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THE 

MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

HANDBOOK 

1943 VOLUME XXXVIII 1944 



J. EDWARD GATES, Editor 

VIRGINIA L. CAIN, Associate Editor 

DONALD L. BARKER, Business Manager 

OWEN McGARITY, Assistant Business Manager 

BYRON SPRAGUE, Illustrator 



Published by the 

YOUNG MEN'S AND YOUNG WOMEN'S 
CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS 

MARYVILLE COLLEGE 
Maryville, Tennessee 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Part One. The College 

President's Greeting 4 

Policies — '. 5 

History 5 

Campus 6 

The Alma Mater 6 

Part Two. Military 

Officers 8 

Program 8 

Civilian Relations 8 

Recreation 8 

Part Three. Student Government 

History 10 

Administration 10 

Constitution 11 

Part Four. The Christian Associations 

The Young Women's Christian Association 18 

The Young Men's Christian Association „_. 22 

Part Five. Activities 

Societies » , 26 

Organizations „__._ rr,,„„! 27 

Publications „„ 29 

Programs 30 

Entertainment _, 30 

Part Six. Athletics 

Intercollegiate _ 32 

Intramural _-„_„ ,. 33 

Point System „_„ „_„_ = _ ===r== „__„ 34 

Part Seven. General Information 

College 36 

Town 38 

Yells and Songs -M 39 

Part Eight. Advertisements 



PART ONE 
THE COLLEGE 




ANDERSON HALL TOWER 



GREETING FROM THE PRESIDENT 



GREETING FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE 




DR. RALPH WALDO LLOYD 

President of Maryville College 

This is written at the opening of the 125th year in the history 
of Maryville College. The rapid turning of events in the world dur- 
ing these days of war makes it impossible to predict what special cir- 
cumstances may surround life on this campus even a few months 
hence. But I think we may reasonably expect to have the privilege 
of welcoming several hundred college students and several hundred 
members of the Army Air Forces College Training Detachment now 
assigned here. 

I am happy to extend an official greeting to all who come here 
to live and work on the Maryville campus as either civilian or soldier 
students. This little book published by students intends to give some 
introductory and ready reference information for all. The College 
officers stand ready to give information daily throughout the year; 
And the officers and faculty welcome an opportuity to become ac- 
quainted with the individuals who are enrolled in or assigned to this 
institution. 

RALPH WALDO LLOYD 
President of Maryville College 



POLICIES HISTORY 



POLICIES 

Basic to an understanding of Maryville College is a knowledge 
of its three distinctive and historic policies. 

HIGH SCHOLORSHIP STANDARDS 

Maryville College is officially accredited by the national, regional, 
and state accrediting bodies; the Association of American Univer- 
sities, the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, 
and the State of Tennessee Department of Education. Among other 
organizations by which it is approved or of which it is a member are 
the National Association of Schools of Music, the American Medical 
Association, the American Council on Education, the Association of 
American Colleges, and the American Association of University 
Women. 

LOW EXPENSE RATES TO STUDENTS 

In order to enable students of limited means as well as those of 
abundant means to secure a college education, Maryville maintains 
a low rate of expense and a self-help program. Students living in 
dormitories pay about $350 a year; those who live in their own homes 
in the community pay approximately $160. About two-thirds of the 
students earn part of their expenses through the self-help program, 
which includes remunerative employment, loans, and a few designated 
scholarship grants. Seldom can one meet all expenses in this way. 

POSITIVE CHRISTIAN EMPHASIS AND PROGRAM 
Maryville College is Christian, although not sectarian, in its 
purposes, program, and teaching. Throughout its history it has been 
connected organically with the Presbyterian Church in the U. S. A. 
It seeks to fulfill its responsibility through Christian faculty and staff, 
required courses in religion, required attendance at daily chapel and at 
Sunday church services, the "February Meetings", the "Maryville 
College Parish" program, and active Christian Associations. 

HISTORY 

Founded in 1819 by Rev. Isaac Anderson, D.D., as a theological sem- 
inary, Maryville College is one of the fifty oldest among the seventeen 
hundred institutions of higher education in the United States and one 
of the fifteen oldest in the South. The original site of the college is 
now occupied by the New Providence Presbyterian Church. In 1861 
the Civil War forced the college to close. 

In 1866 Prof. T. J. Lamar of the pre-war faculty became the 
second founder. A new site was purchased, and within a few years 
Anderson, Memorial, and Baldwin Halls were built. By 1867 women 
students were enrolled, and in 1875 Maryville conferred what was 
probably the first B. A. degree received by a woman in Tennessee. 
Since 1930 Rev. R. W. Lloyd, D. D., has been president. 



HISTORY CAMPUS ALMA MATER 



From 13 students in 1866 and 83 students of college grade in 1901, 
the enrollment had grown to 813 in 1940-41. The armed forces and 
war industries have now, at the end of 1942-43, cut the number to 510. 
Thirty-seven states and four foreign countries are represented. The 
faculty and staff number about 75. 

CAMPUS 

Maryville's beautiful 320-acre campus includes the college woods 
with its picnic ground and natural amphitheatre, the college farm, 
and a nine-hole golf course. A map of the central area, showing 17 
of the 22 buildings on the campus, will be found on the inside back 
cover page of the Handbook. 

From the campus can be seen the distant Cumberland mountains 
on the west and the Chilhowees and Great Smokies on the east. The 
Great Smoky Mountains National Park is only 20 miles away. Knox- 
ville is 16 miles northwest. The city of Maryville, settled about 1785, 
and its sister city Alcoa, where the Aluminum Company of America 
operates one of the largest aluminum plants in the world, with their 
surburban area, now have a population of about 25,000. Maryville's 
principal churches and its attractive business district are within con- 
venient walking distance of the campus. 

ALMA MATER 

Where Chilhowee's lofty mountains 

Pierce the southern blue 
Proudly stands our Alma Mater, 

Noble, grand, and true. 

As thy hilltop crowned with cedars 

Ever green appears; 
So thy memory fresh shall linger 

Through life's smiles and tears. 

Lift the chorus, wake the echoes, 

Make the welkin ring! 
Hail the queen of all the highland! 

Loud her praises sing. 

Chorus 

Orange, garnet, float forever, 

Ensign of our hill! 
Hail to thee, our Alma Mater! 

Hail to Maryville. 



PAHT TWO 
MILITARY 



j SCIENCE 1 I MALL f 




FAYERWEATHER SCIENCE HALL 



8 OFFICERS PROGRAM CIVILIAN RELATIONS RECREATION 

OFFICERS 

First Lt. Donald B. Ladd, Commanding Officer 
First Lt. Louis E. Mackey Second Lt. E. H. Garrison 

First Lt. H. L. Creshire, M.D. Second Lt. Samuel D. Wade 

PROGRAM 

The Army Air Forces College Training (Pref light) Program was 
established at Maryville College on March 1, 1943, with the intent 
of giving Army Air Force candidates a better background for future 
work. Colleges were chosen because they were the best prepared 
institutions to handle such a program. 

