include the 
Maine State Dental Society, New Eng- 
land Dental Society, Franco-American 
Dental Society, Federation Dentaire 
Internationale, Northeastern Dental 
Society, and the American Public 
Health, Association. He is a mem- 
ber of the A.D.A. Council on Dental 
Health and at the 1955 San Francisco 
meeting he became a Fellow of the 
International College of Dentists. 

Dr. Bessette holds memberships in 
the B.P.O.E., the Cranston Chamber 
of Commerce, and the New York Ath- 
letic Club. In 1936 he married Zelma 
Whiteside of Spartanburg, S.C. They 
have six children: Roberta Jane, 17, 
who is a premedical freshman at Rhode 
Island University; Maureen, 15; Edgar 
Jr., 14; Paul, 11; Armand 8; and 
Roland, 3. 

Edmond J. Leger '26 

Dr. Edmond J. Leger, of Bathurst, 
New Brunswick, began his term as 
President of the New Brunswick Den- 
tal Society on October 29. The Alumni 
Records reveal that Dr. Leger is the 
fifth graduate of the B.C.D.S. to be 
thus honored. His predecessors are 
Dr. Frederick A. Taylor (B.C.D.S. '92), 
of Moncton, 1907; Dr. H. W. Snow 
(B.C.D.S. '07), of Moncton, 1919; Dr. 
A. J. Cormier (B.C.D.S. '10), of Monc- 
ton, 1927; and Dr. E. R. McClintock 
(B.C.D.S. '08), of Centerville, 1949. 

Dr. Leger was born in Bathurst on 
November 1, 1903. He received his 
predental training at Sacred Heart Uni- 
versity and Saint Joseph University. 
Following his graduation from the 
B.C.D.S. in the Class of 1926, he began 
practice in Bathurst. Supplementing 
his office work, Dr. Legeer supervises 
the dental clinics at the Notre Dame 
Sanatorium in Vallee Lourdes. In 1951 
the Canadian Cancer Society sent him 
to the Memorial Hospital in New York 
City for a course of study in the field 
of oral cancer. Dr. Leger served on 
the Council of the New Brunswick 
Society for ten years before his elec- 
tion to the presidency. He organized 
and was the first president of the North 
Shore Dental Club. 

Dr. Leger's extra-professional mem- 
berships include the Bathurst Golf Club, 
the Bathurst Curling Club and the 



Knights of Columbus (Fourth Degree). 
He married Louise Landry, of Amherst, 
Nova Scotia, in 1930. They have two 
daughters, Rose Marie, who is twenty- 
two, and Andrea, who is ten. Al- 
though far away from his alma mater, 
Dr. Leger has maintained a warm in- 
terest in the affairs of the B.C.D.S. 
and in the alumni activities. 

Receives Flemming Award 

Dr. David B. Scott, of the March, 
1943 Class, was one of the ten young 
men in the Government service who 
were recently given the Arthur S. 
Flemming Award by the Junior Chamb- 
er of Commerce. Dr. Scott, who was 
one of the five winners selected from 
the scientific and technical fields, has 
achieved an international reputation 
for dental research studies. After his 
graduation from Maryland, Dr. Scott 
did a year of graduate study at the 
University of Rochester. He then re- 
ceived a commission in the U.S.P.H.S. 
and was assigned to the Dental Re- 
search Section, National Institute of 
Health. He has presented reports on 
his electron microscope studies of the 
dental tissues before a large number 
of dental societies in this country and 
in England and Scandinavia. At present 
Dr. Scott is Chief of the histology and 
pathology laboratory at the National 
Institute. He is a member of the 
Gorgas Odontological Society, Sigma 
Epsilon Delta, and Omicron Kappa 
Upsilon. 

Personals 

Dr. John L. Richmond '54 opened 
his office in Lewisburg, W. Va., on 
October 1. He returned to his home 
town after an internship in the United 
States Public Health Service. 

Dr. Robert H. Enterline '55 has an- 
nounced the opening of his office for 
the general practice of dentistry at 23 
North Lime St., Lancaster, Pa. 

Dr. and Mrs. Irving Jacobs '45 an- 
nounce the birth of a daughter, Eileen 
Lynn, on July 28. 

Dr. Milton B. Asbell '38 announces 
the removal of his office to 25 Haddon 
Ave., Camden 3, N.J. Dr. Asbell's 
practice is limited to orthodontics. Dr. 
Asbell is the President of the Southern 
Dental Society of New Jersey. 

Dr. Frank E. Pavel, Jr. '48 is asso- 
ciated with Drs. Bullard and Brockett 
in the practice of oral surgery in San 
Diego, Cal. 

Dr. I. Walter Sloan '37 announces 
the opening of an office for the prac- 
tice of general dentistry at 710 Wilshire 
Boulevard, Santa Monica, Calif. Before 
opening his office on May 1, Dr. Sloan 
had completed the course of post- 
graduate instruction at the University 
of California. He spent four years in 
the U.S.A.A.F., being separated on 
October 19, 1945. 

Dr. Robert B. Bridgeman '53 plans 
to resume his practice in New Martins- 
ville, W. Va., following his release 
from active duty with the Army Den- 
tal Corps at Camp Gordon, Ga. Lt. 
Bridgeman entered the service in Octo- 
ber, 1953. 

Dr. Charles O. Saul '53 is practicing 
in Beckley, W. Va. 

Dr. Herman B. Teter '51, of Frank- 
lin, W. Va., has reopened his office 




MORE FARMERS 
USE ARMOUR'S 




ARMOUR FERTILIZER WORKS 
Curtis Bay, Maryland 



For the Finest in Outboard 



CRUISERS and UTILITIES 



Manufacturing Company 

ARNOLD, MD. 



Look For The Sign 



MARIA'S 
JOO 



Serving Baltimore'* Fitu$t 

Italian Cuisine 

Open 1 1 a.m. to 4 a.m. — Closed Mondays 

300 Albermarle St. MU 5-2811 

Baltimore 2, Md. MU 5-2812 



nCLSOn PERSOIMEL CO. 







Since 


1936 






Accountants - Engineers - Executives 
Salesmen - Secretarial 

r.Exington 9 4727 




2-6 


E. 


Lexington 


St. 


Baltimore, 


Md. 



Maryland 



39 



COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND 

That's what you get whenever you prescribe a CO-OPERATIVE 
Restoration. 

For over 45 years dentists all over the country have entrusted CO- 
OPERATIVE with their prosthetics. We cordially invite a trial case 
so that you may know of the dependable craftsmanship which you 
can expect from CO-OPERATIVE. 

(o-operative 
I Dental Laboratories 

Arll.trt, ,1 O.nlml FttttHtlm 

12 WM Madiwn $tr..i 

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 




SERVING THE DENTAL PROFESSION 
WITH DISTINCTION SINCE 1910 




MASSEY-HARRIS DIVISION 



BALTIMORE BRANCH 

YORK & TIMONIUM ROADS 
TIMONIUM, MARYLAND 

Look For our tocof Dealer in Your Community 



A Cordial Invitation Is Extended to Make 
A Personal Inspection of the New 

COLONIAL NURSING HOME 

Specializing in the care of Tracheostomy Cases 

Conveniently Located at 

4506 FREDERICK AVENUE — BALTIMORE, MD. 

LO. 6-6873 



M 



amor 



Til 



Ok. World. Wod B.autifJ 

ROOF 

MADE EXCLUSIVELY BY 

MANOR TILE CO. 

-/y Pumanmi Zhl* t* « Varitly of Colon 

VAIley 5-3393 BALTIMORE 4, MD. 




after his separation from the Army 
Air Corps. 

Dr. James E. John '13, of Roanoke, 
Va., served on the Report of Presi- 
dent committee at the A.D.A. 1955 
meeting in San Francisco. 

Dr. Alexander Tunnel Jeanette '27, 
of Washington, is a member of the 
North Carolina State Board of Dental 
Examiners. Dr. Jennette was Presi- 
dent of the Fifth District Society in 
1940. 

Dr. Paul L. Heininger '48 is stationed 
at Norfolk, Va. He will complete his 
service in the Navy Dental Corps in 
May. Dr. Justin F. Stolitsky, who is 
a Regular officers is also stationed at 
Norfolk. 

Dr. Harold G. Cheney, Jr. '55 is 
stationed with Headquarters company, 
23rd. Medical Battalion, at Fort Clay- 
ton, Canal Zone. 

In Germany 
Dr. Albert R. Perrelli '54 is assigned 
to the 46th Medical Detachment at 
Kaisersrautern, Germany. He reports 
that Anthony Selvaggi '54 is stationed 
at Baumholder; Kenneth Stoll '54, in 
Hanover; Christopher Hanley '54, near 
Munich; Wharton Nichols '54, in Stutt- 
gart; and Constant Georges in Mann- 
heim. 

Dr. Wesley C. Seward '53, of Balti- 
more, recently received his appoint- 
ment as an Assistant Dental Surgeon 
in the inactive reserve of the Public 
Health Service of the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Health, Education, and wel- 
fare. 

Dr. Donald H. Hobbs '51 was re- 
cently installed as President of the 
Kiwanis Club of Pikesville, Md. 

Dr. Ernesto D. Diaz, '34, of San 
Juan, P.R., is the chairman of the 
Puerto Rico Board of Dental Examin- 
ers. He is a consultant in oral surgery 
to the Veterans Administration and 
to the United States Army, Antilles 
Department. Dr. Diaz conducts a 
special practice in oral surgery. 

Dr. Naomi A. Dunn '39, of New 
Britain, Conn., is Secretary-Treasurer 
of the Connecticut Society of Dentistry 
for Children. 

Dr. Irving W. Eichenbaum '39, of 
New Britain, Conn., is a member of 
the Board of Governors of the Con- 
necticut State Dental Society. 

Dr. Albert W. Morris '39, of Salis- 
bury, Md., is a member of the Board 
of Governors of the Maryland State 
Dental Association. 

To San Francisco 
Dr. Jesse J. Englander '32, of Bridge- 
port, Conn., Vice-President of the Con- 
necticut State Dental Association, was 
a delegate to the San Francisco meet- 
ing of the A.D.A. Dr. Englander is 
a Past President of the Bridgeport 
Dental Society. 

Dr. Chauncey G. Alcott '51 was 
elected for a six-year term on the 
Board of School Directors of Han- 
over, Pa., at the November election. 

Dr. Alan A. Glick '34, of Yardley, 
Pa., was installed as President of the 
Kiwanis Club of Bordentown, N.J., on 
January 5. 

Dr. William Kress '36, of Baltimore, 
was called to active duty in the Air 



40 



Maryland 



Force. Lieutenant Colonel Kress is 
stationed at Mitchell Field, N.Y. 

Dr. Jesse Trager '34 was installed 
as National President of Alpha Omega 
at the fraternity's convention held at 
Pittsburgh, December 28-31. 

Dr. David H. Miller '33, recently 
called to service in the Army, has been 
assigned to the Walter Reed Hospital 
with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. 

Dr. John A. Sigler '22, who formerly 
practiced in Fairmont, W. Va., is now 
practicing in Towson, Md. 

Dr. I Norton Brotman '36, of Balti- 
more, contributed an article on "Let 
Radiography Aid Crown and Bridge 
Dentistry" to the Number 3, 1955 issue 
of Dental Radiography and Photog- 
raphy. Dr. Brotman will present a 
clinic at the Second Triennial Alumni 
Meeting in March. 

Four of the five members of the 
Dental Staff of the recently opened 
Preston Memorial Hospital in King- 
wood, W. Va., are Maryland graduates: 
Fred V. Beerbower '43 (November), 
Mont M. Gardner '43 (March), P. E. 
Kercheval '21, and Eugene S. Prince 
'21. Dr. Kercheval was elected Presi- 
dent of the Staff and Dr. Beerbower, 
Vice-President. 

Editor 

With the January, 1956 issue Dr. 
Francis L. Edwards '50 of Beckley, 
W. Va., began his career as the Editor 
of the West Virginia Dental Journal. 
The Assistant Editor is his wife, Dr. 
Theresa A. Edward, '48. Since their 
graduation from Maryland, Francis and 
Theresa have been prominently active 
in the affairs of the New River Dental 
Society. Their friends among the alum- 
ni will watch with keen and encourag- 
ing interest their work in a new field 
of participation and contribution. 

Dr. John M. Mallow, '44, of Mar- 
lington, W. Va., was re-elected Presi- 
dent of the Greenbrier Valley Dental 
Society in November. Dr. Benjamin 
A. Rose '29, of East Rainelle, was 
re-elected Secretary. 

Dr. Paul H. Loflin '48, of Beckley, 
W. Va., is the new President of the 
New River Dental Society. Dr. Loflin 
served in the Navy Dental Corps from 
September, 1948 to April, 1950. He 
was recalled to the service in January, 
1953 and received his discharge in 
January 1954. 

Dr. Dorsey E. Gaines, Jr. '54, of 
Clarksburg, W. Va., is Vice-President 
of the Harrison County Dental Society. 

Dr. Ralph W. McCue '51, of Blue- 
field, W. Va., gave an illustrated talk 
on Endodontia at the October meeting 
of the New River Dental Society. 
At Wheeling, W. Va. 

Dr. Frank N. Carroll '15, of Wheel- 
ing, W. Va., is the chairman of the 
Wheeling Fire Department Civil Serv- 
ice Commission. He recently became 
a member of the Fire Bell Club of 
of the New York Firemen's Cycle Club. 
New York City and is also a member 
Dr. Carroll served as President of the 
Wheeling District Dental Society in 
1936. 

Dr. James E. Newman '46, of Hunt- 
ington, W. Va., is President of the 
Huntington Dental Society. 

Dr. Norman R. Boweers '28, of Wil- 

Maryland 



liamson, W. Va., is Vice-President of 
the Logan-Mingo Dental Society. 

Dr. Roy L. Lowman '50, of Buck- 
hannon, W. Va., is Vice-President of 
the Monongehela Valley Dental Society. 

Dr. Clemm E. Montgomery, Jr. '51, 
of Keyser, W. Va., is President of the 
Potomac Valley Dental Society. 

Dr. J. Ben Robinson '14 and Dr. Laco 
W. Gochenour '22 form one half of the 
West Virginia group of Delegates to 
the A.D.A. Dr. Francis Edwards '50 
is an alternate. 

Dr. Harold R. Stanley, Jr. '48 con- 
tributed an article on "The Cyclic 
Phenomenon of Periodontitis" to the 
June, 1955 number of Oral Surgery, 
Oral Medicine and Oral Pathology. Dr. 
Stanley is an oral pathologist asso- 
ciated with the Clinical Center, Na- 
tional Institute of Dental Research. 



School of 



Medicine 

— Dr. John Wagner 
III t's wonderful," beamed Mrs. Irma 

I Folker of Baltimore. "I can scrub 
a floor." 

The 29-year-old wife of a fireman 
had reason to be happy. 

She was back home, able to perform 
routine house keeping chores for the 
first time in her life after dramatic 
heart surgery at University of Mary- 
land Hospital. 

The operation was possible largely 
because of a procedure in which the 
patient is literally chilled in a tub of 
cracked ice until body temperature 
is lowered to 79 — nearly 20 degrees be- 
low normal. 

"The other day I went for a walk," 
said Mrs. Folker. "I walked for four 
hours. It was wonderful to feel the 
cold and the briskness." 

Until the operation was performed by 
Dr. R. Adams Cowley, Mrs. Folker was 
left short of breath by the slightest 
exertion. 

"Now I can go swimming, I can 
scrub a floor, I can do anything," she 
said. 

"The doctors even let me listen to 
my own heart, and it sounded just 
like an ordinary, everyday heart. Be- 
fore that it used to skip a beat and 
play all kinds of tricks. 

"I can't tell you how I felt sitting 
down to dinner with my husband and 
little girl." 

Mrs. Folker's trouble was a gaping 
hole in the partition which separates 
the two upper chambers of the heart. 
Doctors call it an interatral septal 
defect. 

In the normal heart, one of these 
chambers receives blood after it has 
been used, or deoxygenated, by the 
body tissues. The other receives fresh 
blood after it has been oxygenated by 
the lungs and passes it on to the body 
again. 

The defect in Mrs. Folker's case, said 
a hospital spokesman, was an opening 
about 2% by 2% inches. This caused an 
interflow of blood between the two 
chambers, and the resultant mixture 
which was passed on to the body did 
not contain enough oxygen. 



Deutsches Haus, Inc. 

1212 CATHEDRAL STREET 
Baltimore, Md. 

GERMAN SPECIALTIES 
IMPORTED BEERS & WINES 

Dinners Served from 5 p.m.-9 p.m. 

Sundays from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. 

ALA CARTE until 1 a.m. 

Mondays Closed 

Halls and Rooms for Private Parties, Banquets 
and Weddings— Call IE. 9-4565 

Wednesday 'til Sunday in Rathskeller 
Dance and Entertainment from 9 p.m. 



George H. 
Dashiells & Sons Co. 

CONTRACTORS • BUILDERS • ENGINEERS 
Brick, Hollow Tile, Cinder Block Work 
Fire Brick Specialist 

Brick Boiler Settings, Furnaces, 
Ovens and Machinery Foundations 

BEImont 5-6449 
223 EAST 33rd STREET 

BALTIMORE 18, MD. 




CHinesE-flmERicfln restaurriit 

Chinese Food at Its Best 

320 PARK AVENUE 

1308 PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE 

Baltimore 17, Md. 

CHINESE GROCERY STORE 

205 W. Mulberry St. — Baltimore, Md. 



F. A. Davis & Sons 

WHOLESALERS 

Cigars, Tobaccos, Sundries & Supplies 

Kitchen & Dining Equipment 

Soda Fountain Supplies 

119 S. HOWARD STREET 
Baltimore 1 , Md. 



•Crawford retreat • 

Interested in Problem Cases 

Henriette L. Nestler, Director 

Elizabeth Meyer, Supr. of Nursing 

WILKINS 7-0704 

• 2117 DENISON ST. BALTIMORE 16, MD. • 



Baltimore-Washington Express 
Company 

Daily Service Between 

BALTIMORE • WASHINGTON • ANNAPOLIS 

LExington 9-1756 
1625 Rldgely Street Baltimore 30, Md. 



41 



?.. , iii . . |y;,^ 



Clover/and 
2)ai 



pr 



r arma 



Vsfualitu 


f-^roducti 


WatcU 


h 


vsjuatitu 


Service 










WE ARE CLOSER THAN YOUR NEIGHBOR 

ARMSTRONG'S PHARMACY 

Thos. H. Caldwell, Prop. 
Prescription Specialists 


Dial 

ORIeans 5 
9318 




Belair Road and Clifton Park T 

Accuracy in Compounding Prescriptions + D 
SAVE TIME — Have your physician phone your p 
I Way Radio Phone Service FREE DELIVERY 


errace 

ependable Service 
rescriptlon 

Established 1904 




Travel Everywhere — 

THE By Steamer ... by Airline ... by Rail 
METROPOLITAN Independent and Conducted Tours 
t/m idict r /\u D a kiv Cruises . . . Resorts . . . Hotels 
TOURIST COMPANY Personalized Travel Service Since 1923 

1115 N. Charles Street — Baltimore 1, Maryland • VErnon 7-4360 



Get in touch with us regarding Bus. lExington 9-8400— Ext. 216 

the affair you are planning Res. MUlberry 5-6523 

BALTIMORE CHECK ROOM SERVICE 

CHECKING FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

(no function is too large or too small) 

CHECKING FOR HOMES OR HALLS 

DAN MORACO Office Lord Baltimore Hotel Check Room 



k^^^FM Jl 5^ giant pansy plants 

(good variety) 

PERENNIAL ... 

I annuals 
chrysanthemums 
field grown perennials 



phone 
OLdfield 3-4589 
• 

Liberty Road 

Randallstown, 

Maryland 



CAREY MACHINERY & SUPPLY COMPANY, Inc. 

Industrial Mill Supplies, Machine Tools, Pumps & Air Compressors 

SAFETY SUPPLIES 
3501 BREHMS LANE - BALTO. 1 3, MD. - BRoad way 6-1600 

(near Intersection Edison Highway and Erdman Ave.) 



The hospital spokesman said the 
chilling, or hypothermia, slows down 
the bodily processes by about 75 per 
cent. This means the tissues require as 
little as one-fourth the usual amount 
of oxygen and other life-giving factors 
supplied by the blood. 

It also means doctors may have up 
to four times the usual number of 
minutes available for actual heart 
surgery. 

Ordinarily, blood vessels can be 
clamped off and the heart can be 
stopped from pumping for about four 
or five minutes. After that the absence 
of fresh blood can cause permanent 
damage to the brain. 

With hypothermia, it was possible in 
this case to leave the heart at rest 
for 13 minutes while it was being 
patched. 

Two days later Mrs. Folker was up 
and around. She was discharged No- 
vember 22, 12 days after the operation. 
Internships 

A civil service examination has been 
announced for Dietetic Intern for fill- 
ing internships paying $2,000 a year in 
Veterans Administration hospitals in 
Los Angeles, California; Bronx, N. Y.; 
Hines, Illinois; Memphis, Tenessee; 
and Houston, Texas. 

To qualify for these internships, 
applicants must have received a bach- 
elor's degree from an accredited college 
or university and have completed cours- 
es of study in appropriate fields. No 
written test is required. Interns will 
be given a 12-month training course 
after which they will be eligible for 
promotion to a Dietitian position with 
the Veterans Administration, which 
pays from $3,670 to $4,525 a year. 

Applications will be accepted through 
March 1, 1956 for the classes of interns 
beginning on July or September 15, 



42 



Maryland 



1956. Applications must be filed with 
the Board of Civil Service Examiners, 
Veterans Administration, Washington 
25, D. C. 

Further information and application 
forms may be obtained from most post 
offices throughout the country or from 
the U. S. Civil Service Commission, 
Washington 25, D. C. 

Apoplexy 
New hope can now be offered for 
unfortunate victims of apoplectic 
stroke through researches conducted 
at the University of Maryland's School 
of Medicine. Studies have revealed that 
a large percentage of patients suffering 
from stroke can recover to a remark- 
able degree when proper treatment is 
begun at an early date and according to 
new methods recently developed. 

This topic was the focal point of dis- 
cussion during the university's public 
service medical program TV-M. D., 
telecast over WBAL-TV. 

Problems concerning the diagnosis 
and clinical management of the disease 
were discussed by Dr. Charles Van 
Buskirk, noted Baltimore neurologist 
and member of the staff of the School 
of Medicine. Dr. Florence Mahoney, 
authority on physical medicine and 
rehabilitation, discussed methods used 
at the School of Medicine in the treat- 
ment and rehabilitation of the apoplec- 
tic. Dr. John A. Wagner of the Division 
of Neuropathology demonstrated with 
actual specimens the location and the 
nature of the brain hemorrhage which 
is the cause of the stroke. 
Postgraduate Day 
Approximately 200 members of the 
Maryland Academy of General Prac- 
tice met at the School of Medicine for 
the university's annual postgraduate 
day program. 

The subjects covered include new 
methods of cancer detection, new ap- 
proaches to obesity, surgery for babies 
and material on the reaction of the 
body to the new miracle drugs. 

According to Dr. Howard Bubert, 
director of the Postgraduate Commit- 
tee, the program is part of the con- 
tinuing education service to the phy- 
sicians in the state provided by the 
School of Medicine. Modern practice 
in medicine requires a constant ed- 
ucation program in order for the gen- 
eral practitioner to keep up-to-date. 
Two Alarm Fire 
A two-alarm fire of unknown origin 
struck the famous old pathology build- 
ing of the School of Medicine, inflicting 
thousands of dollars worth of damage. 
The blaze, which broke out between 
the roof and loft of the structure, was 
first noted by a patrolman who sound- 
ed the initial alarm. Fifteen minutes 
later, a second alarm was sounded. 

Classes for about 150 students at the 
school were suspended as officials pre- 
pared to reach an accurate estimate 
on the actual amount of damage caused 
by the fire. 

The school's medical library, known 
as one of the finest in the East, was 
seriously damaged by water which had 
to be poured into the 50-year-old build- 
ing. Also damaged by the fire was a 
fine collection of medical art which was 

Maryland 



housed in the structure. 

Firemen remained on the scene mak- 
ing a tremendous effort to get water 
out of the building quickly, thus sav- 
ing as much of the books, paper and 
artwork as possible. 

Dr. Arnold H. Eichert 

Conditions in the State's mental in- 
stitutions have passed in two decades 
from the dark ages of psychiatry to an 
era of enlightenment and progress ac- 
cording to Dr. Arnold H. Eichert. 

A native of Baltimore who has never 
been more than 25 miles from home, 
Dr. Eichert was graduated from the 
University of Maryland School of Med- 
icine in 1938. He graduated from the 
School of Pharmacy in 1934. 

The retiring head of the Crownsville 
State Hospital attributed much of this 
to public attention focused on condi- 
tions that formerly "were not as hu- 
mane" as they could have been. 

The 42-year-old psychiatrist ended 
fourteen years of service with three of 
Maryland's mental hospitals. He now 
takes over his new duties as superin- 
tendent of the South Florida State Hos- 
pital, located near Hollywood. 

In summing up his experiences in 
Maryland, he went on to declare that 
the State's commitment laws were 
"among the most enlightened in the 
country." This stems, he explains, from 
statutes which permit commitment 
through medical certification as against 
court commitment alone. 

Maryland was among the first states 
in the nation to adopt such "reform" 
laws, he added. Furthermore, the grad- 
ual awakening of public opinion has 
greatly increased the efficiacy of psy- 
chiatric treatment, the doctor said. 

In such an atmosphere appropria- 
tions to mental institutions have grown, 
bringing with them higher salaries for 
better trained people. However, this 
has given rise to a serious new prob- 
lem. As hospitals improve in capacity 
and efficiency, the number of patients 
in them increases, too, which in itself 
creates a problem of caring for great- 
er numbers of individual cases. 

Dr. Eichert, youngest of three men 
to head Crownsville, also attributed 
better conditions to community inter- 
est in mental hospitals. For example, 
nearly all of them, he said, have ladies' 
auxiliaries that put on parties and gen- 
erally attempt to brighten life for the 
mentally ill. 

"People used to be afraid of mental 
hospitals," Dr. Eichert said, "now they 
come and visit us quite willingly and 
are quite sympathetic." 

Dr. Eichert joined the State service 
in 1941 as staff physician at the 
Springfield Hospital, in Sykesville. In 
1948 and 1949, he was clinical director 
at Crownsville. He held the same posi- 
tion for three years at Spring Grove, 
before becoming superintendent of 
Crownsville on February 1, 1953. 

The Florida institution he now heads 
was recently constructed with a 500- 
bed capacity. It eventually will be ex- 
panded to 1,700 beds. 

During the final stages of construc- 
tion, Dr. Eichert worked with the 



Stock Commentary 

Our letter discussing 
the trend of the market 
and the current position 
of individual stocks, 
will be sent upon re- 
quest without obliga- 
tion. 



W. E. HUTTON & CO. 

Established 1880 

Members New York Stock Exchange 
and other leading exchanges 

608 First National Dank Bldg. 

Baltimore 2, Md. 

New York Cincinnati 



University Book Store 

Specializing In 

Medical Books 

World-Wide Mail Order Service 

519 W. Lombard Street 

LE 9-4315 

Baltimore, Md. 



WILLIAm P. PARR, C. L U.i 

— Insurance Broker — — 

PERSonnL finflnciAL pmnninG 

315 BALTIMORE LIFE BLDG. 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

^SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSi^ 

MEDICAL 



EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 

Mrs. E. M. Hanrahan 
DENTAL — INDUSTRIAL 
MEDICAL — PHARMACEUTICAL 

28 E. 20th St. 
HOpkinS 7-8931 Baltimore, Md. 



ALCAZAR 

CATHEDRAL and MADISON STS. 

Phone VErnon 7-8400 

Baltimore, Md. 



43 




CUSTOM BUILT ORTHOPAEDIC APPLIANCES 

(by prescription) 

STOCK APPLIANCES 
ORTHOPAEDIC APPLIANCE CORPORATION 

220 W. 28th STREET Phone BEImonl 5-9645 BALTIMORE 11, MD. 





I 

WASHINGTON ALUMINUM CO., Inc. 

Baltimore 29, Md. • Arbutus 2700 



ALUMINUM FABRICATORS 

Our products include: 

Marine Accommodation 
Ladders 

Gangways and Hatch Covers 

Marine and Industrial Gratings 

Loading Platforms 

Industrial Gin Poles 

Stop Plates and Guides 

Pressure Vessels and Tanks 



WW 



World Travel Agency 

Conducted World Wide Tours and Cruises 

MEXICO - EUROPE 

Travel By Boat - Plane - Train 
Dependable Reservations and Accommodations 

MT. ROYAL AVENUE and CATHEDRAL STREET 
MU 5-4000 Baltimore, Md. 



44 



architects in designing the buildings. 

"The situation presents a great chal- 
lenge to me," he explained. "The in- 
stitution starts off fresh without any 
old problems. All the mistakes I make 
will be my own." 

Radiology 

Radiology, one of medical science's 
most potent weapons in the diagnosis 
of diseases, was the subject of Mary- 
land's TV-M.D. program, four of the 
university's radiologists discussing how 
and what can be done with x-ray. 

Through the use of x-ray films and 
demonstration of x-ray techniques the 
program was devoted to explanation 
of the very latest methods of disease 
detection. 

Participating on the program, tele- 
vised over WBAL-TV, Channel 11, 
were Drs. John M. Dennis, professor 
and head of the University's Depart- 
ment of Radiology; Charles N. David- 
son, professor of clinical radiology; 
Robert P. Boudreau, assistant profes- 
sor of radiology; and Henry H. Startz- 
man, instructor in radiology. 

Drugs And Driving 

When a holiday period is over the 
traffic accident record does not stand 
still. More and more automobiles and 
more and more careless drivers day by 
day make the record a staggering in- 
dictment. Among the contributors to 
this country's fantastic accident rate 
are drugs. 

On the University's TV-M.D. pro- 
gram over WBAL-TV, Dr. John Krantz, 
professor and head of the Department 
of Pharmacology, discussed drugs and 
driving. 

Dr. Krantz demonstrated by the use 
of animals, how drugs affect humans, 
with particular emphasis upon those 
drugs affecting the central nervous 
system. A major portion of the pro- 
gram was devoted to the affects of 
alcohol on human reaction time. 

The telecast is another in the uni- 
versity's weekly series dealing with 
public medical eduation. 

Diabetes 

The findings of a diabetic detection 
drive, conducted by Dr. J. Sheldon 
Eastland and his Diabetic Committee 
of the Maryland State Medical Society, 
was brought to light on University's 
TV-M.D. program, presented by Dr. 
T. Nelson Carey, professor of Clinical 
Medicine and included a definition of 
diabetes, explanation of what goes 
wrong and symptoms. 

Dr. Carey presented some of the 
major problems that physicians en- 
counter with diabetic patients. Such 
problems as acceptance of the physi- 
cian's diagnosis, the acceptance of the 
discipline that is necessary for patients 
and what treatment is necessary, were 
thoroughly explained. 

Assisting the university professor 
was Miss Jane Hayes of the univer- 
sity's dietetic staff, who discussed the 
recent advancement that has been made 
in the diet, which is so important in the 
treatment of diabetics. 

The program will be concluded with 
a thorough discussion on insulin, its 
administration and expense. 

Maryland 



Reminiscences 

Clare Wooten, News Editor of the 
Diamondback, digs out the following 
reminiscent items: 

1909— Senator Edits: The Triangle, 
Diamondback precursor, was under the 
direction of future U. S. Senator Mil- 
lard Tydings. St. John's, Annapolis, 
was the state football champion, but 
the Maryland Agriculture College 
newspaper "believed that we will soon 
strike our winning stride again and 
occupy the proud position of (former) 
years." They had won the champion- 
ship in '05 and '06. School attire was 
a West Point pattern uniform which 
"gives our cadets a clean-cut appear- 
ance." 

1916 — Students Favor Prohibition: 
Now it is called Maryalnd State Week- 
ly and it reports prohibition debate 
where "wets fought nobly for a dia- 
bolical principle," but were downed. 
This forecast of '55 was followed by a 
"no less instructive talk on 'Onion 
Culture in the U. S.' " 

Finally won the glory of '05 and '06 
again with state championship, and 
editors commented: "Does it pay for 
a College to devote so much time, at- 
tention and money to athletics." (Fa- 
miliar note?) 

". . . prestige, popularity — a larger 
student body next year. And all is 
doubly true when we realize that the 
members of our champion team are 
bona fide under graduate students, and 
that Maryland State has built up her 
athletics on a basis of straight amateur 
college athletics." 

1918 — Girls Galore: 11 girls were 
admitted to University; this was "sat- 
isfactory and before long they hoped 
to be "equally divided." Great hopes 
were held that a ROTC unit could be 
established. 

1923— Cotton Bowl: SMU invited 
Terps to post-season contest in Dallas. 
Never happened, Southwestern Con- 
ference objected. Adele Stamp men- 
tored women's basketball. 

1925 — Editorial writer was one De- 
Witt Hyde, current Maryland repre- 
sentative to Congress. 

1926— DBK Hall of Fame: Diamond- 
back (they finally found out right 
name) masthead listed a Geary Eppley 
as alumni editor. The enrollment had 
swelled (sic) to 38 girls. 

1941 — War Predictions: Prof, pre- 
dicts WW II will be brief, over by 
spring. Rumors run riot, even trenches 
between dorms. 

1942 — This is Vacation?: December 
19 to December 28 (and another day is 
demanded for O. Bowl). 

1945 — Conquering Hero: Col. Geary 
Eppley awarded Legion Merit. Eppley 
is also track coach. Walls of A&S 
painted. (They have held up pretty 
well for 10 years' use.) 

****** 
CONVINCING 

If you want to tell a man something 
he doesn't know — and have him believe 
it — first tell him something he does 
know. Your words will be twice as 
convincing. 

Maryland 



Tribute To Zal 

(Diamondback Feature Reporter) 

BMOCs are plentiful nowadays. But 
Zal is the B-est MOC of all. 

This title is earned not only by his 
285 pounds, but by his success in busi- 
ness, his position in the community 
and — his big heart. 

Mr. Z can be found in his natural 
habitat — the Varsity Grill. 

Emanuel Zalesak started the Grill 
as a tiny soda fountain in 1932, when 
he, then a graduate student at Mary- 
land, took over a tea parlor. "Our first 
lunch special cost 25 cents," Zal recalls. 
"It included soup, a sandwich, a drink 
and dessert." Zal still feels that his 
food business equals his beer business. 
In his 23 years in business, Zal has 
employed 359 students with an aggre- 
gate payroll of a quarter of a million 
dollars. 

Lends A Buck 

Mr. Z has been known to lend a stu- 
dent a buck till the next check from 
home and has often loaned travel ex- 
penses to truck drivers whose vehicles 
have broken down. Also, he frequently 
obtains football tickets for returning 
alums. 

It is hard to picture Zal as the 170- 
pound athlete he was before his gradu- 
ation from Maryland in 1925. Ail- 
American goalie in lacrosse, he was 
also on the track and basketball teams 
— and managed the football team. He 
was a charter member and vice-presi- 
dent of Delta Sigma Phi. 

In 1951, Zal gave a Sugar Bowl trip 
to a Maryland student and this year 
he sent two to the Orange Bowl — all 
expenses paid. 

Now 52, Zal hopes to retire in eight 
years. When Emanuel Zalesak disap- 
pears from the College Park scene, 
Maryland will be losing one of its 
biggest and most pleasant traditions. 



Assistant Leader 

Hugh Henderson, director of bands 
at Montana State University, has been 
appointed codirector of the University 
of Maryland's Red-and-White Band and 
the Air Force ROTC Band, it was 
announced by Prof. Homer Ulrich, head 
of the university's Department of Mu- 
sic. 

Mr. Henderson was graduated from 
the University of North Carolina in 
1941 with an A.B. Degree in Music, 
and subsequently served four and a 
half years in the Army Air Force, in- 
cluding two years as a warrant officer 
bandleader. 

He returned to his alma mater in 
1946 and was appointed graduate as- 
sistant. 

In 1953, following another tour of 
duty with the Air Force, he again re- 
turned to the University of North Car- 
olina to begin work on his Ph.D. in 
musicology. Since 1954 he has been 
Instructor and Director of Bands at 
Montana State University. 



Travel By Air 

An estimated nine per cent of the 
nation's record-breaking air coach pas- 
senger traffic last year was composed 
of college and university students, it 
was disclosed in a survey by North 
American Airlines. 

They reported that last year more 
students than ever used low-fare air 
coach for travel from home to campus, 
for home weekend and vacation visits. 

Still other thousands have inquired 
either individually or through student 
groups concerning North American's 
plan to extend low-fare air coach to 
Europe. 

If given Civil Aeronautics Board ap- 
proval, North American would begin 
flights between New York and the 
principal cities of Europe in April at 
rates averaging 4 cents a mile. 

The trip from New York to Shannon 
would be $125 one way; to London, 
$140; to Paris, $146.50; Frankfurt, 
$156, and Rome, $175. Existing air 
tourist rates are 43 to 63 per cent 
higher than fares planned by North 
American. Present one-way fares 
range from $261 to Shannon to $360.20 
to Rome. 

On its domestic routes, North Ameri- 
can fares are 3.2 cents a mile. The 
one-way transcontinental fare is $80 
from New York to Los Angeles. The 
contemplated 4 cent a mile charge in 
overseas operations is to allow for 
higher cost in transcontinental opera- 
tion. Other airlines charge as much 
as 8 cents a mile on trans-Atlantic air- 
tourist flights. 



Accountants 

Two of the officers of the Maryland 
Association of Certified Public Ac- 
countants were members of the class 
of 1926 of the University of Maryland 
College of Commerce and Business Ad- 
ministration, Baltimore; i.e., Vice-Pres- 
ident William R. Walton, Jr., C.P.A., 
and partner in the firm of Wooden, 
Benson & Walton, C.P.A.'s, Baltimore; 
and Joseph A. Naegele, Secretary. Jos- 
eph A. Naegele is a partner in F. W. 
Lafrentz & Company, C.P.A.'s, Balti- 
more. Two of his sons majored in ac- 
counting at Maryland. J. Gordon 
Naegele graduated during World War 
II, and is now a partner of F. W. 
Lafrentz & Company, Salisbury. The 
youngest son, John C. Naegele, grad- 
uated last June and is now working 
with a public accounting firm in Bal- 
timore and waiting to be drafted in 
the near future. 

B. W. Cochran, President of the D. C. : 
Institute of Certified Public Account- 
ants, has a daughter, Cecelia M. Coch- 
ran, who is a student in the College of 
Education; and he also has a son in 
the Law School. 

Guy S. Kidwell, C.P.A., Hagerstown, 
Md., is the current president of the 
Maryland Association of C.P.A.'s. 

Leonard B. Rowles, Treasurer of the 
Association, attended the Maryland 
College of Commerce and Business Ad- 
ministration. He graduated from the 
School of Law. 



45 



Wonder 

Silk 

Store 




See Our ^^SP»4 

Complete Line of Quality Fabrics 

DRESS MATERIALS & TRIMMINGS 

CUSTOM MADE SLIP COVERS & DRAPERIES 

B571 Georgia Ave. - Silver Spring, Md. 

Juniper 9-9619 
Often Monday, Thursday & Friday Nights 



TftaAch*' & co. 

FLORISTS 

Flowers For All Occasions 

4800 Rhode Island Ave. 
HYATTSVILLE, MD. 



APpleton 
7-9500 




J * H <^£& / Ff/.'r~' .-■^^•rf^fSa~- 



GEORGE H.STIEBER CO., 

FOOD SPECIALISTS 
TOWSON, MD. 



For That Personal Touch 

meri\J&/eJ&s/)ions 

4812 ROLAND AVENUE 
BALTIMORE 

— next to Delvale's — 



Adelaide DeVinny Weil HO 7-9551 



Fashions 

of 

Distinction 



ROUND PARK DRESS SHOP 

5119 Roland Ave. Baltimore 
TU 9-0931 





J>tfL JJtiL 

• • • 0fr 




With Easter just around the corner 
and a hint of spring in the air, our 
thoughts turn to the many wonderful 
opportunities that are available to us 
in Maryland. For those 
who like the water, 
there is boating on our 
many rivers, and the 
Chesapeake Bay, Deep 
Sea Fishing off our own 
coast of Maryland — 
there are the Moun- 
tains and Scenic drives and Picnic 
Areas — and, of course, the Garden 
Tours. 

The Maryland Garden Tours have at- 
tracted guests from all over the na- 
tion and the fabulous Sherwood Gar- 
dens, open to the public, in Baltimore, 
are fast gaining national interest. 

The Preakness and the Cross Coun- 
try Point-to-Point races are truly 
Maryland's own. 

The unique Flower Mart in Balti- 
more where this one day in spring — 
bustling-hustling Charles Street be- 
comes, literally, a Country Fair Haven 
— Flowers, Works of Art, Peppermint 
Candy Sticks and Cake Tables take 

For Absolute 
Reliability 

Heidelbach's 

Applies to Quality 

Price 

Advertisement 

— Established 1882 — 

ROLAND PARK CATONSVILLE 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



By EDITH A. ROSS 

over. The busy Charles Street mer- 
chants and the City Fathers contribute 
their efforts in assisting Baltimore's 
Fair Ladies to continue this great tra- 
ditional event. 

Now — our thoughts move on to sport 
clothes, suits, trousseaus and — gayest 
of all — the Easter Bonnet — Hmmmm 

mxmm 

MERIVALE FASHIONS, INC.— why 
of course, Adelaide DeVinny Weil or 
"Tommy" as she is known to many of 
us, has in her lovely shop at 4812 Ro- 
land Avenue (next to Delvale) every- 
thing needed to be perfectly "turned 
out" for each occasion. Her collection 
of Spring COATS and SUITS is superb. 
Also the pre-summer Cottons in beau- 
tiful new shades are most enticing. So 
with Easter in mind be sure to visit 
Merivale Fashions, Inc. 

Rssaean 

For busy Brides and Mothers with 
wedding arrangements, teas, the re- 
hearsal dinner and the reception, we 
recommend to you, the ultimate in 
catering— FISKE CONFECTIONER & 
CATERER, located at 1758 Park Ave. 

Fiske has been the leading caterer 
in Baltimore for over a half century — 
the personal attention of Franklin 
Fiske assures the hostess that all de- 
tails will be properly cared for. 

At Easter time may we remind you 
of FISKE'S decorated Easter Egg 
Pound Cakes — there are none finer for 
that grand finale of this special occa- 
sion. 

WtOBOBl 

Ladies, with a yen to dress up your 
home and yourselves — visit the WON- 
DER SILK STORE at 8571 Georgia 




Bob Jones 

JfownAA, 



ARE MORE ELOQUENT THAN WORDS 



228 N. Liberty St. Baltimore, Md. 



PL 2-3737 



Daniels Bootery 

Carpenter's Self Starters 
Buntees - Edwards 

£ap££W Dance Footwear 

3 LOCATIONS 

Ellsworth at Fenton 11224 Georgia Ave. 

Silver Spring Wheaton, Md. 

1323 University Lane 

Langley Park 



"Little Furs 
for Spring" 

Capes 
Stoles 
Scarfs 

oHovaIdcIl 

it 

Ssdsunkow 

221 N. LIBERTY STREET 




LExington 9-0275 



BALTIMORE, MD. 



■MVWWWV>WSW(WW»VW»V»W W VyvW> 



IjJomsn, 
Tltcuadand, 




Avenue, Silver Spring, Md. There you 
will find luxurious materials for your 
Formal Gowns as well as a wide choice 
of fabrics for everyday living. The 
spring silk prints, cottons, nylons and 
dacrons are breath-taking — such dress 
trimmings, too! 

For twenty years Mr. Irving Leibo- 
witz has been buying fabrics and he 
chooses for you only the finest. While 
in his shop see the wonderful slip cover 
materials and custom made draperies. 

For the busy career woman and 
homemakers, the WONDER SILK 
STORE stays open Monday, Thursday 
and Friday evenings. 

THE ROLAND PARK DRESS SHOP 
is the same attractive Fashion Center 
formerly known as "Connie Savage". 
Here we now find, as in the past, a 
marvelous array of the latest crea- 
tions. Connie (Mrs. Robert Stinson) 
has a knack of choosing clothes which 
seem to enhance the individuals per- 
sonality. 

It is good to know that the ROLAND 
PARK DRESS SHOP does not close for 
that month long "Summer Break" — in- 
stead it is open continuously, and shows 
vacation clothes intermingled with the 
the first "Back to College" wardrobe. 

For your Spring "Pick-Up" and East- 
er finery the collection of high fashions 
at the ROLAND PARK DRESS SHOP 
— are in a class by themselves. You real- 
ly have to see them to appreciate them. 

BK8SS8 

DANIELS BOOTERY now has Three 
Locations for your convenience. Six 
years ago Daniel Lowenthal opened 
his first store in Silver Spring at Ells- 
worth and Fenton Streets. The Bootery 
carries infants, childrens, misses, and 
big boy's shoes. On their shelves you 
will find such impressive brand names 
as EDWARDS, the shoe for children; 
CARPENTERS, self-starters; CAPE- 
ZIO Dance Footwear, BUNTEES and 
oh— yes, Young CAPEZIOS. 



EARLE KIRKLEY, INC. 




In March 1954 the Langley Park 
Branch at 1323 University Lane was 
opened followed a year later, by the 
Wheaton Store at 11224 Georgia Ave. 

Now Mother! Where ever you shop — 
you will find a DANIELS BOOTERY 
close by. 

Ksaaesg 

Jimmy Wu, the owner of the NEW 
CHINA INN RESTAURANT on 
Charles Street below 25th in Balti- 
more, is an outstanding and success- 
ful restaurateur. At s very young 
age, just out of school, he ventured 
into his present business. 

During the past few months he has 
opened three new dining rooms, that 
adjoin the original business and an 
ultra modern Carry-Out Shop on Cold 
Spring Lane, just off Loch Raven Blvd. 

We chatted with Jimmy recently on 
the additions to the Restaurant and this 
is what he told us. 

The largest room is called "THE 
CHINA COAST" because of a beautiful 
painting on the wall. The chandelier 
is one that adorned a palatial estate in 
Canton, China. The second is called 
the "LONGEVITY ROOM" because of 
a tapestry that is on display. This was 
presented to his father on his 75th 
birthday by a group of leading Chinese 
citizens — the inscription of this tapes- 
try reads, "Longevity is Like South 
Mountain" meaning of course, the Him- 
alayas. The third, an intimate nook, is 
known as "THE FORBIDDEN ROOM." 

The new addition is beautifully dec- 
orated and it is interesting to note 
that Jimmy is the designer. 
■ == Open Mon., Wed., Fri. "til 8 :30 ^E^ 

SPRING - SUMMER 

Dresses for every occasion 
Street Dresses $18.95 up 

Bridal Wear - Mother's Gowns 

Cocktail - Formate - Eastern Star 

Coats - Suits - Millinery 

SIZES 7-46 12M.-24* 

Virginia Driskill's 



at Linden 
Terrace 



I0WS0N ORK RD. 

= Closed Thur*. - Parking Lot 



34 13 MEINMOUNT AVINUC 
Mtlmof*, Md. IIImMt S-0100 



(Bomdy <&utd 

Creative Hair Styles 
Permanent Waving 
Hair Coloring 




1216 N. CHARLES STREET • BALTIMORE 
VErnen 7-9407 SAratoga 7-3789 



Tables to Love 
And to Live With 




CHERRY STEP END 

TABLE 

with drawer 

Brass trimming 

$87.50 

one of many in 

our selections of 

fine tables. 



P» Stein, Inc. 

409 N. Charles Street 
Baltimore 

Free Parking Just Around tht Corner 



3>i&Jul 



CONFECTIONER 
CATERER 



Decorated Fruit & Nut 
Easter Egg Pound Cakes 

Birthday — Wedding 
Teas — Receptions 

1758 Park Ave. Baltimore MA 3-0911 




Begin with 
a suit — begin 
your smart 
Spring Shopping 

1104 N. CHARLES ST. 
BALTIMORE 

— Free Parking Any Lot — 



Pia6u Jbsu/L adekd! 



a 



SHOP 



Shopping Center 

Cold Spring Lane at 

Loch Raven Blvd. 

CH 3-5253 




Will 

Charles St. below 25th 
BALTIMORE 18, MD. 

■Elrnont 5-1744 
,wyyvWAVW»yvywv»»wwsv»<<w^ 



RESIDENTIAL IRON WORK 



SmcEi9 33 E - 




PORCH & TERRACE HAND 

RAILINGS • BALCONIES 

GATES • COLUMNS 

TRELLIAGE 

INTERIOR STAIR RAILINGS 

For Estimate Call 

LA 6-1240 
Washington, D. C. 



Villa yiosa 

dialicuv (fh&IauAant 



siiiirflafe 


mKJEM 




SMI 




^^ ^9S 



PRIVATE BANQUETS 
FLORENTINE ROOM 

SILVER SPRING, MD. 



USE THE COUPON ON 
THE LAST PAGE 



European Tours 

The American Express Company is 
again offering escorted student tours 
throughout Europe. 

Prices begin at $861. A typical 58 
day tour includes visits to England, the 
Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, 
Italy, and France. Stopovers are made 
in London, Stratford, Amsterdam, 
Volendam, Cologne, Baden-Baden, Lu- 
cerne, Milan, Venice, Rome, Florence, 
the French Riviera and Paris. 

For further information, write the 
nearest American Express Office. 



DR. H. C. BYRD HONORED 

Former President Receives M Club And Terrapin 
Award For 42 Years Of Service As Maryland Football 
And Lacrosse Squads Are Acclaimed. 



The head table at the 1955 banquet 
honoring Maryland's unbeaten foot- 
ball team and its national lacrosse 
champions at the Statler Hotel in- 
cluded a college president, football 
coach, lacrosse coaches, athletes and 
politicians. 

It also included Fred Nielson, Ne- 
braska graduate, who coached Mary- 
land's 1905 and 1906 teams on which 
Dr. Byrd starred. 

Dr. H. C (Curley) Byrd received a 
standing ovation when introduced, and 
long cheers greeted his remarks that 
called for a continued and honest em- 
phasis on athletics at College Park. 

With Republican Senators Butler and 
Beall of Maryland on each side, Dr. 
Byrd said he had a "slight interest in 
the development of athletics, as the 
compatriots of the two Republican 
Senators of Maryland impressed upon 
the people of the State two years ago." 




Lacrosse Coaches 
Left : Coach Jack Fab- 
er. Right : Coach Al 
Heagy. 



Both Senators Butler and Beall 
joined in the laughter. 

Dr. Byrd, president emeritus of the 
State institution, received a silver bowl 
from the "M" and Terrapin Clubs, 
presented by Sam Silber, immediate 
past president of the "M" Club, "in 
recognition of his outstanding achieve- 
ments during his 42 years of service 
at the University as player, coach, vice- 
president and president. 

In making his major points Dr. Byrd 
said, "Let us hope the Board of Re- 
gents maintains the kind of athletics 
that have been maintained, and let us 
hope the administration recognizes the 
values of competitive sports and what 
they contribute." 

In reference to the Terrapin Club, ; 
the booster organization for Maryland 
athletics, he said he gave approval to 
the club, but told the members to "put 
into the constitution exactly what you 
do, and give full information." 

Dr. Byrd said one of the most damn- 
able claims against a university is that 
it does nothing for athletes. 

"The students know something is 
being done for the athletes," he said, 
"and to say different is dishonest." He 



Forty -Two Years 




HONORED 

Above : Dr. H. C Byrd as Maryland's 
young football coach, circa 1912. 

At the "M" Club banquet he was 
presented with a silver bowl in recog- 
nition of his outstanding services to 
the University over a period of 42 
years as athlete, coach, vice-president 
and president. 



added that Maryland never had falsi- 
fied its claims for help to athletes, and 
he hoped it never would. 

"I defy anyone to name one instance 
where success in athletics has not been 
helpful to an institution," Dr. Byrd 
said. "Is Penn a better school because 
it lost all its games, or is Notre Dame 
worse because of its emphasis on foot- 
ball? No," he answered. 

He said Maryland should maintain 
a high standard of competitive ath- 
letics, with integrity and honesty above 
reproach. 

The members of Maryland's unde- 
feated lacrosse and football teams were 
introduced individually by their coach- 
es, Jim Tatum and Al Heagy and Jack 
Faber, the latter pair co-coaches of the 
lacrosse team. 

Five members of the national cham- 
pionship lacrosse squad received awards 
as members of the All-America team. 
They were John Simmons, Charlie 
Wicker, and Jim Keating, members of 
the first team, and Jim Kapler and 
Rennie Smith, second team All-Ameri- 
cans. 

Ed Carr, president of the Washing- 
ton Board of Trade, presented his or- 
ganization's trophy to Center Bob 
Pellegrini as lineman of the year. 

Al Lujack, president of the Washing- 
ton Touchdown Club, announced that 
Pellegrini also receives the Knute 
Rockne Memorial Trophy as the out- 






48 



Maryland 



standing college lineman, selected by 
the club. 

George Bowen of the Associated 
Press in Baltimore presented the AP's 
All-America first team certificate to 
Pellegrini. "This certificate was filled 
out before the season started," Bowen 
said. "Pellegrini made it easy for us." 

He also gave a third-team certificate 
to Ed Vereb, adding that Tatum often 
has said he could pick a group of play- 
ers from across the Nation who could 
beat the All-America team, and Vereb 
was one of them. 

The guests included Senator Mon- 
roney, Democrat of Oklahoma, who 
said he won a brand new dollar bill 
from Senator Beall on the Orange Bowl 
game of two years ago when Oklahoma 
beat Maryland, and hoped to win an- 
other. 



Traveling Troupe 

Twenty-three students and two facul- 
ty members from the University of 
Maryland are entertaining Air Force 
personnel in the Azores, Iceland and 
Bermuda. 

The students, members of the Uni- 
versity Theater Group, do a comedy, 
"The Warrior's Husband," and several 
variety acts. The group includes Jim 
Henson, NBC puppet entertainer, and 
Beverly Stubbs, baton twirler who per- 
formed in the Orange Bowl at Miami. 

The troupe, headed by E. Thomas 
Starcher, the director, and Miss Sally 
Conlon, his assistant, both speech in- 
structors, was ferried by the Military 
Air Transport Service from Trenton, 
N. J., to the Azores, thence to Iceland 
and Burmuda. The group is due back 
February 23. 

It will be the second such trip for 
many of the group. 



Banking Seminar 

Three teachers of economics in Mary- 
land's university and colleges attended 
the third annual Central Banking Sem- 
inar at the Federal Reserve Bank of 
Richmond. 

They are D. Hamberg, associate pro- 
fessor at the University of Maryland, 
Paul F. Conway, assistant professor 
of accounting and economics at Mount 
St. Mary's College, and Arthur M. 
Johnson, assistant professor at the 
U. S. Naval Academy. The university 
and colleges named to send representa- 
tives to the seminar, were designated 
by an advisory committee of educators 
including Dudley R. Dillard, professor 
of economics and head of the Depart- 
ment of Economics at the University 
of Maryland. 

The Maryland educators were among 
24 teachers attending the seminar. 
The program, Mr. Leach said, was de- 
signed to give the teachers an inside 
look at Federal Reserve Bank opera- 
tions and the opportunity of hearing 
discussions of the theory and prac- 
tice of monetary policy by top men in 
the field. 



PLEASANT COUNTRY EATING 

30 ll'linules Zrrom 
oUownlown Baltimore 



The Finest Food and Drink 
Served in Friendly Old 
Maryland Atmosphere 

FACILITIES FOR PRIVATE PARTIES 

LOCATED ON BELAIR ROAD, U. S. ROUTE 1 

IV* MILES FROM THE CITY LINE 

IVi MILES SOUTH OF BEL AIR 

Completely Air-Conditioned 




THE KINGSVILLE INN 



FOR RESERVATIONS— FORK 2781 



CLOSED MONDAYS 



Arthur If. Ifen6le? 

Real Estate • Insurance 

WE MULTIPLE LIST 

2406 NORTH CHARLES ST. HOpkins 7-1313 

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



— SCOTT MOTORS, Inc. — 

CHRYSLER - PLYMOUTH 
2630 Sisson St. HO 7-9579 Baltimore 1 1 # Md. 



NATIONAL ENGINEERING CO. 

DISTRIBUTORS • ENGINEERS • CONTRACTORS 

REFRACTORY and INSULATION MATERIALS 

BALTIMORE HAGERSTOWN 



"&SL CL tfUSL&L at yoWL OtVJt, (pCUltifJ' 

THE WARR-BACK company 6 



1612 W. Mt. Royal Ave. 



MAdison 3-4322 

Baltimore 1 7, Md. 




BELT'S SEEDS 

TRINITY BRAND 

Crass - Lawn - Field 

THE BELT SEED CO., INC. 

200 E. Pratt St. Baltimore, Md. 



SA 7-5644 



Maryland 



49 



All-Maryland 




THE COBEY "TEAM" 
Children of Director of Athletics William W. Cobey, Director of Athletics, and 
Mrs. Cobey. Left to right: Judy Anne, William, Munroe, Ellwood, Betty and Mary 
Patricia, sophomore in Arts and Sciences. 



NEW SPORTS HEADS 

BILL COBEY TAKES OVER AS DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS. 
TOMMY MONT SELECTED AS HEAD FOOTBALL COACH. 



Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, University of 
Maryland President, announced the 
appointment of Tommy Mont as Head 
Football Coach of the University and 
William W. Cobey as Director of ath- 
letics. They succeed James M. Tatum, 
who resigned from the Athletic Direc- 
torship and head coaching job to take 
the position as Head Football Coach 
at the University of North Carolina. 
Dr. Elkins' recommendation to the 
Athletic Committee of the Board of 
Regents and the entire Board was 
approved unanimously. 

Mont, a 1947 graduate of the Uni- 
versity, has been backfield coach since 
1951. Cobey, a 1930 
graduate of the Uni- 
versity and Man- 
ager of Athletics, be- 
comes a Department 
Head as Director of 
Athletics. 

In recommending 
Mont and Cobey for 
the positions o f 
Head Coach and 
Director of Athlet- 
ics, Dr. Elkins said: 
"I offered their 
names inasmuch as 
I thought that if those within the 
present staff would qualify, they should 
be given first consideration. They were 
given this privilege and after inter- 
viewing them and studying their back- 
grounds, I thought we had two people 
qualified for the jobs. I recommended 
them to the Athletic Committee of 
the Board of Regents and the Board 




Mr. Blair 



of Regents and they accepted them 
unanimously." 

"I feel both men are familiar with 
the situation in Maryland, are most 
familiar with the University policies 
and are in complete accord with the 
existing policies of the University," 
Dr. Elkins said, adding, "I also feel 
that Tommy Mont, while not a former 
Head Coach, has the qualifications 
needed and should do an outstanding 
job for us." 

"We decided to separate the two jobs 
because of the size of our athletic pro- 
gram and our intentions to broaden 
the program, which means we want to 
give more time to all sports." 

Dr. Elkins said that the University 
is not setting any specific number of 
athletic or non-athletic scholarships. 
They will depend upon the kind of 
applicants the University receives, the 
funds available, and the action of the 
Faculty Scholarship and Grants-in-Aid 
Committee. 

From Cumberland ' 

Mont, a native of Cumberland, Md., 
is one of the all-time names at the 
University. He has the rare distinc- 
tion of being a three-sport athlete four 
years at Maryland, lettering in foot- 
ball, basketball, and lacrosse. A grad- 
uate of Alleghany High School in Cum- 
berland, Mont started his collegiate 
athletic career in 1941. He was in 
school two years before entering the 
service in the spring of 1943. He played 
tailback in 1941, then quarterback on 
the 1942 T eleven. Both years he also 




HEADS ATHLETICS 
Bill Cobey, who has been at Mary- 
land since his graduation in the Class 
of 1930 as cashier and graduate man- 
ager of athletics is now Director of 
Athletics. 



won his basketball and lacrosse mono- 
grams. He won all-America mention 
as well as first team all-Conference and 
the Washington-Maryland outstanding 
college player awards in 1942. 

During the war, Mont served 42 
months in the Army, 18 of which were 
spent in the ETO. He played ball 
throughout his long hitch in the service. 
He was tailback on the Fort Benning 
Post championship team of 1943. As 
quarterback and head coach, he led the 
3rd Infantry team to the ETO title. 
He also was. at the helm of the 7th 
Army all-Star team. 

Following his discharge, Mont re- 
turned to Maryjand and was quarter- 
back on the 1946 team as he gained 
all-America mention and all-Conference 
honors. 

