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Full text of "Maryland"

"Book roc 

XD LIBRARY 
COLLi^vJL PA11K, MD. 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/maryland28univ 



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Ifapp? lfoU6a?s anb .All (boob Wishes for 195 7 



4 4 






WINTER AT COLLEGE PARK 



Univerditu of Jlaryland cAlumni Publication 






BALTIMORE HEADQUARTERS 



UNIVERSITY 




MARYLAND 



It gives us a great deal of pleasure 
to know that we are your Head- 
quarters Hotel . . . and you may be 
sure that Maryland alumni and stu- 
dents will always be "special" to us. 



U\io(MkiAQ) 



HOTEL 



BALTIMORE 






AT HANOVER STREET 




Helping to speed your telephone call. Telephone man Byron Jensen tests the intricate equipment that gets your number quickly and accurately. 

PHOTOGRAPHS BY ANSEL ADAMS 

He keeps an electric brain thinking clearly 

You benefit from skills like his whenever you use the telephone 



Every time you make a call over a 
dial telephone, you start an electric 
brain "thinking" in one of our offices. 

First, it tells you when to start dial- 
ing by means of a tone. Selects your 
number automatically from many 
thousands or millions. Then rings 
your party or tells you the line is busy. 

Such equipment is indeed remark- 
able. But with all its electronic 
magic, it still needs the help of peo- 
ple. Day and night, there is contin- 
uous checking and maintenance by 
telephone office craftsmen like 
Byron Jensen. 

Working togeiher to bring 
BELL TELEPHON 



"A big part of the job," he says, 
"is to keep trouble off the lines. For 
every one of those calls is important 
to someone. And some can be very 
important. 

"Not only personal calls, but Ere 
alarms, burglar alarms, radio pro- 
grams and even newspaper pictures 
go through this same equipment." 

Each Sunday Byron teaches a class 
for boys. Many evenings and week 
ends are devoted to Boy Scout work. 

For a person who enjoys helping 

others, he finds his telephone work 
particularly satisfying. 



people together 
E SYSTEM 



"Whenever I watch those dial 
switches work." he says, "I get the 
feeling I'm at the nerve center of the 
community." 





Instructing Boy Scouts. BjTOn, .1 

troop i hairman, shows scouts how to orient 
themselves with i map and compass in the 
beautiful W asatch Range neai Provo, Utah. 



Maryland — January-February, 195'/ 



'i i r.t • t u 




ing 



life? 



Well, then, this might be a good time to get out of the dog 
house and on your way to a big career at Fairchild to 
assist in the engineering of several airplane prototypes 
now scheduled. 

Investigate the list of categories below. See where you fit in. 

Aircraft Engineers with supervisory experience in one 
or more of these positions: 

Design Project Engineers 

Design Coordinators 

Design Engineers for Sheet Metal Structure, Hy- 
draulic Systems, Landing Gears, Control Systems, 
Equipment and Furnishings, Electrical and Elec- 
tronics Installations, Power Plant Installations 

Stress Engineers for both Sheet Metal Structures and 
Mechanical Systems 

Weight Control 

Layout Designers and Draftsmen 
Project Coordinators and Administrator* 

You'll like working at Fairchild, and you'll like living in 
Hagerstown, Maryland — excellent housing, schools, rec- 
reational facilities . . . close to urban Baltimore and 
Washington. 

Send your resume today to Walter Tydon, Chief 
Engineer, P.O. Box 134, Hagerstown, Maryland. 

A Division of Fairchild Engine and Airplane Corporation 

. . WHERE THE FUTURE IS MEASURED IN LISHT-YfAMt 

FAIRCHILD 



Vol. XXVIII January-February, 1957 No. 1 




*ttal»^ 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of 
Maryland, and entered at the Post Office. 
College. Park. Md., as second class mail mat- 
ter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 
1879. $3.00 per year — Fifty cents the copy, 



Published by 

DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Maryland 

Acting Staff 

Tom Orpwood 
Patricia Burriss 
Mary Lou O'Brien 
Joe Blair 



AIRCRAFT DIVISION 



HAGERSTOWN, MARTIAN* 



SALLY L. OGDEN, Adrertising Director 

EDITH A. ROSS, Adrertising Sales 

HAZEL II. GOFF, Adrertising Copy Chief 

— Advertising Offices — 
18 W. 25th Street 2500 Wise. Ave., N.W. 
Baltimore 18, Md. Washington, D. C. 

(HO 7-9018) (EM 3-2553) 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Officers 

J. Gilbert Prendergnst '33. President 
Joseph II. Deckinnn '31, Vice-President 

Mrs. Acnes M. Krlcker '31, Vice-President 
David L. Brlgham '38, Executive-Secretary 

General Alumni Council 

AGRICULTURE — Clayton Reynolds '22, 
William Evans '20, Howard K. Soper '51. 

ARTS & SCIENCES— Virginia Trultt '52, 
Samuel L. Silber '34, Ralph G. Shure '32. 

BUSINESS & PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION— 
Alvin S. Klein '37. Harry A. Boswell, Jr. 
'42, Chester W. Tawuey '31. 

DENTAL — Dr. Frank Hurst '27, Dr. Harry 
Levin '20, Dr. Daniel E. Shehau '22. 

EDUCATION— John P. Speicher '41, William 
l'rlgg '53, Mrs. John J. lloyert, Jr. '50. 

ENGINEERING — S. Chester Ward '32. Chas. 
R. Hayleck '43, Joseph II. Deckinan '31. 

HOME ECONOMICS— Mrs. Geraldine I*. Ed- 
wards '31, Miss Irene Knox '34, Mrs. Wil- 
liam Krlcker '31. 

LAW — J. Gilbert Prenilergast '33, Stanford 
I. Hoff '34. G. Kenneth Reiblich '2'.). 

MEDICAL — Dr. William II. Triplet! '11. 
Thurston R. Adams '34, Daniel J. Pessagno 
•20. 

NURSING — Miss Flora Streett '88. Mrs. Rob- 
ert T. Singleton '50, Mrs. Mary France Den- 
nis *47. 

PHARMACY— Frank Block '24. Gordon Mount 
'37. Samuel I. Raichlen '25. 



26. 



Alumni Clubs 
BALTIMORE — Dr. Eugene L. Petisagnn 
CARROLL COUNTY— Dr. L. L. I.eggett, 
CUMBERLAND — Dr. J. Russell Cook '23. 
EASTERN SHORE — Otis Twllly. '21. 
FREDERICK COUNTY — William E. Trail 
"M" CLUB— Charles Ellinger '37. 
NEW ENGLAND— R. A. B. Cook, '05. 
NEW YORK— Miss Sarah E. Morris. '24. 
PITTSBURGH— Charles Furtney, '37. 
PRINCE GEORGES— William Kaliler '4S. 
RICHMOND — Paul Mnllinlx. '36. 
SCHENECTADY— Mrs. Janice Mackey V.1 
TERRAPIN— James W. Stevens, '19 

Ex-Officio 

Pas! President — Dr. A. I. Bell. '19. 
Past President — Dr. A. E. Goldstein, '12. 
Past President- — C. V. Koons, '29. 
Past President — J. Homer Remsberg '18. 
Past President — Col. O. H. Saunders, '10 
Past President — T. T. Speer. '17. 
University President — Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 
Executive Secretary — David L. Brigham. '3S. 



Maryland — J a nuary -February, 1957 




i^^rrr^. 



si 



I XI CUTIVr Hi I'AHIMI Ml 

a n ti a i ■ ■ . i i • Maryland 



To my fellow Alumni, 
Students, faculty and friends, 
The University of Maryland: 

Although the times in which we Liv< are unusual it 
momentousness of their events and the rapidity of their develo , we wl i> h ive 

delved into the accountings of history know that the vast a 'heavals around us are but 
parts of the ancient and continuing struggle of mankind for the establishment of 
universal freedom. 

Recognition is given to our Nation's pov. le in 

avoiding the outbreak of that Third World War which could, by the awful might of 
available weapons, destroy our civilization. 

We hear much of our immense Sto< kpil« -, of the imp! 
ments of combat and of our growing force of personnel trained in the use of ar 
and the tactics of battle. 




But America has another gr> pon- -anothc r effective 

deterrent of widespread war. This is the calmness of an informed and enlightened 
people--the calmness of understanding, courage and confidence. It is a calmness 
born of our constantly rising tide of education. 

Our great Universities and Colleges have contributed 
magnificently to the building of this precious stockpile of intellectual ammunition 
which, in the long run, may be the real and effective preventive of the holocaust. 

Outstanding among the Universities in this great work 
has been our own University of Maryland, which not only has sen - a giver of 

advanced education at home, but has spread its fine influence abroad. 

So, as we approach this greatest of our religious holi- 
days --the birthday of Christ, the Prince of Peace, we can and do extend our 
greetings with the humble pride that we, through our magnificent University, are 
contributing our bit to the ending of the barbarity of war and the advancement of 
the cause of civilization. 




Maryland — JunMry-February t 1967 




ijj 'pi jO~n 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



(Cmtrmual and &?£ifistr?ttt?tmtal (Erlrbratimts 



College of Agriculture 1836-1956 



To the Alumni of the University of Maryland: 



School of Medicine 1807-1957 



The future of the University of Maryland has never been so bright. 
The complete freedom and ease that has characterized the Administration 
under the leadership of Dr. Wilson H. Elkins is gaining momentum every- 
where. The goodwill of the Board of Regents towards him and his construct- 
ive plans is rapidly bringing about an air of unity between the executive 
branch and the legal branch of the State of Maryland and the University 
of Maryland. Both and all sides have been fair and helpful in mutually 
assisting in the problems of reconstruction. 

The University of Maryland has made good progress. Our problems, 
some of which are still serious, will be met with more assurance for the 
future as the University is in "good hands." 

To you, therefore, at Christinas time may we express the Regents' 
deep appreciation for your every courtesy extended to us as a group 
and individually. May we earn your respect during the coming years 
while we try to perform our best service to the University, the State 
and its people. We have an obligation and a deep responsibility which 
we cheerfully acknowledge and are trying to fulfill for Maryland. 

A Merry Christmas and a very happy New Year from: 



B. Herbert Brown Edmund S. Burke Wm. P. Cole Jr. 

Edward F. Holter Louis L. Kaplan Harry H. Nuttle 

Yhomas W. Pangborn Enos S. Stockbridge 
T. B. Syraons C. Ewing Tuttle 



and its Chairman, 
Charles P. McCormick 




Oldest building in ike United Stain used continuously fot medical teaching 




Maryland — January-February, 1 957 



aga 




UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
COLLEGE PARK 




OFFICE OF THE PRESiOLNT 



(Erntrmtial attfl &rai|ttiretttenmal (£rlchratimts 



College of Agriculture 1856-1936 



School of Mediant 1807-1957 



CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR MESSAGE 



As we approach the Christmas season and the New Year, it is 
natural for us to reflect upon the blessings of the past and to look ahead 
with hope and confidence. I sincerely hope that this year has been a happy 
time for you, your family, and friends, and that your experiences justify a 
full measure of faith in the goodness of mankind. 

Life has been good to me and my family. We have enjoyed your 
support and your many expressions of encouragement. 

Through your support the University of Maryland is contributing 
to the welfare of an increasing number of individuals, on and off the 
campuses. Our services are expanding in all directions, but we are careful 
to determine that they are not spread too thinly for sound practice. 

We look forward to the New Year with a feeling of confidence. 
Increasing enrollment and increasing demands for additional services 
provide a challenge to all of U3 who believe that it is a poor country 
indeed that cannot afford to develop its human resources. The University 
of Maryland has played a significant role in this development; it has 
resolved to do an even better job in 19 5? • 

May the Christmas season be a joyful one for all of us. 




Jilson H. Elkins 
President 





Oldest building in the United States used contil 



Maryland — January-Febniary, 1957 



ft 



Umvkrs 



ALUMNI COUNCIL 
School Representatives 
agriculture 
william h evan 

CLAYTON Rtl HOLDS 22 
HOWARD K SOPL> 

ARTS AND SCIENCES 

OR Virginia h 

BUSINESS AND 

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

HARRY A BOSWFLL J" 

KLEIN J 7 

• .-. 

DENTAL 

F RANK MiRsT 27 

HARRl 

DANIEL E SHEHAU 

EDUCATION 

MRS JOHN J HOYERT JH SO 

AM B PRIG 
JOHN P SPEICHtR 4 I 

ENGINEERING 

' -.N J ! 
CHARLES R HAYLECK 4 3 
6 CHESTER WAR: 

HOME ECONOMICS 

MRS GERALDINE P EDWARDS J 

MISS IRENE KNOX 

MRS AGNLS M KRiCKLR Jl 

LAW 

STANFORD I MOFF 14 

J GILBERT r 

- NN ■ M 

MEDICAL 

DR THURSTON R ADAV 
DR DANIEL J PES 

' PLETT I 1 

NURSING 

MRS MARY FRAN! ■ 

MRS ROBEB! TON *0 

Miss FLORA M STREETT 38 

PHARMACY 

BLOCK 2 4 
GORDON MOUAT 
SAMUEL I RAICHLLN 25 

BALTIMORE CLUB 

DR EUGENE 10 40 

CARROLL COUNTY CLUB 

DR LAWRENCE L LEGC.FTI 10 

CUMBERLAND 

DR J RUSSELL COOK . 

EASTERN SHORE CLUB 

OTIS TWILLEY 2 I 

FREDERICK CLUB 

OR WILLIAM E TRAIL 26 

M CLUB 
CHARLES ELLINGER 




c ict Hon 




OFFICERS 

PRESIDENT J GILBERT PRENDERGAST 33 

1ST VICE PRES . JOSEPH H DECKMAN 31 

2nd VICE PRCS MRS AGNES McNUTT KRICKER 31 

EXEC SECY DAVID L BRIGHAM 38 



J 7 



NEW ENGLAND CLUB 
JUOGE R A B COOK 05 
NEW YORK CLUB 
MISS SARAH E MORRIS 24 
PITTSBURGH CLUB 
CHARLES FURTNE Y 37 
PRINCE GEORGES CLUB 
WILLIAM KAHLIR 48 
RICHMOND CLUB 
PAUL MUI 

SCHENECTADY CLUB 
MRS JANICE •' 
TERRAPIN CLUB 

MS 19 
EX OFFICIO MEMBERS 
PAST PRESIDENT DR ARTHUR I BE 
PAST PRESIDENT DR ALBERT E GOLDS I I 
PAST i (.V KOOM- 

PAST PRESIDE N T J HOME R Ml. M&BFRG 18 
PAST F>RESIDENT-COL O H SAUNDERS IO 
PAST PRESlDi NT I T SPEFR 17 

■VILSON H ELKINS 
' CRETARY DAVID LB'- 



A new era is about to begin as the University of 
Maryland observes its Sesquicentennial. Almost coincidentally, 
the schools at College Park commemorate a hundred years of 
distinguished service in higher public education, characterized 
by steady and progressive growth in all departments. Although 
the union of the two branches of the University did not become 
complete until 1920, the alumni point to 1807 as the year when 
our alma mater came into existence. 

No longer do Maryland men and women refer to them- 
selves as graduates of the "professional schools" or of 
"College Park." Rather, we are all graduates, or former 
students, of the University of Maryland — and proud of it. 
4dmittedly, such solidity of opinion was not accomplished 
without occasional difficulty in some quarters, but it is 
abundantly evident in the concerted and harmonious work of 
the Alumni Association in which all eleven schools are so 
ably represented. 

It is altogether fitting and proper that the Associa- 
tion acknowledge its debt of gratitude to the alumni for the 
highly effective work they have done, and are doing, as an 
integrated unit to build a greater University of Maryland. 
It is our fervent hope that the bonds so well secured will 
never be broken and that our University may ever continue to 
be held in high esteem throughout the land. 

Now, as we enter the holiday season, I wish to take 
this opportunity to wish you all a very Merry Christmas and 
a Happy and Prosperous New Year. 



Sincerely 



^ 







J. Gilbert Prendergast, President 
Alumni Association 




Maryland — January-February, 1957 



Colleges Face Critical Period 



What's Happened To Faculty Salaries 



Economic Status Of Teaching Profession Declining, 
University Oi Maryland Supports Salary Adequacy. 



&y GhcvUei McGototh ' 
Chairman of tht Board ■,< Rtgentt 




Mr. IfoCormick 



Investments in education arc primarily 
investments in the future. The long 
range progress of any society is de- 
pendent to a considerable extent on the 
degree with which we are able to help 
and encourage succeeding generations 
to comprehend and add to the knowl- 
edge that has been accumulated. In 
teaching and in research the clearness 
with which established facts and ideas 
can be examined de- 
pend basically on the 
ability of those who 
can be attracted to 
teaching a n d re- 
search positions. 

The University of 
Maryland, and other 
institutions of high- 
er learning through- 
out the United 
States, face a criti- 
cal period in their 
history in retaining 
their present facul- 
ties and in securing the services of 
the ablest young people to fill new po- 
sitions. 

Adequate salaries for faculty mem- 
bers can help meet this problem. All 
of the studies made on faculty salaries 
during recent years show that the eco- 
nomic status of the college teaching pro- 
fession is steadily declining. 

The Council for Financial Aid to 
Education, of the U. S. Departments 
of Commerce and Labor, has presented 
this situation graphically for the period 
1940-1954 as illustrated in Figure 1. 
The graph is based on the 1940 buying 
power of the dollar. This illustrates 
that faculty salary increases have been 
more than offset by decreases in pur- 
chasing power. 

University Problem Serious 

The general decline in the economic 
status of college teachers is alarming 
to all, in view of the important role 
that colleges and universities play in 
the advances of our civilization. What 
is more alarming to those who are 
concerned with the University of Mary- 
land is the fact that the University has 
failed to keep pace with the salary 
scales other comparable institutions 
have provided. Thus, the University of 
Maryland faces an extremely critical 
situation in the retention of faculty and 
in attracting new faculty members. 

During the past year a committee of 
the faculty has been studying current 
faculty salaries at the University of 
Maryland, in comparison to other in- 
stitutions of higher learning. In the 



course of this study a number of pub- 
lished summaries of faculty salaries 
were reviewed and a survey was con- 
ducted to determine salaries at institu- 
tions felt to be most comparable to 
the University. This committee found 
that salaries, particularly in the higher 
ranks, were lower than those paid at 
the comparable institutions studied. 
They found that during the 1955-56 
fiscal year the University of Maryland 
was approximately $1900 lower in pro- 
fessor salaries, $900 lower in associate 
professor salaries, and $480 lower in 
assistant professor salaries. Instructor 
salaries at Maryland were comparable 
to those of other institutions. 

Figure 2 shows salaries at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland during the 1955- 
56 fiscal year in comparison to other 
institutions. 

The 30 state universities used for 
comparison were those state universi- 
ties with 5,000 or more enrollment, sum- 
marized in a report by Clarendon 



Smith) in cooperation with the Omaha 
Workshop in College Busine Urn 

ment. 

important First Step 

The ."{:{ universities surveyed by th<- 

committee as comparable to the Uni- 
versity of Maryland included both state 
and private institutions. From this 
same survey the salaries paid at 10 
state universities were summarized for 
comparison. 

With this information in mind it was 
felt that the important first step in 
securing adequate salaries for the Uni- 
versity of Maryland faculty was to 
reach a salary level comparable to the 
levels at the institutions that compete 
for faculty members. It was realized 
that competition for well trained fac- 
ulty personnel from industry and gov- 
ernment is increasing rapidly and that 
the salary scales offered are usually 
higher than are paid by the universi- 
ties with most attractive salary scales. 
However, it was felt that we must 



FIGURE 1 



INDEX (1940=100) 



80 



60 



40 



20 



100 



80 
YEAR 
1940 




££&^£MEmEE5£5%[ 



80 



160 



40 



20 



00 



80 
YEAR 
1954 



REAL INCOME BEFORE TAXES 



Maryland — Ja-nuary-Febmary, 1957 



strive as quickly as possible to place 
the University of Maryland in a posi- 
tion comparable with other progressive 
institutions of higher learning. 

The next opportunity for considera- 
tion of increases in faculty salaries at 
the University of Maryland comes when 
Governor McKeldin presents the budget 
of the University to the Maryland Leg- 
islature in January, 1957. The delib- 
erations of the Legislature, based on 
the recommendations of the Governor, 
will determine the budget for the 1957- 
58 fiscal year. 

The information on which the Uni- 
versity request was based was neces- 
sarily for the 1955-56 fiscal year. This 
had to be viewed in light of the situa- 
tion in which we might expect to find 
ourselves in 1957-58. During the past 
live years faculty salaries throughout 
the United States have increased an 
average of five per cent each year. 
Thus, it seems safe to assume that ap- 
proximately a ten per cent increase 
would take place in general faculty sal- 
aries during the two years that would 
elapse. 

The projection of a ten per cent in- 
crease may well prove to be conserva- 
tive. The Ford Foundation gift of 
$260,000,000 to improve faculty sal- 
aries in privately supported colleges 
has called national attention to the low 
salary scales prevalent in higher edu- 
cation and the deteriorating economic 
status of faculty members in relation 
to other professions. In addition, a 
number of state institutions have re- 
cently determined to place salary in- 



creases in a top priority position in 
their requests. Among these are in- 
stitutions with salaries already consid- 
erably higher than those at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. The two year 
span here concerned may well prove to 
be a period of more rapid increase in 
faculty salaries than has been true 
in recent years. The increased enroll- 
ment that is being experienced through- 
out the United States will undoubted- 
ly place emphasis on measures for im- 
proving faculty salaries. 

Dr. Elkins' Recommendation 
In preparing the budget requests for 
the University each year, the President 
requests each dean and director to re- 
view carefully the funds that are felt 
to be needed for operation of their di- 
visions during the next fiscal year. 
These officers of the University were 
unanimous in feeling that adequate sal- 
aries should receive first consideration 
among the increases being sought. Dr. 
Elkins, in his recommendations to the 
Board of Regents, called attention of 
the Board members to his strong en- 
dorsement of this need and cited four 
reasons why the requests for increased 
salaries are so important at this time. 
He stated: 

1. Higher faculty salaries must be 
made available in the State of 
Maryland if we are to continue 
to have a first class State Uni- 
versity. 

2. The supply of qualified instruc- 
tors is limited in relation to the 

FIGURE 2 



increased demand for faculty 
members brought about by larg- 
er enrollments at institutions of 
higher learning. 

3. Both public and private educa- 
tional institutions are increas- 
ing faculty salaries and com- 
petition among institutions for 
faculty members is increasing. 

4. Industry and government are 
competing to an ever increas- 
ing extent with colleges and uni- 
versities for competent, trained 
personnel. 

Based on the information placed be- 
fore Board members, and the studies 
and recommendations of the Budget 
Committee of the Board, as reported 
by Mr. Nuttle, there was unanimous 
approval of the budget request for the 
1957-58 fiscal year. 

The average salaries of University 
faculty members during 1955-56 were: 

Professor $6,937 

Associate Professor 5,789 

Assistant Professor 5,042 

Instructor 4,133 

The new salary minimums for these 
ranks, selected on the basis of the sur- 
vey and on a projection of increases 
that could be expected elsewhere, have 
been established in the requests of the 
University to the Board of Regents as: 



Professor 


$9,000 


Associate Professor 


7,000 


Assistant Professor 


5,500 


Instructor 


4,500 



FACULTY SALARIES, PRESENT AND PLANNED FUTURE 



io,ooo_ 



jopoo 

9,000 
_8,000 
J7.000 
_6,000 
_5,000 
_4,000 
_3,000 
_2,000 
_1,000 
J2 



9,00£_ 



8,000 



7,000 



6,000 



5.00JL 



4,000 
3,000 
2,00_0 
1,000 




rcft-KS^ 





\1 



1955-56 1957-58 
INSTRUCTORS 



1955-56 1957-58 



1955-56 1957-58 



K 





ffi 



1955-56 



1957-58 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 



PROFESSORS 



B 30 STATE UNIVERSITIES ENROLLMENT 5000 OR HIGHER 

C 3 3 UNIVERSITIES - COMMITTEE SURVEY 

D I STATE UNIVERSITIES FROM COMMITTEE SURVEY 



Mary Ian d — Jan u a ry -February, 1957 



The projected salaries that would 
exist if these scales are achieved at 
the University of Maryland, and if 
other universities continue to give in- 
creases at the rates that have been 
prevalent during the past five years, 
is shown on the larger graph. 

The request for the 1957-58 fiscal 
year calls for a $2,407,867 increase in 
State appropriations to the University. 
Two-thirds of the increased funds re- 
quested are to be used to provide the 
salary scale for faculty members and 
the new positions that are necessary 
for the increased number of students 
expected next year at the University. 

Other Factors Involved 

Comparable salary levels are import- 
ant but are not by any means the only 
factor that a faculty member considers 
in accepting a position, or in continu- 
ing his work at the same location. The 
University of Maryland has been for- 
tunate to attract the high caliber per- 
sonnel so prevalent among its faculty 
members. Among these added attrac- 
tions are the academic freedom that is 
enjoyed at the University, the warm 
support and the genuine interest that 
people of Maryland have shown for its 
State University, and the cultural and 
informational resources so abundant in 
the Washington and Baltimore area. 
The fact that so many outstanding fac- 
ulty members have been retained, in 
spite of a decline in the salary level 
at the University of Maryland in re- 
lation to comparable institutions, em- 
phasizes the loyalty of its faculty. How- 
ever, in fairness to the families that 
are involved and the opportunities for 
a better standard of living, there comes 
a time when faculty members will move 
rather than risk longer delay in receiv- 
ing just returns for their work. 

On the lighter side, yet with a gen- 
erous portion of truth, Roger Keith, a 
senior at the University of Maryland, 
recently commented in the Diamond- 
back concerning the action of the Board 
of Regents to request better salaries. 
"If you take a walk through the 
faculty parking lot in back of Anne 
Arundel Hall and then tour park- 
ing lot B, chances are you'll find 
the newer cars in the student park- 
ing lot. 

And you might just find the more 
expensive tweed suit on the fra- 
ternity man than on the professor 
who wears the same suit every 
other day." 

We are proud of the accomplishments 
of the University of Maryland in the 
past and look with hope to a future in 
which the University will continue to 
contribute to the welfare of the State 
of Maryland and to the nation. We are 
confident that those who examine the 
situation in which we now find our- 
selves with regard to faculty salaries, 
and who think of the challenge that lies 
ahead in meeting the educational needs 
of our ever increasing numbers of 
young people, will support the requests 
that have been made — requests that 
are based on an earnest desire to main- 
tain the high standards of the Uni- 
versity. 



"FRUIT OF TOMORROW" 



fey 2)4. VkatncU B. £y*tu . 

( .1/. mix /■ of tfn Board of R< .</< nts, P 
ih ni /ini ii in and l >' a a Emi 

Of tin ( '"Hi ih Of i I .'/' iriill ii i ■ I 

Leonard Carmichael recently WM 
"The wise psychologist dues not at 

tempt t" predict the nature of the end 
products of human artistic creation or 
try to determine the boundaries <>f 
man's highest intellectual potentiali 

03 spiritual and esthetic insights. 

Rather, psychologists try to describe, 
wherever possible in 
quantitative terms, 

basic mental process- 
es, which are often 
shown to be related 
to the anatomical 
and physiological liv- 
ing machinery of a 
unique primate 
called Homo sap- 
iens." (Man) 




Dr. Symona 



Thus w e are 
thrown into a maze 
of intangible results 
in measuring the in- 
born traits of every human being. From 
the University of Maryland we have 
graduated men and women who have 
accomplished outstanding results; men 
and women who are now engaged in 
solving some of the unknown secrets 
of nature; men and women who have 
prepared themselves to build on the 
past and the present and to add their 
cubit to a world which needs bigger 
and bigger men in a smaller and small- 
er world of tomorrow. 

Mood Of Today 

Someone has said, "The fruit of to- 
morrow is the mood of today." If that 
is true, then we are all presented with 
a challenge of examining ourselves, 
our mood of today, if you please, to 
produce the ripening fruit of tomor- 
row that will contribute to our national 
and world society. 

It has been a privilege to be an hum- 
ble participant in the development of 
our Institution during the last fifty or 
more years, to be a graduate in 1902 
and welcomed into the fold of our lim- 
ited alumni group of those times. I 
may add that we practiced in those 
days the invitation of the graduates to 
the annual alumni dinner and invited 
them to become active members of the 
Association. I am happy to see the 
Association again inaugurate this old 
practice which has not been followed 
for many years. 

I cannot take time to go into the his- 
tory and development of the Institution, 
but when I graduated, we were proud 
of our Alma Mater, the old Maryland 
Agricultural College. 

The contribution of our graduates to 
the defense of our country has been 
notable. These graduates present a 
challenge to the more recent gradu- 



future '••• • 
tlj enlarged facilitiei will law 
foi i h bettei pi i pai ed I 
of ..in a 

a -.'. . men! of 

solai ■ to mention 1 1 

call f"i in the agricultui 

. hemical, m< dical and food fi< 

\i ii. h could be aid concert ing 
remarkable growth of th< 
in compai at i\ elj i ec< ni yeai P • 
dent Hannah, of Michigan Stal 
t he nation' agi icull u i al col l< . 

be credited with advance- that made it 

possible to release 75 pel < . ni of 
A mei ican people f i om fai m woi k to 
this country's indu m in the 

last century. "Maryland*- College of 
Agriculture was one of the pioi 
schools in changing Amei ii an edu 
tion from a privilege for the favored 
classes t<> an opportunity for the 

masses," lie said. 

This has been amply demonstrated 

in the expansion and development <>f 

our University in student enrollment. 
research and service to the people of 
the state and the nation. 

Alumni Didn't Dream 

Little did our older alumni dream 
that the University of Maryland sign 
would be erected at 1'5'5 instruction 
points on four continents in 15 coun- 
tries. Yet a part of our faculty of 
over 1,000 are teaching young Ameri- 
cans at these various stations of our 
Armed Services. More than 8,000 stu T 
dents are registered and certified 
through our registrar at College Park 
in the overseas program. Our distin- 
guished President and our Governor 
attend Commencement exercises in the 
historica Aula of Heidelberg Univer- 
sity. 

Little did we think that our College 
of Special and Continuation Studies 
in cooperation with the College of Edu- 
cation would conduct classes to adults 
in various sections of our own state 
with an enrollment of over 6,000 stu- 
dents during 1954-55. 

Little did we think that a regular 
four-year course of instruction leading 
to a degree of Bachelor of Science, 
would be offered by our Institution in 
Fire Protection. Yet with a national 
loss of approximately $268 million and 
a state loss in the same year of about 
$9 million, we can understand the eco- 
nomic value of trained men in this 
field. We are one of the two or three 
institutions in the country offering such 
a course. 

Little did we think that our Uni- 
versity through the Colleges of Agri- 
culture and Engineering would furnish 
technologists to assist the people and 
governments of British Guiana, Trini- 
dad and Surinam to rehabilitate their 
countries on a government contract 
with the University. 

I could go on citing the tremendous 
developments in all fields of science, 
education, medicine, etc., but suffice it 
to say that we now have a faculty of 
over 2400, a student enrollment of 
15,000, not including the overseas en- 



Maryland — January-February, 1957 



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rollment, and a physical plant at Col- 
lege Park, Baltimore and various re- 
search centers estimated to be worth 
more than $60 million. What a com- 
parison with 50 years ago! I never 
dreamed that I would see a $2,300,000 
educational building erected on the 
campus at College Park as is the case 
today in the erection of our new Li- 
brary. We have a fine athletic pro- 
gram. Our lacrosse team has won two 
national championships. Our football 
teams have won national acclaim. 

Our Alma Mater ranks with the great 
universities of the country. Upon the 
younger graduates and those to follow 
will depend its greatness in the future. 
One suggestion that I would like to 
make is greater participation of the 
alumni in the affairs of the institution. 
We have a large and commanding group 
of over 30,000. Each college group is 
organized under the mechanics of an 
Alumni Council with a distinguished 
alumnus as President and a most com- 
petent Secretary. This group is capable 
of many possibilities for the advance- 
ment of the Institution. 

The President and the Board of Re- 
gents have established a new depart- 
ment to be known as the University 
of Maryland Endowment and Develop- 
ment Department and appointed Dr. 
Alvin E. Cormeny with the title of As- 
sistant to the President, as its head. 
Here is an opportunity for the Alumni 
to render untold assistance to the Uni- 
versity in all its colleges in seeking 
endowment funds. 

I should like to suggest to the Alum- 
ni Association that each college group 
offer a medal award to the outstand- 
ing student graduate each year in each 
College. The medal I received from 
the Alumni Association in agricultur- 
al science in 1902 is the most treasured 
award that I possess. 

I am also bold to suggest, not for 
the Board of Regents, but as an in- 
dividual member, that a Committee of 
Alumni and a Committee of the Board 
with the President could well af- 
ford to meet at least once a year to 
discuss some of the larger problems 
and policies that are constantly con- 
fronting the President and the Board 
of Regents and the State Board of 
Agriculture in guiding the future of 
the institution. Much progress has 
been made during the past year in the 
organization of the faculty by Presi- 
dent Elkins with a view of their great- 
er participation in the affairs of the 
Institution, and I think a like result 
would be affected with a closer alumni 
relationship. 

I want to pay tribute to President 
Elkins for the manner in which he is 
conducting the affairs of this great in- 
stitution. We all have assurance that 
his ambition will be to promote edu- 
cational effectiveness, broaden our re- 
search program, and further extend the 
services of the Institution throughout 
the state. 

Our alumni has much to be thank- 
ful for. Our Alma Mater gave us a 
chance to perform. May it ever con- 
tinue to inspire the youth of our land 
to greater heights in the future. 



10 



Maryland — January-February, 1957 



3,800 M.P.H. ROCKET FIRED 

Fifteen Foot "Terra pin" Fired 



The first flight of :i new rocket 80 
miles up into the ionosphere at 
speeds up to 3,800 miles per hour was 
announced jointly by the University 
of Maryland and Republic Aviation 
Corp. 

The 15-foot, two-stage rocket was 
fired from a proving ground at Wallops 
Island, Va., south oi Chincoteague Bay, 
operated by the National Advisory 
Committee for Aeronautics. 

The research missile was the first of 
several dozen to be produced by Repub- 
lic for an upper atmosphere research 
program to be administered by the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

Data To Be Studied 

Data obtained in the Defense De- 
partment project will be used by a 
group of scientists headed by Dr. S. 
Fred Singer of the University's Physics 
Department to "formulate an inte- 
grated picture of the upper atmos- 
phere." 

Dr. Singer said the rocket pro- 
gram is "of considerable importance, 
not only from the basic research point 
of view but also to investigate better 
the regions outside of the atmosphere 
where the large rockets, satellites and 
eventually manned-spaceships will some 
day be flying." 

The announcement said the rocket, 
dubbed the "Terrapin," after the Uni- 
versity's mascot, is six and a quarter 
inches in diameter at its thickest point 
and weighs 224 pounds. 




A solid propellant was lifted to fire 

the rocket to 10,000 feet in six second- 
at a speed of 1,000 miles per hour. Al- 
ter separation of the first Btage, tin- 
second stage "coasted" another 80,000 
feet higher. 

The second stage then fired the 
rocket to 50,000 feet, attaining peak 
speed of about .'5,800 miles per hour. 

After attaining peak speed at 50, 

feet or about !) miles up, the rocket 
coasted to an altitude of 80 miles, the 
announcement said. 

Instruments Guarded 
At maximum speed, the rocket was 
subject to temperatures in excess of 
1,000 degrees Fahrenheit. Special de- 
vices were used in the warhead to pro- 
tect miniature instruments designed at 
Maryland under the direction of Dr. 
Singer. 

The University of Maryland scientist 
said the instruments make use of sev- 
eral new electronic principles, includ- 
ing printed circuits, a Geiger counter 
to measure radiation and a radio re- 
ceiving and transmitting system. 

Dr. Singer said the instrument sys- 
tem was so simple it was built and as- 
sembled by high school and university 
students. 

Republic officials said the new rocket 
is "one of the cheapest and most port- 
able of its kind." They said it cost 
only a fraction of missiles previously 
used to obtain high altitude data and 
thus may prove a valuable weather and 
research development. 



THIS IS SLURVIAN 
Yes, we had a lovely time on our 
Yerpeen trip, specially nittly. Hard 
and Dorthy were with me. She got 
sick and elapsed but was sweet as 
surp about it. I sent her flars. Things 
happen to Murcans in farn countries 
and we were sure glad to get back to 
Murca even with it Florida herkins. 
Better than being in Mexico riding 
burrs. 

We've had some great Murcans even 
if we can't all be like Fargot at Mobile 
Bay. I've met some great cactus in 
my experience with human beans, both 
fiscal and in spurt. All you need do is 
look in a myrrh, but don't get too sears 
about it. Just be plight and don't tell 
others. I heard a corse of mixed singers 
signing on recent wreckers. That's 
better than looking at a tare and harr 
movie. 

****** 
TEDDY SAID IT 

Teddy Roosevelt became the first bop- 
ster when he said, "Dig that Canal." 



I be ■ " ■ ol mated 

at about one-tenth that of a compai 
able Aerobee rocket, oi about $2,000. 

'1 he Tei iap • i onic inatrun ■ 

tatioa was built and assembled in a 
university classroom by thre 
ate students and i.: ,, high school 
dente during their summi r vacations, 
Singer said. 

The Terrapin project engineei fron 
Republic is Morris S. Roth. University 
ol .Maryland personnel associated with 
Singer in designing the instrumentation 
and in the atmospheric research pro 
jc d include Dr. .1. II. Sreb, Bruce Ed- 
wards, Ray Elton, Richard Bettinger, 
Carl Reber and R. N. Roy. 

The launcher, a -mall metal frame, 

can be bolted together and put into 

position in fifteen minutes. 

Because of this quick launching fea- 
ture, Singer said, the Terrapin will 
be useful for such functions as •'catch 
ing" solar flares, the mysterious sun 
explosions which appear without warn- 
ing and last only a few minutes. He 
said no other known rocket, for practi- 
cal purposes, could be fired into the 
upper atmosphere quickly enough t<. 
catch these fl. 




1WOR T«6 TO? S£Z> 

Education can also 
coyisist of unlearn- 
ing . . . If the thought 
of work fails to dis- 
co u r a g e you — you 
ha ii tin makings of a 
good man . . . Garden- 
ing top: The nay to 

lldlC two hliliti* of 

grass where one grew before is to 
plant some vegetables . . . If a lot of 
people had it all to do over again 
they'd be too tired . . . Dress designers 
apparently believe that there is no 
business like show business . . . It's 
so discouraging to work for nu 
you've already spent . . . Modern music 
is the kind that is played so fast you 
can't tell the classical composer from 
whom it was stolen . . . Salisbury alum- 
nus man was promoted after his wife 
presented him with quadruplets. Boss 
made him head of the jiruduction de- 
partment! . . . The reason they're jiut- 
ting safety belts in autos is that peo- 
ple are getting killed before they have 
their cars paid for . . . Eastern Shore 
obstetrician is about to retire. In order 
to wean himself from his practice he 

must leave the Eastern Shore and just 
to make doubly sure he picked, the Vir- 
gin Islands as his future home . . . 
Sales talk: "The duhtxe job costs no 
more than the standard. You just pay 
a little longer . . ." 



Maryland — January-February, 1957 



u 



"And Away She Goes' 




MISSILE AWAY 

Newest missile (o probe secrets of outer space, devel- 
oped by University of Maryland and Republic Aviation 
Corporation, shown here being tested for first time. 
Though dubbed "Terrapin" after University's mascot, 
there's nothing turtle-like about way this extremely light- 
weight research missile races 80 miles skyward, radios 
back important information. Less than 15 feet tall, it 
can be handled by three men and its low cost means 
may be used in future for weather forecasting. 

In first picture, missile rests on launching cradle at 
75 degree angle. Picture two, shows blast off as rocket 
heads skyward. In third picture-, Terrapin accelerates 
rapidly attaining speed of 1,900 mph. by time it reaches 
10,000 feet. The first section (below top pair of fins) 
drops away. Second rocket motor cuts in, boosting speed 
to 15,800 mph. Republic already is at work on three-stage 
rocket which will climb to altitudes of 200 miles or more. 
And in only a few more seconds than Terrapin. 

(Photos by NAG A) 




12 



Maryland — January-February, 1957 



FOOTBALL HAS PLACE ON CAMPUS 



(/'resident, Vnivertity of Maryland, and 
Former College Oriddcr) 

The crusade to reform intercollegiate 
football is on again. Irregular prac- 
tices are being uncovered, and to the 
detriment of all concerned are being 
labeled "scandals." 

The public is being led to believe 
these practices are eating at the very 
hearts of our colleges and universities. 
Actually, they have had little effect on 
the institutions. 

In any fair appraisal of football, we 
must examine the effect it has had on 
the players and the colleges. The rec- 
ord will show that the players have 
not been brilliant scholars; neither have 
they been dumbbells. 

Average Students 

They have been average students, 
and have achieved at least average suc- 
cess in all walks of life. They have not 
been ne'er-do-wells. 

Football has contributed to the wel- 
fare of many institutions and rarely 
has it been responsible for degrading 
academic standards. In some places 
the amount of attention given football 
has obscured and hampered the main 
purpose of higher education, but this 
has been the exception. 

Generally, where football has been 
dropped or thoroughly "deemphasized" 
the change in academic stature has not 
been noticeable. 

Failures Noted 

It is true that many athletic pro- 
grams have been operated in such a 
way as to reflect on the integrity of 
the institutions in dealing with stu- 
dents and prospective students. Re- 
sponsible administrators have bemoaned 
unfavorable developments, but often 
have failed or refused to look at all 
the facts and to face the problem open- 
ly and realistically. 

There have been attempts to recon- 
cile the athletic program with the ex- 
alted ideals of the "purists" and at the 
same time to conduct a program that 
would satisfy the most enthusiastic fan. 
This has driven the coaches and alumni 
"underground." 

Need For Decision 

There is need for a clear decision. 
The institution should decide whether 
it wants a strong athletic program or 
prefers to operate on a no-aid basis. 
Diversity is one of the chief character- 
istics of higher education, and each in- 
stitution has a right to determine its 
own objectives. 

If those who are responsible for gen- 
eral policies — the governing board and 
the president — believe football has pos- 
itive values, that it builds school spirit, 
strengthens the competitive spirit so 
vital to our national welfare, and at- 
tracts the attention of alumni who sup- 
port the school; and if they believe 
these values can be realized without 
loss of educational effectiveness, then 



the responsible administrators should 
establish the program on a workable 
and defensible basis. 

Two Requisites 
To accomplish this, there are two 
primary requisites. First, the govern- 
ing board should assume responsibility 

for the program and instruct the presi- 
dent to carry it out. The coach and 
athletic director are key men, but the 
final responsibility should rest with and 
on the president and governing board. 

The second requisite is complete con- 
trol by the institution. There can be 
no compromise here. Any arrange- 
ments which subordinate or obligate the 
administration will lead to trouble. 
Problem Areas 

With a clear policy stemming from 
the governing board and the president 
responsible for its execution without 
interference, the institution can work 
out a plan that will help the boys, en- 
courage academic achievement, and en- 
list the support of all except the most 
rabid fans, the gamblers and the self- 
appointed reformers. 

Now let us turn briefly to the insep- 
arable problem areas of recruitment, 
subsidization and academic achieve- 
ment. Recruiting, if carried on indis- 
criminately, can place an institution in 
a bad light and give the young athlete 
an exaggerated impression of his im- 
portance. 

In order to raise the level of all re- 
cruiting and to emphasize the import- 
ance of academic achievement, only 
those who have demonstrated capacity 
and desire to do college work should be 
eligible for financial aid. 

In regard to assistance, I believe con- 
ditions are much better than they were 
25 or 30 years ago. The main problem 
is not the amount but the kind of as- 
sistance. 

Kinds Of Aid 

The off-campus job and direct aid 
by alumni should be ruled out because 
they cannot be controlled by the in- 
stitution. The on-campus job can be 
used to some extent, but in general it 
has not proved satisfactory because of 
lack of time for an honest work pro- 
gram. Scholarships, that is awards 
based on academic distinction (which 
should be well above the average), will 
include only a few athletes. 

A clear distinction should be made 
between kinds of awards, and most as- 
sistance given to athletes falls in the 
class of grants-in-aid. In colleges and 
universities which propose to educate 
all who have capacity, a large number 
of students may properly be considered 
for grants-in-aid. 



Should show Progress 
Over and above the minimum 
quirementa of man;, college . ill 
denti receiving financial a 

should base t- 

assure normal pr d< 

gree. 

intercollegiate football, of i he p* • 
tator \ ai iel a pai ' of the An 

can college tradition. It has much to 
offer the player, the student body, and 

the alumni. To he most prodtl 

must be woven mote closely into the 
fabric of higher education bj open, 
courageous and realistic commitmi 

The individual institution must ac 

cepl responsibility for every part of 

its educational program. Football I- 
no exception. 



Rector Leaves 

College Park 

Counselled Thousands 

The Rev. Nathaniel ('. Acton has 
left his post as rector of St. An- 
drew's Episcopal Church, College Park, 
Md., to take a similar position at St. 
Paul's Episcopal Church, Overbook, Pa. 

The 4G-year-old clergyman has served 
the College Park church since 1940. He 
came there that year as vicar and Epis- 
copal chaplain to the University of 
Maryland. In 19. r >4 he was made rector 
of the church. 

A native of Philadelphia, Mr. Acton 
is a graduate of Pennsylvania State 
University and the Virginia Theologi- 
cal Seminary. After ordination in June, 
1938, he served as curate at St. John's 
Episcopal Church, Lafayette Square, 
for two years. 

Mr. Acton has been active in Epis- 
copal Washington diocesan affairs and 
in numerous organizations while at 
College Park. Among his church posts 
were membership on the diocesan 
standing committee and executive coun- 
cil and on the departments of missions, 
promotion and Christian education. He 
served as chaplain for the College Park 
Rotary Club, Lions Club of Washing- 
ton and Reciprocity Club of Washing- 
ton. 

He is married and has a daughter. 
Natalie Ann, 11, and a son, John Fred- 
erick, 10. 



24 -HOUR TOWINQ SERVICE 



WArfield 7-9710 



750.> RALTIMORE AVENUE 
COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 



Maryland — January-February, 1951 



13 



Technical Assistance 
In British Guiana 



By Conrad H. Liden 
(Administrative Officer 
of the ICA Contract) 



(Reprinted from the "Carribean Magazine." the official publication of the Carribean Commission) 



After nearly two years of operation, 
one can see much progress in 
British Guiana in the Technical Assist- 
ance Program of the International Co- 
operation Administration. This pro- 
gram provides specialists and tech- 
nicians as requested by the Govern- 
ment of British Guiana to aid the de- 
velopment plan of the host country. 
Both the ICA and the University of 
Maryland are providing the staff which 
functions under the United States 
Operations Mission to British Guiana. 
A range of activities including agri- 
culture, housing, surveyor training, 
land settlement, land reclamation and 
rural youth have been given support 



by the Maryland technicians. They have 
worked, for most part, with specialists 
of the host government and have given 
assistance on technical problems and 
counsel on methods of implementing 
plans of work. 

Agriculture 
A number of the British Guiana De- 
partment's projects have been given 
support. It is difficult to say which 
project is most important because all 
of them are necessary for balanced 
development. The first project to re- 
ceive assistance was the soil survey. 
A plan of action was prepared in co- 
operation with the soils specialists 
of the Imperial College of Tropical 



Agriculture to insure that the survey 
results could be of value in coi-relat- 
ing surveys of other countries. Two 
technicians have been assigned to this 
work. 

The soil mapping includes a detailed 
survey of approximately 30,000 acres 
in Blocks I and II of the Courantyne. 
With the exception of rechecking some 
of the soil descriptions, the final report 
on the area is nearing completion. 

Inauguration of a reconnaissance sur- 
vey on that part of the New Coastal 
Belt between the Courantyne and the 
Essiquibo Rivers where detailed map- 
ping is not scheduled has had the co- 
operation of several departments of 



'Aided-Seli-Help" House 




Frank O'Brien, construction manager, inspects native work on an "Aided-Self-Help" house. The technical assistance on 
other construction and design js provided by University of Maryland technicians. 



14 



Maryland — January-February, 1957 



Bamboo Laying Pen 



Thakur Singhn 




At right, Dr. Norman Paulkus, Poultry Specialist, explains the construction 
of a home-made bamboo laying pen. From left, Andy Feency, University Informa- 
tion Specialist, and a Guianese native (hidden). 



.v r 




Kgjjs are collected from an eg^ lay- 
ing battery designed hy Dr. Paulkus 
using local materials. The Guianese 
native worker is Thakur Singhn. 



Program Includes Woodworking 




Natives work in the foreman training program in British Guiana. 



Maryland — Jan uary-Fc b ru a ry, 1 91 



British Guiana Government. The rapid 
progress to date is due to a large 
extent to the use of a helicopter sup- 
plied by the Maryland Mission. Over 
the open or marshy areas, the heli- 
copter transports in a few minutes the 
team of surveyors to locations which 
would require several days to reach 
on foot. 

Connected with the reconnaissance 
survey of the soil, a classification of 
vegetation associations was made by 
the Botanist-Ecologist technician. 1 he 
correlation of the vegetation associ- 
ations with the soil classification could 
have great importance in future soii 
surveys by use of aerial photos. Here, 
again, the helicopter became an im- 
portant means of transportation for 
the survey team. 

An area in the Boerasirie is under 
detailed survey. Here, certain soil con- 
ditions are observed which may have 
important bearing on the future plan- 
ning of irrigation, drainage and de 
velopment programs for the region. 

Throughout the course of the field 
work on the soil survey, chemical 
analysis of soil samples have been con- 
ducted by the Chemistry Laboratory 
Staff of the Department of Agriculture. 

The results of these tests make the 

classification of the soils more mean- 
ingful. 

In the field of livestock and poultry, 
two technicians have been assigned. 



15 




Baltimore Business Forms combine all 
billing and shipping forms into one! 



Regardless of how you bill or ship . . . 
whether by rail and truck exclusively, 
or by parcel post or express, or any 
combination of these . . . Baltimore 
Business Forms will combine all forms 
into one. Invoice, labels, packing slips, 
accounting copies and bills of lading, 
all to be typed at once. 

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The swine specialist worked very close- 
ly with the chief livestock officer of the 
Department of Agriculture in improv- 
ing swine through importation of breed- 
ing stock, followed by increase of good 
lines for distribution to farmers. Feed- 
ing trials, using a maximum of local 
source feeds, resulted in the develop- 
ment of a ration which yielded 100 
pounds of gain on fattening pigs from 
320 pounds of mixed feed. Much coun- 
sel was given on the operation of a 
government-owned ham and bacon fac- 
tory, the opening of which paved the 
way for the establishing of a grading 
system for marketing hogs, thus mak- 
ing it possib'e for the producer to re- 
ceive payment in line with the quality 
of his hogs. 

Poultry products have been in short 
supply in British Guiana. In close 
liaison with the general livestock 
specialist and the head veterinarian of 
the Department of Agriculture, the 
poultry specialist has made noteworthy 
contributions. Improving of blood lines, 
developing constant supply of hatching 
eggs, controlling of disease and insur- 
ing- a feed supply have been some of 
the problems receiving attention. An 
effective program of vaccination for 
certain poultry diseases was begun 
and very satisfactory results obtained. 
Demonstrations in improved manage- 
ment show the possibility of maintain- 
ing- a laying flock of good hens with 
a production up to 70% per day. An 
effective way of improving the small 
farm flock was found in the "rooster 
swapping" program. Here, many of 
the cockerals of new imported stock 
were traded to the farmers in exchange 
for poorer roosters. 

It has been said that the basis of a 
sound agriculture in the future lies in 
a country's youth. A 4-H Club move- 
ment now occupies the full time of 
one Maryland Youth Specialist and two 
Guianese counterparts. In these clubs 
the boys and girls learn to work to- 
gether for their own betterment and 
to assume responsibility of doing in- 
dividual projects. Adult leaders for 
these clubs have been given training 
in a short course and will receive in- 
dividual suoport from the specialists 
in the guiding of club activities. From 
the enthusiasm displayed, the present 
100 members in two clubs will soon 
be increased several times with clubs 
located throughout the country. 

Agricultural information on im- 
proved methods and practices is essen- 
tial to an improving agriculture. The 
Department of Agriculture specialists 
are being aided by a Maryland tech- 
nician. All avenues of information dis- 
semination are being explored and new 
methods applied. Radio programs on 
farming are going over the air in co- 
operation with the Government Infor- 
mation Service. Newspapers are being 
supplied releases on up-to-the-minute 
facts on poultry feeds, rice marketing, 
disease control and other subjects. Well- 
illustrated bulletins and leaflets are 
written by the subject matter special- 
ists of the Department of Agriculture 
and final preparation and publication 
is carried out by the Information Office. 



16 



Maryland — January-February, 1957 



Visual aids including film strips, charts, 
posters and portable exhibits arc pre- 
pared for use by the extension agents 
at meetings with farmers in the rural 
districts. It is believed that the fanner 
must be informed by every means pos- 
sible if he is expected to improve his 
production. This is the aid of the 
Agricultural Information Specialist. 
Land Settlement 
Increasing population pressures 
create needs for job placement for the 
8700 to 3800 new family heads each 
year. It is estimated this number will 
increase to roughly 5000 in ten years. 
Therefore, there must be careful plan- 
ning of a land settlement program for 
new families on newly opened land. 
The problems are complex and a solu- 
tion may not be easy. Some phases of 
the Land Settlement Program are being 
assisted by a socio-economic specialist 
and a machinery technician. 

Continuing sociological studies are 
required to gain information on prob- 
lems associated with the establishment 
of communities on land settlement 
schemes. The nature of government 
organization and operation best de- 
signed to maintain harmonious and 
effective supervision of such schemes 
are receiving consideration. 

The machinery presently on land 
settlement schemes is being maintained 
and operated by many who are un- 
skilled and untrained. Training of the 
mechanics and operators is one way 
in which the machinery technician con- 
tributes to technical assistance. 
Irrigation And Drainage 
A major contribution to the Depart- 
ment of Irrigation and Drainage by 
the Maryland Mission has been two 
summer courses in surveyor training. 
Approximately 45 students have re- 
ceived elementary training in land sur- 
veying, thereby adding to the semi- 
skilled staff of the department. 

Limited assistance has been provided 
in the field of reclamation. Ditching, 
gate construction, water flow require- 
ments and tide guaging are among the 
many phases under study. 
Housing 
Adequate housing poses problems for 
the increasing population. The design 
and construction, as well as site plan- 
ning, have received support from tech- 
nical assistance. 

Construction foremen training has 
provided the supervisory personnel to 
work with the aided self-help groups. 
During this training the men learn all 
the skills in house construction from 
the making and laying of the concrete 
blocks to the finishing of the inside 
carpentry work. 

Lack of careful site planning of 
towns and communities often has re- 
sulted in congestion and disorder. All 
new housing developments are being 
designed by the Department of Public 
Works and aided by a Maryland special- 
ist in this field. Land utilization sur- 
veys for town and village extensions, 
zoning and orientation for residential 
construction and government buildings 
receive careful study. In-service train- 
ing of drawing office personnel con- 
tinues with results which are most en- 
couraging. 



C. Wilbur Cisscl Appointed 

Director Oi Finance And Business, Replaces Benton. 



University President Wilson 11. Elldna 
and the Hoard of Regents an- 
nounced the appointment <>f ('. Wilbur 
Cissel as Director of Finance and Hum 
ncss to succeed Charles L. Henton, re- 
cently resigned to become Budget Direc 
tor of the City of Baltimore. Mr. Cissel, 

a Certified Public Accountant, received 
his Bachelor of Arts degree in Business 
Administration in L932 and, in 1934, 
earned a Master of Arts degree in 
Economics, both University of Mary- 
land. 

He has been on the staff of the Uni- 
versity since 1936, when he was ap- 
pointed Instructor in Economics and 
Accounting, Business and Public Ad- 
ministration. Promoted to Assistant 
Professor, immediately following World 
War II, he was advanced to Associate 
Professor of Accounting. In 1948 Mr. 
Cissel became Comptroller of the Uni- 
versity and served in that position for 
the past eight years. 

In The Service 
In 1941 Mr. Cissel was affiliated with 
the Office of Production Management as 
a Cost Analyst and in 1942 served the 
War Production Board as its liaison 
officer with the War Department Price 
Adjustment Board. Mr. Cissel was an 
ROTC graduate at Maryland and held 
a reserve commission in the Infantry 
until World War II. 

During the war he served in the 
Navy on the staff of Rear Admiral 
Frank Baldwin, Chief of Navy Cost 
Inspection, and left the service in 
1946 as Lieutenant Commander. Dur- 
ing 1946 he acted as Accounting Ad- 
visor to the U. S. House of Represent- 
atives Committee on Merchant Marine 
and Fisheries, at a time when the Com- 
mittee was making a critical analysis of 
the wartime accounting practices of the 
Maritime Commission and the War 
Shipping Administration. 

Mr. Cissel, his wife and three lAild- 
ren reside in College Park. 
Activities 
Miscellaneous activities include: — 
1941, Senior Accountant with Black and 
Company, Baltimore, Certified Public 
Accountants; 1928 to 1934, Potomac 
Electric Power Company, Washington, 
Cashier's and Bookkeeping Depart- 
ments; 1926-1934, Clerical positions in 
three Washington banks. 

Mr. Cissell's professional and honor- 
ary memberships include: — Beta Gam- 
ma Sigma, (Honor Society in Business 
Administration); Beta Alpha Psi, 
(Professional Accounting); Scabbard 
find Blade. (Honorary Military); Amer- 
ican Institute of Accountants, Amer- 
ican Accounting Association, Maryland 
Association of Certified Public Ac- 
countants, Eastern and Southern Asso- 
ciations of College and University Busi- 
ness Officers. 

His religious and social organiza- 
tions: — University Methodist — Member 
of Official Board; formerly Trustee 



Director 





C. WILBUR CISSEL 

Appointed Director of Finance and 
Business to succeed Charles L. Benton. 



and member of Finance Committee for 
7 years; Justice Lodge, No. 46, 
F.A.A.M.; Theta Chi (Social i. 

Dwelling upon the appointment of 
Mr. Cissell, University President Wil- 
son H. Elkins said, "Mr. Cissell is well 
qualified to succeed Mr. Benton. He 
was connected with the College of 
Business and Public Administration as 
Instructor, Assistant Professor and 
Associate Professor of Accounting from 
1936 to 1948, and has been with the 
Office of Finance and Business for 
eight years, most recently in the posi- 
tion of Comptroller. I am sure that he 
understands the function of the Uni- 
versity and that he will cooperate in 
any reasonable manner to assist others. 
The aim of all of us should be full 
cooperation." 

Dr. Elkins' Reaction 

Referring to the departure of Mr. 
Benton, Dr. Elkins went on to say. 
"I regret that Mr. Benton resigned. 
However, I congratulate him on hav- 
ing been selected from among many 
applicants, for the position of Budget 
Director of Baltimore City. Mr. Benton 
has done an outstanding job in the re- 
organization and operation of the Uni- 
versity's Office of Finance and Busil 
I am sure that he will be equally suc- 
cessful in his new position. 

Executive accountant Harry D. Fish- 
er has been appointed to the comptrol- 
ler's position. The comptroller super- 
vises finances at the College Park di- 
vision of the University. Mr. Fisher, a 
certified public accountant, has been in 
the accounting department since 1946. 
He is a graduate of the College of Busi- 
ness and Public Administration, class 
of 1943. 



Maryland — January-February, 1957 



17 



Former University Professor Receives 
Nobel Literature Award 



Pity The Poor Judges 



*iA>- 








: .*'. .■-'" 




Out of these 19 lovely throne aspirants representing dormitories and sor- 
orities, .Miss Jody Floyd, extreme right, first row, was crowned University of 
.Maryland Homecoming Queen at the Maryland-Kentucky football game in Byrd 
Stadium and reigned over the traditional dance in the University's Armory at 
College Park. 

First row, from left: Sandra Connelly, Wicomico Hall, freshman in A & S, 
Belair; Judy Larmour, Kappa Kappa Gamma, junior in Ed., Plainfield, N. J.; 
Joan Marie Sheckel, Anne Arundel Hall, sophomore in A & S, Baltimore; Jeanne 
Kane, Kappa Delta, sophomore in Home Ec, Arlington, Va.; Jody Floyd, Alpha 
Omicion Pi, senior in A & S, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Second row: Jinny Catts, Queen Anne's Hall, freshman in A & S, Hillside, 
Md.; Dianne Reiff, Kappa Alpha Theta, junior in A & S, Falls Church, Va.; Lola 
Burdick, Sigma Kappa, sophomore in A & S, Hammoroton, N. J.; Karen Habich, 
Alpha Delta Pi, sophomore in Home Ec, Mt. Lakes, N. J.; Joan Zimmerman, Alpha 
Epsilon Phi, junior in Ed., Baltimore; Anne Ermer, Delta Gamma, sophomore 
in Nursing, Baltimore; Lee Ross, Alpha Gamma Delta, junior in A & S, 
Chambersburg, Pa. 

Third row: Roma Misiunas, Caroline Hall, sophomore in A & S, Baltimore; 
Joy McGuire, Alpha Xi Delta, junior in Home Ec, Suitland; Dottie Rich, Som- 
erset Hall, freshman in Ed., Bethesda; Susan Gumpper, Delta Delta Delta, sopho- 
more in Home Ec, Silver Spring; Lois Ann Getz, Sigma Delta Tau, senior in 
A & S, Baltimore; Judy Palmer, Gamma Phi Beta, sophomore in Home Ec, 
Arlington, Va.; Jessie Hackett, Carroll Hall, sophomore in Home Ec, West 
Hampton Beach, N. Y. 



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The 1956 Nobel Prize for Literature 
was awarded to a former University 
professor. Spanish poet Juan Ramon 
Jimenez was nominated for the honor 
by friends and former colleagues in 
Maryland's Foreign Language Depart- 
ment. 

Caused Poetic Renaissance 

Jimenez, who taught at Maryland 
from 1948 to 1951, caused an Hispanic 
poetic renaissance according to Mrs. 
Grace Nemes, Spanish instructor and 
his biographer. Her book will be pub- 
lished in 1957. 

The 75-year-old poet-in-residence at 
the University of Puerto Rico was eulo- 
gized in his nomination for this honor. 
"For 50 years he has remained incor- 
ruptedly an exponent and defender of 
the highest idealistic literary principles 
and tendencies, never yielding to out- 
side pressure or personal interests." 

The work recommended for the Nobel 
committee's consideration was "Platero 
y Yo," which has been translated into 
seven languages and is included in 
Maryland's Spanish curriculum. 

Recorded for Blind 

The book was selected in 1955 with 
"Don Quixote" by the Library of Con- 
gress for recording for the blind. 

According to Mrs. Nemes, she dis- 
covered a letter during her research 
stating that although he had been men- 
tioned by the Nobel committee he had 
never been correctly nominated. "I 
found out that a University professor 
or department could nominate him. 
Everyone here is a personal friend of 
the poet and we went to work. 

"There was much red tape and we 
only completed the paper shortly before 
the February deadline." 

The letter of nomination also stated 
that " 'Platero y Yo' is not only an 
outstanding work for its literary per- 
fection alone but for the idealistic ap- 
proach of the poet in the conception of 
his work in which the most humane un- 
derstanding and tenderness are shown 
toward the less able and less fortunate 
members of creation be it a man or an 
animal, an insect or a blade of grass." 

While at Maryland, Jimenez taught 
Spanish literature seminars and ad- 
vanced conversation. 

His wife was on the faculty from 
1944 to 1951. 



The University of Maryland Regis- 
tered More Than 10,000 Students in 
September at College Park. 



18 



Ma njland — January-February, 1957 



University Progress Report 
Given To Baltimore Alumni 



Charter Day 



fly {JeMe Qla4.Cf.aw- 

[Reprinted from Baltimore Sun) 

The president of the University of 
Maryland told a group of Baltimore 
alumni he thinks construction can start 
next March or April on two buildings 
for the University's Haiti more campus. 
They would be the student union 
building, at the southwest corner of 
Greene and Lombard streets, and the 
new library on a tract not far away. 

The university already has three 
projects under way here, new buildings 
for its pharmacy and nursing schools 
and a $f>()(),()()() expansion of University 
Hospital. 

The university president, Dr. Wilson 
H. Elkins, was one of several speakers 
at the annual luncheon the Baltimore 
alumni club gives for the Board of 
Regents. 

Dr. Elkins told the group that pri- 
mary attention now is being given to 
raising salaries for the university's 
faculty and staff. 

He cited difficulties in competing with 
institutions offering more money and 
said that unless Maryland upgrades its 
faculty salaries "we're likely to go 
backward." 

Dr. Elkins said the university also 
is giving attention to strengthening 
its educational program. He said better 
programs and a top-flight faculty are 
essential to "turning out first-class 
products." 

He said the school is not losing sight 
of its physical needs and outlined the 
work being done at the College Park 
and Baltimore campuses as examples 
of improvements along that line. 

At the formal, monthly meeting of 
the regents board before the luncheon, 
the group took two steps toward broad- 
ening the university's program. It 
authorized Dr. Elkins to make formal 
application for a new R.O.T.C. unit, 
which probably would be an army unit. 
The university's present unit trains 
young men for the Air Force. 

The board's other action in this re- 
spect was to approve offering a bachelor 
of music degree. It would not replace 
any degree now being given but would 
be an additional one on the program. 

The music courses now offered lead 
to the degree of bachelor of science 
in music education. The change does 
not involve any additional expense 
but it could, Dr. Elkins said, if there 
is an appreciable increase in music 
students. 

In another action, the Board of Re- 
gents approved amending the legisla- 
tive tuition scholarship law, which now 
restricts the scholarships a legislator 
can award to study on the College Park 
campus. 

In some case, as with pharmacy and 
nursing students, for example, the 



holders of scholarships ran receive as- 
sistance only two years because thej 
complete their work in the professional 

schools located in Baltimore. 

The proposed change in law would 

insert the words "and Baltimore" at 
a strategic place in the Btatute bo the 

legislators' scholarships will mean four 

years' study regardless of the course 
chosen by an undergraduate. 

The regents asked the State for 
authority to spend nearly $.10,001) the 
university saved from maintenance and 
administration funds on a new clock 
and bell system in its buildings and to 
pave two roads on the campus. 

The University of Maryland's new 
student activities building will be named 
for Judge William P. Cole, a member 
of the university's Board of Regents 
for 25 years and its chairman for the 
last 12. 



The <1 . . . i 

I ."i h BMlivei 

the University ■ 

i elebi th a Foundei i >.■.. I 

quet at the Lord Ball imore Hotel -mi 

Januarj 19, 1967. Di I 

Past President of thi \ Medical 

Association, .'.ill | 

drej to alumni and tin n ;■ U '. 

Notification of tl 
in the histoi j of t he i m Ing 

Bent both alumni and facult) with the 
request that ticket ord< i b< 
early since the ballroom capacit) 
limited. 

Members of the banquet emu I 
include Dr. Thomas R, O'Rourk, Chair 

man, Dr. L. W. Bimestefer, Dean Noel 

E. Fobs, Mr. Bridgewatei Arnold, Mr. 
Ernest X. Cory, Jr., Dr. J. Moi 

Reese, Dr. Frank J. Ceraghty, Dr. John 
E. Savage, Judge William P. Cole, Dean 

Adele Stamp, Dean Geary Eppley, 

Mr. David L. Brigham, Dean William 
S. Stone, Mr. Frank J. Macek, Mr. V 
tor H. Morgenroth, and Mr. Norman 
J. Levin. 



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.Music Department Appointees 

Melvin Bernstein and Mary Kathryn 
Green have geen appointed as in- 
structors in the University of Maryland 
Department of Music. 

Bernstein holds an A.B. and a B.Mus. 
from Southwestern at Memphis, an 
M.Mus., from the University of Michi- 
gan and an M.A. degree in musicology 
from the University of Noith Caro- 
lina. 

Bernstein was formerly president of 
the Southeastern chapter of the Ameri- 
can Musicology Society. 

He has appeared professionally as 
an accompanist for the concert cellist 
David Wells and in solo recitals 
throughout the United States. 

Miss Green, a member of the Piano 
faculty of the Eastman School of 
Music at the University of Rochester 
since 1952, holds a B.Mus. and a 
M.Mus. from the Eastman School. 

She has been president of Sigma 
Alpha Iota, professional fraternity for 
women in the music profession. Miss 
Green has been studying and perform- 
ing chamber music at the Aspen, Col- 
orado Music Festival during the past 
summer. 

Earns Ph.D. 

Walter Katkovsky, (A&S '51), re- 
ceived his Doctor of Philosophy degree 
at the summer quarter convocation at 
Ohio State University. 

Joins DuPont 

Dr. Joe M. Parks, (A&S '51), recent- 
ly joined the research staff of DuPont's 
Chemical Department as a chemist at 
the Experimental Station in Wilming- 
ton. 

He was graduated from the Univer- 
sity of Maryland with a bachelor of 
science degree in chemistry. He re- 
ceived his Ph.D. degree in chemistry 
at the Carnegie Institute of Technol- 
ogy this year where he studied under 
a National Science Foundation Fellow- 
ship. 

Staff Attends Meeting 

The following members of the His- 
tory Department staff recently attended 
the meeting of the Mississippi Valley- 
Historical Association held at Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania: Professors 
Gewehr and Merrill; Assistant Profess- 
or John Davidson; and Instructors Earl 
Beard, Patrick Riddleberger, Paul Cart- 
er, and Patrick White. Dr. Merrill de- 
livered a paper at one of the sessions. 

Publishes Book 
Dr. Paul A. Carter, Department of 
History, has recently had a book pub- 
lished by the Cornell University Press. 
This book is entitled, "The Rise and 
Decline of the Social Gospel 1900-1940". 
Dr. Carter talked on the subject of 
his book at a recent meeting of the Phi 
Alpha Theta, national honorary his- 
torical Fraternity, and he addressed the 
Men's Class of the Chevy Chase Pres- 
byterian Church on the same subject. 



Attends Meetings 

Professor Lucius Garvin, Department 
of Philosophy, attended the meetings 
of the American Society for Aesthetics 
at the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology and the Boston Museum of Fine 
Arts. Professor Garvin presented a 
paper entitled "Mrs. Langer's Theory 
of Logical Expression". 

Speaks At Library 
Dr. John S. Toll, Physics Department, 
spoke at the Enoch Pratt Library dur- 
ing their Fall Lecture Series on "Po- 
tentialities ind Implications of Atomic 
Energy". 

Cosmos Club Speaker 
Professor Carl Bode, English Depart- 
ment, spoke at the first Cosmos Club 
"Book and Author" supper of the fali 
season. He spoke on his book, "The 
American Lyceum: Town Meeting of 
the Mind." 

At Testimonial Dinner 
Dr. Bruce L. Melvin, Sociology De- 
partment, spoke at a testimonial din- 
ner for Dr. C. C. Taylor given at the 
meeting of the Rural Sociological So- 
ciety at East Lansing, Michigan. 
Speaks On Quantum Theory 
Dr. Richard A. Ferrell, Physics De- 
partment, recently spoke at the Brook- 
haven National Laboratory on "Quan- 
tum Theory of Collective Oscillations 
in the Light Nuclei". Dr. Ferrell also 
spoke at Johns Hopkins University on 
the subject of "Quantum Theory of Col- 
lective Nuclear Oscillations". 
Addresses Colloquium 
Charles N. Coffer, Department of 
Psychology, addressed the psychology 
department colloquium at the Univer- 
sity of Virginia recently. His subject 
was "The Problem of Organization in 
Cognition". 

Addresses Engineers 
Dr. S. Fred Singer, Physics Depart- 
ment, has been invited to address the 
Washington Section of the American 
Institute of Electrical Engineers. Dr. 
Singer's topic will be "Astrophysical 
Research with Artificial Earth Satel- 
lites". 

New Vice President 
Professor Sherman Ross, Department 
of Psychology has been appointed as 
Vice President of Psi Chi for the East- 
ern Region. Psi Chi is an honorary 
society in psychology. 

Elected To Royal Academy 
Dr. Ladislaus L. Marton, Physics De- 
partment, and chief of the electron 
physics section of the atomic and radia- 
tion physics division of the National 
Bureau of Standards, has been elected 
to the Royal Academy of Belgium in 
recognition of his contributions to 
science and particularly to the devel- 
opment of the electron microscope. 
Marton, who is the only American 
physicist among the foreign members 
of the academy, fills the vacancy left 
by the late J. Verschaffelt of the Neth- 
erlands. 

Elected President 
Dr. Franklin L. Burdette, Director of 
the Bureau of Governmental Research, 
was elected national president of Pi 
Sigma Alpha, honorary political sci- 
ence fraternity, at the biennial conven- 
tion of that organization in Washing- 
ton, D. C. 



20 



Maryland — January-February, 1957 



Presents Two Papers 

Dr. F. M. Miller, Associate Professor 
of Chemistry, attended the fall meeting 
ing of the American Chemical Society 
at Atlantic City, lie delivered one 
paper before the Medicinal Chemistry 
Section and one paper before the Or- 
ganic Chemistry Section. 

Attend Meeting 
Drs. J. Francis Allen and Gordon 
Ramm, Department of Zoology, attend- 
ed the annual meeting of the North- 
east Section of the American Fisheries 
Society in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

Delivers Address 
Professor John W. Brace and Pro- 
fessor Robert E. Fullerton, Depart- 
ment of Mathematics, recently spoke 
at the meeting of the American Mathe- 
matical Society held at the Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology. Profes- 
sor Brace spoke on "The Topology 
of Almost Uniform Convergence" and 
Professor Fullerton spoke on "Quasi 
Interior Points and Separation Prop- 
erties of Cones in a Linear Space". 
Other members of the Department of 
Mathematics attending this meeting 
were Mr. Henry Beiman, Dr. Werner 
Greub, Dr. Harald Holmann, and Dr. 
Geoffrey S. S. Ludford. 

Dr. Nemes 

Dr. Graciela Nemes of the Foreign 
Language Department received a cable 
from the President of the University 
of Puerto Rico inviting her to be 
present at the ceremony memorializing 
the Nobel Prize for Literature award 
to Juan Ramon Jimenez. Dr. Nemes 
is the official biographer of the Spanish 
poet and spent last summer in Puerto 
Rico on a grant from the American 
Philosophical Society putting the final 
touches to her life of Jimenez which 
will see publication in 1957. Senor 
Jimenez served as adjunct professor 
at the University of Maryland from 
1948 to 1951 where he conducted a 
seminar in contemporary poetry. The 
Foreign Language Department was 
one of the groups to recommend the 
selection of Juan Ramon Jimenez for 
this prize. 

Wantz Gets Chevrolet Post 

C. D. Wantz, (A&S '35), formerly 
Richmond zone business manager, has 
been appointed assistant zone mana- 
ger in the Richmond area for the 
Chevrolet Motor Division of General 
Motors Corp. He is a 17 year veteran 
of service with the Company. 

X-Ray Specialist 

Army Specialist Third Class Frank 
L. Lanza (A&S '54) is an X-ray 
specialist in the U. S. Army Dispen- 
sary, Fort Sam Houston, Texas. 

He entered the Army in September, 
1954, and completed basic training at 
Fort Bliss, Texas. 

Receives Commission 

Stuart M. Brown (A&S '52) of 
Bladensburg, Md., recently received a 
Regular Army commission as a first 
lieutenant in the Medical Corps at 
Fort Sam Houston, Texas. 




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Maryland — January-February, 1957 



21 



Lt. Brown, who holds the rank of 
captain in the Army Reserve went on 
active duty in July, 1955, and is now 
.Mied to the Army Medical Service 
School at the fort. He is a member of 
1'hi Delta Epsilon fraternity. 
Principal Speaker 

Dr. John W. Gustad, University Coun- 
seling Center, was the principal speak- 
er at a conference held at the Veterans 
Administration Hospital, Coatesville, 
Pennsylvania. Topic of the conference 
was "Integrating Hospital Treatment 
and Community Resources". Dr. Gus- 
tad's address concerned the operation 
of the medical team in rehabilitation; 
it's title was "Whose Job Is It?". Dr. 
Gustad has also been elected to the 
post of Chairman-elect of the Confer- 
ence of State Psychological Associa- 
tions of the American Psychological 
Association. He has been inducted in- 
to this office and shall succeed to the 
post as Chairman at the annual con- 
vention of that organization in Septem- 
ber, 1957. He has served as Secretary- 
Treasurer of the conference for two 
years. 

Holds Exhibition 

Mr. Herman Maril, Department of 
Art, recently had an exhibition of his 
paintings at the Bader Gallery, Wash- 
ington, D. C. Mr. Maril also had a very 
successful showing of his works at 
the Babcock Galleries in New York 
City last spring. Some of his paintings 
in the present exhibit were done on 
Cape Cod last summer. 

Addresses NAS 

Professor Richard A. Ferrell, Physics 
Department, gave an address at the 
National Academy of Sciences entitled 
"Shell Model Theory of Fast E2 
Transitions". 

At Ohio State 

Dr. Dieter Cunz, Department of 
Foreign Languages, is teaching this 
semester in the German Department of 
Ohio State University. He will resume 
his teaching here at the University in 
February. 

Research Grants 

The University of Maryland Depart- 
ment of Physics has received $83,350 
in research grants from the National 
Science Foundation for cosmic ray 
measurements. 

A grant of $13,650 has been added 
to an existing grant of $19,550 for con- 
structing a cosmic ray monitor tele- 
scope to be used in the International 
Geophysical Year Cosmic Ray Program 
in the Arctic. 

Another grant of $21,400 will be 
added to a previous grant of $40,800 
for the construction of a cosmic ray 
monitor telescope to be used in the 
International Geophysical Year in the 
Antarctic. 

The third grant of $48,300 will es- 
tablish a new research project for the 
study of hijrh speed cosmic ray fluctua- 
tions in the same program. 

Under the direction of Dr. S. Fred 
Singer, the Arctic and Antarctic pro- 
.iets will be supervised by Dr. George 
Homa, research associate; Dr. Martin 
Swetnick, assistant research professor, 
will supervise the fluctuation high 
speed cosmic ray intensity. 



Co//ege of 



Agriculture 

Dr. Howard L. Stier 



Always A Story 

A station wagon with a large rack of 
luggage on top caught the eye of 
Art Hamilton (Agr. '29) in a College 
Park parking lot. The license showed 
they were from Nova Scotia, but more 
pronounced was the number of child- 
ren; heads were everywhere. The driv- 
er looked up from his map on hearing 
the words, "Welcome to Maryland", 
and introduced himself as Bruce Mac- 
Cannell, MD. Also introduced were Mrs. 
MacCannell and their 10 children. They 
were moving from near Sidney, Nova 
Scotia to Dotham, Alabama, where he 
will practice medicine. 

They expressed an interest in the 
University and were taken on a tour 
of the campus. The oldest boys, 15 
and 13, insisted on walking onto the 
football field. The Student Activities 
building was of interest to all, but the 
oldest boys will long remember shak- 
ing hands with Tommy Mont and his 
remark, "I hope you come out for foot- 
ball here someday." 

In the Chapel, the family marveled 
at the altar, the three chapels and the 
offices for the Chaplains. Before leav- 
ing, the mother, father and family of 
ten children took seats and all bowed 
their heads. A wave of hands and they 
headed for their new home in Alabama. 
Solomon Appointed 

Darwin D. Solomon has been ap- 
pointed assistant professor and exten- 
sion rural sociologist for the Univer- 
sity of Maryland Extension Service, 
Agriculture Dean Gordon M. Cairns 
has announced. 

Born and raised on a farm near Sun- 
dance, Wyo., Mr. Solomon was active 
in the Future Farmers of America and 
4-H as a youth. He also served as a 
local leader in 4-H work. 

Graduating from high school with 
honors, he won a four-year scholarship 
to the University of Wyoming, where 
he earned a B.S. degree in 1943 with 
a major in agronomy. As an under- 
graduate, he was president of the stu- 
dent senate and took part in other 
extracurricular activities. 

He also received the Alpha Zeta (hon- 
orary agricultural fraternity) award 
for having the highest grades in his 
freshman class. 

He has done graduate work at Cor- 
nell University in rural sociology and 
agricultural economics. While study- 
ing at Cornell, he was employed as a 
teaching and research assistant and ex- 
tension rural sociologist. He worked in 
leadership training, program projec- 
tion, rural development and rural soc- 
iological research. 

From 194(5-49 he served in China as 
an instructor for the United Nations 
Relief and Rehabilitation Administra- 
tion conducting classes in farm equip- 
ment and maintenance and with the 
Agricultural Industries Service. In the 
latter he did extension teaching and 
agricultural development work. 



He spent another two years in Thai- 
land with the Economic Cooperation 
Administration in development of agri- 
cultural extension work. 

Hamilton Elected 

Arthur B. Hamilton, (Agr. '29) was 
elected National First Vice-President of 
Alpha Gamma Rho Fraternity at the 
annual meeting in Oklahoma. Art came 
up through the ranks from a charter 
member of the Maryland Chapter and 
has served on the National Council 
for 8 years. He is presently secretary 
of the College of Agriculture Alumni 
Association and on the Staff of the 
College of Agriculture of the Univer- 
sity, Department of Agricultural Econ- 
omics and Marketing. 

4-H Project Winners Announced 
By Wilson 

Maryland young people who are state 
winners in their 4-H project work are 
announced by W. Sherard Wilson, state 
4-H Club agent. Projects the 4-H'ers 
carried vary from clothing or food 
preparation, to dairy or garden. 

Individuals named as state winners 
will be notified of the awards they are 
to receive. Recognition, including such 
awards as medals, bonds, watches or 
state, sectional and national trips, is 
designed to recognize and highlight 
the contributions 4-H Club work is 
making to improve rural living. The 
awards are made under the national 
awards program through the coopera- 
tion of the extension service and the 
National Committee on Boys and Girls 
Club Work. 

Project areas and state winners in- 
clude: Achievement (girl) — Janet E. 
Hobbs, West Friendship, Howard 
County; Achievement (boy) — Clyde 
Bohn, Union Bridge, Frederick County; 
Beautification of Home Grounds — 
Grant Hill, Old Court Road, Baltimore 
County; Boys' Agricultural Program — 
Kenneth L. Zimmerman, RFD #4, 
Frederick; Bread demonstration (indi- 
vidual) — Emilie Ann Geibert, Derwood, 
Montgomery County; Bread demonstra- 
tion (team) — Georgia Anne Masser 
and Janet E. McDevitt, both of Fred- 
erick. 

Also, Canning — Joyce Warnick, Bar- 
ton, Allegany County; Citizenship — 
Nancy Loweth, Rt. #2, Clinton, Prince 
Georges County; Clothing — Margie- An- 
dree Summers, Rt. #4, Westminster, 
Carroll County; Dairy — Carol J. Mills, 
Gaithersburg, Montgomery County; 
Dairy Foods Demonstration (indi- 
vidual) — Veronica Little, Thurmont, 
Frederick County; Dairy Foods Demon- 
tration (team) — Carol M. Hutschen- 
reuter, and Sandra Jean Warder, both 
of Glen Arm, Baltimore County. 

Also, Dress Revue — Georgia Anne 
Masser, Frederick; Electric — Charles 
Lee Black, New Windsor, Frederick 
County; Food Preparation — Nancy 
Rice, Queen Anne, Caroline County; 
Garden— Stuart E. Bruchey, Rt. #1, 
Frederick; Girls' Home Economics Pro- 
gram—Joyce L. Hood, RFD #4, Mt. 
Airy, Frederick County; Home Improve- 
ment— Bettie Umstead, RFD #3, Rock- 
ville, Montgomery County; Leadership 
(girl) — Joyce V. Moore, Centreville, 
Queen Annes County; and Leadership 



L'L' 



Maryland — January -February, 1957 



(hoy) — Charles W. Coale, Jr., Forest 
11 ill, Harford County. 

Meat Animal — George Bowman, Jr., 
West Friendship, Howard County; 
Poultry — Donald C. Davis, Parsons- 
burp, Wicomio County; Public Speak- 
ing (girl) — Nellie Polk Dorsey, Sykes- 
ville, Carroll County; and Public Speak- 
ing (boy) — Ralph J. Adkins, Salisbury, 
Wicomico County; Recreation — Helen 
Long, Faullner, Charles County; Safe- 
ty — Richard P. Parsons, Parsonsburg, 
Wicomico County; and Tractor — Ed 
Miller, Frostburg, Allegany County. 

Through the national awards pro- 
gram, alumni recognition is given four 
persons in the state whose service 
records exemplify effective community, 
state, or national leadership, success 
in their chosen careers, and interest 
in 4-H and similar worthy endeavors. 
Honored from Maryland are: Mrs. Nor- 
man Fike, Cordova, Talbot County, a 
local leader for ten years; Mrs. Wesley 
Reynolds, Earleville, Cecil County, a 
Maryland leader for five years, and 
member and leader in Delaware prior 
to that time; A. Doty Remsburg, Jef- 
ferson, Frederick County, Holstein dairy 
farmer who has been a local leader 
for 10 years; and F. Guy McGrady, 
RD # 1, Rising Sun, Cecil County, Jersey 
dairy farmer — a local leader for 12 
years. 
Specialist Offers Check Suggestions 

Homemakers, do you handle the 
checkbook in your family? Even 
though you may not do the banking 
business in your family, it's a good 
idea to know how to "check your 
checks." 

When you have a check you want 
cashed, don't endorse it until you are 
ready for the actual money transaction, 
advises Joanne W. Reitz, extension 
home management specialist. This 
"blank" endorsement — your signature 
on the back of a check — indicates you 
personally have received the value of 
the check. It's a safety advantage to 
wait until you get to the bank when 
endorsing a check. If the check is lost 
and already endorsed, anyone could 
cash it. If the check is not endorsed, 
you could stop payment. 

If a check is lost, notify the bank 
at once. Usually the banks wants a 
signed stop-payment slip describing 
the check. 

The endorsement could be restricted, 
especially when you are depositing by 
mail. Use such phrase as 'Pay to the 
Order of X Bank for Deposit Only' or 
'For Deposit Only.' Then with your 
signature below, the check cannot be 
cashed by anyone, and you are pro- 
tected if it is lost or stolen. 

Miss Reitz adds a few more sugges- 
tions for check handling. If your name 
is misspelled — first, endorse the check 
the way your name is spelled on the 
face of the check, and then affix your 
correct signature. 

One other protective measure in 
handling a check is to cash or deposit 
it immediately upon receipt. One reason 
is that some firms may have a reason- 
able time limit on cashing a check, 
even though they may not be too rigid 
with this rule. Also, most people like 



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When you buy a quart of milk, 
do you GET a quart? 

If it is in a GLASS BOTTLE 
yes! 

— The glass milk bottle is not 
merely a container; it is a 
MEASURE whose accuracy is 
controlled by Weights and 
Measures Authorities. 

— In a GLASS bottle you can 
SEE how much you have on 
hand. 

— Most discriminating people 
PREFER milk in GLASS bot- 
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to keep their books balanced and up 
to date. A check that is still "out" can 
complicate the homemaker's account 
keeping. 

Ardath Stouffer Receives Award 

Mrs. Ardath M. Stouffer, home dem- 
onstration agent in Hagerstown, has 
just returned from Chicago where she 
accepted the Florence Hall award. Mrs. 
Stouffer received the recognition during 
the annual meeting of the National 
Home Demonstration Agents' Associa- 
tion in Chicago, October 28 — Novem- 
ber 1. 

The award, given annually to an 
agent in each of the extension districts 
cf the United States, was based on Mrs. 
Stouffer's 28-year period of service in 
Maryland home demonstration work. 
As the Northeastern area winner, Mrs. 
Stouffer said she plans to use the $100 
for professional improvement in the 
broad sense. 

The position of home demonstration 
agent in Hagerstown was Mrs. Stouf- 
fer's first assignment in Maryland, and 
she has continued serving in that county 
since that time. Her outstanding work 
in the development of leadership over 
the years was the basis of the award. 

1,350 Feeder Calves Sold At Fall Sale 

More than 1,300 calves were sold at 
the fourth annual Fall Feeder Calf 
Sale, on Oct. 25 reports Amos R. Meyer, 
University of Maryland extension 
marketing specialist. The sale is con- 
ducted under the cooperation of the 
University of Maryland Extension Ser- 

Distinguished Service Award 



vice, the Maryland Beef Cattle Pro- 
ducers, Inc., the Maryland Live Stock 
Sanitary Service and the Baltimore 
Livestock Auction Market. 

The sale was held at the auction 
market where 86 consignors delivered 
1,351 Aberdeen-Angus, Shorthorn and 
Hereford calves. The smallest consign- 
ment was one animal, the largest con- 
signment was over 200 animals. 

Although prices were about the same 
as a year ago, one fancy Angus steer 
consigned by Fenwick Keyser of Reist- 
erstown sold for 51 cents a pound. The 
290 pound calf was bought by Stewart 
Thomas, a Pennsylvania feeder. Other 
prices paid were: Steers: fancy, $32.50; 
choice, $25; good, $21.75; and medium, 
$20.25. Heifers: fancy, $23.50; choice, 
$18; good, $16 and medium, $15. 

Most of the cattle sold went to Mary- 
land and Pennsylvania cattle feeders 
and one shipment of 40 choice Angus 
steers went to a Michigan buyer. 

The total animals consigned this year 
represents an increase of more than 
450 over last fall. 

Before the sale began, Dr. James R. 
Ferguson, animal husbandry specialist 
for the University gave a grading 
demonstration. The purpose of the 
demonstration, according to Meyer, is 
to help 4-H'ers, FFA boys and cattle- 
men become more familiar with the 
official grades of feeder calves. "It is 
important that cattlemen be familiar 
with the grades," he said, "in order to 
market their animals at competitive 
prices." 



USE THE HHTON ON LAST PAGE 




Dr. Paul I). Sanders (left), editor of THE AMERICAN PLANTER farm 
magazine published in Richmond, receives the American Forestry Association's 
"Distinguished Service Award" from Louis H. Wilson, chairman, AFA awards 
committee and director of information. National Plant Food Institute. The award 
was made during the annual meeting of the AFA at La Plata, Maryland, in "recog- 
nition of outstanding service in the conservation of American resources of soil, 
water and forests." Dr. Sanders received a M.Sc. degree from Maryland in 1924 and 
and an honorary D. Sc. in 1947. 



24 



Maryland — January-February, 1957 



College of 



Business & Public 



Administration 



— Egbert F. Ting ley 



Office Management Conference 

Highlighting the first session of the 
Eighth Annual Office Management 
Conference at the University was an 
address and demonstration on inte- 
grated data processing by Lincoln R. 
Ward, division commercial supervisor 
of the American Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company. 

In line with the Conference theme 
of keeping office costs at a minimum, 
Mr. Ward spoke on the basic principles 
involved in the combining of account- 
ing and recording machines through a 
keyboard "language" that is "under- 
stood" by other machines. 

A nationally known authority in the 
field, Mr. Ward said, "There is no 
phase of office management which holds 
the potential for reducing operating- 
costs as that of making an office auto- 
matic by means of swift and versatile 
machines for the handling of informa- 
tion so urgently needed to manage 
effectively today's business operations." 

After his speech, enrollees had an 
opportunity to participate in problem 
cases discussed in small round-table 
groups. Mr. Ward summarized the al- 
ternative solutions to the cases at the 
close of the day's session. 

Sponsored by the Department of Of- 
fice Techniques and Management, a di- 
vision of the College of Business and 
Public Administration of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, in cooperation with 
the Area Three Chapters of the Na- 
tional Office Management Association, 
the conference was attended by a hun- 
dred or more office executives, systems 
analysists, and others who are respons- 
ible for controlling activities involving 
paper work. 

Mr. C. C. Garvin, office manager of 
Safeway Stores, Inc., was also a fea- 
tured speaker on the first day's pro- 
gram of the Eighth Annual Office Man- 
agement Conference which was held 
at the University. 

National Newspaper Week 

The University of Maryland Journal- 
ism and Public Relations Department 
marked "National Newspaper Week" 
by presenting an address by Theodore 
A. Serrill, executive director of the 
Washington Newspaper Publishers As- 
sociation. 

Serrill has served as general man- 
ager of the Pennsylvania Newspaper 
Publishers Association since February, 
1950, after joining that group as as- 
sociate manager in charge of industrial 
relations in January, 1944. 

Born in Philadelphia in 1911, the new 
manager attended Cahill High School 
there and Pennsylvania State Univer- 
sity from which he received a B.A. de- 
gree in journalism in 1932. While at 
Penn State he majored in geology. 

Serrill's early newspaper experience 
includes five years' employment with 



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Maryland — January-February, 1957 



25 



the Washington Daily News from 1933 
to 1937. He then became national ad- 
vertising manager of the Charlotte 
( N'.C.) News in 1937-38 and then served 
on the Easton i Pa.) Express from 1938 
to 1942. In the latter year he be- 
came deputy director in charge of war 
loan promotion in the Third Federal 
Reserve District and directed the first 
lour war loan drives in that capacity. 

Sen ill is a member of the Poor Rich- 
ard Club and of the Ten and Pencil 
Club of Philadelphia, the Pittsburgh 
Press Club and the Pittsburgh and 
Harrisburg Advertising Clubs, Sigma 
Delta Chi, a professional journalistic 
fraternity of which he is state chair- 
i.ian; Alpha Delta Sigma, an advertis- 
ing fraternity and of Pi Delta Epsilon, 
;. journalistic society. 

Business Management Institute 

An eight week Business Management 
Institute designed to introduce sources 
of information available to small busi- 
ness operators and increase small busi- 
ness management know-how was held 
at the Frederick High School in Fred- 
( rick, Md. 

Staffed by faculty members of the 
University of Maryland College of 
Business and Public Administration 
the program included lectures and 
group discussion. 

Among the subjects presented were 
the concept principles, business organi- 
zation, accounting, successful financing 
and problems of sales in management. 
Other problems included were diagnosis 
and treatment of an ailing business, 
shipping and receiving and law and the 
small business man. 

Presented as an institute of the Uni- 
versity's College of Special and Con- 
tinuation Studies, the program was ar- 
ranged through the Frederick Chamber 
of Commerce and the Small Business 
Administration. 

Ford Foundation Fellowship 

Eli W. Clemens, professor of busi- 
ness organization and economics at the 
University of Maryland, has been 
awarded a Ford Foundation fellowship 
to study the flexibility of American 
manufacturing equipment. 

The fellowship pays Clemens' teach- 
ing salary for this academic year while 
he devotes full time to research. Clem- 
ens said most of his material will be 
gathered through interviews and study 
with industrial managers. 

The problem, Clemens said, is that 
increasing automation and mechani- 
zation may cause industry to lose a 
great deal of its productive flexibility. 
Part of the study will deal with the ex- 
perience of manufacturers changing 
over to war-time production in World 
War II. 

In its announcement recently of the 
$570,000 appropriation for fellowships 
in economics and business administra- 
tion the Ford Foundation said the pur- 
pose of the grants was to increase the 
number of college teachers and encour- 
age research. 

Faculty fellowships went to 25 uni- 
versity and college teachers. Disserta- 
tion fellowships were awarded to 34 
graduate students who have completed 
their requirements for a doctoral de- 



'Old Grads Meet' 




Carroll M. Cannoles (BPA '50), left, and Walter F. Fehr (BPA '49), met in 
California at the Second Annual California Food Fair. Mr. Cannoles. attended in 
his capacity as Associate Director of the American Meat Institute's western office. 
Mr. Fehr is Secretary-Manager of the Northern California Food Dealers' Associa- 
tion, Inc. Mr. Cannoles writes, "The University of Maryland graduates in this 
area are few in number but strong in spirit, and we would enjoy meeting with 
any graduates who happen to be in this area." 



gree except the thesis. The remaining 
35 fellowships were awarded to gradu- 
ate students who have not yet begun 
work for the doctorate. 

At Fort Gordon, Georgia 

Pvt. Robert E. Payne (BPA '55) was 
recently graduated from the Army's 
Southeastern Signal School at Fort 
Gordon, Ga. 

He completed a nine-week course of 
classroom and field training in Army 
communications methods. Payne ent- 
ered the Army in May of 1950 and 
completed basic training at Fort Jack- 
son, So. Carolina. 

Operation Gyroscope 

Pvt. Jerome D. Kay (BPA '56) left 
the U. S. for Europe as part of Opera- 
tion Gyroscope, the Army's unit rota- 
tion plan. 

He is a member of the 8th Infantry 
Division, which has been stationed at 
Fort Carson, Colorado, and is replacing 
the 9th Infantry Division in Germany. 

Pvt. Kay, 24, is company clerk in the 
Tank Company of the 5th regiment. He 
entered the Army last February. 
Named Ass't. Sales Manager 

W. L. Ellis (BPA '43 and A&S '44) 
has been nominated to the post of 



Assistant Sales Manager of the planned 
Service Bureau subsidiary corporation 
of the International Business Machines 
Corp. (IBM), and will directly assist 
in directing the sales activities of the 
entire corporation. 

In his ten years with IBM, Mr. Ellis 
has had extensive background in both 
sales and administrative matters. His 
first post was in Washington, D. C. 
where he was an Assistant Sales Repre- 
sentative and later an EAM Sales Rep- 
resentative. 

The following year, the new Ser- 
vice Bureau Assistant Sales Manager 
was assigned to the New York Uptown 
office in EAM Sales, and in 1952, he 
moved to Endicott, where he became 
an Instructor in the Department of 
Education. Less than a year later, he 
came to WHQ as an Administrative 
Assistant in the Future Demands and 
Market Analysis Field Testing Depart- 
ments. A few months later he was ad- 
vanced to Administrative Assistant in 
the Office of the President. Last year, 
he was named EAM Manager in 
Rochester. 



20 



Maryland — January-February, 1957 



School of 



Dentistry 

Gardner I'. H. Foley 
■ Kryle W. Preis 



At Fort Sam Houston 

A group of University of Maryland 
School of Dentistry graduates re- 
cently completed the Army Medical 
Service School's military orientation 
course at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. 

The course affords a knowledge of 
the duties and responsibilities of a 
military dental officer. 

The graduating group included: First 
Lieutenant George H. Nieske, '56, as- 
signed to Fort Bliss, Texas; First Lieu- 
tenant Eugene F. Kobylarz, 56; First 
Lieutenant Peter J. Lapolla, 56; First 
Lieutenant Victor B. Costa, '56; who 
received orders assigning him to Fort 
Leonard Wood, Mo. He is a member of 
Alpha Epsilon Delta and the Xi Psi 
Phi fraternities; First Lieutenant 
David A. Denisch, '56, assigned to Fort 
Gordon, Georgia; First Lieutenant Ed- 
ward M. Keely, '56. 

First Lieutenant Marion B. Golberg, 
'56, assigned to Fort George G. Meade, 
Md. He is a member of Alpha Omega 
and Rho Chi fraternities; First Lieu- 
tenant Albert A. Kapsak, '56; First 
Lieutenant Gene C. Hose; '56; assigned 
to Fort Bragg, N. C. He is a member 
of Psi Omega and Phi Delta Theta 
fraternities. 

Dr. and Mrs. Warren E. Thurston, 
'56, of Portland, Me., announce the 
birth of a daughter, Mary Jo, on 
October 11. 

Dr. Charles L. Brandenburg '54 an- 
nounces the opening of his office for 
the general practice of dentistry at 
Pearl Street, Rising Sun, Md. Dr. 
Brandenburg served in the Navy Den- 
tal Corps at the Bainbridge, Md. NTC 
from July, 1954 till September, 1956. 

Dr. and Mrs. Jose A. Munera '53, 
of Ponce, P.R., announce the birth 
of a son, Lawrence Narcisco, on Sep- 
tember 19. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles K. Peters '59 
announce the birth of a daughter, 
Kimberly Anne, on August 16. Mrs. 
Peters is the former Thelma Stang, 
daughter of Dr. John T. Stang '29. 

Dr. and Mrs. Edgar Sweren '54, of 
Baltimore, Md., announce the birth of 
a son, Bennett Scott, on October 7. 

Dr. Mary E. Pate '55 has announced 
the opening of her office for the general 
practice of dentistry at 3800 Nichol- 
son Street, Hyattsville, Md. Dr. Pate 
completed an internship in the U.S.- 
P.H.S. at San Francisco, Cal. 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert J. Jozefiak, '52, 
of Bayonne, N.J., announce the birth 
of a daughter, Janice, on September 
28. 

Dr. Thomas Jackson Allen '54 an- 
nounces the opening of his office for 
the general practice of dentistry in 
the Professional Building, Frederick, 
Md. 

Dr. Joseph Paul Burch, '41, is prac- 
ticing in Vista, Cal. Dr. Burch served 
in the Navy Dental Corps from 1942 




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27 



to 1950, being separated with the rank 
of Lieutenant Commander. He prac- 
ticed in Barstow, Cal. before going to 
Vista in 1953. 

Dr. Clarke Smyser Bressler '18 
is living in Neavitt, Md. Dr. Bressler, 
who practiced in York, Pa., retired in 
l!»4o because of ill health. 

Dr. and Mrs. Milton Asbell '38, of 
Camden, N.J., announce the birth of 
a son, Yale Ian, on September 8. 

Lieutenant Colonel Hansel H. Snider 
'35, of Moorefield, W. Va., was called 
to active duty with the U. S. Air 
Force on November 25, 1955. He is 
stationed at the 44f)5th USAF Hospital, 
Donaldson AFB, Greenville, S. C. 

Dr. Dale R. Moss '56 is practicing 
in Glen Burnie, Md. 

Dr. Kenneth H. Stoll '54, is practicing 
at 1726 Eye St., N.W., Washington 6, 
D. C. Dr. Stoll completed his tour of 
duty with the U. S. Army in February. 
He was stationed at Hanau, Germany. 

Mr. Stanley Macklin '55 is now at 
the Travis AFB, California, having 
been transferred from the Ben Guerir 
AFB, Morocco in October. 

Robinson Receives Gies Gift 

At the Convocation of the Ameri- 
can College of Dentists held in At- 
lantic City on September 30 Dr. J. 
Ben Robinson '14 was the recipient of 
the William John Gies Award "in 
recognition of his leadership and meri- 
torious services to his profession." In 
presenting Dr. Robinson for the Award, 
Dr. Kenneth C. Pruden, President of 
the College, said, in part: 

"That he has served as President 
of the American Association of Dental 
Schools; that he is an acknowledged 
leader among Dental Schools Deans; 
that he is a Past-President of the 
American College of Dentists; that he 
is a former Trustee and President of 
the American Dental Association — all 
of this range of service is indeed a 
notable index to his versatility, and 
as well to a recognition among men 
of his qualities in dynamic leadership. 

"Dr. J. Ben Robinson is the chief 
formulator of much of the philosophy 
which was built into the requirements 
for the Approval of a Dental School, 
and the forthright and stoutest con- 
temporary champion of the autonomy 
of the dental profession." 

The alumni congratulate the Dean 
Emeritus of their alma mater on this 
newest honor to be bestowed on him. 
Dr. Robinson has also received these 
important awards in dentistry: Alpha 
Omega Award (1941); the Alfred C. 
Fones Memorial Medal (1942); and 
the Callahan Award (1944). 

****** 
An alumnus who now lives in the 
cyclone belt tells us that his neighbor 
purchased a barometer from a mail 
order house, tried it out for a day and 
then wrote the mail order outfit, "The 
barometer you sent me is no good. The 
needle is stuck on 'hurricane'." With 
that he bundled the thing up, addressed 
it and walked it down to the Post Office. 
When he returned his house was gone. 



Dr. Korkaus Lectures 

On September 27, upon the invita- 
tion of Dr. Kyrle W. Preis, Professor 
of Orthodontics, Dr. Gustave Korkaus 
of Bonn, Germany, lectured at the 
School on "The Etiology of Malocclu- 
sion." Dr. Korkaus is making an ex- 
tensive tour of the dental schools of 
the United States and Canada in the 
capacity of Director of dental and medi- 
cal education at the University of Bonn. 
The holder of degrees in both dentistry 
and medicine, he teaches and practices 
orthodontics. 

In addition to the students several 
distinguished visitors from the Balti- 
more and Washington areas were pres- 
ent, including Dean Myron S. Aisen- 
berg, Dr. Earl W. Swinehart, former 
professor of Orthodontics, and Dr. 
George Paffenberger, Senior Research 
Associate, A.D.A., National Bureau of 
Standards. 

Dr. Hugh B. Morris '38, of Water- 
town, N.Y., gave a table clinic on 
Endodontia at the 1956 meeting of the 
New York State Dental Society, held 
in Syracuse. 

Dr. Jack H. Soutar '56 has been 
assigned to the U. S. Coast Guard 
Training Station at Groton, Conn. 

Dr. Ashby G. Inscoe '52, of Spring 
Hope, N. C, has demonstrated a fine 
spirit of participation in civic affairs. 
Presently the Secretary-Treasurer of 
the Junior Chamber of Commerce, he 
served as its President in 1954-55. 
For the past five years he has been 
the Chairman of the local Boy Scouts 
organization. In 1955 Dr. Inscoe re- 
ceived the Distinguished Service Award 
from the Junior Chamber of Commerce. 
Dr. William W. Cavers '95 now re- 
sides in St. Petersburg, Fla. Dr. 
Cavers practiced in Buffalo, N.Y. from 
his graduation till his retirement in 
1929. For 44 years he served as a 
director of the Homestead Savings and 
Loan Association. 

Dr. Angelo R. Lombardi '47 re- 
cently opened an office for the prac- 
tice of orthodontics in the Medical Arts 
Building, Jersey City, N. J. Follow- 
ing two years of service with the 
U.S.A.F. in French Morrocco., Dr. 
Lombardi studied for two years at 
Columbia, receiving his certificate in 
Orthodontics. He had been doing re- 
search on the use of the Wetzel Grid 
as a guide to growth and development 
in orthodontics and presented a paper 
on this subject at the 1956 meeting 
of the American Association of Ortho- 
dontists. 

Dr. Irby G. Sorrells '56 is prac- 
ticing at 3939 Greenmount Ave. in 
Baltimore, Md. 

Dr. James C. Bulger '55 received 
his captain's commission on June 5. He 
is stationed at the Mitchel (N.Y.) 
AFB. 

Dr. Paul D. Bingham '48 has been 
associated with the V.A. Hospital in 
Baltimore since 1953. He practiced 
in East Jaffrey, N.H. from 1947 to 
1951, and then began two years' ser- 
vice in the U.S.N.R.D.S., with assign- 
ments at Newport, R.I. and Bain- 
bridge, Md. 



Alumni Breakfast at 
Atlantic City 

Two hundred and twelve alumni at- 
tended the sixth in the series of annual 
breakfasts arranged by the National 
Alumni Association and held in con- 
junction with the American Dental As- 
sociation meetings. The attendance was 
the largest for any alumni meeting 
held outside of Baltimore and was 
certainly a demonstration of alumni 
loyalty at its very best. The officers 
and those other alumni responsible for 
the arrangements deeply appreciate 
the fine support that so many gave — 
and at such an early hour — to their 
efforts in making the Atlantic City 
affair a high-water mark in enthusi- 
astic attendance. 

Although the committee had secured 
the largest room available — the Ameri- 
can Room at the Traymore — there was 
not enough room to accommodate all 
of the alumni who wished to attend. 
It was indeed unfortunate that at 
least 100 alumni and their guests had 
to be turned away because of space 
limitations. 

Seated at the head table were the 
four graduates who are now serving as 
Deans of dental schools: J. Ben Robin- 
son '14, Dean Emeritus of the B.C.D.S. 
and the present Dean of the West Vir- 
ginia University Dental School, Frank 
Houghton '17, Dean of the Loyola Uni- 
versity (New Orleans) Dental School, 
Harry McCarthy '23, Dean of the Bay- 
lor University Dental School, and My- 
ron Aisenberg '22, Dean of the B.C.- 
D.S.; Robert Mills '07, retired Major 
General of the Army Dental Corps; 
George Anderson '19, first recipient 
of the Distinguished Alumni Award; 
Miss Katharine Toomey, Administra- 
tive Assistant at the School; Charles 
Broadrup '32, President of the Mary- 
land State Dental Association; Mr. 
A. E. Cormeny, Assistant to the Presi- 
dent for Endowment and Development; 
and these officers of the Association: 
Frank Hurst '27, President, Daniel 
Shehan '22, President-Elect, Joseph 
Cappuccio '46, Secretary, Kyrle Preis 
'29, Editor, and Milton Asbell '38, His- 
torian. 

After greeting the alumni and guests, 
President Hurst presented Joseph Cap- 
puccio, who acted as toastmaster. He 
introduced a number of distinguished 
alumni, including Daniel Lynch '25, 
Past-President of the American Dental 
Association, and James Ferguson '15, 
Past-President of the American College 
of Dentists. Dean Aisenberg gave a 
report on the School's present activities 
and its plans for the future. Mr. 
Cormeny, representing the President 
of the University, congratulated the 
alumni on the excellent character of 
their Association and discussed the 
relation of the University to its com- 
ponent schools. Also introduced were 
three members of the two oldest 
classes represented: Walter Green '04, 
Karl Heintz '05, and J. Stephenson 
Hopkins '05, each of whom has a re- 
markable record of allegiance to their 



28 



Ma ry la n d — Jan u a ry-Fe bruary, 1957 



alma mater and participation in alumni 

activities. 

In the listing below are given the 

names, the classes and the present 

practice locations or service assign- 
ments of the 212 alumni who attended 

the breakfast. Forty-nine classes were 

represented, from 20 states, Puerto 

Rico, District of Columbia, and San 

Salvador. 

1904— Walter E. Green, Baltimore. 

1905 — Karl P. Heintz, Cumberland, 
Md.; J. Stephenson Hopkins, 
Belair, Md. 

1907— R. H. Mills, Washington, D.C.; 
A. P. Scarborough, Baltimore; 
Richard F. Simmons, Norfolk, 
Va. 

1908— L .G. Coble, Greensboro, N.C. 

1909— C. J. Caraballo, Tampa, Fla. 

1910— A. L. Davenport, Baltimore. 

1911— Allen G. T. Twigg, Cumberland, 
Md. 

1913— J. E. John, Sr., Roanoke, Va. 

1914— Joseph C. Carvalho, Fall River, 
Mass.; J. Ben Robinson, Morgan- 
town, W. Va. 

1915 — James H. Ferguson, Baltimore; 
Conrad L. Inman, Baltimore. 

1916— M. K. Baklor, Baltimore. 

1917 — Morris Cramer, Baltimore; O. 
E. Culler, Baltimore; Frank J. 
Houghton, New Orleans, La. 

1918— Edwin G. Gail, Baltimore; C. F. 
Maristany, Ponce, P.R. 

1919 — George M. Anderson, Baltimore; 
H. W. Miller, Waterbury, Conn.; 
Arthur C. Muhlbach, Baltimore; 
H. H. R. Williams, Cumberland, 
Md. 

1920— Edward C. Morin, Pawtucket, 
R.I. 

1921 — Louis M. Cantor, New Haven, 
Conn.; Louis B. Slifkin, Trenton, 
N.J. 

1922— M. S. Aisenberg, Baltimore; C. 
Adam Bock, Baltimore; John F. 
Clark, Baltimore; Saul M. Gale, 
Newark, N.J.; L. W. Gochenour, 
Clarksburg, W. Va.; Daniel E. 
Shehan, Baltimore; Morris Wolf, 
Washington, DC. 

1923 — J. Russell Cook, Cumberland, 
Md.; Harry B. McCarthy, Dallas, 
Texas; George W. Young, Har- 
risburg, Pa. 

1924— J. Pilcher Bradshaw, Norfolk, 
Va.; Samuel M. Fink, Elkton, 
Md.; James Walter McCarl, 
Greenbelt, Md.; H. Glenn War- 
ing, Baltimore; Harry D. Wilson, 
Baltimore. 

1925— B. A. Dickson, Marion, N. C; 
Daniel F. Lynch, Washington, 
D.C.; George D. Resh, Hamp- 
stead, Md.; George J. Phillips, 
Baltimore; Paul Wilhelm, Card- 
iff, Md.; Howard B. Wood, Cum- 
berland, Md. 

1926— Roy H. Bridger, Silver Spring, 
Md.; Michael Kozubski, Balti- 
more; Harry Levin, Baltimore; 
N. S. Nuger, Baltimore; Wal- 
lace P. Smith, Cambridge, Md.; 
C. W. Richmond, New Holland, 
Pa.; William E. Trail, Frederick, 
Md.; J. LeRoy Trone, Elkton, 
Md.; Eugene E. Veasey, Wilm- 
ington, Del.; Allan L. Watts, 
Shippensburg, Pa. 



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l!»27— .!. H. Demarest, Verona, N.J.; 
Frederick J. Hess, Washington, 
D.C.J James Holdstock, Tampa, 
Fla.; Frank Hurst, Washington, 
D.C.; Robert J. King, Baltimore; 
Charles A. McMullen, Baltimore; 
Albin Rauch, South Orange, 
N.J.; Jacob N. Rose, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

11)28 — Irving J. Aronson. Elizabeth. X. 
J.; W. C. Bashore, Bethesda, Md.; 
Benjamin A. Brown, Atlantic 
City, X.J.; Elmer F. Corey, Balti- 
more; Paul A. Deems, Baltimore; 
Lewis M. Haggerty, Hackensack, 
N.J.; Bernard Kniberg, Eliza- 
beth, N.J.; Philip C. Lowen- 
stein, Upper Montclair, N.J.; 
Wilbur B. Mehring, Silver 
Spring, Md.; A. Harry Ostrow, 
Washington, D.C.; Richard J. 
Stock, Hanover, Pa. 