The curriculum conducted by the Maryville faculty includes 
physics, mathematics, English, history, geography, Civil Air Regula- 
tions, and Medical Aid. The college also provides, on a plan furnished 
by the Air Corps, six hours a week of calisthenics and games, includ- 
ing in season volleyball, softball, tennis, swimming, basketball, and 
perhaps wrestling. There can be no football, touch football, soccer, 
or lacrosse. 

The army has charge of administrative details and drill activity. 
During the latter part of the training period, which lasts approxi- 
mately five months for most of the men, some flying instruction is 
given by the government at the local airport. 

CIVILIAN RELATIONS 

The training detachment is under strict army discipline at all 
times. The men march in formation to all meals, classes, and other 
appointments, spend the evenings in supervised study, go to bed early 
and get up early. Only in their few off hours (week-ends and perhaps 
one night) can they associate with the civilian students. During his 
free time, the aviation student may come and go as he sees fit, exicept 
to off-limits places, as long as he behaves as a gentleman and a soldier. 
The members of the college training detachment are expected by their 
officers to respect the traditions and regulations of Maryville College. 

Some regulations the soldiers follow require civilian cooperation. 
At retreat or at any other time a military force is honoring the flag, 
the civilians in the vicinity should stop and stand at attention until 
the completion of the ceremony. 

RECREATION 

Aircrew students may belong to the social societies and the Y. M. 
C. A. They are welcome at the "Y" Sunday afternoon services. They 
may use the college library and attend the college entertainments 
when their program permits. Last year a dance was held in the 
armory for the detachment and a special show run in the local theatre. 
The men have organized several variety shows and a military band. 
Musical trainees have given impromptu concerts in the barracks. The 
"Y" is planning further entertainment. 



PART THREE 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 




• niMfriftiimiiiinir fiWifllflMilWi'iil 



THAW HALL 



10 HISTORY ADMINISTRATION 

HISTORY 

The Student Council was organized in 1923 to represent student 
opinion and work with the faculty in promoting desirable activities 
and relationships. The Constitution of the Student Council then 
drawn up was repeatedly revised through the years as opportunities 
arose for increased usefulness and broader responsibilities for the 
Council. The present Constitution of the Student Body was formu- 
lated during 1941-1942 and adopted by the Executive Council of the 
Faculty and by the Student Body in April, 1942. One amendment 
has since been added. 

ADMINISTRATION 

STUDENT COUNCIL 

Officers 

President Betty Jane Miller 

Vice-President Helen Anderson 

Secretary-Treasurer Virginia Cain 

Members 

Seniors Juniors 

Helen Anderson Joseph Brown 

William Buford Virginia Cain 

Leroy Dillener Eachel Galbreath 

Jeana Eddleman Louise Henry 

Betty Jane Miller Harold Huffman 

(Three others to be elected) (To be elected) 

Sophomores Freshmen 

William Buzby (Four to be elected) 
Mary Ella Fletcher 
Catherine Sisk 
Byron Sprague 

CLASS OFFICERS 

Senior 

President Paul Smith Secretary Frances Harris 

Vice-Pres. Marion Schanck Treasurer Hubert Rust 

Junior 

President Donald Barker Secretary __ Elizabeth Hoagland 

Vice-Pres. Agnes Peterson Treasurer Abner Richard 

Sophomore 

President John Houdeshel Secretary Polly Edmonds 

Vice-Pres. __ Thelma Richardson Treasurer Robert Barker 



CONSTITUTION 11 



CONSTITUTION OF THE STUDENT EODY OF 
MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

PREAMBLE 

Whereas, the Student Council of Maryville College has functioned 
continuously since its organization in 1923, under a constitution which 
has been amended from time to time, and whereas, the time now seems 
opportune for a general revision of the existing Constitution of the 
Student Council, and for an enlargement of the designated functions 
of such a student organization for the purpose of providing greater 
understanding and cooperation throughout all of the College life and 
activities, now therefore, 

We, the Students of Maryville College do hereby repeal the pre- 
sent Constitution of the Student Council and do adopt in its place this 
the following Constitution of the Student Body of Maryville College. 

Article I — Organization and Meetings of the Student Body 

Section 1. The President, Vice-President and Secretary-Treas- 
urer of the Student Council are respectively the officers of the Stu- 
dent Body. They shall be chosen by the Council as hereafter provided 
for in this Constitution. 

Section 2. The President of the Student Body shall call a meet- 
ing of the Student Body upon vote of the Council, or upon petition of 
fifty (50) students requesting such a meeting, or upon request of the 
President of the College. A meeting called upon petition must be held 
within one week of the date of the presenting of the petition. 

Section 3. Meetings of the Student Body shall be held for the 
consideration and adoption or rejection of amendments to this Con- 
stitution. 

Section 4. Meetings of the Student Body may be held for the 
consideration of other matters. 

Article II — The Student Council 

Section 1. The general administrative functions of the Student 
Body shall be centered in a group of twenty-two student representa- 
tives selected in the manner hereinafter designated, to be known as 
the Student Council. The officers of the Student Council shall serve 
respectively as the President, Vice-President and Secretary-Treasurer 
of the Student Body. 

Section 2. The object of this Council shall be: 

a. To cooperate with faculty and students in maintaining Mary- 
ville College's distinctive major policies, such as those of (1) high 
scholarship, (2) low expense rates, (3) positive Christian emphasis 
and program. 

b. To furnish a responsible group of students who will represent 
accurately the points of view and the interests of the student body. 



12 CONSTITUTION 



c. To serve as a body by which proposals arising from the stu- 
dents may be heard, developed, and presented through official repre- 
sentatives to the Student-Faculty Senate for further consideration. 

d. To supervise, through committees, certain student elections 
and other student activities, as provided for elsewhere in this Con- 
stitution. 

Section 3. The organization of the Student Council shall be as 
follows : 

a. The membership shall consist of 

(1) Four freshmen, to serve for one year 

(2) Four sophomores, the man and the woman respectively 
polling the higher number of votes in the election to serve for two 
years, the other two to serve for one year. 

(3) Six juniors, including the two elected in their sophomore 
year, and four elected in their junior year to serve for two years. 

(4) Eight seniors including the four elected in their junior 
year, and four newly elected. 

b. One-half of the representatives elected from each class shall 
be men and one-half women. 

c. To become and remain eligible for membership in the Council, 
a student shall have met the necessary scholastic requirements for 
membership in the class which he represents. 

d. Council members to represent the senior, junior, and sopho- 
more classes shall be elected by a majority of the votes cast by their 
respective classes (junior, sophomore, and freshman) at the general 
College election each spring, as provided for elsewhere in this Consti- 
tution. 

e. Council members to represent the incoming freshman class 
shall be elected by ballot at a meeting of the class called by the Pres- 
ident of the Council within one month after the opening of the Fall 
Semester, for the purpose of electing all freshman class officers and 
representatives. This meeting shall be presided over and the election 
conducted by the President of the Council, and a majority of all 
votes cast shall be required for the election of each officer and rep- 
resentative. 

f. The classes concerned shall have the power to fill any vacan- 
cies arising between regular elections. 

g. No student may serve as class officer and member of the 
Council at the same time. 

h. Council officers. 