With Redskins 

Drafted by the Washington Redskins 
National Professional Football Club, 
Mont had four brilliant years as quart- 
erback during the last of which he 
did considerable coaching. Then came 
the call to have him return to his 
alma mater as backfield coach, a posi- 
tion he has held since. 

Mont has worked with Maryland 
High Schools and for the past three 
summers he has spent two weeks each 
year as an advisory coach at the Na- 
tional Polytechnique Institute in Mexi- 
co City. He also put in the T formation 
for Scrappy Moore's University of 
Chattanooga eleven in 1949. In the sum- 
mer of 1954, he was asked to assist 
teaching the Split-T for the Parris 



50 



Maryland 



Proud Youngsters 




Washington Star Foto 

FOOTBALL FAMILY 

Tommy Mont, the new head football coach 'at the University of Maryland, and 

his family. Shaking hands with Tommy is Mr. Chips, the (family pet, while others 

are (left to right) Jeffrey, 6; Danny, 5; Mrs. Mont and Stephen, 8. Mrs. Mont is 

a Maryland alumna, Virginia Askins. 



Island Marines. He also has been a 
scout for the Los Angeles Rams. 

Mont married the former Virginia 
Askins, a Maryland alumna, in 1943. 
They have three sons, Steve, 8; Jeffrey, 
6; and Danny, 5. 

Cobey, a 1930 graduate of the Uni- 
versity, is a native of Quincy, Fla. He 
graduated from the School of Arts and 
Science with a B.S. Degree. In 1931 
he was appointed Cashier of the Uni- 
versity, a position he held until 1948. 
It was then that Tatum chose him 
Graduate Manager of Athletics at the 
University. He has had the big job 
of heading the Athletic Business Office 
and scheduling all athletic events out- 
side of football. He also worked closely 
with Tatum, the Director of Athletics. 
Sophomore 

Cobey married the former Mary Gray 
Munroe, also of Quincy in 1935. They 
have six children, three daughters and 
three sons. Their eldest daughter, Mary 
Patricia, is a sophomore at the Uni- 
versity. 

Bill Cobey, one of the most genial 
and likeable men on campus, is from 
one of Maryland's oldest families, dat- 
ing to away back when. 

His father, also named William W. 
Cobey, was born in Grayton, Charles 
County. He graduated with the class 



of 1901, was cadet colonel, president 
of his class and also top man in his 
class academically. Two uncles are 
also Maryland graduates. 

Since Maryland has grown into a 
football power and has attempted a 
big-time basketball schedule in its new 
Student Activities Building, the ath- 
letic directorship has been a tremend- 
ously demanding job. 

Always Marylander 

Bill Cobey said, in a TV interview, 
"I have always been at Maryland; never 
any where else." Bill has been em- 
ployed at Maryland for 27 years. 

Getting back to Mont. One quote on 
him is worth while, "It takes leader- 
ship to be a Captain of Infantry. Then 
to be chosen to head, manage and 
play on the best of those Army teams 
indicates that leadership was outstand- 
ing." 

Another quote worth while from 
Francis Stann, Washington Star, 
"Tommy Mont is about as pure-bred 
a Marylander as breathes, a young man 
bom and raised in Cumberland and 
polished, physically and mentally, at 
College Park." 

'56 Grid Slate 

September — • 

22 — Syracuse 

29 — Wake Forest at Winston-Salem 



^ R ]£^ 



HOTEL 



'PLY CO. 



EST. p ur v e y 0r j f F | ne 1927 

MEATS • POULTRY 

Frozen Foods 
Food Specialties 

To Hotels. 

Institutions, Ships, 

Clubs, Etc. 



LExington 9-7055 

Night Service HO. 7-6817 

227 S. 

HANOVER ST. 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



JhsL BARN 



Restaurant and 
Sportsman's Bar 



Gateway to the Famous it-.'Viw^ 
Chesapeake Bay Country. W-^J^-W 
Facina on Routes l^°..,...- v »»*> 




Facing on Routes 
2 and 301. 




GLEN BURNIE, MD. 

First and Still 
Foremost Restaurant 
on Governor Ritchie 
Highway 



SAVINGS 
ACCOUNT 



SECURITY 

In the Future 

depends largely upon 

how you manage your 

"money" today. 



Watch Your Savings Grow! 

MIDSTATE FEDERAL SAVINGS 
& Loan Association 



5304 YORK ROAD 



BALTIMORE- 12 



(/Sard - ~/rvon S^ckool 

Secretarial - Dramatic Art and Radio 

Day and Evening 

805 N. Charles St. VE. 7-1155 

Baltimore, Md. 



BEImont 
5-6607 



Res. TUxedo 
9-0851 



Virginia Bowen 



$.J &taU 



2434 MARYLAND AVE. 
BALTIMORE 18, MD. 



USE THE COUPON ON 
THE LAST PAGE 



Maryland 



51 



BALTIMORE 




DON'T GUESS 
GET -* 




CHOlC** 



Ql)ALIT> 




MEATS 




BALTIMORE 



*Jh& (Roland (pahli 
tympany. 

Member 

Real Estate Board of Baltimore 

Multiple Listing Bureau 

JOHN McC. MOWBRAY 
President 

B. FRANKLIN HEARN, JR. 
Vice-President in Charge of Sales 

NORMAN F. GORSUCH 
Vice-President 

4810 Roland flue. TUxedo 9-9600 
• Baltimore 10, md. • 



&lt*r Ml 



om«i 



frlodern Kancn ~Jyp* 

xSunaaiows Cf Cotfaqti 

J5fon* and fijriclt 

"NOTHING FINER ANYWHERE" 

For Complete Information 

Call CH. 3-2550, RO. 4-3775 or 

Evenings OL. 3-5275, OL 3-4661 

SEYMOUR RUFF, Builder 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



LIBERTY RADIO & 
TELEVISION SERVICE 

HIGH FIDELITY 

Music Systems for Home and Office 

4908 PARK HEIGHTS AVE. 

Baltimore, Md. Liberty 2-9457 



October — 

6 — Baylor 

12— At Miami, night 
20 — North Carolina at Chapel Hill 
27 — At Tennessee 
November — 

3 — Kentucky 
10 — Clemson 
17 — At South Carolina 
24 — At North Carolina State 
Tactics 

Mont said he didn't plan any radical 
changes in his offense and defense next 
fall, although "we'll throw the ball 
more." 

Announcing the Cobey and Mont ap- 
pointments at a press conference Presi- 
dent Elkins stood up under an hour's 
questioning on the future of athletics 
at Maryland, both on the field and in 
policy matters. 

Dr. Elkins said the number of ath- 
letic scholarships would be determined 
by the amount of money available and 
the number of applications received 
for scholarships and there would not 
be any set figure. 

President Elkins also said he had 
assured the team that there would be 
no change in attitude toward them, 
and there was definitely no danger to 
their losing scholarships no matter 
what the future policy might be. 

Dr. Elkins stressed the importance 
of obtaining more and more State boys 
for the Terp football team. He said 
that where the qualifications of two 
boys were deemed equal, the boy from 
Maryland would receive the scholar- 
ship. 

"This isn't to mean, of course," Dr. 
Elkins went on, "that we will discour- 
age out-of-State athletes. That would 
be ridiculous. But we want to en- 
courage more State boys to attend 
Maryland and play football." 
Call On Governor 

The head of the State of Maryland 
met the head of the University of 
Maryland football team. The meeting 
flowed smoothly amid flowery phrases 
and repeated congratulations. 

Tommy Mont, new Terp grid coach; 
Bill Cobey, newly appointed athletic 
director; Bob Ward, Maryland assis- 
tant coach; Mrs. Mont and Mrs. Cobey 
formed the University party paying 
the University's respects. 

The Governor received a helmet and 
football from Mont, and gave imitation 
black-eyed susans, of which McKeldin 
said "I just happen to have a few with 
me." 

The football helmet was inscribed 
"To Ted McKeldin, Maryland's No. 1 
football fan." 

The autographed football was in- 
scribed with the names of Dr. Wilson 
H. Elkins, University president, Mont, 
assistant coaches and members of the 
football team. 

McKeldin posed with the coaches and 
Cobey for the photographers and tele- 
vision cameras. 

B. Herbert Brown, chairman of the 
Athletic Council of the University 
Board of Regents, was on hand as 
master of ceremonies while Governor 
McKeldin congratulated Mont and 
Cobey. 

"As successor to Jim Tatum," he 
said, "don't feel that you are supposed 
to take his place. You don't have to 



HOOD 

conufiLEScenT 
Home 

"Typifies The Highest 
Standards Now Available" 

COMPLETE FACILITIES FOR 
THE PROPER CARE OF CON- 
VALESCENTS, CHRONICS, IN- 
VALIDS, POST OPERATIVES, 
AND RETIRED GUESTS. 

Physicians Extended Every 
Courtesy . . . Inspection Invited 

Licensed by Maryland State Board of Health 

Wl-lkins 7-3553 

5313 EDMONDSON AVENUE 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



Hendlers 




First Name in fee Cream 
For Over A Half Century 



Mama Emma's 


ROMA 


Famous Italian Cuisine 


in "LITTLE ITALY" 


900 FAWN ST. SA. 7-8990 


231 S. HIGH ST. LE. 9-8965 


(Two Entrances) Baltimore, Md. 



LUDWIG 
KATZENSTEIN 

202 W. PRATT ST. 
BALTIMORE 1, MD. 
SAratoga 7-0748 



picture frames 

made to order 

old 

prints 

gilding 

restoring 



52 



Maryland 



Wise & Volker, Inc. 

Prescription 
Opticians 

1 E. CENTRE (at Charles) 

BALTIMORE 2, MD. VErnon 7-4030 



MARYLAND BRASS 
& METAL WORKS 

Non -Ferrous Castings 

Everdur Pipe Fittings 

To Standard Specifications 

Since 1 866 

MUrdotk Stanley b. PULASKI HIGHWAY 

6-9424 G p r ^!!' Baltimore, Md. 



B. & B. EXTERMINATORS, Inc. 

SANITATION and PEST 
CONTROL SERVICE 

BLACK EAGLE PRODUCTS 

Phones: LExington 9-2140 — 9-2141 

626 NORTH CALVERT ST. 

Baltimore 2, Md. 



JACQUELINE JOYES 

Multiple Listing Realtor 

SALES — RENTALS 
Property Management 

2520 N. CHARLES STREET HOpkins 7-2322 

Baltimore, Md. 



Football 



WHOLESALE STATIONERY 

The Handy " Line 

Baltimore, Md. 



D. HARRY CHAMBERS, Inc. 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS 

Located in the Center of the Shopping District 

326 NORTH HOWARD STREET 
MM. 5-1990 BALTIMORE, MD. 



USE THE COUPON ON 
THE LAST PAGE 




'56 CO-CAPTAINS 

Left to right: — Tackle Mike San- 
dusky and Guard Jack Davis, both 
given honorable mention on the Asso- 
ciated Press All-America team, were 
named co-captains 'of Maryland's 1956 
football team. 

Sandusky is a 20-year-old junior 
from Manville, N.J. At 240 pounds, 
he also was heavyweight wrestling 
champion of 'the A.C.C. last season and 
put the shot and threw the discus on 
the track team. 

Davis, 22-year-old paratroop veteran, 
is also a junior. He comes from East 
Riverdale, Md., is married and has a 
3-year-old daughter. He weighs 195. 



take anybody's place. Instead, make a 
place for yourself." 

Mont then handed McKeldin the hel- 
met. 

"Here, this is for your political 
battles," he said, and McKeldin im- 
mediately popped it on his head. 

"It fits" he exclaimed, "but I can't 
hear anything." 

Tatum Testimonial 
Jim Tatum officially bowed off the 
Washington scene at the Mayflower 
Hotel when the Touchdown Club spon- 
sored a farewell testimonial dinner. 

A gathering of some 200 was on 
hand, including practically all the col- 
legiate athletic officials. 

Tatum received silver gifts from his 
football staff at Maryland, the Wash- 
ington Board of 
Trade, the Terrapin 
Club and a scroll 
from Al Lujack, 
president of the 
Touchdown Club. 

Tatum said he 
hoped to bring a 
North Carolina team 
into a double-decked 
Maryland stadium 
some day and added 
that he hoped the 
Conch Tatum football played un- 
der Tommy Mont 
would be highly successful and would be 
more interesting to the president (Dr. 
Wilson H. Elkins) than the football he 
coached. 

Dr. H. C. Byrd, former university 
President led the praise for Big Jim 
Tatum at the Touchdown Club's testi- 
monial dinner. 




THE 

JEPSEN HOTEL 

SUPPLY COMPANY 



Wholesale Meats 
and Provisions 



Serving 

HOTELS - INSTITUTIONS 

RESTAURANTS 

Harry T. Whitlock 
General Manager 

1121 F STREET, S.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



VICTOR 

CUSHWA 

& SONS 

Manufacturers of 

"CALVERT" 

COLONIAL FACE 

BRICK 

Main Office and Plant 

WILLIAMSPORT, MD. 

Office and Warehouse 

137 INGRAHAM ST., N.E. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Sales Representatives in 
Principal Eastern Cities 



ADVERTISERS 
Mat Service 

Plastic Printing Plates 

Stereotype and 
Rubber Printing Plates 

416 EYE STREET, N.W. 

Washington, D. C Executive 3-5264 



Charles F. King Corp, 

Registered Plumber 

1620 2nd Street, S.W. 
Washington 24, D. C. 



Maryland 



53 



Edward 

Boker 

Frosted 

Foods, 

Inc* 



SERVING 

HOSPITALS 

AND 

INSTITUTIONS 

James T. Doukas, Algr. 
LAwrence 6-8350 

1480 OKIE STREET, N.E. 
WASHINGTON 4, D. C. 



1 INVESTMENT' 
FACTS 

A MUST for Investors- 
compiled by the New York 
Stock Exchange — Indi- 
cates over 291 Listed 
Stocks which have paid 
cash dividends every year 
for 25 years or longer. 

Call or write for free copy 

Jones, Kreeger & Hewitt 

Members N. Y. Stock Exchange 

1625 Eye St., N.W. DI. 7-5700 

Washington, D.C. 

Established 1930 



Wasljiri^ton 

STAIR & ORNAMENTAL 
IRON WORKS, INC. 

ORNAMENTAL IRON - ALUMINUM 
STAINLESS STEEL - BRONZE 

2014 Fifth St., N.E. 
Washington, D. C. 

DUpont 7-7550 



S. J. STACKHOUSE & SON 

We Served Your Parents 

— And Grandparents 

SALES - RENTALS 

MORTGAGES - MANAGEMENT 

20 E. Lexington St. SA. 7-6789 

Baltimore, Md. 



Music Under Florida Skies 



'■ii$£ 







MARYLAND'S BIG RED AND WHITE BAND 
Massed with others between halves of the Orange Bowl game between. 
Maryland and Oklahoma. 



Dr. Byrd said he had an insight on 
Tatum that few knew about. He said 
people who have criticized Tatum for 
his constant desire to win had no idea 
how much Jim worked for the good of 
the school. 

"He was in to see me many times 
at which football never was men- 
tioned," Dr. Byrd said. 

Coach Tommy Mont said the job at 
Maryland was a great challenge and 
opportunity, and he was going to dedi- 
cate himself to carrying on in the 
Tatum tradition. 

Navy? Maybe 
Amid a welter of best wishes for 
the University of Maryland football 
team, the Gridiron Club of Baltimore 
honored outstanding athletes repre- 
senting the State at its first annual 
banquet. 

Terp Coach Jim Tatum and Capt. 
Elliott Loughlin, athletic director at 
the Naval Academy, established be- 
tween them that Maryland and Navy 
will meet again on the gridiron in the 
"near future" meaning perhaps the 
next five or six years. 

The award winners included a couple 
of first-team All-Americans, end Ron 
Beagle, of Navy, and center Bob Pelle- 
grini, of Maryland, and a pair of third- 
team All-Americans, Maryland half- 
back Ed Vereb and Tar quarterback 
George Welsh. 

Mayor D'Alesandro made the awards. 
It was Tatum who "set up" the fu- 
ture Navy-Maryland game. When 
someone called "how about Maryland 
playing in Memorial Stadium," Tatum 
answered impulsively: 

"We'll play in Baltimore when Cap- 
tain Loughlin schedules us." 



Captain Loughlin followed Tatum to 
the speakers' stand, ,and promised that 
Navy will play Maryland in the fu- 
ture, although noting that an annual 
series with the Terp eleven was im- 
possible. 

Board Of Regents 

The Board of Regents deferred until 
the next meeting a proposal that the 
$120,000 annual rental it receives from 
the Athletic Board, Inc., be reduced to 
$1 annually. If that were done, Presi- 
dent Elkins explained, the university 
would take over the operation of the 
snack bar and book store, using the 
profits from them for scholarship 
grants. 

Terps Lose In Orange Bowl 

For 30 minutes on the sunny after- 
noon of January 2, it looked as though 
Maryland and its third undefeated team 
in five years, was going to catch up 
with the vaunted reputation of the 
Oklahoma Sooners and come up with 
the upset of the year as well as one of 
the real upsets of all bowl history. But 
there were 30 minutes left to play and 
the powerful Terps were unable to cope 
with the heroic tactics of the Okies in 
the second half. The Terps suffered a 
20-6 loss to Bud Wilkinson's top-ranked 
eleven. 

After Co-Captain Ed Vereb, the out- 
standing player from both teams, had 
put Maryland ahead with a bi'illiant 
15-yard touchdown run late in the sec- 
ond quarter, Terp fans began to sense 
a victory, inasmuch as after Okla- 
homa took the ensuing kickoff, they 
were driven back and had a third down 
and 37-yard to go situation before 
punting. It looked as though the big 



54 



Maryland 



f D. ۥ Ignition -v 
Ileadqiiarters 

Inc. 

• Complete Analysis . . . 

for difficult electric and meter freublM 

• Tune up . . . 
e Specialty repairs . . . 

e United Motors . . . 

authorlied servicer carburetors, starter*, 
generators, all wipers, speedometers, 
heaters, fuel pumps. 



^ 



Phone: NAtional 8-7038 
1 230 20th St., N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 



J 



THE 

HENRY B. GILPIN 

COMPANY 

Wholesale Druggists 
tor over 100 yean 

WASHINGTON 3, D. C. 

BALTIMORE 6, HID. 

NORFOLK 10, V A. 



WASHINGTON'S FIRST UPTOWN BUICK DEALER 

• BEST TRADES YET 
• FinEST SERVICE 

PER K J 
BUICK C 

INC. 

SALES — 4505 Wisconsin Ave. 

SERVICE — 4555 Wisconsin Ave. 

EM 2-2000 



IMPORTERS EMERSON 2-2732 

WHOLESALE-RETAIL 

ANTIQUES 
Penny's Treasure Chest 

Formerly of Berlin, Germany 
2311 Wisconsin Ave., N.W. Washington 7, D.C. 

Fine Meissen — Dresden — Porcelains — Ivories 
Figurines — Colored Stemware — Bric-a-Brac 



USE THE COUPON ON 
THE LAST PAGE 



Red Shirts from College Park had 
ignited and were not going to cool off, 
even during the long half-time period. 

But after taking the second-half kick- 
off and methodically pounding away 
for two first downs and going into 
Oklahoma territory, a penalty and a 
fumble stopped the attack. 

Then came the turning point of the 
game as both Tatum and Wilkinson 
called it afterwards in their post-game 
statements. Terp end Bill Walker 
stepped back to punt. It was taken 
by All- America halfback Tommy Mc- 
Donald whom the Terps had stopped 
cold all day. McDonald streaked 32 
yards and into Maryland territory, be- 
ing stopped on the 47-yard line. In 
17 plays McDonald scored on a 4-yard 
jaunt. The kick was good and that 
was the margin of victory as the Okla- 
homans scored another in the third 
period with severely executed quick 
thrusts at the Terp line. They added 
another in the final stanza on an inter- 
ception of a Lynn Beightol pass by re- 
serve halfback Carl Dodd. The happy 
little halfback had clear sailing for 
82 yards for his score. 

Tatum after the game said Okla- 
homa truly was the best team in the 
country. Wilkinson returned the same 
type of compliment to his former boss 
as he said Oklahoma got the breaks 
and Maryland didn't and that the Terps 
were by far the best team they had 
played. 

Terp Coach Jim Tatum: "In all my 
20 years of coaching and five years of 
playing, Oklahoma is the finest team 
I've ever seen on a football field. At 
halftime I said to my players that 
Coach Wilkinson was telling his boys, 
'You haven't let them have it. You'll 
have to go out there and play to win.' 
They came back and called the plays 
so fast our boys didn't get breathing 
space. 

Oklahoma's Coach Bud Wilkinson: 
"The greatest second half I've ever 
seen. All we had to do, with Mary- 
land ahead, was goof a couple of times 
and that would have been Maryland's 
game. From what they showed today, 
I'd say they (Maryland) were better 
than anybody we faced all year." 

Mont's Coaching Staff 

Just a few days following his ap- 
pointment as the Terps' new head 
football coach, Tommy Mont started 
to work on filling his staff. Vacanies 
were created as Warren Giese, Tatum's 
longest time assistant was named to 
the head coaching job at South Caro- 
lina, and Tatum beckoned with him 
to North Carolina Terp assistants Ed 
Kensler, Emmett Cheek, and Eddie 
Teague. 

Mont dipped into Maryland grad- 
uates for the most part and appointed 
men who had played for Tatum as well 
as for Mont while Tommy was backfield 
coach. 

First named was former all-Con- 
ference halfback Ed Fullerton, a 1953 
graduate from the School of Business 
and Pub. Adm. Fullerton lettered three 
years for the Terps and had one of the 
greatest single game performances in 



give to the 

MARCH of 
DIMES 



F. S. Co. 



Hotel 

HEDIN HOUSE 

WASHINGTON'S NEWEST HDTEL 

Nearest the University 

Just three miles away and two 
blocks within the District line. 

Completely Air Conditioned 

Phone 2902 Nbwton St., N.B. 

ADams 4 6060 (at R.I. Ave.) 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

) Make Your Reservations Early i 



WINDOW ■ ON - THE • KITCHEN 

JdichabihicL 

SELF-SERVICE 
Delicious food ... All our desserts are 
homo-made . . . popular prices . . . 
no tipping ... air conditioned 

BREAKFAST - LUNCHEON 

DINNER Quality Coffee, 5c a cup 

Open Dally and Sunday 
11th Streat Entrance of 

HOTEL HARRINGTON 
11th ft E Sts., N.W. Washington, D. C. 



SOUTHEAST TITLE CORP. 



Chas. T. Clayton, President 
25 Years Experience 
COMPLETE SERVICE 

Washington, D. C. & Maryland 

Settlements - Escrows 

Real Estate Examinations 

and Title Insurance 

1343 Good Hope Rd., S.E., Washington, D.C. 
lUdlow 1-3200 



HILLYARD SALES CO. 

FLOOR TREATMENT 

R. E. Ruby, Divisional Mgr. 

Terminal Bldg., 4th & D Sts., S.W. 

NA. 8-9515 WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Maryland 



55 



Hi, I'm at U. of M. now — 




thanks to mon 

'n' dad and a FIRST FEDERAL 

savings account. 

I'm going to do the same for 
my children. How? 

the same way— 

the best way — 

the FIRST FEDERAL Way! 

District 7-2370 

UrstT^deral 

in Washington 

610 13th STREET, N.W. (Bet. F & G) 
Washington 5, D. C. 



OLIver 6-3923 

BETHESDA BRANCH OFFICE 

8216 WISCONSIN AVE., N.W. 



"EVERYTHING IN MILLWORK" 

STOCK & SPECIAL 
For Builders and Home Owners 



DOORS 


MANTELS 


SASH 


FRONT ENTRANCES 


FRAMES 


SLIDING DOOR UNITS 


BLINDS 


DISAPPEARING STAIRWAYS 


PLYWOOD 


KITCHEN CABINETS 


MOULDINGS 


STAIR MATERIAL 


PANELING 


CORNER CABINETS 



LAMAR & WALLACE 

37 New York Avenue, N.E. ME 8-4126 

Washington 2, D. C. 



c. 


Engel's Sons 




Incorporated 




Established 1850 


Fruits and Vegetables 




District 7-0995 


522 - 


12th STREET, S.W. 




Washington, D. C 



Terp gridiron history in the 28-13 
victory over Tennessee in the Sugar 
Bowl. Fullerton scored two touchdowns, 
passed for a third, and recovered a 
fumble near midfield that led to the 
fourth. After a year with the Pitts- 
burgh Steelers, Fullerton, with an Air 
Force ROTC commission from Mary- 
land, entered the service. He spent 
two years at Boiling Field in Washing- 
ton and was discharged mid-January. 
At Boiling, he was player-coach. Ful- 
lerton is a native of West View, Pa. 
He married the former Joan Walton al- 
so of West View. They have one son, 
Ed, Jr. 

Joe Moss 
Next to be asked to return to his 
alma mater was a former star tackle 
for the Terps, Joe Moss. A 1952 grad- 
uate from the School of Business and 
Public Administration, Moss will work 
with the line. He was an outstanding 
offensive tackle for Tatum for three 
years then after graduation and his 
ROTC Commission, he played a year 
with the Washington Redskins before 
he was called into the Air Force. A 
native of Ridgeley, W. Va., Moss was 
a Personnel Officer at Boiling Field, 
along with Fullerton, and played for 
the Generals as well as serving as their 
line coach in 1954. Following his dis- 
charge, he went to Canada and played 
tackle last season for the Ottawa 
Roughriders. 

He married the former Betty Lou 
Gulick, Cumberland. They have a 
daughter Nancee Gay and a son, Joe, 
II. 

Mont next went to an old friend 
with whom he played on a team that 
Mont coached and played for in the 
ETO during World War II and had 
also played with in Washington to get 
his next appointee. Jim Peebles, a 1948 
graduate of Vanderbilt University, was 
the selection. Peebles, a native of 
Columbia, Tenn., was a tackle at Van- 
derbilt and with the Redskins. He 
completed his eligibility at Vanderbilt 
in 1941 then went into the Army, De- 
cember 1941. In April 1946 Peebles 
went to the Redskins and played four 
seasons. In 1949, following his discharge 
he was coach at Riverside Military 
Academy, Gainesville, Ga. In '52 he was 
coach at Gallatin High School, Gallatin, 
Tenn. After two-and-one-half years at 
Gallatin he went to University of the 
South, Sewanee, Tenn. as backfield 
coach for one year. He was in public 
school work last year. 

Peebles is married and has two 
children, Betty, and Jim, Jr. 

Johnny Idzik 

Still another alumnus was added to 
complete the staff. To work with the 
backfield, Mont named John Idzik, a 
1951 graduate of the School of Physical 
Education, Recreation, and Health. 
Idzik lettered four years as a star 
Terp halfback. His first years of 1948 
and 1949 he was principally an offen- 
sive halfback but as the days of the 
two-platoon became more demanding, 
Idzik's talent was utilized on defense, 
a chore he handled brilliantly. 

Following his graduation, Idzik en- 



tered the Marine Corps, November, 
1951. He was assigned to Parris Is- 
land, S. C, where he was in Special 
Service, serving as a , Sergeant. He 
played and coached on the Base team 
and was named on the All-Marine 
team of 1952. From Parris Island, he 
was sent to Quantico, Va. where he 
again played for the Base eleven in 
1953. He was discharged November 5, 
1953. 

Tatum saw to it that his former half- 
back star and outstanding student of 
the game was able to get a good place- 
ment as a coach. He was hired by Gen. 
Robert Neyland, University of Ten- 
nessee, as B team coach and scout for 
the Volunteers. After a year there and 
a coaching change, Idzik went to Ot- 
tawa with a Tennessee aide who got 
the head coaching job at Ottawa and 
was backfield coach there last season. 

He returned to the States and was 
contacted by Tatum. Mont lost no 
time in contacting the same boy, and 
back to Maryland came Idzik. 

While at Maryland, he received the 
TKE Trophy given by that Fraternity 
as the student who in four years at 
the University has rendered the great- 
est service to football. 

Idzik married a Maryland graduate 
of 1951, the former Joyce Hoppensteadt 
of Baltimore. 

Shipley Field 

On March 28, 
1956, the base- 
ball diamond and 
stadium adjoin- 
ing Byrd Stad- 
ium will be dedi- 
cated as Shipley 
Field. In cere- 
monies commenc- 
ing at 3:00 p.m., 
H. Burton Ship- 
ley, alumnus, 
four letter ath- 
lete and long 
time coach of 
University of 
Maryland base- 
ball, will be hon- 
ored. Opposition 
for the Terrapins 
will be the Dart- 
mouth baseball 
team. Alumni, 
members of the 
faculty and staff, 
students and the 
many friends of 
Coach Shipley 
are invited to 
participate in 
dedication fes- 
tivities. 




Shipley As Youngster 



TRACK 



Terps-Tarheels Tie 

aryland and North Caro- 
lina put on powerful 
displays of strength at 
V.M.I, to capture four 
first-place medals each 
and tie for another in 
the fifth annual Winter Relays. 




66 



Maryland 



PARK 
TRANSFER 
COMPANY 

Heavy Hauling 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 
NOrth 7-5753 



PLYMOUTH ELECTRIC 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

INCORPORATED 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 



LOVELESS ELECTRIC CO., Inc. 
£JbvdUricaL Qonbiad&iL 

5207 COLORADO AVENUE, N.W. 
WASHINGTON 11, D. C. 



Phone RAndolph 3-4257 



Anchor Fence 

Anchor Post Products, Inc. 

1317 HALF STREET, S.E. 

Lincoln 3-6660 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



SUNTILE 

A genuine Clay Tile 

Burnproof - Waterproof • Colorfatt 
Call your SUNTILE Dealer at NO. 7-1725 

VICK TILE CO. 

2909 M St., N.W. Washington, D. C 




Maryland's Ed Cooke started the 
victory parade by taking the shot put 
with a heave of 48 feet 4% inches. The 
Kehoemen then annexed the next event, 
the open distance medley, in 11:4.3 with 
a team composed of Ed Lloyd, Ches 
Steckel, Carl Party and Ben Good. 

Maryland also took the freshman 
mile relay. Terp runners Don Ander- 
son, Jim Starboard, Dick McKisson and 
Bill Wagner negotiated the distance in 
3:43.6. 

WRESTLING 

Terp Wrestlers Do Well 

aryland's wrestling team, 
defending champions of 
the Atlantic Coast con- 
ference, got off to a 
fast start this fall with 
three convincing wins 
over VMI and two con- 
ference opponents Vir- 
ginia and North Carolina State. 

A sophomore-studded squad is what 
Coach Sully Krouse must work with 
this year. He has three veteran letter- 
men returning in John McHugh, 123- 
pound star; Captain Roney Carroll, 
137-pounder; and heavyweight, Mike 
Sandusky, star football tackle. San- 
dusky, busy with the Orange Bowl did 
not compete in the three matches, but 
was ready for the Navy meet. 

Soph Jack Norrie, Hershey, Pa., has 
been one of the most impressive new- 
comers that Krouse ever has had. All 
three of his wins have been recorded by 
pinning his opponents. 

Results of the first three matches: 

Maryland vs. VMI 

123-Pound : McHugh, Md., decisioned Mac- 
Kay, VMI. (8-0) 

130- Pound: Weatherly, Md., won by FALL 
over McCown, VMI. ( :34 seconds, 1st. 
Period) 

137-Pound : Norrie, Md., won by FALL over 
Hubbard, VMI. (1 :09, 2nd Period) 

147-Pound : Ogurkis, Md., decisioned by 
Jones. VMI. (11-0) 

157-Pound : Kennedy, Md., won by FALL 
over Davis, VMI. (2 :39, 2nd Period) 

167-Pound : Massie, VMI, decisioned 
Wozunk, Md. (9-6) 

177-Pound : Baker, VMI, decisioned Amato, 
Md. (5-0) 

Hvy. : Cook, Md., won by FALL over Taylor, 
VMI. (1 :54, 3rd Period) 

Voted Best Wrestler of Match : Ed Weather- 
ly, Maryland. 

FINAL SCORE : Maryland : 23 — VMI 9 

Maryland vs. Virginia 

123-Pound : McHugh, Md., decisioned Steele, 
Va. (4-0) 

139-Pound : Weatherfy, Md., decisioned 
Thomas, Va. (16-6) 

137-Pound : Norrie, Md., won by FALL over 
Brown, Va. (5 :43, 2nd. Period) 

147-Pound : Carroll, Md., decisioned Gaudry, 
Va. (5-0) 

157-Pound : Kennedy, Md. decisioned Chen- 
ey, Va. (11-0) 

167-Pound : Wozunk, Md. and Petrilli, Va., 

Draw. (6-6) 

177-Pound : Schwab, Va., decisioned Cook, 
Md. (10-1) 

Hvy. : Jordan, Va., decisioned Bowler, Md. 
(4-0) 

Voted Best Wrestlers of Match : John Mc- 
Hugh and Ed Weatherly, Maryland. 

FINAL SCORE : Maryland : 19 — Virginia 8 




Just eight miles from Washington, 
near the University of Maryland, 
you'll find complete comfort and 
conveniences. 

Rooms & Cottages 

Phone WArfield 7-8324 
For Reservations 

THE 

LORD CALVERT 

HOTEL & COTTAGES 

Free Parking 

On U. S. Highway No. 1 

7200 Baltimore Avenue 

COLLEGE PARK. MD. 



PARKWOOD 

OPTICIANS 

DISPENSING OPTICIANS 

QUALITY - SERVICE & COURTESY 
in HYATTSVILLE 

WArfield 7-1880 

5620 BALTIMORE AVE. 
8248 GEORGIA AVE., SILVER SPRING, MD. 

Silver Spring Office by App. Only 
1760 K ST., N.W., WASHINGTON, D. C 

STerling 3-8553 



PEOPLE'S SUPPLY CO. 

INC. 

Everything To Build Anything 
Building Supplies Of All Kinds 

LUMBER, MILLWORK 
and MASONRY 

3004 KENILWORTH AVENUE (Bladensburg) 

P.O. HYATTSVILLE, MD. 
Phone WArfield 7-2205 



NELSON MOTORS 

— STUDEBAKCR — 

Authorized Sales & Service 
Auto Repairs — All Makes of Cars 
3 blocki from U. of M. on Route 1 

USED CARS UNion 4-8600 

7211 BALTIMORE BLVD. • COLLEGE PARK, MB. 



Maryland 



67 



We Invite You 
To Inspect Our 

RESIDEIITIAL COmmUfllTV 

at 

K 41 PARK 

— Featuring — 
and 

JhsL QohmiaL 

— the finest in homes 
of enduring value 

HARRY R. B0SUJ6LL CO., Inc. 

REALTORS 

3718 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE 

MT. RAINIER, MD. 
AP. 7-1111 



fianlc d^ VfljcVtyLcmcL 

SEAT PLEASANT, MD. 

— Branches — 

BOWIE - CAPITOL HEIGHTS 

CORAL HILLS - LANHAM 

SUITLAND 

HILLCREST HEIGHTS 



SUITLAND CENSUS FACILITY 





Stock 

Nursery 



jp™**' Randolph Rd. 
(^■p| Bethesda, Md. 



"">,:,£.*«< 



OL 2-8100 



LANDSCAPE DESIGN and CONTRACTING 



Maryland vs. NC State 

123-Pound : McHugh, Md., won by FOR- 
FEIT. (5-0) 

130-Pound : Weatherly, Md. won by FALL, 
over McGeean, NCS. (5 :27, 2nd Period) 

137-Pound : Norrie, Md., won by FALL over 
Dail, NCS. (3:13, 2nd Period) 

147-Pound : Ogurkis, Md., decisioned Am- 
ster, NCS. (13-9) 

157-Pound : Kaplan, NCS 1 , decisioned Ama- 
to, Md. (5-3) 

107-Pound : Carroll, Md., decisioned Miller, 
NCS. (5-3) 

177 Pound: Wozunk, Md., and Nardon, NCS, 
DRAW. (1-1) 

I Ivy. : Henry, NCS, decisioned Dougherty, 
Md. (2-0) 

Voted Pest Wrestler of Match : .Terry Ogur- 
kis, Maryland. 

FIX A I. SCORE: Maryland: 23— North Caro- 
line State 8. 

Navy 24; Maryland 6 

Navy handed the Terrapins their 
first defeat of the year, 24 to 6. 

The Middies took three matches on 
falls and three on decisions. Mary- 
land's six points came on decisions by 
Roney Carroll in the 147-pound class 
and heavyweight Mike Sandusky. 
123-Pound Class — Marshall Masterson, Navy, 
defeated John McHugh, fall, body press, 
8.15. 
130-Pound Class — Orbert Green, Navy, de- 
feated Charlie Kerler, decision, 7 — 2. 
137-Pound Class — Joe Longton, Navy, de- 
feated Ed Weatherly, decision, 6 — 1. 
147-Pound Class — Roney Carroll, Maryland, 

defeated Dick Johnson, decision, 7 — i. 
157-Pound Class — Jim Zeberline, Navy, de- 
feated Leroy Kennedy, decision, 6 — 1. 
167-Pound Class — Phil Brainerd, Navy, de- 
feated Sal Amato, fall, cradle hold, 1.20. 
177-Pound Class — Ed Zabryckl, Navy, de- 
feated Joe Wozunk, fall, half nelson and 
body press, 6.45. 
Heavyweight — Mike Sandusky, Maryland, de- 
feated Art Wright, decision, 5 — 3. 



BASKETBALL 




Obey Names Lester 

aryland's Director o f 
Athletics, William W. 
Cobey, announced the 
appointment of a fresh- 
man basketball and 
football coach in Roy 
Lester, Cumberland, 
Md. 

Lester, football coach at Cumber- 
land's Allegany High School since 1952 
and baseball coach during the seasons 
of 1954 and 1955, is the first coaching 
help Terp basketball coach Bud Milli- 
kan has had since coming to Maryland 
six years ago. His immediate job at 
Maryland when he reports will be to 
help Millikan with the basketball pro- 
gram and be available for some duty 
with Tommy Mont during spring foot- 
ball practice. 

A 1949 graduate of West Virginia 
University, Lester was a three-sport 
letterman for the Mountaineers. He 
lettered four years in baseball, two in 
basketball, and tw oin football. He 
played in the January 1949 Sun Bowl 
as an end for West Virginia. 

The 32-year-old native of Spencer, W. 
Va., is a Navy veteran who played end 
for Jim Tatum at Jacksonville Naval 
Air Station in 1945. Before his tenure 



at Alleghany High School, Lester was 
freshman baseball coach at West Vir- 
ginia in the spring of 1950. In the fall 
of '50, he went to Walton, W. Va. He 
School where he coached all sports and 
taught History for two years. He was 
a History teacher at Allegany. 

His four-year coaching record read 
23 wins, 10 losses, and three ties. 
Maryland 52 — William and Mary 51 

A set shot by Nick Davis with five 
minutes left enabled Maryland to come 
from behind for a 52-to-51 basketball 
victory over William and Mary. 

Davis, a tricky sophomore used by 
Coach Bud Millikan as a spot player, 
sank his basket nearly two minutes 
after a similar effort by Paul Furlong 
had given William and Mary a 51-50 
lead. 

In the rugged battle of ball control 
favored by Maryland, Terrapin rebound 
strength and Davis's ball-hawking made 
the difference. The alert guard turned 
back an Indian assault with 1:15 left 
by stealing the ball under the Maryland 
basket. 

Bob Kessler paced the Maryland 
scorers with 18 points and Bob O'Brien 
was next with 11, but four field goals 
pumped in by Davis at crucial stages 
gave the Terps a big lift. 

Dick Savage sparked William and 
Mary with 17. Kaplan had 10. 

The Terrapins, connecting on only 
23.6 per cent of their shots from the 
floor while the Indians hit on 36.9, for 
the Indians. 

The victory was Maryland's third 
without a defeat. William and Mary 
lost to George Washington in its 
only other start. 

Maryland 61 — Wake Forest 51 

Maryland outscored Wake Forest, 
18-4 during a torrid stretch in the 
second half and went on to beat the 
Deacons, 61-51, after trailing by four 
points at halftime. Bob O'Brien was 
high man with 20 points. 

For the first time this season, Mary- 
land's basketball team met up with the 
zone defense and a fast-breaking of- 
fense and the combination helped Wake 
Forest to a 27-23 halftime lead. 
Kentucky 62— Maryland 61 

Maryland's bid for collegiate basket- 
ball glory died when Bob O'Brien 
missed a free throw 40 seconds from 
the finish and Kentucky dumped the 
Terps from the unbeaten, 62 to 61, be- 
fore 10,215, the largest crowd ever to 
watch a court scrap in the State. 

But the dogged Terps, who had sent 
the crowd into bedlam with their spir- 
ited rally, crowded a handful of mis- 
takes into the fading moments to go 
tumbling to their first defeat after 
three triumphs. 

Maryland failed to contain Ken- 
tucky's backcourt pair, Hatton and 
fiery Gerry Calvert, and these two, 
bagging 34 points between them, also 
killied off Maryland's fading hopes 
with stalling dribbles and passwork 
during the dwindling seconds. 

These two continually carried the 
load as the Terps clamped down on Bob 
Burrow, Kentucky's All-American nom- 
inee and Cookie Grawemeyer. Jerry 



58 



Maryland 



Bird, third members of Kentucky's tall 
fore-court, came to life in the second 
half as Maryland rubbed out Kentucky's 
wide advantage on Bob Kessler's spark- 
ling efforts. 

With Maryland down, 20-8, at the 
start, 39-31 at intermission and 43-37 
in the second half's early moments, 
Kessler went off on a torrid shooting, 
rebounding, feeding spree to square 
matters, 43-all, and again at 50-50. 

Then John Sandbower, dribbling the 
full length of the court after pouncing 
on a rebound, stuck the Terps on top at 
52-50 with 9.50 left. 

Kessler, big gun for the evening on 
25 tallies, hiked the Terps to 54-51 but 
Ed Beck tapped home a basket and the 
5-foot-ll Calvert netted two free 
throws to swing the edge back Ken- 
tucky's way, 55-54. Nick Davis and 
O'Brien linked charity goals for 57-55, 
Maryland, only to have Bird drive on 
Sandbower for a timely layup and 
57-57. 

O'Brien shoved Maryland back in 
front, 59-57, with a brace of foul pops 
and Kessler, who fouled out Grawe- 
meyer with his digging for the hoop, 
picked up a point the same way on Bill 
Smith and the Terps were hanging on- 
to a 60-57 margin with 4.10 left. Hat- 
ton chopped two markers off with a 
jump and came right back again from 
the charity stripe for 60-60. 

Maryland hustled downcourt as ten- 
sion mounted, but Kessler's twisting 
jump shot bounced from the ring. Beck 
rebounded and Hatton wound up with 
the ball on the right side. He went 
straight down the sideline, under the 
hoop and when nobody attempted to 
stop him, quickly spun around and 
plopped home the fielder for 62-60 as 
the scoreboard clock winked 2.58. 

Again Maryland worked the ball to- 
ward the hoop, but Sandbower got 
himself trapped in the corner, sought 
to fling it outside and unhappily found 
Hatton picking the throw off. Kentucky 
now stalled, and Calvert killed the 
clock for 1.40. Then his bounce pass 
skipped past Beck and out of hounds. 

O'Brien took a hurried one-hander, 
charged in after it and got himself two 
free throws. He swished the first. The 
second hit the front of the rim, bal- 
anced on the lip of the goal and rolled 
the wrong way. Beck tapped the ball 
Kentucky's way, and when Schaufler 
regained possession for Maryland the 
final horn was sounding. 

Michigan State 95 — Maryland 75 
Michigan State, rolling to its fifth 
straight victory, handed Maryland the 
worst basketball defeat in its history, 
95 to 75, in the semifinals of the 
Winter invitational tournament. 

Maryland salvaged a bit of glory, 
however. Its Bob Kessler emerged as 
the game's high scorer with*31 points, 
a record production for the new Mary- 
land field house. 

McCoy, slim Negro senior, poured in 
30 points and Peterson, a 6-foot-7 
demon off the backboards, contributed 
25. The Spartans built up a 30-point 
lead midway through the second half 
before Coach Forddy Anderson let in 
the substitutes. 




on a new 1956 PONTIAC 

See 

«^£\ 7125 Baltimore Avenue 

\^^y /«*' South of the Campus 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



of 

(pAinaL ^sufiqsiL Qounhj^, Qwl. 

COMPLETE LAND TITLE SERVICE 
4312 HAMILTON STREET 2412 MINNESOTA AVE., S.E. 

Hyattsville, Maryland APpletOn 7-6464 Washington, D. C. 

HUBERT K. ARNOLD, Pres. & Counsel HAROLD S. WANNER, 

Clan of 1935 Vice Pres.-Treas. 



SSEY - H 



5 ScdnA, and, SeAuiaL 



N. E. Kefauver, Jr. 
PHONE 30 MIDDLETOWN, MARYLAND SKYLINE 3-7481 
Hay - Straw - Tractors • Combines - Farm Implements 

Serving Frederick County Since 1935 



TOWER 9-6204 - 

JIMMIE PORTER 

Trading as 

KIERNAN'S 

A Complete Line of Beverages 
8200 Baltimore Blvd. College Park, Md. 



• W. W. LEWIS 

fisaUtifL. 
HEmlock 4-3500 

Eves. WA. 7-1231 
2020 UNIVERSITY LANE 
Lewisdale Office, Hyattsville, Md. 



USE THE COUPON ON THE LAST PAGE 



S 



fyhL 

IfWfL 




CUSTOM-DESIGNED AND READY-TO-WEAR 

7409 BALTIMORE AVENUE UNion 4-0520 

COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 

ALTERATIONS FOR MEN AND WOMEN 



Maryland 



59 



Drink 

MILK 

For 

Goodness Sake! 

You Get So Much 
For So Little 

V PROTEIN for BODY BUILDING 

V RIBOFLAVIN for EYES & SKIN 

V CALCIUM for TEETH & BONES 

V NIACIN for NERVES 

V CALORIES for ENERGY 

Harvey Dairy, Inc. 

Serving the 

COLLEGE COMMUNITY 

since 

JANUARY 

NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 

BRENTWOOD, MD. 



C. H. Lauison, Inc. 

— General Contractor — 

ROAD BUILDING and 
GRADING 

Field Office 

9072 BALTIMORE-WASHINGTON BLVD. 

Bervvyn, Md. 

Phone WEbster 5-5744 

Williamsburg, Va. 

Phone — Williamsburg 106 



COLLEGE PARK 

CABINET & MILLWORK CO., INC. 

Custom Kitchen Cabinets — Bookcases 

Window — Porch Screens 

Formica Sink Tops 

Appleton 7410 - 50th Ave. 

7-3911 College Park, Md. 

USE COUPON ON LAST PAGE 



Maryland 69— St. Francis 56 

Host Maryland led throughout to win 
consolation honors with a 69-to-56 
triumph over St. Francis, of Loretta, 
Pa. 

Bob O'Brien and Kessler, who added 
27 points to the 31 he tallied last night 
to take toumey honors, put the Terps 
in front with baskets in the first 
minute. Maryland then ran the lead to 
14 to 2 after five minutes and 25 to 
10 midway of the half. At intermission, 
the Old Liners were in command at 36 
to 23. 

With a 53-to-43 edge, the Terps 
coasted in through the final V/i min- 
utes. 

John Sandbower made 11 points and 
O'Brien 10 to trail Kessler in that de- 
partment. The Terps hit on 21 of 51 
shots for 40 per cent. St. Francis was 
14 to 59. 

Kessler, Holup and McCoy were 
unanimous choices for the all-tourna- 
ment team. 

Maryland 76— SC 57 

Bud Millikan, Maryland basketball 
coach, had a long look at his second 
string as the Terrapins breezed past 
South Carolina, 76 to 57, in an Atlan- 
tic Coast Conference game. 

Paced by Forward Bob Kessler, who 
hung up 26 points during the evening, 
Maryland rolled to a commanding 39- 
to-25 halftime lead. 

The Terps started rolling before 
Kessler's driving layups gave them an 
18-to-6 lead with 8.30 remaining in the 
first half. Millikan sent the second 
team in for most of the second half. 

The 76 points the Terrapins rolled 
up was the highest score they have 
made this season. 

Maryland 62— GW 48 

Maryland scored a major basketball 
upset by trouncing 7th ranked George 
Washington, 62-48, behind a slow brand 
of play that held the Colonials to their 
lowest point production in years. 

Not since 1950 had GW scored less 
than 50 points. 

Taking a four-point lead of 28-24 
into the second half, the Marylanders 
played a game of pitch and catch, 
daring the Colonials to come and get 
them. 

When the GW players committed 
themselves, they fouled. That was 
Coach Bud Millikan's intention and his 
Maryland players didn't let him down. 
The Terrapins sank 16 consecutive 
foul tries in the second half to win 
going away. 

Joe Holup, GW's star center who was 
fourth in the nation in scoring with a 
28-point average going into the game, 
was held to 14 points, his smallest 
of the season. 

When the outside shooters failed 
GW, the Colonials went down to their 
second defeat of the season against 
nine victories. 

Maryland's Bob Kessler, who sank 
12 of 12 foul tries, was high man for 
the night with 22 points. Teammate 
Bob O'Brien scored 16 while Holup 
topped GW with his 14. 



Maryland 71 — Clemson 63 

The Maryland Terps played posses- 
sion ball in the second half and cashed 
in on foul shots to whip the Clemson 
Tigers, 71-63, in an Atlantic Coast 
Conference game. 

The Terps took the lead for the final 
time a minute before the half and left 
at intermission with a 38-34 margin. 
Once during the second half the visitors 
were ahead by 16 points, but the Tigers 
closed the gap to six with less than 
a minute to go. 

The spectacular shooting of Mary- 
land's Bob O'Brien from 30 feet out 
kept the Terps in the game in the first 
half, as the lead changed hands nine 
times and was tied four more times. 
O'Brien was high scorer for the night 
with 33 points. 

Clemson, which had averaged 84 
points a game this year, out-shot the 
Terps from the floor, 25 to 33, but 
were able to get only 13 foul shots to 
Maryland's 25. 

Bob Kessler followed O'Brien in the 
Maryland scoring with 20 points. 

Maryland 59— SC 53 

Four Maryland players hit in the 
double figures as the Terps downed 
South Carolina, 59-53, to hold first place 
in the Atlantic Coast conference. 

John Nacincik, a 6-3 guard, led the 
Maryland scoring with 19 points. But 
the Terps' points were evenly dis- 
tributed with guard John Sandbower 
hitting 14, forward Bob Kessler 12, 
and forward Bob O'Brien 10. 

Grady Wallace, South Carolina's ace 
forward, was high for the night with 
21 points. 

South Carolina extended Maryland 
during most of the game. Maryland 
trailed most of the first half and was 
in a 49-49 tie with six minutes left in 
the game when Sandbower hit two free 
throws to put Maryland ahead to stay. 
The Gamecocks led at the half, 29-28. 

NC State 73— Maryland 64 

Maryland started its rush far too 
late and fast-breaking North Carolina 
State spilled the Terps from the At- 
lantic Coast Conference lead, 73 to 
64, before 10,400, largest basketball 
crowd in the State's history. 

Trailing by 23 points midway 
through the final half, Maryland came 
to life behind long-shooting Bob 
O'Brien and fought within five markers 
54 seconds from the finish before State 
went back to its hurried down-court 
attack to tuck away its twelfth tri- 
umph in 13 starts and snap Maryland's 
winning string at five straight. 

While his teammates clogged the 
middle with a sliding zone, N.C.S.'s 
Molodet pursued Kessler on a man-for- 
man basis. He stymied Kessler with 11 
tallies, limited him to just 14 shots, 
most of them far out. 

State kept right on going soon after 
the second round's start waiting until 
there was 9.27 remaining before insert- 
ing their first substitution. 

The Terps, meanwhile, were just 
getting started. They hustled within 
63-53 as Nick Davis joined O'Brien 
in popping away from outside and 



60 



Maryland 



O'Brien's dashing play whittled the 
deficit to 67-62. 

With 54 seconds winking on the 
scoreboard, Soph Perry Moore, then 
knocked a State pass out of bounds and 
the Terps had a chance to set up their 
defense. 

However, Hafer slipped away from 
Kessler for a two-pointer. O'Brien 
matched it with a set for 69-64 only to 
have State throw a length-of-the-court 
pass to Molodet for a fielder and Maglio 
added a brace of free throws, all in the 
last 13 seconds. 

Duke 76— Maryland 62 

Duke's Blue Devils remained tied for 
first place in the Atlantic Coast Con- 
ference basketball race to win over 
Maryland before 6,000 fans in Duke's 
indoor stadium. 

Duke, ranked sixth in the Nation, 
set the Terps back with a tremendous 
floor game that saw the Blue Devils 
break through the Maryland defense 
consistently for layups. 

The game was close for the first 13 
minutes, but Duke hit a hot streak to 
give the Blue Devils a lead they never 
surrendered. Maryland, with Bob 
O'Brien leading the way, tried vainly 
to catch up in the second half. 

O'Brien led the Maryland attack 
with 22 points, making eight out of 
eight free throws and seven shots from 
the floor. 

Maryland hurt its own cause with 
some faulty foul shooting in contrast 
to O'Brien's performance. Bob Kessler, 
the Terps' leading scorer, missed nine 
consecutive throws. 

NC 64— Maryland 55 

North Carolina's rangy basketball 
team bounced into the Atlantic Coast 
Conference lead defeating Maryland 
64-55. 

Tar Heels moved out in front in the 
early moments of the game. 

Maryland moved to within a point 
of the flying Tar Heels in the first half 
three times but could never pull 
abreast of the new leaders. 

Twice in the second half, Carolina 
moved away to 12-point advantages, 
but a belated Maryland rally in the 
waning moments of the game closed 
the gap to 9 points at the finish. 

North Carolina outscored Maryland 
by only one bucket from the floor but 
the Tar Heels' accuracy at the foul line 
spelled the big difference. 

Four Terp players wei-e in double 
bracket scoring but the high point 
man, guard Bob O'Brien, had only 12. 
Forward Bob Kessler, usual high scorer, 
and guard Johnny Nacinik had 11 
each while guard Perry Moore had 10. 

Maryland 62 — Georgetown 53 

Maryland grabbed the second leg of 
the mythical Big Three city basketball 
championship by defeating Georgetown 
in an overtime in jam-packed Mc- 
Donogh Gym, 62-57. 

Maryland upset George Washington 
to take its first leg and put on an 
exhibition of smart basketball in an 
extra five-minute period to win a 
thrill-packed contest that stood at 51-51 
at the end of the regular 40 minutes. 



A. H. SMITH 



SAND 
GRAVEL 
CONCRETE 
ASPHALT PAVING 



Branchville 

Phone 

WEbster 5-5200 



Plants: Branchville, Md. 
Brandywine, Md. 
Curtis Bay, Baltimore, Md. 



McLeod & Romberg 
Stone Co., Inc. 

CUT STONE 

— • — 

Bladensburg, Maryland 




OXYGEN COMPANY 

® COMPRESSED GAS MANUFACTURER 
ANESTHETIC & THERAPEUTIC 

GASES and EQUIPMENT 
RESUCITATION EQUIPMENT 

RENTAL and REPAIR SERVICE 

2900 Kenilworth Ave. — Bladensburg, Md. — UNion 4-2345 



PHONE UNION 4-5100 



B. SU6RUE— PRES. 

r 



NORMAN MO TOR COMPANY, Inc. 

SALES #jg2^ SERVICE 

8320 WASHINGTON-BALTIMORE BLVD. • COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



Maryland 



61 



iiHVM 



Maryland University Campus 
and athletic fields are 
maintained with Toro Grass 
Cutting Equipment 



Call Us For A Demonstration 
JUniper 7-7800 

NATIONAL 
CAPITOL TORO, Inc. 

SILVER SPRING, MD. 



Complete Service Department 



Montgomery-Stubbs 
Motors, Inc. 




miRCURY 



SALES and SERVICE 

1200 EAST WEST HIGHWAY 

Silver Spring, Maryland 

JUniper 9-8040 



SILVER SPRING 

NURSES REGISTRY 

CHRISTELL D. EMERY, Registrar 
NURSES 
General 

and 

Obstetrical 

Male & Female 

Experienced 

Licensed By 

State of Maryland 

Interviews By Appointment Only 

JUniper 9-7671 

If No Answer Call JUniper 9-3929 




WO WO 

KK 

® 



y Ku&whbeme} 



KING OF AMERICA' S 

doughnuts 



8000 Georgia Ave. JU 5-7500 
SILVER SPRING, MD. 



A capacity crowd of 3600 sat on the 

edges of their chairs as the two teams 
staged their nip and tuck battle to the 
wire. 

Then in the added five minutes the 
place was a bedlam as Maryland used 
its. famed possession style to lure 
Georgetown into fouling the game 
away as Maryland scored 11 points. 

Maryland led Georgetown 51-50, in 
the dying moments of the game. 

Georgetown's Pichette missed but 
was fouled just as the whistle blew and 
then Pichette attempted the free 
throws that could still spell victory 
for Georgetown. 

His first try rimmed the hoop and 
rolled harmlessly to the floor. But the 
6-foot-3 forward, dunked has next 
squarely through the cords. 

Maryland scored only once from the 
floor in the extra 5 minutes on a goal by 
Bob Kessler which came at the gun and 
had little or no bearing on the final 
decision. 

Georgetown, on the other hand, 
scored three times in the extra period 
but a parade of nine foul points gave 
Maryland its ninth victory in 15 games. 

Kessler scored on two of his 13 first 
half attempts from the floor but fin- 
ished up as the games' leading scorer 
with 23 points. He scored eight field 
goals for 16 points and made good on 
seven of nine foul goal attempts. 

Georgetown started the game with a 
zone defense and had Maryland com- 
pletely befuddled. But, strangely 
enough, the Hoyas came out with a 
man-to-man defense in the last minute 
and 45 seconds of the regulation game 
and used that type defense in the bitter 
five minute overtime. 

Maryland, on the other hand, played 
man-to-man the entire distance. 
Maryland 80; Navy 61 

The Navy basketball team made its 
first appearance at College Park in 24 
years and Coach Millikan's Terrapins 
ran up their highest score of the sea- 
son, 80-61. 

Navy led for the first nine minutes 
but when Maryland solved Navy's de- 
fense the Terps took the lead and were 
never headed again. 

Bob Kessler had one of his good 
nights with 17 points. 

Maryland controlled the backboards, 
grabbing 66 rebounds to 28 for Navy 
and led only 33-27 at the half. 

Maryland came out with a well-bal- 
anced offense in the second half. 

Bob O'Brien was right behind Kess- 
ler in scoring with 16 points. 

Center Perry Moore scored seven 
straight points for Maryland after 7 
minutes of the second half and the is- 
sue was never in doubt. 

BOXING 

Veteran Honored 

aryland's former boxing 
coach, Colonel Harvey 
L. Miller (Ret.) was 
signally honored by the 
National Boxing Asso- 
ciation in the presenta- 
tion of a large gold 
plaque, bedecked with 




62 



ring figurines, and a wrist watch en- 
graved "Colonel Heinie Miller, World's 
No. 1 Champion of Boxing." 

The N.B.A., since its formation in 
1920, has never before so honored any 
of its officials. Miller was N.B.A. vice- 
president in 1938, president in 1939 and 
executive secretary, 1940 to 1954. 

The plaque reads: 

"To Colonel Harvey L. Miller in 
grateful appreciation for long and out- 
standing service. 

"Presented by the National Boxing 
Association, representing world-wide 
boxing through organized commissions 
from the entire universe, acknowledg- 
ing everlasting gratitude for a life- 
time of devoted service as contestant, 
manager, referee, promoter, sports edi- 
tor, college boxing coach, N.B.A. vice- 
president, president, and executive sec- 
retary, in convention assembled at De- 
troit, Michigan, August 15, 1955." 

At the same time the Board of Com- 
missioners of the District of Columbia, 
the Honorable Samuel Spencer, R. E. 
McLaughlin and Thos. A. Lane, pre- 
sented Miller with a Certificate of Mer- 
it "for excellence and efficiency during 
21 years of service." Miller had served 
as the District Boxing Commission 
Chairman. He authored the D. C. Box- 
ing Commission's rule book which was 
later adopted nationally by the Na- 
tional Boxing Association. 

The occasion was a surprise birthday 
party for Miller, at the Hamilton Hotel, 
attended by several hundred boxing 
officials and enthusiasts, some from as 
far away as Chicago and New York. 