1929— Edward C. Dobbs, Baltimore; 
Raymond D. Grace. Caldwell, N. 
J.; Frederic S. Harold, New Ha- 
ven, Conn.; Max N. Matzkin, 
Waterbury, Conn.; William L. 
Meyer, Baltimore; Kyrle W. 
Preis, Baltimore; Maurice J. 
Savitz, Brookline, Mass.; C. 
Howard Scheid, Baltimore. 

1930 — Norman P. Chanaud, Centreville, 
Md.; Anthony J. Hai-lacher, East 



Stroudsburg, Pa.; F. J. Mc- 
Nerney, Baltimore; John F. Ma- 
guire, Wilmington, Dela. ; Philip 
Schwartz, East Orange, N.J. 

1931— E. C. Barnes, Woodbury, N.J.; 
J. D. Cross, Leonardtown, Md.; 
Pa.; Ernest B. Nuttall, Balti- 
more; El wood S. Snyder, West 
Orange, N.J.; L. Edward Warn- 
er, Baltimore. 

1932 — Irving Abramson, Baltimore; 
Edgar L. Bessette, Cranston, 
R.I.; Charles E. Broadrup, Fred- 
erick, Md.; Samuel H. Bryant, 
Baltimore; Jesse J. Englander, 
Bridgeport, Conn.; Merrill C. 
Hills, Hartford, Conn.; Lyman 
F. Milliken; Annapolis, Md. 

.1933— Albert C. Cook, Cumberland, 
Md. ; E. T. Leary, Wilmington, 
Dela.; Lewis Goldstein, James- 
burg, N.J.; Martin A. Liddy, 
Elizabeth, N.J.; Charles E. Mc- 
Garry, Baltimore; Joseph Piom- 
bino, Baltimore; David H. Wili- 
er, Washington, D.C. 

1934 — L. W. Bimestefer, Baltimore; 
Douglas A. Browning, Balti- 
more; Ernesto Davila-Diaz, 
San Juan, P.R.; J. C. Johnson, 
Jr., Cambridge, Md.; William R. 
Joule, Newark, N.J.; Lester B. 
Olderf, Union City, N.J.; C. 
Frank Sabatino, Plainfield, N. 



1935- 



J.; William Schunick, Baltimore; 
Jesse Trager, Baltimore. 

-John Anzalone, Baltimore; Wil- 
liam W. Noel, Hagerstown, Md. ; 
Alfred H. Schilling, Carlstadt, 
N.J.; Eugene A. Ward, Upper 
Montclair, N.J.; John H. Whit- 
aker, Baltimore. 
1936 — James Corthouts. Hartford, 
Conn.; Marvin Evans, Chapel 
Hill, N.C.; Otto G. Klotz, 
Gloucester, N.J.; Louis Kresh- 
tool, Wilmington, Del.; Joseph 
Metz, Jr., Baltimore; J. A. Walk- 
er, Montpelier, Vt. 

-James A. Fulmer, Fountain Inn, 
S.C. 

-Milton B. Asbell, Camden, N.J.; 
Carl E. Bailev, Baltimore; James 
T. Cabler, Snow Hill, Md.; 
David Cooper, Atlantic City, N. 
J.; Edwin D. Cruit, Aberdeen, 
Md.; Charles S. Jonas, Atlantic 
City, N.J.; Charles P. McCaus- 
land, Towson, Md. 

-Barry B. Auerbach, Baltimore; 
Albert W. Morris, Salisbury, 
Md.; Kenneth V. Randolph, Bal- 
timore; D. R. Tipton, Baltimore. 
1940— B. A. Dabrowski, Baltimore; E. 
L. Pessagno, Baltimore. 

—Joseph M. Tighe, Baltimore. 

March — George P. Cook, Ticon- 
deroga, N.Y.; George M. De- 



1937- 
1938- 



1939- 



1942- 
1943 



Head Table At The Atlantic City Breakfast 




From left: Asbell, .Miss Toomey, Anderson, .Mills, Robinson, McCarthy, Cappuccio, Hurst, Cormeny, Aisenberg, Hough- 
ton, Shehan, Preis, and Broadrup. a_ 



W 



Maryland- -January-Februdry, 1957 . 



I'.ii:: 



1944- 
1945- 



1046- 



1948- 



1950- 



Yountf, Packanack Lake, N.J.; 
Joseph Klein, Cold Spring, N.Y. ; 
L. S. Libby, Baltimore; John W. 
Menius, Jr.; Asheboro, N.C.; 
Russell P. Smith, Jr., Cambridge, 
Md. 

November — Robert H. Bernert, 
Hartford, Conn.; Lee J. Hor- 
witz, Baltimore; Herbert Kras- 
ner, Bloomfield, N.J. 
Elpidio Diaz, Baltimore. 
Norman V. Bianco, North Ad- 
ams, Mass.; Walter I. Levine, 
Baltimore. 
— 'Charles J- jBove, Jr., Anna- 
polis, Md.; J. P. Cappuccio, Bal- 
timore; J. P. San Clemente, 
South Braintree, Mass.; Alex 
Demyan, Glen Burnie, Md. ; Har- 
ry W. F. Dressel, Baltimore; 
George Hooz, Dover, N.H.; Har- 
old D. Moses, Hamilton, Mass.; 
Bruce N. Scidmore, Corinth, N. 
Y.; Henry S. Zaytoun, Rocky 
Mount, N.C. 

Ashur G. Chavoor, Washington, 
D.C.; Theresa Edwards, Heck- 
ley, W. Va.; William T. Frid- 
inger, Cumberland, Md. ; A. S. 
Vikell, Lexington Park, Md. 
William W. Cunningham, Man- 
chester, Md.; Francis L. Ed- 
Wards, Becklev, W. Va.; Alan 
A. Gale, Newark, N.J.; A. Clyde 
Hannah, Salisbury, Md.; George 
E. Mannix, Longmeadovv, Mass.; 
Manuel A. Rosso, Santurce, P.R. 
1951 — Simon Berenson, Portland, Me.; 
John J. Daub, Jr., Union City, 
N.J.; Stanley R. Mallow, Pasa- 
dena, Md.; Elizabeth Schneider 
Powell, Arlington, Va.; Thomas 
E. Wolf, Lancaster, Pa. 
1952— Alvin P. Friend, Oakland, Md.; 
Glenn A. Little, Jr., Salisbury, 
Md.; William B. Powell, Arling- 
ton, Va.; Joe N. Price, Land- 
over Hills, Md. 
1953— Donald F. Laird, Baltimore; 
Gerard Joseph Lemongello, Mor- 
ristown, N.J.; Rudolph A. Novel- 
lo, Elizabeth, N.J.; C. Baker 
Ramsay, Towson, Md. 
1954— Thomas J. Allen, Frederick, Md.; 
Christopher J. Hanley, Jr., West 
Warwick, R.I.; Barbara Seifert, 
Baltimore; Herbert J. Underhill, 
Jr., East Greenwich, R.I.; Nann 
Alix Wickwire, Tampa, Fla. 
-Carlos Alfaro, San Salvador, 
El Salvador; Alfred E. Bees, 
Hampstead, Md.; Hunter A. 
Brinker, Jr., Ft. Myer, Va.; 
William R. Cotton, Camp Le- 
jeune, N.C; Robert D. Hanley, 
Providence, R.I.; James T. Mc- 
Carl, Greenbelt, Md.; Maurice 
Lussier, Manchester, N.H.; Ron- 
ald M. Lauer, Presque Isle, Me.; 
Hervey A. Lupien, Danielson, 
Conn.; S. Sidney Snyder, Green- 
ville, S.C.; Thomas E. Wagner, 
Fort Campbell, Ky. ; Joseph F. 
Williams, Cherry Point, N.C. 
■Fred S. Fink, Ft. Dix, N.J.; 
Jules J. Levin, Cape May, N.J.; 
Clayton S. McCarl, Greenbelt, 
Md.; Raymond W. Palmer, Jr., 
Bainbridge, Md.; I. G. Sorrells, 
Baltimore. 



1955- 



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31 



Engineering Students Receive Scholarships 



Three University of Maryland engi- 
neering students have been selected 
to receive Westinghouse Electric Cor- 
poration Air Arm Division Scholar- 
ships. 

They are Benjamin F. Hoffman of 
14th Avenue, Hyattsville, Md., a 
sophomore in electrical engineering, 
Glenn R. Linsenmayer of 3140 Belle- 
view Avenue, Cheverly, Md., a junior 
in electrical engineering; and, Leo W. 
Pearson of 3410 Pennsylvania Street, 
University Hills in Hyattsville, Md., a 
senior in mechanical engineering. 

The university students were selected 
on a basis of their academic standing 
Out of a possible academic average of 
4.000, since entering the university, 
Hoffman has an average of 3.897, Lin- 
senmayer's average is 3.951 and Pear- 
son is averaging 3.895. 



In a ceremony held in University 
President Wilson H. Elkin's office, cer- 
tificates and checks were presented to 
the three students by Nicholas V. Pet- 
rou, manager of engineering for the 
Westinghouse Air Arm Division in Bal- 
timore. Also repi'esenting the Westing- 
house Electric Corporation was Robert 
H. Lake, personnel administrator. 

The University of Maryland is one of 
twelve selected colleges and universi- 
ties participating in the Air Arm Divi- 
sion scholarship program. 

Each of the twelve scholarships are 
awarded annually to outstanding stu- 
dents who have successfully completed 
the first year of a regular four-year 
undergraduate program. 

In initiating the program the Air 
Arm Division of Baltimore made avail- 
able for the 1956-57 school year, twelve 



scholarships valued at $1500 each to 
men who are three years from gradua- 
tion, and twelve to men who will be en- 
tering their last year of the under- 
graduate curriculum prior to the bache- 
or degree. Following this initial pro- 
cedure, the scholarships will be award- 
ed to men three years from their gradu- 
ation. 

Hoffman, a graduate of Montgomery- 
Blair High School, is married to the 
former Hazel V. Dollev of Washington, 
D. C. 

Linsenmayer, a graduate of Bladens- 
burg High School is the son of Mr. 
Leonard Linsenmayer. 

Pearson is a graduate of Andrew 
Jackson High School in St. Albans, N.Y. 
His parents are Mr. and Mrs. Michael 
B. Green of Hyattsville, Md. 



Mr. Petrou Presents Awards 




In a ceremony held in University President Wilson H. Elkin's office Westinghouse Electric Corporation Air Arm Division 
scholarship certificates are presented to three University of Maryland engineering students. The scholarships were awarded 
on the basis of high scholastic standing in engineering. 

From left, Benjamin H. Hoffman of Hyattsville, Maryland, a sophomore in electrical engineering; Glenn R. Linsen- 
mayer of Cheverly, Maryland, a junior in electrical engineering; Mr. Nicholas V. Petrou, manager of engineering at 
Westinghouse Air Arm Division; Dr. Elkins; Mr. Robert H.Lake, personnel administrator of Westinghouse Electric Corp- 
oration; and, Dean S, S. Steinberg of the University of Maryland College of Engineering. 



32 



Maryland — January-February, 1957 



College of 



Education 



Dr. Clarence A. Newell, College of 
Education, is the author of an 
article entitled "Planning and Evaluat- 
ing Internship Experiences in Educa- 
tional Administration" in a recent is- 
sue of the Journal of Teacher Educa- 
tion. The article describes some of 
the techniques being used in the Uni- 
versity of Maryland program. 

Elected President 
R. Lee Hornbake, Industrial Educa- 
tion, was elected President of the 
American Council on Industrial Arts 
Teacher Education at its recent na- 
tional convention in Milwaukee. Dr. 
Hornbake gave the opening address 
at the initial general session of the 
parent organization, The American In- 
dustrial Arts Association. 

Elected President 
Mabel S. Spencer, Education, was re- 
cently elected President of the Voca- 
tional and Practical Arts Association 
at their recent meeting in Baltimore. 



AAUP Meets 

Dr. Arthur S. Adams, president of 
the American Council on Education, ad- 
dressed a faculty banquet in the Uni- 
versity Dining Hall at College Park. 

The banquet was sponsored by the 
University of Maryland chapter of the 
American Association of University 
Professors, and is that organization's 
first formal event of the academic year. 
Appointments, promotions, and salar- 
ies are to be the topic of the meeting 
in November, and in March a meeting 
will be concerned with professional 
ethics, academic freedom and tenure at 
the University of Maryland. 

Dr. Adams is a former president of 
the University of New Hampshire and 
a former provost of Cornell University. 
His topic was "The University Fam- 
ily". 

New officers of the Maryland chap- 
ter, to serve in the current academic 
year, are Dr. R. Lee Hornbake, presi- 
dent; Dr. Lucius Garvin, first vice- 
president; Dr. Gardiner P. Foley, sec- 
ond vice-president; Prof. Anna Urban, 
recording secretary; Dr. Donald W. 
Krimel, corresponding secretary; and 
Prof. John A. Daiker, treasurer. 



"Miss Football" 

Maryland University's entry in the 
"Miss Football" contest which high- 
lighted the 11th annual Berkeley (Cal.) 
Football Festival, was blonde, hazel- 
eyed Helena Day, sophomore speech 
major. 

Daughter of Stanley E. Day, Sr. of 
Davidsonsville, Md., she competed for 
the crown against a field of 14 campus 
beauties at a Coronation Ball on Thurs- 
day, Sept. 20, in Berkeley. 

Helena is 19 years old, stands 5 feet 
6 inches and weighs 125 pounds. She 
plans to do children's experimental the- 
ater work after graduating. The coeds 
assembled in Los Angeles on Sept. 16. 



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i 33 



College of 



Engineering 



Col. O. H. Saunders '10 
A. Lawrence Guess '51 



Pvt. Richard B. Davis, (Engr. '55), 
recently was graduated from the 
Seventh Army Non-Commissioned Offi- 
cer Academy in Munich, Germany. Dav- 
is, who arrived overseas last April, 
is a message-center clerk in Head- 
quarters Company of the 25th Signal 
Battalion. He entered the Army in 
September of last year and completed 
basic trailing at Fort Jackson, S. C. 

At Naval Research 
Wilmer M. Lawson (Eng. '56) of 
Crisfield, Maryland, is in the employ 
of the Naval Research Laboratory in 
Washington, D. C. He is an electronic- 
scientist and began his duties in this 
capacity in September, 1956. 

To Judge Competition 
The American Institute of Steel Con- 
struction selected Dean S. S. Stein- 
berg of the University of Maryland 
College of Engineering to serve as the 
engineering member of a jury which 
selected the prize winning steel bridge 
in this year's annual bridge competi- 
tion. 

The Susquehanna River Bridge be- 
tween Havre de Grace and Perryville, 
Maryland took first place in 1940. 
Herschel H. Allen of the university 
class of 1910 was the designer of the 
bridge. 

Attend Conference 
John L. Bryan and Robert C. Byrus, 
Fire Service Extension, attended the 
annual conference of the National Fire 
Protection Association in Boston, Mass- 
achusetts. 

At Brussels, Belgium 
Px-ofessor S. I. Pai, Institute for 
Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathe- 
matics, recently flew to Europe for the 
meeting of the IX International Con- 
gress of Applied Mechanics, at Brus- 
sels, Belgium. Dr. Pai presented a 
paper entitled "On Exact Solutions of 
One Dimensional Flow Equations of 
Magneto-Gas Dynamics". After the con- 
gress he visited a few research insti- 
tutes in England. 

Speaks At AMS 
L. E. Payne, Institute for Fluid Dy- 
namics and Applied Mathematics, re- 
cently spoke at the meeting of the 
American Mathematical Society, in 
Cambridge, Massachusetts. Professor 
Payne spoke on "Pointwise Bounds in 
Neumann Problems". 



Presidential M.C. 

Mickey Croce, 21 year old member of 
Sigma Chi fraternity, was master of 
ceremonies at a rally held in honor 
of President Eisenhower. 

He introduced such well known cele- 
brities as Helen Hayes and Michael 
Dowd Gill, Mrs. Eisenhower's nephew. 

Croce said that Gill, an old friend, 
asked him to take on the job. 



To Fort Belvoir 

PFC Hasan A. Hasan (Engr. '55) is a 
troop information and education spe- 
cialist in Headquarters Company of 
the 79th Engineer Construction Group 
at Fort Belvoir, Virginia. 

Pvt. Hasan entered the Army in 
February, 1955, and received his basic 
training at Fort Jackson, So. Carolina, 
end was last stationed in Alaska. He is 
a member of Alpha Phi Omega fra- 
ternity. 

With 95th Engineers 
PFC Robert S. Norton, Jr. (Engr. 
'55), of Silver Spring, Md., recently 
participated in an annual Army train- 
ing test with the 95th Engineer Bat- 
talion in Darmstadt, Germany. 

Norton is a surveyor in the battal- 
ion's Headquarters and Service Com- 
pany. He entered the Army in Septem- 
ber, 1955, was last stationed at Fort 
Jackson, So. Carolina, and arrived in 
Europe last April. 

The 24 year old soldier was employed 
by the U. S. Soil Conservation Service 
in College Park before entering the 
Army. 

At Fort Leonard W'ood 
Pvt. Ernest Berliner recently began 
six months of active duty training at 
Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, under 
the Reserve Forces Act. 

Berliner is receiving eight weeks of 
basic combat training which will be 
followed by advanced individual and 
unit training. Men volunteering for the 
six month tour of active duty are per- 
mitted to finish their military obliga- 
tion in local Army Reserve or National 
Guard units. 

Dingman Appointed 
Ralph L. Helmreich, Director of Op- 
erations of the Long Lines Dept. of 
the A. T. & T. Co., has been elected 
Vice President and General Manager 
of Bell Telephone 
Laboratories. 

Mr. Helmreich 
will succeed James 
E. Dingman, who 
has resigned to ac- 
cept the position of 
Director of Opera- 
tions of Long Lines. 
They will resume 
their new duties on 
November 1. Also on 
that date, Mr. Helm- 
reich will become a 
Director of Bell 
Laboratories, and Mr. Dingman will 
succeed him as a member of the Long 
Lines Board. 

Mr. Dingman started as a tester 
with Western Electric Company in 
1922. A year later he transferred to 
Long Lines and held various positions 
in the department until 1949 when he 
was elected a Vice President of Bell 
Telephone Company of Pennsylvania, 
and the Diamond State Telephone 
Company of Delaware. He joined Bell 
Laboratories in 1952. 

Mr. Dingman received a B.S. degree 
in mechanical engineering from the 
University of Maryland in 1921. 

He was born in Baltimore, Maryland 
in 1901. 




Mr. Dingman 



Dr. Schroeder Speaks 

Coal and oil shale as energy resources 
for the future was discussed by Dr. 
W. C. Schroeder, professor of chemical 
engineering before a group of national 
energy experts in Denver, Colo. 

The meeting featured authorities in 
oil and gas, atomic and solar energies 
as well as oil shale and coal for the 
first of its type to be held in the nation. 

As an outstanding authority in the 
energy field Dr. Schroeder was invited 
to attend the meeting by the Denver 
Chamber of Commerce, sponsoring the 
meeting. 

In considering economics of synthetic 
fuels from coal and oil shale Dr. Schroe- 
der pointed to the current impact of 
foreign oil on domestic production from 
not only our oil sources but from other 
domestic energy sources. 



Graduate School 



Scholarships Awarded 

David Yue Wong and Alfred Chi-Tai 
Wu of the University of Mary- 
land Graduate School have been award- 
ed the Frank M. Shu Fellowships for 
graduate study in the University's De- 
partment of Physics. 

Both of the students studied at the 
National Taiwan University in For- 
mosa prior to coming to this country. 
Wong also studied at Canton College 
in Hong Kong, before receiving his 
B.A. degree from Hardin-Simmons Uni- 
versity at Abilene, Texas, in 1954. Wu 
was graduated in 1955 from Wheaton 
College in Illinois. 

The Frank M. Shu scientific fellow- 
ships are awarded annually by the 
China Institute in America to eight 
outstanding students of the sciences. 
The awards are made on the basis of 
a nation-wide competition among stu- 
dents of Chinese origin. 

Wong and Wu before taking gradu- 
ate work succeeded in passing the Uni- 
versity's qualifying examination for 
the master of science degree in physics 
which, according to department head 
Dr. John Toll, says is seldom accomp- 
lished. 

At the end of his first year of grad- 
uate studies, Wong won the "Physics 
Prize" at the University. 

Natives of China, both students are 
now engaged in studies for their Ph.D. 
degrees at College Park. 

Strike It Rich 

Esperanza Valdez, a graduate stu- 
dent in the College of Business Educa- 
tion and her husband, Juan, a student 
at Johns Hopkins University went to 
New York to appear on the "Strike It 
Rich" TV show. 

Starting at the usual $30 they 
answered all four questions for a total 
of $280. The couple also received a 
"Heart line" of $100 from an unknown 
donor. 

When offered the chance to go on 
another show, Mrs. Valdez replied, 
"No, I think our business is to go to 
school while we're in the States." 



34 



Maryland — January-February, 19. r >7 




Ifr. WdMx 



Named Deputy Director 
For Earth Satellite Program Hy Navy 
Dr. John P. Hagen, Director of Pro- 
ject VANGUARD, announced the ap- 
pointment of .J. Paul Walsh as Deputy 
Director of Project VANGUARD. 

A consultant on the earth satellite 
program since October, 1955, Mr. Walsh 
has served on the Laboratory stall' as 
a. member of the Mechanics Division 
since .January, L943. 

As an administrator and top flight 
mechanical engineer, he has assisted 
in setting up a num- 
ber of important 
p r o k r a m s, both 
within the Labora- 
tory and the De- 
partment of the 
Navy. 

In 1944, he assist- 
ed in the organiza- 
tion of the Shock 
and Vibration Divi- 
sion, which later 
merged with the 
Mechanics Division. 
In 1951, he organ- 
ized and served as Head of the Struc- 
tures Branch of the Mechanics Divi- 
sion until assigned as consultant to 
Dr. Hagen. 

He directed work connected with 
the full scale and model shock test 
of the reactor for the first nuclear 
power submarine. This involved the 
coordination of the efforts of the Elec- 
tric Boat Company, General Electric 
Company, Westinghouse, Norfolk Naval 
Shipyard, and several fleet support 
ships. 

Mr. Walsh was given top assign- 
ments with Operations Castle iand 
Wigwam. His work with Operation 
Castle involved the coordination of 
efforts of the Navy's David Taylor 
Model Basin, Naval Ordnance Labora- 
tory, Naval Research Laboratory, and 
several fleet support units to measure 
the pressure from high yield devices 
at the Pacific Proving Grounds of the 
Atomic Energy Commission. 

With Operation Wigwam, he direct- 
ed the management of a project to 
measure the pressure from a deep un- 
derwater atomic explosion. For success 
in this project, Mr. Walsh was given 
the Meritorious Civilian Service Award. 
A native of Fall River, Massachu- 
setts, he attended elementary and high 
school in Providence, Rhode Island. He 
received the degree of Mechanical Engi- 
neer from Stevens Institute of Tech- 
nology in 1938 and Master of Science 
from the University of Maryland in 
1950. 

He is registered as a professional 
engineer in the District of Columbia 
and is the author of several papers in 
the field of dynamics and mechanical 
systems. He is a member of the Na- 
tional Society of Professional Engi- 
neers and the Washington Philosophi- 
cal Society. 

Mr. Walsh is married to the former 
Miss Joan Edwards of Delanco, New 
Jersey. The couple have three chil- 
dren, Joanne, 11; James P., Jr., 8; 
and William, 3. They reside at 8904 
Sudburry Road, Silver Spring, Mary- 
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Home Economics 

Laura Amos Bull '26 
Vera Klein Woods '32 



Annual Association Meeting 
//I ittle tricks" of good home man- 
L agement, to meet changing 
family needs and to insure most en- 
joyable family living, was the subject 
of Dr. Henrietta Fleck's informative 
address at the annual fall meeting of 
the Maryland Home Economics Asso- 
ciation held in Baltimore. Dr. Fleck, 
of New York University, was the main 
speaker. Miss Jane Crow, of the Uni- 
versity's college of Home Economics, 
and currently president of the State 
Home Economics Association, presided 
at the meeting. Miss Evelyn Miller, 
alumna of the University and Supervi- 
sor of Home Economics in the State 
Department of Education, introduced 
the speaker. Among the many gradu- 
ates attending were: Alice Burdick '28, 
Marie Webster '31, Billie Bland '21, 
Miriam Jones '23, Gladys Crowther 
Verdin '24, Veronica Zuran '48, Nellie 
Buckey '25, Florence McKenney '35, 
Agnes Soper '35, Yola Hudson, Vir- 
ginia Toavine, and Betty Amos Bull, 
all in the class of '26, Anne Matthews 
'29, Ethel Groves '27 and many others. 

Elected To Royal Society 

Anne Mathews '29, nutritionist for 
the Maryland State Health Department, 
was recently elected to membership in 
the Royal Society of Public Health 
Workers of London, England. Miss 
Mathews is the only nutritionist in the 
entire country to be selected for mem- 
bership, which is made up of outstand- 
ing professional men and women. 

Dean Mount Ailing 

Dean Marie Mount is recuperating 
from a recent operation in the Johns 
Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. We 
sincerely hope that by the time you 
read this she will be fully recovered 
and back at her desk feeling better than 
ever. 

News Of Alumna 

Victoria Vaiden Worden '23, has con- 
tinued to live on at The Green in Dover, 
Delaware, since the rather sudden 
death of her husband, Dr. Stanley Wor- 
den. Since 1950 she has worked in 
the Division of Public Health Educa- 
tion at the Delaware State Board of 
Health. At present she is acting head 
of the division. She has a daughter 
who is a senior at Goucher College and 
a son, Stanley, who attended Haver- 
ford. 

Amy Heckinger '50, is with the Col- 
lege of Special and Continuation Stud- 
ies stationed in Heidelberg, Germany 
as Director of Lamplighter Service 
Club there. 

Marjory Frayl is coping with the 
duties of registrar with the Univer- 
sity's branch in Japan. 

Miriam Jones '23, is teaching cloth- 
ing and textiles to senior high school 
students at Western High School, Balti- 
more. 



Gladys Crowther Verdin '24, is teach- 
ing Home Economics in the Baltimore 
Cuy school system. She also manages 
the old Crowther family farm near 
Sparks, Maryland. 

Carolyn Cheser Coppinger '30, left 
with her family recently for Japan. She 
writes that the children are in school 
there and everyone is getting adjusted 
to their new life nicely. She is inter- 
ested in hearing from other alumna. 
Her address: Mrs. W. P. Coppinger, 
USOM to Japan, c/o American Embas- 
sy, APO 500, c/o PM, San Francisco, 
California. 

Shirley Voltz Rogers '53, is in Ger- 
many and has planned many trips 
around Europe. Baby Suzan and Hus- 
band Bill were fine. Her address: Mrs. 
William Rogers, Sta. Comp. Det. 7743 
AU, APO 256, c/o PM, New York, 
New York. 

New Appointment 

Dr. Florence King, who lectured in the 
college last year, has been appointed 
head of the Department of Foods and 
Nutrition. She retired a year ago from 
the University of Vermont, where she 
served as head of the Department of 
Home Economics. Among her many ac- 
tivities, she is currently engaged in 
writing a textbook on foods. 
Change Of Status 

Miss Jane Crow has recently been 
appointed as associate professor and 
head of the Department of Home and 
Institution Management. She is also 
serving as president of the Maryland 
Home Economics Association and as 
an advisor to the alumnae association. 
New Faculty Member 

Miss Bernice Harris has joined the 
faculty of the Department of Textiles 
and Clothing. She comes to us from 
New York where she was associated 
with the Necchi Sewing Machine Com- 
pany. 

From Rhode Island 

Mr. Sanford Farwell, formei'ly with 
the Rhode Island School of Design in 
Providence, has joined the staff of the 
Department of Practical Art, where 
he is filling in for Mrs. Eleanor Whaley 
who is on a one-year leave of absence 
to study at Cranbrook Institute of Art 
in Michigan. 

Textiles And Clothing Conference 

A conference for all teachers in the 
field of textiles and clothing was held 
in Washington, D. C, in the Washing- 
ton Hotel. Eileen Heagney and Ruth 
Parker of the University staff were ill 
charge of making local arrangements. 
The entire staff of the University's 
Department of Textiles and Clothing 
attended. 

Mrs. Wilbur Honored 

Mrs. June Wilbur, assistant profes- 
sor in the Department of Textiles and 
Clothing, has been chosen to serve as 
president of the Maryland Chapter of 
Phi Kappa Phi, honorary scholastic 
fraternity, for the school year, 1956—57. 

****** 
HAND IN HAND 

There can be little sound judgment 

without adequate knowledge. 



36 



Maryland — January-February, 1957 



School of 



Dr. John Wagner 



Anniversary Medal 

The University of Maryland School 
of Medicine, the nation's fifth oldest 
Medical School, will mark the 150th 
anniversary of its founding in 1857. In 
commemoration of this event, the 
Medical Alumni Association will strike 
a commemorative medal to be issued on 
the University's Founders Day, Janu- 
ary 20, 1957. 

The medal will show on one side the 
original building of the School of 
Medicine, the oldest structure in the 
United States continually used in the 
teaching of medical students. Sur- 
rounding this will be the words "150 
years of medical education 1807-1957". 
The reverse side will be the official 
seal of the University of Maryland. 

It is expected that a limited edi- 
tion in silver will be available, with 
the remainder of the edition being 
in bronze. 

As yet, prices have not been an- 
nounced nor has the actual size of the 
medal been determined. Inquiries 
should be addressed to the Medical 
Alumni Association, University of 
Maryland, Lombard and Green Streets, 
Baltimore 1, Maryland. 

High Standing 
The University School of Medicine 
has been fully accredited by the Mid- 
dle States Association according to 
Dean William S. Stone. 

Dr. Stone stated that the evaluators 
turned in a report which is very favor- 
able in every respect. 

When questioned about the school's 
graduates, Dr. Stone pointed out, "It 
has always been the record of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland's School of Medi- 
cine to graduate qualified doctors of 
medicine." 

Dr. Stone qualified this statement by 
saying that this a definite fact because 
doctors are measured 
by such standards 
as licensing, entry 
into more specialties 
and obtaining posi- 
tion of responsibility 
in local and national 
health circles. Mary- 
land graduates have 
competed and suc- 
cessfully stood up 
with qualified grad- 
uates of all schools. 
He pointed out 
that during World 
War II, the welfare of men in the army 
and air force were entrusted to the 
leadership of Maj. Gen. Norman L. 
Kirk and the surgical specialties to 
Brig. Gen. Fred Rankin. 

Gen. Kirk was the Surgeon General 
in World War II and Gen. Rankin was 
Chief Consultant to the Surgeon Gen- 
eral. Both were Maryland graduates. 
Dr. Stone said, "The University of 
Maryland throughout its history has 
been a leader in medical education in 
the United States. Through the action 




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authorized service: carburetors, starters, 
generators, all wipers, speedometers, 
heaters, fuel pumps. 

Phone: NAtional 8-7038 
1230 20th St., N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 



V. 



J 



McNeill Surveys, Inc. 

LAND PLANNING AND SUBDIVISION 
6480 SLIGO MILL ROAD 

TAKOMA PARK, MD. 
Telephone: JUnlper 9-7508 



GER SELUinG IHflCHinE 

8670 Colesville Rd. 

SILVER SPRING, MD. 

JU 9-8844 



IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE 
IN MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Maryland — January-February, 1957 



37 



WO WO 

AA 



\ KmmKiemeo 



KINC Of AMERICA'S 

doughnuts 



8000 Georgia Ave. JU 5-7500 
SILVER SPRING, MD. 



Sank ofc WxVaflaniL 

SEAT PLEASANT, MD. 

— Branches — 

BOWIE - CAPITOL HEIGHTS 

CORAL HILLS - LANHAM 

SUITLAND 

HILLCREST HEIGHTS 



SUITLAND CENSUS FACILITY 




TOWSON PRACTICAL 
NURSING AGENCY 

BONDED & LICENSED 

MATERNITY - CHRONIC 

POST OPERATIVE CASES 

COMPANION NURSES 

IitMA C. Gekman, Owner 



DRexel 7-9138 



BALTIMORE, MD. 



JUnlper 9-1459 : 



Dale Music Co. 

Complete Music Center 

Open Mon., Thurs. & Fri. 
Evenings 'Til 9 P.M. 

8240 Georgia Avenue 

Silver Spring, Md. 




S. A. GATTI & SONS, Inc. 

Institutional Grocers 

3125 V STREET, N.E. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

U 6-8234 



of its faculty in 1890, it brought about 
the meeting which formed the Ameri- 
can Association of Medical Colleges." 

"It was one of the first to adopt three 
and four-year medical curricula," he 
added. 

Dr. Stone asserted that 98.8 percent 
of the persons being tested by the 
state for licenses to practice medicine 
in Maryland during 1954, who had 
graduated from the University, suc- 
cessfully completed all requirements 
and were awarded their certificate. 

The next highest percentage can be 
found in applicants at Johns Hopkins 
where 98.6 of those tested were award- 
ed licenses. 

The Middle States Association states 
in part: 

"The University of Maryland School 
of Medicine has an approved, progres- 
sive program of medical education in 
keeping with the best standards of 
American medical schools. This pro- 
gram reflects the progress being made 
in medical science. Through faculty 
visits to other medical schools and ex- 
change of information, full advantage 
is being taken of current experiments 
aimed at improvement of medical cur- 
ricula and teaching methods. 

"In the introduction of faculty-stu- 
dent seminars, led by outstanding au- 
thorities on subjects of broad educa- 
tional value, dealing with "Man and 
His Environment," the medical school 
has made a fine contribution in improv- 
ing medical education that has received 
favorable recognition from other medi- 
cal schools." 

"Although handicapped by an in- 
adequate physical plant, every effort is 
being made to improve it and to make 
the greatest use of resources available. 

"Records of recent medical graduates 
in internship and residency programs 
in leading teaching hospitals in the 
great medical centers of the United 
States show that Maryland graduates 
rate high in professional medical 
knowledge and ability." 

Commemorative Souvenirs 
The Women's Auxiliary Board of 
the University of Maryland's Univer- 
sity Hospital are presenting a com- 
memorative cup and saucer and ash- 
tray for sale in conjunction with the 
University's centennial and sesqui- 
centennial celebration. 

Each piece will carry the inscription, 
"150 years of medical education," to- 
gether with the seal of the University. 
The items will be on sale at the hos- 
pital gift shop or may be obtained by 
phone order or letter. 



LENGTHY 

The traveling man decided to go to 
church. After the sermon went on and 
on for two hours, he began to get rest- 
less and fidgety. Finally he asked an 
old man sitting next to him how long 
the preacher had been preaching there. 

"About 10 years," the old man whis- 
pered. 

"Well, I'll stay, then," said the man. 
"He must be almost through." 



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BRENTWOOD, MD. 

SERVING PRINCE GEORGES 
and MONTGOMERY COUNTIES 



Your Neighbors 
Buy Our Milk 

• Vitamin D Homogenized Milk 

• Grade A Pasteurized Milk 

• Extra Rich Homogenized 
Vitamin D Milk 

• Cultured Buttermilk 

• Fat Free Milk 

• Chocolate Milk 

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• Cottage Cheese 

• Eggs — Strictly Fresh 

• Half and Half 

• Sour Cream 

• Table Cream 

• Whipping Cream 

• Margarine 



APpleton 7-3434 



Choice of Maryland 

Suburban Residents 

Since 1927 



C. & W. Sport Shop 

Complete Sporting Goods 

Rawlings— Spalding— Wilson 

HUNTING LICENSES 

QUEENS CHAPEL SHOPPING CENTER 
WEST HYATTSVILLE, MD. 



TAG'S Restaurant & Bar 

"Moma Mia What Pizza" 

BEST ITALIAN FOODS 
^}) RAW BAR 

Air-Conditioned PArkway 5-9819 
44 Washington Blvd. LAUREL, MD. 




HILLYARD SALES CO. 

FLOOR TREATMENT 

R. B. Rubv, Diviiional Mgr. 

8008 PINEY BRANCH ROAD 

JUnlper 5-3957 Silver Spring, Md. 



38 



Maryland — January-February, 1957 



Mrs. Azlcm Appointed 
Registrar 




Mrs. Norma Azlein 

Mis. Norma Azlein has been ap- 
pointed Registrar of the University 
of Maryland. 

The appointment was announced by 
Mr. G. Watson Algire, Director of 
Admissions and Registrations, under 
whose jurisdiction she will serve. 

Mrs. Azlein's office is primarily con- 
cerned with the maintenance of stu- 
dents' records of scholastic achievement 
not only on the College Park Campus 
and at Baltimore, but also in the Off- 
Campus and Overseas Programs con- 
ducted by the University. 

She is a graduate of the University 
of Chicago in the fields of art, history 
and education. After her graduation 
in 1940, she worked in the Office of 
the Registrar of the University of 
Chicago for 10 years. During this 
period, in which she was initially a 
transcription clerk, she worked in sev- 
eral capacities, finally holding the posi- 
tion of chief administration clerk. 

In the spring of 1950, Mrs. Azlein 
came to the University of Maryland 
as a junior clerk in the Registrar's 
Office. She was Assistant Registrar 
under Miss Alma Preinkert at the time 
of Miss Preinkert's death in 1954, when 
she became Associate Registrar. 

During the period in which Mrs. Az- 
lein was with the administration of the 
University of Chicago, she married Mr. 
Arthur A. Azlein, then a divinity stu- 
dent at the same school. The Rev. Mr. 
Azlein is at present the pastor of 
Michigan Park Christian Church, 
Washington, D. C, and Mrs. Azlein 
frequently assists her husband in his 
work by acting as choir director and 
organist for the congregation. 



For Your 



Enjoyment 

MEADOW GOLD ICE CREAM 



• Rich, smooth, 
Delicious . . . 
A Taste Treat 
for every Occasion. 

Meadow Gold Products Co. 

Ask For Our Flavor Of The Month 




^C^mtger£Af<&ToOW£/?.. 




STEAK 
HOUSE 

W. Opp. Shorcham Hotel 
OPEN DAILY 11 A.M. -2 A.M. Dancing Thursday, Friday and Sat. 

Catering to Private. Parties — Also private luncheon parties — NO. 7-4779 

VISIT OUR NEW TAP ROOM ON THE STREET FLOOR -' . 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 



he Happiest Day 
of Your Career 

m . . , the day you take com- 
nnnd of your "success" office. 
Completely designed and executed 
for you by Andrews. 

An Andrews presentation com- 
plete with blueprints, sample 
swatches and furnishings vis- 
uals will make your "dream 
office" a reality at a surpris- 
ingly reasonable cost. 

Treat yourself — Call Andrews 
soon. 

Andrews 

OFFICE SUPPLY & 
EQUIPMENT COMPANY 

718 13th ST. N.W., WASHINGTON, D.C. 
REpublic 7-8250 



I 1 

J. E. Dyer & Co 

QUALITY FROZEN and 
CANNED FOODS 

Serving Washington Since 1878 



A Division of 
L. H. PARKE CO. 

PHILADELPHIA and 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 



L 



3330 M Street, N.W. 
WASHINGTON 7, D.C. 

FE 3-3800 



Maryland — January-February, 19- r >7 



89 



IN THE MARYLAND SEGMENT 

OF GREATER WASHINGTON 

IT'S THE 



Suburban 



Trust 



Company 



14 OFFICES TO SERVE YOU 

Every Banking and Trust Facility 

• 

HYATTSVILLE, MD. SILVER SPRING, MD. 

Member F. D. I. C. 



C. H. Lauison, Inc. 

— General Contractor — 

ROAD BUILDING and 
GRADING 

Field Office 
COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

Phone WEbster 5-5744 

Williamsburg, Va. 

Phone — Williamsburg 106 



FORTUNA, INC. u, ,9,7 

The Best in 
lUCCAGE AND FINE LEATHERWARE 

Largest selection oj famous brand 
merchandise in metropolitan Washington 

FJtEB PAltKINO 

7202-06 Wisconsin Ave. Belhesda 14, Md. 

Phone 01. 4-2533 



NELSON MOTORS 

— STUDEBAKER — 

Authorized Sales & Service 
Auto Repairs — All Makes of Cars 

3 block* from U. of M. on Koute 1 

USED CARS UNion 4-8600 

7211 BALTIMORE BLVD. • COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



College of 



Military Science 



To Far East 

Captain Herman R. Eidem, was re- 
cently assigned to the Engineer 
Supply Center in Japan. He entered 
the Army in 1942 and arrived in the 
Far East in October, 1954 after hav- 
ing received his degree from Maryland. 
His wife, Margaret, is with him in 
Japan. 

Completes Training 
On October 5th, Marine 1st Lt. Wil- 
liam D. Boyer, '54, completed helicopter 
flight training after 8 weeks training 
in the Navy's Bell and Vertol helicop- 
ters. He has since been transferred to 
the 1st Marine Wing, Far East Com- 
mand in Japan. 



Hughes Fellowship Awarded 

Two University of Maryland gradu- 
ates have been awarded Hughes Master 
of Science Fellowships enabling them 
to continue their education while em- 
ployed part-time at Hughes Aircraft 
Company in Culver City, Calif. 

They are Robert L. Forward, a 1954 
bachelor of science in physics and 
mathematics, and Walter T. Marable, 
Jr., a 1956 bachelor of science in elec- 
trical engineering. 

The former Maryland men and 198 
others from 75 other universities who 
also were granted Hughes fellowships, 
are taking advanced courses at univer- 
sities in the Los Angeles area while 
employed in Hughes research and de- 
velopment laboratories in practical 
work closely allied to their studies. 

Forward is attending University of 
California at Los Angeles and Marable 
is studying at University of Southern 
California. 

Hughes manufactures electronic arm- 
ament control systems for jet intercep- 
tors, Falcon air-to-air guided missiles, 
cathode ray storage tubes and several 
types of semi-conductors. Other fields 
of activity include digital computers, 
ground radar, microwave devices and 
antennas, radomes and precision plas- 
tics, communication systems and min- 
iaturization. 

Mr. Forward and Mr. Marable re- 
ceive salaries from Hughes as well as 
payment for tuition, books and fees. 

****** 
CLASSIFICATION 

"Now, gentlemen," said the Profess- 
or, "can any of you give me a clear, 
concise definition of a politician?" 

"I can, sir," volunteered the son of a 
Congressman, "if you'll just tell me to 
which party you refer." 

****** 
MOBILE TARGET 

Have you ever wondered why bag- 
pipers always walk up and down while 
they play ? They're harder to hit when 
they're moving. 



•AMERICAN TRAILER* 

COMPANY, Inc. 

Headquarters for 

MOBILE HOMES 



LUGGAGE TRAILERS 
RENTED 



10180 WASHINGTON-BALTIMORE BLVD. 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

(IV, Miles North of U. of Md.) 

WEbster 5-5035 




Thomas E. Carroll 
& Son 

LANDSCAPE CONTRACTING 

Tree Moving 
Trees Shrubs 

Sodding Grading 

EVergreen 4-3041 

Colesville Pike, Route #3 
ROCK VILLI, MARYLAND 



THE ======== 

LORD CALVERT 
HOTEL & COTTAGES 

yoitA, J>/Luwdli^ 2(da£Jl 

Just eight miles from Washington, 
near the University of Maryland, 
you'll lind complete comfort and con- 
veniences. 

Phone WArfield 7-8324 

For Reservations 

Free TV — Free Parking 

On U. S. Highway No. 1 

7200 BALTIMORE AVENUE 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



TOWER 9-6204 

JIMMIE PORTER 

Trading as 

KIERNAN'S 

A Complete Line of Beverages 
8200 Baltimore Blvd. College Park, Md. 



MITCHELL SALES CO. 

Typewriters — Adding Machines 

Printing Calculators 
Sales — KKNTALS — Service 

5618 BALTIMORE BLVD. UNION 4-8436 

Hyattsvilie, Md. 



40 



Maryland — January-February, 1957 



Dean To Leave 

Dean S. S. (Samuel Sidney) Stein- 
berg, the man whose name is syn- 
onymous with the University of Mary- 
land's College of Engineering, signed 
a contract to become head of a 
government-operated aeronautical en- 
gineering school in Brazil. 

The dean will leave the school at 
College Park, Md. in December. 

It was understood Mr. Steinberg 
would resign from his present post 
at a meeting of the Board of Regents. 

The contract was signed by the dean 
and the Brazilian Air Attache, Brig. 
Gen. Ignacio de Loyola Daher, at the 
Embassy. 

The school he will take over is a 
civilian institution called the Techno- 
logical Institution of Aeronautics at 
Sao Jose des Campos in the State of 
Sao Paulo, Brazil, some 50 miles from 
Sao Paulo and 200 miles from Rio 
de Janeiro. 

It was started in 1950 and now 
has a student body of 500. 

It is identified with the Brazilian 
Air Force and includes research facili- 
ties, a college of engineering, a post- 
graduate school and even a lower 
school for development of technicians 
for maintenance and operation of air- 
craft and airfields. 

Mr. Steinberg called it "the MIT of 
Brazil, with a distinguished faculty 
of Brazilian professors from North 
America and from other places." 

The contract will run for four years, 
with option for renewal. 

The 65-year-old dean would have 
been required to retire at Maryland 
in another five years. He will draw 
nearly half of his pay in retirement. 

A civil engineer by trade, Mr. Stein- 
berg has become associated closely with 
aeronautical engineering through de- 
velopment of a school in that field at 
Maryland with the millions given the 
institution by the late Glenn L. Martin, 
the Baltimore airplane pioneer. Mary- 
land's aeronautical engineering school 
was accredited in 1952 and was one 
of the country's first schools to build 
a wind tunnel. 

The civil, electrical and mechanical 
engineering schools there were accredit- 
ed a year after Mr. Steinberg was 
named dean in 1936. The chemical 
engineering school was accredited in 
1942. 

Mr. Steinberg came to College Park 
in 1918 after serving in various high- 
way jobs for eight years. He was 
graduated from Copper Union School 
of Engineering in his native New 
York City in 1913. 

He became interested in Latin Ameri- 
can affairs at an early age, when he 
was with the United Fruit Co. in 
Honduras in 1913 and 1914. 

In 1945 and again in 1948 he made 
a study of all Latin American engi- 
neering schools for the Department of 
State and he was head of the United 
States delegation to the first Pan 
American Engineering Congress in 
1949. He is an honorary professor 
at most Latin American institutions 
and is an honorary member of most 
of their engineering societies. 



» FRFNTU 



through the miracle of 

LONG PLAYING RECORDS 
you can learn to speak 
SPANISH, GERMAN or ITALIAN 



• 40 LESSONS • CONVERSATION MANUAL 

• 4 L.P. RECORDS • USAGE DICTIONARY 

Q 95 SoautiQuIlL^ (Box&dL Q QS 

SET Instead of the regular $29.95 price SiT 

THE MUSIC BOX 

427 - 10th Street, N.W. Washington, D. C. 

MAIL ORDERS PROMPTLY FILLED 



STANDARD 
ENGINEERING CO, 

INCORPORATED 

Engineers and Contractors 

REpublic 7-1343 

2129 EYE STREET, NORTHWEST 

WASHINGTON 7, D. C. 



#WE SPECIALIZE IN RENTALS 



HANNES FORMAL WEAR 



TUXEDOS & FORMALS 
JUniper 9-0505 
PARKING FACILITIES 



FRRHK B. J0I1ES 

OPTICIAN 

Orcr 30 Years Experience 
Dispensing and Manufacturing] 
Modern Eye Wear 

Complete Optical Laboratory 
on Premises 

JUniper 9-8780 

\8482 FENTON ST., SILVER SPRING, MD. 



"First in Silver Spring" 

8229 GEORGIA AVE. 
SILVER SPRING, MD. 
Diagonally ncross from Suburban Trust Co. f 



IHEATING WArfield 7-8538 

PLUMBING 
REMODELING 
NOBBING A SPECIALTY 

ROBERT F. HOFF 

16313 - 46th Ave. Riverdole, Md. 



REdwood 6-7010 - 11 



JOHN A. SCHEIBEL, 
INCORPORATED 

General Contractor 

5581 BRANCH AVENUE, S.E. 

Washington 23, D. C. 



SI IIC I \«. 
PROCESS 

BOOKBINDING 

EVERY TYPE EOR EVERY PURPOSE 

A Complete Printers Finishing Service 

9401 Baltimore Blvd. COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



— SmiTH UJELDinG—* 

COMPANY 
PORTABLE EQUIPMENT 

4803 Rhode Island Ave. 
Hyattsville, Md. 



Maryland — January-Februa ry, 1 95'< 



41 



— - - - d 



§ 
B 
o: 
g 



(palaxjL 

Finest PEKING Cuisine 
in the Nation's Capital 




:o: 
B 
I 



g 
B 



:o: 
B 

:©: 



"ll'c entertain 

Daily more 

Diplomats than 

the 

White House" 



and Superb 

AMERICAN HOME 

COOKING 

INTERNATIONAL COCKTAILS 

Open Daily 11:30 to Midnight 

3524 CONN. AVE., N.W. 

At Porter Street 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Any size party 
accommodated at any time 
Reservations: EM. 2-6358 



n 

§ 
§ 

:o: 
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S 

I 
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§ 
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s>: 
:©: 
:o: 
8 
:c>: 
:o: 
:o: 
:o: 
B 
:o: 
:c>: 
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:o: 
:o: 
§ 
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^»::«:o:.<>::<<:<>::«:<^ 

49 West 

CHESAPEAKE 

Ave. 

T0WS0N 4, MD. 

VA 3-0330 

Wedding Specialists 
Floral Arrangements 

A Complete Line of 
Foliage and Blooming Plants 

Personalized Service - Always Reasonable 
■ — Flowers By Wire — 




dSeaulljrul s^iothei 

Jeanette Beck, Inc. 

DRESSES 
1016 N. CHARLES STREET 
BALTIMORE 1, MARYLAND 

TELEPHONES: 
MULBERRY 5-1445 
VERNON 7-9574 




TJtcttofltana 



//^Veck the halls with boughs of 
\J holly, : Tis the season to be 
jolly" — and jolly it's going to be. There 
are parties galore for the young and 
not so young. Our home must be decor- 
ated, and the last minute presents arc 
to be purchased as music fills the air — 
Oh, to know Santa's secret of Christ- 
mas Eve magic when he, with the 
assistance of Prancer, Dancer and Ru- 
dolph, to lead the way, travels the 
world over visting each and every 
home. Well, my fair lady, for you 
we contracted Saint Nick himself and 
found the magic answer. 



Santa suggested we call on BOB 
JONES FLORISTS, 228 N. LIBERTY 
STREET in BALTIMORE to see the 
most unusual and attractive Christmas 
decorations. There we met BENJAMIN 
SCOTTA who showed us a natural tree 
that had been sprayed by a special 
process with white snow and trimmed 
with red satin bows and red, red car- 
nations. They can be had in pale pink 
and blue, too, to blend with the color 
scheme of your room. The boxwood 
wreaths decorated with gold lame' 
fabric, tiny gold Christmas balls and 
sprayed with clear plastic, stay fresh 
and magnificient throughout the holi- 



for your 

Holiday^ JablsA, 

The Heidelbach Co. 

Complete Food Stores 

& Wine Merchants 

Catonsville - Roland Park 

BALTIMORE, MD. 




THE FASHIONABLE 

Westchester 

> DINING ROOM 

Finest Cuisine- Served graciously in quiet luxury 
Superb wine cellar. For reservations call Arnold — WOodloy 6-7700 

Cocktails In Tho Loungo" or Dining room 
thC tlOlidSy room Exquisite private accommodations 
for ten to fifty guests. 4000 CATHEDRAL AVENUE 
Free Parking for Dinner Guests from 6 to 10 P.M. IN MAIN GARAGE 



day season. While there, we saw the 
Orchid named for Gina Lollobrigida. 
Did you know it was grown in Jessup, 
Maryland? So many wonderful flow- 
ers and ornaments, we can not describe 
them all, so do visit BOB JONES. 



Our next suggestion from Mr. Claus 
was to stop in the jewelry store of 
C. J. ANDERSON, 119 W. SARATOGA 
STREET, BALTIMORE. He is one of 
the few Gem experts recognized 
throughout the world, having studied 
at the Gemmological Institute of 
America. As you enter the salon you 
are immediately attracted by the 
charming interior — ice blue walls, grey 
scalloped carpet on a black tile floor 
with wrought iron chairs covered in 
brilliant coral. Black iron chandeliers 
and sconces with crystal prisms add 
the finishing touch to a gracious set- 
ting. MR. ANDERSON is a Gem 
Analyst, identifier of precious stones, 
and a creative designer. His collection 
of Jewelry, Silver, Objets d'Art and 
unusual gifts represents his supei ior 
taste. Here you will find the problems 
on your Christmas list solved and at 
moderate prices. 

With invitations out for so many 
Christmas and New Years parties, the 
new fashions demand attention. On 
Santa's advice, we went to see WOLF 
COHN, 1220 NORTH CHARLES 
STREET, BALTIMORE, to see their 
wonderful collection of mid winter, 
cruise and southern ready-to-wear 
clothes, furs and millinery. Under one 
roof you can find coordinated styling 
in young inexpensive creations as well 
as exciting designer costumes. MR. 
WOLF COHN founded this business 
in 1895. A few years later he had the 
honor of being the recipient of the Gold 
Medal for outstanding design in 
fashions. 




42 



Maryland — January-February, 1957 



OomsjtL 



A pioneer in many ways, he was the 
first to realize that business firms 
would some day move north on Charles 
Street SO in 1915 he moved to the 
present location. Today, his daughters, 
Lee, Fannie and Ann Cohn, continue 
to carry on in the same traditional 
manner started by their father at their 
exclusive apparel salon, which is a 
favorite of Maryland Women as well 
as those of the District of Columbia. 

The Christmas spirit is felt the world 
over and the most delightful place to 
celebrate during the holidays, or at any 
time, is YENCHING PALACE, 3524 
CONNECTICUT AVENUE, WASH- 
INGTON, D. C. This charming Chinese 
restaurant was opened just two years 
ago by MR. VAN LONG. With the 
help of his manager, MR. PAUL 
DEITRICH, they have made YENCH- 
ING PALACE an outstanding success 
in a short time. 

The slogan, "We entertain more 
Diplomats daily than the White House," 
is really true. In September the Chin- 
ese people of Washington gathered 
at YENCHING PALCE to give a wel- 
come dinner for the New Chinese Am- 
bassador Hollington K. Tong and Mme. 
Tong. Their gala menu of shark fin 
soup, shrimp toast, Chinese fried chick- 
en, sliced beef steaks with Chungking 
cabbage and bamboo shoots topped off 
with moon cakes and fresh sliced 
apples, is an example of the fine North- 
ern Chinese food served here. The 
superb menu has fifteen appetizers and 
one hundred and fifty-one entrees to 



Somsdhinq. 7buv 
habu bssufL adtfaxL! 

JIMMY WU'S 
CARRY OUT 



SHOP 






Shopping Center 

Cold Spring Lane at 

Loch Raven Blvd. 

CH. 3-5253 

mm it lAJu J 

m m i 

Charles St. below 25th 
BALTIMORE 18, MD. 

BEImont 5-8744 




select from. A large cocktail lounge 
accommodates any size party. Thi 
is truly a gourmet's delight. 

ESC 

Saint Nick next advised a visil to 
WALTER VAX DURAND PHOTO 
GRAPHIC STUDIOS, whose Pittsburgh 

Studio was opened first in 1934. MR. 
VAN DURAND'S fine work led to 
quick success and in l!). - i7 an additional 
studio was started in Del Kay Beach, 
Florida, followed in 1!)40 by the WASH- 
INGTON location at 1659 WISCONSIN 
AVENUE, N. W.; in 1951 another at 
Palm Beach, Florida and in 1954 the 
South Hampton .studio opened its doors. 
MR. VAN DURAND has developed 
a special technique of color photog- 
raphy. By using color sensitized film, 
absolutely accurate flesh tones are 
reproduced in the studio for the first 
time. The distinguished clientele of 
the salon speaks for the high quality 
of work done by this organization. 
Such world famous personalities as 
Vice President and Mrs. Richard Nixon, 
the children of Benson and Henry Ford 
and Hollywood actress, Joan Fontaine, 
are numbered among those recently 
photographed. 



Furs and Clothes 
of Distinction 



XUC 



\\~ echn 



rouNOCo teas 



1220 Charles Street, North 
Baltimore, Md. 




THE 

FAVORITE 

GIFT 

) our 

ChUd'a 

Photograph 

by 

l/a n oLju ra n a 

NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE FOR HOME SITTING 
Also Direct Color Photography 

1659 WISCONSIN AVf • DE 2 8704 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 




ITIERLE nORM 

COSMETIC STUDIO 



313 N. Howard St. 
15 Alleghany Ave. 



PL. 2-5782 
VA. 5-9070 



Enjoy " demonstration of ihr three 

famous steps to natural beauty and o 

complete makeup by a trained hmnty 
consultant your* without eo*t or 
obligation. 



Gifts of Distinction • Ob jets d'Art 

• CREATIVE DESIGNS 

. PRECIDUS STONES 
• WATCHES 

TFanderson 

Graduate Gemologist, G.I. A. 
— Jeweler — 

1 19 W. SARATOGA STREET 
Baltimore 1, Md. LE 9-6342 





_^^^^ 






BEAUTIFUL 


\\&/fejS%fafoc Bob Jones 


* 




g^r Ayt/fC^cyCCf^^ JhweAA. 








228 N. Liberty St. Baltimore, Md. PL 2-3737 



CONNOR TRAVEL AGENCY 
CARIBBEAN CRUISES 



Winter Vacations In Florida 



815 N. Charles St. 



Haiti more. Md. 



VE 7-S955 



Maryland — January-February, 1957 






Jtft, 

WloUiyLand. 



Situated on a twenty-seven and one- 
half acre site at 4000 CATHEDRAL 
AVENUE, X. \V., THE WESTCHEST- 
ER is WASHINGTON'S foremost 
apartment development which is on our 
list as a "must." The beautifully land- 
scaped grounds set off perfectly the 
four buildings which comprise The 
Westchester with its 575 apartments. 

The spacious lobbies in each building 
lend charm and color to the surround- 
ings and create a delightful "first im- 
pression" as you enter. 

Brig. General Carter W. Clarke, 
U.S.A. Ret., was appointed resident 




ALWATI A pavobitii ©im 



EARLE KIRKLEY, Inc. 

3413 Greenmount Ave. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



ORIGINAL PAINTINGS 

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Since 
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At Dupont Circle Next to Riggs Bank 

1512 Connecticut Ave., N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 




GEORGE H.STIEBER CO., 

TOWSON, MD. 
FOOD SPECIALISTS 



(tfowmrL 



manager of the Westchester, (the larg- 
est cooperative hotel apartment de- 
velopment in Washington) a year and 
a half ago. An electrical engineer 
prior to his entry into the military 
service, Gen Clarke was for ten years 
public relations officer for the Army 
Signal Corps., and prior to retirement 
he was Commanding General, South- 
western Command, Armed Forces in the 
Far East, operating several ports, 
depots, hospitals and camps including 
22 Japanese resort hotels which were 
used as rest hotels and recuperation 
centers for troops returning from 
Korea. 

It has been said that one could live 
comfortably without ever leaving the 
grounds of the Westchester. A charm- 
ing dining room with its exquisite and 
exciting new Dorothy Draper decor and 
excellent cuisine is a most wonderful 
place to dine. 

Here in the beautiful Westchester 
Restaurant, the Holiday Room, which 
has been selected by the Chevaliers du 
Tastevin, and other gourmet societies, 
for their reunions and festivities, or 
in the Cocktail Lounge, in an atmos- 
phere of elegance and refinement, and 
among people of acknowledged taste, 
one can enjoy some of the finest cuisine 
prepared for connoisseurs, but moder- 
ately priced, and served graciously in 
the Continental fashion. The wine cel- 
lar is unsurpassed. 

The Chef was trained under gradu- 
ates of the world famous Paris "Tour 
d'Argent" Restaurant. The Maitre 
d'Hotel, Arnold, before joining the 
staff, catered to the exclusive clientele 
of the New York Sherry-Netherland 
Hotel, and in the English Grill at 
Rockefeller Center. 

Play areas right on the grounds are 
available for children and immediately 
adjacent to The Westchester is Glover 
Park, a lovely wooded area that will 
remain free from future construction. 

In Towson, Maryland, the excitement 
of the Yuletide season is in ele- 
gant order at GORDON, FLORIST, 
INC., 19 WEST PENNSYLVANIA 
AVENUE. The lovely individual door 
swags created by this florist are each 
a work of art. Also to help you deck 
your halls with holly, GORDON'S have 
imported English holly, both the varie- 
gated and green varieties. The little 
red and white pottery angels with frilly 
fur trim, are an inexpensive decorative 
addition to the holiday decor. The 
unusualy large inventory of center- 
pieces, tree ornaments and Christmas 
greens have been assembled from all 
over the world. 

Merry Christmas to everyone! 



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Importers 



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HO. 2-4550 12 Noon— 12:30 A.M. 



44 



Maryland — January-February, 1957 



School of 



Nursing 

Bessie M. A nun ins 
Helen E. King 



Practical Nursing (lass 

The University of Maryland has en- 
rolled fifty students in practical 
nursing in Baltimore. 

Completion of the one year program 
qualifies the student to take the exami- 
nation for a practical muse licen.se in 
Maryland. 

Practical nursing students include: 
Delores Allison, James Brown, Ernes- 
tine Campbell, Jennie Carey, Natalie 
Carter, Edith Casseta, Johnnie Chis- 
holm, Dolores Connor, Dorothy Davis, 
Thelma Davis, Gladys Evans, Marian 
Fletcher, Josephine Gallo, James Gas- 
kins, Deanna Gibson, Gladys Goodwyn, 
Shirley Holmes, Helen Hopson, Anna- 
belle Johnson, David Johnson, Mary 
Anne Johnson, Almena Joyner, Louise 
Justice, Gwendolyn Kertley, Georgi- 
anna Lee, Geneva Lucas, Amanda Mad- 
dix, Nannie McCoy, Bernice Miles, Mar- 
cella Mitchel, Jean Moore, Stella Now- 
ak, Mary Rosborough, Elamb Saunders, 
Nancy Spencer, Shirley Talbott, Eliza- 
beth Thiess, Margie Thomas, Annie 
Watson, Alice Whetstone, Effie Wil- 
liams, Betty Wilson and Diana Zemai- 
tis, all of Baltimore. 

Other Maryland students include 
Margaret James of Edgewood, Eliza- 
beth Barnes of Catonsville, Estelle 
Brown of Lutherville, Hilaria Cooper 
of Glen Burnie, and Janet Glace of 
Owings Mills. 

The class also includes Shirley Full- 
em of Rockwood, Pa., and Marian Ross- 
er of Lovettsville, Va. 

Another class is in the process of 
organization to enter in March 1957. 
Inquiries may be directed to Mrs. Ethel 
Troy, director, Division of Practical 
Nursing, School of Nursing, Univer- 
sity of Maryland, Baltimore, Md. 
In Charlotte, N. C. 
Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Christensen, are 
living in their new home at 1225 Bilt- 
more Drive, Charlotte, N. C. The Chris- 
tensen's have four children. Mrs. Chris- 
tensen was Florence Darden, '43. 
In Warwick, Va. 
Rev. and Mrs. William A. Moore, and 
two children, are residing in Warwick, 
Virginia. Rev. Moore is assistant Min- 
ister at the St. Andrews Episcopal 
Church in Warwick. Mrs. Moore was 
Betty Arthur Moore, '52. 
In California 
Mr. and Mrs. James C. Truxton, Jr. 
are residing in Fullerton, California. 
Mrs. Truxton writes, "In April, 1943, 
I entered the Army Nurse Corps, serv- 
ing there three years. Following my 
separation from the service, I attended 
school in the East. Several months 
after, I married. My husband and I 
have been working in South America. 
Mrs. Truxton was Elizabeth Clarke, 
'41. 

At Ft. Sam Houston 
Army Nurse (1st Lt.) Elizabeth A. 
Ray, '55, recently completed the Army 
Medical Service School's military orien- 
tation course at Fort Sam Houston, 
Tex. 



FLOORS 
by 

HAMMOND 

In the beautiful 

TROPHY ROOM 

in the 

ACTIVITIES BUILDING 

at the 
University of Maryland 

40,000 Square Feel of Asphalt 
Tile Flooring in grey and black 
enhance the beauty of this out- 
standing building. 

EARL H. 

HAMMOND 

COMPANY 

4315 YORK ROAD 

Baltimore 12, Md. 

BElmont 5-7791 — 5-7792 





Avoid a Headache... 

call DAVIDSON 
for safe, easy moving! 

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dean, Sanitized vans 

Baltimore BR 6-7900 
Washington TA 9-5200 



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Maryland — January-February, 1951 



45 



BALTIMORE 




DON'T GUESS 

GET -* 




CHOlC** 



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MEATS 



BALTIMORE 




Mama Emma's 



ROMA 

Nationally Famous Italian Cuisine 
in "LITTLE ITALY" 



900 FAWN ST. 
231 S. HIGH ST. 



SA. 7-8990 
LE. 9-8965 



(Two Entrances) Boltlmore, Md. 

Open Daily 11 AM. to 4 AM. 



If you cannot sell fluid milk, 
separate it and sell your cream 
to us. We will buy it year 'round. 
Write for particulars. 

Chesapeake Creameries 

INCORPORATED 
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OR CALL EDmondson 6-5300 



JJarry, S. M,icKey> 

Industrial & Commercial 

ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS 

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Phone Hilltop 4-51)0 — 4-5111 



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Secretarial - Dramatic Art and Radio 

Day and Evening 
805 N. Charles St. VE. 7-1155 

Baltimore, Md. 



The course gave her a knowledge of 
the duties and responsibilities of a 
military medical officer. 

Lieutenant Ray has received orders 
assigning her to the U. S. Army Hos- 
pital at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Ind. 



Advertising's Value 

//k A aryland", like most publica- 

fxl tions, subsists largely on in- 
come from advertising. 

Many readers look upon advertising 
as a sort of "help a good cause along". 
That's wrong. 

Advertising should be regarded ob- 
jectively on a commodity basis, i.e., so 
many dollars per inch per thousand 
paid circulation. It should be purchased 
in the same manner as a necktie or an 
automobile is acquired — as a com- 
modity. 

Advertising pays off. TV proves it 
light along, its programs made possi- 
ble by advertising. 

When one buys a tube of toothpaste 
or shaving cream it is purchased by 
name. How do you learn the name? 
Some advertising medium acquainted 
you with it. 

Not long ago the gentleman in 
charge of a lime company near Fred- 
erick said of his ad in "Maryland", 
"People come in here and say 'I saw 
your ad in "Maryland," and they buy 
lime'." 

An advertiser at Seat Pleasant ad- 
vertises a chinchilla farm. We ques- 
tioned him as to results from his ad- 
vertisement. He replied, "Don't take 
that ad out of your paper. Right now 
I'm boxing up a pair of chinchillas to 
send to an M.D. in West Virginia, a 
Maryland alumnus who saw my ad in 
"Maryland". (He then told us the cost, 
of a pair of chinchillas. It was some- 
thing like $1,000.) 

Many alumni publications refer 
editorially, to difficulty in obtaining ad- 
vertising and some of them, due to lack 
of such support publish magazines of 
much less volume than "Maryland" 
and some of them also skip publica- 
tion during the summer months. None 
of them present the volume of reading 
matter printed in "Maryland". 



Don't tell us about 
women — we mar- 
ried one of them!" . . . 
Grandpa Sweeney put 
on so many suits of 
long underwear last 
winter that he beca/me 
flap-foappy . . . We 
won't name the brave 
husband who told us quite confidently: 
"I never contradict my wife. I just wait 
a while and she contradicts herself . . ." 
J'ever notice? When a couple is sup- 
posed to go somewhere, the woman's 
first thought is "What shall I wear?" 
and the man's "How can I get out of 
going?" . . . An old-timer is anyone 
who remembers a housewife putting 
food into cans, instead of taking it out. 

— ' 




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Philosophy, Drama, Art 

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USE COUPON ON LAST PAGE 



46 



Maryland — January-February, 1957 



School of 



Pharmacy 

B. Olive Cole 
.Adele B. Ballman 



Lambda Kappa Sigma Convention 

The Fourteenth Biennial Convention 
of Lambda Kappa Sigma, Interna- 
tional Pharmaceutical Sorority, was 
held in Chicago. 

The Epsilon Chapters of Lambda 
Kappa Sigma Sorority arc active at 
the School of Pharmacy of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, both as a stu- 
dent group and as a graduate group. 

The Epsilon Chapter was organized 
ill 1929, mainly at the instigation of 
Mrs. William B. Day, the pharmacist 
wife of the then Dean of the College 
of Pharmacy, University of Illinois. 
Mrs. Day was a guest at the Biennial 
Convention. Amelia C. DeDominicis 
and Jennie Liebermann were delegates 
to the Convention from the Epsilon 
Graduate Chapter. Miss Ursula Bier- 
macher, a former member of Epsilon 
Chapter, but now affiliated with the 
Chicago Alumnae Chapter, was the 
Convention Chairman. 

The Epsilon Graduate Chapter of the 
Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority pro- 
vides annually a key which is awarded 
to the senior student selected by the 
Faculty of the School of Pharmacy, 
for outstanding proficiency in Pharm- 
acy Administration. 

The features of the Convention in- 
cluded an interesting and inspiring 
talk by Dean E. R. Series of the Col- 
lege of Pharmacy, University of Illi- 
nois; a tour of the Medical Center and 
the College of Pharmacy; entertain- 
ment at luncheon and dinner by the 
Abbott Laboratories; and the formal 
banquet, where the Efficiency Cup and 
the Efficiency Gavel were presented to 
Alpha Chapter from Boston, and the 
Alumni Chapter from Indianapolis, for 
outstanding work during the biennium. 

Miss Imogene Piper, of Indianapolis, 
was elected Grand President for 1956- 
58, and Miss Amelia C. DeDominicis of 
Baltimore was continued as Grand Edi- 
tor of the Blue and Gold Triangle, the 
Journal of the International Pharma- 
ceutical Sorority. 

From Puerto Rico 

Mrs. Alfonso Lugo of San German, 
Puerto Rico, paid a surprised visit to 
Baltimore in August. Mrs. Lugo was 
Sara Rodriquez of the Class of 1932 
at the School of Pharmacy, University 
of Maryland. With her husband, daugh- 
ter and son, they planned to visit sev- 
eral states in the United States and 
before returning to Puerto Rico, they 
were also planning on visiting Cuba. 

While in Baltimore they visited the 
School of Pharmacy and the Kelly Me- 
morial Building. 

***** ~~ * 
WARNING 

Note for pedestrians: "Be careful — 
it's hell to be a cripple." 



I 

WASHINGTON ALUMINUM CO., Inc. 

Baltimore 29, Md. • Arbutus 2700 



ALUMINUM FABRICATORS 

Our products include: 

Marine Accommodation 
Ladders 

Gangways and Hatch Covers 

Marine and Industrial Gratings 

Loading Platforms 

Industrial Gin Poles 

Stop Plates and Guides 

Pressure Vessels and Tanks 



CARTER FUEL PUMPS 

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Install a CARTER FUEL PUMP On YOUR Car 
for thousands of miles of worry-free driving . . . 

PARKS & HULL Automotive Corp. 

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THE 


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MANUFACTURERS AND PRINTERS OF ENVELOPES 

1020 WEST PRATT STREET 


CO. 




Phone 


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Itimore 23, 


Maryland 





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BALTIMORE, 


MD. 



TAZE AND HEWITT 

SALES ENGINEERS 

33 E. 21st Street - Baltimore 18, Md. 

HEATING • VENTILATING 
COOLING EQUIPMENT 

Phone: BEImont 5-5895 — 5-5896 
Ed Taze "Rip" Hewitt 



LOEWY 

DRUG CO., INC. 

manufacturing and wholesale 
druggists 

distributors of 

LILLY PHARMACEUTICALS 

daily delivery within city limits 

108 S. HANOVER STREET 
BALTIMORE 1 , MD. SA 7-6203 



Maryland — January-February, 1957 



47 



STEVENSON 

CANVAS 
PRODUCTS 

for 

Commercial, 

industrial, 

Steamship, yacht 

and Residential use 

We can also supply every 
need in Vinyl-Plastic, Rub- 
ber Coated Fabrics, Fiber- 
glas, Orion, Nylon Covers. 
Truck Covers and Tarpaulins. 



P M**' 

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Free 
Parking inside 



^Bnttscl|cs plans, <3lnc. 

1212 CATHEDRAL STREET 
Baltimore, Md. 

GERMAN SPECIALTIES 

IMPORTED BEERS & WINES 

Dinners Served from 5 p.m.-i) p.m. 

Sundays from 1 p.m. to '■< p.m. 

ALA CAKTE until 1 u.m. 

Mondays Closed 

Holli and Rooms for Private Parties, Banquets 

and Weddings — Call IE. 9-4565 

Wednesday 'til Sunday in Rathskeller 

Dance and Entertainment from p.m. 



"CLOTHES OF CHARACTER" 

EDDIE^fjACOBS 

Charles St. at Redwood 
Baltimore/ Md. 



LIBERTY RADIO & 
TELEVISION SERVICE 

HIGH FIDELITY 

Music Systems for Home and Office 

4908 PARK HEIGHTS AVE. 

Baltimore. Md. Liberty 2-9457 



IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE 

IN MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Manpower Needs 
In Pharmacy 

Qy GadimiA 9clirti&w4ki, Pk.Jb. 
School hi Pharmacy! University o/ Maryland 

(Reprinted from the Newsletter of 
the Maryland Society For Medical Re- 
search.) 
In general, opportunities are good in 
retail pharmacy, hospital pharmacy 
and in the various divisions of pharma- 
ceutical industry such as medical serv- 
ice representation (detailing), market- 
ing research and the development of 
pharmaceutical formulations. The 
branches of the Federal Government 
utilizing pharmacists in their programs 
are usually within the Veterans Ad- 
ministration, U. S. Public Health Serv- 
ice and the Food and Drug Administra- 
tion. The particular immediate require- 
ments of the health service and ad- 
ministrative branches of the Armed 
Services have been amply met. Teach- 
ers are also in demand, and here grad- 
uate degrees are prerequisites as they 
are for the more responsible positions 
in hospital pharmacy and in pharma- 
ceutical industry. In fact there has 
always been a shortage of hospital 
pharmacists in Maryland. 

Studies of manpower needs in pharm- 
acy on a nationwide basis reveal that 
the greatest demand is for retail phar- 
macists and several areas describe the 
need as acute. Pharmacy graduates 
currently are in demand to service the 
requirements of hospital pharmacies 
and professional service representation. 
In a recent poll of the deans of schools 
and colleges of pharmacy, 70% of these 
educators were of the opinion that their 
institutions were producing less than 
the optimum number of graduates. 

The opportunity picture, here in 
Maryland, shows a pattern nearly simi- 
lar to that reported for the nation. 
Opinions expressed by Mr. Francis S. 
Balassone, Chief, Drug Control of 
Maryland and Mr. Joseph Cohen, Exec- 
utive Secretary of the Maryland Phar- 
maceutical Association and the Balti- 
more Retail Druggists Association re- 
veal that there is a high demand for 
retail pharmacists. 

Terpolosophy 

ow did the fool and 
his money ever get 
together in the first 
place? . . . We often dis- 
like people not for what 
they are but for what we 
are . . . A hug is energy 
that has gone to waist , . . 
There are two big prob- 
lems before the people 
of every city today — where to park and 
where to jump . . . Sometimes the best 
inspiration is born of desperation and 
perspiration . . . You can't take it 
with you, but you can prove that you 
were a worthy custodian by leaving it 
in better hands. 




H 



S^cltmidt 6 



BLUE 

RIBBON 

BREAD 



BALTIMORE, 
MARYLAND 




Season's Greetings 

FRANKLIN UNIFORM CO. 

Uniform Satisfaction 



PHYSICIANS 


MAIDS 


DENTISTS 


WAITRESSES 


NURSES 


BEAUTICIANS 



— Stores Located — 

Baltimore - Washington 

Richmond - Norfolk 



IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE 
IN MARYLAND MAGAZINE 






48 



Maryland — January-February, 1951 



College of 



Physical Education 
Recreation & Health 



i^^^^^^^^^i Theron A. Tompkins 
Sports Ambassador 

James F. Johnson, (Physical Ed. '52), 
coach at Wethersfield High School 
in Kewanee, Illinois, has an unusual 
answer to the teacher's perennial ques- 
tion of how to spend the summer vaca- 
tion period: 

"Go abroad as a 'sports ambassa- 
dor' for the United States." 

Mr. Johnson recently returned to 
Kewanee from the heart of South 
America, where he spent three months 
working with Bolivian and Paraguayan 
athletes under auspices of the Educa- 
tional Exchange Program of the U. S. 
Department of State. 

His trip was arranged jointly by the 
U. S. Information Agency office in 
Paraguay and the local athletes and 
educational officials who had requested 
the visit. The trip was part of the 
world-wide educational exchange pro- 
gram conducted by the Department of 
State to achieve greater understanding 
and appreciation of Americans and of 
their accomplishments among foreign 
peoples. 

As part of this U. S. exchange pro- 
gram, many noted American visitors, 
among them the outstanding San Fran- 
cisco Dons basketball team, have re- 
cently toured in Latin America. 

The Kewanee coach toured the ma- 
jor cities of Bolivia for two and a half 
months, giving instructions and demon- 
strations in basketball, volleyball, and 
track and field techniques. 

In addition to these practical train- 
ing sessions, he showed sports films and 
lectured on physical education in the 
United States to overflow audiences 
several times each week. 

After his work in Boliva, Johnson 
flew to neighboring Paraguay to spend 
two weeks conducting a similar pro- 
gram with athletes in the capital city 
of Asuncion. 

Johnson, who is fluent in Spanish and 
teaches high school courses in that 
language, had the opportunity during 
his three-month tour to become ac- 
quainted with scores of persons who 
ordinarily have little contact with 
Americans, such as coaches, physical 
education teachers, sports writers, and 
sports-education officials, in addition to 
the thousands of athletes with whom 
he worked. 

Before he left Asuncion by plane to 
return to the United States, the 28- 
year-old American coach commented: 

"Of course, soccer is king here in 
South America, but the enthusiasm for 
all sports is simply incredible. I esti- 
mate that I personally contacted more 
than 30,000 persons during the course 
of my tour. And I firmly believe that 
sports is tops as a medium through 
which to further international harmony 
and understanding." 

Johnson, himself a basketball and 
track star who was named the Uni- 




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IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE IN MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Maryland — January-February, 1957 



40 



50th ANNIVERSARY 
1906 1956 




ARUNDEL FEDERAL 
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326 NORTH HOWARD STREET 
MM. 5-1990 BALTIMORE, MD. 



versity of Maryland's best athlete in 
L952, added that he was very much 
impressed by the caliber of basketball 
played in Paraguay, noting that when 
the Paraguayan champions recently 
played the San Francisco Dons in 
Asuncion, they held the visiting TJ. S. 
champions to a two-point victory, 45 
to 43. 

A graduate of the University of 
Maryland, he has also completed his 
master's degree requirements at the 
University of Illinois. Johnson, who is 
married, has coached at Kewanec 
since 1953. 

Dr. Dorothy Madden 

Mfiss Dorothy Madden, Assistant 
Professor of Physical Education, direct- 
ed a workshop in modern dance for 
students of eleven high schools in 
the vicinity of Annapolis on Saturday, 
October 27th. Mary Harrington, In- 
structor of Physical Education, as- 
sisted with the demonstration. The 
workshop was under the auspices of 
the Annapolis Senior High School 
dance group sponsored by Mrs. Pat 
Osborne, Instructor of Physical Edu- 
cation. 

Miss Dorothy Hamberg and Miss 
Jean Deyoe, Instructors, Department 
of Physical Education for Women, 
attended the annual fall conference 
of The Eastern Association of Physical 
Education of College Women held at 
Stockbridge, Massachusetts, October 
26th through the 28th. Miss Hamberg 
served as chairman of the research 
section of the Low Motor Ability Stu- 
dent, and Miss Deyoe was chairman of 
the group discussion on Methods of 
Evaluating Posture. 

Miss Florence Clapham, Instructor 
in the Department of Physical Edu- 
cation for Women, attended a clinic 
on synchronized swimming sponsored 
by the Conference for National Coop- 
eration in Aquatics held at Yale Uni- 
versity, October 25th and 26th. 
Physical Education Workshop 

Dr. Dorothy Mohr and Dr. Dorothy 
Deach, Physical Education for Women, 
attended the Workshop of the National 
Association of Physical Education for 
College Women held at Lake Geneva, 
Wisconsin. Dr. Deach was chairman 
of a workshop session devoted to the 
study of planning programs of physical 
education for college women. Dr. Mohr 
served as a discussion leader and as co- 
ordinator of discussion sessions devoted 
to movement education. She was in 
charge of recorders of all discussion 
groups and also served on the editorial 
committee publishing the report of 
the conference. 

Attends Conference 

Dr. Dorothy Deach, Physical Educa- 
tion for Women, participated in the 
National Conference on Facilities for 
Health, Physical Education and Recre- 
ation, held at Michigan State Univer- 
sity. 

Aide-De-Cainp 

Captain Claude N. Robinson (Phys. 
Ed. '51) of Washington, D. C, is aide- 
de-camp to Major Gen. Herbert B. 
Powell, new commandant of the In- 
fantry School and commander of the 
Infantry Center at Fort Benning, Ga. 




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50 



Maryland — January-February, 1957 



Attends Institute 
Dean L. M. Fraley, College of Physi- 
cal Education, has recently returned 
from South America where he attended 
the International Institute of Physi- 
cal Education at the University of 
Chile, Santiago, Chile. Dean Fraley was 
a consultant on Physical Education to 
the Inter- American Seminar on Physi- 
cal Education. He was also the only 
North American delegate present 
whereas there were '37 delegates from 
Central and South America. Dean Fra- 
ley delivered the address at the final 
session of the Institute. 



College of ^r^^-^rr^^==^= 

Special & Continuation 
Studies 

Heads Far East Program 

Dr. Augustus J. Prahl has been 
named director of the University 
of Maryland's newly established Far 
East Program with Headquarters in 
Tokyo, Japan, by President Wilson H. 
Elkins. 

Dr. Prahl, a former director of the 
Maryland Program on the other side 
of the Atlantic Ocean, brings a wealth 
of administrative and educational ex- 
perience to the Program across the 
Pacific, according to Dr. Elkins. 

Born in Koenigsberg, Germany, he 
emigrated to the United States in 1923 
at the age of twenty-two, having stud- 
ied law at the University in his native 
city. 

He received his master of arts de- 
gree five years later from Washington 
University, St. Louis, Mo., in the field 
of general literature. 

Three years later he joined the fac- 
ulty of the University of Maryland at 
College Park in the Foreign Language 
Department, and in 1949 and 1950 he 
served as the resident dean of the 
"Graduate Year Abroad" program in 
Zurich, Switzerland, a program which, 
from 1947 to 1951, enabled graduate 
students of Maryland to fulfill the resi- 
dence requirements for a Master of 
Foreign Studies degree. 

After a return to College Park from 
1950 to 1952, during which time he 
served as Acting Head of the Foreign 
Language Department in the absence 
of Dr. Adolph Zucker, Dr. Prahl di- 
rected the Overseas Program of the 
College of Special and Continuation 
Studies at Heidelberg, Germany, for 
two years. 

"This extension," said Dr. Prahl of 
the Far East Program, "is right in line 
with the spii-it of service which 
prompted the University to open its 
Program in Europe and in the North 
Atlantic in 1947 and in 1951, respective- 
ly." 

From the statement of the Comman- 
der-in-Chief of the Far Eastern Com- 
mand, Gen. Lemnitzer, it is evident 
that great hopes are attached to the 
appearance of the University of Mary- 
land here. 



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Maryland — January-February, 1957 



51 



U M" CLUB ALL-AMERICAN BANQUET 

Set For Lord Baltimore Hotel December 13, 1956 At 6:15 P. M. 



Charles Ellingcr, '37, President of the 
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tive occasion of this fine feature which 
is scheduled for the Lord Baltimore 
Hotel in Baltimore on Thursday, De- 
cember 13th, 1956. Cocktails are 
scheduled from 6:15 PM until shortly 
before the banquet time, 7:30 PM. Mr. 
Ellinger states the full evening with 
fine entertainment will cost $7.50 per 
person. Distribution is being handled 
through "M" Club members and the 
Alumni Office at Collega Park. 

Purpose of the banquet is to honor 
University of Maryland athletes who 
have been nationally recognized as All 
Americans in their respective sports 
as well as those teams which have 
brought championships to the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 

Master of Ceremonies will be Bailey 
Goss, prominent athlete and sports- 
caster. Chairman of the dinner is 
Charles E. "Buckey" Miller, '32, and the 
Program Chairman is former Presi- 
dent, Joseph Deckman, '31. 

Elected to the Maryland Athletic 
Hall of Fame each year are three living 
persons and one deceased. This recog- 
nition was introduced last year with 
Babe Ruth, Jimmy Foxx, Frank Baker 
and Robert Garrett. Those selected 
for this year are Vince Dundee, de- 
ceased; H. C. "Curley" Byrd, Ned Du- 
val and Moses Grove Plaques will be 
presented by Charles P. McCormick, 
Chairman of the Board of Regents. 

The Hall of Fame selection com- 
mittee included Chairman Deckman, 
Ellinger, Sam Silber, '36, and the follow- 
ing sports editors; Rodger H. Pippen, 
Paul Menton and Jesse Linthicum of 



the Baltimore Papers, Bob Layton of 
Cambridge, J. Suter Kegg of Cumber- 
land, Robert Wallis of Bel Air, and 
Sportscasters, Bailey Goss and Eddie 
Fenton of Baltimore. Governor Theo- 
dore R. McKeldin is honorary chairman. 

George Preston Marshall, President 
of the Washington Redskins, will be the 
principal speaker and will receive 
honorary membership in the "M" Club. 
A similar honor will be accorded Dr. 
Thurston Adams, Past President of the 
Terrapin Club and team physician for 
football. 

The All American award will be pre- 
sented by W. W. Cobey, Director of 
Athletics, while special individual 
awards will be presented by Talbot T. 
Speer, Past President of the University 
Alumni Association, and a former star 
halfback for Maryland; Charles P. Mc- 
Cormick, outstanding Baltimore indus- 
trialist; A. B. Williams, Past President 
of the "M" Club and center for the 
1917 Maryland football team. 

Distinguished honorary "M" Club 
members, many of whom are expected 
to attend, include Governor Theodore R. 
McKeldin, Mayor Thomas D'Alesandro, 
William Preston Lane, Jr., Herbert R. 
O'Connor, Congressman James P. S. 
Devereux, Col. Harvey L. Miller, Peter 
W. Chichester, William W. Cobey, 
Charles P. McCormick, Dr. George E. 
Bennett, Neil H. Swanson, Melvin H. 
Baker, Fred I. Archibald, H. A. (Bud) 
Millikan, Lansdale Sasscer, Dr. Wilson 
H. Elkins, Herbert Brown, Robinson 
Lappin, Rodger H. Pippen, Jesse Lin- 
thicum, and Paul Menton. 




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This inspiring building is one of many on 
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52 



Maryland — January-February, 1957 



United Nations Day 
Celebrated 

University of Maryland students, 
representing 43 nations, participated 
in a United Nations Day program. The 
students met in front of the Municipal 
Building in College Park by the Hags of 
their respective countries carried by lo- 
cal Boy Scouts. 

Invitations were sent to the students 
of these nations by Professor Furman 
A. Bridgers, Foreign Student Advisor. 
The daughter of the Argentinian Am- 
bassador and the son of the president 
of Burma were among the students. The 
United States was represented by Joan 
Adams, President of the Associated 
Women's' Society, and Ed Riley, presi- 
dent of the Men's League. 

Following the program at the munici- 
pal building, there was a tea honoring 
loreign students, at the old St. An- 
drew's Parish House. 



Tambo 

At Fort Jackson, S. C. 

A great year had been predicted 
for Frank Tamburello on the Maryland 
football squad before Uncle Sam 
stepped into the picture with a draft 
notice. 

Now "Tambo" is at Fort Jackson, 
South Carolina, for his basic training 
in the Army. Prior to his service call, 
Tamburello was "the" quarterback for 
the Terp eleven. 

He is 21, married, and his wife, Gina, 
is expecting a child. "Tambo" will re- 
turn to Maryland after he finishes his 
two-year tour of service. 







FRESHMAN BASKETBALL 


SCHEDULE 






FRESHMAN COACH : KOY LESTER 


December — 




1 — Virginia 


Away 


10 — St. Johns 


Home 


January — 




10 — U.S. Naval Receiving Station 


Home 


12 — George Washington 


Away 


14 — Anacostia Naval Air Station 


Home 


16 — Georgetown 


Home 


February — 




2 — George Washington 


Home 


5 — Bullis Prep 


Home 


11 — Anacostia Naval Air Station 


Away 


12 — Virginia 


Home 


16 — U.S. Naval Academy 


Away 


18 — U.S. Naval Recruiting Station 


Away 


21 — Bullis Prep 


Away 


27 — Georgetown 


Away 


(Games start at 6 :15 p.m.) 






INDOOR TRACK SCHEDULE 





HEAD COACH: JIM KEIIOE 
January — 

25 — Philadelphia Inquirer Meet 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
26 — Evening Star Games 

Washington, D. C. 
February — 

9 — Millrose A. A. New York 

16 — New York A.C. Games New York 
23 — IC-4A Games New York 

ACC Conference Meet 




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PRINTERS 
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Mwryland — January-February, 1957 



53 



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54 





^j| BLAIR FACTS 

«* TERRAPIN SPORTS 

/Ku ine tfslair 1 



The Probable Answer 



When you lose the set of keys for 
your car, you are in trouble. 
When you lose the top executive in 
your business, you face a similar prob- 
lem. When a football coach loses his 
top quarterback, he's in similar trouble. 
Without making any endeavor for an 
excuse, Coach Tommy Mont has, in 
his first year of head coaching at his 
alma mater, been retarded by what 
the top football people across the na- 
tion call the most unprecedented 
"tough luck" that any major college 
football team has experienced in many 
many years. This is just not our way of 
thinking, but it is a situation that can 
be substantiated by adult reasoning; 
the type of thought that has prompted 
the top football coaches in the country 
into sending Mont what you might 
call "condolence notes." It is with 
tongue in cheek that Mont has weath- 



SWIMMING SCHEDULE 



HKAD COACH: WII.I.IAM CAMI'HEIX 



December — 






8 — Clemson 




Home 


14— V.M.I. 




Away 


] ."> — Washington & Lee 




Away 


January — 






r> — Georgetown 




Home 


12 — Wake Forest 




Home 


18— N. C. State 




Away 


19 — North Carolina 




Away 


February — 






2 — Duke 




Away 


9 — S'outh Carolina 




Home 


13 — Virginia 




Away 


20 — Navy 




Away 


.March — 






7-8-9— ACC Meet < 


Impel 


Hill, N. C. 



60 Minute Men 




Tackle Al Wharton and fullback Fred Hamilton have been two of the Terps' 
that have been giving near 60-minute performances this season. Wharton has 
been the most consistent lineman this season each game and Hamilton has been 
the workhorse in the backfield. He has played both right halfback and fullback 
and has been used on the left side during practice to fill in for injured players. 
Wharton is a senior while Hamilton, the regular fullback last season, is a junior. 



Maryland — January-February, 1957 



ered so many unforeseen and most un- 
fortunate incidents in his efforts to give 
Teip fans another fine football team. 
The toll of key personnel losses has 
come from the selective service, sick- 
ness, yellow jaundice, and injuries. 

Let us go back to our homecoming 
game with Kentucky on November .'5 
at Byrd Stadium. The starting back- 
field was Dickie Lewis at quarterback; 
Teddy Kershner, left halfback; Jack 
Healy, right halfback; and Fred Hamil- 
ton, fullback. The Kentucky game was 
the Terps' seventh game. The above 
backfield represented the seventh dif- 
ferent starting backfield that Mont 
has had to use this season because of 
personnel injuries. Up until the Ken- 
tucky game, the same backfield hadn't 
started two games in a row. This in 
itself indicates that the coaching staff 
has had more than its share of the 
juggling act, more than at any time in 
the recent era of Maryland Football. 

Now let us go back to early in May. 
The varsity-alumni game brought to 
Byrd Stadium one of the most formid- 
able alumni groups that ever returned 
to its alma mater for the traditional 
benefit game. Going against them was 
what we considered to be another out- 
standing edition of Maryland football, 
and it was. The varsity came through 
with a tremendous exhibition and 
matched touchdowns with the alum- 
ni, losing by the pair of extra points. 
The all-pro alums said later that it 
was the best varsity eleven they had 
seen. 

Then to make a long story short, 
Mont lost the "key" to his expected 
success for 1956 when the draft board 
called his quarterback Frank Tam- 
burello. The All-America quarterback 
candidate had led the Terps to 15 
straight wins over the past one and 
half years. In the last intra-squad 
scrimmage, he lost his fine soph quar- 
terback prospect Dickie Lewis with a 
severe ankle injury. The day before 
the Syracuse opener he lost his star 
veteran right halfback Howie Dare 
who came down with yellow jaundice. 
From then on it was just one injury 
after another to his first two teams, 
the units that were to carry Maryland 
to a winning season. Without going 
into the long list of boys who have 
missed from one to six games because 
of these discouraging physical setbacks, 
in the seven games, there have been 



VARSITY WRESTLING 


SCHEDULE 


HEAD COACH 








WILLIAM E. "SULLY" 


KROUSE 


December — 








14 — Virginia 


8 


P.M. 


Home 


January — 








12 — Pittsburgh 






Away 


lfi — I'enn State 






Away 


19— N. C. State 6 


4f. 


P.M. 


Home 


February — 








2— V.M.I. 


3 


P.M. 


Home 


8 — North Carolina 






Away 


9— Wake Forest 






Away 


16 — Navy 






Away 


23— Duke 






Away 


March — 








K- 9— ACC Tournament 




Virginia 


22-23 — NCAA Tournament 




Pitt 


Bburgh 



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Maryland — Jan uary-February, 1 957 



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USE THE COUPON ON 
THE LAST PAGE 



14 of the 22 boys who have missed a 
game or games. That is what Coach 
Mont and his staff have tried to over- 
come this year with a tremendous 
schedule. Maryland will finish the sea- 
son with one of its poorest records in 
years, but there has not been a major 
college team in this era that has had 
its record dictated by these many tell- 
ing blows that have hit our '56 Terps. 
The squad itself has felt bad, for 
the University, Coach Mont and them- 
selves. One of the finest players on 
the squad the past two seasons has 
been junior halfback Jack Healy. A 
public relations major with near a B 
average recently had this to say about 
Coach Mont and the disappointing 
season. 

"One of the most important as- 
pects of a man's life is to prove to him- 
self, his family, and friends that he 
is a man. 

"Maryland's coach has worked many 
long and hard years to attain his pres- 
ent position. He didn't get the job be- 
cause of his looks, friends, or what 
have you, but he earned it by putting 
his nose to the grindstone. 

"He has been dealt every rotten card 
in the deck these past two months. He 
has been hit hard, to the point where 
most men would have folded under 
pressure. But he hasn't given in, and 
never will because he is the type of 
man that can take anything life dishes 
out. 

"Mont is our coach and we are proud 
of him. He has proven to us that he 
can take setback after setback and still 
maintain the characteristics of a true 
man. 

"The relationship between a coach and 
player cannot be explained in words. A 
coach to a player is like a father or a 
big brother. He is like the captain of 
a ship or the pastor of a parish. He is 
the one you look to for encouragement, 
knowledge, confidence, and most of all, 
the guy to guide you when the going 
gets tough. 

"The going has been tough this year, 
but our coach has. stuck with us. To 
a ball player this is a priceless quality 
to possess. So many of our modern 
day coaches across the country lack 
this feature. It is a quality that comes 
from faith . . . faith in your fellow 
human beings. 

"Coach Mont's record of wins and 
losses is not the most impressive in 
the nation this year. But he will win 
games, lots of games. He is building 
not only football players but something 
more than that. By exemplifying his 
guts and courage he is building up what, 
is known as character in a man. This 
trait is obvious and will rub off on 
his players, his family, and anyone who 
knows him. 

"While slowly walking off the field 
this past Saturday in defeat, Mont, who 
felt worse than anyone, approached 
Jack Davis. The coach put his warm 
arm around the Captain's battered 
shoulders, gave a firm squeeze, and 
gazed sincerely into Jack's eyes. 

"Jack, keep your chin up and the 
guys hustling. We'll get 'em next 
week," said our coach, and you could 
almost see a tear in a great man's eye." 



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IN MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



56 



Maryland — January-February, 1957 



(JOLF 





Coach Cronin 



By JON FILES 

"Diamondback" 

aryland's Doane Beman, 
Bill Dudley, and Ralph 
Kessler lead one of the 
most promising group 
of freshman golfers 
ever to enter the Uni- 
versity. 

These three and many others bring 
with them a large number of champion- 
ships and a vast amount of experience. 
Probably the best known golfer ever 
to start out with Coach Frank Cronin 
is Beman. He is the 
^ _ ... . , youngest linksman 

ever to qualify for 
the National Open 
tournament. Deane 
qualified in 1955 and 
also played this past 
July iii the 1956 
open. 

The honor of win- 
ning the largest ju- 
nior golf tourna- 
ment in the Middle 
Atlantic area, the 
Bobby Worsham 
tournament, fell to 
the well - rounded 
game of this young 
golfer. Deane's second place finish in 
the Western Junior golf championship 
was no mistake either. 

Sports Illustrated thought enough of 
his accomplishments to give him an 
excellent write-up in their magazine. 
Coach Cronin has nothing but praise 
for the younger of Maryland's Beman 
brothers. All this along with his nu- 
merous other achievements give us 
cause to believe that the name of the 
University will rise in golf circles in 
years to come. 

Bill Dudley is another with vast ex- 
perience that is expected to make the 
freshman team shine. His champion- 
ship golf enabled him to be a first 
flight winner in the Bobby Worsham 
tournament. 

Bruce Kessler, a former teammate of 
Beman and Dudley on the highly re- 
garded Bethesda-Chevy Chase squad, 
is known to provide plenty of tough 
competition. Another golfer from this 
area that is highly touted is John 
Owens, an outstanding linksman from 
Montgomery-Blair High School. John 
Stitt, a member of the freshman foot- 
ball squad, also plans to make his pres- 
ence known. 

The New England Junior Champion, 
Ken Johnson, and Carl Lohi-en round 
out the freshman team. Carl was a 
finalist in the Virginia Amateur cham- 
pionship. 

This year's freshman golf team has 
both the quantity and quality to make 
golf enthusiasts and Maryland oppo- 
nents sit up and take notice. Led by 
the aforementioned members, the fresh- 
men should bring to Maryland a links 
mastery for years to come. 

The outlook for this year's varsity 
squad is also very good. Seven veterans 



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return to bolster the team. With the 
McFerren brothers, Bill and Jerry, 
leading the way, this year's team hopes 
to better last season's so-so record. 

Jerry McFerren is an outstanding 
amateur golfer. He was a qualifier for 
the National Amateur championship 
and is a former Western Junior Cham- 
pion. Bill, his brother, is another 
steady performer for the varsity. 

Although the younger of the Beman 
brothers has received most of the pub- 
licity, Del Beman is not to be over- 
looked. Del was the low qualifier or 
medalist in the Middle Atlantic Ama- 
teur championship. 

Backed by the steady play of Marty 
Parks, Bob Moran, Dwight Mock, Ron- 
nie Dobbs, and Roger Coonrod, re- 
turning lettermen, the McFerren broth- 
ers and Del Beman should provide 
the Terps with the nucleus for a win- 
ning team. Fighting to break into this 
lineup will be Harry Elwell, Larry 
Burns, Bob Hogg and Bob Irelan from 
last year's freshman team. 



WRESTLING 

aryland's Wrestling 
Coach Sully Krouse is 
blessed with the great- 
est array of talent since 
he has been coach at the 
University of Mary- 
and. 

To quote Coach Krouse, "If the boys 
want to pay the price they can be the 
finest team in the history of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland." 

Led by co-captains John McHugh 

and Mike Sandusky, the Terps will be 

a formidable oppo- 

r' "j"j^" -— — — >■ nent for any wrest- 
^■W' ling squad in the na- 

tion. The team this 
year will be after an 
unprecedented fifth 
straight conference 
title. 

The Terps face 
the roughest sched- 
ule since they joined 
the Atlantic Coast 
Conference. Besides 
the usual conference 
matches, Maryland 
will meet such teams 
perennial National 
rugged Pittsburgh 





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as Penn State, 

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University. Coach Krouse believes this 

year that the University of Virginia 

will be Maryland's strongest opponent 

in the Atlantic Coast Conference. 

"Sully" thinks he has the boys to go 
all the way and the way things are 
shaping up he has every reason to be 
optimistic. Included in this years squad 
are such stars of last season as Charles 
Kerler, Berly Cohen, Ed Boxwell, Sal 
Amoto, Jerry Ogursky, and Joe Woz- 
unk. 

Some of the more outstanding mem- 
bers of this team are Ray Osborne, 123- 
lb., 2nd in Olympic tryouts; Ken Har- 
vey, National Prep School Blind Champ; 
Richard Van Aukey, and Richard Bc- 
singer, New Jersey State Champ. 



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58 



Maryland — January-February, 1957 



1956 BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 

COACH : I!. A I'.I D" MIU.IKAN 

I lecember — 

4 — Alumni Horn* 

6 — Fonlham Home 

•10 Wake Fores! Home 

•17— North Carolina Away 
28, 29, 31, Jan. 1 — All -American City 

Tournament Owenslioro, Ky. 
.hi n nary — 

•4 — Clomson A.WBJ 

•5 — South Carolina Away 

•id — Duke Home 

12 — George Washington Away 

•14- South Carolina Home 

16 — Georgetown Home 

•111 North Carolina State Home 

•31— Duke Away 
February — 

2 — George Washington Home 

*."> — North Carolina Home 

•12 — Virginia Home 

•11— Wake Forest Away 

•It! — North Carolina Slate Away 
18 — Wake Forest 

23 — Navy Away 

•2.") — Clemson Home 

27 — Georgetown Away 
March— 

7-S-i) — A.C.C. Tournament Raleigh, N.C. 



(Home games begin at 8:15 p.m.) 

•Conference game 

VARSITY RIFLE SCHEDULE 

HEAD COACH 
M/SGT. CARROLL W. OLIFF 

January — 

12 — Drexel/LaSalle Away 

19 — V.IM. Home 

February — 

2— V.M.I. Home 

9 — Navy Away 

16 — Army Away 

22— Lehigh 

23 — South Carolina Away 

March — 

2— V.P.I. Away 

8 — Yale Home 

9— Catholic U. Home 

16 — NRA Sectional Home 

23 — Wake Forest Away 




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Maryland — January-February, 195', 



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ENGAGEMENTS 



Barr — Cohen 

Toby Zelda Barr, Maryland student, 
to Howard Melvin Cohen, George 
Washington University student. 
Batchelor — Kihn 
Theresa Adrienne Batchelor, gradu- 
ate of Mt. St. Agnes Preparatory 
School, to Dr. Francis Joseph Kihn, 
Maryland alumnus. 

Benton — England 
Lynne Garland Benton, former Mary- 
land student, to Robert Arthur Eng- 
land, Georgetown University graduate. 
Brott— Hare 
Ann Carol Brott, Maryland alumna, 
to Michael Scott Hare, Colgate Uni- 
versity graduate, now serving with the 
United States Armed Forces in Ger- 
many. 

Carty — Groner 
Carol Virginia Carty, former Mary- 
land student, to William Ernest Lin- 
coln Groner, Maryland graduate stu- 
dent. 

Collins — Day 
Marjorie Ann Collins to Charles Her- 
bert Day, Maryland graduate. 
Cottman — Barringer 
Elizabeth Evans Cottman, Stratford 
College graduate, to William Allen Bar- 
ringer, Maryland student. 
Decker — Wenzel 
Clarabelle Decker, Maryland student, 
to Charles E. Wenzel, Jr., Maryland 
alumnus. 

Dickinson — Castellano 
Audrey Elizabeth Dickinson, gradu- 
ate of the St. Agnes' Hospital 
School of Nursing, to Dr. James Castel- 
lano, Jr., Maryland alumnus. 
Dudley — Rassbach 
Jean Eleanor Dudley, former Mary- 
land student, to William H. Rass- 
bach, graduate of Carnegie Institute of 
Technology. 

Eddy — Finan 
Joanne Eddy, former Maryland stu- 
dent, to John Edward Finan, Catholic 
University graduate. 

El son — Zadravec 
Katharine Ellen Elson, alumna of 
Manhattanville College of the Sacred 
Heart, Purchase, New York, to Martin 
S. Zadravec, Maryland graduate. 
Faigen — Silverman 
Eileen Faigen to Ralph Silverman, 
Maryland student. 

Folliard — Dtigan 
Patricia Mary Folliard, former Mary- 
land student, to Lt. John J. Dugan, 
U.S.A.F., graduate of Rensselaer Poly- 
technic Institute. 

Ford— Waddtll 
Marilyn Ford to Leslie C. Waddell, 



Jr., former Maryland student. 
Fox — Kobren 
Both Maryland students, Gertrude 
Anne Fox to Lawrence Kobren. 
Foxworth — Parrigin 
Laura Ellen Foxworth to Charlie 
Parrigin, Jr., former Maryland student. 
Hartman — Marshall 
Carol Virginia Hartman to Russell 
Ephraim Marshall, Jr., both Maryland 
students. 

Hobson — Imbierowicz 
Harriett Hobson to Stanley Edward 
Imbierowicz, both Maryland graduates. 
Holt — Ginnings 
Nancy Jane Holt, Maryland gradu- 
ate, to Robert Meade Ginnings, Mary- 
land student. 

Irwin — Plummer 
Janice Eve Irwin, former Maryland 
student, to William Gardner Plummer, 
University of Virginia graduate. 
Kayne — Klupt 
Sandra Fay Kayne to Gene L. Klupt, 
Maryland student. 

Lankford — Loizeaux 
Carolyn Jane Lankford, West Chester 
State Teachers College graduate, to 
Peter S. Loizeaux, Maryland alumnus, 
now attending the University of 
Georgia School of Veterinary Medicine. 
Leon — Shevitz 
Rochelle Renee Leon to Melvin Stan- 
ley Shevitz, Maryland graduate. 
Levin — Plotkin 
Rose Lynn Levin, University of 
Florida alumna, to Herbert Plotkin, 
Maryland graduate. 

Marmelstein — Hyatt 
Joyce Lydia Marmelstein, Maryland 
alumna, to Dr. Asher S. Hyatt, alum- 
nus of Queen Mary College and the 
University of London, now engaged in 
post-graduate research at the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology. 
Max — Penn 
Beverly Max to Samuel Penn, both 
Maryland students. 

Mayea — Jenks 
Annette Joy Mayea, Maryland grad- 
uate, to Dudley Adamson Jenks, Am- 
herst College; alumnus. 

Means — Edler 
Grace Joan Means, graduate of 
Pennsylvania State University, to 
George C. Edler, Maryland student. 
Padgett — Churchville 
Eleanor Elizabeth Padgett, Maryland 
graduate, to Richard Paul Churchville, 
Maryland student. 

Rasin — Hyman 
Both former Maryland students, 
Leah May Rasin to Morton L. Hyman, 
now serving in the Marine Corps. 
Raynor — Bygate 
Fahy Raynor, Maryland student, to 
Bruce Thorn Bygate, Maryland gradu- 
ate, now attending Naval Officers Can- 
dTdate School at Newport, Rhode Is- 
land. 



60 



Maryland — January-February, 1957 



Kudden — Shapiro 

Marilyn Joan Kudden, former Mary- 
land student, to Leonard Jay Shapiro, 
graduate of George Washington Uni- 
versity. 

Salganik — Frank 
Paula Salganik to Stanley Frank, 
hoth Maryland graduates. 

Sch i Id ka mp — Fitch 
Salley Elaine Schildkamp, gradual.' 
of Mercy Hospital School of Nursing, 
to Harry John Pitch, Maryland medi- 
cal student. 

Selden — Cushner 
Charlotte Parrille Selden, student at 
Towson State Teachers College, to Gil- 
bert Bernard Cushner, Maryland med- 
ical student. 

Seltzer — Vodenos 
Stella E. Seltzer, former Maryland 
student, and graduate of Towson State 
Teachers College, to Phillip Vodenos, 
Maryland alumnus. 

Smith — Jut en 
Gaye Todd Smith to Richard Mil- 
ford Jut en, both Maryland students. 
Smith — Madison 
Sally Jane Smith, Maryland student, 
to Midshipman Joseph Bruce Hunter 
Madison, member of the class of 1957 
at the United States Naval Academy. 
Stark — Madary 
Barbara Grace Stark to Charles Boyd 
Madary, both Maryland students. 
Taylor — Schaefer 
Elizabeth Jane Taylor to William 
Nicholas Schaefer .'3d, former Maryland 
student. 

Thompson — Morrison 
Anne Buchanan Thompson, Mary- 
land alumna, to James Charles Mor- 
rison, University of North Carolina 
student. 

Walder — Kouzel 
Beverly Elaine Walder, Maryland stu- 
dent, to Samuel Irwin Kouzel, George 
Washington alumnus. 

Weaver — Moore 
Stuart Tait Weaver, former Mary- 
land student, to Michael Whitman 
Moore, Virginia Polytechnic Institute 
graduate. 

Witzke — Barnes 
Eve Beth Witzke, Maryland grad- 
uate student, to Lloyd John Barnes, 
Maryland alumnus. 

Zuriff — Hotz 
Eileen Zuriff, Maryland graduate, to 
Melvin Hotz, New York University 
alumnus. 




Maryland 

MARRIAGES 



Berger — McCaffrey 

Patricia Ann McCaffrey, former stu- 
dent of the Peninsula General Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, to Robert 
Louis Berger, Maryland alumnus, now 
attending the University's law school. 
Bowie — Grace 
Rosemarie Phyllis Grace, senior 
Maryland student, to Kenneth Allen 
Bowie, former Maryland student. 
Bridgers — Dickerson 
Mae Smart Dickerson to Dr. Fur- 
man Bridgers, Advisor of Foreign Stu- 
dents. 



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Maryland — January-Feb.nary, 1957 



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Buswell — Sesso 
Joyce Marie Sesso, former Maryland 
student, to William E. Buswell, Mary- 
land student. 

Cohen — Weitz 
Marilynn Edith Weitz, Maryland 
senior, to Norman Cohen, graduate of 
George Washington University. 
Coleburn — Chesser 
Barbara Ann Huff Chesser to Rob- 
ert Warren Uoleburn, now attending 
the University's law school. 

Eigenbrode — Devilbiss 
Nancy Elaine Devilbiss to David 
Daniel Eigenbrode, both Maryland 
alumni. 

Hartsing — Morrison 
Ruth Ann Morrison, Mary Washing- 
ton graduate, to Tyler F. Hartsing, 
Jr., Maryland graduate. 

Hughes — Meredith 
Barbara Jean Meredith, former Uni- 
versity of Florida student, to Lt. Harry 
Louis Hughes, Jr., U.S.A. F., Maryland 
alumnus. 

Judd — Chambers 
Barbara Ann Chambers to James P. 
Judd, Jr., Maryland '56 graduate. 
Kirk — Howenstein 
Marilyn Howenstein, Maryland alum- 
na, to Richard Kirk, Maryland grad- 
uate. 

Knebel — King 
Both Columbia University alumni, 
Eleanor Peacock King to Lewis M. 
Knebel, Director of Placement. 
Low — Siegman 
Both Maryland graduates, Patricia 
Marian Siegman to James Patterson 
Low. 

McClosky— Lyell 
Anna Doswell Lyell, Maryland alum- 
na now attending McCoy College, to 
William Bertine McCloskey, Jr., Colum- 
bia University alumnus. 
Noah— Treat 
Priscilla Loyal Treat, Maryland 
graduate, to Lt. Max Wilbur Noah, 
U.S.A., now stationed at Pierre, South 
Dakota. 

Phillips — Fogel 
Helen Maxine Fogel, Maryland alum- 
na, to Lt. Robert Noel Phillips, grad- 
uate of the United States Naval Aca- 
demy. 

Portman — Walsh 
Catherine Theresa Walsh, graduate 
of the Katharine Gibbs School, New 
York, and former Maryland student, 
to Warren Conrad Portman, now at- 
tending the City College of New York's 
Film Institute. 

Quillin — Stelzer 
Carolyn Stelzer, Maryland alumna, 
to Edgar Clinton Quillin, graduate of 
Augusta Military Academy, now at- 
tending Maryland. 

Rice — Jar vis 
Sheila Marie Jarvis, graduate of 
Notre Dame Academy and Trinity Col- 
lege in Washington, to William Rice, 
former Maryland student. 
Roche — Roane 
Barbara Louise Roane, former Mary- 
land student, to Kenneth Charles Roche, 
Maryland graduate. 

Rudder — Cronin 
Both former Maryland students, 
Sara Hanvvay Cronin to Albert Pinck- 
ney Rudder, Jr. 