CONSTITUTION 13 



(1) Within one week following the election of senior, junior, 
and sophomore class representatives in the annual student election in 
the spring, the retiring President of the Council shall call a meeting 
of the new Council for the purpose of electing officers for the follow- 
ing year. This election shall be by ballot, and shall be conducted by 
the retiring President, who shall not have a vote. 

(2) The officers of the Council shall be a President and a 
Vice-President, both of whom shall be seniors in the year in which 
they serve, and a Secretary-Treasurer. 

(3) In case any officer becomes unable to serve, his successor 
shall be elected at the next meeting of the Council. 

Section 4. The duties of the Council shall be as follows: 

a. It shall meet at regular intervals as it may decide, but at 
least once each month from September to May; special meetings may 
be held at the call of the President. 

b. It shall supervise through its committees such activities as are 
specified in this Constitution. It may require reports from its com- 
mittees at designated times, and shall pass on to its committees such 
suggestions and requests as it may deem wise. 

c. The Council as a group, and its members as individuals, shall 
be responsible for the leadership of student opinion, and shall seek 
always to develop within the Student Body a spirit of self-discipline 
which shall make for such an observance of the standards of our 
common life as shall render enforcement increasingly unnecessary. 

d. The Council may prepare and present through its represen- 
tatives on the Student-Faculty Senate, such proposals as may arise 
for the good of the College. 

e. Representatives of other student organizations of the College 
may appear before the Council to present matters in which they are 
directly concerned. 

f. The Council may from time to time designate its meetings as 
open or closed to the student body. 

Article III — The Student-Faculty Senate 

Section 1. The Student-Faculty Senate shall be composed of 
seven members of the Council, and seven faculty members, of whom 
one shall be the President of the College. The student members are 
to be distributed as follows: 

a. One sophomore, to serve for two years, to be chosen from the 
two sophomores elected to the Council for two-year terms. 

b. Three juniors, the one who was elected as a sophomore, and 
two newly elected for two years, to be chosen from juniors elected to 
the Council for two-year terms. 



14 CONSTITUTION 



c. Three seniors, the two who were elected as juniors, and one 
newly elected, provided that one of the three senior members shall be 
the President of the Council. 

Section 2. The student members of the Senate shall be elected 
by ballot by the Council at its second regular meeting in the Fall 
Semester; the other faculty members shall be appointed by the Pres- 
ident of the College or selected in such other manner as he may 
specify. 

Section 3. The President of the College or someone else whom he 
may designate shall serve as Chairman of the Senate; a student 
member shall be elected Secretary by the Senate at its first meeting 
in the fall Semester. 

Section 4. The Senate shall meet at regular times as it may de- 
cide, but at least once a month after its election. 

Section 5. It shall be the duty of the Senate to consider prob- 
lems and proposals with reference to the common life and activities 
of the College community, and to adopt from time to time, subject to 
the approval of the Executive Council of the Faculty, such regulations 
and such changes in existing regulations of the College as may be 
deemed wise and necessary. 

Section 6. A quorum for the transaction of all business shall con- 
sist of at least four student members and four faculty members. 

Article IV — Committees 

Section 1. The Elections Committee shall be composed of nine 
members of the Council, three seniors, two juniors, two sophomores, 
and two freshmen, to be appointed by the President of the Council. 

a. It shall be the duty of the Elections Committee to conduct the 
annual election each May at such time and place as shall be specified 
by the Council. The Committee shall have prepared mimeographed 
ballots, and shall have posted lists of nominations for class officers 
and representatives, and officers and members of the Executive 
Board of the Athletic Association, for the ensuing year, as certified 
to the _ Committee by the class presidents and the President of the 
Athletic Association, respectively. At all times during the voting 
hours there shall be at least three members of the Elections Commit- 
tee on duty at the voting place, who shall have authorized lists of all 
members of the voting classes, shall provide proper conditions for 
secret balloting, shall see that not votes are cast other than by regis- 
tered students upon the proper ballots, and shall keep an accurate 
record of those voting. 

b. Nominations for the various class officers and representatives 



CONSTITUTION 15 



shall be made at meetings of the respective classes at least one week 
before the annual election, notice of each class meeting- having been 
given, either by announcement in Chapel or by publication in the 
Highland Echo, at least three days in advance of the meeting. Two 
nominees for each position shall be selected, and shall be certified to 
the Elections Committee by the class presidents. 

c. Officers and members of the Executive Board of the Athletic 
Association having been nominated at a meeting of the Student Body 
and Faculty as provided in the By-Laws of the Association, shall be 
elected by ballot at the annual election, all students and faculty being 
eligible to vote. 

d. The list to be voted on by the senior cfass and faculty shall 
consist of nominations for officers and members of the Executive 
Board of the Athletic Association. The list for the junior class shall 
consist of nominations for senior class officers and Council represen- 
tatives, and for officers and members of the Executive Board of the 
Athletic Association. The list for the sophomore class shall consist 
of nominations for junior class officers, editor and business manager 
of the Chilhowean, and Council representatives, and for officers and 
members of the Executive Board of the Athletic Association. The 
list for the freshman class shall consist of nominations for sophomore 
class officers and Council representatives, and for officers and mem- 
bers of the Executive Board of the Athletic Association. 

e. The Elections Committee shall be responsible for having the 
date, hours, and place of the election announced in Chapel at least 
five days before the election; for having this information and lists of 
all nominees published in the issue of the Highland Echo immediately 
preceding the election; and for counting all votes and certifying the 
results to the Council. 

f. The Council may direct the Elections Committee to conduct 
other general student elections, such as for Barnwarming and May 
Day, when requested to do so by the groups sponsoring such activities. 

Section 2. The Finance Committee shall be composed of three 
members of the Council: the Secretary-Treasurer of the Council, who 
shall act as chairman, and two others appointed by the President of 
the Council. The Committee shall be responsible for the collection of 
all funds for Council purposes, and shall be permitted to make assess- 
ments upon the classes, as approved by the Council. 

Section 3. The Student Publications Committee shall be com- 
posed of four members of the Council, appointed by the President of 
the Council. 

a. The Committee shall serve as a part of the Highland Echo 
Committee as provided in the Highland Echo regulations, and shall 



16 CONSTITUTION 



carry out such duties as are prescribed by said regulations. 

b. The Committee shall also be responsible for publicizing the 
activities of the Council, and for conveying to the publications staffs 
such suggestions and recommendations as the Council may direct. 

Section 4. The Pep Committee shall be composed of the head 
cheerleader, two faculty members appointed by the President of the 
College, and three members of the student body appointed by the 
President of the Council. The Committee shall elect its own officers. 
The Committee shall be responsible for all pep celebrations, and at 
the first pep celebration in the fall Semester shall supervise the elec- 
tion of cheerleaders by the students present; the candidate receiving 
the largest number of votes shall be the head cheerleader. 

Section 5. The Social Committee shall be composed of seven 
students appointed by the President of the Council and six faculty 
members appointed by the President of the College. The student 
members shall be two seniors, two juniors, and one sophomore 
appointed from the student body, and one senior and one junior 
appointed from the Council; there shall be as nearly as possible an 
equal number of men and women, and at least three of the students 
appointed each year shall have served on the Committee the previous 
year. The Committee shall elect its own officers. It shall be the duty 
of the Committee to plan and carry out a social program for the 
students in general. 