During the evening's festivities a 
University of Maryland contingent, in- 
cluding boxing coach Frank A. Cronin, 
Tom Orpwood, Patricia M. Reihm, 
George A. Quigley and Mrs. Quigley, 
Lloyd Smoot and former boxers Benny 
and Hotsy Alperstein and Bob Hafer, 
presented Miller with a large silver 
tray. 

The boxing gloves with which Miller 
won the Far Eastern lightweight title 
in the 13th round of a 45 round con- 
test in 1908, was presented to him, 
metalized and gold plated. 

Tribute was paid, also, to him 
for his work with the Metropolitan 
Police Boys Club of which he is a 
member of the Board of Governors 
and the Board of Regents. Major Ern- 
est W. Brown, retired Chief of Police 
and founder of the Boys Club, spoke. 
For the past five years Miller has been 
chairman of the program committee of 
the Boys clubs. 

Brigadier General Robert L. Kil- 
martin, USMC (Ret.), representing the 
Navy and Marine Corps, praised Mill- 
er's service record including service in 
World War I, World War II, Cuba, 
China, the Philippines, Nicaragua and 
Mexico. 

The affair was a complete surprise 
to Miller who went to the hotel expect- 
ing to have dinner with his family and 
a few relatives. 

Miller coached the Maryland boxers 
from 1936 to 1940 and from 1946 to 
1951, piloting the Terps to their first 

Maryland 



conference title in 1937 and repeating 
in 1939 and 1947. He was on leave dur- 
ing the war years 1940 to 1945. 



THE FIRST "BOWL" 

The first bowl bid ever offered a 
Maryland team was to the Terrapin 
boxing team in 1947. 

After an undefeated season they 
were invited to the Sugar Bowl and 
there defeated Michigan State. 

That first Maryland bowl team con- 
sisted of Al Salkowski, bantam; Andy 
Quattrocchi, feather; Danny Smith, 
lightweight; Roland Hyde, welter; Ed- 
die Ryder, junior middle; Bob Greg- 
son, middle; Kenney Malone, light- 
heavy; Monty Whipp, heavy. 

Somewhat Late ! 

The National Collegiate Athletic As- 
sociation ruled that freshmen may box 
on this year's varsity squads. It's a 
move to keep boxing alive but comes 
a bit late as most of the schools which 
did not load up 
with talent from 
afar have dropped 
the sport. 

In the meantime, 
some of the schools 
which no longer 
field teams but 
have National 
champions from 
last year — like 
Maryland's classy 
Vinnie Palumbo — 
are expected to de- 
fend their titles 
and it is being 
champions be ac- 
corded "all available facilities." "All 
available facilities" would largely be 
sparring partners of varsity stature. 

Collegiate champions, comes the 
word, are also to be permitted to enter 
Golden Gloves competition. 




Vinnie Palumbo 
urged that such 




CLUB 
HONORS 



Terp Athletes Honored 

The "M" Club, composed of Univer- 
sity of Maryland lettermen, honored 
Terp athletes who excelled in 1955, and 
also paid tribute to Gen. Carlos Romulo, 
distinguished Philippine war hero and 
diplomat, at its fifth annual dinner in 
Baltimore. 

Gen. Romulo, former president of 
the United Nations General Assembly, 
was cited for his achievements in the 
field of international relations. 

Romulo captivated the audience with 
his engaging personality and straight- 
forward speech. He accepted an hon- 
orary membership in the "M" Club and 
the Outstanding Achievement Award 
from Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, president 
of the University. 



CERTIFIED BUILDERS 



INC. 




General 
Contractors 




2662-64 KENSINGTON-WHEATON ROAD 
SILVER SPRING, MARYLAND 



Telephone: 

LOckwood 

4-8400 



Wood Floors 
Asphalt Til* 
Linoleum 



SOUTHERSTERR FLOOR CO. 

4935 Bethesda Avenue 
Bethesda 14, Md. 



Rubber Tile 

Cork Til* 

Acoustic TIU 



Phone 01. 2-2112 



Jack Daniels Buick, inc. 

8526 GEORGIA AVENUE 

SILVER SPRING, MD. 

JUniper 9-9385 

"Silver Spring Has Everything" 



QUALITY 
RER10DELIRG 

Distinctive Kitchens 

"Rec" Rooms 

Jalousies 

Additions 

SECO SALES EnGMEERS 

617 SLIGO AVE. JU 8-3010 
SILVER SPRING, MD. 



„•<•*••: 






..I l> 



******** a.9-V» 4S 



USE THE COUPON ON THE LAST PAGE 



Maryland 



63 




Thomas E. Carroll 
& Son 

LANDSCAPE CONTRACTING 

Tree Moving 
Trees Shrubs 

Sodding Grading 

EVergreen 4-3041 

Co/esvif/e Pike, Route #3 
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 



Murray Hardware Co. 

Your Hardware Department 
Store 
Open Daily 9 to 9 

LANGLEY SHOPPING CENTER 

UNIVERSITY LANE and 
NEW HAMPSHIRE AVE. 

SILVER SPRING, MD. 

HEmlock 4-3000 




QUA*D YOUR 

FAMILY 



GIVE 

TO FIGHT 

CANCER 

AMERICAN 
CANCER SOCIETY 



JOHANNES & MURRAY 
Silver Spring, Md. 





Give To The 



MARCH of DIMES 



R. B. 



Lacrosse Greats 




ALL SOUTH 

Left to right : Pete Matthews, Ronnie 
Shock and Andy McDonald, a trio which 
played a major role in the 1955 captur- 
ing of the ACC soccer trophy, once 
more placed the Terp hooters in the 
spotlight by landing three berths on 
the All-South Squad. 

Based on the records of coaches from 
an area encompassing the district from 
South Carolina to North Baltimore, the 
nominating committee selected 55 play- 
ers from among the Southern Confer- 
ence, the Atlantic Coast Conference, 
the Mason Dixon Conference and the 
various independents that are scattered 
throughout this region. Each player 



Hon. Perry O. Wilkinson, speaker 
pro tern of the House of Delegates, 
acted as Master of Ceremonies. 

The eight athletes honored were Bob 
Pellegrini, Ail-American center; Half- 
back Ed Vereb and Quarterback Lynn 
Beightol of the football squad; John 
Simmons, Charles Wicker, Jim Keating 
and Rennie Smith of the lacrosse team, 
and Vince Palumbo, NCAA 132-pound 
boxing champion This is Palumbo's 
second year for the award. 

Vereb, co-captain of the football 
squad and the Redskins' No. 1 draft 
choice, received the Talbot T. Speer 
award given for excellence in scholastic 
work, sports and leadership. Beightol 
was presented with the A. V. Williams 
trophy for sportsmanship. Mr. Williams 
who presented the award, is a Past 
President of the "M" Club, and an 
active member of the Terrapin Club, a 
former star center of the 1917 Mary- 
land Football team. 

Smith, sparkplug of the lacrosse at- 
tack, received the Charles T. McCor- 
mick award for the senior athlete in 
the Baltimore area who has contributed 
most to Maryland sports. Mr. Mc- 
Cormick is a member of the Board of 
Regents. 

The "M" Club has established a 
"Hall of Fame" to honor Maryland born 




was nominated to the team by a system 
of voting which consisted of awarding 
the honors to the individual obtaining 
the highest amount of points for every 
position. 

Of the three Terps who were picked, 
Shock was the only player to be nom- 
inated to an inside position. Pete Mat- 
thews took the center half slot while 
Andy McDonald, the Terps leading 
scorer, secured his berth at outside left. 



athletes who have excelled in all sports 
throughout the years. Each year three 
living athletes and one deceased star 
were elected to the State of Maryland 
Hall of Fame. Maryland ranks sec- 
ond to none in outstanding athletes. 

Dr. Wilson Elkins, Maryland presi- 
dent, presented honorary "M" Club 
awards to A. E. Duncan, founder-chair- 
man of the Commercial Credit Co., and 
George Cook, first president of the 
Terrapin Club. 

"M" Club Hall of Fame awards, 
previously announced, honored Babe 
Ruth, Jimmy Foxx, Frank Baker and 
Robert Garrett. Mrs. Ruth accepted 
the certificate and Foxx, Baker and 
Garrett will be present. These awards 
were made by Governor McKeldin. 

Special merit awards went to Frank 
Cronin, boxing coach; Jack Faber, co- 
coach of the lacrosse team; Jim Kehoe, 
head track coach; Bill Krouse, wres- 
tling coach, and Doyle Royal, soccer 
coach. Presentations were made by 
Al Heagy, President of the "M" Club 
and co-coach of the N.C.A.A. lacrosse 
champions. 

****** 
INVENTORY 

When you get to feeling too self- 
satisfied, look inside your wallet. 



64 



Maryland 




// you want a job well done, assign it to a 

He loves the opera even if they don't 
come out on the runway. 

* *. * 

You don't have to go to college to 
learn how to neck — but it helps! 

* *■ * 

Golfer I: Tee the ball. 
Golfer II : Sure, I see it, but why the 
baby talk? 

* *• • 

The author shot himself. He wanted 

to be a ghost-writer. 

* *. * 

Stude: "I'd like a couple of hard- 
boiled eggs to take out." 

Waitress: "All right, but you will 
have to wait; we don't get off until 10." 

* »• * 

Harvard I: "Who is at the door?" 
Janitor: "It's me." 
Harvard II: "WhaVs he trying to 
say?" 

* *■ * 

"Oh, yes, Mummy," said Miss Thir- 
teen, "It's a lovely book, but I don't 
think you would like it. It's so sad at 
the end." 

"How is it sad, darling?" 
"Well, she dies, and he has to go 
back to his wife." 

* *■ » 

A German couple in Milwaukee had 
done a grand job in raising four kids. 
The youngsters were grown now and 
things were a little easier for Mama 
and Papa, when, bingo, surprise, along 
came a little baby sister. 

Came the christening and all the 
neighbors were there. Old man hud- 
wig Schultz, puffing on a long pipe, 
asked the father, "August, for why 
you named the childt 'Alice'? Alice 
ist kein deutscher name?" 

"No, no, no," replied the father, "not 
Alice. Dass ist nicht 'Alice'; doss ist 
ALLES!" 

* *> * 

Judge: "Isn't this the fifth time 
you've been arrested for drunken- 
ness?" 

Intoxicated Pat: "Don't ash me, hie. 
I tho't youse was keepin' score." 

* *■ * 

She laughed when I sat down to play. 
I didn't know she was ticklish. 

* *• * 

Sailor: "Yes, she's a smart little 
craft and can steam thirty knots." 

Dear Old Lady: "How thoughtful of 
you! I suppose you steam the knots 
so that the sailors can untie them 
easily in cold weather." 

* * * 

Observation in metamorphosis. Two 
Jersey kids watching a terrapin on his 
back. "Gee, Shoiley, look. The toipin 
just made soitin that a toipin can toin 
toitle." 

* * *• 

Indignant woman to luscious-looking 
librarian: "Funny you haven't that 
book. My husband said you had every- 
thing." 

Maryland 



busy man; he'll have his secretary do it. 
Soldier to bookstore clerk: "Do you 
have anything on the psychological 
treatment of civilians by returned serv- 
ice men?" 

* * * 

And then there was the mammy who 
named her children Eenie, Meenie, 
Miney and Edgar. She didn't want 
any Mo. 

* * * 

Young girl at perfume counter, after 
looking at "My Sin," "Breathless," and 
the other lurid names : "Have you any- 
thing for a mere beginner?" 

* * * 

Tune in again next issue. Same sta- 
tion, same time, same jokes!" 

* * * 

Prof: "Give me a sentence contain 
ing a direct object." 
Delta: "You are very beautiful." 
Prof: "What is the object?" 
Delta: "A good grade." 

* * * 

Father: "Young man, we turn the 
lights off in this house at 10:30." 

Terp, seated next to the man's daugh- 
ter: "Gee, that's darn nice of you." 

*' * * 

Ole and Arvid fishing in Chesapeake 
Bay over the weekend. Not a bite. 

"Ve ketch no fish here," moaned Ole, 
"ve pull beck to shore. Ve nefer come 
diss blace for fish no more." 

Disgustedly they began to row back. 

"Ve yoost pull in here vun more 
blace," suggested Arvid. They did and 
filled the boat with fish. 

"Diss ban only goot blace in Chesa- 
peake," commented Ole, "ve come beck 
here next veek und so ve be sure of 
same blace, Arvid, you make take 
small piece chalk and make 'X' on side 
of boadt." 

"Dass ban silly business," replied 
Arvid, "making 'X' on side of boadt. 
Suppose ve come beck here next veek 
und dhey rent us a different boadt." 

*■ * * 

Preacher, guest for dinner, "Why 
does that little dog sit there glaring 
at me?" 

Junior, "You're eatin' off'n his 
plate!" 



EEnn 

Photo & Movie 



SUPPLIES 

EASY TERMS-TRADE INS 
Finest Photo Finishing 




BSSBBM 



Washington, D.C. 



HUGH C. GARDIIUR, Jr. 

SALES — SERVICE 

TRACTORS-FARM SUPPLIES 
REFRIGERATORS 



Faulkner, Md. 



Phone LaPlato 5441 



•*S^^N^^S^/SSS*NSSA^^S^ I A^ I 'NS^S/NSS/>S>*%'N/V>SVVVV'^S^ I ^SS 



MOTORISTS- 



If you wish to save fuel, take your 
car to A. J. Buell. He can tune 
your motor, too, so, it will run just 
like new. 
BUELL S CARBURETOR & IGNITION SERVICE 
811 10th Street, N.W. ME. 8-5777 

Washington, D. C. 



Bon Ton 


lUk 


SARATOGA CHIPS 


distributed by 


vn ^Mw 


BON TON SARATOGA 


\^ as 


CHIP DISTRIBUTORS 


\j|? 


Rear— 1229 D St., S.E. . 


jnj&n 


11. 3-4S4S Washington 





Hilliard C. Myers & Son 

Roofing Specialists 

FIREPLACES and CHIMNEYS 

CLEANED and REPAIRED 

Incinerator Screen Tops Made to Order 

JS40 14th ST., N.W. WASHINGTON, D. C 

RAndolph 6-1364 



American Disinfectant Co. 

Pest Control Service 
928 EYE STREET, N.W. 

Washington 1, D. C. NAtional 8-6478 



ECKINGTON BUILDING SUPPLY CO. 

657 A STREET, S.E. — WASHINGTON, D. C. 

LI 7-2122 

Complete Lint of 
Building Materials • Plastering Materials • Brick • Cinder Block 
Mortar • Cement • Rough Hardware and Steel Tubular Scaffolding 

Sales and Rentals 

Warehouse: 1919 5th STREET, N.E., WASHINGTON, D. C. 



65 




KLOMAN 

Instrument Co., 

Inc. 

Surgical Instruments 

Hospital & Physicians 

Supplies 

907 Cathedral St. IE, 9-2912 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

1822 Eye St., N.W. NA. 8-6566 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 




WILLIAM F. STONE, JR. 

2612 N. Charles Street 

Baltimore 18, Md. 



C. J. 

LANGENFELDER 
& SON, INC. 



Contractors 



BALTIMORE 
MARYLAND 



Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 

Manufacturers of 
Concrete Pipe 

6315 EASTERN AVENUE 



Baltimore 24, Md. 




MARYLAND 



wo ci a 



i 



£u Clay fCeene /Desmond 





M,aryland 

MARRIAGES 



Adrion — Williams 

Janet Lee Williams, to Oliver C. 
Adrion, of the University's Research 
Station at Salisbury, Md. 
Baer — Myers 
Carolyn Elizabeth Myers, Nursing 
1953, to Henry Allen Baer. 

Basarab — Gregorius 
Wanda Emily Gregorius, Nursing 
1950, to Stephen Basarab. 
Cline — Schewe 
Carol Joyce Schewe, graduate of 
Maryland, teaching school in Germany, 
to Lieut. R. M. Cline, Jr., Maryland 
alumnus and West Point graduate, at 
Frankfort, Germany. 

Cole — Schaum 
Mrs. Gladys Hix Schaum, Nursing 
1933, to Richard D. Cole. 

Comulada — Daley 
Margaret Geraldine Daley, West- 
minster, Md., to Edward V. Comulada, 
D.D.S. '55 

Diaz — Lanaham 
Jeannie Lanaham, Nursing 1955, to 
Ricardo Diaz. 

Dini — McClaran 
Patricia McClaran, alumna of Uni- 
versity of Maryland in Munich, Ger- 
many, to Robert L. Dini, graduate of 
Tufts College and the Boston Museum 
of Fine Arts. 

Donovan — Shaech 
Dorothy Freida Shaecwh, graduate of 
the School of Pharmacy, to Arthur J. 
Donovan, membe rof the Baltimore 
Colts pro footbal lteam. 

Glolfelty— Hines 
Rose Marie Hines, Nursing 1954, to 
Robert Glolfelty. 

Hasenbuhler — Haddox 
Evelyn Catherine Haddox, Nursing 
1929, to J. Bernard Hasenbuhler. 
Henley — Smith 
Helen Fiske Smith, Maryland alumna 
("Miss D.C., 1953) to Richard W. Hen- 
ley, graduate of Southern California. 
Hoatson — Dorfler 
Betty Ann Dorfler, Nursing 1955, 
to Donald Wallace Hoatson. 
Hoffman — Kelly 
Captain Kjerstine Kelly, A.N.C., 
Nursing 1947, to Richard Hoffman. 

Jaleel — Hauver 

Bertha Jean Hauver, nursing 1954, 
to Hapif Jaleel, 1955. 

Jenkins — Pazakis 

Diana Pazakis, Hyannis, Mass., to 
John Kenna Jenkins, D.D.S. '54. 



King — Maxwell 

Helen Maxwell, Nursing| 1952, to 
Jackson B. King. 

Kuhn — Kemp 
Patricia Joan Kemp, Maryland alum- 
na, now teaching at Kensington Jun- 
ior High, to David L. Kuhn, Maryland 
student. 

Kwiatkowski — Lang 
Dorothy Ellen Lang, Nursing 1952, 
to Felix Paul Kwiatkowski. 
McDavitt — Turner 
Edith Turner, Nursing 1946, to Wm. 
D. McDavitt. 

Mincemoyer — Kauffman 
Elizabeth Jane Kauffman, Nursing 
1948, to Donald Mincemoyer. 
Moore — Anselmo 
Dorothy Adele Anselmo to Charles 
Aubrey Moore, Jr. Both graduates of 
Maryland, class '55. Married in Tokyo, 
Japan, where Lieut. Moore is serving 
in the Air Force. 

Nees — Ronchi 
Both Maryland alumni, Beverly Ann 
Ronchi to Bernard H. Nees. 
Pare — Kelly 
Nancy Jean Kelly, Maryland gradu- 
ate, to Philip John Pare, Maryland 
student. 

Poole — Schuster 
Ellen Ruth Schuster, Nursing 1951, 
to Edward S. Poole, Jr. 

Randolph — Hahn 
Betty Lee Hahn, Nursing 1948, to 
Peter Dowell Randolph. 

Ravesies — Lubinsky 
Mrs. Ruby Thompson Lubinski, Nurs- 
ing 1936, to Daniel W. Ravesies. 
Richardson — Mackenzie 
Merlene MacKenzie, Nursing 1954, 
to Roland 0. Richardson, U.S. Navy. 
Ritzman — Parks 
Faye Anita L. Parks, Nursing 1954, 
to Robert Ritzman. 

Sanstol — Fraley 
Nancy Kathryn Fraley, daughter of 
Dean and Mrs. Lester M. Fraley, Col- 
lege of Physical Education, Maryland, 
to Ensign George S. Sanstol, U.S. 
Navy, graduate of the Naval Acad- 
emy. 

Snyder — Crist 
Patricia Mae Crist, Nursing 1954, 
to Wm. Snyder. 

Spaulding — Cruciano 
Gloria Ellen Spaulding, Nursing 
1955, to Albert Cruciano, Jr. 
Teeples — Murphy 
Paula Elizabeth Murphy, Maryland 
alumna and graduate of Marymount 
in Rome, to Thomas C. Teeples. 
Updefraff— Daly 
At Salt Lake City, June Daly, Uni- 
versity of Utah alumna, to Lieut. Ed- 
ward R. Updegraff, Maryland graduate. 



Maryland 



Williams — Brannan 

Dolores V. Brannan to Jos. F. Wil- 
liams, D.D.S. 

Yancey — Elmore 
Jean Frances Elmore, Nursing 1953, 
to Wallace Eugene Yancey. 
Yurso — Michel 
Helene Elizabeth Michel, Maryland 
graduate, to Ensign Joseph F. Yurso, 
graduate of Penn State. 

Young — Kohlhoss 
Nancy Jo Kohlhoss, Nursing 1953, 
to James Ronald Young. 

Zeleznik — Kipnis 

Myra June Kipnis, Maryland alum- 
na, to Lieut. Reivan Zeleznik, U.S. 
Army, graduate of New York Univer- 
sity. 




Maryland 

ENGAGEMENTS 



Abrams — Shillman 

Joy Abrams, Maryland graduate, to 
Norman Shillman, graduate of 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Barranco — Del Rosso i 
Mary Antoinette Barranco, St. Jos- 
eph's School of Nursing, to Remo A. 
Del Rosso, Dental School student. 
Bartlett — Charron ' 
Joyce Bartlett to Edward A. Char- 
ron, Maryland graduate. 

Beckwith — Becker 
Patricia Ann Beckwith, Grove City 
College alumna, to Thomas B. Becker, 
Maryland graduate. 

Beman — Curtiss 
Both Maryland alumni, Arline Be- 
man to Raymond Curtiss. 
Block — Bel more 
Carol Ann Block, Marjorie Webster 
student, to Mandell Bellmore, Mary- 
land student. 

Bowen — Dietrich 
Claudette M. Bowen, Maryland alum- 
na, to Edward B. Dietrich, Maryland 
student. 

Buckner — Jones 
Both Maryland alumni, Mary Juanita 
Buckner to John Fountaine Jones, Jr. 
Bur cket t — Brandt 
Gail Louise Burckett, Beaver College, 
to William L. Brandt, student, School 
of Law. 




'% 



TIL WHEN? 



"Dear, could you let me have ten dol- 
lars until doomsday?" 




Reese Press 

PRINTERS 

301 E. LOMBARD ST. BALTIMORE 2, MD. 




Dukeland brand 

• SMOKED HAMS 

• PICNIC HAMS 

CORNED BEEF AND TONGUES 

SMOKED AND READY TO EAT 

MEAT PRODUCTS 

Baltimore, Md. 



THE COGSWELL CODSTRUCTIOII CO. 

513 PARK AVENUE BALTIMORE 1, MD. 



Kefauver Lumber Company Inc* 

LUMBER, MILLWORK, BUILDING SUPPLIES 
BRICK and BLOCKS 

Telephone: JABRETTSVILLE 4601 

BEL AIR 174 FOREST HILL, MD. 



THE BALTIMORE ENVELOPE 


CO. 


MANUFACTURERS AND PRINTERS OF ENVELOPES 




600-608 EAST LOMBARD STREET 




Phone MUlberry 5-6070 


■altlmere 2, Maryland 



SAratoga 


7-641 • 










LOUIS 


Salganlk 


& SONS 


/$£& 






— WHOLESALE MEATS 




v^ywy 


320 S. 


EUTAW STREET 


BALTIMORE 1, 


MD. V^ 



Maryland 



67 



Another First for the Pimlieo Hotel 

Old Time 
Barbecue Treats 

Tantalizing barbecue dishes in the grand 
manner) Choice, tender meat turned 
slowly on a spit over a blazing fire, to 
a golden brown. Basted with a pungent, 
thick, mouthwatering sauce, prepared from 
an old recipe by our own export chefsl 

Nate's and Leon's 



imlico 

HOTEL 



Open 'til 2 a.m. - Saturday 'til 3 
5301 PARK HEIGHTS AVE. BALTIMORE 



"Electrically 

Our Coverage Of 

Maryland Is 

Complete" 



* 1 1 



mk 



^XCtRICAL 



TRISTATE 



ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION 

MATERIALS - SUPPLIES 

EQUIPMENT 

• 

OPERATING ON AN EXCLUSIVE 
WHOLESALE POLICY 




AMERICAN 

Office Equipment Co., Inc. 
COMPLETE LINE OF 

DESKS, CHAIRS, 

FILING CABINETS, 

SAFES 



ROOM AIR CONDITIONERS 
and OFFICE PARTITIONS 

Bought, Sold & Exchanged 

Leather 

Upholstered Furniture 

NEW and USED 

309 N. CALVERT STREET 
Baltimore, Md. 



LExington 9-7529 

Member Baltimore Office Furniture A mo. 



VICTOR'S mARKET, Inc. 

Exclusive Distributors 

for 
S. S. PIERCE PRODUCTS 




4804 ROUND AVE. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



HO 7-OBle 



Cardaci — Smith 

Mary Jean Cardaci, Maryland alum- 
na, to Ronald W. Smith, Maryland 
graduate, former Air Force Lieutenant 
and now third year medical student at 
George Washington University. 
Chinn — Sween 
Jane Alice Chinn, Maryland gradu- 
ate, to Lieut. Lawrence C. Sween, U.S. 
A.F. 

Cole— Gill 
Susan Cole, Maryland student, to 
Richard Gill, Jr., U.S. Army. 
Curion — Lowery 
Eleanor Dolores Curion to James A. 
Lowery, Maryland student. 
Dean — Lowe 
Both Maryland students, Virginia 
Ellen Dean to John Hardin Lowe. 
Delaney — Vasta 
Dorothy Ann Delaney, Maryland stu- 
dent, to Druno M. Vasta, Georgetown 
University graduate. 

Drewry — Barr 
Nancy Lee Drewry to Robert William 
Barr, Maryland alumnus. 
Ecsery — Harten 
Both Maryland students, Elaine 
Marie Ecsery, Sigma Kappa, to Glenn 
B. Harten, Delta Tau Delta. 
Elliott— Towne 
Elizabeth Belle Elliott, graduate of 
American University, to Samuel A. 
Towne, Jr., Maryland alumnus. 
Elms — Cotchan 
Barbara S. Elms, graduate of Mary- 
land, to Wesley S. Cotchan, graduate 
of King's College, Wilkes-Barre. 
Enten — Sidle 
Adele Enten to Gerald Sidle, Mary- 
land student, Tau Epsilon Phi. 
Epstein — Shifrin 
Charlotte Janice Epstein, student 
Peabody Conservatory, to Sidney Shif- 
rin, Maryland graduate. 

Evans — Hoffman 
Both juniors at Maryland, Diane 
Louise Evans to Richard H. Hoffman, 
graduate of Baltimore Junior College. 
Fallon — Snowden 
Margery Ann Fallon to Thomas 
Charles Snowden, Maryland alumnus. 
Flynn Riegel 
Both Maryland alumni, Patricia Jane 
Flynn to Robert Witherspoon Riegel. 
Friedman — Bernstein 
Charlotte Friedman, Maryland alum- 
na, to Paul Bernstein, George Wash- 
ington University alumnus. 
Gelson — Kindley 
Catherine Aline Gelson, College of 
Notre Dame student, to Lieut. William 
E. Kindley, 3rd, U.S.A.F., Maryland 
graduate, Theta Chi. 

Gerard — Brunn 
Adrienne Maria Gerard, Maryland 
senior, to Ronald G. Brunn, Johns Hop- 
kins graduate. 

Gilbert— Bock 
Caroline Polk Gilbert to C. Adam 
Bock, student in the School of Law. 
Gilson — Yeager 
Barbara Jane Gilson, to Kenneth 
George Yeager, Maryland student. 
Goe — Orem 
Jeanne Louise Goe, Maryland stu- 
dent, Alpha Gamma Delta, to Lieut. 
John Howard Orem, Maryland gradu- 
ate, Kappa Alpha. 



Gottlieb — Abramson 

Marilyn Gottlieb, Maryland graduate, 
to David Abramson. 

Graff am — Snyder 

Suzanne Stokes Graffam, student at 
Marjorie Webster, to Elwood S. Snyder, 
Middlebury College alumnus, junior at 
the School of Dentistry. 

Gross — Goozh 

Marian Frances Gross, Maryland 
student, to Walter E. Goozh, student al 
George Washington School of Medicine. 

Gust — Lowell 

Miss Mayme Anna Gust, senior, Pi 
Beta Phi, University of Colorado, to 
George R. Sowell, graduate of Char- 
lotte Hall and The Citadel, now a senior 
in the School of Medicine. 

Hansen — Williams 

Mary Carolyn Hansen to Harlan 
Cooper Williams, Maryland graduate. 

Harrison — Silberstein 

Both Maryland students, Barbara 
Yvonne Harrison, Alpha Epsilon Phi, 
to Charles Eliot Silberstein, Phi Delta 
Epsilon. 

Hassencamp — Lynch 

Paula K. Hassencamp to Franklin 
Hastings Lynch, Maryland graduate. 

Henderson — Palmer 

Diane Doris Henderson, Maryland 
graduate, to 2nd Lieutenant Harry C. 
Palmer, U.S.A., graduate of Washing- 
ton and Lee and Rensselaer Polytech- 
nic Institute. 

Hermann — Wolff 

Diana May Hermann, Maryland stu- 
dent, to Gerhard S. Wolff, graduate 
of Benjamin Franklin University. 

Herzig — Brotman 

Ruth Herzig, Maryland graduate, to 
Carl Brotman. 

Hildebrandt — Longest 

Barbara Hildebrandt, student at Bal- 
timore Business College, to Charles L. 
Longest, senior at Maryland. 

Hiser — Monson 

Florence McNamee Hiser, Maryland 
student, to Midshipman Charles L. 
Monson, Jr., Naval Academy. 
Hoffberger — Nasdor 
Suzanne Hoffberger to Bruce Carter 
Nasdor, Maryland alumnus. 
Jones — Woods 
Barbara Ann Jones to Arthur R. 
Woods, 3d, Maryland student. 
Kilmer — Schuler 
Janis Ida Schuler, Maryland student, 
Delta Gamma, to B. Gersham Kilmer, 
Jr., Johns Hopkins University student. 
Lamb — Shrimpton 
Katherine Elizabeth Lamb, Maryland 
alumna, daughter of the late Professor 
and Mrs. Reginald C. Lamb, Annapolis, 
to Peter E. Shrimpton, of London, 
England. 

Lehman — McGowan 
Virginia Elizabeth Lehman, junior 
at Maryland, Sigma Kappa, to Michael 
T. McGowan, student at State Teach- 
er's College, Salisbury. 

Liberman — Rabinowitz 

Reva Harriet Liberman to Max Ra- 
binowitz, Maryland graduate. 



68 



Maryland 



Litty — Conway 

Marylyn Claire Litty, graduate of 
ieaver College, to Henry L. Conway, 
graduate of Bowdoin, veteran of Korea 
U.S.M.C.) now a student at the School 
if Law. 

Lusby — Magness 
Shirley Anne Lusby, Maryland stu- 
lent, to Donald E. Magness, Air Force 
veteran. 

Madden — Van Fleet 
Helen Eve Madden to Robert Van 
?leet, both Maryland students. 
Mathiasen — Levandowsky 
Marcia Mathiasen, Maryland alum- 
la, now on the faculty of Antioch Col- 
ege, to Anton D. Levandowsky, An- 
:ioch student. 

Mays — Watson 
Joan Valentine Mays, Maryland stu- 
ient, to James Stephen "Watson. 
McFadden — Huffard 
Helen McFadden, senior, School of 
Nursing to William Huffard, graduate 
r>f Maryland, now a student at Georgia 
School of Veterinary Medicine. 
Miller — May 
Carolyn Barbara Miller, graduate of 
the School of Nursing, now at General 
Rose Memorial Hospital, Denver, to 
William A. May, graduate of William 
and Mary, now in the Army at Ft. 
Carson, Colorado. 

Morrison — Hart sing 
Ruth Ann Morrison, to Tyler Frank 
Hartsing, Jr., Maryland student. 
Nethken — Bangert 
Penny Nethken, Maryland senior, to 
Midshipman James E. Bangert, Naval 
Academy. 

Nicely — McKenzie 
Both Maryland students, Carolyn 
Sue Nicely to James T. McKenzie. 
Oliver — Irey 
Carolyn Oliver to Donald L. Irey, 
Maryland alumnus. 

Owen — Webb 
Barbara Carolyn Owen, Maryland 
alumna, to John B. Webb. 

Paerigin — Paynter 
Both Maryland graduates, Mary 
Catherine Paerigin to Kennedy Troy 
Paynter. 

Park— Polk 
Margaret Ann Park, Maryland alum- 
na, to John William Polk, Maryland 
student. 

Peterson — Frisbie 
Alice Adelheid Peterson to Charles 
M. Frisbie, Maryland student. 
Phipps — James 
Patricia Anne Phipps to Robert Trux- 
ton James, Maryland Medical School 
student. 

Piatt— Pell 
R. Paula Piatt to Gordon J. Pell, 
Maryland alumnus. 

Piper — Bond 
Jane Loring Piper to Calhoun Bond, 
Maryland Law School graduate. 
Pringle — Fuller 
Marcia Sue Pringle to Wayne Allen 
Fuller, Maryland student. 

Pritchard — Miller 
Mary Jane Pritchard to Steven Jay 
Miller, Maryland Dental School stu- 
dent. 



THE 



BALTIMORE ASPHALT 
BLOCK and TILE CO. 



BABCO 
HOT ASPHALT PAVEMENTS 

• private driveways 

• industrial yards 
for • service stations 

e playgrounds 
e parking areas 



general 
contractors 



1320 N. MONROE ST. 
Call: MAdison 3-4346 



BALTIMORE 17, MD. 



"SPRING TUNE UP TIME" 

CHECK THOSE BATTERIES AFTER WINTER USE 

Replace with a 

DELCO BATTERY 

The best all-around performance battery 

PARKS & HULL Automotive Corp. 



1033 Cathedral St. 



SAratoga 7-8383 



Baltimore 1, Md. 



Staffer's 

CONVALESCENT RETREAT 

Situated on a knoll in the center of a 10-acre lawn, 
beautiful shade trees and landscape grounds 

ELLICOTT CITY, MARYLAND 

25 minutes to downtown Baltimore — 30 miles to Washington 
Phone Ellicott City 206 



GULF MOTEL 

U. S. ROUTE 1 at 

MARYLAND ROUTE 152 

4 Miles South of Bel Air 
18 Miles North of Baltimore 

FALLSTON, MARYLAND 




Maryland 




Ate Quay 

SEASONMAKERS 

YEAR 'ROUND 

AIR CONDITIONING 

for 



cleaner, healthier, more 
comfortable living! 
Provides heated, filtered air in 
winter; cooled, dehumidified, fil- 
tered air in summer. 



THE 



CROWN 




REFRIGERATION SUPPLY CO. 
913 E. Biddle St., Balto. 2, Md. 

PLAZA 2-3359 PLAZA 2-9665 



The 



Maurice 
Leeser Co, 



i PRINTERS 
* I PUBLISHERS 

Viclor 1'. Skruck, Pits. 

536 W. PRATT ST., BALTIMORE 1 
SAraloga 7-4446 

In Our Second Generation 
of QuulilY and Service 



PARADISE 
II NURSING HOME 

QUIET, RESTFUL SURROUNDINGS 

21-Hour N-urring Service 

Automatic Fird Sprinkling Ststbm 

MARGARET C. SHERRICK 

PARADISE and ALTAMONT AVES. 

CATONSVIllE, MD. 



lUMBfft 



For Every Purpose 

Walbrook Lumber Co. 

2636 W. North Ave. 
Baltimore/ Md. 



For The Best In 

PLATING SERVICES 
STANDARD PLATING CO. 

411 N. EXETER ST. SA 7-4257 

Baltimore 2, Md. 

70 



Read — Dickey 

Lila Jean Read, Maryland gradu- 
ate, to Midshipman James Allen Dick- 
ey, U.S. Naval Academy. 
Regus — Rother 
Grace Patricia Regus, Maryland 
graduate, to David Englar Rother. 
Rivkin — Birnbaum 
Esther F. Rivkin, Goucher College 
graduate, to Dr. Adolf Birnbaum, grad- 
uate School of Dentistry. 

Rosenkoff — Bochenek 
Claire Frances Rosenkoff, Michigan 
graduate, to Benjamin H. Bochenek, 
graduate of Maryland's School of Law. 
^Sertoli — Sauerbrei 
Both Maryland students, Margaret 
Grainger Scholl, to Merril A. Sauer- 
brei. 

Taubman — Friedman 
Raye Taubman to Marvin Friedman, 
Maryland graduate. 

Taylor — Baker 
Mary Carol Taylor to John Barth 
Baker, Maryland alumnus, Sigma Nu. 
Trippe — Thorne 
Frederika Lee Trippe, Maryland grad- 
uate, and T. Taylor Thorne, N.C.S. 
graduate. 

Waldvogel — Ross 
Betty L. Waldvogel, Maryland alum- 
na, Kappa Delta, now a student at 
Union Memorial Hospital School of 
Nursing, to Airman First Class Charles 
W. Ross, 4th, Maryland alumnus, 
Lambda Chi Alpha, now at Ellington 
Air Force Base, Houston, Texas. 
Wehrly — Balcom 
Jean Wehrly, Maryland student, to 
David A. Balcom, Western Maryland. 
Weitz — Cohen 
Marilyn Edith Weitz, Maryland stu- 
dent, to Norman Cohen, George Wash- 
ington student. 

Willcox — Linthicum 
Nancy Willcox, Maryland graduate, 
to Barry W. Linthicum, Maryland stu- 
dent. 

Wolfram — Blasbalg 
Frances Jean Wolfram, Maryland 
alumna, to Herman Lawrence Blasbalg, 
Maryland graduate. 

Woods — Twining 
Both Maryland alumni, Cecilia Marie 
Woods to Edward Attkinson Twining, 
Jr. 

Yanicki — Eddy 
Doris Evelyn Yanicki to Russell E. 
Eddy, Jr., Maryland alumnus. 
Zelko — Grozen 
Phyllis Dorothy Zelko, Maryland 
graduate, Phi Sigma Sigma, to Ensign 
Paul Barton Grozen, U.S. Navy. 
Zitomer — Postal 
Anita Zitober, Maryland alumna, to 
Albert Edward Postal, Maryland stu- 
dent. 




School Of Nursing Babies 

To Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. Tegler, a 
daughter, Tracey Nanette. Mrs. 
Tegler was Jennie Bunting, Class '48. 
To Dr. and Mrs. Donald W. Mintzer, 



a son, Jefferson Willis. Mrs. Mintzer 
was Gladys Ellen Abshire, Class 1945. 

To Mr. and Mrs. William M. Moore, 
a daughter, Lynn Elizabeth. Mrs. 
Moore graduated in 1952. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Fleck, a 
second son, Michael Warren. The first 
son, Stephen Leroy, on April 20, 1953. 
Mrs. Fleck was Sara Jane Beatty 
Fleck, Class 1951. 

To Dr. and Mrs. John E. Evans, 
Jr., a son, John E. Ill, on July 1, 1954. 
Mrs. Evans was Clara Byerly Evans, 
Class 1952. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Kyle Young Swish- 
er, II, a son, Kyle Young, III. Mrs. 
Swisher was Nan Rittenhouse, Class 
1949. 

To Lt. and Mrs. Robert Purcell, a 
daughter. Mrs. Purcell graduated in 
1952. 

To Lt. and Mrs. Michael Iacona, a 
daughter, Rosemarie. Mrs. Iacona was 
Charlotte Halter, Class 1948. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Wayne A. Reber, 
Jr., a son, Terry Wayne. Mrs. Reber 
was Fae L. Renninger, Class 1953. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Weber, Jr., 
a son, Gary Wright. Mrs. Weber was 
Christine Raab, Class 1947. 

To Dr. and Mrs. William E. Wolfel, 
Jr., a daughter, Sandra Lynn. Mrs. 
Wolfel was Florence Bassler, Class 
1950. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Schild- 
wachter, a daughter, Eleanor Jane. 
Mrs. Schildwachter was Lois Evalyn 
Fraley, Class 1948. 

To First Lt. and Mrs. William Sites 
Kiser, a son, William Sites, Jr., in 
Rabat, South Africa. Mrs. Kiser was 
Eugenia Crow, Class 1947. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Harold L. Mc- 
Clendon, a son, David Lawrence. Mrs. 
McClendon was Elizabeth Outzs Mc- 
Clendon, Class 1952. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Louis H. Kraus, Jr., 
a son, Charles Louis. Mrs. Kraus was 
Elizabeth S. Warfield, Class 1952. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Edward Parker, Jr., 
a daughter, Martha Anne. Mrs. Parker 
was Janet L. White, Class 1951. 

To Mr. and Mrs. William Boughton 
Littlepage, a daughter, Margaret Lind- 
sey. Mrs. Littlepage was Caroline 
Elizabeth Clinite, Class 1944. 

To Mr. and Mrs. John Edward Bos- 
ley, a daughter, Patricia Lynn. Mrs. 
Bosley was Sally Frances Fritz, Class 
1953. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Raymond J. Emery, 
a son, Gary Lnn. Mrs. Emery was 
Vemice Lee Bowling, Class 1936. 

To S/Sgt. Calvin R. and Mrs. Porter, 
a son, Henry Richard. Mrs. Porter 
was Jean M. Galton, Class 1952. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Fred M. Dalrymple, 
a son. Mrs. Dalrymple, was Vivian 
Sawyer, Class 1952. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Robert Seal, a 
daughter. Mrs. Seal was Joann Gross, 
Class 1952. 

To Mr. and Mrs. James Cottrell, a 
son. Mrs. Cottrell was Helen F. Bren- 
nan, Class 1952. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Robert T. Singleton, 
a son, Robert Tiffany, Jr. Mrs. Single- 
ton was Elizabeth Grenning Rohr, 
Class 1947. 

Maryland 



To Lt. and Mrs. A. B. McClintock, a 
;on. Mrs. McClintock was Phyllis Vir- 
ginia Booth, Class 1952. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Marthin J. Smith, 
t daughter, Lisa Suzanne. Mrs. Martin 
vas Nellie Mae Bloxom, Class 1953. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Wiliford Eppes, a 
laughter, Barbara Carolyn. Mrs. Eppes 
vas Emily Mulligan, Class 1947. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Paul A. Thomas, a 
ion, Gregory Paul. Mrs. Thomas was 
'•fancy R. Amadon, Class 1949. They 
ilso have David, age four, and Sandra 
Fean, age two. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Ronald G. Keyser, 
i son, Stephen Richard, on August 19, 
L955. This is the third child, second 
;on. Mrs. Keyser was Margaret Head, 
Dlass 1951. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Guy Graham Baby- 
on, a daughter, Donna Rae. Mrs. 
3abylon was Mary Katherine Warner, 
:iass 1949. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Barry D. Murphy, 
i daughter, Lynn Louise. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Charles Johnson, 
i daughter, Cynthia Hunt. Mrs. John- 
son was Phyllis Moody, Class 1949. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Robert Y. Lambert, 
i daughter, Maria Kay. Mrs. Lambert 
vas Thelma Grovo, Class 1949. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Clifford F. Haines, 
i son, John Thomas. Mrs. Haines was 
Barbara Dunn, Class 1953. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Peter Dowell Ran- 
dolph, a son, Stevie, weighing three 
sounds, doing fine. Mrs. Randolph was 
Betty Hahn, Class 1948. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Paul Strack, a son. 
Mrs. Strack was Ruby Mae Sterling 
Stack, Class 1955. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Andrew J. Bittner, 
a daughter, Peggy Ann. Mrs. Bitt- 
ner was Margaret Walter, Class 1949. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Fred R. McCrumb, 
a daughter, Mariet Francesea, in Lum- 
par, Malaya. Mrs. McCrumb was Glor- 
ia Mullen, Class 1950. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Frank S. Parrott, 
a daughter, Martha. Mrs. Parrott was 
Miriam Stultz, Class 1943. 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert K. Arthur, Jr., 
have adopted a baby daughter, Mar- 
garet Carol. Mrs. Arthur was Dorothy 
M. Bechtold, Class 1949. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clavin E. Zimmerman, 
a daughter, Susan. They have a son, 
David, four years old. Mrs. Zimmer- 
man was Genevieve Boone, Class 1946. 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard N. Nathen- 
son, Barbara Ellen. Mrs. Nathenson, 
nee Joyce Beverly Udell, Class 1955. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen O'Hearne, 
twins, Stephen Howard and Cynthia 
Tess, nee Ingrid Helen Davenport, 
Class 1955. 

To Mr. and Mrs. David L. Venezky, 
a daughter, Donna Lynn. Mrs. Venezky 
graduated in 1951. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Lee W. Elgin, Jr., 
a daughter, Cynthia Margaret. Mrs. 
Elgin graduated in 1955. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. Avery, a 
daughter, Robin Lydia. Mrs. Avery 
was Joyce Johnson, Class 1952. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Wm. R. Schmidt, 
III, a daughter, Carol Lynn. Mrs. 
Schmidt wag Dorothy Huchsoll, Class 
1951. 



POOR, BOWIEN, 
ARTLETT & KENNEDY, INC. 



Insurance & Bonding of every 
description for more than 
half a century 



Policy analysis 
Engineering surveys 
Appraisals 



Phone: LExington 9-6004 
26 S. CALVERT STREET 
BALTIMORE 3, MD. 





■Mill LA LA AIJH X- f f\ 


1 hJ c 






DRUMMOND « \-\J . 


iriv>, 




• 
• 


KOTALIZED 

ALL-WEATHER TENNIS COURTS & 
PLAY AREAS 

KOTALIZED BITUMINOUS CONCRETE Sj 
HEAVY DUTY INDUSTRIAL ROADS. £ 
PARKING LOTS AND DRIVEWAYS 


' — i 


vut 


ASPHALT 1 

PAVINO 1 






• 


CONCRETE 
WORK 

HUnter 6-7900 

WESTERN MD. RR & MILFORD MILL RD. 
PIKESVILLE 8. MARYLAND 




T^L 



-National Realty Corp = 

BUILDERS - REALTORS - ENGINEERS 

Ranch Homes in Hamilton and Arbutus 
3004 Ridgewood Ave. MO 4-8500 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



Gifts of Distinction 



Objects d'Art 



• CREATIVE DESIGNS • PRECIOUS STDNES • WATCHES • 

C. J. ANDERSON 

Graduate Gemologist, G.I.A. 
— Jeweler — 
1 1 9 W. SARATOGA STREET 
BALTIMORE 1, MD. LExington 9-6342 




3805 Forest Park Avenue 

(Just off Garrison Blvd.) 



FORMAL WEAR 
RENTAL SERVICE 



• LATEST STYLES 

• PRECISION FITTED 



FOR THOSE WHO DEMAND THE FINEST 



MOhawk 4-8070 

Baltimore, Md. 



Maryland 



71 



Pre-Planned 
MOVING 

with Care, 
Everywhere 



DPVIDSOft 

TRANSFER & STORAGE CO. 



• Clean Sanitized Vans 

• Expert Packing 

• Modern Storage 

- IN BALTIMORE, CALL 

BRoadway 6-7900 

- IN WASHINGTON, CALL 

TAylor 9-5200 




UlLLfl DGCnCV 

Licensed and 0ertifle4 

Specially Trained Adult Baby Sitter! 

Bonded For Your Protection 

Call MYRA P. FULD 

WILKINS 5-191 • 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



_J 



To Mr. and Mrs. Morris L. Renshaw, 
a daughter, Laura Elizabeth. Mrs. Ren- 
shaw was Nancy Strong, Class 1952. 

To Dr. and Mrs. George E. Garring- 
ton, a son, William Todd. Mrs. Garring- 
ton was Doris M. Price, Class 1952. 

Mr. and Mrs. Juan Alzabora, a son, 
Roger Joel. Mrs. Alzamora was Ruth 
V. Carmine, Class 1949. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Carl Edwin Ander- 
son, a son, Carl Edwin, Jr. Mrs. And- 
erson was Patricia Leffel, Class 1954. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Donald S. Weber, 
a daughter, Mamie Jean. Mrs. Weber 
was Alice C. Schafer, Class 1953. 

To Mr. and Mrs. James B. Mac- 
Dermott, Jr., a son, William Withing- 
ton. The MacDermotts have a three 
and a half year-old son, James B., 
III. Mrs. MacDermott was Marjorie 
Withington, Class 1948. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Bessett, 
Jr., a daughter, Mary Colleen. The 
mother was Mary Catherine Byrnes, 
Class 1946. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Durney, 
a son, Thomas Edward. Mrs. Durney 
was Lille F. Porter, Class 1951. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Edward 
Larsen, a son, Lawrence Michel. Mrs. 
Larsen was Rita D. Schwinger, Class 
1943. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Edward Joseph Di- 
Carlo, ,a daughter. Mrs DiCarlo was 
Dorothy E. Koerner, Class 1949. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Michael 
Litrenta, a son, Ernest Michael, Jr. 
Mrs. Litrenta was Gilda Iruretagoyena, 
Class 1949. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Wm. W. Roemer, 
son, Paul Craig. Mrs. Roemer was 
Joan M. Seiders, Class 1949. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur D. Boughter, 
a daughter, Barbara Allen. Mrs. 
Boughter was Dorothy Ellen Studley, 
Class 1947. 

To Dr. and Mrs. John Philip White, 
III, a daughter, Susan Ethel. Mrs. 
White was Geraldine Kilby, Class 1952. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Walter B. Morgan, 
a son, Melvin Sanford, and a son, John 
Henry. Mrs. Morgan was Arra Bur- 
nette, Class 1933. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Richard Kline, a 
daughter, Debra Sue. Debra Sue has 
a sister who will be two years old. Mrs. 
Kline was Janet Syster, Class 1952. 

To Mr. nd Mrs. William C. Wroe, 
a son, Tracy. Mrs. Wroe was Edith 
Elen Viereck, Class 1950. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Owen Wood, a son. 
Mrs. Wood graduated in 1953. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence H. Ey, 
a son, David Danaher. Mrs. Ey was 
Thelma N. Hause, Class 1947. 

Record Baby 

A record breaking 12 pound, 11 ounce 
son was born to Mrs. Janet Levy, 21, 
wife of Donald Levy, 31, in Washing- 
ton. 

The baby was the largest in the 
memory of the Columbia Hospital's 
staff. Dr. Blanche Nimetz, who has 
been in the profession since 1944, said 
it was the largest baby she has ever 
delivered, or even seen. 

Donald Levy graduated from the 
University of Maryland (Chemical 
Engineering, '47). 



Mrs. Levy was a student at Georgt 
Washington University, majoring ii 
Spanish, at the time of her marriag< 
on Christmas Eve, 1954. She is th< 
daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Ben Glazer 
Orlando, Fla. 

Weirich Baby 

A daughter, Dierdre Elizabeth tc 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. Weirich, both 
Maryland graduates. 

Young Martin 

A son, John Holt, to Mr. and Mrs 
John F. Martin, Jr., both Maryland 
graduates. 

Dental School Babies 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles R. Farley '55 
announce the birth of a daughter, 
Rebecca, on October 2. 

Dr. and Mrs. Joseph G. R. Paul '50 
announce the birth of a daughter, Den- 
ise Marie, on December 7. 

Dr. and Mrs. John Norman Grabner 
'51 announce the birth of a son, John 
Norman, Jr., on July 17. 

Dr. and Mrs. John H. Haddox '54, 
of Montgomery, W. Va., announce the 
birth of a daughter, Lisa Jan, on Octo- 
ber 13. 



YOU CAN RENT 
YOU CAN BUY 

GOWNS and FROCKS 

FOR THE 

BRIDE and HER 
ATTENDANTS 

— ALSO — 

GOWNS FOR SOCIAL 
FUNCTIONS 

You Will Be Fitted With the Proper 

down to Suit Your Personality 

MRS. SACHS WILL GIVE HER PERSONAL 

ATTENTION TO ALL FITTINGS 

By Appointment Only 

MOhawk 4-7422 

Music by Henry Sachs 

The HOUSE OF SACHS 



WE SPECIALIZE IN 

OFFICE INTERIORS AND 
OFFICE PLANNING 

IHE UNUSUAL IN OFFICE FURNITURE 
and ACCESSORIES. 

Let our well-trained staff assist you 
in Planning your Office. 

MODERN 

STATIONERY COMPANY 

17 S. CHARLES ST. MU 5-4377 

BALTIMORE 

Serving this area since 1919 



Famous Brands of 
EXERCISE - MASSAGE & REDUCING EQUIPMENT 

Oyro - Niagara - Exercycle - HeaUh-A Lator 
Battle Creek - Portable Steam Gabinete 

diaaUth, £qjuifinuLnL Company 

Sales and Service 

623 W North Ave. Baltimore, Md. LA 3-0011 



72 



Maryland 



(Eapa 



Herbert E. Zepp, M.D. 

Dr. Herbert E. Zepp, 78, died in 
Baltimore. 

During his long and extensive he 
delivered 4,224 babies. 

For a number of years he was presi- 
dent of the Central Bank of Howard 
County, at Clarksville. He was made 
nonorary president of the bank in 
January, 1953. 

A native of Howard county, Dr. Zepp 
was born October 9, 1877, near Clarks- 
ville, one of nine children of Coving- 
ton B. Zepp and Caroline W. Zepp. 

He attended schools in Howard 
county and was graduated in 1904 from 
the University of Maryland School of 
Medicine. 

On December 6, 1905, he married 
Grace Linwood Northam at Accomac 
county, Va. 

He practiced three years at St. 
Michaels, on the Eastern Shore. 

He was a member of Boumi Temple 
and belonged to the Walbrook Metho- 
dist Church. 

Surviving are his wife and a number 
of nieces and nephews. 

Dr. W. H. Savage 

Dr. William Henry Savage, 88, of 
Clifton Forge, Va., dentist for 67 years 
and former president of the Virginia 
State Checker Association, died at his 
home in Clifton Forge. 

He was a pioneer in the use of na- 
tural color in artificial teeth. 

Dr. Savage was a native of North 
Carolina and a graduate of the School 
of Dentistry, University of Maryland. 

Survivors are four sons, a sister, 
four grandchildren and two great 
grandchildren. 

Frederick H. Sowers 

Frederick H. Sowers, 67, died in 
Hyattsville following a short illness. 

Long interested in civic affairs, he 
was instrumental in the organization 
of the Hyattsville Citizens Association, 
and was serving as ti-easurer of that 
organization at the time of his death. 
He was an unsuccessful candidate for 
Councilman, 2nd ward, in the Hyatts- 
ville City Elections of last May. 

Born on a farm near Leesburg, Va., 
Mr. Sowers lived for a time in Wash- 
ington, then resided in Cottage City 
before coming to Hyattsville 30 years 
ago. He retired five years ago from 
his position in the War Department, 
and recently had worked in the Gen- 
eral Services Department of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, where he was 
treasurer of the classified employees 
association. He was a member of the 
First Baptist Church of Hyattsville. 

Besides his wife, Elinor L. (Nellie) 
Sowers, he is survived by two daugh- 
ters, Mrs. J. W. Taliaferro, of Hyatts- 
ville, and Mrs. Horace C. Haines, of 
Chillum Heights. Also surviving are 
two sisters, two brothers, five grand- 
children and three great-grandchildren. 



James Latane 

James Allen Latane, 75, master in 
chancery for the equity courts of Bal- 
timore City, died suddenly. 

Mr. Latane was graduated from the 
University of Maryland School of Law 
and admitted to the bar in 1901. 

Mr. Latane had served as master in 
chancery since 1931. For ten years 
prior to that he had been chairman of 
the Maryland Racing Commission. 

Mr. Latane was assistant State's 
Attorney for Baltimore City from 1903 
to 1911 and assistant United State's 
Attorney for the Maryland district 
from 1915 to 1920. 

He was the son of the late Bishop 
James A. Latane and Mary Minor Holl 
aday Latane. He was born at King and 
Queen County, Va., but lived in Balti- 
more all but a few months of his life. 

From 1936 to 1946, he was presi- 
dent of the board of trustees of the 
Prisoner's Aid Association. He also 
was a member of the standing com- 
mittee of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church, Diocese of Maryland, and a 
member of the council of the Church- 
man's Club. 

Mr. Latane was a member of the 
board of trustees of the Church Home 
and Hospital and a former member 
of the board of Uplands Homes. He 
belonged to the Maryland, the Mer- 
chants Club and the Society of the 
Colonial Wars in Maryland. 

In 1912 he married Mary Douglas 
Dabney. 

Survivors include his wife, a son, 
James Allen Latane 3d, of Richmond, 
Va.; a daughter, Mrs. J. Hambleton 
Palmer, of Baltimore; two sisters, Mrs. 
Samuel McLanahan, Sr., of Baltimore, 
and Miss Edith Latane, of Tappahan- 
nock, Va., and six grandchildren. 
John Phelps 

John Phelps, Baltimore attorney, 
died at his home, Eglington Farm, 
Mitchellville, Md. He was 82. 

Mr. Phelps attended the Baltimore 
public schools and took his law degree 
at the University of Maryland. 

For twelve years he was a lecturer 
in law at the University of Maryland 
and the Baltimore Law School, going 
into private law practice after his 
period in office. 

Mr. Phelps, for many years a well- 
known figure in Baltimore and in 
Prince Georges County, was the son of 
the late Judge Charles E. Phelps, of 
the Supreme Bench of Baltimore City. 
Both his grandfather and great-grand- 
father were judges, the former in Ver- 
mont, the latter in colonial New York. 

After graduating from law school 
in 1896, Mr. Phelps worked for four 
years in the law department of the 
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, leaving 
to become an assistant State's attor- 
ney, a post he also held for four years. 

During World War I, Mr. Phelps was 
instructor in French to the officers of 
the 313th Infantry at Fort Meade, and 
in 1929 he was appointed consular 
agent for the Republic of France in 
Baltimore. 

On his retirement in 1937, he was 
nominated a Chevalier of the Legion 



POHANKA 
SERVICE 

INC. 

Washington's Oldest 

OLDSMOBILE 

Dealership 




Serving 
Maryland 
Alumni 
for many years 

1126 20th ST., N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

EX 3-8300 



• REFRIGERATION SUPPLY CO., Inc.* 

WHOLESALE ONLY 

1612 FOURTEENTH ST., N.W. 

Complete — 

AIR CONDITIONING, REFRIGERATION, 
PARTS AND SUPPLIES 

Serving — 

THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, MARYLAND, 
VIRGINIA AND WEST VIRGINIA 
Member A.R.W. 

HO. 2-2600 

9 WASHINGTON 9, D. C. • 



Maryland 



73 



Jack Blank 

Invito* You To 

Test Drive The New 
1956 

PONTIAC 

With Spectacular 

New Dual-Range 

Performance 

Arcade*' 
Pontiac 

1437 IRVING ST., N.W. 
ADAMS 4-8500 

Washington'* Largest 
Pontiac Doafor 




. . . the complete 
Floor Covering Institute 

• Rugs • Asphalt Tile 

• Carpet • Rug Cleaning 

• Linoleum • Repairing 

Everything in Floor Cover- 
ings featuring the Best in 
Service and Materials 

1500 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE, N.E. 

Washington, D. C. • HU 3-8700 




EXTERMINATING CO. 

TERMITE CONTROL 
Safe - Efficient - Economical 

Providing Protection from Insects and 
Rodents Destroying Fabric, Wood, Food 
FREE INSPECTION WITHOUT OBLIGATION 

— New Address — 

4904 WISCONSIN AVE., N.W. 

WASHINGTON 16, D. C 

EMerson 3-9660 



EDWIN E. ELLETT 

MARBLE and TILE 
Table Tops - Cuffing 
Polishing - Repairing 

1106 9th STREET, N.W. CO 5-8731 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



d'Honneur, which was presented to him 
by his successor, Ernest Guy. When 
Mr. Guy retired himself in 1939, Mr. 
Phelps again took over the post, in 
which he remained until 1940. 

In 1934, Mr. Phelps was nominated 
as an independent candidate for the 
Supreme Bench, and more than 3,400 
persons signed his certificate of nomi- 
nation, though he was not elected. 

Mr. Phelps was a former president 
of the Alliance Francaise, and a mem- 
ber of the Baltimore Country and Uni- 
versity Clubs. 

He married, firstly, Miss Alma Turn- 
er, of Texas, from whom he was di- 
vorced in 1922, and who died in Sep- 
tember, and secondly, Mile. Helene 
Gigan, of Paris, who survives. 

Other survivors are two daughters, 
Mrs. Forrest Close, now living in Ma- 
drid, Spain, and Mrs. Eleanor Phelps 
Hebo, of New York, and a sister, Mrs. 
Martha P. Barnett. 

James A. McGuire, Jr. 