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62 



Maryland — January-February, 1957 



Rulis — de Sepulveda 

Ines de Sepulveda, daughter of Am- 
bassador and Senora de Sepulveda of 
Chile, to Lt. Robert Alexander Rulis, 
U.S.N. , Maryland graduate. 
Sanborn — Sherman 

Emilie Broom Sherman, Rucknell 
graduate, to James M. Sanborn, Mary- 
land graduate. 

Tholen — I'utman 

Margaret Anne Putman, Maryland 
alumna, to Albert David Tholen, grad- 
uate of Drexel Institute of Technology. 
Vander Bosche — Stearne 

Dolores Vee Steam, former Mary- 
land student, to Richard Poulaert Van- 
der Bosche, Maryland alumnus, now 
stationed at Fort Sam Houston, San 
Antonio, Texas. 

Wiegand — Chandler 

Alice Jane Chandler, former Mary- 
land student, to Martin Wiegand, Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania alumnus. 



O Tannenbaum 

On the Maryland campus the Me- 
morial Chapel chimes ring out 
regularly with "My Maryland." (By the 
way, that's the official title; not "Mary- 
land, My Maryland") and, as we hear 
it, we cannot help but think how that 
melody stemmed from an old German 
song in tribute to the Christmas tree. 
It went: 

O tannenbaum, o STanncnbaum, 
®ie flriin finb beine flatter, 
£u bliim'ft nicfit mir gut Sommergeit. 
9?ein audi im SBinrcr, mcnn c§ fcfrneit, 
O Jnnnenbaum, o $annwibaum, 
2Bie nriin finb bcinc flatter. 

Without the change of a note James 
R. Randall provided that ancient mel- 
ody with new lyrics 

"The despot's heel is on thy shore, 

"Maryland, my Maryland," etc., etc. 

Christmas is world wide, variously 
celebrated in one way or another. 

As we celebrate it, it is an importa- 
tion from Germany direct, as well as 
from that country via England. The 
Germans celebrated the annual visit of 
the Christ Child, aided by "Sankt 
Nickolaus," "der Weihnachtsmann" (the 
Christmas man), who erected Christ- 
mas trees and decorated them with 
baubles and candles. 

When German born Queen Victoria, 
of England, married German born 
Prince Albert, Christmas as we cele- 
brate it today began to make its ap- 
pearance in England. Thence, our pres- 
ent form of Christmas came to the 
United States, and "Sankt Nickolaus" 
became Santa Claus or Saint Nick. 

A minister in a small town in Ohio 
is credited with having erected the first 
candle studded Christmas tree in the 
United States. Townspeople threatened 
to lynch him for worshipping lights 
during the sacred Christmas season. 

****** 
ONLY HALF DIZZY 

Her: "That dance made me dizzy. 
Let's sit down." 

Him: "All right; I know a nice cor- 
ner out on the veranda." 

Her: "Thanks, but I'm not quite that 
dizzy." 




for Embassy 



for Excellence 



Now, More Than Ever Before 

EMBASSY DAIRY Products Are Distinguished 

By Quality, Purity, Superior "Goodness" 

and Embassy Dairy Service Unsurpassed By 

Any Other Call Now for Delivery of 

EMBASSY DAIRY PRODUCTS 



Washington, D. C. 



DUpont 7-1441 





Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co. 
Silver Hill Concrete Co. 




Phone 

for 

CONCRETE 

RE 

6-8400 


Producers and Distributors of 

WASHED SAND & GRAVEL 
TOP SOIL . ROAD GRAVEL 
READY-MIXED CONCRETE 


Phone 

for 
SAND A 
GRAVEL 

RE 
6-7100 






WASHINGTON 20, D. C. 





DRINK 



Wfe 



COFFEE 



NATIONAL EQUIPMENT & SUPPLY CO Inc. 


Link Belt Company 


"Pyrene" & 


"MSA" Industrial 


Power Transmission • 


"CO-TWO" • 


Gas Masks. Canisters 


Supplies 


Fire Extinguishers 


& First Aid Equipment 


2600 12th STREET, N.E. 


WASHINGTON IS, D. C. 


LAwrenco 6-1362 



Maryland — January-February, 1957 



63 




ENJOY THE BEST IN 

SEAFOOD 

STEAKS & CHOPS 

O'DONNELL'S 

Downtown Washington 

1221-1207 E STREET, N.W. 

Bethesda, Maryland 

8301 WISCONSIN AVE. 



THE 

HENRY B. GILPIN 

COMPANY 

Wholesale Druggists 
for over 100 years 

WASHINGTON 3, D. C. 

BALTIMORE 6, MD. 

NORFOLK 10, V A. 



* Hotel 

HEDIN HOUSE 

WASHINGTON'S NEWEST HOTEL 

Nearest the University 

■hint three miles away and two 
blocks within the District line. 



Completely Air-Conditioned 
l'bone 2902 Nbwton St., N.B. 

ADams 4 0000 (at R.I. Ave.) 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

I Make Your Reservations Early 



American Disinfectant Co. 

Pest Control Service 
928 EYE STREET, N.W. 

Washington 1, D. C. NAtional 8-6478 




Dr. and Mrs. Don N. Brotman (D.D. 
S. '55), announce the birth of a 
bouncing baby boy, named Solomon 
George after his grandfather who grad- 
uated from the University of Mary- 
land School of Pharmacy in the class 
of 1923. 

New Twin Models 

Major and Mrs. Walter Zaharevitz 
(Mil. Sci. '53) are mighty proud of 
their twin images, born at Limestone, 
Maine. Masters Raymond John and 
and Walter Bruce were doing fine at 
last report. 

School Of Nursing Births 

To Mrs. Thomas Reed Johnson and 
the late Mr. Thomas Reed Johnson, 
a daughter, Katherine Reed. Mrs. John- 
son was Carolyn Jane Ward, '45. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Wm. J. Kerger, 
Jr., a daughter, June Gilvane. Mrs. 
Kerger was Brunehilda G o n d i n a 
Oliveira, '48. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Maivin Teffeau, a 
son, William Wells, on June 24, 1956. 
Mrs. Teffeau was Shirley (Brown) 
Teffeau, '55. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Joseph J. Piala, a 
son, Jack Maxwell. Mrs. Piala was 
Madelon Maxwell, '45. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Jerry Cohn, a son, 
Jeff. The Cohns have a two and a 
half year old son, Mark. Mrs. Cohn 
was Jean Waters, '48. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Monroe E. Fraleigh, 
a daughter, Donna Ellon. Mrs. Fra- 
leigh, was Dorothea Fenwick, '53. Mrs. 
Fraleigh writes, "Donna joined our 
family to make us four. Peter enjoys 
his new baby sitter very much." 

To Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd E. Windsor, 
a daughter, Rebecca Jeanne. Mrs. 
Windsor was Jeanne Rowe Snyder, '50. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Wm. C. Wroe, a 
son, Nortin Paul. Mrs. Wroe was Edith 
E. Viereck, '50. 

To Mr. and Mrs. John J. Hojnowski, 
a daughter, Adele Freda. Mrs. Hojnow- 
ski was Ellen Stumpf, '47. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Martin H. Stephen, 
a daughter, Marsha Mae. Mrs. Stephan 
was Dorothy E. Kidd, '47. 

To Mrs. George H. Smith and the 
late Dr. George H. Smith, a daughter, 
Terry Lee. Mrs. Smith was Patricia 
(Robinson) Smith, '53. 

To Mr. and Mrs. .Tohn B. Walker, a 
son, John William. Mrs. Walker was 
Catherine C. Nonamaker, '52. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Raymond F. Pu- 
laski, a daughter, Jo Ann. Mrs. Pu- 
laski was Betty Jane Roughton, '47. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Frederick K. Tesher, 
a son, Lawrence Kurt. Mrs. Tesher 
was Helen W. Hergert, '56. 



CONFIDENTIAL 

"I can't hear you, dear," said the 
mother as the tiny terpette whispered 
her good night prayer. 

"I wasn't talking to you," replied 
the tiny terpette. 



Wm. H. Singleton 

COMPANY, INC. 



Heating 

Ventilating 

Plumbing 

Air Conditioning 



Power Plants 
Process Piping 
Welded Piping Systems 
Automatic Sprinkler 
Systems 



1 240 Jefferson Davis Hwy. 

ARLINGTON, VA. 

RICHMOND, VA. 




. . . the complete 
Floor Covering Institute 

• Rugs • Asphalt Tile 

• Carpet • Rug Cleaning 

• Linoleum • Repairing 

Everything in Floor Cover- 
ings featuring the Best in 
Service and Materials 

1500 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE, N.E. 



Washington, D. C. 



HU 3-8700 



PLYMOUTH ELECTRIC 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 

INCORPORATED 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 



SUNTILE 

A genuine Clay Tile 

Burnproof - Waterproof - Colorfast 
Call your SUNTILE Dealer at NO. 7-1725 

VICK TILE CO. 



1909 M St., N.W. 



Washington, D. C. 



64 



Maryland — January-February, 1951 



Jlaryland 

OBITUARIES 



John F. Aubrey 

John Forsyth Aubrey, an Army doc- 
tor who solved in both World Wars 
and a sanitation officer during the con- 
struction of the Panama ('anal, died at 
Mount Alto Hospital after a long ill- 
ness. 

Dr. Aubrey was the son of the lat< 
.Indue William Aubrey of San Antonio. 
His grandfather, John Forsyth, was a 
former governor of Georgia and served 
as secretary of state under Presidents 
Martin Van Buren and Andrew Jackson. 
Dr. Aubrey was born in Lynchburg, 
Va. He attended the University of Tex- 
as and Johns Hopkins University and 
received his medical degree from the 
University of Maryland. He lived in 
Baltimore for 30 years and served as 
surgeon at the Maryland State Peni- 
tentiary. He also was a member of the 
Baltimore Board of Education. 

Dr. Aubrey served as medical officer 
with the 29th Division during World 
War I and was a surgeon at the Phil- 
adelphia Signal Depot during World 
War II. 

He was a member of Baltimore Med- 
ical Society, the American Medical So- 
ciety, the Military College of Surgeons, 
the Panama Canal Society, the Veter- 
ans of Foreign Wars and the American 
Legion. 

Robert E. Allen 
Dr. Robert E. Allen, '08 (U. of Md.), 
of Jacksonville, Fla., died on July 8. 
A native of East Bend, N. C, where 
he was born on June 19, 1887, Dr. Allen 
had practiced in Jacksonville since 
1926. Previously he had practiced in 
Charlottesville, Va. (1808-10) and 
Staunton, Va. (1910-26). Dr. Allen at- 
tended the Dewey School of Ortho- 
dontia in 1930 and since then had lim- 
ited his practice to orthodontia. He was 
a member of Psi Omega. 

Roman C. Steigerwald 
Dr. Roman C. Steigerwald '07 (B.C. 
D.S.). of Tamoa, Fla., died on June 
10. Dr. Steigerwald had practiced in 
his native Johnstown, Pa., before re- 
moving to Tampa in 1911. He was a 
member of Xi Psi Phi. A daughter, 
Mrs. Louise S. Shelton of Tampa, sur- 
vives him. 

Mann R. P. Lee 
Dr. Mann Randolph Page Lee, '00 
(B.M.C.), of Berry ville, Va., died on 
March 21. Born in Clarke County, Va., 
on May 5, 1822, Dr. Lee had practiced 
in Washington, D.C. and Norfolk, Va., 
prior to coming to Berryville in 1924. 
In 1921 he took a post-graduate course 
in prothetics at the University of Min- 
nesota, following which he emphasized 
prosthetic work in his practice. Dr. 
Lee is survived by his widow. 
Lester C. Couch 
Dr. Lester Clay Couch, '12 (B.C.D.S.), 
died on September 3, 1953. Bom in 
Iredell County, N. C. on April 13, 1887, 
Dr. Couch spent his entire professional 
career in Elkin, N. C. 



FRANCIS & PARSONS, Inc. 

Exclusive S. /:'. Dodge Plymouth Deolei 
Dodge Job Rated Trucks 

SALES & SERVICE 
GUARANTEED USED CARS 

2100 NICHOLS AVE., S.E. — ANACOSTIA, I). ( . 

"We're Easy to Deal With" 
LU 4-7400 Used Care— LU 4-2880 



r 



"> 



Johnston, Lemon & Co 

MEMBER PHILADELPHIA BALTIMORE STOCK EXCHANGE 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES 



SOUTHERN BUILDING 

Washington 5, D. C. 

STerling 3-3130 



IIS N. ST. ASAPH 

Alexandria, Va. 

King 8 6600 



NORTH WASHINGTON PRESS, inc. 
£fflicwt£ (p hinting Ssuwicsl 

Phone TAylor 9-3932 849 Upshur St., N.W. 

WASHINGTON 11, D. C. 



MOSES-ECCO CO., Inc 

(AFFILIATED WITH S. D. MOSES, INC.) 

CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION 



823 MILLS BUILDING 
WASHINGTON 6, D. C. 

National 8-8586 



(f^ 


BERCMANN S LAUNDRY 


\ "* • 


"Become Quality, G&nddxMA" 




PLANT: 621-27 G STREET, N.W. REpublic 7-J400 


• . 


WASHINGTON, D. C. 


BRANCH OFFICE: HYATTSVILIE, MD. WArfleld 7-0810 

■- ■ " ' 



IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE IN MARYLAND MACAZINE 



Maryland — January-Febi'uary, 1957 



65 




WASHINGTON'S 

ONLY 

"DRIVE THRU" 

LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANERS 
Where You Save Up To 20% 

Drive In 

Hand In Your Bundle 

Drive Out 

QUICK SERVICE 

LAUNDRY, DRY CLEANERS 

1016 Blodensburg Road, N.E. 

Washington, D. C. 

(Across from Sears-Roebuck) 



"EVERYTHING IN MILLWORK" 


STOCK 


& SPECIAL 


For Builders 


and Home Owners 


DOORS 


MANTELS 


SASH 


FRONT ENTRANCES 


FRAMES 


SLIDING DOOR UNITS 


BLINDS 


DISAPPEARING STAIRWAYS 


PLYWOOD 


KITCHEN CABINETS 


MOULDINGS 


STAIR MATERIAL 


PANELING 


CORNER CABINETS 


LAMAR 


& WALLACE 


37 New York A 


venue, N.E. ME 8-4126 


Washington 2, D. C. 



LOVELESS ELECTRIC CO., Inc. 
£ju2Jci/ucaL QtyniJiadbfUL 

5207 COLORADO AVENUE, N.W. 
WASHINGTON 11, D. C. 

Phone RAndolph 3-4257 



IMPORTERS 
WHOLESALE-RETAIL 



EMERSON 2-2732 



ANTIQUES 
Penny's Treasure Chest 

Formerly of Berlin, Germany 
2311 Wisconsin Ave., N.W. Washington 7, D.C. 

Fine Meissen — Dresden — Porcelains — Ivories 
Figurines — Colored Stemware — Brlc-a-Brac 



Bon Ton 

SARATOGA CHIPS 

distributed by 

BON TON SARATOGA 

CHIP DISTRIBUTORS 

Reor— 1229 D St., S.E. 

LI. 3-484S Washington 




Wilfred F. White 

Wilfred F. White, 56, former man- 
ager of Westinghouse Lighting Divi- 
sion in Cleveland, and a native of Wash- 
ington, died in Cleveland. 

Mr. White was educated in District 
schools and attended the University of 
Maryland. He went to work for West- 
inghouse in Cleveland in 1930. During 
the 1930s, he served as chairman of 
the Cleveland section of the Illuminat- 
ing Engineering Society and was re- 
sponsible for much of the design and 
engineering of lighting at the Great 
Lakes Exposition and the New York 
World's Fair. 

He resigned from Westinghouse after 
the war and most recently was associ- 
ated with the Jones Metal Products Co. 
of West Lafayette, Ohio. 

Alexander Goodman 
Alexander Goodman, 54, Baltimore 
lawyer and national executive secretary 
of Phi Alpha Fraternity for the last 
30 years, died in Union Memorial Hos- 
pital, Baltimore. 

Mr. Goodman had attended the 
annual national convention of his fra- 
ternitv. before his death. He was 
formerly supreme grand regent of the 
fraternity. 

Mr. Goodman, who visited Washing- 
ton chapters of Phi Alpha frequently, 
was formerly secretary to Baltimore 
Mayor James H. Preston, a police mag- 
istrate and a member of the General 
Assembly. He lectured on law at the 
University of Batimore in the 1930s. 
A native of Baltimore. Mr. Goodman 
was graduated from Baltimore City 
College and the University of Mary- 
land Law School. 

Charles T. Fisher 
Dr. Charles T. Fisher, physician since 
1920, died after being in poor health for 
several months. He celebrated his 77th 
birthdav recently in Peninsula General 
Hospital where he had been a patient. 
Dr. Fisher was born and raised in 
the Princess Anne area. After his grad- 
uation from the University of Maryland 
M»diVa] School in 1901. and two and 
a half years of internship, he returned 
to Princess Anne to set up practice. 
Durintr his internship, he spent a winter 
abroad at the University of Munich. 

He practiced in his home town for 
18 years and throughout his life liked 
to recall those early days when his 
calls were made by horse and buggy, 
oft.on pyViqntstine: all four of his horses 
making the rounds of the countryside. 
Tn 1918. Dr. Fisher went to Baltimore 
to work with Drs. Thomas Cullen and 
Howard A. Kelly. After a year, he 
was appointed superintendent of the 
Maryland General Hospital in that city. 
He married the former Miss Ellen 
McMaster of Princess Anne in 1929 
and retnrnpd to the Eastern Shore se- 
lecting Salisbury as his home and for 
his practice because he liked small 
rural towns. 

He served as chief surgeon at Pen- 
insula General Hospital for 10 years. 
He continued his practice here until 
earlier this year when because of his 
illness he was forced to retire. 
Howard F. Lamborn 
Ensign Howard F. Lambom III, 25, 



fuller 8c h'^lbert 



INCORPORATED 



SUPPLYING 

EVERY 
PHOTOGRAPHIC 

NEED 



Since 



1920 



f 



Phone — Executive 3-8120 

815 TENTH STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



WESTERN 
EXTERMINATING CO. 

TERMITE CONTROL 
Safe • Efficient - Economical 

Providing Protection from Insects and 
Rodents Destroying Fabric, Wood, Food 
FREE INSPECTION WITHOUT OBLIGATION 

4904 WISCONSIN AVE., N.W. 

WASHINGTON 16, D. C. 

EMerson 3-9660 



• REFRIGERATION SUPPLY CO., Inc.* 

WHOLESALE ONLY 

1612 FOURTEENTH ST., N.W. 

Complete — 

AIR CONDITIONING, REFRIGERATION, 
PARTS AND SUPPLIES 

Serving — 

THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, MARYLAND, 
VIRGINIA AND WEST VIRGINIA 
Member A.R.W. 

HO. 2-2600 

# WASHINGTON 9, D. C. • 



Charles F. King Corp, 

Registered Plumber 

1620 2nd Street, S.W. 
Washington 24, D. C. 



CHESTNUT FARMS 
DAIRY 

ADams 2-1011 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



IT PAYS TO ADVERTISE 
IN MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



66 



Maryland — January -February, 195 



an insurance salesman here until he 
went on duty with the Navy, was 
killed when his training plane crashed 
at Saufley Field, Pensacola, Fla. 

Ensign Lamborn was the son of Mr. 
;md Mrs. Howard F. Lamborn, Jr., 22(). r > 
Washington Avenue, Silver Spring, Md. 
Mr. Lamborn is a research analyst with 
the Army Map Service. 

Linton W. Mason 

Linton William Mason, 64, retired 
transfer company official and an author- 
ity on the trucking industry, died 
at Arlington Hospital of a heart con- 
dition. He lived at 108 East Rosemary 
Lane, Falls Church, Va. 

Mr. Mason was author of the book 
"Local Trucking". 

Born in Riva, Va., Mr. Mason went 
to public schools in Culpeper, Va., and 
studied law at the University of Mary- 
land. He worked for a short time for 
the Culpeper National Bank. He began 
his transportation career in 1913 in 
Raltimore with the old New York-Bal- 
timore Transportation Co. 

In 1814, Mr. Mason became a book- 
keeper with the Jacobs Transfer Co., 
and when he retired in March, 1949, he 
was secretary-treasurer of that com- 
pany as well as the Jacobs Transfer 
Co. of Baltimore. 

Kyran F. Powell 

Col. Kyran F. Powell, 41, assigned to 
the office of the chief signal officer at 
the Pentagon since 1955, died in Walter 
Reed Hospital, where he had been a 
patient since May, 1956. He lived in 
Falls Church, Va. 

Col. Powell was born in Brooklyn, 
N. Y., and studied at the University of 
Maryland. He was a business repre- 
sentative for Consolidated Edison Co. 
and formerly was an enlisted man in 
the Army. 

In 1942, he was commissioned in the 
Regular Army. During World War II, 
he was in the China-Burma-India the- 
ater and later was with European Oc- 
cupation forces. From 1953 to 1955, he 
was in Korea. He received the Bronze 
Star medal and Commendation Ribbon. 

William A. Randall 

William A. Randall, 49, Director of 
Research of the Division of Antibiotics 
of the Food and Drug Administration, 
died at the Washington Sanitarium in 
Takoma Park. 

A native of Washington, he lived in 
Indian Spring Village, Md. 

His collaborative report on anti- 
biotics in feeds was to have been de- 
livered at the Association of Official 
Agricultural Chemists convention at the 
Shoreham Hotel. He also was sched- 
uled to moderate a panel discussion on 
antibiotics as food preservatives at the 
Fourth Annual Symposium on Anti- 
biotics which was held at the Willard 
on October 19, 1956. 

He taught bacteriology at the 
Georgetown University Medical School 
for 10 years and became an associate 
professor there in 1940. He joined the 
staff of the Food and Drug Adminis- 
tration in 1942, becoming director of 
research for the division of antibiotics 
when it was established in 1945. 



STANLEV COAI 



HEATS THE 



University of Maryland 



STANLEY COAL CO 

WHOLESALE and RETAIL 



Crellin 



Maryland 



RIVERVIEW COURTS 

On U. S. Route 50 — North of the Choptank River Bridge 
Opposite Cambridge, Maryland 



MAILING ADDRESS: 
TRAPPE, MARYLAND 



TELEPHONE: 
CAMBRIDGE 1903 



Television, Radios and Playground Available 

. LANDSCAPED GROUNDS 

. BACK FROM THE ROAD 

HUNTING, FISHING & SWIMMING AVAILABLE 



In Montgomery County 

Farmers Supply 




McCoi mick-Deering Farm 
Equipment 

GAITHERSBURG, MD. GAITHERSBURG 777 



GOBBLE GREEN 



FANCY | 
TURKEYS f 



Premium Grade - Milk Fed 

Frozen (Eviscerated) 

Broad Breast Bronze 

Howard C. Taylor 

EASTON 869-J EASTON, MD. 




J. MeKcnny Willis & Son. ■"«• 



GRAIN 

FEED 

SEED 



EASTOX. 31 D. 

Phone 744 



Maryland — January -February, 1957 



67 



Country dining with "Old 
World Charm" . . . 

POTOMAC, MARYLAND 

OL 2-9421 




Authentic Pennsylvania Dutch 

(Ocdtsuc %aisL Qjtul 

On the Potomac at F 

Dl 7-9256 



Open every day of the year 

Luncheon — Cocktails — Dinner 



PARK 
TRANSFER 
COMPANY 

Heavy Hauling 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 
NOrth 7-5753 



SOUTHEAST TITLE CORP. 



Chas. T. CLAYTON, President 
25 Years Experience 
COMPLETE SERVICE 

Washington, D. C. & Maryland 

Settlement* - Uncrown 

Ural Estate Vlxaminations 

and Title Insurance 

1343 Good Hope Rd., S.E., Washington, D.C. 
LUdlow 1-3200 



EDWIN E. ELLETT 

MARBLE and TILE 
Table Tops - Cutting 
Polishing - Repairing 

1100 9th STREET, N.W. CO 5-8731 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Paul E. Carliner 
Dr. Paul E. Carliner, assistant in 
medicine at the Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity School of Medicine, who was co- 
developer of dramamine, a drug to end 
motion sickness, died recently. 

The 46-year-old physician and re- 
search scientist had almost completed 
a new method for the administration of 
drugs at the time of his death. 

Dr. Carliner was a staff member of 
the Johns Hopkins Hospital allergy 
clinic and was also a staff member of 
University and Sinai hospitals. 

He suffered a heart attack Wednes- 
day during a dinner party at his home, 
2217 South road, and died of a coronary 
condition at 10 A.M. yesterday at Johns 
Hopkins Hospital. 

It was in 1949 that Dr. Carliner, to- 
gether with his colleague, Dr. Leslie N. 
Gay, made the announcement that a 
cure and a preventive for motion sick- 
ness was perfected. 

The drug, dramamine, was tested by 
Drs. Carliner and Gay on 1,376 service 
men aboard the army transport Gen- 
eral Ballou on a rough Atlantic crossing 
from New York to Bremerhaven in De- 
cember, 1948. 

At the time, the experiment was so 
successful, it was called a "miracle of 
medicine." Since then, the di-ug has 
been marketed commercially in pill 
form for the general public. 

Dramamine has also been used suc- 
cessfully in relieving morning sickness 
of pregnant women and to relieve nau- 
sea of patients given morphine and 
other pain-killing drugs. 

Dr. Carliner's current work, in the 
administration of drugs, would permit 
a fixed quantitv to be taken bv use of 
a sunpositorv. This would eliminate the 
need for a doctor to administer hypo- 
dermics. 

The fixed quantity contained in a 
plastic suppository would prevent ex- 
cess dosage. 

Friends of Dr. Carliner have said he 
never accepted any compensation for 
his medical developments. "It was mce 
important to him that the interests of 
humanity be served through his contri- 
bution to science," a colleague ex- 
p 1 pined. 

This public service was also exemp- 
lified in the organization of a program 
two years atro by Dr. Carliner to insure 
the availability of a doctor for anyone 
on a twenty-four hour basis. 

Word to the Police Department 
would immediately bring a doctor to 
tb« caller for any medical service. 

D>\ Carliner was medical director for 
the State Employment Commission and 
supervised a staff of physicians in each 
of the 23 counties to examine State em- 
plovees. 

He interned and was a resident phy- 
sician at Sinai Hospital. Dr. Carliner 
was a member of the Baltimore City 
Medical Society, the Medical and 
Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland and 
the American Academy of Allergies. 



JACK BLANK 

Invites You To 



SEE IT NOW! 
1957 
PONTIAC_ 

New Beauty! 
New Power! 
New Performance! 



Arcade^ 
Pontiac 



ADAMS 4-8500 
1437 IRVING ST., N.W. 

WASHINGTON'S LARGEST 
PONTIAC DEALER 



W. R. WINSLOW 
COMPANY 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

For Paints 

ir 7514 Wisconsin Ave., N.W. 

Oliver 4-4100 
*922 New York Ave., N.W. 

NAtional 8-8G10 

* 3754 Minnesota Ave., N.E. 

LUdlow 1-0750 

* 5418 Queens Chapel Rd., Hyatts. 

WArfield 7-2222 
■fc 8211 Georgia Ave., Silver Spring 

JUnlper 0-2284 
*5307 Baltimore Ave., Hyattsville i 

WArfield 7-1180 

* 3211 N. 10th St., Arlington 

JAckson 5-7878 

* 1239 Wisconsin Ave., N.W. 
ADams 2-0007 



J. NICHOLS 

— WHOLESALE — 

FANCY 
FRUITS & 
PRODUCE 

Lincoln 7-4888 

UNION MARKET TERMINAL 

1278 5th St., N.E. Washington 



68 



Maryland — January -February, 1 957 



His energies did not end with work 
in the medical field. 

He was president of the Parent- 
Teachers Association of the Mount 
Washington School, president of the 
Hebrew Immigrant Orphan Aid Pro- 
gram, and vice president of the Beth 
Kl I Jongregation. 

In World War II he served in the 
Medical Corps as a captain in the 80th 
Division in the European theater, and 
was in the "Battle of the Bulge" in 
December, 1944. 

He was a graduate of the University 
of Maryland School of Pharmacy in 
1929 and of the University of Maryland 
Medical School in 1934. 

Joseph \V . Shirley, Jr. 

Joseph Wnuney Slurley, Jr., a gentle- 
man farmer and Maryland State Fair 
official, died at his (hartley farm near 
iteisterstown. He was 51. 

The death spread gloom among offi- 
cials, employees and exhibitors at the 
lair, which Mr. Shirley had served as 
a member of the board of directors and 
as superintendent of tne draft horse 
department for many years. 

Deatn came to Mr. Shirley as he 
slept, only a lew hours before he was 
to nave shown his pure-bred Clydes- 
uale dial't horses in 12 classes of com- 
petition at the State Fair. 

A native of Baltimore, Mr. Shirley 
attended Pennsylvania Military Aca- 
demy and was graduated from the Uni- 
versity of Maryland College of Law. 
He resigned the practice of law two 
years ago to give his full attention to 
farming. 

The Clydesdales he raised on his 
360-acre farm were a hobby. Cattle 
were his business. 

A friendly, colorful man who always 
wore a Stetson hat, he was a familiar 
figure at the lair and the Eastern Na- 
tional Livestock Show. Until two years 
ago, nr served as manager of the East- 
ern National and at his death was vice- 
president. 

Mr. Shirley had exhibited at the 
State Fair since he was 10. He boasted 
he had never missed a fair or Eastern 
National. 

Recently he sold Chartley Farm and 
purchased a larger farm in Carroll 
County between Taneytown and West- 
minster. The family planned to move 
in October. Chartley Farm was a Mary- 
land showplace. 

William J. Warnock 

Dr. William Joseph Warnock, '89 (U. 
of Md.), of El Paso, Texas, died on 
August 21. The ninety-year-old dean 
of El Paso dentists had practiced there 
from 1904 till shortly before his death. 
A native of Whitman, Ga., Dr. Warnock 
attended Vanderbilt University before 
coming to Maryland. He is survived by 
his widow, Mrs. Josephine C. Warnock; 
a daughter, Mrs. Leola Freeman, of 
El Paso; and two sons, W. Sheley and 
Francis J. Warnock, both of El Paso. 
Harvey U. Yeater 

Dr. Harvey Upton Yeater, '18, (U. of 
Md.), of Hagerstown, Md., died on 
August 28. A native of Cameron, W. 
Va., Yeater had practiced in Hagers- 
town since 1924. He was a member of 



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USE THE COUPON ON 
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Maryland — January-February, 1957 



69 



THE 

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Phi Sigma Kappa, Psi Omega and the 
Gorgas Odontological Society. Dr. 
Yeater is survived by his wife, Mrs. 
Ruth (Jenkins) Yeater; three brothers, 
Texan, of Barnesville, Ohio, and Kermit 
and Lester, both of Cameron, W. Va.; 
and three sisters, Mrs. Dessie King, of 
Cameron, and Miss Mayne Yeater and 
Miss Pearl Yeater, of Cleveland, Ohio. 

Francis P. Laflin 
Dr. Francis Philip Laffin, '14 (B.C. 
D.S.), of Ellsworth, Maine, died on 
October 1. Dr. Laffin had practiced in 
Ellsworth since 1915. Active in many 
civic projects he was particularly in- 
terested in the work of the American 
Red Cross and the Boy Scouts. His long 
record of service to the latter organiza- 
tion earned for him the Silver Beaver 
award. He had also served as presi- 
dent of the Luncheon Club, secretary of 
the Chamber of Commerce and director 
of the Ellsworth Loan and Building 
Association. Dr. Laffin is survived by 
his wife, Mrs. Laverna Scribner Laffin; 
a daughter, Mrs. George F. Mahoney, 
of Readfield; and a son, Charles A. 
Laffin, of Ellsworth. 

Ralph M. Whitney 

Dr. Ralph Milton Whitney, '03 (U. 
of Md.), of Westbrook, Me., died on 
April 8. Born in Gorham, Me., on Sep- 
tember 14, 1878, Dr. Whitney had 
practiced in Westbrook from 1903 till 
his retirement in 1950. He was a chart- 
er member of the Westbrook Kiwanis 
Club and had been awarded a 50-year 
medal by the Harmony Lodge of Ma- 
sons. He was also a member of Psi 
Omega. Dr. Whitney is survived by 
his widow, Mrs. Mildred Stevens Whit- 
ney. 

Albert Lapow 

Dr. Albert Lapow, '30, of Somerville, 
N. J., died on February 26. Born in 
Newark on December 1, 1908, Dr. La- 
pow had practiced in Newark prior to 
his entering the service in July, 1942 
and in Somerville following his separa- 
tion in March 1946. His Army Dental 
Corps record included service in Rome, 
Arno, Southern France, Rhineland, 
and Po Valley and on the Hospital 
Ship Platoon. He was separated with 
the rank of Captain. Dr. Lapow is sur- 
vived by his wife, Mrs. Jeanette L. 
Lapow, and a three-year old daughter, 
Cheryl Betsy. 

James R. Meador 

Dr. James Raine Meador, '06 (U. of 
Md.), died on July 19 while vacationing 
at Winter Park, Fla. Born in Rocking- 
ham County on December 20, 1882, 
Dr. Meador had practiced in Reidsville, 
N. C, till his retirement in 1955. He is 
survived by his wife, Mrs. Eleanor 
Wheeler Meador; an adopted daughter, 
Mrs. Joe Roberts of Reidsville; a broth- 
er, Fife Meador of Greensboro; and 
two sisters, Miss Mae Meador of High 
Point and Mrs. M. T. Owen of Spencer. 

Howard Barr Winant 
Howard Barr Winant, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Soils (Agronomy) died Octo- 
ber 4, 1956. 

Mr. Winant was born in New York 
State, August 3, 1892. He received his 
B.S. Degree in Agricultural Education 




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70 



Maryland— January-February, 1957 



rom the Maryland Agricultural State 
College (now University of Maryland) 
n June of 1917. Upon graduation he acc- 
epted a position as an assistant farm 
nanager in the Timmonsville area of 
South Carolina. In 1!)18, he became a 
:astor bean inspector at Jacksonville, 
Honda. Mr. Winant returned to the 
Jniversity of Maryland in 1919 as an 
issistant in Soil Investigation and re- 
vived his Masters Degree in Soils in 
.924 and in 1936 he was made Assistant 
""rofessor of Soils. 

Mr. Winant mapped and published 
omplete soil surveys for five of Mary- 
and's twenty-three counties during the 
>eriod of 1925 to 1931. He was also 
issociate in most of the fertility in- 
vestigations that were conducted at this 
nstitution during his tenure, and had 
»ided many a graduate student in their 
nvestigations, as evidenced by over 
wenty acknowledgements in Doctors 
md Masters theses. 

He is survived by his wife, Mrs. 
\dele Thomas Winant and their six 
mildren, James Howard Winant, Mrs. 
Rose Ellen Melton, Miss Frances Louise 
Winant, Miss Marporie Adele Winant, 
Austin Thomas Winant and Walter 
Maxwell Winant. 

Frank W. Cairns 

Dr. Frank W. Cairns, Melrose, Mass., 
passed away at the age of 74, in 
March of this year. He graduated in 
1904 from B.C.D.S. and attended his 
50th reunion in Baltimore two years 
ago. A native of Prince Edward Island, 
he came to Maiden when 7 years old. 
He was actively engaged in dental 
practice until his death, and was an 
active member of the Mass. and Amer- 
ican Dental Societies and the Univer- 
sity of Maryland Alumni Association. 
Survivors include his wife, five children 
and nine grandchildren. 



Sez Testudinette: 

A fool and his 
honey are soon 
parted . . . He who 
hesitates is bossed. 
. . . A pessimist is 
a man who feels 
that all women are 
had. An optimist 
hopes so ... . When 
you have something 
to say to a mule, 
say it to his face; 
it's safer . . . Wom- 
en are showing more 
and more backbone. 
. . . A hole in a tooth feels larger 
because of the tendency of the tongue 
to exaggerate . . . An arrow may fly 
through the air, and leave no trace — 
but an ill thought leaves a trail like 
a serpent . . . Square meals make 
round people . . . The florist with two 
children — one was a budding genius, the 
other a blooming idiot . . . Custom de- 
crees that a woman may not accept 
money from a man unless she's mar- 
ried to him, when it's a case of win- 
ner take all. 




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Maryland — January-Fe b ruary, 1957 



71 



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CLIP AND MAIL THIS COUPON TO: 

Secretary, Alumni Association, 
University of Maryland, College Park Md. 

Enclosed herewith is $ , my contribution to the Alumni Fund. $3.00 of 

this amount is for a subscription to "MARYLAND" for one year. 



Personal 
Income 



In 1956 personal income in Maryland 
will reach a new high, probably ex- 
ceeding $6 billion, according to a re- 
search publication released today by the 
Bureau of Business and Economic Re- 
search, College of Business and Public 
Administration of the University of 
Maryland. Under the title "Personal 
Income in Maryland", the study ex- 
plores changes in total and per capita 
income in Maryland and the U.S. since 
1929. 

Despite striking growth in total in- 
come since World War II, increases in 
Maryland and U.S. income have been 
overshadowed by greater increases in 
population and the cost of living. As 
a result, real per capita personal in- 
come in Maryland by 1955 had still 
not regained the record high of 1944. 
On the basis of constant dollars (1947- 
1949 = 100) Maryland's record high 
personal income for individuals reached 
a high of $1,770 in 1944. In 1955 only 
a level of $1,739 had been obtained in 
Maryland. On the same basis, personal 
income in the U.S. reached its high in 
1945 at $1,605. By 1955, for the first 
time, postwar U.S. personal income 
had reached and exceeded its 1945 level 
at a figure of $1,613. 

Maryland per capita personal income 
in current dollars was the twelfth 
highest in the nation in 1955 at $1,991. 
This exceeds income in all immediate 
surrounding areas except for Delaware 
and the District of Columbia. The 
story points out that income distribu- 
tion in Maryland is characterized by 
considerable inequality, which, however, 
is slightly less severe than that for the 
U.S. as a whole. 

Total personal income for the state 
in 1955 was $5,463,000,000. By source, 
Maryland incomes are received pri- 
marily in terms of wages and salaries 
which constitute three-quai - ters of the 
total. Government disbursements con- 
stitute 25 percent of all income receipts 
for Maryland residents with manufac- 
turing wages in second place contribut- 
ing 20 per cent. Property income 
accounts for only about 12 per cent and 
proprietors' income, 9 per cent. Income 
from farming activities in 1955 amount- 
ed to $88 million or less than 2 per 
cent of the total. 

Official U.S. statistics on state income 
are not released until nine months after 
the end of the year to which they apply. 
However, a very high correlation exists 
between state income and statistics on 
state bank debits. On the basis of this 
correlation, the Bureau of Business and 
Economic Research was able to make its 
estimate that income in the state in 
1956 will exceed, for the first time, 
$6 billion. 

****** 
COMPLAINT 

"This pen leaks," said the convict, 
as the rain came through the roof. 



72 



Ma ryland — January-February, 1957 




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the 



volume xxviii Number z 
March-April 

ARY 

A Publication of 



Maryland 



magazine 



the University of 



Maryland Alumni Association 




In This Issue: Dedication of Student Activities Building 
Charter Day Ceremonies 
An Alumnus in Russia 
CSCS. The World Campus 





The C-123 can't land on a postage stamp.. 

but almost any clearing is its landing field ! 



On almost any clearing — almost any field — 
you can safely land the Fairchild C-123 
;iss;uilt transport. 

Actual short-field tests have demonstrated that 
the rugged C-123 is able to take off and land 
from deeply eroded, sandy fields; that it can 
work from unprepared clearings under down- 
wind conditions; that it is capable of mass 



landings into ungraded "combat zones" . . . 
at 8-second intervals. And literally thousands 
of flights have proven that the C-123 requires 
no more than 700 ft. for takeoffs and landings. 
During these strenuous tests, no C-123 was 
lost, none was damaged. 

What better proof of the C-123's near- 
universal assault and logistics capability? 



FAIRCHILD 

AIRCRAFT DIVISION • HAGERSIOWN 10. MARYLAND 
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. ..WHERE TME FUTURE IS MEASURED IN LIOMT. YEARS! 



MARCH-APRIL • 1957 



the 



Maryland 



magazine 



Volume XXVIII Number 2 



ROBERT J. MCCARTNEY. Executive Editor 
ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Managing Editor 
PATRICIA M. BURRISS, Assistant Editor 
JOSEPH F. BLAIR, Sports Editor 
At- DANEGGER, StaM Photographer 

Published Bi-Monthly at the University of 
Maryland, and entered at the Post Office, 
College Park, Md., as second clans mail mat- 
in- under the Act of Congress of March 3, 
1879. $3.00 per year — Fifty cents the copy. 
Member of American Alumni Council 

SALLY L. OGDEN, Advertising Director 
Advertising Offices 

IS W. 25th Street 2500 Wise. Ave., N.W. 
Baltimore 18, Md. Washington, D. C. 

(HO 7-9018) (EM 3-2553) 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Officers 

J. Gilbert Prendergast '33, President 
Joseph H. Deekman '31, Vice-President 
Mrs. Agnes M. Kiieker '31. Vice-President 
David I,. Brigham '3S, Executive-Secretary 

General Alumni Council 

AGRICULTURE — Clayton Reynolds '22, 
William Evans '26, Howard K. Soper '51. 

ARTS & SCIENCES — Virginia Truitt '52, 
s'aiimel L. Silber '34, Ralph G. Shure '32. 

BUSINESS & PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION — 
Alvin S. Klein '37, Harry A. Boswell, Jr. 
'42. Chester W. Tawney '31. 

DENTAL — Dr. Frank Hurst '27, Dr. Harry 
Levin '26. Dr. Daniel E. Shehan '22. 

EDUCATION— John P. Speicher '41, William 
Prigg '53, Mrs. John J. Hovert, Jr. '50. 

ENGINEERING — S. Chester Ward '32, Chas. 
R. Hayleck '43, Joseph H. Deekman '31. 

HOME ECONOMICS — Mrs. Geraldine P. Ed- 
wards '31, Miss Irene Knox '34, Mrs. Wil- 
liam Kricker '31. 

LAW— J. Gilbert Prendergast '33, Stanford 
I. Hoff '34. G. Kenneth Reiblich '29. 

MEDICAL — Dr. William H. Triplett *11, 
Thurston R. Adams '34, Daniel J. Pessagno 
'20. 

NURSING — Miss Flora Streett '38. Mrs. Rob- 
ert T. Singleton '50, Mrs. Mary France Den- 
nis '47. 

PHARMACY — Frank Block '24, Gordon Mouat 
'37, Samuel I. Raichlen '25. 

Ex-Officio Members 

University President — Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 
Executive Secretary — David L. Brigham, "38. 
Past President — Dr. A. I. Bell, '19. 
Past President — Dr. A. E. Goldstein, '12. 
Past President — C. V. Koons, '29. 
Past President — J. Homer Remsberg '18. 
Past President — Col. O. H. Saunders, '10 
Past President — T. T. Speer, '17. 

Alumni Clubs 

UALTIMORE — Dr. Eugene L. Pessagno '40. 
CARROLL COUNTY— Dr. L. L. Leggett, '30. 
CUMBERLAND— Dr. J. Russell Cook '23. 
EASTERN SHORE — Otis Twillv, '21. 
FREDERICK COUNTY— William E. Trail "26. 
"M" CLUB— Charles Ellinger '37. 
NEW ENGLAND — R. A. Cook, '05. 
NEW YORK— Miss Sarah E. Morris. '24. 
PITTSBURGH— Charles Furtney, '37. 
PRINCE GEORGES— William Kahler '48. 
RICHMOND — Paul Mullinix, '36. 
SCHENECTADY— Mrs. Marie Esher, '45. 
TERRAPIN— James W. Stevens, '19. 



In This Issue: 



Cover — sec page 22. 

Dedication of the William P. Cole, .Jr. 

Student Activities Building 2 

Charter Day, 1957— Celebrating 150 Years of 

Service 6 

Id 

12 



An Alumnus in Russia 

C. S. C. S., Serving - Americans Around the World 



Short Features 

Cobalt 60 Unit Installed at University Hospital 

New Library to Replace Davidge Hall 

Dr. Singer to Direct Research on Gauge to Measure 
Meteoric Dust 

Dean Mount Dies, Head of College of 

Home Economics Since 1925 



Alumni Portraits — 1 
Alumni Portraits — 2 

News From The Colleges 

Agriculture 

Arts and Sciences 

Business and Public Administration 

Dentistry 



19 

20 

22 

23 
24 
26 

28 
30 
31 
33 



Engineering 38 

Graduate School 39 

Law . 40 

Medicine 42 

Nursing 44 

Pharmacy ... 47 



Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

Other Departments 

For Maryland Women 
M Club News 
University Sports 
Maryland Engagements 
Maryland Marriages 
Maryland Obituaries 
Directory of Advertisers 



50 

56 
59 
60 
65 
68 
69 
76 







wjl p. con, jjl 

student ACT 

MJLDJflG 

Una MiiMM, m o n d m *a 
m till if m t m a* wk wmmm m 
uMm!sm,i& jwst!m>ji> ''ffl&WMadm 

VA U l A JC ?. C o k * , -ft .DWt^H^MD JWJWR 

Km urnm® mm mam, & imxm 




ItfC*?,!"^ H, H3 3 



a 




Dedication 



The University of Maryland's huge, 12,500 seat, 
indoor stadium was dedicated December 14, 
1956, in honor of Judge William P. Cole, Jr., for 25 
years a member of the University's Board of Re- 
gents. 

The building, located in the north-west section 
of the College Park campus, was named the William 
P. Cole, Jr. Student Activities Building in ceremon- 
ies witnessed by ranking State political leaders and 
distinguished alumni. 

Governor Theodore R. McKeldin delivered the 
dedicatory address and presented a citation from the 
State of Maryland. Commendations were read by 
Mayor Thomas D'Alesandro of Baltimore City and 
Mr. Joseph H. Deckman, Vice-President of the Uni- 
versity's Alumni Association. 

Presided over by Dr. Elkins, the program included 
presentations by members of the University's Board 



of Regents. Dr. Louis L. Kaplan, Assistant Secre^ 
tary, gave the invocation and Mr. B. Herbert Brown 
Secretary, read the Board's resolution that made th( 
dedication an official action. 

A plaque, to be mounted in the building's foyer 
was presented by Charles P. McCormick, Chairmar 
of the Board of Regents. 

Judge Cole, convalescing at University Hospital 
was unable to attend the dedication ceremonies; Mr 
C. Walter Cole, his brother, acted in his behalf. 

The texts of the various presentations, some oi 
which are excerpts, follow: 

Invocation — Dr. Louis L. Kaplan, Assistant Sec 
retary of the Board of Regents 

"The name 'William P. Cole, Jr. Student Ac- 
tivities Building' redeems the bricks and mortar 



Maryland — March^April, 1957 



from their material anonymity and adds to 
them the dimension of the human spirit. We 
pray, Thee, O, Lord, that the devotion and loy- 
alty to God and Country, the integrity and no- 
bility of mind and heart which we have come 
to associate with the name William P. Cole, Jr. 
maij inspire those who enter this building to 
walk in his tvays. 

"Thou, who art the healer of the sick and 
dost bind up their /rounds, ire beseech Thee to 
send Thy blessings of health and bodily vigor to 
Thy faithful servant, William P. Cole, Jr., and 
to his devoted wife. Grant them sin-cease from 
pain and restore them unto us in life and well- 
being and let us unite in saying Amen." 

Purpose of the Occasion — Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, 
President of the University 

"This occasion is quite significant in the life of 
the University. We are gathered here in the foyer 
of this magnificent structure to do honor to a man 
whose distinguished career has reflected glory on 
his State and Alma Mater. 

"If any man ever deserved such a high honor it 
is Bill Cole. He has served longer than any other 
man on the Board of Regents. He has provided in- 
telligent and dynamic leadership for many years. 
He has lived with the University. He has been 
ready at all times to do whatever should be done 
for the students. He was a student at the Univer- 
sity ; his son was a student ; he has the student's 
point of view. It is highly appropriate, therefore, 
that we should meet to place officially the name of 
William P. Cole, Jr., on a building that is dedicated 
to the welfare of youth." 

Resolution of the Board of Regents — B. Herbert 
Broivn, Secretary of the Board of Regents 

"The members of the Board of Regents of the 



University of Maryland unanimously voted thai 
tin Student Activities Building on the CoUegt 
Park campus bt named Tht William P. < olt . Jt, 
studi ut Activities Building, and thai a bro 
plague be inscribed and placed in tfu foyer of 
the building, and that suitabU ceremonies bt 
arranged for the dedication of tht building and 
the unveiling of the plaque. 

"Such action iras tahiii in graft ful reCOgtl 

Hon for the twenty-five years of dt voted 8^ n 

that Judge William P. Coli . Jr. Unselfishly /' /"/- 

ered the University of Maryland as a member 

of tin 1 Hoard of Regents, and iii particular rec- 
ognition for his having served as Chairman of 
the Board for twelve consecutive years from 
June, 19U to June, 1956." 

Commendation from the Alumni Association — 
Joseph H. Deckman, Vice-President of the 
Alumni Association 

"In his celebrated treatise, The Idea of a Univt r- 
sity, Cardinal Newman observed that a university: 
' . . . has this object and this mission ; it contem- 
plates neither moral impression or mechanical pro- 
duction; it professes to exercise the mind neither in 
art nor in duty; its function is intellectual culture; 
here it may leave its scholars, and it has done its 
work when it has done as much as this. It educates 
the intellect to reason well in all matters, to reach 
out towards truth and to grasp it.' 

"The fulfillment of those objectives is found in 
the person of the Honorable William P. Cole, Jr., 
who is being honored today. Judge Cole is a man 
of scholarly attainments whose mind is constantly 
seeking the truth and consistently finding it. His 
career on the bench of the federal courts, where he 
has served with great distinction for many years, 
is ample evidence of this statement. His years of 
effective service to the University of Maryland as 
a member of the Board of Regents, and for long its 




Aerial view of the William P. Cole, Jr. Student Activities Building, showing adjacent tennis 
courts and, to the right, the iving housing the new swimming }iool. 



Mwrylandr-M arch- April, 1957 




Waiting to 
plat form a 
Deckman. 



proceed to tJie Dedication speakers 
re Dr. Kaplan, Mr. Brown and Mr. 




Mr. Walter Cole responding for his brother, 
Judge Cole. 




Part of the crowd which witnessed the Dedica- 
tion ceremonies. 



chairman, are replete with events revealing his in- 
tellectual culture. His analytical mind would quick- 
ly find the essence of many a perplexing problem 
and as quickly solve it. 

"Judge Cole's illustrious career is a tribute to this 
University, of which he is a graduate, and an ex- 
ample and an inspiration to all others who have had 
the opportunity to acquire culture at this institu- 
tion. He is universally respected and admired by 
the alumni not only for his myriad attainments but 
for his genuine friendship and helpful assistance 
at all times. 

"It is altogether fitting and proper that the 
beautiful Student Activities Building should be 
named in his honor. The Alumni Association con- 
siders itself privileged to commend this action and 
does so heartily. It is gratifying to know that Judge 
Cole is present to witness this acknowledgment of 
his illustrious life ; and it is our fervent hope that 
Divine Providence will grant him many more years 
of helpful service to his country, his state, and his 
alma mater." 

Commendation from the City of Baltimore — 
Honorable Thomas D'Alesandro, Jr., Mayor 

"The people of Baltimore, as elsewhere, have 
long since recognized and acknowledged the ob- 
ligations which they, as citizens, owe to this 
outstanding institution of higher learning. 
From College Park and from other branches 
have gone forth many active citizens, the better 
for having been educated here, to the dignity 
of their franchises and civic responsibilities. 

"The dedication of any structure designed 
for, and to be devoted to, scholastic needs and 
purposes is always an event of extraordinary 
importance. Designed as it is, for athletic and 
recreational purposes, the indoor stadium will 
seat 12,500, making it the second largest indoor 
stadium on the east coast. 

"In giving the structure the name of Judge 
William P. Cole, Jr., distinguished jurist, the 
University pays tribute to a man well-deserv- 
ing of the honor. He served his country with 
merit during World War One as a Captain of 
the 316th Infantry, 79th Division, and, for the 
past twenty-five years, has been a member of 
the University's Board of Regents. I know we 
all regret sincerely that the Judge is unable to 
be here in person, due to illness, but our 
thoughts are with him, and this stadium tvill be 
a permanent memorial to his many educational 
and civic contributions to the welfare of our 
city, state and nation. 

"I consider it a valued privilege to present 
to Judge Cole a certificate making him an hon- 
ored citizen of Baltimore for his outstanding 
civic endeavor. Because of the Judge's en- 
forced absence, I will present the citation to his 
brother, with the request that he present it to 
the Judge, along with the greetings and best 
irish.es of the citizens of Baltimore. 

"I join with all of you in the hope that Judge 
Cole tvill have a speedy recovery, with a re- 
sumption of his manifold activities." 

Address and Citation from the State of Maryland 

— The Honorable Theodore R. McKeldin, 
Governor 
"The thousands of little colleges which exist away 
from the beaten paths and thrive through the de- 



Mwryland — Mwrch-April, 1957 



cades and the centuries within the limits of their 
original campuses serve a useful purpose. 

"They bring the culture of higher education to 
the communities. They are forces of stabilization. 
They are objects of local pride. They advance the 
liberal arts. They help in the training of teachers 
for our schools. Great writers, musicians, states- 
men, instructors have come from their classes. They 
have prepared many to go on with more specialized 
studies. Industry draws heavily on their graduating 
classes for capable and informed personnel. 

"Maryland is proud of its liberal arts colleges. 

"Universities have a much different role in our 
educational scheme. 

"Versatility is the life of a university. 

"The university is not just a college. It is a whole 
group of colleges. It is even more. It is a network 
of research. 

"The university is a thing of constantly increas- 
ing life. It must be ready to respond to each new 
call of industry and government. It must grow with 
the changes of our society. It must keep its roots 
in the soil and still be able to scan the distant hori- 
zons and beyond. 

"The University does not merely maintain the 
status quo. It must sometimes be the disturber of 
the peace. It must seek out the faults as well as the 
virtues in all that we grow, in all that we build, in 
all that we plan, in our approaches and in our 
methods. 

"The inquisitive mind of man is the nerve center 
of the university. 

"From our high schools, we expect good basic 
educations — good groundings in the fundamentals 
of knowledge. From our liberal arts colleges, we ex- 
pect stability and sound thinking. 

"But when the students from those schools come 
to the university, we search among them for the 
man or the woman who wants to make things bet- 
ter — the searcher, the hunter, the experimenter — 
the fellow or the girl who will risk a year or a life- 
time to discover a better way to build a bridge or 
dam a stream — or find a new cure or preventive for 
a deadly illness — or produce a new source of food — 
or do one of the many things that may be done to 
improve the life of mankind. 

"We are proud, indeed, of our universities — of 
their growth and their virility. We are proud — 
very proud — of this great University of Maryland 
— not only of its schools and its research in College 
Park and in Maryland — not only of the extension 
of its services into Maryland farms and Maryland 
homes — but of the manner in which it attends the 
needs for advanced education of our men in the 
far-flung military outposts of the earth. 

"The past quarter of a century, a great and de- 
voted man has served on its Board of Regents, part 
of the time as Chairman. 

"It is indeed a fitting tribute that we pay today 
to Judge William P. Cole, Jr. 

"It is indeed most proper that this Student Ac- 
tivities Building should, now and forever, bear his 
honored name. 

"William Purrington Cole, Jr., graduated from 
the forerunner of this University — the Maryland 
Agricultural College. He pursued his studies in the 
University's Law School. 

"Through the years that have intervened he has 
never lost his interest. Indeed, his efforts to advance 
the University and its great works have advanced 
through the years. 
(Continued on page 18) 




Gov. McKeldin and Dr. HI kins awaiting trans- 
portation to the buffet luncheon si rved »t tin- 
President' a House. 




Dedication principals enjoying the luncheon. 




The 12,500-seat indoor stadium is (.raided in 
size on the East Coast only bit Madison Square 
Garden. 



Maryland — March^April, 1957 




Charter Day, 1957 

Celebrating 150 Years Of Service 



Some seven hundred University officials, alumni 
and State dignitaries gathered January 19 at the 
Lord Baltimore Hotel for a Sesquicentennial Charter 
Day Banquet commemorating the 150th anniversary 
of the University of Maryland. 

The banquet was the second major function of 
a joint fifteen-month celebration of University cen- 
tennial-sesquicentennial anniversaries which began 
in March, 1956. 

The centennial anniversary marks the establish- 
ment of the Maryland Agricultural College in 1856; 
the sesquicentennial celebration commemorates the 
establishment of the College of Medicine of Mary- 
land in 1807. Both of these institutions formed the 
foundation upon which the University has been built. 

Principal speaker, Dr. Elmer Hess, immediate past 
president, American Medical Association, praised 
the progress made by the School of Medicine during 
its 150 years of existence. Dr. Hess commended 
Governor McKeldin for requesting higher salaries 
for medical school teachers. "Financial support," he 
said, "must be increased if we are to have the cali- 
ber of men we need to lead young America to the 
practice of decent medicine." Dr. Hess also called 
for strong research programs in the Nation's medi- 
cal institutions as a means of strengthening the 
quality of instruction available to medical students. 

The distinguished physician also urged that 
American medical schools integrate instruction in 
the humanities with the regular medical curriculum, 
"to care for the whole man." 

A summary of Dr. Hess' remarks are found on 
pages 8 and 9. 



Telegram From Eisenhower 

Dr. Elkins outlined to the assembly the many con- 
tributions which the University has made to the 
people of the State and to the Nation. "The Uni- 
versity," he said, "now stands on the threshold of 
even greater achievement." Dr. Elkins read a tele- 
gram of greetings from President Eisenhower which 
stated : 

"Through science and the liberal arts and the 
many benefits of undergraduate life, the Uni- 
versity of Maryland makes a notable contribu- 
tion to the youth of America at home, and 
abroad in its overseas academic program for 
members of the armed forces. The privileges 
of higher education with Maryland standards 
are especially appreciated." 

Other speakers were the Honorable Enos S. Stock- 
bridge, member of the Board of Regents; the Hon- 
orable Louis L. Goldstein, President, Maryland State 
Senate ; Perry 0. Wilkinson, Chairman of the Prince 
George's delegation to the Maryland House of Dele- 
gates; J. Gilbert Prendergast, President of the 
Alumni Association. Mr. Prendergast paid tribute 
to Judge William P. Cole, Jr., former Chairman of 
the Board of Regents and presented to Colonel 0. 
H. Saunders, past president of the Alumni Associa- 
tion, a plaque and chair embossed with the Univers- 
ity seal for Judge Cole who was ill and unable to 
attend. Toastmaster was Dr. Charles Reed Edwards. 
The invocation was given by the Rev. John H. Gard- 
ner, Jr., of the First Presbyterian Church and en- 
tertainment was provided by Professor Fague 
Springmann of the University Department of Music 
and the Jack Leder Orchestra. 



Maryland — March-April, 1957 




Dean Stone Comments 

Prior to the banquet Dean William S. Stone of 
the School of Medicine issued a statement which 
said in effect that the University of Maryland is 
faithfully carrying out the charge of its founders. 

Dean Stone said that the 150th Charter Day cele- 
bration was of particular significance because "it 
marks the many years of service to the people of 
Maryland and the Nation during which the Uni- 
versity not only influenced beneficially the health 
but the general welfare and culture of each genera- 
tion. 

"The education program of the University is main- 
tained on a most liberal plan. 

"Its inclusion of integrated teaching with minimal 
departmental isolation in broad areas of science re- 
lated to medicine in its course to man and his en- 
vironment foreshadow the progress being made." 

Dean Stone continued, "Today the Medical School 
continues to utilize advanced ideas in the develop- 
ment of its curriculum. 

"Marylanders have every reason to expect that 
its Medical School will graduate outstanding phy- 
sicians who will not only render great service but 
who will also add much to the improvement of knowl- 
edge of disease through research." 

The School of Medicine, fifth oldest in the United 
States, was founded in 1807 ; the School of Law, one 
of the Nation's oldest, in 1813; the School of Dental 
Surgery, recognized as the first in the world, in 



1840; and the School of Pharmacy, one of the old- 
est, in 1841. 

The College of Agriculture, founded in 1856, be- 
came the third oldest in the western hemisphere. 
This was followed bv the College of Engineering in 
1859, the School of Nursing in 1889, and in 1918, 
the Colleges of Arts and Sciences, Education, Home 
Economics and the Graduate School. The College 
of Business and Public Administration had its start 
in 1938, and was followed by the College of Military 
Science, Physical Education and Recreation in 1947. 
This college was separated in 1949, to become sep- 
arate colleges of Military Science and Physical Edu- 
cation, Recreation and Health. The College of Special 
and Continuation Studies, founded in 1947. now 
serves more than 18,000 members of the armed 
forces in the European, North Atlantic and Pacific 
theaters. 

Banquet Committee Members 

Members of the Charter Day Banquet Committee 
were: Dr. Thomas R. O'Rourk, Chairman; Mr. 
Bridgewater Arnold, School of Law ; Dr. L. W. 
Bimestefer; David L. Brigham, Executive Secretary, 
Alumni Association; Judge William P. Cole. Jr. : Mr. 
Ernest N. Cory, Jr.; Dean Geary Eppley, Dean of 
Men; Dean Noel E. Foss, School of Pharmacy; Dr. 
Frank J. Geraghty; Mr. Norman J. Levin, Presi- 
dent, School of Pharmacy Alumni Association: Mr. 
Frank J. Macek, President. Maryland Pharmaceuti- 
cal Association; Mr. Victor H. Morgenroth, Presi- 
dent, Baltimore Retail Druggists' Association: Dr. 
J. Morris Reese; Dr. John E. Savage; Dean Adele 
Stamp, Dean of Women; and Dr. William S. Stone, 
Dean, School of Medicine. # 



Maryland — March-April, 1957 



Summary Of Remarks 
Presented By Dr. Hess 

"It is an axiom that all true education is 
self-education. This immediately makes the 
student the unit of education, not the 
courses, the credit hours, or the faculty, and 
requires that the methods of instruction 
should be modified accordingly. 

"Tremendous and almost unbelievable ad- 
vances in knowledge applicable to medicine 
necessitating readjustments in medical edu- 
cation and medical practice have occurred in 
the years intervening since the preceding 
statement appeared. This basic statement, 
however, is as applicable today as it was a 
quarter of a century ago. Depending upon 
leadership, personnel, finances, and facilities, 
the trends being initiated at that time in 
liberalization of the basic program of medi- 
cal education have developed with varying 
degrees of effectiveness in medical schools. 
It was largely through the discussions of the 
commission with representatives of the As- 
sociation of American Medical Colleges, the 
Council on Medical Education and Hospitals, 
and the Federation of State Medical Boards 
that flexibility began to enter into what had 
previously been a relatively rigid medical 
curriculum and that sound educational ex- 
perimentation began to be encouraged. 

Small vs. Large Community 

'Although there is great variation among 
the graduates of different schools, an in- 
creasing proportion of graduates are tend- 
ing to locate in smaller communities; and 
many factors influence the choice of prac- 
tice location of graduates. 

"It is interesting to note that graduates 
whose prior residence was in small communi- 
ties show a greater tendency to locate in 
such communities than do those whose for- 
mer residence had been in large communi- 
ties; the publicly supported schools draw a 
higher proportion of their students from 



smaller communities and contribute compar 
atively more physicians to them than do th 
private schools; and prior residence seemei 
to play a more important role in determininj 
the place of practice than the location o 
the medical school attended or the com 
munity in which graduate education wa; 
obtained. 

"There can be no dissent that the researcl 
of yesterday must become the education o 
today if it is to develop into the practice o 
tomorrow. Yet in medicine, there has beei 
little probing of the significant implication 
of this necessary orderly progression. Al 
too often individuals primarily engaged ii 
one activity have little concern with or knowl 
edge of the problems, challenges, and satis 
factions of another. Unfortunately, on oc 
casion, there seems to be greater interest ii 
matters that separate rather than in thos< 
stronger and more enduring bonds that job 
colleagues in these interwoven activities. 

"These and many similar matters are o: 
vital importance to the three fields of re 
search, education, and practice in medicine 

Public vs. Private Schools 

"As far as the Council on Medical Educa 
tion and Hospitals is concerned, and I an 
sure they reflect the attitude of the Ameri 
can Medical Association at large in this mat 
ter, there is concern that medical educatior 
be good regardless of whether it is conductec 
in a publicly owned or privately owned in 
stitution. 

"There can be no double standards as tc 
what basically constitutes sound medical edu- 
cation, for after all, the graduates of al 
our medical schools are destined to take can 
of their fellow human beings. 

"Currently 39 of our 82 approved four 
year medical schools and schools of basic 
medical science are listed as being under 
public ownership and 43 are listed as being 
privately owned. 




Dr. Elkins, Mrs. Elkins and 
Harry Robinson, Jr. chat 
informally. 



Maryland — March-April, 195*< 



"One of the great traditions that has been 
fostered in this nation of ours is the pro- 
vision of education through the medium of 
publicly owned and publicly supported insti- 
tutions, so that it may be available to the 
many students who might not be able to re- 
ceive their education through the medium 
of privately owned institutions. This has 
been true in professional education as well 
as in elementary, secondary, and other 
aspects of higher education. The public has 
apparently been willing to support public edu- 
cation from the elementary phases through 
the professional areas for many years. As 
far as the Council on Medical Education and 

I Hospitals is concerned, the requirements for 
'. approval of medical schools have consistent- 
ly been the same whether they are publicly 
or privately owned. 

"There are outstandingly excellent schools 

II in both groups where both teaching and re- 
search activities are superb. 

I 
Where The Money Comes From 

"Costs of medical education, like every- 
thing else, have gone up tremendously in re- 
j cent years. Endowment incomes for private 
] schools have covered less and less of the 
, total cost. Tuition income currently covers 
j above 18.2'; of the total cost of basic medi- 
cal operating budgets in medical schools for 
.the year 1955 and 1956-57. It is true that 
; some private schools have to depend much 
I more heavily on tuition income and endow- 
ment than do schools which have their basic 
support from governmental agencies (state 
or municipal). There are a few private 
I schools where tuition income may account 
for half or more of the total basic budget of 
that institution. 

"In some states the privately owned medi- 
' cal schools receive a very large portion of 

their basic support from legislative grants 
i within the state itself. A good example of 

this is the State of Pennsylvania where all 



of the medical schools arc privately owned 
and yet every one of them receives a very 
large share of its basic support from the 
Pennsylvania legislature. This year, I be- 
lieve each of those schools is receiving ap- 
proximately $2,000 per student per year in 
support from the state legislature. 



All Schools Receive Government Aid 

"The plain unvarnished facts are that no 
medical school today would be conducting its 
current program of basic medical education 
and research without some of the financing 
it receives through governmental sources of 
one kind or another. 

"It is my very frank feeling that none of 
the institutions should be taking pot shots 
at each other over which one was the more 
deserving and which one was doing the best 
job. It is hard to separate education and re- 
search and all good schools should be con- 
ducting both within the means available to 
them. 



Greater Public Support Needed 

"If I were to try to briefly sum up what I 
believe the philosophy of the Council and of 
the AMA is, I believe it would be that we 
expect medical schools to offer education and 
training opportunities in keeping with the 
changing knowledge of the times that makes 
it possible for adequately prepared Ameri- 
can youth to have the basic experience need- 
ed by anyone entering the profession of 
medicine. To make such opportunities pos- 
sible both private and publicly owned schools 
need public understanding and support. Be- 
cause of increasing costs, privately owned 
medical schools must have increasing sup- 
port from industry and private resources if 
their programs are to be effectively main- 
tained without materially augmented sup- 
port from one or more governmental agen- 
cies." # 



PHncipal speaker, Dr. Elmer 
Hess, Immediate Past Presi- 
dent of the American Medical 
Association. 




Maryland — March-April, 1957 





Russians everywhere are interested in automotive vehi- 
cles. All the cars i)i this photograph, including the jeep 
in the background are of Russian manufacture. 



Russian working people crowd a city market. Approxi- 
mately 15 rubles equal an American dollar. The 45-hour 
ivork week is common. 



An Alumnus In 



Russia 



By Dave Brigham, Alumni Secretary 



A searching view of the progress the Soviet Union 
is making in the areas of industry and building con- 
struction was made recently by Marvland alumnus 
(1942), Harry A. Boswell, Jr. 

Boswell, a realtor in Mt. Rainier, Maryland, was 
one of a group participating in an exchange visit 
sponsored by the National Association of Home 
Builders. His report on what he saw was outlined 
to a meeting of BPA alumni and faculty in the Uni- 
versity Dining Hall on October 31. 

The purpose of the 30-day visit was to study Rus- 
sian urban planning, development and construction. 

The group was the first from America to see the 
Trans Caucasus integrated steel mill in operation 
and was permitted to take many pictures of subjects 
that had been previously forbidden. They soon 
learned something of the business structure in a 
country where the government owns everything in- 
cluding the land and all elements of production. One 
of the rare exceptions to this policy are beekeepers 
who are permitted to freely follow the blooming of 
flowers in the high areas and to privately merchan- 
dise their honey. Even Russians who raise vege- 
tables in their own backyards either for sale or for 
home use, must obtain a government license. 

Home Ownership, Russian Style 

Boswell reported that there has been a slight 
change from the plan to permit some home owner- 
ship on government-owned land. The objective now 
is to locate all Russians on collective farms or in 
consolidated apartments. The low-standard, indi- 
vidual homes are built on small lots with materials 
(by American standards) of a quality equal to cast- 
ofT materials. The potential builder must have politi- 
cal security to obtain both a land assignment and 
financing. The ambition to own his own home ex- 
pressed by many Russians despite many difficulties 
was especially stimulating to Boswell. 

A government supervisor (described by the Rus- 
sians as similar to our county agent), tells the farm- 
ers what to plant, when to plant, when to harvest, 
where machinery is to be assigned and, in addition, 
has the power to conscript "volunteer labor." Theo- 
retically, farming is on a cooperative basis. 

Russia is assisted in her bureaucracy by an econ- 
omy of scarcity. Price levels are set so demand will 



be on an even basis with minimum needs. Employ- 
ment is regulated by economic controls. If certain 
skills are needed in a particular city, those possess- 
ing the skills are fired from jobs which they hold in 
industry and announcements are made that there 
are employment openings in another city. The gov- 
ernment provides transportation to the new jobs as 
a "kind and generous" gesture. 

"Big Brother" Is Watching 

Spies are often recruited by economic pressure. 
Often, several members of a family will be fired 
from their jobs. When inquiry is made to the rea- 
son, the government representative says, "You tell 
us." The individual is then required to think of any 
statement or action which he or any member of his 
family might have made or taken to offend the 
government. He is told the only way to purge him- 
self is to give regular reports on those living in his 
apartment house or working with him. 

Education is the responsibility of the government 
from the nursery through 7 years of formal educa- 
tion. A high school graduation, two of which were 
witnessed by the Maryland man, is held in the eve- 
ning and concluded about 11:00 p.m. Members of 
the class then spend the rest of the night in fes- 
tive song. English is the number one foreign lan- 
guage. Mr. Boswell feels that standards for gradu- 
ate engineers are not comparable to those demanded 
of an American graduate engineer except for a very 
specialized field or in a very narrow sphere. Such 
limited and intensive work is possible only in a coun- 
try of slow development. In ten years, this special- 
ized training would be outdated in America. The 
graduate (except for a few top scholars) cannot 
choose where he will go to work but is assigned ac- 
cording to government needs. Competition by Amer- 
ican private industry for engineering and scientific 
graduates would most certainly astound Russian 
bureaucrats. 

The Engineering Elite 

For the most part students are selected for vari- 
ous fields according to educational aptitudes. Tests 
are given in the lower schools to make this deter- 
mination. Engineering is in the top professional 
level; physicians and lawyers are not as highly re- 



10 



Maryland — March-April, 1957 




lective farm workers pose in front of their housing. 
[ 3 is a vinyard, reputedly one of the most prosperous 
t the Collectives. 




.1 fregui ut sight, according t<> Boswell, is that "i 
performing difficult manual labor such us this group 
working at a construction, site. 



spected as they are in the free world. There are 

many women physicians who serve as the American 
. equivalent of general practitioners. Surgeons have 
j a higher standing and are generally men. Practical- 
,■ ly all medical care is free. 

Radios that are pretuned are cheap. Those with 
y free tuning similar to American models are very 

expensive since the government desires to control 
! which programs people hear. In general, the best 

talent and the greatest efforts are relegated to heavy 
J industry and power for government use. Produc- 
j tion for consumers is on a much lower priority and 
■i all prices are stabilized and government-regulated 
[i to provide a stated profit for the government. The 
J government business man does not dare to have a 
i loss and in some cases if there is an extra profit it 

sifts down to employees in the form of an incentive 
i bonus. 

Russians Work Part of Saturday, Too 

The work schedule is generally five 8-hour days 
. and one 5-hour day. A change has been contem- 
'; plated to reduce the 5 weekdays to seven hours. 
Russian bureaucrats recommend this change rather 
I than eliminating Saturday work because they feel 
| employees would not know what to do with an extra 
idle day. 

Practically all savings go into lottery bonds on 

j the chance they might hit and come out on top 

financially. The top income tax is 8% but there 

j is no tax on lottery winnings. There is, however, 

I a 6% surtax on bachelors. 

The Russians are shorter in stature than Ameri- 
cans ; a large percentage of the women work ; and 
I a special Boswell observation was, "the small num- 
' ber of expectant women is evident in cities." This 
I is attributed to the high cost of living where a city 
■ child is a liability while a country child who can 
i work on a collective farm is an asset. 

The selection of merchandise is extremely lim- 
ited and the quality of clothing both in material and 
| workmanship is very poor. The GUM department 
I store in Moscow is the one exception where all types 
of goods including such items otherwise unobtain- 
' able, such as silverware, can be purchased at a price. 
Contrasts were observed everywhere by the group, 
such as plowing with oxen and a wooden plow on a 



tobacco farm while large and very modern combines 
were in operation on large cooperative grain farms. 

Housing Construction 

Housing conditions were found to be deplorable 
with 40 square feet of living space per person as 
the average. This space doesn't include halls, baths 
or kitchens which are ordinarily shared by more 
than one family. Construction is poor and much of 
the housing has not been maintained nor is it 
weather tight. The Russians are beginning a con- 
struction program which includes extensive use of 
large sections, particularly precast concrete. 

The average Russian is accustomed to restraint 
and scarcity of consumer goods. It is said they are 
100' < literate and newspapers are posted in public 
squares for all who cannot afford individual copies. 
Their paper Pravda (meaning truth), is not to be 
disputed while the Voice of America is simply 
propaganda. Headlines in this paper the day after 
all but two of the group had left (Boswell was one 
of the two remaining), read, "American bombers 
invade Russian territory." This, of course, proved 
to be another minor incident in the already strained 
relations between the two powers. 

Russians Friendly, Like Americans 

Boswell felt that the Russian people generally are 
friendly and were interested in Americans. But 
Russians also believe that America is materialistic 
while Communism is spiritualistic. To Russians, re- 
ligion is superstition and while churches are main- 
tained with all of their finery, people simply do not 
attend services. Reports which come from America 
are always on the seamy side with the emphasis on 
strikes, plane crashes, crimes and the like. There 
is the general feeling that the American press is 
irresponsible since they present different sides to 
questions. To them, black is black and white is 
white. There can only be one side: that which Prav- 
da presents; any different interpretation would only 
be a misstatement of fact designed to confuse peo- 
ple. Russians cannot understand American politics: 
they would rather have those who know tell them 
who is the best man for a job so they may have 
the privilege of voting for him. 

Harry Boswell's final comment : "Thank Cod 1 
could come home to America." # 



Maryland — March- April, 1957 



11 



The Jong-nosed jet appeared suddenly from the 
darkening eastern sky and swooped down 
through the frozen hills to land on an illuminated 
runway. The pilot, when his plastic canopy was 
jerked back, climbed out wearily and unbuttoned the 
chin strap of his crash helmet. The reconnaisance 
had been, as usual, tense — the kind of flight that 
took a lot out of a man. 

Ordinarily he would have eaten supper, read a 
magazine and gone to bed, monotonously prepar- 
ing himself for his next assignment. But tonight 
he was going to college — 2,500 miles from home — 
to try to learn what were capital gains and how they 
would affect the financial structure of a consultive 
engineering firm which he intended to start when 
he completed his tour of duty. His campus was a 
strategic USAF Air Base. A quonset served as 
his ivy-covered classroom building. 

This pilot, like about 20,000 other service people 
and their dependents, is part of the student body of 
the University of Maryland's College of Special and 
Continuation Studies (CSCS) — a world-wide teach- 
ing organization which accomplishments have had 
awesome effects upon the structure of modern Amer- 
ican higher education and upon the lives and capa- 
bilities of today's generation of young people in the 
service of their country. 



alone, over 20,000 military students enrolled in off- 
duty courses, and last May a large number of grad- 
uating military students were awarded degrees in 
ceremonies at Heidelberg, Germany, presided over ; 
by the President of the University, Dr. Wilson H. ' 
Elkins, and attended by numerous overseas digni- 
taries. 

How Did It All Begin? 

In 1947, the Board of Regents of the University 
of Maryland established the College of Special and 
Continuation Studies to provide adult education op- 
portunities throughout the State of Maryland. Short- 
ly thereafter, CSCS officials recognized the exist- 
ence of large numbers of military personnel sta- 
tioned at nearby Fort George G. Meade, at the 
Pentagon, at Aberdeen Proving Ground, and at Boil- 
ing and Andrews Air Force Bases. Visits to these 
installations revealed military personnel who were 
most eager to avail themselves of educational op- 
portunities, and military leaders who recognized 
the need of education for persons in the service and 
the value of educational programs. These leaders 
enthusiastically promised full cooperation. 

Pilot programs were arranged, and one or more 
classes were scheduled and taught by resident fac- 
ulty members. The response exceeded all estimates 



CSCS ' 

Serving Americans Around The World 



By Edward F. James, Assistant To The Dean, CSCS 



The Flying Dean 

During the past year, Dr. Ray Ehrensberger, Dean 
of the College of Special and Continuation Studies 
(CSCS) at the University of Maryland, spent over 
four hundred hours in the air in guiding and direct- 
ing a campus which is now world wide. 

In 1956, he made one trip around the world, 
two flights to Europe, and one trip each to Latin 
America, to the Arctic, and to the Far East. The 
thousands of miles covered by the "Flying Dean" of 
CSCS each year dramatize the magnitude of the 
University of Maryland program. 

Maryland's far-reaching CSCS program includes 
considerable stateside participation and extends its 
educational facilities to such exotic outposts as Sond- 
restromfjord, Greenland, where SAS planes land 
briefly on their polar flights, and the casbahs of 
Casablanca. This largest campus in the world en- 
compasses two-thirds of the globe, and runs from 
the mountain city of Asmara, Ethiopia, and Marra- 
kech, Morocco, to the front lines of Korea. In Sep- 
tember of 1956, the College's ninth year of existence, 
the program was carried to the Far East when the 
Far East Command invited the University to include 
Japan, Okinawa, and Korea. By the time this arti- 
cle goes to press, new centers will have been opened 
in Guam and Formosa. Today, the University of 
Maryland offers educational opportunities to United 
States military personnel in eighteen countries on 
four continents. During the 1955-56 school year 



and additional classes were organized during sub- 
sequent semesters. Today, the annual combined en- 
rollment at these nearby military installations ex- 
ceeds four thousand individuals. 

As military personnel rotated overseas, they found 
much leisure time on their hands, but no opportuni- 
ties to continue their educational programs. Lead- 
ers in the military recognized that the Armed 
Forces, working by themselves, could not offer 
courses leading toward recognized degree programs. 
A call for aid was sent to American universities. 
Maryland responded by assigning a representative 
to explore the possibilities of a European Program. 
Favorable reports resulted in the establishment of 
classes at Armed Forces centers in Berlin, Frank- 
furt, Heidelberg, Munich, Nurnberg, and Wiesbaden 
on October 31, 1949. Again, the initial enrollment 
shattered all expectations ! Provisions had been 
made for six hundred students; eighteen hundred 
enrolled. 

Program Meets Need 

Dr. Loren Reid, Professor of Speech at the Uni- 
versity of Missouri and President of the Speech As- 
sociation of America, commented on Maryland's hav- 
ing met a real need for education of the military as 
follows : 

"I call the Overseas Program the educational 
phenomenon of this age. As an imaginative con- 
cept I rank it ahead of the founding of the Ameri- 



12 



Maryland — March- April, 1957 



Professor Iiussell lioss uses the 
passenger compartment of a heli- 
copter to cheek orcr his lecture 
text while enroute to t<«<-h 
servicemen-students at remote 

Northeast Air Command out- 
posts. 




Close coordination between College Park and 
centers overseas insures maintenance of high 
academic standards. Here, in Heidelberg. Dean 
Ehrensberger meets with Dr. Herman Beu- 
kema, Director of the CSCS European Pro- 
gram, and Dr. Mason G. Daly, Assistant Di- 
rector of the European Program. 





Munich's "Fraulein Club" pro- 
vides a environment of re- 
laxation for Raymond ('. Nel- 
son and Marilyn Ohrgn n, 
teachers in school for depend- 
ents. 



Maryland — March-April, 1957 



13 



can summer school and the American junior college. 
The summer school found a new time for education, 
the summer months; the junior college found a new 
space, the large towns and cities ; the Overseas Pro- 
gram found both. It found a new time previously 
overlooked, the period of military service; and it 
found new space, on the bases of overseas military 
installations. 

"The Overseas Program advances the concept 
that . . . young people when in uniform shall have 
an opportunity to further their progress toward a 
university degree even while serving overseas . . ." 

Gradually courses were extended to other parts 
of Germany, the United Kingdom, France, Greece, 
Italy, Noi'th Africa, and the Middle East. These 
programs in Europe all came under the super- 
vision of the Heidelberg Office which was organized 
in April, 1950. This office presently is in charge of 
the reviewing of the European-stationed student 
admission records and grades; it collects tuition 
fees; purchases reference books; distributes text- 
books; and assigns staff members to the hundreds 
of continental centers. Yet almost daily various 
problems are resolved by means of air mail letters 
to the University home campus, by cables and oc- 
casionally by transoceanic telephone conversations. 

World Organization 

At present, the program which was initiated in 
the State of Maryland and at the Pentagon now in- 
cludes three principal divisions. The European Di- 
vision is under the direction of the Heidelberg Office, 
and is headed by Brig. Gen. Herman Beukema, 
USA (retired), formerly Head of the Social Studies 
Department at the United States Military Academy 
at West Point. General Beukema is ably assisted 
by Dr. Mason G. Daly and a staff of over twenty 
persons. The Far East Division, with an admin- 
istrative office in Tokyo, Japan is under the direc- 
tion of Dr. Augustus J. Prahl, a member of the 
University of Maryland faculty for twenty-three 
years. The North Atlantic Division, which was 
established in 1950, is administered directly from 
the home campus office. 

European Division 

France — Bordeaux-Gradignan, Bordeaux-Merig- 
nac, Braconne, Bussac, Captieux, Camp Des Loges, 
Chambley, Chateauroux, Chinon, Chaumont, Croix 
Chapeau, Dreux, Evreux, Etain, Fontainebleau, Fon- 
tenet, Laon, La Rochelle, Maison Fort, Metz, Nancy, 
Orleans, Orly, Paris, Perigueux, Poitiers, Rochefort, 
Toul Eng. Depot, Saumur, Toui-Rosieres Air Base, 
Troisfontaines, Verdun. 

Ethiopia — Asmara. 

French Morocco — Ben Guerir, Nouasseur, Rabat, 
Sidi Dlimane. 

Germany — Amberg, Ansbach, Aschaffenburg, 
Augsburg, Babenhausen, Bad Kissingen, Bad Kreuz- 
nach, Bad Tolz, Bamberg, Baumholder, Bayreuth, 
Berling, Birkenfeld, Bitburg, Boblingen, Bremer- 
haven, Budingen, Crailsheim, Darmstadt, Dexheim, 
Dillingen, Erding, Erlangen, Frankfurt, Freising, 
Friedberg, Furstenfeldbruck, Furth, Fulda, Gar- 
misch, Geinhausen, Giessen, Goppingen, Grafen- 
wohr, Hahn, Hammelburg, Hanau, Heidelberg, Heil- 
bronn, Herzo Base, Hohenfels, Idar-Oberstein, Kais- 
erslautern, Karlsruhe, Kaufbeuren, Kirschgoens, 
Kitzingen, Kornwestheim, Landsberg, Landshut, 
Landstuhl Air Base, Landstuhl Med. Center, Leip- 
heim, Ludwigsburg, Mainz, Mannheim, Moehringen, 
Munich, Murnau, Neckarsulm, Nellingen, Neubiberg, 

14 



Neubruecke, Nurnberg, Oberammergau, Ramstein, 
Regensburg, Rhein-Main, Schwabisch G m u n d, 
Schwabisch Hall, Schweinfurt, Schwetzingen, Seck- 
enheim, Stuttgart, Sembach, Straubing, Spang- 
dahlem, Trier, Ulm, Vaihingen, Wackernheim, Wert- 
heim, Wiesbaden, Wildflecken, Worms, Wurzburg. 

Greece — Athens. 

Italy — Aviano, Leghorn, Naples, Rome, Udine. 

Libya — Tripoli. 

Netherlands — Soesterberg. 

Norway — Oslo. 

Saudi Arabia — Dhahran. 

Turkey — Ankara, Izmir. 

United Kingdom — Alconbury, Bentwaters, Bov- 
ingdon, Brize Norton, Burderop Park, Burtonwood, 
Bushey Hall, Bushy Park, Chelveston, Chicksands, 
East Kirkby, Fairford, Greenham Common, High 
Wycombe, Grosvenor Square, Kirknewton, Laken- 
heath, Lindholme, Manston, Mildenhall, Molesworth, 
Prestwick, Sculthorpe, Sealand, Shellingford, Shep- 
herd's Grove, South Ruislip, Stanstead Mountfitchet, 
Sturgate, Upper Heyford, West Drayton, Wethers- 
field, Wimpole Park. 

Far East Division 

Japan — Ashiya Air Base, Atsugi Naval Air Sta- 
tion, Brady Air Base, Chitose Air Base, Camp Drake, 
Fuchu Air Station, Gifu Air Base, Itami Air Base, 
Itazuke Air Base, Iwakuni Naval Air Station, John- 
son Air Base, Kisarazu Air Base, Camp Kokura, 
Komaki Air Base, Misawa Air Base, Mortyama Air 
Station, Oppama Ordnance Depot, Camp Otsu, Camp 
Schimmelpfennig, Shiroi Air Base, Tachikawa Air 
Base, Tokyo Army Education Center, Tokyo Inter- 
national Airport, Camp Whittington, Yokohama 
Army Education Center, Fleet Activities Yokosuka, 
Yokota Air Base, Camp Zama. 

Korea — Ascom Area Command, I Corps: Jackson 
Compound Command, I Corps Artillery, 36th Engi- 
neer Group; Inchon Area Command, 7th Infantry 
Division : Special Troops, 7th Division Artillery, 17th 
Inf. Regiment, 31st Infantry Regiment; 24th In- 
fantry Division : Special Troops, 6th Tank Battalion, 
34th Infantry Regiment, 21st Infantry Regiment, 
24th Division Artillery, 19th Infantry Regiment; 
Kimpo Air Base (K-14), Kunsan Air Base (K-8), 
Osan Air Base (K-55), Pusan Area Command, Py- 




The CSCS Program for Korea, Okinawa, Guam, 
Formosa and Japan is administered from this 
"little Pentagon" of U.S. and U.N. Commands 
in Tokyo. 



Maryland — March-April, 1957 



ongtaek Air Base (K-6), Seoul Area Command, 
Taegu-Taejon Area Command. 

Okinawa — Kadena Air Base, Nana Air Base. Ry- 
ukyus Command: RYCOM AEC, Machinato AEC, 
Naha AEC. 

North Atlantic Division 

Greenland — Narsarssuak, Sondrestrom, Thule, Ar- 
gentia. 

Iceland — Keflavik. 

Labrador — Goose Bay. 

Newfoundland — Harmon, Pepperrell. 

Eisenhower Lauds Program 

On November 7, 1956, President Dwight D. Eisen- 
hower cabled the following congratulatory message 
to the Maryland Far East Office: 

"In eighteen countries throughout the world the 
Special and Continuation Studies Program of the 
University of Maryland enables our military per- 
sonnel to advance their education and to earn col- 
lege degrees. This program now includes the Far 
East with nearly two thousand American students 
enrolled in Japan, Okinawa, and Korea. This is a 
splendid investment and I know it will continue to 
expand for the good of our young people and the 
strength of the nation." 

It should, perhaps, be emphasized at this point 
that the CSCS program is entirely self-supporting. 
The people of the State of Maryland are therefore 
in no way contributing taxes or other support to 
the education of out-of-state personnel. 

Education Offices Vital 

The University is a guest of the military and is 
an independent organization working in cooperation 
with the Armed Forces. Without the assistance of 
the staffs of Education Offices in the Armed Forces, 
the various overseas programs could not exist. The 
problems of students in overseas centers are taken 
first to the Education Officers, or civilian advisers, 
who give important assistance in surveying the 
course needs of students, publicizing offerings, reg- 
istering students, providing classrooms, assisting in 
the reproduction of quizzes and examinations to be 
given, arranging for quarters for teachers, and in 
carrying out a host of other details. 

Every military center at which the University of 
Maryland offers work has an Education Center. Dr. 
Ehrensberger summed up the importance of such 
service assistance by saying: "The University's 
Overseas Program could not operate without the 
excellent cooperation of the education personnel, 
both military and civilian advisers." 

Since Maryland undertook the job of providing 
education to other parts of the world outside its im- 
mediate campus area, other universities have fol- 
lowed Maryland's initiative, but they have not 
equalled its CSCS program in the extensiveness of 
such an operation. 

The spirit which prompts the motto of the Uni- 
versity's program with the military, "Maryland 
Serves You While You Serve," has been well key- 
noted by the dynamic President of the University 
of Maryland, Dr. Wilson H. Elkins. Dr. Elkins, who 
has given wholehearted support to the CSCS en- 
deavor, feels that "education is not limited to any 
place, time, or person. Anyone who has ability, in- 
terest, and ambition can get an education if the op- 
portunity is available. Our objective is to provide 
opportunity wherever and whenever possible, and 
the University is fulfilling this obligation by taking 
education to those who desire and deserve it." 



Instructors (Jo To Students 

It is sometimes surprising that many who have 
heard of the Maryland Overseas Program often 
sume that it is of a correspondence nature, that 
GIs complete lessons and forward them to the Uni- 
versity for grading. This assumption i certainly 
incorrect, since all Maryland Courses are taught by 

regular staff members. These stall' members are 
recruited by the various College Park academic de- 
partments and are thereafter assigned to over 

bases. The overseas staff members have similar 
academic backgrounds to those of their counterparts 
teaching identical courses on the campus. Through- 
out the school year close liaison is maintained be- 
tween the individual staff member and his academic 
department. 

The CSCS program, which is a unique thing in 
the annals of education history, has simply reversed 
what is considered to be a normal procedure: in- 
stead of the students coming to the teacher, the 
teacher goes to the students. 

In order to provide a variety of courses, instruc- 
tors are rotated from base to base every eight or six- 




Mary land^-M arch- April, 1957 



CSCS activity close to home — the mobile library 
unit which makes library service available to 
off-campus students in the Washington-Balti- 
more-College Park area. 

teen weeks. During an eight-week term each in- 
structor usually teaches one course on Monday and 
Wednesday evening, and another on Tuesday and 
Thursday evening. The remaining evenings permit 
the instructor to hold special makeup sessions which 
may be required for those unable to attend the 
regular class because of a special flight or duty as- 
signment. Each instructor carries a collection of 
approved books for collateral reading from base to 
base in a special book kit. For the Stateside Pro- 
gram, an Off -Campus Library Service has been estab- 
lished, and a Bookmobile is operated for this pur- 
pose. 

The overseas instructors may set up teaching 
quarters in Quonset huts, snack bars, exclusive 
hotels, or even in tents. When conditions have per- 
mitted, classes have even occasionally been held out- 
of-doors ! 

Dependent Personnel Day Program 

Off-campus courses are all held during the eve- 
ning hours, with but one exception. The one ex- 
ception to night class periods is the day program 

15 




Abdullah Ham dam studies the struc- 
ture of human perception in a CSCS 
class concerned with audio-visual ed- 
ucation, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. 






at McGraw Kasorne in Munich. This day program 
was established in 1951, and is designed to meet the 
needs of the dependents of service personnel who 
are qualified for college work. The McGraw Kasorne 
program was opened at the request of the military, 
and affords college-level educational opportunities 
for the dependent children of the Armed Forces per- 
sonnel stationed overseas. Dormitory facilities and 
other logistical support is available to authorized 
dependents. The program is complete with recrea- 
tional facilities similar to those available to students 
at College Park. 

Complete Degree Programs 

The courses that are offered overseas are the 
same as those offered on the College Park campus. 
For purposes of planning and administrating the 
program, the College of Special and Continuation 
Studies has full responsibility. Courses of study un- 
der this college are primarily arranged so that the 
individual may receive a degree in one of three pos- 
sible program fields: (1) The Bachelor of Arts De- 
gree in General Studies; (2) The Bachelor of Science 
Degree in Military Science; and (3) The Bachelor of 
Science Degree in Military Affairs. Although not 
ranging literally from A to Z, the possibilities for 
courses include Business Administration, Econom- 
ics, Education, English Language and Literature, 



Geography, Government and Politics, History, For- 
eign Languages, Philosophy, Psychology, Sociology, 
and Speech, among other offerings. Experience with 
the CSCS program over the last ten years has shown 
that students are glad of the chance to be taught 
by specialists. Students are exposed to a wide offer- 
ing of courses, and they have an opportunity to meet 
a great number of individual personalities — probably 
more so than on a regular college campus. 

Students Highly Motivated 

University instructors themselves are intrigued 
with an assignment which may take them anywhere 
from the gaiety of Vienna, "the Paris of the East," 
to the timelessness of the shadows of Fujiyame, 
sacred mountain of the Orient. Overseas faculty 
have a high regard for the military student. Unani- 
mously, they express feeling a real satisfaction in 
working with their military students, and they feel 
that the military student is strongly motivated and 
of considerable personal responsibility. They find, 
too, that the military students have a seriousness 
of purpose not generally equalled. 

And the academic success of military students? 

Last May, one overseas student received top hon- 
ors in his overseas graduating class. When the final 
computations were made at College Park, the Uni- 
versity's Registrar announced that this student "out- 



^fc^K. ^^*- - 





Down the streets of Oberammergau, home of 
the historic Passion Play, walk University of 
Maryland teachers and students. 



If. 



Maryland — March-Apr'd, 195! 



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c-'"'-. .U'7\'( hi i, i and Dr. Ell 
mi surrounded by military 
anil educational officials on 
tin ir arrival at Nt wbifa rg 
Air Basi . Munich. Tfu I 
n rsity maintains clo 
tact with its o 
by fn <im ut visits of can 
officials. 



honored" all of the two thousand graduating seniors 
who received their diplomas from the University 
of Maryland last year. Other statistics have re- 
vealed that overseas graduates differed consider- 
ably from their stateside counterparts. Four-fifths 
of the overseas class of a recent group of graduates 
were married, and the group could count among 
themselves about one hundred children. The aver- 
age age of the overseas graduate was much higher 
than that of the stateside graduate ; thirty-six years 
of age seemed average. And these figures are sig- 
nificant. These more mature students appear to be 
academically somewhat more responsible. 

Only a fraction of overseas students actually com- 
plete degree programs with the University of Mary- 
land. Most students enroll with Maryland to com- 
plete courses and transfer course credits for those 
studies to their home institution at a later date. A 
recent survey of four hundred former servicemen 
who transferred from the Maryland Overseas Pro- 
gram to stateside universities, revealed that one 
hundred and ten degrees were earned at eighty- 
three different universities and colleges. Interest- 
ingly enough, twenty-two of these former students 
graduated with honors from institutions other than 
the University of Maryland. 

As shown above, presidential recognition has been 
accorded the past Off-Campus Program of the Uni- 



versity of Maryland. Expressions of appreciation 
and commendations of the program have been ex- 
tended to Maryland by other national figures. 

Yet, perhaps, no one has commented more force- 
fully, or summed up more effectively the significance 
of the University's CSCS Program than Governor 
Theodore R. McKeldin who expressed the im- 
portance of education for the military in an ad- 
dress to the Baltimore Armed Services Education 
Conference. He stated: "The man in uniform ought 
to be the best educated American alive, for there 
is no predicting at what moment he may be required 
to perform some non-military duty that will tax 
his intellectual capacity along lines that have no 
relation to strategy or tactics. For the supreme 
duty of our military establishment, Army, Navy. 
and Air Force, is not to win wars but to assure the 
safety of the nation, an objective that sometimes 
depends upon the physical strength, but more often 
upon the brains and character of our armed men. 
. . . Accordingly, I salute the people who are carry- 
ing forward the educational program in the armed 
forces as men engaged in a peculiarly American en- 
terprise, as American as the Kentucky rifle, as 
American as the covered wagon, above all as Ameri- 
can as the high resolve that government of the peo- 
ple, by the people, for the people shall not perish 
from the earth." # 



Dr. Augustus J. Prahl {2nd 
from left), the Director of 
the new Far East Program, 
is surrounded by members of 
his staff and representatives 
of the University a)id the mili- 
tary, as he left for his new 
post in September. 



Maryland — March-April, 19b', 




DEDICATION' — con tinned from page 5 

"This distinguished Marylander, whose only son 
died in action in the Second World War, had an 
abiding and enthusiastic concern for the well-being 
of the young men and women of this State. 

"Much of the fine spirit that exists in this Uni- 
versity is the spirit of Judge Cole. 

"The high morale that we find today on the cam- 
pus is largely inspired by his grand enthusiasm. 

"It is with pride that I join with you today in 
these ceremonies, giving his illustrious name to a 
building that will live and grow in its usefulness 
for succeeding generations of men and women of 
the University of Maryland. 

"I am sorry that Judge Cole cannot be with us 
in person. I am sure his thoughts are filled with 
the occasion and clearly pictured in his keen and 
penetrating mind. 

"I am sure you join with me in the hope and 
the prayer that he soon will be able to visit the 
University again and to view this building with his 
name above the portals. 

"Let us who are here — and all who love the Uni- 
versity of Maryland — dedicate ourselves to the de- 
termination that this University will, in its service 
to mankind, continue to be a University in fact, 
and grow through the centuries with the greatness 
of America." 

Presentation of Plaque — Charles P. McCormick, 

Chairman of the Board of Regents 
"The plaque reads: 

'Wm. P. Cole, Jr. 
Student Activities Building 
This building, provided in part by the 
students of the University of Maryland, is 
dedicated to the welfare of youth and is 
named in honor of William P. Cole, Jr., 
distinguished judge and devoted public 
servant, a member of the Board of Re- 
gents since 1031 and chairman from 19UU 
to 1956. 

December 1U, 1956' " 

Response for Judge William P. Cole, Jr. — Mr. C. 

Walter Cole 

"On behalf of my beloved brother, William P. 
Cole, Jr., I acknowledge with grateful appreciation 
the high honors extended to him upon this occasion. 
We all wish, of course, that he were present to 
acknowledge, in person, the dedication of this mag- 
nificent building in his name, and also the kind and 
beautiful tributes presented by Dr. Elkins, Mr. 
Deckman, Mayor D'Alesandro, Governor McKeldin 
and Mr. McCormick. He deeply appreciates, I know, 
the thoughtful and generous resolution of the Board 
of Regents, and the thorough and painstaking work 
of the Committee on Arrangements and in par- 
ticular, the love and devotion manifested by Mr. B. 
Herbert Brown, Chairman of that Committee. May 
I, too, thank those present for their manifestation 
of interest and affection. 

"It is appropriate, indeed, that this particular 
building — Student Activities Building — should be 
so intimately associated with the name of William 
P. Cole, Jr., because of his ever-keen interest in the 
students and their activities. As those associated 
with the University well know, 'Bill' Cole, over the 
years, has been a frequent visitor on the campus and 
at the many sport and other events of the students. 
He travelled far and wide with the football team. 
Only recently, before his present illness, he was in 



Florida and North Carolina Avith the football team. 

"These exercises, I firmly believe, are a crowning 
event in his many years of close association with 
the University as a student, alumnus, member of 
the Board of Regents, and until last June, Chairman 
of the Board, when he resigned. It will be a privi- 
lege to report to him and to his good wife, who is 
also ill and unable to be here, the details of this joy- 
ous and memorable occasion in his honor. 

"Thank you very much." 

Concluding Remarks — Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, 
President of the University 
"Warmest greetings from us to Judge and 
Mrs. Cole and we all hope, I am sure, that he 
will take away from the University Hospital 
with him in a short time some pleasant 
thoughts of this occasion and some of the 
momentos of this occasion. If Judge Cole 
were here he would thank all of you most 
graciously for honoring him and we would 
reply, I am sure, it is an honor truly and fidly 
deserved. The name William P. Cole, Jr. Stu- 
dent Activities Building will stand timeless in 
recognition of unselfish service. 

"May we be guided by Divine Providence in 
the use of this building and may all life's 
blessings fill the life of Judge and Mrs. Cole." 
Judge Cole, was born May 11, 1889. He gradu- 
ated from Maryland Agricultural College with a de- 
gree in Civil Engineering in 1910. He completed 
two years of study at the University of Maryland 
Law School in 1912 and passed the Maryland Bar 
Examination in the same year. 

Judge Cole practiced law in Towson, Maryland, 
from 1912 until his election to the Congress of the 
United States, for the term 1927-29. He subsequent- 
ly served as Congressman from 1941 to 1942. He 
resigned from Congress in October, 1942, to accept 
appointment as Judge, of the United States Court 
of Customs and Patent Appeals. This position he 
now holds. 

In 1931, Judge Cole was appointed to the Board 
of Regents of the University of Maryland and was 
Chairman of this body from 1944 until 1956. He has 
also served as a member of the Board of Regents 
of the Smithsonian Institute. 

Judge Cole saw service in World War I, as a Cap- 
tain of the 316th Infantrv, 79th Division. His son, 
William P. Cole, III, left the University of Mary- 
land while a student and entered service as a private 
on June 26, 1941. He was later commissioned and 
received a battlefield promotion to the rank of Cap- 
tain. On September 11, 1944, he was killed in action 
with the 110th Field Artillery during a drive 
through France, under General Patton. 

From 1933, to 1942, Judge Cole headed" the Cole 
Committee of Congress which was a sub-committee 
for the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Com- 
merce. This group had responsibility for investi- 
gating the petroleum industry throughout the coun- 
try on such problems as orderly production, conser- 
vation and prevention of waste, productions, trans- 
portation, refining and the investigation of the in- 
dustry in general. This committee made a major 
contribution to the war effort through the policies 
it established in the industry prior to the outbreak 
of hostilities. The committee report prepared after 
Judge Cole's appointment to the Customs Court, de- 
votes a paragraph of the special appreciation to the 
former chairman of the committee for his leader- 
ship and efforts which made possible the extremely 
successfulness of the Cole Committee. # 



Mary la nd — Ma rch -April, 1 95 i 




University's New Cobalt 60 Unit 
Places Cancer Under New Attack 



A radio-active "Cobalt 60 Un- 
it," for deep-seated cancer ther- 
apy, the first such apparatus in 
the State, has been installed in 
the University's Division of Ra- 
dio Therapy, Department of Radi- 
ology in Baltimore. 

Assembly work on the $28,500 
machine was concluded in No- 
vember with the insertion of a 
$6,500 source of cobalt. Approx- 
imately $18,000 has been spent 
in renovation of an area of the 
University's Psychiatric Insti- 
tute into treatment, waiting and 
dressing rooms, offices, and an es- 
pecially equipped room for the 
3-ton machine. 

Delivers Bigger Dose 

Super-voltage therapy makes 
possible the delivery of a bigger 
dose in the malignant tissue, thus 
increasing the chance of cure. 
Other advantages include less ir- 
radiation reaction to the skin, less 
reaction in the normal tissue and 
less systemic reaction. 

Diagnosis for this type of ther- 
apy is accomplished by touch ; 
X-ray; or biopsy, a sampling of 



the tissue. Following diagnosis, 
the physician is able to pin-point 
the exact location of the malig- 
nancy. The machine is then em- 
ployed, with no pain to the pa- 
tient, in bombarding the diseased 
tissue with radio-active cobalt. 

Gift From Filbert Foundation 

To be known as the Martha V. 
Filbert Radiation Center, the fa- 
cility was made possible by a 
$35,000 gift from the Filbert 
Foundation as a memorial to Mrs. 
Filbert by her son, Alvin B. Fil- 
bert; her daughter, Mrs. E. H. 
Landauer; and her late son, John 
H. Filbert. 

From 1918, until her death in 
1954, Mrs. Filbert, as president 
of the J. H. Filbert Company of 
Baltimore, built one of the larg- 
est independent margarine, may- 
onnaise and food companies in 
the East. She was known as an 
outstanding business leader for 
her many contributions to the 
food industry. 

Other gifts to tin 1 cancer ther- 
apy center included $8,000 from 
the University Hospital's Wom- 
en's Auxiliary Hoard and $5,000 



from the National Brewing Com- 
pany of Baltimore. 

The lieu equipmenl will pro- 
duce rays equivalent in a •".- 
million volt X-raj machine and 
will be used for treatment of 
deep-seated cancer in auch ai 
as lungs, ovaries. bone and blad- 
der. Conventional therapy ma- 
chines provide only 250,000 volts. 

Although COball will not con- 
taminate anything in its immed- 
iate area, t he unit will lie housed 
in a room built top. bottom and 
sides of it; 1 .- inch reinforced con- 
crete. A four-inch door to the 
therapy room contains a lead 

center. 

At the present time the De- 
partment of Radiology, under the 

direction of Dr. John Dennis, is 
devising and building a special 

piece of equipment which will 
further aid in the localization of 
tumors. 

The new Martha V. Filbert Ra- 
diation Center will be under the 
Division of Radio Therapy, head- 
ed by Dr. Fernando Bloedorn. 

Sun Editorial Praises Unit 

The Baltimore Sun, reporting 
on the installation of the Cobalt 
60 unit, stated in an editorial 
titled "Atomic Benefactor" : 

"One of the first and most bene- 
ficial effects discovered in radia- 
tion has been its use against can- 
cer. Now it is to be used on a 
large scale in Maryland in the 
"Cobalt 60" unit recently in- 
stalled at the University of Mary- 
land's Radiology Department in 
Baltimore, where the $28,000 ma- 
chine is now available for ther- 
apy- 

"The machine, after diagnosis 
is made, can painlessly bombard 
diseased tissue with radio-active 
cobalt. This supervoltage ther- 
apy delivers a bigger dose to the 
malignant tissue, with less ir- 
radiation reaction to normal tis- 
sue and to the skin, than has 
heretofore been possible. Its dose 
provides rays equivalent to 3,000,- 
000 volts from an X-ray machine. 
against the normal 250,000 volts 
used for therapy. 

"The marvels of the atomic 
age (and the horrors) come so 
fast that we hardly pause to com- 
ment on or note them. This new 
machine, the first of its kind in 
Maryland, deserves notice as one 
of the happier byproducts of mod- 
ern research." # 



Marylav d — March- A pril, J 95 7 



19 



Davidge Hall, once a church, 
soon to be torn down and re- 
placed by $1,000,000 medical 
services library. 




New Library 



To Replace 



Davidge Hall 



By Donald Hirzel 

(Reprinted by permission of 
The Baltimore Sun) 

The building housing the oldest 
medical college library in the 
United States that has been in 
continuous existence is to be 
razed to make way for a modern 
library building in Baltimore. 

The structure is the three-story 
brick library of the University of 
Maryland Medical School and is 
at Greene and Lombard Streets. 

Built originally as a church in 
1843, the library, known as Dav- 
idge Hall, will be razed next 
month. In its place will arise a 
$1,000,000 medical sciences li- 
brary equipped to serve the grow- 
ing needs of the University. 

Mrs. Ida Marian Robinson, li- 
brarian, said the converted church 
has served as the school library 
since 1913. The college's book col- 
lection was begun in 1813. 

The new structure will serve 
the schools of medicine, nursing, 
dentistry and pharmacy. 

Destruction of the old building 
will stir nostalgia in many, she 
said, since it served as a second 
home to hundreds of hard-work- 
ing medical students. 

The man Mrs. Robinson be- 
lieves will miss the library the 



most is a Baltimore doctor who as 
a student bore the nickname 
"Peanuts." 

"This doctor, who shall remain 
nameless," Mrs. Robinson said, 
"had little money while attending 
school so he took the job of jan- 
itor of the library and had a room 
in the basement." 

Since he was so poor, he per- 
mitted himself only five cents a 
day for lunch. And for that five 
cents he bought a bag of peanuts. 

"From this daily habit, he nat- 
urally gained the nickname of 
'Peanuts'," she said. 

Converted From Church 

In 1913, when the school con- 
verted the church into a library, 
the building was surrounded by 
trees and shrubs and a brick side- 
walk led up to the massive front 
door. Today, the building huddles 
next to giants of steel and con- 
crete. 

Only part of the structure was 
used as a library at first. 

A young man rented an office 
in the basement in 1917 and set 
up a book store, specializing in 
law books. He was James M. Hep- 
bron, present Baltimore City pol- 
ice commissioner. 



Architect's conception of how 
the new structure ivill appear 
jvhen completed in 1958. 



20 




During World War I members 
of the Student Army Training 
Corps used the basement as a 
mess hall and the Red Cross util- 
ized space there to prepare hos- 
pital supplies. 

From 1920 until 1936 a section 
of the children's clinic of the hos- 
pital was located in the basement. 

The building was built in 1843 
by the West Baltimore Metho- 
dist Protestant Church. That or- 
ganization sold the structure to 
the Calvarv Methodist Episcopal 
Church in 1880. 

Named For Founder 

When the school bought the 
property, the name was changed 
to Davidge Hall, in honor of John 
Beale Davidge, who founded the 
University of Maryland. 

Mrs. Ruth Lee Briscoe, the first 
librarian in the converted church, 
had a lofty position on a platform 
at one end of the main room. The 
loft was the former pulpit, Mrs. 
Robinson said. The platform was 
removed about eight years later. 

A balcony was added which 
connected with the old choir loft. 
Book shelves lined the walls. In 
those days the books were kept 
under lock and key. 

"Each book case," she ex- 
plained, "was enclosed in a wire 
screen and locked. So when a 
student wanted a book, the li- 
brarian had first to unlock the 
case." 

This practice was later aban- 
doned in favor of open shelves. 

Stained Windows Remain 

There were originally three 
stained-glass windows in the 
:hurch. The center window was 
removed and the space sealed up 
for library purposes, but the 
sther windows remained. 

So when a student was strug- 
gling over the human anatomy, 
his figure quite often would be 
Dathed in the bright colors from 
the religious window panes. 

The two remaining windows 
.vill be given to the West Balti- 
more Methodist Church before 
Davidge Hall is destroyed. 

"In a way it is sad that the 
Duilding will be destroyed," Mrs. 
Robinson said, "but it is just out- 
dated and does not serve the 
leeds of the school, so it must 
?o." 

She added that a fitting tribute 
;o the hall will be the new build- 
ng, which should be completed 
sometime in 1958. # 




H. A. B. DUNNING MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP 

Dr. H. A. B. Dunning presents a $50,000 gift to W. Paul Briggs, 
establishing the H. A. B. Dunning Memorial Fellowship with the 
American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education. Dr. Dunning 
was the fourth President of the Foundation in 1952-53. 

Dr. Dunning is Chairman of the Board of Directors of Hynson, 
Westcott & Dunning, Inc., an important manufacturer of prescription 
drugs and diagnostic agents distributed throughout the world. For 
many years, he was Professor of Chemistry, Department of Pharmacy, 
University of Maryland. 

The American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education, chart- 
ered in 1942, has aided over 1,300 pharmacists to complete their edu- 
cation and also nearly 400 graduate scientists in the fields of pharmacy 
to achieve their doctor of philosophy degrees in preparation for teach- 
ing and research. 

Dr. Dunning is a past President of the American Pharmaceutical 
Association and as Chairman of the Association's Pharmacy Head- 
quarters Building Fund, was largely responsible for the unique site 
and magnificent building in Washington, D. C, housing the Associa- 
tion. 

Dr. Dunning was a member of the Class of 1897 of the School of 
Pharmacy, and was awarded the honorary Doctor of Science degree 
in 1941. Dr. Briggs received his Master of Science degree from the 
School of Pharmacy in 1930; he was awarded the honorary Doctor 
of Science degree at Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science 
in 1947. # 



Dr. Gordon Awarded Grant For 
Political History Study In Australia 



The Department of State has 
announced the awarding of a 
grant to Donald C. Gordon, Ph.D., 
Associate Professor of History, 
to conduct research in political 
history at the Australian Nation- 
al University in Canberra, Aus- 
tralia. 

The award is made under the 
provisions of Public Law 584, 
79th Congress, the Fulbright Act 
and is one of approximately 400 
giants for lecturing and research 
abroad included in the program 



for the academic year, 1957-58. 
As provided by the Act, all candi- 
dates are selected by the Board 
of Foreign Scholarships, the 
members of which are appointed 
by the President. Lecturers and 
research scholars are recommend- 
ed for the Board's consideration 
by the Conference Board of As- 
sociated Research Councils, which 
has been designated to receive 
and review the applications of 
candidates in these categories. - 



Maryland — March-April, 1957 



21 




Dr. Singer To Direct Research On 
Gauge To Measure Meteoric Dust 



The man pictured on the cover 
of this issue of Maryland is Dr. 
S. Fred Singer, Associate Profes- 
sor of Physics at the University. 