Article V — Rules of Order 

In matters of procedure not covered by this Constitution Robert's 
Rules of Order shall be followed. 

Article VI — Amendments 

This Constitution may be amended as follows: 

a. Each proposed amendment shall be approved by a two-thirds 
vote of the Student Council. 

b. The proposed amendment shall then be presented to the Ex- 
ecutive Council of the Faulty for approval. 

c If approved by the Executive Council of the Faculty, the 
amendment shall then be published in the Highland Echo one week 
prior to the date set for presenting it to the Student Body, together 
with a notiee of the time and place of the meeting. 

d. If passed by a two-thirds vote of the Student Body, the 
amendment shall become effective. 

Article VII — Ratification 

This Constitution shall become effective when approved by the 
Student Council and by the Executive Council of the Faculty and 
passed by a two-thirds vote of the Student Body 



PART FOUR 

THE CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS 




BARTLETT HALL 



17 



18 Y.W.C.A. 



YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

PRESIDENT'S WELCOME 



Hello, New Girls ! 

What a unique group of girls you are to be planning on entering 
college in 1943! Have you ever stopped to think of all the young 
men and women who have given up such plans, either necessarily or 
by choice? Many of the young women have chosen to enter into 
women's military organizations, early mar- 
riage, or war jobs. You have chosen to enter 
college to prepare in the way open to you 
for whatever may come. You are wise, for 
those of us who are privileged to do so, may 
best serve our country by continuing our edu- 
cation. War is only a temporary activity. 
The time is coming when we will be able to 
serve our country in ways for which we are 
now preparing. 

You are a fortunate group of girls, also, 
for you have chosen to come to Maryville for 
your college years. The spirit at Maryville is 
one of warm Christian fellowship and inter- 
est. On our campus the YWCA is an organ- 
ization which embodies this spirit for the girls. 
The purpose of YW is to serve all Maryville 
girls, and there is a place for you. But, "Y," 
like all worthwhile activities, is able to give 
Muriel Geisler to you only as much as you are willing to give 
President, YWCA to it through your interest and participation. 

"Y's" motto this year is a conditional one, 
"If thou wouldst enter into life." We invite you to find your place 
in "Y" and to seek with us through recreational activities, service, 
and worship, those qualities which we will need to enter into life — 
the full and beautiful Christian life. 



Sincerely, 

MURIEL GEISLER 
President, Y.W.C.A. 




Y.W.C.A. 19 



ADMINISTRATION 
Officers 

President Muriel Geisler Secretary Mary E. Waisman 

Vice-Pres. Ruth Meineke Treasurer Johnnye Gudel 

Nu Gamma Chairman Agnes Peterson 

Advisory Board 

Class of 1944 Students 

Mrs. Lincoln Barker Johnnye Gudel 

Mrs. Bonnie H. Brown Agnes Peterson 

Class of 1945 Ruth Meineke 

Miss Irene Bannon Muriel Geisler 

Miss Katharine Davies Mary E. Waisman 

Cabinet 

Artists' Series Rachael Galbreath 

Athletics Betsey Burleigh 

Barnwarming _ Virginia Cain, Peggy Caldwell 

Devotions Ethel Planners, Ruth Anderson 

House Committee Marian Garvin, Jean Bellerjeau 

"M" Book Virginia Cain 

Mission Mary Metcalf 

Music Dorothy Lehman 

Orphanage Hope Pleyl 

Pi Gamma Sigma Jeana Eddleman 

Program Helen Anderson, Marion Stout 

Social Committee Jane Hays, Lucille Gaultney 

World Fellowship Ruth Case 

Publicity June Gowanlock 

"Y" Store Betty Lou McCoy 



ACTIVITY 

Christian Service. Maryville's Y.W.C.A. has always endeavored 
to help girls find real satisfaction in well-balanced Christian living. 
Keeping this aim ever in view, Y.W. has organized and conducts 
such groups as Nu Gamma Sigma, Pi Gamma Sigma, the Big Sister 
movement, and the International Relations Club. The "Y" also par- 
ticipates in the East Tennessee Intercollegiate Christian Council. 

Worship Services. The Sunday afternoon worship services are 
planned to give inspiration and help. Problems of vital interest to all 
college girls are presented — personal, social, and international prob- 
lems. Both new and old girls have opportunity to assist in some part 
of these services, and are greatly benefitted by the actual partici- 
pation. 



20 



Y.W.C.A. 



Community Service and Recreation. Besides the joint activ- 
ities with the Y.M.C.A. the program of the Y. W. includes such 
activities as the production of the May Day pageant, semi-annual 
tennis tournaments, social service work in the mission chapels and 
in the orphanage, and various social activities for Y. W. members. 
The Y. W. rooms in Thaw Hall are especially well adapted and 
equipped for group events or individual relaxation and enjoyment. 
All members are invited to use the "Y" rooms, which are always 
open throughout the day. 

You will find that the members of the "Y" cabinet, the Nu 
Gamma and Pi Gamma leaders, and old members of the "Y" are 
willing to help in every way possible. Give Y. W. a chance to be 
your friend and guide, and join the old members as they follow the 
year's motto, "If thou wouldst enter into life." 




m 




PEARSON'S HALL 



Y.W.C.A. 



21 



NU GAMMA CHAIRMAN'S WELCOME 



Hello, New Girls! 

This letter carries a hearty welcome to some of the luckiest girls 

anywhere. Hearty because we are wanting to see and know you, and 

luckiest because you are coming to Maryville. I believe that happy 

hours and associations are awaiting you just as new friendships are 

in store for us when you get here. 

If you have already heard from your Nu 
Gamma leader, she will have given you ideas 
and suggestions as well as welcomed you. You 
and the rest of the girls in your group will 
have grand times together — in the college woods 
or over the fudge pan in the kitchen — as you 
discuss and ask all the questions that are filling 
your mind. 

All of us are looking forward to a grand 
year with you — a year of new friendships, op- 
portunities, and responsibilities, of clean fun 
and hard work. So pack your duds and come 
on; we'll be just as glad to see you as you will 




Agnes Peterson 



Nu Gamma Chairman be to get here. 



Sincerely, 

AGNES PETERSON 

Nu Gamma Chairman 



22 



Y.M.C.A. 



THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

THE PRESIDENT'S WELCOME 



Hello New Fellows: 

The Y.M.C.A. of Maryville College is happy to welcome you and 
to invite you into the fellowship of our group. Be assured that you 
are entering a college home which will become more meaningful to 
you as the years pass. By becoming an active member of the 
Y.M.C.A. you will have a part in our program 
which includes Sunday worship services, moun- 
tain hikes, a watermelon pow wow, a spring 
banquet, and other activities. 

Due to the presence of the Army pre-cadets 
there will be activities which will be something 
new for the "Y." There is a place in "Y" for 
you; therefore, we extend our invitation — find 
your place in "Y~." 

Feel free to call at the "Y" office upon 
your arrival. We want to assist you in getting 
acquainted with the college and the young people 
here. Our motto this year is a quotation from 
Theodore Roosevelt, "The only homage that is 
worthwhile is the homage of deeds," We hope 
you will have a share in helping us realize this motto. 