James A. McGuire, Jr., a 19-year- 
old Maryland student died in Washing- 
ton Sanitarium at Takoma Park of 
head injuries suffered in an automobile 
accident in the Chillum section of 
Prince George County. 

The youth was a passenger in a car 
which collided with a parked tractor- 
trailer truck on Guilford Road near 
Drexel Street in the University City 
apartment development off University 
Lane. 

The driver of the car, George Pittas, 
18, was treated at Washington Sani- 
tarium and released. 

Young McGuire is survived by his 
mother, Mrs. Mary McGuire, and a 
sister, Mary Lou, 10. His father died 
a month ago. 

McGuire and Pittas had planned to 
leave for Florida with five other stu- 
dents to attend the Orange Bowl game. 
Dr. James Bordley, Jr. 

Dr. James Bordley, Jr., ophthal- 
mological specialist, antiquarian and 
member of a family for generations 
distinguished in Maryland medicine, 
died in Baltimore after an illness of 
only three days. He would have been 
82 years old on February 20. 

He was the fourth James Bordley to 
have practiced medicine in the State 
and the father of two sons in the 
profession. 

As late as 1953, after he had retired 
from the active practice of his medical 
specialty, he was given a national 
citation by the American Association 
for State and Local History in recog- 
nition of his contributions toward the 
preservation of Maryland antiquities 
and his fostering of interest in all 
things historical. 

Dr. Bordley was born in Centreville 
on February 20, 1874. 

After early education in the Davis 
Military Academy, he went on to the 
University of Maryland, taking his 
medical degree there in 1896. He in- 
terned in Baltimore City Hospitals and 
returned to Centreville for a brief 
period of general practice. 

But his interest was in specializing, 
especially in ophthalmology, and he 



came to Baltimore to work with and 
study under men of distinction in the 
field. Among the specialists with whom 
his early studies were linked were Dr. 
Harvey Cushing, Dr. Samuel Theobald 
and Dr. Hiram Woods, all physicians 
of national fame. 

He conducted his own original re- 
search and became chief surgeon of 
the old South Baltimore Eye, Ear and 
Throat Clinic. It was largely through 
his efforts that the institution was re- 
organized and expanded to become the 
present South Baltimore General Hos- 
pital. 

Professionally his recognition was 
national in scope. He became president 
of the American Ophthalmological Soci- 
ety and was certified by the American 
Academy of Ophthalmology and Oto- 
laryngology as well as by the American 
Ophthalmological Society. 

During the first World War, Dr. 
Bordley served with the Army Medical 
Corps with the rank of colonel. Return- 
ing from military service, he became 
director of the Institute for the Re- 
habilitation of the War Blind, also 
known as the Evergreen School for the 
Military Blind, established on what is 
now a part of the campus of Loyola 
College. 

He studied arts and crafts native 
to Maryland and put together collec- 
tions of authentic furniture, portraits, 
costumes and manuscripts which later 
he presented to the Maryland Historical 
Society of which he was a zealous 
member. He also gave substantial 
financial support to the organization. 

As chairman of the committee on 
Colonial properties of the board of 
visitors and governors of St. Johns 
College, Doctor Bordley was an effec- 
tive influence in preserving the famous 
Hammond-Harwood House in Annapolis 
as a museum and shrine. 

He was also a founding trustee of 
the Baltimore Museum of Art and one 
of the institution's active supporters. 

He is survived by his wife, Mrs. 
Margaret Carroll Hollyday Bordley; a 
daughter, Mrs. Charles A. Webb, and 
two sons, Dr. James Bordley 3d, physi- 
cian in chief at the Mary Imogene Bas- 
sett Hospital in Cooperstown, N.Y., 
and Dr. John E. Bordley, of Baltimore. 
A brother, Worthington Bordley, and 
seven grandchildren also survive. 
George B. D. Gray 

George B. D. Gray, 60, manager of 
Maryland's Biological Research Labor- 
atory at Solomons Island, died at 
Prince Frederick. 

Mr. Gray was found shot to death 
in the basement of his home. Authori- 
ties said they found a .32-caliber auto- 
matic in his hand but could not deter- 
mine if his death was an accident or 
suicide. 

Members of the family said he had 
seemed in excellent spirits and good 
health. 

Survivors include his wife; a son, 
two sisters and two brothers. One of 
the latter is Chief Judge John B. Gray 
of Maryland's Seventh Judicial Circuit. 

Mr. Gray was a 1916 graduate in 
engineering at the University of Mary- 



74 



Maryland 






land. He was active in the Masonic 
Lodge and was registrar of St. Paul's 
Episcopal Church. 

Mrs. Leslie Smith 

Mrs. Leslie A. Smith, 31, a former 
cheerleader and "Miss Maryland" at 
the University, died of Leukemia at 
Prince Georges Hospital. She lived in 
University Park. 

Mrs. Smith was the former Bert 
Williams, who was born and raised in 
Baltimore. Her father, Lewis Williams, 
Sr., is in the wholesale coal business 
in Baltimore. 

Mrs. Smith was a cheerleader at the 
University of Maryland while her 
future husband played varsity football 
during the 1944-5 seasons. She was 
graduated in 1946 and before her 
marriage in the spring of 1947, Mrs. 
Smith worked with the Prince Georges 
Girl Scout Council as a district director. 
She was a Delta Delta Delta Sorority 
member at the university and until her 
death she was an alumnae adviser with 
the sorority. She also was active in the 
Sigma's, the wives' group of Sigma 
Chi Fraternity. 

She and her husband were in Miami 
for the Orange Bowl football game 
when she was stricken. She was flown 
home and taken to the hospital. 

In 1945 Mrs. Smith was picked for 
the title of "Miss Maryland". 

Beside her husband, who is a civil 
engineer for Ben Dyer Associates, Inc., 
in Hyattsville, and her parents, of 
Baltimore, she is survived by a son 
Richard, 6; a daughter Lannis, 5, and 
a brother, Lewis Williams, Jr., of Bal- 
timore. 

Mrs. F. W. Oldenburg 

Mrs. Frederic William Oldenburg, 
78, of Hyattsville, a teacher and active 
club woman for many years in Prince 
Georges County, died Thursday in 
Prince Georges General Hospital after 
an illness of two months. 

Mrs. Oldenburg had been hospitalized 
since she suffered a stroke. 

The former Lillian Olivia Jensen, 
Mrs. Oldenburg was a native of Eacine, 
Wis., and came to Maryland in 1917 
with her husband. Mr. Oldenburg, who 
died in 1937, was an agronomist with 
the Agriculture Department's Exten- 
sion Service at the University of Mary- 
land. 

Mrs. Oldenburg, who had taught 
school in Wisconsin, resumed her 
teaching career in 1919 at the Hyatts- 
ville Elementary School. She served 
as principal of the Riverdale Elemen- 
tary School from 1923 until her retire- 
ment in 1934. 

During World War II, she was em- 
ployed by the Federal Government. 

Mrs. Oldenburg was interested all 
her life in women's club work. She was 
a past president of the Riverdale 
Women's Club and a former treasurer 
for the Maryland Federation of Wom- 
en's Clubs. 

She also belonged to the Hyattsville 
Horticultural Society. 

Surviving are a son, Lester, two 
daughters, Mrs. Margaret Guttrich, and 
Mrs. Grace Watkins; two sisters, Mrs. 
Edith Hickey and Mrs. Alice Hull, and 
five granddaughters. 



r 



>. 



v_ 



Johnston, Lemon & Co 

MEMBER PHILADELPHIA BALTIMORE STOCK EXCHANGE 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES 



SOUTHERN BUILDING 

Washington 5, D. C. 

STerling 3-3130 



115 N. ST. ASAPH 

Alexandria, Va. 

King 8-6600 







/ 




BUY 

U. S. 

DEFENSE 

BONDS 






C. B. CO. 





S. D. MOSES, INC. 

Concrete Construction 



823 MILLS BUILDING 



NAtlonal 8-8586 WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Phone, NAtional 8-3660 



Night Phones: LUdlow 2-7916 — JOrdon 8-2377 



Established 1915 



Central Armature Works, Inc. 

625 D STREET, N.W. 

Rewinding — Generators — Motors — Transformers — Power Installations 

Construction 
Complete Line Motors and Electrical Supplies 
Century & General Electric Motors — Telechron, Revere, General Electric and all makes Clocks 

Switchboards, Field Colls, Armature Coils, Vee Bolts and Sheave* leather and lubber Belting 



Maryland 



75 



Ifttlier 8c b'^lbtvt 



INCORPORATED 



SUPPLYING 

EVERY 
PHOTOGRAPHIC 

NEED 

Since 1920 



Phone — Executive 3-8120 

815 TENTH STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



|iiiDiiiiiiiiiiioin loiniiiiiiioiiii am iinnn ma 

j PAVILION I 

| Chinese & American Restaurant | 
I g 

I Special Lunch - Dinners I 

□ E 

| PRIVATE DINING ROOMS FOR SPECIAL PARTIES I 

SPECIAL ORDERS TO TAKE OUT 

| 612 H STREET, N.W. WASHINGTON 1, D.C. 1 
| Phone: STerling 3-8379 Alr-Conditloned f 

g»j"° "'"'"'"' iiitJiiimiiimtJimimiiiiHiiiiiiimiiciH nP. 



"Pace Heated is 
Well Heated" 



W. K. PACE 



HEATING - PIPING - AIR CONDITIONING 

1240 Ninth St., N.W. 
Washington 1, D. C. 

ADams 4-4665 



SUNSHINE PARK 

RACING 

ASSOCIATION 

STOCK $1.50 - Rl 

Prospectus Free Upon Request 

C. J. BLIEDUNG 

915 EYE STREET, N.W. 
WASHINGTON 1, D. C. 

NA. 8-7358 



BLRYDES SAFE & LOCK CO. 

Wholesale Distributor 
2809 14th St., N.W. 
Washington 9, D. C. 

CO 5-3122 

76 



Thomas D. Holder 

Thomas D. Holder, Agr. '22, died in 
Baltimore, following a prolonged ill- 
ness. Mr. Holder was originally from 
Vienna, Maryland, but he and Mrs. 
Holder, who survives him, had estab- 
lished their home in Beachhaven, be- 
tween East New Market and Cam- 
bridge, after he retired last August 
from the American Can Company. He 
had been a County Agent and later 
a Processing Crops Specialist in Mary- 
land before becoming affiliated with the 
American Can Company where he was 
employed for 20 years. 

Dr. George H. Costner 
Dr. George H. Costner died a victim 
of cancer and is survived by his wife 
who is residing in Lincolnton, North 
Carolina. 

Charles W. Higgins 
Funeral services for Charles William 
Higgins, 23, who died of Hodgkin's dis- 
ease, were held in Washington. 

Mr. Higgins had been ill since Octo- 
ber. 

He had attended the University of 
Maryland. A Navy veteran, he worked 
as a clerk for the Department of Health, 
Education and Welfare. 

Besides his wife, Deanna W. Higgins, 
he is survived by his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Clarence E. Higgins and two 
sisters Joyce Higgins and Gwen Ham- 
man. 

Dr. Eugene Spanier 
Dr. Eugene Spanier '43 of Brooklyn, 
N.Y., died on December 13. Dr. Spanier 
received his predental training at New 
York University. He was a member of 
Sigma Epsilon Delta. 

Dr. Emory C. Thompson 
Dr. Emory Charles Thompson '02 
(B.C.D.S.), of Buffalo, N.Y., died on 
May 12, 1955. Dr. Thompson was a 
member of Psi Omega. He had also 
practiced in Warren, Pa. 

Dr. J. Fuller Robinson 
Dr. John Fuller Robinson '07 (B.M.- 
C), of Roanoke,, Va., died recently. 
Dr. Frederick J. Jackson 
Dr. Frederick J. Jackson '16 (B. C- 
D.S.), of Fall River, Mass., died re- 
cently. Dr. Jackson was the President 
of his Class in his senior year and 
was a member of Psi Omega. 
Dr. Jacob M. Jacobs 
Dr. Jacob M. Jacobs '00 (B.M.C.), 
of Roxobel, N.C., died on July 14, 1954. 
Dr. Harry W. Urling 
Dr. Harry W. Urling '87 (B.C.D.S.), 
of Pitsburgh, Pa., died on November 
2, 1954. 

Dr. Peter McNichol 
Dr. Peter McNichol '98 (B.M.C.), of 
Campbellton, New Brunswick, died re- 
cently. 

Dr. Williams C. Callahan 
Dr. Williams Carpenter Callahan '92 
(B.C.D.S.), of Johnstown, N.Y., died 
on November 7, 1954. 

Dr. Herbert W. Huff 
Dr. Herbert W. Huff '14 (B.C.D.S.), 
of Orange, N.J., died on November 21, 
1954. He was a member of Xi Psi 
Phi. As an undergraduate Dr. Huff 
was Editor-in-Chief of the Mirror and 
won the Benton Mechanical Prize. 
Dr. William L. Hand 
Dr. William Luther Hand '05 (U. of 
Md.) f of New Bern N.C., died on Sep- 



tember 30. He was electrocuted while 
checking on electrical equipment in the 
flooded cellar of his home. Dr. Hand 
was bom in Burgaw, N.C. in 1878. He 
was Secretary of the Fifth District 
Society, 1930-32, and its President, 
1933. He was a member of Psi Omega. 
Dr. James R. Gorman 
Dr. James Raymond Gorman '24, of 
Fall River, Mass., died on May 9, 1955. 
Dr. Arthur E. Guptill 
Dr. Arthur E. Guptill '97 (B.C.D.S.), 
of Fitzburg, Mass., died on August 6. 
Dr. Guptill won the Diamond Medal 
and also the Farrar Prize in Ortho- 
dontia. He was widely known in Massa- 
chusetts because of his valuable par- 
ticipation in the activities of the State 
Dental Society. 

Dr. Harry C. Stover 
Dr. Harry C. Stover '99 (U. of Md.), 
of Harrisburg, Pa., died on August 13, 
1955. 

Dr. John F. Dunn 
Dr. John F. Dunn '09 (B.C.D.S.), of 
Fall River, Mass., died on May 15, 
1955. 

Dr. Albert W. Gilkinson 
Dr. Albert W. Gilkinson '01 (U. of 
Md.), of New Philadelphia, Ohio, died 
on April 16, 1955. 

Dr. Arthur A. Begin 
Dr. Arthur A. Begin '26, of Dor- 
chester, Mass., died on October 26, 
1954. Dr. Begin was a member of 
Psi Omega. 

Dr. Franklin J. Cline 
Dr. Franklin J. Cline '99 (U. of Md.), 
of Covina, Cal., died on February 5, 
1955. 

Dr. Benjamin M. Oxley 
Dr. Benjamin M. Oxley '90 (B.C.D.- 
S.), of New York, N.Y., died on Janu- 
ary 14, 1955. 

Dr. George G. Wheeler 
Dr. George Gilman Wheeler '04 (U. 
of Md.) died on April 12 in Miami, 
Fla., where he had practiced for 26 
years. Dr. Wheeler had formerly prac- 
ticed in Cambridge, Mass. and had 
been associated with the Tufts Dental 
School and the Forsythe Clinic. 
Dr. Lawrence A. Bragg 
Dr. Lawrence A. Bragg '01 (U. of 
Md.), of Norfolk, Va., died on Decem- 
ber 11, 1954. 

Dr. Aubrey D. Durling 
Dr. Aubrey Donkin Durling '09 (U. 
of Md.), of Middleton, Nova Scotia, 
died recently. 

Dr. John J. Keefe 
Dr. John Joseph Keefe '05 (B.M.C.), 
of Lawrence, Mass., died on April 14, 
1955. 

Dr. Harry O. Rue 
Dr. Harry Oliver Rue '04 (B.C.D.S.), 
of Baltimore, died recently. 
Dr. Jos. J. Wolk 
Dr. Joseph J. Wolk '15 (U. of Md.), 
of Jamaica, N. Y., died recently. Dr. 
Wolk was a member of Alpha Omega. 
Dr. Vincent A. Carroll 
Dr. Vincent Allyn Carrol '26, of 
Sayre, Pa., died on March 28, 1955. 
Dr. Carroll entered Maryland from 
Corning, N. Y., and had attended 
Georgetown University. He was a 
member of Xi Psi Phi. 

Dr. James F. R. Burns 
Dr. James Francis Ryar Burns '30, 
of Trenton, N. J., died recently. Dr. 

Maryland 



turns was a member of Delta Sigma 
)elta. 

Dr. Alfred Brotman 

Dr. A. Alfred Brotman '41, of Balti- 
nore, died on October 18, 1955. A vet- 
ran of World War II, Dr. Brotman was 
t Past President of the Maccabean 
'ost, No. 32, American Legion and 
pas a member of Voiture Locale No. 
13, La Societo des Quarante Hommes 
>t Huit Chevaux. He' was also a mem- 
>er of Alpha Omego fraternity. His 
iurvivors include his wife, Mrs. Shir- 
ey Glassman Brotman; a daughter, 
Sandy Jane; a sister, Mrs. George Le- 
ine; and five brothers: Abraham, of 
Long Island, N. Y.; Dr. Robert H., a 
nember of the Class of 1922; Jack, 
Morton, and Harry, of Baltimore. 

Dr. French M. Farnsworth 

Dr. French M. Farnsworth '12 (B.C.- 
D.S.), of Buckhannon, W. Va., died on 
November 11, 1955. He was born at 
Holly Grove, W. Va., on August 11, 
1891, a son of the late Dr. F. F. and 
Lasora Martin Farnsworth. During 
the course of his forty-three years of 
practice in Buckhannon, Dr. Farns- 
worth made outstanding contributions 
to both his community and his profes- 
sion. He was a Past President of the 
local Chamber of Commerce, charter 
member and Past President of the 
Lions Club, Past Master of the Frank- 
lin Lodge A.F. and A.M., Past Com- 
mander of the Buckhannon Command- 
ery No. 24, and a member of the Elks, 
the Modern Woodmen, the Eastern Star 
and the Buckhannon Country Club. His 
other important services to the com- 
munity included the directorship of the 
Central West Virginia Strawberry Fest- 
ival, his 18 years of participation in Boy 
Scout leadership for which he received 
the Silver Beaver award in 1952, and 
his ten years as Chairman of the Up- 
shur County Chapter of the Red Cross. 
He was also associated with several 
local business enterprises and was 
President of the Upshur Loan Associa- 
tion. Dr. Farnsworth belongs among 
the great figures of West Virginia 
dentistry, for he made an exception- 
ally fine record of valuable participa- 
tion in many areas of professional ac- 
tivity. He was founder and first editor 
of the Bulletin of the West Virginia 
State Dental Society. He served the 
State Society as Secretary, 1923-1926, 
and as President, 1929. He was also a 
Past President of the Monongahela 
Valley Dental Society. For several 
years he was a member of the State 
Boai'd of Dental Examiners. 



Keenly interested in the development 
of the state and local programs of 
dental health education, Dr. Farns- 
worth was chairman of the Committee 
that secured the passage of the state's 
Dental Hygienists Law and also headed 
the Committee that effected passage of 
the law placing a dentist on the State 
Board of Health. He never missed a 
meeting of the State Society in his 
long period of membership and early 
in his career became a pillar of 
strength in the Society's activities. Dr. 



For Your 



Enjoyment 

MEADOW GOLD ICE CREAM 



• Rich, smooth, 
Delicious . . . 
A Taste Treat 
for every Occasion. 

Meadow Gold Products Co. 

Ask For Our Flavor Of The Month 




The Difference Spent Is All That Counts 

HUNDREDS OF DOLLARS SAVINGS 




CHRYSLER 
PLYMOUTH 
IMPERIAL 



Largest Metropolitan Washington Dealer 
BETTER TRADES — FINEST SERVICE 

ENTIRE 4800 BLOCK WISCONSIN AVENUE, N.W. 

Washington, D. C. EMerson 3-4800 Closed Sunday 



INSURANCE — BONDS 

FOR COMPLETE INFORMATION ON THE FOLLOWING: 
FIRE BONDS (Fidelity, Estate, 

LIABILITY (All Kinds) Contractor) 

JEWELRY & FUR LIFE (Estate, Mortgage) 

,3, CALL District 7-1100 

THE Shiver* INSURANCE AGENCY, Inc. 

1010 VERMONT AVE., N.W. WASHINGTON, D. C. 



0% 


BERCMANNS LAUNDRY 




"Become 2ualUy G&HAdwA." 

PLANT: 621-27 G ST., N.W. Metropolitan 8-2220 


Iff? ■ jjm&r 


WASHINGTON, D. C. 


BRANCH OFFICE: HYATTSVIUE, MD. WArfield 7-0880 





ROUSE, BREWER & BECKER 




INVESTMENT BANKERS 




Member Philadelphia and Baltimore Stock Exchange 




WYATT BUILDING 8616 GEORGIA AVE. ARLINGTON TRUST BLDG. 




777 14th Street, N.W. Silver Spring, Arlington, 




Washington, D. C. Maryland Virginia 




STerllng 3-5800 JUnlper 7-9500 JA 5-5300 



Maryland 



Tl 



Wm. H. Singleton 

COMPANY, INC. 



Heating 

Ventilating 

Plumbing 

Air Conditioning 



Power Plants 
Process Piping 
Welded Piping Systems 
Automatic Sprinkler 
Systems 



1240 Jefferson Davis Hwy. 

ARLINGTON, VA. 



RICHMOND, VA. 
ATLANTA, 6A. 




WASHINGTON'S 

ONLY 



"DRIVE THRU" 

LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANERS 

Where You Save Up To 20% 

Drive In 

Hand In Your Bundle 

Drive Out 

QUICK SERVICE 

LAUNDRY, DRY CLEANERS 

1016 Bladentburg Road, N.E. 

Washington, D. C. 

(Across from Sears-Roobuck) 




SAVILE BOOK SHOP 

3236 P STREET 

French, Politics, History, Fiction, 
Philosophy, Drama, Art 

Washington 7, D. C. 
Georgetown 

Phone ADams 2-3321 



vi ncem toiielli 

monuments — mausoleums 

ITALIAN STATUARY MARBLE 

GARDEN FURNITURE - PARLOR and 

ART STATUARY 

1830 Lincoln Rd., N.E. DU 7-6701 
Washington, D. C 



Farnsworth was a devoted alumnus and 
returned to Baltimore for many of the 
1912 reunions. He is survived by his 
wife, Mrs. Reta McCue Farnsworth; 
two sons: Neil, of Tallmadge, Ohio, and 
Daniel of Lake Worth, Fla.; a step- 
daughter, Mrs. Gale Ober, of Cuya- 
hoga Falls, Ohio; two brothers: Dr. 
L. E. Farnsworth, of Huntington, W. 
Va., and Dr. D. A. Farnsworth, of 
Lewisburg, W. Va.; and a sister, Mrs. 
Ora Blackwood, of Milton, W. Va. 
Dr. Gary Heeseman 

Dr. Gary Heeseman '29, of Charlotte, 
N. C, died on September 25, 1955. Born 
in Orangeburg, S. C, on April 12, 
1906, Dr. Heeseman attended the 
schools of Charlotte and the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina. Following his 
graduation from Maryland, he began 
his twenty- five years of practice in 
Charlotte. Dr. Heeseman was a mem- 
ber of Psi Omega. Surviving are his 
wife, Mrs. Brantley Nichols Heeseman; 
a son, Gary, Jr.; and two daughters, 
Elizabeth and Anne. 

Dr. Harry C. Grove 

Dr. Harry Clyde Grove '39, of Hag- 
erstown, Md., died recently. Dr. Grove 
received his predental training at the 
University of Maryland, College Park, 
where he was a member of Lambda 
Chi Alpha. Dr. Grove had practiced in 
Hagerstown since his graduation. He 
was a member of Psi Omega. Sur- 
viving are his wife, Mrs. Beatrice Bock 
Grove; his mother, Mrs. Susan Duckett 
Grove; his son, Harry C. Ill; his daugh- 
ter, Nancy Carol; his brother, Richard, 
of Dallas, Tex.; and his sisters Mrs. 
Francis Price of Waynesboro, Pa., and 
Miss Jeannette Grove, of Hagerstown. 
' Dr. Alfred H. Sheppe 

Dr. Alfred Houston Sheppe '23, of 
Huntington, W. Va., died on Decem- 
ber 28. After a brief period of prac- 
tice in Keystone, W. Va., Dr. Sheppe 
removed to Huntington, where he had 
practiced for thirty years. During his 
undergraduate years he was President 
of the Sophomore Class, President of 
the Student Council, and Editor-in- 
Chief of the "Terra Mariae." He was 
a member of the Gorgas Odontological 
Society, Phi Sigma Kappa and Psi 
Omega. He received the gold medal 
awarded for excellence in prosthetics. 
He was a veteran of World War I. 
Dr. Sheppe was associated in practice 
with his son, Dr. Joseph H. Sheppe, a 
member of the Class of 1950. Other 
survivors are his wife, Mrs. Irene B. 
Sheppe; a son, Jack; a daughter, Mrs. 
Ann Edeburn, of Aiken, S. C; and a 
brother, Dr. Robert Sheppe, of Ballard, 
W. Va. 

Dr. Lynwood C. Holland 

Dr. Lynwood Carr Holland '04 (U. 
of Md.), of Suffolk, Va., died on Sep- 
tember 20, 1955 after almost 51 years 
of practice in his native city. Dr. 
Holland was given a dinner on August 
1, 1954 by the Suffolk Dental Society in 
honor of his 50 years of practice in 
Suffolk. He was the first President of 
the Suffolk Society. In June of 1954 
Dr. Holland returned to his alma mater 
for his Golden Anniversary Reunion 
and was presented with the Certificate 
awarded by the National Alumni Asso- 



78 



ciation in recognition of his half cen- 
tury of service to the profession. From 
1913 to 1919 he was a member of the 
City Council. As a councilman he was 
Superintendent of the Fire Depart- 
ment and also of the cemetery and city 
parks. Dr. Holland was one of the 
most widely known "truants" of the 
dental profession. For the past 25 
years he had made appearances with 
circuses as a guest clown. He per- 
formed in Richmond, Norfolk, Wash- 
ington with a dozen different circuses, 
including the Ringling, and had a wide 
acquaintance among the circus clowns 
of the United States. Dr. Holland is 
survived by his wife Mrs. Lota Barrett 
Holland; a son, Reginald; a brother, 
G. S. P. Holland, of Miami, Fla.; and 
a half-sister, Miss Annie H. Holland, 
of Suffolk. 

Dr. Noah M. Wilson 

Dr. Noah McKendree Wilson '95 (U. 
of Md.), died in a Pittsburgh hospital 
on April 30, 1955. Born in Sharpsburg, 
Md., on May 18, 1873, Dr. Wilson had 
practiced for almost sixty years in 
Thomas and Davis, W. Va. A year ago 
he had gone to Pittsburgh to reside 
with his son Millard. Other survivors 
include four sisters: Mrs. Louis Smith, 
of Sharpsburg; Mrs. John Smith, of 
Hagerstown, Md.; Mrs. Raymond Dix- 
on, of Pocomoke City, Md.; and Mrs. 
William Crane, of Camden, N. J. 
Dr. Henry M. Strasser 

Dr. Henry M. Strasser '06 (U. of 
Md.), of Baltimore, died on September 
25, 1955. A native of Baltimore, Dr. 
Strasser had practiced in that city un- 
til his retirement in 1953. He received 
three awards as an undergraduate: the 
Freshman Gold Medal for Crown and 
Bridge work, the Uhler Gold Medal and 
the Deeley Gold Medal. He was Ser- 
geant-at-Arms in his freshman year 
and was elected Class Orator in his 
senior year. Dr. Strasser was a mem- 
ber of Psi Omega. His survivors in- 
due a sister, Mrs. Lena Seitz, and four 
brothers: August, Andrew, Edward and 
Charles Strasser — all of Baltimore. 
Dr. Harry C. Leib 

Dr. Harry C. Leib '04 (U. of Md.), 
of Easton, Md., died on December 22, 
1955. A native of Stewartstown, Pa., 
Dr. Leib began practice in St. Michaels, 
Md. In 1921 he removed to Easton. Dr. 
Leib's survivors are his wife, Mrs. 
Lena B. Leib, and two sisters, who re- 
side in Stewartstown. 

Dr. Athol L. Frew 

Dr. Athol Lee Frew '05 (U. of Md.), 
of Dallas, Texas, died on November 
6, 1955. During the course of his 
half century of practice, Dr. Frew 
earned a reputation as one of the most 
distinguished graduates of his alma 
mater. Born in Bombay, N. Y., on No- 
vember 22, 1879, he entered Maryland 
from Brushton, N. Y. Shortly after his 
graduation Dr. Frew began practice in 
Dallas. He became a great contributor 
to the development of the profession in 
Texas demonstrating a fine capacity for 
leadership in several areas of dental 
activity. In 1915 he was chosen a 
member of the Board of Directors of 
the Texas Dental College, which in 

Maryland 



918 was taken over by Baylor Univer- 
ity and renamed Baylor University, 
school of Dentistry. Dr. Frew joined 
he reorganized faculty as Professor of 
)ral Surgery. In 1922 he became Dean 
if the Baylor School, a position he held 
until 1928. He had been on the staff of 
he Dallas Medical and Surgical Clinic 
ince 1922 and had been an oral surgeon 
it the Scottish Rite Hospital since 1923. 
ie enjoyed a wide reputation for his 
vork in the field of cleft palate and 
larelip surgery. 

Dr. Frew was a strong participant in 
he activities of many dental organiza- 
ions. He was a member of Xi Psi 
'hi, a founding member of the Ameri- 
an Board of Oral Surgery, a Fellow of 
he American College of dentists, a 
>ast President of the American Society 
if Oral Surgeons and Exodontists, the 
Dallas County Dental Society, and the 
rexas Dental Association, and Vice- 
'resident of the American Dental As- 
iociation. Dr. Frew was very active 
n Masonic affairs. He was a charter 
nember of the Pentagon Lodge, A.F. 
ind A.M., and was the Potentate of 
he Dallas Hella Temple Shrine in 1931. 
ie had served as a patron of the Order 
>f the Eastern Star and has Com- 
nander of the Dallas Council of the 
inights of Kodosh. Dr. Frew is sur- 
vived by his wife, Mrs. Bertie May 
Frew; a son, Dr. Athol Lee Frew, Jr., 
)f Oklahoma City, Okla.; a sister, Mrs. 
Catherine Kimball, of Farmingdale, 
tf. Y.; and a brother, G. C. Frew, of 
Vtalone, N. Y. 

Dr. Charles B. Tarr 
Dr. Charles Burritt Tarr '91 (B.C.- 
D.S.), of Winterport, Me., died on July 
L7 at the age of 101. Dr. Tarr was the 
3ldest living alumnus of the School. 
Born in Hampden, Me. on January 25, 
1854, he began at twenty-one a career 
as an engineer for the Boston and 
Maine Railroad. Becoming convinced 
that the dental profession offered su- 
perior opportunities, he gave up rail- 
roading to serve an apprenticeship in 
the office of Dr. Philander Evans of 
Bangor. He began his second career 
by opening an office in Hampden, 
where he practiced for ten years. Rec- 
ognizing the advantages to be derived 
from a formal course of study, Dr. Tarr 
entered the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery. After his graduation he be- 
gan practicing in Melrose Highlands, 
Mass. He continued to practice there 
until his retirement in 1936 at 82. Dr. 
and Mrs. Tarr then returned to their 
native Hampden. Mrs. Tarr died in 
1943, shortly after the couple had cele- 
brated their sixty-second wedding an- 
niversary. Dr. Tarr is survived by a 
daughter, Mrs. Newton Robbins, of 
Winterport, with whom he had lived 
for several years. 

R. Sumter Griffith 

Dr. R. Sumter Griffith of the class of 
1880 (Maryland Agricultural College) 
and the Medical School class of 1886 
left this life at the age of 94 on De- 
cember 14, 1955. Dr. Griffith who had 
been the oldest alumnus of the Univer- 
sity in terms of years out of school, 





Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co. 
Silver Hill Concrete Co. 




Phone 

for 

CONCRETE 

RE 

6-8400 


Producers and Distributors of 

WASHED SAND & GRAVEL 
TOP SOIL • ROAD GRAVEL 
READY-MIXED CONCRETE 


Phone 

for 
SAND & 
GRAVEL 

RE 
6-7100 






WASHINGTON 20, D. C 





SALES 




SERVICE 



Specialists in Residential and 
Commercial Air Conditioning 

Room Coolers - Package Units - Year Round Furnaces 

WASHINGTON REFRIGERATION CO. 

2052 West Virginia Avenue, N.E. 

LAwrence 6-5100 Washington, D. C. 



JAMES D, KEMPER 

BUILDING PRODUCTS 

Miracle Adhesives 
• Finish Lime 

• Rockwool Insulation 

• Penn Metal Lath and Accessories 

• Keystone Roofing and Waterproof Papers 
3408 WISCONSIN AVE., N.W. 




EMerion 
3-2345 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 



: ARTIFICIAL MARBLE 


ARTIFICIAL STONE ARTIFICIAL f 


; (SCAGLI0LA) 


FOR INTERIOR TRAVERTINE STONE 


STANDARD ART MARBLE and TILE CO. 




SCAGLIOLA - MARBLE - MOSAIC - TERRAZZO 




TILE - CERAMIC - SLATE 


1 1 7 D STREET, 


NORTHWEST • WASHINGTON 1, D. C. 




Telephone National 8-7413 



NATIONAL EQUIPMENT & SUPPLY CO., 


Inc. 


Link Belt Company 


"Pyrene" & 


"MSA" 


Industrial 


Power Transmission 


• "C-O-TWO" 


• Gas Masks 


Canisters 


Supplies 


Fire Extinguishers 


& First Aid 


Equipment 


1144 NINTH STREET, N.W. 


WASHINGTON 1, D. C. 


Hudson 1-44S0 



Maryland 



79 



EQUITABLE 


SAVINGS & LOAN 


ASSOCIATION 


"Organized 


1879" 


• SHARE SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 

• LIBERAL DIVIDENDS 


HOME LOANS 


# ACCOUNTS INSURED UP TO $10,000 
BY FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN 
INSURANCE CORP. 


FOR BUILDING 
REMODELING - REPAIRS 


915 F N.W. 1 


Wheaton Branch 


Washington, D. C. 


11433 Georgia Ave. 
Silver Spring. Md. 


NAtional 8-1741 I 


LOckwood 4-0001 



You Just SHOULDN'T Be 

The Fellow At The Left!" 



WHAT GOES ON AT OUR 
ALMA MATER? 

What of our Classmates? 
What's the Alumni News? 
The Sports News? 

The Alumnus at the left made 
the mistake of not subscribing to 
"Maryland." 

He should tear out this ad and 
coupon and send it in. You can use 
the coupon for renewals too. Make 
your overall alumni contribution 
with $3.00 of it going for "Mary- 
land" magazine. 




ELMER Q. 

BUSMISSER : — 

"Whatever became 

of—r" 

"What teat the 
score — t" 

•What's this rumor 
I hear about all 
this expansion 
at College Park 
and in Balti- 
more t" 

"Oo»h, I never know 
what goes onf" 



HOMER J. 
UPTODATE : — 
'/ have all the an- 
swers right here 
under my arm. 
Read 'Maryland.' 
Use the coupon 
printed below. I 
have all the news 
of all the Univer- 
sity all the time." 



Please pass this message along to non-subscribers 

"ClIT IT OUT NOW!" H 




<y> SECRETARY, ALUMNI ASSOCI 

#:•: UNIVERSITY OP MARYLAND, COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



Enclosed herewith is $ , my contribution to the 

Alumni Fund. $3.00 of this amount is for a subscription to "MARYLAND" 
for one year. 



returned for his 75th Commencement 
anniversary in June of last year. He is 
the only alumnus to have attained this 
distinction and received from the Alum- 
ni Association, diamond chip cuff links 
as a symbol of the event. 

The doctor was a familiar sight on 
both the College Park and Baltimore 
campuses. A native of Maryland, he had 
practiced medicine in Waynesboro, Vir- 
ginia for more than half a century. 

In addition to his interest in the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, he held a 50 year 
pin for service with the Masons and a 
diamond pin for his service as physician 
for the Norfolk and Western Railway. 

For many years Dr. Griffith was ac- 
tive in political and civic affairs. He 
served as Mayor of Basic City 
(Waynesboro) for 11 years and served 
one term as Councilman. Following 
the consolidation of Waynesboro and 
Basic City, he served an additional 10 
years on the City Council. In addition 
he held many offices with the Masons 
and Knights of Pythias. He served 62 
years as a volunteer fireman and for 
many years was chief of the Basic City 
Fire Department. Until shortly before 
his death, his model A Ford with the 
Doctor at the wheel made the rounds 
of Waynesboro. The last visit to the 
campus came with the 1955 Home- 
coming in October when Dr. Griffith 
traveled as usual by rail in a chair car 
and for most of the night. The visits 
of the "Little Doctor" will be sorely 
missed by the many who knew him well 
and understood his devotion to the 
University of Maryland. 

He is survived by two sons, Louis 
Griffith, of Arcadia, Florida and Mat- 
thews A. Griffith, of Waynesboro, and 
one daughter, Miss M. V. Griffith of 
Waynesboro. 

Dr. Edmund Kahn 

Dr. Edmund Kahn, a practicing den- 
tist in West Baltimore for 52 years, 
died after an illness of several months. 
He was 74. 

Born in Centreville, Md., June 28, 
1881, Dr. Kahn was the son of the 
late Henrietta and Meyer Kahn. He 
attended public schools in Centreville, 
then attended the University of Mary- 
land School of Dentistry, from which 
he was graduated in 1904. 

His wife, the former Gertrude Fried, 
died a year ago. 

Dr. Kahn was a life member of the 
American Dental Association, the 
Amicable Lodge of Masons, the Oheb 
Shalom Synagogue and Alpha Omega 
Dental Fraternity. 

He is survived by his daughter, Mrs. 
Janice K. Friedman. 



80 



At Kiwanis 

Colonel Harvey L. Miller, Director of 
Publications and Publicity, was guest 
speaker at the Langley Park Kiwanis 
Club at the Hot Shoppe. 

Miller, at Kiwanis' request, spoke 
on the subject "What's Wrong With 
Boxing as a National Sport." 

He has been actively associated 
with boxing at various levels since 
1900. 

Maryland 



J 




. . . for modern plumbing and heating supplies. 
We offer the finest selection, best quality . . . 

« plumbing & heating supplies 

• pipes • valves 

• fittings 

plumbing and heating specifications 
available for architects, builders. 



JAMES A. MESSER CO. 



office and 
showroom 

warehouses 



li ranch 



branch 



1 206 K Street, N.W. 
Washington/ D. C. 

4th & Channing Streets, N.E. 
1206-8 K Street, N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 

8216 Georgia Avenue 

Silver Spring, Maryland 

1680 Clough Street 

Baltimore, Maryland 




R. D. WATSON, President 

CLASS 1917 



■m 



AIR CO 



AND 




University o> 



io Y 3 EAR Univer3ity, of yfiarylahd cAlumni 




/ /'•" ?• MAY- JUNE 

blica tion 50c } g E " COPY 

— 1 



I 




WASH I NGTON'S NEWEST, MOST MODERN HOTEL 




HOTEL DUPONT PLAZA 

COMPLETELY AIR CONDITIONED 

Meeting and Banquet Facilities 

DUPONT CIRCLE WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Alvin L. Aubinoe, Pres. John J. Cost, Gen. Mgr. 



ALVIN-L-AUBINOEInc 



Build 



er 



1515 19th Street, N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Phone: 
HUdson 3-6025 



NEW 





MOTI1I, 



Between 21st and 22nd Street on the Boardwalk 
OCEAN CITY, MD. 

Ojv Jhiiu (BsucuudifaiL S&adfL 




AIR 
CONDITIONED 




HEATED 



Ocean View From The Stowaway 

52 ROOMS WITH BATH 
RESTAURANT 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

TELEPHONE IN EVERY ROOM 

SWIMMING POOL 

GIFT SHOP 

William Carrier extends an invitation to come to The Stowaway 

OPENING MAY 15 



Maryland 



Vol. XXVII 



May-June. 19.~i<> 



.No. 




leading 



life? 



Well, then, this might be a good time to get out of the dog 
house and on your way to a big career at Fairchild to 
assist in the engineering of several airplane prototypes 
now scheduled. 

Investigate the list of categories below. See where you fit in. 

Aircraft Engineers with supervisory experience in one 
or more of these positions: 

Design Project Engineers 

Design Coordinators 

Design Engineers for Sheet Metal Structure, Hy- 
draulic Systems, Landing Gears, Control Systems, 
Equipment and Furnishings, Electrical and Elec- 
tronics Installations, Power Plant Installations 

Stress Engineers for both Sheet Metal Structures and 
Mechanical Systems 

Weight Control 

Layout Designers and Draftsmen 
Project Coordinators and Administrator* 

You'll like working at Fairchild, and you'll like living in 
Hagerstown, Maryland — excellent housing, schools, rec- 
reational facilities . . . close to urban Baltimore and 
Washington. 

Send your resume today to Walter Tydon, Chief 
Engineer, P.O. Box 134, Hagerstown, Maryland. 

A Division of Fairchild Engine and Airplane Corporation 



f FAIRCHILD 



A I • C ■ A F T DIVISION 



NAOIISIOWM, MAIYIAND 




**8^&%£!)*~' 



Published Bi-AIonthly at the University of 
Maryland, and entered at the Pott Office. 
College Park, Md., as second class mail mat- 
ter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 
1879. $3.00 per year — Fifty cents the copy. 



OFFICE OF PUBLICATION 

28 Symons Hall, 

University of Maryland, 

College Park, Md. 

WA. 7-3800. Ext. 249 or 394 



HARVEY L. MILLER, 
Managing Editor 



PATRICIA M. REIHM, 
Assistant Editor 



JOSEPH F. BLAIR. 
Sports Editor 



SALLY L. OGDEN. Advertising Director 

EDITH A. ROSS, Advertising Sales 

HAZEL H. GOFF, Advertising Copy OMsf 

— Advertising Offices — 
18 W. 25th Street 2500 Wise. Ave., N.W. 

Baltimore 18, Md. Washington, D. C. 

(HO 7-9018) (EM 3-2553) 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Officers 

J. Homer Remsberg '18, President 
Frank Block "24, Vice-President 
J. Gilbert Prendergnst '33, Vice-President 
David L. Brigham '38, Exec-Secy. 

General Alumni Council 

AGRICULTURE — Clayton Reynolds '22, 

William Evans '26, .T. Homer Remsberg 

•18. 
ARTS & SCIENCES— Vlrglnlu Trultt '52. 

Charles Elllnger '37, Ralph G. Shure '32. 
BUSINESS & PUHL1C ADMINISTRATION— 

Alvln S. Klein '37, John Dyson '53, Roger 

L. Odette '52. 
DENTAL — Dr. Lawrence W. Blmestefer *34, 

Dr. Harry Levin '26, Dr. Gerald Devlin '23. 
EDUCATION — John P. Spelcher '41, William 

Prlgg '53, E. Louise Sudlow '50. 
ENGINEERING — 8. Chester Ward '32, John 

C. Dye '34, Col. O. H. Saunders '10. 
HOME ECONOMICS — Mrs. Robert Chaney 

'42, Miss Irene Knox '34, Mrs. William 

Kricker '31. 
LAW — J. Gilbert Preadergnst '33, Stanford 

I. Hoff '34, G. Kenneth Reiblich '29. 
MEDICAL — Albert E. Goldstein '12, Thurs- 
ton R. Adams '34, Daniel J. Pessagno. 
PHARMACY — Frank Block '24, Frank Black 

'04, Samuel I. Ralchlen '25. 
NURSING — Flora Street '38, Virginia Stack 

Simmons '33, Mary France Dennis '47. 

Alumni Clubs 

BALTIMORE — Frank Block. '24. 
CARROLL COUNTY— Dr. L. L. Leggett, '30. 
CUMBERLAND — Dr. J. Russell Cook 23. 
EASTERN SHORE — Otis Twllly. '21. 
FREDERICK COUNTY — William E. Trail '26. 
"M" CLUB — Sam Sllber. '34. 
NEW ENGLAND — R. A. Cook, '05. 
NEW YORK — Miss Sarah E. Morris. '24. 
PITTSBURGH — Charles Furtney, '37. 
PRINCE GEORGE'S CO. — Ellwood R. Nich- 
olas, '28. 
RICHMOND — Paul Mullinlx, '36. 
SCHENECTADY — Mrs. Marie Esher, "45. 
TERRAPIN — James W. Stevens, '17. 

Ex-Officio 

Past President — Col. O. H. Saunders, "10 
Past President — Dr. A. B. Goldstein, '12. 
Past President — Dr. A. I. Bell, '19. 
Past President — C. V. Koons, '29. 
Past President — T. T. Speer, '17. 
University President — Dr. Wilson H. Elklns 
Executive Secretary — David L. Brigham, '38. 



Maryland 



LIBRARY GROUND-BREAKING 

"Let Us Wear Out The Books," Says Governor McKeldin. 
"The Dawn Of A New Day," Says President Elkins. 



Ground was broken for the Uni- 
versity's Main Library Building 
on March 21, 1956. 

Guests for the ceremony included 
Governor Theodore R. McKeldin, Mr. 
James McDonnell, director of the Mary- 
land State Department of Public Im- 
provements, members of the Univer- 
sity's Board of Regents, President Wil- 
son H. Elkins, Assistant to the Presi- 
dent Albin O. Kuhn, Librarian Howard 
Rovelstad and staff, and other uni- 
versity officials. 

To be constructed by the George 
Hyman Construction Company, the new 
library will require 425 days for com- 
pletion. It will house over one million 
volumes and have a seating capacity 
of over 2,000. 

The contract was awarded by the 
Board of Public Works after 16 bids 
were received. Hyman's lease bid was 
$2,354,000 compared to an appropria- 
tion of $2,090,000 for the project, but 
by leaving out certain library equip- 
ment and a wall around the parking 
lot, the total cost was reduced to 
$2,028,000. This firm previously con- 
structed Memoral Chapel. 

The building will be located on the 
west end of the campus mall. 

On The Mall 

The building was designed by Archi- 
tect Henry P. Hopkins, and will be 
of brick exterior with cinder block 
back-up, reinforced concrete sub-floors 
supported on a steel structure. The 
finished surface of most floor areas 
will be asphalt tile, and acoustic tile 
will be used for the finished ceilings. 

Overall the building is 24.3 feet across 
the front and 118 feet from front 
to back. It will contain a fu'l basement 
providing storage space, a ground floor, 
first, second and third floors. Above 
the first, second, and third floors, at 
the usual stack height in multi-story 
libraries, mezzanine floors will be pro- 
vided. The mezzanine floors provide 
floor space ranging from 60% to 75% 
of the regular floors, to be used for 
library stacks and seminar rooms. All 
floors will be served by two elevators 
and a book conveyor. 

In addition to the stack and work 
areas on each floor, special rooms will 
be assigned on the ground floor for 
reserved books and a study room; on 
the first floor rooms for reference and 
the humanities; on the second, rooms 
for Social Sciences, agriculture, and a 
special collection; and on the third 
floor rooms for music and arts, library 
sciences, a Maryland Room, and an 
audio visual center. 

"This is a very significant event for 
the University, and many people should 



be thanked for their support," univer- 
sity President Wilson H. Elkins said 
in the opening speech of the ground- 
breaking ceremony. 

Dr. Elkins termed the start of the 
new library "the dawn of a new day 
for the University of Maryland." 

Address By Governor 

Governor McKeldin said at the 
ground-breaking "Aptly, the library 
has been called the heart of a Univer- 
sity. It follows, therefore, that a better 
library is a stronger heart — a more 
efficient pump of the life-blood of learn- 
ing into the arteries of intellectual 
existence. 

"The beauty of a new library is a 
combination of its functional modernity 
and its built-in tradition. The fixtures 
may be of the latest in style, designed 
for the ultimate in convenience, but 
such desirable concessions to progress 
do not deprive us of the wisdom of the 
ages contained in the texts of the lead- 
ing thinkers and writers through the 
ages — from the ancient to the contem- 
porary — with glances, perhaps, into 
the future," the Governor continued. 

Ground Breaking 



"This new library" Governor McKel- 
din went on to say " has been needed 
for a long time. Funds for the prepar- 
ation of plans were appropriated in 
1951. A couple of years ago, or a little 
more, there was brought out in clear 
relief and unquestionable tiansparency 
the absolute necessity for a new, mod- 
ern library if this great and growing 
University were to function at its best. 

"Indeed, as early as 1947, the Mary- 
land Commission on Higher Education 
stated that the library building at Col- 
lege Park has been outgrown and there 
is urgent need for a new building", the 
Chief Executive continued. 

"It is not for me now to judge the 
comparative importance of some of the 
buildings that were constructed for 
other purposes in the intervening years, 
but I know that I am very happy be- 
cause we are breaking ground today 
for this structure which, to my way 
of thinking, will be among the most 
essential buildings on these grounds," 
the Governor continued. 

Well Planned 

"Funds for its conduction were pro- 
vided in the State's General Construc- 
tion Loan which I submitted to the 
Legislature in 1955. It is a well planned 
building — 243 feet across the front and 
118 feet from front to back — three 
stories high plus a full basement for 
storage. The mezzanine floors will have, 
in addition to the library stacks, sem- 
inar rooms. Rooms will be assigned 
on the ground floor for reserved books 




FOR NEW LIBRARY 
Center: — Governor Theodore R. McKeldin, breaks ground for the new 
University Library. At the left, University President Wilson H. Elkins 
does likewise. In the background is Mrs. Elkins, Dr. Thos. B. Symons, of the 
Board of Regents, and other notables. At the right is Director of Libraries 
Howard Rovelstad and members of the library staff. 



Maryland 



science degree from Michigan State 
University. 

On graduation he joined the faculty 
as an extension specialist in poultry 
husbandry. He later became secretary 
of the State Board of Agriculture and 
of the university, launching an ex- 
tensive building program. 

Harry H. Nuttle, of the Board of 
Regents, spoke briefly in place of Judge 
Wm. P. Cole, Jr., chairman of the 
Board, who was ill. 

The Right Man 

Dr. Elkins said in securing Dr. Han- 
nah as speaker, the University had 



gotten "the right man in the right 
place at the right time." Michigan State 
is the oldest Land Grant college in the 
country; Maryland, the third oldest. 

Governor Theodore McKeldin told 
how Maryland Agricultural College was 
chartered in 1856, with the State Legis- 
lature offering to contribute $6000. "Ah, 
those were the good old days," the gov- 
ernor quipped. 

The University "has grown with the 
needs of our complex years," he said, 
and our goal for the future must be 
"to keep abreast of the times — and a 
little ahead." 



100 YEARS OF PROGRESS 

Illustrated By Centennial And 
Sesquicentennial Exhibits 



(Baltimore Sum) 

What was the most important in- 
vention in history ? 

Many claim it to be the reaper, the 
McCormick reaper of 1831 usually 
being cited as the prototype. 

"And that's not claiming too much," 
states Ray W. Carpenter, professor and 
head of the department of agricultural 
engineering at the University of Mary- 
land. 

Professor Carpenter's remark was 
made in connection with the exhibit 
depicting agriculture's 100 years of 
progress — commemorating the progress 
made since the university's College of 
Agriculture was founded in 1836 and 
the College of Medicine in 1807. 

McCormick Replica Exhibited 

Professor Carpenter had on hand the 
reaper of which he speaks, a replica of 
McCormick's reaper, the first machine 
to utilize animal power instead of hu- 
man power in the harvesting of crops. 

No one knows whether it is the 
original or not. But the marks on the 
machine, worn smooth by stalks of 
grain passing over it, attest to the 
fact that it is one of the few early ones 
in existence. 

This agricultural antique was one of 
the three most important (to global 
agriculture) in the show. The three 
illustrated the basic principles of agri- 
cultural engineering — plowing, harvest- 
ing and threshing. 

In addition to the reaper, fashioned 
by hand by Cyrus Hall McCormick at 
his Virginia blacksmith shop, there was 
the Andrus-Deere steel plow of the 
1830's and the groundhog thresher of 
1840. 

They Spell The Difference 

As Professor Carpenter pointed out, 
the reaper and the thresher, and par- 
ticularly the reaper, spelled the differ- 
ence between feast and famine in this 
country and in those countries of the 
world where mechanized farming pro^ 
cedures have been adopted, 



At the time of the invention of these 
machines, 85 per cent of the nation was 
engaged in agriculture. That left but 
15 per cent of the people to build the 
factories, and man the machines which 
produced the consumer goods for the 
rest of the people. 

These machines broke the "bottleneck 
of the harvesting of cereal crops," to 
the extent that today the situation has 
been reversed wih but 15 per cent of 
the population engaged in agriculture. 
Now the problem is not one of famine, 
but one of surplus. 

The reaper and the thresher provide 
combination harvester-thresher, or the 



"combine," as it is more popularly 
known. 

Modern Combine Displayed 

The exhibit had one of these com- 
bines, a 1956 model, probably the only 
one of its kind in the world in view 
of the fact that Mr. Carpenter persuad- 
ed the manufacturer to peel off one side 
of the contraption and replace it with 
plexi-glass so that the show visitor 
could see the workings of the machine 
in operation. 

This open-view arrangement into the 
insides of the machine dramatized the 
evolution of the apparatus — showing 
how little the basic principles of the 
machines have deviated from the orig- 
inals. The big difference is not in the 
machines, but in their capabilities. 

In 1829 it took 46 man hours to har- 
vest with a sickle an acre field of wheat. 
In 1831 it took 34 hours to harvest an 
acre of wheat with McCormick's reaper. 
By 1896, with the use of the 5-foot 
grain binder, the process had been re- 
duced to three hours. Today, it takes 
about one-half hour using a 14-foot 
combine. 

The third of the "old originals" on 
view, the Andrus-Deere steel plow, was 
as important as the other two in revo- 
lutionizing our economy, Professor 
Carpenter pointed out. It was the plow 
that saved the Middle West for colon- 
ization purposes. 

When the original settlers moved 
westward they took with them their 
iron patched, wooden and cast-iron 
plows, which worked well in the gran- 
ular soil of the East. But in the Middle 






Centennial Exhibit 




OLD MILKING MACHINE 

Dr. John Dietrich (right), assistant professor of dairy extension explains 
a 64-year-old milking machine to Anne Longfellow, a sophomore in the 
school's College of Education, 



6 



Maryland 



(Vest the rich black earth clung to 
;he moldboard, increasing draft and 
naking plows difficult to hold in the 
ground. 

Plow Saved Situation 

Many returned East rather than 
contend with the problem. It was only 
he invention of the plow with a com- 
bined share and moldboard of steel, 
;hat saved the situation, in that earth 
lid not cling to it. One observer at he 
;ime estimated that the steel plow "cut 
)y at least a third the animal power 
leeded for turning the soil." 

Visitors to the show also enjoyed a 
Dermanent exhibit kept in the agricul- 
:ural engineering building. This con- 
sisted of many types of farm tools and 
equipment of a century ago. Landon 
2. Burns, Carroll county extension 
igent, furnished many of the items 
forming the nucleus of the museum, 
vhich had been arranged by the alumni 
:ommittee of the College of Agriculture. 

Naturally, many of the items come 
:rom Carroll county. Mr. Burns started 
;he collection about five years ago, 
ifter it occurred to him that future 
generations of extension agents might 
lot have any of the early tools to show 
;o the young 4-H members. 

Ribbon Cutting 

In cutting the ribbon that opened the 
exhibit, Dr. Thos. B. Symons, member 
)f the Board of Regents and former 
icting president of the University said 
'the vision of the founders of the 
Maryland Agriculture College in 1856 
md the merger of the Institution with 
;he University of Maryland in Balti- 
nore in 1920, brings to fruition the 
hopes and aspir- 
ations of many 
distinguished ed- 
ucators and citi- 
zens of our state. 
As the third 
Land Grant Col- 
lege to be chart- 
ered in our coun- 
try, we are proud 
of its growth and 
development over 
the years. 

"It is appropri- 
ate that as a 
'eature in our celebration," Dr. Symons 
continued "this magnificent exhibit has 
>een prepared to emphasize the pro- 
gress the university has made in edu- 
cation, research and service for the 
jenefit of our youth and the people 
>f the state. Congratulations are due to 
Dr. E. N. Cory, chairman, and his 
policy committee, to Mr. David 
Brigham, the coordinator, and to Man- 
iger Mayers, the deans and heads of 
iepartments, for the installation of 
;his magnificent exhibit under the 
;heme of "Then and Now" which typi- 
cally represents the outstanding strides 
;hat have been made by the In- 
stitution during these years. 

"Great credit is due the governors 
md legislators and the citizens," Dr. 
3ymons went on to say "generally, of 
>ur State in the support and encourage- 
ment that they have given this In- 
stitution in its development over the 



Ground Hog 




Symons 




ON DISPLAY 

This "Groundhog" thresher, circa 
1840, was one of the historical farm 
implements on display at the Univer- 
sity's agricultural exhibit. 



century. We are also indebted to the 
Federal Government for its contribu- 
tions and cooperation with the State - 
Land Grant Institution. 

"We are especially grateful to the 
farmers and homemakers of the state, 
to our industrialists, medical and other 
leaders, and to our alumni," Dr. Sy- 
mons concluded " for their continued 
support and inspiration in permitting 
the administration of the Institution 
to provide adequate facilities and in- 
struction for the youth of our state, 
country and other lands. May the cut- 
ting of the ribbon for the opening of 
this marvelous exhibit in this wonder- 
ful setting serve to stimulate our vision 
for the further development and service 
of our Institution in the years to come. 
In the name of Judge Cole and the 
Board of Regents, we salute President 
Elkins, Dr. Cory and all those con- 
cerned in the preparation of this ex- 
hibit as a most appropriate, edifying 
demonstration of Progress at this Cen- 
tennial celebration." 

Milking Machine 

A sixty-four year old milking ma- 
chine was among the 108 exhibits on 
display in connection with the Univer- 
sity's Centennial and Sesquicentennial 
observances in the Activities Building 
at College Park, Maryland. 

The machine, invented in December 
20, 1892, was built, patented and manu- 
factured by Mr. William P. Mehring of 
Keymar, Carroll County, Maryland. 

Distributed nationally at that time, 
the "Mehring Milker" is reported to 
have "worked very well." 

According to Dr. John P. Dietrich, 
assistant in the university's dairy ex- 
tension program, the machine was used 
about four years. "About that time," 
Dr. Dietrich states, "Mr. Mehring ap- 
parently became lazy. The pump handle 
was removed and the inventor replaced 
it with a foot treadle which operated 
much like a bicycle pump." 

The "Mehring Milker" was a pari, 
of the Dairy Departments exhibit. 



The Human Heart 

There has been a great deal of public 
curiosity regarding delicate and dra- 
matic operations performed on the 
human heart. The School of Medicine 
played a vital part in the research 
and surgical developments which made 
these operations possible. The univer- 
sity's Departments of Anesthesiology 
and Surgery displayed the chain of 
events in reconstructive heart surgery 
and blood vessels from the point of 
diagnosis through actual surgery and 
rehabilitation. Displayed were instru- 
ments and equipment used in modern 
surgery. 

Old Medical Library 

The remarkable collection of books 
once owned by a medical doctor who, 
in 1790, made the "preposterous" sug- 
gestion that diseases are caused by 
germs was displayed by the University 
in connection with the Centennial and 
Sesquicentennial celebration. 

Dr. John Crawford's 400-volume li- 
brary, one of the oldest medical collec- 
tions in the United States, was one of 
the departmental exhibits in the stu- 
dent activities building. 

Some of Dr. Crawford's books are 
more than 400 years old, which means 
they were printed scarcely a hundred 
years after the invention of the print- 
ing press. 

There is an interesting story behind 
the purchase of Dr. Crawford's books 
by the university. 

Born in Ireland, Dr. Crawford 
studied medicine in Dublin and then in 
Leyden, Holland. He served in India 
and the West Indies before coming to 
Baltimore to set up practice upon the 
urging of his brother-in-law. 

In many ways he showed himself a 
remarkably foresighted physician. 

As president of the Medical Faculty 
of Baltimore, he introduced vaccina- 
tions in the Baltimore area at the 
same time a Massachusetts doctor, Ben- 
jamin Waterhouse, was getting his- 
tory's credit for being the first to urge 
this practice in the New World. 

He was instrumental in organizing 
the Baltimore General Dispensary, the 
Baltimore Public Hospital (predecessor 
of Baltimore City Hospitals), and in 
1809 asked the Mayor to appoint a 
physician to the Board of Health. 

In this last request he was far ahead 
of his time. It was not until 1839 that 
the board took on a medical man. 