Dr. Singer, during his tenure 
at the University, is perhaps best 
known for his work in construct- 
ing special devices in the war- 
head section of the "Terrapin" 
rocket. 

Assigned New Project 

Now Dr. Singer has been asked 
to serve as Technical Director for 
a project to design and operate 
a radio-active gauge for measur- 
ing the erosion caused by meteor- 
ic dust to the skin of a satellite. 
A $24,150 grant has been award- 
ed to the University by the Na- 
tional Science Foundation for this 
work. 

Dr. Singer is currently engaged 
in several research projects in- 
cluding the exploration of the up- 
per atmosphere with small roc- 
kets and design of artificial satel- 
lites. 

Construction of the gauge will 
be tailored for use with presently- 
conceived satellites, but will be 
flexible enough so that the in- 
strument can be adapted for use 
with more advanced satellites in 
the future. 

Dr. Singer, while an instructor 
in physics at Princeton University 

22 



in 1943, was responsible for the 
program of electrical and atomic 
physics laboratories developed 
there. 

Mine Expert During War 

From 1944 to 1946, he was on 
active duty with the U.S. Navy 
where he was primarily concerned 
with mine warfare and mine de- 
sign. In 1946, he was attached 
to the Johns Hopkins University 
Applied Physics Laboratory in 
Silver Spring, Md. 

There he was engaged in high 
altitude research with rockets on 
the primary cosmic radiation and 
ionosphere, sea level cosmic ray 
experiments, and cosmic ray bal- 
loon measurements ; the latter in- 
volved participation in two Nav- 
al operations into the Arctic and 
shipboard rocket launchings at 
the equator. 

Assigned To U.S. Embassy 

From 1950 to 1953, he was the 
scientific liaison officer with the 
Office of Naval Research, U.S. 
Embassy, London, where he stud- 
ied European research programs 
in cosmic rays and elementary 
particle physics, upper atmos- 
phere physics, radioastronomy 
and astrophysics; visited labora- 
tories working in these fields and 
reported on outstanding research 
work and new developments. # 



McCartney Heads 

New Office Of 
University Relations 

The University's academic and 
administrative information serv- 
ices have been consolidated into 
a new Office of University Rela- 
tions. 

Robert J. McCartney, Director 
of Publicity and News at the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts, has 
been appointed to head the pro- 
gram. 

Robert Breunig, formerly Edi- 
tor of technical publications with 
the Asphalt Institute, has been 
appointed Editor of University 
Publications. 

The move creates a single offi- 
cial source for news and publi- 
cations related to the Univer- 
sity's general program. 

Broadens Public Services 

President Elkins said the ob- 
jectives of the new department 
will be grounded in a conception 
of improved public service. He 
pointed out that rapid develop- 
ment and diversification of the 
University's program in the years 
ahead will bring the institution's 
influence to bear on every indus- 
try, profession and home in the 
State. As the University moves 
ahead with a balanced program 
of high educational quality, the 
new office will be expected to as- 
sist the public to realize maxi- 
mum benefit from its achieve- 
ments and services. 

McCartney received his B.A. 
degree from the University of 
Massachusetts in 1941 and for 
the next four years was in the 
Army Intelligence Services. On 
his release from the service he 
returned to the Univei'sity of 
Massachusetts to direct its news 
and publications activities which 
have increased in scope during 
the intervening years. 

Winner of Merit Awards 

The new Director has been ac- 
tive in college public relations or- 
ganizations as president of the 
New England Land-Grant Pub- 
lic Relations Council and as a 
member of the American College 
Public Relations Association. 
Publications issued by his office 
at the University of Massachu- 
setts have received merit awards 
from the American Alumni Coun- 
cil. Mr. McCartney has also been 
active in civic affairs in Amherst, 



Maryland — March- April, 1957 



Massachusetts, as a member of 
the Chamber of Commerce and as 
Director of Public Relations for 
the City's bicentennial celebra- 
tion. 

He is married and the father of 
four children. 

Former Technical Editor 

Breunig received his Bachelor 
of Arts degree in journalism from 
Indiana University in 1950. Dur- 
ing World War II he fought with 
the Second Infantry Division. He 
has worked as a newspaper re- 
porter and assistant editor ; news- 
i writer with the U. S. Information 
I Service ; magazine editor and di- 
ll rector of public relations with a 
national fraternal organization ; 
and as Editor of Technical Publi- 
cations with the Asphalt Insti- 
tute, an international trade as- 
. sociation. 

He is married and the father 
of one child. 

Tom Orpwood, Editor of the 
University's News Service, also 
forms part of the newly organ- 
1 ized Office of University Rela- 
tions. # 



• Dentistry Receives 
1 Fellowship Grant 

i! The U.S. Public Health Service 
' has given the School of Dentistry 
i a grant of $864 for dental student 
research fellowships. 

The funds will be made avail- 
able to deserving dental students 
in Baltimore for research projects 
! in conjunction with their senior 
< thesis. 

Established for the purpose of 
. developing research personnel in 
i the field of dentistry, the grant 
j makes a total of six fellowships 
I received by the University's 
I School of Dentistry from P.H.S. 
I this year. # 



i Civil War Cannons 

Are Resurrected 

i 

Two Civil War cannons have 
been placed in front of the Arm- 
j ory at College Park. 

The cannons, which once stood 

on the present site of the Uni- 
1 versity chapel, had been stored in 
j an area behind a men's dormitory 
; on campus. They are believed to 

have been equipment for the 
i Maryland militia in 1864, but it 

is doubtful that they were ever 

used in combat. # 




Dean Mount Dies, Head Of College 
Of Home Economics Since 1925 



Marie Mount, Dean of the Col- 
lege of Home Economics since it 
was founded in 1925, died on Jan- 
uary 21, 1957. 

Miss Mount came to the Uni- 
versity as head of the Depart- 
ment of Home and Institution 
Management in 1919 after at- 
tending Vassar, receiving her de- 
gree from the University of Indi- 
ana, and working on nutrition 
research projects in Baltimore. 
She held a Master's degree from 
Columbia University. 

Loved and respected by hun- 
dreds of students, faculty and 
friends, Miss Mount was instru- 
mental in establishing many 
scholarships under which young 
women could study home econom- 
ics. 

Dr. Elkins Comments 

Dr. Elkins commenting on 
Dean Mount's death said : 

"The death of Dean Mount has 
caused a real loss to the Univer- 
sity. She and her colleagues have 
built up a splendid organization. 
The College of Home Economics 
has as fine and enthusiastic alum- 



Maryland — March-April, 1957 



ni as any in the Universitv fam- 
ily." 

Miss Mount was owner of the 
Iron Gate Inn in Washington, 
D. C, and served as President 
of the Maryland Home Econom- 
ics Association. She was a mem- 
ber of the American Home Eco- 
nomics Association and appointed 
to the Executive Board of the 
Home Economics Section of the 
Land Grant Colleges and Univer- 
sities Association. 

Director of Food Firm 

Dean Mount was a member of 
Kappa Kappa Gamma, a social 
sorority; Phi Kappa Phi. an hon- 
or society, and Omicron Nu, a 
home economics honor society. 
She was also a member of the 
American Dietetic Association, 
the American Association of Uni- 
versity Professors, the Ameri- 
can Association of University 
Women, American Council on 
Family Relations and the Capitol 
Hill Club. Miss Mount was a di- 
rector of Hines Park Foods. Inc.. 
a canning concern and Chairman 
of the Health Committee of the 
Prince Georges County Commun- 
ity Chest and Planning Council. 



■l:\ 



Alumni Portraits — 1 



Engineer Alvin L. Aubinoe 
Builds For A Modern World 



By Sally L. Ogden 



Alvin L. Aubinoe, Engineering, 
1926, has achieved important suc- 
cess as an engineer, builder, archi- 
tect and developer. 

Born on Lincoln's birthday, 
1903, in the District of Colum- 
bia, Mr. Aubinoe attended local 
schools, graduated from Tech 
High School and became a grad- 
uate engineer of the University 
of Maryland in 1926. Now, at 
fifty-four, he has established him- 
self as a civic leader, business 
man and avid alumnus of the 
University of Maryland. 

Mr. Aubinoe is credited with 
designing and constructing many 
architecturally modern buildings 
in Washington, chief of which is 
the DuPont Plaza Hotel at Du- 
Pont Circle presently owned and 
managed by the Alvin L. Aubinoe 
Company. 

From offices in the Hotel Du- 
Pont Plaza, Aubinoe directs the 
operations of his several com- 
panies. He is President of Alvin 
L. Aubinoe, Inc.; Aubinoe Con- 
struction Company ; Wildwood In- 
vestment Corporation ; The Allan- 
dott, Inc. ; the Washington and 
Lee Apartments, Inc. ; Parkside 
Apartments, Inc.; DuPont Plaza, 
Inc.; Treasurer of Hardware, Inc. 
and principal partner in the archi- 
tectural firm of Aubinoe, Edwards 
and Beery. It is estimated that 
these firms do a combined busi- 
ness of $10,000,000 a year. 
Outstanding Buildings 

Many modern designed apart- 
ment houses, office buildings, and 
industrial structures as well as 
hotels and homes have been de- 
signed and constructed by the 
Aubinoe firms. Among these are: 
The Congressional Hotel on New 
Jersey Avenue and C Street, 
Southeast, completed prior to the 
erection of the DuPont Plaza 



Hotel; Carillon House at 2500 
Wisconsin Avenue, N.W. ; apart- 
ment buildings located at 2000 
Connecticut Avenue, N.W., 4801 
Connecticut Avenue, N.W., The 
Majestic at Sixteenth and Lamont 
Streets, N.W., The Otis and Og- 
den Garden Apartments, 1445 Otis 
Place, N.W., Abingdon Apart- 
ments, Alexandria, Va., Washing- 
ton and Lee Apartments, Arling- 
ton, Va., 1725 Massachusetts Ave- 
nue, N.W., 1600 Sixteenth Street, 
N.W.; The Wire Building, Ver- 
mont Avenue and K Street, and 
the Commonwealth Office Build- 
ing. 

Mr. Aubinoe has had the dis- 
tinction of receiving awards of 
merit from the Washington Board 
of Trade and the Maryland Divi- 
sion of the Washington-Metro- 
politan Chapter of the American 
Institute of Architects. Among 
his prize-winning buildings are 
The Wire Office Building, Abing- 
don Apartments of Alexandria, 
Va., DuPont Plaza Hotel and the 
Thomas Somerville Residence at 
Kenwood, Md. He was recently 
commissioned to plan and erect a 
new office building for the Na- 
tional Association of Home Build- 
ers, to be used as National Head- 
quarters in the Nation's Capitol. 
Plans are being completed for a 
$10,000,000 shopping center de- 
velopment at Wildwood Manor, 
Bethesda, Md. 

Built, owned and operated by 
Mr. Aubinoe are such large de- 
velopments as the Washington 
and Lee Apartments; 4801 Con- 
necticut Avenue, N.W. ; Wildwood 
Manor Subdivision, Bethesda, 
Md. ; Decatur Homes, Eighth and 
Decatur Streets, N.E. ; Parkside 
Apartments, Wisconsin Avenue 
Avenue and Montrose Avenue, 
Bethesda, Md. 



Work In Belgian Congo 

Mr. Aubinoe's work operations 
have extended as far away as 
Leopoldville, the capital of the 
Belgian Congo. There he helped 
construct a luxury apartment 
for the Belgian Government, in- 
tended to help attract mining 
and industrialists to the area. 
Mr. Aubinoe's firm planned the 
project and supplied a super- 
visory construction crew. The 
building has one hundred apart- 
ments, each estimated to cost 
$40,000. Special features are air 
conditioning, extra-large rooms 
and servants' quarters, a swim- 
ming pool and tennis courts. The 
plant offers resort facilities and 
overlooks a five-mile wide section 
of the Congo River. 

Aubinoe began his career as an 
engineer with the Rust Engineer- 
ing Company. At REC he worked 
as an engineer on the Dam 
Filtration and Water Works at 
Patton, Pennsylvania. He was 
employed as an engineer in the 
Ford Assembly Plant in Norfolk, 
Virginia, and then returned to 
Washington to take a position as 
engineer for the Washington 
Railway and Electric Company. 
Later he joined the fii'm of Caf- 
ritz Construction Company as 
Architect and Manager of Con- 
struction. He stayed with the 
firm until 1938 when he estab- 
lished his present business as 
architect, developer, and builder. 

Mr. and Mrs. Aubinoe live at 
8000 Overhill Road, Bethesda, 
Marvland. Thev have two child- 
ren,' Mrs. Paul' Griffith of 5504 
Lambeth Road, Bethesda, Mary- 
land, and a son, Alvin L. Aubinoe, 
Jr. 

Much of Mr. Aubinoe's work 
in the Washington area is con- 



24 



Maryland — March-April, 195? 



cerned with problems of zoning 
and housing codes. He serves as 
chairman of the D. C. Building 
Code Advisory Committee as well 
as a member of the Commission- 
ers' Zoning Advisory Committee. 
Mr. Aubinoe has a great will to 
work and finds time to devote a 
considerable portion of his en- 
ergies to work for his church. He 
is a member of the Bethesda 
Presbyterian Church where he 
serves as trustee and president 
Df the Board of Deacons. 

Civic Leader 

He is a member of the Beta 
Kappa Chapter of Kappa Alpha 
Fraternity (University of Mary- 
land) ; the Court of Honor, Wood 
Province, Kappa Alpha Order; 
Treasurer of the Beta Kappa 
Corporation; President of Fra- 
ternity Housing Corporation, 
Kappa Alpha Order ; Past Nation- 
al President of Alpha Delta Sig- 
ma Fraternity; Past President of 
the Home Builders Association of 
Metropolitan Washington; Direc- 
tor of Home Builders Association 
of Metropolitan Washington; Di- 
rector of National Association of 
Home Builders ; Director of the 
Federal City Council ; Director of 
National Metropolitan Bank of 
Washington ; and member of the 
Board of Trustees of the United 
Community Services of Wash- 
ington, and Director, Washing- 
ton Board of Trade. 

As an alumnus of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, he has been a 
staunch supporter of the football 
team. He is a Past President of 
the Terrapin Club of the Univer- 
sity and an interested party to 
all University of Maryland devel- 
opments. 

Travelling to football games 
and playing golf at Columbia 
Country Club are Aubinoe's fa- 
vorite means of recreation. For 
rest relaxation, however, he re- 
tires to his "Pink Palace", a re- 
sort residence on the sands of 
Rehobeth, Delaware, built by the 
Duponts and acquired by Aubinoe 
a few years ago. There he and 
his family escape to the leisure 
of a quiet comfortable retreat, 
which offers a family swimming 
pool, tennis courts and the beach. 

With the Terps in the fall, 
"Pink Palace" in the spring and 
summer, and business as usual all 
the time, Aubinoe says, "the 
year is pretty well cut out for 
me ... " 

The University is proud of 
hard-working, creative A 1 v i n 
Aubinoe, Class of 1926. # 




Mr. Aubinoe operates his construction complex from a suite of 
offices in the Dupont Plaza Hotel. 




One of the "pride and joys" of the Aubinoe interests is the Hotel 
Dupont Plaza. 







' 'j. - - - - f W 



' Apartment building in Leopold ville, Belgian Congo, designed by 
Aubinoe, Edwards and Beery, Architects. 



Maryland — March-April, 1957 



25 



Alumni Portraits — 2 



Sam Silber, Navy Ace, 
Becomes One Of Baltimore's 
Leading Bakers 




By Sally L. Ogden 



Mr. Silber as he served as Air 
Group Commander aboard U.S.S. 
Tarawa in 1946. 



Sam Leonard Silber, former 
Commander, U. S. Navy Air 
Force, the "Baker Man" of Balti- 
more, is one of the University of 
Maryland's outstanding alumni. 

Born September 19, 1913, son 
of Dora and the late Isaac Silber, 
bakery operators since 1907, Sam 
relates that some of his first 
clothes were made of flour sacks 
and as a child he would nestle up 
to the warmth of the ovens while 
he watched his father mix a 
batch of sour rye for fermenta- 
tion. 

"Sambo," as his friends know 
him, attended various Baltimore 
Elementary Schools and was 
graduated from Baltimore City 
College in 1930. 

Sweets For The Team 

Without any definite idea of 
what career to pursue, he en- 
rolled at the University of Mary- 
land in the School of Engineering 
in the fall of 1930. One of the 
familiar sights on the athletic 
field was his father, who was so 
proud of the fact that his son was 
able to go to college that he dis- 
tributed a large sack of sweet 
rolls and buns for the entire team 
after each practice session. 

During Sam's sophomore year, 
he changed his course to the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences and de- 
cided to major in Physiological 
Chemistry, 



i« 



Under "Curley" Byrd's guid- 
ance and tutelage, he sat on the 
football bench the entire year — 
and had exactly the same exper- 
ience on the lacrosse team — 
fondling an old tired goalie stick 
that Coach Faber had given him. 

He was not very active in ex- 
tracurricular activities at Mary- 
land but he played on the la- 
crosse team during his junior 
year and was chosen "All Mary- 
land" and "All-American" in la- 
crosse both in 1934 and 1935. 
During those years he played just 
enough football to earn his letter, 
however, he was active in other 
athletics and earned a handful of 
medals for volleyball and basket- 
ball and even won a diving cham- 
pionship in 1934. 

Silber played on the All-Star 
Lacrosse team in 1934 and turned 
down an opportunity to tour Can- 
ada in 1935 in order to join the 
Navy as an Aviation Cadet. 

Wins Wings of Gold 

He finished his flight training 
in 1936 and after winning his 
Navy Wings of Gold was as- 
signed to a Navy Fighter Squad- 
ron on the Ranger — flying the 
world's smallest planes. This cre- 
ated a ludicrous situation inas- 
much as Cadet Silber stood over 
six feet tall and weighed 200 
pounds at the time. 



His Navy career took him next 
to Pensacola where he was as- 
signed to Instruct Fighter Tac- 
tics and Instruments. He was as- 
sistant football coach under Bul- 
let L. Kirn, who many Maryland- 
ers will remember for having sunk 
the U. of M. team in a sparkling 
80 yard run, back in 1932, when 
Kirn was at the U. S. Naval Acad- 
emy. 

Africa To Guadalcanal 

Cadet Silber was then trans- 
ferred to Miami Naval Air Sta- 
tion as Fighter Instructor and af- 
ter two years in that tropical 
paradise, was transferred t o 
Fighting Squadron 27 on the USS 
Sewannee as Executive, Flight 
and Gunnery Officer. During that 
tour of duty he participated in 
the invasion of Africa and after 
seeing action which included be- 
ing based on Guadalcanal for a 
spell, Lieut. Silber was assigned 
to Fighter Squadron 18 abroad 
the USS Bunker Hill as Com- 
manding Officer. 

After only four months of 
training his squadron, he led them 
on the first carrier raids on Ra- 
baul — then the real Jap strong- 
hold in the Pacific, and was cred- 
ited with seven Jap planes and 
many other probables. 

Lieut. Commander Silber was 
then assigned to Jacksonville, 
Florida, where he organized and 
set up the Instructor School for 



Maryland — March- April, 105't 




Huge ovens bake delicious Silber pastries. 



Placing trays of cream- filled foils and cakes into 
freezer. 



all instructors in the Advanced 
Training Phase of Naval Avia- 
tion. He went on to the Naval 
Air Station in Deland, Florida, 
where he helped reorganize it 
from a Scouting and Dive Bomb- 
ing Training Station to a Fight- 
er Training Station. 

Commander Silber was later 
assigned to the USS Tarawa as 
Air Group Commander for over 
two years. 

With a chest full of ribbons in- 
cluding the Legion of Merit, four 
Distinguished Flying Crosses, sev- 
en Air Medals, two Presidential 
Unit Citations and one Purple 
Heart, he went on to the U. S. 
Naval Line School at Newport 
with his bride and, after twelve 
hectic months, resigned his com- 
mission in 1948. 

Joins Family Business 

Silber took a leave of one year 
after his tour of duty in the serv- 
ice and joined his brother, Sidney, 
an M.I.T. graduate who had re- 
cently resigned his job as Flight 
Test Analyst for Boeing Aircraft 
Company, to assist with the fam- 
ily business — the Silber Bakery. 
Sam was appointed as the com- 
pany Sales Manager and he holds 
that position today. During the 
past seven years, Silber's Bakery 
has more than tripled its output 
and has expanded to almost every 
section of the Baltimore area with 
more stores opening in the very 



near future. To date there are 
seventeen modern Silber Bakery 
stores. 

Mr. Silber is active in civic af- 
fairs in Baltimore and has served 
on the Athletic Council, YMCA, 
has assisted in numerous Red 
Cross, Community Chest and 
other charitable fund raising cam- 
paigns. He is a life member of 
the Brandeis University Clubs; 
member of the University Club 
of Baltimore ; Colts Associates ; 
Advertising Club of Baltimore ; 
he is the Past President of the 
"M" Club of the University of 
Maryland ; Chairman of the Ath- 
letic Committee, Baltimore City 
College Alumni ; a member of the 
Terrapin Club of the University 
of Maryland ; Board member of 
the Baltimore Chapter of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Alumni; 
member of the Baltimore Mu- 
seum and the Past Vice-President 
of the American Marketing As- 
sociation in 1954. 

Photos, Food Are Hobbies 

Mr. Silber has several hobbies. 
His photographic work is out- 
standing and in his home he has 
pictures that he made of many 
of his war experiences as well as 
places he visited during his Navy 
career. 

He is a gourmet of note and 
to enjoy a dinner which he pre- 
pares is a real experience. His 
secrets include marinating thick, 



juicy steaks in a honey and suey 
sauce mixture for hours before 
broiling — and his Caesar Salad is 
in a class of its own. 

When one meets Sam Silber, 
they see a powerful man who is 
tall, broad and strong. His hands 
are large and generous. One would 
never associate him with a beauti- 
ful garden. However, one of his 
most interesting hobbies is his 
garden, which ranks among Bal- 
timore's finest. He lives with his 
mother in a large Victorian house 
at 4000 Liberty Heights Avenue 
and, at some time during every 
day (after the frost is out of the 
ground and until the last day of 
fall), he will be found working in 
his garden experimenting with 
the growth of the very simplest 
flowers or the rarest blooms that 
he gathers from many parts of 
the country. 

Key U.M. Supporter 

Mr. Silber is an avid alumnus 
and supports many of the activi- 
ties of the University of .Marx- 
land. He is one of three brothers 
who attended the University — 
Dr. Earl Silber, Psychiatrist, for- 
merly with the National Institute 
of Health in Washington; Dr. 
Bernard Silber, Internist, of Red- 
wood City, California: and his 
youngest of four sisters, Evelyn, 
was also a University of Mary- 
land student. 

Sam Silber — we salute you! 



Maryland — March-April, 1957 



27 




RECEIVES DIRECT COMMISSION 

A University of Maryland sophomore has received a direct com- 
mission as a Lieutenant in the United States Air Force as a result 
of passing the Air Force Officer's Qualifying Test last spring. 

Lt. Edward H. (Mark) Dunker, 20, of Glen Burnie, Maryland, is 
finishing his second year at the University as an industrial education 
major. Although his orders have not been received as yet, he has 
been told that he will report to the Connolly Air Force Base in Waco, 
Texas, when they do arrive. 



College of ?"==^^=^== 

Agriculture 

z^^^^^^=^=. Dr. Howard L. Stier 

Maryland's poultry judging 
team placed first in the 
33rd Annual Eastern Intercollegi- 
ate Poultry Judging contest on 
the Maryland campus. Ten east- 
ern university teams competed. 

Amassing a total of 1,590 points 
out of a possible 1,800, Roy Bea- 
champ, Maryland team member 
from Pocomoke City, was high 
individual in the competition. 
Second high individual was an- 
other Marylander, Vaughn Mur- 
ray, Berlin. Another University 
team member was Paula Schlatre, 
Cockeysville ; Davis Steinbauer of 
Laurel, served as alternate. 

According to Coach George D. 
Quigley, this is the second year 
in a row that Maryland has been 
tops in a similar event. Included 
in the day-long contest were 14 
classes of production poultry 
(both male and female) ; one 
class live market fowl; one class 
live market broilers ; and four dis- 
qualification classes. 

Agriculture Conference 

Seven members of the College 
of Agriculture faculty repre- 
sented the University at the 34th 




Maryland — March-April, 1957 



innual Agricultural Outlook Con- 
erence in Washington, D. C. 

The Maryland delegates were 
)r. Paul R. Poffenberger, Assist- 
int Dean of Instruction; A. B. 
Hamilton, Farm Management 
Specialist; H. H. Hoecker, Mar- 
king Specialist; John W. Ma- 
rruder, County Agent Leader; 
Imos Meyer, Marketing Special- 
st; George Stevens, Agricultural 
Economist, and Miss Joanne W. 
leitz, Home Management Spe- 
:ialist. 

They met with extension econ- 
>mists from 47 other states and 
D uerto Rico and representatives 
>f the Agriculture Department's 
Marketing, Research, Foreign, 
Extension Forest and Commodity 
stabilization Services. 

Hiss McLuckie Appointed 

Virginia L. McLuckie of Balti- 
nore assumed duties as food 
economist with the Department 
)f Markets, University of Mary- 
and Extension Service. Miss Mc- 
Luckie will assist the department 
n consumer education. She will 
lelp housewives in Baltimore City 
md other areas in better buying 
nformation and help move foods 
n plentiful supply. 



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Maryland — March'April, 1957 



29 



College of 



Arts and Sciences 



Lois Eld Ernest 



Dr. John A. Yourtee has been 
appointed technical superin- 
tendent of American Viscose 
Corporation's Film Division plant 
at Marcus Hook. Dr. Yourtee has 
been coordinator of research and 
development activities at the 
Fredericksburg, Va., film plant 
for the past year. 

With the Film Division since 
1934 when he started as a re- 
search chemist, Dr. Yourtee has 
worked not only in cellophane re- 
search but also has been a re- 
search chemist and department 
head in the urea-formaldehyde 
plastics manufacturing opera- 
tions. He has served in the ca- 
pacity of patent searcher and as 
director of quality control for all 
operations at Fredericksburg. 

Born in Brownsville, Md., Dr. 
Yourtee studied In Maryland 
schools and in 1933 received his 
B.S. in chemistry from the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. The Uni- 
versity granted his Ph.D. de- 
gree in organic chemistry ten 
years later. 

He is a member of the Ameri- 
can Chemical Society, the Amer- 
ican Society for Quality Control, 



Alpha Chi Sigma, Sigma Xi, Phi 
Kappa Phi, and is a fellow of the 
American Institute of Chemists. 
He has also been active in Fred- 
ericksburg church and commun- 
ity affairs. 

Dr. Yourtee and his wife have 
two children, John B., 9, and Anne 
E., 4 months. 

To Dow Company 

Donald M. Baldwin, '56, is cur- 
rently employed in production co- 
ordination with the Dow Chemi- 
cal Company in Midland, Mich. 

Joins Physics Department 

Professor Hiroomi Umezawa of 
the University of Tokyo, has 
joined the Physics Department as 
a visiting lecturer. Dr. Ernest 
Opik of Armagh Observatory, 
North Ireland, has also joined the 
department as a visiting research 
professor in Cosmic Rays and Up- 
per Atmosphere Physics. 

Music Department Activities 

Dr. Bryce Jordan, Music De- 
partment, recently read a paper 
titled "The Music of Pelham Hum- 
frey (1647-74)" at the annual 
meeting of the American Music- 
ological Society in Urbana, 111. 

Dr. Jordan and Professor Rose 
Marie Grentzer conducted all- 
county meetings of music teach- 
ers of the Montgomery County 
Schools recently. Dr. Jordan dis- 
cussed the development of music 



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reading in the instrumental pro- 
gram at all levels of public schools 
and Miss Grentzer discussed mu- 
sic-reading activities in the gen- 
eral and choral-music area. Miss 
Grentzer was also the featured 
speaker at the Founder's Day 
Banquet given by the Washing- 
ton, D. C. Alumni of Sigma Alpha 
Iota, women's music fraternity. 
Miss Grentzer has been invited 
to attend the annual meeting of 
the Council on Cooperation in 
Teacher Education of the Ameri- 
can Council on Education, held in 
Washington, D. C. 

Professor Homer Ulrich, also 
of the Music Department, recent- 
ly represented the University at 
the yearly meeting of the Nation- 
al Association of Schools of Music 
in Cleveland, Ohio. Professor Ul- 
rich has been appointed editor of 
The Maryland Music Educator, 
official publication of the Mary- 
land Music Educators Associa- 
tion. 

Speaks At National Institute 

Professor Charles N. Cofer, 
Psychology Department, spoke to 
the staff of the Laboratory of 
Psychology, National Institute of 
Mental Health on "On The Prob- 
lem of Cognitive Organization." 

Paper Is Translated 

Dr. Bruce L. Melvin and Abdul 
J. Araim, Department of Soci- 
ology, have an article in the cur- 
rent issue of Revista Mexicana de 
Sociologia. This is a translation 
of a paper read at the 1955 meet- 
ing of the American Sociological 
Society. Dr. Melvin was also one 
of twenty-four anthropologists 
and sociologists attending a con- 
ference on Social Theory at Emory 
University. 

Library Staff Notes 

Miss Anna Carper, Robert Pier- 
son, Howard Rovelstad and Mrs. 
Eleanor Smith, of the library 
staff, attended the annual meet- 
ing of the Maryland, Virginia and 
District of Columbia Regional 
Group of Catalogers and Classi- 
fiers held at the Jefferson Hotel 
in Richmond, Va. Mrs. Smith re- 
cently spoke to the library staff 
on "What it Means to be a Diplo- 
mat's Wife." Mrs. Smith is the 
wife of John N. Smith, graduate 
assistant in agricultural econom- 
ics here on campus. Mr. Smith 
was with the State Department 
from 1946 to 1954 and was as- 
signed to posts in Mexico City, 
Brazil and Yugoslavia. 



30 



Maryland — March- April, 1957 



Physics Department 

Dr. Richard Ferrell spoke re- 
cently at the Naval Ordnance 
Laboratory on "The Annihilation 
of Positrons in Solids." Dr. Fer- 
rell also spoke at the Thermody- 
namics Colloquium, National Bur- 
eau of Standards, on "Dispersion 
Relation and Short-Wave Cutoff 
for Electron Plasma Oscillation." 

Dr. John S. Toll spoke before 
the Princeton University Theo- 
retical Physics Colloquium on the 
subject of "Dispersion Relations 
for the Scattering Matrix." Dr. 
Toll also spoke at the National 
Bureau of Standards Nuclear 
Physics Seminar on "The General 
Theory of Dispersion Relations." 

Dr. Friedrich Hund was recent- 
ly installed into Sigma Pi Sigma, 
the national physics honor socie- 
ty, at the organization's banquet 
at College Park. Dr. Hund was 
cited for his contributions to the 
understanding of atomic and 
molecular spectra and the struc- 
ture of matter. Definitive ex- 
planations of many of the prob- 
lems in these fields were given 
in his famous treatises in 1927 
and 1933. Dr. Hund was invited 
to speak at the Catholic Univer- 
sity Physics Seminar on the sub- 
ject of "Elementary Remarks on 
Field Quantization." 

Dr. F. G. Brickwedde has re- 
signed his position as Professor 
of Physics to accept a position as 



Dean of the College of Chemistry 

and Physics at Pennsylvania State 
College. 

Dr. S. F. Singer recently de- 
livered an invited paper on "Elec- 
tronics Problem in Earth Satel- 
lites" at the First National Con- 
gress of Electronics, Telecom- 
munications and Radio Diffusion 
at Mexico City. 

Dr. Singer and Dr. Martin J. 
Swetnick spoke before the Ameri- 
can Astronautical Society Conven- 
tion at the Hotel Edison in New 
York. Dr. Swetnick spoke on 
"Meteoric Abrasion Studies Pro- 
posed for Vanguard." "Space 
Vehicles as Tools for Research 
in Relativity" was the topic for 
Dr. Singer's speech. 

Speech Department Activities 

Mrs. Dorothy Craven was elect- 
ed national treasurer of Sigma 
Alpha Eta at their national as- 
sembly held in conjunction with 
the annual convention of the 
American Speech and Hearing As- 
sociation at the Palmer House in 
Chicago, Illinois. Mrs. Craven 
will serve in her office for the 
period 1956-58. 

Dr. Lyle V. Mayer, Mr. Ru- 
dolph Pugliese and Mr. James 
Byrd represented the Department 
of Speech at the silver annivers- 
ary celebration of the Fort Hill 
High School's National Thespian 
Conference in Cumberland, Md. 



Co//ege of 



Business & Public 



Administration 

- Egbert F. Tiiu/li'y 



Arthur E. Briggs, '51, was one 
of 15 men from i he Harvard 
Graduate School of Business Ad- 
ministration, class of 1!)")7, to be 
elected a George F. Baker Schol- 
ar, the highest scholastic achieve- 
ment awarded by the school. Mr. 

BriggS worked as a salesman and 

junior accountant until he en- 
tered the Air Force as a Second 
Lieutenant. 

Elected Vice President 

Warren H. Eierman, '43, has 

been elected a vice-president of 
the Hanover Bank, New York 
City. 

With The Hanover Bank since 
1952, Mr. Eierman is in charge of 
the bank's will review and estate 
analysis department. 

Before joining The Hanover 
Bank, he was trust officer at 
Union National Bank, Clarks- 
burg, W. Va. He previously had 
been a national bank examiner 
in the Fifth Federal Reserve Dis- 
trict, specializing in trust exami- 
nations. 

He is a director and treasurer 
of Lily-Dungan Co., Baltimore. 



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31 



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Speaks At Cosmos Club 

Norton T. Dodge, Economics 
Department, recently addressed 
the Cosmos Club of Washington 
on "The Challenge of Soviet Edu- 
cation." 

Attends Directors Meeting 

Dr. Donald W. Krimel, Jour- 
nalism and Public Relations De- 
partment, attended the annual 
meeting of the American Public 
Relations Association Board of 
Directors in New York. Dr. 
Krimel was appointed to the 
chairmanship of the Association's 
National Education Committee 
and was re-appointed to the edi- 
torial board of the Quarterly 
Journal of Public Relations. 

Speaks To Little Academy 

Dr. Arthur S. Patrick, Office 
Techniques and Management, 
spoke to the Little Academy, a 
group of business leaders in New 
York on "The Guidance Values of 
Exploratory Courses in Business 
Education." 

Wright To Japan 

Donald D. Wright, Jr., '55, who 
was commissioned a Second Lieu- 
tenant in the U.S. Air Force at 
the University in February, 1955, 
is now stationed at the Ashiya 
Air Force Base, Kyushu, Japan, 
as Transportation Officer. 

Graduate Of Finance School 

Teddy T. Mercer, '55, graduated 
from the Army's Finance School 
at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indi- 
ana. During the eight week 
course, Mercer received training 
in disbursing operations and fi- 
nance and accounting practices. 
Regularly assigned to the Sev- 
enth Finance Disbursing Section 
at Fort Harrison, he completed 
basic training at Fort Jackson, 
South Carolina. 

Writes Article 

Dr. Franklin L. Burdette, Bur- 
eau of Governmental Research, is 
the author of an article, "U.S. In- 
formation Agency and Advanced 
Learning Abroad," in the Novem- 
ber issue of Higher Education, of- 
ficial journal of the U. S. Office of 
Education. From 1954 to 1956, 
Dr. Burdette was on leave of ab- 
sence from the University to 
serve as chief of the overseas 
book program and related cul- 
tural activities of the U. S. In- 
formation Agency. 



32 



Maryland — March-April, 1957 



School of 



Dentistry 

Gardner P. H. Foley 
■ Kryle W. Preis 



The New Jersey Alumni Asso- 
ciation held its annual din- 
ner-dance at the Essex House in 
Newark recently. The affair was 
a huge success; Dr. Robert Jer- 
nick '50 and his committee merit 
a full measure of appreciation for 
their good work. 

The meeting was the most im- 
pressive of the many fine New 
Jersey meetings because of the 
introduction of an important new 
feature in the Association's ac- 
tivities: the presentation of an 
award in recognition of the re- 
cipient's outstanding service to 
the alumni. The Selection Com- 
mittee, after a careful analysis 
of the records of members of the 
New Jersey alumni group, en- 
dorsed unanimously the selection 
of Dr. Frank J. Houghton '17, 
Dean of the School of Dentistry 
of Loyola University of New Or- 
leans, as the first recipient of the 
Award. The plaque, which was 
presented to Dr. Houghton by Dr. 
Louis E. Greenwald '25, Presi- 
dent of the Association, bears 
this inscription : "Presented to 
Dr. Frank J. Houghton '17 in 
recognition of his many years of 
unselfish service to the dental 
profession and in appreciation of 
his devoted efforts in behalf of 
our alumni." 

Dr. Gerard A. Devlin '23, in 
presenting Dr. Houghton, gave 
this account of his fellow alum- 
nus: Born in Jersey City, N. J., 
Dr. Houghton graduated from 
the Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery in 1917. He is a veteran 
of World War I. He practiced 
dentistry in Jersey City from 
1919 to 1951. He married Ethel 
M. Herrick, of Jersey City and 
they have two sons, Dr. James 
F. Houghton of Fargo, N. D., and 
the Reverend Francis J. Hough- 
ton of Westfield, N. J. 

Dr. Houghton headed the Den- 
tal Department at the Jersey City 
Medical Center from 1925 to 
1951. In 1924, he was elected 
Secretary and in 1929, President 
of the Hudson County Dental 
Society. From 1919 to 1939 he 
was a member of the Board of 
Education in the Department of 
Oral Hygiene in Jersey City, dur- 




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Frederick Underwriters 

Incorporated 

General Insurance Agents 

EVERY KIND OF INSURANCE 
110 W. Patrick St. Frederick, Md. 



Crown Oil & Wax Co. 

Distributors 

Shell Petroleum Products 

Phone MONUMENT 3-6381 

FREDERICK, MD. 



ing which time he was supervis- 
or of the board. In 1931 he was 
elected Trustee to the New Jer- 
sey State Dental Society by the 
Hudson County Dental Society. 
He was elected Vice President of 
the New Jersey State Dental So- 
ciety in 1937; and in 1939, Presi- 
dent. 

Dr. Houghton has served as a 
Delegate to the American Dental 
Association from New Jersey for 
many years; he acted as Chair- 
man of the Delegation for eight 
years. He was Chairman of the 
Publicity Committee of the Amer- 
ican Dental Association. From 
1944 to 1949 he was a member 
of the Hospital Dental Service 
Committee of the American Den- 
tal Association. From 1946 to 
1949 he was a member of the 
Council on Dental Education of 
the American Dental Association. 
He also served as the Chairman 
of the Internship and Residency 
Committee of the Council on Den- 
tal Education of the American 
Dental Association. 

Dr. Houghton is a Fellow of 
the American College of Dentists 
and the International College of 
Dentists. He is also a member 
of Omicron Kappa Upsilon, hon- 
orary dental fraternity. 

Dr. Houghton has given clinics 
and read papers before the Chil- 
dren's Dentistry Section of the 
American Dental Association, the 
Greater New York Meeting, the 
New Jersey State Dental Society, 
the Second District Society of 
New York, the Hospital Section 
of the American Association of 
Dental Schools and the Navy Den- 
tal School, Bethesda, Md. 

Dr. Houghton was Vice-Chair- 
man of the Crippled Childrens 
Committee of the Jersey City 
Lodge of Elks for 25 years. He 
was Secretary-Treasurer of the 
Jersey City Sunshine Camp for 
Physically Handicapped Children 
for 24 years. He was a member 
of the Advisory Board of Selec- 
tive Service and was Chairman 
of the original Veteran's Admin- 
istration Advisory Committee. 

Dr. Houghton was appointed 
Dean of the School of Dentistry 
of Loyola University, New Or- 
leans, in 1951. He is the Senior 
Visiting Dental Surgeon and 
Chief of the Loyola University 
Unit of the Charity Hospital of 
Louisiana in New Orleans. He 
is also the Area Dental Consult- 
ant for the Veterans Administra- 
tion. 



34 



Maryland — March-April, 1U57 



The National Alumni extends 
its heartiest compliments to the 
New Jersey component group for 
establishing- such a fine annual 
award. The Association also wish- 
es to congratulate Dr. Houghton 
for the well deserved recognition 
that has been given him by his 
fellow alumni in his home state. 

The following were elected to 
office for 1957: 

President: A. R. Oliva '32 

President-Elect: Saul M. Gale 
'22 

Vice-President : Joseph J. Mar- 
tini '34 

Treasurer: Samuel H. Byer '27 

Secretary: Alan A. Gale '50 

Executive Board: Winfield J. 
Atno '22, Benjamin Brown 
'28, Gerard A. Devlin '23. 

Trustees for the Friedberg Me- 
morial Award : Bernard Kni- 
berg '28, William Joule '34, 
Robert Jernick '50, Milton 
Asbell '38. 

Washington Alumni Breakfast 

The Twenty-Fifth Annual Post- 
graduate Clinic of the District of 
Columbia Dental Society will be 
held in March at the Shoreham 
Hotel. In association with this 
meeting the District of Columbia 
Section of the National Alumni 
Association is sponsoring a Mary- 
land Breakfast to be held in the 
Blue Room of the Shoreham Hotel 
at 8:30 a.m. on Tuesday, March 
12th . This annual Washington 
breakfast has continued to grow 
in stature and is now recognized 
as one of the leading alumni func- 
tions of the year. Dr. Melvin H. 
Colvin '28 is in charge of arrange- 
ments. His address is 435 Sev- 
enth Street, S.W. (NA 8-5378). 
Dr. Colvin's committee is expect- 
ing an excellent turnout of en- 
thusiastic alumni from the Dis- 
trict, Maryland, Virginia and 
other nearby states. 

Chairmen of 1957 Class Reunions 

The returning members of the 
Golden Anniversary Class of 1907 
will be honored guests of the Na- 
tional Alumni Association at its 
annual luncheon on June 7 at the 
Lord Baltimore Hotel. Dr. L. 
Lynn Emmart '22, 4715 Liberty 
Heights Ave., Baltimore, is in 
charge of the general arrange- 
ments. The reunion dinners of all 
other five-year classes will be held 
on the night of June 6. 



Mabser's Mdtel & Restaurant 

Maryland's Outstanding 

MOTEL 

OPEN ALL YEAR 

FINE DINING ROOM — 

AIR-CONDITIONED 
On U.S. Route 40 — 1 Miles West of Frederick, Md. 




rap"fei&3L 



ASSEY - HARRIS s«i^ and. s**,^ 

N. E. Kepauver, Jr. 
PHONE 30 MIDDLETOWN, MARYLAND SKYLINE 3-7481 
Hay - Straw • Tractors • Combines - farm Implements 

Serving Frederick County Since 193S 



Do You Have A Plan? 

Do you have a definite plan for your family's 
future security — regardless of what tomorrow may 
bring? Have you thought of such a plan at times 
only to put it aside because of the pressure of other 
matters? 

Our experience as executor and trustee of many 
estates may be of help to you in benefiting your 
family and others in the years to come. 

Without cost or obligation to you, call our Trust 
Department today. An hour of your time may make 
a world of difference to vour familv. 



The FIRST NATIONAL 
BANK of BALTIMORE 

Capital, surplus and profits in excess of $23,000,000. 



Member 
Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 





M 

rpocc 
rL -O0C 

rrffl oc 



*8* 

-3 rTjrrj 



psri 



t^fcraj^—ltto. i — 




s35 

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a * 3 

Boa 

HO pi 



Maryland — March- April, 1957 



35 



WILLIAMS 

CONSTRUCTION 

COMPANY 



INC. 



General Contractors 
Highways 

Airports 



Phone MUrdock 
6-6600 



BALTIMORE, 
MD. 




76 TOR O PROFESSIONAL 
CUTS 1 5-20 ACRES A DAY 

A Mower for Every Need: 

REELS - ROTARYS 

Complete Turf and Garden 
Equipment 

BALTIMORE TORO CO. 
Distributor 

2205 JOPPA ROAD 
BALTIMORE 14, MD. 
Phone NO 8-0500 

Sales and Service 



Look for the Sign 



MARIA'S 
JO© 



Serving Baltimore's Finest 

Italian Cuisine 

Open 1 1 a.m. to 4 a.m. — Closed Mondays 

300 Albermarle St. MU 5-2811 

Baltimore 2, Md. MU 5-2812 



BANK OF CRISFIELD 

Dependable Service Since 1893 
MARION BRANCH — Phone 2381 
UPTOWN BRANCH— Phone 312 
MAIN OFFICE— Phone 102 

Member Federal Deposit Ins. Corp. 



Jrarrif, &. MicKey 

Industrial & Commercial 

ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS 

3114 Woodhome Avenue Baltimore 14, Md. 

Phone Hilltop 4-5110 — 4-5111 



1907 — A. Preston Scarborough, 
3406 Grantley Road, Balti- 
more 15. 

1912— B.C.D.S. — Arthur Lank- 
ford, Medical Arts Bldg., 
Baltimore 1. 

U. of Md.— Herbert T. 
Grempler, 908 Light St., 
Baltimore 30. 

1917 — B.C.D.S. — E. B. Jackson, 
3228 Eastern Ave., Balti- 
more 24. 

U. of Md.— Oscar E. Cull- 
er, Fidelity Bldg., Balti- 
more 1. 

1922— Daniel E. Sheehan, Medi- 
cal Arts Bldg., Baltimore 
1. 

(Joint reunion of the B.C.- 
D.S. and U. of Md. Classes) 

1927 — Brice M. Dorsey, Medical 
Arts Bldg., Baltimore 1. 

1932 — Irving Abramson, Medical 
Arts Bldg., Baltimore 1. 

1937— John C. Heck, 3626 Green- 
mount Ave., Baltimore 18. 
Wilbur D. Burton, Jr., 829 
Park Ave., Baltimore 1. 

1942— Joseph M. Tighe, 6601 
York Road, Baltimore 12. 
Lewis C. Toomey, Jr., 
8641 Colesville Road, Sil- 
ver Spring, Md. 

1952 — Richard and Robert Ax- 
man, 5510 Park Heights 
Ave., Baltimore 15. 

Dr. Betts Up Yonder 

Dr. Robert L. Betts '41, is ac- 
complished in the art of reloca- 
tion and orientation. His experi- 
ences with the International 
Grenfell Mission of Newfound- 
land following his graduation 
were so appealing that a few 
years ago he and his family spent 
a summer in Labrador. His tour 
of service with the U. S. Public 
Health afforded him an opportun- 
ity to be in Trinidad, B.W.I., for 
some time. Then back to New 
Jersey he went to practice. The 
latest venture of the Betts family 
is life in Alaska. Bob is on the 
staff of the A.N.H.S. Hospital, 
Kanakanak, Dillingham. The Betts 
family, which includes three sons, 
has taken up residence in the 
town. There the children are at- 
tending school when they are not 
skiing and sledding during the 
present short daylight hours of 
from 9 :00 a.m. to 4 :00 p.m. 

Lt. Comdr. Scribner Down Under 

Lieutenant Commander James 
H. Scribner '48, of Framingham, 



Maryland — MarchrAprU, 1957 



Mass., recently rejoined the Byrd 
Expedition in Little America for 
a six months tour of duty. This 
is Dr. Scribner's second assign- 
ment with the expedition. He 
will participate in dental research 
that will constitute a part of the 
program set up for the interna- 
tional geophysical year. 

Dr. Asbell Chief of Clinic 

Dr. Milton B. Asbell, '38, of 
Camden, New Jersey, was ap- 
pointed Chief of the newly or- 
ganized Dental Rehabilitation 
Clinic of the Municipal Hospital 
of Camden. He will also serve as 
the Orthodontics Consultant of 
the Clinic. Recently Dr. Asbell 
spoke to the faculty of the New 
York University College of Dent- 
istry and their friends. He re- 
viewed the recently published 
Cotton Mather, First Significant 
Figure in American Medicine by 
Otho T. Beal, Jr. and Richard H. 
Shryock. In his review Dr. As- 
bell stressed the fact that Mather 
should also be considered as a 
significant figure in American 
dentistry. His Diary and other 
writings contain a large number 
of references to dentistry. 

Completes Service Schooling 

Lt. Bernard Busch, class of '56, 
recently completed the Army 
Medical Service Schools' military 
orientation course at Fort Sam 
Houston, Texas. The course gave 
him a knowledge of the duties and 
responsibilities of a military den- 
tal officer. Lt. Busch has received 
orders assigning him to Fort 
Eustis, Va. 




i iniii 1 1 »>'- 



OLE 



ENVELOPE CORPORATION 

lialtimane'd- Pio+ie&i £>noel»pe ManufjOctuA&i 

Hatabllahed 1912 

Factory and Office: 2S10 LOCH RAVEN ROAD 

Baltimore 18, Maryland CHesapeakc 3-1.120 

Washington Sales Office: 2003 QUE STREET, N.W. 
Washington 9, D. C. ADams 4-3979 




WATCH 

IT 
GROW 

mmsTRTE Federal SnvinGS 
& Loon Rssn. 

5304 YORK ROAD BALTIMORE, MD. 

Phone ID 5-3020 



WE SPECIALIZE IN 

OFFICE INTERIORS AND 
OFFICE PLANNING 

THE UNUSUAL IN OFFICE FURNITURE 
and ACCESSORIES. 

Let our well-trained staff assist you 
In Planning your Office. 

MODERN 

STATIONERY COMPANY 

17 $. CHARLES ST. MU 5-4377 

BALTIMORE 

Serving this area since 1919 



J. McKenny Willis & Son, inc. 



GRAIN 

FEED 

SEED 



EASTON, MD. 
Phone 744 



TYPEWRITERS 



NEW & USED OFFICE FURNITURE 



Mimeographs 



WHteHfittncirtl 



Business Forms 



SALISBURY, MD. 



Adding Machines 




X Itoto Cnqravlud* 
tor JLroaratws 

a JXjaaazi 



oqs 



an 



\azmcs 



Tk« 

ADVERTISERS ENGRAVING COMPANY 

501-509 EAST PRESTON STREET 
MUlberry 5-2357 5-2358 



v^ 



BALTIMORE, MD. 



Be a MEAT EXPERT! 
Always say 



ZSSKAV 

lnQUALITYW 



ALL MEAT FRANKS 

Every ounce of the pure beef and 
pork in Esskay's all-meat Franks 
is carefully selected by Esskay's 
experts, who season and spice 
these famous franks to wholesome, 
flavorful perfection. Be sure to 
ask for Esskay Franks — they're 
the finest made! They're on sale in 
the Byrd Stadium and new Stu- 
dent Activities Building. 

WM. SCHLUDERIERC— T. J. KURDLI CO. 



Maryland— March-April, 1957 



87 



SALES 




SERVICE 



Specialists in Residential and 
Commercial Air Conditioning 

Room Coolers - Package Units - Year Round Furnaces 

WASHINGTON REFRIGERATION CO. 

2052 West Virginia Avenue, N.E. 

LAwrence 6-5100 Washington, D. C. 



Phone, NAtional 8-3660 



Night Phones: LUdlow 2-7916 - JOrdon 8-2377 



Established 1915 



Central Armature Works, Inc. 

625 D STREET, N.W. 

Rewinding — Generators — Motors — Transformers — Power Installations 

Construction 

Complete Line Motors and Electrical Supplies 

Century & General Electric Motors — Telechron, Revere, General Electric and all makes Clocks 

Switchboards, Field Coils, Aramature Coils, Vee Belts and Sheaves Leather and Rubber Belting 



RIVERS & BRYON 



INC. 



MASONRY 
CONTRACTORS 



MASON 




• 

Glazed 

Structural 

Tile 

• 

Cinder Block 

Brick 



LO 5-3567 

11301 GEORGIA AVE. 

WHEATON MD. 



SCRAP IRON and METALS 

BATTERIES - RAGS 

WASTE PAPER 

For Information Call — 

River Road Iron & Metal Co. 

Kenilworth Ave. & Lawrence 
APpleton 7-0400 

Bladensburg, Md. 



Jfitller Sc b'^Ibert 



INCORPORATED 



SUPPLYING 

EVERY 
PHOTOGRAPHIC 

NEED 



Since 



1920 



Phone — EXetutlve 3-8120 

815 TENTH STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



* Davis Instrument ITlfg. Co. * 

INC. 

Transits - Levels - Signal Belts 

Whirling Psychrometer - Blasting Machines 

Anemometers - Portable - Pressure Indicators 

Repairs and Adjustments 

• 513 E. 36th STREET BALTIMORE, MD. • 



College of 



Engineering 



Col. O. H. Saundere '10 
A. Lawrence Guess '51 



Palmer W. Sullivan, '42, has 
been promoted to staff engi- 
neer in the Production Design de- 
partment of the IBM Airborne 
Computer Laboratories' Military 
Products Division at Poughkeep- 
sie, New York. Mr. Sullivan, who 
joined IBM in 1953 as a design 
engineer in the Production De- 
sign department, was promoted 
to associate engineer in Decem- 
ber, 1955. He served with the 
Army from 1944 to 1946 and is a 
member of the Association of 
Mechanical Engineers. 

Receives Award of Merit 

John H. Eiseman, '21, employed 
by the gas chemistry section of 
the National Bureau of Stand- 
ards, has received an "Award of 
Merit" from the operating sec- 
tion of the American Gas Asso- 
ciation. This award recognizes 
his continuous and extensive con- 
tributions in promoting the wel- 
fare of the industry and the pub- 
lic which it serves. 

Graduate Work 

Herbert E. Hunter, '56, is cur- 
rently working toward his M.S. 
degree at the California Institute 
of Technology in the field of aero- 
nautics. 

Appointed General Foreman 

O. C. Gouchenour, was recent- 
ly appointed general foreman of 
general maintenance at the Jones 
and Laughlin Steel Corporation 
of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He 
was formerly employed by Gen- 
eral Electric Corporation, Sche : 
nectady, New York, as field sup- 
ervisor. 

Specialist Third Class 

Hasan A. Hasan, '55, was pro- 
moted to Specialist Third Class at 
Fort Belvoir, Va., where he is a 
member of the 79th Engineer 
Group. 



MIDLANTIC METAL FABRICATORS 



OLD (WEBB) AIRPORT 
Grain Bulk Feed Hoppers 

Grain Wagon Bodies 



EASTON, MD. 

Septic Tanks 

Telephone 
EAston 1123 



38 



Maryland — March-April, 1957 



Graduate School 



Dr. Irwin W. Tucker, who re- 
ceived his Doctor of Phi- 
losphy degree from the Univer- 
sity, was elected a Director of the 
Brown and Williamson Tobacco 
Corporation. Dr. Tucker has been 
Director of Research for this 
corporation since 1953. He is the 
author of numerous publications 
and holds many patents in the 
field of theoretical organic chem- 
istry, the chemistry of agricul- 
tural products and related sub- 
jects. 

Working For Ph.D. 

Nick George, Jr., who received 
his M.S. degree from the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, is currently 
working toward his Ph.D. degree 
in electrical engineering at the 
California Institute of Technol- 
ogy at Pasadena, Cal. 

Technical Service Engineer 

James E. Fike, who received his 
M.S. degree in agriculture at the 
University, has joined Pennsalt 
Chemicals Company as Technical 
Service Engineer in the Chemical 
Specialties Division. In this ca- 
pacity he will specialize in sales 
service on Pennsalt's well-known 
tine of B-K sanitation chemicals 
for milk producers and the dairy 
ind food processing industries. 

Elected Chairman 

Dr. A. Wayne Ruddy, holder of 
i Doctorate from the University 
)f Maryland, has been elected 
chairman of the American Chem- 
cal Society's Division of Medici- 
lal Chemistry. An authority in 
several fields of medicinal chem- 
stry, Dr. Ruddy has conducted 
mportant research on arsenicals, 
local anesthetics, and antispas- 
modics. 



NORMAN S. 

EARLEY &l SON 

General Contractors 
and Builders 

Plants — Homes — Stores 
Public Buildings 

638 FREDERICK STREET 
Hagerstown, Maryland 



CLASS 1947 



/ 



Tennis Courts 

Hand and Volley 
Ball Courts 

Concrete Driveways 



MYERS & QUIGG, Inc 

PAVING CONTRACTORS 

Office & Plant: 91 -O Street, Southeast 
Lincoln 7-2434 Washington 3, D. C. 




STANDARD 
ENGINEERING CO, 

INCORPORATED 

Engineers and Contractors 

REpublic 7-1343 

2129 EYE STREET, NORTHWEST 

WASHINGTON 7, D. C. 



MOSES-ECCO CO., Inc 

(AFFILIATED WITH S. D. MOSES, INC.) 

CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION 

823 MILLS BUILDING 
WASHINGTON 6, D. C. 

National 8-8586 



(HEATING WArfield 7 8538 

PLUMBING 
REMODELING 
NOBBING A SPECIALTY 

ROBERT F. HOFF 

|6313 - 46th Ave. Riverdale, Md. 



HILLYARD SALES CO. 

FLOOR TREATMENT 

R B. Ruby, Divisional ilgr. 

8008 PINEY BRANCH ROAD 

JUnlper 5-3957 Sliver Spring, Md. 



RESTORFF MOTORS 

Sales JyCi>&>lt Service 

7323 BALTIMORE BLVD. • AP 7-5100 
COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



KIDLUELL & KIDUJELL, Inc. 

Plastering - Dry Wall 
Installation 



BOX 266 
WEbster 5-4500 



COLLEGE PARK 
MD. 



Maryland — March- April, 1957 



39 



CRANE CO 



DISPLAY ROOM — WAREHOUSE 

10700 Hanna Street — Beltsville, Md. 

WEbster 5-4600 

DISPLAY ROOM — WAREHOUSE 

212 N. West Street — Falls Church, Va. 

JEfferson 4-4800 

Wholesale Plumbing - Heating 
Valves and Fittings 











Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co. 
Silver Hill Concrete Co. 




Phono 

for 

CONCRETE 

RE 

6-MOO 


Producers and Distributors of 

WASHED SAND & GRAVEL 
TOP SOIL • ROAD GRAVEL 
READY-MIXED CONCRETE 


Phono 

for 
SAND t 
SRAVEL 

RE 
6-7100 






WASHINGTON 20, D. C. 





Lumber 
Millwork 



Building 
Material 



BELTSVILLE LUMBER CO. 

Telephone WEbster 5-3103 

10730 BALTIMORE AVENUE ( u. s. no. I) 
BELTSVILLE, MARYLAND 



School of 



Law 



== ^ ==== G. Kenneth Reiblich '29 

Anselm Sodaro, a graduate of 
the University's School of 
Law, will fill one of two vacancies 
on the Supreme Bench of Balti- 
more. 

Mr. Sodaro has been State's 
Attorney since 1951. He will fill 
the vacancy created by the death 
of Judge Herman M. Moser. The 
newly-appointed judge must run 
for re-election for a full 15 year 
term in the 1958 general election, 
land Law School Alumni Associa- 
tion. 

Mr. Sodaro, was graduated in 
1934 from the University of 
Maryland School of Law and was 
admitted to the bar that same 
year. Five years later he was 
named Assistant State's Attor- 
ney and in 1950 was elected to 
the post of chief prosecutor. He 
was re-elected in 1954. 

J. Harold Grady, also a gradu- 
ate of the School of Law, has 
been appointed to the post of 
State's Attorney vacated by Mr. 
Sodaro. Mr. Grady will serve out 
the unexpired term of Mr. Sodaro 
and, if he wishes to remain in 
office, he will have to stand for 
election in 1958. 

Mr. Grady was graduated from 
the University of Maryland School 
of Law in 1942. While a student 
he was appointed to the student 
editorial board of the Maryland 
Law Review and upon graduation 
was elected to the Order of the 
Coif, national law student honor 
society. 

The new appointee has been a 
law instructor since 1949, both 
at the University and at the 
Mount Vernon School of Law. He 
is a member of the executive com- 
mittee of the University of Mary- 
land School Alumni Association. 

Mr. Eltgroth Appointed 

George V. Eltgroth, class of 
'47, was appointed Patent Coun- 
sel of the Industrial Electronics 
Division of General Electric Co. 
Mr. Eltgroth will make his head- 
quarters at Electronics Park in 
Syracuse, New York. The new 
position carries the responsibility 
for patent matters pertaining to 
communication equipment, broad- 
cast equipment, computers, x-ray 
equipment and specialty control 



40 



Maryland — March-April, 1957 




KLOMAN 

Instrument Co., 

Inc. 

Surgical Instruments 

Hospital & Physicians 

Supplies 

907 Cathedral St. IE. 9-2912 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

1S22 Eye St., N.W. NA. 8-6566 

WASHINGTON, D. C 



W. R. WINSLOW 
COMPANY 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

For Paints 

• 7514 Wisconsin Ave., N.W. 

OLiver 4-4160 
*922 New York Ave., N.W. 

NAtional 8-8610 
•k 3754 Minnesota Ave., N.E. 

LUdlow 1-6756 

* 5418 Queens Chapel Rd., Hyatts. 

WArfleld 7-2222 

*8211 Georgia Ave., Silver Spring 

JUnlper 9-2284 

* 5307 Baltimore Ave., Hyattsville 

WArfleld 7-1180 

• 3211 N. 10th St., Arlington 
JAokson 5-7878 

139 Wisconsin Ave., N.W. 

ADams 2-0067 



REdwood 6-7010 - 11 

JOHN A. SCHEIBEL, 
INCORPORATED 

General Contractor 

5581 BRANCH AVENUE, S.E. 

Washington 23, D. C. 



RIVERSIDE NURSING HOME 

Quiet and Restful Location 
409 CAMDEN COURT, SALISBURY, MD. 

Salisbury 2-2639 



in the various departments of the 
Division. 

The annual banquet of the Law 
School Alumni Association 
will be held on Saturday, March 
30, at 7:00 p.m. at the Emerson 
Hotel, Baltimore. Guests of hon- 
or will include Governor Theodore 
R. McKeldin, Judges of the Court 
of Appeals of Maryland and Fed- 
eral Judges for the Fourth Cir- 
cuit. 

The Nominating Committee, 
appointed by Honorable Stanford 
I. Hoff, President, has presented 
to the Secretary the following list 
of officers for the year 1956-57, 
to be elected by ballot at the ban- 
quet: 

President — Leon H. A. Pierson, 
Esq. '23— Baltimore 

First Vice President — Benjamin 
B. Rosenstock, Esq. '25— Fred- 
erick 

Second Vice President — Hon. 
Emory H. Niles, '17— Balti- 
more 

Third Vice President — Hon. Lay- 
man J. Redden, '34 — Denton 

Secretary-Treasurer — G. Kenneth 
Reiblich, Esq. '29— Baltimore 

Executive Committee: — 

Mary Arabian, '44 — Baltimore 
Thomas N. Berry, Esq. '40 — 

Cumberland 
Clayton C. Carter, Esq. '46— 

Centerville 
Hon. Joseph L. Carter, '25 — 

Baltimore 
Hamilton P. Fox, Jr., Esq. '47 — 

Salisbury 
J. Harold Grady, Esq. '42— 

Baltimore 
W. Alexander Loker, Esq. '33 

— Leonardtown 
W. Albert Menchine, Esq. '29 — 

Baltimore County 
J. Hodge Smith, Esq. '39— 

Rockville 
Hon. C. Awdry Thompson, '40 

— Cambridge 

The Nominating Committee: — 
J. Gilbert Prendergast, Esq. '33 

— Chairman 
Margaret A. Coonan, '43 
Norman P. Ramsey, Esq. '47 
R. Walter Tabler, Esq. '50 
Albert E. Weir, Esq. '42 

Any additional nominations are 
required under the Constitution 
to be submitted by petition signed 
by ten members and mailed to 
the Secretary, G. Kenneth Reib- 
lich, at the School of Law, at least 
30 days prior to the date of the 
banquet. 



axmuuauaaanaanaaannanaaaDMa 

j 

D 



CusTom m n d e 

a 

Slipcovers 



and 



Draperies 



LAMPS 

TABLES 

CURTAINS 

BEDSPREADS 

HASSOCKS 




Free Estimates 
Cheerfully Given 

villtkS 

Home FURnisHiiiGs 



710 - 11th Street, N.W. 
Phone NAtional 8-7717 

WASHINGTON 1,0.0. 



«8<«:«:o::o::o:&::o::«:«:c^ 



THE 

HENRY B. GILPIN 

COMPANY 

Wholesale Druggists 
for over 100 years 

WASHINGTON 3, D. C. 

BALTIMORE 6, M0. 
NORFOLK 10, V A. 



NELSON MOTORS 

STUDEBAKER 

Authorized Sales & Service 
Auto Repairs — All Makes of Cars 
3 blocki from U. of M. od Route 1 

USED CARS UNion 4-8600 

7211 IALTIMORE BLVD. ■ COLLEGE PARK, MB. 



Iwyland— March-April, 1967 



41 



Baltimore Alumni Club To 
Entertain College Presidents 

The University of Maryland Alumni Club of Baltimore will enter- 
tain the Presidents of four of the colleges in the Baltimore area at 
an open forum, on Wednesday, March 20th in the Blue Room of the 
Alcazar, Cathedral and Madison Streets. Their topic will be "The 
Freshman Class of 1960". 

Dr. Wilson Homer Elkins will represent the University of Mary- 
land; the other colleges will be represented by The Very Rev- 
erend Vincent F. Beatty, Loyola College; Dr. Otto F. Krausharr, 
Goucher College; and Dr. Richard D. Weigle, St. John's College, An- 
napolis. 

Thomas A. Van Sant, Assistant Superintendent of Secondary 
Adult Education, of the Baltimore City Public Schools will be the 
moderator. 

The program chairman, James 0. Proctor, is being assisted by 
Dr. B. Olive Cole, Hyman Davidov, Charles Ellenger, Sam Goldstein, 
Miss Florence McKenny, Hanlin D. Murphy, Seymour Ruff, Dr. Frank 
Slama and James Stevens. 

Dr. Eugene Pessagno is the President of the Baltimore Club. He 
promises an interesting evening for members and friends of the local 
group. Refreshments will be served. There will be no admission fee. 



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Dr. John Wagner 



Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, for 
many years Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Pathology in the School 
of Medicine and active in the 
teaching of genito-urinary path- 
ology, tendered his resignation ef- 
fective with the beginning of the 
new school year. The School of 
Medicine acknowledges the long 
and faithful service of Dr. Gold- 
stein and commends him for the 
fine work he did in the teaching 
of genito-urinary pathology. 

In a letter to Dr. Wagner, Dr. 
Goldstein stated, "I want you to 
know that I have spent my most 
pleasant days with the students 
at the University of Maryland as 
well as with all the men in the De- 
partment of Pathology. I have al- 
ways been keenly interested and 
still am interested. However, I 
feel that I now need a little rest. 

"While I do not intend to dis- 
associate myself entirely, please 
feel that if I can be of service to 
you and certainly to the Univer- 
sity of Maryland whether it is 
the Medical School or otherwise, 
I shall always be happy to do so. 

"I have obtained much knowl- 
edge at the University of Mary- 
land during the past 35 years and 
I appreciate it." 

Dr. Figge Heads ACS 

Dr. Frank H. J. Figge, Profes- 
sor of Anatomy, has been elected 
President of the Maryland Divi- 
sion of the American Cancer So- 
ciety. Dr. Figge, who has for 
many years served as Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Maryland Division, 
was elected to succeed Dr. C. Ber- 
nard Brack who became Chair- 
man of the Board. 

Elected Councillor 

Dr. Harry M. Robinson, Jr., 
Professor of Dermatology, was 
recently elected a councillor of 
the Southern Medical Association 
representing the State of Mary- 
land. Dr. Robinson will replace 
Dr. J. Morris Reese, class of 1920, 
who has completed his term of 
office on the council. Dr. Robin- 
son and colleagues Dr. R. C. V. 
Robinson and Dr. John F. Strahan 
presented an exhibit on "Tran- 
quilizers in Dermatology" at the 
meeting of the Southern Medical 



42 



Maryland — March- April, 1957 



Association in Washington, D. C. 
The same exhibit was presented 
at the meeting of the American 
Academy of Dermatology. The 
same trio also presented a paper 
before the Southern Medical As- 
sociation entitled "Hydroxizine 
Hydrochloride, a New Tranquil- 
izer." 

Elected President 

Dr. Robert W. Farr, class of 
'34, has been recently elected 
president of the Maryland Acad- 
emy of General Practice. 

News of New Offices 

Dr. Henry E. Langenfelder, un- 
til recently resident in surgery at 
the University Hospital, has an- 
nounced the opening of his office 
for the practice of general surgery 
at 104 West Madison Street in 
P>altimore. 

Dr. Joseph D. Lichtenberg, 
class of 1950, announces the open- 
ing of his office for the practice 
of psychiatry at 11 East Chase 
Street, Baltimore. 

Dr. Henry J. Walton, Professor 
Emeritus of Roentgenology, Dr. 
Walter L. Kilby and Dr. Charles 
N. Davidson have announced the 
association of Dr. Henry H. Start- 
man, Jr., class of 1950, in the 
practice of roentgenology. They 
have also announced the opening 
of a new branch office at 7307 
York Road, Towson, Md. 

Dr. Stephen K. Padussis, class 
of 1948, has announced the open- 
ing of his office at 401-402 Medi- 
cal Arts Building in Baltimore. 
Dr. Padussis is engaged in the 
practice of general surgery. 

Dr. William G. Thuss, Jr., class 
of 1948, has announced his re- 
turn to active practice with the 
Thuss Clinic for Industrial Medi- 
cine and Surgery at 2230 Third 
Avenue North, Birmingham, Ala- 
bama. In June, 1956, he received 
the Doctor of Science degree in 
Industrial Medicine from the Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati, following a 
three year fellowship in industrial 
medicine at the Kettering Labora- 
tory of the College of Medicine of 
the University of Cincinnati. 

Named Consultant 

Dr. Eugene S. Bereston, class 
of 1937, has been named con- 
sultant for the 1957 edition of 
New and Non-Official Remedies 
published by the Council on Phar- 
macy and Chemistry of the Amer- 
ican Medical Association. 




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Dr. George H. Wall, class of 
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mouth, Virginia. 

Dr. Spencer Named 
Emeritus Professor 

Upon nomination of the facul- 
ty and confirmation of the Board 
of Regents of the University, Dr. 
Hugh R. Spencer, who retired as 
Professor of Pathology in the 
School of Medicine, was recently 
named Emeritus Professor of 
Pathology. 

Dr. Neafie Honored 

Dr. Charles A. Neafie, class of 
1909, and a resident of Pontiac, 
Mich., was the recipient of the 
Seventh Annual Award of the 
Oakland County Medical Society 
for "distinguished service to med- 
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Miss Miriam Brown, Class of 
1955, has a position as staff 
nurse at Prince George Hospital, 
Cheverly, Md. 

Miss Shirley Ward, Class of 
1955, resigned as staff nurse at 
the University Hospital and now 
has a position in Dr. Don Knowl- 
ton's office in Washington, D. C. 

Mrs. Clarice Hughes Nochera, 
Class of 1924, has resigned from 
the University o f Maryland 
Nurses' Directory and is living 
with her son, Mr. Frank P. Noch- 
era, Alexandria, Va. 

Lucy G. Winslow, Class of 1952, 
resigned from her position in 
Richmond, Va., and now has a 
position as staff nurse in the Ped- 
iatrics Department at the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin Hospital, 
Madison, Wis. 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert K. Arthur, 
Jr., and daughter, Margaret Car- 
roll, have returned from Tiffin, 
Ohio, and are residing at 5510 
The Alameda Boulevard, Balti- 
more, Md. Dr. Arthur is on the 
staff at Baltimore City Hospital. 
He is the Assistant Chief on 
the Obstetrical and Gynecological 
staff at the Baltimore City Hos- 
pital. 

Miss Katherine Veronica Shea, 
Class of 1913, retired from Direc- 
tor of Nursing at the North 
Adams Massachusetts Hospital, 
North Adams, and is residing at 
981 Summer St., North Adams, 
Mass. Miss Shea visited friends 
and classmates in Annapolis and 
Baltimore during the fall. 

Miss N. Katherine Kiddy, Class 
of 1952, has an industrial posi- 
tion with the Central Medical 
Center at 338 W. Pratt Street, 
Baltimore, Md. 

Mrs. Frederick E. Connelly, nee 
Nellie Pardew, Class of 1955, left 
the States by plane the last of 
November to join her husband in 
French Morocco. 

Margaret Ann Richardson, Class 
of 1953, has joined the Army Air 
Force Staff in San Antonio, Tex. 

The past summer Miss Shirley 
Byers, Class of 1942, spent ten 
weeks traveling in Europe. She 
visited Southern Germany, Italy, 
Switzerland, France, England and 
Scotland. While in France, she 
visited with Alden Tucker Scar- 



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44 



Maryland — March-April, 1957 



borough, also Class of 1942, who 
is now living in Paris with her 
family. At present, Miss Byers 
is teaching at George Fox Junior 
High School in Pasadena, Md. 

Catherine Atwater, Class of 
1948, has a position in Annapolis, 
Md., with the Anne Arundel 
County Health Department. Mrs. 
Jane Small Baker, Class of 1942, 
also has a position with the Anne 
Arundel County Health Depart- 
ment, Annapolis, Md. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Rayburn 
and family moved to Pittsburgh, 
Penna., the first of November, 
1956. Mrs. Rayburn was Joan 
Elaine Gleason, Class of 1950. 

Miss Ruth Clements, Class of 
1920, who is Instructor at the 
Milford, Delaware Hospital, spent 
several days in Baltimore in No- 
vember visiting friends and class- 
mates. 

Miss Marguerite Wilson Foster, 
Class of 1939, has a position at 
Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Md., 
as Instructor in Medical and 
Surgical Nursing. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard F. Woel- 
fel, and five children are living 
in Grosse Pointe Park, Mich. They 
moved from Chicago, 111., last 
June. Mrs. Woelfel was Jean 
Louise Conrad, Class of 1942. 

November 28th, a note from 
Miss Shirley Byers, telling us that 
on December 15th Mr. and Mrs. 
Maxwell Scarborough will move 
to London from Paris. Mr. Scar- 
borough will be assigned to the 
London Office as European Co- 
ordinator in charge of general ad- 
ministration. They will probably 
be in London until the spring of 
1958. 

Mrs. Theodore D. Lewis, Jr., 
nee Shirley M. Johns, Class of 
1954, writes that she and her 
husband, Ensign T. D. Lewis, Jr., 
are stationed on Okinawa and ex- 
pect to be there for about eigh- 
teen months. Address: c/o En- 
sign T. D. Lewis, Jr., Navy No. 
3867 VP-4, c/o Fleet Post Office, 
San Francisco, California. 

Mrs. Lolah Marshall Mihm, 
Class of 1939, resigned her posi- 
tion with the Dental Department, 
University of Maryland Hospital 
and is now supervisor of the Cen- 
tral Supply Room, University of 
Maryland Hospital, Baltimore, 
Md. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Rowe, 
nee Nancy Elizabeth Meredith, 
Class of 1950, moved to Georgia 
after Mr. Rowe's discharge from 
the Navy. Mrs. Rowe is doing 
private duty nursing at the 
Kennslone Hospital in Marietta, 



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Georgia. They have a son, Mark 
Edward, born August 21, 1956. 

Captain and Mrs. Michael Ia- 
cona, are residing in Newport, 
Rhode Island. Mrs. Iacona was 
Charlotte Halter, Class of 1948. 

Lt. Col. and Mrs. James B. 
Nuttall, have returned from 
abroad, and are residing at 134 S. 
Pershing Drive, Arlington, Va. 
Mrs. Nuttall was Virginia B. 
Richardson, Class of 1939. 

Dr. and Mrs. Lee Elgin, Jr., 
and two daughters, Cynthia and 
Laura Lynn, are living in Dur- 
ham, North Carolina. Dr. Elgin 
is in residency in Eye, Ear, Nose 
and Throat at Duke University. 
Mrs. Elgin graduated in 1954. 

Dr. and Mrs. Jerry E. Cohen, 
visited the University Hospital 
in December while east on Christ- 
mas vacation. They are living in 
Salt Lake City, Utah. Mrs. Cohen 
was Jean Waters, Class of 1948. 

Dr. and Mrs. Raymond C. 
Spaulding, Jr., and family have 
moved to Tucson, Arizona. Mrs. 
Spaulding was Doris A. Swartz, 
Class of 1947. 

A note from Mrs. Harold S. 
Holt, telling us that her husband 
retired from the DuPont Co., 
in December, 1956. The Holts 
will move to Ocean Springs, Miss. 
Mrs. Holt was Elizabeth Copen- 
haver, Class of 1924. 

Alumnae Marriages 

Carolyn Miller, Class of '52, to 
Mr. William A. May on February 
25, 1956. 

Joan Elizabeth Mathews, Class 
of '56, to Lt. Ralph Jacobson, 
USN, on June 2, 1956. Mrs. Jac- 
obson won $17,000 on "Name 
That Tune" in June of 1956. 

Maxine Carolyn Haynes, Class 
of '53, to Charles N. Masten on 
September 11, 1954. 

Nellie G. Pardew, Class of '55, 
to Lt. Frederick E. Connelly on 
July 26, 1956. 

Lou Ann Resh, Class of '56, to 
Wayne Ridgely Harman on June 
16, 1956. 

Suzanne Waterman, Class of 
'55, to Edward L. Hines, on June 
10, 1956. 

Delores Ann Tucker, Class of 
'53, to James K. Bouzoukis on 
September 19, 1956. 

Mary Juanita Buckner, Class 
of '51, to John F. Jones, Jr., on 
August 25, 1956. 

Julia Grammer Parkman, Class 
of '39, to Col. Ralph H. Hatfield 
on September 29, 1956. 

Mary Joan Moniodes, Class of 
'55, to William Koutrelakas, on 
June 10, 1956. 



46 



Mwrylandr-^-Mwrch- April, 1957 



School o/ 



Pharmacy 

Dr. John Autian 
Dr. Norman J- Doorenbos 



Dr. John Autian, Assistant 
Professor of Pharmacy and 
Mr. John Sciarra, Instructor in 
Pharmacy, presented two papers 
to the Pharmacy Science Section 
of the American Association for 
the Advancement of Science at 
the meeting of the Society held 
in New York. Mr. Robert Hav- 
ranek, Graduate Assistant and 
Mr. Charles Swarts, graduate stu- 
dent were also present at the 
meeting. This meeting also af- 
forded an opportunity for a num- 
ber of alumni of the School of 
Pharmacy to meet informally 
throughout the various sessions. 

Attends Dinner and Exercises 

Dean Foss recently attended 
inauguration exercises installing 
Dr. Robert Blackwell Smith, Jr., 
as President of the Medical Col- 
lege of Virginia. A graduate of 
the School of Pharmacy, Univer- 
sity of Maryland, Dr. Warren E. 
Weaver, will be the new Dean of 
the Pharmacy School of the Medi- 
cal College of Virginia, the post 
vacated by Dr. Smith upon his 
appointment as President. Dean 
Foss also attended a testimonial 
dinner honoring Dr. Frank W. 
Moudry as the recipient of the 
1956 Remington Medal in New 
York. 

Speaks To Pharmacy Group 

At the invitation of the Mary- 
land Association of Hospital 
Pharmacists, Dr. John Autian 
gave a talk entitled "The Appli- 
cation of Physical Pharmacy to 
Compounding and Formulation." 
The meeting of the group was 
held at the Bon Secours Hospital 
under the leadership of Mr. Wil- 
liam H. Briner, President. 

Lecture Series 

Faculty members of the School 
of Pharmacy conducting research 
are participating in a lecture ser- 
ies with the Medical Faculty at 
the University Hospital. Drs. 
Francis M. Miller, Norman J. 
Doorenbos and John Autian will 
present talks dealing with the re- 
search they have conducted. 



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Article Appears 

In a recent issue of Aerosol 
Age, an article appeared entitled 
"Aerosol Therapy." The article 
was written by Mr. John J. Sciar- 
ra, Instructor in Pharmacy and 
has achieved a status of national 
importance in the field of dis- 
pensing medicinal agents by the 
aerosol principle. 

Presents Paper 

A paper presented by Dr. 
Francis M. Miller and Mr. Myron 
Weinberg has received interna- 
tional publicity through its in- 
clusion in the Chemical and Engi- 
neering News. This journal, which 
has an international circulation, 
described their experiments on 
the synthesis of several tranquil- 
izing agents. 

Receives Promotion 

Leonard L. Mitnick, class of '56, 
was recently promoted to Private 
First Class in Washington, D. C, 
where he is a member of the Wal- 
ter Reed Army Medical Center. 
Mitnick entered the army last 
February and received basic train- 
ing at Fort Jackson, South Caro- 
lina. 

Tenth Annual Frolic 

The Tenth Annual Frolic of the 
Alumni Association of the School 
of Pharmacy was held at the Al- 
cazar in Baltimore. Although on 
the evening of the frolic the 
heavens seemed to open and pour 
down rain, and some fog too, some 
450 persons, including students, 
their parents, friends, faculty, 
fraternities, sororities and alum- 
ni, attended the affair. 

The entertainment consisted of 
competitive skits by the fraterni- 
ties and sorority, and also by in- 
dividuals and groups — all stu- 
dents of the School of Pharmacy. 
Dr. Frank J. Slama as a mem- 
ber of the Entertainment Com- 
mittee and as a professor in the 
School of Pharmacy, supervised 
the presentation of the skits. 

The following captured the 
prizes, with the resounding ap- 
plause of the students and their 
friends : 

Newman Club — First cash prize 
and the Bernard Cherry Cup for 
one year. 

Lambda Kappa Sigma Sorority 
— Second cash prize. 

Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity 
— Third cash prize. 

A group who styled themselves 
as the "Unknowns" received the 
first cash prize for a special pre- 
sentation. 



48 



Maryland — March-April, 1957 



The judges were Frank X. Hen- 
nessy, Radio Station WBAL ; Earl 
Webster, member of the Mary- 
land Board of Pharmacy ; and 
George W. Rider of Muth Bros. 
Co., Wholesale Druggists. 

President Norman Levin wel- 
comed the guests and awarded 
the prizes. First Vice President 
H. Nelson Warfield was Master 
of Ceremonies. 

Dean Noel E. Foss reported on 
the progress being made in the 
construction of the new pharmacy 
building. Samuel I. Raichlen re- 
ported on the scholarship award 
to a first year student of the 
School and also mentioned the 
award of the Maryland Pharma- 
ceutical Association to a first year 
student. The Alumni Association 
has also recently provided .$400 
for scholarships to undergradu- 
ate students. This contribution is 
matched by the American Foun- 
dation for Pharmaceutical Educa- 
tion. The donation of the Alumni 
Association therefore makes $800 
additional available for scholar- 
ships in the School of Pharmacy. 

Music for the entertainment 
and dancing was furnished by 
the Zamecki Orchestra. Refresh- 
ments were served. Ice cream 
was provided by The Borden Co. ; 
peanut butter crackers by the 
Austin Packing Co. ; potato chips 
and pretzels by Mrs. Ihrie's Po- 
tato Chip Co. Coca-Cola, cider 
and doughnuts were also served. 
The refreshments were popular 
during the intermission and dur- 
ing the dancing. 

Tickets were provided for reg- 
istration when entering the hall 
and persons holding the lucky 
numbers were given silver dol- 
lars. 

The chairmen of the commit- 
tees in charge of the affairs in- 
cluded Irvin Cohen, Tickets; Sam 
A. Goldstein, Place and Arrange- 
ments; James P. Cragg, Jr:, and 
Frank J. Slama, Entertainment; 
Jerome Stiffman, Publicity; Gor- 
don Mouat and Frank S. Balas- 
sone, Reception. 

Congratulations and best wish- 
es were extended during the eve- 
ning to Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 
Cohen who marked their twenty- 
fifth wedding anniversary. The 
same day was also Mr. Cohen's 
birthday. Mr. Cohen is Execu- 
tive Secretary of the American 
Pharmaceutical Association and 
the Baltimore Retail Druggists 
Association. 



THE 




BALTIMORE 
BLOCK and 


ASPHALT 
TILE CO. 


BABCO 






HOT ASPHALT PAVEMENTS 


general 


• private driveways 

• industrial yards 
for • service stations 

• playgrounds 

• parking areas 




contractors 


1320 N. MONROE ST. 


BALTIMORE 17, MD. 


Call: MAdison 3-4346 








Dukeland brand 

• SMOKED HAMS 

• PICNIC HAMS 

CORNED BEEF AND TONGUES 

SMOKED AND READY TO EAT 

MEAT PRODUCTS 

Baltimore, Aid. 



Get in touch with us regarding 
the affair you are planning 



Bus. LExington 9-8400 — Ext. 216 
Res. MUlberry 5-6523 



BALTIMORE CHECK ROOM SERVICE 

CHECKING FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

(no lunciioti la too large or too small) 

CHECKING FOR HOMES OR HALLS 

DAN MORACO Office Lord Baltimore Hotel Check Room 



NATIONAL EQUIPMENT & SUPPLY CO Inc. 


Link Belt Company 




"Pyrene" & "MSA" Industrial 


Power Transmission 


• 


CO-TWO " • Gas Masks. Canisters 


Supplies 




Fire Extinguishers & First Aid Equipment 


2600 12th STREET, N.E. 




WASHINGTON 18, 0. C. LAwrence 6-1 362 



B. & B. EXTERMINATORS, Inc. 

SANITATION and PEST 
CONTROL SERVICE 

BLACK EAGLE PRODUCTS 

Phones: LExington 9-2140—9-2141 

626 NORTH CALVERT ST. 

Baltimore 2, Md. 



THE 

E. fl. KRESTRER 

C0IT1PRRY 

DAIRY 6* CREAMERY 
APPARATUS 

5401 PULASKI HIGHWAY 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



Maryland — March-April, 1957 



49 



51st ANNIVERSARY 
1906 1957 




ARUNDEL FEDERAL 
SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION 

direct reduction home loans 
savings accounts - liberal dividends 

• 
Insured up to $10,000 by the Federal 
Savings and Loan Insurance Corp. 

• 
Christmas Clubs — Safe Deposit Boxes 

Community Hall for Rent 
Hours: 

9 to 2 daily 
7 to 9 Tuesday evening 

PATAPSCO AVENUE & FOURTH STREET 
Baltimore 25, Md. CUrtis 7-1112 



1799 



1957 



HENRY W. 

pi skins 

AND SONS CO., Inc. 

DAVID W. JENKINS, President 

4905 York Road at Rossiter Ave. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Oldest and Most Modern Funeral Directors 
in tin- United States — \ou> Our 159<h Year 



Idlewood 
50200 



Idlewood 
5-0201 



Private Off Street Parking 



"Electrically 

Our Coverage Of 

Maryland Is 

Complete" 

fyfCTRICALSft^. 



TRISTATE 



STOWN-CUME 

ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION 

MATERIALS - SUPPLIES 

EQUIPMENT 

• 

OPERATING ON AN EXCLUSIVE 
WHOLESALE POLICY 




College of 



Them 



HEALTHY . . . 

GIVE TO 
FIGHT POLIO 

WILLIAM F. STONE, JR. 

2612 N. Charles Street 

Baltimore 18, Md. 



Another First for the Pimlico Hotel 

Old Time 
Barbecue Treats 

Tantalizing barbecue dishes in the grand 
manner! Choice, tender meat turned 
slowly on a spit over a blazing fire, to 
a golden brown. Basted with a pungent, 
thick, mouthwatering sauce, prepared from 
an old recipe by our own expert chefsl 

Nate's and Leon's 



imlico 

HOTEL 



O/ien 'til 2 a.m. - Saturday 'til 3 
5301 PARK HEIGHTS AVE. BALTIMORE 



Physical Education 
Recreation & Health 



Theron A. Tompkins 



Three University of Maryland 
athletes were among 17 stu- 
dents tapped for membership in 
Phi Alpha Epsilon, physical edu- 
cation honorary. 

Included among the new mem- 
bers is Perry Moore, a junior who 
led the varsity track team last 
year in scoring with 83% points 
for the season and is currently a 
member of Coach Bud Millikan's 
basketball squad. 

Moore was ranked sixth in the 
United States in 1955 and ninth 
in 1956 in the decathlon event. 
He was DCAAU high hurdle and 
broad jump champion last year 
and placed third in the low hurdle 
event in the ICAAA champion- 
ships track meet in New York. 
Coach Kehoe calls him, "one of 
the most outstanding track and 



BE. 5-7135 



Call 



— HO. 7-6746 



R & F nURSES RECISTRV 



MALE — FEMALE 

RNS LICENSED PRACTICAL* 

Lie. — PracticaU - Maternity 
Bonded Nurses 

Sarah Anderson 
Manager 




• 13 Homestead St. 
Baltimore IS, Md. 



BARTLETT & KENNEDY, INC. 



Insurance & Bonding of every 
description for more than 
half a century 



Policy analysis 
Engineering surveys 
Appraisals 



Phone: LExington 9-6004 
BALTIMORE 3, MD. 
26 S. CALVERT STREET 



50 



Maryland — March-April, 1957 



field men ever to attend the Uni- 
versity of Maryland." 

Also tapped were Jim Parsons, 
a former Wilson High School ath- 
lete who started at end on Mary- 
land's 1956 Orange Bowl squad, 
and Frank Fellows, who lettered 
on the varsity basketball squad 
three years ago and is currently 
doing graduate work. 

Reads Paper 

Dr. Rita Bergman, Instructor 
of Health Education, presented a 
paper entitled "The Student — 
The Ultimate Aim," at the School 
and College Section of the Na- 
tional Safety Congress recently 
held in Chicago. 

Attend Convention 

Dr. Josephine Hubbell, Assist- 
ant Professor, Miss Doris Terry, 
Instructor of Health Education, 
and Dr. Warren Johnson, Profes- 
sor of Physical Education and 
Health Education, attended the 
convention of American School 
Health and the annual convention 
of the American Public Health 
Association at Atlantic City. 

Serves At National Conference 

Dr. Ellen Harvey, Associate 
Professor of Recreation, served 
as a member of the steering com- 
mittee for the National Confer- 
ence on Professional Preparation 
of Recreation Personnel, held in 
Washintgon, D. C. 

Attends Aquatic Forum 

Dr. Dorothy R. Mohr, Physical 
Education, attended the meeting 
of the Women's National Aquatic 
Forum at Hollywood, Florida. At 
this session Dr. Mohr presented 
a paper at a meeting of the re- 
search section. She was also 
elected to the Executive Com- 
mittee of the Forum to serve a 
three-year term. 

Staff Attends Convention 

Dr. Benjamin Massey, Dr. Mar- 
vin Eyler and Dr. Burris Hus- 
man, attended the annual con- 
vention of the College Physical 
Education Association held in 
Columbus, Ohio. Dr. Massey pre- 
sented two papers — "Measure- 
ment and Evaluation as Related 
to Perspective Problems Created 
in Institutions of Higher Educa- 
tion over the Next Ten Years," 
and "A Recommended Organiza- 
tion and Structure for the Col- 
lege Physical Education Associa- 
tion." 



FRANCIS & PARSONS, Inc. 

Exclusive S. E. Dodge — Plymouth Dealer 
Dodge Job Rated Trucks 

SALES & SERVICE 
GUARANTEED USED CARS 

2100 NICHOLS AVE., S.E. — ANACOSTIA, D. C. 

"We're Easy to Deal With" 



LU 4-7400 



Used Cars— LU 4-2880 



<£awjy£AA, Jittc Qompam^ 

of 

(pAuuciL tjsufiqsLdu fowih^, QruL. 

COMPLETE LAND TITLE SERVICE 



4312 HAMILTON STREET 

Hyattsville, Maryland 

HUBERT K. ARNOLD, Pres. & Counsel 
Class of 1935 



APpleton 
7-6464 



2412 MINNESOTA AVE., S.E. 

Washington, D. C. 



HAROLD S. WANNER, 
Vice Pres.-Treas. 




Milkredt FLORISTS 



WE DELIVER 

LeROY RUBOTTOM 
Owner-Detlaner 



6921 LAUREL AVE. 



TAK0MA PARK, MD. 



£sl&L Suidc IjsL 

Jack Daniels Buick, inc 

8526 GEORGIA AVENUE 

SILVER SPRING, MO. 

JUniper 9-9385 

"Silver Spring Has Everything" 



Maryland — March-April, 1957 



51 




9£L 
a 






s^rt Ljour Command. 



Because you are particular about where you shop, 
dine, or purchase that new car— may we suggest these 
fine, long established business firms on these pages, 
to satisfy your discriminating taste. 



WARNER'S * 

20 E. BALTIMORE ST., BALTIMORE, MD. 



North- 



South 




East 



West 



cAttention. JboctorJ: 

For Complete Supplies and Equipment 

HOFFMAN SURGI 

CO., INC. 



A Truly Qreat Name in Baltimore Real Estate 

The Roland Park Realty Co. 

B. Franklin Hearn, President 

Norman F. Gorsuch — Aurine B. Morsell 

Vice-Presidents 



503 W. COLD SPRING LANE 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



TU 9-5555 



4810 ROLAND AVE. 



BALTIM 



ORE, MD. /\ 



(Bsl&L (Bm^ . . . 



BUICK 



from 




FOR MEN 

1133 MATHIESON BLDG. 
BALTIMORE 2, MD. 



EXPERT CAREER COUNSELING 
FOR COLLEGE GRADS 



A 



Vice President — Sales Manager 



BROOKSPRICE 



FOR 

WOMEN 

927 MATHIESON BLOG. 
BALTIMORE 2, MD. 



BALTIMORE 




52 



M wry land — March-April, 1957 



WE BRING YOU 
YOUR PAGE 



in 



A 



MAGA 




>< 



d U)nlL (DmaaqcL nfYlan U)qoaa a Xal 

SOUTHCON 

MEN'S HATS 

STETSDN HAT QUARTERS 
St< tsmi I ■ 




10? E. BALTIMORE STREET 



llmlnjUn ♦ SM» 



IAITIMORE, MD 



RELIABLE Tl 



Year 'Round 
Air Conditioning 

Provides heated, filtered air in 
winter; cooled, dehumidified, fil- 
tered air in summer. 



The CROWN Refrigeration Supply Co 




* 




u. 



Headquarters 

For Famous 



K 



913 E. BIDDLE ST. 
PL 2-3359 



BALTIMORE 2, MD. 
Ask for August Huber 



cJjiitinauiined ~J~ormat lA/ear 

for Ljentlemen of ^Discernment 
LATEST STYLES — CORRECTLY FITTED 



* 






FORMAL WEAR 
RENTAL SERVICE 

MOhawk 4-8070 



3805 Forest Park Ave. 



Baltimore 16, Mn. 




Dependability and Service 

MORRISON & FIFER 

— Dispensing Chemists — 
Paul Archambault, Prop. 

3109 ST. PAUL ST. BE 5-3579 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



TIRES • TUBES • BATTERIES 
Convenient Terms Arranged 

1121 MARYLAND AVE. 
BALTIMORE 



3*&l. (Dining fisApudtion, 
TFlwujLcwcL TTbm. C^oasl 

* MECCA 

RESTAURANT 

SA 7-7730 32 S. Calvert St 

Baltimore, Md. 



Title Insurance 



Service available throughout Maryland 



Secure what 
you own — 
with T I T L I 
INSURANCE 




CHARTERED 1811 



THE 
TITLE GUARANTEE CO. 

St. Paul and Lexington Sts. 
Baltimore 2 SAratoga 7-3700 



Maryland — March-April, 1957 



53 







TJZaJu/jtand. . 

As business men in the community, we watch 
with pride your accomplishments in business 
and professions. We are interested in your 
activities, your contributions, your sports and 
your hobbies. 



ion 



ilSuiinedi ^TurniL 



\Sffice and J^cnoot 



£. 



H ui r 



it Cf ^uijpli 



Tr 



iei 



CHAS. G. STOTT & CO. 

1310 New York Ave., N. W. 

Washington, D. C. 

NA 8-4181 

PAPER & PAPER PRODUCTS 

1935 5th St., N. E. 

Washington, D. C. 

DU 7-4433 



Botany "500" and Hyde Park Clothes 
Dobbs Hats - Bostonian Shoes 




PRINCE GEORfiB FINEST MEN'J WEAR 5T0Rt 



(BETWEEN RIVERDALE 

6D33 BALTIMORE BLVD. and hyattsville) 



UNIDN 4-1312 



.VI 



Maryland — March- April, 1957 



WE HAIL YOU! 

You and your University have and are con- 
tributing so much to the Nation and the Na- 
tion's Capital. We extend to you an invitation 
to visit our establishments and make your- 
selves known. Best Wishes! 




^ror tUuiCK ^Jhii ii a J-^eahe Lye t 

SEE AND DRIVE THE 
NEWEST BUICK YET 

Qet the Top Deal From 

PEAKC 
(BiiicL, 9nc. wm 



WISCONSIN AVE. AT ALBEMARLE ST. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

EM 2-2000 



"A Service You Can Trust" 

LEE FREW IPILATT 

REAL ESTATE and INSURANCE 

9437 GEORGIA AVE. SILVER SPRING, MD. 
JU 9-5708 




Maryland 

Men 

Select 



HYATTSVILLE AUTO GLASS CO 

"IF IT'S GLASS. WE HAVE IT" 
Auto Glass Installed While-U-Wait 



* 



J Jul qathsuaw^ fdaxJL pfL 

DUKE ZEIBERT'S 






* 




DUKE ZEIBERT'S 



RESTAURANT 



5516 BALTIMORE AVENUE 



HYATTSVILLE, MD. 



1730 L STREET (Two doors west of Connecticut Ave.) 

STerling 3-1730 
Open 'til Midnight — Sunday 'til 10 P.M. 



-7or (a/ualilij I Jon L ,in . 'mil 

CARPET CENTER 

NATIONALLY FAMDUS BRANDS 

RUGS AND CARPETS 



JUNIPER 5-1117 
8612 GEORGIA AVE. SILVER SPRING. MD 



Maryland — March-April, 1957 



;>.-> 



TR»D£ MARK 




6TCRLING 
ttS I 1000 




.ompanu inc. 

iD/er/ma Oiwerware 

Charles at Pleasant Sts ^BaHimore-LMd 




KARL M. GRAF 

& Company 

2220 N.CHARLES ST 
BALTIMORE. MD. 

Furniture 
Interiors 




"The Store of Highest 
Tradition and Prestige" 



eA 



(Z5eautiPui i^iotli 

Jeanette Beck, Inc 

DRESSES 
1016 N. CHARLES STREET 
BALTIMORE 1, MARYLAND 

TELEPHONES: 
MULBERRY 5-1445 
VERNON 7-9574 




J&L 



By EDITH A. ROSS 

It's Springtime! The amazing season 
that captures your fancy with ita 
calm, magical charm. A soft breeze 
brings us the news — the gentle season 
is here! And with the wonderful new- 
ness of spring comes a reawakened in- 
terest in sports, gardening, home and 
fashion. 

With a feeling of excitement, we 
called on the charming Berthe M. Scho- 
field at SCHOFIELD & COMPANY, 
INC., 331 N. CHARLES STREET, to 
see if she could show us the replicas 
of the Woodlawn Vase, the trophy to be 
presented at the famous Preakness, at 
Pimlico Race Track, and, too, the Inter- 
national Cup, to be presented at the 
Laurel Race Track. Her firm makes 
these fine replicas. She was most graci- 
ous and told us many interesting things 
about her firm. 

The company was founded in 1871 by 
her late husband, Frank M. Schofield, 
whose family had been Silversmiths in 
London, England since 1759. Under the 
Schofield supervision, the famous Wood- 
lawn trophy and International Cup 
were designed. 

Mrs. Schofield recalled another item 
of interest when the congregation of 
St. Ignatius Church contributed gifts 
of old gold to be melted down to make 
the "Golden Arm" that is in the church 
today. 

Mr. Edward Pick is Vice-President 
and General Manager of the firm. He 
showed us some of the flat silver and 
hollow pieces that are Schofield design 
and are truly beautiful. Their work of 
repairing old silver to look like new 
is true artistry. 



TftaJuflam 



Mrs. Schofield, who has made a study 
of Silver, frequently is called upon by 
Womens' Clubs to talk on "The Ro- 
mance of Silver." 



THE FASHIONABLE 

westehester 

DINING ROOM 



Finest Cuisine -Served graciously in quiet luxury 
Superb wine cellar. For reservations call Arnold — WOodley 6*7700 

Cocktails In The lounge" or Dining room 
til 6 holiday room Exquisite private accommodations 
for ten fo fifty guests. 40 oo CATHEDRAL avenue 
Free Parking for Dinner Guests from 6 to 10 P.M. IN MAIN GARAGE 



We had heard of the new Young 
Modern Shop at MILLER BROTHERS, 
1110 N. CHARLES STREET, and de- 
cided to enjoy a short walk to take a 
"look see." Sidney Miller welcomed Uc 
and asked us to see his marvelous col- 
lection of spring and summer clothes. 
But, we first wanted to see the New 
Young Modern Shop. It's lovely. 

The dyed-to-match sweaters and 
skirts aie breath taking — such divine 
colors. Then we saw the new summer 
shorts and pedal pushers, just perfect 
for the relaxing hours or work in the 
garden, and the bathing suits are su- 
perb. 

For many years, Baltimore women 
have known Millers Brothers Fashion 
Center for their lovely furs, suits and 
dresses. This new addition of the 
Young Modern Shop is a welcome one 
which we heartily approve. 



We crossed Charles Street this beau- 
tiful spring day, and looked in all the 
display windows on our way to the 
shop of NELSON COLEMAN AND 
ASSOCIATES, at 333 N. CHARLES 
STREET. 

Mr. Coleman is a master craftsman 
of note, in the art of re-styling precious 
jewelry. His original designs are mag- 
nificently different. 

For the creation of new custom jew- 
elry, he has a fabulous selection of 



Tables to Love 


And to Live With 




CHERRY STEP END 




TABLE 




with drawer 


Jfi JK^^w 


Brass trimming 




$87.50 




one of many In 


~"*"^^^M '^VBIVVV 


our selections of 




fine tables. 


Win* P. Stein, Inc. 


401 N. Charles Street 


Baltimore 


Free Parking Just Around the Corner 



56 



Maryland — March-April, 1957 



i/v/nc/L 



precious gems — diamonds, pearls, plat- 
inum and gold to be created into rings, 
bracelets or necklaces of a customers 
choice. 

Mr. Coleman, a pleasant gentleman, 
is well known to Baltimoreans. For 
years he was the president of the Carl 
J. Doederlein Company. The jewelry 
business has been his life's work and 
today he devotes his personal attention 
to the design of each and every piece 
of jewelry in his distinctive salon. 



We wanted a book on gardening and 
knew of no better place to stop than 
the COKESBURY BOOK STORE, at 
516 N. CHARLES STREET. It is truly 
Baltimore's cultural department store. 

The firm was established in 1838 
with offices at 316 N. CHARLES 
STREET and moved to its present lo- 
cation in 1925. 

Completely remodeled in 1955 in mod- 
ern decor, it is now Baltimore's most 
complete Book Store. Three levels sep- 
arate each department. The first level 
is devoted to General and Children's 
Books plus a special section for Re- 
ligious Books and Bibles. 

On the second level will be found 
Rust Craft and Hallmark Cards and 
Stationery. The third level specializes 
in supplies and books for all depurt- 
mens of the church and Sunday School. 

When you are near, stop in and ask 
for a Cokesbury Book Catalog, "Look 
at the Book," or drop them a post- 
card. It will be sent without charge. 

Alfred C. Choin is manager of the 
COKESBURY BOOK STORE. He is a 
well read, interesting and pleasant per- 
son to chat with. Whether you are in- 
terested in Fiction, Non-Fiction, His- 
tory, Biographies, or Humor, he or his 
capable staff can help you. 



There is nothing, but nothing, that 
fills the air with a finer scent than 
freshly baked bread so our next stop 
was the RICE BAKING COMPANY. 
Founded in 1868 by Duane H. Rice, it 
is still operated in the same location 
in Baltimore on Gay Street. It has 
grown to tremendous proportions and 
is operated today by descendants of 
the original family. 




Duane Rice Stoneleigh, nephew of 
Duane Rice, i.s president of the linn 
and under his supervision, as through- 
out the years, a friendly labor rela- 
tions exists that tells the story of con- 
tentment. There are no unions and a 
number of the employees are reaching 
the half century mark of employment 
with the firm. Recently, at a company 
awards gathering, over 200 of the Too 
employees received their ten year rec- 
ognition awards. 

Where Rice's Bakery is known for 
its many varieties of fine breads, they 
have also won several awards for fancy 
cake decorations. Their head decorator, 
Max Adam, was awarded the 1956 first 
and second prizes in the Baker's Pro- 
duction Club of Maryland. 



NelAon CoL 



eman 



JEWELRY SPECIALISTS 

333 N. CHARLES at PLEASANT 

BALTIMORE 1, MD. 

LExington 9-3136 LExington 9-3137 

Custom-made Jewelry 

BY APPOINTMENT 

— Designs Submitted — 



THE ^^ 

LORD CALVERT 
HOTEL & COTTAGES 

Just eight miles from Washington, 
near the University of Maryland, 
you'll find complete comfort and con- 
veniences. 

Phone WArfield 7-8324 

For Reservations 

Free TV — Free Parking 

On U. S. Highway No. 1 

7200 BALTIMORE AVENUE 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 




Bob Jones 



SS ARE MORE ELOQUENT THAN WORDS 



228 N. Liberty St. Baltimore, Md. 



J>folV£AA. 
PL 2-3737 




Fiction 

Nonl'iction 

Children's Bonks 

Educational (James 
and Toys 

Stationery and 
Qreeting Cards 

Religious Books and 
Bibles 

vJaltimors '$ Cultural -Dtpartmsnt -_>/ 



Mail and phone orders shipped promptly. 
Write for free Book Cotolog 




BOOK STORE 

516 N. CHARLES STREET 

Phone SA. 7-7280 

Baltimore, Md. 



Young MODERN'S Shop 

Outstanding Sport and 
Casual Clothes 



LE 9-0550 
Baltimore, Md. 



1110-1112 
N. Charles St. 





Your 


B^ ttSr ^" 


Child's 


■M^f Photograph 


IKfe- by 


Uan oDurana 


NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE FOR HOME SITTING 


Also Direct Color Photography 


1659 WISCONSIN AVE. • DE 2-8706 


WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Maryland — March^April, 1957 



57 



3>(A. 



TftaAyhmcL (j^omsut. 



Rice Bakery shops are dotted over 
the greater part of Baltimore and now 
service has been extended to Delaware, 
Pennsylvania and, in the Washington 
area, to Montgomery and Prince 
George's Counties. 

Among the fine jobs the Rice Baking 
Company is doing, is giving practical 
experience to the students of Mergen- 
thaler, the vocational school of Balti- 
more. Students in the bakery depart- 
ment can work with the firm while 
they are going to school. One of the 
members of the Rice organization is 
on the Mergenthaler Board and the 
firm contributes generously toward the 
work the school is doing. 



Worn 

,*>* Est 1868 > A 



AT OUR BAKE SHOPS 

Delivered Fresh Twice Daily 

• Layer Cakes 

• Party Cookies 

• Wedding Cakes 

• Low Sodium Bread 

• Eastern Sho Bread 

• Coffee Cakes 

• PAN DANDY 

Brown 'n Serve Rolls 



See your telephone book 
for locations 

Baltimore, Maryland 



Gifts of Distinction • Objets d'Art ! 

CREATIVE DESIGNS 

• PRECIDUS STDNES 
• WATCHES 

C. J. ANDERSOT 

Graduate Gemologist, G.I. A. 
— Jeweler — 

1 1 9 W. SARATOGA STREET 
Baltimore 1, Md. LE 9-6342 



Springtime gives every home-maker 
the urge to get the winter blanket; 
washed, cuitaTns, draperies and furni- 
ture cleaned. It's the time of the year 
that one wants everything to sparkle 
and shine. 

There is no one better qualified to 
give suggestions on the proper way 
to wash blankets, or your finest laces 
and curtains than the capable Polly 
Kite, the home economist for the fine 
old Baltimore firm, THE MANGELS- 
HEROLD COMPANY located on KEY 
HIGHWAY & BOYLE STREET. The 
firm has been serving the nation for 
over 50 years. 

Mangels-Herold has introduced three 
washday products which are enjoying 
ever-increasing popularity. They are 
King Starch, King Fluff, and King 
Powdered Laundry Bleach. If you call 
Polly, she will be happy to tell you how 
to get the best results on any of your 
washday problems. 

King Starch is highly concentrated 
and actually contains more starch than 
any other brand. It goes much farther 
. . . one quart of King makes six 
quarts of starch. 

King Fluff is a new rinse that elimi- 
nates the static from your daintiest ny- 
lons or cashmere sweaters, makes baby 
diapers, towels, blankets and other 
washables extra soft and fluffy. It also 
makes ironing far easier for the home- 
maker. 

King Bleach is the only bleach that 
is guaranteed safe for all fabrics, even 
including the sheerest nylons and silks, 
and is safe for all tub-fast colors. 

For more than 50 years, the Mangels- 
Herold Company has been famous for 
King Syrup which has been a favorite 
with people who love good things to 
eat. The phrase, "sweet, golden, mel- 
low" aptly describes this table delicacy. 



#;«:<maKa«:«:«:«s»::o:^^ 



Furs and Clothes 
of Distinction 



,UJ 



IP P 



rouNOCO 1893 



1 220 Charles Street, North 
Baltimore, Md. 



(palaoL 

Finest PEKING Cuisine 
in the Nation's Capital 




'MFe entertain 

Daily more 
Diplomats tlian 

the 
~\Y)tite House" 



and Superb 

AMERICAN HOME 

COOKING 

INTERNATIONAL COCKTAILS 

Open Daily 11:30 to Midnight 

3524 CONN. AVE., N.W. 

At Porter Street 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Any size party 
accommodated at any time 
Reservations: EM. 2-6358 



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58 



Maryland — March-April, 19t 




CLUB 

NEWS 

Jos. H. Deck ma n. 
Treasurer 



The Sixth Annual All-Ameri- 
can "M" Club Banquet was 
held recently in the main ball- 
room of the Lord Baltimore 
Hotel. 

The "M" Club Banquet was 
established in 1952. Its main pur- 
pose is annually to honor the 
I 'Diversity of Maryland's nation- 
ally recognized All-American ath- 
letes. In addition, the Univer- 
sity's championship teams are 
honored (all sports) as long as 
such teams are recognized by the 
N.C.A.A. 

Charles Ellinger, President of 
the "M' ' Club, introduced the 
Master of Ceremonies, Bailey 
Goss. 

Tommy Mont, the University 
of Maryland's new football coach, 
made the All-American presen- 
tations. All-American athletes 
from the University of Maryland 
who received awards this year 
are: 

Lacrosse — Jim Kappler — Goal 

Lacrosse — Charlie Wicker — 
Attack 

Lacrosse — Jim Keating — 
Midfield 

Lacrosse — John Simmons — 
Defense 

Other awards given at the ban- 
quet were: 

Talbot T. Speer Award— Re- 
cipient was Mike Sandusky, cap- 
tain of the football and wrestling 
teams. 

The man for whom this award 
is named, is a well known busi- 
ness executive and a former star 
halfback on one of Maryland's 
football teams. He is a past presi- 
dent of the General Alumni As- 
sociation. Mr. Speer has been ac- 
tive in many worthwhile chari- 
table causes; he is a man of na- 
tional prominence whose varied 
activities cover three pages in 
Who's Who. 

To win the Talbot T. Speer 
Award, an athlete must excel in 
leadership, scholastics, and have 
all around athletic ability. 

The McCormick Award — Re- 
cipient was William Waesche, of 
the lacrosse team. 

Mr. Charles P. McCormick, who 
presented this award is a well- 



known Baltimore industrialist 
who has gained world-wide recog- 
nition for his company. Mr. Mc- 
Cormick is a member of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland's Hoard of 
Regents. 

Eligibility for this award is 
limited to U. of M. seniors whose 
residence is established in the 
Baltimore area. The award is 
made to the individual who is ad- 
judged to have contributed the 
most to athletics during his sen- 
ior year at the University. 

The A. V. Williams Award — 
Recipient was Jack Davis, of the 
football team. 

Mr. Williams, who presented 
this award, is a past president 
of the "M" Club, an active mem- 
ber of the Terrapin Club, a star- 
center of the 1917 Maryland Foot- 
ball Team, and president of his 
own company. 

"M" Club Honorary Member- 
ships — "M" Club honorary 
membership presentations were 
awarded to Dr. Elkins and Dr. 
Thurston Adams, physician for 
the football team. 

Each year the "M" Club awards 
honorary memberships to men 
who have made notable achieve- 
ments in the political, profession- 
al, and business areas. These men 
may or may not be athletes. How- 
ever, it is considered that out- 
standing success in any walk of 
life requires the same intelli- 
gence, courage, physical stamina, 
and drive needed to become a 
great athlete. 

Hall of Fame — Presentations 
were made by Mr. McCormick. 

The Maryland Athletic Hall of 
Fame has been founded this year 
through the efforts of the "M" 
Club. 