John Deforest 
President, YMCA 



Sincerely yours, 

JOHN DeFOREST 
President, Y r M.C.A. 



Y.M.C.A. 



23 



ADMINISTRATION 
Officers 



President 
Vice-Pres. 



. John DeForest 
William Buford 



Secretary Donald Barker 

Treasurer Wallace Easter 



Advisory Board 



Class of 1944 
Dr. H. E. Orr 
Dr. E. W. Davis 
Paul A. Jamarik 

Class of 1945 
Dr. J. A. Gates 
Prof. E. R. Walker 
Sam H. Pemberton 



Class of 1946 
Dr. R. T. Case 
Mr. E. C. Brown 
John Houdeshel 
Ex-Officio 
John DeForest 
Donald Barker 



Cabinet 

Artist Series Paul Moehlman 

Athletics Lloyd Anderson 

Community William Buford, Donald Barker, Owen McGarity 

Devotions John Taylor 

Discussion and Fellowship Hubert Rust, Joseph Brown, 

Lloyd Anderson 

Maintenance Robert Barker 

Music _^ John Scott 

Publicity Byron Sprague 

Worship Benjamin Lynt, Paul Smith 

"Y" Store Joseph Brown 

ACTIVITY 

The Maryville College Y.M.C.A., a pioneer college "Y", has for 
sixty-six years offered a Christ-centered program for the full phys- 
ical, mental, and social development of Maryville men. 

College Service. The service of the "Y" begins when a student 
enrolls. An upperclassman assumes special responsibility for writing 
to him during the summer and introducing him to the campus and 
old students when he arrives on the Hill. A Frosh Fellowship Club 
helps new men get acquainted and adjusted. The program continues 
with a watermelon pow wow and a mountain hike in the fall and the 
annual banquet in the spring. The original sponsor of interclass 
athletics, the "Y" now helps administer the intramural program. 
Other services are performed for civilian and army men from time 
to time; this spring copies of Today have been distributed in Carnegie 
and Bartlett each month. 



24 Y.M.C.A. JOINT ACTIVITIES 

Community Service. The "Y" provides leadership for the pro- 
gram of the local cub pack and a scout troop it started. 

Worship. The central feature of the program is the Sunday 
afternoon meeting; through guest speakers, special music, or student 
discussion the attempt is made to reach the various problems of col- 
lege men with the vital resources of religion. 

JOINT ACTIVITIES 

Devotional. Joint devotional meetings are conducted coopera- 
tively by the "Y's" several times each year. Three days each spring 
the cabinets hold Retreat in the mountains for planning and devo- 
tionals. 

Cultural. The International Relations Club, to help students 
think intelligently about world affairs, presents well-informed speak- 
ers, informal discussion groups, and a current events class. The 
Artist Series, originally an activity of the YMCA, is now managed 
by a faculty committee assisted by the "Y's." 

Recreational. Barnwarming, largely staged by the YWCA, is 
the gala affair that everyone attends on Thanksgiving evening in the 
Alumni Gymnasium. The proceeds help meet some world need. 

Service. The Chatterbox is a social center and a convenient 
place to buy food, refreshments, and necessities. New students as 
they arrive on the campus are directed and aided by "Y" representa- 
tives. This Handbook is itself a joint production. 



PART FIVE 

ACTIVITIES 




THE ELIZABETH R. VOORHEES CHAPEL 



25 



26 SOCIETIES 

Every student can find some organized college activity to capture 
his interest and utilize his ability. Some organizations are open to 
all; others are selective or honorary. Extra-curricular activities will 
form an important part of your college life ; so we advise you to choose 
them carefully. 

SOCIETIES 

HONORARY 

Pi Kappa Delta. Maryville has the honor or having the Tennessee 
Alpha Chapter of the national honorary fraternity, Pi Kappa Delta. 
Last year members of the chapter entered a number of different speech 
tournaments throughout the South in addition to other speaking activ- 
ity. Members of the squad have consistantly ranked high in national 
and local tournaments. There is a freshman debate squad as well as 
a varsity squad, both of which meet as classes and receive college credit 
for their work. 

Theta Alpha Phi. Talented dramatic students may, upon meet- 
ing certain requirements for membership, be initiated into the Ten- 
nessee Delta Chapter of the national honorary dramatic fraternity, 
Theta Alpha Phi. All students have opportunity to try out for the 
plays given by various organizations each year. 

Sigma Delta Psi. The Maryville chapter of Sigma Delta Psi 
was established in 1930. Membership is open to all men of the college 
"who maintain satisfactory scholorship and command the respect of 
their associates as athletes and gentlemen." Membership is earned 
by meeting the requirements of the various athletic tests in the pre- 
sence of a responsible committee. 

Alpha Gamma Sigma. Alpha Gamma Sigma was organized in 
the spring of 1934, for the purpose of motivating high scholorship 
among students. Its requirements are equal to those of Phi Beta 
Kappa. Ten per cent of the graduating class may be admitted pro- 
vided the members have a grade point ratio of 6.5, or somewhat more 
than a B average. Honorary members are elected from the alumni 
of Maryville College who have won distinction in various fields of 
endeavor. 

SOCIAL 

In the past there were two sets of literary societies on the Hill. 
Recently all of the organizations have swerved from their original 
purpose, and have become purely social societies. The girl's societies, 
Bainonian and Theta Epsilon, are the sister societies of the men's 
organizations known as Athenian and Alpha Sigma. The societies 
meet every Saturday evening, the men in their rooms on the third floor 
of Anderson Hall and the women in their rooms on the second floor 
of Pearsons Hall. Each society adds much to the social activities. 



ORGANIZATIONS 27 



ORGANIZATIONS 

RELIGIOUS 

The Ministerial Association. Organized in 1900, the Ministerial 
Association is composed of students that are candidates for the Chris- 
tian ministry. It has for its object the enlistment of its members in 
various forms of active Christian work and the discussion of themes 
relating to the work of the ministry. Its most important activity is 
that embodied in four standing commitees which conduct regular pre- 
that embodied in four standing committees which conduct regular 
preaching and pastoral work in the county prison, local missions, and 
the country churches in the vicinity of Maryville. 

Student Volunteers. Since 1894 the students have maintained 
a Student Volunteer organization which is one of the strongest re- 
ligious influences in the College. It is composed not only of those 
who have pledged themselves to the foreign field, but of those who 
are interested in this type of work. Regular meetings of the group 
are held Sunday evenings after Vespers. Some phase of missionary 
work is considered, and frequently missionaries on furlough provide 
valuable and inspiring first-hand material. 

Parish Project. The Parish Project is a program of Christian 
service to communities in the vicinity of Maryville. Students who 
volunteer and are accepted for service in the Project carry on various 
types of service activity. These include Sunday school teaching and 
administration, teaching week-day Bible classes in a selected group 
of public schools, supervising young people's societies, and the leader- 
ship of character-building activity groups for boys and girls. The 
project is jointly sponsored and supported by the Board of National 
Missions, the Board of Christian Education, Maryville College, and 
the New Providence Presbyterian Church of Maryville. All who serve 
in the project are enrolled in a class and receive academic credit for 
satisfactory completion of the work, each semester. 