Interested in more than just medical 
affairs, he is given credit for being one 
of those most responsible for the es- 
tablishment of a State penitentiary. 

Yet in 1808, Dr. Benjamin Rush, of 
Philadelphia, wrote the following, as 
quoted by Julia E. Wilson in a brief 
summary of Dr. Crawford's life written 
for the University of Maryland School 
of Medicine Bulletin in 1940: 

"This evening Dr. Crawford, of Bal- 
timore, drank tea with me . . . the 
doctor said he had lost all his business 
by propagating an unpopular opinion 
in medicine, namely that all diseases 
were occasioned by animalculae." 



Maryland 



When Dr. Crawford died in 1813, his 
will stipulated that his books be sold 
to pay "all just claims against me." 

The university purchased the books, 
thereby establishing the core of its 
medical library, now the oldest medical 
library in continuous use in the United 
States. 

Nowadays they are collector's items 
lather than books of practical use to 
medical students, though of course 
they are of great value in study of 
medical history. 

The oldest books in the collection are 
"Galeni Opera Amnia," or "Galen's 
Complete Works." Galen was a philos- 
opher and physician who lived 130 to 
200 A.D. and whose medical writings, 
like those of Hippocrates, remained 
standard for centuries. 

Another book, published in 1687, is 
Malpighi's "Principles of the Art of 
Medicine after Hippocrates and Galen," 
also in Latin. 

In Four Languages 

Altogether, the books are in four 
different languages and range over four 
centuries. They were published in 43 
different cities. The latest was pub- 
lished in 1811, indicating collecting un- 
til his death. 

There are ten titles not listed in any 
other American library. 

The permanent home of the Craw- 
ford collection is in the medical library 
in Davidge Hall, Baltimore, where Mrs. 
Ida Marian Robinson, librarian of the 
medical, dental, pharmacy and nursing 
libraries, is their custodian. 

The purchase of the Crawford col- 
lection marked the first establishment 
of a library in any university depart- 
ment. Hence it is actually the nucleus 
of all the libraries in the vast univer- 
sity system. 

Pharmacy Exhibit 

In the Centennial and Sequicenten- 
nial exhibit at College Park, the School 
of Pharmacy had a booth portraying 
the general theme of the exhibition. 
Pharmaceutical equipment of the pres- 
ent day was contrasted with that of a 
hundred years ago. Mr. George Griffen- 
hagen, Associate Curator of the Divi- 
sion of Medicine and Public Health at 
the Smithsonian Institution, lent effec- 
tive display cases and many valuable 
patent office models of pharmaceutical 
equipment, in addition to old glass- 
ware and momentos from Maryland 
drug stores of a century ago. The Mary- 
land Historical Society lent a set of 
rare Wedgewood weights, an old 
apothecaries daybook, and other rec- 
ords. Mortars from the notable collec- 
tion of Morris Cooper were on display. 
In two large fiat cases were shown old 
catalogues, commencement programs, 
research bulletins and pictures from 
the collection of Mr. William Gould. 
The first book used by the library was 
contrasted with the present day pharm- 
acy collection of 27,000 volumes of 
books. On display was the United 
States Pharmacopeia of 1850 to which 
the early faculty had contributed much 
research. The original charter of the 
school from 1841, in graceful Spen- 
cerian hand, was also shown. There 
was an effective contrast of the cur- 



riculum of 1851 and that of 1956. In 
another case were displayed drugs for 
1841 still in common use. Many of 
these drugs in original containers (even 
aloes from Zanzibar in a monkey skin!) 
came from the vast Materia Media 
collection of the Smithsonian. Con- 
trasted with the old standbys were 
pharmacy's wonderful contributions to 
contemporary medicine. Also statistics 
of which the School of Pharmacy can 
be proud; having graduated 3147 phar- 
macists, giving Maryland 90 per cent 
of her pharmacists. The exhibit was 
directed and arranged by Dr. A. B. 
Ballman. Generous assistance in set- 
ting up the elaborate display was given 
by Mr. John J. Sciaria, Instructor in 
Pharmacy, Mrs. Daisy E. Gue, and Mr. 
Russell Carrington. Other members 
of the Centennial and Sesquicentennial 
Committee were Dr. Frank J. Slama 
and Dr. C. T. Ichniowski. 



History Shown 

Interesting Exhibits 
Illustrate Maryland's Past 

Bf Weldtm Wallace 

(Baltimore Sim) 

Chicks were hatching in one booth; 
artificial lightning flashed from an- 
other, and in a bottle of bubbling 
chartreuse fluid, microscopic algae 
swam invisibly but no doubt happily. 

Everything was ready when the black 
and gold ribbon fluttered to the floor 
this afternoon to admit the first visitors 
to the four-day exhibit covering all 
phases of the University's history and 
functions. 

Spectators moving among the bloom- 
ing peach trees, surgical instruments 
and historic false teeth on display 
might well have concluded that science 
is wonderful. 

One saw a hen that is not a mother 
make an endearing fuss over chicks 
that were not hers and were hatched 
in an incubator. This heartening dis- 
play of motherhood was created artifi- 
cially by injecting a hormone, prolactin, 
into the hen. 

Accurate Machines 

There were machines on view that 
could tell more about the taste, feel, 
color and smell of food than can man, 
with his fallible senses. 

A pea's reaction to pressure in one 
of these devices will tell a food packer 
how the vegetable is going to feel in 
the mouth of a prospective eater — how 
tender or tough it is. 

Another device showed just how 
bright or dull, light or dark. 

A distillation apparatus extracted 
aromatic esters from foods. The esters 
are responsible for smell and taste, 
and a measurement of them is a re- 
liable guide to the taste of food. 

One exhibit showed how the Univer- 
sity is combating villainous little or- 
ganisms known as nematodes that de- 
stroy the root systems of plants. 



Experts on nematodes from the uni- 
versity made a thorough canvas of the 
State to find out all they can about the 
activity of these organisms, which are 
busily desti'oying roots in fields all 
over the world. 

Maryland is one of only two schools 
in the country that are training person- 
nel in warfare against nematodes (a 
relatively new procedure). 

The exhibit visitor interested in 
machinery viewed the insides of a 
modern reaper in operation and could 
compare it with Cyrus McCormick's 
original reaper of 1831, also on display. 

The visitor could examine an elabor- 
ate model of a nuclear reactor, or if he 
felt nostalgic he could sample real 
crackers from a real crackerbarrel in 
an old country store — but he had bet- 
ter not reach down too far because the 
barrel has a false bottom. 

There was a machine that could 
make a man stutter by feeding his 
voice back to him through earphones 
at a slower pace than he talked. 

There was something that looked like 
a barrel-sized ice-cream freezer — and 
was. It does not work by hand, how- 
ever, but by a mammoth wheel. It was 
the first freezer to make commercial 
ice-cream in Baltimore. 
Old Photos 

Photographs depicted old football 
teams and old surgical teams once 
active at the university. 

Charts demonstrated the latest tech- 
niques of heart surgery. One item of 
late medical equipment was an ordin- 
ary pressure cooker. Dr. Harry M. 
Robinson, Jr., University of Maryland 
dermatologist, discovered that this com- 
mon kitchen item makes a fine sterilizer 
for office medical use. 

An agricultural chart revealed that 
cne farm worker was responsible for 
feeding four persons 100 yeas ago. 
Today, one worker feeds nineteen, and 
by 1975, according to the prediction, 
he may be feeding 25 or 30. 

If all of these things and many more 
were not enough to make a spectator's 
hair stand on end, there was a static- 
electricity generator in the electrical 
engineering booth that did just that. 



Bugs and Models 

By [Janetta So*neMet 

( Baltimore Sun) 

A world-famous professor who has 
waged life-long war against insect 
pests and a 10-year-old boy who builds 
model airplanes were among the many 
people whose work was put on display 
by the University of Maryland cen- 
tennial and sesquicentennial exhibition. 

Most of them paused to shudder at 
the gigantic model cockchafer in Prof. 
Ernest N. Cory's entomology exhibit, 
and stared in fascination at the 61 
scale model planes built by Billy Ma- 
hannah, of Glen Burnie. 

Dr. Cory, chairman of the celebra- 
tions, contributed a great deal of cheer- 
ful enthusiasm, a rhinoceros beetle and 
a gigantic scarab beetle 4 inches long 



S 



Ma/ryland 



id laconically labelled, "W. Africa 
itercepted at Boston," to the fun. 

Billy, a chubby boy with a crew 
it and an enviable precision of speech, 
lid his planes had been borrowed to 
lustrate the work of the College of 
[ilitary Science by Col. John P. O'Reg- 
a, of the R.O.T.C., which provided 
informed guards for the display. 

Another enthusiast, Prof. S. O. 
urhoe, head of the zoology depart- 
lent, brooded affectionately over a 
mall, reddish field mouse with four 
lackish babies, which she fed very 
ilmly in a little glass box. 

"It's a peremyscus, and it nests 
bove ground, but never in a house" 
; was explained. The mouse is making 

contribution to science, in company 
ith her relatives, by creeping into 
•ooden nesting boxes at the Patuxent 
'efuge, where Maryland zoologists 
re lying in wait. 

From the bottom of the boxes, by 
leans of small glass jars, Professor 
turhoe said, the scientists take the 
enumerable parasites which prey upon 
he mice. 

On One Mouse 

"The record was 556 in one col- 
ection — in May, because as the chart 
hows, the months of April and May 
re when you find the most parasites, 
^hink of it, 556 on one little mouse," 
'rofessor Burhoe added. 

Professor Burhoe was in hopes that 
ome domestic-mouse experiments the 
iniversity is now working on may have 
nteresting results, since his black 
nice have been producing occasional 
>abies which are half chocolate-brown 
ind have two distinctive lengths of 
lair. 

"One of them looks like a lion," 
le said. "How the genetic factors work, 

don't know. We shall see." 

Around the corner, the curious were 
ingering the fluted point d'esprit lace 
)f a "Nightingale cap" from the School 
if Nursing, a replica, such as is worn 
:o this day by graduates, of the cap 
Florence Nightingale designed for the 
Maryland nurses in 1889. 

Above it were pictures of Louisa 
Parsons, the pupil of Miss Nightingale 
.vho founded the school, and a case full 
)f the medals she won in being nurse 
:o British soldiers. 

In another corner, excited children 
vere watching chickens hatch in a glass 
ncubator, and stagger stickily out of 
:he shells. The class of 1961 seemed to 
?et a big kick out of the show. 



705 Exhibits 

"Education, Research and Service — 
rhe Story of the University of Mary- 
land" was vividly brought to life in a 
four day show of 108 exhibits in the 
university's Activities Building, in 
connection with the Centennial and 
Sesquicentennial observance. 

Open to the public, free, each day, 
the displays were the largest collection 
of its type ever to be held on the 
East Coast. 

The show highlighted the contribu- 
tions made by the university's educa- 
tional departments, colleges and pro- 



fessional schools of both the Baltimore 
and College Park campuses to the State 
of Maryland, the country and the world. 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, president of 
the university, had issued invitations 
to the people of the States of Mary- 
land, Virginia and Pennsylvania, and 
the District of Columbia to attend the 
exhibition sometime during the four 
day period. 

The exhibition was the kick-off for 
the University of Maryland's 15 month 
joint celebration of its centennial and 
sesquicentennial anniversaries. The 
centennial commemoration marked the 
100th year of the Maryland Agriculture 
College established in 1856. The ses- 
quicentennial observance marked the 
establishment of the College of Medi- 
cine in 1807. Both institutions formed 
the nucleus of the present university. 

The theme for the entire fifteen 
months celebration, "Education, Re- 
search, and Service — The Story of the 
University of Maryland," was also 
used as a theme for the exhibition in 
the new indoor stadium at College Park 
was the title of a capsuled history 
publication about the university. 

All Participate 

Each department, college, and pro- 
fessional school is participating dur- 
ing the 15 months with projects that 
include professional meetings and in- 
dividual novelty programs. 

Old Cracker Barrel 

Remember the old country grocery 
store and the cracker barrel? And 
steak at 15 cents a pound? There was 
the opportunity to examine this figment 
of the past as well as to view the 
most modern and efficient self-service 
grocery store. 

A rocket trip to the moon ? The 
Physics Department showed just how 
much fun this trip will be and ex- 
plained the latest developments in man- 
made earth satellites and the equip- 
ment used for upper atmosphere 
studies. 

For the youngsters, the College of 
Agriculture arranged a fascinating dis- 
play of hatching chickens, the chicks 
pecking away at their egg shells on 
the way to their first look at the out- 
side world. 

Other major programs, marking the 
university's centennial and sesquicen- 
tennial years, will include a Charter 
Day banquet to be held on January 
19, 1957 in Baltimore; and Commence- 
ment in June, 1957. 

Dr. Cory In Charge 

The entire 15 month program is un- 
der the direction of Dr. Ernest Cory, 
Maryland State entomologist and head 
of the Department of Entomology, and 
a faculty committee of representatives 
from each of the university's 9 col- 
leges and five professional schools. 
Coordinator for the celebrations is 
Mr. David Brigham, executive Secre- 
tary of the Alumni Association. 

Booths 

The exhibition consisted of 108 
booths as follows: — 

Booths 1-3: Agricultural Economics. 
Booths 4-5: Agricultural Education. 
Booths 6-7: Agronomy Agriculture. 



Booths 8-9: Poultry. 
Booths 10-12: Overall Agriculture. 
Booths 13-15: Home Demonstration. 
Booth No. 16: 4-H Club. 
No. 17: Botany. 
Booths 18-20: Horticulture. 
Booths 21-22: Animal Husbandry. 
Booth No. 23: Engineering. 
Booth No. 24: Chemical Engineering. 
Booth No. 25: Engineering. 
Booth No. 26: Institute of Fluid Dy- 
namics. 

Booths 27-28: Engineering. 
Booth No. 29: Bacteriology. 
Booth No. 30: Chemistry. 
Booth No. 31: Physics. 
Booth No. 32: Zoology. 
Booths 33-35: Physical Education. 
Booth No. 36: Professional Physical 
Education. 

Booth No. 37: Entomology. 
Booths 38-39: Livestock Sanitary 
Service. 

Booths 40-42: Dairy. 

Booth No. 43: Entomology. 

Booth No. 44: Alumni, M Club. 

Booth No. 45: Law School. 

Booths 46-48: Dentistry. 

Booth No. 49: From the School's 
Museum. 

Booths 50-53: Women's Physical Ed- 
ucation. 

Booths 54-56: Pharmacy. 

Booths 57-60: Business & Public 
Administration. 

Booths 61-62: Aero Engineering. 

Booths 63-64: Civil Engineering. 

Booths 65-66: Business & Public 
Administration. 

Booth No. 67: Class of 1956. 

Booths 68-70: Arts & Sciences. 

Booth No. 71: Medicine. 

Booth No. 72: Hackett and Conley 
Medicine. 

Booths 73-77: Medicine. 

Booths 78-79: CSCS. 

Booths 80-81: Library. 

Booths 82-84: Nursing. 

Booth No. 85: Student Publications 
and WMUC. 

Booth No. 86: Industrial Education. 

Booths 87-88: Education. 

Booth No. 89: Associated Women 
Students. 

Booths 90-92: Home Economics. 

Booths 93-95: Education. 

Booth No. 96: Speech. 

Booth No. 97: Faculty Books. 

Booth No. 98: Psychology. 

Booths 99-100: University. 

Booths 101-108: Agricultural En- 
gineering. 



Debate Society 

Maryland's Calvert Debate Society 
matched words with the Naval Acad 
emy on "Resolved: The non-agricul- 
tural industries of the United States 
should grant their employees a guar- 
anteed annual wage." 

The audience was asked to judge 
by putting down their opinion bebfore 
the debate and to what extent it had 
changed after the debate. 

Members of the Maryland team were 
Alok Guha and Beatrice Fiks for the 
affirmative and Sue Cohen and Ben 
Dorman for the negative. 



Maryland 



9 



From True Sisters 




FOR RADIOLOGY 

The University of Maryland has received $1000 from the Baltimore Chapter 
of True Sisters which has been earmarked for the Department of Radiology. The 
money is to be used to purchase radium for research. 

Mrs. H. Levin Morvitz presents the check to Dr. Fernando Bloedorn. At right 
Dr. John Dennis, head of the department. At right Mrs. Louis E. Hess. 



Judge Wm. P. Cole Jr. 

By Glan& li/ootten 

Managing Editor, The Diamondback 

(The first of a series of interviews with 
members of the Board of Regents as to 
the outstanding accomplishment during their 
respective terms in office.) 

My only child was killed in World 
War II. The most pleasing ac- 
complishment of my tenure of office 
has been the construction and comple- 
tion of Memorial Chapel . . . dedi- 
cated to him and other Maryland stu- 
dents and alums who gave their lives 
for their country." 

This was the sentiment of Judge 
William P. Cole, Jr., chairman of the 
Board of Regents. 
For 25 years as 
member of the 
Board and 12 years 
as chairman Cole 
has guided the 
University through 
its period of most 
rapid growth. 

"So many won- 
derful things have 
occurred since I 
have been in 
office," the Mary- 
land alum of 1910 
said, "that it is 
hard to select the greatest accomplish- 
ment. Perhaps the consolidation of the 
College Park and Baltimore branches 
would rank first. 

Discussing the new library he said, 
"We've waited a long time, but now 
that we have it, it's best to forget the 
past and just say thank you." He 
referred to the criticism that it will be 
outmoded in 10 or 15 years by in- 
crease in enrollment and disagreed 




with the statement that the University 
is not planning for the future. "Extra 
stacks can be added, but the main 
building will be adequate." 

Judge Cole, who served as a Con- 
gressman from '27 to '29 and from 
'31 to '43, declined to comment on the 
Faculty Senate. "It is a new under- 
taking. Let it function awhile." The 
Senate is subject to the Regents' juris- 
diction. 

Although the Board is the final 
authority on University affairs, stu- 
dents are unfamiliar with its workings. 
Judge Cole said, "They have never 
referred to the Board on any problem. 
We have responsible administrative 
heads employed in College Park for 
this reason. The Board's sessions are 
always open and the students are wel- 
come to attend." 

According to the chairman, no com- 
plaints have been received regarding 
lax enforcement of the drinking ban. 
"The main reason for it was he ex- 
plained "has been the same for every 
boy and girl since Adam and Eve. 
You can't indulge in too much frolic. 
My own fraternity (Phi Kappa Sigma) 
has accepted it willingly, from all 
reports." 



Judge Cole 



Social Security 

President Wilson H. Elkins, of the 
University of Maryland, in seeking 
legislative permission to bring about 
social security coverage for the uni- 
versity's faculty, appeared before the 
Senate Finance and the House Ways 
and Means committees at Annapolis 
on the university's budget and said that 
he would like to use monies allocated 
for general salary increases toward 
social security. 

He said that the faculty, particularly 
the older members, are "very anxious" 



to be placed under social security and 
voted "overwhelmingly" in favor of it. 

Whatever is allocated to the univer- 
sity under the proposed pay raise plan, 
if sufficient, he feels, could be used to 
much better advantage by picking up 
social security, retroactive to Juanary 
1955. 

The social security coverage Dr. 
Elkins said, would cost about $300,- 
000 — an appropriation not included in 
the Governor's budget. 

Should the General Assembly agree 
to allow the use of salary increase 
money for this purpose, Dr. Elkins 
pointed out, it would of course, in- 
volve a referendum of the faculty it- 
self. 

University officials and its staff, have 
long been stressing the importance of 
social security coverage in retaining 
and building up an adequate staff, and 
have declared that unless salaries and 
retirement income are made more at- 
tractive, key personnel may be lost to 
other states. 

Dr. Elkins told the committees the 
university sometimes has trouble hiring 
faculty members away from other 
schools where they are under social 
security. 



Dining Hall 



Dining Hall repairs, which will com- 
mence with summer vacation, were re- 
cently approved by President Elkins 
and Dr. Kuhn, head of the Capital Im- 
provement Committee. 

"I realize," said Robinson Lappin, 
Dining Hall manager "that at present, 
there are not enough serving lines in 
the Dining Hall for our 2800 boarders. 
I need every student's cooperation until 
we can ease this pending physical con- 
gestion." 

The repairs will consist of moving 
the kitchen upstairs and construction 
of new serving aisles. "With the 
kitchen upstairs," Lappin said, "the 
chefs can cook into 
the lines which will 
mean more food at 
its correct tempera- 
ture, more variety 
in the menus, and 
no bottlenecks. 

"Planned also," he 
continued, "will be a 
revision in the tray 
problem. More bus- 
ing stations will be 
present at several 
central points of the 
hall. This will save 
the students time, and too, it will not 
necessitate their handling dishes. 
Everything we do is done for the stu- 
dents. 

"The coeds will be pleased with our 
redercoration of the hall which will give 
all of us a more pleasing atmosphere 
in which to dine. Another student ad- 
vantage of these changes will be the in- 
crease in student employment." 

This is another step in the Univer- 
sity's program for the future. Mary- 
land is getting ready for a 10,000 stu- 
dent increase within 10 years. 




Mr. Lappin 



10 



Maryland 



Telephone Man 
Helps Save Five 
from Tidal Waters 

Quick action prevents 
tragedy when family 
is marooned in hurricane 



Hurricane winds of 110 miles an 
hour were creating a tidal wave when 
the telephone operator at Block Is- 
land, Rhode Island, received a call 
for help from a family marooned in 
a cottage. 

"I was in the telephone office," 
says installer repairman Robert A. 
Gillespie, "when I heard of the call. 
I'd been through hurricanes before 
and I knew they might be in real 
trouble." 

Quickly enlisting the aid of two 
men who were outside the telephone 
building, he drove his company truck 
to within 400 feet of the isolated 



RESCUE AT HAND. Telephone man fights his 
way through swirling waters to bring ma- 
rooned cottagers to safety during hurricane. 




AWARDED MEDAL -Robert A. Gillespie, of Block Island, R. I., was awarded the Vail Medal 
for "courage, endurance and ingenuity" in helping to rescue five people marooned by tidal 
waters. Vail Medals, accompanied by cash awards, are given annually by the Bell System 
for acts of noteworthy public service by telephone employees. 




cottage, as near as the high water 
would allow. 

"We could see that three poles led 
toward the cottage," says Bob Gilles- 
pie, "so we took handlines and a rope 
from the truck. We secured one end 
of the line to the first pole and waded 
to the second pole. There we tied 
up our line and kept wading to the 
third pole." 

But they were still thirty feet away 
from the marooned family when they 
got as far as the rope would go— thirty 
feet of dangerous, rushing water. 



Bob Gillespie's companions safe- 
guarded the ropes while he fought 
his way alone to the cottage. 

He made three trips through the 
rising tidal waters. First he carried a 
small bov to the comparative safety 
of the forward end of the rope. 

Then, with considerable difficulty, 
assisted two women; and a man and 
another boy. And finally, though 
almost exhausted, he guided the en- 
tire group along the all-important 
rope lifeline that led to high ground 
and safetv. 



HELPING HANDS— The spirit of service of telephone men and women is shown not 
only in the dramatic situations of fire and flood and storm, hut m the everyday 
affairs of life. Thousands of times every day, and through the long hours oi the 
night, the telephone and telephone people help those who are ill or in trouble 
or confronted by some occasion that needs a skilled and willing hand. Just having 
the telephone close by gives a feeling of security and of being close to people. 



BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 




\twryland 



n 



Planned For Baltimore 





THE INITIAL STRUCTURE 



Palm Sunday 

Palm Sunday was observed at the 
University's Memorial Chapel, with 
service conducted by Dr. Krister Sten- 
dahl and a performance of Bach's "The 
Passion According to St. Matthew" by 
the University Choir. 

Dr. Stendahl, a noted Swedish theo- 
logian, is an authority on the Dead Sea 
Scrolls. He was president of the Swed- 
ish student christian movement before 
coming to the United States in 1954. 
He is an assistant professor of New 
Testament at the Harvard Divinity 
School. Dr. Stendahl is author of 
several religious works, among them 
"The School of St. Matthew," pub- 
lished in 1954. 

12 



Hamline Methodist and Bethany Bap- 
tist Churches of Washington, assisted 
with the Children's Choir of the John 
Nevin Andrews School. 

Orchestral accompaniment with Pro- 
fessor Charleton Meyer, harpsichordist; 
and the choirs was under the direc- 
tion of Professor Fague Springmann. 
Both are faculty members of the De- 
parment of Music. 



At Cincinnati 

Miss Adele H. Stamp, Dean of 
Women, and Miss M. Margaret Jame- 
son, Assistant Dean of Women, at- 
tended the National Association of 
Deans of Women Convention in Cin- 
cinnati. 



THE BALTIMORE UNION 

WHEN COMPLETED 

With the growth and expansion of the 
Professional Schools of Medicine, Dentistry, 
Pharmacy, Nursing and Law, and University 
Hospital, a need has developed for facilities, 
other than academic, to meet the require- 
ments of students and faculty alike. 

To meet these demands the Office of 
Lucius K. White, Jr., Architect, was re- 
tained and preliminary plans and specinca- 
tons were developed for a Union-Dormitory 
Building, to house a Student Supply Store, 
Barber Shop, Post Office, Cafeteria, Main 
Lounge, Fountain Lounge, Dance Terrace, 
Meeting Rooms, Offices, TV Room, and 
Residence Rooms for students. 

Although the ultimate structure will b« 
K-shaped as shown above, located on the 
southwest corner of Lombard and Greene 
Streets, the initial construction will be 
limited to one-half of the K structure, oc- 
cupying the site now utilized as a parking 
facility, as shown below, adjacent to the 
Out-Patient Department. The cost, approxi- 
mating $1,000,000.00, will be defrayed 
through the sale of bonds, for which legis- 
lative sanction will be sought from the 
State Legislature to permit the offering of 
bonds, and the amortization of the cost 
over the years on a self-liquidating basis. 

With the cooperative effort of the mem- 
bers of the Legislature, the officials of the 
University, the Alumni and the students, 
it is hoped that the initial construction will 
be realized within the next year, to provide 
the students, nurses, interns, residents 
faculty and friends a place of refinement in 
which to meet, study, relax and live. 



Miss Jameson served as chairman 
of panel discussion on the subject 
"Training House Directors." Addi- 
tionally, she participated in a state 
president's workshop at the convention. 

Miss Stamp will speak at the Alpha 
Lambda Delta Breakfast. Miss Stamp 
is a former Chairman of the University 
Section, Secretary of the University 
Section, and Headquarters Consultant 
of the National Association of Deans 
of Women. She will also attend the 
coffee hour given by National Mortar 
Board to all Deans of Women who are 
Mortar Boards at the time of the meet- 
ing. 

Maryland 



May Day '56 

May Day this year will be called 
Centennial May Day, and will be built 
around the history and activities of 
women at the University of Maryland 
from the time Flora Darling graduated 
in 1908 until the present. 

A great effort is being made to get 
a large number of former graduates 
back to our Centennial May Day. Es- 
pecially invited are all Mortar Boards. 
This is Mortar Board's Twenty-first 
Birthday at the University. A special 
section will be reserved for the Mortar 
Boards and there will be a Mortar 
Board Episode in May Day. 

A great effort is also being made 
to bring back all of the former May 
Queens, and those who were in the 
Queens' Courts. 

A determined effort is also being 
made to bring back as many of the 
Presidents of the Associated Women 
Students as possible. This was called 
the Women's Student Government As- 
sociation first, then the Women's 
League, and now the Associated Women 
Students. Since the Presidents from 
1922 on, when it was first organized, 
are scattered all over the globe, they 
are invited through the pages of the 
magazine. 

A very special invitation is also ex- 
tended to all alumni to come back for 
the May Day celebration. A dinner 
will be held in the Dining Hall the 
night of May Day, which is May 8th, 
honoring Miss Stamp. The dinner will 
be held at 7 o'clock in the Dining Hall 
following May Day and Mortar Board 
tapping. May Day will begin at 4 
o'clock on May 8th. 



Chinese Opera 

A Chinese opera was presented at 
University Theatre. 

Entitled Ssu Lang Tan Mu, the opera 
was under the direction of Professor 
John Young of Georgetown University. 

Members of the Chinese Drama Club 
of Washington portrayed the characters 
of the opera as well as providing 
costumes and an orchestra of Chinese 
instruments. Dr. Adolph E. Zucker, pro- 
fessor and head of the University of 
Maryland's Department of Foreign 
Languages, narrated an English trans- 
lation of the work. 

A fashion show of modern and tra- 
ditional Chinese clothing was modeled 
prior to the performance. 

The program was arranged by Jack- 
son Yang, president of the University's 
Chinese Club, a sophomore in En- 
gineering. 



Author Article 

Dorothy R. Mohr and Martha J. 
Haverstick, Physical Education, are the 
authors of an article appearing in the 
March issue of the RESEARCH 
QUARTERLY of the American Asso- 
ciation for Health, Physical Education 
and Recreation. The article is entitled 
"Relationship Between Height, Jump- 
ing Ability and Agility to Volleyball 
Skill". 



DOES YOUR WILL REFLECT 
TODAY'S CONDITIONS? 

A birth, a death, disposition or acquisition of 
certain property, increase or decrease of net 
worth, changes in tax laws are a few of the 
reasons that make it vital to examine your 
will periodically and keep it up-to-date. 

Revisions are often necessary, and sometimes 
a new will is advisable. The fee charged by 
your attorney will prove a sound investment 
for you and your family. 

Our officers will be glad to explain how, as 
Executor or Trustee, First National will carry 
out your plans. 



The FIRST NATIONAL 
BANK of BALTIMORE 

Capital, surplus and profits in excess of $21,000,000. 



Member 
Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 




Bfigi! 







tjUB. - " 
SHOE 



S^OOBltB 



Be a MEAT EXPERT! 
Always say 



lftQUALITYV 



All-Meat Franks 

Every ounce of the pure beef and 
pork in Esskay's all-meat Franks 
is carefully selected by Esskay's 
experts, who season and spice 
these famous franks to wholesome, 
flavorful perfection. Be sure to 
ask for Esskay Franks — they're 
the finest made! 

WM. SCHLUDERBERS— T. J. KURDIE CO. 



Hendlers 




First Name in fee Cream 
For Over A Half Century 



Maryland 



13 



Proposed Annex 




- 



I 



r-i i 




J! 



1 1 /3l! 



T # 





1 1 1 M 

1 Kr 




FOR ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES 

Above is Architect Ted Englehardt's drawing of the proposed new Administrative Building Annex, intended to house an 
assembly room, the Dean of Men, the Dean of Women, Placement Counselor, Cashier, Registrar, Admissions, Department 
of Physical Plant, Director of Publications, Public Relations, Photography, and other related departments. 



Women Meet 

A program, described by Miss Mari- 
an Johnson, assistant dean of women, 
as "a general look at the problem 
of college women in general" was held 
in the Student Union Auditorium, spon- 
sored by the Women's Forum Com- 
mittee. 

Heading the list of speakers was 
Mrs. Anna W. Behrens, Chief of the 



Division of Program Planning, Analy- 
sis, and Reports of the Women's Bur- 
eau, Department of Labor. She did 
undergraduate work at the University 
of Illinois, received her B.S. from the 
University of Detroit in 1928, and ob- 
tained an M.A. in Economics from the 
University of Michigan in 1937. 

Alumnae who graduated from Mary- 
land during the last 10 years were 
present. Some were married women 



In Alabama 




AT MAXWELL AIR FORCE BASE 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, President of the University of Maryland, recently 
visited Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama, the home of the Air University, and 
is shown at a briefing on the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps program 
by Major General M. K. Deichelmann, Commandant. 

Dr. Elkins was further briefed on the mission of the Air University by Major 
General Dean C. Strother, acting Commander; on the Air War College by Major 
General Delmar T. Spivey; and on the Air Command and Staff College by Brigadier 
General Lloyd P. Hopwood. Accompanying Dr. Elkins were Colonel Joseph R. 
Ambrose, Professor of Air Science and Lieutenant Colonel John P. O'Reagan, 
Commandant of Cadets, both of the University of Maryland. The briefing was 
arranged by Colonel A, J. Wheeler, Area "B" Liaison Officer, Headquarters, 
AFROTC. 



with children, some have a career 
and some are married and maintain 
a career as well. Eight different sorori- 
ties were represented, and four of the 
women were Mortar Board members. 

The theme of the program was "The 
Relation of College Experience to Our 
Immediate Future; On the Job, in 
Marriage, and in the Community." 
Questions were addressed to the speak- 
ers during the program, after which 
the audience and guests adjourned to 
the Student Union Coffee Shop, where 
hostesses and alumnae sat at different 
tables so that those interested received 
individual attention and carried on 
further discussion of specific problems, 

Marinne Allen — A. & S. '54 — Aii 
Line Hostess; Mary Lou Baluta — A 
& S. '55 — Elementary Teacher; Carol 
Bolder— A. & S. '55— Speech Therapist; 
Jane Cahill— A. & S. '54— I.B.M.— 
Service Representative; Margarel 
Hughes Cutler— A. & S. '46— Edi- 
torial Work; Mellis Rock Erlbeck— 
Home Ec. '53 — Radio Program; Ella 
Fazzalari — Home E. '52 — County Exten- 
sion Agent; Elizabeth Clifford — A. & 
S. '31 — Teacher; Betty Karavangeos— 
B.P.A. '52 — Law Office Secretary; Les- 
lie MacKintosh— Home Ec. '51— U. S 
Chamber of Commerce; Barbara Schei 
— A. & S. '55 — Cartoonist for Govern- 
ment; Hortense Bunting Tegler — A. <£ 
S. '48 — Nursing; Frances White Walkei 
— Phys Ed. '54 — Physical Educatior 
Teacher. 

Statistics show, Mrs. Behrens said 
that half of the women college gradu 
ates over 25, married or not, are work 
ing. 

College women, she said, are twice as 
likely to work after marriage as womer 
who have not had a higher education 
partly because they get better anc 
more interesting jobs, and find satis 
faction in using the skills they have 
acquired at school. 

Assistant Dean of Men, Lewis Kne 
bel, told the group, that some of the 
students leave the choosing of job; 
until far too late. 

Mr. Knebel, who is director of the 
University Placement Service, also de 



14 



Marylamc 



plored the fact that girls major in a 
subject in which they have no interest, 
and then try to get a job in an un- 
related field. 

One student raised the question of 
typing jobs, which are always open, 
and said that many women with a 
liberal arts degree "wind up sitting 
behind a typewriter five days a week" 
because of the need for typists. 




Miss Stamp 



Miss Stamp Honored 

As a feature of the University's Cen- 
tennial celebration, the Dean of Women, 
Adele Hagner Stamp, will be honored 
on Tuesday, May, 8. At 3:30 P.M. that 
day, the annual May Day pageant, 
featuring the history 
of women at the uni- 
versity with a "Then 
and Now" theme 
will be presented. 
This will be followed 
by Mortar Board 
"tapping" and in- 
stallation. At 7:00 
P.M. the recognition 
dinner and portrait 
presentation will 
take place in the 
University's dining 
hall. 

Everyone is invited! Send dinner 
reservation checks, $2.50 per person, 
payable to the Adele Stamp Dinner 
Committee, in care of the Alumni 
Assoc, office, University of Maryland, 
College Park, Md. before May 5. 

Write either one of the Alumnae 
chairmen, Miss Nellie Buckley or Mrs. 
Betty Amos Bull c/o the Alumni Assoc, 
office, for further details regarding 
contributions to the Recognition Fund 
or program details. A limited number 
of rooms may be reserved at Ross- 
borough Inn at $4.00 per person for 
those wishing over-night accomoda- 
tions. 

Indications are that the largest 
group of women alumnae ever to re- 
turn to the University will be present 
that day, most of them with their 
husbands and families. 



«S£55S«S»S£«S5£5ft2«^«5«««S5S»^^ 



Counseling Center 

Dr. John W. Gustad and Dr. Thomas 
Magoon, both of the Counseling Center, 
attended the convention of the Ameri- 
can Personnel and Guidance Associa- 
tion, held in Washington. Dr. Magoon 
read a paper on the problems in practi- 
cal training for counselors. Dr. Ma- 
goon has also been named as chairman 
of the Professional Practices Commit- 
tee of the organization. Dr. Gustad 
read a paper at the meeting on current 
research in counseling. Dr. Gustad was 
appointed by University President El- 
kins as the Maryland representative 
to the Commission on Student Per- 
sonnel of the Southern Regional Edu- 
cation Board. Dr. Gustav is the South- 
ern Regional Education Board's Coun- 
cil on Psychological Resources Mary- 
land representative and chairman of 
this council's Committee on Psychologi- 
cal Research Facilities and personnel. 



jOVU Dy IflQII! People in 48 States and 29 
Foreign Countries maintain growing 
savings accounts in this big, strong, insured savings 
institution. Liberal dividends, compounded semi-annually. 








PERPETUAL 

BUILDING ASSOCIATION 

MAIN OFFICE: Htm AND E STREETS. N. W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

ASSETS MORE THAN $200,000,000 



EDWARD C. BALTZ, President WILLIAM H. DYER, Executive Fice President 



CERTIFIED BUILDERS 



INC. 




General 
Contractors 




Telephone: 
2662-64 KENSINGTON-WHEATON ROAD LOckwood 

SILVER SPRING, MARYLAND 4-8400 



JUniper 9-4580 



JUniper 9-3340 



A. MYRON COWELL, Inc. 

MASONRY - CONTRACTORS 



8416 Ramsey Avenue 



Silver Spring, Md. 



Maryland 



15 



New Swimming Pool 




With preliminary sketches in hand, 
the Harrisons called upon Charles 
Brandt, of Bonnet and Brandt, archi- 
tects and engineers. Mr. Brandt pro- 
duced working blue prints. 

One of the most difficult of the con- 
struction assignments was the Crooked 
Man's Crooked House, with one roof- 
top perpendicular to the ground, this 
building seemingly defies the law of 
gravity, yet is built with such strength 
that it can withstand tons of weight. 

Live animals receive more than their 
share of attention — from the families 
of rabbits who live in the old-fashioned 
Easter Egg, to the little Red Hen and 
the graceful deer named Chloe. 

Among the new features this year 
are a dancing Merry Miller, and an 
"mmated Mouse Band which plays 
lively songs for him. 



TO OPEN SOON 

Opening of the pool was delayed due to a leak. In the meantime Bill 
Campbell, swimming coach, has set up a tentative schedule for the use of 
the pool. Five days a week between 8 a. m. and 3 p. m. physical education 
classes in swimming will have use of the pool. The swimming team will use 
the pool for practice until 5 p. m. 

The pool will be open at night for recreational swimming. Monday will 
be for the families. Tuesday and Thursday nights will be for students. Wednes- 
day nights will be for intramurals. 



Ad Exhibit 

The Women's Advertising Club of 
Washington sent an exhibit of their 
work and five representatives to the 
University. 

The meeting in the Maryland Room 
of Margaret Brent Hall, was to ac- 
quaint art students about specialties 
and opportunities in the field of adver- 
tising. After the lecture and exhibit 
there was a question period. 

The visitors, whose work touched on 
many phases of Advertising Art Pro- 
duction and copy were lead by Ann 
Evans, senior writer for the Lewis Ed- 
win Ryan Advertising Agency and a 
graduate of the University. 



A Wonderland 

There is a story-book community 15 
miles west of Baltimore on Route 40. 

As the motorist drives along Route 
40, viewing the usual highway scenes, 
he suddenly comes upon a medieval 
castle, complete with towers, turrets, 
drawbridge, moat and a wistful dragon 
up on top who spends his time serenad- 
ing a princess, standing in one of the 
towers. In front of the castle there's 
a huge parking lot, surrounded by 
gingerbread men wearing coats of pink 
and white frosting, while an immense 
figure of "Old King Cole," beckons 
one and all to enter his "Kingdom." 

It is an Enchanted Forest, a wonder- 
ful world of make believe. . . . Mother 
Goose and Grimms Fairy Tale char- 
acters live in a setting so authentic as 
to be constantly amazing. 

Each path reveals a new scene and 
a new story. The size of the displays 
and the brilliance of their color and 
design are amazing. 

The Enchanted Forest had its be- 
ginning over five years ago when 
Howard E. Harrison, Sr., father of 
5 and grandfather of 11, conceived the 
idea of a dramatic fairy land while 
telling nursery rhymes to his grand- 
children. 

His interest in his own off-spring and 
his love of children in general brought 
about the fairly land. 



Enchanted Forest 




THE MERRY MILLER'S HOUSE 

The water wheel at the Merry Miller's' House holds great fascination. Inside a 
tuneful band of mice musicians play. 

The Merry Miller's House is just one of many story-book attractions awaiting 
visitors to The Enchanted Forest, on U. S. Route 40 near Ellicott City. 



16 



Maryland 



Assistant Dean 

Frederick De Man-, (A. & S. '54), 
returned to the College Park campus 
to assume duties as the new assistant 
dean of men. 

A former instructor of history and 
government and politics with the 
Munich program of 
the College of Speci- 
al and Continuation 
Studies, De Man- 
takes charge of stu- 
dent activities, stu- 
dent organizations, 
and the Chapel. His 
office is located in 
the Chapel. 

In his job with 
the overseas pro- 
gram of CSCS, De- 
i/i-. DeMarr Marr taught courses 

in St. Johns, New- 
foundland; Goose Bay and Cartwright, 
Labrador; Norsarssuah and Sondestrom 
Air Bases in Greenland, and Munich. 
Besides teaching in Munich, he was 
director of athletics there. 




Miss Brown Retires 

Miss Agatha Brown retired from the 
staff of the Library on January 16. 
Miss Brown held the rank of Associate 
Librarian. She joined the staff in the 
Catalog Department on October 1, 1948 
and specialized in processing books in 
foreign languages. She came to the 
University of Maryland from the Theo- 
logical Seminary Library, Princeton, 
New Jersey. Since July 1, 1955, Miss 
Brown has had charge of the Music 
Collection. 



Librarians Meet 

Christine Reb. Howard Rovelstad and 
Josephine Wedemeyer, Library, attend- 
ed the Midwinter Conference of the 
American Library Association field in 
Chicago. Professor Rovelstad and Miss 
Wedemeyer attended as members of 
the Council of the American Library 
Association. 

Miss Eunice Disney, Library Staff, 
left to go to the University of Florida 
at Gainesville as a cataloguer. Miss 
Disney is a graduate of the University 
of Maryland, and took her Master of 
Library Science degree at Emory. She 
came to Maryland from the University 
of Georgia in September 1953. 

Mrs. Ira Koiv, Library Staff, recently 
joined the staff of the Engineering and 
Physical Sciences Library. 



Flying Club 



The Maryland Flying Club a cam- 
pus organization whose purpose is to 
present flying as a useful and inter- 
esting hobby. The flying club once 
again has the accommodations to teach 
its members the basic fundamentals 
of ground school and flight training 
which eventually lead to a private 
pilot's license. 

The runway is located within Col 
lege Park just beyond University prop- 
erty to the east. 



fottgAaiulaiwnA. 
CIcl&a. d£ '56 



. . . as you take your 

places in your community 

and throughout the 

land. We sincerely 

wish you all . . . 

siicccks and 

happiness 

today and 

in the 

years 

ahead 

JOHN M. WALTON 
DENNIS W. MADDEN 

3510 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE 
MT. RAINIER, MD. 




C.&W. Sport Shop 

Complete Sporting Goods 

Rawlings— Spalding— Wilson 

FISHING LICENSES 

QUEENS CHAPEL SHOPPING CENTER 
WEST HYATTSVILLE, MD. 



S 



AVE S100 



Mention This Ad 



Before you buy — see the new '56 DaSoto 
It's New — It's Beautiful 

oDe^oto J ' lumouth 



G228 KALTIMOKE AVE. 

KIVERDALE, MD. 

P. A. Sellers WArfieltl 7-6000 




s 



ELLERS 

ALES & SERVICE 



Wallace E. Miller 

Hardware - Nursery Stock 

SEEDS - FEEDS 



Fertilizer - Insecticides 

TOYS & SPORTING EQUIPMENT 

6970 Central Avenue 

SEAT PLEASANT, MD. 

REwood 6-7800 



TOWER 9-6204 =^=^=== 

JIMMIE PORTER 

Trading as 

KIERNAN'S 

A Complete Line of Beverages 
8200 Baltimore Blvd. College Pork, Md. 



NELSON MOTORS 

— STUDEBAKER — 

Authorized Sales & Service 
Auto Repairs — AH Makes of Cars 
3 blocks from U. of M. on Route 1 

USED CARS UNion 4-8600 

7211 BALTIMORE BLVD. - C0LLE6E PARK. MB. 



THOMSSON STEEL CO., 


Inc. 


5104 BALTIMORE AVE. 




HYATTSVILLE, MD. AP 7-1188 



Maryland 



17 



From The Eastern Shore 

The Angus Cup, Steuben Crystal, Awarded To 
Alexander Keith, of Aberdeenshire, Scotland. 



Mr. Arthur A. Houghton, Jr. is pres- 
ident of Steuben Glass Company, 
Corning, New York. Mr. Houghton and 
a group of Marylanders have been 
interested in the restoration of an- 
tiquity on the Eastern Shore of Mary- 
land. 

Mr. and Mrs. Houghton are the own- 
ers of the fabulous Wye Plantation 
once the home of William Paca, early 
governor of the State of Maryland 
and a signer of the Declaration of In- 
dependence. 

They advise that, at Perth, Scotland, 
two American dirt farmers recently 
presented one of the world's rarest 
gifts, that heretofore has gone only to 
royalty or the heads of states, to a 
Scottish cattle breeder. 

The gift is a specially designed piece 
of Steuben crystal named "The Angus 
Cup". It is a hand-made, engraved 
work of art, 15 inches high. Other 
such pieces have been executed for 
H. M. the Queen Mother, H. M. Queen 
Elizabeth II, and President Dwight 
D. Eisenhower. 

"The Angus Cup" goes to Alexander 
Keith, of Aberdeenshire, Scotland, who 
is retiring as secretary of the inter- 
national Aberdeen Angus Cattle Society 
and as editor of the Aberdeen Angus 
Review. It goes to him for his services 
to the breed and to Angus breeders 
around the world. 

The co-donors are James B. Lingle 
and Kenneth A. Clark, neighbors and 
Angus breeders on the Eastern Shore 
of Maryland. Mr. Lingle is manager 
of Wye Plantation, the colonial estate 
of William Paca, first governor of 
Maryland and signer of the Declaration 
of Independence. 

Both the Lingle and Clark herds — of 
purebred Angus — are of straight Scott- 
ish derivation, and for many years all 
their bulls have been imported from 
the British Isles. 



QUA*D YOU* 
fAMILY 

GIVE 

TO FIQHT 

CANCER 

AMERICAN 
CANCIt SOCIITY 

WILLIAM F. STONE, JR. 

2612 N. CHARLES STREET 
BALTIMORE 18, MO. 





The inscription on the cup gives their 
reasons for the gift. At the top is a 
sentence from the Latin poet Virgil. 
It reads: 

"To note the tribe, the lineage, and 

the sire". 

Beneath is a stylized engraving of 
an Angus bull, then the commemora- 
tive legend: 

"To Alexander Keith, whose wisdom, 
integrity and energy have improved 
the breed of Aberdeen-Angus Cattle 
throughout the world." 

The precious gift was flown to 
Britain by Mr. Clark, who made the 
actual presentation on the opening 
of the famous Perth Cattle Show 
in the presence of several hun- 
dred cattlemen from all over the world 
where beef cattle are produced includ- 
ing Great Britain, Canada, Australia, 
New Zealand, South Africa, Argentina, 
and the United States. 



Angus Cup 




■ 



FROM EASTERN SHORE 
The Angus Cup of engraved Steu- 
ben crystal, given to Mr. Alexander 
Keith of Aberdeen, Scotland, by Mr. 
James B. Lingle and Mr. Kenneth A. 
Clark, cattle breeders from the Eastern 
Shore. 



Terps Studied 

Animal Becoming Scarce 

fey cMaudtcm. 9*Uf/iaM 
( Diamondb ack ) 

The University is conducting exten- 
sive studies on the growth and eat- 
ing habits of terps. 

Individual terps were marked for 
identification with red nail polish which 
remained permanent for at least six 
months and was easily replaceable. The 
group was fed only three times a week, 
and after each meal was bathed thor- 
oughly and returned to the laboratory. 

Chopped Food 

Their food was chopped as finely 
as possible and a sufficient quantity 
provided so that some would be left 
upon completion of the meal. This al- 
lowed the smaller, weaker terps to eat 
their fill without interference. 

In order to determine food prefer- 
ences of the group, the following items 
were offered: crabs, oysters, clams, 
canned fish, fresh fish, liver and beef. 
After the third week, the canned fish 
was refused and the group would go 
without eating rather than consume it. 
It was discovered that food preferences 
are developed and once firmly estab- 
lished, are very difficult to break. 

The average growth of the terps 
the first year was 31.28 milimeters and 
somewhat less the second year. Increase 
in weight of the group showed the 
same average trend as that of growth. 
They were divided into groups of 20 
to eliminate problems created under 
laboratory conditions with respect to 
sanitation, water supply, and eating 
methods. 

Under clean conditions, a group will 
grow T as rapidly and survive as well 
under lab conditions as under natural 
conditions. 

Eighty-six percent of the group sur- 
vived the first year. The remainder died 
because of refusal to eat, or from the 
effects of a two-day experiment in 
which the lab temperature was kept at 
32 degrees. 

Professors' Interest 

These terps, or diamondback terra- 
pins "Malaclemy's Centrata Concen- 
trica," have undergone this extensive 
observation program as a result of the 
interest of Dr. Robert A. Littleford, 
who is in charge of the University Sea- 
food Processing Lab at Crisfield, Md., 
and Dr. J. Francis Allen, head of Uni- 
versity Fisheries-Biology. 

The two men became interested in 
the propagation of the diamondback 
terrapin in recent years because the 
animal is becoming very scarce. 

Because this valuable aquatic animal 
is threatened with extinction, they have 
made extensive studies concerning its 
habits and life history, and have carried 
out comprehensive research in recent 
years on methods of propagation. 



18 



Maryland 




LUNCHEON - DINNER 
COCKTAILS 

NOON to 9:30 P.M. DAILY 
(Closed Mondays) 

ACCOMMODATIONS FOR BRIDGE PARTIES, 
WEDDINGS, BANQUETS, CLUB MEETINGS 

ON STATE ROUTE 97 
OLNEY, MARYLAND 

— Ample Parking Spact — 
PHONE Whitehall 6-5757 

GniiTiiiiDB Allison Brewster, Owner 




WASHINGTON'S 

ONLY 



"DRIVE THRU" 

LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANERS 

Where You Save Up To 20% 

Drive In 

Hand In Your Bundle 

Drive Out 

QUICK SERVICE 

LAUNDRY, DRY CLEANERS 

1016 Bladensburg Road, N.E. 

Washington, D. C 

(Across from Sean-Roebuck) 




SAVILE BOOK SHOP 

3236 P STREET 

French, Politics, History, Fiction, 
Philosophy, Drama, Art 

Washington 7, D. C. 
Georgetown 

Phone ADams 2-3321 



Registration Up 

For the present semester almost 
1,000 more students enrolled at the 
University of Maryland than were 
registered at the same time last year. 

At the close of registration, 9,124 
had enrolled. Of this number 6,699 are 
undergraduates, 878 are in the gradu- 
ate school and 1,547 are on a part-time 
basis. 

During a comparable period in 1955 
81,173 students registered with 6,045 
in the undergraduate category, 851 in 
graduate school and 1,277 on part-time. 

These figures, released by the regis- 
tration office, represent an 11.6 per 
cent overall increase in total enroll- 
ment. 



Selective Service 

College students interested in taking 
the Selective Service College Qualifi- 
cation Test had until March 5, 1956, 
to submit application, it was announced 
by Dr. David K. Pumroy, test super- 
visor. The test center is the University 
of Maryland, College Park. 

The purpose of the testing program 
is to provide evidence for local Selec- 
tive Service boards so they may con- 
sider student deferments for military 
registrants. 

To be eligible to apply for the test, 
scheduled to be given to college stu- 
dents in 875 test centers throughout 
the United States, Alaska, the Canal 
Zone, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico, a stu- 
dent must intend to request defer- 
ment as a student, be satisfactorily 
pursuing a full-time course of instruc- 
tion, and must not have previously 
taken the test. 

The test was developed by Science 
Research Associates of Chicago, one of 
the nation's leading publishers of edu- 
cational testing, reading-improvement, 
and guidance materials. 



Korean Orphan 

An orphan boy in Korea depends 
upon a group of people thousands 
of miles away for his education and 
clothing. In return, he offers "a whole- 
hearted prayer" to his benefactors. 

Lee Jong Nam, 8, was adopted by 
the Inter-Fraternity Council through 
the Foster Parents Plan for War 
Children Inc. The council gives $180 
a year for the support of the boy. 

Lee Jong writes weekly letters to 
the IFC telling of his progress in 
school. Each month a different fra- 
ternity is appointed to answer his 
correspondence. 

Expressing his gratitude in a re- 
cent letter the orphan boy wrote: 
"I am ever fine and attending school 
without a single days absence. I have 
grown up into big and fine boy through 
your gi-eat help and tender care. By 
succeeding I would really wish to 
pay back even a small part of your 
kindness to me." 



Drink 

MILK 

For 

Goodness Sake! 

You (Jet So Much 
For So Little 

V PROTEIN for BODY BUILDING 

V RIBOFLAVIN for EYES & SKIN 

V CALCIUM for TEETH & BONES 

V NIACIN for NERVES 

V CALORIES for ENERGY 

Harvey Dairy, Inc. 

Serving the 

COLLEGE COMMUNITY 

since 

NINETEEN TWENTY-EIGHT 

BRENTWOOD, MD. 




Just eight miles from Washington, 
near the University of Maryland, 
you'll find complete comfort and 
conveniences. 

Rooms & Cottages 

Phone WArfield 7-8324 
For Reservations 

THE 

LORD CALVERT 

HOTEL & COTTAGES 

FREE TV 

Free Parking 

On U. S. Highway No. 1 

7200 Baltimore Avenue 

COLLEGE PARK. MD. 



Maryland 



19 



We Invite You 
To Inspect Our 

RESiDEMiflL communiTv 

at 

RAY PARK 

— featuring — 

JhsL 0°^ &>& 

J Jul Split 3swnL 

JhsL JhL-3su)&L 

and 

JhsL ColsmiaL 

— the finest in homes 
of enduring value 

HARRY fl. BOSUIELL CO,, Inc. 

REALTORS 

3718 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE 

MT. RAINIER, MD. 
AP. 7-1111 



See the NEW Better Than Ever 



SALES 



i?£V^ 



SERVICE 



PALMER FORD, INC. 

3)10 Hamilton Street 

HYATTSVILLE, MD. 
Phone WArfield 7-0900 



JOuwwl dbnhdwahSL 
& Supply- 

Hardware - Plumbing 

Purina J-'eedx - Sporting Ooodt 

8204 Baltimore Blvd. TOweb 9-6080 

College Park, Md. 

Open Sunday 10 A.M. to 2 P.M. 



College of 



DEL HAVEN WHITE HOUSE COTTAGES 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

loltlmor* Wathtngton Boulevard 

Two Mtlei North — University Maryland 

Hot Water Heated 00 Brick Cottage* 

Tile Bathi 



F. M. Ibwin, Prop. 



WEbater 0-4802 



USE THE COUPON ON 
THE LAST PAGE 



Home Economics 

Laura Amos Bull '26 
Vera Klein Woods '32 



Wins Scholarship 

Dorothy A. Williams, 21-year-old 
4-h'er from St. Leonard, Calvert 
county, is the recipient of an annual 
$300 scholarship and is using the award 
to help finance her senior year in Home 
Economics. The scholarship goes each 
year to the senior in home economics 
who has the highest scholastic average, 
and who has taken two or more courses 
in foods and nutrition. 

Miss Williams has a 3.82 average, 
and is a major in home economics edu- 
cation. She plans to teach home econ- 
omics when she graduates. 

Her college activities include a long 
list of leadership achievements. She 
is president of both the Home Econ- 
omics club and Omicron Nu, national 
home economics honor society. When a 
freshman, she received the Omicron 
Nu scholarship award for attaining the 
highest scholastic average during her 
first semester. 

She is a member of Phi Kappa Phi, 
national scholastic honorary society, 
and Mortar Board, national senior hon- 
or society for women recognizing ser- 
vice, leadership and scholarship. She is 
vice-president of her social sorority, 
Delta Gamma. 

Miss Williams was a delegate to the 
Chicago National Club Congress in 
1951, and a Maryland 4-H representa- 
tive at Camp Miniwanca, Mich., for 
leadership training. 

Alumna Honored Again! 

Sarah E. Morris '24, member of 
University Alumni Council representing 
the New York area, and president of 
the N.Y. Alumni Club, has been elected 
president of the National Seraphic 
Secretaries Club for a two year term! 
This is an organization of executive 
secretaries, now in its sixteenth year, 
whose number is limited to 100 mem- 
bers. This is a non-partisan and non- 
sectarian organiza- 
tion whose members 
are secretaries to 
leaders in industry; 
in professional, civ- 
ic, philanthropic, so- 
cial and other im- 
portant enterprise:;. 

Represented in the 
roster of member- 
ship are secretaries 
to such notables as 
Herbert Hoover, 
Miss Morris Capt. Eddie Ricken- 

backer, Thomas E. 
Dewey, Bruce Barton, Lowell Thomas, 
William Zeckendorf, and the Presidents 
of American Telephone and Telegraph 
Company, Radio Corporation of Amer- 
ica, U. S. Rubber Company, Fuller Con- 
struction Company, Western Union and 
many other equally outstanding com- 
panies. 




Sarah has been in New York City 
since 1934 as secretary to Matthew H. 
O'Brien. Until June, 1945 he was Vice 
President and General Attorney for 
Celanese Corporation of America and 
now has his own law office in the Em- 
pire State Building. In addition to his 
legal practice, Mr. O'Brien is Chair- 
man of Rayon and Acetate Fiber Pro- 
ducers Group and President of Ameri- 
can Rayon Institute, Inc. 

It is a distinct honor to be elected to 
membership in the Seraphic Secretaries 
Club, but to be elected President is a 
still greater honor. 

Mullinix Family 

Paul Mullinix, Agriculture Educa- 
tion '36, and Carolyn Young Mullinix, 
Home Ec. Education '37, and their three 
children, Barbara, Polly, and Patty — 
"three cheerleaders for U. of M. but 
no quarterbacks," said Carolyn. Paul is 
director of Management Service for 
Southern States Farmers' Cooperative, 
Richmond, Va. He is also President of 
the Local Alumni group. 

Barbaia made the head-lines last 
Fall when she was the one and only 
junior in the Hermitage High School, 
enrollment 1200, to be tapped for the 
National Honor Society along with the 
four seniors. The members were "chosen 
on the basis of leadership, character, 
service to the school, and scholarship. 
A person must have at least an 88 
average to qualify for membership," 
stated the High School paper. She 
plans to major in Home Economics at 
the University starting next year as a 
freshman. She has a most enviable 
record of leadership, serving this year 
as President of the Future Home- 
makers' club, President of the Y-Teen 
Triangle, on the student council, school 
newspaper, yearbook, a cheer-leader, 
member of basketball team, a member 
of swimming team winning medals at 
state meets and the state Jr. Olympics, 
an officer of the County Future Home- 




THE MULLINIX FAMILY 

'All Cheerleaders; No Quarterbacks" 



20 



Maryland 



makers, active in church and choir 
work, an outstanding 4-H Club leader 
in which she has won many honors. 

Carolyn is President of a Home Dem- 
onstration Club, a local 4-H Club 
leader, general chairman of the County 
4-H Achievement Day, chairman of 
volunteer services in a woman's club, 
active in both elementary and H.S. 
P.T.A.'s, Treasurer of Missionary Soci- 
ety in church, and active in many other 
community activities. Polly and Patty 
are following in the footsteps of the 
older members of the family being 
active already in 4-H — swimming — and 
sports. We salute the whole family! 
Dates To Remember 
"Open House"— Thursday, April 26, 
from 3:00 to 10:00 P.M. in Margaret 
Brent Hall. See the exhibits and dem- 
onstrations in each department of the 
College of Home Economics showing 
the broad scope of work in the field to- 
day. 

"Annual Alumni Day"— Saturday, 
May 5th, Margaret Brent Hall, the 
"Maryland Room." The seniors will be 
guests, several alumnae will be honored 
and new members of the Home Eco- 
nomic Alumni Boards will be elected. 
Candidates nominated are: 

For member-at-large — 3 yr. term — 
Mrs. Carolyn Young Mullinix, 2409 
Essex Road, Richmond, Va. 