The four names added to the 
Hall of Fame this year are : 

1. Moses Grove 

2. Dr. Harry Byrd 

3. Vince Dundee 

4. Ned Duvall 

The Hall of Fame Selection 
Committee consisted of: Charles 
Ellinger, President of the "M" 
Club; Joseph H. Deckman, Chair- 
man of the Hall of Fame; Sam 
Silber, Class of 1935; Rodger H. 
Pippen, Paul Menton, Jesse Lin- 
thicum, Sports Editors; Bob Lay- 
ton, J. Suter Kegg, Robert Wall- 
is, Sports Editors: Bailey Goss, 
Eddie Fenton. Sportscasters; 
Theodore R. McKeldin. Governor, 
Honorary Chairman. 

Distinguished honorary "M" 
Club members attending the ban- 



quet were: Governor McKeldin. 
Mayor Thomas I I'Alesandro, Wil- 
liam Preston Lane, Jr., Herberl 
R, < i'< lonor, I [onorable .lame- I'. 
s. Devereux, ' !ol. Harvey L Mill- 
er, ( !ol. Harlan < '. < rriswold, Peter 

\V. Chichester, William w. Cobey, 
( harlesP. McCormick, Dr. George 
E. Bennett, Neil H. Swanson, Mel- 
vin II. Baker, Fred I. Archibald, 
II. A. (Bud) Millikan, Lansdale 
Sasscer, Dr. Wilson II. Elkins, 
Herberl Brown, Robinson Lappin, 

Rodger II. Pippin, .Jesse Li nth i- 
cuni, and Paul Menton. 



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Ma ryla n d — March- A prz7, 1957 



59 




Capt. Bob O'Brien paces 
his teammates in scoring. 



Clever def< nsi man 

John Nacincik puts 

the lid on opponent's 

high scorers. 



UNIVERSITY 
SPORTS 



By JOE BLAIR 
Sports Editor 



Basketball Team Hits Hot 
Streak At Mid-season 



Maryland's basketball team, led 
by their senior captain Bob 
O'Brien, McMechen, W. Va., hit 
one of the hottest streaks in 
Coach Bud Millikan's seven years 
at College Park, to take a 10-5 
record into the mid-year break. 

Returning home after the 
Christmas tournament in Owens- 
boro, Ky., and a split in games 
with Conference rivals Clemson 
and South Carolina, the Millikan- 
men won their next five games 
and created enough excitement to 
establish themselves a threat to 
take the nation's number one 
team, North Carolina, in the Cole 



Activities Building on February 
5. The game with the Tarheels 
also was expected to draw the 
largest crowd ever to see a game 
in the new basketball arena. 

O'Brien, Nacincik Lead Way 

With O'Brien leading the of- 
fensive path through the victor- 
ies over Duke, George Washing- 
ton, South Carolina, Georgetown, 
and North Carolina State, the 
slender hard-working junior John 
Nacincik was applying one of the 
top defensive jobs to the oppo- 
nents' high scorers, as well as 
coming through with valuable 




fiO 



Maryland — March- A pril, 1S57 



scoring to place him the second 
highest scorer for the 15 games, 
just behind O'Brien. 

Midgets of Conference 

The Terp five, smallest in 
the Atlantic ("oast Conference, 
didn't figure to come up with 
some of the early big wins be- 
cause of their lack of size. But 
the slack in height has been tak- 
en up by the tremendous hustle 
of the team. 

Halleck A Scoring Ace 

Millikan, building for the next 
year with an outstanding fresh- 
man team dominated by good "big 
men," wasn't even offering alibis 
after he lost star sophomore 
Gene Danko the second game of 
the season. Danko, an Ail-Ameri- 
can in high school, broke his ankle 
and may not be available until 
tournament time in March. His 
replacement, another sophomore, 
Jim Halleck, New Jersey all-state 
in high school, came in and has 
given the team another double- 
figure scoring ace along with un- 
expected help rebounding. 

He, along with holdover star 
Nick Davis and Perry Moore, 
who at 6-4 is the tallest Terp, 
have teamed with O'Brien and 
Nacincik to give Maryland the 
surprise team of the league. Most 
capable substitutes have been 
Bill Murphy, Julian Weingarten, 
Wayne McGinnis, all sophomores, 
and senior Bob Hardiman and 
service returnee, Bob Moorhead. 
# 



Golfers Beg-in 
Spring- Practice 

Maryland's j^olf team has 
started pre-season practice for 
their first match with George 
Washington University, March 
26. Coach Frank Cronin reported 
that 40 hopefuls turned out for 
the first session. Last year's top 
man, Jerry McFerran, has two 
more years of eligiblity. # 



Track Focus 
On Burr Grim 

Maryland's indoor track sea- 
son is featured by the entry in 
many top meets of the Terps' 
nationally known distance runner, 
Burr Grim. Making a great come- 
back after a serious back opera- 
tion last spring, Grim was nipped 
at the tape in the Boston K of C 
Meet. The winning time for the 
mile run, the top event of the 
night before 12,000 fans, was 
4:10.8. Reports out of Boston in- 
dicated that Grim could have won 
the race if he hadn't been boxed 
in the last ten yards. He received 
a standing ovation for his thrill- 
ing race. 

Throughout the indoor season, 
it will be Grim who will receive 
the attention of track fans across 
the nation as well as here at the 
University. # 



1957 Football Schedule Set; 
Opener Against Texas A&M 



Maryland's 1957 football sched- 
ule, released recently by William 
W. Cobey, Director of Athletics, 
includes three top intersectional 
games and seven games with 
teams of the Atlantic Coast Con- 
ference. The Red and White opens 
the season with fourth-ranked 
Texas A&M in the Cotton Bowl 
in Dallas and later play second- 
ranked Tennessee and sixth- 
ranked Miami in the Orange 
Bowl. The Tennessee game will 
be the feature of the five game 
home schedule. 

In the ACC, Duke and Vir- 
ginia will be met for the first 
time in a number of years. The 
Terps and Blue Devils last played 
in 1950 while the Cavaliers and 
Terps have gone 12 years with- 
out meeting on the gridiron. 

Maryland — March- April, 1957 



The 1957 schedule: 
September — 

20— Texas A&M at Dallas, Tex. 

(Friday night game) 
28— North Carolina State at 
College Park, Md. 
October — 

5 — Duke at Durham, N. C. 
12— Wake Forest at College 

Park, Md. 
19 — North Carolina at College 

Park, Md. 
26 — Tennessee at College Park, 
Md. 
November — 

2 — South Carolina at Colum- 
bia, S. C. 
9 — Clemson at Clemson, S. C. 
15 — Miami, at Miami, Fla. (Fri- 

dav night game) 
23— Virginia at College Park, 
Md. # 




L 



Kidt Grim — track 

talis across the 

nation arc watching 

his thrilling comeback. 



61 



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Jack Hennemeier Named 
As Aide To Tommy Mont 

Jack Hennemier, who recruited 
many of Maryland's greatest foot- 
ball players and coached the lines 
of the school's top defensive 
teams, will return as an assist- 
ant to Tommy Mont. 

The Terps' coach had been 
dickering for his former co-work- 
er since Hennemier left as coach 
of the Calgary Stampeders in the 
Canadian Pro League in mid- 
season last year. 

Helped Tatum In '56 

Hennemier helped Jim Tatum 
at North Carolina for the last 
half of the 1956 season and since 
that time has been considering 
several coaching offers. He de- 
cided to return to Maryland be- 
cause of his friendship with Mont 
and many others in College Park. 
When Hennemier first took over 
the Calgary team, Mont spent two 
weeks in Canada helping Jack in- 
stall an offense. 

Hennemier somewhat reluctant- 



ly left Maryland after the 1954 
season to take the head coaching 
job at Calgary. The Canadian 
Club tore up his original contract 
and gave him a new one with a 
raise halfway through his first 
season. 

Hennemier, a soft-spoken Duke 
star, was a tremendous help to 
Maryland as player scout in the 
Pittsburgh area. 

The Modzelewski brothers, Ber- 
nie Faloney, Ralph Felton, Ed 
Fullerton, Bill Walker, Bob Mor- 
gan, George Palahunik, John Irv- 
ine and Bob Pellegrini were 
among the Pittsburgh area stars 
Hennemier persuaded to attend 
Maryland. 

Star Center At Duke 

Jack, who weighed only 150 
pounds when he was center at 
Duke, was the Blue Devils' most 
valuable player in 1935, made the 
All-Southern Conference team and 
received All-America mention. 




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Maryland — March-April, 1957 



Exact Assignment Uncertain 

Hennemier went into high 
school coaching in Savannah, Ga., 
after he was graduated from 
Duke. From there he was ap- 
pointed line coach at Washing- 
ton & Lee and coached the Gen- 
erals for three years before 3% 
years of Navy service. 

He returned to Duke as an as- 
sistant coach in 1945, and re- 
mained there until Tatum brought 
him to Maryland in 1949. 

Hennemier probably will coach 
the defensive line with Bob Ward 
probably shifting to offense. It 
has not been decided whether 
Hennemier will return to the 
Pittsburgh scouting assignment. 
Fullerton now represents the 
Terps in his home town. # 



Matmen Shoot 
For Fourth Title 

Maryland's wrestling team, aim- 
ing for its fourth consecutive At- 
lantic Coast Conference mat title, 
went into mid-terms leading the 
league and a strong favorite to 
retain its championship. 

With only two conference match- 
2S and two outside meets, the 
rerps were 2-2. They easily de- 
feated league opponents Virginia 
md North Carolina State but lost 
;o the nationally ranked Pitt and 
Penn State teams. Heavyweight 
Mike Sandusky and 123-pounder 
John McHugh, co-captains, are 
;he top matmen of Coach William 
'Sully" Krouse. Both are defend- 
ng ACC champions. Soph stand- 
)uts are Ray Haney, Nick Biondi, 
md Dick Dean. 

The summaries : 

Maryland vs. Virginia 

123-Pound— McHugh, M. pinned 

Cooper, 4:00 
130-Pound — Haney, M., pinned 

Horsely, 1:51 
L37-Pound— Mitchell, V., decis- 

ioned Norrie 
47-Pound — Norris M., pinned 

Gaudry, 8:28 
157-Pound — Biondi, M., won by 

default 
67-Pound — Petrilli, V., decisioned 

Kennedy 
77-Pound— Dean, M., pinned 

Stassen, 3:50 
Ivy. — Jordon, V., decisioned Mat- 
thews 
^inal Score: Maryland 25 — Virginia 9 



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Maryland vs. Pittsburgh 

123-Pound — John McHugh, Mary- 
land tied Bill Hulings. 3-3 

130-Pound— Ed Perry, Pitt, de- 
cisioned Ray Haney. 5-2 

137-Pound— Vic Defence, Pitt, de- 
cisioned Jack Norrie. 5-0 

147-Pound— Ted Bienkowski, Pitt, 
decisioned Rodney Norris. 2-0 

157-Pound — Bob Richardson, Pitt, 
pinned Nick Biondi. 4:45 

167-Pound — Dave Johnson, Pitt, 
won by default over Carl Long- 
enecker. 7:55 

177-Pound— Tom Alberts, Pitt, 
decisioned Dick Dean. 6-4 

Hvy. — Mike Sandusky, Maryland, 
tied Ron Schief. 1-1 

Final Score: Pitt 25— Maryland 4 



Maryland vs. Penn State 

123-Pound — George Smith, Penn 
State, decisioned Tony Toston. 
6-3 

130-Pound — Sidney Nodland, Penn 
State, decisioned Ray Haney. 
3-2 

137-Pound — John Johnstone, Penn 
State, decisioned Jack Norrie. 
7-0 

147-Pound — Rodney Norris, Md., 
decisioned John Pepe. 6-5 

157-Pound — Dave Adams, Penn 
State, pinned Nick Biondi. 7:25 

167-Pound — George Gray, Penn 
State, decisioned Leroy Ken- 
nedy. 14-6 

177-Pound — Dick Dean, Md., de- 
cisioned Bruce Gilmore. 7-6 

Hvy. — Mike Sandusky, Maryland, 
pinned Sam Markle. :31 



Final Score: 
11 



Penn State 17 — Maryland 



Maryland vs. N. C. State 

123-Pound — Tony Toston, Mary- 
land, decisioned Matthews 

130-Pound — Won by Maryland, 
forfeit 

137-Pound — Jack Norrie, Mary- 
land, pinned Cutts. 5:25 

147-Pound — Rodney Norris, Md., 
pinned Dail. 1 :30 

157-Pound — Nick Biondi, Mary- 
land, decisioned Multere. 12-5 

167-Pound — Leroy Kennedy, Md., 
pinned Newberry. :56 

177-Pound— Dick Dean, Md., de- 
cisioned Becker. 4-2 

Hvy. — Won by Maryland, forfeit 

Final Score: Maryland 34 — North Car- 
olina State 0. # 



64 



Maryland — March-April, 1957 




Allen — Cooper 

Florence Byrd Allen, Maryland 
alumna, to Levin T. Cooper. 
Andrews — Taymans 
Ann Andrews, Maryland stu- 
dent, to Lieutenant William R. 
Taymans, Loyola College alum- 
nus. 

Bonnette — Foster 
Aletha Pauline Bonnette to 
Robert Mitchell Foster, Mary- 
land alumnus. 

Burbage — Smith 
Mary Lou Burbage, Bradford 
Junior College alumna, to Fran- 
ces Edward Smith, Maryland 
graduate. 

Cannon — O'Keefe 
Doris Marie Cannon, Maryland 
graduate, to Thomas Arthur 
O'Keefe, Maryland student. 
Cataldo — Harper 
Barbara Marie Cataldo to Quil- 
lie M. Harper, Jr., Maryland stu- 
dent. 

Chernak — Pollack 
Marlene T. Chernak, Goucher 
College student, to Dr. Irvin Paul 
Pollack, Maryland alumnus. 
Covert — Kyne 
Joy Lee Covert to Philip Wil- 
liam Kyne, both Maryland alum- 
ni. 

Cowne — Nagel 
Betty Lou Cowne, Maryland 
student, to Walter R. Nagel, now 
serving with the U. S. Navy. 
Erb — Mook 
Both Maryland graduates, Ly- 
la Norris Erb to Dudley Green- 
wood Mook. 

Evans — Lurton 
Helen Rae Evans, former 
Maryland student, to William 
Lee Lurton. 

Fazzalari — Smart 
Ella M. Fazzalari to Clarence S. 
Smart, Jr., Maryland alumnus. 
Golden — Sternstein 
Gail Lee Golden to Sanford S. 
Sternstein, Maryland student. 
Goodman — Blanken 
Elaine Goodman to Lawrence 
M. Blanken, Maryland student. 
Harding — Nichols 
Joan Edith Harding, former 
George Washington University 
student, to Harold Edwin Nic- 
hols, former Maryland student. 
Hastings — Chase 
Miss Retta Frances Hastings, 
Maryland graduate student, to 
Dr. James McAllister Chase, Jr., 
Maryland alumnus. 



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Maryland — March- April, 1957 






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Keigler— Raffel 

Norma M. Keigler, Maryland 
alumna, to Marshall W. Raffel, 
University of Illinois graduate. 
Kirson — Meyerson 

Phyllis Danita Kirson, Mary- 
land student to Theodore Meyer- 
son, graduate of Carnegie Insti- 
tute of Technology. 

Knobla — Shuppert 

Judith Mae Knobla, former 
Maryland student, to Robert Cecil 
Shuppert, Maryland student. 
Latimer — Wigglesworth 

Ann Latimer, Maryland alum- 
na, to First Lt. Albert Gifford 
Wigglesworth, Jr., U. S. M. C, 
graduate of the Babson Institute 
of Finance in Wellesley, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Kricker — Hussman 

Caroline Kricker to Vernon 
Eugene Hussman, both Maryland 
graduates. 

Lerman — Berman 

Vivian Lerman, Maryland stu- 
dent, to Philip 0. Berman, form- 
er University of Baltimore stu- 
dent. 

Matthews — Hodgson 

Jane Meredith Matthews, Den- 
ison University alumna, to First 
Lt. Charles Edward Hodgson, 
Maryland graduate, now serving 
with the U. S. Air Force. 



"AG" ALUMNI 
OUTING 

Will Held On The 

University Campus 

at the 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

FRIDAY, APRIL 26 
1 to 7 P.M. 

• Tour of Campus Departments 

• Student Fitting and 
Showing Contest 

• Sheep Shearing 

• Co-ed Milking Contest 

• Greased Pig Contest 

• Bar-B-Q Supper 

Come Anytime — Stay as Long 
As You Want 

ALUMNI WILL BE NOTIFIED BY LETTER 

• * 



AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FOOD 

El Mexico 

t«ft 




Washington's Most Dtatinjpiishrd 
Resruitruru 

Year Round Air-Conditioning 

COMPLETE DINNERS 

Also Featuring 

• Arroz Con Polio 

• Polio En Mole • Enchiladas 

• Tamales • Tacos • Puerco Ado Vado 

Complete Bar • Open 7 Days 

2603 Conn. Ave., N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 

One Block from Shoreham and 

Sheraton-Park Hotels 

HO. 2-4550 12 Noon— 12:30 A.M. 



-_>erw'na iludenli and 

alumni of Hit 

lAniverlilu of 

tf/aru'and 

32 ueari 

LUSTine nicHOLSon 

QhswiwloL 
OldAmoJbilsL 

/■^nil cJ.it it in* . . . 
head of Loin companies 

Baltimore Rue. on Route 1 
Hvattsuille, md. 
WArfield 7-7200 



Corbin & Dodson 

PRECISION 1 WORKS, inc. 

9664 BALTIMORE BOULEVARD 

College Park, Md. 

WEbster 5-4909 



CHESTNUT FARMS 
DAIRY 

ADams 2-1011 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



SlilGER SEUJMG mRCHME CO 

8670 Colesville Rd. 

SILVER SPRING, MD. 

JU 9-8844 



6G 



Maryland — March- April, 195? 




WASHINGTON'S 

ONLY 

"DRIVE THRU" 

LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANERS 
Where You Save Up To 20% 

Drive In 

Hand In Your Bundle 

Drive Out 

QUICK SERVICE 

LAUNDRY, DRY CLEANERS 

1016 Biadensburg Road, N.E. 

Washington, D. C. 

(Across from Sears-Roebuck) 



w'O WO 

jKjK 



i KusmMlenSo 



KING OF AMEBIC A' S 

doughnuts 



8000 Georgia Ave. JU 5-7500 
SILVER SPRING, MD. 



'REFRIGERATION SUPPLY CO., Inc.* 

WHOLESALE ONLY 

1612 FOURTEENTH ST., N.W. 

Complete — 

AIR CONDITIONING, REFRIGERATION, 
PARTS AND SUPPLIES 

Serving — 

THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, MARYLAND, 
VIRGINIA AND WEST VIRGINIA 
Member A.R.W. 

HO. 2-2600 

> WASHINGTON 9, D. C. • 



Charles F. King Corp, 

Registered Plumber 

1620 2nd Street, S.W. 
Washington 24, D. C. 



TOWER 9-6204 =^==^=^= 

JIMMIE PORTER 

Trading as 

KIERNAN'S 

A Complete Line of Beverages 
8200 Baltimore Blvd. College Park, Md. 



McGraw — Dawson 
Janice Marlene McGraw, West- 
ern Maryland College student, to 
John J. Haw son, Jr., Maryland 
alumnus. 

Meyers — Shpritz 
Shirley Meyers to Dr. Norwood 
Shpritz, a graduate of the Uni- 
versity's Scdiool o!' Dentistry. 
Miller — Eitemiller 
Roth Maryland students. .Mar- 
ion Joanne Miller to William 
Witte Eitemiller. 

Mitchell— Mitchell 
Melissa Joanne Mitchell, form- 
er Maryland student, to Mahlon 
Benson Mitchell, Jr., former 
Johns Hopkins University stu- 
dent, now serving with the U. S. 
Navy. 

Norton — Fowler 
Jane Norton, Wake Forest Col- 
lege student, to Robert Fayette 
Fowler, Maryland student. 

Osborn — Eckert 

Lynn Ann Osborn to Dr. Her- 
bert Eckert, Maryland alumnus. 
Peterson — Amick 

Kathryn Yvonne Peterson, stu- 
dent at Towson State Teachers 
College, to John Russell Amick, 
Maryland student. 

Reitz — LaFehr 

Arlys Jane Reitz, Maryland 
student, to Thomas R. Le Fehr, 
University of California student. 
Robinowitz — Jacobs 

Grace Robinowitz to Stanley 
Robert Jacobs, both Maryland 
alumni. 

Rosenthal — Menick 

Barbara Rosenthal, former 
Maryland student, to Dr. Marvin 
Menick, Northwestern University 
Dental School alumnus. 

Rosent hal — Potash 

Vella Rosenthal, Goucher Col- 
lege student, to Michael Donald 
Potash, now attending the Uni- 
versity's School of Medicine. 
Salmon — Hodges 

Eleanor Lynn Salmon to James 
Parrish Hodges, both Maryland 
students. 

Samakow — Wiczer 

Jacklyn Samakow, Maryland 
student, to Donald W. Wiczer, at- 
tending George Washington Uni- 
versity's School of Medicine. 
Silverman — Turner 

Nadyne Josepha Silverman, 
Maryland student, to Gurston 
David Turner, graduate of the 
National Agricultural College. 
Smith — Martino 

Nancy Joanne Smith, Hood Col- 
lege graduate, to Vincent Aldo 
Martino, former Maryland stu- 
dent. 




Thomas E. Carroll 
& Son 

LANDSCAPE CONTRACTING 

Tree Moving 
Trees Shrubs 

Sodding Grading 

EVergreen 4-3041 

Colesville Pike, Route #3 
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 



'EVERYTHING IN MILLWORK" 

STOCK & SPECIAL 

For Builders and Home Owners 



DOORS 


MANTELS 


SASH 


FRONT ENTRANCES 


FRAMES 


SLIDING DOOR UNITS 


BLINDS 


DISAPPEARING STAIRWAYS 


PLYWOOD 


KITCHEN CABINETS 


MOULDINGS 


STAIR MATERIAL 


PANELING 


CORNER CABINETS 



LAMAR & WALLACE 

37 New York Avenue, N.E. ME 8-4126 

Washington 2, D. C. 



'Hotel 

HEDIN HOUSE 

WASHINGTON'S NEWEST HOTEL 

Nearest the University 
.hint three miles iiumy and two 
blacks within tlte District line. 



Completely Air Conditioned 
I'lmne 29(12 Newton St., N.E. 

AI)AMH 4-0000 (at R.I. Ave.) 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

» Mnki- Your Iti'Hi'rvntlotiH Knrljr 



Bon Ton 

SARATOGA CHIPS 

distributed by 
BON TON SARATOGA 
CHIP DISTRIBUTORS 

Rear- 1229 D St., S.E. 

II. 3-4848 Washington 




JOicufWL diWidwahSL 
&■ Supphf 

Hardware ■ Plumbing 

Purina Peril* ■ Sporting Qoodm 

K2IN IUi.timiiiie Is LVD. TOfflB 6060 

College I'aiik. Md. 

Open Sunday 10 A.M. to 2 T.M. 



taryland — March-April, 1957 



67 



tuny \yiiwii3jj y is 

mflRYLflno's FinesT corr 

Mitchell's Premium Corn tastes like 
it was just cut from the cob . . . the 
result of Mitchell's own process- 
ing that cooks and seals the 
corn in cans with- 
in the hour it is 
pulled from the 
stalk. 



ifflTCHEiiii 



SHOE PEG 





- Packed by — 



F. 0. miTCHELL & BRO., Inc. 

PERRYMAN, MO. - KENNEDYVILLE, MD. 

Main Office, Perryman, Md. 

Phone Aberdeen 621 -J 



C. J. 

LANGENFELDER 
& SON, INC. 



Contractors 



BALTIMORE 
MARYLAND 



Hendlers 




first Name in fee Cream 
For Over A Half Century 



Sprafkin — Woolfson 

Judith Anne Sprafkin, Mary- 
land student, to Martin Gerald 
Woolfson, Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity student. 

Stephens — Johnson 

Jennye Alyce Stephens, George 
Washington University student, 
to John Gibson Johnson, Jr., 
Maryland student. 

Wilson — Beckman 

Suzanna Middleton Wilson, 
Maryland alumna, to Lt. Francis 
Ridley Beckman, U. S. Army. 

Wolf— Goldberg 

Gloria Sue Wolf to Martin Jay 
Goldberg, both Maryland stu- 
dents. 




^Haryland 

MARRIAGES 



Bell — Pierce 

Dora Grant Pierce to Robert 
N. Bell, Maryland student. 

Carroll — Wode 

Mary Carolyn Wode, Maryland 
student, to Jerome Carroll, Mary- 
land alumnus. 

Childs— Hottel 

Susan Amye Hottel, Maryland 
alumna, to Daniel B. Childs, 
Maryland graduate student. 

Dean — Nagle 

Leila Ann Nagle, former Mary- 
land student, to Robert Frederick 
Dean, Lawrence Institute of 
Technology alumnus. 

Jackson — Wood 

Patricia Lee Wood, Maryland 
alumna, to The Reverend Herbert 
Ward Jackson, graduate of the 
Episcopal Theological School, 
Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Keefer — Schatz 

Ann Marie Schatz to Robert L. 
Keefer, both Maryland students. 

Sheridan — Hallgren 

Katherine Hallgren, Maryland 
alumna, to Frank Hugh Sheridan, 
former University of California 
student. 

Topkis — Kohner 

Mrs. Bertha Ezeckiel Kohner, 
Maryland alumna, to Bernard 
Harry Topkis. 

Vaughan — Younger 

Nancy Ella Younger, Maryland 
student, to Richard Henry 




SALISBURY, MARYLAND 

EVINRUDE MOTORS 

Complete Line of Outboard 

Boats, Trailers & Supplies 

N. Salisbury Blvd. 




SALISBURY 



Pr incess Anne Pharmacy 

JOHN DEANS, Pharmacist 

PROFESSIONAL SERVICE TO 
SICK AND WELL 

Phone 121 Princess Anne, Md. 



SHORE RADIO SERVICE 

Salisbury, Md. 

Auto Q A I) I fl Repairs 

Home II M U I U Installation 

Record Players 
Public Address Systems 



ARTCRflFT ELECTRIC 
SUPPLY CO. of mo. 

Wholesale Distributors of 

Electrical Supplies and 

Appliances 

• CALVERT & BAPTIST STS. SALISBURY, MD. 




Dietrich & Gambrill, Inc. 

Frederick, Md. 

A Maryland Institution 



Vaughan, now serving with the 
U. S. Army. 

Wall — Abplanalp 

Sarah Abplanalp to John R. 
Wall, Jr., both Maryland stu- 
dents. 



08 



Maryland — March-April, 1957 



Maryland 

OBITUARIES 



Edward S. Johnson 
Dr. Edward S. Johnson, well 
known Baltimore surgeon and 
member of the Class of 1912, 
School of Medicine, died sudden- 
ly at his home in Baltimore. Re- 
cently retired from active prac- 
tice, Dr. Johnson had previously 
served in World War I and was 
active on the staffs of Mercy, 
Lutheran, Franklin Square, South 
Baltimore General and Univer- 
sity Hospitals. For many years 
he was active on the Board of 
Directors of St. Joseph's Hospital 
and also of the Church Home and 
Hospital. In 1954; he received a 
citation from the Maryland Hos- 
pital Service in recognition of his 
many years of service as a mem- 
ber of the Board of Directors of 
that organization. 

Judge Herman M. Moser 
Judge Herman M. Moser of 
Baltimore, member of the Su- 
preme Bench of Baltimore for 
twelve years died after an ill- 
ness of two years. Judge Moser, 
56, was educated in Baltimore and 
was graduated from the Univer- 
sity of Maryland School of Law 
in 1920. He passed the bar exam- 
ination but was too young to start 
practice so had to wait a year 
before beginning a long and dis- 
tinguished legal career. 

W. J. Coleman 

Dr. William J. Coleman, sur- 
geon and former Superintendent 
of the University Hospital, died 
on November 25, 1956. He was 
75 years old. 

A native of England, Dr. Cole- 
man first settled in Connecticut 
and later was graduated from 
the School of Medicine in the class 
of 1906. At the outbreak of 
World War I, he served as Super- 
intendent of the University Hos- 
pital. Later, active in the Na- 
tional Guard, he served with the 
115th Infantry overseas and was 
discharged from the Army with 
the rank of colonel in 1919. 

Returning to Baltimore, he 
then began the practice of surgery 
and was active on the staff of the 
Maryland General Hospital. 
H. J. Caul 

Harold J. Caul, a member of 
the Class of 1906, died October 5, 
1956 at Dade City, Florida at the 
age of 70 years. He was a native 
of Buffalo, New York and was 



I 

WASHINGTON ALUMINUM CO., Inc. 

Baltimore 29, Md. • Arbutus 2700 



ALUMINUM FABRICATORS 

Our products include: 

Marine Accommodation 
Ladders 

Gangways and Hatch Covers 

Marine and Industrial Gratings 

Loading Platforms 

Industrial Gin Poles 

Stop Plates and Guides 

Pressure Vessels and Tanks 




PENINSULA POULTRY DISTRIBUTORS, Inc. 

Eviscerated Poultry Cornish Game Hens 

Western Turkeys Beltsville Turkeys 

Call — HARRY NELSON — PLaza 2-0287 
221 S. Howard Street Baltimore 1, Md. 



CAREY MACHINERY & SUPPLY COMPANY, Inc. 

Industrial Mill Supplies, Machine Tools, Pumps & Air Compressors 

SAFETY SUPPLIES 
3501 BREHMS LANE - BALTO. 13, MD. - BRoadway 6-1600 

(near Intersection Edison Highway and Erdmon Ave.) 



King Bros., Inc. 

PRINTING & OFFSETTING 

SAratoga 7-5835 

208 N. Calvert Street 
BALTIMORE 2, MD. 



UNITED CLAY & 
SUPPLY CORP. 

BUILDING MATERIALS - BRICK & TILE 

JOHNS MANVILLE PRODUCTS 

CARRIER AIR CONDITIONING and 

REFRIGERATION 

BEAUTYCRAFT KITCHENS 

WASTE-KING PULVERATOR 

1122 North Charles Street 

Baltimore 1, Md. MUiberry 5-7200 



Mama Emma's 



ROMA 

Nationally Famous Italian Cuisine 
in "LITTLE ITALY" 



900 FAWN ST. 
231 S. HIGH ST. 



SA. 7-8990 
LE. 9-8965 



(Two Entrances) Baltimore, Md. 

Open Daily 11 A. if. to 4 A.M. 



F. A. Davis & Sons 

WHOLESALERS 

Cigars, Tobaccos, Sundries & Supplies 

Kitchen & Dining Equipment 

Soda Fountain Supplies 

119 S. HOWARD STREET 
Baltimore 1 , Md. 



Maryland — March- A pril, 1957 



69 



STURDEE 



All Metal Porch 

and Step Units 

COMMERCIAL AND 

RESIDENTIAL 

STAIRWAYS 
"The Best Lifetime All Steel 
Porch and Step Unit Made!" 

STURDEE 

Metal Products Co. 

1 743 LAMONT AVENUE 

BALTIMORE 2, MD. 
SA 7-0294 and 7-8666 



Kg^r^^g^r^Xg^r^)^ 



^^Ij 



HOTEL 



'PLY CO. 



EST. Purveyors of Fin* W27 

MEATS - POULTRY 

Frozen Foods 
Food Specialties 

Te Hotels, 

Institutions, Shins. 

Class. Ete. 



LExington 9-7055 

Night Service HO. 7-6817 

227 S. 

HANOVER ST. 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



\V. S. Bailey 


Bunny & 




Thomas Bailey 


The Bel Air 


Lumber Co. 


Lumber 




Special Millwork 




Building Material 




Hardware — Paints 




York Cinder Blocks 


Phone 


Marsh Furniture 


Bel Air 642 


Cabinets 




Tile Products 


BEL AIR, MD. 



PROCESS SUPPLY 



Quality 



INCORPORATED 



PLATE GRAINING and REGRAINING 

.4 II Sizet 
V & J Chemicals - Lithographers and 
Engravers Supplies and Equipment 
Tel: SAratoga 7-2547 — Baltimore 
ENterprise 1-6109 — Washington 



LIBERTY RADIO & 
TELEVISION SERVICE 

HIGH FIDELITY 

Music Systems for Home and Office 

4908 PARK HEIGHTS AVE. 

Baltimore. Md. liberty 2-9457 



born in that city on June 22, 
1886. 

"Pete," as he was known to all 
his classmates, was active in all 
college affairs and was very popu- 
lar with his professors and fel- 
low students. In his senior year 
he was a member of the football 
and basketball teams and was 
manager of the baseball team. He 
also served as Chairman of the 
Floor Committee of the Ross- 
borough Club, Stage Manager of 
the Minstrel Show and was Art 
and Design Editor of the 1906 
Reveille. 

After graduation, Mr. Caul 
managed a fruit ranch in Puerto 
Rico for several years. He also 
conducted a Commission Broker- 
age Business in New York, spe- 
cializing in fruits and produce 
from Puerto Rico. Later, leaving 
this business, he was employed 
by the Brooklyn Omnibus Com- 
pany, until his retirement sev- 
eral years ago. 

Following his retirement, he 
moved to Florida and lived in 
Sulphur Springs and Zephyr- 
hills. 

W. C. Jester, Jr. 

William C. Jester, Jr., 28, 
passed away on July 30, 1956. 

He graduated from the Uni- 
versity of Maryland College of 
Business and Public Administra- 
tion in the Class of 1951 and at 
the time of death, was employed 
in the Sales Division of the Shaw- 
Walker Co. in Washington, D. C. 
He was a member of Sigma Chi 
fraternity while in college. 

W. S. Kelley 

First Lt. Winfield Scott Kelley, 
Jr., 25, an Air Force jet pilot and 
son of a retired Metropolitan 
policeman, died of injuries suf- 
fered when his car ran into a 
tree near Wolfseld, Germany. The 
daylight accident occurred on a 
wet and slippery road. 

Lt. Kelley, who was known as 
"Scottie," was graduated in 1953 
in business administration from 
the University. He was commis- 
sioned a Second Lieutenant the 
same year after completing the 
Air Force Reserve Training pro- 
gram. He trained in Georgia, 
Texas and Nevada and went over- 
seas in 1954. He was stationed 
with the 22d Fighter Day Squad- 
ron in Bitburg, Germany. 

E. J. Merrick, Jr. 
Ezekiel J. Merrick, Jr., 63, an 
engineer with the Army Corps of 
Engineers who supervised major 
construction projects in this area 
since 1916, died of a heart at- 




ujAsmnGTon hotel 

PRINCESS ANNE, MD. 

Home phone 

COOKIIIG 22 

Dining Room For Private Parties 



J^prina ^ntill 

PRIVATE SANITARIUM 

SALISBURY, MARYLAND 

TELEPHONE SALISBURY 5594 



Salisbury Milling Co. 

Incorporated 

Salisbury's Best 

Broiler - Laying - Hog 

FEEDS 

Corn Goods - Eshelman Feeds 

Salisbury, Md. 



GOBBLE GREEN 

FANCY 
TURKEYS f j 

Premium Grade - Milk Fed 

Frozen (Eviscerated) 

Broad Breast Bronze 

Howard C. Taylor 

EASTON 869-J EASTON, MD. 




70 



Maryland — March-April, 1957 



tack at his home, 5601 13th St., 
N.W., Washington, D. C. 

Among- his major projects were 
the land reclamation and runway 
construction for Washington Na- 
tional Airport, reclamation of the 
Anacostia River and from the 
river's mouth to the District Line, 
flood control studies of the Po- 
tomac River Valley and the con- 
struction of military bases in 
Newfoundland, the Caribbean and 
Bermuda. 

The son of the late E. J. and 
Lida Benson Merrick of Sudlers- 
/ille, Md., he was born at Ingle- 
iide, Md., on Nov. 5, 1893. After 
ittending public schools in Crump- 
;on and Sudlersville, he received 
lis Bachelor's degree in civil engi- 
leering from the University in 
L913, and his Master's degree 
n 1943. 

Joining the Corps of Engineers 
is a civil engineer in 1913, he re- 
named a civilian with the Corps 
mtil his retirement three years 
igo. Two of the early projects 
le worked on were the construc- 
;ion of Key Bridge and the re- 
valuation of East and West Po- 
omac Park by hydraulic fill. 

As engineer in charge of the 
\nacostia River reclamation from 
.916 to 1928, he also supervised 
he design and maintenance of 
•iver and harbor improvements 
n Chesapeake Bay and tributary 
vaters from 1922 until 1938. This 
ncluded the clearing of 200 wood 
Vorld War I vessels from the 
'otomac River and other major 
alvaging operations. 

Mr. Merrick was engineer in 
:harge of the land reclamation 
l n d runway construction a t 
Washington National Airport 
! rom 1938 to 1940, a project 
hat also included the relocation 
if a section of Memorial High- 
way. He later took charge of air 
>ase work in Newfoundland, 
Jermuda and the Caribbean as 
hief civil engineer with the 
Eastern and Caribbean Division 
luring World War II. 

The Army Map Service build- 
ng on MacArthur Blvd. and con- 
traction of the Continental Air 
Command facilities at Andrews 
Br Force Base were two of his 
lostwar projects. He also super- 
ised construction of the National 
nstitute of Pathology at the 
Irmy Medical Center and perma- 
tent improvements to Soldiers 
lome. 

At the time of his retirement 
n 1953, Mr. Merrick was chief 
■ the engineering division of the 
Washington District Engineer's 
Jffice. 

Maryland — March-April, 1957 



CITY EXPRESS, INC. 

200 N. WARWICK AVENUE BALTIMORE 28, MD. 

BALTIMORE . WASH INC TON . ANNAPOLIS 

Truck Leasing - Contract Trucks - Hourly - Weekly - Yearly 

BALTIMORE WASHINGTON 

EDmondson 6-0110 STerling 3-8346 

Maksh all H. Wentz, Pre*. 



IF IT GROWS "C" KROH'S 

HYBRID RHODODENDRON AZALEAS OF ALL TYPES AND COLORS 

Vegetable Plants and Shrubbery 

PHONE 

134 N. Bond St. BEL AIR 301 Bel Air, Md. 



SAratoga 


7-6418 











LOUIS 


Salganik 


& SONS 


iJP^t 






— WHOLESALE MEATS 




\kmW 


320 S. 


EUTAW STREET 


BALTIMORE 1, 


MD. 



THE 


BALTIMORE ENVELOPE 

MANUFACTURERS AND PRINTERS OF ENVELOPES 

1020 WEST PRATT STREET 


CO. 




Phone MUlberry 5-6070 Baltimore 23, 


Maryland 



AMERICAN 

Office Equipment Co., Inc. 
COMPLETE LINE OF 

DESKS, CHAIRS, 

FILING CABINETS, 

SAFES 

ROOM AIR CONDITIONERS 
and OFFICE PARTITIONS 

Bought, Sold & Exchanged 

Leather 

Upholstered Furniture 

NEW and USED 

309 N. CALVERT STREET 
Baltimore, Md. 

LExington 9-7529 

Member Baltimore Office Furniture Aaao. 





LOEWY 

DRUG CO., INC. 

manufacturing and wholesale 
druggists 

distributors of 

LILLY PHARMACEUTICALS 

daily delivery within city limits 

1 08 S. HANOVER STREET 
BALTIMORE 1 , MD. SA 7-6203 



frl, . . . 

BEAUTIFUL 
LAWNS 




WM. G. SCARLETT & CO. 
BALTIMORE 2, MD. 



TAZE AND HEWITT 

SALES ENGINEERS 
33 E. 21st Street - Baltimore 18, Md. 

HEATING • VENTILATING 
COOLING EQUIPMENT 

Phone: BElmont 5-5895 — 5-5896 
Ed Taze "Rip" Hewitt 



71 



PARK YOU 
PRINTING 

PROBLEMS 
HERE... 



MAURICE LEESER Co. 

Victor P. Skruck, Pres. 
Fine Printing for 2 Generations 

Pratt and Greene Sfs. • SAratoga 7-4446 



T 



OWSON 

ELEPHONE 

SECRETARIES 

Mns. Flanagan, Owner 

WE ANSWER YOUR PHONE 
VAIley 5-1300 

24 Hours A Day Every Day 
T0WS0N 

Month to ilonth Basis, Order By Phone 

For Information Call VAIley 5-1300 

107 YORK ROAD 



1212 CATHEDRAL STREET 
Baltimore/ Md. 

GERMAN SPECIALTIES 
IMPORTED BEERS & WINES 

Dinners Served from !> p.m.-» p.m. 

Sundays from 1 p.m. to 9 p.m. 

ALA CARTE until 1 a.m. 

Mondays Closed 

Halls and Rooms for Private Parties, Banquets 

and Weddings— Call IE. 9-4565 

Wednesday 'til Sunday in Rathskeller 

Dance and Entertainment Jrom 9 p.m. 



"CLOTHES OF CHARACTER" 

eddie5?jacobs 

Charles St. at Redwood 
Baltimore, Md. 



Baltimore-Washington Express 
Company 

Daily Service Between 

BALTIMORE - WASHINGTON - ANNAPOLIS 

LExington 9-1756 

1625 Ridgely Street Baltimore 30, Md. 



. ii iniii 11. XIJ.111C1, I U, lUnycl 

and real estate man, died at his 
home, at 3504 Edgewood Road, 
after an illness of five weeks. 

Born in Baltimore, he was edu- 
cated in city schools. He was a 
graduate of City College and the 
University of Maryland School of 
Law and had practiced law 55 
years. 

He was long active in the real 
estate business and was a mem- 
ber of the Real Estate Board of 
Baltimore. 

His membership included the 
Baltimore Athletic Club, and he 
had been for many years a mem- 
ber of the Country Club of Mary- 
land. 

Divight H. Mohr 

Dr. Dwight H. Mohr, chief 
physician of the Baltimore Police 
Department since 1920 and war- 
time commander of the Maryland 
State Guard, died recently. He 
was 69. 

Dr. Mohr, a retired major gen- 
eral in the Army, was stricken 
at his home in Towson and died 
in Bon Secours Hospital. 

He came to Maryland in 1909 
after graduation from Trinity 
College, New York, where he was 
captain of the football team. He 
was a graduate of the University 
of Maryland Medical School and 
served with the 29th Division in 
France in World War II. 

In 1940, he commanded the 
104th Medical Regiment of the 
National Guard but was retired 
a year later for physical reasons. 
Gov. Herbert R. O'Conor ap- 
pointed him a brigadier general 
and ordered him to take com- 
mand of the State Guard which 
was organized when the National 
Guardsmen were called into serv- 
ice in World War II. 

J. A. Moran 
Dr. John A. Moran, Class of 
'22, passed away in Pittsburgh, 
Pa., on July 30, 1956. 

M. B. Morehouse 
Mortimar B. Morehouse, Class 
of '22, passed away in Jackson- 
ville, Florida, on March 1, 1956. 

D. K. Nice 

Judge Deeley K. Nice, recent- 
ly elected to a 15-year term on 
the Supreme Bench of Baltimore, 
died of a heart attack at his 
home. He was 46. 

Judge Nice was appointed by 
Gov. Theodore R. McKeldin to 
the Supreme Court Bench in No- 
vember, 1954, to fill a vacancy 
created when Judge Emory H. 



"Call Ike 




C. Walter Porter, Mgr. 
SAratoga 7-6118 " 
22 W. FRANKLIN STREET 
Baltimore 1, Md. 




Printers and 
Publishers of fine 
Books - Catalogs 
Viewbooks - etc. 

THE 

COLLEGIATE 
PUBLISHING 

COMPANY 

546 S. Long wood Street 

Baltimore 23, Md. 

Gilmor 5-3517 



W 



in Baltimore 
it's the 



for banquets 

parties 

special meetings 



STAFFORD 111 

Visit Our New Mt. Vernon Bar 



CHARLES ft MADISON 
BALTIMORE 1, MD. 
MUlberry 5-0990 



99 



Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 

Manufacturers of 
Concrete Pipe 

6315 EASTERN AVENUE 

Baltimore 24, Md. 



(l5ard - ~/rvon School 

Secretarial - Dramatic Art and Radio 

Day and Evening 
805 N. Charles St. VE. 7-1155 

Baltimore, Md. 



D. HARRY CHAMBERS, Inc. 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS 

located in the Center of the Shopping District 

326 NORTH HOWARD STREET 
Ml. 5-1990 BALTIMORE, MD. 



72 



Maryland — March-April, 1957 



Niles was elevated to the chief 
judgeship. 

Prior to his elevation to the 
Bench, Judge Nice had had a 
varied career in law and Republi- 
can politics. 

He was a nephew of the late 
Gov. Harry W. Nice. 

Judge Nice served as chief 
judge of Baltimore's Appeal Tax 
Court after Gov. McKeldin was 
elected Mayor of the city. In 
1947, he tried to succeed Mc- 
Keldin as Mayor but was defeated 
by Thomas D'Alesandro, Jr., the 
Democratic candidate. 

Gov. McKeldin named him 
chairman of the State Tax Com- 
mission in 1951. 

Judge Nice was born in Balti- 
more. He attended Johns Hop- 
kins University and received a 
law degree in 1932 from the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Law School. 

As a lawyer, Judge Nice spe- 
cialized in the tort field and was 
a member of the law firm of Nice 
and Sokel. 

M. L. Pittman 

M. Luther Pittman, clerk of the 
Baltimore Superior Court since 
1938, died recently. 

Mr. Pittman, 62, died unex- 
pectedly at his home. He had ap- 
peared to be recovering from 
what was at first not believed to 
be a serious illness. 

A veteran of courthouse serv- 
ice, he had begun his work in 
Superior Court in 1919, serving 
as a clerk and recording land 
deeds with pen and ink. 

Through the years, he served 
in every staff position until he 
was made clerk of the court in 
1938. After his appointment he 
was elected repeatedly to six more 
terms, the last election falling 
in 1954. 

During his long service, Mr. 
Pittman swore in 23 judges, three 
mayors, three police commission- 
ers and more than 60,000 notar- 
ies public and justices of the 
peace. 

He had attended night classes 
at the University of Maryland 
Law School, earning a law degree 
in 1925. He was admitted to the 
bar in the same year. 

/. L. Prince 
John Leland Prince, 23, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. James L. Prince, 
8102 Tahona Drive, Silver Spring, 
Md., died at Walter Reed Hos- 
pital after an illness of less than 
a week. 

Mr. Prince, an Army private, 
was a biologist in the pathologi- 
cal laboratory at the Army Chem- 



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B. JUCRUE— PRES. 



NORMAN MO TOR COMPANY, Inc. 

SALES fe^gp) SERVICE 

8313 WASHINGTON-BALTIMORE BLVD. • COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



SOUTHEAST TITLE CORP. 



Chas. T. Clayton, President 
25 Years Experience 
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Washington, D. C. & Maryland 

Settlements - Escrows 

Ileal Estate Examinations 

and Title Insurance 

1343 Good Hope Rd., S.E., Washington, D.C. 
LUdlow 1-3200 



McNeill Surveys, Inc. 

LAND PLANNING AND SUBDIVISION 
6480 SLIGO MILL ROAD 

TAKOMA PARK, MD. 
Telephone: JUnlper 9-7508 



WESTERN 
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DEL HAVEN WHITE HOUSE COTTAGES 

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Tile Baths 
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Hyattsville, Md. 



Maryland — March- April, 1957 



73 



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— Telephones — 

Salisbury 2-2144 — 2-2145 

P.O. Box 312 

SALISBURY, MARYLAND 



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for you . . . Write for folders, 
data sheets, prices. 
Addresn: J. B. LINGLE, Mgr. 



WVE PLANTATION, Queenstowit.Md. 



-LELAND L FISHER, Inc.- 

LUMBER - MILLWDRK - PAINT 
Rockville, Md. POplar 2-6123 



American Disinfectant Co. 

Pest Control Service 

928 EYE STREET, N.W. 

Washington I, D. C. NAtlonal 8-6478 



1-SmiTH UJELDIflG _ 

COMPANY 

PORTABLE EQUIPMENT 

4803 Rhode Island Ave. 
Hyattsville, Md. 



NATIONAL ENGINEERING CO. 

DISTRIBUTORS • ENGINEERS • CONTRACTORS 

REFRACTORY and INSULATION MATERIALS 

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Phone WArfield 7-0900 




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General Machine Work 

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ical Center, Edgewood, Md. 

Born in Wagoner, Oklahoma, 
Mr. Prince graduated from Sa- 
pulpa (Okla.) High School. He 
attended Montgomery Junior Col- 
lege here and the University of 
Oklahoma and graduated from 
Oklahoma Baptist University in 
Shawnee in 1955. He engaged in 
graduate work at the University 
of Maryland. 

Mr. Prince taught physical edu- 
cation at Richard Montgomery 
High School in Rockville and was 
a director in the Montgomery 
County Recreation Department 
for two summers. His father is 
an assistant superintendent of 
schools for Montgomery County. 

Mr. Prince was state president 
of the Oklahoma Scholastic Hon- 
or Society. At Montgomery Jun- 
ior College, he was voted most 
popular man in his class. 

M. T. Sudler 

Dr. Mervin Tubman Sudler, 
Class of 1901, former Dean of 
the Kansas University School of 
Medicine, died on June 22, 1956 
at the age of 80. 

Born in Westover, Md., Dr. 
Sudler received his Bachelor of 
Science degree from the Mary- 
land Agricultural College in 1894 
and his degree of Doctor of Phi- 
losophy in 1899 from the Johns 
Hopkins University. He then en- 
rolled in the College of Physic- 
ians and Surgeons in Baltimore, 
receiving the degree of Doctor 
of Medicine in 1901. 

Dr. Sudler was a Fellow of the 
American College of Surgeons, a 
member of the American Medical 
Association and the Nu Sigma 
Nu medical fraternity. 

L. K. Walker 

Dr. Louis Kyle Walker, Class 
of 1911, died May 17, 1956, at 
Ahoskie, North Carolina, aged 67. 

A graduate of the University 
of North Carolina and the Uni- 
versity of Maryland School of 
Medicine, Dr. Walker began the 
practice of medicine in Ahoskie 
in 1914 and was later appointed 
chief of staff of the Roanoke- 
Chowan Hospital in that city. 

He was a member of the Hert- 
ford County and North Carolina 
Medical Societies and was active 
in cancer, tuberculosis and Red 
Cross campaigns. 

E. J. Weatherby 

Edwin J. Weatherby, .39, as- 
sistant professor of dairying at 
the University of Maryland, died 
recently. 



74 



Maryland— March-April, 1957 



A native of Sinclairville, New 
York, Mr. VVeatherby diecl of a 
heart attack at his home, 2507 
Plyers Mill Rd., Kensington, Md. 

Mr. VVeatherby had been man- 
ager of the Farmers' Artificial 
Breeding Co-Operative, a uni- 
versity extension at College Park. 
He came to the Washington area 
about 10 years ago from New Jer- 
sey, where he had done dairy and 
breeding work in Sussex County. 

C. Woodruff' 
Dr. Caldwell Woodruff, well 
known Linthicum, Md. physician, 
died on September 22, 1950, of a 
heart attack at the age of 74. 
Dr. Woodruff had suffered an 
attack of coronary thrombosis in 
1980 at which time he retired 
from the active practice of medi- 
cine. 

Born in Charlotte, N. C, on 
April 10, 1882, the son of George 
Egleston and Betty Caldwell 
Woodruff, he attended the Char- 
lotte schools and later the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina. He 
then entered the College of Phy- 
sicians and Surgeons in Balti- 
more receiving his degree of doc- 
tor of medicine in 1911. Upon the 
completion of his internship at 
Mercy Hospital he entered the 
United States Public Health Serv- 
ice. Dr. Woodruff was a member 
of the National Guard and saw 
service on the Mexican Border. 

At the outbreak of World War 
I, he was commissioned a captain 
in the Medical Corps of the 
United States Army and served 
in France with the 29th Division. 
Following the war, he moved to 
Linthicum and engaged in the act- 
ing practice of medicine until his 
retirement in 1930. 

Dr. Woodruff was a former 
Chairman of the Anne Arundel 
County Sanitary Commission and 
in 1940 was appointed Chairman 
of the Glen Burnie Draft Board, 
serving on the Board until Janu- 
ary, 1955, both in Glen Burnie, 
Md., and later in Annapolis. 

He took a keen interest in gen- 
ealogy having written many pa- 
pers on the histories of families 
in North Carolina, South Caro- 
lina and Georgia. 

He was a member of the Epis- 
copal Church; the Glen Burnie 
Rotary Club; Glen Burnie Post 
40, American Legion; Post 1, 
29th Division Association; the 
Society of the Cincinnati ; the So- 
ciety of Colonial Wars, the Sons 
of the Revolution and the Sons 
of the American Revolution. 



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BREAKFAST • LUNCHEON 

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Open Daily and Sunday 
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llth S E Sts., N W Washington, 0. C. 



C. H. Lauuson, Inc. 

General Contractor 

ROAD BUILDING and 
GRADING 

Field Office 
COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

Phone WEbster 5-5744 

Williamsburg, Va. 

Phone — Williamsburg 106 



IMPORTERS 

WHOlESAlf. RETAIL 



EMERSON 2-2731 



ANTIQUES 
Penny's Treasure Chest 

Formerly of Berlin, Germany 

2311 Wisconsin Ave., N.W. Washington 7, O.C. 

Fine Meissen — Dresden — Porcelains — Ivortee 

Figurines — Colored Stemware — Brlc-a-Brac 



MONTGOMERY BUILDING 
SUPPLY CO., Inc. 

Complete Line of 

MASONRY SUPPLIES 
BRICK - CINDER BLOCK 

River Rd. of B t R.R. 01 4-1616 

BETHESDA. MD. 



C. Engel's Sons 

Incorporated 

Established 1850 
Fruits and Vegetables 

District 7-0995 

522 • 1 2th STREET, S.W. 

Washington, 0. C. 



Marylayid — March-April, 1957 



Directory Of Advertisers 



A »V I N.ir..-. Registry 80 

keme Iron Works 66 

Advertisers Engravers 37 

A Icazar 48 

Aid.. Cafe 74 

American Disinfectant Co 74 

American Offlee Equipment Co., Inc. .... 71 

anchor Post Products (Anchor Fence) 32 

(J. Anderson 58 

Lndrewa Office Supply & Equipment Co. 32 

Arcade Pontiac Co 64 

Marie C. Armacosl Nursing Home 42 

kmold'fl Village Shop 54 

Artcraft Electric Supply Co. of Maryland 68 

Arundel Federal Savings & Loan Vssn. 50 

Alvin I.. Aiihinoc Back Cover 

i. I it Exterminator Co 49 

Baltimore Asphalt Block A. Tile Co 49 

Baltimore Check Koom service 49 

Baltimore Envelope Co 71 

Baltimore Gas .V Electric Co 29 

Baltimore Tnro Co 36 

Baltimore- Washington Express Co 72 

Itank of Crisfleld 36 

Bard-Avon school 72 

Bartlett Keal Kstate 42 

.leanette Beck, Inc 66 

Bel Air Lumber Co 70 

Beltsville Lumber Co 40 

Bendann Art Galleries 46 



Bergman's Laundry 



73 



Henry O. Berman Co., Inc 47 



H. M. Biden Co. 



65 



Edward Boker Fronted Foods, Inc 44 



Bon Ton Saratoga Chip Dist. 



67 



Briggs Construction Co., Inc 64 

52 

59 



Brooks- Price Co. 
Buck Glasa Co. 



Carey Machinery * Supply Co 69 

Carpet Center 55 

Thos B. Carroll & Son 67 

Caton Kidge Nursing Home 42 

Central Armature Works, Inc 38 

D. Harry Chambers, Inc 72 

< li. ■vliuit Parma Dairy 66 

Chevy Chase Aged .V Convalescent Home 43 

City Express, Inc 71 

(loterland Farms Dairy 28 

Cohn <v Bock Co 47 

Cokeshury Book Store 57 

Nelson Coleman 57 

Collegiate Publishing Co 72 

(..rl.ii. & Dodson, Inc 66 

A. Myron Cowell, Inc 45 

Crane Company 40 

Cross & Blackwell Co 62 

Crown Oil & Wax Co 34 

Crown Refrigeration Supply Co 53 

Victor Cusliwa & Sons 62 

Dangary 1'iihlishing Co 42 

•lack Daniels Buick, Inc 51 

Danny's Formal Wear 53 

Davidson Transfer & Storage Co 29 

Davis Instrument Mfg. Co., Inc 38 

I'. A. Davis X Sons 69 

Del-Haven White House Cottages 73 

Deutsches II....- Inc 72 

Dietrich & (...ml. rill. Inc 68 

Dietrich Bros.. Inc 43 

Dor-Linn Dance Studios 65 

Drummond & Co., Inc 48 



Norman S. Farley & Son . . 
Electronic Wholesalers, Inc. 
El Mexico Restaurant .... 
C. En gels A Sons 



39 
63 
66 
75 



Equitable Savings & Loan Assn 75 

Fairchild Aircraft Division 

Inside Front Cover 

Farmers Cooperative Assn 84 

.1. H. Filbert. Inc 47 

First Federal Savings & Loan Assn 62 

First National Bank of Baltimore 35 

Leland L. Fisher, Inc 74 

I'ogan's Steak House 63 

Fortuna. Inc 66 

Francis & Parsons 51 

Frederick Fnderwrlters, Inc 34 

Fuller & d'Albert, Inc 38 

s. A. Oattl & Son. Inc 66 

Henry It. Gilpin Co 41 

Gobble Greeu (Turkey Farm) 70 

Albert F. Goetze Packing Co 47 

Goodhody A Co 34 



Karl M. Graf i to 56 

Graj Concrete Pipe Co 72 

The Handy Line (Paul M. Adams) 65 

Hanncs Formal Wear 75 

Harrington Hotel 75 

Harvey Dairy. Inc 44 

II, din House Hotel 67 

II.Midler's Ice Cream 68 

llilkr.-t. FlOllsta 51 

Hillyard Sales Co 89 

Robert F. Hoff 39 

(. Iloffberger Co 48 

II ..I I man Surgical Supply Co 52 

Hotel Dupont Plaza Back Cover 

HyattsviUe Auto Glass Co 56 

George Hyman Construction Co 46 

Fddie Jacobs 72 

Henry W. Jenkins & Sons Co., Inc 50 

Johnston, Lemon & Co 64 

Bob Jones, Flowers 57 

The E. A. Kaestner Co 49 

N. E. Kefauver. Jr 35 

Kidwell & Kidwell. Inc 39 

King Bros., Inc 69 

(has. F. King Corp 67 

Kingsville Inn 65 

K.loman Instrument Co 41 

E. H . Koester Bakery Co 29 

Koontz Creamery, Inc 46 

Kramer Hardware & Supply Co 67 

Krispy Kreme Doughnuts 67 

Kroh's '1 

Lamar & Wallace 67 

(. J. Langenfelder & Son, Inc 68 

C. H. Lawson, Inc 75 

Lawyers Title Co. of Prince Georges 

County, Inc 51 

Maurice Leeser Co 72 

Liberty Radio & Television Service 70 

Loewy Drug Co., Inc 71 

Lombardo's Main.. Center 68 

Lord Calvert Hotel 57 

Loveless Electric Co 64 

Lustiiie-Nicholson Chevrolet 66 

Minis Dispensing Opticians 34 

Mangels, Harold Co., Inc 30 

Maria's Restaurant 36 

Marks Home Furnishings 41 

Martin's. Importers 58 

Mar. hi,,, I Hotel Supply Co 70 

Massers Motel & Restaurant 35 

Meadow Gold Ice Cream Co 63 

The Mecca Restaurant 53 

Harry S. MicKey Electric Co 86 

Mi, ll.,„ 1 1. Metal Fabricators 38 

Midstate Federal Savings .V Loan Assn. 37 

Miller Brothers 57 

F. O. Mitchell & Bro., Inc 68 

Mitchell Sales Co 82 

Modern Machinist Co 74 

Modern Stationery Co 37 

Montgomery Building Supply Co., Inc. .. 75 

Montgomery-Stubbs Motors, Inc 44 

Morauer & Hartzell 51 

Morrison & Fifer 53 

Moses-Ecco Co., Inc 39 

Myers A Quigg, Inc 30 

McLeod * Koml.org Stone Co., Inc 33 

McNeill Surveys. Inc 73 

National Bank of Cambridge 70 

National F^nglneering Co 74 

National Equipment & Supply Co 49 

Nationwide Employment Service 52 

Nelson Motors 41 

New China Inn 48 

Norman Motor Co 73 

North Washington Press, Inc 78 

Old New Orleans Restaurant 51 

Dies Envelope Corp 87 

Olney Inn 32 

W. K. Pace Co 45 

Palmer Ford, Inc 74 

Park Transfer Co 66 

Parks a Hull Automotive Corp 46 

Parkwood Opticians 43 

Peake Buick, Inc 55 

r. -1111111. .in & Browne, Inc 47 

Penny's Treasure Chest 75 

Perpetual Building Assn 32 

Pimlico Hotel 50 



Lee Frew Piatt 55 

Plymouth Electric Construction Co 53 

Pocahontas, Inc 48 

Poor, Bowcn, Bartlett A Kennedy, Inc. 50 

Popular Club Beverage Co 47 

.limmie Porter T/A Kiernan's 67 

Princess Anne Pharmacy 68 

Process Supply, Inc 70 

Quaint Acres Nursery 45 

((nick Service Laundry 67 

Kefrigeration Supply Co 67 

Reliable Tire Sales 53 

Restorff Motors 39 

Bex Engraving Co 40 

Rice's Bakery 58 

River Road Iron & Metal Co 38 

Rivers &• Byron, Inc 38 

Riverside Nursing Home 41 

Kocco's Charcoal House 44 

Roland Park Co 52 

Knma Restaurant 69 

Hose Exterminator Co 72 

sade. Kristeller & Co 68 

Safeway Traiiways 81 

Salganik & Sons 71 

Salisbury Milling Co 70 

Savile Book Shop 44 

Van Rensselaer P. Save 48 

Wm. G. Scarlett & Co 71 

John A. Scheibel, Inc 41 

Schotield Co., Inc 56 

Schluderberg-Kurdle Co. (Esskay) .... 37 

Schmidt's Baking Co., Inc 48 

SchiUmerich Carillons. Inc 38 

Scott's Perennial Gardens 65 

Seidenspinner. Realtor 75 

Shore Radio Service 68 

Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co 40 

singer Sewing Center 66 

W. H. Singleton Co., Inc 64 

Smith Welding Co 74 

Russell W. Smith 46 

Smorgasbord Restaurant 78 

Southcomb. Inc 53 

Southeast Title Corp 73 

Southeastern Floor Co 78 

spe\ak Packing Co. (Dukeland Hams).. 49 

spring Hill Sanitarium 70 

Stafford Hotel 72 

Standard Engineering Co 39 

C. II. Stark Electric Co 46 

Wm. P. Stein, Inc 56 

sterling Process 74 

George H Stieber Co., Inc 58 

William F. Stone, Jr 50 

Charles G. Stott Co., Inc 54 

Sturdee Metal Products Co 70 

Suburban Supply, Inc 74 

Suburban Trust Co 44 

Sunshine Laundry 68 

Sweet heart Bakers 47 

Tag's Restaurant & Bar 42 

Taze & Hewitt 71 

Thomas & Thompson Co 48 

Thomas Distributing Co 34 

Tbomsson Steel Co 75 

Title Guarantee C 53 

Towson Practical Nursing Agency 43 

Towson Telephone Secretaries 72 

Tri-State Electric Supply Co 60 

Cnited Clay * Supply Corp 69 

Van Durand Studios 57 

Wallop «S Son, Insurance 64 

Warner's 52 

W arr-Bach Catering Co 65 

Washington Aluminum Co., Inc 69 

Washington Coca-Cola Bottling Works.. 34 

Washington Hotel 70 

Washington Refrigeration Co 38 

J. I. Wells Co., Inc 74 

Westchester Dining Room ,">6 

Western Exterminating Co 78 

White & Leonard 37 

Perry O. Wilkinson, Insurance 78 

Williams Construction Co 36 

J. McKenny Willis . .., 87 

W. R. Winslow Co 41 

Wolf Cohn 58 

Wye Plantation 74 

Venching Palace 58 

Duke Zeibert's Restaurant 65 



76 



Maryland — March-April, 1957 








1 AN HISTORIC MILESTONE 



150 Years 
of 

• Education 

• Research 

and 

• Service 



mm--, 

llmucrsttu of iiflaryhmo 



SESQUICENTENNIAL 

School of Medicine — 1807-1957 

CENTENNIAL 

College or Agriculture — 1 856-1 95* 




•7 



he University of Maryland now celebrates a Ses- 
quicentennial. The School of Medicine, chartered in 1807, 
is the foundation upon which an institution embracing 
fifteen major schools now stands. 

As is usually the case, the beginning was humble and 
the result of a few dedicated and brilliant persons. 

In brief, the School of Medicine, fifth oldest in the United 
States, was founded in 1807 ; the School of Law, one of the 
country's oldest, in 1813; the School of Dental Surgery, 
recognized as the first in the world, in 1840 ; and the School 
of Pharmacy, one the earliest, in 1841. 

The College of Agriculture, founded in 1856, became the third oldest in the West- 
ern Hemisphere. This was followed by the College of Engineering in 1859, the School 
of Nursing in 1889, and in 1918, the Colleges of Arts and Sciences, Education, Home 
Economics and the Graduate School. The College of Business and Public Administra- 
tion had its start in 1938 and was followed by the College of Military Science, Physi- 
cal Education and Recreation in 1947. These two were separated to become the Col- 
lege of Military Science and the College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health 
in 1949. The College of Special and Continuation Studies, founded in 1947, now serves 
more than 18,000 members of the Armed Forces in the European, North Atlantic and 
Pacific Theatres ; centers of education for military personnel reach across four continents. 

Latest enrollment figures indicate a student body of more than 36,000. Assets, 
including a physical plant of more than 100 buildings, are in the neighborhood of 
$80,000,000.00. In this anniversary inventory, no measure can be made of the total 
contribution of the University to the State and to the Nation. Illustrious alumni by 
the hundreds and capable, solid citizens by the thousands are prime assets which this 
great fountain of learning can boast. 



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Volume XXVIII • Number 4 
May-June • 1957 



the 



Maryland 



magazine 



0P MARY; AtJiTl 

?ARy° r e Alumni of the 

- /957 

University of Maryland 




In This Issue: A Speech About Academic Standards 
Art and the Creative Mind 
Our Growing System of Libraries 
Summer Session at College Park 




The C-123 



can't stop on st dime — 

but it can land in 700 feet! 



FAIRCHILD 

AIRCRAFT DIVISION • HAGERSTOWN 10. MARYLAND 
A Division of Fairchild Engine and Airplane Corporation 



...WHERE THE FUTURE IS MEASURED IN LIGHT-YEARS! 



Meet the most agile, the most sure-footed 
transport in the world — the Fairchild 
C-123. It is capable of air-lifting up to 
60 troops, or up to eight tons of bulk 
combat cargo— and it needs no mile-long 
concrete runway. 

Almost any clearing, almost any field is 
a potential C-123 airbase; even deeply 



rutted, ungraded, or sandy grounds are 
taken in stride by this rugged ship. And 
sophisticated aerodynamic design makes 
possible a landing run of only 700 feet — 
a takeoff run only a little longer. 
Performance, ruggedness, payload and 
versatility . . . these are traditional hall- 
marks of Fairchild aircraft. 







Maryland 




^g#a "**^ 




IHr 





COVER: 

Pensive, unassuming Shelby Shackelford Cox is an oul landing Baltimore 

artist. Her interesting account of how she came to i I ■ career 

is found in the article, "Art and the Creative Mind," starting on page <",. 



the 



Maryland 

magazine 

Volume XXVIII Number 4 



MAY-JUNE - 1957 



For the Alumni of 

the University of Maryland 

Published Bl-Monthly at the University of 
Maryland, and entered at the Post Office, 
College Park, Md.. as second class mall mat- 
ter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 
1879. $3.00 per yeai — Fifty cents the copy 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
ROBERT J. McCARTNEY, Director 



OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, Director 



ROBERT H BREUNIG. Editor 
PATRICIA M. BURRISS, Assistant Editor 
JOSEPH F. BLAIR. Sports Editor 
AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 



Member of American Alumni Council 



OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



ADVERTISING DIRFCTOR 

SALLY L. OGDEN 
18 W. 25th Street 2SOO Wise. Ave., N.W. 
Baltimore 18, Md. Washington. D. C. 

(HO 7-9018) (EM 3-2553) 



In This Issue — 



Features 

2 

5 

6 

12 

17 

18 

21 

News From the Colleges 

36 
37 
41 
46 
51 
54 
54 
56 
59 
60 
64 
68 

70 



A Speech About Academic Standards 

The Alumni Corner 

Art and the Creative Mind 

Our Growing System of Libraries 

Our Agricultural Museum 

Summer Session at College Park 

University Sports 



Agriculture 

Arts and Sciences 

Business and Public Administration 

Education 

Engineering 

Graduate School 

Home Economics 

Medicine 

Military Science 

Nursing 

Pharmacy 

Physical Education, Recreation and Health 



Maryland Obituaries 




A Speech About Academic Standards 



The following address tvas presented by Dr. 
Elkins at the spring convocation, February 27, 
J 957. For the reason that it contains sections deal- 
ing with the University's plans to raise academic 
standards, this address is of interest to many alum- 
ni. Approximately 3,000 students and faculty mem- 
bers crowded the Armory and approximately 500 
heard the address over loudspeakers set up on the 
steps outside. Dr. Elkins' address was received 
thoughtfully, and at times, enthusiastically. The 
complete text follows : 



D 



A Quantity Of Quality 

ean Smith, Members of the Board of Regents, 
Faculty, Students and Guests — 

The Public Functions Committee has had a hard 
time trying to "capture" a "name" speaker for a 
general convocation. They might have had Adlai 
Stevenson but for a policy against partisan political 
meetings, and, in this connection I am pleased to 
report to you that after careful consideration of 
all problems involved the policy has been changed 
— but too late to save Mr. Stevenson. Now we may 
consider any one for a speaker who dares to risk 
the title of "egg head" by appearing before a uni- 
versity audience. 

Anyway, after a desperate attempt by the Com- 
mittee to get Mr. Nehru and other well known 



"names", your Diamondback Editor decided that the 
President of the University, seldom seen by stu- 
dents who do not get into serious trouble, should 
make a pre-Christmas appearance to tell you what 
Santa Claus had in store for us at the University 
of Maryland. 

The President was not unmindful of the "call", 
but while considering the advisability of a Christ- 
mas message, his attention was diverted by a cam- 
paign to save you from the dangers of the highways 
on New Year's Day, and so he recommended an 
extra holiday by way of showing appreciation for 
your interest in safety. From what I've heard, it 
was a popular decision. 

Soon after the end of the first semester numerous 
petitions from students who had received notices 
that they had ended their social life at the Uni- 
versity, gave me the impression that it was time to 
make myself available to the Public Functions Com- 
mittee, and with a little urging the Committee re- 
sponded favorably. So, with rather short notice, 
I am here today, and I am indeed grateful to all 
of you for coming, although the Student Life Com- 
mittee has stolen the headlines during the past 
few days. 

Seriously, I want to talk to you about what we 
are trying to do to make your University education 
more meaningful. I want to talk with' vou about 



The Maryland Magazine 





. . . Is Thoughtfully Received 



the task that confronts all of us who believe that 
every individual, regardless of the number involved, 
should have an opportunity to develop his talents. 
During the last few decades we have been witnessing 
a social revolution with the individual as the center, 
and it is extremely important that this revolution 
have a clear objective. Otherwise, it could very 
easily result in a widespread conviction that every- 
one should share, and share alike, the benefits of a 
free society regardless of capacity, effort, initiative 
and ambition. Among other things, this would 
lead to the weakening of higher education by the 
admission and retention of all comers to the camp- 
uses of the colleges and universities, and the re- 
duction of our programs to a low common denomi- 
nator. This would be a disservice to society. We 
must, therefore, strive to direct to revolution toward 
the recognition of individual differences while as- 
suring each individual of the opportunity to go as 
far along various courses as his talents and energy 
will permit. 

The University of Maryland is only a part of 
the whole picture, but it is none-the-less important 
that it fulfill its mission. This is a State institution, 
supported in large part by the people, and as such 
it cannot and should not be selective to the point 
of excluding qualified students. It should be suffi- 
ciently selective and attentive to standards of per- 
formance to ensure a higher education to those 



who are admitted. Our society calls for a large 
quantity of individuals who are prepared for careers 
in the arts and sciences, for intelligent participa- 
tion in self government, and it needs an increasing 
number who are creative and can assume the role 
of leadership. So our problem in a State University 
is to develop a quantity of quality — and this is no 
easy assignment. 



-L'et us assure you at this point that our planning, 
so far as standards of performance are concerned, 
is not designed to eliminate you. It is designed to 
protect the value of this University's degree in 
hard as well as good times. If this is not done, the 
time will come when the degree will mean simply 
that the recipient has won some kind of an endur- 
ance contest, and the employer and society will 
have to find some other measure of achievement. 
Our aim, our obligation, is to see that this doesn't 
happen to those of you who are in the University 
to demonstrate your capacity and your will to 
achieve a recognizable distinction. 

In the near future, if all goes well, we shall an- 
nounce a part of an overall plan that will be con- 
sistent with the function of a State university and 
that will serve as a protection against t lie waste 
of tax money. This will not be done in haste or 
without careful consideration of the manv factors 



May-June, 1957 



Z 



mvuiveu. il win ienect an appreciation 01 me 
freshman's problems and the progress that should 
be made toward graduation. It will be based on 
the philosophy that every student deserves a fair 
chance. You should anticipate the raising of stand- 
ards, but you should not indulge in wild speculation 
and groundless rumors. You will be given due 
notice of any changes. I would only suggest at this 
time that you not lay plans to make an extended 
career out of going to college, unless you want to 
become a professor or a college president. 



I 



n raising the minimum requirements for a large 
and increasing enrollment, we must at the same 
time be careful to maintain the highest quality of 
teaching. We must guard against any tendency 
to look upon students as mere statistics, or to 
assume the attitude of "here it is, take it or leave 
it." In the days and years ahead we are going to 
need all of the imagination, efficiency and devotion 
to student welfare that can be developed in our 
faculties. It is for this reason, primarily, that we 
are urging the Legislature to increase salaries. If 
we are to do the kind of teaching and research that 
becomes a great university, we must be in a position 
to attract and retain superior talent. I am encour- 
aged by the hearing we have been given before 
legislative committees, and while I repeat that the 
prospect of increased income should not lead to 
extravagant living, we can be certain that if our 
request is granted the general faculty — including 
all who are engaged in the educational program — 
will be expected to perform at a high level. 

In the learning process there are two very impor- 
tant factors. First is the desire of the student to 
excel and a willingness to develop capacity. Second 
is the ability of the instructor to teach coupled with 
a sincere interest in the welfare of each individual. 
This is the ideal condition for maximum progress, 
a condition that is extremely important when the 
student-teacher ratio permits only a limited personal 
relationship. 

Please do not get the wrong impression from 
these remarks. The faculty of the University, with 
a fine student body, has been doing a good job; and 
we are presently engaged in studies that are aimed 
at better instruction. For example, the Committee 
on Appointments and Promotions has been working 
on ways and means of recognizing and rewarding 
superior teaching as well as productive research. 
Every great university has tackled this complex 
problem with varying degrees of success, and this 
University must come up with an answer if it 
is to utilize its talent in the best interest of the 
students and society. If we fail to reward quality 
in teaching, we shall be guilty of neglecting our 
primary function. 

Any university which emphasizes quality must 
be attentive to conditions that are conducive to good 
work. A large university whose function is to 
serve a heterogeneous group of students, of many 
backgrounds and different ages, must be even more 
attentive to conditions which influence and affect 
achievement. The general policies and regulations 
must be designed for the good of the whole under- 



graduate population, aitnougn tney may seem to 
be less applicable to certain groups and individuals. 
All of the extra-curricula activities, which are 
important in the development of the whole person, 
should contribute to moral, intellectual, social and 
physical growth. It is the intention of this Uni- 
versity to foster and encourage clubs, societies, 
associations, fraternities, sororities, athletic teams 
and other organized groups whose chief purpose 
fits into the picture of a real university. Conversely, 
the University should not be burdened and handi- 
capped by any activity or group which seeks Uni- 
versity sanction but is unwilling or unable to con- 
form to standards as set by the general faculty 
and the Board of Regents. Contrary to some rumors, 
we are not attempting to abolish fraternities, foot- 
ball, or minstrel shows; we are simply asking that 
everything at the University be a credit to an 
institution of higher learning and be subject to 
control and supervision by those who are charged 
with responsibility. 

Now I know that some of you may be saying 
to yourselves, "Why doesn't he talk about the 
quantity and quality of the food in the Dining 
Hall and the quality of some of our roads and 
parking lots." Well, I do not minimize the impor- 
tance of these incidentals, but if the day ever 
comes when students cease to gripe about food, we 
shall have doubled the price of board and left only 
one universal topic of conversation — the weather. 
The parking problem can be improved, but it can 
only be solved by a substantial number accepting 
Dr. White's prescription of the bicycle for better 
health and fewer heart attacks. 



T, 



he University of Maryland is our University. 
The State is appropriating about $15,000,000 a year 
for operating expenses, in addition to income from 
tuition, fees and services, in order to provide op- 
portunity for all who seek self-improvement. We 
are asking about $4,000,000 this year for physical 
plant expansion — a new Business Administration 
and Classroom Building and additional dormitory 
space, and other smaller items. All of this is as 
it should be in a democracy dedicated to equality 
of opportunity. We are engaged here in the develop- 
ment of human resources on an unprecedented scale. 
When the history of the next fifteen years is written, 
we shall be judged not on how much was spent 
but on how well it was spent. 

The welfare of all of us demands a reappraisal 
of our programs. Both quantity and quality are 
essential for the preservation of our principles and 
our prosperity. You may ask, "Can we accomplish 
this difficult task?" And I am sure you would 
answer, "We cannot afford to fail," for who will 
profit more than those of you who are preparing 
for the future. 

Higher education is at the cross roads, it can 
travel along the path of mediocrity or by intelligent 
planning and courageous action, it can take the 
high road to greater and greater contribution to 
our individual and collective welfare. Your Uni- 
versity has chosen the higher road. 



The Maryland Magazine 



Alumni Association 

The Officers: 

President: J. Gilbert Prendergast, ' : ' :! . Balti- 
more 

Vice President: Joseph 11. Deckman, '81| 
College Turk 

Vice President: Mrs. Agnes M. Krlcker, '81, 
Sand; Spring 

S'rcretary-Treasurbr : David I.. Brlgham, 
■38, Roekville 

• 

The General Alumni Council: 

(School and College Representatives) 

AGRICULTURE 

Clayton Reynolds, '22 
William Evans, '26 
Howard K. Sopor, '51 

ART & SCIENCES 

Virginia Trultt, '52 

Samule 1.. Sllber, ::t 

Ralph G. Shure, '32 
BUSINESS & PUBLIC 
ADMINISTRATION 

Alvin S. Klein, ':(7 

Harry A. Boswell, Jr.. '42 

Chester \V. Tawney, '31 

DENTAL 

Dr. Prank Hurst, '27 
Dr. Harry Levin, '26 
Dr. Daniel E. Shehan, '•-•l' 

EDUCATION 

John I'. Speicher, '41 

William Prigg, '53 

Mrs. John J. Hoyert, Jr., '50 

ENGINEERING 

S. Chester Ward. '32 
(has. R. Hayleck, '43 

Joseph II. Deckman. '31 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Mrs. Geraldlne P. Edwards, '::i 
Miss Irene Knox, '34 
Mis. William Krlcker, '31 

LAW 

J. (iilbert Prendergast, '33 
Stanford I. Hoff, '34 

G. Kenneth Reihllch, '2!t 

MEDICAL 

Dr. William II. Trinlett, '11 

Thurston R. Adams, '34 

Daniel J. I'essagno, '20 
NURSING 

Miss Flora Streett, '38 

Mrs. Robert T. Singleton, '50 

Mrs. Mary France Dennis, '47 

PHARMACY 

Frank Bloeh, "24 
Gordon Mouat, '37 
Samuel I. Rnichlen, '25 



Ex-Officio Members of the Council: 

Dr. Wilson II. Elklns, President of the Uni- 
versity 
David L. Brigham, '38, Secretary and Treas- 
urer 
Dr. A. I. Bell, '10, Past President 
Dr. A. E. Goldstein, '20, Past President 
C. V. Koons, '20, Past President 
J. Homer Kemsberg, '18, Past President 
Col. O. H. Saunders, '10, Past President 
T. T. Speer, '17, Past President 
• 

Alumni Clubs and Representatives: 

Baltimore — Dr. Eugene L. I'essagno, '40 
Carroll County — Dr. L. L. Leggett, '30 
Cumberland — Dr. J. Russell Cook, '23 
Eastern S"hore — Otis Twilly, '21 
Frederick County — William E. Trail, '20 
"M" Club — Charles Ellinger, '37 
New England — R. A. Cook, '05 
New York— Miss Sarah E. Morris, '24 
Pittsburgh — Charles Furtney, '37 
Prince Georges — William Kahler, '48 
Richmond — Paul Mullinlx, '36 
Schnectady — Mrs. Janice Mackey, '51 
Terrapin— James W. Stevens, '19 



The Alumni Corner 



Dear Fellow Alumnus 



SPRING brings with it many changes, a reawakening, and often 
a new zest and purpose. Just around the corner lies the Sesqui- 
centennial climax in the form of our 150th anniversary commence- 
ment. New alumni will be taking their respective places in the 
affairs of the community, the State, and the Nation. 

At the same time many older alumni will be returning to our 
campus to recall events of other days and to view with understandable 
amazement the physical face lifting of the campus. 

The Alumni Association and the University are joined in an 
enthusiastic awakening which, it is hoped, will give alumni an im- 
portant role in the development of the University as it moves to 
achieve full destiny as one of the great institutions of our country. 



CONTEMPLATED under the activation plan is the addition of 
a Field Secretary to the permanent staff of the Office of Alumni 
Relations, additional assistance to existing clubs and the establish- 
ment of a number of geographical alumni organizations. Hand in 
hand with the expanded alumni field program will go a new look 
for The Maryland Magazine, a quarterly news letter to all alumni, 
the establishment of an Alumni Fund, a Development and Endow- 
ment Program for the University and a central office organization 
designed to adequately meet the needs of a progressive and expanding 
Alumni Association. 



YOUR General Alumni Council, the offices of our various alumni 
clubs and school associations and many individual alumni have 
given time, energy and understanding to these new efforts. In 
short, the Alumni Association is on the move in an active, planned, 
and coordinated effort to build alumni affairs on an aggressive basis. 
We trust every alumnus will want his name identified with a program 
which will be making a major contribution to the development of 
both the Alumni Association and the University which it represents. 




£2t* — , 



DAVID L, BRIGHAM. Director 
Office of Alumni Relations 



May June, 1957 




Art and the Creative Mind 



What are some of the factors affecting the 
development of the creative processes in the 
human mind? 

Finding the answers to this question is intensely 
important to psychiatrists and — ultimately — to 
everyone. Dr. Jacob E. Finesinger, Director of the 
University's Institute of Psychiatry, is trying a new 
tack : study of the creative development of artists 
through examination of their works and through 
their personal testaments. 

The value of such a procedure was recently 
demonstrated at an exhibition of paintings and 
drawings called, "Stages in the Creative Process", 
held in the Institute of Psychiatry in Baltimore, 
and examined in a round-table discussion follow-up. 
Approximately 1,200 persons attended the exhibi- 
tion. 

Four artists, whose work showed some diversity 
in style and content were invited to exhibit. They 
were Mrs. Amalie Rothschild, Mrs. Shelby Shackle- 



ford Cox, Mr. Aaron Sopher and Mr. Keith Martin. 
They were asked to arrange their works chrono- 
logically, beginning with their first (Mr. Martin 
submitted a pre-school drawing), continuing with 
works representing significant changes in style and 
development, and ending with their most recent 
offering. 

Each artist has commented on his personal ex- 
periences relating to his work, its development and 
the subjective experience which led to the final 
production. Their edited comments are recorded in 
this article. 

"The nature of the paintings and drawings," Dr. 
Finesinger says, "their sequence, the written ac- 
counts, and the brief comments — all of these repre- 
sent the artist's own contribution towards the under- 
standing of his artistic development. This exhibi- 
tion provided important material for our round- 
table discussion concerning some of the problems 
inherent in the understanding and evaluation of a 
work of art. 



The Maryland Magazine 




Dr. Fineainger, Mrs. Cox, Mr. Mar go, Mr. Martin and Mr. Sopher 



I" A any people do not realize that the interests 
of psychiatry go far beyond the concern with sick 
people. During the past generation much has been 
learned about the psychological processes at work 
in normal people and in superior people, and many 
psychiatrists have felt that not sufficient attention 
has been given to the understanding of these studies. 
As a result, there are several studies in progress 
on normal and superior people, in an attempt to 
understand the factors which encourage and pro- 
mote creative ideas and of the factors which make 
it possible for these creative ideas to become func- 
tional — to be carried out in creative work. Studies 
in the creative process are not limited to painters. 
They have a broad range and extend to original 
work in many fields in arts and in the sciences as 
well. Our first interest is scientific and is aimed 
toward a clear understanding of the experiences 
which make for original or creative contributions. 

"We hope that these studies might tell us how 
professional training and experience modify and 
dovetail into the personality traits of the artists. 
There is some evidence which points to the crucial 
importance of the social setting in establishing the 
artist's ideals, in mobilizing the necessary energy, 
and in blocking or facilitating the creative use of 
the artist's emotional and intellectual resources. 
Some studies have hinted at the importance of 
experience in developing and setting the content of 
the psychological theme songs which the artist is 
impelled to express through his skill in various 
media. The subjective accounts of the artist coupled 
with the objective evidence of change in the per- 
formance, comprise the data for studies of this 
kind. 

"There is much written more specifically about 
the value of painting in facilitating self-expression 
— especially for people whose gift lies in communi- 
cating through non-verbal means. This idea has 



been carried over to the treatment of patients. 
Whether patients receive benefit from expression 
through free or structured paintings, is still open 
to question. The work of professional artists with 
patients offers the opportunity to study this prob- 
lem. Such work also gives the artists a chance to 
become acquainted at first-hand with the phenomena 
of mental illness and to many, this can be a broaden- 
ing human experience." 



T, 



May-June; 1957- 



he round-table discussion to which Dr. Fine- 
singer alludes was attended by: Adelyn Breeskin, 
Director, Baltimore Museum of Art; Thomas I. Cook, 
Professor of Political Science, Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity (Dr. Cook, unable to attend, sent a manu- 
script which was read) ; Boris Margo, painter; 
Amalie Rothschild, painter; Kenneth Sawyer, art 
critic, the Baltimore Sunday Sun; and Shelby 
Shackleford Cox, painter. Dr. Finesinger was mod- 
erator. More than 150 interested spectators at- 
tended the discussion; approximately 100 others, 
unable to find seats, listened from the hallway. 

Mr. Margo, a well-known New York artist, and 
Dr. Finesinger put together the exhibition based 
on ideas developed through years of their collabora- 
tion in areas of art and psychiatry. 

"In selecting each work," Mr. Margo says, "the 
artists kept in mind our aim in demonstrating 
change and development over a long period of time. 
This was not a retrospective show. Such an exhibi- 
tion usually focuses on only one artist, one most 
probably venerable or even, recently deceased. The 
retrospective shows aims to commemorate, evalu- 
ate, summarize a career. Our objective was quite 
different. It proposed, not to display the range and 
content of the artists' mature work only, but rather, 
through the investigation of the many phases t\( 
their development, to illustrate some of the steps 
in the creative process itself." 

7 



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News for Sale. 1957. 

It would not be accurate for me to say that I made 
a decision to become an artist. The idea of be- 
coming an artist probably crept up on me after 
my father sent me to the art school (The Maryland 
Institute of Fine and Applied Arts here in Balti- 
more) and then it never occurred to me to be any- 
thing else. (This sounds very uncomplicated to me, 
Doctor, — I hope it is not too simple for your pur- 
poses). 

At the art school I found myself drawing the 
students in their various natural postures rather 




\ 



Married Couple. 1! 

than the consciously posed models — and ever since 
then I've drawn people that I see around me — their 
bodies-gestures-facial expressions. 

I think of my drawings as communicative and 
literary — incorporating the main elements of litera- 
ture — that is, characterization and man's behavior 
and relations to man. 

The human figure is the base of my drawings — 
they are traditional but not strictly representational 
in an academic way — because they editorialize, criti- 
cize and comment on the subject. 



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Caryatid. 1956. 



An art career seemed to be my ambition from 
early childhood when my parents sent me to 
Saturday art school, continuing through high school, 
after which I studied fashion illustration. 

After two years as a fashion artist I married 
and turned to painting to fulfill the desire to con- 
tinue as an artist without working away from home. 

Style in painting develops as the personality 



Phantasmal Collection. 



matures, reflecting such things in my character 
as stability, self-discipline, orderliness, forthright- 
ness. Changes in style are the result of experimen- 
tation with methods. Whereas one's own style un- 
folds in spite of conscious effort, it is undeniable 
that we are influenced by major movements in our 
time. 

The painter in society has many roles: enter- 



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Operation. 1954. 



Pimlico. 19 



I'm sure I did not arrive at this approach by 
abstract reasoning or theorizing of any kind. I 
merely liked to draw people — and as I grow older 
I come to the conclusion that people are valid and 
important subject matter for pictures (and I am 
aware that this view is not shared by all of my 
fellow artists). 

Assuming that the artist is a human being- with 
human feelings, thoughts and interests — it could 
follow that the human element could logically be a 
jumping off point in his art — but, I feel, that in 



this particular era many artists have jumped too 
far — perhaps into too rare an atmosphere, an atmos- 
phere so rare that it does not permit them to remain 
citizens of this planet. 

I would certainly not advocate the elimination 
of non-objective art but I would argue its postpone- 
ment until the arrival of Utopia. 

Goethe presented the picture more neatly when 
he wrote — "Art can be a wonderful approach to 
life as well as a wonderful escape." 



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Unnamed. Early. 

tainer, decorator, stylist, recorder, interpreter, in- 
novator, visionary, philosopher, educator, therapist, 
stimulator, pacifier. His influence radiates oceans 
and eons beyond the personal act of putting patches 
of color on canvas — what a seemingly futile way to 
spend the day! 



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Landscape with Rocks. 1950. 



Formal Portrait. 1955. 

During the late twenties, the magazine Vanity 
Fair was brought to my attention. It was a 
sophisticated record of the contemporary scene and 
introduced to its readers reproductions of the 
modern French and American painters and sculp- 
tors. This revolutionary way of seeing excited my 
imagination to the point of wanting to become a 
painter in the sense of expressing myself in my 
own time. Design and pattern were given impor- 
tance, color had been released and was being used 
as a psychological factor — most important of all, 
the artist (labelled "modernistic"), was free to ex- 
periment with new interpretations. The abstract 
for art's sake had come into being. 




In my high school design class, we were taught 
to experiment with brightly colored papers, form- 
ing harmonies of color and design rather than 
making pictures. Years later, I returned to college 
as a change from oil, gouache (opaque watercolor), 
etc. and discovered this medium ideal for producing 
pictures. The high school experiments helped to 
heighten and develop a sense of color. 

I continued with my art studies for a year and 
a half at the University of Nebraska (Fine Arts 
Department) where I was introduced to oil painting 
for the first time. From 1930 to 1933 I attended 
the Art Institute of Chicago where, under the able 
guidance of two excellent teachers, I was helped 



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Demolition. 1956. 

Writing about one's "creative process" is difficult 
I think for the average artist. It is an effort 
to make clear to the outsider what is not always 
completely clear within the mind of the individual 
himself. Not that I mean that the artist works 
unknowingly with his media, but that there is an 
emotional content which enters a work and which 
is not explainable in the somewhat limited technical 
terms which we are forced to employ in trying to 
describe art. As my medium is chiefly that of a 
painter, with some black and white included, I shall 
try to speak in terms of a painter. The learning 
process of a painter has its variations according to 
the training to which he is exposed and his accept- 
ance or rejection of that training. This training 




Migration II. 1952. 

does not begin in the art school, but in the very 
earliest experiences to which he, as a child, is 
exposed. 

Until I was twelve I grew up in a small town 
with trips to the country for summer vacations. 
In this simple environment I soon became aware 
with a continuous feeling of excitement and dis- 
covery of the happenings in nature: the growth of 
plants, the varied insects, the patterns of stones 
and shells. One summer I was taken to the high 
mountains, and what I was enchanted with was not 
the grandeur of the view but the ferns that grew 
among the stones and a rock wall full of fossils. 
I think it has always been the small and intricate 
Which has fascinated me. (Continued on Page 33) 



10 



The Maryland Magazine 




/ dirir tij tillvrl. l:'4:>. 




Twin Towers, Berlin. 1938. 



to appreciate creative art of all periods. Miss Kath- 
leen Blackshear taught me the timelessness of good 
art, the value and use of abstraction throughout the 
history of art and above all, encouraged my grow- 
ing interest in composition. Miss Margaret Arting- 
stall gave me sound training in design and color. 
Meanwhile, I have continued in the traditional 
media : oil, ink, pencil and gouache, each of which 
presents a different approach towards the artist's 
goal — a personal style. 

I do not ever remember expecting to follow any- 
thing other than art. From a very early age, I 
had naturally taken to drawing and painting. It 
seemed inevitable I would want to become a painter. 



During my frequent childhood illnesses, my parents, 
thinking to keep me quiet and amused, kept me well 
supplied with crayons, water colors and paper. I 
enjoyed having my parents read aloud the classic 
fairy tales and this may have stimulated my interest 
in fantasy which plays a certain role in my work 
today. 



V_^ertain experiences were important in starting 
me on a professional career: as a child pouring 
over magazines, copying the comic strips though 
I had no interest in becoming a cartoonist, given 

{Continued on. Page 32) 





Studio. 19 U. 



Zoo Fantasy. 1934. 



May June, J 9 57 



11 













} : . % 




Dr. Rovelatad displays plans for new Main Library 



Our Growing System of Libraries 



A young history student, casually dressed, fitted 
a small 4x5 card into a rubber roll, adjusted 
it, viewed the image which appeared on the ground 
glass screen, and began to quietly read The Pennsyl- 
vania Town and Country Man's Almanack, pub- 
lished 1789. 

One hundred and forty-four years ago when the 
University's library system was founded in 1831, 
no such device was available, indeed, the Almanack 
itself was lying forgotten in an attic gathering dust. 

Through the years, the University's Library Sys- 
tem, has attempted to keep pace with the Univer- 
sity's changing demands and, within the past 11 
years, its tremendous growth. It has not been an 
easy assignment. But within the next two years, 
spanking new library buildings will have been con- 
structed on both College Park and Baltimore cam- 
puses — fulfilling the University's fondest dreams. 

The new Main Library building in College Park, 
which ultimately will house 1,000,000 volumes and 
seat 2,000 readers at one time, will be completed 
in the Fall of 1957. The new Medical Sciences 
Library in Baltimore, designed to serve Medicine, 



Dentistry, Pharmacy and Nursing, will be completed 
by the Fall of 1958. The Baltimore building will 
accommodate 200,000 volumes and 500 readers. 

The first significant event in the history of the 
libraries can be traced back to the year 1813. 

In that year the personal library of Dr. John 
Crawford, who had been a Professor of Natural 
History on the Medical School faculty, was pur- 
chased from his estate for $500.00. This collec- 
tion was used as a nucleus for the Medical School 
Library which then comprised the University of 
Maryland. The Library today is the oldest medical 
school library in this country which has been in 
continuous existence since its founding. 

For an individual, Dr. Crawford had a remarkable 
collection of books covering the medical sciences 
(dentistry, pharmacy, and nursing to some extent, 
as well as medicine) — a total of some four hundred 
volumes. Dr. Crawford was as unusual and signifi- 
cant as the books which he collected. Some of his 
medical theories were far in advance of his time, 
scorned during his life but later recognized and 
accepted. When Dr. Crawford died in 1813, he was 
buried in a churchyard located two blocks from the 



12 



The Maryland Magazine 



Baltimore campus. It was altogether fitting that 
Dr. Crawford's volumes were the beginning of the 
present library collections of the University of 
Maryland. 

Records of the early years of the library for the 
medical school are few. Growth was slow. In 1890, 
the collection consisted of about 1,000 volumes; in 
1891 the number was greatly increased by a gift 
of 1,200 volumes from the late Dr. T. Barton Bruce, 
an alumnus. 



An 1903, a Chair for the History of Medicine was 
founded and Dr. Eugene Fauntleroy Cordell was 
appointed to fill this Professorship. Through Dr. 
Cordell, interest in the library was revived, and in 
1906 the librarian reported to the faculty that the 
library contained 6,980 volumes and 4,200 pamph- 
lets, and received 46 journals. 

During the early years the library was housed 
in what later became known as the Provost's office 
in the medical college building. In 1913, the library 
was moved to Davidge Hall, its present quarters 
and the site for the new Medical Sciences Library 
on the corner of Lombard and Greene streets. 

In the following years other collections were 
added to the library — law, dentistry, pharmacy 
and commerce. Then as the various schools grew 
in size they erected their own buildings and with- 
drew their libraries. The general or classical ma- 
terial of 1,000 volumes was transferred to College 
Park in 1931. 

The libraries operated as separate units of the 
various schools until 1937 when they were com- 
bined into a single system of libraries including 
the libraries located on the College Park campus. 





Above: Engineering Library. 
Left : Psych ia t He Lib ra ry. 
Below. Chemistry Library. 



May-June, 1951 




o 




Reference Desk, present main library, 
Shoemaker Hall. 



n the College Park campus the library was 
first located in a reading room of the old Col- 
lege Building in the early 1870's. In this room, 
general agricultural periodicals and newspapers of 
the state were available. In 1882, the library began 
to acquire State and Federal reports, and laws 
and "other valuable and useful works." By 1886, 
the college Library had several hundred books. The 
Mercer Literary Society Library contained prob- 
ably 1,500 volumes and the private libraries of the 
professors an equal number — all of which were 
available for student use "under proper conditions." 

Into what is now the Dean of Women's Building 
the library was moved in 1894. Library quarters 
were on the second floor; the gymnasium was on 
the first floor. Mr. R. R. Pue, a student, was given 
credit for the organization of the library at that 
time. It was said then that the library was "slowly 
assuming its proper place as one of the most im- 
portant departments of the institution." 

An important date in the history of the library 
system was October 22, 1901, when the first Library 
Committee was organized. Dr. H. B. McDonnell, 
Chairman, called the meeting to order, and Pro- 
fessor F. B. Bomberger was elected secretary. Pro- 
fessor Bomberger, who occupied the Chair of Eng- 
lish and Physics, was given the title of Librarian 
in March 1905. In the fall of 1914 the library had 
for the first time a full-time official in charge with 
the appointment of Miss Lulu E. Conner as Asso- 
ciate Librarian. On June 11, 1917, Miss Kate White, 
who is at present a member of the library staff, 
was appointed to an assistantship in the library. 

Miss White, at present responsible for the periodi- 
cal room in the General Library at College Park, 
remembers that in that year, U. S. Route One 
was still a dirt road and the University pretty much 
resembled a giant farm. In the winter, University 
dairymen cut ice from three reservoirs on campus, 
one of which was located where the BPA Building 
is located today. The ice was stored in straw and 
used for refrigerating dairy products during the 
summer. 

George Fogg, now Director of Personnel, is re- 
membered by Miss White as a conscientious young 
man who worked for some 14 years in the Uni- 
versity's general library. As an undergraduate, 
Fogg worked part-time in the old library. For 
12 years, Fogg was in the reference and loan sec- 
tion, responsible for all public services. 

Many of the periodicals which the old library 
received have since passed from publication and some 
are still going strong: Literary Digest; Breeder's 
Gazette', Wallace's Farmer; Saturday Evening Post; 
American Magazine; Country Gentlemen; The 
Bookman; Ladies Home Journal. 

In 1915, Experiment Station and College libraries 
were merged and the agricultural part of the collec- 
tion housed on the first floor of the building. The 
combined collections totaled about 15,000 books and 
pamphlets. The library was made a depository for 
U. S. Government publications in 1925. 

The next significant development occurred in 1931 
when the library moved into its present quarters, 
Shoemaker Hall. The ground floor and basement 
for the most part housed the administrative offices, 
book store and post office. These activities soon 



14 



The Maryland Magatint 




m 

Main library in 1910 was located m 
present Dean of Women's Building. 




- 



f 



i ► 



' i-' 



Construction of nenv ma-in library 
on Mall is progressing rapidly. 



and Industrial Education, and other units. This 
branch library has Bhelving for 100,000 volui 

and scats 200 readers. 

In 1953, in cooperation with the < lollege of Special 
and Continuation studies, bookmobile Bervice was 
begun to provide library material to "11 campu 
classes. Regularly scheduled runs are made t«i Bal 
timore, Andrews Field and the Pentagon Building:. 

In addition book collect ions are distributed to BUCh 
Off-campus centers as Salisbury, Frederick and 

Cumberland on a semester loan basis. 



I 



moved to other locations on the campus until the 
library occupied the entire building. 



►3ince 1937, when all libraries of the University 
were combined to form a single system of libraries 
to serve the entire institution, progress has been 
made to provide modern library service. 

The Nursing Library was established in 1946. 
In the following year a temporary structure, the 
Library Annex, was added on the College Park 
Campus to care for the rapidly increasing postwar 
enrollment. 

A library to serve the needs of the College of 
Engineering and the Institute of Fluid Dynamics 
and Applied Mathematics was set up in 1949. The 
material in this library was moved in 1953 to new 
and large quarters in the Mathematics Building. 
Here it was combined with material in mathematics 
and physics and serves beside Engineering and the 
Institute, the Departments of Mathematics, Physics 

Virginia Phillips research- 
ing rare historical texts 
in the Maryland Collection. 



May- June, 1957 



n the entire system of libraries, the collection of 
catalogued volumes grew from 122,618 in L938 to 

more than 325,000 at the present time. In addition 

t<> catalogued volumes, library holdings include over 
L00,000 government documents and many thousands 
of volumes of books and serials in storage on tin- 
College Park campus. In 1938-39 a total of $21,416 
was expended for books, periodicals and binding; 
in 1955-5(5 a total of $143,193 was expended for 
the same materials and services; At the present 
time the libraries receive over 1.000 periodicals on a 
regular basis. 

The library today employs 51 full-time profes- 
sional and clerical persons and SO part-time stu- 
dents. Of the full-time employees, 29 are classified 
as professional librarians and 25 as non-professional 
and clericals. The 80 part-time students work an 
average of 10 to 15 hours a week; the salary budget 
for students averages $25,000 a year. 

When the new building is completed, 11 new 
positions will have been created (10 professional 
librarians and one non-professional and clerical). 
Additional full- and part-time positions will open 
as the various services offered by the new library 
are placed into operation. 




How many books do the various libraries loan 
out? During 1955-56, a total of 113,659 books were 
issued for use (172,353 for home use and 58,694 
for use in the libraries). For inter-library loan, 825 
books were borrowed and 667 lent. Some 5,721 
reference questions were asked of library staffs. 

All library collections have their strengths and 
weaknesses. Areas in which the College Park collec- 
tions are especially strong include Marylandia, 
chemistry, agriculture, science, American history, 
government documents, languages and early religi- 
ous sects in America. Special collections on the 
Baltimore campus include medical history (includ- 
ing the Crawford Collection), dental history, anes- 
thesia and anatomy. 

Construction on the new $2.5 million main library 
building on the College Park campus is now approxi- 
mately two-thirds completed. It is far enough along 
so that the massive size (240 by 120 feet) and 
beauty of the facility are obvious. The lower ex- 
terior walls, constructed of Alabama Rockwood 
limestone, and the upper walls of red colonial brick, 
are completed. At the front of the building, at the 
fourth floor level, are two inscriptions carved in 




Library materials are available to stu- 
dents enrolled in off-campus classes 



limestone. One has been taken from Thomas Car- 
lyle's Heroes and Hero-Worship, the Hero as Man 
of Letters: "In books lies the soul of the whole 
Past Time." The other is from a letter of Thomas 
Jefferson to Henry Dearborn : "The field of knowl- 
edge is the common property of all mankind." 

On the main floor, the Loan and General Refer- 
ence areas, library offices and Humanities Division- 
al Service Center are taking shape. This Subject 
Divisional Center is one of three such rooms in the 
building. The room will accommodate about 200 
students and will provide space for reference service 
in the humanities as well as easy access to all library 
materials in this broad field. Reference books, bibli- 
ographies, journals, microfilms and microcards as 
well as circulating books in the humanities will be 
readily accessible in this room and adjacent book 
stacks. Subjects to be included in the humanities 
are literature, English and foreign languages, and 
philosophy. 



The other two Subject Divisional Centers are 
located on the second floor and will provide library 
service centers for the social sciences, and agri- 
culture and the biological sciences. Each Center will 
have its own suite of offices, catalog and battery 
of microfilm and microcard readers. Library special- 
ists will be assigned to the Divisional rooms to 
provide expert library service. 

Activities for library service in music and fine 
arts, audio-visual materials, library science and 
the Maryland Collection will be provided for on the 
third floor. In the Music and Fine Arts room will 
be located the phonograph record collection, listen- 
ing booths, music scores and picture files as well 
as books on music and the fine arts. 

The Audio-Visual Center will provide a reading 
area, storage facilities for film, slides and propec- 
tors ; and a large room with a small stage and pro- 
jection room for accommodating about 200 people. 
These facilities are to serve the entire campus. A 
grand piano will be purchased for use at concerts. 

Scattered through the building are to be fifteen 
seminar rooms for graduate classes and two hun- 
dred carrels and studies for the use of faculty, 
graduate students and special researchers. 

The book stack areas of the building will be open 
to undergraduate students, as well as to graduate 
students and faculty. 



T, 



he new library for the medical sciences on the 
Baltimore campus will be constructed on the site of 
the 112-year-old medical library building (Davidge 
Hall), the two properties to the east and the one 
to the south. The additional property has been 
purchased by the University and all of the buildings 
have been razed. The combined properties now 
provide a site of 176 by 103 feet. 

On the ground floor of the building will be located 
18 faculty studies, facilities for audio-visual and 
photoduplication services, a room for providing 
library service to the off-campus Baltimore classes 
of the College of Special and Continuation Studies, 
book stacks and carrels, and an auditorium seating 
416. 

The circulation desk is located at the main floor 
entrance. Also on this floor are large service areas 
for reference and journals, the card catalog, cata- 
loging department, administrative offices, and addi- 
tional book stacks and carrels. 

The second floor will accommodate, in addition 
to book stacks and carrels, the historical book room, 
archives, and several conference rooms. 

The building will house a total of 84 carrels and 
10 group study rooms. The building is to be con- 
structed so that the library can be expanded by 
adding an additional floor. 

To serve the educational and research needs of 
the University, the library system must forever 
grow and expand. Books and journals must be 
added daily; few may be discarded. No other De- 
partment of the University requires increased space 
daily to carry on its normal activities as do the 
libraries. 

The two new library buildings should provide 
centers of education and research for many years; 
indeed, the library system, through these new facili- 
ties, keeps pace with the tremendous growth of 
this great American university. 



16 



The Maryland Magazine 




Our Agricultural Museum 



By Dr. Theodore Bissell 



Shriver Laboratory, home of 
the Department of Agricul- 
tural Engineering, now houses a 
collection of farm and carpenter 
tools, some of which date back 
135 years. In the big room ad- 
joining are examples of modern 
machinery — tractors, combines, 
etc. The contrast is striking. The 
museum collection is a project of 
the Agricultural Alumni of the 
University. 

It is hard to say when it started 
but the first concrete evidence of 
a museum was in 1955 when Dave 
Brigham, Director of Alumni 
Relations, brought to the Univer- 
sity a large truck load of old 
things that Landon C. Burns 
(1923) had collected in Carroll 
County and had shown in a county 
celebration. Ray Carpenter, Head 
of Agricultural Engineering pro- 
vided a room in Shriver Labora- 
tory and there the articles were 
placed. 

The Agricultural Alumni meet- 
ing in June 1955 began action to 
put the Burns collection in order 
and develop it as an Agricultural 
Museum. Money was found for 
display panels, and other mate- 
rials, and work started in the 
fall. Participants in this work 
were George Abrams (1927), Ted 
Bissell (1920), Dave Brigham 
(1938), Bill Evans (1926), Guy 



Gienger (1933), Art Hamilton 
(1929) and a number of students. 
Dr. T. B. Symons (1902), Dean 
Gordon Cairns and Prof. Ray 
Carpenter have been of continu- 
ous help in providing inspiration 
and facilities. Very valuable sug- 
gestions at the first planning 
meeting were given by Edward C. 
Kendall, Curator of Agricultural 
Industries, Smithsonian Institu- 
tion, Washington, D. C. 

After several Saturdays of 
steady plugging, the Museum 
room was put in shape for the 
University Centennial in March, 
1956. Peg board was fastened to 
the walls and many of the items 
properly labeled, were displayed 
for the first time. Large items — 
plows, a tool chest, platform 
scales, etc. were placed by the 
walls. A large wood-working 
lathe was placed in the center of 
the floor. The lathe, 12 feet long, 
was built and operated by Eph- 
raim Doyle, cabinet maker at 
Shirlevsburg, Pennsylvania, 1825 
to 1870. This was donated by S. 
M. Doyle, his grandson, now re- 
siding on Long Island, New York. 
The lathe is complete with treadle, 
fly wheel and wood working tools. 

A chest of tools used in making 
all kinds of home equipment, 
stairways and coffins at the Shir- 
leysburg shop was also contrib- 



uted by Mr. D03 If. He Bayi his 
grandfather made many <>t the 

tools. 

I,, c. Burns' collection includes 
shovel plows, constructed mostly 

of wood, three grain cradles used 

in harvesting wheat, a "flop-over" 
hay rake believed to date from 
1820, sickles, a Hail for threshing 

grain, pitch forks of hand- 
wrought iron, a line old side sad- 
dle and harness workers bench, 

and a large assortment of augers, 

chisels, vises and more carpenter 
tools. There is an early forage 

cutter made with a scythe blade. 
A farm bell hung in the middle 
ol the room brings to the mind 
of visitors the pleasant sound of 
other such bells. 



A 



hand corn planter (single 
hill) made by Robert A. Veitch 
of Montgomery County about 1880 
was presented to the museum 
by Fletcher Veitch, Jr., (1931). 
A fine ox yoke was contributed 
by Gen. Edgar Conley, Comman- 
dant of the MAC Cadet Corps 
1908 to 1911. This yoke had be- 
longed to Gen. Conley's father at 
Fairland. Other items which have 
been given to the Museum in- 
clude : a bucksaw by Paul Gal- 
breath, (1939) ; a sausage grind- 
er by B. W. Stultz, Baltimore ; a 
two-inch auger and a metal vise 
from William F. Bauer, florist, 
Baltimore; a horse collar, "Slo- 
cum's Indestructible," which was 
made without leather, and a pair 
of pruning shears made in the 
shop of Henry Stabler, given by 
his grandson, Svdnev S. Stabler 
(1910). 

Many more items have been 
offered but have not been ac- 
cepted until additional space can 
be found. There are still avail- 
able many farm implements which 
would make interesting displays 
and which will become increas- 
ingly hard to obtain. There is 
still space for small items such 
as wooden rakes, shovels, sickles 
but the larger ones must be held 
back at present. 

There are two other needs of 
the museum, which volunteer 
help can give, the establishment 
of a record file and the cleaning 
and repair of broken items. 

The Museum is open Monday 
to Friday. Visitors should con- 
tact Prof. Ray Carpenter, Guy 
Gienger, or other members of the 
Agricultural Engineering Depart- 
ment, Shriver Laboratory. 



May-June, 1957 



17 




By Phil Geraci, Instructor, 
Department of Journalism 



R Harrison Smith mopped the 
• prespiration from his brow 
and strolled into the classroom. 
It was nine a.m. and already the 
College Park air felt heavy. He 
glanced out of the window. The 
sky was cloudless, but not blue. 
Hanging over everything was a 
milky haze ; a warm, stifling cloud 
of moisture which bathed every- 
thing it touched. 

"It's going to be a corker," 
thought Smith. He opened his 
notebook. Turning to the tee- 
shirted student at his elbow he 
asked, "What's the weather re- 
port?" 

"Rain, I think." 



Summer Sess 



"Boy, I hope so. I couldn't sleep 
at all last night. I turned on the 
fan but it only blew hot air 
around. How was it out your 
way?" 

"The same. I hope that storm 
comes." 

Smith, of course, is fictitious. 
The name, that is. But he is a 
personification of the thousands 
of Maryland graduates and un- 
dergraduates who forego summer 
vacations or summer jobs and be- 
come, instead, summer students. 

The topic of conversation is 
typical. It arises every morning 
in the humid classrooms which 
dot the University campus. The 
weather is no joke, but a subject 
of genuine concern during the six 
weeks of June and July when 
the doors of the campus are open. 
Yet the very nature of its per- 
plexity serves as a bond between 
students who find in this com- 
mon denominator the relaxed, in- 
formal relationship which makes 
the summer program unique. 

Just what is Summer School? 
Basically, and insofar as scholarly 
aspects are concerned, it is a 
15-week fall or spring semester 
crowded into a six-week period 
which falls roughly between the 
middle of June and the end of 
July. The same number of class- 
room hours pertinent during the 
winter — for example, three hours 
of credit assigned to a transcript 
will demand 45 hours of class- 
room attendance — prevail in sum- 
mer. But since the semester is 
shorter, classes are called at the 
hurry-up tempo of eight per week 
for every three which meet week- 
ly in winter. 