PRE-VOCATIONAL 

Law Club. The Law Club is composed of students whose purpose 
is to familiarize themselves with the features of this profession, while 
developing high standards in connection with it. Visits of eminent 
speakers, participation by the members, and mock trials give valuable 
information and experience. 

Pre-Medical Club. This club is organized to promote interest 
in medicine and in the medical profession. Anyone having interests 
along these lines is invited to join. 



28 ORGANIZATIONS 



INTEREST 

Writers' Workshop. Students who show interest and ability in 
literary work may be elected to the Writers' Workshop. The members 
are elected from the faculty and the junior and senior classes. Each 
member writes and reads aloud for criticism one paper a semester. 

Nature Club. The Nature Club is organized for all those who 
are interested in nature. The programs are planned to include movies, 
demonstrations, and similar entertainment. No technical knowledge 
is required for membership. 

Art Club. The Art Club is interested in promoting appreciation 
of art and in stimulating its members to creative work. There is a 
wide field of interest which includes architecture, sculpture, and other 
branches of creative art. 

Disc Club. The Disc Club is organized for music lovers who 
desire a better understanding and appreciation of good music. Each 
program is built around one composer's work and is introduced by a 
qualified commentator. 

"M" Club. The "M" Club membership is restricted to those girls 
who have earned the college letter by participation in the athletic 
activities sponsored by the Point System. 

Language Clubs. For students interested in modern languages 
and in the manners and customs of foreign countries, there is oppor- 
tunity to gain confidence in the use of the foreign tongue, and to have 
enjoyment in the French, German, and Spanish Clubs. The pro- 
grams are varied from seeing pictures and hearing lectures to giving 
plays in the foreign language. 

MUSICAL 

Choir. The College Choir is composed of forty students who are 
admitted to its ranks only after passing a rigid entrance examination. 
In addition to its participation in the daily chapel and weekly Vesper 
services, the choir takes part in the recently inaugurated radio vesper 
services, and other special programs. 

Glee Club. The Glee Club is composed of a limited number of 
women who are interested, and who successfully pass the voice tests 
given. The outstanding program of the year given by the Glee Club 
is its yearly spring concert. 

Band. The College Band is open to students with a fair ability to 
play a band instrument. Although no college credit is given for par- 
ticipation in this organization, band letters can be earned by faithful 
members. 



ORGANIZATIONS PUBLICATIONS 29 

Orchestra. Opportunity to become a member of the orchestra 
is given to all interested students who have sufficient musical training. 
Under certain conditions such membership carries limited credit. A 
spring concert is also given by the orchestra. 

SOCIAL 

Pi Gamma Sigma. This organization is sponsored by the Y. W. 
C. A. to promote fellowship between the town girls attending college 
and the dormitory girls. A luncheon is held every two weeks and an 
interesting program presented. 

"B. G." Originally formed for the purpose of hiking, this women's 
club has gradually taken on more varied activity. The membership 
is limited to eight persons. 

Pi Upsilon. This club is sometimes called the Hi Trail Club. 
Like the "B. G." Club it is a hiking club organized for the men, mem- 
bership being limited to twelve persons. 

Sectional Clubs. Organized along geographical lines for social 
purposes are the Triangle Club, made up of men and women from 
Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York; the Cotton Club, including 
students from Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and Florida; and the 
Appalachian Club, composed of those from Tennessee, North Carolina, 
Kentucky, Virginia, and West Virginia. 

PUBLICATIONS 

HIGHLAND ECHO 

The Highland Echo is the Maryville College student paper which 
is delivered every Saturday night. The editorial staff consists of mem- 
bers of the four college classes, selected on a competitive basis. Fresh- 
man students are allowed to try out for the Echo through their English 
classes at the first of the year, twelve apprentices being chosen each 
year by the examination of samples of their writings in competitive 
try outs. 

CHILHOWEAN 

The Chilhowean is the annual yearbook which is published by 
the members of the junior class assisted by representatives of the soph- 
omore class. Containing a summarized record of the year's work in all 
departments of the college, this makes an attractive souvenir. After 
ordering their 1944 annuals, freshmen and new students will find it 
informative and interesting to sample last year's or earlier copies in 
the. library. 



30 PUBLICATIONS PROGRAMS ENTERTAINMENT 

"M" BOOK 

The "M" Book is published each year by the Y. W. C. A. and the 
Y. M. C. A. and is designed to orient the new students to some extent 
to the type of program which Maryville presents in the cultural, re- 
ligious, athletic, and social fields. Copies are sent out to each new 
student before he comes to school. 

PROGRAMS 

RELIGIOUS 

February Meetings. Since 1877 February Meetings have been 
a part of the religious program. A prominent religious speaker con- 
ducts daily services, the object of which is to deepen the spiritual life 
on the campus. 

Fred Hope Drive. The annual Fred Hope driive is for the collec- 
tion of funds for use in the work of an African mission school of which 
Mr. Hope, a former Maryville student, is superintendent. 

Vespers. A Vesper Service is conducted in the chapel each Sun- 
day evening during the college year. The service includes a sermon by 
some outstanding person, either a faculty member or a visiting speaker, 
and special music by the Maryville College Choir. 

Messiah. Each year on the Sunday before school is dismissed 
before the Christmas vacation, the Fine Arts Department presents 
Handel's Messiah with a chorus of two hundred voices, built around 
the nucleus of the choir and the glee clubs, accompanied by the college 
orchestra. 

CULTURAL 

Artist's Series. These programs are sponsored by the Y. W. C. 
A. and the Y. M. C. A. Every year the college brings to the campus 
a number of artists of the highest excellence. Tickets are sold to the 
public; the cost to the students is included in the Student Activity Fee. 

Guest Speakers. Each year the College brings many outstanding 
speakers from various parts of the state, the country, and the world 
to give the students first-hand information on the type of work which 
they do. 

ENTERTAINMENT 

The Social Committee which is organized by the Student Council 
has charge of all social and recreational activity outside of the reg- 
ularly planned programs of the year. 



PART SIX 

ATHLETICS 




THE ALUMNI GYMNASIUM 



31 



32 INTERCOLLEGIATE 



INTERCOLLEGIATE 

For over half a century Maryville has maintained teams in inter- 
collegiate competition. Because few men remain at Maryville and 
other colleges and army college trainees cannot take part in an inter- 
scholastic program, there will probably be no intercollegiate athletics 
at Maryville for the duration of the war. There might be enough men 
for wrestling and tennis teams. 

ADMINISTRATION 

The athletic program of Maryville College is directed by the fac- 
ulty, through its Committee on Athletics (of which Athletic Director 
Lombe S. Honaker is a member), with the cooperation of the student 
body, organized as the Athletic Association, through its elected rep- 
resentatives (eight students and three faculty members) on the Athletic 
Board of Control. This body, regulated by a constitution, largely 
determines the policy of Maryville athletics. The members of the 
Board for 1943-44 are as follows: Lloyd Anderson, president; Trevor 
Williams, vice-president, Johnnye Gudel, secretary-treasurer; Dr. Case, 
Mrs. Queener, Margaret Boretsky, Mary Evelyn Waisman, Joseph 
Brown, Samuel Crawford, and William Sidner. 