For member of Board— Temple Curry 
Grant (Mrs. Charles R.), 5207 Battery 
Lane, Bethesda 14, Md. 

For member of Board — Geraldine 
Parry Edwards (Mrs. Wm. J.), Arling- 
ton, Va. 

For member of Board— Mary Ellen 
Wentz-Hines (Mrs. Wm. J.) of Route 
No. 3, Rockville, Md. 

From Here And There 
Margaret E. Richardson Lockwood, 
'45, and her two children, Dan 6, and 
Lynn 4, sailed from San Francisco 
about a year ago to join her husband 
at Tachikowa Air Base, 20 miles North- 
west of Tokyo. She says a taxi ride in 
Tokyo is one thing one will never for- 
get if she lives through it! Cab drivers, 
she says, observe no regulations, ex- 
cept to drive on the left hand side of 
the street. The speeds, making turns 
on a maximum of two wheels, the hun- 
dreds of bicyclists weaving in and out, 
horns honking constantly, scurrying 
wooden shoes on the pavement as pe- 
destrians rush to one side to let a 
vehicle through, all petrified Margaret 
Emma. 

Tempe Curry Grant (Mrs. Charles 
R.) '40, who worked in the personnel 
office at Woodward and Lothrop's and 
later as secretary of the Automobile 
Manufacturers Assoc, before her marri- 
age to Charles R. Grant now lives at 
5207 Battery Lane, Bethesda, Md. Her 
husband has his own company — 
"Charles R. Grant Insurance Agency" 
and has served as Pack Master for the 
Scouts, on the Troop Committees as 
chairman for two Brownie troops, and 
as active P.T.A. member serving for 
the 5th year on the Executive Board of 
the Bethesda Elementary School. Tempe 
has served as Den Mother for 2 years 
for the Cub Scouts and as chairman 




on a new 1956 PONTIAC 

See 

^A\ 7125 Baltimore Avenue 

\^^J Ji'-st South of the Campus 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



Sank ofc WlwiylaruL 

SEAT PLEASANT, MD. 

— Branches — 

BOWIE - CAPITOL HEIGHTS 

CORAL HILLS - LANHAM 

SUITLAND 

HILLCREST HEIGHTS 



SUITLAND CENSUS FACILITY 



College Park Record Center 



Complete Line 
Popular 
Classical & 
Hillbilly Records 

Phonographs 
Greeting Cards 

In the Heart of College Park 
7406 Baltimore Blvd. WA 7-4102 



flsLWiy. ff. (jJiUunADfL 

INSURANCE 
of All Kinds 

UNION 4-1 100 

4316 GALLATIN STREET 
Hyattsville, Md. 



RESTORFF MOTORS 

Sales JyCvi4f> Service 

7323 BALTIMORE BLVD. • AP 7-5100 
COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



l_SmiTH UlELDinG^ 

COMPANY 

PORTABLE EQUIPMENT 

4803 Rhode Island Ave. 
Hyattsville, Md. 



PHONE UNION 4-5100 



B. SU6RUE— PRES. 



NORMAN MO TOR C OMPANY, Inc 

SALES 4&@mm SERVICE 

8320 WASHINGTON-BALTIMORE BLVD. • COLLEGE PARK, MO. 



Maryland 



-21 



NOW — fVfltr SINGH PART OF 

UNIVERSAL 
SCAFFOLDING 




CALL US FOR 
imilUDIATE SERUICE 

COMPLETE STOCKS 
SALES 

RENTALS 

TOOL & SUPPLY 
CO., Inc. 

BALTIMORE: 701 Bonaparte Avenue 
Telephone BEImont 5-9214 



WASHINGTON: 2820 10th Street, N.W. 
Telephone NOrth 7-1615 




ASIA 



KLOMAN 

Instrument Co., 

Inc. 

Surgical Instruments 

Hospital & Physicians 

Supplies 

907 Cathedral St. LE. 9-2912 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

1822 Eye St., N.W. NA. 8-6566 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



THE 

E. R. KRESTI1ER 

COmPflllY 

DAIRY & CREAMERY 
APPARATUS 

6401 PULASKI HIGHWAY 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



of Brownie troops to which her daught- 
ers belong. The Grants have 5 children: 
C. Ridgely Grant-13, Elise Haile-11, 
Tempe Dana-9, Charlotte W.-7, and 
Granville Curry-9 months! 

On Leave 

Miss Faye Mitchell, head of the De- 
partment of Textiles and Clothing, is 
on Sabbatical leave attending Teachers 
College in New York this semester. 
Mrs. Mable Spencer, of the Home Ec- 
onomics Education Department, also 
on leave, is planning to take courses 
at American University. 

Home Economics Personals 

Catherine Compton Bassie '48, is in 
California where she continues her 
Home Economics growth with the Cali- 
fornia Home Economics Association, 
has worked with the Future Homemak- 
ers of America, and is teaching in the 
high school there. 

A note from Audry Dugdale Hatry 
indicates that she is still in Germany 
with her husband who is in the armed 
service. 

Mrs. Eilleen Heagney and Miss Ruth 
Parker, of the Textiles and Clothing 
faculty, went to Wheaton High School 
to represent Home Economics on 
Charter Day. 

At The Home Economics Department 

The Home Economics exhibit for the 
centennial, mural and photo murals, 
has been brought to the Maryland room 
where it is now on exhibit. 

Display cabinets in the Maryland 
Room are currently featuring craft 
work done by the students. 

Coed Gets Scholarship 

Dorothy A. Williams, 21-year-old sen- 
ior from St. Leonard, Md., has been 
awarded a $300 Borden scholarship for 
top scholastic achievement in the Col- 
lege of Home Economics. 

The award is made annually to the 
Home Ec senior who has compiled the 
highest scholastic average and who 
has taken two or more courses in foods 
and nutrition. 



MARK OF SUCCESS 

The ability to play poor cards well 
is a mark of success — in card playing. 



College of 



Special & Continuation 

Studies 



A conference designed to develop 
the communication skills of exe- 
cutives through round-table discussions, 
lectures and actual practice was held 
at the Univei'sity. 

The objectives of the "Workshop in 
Executive Communications' were to 
provide each participant with improved 
speaking and listening skills, confer- 
ence leadership and participation tech- 
niques, utilization of audiovisual 



methods, microphone and television 
skills, and written communications 
techniques. 

Top academic and industrial experts 
served as faculty for the three day 
conference which included such topics 
as "The Place of Communication in 
Today's Management," "The Role of 
Communication in Management." "De- 
velopment of Speaking and Listening 
Skills," "Meaning What You Say and 
Saying What You Mean," "New Con- 
ference Techniques for Improving 
Customer Relations" and "Conference 
Leadership." 

Each participant received individual 
instruction and a separate confidential 
post-workshop recommendation-report 
for continued improvement. Additional- 
ly each participant received a special 
recording of one of his workshop 
speeches. 

According to Richard Stottler, direc- 
tor of institutes, College of Special 
and Continuation Studies, the univer- 
sity offered the woikshop as a ser- 
vice to area executives for members 
of management, sales, public relations 
and training staffs of corporation, as- 
sociations and government agencies. 

In Germany 

Mainz, Germany, being one of the 
strongest centers in Europe for the 
study of American culture, it is not 
surprising that the Ausland and Dol- 
metscher Institute there recently held 
a conference on the subject of Ameri- 
can culture. 

Robert Shepherd, an Instructor in 
the University's Overseas Program in 
the area, took over opening day with a 
detailed discussion of American history. 

The Institute is under the direction of 
Dr. Karl Thieme, who was active in 
German education before World War II. 
He had to flee Germany, and became a 
Swiss citizen. His current research in- 
volves the study of causes for the rise 
of totalitarianism. 

The conference, involving about 40 
German high school teachers, was 
sponsored by the German Ministry of 
Education and the American Embassy 
in Frankfurt. 

During the day, Mr. Shepherd talked 
about the settlement of America, 
causes of the revolution, the nature of 
the American Constitution, structure of 
the American government, the chief 
ideas of the Jeffersonians and the Jack- 
sonians, the organization and develop- 
ment of American political parties, the 
Civil War and its main effects on Amer- 
ican society, American foreign policy 
after the emergence of the U.S. as a 
world power, and some of the chief 
problems of contemporary American 
government and some details of cur- 
rent American politics. 

After dinner the group met to see 
movies of American life and heard a re- 
cital of folk songs. All joined in a 
group-sing of such old favorites as 
"On Top of Old Smokey," "I Am a 
Bachelor," "Oh, Suzanna," etc. Part 
of Mr. Shepherd's talk was taped in 
order, later, to help teachers speak 
idiomatic English. 



22 



Ma/ryland 



"The teachers were a very alert 
group," Mr. Shepherd declares. "They 
spoke and understood English very 
well. They asked intelligent questions. 
They were particularly eager to learn 
American colloquialisms and slang ex- 
pressions, the idiom of America. 

"Of the material I presented they 
were most impressed by the fact that 
I lectured with a general informality. 

"They also commented favorably that 
I had not given an interpretation of 
American history that was uniformly 
favorable to the U.S., an interpreta- 
tion very few Germans would admit, 
they said, about Germany." 

Counselors Meet 

Guidance counselors of the State of 
Maryland met at the University, under 
the auspices of the College of Special 
and Continuation Studies, for a one day 
program on counseling problems. 

The meeting was the Third Annual 
Guidance Conference and consisted of 
and address and panel discussions by 
leading experts in the field. 

Featured speaker was Dr. Donald E. 
Super, professor of education, Teachers 
College, Columbia University. Dr. Super 
spoke on the subject "Implications of 
Recent Testing Research." 

Counseling authorities of the Univer- 
sity, the Baltimore Department of Ed- 
ucation, National Institutes of Health, 
Morgan State College, Washington and 
Prince Georges Counties and junior 
and senior high schools of the state 
participated as panel members in the 
afternoon sessions. 

Subjects included: "The Counselor 
as a Mental Hygientist, Methods and 
Problems of Research in Counseling 
Outcome, the Core Teacher as a Guid- 
ance Worker and Counseling Low- 
Achievement Pupil Personnel." 

Debate 

A handful of University of Maryland 
students gave a demonstration debate 
before 100 University of Mainz stu- 
dents for the first time at Germer- 
sheim, Germany. 

Never before have American stu- 
dents participated in a public debate 
before German listeners. 

More importantly, the contest opened 
a new vista for the German system of 
education which never has fostered 
public debate on public issues in uni- 
versities. 

Mr. Edmund R. Johnson, Cultural 
Affairs Officer of the United States 
Foreign Service at Mainz, Germany, 
expressed his reaction: 

"The importance of the debate is not 
that of an isolated event. The real sig- 
nificance is realized only when one 
knows that debating of this type is 
not done in German universities, but 
3hould be done if the German univer- 
sities are to turn out students qualified 
to lead Germany — or Europe — to a 
brighter future. 

"Perhaps the demonstration planted 
a seed-idea which could grow to some- 
thing significant in the future. 

"There was enough interest shown 
by the audience to give some hope that 
the debating idea may be taken up 
and developed." 



CRANE CO 



DISPLAY ROOM — WAREHOUSE 

10700 Hanna Street — Beltsville, Md. 

WEbster 5-4600 

DISPLAY ROOM — WAREHOUSE 

212 N. West Street — Falls Church, Va. 

JEfferson 4-4800 

Wholesale Plumbing - Heating 
Valves and Fittings 




OXYGEN COMPANY 

® COMPRESSED GAS MANUFACTURER 
ANESTHETIC & THERAPEUTIC 

GASES and EQUIPMENT 
RESUCITATION EQUIPMENT 

RENTAL and REPAIR SERVICE 

2900 Kenilworth Ave. — Bladensburg, Md. — UNion 4-2345 



McLeod & Romborg 
Stone Co., Inc. 

CUT STONE 

— • — 

Bladensburg, Maryland 



24 -HOUR TOW1NQ SERVICE 



WArfield 7-9710 



7505 BALTIMORE AVENUE 
COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 



Maryland 



23 



• LCOnflRD 

• COLlECTIOn 
• flGintY 

Specializing in Collections 
for Medical Men 



882 PARK AVE. IE 9-6909 

BALTIMORE, MO. 



Mama Emma's 

DOM 


A 






Famous Italian 


A 

Cuisine 




in "LITTLE ITALY" 




900 FAWN ST. 


SA. 


7-8990 


231 


S. HIGH ST. 


LE. 


9-8965 


(Two 


Entrances) 


Baltimore, Md. 



Est. Since 1935 

BALTIMORE 

NURSES 
EXCHANGE 

Licensed By 
State of Md. 
GRADUATE - UNDERGRADUATE 
AND PRACTICAL NURSES 

FOR HOSPITAL & HOME 

Hourly Work 

Alice Weber, Director 

(Daughter of the Lute Alice Foos) 

s. Athoi av. LOng wood 6-6144 




V.OMBEO 



For Every Purpose 

Walbrook Lumber Co. 

2636 W. North Ave. 
Baltimore, Md. 



Baltimore-Washington Express 


Company 


Daily Service Between 


BALTIMORE - WASHINGTON - ANNAPOLIS 


LExington 9-1756 


1625 Ridgely Street Baltimore 30, Md. 



Russell W. Smith 

General Insurance 

1003 MERCANTILE TRUST BLDG. 

Baltimore 2, Md. 
LExington 9-0020 



The debaters, five in all, are mem- 
bers of the Overseas Program advanced 
speech class. They were directed by Dr. 
James H. McBath, Assistant Professor 
of Speech at the University of Mary- 
land. 

Two to a side on the question, "Re- 
solved: That this house favors an im- 
mediate end to colonialism," were Lt. 
Col. Dealey; First Lt. Frank Jackson, 
and Mr. Charles Blue, of Vogelweh. Mr. 
Joseph Mitchell, of the Rhine Ordnance 
Depot, served as moderator. 

It was the old affirmative vs. nega- 
tive hassle so familiar to Americans, 
and so eye-opening to Germans. The 
argumentative portion was immediate- 
ly — and mercifully — followed by a per- 
iod in which the four debaters and the 
harassed moderator explained points 
and procedures in response to questions 
from the bewildered but fascinated 
German students. 

Dr. McBath stepped in finally to 
assure one and all that American inter- 
collegiate debating is a "friendly com- 
petion between logically opposed points 
of view on a controversial topic." 

His emphasis was on the point that 
debaters need not necessarily be con- 
vinced of the argument they are trying 
to uphold. 

"Their responsibility," Dr. McBath 
explained, "is simply to make the best 
possible case for the side they are 
defending, so that the audience gets a 
fair, comprehensive analysis of the 
problem." 

Business-Industry Meet 

Education and industry of the State 
joined together in a two day Business 
and Industry Training Conference at 
the University. 

The theme of the program was 
"Meeting the Challenge of Business 
and Industry through Training and 
Education." 

Representatives of leading industrial 
organizations, professional training so- 
cities, labor, local educational systems, 
and universities and colleges partici- 
pated in panel discussions designed to 
give an exchange of ideas on specific 
problems of training personnel. 

Set up especially for smaller organi- 
zations which do not maintain formal 
training programs, the conference was 
an attempt to provide a service to 
business and industry as an aid in 
acquainting participants with tech- 
niques used in determining training 
needs, methods and programs being 
used today. Additionally, it acquainted 
business and industry with available 
educational programs offered by schools 
and colleges in the State. Panel train- 
ing subjects included — Skilled Worker, 
Semi-Skilled Worker, Technical and 
Junior Engineer, White Collar Worker, 
Labor's Views and Resources for Out- 
side Training and Development. Super- 
visory Responsibilities, Job Knowledge, 
Job Instruction and Human Relations, 
and Job Methods. Guest speaker was 
John Siedel, assistant superintendent 
of schools in Maryland. His topic was 
"Management's Views on Training." 

The meetings were held in the Stu- 
dent Union Building. 



Another First for the Pimlico Hotel 

Old Time 
Barbecue Treats 

Tantalizing barbecue dishes in the grand 
manner! Choice, tender meat turned 
slowly on a spit over a blazing fire, to 
a golden brown. Basted with a pungent, 
thick, mouthwatering sauce, prepared from 
an old recipe by our own expert chefs! 

Nate's and Leon's 



P 



imlico 

HOTEL 



Open 'til 2 a.m. - Saturday 'til 3 
5301 PARK HEIGHTS AVE. BALTIMORE 

FRANK WELSH 

and his 

ORCHESTRA 

"FINEST MUSIC FOR 
ALL OCCASIONS" 

707 HIGHWOOD DRIVE 
Baltimore 12, Md. 

ID. 5-8736 

Former Maryland Student 

For Absolute 
Reliability 

Heidelbach's 

Applies to Quality 

Price 

Advertisement 

— Established 1882 — 

ROLAND PARK CAT0NSVILLE 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



FIRST 



IN FUEL OIL AND 
BURNER SERVICE 



C. HOFFBERGER CO. 

MONUMENT and FORREST STREETS 
Phone MU 5-8400 Baltimore, Md. 



Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 

Consulting Engineer 

1701 SAINT PAUL STREET 
Baltimore 1, Md. 



Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 

Manufacturers of 
Concrete Pipe 

6315 EASTERN AVENUE 

Baltimore 24, Md. 



24 



Maryland 



Moppet Music 




INTERESTED READERS 

The author of the book, Mrs. Laura Pendleton MacCartney (center), 
shows a copy of it to Mrs. Ruth P. Chappell and her son Chris, and Mrs. 
Cecile Barnes. 



College of 



Education 



Music In The Making 

Students' of the Childhood Education 
Center, a nursery school, where the 
average age is about three and one half, 
have music of their own making these 
days. 

The tots of the Nursery School and 
Kindergarten, taught by Prof. Edna 
McNaughton, Professor of Childhood 
Education, and her staff of student 
teachers, have contributed their ideas 
for a new-style music book which is 
used in class. The volume is called Up 
and Down We Go. It was prepared by 
Laura Pendleton MacCartney, former 
music teacher of the center. 

Mrs. MacCartney says that formal 
musical note patterns are not easy for 
children to learn. So the new-style mu- 
sical instruction book is the result. It's 
chock full of up-and-down pictures the 



tykes can comprehend: Things like 
tugboats, leaping lamps, draggin' 
wagons, ice cream cones, airplanes and 
other items. These pictures, placed at 
various levels on the page, give the 
children a feeling for the ascending 
and descending scales. The variation in 
the size of the picture, too, is designed 
to give the children the idea that some 
tones are longer than others. 

The words to the music in the book 
were in many instances suggested by 
the moppets — with a generous assist 
from Mrs. MacCartney. Like the song 
of the Black Lamb which goes: 

"Little Black Lamb," playful and gay. 

Scamper and dance, but don't run 
away." 

Or that of the Lazy Frog: 

"Why do you sit so long on a log? 
Jump in the water, lazy frog!" 

Children learn to follow the up-and- 
down pictures with their fingers and 
gradually learn the varying changes in 
the pitch of the tone as they hit a 
particularly highly placed snowman or 
a frog placed very low on the page. On 



J/ul BARN 

Restaurant and 
Sportsman's Bar 

Gateway to the Famous 
Chesapeake Bay Country. 
Facing on Routes 
2 and 301. 





GLEN BURNIE, MD. 

First and Still 
Foremost Restaurant 
on Governor Ritchie 
Highway 




320 PARK AVE. 1300 PENNA. AVE. 

SHANG WAH LONG CO, 

304-6 PARK AVE. BALTIMORE 1, Md. 

This store carries Oriental general merchan- 
dise — Chinaware, Ladies' & Children's Wear, 
Novelties. Also Chinese general groceries 
and fresh produce daily. 



foetter ^rtomei 

fl/oaern l^ancn ^Jupt 

XJunaatowd C7 1 L,oitaqe.i 

.3 /©»»*> ana (JSrlch 

"NOTHING FINER ANYWHERE" 

For Complete Information 

Call CH. 3 2550, R0. 4-3775 or 

Fvenings 01 3-5275, OL. 3-4661 

SEYMOUR RUFF, Builder 

BALTIMORE. MD. 



nELSOIl PERSOIMEL CO. 

Since 1936 

Accountants - Engineers - Executives 
Salesmen • Secretarial 

LExington 9-4727 

2-6 E. Lexington St. Baltimore, Md. 



LExington _^^_____ VAlley 
9-2105 \ M'S / 3 - 4863 



WEST & CO. 



Gakkktt \Glga£t&i4\ u a ,, T imoub 

Bldo. ^ 2. Md. 

MULTIPLE LISTING REALTORS 

Specializing in 

NORTHERN PROPERTIES 



WHOLESALE STATIONERY 

The "Handy" Line 

Baltimore, Md. 



Maryland 



25 



T 



OWSON 

ELEPHONE 

SECRETARIES 

Mrs. Flanagan, Owner 

WE ANSWER YOUR PHONE 
VAIley 5-1300 

24 Hours A Day Every Day 
TOWSON 

Month to Month Basis, Order By Phone 

For Information Call VAIley 5-1300 

107 YORK ROAD 



HIGH FIDELITY 

for 

THE MODERN HOME 

COMPLETE SYSTEMS FOR 
AS LITTLE AS 

$99 so 

WHOLESALE RADIO PARTS CO., Inc. 

311 W. Baltimore St. Balto. 1, Md. 
Tel. MU 5-2134 



Harbor Towing Corp. 

Never Closed 

GEORGE E. ROGERS 

TUGBOATS - PETROLEUM 
General Towing 

Day Phone Night Phone 

PE 2-7265 AT 4-31 18 

Baltimore, Md. 



LIBERTY RADIO & 
TELEVISION SERVICE 

HIGH FIDELITY 

Music Systems for Home and Office 

4908 PARK HEIGHTS AVE. 

Baltimore, Md. Liberty 2-9457 



Kuum kJdUiu 



DISTINCTIVE FORM FIT UNIFDRM 

Regulation Nurses Uniforms 

To Measure 

1 20 FOREST DRIVE 
BALTIMORE 21, MD. 



Rldgeway 7-6575 



"Crawford retreat • 

Interested in Problem Cases 

Henriette L. Nestler, Director 

Elizabeth Meyer, Supr. of Nursing 

WILKINS 7-0704 

• 21 1 7 DENISON ST. BALTIMORE 1 *, MD. • 



a big picture like that of a large horse, 
they'll hold their fingers on the picture 
longer than on that of a small pony. 
Soon they learn the feel of the music, 
the melody and the rhythm in the song 
through their bodies and finally in the 
mind. By this time, they're usually 
pretty well prepared to follow the 
actual musical scale notes which appear 
opposite the picture pages in the book. 

The Childhood Education student- 
teachers contributed in many ways also. 
Some helped write the melodies, or part 
of them; or the words, or the idea of 
the words from the illustrations. The 
ideas for the illustrations were in al- 
most all instances worked out by these 
earnest young co-eds who plan teaching 
careers. 

The staff of the center consists of 
seven permanent members and 150 stu- 
dents majoring in childhood education. 
There are about 101 children enrolled 
in the center currently. The center 
has its own building on campus, com- 
plete with a fenced-in play yard. The 
tots can slide down a wooden sliding 
board or a metal fireman's pole when 
leaving school for the day or use the 
more conventional steps adjacent to 
the fast-exit equipment at the door. 
The University of Maryland is the only 
school in the East where training is 
given in both nursery school and kin- 
dergarten. 

New Wings 

Second Lt. Lloyd G. Cox, (Education 
54) completed basic multi-engine flying 
training at Goodfel- 
low Air Force Base, 
Texas and was 
awarded the silver 
wings at a special 
ceremony held there. 
The Lieutenant, at 
Maryland, majored 
in Industrial Educa- 
tion and was a mem- 
ber of the Pi Kappa 
Alpha fraternity. He 
received his commis- 
sion through the 
Maryland R.O.T.C. 
program. He is married to the former 
Miss Betty Ann Brown of Laurel, Md. 

Education Personals 

Dr. Donald Maley, Industrial Educa- 
tion, was elected the National Presi- 
dent of Iota Lambda Sigma, national 
honorary professional fraternity in 
Industrial Education. Dr. Maley as- 
sumed the presidency at the meeting 
held in Atlantic City in conjunction 
with the annual convention of the 
American Vocational Association. 

Mabel F. Spencer, Education, is tak- 
ing sabbatical leave for one semester 
of advanced study. 

Dr. R. L. Hornbake, Industrial Edu- 
cation, addressed the Industrial Edu- 
cation Teachers of Washington, D. C. 

Dr. Ira J. Gordon, Institute for 
Child Study, recently attended the 
general session of the American 
School Counciling Association, where he 
spoke on the "Role of the Teacher in 
the School Guidance Program". 







Lt. Cox 



Mathematics 

On July 27, and 28, there will be a 
Conference on Mathematics, Science, 
and Engineering Education, coopera- 
tively sponsored by the Colleges of 
Education, Engineering, and the Spec- 
ial and Continuation Studies for science 
and mathematics teachers, guidance 
directors and counselors, and superin- 
tendents and high school principals. 
It will provide an opportunity for teach- 
ers to get together with leaders from 
industry and engineering to discuss the 
important questions of educating young 
people for the scientific and engineering 
fields, both as teachers and practition- 
ers; of how to attract young people 
into careers in these fields; and of 
what part can be mutually played by 
secondary schools in the University 
in the education of these people. 

There will be addresses and panel 
discussions by outstanding people in the 
fields of science, engineeiing, and edu- 
cation and small discussion groups 
where there will be an opportunity to 
meet with industrialists, engineers, and 
staff members from the university 
teaching in these fields. In addition, 
there will be guided tours to the en- 
gineering, science, and mathematics 
buildings. 

White House Conference 

Betty Amos Bull '26 (Mrs. F. L. Bull) 
was one of the 20 official state dele- 
gates to the White House Conference 
on Education. Since then, she has been 
reporting the find- 
ings at local, coun- 
ty, and state meet- 
ing throughout 
Maryland. 

Betty has long 
been interested in 
improved and ex- 
panded educational 
opportunities for all 
children and youth, 
long before it be- 
came the popular 
thing to do. Current- 
ly, she is serving 
her second year as President of the 
Md. Congress of Parents & Teachers, 
the largest volunteer organization in 
the state, whose membership this school 
year has increased from 135,000 to 
150,000 paid-up members! Just recent- 
ly the Baltimore City P.T.A. units, 
which have not belonged to the state 
and national organization, have voted 
to join. This undoubtedly will cause 
the membership to jump ahead again 
next year by many more thousands. 
"Such rapid growth is a great chal- 
lenge," says Betty, "because it means 
our whole broad program of work and 
our leadership training must keep 
pace". "It is not easy when there is a 
turnover of leadership each year in our 
nearly 600 local units and 23 county 
councils". 

Betty is a past-president of the 
Maryland Council on Education, an or- 
ganization made up of 60 state-wide 
organizations having a continuing in- 
terest in Education. She was the only 
lay representative from Maryland in- 




Mrs. Bull 



26 



Maryland 



vited to the recent Regional "Teacher 
Education and Professional Standards" 
Conference held at the Wooden Hotel in 
D.C. Last year the Md. State Teachers' 
Assoc, sent her as a lay participant to 
the National TEPS Conference held 
in DeKalb, 111. She also attended the 
N.E.A. Convention in Chicago as a 
voting delegate. In February, she at- 
tended the American Association of 
School Administrators Convention in 
Atlantic City, and was a platform quest 
the opening night. This May she will 
represent the State at the National 
P.T.A. Convention in San Francisco. 

Her husband, Fred L. Bull ('25— Col- 
lege of Agriculture) is State Soil Con- 
servationist for the Univ. of Md. Ex- 
tension Service; son — Robert L. Bull, 
Cornell '52, is on the faculty of the 
University of Delaware; daughter — 
"Betsy" instructs groups of secretaries 
in the use of complicated I.B.M. office 
machines and was one of three winners 
in the "Best Secretary in Baltimore 
City" contest last year. 

Betty always has been very active 
in community life, serving at one time 
or another as local P.T.A. President, 
County Council P.T.A. President, as an 
officer of the state and National Home- 
maker's Clubs, as a local 4H Club 
leader, a Scout Den Mother, a teacher 
of Sunday School class, as chairman of 
the Natural Resources Committee of 
Md. Women, and other groups. For the 
last four years she has re-organized 
and served as Superintendent of the 
main exhibition hall at the Md. State 
Fair at Timonium. 

Educator's Responsibilities 

"What are the Professional Edu- 
cator's Responsibilities for the Future 
of the Schools," was the subject of a 
one-day education conference at the 
University. 

The objectives of the institute are 
to bring together representatives of 
the public, teachers and administrative 
educators to discuss and critically ex- 
amine some of the major problems 
confronting education. 

Sponsoring the program was the 
Beta Epsilon Chapter of Phi Delta 
Kappa, education honorary fraternity, 
and the University. 

The university's chapter of the fra- 
ternity invited to College Park, out- 
standing leaders in education to conduct 
discussions on individual problems. The 
College of Education faculty members 
acted as coordinators for the individual 
groups 

All educators in the State of Mary- 
land were invited to participate 
in the program designed to seek ways 
of improving leadership, research and 
service in education in the state. 

Members of the planning committee 
were Emory A. Harmon, chairman; 
Walter S. Blake, Jr.; and Fred L. 
Dunn, Jr. 

Dr. Harold Benjamin, chairman of 
the Division of Social Foundations at 
Peabody Teachers College and former 
dean of the University of Maryland 
College of Education, keynoted the 
meeting. 




Days of work 
reduced to a few hours . . . 

by Baltimore Business Forms! 

Piece Work Operation Now Does 6 Jobs With 1 Form 

A leading piece work manufacturer presented this problem. "How 
to get more accurate production records by work classification and 
cut high cost of sorting 20,000 tickets a week?" 

After careful study, Baltimore Business Forms design specialists 
came up with a simple triplicate form to handle all these jobs at 
one time. Now, this company (name on request), controls inventory 
— productive and rework costs and furnishes worker's receipt, in- 
spection ticket, pay roll slip on one simple form! It takes experi- 
enced designers to produce these money-saving results. Baltimore 
Business Forms have designed forms for thousands of leading busi- 
ness houses! And because our line is complete, you get unbiased 
recommendations, excellent business form service for any need — 
when you need it! 

Write today for unmistakable proof that we can help solve your 
business form problem. The Baltimore Business Forms Co., 
Dept. A, 3130 Frederick Ave., Baltimore 29, Md. 

11 B altimore Business Forms (oropanu 

(THE BALTIMORE SAIESBOOK COMPANY) 

Saving time and reducing costs in business and industry 




Maryland 



27 




X Jtoto Dn 



for Lroa 



naraxmai 



irams 



— VJ* ° 



and J\)a 



3' 



3 



azmcs 



ADVERTISERS ENGRAVING COMPANY 

501-509 EAST PRESTON STREET 
MUlberry 5-2357 5-2358 



v^ 



9 Jh& (Roland (pctAk* 

fisualhj. 

tympany 

Member 

Real Estate Board of Baltimore 

Multiple Listing Bureau 

JOHN McC. MOWBRAY 
President 

B. FRANKLIN HEARN, JR. 
Vice-President in Charge of Sales 

NORMAN F. GORSUCH 
Vice-President 

4810 Roland Rue. TUxedo 9-9600 
• Baltimore 10, flld. • 



F. A Davis & Sons 

WHOLESALERS 

Cigars, Tobaccos, Sundries & Supplies 

Kitchen & Dining Equipment 

Soda Fountain Supplies 

1 1 9 S. HOWARD STREET 
Baltimore 1 , Md. 



MRS. ALICE STIIDLEY 

SWEDISH MEDICAL MASSEUSE 

AT HOSPITALS and HOMES 

By Appointment Only 



Gymkana 

"Cartoon Capers" will be the theme 
of the annual Gymkana Home Show, 
April 12 and 13 in Ritchie Coliseum. 

This year's show will feature the 
gymnastics of comic strip characters 
in juggling, balancing and trampoline 
acts. Tarzan and Cheeta are practicing 
for their trampoline act. 

While practicing for the big show the 
Troupers keep up their regular per- 
formances for high schools around the 
state. 

Nineteen members of the Gymkana 
Troupe went on a 10-day 1600-mile 
tour of Army Camps in the Southland, 
giving up their mid-semester holiday. 
Starting by plane to Ft. Bragg, N.C., 
the troupe took their show to seven 
camps and hospitals in the Carolinas, 
Alabama and Georgia. 



College of 



Business & Public 



Administration 



Baltimore, Md. 



BE 5-2569 




Lt. Gollomb 



— Egbert F. Tingley 

Silver Wings 

Henry L. Collomb received the silver 
wings of an Air Force jet pilot re- 
cently at Laredo Air 
Force Base, Texas 
The graduation cul- 
minated fourteen 
months of intensive 
pilot training in 
both propeller driv- 
en and jet type air- 
craft. 

The 26-year-old 
jet pilot graduated 
from Maryland in 
June, 1954, (B&PA) 
where he acquired a 
Bachelor of Science 
degree in Business Administration. At 
the same time, he also received his 
commission through the Air Force 
ROTC Unit. 

New Scholarships 

Two scholarships of $1,000 each, 
sponsored by The Baltimore News-Post 
and Sunday American, will become 
available next year to students at the 
University, it was announced at a 
Maryland Press Association meeting 
in Baltimore. 

One of these scholarships will be 
for the study of journalism and the 
other for the study of history. 

Announcement was made by Elmer 
M. Jackson, of the Press Association's 
advisory committee for the University's 
Department of Journalism. 

The scholarships were made possible 
by a gift of bonds from the Hearst 
Foundation in 1947, which now have 
matured and the income from the fund, 
now $50,000, will be used to pay the 
scholarships. 

To Receive Award 

Ralph W. Crosby, (B & PA), was 
chosen to receive an award as the top 
journalism student, for leadership, 
studies, and to be the "most likely to 
succeed." 



Business Management Institute 

A weekly Business Management In- 
stitute was held by the College of 
Business and Public Administration 
on the University s Baltimore campus. 

The purpose oi the institute was to 
develop basic skihs required of man- 
agement that will result in better 
planning, organizing and controlling 
the work of the business organization. 

Each of the three hour weekly meet- 
ings consisted of lecture and discus- 
sions led by faculty members of the 
College of Business and Public Ad- 
ministration and its Department of 
Business Organization. 

The programs were designed to pre- 
sent "the knowledge of systematic 
approach to sowing every day prob- 
lems, an opportunity to meet and dis- 
cuss problems with other business men, 
an introduction to sources of informa- 
tion available to the small business 
operator, and an opportunity to in- 
crease individual management skills 
that may be used as a tool to improve 
operations." 

Cooperating with the University on 
the project were the Baltimore Asso- 
ciation of Commerce, the Baltimore 
Junior Association of Commerce, the 
Hardware Club of Baltimore, the Pikes- 
ville Business and Professional Asso- 
ciation and the Catonsville Business 
and Professional Association. 

All the meetings were held on Tues- 
day evenings at the University's Bress- 
ler Research Laboratory. 

For Good Government 

An important function of every state 
university consists of providing re- 
search and consultant services to state 
and local governmental agencies. 

At the University of Maryland a 
large portion of these governmental 
service activities are conducted through 
its Bureau of Governmental Research, 
in the College of Business and Public 
Administration. 

"Should a rapidly growing commun- 
ity incorporate?" What portion of 
state funds should be spent in each 
individual county for health purposes?' 
What Maryland officials are involved 
in administering state funds and what 
are their responsibilities?" These are 
some of the problems that haye. re- 
cently come to the university for study 
and analysis. 

An important adjunct of the bureau's 
research work is a publication pro- 
gram. Often the findings of the re- 
search work are printed for distribu- 
tion throughout the state. Since 1947, 
nearly two dozen monographs have 
been issued. Representative titles oyer 
the years include Maryland Fiscal 
Scene, Improving the Government of 
Wicomico County, Maryland Municipal 
Police Systems, Election Practices in 
Maryland and Local Government in 
Maryland. 

Through the university's bureau are 
also conducted short courses for state 
and local officials. Now in its eleventh 
year, for instance, is the Annual School 
for Maryland Assessing Officers. Each 
year this and other courses bring hun- 
dreds of Marylanders from all over the 



28 



Maryland 




state to the College Park campus for 
meetings. 

Work of the Bureau of Governmental 
Research in state and local government 
administration has been recognized in 
academic and professional circles 
throughout the country proving once 
again the old adage that "the greatest 
distinction comes from serving those 
nearest you." 

New Wings 
Second Lt. Michael Patrick Troiano, 
completed basic 
multi-flying training 
at Goodfellow Air 
Force Base, Texas. 
The New Air Force 
pilot received the 
Jr., (B. & PA '54), 
silver wings in a 
special ceremony 
held there. 
^^^ ^^B The Lieutenant 

H ^ ^fl I received his com- 
HeW^HBI m ' ssl " n through the 
ROTC program at 
Lt. Troiano Maryland. 

To Germany 
Pvt. Richard B. Davis, (B.&P.A. '55) 
left the U. S. for Germany as part of 
Operation Gyroscope, the Army's unit 
rotation plan. 

Davis' unit, the 25th Signal Battal- 
ion, stationed at Fort Devens, Mass., 
replaced the 40th Signal Battalion in 
Europe. 

He entered the Army in September 
of last year and completed basic train- 
ing at Fort Jackson, S. C. Davis is a 
member of Phi Delta Theta fraternity. 
Pvt. Thomas P. Moran, (B.&P.A. 
'55) son of Edward E. Moran, College 
Park, arrived in Germany and is a 
member of the 7822d Army Unit. 

A teletype operator in the signal 
section, Moran was last stationed at 
Camp Gordon, Ga. He entered the 
Army in August 1955, is a member of 
Phi Kappa Phi, Delta Sigma Phi, and 
Betta Gamma Sigma fraternities. 
Silver Wings 
Second Lieutenant James S. Faulk- 
ner received the silver wings of an Air 
Force jet pilot recently at Laredo Air 
Force Base, Texas. The graduation cul- 
minated fourteen 
months of intensive 
pilot training in 
both propeller driv- 
en and jet type air- 
craft. 

The 25-year-o 1 d 
jet pilot graduated 
from Maryland in 
June 1954 (B. & P,^ 
A.) where he ac= 
quired a degree in 
Business Adminis- 
tration. At the same 
time, he also re- 
ceived his commission through the Air 
Force ROTC Unit. 

While at the University of Mary- 
land, Lieutenant Faulkner participated 
in varsity Baseball. He was also a 
member of Kappa Alpha. 

Ford Convention 
The presidents of seven Washington 
area colleges, including Maryland have 
been invited by Henry Ford II, presi- 

Maryland 




Lt. Faulkner 



dent of Ford Motor Company, to 
nominate faculty members to attend 
the second annual Ford Educational 
Forum at Dearborn, Mich., July 15-28. 

Mr. Ford said that 37 educators 
would be granted Fellowship Awards 
for the conference, designed to give 
active college instructors a "short 
course" in various phases of the auto 
industry. Colleges in this area invited 
to participate are American Univer- 
tsiy, Catholic University, George Wash- 
ington University, Georgetown Uni- 
versity, Howard University, Trinity 
College and University of Maryland. 

The first Forum in 1955 was inspired 
by the growing interest among edu- 
cators to acquire a more intimate 
knowledge of the world of business and 
industry. Leland B. Yeager, of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, attended the 
Forum last year. 

"We hope this 1956 conference will 
give another group of professors the 
opportunity to see for themselves what 
a major industry looks like and how 
it works," Mr. Ford added. 

Topics for study and discussion wil! 
include the organization and adminis- 
tration of the company, employe re- 
lations, marketing of automotive pro- 
ducts, problems of mass production, 
public relations, and economics of the 
industry. 

The instructors will be selected by 
a board of college educators and com- 
pany officials. The Fellowship Awards 
will cover expenses, including trans- 
portation to and from Dearborn. Both 
men and women currently teaching in 
the social science and humanity fields 
will be eligible. 

Legislative Conference 

Approximately 225 boys and girls 
representing Hi-Y clubs of the Y.M.- 
C.A. of the State of Maryland par- 
ticipated in a Pre-legislative confer- 
ence at the University. 

Dr. Don L. Bowen, director of the 
university's Bureau of Governmental 
Research, and chairman of the con- 
ference noted that the conference 
was designed to give boys and 
girls of Maryland an opportunity to 
participate in the exact state govern- 
mental structure as it exists in An- 
napolis. 

Highlights of the one day meeting 
were the election of a boy governor 
and the actual functioning of a legis- 
lature complete with committee as- 
signments. 

Assisting Dr. Bowen in the presen- 
tation of the program were many state 
officials, civic leaders, high school and 
junior college representatives, and 
Y.M.C.A. leaders. 

Politics 

Governor Theodore R. McKeldin will 
be principal speaker at the "Youth In 
Politics" conference to be at the Uni- 
versity Saturday, April 7. 

The conference will take up the op- 
portunities for youth in politics and 
emphasize the practical aspects of 
party politics on the national, state and 
local levels of government. 

President Wilson H. Elkins will open 
proceedings and four panel discussions 



ALL ROADS LEAD TO 



HOTEL 




SALISBURY • MARYLAND 
Corner Division and Main Sts. 



Baltimore. Pheoerick, 

Annapolis, Washington 

and thi West 



New enolano New rami, 
Philadelphia. Wilming- 
ton. Del. and the Month 




norpolk, Newport News 
and the South 




FAMILY RATES 

(Children Free) 
Our Famous 



EASTERN SHORE 
CUISINE 

TRUE SOUTHERN 
HOSPITALITY 



PLANTATION 



"Scotch- bred" 
ANGUS BULLS 

Our U. of Md. supervised weigh- 
ing program proves Wye "Scotch 
as a Bagpipe" bulls average near- 
ly 3 lbs. gain per day. Big, fast 
growing, they'll get the same kind 
for you . . . Write for folders, 
data sheets, prices. 
Addrett : J. B. LINGLE, Mgr. 



LVVE PLANTATION, Queenstown.Md. 



( ljsi£Vc fiowruL Kduasl 

COR. BALTIMORE AVE. and 4th STREET 
(1 Block from Boardwalk) 

PRIVATE ROOMS 

APARTMENTS 

Alio Accommodqtioni For 

Parties of Four or More 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold J. Rayne, Jr. 

OCEAN CITY 787 

OCEAN CITY, MD. 



USE THE COUPON ON 
THE LAST PAGE 

29 



LIGHTHOUSE 
DinCR 

Two Places to Eat 
Here and at Home 

open year Rouno 

• June to October 
• 24-Hour Service 

FINE FOOD and 
MIXED DRINKS 

8 Miles from Oteon City, Md. 
en Beach Highway 

Feniuick Island, Del. 




Chas. E. Holloway Nursery 
Delmar-(88)-4401 

S. SECOND ST. DELMAR, DEL. 



BELDEN RESTORIUM 

821 Second St. Tel: 746 

POCOMOKE CITY, MD. 

For Convalescents and Chronic Patients 
Dietary Supervision — State Inspected 

24-HR. NURSING CARE 2 DOCTORS ON STAFF 

Mrs. Thei.ma F. Redden 



^prina ^J4ill 



PRIVATE SANITARIUM 



SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



TELEPHONE SALISBURY 9B94 



MASSEY-HARRIS 

Sales - Service - Parts 

LUTHY 

FARM MACHINERY CO. 

CAMBRIDGE 838 CAMBRIDGE, MD. 



USE THE COUPON ON 
THE LAST PAGE 




led by ranking state officials and lead- 
ers of both Democratic and Republican 
parties will follow. 

Among the political figures who will 
attend are U. S. Senator John Marshall 
Butler (Republican) and Congressman 
Richard E. Lankford (Democratic). 

The University's Department of 
Government and Politics is co-sponsor- 
ing the conference with the Young 
Democratic Clubs of Maryland and the 
Maryland Federation of Young Re- 
publicans. 

The purpose of the conference is to 
familiarize students with practical 
politics and to encourage their partici- 
pation. 

Economics 
What causes inflation and depres- 
sion? Are there dangers in a large 
public debt ? What would be the effects 
in Maryland of rais- 
ing more state rev- 
enue by increasing 
the sales tax as com- 
pared with an in- 
crease in the per- 
sonal income tax? 
How do higher tar- 
iffs on Swiss 
watches affect the 
sale of Maryland 
tobacco? These ques- 
tions are typical of 
the problems dis- 
cussed in the class- 
room and written 
about by members 
of the faculty of 
the Department of 
Economics at the 
University of Maryland. 

Economics courses are essential for 
business administration and economics 
majors, but an understanding of eco- 
nomics problems clearly is indispens- 
able for intelligent citizenship in a 
democracy. 

In point of service, the oldest member 
of the University's Department of Eco- 
nomics is Professor Allan G. Gruchy, 
who came to College Park in 1937. At 
present Professor Gruchy is writing a 
book on the principles of stable eco- 
nomic growth in the United States. 

One of the newest members of the 
Economics faculty is Dr. E. A. J. 
Johnson, who taught at Harvard, Ox- 
ford and Cambridge, and before coming 
to Maryland, taught at Harvard, Cor- 
nell and New York University. Dr. 
Johnson is co-founder of one of the 
nationally important learned societies, 
the Economic History Association. He 
has held many high government posts 
including that of Civil Governor of 
Korea in 1946-47. 

Books recently published by members 
of the Economics faculty include, The 
Crisis of the Middle Class, by Pro : 
fessor Henry Grayson, and Economic 
Growth and Instability, by Professor 
Daniel Hamberg. 

Industrial Dispersal 
Industrial dispersal one of the most 
important factors of national defense 
in the atomic age, has been tragically 
neglected in the U. S., according to 
results of a research project published 



Prof. Gruchy 



today by the Bureau of Business and 
Economic Research of the University 
of Maryland. Under the title, "Indus- 
trial Dispersal," under the Bureau's 
studies in business and economics, 
March, 1956, the study attempts to 
provide an objective analysis of the 
arguments for and against industrial 
dispersal. 

Although the United States has 
officially had a dispersal program since 
1951, the analysis indicates that lack 
of support by top government and 
business officials has resulted in an 
economy which is dangerously over- 
centralized and vulnerable to nuclear 
attack. While much precious time has 
already been lost, it is not too late to 
reorganize our industrial dispersal pro- 
gram, preferably with the necessary 
authority and responsibility centered in 
a single agency. Figures published in 
the study show that the U. S. economy 
is growing at such at rate that, if an 
effective program were initiated in the 
near future, the normal growth of new 
plants would quickly result in the loca- 
tion of a very sizable portion of our 
national economy in decentralized areas. 

The study also recommends that 
dispersal be planned on a long-run 
basis which could be sustained regard- 
less of changes of pace in the foreign 
policy of potential enemies. Towards 
this end, dispersal policy should be in- 
tegrated with other regional programs 
such as the expanding Federal highway 
program and aid to distressed areas. 

While it is recognized that the Fed- 
eral Government must assume the basic 
responsibility for a realistic program, 
states and local communities have an 
important role to play. Emphasis should 
be upon the organization of county and 
local planning agencies which should 
develop community expansion programs 
with zoning provisions adequate to pro- 
vide organized industrial districts as 
well as long-run protection for resi- 
dential areas. 

Potentially important assets to the 
dispersal program in Maryland are the 
relatively invulnerable and protected 
mountain areas of western Maryland 
with their network of mine shafts and 
the sparsely populated areas of tide- 
water southern Maryland. 

The study concludes that, until the 
Federal Government formulates and 
enforces a realistic dispersal program, 
it is in the interest of businessmen in 
Maryland and other states voluntarily 
to protect their employees and stock- 
holders by choosing decentralized loca- 
tions for the expanding capacity of 
their plants. 

With C. & P. Tel. Co. 

Ralph Frey, Jr., BPA '41, has been 
appointed General Commercial Super- 
visor for the Washington Company of 
the Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone 
Co. Mr. Frey is a native of Mt. Rainier, 
Md. and after receiving his degree he 
went to work for the Telephone Co. as 
a commercial representative. Since that 
time he has made many advances. 

Mr. Frey is a member of the Mt. 
Rainier-Brentwood Lions Club, Past 
Commander Post 110, American Legion, 



30 



Maryland 



member of the Pr. Geo. County Cham- 
ber of Commerce, Bethesda Chamber of 
Commerce and Silver Spring Board of 
Trade. 

He and his wife, the former Bettie 
Boyce with their family, reside in 
Takoma Park, Md. 

With A.T. & T. 

Edwin R. Burtner, BPA '52, Staff 
Accountant for the Chesapeake and 
Potomac Telephone Co., has accepted 
a temporary assignment with the 
Treasury Department of the American 
Telephone and Telegraph Co. in New 
York. He will be engaged in work in 
connection with the offering of deben- 
tures to stockholders of the American 
Company. This assignment is con- 
sidered an honor to attain. 

In Kansas 

William Thomas Ward, BPA '49, has 
become the 553rd person to receive a 
certificate as Certified Public Account- 
ant from the Board of Accountancy 
of the State of Kansas, where he now 
resides. Mr. Ward will, of course, be 
subject to the rules of professional 
conduct of the Board of Accountancy. 
This certificate qualifies Mr. Ward to 
serve businesses and individuals con- 
cerning such matters as income tax, 
auditing and accounting methods and 
procedures. 

In Florida 

Graduated from the Naval Pre-Flight 
School at Pensa- 
cola, Fla., was Na- 
val Aviation Ca- 
det Jeremy D. 
Taylor, who at- 
tended B & PA '53, 
'54, '55 before en- 
tering the Naval 
Aviation Cadet 
Program through 
the Anacostia Na- 
val Air Station at 
Washington. He is 
now assigned to 
the Whiting Field 
Naval Auxiliary Air Station, Milton, 
Fla., for primary flight training. 

B. & P.A. Personals 

Dr. Daniel Hamberg, Department 
of Economics, published a book entitled 
"Economic Growth and Instability": A 
Study in the Problem of Capital Ac- 
cumulation, Employment, and the Bus- 
iness Cycle". 

Dr. Charles A. Taff, Professor of 
Transportation, presented a Transpor- 
tation paper at the American Economic 
Association's annual meeting in New 
York. The subject of the paper was 
the "Competition of Long-Distance 
Motor Trucking Farm and Industrial 
Products and Supplies". 

Dr. John H. Frederick, Business Or- 
ganization, spoke before the United 
Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Association 
at their convention in New Orleans on 
the subject of proposed changes in 
national transportation policy. Dr. 
Frederick also discussed the same sub- 
ject before the Legal Committee of the 
American Automobile Association 
meeting in Miami, Florida. 




Cadet Taylor 



&za Scape Wlobd 



On the Beach 

16th St. & Boardwalk, Ocean City, Md. 




• AIR CONDITIONED ROOMS 

• ICE WATER TAPS 

• TELEPHONES 

Write for Reservations or 



• COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

• SWIMMING POOL 

• COFFEE SHOP 



PHONE OCEAN CITY 1030 



PLIMHIMMON HOTEL 

Largest and Most Modern Hotel in Ocean City, Md. 

Located on the corner 2nd Street & Boardwalk 

OPEN MAY 25th TILL SEPT. 15th 

287 Rooms with Baths 

• Elevator Service • Large Dining Room 

• Coffee Shop • Bathers Welcome 

American or European Plans 




MAGEE OIL CO. 

BERLIN OCEAN CITY 
DAGSBORO SELBYVILLE 

Dependable Service 
Since 1920 



J. McKenny Willis & Son, inc. 



GRAIX 

FEED 

SEED 



EASTON, MD. 

Phone 744 



Hot Rolled Bars 
Cold Finished Bars 
Structural Shapes 
Hot Rolled Plates 

Floor Plates 
Jalloy H. T. Plates 

Pipe 



The EASTERN SHORE STEEL Co. 

Complete Steel Warehouse Service 

314 West Carroll Street 
Tel. 9200 Salisbury, Maryland 



Hot Rolled Sheets 
Cold Rolled 

Sheets 
Galvanized Sheets 
Hot Rolled Strip 
Drill Rod & Tool 

Steels 
Expanded Metals 
Deformed Bars 



Maryland 



31 



MARYLAND INN 




In HISTORIC ANNAPOLIS, MD. 

18th CENTURY HOSTELRY with 

20th CENTURY COMFORTS 

Air Conditioned 

Rooms and Apartments 

CHURCH CIRCLE & MAIN STREET 

COIonial 3-2641 



/. C. BAN 




• Canvas and 

Flexalum 

Aluminum 

AWNINGS 

• UPHOLSTERING 

Work Called For and Delivered 
1 HIGGINS ST. PHONE 

EASTON, MD. 635 J 



uucomico COIWTV FflRITI 
BUREAU CO-OPERATlUc 

INC. 
feed - fertilizer 

Seed 

Farm Supplies 

917 W ISABELLA STREET 

Salisbury, Md. • Phone 4651 






RIVERSIDE NURSING HOME 

Quiet and Restful Location 

409 CAMDEN COURT, SALISBURY, MD. 
Salisbury 2-2639 






IJ IJ I II IJ 

ENRICHED BREAD 

IT'S DELICIOUS 
SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



Miss Monora Noyes and Mrs. Harold 
Hayes, of B & PA and the Library 
Staff respectively, were elected to the 
Board of Directors of the League of 
Women Voters of Prince Georges 
County at the annual dinner of the 
League. Miss Noyes was elected a di- 
rector for a one-year term and Mrs. 
Hayes was elected First Vice President. 

The following named members of the 
Department of Geography attended the 
Annual meeting of the Association of 
American Geographers in Montreal, 
Canada: Dr. W. Van Royen, Dr. D. J. 
Patton, Dr. J. P. Augelli, Mr. W. W. 
Deshler, Mr. C. C. Chang, Mr. Anthony 
Sas, Dr. Frank Ahnert, and Mr. R. R. 
Merrens. Dr. Patton, Dr. Augelli, Mr. 
Deshler and Mr. Chang will read papers 
at the meeting. Dr. Patton is Chair- 
man of the International Fellowship 
Committee and Dr. Augelli is Chair- 
man of the Placement Committee of 
the Association. 



College of 



Arts and Sciences 



Lois Eld Ernest 




Lt. Huebel 



Silver Wings 

Second Lieutenant Jared M. Huebel, 
received the silver wings of an 

Air Force jet pilot recently at Laredo 
Air Force Base, Tex- 
as. The graduation 
culminated fourteen 
months of intensive 
pilot training in 
both propeller driv- 
en and jet type air- 
craft. 

The 24-year-old 
jet pilot graduated 
from Maryland in 
1954 (A & S) where 
he acquired a B. A. 
degree in Psychol- 
ogy. At the same 

time, he also received his commission 

through the Air Force ROTC LTnit. 
Lieutenant Huebel was an active 

member of the Sigma Alpha Lpsilon. 

Scholarships 

One new and two renewed scholar- 
ships for doctoral degree candidates in 
chemistry have been made a ailable, 
it was announced by Dr. Nathan L. 
Drake, head of the Department of 
Chemistry. 

The new scholarship has been pro- 
vided by the Fellowship Committee of 
the Eastman Kodak Company. The 
renewed scholarships have been award- 
ed by the General Development De- 
partment of the Monsanto Chemical 
Company, St. Louis, Missouri and the 
Committee on Fellowships and Grants 
of the E. I. du Pont de Nemours and 
Company, Wilmington, Delaware. 

The scholarships, to be effective for 
the academic year 1956-57, provide for 
financial assistance to outstanding 




Kurpa 



chemistry students and are for the 
purpose of encouraging and assisting 
chemistry students pursuing graduate 
training toward advanced degrees. 

Honor Accorded Karpa 

Morton Karpa, (A. & S. alumnus 
'47 to '52) Maryland state manager 
for Kessler-Gallagher and Burton, was 
elected Worshipful Master of Centre 
Lodge, No. 108, AF 
&( AM, Baltimore. 
Governor Theodore 
R. McKeldin, guest 
speaker at the in- 
stallation ceremony, 
presented Mr. Krapa 
with a white oak 
gavel made from a 
limb of the Wye 
Oak, Maryland's 
official state tree. 
Mr. Karpa is a na- 
tive of Baltimore. 
He was president of 
the Hillel Foundation as an under- 
graduate. He served in the Navy 
during World War II. 

Files For Judgeship 

Samuel W. H. Meloy, United States 
commissioner at Upper Marlboro, filed 
for the judgeship of the Prince Georges 
County Circuit Court. 

Mr. Meloy has been a commissioner 
for the past 10 years, and for the 
same period has served as auditor to 
the Circuit Court. He was graduated 
from the University of Maryland with 
a bachelor of arts degree in 1936, from 
the College of Arts and Sciences. 

The 40-year-old commissioner be- 
came a member of the District bar in 
1939, and was admitted to the Mary- 
land bar in 1940. 

During World War II he was a Navy 
lieutenant with the Atlantic Fleet. He 
now resides on his tobacco farm near 
Upper Marlboro with his wife and 
three young children. 

Chemistry Scholarships 

The Eastman Kodak Co. has provided 
a chemistry scholarship for a doctor's 
degree candidate at the University, Dr. 
Nathan L. Drake, who heads the chem- 
istry department, announced. Two 
similar scholarships provided by the 
Monsanto Chemical Co. and E. I. du 
Pont de Nemours & Co. have been re- 
newed, Dr. Drake added. They will be 
effective for the next „v.ademic year. 

To Puerto Rico 

Dr. Graclela P. Nemes, Spanish in- 
structor, will take a short vacation 
from teaching duties this summer to 
visit Puerto Rico in connection with a 
book she is writing. 

The book, a biography of Spanish 
poet Juan Ramon Jimenez, will be 
the first account of the poet's life to 
appear in print, and will be published 
in Spain this fall. 

Dr. Nemes, with the help of Dr. 
Zucker, foreign language department 
head, obtained a grant for her Puerto 
Rican jaunt. 



32 



Maryland 



Dr. Nemes has been doing research 
on the book since 1949, but Jiminez 
recently made public personal papers 
which will make possible the work's 
completion. 

To Atlanta 

Dr. Norman R. Roth, assistant pro- 
fessor of sociology, attended a con- 
ference sponsored by the Southern Re- 
gional Education Board in Atlanta, 
Georgia. 

The Southern Regional Education 
Board was established in 1949 under 
the Interstate Compact and coordinates 
educational programs in fourteen states 
stretching geographically from Mary- 
land to Texas. The University of Mary- 
land has taken an active role in the 
program of the Board since its estab- 
lishment. 

The Conference brought together 
representatives of undergraduate and 
graduate programs in social work edu- 
cation, and of the state mental health 
agencies to consider the important 
problems attendant to meeting the 
needs for more social workers in state 
mental health services. Dr. Roth rep- 
resented Maryland at this meeting. 

The theme of the conference was 
"Social Work Personnel for Mental 
Health Programs." 

Polyfluorometer 

The American Instrument Company 
of Silver Spring, presented the Depart- 
ment of Chemistry with a recently per- 
fected multi-position polyfluorometer. 

Valued at approximately $1000, the 
instrument will be used by Dr. Charles 
E. White, professor of inorganic chem- 
istry, in the development of fluori metric 
methods of analysis. Dr. White was a 
contributor to the final design of the 
analytical device. 

The instrument is used to measure 
fluroescence of solids, liquids, powders, 
melts, plates and films. Additionally it 
can be converted, without tools, to a 
number of different arrangements for 
other measurements. 

Prior to the construction of the 
polyfluorometer is was necessary to 
make these measurements on a number 
of single-purpose instruments. 

Physics Scholarship 

The University has established a new 
scholarship for deserving students 
showing outstanding promise in physics 
in addition to good character, academic 
achievement, and qualifications for 
leadership. Sti x °nd will depend upon 
need and will normally cover full 
tuition. 

There is now a critical national 
shortage of physicists and unlimited 
opportunities exist in fundamental 
scientific discovery and in the nation's 
defense or atomic and technical develop- 
ment. 

Any high school senior who wishes 
to apply for this scholarship should 
take the following steps: 

1. Write to the Director of Admis- 
sions for an application for admission 
to the University of Maryland. 

2. Write to Dr. John S. Toll, Profes- 
sor and Head of Physics, University of 
Maryland requesting application form 



Best for Baby . . ♦ 



extra rich 
extra nourishing 
extra delicious 



Serving the Major Portion of MARYLAND 




KOONTZ 



Tlflfl^^ 



BALTIMORE — Liberty 2-4300 

SALISBURY, MD. EASTON, MD. 

7145 375 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. LINTHICUM, MD. 

225 224 

First with (he "Carriage" Trade! 



VILLA-NOVA 




OHHEBH 



MOTEL - COTTAGES - APARTMENTS 

OCEAN CITY, MD. 