18 



The Maryland Magazine 



Who goes to Summer School? 
Any student — if we assume an 
absence of mitigating circum- 
stances — may attend. It is not 
inconceivable for an entire semes- 
ter to be sliced from a collegiate 
program by the energetic student 
who attends three consecutive 
summer sessions. 

The preponderence of summer 
matriculation, however, probably 
falls to the elementary and high 
school teacher who works piece- 
meal on a graduate degree by 
persistent, summer after summer, 
attendance. On and off-campus 
enrollment last year was 3,890. 
Of this total, 1,093 were enrolled 



College Park 



in the Graduate School, 523 in 
Education, 323 in Arts and 
Sciences, 287 in BPA, 209 in En- 
gineering, 112 in Military Sci- 
ence, 58 in Agriculture, 49 in 
Physical Education, 34 in Home 
Economics and 9 in Nursing. 
Some 1,193 students were en- 
rolled in SCS courses. 

Summer Session is ably admin- 
istered by Dr. Vernon E. Ander- 
son, Dean of the College of Ed- 
ucation. Serving as Assistant 
Director of Sumer Session is en- 
ergetic Dr. Orval L. Ury. Dr. 
Ulry says of this year's program : 
"To better serve those who de- 
sire summer study, the Univer- 
sity of Maryland Summer Session 
affords opportunities to two ma- 
jor groups : first, to the profes- 
sional men and women for addi- 
tional work in their chosen fields ; 
and second, to college students 
for meeting requirements toward 
graduation. This summer, special 
emphasis has been placed upon 
broadening both the variety and 
the extent of offerings especially 
at the graduate level throughout 
the various colleges and depart- 
ments on the campus. Summer 
offerings include institutes, work- 
shops, conferences, short courses, 
and a lecture series in addition 
to a large number and variety of 
regularly scheduled offerings. 
These offerings are conducted on 
the same high plane that prevails 
during the regular fall and spring 
semesters." 

It's not all work of course. 
Mindful of the oppressive sum- 
mer heat, University planners 
thoughtfully scheduled summer 



classes for the relatively cooler 
morning hours only. A more 
scholarly appreciation of this ar- 
rangement would allocate after- 
noons to study ami research, and 
so it must he for many who rush 
to keep abreast of the speeded- 
up tempo. 



T, 



he College of Physical Edu- 
cation, Recreation and Health 

masterminds the summer recrea- 
tion program. Under the experi- 
enced guidance of genial, robust 
Dr. Ellen Harvey — herself a 
recreation director of long stand- 
ing — the Recreation and Social 
Activities Committee organizes 
softball and tennis tournaments, 
swimming, outdoor movies, sum- 
mer theater workshops, dances, 
band concerts, guided tours of 
Washington, chapel vesper ser- 
vices and a summer chorus. Rill 
Hoff, the hospitable director of 
the Student Union, lends a hand 
by opening the doors of his off- 
duty palace to summer loungers 
for movies, dances and the like, 
a menu which will never replace 
classes, but well may serve to 
make them more palatable. 

Counselling by the recreation 
director never stops with planned 
itineraries. Small groups often 
arrange for picnics, bicycling or 
what have you, the impromptu 
what-shall-we-do sort of thing 
which is seldom scheduled yet 
must always be anticipated. 

Almost every major depart- 
ment of the University schedules 
at least one course during the 
summer. Of particular interest 
to undergraduates are the general 
courses — in Botany, Chemistry, 
Bacteriology, and related fields — 
which are essential to their cur- 
ricula yet often are difficult to 
schedule during the winter sem- 
esters. A few departments — for 
instance, Journalism & Public Re- 
lations — close shop during the 
summer, although individuals on 
a twelve-month teaching basis 
must remain in the department 
until August. 

Like the Graduate School, the 
College of Education rolls out the 
welcome mat and shines with a 
knowledeable luster as teachers 
from all parts of the State become 
students again and pour into Col- 
lege Park. 

Dr. George W. Denemark is 
the tall, polished, deep voiced As- 
sistant Dean of the College of 
Education. This spring he sat in 
his bright, modern office in the 
Skinner Building and proudly ex- 



plained a new -iminier program 
which he hopes will extend the 

prestige of the University in this 
country as the CSCS program has 

done overseas. 

"It's essentially a guest lecture 

series," lie said, "in which t he 

speakers are nationally prominent 
figures in education. The pro- 
gram, known as the 'Lecture 

Series on Problems and Trends 
in Contemporary American Edu- 
cation" will be kicked (.if by Dr. 
Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., State 
Superintendent of Schools, on 

-June 26 with a lecture titled 
'Educational Issues in Maryland 

Today.' 

"Then on July 29. .Mr. William 
Brish, Superintendent for Wash- 
ington County, will explain some 
of the ramifications of his tele- 
vision teaching experiment in 

Hagerstown. That one should be 

of interest to parents and edu- 
cators throughout the nation. 

"In addition, we'll have Prof. 
.Marie Rasey, from Wayne State 
University; Prof. Guy Johnson, 
from North Carolina; Mr. .lames 
L. McCaskill, from the National 
Education Association; and many 
others. 

"We intend it to be a program 
similar to one which was insti- 
tuted at Syracuse last year and 
which was eminently successful. 
We have hopes of publishing the 
texts of the lectures in a consoli- 
dated form later in the year, if 
interest warrants." 



D, 



r. Denemark smiled. "One of 
the outstanding features of the 
program lies in the fact that the 
lectures will be open to all stu- 
dents attending Summer School. 
The time of the lectures has been 
set at 1 to 3 p.m., Monday and 
Wednesdays, so that all students 
may attend. We hope to arouse 
a feeling of comraderie among 
summer students. 

"Of course, education majors 
may register for the course — it's 
Education 190 — and participate 
in discussion groups which will 
meet at 11 a.m. and which will 
be conducted by members of our 
own faculty." 

Dr. Denemark ruffled through 
the notes on the gleaming, for- 
mica table in his draped office. 
"One other thing of interest." he 
said with a twinkle. "The lec- 
tures will be held in Physics 115. 
It's air conditioned, you know." 

The program so enthusiasti- 
cally explained by Dr. Denemark 
is but one of a multitude of in- 



May'June, 1957 



19 



teresting though unrelated work- 
shops which will take place dur- 
ing the warm summer months 
at College Park. 

A Workshop in Human De- 
velopment will study children and 
youth, analyze case records, delve 
into factors relating to youth 
leadership and teacher education. 
The emphasis will be on human 
growth and development. 

An indoctrination and refresh- 
er course for teachers who have 
never taught elementary school 
or who have been inactive for a 
number of years will be held 
weekdays from 9 a.m. to Noon. 

National concern over the omi- 
nous dearth of science devotees 
and engineering graduates in col- 
leges has resulted in vigorous 
methods to spark scientific inter- 
est among elementary and secon- 
dary school students. At least two 
workshops directly relating to sci- 
ence teaching have been planned 
for the summer months. 

A "Workshop on the Improve- 
ment of Science Teaching", spon- 
sored by the National Science 
Teachers Association, the West 
Virginia Pulp and Paper Company 
and the University, will select 
forty junior and senior high 
school teachers, study the role of 
the science teacher in helping to 
guide young minds into the chan- 
nels of science and "science-re- 
lated areas." 

Another workshop — an Insti- 
tute for Teachers of Science and 
Mathematics — will be sponsored 
by the National Science Founda- 
tion and the College of Arts and 



Sciences, Agriculture, Education 
and The Graduate School. The 
Institute will offer up to six sem- 
ester hours graduate credit; will 
cover the biological sciences, 
mathematics and physical sci- 
ences. Laboratory demonstra- 
tions, lectures, and field trips will 
bring teachers up to date with 
science and industry. It is hoped 
that participants will also elect 
study in a number of other course 
offerings recomended by the Insti- 
tute. Specifically urged are courses 
in advanced mathematics, elec- 
tronics, physics, bacteriology, bot- 
any, chemistry, zoology and re- 
lated fields. 

Fifty selected participants will 
receive a stipend of $75 per week, 
$15 for each dependent up to four, 
mileage allowance to College 
Park, in addition to tuition and 
fees. This has been made possible 
through a grant from the Na- 
tional Science Foundation. 

The College of Special and Con- 
tinuation Studies, which directs 
the "Global campus" with exten- 
sion courses in Europe and the 
Far East, also is the local bureau 
which supervises the administra- 
tion of short seminai*s and insti- 
tutes in varying fields. Each year, 
under the guidance of Mr. Richard 
Stottler and the Institutes Divi- 
sion of CSCS, the University 
brings to College Park special in- 
terest groups who immerse them- 
selves in a consolidated and en- 
forced study and discussion period 
which may range over a week or 
more. A number of conferences 
repeat, year after year. 



The Cosmetology Institute will 
meet this summer for the ninth 
straight time, bringing together 
hairdressers, dermatologists, cos- 
metic chemists and artists in a 
joint meeting which has the best 
interests of personal grooming 
uppermost in mind. 



A 



four-day "Transportation In- 
stitute" late in June will serve 
bus drivers, transportation super- 
visors, teachers and principals 
concerned with pupil transporta- 
tion, the possibility of establish- 
ing state-wide policies regarding 
school bus operation is a topic 
which will occupy the attention 
of participants in small-group 
work sessions this year. State 
and national consultants on trans- 
portation problems will be in at- 
tendance for consultation. 

An Institute of Acarology will 
bring together entomologists, par- 
asitologists, zoologists and ad- 
vanced students of biology in a 
study of mites and ticks. The In- 
stitute will include lectures, lab- 
oratory and field work during its 
two week span. 

The summer program in College 
Park is a unique experience. The 
staid, formal regimen of the win- 
ter program relaxes into an in- 
formal, easy relationship of 
friendly discussion. Neckties and 
jackets become almost passe. The 
voices of instructors often mix 
with the steady drone of recipro- 
cating fans. 

It will be hot, but summer time 
is a pleasant time on the Uni- 
versity of Maryland campus. 




UNIVERSITY SPORTS 



By JOE BLAIR 
Sports Editor 



Basketball Team 
Places Second In ACC 
Play; Watch Out For 
The Terps Next Year 

In the past few years, many per- 
sons have said that the Wash- 
ington-Baltimore area was not a 
basketball section. "People just 
won't come out to see basketball," 
was typical of the remarks. But 
these critics have been forced to 
take back their opinions since 
February 5. 

It was on this night that 14,000 
rabid basketball fans tramped 
through rain and snow to the Cole 
Field House to watch the Mary- 
land-North Carolina game. The 
Tarheels were the top-ranked 
team in the Nation and expected 
to add the Terps to their list of 
victims with ease. They found 
the going rough, for Bud Milli- 
kan's scrappy five came closer 
than any other team on the Caro- 
lina schedule to beating them. The 
Terps were four points ahead 
with two minutes to play and the 
biggest upset of the year appeared 
imminent. But national cham- 
pions as they were, the Blue and 
White from Chapel Hill tied the 
score then kept their poise to win 
65-61 in a double overtime. Only 
in the NCAA tournament against 
Michigan State and Kansas, both 
highly ranked fives, were the Tar- 
heels so extended. The 14,000 
"basketball fans" went away limp 
but pleased. They will be back 
next season. The Associated Press 
confirmed our report that this 
was the largest basketball crowd 
during the regular season on the 
East Coast, and throughout South 
and Southwest. Only in the mam- 
moth Big Ten gymnasiums and 
the field houses of Kansas and 




Perry Moore, Maryland center {i~>), jumps to tup John 

Naritwik's (33) rebound in for two points in tin first period of 

the thrill-packed MaryahuL-North Carolina (/nine. Other* in 

the picture are Jim Halleck (4-4) of Maryland and !'< U 

Brennan (35) and Joe Quigg (44) of the Tarheels. 



May-June, 1957 



21 



Kansas State were the Terps' 
outdone by larger crowds, a trib- 
ute to Millikan and his team and 
certainly the basketball fans 
which this area was not supposed 
to have. 

For the seventh consecutive 
year, Millikan, the former Okla- 
home A&M All-American, had a 
winning season for Maryland. 
The regular season mark was 
15-9 and 1G-10 following the 
Atlantic Coast Conference Tour- 
nament. The Terps finished sec- 
ond in the ACC race behind the 
champion Tarheels. 

Millikan's achievements at 
Maryland, recognized nationally, 
have brought an invitation and 
acceptance for the Red and White 
to play in the annual Sugar Bowl 
Tournament in New Orleans over 
the Christmas Holidays of 1957. 
The other three teams selected by 
the Sugar Bowl committee are 
Loyola of New Orleans, Memphis 
State, runnerup to Bradley for 
the NIT title, and Vanderbilt, 
runnerup to Kentucky for the 
Southeastern crown this past sea- 
son. 



T, 



hings are looking up for the 
Terps next season. Stimulated 
by the best and "biggest" fresh- 
man team he has had in his 
seven campaigns, Millikan lost 
only one regular from this year's 
team which he has called the best 
team he has had at Maryland. 
Captain Bob O'Brien, the top 
scorer and team leader will grad- 
uate and the only other graduate 
will be reserve Bob Herdiman. 
Returning will be such stars as 
Nick Davis, John Nacincik, Perry 
Moore, Jim Halleck, all from the 
first five, along with the promis- 
ing Gene Danko, Bill Murphy, 
Doc Weingarten, and Wayne Mc- 
Ginnis. The encouraging aspect 
of what to look for next season 
will be the "big men" from this 
year's yearlings who posted a 
10-2 mark and went over the 100- 
point total in three games. 

Leading the frosh was Al 
Bunge, a real fine prospect at 
G-8. Bunge, the high scorer, could 
help Millikan win a lot of games. 
Other newcomers that started are 
6-9 center Bob Wilson; 6-7 for- 



ward Bob McDonald; 6-6 guard 
Charles McNeil, and 6-2 guard 
Jerry Shannahan. The little 6-2 
floor leader and play maker was 
second high scorer and indications 
are that he will also be a man 
to watch next season. Clay Smith, 
6-5, is another fine prospect. He 
came through with 32 points 
against Fort Belvoir to take 
single game scoring honors for 
the year. A boy nobody heard 
from this winter since he was a 
February, 1956 enrollee and not 
able to play for the frosh is Jerry 
Bechtle, a great star from Eliza- 
beth, N.J., and a cousin of Hal- 
leck. Millikan believes him to be 
one of the greatest shots he has 
seen and a definite candidate for 
first team. If all this doesn't 
seem enough, Millikan was given 
an added lift with the return 
from the Service of a star of two 
years ago, Tom Young. He is 
another whom he thinks will make 
a strong bid for a starting assign- 
ment. 

The 1957-58 schedule will" be 
completed at the May meeting of 
the Conference. 



K rouse's Wrestling 
Team Wins Fourth 
Consecutive ACC Title 
With 6-3 Season 

For the fourth consecutive 
year, Coach William E. "Sully" 
Krouse's mat team has won the 
Championship of the Atlantic 
Coast Conference. Closing out 
the season with a lop-sided 26-8 
victory over Duke, the Krouse- 
men kept their record clean of 
never having lost a Conference 
match since the birth of the new 
league four years ago. 

Co-Captains John McHugh, 123- 
pounder, and heavyweight Mike 
Sandusky, along with sophs Ray 
Ilaney, Nick Bondi, and Dick 
Dean led the team to its clean 
slate against Conference competi- 
tion and to good showings against 
strong Pitt, Penn State, and Navy. 
In the Conference meet at the 
University of Virginia, seven 
Terps won individual titles. They 
included : McHugh, Haney, Rod- 
ney Norris, Biondi, Sal Amato, 
Dean, and Cliff Matthews. Nor- 
ris was voted the outstanding 
wrestler of the tournament. 



Eight men were entered in the 
NCAA championships at the Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh. Only Mc- 
Hugh and Sandusky advanced 
after the initial rounds. Both 
then were eliminated in the semi- 
finals. 



1956-57 Final Ii 


idividiial 


Wrestling Su 


II ill :i II. ■> 














IN ACC TOURNEY 


Regular Season 


Won 


Lost 


Draw 


Won 


Lost 


Draw 


115-Pound: Tony Toston 


1 


1 








1 





*123-Pound: John McHugh 


6 





1 


4 








*130-Pound: Ray Haney 


6 


3 





3 








**137-Pound: Rodney Norris 


5 


2 





4 








*147-Pound: Nick Biondi 


5 


2 





4 








*157-Pound: Sal Amato 


1 








3 








*167-Pound: Dick Dean 


7 


1 





3 








*177-Pound: Cliff Matthews 





3 





3 








191-Pound: Joe Dougherty 


1 








1 


1 





Hvy. : Mike Sandusky 


5 


1 


1 





1 






* — Atlantic Coast Conference Champions. 
** — Atlantic Coast Sonference Outstanding Wrestler Award Winners. 

Season's Overall Record: Won: G — Lost: 3 
ACC Record: Won: 5— Lost: 



Scores Of Season Matches 



Maryland 25 


Virginia 


9 


Maryland 24 


4 


Pitt 


26 


34 


11 


Penn State 


17 


9 


34 


NC State 





26 


26 


VMI 


5 





NC 6 

Wake Forest 

Navy 15 

Duke 8 



22 



The Maryland Magazine 




Ernie Fischer, former Mary- 
land 177-pound Conference 
wrestling champion, now a First 
Lieutenant in the Air Corps, was 
the second University represent- 
ative to appear in the Olympics. 
Rifleman Arthur Cook took honors 
in the 1'JbS Games. 



University of Maryland wrestling 

team that won the fourth 

Atlantic Coast Championship in 

in a row this winter. 

Left to right: Tony Toston, Ray 

Honey, Nick Biondi, Sal Amato, 

Dick Dean, Cliff Matthews, Joe 

Dougherty, and Mike Sandusky. 

Missing from the picture is 

John McHugh, 123-pound titlist. 




Stupe Shields, top Maryland diver, 
promises to be a etand-OUt an 
Coach Campbell's 1958 inter- 
collegiate swimming team. 



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Burr Grim Sparkles; 
Trackmen Win 
Indoor Title 

The big news all winter, not 
only locally, but nationally, was 
the running of Maryland's great 
distance man, miler Burr Grim, 
pictured in the March-April issue 
of The Maryland Magazine. The 
slender Virginian competed in 
eight top meets throughout the 
country and gave an amazing 
account of himself. Although he 
didn't win any of the efforts (and 
wasn't supposed to), he estab- 
lished himself as one of the Na- 
tion's top future milers. His fine 
performances in New York, Bos- 
ton, and Chicago brought the Uni- 
versity a great deal of fine pub- 
licity. Villanova's Ron Delaney, 
winner of the miles in which 
Grim ran, said the Terp was the 
best he has run against. 

The Terps won the Atlantic 
Coast Conference indoor title held 
at North Carolina for the second 
consecutive year. Jim Kehoe's 
team came up with six individual 
titles. 



TRACK SUMMARIES 

Broad Jump — Robert Laberty, Duke; 
Eddie Lloyd, Maryland; Edward Braw- 
ley, North Carolina; Mike Miller, North 
Carolina State. 21 feet, 1% inches. 



Shot Put — Ed Coocke, Maryland; 
Larry Steer, Duke: Nick Leras, Mary- 
land; Harold Outten, Virginia. 50 feet, 
7% inches. 

High Jump — Tie between George 
Hogan and Ton Tait, both Maryland; 
tie between James Booher, Maryland, 
and Max Philips, North Carolina State. 
6 feet, 3 inches. 



Two-Mile Relay— Maryland (West, 
Hardee, Wagner Steckel); Clemson; 
North Carolina State; Virginia. 8:20.3. 



.Mile — Jim Beatty, North Carolina; 
Burr Grim, Maryland; Everett What- 
ley, North Carolina; H. D. Tinsley, 
Clemson. 4:1(J.9. 



60- Yard Dash— Dave Sime, Duke; 
Larry Salmon, Maryland; John Elder, 
Duke; Steve Scheck," Maryland. 6.3. 

70-Yard High Hurdles— Jim Star- 
board, Maryland; J. R. Steedley, Clem- 
Bon; Elliott Thompson, Maryland; tie 
between W. C. Simmons, Clemson and 
Duncan, Maryland. 8:6. 



600-yard Run — Dave Leas, Maryland; 
Jess Peter, Maryland; Richard McFad- 
din Jr., North Carolina; Jim Cathcart, 
South Carolina. 1:18.1. 



24 



The Maryland Magazine 



Two mile — Jim Beatty, North Caro- 
lina; Burr Grim, Maryland; Wayne 
Bishop, North Carolina; James Whatlev 
South Carolina. !)::i2.()2. 



One-mile relay — North Carolina (Wil- 
liams. Sylvester, McFaddin, Scurlock) ; 
Maryland; North Carolina State; Vir- 
ginia. :(:29.9. 



800-yard run— David Scurlock, North 
Carolina; Carl Party, Maryland; Ben 
Williams, North Carolina; Howard 
Khahn, North Carolina. 1:57.1. 



70-yard low hurdles -Jim Starboard, 

Maryland; Larry Salmon, Maryland 
Elliott Thompson, Maryland; Jack Lin- 
den, Duke. :8.7. 



Pole vault — Henry Davenport, Vir- 
ginia; Jess Peter, Duke; Clarence 
Roberts, Virginia; tie between Conway 
Snipes, South Carolina, and George 
Murman, Maryland. 13 feet. 



Swimmers Sharpen 
For Next Year's Meets 

Maryland's first intercollegiate 
swimming team, coached by Bill 
Campbell gave, as Campbell put 
it, a much better account of itself 
than expected. The Terp nata- 
tors finished fourth in the Con- 
ference behind perennial power- 
ful North Carolina, North Caro- 
lina State, and Duke. They had a 
4-3 mark in Conference meets 
and a 5-6 overall mark. 

Campbell believes he had a good 
nucleus for his first team and will 
oe much stronger next winter. 
Leading the Terp swimmers were 
iiver Step Shields ; George Lucey, 
jackstroke star ; John Bell, 
jreastroke; and Ray Ascherfeld, 
:rawl. 



SPRING SPORTS RESUME 
IN NEXT ISSUE 

Sports activity at the Uni- 
versity always picks up in the 
spring. Students and fans are 
treated with baseball, lacrosse, 
track, golf, tennis, and spring 
football. The next issue of 
The Maryland Magazine will 
carry a complete rundown of 
all the spring sports events at 
College Park. 



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'Blondes' Is Theater's 
Next Play; 'Hamlet' 
Draws 2,500 Playgoers 

The next regular play pre- 
sented by the University Theater 
will be "Gentlemen Prefer 
Blondes," smash hit on Broadway 
for several seasons. 

The play will run April 26, 27, 
30 through May 4 and will in- 
clude in its cast Miss Margo Lucy, 
second runner-up for the crown 
of Miss America in Atlantic City 
last year. Miss Margo will play 
the role of "Dorothey." 

Performances will begin at 8 
p.m. sharp and extend to about 
11 p.m. All seats are $1.50 and 
may be purchased from the De- 
partment of Speech, College Park. 

"Hamlet," the play just con- 
cluded by the players, draw ap- 
proximately 2,500 persons to 
its performances. 

Veteran University Theater 
performer Robert Milli was fea- 
tured in the title role. Milli, a 
senior from Dundalk, Md., has 
had several top roles including 
leads in "Finian's Rainbow" and 
"The Crucible." 

Last summer he was active in 
the University's Summer The- 
ater Workshop in which he di- 
rected "Picnic" and played the 
leads in "Stalag 17," "Mr Rob- 
erts," and "Arms and the Man." 

In the role of Ophelia was 
another University Theater vet- 
eran, Janet Shipley, who has had 
roles in "Summer and Smoke," 
"Outward Bound," " Volpone" 
and "The Importance of Being 
Earnest." Miss Shipley, a junior 
from Linthicum, Md., has also 
appeared with the Vagabond The- 
ater group in Baltimore and the 
Community Players in Glen Bur- 
nie. 

Bob Gunther, a newcomer to 
the University of Maryland stage, 
played the role of Claudius. Bob, 
a senior from Catonsville, Md., 
is an announcer-disc jockey at 
Station WCAO in Baltimore 
where he broadcasts under the 
professional name of Bob Granger. 

Another neophyte to collegiate 
acting is Judy Neumann, of Sil- 
ver Spring, Md., who appealed as 
Gertrude. Miss Neumann's only 
previous theatrical experience 
was in the part of Mrs. Birling in 



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26. 



The Maryland Magazine 



" An Inspector Calls," a theatre- 
in-the-round production staged by 
Milli earlier this year. 

Bernard Stopak, a sophomore 
from Washington, D. C, played 
Horatio. Stopak's only other role 
at the University was in the part 
of Henry in "Outward Hound." 

Joe Maratta, Jr., of Hyattsville, 
Md., appeared as Laertes. Maratta 
has had roles in the "Male Ani- 
mal" and "Dear Ruth" at Mary- 
land. While with the U. S. Army 
in Germany he was featured in a 
service production of "Light Up 
The Sky." 

The play was directed by James 
Byrd of the Speech Department. 



Chemistry Awarded 
$29,550 Air Force Grant 

A grant of $29,550 has been 
made to the University's De- 
partment of Chemistry by the Air 
Force for the study of a new class 
of compounds, developed at the 
University, which have a high 
ability to absorb high energy 
radiation. 

The research study will be 
under the direction of Dr. Forrest 
Woods, Professor of organic 
chemistry, in collaboration with 
Dr. Carl Rollinson, Professor of 
inorganic chemistry. 

Technically known as poly- 
phenyls, the compounds are the 
result of research begun in 1950 
by Dr. Woods. 

According to Dr. Woods, all 
substances are destroyed to some 
degree upon absorption of high 
energy radiation. 

"As an example, it is common 
knowledge that normal light rays 
of the sun will break down color 
in cloth and result in color fad- 
ing," he said. 

"Thus, if the rays are more 
powerful," he declared, "the de- 
struction of the substance by high 
energy radiation is many times 
greater and normally the sub- 
stance will be completely changed 
in chemical nature and state. 

"We have found that poly- 
phenyls remain remarkably stable 
when bombarded with the rays of 
high energy sources," he con- 
cluded. 

The grant calls for the study 
of the absorption of gamma rays, 
x-ray and ultra violet light; and 
the changes and causes of 
changes in molecular structure of 



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the polyphenyls resulting from 
radiation. 

The two University professors 
will also attempt to determine 
those factors which lead to great- 
er radiation stability. 

Dr. Woods holds a B.A. degree 
from Northwestern University 
and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in 
organic chemistry from Harvard 
University. He was a member of 
the Harvard faculty until 1945, 
at which time he came to the 
University of Maryland. 

Dr. Rollinson came to the Uni- 
versity of Maryland in 1946, from 
the Monsanto Chemical Corpora- 
tion. He holds a B.S. degree from 
the University of Michigan and 
a Ph.D. degree in organic chem- 
istry from the University of 
Illinois. 



Ambassador Bruce Is 
Commencement Speaker 

David K. E. Bruce, recently ap- 
pointed U. S. Ambassador to the 
Federal Republic of Germany, will 
be the principal speaker at the 
University's Overseas Program 
Commencement to be held in Hei- 
delberg, Germany, May 25. Over 
100 students of Maryland's Euro- 
pean Division of the Overseas 
Program will receive their diplo- 
mas during the ceremony. 

Mr. Bruce, 59, was born in 
Maryland and attended the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Law School. 
A member of Maryland's House 
of Delegates, Mr. Bruce later 
served in important positions in 
the Administrations of Presidents 
Roosevelt, Truman, and Eisen- 
hower. 

During World War II he was 
an official with the Office of Stra- 
tegic Services following which he 
was appointed Assistant Secre- 
tary of Commerce. In 1949-1952 
he was the U. S. Ambassador to 
France. Soon after he began his 
first term, President Eisenhower 
appointed Mr. Bruce as the special 
U. S. Representative to the Euro- 
pean Coal and Steel Community. 

The University of Maryland's 
Overseas Program is designed pri- 
marily to meet the higher educa- 
tional needs of American service- 
men stationed in overseas areas. 
Offering courses at over 200 over- 
seas centers, nearly 20,000 stu- 
dents enroll each year in its 
classes. 



Chinese Student 
Expresses Gratitude 

A story of how a kindness ex- 
tended to a Chinese student dur- 
ing his attendance at the Uni- 
versity which resulted in the for- 
mation of a small student help 
fund, has come from the desk of 
Dr. Adolf A. Zucker, Professor 
and Head of the Department of 
Foreign Languages. 

"Some years ago," says Dr. 
Zucker, "when I was advisor to 
the Chinese students, my duties 
consisted chiefly of checking with 
the State Department in regard 
to which of these exiles from 
Communist China deserved aid 
from the $1.5 million Congress 
had voted for the Chinese strand- 
ed in our universities. A small 
number had private means, but the 
majority were absolutely cut off 
from contact with their parents 
or other sources of support. In 
the course of two years my re- 
spect for the Chinese increased 
considerably, despite two persons 
who attempted to graft by hiding 
their independent resources. 

"In the summer of 1953 there 
came to my office one of our best 
Chinese students who was living 
with his wife and a four-year-old 
son on the State Department al- 
lowance. Very shyly he told me 
that he had severe trouble with 
his eyes, he couldn't focus prop- 
erly and could read no more than 
a few minutes without contract- 
ing a violent headache. He was 
within a year of receiving his 
Doctoral degi'ee, but was now un- 
able to do any reading at the 
very time when he needed to work 
hardest. In view of the fact that 
neither the Government nor the 
University had funds with which 
to help him and that even his 
stipend would be cancelled unless 
he were continuing as a student, 
he was in a desperate situation 
indeed. 

"However it was possible by 
special pleas to secure some funds 
from a Chinese foundation in 
California, from the local Rotary 
Club, from the Men's Group of 
the Episcopal Church, and from a 
few individuals — all with the pro- 
viso that this was a special case 
and really not our proper func- 
tion. A friendly Washington 
ophtholmologist performed the 
operation for a nominal fee and 
after due hospitalization the stu- 
dent was able to resume his work, 



28 



The Maty land Magazine 



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securing his degree in the follow- 
ing June. 

"At Christmas time last year 

this student sent me a letter en- 
closing a cheek for a $100 to he 
used to help foreign students in 

special need. With deep gratitude 

to the various donors he wrote 
that now. after he had secured a 
good job in a city in Pennsylvania, 
he felt he should do something 
to give a needed assist to others 
who might find themselves help- 
less just as he had. At the direc- 
tion of President Elkins, a special 
loan fund has now been set up 
with the $100 from this former 
student plus some smaller gifts 
that have been received since. 
Prof. Furman A. Bridgers, Assis- 
tant Professor of Foreign Lan- 
guages, Assistant Dean of Men 
and Foreign Student Advisor, is 
empowered to make small loans to 
students who while far from home 
are in sudden need. Anyone who 
would like to do a kindness to 
strangers within our gates may 
now do so by sending a contribu- 
tion to our Foreign Student Loan 
Fund." 



Clinical Psychology 
Internship Program 
Approved By APA 

In its first published list of 
internship facilities, the Ameri- 
can Psychological Association has 
given approval to University Hos- 
pital's clinical psychology pro- 
gram. 

The program is under the direc- 
tion of Dr. Lester Libo, Chief 
Psychologist in the University's 
Institute of Psychiatry. 

The only approved clinical psy- 
chology internship center between 
New York and North Carolina, it 
offers services to patients of all 
ages and types on both an in- 
patient and out-patient basis. 

Only twenty-six other institu- 
tions in the United States appear 
on the APA approved list. Clinics 
and hospitals of the Veterans Ad- 
ministration are to be evaluated 
in the future and the present list 
includes only those agencies who 
have made application for ap- 
proval. 

The University of Maryland 
program is supported by a train- 
ing grant from the U. S. Public 




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To you, the new alumni of the University of Maryland 
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Health Service and at the present 
time provides two internships 
each year. 

The candidate for the Ph.D. de- 
gree in clinical psychology from 
an APA approved university must 
complete a one-year internship as 
part of his four-year program of 
graduate study. 

Assisting Dr. Libo in the in- 
ternship program are Drs. Ben- 
jamin Pope and Ralph Dunlap, 
staff psychologists ; and Drs. Mar- 
garet Rioch of Chestnut Lodge 
Sanitarium, and Margaret Thaler 
of the Walter Reed Army Medical 
Center, consultants. 

Dr. Jacob Finesinger is Director 
of the University's Psychiatric 
Institute. 



Surburban Counties 
Set Pace For 
Population, Income 

Maryland income and popula- 
tion continues to concentrate in 
the suburban areas surrounding 
the cities of Washington, D. C. 
and Baltimore, according to the 
University's Bureau of Business 
and Economic Research. 

Personal Income in Maryland 
Counties, 1951-1955, just pub- 
lished by the Bureau, reports 
highest per capita income in 
Montgomery County ($2,230), 
followed by Baltimore City, Bal- 
timore County, Prince Georges 
County and Anne Arundel County. 

At the low end of the income 
scale is St. Mary's County with a 
per capita income of $990 in 
1955. In general, low per capita 
incomes were reported for the 
southern and Eastern Shore 
counties. 

The Bureau estimates that the 
total State population was in- 
creased by 380,000 persons, from 
the 2,364,055 reported in 1950 
to 2,744,014 reported in 1955. 
All Eastern Shore counties ex- 
cept Wicomico section of the 
State, Allegany County lost 
20,000 persons and Garrett Coun- 
ty, 4,876. 

Variation in county per capita 
income is primarily associated 
with factors of location, popula- 
tion, and sources of income. 
Therefore, while the overall 
trend of per capta income is 
strongly upward, twenty of the 
State's twenty-four counties have 
per capita incomes below the 
U.S. average for 1955. 

The Maryland Magazine 



The Bureau of Business and 
Economic Research operates 
within the College of Business 

and Public Administration and is 
under the direction of Dr. John 
H. Cover. 



Dr. Burdette Attends 
Iraqi Development Week 

Dr. Franklin L. Burdette, Pro- 
fessor and Director of the Bureau 
of Governmental Research, upon 
the invitation of the government 
of Iraq represented American 
education and the Council on Is- 
lamic Affairs at Iraq Development 
Week in Baghdad, March 23 to 30. 

At conferences in Baghdad and 
other centers, projects were in- 
augurated for the further develop- 
ment of modern Iraq. Among 
these are vocational schools and 
housing projects, drainage sta- 
tions, highways, factories, and an 
Iraq museum in Baghdad. 

The invitation to Dr. Burdette 
was extended on behalf of the 
Iraq government by Dr. Moussa 
Shabandar, Iraq Ambassador in 
Washington and a former Foreign 
Minister of Iraq who is a member 
of the Advisory Board of the 
Council on Islamic Affairs. 

Dr. Burdette, who is a Director 
of the Council on Islamic Affairs, 
served for two years while on 
leave of absence from the Uni- 
versity as head of the overseas 
book and cultural program of the 
Federal government, conducted 
by the U. S. Information Agency. 
He has been a member of the Uni- 
versity faculty since 1946, serving 
as Head of the Department of 
Government and Politics from 
1950 to 1954 and as Professor and 
Director of the Bureau since 1956. 
He is the author of books in the 
field of government and has also 
been a member of the faculty 
of Princeton University, which 
granted his Doctor's degree in 
1938. 

A native of West Virginia, Dr. 
Burdette was graduated from 
Marshall College in 1934 and re- 
ceived a Master's degree from the 
University of Nebraska in 1935. 
From 1940 to 1946 he was Ex- 
excutive Secretary of the Na- 
tional Foundation for Education 
in American Citizenship, Indian- 
apolis. 

Another guest of the Iraq 
government for the conferences 
was Niel Stanford, Washington 
correspondent for the Christian 
Science Monitor. 



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ART — Continued from Page 11. 
Martin 

freedom and encouragement to 
express myself (my parents were 
without artistic knowledge), be- 
ing allowed to attend the Uni- 
versity of Nebraska Saturday 
children's classes, consent given 
to leave home in order to attend 
full time classes at the Art In- 
stitute of Chicago, a year abroad 
where I could see the great Euro- 
pean museums. After this, it was 
clear I would follow my natural 
inclinations to become an artist. 

I settled in New York City 
where I painted, tried my hand 
at fashion sketching, wall paper 
and fabric designing, ballet cos- 
tume designing, thus widening 
the range of the artist's potential. 

I entered the service in 1941 
and soon found myself doing 
murals, lettering and poster-w^ork 
as well as being trained in camou- 
flage for war purposes. In my 
spare time I returned to pencil 
drawing and gouache studies, 
thus giving me the opportunity 
to exhibit in organized service- 
men's exhibitions, later to have 
one-man shows in London and 
Paris. 

My style of painting and the 
changes in it are linked to an in- 
terest in experimentation. From 
time to time, no doubt under the 
influence of a strong art person- 
ality, I have accepted new hori- 
zons to explore. Wanting to have 
an appreciation of all types of 
art, I have studied the old mas- 
ters and the primitive arts as 
well as following the modern mas- 
ters. After assimilating many 
styles, I have discovered my own 
style is toward abstraction, using 
simplification, design, color and 
line symbolically with emphasis 
on appealing to the inner eye in 
order to express my personal way 
of seeing. 

The painter functions in a so- 
ciety as a visual recorder of 
the mood of his time, sometimes 
as a decorator and creator of 
taste and fashion. 

The painter as a citizen, with 
his inquisitive, creative mind 
and experimental leanings, seeks 
for improvement and growth, 
thus speaking for his less creative 
brother. 

Of the paintings which The 
Mori/land Magazine will use to 
illustrate its article, I offer the 
following comment: 



32 



The Maryland Magazine 



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"Formal Portrait" is an at- 
tempt to stylize the human head 
in order to achieve a decorative, 
repetitive composition. 

"Landscape with Rocks" is in 
oil which was not painted in 
Colorado where I spend many of 
my summers. It is a scene of 
the Colorado country, painted 
from memory in my Baltimore 
studio. 

"Tower of Babel" was done 
during my spare time (U.S. Army 
Education — Paris) I managed to 
continue with my painting and 
drawing. This picture was in- 
cluded in my one-man exhibition 
at the Galerie Vendome — the first 
showing of an American since 
the occupation. 

"Twin Towers, Berlin". This 
the first picture I painted in my 
Berlin pension room. It repre- 
sents a bit of architecture I could 
see from my balcony, overlooking 
Potsdamerstrasse. 



ART — Continued from Page 10. 
Cox " 

Like all children who are given 
tools with which to work, I 
painted and wrote stories as far 
back as I can remember. As I 
had no siblings and my father 
had died when I was very young, 
perhaps I occupied myself more 
than the average child in this 
way in the quiet house of a 
cousin with whom my mother 
and I lived. Two of the gifts 
from that time which I remem- 
ber most clearly were a large 
and wonderful box of paints from 
my mother and a rather unusual 
gift from my cousin, a small piece 
of land about six by eight feet. 
This piece of land was at the far 
end of my cousin's garden, a 
long, narrow old-fashioned gar- 
den between high board fences, 
full of sweet violets, lilies of the 
valley, rose, phlox and pinks. 
There was a mimosa tree at the 
end beside my piece of land, and 
here I made my first garden. 
Everything that grew in it was 
wonderful to me, even the weeds 
and bugs, and I came to know, 
through it, the amazing variety 
of shape and color even a very 
small piece of earth could bring 
into being. For more than half 
the year it was barren, often cov- 
ered with snow and ice, but my 
memory always fills it with grow- 
ing things. 

When I was tw T elve my mother 
took me to Switzerland, where I 



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was put into a boarding school 
to learn French. I learned French 
and the pangs of homesickness. 
During the holidays we travelled 
and I saw the art galleries of 
Italy and Paris. These exper- 
iences are happier to me in retro- 
spect than they were at the time. 
I was awed by the great museums 
and dark churches and art to me 
was then something remote and 
incomprehensible. I continued 
to make my own paintings with 
childish satisfaction. 



B 



'y the time I was eighteen I 
began to think of art as a serious 
occupation. Unhappily the near- 
est art school was one of con- 
servatism and filled with a dull 
routine beginning with the draw- 
ing from casts and going on and 
on ... I stayed there for three 
years, but feeling that perhaps 
I did not like "art" after all. 

Then I had the unexpected joy 
of finding out that art was no 
routine matter, that painting was 
an adventure, a process of dis- 
covery for which there should be 
no end, that the necessary "dis- 
cipline" of the artist was to learn 
to establish an integrity of ap- 
proach toward whatever he did 
and to work toward finding and 
rendering his image of the world 
around him. This change came 
about during a summer in which 
I worked with Marguerite Zor- 
ach and where I met many young 
people full of belief in painting 
and in themselves. I knew then 
that I would always paint. 

At the time Clive Bell was the 
"modern" critic, and as I read 
about "significant form" and the 
work of Cezanne, Gauguin, Ma- 
tisse, I came to know how little 
I knew, or even imagined about 
the contemporary word of paint- 
ing. More and more I wanted 
to go to the source, Paris. This 
I did eventually and spent a year 
working in the studios of Othon 
Friesz and Fernand Leger. I 
was only one of hundreds of art 
students from many countries, 
each believing in his own particu- 
lar star. So many stars! On my 
return to America I worked alone 
but with long discussions with 
other young painters. They be- 
came my best friends and have 
remained so ever since — Janice 
Biala, Loren Maclver, Jack Twor- 
kov, and others — sometimes we 
gathered in the studio of Karl 
Knaths in Provincetown for dis- 
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The Maryland Magazine 



Shortly I was married and went 
to live in New York. My hus- 
band was a physicist, but with 
both talent and understanding of 
art. The first few summers we 
both painted. As our children, a 
boy and a girl, took more of my 
time, I painted when they slept 
or made drawings of them when- 
ever I could. I wanted a family, 
but for a while the painting time 
was very limited. When the Sec- 
ond World War came, fear hung 
over New York and Europe was 
closer and more important than 
the easel and canvas. At this 
time we moved to Baltimore and 
I began my first teaching of art. 
I worked for two years with the 
Red Cross at the Marine Hospital 
with ill and wounded men of all 
ages and from many countries. 
It was most rewarding and the 
work which came out surprising- 
ly interesting. A non-English 
speaking Sicilian, near sixty, com- 
pletely untaught, painted scenes 
of Naples and Sicily in small 
squares and rectangles of paint, 
almost like a pointillist. I won- 
dered about this technique and 
concluded that it came from mem- 
ories of mosaics in his native 
land. The churches there are 
famous for them. An Egyptian 
painted unreal but very "alive" 
animals leaping over his papers. 
A Haitian did imaginary still lifes 
of rich tropical fruits. There was 
an eighteen year old American 
boy who had run away from home 
and signed up on a freighter, who 
wanted to be a "Petruska." He 
tried to paint dancers. Always 
these men painted their own 
world or the one they wanted. 
Later when I taught eleven year 
olds it was the same. 

There was one very unhappy 
boy who painted "bad smells"; 
buses, glue works, the sewerage 
system in heavy browns, reds and 
blacks. 

Now in working with "aver- 
age" people (I have classes of 
young and old) I learn to know 
them by their paintings long be- 
fore I know their names. I be- 
lieve that painting, unless routin- 
ized, is just that revealing. 

To come back to my own, about 
which I was asked to write, I 
believe that within the last five 
years I have painted with both 
more freedom and assurance than 
before. I know better how to 
arrive at the expression I am 
seeking. My painting has become 
more abstract, more concerned 
with the fact of the flat surface 
of my canvas and the consistency 



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May-June, 1957 



35 



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of my paints. 1 am not a non- 
objective painter, as my canvases 
always have a beginning in a 
visual experience. 

I have been asked a number of 
times, "How do you begin a paint- 
ing?" I know very well how I do 
not begin. I do not set up an 
easel and paint what is in front 
of me. How I begin is far more 
tentative. I think it starts with 
a feeling which I want to make 
visible. Sometimes it takes me a 
long time to "see" this within my 
own mind ; sometimes it comes 
quickly. It may be started by 
color sensations from trees, hills, 
skies, water, streets — anything. 
It may be in the shape of small 
objects, stones, shells, feathers. 
Almost always the stimulus comes 
from outside, from the visual 
world around me. I was recently 
called "a nature painter." This is 
true, in that the beginning of my 
subject matter is nature. What 
I do with it, or a small part of 
it, becomes my own translation. 

My style has changed through- 
out my painting span, but always 
I think, because of the effort to 
do my own seeing. I have felt 
influences from the work of 
other painters, but I have known 
they were to be considered, not 
copied. I paint slowly, as a rule, 
and keep several canvases going, 
on which I paint for months. 
Occasionally I may repaint a 
whole canvas in two or three 
days, having learned through 
trial and error what I wanted 
to achieve. I build up my com- 
positions into a sort of architec- 
tural understructure. Much of 
this is lost, as is the framing of 
buildings when the building is 
completed. Like any artist, I am 
concerned with the balance of 
form and color, and I am con- 
tinually surprised by the beauty 
of line, and the possibilities of 
textures. 

I do not feel qualified to talk 
of the function of the artist in 
society. This is the field of the 
philosopher. I know only that the 
job of the artist is to render his 
own particular "seeing" as clear- 
ly as possible. 



Post Graduate Committee 
Presents Lectures 

The School of Medicine Post- 
Graduate Committee presented a 
day of lectures for the Maryland 
Academy of General Practice. Dr. 



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The Maryland Magazine 



Joseph Workman, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Medicine and Acting 
Head of the Division of Radio- 
Active Isotopes and Dr. Charles 
E. Shaw, Associate in Medicine, 
presented a lecture on endocri- 
nology. Hyptertension was the 
subject of a discussion by Dr. 
Samuel T. Revell, Jr., and Dr. 
Frances J. Borges, Associate in 
Medicine and Associate Head of 
the Hypertension Clinic. A lec- 
ture on diseases of the blood was 
given by Dr. Milton S. Sacks, Pro- 
fessor of Clinical Medicine and 
Head of the Division of Clinical 
Pathology. Another lecture was 
delivered on the subject of the 
paroxysmal tachycardias by Dr. 
Henry J. L. Marriott, Associate 
Professor of Medicine and Head 
of the Department of Physical 
Medicine. Four and one-half cred- 
it hours were allowed by the 
Academy of General Practice for 
lecture attendance. 

Dr. Hymens Receives 
Education Appointment 

Dr. James L. Hymens, Jr., has 
been appointed to direct the Uni- 
versity's Childhood Education 
Program and Nursery-Kinder- 
garten Laboratory School. 

Presently, a Professor of Edu- 
cation at the George Peabody 
College for Teachers, Nashville, 
Tenn., Dr. Hymens received his 
A.B. at Harvard College in 1934, 
majoring in international law 
and relations. He received the 
degree of M.A. in 1936 in child 
development from Teachers Col- 
lege, Columbia University and in 
1947, he earned his Ed.D., in 
childhood and parent education 
from the same institution. 

He served as associate execu- 
tive secretary and managing edi- 
tor for "Frontiers of American 
Democracy" for four years, and 
editor of "Progressive Education" 
for two years. From 1943 to 
1945, Dr. Hymens was manager 
of the child service department 
for Kaiser Company, Inc., of Port- 
land, Oregon. Since 1949, he has 
held his present position as pro- 
fessor of education at the George 
Peabody College. 

Besides numerous periodical 
articles and pamphlets, Dr. Hy- 
mens has published several books 
including "Understanding Your 
Child," (1952) ; "Effective Home- 
School Relations," (1953); "A 
Child Development Point of View" 
(1955) and "Behavior and Mis- 
behavior: A Teachers Guide to 
Action" (1955). 



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May- June, 1957 



37 



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88 



College of ■ 

Agriculture 

^^^^^^^^ Dr. Howard L. Stier 
Heads Cattle Association 

J. Homer Remsberg, '18, promi- 
nent Middletown dairyman 
was elected president of the Pure- 
bred Dairy Cattle Association of 
America at the 18th Annual Ses- 
sion of the Association held at 
the Lord Baltimore Hotel. Mr. 
Remsberg operates several dairy 
farms and enjoys an international 
reputation as a judge of pure- 
bred dairy cattle. He is current- 
ly President of the Maryland- 
Virginia Milk Producers Associa- 
tion and a past President of the 
Holstein-Friesian Association of 
America. Mr. Remsberg is active 
in the Alumni Association of the 
University. 



Elected to Academy 

Dr. Marvin L. Speck, '35, Pro- 
fessor of animal industry at 
North Carolina State College, has 
been elected a Fellow of the 
American Academy of Microbi- 
ology — highest professional hon- 
or in his field. The Academy's 
membership is composed of top- 
level microbiologists in all 
branches of science throughout 
the United States and Canada. 



Mullinix Cited 

Paul E. Mullinix, '36, Agricul- 
ture Alumni President, is fea- 
tured in the Alpha Gamma Rho 
magazine Sickle and Sheaf as an 
example of the opportunities 
available to all in a democracy. 
With Southern State Cooperative, 
he started with a job unloading 
feed from freight cars. He is 
now head of Management Ser- 
vices for the cooperative. The 
success story, prepared by fellow 
alumnus, A. B. Hamilton, con- 
cludes, "Mullinix's combination 
of ability, determination, and his 
continuous smile, coupled with 
his dedication to the principles of 
cooperation that he learned as a 
farm boy, have all aided him in 
his 20-year climb in the coopera- 
tive business." 



With Calspray 

James C. Nichol, '51, has been 
appointed Agricultural Specialist, 
Advertising Division of California 
Spray - Chemical Corporation, 




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The Maryland Magazine 



Richmond, California, In his new 
position, Nichol will be responsible 
for initial planning and prepara- 
tion of advertising materials, re- 
lating to insecticides, fungicides, 
and weed control products, manu- 
factured by Calspray and mar- 
keted throughout the world. 

At Plattsburgh 

Henry A. Sohn, '48, is presently 
stationed at Plattsburgh Air 
Force Base in New York and is 
assigned to a H-47 bomber crew 
as the Navigator-Bombardier. The 
Sohns have three children, Aug- 
ust, David and Edith. 

Ice Cream Honors 

The Ice Cream Cup, first place 
award in the Ice Cream Division 
of the 22nd Collegiate Students' 
International Contest in Judging 
Dairy Products, was won by the 
student judging team from the 
University of Maryland in At- 
lantic City, New Jersey. The team 
members were, Ronald Sapping- 
ton, Lloyd Ludy, Wilton Zaiser, 
and were coached by Harold A. 
Newlander. Ronald Sappington 
was also honored with the first 
place individual award in the con- 
test, and was presented a Gruen 
watch. 



College of 



Arts and Sciences 



Lois Eld Ernest 



Presides At Sessions 

Mrs. Mary French Kemble, In- 
structor and adviser in music 
education and Chairman of the 
Committee on Curriculum of Mus- 
ic in American Life, Commission 
VII, Higher Education of the 
Eastern Music Educators Nation- 
al Conference, presided at two 
sessions and was general recorder 
for higher education at their re- 
cent EMENC convention at At- 
lantic City, New Jersey. 

Sigma Xi Lecturer 

Dr. Joseph V. Brady, Depart- 
ment of Psychology, delivered a 
Sigma Xi lecture on "An Experi- 
mental Approach to the Analysis 
of Emotional Behavior" at the 
University of Massachusetts, Am- 
herst, recently. 




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GLASS milk bottles <l<- not 
leak and cause inconveni- 
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frigerators and on clothing, How 
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heard complain bitterly of messy 
refrigerators and kitchen floors 
and ruined clothing because of 
milk leakage from substitute con- 
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May-June, 1957 



39 



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Speaks at Colloquium 

Dr. John S. Toll, Physics De- 
partment, spoke before the Phys- 
ics Colloquium of the University 
of Pennsylvania on "Dispersion 
Relations for the Scattering of 
Relativistic Particles." 

Gives Paper Before APS 

Professor Johannes M. Burgers 
of the Institute for Fluid Dynam- 
ics and Applied Mathematics, was 
invited to give a paper before the 
meeting of the American Physical 
Society at Oklahoma University 
in Norman. The title of his talk 
was "Magnetohydrodynamics". 

Panel on Suburban Living 

Dr. Margaret Cussler of the De- 
partment of Sociology and Dr. 
James A. Walker of the Depart- 
ment of English made up a panel 
with John Keats, author of "The 
Crack in the Picture Window", a 
recent book on suburban living. 
The discussion was held at a 
meeting of the Oakview Citizen's 
Association and was broadcast 
over Station WGAY. 

Addresses AAUW 

Dr. James A. Walker, Lecturer 
in the Department of English, ad- 
dressed the Kensington Chapter 
of the American Association of 
University Women. The talk was 
entitled "English in Adult Edu- 
cation." 

Parts Course Graduate 

Pvt. William H. Dunn (A&S 
'56), was recently graduated 
from the parts course at the 
Ordnance School, Aberdeen Prov- 
ing Ground, Maryland. Pvt. Dunn 
entered the Army last May and 
completed basic training at Fort 
Hood, Texas. 

Completes Twelve Week Course 

Capt. Stuart M. Brown, has 
completed the company level offi- 
cer course at the Army Medical 
Service School, Fort Sam Hous- 
ton, Texas. The 12-week course 
trained him in the tactical, ad- 
ministrative and professional du- 
ties of a company level medical 
officer. Capt. Brown was gradu- 
ated in the class of 1952. 

Speaks in Canada 

Professor J. M. Burgers, Insti- 
tute for Fluid Dynamics and Ap- 
plied Mathematics, spoke before 
the Institute of Aerophysics at 
Toronto, Canada on "The Pene- 
tration of a Shock Wave into a 
Magnetic Field". 



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NEW 

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RESTAURANT 

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40 



The Maryland Magazine 



Assigned to Ceremonial Unit 

Pvt. Jack Weiner (A&S '56), 
has been assigned to the Third 
Infantry Regiment, the Army's 
top ceremonial unit at Fort Myer, 
Virginia. Members of the regi- 
ment are selected by merit and 
service as the official honor guard 
for the nation's capitol. 

Deliver Scientific Papers 

The following members of 
Physics Department delivered sci- 
entific papers at the annual meet- 
ing of the American Physical So- 
ciety in New York City recently: 
Mr." Robert S. Allgaier; Mr. Sta- 
vos Fallieros; Dr. Richard Fer- 
rell; Dr. William Hornyak; Dr. 
M. S. Green; Mr. David Goldman; 
Dr. Robert Jastrow; Mr. James 
M. Knight; Dr. Howard J. Laster; 
Dr. David Lide; Dr. William M. 
MacDonald; Dr. L. Marton; Dr. 
R. C. O'Rourke; Mr. John Quinn; 
Dr. A. W. Saenz ; Dr. Fred Singer ; 
Dr. John S. Toll; and Mr. David 
Wong. 

With American Cyanamid 

Dr. Henry F. Lederle, (A&S 
'52), recently joined the Research 
Division of the American Cyana- 
mid Company. He was assigned 
to the Product Research Depart- 
ment at the company's Stamford, 
Connecticut laboratories. Prior 
to joining Cyanamid, Dr. Lederle 
was associated with the Sinclair 
Research Laboratories, Inc., at 
Harvey, Illinois. 

To Evening College Faculty 

Charles H. Warlick (A&S '55), 
has been added to the University 
of Cincinnati Evening College 
faculty. He will teach a second- 
semester course in algebra. Mr. 
Warlick is manager of the aero- 
dynamics, diffusion, and heat 
transfer computations unit of 
GE. 

General's Orderly 

Army Specialist Third Class 
Eugene H. Phifer, Jr., '55, re- 
cently served as General's Orderly 
of the Day to Maj. Gen. David H. 
Tulley, Comander of the Engineer 
Center at Fort Belvoir, Virginia. 
Specialist Phifer, a supply clerk 
in Company M of the Engineer 
Center Regiment, was selected 
for the honor in competition on 
a basis of neatness, knowledge of 
military subjects and efficient per- 
formance of assigned duties. 

With CIBA 

Austin G. Peterson Jr., '51, has 
been appointed sales training as- 




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MwyJune, 1957 



41 



"An organ breathes in every groove; 

And the full heart's a Psalter 

Rich in deep hymn of gratitude and love." 

HOOD— ODE TO RAE WILSON 

The beautiful organ music in Maryland's 
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Crown Oil & Wax Co. 

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Phone MONUMENT 3-6381 

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sociate of CIBA Pharmaceutical 
Products, Inc. Mr. Peterson 
served as a professional sales 
representative for CIBA in a 
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prior to his recent appointment. 
He is married and has two chil- 
dren. 

Receives Commission 

Glenn B. Harten, '56, received 
a commission promoting him to 
Ensign in the United States Navy 
at recent exercises at the Naval 
Air Station, Pensacola, Florida. 
He is now undergoing primary 
flight training at Pensacola. 

Army Biologist 

Miss May C. Edwards, '56, has 
accepted a position as Biologist 
in the Sanitary Engineering 
Branch at the U. S. Army Corps 
of Engineers' Research and De- 
velopment Labobratories, Fort 
Belvoir, Virginia. Miss Edwards 
recently completed a two-weeks' 
training course at the Dalecarlia 
Water Plant in Washington, D.C. 

Honored by Company 

Theodore H. Erbe, '36, was 
honored as one of the outstanding 
agents of the Travelers Insurance 
Company at a recent meeting of 
that organization. Mr. Erbe was 
admitted to membership in the 
Order of the Tower, top honorary 
agents' organization. He was 
credited with more than $1 mil- 
lion of life insurance sold during 
1956. 

Dr. Brady Speaks 

Dr. Joseph V. Brady, Depart- 
ment of Psychology, presented 
the staff conference on "Emo- 
tional Behavior and the Nervous 
System" at the Psychiatric Insti- 
tute, University of Maryland 
School of Medicine. Later Dr. 
Brady presented a colloquium on 
the same subject at Brown Uni- 
versity, Providence, Rhode Island. 

Elected Bank President 

Winship I. Green (A&S '26) 
has been elected President of the 
Farmers Banking and Trust Com- 
pany at Rockville, Maryland. He 
succeeds his father, Richard F. 
Green, who became Chairman of 
the Board. Mr. Green is a past 
member of the Alumni Board for 
the College of Arts and Sciences 
and of the General Alumni Coun- 
cil. He resides in Silver Spring 
and is also President of the Ken- 
sington Bank. 



42 



The Maryland Magazine 



College of 



Business & Public 



Dr. Taff Speaks 



Administration 

■ Egbert F. Tingley 



Dr. Charles A. Taff, Professor 
of Transportation, recently 
spoke to the Air Force Advanced 
Logistics Class at Wright Field, 
Dayton, Ohio. His presentation 
covered the role of transportation 
in logistics. Dr. Taff also spoke 
at the Regional Meeting of the 
Delta Nu Alpha Transportation 
Fraternity in Baltimore. The sub- 
ject of his talk was "Transporta- 
tion Opportunities in Government 
and Industry." Guests of the Fra- 
ternity at this meeting included 
vocational guidance counselors 
from a number of Maryland 
schools. 

Honored by Boys Club 

Lt. Col. Francis X. Beamer, '40, 
was recently honored by the Jel- 
leff Boys Club of Washington, 
D. C. He received a leather desk 
calendar and an alumni award 
for his outstanding accomplish- 
ments. At the University, Col. 
Beamer was active with the foot- 
ball, basketball and lacrosse 
teams. 



MARYLAND'S FINEST FOOD 

The Coffee Room 
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Est. 1891 
Members N. Y. Stock Exchange 

RALPH A. BAIERL 

Reg. Representative 

10 N. JONATHAN STREET 
Hagerstown, Md. Phone 5301 



Appointed Compl roller 

Tom Lescalleet, President <>r 

the Class of '56, ha8 been ap- 
pointed Assistant Comptroller of 
the University's Far Bast Pro- 
gram. 

Dr. Burdette Addresses Meetings 

Dr. Franklin L. Burdette, Pro- 
fessor and Director of the Bureau 
of Governmental Research, ad- 
dressed the District of Columbia 
Political Science Association on 
"International Information Pro- 
grams" and the American Asso- 
ciation of University Women at 
Salisbury State Teachers College 
on "Changing the Constitution of 
Maryland." 

At Seattle, Washington 

Pvt. Harold S. Levin, '52, was 
recently graduated from the 
Army's Cashier School at Seattle. 
Pvt. Levin is an accounting 
specialist with the 9427th Techni- 
cal Service Unit of the U. S. Army 
Alaskan Communication System. 
He was employed by the Treasury 
Department before entering the 
Army. 

Assumes Management Post 

Thomas Trone, '51, has been ap- 
pointed Manager-Military Trans- 
portation on Trans World Air- 
lines' system sales staff. Mr. 
Trone joined TWA in Washington 
after graduation and has held the 
posts of Supervisor of the Inter- 
national Reservations Depart- 
ment and sales representative in 
that city. He is now based in 
New York. 

Director of Agencies 

A. Samuel Koski, '49 has been 
appointed Director of Agencies 
for the Chesapeake Life Insur- 
ance Company of Baltimore. Mr. 
Koski has had a successful record 
as a personal producer and was 
appointed Assistant Manager for 
the State Mutual Life where he 
performed an outstanding job of 
agency training before receiving 
this promotion directly from the 
field. 

Completes Course 

Pvt. King T. Leatherbury, '56, 
has completed the teletype opera- 
tion course at the Army's South- 
eastern Signal School, Fort Gor- 
don, Ga. The eight-week course 
trained him in the use of military 
keyboard, teletype and tape relay 
operation and communications 
center procedure. 



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Frederick, Md. 

A Maryland Institution 



May-June, 1957 



43 




New Assignment 

Ensign Richard A. Johnson, '55, 
has completed a course at the 
Naval Supply Corps School, 
Athens, Georgia. He is now as- 
signed as Dispersing Officer and 
Assistant Supply Officer of the 
U. S. S. Pawcatuck. 

News from Georgia 

Joseph K. McGeady, '56, has 
purchased a home in Atlanta 
where he is working as an insur- 
ance representative with the 
Metropolitan Life Insurance Com- 
pany. The family census will be 
raised to four in May when a new 
McGeady is scheduled to appear. 

Diving Clinic 

On Sunday, March 24 here at 
the University of Maryland, Mr. 
William R. Campbell conducted a 
Diving Clinic. This clinic was a 
lecture-movie type clinic on 
phases of Fancy Diving. 



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Sales & Service 




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This year's graduating senior 
class will, for the first time, 
include 52 elementary education 
majors who began as freshmen 
four years ago when the new ele- 
mentary education curriculum 
came into being. Two hundred 
and forty-four full-time students 
are now enrolled in the elemen- 
tary program. 

Dr. Blough To Presidency of 

NSTA 

Dr. Glenn 0. Blough, Associate 
Professor of Education, at the 
University of Maryland, will as- 
sume office as President of the 
National Science Teachers Asso- 
ciation at its July meeting in Phil- 
adelphia. He has been serving 
as President-elect during the past 
year. The Science Teachers As- 
sociation is part of the National 
Education Association and serves 
science teachers at all levels of 
instruction. More than 1,200 of 
its 11,000 members attended the 
annual meeting held recently in 
Cleveland. 



Dr. Waetjen In NEA Panel 
Discussion 

Dr. Walter B. Waetjen, Associ- 
ate Professor in the Institute for 
Child Study, College of Educa- 
tion, was a panel member on the 
program of the Association for 
Supervision and Curriculum De- 
velopment, N.E.A., held in St. 
Louis from March 17-21, 1957. 
The topic for panel discussion was 
"Using What We Know About 
Modern Society In Curriculum 
Planning." 



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44 



The Mainland Magazine 



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Dr. Denemnrk At NEA Meeting 

Dr. George \V. Denemark, As- 
sistant Dean of the College of 
Education, was chairman of an 

assembly panel on the topic "Eval- 
uating the Effectiveness of Teach 
era and Teaching" at the 12th 
Annual Conference Of the Asso- 
ciation for Supervision and Cur- 
riculum Development, N.E.A., In 
St. Louis, Missouri on March 19. 
The panel group brought to- 
gether educators from Teachers 
College, Columbia University; 
Decatur, Illinois Public Schools; 
University of Utah; and the 
Provo, Utah Public Schools. Af- 
ter a discussion of some of the 
current forces responsible for 
the growing interest and con- 
cern with the evaluations of 
teachers and teaching, the panel 
group turned to a discussion of 
three major issues relating to this 
topic. Thev were: (1) "Can We 
Describe Teaching?"; (2) "What 
Values Do We Use In Defining 
Good Teaching?"; (3) "How Can 
We Reduce The Personal Threat 
Often Associated With Teacher 
Evaluation?" The discussion gave 
considerable emphasis to the Pro- 
vo, Utah Merit Study which has 
been doing some extremely in- 
teresting work in clarifying pro- 
cedures by which teaching can 
be more accurately and usefully 
described. More than 500 cur- 
riculum workers from all over 
the United States attended this 
session. 

Dr. Anderson At Principal's 
Meeting 

Dr. Vernon E. Anderson, Dean 
of the College of Education, pre- 
sided over a luncheon meeting of 
the Elementary School Princi- 
pals in Baltimore on March 5, 
1957. He has also been appointed 
to the 1960 Yearbook Committee 
of the Association for Super- 
vision and Curriculum Develop- 
ment which deals with the topic, 
"Leadership in Instruction." On 
April 6, 1957 he was a member 
of a panel discussion "What Col- 
lege for Specific Training?" at 
the Maryland Association of Fu- 
ture Teachers of America at Reis- 
terstown. 

Mrs. Brown Writes Book 

A recent publication by Mrs. 
Lillian Willse Brown, Instructor, 
Nursery School, is Studies In 
Basic Rhythms For Young Chil- 
dren, published by Willis Music 
Company. This book was pre- 
pared primarily for students in 
Nursery School-Kindergarten ed- 
ucation. 



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Tile Baths • Housekeeping Facilities 

Life Guards on Beach 

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Art Exhibition In Langley Park 

The class in C.Ed. 115, Chil- 
dren's Activities and Activity Ma- 
terial, now being given on Satur- 
day at Langley Park Elementary 
School by Mrs. Margaret Stant, 
under the auspices of the College 
of Special and Continuation Stud- 
ies, will have an exhibition of 
the class's art project on May 25 
at the school, 15th and Merrimac 
Streets, Takoma Park, Md. 

Mrs. Stant Is Lecturer 

On March 7, 1957 Mrs. Mar- 
garet A. Stant, Assistant Profes- 
sor of Education, Childhood Edu- 
cation, was a speaker in a series 
of five lectures sponsored by the 
Northern Virginia University 
Center, Arlington, and The Fed- 
eration of Cooperative Schools of 
Northern Virginia at the Wash- 
ington Lee High School in Arling- 
ton. Mrs. Stant was the lead- 
er of a group at the Potomac As- 
sociation of Cooperative Teachers 
on March 4. The topic "How Can 
We Satisfy and Stimulate Curi- 
osity About the Physical World?" 
was a part of the theme "The 
Three R's of the Pre-School— 
Reality, Relationship, Release." 

Dr. Schneider Speaks 

Dr. Fern D. Schneider, Associ- 
ate Professor of Education, Col- 
lege of Education, has had sev- 
eral speaking engagements re- 
cently. On March 12 she spoke 
on "Adolescents — What Makes 
Them Tick?" at Leland Junior 
High School; on March 28, "Un- 
derstanding Our Children — Three 
to Nine Years Olds" at Langley 
Cooperative School in McLean, 
Virginia; and on March 26, Dr. 
Schneider spoke to the Lambda 
Chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma 
Society at the Candlelight Lodge 
in Catonsville. 

"The Core Curriculum" was 
the topic of the panel at Lisbon 
High School in Howard County, 
Maryland on April 2 in which Dr. 
Schneider participated. On April 
13, she spoke before the Epsilon 
Chapter of the Delta Kappa Gam- 
ma Society in Annapolis and will 
attend a state meeting of the So- 
ciety in Cumberland May 24-26. 
Dr. Schneider is the Executive 
Secretary of Alpha Beta State — 
Maryland. On June 19th she will 
leave for a tour of Europe, which 
she is conducting for Travel, Inc. 
The tour will include England, 
Scotland, Holland, Belgium, Lux- 
embourg, Germany, Switzerland, 
Italy and France. 



46 



The Maryland Magazine 



Bob Chung's 

RESTAURANT 

and 

LA GRANDE HOTEL 

14th and BOARDWALK 
OCEAN CITY, MD. 



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Home of 

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Local FTA Elects 

On March 28th the local chap- 
ter of F.T.A. elected the follow- 
ing officers for 1957-58. 
President — Patricia Hensley 
Vice-President — Margaret Kline 
Secretary — Joyce ( 'ox 
Treasurer — Ralph Vbighl 

The F.T.A. is a branch of the 
National Education Association. 

Beginning with September, P). r )7, 

the college chapters will he called 
Student Members of the NKA in- 
stead of F.T.A. Ralph Voight, 
President 195(5-57. as well as Mar- 
garet Kline, Joyce Cox, and Rich- 
ard Martin will represent the loc- 
al chapter of F.T.A. at the state 
meeting held April 6 at Reisters- 
town, Md. 

Ralph Voight, President of the 
local chapter of Future Teachers 
of America, represented the Col- 
lege of Education on a panel at 
the Leland Junior High School in 
Montgomery County on March 
26. The occasion honored Future 
Teachers of America's of the jun- 
ior and senior high schools and 
colleges. 

Dr. Prescott Makes 10 Speeches 

Dr. Daniel A. Prescott, Direc- 
tor of Institute for Child Study 
has been and will be engaged in 
the following speaking engage- 
ments and activities from March 
through May. 

McKeesport Public Schools, 
March 1 ; Elementary Principal's 
Association of Massachusetts at 
Amherst, Mass., March 21 ; Mas- 
sachusetts Elementary Supervis- 
or's Association, Amherst, Mass., 
March 22; Second Annual Mary- 
land Education Conference, Uni- 
versity of Maryland, March 30; 
Ontario Educational Association, 
Toronto, Canada, April 23-24; 
Workshop for Los Angeles Coun- 
ty District Superintendent's of 
Los Angeles County, Cal., May 
6-10; Conference on Human Re- 
lations, University of Maryland, 
May 17; Institute on Mental 
Health in the Schools, Nassau 
County, Albany, N. Y., May 23- 
25 ; Television Panel, Maryland 
State P.T.A., Baltimore, April 6; 
Television Panel, Station WAAM, 
Baltimore, May 29. 

Brandt, Perkins Present 
Monograph 

Dr. Richard M. Brandt, Assist- 
ant Professor, Institute for Child 
Study, and Dr. Hugh V. Perkins. 
Professor of Education, Institute 
of Child Study have completed a 
monograph titled Research Eval- 
uating a Child Study Program. 




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Mongr. Soc. Res. Child Develop- 
ment, 1956, 62, No. 1. This mono- 
graph reports and summarizes 
sixteen researches that have been 
completed over a ten-year period 
in evaluating an in-service teach- 
er child study program. The pro- 
gram was developed initially 
through the work of the Commis- 
sion on Teacher Education of the 
American Council on Education 
from 1939 to 1944. Since 1947, 
the further development and ex- 
pansion of this program has been 
carried forward by the Institute 
for Child Study of the University 
of Maryland and by educational 
institutions in other states serv- 
ing teacher groups in those states. 
Dr. Glen 0. Blough, Associate 
Professor of Education, has pub- 
lished a children's nature book 
entitled After the Sun Goes Down. 
Dr. Blough is the author of 
numerous science books for chil- 
dren and was at one time a sci- 
ence editor for Scott Foresman 
and Company. He is also Presi- 
dent-elect of the National Science 
Teachers Association. Dr. Blough 
was among the principal speakers 
at the Second Annual Conference 
of the International Reading As- 
sociation held in New York City. 
Dr. Blough spoke on the topic, 
"Using Interest in Science as a 
Springboard to Further Read- 
ing." 

Completes Course 

Pvt. R. A. Patton, 56, was 
recently graduated from the 
general supply specialist course 
at the Army's Quartermaster 
School, Fort Lee, Virginia. Dur- 
ing the eight-week course, Patton 
was trained to perform general 
unit supply duties, serve as a unit 
armorer, and assist in general 
supply operations. 

To Germany 

Miss Barbara B. Close, '52, is 
one of more than 1,300 teachers 
now instructing American chil- 
dren in the Army Dependent 
Schools in France and Germany. 
Miss Close is teaching physical 
education and English in the 
Kaiserslautern (Germany) high 
school. 

Attend Convention 

Dr. George W. Denemark, As- 
sistant Dean of the College of 
Education and Dr. Orval L. Ulry, 
Assistant Director of the Summer 
Session, took part in the Ninth 
Annual Convention of the Ameri- 
can Association of Colleges for 
Teacher Education held at the 
Morrison Hotel in Chicago. 



48 



The Maryland Magazine 



JACK BLANK 

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1957 

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Engineering 



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Assistant Chief Engineer 

Lawrence Mattingly, '43, has 
been appointed Assistant 
Chief Engineer for Television at 
Motorola, Inc. During his ten 
years in the company's television 
receiver design department, Mat- 
tingly has been granted five pat- 
ents for his design techniques. 
Mr. Mattingly is married and has 
lour children. The Mattingly's 
make their home in Lombard, 
Illinois. 

Advances to Staff Engineer 

Palmer W. Sullivan, '52, has 
been advanced to Staff Engineer, 
Production Design Department in 
the Airborne Computor Labor- 
atories of the MPD. Mr. Sulli- 
van had been serving as an As- 
sociate Engineer prior to his pro- 
motion. 

Transferred to New York 

C. R. Lund, Jr., '44, has been 
transferred to Shell Oil Com- 
pany's Head Office, New York, as 
Sales Representative, Asphalt 
Department. Mr. Lund had pre- 
viouslv served as engineer at 
Shell's Columbia, S.C., office. Mr. 
Lund joined Shell in 1947 as a 
field engineer in the company's 
Baltimore office. 



Chaplain's Assistant 

Pfc. William F. Myers, Class of 
'55, recently participated in a ten- 
day field training exercise with 
the Seventh Army in Germany. 
A chaplain's assistant in Head- 
quarters Battery of the Army's 
Third Armored Division Artillery, 
Myers entered the Army in Aug- 
ust, 1955, and arrived in Europe 
last June. 



At Fort Hood, Texas 

Pvt. Gerald J. Davis, '56, is re- 
ceiving eight weeks of basic com- 
bat training with the Fourth 
Armored Division at Fort Hood, 
Texas. Davis is in the first of 
a three-phase program set up to 
train 7,500 replacements for the 
Third Armored Division in Ger- 
many. 



VICTOR 

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49 




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Eviscerated Poultry Cornish Game Hens 

Western Turkeys Beltsville Turkeys 

Call — HARRY NELSON — PLaza 2-0287 
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Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 

Manufacturers of 
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Graduate School 



William Deitch who this year 
will receive his Master of 
Business Administration in mar- 
keting from the University of 
Maryland, was added to Life's 
Market Research Department as 
Staff Analyst. Mr. Deitch is a 
native of Hazleton, Pennsylvania. 

To DuPont Company 

Dr. Edwin A. Gee, holder of a 
Doctorate in Chemical Engineer- 
ing from the University of Mary- 
land, has been promoted to Assis- 
tant Director of Sales in the Pig- 
ments Department, E. I. DuPont 
De Nemours Company. Dr. Gee 
has been associated with research 
and engineering development 
with the company since 1948. In 
the titanium metal field he has 
become recognized as one of the 
nation's authorities. 



College of 



Home Economics 

Laura Amos Bull '26 
5=5 Vera Klein Woods '32 



Ninth Annual Spring Reunion 

The Ninth Annual Spring Re- 
union of the Home Economics 
Alumni was held in the Maryland 
Room of Margaret Brent Hall. 
Departing from its usual pro- 
cedure of business, the Board 
felt that this occasion should be 
devoted to paying tribute to Dean 
Marie Mount who passed away 
on January 23, 1957. 

After welcoming the group, Dr. 
Florance B. King, Acting Dean 
of Home Economics, was intro- 
duced to the Association by Agnes 
Kricker, President of the Associa- 
tion. 

An outstanding senior girl, 
Sibyl Klak, was honored by the 
presentation of a silver dish 
awarded annually to the girl who 
most nearly measures up to the 
high standards of character, serv- 
ice and spirit set by the College 
of Home Economics. 

The following new members 
were elected to serve on the 
Alumni Board for the next three 
years: Miriam L. Beall, Amy F. 



50 



The Maryland Magazine 




J-^roducls 

fflatcU 

\s^ua tit 'u 



Leber, and Grace Rogers. Betty 
Schmitt was elected member-at- 
large. These new members are 
to replace Agnes M. Kricker, Bet- 
ty A. Bull and Vera K. Woods 
whose three year terms have ex- 
pired. 

Tributes were paid Miss Mount 
by Sibyl Klak who spoke for her 
fellow-students ; Miss Faye Mitch- 
ell and Mr. George Cuneo who 
spoke for the faculty; Mrs. Mar- 
tha R. T. Andrews who spoke 
for the alumni and Miss Ida J. 
K. Beach who spoke for the Home 
Economist in Business. The trib- 
utes described Miss Mount as a 
warm friend, a capable scholar 
and administrator and a wise 
counselor. They spoke of the wide 
breadth of interests that were 
Miss Mount's ; of her wonderful 
zest for life and her great drive. 
Miss Mount, during her life, was 
symbolized by the open door to 
her office and also to her heart. 
She helped people in many ways 
in things both material and spir- 
itual. Few ever came away from 
contact with her without having 
gained in strength. Many were 
helped over difficult periods by 
her personal philanthropy and 
her great belief in their worth as 
human beings. 

One of Miss Mount's deepest 
interests was in the furthering 
of the cause of home economics 
scholarships for worthy girls who 
were in need of financial assist- 
ance. It was decided, therefore, 

May- June, 1957 



to honor Miss Mount's memory 
by establishing a Memorial Schol- 
arship Fund. A committee was 
formed with Miss T. Faye Mitch- 
ell as its Chairman. Contributions 
to the Fund should be sent to: 

Marie Mount Memorial 

Scholarship Fund, 

College of Home Economics, 

University of Mart/land, 

College Park, Md. 

Following the meeting there 
was a business meeting of the 
Alumni Board. The following 
officers were elected: Geraldine 
P. Edwards, Chairman ; Miriam 
L. Beall, Vice-Chairman ; Irene 
Knox, Recording Secy. ; Tempe C. 
Grant, Treasurer; Amy F. Leber, 
Magazine Articles ; and Grace 
Rogers, Corresponding Secretary. 

News of Grads 

We have news of several home 
economics grads in other parts 
of the world this month. They 
are: Gladys Oberlin, '31, who is 
a Methodist missionary in Brazil 
and Margery Fry, '52, is in Tokyo, 
Japan as registrar for the Uni- 
versity Overseas Program. Marg- 
ery will be returning to the States 
in mid-August. Miriam Lloyd 
Beall, '31, and her 16 year old 
daughter, Barbara will spend two 
months in Europe this summer. 
They are sailing on June 28 and 
will visit France, Switzerland, 
Germany, Holland, Denmark, Nor- 
way, and the British Isles. 





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Dr. Goldstein Testimonial 

A testimonial dinner was giv- 
en at the Sheraton-Belve- 
dere Hotel in Baltimore in honor 
of Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, a 
member of the University of 
Maryland Medical School faculty 
for the past 36 years. 

Dr. Goldstein, a native of New 
Haven, Conn., studied at the Yale 
and University of Maryland 
Medical Schools, receiving his de- 
gree from the latter in 1912. 
While interning at Sinai Hospital, 
he became interested in genito- 
urinary surgery and studied this 
specialty during the period, 1913- 
1919. 

During World War I, Dr. Gold- 
stein was consultant in urology 
to the Medical Advisory Board. 
Followng the war, he organized 
a genito-urinary department at 
Sinai Hospital and has served on 
the Executive Committee of that 
Hospital. 

In 1921, Dr. Goldstein began 
teaching genito-urinary pathol- 
ogy at the University of Mary- 
land School of Medicine and 
taught as an Assistant Professor 
in this Department until his re- 
cent retirement. He is currently 
Medical Director of the Levindale 
Home for the Aged and Infirm. 

Dr. Goldstein is a Diplomate of 
the American Board of Urology 
and Fellow of the American Col- 
lege of Surgeons. He is a member 
of the American Urological Asso- 
ciation, the Southern Medical 
Association, Mid-Atlantic Urolog- 
ical Association, American Uro- 
logical Association, Southeastern 
Surgical Society, Internationale 
societe D'Urologie and Interna- 
tional College of Surgeons. 

He was married to Elsie May 
Martin of Baltimore in 1914. 
They are the parents of four sons. 

The banquet was arranged by 
University alumni, faculty and 
friends. 

Annual Pediatric Seminar 

The Department of Pediatrics 
of the School of Medicine held 
its annual Pediatric Seminar re- 
cently. An all-day meeting de- 
signed specifically as an instru- 
ment of postgraduate education, 
prominent speakers presented the 
following program : "Recognition 




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52 



The Maryland Magazine 



and Management of Pancreatic 
Deficiency", Dr. Harry Schwach- 
man of the Children's Medical 
Center, Boston; "Pediatric Surgi- 
cal Emergencies", Dr. Hairy C. 
Bishop of the Children's Hospital 
of Philadelphia; "Poisoning in 
Children", Dr. Edward Press, The 
American Public Health Associa- 
tion, Inc., New York, New York ; 
and "Problems of Staphylococcal 
Infections in Children", Dr. Er- 
win Neter, Children's Hospital, 
Buffalo, New York. 

Committee members arranging 
this program included Dr. Wil- 
liam M. Seabold, Dr. Israel P. 
Meranski and Dr. Frederick J. 
Heldrich Jr., Chairman. 
i 

New Student Orientation 
Program 

Largely due to the efforts of 
the Dean's office and the Student 
Government Association of the 
School of Medicine, an Orienta- 
tion Program for new students 
was introduced at the beginning 
of the Sesquicentennial Year. 

The program opened on Sep- 
tember 17 with an address by 
Mr. Howard Siegel, Chairman of 
the Student Orientation Commit- 
tee. A welcome was extended by 
Dean Stone. Addresses by Drs. 
Louis Krause and Robert Parker 
concerning the future of the stu- 
dent in medicine and the medical 
school curriculum were then 
given. Dr. Dietrich C. Smith dis- 
cussed the organization of the 
University. 

In order, the following Medical 
School organizations were pre- 
sented: Library, Student Health 
Service, Alpha Omega Alpha, Stu- 
dent Government Association, 
Student American Medical Asso- 
ciation, Interfraternity Council, 
Newman Club, Christian Medical 
Association and the year book, 
Terra Mariae Medicus. Later in 
the day, students were addressed 
by Drs. Maurice Pincoffs and 
John C. Krantz Jr. 

The following day there were 
additional lectures and demon- 
strations. A tour of the Medical 
School was conducted, followed 
by a luncheon sponsored by the 
Medical Alumni Association held 
in the Terrace Room of the Psy- 
chiatric Institute. 

Additional addresses by Drs. 
Pincoffs and Woodward designed 
to further orient the students 
were given on the next day. At 
this time also, various instrument 
companies, particularly those 
manufacturing microscopes, were 




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May-June, 1957 



53 



51st ANNIVERSARY 
1906 , 1957 




ARUNDEL FEDERAL 
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1957 



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in attendance to demonstrate 
their products. 

Commemorative Gifts 

The Women's Auxiliary Board 
of the University Hospital is pre- 
senting for sale a commemorative 
cup and saucer and ash tray in 
honor of the Sesquicentennial 
Year. Each piece will carry the 
inscription "150 years of Medical 
Education" together with the seal 
of the University. These items 
will be on sale during the Ses- 
quicentennial Year in the Gift 
Shop of the University Hospital. 
They may be obtained either by 
phone order or by letter. Prices 
are available upon inquiry. 

The Medical Alumni Associa- 
tion is sponsoring a Commemora- 
tive Medal to be placed on sale 
shortly. The medal will be struck 
principally in bronze but a limited 
edition of silver coins will be 
available, these being the first 
to be struck. 

The price of the silver medal 
will be $6.00 postpaid and the 
bronze, $3.00. Orders should be 
sent to the Medical Alumni Asso- 
ciation, University of Maryland, 
Lombard and Greene Streets, Bal- 
timore 1, Maryland accompanied 
by remittance. 

Named Medical Consultant 

Colonel Paul Hayes, '28, Army 
Medical Corps, has been named 
Medical Consultant to the Chief 
of the Professional Division in 
the Office of the Army Surgeon 
General. Colonel Hayes will ad- 
vise the Chief of the Professional 
Division as to the standard of 
medical care being rendered in 
the field of internal medicine in 
all Army facilities in the Conti- 
nental United States and over- 
seas. Colonel Hayes will review 
the professional qualifications of 
internal medicine officers and 
recommend their assignments to 
assure the maximum utilization 
of professional training. Colonel 
Hayes has been with the Army 
since he graduated from the 
Medical School. 

Annual Lecture 

The annual lecture sponsored 
by Phi Delta Epsilon fraternity 
featured Dr. Paul Hoch, Commis- 
sioner of Mental Hygiene of the 
State of New York. Dr. Hoch 
spoke on the topic "The Use and 
Abuse of Tranquilizing Drugs." 
The lecture was held in Gordon 
Wilson Hall, University Hospital 
and has been an annual feature 
of the Phi Delta Epsilon frater- 
nity. 



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Baltimore, Md. 



54 



The Maryland Magazine 



Chairman of Heart Program 

Dr. Francis J. Borges, class of 
1950, is currently Chairman of 
the Rehabilitation Program of the 
Heart Association of Maryland. 

At St. Albans, New York 

Dr. Jose Alvarez de Choudens, 
class of '44, is on duty with the 
United States Navy at the United 
States Naval Hospital at St. Al- 
bans, New York. He was recent- 
ly promoted to Commander in the 
Medical Corps, United States 
Naval Reserve. Dr. Alvarez will 
shortly complete his tour of duty 
and will return to practice in San 
Juan, Puerto Rico. 

Instructor At Pittsburgh 

Dr. Aaron Finegold, class of 
'43, is serving as Instructor in 
Neurology at the University of 
Pittsburgh School of Medicine. 
Dr. Finegold was a recent visitor 
to Baltimore on the occasion of 
the Phi Delta Epsilon alumni club 
dinner. 

Veep of Graduate Club 

Dr. John D. Rosin, Class of 
'42, was elected Vice President 
of the Baltimore Graduate Club 
of Phi Delta Epsilon fraternity. 



College of 



Military Science 



Receives Degree 

Roy A. Jaynes, '56, recently re- 
ceived the degree of M.Litt. 
in Industrial Management at the 
mid-year commencement exer- 
cises of the University of Pitts- 
burgh held in the Carnegie Music 
Hall, Oakland. 

At Fort Harrison 

Major Llewellyn S. Helsley, '5G, 
was recently graduated from the 
five-week financial management 
integrated accounting course at 
the Army's Finance School, Fort 
Benjamin Harrison, Indiana. Ma- 
jor Helsley is a finance and ac- 
counting officer at the Boston 
Army base. 

Completes Medical School 

Capt. Roger R. Bisson, '56, re- 
cently was graduated from the 
Army Medical Service School at 
Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Cap- 
tain Bisson completed a 34-week 
advanced course designed to ac- 
quaint students with tactical, ad- 
ministrative and professional du- 
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Miss Lorraine Neel, R.N., and 
Mrs. Helen King, R.N., have 
just returned from Birmingham, 
Alabama where they attended 
the Institute of Nursing Service 
Administration. The purpose of 
the Institute was to bring to- 
gether various nurse educators 
in an effort to discuss new tech- 
niques, mutual problems and 
progress made in administrative 
nursing. Eighty nurses from 
twenty-one states participated in 
this comprehensive four-day pro- 
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Mental Health Meeting 

A group of 75 persons nation- 
ally known in their respective 
fields of education and health met 
recently in Tulsa, Oklahoma to 
consider the problem of mental 
health and how to provide suffi- 
cient nursing personnel to staff 
the hospitals in the southern re- 
gion. The meeting and workshop 
was sponsored by the Southern 
Regional Education Board, At- 
lanta, Georgia, at the request of 
the Governors of the sixteen 
states. 

Representing the University of 
Maryland were Dr. Florence M. 
Gipe, Dean of Nursing, who is 
Chairman of the Southern Re- 
gional Education Board on Nurs- 
ing Education; Dr. Mary Carl, 
Head of the Graduate Education 
in Nursing; and Miss Theresa 
Fernandez, Supervisor of Instruc- 
tion in Psychiatric Nursing. 
Others attending from the State 
of Maryland were: Mr. George 
Mason, Director of Nursing De- 
partment of Mental Hygiene; 
and Miss Eleanor Jones, Director 
of Nursing Education, Eastern 
Shore State Hospital. 

The University of Maryland 
School of Nursing was chosen by 
the Southern Regional Education 
Board to institute a Master's de- 
gree program in psychiatric nurs- 
ing in 1956. To date, seven grad- 
uate nurses have completed the 
requirements for the degree with 
eight additional students now 
being prepared for teaching, sup- 
ervision and psychiatric nursing 
specialists. 



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Real Estate Examinations 

and Title Insurance 

1343 Good Hope Rd.. S.E., Washington, D.C. 
LUdlow 1-3200 



HUFFER SHINN 
Optical 
Company, Inc. 

Prescription Opticians 
Repairs - Replacements 

1413 L STREET. N.W. 

National 8-1457 Washington, 0. C 




SAVILE BOOK SHOP 

3236 P STREET 

French, Politic*, History, Fiction, 
Philosophy, Drama, Art 

Washington 7, D. C. 
Georgetown 

Phone ADamj 2-3321 



56 



The Maryland Magazine 



News Of Nursing Grads 

Mrs. Dorothy Bowman Caul- 
field, '33, has accepted a position 
as a relief supervisor at the Chil- 
dren's Heart Hospital. 

Lt. Mabel Schools Upteirraff, 
A.N.C., is now stationed at Fort 
Bennintf, Georgia. 

Frances Williams Price, '43, is 
now living in Vienna, West Vir- 
ginia. Mrs. Price's husband is 
a chemist with DuPont Company. 

Mrs. Janice Wert Lovell, '38, is 
now working in surgery at the 
Oschuner Foundation Hospital, 
San Diego, California. 

2 Lt. Mary Lee Thompson, 
A.N.C., is night supervisor at 
Lackland Hospital, San Antonio, 
Texas. 

Mrs. Kjerstine Kelly Hoffman, 
'47, has returned to Pittsburgh 
and civilian life after a tour of 
duty in Germany. 

Mrs. Jean Nillson Mallis. '47, 
is living in Washington, D. C. Her 
husband, Major Nicholas Mallis, 
is stationed at Walter Reed Hos- 
pital. 

Mrs. Mary Bodmer Johnson, 
'45, expects to return to the States 
in August. She and her husband 
have spent three years at Tachik- 
awa Air Base, near Tokyo. 

Cpt. Doris Kessler Freeborn 
was married in St. Petersburg, 
Florida. Mrs. Freeborn's hus- 
band is also a member of the 
Air Force. 

Attend Conference 

Dr. John W. Gustad, director 
of the University's Counselling 
Center and Miss Theresa M. Fer- 
nandez, assistant professor of 
Psychiatric Nursing Education at 
the School of Nursing in Balti- 
more represented the University 
at the Southern Regional Educa- 
tion Board Conference on Psy- 
chologists in Mental Health in 
Atlanta, Georgia. 

Advanced Degrees Awarded 

At University of Minnesota 
commencement exercises, Donald 
R. Knauff '50, was awarded a 
Master of Science degree and 
John S. Maybee '50, and Ira D. 
Porterfield '44, were awarded Doc- 
tor of Philosophy degrees. 

At Fort Hood, Texas 

Pvt. Gordon L. Barker, Class 
of '56, is receiving basic combat 
training with the Fourth Arm- 
ored Division at Fort Hood, Tex- 
as. He is in the first of a three- 
phase program set up to train 
7,500 replacements for the Third 
Armored Division in Germany. 

May-June, 1957 



THE LEO BUTLER COMPANY 

College Park, Maryland 



Heavy Construction Contractors 



WEbster 5-6600 



Tunnels — Bridges — Water Lines 



SEWER and SUBAQUEOUS CONSTRUCTION 



BARBER & ROSS CO. 

ROUGH - HARDWARE - FINISHED 
STRUCTURAL STEEL 

MUlwork Complete Kitchens 

ROOFING • PAINTS • INSULATION 

Stanley Aluminum Windows and Doors 

WESTINGHOUSE APPLIANCES 
DIXIE RANGES * GARDEN SUPPLIES 



— We Deliver — 



WASHINGTON STORE 

5th and VEE STS., N.E. 

Phone: DEcatur 2-0501 
Hours: Monday thru Friday 
7:30 A.M. to 5 P.M. 



FALLS CHURCH STORE 

SEVEN CORNERS SHOPPING CENTER 

Phone: JEfferson 2-3710 
Hours: Mon., Thurs., Fri. 

8:30 A.M. to 9:30 P.M. 
Tues., Wed. & Sat. 

8:30 A.M. to 6 P.M. 






'**& 







mom; house 



. visit the Manila ml Room 
where smart people gather 

for dining at its best 



WASHINGTON 




SILVER 
SPRING 



BETMESDA 



U. OF 
MARYLAND 



DEEP SOUTH BAR-B-Q 

7553 New Hampshire Ave. 

Langlcy Park 

Washington, I). C. 

HEmlock 4-1818 



FOUR CORNERS 

SILVER SPRING, Ml). 

HIGHWA1 2V 

JUniper 8-9700 

57 







-Art Vjour (command . . . 
(gentlemen' 



Because you are particular about where you shop, 
dine, or purchase that new car— may we suggest these 
fine, long established business firms on these pages, 
to satisfy your discriminating taste. 



* 



c4ttention ^Doctors! 



For Complete Supplies and Equipment 



H 



CO., INC. 



503 W. COLD SPRING LANE 
BALTIMORE, MD 



TU 9-5555 



North 



South 




East 



West 



A Truly Qreat Name in Baltimore Real Estate 

The Roland Park Realty Co. 

B. Franklin Hearn, President 

Norman F. Gorsuch — Aurine B. Morsell 

Vice-Presidents 



* 



4810 ROLAND AVE. 



BALTIMORE, MD. 



Fraternity Federal 
Savings 

AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

764 WASHINGTON BLVD. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

* INSURED SAVINGS * DRIVE-IN SERVICE 

+ LIBERAL DIVIDENDS * PARKING LOT 
* Speedy SAVE-by-M AIL 




FOR MEN 

1133 MATHIESON BLDG 
BALTIMORE 2, MD. 



EXPERT CAREER COUNSELING 
FOR COLLEGE GRADS 



FOR 

WOMEN 

927 MATHIESON BLDG. 
BALTIMORE 2, MD. 




58 



Th$ Maryland Magatint 



WE BRING YOU 
YOUR PAGE 



in 



Ci U)dL (DhsAAsucL IfYUut UtewuL cl Mat 

SOUTHCOMB 

MEN'S HATS 

STETSON HAT QUARTERS 
Stttton Tics 




109 I. BALTIMORE STREET 



MARYLAND 
MAGAZINE 



Uilngton 9 3799 




Year 'Round 
Air Conditioning 

Provides heated, filtered air in 
winter; cooled, dehumidified, fil- 
tered air in summer. 



The CROWN Refrigeration Supply Co. 



* 



913 E. BIDDLE ST. 
PL 2-3359 



BALTIMORE 2, MD. 

Ask for August Huber 



cJjiitinguidhed ^jrormal Wear 

for Ljentlemen of ^Jjiicernment 
LATEST STYLES — CORRECTLY FITTED 



* 






FORMAL WEAR 
RENTAL SERVICE 

MOhawk 4-8070 



3805 Forest Park Ave. 



Baltimore 16, Md. 




Dependability and Service 

MORRISON & FIFER 

— Dispensing Chemists — 
Paul Archambault, Prop. 

3109 ST. PAUL ST. BE 5-3579 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



BALTIMORE, MD. 



RELIABLE TIRE CO. 



Headquarters 

Far Famous 




IF II S K 



TIRES • TUBES • BATTERIES 
Convenient Terms Arranged 

1 121 MARYLAND AVE. 
BALTIMORE 



* MECCA 

RESTAURANT 



SA 7-7730 32 S. Calvert St. 

Baltimore, Md. 



Title Insurance 

Service available throughout Maryland 



Secure what 
you own — 
with TITLE 
INSURANCE 




CHARTERED 1884 



THE 
TITLE GUARANTEE CO. 

St. Paul and Lexington Sts. 
Baltimore 2 SAratoea 7-3700 



May- June,, 1957 



59 



J. 


E. 


GREINER 

CONSULTING 


CO. 






ENGINEERS 

1106 NORTH CHARLES STREET 


L 


. 




BALTIMORE 1, MARYLAND 





»3 erving the Medical Profession 
for over a third of a century 



Sl5e55H> 



Equipment ana Supplied tor: 

Physicians ana Surgeons * Hoepital* 

Laboratories • Industrial Clinic* 

.Murray- Saumgartner 

SURGICAL INSTRUMENT COMPANY, INC. 

5 West Cnase Street • SAratoga 7-7333 
Baltimore 1, Maryland 



CAREY MACHINERY & SUPPLY COMPANY, Inc. 

Industrial Mill Supplies, Machine Tools, Pumps & Air Compressors 

SAFETY SUPPLIES 
3501 BREHMS LANE - BALTO. 13, MD. - BRoadway 6-1600 

(near Intersection Edison Highway and Erdman Ave.) 



NATIONAL ENGINEERING CO. 

DISTRIBUTORS • ENGINEERS • CONTRACTORS 

REFRACTORY and INSULATION MATERIALS 

BALTIMORE HAGERSTOWN 



D. HARRY CHAMBERS, Inc. 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS 

located In the Center of the Shopping District 

326 NORTH HOWARD STREET 
Ml. J 1990 BALTIMORE, MD. 



ALCAZAR 

CATHEDRAL and MADISON STS. 

Phone VErnon 7-8400 

Baltimore, Md. 



School of 



Pharmacy 

Dr. John Autian 
i. Dr. Norman J. Doorenbos 



Presents Paper 

Dr. W. Arthur Purdum, Pro- 
fessor of Hospital Pharmacy, 
presented a paper entitled, "What 
the Bobst-Columbia Plan Means 
to Hospital Pharmacy," at a meet- 
ing held at the Waldorf-Astoria 
in New York. Dr. Purdum was 
one of several speakers who dis- 
cussed the Bobst-Columbia Plan 
for the five-year curriculum in 
Colleges of Pharmacy. Dr. Pur- 
dum was also recently appointed 
to the Committee on Awards and 
Grants of the American Society 
of Hospital Pharmacists. 

Speaks To Journal Club 

Dr. Norman J. Doorenbos, As- 
sistant Professor of Pharmaceuti- 
cal Chemistry presented a talk 
before the Interdepartmental 
Journal Club of the professional 
schools at the University. The 
subject of his talk was "The 
Structure Activity Relationships 
and Mechanism of Action of 
Chlorarphenicol." Dr. F. M. Mill- 
er, Associate Professor of Chem- 
istry, also presented a talk before 
the Interdepartmental Journal 
Club entitled, "Structure Activity 
Relationships in the Reserpine 
Molecule." He discussed research 
carried out by Mr. Weinberg, a 
graduate student in the School of 
Pharmacy. 

Korean Educator Visits School 

Mr. Kyung Mo Chung, Chief of 
the Bureau of Pharmaceutical 
Affairs, Ministry of Health and 
Social Affairs, of the Republic of 
Korea, visited the School of Phar- 
macy recently. Mr. Chung was 
impressed with the extensive fa- 
cilities of the School and espe- 
cially with the laboratories. Ko- 
rea is not able to give phar- 
macy students laboratory experi- 
ence in some of the professional 
areas such as Pharmacology. 

Dr. Autian Appointed 

Dr. John Autian has been ap- 
pointed by Dr. Justin L. Powers, 
Director of Revision of the Na- 
tional Formulary, as a member of 
the National Formulary Advisory 
Panel. Dr. Autian's duties will be 



60 



The Maryland Magazine 



Why 



MITCHECD 



is 



mflRYiflnD's fihest coRn 

Mitchell's Premium Corn tastes like 
it was just cut from the cob . . . the 
result of Mitchell's own process- 
ing that cooks and seals the 
corn in cans with- 
in the hour it is 
pulled from the 
stalk. 



AlTCHmi 



SHOE PEG 




(UNotCKCRna 




- Packed by — 

F. 0. miTCHELL & BRO., Inc. 

PERRYMAN, MD. - KENNEDYVILLE, MD. 

Main Office, Perryman, Md. 

Phone Aberdeen 621 -J 



MARYLAND BRASS 
& METAL WORKS 

Non-Ferrous Castings 

Everdur Pipe Fittings 

To Standard Specifications 

Since 1 866 

Stanley B. Cisrlel, Pres. 

MUrdock PULASKI HIGHWAY 

6-9424 Baltimore, Md. 



STERlinG UGHTIflG CO 

J/#f QdsjOA J&l J/tOAS 
(jJho Jjojm? JhinqA oft (Be aid if 

LIGHTinG FIXTURES FOR VOUR HOlllf 



403 N. Charles Street 

Baltimore 



LE 9-0222 



Uxington 9-5311 

II. M. ItllMV CO. 

Office Supplies - Printing 
OFFICE FURNITURE 

110 E. HAMILTON STREET 
BALTIMORE 2, MD. 



to advise on problems of a phar- 
maceutical nature which will arise 
with the revision of NF X. 

Dr. Autian recently presented 
a paper dealing with a method 
for the stabilization of Sulfadi- 
azine Sodium Injection at the 
American Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Science. This paper 
was cited in a recent article in 
Science and also in the Journal 
of the Drug and Cosmetic Indus- 
try. Dr. Autian conducted this 
research for the Armed Forces 
Medical Procurement Agency. 
Further research work is now be- 
ing conducted by Dr. Autian and 
Mr. Charles Swartz, graduate stu- 
dent, to elucidate the mechanism 
of the degradation of sulfadiazine 
sodium in injections. 

Delivers Lecture 

Mr. John Sciarra, Instructor in 
Pharmacy, delivered a lecture on 
aerosols in medicinal products at 
a joint meeting of the Baltimore 
Branch and the Student Branch 
of the American Pharmaceutical 
Association at the Kelly Memorial 
Building. 

Article Published 

In a recent issue of Drug Stand- 
ards, an article appeared on the 
assay of Phenolated Calamine Lo- 
tion,' USP XV. Dr. Benjamin 
Allen, Associate Professor of 
Pharmacy, and Mr. Robert Ko- 
koski, Junior Instructor in Phar- 
macognosy, were the authors and 
research workers who made the 
study. 

Appointed To Committee 

At a meeting of the Baltimore 
Branch of the American Pharma- 
ceutical Association, Dr. Frank J. 
Slama was appointed as a member 
of the Nominating Committee for 
officers of the Association for the 
coming year. 

Elected Treasurer 

Dr. Donald E. Shay, Professor 
of Bacteriology, has been elected 
Treasurer of the Maryland Bio- 
logical Society. Dr. Shay is Chair- 
man of the Conference Session in 
Bacteriology being held at Atlan- 
tic City under the sponsorship of 
the American Association of Den- 
tal Schools. The topic is " Teach- 
ing of Bacteriology in Profession- 
al Schools." A similar conference 
is being planned for Colleges of 
Pharmacy by Dr. LeBeau, of the 
University of Illinois, which would 
be held under the sponsorship of 
the American Association of Col- 
leges of Pharmacy. 




King Bros., Inc. 

PRINTING & OFFSETTING 

SAratogo 7-5835 

208 N. Calvert Street 
BALTIMORE 2, MD. 



LOEWY 

DRUG CO., INC. 

manufacturing and wholesale 
druggists 

distributors of 

LILLY PHARMACEUTICALS 

daily delivery within city limits 

108 S. HANOVER STREET 
BALTIMORE 1 , MD. SA 7-6203 



May-June; 1957 



MOTORS and GENERATORS 

Sold - Repaired - Rewound - Installed 

COMPLETE SHOP FACILITIES 

Trouble Service in 15 Minutes 

C. H. STARK ELECTRIC CO. 

119 Light Street Baltimore, Md. PL 2-5600 



61 



Hen< 


dlers 

Him _!>■ -^SW'i 


^»l 


First Name in Ice Cream 
For Over A Half Century 



Edward H. Curlander 

Pictures of 
Every Description 

DISTINCTIVE FRAMING 

525 N. CHARLES STREET 

Boltimore, Md. 

LExington 9 4716 



Mama Emma's 



ROMA 

Nationally Famous Italian Cuisine 
in "LITTLE ITALY" 



900 FAWN ST. 
231 S. HIGH ST. 



SA. 7-8990 
LE. 9-8965 



(Two Fntrant.il Baltimore, Md. 

Open Daily 11 AM. to 4 A.M. 



For Advertising Space 
in 

MARYLAND MAGAZINE 





Contact 




SALLY OGDEN 


HOpkins 


18 W. 25th St. 


7-9018 


Baltimore 18, Md 



New Faculty Members 

Mr. Bernard S. Melnicove, 
LL.B., has been appointed Visit- 
ing Lecturer in Pharmacy Admin- 
istration. He is teaching Juris- 
prudence this semester. Mr. Mel- 
nicove received his LL.B. at the 
University of Baltimore. He has 
been the attorney for the Balti- 
more Retail Druggists' Associa- 
tion for five years and is also the 
attorney for the Maryland Phar- 
maceutical Association. Mr. Mel- 
nicove is a former State Senator 
from the Fourth District of Balti- 
more City. 

Mr. James W. Hillis, Jr., of the 
College of Arts and Sciences at 
College Park, is Instructor in 
Speech in the School of Pharmacy 
this semester. 

Mr. John A. Polto has recently 
been appointed Graduate Assis- 
tant in Zoology. 

Mr. Landon W. Burbage is 
again Visiting Lecturer in Mar- 
keting. 

Instructor Conducts Research 

Mr. Leslie Costello, Instructor 
in Zoology and Physiology at the 
School of Pharmacy, has con- 
ducted studies on the biochemical 
pathways which supply energy 
for parasitic worms which are 
present in sheep. The young 
teacher and scientist will receive 
his Doctorate degree from the 
Graduate School of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland this June. Mr. 
Costello has already contributed 
a number of scientific papers to 
the fields of biology and biochem- 
istry and is a member of the 
following scientific societies: Sig- 
ma Xi, American Society of Pro- 
tozoologists, American Society of 
Parasitologists Helminthological 
Society of Washington, Society of 
Systematic Zoologists, and the 
Society of Tropical Medicine. 

Industrial Leader Visits 

Dr. Harold W. Werner, Vice 
President in Charge of Research, 
William S. Merrell Company, was 
a recent visitor to the School of 
Pharmacy. 

Guest Lecturers 

Dr. B. Olive Cole, Professor 
Emeritus, gave a very interesting 
lecture on the history of the 
School of Pharmacy to the Fresh- 
man class in "Pharmacy Orienta- 
tion." 

Mr. Frank Balassone, Chief, 
Drug Control, Maryland State 
Department of Health, and Secre- 
tary of the State Board of Phar- 



macy, was guest lecturer in 
"Pharmacy Orientation" recently. 
He outlined the responsibilities of 
pharmacy students and pharma- 
cists in regards to the practice of 
pharmacy. 

Alumni Association Activities 

The annual entertainment and 
Valentine dance of the Alumni 
Association of the School of Phar- 
macy was held in the ballroom of 
the Emerson Hotel in Baltimore. 

Outside rain and snow made for 
a disagreeable drive to the hotel, 
but in the ballroom was happiness, 
good fellowship, and an enjoyable 
evening for over 500 persons who 
attended, including 100 students 
and their ladies or escorts, faculty 
members, graduate students, in- 
vited guests and 300 members of 
the Alumni Association. 

President Norman J. Levin wel- 
comed the group in attendance. 
H. Nelson Warfield, First Vice 
President, was General Chairman 
of the committees, and presented 
the following entertainers for the 
evening: 

Frank Whitmore, Master of 
Ceremonies, who is soloist with 
the Baltimore Symphony Orches- 
tra, and who has appeared in 
three broadway show hits ; Elaine 
Lee, pianist and organizer of 
young people who show unusual 
talents in show business; Winnie 
Sanders in a balancing act ; Jeane 
Steele, "Miss Maryland 1957" 
with vocal selections; Beverly 
Ann Welch, with miramba and 
zylophone; and Jo-Jo Vitale, Bal- 
timore's Little Master Showman. 

The Souvenir Program repre- 
sented donations for advertise- 
m e n t s from manufacturers, 
wholesalers, retailers, associated 
organizations and friends. Solo- 
mon Wiener was Chairman of 
this committee and George Stiff- 
man, co-chairman. 

The several thousands of dol- 
lars received from advertisements 
in the Souvenir Program will be 
used for student aid and scholar- 
ships. Scholarships are provided 
by the Association for two first- 
year students, and include the 
full amount of tuition, books, etc., 
for the year. The Alumni Asso- 
ciation has also donated $400 
annually for student aid to the 
upper classes, which is matched 
by a corresponding amount from 
the American Foundation for 
Pharmaceutical Education. 

The Alumni Association is also 
extremely interested in the work 



62 



The Maryland Magazine 



of the Student Recruitment Com- 
mittee. The members of this 
Committee visit high schools, 
upon invitation, and present Phar- 
macy as a profession, explaining 
entrance requirements, curricu- 
lum, and other advantages of 
graduation from the School of 
Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland. The following are 
members of this Committee: H. 
Nelson Warfield, Chairman; Alex- 
ander J. Ogrinz, Cordon Mouat, 
Norman J. Levin, Victor Morgen- 
roth, Samuel I. Raichlen, and 
Dean Noel E. Foss. 

Delicious ice cream from Hend- 
ler's was served following the 
presentation of the program. Dan- 
cing to the music of Stan Bridge's 
orchestra was enjoyed by stu- 
dents and alumni — voung and 
old— until 1 A.M. 

Prizes donated by the follow- 
ing were drawn bv the holders 
of the lucky tickets: H. B. Gil- 
pin, through Mr. William Harri- 
son; Brockway Glass, through 
Arthur H. All ; and Owens-Illinois 
Glass, through Elmer Biles. 

Assigned to Walter Reed 

Pvt. Richard E. Myers, '55, was 
recently assigned to the Walter 
Reed Army Medical Center, 
Washington, D. C. 

"Exercise Hard Times" 

Pfc. Max L. Mendelsohn, '55, re- 
cently participated in "Exercise 
Hard Times" with the Second In- 
fantry Division at Fort Richard- 
son, Alaska. The six-day exercise, 
designed to test the combat effici- 
ency of the Division under arctic 
conditions, was the largest ever 
held at the Alaskan fort. 

James P. Cragg, Jr., was Chair- 
man of the Entertainment Com- 
mittee; Sam A. Goldstein was 
Chairman of the Place and Ar- 
rangement Committee ; Jerome 
Stiffman was Chairman of the 
Publicity Committee ; Irving Coh- 
en was Chairman of the Ticket 
Committee and had the coopera- 
tion of alumni and students in 
securing a large and appreciative 
attendance. President Norman J. 
Levin was pleased and proud of 
the accomplishments of the 
Chairmen and the many members 
of the various committees. 

Plans are being made for the 
entertainment of the 1957 gradu- 
ates of the School of Pharmacy 
in June. 



Best for Baby . . . 



extra rich 
extra nourishing 
extra delicious 



Serving the Major Portion of MARYLAND 




KOONTZ 



\~($>^ 



BALTIMORE — Liberty 2-4300 
SALISBURY, MD. EASTON, MD. 



7145 

CHESTERTOWN, MD. 
225 



375 

LINTHICUM, MD. 
224 



First ivith the "Carriage" Trade! 



CRANE CO 



DISPLAY ROOM — WAREHOUSE 

10700 Hanna Street — Beltsville, Md. 

WEbster 5-4600 

DISPLAY ROOM — WAREHOUSE 

212 N. West Street — Falls Church, Va. 

JEfferson 4-4800 

Wholesale Plumbing - Heating 
Valves and Fittings 



MARIE C ARMACOST 




PRIVATE 

CONVALESCENT 
HOME 

812 Register Ave. 
BALTIMORE 12, MD. 

24 Hour Nursing Service 

Phone VA 3-4366 
Moderate Kates 

Orderly In Attendance 



May' June, 1957 



63 



^f 



^" 



$ 



l\' 



VYlcihjykwjdL 



As business men in the community, we watch 
with pride your accomplishments in business 
and professions. We are interested in your 
activities, your contributions, your sports and 
your hobbies. 



•* f 



^Jodau i ^jrainion 
in t/J>usinesi ~jrurnilure 

Lyff-ice ana S^cliool 

C^c^uipment Cf ^iunpliei 

HAS. G. STOTT & CO. 

1310 New York Ave., N. W. 

Washington, D. C. 

NA 8-4181 

PAPER & PAPER PRODUCTS 

1935 5th St, N. E. 

Washington, D. C. 

DU 7-4433 






it 




»v 



Botany "500" and Hyde Park Clothes 



Dobbs Hats - Bostonian Shoes 



Hi 



J/ J Vdla/ft Shop 
PRINCb 690RGO FINEST MEN'J WtAR 5T0R& 



(BETWEEN RIVERDALE 

6D33 BALTIMORE BLVD. and hyattsville) 



UNIDN 4-1312 



64 



The Maryland Magazine 



WE HAIL YOU! 



You and your University have and are con- 
tributing so much to the Nation and the Na- 
tion's Capital. We extend to you an invitation 
to visit our establishments and make your- 
selves known. Best Wishes! 