PROGRAM 

Standing for a well-rounded college life, Maryville College has 
attained a high rating of excellence among southeastern schools. Its 
athletes are not bought; only physical fitness and average scholastic 
ability determine eligibility. Athletic ability alone does not make a 
man popular. 

The Maryville football team has an impressive record. In 1941 
the Highlanders triumphed in eight games out of nine. However in 
1942, unable to schedule its traditional rivals, the team won only the 
first of eight games. The basketball team in 1940 defeated Lincoln 
Memorial University three games out of four after the Railsplitters' 
long winning streak over such teams as Duke, and U. of N. C. The 
wrestling team, competing with some of the best teams in the country 
has taken twelve championships. In 1943 it lost only one match. The 
baseball team won 42 games, lost three, and tied one in three years, 
1940-42. Some Maryville diamond men have made good as profession- 
als, notably Johnny Stone, long a star of the Washington Senators. The 
tennis team placed third at the state meet in 1942 and first in 1943. 
Swimming teams had competed with increasing success; the track and 
field team won the state title in 1939. 

1942-43 VARSITY LETTERMEN 
Football. Kenneth Andes, Robert Bayless, J. I. Breazeale, Albert 
Chambers, Wayne Davis, Ronald Easter, Winton Enloe, James Garvin, 
Joseph Gouffon, Harvey Hollingsworth, Ross Honaker, Jack Kramer, 



INTERCOLLEGIATE INTRAMURAL 33 

Marvin Mitchell, Robert Morton, Charles Pepper, Leslie Rock (capt.), 
Oliver Spears, Arthur Spears, Frank Still, Kenneth Talbott, Lloyd 
Taylor, Gordon Webb, Dale Wiley and Mac Wilson. 

Wrestling. Lloyd Anderson, Edwin Ballinger, Frank Bradford, 
Robert Morton, Joseph Suitor (captain), William Thompson, Trevor 
Williams, Ed Wilson, Mac Wilson. 

Tennis. Kenneth Cooper, Wallace Easter, Robert Hunter, J. 
Edward Kidder, Jr., Hal Lloyd, Theodore Pratt. 

INTRAMURAL 

The intramural program provides Maryville men with a chance 
to participate in various non-varsity sports for good fellowship, vig- 
orous competition, and physical fitness. 

ADMINISTRATION 
To a large extent the responsibility for the intramural sports pro- 
gram rests upon the senior student manager, a representative of the 
YMCA. Working with him and the coach are the junior, sophomore, 
and freshman (tryout) managers. 

PROGRAM 
Running through the year as part of the physical education pro- 
gram, two types of competition are offered. The division or team 
sports are conducted in two leagues, society and independent, operating 
on the same schedule. Playoffs are held between league champions. 
The all-college sports are engaged in individually or in small groups, 
each person representing himself. Faculty teams or individuals may 
take part in intramural activity but are not eligible for awards. Some 
events such as archery have been open to women. In 1943-44 it may 
be possible for aircrew students to join the fun. Besides the sports 
mentioned in the awards section below, gymnastics, croquet, swim- 
ming, track, and archery were scheduled and may be offered another 
year. A phamplet setting forth the schedule, staff, objectives, reg- 
ulations, point system, and other information is given the men each 
fall. Plan to be active in intramurals. 

1942-1943 AWARDS AND WINNERS 
Senior Manager Letters and Sweaters. Oliver Van Cise (first 
semester), Hal Lloyd (second semester). 

Assistant Manager Keys. Guy Lambert, Stanley Crews. Abner 
Richard, Raymond Swartzback, Daniel Long, James Hogue, Harold 
Huffman, Joseph Brown, William Segraves, Lloyd Anderson. 

Intramural Letters. Sam Pemberton, 735 ; William Adams, 665 ; 
Enrico Scapellati, 524; William Evans, 520; Arthur Bushing,479; 
Edward Rowley, 472.5; Kenneth Cooper, 472.5; William Segraves, 
446; Wallace Easter, 438; Olson Pemberton, 434; Ralph Parvin, 418. 



34 INTRAMURAL POINT SYSTEM 

EVENTS WINNERS 

Singles Tennis __ Wallace Easter Doubles Handball Incomplete 

Speedball Athenian Foul Throw Contest. Roseborough 

Doubles Golf Robert Hunter, Relay Races Athenian 

William Evans Table Tennis Singles. _Ted Pratt 

Football Field Day.Wm. Sweeney Water Polo Water Buoys 

Touch Football Athenian Horseshoe Singles W. Chapman 

Horseshoe Doubles W. Ezell, Singles Golf Robert Hunter 

Douglas Roseborough Softball : Athenian 

Handball Singles Athenian Shuffleboard Sam Pemberton, 

Table Tennis Singles Van Cise Olson Pemberton 

Basketball Varsity Outcast Tennis Doubles. Adams and Evans 

Bushing and Williamson (tie) 

POINT SYSTEM 

As at most colleges, there are no longer intercollegiate contests 
for women at Maryville. For them has been substituted the point 
system, directed by Mrs. Evelyn N. Queener and her assistants. Like 
the men's intramural program, the point system attracts those seek- 
ing voluntary and required exercise. 

PROGRAM 
Participation in the different sports qualifies a girl for a given 
number of points. To those earning over 300 points awards are made 
at the end of the year. Every girl must walk the seven-mile loop 
twelve times a year, swim twice a month, and spend an hour in ex- 
ercise daily. Those who play basketball, soccer, indoor baseball, or 
volleyball earn 30 points for their team. Taking part in swimming, 
track, tennis, hiking, or aerial dart tournaments entitles a girl to 50 
points. Additional points are awarded for sportsmanship, member- 
ship on the squad, managing a team, and perfect attendance. The ob- 
servance of health rules gives a maximum of 25 points a semester. 
High scholarship adds a percentage of the total. Members of the "M" 
Club (those who have earned at least 400 points) take a mountain 
hike each spring, and enjoy several other activities. 

1942-1943 AWARDS 

"M" and Sweater. Johnnye Gudel, 545; Agnes Peterson, 517; 
Nancy Russell, 507; Edith George, 504; Betsey Burleigh, 500. 

"M". Winifred Somers, 479; Marguerite Taylor, 455; Barbara 
Burnett, 450; Betsy Watkins, 442; Rose Pinneo, 438; Margaret Bor- 
etsky, 433; Lois King, 432; Sue Clarke, 421; Catherine Loesch, 411; 
Thelma Richardson, 408; Marion Stout, 404. 

Monogram "MC". Betty Lou King, 392; Jean Bellerjeau, 389; 
Carol Gillette, 382; Margaret Witt, 378; Rebecca Davis, 370; Joseph- 
ine Gillette, 368; Jeana Eddleman, 366; Flora Torbert, 362; Dorothy 
Justus, 361; Rosalind Garges, 331 Zenobia Bernardini, 324; Miriam 
Wickham, 313; Ruth Chandler, 307. 



PART SEVEN 
GENERAL INFORMATION 




&Mmimnmmmuum*« 



LAMAR BOOK STORE 



35 



36 



COLLEGE 



COLLEGE 

1943-1944 CALENDAR 



Fall Semester 

Sept. 1, Wednesday, 8:00 a. m. — 
Registration of new students; 
payment of bills by old or new 
students who have registered. 