44 Fully Equipped Units — All Conveniences 

REASONABLE RATES 

• Safe Playground for Children • Snack Bar 

• Fishing Accommodations Arranged • Recreation Room 
Angelo M. Villani, Mgr. OCEAN CITY 781 or 0300W-3 or 86 

WRITE OR PHONE FOR RESERVATION NOW! 



MIDLANTIC METAL FABRICATORS 



OLD (WEBB) AIRPORT 
Grain Bulk Feed Hoppers 

Grain Wagon Bodies 



EASTON, MD. 

Septic Tanks 

Telephone 
EAston 1123 



MERCURY MOTORS— WOLVERINE & SKIPPER-CRAFT BOATS 



BOATS THE SHIP MOTORS 




SALISBURY, MD. 



PHONE 7649 



USE THE COUPON ON THE LAST PAGE 



Maryland 



23 



SHORE 

DISTRIBUTORS 

• wholesale plumbing 

• and heating supplies 

Salisbury, Md. 

• PHONE 3121 

Easton, Md. 

• PHONE 860 

Milford, Del. 

• PHONE 

Dover, Del 

• PHON 

Onley, Va. 



PHONE 8922 



PHONE 7453 



• PHONE ONANCOCK 755 

Show Room, at all Locations 



Hi-Way Marine 

Sales & Service 




Owens Yachts 

Skipper-Craft 

Whirlwind Boats 

OUTBOARD mOTORS & TRAILERS 

E ASTON, MD. Route 50 

Phone 1985W 





f® 


seafood 

* * 
special 
fried 
chicken 




riOHNMYS 3 




^T^ 5 *^ 




> SAMMYSJ 






ROUTE 13 SALISBl 


JRY, MD. 



for the Alumni Scholarship in Physics. 
Ask his high school science and mathe- 
matics teachers to send appraisals of 
his scientific promise. 

3. Make plans through his high 
school physics teacher to take the high 
school competitive examination in 
physics which will be offered Saturday, 
May 5, 1956, by the American Associa- 
tion of Physics Teachers. (Applications 
must be submitted by April 20, 1956). 

Feynman Address 

As a part of the centennial and 
sesquicentennial celebration of the Uni- 
versity, the University's Department 
of Physics held a special series of lec- 
tures entitled "The Centennial Lectures 
in Physics." 

An address in this series was given 
by Professor Richard Feynman of the 
California Institute of Technology on 
'Liquid Helium'. 

Professor Feynman is one of the 
outstanding theoretical physicists in 
the United States and particularly well 
known for his contribution to the re- 
formulation of quantum field theory 
for which he received the Einstein Prize 
in 1954. He is also well known for his 
explanation of the knowledge of the 
principle of least action in quantum 
mechanics. 

Professor Feynman is a member of 
the National Academy of Sciences, 
American Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Science, and the Amer- 
ican Physical Society. 

Maril Exhibit 

Herman Maril, well known American 
painter and a member of the Art De- 
partment of the University, is having 
a one-man exhibition of his work at 
the Babcock Galleries in New York. 
The exhibit will run from March 26 
to April 14. 

Among the works shown will be a 
large oil "Inlet" which was included 
in this year's annual exhibition of the 
National Academy of Design and "Cape 
Still Life" which was shown at the 
Audubon Society's exhibition in New 
York this year. 

Mr. Maril's representation in the 
permanent collections of museums and 
private collectors has been steadily in- 
creasing throughout the years, and his 
work has been exhibited very widely, 
both in this country and abroad. 

A. & S* Personals 

Dr. John Robinson, Philosophy De- 
partment, was elected Secretary of the 
Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy 
at its annual meeting at Boston Uni- 
versity. 

Dr. S. F. Singer, Physics Department, 
recently spoke at the Naval Research 
Laboratory on "Variations in the Pri- 
mary Cosmic Radiation". 

Professors Philip E. Arsenault, 
Charles E. Kramer and A. E. 
Zucker, of the Foreign Language 
Department attended the regional meet- 
ing of Foreign Language Teachers in 
Hagerstown. The meeting was called 
by the Maryland State Department of 
Education. 

Dr. Harold Hoffsomer, Department 
of Sociology, was elected chairman of 



the Northeastern Regional Committee 
on Rural Sociology. 

Professor George F. Batka, Depart- 
ment of Speech and Dramatic Art, 
represented Maryland at Iowa Uni- 
versity at a meeting of the American 
Council on Education. The meeting was 
held for a discussion of "Effective Use 
of Closed-Circuit Television as a 
Teaching Medium". More than ninety 
colleges and universities were repre- 
sented. 

Professor Stanley B. Jackson, De- 
partment of Mathematics, spoke twice 
at Randolph Macon Women's College, in 
the afternoon on "The Impossible Prob- 
lems in Mathematics", in the evening 
in "When Geometry and Calculus 
Meet". 

Dick Duffy, Chemical Engineering, 
is co-author of an article on "Pyro- 
processing for Nuclear Fuels", which 
appeared in the February number of 
NUCLEONICS. 

Dr. Robert Herman, Physics Depart- 
ment, gave an address at General 
Motors Technical Center on "Spec- 
torscopy and Combustion Theory". 

Dr. Richard Ferrell, Physics Depart- 
ment, presented a paper at the Pitts- 
burgh meeting of the American Phy- 
sical Society on "Effect of Electron 
Density Fluctuations on the Anni- 
hilation of Positions in Metals". 

Dr. Roald K. Wangsness, Physics De- 
partment, presented a paper at the 
same meeting entitled "Comparison of 
Experiment and Theory in Antifer- 
romagnetic Resonance". 

Dr. Norman P. Heydenburg, joined 
the Physics Department as a visiting 
professor during the spring semester. 
Dr. Heydenburg teaches an introduc- 
tory graduate course in Nuclear 
Physics. He was formerly associated 
with the Carnegie Institute of Wash- 
ington. 

Dr. Sherman Ross, Psychology, has 
been appointed as Associate Editor of 
Psychological Reports, a new journal 
published by the Southern Universities 
Press. 

Dr. C. W. Wharton, Department of 
Zoology, was elected to membership 
in the Sociedade Brasileira de Ento- 
mologia. 

Professor E. Aubert Mooney, De- 
partment of English, spoke on George 
Eliot's "Adam Bede" on the Invitation 
to Learning radio program on Station 
WTOP. Professor Mooney has been 
heard on the same station earlier this 
semester on the Victorian writers Trol- 
lope and Tennyson. 

Dr. James Walker, Department of 
English, was a member of a panel 
discussion of "Problems in Teaching 
Structure of Language", at the annual 
meeting of the College Conference on 
Composition and Communication in 
New York. Dr. George Kelly, also of 
this department, attended the meeting 
as a research consultant for the execu- 
tive committee of the conference. 

Professor Mary L. Andrews, Depart- 
ment of English, spoke on "Broadway 
Plays This Season" at the Potomac 
Women's Club in Arlington, Va. 



34 



Maryland 



Miss Dorothy L. Powell, (A & S '43) 
former Associate Director of Admis- 
sions, has joined the staff of the Salis- 
bury State Teachers College in the 
capacity of Registrar. 

Dr. Richard A. Ferrell, Physics De- 
partment, gave a talk before the col- 
loquium at the University of Virginia, 
on "Position Annihilation in Solids". 

Dr. F. G. Brickwedde, Physics De- 
partment, gave an invited address be- 
fore the Philosophical Society of Wash- 
ington on the subject "Temperatures 
in the Atomic Explosions". 

Dr. Roy Anderson and Dr. John S. 
Toll, Physics Department, attended the 
meeting of the Chesapeake Section of 
the American Association of Physics 
Teachers, at which Dr. Toll presided as 
retiring president. Dr. Anderson was 
chairman of the committee on the prep- 
aration of the AAPT physics examina- 
tion. Dr. Toll was elected section repre- 
sentative of the National Council of the 
American Association of Physics 
Teachers. 

Dr. Kathryn Ward, English Depart- 
ment, spoke on "Peace — the Concept 
of Hellenism", at the Women's City 
Club of Washington. Dr. Ward, presi- 
dent of the club, was formerly a cul- 
tural attache in Greece. 

Dr. Harold Orel, English Department, 
was heard on the Invitation to Learn- 
ing program on Station WTOP in a 
discussion of the Victorian Critic, 
George Saintsbury. Dr. Orel has spoken 
on the same program earlier on the 
V i c t o r i a 1 writers Macaulay and 
Dickens. 

The following named members of 
the Physics Department have been in- 
vited to give addresses before the 
meeting of the American Physical So- 
ciety in Washington, D. C; Dr. Rich- 
ard A. Ferrell, Dr. F. G. Brickwedde, 
Dr. C. M. Herzfeld, and Dr. L. Mar- 
ston. Contributed papers will also be 
given by Dr. Derrell, Dr. M. Galli, Mr. 
P. Merat, Dr. S. F. Singer, and Dr. 
Frank Stern. 

Dr. Carl Bode, English Department 
has had his book, entitled "The Ameri- 
can Lyceum: Town Meeting of the 
Mind," published by the Oxford Uni- 
versity Press. The first book on the 
subject, it is a study in the field of 
cultural history. 




GLENBURN 
CONVALESCENT HOME 

LICENSED BY MD. STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 
ALL ON ONE FLOOR — NEW WING - Ultra Modern 




Complete Facilities For The Proper Care Of 
Medical - Paralytic - Chronic - Convalescent - Post Operative 

Fracture - Aged Cases and Shock Treatment. 
Oxygen Equipped .... Occupational and Hydro-Therapy. 

Competent Staff of Day and Night Nurses (Spec. Nurses Available) 
Inspection Invited — House Physician On Call. 

Thelma C. Passwaters, Owner & Supervisor 




MODERATE 
RATES 

WHOLESOME 

and 

NOURISHING 

FOOD 

PRIVATE 

SEMI-PRIVATE 

WARD 

ACCOMMODATIONS 




CAMBRIDGE, MD. 



CITIZENS 

NATIONAL 

BANK 

Members Federal Deposit 

Insurance Corporation 
A Federal Reserve Bank 

POCOMOKE CITY 
MARYLAND 



ROBERTS CRR1BRIDGE 

SHIPYARD 

Cnrid -Craft 

Marine Railway 

Repairs A Specialty 

muRine hardware 

WET & DRY STORAGE— INSIDE and OUT 

MARYLAND AVENUE — CAMBRIDGE, MD. 



"This campus certainly isn't utilizing 
its manpower efficiently! I happen to 
know that four fellows are dating girls 
from other colleges!" 



(DfdirijDJUA, — 



BAKED TO 
STAY FRESH 




Maryland 



35 



UJhv 



M1TCHHE3 



is 



mflRYLflno's FincsT com 

Mitchell's Premium Corn tastes like 
it was just cut from the cob . . . th« 
result of Mitchell's own process- 
ing that cooks and seals the 
corn in cans wiin- 
in the hour it is 
pulled from the 
stalk. 



mmiEu-, 



SHOE PEG 




HSUIEET 




- Packed by — 

f. 0. miTCHELL & BRO., Inc. 

FERRYMAN, MO. - KENNEDYVILLE, MD. 

Main Office, Perryman, Md. 

Phone Aberdeen 621 -J 



"Electrically 

Our Coverage Of 

Maryland Is 

Complete" 

tCfGTRICAL 



TRISTATE 



ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION 

MATERIALS - SUPPLIES 

EQUIPMENT 

• 

OPERATING ON AN EXCLUSIVE 
WHOLESALE POLICY 



Furniture 

Interior Decorating 

Furnishing and Decorating Maryland 

Homes and Institutions for 

over 58 years 

BENSON 

CHARLES STREET at Franklin 
MU. 5-4510 Baltimore, Md. 



"^ 



THE LAST PAGE 
USE THE COUPON ON 



Graduate School 



Wins Thunderbird 

Robert Knaff, graduate student in 
psychology, is riding around in a 
shiny new Ford Thunderbird thanks to 
a little imagination and the Viceroy 
cigarette people. 

Knaff was one of the winners in a 
Viceroy cigarette "Name the Filter" 
contest. Ford Thunderbirds were award- 
ed to the 10 students submitting the 
top entries in the contest. 

Each winner received a color tele- 
vision set — to be donated to the cam- 
pus organization of his choice. Knaff 
chose the Student Union at the recipi- 
ent. 

Knaff, who is working on his doctor's 
degree in human engineering, received 
his BA from Champlain College and 
his MA from McGill University in 
Montreal, Canada. 



College of 



Military Science 



Second Lieutenant 

Fourteen AFROTC Cadets of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland received the 
Gold Bars of a Second Lieutenant, 
United States Air Force Reserve, at 
ceremonies held in the Armory. 

Introduced by Colonel Joseph R. Am- 
brose, Dean of the Military College of 
Science, Major General Raymond J. 
Reeves, Director of Military Personnel, 
Headquarters United States Air Force, 
administered the Oath of Office. Dr. T. 
B. Symons, of the Board of Regents, 
awarded the insignia of rank. The 
newly commissioned officers, who have 
concurrently completed degree require- 
ments at the University, departed for 
active duty assignments with the Air 
Force. 

Commissioned were Melvin A. Bron- 
zert, William A. Cusimano, Sherwin 
Estrin, Theodore S. Gochenour Jr., 
Robert E. Grutzik, Robert C. Hur, 
Nelson C. Kuida, John P. McKee, Wil- 
lard R. Mumford, Jay E. Ricks, Mer- 
rill A. Sauerbrei Jr., Andrew M. Sher- 
ling, James A. Shoemaker and William 
M. Vondersmith Jr. 

Maryland Cited 

The University of Maryland was cited 
by a military air research chief as 
a leader in the production of technical- 
ly-trained personnel heeded for national 
defense. 

Major General Floyd B. Wood, depu- 
ty commander of the Air Research and 
Development command, said the staff 
of Maryland Schools in general ranked 
high in training young scientists and 
engineers. 

****** 
APPROPRIATE DESIGNATION 

The professor retired after 40 years 
of teaching mathematics and built a 
lodge in the mountains. Its name: 
"After Math." 



He pointed out, following a speech 
before members of Aberdeen Post, 
American Ordnance Association in Bal- 
timore, that States are not compared 
in that respect statistically, but Mary- 
land ranks high in his opinion. 

General Wood told association mem- 
bers, gathered for their annual meeting, 
that the nation's military prowess de- 
pends in large part upon how well it 
educates its youth. 

Through comments and a series of 
charts, he showed how Air Force re- 
search efforts are connected closely 
with the industrial and economic 
growth of the country. 

National progress in all fields, he 
pointed out, is measured at an ever- 
increasing rate. 

Our present national "level of effort" 
in technological advancement, how- 
ever, is far below the level needed for 
adequate military defense, he declared. 



College of 



Engineering 




Lt. McOovern 



Col. O. H. Saunders '10 
- A. Lawrence Guess '51 

Silver Wings 

Second Lieutenant Gerald McGovern, 
received the silver wings of an Air 
Force jet pilot recently at Laredo Air 
Force Base, Texas. 
The graduation cul- 
m i n a t e d fourteen 
months of intensive 
pilot training in both 
propeller driven and 
jet type aircraft. 

The 2 3-year-old 
jet pilot graduated 
from Maryland in 
^^^ ^ 1954 (Engineering) 

^^^ ! I where he majored in 

■«« I Aeronautical En- 

gineering. At the 
same time, he also 
received his commission through the 
Air Force ROTC Unit. 

Lieutenant McGovern was an Aero- 
nautical Engineer for Fairchild Engine 
Corporation prior to entering the 
USAF. 

Radio Awards 
Two Maryland students were honored 
by the Washington, D. C, Section of 
the Institute of Radio Engineers for 
their outstanding work during the past 
year. 

They are Jules Sussman and James 
Reid Gouge Jr. They received the stu- 
dent awards at the annual banquet 
of the society. 

In Washington, D. C. 
Dean S. S. Steinberg of the College 
of Engineering participated in a sym- 
posium on "Scientists and Engineers 
in the Atomic Age" at the Willard 
Hotel, Washington, D. C. 

He presented a discussion on educat- 
ing the scientists and engineers in the 
atomic age. 

The program was sponsored by the 
District of Columbia Council of En- 
gineering and Architectural Societies, 
the Washington Academy of Sciences 
and the Institute of Radio Engineering. 



36 



Maryland 




Mr. Aubinoe 



Alvin L. Aubinoe 

Alvin L. Aubinoe, (Eng. '26) Wash- 
ington and Maryland architect and 
builder, was chosen foreman of the 
Montgomery County grand jury for 
the March term of the county circuit 
court. 

The 58-y e a r-old 
builder, is past 
president of the Ter- 
rapin Club, has con- 
structed numerous 
metropolitan area 
hotels, apartments 
and residential de- 
velopments, is a res- 
ident of Greenwich 
Forest in the Be- 
thesda area. 

He is the owner of 
the Dupont Plaza 
Hotel, which he de- 
signed and built. He also is the archi- 
tect and builder of the Congressional 
Hotel in Washington. 

Mr. Aubinoe is a past president of 
the Homebuilders' Association of 
Metropolitan Washington and a direc- 
tor of the National Association of 
Home-builders. He is a member of 
the American Institute of Architects, 
Washington Building Congress, Wash- 
ington Board of Trade and Columbia 
Country Club. 

With Missile Tests 

Thomas E. Follett, (BSEE '50), is an 
engineer at the RCA Service Company's 
Missile Test Project, Patrick Air Force 
Base, Florida. 

Since the Radio Corporation of 
America has been the contractor re- 
sponsible for the de- 
sign, operation and 
maintenance of elec- 
tronic and optical 
instrumentation for 
data acquisition, 
transmission and in- 
duction on the Air 
Force Florida Guid- 
ed Missile Test 
Range. 

He is responsible 
for the establish- 
ment of specifica- 
tions and the pro- 
curement of radar instrumentation for 
the 5000 mile range extending from 
Cape Canaveral, Florida to Ascension 
Island, near the coast of Africa. 

Follett sees engineering's greatest 
challenge in the field of guided missiles. 
He said, in a comment on his job at 
the Missile Test Project, "Progress in 
missile development is only limited by 
the number of qualified electronic engi- 
neers and physicists available. It is an 
interesting and opportunity filled in- 
dustry." 

Firemen Meet 

Fire inspectors of the State of Mary- 
land, ten surrounding states and a num- 
ber from Canada met for the Fifth An- 
nual Short Course for Fire Inspectors 
held at the University. 

The meetings for each day were de- 
voted to one aspect of the "increasingly 
complex fire safety picture," 




Mr. Follett 



STANDARD 
ENGINEERING CO, 

INCORPORATED 

Engineers and Contractors 

REpublic 7-1343 

2129 EYE STREET, NORTHWEST 

WASHINGTON 7, D. C. 




Tennis Courts 

Hand and Volley 
Ball Courts 



*** Concrete Driveways 



MYERS & QUIGG, Inc. 

PAVINC CONTRACTORS 

Office & Plant: 91 -O Street, Southeast 
Lincoln 7-2434 Washington 3, D. C. 



EQUITABLE 



SAVINGS & LOAN 

"Organized 

• SHARE SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 

• LIBERAL DIVIDENDS 

• ACCOUNTS INSURED UP TO $10,000 
BY FEDERAL SAVINGS & LOAN 
INSURANCE CORP. 

915 F STREET, N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 

NAtional 8-1741 



ASSOCIATION 

1879" 

HOME LOANS 

FOR BUILDING 
REMODELING - REPAIRS 

Wheaton Branch 
11433 Georgia Ave. 

Silvar Spring, Md. 

LOckwood 4-0001 



S. D. MOSES, INC. 

Concrete Construction 



823 MILLS BUILDING 



NAtional 8-8586 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Maryland 



87. 



OFFICE FURNITURE 

Fine Executive Desks and Chairs 

Leather Club Chairs and 

Davenports 

Steel Desks and Filing Cabinets 

THE JAMES T. VERNAY 
& SONS CO. 

5 E. LEXINGTON STREET 
Plaio 2-4220 Baltimore 2, Md. 



TAZE AND HEWITT 

SALES ENGINEERS 

33 E. 21st Street - Baltimore 18, Md. 

HEATING • VENTILATING 
COOLING EQUIPMENT 

Phone: BElmont 5-5895 — 5-5896 
Ed Taze "Rip" Hewitt 



Famous Brands of 
EXERCISE - MASSAGE & REDUCING EQUIPMENT 

Oyro - Niagara - Exercycle - Health-A Lator 
Battle Creek - Portable Steam Cabinet* 

Ksalih. £qjuipjn&nL fompanij- 

Sai.es and Service 

623 W. North Ave. Baltimore, Md. LA 3-0011 

* Davis Instrument LUfg. Co. * 

INC. 

Transits - Levels - Signal Belts 

Whirling Psychrometer - Blasting Machines 

Anemometers - Portable - Pressure Indicators 

Repairs and Adjustments 

.513 E. 36th STREET BALTIMORE, MD. . 



"CLOTHES OF CHARACTER" 

eddieXjacobs 

Charles St. at Redwood 
Baltimore, Md. 

VICTOR'S mfiRKET, Inc. 

Exclusive Distributors 

for 
S. S. PIERCE PRODUCTS 

4804 ROLAND AVE. 

BALTIMORE, MD. HO 7-0826 

USE THE COUPON ON 
THE LAST PAGE 



Instructors and guest lecturers were 
chosen because of their qualification as 
authorities on their subject assignment. 

Themes for the four day program 
included "Arson;" "Fire Protection;" 
"Inspection Techniques;" and "Special 
Hazards." 

The treatment given each class as- 
signment was of a technical nature, 
with the assumption that those in at- 
tendance had a personal background 
of experience and study. 

There was no registration fee for 
attendance as the program was public 
service provided by the University. 

The short course was sponsored by 
the Maryland State Fire Marshall, 
Charles S. Jackson, and the university. 

With Bureau Of Standards 

Earle R. Toense has joined the Digi- 
tal Circuitry Section of the Data Pro- 
cessing Systems Division of the Na- 
tional Bureau of Standards where he 
will aid in the development of high 
speed memories for computers. 

Mr. Toense, who graduated from the 
University in 1950 with a B.S. in elec- 
trical engineering, also worked on the 
Bureau's high speed computer, SAEC, 
from 1950 to 1954. During this time, 
he helped in the research on the Wil- 
liams type of memory and in the de- 
sign of a very high speed diode- 
capacitor memory. 

During 1955, Mr. Toense was en 
gaged in digital circuitry development 
for ACF Electronics in Alexandria, 
Virginia. 

Fire Protection 

The University will inaugurate a 4- 
year course in fire protection which will 
lead to a bachelor of science degree in 
the College of Engineering. 

Dean S. S. Steinberg, of the College 
of Engineering, said, "Specifically, we 
plan to offer a collegiate course for 
those young men who desire to make 
their career that of fire protection and 
prevention." 

The new course is designed to empha- 
size "the scientific and technical basis 
of fire prevention, its humanitarian as- 
pects and the development of the in- 
dividual," he said. 

Entrance requirements will be the 
same as for the College of Engineering 
and the first two year's course work 
will be similar to engineering require- 
ments. Some liberal arts and fire pro- 
tection and control courses, however, 
will be added to the curriculum. 

The course will be the only educa- 
tional program of its type east of the 
Mississippi. 

The first similar course in fire pro- 
tection engineering was set up in 1903 
at the Illinois Institute of Technology 
in Chicago. 

Interest in education for firemen at 
the University of Maryland goes back 
to 1930 when the first short course for 
volunteer firemen was inaugurated. 
Seven years later, a Fire Service Ex- 
tension Department was started and 
administered under the College of En- 
gineering. 

Last year, for the first time in the 
country, a short course was given in 
radiological monitory for fire service. 



According to Dean Steinberg, the 
curriculum has been approved by the 
faculty of the College of Engineering, 
the University New Courses Committee, 
President Wilson H. Elkins, the Board 
of Regents, the budget director, Mary- 
land's Gov. Theodore R. McKeldin and 
the Maryland Legislature. 

John L. Bryan, a senior instructor in 
the Fire Service Extension Department, 
will head the new program. 
Minta Martin Lecture 

The Aeronautical Engineering De- 
partment of the Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology with the Univer- 
sity of Maryland and the Washington 
Section of the Institute of the Aero- 
nautical Science presented the first 
Minta Martin Lecture. 

The Minta Martin Lecture series 
were set up in conjunction with a 
professorship established at M.I.T. in 
1954 in honor of Jerome Clarke Hun- 
saker, a leading figure in aviation and 
for many years Head of the M.I.T. 
Aeronautical Engineering Department. 
Lester D. Gardner, founder of the In- 
stitute of the Aeronautical Sciences, 
conceived and aided in founding this 
endowed chair. To emphasize its na- 
tional character, the late Glenn L. 
Martin contributed a special gift pro- 
viding for presentation each year by 
the Hunsaker Professor of the Minta 
Martin Lecture in several aeronautical 
centers throughout the nation. 

Featured speaker was Dr. William 
R. Hawthorne, Jerome Clarke Hun- 
saker professor of aeronautical engi- 
neering at M.I.T. His subject was "The 
Aerodynamics of Aircraft Engines." 

Dr. Hawthorne is a Fellow of both 
the Royal Society and the Royal Aero- 
nautical Society and of Trinity College, 
Cambridge. He is a member of the 
Institute of the Aeronautical Sciences 
and of the Institution of Mechanical 
Engineers and a Fellow of the Ameri- 
can Academy of Arts and Sciences. 
He has served on many governmental 
committees both in this country and 
in England dealing with aircraft pro- 
pulsion, fuels, and guided missiles. 

Honorary chairman for the program 
was Dr. Hugh L. Dryden, director of 
the National Advisory Committee for 
Aeronautics. 

The program included an inspection 
of the University of Maryland's aero- 
nautical facilities, a dinner in the uni- 
versity's dining hall and the lecture at 
the Student Union Building. 
Republic Steel 

"It is not enough to make the best 
product on the market today and face 
the future with complacency. We must 
be alert to new and corollary lines with 
which to bolster and supplement exist- 
ing business." With this idea in mind, 
Charles M. White (Engineering '13) 
has guided Republic Steel to its posi- 
tion as the third largest steel maker 
in the country. 

Since White became President in 
1945, Republic has increased its steel 
ingot capacity and greatly diversified 
its product lines. His diversification has 
taken the firm into titanium, plastic 
pipe, chain, steel kitchens and iron 
powder. 



38 



Maryland 



TRAILWAYS ALWAYS 



NOW OPEN 

College Park Terminal 

and information center. 

For departures, fares, and 

charter coach rates, call 

COLLEGE PARK RECORD CENTER 

7406 BALTIMORE AVENUE 
WArfield 7-4102 

featuring Thru Expreii Service 
via New Jersey Turnpike to 
Philadelphia and New York. 

FREQUENT DEPARTURES CHARTERS 
PLEASURE-PLANNED TOURS 



PEN.' / 




BBHTRO(LWOyS 



White's chief interest is in the long- 
term future of business as opposed to 
the next few months. "Republic is go- 
ing to be in business for a good many 
years," says White, "and plans must 
be laid for a long time ahead. We are 
anticipating the future by maintaining 
a vigorous program of research and 
new products development." 

He has seen to it that careful plan- 
ning goes into every undertaking by 
establishing a New Products Commit- 
tee, consisting of representatives from 
executive management, operations, 
sales, development, and engineering. 

White, who was born on June 13, 
1891, and graduated from the Univer- 
sity of Maryland with a BS degree, 
took his first steel job in 1913 with the 
American Bridge Company. 

He later went to work for Jones & 
Laughlin Steel, where his progress was 
rapid and brought him extensive ex- 
perience in steel making. 

In 1930, White joined the newly- 
organized Republic Steel Corp. as 
Assistant Vice President of Operations. 
Much of the responsibility of integrat- 
ing the varied and wide-spread opera- 
tions of the new company fell on his 
shoulders. 

White feels that just as America's 
prosperity for years ahead is being 
created in the research laboratories, so 
the future prosperity of Republic is 
being advanced by the firm's skilled 
research and development teams. "Re- 
search," says White, "is vital to Re- 
public's stockholders for the greater 
security it provides for their invest- 
ment and the greater opportunity for 
gain." 

With an eye and mind constantly 
on wkat's ahead, White says, "Republic 
is dedicated to the philosophy of al- 
ways looking ahead. This philosophy 

Maryland. 



THE GEORGE II \M A \ 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 



A Maryland Corporation Since 1922 



ENGINEERS & CONTRACTORS 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 



USE THE COUPON ON THE LAST PAGE 



of 

fljrinoL tjsuftqsLiL. Qounh^, (Inc. 

COMPLETE LAND TITLE SERVICE 
4312 HAMILTON STREET 2412 MINNESOTA AVE., S.E. 

Hyattsville, Maryland APpleton 7-6464 Washington, D. C. 

HUBERT K. ARNOLD, Pres. & Counsel HAROLD S. WANNER, 

cian of 1935 Vice Pres.-Treas. 



39 



hoA. basin. add&xL! 



SHOP 




Shopping Center 

Cold Spring Lane at 

Loch Raven Blvd. 

CH. 3-5253 

Aimmu lAJu. i 

iff am i 

Charles St. below 25th 
BALTIMORE 18, MD. 

BEImont 5-8744 



# BE. 5-7135 Call HO. 7-6746 m 

A & f nURSES REGISTRV 

MALE — FEMALE 

RNS LICENSED PRACTICAL 

Lie. — Practical* - Maternity - Bonded 

Nurses 

Sarah Anderson 613 Homestead St. 

• Manager Baltimore 18, Md. • 



MEDICAL 



EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 

Mrs. E. M. Hanrahan 

DENTAL — INDUSTRIAL 
MEDICAL — PHARMACEUTICAL 

28 E. 20th St. 
HOpkinS 7-8931 Baltimore. Md. 



For The Best In 

PLATING SERVICES 
STANDARD PLATING CO. 

4U N. EXETER ST. SA 7-4257 

Baltimore 2, Md. 



BEImont 
5-6607 



Res. TUxedo 
9-0851 



Virginia Bowen 

l\*al C-italt 



2434 MARYLAND AVE. 
BALTIMORE 18, MD. 



PROCESS SUPPLY 

INCORPORATED 

Quality 

PLATE GRAINING and REGRAINING 

All Sizes 
P & J Chemicals - Lithographers and 
Engravers Supplies and Equipment 

Tel: SAratoga 7-2547 — Baltimore 

ENterprise 1-6109 — Washington 



brought success in the past and will 
bring even greater success in the 
future!" 

Women Engineers 

Writes Mary Beth in the Baltimore 
Sun:— 

"Did you know that there are less 
than 3,000 practicing women engineers 
in America today? 

"We didn't until the other day when 
we talked to an Annapolis girl, who, 
incidentally, left little doubt in our 
minds that she will one day be de- 
signing bridges and skyscrapers. 

"She is Joan Earle, one of six girl 
students in the college of engineering. 
She is one of those rarities of the fair 
sex — a girl who dotes on mathematics 
and the sciences." 

"Actually, Joan can't remember a 
time — since she became old enough to 
think about a career — when she didn't 
and the sciences. 

" 'I've always liked the practical side 
of things more than the theoretical,' 
she says. And, to me, engineering is 
not only a profession, but a way of 
living. 

"Joan, who is studying civil engineer- 
ing, says her ambition is 'to be a 
structural designer for a consulting 
firm'. 

"Although her parents are both pro- 
fessional engineers, she denies that 
they had any influence on her choice 
of a profession. 

"Her father, Sherod L. Earle, Anna- 
polis, is a mechanical engineer and 
head of the Diesel engines division at 
the United States Naval Engineering 
Experimental Station in the State 
Capitol. 

"Her mother, Joan says proudly, was 
the first woman to be graduated in 
engineering from Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute. Mrs. Earle practiced about 
five years following her graduation, 
then married. 

"The only member of the Earle fami- 
ly who hasn't prepared for a career 
in engineering is Joan's older brother, 
Sherod, who was graduated in agron- 
omy from Maryland. 

With I.B.M. 

Donald N. Streeter, Engr. '50 who 
received his B.S. degree in Mechanical 
Engineering in 1950, has been promoted 
to Associate Staff Engineer at the IBM 
Product Development Laboratory in 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. In his new posi- 
tion, Mr. Streeter is assigned to tech- 
nical duties in the Engineering Analy- 
sis and Measurements laboratory. 

He joined IBM in 1951 as a Design 
Engineer, and was promoted to Techni- 
cal Engineer in 1953 and Associate 
Engineer one year later, the position 
he has held until his recent promotion. 
Prior to coming with the company, 
Mr. Streeter had been employed at 
Princeton University as a teaching as- 
sistant, at the Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity applied physics laboratory as an 
associate engineer, at the Naval Ord- 
nance Laboratory as an engineering 



aide, and in the National Bureau of 
Standards s a physical science aide. 

Mr. Streeter received his Master's 
degree in Mechanical Engineering from 
Princeton in 1951. During World War 
II he served with the U.S. Navy. A 
member of the Society for Experimen- 
tal Stress Analysis, he belongs also 
to the Tau Beta Pi and Sigma Xi 
honorary engineering societies. 

Mr. and Mrs. Streeter, who reside at 
Moore's Mills, Poughkeepsie, are par- 
ents of two sons. 

Engineering Personals 

Dean S. S. Steinberg, recently ad- 
dressed the Junior Member Forum 
of the American Society of Civil En- 
gineers at the Raleigh Hotel, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Dean S. S. Steinberg, Engineering, 
presented a paper on "Progress in 
Fire Protection Education" at the an- 
nual fire department instructor con- 
ference in Memphis, Tennessee. He dis- 
cussed in detail the proposed curricu- 
lum in fire protection which is planned 
to be inaugurated at the University of 
Maryland in September 1956. 

Shi I. Pai, Institute for Fluid Dy- 
namics and Applied Mathematics, gave 
a talk on Magnetohydrodynamics and 
Magnetogasdynamics in the Aero- 
nautical Engineering Department of 
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 

Ralph A. Freeman, Eng. '41, is a 
member of the technical staff of the 
Systems Division, Hughes Aircraft 
Company, Culver City, California. He 
was formerly affiliated with Eastern 
Electric Company. 

The American Society of Civil En- 
gineers met in Baltimore. 

The speaker was Joan T. Earle of 
the University of Maryland student 
chapter, who discussed "Women in En- 
gineering." 

Darshan S. Dosanjh, Institute for 
Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathe- 
matics, spoke at Syracuse University, 
on "Interaction of Grids with Travel- 
ing Shock Waves". 

Dr. S. I. Pai, Institute for Fluid 
Dynamics and Applied Mathematics, 
gave a talk at the Hydromechanics 
Laboratory Colloquium, David Taylor 
Model Basin, Navy Department, Wash- 
ington. 




SIGNALS CROSSED 
"Gosh durn, Dean, you left word 
that you were too busy to see me!" 



40 



Maryland 



There's o 

MILLER 
CHEMICAL" 

for you . . . 



MILLER 



FOR THE 
FARM . . . 
FOR THE 
HOME . . . 

INSECTICIDES-FUNGICIDES 
WEEDACIDES 

Ask about Miller Liquid Fertilizer, 

the newest development in the 

fertilizer field. 

SOLUBLE FERTILIZER 
VHPF - NUTRILEAF 



Available in Bulk or Small Packages 

MILLER CHEM. & FERT. CORP. 
Baltimore 1 8, Md. 



College or 



BALTIMORE 




"T GUESS 




CHOtC** 



qUALI7> 




MEATS 



BALTIMORE 




SAVE HERE 




miDSTATE Federal Sauiiigs 
& Loon Assn. 

► 5304 YORK ROAD BALTIMORE, MD. # 



Agriculture 

Dr. Howard L. Stier 



4%M 



Wins Wings 

> econd Lt. James W. Ramsay, (Agri- 
I culture '54), completed basic multi- 
engine flying train- 
M^B||^ Goodfellow 

A ^k Air Force Base, 

W ^ ^ Texas. The New Air 
' Force pilot received 

"^3f 4ST ' his wings at a 
special ceremony 
held here. 

Lt. Ramsay re- 
ceived his commis- 
sion through the 
Maryland R O T C 
program. 
Lt. Ramsey He is married 

to the former Miss Roberta Stevens 
of Poolesville. 

To Kansas State 
The Board of Regents of Kansas 
State College approved the appoint- 
ment of Glenn H. Beck as director 
of the Kansas Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station. 

It will be homecoming for Beck. 
Head of the diary husbandry depart- 
ment at the University of Maryland, 
he was on the K-State staff from 1936 
to 1953. His appointment is effective 
May 1. 

Beck was in the dairy husbandry 
department at Kansas State until Sep- 
tember 1, 1953, when he went to the 
University of Maryland as head of the 
dairy husbandry department. A native 
of Chester, Utah, his B.S. is from the 
University of Idaho, his M.S. from 
K-State, and his Ph.D. from Cornell 
University. From 1936 to 1953. with 
military and graduate study leaves, 
Beck, in successive order, was a gradu- 
ate research assistant, instructo", assis- 
tant professor, associate professor, and 
professor in dairy husbandry at Kan- 
sas State College. 

Agronomists Meet 
The summer meeting of the North- 
east branch of the American Society 
of Agronomy will be held this vear on 
the College Park campus, the Univer- 
sity and the Beltsville (Md.) Plant 
Industry Station of the U.S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture being hosts for 
the region's agronomists June 20-22. 

Along with special topics of interest 
to agronomists, field trips will take 
visitors through the Plant Industry 
Station soil and crop laboratories and 
to field trials in and around Beltsville. 
The university's experimental farms 
will also be visited as well as special 
tours to Washington and nearby his- 
torical points. 

Guernsey Breeders 
The Maryland Cooperative Guernsey 
Breeders Association met at Frederick. 
The main speaker for the meeting 
was Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, president of 
the University. Other speakers includ- 
ed Dr. Gordon M. Cairns, dean of the 
College of Agriculture, Dr. Arthur L. 
Brueckner, director of the Live Stock 
Sanitary Service. 




StERLIIIG LIGHTinG CO. 

U)ho Jjdvc JhLnqA o§ fiaauiy 
LIGHTinG FIXTURES FOR VOUR NOIRE 



403 N. Charles Street 

Baltimore 



LE 9-0222 



Maryland 



41 



DUE TO THE FIRE 

THAT DESTROYED 

OUR FORMER PREMISES 

WE HAVE MOVED TO 

11728 MULLIKIN STREET! 

(Zone 31) 

New phone: EA 7-6500 
V 2 Block East of Broadway 

(Between Orleans and Fayette) 

Our increased production facili- 
ties at this new location will 
provide better, faster service and 
lower costs for you. 

ALL NEW MATERIALS! 



F. M. 

STEVENSON 

COMPANY, INC. 



^^J 



HOTEL 



PLY CO. 



EST. Purveyors of Flnt 1927 

MFATS • POULTRY 

Frozen Foods 
Food Specialties 

To Hotels, 

Institutions. Ships. 

Clubs, Etc. 



LExington 9-7058 

Night Sorvlce NO. 7-6*17 

227 S. 

HANOVER ST. 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



WE SPECIALIZE IN 

OFFICE INTERIORS AND 
OFFICE PLANNING 

THE UNUSUAL IN OFFICE FURNITURE 
and ACCESSORIES. 

Let our well-trained staff assist you 
in Planning your Office. 

MODERN 

STATIONERY COMPANY 

17 S. CHARLES ST. MU 5-4377 

BALTIMORE 

Serving this area »ino« 1918 



They Join Army 




GENERAL PIERCE EXPLAINS 
Major General James R. Pierce, Commanding General of the Second Army, 
stressed the importance of a strong Reserve in addressing members of the 2071st 
ARASU, Baltimore USAR School, at the Fallsway Armory. In civilian clothes 
are six University of Maryland Law School students who joined the unit as en- 
listed reservists. From left to right, they are Charles Yumkas, Carl Friedler, 
Gilbert Rosenthal, John Phillips, Joseph Jacobs, and Vincent Groh. 



School of 



Law 



=======i G. Kenneth Reiblich '29 

Can't Read Properly? 

Dean William C. Warren of Colum- 
bia Law School says many students 
attending the school with bachelor of 
arts degrees from colleges "can't read 
properly." 

Dean Roger Howell of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland School of Law won't 
go that far, but he did say too many 
law freshmen flunked out in their first 
year, and added: 

"As to some of these students, I 
wonder how on earth they ever got 
this far." 

Dean Warren went further, and com- 
plained that college curriculums do not 
prepare students properly to study the 
law. 

He says not only can many students 
not read properly, many cannot express 
themselves intelligently in writing. 

Dean Warren says the law schools 
are partly to blame for not letting the 
colleges know what a prelaw curriculum 
should be. 

Of this Dean Howell, the Maryland 
echool's head, said: 

"I can't agree with this. The Amer- 
ican Bar Association gave the matter 
intense study, and came up with the 
conclusion there is no such thing as a 
necessary prelaw curriculum. 

"Most any subject studied in col- 
lege should help the law student in his 
later studies." 

Speaking of the predilection of law 
students to fail out in the first year, 
Dean Howell said: 

"While we are quite disturbed at the 
high rate of failing out, investigation 
shows it not to be so much any lack 
of college training, but rather that the 
students are entering upon a study 
for which they are not fitted. 

Dean Warren said: 



"We feel we are entitled to expect 
the college graduate to be able to read 
argumentative or expository prose 
swiftly, comprehendingly and retentive- 
ly; that he be able to express himself 
in speech and writing grammatically, 
literately and precisely; that he has 
learned the basic lesson of using a 
dictionary." 

Dean Howell said he felt Dean 
Warren was being too hard on the stu- 
dents. Dean Howell said: 

"After all, most of the writing stu- 
dents do is in examinations, where they 
are working against time. "It's not too 
easy to do precise and careful writing 
when what you do must be done as fast 
as possible." 

Candidate For Judge 

John E. Raine, Jr., State's attorney 
for Baltimore county, is a candidate 
for judge of the Third Judicial Cir- 
cuit, comprising Baltimore and Har- 
ford counties. 

That Mr. Raine's name would appear 
on the ballot came as no surprise for 
rumors had circulated as early as 
June when the Legislature created 
another judgeship in the Third Cir- 
cuit for a resident of Baltimore county 
that Mr. Raine would be a candidate. 

Moreover, the county prosecutor has 
never indicated that he would seek the 
elevation to the bench, and had on at 
least two occasions, stated that he 
would welcome the opportunity to serve 
the county in this capacity. 

County voters wlil elect three judges 
at the general election in November. 

Mr. Raine is a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland School of Law. 
He was admitted to the bar in 1941. 

After serving as an assistant State's 
attorney in 1944 and 1945, Mr. Raine 
was elected State's attorney in 1950 
and was re-elected in 1954. 

At the last annual meeting of the 
Baltimore county Bar Association, he 
was elected president. 

Mr. Raine is married and has two 
children. 



42 



Maryland 



'50 Holds Reunion 

The day law class of 1950 held its 
6th annual reunion at the Stafford 
Hotel on March 17. Forty-two class- 
mates and faculty members of the 
Law School heard the recently ap- 
pointed United States Marshal for the 
District of Maryland, Gerald Bracken, 
a member of the class, speak on the 
duties of a United States Marshal. 

Alleck A. Resnick, Esq., President 
of the class, served as toastmaster and 
was assisted in arranging- the affair by 
David Rosenberg and Jack Marshall. 
During the course of the evening it 
was pointed out that of fifty class 
mates, some twelve or more have served 
as Assistant United States Attorneys 
or Assistant States Attorneys, with 
three currently occupying such posi- 
tions. 

Faculty members present were: Dean 
Roger Howell and Messrs. Bridgewater 
M. Arnold, L. Whiting Farinholt, Jr., 
Lawrence M. Jones, G. Kenneth Rei- 
blich, Russell R. Reno, and George O. 
Blome. 

Students Enlist 

Six University of Maryland law 
school students have taken advantage 
of provisions of the Reserve program 
to absorb military knowledge along 
with Blackstone. 

They have joined the 2071st ARASU, 
which operates the Baltimore U. S. 
Army Reserve School. They were 
sworn in as enlisted Reservists, by Maj- 
or General James R. Pierce, Command- 
ing General of the Second Army, in a 
special ceremony at the Fallsway Arm- 
ory. 

Included in the group were: Charles 
Yumkas, Carl Friedler, Gilbert Rosen- 
thal, John Phillips, Joseph Jacobs, and 
Vincent Groh. Phillips is a graduate 
of Loyola College, and the others ma- 
triculated at College Park. 

By enlisting in the Army Reserve, 
the embryo attorneys will fulfill their 
military obligations by attending train- 
ing assemblies one evening each week 
and participating in two weeks of ac- 
tive duty during the summer months, 
pending their Selective Service call for 
active duty. 

The great advantage to the Reserv- 
ists is that the required six-year period 
— consisting of two years active and 
four years in active duty — begins im- 
mediately. 

The six law students will be assigned 
to staff sections of the 2071st ARASU, 
with headquarters at the Fallsway 
Armory. Nearly 600 students, all Army 
Reservists, are enrolled in the Balti- 
more USAR School, which conducts 
classes at five locations in Baltimore, as 
well as in Cumberland, Hagerstown, 
Frederick, Aberdeen, Annapolis and 
Silver Spring. 



****** 

TOO LATE 

Conscience often tells not to do a 
thing — after you have done it. 

Maryland 



I 

WASHINGTON ALUMINUM CO., Inc. 

Baltimore 29, Md. * Arbutus 2700 



ALUMINUM FABRICATORS 

Our products include: 

Marine Accommodation 
Ladders 

Gangways and Hatch Covers 

Marine and Industrial Gratings 

Loading Platforms 

Industrial Gin Poles 

Stop Plates and Guides 

Pressure Vessels and Tanks 



{faciUticA. foi. 

AsmniotL dituWiA. & Jbanqusddu 

■arvland seafood at it's finest 
dining room open daily 



marling house 
20 e. fayette 



IH 




SA 7-4460 



baltimore, md. 



v3 erving the Medical Profession 
for over a third of a century 



Equipment and Supplies ton 

Physicians ana Surgeons • I iospital* 

Laboratories * Industrial Clinics 



AfuRRAY-jBAUMGARTNER 
SURGICAL INSTRUMENT COMPANY, INC. 



tS^r j 5 West Chase Street • SAratoga 7-7333 
Baltimore 1, Maryland 



GULF MOTEL 


■ 


U. S. ROUTE 1 at 

MARYLAND ROUTE 152 


1 MOTEL 1 


4 Miles South of Bel Air 


■ft ' <A f| #M/ "JLk 


1 8 Miles North of Baltimore 




FALLSTON, MARYLAND 


lS5«V7- $53 



43 




ENJOY THE BEST IN 

SEAFOOD 

STEAKS & CHOPS 

ODONNELLS 

<5ea<S/u£& 

Downtown Washington 

1221-1207 E STREET, N.W. 

Bethesda, Maryland 

8301 WISCONSIN AVE. 






PARK 
TRANSFER 
COMPANY 

Heavy Hauling 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 
NOrth 7-5753 



ROBINSON 
INC. 



™ | mm ^ 



owned and 
operated by 
Joseph H. Deckman 
Class of '31 



LUdlow 
4-1400 



Building Supplies 
Builders' Hardware 

and Specialties 
Slag Foam Block 
Structural Steel 
Shenco Brick 



2021 SHANNON PLACE, S.E. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 




NEEDED MATERIAL 

"What was the idea of taking toast 
out of the dining hall?" 

"I had to make some charcoal 
sketches." 



School of 



Pharmacy 



B. Olive Cole 
— - — Adele B. Ballman 




Annual Entertainment 

The annual entertainment and dance 
of the Alumni Association of the 
School of Pharmacy was held in the 
ballroom of the Eemerson Hotel, Bal- 
timore. 

President Gordon A. Mouat welcomed 
the Alumni and friends, and thanked 
his associates and many friends, 
through advertising in the Souvenir 
Program, for assist- 
ing to make the 
Alumni Association 
a financially stable 
organization, which 
makes possible good 
fellowship, as well 
as a student scholar- 
ship which will be 
offered to a member 
of the Freshman 
Class of 1956 of the 
School of Pharmacy. 
Norman J. Levin, 
First Vice-President, 
was General Chairman of the affair. 
He presented the entertainers and also 
distributed the door prizes, which in- 
cluded double-deck playing cards and 
a transitor radio. 

Morris Cooper was Chairman of En- 
tertainment and three presentations, 
including a musical novelty on the Zy- 
lophone by Beverly Ann Wells, solos 
by the very fine baritone Paul East, 
and a television novelty puppet act by 
Chandler Brothers, were enthusiastical- 
ly received and enjoyed. The orchestra 
of Morgan Baer played for the enter- 
tainment and also for the dancing. 

Sam Portney was Chairman of the 
Ticket Committee and had the cooper- 
ation of alumni and friends in secur- 
ing a large and appreciative attendance. 
Sam A. Goldstein was Chairman of 
the Place and Arrangements Com- 
mittee. 



Mr. Cooper 



Irving Cohen was chairman of the 
Souvenir Program Committee, solicit- 
ing the advertisements and supervising 
the printing of the program which 
financially assists in the activities of 
the Alumni Association, consisting of 
a Fall Frolic for students and the 
banquet in June for the graduates of 
the School of Pharmacy. 

The annual meeting of the Alumni 
Association of the School of Pharmacy 
will be held at the Kelly Memorial. 
Building on May 20, 1956, 
6:30 P.M. at which time reports will 
be given by the officers and different 
committees of the Association cover- 
ing the work of the past year. Officers 
for 1956-57 will be elected at that 
time. 

The dinner of the Alumni Associa- 
tion of the School of Pharmacy in hon- 
or of the 1956 graduates will be held 
at the Emerson Hotel on June 7, 1956. 
The Distinguished Alumni Honor 
Award for 1956 will also be bestowed 
at this time. This is a happy occasion 
for alumni, 1956 graduates, their fam- 
ilies and friends. 

Omicron Chapter 
Omicron Chapter of Rho Chi, Honor- 
ary Pharmaceutical Society, elected the 
following to membership from the 
Junior Class: Miss Geraldine Austraw, 
Raymond Bahr, Gilbert Berman, Erwin 
Deitch, Miss Sue Goldman. 

Graduate Students: Bernard Grabow- 
ski, Instructor in Chemistry; Theodore 
Kranzler, Assistant in Pharmacy; 
Dean E. Leavitt, Assistant in Phar- 
macy Administration; Williard J. 
Lennoz, Assistant in Pharmacology; 
Joseph C. Mastriani, Intern in Hospital 
Pharmacy; Myron Weinberg, Assistant 
in Chemistry. 

Alumni Member: Mr. Charles S. 
Austin, Jr., Class of 1916 

Dean's Honor List 

Dean Foss released the Honor List 
for the first semester. This list reveals 
a record of meritorious scholarship 
of which our student body can be 
proud. Stars after names indicate the 
number of times a student has been 
so honored. 

FIRST YEAR 

Becker, John 

Becker, Stanley 

Chaiet, Melvin 

Davies, Joseph 

Macks, Harry 

Pozanek, Larry 

Sachs, Herbert 

Saiontz, Marvin 

Spear, Murray 
SECOND YEAR 

Bass, Harry** 

Brinsfield, Jay 

Cohen, Gerald 

Clinegr, W. T.** 

Horn, Conrad** 

Ksslinegr, Edward 

Friedman, Melvin** 

Lisse, Allan 

Mallonee, James** 

Oster, Herbert** 

Reier, George** 

St. John, Miles** 

Sultan, Walter 
THIRD YEAR 

Austraw Geraldine*** 

Bahr Raym.ond**** 

Deitch, Erwin** 

Elliott, Donald 

Goldman, Sue** 

STierman, Miriam 
FOURTH YEAR 

Dorsey, M. Lee* 

Engel, Ralph*** 

Fine, Sue Brotman**** 



44 



Maryland 



Friedman, Sheldon 

Grossman. I. William****** 

Holtschneider, Douglas* 

Klatsky, Stanley** 

Kwash, Herbert 

Miller. Richard** 

Oster, Walter 

Plotkin, Richard 

S.li iff. Hoard***** 

Sophocwleus, Gregory 

Swartz, Irving: 

Entrance Examinations 
The first entrance examinations for 
admission to the School of Pharmacy 
were given to thirty high school stu- 
dents. 

The following students took the ex- 
aminations: Jerome A. Berger, Vincent 
R. DiPaula, William J. Duvall, Thomas 
J. Ellwood, Helen E. Evert, Arnold 
Felberbaum, Joseph S. Freeman, Ron- 
ald Goldner, Gerald S. Gordon, Martin 
D. Grebow, Ellen G. Hanken, Charles 
W. Heusller, Marta Hoffman, Bennett 
R. Kantorow, Beryl Lerner, Joseph H. 
Lemer, Irvin I. Levin, Daniel E. Lis- 
zewski, Mildred L. Petts, Irving J. Ras- 
kin, Morton D. Richman, Leonard J. 
Sadowski, Fred M. Scholnick, Irvin 
Silen, Arnold Speert, Jeffery B. Stiff- 
man, Albert H. Warfield, John D. War- 
then, Jr., Elliott M. Westfield. 

Students assisting Dr. Richeson 
were: Bernard Heyman, Donald Ull- 
man, Sue Goldman, William Ressner, 
Louis Kern, Sheldon Friedlander, and 
Ronald Kronsberg. 

In Navy 
Edward B. Williams '55 recently 
completed basic training in the U.S.- 
N.T.C. at Bainbridge, Maryland, and 
was graduated with honors. Our hearti- 
est congratulations to Eddie!! 

School of ■ 



Dentistry 

Dr. Ger8on A. Freedman 
Gardner P. H. Foley 



Miss Toomey Honored 

The National Alumni Association of 
the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery, Dental School, University of 
Maryland, paid a tribute to Miss Kath- 
arine Toomey, Administrative Assis- 
tant, at a luncheon in the Ballroom of 
the Lord Baltimore Hotel. The more 
than 400 in attendance heard Kate 
eulogized by Dr. Paul A. Deems 
through her nearly thirty-nine years 
of service to the School during the ad- 
ministration of three deans — the late 
Dr. T. O. Heatwole, Dr. J. Ben Robin- 
son and Dr. M. S. Aisenberg. 

Miss Toomey's portrait was present- 
ed to the Dental School by Dr. Deems, 
a member of the 1928 Class, which 
class made possible the painting. In 
accepting the portrait, Dean Aisen- 
berg expressed the appreciation of the 
faculty for the devotion and loyalty 
of Miss Toomey to the School and its 
alumni. 

Dr. Daniel E. Shehan, 1922 Class, 
presided at this meeting. 

Governor McKeldin, the speaker at 
tha luncheon meeting, bestowed upon 
Miss Toomey a Certificate of Appre- 
ciation from the State of Maryland 
which bears the following text: 

"Be It Known, that Maryland 

recognizes the extensive contribu- 




U. of M. Chapel 
(when under construction) 

Baltimore 18, Maryland 
Phone: HOpkins 7-9700 

Raleigh, N. C. 

1408 Insurance Building 

Phone: 5623 

Washington, D. C. 

STEEL FABRICATING 
STEEL WAREHOUSING 



Under the surface 
there is strength . . . 

This enduring quality of steel 
is fitting — yet the real 
significance of this chapel is 
far more enduring in the hearts 
of young people who now 
gather there . . . 

WHEN CONSTRUCTION CALLS FOR 

STEEL 

IT'S 



DIETRICH 
BROTHERS 



CONGRATULATIONS — CLASS OF '56 

To you, the new alumni of the University of Maryland School of 
Dentistry, we extend our very best wishes for a successful career in 
the practice of your chosen profession. 

We cordially invite you to come in and inspect the facilities of one 
of America' 1 s largest laboratories. 



•*«■>! SCNWAITI.INC.. 0»Ct«TIMg 

o-operative 

Dental Laboratories 

A, Hunt »l Dtnltl »roi</wr/«i 
12 WW Madison Street 
BALTIMORE. MARYLAND 




SIRVING THE DENTAL PROFESSION 
WITH DISTINCTION SINCE 1910 









WE ARE CLOSER THAN YOUR NEIGHBOR 

ARMSTRONG'S PHARMACY 

Thos. H. Caldwell, Prop. 
Prescription Specialists 


Dial 

ORIeans 5 
9318 




Belair Road and Clifton Park T 

Accuracy in Compounding Prescriptions -f- D 
SAVE TIME — Have your physician phone your p 
2-Way Radio Phone Service FREE DELIVERY 


errace 

spendable Service 
rescrlption 

Established 1904 





^National Realty Corp. - 

BUILDERS - REALTORS - ENGINEERS 

Ranch Homes in Hamilton and Arbutus 
3004 Ridgewood Ave. MO 4-8500 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



Truly Beautiful Wedding Receptions! 

Catered with that "Special Touch" 

The Warr-Bach Catering Co. 



1612 Mt. Royal Avenue 



MA 3-4322 



Baltimore, Md. 



We ewtend an invitation to visit our office and receive a useful gift. 



Maryland 



46 




Fiction 

Non-Fiction 

Children's Books 

Educational Qames 
and Toys 

Stationery and 
Qreeting Cards 

Religious Books and 
Bibles 

iltimort'i Cultural ^Department ~->tore' 

l WE P^ PCo' _ / Mail and phone orders shipped promptly. 
Write for free Book Catalog. 




BOOK STORE 

516 N. CHARLES STREET 
Phone SA. 7-7280 



PESTS? 



"Call 7lte 



TERMITES? 



Rote Man" 




PEST Control SINCE I8d 



C. Walter Porter, Mgr. 

SAratoga 7-6118 

22 W. FRANKLIN STREET 

Baltimore 1, Md. 



MARYLAND BRASS 
& METAL WORKS 

Non-Ferrous Castings 

Everdur Pipe Fittings 

To Standard Specifications 

Since 1 866 

Stanley B. Gisriel, Pres. 

MUrdock PULASKI HIGHWAY 

6-9424 Baltimore, Md. 



Portrait 




MISS TOOMEY HONORED 
Governor Theodore R. McKeldin and Miss Katharine Toomey view the 
painting of Miss Toomey, presented by the class of '28, School of Dentistry 
in recognition of her 39 years of devoted service. 



tion you have made to the health 
and welfare of the people through 
your years of executive service to 
the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery — years of sound judgment 
in an Administration that has 
stood for consistent progress — 
years of inspiration to classes of 
students in a highly essential, 
learned profession. Therefore, you 
are awarded this CERTIFICATE 
OF APPRECIATION in gratitude 
for the decades of your devotion to 
the advancement of a healthier, 
happier citizenry and to the cause 
of education." 

Among the many gifts received by 
Kate on this occasion was a shower 
of orchids flown to Baltimore by the 
Dental School alumni located in Hawaii. 

To Captain 

After being promoted to captain at 
Fort Belvoir, Va., Jack A. Gray of 
Hagerstown, Md., received his new 
silver bars signify- 
ing his new rank 
from Colonel Stan- 
ley F. Steele, post 
surgeon of the U. S. 
Army Hospital. Cap- 
tain Gray entered 
the Army in 1954 
and was last sta- 
tioned at Fort Sam 
Houston, Tex. He is 
a dental officer in 
the 7071st Area 
Service Unit's Den- 
tal Detachment. He 
was graduated in 1954 from the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 




Gapt. Gray 



Personals 

Dr. Charles Graham Blue, '53, has 
announced the opening of his office for 
the practice of children's dentistry, at 
617 Medical Arts Building, Jackson, 
Miss. 

Dr. Claude Richard Gaines, Jr. '54 
is stationed at Camp Gordon, Ga. Fol- 
lowing his release from the Army, 
June 30, Dr. Gaines will open an office 
in Atlanta. 

Dr. Viron LeRoy Diefenbach '49 was 
recently assigned as the Assistant Re- 
cruitment Officer, Division of Personnel, 
Office of the Surgeon General of the 
Public Health Service, in Washington, 
D.C. Dr. Diefenbach has been affiliated 
with the Public Health Service since 
his graduation. 

Dr. Herbert Joseph Underhill '54 has 
announced the opening of his office for 
the general practice of dentistry, at 
4575 Post Road, East Greenwich, R. I. 

Dr. Charles Wissler '55 has an- 
nounced the removal of his office to the 
McLean Center, Old Dominion Drive, 
McLean, Va. 

Dr. and Mrs. Burton H. Press '53 
announce the birth of a daughter, Carol 
Sue, on March 15. Dr. Press is present- 
ly stationed at the Hamilton Air Force 
Base. Following his separation in June, 
he plans to practice in Pittsburg, Cal. 