_/o/' /DtiicL' Jhis is a J-^ealie Lyei 

SEE AND DRIVE THE 
NEWEST BUICK YET 

Qet the Top Deal From 

PEAK C 
(BuicL, Qnc. mm 



WISCONSIN AVE. AT ALBEMARLE ST. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

EM 2-2000 



"A Service You Can Trust" 

LEE FREW PLATT 

REAL ESTATE and INSURANCE 

9437 GEORGIA AVE. SILVER SPRING, MD. 
JU 9-5708 




Maryland 

Men 

Select 



HYATTSVILLE AUTO GLASS CO 

"IF IT'S GLASS. WE HAVE IT" 

Auto Glass Installed While-U-Wait 



5516 BALTIMORE AVENUE 



HYATTSVILLE, MD. 




* 



JhsL qatlmAuv} pdaaL fyfi, 
maAytand TTktL ofr Saod, JoaJUl 

DUKE ZEIBERT'S 






* 




DUKE ZEIBERT'S 



RESTAURANT 



May- June, J 957 



1730 L STREET (Two doors west of Connecticut Ave.) 

STerling 3-1730 
Open 'til Midnight — Sunday 'til 10 P.M. 



CARPET CENTER 

NATIONALLY FAMDUS BRANDS 

RUGS AND CARPETS 



JUNIPER 5-1117 

8612 GEORGIA AVE. SILVER SPRING, MD. 

65 





KARL M.GRAF 

& Company 

2220 N.CHARLES ST 
BALTIMORE. MD. 

Furniture 
Interiors 




"The Store of Highest 
Tradition and Prestige' 



NeUon CoL 



entan 



JEWELRY SPECIALISTS 

333 N. CHARLES at PLEASANT 

BALTIMORE 1, MD. 

LExington 9-3136 LExington 9-3137 

Custom-made Jewelry 

BY APPOINTMENT 

— Designs Submitted — 



By EDITH A. ROSS 

The June brides, vacation plans 
and graduation are the topic of 
the day and rightfully so. 

The shops are filled to the over- 
flowing with beautiful and useful 
articles for we Marylanders, who 
along with other Americans, are 
the most mobile people in the 
world and more than 75% of us 
will be planning a vacation or 
business trip before too many 
months have past. 

The travel agencies have never 
booked more exciting and inter- 
esting around the world cruises, 
airflights to distant lands and the 
hotels in the resort areas are al- 
ready being booked to capacity 
as America takes to the road. 

A trip to our own Ocean City, 
Maryland, early in March found 
the hotels, motels and restaura- 
teurs building, painting and "pol- 
ishing-up" for the influx of honey- 
mooners and vacationers. 

Ocean City has taken on a new 
look, many new modern motels 
are open and ready to accommo- 
date. The "old time" sleepy sum- 
mer hotel is a fast disappearing 
picture. Today the modern accom- 
modations are likened only to the 
fabulous "Motel Row" of Miami 
Beach. 



If your plans include a trip 
where you will be staying away 
from the more lavish hotels, you 
may want to bring along your 
own entertainment, there are so 
many useful items on the market 
today. There is the transistor 
radio that is small and compact 
and can be carried in your purse. 
From your cabin in a Michigan 
back woods or any camp site you 
can quickly tune into civilization. 
There are other types of recrea- 
tion that can be carried in a suit 
case that take up very little space 
and one that we favor is a Mag- 
netic miniature Scrabble set. On 
ship, plane or automobile this 
game defies gravity. 

For the travelers good groom- 
ing, there are items which fit com- 
pactly in small kits. The plastic 
containers are spill proof for 
creams, lotions, colognes and per- 
fumes. A ten weeks supply of 
shampoo, soaps and hand lotions 
in tubes is fitted into a small com- 
pact package which weighs just 
a few ounces. 

A great deal of thought is 
given today by the Air traveler 
to the weight of luggage for long 
trips and there are several fine 
products to choose from. Wash- 
able Nylon in dresses, lingerie 
and gloves is the answer. Just 
wash and dry overnight and step 
out again fresh as a daisy the 
next day. There is a wrinkle 
proof fabric that can be unpacked 
and never a need to call valet 



THE FASHIONABLE 

westch ester 

DINING ROOM 

Finest Cuisine-Served graciously in quiet luxury 
Superb wine cellar. For reservations call Arnold— WOodley 6-7700 

Cocktails In The lounge" or Dining room 
th© holiday room Exquisite private accommodations 
for ten to fifty guests. 4000 cathidral avinui 
Free Parking for Dinner Guests from 6 to 10 P.M. IN MAIN GARAGE 



service. 



The bride steals the spotlight 
in all shops at this glorious time 




A Bit of Old Italy in 

the Nation's Capital 

• 

Italian Cuisine 

Choice N.Y. Cut Steaks 

Luncheon - Dinner - late Supper 

1143 NEW HAMPSHIRE AVE., N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D.C. - ME 8-2985 

ALDO Cafe 

Complete Bar & Wines 
12 Noon - 1 A.M. 




66 



The Maryland Magazine 



^omatL 



of the vear and for you busy 
people with so many friends be- 
ing married in June, MARTIN'S 
IMPORTERS, 1223 Connecticut 
Avenue, Washington, D. C. is the 
answer to your prayers. This 
fabulous establishment has beau- 
tiful silver, fine china, lovely 
crystals, Art Objets— just every- 
thing a bride would treasure. 

Martin's has the largest col- 
lection of china in Washington. 
You will find it difficult to decide 
between beautiful WEDGE- 
WOOD, ROYAL DOULTON, 
CROWN DARBY, etc. Make your 
gift one to be loved and cherished 
always, by shopping at Martin's 

Importers. 

* * * 

If April showers bring May 
flowers it must continually be that 
magic month at EARLE KIRK- 
LEY'S FLORIST SHOP, 3413 
Greenmount Avenue, Baltimore. 
Here you will find the year round, 
lovely flowers, always a favorite 
lift. 

Mr. Kirkley moved to Balti- 
more from Pittsburgh twenty- 
nine years ago and started his 
florist business. It certainly was 
3ur city's gain and Pittsburgh's 
loss. Earle not only runs his 
successful business but still finds 
time in his busy life to take an 
active part in many civic organi- 
zations. 

All the floral arrangements are 
beautiful and so unusual and his 
wedding bouquets are really 
works of Art. 

Do call BElmont 5-0200 or stop 
in at 3413 Greenmount Avenue, 
the next time you want lovely 
flowers. 




BE 
3 5-0200 



EARLE KIRKLEY, Inc. 

3413 Greenmount Ave. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 




KARL M. GRAF extends an 
invitation for all the lovely June 
brides to visit him at 2220 N. 
Charles Street. Here in this 
beautiful setting one finds furni- 
ture, rugs, lamps, fabrics, etc., to 
suit each and every taste. The 
new bride whose house or apart- 
ment is decorated by Mr. Graf is 
a lucky girl indeed, for she will 
have a charming individual home 
done to suit her personality and 
like a lovely jewel in a fine set- 
ting, she will sparkle in her new 

surroundings. 

* * * 

ALDO CAFE at 1143 New 
Hampshire Avenue, Northwest, 
Washington, D. C. originally 
opened in 1929 as a small cafe 
catering to friends of the family 
of Aldo and Maria Prati. 

Aldo did all the serving and 
Maria all the cooking. It pro- 
gressed thru the years by praises 
from satisfied customers who 
eagerly acquainted their friends 
with the fine food and wonderful 
hospitality at "Aldos." It wasn't 





Your 


m mm- * n 


Child's 


•» JP*JBk < 


Van oDurand 


NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE FOR HOME SITTING 


Also Direct Color Photography 


1659 WISCONSIN AVE. • DE 2-870* 


WASHINGTON, D. C. 



T H » '. f MARK 




• II I I 000 




Ocnotield v_ompanu inc. 

uierlina Din'erwarv 

CarUsalPleasanl Sis 'BalUor.-I.Md" 



Furs and Clothes 
of Distinction 

IP P 

Auoip eol\i 



'OUNOtO 1803 



1 220 Charles Street, North 
Baltimore, Md. 




Fiction 

Non-Ficrion 

Children's Boohs 

Educational Qames 
and Toys 

Stationery and 
Qreeting Cards 

Religious Books and 
Bibles 

l5altimor*'l Cullurat Ujiparlm*nl -_>/«/•« 

1 Wl f HI FO* 7 *.'/ Moil ond phont orders ttupp.d •r*m>riy. 
0N ALL »OOH.; \ Writ* for fiM lo.k Cotolc, 




BOOK STORE 

516 N. CHARLES STREET 

Phone SA. 7-7280 

Baltimore, Md. 



May-June, 1957 



67 



JtA. 



WbWfkuruL U)omsuL 



very long before hundreds of 
people began coming to Aldo's to 
enjoy the wonderful cooking of 
" Moma " and the genial welcome 
of Aldo. 

The original capacity, seating 
twenty people soon mushroomed 
until at present ALDO'S has 
three modern dining rooms, a 
summer garden and private rooms 
with a capacity of over 300 ac- 
commodations. 

Aldo passed away in 1953 but 
" Moma" is still very active in 
the operation of the business 
along with her two sons, Henrv 
and Ermanno. "Hank" and "Al" 
in the early days learned the 
restaurant business and the re- 
sponsibility it entailed. They both 
washed dishes, helped prepare 
salads, served as waiters and bus- 



(J->eautiful Clothes 

Jeanette Beck, Inc. 

1016 N. CHARLES STREET 
BALTIMORE 1, MARYLAND 



fijcdaoL 

Finest PEKING Cuisine 
in the Nation's Capital 




"We entertain 

Daily more 
Diplomats than 

the 
White House" 



and Superb 

AMERICAN HOME 

COOKING 

INTERNATIONAL COCKTAILS 

Open Dally 11:30 to Midnight 

3524 CONN. AVE., N.W. 

At Porter Street 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Any size party 
accommodated at any time 
Reservations: EM. 2-6358 



1 

»: 
:o: 



boys in between school hours. It 
started with a comfortable and 
homey atmosphere and still main- 
tains that atmosphere. 

"Moma" Prati still directs the 
kitchen under her exacting stand- 
ards and the boys continue in 
maintaining their fathers tradi- 
tion of offering the customers a 
genial and friendly atmosphere 
coupled with wonderful food and 
service. The summer garden is 
an old favorite with the thou- 
sands of guests who enjoy out- 
side dining under an authentic 
grape arbor, colorful lights, red 
and white checkered table cloths 
and hanging Chianti bottles, all 
contributing to bring "A bit of 
old Italy to the Nation's Capital." 

Books that are "Good Reading" 
for May-June from the COKES- 
BURY BOOK STORE, 516 North 
Charles Street, are as follows: 

Fiction 
The Scapegoat — Du Maurier 
Till We Have Faces— C. S. Lewis 
Day of Infamy — Walter Lord 
The Eye of Love — Margery Sharp 
And Walk In Love — Buckmaster 

Non Fiction 
Stay Alive All Your Life — Nor- 
man V. Peale 
This Hallowed Ground — Bruce 

Catton 
I Chose A Parson — Stark 
Profiles In Courage — Kennedy 
The Art Of Loving — Erich 

Fromm 
1000 Inspirational Things — Mor- 
ris 
1000 Beautiful Things — Barrows 
Youth— Gesell 
Love Or Perish — Blanton 
Gift From The Sea — Lindbergh 
Emily Post's Etiquette 
Webster's New World Dictionary 
Don't Go Near The Water— Wm. 

Brinkley 
The FBI Story— Don Whitehead 



6'S 



Gifts of Distinction • Objets d'Art 

• CREATIVE DE5IGN5 

• PRECIOUS STONES 
• WATCHES 

C. J. ANDERSON 

Graduate Gemologist, G.I. A. 
^— Jeweler — 

1 1 9 W. SARATOGA STREET 
Baltimore 1, Md. LE 9-6342 



$d to ih& S£OAlw\£ 
wilhfcmpk} 3Luqqaq&V. 



Why Not? 



Shop in Air-Conditioned 
comfort overlooking the 
ocean 

Fashions for LADIES 
. . . for MEN 




BOARDWALK at 9th STREET 

OCEAN CITY, MD. 

Other HESS Shops — Salisbury and Easton 



m 



artin J 

Importers 



SILVER 
FINE CHINA 
RICH CRYSTALS 
AND ART OBJECTS 



1223 C0NNEOICUT AVENUE 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



j*> Est '868^ j 



AT OUR BAKE SHOPS 

Delivered Fresh Twice Daily 

• Layer Cakes 

• Party Cookies 

• Wedding Cakes 

• Low Sodium Bread 

• Eastern Sho Bread 

• Coffee Cakes 

• PAN DANDY 

Brown n Serve Rolls 

See your telephone book 
for locations 

Baltimore, Maryland 



The Maryland Magazine 




CLUB 



NEWS 

Jos. II. Deckman, 
Treasurer 



Alumni Take Terps 

Coach Tommy Mont took the 
wraps off a fine crop of 
young 1 Terrapins and matched 
them against a star-studded 
alumni roster — final score, 14-13, 
alumni. Some 11,000 witnessed 
the contest at Byrd stadium on 
April 13, and came away talking 
about a young freshman from 
Philadelphia who gained 78 yards 
and scored a touchdown. This 
205-pound halfback named Jim 
Joyce may well be a name to re- 
member. He was running against 
an alumni line averaging nearly 
245 pounds and containing great 
professional and All-America 
names. 

Proceeds from the game are 
channeled through the "M" Club 
to assist in nine recognized sports 
at the University. Alumni who 
saw action and the professional 
team with which they play were: 
quarterbacks — Bernie Faloney 
(Edmonton-Hamilton), Bob De- 
Stefano, Lynn Beigtol (Packers- 
Colts), Jack Scarbath (Redskins- 
Steelers), and Fred Petrella; half- 
backs — Joe Horning, Dick Nolan 
(Giants), Ron Waller (Rams), Joe 
Petruzzo, Ed Vereb (Vancouver), 
Chester Hanulak (Browns), and 
Dave Nuszi ; fullbacks — Ralph 
Felton (Redskins), Dick Bielski 
(Eagles), Jim Skarda, Tom Selep 
(Lions), John Merricks, Dan 
Staffieri and Karney Scioscia. 

On the line were centers — Bob 
Pellegrini (Eagles), and John 
Irvine (Cards-Hamilton) ; guards 
— Jack Davis (Redskins), Bill 
Maletzky (Browns), Charles Lat- 
timer, George Kolarac, Pete Lady- 
go (Steelers, Ottawa) ; Tom Mc- 
Hugh, Herb Hoffman, and Jim 
Molster; tackles — Ray Krouse 
(Giants-Lions), Mike Sandusky 
(49'ers), Bob Morgan (Redskins- 
Calgary), Ralph Baieri, Chester 
Gierula* (Browns), Ed Heuring 
(Bears) and Stan Jones (Bears). 

At the ends were such past 
favorites as Lou Weidensaul 
(Redskins), Stan Karnash, Paul 
Nestor (Colts), Jim Parsons, Rus- 
sell Dennis (Packers), Dick Port- 
er, Jean Waters, Joe Ponze, 
Lloyd ColteryahiL (Colts), and 
Marty Crytzers. 




£ . > 



J*^/!flWKr-«*fc: 




For Reservations Write or Call OCEAN CITY 1090 

STOWAWAY MOTEL 

22nd Street and Boardwalk, Ocean City, Md. 
Ocean City's Most Modern Motel 

Complete with 32 Ultra Modern Units for all your vacation needs. 
AIR-CONDITIONED AND HEATED FOR YEAR ROUND COMFORT. 
Olympic Size Swimming Pool — Cocktail lounge and Restaurant 
OCEAN VIEW PATIO FOR YOUR RELAXING PLEASURE. 

Ownership-Management, William A. Carrier 



Spend Your Vacation Having Fun In 

OCEAN CITY 

MARYLAND 

ALL SPORTS AND AMUSEMENTS 

PLAN NOW TO VISIT DURING THE SUMMER. 
REGARDLESS OF HOW LONG THE VISIT OR 
THE BUDGET. YOU'LL FIND WHAT YOU LIKE 

in OCEAN CITY. MD. 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, WRITE 

INFORMATION CENTER OCEAN CITY, MD. 




cZanAfo%eL KohL 



Between 8th & 9th 
on Boardwalk 

OPEN MAY 25 



Ocean City, Md. 

Phone 102 
Mgr. Mary B. Quillen 



FISHER'S PHARMACY 

Edw. H. Fisher - Philip E. Fisher 
— Prescription Specialists — 

I£ FOR SUNBURN 



Baltimore Ave. at Caroline St. 

Hours 8:30 • 


Ocean City, Md. 

12:00 


EDWARD 

B 
Sales 

Phone 27 

104 N. PHILADELPHIA AVE. 


L 

R O K 
and 


THOMAS 

E R 

Rentals 

OCEAN CITY 
MD. 



Mdy'June, 1957 



69 



Congratulations 

to the 

Graduates of the 

UNIVERSITY OF 
MARYLAND 

• 

Class of 1957 



R & H 



11 



• Send For Free Booklet: 

Research and 
Consultation" 

Learn how Penniman & Browne, 



Inc. can help solve your Chemis- 
try, Engineering and Inspection 
problems. Write today for your 
copy. Dept. M. 
341 St. Paul Place, Baltimore 2, Md., MU 5-5811 



TOWSON PRACTICAL 
NURSING AGENCY 

UONDKD & LICENSED 

MATERNITY — CHRONIC 
POST OPERATIVE CASES 
COMPANION NURSES 
Iiima C. Okuman, Owner 




DRexel 7-9138 



BALTIMORE, MD: 



BALTIMORE 




"T GUESS 






MEATS 



BALTIMORE 



College of 



Physical Education 
Recreation & Health 



- T heron A. Tompkins 
Off-Campus Courses 

The College of Physical Edu- 
cation, Recreation and Health 
offers off-campus courses in 
Health, Physical Education (ele- 
mentary and secondary) and 
Recreation to school, health and 
recreational personnel. 

During the first semester of 
the current academic year, five 
different courses were taught in 
six different places by five differ- 
ent members of the faculty. Two 
hundred and twenty-four persons 
were enrolled in these courses and 
the teachers traveled 13,225 miles 
to meet these classes once a week 
for 16 weeks. 

During the present semester 
six different faculty members are 
teaching seven different courses 
in four different localities. These 
teachers will travel 8,800 miles 
to teach 173 students enrolled in 
these courses. 

By the end of the present sem- 
ester eight different faculty mem- 
bers will have traveled 22,025 
miles to have taught 397 students. 

Dr. Warren R. Johnson and 
Dr. Benjamin H. Massey are cur- 
rently teaching courses to nurses 
for the Nursing School. Dr. John- 
son is teaching a health course 
entitled, "Methods and Materials 
for School Health Instruction," 
and Dr. Massey is teaching a 
physical education course entitled, 
"Scientific Bases of Movement 
Applied." 

Intramural Department 

The Intramural Department in- 
augurated its first swimming 
tournament this winter and 100 
students participated. The re- 
sponse was such that next year 
the Intramural Department plans 
to hold two separate tournaments 
— one for the fraternities and 
one for the independent groups. 
A large crowd of students wit- 
nessed the event which was held 
in the Cole Activities Building 
on March 19 and 20. 

Required P.E. Department (Men) 

About 50 faculty children are 
receiving instruction in swimming 
each Monday night from 6:45 to 
7:30. The instruction is being 
given by Mr. Jack Lowder, In- 
structor on the Physical Educa- 
tion staff and three physical edu- 
cation major students. 



A BALTIMORE INSTITUTION 
SINCE 1874 

WM. J. TICKNER 

& SONS 

INCORPORATED 

North and Pennsylvania Aves. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Phone LA 3-4321 

Distinctive Funeral Service 




HEALTHY 



• • 



GIVE TO 
FIGHT POLIO 

WILLIAM F. STONE, JR. 

2612 N. Charles Street 

Baltimore 1 8, Md. 




WEATHERMAKER 



Contact UNITED CLAY 

& SUPPLY CORP. 
1122 N. Charles Street 

MU. 5-7200 

for the name of 
your nearest dealer 



70 



The Maryland Magazine 



At the present time all instruc- 
tion is limited to non-swimmers. 
However, next fall the College 
of Physical Education, Recreation 
and Health hopes to be able to 
offer some intermediate instruc- 
tion. 

Immediately after this instruc- 
tion, 150 to 200 faculty members 
and their children are enjoying 
a recreation swimming period. 

Weight Lifting Club: 

The University of Maryland 
Weight Lifting Club is proud of 
its recent growth to the number 
seventy-five. Elections at mid 
year resulted in placing Ed Lane- 
hart, Physical Education major 
and this past year's "Mr. Mary- 
land," in the president's post. 
Fred Schleifer, another major 
and experienced amateur lifter, 
was named vice-president, and 
Richard Pozecki, a former service 
man with lifting experience be- 
came the secretary. The club is 
open to all Maryland University 
students and Faculty five days a 
week and two evenings a week. 
Constructive instruction is avail- 
able to all by the officers and 
other capable members. Mr. Har- 
old W. Freeman, Physical Edu- 
cation Instructor, is the sponsor. 

As a physical education activi- 
ty, the sport is growing. Pres- 
ently there are ten sections aver- 
aging thirty students per section 
taking the Weight Training 
course in the Required Physical 
Education Curriculum. Here the 
emphasis is placed upon funda- 
mentals of lifting and training. 

Within the present "Club" 
those who are displaying the 
most concerted interest and who 
envision some kind of competition 
in the future are banding together 
to be known as the "Olvmpic 
Barbell Club." 

Undergraduate Professional 
Curriculum 

The Undergraduate Profession- 
al Curriculum is undergoing con- 
stant scrutiny and the following 
changes will be in effect for the 
school year, September, 1957-58. 

In the PE 60 series, the follow- 
ing courses will be offered: PE 
61, Soccer and Gymnastics; PE 
63, Volleyball and Track and 
Field; PE 65, Wrestling and 
Tackle Football; PE 67, Basket- 
ball and Baseball. 

In addition, a new course with 
a title similar to recreational 
sports activities, is being studied 
with the intent that the course 
will become a requirement for 

May-June, 1957 






41 r ^ M m m 

t^f Very Impressive Potion 

Tired of ordinary soups 
...try 

CrabakMaryland 

from the 

CroSSe &Elaiiwell 
Soup Shelf 




Cream of Oman 

Soup 



V^ 



Find Stfli 
Ohm Sup 




9 'y land 



At your grocer's now, or write for 
name of nearest dealer to: Crosse 
& Blackwcll. Baltimore 24, Md. 



Another First for the Pimlico Hotel 

Old Time 
Barbecue Treats 

Tontalinng barbecue dishes in the grand 
manner! Choice, lender meat turned 
slowly on a spit over a blaiing fire, to 
a golden brown. Basted with a pungent, 
thick, mouthwatering sauce, prepared from 
an old recipe by our own expert chefsl 

Nate's and Leon's 



imlico 

HOTEL 



Open 'til 2 a.m. - Saturday 'til 3 
5301 PARK HEIGHTS AVE. BALTIMORE 



B. & B. EXTERMINATORS, Inc. 

SANITATION and PEST 
CONTROL SERVICE 

BLACK EAGLE PRODUCTS 

Phones: LExington 9-2140 — 9-2141 

626 NORTH CALVERT ST. 

Baltimore 2, Md. 



Be a MEAT EXPERT! 
Always say 



ZSSKAV 

mQUALITYfl# 



ALL MEAT FRANKS 

Every ounce of the pure beef and 
pork in Esskay's all-meat Franks 
is carefully selected by Esskay's 
experts, who season and spice 
these famous franks to wholesome, 
flavorful perfection. Be sure to 
ask for Esskay Franks — they're 
the finest made! They're on sale in 
the Byrd Stadium and new Stu- 
dent Activities Building. 

WM SCHIUDERBERG — T J KURDIE CO. 




71 



Ga+HflatulatiattA. 
ClaU 0/ '57 



. . . as you take your 
place* in your community 

and throughout the 

land, ire sincerely 

iriuli you all . . . 

success and 

happiness 

today and 

in the 

years 

ahead. 

JOHN M. WALTON 
DENNIS W. MADDEN 

3510 RHODE ISLAND AVENUE 
MT. RAINIER, MD. 




Lumber 

Millwork 



Building 
Material 



BELTSVILLE LUMBER CO 

Telephone WEbster 5-3103 

10730 BALTIMORE AVENUE ( u. s. no. i) 
BELTSVILLE, MARYLAND 



THOMSSON STEEL CO., Inc 

5106 Baltimore Avenue 
HYATTSVILLE, MD. AP 7-3201 



• WE SPECIALIZE IN RENTALS 



HANNES FORMAL WEAR 



TUXEDOS & FORMALS 
JUniper 9-0505 
PARKING FACILITIES 



"First in Silver Spring" 

8229 GEORGIA AVE. 
SILVER SPRING, MD. 
Diagonally across from Suburban Trust Co. f 



PHONE UNION 4-5100 



B. SUGRUE— PRES. 



NORMAN MO TOR C OMPANY, Inc. 

SALES & % SERVICE 



8313 WASHINGTON-BALTIMORE BLVD. • COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



TOWER 9-6204 



JIMMIE PORTER 

Trading as 

KIERNAN'S 

A Complete Line of Beverages 
8200 Baltimore Blvd. College Park, Md. 



C. Engel's Sons 

Incorporated 

Established 1850 
Fruits and Vegetables 

District 7-0995 
350 D STREET, S.W. 

Washington, D. C. 



undergraduate professional physi- 
cal education majors. 

We are gratified with the in- 
creased enrollment from 1955-56 
in comparison to the present 
school year. We had an increase 
of some 29 r '< . This increase in 
enrollment is welcomed because 
as a result of a recent survey 
made in the State of Maryland, 
there still is a definite need for 
Physical Education in the Junior 
High School and Elementary 
levels and a particular need for 
women physical education majors. 

Progress Report on Safety 
Education Center 

The July, August issue (1955) 
of The Maryland Magazine told 
of the need in Maryland for safe- 
ty and driver education courses, 
especially for prospective teach- 
ers of high school driver educa- 
tion, and of the development of 
these courses in the College of 
Physical Education, Recreation 
and Health. The need for driver 
education is evident to everyone. 
Studies show that persons who 
have had driver education gener- 
ally have fewer accidents and 
traffic law violations than others. 

Five courses are now offered in 
the Safety Education Curriculum. 
The two general safety education 
courses have been given since 
1946. In February, 1955, "The 
Driver, His Characteristics and 
Improvement," was added. This 
was, followed in the fall of 1955 
by a course in Basic Driver Edu- 
cation, which deals with traffic 
problems, motor vehicle laws, 
automobile construction and 
maintenance, and methods of in- 
struction. Finally during the 
1956 spring semester, Advanced 
Driver Education was offered at 
College Park and at Baltimore. 
It is possible that in the future 
courses with graduate credit may 
be offered in safety education. 

During the 1956 spring semes- 
ter 113 students were enrolled 
in these courses. Among the 
June graduates were seven who 
had a minor in safety educa- 
tion. (There are only 21 colleges 
in the United States that offer 
a minor in safety education.) 
Next year's graduate class is ex- 
pected to include 25 with safety 
education as a minor. 

Summer School courses, like 
those described above, were off- 
ered in 1955-56 and will be offered 
in 1957. The Summer School 
program is designed to enable 
teachers now engaged in driver 
education to extend their compe- 



72 



The Maryland Magazine 



ence in teaching or to prepare 
'or promotion or advancement 
nto supervisory or administrative 
lositions in safety education, 
^hese courses are also open to 
eachers of other subjects who 
vould like to become qualified to 
each driver education. The All 
>tate Foundation is giving a 
'rant to the Safety Education 
:enter of $2,000 for the Summer 
if 1957— four-fifths to be used 
or summer school scholarships, 
ind one-fifth to be used for ex- 
>enses, materials and equipment. 

The Safety Education ("enter 
las a combination classroom and 
aboratory on the second floor of 
he new Cole Activities Building, 
rhe purchase of the driver traili- 
ng equipment in the laboratory 
vas made possible by a great 
rom the Nationwide Insurance 
"ompany. Among the equipment 
ire testing devices for field of 
r ision, color vision, distance judg- 
nent, visual acuity, night sight 
nd reaction time. 

While driving, it is necessary 

notice cars and pedestrians ap- 
proaching from the sides. In the 
ield of vision test, small black 
ind white targets rotate as they 
nove forward on either side while 
he subject looks straight ahead. 
Phe angle at which these objects 
tre first noticed is then read from 

1 scale on the test. 

In the distance judgment test, 
hree miniature cars are set by 
he examiner in random positions 
ind the subject is asked to indi- 
:ate the car which appears near- 
ist, and that which appears far- 
hermost. Eight different settings 
ire possible with this device. 

The night sight meter is an 
ittempt to duplicate night driv- 
ng conditions. It incorporates 
;he element of speed, which is 
lot usually found in tests of this 
lature. The targets change at 
he rate of 45 per minute, so the 
subject must identify them quick- 
y. This is the situation on the 
lighway where the driver must 
identify pedestrians and other 
objects very quickly in order to 
ivoid hitting them. 

The reaction time unit of the 
iriver evaluator houses the brake, 
iccelerator, pedals, the timer, and 
red and green lights. To give 
the test, the examiner presses a 
Dutton on the end of a card to 
turn on the red light. When the 
subject responds by stepping on 
the brake, the timer is stopped 
and can be read to the nearest 
1 100 of a second. 

One of the road training de- 
vices is the detonator. The deto- 



fhe smart set's guide 
to dining and dancing 

Palladian Room 

ROLLY ROLLS, his entertaining 
piano and his orchestra for 
dancing, 10 till closing. 
COLONIAL WAGONS DINNER 
$3.85, 6 to 10, Monday thru 
Saturday. 

Blue Room 

Brings you its Parade of fam- 
ous name Bands for dancing 
from 8:15 to 12:45. Tuesday 
thru Saturday. 

Dining from 7. 



THE 




CONNECTICUT AT CALVERT 
RESERVATIONS: ADams 4-0700 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 




WHEELER is 

CHRYSLER - PLYMOUTH - IMPERIAL 
IN WASHINGTON 



te 



ler.l 



nc. 



CHRYSLER CITY 



Before You Buy 
Better Find Out Why 



Largest Chrysler -Plymouth-Imperial Dealer 

ENTIRE 4800 BLOCK WISCONSIN AVE., N.W. 



EQUITABLE 



SAVINGS & LOAN ASSOCIATION 

"Organized 1879" 

• SHARE SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 

• LIBERAL DIVIDENDS 
ACCOUNTS INSURED UP TO $10,000 FOR BUILDING 

REMODELING - REPAIRS 



HOME LOANS 



BY FEDERAL SAVINGS 
INSURANCE CORP. 



A LOAN 



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Washington, D. C. 

NAtional 8-1741 



Wheaton Branch 
11433 Georgia Ave. 

Silver Spring, Md. 

LOckwood 4-0001 



NATIONAL EQUIPMENT & SUPPLY CO Inc. 



Link Belt Company 

Power Transmission 

Supplies 

2600 12th STREET, N.E. 



"Pyrene" & 
"CO-TWO" 

Fire Extinguishers 

WASHINGTON 18, D. 



"MSA" Industrial 
Gas Masks. Canisters 
& First Aid Equipment 

lAwrence 6-1362 




S. A. GATTI & SONS.Inc. 

Institutional Grocers 
3125 V STREET, N.E. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

LA 6-8234 



[HEATING WArfield 7-8538 

PLUMBING 
REMODELING 
JOBBING A SPECIALTY 

ROBERT F. HOFF 

|6313 - 46th Ave. Riverdale, Md. 



May-June, 1957 



73 




KLOMAN 

Instrument Co., 

Inc. 

Surgical Instruments 

Hospital & Physicians 

Supplies 

907 Cathedral St. IE. 9-2912 

BALTIMORE, MD. 
1822 Eye St., N.W. NA. 8-6566 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Buy Defense Bonds 
Every Payday 



J. H. F. 



WINDOW - ON - THE - KITCHEN 

JGidrudsihicL 

SELF-SERVICE 
Delicious food ... All our desserts are 
home-made . . . popular prices . . . 
no tipping . . . air conditioned 

BREAKFAST - LUNCHEON 

DINNER Quality Coffee. 5c a cup 

Open Daily and Sunday 
11th Street Entrance of 

HOTEL HARRINGTON 
11th & E SIS., N.W. Washington, D. C. 



STERLING 
PROCESS 

BOOKBINDING 

EVERY TYPE FOR EVERY PURPOSE 

A Complete Printers Finishing Service 

9401 Baltimore Blvd. COLLEGE PARK, MD. 




Old Dutch Tile Co. 



Inc. 



Slate, Ceramic Tile, 
Terrazzo, Marble 

1319 Linden Court, N.E. 
WASHINGTON 2, D. C. 



McNeill Surveys, Inc. 

LAND PLANNING AND SUBDIVISION 
6480 SLIGO MILL ROAD 

TAKOMA PARK, MD. 
Telephone: JUniper 9-7508 



nator hangs on the car bumper. 
The instructor fires the first shell 
as a warning for the student to 
make an emergency stop. Colored 
powder makes a mark on the 
roadway. When the driver re- 
sponds by stepping on the brake, 
a second shell is fired making an- 
other mark. The distance between 
the two marks gives the reaction 
time distance, and the distance 
from the second mark to where 
the car comes to a stop gives the 
braking distance. 

These psycho-physical tests 
help make prospective teachers 
of safety education and new 
drivers aware of the importance 
of personal limitations and how 
they can affect his ability to drive 
skillfully and safely. The good 
driver will learn his limitations 
and make needed corrections and 
compensations. He will be alert, 
too, to the fact that other drivers 
possess weaknesses and will pro- 
tect himself against mistakes 
that they may make. 

The driver training car which 
is used for testing and practice 
teaching is kept on the ground 
floor of the Cole Activities Build- 
ing. The road behind the building 
surrounding the stadium is used 
for the practice area. Banning 
& Sons Motors, Inc., of Hyatts- 
ville contributed the 1957 Ply- 
mouth we are now using. 

The interest in, importance of, 
and need for this safety education 
curriculum is emphasized by the 
number of telephone calls and 
letters received by the Safety 
Education Center from house- 
wives, factory workers and facul- 
ty inquiring about the program. 
Among those, other than teach- 
ers, who have expressed an inter- 
est in being admitted to these 
courses are police officers and fire- 
men. 

It should be noted that the 
Safety Education Center is not 
in any way replacing private 
driver training schools. These 
courses are designed at present, 
only for prospective teachers of 
driver education. However, stu- 
dents on the campus who would 
like to learn to drive, should call 
the Center; driver education stu- 
dents use a limited number from 
this list for their practice teach- 
ing. 

Insurance companies, the armed 
services, and industrial concerns 
have also shown an interest in 
the curriculum and have inter- 
viewed some of the Center's grad- 
uates for positions in the field of 
safety education. 



^Maryland 

OBITUARIES 



74 



0. W. Spurrier 

Dr. Oliver Walter Spurrier, 52, 
died recently at his home in Balti- 
more after a long illness. As a 
pediatrician, he had served on the 
staff of seven Baltimore hospitals. 

He was a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland School of 
Medicine in 1929. Dr. Spurrier 
served in the Army Medical Corps 
as a major during World War II. 
He was a member of the Hop- 
kins Club and of the Maryland 
Society of the Sons of 1812. 

W. M. Stahl 
William M. Stahl, a member of 
the School of Medicine class of 
1914, died recently. Mr. Stahl 
lived in Danbury, Connecticut and 
was an active member of the 
New England Alumni Club. 

M. E. Coberth 

Dr. M. Edward Coberth, a pio- 
neer in the field of children's den- 
tistry, died at the Maryland Gen- 
eral Hospital after a short illness. 
He was 55. 

Dr. Coberth had a life-long in- 
terest and distinguished career in 
children's dentistry and in the 
welfare of the children them- 
selves. 

For 25 years he was a teacher 
of dentistry as applied to children 
at the University of Maryland 
School of Dentistry, from which 
he was graduated in 1927. 

During the same period, Dr. 
Coberth was chief dental surgeon 
at the Kernan Hospital for Crip- 
pled Children, where he was not 
only known for his professional 
competence but for his warmth 
and interest in his patients. 

"Dr. Coberth was dedicated to 
the problem of children's care," 
said Dr. Douglas Browning, Pres- 
ident of the Baltimore City Den- 
tal Society. "He was more than 
a pioneer in his field." 

He was a past President and 
Treasurer of the city society and 
was active in dental affairs 
throughout the State. At the time 
of his death, Dr. Coberth was 
Chairman of the seventy-fifth an- 
niversary program of the Mary- 
land State Dental Association. 

A native Baltimorean, Dr. 
Coberth attended the Gettysburg 
Academy before taking his dental 
training at the University of 

The Maryland Magazine 



Maryland School. 

Dr. Coberth was founder and 
first President of the Society of 
Dentistry for Children in Mary- 
land. 

E. F. Gamer 

Professor Enoch Francis Gar- 
ner died recently at the Singing 
Pines Nursing Home in Fairfax, 
Virginia after a long illness. He 
was a member of the Class of 
1903 at the Maryland Agricul- 
tural College where he graduated 
with the degree of Mechanical 
Engineer. Soon after graduation 
he joined the staff of Sibley Col- 
lege at Cornell University, where 
he taught and did research work 
in mechanical engineering until 
his retirement 15 years ago. 

D. J. Howard 

Dowell J. Howard of Rich- 
mond, Virginia died suddenly at 
Alexandria Hospital. Mr. How- 
ard was Virginia's superinten- 
dent of public instruction since 
1950 and a figure in state school 
administration for 32 years. 

He had been an educator since 
1919 when he began a teaching 
career as a vocational agricultural 
instructor in Virginia. He as- 
sumed the state's top educational 
post by appointment after moving 
up through the ranks of the de- 
partment. Mr. Howard graduated 
from the University of Maryland 
College of Education in 1917. 

William Johnson 

William Johnson, Broadway 
musical baritone, died suddenly 
recently. Mr. Johnson was born 
in Baltimore and was a former 
student in the University of 
Maryland College of Engineering. 

Elizabeth P. Hutton 

Elizabeth Pollock Hutton, 73, 
widow of T. A. Hutton, former 
purchasing agent at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, died at Leland 
Memorial Hospital, Riverdale, 
Maryland, after a heart attack. 

She married Mr. Hutton in 
1915 and moved to Spearfish, 
South Dakota, where he taught 
history and later became Business 
Secretary at Spearfish Teachers 
College. Mrs. Hutton was Regis- 
trar at the College. 

After they moved to the Uni- 
versity of Maryland in 1919, Mrs. 
Hutton acted as her husband's 
secretary for many years. 

Mrs. Hutton lived at 4407 
Beechwood Rd., College Heights. 




JOIN *. FIGHT 
AGAINST POLIO 



Mc 



CITY EXPRESS, INC. 

200 N. WARWICK AVENUE BALTIMORE 23, MD. 

BALTIMORE • WASHINGTON • ANNAPOLIS 
Truck Leasing - Contract Trucks - Hourly - Weekly - Yearly 

BALTIMORE WASHINGTON 

EDmondson 6-0110 STerling 3-8346 

Marshall H. Wentz, Pres. 



LELAND L. FISHER, Inc 



BUILDERS HARDWARE 

LUMBER - MILLWDRK - PAINT 
Rockville, Md. POplar 2-6123 



24 -HOUR TOW1NQ SERVICE 



WArfield 7-9710 



7505 BALTIMORE AVENUE 
COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND 



swimming pool equipment 

and supply company 

Manufacturers or Distributors of everything your pool needs 

1025 CONNECTICUT AVENUE 

Specify SPESCO with Confidence wash.ngton *. o c. 

r ' Executive 3-7077 



May-June, 1957 



A & F Nurses Registry 38 

Acme Iron Works 56 

K. S. Adkins 45 

Advertisers Engravers 58 

Vli-it/iir 60 

Aldo t afe 66 

American Disinfectant Co 40 

American Office Equipment Co., lnc 39 

American Telephone and Telegraph 

Inside Front Cover 

Anchor Post Product* (Anchor Fence).. 34 

C. .1. AndersoB 68 

Andrews Office Supply & Equipment Co. 56 

Arcade I'ontiac Co 49 

Arcticaire. Inc 43 

Artcrall Electric Supply Co. of Maryland 4" 

Marie C. Armacost Nursing Home 63 

Arnold's \ illage Shop 64 

Arundel Federal Savings & Loan Assn. 54 

Alvin L. Aubinoe Back (.over 

\ \ ik none 4 reres 29 

1'. A It Exterminator Co 71 

Itiiltimore Asphalt Block & Tile Co 31 

Baltimore (heck Room Service 55 

Baltimore Envelope Co 35 

Baltimore Business Forms 24 

Baltimore-Washington Express Co 51 

Bank of Crisfleld 45 

Barber & Ross Hardware, Inc 57 

Bard-Avon School 50 

Bartlett Real Estate 46 

Jeanette Beck. Inc 68 

BeltSvUle Lumber Co 72 

C. I . Benson Furniture Co 31 

Bergman's Laundry 25 

H. M. Biden Co 61 

Bon Ton Saratoga Chip Distributors .... 26 

Brentwood Inn 38 

Brlggs Construction Co., Inc 40 

Buck Glass Co 39 

Leo Butler Co 57 

Carey Machinery & Supply Co 60 

Carpet Center 65 

Tlios. E. Carroll & Son 36 

Caton Ridge Nursing Home 53 

Central Armature Works, Inc, 55 

D. Harry Chambers, Opticians 60 

Chaney's Oarage 75 

Chestnut Farms Dairy 37 

Citizens National Bank 45 

City Express, Inc 75 

Cloverland Farms Dairy 51 

Cohn & Bock Co 45 

Cokesbury Book Store 67 

Nelson Coleman 66 

Collegiate Publishing Co CI 

Colson Merriam 71 

Cooperative Dental Laboratory 30 

Corbin & Dodson Precision Works, Inc. 36 

G. L. Cornell Co 41 

A. Myron Cowell, Inc 48 

Crane Company 63 

Crosse & Blackvvell Co 71 

Crown Oil & Wax Co 42 

Crown Refrigeration Supply Co 59 

Curlandcr Law Book Co 62 

Victor Cushwa & Sons 49 

Duncan Publishing Co 53 

Jack Daniels Buick, Inc 36 

Danny's Formal Wear 59 

Davidson Transfer & Storage Co 38 

F. A. Davis & Sons 28 

Del-Haven White House Cottages 25 

Deotcb.es Haus, Inc 54 

Dietrich & (iambrill, Inc 43 

Dietrich Bros., Inc 31 

Drummond & Co, Ine 50 

J. E. Dyer & Co 36 

Norman S. Earley & Son 42 

EI Mexico Restaurant 36 

Embassy Dairy 32 

C. Engels & Sons 72 

Equitable Savings & Loan Assn 73 

Fairchild Aircraft Division 

Inside Front Cover 

Farmers Cooperative Association 43 

J. H. Filbert, Inc 74 

First Federal Savings & Loan Association 26 

Fisher's Pharmacy 69 

Leland L. Fisher, Inc 75 

I ok. hi - Sleak House 32 

Francis & Parsons 37 

Fraternity Federal Savings & Loan Assn. 58 

Frederick Underwriters, Inc 42 

Fuller & d'Albert, Inc 49 

S. A. Gatti A Son, Inc 73 

Henry B. Gilpin Co 28 

Gobble Green Turkey Farm 47 

Albert I'. Ooetze Packing Co 70 

Goodbody & Co 43 

Karl If. Graf & Co 66 

Gray Concrete Pipe Co 50 

J. E. Grelner Co 60 



Directory of Advertisers 

The Handy Line (Paul M. Adams) 50 

Hannes Formal Wear 72 

Harrington Hotel 74 

Harvey Dairy, Inc 26 

Heilin House Hotel 29 

Hendler's Ice Cream 62 

Hess Apparel 68 

Hilkrest, Florists 37 

Hillyard Sales Co 34 

Hi way Marine 44 

Robert F. Hoff 73 

C. Hoffbcrger Co 52 

Hoffman Surgical Supply Co 58 

Hotel Dupont Plaza Back Cover 

Huffer-Shinn Optical Co 56 

Hyattsville Auto Glass Co 65 

George Hyman Construction Co 35 

Eddie Jacobs 54 

Henry W. Jenkins & Sons Co., Ine 54 

Johnnys A Sammys 45 

Johnston, Lemon & Co 32 

Frank B. Jones 34 

N. E. Kefauver, Jr 42 

Francis Scott Key Hotel 43 

Kidwell & Kidwell, Inc 49 

King Bros., Inc 61 

Kingsville Inn 55 

Earle Kirkley, Inc 67 

Kloman Instrument Co 74 

E. H. Koester Bakery Co 61 

Koontz Creamery, Inc 63 

Kramer Hardware & Supply Co 29 

Krispy Kreme Doughnuts 26 

La Grande Hotel — Bob Ching Restaurant 47 

Lamar & Wallace 33 

Lankford Hotel 69 

Lawyers Title Co. of Prince George's 

County, Inc 32 

Maurice Leeser Co 52 

Liberty Radio & Television Service .... 38 

Lighthouse Diner 45 

Loewy Drug Co., Inc 61 

Lombardo's Marine Center 47 

Lord Calvert Hotel 40 

Loveless Electric Co 37 

Lustine-Nicholson Chevrolet S3 

Maas Dispensing Opticians 42 

G. B. Macke Com 29 

Mangels, ll.r,,u Co.. Inc 30 

Maria's Restaurant 28 

Maridel Motel 46 

Martin's, Importers 68 

Maryland Brass & Metal Works 61 

Maryland Hotel Supply Co 54 

Mason Canning Co 46 

Massers Motel & Restaurant 42 

Mayor & City Council of Ocean City 69 

Meadow Gold Ice Cream Co 25 

The Mecca Restaurant 59 

Metropolitan Tourist Co 53 

Harry S. MicKey Electric Co 38 

Midstate Federal Savings & Loan Assn. 54 

Miller Chemical Co 54 

Wallace E. Miller 49 

F. O. Mitchell & Bro., Inc 61 

Modern Machinist Co 40 

Modern Stationery Co 38 

M. P. Moller, Inc 42 

Montgomery Building Supply Co., Inc. 29 

Morauer & Hartzell 56 

Morrison & Fifer 59 

Moses-Ecco Co., Inc 41 

Murray-Baumgartner Co 60 

Myers & Quigg, Inc 41 

McLeod & Romborg Stone Co., Inc 39 

McNeill Surveys, Inc 74 

National Bank of Cambridge 44 

National Engineering Co 60 

National Equipment & Supply Co 73 

Nationwide Employment Service 58 

Nelson Motors 25 

New China Inn 34 

Norman Motor Co 72 

North Washington Press, Inc 25 

Old New Orleans Restaurant 34 

Oles Envelope Corp 53 

Olney Inn 33 

Old Dutch Tile Co 74 

Palmer Ford, Inc 29 

Park Transfer Co 49 

Parks & Hull Automotive Corp 60 

Parkwood Opticians 34 

Peake Buick, Inc 65 

Peninsula Poultry Distributors, Inc 50 

!'• ■inn in i n & Browne, Inc 70 

Penny's Treasure Chest 49 

People's Supply Co 49 

Perpetual Building Assn 27 

Pimlico Hotel 71 

Lee Frew Piatt 65 

Pocahontas, Inc 47 

The Poole & Kent Co 55 

Piiiiuii. Porter (T/A Kiernan's) 72 



Princess Anne Pharmacy 44 

Process Supply, Inc 38 

Quick Service Laundry 2* 

Refrigeration Supply Co 29 

Reliable Tire Sales 59 

Restorff Motors 29 

Rex Engraving Co 35 

Rice's Bakery 68 

Rivers & Bryon, Inc 40 

Riverside Nursing Home 44 

Katherine Robb Nursing Home 53 

Roberts Cambridge Shipyard, Inc 47 

Rocco's Charcoal House 56 

Roche & Hull. Inc 70 

The Roland Park Co 58 

Roma Restaurant 62 

Rose Exterminator Co 51 

Salganik & Sons 55 

Salisbury Milling Co 47 

Savile Book Shop 56 

Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 47 

John A. Scbeibel. Inc 36 

». h, in, Li Co., Inc 67 

Schluderberg-Kurdle Co. (Esskay) 71 

Schmidt's Baking Co., Inc 39 

Seidenspinner, Realtor 40 

George C. Shaffer, Inc 33 

Shoreham Hotel 73 

Shore Radio Service 44 

Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co 27 

Singer Sewing Center 37 

W. H. Singleton Co., Inc 34 

Smith Welding Co 36 

A. H. Smith Sand & Gravel Co 48 

Russell '.V. Smith 50 

Smorgasbord Restaurant 40 

Southcomb, Inc 59 

Southeast Title Corp 56 

Southeastern Floor Co 27 

Spring Hill Sanitarium 46 

Standard Art, Marble & Tile Co 25 

Standard Engineering Co 41 

C. H. Stark Electric Co 61 

Sterling Lighting Co 61 

Sterling Process 74 

F. M. Stevenson Co., Inc 38 

Stone House Inn 67 

William F. Stone, Jr 70 

Charles G. Stott Co., Inc 64 

Stowaway Motel 69 

Sturdee Metal Products Co. 28 

Suburban Supply, Inc 40 

Suburban Trust Co 40 

Sunset Heights l"> 

Sunshine Laundry 47 

Mano Swartz 27 

Sweetheart Bakers 45 

Swimming Pool Equipment & Supply 

Co., Inc 75 

Tag's Restaurant & Bar 33 

Thomas & Thompson Co 52 

Thomas Distributing Co 43 

Edward L. Thomns 69 

Thomsson Steel Co 72 

William J. Tickner & Sons. Inc 70 

Tingle's Motel 47 

The Title Guarantee Co 59 

Tool & Supply Co., Inc 33 

Towne Point Motel 46 

Towson Practical Nursing Agency 70 

Towson Surgical Supply Co 53 

Towson Telephone Secretaries 52 

Tri-State Electric Supply Co 52 

United Clay & Supply Corp 70 

Fniversity Book Store 31 

Van Durand Studios 67 

Wallop & Son, Insurance 4S 

W alton & Madden 72 

Washington Coca Cola Bottling Works.. 37 

Washington Hotel 45 

George Washington Hotel 44 

L. T. Washington 29 

Washington Refrigeration Co 48 

Washington Stair & Ornamental 

Iron Works 56 

J. I. Wells Co., Inc 47 

Westchester Dining Room 66 

Western Exterminating Co 36 

Wheeler, Inc 73 

White & Leonard 46 

Perry O. Wilkinson 34 

Williams Construction Co 30 

J. McKennv Willis 46 

W. K. Winslow Co 29 

Wise Owl Distributors 33 

Wolf Cohn 67 

C. O. Wurzberger & Sons 60 

Wye Plantation 45 

Wolk Printing Company 62 

Yenching Palace 68 

Duke Zeiberl's Restaurant 65 




TELEPHONE MEN AND WOKEN attend one of the training courses in day-to-day matters of telephone service, employee and 
public relations. These particular courses are for management people in the Bell Telephone Companies throughout the country. 
There are many other Bell System programs for the training and advancement ol telephone people at various stages of their 
careers. They include broad liberal arts courses at leading universities as well as schools within the business for executives. 



From the building of people 
comes the progress of the business" 



Bell System's management training programs 
benefit telephone users and the company as well 
as telephone men and women. 

There is nothing more important to good tele- 
phone sen ice and to the future of the husiness than 
the finding and developing of capable people. 

The Bell System has long been among the lead- 
ers in this field and it has pioneered many new 
methods for the training of telephone men and 
women at various stages of their careers. 



What we aim to do is to provide both the oppor- 
tunity and the preparation lor a better job. I lie 
long-standing policy ol making promotions from 
the ranks also helps to assure the continuing know- 
how and spirit of the organization. 

This in turn brings far reaching benefits to all 
who use the telephone and to the progress ol the 
company. It is an important reason lor today's 
good service and the solid Foundation lor still 
better things to come. 



Working together to bring people together. . . Bell Telephone System 




WASHINGTON'S NEWEST, MOST MODERN HOTEL 




HOTEL DUPONT PLAZA 

COMPLETELY AIR CONDITIONED 

Meeting and Banquet Facilities 

DUPONT CIRCLE WASHINGTON, I). C. 

Alvin L. Aubinoe, Pres. John J. Cost, Gen. Mgr. 



ALVINL-AUBINOEInc 

• Builder ■ 



n 
a. 



a. 

m 

tn 

«H 

>> >: 
i« <n 

nj • "1 

J «c o 



1515 l'tth Street, N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Phone: 
HUdson 3-6025 



Volume XXVIII • Number 5 
July-August • 1957 



the 



Maryland 



magazine 




aryland 



SMSSBMAblm*- 




In This Issue: Commencement, 1957 
Alt mm Reunions 

Bac KSTAGl Willi Sl \so\ 's BES1 PLA^ 







This warhorse doubles as a pack mule! 



The Fairchild C-123 Assault Transport is 
now doing double duty. 

In combat maneuvers, it demonstrates day 
after day how it can operate out of pastures 
and clearings barely large enough for light 
planes; and on logistical missions, it has 
proved itself as a highly efficient bulk cargo 
and troop carrier. 

Recently, in Germany. 30 C-123's moved 
1 1 ,000 men and 2000 tons of equipment clear 
across Bavaria ... in an even five days. 



An agile combat vehicle, or an economical 
transport plane at will — the C-123 is in large- 
scale service all over the free world. 

It embodies the performance, the reliabil- 
ity—the unlimited usefulness which distin- 
guish aircraft designed and built by Fairchild. 



FAIRCHILD 

AIRCRAFT DIVISION • HAGF.R STOWN 10. MARYLAND 

A DIVISION OF FAIRCHILD ENGINE AND AIRPLANE CORPORATION 




*ERE THE FUTURE 13 MEASURED IN LIGMT-VEARSt 



Maryland 




cover: 

The formal commencement of graduates begins with the traditional academu pro- 
cessional. I Ins issue of Maryi \m> coven the i»<, l<iv stories of the Minima ( ,,m 
mencement and the reunion of alumni. The Editors hopi \<>n mil find these ami 
others pleasant warm weather reading. 



the 



Maryland 



JULY-AlKiUsr 



1957 



magazine 



Volume XXVIII 



Number 5 



For the Alumni of 

the University of Maryland 

Published Bi-Monthly at the University of 
Maryland, and entered at the Post Office, 
College Park, Md., as second class mail mat- 
ter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 
1879. $3.00 per year — Fifty cents the copy 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
ROBERT J. McCARTNEY, Director 



ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 
CAROL E. WHEELER, Assistant Editor 
JOSEPH F. BLAIR, Sports Editor 
AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 



Member of American Alumni Council 



OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 
DAVID L. BRIGHAM, Director 



ADVERTISING DIRECTOR 

SALLY L. OGDEN 
18 W. 25th Street 2500 Wise. Ave., N.W. 
Baltimore 18, Md. Washington, D. C. 

(HO 7-9018i I EM 3-2553 



In This Issue — 




FEATURES 




2 


Alumni Diary 


4 


Campus Notes 


6 


Commencement, 1957 — Graduation Into A Prosperous, Anxious World 


11 


Alumni Reunite And See A Changing Campus 


13 


Four Old Grads Make A Sentimental Pilgrimage To The Campus Of Their Youth 


16 


New Building Construction Evidences University's Growth 


20 


Backstage with the Season's Best Show — Gentlemen Prefer Blondes 


26 


University Sports 


NEWS FROM THE COLLEGES 




32 


College of Agriculture 


38 


College of Arts and Sciences 


39 


College of Business and Public Administration 


49 


School of Dentistry 


54 


College of Education 


55 


Graduate School 


60 


College of Home Economics 


61 


College of Military Science 


61 


School of Nursing 


62 


School of Pharmacy 


64 


Maryland Obituaries 


68 


Directory of Advertisers 



Alumni Association 
The Officers: 

President: J. Gilbert Prendergast. "33, Baltimore 
Vice President: Joseph H. Deckman, '31, 

College Park 
Vice President: Mrs. Agnes M. Kricker. '31, 

Sandy Sprinu 
Secretary-Treasurer: David L. Brigham. '38, 

Rockville 




THE ALUMNI DIARY 



The General Alumni Council: 

(School and College Representatives) 

Agriculture 

Clayton Reynolds, '22 
William Evans, '26 
Howard K. Soper, '51 

Art & Sciences 

Virginia Truitt, '52 
Samuel L. Silber, '34 
Ralph G. Shure, '32 

Business & Public Administration 

Alvin S. Klein. '37 

Harry A. Boswell, Jr., '42 

Chester W. Tawney, '31 

Dental 

Dr. Frank Hurst. '27 
Dr. Harry Levin, '26 
Dr. Daniel E. Shehan. '22 

Education 

John P. Speicher, '41 

William Prigg. '53 

Mrs. John J. Hoyert, Jr., '50 

Engineering 

S. Chester Ward. '32 
Chas. R. Hayleck. '43 
Joseph H. Deckman. '31 

Home Economics 

Mrs. Geraldine P. Edwards, '31 
Miss Irene Knox, '34 
Mrs. William Kricker, '31 

Law 

J. Gilbert Prendergast, '33 

Stanford I. Hon". '34 

G. Kenneth Reiblich. '29 

Medical 

Dr. William H. Triplett, 11 
Thurston R. Adams, '34 
Daniel J. Pessagno, '20 

Nursing 

Miss Flora Streett. '38 

Mrs. Robert T. Singleton, '50 

Mrs. Mary France Dennis, '47 

Pharmacy 

Frank Block, '24 
Gordon Mouat, '37 
Samuel I. Raichlen, '25 



Ex-Officio Members of the 
Council: 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, President of the Uni- 
versity 
David L. Brigham, '38, Secretary and Treasurer 
Dr. A. I. Bell, '19, Past President 
Dr. A. E. Goldstein, '29, Past President 
C V. Koons, '29, Past President 
J. Homer Rcmsbcrg, '18, Past President 
Col. O. H. Saunders, '10 Past President 
T. T. Speer, '17, Past President 



Alumni Clubs and Representatives: 

Baltimore — Dr. Eugene L. Pessagno, '40 
Carrol] County — Dr. L. L. Leggett, '30 
Cumberland — Dr. J. Russell Cook, '23 
Eastern Shore — Otis Twilly, '21 
Frederick County — William E. Trail, 



casiern .inure — wus i winy, zi 
Frederick County — William E. Trail 
"M" Club— Charles Ellinger, '37 
New England— R. A. Cook, '05 
New York — Miss Sarah E. Morris, 
Pittsburgh — Charles Furtncy, '37 
Prince Georges — William Kahlcr. '48 
Richmond — Paul Mullinix. '36 
SchlMCtady — Mrs. Janice Mackey, '51 
Terrapin — James W. Stevens. '19 



Dear Fellow Alumni: 

We have traveled at a fast pace in the past two months and our paths have crossed 
with many University and Alumni friends. There was a trip to Heidelberg, 
Germany, by way of the Azores and Paris. The pupose was to organize an over- 
seas Chapter of the Alumni Association and to attend the graduation ceremonies 
for nearly 100 new alumni who are products of the University of Maryland 
abroad. Alumni officers of the new Chapter about which much will be written 
in the next issue of Maryland include Col. Edward Fletcher, '37, President: Col. 
Logan Schutz, '38, Vice-President; and Lt. Col. K. S. Vandergrift, '55, Secretary- 
Treasurer. The last named is Commanding Officer at Berchtesgaden where the 
organizational meeting was held. His hospitality and inspiration will long be 
remembered. 

The Frederick County Chapter had a fine meeting which saw Dick Zimmerman. 
'38 take over the reins from Alvin Klein, '37. Harry Boswell made the principal 
address here with the "Russian Story." Cumberland played host for a fine banquet 
and meeting which Coach Tommy Mont gave a real shot in the arm. Dr. J. 
Russell Cook, '23, is the President and was a fine MC. 

Prince George's held elections prior to University Theater showing of Gentlemen 
Prefer Blonds. Tommy Brooks, '38 is the new President. The Baltimore Club is 
active with sights set on breaking ground for the new Student Union Building in 
Baltimore and furnishings for same. 

The General Alumni Council was in session on the new alumni program. The 
kinks are shaking out and there will be real developments in an expanded alumni 
clubs effort enhanced by a new Field Secretary. Elections for new Alumni 
Council Officers will come at the close of June. 

AH School Associations have run the traditional gamut of banquets and class 
reunions. I only wish space would permit the telling of the fine events featured 
by each. Perhaps the highlight from this corner was the return to the College 
Park campus of four members of the Class of 1897. Never did alumni have 
more fun or deserve more attention. 

You cannot put your finger on a climax for a period of this kind but certainly 
the four foot square, four-tiered, 150th Anniversary Birthday cake brought to a 
resounding close the Centennial-Sesquicentennial celebrations of the University. 
Featured during the period were the 100 exhibits in the Cole Activity Building, the 
Charter Day Banquet and the superior effort of the School of Medicine in their 
pre-commencement effort to mark 150 years of progress. Not the least of the 
climax period was the addition of 2300 new members to our alumni rolls from 
the Class of 1957. 

Backward glances of this nature might cause some to say the past is sufficient 
nourishment for many days to come. The stimulation of these activities, however, 
serves only to vividly reveal the great challenge which lies ahead. Unopened 
pages in our alumni diary are waiting for the events which you and I will note 
as we climb the slope of alumni progress toward the mountain top of alumni 
cooperation and achievement. 



24 




£24* , 



David L. Brigham. Director. 
Office of Alumni Relations 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Well, perhaps, if you want to be strictly literal. 

And yet, when she reaches college age will she be too 

late? Too late to get the kind of higher education 

so vital to her future and to the future of her country? 

It all depends. 

There is in the United States today a growing threat to 
the ability of our colleges to produce thinking, well- 
informed graduates. That threat is composed of several 
elements: an inadequate salary scale that is 
steadily reducing the number of qualified people who 
choose college teaching as a career; classrooms and 
laboratories already overcrowded ; and a pressure for 
enrollment that will double by 1967. 

The effects of these shortcomings can become extremely 
serious. Never in our history has the need for educated 
leadership been so acute. The problems of business, 
government and science grow relentlessly more complex, 
the body of knowledge more mountainous. 
The capacity of our colleges— all colleges— 
to meet these challenges is essential not only 
to the cultural development of our children but 
to the intellectual stature of our nation. 

In a very real sense, our personal and national progress 

depends on our colleges. They must have more support 

in keeping pace with their increasing importance to society. 

Help the colleges or universities of your choice. Help them 
plan for stronger faculties and expansion. The returns 
will be greater than you think. 



If you want to know what the college 
crisis means to you, write for a free 
booklet to: HIGHER EDUCATION, 
Box 36, Times Square Station, New 
York 36, New York. 



-/\- HIGHER EDUCATION 





Sponsored as a public service, in cooperation with the Council for Financial Aid to Education, by 




JULY-AUGUST. 1957 




CAMPUS NOTES 



SECOND REFERENCE JOURNAL IS ISSUED 

The second issue of The University of 
Maryland Reference Journal has just 
come off the press. The Journal is pub- 
lished four times a year in March, June, 
September and December for the in- 
formation of 31,500 University alumni, 
friends of the University and special 
groups within the State. 

COMMENCEMENT PHOTOGRAPHER 
COLLAPSES 

To record as complete a picture story 
as possible of the Alumni Reunions and 
Commencement, a team of four Uni- 
versity photographers worked nearly 
around the clock June 5-8. 

Directing the effort was Al Danegger, 
Head, Photographic Section. Depart- 
ment of Journalism and Public Rela- 
tions. On the last day of the coverage, 
Danegger collapsed, exhausted, in the 
steaming Cole Student Activities Build- 
ing during Commencement excercises. 

Some 507 photographs were taken of 
pre-commencement and commencement 
activities and 83 of the Alumni Re- 
unions. The "shooting coverage" was 
followed by a week of developing and 
printing. 

Other photographers were Victor 
Holm, Photographic Technician; 
Robert Carey, Assistant Professor of 
Journalism; and Philip Geraci, Instruc- 
tor, Department of Journalism and 
Public Relations. 

CSCS PROGRAMS OUTLINED 
IN HIGHER EDUCATION 

The scope of the University's overseas 
program conducted by the College of 
Special and Continuation Studies is the 
subject of an article written by Dr. 
Ralph J. Klein, Assistant to the Dean of 
CSCS, and published in a recent edition 
of Higher Education, monthly publica- 
tion of the U.S. Department of Health. 
Fducation and Welfare. 




Dr. Thomas B. Symons, member of the Board of Regents and Dr. Wilson H. Elk ins. 
President of the University of Maryland look on as Dr. John Taylor Williams. President 
of Maryland State College points to the newly-christened John R. Waters Dining Hall. 



BUILDINGS DEDICATED AT 
PRINCESS ANNE 

At recent dedication ceremonies, Dr. 
John Taylor Williams. President of 
Maryland State College, formally re- 
ceived five recently-erected buildings 
named in honor of three outstanding 
Eastern Shore men and two Eastern 
Shore counties. The buildings were 
first presented to Dr. Elkins who ac- 
cepted them on behalf of the Univer- 
sity's Board of Regents. 

Principal speaker was Dr. Thomas 
B. Symons, former President Pro-tem 
of the University of Maryland. Dr. 
Symons, stressing the important roles 
played by men of previous generations 
in the building of the College, said, 
"The hope of today and tomorrow is 
that we of this generation may do our 
part in advancing the facilities and 
ideals of this creditable and renowned 



institution for the benefit of all our 
people." 

Dr. Symons said four main chal- 
lenges face us at present: the challenge 
of maintaining peace in the world; the 
challenge of the tremendous advance- 
ment in the sciences and technology 
during recent years which now con- 
fronts every educational institution for 
preparing young men and women to 
enter their life's work thoroughly pre- 
pared; the challenge of the quality and 
quantity of student life accepted at our 
institutions discussed recently by Dr. 
Elkins; and the challenge of the time 
required of a young man or woman in 
seeking a college education. 

Dr. Symons requested on behalf of 
the Board of Regents that the following 
building names be changed: 

The Dining Hall to be named The 
Joseph R. Waters Dining Hall, in honor 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 






of this Minister ol the Methodisi 

Church who was a chief figure in the 
founding of the College at Princess 
Anne; 

The Classroom Building to be named 
The John B. Wilson Building, in honor 
of the Rev. Wilson, "an able, inde- 
fatigable, inspiring minister, lecturer ami 
social reformer." also an important 
force in the founding of the College at 
Princess Anne. 

I he Agricultural Building to be 
named The Frank J. Trigg Building, in 
honor of this former Principal of the 
then Princess Anne Academy. 

Dormitory # 1 to be named Somer- 
set Hall in honor of Somerset County. 

Dormitory #2 to be named Harford 
Hall in honor of Harford County. 

Also taking part in the ceremonies 
were Senator Harry T. Phoebus, 
Councilman Charles Cornish, Mrs. 
Helen C. Waters, of Cambridge; Harry 
H. Nuttle, member of the Board of 
Regents and W. Tycer Nelson. College 
Minister. 




Dr. Elkins presents certificate of appreciation to George W. Fogg, Director ot Personnel. 



NEW HISTORY SERIES 

In the next issue of Maryland magazine 
(September-October), starts a new 
series of historical articles written by 
Frederick S. DeMarr, Assistant Dean 
of Men. 

The first article will deal with the 
Calvert family of Riverdale and its in- 
fluence on the early University. Suc- 
ceeding articles will concern themselves 
with early history of the University and 
the State. Each article will include a 
number of illustrations. 

CORRECTION 

In its last issue (May-June). Maryland 
magazine had its own commencement 
and inadvertently conferred a degree of 
Doctor upon Howard Rovelstad. Direc- 
tor of Libraries who was pictured in the 
article "Our Growing System of Li- 
braries." Although Professor Howard 
Rovelstad appreciates the recognition, 
he doubts its value and therefore wishes 
to return to his previous estate. Wish 
granted! 

GRANT PROGRAMS ANNOUNCED 

The Committee on Scholarship and 
Scholarships, College of Arts and 
Sciences, informs colleagues of an an- 
nouncement issued by the American 
Council of Learned Societies concern- 
ing research and study grants in the 
humanities to be offered during the 
academic year 1958-59 (a limited 
number in 1957-58). 

Three types of programs are de- 
scribed: the fellowship program for 
younger scholars wishing to complete 



research projects in the humanities or to 
extend their competences by study in 
fields related to their major interests; 
the grant-in-aid program to support 
humanistic research already in progress; 
and the special awards program for 
mature scholars who are nearing com- 
pletion of distinguished work in one or 
more of several humanistic disciplines. 

Information regarding any of these 
may be obtained from Dr. Lucius 
Garvin. Professor and Head. Depart- 
ment of Philosophy. 

EMPLOYEES RECEIVE 
CERTIFICATES OF APPRECIATION 

In honor of their long and faithful 
service to the University. 74 persons 
with 10. 15, 20. 25. 30 and 35 years 
of service, were awarded certificates of 
appreciation signed by Gov. McKeldin. 
Dr. Elkins made the presentations in 
the auditorium of the Student Union 
Building. 

Names and titles of the 30 and 35 
year employees follow: 

Ed y the Beard. Stenographer-Secretary, 
Home Economics, 35 years. 

Margaret Engle, Stenographer-Secre- 
tary. Engineering. 35 years. 

Edith Frothingham, Administrative As- 
sistant. Finance and Business. 35 
years. 

George W. Fogg, Director of Person- 
nel. 30 years. 

William Footen, Agricultural Products 

Inspector, State Inspection Service. 
30 years. 

Frank Haszard. Director, Maryland 



State Agency for Surplus Property. 
30 years. 

Delarce Dory. Cook. Dining Hall. 
30 years. 

Peter Holler, Agricultural Aide, Dairy 
Husbandry, 30 years. 

Howard James. Chauffeur, Physical 
Plant. 30 years. 

James King, Carpenter Foreman. Phys- 
ical Plant, 30 years. 

John McKnight, Stationary Engineer, 
Physical Plant. 30 years. 

Names and years of service of the re- 
maining 64 persons follow : 

Helen Bewley, 25 years. Olive Kelk. 
25 years, henna Gross, 20 years. Frank 
Hanus, 20 years, Bern ice Iglehart. 20 
years. Mabel Weitzell, 20 years, Daniel 
Wiseman, 20 years, Raymond Birth, 15 
years, William Bttrslem. 15 years, Mar- 
garet Geary, 15 years. Dishie Powers. 
15 years, Mary Jane Roach. 15 years. 
John Schueler, 15 years. 

Marion W . Sims. 15 years, Stanley 
Sines. 15 years, James White. 15 years. 
Percy Apperson, 10 years. John Bald- 
win. 10 years. Fester Bastian. 10 years. 
Theodore Batts, 10 years. Elizabeth 
Burrell, 10 years. Clara Butler. 10 
years. Robbia Coddington, 10 years. 
Virginia Conley. 10 years, James Con- 
way. 10 years. Mary Cowan 10 years, 

Jesse Curry, 10 years. Donald Dahl. 
10 years. Ellen Emack. 10 years. Harry 
Fisher, 10 years. Mary Ford. 10 years. 
H attic Forrester. 10 years. William 
Goodall, 10 years, Frances Graves. 10 
rears. Louis Gray. 10 years, Marx 
{Continued on page 21) 



JULY-AUGUST. 1957 




Commencement, 1957 
Graduation into a Prosperous, 
Anxious World 



Approximately 2,295 young men and women received 
academic degrees at commencement excerises on Saturday, 
June H, at the Cole Student Activities Building on the College 
Park campus. 

More than 1 (),()()() proud mothers, fathers, other relatives 
and friends witnessed the ceremonies; special commencement 
guests were Gov. Theodore R. McKeldin, members of the 
University's Board of Regents, recipients of honorary degrees 
and special friends of the University. 

Degrees were conferred by Dr. Wilson H. Elkins and dis- 
tributed by the deans of the eight College Park colleges and 
five Baltimore professional schools. 

The June commencement concluded a 15-month joint 
celebration of the University's centennial-sesquicentennial an- 
niversaries and climaxed two weeks of pre-commencement 
activities on the College Park and Baltimore campuses. 




THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



Three honorary degrees and tour certificates ol merit m 

agriculture were conferred by Dr. Elkins. 

Dr. Arthur Lovejoy, Johns Hopkins Professor Emeritus 
and former member of the University of Maryland's Board ol 
Regents, received the degree of Doctor of Literature; and 
Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, prominent Baltimore urological 
surgeon, received the degree of Doctor of Science. A Doctor 
of Laws degree was conferred upon Dr. George K. Funs ton, 
President of the New York Stock Exchange and commence- 
ment principal speaker. 

Residents of Maryland who were recipients ol certificates 
of merit in agriculture included Mrs. Abram Pearce. of Glyn- 
don; Mr. Olin A. Davis, of Golts; Mr. Albeit G. Rolfe, Si.. 
oi Poolesville; and Mr. R. Ridgely Todd, Sr.. of Salisbury. 

Following Commencement Exercises, some 225 special 
guests of the University, including members of the Hoard of 
Regents and leading state industrial and political leaders 
lunched in the Rotary Room of the Dining Hall. 

Typical of the many pre-commencement activities was the 
School of Engineering's Honor Awards Day. May 22. Four- 
teen young men received awards established by private 
citizens and industrial companies. 

The School of Pharmacy had its annual honors awards 
presentation at historic Westminster Presbyterian Church. 
June 5. The School of Dentistry held honors awards presen- 
tation and alumni meetings June 7. Members of the graduat- 
ing class of the School of Law were honored at the School's 
annual alumni banquet, March 30. 

The school of medicine combined celebrations of its ses- 
quicentennial anniversary and commencement on June 7 
with a "Scientific Session" featuring live instructional closed- 
circuit telecasts in color and black and white, presentation of 
an alumni honor award to Dr. Charles Reid Edwards. '13, 
medical alumni reunions and the annual alumni banquet 
which featured the introduction of fifty-year graduates and 
awarding of certificates of honor. 

Presentation was made on the use of Cobalt 60 in the 



treatment ol cancer bj Di Fernando Bloedorn Associate 
Professoi ol Radiology and Head ol the Division ol Radio 
therapy (televised in black and white); and dermatosis asso- 
ciated wiih psychogenic stimuli by Di \i.\u\ \i Robinson 
Jr., Professoi and Head oi the Division ol Dermatology 

( tele\ ised m color ) . 

A team ol three faculty members performed open cardiac 
surgery with hyperthermia, rhej were Dis k tdanu 
Cowley, Assistant Professor ol Thoracic Surgery and Direc 
tor ol the Cardio-pulmony Physiologj Laboratory; Leonard 
Scherlis, .Assistant Proicssoi oi \ledicme. and Martin Helrich, 
Professor oi Anesthesiology. 

Other presentations were made on otosclerosis In I )i 

Cyrus 1 . Blanchard, Professor ol Otolaryngology and Head 
of the Division ol 1 aryngology (televised in black and white); 
observations on the teaching process in first yeai courses in 
psychiatry by Dr. Jacob Finesinger (televised in black and 
white): and modern treatment ol nutritional anemia by Di 
Martin Ciorten. Instructor in Pediatrics (televised in black 
and white). 

Dr. John K. Frost. Associate Professor ol Pathology and 
Head oi Division of Cytology presented a lecture and demon- 
stration on cytologic pathology in medicine (televised in 
color ) . 

(losing remarks were made by Di William S Stone, Dean 
of the School of Medicine: Dr. ( ail W. Ebering, III. Assist- 
ant Professor of Medicine and Head oi the Division oi 
Gastro-Enterology . served as toastmaster. 

Dr. Allen M. Chesney. Dean of the Medical Faculty ol the 
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine until his retirement in 
1953, was guest speaker for the School of Medicine's ses- 
quicentennial convocation, held the following day. 

The subject of Dr. Chesney's address was "The Role o\ 
the University of Maryland in the Founding o\ the Johns 
Hopkins University." 

The convocation, held on the terrace next to University 
Hospital, marked the 150th anniversary o\ the school which 
was established in 1807. 






plkins confers honorary degrees upon 
. . . Dr. Arthur Lovejoy 



Dr. Albert E. Goldstein 



and Dr. George K. Funston. 



JULY-AUGUST. 1957 



A highlight of the ceremony was a skit depicting the award- 
ing of the first University of Maryland honorary degree in 
1810 to General Lafayette. Medical students enacted the 
characters in costume. 

Awards, honors and prizes were presented during the 
afternoon to medical students who attained academic achieve- 
ment. 

An academic procession of the medical faculty led by 
Dr. Wilson H. Elkins. Board of Regents Chairman Charles 
P. McCormick and Medical Dean William S. Stone preceded 
the convocation. 

The medical building at Lombard and Greene Sts., Balti- 
more, was decorated for the sesquicentennial ceremony 
exactly as it was in 1900 during the school's centennial cele- 
bration. Constructed in 1810. the building is the oldest 
structure in the United States used continuously for medical 
education. 





Medical alumni 
watch televised 
presentations. 



For graduating seniors, the commencement celebration 
began May 29 with the traditional senior banquet and prom, 
followed by the Baccalaureate Service on June 2 and con- 
cluding with commencement. 

Principal speaker of the Baccalaureate Service in the 
Memorial Chapel was Dr. Lee Shane, pastor of the National 
Baptist Memorial Church, of Washington, D. C. Last year's 
main speaker was Dr. Frederick Brown Harris, Chaplain of 
the United States Senate. 

Highlight of the commencement was an address presented 
by Keith Funston. President of the New York Stock Ex- 
change. 

The Exchange President termed today's college graduates 
the "nation's best-advertised shortage" — but, he added, the 
real need among college-trained people is for the "full man," 
not merely for those with technical training. He defined the 
"full man" as adaptable, imaginative and trained to think — 
one who is essentially creative. 

Mr. Funston outlined four yardsticks which, he said, 
employers will use to measure the progress of the 1957 crop 
of college graduates: 

1. The ability to get along with people and at the same 
time respond to new situations while operating within the 
framework of an organization. 

2. Creative ability. The employer, Mr. Funston said, will 
look for "the initiative and imagination required to range far 
beyond the immediate job. He will turn instinctively to people 
venturesome enough to suggest new methods of doing business 
because the old ways just aren't good enough. Above all, 
he will look for people who can tell him not only how some- 
thing should be done, but also whether or not it should be 
done at all." 

3. Measured judgment — "the patience to learn the busi- 
ness thoroughly, the calm ability to get all the facts, and the 
skill to relate them to the broader economic and social prob- 
lems that press in on a company." 

4. Firm beliefs and the ability to articulate them. Em- 
ployers, Mr. Funston declared, "will expect people with 
courage, willing to cling to basic convictions and equally 
willing to express new ones. He will expect a mature under- 
standing of our free economy and its relationships to the 
other freedoms we enjoy." 

One fact that is likely to influence their immediate futures, 
Mr. Funston told the graduates, "is a quiet, economic rev- 
olution that has taken place in the United States. 

"Simply stated, it is the growth of a new kind of capitalism 
— -a People's Capitalism. In it, men and women from every 




Dr. Funston and Dr. Elkins. 




Graduates of the School of Den- 
tistry stand to be recognized. 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 




I>> StOUl illals with ii group of 

graduates of thi School oj Sursing. 



[cademic procession, School oj Pharmacy. 




School of Medicine's ses- 
quicentennial convolution 
(it the University Hospital. 




walk of life have begun to invest directly in the ownership 
of our great businesses. Today, more than 8V2 million people 
— two-thirds of them with incomes under $7,500 a year — 
are the owners of our publicly-held companies. This is a 
33 per cent jump over 1952." 

The significance of the rise of a People's Capitalism to the 
1957 college graduate is two-fold, Mr. Funston said: 

"First, by encouraging greater shareownership — by giving 
people everywhere the chance to participate more directly 
in the risks and rewards of our economy — we are proving 
the preposterousness of the Marxist theory . . . that the rich 
will get richer while the poor become poorer. Well, we are 
actually demonstrating in America, as one economist has 
noted, that 'of all great industrial nations the one that clings 
most tenaciously to private capitalism has come closest to the 
socialist goal of providing abundance for all in a classless 
society.' " 

The second reason, he said, is that "it is increasingly clear 
that the economic freedom running through our lives has a 
strong relationship to the other freedoms we enjoy. To a large 
degree, the strength of our economy is the key to a more 
secure world. 

"And for our kind of capitalism to remain strong we 
need the understanding and active support of thoughtful, 
trained people like yourselves. 

"In economic terms you can anticipate the excitement of 
helping shape a system of enterprise that is now in the midst 
of a unique revolution. . ." 



( OMM1 N< 1 Ml M 


BOX 


S( OKI 




roi u : 2,295 




Graduate School. 




Doctor of 




Philosophy 


71 


Doctor of 




Education 


11 


Master of Arts 


65 


Master of Science 


70 


Master of 




Education 


127 


Master of Business 




Administration 


24 


Master of Foreign 




Study 


1 


Total 


369 


School of Medicine 


94 


School of Dentistry 


96 


School of Law- 


90 


Certificate of 




Proficiency 


1 


College of 




Agriculture 


56 


College of Arts A Sciences 


Bachelor of Arts 


247 


Bachelor of 




Science 


113 


College of Business 




and Public Admin. 


258 


College of Education 




Bachelor of Aits 


32 


Bachelor of 




Science 


183 


College of 




Engineering 


153 


College of 




Home Economics 


66 


College of 




Military Science 


362 


College of 




Physical Education 


42 


School of Nursing 


45 


School of Pharmacy 


S3 


College of Special an 


1 


Continuation 




Studies 


35 


Grand Total 2 


,295 



JULY-AUGUST. 1957 




Typical of the numerous awards presented 
during the pre-commencement period were 
the two won by William S. Haney, Jr., out- 
standing student in the College of Engi- 
neering. The B. L. Crozier and Hamilton 
Awards are here awarded Haney by Pro- 
fessor Russell Allen. 



Mr. Funston said in conclusion: 

"I would summarize your opportunities and responsibilities 
this way: 

"You are moving into a world filled with enormous change 
and great promise. In economic terms you can anticipate the 
excitement of helping shape a system of enterprise that is now 
in the midst of a unique revolution — characterized by a rise 
of a true People's Capitalism. You have the wonderful reas- 
surance of knowing that your talents, energies and under- 
standing are in great demand. But by the same token, very 
special burdens will be placed on you. 

"At work you will be charged with decisions requiring not 
only good judgment, but courage as well in exercising it. 
Behind these decisions there will have to be an awareness 
that our economic freedoms are part and parcel of our other 
freedoms. And you will be called on to demonstrate an 
understanding of the changes — such as broader shareowner- 
ship — that now are shaping society. 

"At home, your burden will be no less arduous. You will 
be introduced to the job of managing a household, raising 
children, planning savings programs and investing wisely — 
not only in securities — but in your futures as well. 

"There is no question in my mind that your years at Mary- 
land have prepared you well for this. In the long view of 
history your record will, I think, give fresh meaning to 
Lowell's observation that ". . . in making education not only 
common to all, but in some sense compulsory . . . the des- 
tiny of the free republic of America was practically settled. 

"Congratulations and Godspeed." 










>■ 


21^ 




Among the prominent guests at Commencement Exercises were: 
First row: Mrs. Albert E. Goldstein and Dr. Goldstein. Others, 
left to right: Albert E. Goldstein, Jr.. Dr. William S. Stone, Mrs. 
Robert B. Goldstein. Mrs. Stone, William O. Goldstein, Mrs. 
Albert E. Goldstein. Jr. and Dr. Robert B. Goldstein. 



Left to right: Dr. Olive Cole, Dr. Albert C. Cook, Mrs. Cook, 
Mrs. E. B. Taylor, Douglas Cook, Miss Katharine Toomey and 
Dr. Byrne. 



10 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 




Vl 



>i 



.Vi 



I 




Registering for the alumni reunion are 
George N. Schramm, 22, of Pittsburgh, his 
wife and his son, George, Jr. Mrs. William II. 
Hottel, secretary to the Director of Alum- 
ni Relations, records the registration. 



Alumni Reunions 



Returning to the College Park campus tor alumni reunions during 
the week-end of Commencement were ten graduating classes. Using 
the Student Union Building as their base of operations, the old and 
not-so-old grads ranged the campus noting with astonishment and 
pride the addition of handsome new buildings and facilities. Perhaps 
the most astonished were four members of the Class of 1 897 who met 
for their sixty-year reunion. Their reactions to what they saw is 
recorded in an article appearing on page 10. 

Following registration and luncheon in the early afternoon, class 
reunion business meetings livened the Union for several hours and 
then many took advantage of guided tours by station wagon up and 
down the rolling campus. In the late afternoon, the Colleges of Agri- 
culture, Arts and Sciences, Engineering and Education, had their 
separate business meetings. 

At the Reunion Banquet. Dr. Elkins told the alumni that the Univer- 
sity is attempting to provide an excellent education for a large number 
of persons and that this task requires teamwork and understanding 
on the part of the faculty and staff. In the years ahead, he continued, 
the University will need the understanding and moral and material 
support of the alumni. The University is interested in encouraging 
greater participation of alumni in support of the institution, he said. 



Class of 1907: Morris H. 
Adams and Charles H. Harper. 




Dean Cairns addresses a meet- 
ing of the Agriculture alumni. 




Members id the Claw of '17 reminisce m 
a room in the Student Union Building. 




A touring group of alumni view the Uni- 
versity's Olympic-sized swimming pool. 





Class of 1937: Stanley B. Young and Mrs. Carolyn Mullinix. 




Class of 1922. First row: George N. Schramm, Mildred S. Jones, 
Charles E. Damall, Bertha E. Topkins and A. W. Hines. Second 
row: H. E. Semler, William W. Kirhy, Clayton Reynolds, and Ed 
Browne. Third row: F. R. Darkis, William P. Fusselbargh, E. B. 
Filbert and M. M. Clark. Top: Laurence J. Stabler. 




Class of 1932. First row: Myra Ferrier Wolf, Mrs. Catherine L. 
Dnvall and Miss Virginia Liters. Second row: lrvin O. Wolf, Bill 
Kricker and Ralph Share. 




Class of 1917. First row: Bert Coggins, Albert H. Sillman, H. B. 
Derrick and C. G. Donovan. Second row: A. V. Williams. P. M. 
Nash, R. D. Watson, William M. Kishpaugh and H. R. Shoe- 
maker. 




Class of 1927: Norwood C. Thornton and Egbert Tingley. 



12 




Class of 1912: First row: G. B. Posey, Fulton W. Allen and 
Hugh C. F. Gill. Standing: Nathan Warthen. 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



1897-1957 



Four Old Grads Make Sentimental 
Pilgrimage to the Campus of their Youth 



By David L. Brigham 

Director, Alimuii Relations 



fms is the easiest story I have ever 
written. It's about four graduates of 
the Class of 1897 and their impressions 
of our present-day campus compared 
with the one they knew sixty years ago. 

No university has more faithful 
alumni than Harry Heward, Grenville 
Lewis, C. Jurningham Queen and Owen 
H. Fowler, graduates of the old Mary- 
land Agricultural College and students 
on a campus which saw no telephones, 
paved roads or automobiles; a campus 
surrounded by ponds and woods. 

Sitting in the Office of Alumni Re- 
lations they lost no time in reviewing 
never-forgotten experiences. Lewis, 
Queen and Heward played together on 
the MAC football team. 

"Grenville was an experienced foot- 
ball man before he came to the col- 
lege," Queen says. "I was a farm boy 
who walked right off the farm to go to 
school. Grenville taught us all about 
the game. He was a tiger". 

"You know in those days," picks up 
Lewis, "we played on a gravel lot. We 
had a little padding in the shoulders and 
knees, just to keep us from getting 
skinned, you know." 

Of the four, Grenville probably led 
the most adventurous life. He was cap- 
tain and coach of the Columbia Col- 
lege's ( now George Washington Un- 
iversity) football team. He worked in 
Honduras in the mahogany and cedar 
forests for two years. He played pro 
football with Homestead Athletic Club, 
Pittsburgh. Other highlights of his fast- 



paced life: engineering-supervision in 
Pittsburgh, the Virginia Railroad and 
the Panama Canal; superintendent of 
mines in Chattanooga, Tennessee and 
Straight Creek, Kentucky; launched his 
own coal stripping operation in Lilly, 
Kentucky; Assistant General Superin- 
tendent, Jones and McLaughlin Steel 
Co.; owner of 1,000-acre farm in St. 
Mary's County. This, we were assured, 
was by no means a complete inventory. 
At present Lewis is a Senior Training 
Supervisor, Naval Air Station, Pautex- 
ent. He has a son and a daughter. 

"The difference between MAC and 
the University today is — well — unbe- 
lievable and incomparable. We lived in 
the gaslight era. Put a gaslight (if you 
can find one) next to a fluorescent light. 
That's the difference." 

Heward, a tackle on the same team 
on which Lewis played fullback and 
Queen played guard, is quiet and well- 
spoken. He is a retired shellfish whole- 
saler who lives now in the seashore 
town of Stone Harbor, New Jersey. 
Thinking back over nearly an average 
lifetime, he began: 

"Lewis, a would-be fullback, was my 
roommate. Remember Grenville. what 
our tuition was? — $275 per year (we 
didn't have semesters in those days), 
plus uniforms and washing." 

"Frankly, I don't know if I could 
get through the University today. I 
think the students have it much tougher 
now: they must learn so much more 
specialized information. Certainly, a 




Remember when we . . ." 



JULY-AUGUST. 1957 



13 



great change for the better has come 
over the University — beyond compre- 
hension." 

In the College's first year book. The 
Reveille, this was the prophecy for 
Heward: 

"The scene (the author was having a 
vision) was now changed to that of the 
ocean, where the waves rose and fell 
with the regularity of clock-work. One 
beautiful craft was speeding on its way 
over the surface of the water. It was 
close enough for me to read the name 
— The Harry Heward. The ship, I was 
told, had been named in honor of its 
captain, who had done good service 
for his country on the revenue cutter 
force." 

Heward spent the greater part of his 
life on Front and Spruce Streets, Phila- 
delphia, buying and selling Southern 
New Jersey clams and oysters. He has 
three sons and one daughter. 

Former farm-boy Queen never re- 
turned to the farm. In The Reveille, 
Queen was described as having "won 
friends on the football field as well as 
in all places where he is known." 

The year book prophecy said: 

"... a scene before me of a country 
cottage, and green fields of grass and 
grain. The owner of this farm I found 
to be Mr. C. J. Queen, and I was told 
of large profits which rewarded his 
efforts." 

Queen spent 35 years as a lieutenant 
on the New York City Police Force — 
in Brooklyn. In those days. Queen re- 
calls, there was a saying, "there is more 
law in a night stick than in all the 
courts in the land." Queen further re- 
calls, "we handled some tough ones in 
those days." 

"The campus looks like a city now; 
the old MAC campus we knew looked 
like a grouping of uptodate farmhouses. 
You have made wonderful progress 
here." 

Fowler left MAC in his junior year 
to attend Columbia College (now 
George Washington University). He 
received his degree in law in 1897. 

"I don't think," he said, "there's 
another university in the country which 
has moved as rapidly ahead as Mary- 
land. There are all ways to compare 
dimensions. For example, our enroll- 
ment was about 150-175. But this type 
of comparison is irrcvclant. 

"I am completely satisfied that the 
University is attempting to fulfill the 
highest expectations of all of its alumni. 
All departments of the University are 
at an infinitely higher level than yester- 
year. The kids have to buckle down 




Dave Brigham welcomes Messrs, 
Queen, Lewis, Fowler and Heward. 

Reading bound copies of Maryland magazine. 




"Lewis in Dave Brigham' s office: "Where 
we are sitting was all pasture land . . ." 




14 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 





Formal portrait: Heward, Queen. Fowler and Lewis. 



Lewis and last year's football captain Jack 
Davis: "We took the left flank . . ." 



Coda) to meet the more stringent re- 
quirements for competence. 1 he\ also 
have a better opportunity to learn, and 
they learn more. Remember, in those 
days MAC credits were not even ac- 
ceptable at Columbia College!" 

Lewis spoke up again. "Take another 
example of how many giant steps have 
been taken in sixty years. Photographs 
for The Reveille were exposed on glass 
plates we made ourselves. We took 
plain window glass, coated sheets of it 
with whites of eggs and etched them 
with a chemical." 

Fowler had his own law practice 
until the advent of World War I when 
he entered the service. He worked as 
an attornev for the Bendix Aviation 



Corporation tor thirty years and re- 
tired from this service. He is still prac- 
tising as a patent attorney. 

The University made every attempt 
to make their day on the campus a 
pleasant one: they were taken on a 
tour of the campus by Jack Davis, last 
year's football team captain: chatted 
with Dr. Elkins; were guests ol honor 
at the annual alumni banquet. 

As he walked out the Dining Hall 
into the cool of the evening. Fowler 
looked around him. 

"We're proud of this University." he 
said. 

And the University is proud of its 
four remaining, faithful sixty-year men. 
Class of 1897. 



Sixty year graduates chat with Dr. 
Elkins at the Alumni Banquet. 




Relaxing before a television set in the Student I num. 




•. 







New Building Construction 



Evidences University's Growth 



New construction on the College Park campus continues 
its hustling pace with five huildings completed or soon to be 
completed during 1957. Last year, the University caused the 
construction of five buildings at a combined cost of $1,115,- 
585.90. This year's construction, including the huge new 
library building, journalism building and the administration 
annex, will cost an estimated $3,417,926.37. 

The administration makes requests to the State Legislature 
for new buildings each year; usually planning money is ap- 
propriated one year, and construction money the year fol- 
lowing. 

Buildings approved by the Board of Regents under a two- 



year construction plan (after 1957) are: a new building for 
the College of Business and Public Administration; Dorchester 
Hall, a women's dormitory building; Worcester Hall, a 
women's dormitory building; Cecil Hall, a men's dormitory 
building; and Frederick Hall, a men's dormitory addition. 

The following contains information concerning University 
buildings completed in 1956, buildings completed so far in 
1957, and buildings expected to be completed in 1957. This 
material was compiled by Mr. George O. Weber, Director 
and Supervising Engineer of the Department of the Physical 
Plant — a very busy man, indeed! 



16 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 




BUILDINGS COMPLETED IN 1956 

I . President's residence. 

Location: west of parking lot B, north of Campus Drive. 

Cost: $65,000. 

Purpose: residence. 

Occupied by: President's family. 

Architect: John Carroll Dunn. 

Building Materials: masonry construction, wood frame 

flooring and slate roof. 
Size: 57,040 cubic feet, 5,745 square feet. 
Contractor — Built and owned by the University of Mary- 
land. 

2. Infirmary addition. 

Location: northwest and southwest corners present in- 
firmary. 
Cost: $14,970.67. 

Purpose: medical offices and examining rooms. 
Occupied by: Student Welfare. 
Building materials: masonry construction, wood frames, 

built up roof. 
Size: 7,749 cubic feet, 738 square feet. 
Contractor: Built and owned by the University of Mary- 
land. 

3. Greenhouse addition. 

Location: northeast corner of existing greenhouse range. 
Cost: $34,006.69. 

Purpose: Horticulture experimentation and teaching lab- 
oratories. 
Occupied by: Horticulture Department, College of Agri- 
culture. 
Building materials: galvanized steel frame, glazed. 
Size: 65,862 cubic feet, 5,635 square feet. 
Contractor: Lord and Burnham, fabricator and erector. 

4. Surplus Property warehouse. 

Location: east of heating plant on railroad siding. 
Cost: $19,091.40. 
Purpose: warehousing storage. 

Occupied by: Surplus Property Agency — State of Mary- 
land. 
Building materials: reinforced concrete, light structural 

steel shapes, galvanized sheet steel 

siding and roof. 
Size: 72,900 cubic feet, 5,400 square feet. 
Contractor: Built and owned by the University of Mary- 
land. 

5. Heating Plant addition. 

Location: east end of existing heating plant. 

Cost: $982,517.14. 

Purpose: steam generation for heating and hot water. 

Occupied by: Department of Physical Plant. 

Architect: Egli and Gomph, designer and mechanical en- 
gineer; Van Rensselaer P. Saxe, structural en- 
gineer. 

Building materials: reinforced concrete, structural steel, 
masonry, pre-cast slab roof. 

Size: 131,539 cubic feet, 11,938 square feet. 

Contractor: Porter Construction Company. 



J 








iilB 



JULY-AUGUST. 1957 



















m 




"1 


\ 


l 






BUILDINGS COMPLETED IN 1957 

1 . Journalism Building 

Location: immediately west of Francis Scott Key Hall. 
Cost: $467,926.37. 

Purpose: classrooms, offices for department head, faculty 
and campus periodicals, photography teaching 
laboratories, press room and library. 
Occupied by: Journalism Department, College of Business 

& Public Administration. 
Architect: Walton and Madden; J. L. Faisant and Associ- 
ates, structural engineers; H. Walton Redmile 
and Associates, mechanical engineer. 
Building materials: reinforced concrete frame, masonry 
walls and partitions, wood frame and 
slate roof. 
Size: 295,000 cubic feet, 19,650 square feet. 
Contractor: Certified Builders, Inc. 

2. Grounds Custodial Building 

Location: north of Wind Tunnel. 
Cost: $75,000. 



Purpose: Supervisors offices, locker rooms, stock rooms, 
grounds equipment, storage garage. Venetian 
blind repair shop and laundry. 
Occupied by: Grounds and Custodial Sections, Depart- 
ment of Physical Plant. 
Architect: Arthur L. Anderson; Beall and LeMay, struc- 
tural engineers; Shefferman and Luchenburg. 
mechanical engineer; Arthur Bigelson, electri- 
cal engineer. 
Building materials: concrete floor, masonry walls, wood 

truss and slate roof. 
Size: 177,986 cubic feet. 9,999 square feet. 
Contractor: Viner Construction Company. 

3. Surplus Properly (State Agency) 
Location: north of Wind Tunnel. 
Cost: $29,106. 

Purpose: Administrative offices and small storage. 
Occupied by: Surplus Property Agency — State of Mary- 
land. 
Architect: Walton and Madden. 
Building materials: concrete slab floor, masonry walls. 

bar joists with gypsum deck and 

built up roof. 
Size: 36.081 cubic feet, 2,532 square feet. 
Contractor: Viner Construction Company. 



18 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 






Grounds Custodial and Surplus Properly Buildings 





W 



Heating I'hmi Addition 



BUILDINGS TO BE COMPLETED IN 1957 

1 . Library 

Location: center of Mall, east of Anne Arundel Hall. 
Cost: $2,950,000. 

Purpose: complete library facilities, reading rooms, sem- 
inar rooms, etc. 
Occupied by: General library staff. 

Architect: Henry Powell Hopkins; Van Rensselaer P. 
Saxe, structural engineer; James Posey, me- 
chanical engineer. 
Building materials: reinforced concrete and structural 
steel, frame, masonry walls, wood 
frame and slate roof. 
Size: 2,298,620 cubic feet, 210.317 square feet. 
Contractor: George Hyman Construction Company. 

2. Administration Building Annex 

Location: north of present Administration Building. 
Cost: $450,000. 
Purpose. Administrative offices. 

Occupied by: Department of Physical Plant, Office of 
University Relations. Registrar, Admis- 
sions, Cashier, Dean of Men and Dean of 
Women. 
Architect: Ted Englehart; Beall and LeMay, structural 
engineers; H. Walton Redmile and Associates, 
mechanical engineers. 
Building materials: reinforced concrete frames, masonry 
walls and partitions, structural steel 
with wood frame and slate roof. 
Size: 486,832 cubic feet, 42.442 square feet. 
Contractor: P. F. DuLaney. 




JULY-AUGUST. 1957 



19 



Backstage with the 




Season's Best Show — 



Gentlemen Prefer Blondes 



Lorelei stalked the young button manufacturer from New 
York to Paris and back, her mind aglitter with the certain 
belief that "diamonds are a girl's best friend." 

Would she overcome the objections of her swain's mean 
old millionaire father; would she find the inventor of the 
zipper more attractive; would girl friend Dorothy Shaw be 
able to find a rich but honest husband? 

Each night for seven nights the University Theater (con- 
necting Woods Hall and the Skinner Building) filled with an 
enthusiastic audience which delighted in the search for the 
obvious answers to these questions. The attraction was the 
brash Broadway play, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, produced 
by the University Theater. Attendance surpassed all previous 
records — a total of 3,269 persons saw the show. 

On stage, fun and frolic — behind the scenes, a nightmare 
of planning and production exaggerated by lack of facilities 
and money (the stage, or proscenium, measured 23 feet wide 
by 17 feet deep, $200 was budgeted to costume forty 
"Roaring Twenties"-type performers). 

On the basis of its appealing score, simplicity of production, 
and ability to cast, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes was selected 
in January by a production staff consisting of Musical Direc- 
tor, Melvin Bernstein. Instructor, Department of Music: Tech- 
nical Director, James Byrd, Instructor, Department of Speech 
and Dramatic Art; Warren L. Strausbaugh. Associate Pro- 
fessor and Head, Department of Speech and Dramatic Art: 
and Director Rudolph E. Pugliese, Instructor, Department of 
Speech and Dramatic Art. These men. with the addition of 
choreographers Jill Vasilyk, Phyllis Heuring and Rita Villani. 
and Stage Manager Robert Milli, provided executive direction. 

Blonde's excellent cast starred Margo Lucey, first runner-up 
to last year's Miss America, playing Dorothy Shaw: Margaret 
Foster, freshman standout who played Lorelei; and Edward 
Porter who portrayed Gus Esmond, the up-right young button 
heir. 



20 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 




Planning began last year. In December, the show ran into 
financing problems, but the Student Government Association 
promised a minimum amount which guaranteed production. 
To gain additional monies, ticket prices were raised to $1.50. 

Try-outs were held in February. Vocalists tried out first 
for Bernstein and he selected voices for solo parts and the 
ensemble. Approximately 100 students auditioned. Reading 
try-outs to determine speaking ability followed. Then the 
best combination of singers and actors were called together 
for final auditions. The final try-outs were heavily attended. 

Hamlet and the Dance Concert occupied the UT stage at the 
time rehearsals for Blondes were scheduled to begin. With 
a green cast and limited rehearsal time, this two-week delay 
became a serious handicap. Bernstein worked with the soloists 
and chorus separately. First rehearsals were held in the radio 
studio. Holidays kept many actors from attending rehearsals; 
Easter vacation came a week before opening night. The com- 




Director Pugliese's six year old ton 

Greg and his friend I. airy watch the 

spring try outs with amusement. 

Left: Carole Michelson. Below: Sanni Staik. 



IPJ 



JULY-AUGUST. 1957 



pany returned to the campus a da) before school opened and 
rehearsed for 12 hours. 

"The intense schedule was too much for man) of the per- 
formers," remembers Pugliese. "Illness was common anion;: 
cast and crew. Not a night passed which did not see some- 
one out with a sore throat, a cough or a serious cold. 

"Limited funds gave the freshman costume mistress. Mar) 
Anne Steinger. a headache. With onl) $200 to clothe some 
forty persons, she had to borrow, re-sew or make most o\ the 
costumes. Main of the costumes o\' the twenties came out 
of attics. 

"During the show we used a motion picture requiring in- 
volved advanced planning weeks before the show opened. 
One Saturday morning we dressed about twenty actors and 
actresses and shot them in an after-thc-wcdding' scene: the 
speed of the film was speeded up to resemble an old fashioned 
movie. The results were most satisfactory considering this 
was our first venture in cinematograph) . 

21 



KEEP THIS 





Musical Director Bernstein. 




Between rehearsals a student uses an empty 
classroom to studx the next day's lesson. 




r> 



•* 






A 



Vj 



Above: Margo Lucey and Pugliese discuss 
a problem backstage. Left: clipboard in 
hand. Pugliese directs a final rehearsal. 



Margaret Foster experiments with "Lorelei Lee-type" poses. 

Em3l 




22 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 





\//-. Gage, the zipper king, <l<l I '.</ Covey) i i 
i>luiit\ the mechanics of </ zipper '<> Lorelei 
(Margie Foster) <n hei fiancee, Gus Esmond, tli< 
button king (Chip Porter) /<><>/. \ on disapprovingly 



Phyllis H curing, Nancy Nystrom and Diane Cara- 
way await dancing cues in the makeup room. 




Sir Francis Bcekman (Frank 
Tudesco) is once again rep- 
rimanded by Lady Beek- 
man (Judy Fine) for flirting. 




Director Rudolph Pugliese points out errors to Margo 
Lucey as others await their turn in "green room.'' 



The chorus girls from the Pre Catelin 
in Paris strike their final pose — Leah 
Gapanoff, Margie Foster, Connie Cor- 
nell, Diane Caraway, Nancy Nystrom. 




"The final week of rehearsal turned out to be a nightmare. 
Three nights before opening both leading ladies became ill. 
Luckily. Margo Lucey returned to the cast the night before 
dress rehearsal. Sanni Stack, scheduled to play Lorelei Lee 
never made it. She was replaced by Margaret Foster who 
played the entire run with only two days rehearsal. Her per- 
formance was magnificent. 

"There were two close calls during performances. Ed 
Le Covey (Mr. Gage) burned his hand one night and was in 
such a state of shock he nearly fell into the orchestra pit. 
Another night, Ed sprained a knee and was barely able to 
complete the show. One of the male leads became severely 
ill one evening just before the opening curtain. We immedi- 
ately prepared our stage manager as a replacement but the 
actor recovered in time to go on. 

"The production broke all attendance records for the 
University Theater. We could have sold three times as many 
tickets. It is unfortunate we were not in a position to cap- 
italize on this potential." 

From the viewpoint of the Technical Director, a musical 
show demands a different type and style of scenery than that 
required by dramatic plays. Audiences today will not allow a 
musical to stop while scenery is changed on the stage; all 
musicals require a great number of settings. 

Blondes required seven different settings: a ship sun deck; 
a New York pier; a hotel suite in Paris; two different night 
clubs; a park in Paris; and a street in Paris. It was, of course, 
impossible to station all these on the small UT stage. Tech- 
nical Director Byrd takes up the story: 

'in designing the scenery for this show I first had to con- 
sider the fast changes and then the size of the stage. The 
first act demanded six changes of scene. After consultation 
with the Director, it was decided to double-up on some of 
the settings and eliminate others so as to leave as much stage 
space as possible for the large crowd scenes. 

"In a musical the 'show curtain' is very important because 
it closes behind action on the stage apron and allows for 
scenery changes behind it. For Blondes, I decided to do a 
bright and colorful curtain with symbols of Paris and France 
painted on in bright colors and silver sequins to build up the 
high point of the story — diamonds. By revealing this curtain 
during the overture, the audience was prepared to anticipate 
a light, entertaining musical. This curtain opened to reveal 
a pier scene in New York harbor which was painted on a roll 
drop. At the conclusion of this scene, the drop rolled up to 
the stage ceiling and was out of the way for the rest of the 
show. Set up behind this drop was the sun deck of a ship 
with a sky scrim (gauze cloth) backdrop. Much of the stage 
was thus made available for a large dance number. 

"By use of a transparent drop (a transparent scrim with 
opaque objects painted on) different scenes can be achieved 
by simply using different colors of light. Such a drop was 
attached to a traveller track and in a matter of seconds the 
scene of a park in Paris was changed to an outdoor cafe scene 
in Paris, a nighttime scene. 

"The hotel scene was probably the most difficult to de- 
cide upon. It was impossible to be realistic about this scene 
because there was not sufficient time or space to set up a 
complete room. I stylized this setting by using a three-fold 
flat unit set up in front of a dark curtain. This was painted to 
suggest walls and included a theatrically-painted window 
showing a view of Paris. 

"Planning and timing of the operation of the sets in a 
musical is all-important. Each of the technical crew must 
know exactly what he is to do each moment. Speed is im- 
portant." 



Organization of the orchestra actually begins with the 
selection of the show. When the musical score arrives, a list 
of the instrumentation required is usually included. Then 
along with consideration of staging and casting, orchestra 
problems are reviewed. 

According to Musical Director Bernstein, he made his de- 
cisions in the following order: 

1 . Can the required ensemble be supplied? 

"Musical scores for such shows are written with the in- 
strumental 'doublings', that is, one player being required to 
play more than one instrument, depending on the type of 
background written for a particular scene or song accompani- 
ment. Typical doublings are: clarinet and saxophone, or flute 
and piccolo. Occasionally, the doubling requirements are 
much more difficult to supply, especially when depending 
upon student talent. When the final selection of the show is 
made, whatever problems remain unsolved concerning the 
instrumental requirements must be taken care of by either 
adding extra players, or, if the necessary instruments cannot 
be supplied, the director must transpose or re-arrange the 
parts in question so that they can be played on other in- 
struments. 

"In Blondes many complications confronted us. The agent 
who sent the score and parts sent incorrect information about 
the doubling. The correct doublings proved impossible to 
supply. For example, one player was expected to play at 
one time or another, alto saxophone, clarinet, flute oboe, and 
English horn: another, alto saxophone, baritone saxophone, 
clarinet, and bassoon; another, tenor saxophone, clarinet 
bass clarinet, and French horn. Since it was impossible to 
find students capable of these doublings, many changes had to 
be made in the parts. By taking out all the flute parts from 
the saxophone books, a separate and important part was made 
up just for a flute player. All the oboe and English horn 
parts were transposed so that one player could play all the 
parts on clarinet. Another entire group of parts was re- 
arranged so that one player could play an entire set of bas- 
soon, baritone and alto saxophone, and clarinet parts in one 
book." 

2. Will complications develop over the long run of re- 
hearsals and performances? 

"Most of the student musicians capable of playing diffi- 
cult parts like these usually earn their living, or at least 
spending money, playing professionally on week-ends. If they 
have other commitments during the run. or should become 
sick, substitutions must be available. In order to cover this 
possibility, almost a double 'team' had to be recruited for the 
orchestra just as the leads on stage have their understudies. 
The members of the orchestra who know in advance that 
they will have to be out a night or two bring their substitutes 
to rehearsals in advance so that they will know their parts. 
This problem must be carefully considered so that the show 
will continue to go smoothly night after night. Every musician 
must know his part so thoroughly that if a singer on stage 
miscounts or misses a cue he can jump to the proper place 
immediately at the conductor's direction without a breakdown 
in the ensemble." 

3. What cuts or changes must be made in the original 
score due to our problems of staging, choreography and 
singing? 

"Fortunately, very few changes had to be made. Some cuts 
were made because the directors felt certain musical or dance 
sequences were too long. In all cases, the orchestra parts 
must be carefully marked and the musicians must be re- 
hearsed so that they are used to the cuts. 

"Finally," Bernstein concludes, "as the weeks of rehearsing 



24 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



the cast have passed, the time arrives for the orchestra to be 
brought in. Prior to this time the music has been rehearsed 
with the piano only. The orchestra gets only one or two long 
rehearsals of the music by itself and then plays the first dress 
rehearsal of the cast. At this point the success of the show 
depends entirely on three things: how well the cast can come 
through on everything the director has trained them to do; 
the smoothness with which the technical crew can run the 
scene changes, lights, sound, and curtains: and the ability o\ 
the orchestra to support the musical scenes, and the con- 
ductor's ability to hold the entire musical ensemble together." 

Other members of the cast were Pete Clark ( 1st Steward). 
Norman Pearl (Pierre). Frank Embree (Frank), William 
Cave (George), Frank Tudesco (Sir Francis Beekman), Judj 
Fine (Lady Beekman). Charles Ballew (Henry Spofford), 
Edward La Covey (Mr. Gage), Larry Bubes (Olympic Boy), 
Phyllis Heuring (Gloria), Rimas Chesonis (Robert Saman- 
teur), Marshall Megginson (Maitre). Harriet Morton (Fifi). 
Kathv Moore (Zizi), Rod Cox (Bartender). Joe Warfield 
(Bill). 

Titles of some of the musical numbers indicate the play's 
tenor: High Time, Bye Bye Baby, I Love What I'm Doing, 
You Say You Care, Diamonds Are a Girl's Best Friend, and 
Button Up With Esmond. 

Approximately 60 students formed working parties for 
stage construction, lights, publicity, sound, box office and 
others. Some 40 young men and women, in addition to the 
22 principal actors, performed as dancers, members of the 
chorus and as showgirls. 

All in all, a fine performance, excellent direction and an en- 
thusiastic and well-trained cast. The University family can 
well be proud of its hardworking, talented University Theater. 




A thirsty audience invades the Macke Machines 
and discusses the first act during intermission. 




Margie Foster smiles radiantly upon receiving flowers on opening night. 



JULY-AUGUST. 1957 



25 



UNIVERSITY SPORTS 



By JOE BLAIR 
Sports Editor 



Summary of 1956-57 Sports Year 



The 1956-57 year closed in athletics 
with the Maryland Terrapins once again 
dominating the conference picture and 
gaining national recognition during the 
spring with performances from the la- 
crosse team and brilliant efforts from 
the track team's great distance runner. 
Burr Grim. Along with this, the Terps 
captured three conference titles in the 
five spring sports to make a total of 
six for the Maryland teams out of a 
total of 1 2 that are competed for in the 
Atlantic Coast league. 



The titlists in spring sports were la- 
crosse, outdoor track, and tennis. They 
joined the soccer, wrestling, and indoor 
track that won conference champion- 
ships during the fall and winter. In 
cross country and basketball, Maryland 
finished runnerup, both to the North 
Carolina teams. 

Coach Doyle Royle of soccer and 
tennis and Coach Jim Kehoe of indoor 
and outdoor track had the distinction of 
bringing to the campus double winners. 