Dr. Francisco Veray '16 (B.C.D.S.), 
of Yauco, P. R., is the Editor of the 
Revista Dental, quarterly publication of 
the College of Dental Surgeons of 
Puerto Rico. The journal is now in its 
eighth volume. The fourth number of 
1955 featured Dr. Enrique Capo '25, 
of Ponce, who was the subject of the 
"Galeria Odontologica." Dr. Capo is 
well known for his varied activities and 



46 



Maryland 



interests in the field of sports and for 
outstanding contributions to dentistry, 
especially the fine services rendered by 
him in various offices of the College of 
Surgeons. 

Dr. Norman Pierre Chanaud '30, of 
Centreville, Md., was appointed by the 
Public Health Service to the inactive 
reserve component of its commissioned 
officer corps, with the rank of Senior 
Dental Surgeon. Dr. Stanley Joseph 
Meadows '38 of Brunswick, Md., also 
received an appointment with the rank 
of Senior Dental Surgeon. 

Dr. Clyde 0. Wells '52, of Spartan- 
burg, is Commercial Secretary of the 
South Carolina Dental Association. 

Dr. George E. Garrington '53 and Dr. 
Burt H. Press '53 participated in the 
program of the Sixtieth Annual Meet- 
ing of the Alumni Association of the 
University of California College of 
Dentistry, held in the St. Francis Hotel, 
San Francisco, January 22-23. Dr. Gar- 
rington, who is stationed at the Public 
Health Service Hospital in San Fran- 
cisco, gave a table clinic, "Comparison 
of Indirect Impression Material for 
Crown and Bridge." Dr. Press, who is 
stationed at the Hamilton Air Force 
Base also gave a table clinic, "Use of 
Cold Cure Acrylic for Temporary 
Crowns and Bridges." 

In Camden 

The February meeting of the South- 
ern Dental Society of New Jersey was 
designated as "University of Maryland 
Alumni Night." The meeting, attended 
by 75 members, was held in the Walt 
Whitman Hotel, Camden, following a 
dinner. Dr. Milton Asbell '38 is the 
President of the Society; Dr. Samuel 
A. Blank '22, the Chairman of the 
program, presided. Dr. Myron S. Aisen- 
berg, Dean, and Mr. Gardner P. H. 
Foley, Professor of Dental Literature, 
were guests of the Society. Dr. Aisen- 
berg addressed the group on "Diag- 
nosis of Malignancies in and about the 
Oral Cavity." The presentation was 
copiously illustrated by lantern slides. 
Mr. Foley spoke on "Dental Lore." Oth- 
er alumni members who attended were 
Dr. Edwin C. Barnes '31, President- 
Elect ; Dr. William D. Brown, Past 
President (1940-41); Dr. Abraham 
Hirshorn '37; and Dr. Otto G. Klotz 
'36. Dr. Leon Mazzotta '45, of Wild- 
wood, also was present. 

In recognition of the visit of Dr. 
Aisenberg and Mr. Foley, the Society 
very graciously made a gift of fifty 
dollars to the Albert A. Harrington 
Fund, which was established in 1954 
by the New Jersey Alumni Association. 
Triennial Meeting 

Like the triennial meeting of 1953 
the Second Triennial Meeting, held on 
March 1 and 2, was a great success, 
enjoyed, relished and appreciated by 
all who attended. From the two days 
of the homecoming activities the 600 
returning sons of the B.C.D.S. derived 
much pleasure and certainly a good 
measure of worthwhile information. Dr. 
Adam Bock and Dr. Myron Aisenberg, 
the Co-chairmen, and their committee 
did an excellent job of arranging for a 
fine combination of social and profes- 
sional features. 



The climactic event of the program 
was the Alumni Banquet on March 1. 
The speaker was Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, 
President of the University, who made 
a fine impression in his first appearance 
before the alumni of the B.C.D.S. Dr. 
Elkins spoke on the future of the 
Baltimore Division of the University, 
giving special attention to needs of and 
expectations for the School of Dentis- 
try. The highlight of the evening was 
the presentation of the Distinguished 
Alumni Award to its first recipient, Dr. 
George M. Anderson '19. (Dr. Ander- 
son will be the subject of an article 
in the next issue of Maryland.) 



Alumni Award 




THE DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI 
AWARD 

Presented to Dr. George M. Ander- 
son '19, its first recipient, on March 1. 



School of 



Nursing 

Bessie M. Arnurius 
Helen E. King 



Dr. Gladys Sellew 

Dr Gladys Sellew will begin her 
duties as a full time professor 
in nursing of children in June, it was 
announced by Dean Florence M. Gipe. 
Dr. Sellew holds a 
bachelor of science 
degree in nursing 
and health from the 
University of Cin- 
cinnati School of 
Nursing. Addition- 
ally she holds a 
master's degree in 
economics and a 
Ph.D. degree in 
nursing from the 
Catholic University 
of America. 
She is the author of a number of 
nursing textbooks and periodicals 
among which is Nursing of Children 
which is now in its ninth edition. 

The new university professor has 
been an instructor of the nursing of 




Dr. Sellew 



50th ANNIVERSARY 
1906 1956 




ARUNDEL FEDERAL 
SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION 

direct reduction home loans 
savings accounts - liberal dividends 

• 
Insured up to $10,000 by the Federal 
Savings and Loan Insurance Corp. 

• 
Christmas Cluhs — Safe Deposit Boxes 
Community Hall for Rent 

Hours: 

9 to 2 daily 

7 to 9 Tuesday evening 

PATAPSCO AVENUE & FOURTH STREET 
Baltimore 25, Md. CUrtis 7-1112 



The 

Maurice 
Leeser Co* 

i PRINTERS 
* I PUBLISHERS 

Victor P. Skruck, Pres. 

536 W. PRATT ST., BALTIMORE 1 
SAratoga 7-4446 

In Our Second Generation 
of Quality and Service 



Deutsches Haus, Inc. 

1212 CATHEDRAL STREET 
Baltimore, Md. 

GERMAN SPECIALTIES 
IMPORTED BEERS & WINES 

Dinners Served from 5 p.m.-9 p.m. 

Sundays from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. 

ALA CARTE until 1 a.m. 

Mondays Closed 

Halls and Rooms for Private Parties, Banquets 
and Weddings— Call IE. 9-4565 

Wednesday 'til Sunday in Rathskeller 
Dance and Entertainment from 9 p.m. 



LUDWIG 
KATZENSTEIN 

202 W. PRATT ST. 
BALTIMORE 1, MD. 
SAratoga 7-0748 



picture frames 

made to order 

old 

prints 

gilding 

restoring 



Maryland 



47 



PLEASANT COUNTRY EATING 

30 1 1 "limited SJrrom 
JUowntotvn QSattimore 




The Finest Food and Drink 

Served in Friendly Old 

Maryland Atmosphere 

FACILITIES FOR PRIVATE PARTIES 

LOCATED ON BELAIR ROAD, U. S. ROUTE 1 

7% MILES FROM THE CITY LINE 

7Vi MILES SOUTH OF BEL AIR 

Completely A ir-Conditioned 

THE KINGSVILLE INN 



FOR RESERVATIONS— FORK 2781 



CLOSED MONDAYS 



NATIONAL ENGINEERING CO. 

DISTRIBUTORS • ENGINEERS • CONTRACTORS 

REFRACTORY and INSULATION MATERIALS 

BALTIMORE HAGERSTOWN 



Get In touch with us regarding Bus. LExington 9-8400 — Ext. 216 

the affair you are planning Res. MUlberry 5-6523 

BALTIMORE CHECK ROOM SERVICE 

CHECKING FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

(no function is too large or too small) 
CHECKING FOR HOMES OR HALLS 

DAN MOHACO Office Lord Baltimore Hotel Check Room 



CARTER fuel pumps 

Are Setting New Records for Ruggedness and Dependability 

Install a CARTER FUEL PUMP On YOUR Car 
for thousands of miles of worry-free driving . . . 

PARKS & HULL Automotive Corp. 



1033 Cathedral St. 



SAratoga 7-8383 



Baltimore 1, Md. 



♦ 



Designers & Printers 
BOOKS - PERIODICALS 



DANGARY PUBLISHING CO. 

2807 W. Belvedere Ave. • Baltimore 15, Md. 

Printers of Maryland Magazine 



children, University of Cincinnati; 
associate professor, nursing of chil- 
dren; Western Reserve University, 
Cleveland; assistant professor in the 
nursing of children, Catholic Univer- 
sity; director, Department of Nursing, 
College of St. Catherine, St. Paul, 
Minnesota. The appointee comes to the 
University of Maryland from Rosary 
College, River Forest, Illinois where she 
was professor and chairman of the 
Department of Sociology. 

Dr. Sellew has served in the capa- 
city of child consultant to the White 
House Conferences for several presi- 
dential administrations. 

Panel Members 

Mrs. Elizabeth Singleton, President 
of the Nurses' Alumnae Association 
and former faculty member of the 
School of Nursing participated in the 
Fourth Convention of the Future 
Nurses of Maryland. 

This convention, sponsored by the 
Woman's Auxiliary to the Medical and 
Chirurgical Faculty of the State of 
Maryland and the Committee on Ca- 
reers, Maryland League for Nursing 
was attended by members of Future 
Nurses Clubs throughout the State 
of Maryland. 

Mrs. Singleton was a member of a 
panel which discussed various types 
of nursing education programs. Her 
topic was 'Collegiate Nursing Educa- 
tion'. 

Maryland was one of the first states 
to organize Future Nurses Clubs on a 
state-wide level. The spectacular 
growth of these clubs has been pro- 
moted by the cooperative efforts of 
professional, civic and lay persons 
in various Maryland communities. 

In Alabama 

Mary K. Carl, Associate Professor 
of Nursing, School of Nursing, will 
take part in a panel discussion of the 
topic, "Regional Research in Nursing" 
at the annual convention of the Ala- 
bama League for Nursing in Mont- 
gomery, Alabama on April 20th. 

On Leave 

Three faculty members of the School 
of Nursing are on leave of absence for 
advanced preparation on the graduate 
level at several universities. They are 
Carol Hofeldt, University of Pennsyl- 
vania; Cecilia Zithas, Catholic Univer- 
sity of America; Margaret Paulonis, 
Catholic University of America. 

Basic Nursing Education 

Dr. Ole Sands conducted a two day 
institute in Basic Nursing Education 
in the Kelly Memorial Building, Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

The institute was sponsored by the 
Committee of Baccalaureate and High- 
er Degree Programs of the Maryland 
League for Nursing and the Univer- 
sity's School of Nursing. 

Dr. Sands is Associate Professor of 
Education at Wayne University. He 
is a member of the Curriculum Com- 
mittee of the National Council for 
Social Studies and is co-editor of the 
1955 yearbook for the Council. He is 



48 



Maryland 



ie author of numerous papers pub- 
jhed in various professional journals 
id has contributed to several educa- 
on books. One of his most recent pub- 
cations is Curriculum Study in Basic 
ursing Education. 

In 1953 he was granted a leave of 
jsence from Wayne University to ac- 
spt the appointment as Director of the 
curriculum Research Project in Basic 
ursing Education at the University 
f Washington in Seattle. This project 
as sponsored by the United States 
ublic Health Service. 

Participants in the institute con- 
Isted of members of the Committee on 
accalaureate and Higher Degree Pro- 
rams and key nursing educators in 
tie State of Maryland. Dr. Florence 
I. Gipe, Dean of the School of Nursing, 
•as the chairman of the committee. 

Dr. Mary K. Call and Miss Virginia 
lonley of the School of Nursing Fac- 
lty and Mrs. Irene Krebs served as 
nembers of the Committee on Ar- 
angements. 

Dean Gipe Honored 

Dean Florence Gipe was honored by 
riends and colleagues at a dinner 
>arty on February 15 at Candlelight 
jodge, Baltimore. The occasion for the 
:elebration was Dean Gipe's 10th an- 
liversary as the head of nursing edu- 
ction at the University. Thirty-two 
quests paid tribute to Miss Gipe's con- 
ributions to the School of Nursing and 
to the nursing pro- 
fession on both the 
state and national 
level. Those persons 
present included 
nurses in all phases 
of nursing in the 
State of Maryland, 
alumnae members 
and faculty of the 
School of Nursing. 
During Dean 
Gipe's administra 
tion the School of 
Nursing has devel- 
oped into a college of the University 
which has received state and national 
recognition. Her activities with the 
Southern Regional Education Board 
have led to the development of gradu- 
ate education for nurses at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 

Letters and gifts of tribute and com- 
mendation were bestowed upon the 
Dean in recognition for her services. 

Attend Workshop 

Miss Virginia C. Conley, Chairman of 
the Baccalaureate Program and Dr. K. 
Carl, Chairman of the Graduate Pro- 
gram attended a Workshop on Col- 
legiate Nursing Education. 

This workshop was sponsored by the 
Department of Baccalaureate and 
Higher Degree Programs of the Na- 
tional League for Nursing and took 
place at the Edgewater Beach Hotel 
in Chicago. 

Participants of the Workshop includ- 
ed representatives of approximately 
one hundred collegiate schools of nurs- 
ing throughout the United States. The 
major issues which were considered at 



^Tv 




Dean Gipe 



IHaryland Lads . 

IHaryland Grads . 
IHaryland Dads! 




Yes . . . many a Marylander has "grown up" with Union Trustl 
Through youth . . . the early years of adulthood . . . and finally 
in maturity . . . Union Trust has served the personal and 
business needs of generations. 

Complete banking and trust services are available at any 
of the 25 Union Trust Offices located throughout Baltimore 
and vicinity. 

For banking convenience that saves time and money . . . 
bank at Union Trust — Maryland's oldest bank! Consult the 
telephone directory for the address of the office 
nearest you. 

25 OFFICES ... ALL AROUllD TOUJR! 



union trust 

company of mRRYLRno 

MAIN OFFICE: BALTIMORE & ST. PAUL STREETS 

Member Federal Insurance Corporation . . . Federal Reserve System 



MARYLAND'S OLDEST AND LARGEST FURRIERS 

• FURS 

Exquisite Coats, 
Jackets, Capes, 
Stoles 

• RESTYLING 
In the 
Advanced 
Modes 

SAFE STORAGE 

THURSDAY NIGHTS • LE. 9-4900 

supervision 225 N. HOWARD ST. BALTIMORE 1, MD. 




Maryland 



49 




CUSTOM BUILT ORTHOPAEDIC APPLIANCES 

(by prescription) 

STOCK APPLIANCES 
ORTHOPAEDIC APPLIANCE CORPORATION 

220 W. 28th STREET Phone BEimont 5-9645 BALTIMORE 11, MD. 





iJw 



World Travel Agency 

Conducted World Wide Tours and Cruises 

MEXICO - EUROPE 

Travel By Boat - Plane - Train 
Dependable Reservations and Accommodations 

MT. ROYAL AVENUE and CATHEDRAL STREET 
MU 5-4000 Baltimore, Md. 



ALCAZAR 


CATHEDRAL and MADISON ITS. 


Phone VErnon 7-8400 


Baltimore, Md. 



A5ard - -srvon S^cnool 

Secretarial - Dramatic Art and Radio 

Day and Evening 

805 N. Charles St. VE. 7-1155 

Baltimore, Md. 



For youngsters and the young in heart — the wonderful 

EltCHflllTETJ FOREST 

Story-book 
Land where 
Fairy Tales 
come true 

Free Parking • Snack Bar 

Route 40-Ellicott City, Md. 

Open Weekdays: 10 a.m. to dark — Sundays: 1 p.m. to dark 





this meeting were criteria for eval- 
uating baccalaureate programs in nurs- 
ing. 

The School of Nursing holds agency 
membership in the Department of Bac- 
calaureate and Higher Degree Pro- 
grams of the National League for 
Nursing. 

Heads Department 

Dean Florence M. Gipe of the School 
of Nursing has recently been appointed 
by the Maryland State League for 
Nursing to head the Department of 
Baccalaureate and Higher Degree Pro- 
grams in the state of Maryland. 

Dr. Gipe has been Dean of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland's School of Nurs- 
ing since 1952. Prior to that she was 
also Director of Nursing Service, Uni- 
versity Hospital, which dual position 
she held for the University until 1954. 

Presently Dr. Gipe, beside conducting 
two nursing offices, one at College 
Park, and one on the Baltimore cam- 
pus, is also engaged in teaching in the 
undergraduate and graduate program 
in Nursing Education. She is an ad- 
visory Board Member of the Lutheran 
Hospital and Home Association, Inc. 
which connection she has held for the 
past ten years. She is also a member of 
the Deans Advisory Committee on 
Nursing of the Southern Regional Ed- 
ucational Board. Nationally she is very 
well known because of her wide ex- 
perience in the field of Hospital Admin- 
istration, Nursing Education and Re- 
search. 

From Emory 

Fourteen nursing students of the 
Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, 
registered in the University of Mary- 
land School of Nursing. 

These students will undertake the 
program of study and experience in 
psychiatric nursing which is offered to 
the basic professional nursing students 
in the University of Maryland. This 
group of Emory students will remain 
in the University of Maryland for a 
three month period and additional 
groups of students will follow through- 
out the year. The arrangements for the 
cooperative activity was made by the 
presidents of the two educational in- 
stitutions and was brought about 
through the activities of the Southern 
Regional Education Board. 

The University of Maryland and 
Emory University are two of the six 
cooperating southern universities which 
are developing advanced nursing pro- 
grams under the sponsorship of the 
Southern Regional Education Board. 

Extension Courses 

Approximately five hundred gradu- 
ate registered nurses from diploma 
nursing schools in the state of Mary- 
land are registered with the Univer- 
sity for Bachelors degrees in Nursing. 
Most of these nurses are employed in 
hospitals and various health agencies in 
the state of Maryland and attend after- 
noon and night school in the College of 
Special and Continuation Studies. Nur- 
ses who are being prepared for future 
Public Health Nurses are being sent 
to Anne Arundel County Health De- 
partment for field experience in Public 



50 



Maryland 



Health Nursing. Public Health field 
experience from eight to thirteen weeks 
is now a regular graduation require- 
ment in the School of Nursing. 
At Salisbury 

Thirty-five graduate nurses are en- 
rolled in an extension course in Salis- 
bury, at the Peninsula General Hos- 
pital. The course is being taught by 
Miss Theresa Fernandez, Assistant 
Professor in the School of Nursing. 

The students are employed at both 
Peninsula General Hospital and at 
Easton Memorial Hospital, and repre- 
sent all phases of nursing including 
operating room, central supply, medi- 
cal-surgical, both from the teaching 
and administrative point of view. 

The course is centered not only 
around teaching methods, but also at- 
tempts to assist the student toward 
gaining a greater ability to identify 
pioblems in the learning situation both 
in the classroom and in work in the 
hospital. Through greater ability to 
identify problems, the students are bet- 
ter prepared to gear their teaching 
methods toward solutions of these 
problems. Thus the course becomes 
practical as well as theoretical. 
Extension Registration 

Extension classes of the School of 
Nursing at Hagerstown, Maryland un- 
der faculty member, Assistant Profes- 
sor Miss Elsie Ho, R.N., M.A., have 
been meeting at the Washington Coun- 
ty Hospital School of Nursing. En- 
rollment has gone far above expecta- 
tion; a total of thirty-three graduate 
nurses are enrolled, representing the 
following employing health agencies 
located in and near Hagerstown: Wash- 
ington County Hospital, Waynesboro 
Hospital (Pennsylvania), Jackson Con- 
valescent Home, Garlock Memorial 
Home, Newton D. Baker Veterans Ad- 
ministration Center, Washington Coun- 
ty Health Department, and Maryland 
State Reformatory for Males. 

Classes are held once a week, 6-9 
P.M., and cover everyday nursing prob- 
lems as encountered by nurses. Much 
emphasis is placed upon helping the 
nurse get a better understanding of 
human behavior, in health and in ill- 
ness so that she can be a more effective 
health worker in promoting and en- 
couraging improved interpersonal re- 
lationships within the framework of 
her own work and living situation. 
Various techniques for implementing 
and promoting individual and group 
participation are explored to offer the 
students additional resources to utilize 
in their own nursing programs. 



School of 



— Dr. John Wagn*r 

Assistant Director 

Mr. Sam 0. Gilmer, Jr. has been 
appointed as assistant director 
of University Hospital. 

A graduate of Furman and Duke 
Universities, he took additional train- 
ing from the U. S. Public Health Ser- 

Maryland 




Mr. Gilmer 



vice and the Department of the Army. 
He served as an 
Army captain in 
various administra- 
tive capacities in the 
European Theater of 
Operations between 
1942 and 1946. Mr. 
Gilmer has been ad- 
ministrator at 
Bake r-Thompson 
Memorial Hospital; 
chief hospital ad- 
ministrative consult- 
ant and chief, Med- 
i c a 1-Hospital-Ad- 
ministrative Branch, the Division of 
Medical and Hospital Resources; U. S. 
Public Health Service. 

The new appointee comes to the 
University of Maryland from Tampa 
Municipal Hospital were he was deputy 
administrator. 

In addition to being author of a 
number of publications on hospital ad- 
ministration, Mr. Gilmer is a fellow of 
the American Public Health Associa- 
tion; a member of the American Hos- 
pital Association, Hospital Account- 
ants "52 Club", the American Associa- 
tion of Hospital Accounts and the As- 
sociation of Military Surgeons of the 
United States. 

Gall Bladder Disease 
Gall bladder disease, the 3rd most 
frequent cause for hospital admissions, 
was the subject of a Maryland TV-M.D. 
program on WBAL-TV. 

According to Dr. Karl Mech, assist- 
ant professor in the University's De- 
partment of Gross Anatomy and an as- 
sociate in surgery, 10 out of 20 people, 
over 30 years of age, have the problem 
of gall bladder disease. 

Dr. Mech, who made the TV-M.D. 
presentation, explained some of the 
latest developments in diagnosis of the 
problem with particular emphasis on 
the use of x-ray. 

Through the use of laboratory charts 
and actual specimens he explained just 
what gall stones are, the anatomy of 
the gall bladder, and how the bladder 
becomes diseased. He demonstrated 
how the condition is corrected, both 
medically and surgically. 

Dr. Robert Wright, associate pro- 
fessor in pathology, assisted Dr. Mech. 
Advice For Children 
According to Dr. Kurt Glaser of the 
Department of Pediatrics and Psychi- 
atry, the problem of getting a young 
child to go willingly to a doctor's office 
or a hospital can be solved by a few 
parental do's and don'ts. 

On the University's TV-M.D. pro- 
gram over WBAL-TV, Dr. Glaser dem- 
onstrated how a child can be emotional- 
ly calmed for his first surgical or medi- 
cal visit as a patient. 

He presented ways in which a 
parent can avoid giving a child a sub- 
conscious fear of hospitals and doctors 
during the growing up period. 

Dr. Glaser demonstrated the effects 
of using the idea of doctors and hos- 
pitals as punishments for mis-behavior. 
Phi Delta Epsilon 
Phi Delta Epsilon, the Maryland 
medical fraternity, held its annual 



Stock Commentary 

Our letter discussing 
the trend of the market 
and the current position 
of individual stocks, 
will be sent upon re- 
quest without obliga- 
tion. 



W. E . HUTTON & CO. 

Established 1886 

it embers New York Stock Exchange 
and other leading exchanges 

608 First National Bank Bldg. 

Baltimore 2, Md. 

New York Cincinnati 



Congratulations, Graduates 

University Book Store 

Specializing In 

Medical Books 

World-Wide Mail Order Service 

5 1 9 W. Lombard Street 

LE 9-4315 

Baltimore, Md. 



PENNIMAN & 
BROWNE, INC. 

Chemists 

Engineers 

Inspectors 

• 

Testing Laboratories 
Baltimore - Washington 



LUILLinm P. PARR, C. L. U. 

— Insurance Broker — 

PERSonflL finAnciAL PLflnninG 



315 BALTIMORE LIFE BLDG. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



:* 



51 



ANDERSON 
LUMBER CO. 




LUMBER 

and 

MILLWORK 



ROOFING MATERIALS 
BUILDING MATERIALS 

CREOSOTE LUMBER, POSTS & PILING 

Everything to Build Anything 

For Prompt Deliveries Call— Easton 1946 

DOVER ROAD EASTON, MD. 



For the Finest in Outboard 

CRUISERS and UTILITIES 

Manufacturing Company 

ARNOLD, MD. 



ROOSEVELT 
HOTEL 

OCEAN CITY. MD. 

On the Boardwalk, centrally lo- 
cated. An ideal vacation hotel. 
Famous Southern meals. Make 
your reservations early. Special 
rates for June and September. 
Write or phone Mr. and Mrs. 
Elwood F. Fleming. 

Ocean City 334 



MIAMI COURT 

N. PHILADELPHIA AVE. 
AT 22nd STREET 

OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND 

TELEPHONE 519 
"Where a Friend Meets a Friend" 



lecture meeting at the University of 
Maryland School of Medicine. 

Dr. Ancel Keys, internationally 
known heart specialist and professor 
in the University of Minnesota's School 
of Public Health was guest lecturer. 

Dr. Keys is a member of the research 
committee and is a member of the 
board of directors of the American 
Heart Association. He is also a mem- 
ber of the American Society for the 
Study of Arteriosclerosis. 

The subject of the program was "The 
Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease. 

According to Dr. Sidney Scherlis, 
assistant professor of medicine at the 
university and chairman of the meet- 
ing, Dr. Paul White has joined Dr. 
Keys on two research expeditions to 
Italy and will accompany him on two 
others to Japan and Hawaii in the 
near future for work using experiments 
of nature as a "research tool." 

The program was held in the uni- 
versity's Chemical Hall. 
Fire 

A laboratory containing radio-active 
isotopes at the School of Medicine was 
damaged by a one-alarm fire which 
broke out about 10 P.M. in the path- 
ology building. 

Smoke was so dense that firemen 
had to wear masks before entering the 
room, which they were wary of ap- 
proaching because of the radioactive 
material inside. 

The floor of the laboratory had to be 
torn out, and the room on the first 
floor below was badly damaged, as 
were scientific instruments and equip- 
ment stored there. 

Academy Hears Speakers 

The Maryland Academy of Medicine 
and Surgery heard an address by Dr. 
Conrad Acton on "Common Sense and 
Treatment of Overweight". 

The group also heard a talk by Dr. 
John Wagner, associate professor of 
pathology at the School of Medicine 
on "The Common Biopsy." 

Dr. Acton is an associate in medicine 
at the School of Medicine. 

Appointed Dietician 

Dr. Clifford Blitch, Director of Uni- 
versity of Maryland's University Hos- 
pital has announced the appointment 
of Miss Gladys E. Hall as chief 
dietician of the hospital. 

Miss Hall, a native of Indiana, holds 
A.B. and M.S. degree from Indiana 
University. She completed a dietetic 
internship at Indiana University Hos- 
pitals and served as administrative 
dietitian at Indiana University Medical 
Center for several years. She has been 
Director of the Dietary Department 
at St. Louis University Hospitals. In 
that position she organized a dietetic 
internship which was approved by the 
American Dietetic Association. This 
program involved coi'relating work in 
the dietary units of Firmin Desloge 
Hospital, St. Mary's Hospital and St. 
Louis University Medical School Cafe- 
teria. 

Miss Hall served as chairman of the 
Professional Education Section of the 
American Dietetic Association. In 1940 
she was appointed by the Executive 
Board as the first educational director 



of the Association. Her chief activities 
in that position related to the graduate 
dietetic internships approved by the 
American Dietetic Association. Four 
years later she became the Executive 
Secretary for the Association and 
served in that capacity until 1950. The 
following year, Miss Hall accepted the 
position of associate professor in the 
Department of Restaurant and Hotel 
Management at Florida State Univer- 
sity in Tallahassee. 

The new appointee is a life member 
of the American Dietetic Association; 
she is a member of the American 
Association of University Women and 
Omicron Nu. She has held member- 
ship in the Altrusa Clubs of Chicago 
and Tallahassee. 

University Hospital 
The University Hospital, which had 
operated as a separate unit, now is 
set up as an integral part of the school 
of medicine. Streamlining of curricu- 
lum and administration has resulted 
in the combining of allied fields, such 
as obstetrics and gynecology, to give 
broader training to students. 
Obstetrics 
Approximately one out of every 65 
women bearing children do so with 
some type of heart condition, according 
to Dr. D. Frank Kaltreider, associate 
professor of obstetrics and gynocology 
at the School of Medicine. 

Dr. Kaltreider; Dr. J. M. Reese, asso- 
ciate professor and Dr. H. B. McNally, 
assistant professor presented a discus- 
sion of the relationship of these con- 
ditions on the University's TV-M. D. 
program over WBAL-TV. 

An actual case history was presented 
during the half hour telecast with em- 
phasis placed on cooperation necessary 
between patient and physician in order 
that risk may be reduced. 

David M. Kipnis, M.D. 
The John and Mary R. Markle Foun- 
dation has announced the appointment 
of David M. Kipnis, M. D., as a scholar 
in medical science at the university. 

The fund will pro- 
vide for a total of 
$30,000 toward his 
support, to be grant- 
ed at the rate of 
$6,000 annually for 
five years to the uni- 
versity's medical 
school where he will 
teach and carry on 
research. 

Dr. Kipnis is one 
of twenty-t h r e e 
members of medical 
school faculties in 
the United States and Canada to re- 
ceive Markle Foundation appointments. 
Scholars were selected from forty- 
nine candidates nominated by deans of 
medical schools, each of whom pre- 
sented a five-year program for advanc- 
ing his candidate "up the ladder." 
In his letter of nomination Dean 
William S. Stone of the School of 
Medicine outlined the university's plans 
for Dr. Kipnis. 

He said, "Following his return from 
Washington University, Dr. Kipnis will 




Dr. Kipnis 



52 



Maryland 




assume the rank of associate in medi- 
cine and director of the Metabolic Re- 
search Laboratory. In addition to his 
laboratory responsibilities, he will 
teach medical students, house officers 
and fellows in problems of endocrinol- 
ogy." 

Additionally, the new Markle Scholar 
will render consultative service to the 
medical department, participate in the 
post-graduate program in basic sciences 
as they apply to the practice of medi- 
cine and conduct his personal line of 
research. 

Dean Stone concluded, "It is con- 
templated that Dr. Kipnis will be ap- 
pointed as an absolute full-time faculty 
member during his Markle Foundation 
sponsorship." 

Other plans call for a laboratory 
suitable for biochemical, enzymatic, 
and hormonal determinations. 

Dr. Kipnis, 2d, was graduated from 
the University of Maryland School of 
Medicine with an M. D. degree in 1951. 
Additionally he holds a diploma in 
music (piano) from the Peabody 
Preparatory of Music. 

Following an internship at Johns 
Hopkins Hospital, the Markle scholar 
was junior assistant resident and sen- 
ior assistant resident at Duke Univer- 
sity Hospital. He was later chief resi- 
dent in medicine at the University of 
Maryland's Hospital. He holds an 
American College of Physicians Re- 
search Fellowship under Dr. Carl Cori, 
head of the Washington University 
School of Medicine's Department of 
Biochemistry. 

The Maryland graduate has held aca- 
demic appointments at Johns Hopkins, 
Maryland and Washington Universities. 
He served in the Army in 1945 and 
1946. 

He is a member of Alpha Omega 
Alpha, honorary medical society; the 
New York Academy of Science, the 
American Federation of Clinical Re- 
search; Alpha Epsilon, social fratern- 
ity, Phi Delta Epsilon, social and medi- 
cal franternity. 

The author of a number of publica- 
tions, Dr. Kipnis was the recipient of 
the Myer L. Frank Scholarship at Johns 
Hopkins University in 1943; the Fran- 
cis Gehrmann Scholarship; the Univer- 
sity Prize Gold Medal and Graduation 



George Washington Hotel 

BOARDWALK at 10th STREET 

— Under New Management — 

Completely Redecorated 

48 BEDROOMS and DINING ROOM 
— AIR-CONDITIONED — 



NEW 
COFFEE SHOP 



NEW 
COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



Phone OCEAN CITY 270 




Towne Point Motel 



DOVER 
DELAWARE 



Built in 1954 - 

54 ROOMS 



U.S. ROUTE 13 & 113 
AIR CONDITIONED 
TELEVISION 



MEMBERS OF — QUALITY COURT — AAA — OCEAN HIGHWAY ASSOCIATION 

Vernon B. Deebickson, Pres. 
Vebnon B. Deebickson, Ju.. Manager 



£anAftrxd diobd. 



Between 8th & 9th 
on Boardwalk 

OPEN MAY 26 



Ocean City, Md. 

Phone 102 
Mgr. Mary B. Quillen 




W. E. RIGGIN & COMPANY 



— Dealers in — 

CHESAPEAKE and TANGIER 
OYSTERS 

Fish, Clams, Crab Meat, Hard, Soft and 
Shedder Crabs 

CRISFIELD, MARYLAND 



RICHARDSDN MANDR 



4©th STREET & BEACH HIGHWAY 

OCEAN CITY, MD. 

1-2 & 3 BEDROOM APARTMENTS 
PRIVATE GUARDED BEACH ■ Phdn. 1123 



Maryland 



53 




ANTA 



M 



ARIA 



111 ROOMS 



30 
OCEAN 
FRONT 



RADIO ADD TELEPH0I1E in EVERY ROOITI 

— TV on Request — 

• SUN DECK 

• SHUFFEL BOARD 

• ELEVATOR 

Each Room Has Private Porch 



EUROPEAN PLAN 



Reservations Available June 1st 




MAR! DEI REALTY 



Sales and Specialists in Ocean Front Rentals 

officr - MAIN — 41 " smtT and BEACN HIWAY ~~ 0CEAN CITY 98s 

) 605 BOARDWALK — OCEAN CITY 249 



OCEAN CITY, MD, 



EDWARD L THOMAS 



Sales 



REALTOR 

and Rentals 



Phoni 27 

104 N. PHILADELPHIA AVE. 



OCEAN CITY 

MD. 



summa cum laude at Maryland in 1950; 
the Mosby Prize in Medicine; and the 
American Academy of Dental Medicine 
in 1951. 

The Markle foundation was estab- 
lished in 1927 by John Markle, Penn- 
sylvania coal operator, with in anitial 
endowment of $3,000,000. which in- 
creased under the terms of his will ap- 
proximately $16,000,000. Grants for 
scholars in medical science are now the 
major program of the fund. 

Dr. Kipnis is married to the former 
Paula Levin. They have a 3 month old 
daughter. 

Pediatrics Seminar 

Experts on pediatrics from leading 
hospitals and medical schools discussed 
problems of the field at the fifth an- 
i ual Pediatrics Seminar, sponsored by 
the pediatrics department. 

Speakers included Dr. Edward B. D. 
Neuhauser, chief radiologist of the 
Children's Medical Center and Harvard 
Medical School professor; Dr. Horace 
L. Hodes, director of the department 
of pediatrics of Mount Sinai Hospital; 
Dr. Irving J. Wolman, director of lab- 
oratories of the Children's Hospital of 
Philadelphia, and Dr. Meredith F. 
Campbell, professor of urology emer- 
itus, New York University. 

Dr. Samuel S. Glick was the seminar 
chairman. 

Acne Scars 

A new technique for the removal of 
acne scars was demonstrated to the 
viewers of TV-M.D. 

Dr. Harry M. Robinson, Jr., profes- 
sor and head of the University's De- 
partment of Dermatology, explained the 
use of the "dermal abrasion unit" in 
the technique. 

Step by step, from the first examin- 
ation to the actual healing, Dr. Robin- 
son showed how the dermatological 
procedure is being used to correct the 
disfiguring scars of acne. Additionally, 
he dealt with conditions that cannot 
be corrected with the procedure. 



NEWS OF 



ALUMNI CLUBS 



Baltimore 

The Alumni Club of Baltimore will 
hold a meeting on Thursday, May 
17th at 8:00 p.m. in the Alcazar. 

Dr. Fred Singer, Professor of Physics 
of the University, internationally rec- 
ognized, will be the guest speaker. Dr. 
Singer developed what is commonly 
known as the MOUSE, the basis for 
satellite and outer space travel. Dr. 
Singer has an insight into the future 
which he capably presents in terms 
that a layman can understand. 

All alumni members in the Balti- 
more area are invited to attend and 
bring guests. 



54 



Maryland 



THE EASTERN SHORE 

Maryland's Famed Coastal Area Beckons Again 



The wheels of your car touch the soil 
of Maryland's Eastern Shore after 
you pass over the beautiful Chesapeake 
Bay Bridge and at once, you begin to 
feel yourself relaxing, slowing down, 
the tension of today's busy life seems 
to lessen and the atmosphere of easy, 
comfortable living takes its place. 

The Eastern Shore was first discov- 
ered by Giovanni de Verrazano in 1524, 
Captain John Smith explored the Ches- 
apeake Bay and its tributaries in 1606. 
Since then the temperate climate, rich- 
ness of sea and land have lured many 
to work and play in a setting of pro- 
gressiveness, still retaining many social 
customs which are "The Shore's" in- 
heritance and pride. 

As you continue down Route 50 it is 
interesting to see WYE PLANTA- 
TION, once the home of William Paca, 
an early governor of the state and a 
signer of the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence, now the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Arthur Houghton. 

400 Years Old 

The OLD WYE OAK tree, the larg- 
est white oak in the country and more 
than 400 years old is our next stop- 
ping pake. 

The Maryland Historical Society is 
planning a restoration program for 
CENTERVILLE one of the oldest and 
quaintest communities on the Eastern 
Shore. In EASTON there is the THIRD 
HAVEN MEETING HOUSE, built in 
1682 and at OXFORD, the OXFORD- 
BELLVUE FERRY which carries only 
two cars at one time making the trip 
in about 20 minutes — all very pic- 
turesque. 

You approach CAMBRIDGE by way 
of the CHOPTANK RIVER bridge and 
by-pass the city, and before you know 
it you are in SALISBURY. 

THE WICOMICO HOTEL has had a 
complete "face-lifting." The spacious 
dining room, lobby and guest rooms 
have all been renovated and air-con- 
ditioning has been completely installed. 
You'll see a new drive-in entrance and 
a new Snack-Bar. 

The thriving and progressive busi- 
ness men of the city have made it the 
metropolis of the Eastern Shore. To 
mention a few of the outstanding estab- 
lishments, there are: SHORE DIS- 
TRIBUTORS, EASTERN SHORE 
STEEL COMPANY, E. S. ADKINS, 
ARTCRAFT SUPPLY COMPANY OF 
MARYLAND, WHITE & LEONARD 
and many others. 

Maryland Alumnus 
CRISFIELD and POCOMOKE CITY 
are delightfully interesting and our 
vote goes to picturesque Crisfield, the 
home of Maryland's fisheries; W. E. 
RIGGIN operates one of the finest. 
THE CARVEL HALL CUTLERY CO., 
owned by Charles D. Briddell, an alum- 



nus of the University of Maryland, is 
world renowned. Visiting hours are 
open to the public and while in Cris- 
field, see THE STAR BAKING COM- 
PANY whose products are sold over 
the entire Eastern Shore. 

Back tracking a short distance we 
go through BERLIN and pass the MA- 
GEE OIL COMPANY, who now ex- 
tend their services as far as Cape 
Charles. From here it is just a few 
minutes drive to OCEAN CITY, THE 
PLAYGROUND OF MARYLAND, 
where you will find everything to make 
your vacation truly perfect. 

The wide, white beach and invigorat- 
ing Atlantic Ocean are most invit- 
ing. In addition you have the finest 
White Marlin fishing spot in the coun- 
try. Beautful hotels, motels and de- 
lightful restaurants greet you. 

The large super highways that lead 
into the resort are a far cry from the 
boats that were the only access to the 
island until 1879. 

Many Changes 

MARY B. QUILLIN, whose hotel the 
Lankford at 8th and Boardwalk, built 
in 1924 was thought to be too far north 
to attract guests. Today, motels and 
hotels extend several miles further 
north of the LANKFORD HOTEL. 

Visitors to Ocean City this year will 
find many changes. Most of the hotels 
have been completely redecorated and 
are charming. THE GEORGE WASH- 
INGTON and PLIMHIMMON have 
been re-done both inside and out and 
are lovelier than ever. 

For those who prefer motel life there 
is Bob Harmon's SEA SCAPE, which 
always wins our praise. But don't over- 
look the two new magnificent motels 
that have been built in the past few- 
months. 

Mr. William Carrier and his brother 
Dr. Marshall Carrier have built THE 
STOWAWAY of beauty, spaciousness 
and convenience. The rooms, cocktail 
lounge, swimming pool and restaurant 
were designed with the vacationer in 
mind. 

Bit Of Spain 

The SANTA MARIA, a bit of Spain 
in Ocean City, built by Mrs. Charles 
Ludlam, is delightfully different. From 
dining room (oh pardon me) "The Cap- 
tain's Table" where the menu is pre- 
pared by Swiss and Belgium chefs to 
the sun deck, atop The Santa Maria, 
everything is ship-shape. Upon your 
arrival you will "dock your car" and 
Captain Tom Middlebrook (resident 
manager) will welcome you. 

The realtors in Ocean City are 
mighty busy, MARIDEL REALTY (El- 
vine Holland) and EDWARD L. THOM- 
AS are two of the busiest. 

VILLA-NOVA Motel and Cottages 
owned and operated by Angelo M. Vill- 
ain is in another charming location at 



* mRRIO'S 

Specializing in 
ITALIAN-AMERICAN FOOD 

PIZZA - LIQUORS • ENTERTAINMENT 

Visit the New Surf Room 

BEACH HIGHWAY 
at 22nd Street 

OCEAN CITY, MD. 

• Phone 845 



J.L 

WELLS 
CO-, 



CHEOSO TED 
PRODUCTS 

— Telephones — 

Salisbury 2-2144 — 2-2145 

P.O. Box 312 

SALISBURY, MARYLAND 




ec 



everything 

needed 

for 

building ** 

Phone 3171 
Salisbury, Md. 



* RRTCRRFT ELECTRIC " 
SUPPLY CO. of HID. 

Wholesale Distributors of 

Electrical Supplies and 

Appliances 

M Phen« SALISBURY 6151 SALISBURY, MD. , 



Salisbury Mi 

Incorpora 

FLOUR 
TABLE MEAL 
PURINA & 
ECONOMY FEEDS 


lling Co. 

ted 

SALISBURY, 
MARYLAND 

■ - - 



BARTLETT S«V» 

Eastern Shore Properties 
Water Front Farms 

OFFICE PHONE 1 18 

RESIDENCE 1784 

TIDEWATER INN EASTON, MD. 



Maryland 



55 



ENJOY all the 

advantages of fine silver 
at a fraction of the cost! 




LEISURE 

a new stainless by George Nelson 



LEISURE will add a new dimension to your living-dining 
pleasure. It never grows old . . . never needs special 
care . . . never tarnishes . . . Fashioned by George Nelson 
exclusively for Carvel Hall from a new and eminently 
superior stainless steel. 

INDIVIDUAL 6-PIECE SETTING (Fed. Tax li»cl.) *9* 75 

CHAS. D. BRIDDELL, Inc., CRISFIELD, MD. 

President, Chas. D. BriJdeH, Class oj 19 IS 



MARIDEL 



MOTEL AND COTTAGES 

Tile Baths • Housekeeping Facilities 

Life Guards on Beach 

41st STREET & BEACH ROAD OCEAN CITY 665 

Ocean City, Md. 




west Ocean City. Mr. Villani is first 
vice-president of Ocean City's Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 

MIAMI COURT, YEAR ROUND 
HOUSE and MARIDEL MOTEL and 
COTTAGES, popular as ever, are pre- 
paring for the summer visitors. 

MARIO's Restaurant is one of the 
finer places to dine and the new Surf 
Room is especially attractive. 

Ocean City natives are talking about 
THE CHICKEN FESTIVAL to be held 
June 20th to 22nd. Three states, Mary- 
land, Delaware and Virginia, join in 
this event to produce an annual affair 
to promote and publicize DELMARVA 
CHICKENS. 

The Chamber of Commerce and the 
City Fathers with an eye to the fu- 
ture, are toying with the idea of 
"PLEASURAMA PIER" which, if it 
happens, will be a glass and steel 
structure extending 800 feet out to 
sea. It will be about 200 feet wide and 
three decks high. 

The first deck will house the muralled 
lobby, the colorful musical fountain, 
shopping center, silent speed roller 
rink, little theater and movie, conven- 
tion hall, Olympic swimming pool, and 
wading pools. 

On the second deck will be the Inter- 
national Village composed of shops of 
NATO and Pan-American nations, the 
specially designed committee meeting 
rooms of the convention hall and the 
nurseries. 

The third deck will house the Star- 
light Ballroom, Cafe de la Paix, the 
overseas restaurant, the pier manage- 
ment offices and special dining rooms. 

The roof deck will support the Sea- 
tel, the Solar observatory, the health 
club and the weather station. 

If you approach Ocean City by way 
of US Route 13 and 113 you will find 
one of the most exquisite structures 
on all of the Eastern Shore. Vernon 
B. Derrickson built the TOWNE POINT 
MOTEL in Dover, Delaware in 1954. 
"The Award of Merit" by friends of 
Old Dover, Delaware was presented to 
Mr. Derrickson, president of the Motel, 
in recognition of his efforts in con- 
tributing toward maintaining the co- 
lonial heritage of Dover. In the plan- 
ning, erection and furnishing of the 
modern motel, which he provided for 
Dover, every consideration was given 
toward the continuance of the style of 
architecture prevalent in this historic 
city. 



Marine Salute 

The University was saluted in the 
ABC radio network's "Marines in Re- 
view. 

"Marines in Review," an all-Marine 
radio show originating from Camp 
Pendleton, Calif., has been carried by 
ABC for the past five years. 

Salutes to the nation's out-standing 
universities are a weekly feature of 
the program. Maryland was honored 
with a short, narrative description of 
the school's history and points of in- 
terest, followed by a medley of school 
songs played by the Camp Pendle- 
ton Marine Band. 



56 



Maryland 



(^[overland 

JLJairu 
• 

lajualitu 
f-^roaucti 
WalcU 

h 

\s^ualitu 

Service 




Terpolosophy 




Same guys have a falset- 
to voice. Others a fal- 
setto teeth . . . Sardines 
have their sicknesses and 
ills, but only on a small 
scale . . . Feller from 
Texas tells about the 
great spell down thar 
when cattle were so thin 
the cowhands used car- 
bon paper and branded 'em in triplicate 
. . . A girl needn't be a golfer just be- 
cause you play a round with her . . . 
Rides for playing Moronia. Three 
players are required. They sit down 
together, each with a bottle of Noka 
Nola. They empty their respective 
bottle. One player gets up and leaves. 
The other two then try to guess who 
left . . . It is tough to figure on a cow 
being named "Bessie," and find the 
animals name is "Pete." . . . Girl known 
as "Dodo." She's a rare boid. 



r~ (Carrier) ~\ 



Woodrow H. Kratz 

Sales and Service 
Air Conditioning & Heating 

Residential and Commercial 
Room Air Conditioners 

16 S. CALVERTON ROAD BALTIMORE 23, MD. 

GILMOR 5-7100 



THE 



BALTIMORE ASPHALT 
BLOCK and TILE CO. 



BABCO 

HOT ASPHALT PAVEMENTS 

• private driveways 
e industrial yards 
for • service stations 
e playgrounds 
e parking areas 



general 
contractors 



1320 N. MONROE ST. 
Call: MAdison 3-4346 



BALTIMORE 17. MD. 



tArotoaa 7-6411 

LOUIS 



S&Igtutlk 



& SONS 



— WHOLE SALS MEATS — 
320 S. EUTAW STREET BALTIMORE 1 , MD. 




THE BALTIMORE ENVELOPE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS AND PRINTERS OF ENVELOPES 

600-608 EAST LOMBARD STREET 

Phone MUlberry 5-6070 Baltimore 2, Maryland 



Maryland 



57 



IN THE MARYLAND SEGMENT 

OF GREATER WASHINGTON 

IT'S THE 



Suburban 



Trust 



Company 



14 OFFICES TO SERVE YOU 

Every Banking and Trust Facility 

• 
HYATTSVILLE, MD. SILVER SPRING, MD. 

Member F. D. I. C. 




Thomas E. Carroll 
& Son 

LANDSCAPE CONTRACTING 

Tree Moving 
Trees Shrubs 

Sodding Grading 

EVergreen 4-3041 

Co/esvi/fe Pike, Route #3 
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 



(BhaL /BiucL y&L 

Jack Daniels Buick, inc. 

8526 GEORGIA AVENUE 

SILVER SPRING, MD. 

JUniper 9-9385 

"Silver Spring Has Everything" 



McNeill Surveys, Inc. 

LAND PLANNING AND SUBDIVISION 
6480 SLIGO MILL ROAD 

TAKOMA PARK, MD. 
Telephone: JUniper 9-7501 



FOOTBALL "OVER THERE" 



Maryland Football Coach 

And Great Grid Star 
Recalls Wartime Football 

fey Vwtunif. Mont 
(Head Football Coach) 

After World War II experts wrote 
that ex-Service men in football, 
as well as in other branches of sport, 
"lost something" in general ability 
while in uniform. 

That may be true in some cases. 
Some of us, however, have gained 
something. 

While our war time work and post 
war activity kept us plenty busy we 
did have time, in Europe, for partici- 
pation in high class football on Grade 
"A" teams and against bang-up op- 
position. 

Because "Maryland" readers and 

followers of the sport in general might 

be interested in football in post war 

Europe I have been asked to write a 

brief sketch of our 

grid activities "on 

the other side," plus 

reaction to the 

games. 

A Grand Team 
My job was head 
coach, i.e. playing 
coach, for the Third 
Infantry Regiment- 
al Team as well as 
for the Seventh 
Army All Stars. 
The Third Infantry 
based at Darmstadt 
and the Seventh Army at Heidelberg. 

The Third Regiment team ran off 
their regular schedule of nine games 
with no defeats and no ties. It was 
quite a ball club. This team played 
in a league made up entirely of Army 
teams in the Seventh Army Football 
league. 

Our big game, a sort of homecoming 
combined with a command perfor- 
mance for General Eisenhower, took 
place in Frankfurt. Our opponents 
were a hard playing bunch of para- 
chuters from the 508th Parachute Reg- 
iment. The Third Infantry won, 20 to 
12, after a real tussle. 

Other Games 

Other games saw us win from the 
29th Division at Bremen, 20 to 0; 78th 
Division 35 to 0; 82nd Airborne Divi- 
sion 20 to 6; 36th Division 48 to 0; 
First Armored Division 24 to 0; 84th 
Division 14 to 6; 3rd Division 33 to 19; 
100th Division 26 to 0. 

Our crack Third Regiment team, a 
regimental organization which repre- 
sented an entire Division, lost one 
game to the 71st Division team, cham- 
pions of the Third Army. The score 
was 20 to 6. The game was played in 
Frankfurt and was rated as the great- 
est upset of the European football pro- 
gram. 




Coach Mont 



Such incidents prove that there are 
no setups or suckers in sport. Some- 
times an underrated team gets hot and 
lucky and, with good condition and 
good coaching, upsets the old apple 
cart. 

Some Great Players 

The 7th Army All Stars were com- 
prised of the outstanding players in 
the 7th Army League. They played 
three games, winning two and tieing 
one. 7th Army defeated Com Z All 
Stars at Nice, France, 7 to 0. They 
tied with the Theatre Service All Stars 
at Mannheim, 7 to 7. They wound up 
the season by defeating the Theatre 
Service All Stars 25 to 6 in the New 
Year's Day game at Paris. The boys 
facetiously tabbed that one "The Cog- 
nac Bowl." 

Concensus in Europe was that the 
caliber of football played by these serv- 
ice teams was on a parity with good 
college games in the United States. All 
the teams were made up of former col- 
lege and professional stars. 

Some of the outstanding players 
were Cutchin, Kentucky; Feibish, NYU 
and Philadelphia Eagles; Monk Gaf- 
ford, Auburn; Maddox, All American 
from Kansas State and the Green Bay 
Packers; Hal McCullough, All Amer- 
ican from Cornell and the Brooklyn 
Dodgers; Anderson, Georgia; Huff, 
Indiana; Gonda, Pittsburgh Pirates; 
Sam Bartholomew, Tennessee; Ribar, 
Washington Redskins; Lamana, Bos- 
ton University; Bachman and Wilkins, 
teammates from University of Ne- 
braska; Berie Chieck, Niagara Uni- 
versity and others of like reputation 
and ability. 

I considered it quite an honor to 
play in such company; even more of 
an honor to coach teams in the Euro- 
pean Service loops. 

The average crowd at these games 
numbered 15,000, while a few games 
reached the 20,000 mark. 

Great Morale Aid 

Football in Europe was rated as a 
great morale factor for our troops. 

Not many Germans saw our games 
and I am not familiar with the re- 
actions of the comparatively few Ger- 
mans that did witness the contests. 

They might have learned something 
there! They had just had yet another 
example of the fallacy of THEIR sys- 
tem. The roll of drums, the snap of 
windwhipped guidons, the blare of 
bands, the barked commands, the ca- 
dence of marching feet. It built up 
one of the greatest military machines 
in all history. Its youth was enthused 
about it. Conquer the earth? Most 
of them got six feet of it — but for 
keeps. The system proved itself to be 
no good. 

We Showed Them 

We showed them, on the other hand, 
groups of American athletes who, 
standing proudly at attention until the 
National Anthem had been played, 
broke the silence with a yell and pitch- 



58 



Maryland 



sd into hard fought athletic competi- 
tion. 

They had just seen the "score board" 
indicating that our system produced 
fighting men who ripped apart the 
mightiest war machine in Europe's 
history, strewed it about in itsy bitsy 
pieces and generally took it apart to 
see what made it bleed. 

French spectators enjoyed the 
games. They were astounded at the 
size of our fellows. However, many 
of the French thought our sport a bit 
rough and brutal! If you can tie that 
after what the other system had just 
imposed upon the peoples of Europe! 
There is nothing sinister about our 
system of sports-built young America. 
There is, on the other hand, something 
sinister about the other system, em- 
phasized by smiling troops proudly 
marching off to war with flowars stuck 
into the muzzles of rifles. 

The flowers withered! The troops 
and the gun muzzles never came back. 
Our sports system of training Amer- 
ican youth seems to bloom, develop 
and re-root. Also it's a winner even 
in a great world war. 



TRACK ECHOES 

By Bill Mc^bcmald 

Recalling The Terp Team That Upset 
The Penn Relays, 1940 



On April 27, 1940, thirty-two thou- 
sand track fans huddled in the 
blustery chill of Philadelphia's Franklin 
Field and watched in amazement as 
six spindle-legged, youngsters from the 
University of Maryland turned the 46th 
annual Penn Relay Carnival topsy- 
turvey. The Terps ran that day. They 
ran the big dogs of track into the 
cinders and they returned with a haul 
of three championships, three plaques, 
three trophys, satisfaction of having 
splashed Maryland's name in headlines 
from Brownsville to Monterey. 

Eighteen months later Japan struck 
at Pearl Harbor and the Nation settled 
down to writing bigger headlines than 
those six men thought were possible. 
This time the six young Terps did not 
run. To a man they pitched into the 
fight and turned in performances remi- 
niscent of the iron-man jobs they did 
that afternoon in Philadelphia. 

Skyrocket Nationally 

Tom Fields, Mason Chronister, Jim 
Kehoe, Alan Miller, Gene Ochsenreiter, 
and Bob Condon are names that sky- 
rocketed to national significance inside 
of seventy thrill-jammed minutes. Com- 
peting against the countries best col- 
legiate runners, these six men won for 
Maryland two two-mile relay races and 
the four-mile relay. On Friday, the 
opening day of the carnival, the Terps 
won the two-mile medley. On Saturday 
they captured the two-mile relay, then 
returned an hour and ten minutes later 
to win the grueling four-mile event. 



USED Of net 



a JtDll£l*^l!iilM a5s ^*^ < 



WHITE & LEONARD 



SALISBURY, MD. 



Few teams ever had won three Penn 
Relay championships. That unheralded, 
unsung Maryland should accomplish it 
was unheard of. That six men, two of 
them competing in three races, should 
turn the trick shocked the sports world 
and those unbelieving but approving 
fans yelled themselves hoarse in ova- 
tion. 

Those Terps distinguished them- 
selves as a team and later distinguished 
themselves as service men. Miller, 
Fields, and Chronister were commis- 
sioned in the Marines. Kehoe, Condon 
and Ochsenreiter went into the Army. 

He Gave His Life 

One did not return. That is a story 
of valor in itself. Tall, hollow-cheeked, 
curly haired Mason Chronister was 
commissioned in the Marine Corps 
upon his graduation and shortly there- 
after was shipped into the Pacific. 
At the time the Japs overran the 
Phillipines, he was on duty as a censor 
in Manila and upon the fall of that 
city moved to Bataan with the Fourth 
Marine Division. The willowy miler 
subsequently was taken prisoner when 
the American forces capitulated and 
did not survive the infamous Death 
March. 

The others, too, contributed com- 
mendable war services. Fields was an 
officer in the Marine paratroopers; 
Kehoe an infantry officer; Miller a 
Marine Major attached to the Pacific 
fleet carrier force; Condon an Army 
paratrooper; and Ochsenreiter confined 
his Air Corps service in this country 
when the accident prevented his over- 
seas shipment. 

Previous to its triple-killing in 1940, 
Maryland had won only one Penn 
championship and was conceded little 
chance of making a show against 
powerful New York University, then 
led by the fast-stepping Les Mac- 
Mitchell. Everybody but an ex-profes- 
sor of agronomy and the six confident 
Marylanders conceded the Violets 
three, maybe four titles. But as the 



FARMERS COOPERATIVE 
ASSOCIATION, INC. 

Maryland's Largest Locally Owned 
and Operated Cooperative 

FEEDS 

SEEDS 

FERTILIZER 

LIMESTONE 

PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 
I 



FREDERICK 



Feed MO 3-3113 

Petroleum MO 3-5422 

THURMONT 3111 MIDDLETOWN 6 



Alain Office: 



35 E. SOUTH ST. 
FREDERICK, MD. 



G00DB0DY & CO. 

Est. 1891 
Members N. Y. Stock Exchange) 

RALPH A. BAIERL 

Reg. Representative 

10 N. JONATHAN STREET 
Hagerstown, Md. Phone 5301 





NALLEY'S 




NURSING HOME 


For 


the Aged, Chronic, Convaloiconl, 




Invalid and Retired Gueeti 




- 24 HOUR CARE — 


Hagers 


town 74 28 Funkttewn, Md. 



USE THE COUPON ON 
THE LAST PAGE 



Mabber's Motel & Restaurant 

Maryland's Outstanding 



OTEL 



OPEN ALL YEAR 
FINE DINING ROOM 
AIR-CONDITIONED 
On U.S. Route 40 — 1 Miles West of Frederick, Md. 




Maryland 



59 



THE 

M. J. GROVE 
LIME CO. 

• Established 1859 • 

Crushed Stone • Limestone 

Industrial & Agricultural Lime 

Concrete S Cinder Block 

Cement - Sand - Pipe 

Transit Mixed Concrete 

Free State Masonry Mortar 

Street, Road, Bridge Construction 



PLANTS " 

Stephen City, Va. 

Middletown, Va. 

Frederick, Md. 

Lime Kiln, Md. 



General Offices 

Lime Kiln 
Frederick Co., Md. 

PHONE 
Monument 3-3104 



In Montgomery County 

Farmers Supply 




McCormick-Deering Farm 
Equipment 

GAITHERSBURG, MD. GAITHERSBURG 777 



HICKORY SMOKED AGED 
HAMS 



WRITE OR STOP BY 

Souih&AfL J>aAinA. 

6 Miles North of Frederick 
on Route 194 

WALKERSVILLE, MD. 

Open Daily 8 to 5 Sunday 12 to 5 



VENICE MOTEL 
& RESTURANT 

U.S. ROUTE 40 
HAGERSTOWN, MD. 

"Air Conditioned" 
Italian Cuisine — Steaks and Seafood 
34 Modern Rooms Tel. 4427 



A Great Team 




Field* O^f"^"^!**- K«V\oe Ctr>*>oi!iii»V«».f Mi4]k*«v 

SIX CHAMPS, SIX TROPHIES 

Colonel Geary F. Eppley (left), now Dean of Men and Director of Student 

Activities, will always be proud of the athletes he coached as track mentor. 

However, of none will he be prouder than the team pictured 

here, not only because of their track performances, but on 

account of their records in uniform. 

Unheralded, these six lads, in 1940, dominated the Penn 
Relays, winning three races for Maryland against the na- 
tion's top grade talent. 

Then the entire team went to war. Left to right, Tommy 
Fields went into the Marine Corps. He's still in. Lieutenant 
Colonel now. 

Gene Ochsenreiter did his as a pilot in Army aviation. 
Jim Kehoe served in the Army and is still active in th