With the spring program just com- 



pleted, let us glance at some of their 
accomplishments. The lacrosse team, 
defending national champions the past 
two years under the guidance of co- 
coaches Jack Faber and Al Heagy, took 
a 22-game winning streak into the 1957 
campaign. After losing three ail-Amer- 
icans from the '56 team plus several 
other outstanding players, the '57 edi- 
tion of the stickmen were not expected 
to get through the schedule without 
several setbacks. But Faber and Heagy 
molded together a top unit, including 



Burr Grim, the Terps' ace distance 
runner who has given the University 
a national reputation in track for the 
first time. After a great indoor sea- 
son he came hack early this spring to 
run a 4:06 outdoor mile in a dual 
meet with North Carolina. This was 
the nation's best mile. 



Ed Cooke, the Terrapins' start shot- 
putter. He set a new University rec- 
ord in the Penn Relays when he 
threw the shot 52 feet, 4 inches. He 
is the Conference title holder, indoor 
and outdoor. He also throws the dis- 
cus and javelin. Cooke is a star end 
on the football team. 



First baseman Howie Dare furnished 
the Terp baseball team with some of 
the best playing and hitting in four 
year. Dare hit over .333 for the 
season and was superb in the field. 
He is a star halfback on the football 
team. 





i 




three sophomore attackmen, and came 
up to the final game with Johns Hop- 
kins undefeated and with a 31 -game 
winning streak. This tied the all-time 
win streak, held by the Blue Jays. Be- 
fore 11,500 excited lacrosse fans, the 
Terrapins dropped a 15-10 decision to 
the favored Jays and relinquished their 
national title. Top performers for the 
Terps were their goalie. all-American 
Jimmy Kappler. midfielders Ernie Betz, 
Leroy Skinner, and Stuart Carlisle, and 
the defense trio of Ronnie Scheydt. 
Dick Szlasa, and led Kyte, With an 
undefeated freshman stick ten, Terp 
fans can be assured of the team starting 
another winning streak next spring. 

Kehoe's track team won their third 
of four Atlantic Coast Conference titles 
with a convincing win in the Confer- 
ence meet. The Terps were defending 
titlists. The '57 season also brought 
another unbeaten dual meet mark with 
victories in six dual meets. The '56 team 
also was unbeaten in dual meets, along 
with winning the title. 

Although there were consistent win- 
ners all season and several double win- 
ners all year, the attractive name was 
that of Burr Grim, who has become 
known on the campus not as "Burr." 



but as "Four-O-Six" Grim, ["his refers 

lo his great mile run in the North ( aro 
lina dual meet when he beat Ins n.i 
tional rival Iron) Chapel Hill I mi 

Beatty, in the second best time ol the 

year across the nation 4:06. lieatt \ 

was onl> lour yards behinds at the 

finish, in the time ol 4:06.5., third best 
time in the COUntrj this year, (nun 
also had a 9:07.2 two-mile in the 
DCAAU meet, fifth best in the nation 

In the ACC meet. Grim won both 
the mile and two mile anil big Ed 
Cooke, a tremendous field man. also 
was a double winner, in the shot and 
discus. Cooke is an end on the foot- 
ball team. In the Virginia meet, he was 
a triple-winner — the shot, discus, and 
javelin. In the ACC meet, winning by 
a 36-point margin over second place 
North Carolina, the Terps captured 
seven of the 1 5 first places. Besides 
the double-winners of Grim and Cooke. 
Cieorge Hogan won the high jump; 
Eddie l.loyd the broad jump; and 
Larry Salmon, the 220-yard low 
hurdles. 

Doyle Royal brought his second con- 
ference title to Maryland when his 
tennis team won the first conference 
crown in the school's historv and also 



won the individual title when two 

lerps. Dave F iiislit.it won ovei i 

mate lackson "i .ii]'.' Roj al i neti 
were undefeated in league plaj (7-0) 
and lost onlj .■ <> I match t«' Nai 

the entire season 

In the conference doubles champ 
ionship held .it Richmond, \ .i the out 

standing double team ol I u-ishi.it .md 
( ail Bucks lost to Duke's double entl 
otherwise (he Icli.ipuis would have 
made a clean sweep ol the pi. 
Championships to go with league title 

Freishtat, Bucks, and Yang were the 

stars in a big year. 

Baseball and goli gave it a real good 

try. It tinned out to be the leip nine 
that became the "giant-killers'' m the 
conference when North Carolina was 

forced to come to College Park to plaj 

a rained out game inasmuch as it 
figured in the I arheels' chance ol ticing 
Duke for the title Coach Shipley's 
team came through with a thrilling 
ninth inning tun to nip the I arheels. 
8-7 and allow Duke to back into the 
title. Howie Dare, the line I erp hall- 
back, was the big name on the team 
He led the batting with .357. one ol 
the tops in the Conference, and set a 
(Continued on next page) 



Maryland's top stick trio of the 1957 .season — they helped the Terrapins to their 31st consecutive victory 
and possible third national title in a row. Goalie Jim Kappler, All- American for two years is headed for 
first team honors again and midfielders Ernie Betz and Leroy Skinner are top candidates for all-star honors. 



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Sports 

Continued from page 25 



new conference record for stolen bases 
with 31. The old record was 21 set 
in 1956. He was scouted heavily by 
several major league teams as was third 
baseman Andy McDonald, acclaimed 
to have the best arm in the league. 
McDonald hit .318 and led in runs- 
batted-in with 23. Along with Dare and 
McDonald, the other big name was 
sophomore pitcher Fred Gebhardt. 
With an 11-12 overall record, Gebhardt 
had a 5-3 record and had a phenomenal 
earned run average of 2.1 1. Stan Bobb, 
senior pitcher, came up with another 
good year, winning the other six games 
for the Terps. He had a 6-5 mark and 
won the last big game. The Terp nine 
had a five game winning streak to close 
the season. The frosh team had a 10-1 
mark, losing the final game of the 
season to Frederick High School. 

Frank Cronin's golfers, led by Jerry 
McFerren and Marty Parks, posted a 
9-6 record. McFerren came in seventh 
in the tournament. Next year they will 
have a home course all to themselves 
for the new University course will be 
ready. They have had the handicap in 
past years of traveling to a foreign 
course, Prince Georges Country Club, 
for their matches. With one of the na- 
tion's finest young golfers, Deane Be- 
man. a freshman this year, Cronin. and 
Maryland golf is certain to become a 
real challenger in top-flight company. 

University Grad Presents 
Citation to Sir Winston 

James M. Swartz, a 1917 graduate of 
the College of Agriculture, has just re- 
turned from a trip to Europe and a 
visit with Britain's former Prime Min- 
ister, Sir Winston Churchill. Mr. Swartz 
represented U.S. Marine Post No. 1 of 
the American Legion and presented to 
Sir Winston the Post's "Man of the 
Century" award. 

An audience with Sir Winston is not 
easily obtained. The mission was a 
simple one, however, for a former ma- 
rine with a brilliant World War I rec- 
ord. Accompanying Mr. Swartz on the 
trip from Baltimore were his son, Mano 
II and his grandson Mano III. The 
presentation was made at a villa on the 
French Riviera. This followed a stop 
at Sir Winston's home in Kent, Eng- 
land. The interview came on March 1 
with the retired British Prime Minister, 
and Mr. Swartz will long remember 
being received at tea when Sir Winston 
ordered "whiskev for the men." 



28 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINF 



It was Lady Churchill who read 
aloud the citation which the Maryland 
alumnus had presented. Alter the l.adv 
admonished her cigar smoking husband 
concerning the blowing of smoke in her 
face, she read the following: 



/ ribute 

to 

The Right Honorable 

Sir Winston S. Churchill 

by 

United States Marines Post No. 1 
American Legion 

With humility we record our pro- 
found appreciation of Sir Winston 
Churchill for his inspired and 
mighty leadership in the global 
fight to preserve freedom and to 
shape a peacfnl world in which 
freedom can again feel secure. 
To Sir Winston Churchill . . . ded- 
icated advocate of the free man 
. . . we pay tribute as 

MAN OF THE CENTURY 

For his vision in time of total dark- 
ness . . . for his towering strength in 
a period of travail . . . for his lead- 
ership in the areas of life that 
vitally affect human destiny for 
centuries to come . . . we present 
this testimonial of our undying 
respect. 

January 30. 1957 

/s/ John L. Fenwick 
Commander 
U. S. Marine Post 

No. I 
American Legion 



Churchill's reaction was immediate. 
He said, "Your courtesy and your com- 
pliments go far beyond the limits which 
I can claim." 

Assisting in arrangements for the 
meeting with the former Prime Minister 
were Governor McKeldin. James P. S. 
Devereux, Congressman from the Sec- 
ond District of Maryland and John T. 
Menzies, President of the Crosse and 
Blackwell Company. In addition to his 
memory of cherished hours with a great 
figure of the century, Mr. Swartz also 
has a written expression from Sir Win- 
ston and Lady Churchill repeating how 
touched and complimented they were 
by the honor which these American 
veterans bestowed upon them. 



Campus Notes 
Continued from page s 



Green, l<> years, Nellie Green, 10 

years, Helen Grenell, 10 wars Laura 

Hamilton, lo years, Anita Hoist, 10 
years, Paul 1 1 mine . lo years, Francis 

Jackson. 10 vears I hells Johnson. 10 
vears. I. con Kiosks. K) vears. LI, use 
Kramer. K) years. 

Henry Kuhn, l<) years. Harriet 

Maiersperger, 10 years. William Mc- 
Farland, 10 years. Nancy Phillips. 10 
wars. Alice Ross. 10 years. Kalherine 
Schneider. 10 vears. Jacov Sliives, 10 
vears. William Sines. 10 years. Violetta 
Smith. 10 years. Cecil Speake. 10 years. 
Estelle Thomas. 10 years. Dorothy 
Thompson, 10 years, Margaret Vaughn, 
10 years. Larl White. 10 years. Lucy 
Wilson. 10 years, Arthur Wilkerson. 10 
years. Raymond Wilson. 10 years, 
Anita Woodruff, 10 years, Virginia 
Rees. 10 years. 

MR. MCCORMICK ELECTED TO 
"HALL OF FAME" 

Charles P. McCormick, Chairman of 
the Board of Regents of the University 
of Maryland and a leading Baltimore 
business executive, was among the first 
12 members named to Baltimore City 
College's "Hall of Fame" at a special 
ceremony held early this year. A 
member of City's Class of 1915 Mr. 
McCormick. a former President and 
now Board Chairman of McCormick 
& Company, was elected to the "Hall 
of Fame" for his outstanding career as 
a business man. William Russey, Chair- 
man of the "Hall of Fame" Committee, 
said that an alumnus must have grad- 
uated from City at least 1 5 years prior 
to his selection to be eligible for 
membership in City College's "Hall of 
Fame." 

The idea for City College's "Hall of 
Fame" was originally suggested by the 
late Dr. Chester H. Katenkamp, former 
principal of the school, and was sup- 
ported earlier this year by the school's 
P. T. A., alumni, and senior class 
members and will be continued on an 
annual basis. 

DR. BAMFORD ELECTED TO HONORARY 

Dr. Ronald Bamford, Dean of the 
Graduate School, has been selected for 
alumni membership into the University 
of Connecticut chapter of Phi Beta 
Kappa, national honorary "dedicated to 
the cultivation of the intellect and to 
the union of those engaged in intellec- 
tual pursuits." 

Born in Rochdale. England. Dr. 
Bamford received the bachelor of 
(Continued on next pa gel 




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science degree at the University of Con- 
necticut in 1924 and the master of 
science degree at the University of Ver- 
mont in 1926. He received the doctor 
of philosophy degree at Columbia Uni- 
versity in 1931. 

He presently is associated with Bo- 
tanical Society of America, the Amer- 
ican Genetics Association, the Amer- 
ican Institute of Biological Sciences 
and the Washington Botanical Society. 
as well as honorary and professional 
organizations including Phi Kappa Phi, 
Sigma Xi, Omicron Delta Kappa and 
Alpha Zeta. 

Dr. Bamford has published approxi- 
mately 30 articles concerning chromo- 
somes and related subjects. 

ENGINEERING HONOR AWARDS 

Vincent G. Sigillito, of 3941 Ames 
St., N. E., Washington, D. C, has 
been presented with the first annual 
David Arthur Berman Memorial Award 
for receiving the highest average among 
juniors in the Department of Chemical 
Engineering at the University. 

The award established by Mr. and 
Mrs. Herman Berman. of 4007 Con- 
necticut Ave.. N. W.. Washington, 
D. C, and their relatives and friends, 
is in honor of the Bermans' son, David 
Arthur, who died of cancer earlier this 
year. David, an honor student in 
chemical engineering at the University, 
and a member of Tau Beta Pi, the en- 
gineering honorary, was to have gradu- 
ated this year. 

Sigillito and Edward F. Adams, of 
7104 Greenvale Parkway, Hyattsville, 
also received scholarships and job offers 
from the Washington Gas Light Com- 
pany. 

Sanford S. Sternstein, of 4308 Kay- 
wood Dr., Mt. Ranier, is the recipient 
of the American Institute of Chemical 
Engineers Award in recognition ot the 
chemical engineering student who has 
compiled the highest average during his 
freshman and sophomore years. 

Sternstein and John C. Krimmell, of 
1229 Dulaney Valley Rd.. Towson, 
were awarded Union Carbide Engineer- 
ing Scholarships, sponsored by the 
Bakelite Division. 

William S. Haney. Jr.. of 2001 Ogle- 
thorpe St.. Hyattsville, received the 
Hamilton Award for the graduating 
senior who has most successfully com- 
bined proficiency in studies with 
achievements in social science and hu- 
manities. 

Haney also received the Bernard LJ 
Crozier Award to the senior in engi- 
neering displaying the greatest improve- 
ment in scholarship. 

The Dinah Berman Medal awarded 



30 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



to the engineering sophomore with the 
highest average went to Benjamin F. 
Hodman, of 8004 1 4th Ave.. Hyatts- 
ville. Cilenn R. Linsenmayer, of 3148 
Belleview Ave., Cheverly. received the 
Tau Beta Pi Award for being the 
junior who has shown the greatest im- 
provement between his freshman and 
sophomore years. Both Hoffman and 
Linsenmayer were awarded scholarships 
by Westinghouse Air Arm Division. 

Gerald H. Schlimm, of College Park, 
uas awarded a junior membership in 
the American Society for Chemical En- 
gineers. Other awards included the 
William F. Childs, Jr.. Scholarship to 
Charles P. Finn. o\ 2007 Belair Rd.. 
Baltimore; and the Douglas Aircraft 
Company Scholarship to Donald H. 
Spencer, of 4110 Woodberry St., Hy- 
attsville and the Western Electric Com- 
pany Scholarship to Donald L. Murphy, 
of 732 Reservoir St., Elmira, N. Y. 

Dr. Goldstein Receives Scroll 
Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, graduate of 
the School of Medicine of the Univer- 
sity in 1912, received an Honorary De- 
gree from his alma mater at the 1957 
Commencement (Commencement. '57 
—page 4). In a year when the Univer- 
sity celebrates the 150th Anniversary 
the Medical Faculty and Alumni were 
unanimous in nominating Dr. Goldstein 
for this recognition. 

The honor came only two months 
after a testimonial banquet at which 
time a scroll was presented calling at- 
tention to Dr. Goldstein's more than 
forty-five years of practice in the spe- 
cialty of urology. The scroll reads: 

doctor Goldstein has practiced medi- 
cine among us for forty-five years. 
He has distinguished himself as a 
teacher and in the specialty of uro- 
logy. He is beloved by his patients 
and esteemed highly by his col- 
leagues. His enthusiasm has been un- 
dimmed through the ever-lengthening 
past. He has assisted in the educa- 
tion of many young physicians and 
notably some who have achieved bril- 
liant success in urology. He has the 
capacity to understand the value of 
worthwhile goals, and having under- 
stood, he has labored energetically 
and unselfishly toward their achieve- 
ment. And further, he has walked 
among us in humility, loving mercy 
and adoring justice. Charity has been 
the coin of his realm. 

Dr. Goldstein has served with distinc- 
tion as President of the Medical School 
Alumni and the University of Maryland 
Alumni. 



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College of'- 



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Agriculture 



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20 CLASSES OFFERED 

Approximately 1,000 homemakers at- 
tended Rural Women's Short Course at 
the University, June 17-22. The "'Col- 
lege Week for Women" offered a four- 
day condensed course of study on sub- 
jects ranging from international rela- 
tions to poultry. '"Students" could 
choose three of the 20 classes offered. 

This was the thirty-first Annual Short 
Course to be sponsored by the Univer- 
sity's Extension Service. This year it 
was directed by Margaret T. Loar and 
Evelyn D. Scott, Assistant State Home 
Demonstration Agent leaders for the 
Extension Service. 

Most classes were in the practical 
homemaking arts, others were for self- 
development or were aids for home- 
making club members, with still others 
in the fields of civic and international 
affairs. 

Three days in the clothing class were 
devoted to grooming, posture and fash- 
ion, while the final class featured men's 
clothing (most of which is bought by 
women), under the title of "Clothes 
Make the Man." 

Making the most of their own re- 
sources — planning time, chores, storage 
and kitchen arrangement — was taught 
women taking home management. 

"Maryland food" was highlighted in 
the foods and nutrition classes with 
Maryland vegetables, fruits and poultry 
stressed. The "Big Four" concept of 
nutrition, which supplants the "Basic 
Seven" idea was introduced. 

Color in home decoration, use of 

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modern furniture and window styling 
were studied by women taking home 
furnishings. 

Women in the family life classes 
learned about basic needs of people, 
how they set their values and adjust to 
rapidly changing conditions in our 
modern world. 

Present and prospective 4-H local 
leaders at Short Course brushed up on 
some of the basic requirements and 
methods of youth leadership in the 4-H 
leadership training classes. Leadership 
for members of homemakers clubs and 
other organizations was taught in an- 
other class. 

Developing self confidence as an aid 
in public speaking, as well as part of 
personality development was the sub- 
ject of one class, while there was an- 
other specifically on public speaking 
and personality development. 

Club members were able to study 
fundamentals of parliamentary law and 
publicity which they might use in their 
organizational work. 

Two very practical subjects — land- 
scape gardening and poultry — were of- 
fered. Landscaping stressed knowing 
which plants are best suited for the 
various landscaping uses. The poultry 
class, held for the first time since 1941, 
covered some of the most recent devel- 
opments in this field, which often is 
considered to be one of the farm wife's 
outside chores. 

Flower arrangement, sketching and 
music appreciation were three classes 
given in the more aesthetic fields. 

In the field of public affairs classes 
were given in citizenship and civil de- 
fense, and health and safety. 

Three International Farm Youth Ex- 
changees discussed farming and family 
living in Austria, Iran and Guatemala 
as part of the class in international 
relations. 

Bird study was a popular new class 
being offered this year, and followed 
a theme of "Strictly for the Birds." 

Rounding out activities during the 
5-day Short Course were assemblies 
with nationally known speakers, tours, 
morning meditation periods, a concert, 
style show, and presentation of certifi- 
cates to the 88 women who had at- 
tended 4 years. Gold pins were given 
38 homemakers who had attended 8 
years. 

STUDY MECHANICAL COW 

It's getting so a girl can't keep any 
secrets anymore. Not if she happens 
to be a cow at the University of Mary- 
land's College Park campus. 

Maryland dairy research workers, 
delving into bossy's secret of turning 
grass and grain into milk, have come 



32 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



up with several new ways to break the 
bovine barrier — a new kind of "me- 
chanical cow" and radioactive tracers 
in dairy feeds. 

The new techniques were disclosed 
June 29 by a team of University of 
Maryland research workers at the 
American Dairy Science Association 
meeting at Oklahoma A & M College 
at Stillwater, Oklahoma. 

It used to be the scientists were con- 
tent to study bovine digestion through 
a small window in the cow's rumen. 
(The rumen is a cow's first stomach, 
the one where most of the digestive 
work is done. ) And the cow didn't 
seem to mind. She just went on chew- 
ing her cud and went about her work 
as the foster mother of the human race, 
producing milk as though she weren't 
being watched. 

To study milk secretion, the re- 
searchers rigged their first "mechanical 
cow," a combination of complicated 
machinery and an udder from a cow 
that has been slaughtered for meat. 

But this wasn't enough for research 
workers at the University's Agriculture 
Experiment Station. 

Although Maryland's dairy depart- 
ment research team is well known for 
their many contributions to science in 
the field of dairying, the Maryland 
group was impatient with the progress 
they were making, so they have de- 
veloped techniques for using radioiso- 
topes, or tracers, in their nutrition and 
milk secretion research. And they have 
added to their atomic bag of tricks 
another type of mechanical cow, this 
one using a rumen. This gives them 
almost unlimited opportunity to study 
the digestive process under carefully 
controlled conditions. 

Immediately after an animal is 
slaughtered for meat, the scientists 
place the still living rumen in water, 
and connect it to their maze of ma- 
chinery to study digestive processes. 
The Maryland researchers told the 
dairy scientists in Oklahoma about the 
process — rumen perfusion — in detail 
for the first time in public. 

A pump serves as the "heart" of the 
mechanical cow, while an oxygenation 
apparatus acts as an artificial "lung." 
These circulate fresh blood through the 
rumen, which can be kept "alive" for 
several hours. 

Feed substances tagged by radio- 
active atoms are "fed" into the rumen. 
Geiger counters, or scintillometers, are 
used to track the passage of the radio- 
active tracers into the blood. 

This enables the scientists to learn 
how feeds are broken down in the 
(Continued on next page) 



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rumen, and which feed substances pass 
into the blood for production of milk. 

This system works equally well with 
rumens from sheep or goats, so the re- 
searchers can use the same techniques 
to study feeds that are best for produc- 
tion of meat and wool, as well as milk. 

But the cows at College Park and 
elsewhere can remain content. The 
scientists aren't trying to horn in on 
bossy's secrets to do her out of a job. 
The whole purpose of the work is to 
give the research men new information 
that will enable them to help farmers 
feed their cattle better for more efficient 
milk production. 

You can be sure for many years to 
come that the milk on your doorstep in 
the morning came from cows that never 
even heard of Maryland's Agricultural 
College. But you can be almost as 
sure that a mechanical cow in the 
Dairy Department's laboratories may 
have yielded new information that will 
make your milk more plentiful, more 
nutritious, and perhaps cheaper. 

DEMONSTRATION LEADER APPOINTED 

Miss Margaret Oliver's appointment to 
the position of State Home Demonstra- 
tion Leader was approved June 14 by 
the Board of Regents. 

Miss Oliver will come to Maryland 
August 15 to replace Mrs. Florence W. 
Low who is now Dean of Home Econo- 
mics at Texas A & M, College Station, 
Texas. 

Miss Oliver has been District Home 
Demonstration Agent in Alabama for 
the past 1 1 years. Before that she was 
home agent in Lee county, Ala., and an 
assistant in Covington, Pike and Shelly 
counties in Alabama. She was a home 
economics teacher before entering the 
extension field. 

She has a BS degree in home econo- 
mics from Huntington College, Mont- 
gomery, and an MA degree in extension 
education from Columbia University. 

Miss Oliver will head the University 
extension program for women, carried 
out cooperatively by the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture and county govern- 
ments. Over 18.000 homemakers are 
enrolled in home demonstration clubs, 
through which most of the home eco- 
nomics extension is conducted. 

JUNE GRAD TO FINLAND 

A petite University of Maryland grad 
has a good-size job ahead of her. Peggy 
Pfefferkorn. Howard County, left 
Maryland June 18 to become a "grass 
roots ambassador" to Finland. As a 
delegate in the International Farm 
Youth Exchange program, Peggy will 
live and work along with Finnish farm 
families this summer. 



34 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



She has a farm background and will 
share her experiences with the Finnish 
people, at the same time learning from 
them. When she returns to Maryland 
this fall she hopes to spread understand- 
ing and good-will about Finland. 

Petite Peggy received a Bachelor of 
Science degree at the University of 
Maryland. June 8, majoring in home 
economics. Peggy's home with her 
parents — Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Pfeffer- 
korn — is near West Friendship. She has 
lived on a farm all of her 21 years. 

"Versatile" describes Peggy. Besides 
knowing homemaking and farming, 
she's a swimming instructor and camp 
counselor. As for hobbies, she has 
many — fox hunting, horseback riding, 
showing horses and playing the piano. 

She has belonged to the Alpha Busy 
Bees 4-H Club for 12 years. During 
this time, she attended National 4-H 
Club Camp in Washington, D.C. Also 
to her credit — she was runner-up in the 
national Apple Pan Doudy contest and 
won a $300 4-H safety scholarship at 
National 4-H Club Congress in Chicago 
in 1953. 

Contributing toward Peggy's trip are 
the following organizations: National 
4-H Club Foundation; Maryland State 
Fair Board; Maryland Banker's As- 
sociation; Maryland PTA; and the 
Maryland division of the American As- 
sociation of University Women. 

NO COOKS FOR COWS 

Feeding cows cooked or heated feeds 
cuts milk fat production by 50 per cent. 
Dr. Joseph C. Shaw. Professor of Dairy 
Husbandry, told delegates to the Amer- 
ican Dairy Science Association meeting 
at Stillwater, Oklahoma, June 29. New 
radioisotope techniques of tracing the 
movement and changes of food ele- 
ments inside the cow are speeding up 
research on more efficient feeding, he 
said. He considers the growing use of 
radioactive material for tracers in 
animals and plants one of the most far- 
reaching scientific developments of the 
atomic age. 

The University is making full use of 
the isotope in dairy studies. One set 
of experiments with the less usual kinds 
of feeds included tests of bread. Stale 
bread, a cheap source of energy, has 
been fed successfully to growing pigs 
and other livestock, but was found un- 
suitable for cows giving milk. 

"Dairy cows fed on high levels of 
bread exhibited remarkable decreases 
in percent of fat in the milk, cows 
normally testing 3.0 to 4.0 percent fat 
produced milk testing no more than 
1.0 to 2 percent milk," said Dr. Shaw. 
"Similar results were obtained when the 
(Continued on page 38) 



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36 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



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ration was made up of cooked grain 
and cooked potatoes. It appears that 
if the ration is made up of a high 
proportion of crimped grains (crimping 
grains also tends to cook the starch) a 
similar depressing effect on milk fat 
percent will be obtained." 

Further light on the rapidly develop- 
ing science of ruminology was shed by 
Dr. Shaw. 

"Studies on rumen (one of the four 
stomachs of a cow) contents showed 
that the cooked or heated feed is 
broken down by rumen bacteria quite 
differently from unheated feeds. Studies 
with artificial rumens in which are 
placed rumen bacteria and radioactive 
substances, such as sugar labeled with 
radioactive carbon, show that the bac- 
teria taken from the rumen of a cow 
fed cooked or heated feeds produce en- 
tirely different amounts and kinds of 
substances (feed acids) than do bacteria 
from cows on uncooked or unheated 
foods. Thus it is shown clearly that 
marked reductions in milk fat test can 
be due to the form in which the con- 
centrate is fed." 

The University was represented at 
the Stillwater meeting by Dr. Shaw. 
Robert D. Appleman. R. N. Doetsch, 
J. F. Mattick, Mark Keeney, S. Laksh- 
manan, and R. D. McCarthy, of the 
Dairy Department; R. D. Gibbons and 
J. J. Gilroy, of the Department of 
Microbiology and E. C. Leffel and W. 
H. Brown of the Animal Husbandry 
Department. Dr. Leffel and Dr. 
Doetsch were associated with Shaw in 
preparation of the paper on the feeding 
of cooked materials. 



College of 



Arts and Sciences 



Lois Eld Ernest 



POWERS GIVEN AWARD 

Lawrence J. Powers '34, was named 
by the National Civil Service League as 
recipient of its third annual Career 
Service Award given for outstanding 
public service. Powers is Director, De- 
fense Accounting and Auditing Divi- 
sion, General Accounting Office. He 
began 22 years of continuous Govern- 
ment service as a junior clerk in the 
Treasury Department. 

MANZANARES GRADUATES 

Pvt. Anthony Manzanares '54, recently 
was graduated from the twelve week 
radio maintenance course at the Army's 
Infantry School, Fort Benning, Georgia. 

TRAINING MANEUVER 

Pvt. Carl Lovett, Jr., '56, recently 
completed a three week training ma- 
neuver with the 10th Infantry Division 



38 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



in Germany. Lovett, a radio repairman 
in the Second Battalion Headquarters 
Company of the Division's 86th Regi- 
ment, received practice in night right- 
ing, map reading and squad and 
platoon tactics under simulated combat 
conditions. 

I)K. SPARKS RECEIVES (IRAN I 

Dr. David S. Sparks. Department ol 
History, has received a grant-in-aid to 
the extent of $950.00 from the Social 
Science Research Council. Dr. Sparks 
will pursue research on his General 
Henry Wager Halleck: Warfare in a 
Democracy. 

ADDED TO 1 INDi: STAFF 
Paul E. Pickert '54. was recently added 
to the staff of l.inde Air Products Com- 
pany, a division of Union Carbide and 
Carbon Company. His present assign- 
ment is in development. 

MCFARI ANE APPOINTED MANAGER 

Samuel B. McFarlane '39. has been 
appointed Manager of the Fiber Re- 
search Department of the Summit. New 
Jersey Research Laboratories of the 
Celanese Corporation of America. For 
the past year, he has served as Lab- 
oratory Manager of research facilities 
there. 

BERNSTEIN HONORED 

Philip Bernstein '52, was inducted into 
Howard University's chapter of Alpha 
Omega Alpha, the national honorary 
medical societv. 



College of 



Business & Public 
Administration 



Egbert F. Tingley 



SPECIAL AGENT SAVAGE 

The American Surety Company has an- 
nounced the appointment of Harold B. 
Savage '55, as Special Agent at its 
Washington, D. C. branch office. Mr. 
Savage has been with the company 
since 1956 at the above office. He re- 
ceived his designation upon completion 
of the Company's Special Agent Train- 
ing Program. 

TO BENDIX PR STAFF 

Clyde E. Bourke Jr., '55, has been ap- 
pointed to the public relations staff of 
Bendix Radio Division of Bendix Avia- 
tion Corporation. He will assist with 
planning and execution of public re- 
lations program on national and local 
levels for the division which is engaged 
in the manufacture of precision elec- 
tronic equipment for both military and 
commercial application. 

(Continued on next page) 




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OVERSEAS ASSIGNMENT 

Pvt. William K. Espey '56, recently ar- 
rived in Japan and is now a member 
of the U. .S. Army Signal Long Lines 
Battalion at Camp Zama. Espey is as- 
signed to the battalion's Company D. 

AT FORT MACARTHUR 

Pvt. Earle W. Falck '56, is a member of 
the 108th Antiaircraft Artillery Group's 
Headquarters Battery at Fort Mac- 
Arthur, California. 

BOSWELL IS A PANEL MEMBER 

Harry A. Boswell '42, was one of the 
members of a panel which discussed 
"The Church and Urban Redevelop- 
ment" before a recent meeting of the 
National Council of Churches in Chi- 
cago. Mr. Boswell, in addition to his 
activities in real estate and building, is 
a member of the Strategic Planning 
Committee of the Department of 
Missions of the Episcopal Diocese of 
Washington. 

AVIATION GUNNER 

Lt. Thomas R. Wade '53, has qualified 
in aviation gunnery. He is now under- 
going instrument flight training at the 
Corry Field Naval Auxiliary Air 
Station, Pensacola, Florida. 

ANNUAL ASSESSORS SCHOOL 

Each year since 1946, a School for 
Maryland Assessing Officers has been 
held on the campus at College Park 
under the auspices of the Bureau of 
Governmental Research, College of 
Business and Public Administration, in 
cooperation with the Maryland Associa- 
tion of Assessing Officers and the State 
Department of Education. 

The week long program includes 
lectures by assessing authorities, dis- 
cussion and examination of the prob- 
lems of assessing as well as practical 
field projects. This activity represents 
an important part of the training of 
assessors in the State of Maryland and 
contributes to the development of their 
professional standards. 

CONSULTANT TO SPECIAL COMMITTEE 

Dr. Albert L. Alford of the Department 
of Government and Politics. College of 
Business and Public Administration, is 
serving as a consultant to the State Leg- 
islative Council Committee on Taxation 
and Fiscal Matters headed by State 
Senator Edward S. Northrop. This con- 
sultation has been arranged through 
the Bureau of Governmental Research. 
This Committee, which will do most 
of its work during the Summer of 1957, 
will report among other things on the 
formulae for distribution of state-shared 
taxes and grants-in-aid to the local units 
of government in the State. 



40 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



POLITICAL MONOGRAPH PUB1 ISHI I) 

The Bureau of Governmental Research 
published on May 21 a short mono- 
graph, "Political Thories of Monopoly 
Power," by Karl Latham, the Joseph 
B, Eastman Professor of political 
science and Chairman of the department 
at Amherst College. This booklet rep- 
resents the third in a series of lectures 
on public affairs under the auspices of 
the Department of Government and 
Politics and the Bureau. The lecture 
was delivered to (acuity, visiting guests, 
and advanced students at College Park 
on March 8. 

STATE BUDGET BOOK ISSUED 

The Bureau of Government Research 
published in January State Budget Ad- 
ministration in Maryland ( 109 pp.) by 
Dr. George A. Bell, Research Associ- 
ate. The study describes and analyzes 
the processes of budget formulation, 
adoption, and execution in the State. 
Special attention is given to three fea- 
tures of the system in which Maryland 
has made notable achievements: strong 
executive powers in budget formulation 
coupled with limited legislative powers 
of amendment; budget presentation and 
analysis by programs rather than by 
line items; and capital improvement 
planning and budgeting. 

DR. CLEMENS RECEIVES GRANT 

Dr. E. W. Clemens, Professor of the 
Department of Business Organization, 
has been on leave of absence this year 
doing research work on a Ford Foun- 
dation grant. The grant, one of 24 
awarded in the fields of economics and 
business administration to faculty 
members of various universities, per- 
mits the recipient to devote full time to 
a research project of his own choice. 

Dr. Clemens is studying the problem 
of flexibility of manufacturing equip- 
ment, a problem in national defense 
and one which is assuming changing 
significance with the growth of auto- 
mation. Dr. Clemens will also use the 
grant to gather further information for 
a book on American industries on 
which he has already done considerable 
work. 

DR. BURDETTE FRATERNITY PRESIDENT 

Dr. Franklin L. Burdette. Professor 
and Director of the Bureau of Govern- 
mental Research, is serving as national 
president of the 84 chapters of Pi 
Sigma Alpha, honor political science 
fraternity. He has recently participated 
in installing new chapters at Johns Hop- 
kins University and at West Virginia 
University. 

(Continued on next page) 



Do You Have A Plan? 




Do you have a definite plan lor your family's 
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JULY-AUGUST. 1957 



41 



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FACULTY CONTACTS WITH INDUSTRY 

Industry Contacts 
It is important for teachers of business 
subjects to be recognized by the various 
industries with which their specialties 
deal. Such recognition comes about 
when these men are asked to speak 
before the national trade associations 
involved. During 1956-57 members of 
the Business Organization Department 
faculty have spoken to eleven trade and 
other organizations in various parts of 
the country as follows: Ohio State 
Automobile Association, Transportation 
Committee of the American Petroleum 
Institute. Peoria. Illinois. Transporta- 
tion Club National School Service In- 
stitute, Private Truck Council of Amer- 
ica, Air Force Institute of Technology. 
Delta Nu Alpha Transportation Frater- 
nity, American Accounting Associa- 
tion. American Economic Association 
(Transportation Section), District of 
Columbia Chapter, Comptrollers 
Branch. National Retail Drygoods As- 
sociation. 

HISTORY PROFESSORS WRITE BOOK 

Four University professors of history 
have collaborated on a book entitled 
American Civilization: A Survey of its 
History (McGraw-Hill, Inc.) released 
early this year. 

The book was edited by Dr. Wesley 
M. Gewehr, Professor and Head of the 
History Department; Dr. Donald C. 
Gordon, Associate Professor of His- 
tory, and Dr. David S. Sparks and Dr. 
Roland N. Stromberg. Assistant Pro- 
fessors of History. 

The purpose of the book is to point 
up the significant trends, meanings and 
interpretations of the nation's history 
from its European beginnings through 
the Korean War and its aftermath. 

Of special importance is the final 
synthesis chapter surveying the course 
of some of the continuities of American 
history and civilization and a discussion 



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42 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



of the ideals for which the United 
States has stood. 

The appendix contains two essays of 
unusual interest: "Civil Rights and the 
Constitution" and " I he Negro and the 
Constitution." 

FOREIGN POl l< V HOOK ISSUED nils I \1 1 
A 150-page book. Ethics and United 
States Foreign Policy, by Ernest W. 
I clever. Instructor, Department of 
Government and Politics, will he pub- 
lished this fall by Meridan Hooks, New 
York, in their Living Age Series. I he 
introduction has been written by Pro- 
fessor Hans J. Morgenthau of the Uni- 
versity of Chicago. Dr. 1 clever wrote 
the manuscript under a Rockefeller 
Foundation grant for research in 
"ethics and foreign policy." 

The book is a critical interpretation 
of United States foreign policy. It at- 
tempts to relate central elements of 
Western ethics to problems oi formulat- 
ing and conducting American foreign 
relations. In dealing with major current 
foreign policy it is descriptive, analyti- 
cal, and critical, attempting to present 
the subject in the context of a morally 
responsible and politically realistic 
theory of international politics. 

DR. PLISCHKE ISSUES BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Dr. Elmer Plischke. Professor and 
Head, Department of Government and 
Politics, has recently published a bib- 
liography entitled American Diplo- 
macy: A Bibliography of Biographies, 
Autobiographies, and Commentaries, 
with the aid of a grant to the compiler 
by the General Research Board of the 
University. 

This is the second in a series; an 
earlier volume entitled American For- 
eign Relations: A Bibliography of Of- 
ficial Sources was published in 1955. 
Both were issued by the Bureau of 
Government Research of the Univer- 
sity. Professor Plischke also has written 
other volumes and articles in the field 
of American foreign relations, including 
a textbook entitled Conduct of Amer- 
ican Diplomacy, and he currently is 
engaged in writing a text on American 
Foreign Relations. 

GRANT TO DR. ANDERSON 

Dr. Thornton H. Anderson, of the 
Department of Government and Poli- 
tics, has been awarded a Rockefeller 
Foundation grant in the field of "legal 
and political philosophy." He has been 
granted a leave of absence by the Uni- 
versity for the academic year 1957-58. 
He will be engaged in a study of the 
arguments used against the Federalists 
during our formative history and in 
preparing for publication the Anti- 
(Continued on next page) 



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federalist Papers, relating the results of 
his study to the development and prob- 
lems of national and international fed- 
eralism in the contemporary period. 

DR. HOHENSTEIN WRITING REPORT 

Dr. Walter V. Hohenstein, of the De- 
partment of Government and Politics, 
is completing a report on National In- 
fluence and Control Over State and 
Local Personnel Practices in Maryland. 
The report is designed to assist state 
and local officers to understand the 
significance, extent, and effect of na- 
tional influence over personnel practices 
as found in Federal grant-in-aid pro- 
grams and in the dual Federal-state ap- 
pointment of public officers. This will 
be published by the Bureau of Govern- 
mental Research of the University. 

Dr. Hohenstein also is writing a 
Guide Book on Financing Pollution 
Control for the State. This is intended 
to assist local government officials, civic 
leaders, and others with respect to pos- 
sible steps that may be taken to solve 
pollution problems confronting Mary- 
land communities. It includes a general 
review of the pollution problem and a 
discussion of the legal authority and 
responsibility of the agencies involved. 
This guide book stresses the problem of 
financing sanitation facilities, and dis- 
cusses assistance that is given through 
federal aid programs. It concludes with 
a summary of procedures for the plan- 
ning, design and construction of sani- 
tarty facilities. 

DEAN PYLE SBA ADVISORS 

Dean J. F. Pyle is serving as a mem- 
ber of the National Board of Field Ad- 
visers, Small Business Administration, 
serving Region IV which includes 
Maryland, the District of Columbia, 
Virginia, North Carolina, South Caro- 
lina, and West Virginia. 

DR. WENGERT RECEIVES GRANT 

Dr. Norman Wengert, Professor of 
Government and Politics, has received 
a grant from Resources for the Future, 
Inc. (a research foundation) to con- 
tinue his investigation of the policy 
decision-making process with respect to 
the disposal, retention, and manage- 
ment of the public domain, 1890 to 
1920. This study was begun by Dr. 
Wengert when he was a Research Asso- 
ciate on the staff of Resources for the 
Future, Inc., prior to his joining the 
University faculty. He will work on 
the project during the summer and 
plans to complete a draft manuscript 
of a monograph on the subject by the 
fall of 1957. 

BOOKS AUTHORED BY FACULTY 

Members of the faculty of the De- 



44 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



partment of Business Organization had 
two books appear during the past year. 
Dr. John H. Frederick. Head of the 
Department and Professor of Trans- 
portation is author of "Traffic Depart- 
ment Organization", published by the 
Chilton Co. in Philadelphia. Dr. 
Howard W. Wright is co-author of 
"Accounting in the Federal Govern- 
ment" published by Prentice-Hall. Inc. 
in New York. 

st. lawrenck ShAWAY tolls 
Dr. Charles A. I all". Professor of 
Transportation has been a member of 
an international committee, responsible 
for setting tolls on the St. Lawrence 
Seaway. This body was set up two 
years ago by the United States and 
Canada. 

NORTHWESTERN CALLS ON MARYLAND 

Northwestern University called on 
two members of the faculty of the De- 
partment of Business Organization for 
lectures in connection with their general 
course in transportation for carrier ex- 
ecutives held in January and February. 
Dr. John H. Frederick spoke on "De- 
velopment of Common Carrier and 
Private Transportation" and Dr. Charles 
A. Taff spoke on "The Present and 
Future Pattern of Regulation of Aban- 
donment, Route Extensions and Service 
Regulation". 

DR. SMITH TESTIFIES BEFORE 
COMMITTEES 

Dr. Spencer M. Smith, Jr., Assistant 
Professor of Economics, testified before 
Congressional Committees on questions 
relating to the economics of the con- 
servation of natural resources during 
the current session of Congress. He 
testified on the economic implications 
of the President's budget for renewable 
resources, including forestry, water 
power, and soil conservation before the 
Senate Committee on Appropriations 
and the Senate Committee on Interior 
and Insular Affairs. Dr. Smith has 
served as a member of the Advisory 
Committee to the Forest Service on 
Timber Resources Review. This Ad- 
visory Committee recently published a 
nine-volume study on natural resources 
of the United States. Dr. Smith's con- 
tribution concerned the estimating of 
timber needs of the American economy 
in 1965, 1980. and 2000. He also con- 
tributed to the section on multiple uses 
of timber lands for lumber, recreation, 
and soil conservation. 

Dr. Smith delivered a paper to the 
Professional Business Economists Asso- 
ciation in Washington on May 6, 1957. 
The subject of his paper was "Problems 
of the Changing Structure of the Ameri- 
(Continued on next page) 



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CONTRIBUTOR TO INTERNATIONAL MEET 

Dr. G. Donald Shelby. Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Economics, has been asked to 
be the American contributor to an in- 
ternational symposium on Business 
Cycles. Dr. Shelby's paper will be con- 
cerned with the post-war growth of the 
United States economy, the recessions 
of 1948-49 and 1953-54. and the im- 
plications of the total post-war experi- 
ence and economic theory and policy. 
One economist has been chosen from 
each of the leading European countries 
and the United States to summarize 
economic growth and fluctuations in 
his country since 1945. Dr. Shelby's 
paper will be published in the French 
journal, Revue Economique. 

DR. DALTON RECEIVES GRANT 

Dr. John H. Dalton, Assistant Profes- 
sor of Economics, has received a grant 
from the Ford Foundation enabling 
him to spend the calendar year 1957 
in Europe and Africa studying the 
economics of tropical agriculture in the 
Belgian Congo. Dr. Dalton will spend 
part of his time gathering material in 
the Colonial Office in Brussels and will 
make two trips of four months each to 
the Congo. The results of his research 
will be published in book form after 
he returns to his regular position on the 
College Park campus. Dr. Dalton has 
already established a reputation as a 
specialist in the increasingly important 
area of African economics with a def- 
initive study of the Economic Develop- 
ment Problems of the Gold Coast 
(Ghana). 

CITY TAX STRUCTURE STUDIED 

Dr. Walter S. Measday, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Economics, and Dr. Albert L. 
Alford, Instructor in Government and 
Politics, are serving as consultants to 
the Special Tax Study Commission of 
the City of Baltimore. Judge Joseph 
Sherbow is chairman of the Commis- 
sion. Two reports by Drs. Measday 
and Alford have been published and a 
final report will be forthcoming in the 
near future. 

Their study is concerned primarily 
with new sources of revenue for the 
City of Baltimore as well as possible 
increase in taxes already levied, other 
than the real estate tax. The first re- 
port dealt with the potential sources of 
revenue from earnings taxation, sales 
taxation, and sewer service charges. 
The second report dealt with assessment 
inequality in the State of Maryland and 
its impact on the City of Baltimore. It 
is hoped that the presentation of the 



46 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



tacts by Drs. Measday and All'ord will 
provide Judge Sherbow's Commission 
with the basis for recommendations to 
remedy the pressing revenue problem 
of Baltimore City. 

NORTON DODGE LECTURES 

Norton Dodge, Instructor of Econo- 
mics, spoke to the Maryland Bankers' 

Association, the Cosmos Club of Wash- 
ington, and other organizations on the 
"Challenge of Soviet Education." Mr. 
Dodge received his basic training at 
the Harvard Russian Research Center 
and for several years has been doing 
intensive research on the Soviet econ- 
omy and institutions. During 1955 he 
visited the Soviet Union with his father, 
a distinguished scientist and educator. 
They visited Soviet institutions of 
higher learning, especially in the science 
and engineering fields. The results of 
their findings were reported in (J. S. 
News and World Report. 

DR. GURI.EY AT BROOKINGS 

Dr. John G. Gurley, Associate Profes- 
sor, Economics Department is collabor- 
ating with Professor E. S. Shaw of 
Stanford University on a three-volume 
study of financial institutions and eco- 
nomic growth in the United States. The 
first volume, now nearinj; completion, 
is a theoretical study of commercial 
banking. Volumes two and three will 
be a statistical and historical examina- 
tion of the development of banks and 
other financial institutions in the United 
States since 1879. The study has been 
underway for approximately three years 
and will continue for three more years. 
Professors Gurley and Shaw have pub- 
lished several articles and progress re- 
ports. The research is sponsored by 
the Brookings Institution of Washing- 
ton, and the results to be contained in 
the three volumes will be published by 
Brookings. 

RESEARCH IN SCANDINAVIA 

Dr. Allan G. Gruchy, Professor of 
Economics, will spend the summer in 
Europe studying the private and gov- 
ernment economic policies of the Scan- 
dinavian countries. His special interest 
is in the economic programming used 
by these countries to facilitate full em- 
ployment and sustained rates of econ- 
omic growth. Dr. Gruchy has made 
similar studies of Great Britian and the 
United States. He has received a grant 
from the University's Research Council 
for his present study. 

DR. PATRICK APPOINTED 

Dr. Arthur S. Patrick of the College 
of Business and Public Administration 
has been appointed to the "Clinics 
Committee" of the National Office 
(Continued on next page) 



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Management Association. The purpose 
of this committee is to develop As- 
sociation clinics on office automation to 
be conducted for the more than 18,000 
members in 167 chapters located in the 
United States and Canada. 

CONSUMPTION STUDY NEARS 
COMPLETION 

The Bureau of Business and Economic 
Research is now completing work on a 
research project which will use elec- 
tronic computing equipment to measure 
the impacts of changing U. S . con- 
sumption patterns upon the resource 
sectors of the economy. The project, 
directed by Dr. John H. Cumberland, 
Associate Professor of Economics and 
Assistant Director of the Bureau, was 
undertaken at the request of Resources 
For the Future. Inc. of the Ford 
Foundation. It will cover the period 
1899 to 1954. Working full time on the 
project as Research Associates are 
Elizabeth K. Vogely, a graduate of 
Bryn Mawr and former Graduate As- 
sistant in the Bureau, and John L. Culp, 
an alumnus of the University of Mary- 
land who returned from graduate work 
at M. I. T. for this assignment. 

Results of the study will be published 
as part of the regular Bureau series, 
Studies in Business and Economics, and 
later in book form. 

DR. CUMBERLAND TO PRESENT PAPER 

Dr. John H. Cumberland has been in- 
vited to present a paper before the 30th 
Annual Session of the International 
Statistical Institute in Stockholm in 
August. 

His paper, dealing with recent de- 
velopments in mathematical economics 
is titled Regional Input-Output Analysis. 

Dr. Cumberland is Associate Pro- 
fessor of Economics and Assistant Di- 
rector of the Bureau of Business and 
Economic Research. An alumnus of 
the University, he received his graduate 
degrees from Harvard where he was ap- 
pointed a Teaching Fellow. Before 
returning to the University of Mary- 
land in 1953. he was Chief of the Criti- 
cal Materials Section of U. S. Bureau of 
Mines. 

DR. COVER TO MERRILL CENTER 

The Director of the Bureau of Business 
and Economic Research, Dr. John H. 
Cover, has been invited to participate in 
the discussions of the Merrill Center 
for Economics this summer at South- 
ampton, Long Island. Topics scheduled 
include the following: 

International impact of differences in 
productivity and labor standards, both 
with respect to the problems which this 
may create in moves toward common 
markets and its relation to the increased 



48 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



demand for protection ill industrial 
countries. 

Economic development of metropol- 
itan areas. 

The problems of Western Europe, 
probably considering such subjects as 
the developments looking toward a 
common market, the balance of pay- 
ments difficulties, and the significance 
of atomic power. 

International trade, developments in 
theory and in practice. 



School of 



Dentistry 

Gardner P. H. Foley 
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ALUMNI BREAKFAST IN IXC. 

Sixty-six alumni of the B. C. D. S. 
attended the 1957 Maryland Breakfast 
held at the Shoreham Hotel, during the 
Twenty-fifth Postgraduate Clinic of the 
District of Columbia Dental Society. 
This year's affair was the best attended 
of the series of annual breakfasts. 
Thirty-three classes were represented 
by graduates who came from eleven 
states and the District. 

Seated at the head table were Dr. 
Frank Hurst, President of the Na- 
tional Alumni Association; Dr. Daniel 
Shehan, President-Elect; Dr. Joseph 
Cappuccio, Secretary; Dean Myron 
Aisenberg; Miss Katharine Toomey; 
Dr. Daniel Lynch, Past President of 
the American Dental Association; Dr. 
Ernest M. Colvin, President-Elect of the 
District of Columbia Dental Society; 
and Dr. Melvin Colvin. Chairman of 
the Breakfast Committee. 

Dr. Hurst introduced those at the 
head table. Dean Aisenberg reported 
to the group on the developing and the 
planned activities of the School. Miss 
Toomey was given the customary stand- 
ing ovation as an enthusiastic expres- 
sion of alumni affection for their great 
friend and devoted supporter. Dr. Hurst 
also presented the oldest graduate pres- 
ent, Dr. Walter Green '04. who for 
over half a century has contributed 
solidly to the promotion of alumni 
affairs. 

Dr. Hurst commented on the over- 
whelmingly successful Atlantic City 
Alumni Breakfast and discussed plans 
for the Breakfast to be held during the 
A.D.A. Meeting in Miami. He stated 
that the number of paid-up members of 
the Association for 1957 has already 
surpassed the highest previous total. 

Dr. Cappuccio spoke about the com- 
ponent groups of our alumni. He urged 
all present to work in their local areas 
for the organization of sections of the 
(Continued on next page) 



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National Association. He pointed out 
that the D. C. group, under the very 
capable chairmanship of Dr. Melvin 
Colvin. had demonstrated by organiz- 
ing the Washington Breakfast what a 
component section can accomplish. 
Alumni attending were: 

1904 - Walter E. Green. Baltimore. 

1907 - Richard F. Simmons. Norfolk, 

Va. 
1910 -S. Vernon Strickler. Charlottes- 
ville. Va.: Thomas D. Webb. Wash- 
ington. 

1911 -Allen G. T. Twigg. Cumber- 
land, Md. 

1912 -Edgar S. Webster. Norfolk. Va. 

1915 -Conrad L. Inman. Baltimore. 

1916- Max K. Baklor. Baltimore. 

1918 -Edwin G. Gail, Baltimore: Dan 
O. Via, Charlottesville, Va. 

1919 -George M. Anderson. Balti- 
more: Arthur 1. Bell. Baltimore. 

1922 - M. S. Aisenberg. Baltimore; 
John F. Clark. Baltimore: Daniel E. 
Shehan. Baltimore. 

1924 -J. Pilcher Bradshaw. Norfolk. 
Va. 

1925 -Ernest M. Colvin, Washington; 
Daniel F. Lynch. Washington: Frank 
C. McCrystle. Towson, Md.; Robert 
E. Williams. Goldsboro. N. C. 

1926 -Roy H. Bridger, Silver Spring. 
Md.; Harry Levin, Baltimore. 

1927 -John P. Fitzgerald, Washington; 
Paul Hoffman, Washington: Frank 
Hurst. Washington. 

1928 -Melvin H. Colvin, Washington; 
Charles K. Gould, Washington; Wil- 
bur B. Mehring, Silver Spring, Md.; 
A. Harry Ostrow. Washington. 

1929- Ludolphus G. Page. Yancey- 
ville, N. C; Kyrle W. Preis. Balti- 
more. 

1 935 -Philip W. Anderson. Portland, 
Me. 

1938 -Craig P. Mathias. Waynesboro, 
Pa.; Ernest V. Williams. Washington. 

1939 - Robert E. Jacoby, Chevy Chase, 
Md.; Harold Plaster, Shelby, N. C; 
John H. Wooden, Jr.. Baltimore. 

1940-E. L. Pessagno, Baltimore. 

1941 - Raynard F. Ruskin, Baltimore. 

1942 -Jason Lewis, Richmond. Va.; 
Joseph M. Tighe. Baltimore: Lewis 
C. Toomey, Silver Spring. Md. 

1943 (November) -Frank J. Bryoe, 
Silver Spring. Md. 

1944 -Walter B. Brown. Fairmont, W. 
Va.; Lloyd E. Church. Bethesda. Md. 

1946 -Joseph P. Cappuccio, Baltimore. 

1947 -Charles W. Cox. Morgantown, 
W. Va.: Samuel W. Johnston. Fort 
Lauderdale. Fla. 

1948-Ashur G. Chavoor, Washing- 
ton; William P. G. Dodson, Arling- 
ton. Va.: William T. Fridinger, Cum- 
berland. Md.: Paul H. Loflin, Beck- 



50 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



ley, W. Va.; William T. Strahan, 
Silver Spring, Md. 

1951 -Roland V. Reed, Wilmington, 
Del.; Jack D. Robertson. Washing- 
ton; Thomas E. Wolf, Lancaster, Pa. 

1952 -Eugene Hinds. Silver Spring. 
Md. 

1953 -George E. Garrington, Be- 
thcsda. Md.: James A. Markwood, 
Rockville, Md.; Harvey L. Wert/. 
Silver Spring, Md. 

1954 -John H. Haddox. Montgomery. 
W. Va.; J. K. Jennings. Boston, 
Mass.: Lester A. Safier, Springfield. 
N. J. 

1955 -Mary E. Pate. Hyattsville. Md. 

1956- Michael E. Fleming. Washing- 
ton: Robert A. Gagne, Waterbury, 
Conn. 

ALUMNI MEETING IN PUERTO RICO 

A highlight of the 1957 meeting of the 
College of Dental Surgeons of Puerto 
Rico was the reunion of the graduates 
of the B. C. D. S. held at the Norman- 
die Hotel in San Juan. Dr. Carlos F. 
Maristany '18, President of the Alumni 
Section of Puerto Rico, was unable to 
attend. In his absence. Dr. Lawrence 
J. Olson "44 presided at the luncheon 
and at the business meeting which fol- 
lowed. Besides the members, the lunch- 
eon was attended by Dr. Edward C. 
Dobbs '29, who participated in the as- 
sociation's program: Dr. Jose Medina 
'48 and Mrs. Medina; and Miss Katha- 
rine Toomey, who was honored guest 
of the luncheon. 

Attending the luncheon were: 
1906 -Oscar P. Monagas 
1912 -Joaquin Fernandez Carballo 
1921 - Francisco G. Garcia 
1924 - Cristino Munoz. Jr. 
1925 — Narcisco Munera 
1928 - Francisco Guerra Alvarez 
1942 -Jorge E. Munoz. Mario F. 

Ramirez-Acosta 
1943 (March) -Alberto Jose Walsh 
1944-Artaldo V. Quinones. Lawrence 

J. Olsen. Jr. 
1945-Arturo Benavent. Jr. 
1946 - Guillermo T. Calderon 
1950- Manuel R. Fossas. Jr., Carlos 

J. Nova. Manuel A. Rosso, Jose R. 

Torres 
1951 -Santiago Padilla, Jr. 
1952 -Pilar Reguero 
1953 - Guillermo Colon-Bonet. Jaime 

R. Lanza, Jose A. Munera 

At the business meeting officers for 
the 1957-58 term were elected: 
President: Alberto J. Walsh '43 

(March) 
Vice-President: Jorge E. Munoz '42 
Secretary: Jose A. Zequeira '51 
Treasurer: Jaime R. Lanza '53 

Dr. Manuel Rosso '50. President of 
(Continued on next page) 



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the College, presided at the sessions of 
the 1957 meeting. Dr. Francisco Veray 
Marin '16 is Editor of the College's 
Revista Dental. Dr. Ernesto Davila 
Diaz '34 is President of the Junta 
Dental Examinadora. Another of the 
three members of the Junta is Dr. 
Francisco G. Garcia '21. 

RECENT ALUMNI APPOINTMENTS 

Dr. Frank Hurst '27, of Washington, 
D. C, is President of the National 
Alumni Association of the B.C.D.S. A 
native of Beaver, Utah, Dr. Hurst en- 
tered Maryland from Winona, W. Va. 
From his graduation till 1942 he prac- 
ticed in Baltimore and also served on 
the faculty of his alma mater as Instruc- 
tor of Dental Anatomy and Operative 
Dentistry Technics. Dr. Hurst removed 
to Washington in 1942. He is a member 
of Psi Omega. 

Dr. Eugene L. Pessagno '40, of 
Baltimore, is President of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland Alumni Club of Balti- 
more. Dr. Pessagno, who has been an 
outstanding participant in Alumni ac- 
tivities, was President of the National 
Alumni Association. 1953-54. He 
served as Secretary of the Maryland 
State Dental Association, 1947-55. 
Since 1953 he has been a member of 
the ADA Council on Relief. He be- 
came a Fellow of the American College 
of Dentists in 1954. In 1941-42 and 
1946-49 he was an Instructor in Opera- 
tive Dentistry at his alma mater. He 
entered the Army in 1942 and was 
separated in 1946 as a Major. 

Dr. John F. Barton, of Hartford, 
Conn., is President of the New England 
Dental Society. Dr. Barton is the fourth 
of our alumni to hold that office, having 
been preceded by Dr. William R. Pond 
'99, Dr. John E. Tyler '17, and Dr. 
Philip J. Conley '22. Dr. Barton has 
also been President of the Hartford 
Dental Society, 1917-19, and the Con- 
necticut State Dental Association, 1922. 
He has presented many clinics dealing 
with prosthetics and is an authority on 
Horace Wells. As an undergraduate 
he was awarded an Honor Medal, rank- 
ing second in the graduating class, and 
was awarded the Farrar Prize in Or- 
thodontia. 

Dr. Alfredo H. Berguido. of Panama, 
R. de P., is President of the Associacion 
Odontologica Panamena. As the repre- 
sentative from Panama Dr. Berguido 
was one of the organizers of the Fcd- 
eracion Odontologica Centro Ameri- 
cana y Panama, founded in October, 
1956. 

Dr. Charles E. Broadrup '38, of Fred- 
erick, is President of the Maryland 
State Dental Association. He is a Past 



52 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



President of the Frederick County 
Dental Society (1937). Dr. Broadrup 
has been a valuable contributor to the 
work of the Boy Scouts of America in 
his area. 

Dr. Louis Kreshtool '36, of Wilming- 
ton, is President of the Delaware State 
Dental Society. Dr. Kreshtool interned 
at the Delaware State Hospital. After 
studying Orthodontics at Columbia, he 
began specializing in 1941. From 1942 
to 1946 he served in the Dental Corps, 
A. U.S. Dr. Kreshtool is a Diplomate 
of the American Board of Orthodontics. 
He has contributed to the literature and 
presented papers on the subject of 
speech and hearing disorders as they are 
related to oral conditions. 

Dr. Frederic S. Harold '29, of New 
Haven, is President of the Connecticut 
State Dental Association, the ninth of 
our alumni to be elected to that high 
office. A Past President of the New 
Haven Dental Association, the Wilson- 
ian Professional Men's Club, and the 
Lions Club. Dr. Harold had served on 
the Board of Governors of the State 
Association, 1950-56. He is a Fellow 
of the American College of Dentists. 

Dr. Simon G. Markos '37, of Dover, 
N.H., is President of the New England 
Board of Dental Examiners; he has 
been a member of the New Hampshire 
Board since 1948. Dr. Markos is a 
Trustee of the Public Library and 
Chairman of the Board of Trustees of 
Wentworth Hospital. He was Mayor 
of Dover, 1948-50, a member of the 
School Board, and a member of the 
City Council, 1948-52. He served in 
the Air Force, 1942-46. 

Dr. John P. Bradshaw '24, of Nor- 
folk, Va., is the thirty-fifth alumnus of 
our School to be honored by election as 
President of the Virginia State Dental 
Association. Dr. Bradshaw is a Past 
President of the Tidewater Dental 
Society (1937) and the Norfolk Lions 
Club (1937). 

Dr. Michael B. Messore '30, of Prov- 
idence, was recently appointed Director 
of the Joseph Samuels Dental Clinic of 
the Rhode Island Hospital. Dr. Messore 
is a Past President of the Rhode Island 
State Dental Society (1949) and is 
presently Chairman of the State Board 
of Dental Examiners. During the World 
War he served for three years in the 
Army Air Force. Dr. Messore is a 
former member of the City Council of 
Providence and the Rhode Island 
House of Representatives. 

NEWS OF DR. FREEMAN IN INDIA 

There are many graduates of the old 

B. C. D. S. who have gone to faraway 

(Continued on next page) 



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places to practice their profession. But 
it would be difficult indeed to find an 
alumnus who has had a more unusual 
professional career than Dr. Max Lee 
Freeman of the Class of 1908. A native 
of Nova Scotia, Dr. Freeman practiced 
in Lunenberg, N.S., from 1908 till the 
end of 1910. Early in 1911 he removed 
to Madras, India, where he is still prac- 
ticing at seventy. At the outbreak of 
World War I he was appointed Red 
Cross Dentist to the forces. In 1916 
he received a commission as Major in 
the First Madras Guard, a local De- 
fense Force regiment. 

While Dr. Freeman has a "head- 
quarters office" in Madras, he spends 
the months of April. May and June in 
Kodaikordl. situated in the Poluai hills. 
7,500 feet above sea level. To this 
place come missionary folk from all 
over the East and Middle East for the 
summer season. The desire of these 
visitors to secure the services of a skill- 
ful dentist keeps Dr. Freeman verj 
busy during the entire season. 

Dr. Freeman describes his Madras 
clientele as "a very mixed bag." He 
has treated a queen, princes and prin- 
cesses, viceroys, maharajahs. governors, 
and other important personages. So cos- 
mopolitan is Madras that his patients of 
a single day may speak a dozen differ- 
ent languages. Since Dr. Freeman is 
the only qualified Western dentist in 
Madras, with a population of 2.000.- 
000. and no other of his status is likely 
to be granted a license in the near 
future, he finds it very difficult to con- 
template retirement. 

Dr. Freeman is fond of tennis and 
hunting. He was a ranking tennis player 
for ten years and has hunted every kind 
of big game: elephant, bison, tiger, 
panther, etc. — a bag of three tigers in 
one morning, for instance. 

Dr. Freeman married in 1914. Of 
two sons, the younger is practicing 
dentistry in London; the elder was 
killed in action in the late War while in 
command of a squadron of British 
bombers. There are also two girls in 
the family, plus eight grandchildren. 



College of 



Education 



MRS. STANT SPEAKS 

Mrs. Margaret A. Stant. Department of 
Childhood Education, spoke at the 
Greenbelt Cooperative Kindergarten 
PTA recently. Her topic was "Educa- 
tional Value of Cooperatives". She also 
spoke at a meeting of the Hyattsville El- 
ementary School Mothers and Teachers 
Club on "Living With Children". 



54 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



WRITES hook 
Anne Guy, who received her B.A. de- 
gree from the College of Education, has 
just had a new book for children pub- 
lished by the Abingdon Press. I he 
book, entitled A Baby for Betsy, is the 
story of a little girl whose family adopts 
a baby and is designed lor beginning 
readers. 

Joyce Kiggs Hawkins '56. is As- 
sistant Home Demonstration Agent in 
Carroll County, Maryland, working 
with 4-H girls. 

Carolyn Young Mullinix '37, was 
one of the ten nominees for the Volun- 
teer of the Year Award in Richmond, 
Virginia. She was nominated by the 
Tuberculosis Association. 

Margaret David Jensen '53, is living 
in York, Nebraska, where her husband 
is a Pioneer Hi-Brid corn breeder. 

Margaret Thompson '56, is working 
for the Educational Testing Service in 
Princeton, New Jersey. 

Mary Ellen Wentz Hines '47, reports 
that she now has five children, three 
boys and two girls. She and Bill (Agr. 
'47), are living in Silver Spring where 
he has a Southern States Cooperative 
Agency. 

Philip Morgan '56, and Guy Widner 
'57, both majors in institution manage- 
ment, have new jobs. Phil is assistant 
manager of Food Fair in Edmondson, 
and Guy has moved to Harpers Ferry, 
West Virginia, to administer the food 
service to the city hospital. 

Tom Mallonee '52, Joe Murphy '54, 
and Dick Hayes '50, are all with ad- 
vertising firms. Tom is Art Buyer for 
Van Sant Dugdale, Baltimore; Joe is 
Art Director for Reuben Donnelly in 
Washington; and Dick is Art Director 
for Ver Standig in Washington. 

Charles McKeown '56. is now serv- 
ing with Uncle Sam for a while. Prior 
to going into the service, Charlie was 
employed here at his Alma Mater in the 
Information and Publications Depart- 
ment of the Agriculture Extension 
Service. 



Graduate School 



BOOK IN THIRD PRINTING 

Cathryn Wood who received a Master 
of Science degree in Home Economics 
in 1943 has written a book which 
is now entering its third printing. Miss 
Wood writes under the name of Cath- 
aryn Elwood. The book, entitled Feel 
Like A Million, tells you not only what 
the proper foods are, but, most impor- 
tant, how they can rebuild tired, sick 
and overweight bodies. 

(Continued on page 58) 



the smart set's guide 
to dining and dancing 

Palladian Room 

ROLLY ROLLS, his entertaining 
piano and his orchestra for 
dancing, 10 till closing. 
COLONIAL WAGONS DINNER 
$3.85, 6 to 10, Monday thru 
Saturday. 

Blue Room 

Brings you its Parade of fam- 
ous name Bands for dancing 
from 8:15 to 12:45. Tuesday 
thru Saturday. 

Dining from 7. 



THE 




CONNECTICUT AT CALVERT 

RESERVATIONS: ADams 4-0700 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 




JfulliT & b'SUbcrt 

INCORPORATED 



SUPPLYING 

EVERY 
PHOTOGRAPHIC 

NEED 

Since 1920 



Phone — Executive 3-8120 

815 TENTH STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



• REFRIGERATION SUPPLY CO., Inc. • 

WHOLESALE ONLY 

1612 FOURTEENTH ST.. N.W. 
Complete 

AIR CONDITIONING, REFRIGERATION, 
PARTS AND SUPPLIES 

Serving 

THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, MARYLAND, 
VIRGINIA AND WEST VIRGINIA 
Member A.R.W. 

HO. 2-2600 

. WASHINGTON 9, D. C. m 



American Disinfectant Co. 




Pest Control Service 




928 EYE STREET. N.W. 




Washington 1, D. C. NAtional 8-6478 






WASHINGTON'S 

ONLY 

"DRIVE THRU" 

LAUNDRY & DRY CLEANERS 

Where You Save Up to 20° o 

Drive In 

Hand In Your Bundle 

Drive Out 

QUICK SERVICE 

LAUNDRY, DRY CLEANERS 

1016 Biadensburg Road, N.E. 

Washington, D. C. 
(Across from Sears-Roebuck) 



Anchor Fence 

Anchor Post Products, Inc. 

1317 HALF STREET. S.E. 

Lincoln 3-6660 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



RESTORFF MOTORS 

A/cuU 



Sales 



Service 



JULY-AUGUST. 1957 



7323 BALTIMORE BLVD. • AP 7-5100 
COLLEGE PARK. MD. 



55 




ssSS^ 



iY v Vl 









Men o^ 

Maryland . . . 



As business men in the community, we watch 
with pride your accomplishments in business 
and professions. We are interested in your 
activities, your contributions, your sports and 
your hobbies. 



Jodaij S J~aihion 
in (Ouiineii ^Turnifure 

Lyft-ice and School 



C^auiament Cf S^upplieS 

HAS. G. STOTT & CO, 

1310 New York Ave., N. W. 

Washington, D. C. 

NA 8-4181 

PAPER & PAPER PRODUCTS 

1935 5th St., N. E. 

Washington, D. C. 

DU 7-4433 



Botany "500" and Hyde Park Clothes 



Dobbs Hats — Bostonian Shoes 



,. 



Vdlaqe SJiap 
PRINCE- GE0R6B HNE5T MEN'S WEAR JTORE 



(BETWEEN RIVERDALE 

6D33 BALTIMORE BLVD. and hyattsville 



UNIDN 4-1312 



56 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



WE HAIL YOU! 



You and your University have and are contribut- 
ing so much to the Nation and the Nation's 
Capital. We extend to you an invitation to visit 
our establishments and make yourselves known. 
Best Wishes! 



Jror IDuich Uliis is a J^ealie Wear 

SEE AND DRIVE THE 
NEWEST BUICK YET 

Get the Top Deal From 

PEAKE 
Quick, 9+ic. |h 

WISCONSIN AVE. AT ALBEMARLE ST. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



EM 2-2000 



'A Service You Can Trust" 



LEE FREW IPLATT 

REAL ESTATE and INSURANCE 



9437 GEORGIA AVE. SILVER SPRING MD. 
JU 9-5708 




Maryland 

Men 

Select 



HYATTSVILLE AUTO GLASS CO. 

"IF IT'S GLASS, WE HAVE IT" 
Auto Glass Installed Whlle-U-Wait 



* 



# 




5516 BALTIMORE AVENUE 



HYATTSVILLE, MD. 



_y<>/- \ajnalilij {/Jou Can Jrttsl 

CARPET CENTER 

NATIONALLY FAMOUS BRANDS 

RUGS AND CARPETS 



JUniper 5-1117 
8612 GEORGIA AVE. SILVER SPRING, MD. 



JULY-AUGUST. 1957 



57 



TRADE MARK 




GTCRLING 
• 85 I I 000 




ompanu inc. 

/ D,„ 9 rw.„JA\»l,rs « 

Oler/ma L^iwerware 

Oarles al Pleasani Sis "BaNlmore-I.Md 



Look for the Sign 



MARIA'S 



Serving Baltimore's Finest 
Italian Cuisine 



Open 11 a.m. to 4 a.m 

300 Albermarle St. 

Baltimore 2, Md. 



— Closed Mondays 
MU 5-2811 
MU 5-2812 



teS 



V^eautlf-ul i^lotli 
JEANETTE BECK, INC 



DRESSES 

1016 N. CHARLES STREET 
BALTIMORE 1, MARYLAND 

TELEPHONES: 
MULBERRY 5-1445 
VERNON 7-9574 




tf-ox. 



By SALLY LADIN OGDEN 

America's resort hotels are filled to the 
overflowing as we go into the height 
of the vacation season and our own 
Maryland resort areas are bulging with 
record crowds. But for those of us who 
are home for the summer, there are 
many enjoyable pleasures right in our 
own "Back Yard." For one thing, the 
barbecue season is on and His High- 
ness, the Master of the House, takes 
over as chef in a round of summer 
parties. Here, your back yard, the 
porch or any place where one can plant 
a charcoal grill, becomes a party spot. 

This season a number of new "help- 
mates" have turned up on the market, 
but one that does more than lend charm 
to the party, is a three-shelved cart 
where the top shelf becomes a serving 
tray. 

If your party is well planned, you'll 
save yourself many steps to the kitchen 
as everything from ice bucket, cock- 
tail mixes, plates and spices to silver 
will all come out at the same time. 

An easy barbecue supper and one 
most everyone enjoys includes choice 
chopped sirloin — made into cakes, 2 
inches thick, and cooked to order. Have 
plenty of barbecue sauces — pickles, 
catsup and mustard on that cart table. 

Corn on the cob — roasted in the 
charcoals of your barbecue grill in ad- 
vance of cooking your juicy chopped 
steak, is always good. Peel the husks 
back from the corn — remove the silk — 
then wrap a strip of bacon around the 
corn, pull the husks back up over the 
bacon and corn, wrap each ear in foil 
and allow one hour for roasting. M-M- 
m-m — good! 

A tossed salad can be prepared in 



McrtAflaA 



advance — but have the host add his 
favorite dressing, spices and herbs. He'll 
be happy to serve this dish. 

Iced tea and light cooling lemon chif- 
fon pie makes easy work of a dessert. 

We were down in Little Italy the 
other day and decided to stop by and 
see Maria, the distinguished Baltimore 
Restaurateur who has made MARIA'S 
•300" AT 300 ALBEMARLE 
STREET, famous from coast to coast 
with her unusual ability of creating 
delicious Italian dishes. 

The late Henry L. Mencken, world 
famous columnist and author, recog- 
nized in Maria her talent and ability 
when, at the age of 28, she decided 
to go into business for herself. Mr. 
Mencken gave her the necessary in- 
spiration that she needed when the 
going was rough and Maria was an un- 
known with no financial backing. 

Today. Maria, as a successful busi- 
ness woman, says. "My work is easy 
because I love it — I love to cook; I 
love the public and my work is my 
hobby." 

Maria relates how, in the early days 
when the difference between a com- 
mercial refrigerator and a residential 
one was an unknown quantity to her, 
she went to one of her friends and cus- 
tomers of the Baltimore Gas & Electric 
Company and. through her sincerity of 
approach, was helped to get her first 
refrigerator without a down payment, 
and in those days an owner of a sign 
company had to eat spaghetti to get 
his payment for work. Today that sign 
man is among Maria's strongest ad- 
mirers and supporters. 

People like Dr. Frank Marino, rec- 
ognizing her endless amount of energy 
and her willingness to make good, came 



THE FASHIONABLE 

stchester 

DINING ROOM 

Finest Cuisine Served graciously in quiet luxury 
Superb wine cellar. For reservations call Arnold — WOodley 6-7700 

Coctctails In "Tho Lounge" or Dining room 

th © holiday rOOm Exquisite private accommodations 

for ten to fifty guests. 40 00 CATHEDRA!. AVENUE 

Free Parking tor Dinner Guests trom 6 to 10 P.M. IN MAIN GARAGE 



ft els oh Coleman 

JEWELRY SPECIALISTS 

333 N. CHARLES at PLEASANT 

BALTIMORE 1, MD. 

LExington 9-3136 LExington 9-3137 

Custom-made Jewelry 

BY APPOINTMENT 
— Designs Submitted — 



58 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



>omen 



to her assistance, as did Victor Frenkil 
of the Baltimore Contractors. Louis 
Azrael of the Baltimore News Post 
named the restaurant, "Maria's." 

One of the ambitions of the late 
Henry L. Mencken was to write Maria's 
life story and combine it with a cook 
book of her famous recipes. He had 
started work on this before his last 
illness. 

Maria, a large woman with a pleas- 
ant easy smile, is never without a Red 
Rose in her hair. 'Maria's Rose" has 
become a symbol and many women 
have wanted to wear it. Her Rose is 
as constant a companion as breath it- 
self; she says there will be only one 
other person who will wear her Red 
Rose and that one is her grandchild, 
Maria Louisa. 

She loves gay colors and she person- 
ally decorates her restaurant each season 
with great quantities of beautiful arti- 
ficial flowers of unusual design. 

Maria Alloris' success story from 
waitress to head of a progressive and 
famous Restaurant in 23 years, is both 
interesting and inspiring. Maria is an 
institution in herself. 

The cool air-conditioning of most 
dining places today makes one think 
of furs, even though fall and winter 
seem far away. The fur shops in Balti- 
more and Washington are having some 



The Best 
Northern Chinese 

Food in the 
^Nation's Capital 

palace 



r' J "We Entertom 

More Diplomats Daily 

Than the White 

House" 

International 
Cocktails 

Yenching Palace 

3524 Conn. Ave. N.W. 

(at Porter St.) 

EM 2-6358 Wash., D. C. 







fabulous summer sales. You girls who 
are planning to invest in a new mink 
stole, a long fur coat or a jacket, should 
see the collection at MANO SWARTZ 
FURS. 225 NORTH HOWARD 
STREET. 

James Swartz, who is the head of 
the firm, is a graduate of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland and his firm's selec- 
tion is among the finest anywhere. 

One item that caught our eye was a 
white saffire mink shrug. It is beautiful 
— just the little gem that goes on every 
vacation — summer or winter and gives 
you that glamorous feeling of real lux- 
ury — and not too expensive. 

Books that are "Good Reading" for 
July- August from the cokesbury book 
store, 516 North Charles Street, are as 
follows: 

Alabama Empire — Welborn Kelly 
Innocent Ambassadors — Philip Wylie 
Tugboat; The Moran Story — Eugene F. 
Moran and Louis Reid 
Hiniself and I — Anna O'Neill-Banna 
That Kelly Family — John McCallum 
Houseful of Love — Marjorie Housepian 
The Scapegoat — Daphne du Maurier 
Wapshot Chronicle — John Cheever 
/, Madame Tussand — Sylvia Martin 
Day Christ Died — Jim Bishop 
Charlie — Ben Hecht 
Ghost Ships of the Confederacy — Ed- 
ward Bovkin 



\ j<i l<> Hi, . )i(ii/iun 

with C*mplu aliUMM J . 
Win Not? 



I ■ 



Fashions for LADIES 

. . lor MEN 




s 



'J/j/uf>r/ 



BOARDWALK at 9th STREET 

OCEAN CITY, MD. 

Other HESS Shops — Salisbury and Easton 




Fiction 

Non-Fiction 

Children's Bitoks 

Educational Games 
and Toys 

Stationery and 

Greeting Cards 

Religions Books and 
Bibles 

' fealLmoAe'l Qultunal ^befuznime*it Stable" 

WE tPCI POST A _ / Mail and phone orders shipped promptly. 
0N ALL BOOK., \ Wri(e for ftee Book Cota | og 




BOOK 


STORED 


r>16 N. CHARLES STREET 


Phone SA 


7-7280 


Baltimore, Md. 



AUGUST FUR SALE 



Maryland's Most Thrilling Fur Event! Prices 

daringly reduced on ALL our exquisite Ma 

terpiece Furs. See 

Mano Swartz for 

the coat of YOU 

dreams ... at 

truly "dream" 

prices! 

225 N. HOWARD ST. 




BALTIMORE 1. MD. 



JULY-AUGUST, 1957 



59 



Massers Motel & Restaurant 

Maryland's Outstanding 



TEL 



OPEN ALL YEAR 
FINE DINING ROOM 
AIR-CONDITIONED 




On U.S. Route 40 — 2 Miles West of Frederick, Md. 



MASSEY- HARRIS BaU oJ £e*<uee 

N. E. Kefauver, Jr. 

PHONE 30 MIDDLETOWN, MARYLAND SKYLINE 3-7481 

Hay • Straw - Tractors - Combines - Farm Implements 

Serving Frederick County Since 1935 



NORMAN S. 

EARLEY & SON 

General Contractors 
and Builders 

Plants — Homes — Stores 
Public Buildings 

638 FREDERICK STREET 
Hagerstown, Maryland 



CLASS 1947 



UJhu 



MnCHHlJ 



IS 



mRRYLflno's FinesT corii 

Mitchell's Premium Corn tastes like 
it was just cut from the cob . . . the 
result of Mitchell's own process- 
ing that cooks and seals the 
corn in cans with- 
in the hour it is 
pulled from the 
stalk. 



wrcHmj, 



SHOE PEG 




Swuimm 7 
WTE SWEET CM 




- Packed by 

F. 0. miTCHELL & BRO., Inc. 

FERRYMAN, MD. - KENNEDYVILLE, MD. 

Main Office, Perryman, Md. 

Phone Aberdeen 621 -J 



Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Concrete Pipe 

6315 EASTERN AVENUE 

Baltimore 24, Md. 



E. A. MAAS ^^^^^^— 
Owner 



2 LOCATIONS 

13 SUMMIT AVE. S W. SECOND 

Hagerstown, Md. Frederick, Md. 

Phone Regent 3-8480 Phone MO 2-1451 



G00DB0DY&C0. 

EST. 1891 
Members N. Y. Stock Exchange 

RALPH A. BAIERL 

Reg. Representative 

10 N. JONATHAN STREET 

Hagerstown, Md. Phone RE 3-4341 



HICKORY SMOKED AGED 
HAMS 

WRITE OR STOP BY 
S^outnern ~J~armA 

6 Miles North of Frederick 
on Route 194 

WALKERSVILLE. MD. 

Vinewood 5-2621 

Open Daily 8 to 6 Sunday 12 to 5 




Dietrich & Gambrill, Inc. 

Frederick, Md. 
A Maryland Institution 



BOGDONOFF JOINS CSC 

Philip D. Bogdonoff. who received his 
Doctor of Philosophy degree in 1955, 
has joined the Research and Develop- 
ment staff of Commercial Solvents Cor- 
poration. Dr. Bogdonoff will be en- 
gaged primarily in basic research on the 
nutrition of farm animals. 

ADD GRADUATE SCHOOL 

For the first time in the history of 
the University, funds were made avail- 
able to the General Research Board for 
distribution to those faculty members 
who needed assistance in pursuing their 
research. Summer salaries that allow 
untrammeled time for that period, 
special equipment purchases not avail- 
able from regular funds, and miscel- 
laneous funds for travel, typing, cata- 
loging and publication were requested 
during the year. Over seventy requests 
were received involving a total of over 
one hundred thousand dollars and 
thirty-three requests were granted, using 
up all of the current funds and dipping 
into next year's allocation. 



College of 



Home Economics 



Laura Amos Bull '26 
Vera Klein Woods '32 



NEWS OF GRADUATES 

Phyllis Rowe '52, husband and two 
boys are living in Arizona where Bill is 
a child psychologist with the Child 
Study Service. Phyllis is teaching one 
night a week at an adult clothing class 
at Phoenix College. They recently 
moved into a new home. 

Joan Faye '56, who is employed at 
JellefT's in the display department, re- 
cently participated in a career panel at 
freshman orientation classes. 

Anna Karavangelos '56, is working 
in New York in the Textile Advertising 
Division of Eastman Chemical Prod- 
ucts, Inc. 

MEDICAL SCHOOL 

A conference on "Mental Illness and 
the Family; A Research Orientation in 
Social Work" was sponsored recently 
by The Department of Psychiatry of 
the University's Medical School. The 
Conference, the first in a series to be 
held over a two year period, provides 
an opportunity to fulfill the educational 
function of the University in the Social 
Work Community in Maryland. The 
planning of the Conference was de- 
veloped in collaboration with Social 
Agencies whose representatives partici- 
pated in committee activity. In the 
Conference, which was under the dir- 
ection of Dr. Jacob E. Finesinger, Pro- 
fessor of Psychiatry and Mrs. Imogene 



oo 



TXE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



S. Young. Associate Professor of Psj - 
chiatric Social Work, the following 

panel of leaders participated. 

Dr. Ray I.. Birdwhistell, Associate 
Professor of Anthropology. Department 
of Anthropology and Linguistics. Uni- 
versity of Buffalo. 

Dr. Joseph Cramer. Associate Pro- 
fessor and Director of Child Psychiatry. 
Alhert Einstein College of Medicine. 

Miss Hester B. Crutcher, Director 
of Social Work. New York State Dept. 
of Mental Hygiene. 

Dr. Oswald Hall, Professor of Politi- 
cal Economy. University of Toronto. 

Dr. Edward E. Schwartz. Director. 
Graduate School of Public Administra- 
tion and Social Service. New York Uni- 
versity. 

Work shop leaders who participated 
for small discussion groups were: 
Miss Marta Korwin 
Miss Cecelia McCue 
Mrs. Isabel Nelson 
Mrs. Melly Simon 
Miss Regina Slaughter 
Miss Bonnie Strain 
Miss Edith Varon 
Miss Margaret Wilson 



College of 



Military Science 



GOODMAN IN KOREA 

Major Glenn W. Goodman '54, recently 
arrived in Korea and is now a member 
of Headquarters, Army Forces Far 
East and Eighth Army. He is chief of 
the classification and assignment branch 
of the Adjutant General Section. 

TINARI GRADUATES 

Major Emanuel J. Tinari '55,, gradu- 
ated from Command and General Staff 
College at Fort Leavenworth. Kansas. 
He is one of 310 U.S. and Allied 
officers completing the 16 week associ- 
ate officer course at the Army's senior 
tactical school. 

GEORGE F. BAKER SCHOLAR 

Harry E. Tabor '55. has been elected 
a George F. Baker Scholar at the Har- 
vard Graduate School of Business Ad- 
ministration. The Baker award honors 
the men with the highest scholastic 
achievement in the School. 



School of 



Nursing 

Bessie M. Amur ins 
— Helen E. Kinx 



TELEVISION APPEARANCE 

Four students from the School of 

Nursing appeared on the "To Promote 

(Continued on next page) 



STANLEY COAL 



HEATS THE 



University of Maryland 



STANLEY COAL CO. 



WHOLESALE and RETAIL 



Civil in 



Maryland 



^aniuaa 



RESTAURANT 



Famous for 

MARYLAND FOODS at their BEST 



HAGERSTOWN, MD. 

1 Mile East of Hagerstown on Route 40 



PHONE 
RE 3-5080 



Support 




Boy Scouts of America 

THE THOMAS DISTRIBUTING 
COMPANY 

1008 S. Potomac Street 
Hagerstown, Md. 



FARMERS COOPERATIVE 
ASSOCIATION, INC. 

Maryland's Largest Locally Owned 
and Operated Cooperative 

FEEDS 
SEEDS 
FERTILIZER 

LIMESTONE 
PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 



FREDERICK 



^Feed MO 3-3113 

J Petroleum MO 3-5422 
THURMONT 3111 MIDDLETOWN 6 



Main Office. 



35 E. SOUTH ST. 
FREDERICK. MD. 



Frederick Underwriters 

Incorporated 

General Insurance Agents 
Every kind of Insurance 

110 W. Patrick St. Frederick, Md. 



Crown Oil & Wax Co. 

Distributors 
Shell Petroleum Products 

Phone MONUMENT 3-6381 

FREDERICK. MD. 



JULY-AUGUST. 1957 



61 



POOR, BOWEN. 

BARTLETT & KENNEDY, INC 



Insurance & Bonding of every 
description for more than 
half a century 



Policy analysis 
Engineering surveys 
Appraisals 



Phone: LExington 9-6004 

BALTIMORE 3, MD. 

26 S. CALVERT STREET 



CARTER FUEL PUMPS 

Are Setting New Records for Ruggedness and Dependability 
Install a CARTER FUEL PUMP On YOUR Car 

for thousands of miles of worry-free driving . . . 

PARKS & HULL Automotive Corp. 

1033 Cathedral St. SAratoga 7-8383 Baltimore 1. Md. 



CAREY MACHINERY & SUPPLY COMPANY, Inc. 

Industrial Mill Supplies, Machine Tools, Pumps & Air Compressors 
SAFETY SUPPLIES 

3501 BREHMS LANE • BALTO. 13. MD. - BRoadway 6-1600 

(near Intersection Edison Highway and Erdman Ave.) 



T 



0WS0N 

ELEPH0NE 

SECRETARIES 



Mrs. Flanagan, Owner 

WE ANSWER YOUR PHONE 
VAIley 5-1300 

24 Hours A Day Every Day 

TOWSON 

Month to Month liasis, Order Hy Phone 

For Information Call VAIley 5-1300 

107 YORK ROAD 



Russell W. Smith 

General Insurance 
1003 MERCANTILE TRUST BLDG. 

Baltimore 2. Md. 
LExington 9-0020 



WE SPECIALIZE IN 

OFFICE INTERIORS AND 
OFFICE PLANNING 

THE UNUSUAL IN OFFICE FURNITURE 
and ACCESSORIES 

Let our well-trained staff assist you 
in Planning your Office. 

MODERN 

STATIONERY COMPANY 

17 S. CHARLES ST. MU 5-4377 

BALTIMORE 

Serving this area since 1919 



Industrial & Commerical 

Electrical Installations 

3114 Woodhome Avenue Baltimore 14, Md. 

Phone Hilltop 4-5110 — 4-5111 



Good Will" program on WAAM-TV in 
Baltimore. 

ATTEND NURSING CONVENTION 

Misses Anne Wilson and Jeanette 
Sowers represented the student body of 
the School of Nursing at the National 
League for Nursing Biennial Conven- 
tion held in Chicago recently. 

NURSING COURSE HELD 

The Division of Nursing at Mount Saint 
Agnes College, Mt. Washington, began 
an associated program with the School 
of Nursing in August when a group of 
students arrived for a course in nursing 
of children. 

STUDENT PROGRAM 

Twelve students from Emory Univer- 
sity, Atlanta, Georgia, came to the 
School of Nursing recently to partici- 
pate in an associated program in psychi- 
atric nursing. 

ASSOCIATED PROGRAMS BEGUN 

Twenty-eight students from the Wash- 
ington Missionary College began an as- 
sociated program in psychiatric nurs- 
ing of children at the School of Nursing 
in March. Students of the School of 
Nursing are participating in a program 
of nursing in chronic diseases and re- 
habilitation at Montebello State Hos- 
pital and in mental nursing at Spring 
Grove Hospital. 



School of 



Pharmacy 

Dr. John Autian 
Dr. Norman J . Doorenbos 



TOELLE AT FORT RICHARDSON 

Milton F. Toelle '55, is a member of 
the 2nd Division's 23rd Infantry at 
Fort Richardson, Alaska. Before enter- 
ing the army he was employed by the 
Read Drug and Chemical Company. 

ROSENBERG IN HAWAII 

Milton B. Rosenberg '52, recently ar- 
rived in Honolulu, Hawaii to serve as 
a professional service representative of 
McNeil Laboratories, Inc. He will serve 
physicians, pharmacists and hospitals. 
Mr. Rosenberg was formerly associated 
with the District Heights Pharmacy in 
Washington, D.C. 

CRISPENS WITH LILLY COMPANY 

Gordon M. Crispens '52, has been ap- 
pointed represntative of Eli Lilly and 
Company. Mr. Crispens succeeds his 
brother, who has been transferred to 
North Carolina. He will be located in 
the Portsmouth (Va.) territory. 

DOORENBOS SPEAKS TO MBS 

Dr. Norman J. Doorenbos, Assistant 
Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, 



62 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



was guest speaker at the last quarter!) 
meeting of the University of Maryland 
Biological Society. His subject was 
'■Recent Developments in Steroids". Dr. 
Doorenbos predicted that it the da) 
comes when one medicinal agent serves 
as both hair restorer and a cure tor can- 
cer, the product would probably be a 
steroid. 

DISTINGUISHED PHARMACIST MSI is 

Mr. In Suk. Ko, Chief, Assay and 
Standardization, The National Chem- 
istry Laboratories, Ministry of Health 
and Social Affairs, Korea, visited the 
School of Pharmacy for one week. 
During his visit. Mr. Ko visited each of 
the departments of the school and at- 
tended lectures and visited laboratories. 
Mr. Ko was especially interested in an- 
alytical equipment and procedures used 
in the various departments. 

MODLRAIOR OF PANEL 

Dr. Shay, Professor of Bacteriology . 
was the moderator of a panel discussion 
held at the national meeting of the 
Society of American Bacteriologists in 
Detroit. The subject under discussion 
was "Teaching of Bacteriology to Phar- 
macy Students". 

PANEL ON BRAIN CHEMISTRY 

Dr. F. M. Miller. Associate Professor 
of Chemistry, was a member of a panel 
which discussed papers presented be- 
fore the 25th Ross Research Confer- 
ence which was held at the University. 
Dr. Miller and Mr. Myron Weinberg, 
a graduate student, have received rec- 
ognition for their studies of synthetic 
reserpine analogues. 

DRS. FOSS, SLAMA ATTEND MEETING 

Dean Noel E. Foss and Dr. Frank J. 
Slama represented the School of Phar- 
macy at the meeting and banquet of the 
Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 
held at Easton, Maryland. 

HONORED BY SIGMA XI 

At its initiation and banquet at College 
Park, the Society of Sigma Xi honored 
Dr. John Sciarra, Mr. Hatif H. Al- 
Jaleel, and Mr. Charles J. Swartz for 
their contribution to research. Sigma 
Xi is the highest honor society repre- 
senting scientists in all fields of en- 
deavor. 

INSTRUCTORS RECEIVE DEGREES 

John Sciarra, Instructor in Pharmacy, 
has successfully completed requirements 
for the Doctor of Philosphy degree. He 
has been with the University for the 
past three years, serving as class ad- 
visor, faculty advisor for the student 
branch of the A. Ph. A. and Rho Chi 
honor society. In September Dr. Sciarra 
will assume the position of Assistant 
(Continued on next page) 



' 




^ Very Impressive Potion 



Tired of ordinary soups 
...try 

CrabalaMaryland 

from "die 

Crosse &ElacWell 
Soup Shelf ~~y 








*b Soup 







FINE 
FOODS 
SINCE 
1706 



At your grocer's now, or write for 
name of nearest dealer to: Crosse 
& Blackwell, Baltimore 24, Md. 



Another First for the Pimlico Hotel 

Old Time 
Barbecue Treats 

Tantalizing barbecue dishes in the grand 
manner! Choice, tender meat turned 
slowly on a spit over a blazing fire, to 
a golden brown. Basted with a pungent, 
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JULY-AUGUST. 1957 



63 




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BUILDING 



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Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 
at his Alma Mater. St. John's Univer- 
sity, New York. Leslie C. Costello. In- 
structor in Zoology, has also completed 
the requirements and now holds the de- 
gree of Doctor of Philosophy. Dr. 
Costello will continue in his duties at 
the School of Pharmacy and will direct 
research in the biological sciences. 

GIFT FROM KING SAUD 

Mr. Frank R. Milio. Instructor in Phar- 
macy, has received a gold desk set from 
King Saud Al Saud of Saudi. Arabia, in 
token of appreciation for Mr. Milio's 
work as instructor to several Arabic 
students. 

RESEARCH PAPERS PRESENTED 

Eight research papers were presented 
by the School of Pharmacy to the meet- 
ing of the American Pharmaceutical 
Association in New York. The follow- 
ing members of the faculty attended the 
New York meeting: Dr. Noel Foss, Dr. 
Cazimir Ichniowski, Dr. Frank Slama, 
Dr. Benjamin Allen, Dr. John Autian, 
Dr. John Sciarra, Dr. Norman Dooren- 
bos, Mr. Frank Milio and Mr. Robert 
Kokoski. 

ALUMNI NEWS 

Dr. George P. Hager, former Professor 
of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, acted as 
Chairman of the Scientific Section of 
the American Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion meeting in New York. Lt. J. L. 
Fine and Mrs. Fine (Sue Brotman) 
both of the class of 1956 are living in 
San Antonio, Texas where Lt. Fine is 
stationed in the Army. Basil P. Johns, 
class of 1955, has purchased the 
Marion Pharmacy at Marion Station 
(Eastern Shore), Maryland. Dr. Homer 
Lawrence and Dr. Bernard Misek are 
both teaching and conducting research 
at the University of Houston, School 
of Pharmacy. Houston, Texas. 



Maryland Obituaries 



SAMUEL MARVIN PEACH 

Samuel Marvin Peach, who graduated 
from the old Maryland Agricultural 
College in 1900 and from the Univer- 
sity of Maryland School of Law in 
1902, died of coronary thrombosis at 
the age of 75. Mr. Peach was a demo- 
cratic representative of Prince Georges 
County in the House of Delegates in 
the early 1900's. Besides practicing law 
in Hyattsville. Maryland, Mr. Peach 
maintained a law office in Upper Marl- 
boro until his retirement. Mr. Peach 
was active in numerous civic and 
church activities and was a member of 
the F.A.A.M. lodge in Hyattsville. 



64 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 




Mr. Hottel 



Will 1AM H. MO I I I I 

William H. Hottcl. well-known figure 

on the University campus, died after 
a long illness. Affectionately known as 
"Bill" by everyone who kne« him. he- 
was assistant sports editor of the Wash- 
ington Evening Star until his retirement 
1 I years ago. He 
was for main 
years a journal- 
ism instructor at 
t h e U n i vers it y 

and was faculty 

advisor for the 

student publica- 
tions. He was in- 
strumental in 
forming Pi Delta 
Epsilon Journ- 
alism fraternity on the campus. The 
fraternity's annual award to the student 
who has contributed the most to the 
college publication is known as the Bill 
Hottel Award. Another sideline of his 
was that of sports publicist at Mary- 
land, a job he took on a temporary- 
basis to help his friend. Curley Byrd. 
then football coach. That was in 1922 
and the "temporary" job lasted 25 
years. Bill Hottel was responsible for 
the popularization of lacrosse at the 
University. Through his efforts and 
publicity much attention was focused 
on the game. Hottel was born in Wood- 
stock. Va.. and after receiving his early 
education there was graduated from the 
old Emerson Institute in Washington. 
His friendship and admiration for Byrd 
led to his more or less adopting Mary- 
land as his alma mater and the school 
had no more ardent supporters than 
Hottel. Mr. Hottel is survived by his 
wife, the former Lula Wright; who is 
employed in the Alumni Office of the 
University, a daughter and two grand- 
children. 

WILLIAM WILEY CHASE 

Dr. William Wiley Chase, School of 
Medicine 1927, died after a long illness. 
Dr. Chase was chairman of Garfield 
Memorial Hospital's surgery depart- 
ment and was recently elected chairman 
of the surgery department for the new 
Washington Hospital Center. 

EMU NOVAK 

Dr. Emil Novak, graduate of the 
School of Medicine, died recently of a 
heart condition. A physician and 
surgeon of note he had been honored 
by seven foreign countries as a medical 
writer, educator, and specialist in ob- 
stetrics and gynecology. In addition to 
an honorary fellowship in the Royal 
College of Obstetrics and Gynecolo- 
(Continued on next page) 



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gists, he was also awarded an honorary : 
fellowship in the Royal Society of 
Medicine in London. Dr. Novak was 
Chief of Staff for Baltimore's Bon 
Secours Hospital until three years ago 
and was also Chief Gynecologist at St. 
Agnes Hospital. 

HAMPTON EMORY BROWN 

Dr. Hampton Emory Brown (Dentistry 
'01), died after being ill since Novem- 
ber. Dr. Brown practiced actively until 
he became ill. He was 85 years old. 

EDWARD S. MILLER 

Dr. Edward S. Miller (Dentistry '00), 
died in Woodsville, New Hampshire at 
the age of ninety. Dr. Miller had been 
an active practitioner till late in 1955. 

W. S. P. COMBS 

Dr. Warren Stevenson Philips Combs 
(Dentistry '06), died in Middletown, 
Delaware. Dr. Combs, during his half 
century in the profession, had achieved 
recognition as one of the most distin- 
guished men in the history of Delaware 
dentistry. He was a past president of 
the Delaware State Dental Society and 
of the National Association of Dental 
Examiners and a Fellow of the Ameri- 
can College of Dentists. Also active in 
community and fraternal affairs, Dr. 
Combs was a charter member and the 
first president of the Rotary Club and a 
Past Master of Union Lodge, A.F. & 
A.M. 

WILLIAM L. LLOYD 

Dr. William L. Lloyd (Dentistry '12), 
died in Brunswick, Maryland, at the 
age of 68. Dr. Lloyd had practiced in 
Cockeysville and Baltimore before re- 
moving to Brunswick. A Past President 
of the Frederick County Dental Society, 
he was a member of the Knights of 
Pythias, Board of Trade, Rotary and 
the Volunteer Fire Department. 

JOHN S. HEBB 

Dr. John S. Hebb (Baltimore Medical 
College '05). died after a half century 
of practice before his retirement in 
1955. He was a member of Psi Omega. 

ELDRIDGE BASKIN 

Dr. Eldridge Baskin (Dentistry '03), 
passed away alter many years of valu- 
able service in both dentistry and medi- 
cine. Dr. Baskin held both medicine 
and dentistry degrees from the Univer- 
sity. 

JOHN C. JOYCE 

Dr. John C. Joyce (Baltimore Medical 
College '()()), died in Baltimore. Dr. 
Joyce had practiced in Baltimore for 
55 years before his retirement in 1955. 



66 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



JOHN L. GEER 

Dr. John L. Geer (Baltimore Medical 
College '05), died after practicing for 

forty-eight years. Dr. Geer served in 
the Spanish-American War with the 
Navy, one of the very few of our 
alumni who fought in that conflict. 

PEDRO H. H1RNANDI / 

Dr. Pedro H. Hernandez (Dentistry 
'19), passed away recently. Dr. Her- 
nandez was a loyal alumnus and was 
a fine and influential representative oi 
his alma mater in Puerto Rico. Two of 
Dr. Hernandez' sons were graduated 
from the University of Maryland 
School of Dentistry, Luis '46 and Pedro 
'49. 

THEODORE It. CRAIG 

Dr. Theodore H. Craig (Dentistry '44). 
died recently. Following graduation. 
Dr. Craig entered the Army Dental 
Corps. After his separation Dr. Craig 
practiced in Wallingford, Conn., until 
his death. 

WALTER J. BOYDSTON 

Dr. Walter J. Boydston (Dentistry '00), 
died in Fairmont. West Virginia. Dr. 
Boydston had been honored this past 
February by the Marion County Dental 
Society in celebration of his eightieth 
birthday. He had practiced up to with- 
in a few days of his death. Dr. Boyd- 
ston was active in many professional 
societies and also many civic activities 
and fraternal orders. 

ARTHUR P. READE 

Dr. Arthur P. Reade '07. died at Dur- 
ham, North Carolina. Dr. Reade had 
been associated with the Health Depart- 
ment of Durham before entering 
private practice. He was a member of 
Psi Omega. 

DANIEL B. MIZZELL 

Dr. Daniel B. Mizzell '19, died at Char- 
lotte, North Carolina. The son of Dr. 
W. G. Mizzell of the Baltimore College 
of Dental Surgery, class of 1894, Dr. 
Mizzell had specialized in Peridontia 
since 1926. He was a member of Psi 
Omega. 

HARVEY K. FOSTER 

Dr. Harvey K. Foster '14. died at 
Greensboro, North Carolina. He had 
retired in 1955 because of ill health. 
Dr. Foster was with the Army Dental 
Corps during World War 1 and was 
the first dentist appointed to the staff 
of Wesley Long Hospital of Greens- 
boro. 



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67 



Directory of Advertisers 



A & F Nurses Registry 65 

Acme Iron Works 47 

Advertisers Engraving Co 33 

Alban Tractor Company 67 

Alcazar 50 

Aldo Cafe 31 

American Disinfectant Company 55 

American Office Equipment Co.. Inc 66 

Anchor Post Products (Anchor Fence) .... 55 

Arnold's Village Shop 56 

Arlcraft Electric Supply Co. of Maryland ... 42 

Arundel Federal Savings & Loan Assn 40 

F. G. Arvvood & Co.. Inc 52 

Akin L. Aubinoe Outside Back Cover 



B.illimore Asphalt Block & Tile Co 33 

Baltimore Envelope Co 65 

Baltimore-Washington Express Co 67 

Bank of Crisfield 44 

Barber & Ross Hardware, Inc 49 

Bard-Avon School 64 

Bartlett Realty Co 44 

Jeanelle Beck. Inc 58 

Beltsville Lumber Co 49 

Bergman'^ Laundry 51 

H. M. Biden Co 40 

Bill's Ship Cafe 45 

Bon Ton Saratoga Chip Distributors 48 

The Bottle & Cork 28 

Briggs Construction Co., Inc 51 

Brooks-Price Co 36 

Buck Glass Co 32 



Carey Machinery & Supply Co 62 

Carpet Center 57 

Thos. E. Carroll & Son 29 

Caton Ridge Nursing Home 66 

C & W Sport Shop 51 

Central Armature Works, Inc 50 

D. Harry Chambers. Opticians 40 

Chestnut Farms Dairy 50 

City Express, Inc 40 

Conn & Bock Co 44 

Cokesbury Book Store 59 

Nelson Coleman 58 

Collegiate Publishing Co 52 

Corbin & Dodson Precision Works, Inc 30 

G. L. Cornell Co 50 

A. Myron Cowell, Inc 53 

Crane Company 31 

Geo. Bert Cropper 45 

Crosse & Blackwell Co 63 

Crown Oil & Wax Co 61 

Crown Refrigeration Supply Co 37 

Victor Cushwa & Sons 46 



Jack Daniels Buick, Inc 31 

Davidson Transfer & Storage Co 39 

Davis & Lynch Fish Co., Inc 44 

Del-Haven White House Cottages 29 

Deutsches Haus, Inc 33 

Dietrich & Gambrill, Inc 60 

Dietrich Bros., Inc 64 

Drummon & Co.. Inc 64 

Duncan Bros., Inc 42 



Norman S. Earley & Sons 
C. Engel's Sons 



60 
49 



Pairchild Aircraft Division. .. .Inside Front Cover 

Farmers Cooperative Assocn., Inc 61 

J. H. Filbert, Inc 65 

First Federal Savings & Loan Assn 52 

First National Bank of Baltimore 41 

Fisher's Pharmacy 45 

Francis & Parsons 34 

Fraternity Federal Savings & Loan Assn. ... 37 

Frederick Underwriters. Inc 61 

Fuller & d'Albcrt. Inc 55 

Garamond Press 63 

S. A. Gatti & Sons, Inc 35 

Henry B. Gilpin Co 64 

Albert I. (met/ Packing Co 32 

(ioodbody & Co 60 

Gray Concrete Pipe Co 60 



The Handy Line (Paul M. Adams) 64 

Hannes Formal Wear 48 

Harrington Hotel 47 

Harvey Dairy. Inc 54 

Media House Hotel 30 

Hendler's Ice Cream 65 

ikss Apparel 59 

Hilkrest Florists 47 

Hillyard Sales Co 46 

Hi-way Marine 43 

Robert F. HofT 30 

C. Hoffberger Co 66 

Hoffman Surgical Supply Co 36 

Hotel Dupont Plaza Outside Back Cover 

Hyattsville Auto Glass Co 57 

George Hyman Construction Co 35 



Eddie Jacobs 54 

Henry W. Jenkins & Sons Co., Inc 54 

Johannes & Murray 28 

Johnston, Lemon & Co 30 

Josie & Maria's Restaurant 42 



N. E. Kefauver, Jr 60 

Kidwell & Kidwell, Inc 29 

King Bros, Inc 33 

Kingsville Inn 65 

Kirby Lithographic Co., Inc 53 

Kloman Instrument Co 65 

E. H. Koester Bakery Co 38 

Koontz Creamery, Inc 66 

Kramer Hardware & Supply 35 



La Grande Hotel — Bob Ching's Restaurant.. 43 

Lamar & Wallace 53 

Lankford Hotel 43 

W. P. Laws Market 42 

Lawyers Title Co. of Prince Georges Co., Inc. 51 

Maurice Leeser Co 67 

Liberty Radio & Television Service 67 

Loewy Drug Co., Inc 66 

Lord Calvert Hotel 47 

Loveless Electric Co 53 

Lustine-Nicholson Chevrolet 50 

Maas Dispensing Opticians 60 

Mangels Herold Co., Inc 38 

Maria's Restaurant 58 

Maryland Hotel Supply Co 54 

Masser's Motel & Restaurant 60 

Meadow Gold Ice Cream Co 35 

The Mecca Restaurant 37 

Harry S. MicKey Electric Co 62 

Midstate Federal Savings & Loan Assn 64 

Wallace E. Miller 50 

F. O. Mitchell & Bro., Inc 60 

Modern Machinists Co 47 

Modern Stationery Co 62 

Montgomery-Stubbs Motors, Inc 47 

Morauer & Hartzell 29 

Morrison & Fifer 37 

Moses-Ecco Co., Inc 49 

McLeod & Romberg Stone Co.. Inc 34 

McNeill Surveys. Inc 46 

National Bank of Cambridge 43 

National Equipment & Supply Co 48 

Nationwide Employment Service 36 

Norman Motor Co., Inc 49 

North Washington Press, Inc 50 

Old Dutch Tile Co 48 

Old New Orleans Restaurant 46 

Oles Envelope Corp 40 

Olney Inn 46 

W. K. Pace Co 53 

Palmer Ford. Inc 30 

Park Transfer Co 29 

Parks & Hull Automotive Corp 62 

Parkwood Opticians 54 

Peake Buick, Inc 57 

Peninsula Poultry Distributors, Inc 37 

Pcnniman & Browne, Inc 32 



Penny's Treasure Chest 35 

Perpetual Building Assn 31 

J. P. Pfeiffer & Son, Inc 40 

Pimlieo Hotel 63 

Lee Frew Piatt 57 

Poor. Bowen. Bartlett & Kennedy, Inc 62 

Popular Club Beverage Co., Inc 39 

Jimmie Porter (T/A Kiernan's) 54 

Process Supply. Inc 35 

Quick Service Laundry 55 

Reese Press 39 

Refrigeration Supply Co.. Inc 55 

Regal Restaurant 28 

Reliable Tire Company 37 

Restorff Motors 55 

Rex Engraving Co 34 

Rice's Bakery 40 

Rivers & Br> on. Inc 46 

Riverside Nursing Home 28 

Riverview Courts 45 

Roberts Cambridge Shipyard, Inc 42 

Rocco's Charcoal House 46 

The Roland Park Realty Co 36 

Roma Restaurant 67 

Rose Exterminator Co 54 

Salganik & Sons 67 

Salisbury Milling Co 28 

Savile Book Shop 49 

Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 66 

Schofield Co., Inc 58 

Schluderberg-Kurdle Co. (Esskay) 66 

Schmidt's Baking Co., Inc 52 

Seaside Motel 40 

Seidenspinner, Realtor 47 

Shoreham Hotel 55 

Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co 30 

Singer Sewing Machine Co 47 

Wm. H. Singleton Co., Inc 48 

Russell W. Smith. Insurance 62 

Smorgasbord Restaurant 49 

Southcomb, Inc 37 

Southeastern Floor Co 48 

Southern Farms (Aunt Lucy Hams) 60 

Spring Hill Sanitarium 28 

Standard Engineering Co 30 

Stanley Coal Co 61 

C. H. Stark Electric Co 38 

Sterling Process 47 

William F. Stone, Jr 52 

Charles G. Stott Co 56 

Sturdee Metal Products Co 64 

Suburban Trust Co 48 

Sunshine Laundry 44 

Mano Swartz 59 

Sweetheart Bakers 43 

Tag's Restaurant & Bar 38 

Thomas & Thompson Co 67 

Thomas Distributing Co 61 

Edward L. Thomas 43 

Thomsson Steel Co., Inc 51 

William J. Tickner & Sons, Inc 33 

Tingle's Motel 43 

The Title Guarantee Co 37 

Janet Tole's Beauty Shop 2X 

Tortuga Restaurant 61 

Towne Point Motel 44 

Towson Telephone Secretaries 62 

Tri-State Electric Supply Co 63 

The Paul J. Vincent Co 38 

Wallop & Son. Insurance 48 

Washington Coca Cola Bottling Works .... 51 

George Washington Hotel 42 

Washington Refrigeration Co 34 

J. I. Wells Co., Inc 28 

Westchester Dining Room 58 

Western Exterminating Co., Inc 53 

Westward, Ho 28 

Perry O. Wilkinson 50 

Williams Construction Co 41 

J. McKennv Willis & Son, Inc 44 

Wye Plantation 28 

Venching Palace 59 



68 



THE MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



FOOTBALL TICKETS 
NOW AVAILABLE 



By tradition. University Alumni are given first choice of tickets 
for each season's football games. Your application for individual 

game or season tickets will be processed speedily. Preference will 
be given applications in order of their receipt. 

Price of individual games is $3.75 . . . all seats reserved. Season s 
tickets for five home games are $18.75 . . . all seats reserved. 







1957 Schedule 




HOME 






AWAY 

Texas A & M (at Dallas) 


Sept. 21 


North Carolina State 




Sept. 28 


Duke 1 at Durham 1 


Oct. 5 


Wake Forest ( Band Day I 




Oct. 12 


South Carolina (at Columhia I 


Nov. 2 


North Carolina 




Oct. 19 


Clemson ( at Clemson ) 


Nov. 9 


Tennessee (Homecoming) 




Oct. 26 


"Miami 1 at Miami) 


Nov. 15 


Virginia (AFROTC & Parents 


Day) 


Nov. 23 


* Night Game 





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