Sept. 2, Thursday, 8:10 a. m. — 
Opening chapel service; regis- 
tration. 

Sept. 3, Friday, 8:10 a. m. — An- 
nual Convocation; first meet- 
ing of classes. 

Sept. 4, Saturday, 8:00 p. m. — 
Y.W.C.A. and Y.M.C.A. recep- 
tions. 

Sept. 6, Monday, 8:00 p m. — Y. 
Faculty reception. 

Oct. 30, Saturday — Founders' 
and Homecoming Day. 

Nov. 16, Tuesday, 9:00 a. m. — 
Fall Meeting of the Directors. 

Nov. 25, Thursday — Thanksgiv- 
ing Day. 

Dec. 10-15 — First semester exam- 
inations. 

Dec. 12, Sunday, 3:00 p. m. — 
"The Messiah." 

Dec. 15, Wednesday, noon — First 
semester ends; Christmas hol- 
idays begin. 



Spring Semester 

Jan. 12, Wednesday, 8:10 a. m. — 
Chapel ; Christmas holidays 
end; second semester begins. 

Feb. 2-10, February Meetings. 

Apr. 9, Sunday — Easter. 

Apr. 12-13, Comprehensive Ex- 
aminations for Seniors, and 
National Cooperative Tests for 
Sophomores. 

May 1, Monday — May Day. 

May 8-13, Second semester exam- 
inations. 

May 13-15, Commencement pro- 
gram: 

May 13, Saturday, Alumni Day: 
9:25-11:15 a. m. — Alumini sem- 
inars. 
3 : 00-5 : 00 p. m. — President's 

reception. 
8:00 p. m. — Annual Alumni As- 
sociation meeting. 

May 14, Sunday, 10:30 a. m. — 
Baccalaureate service. 

May 14, Sunday, 7:00 p. m. — 
Vesper service. 

May 15, Monday, 10:00 a. m. — 
Graduation exercises. 







SCHEDULE 






Daily 


6:00 p.m. 


Dinner 


6:00 a.m. 


Rising bell 


7:00 p.m. 


Study hours begin 


7:00 a.m. 


Breakfast 


11:00 p.m. 


Lights out 


8:00 a.m. 


Chapel 




Sunday 


8:30 a.m. 


First Period 


9:15 a.m. 


Sunday School in 


9:30 a.m. 


Second Period 




town 


10:30 a.m. 


Third Period 


10:30 a.m. 


Church in town 


11:30 a.m. 


Fourth Period 


1:30 p. m. 


YMCA and YWCA 


12:30 p.m. 


Lunch 




Services 


1:30 p.m. 


Fifth Period 


7:00 p.m. 


Chapel Vesper ser- 


2:30 p.m. 


Sixth Period 




vice 


3:30 p.m. 


Seventh period 


8:10 p.m. 


Student Volunteers 



COLLEGE 37 



WHO'S WHO 

Student Council Betty Jane Miller, President 

Senior Class Paul Smith, President 

Junior Class Donald Barker, President 

Sophomore Class John Houdeshel, President 

Athletic Board of Control Lloyd Anderson, President 

Y.W.C.A. Muriel Geisler, President 

Y.M.C.A. John DeForest, President 

Pi Kappa Delta Dorothy Lehman, President 

Theta Alpha Phi Betty Jean Kennedy, President 

Bainonian Marion Stout, President 

Athenian Wallace Easter, President 

Theta Epsilon Johnnye Gudel, President 

Ministerial Association Hubert Rust, President 

Student Volunteers Paul Smith, President 

Highland Echo Billye Ruth Braly, Editor, 

Marian Schanck, Bus. Mgr. 

Chilhowean, 1944 Dorothy Lehman, Editor, 

Frances Lane, Bus. Mgr. 

PROCEDURE FOR NEW STUDENTS ARRIVING 
IN MARYVILLE 

1. Inquire at one of the Y.W. and Y.M. general information tables 
which will be located on the lawn in the central campus area if 
you are in doubt about anything. 

2. Get room assignments, find rooms. 

3. Check baggage with Y.M., Y.W. 

4. Go to scheduled meeting in chapel. 

5. Follow schedule sheets sent out by the Personnel Office and 
further directions given at meetings. 

COMMON SENSE FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS 

Have regular hours for study — and use them for study. Effect- 
ive studying is partly a science and partly an art to be mastered by 
each individual through studying his own particular habits and needs. 

"Tote fair" with the home folks. Match their sacrifice with your 
diligence. Write to them, especially Mother, at least once a week. 
Your neglect will convict you of the crime of ingratitude. 

Be yourself — your best self, consistently. If you have ideals, 
hold on to them; if you have questions, ask them; if you have ideas, 
put them to work. 

Don't let anyone tell you that "activities" are as important or 
more important than studies. They're not — at least not for any stu- 
dent who has a reasonable amount of brains and intellectual interest. 
If you haven't these, leave college now! 

When you get a chance to further a friendship with a professor, 
don't be a fool and think it isn't done — grab it ! 



38 COLLEGE TOWN 



Spiritual "rickets" may be fashionable with some students but 
you cannot walk with undernourished legs. And walk you must to live, 
and live you must before you dare to die. So — go to church; not to 
please the school, but to refill yourself with strength, courage, and 
truth in order that you may perform with the greatest ability your 
life tasks as you see them cut out before you. 

Experience is the stuff of growth; and you grow only when you 
reflect upon and evaluate your experiences and the experiences of the 
race, and then, on the basis of such evaluations, act more wisely in the 
future from the way you have acted in the past. 

— V.P.B., Guidon, Virginia Tech 

TOWN 

CHURCHES 

Broadway Methodist Church, East Broadway Phone 967 J 

First Baptist Church, 141 East High Phone 250J 

First Christian Church, South College 

First Methodist Church, East Broadway Phone 1754 

New Providence Presbyterian Church, East Broadway Phone 340 

Saint Andrew's Episcopal Church, West Broadway Phone 1607 

HOSPITALS 

Burchfield Hospital, 309 Court St. Phone 45 

Fort Craig Hospital, 327 Washington Ave Phone 670 

Maryville College Hospital, College Campus Phone 150 W 

TOURIST HOMES 

Mrs. R. D. Honicutt, Alexander Avenue 

A. B. Bull, Washington Avenue Phone 836M 

Smoky Mt. Tourist Home, 215 Washington Avenue 

Coleman's Tourist Court, Knoxville Highway 

Lombardy Tourist Home, Knoxville Highway 

Mrs. Hugh M. Clark, 133 E. Broadway Phone 313 

G. F. Eagleton, 963 W. Broadway Phone 102J 

Magnolia Tourist Home, 432 W. Broadway Phone 122 

Mrs. W. F. Walker, 902 W. Broadway Phone 861 

Hillcrest Tourist Home, 829 W. Broadway Phone 190J 

The following also have accommodations: 

Mrs. Jasper C. Barnes, 215 Indiana Ave. Phone 63 

Mrs. Alf Hibbert, Niles Ferry Pike Phone 1788W 

Mrs. Nannie T. Maxey, 316 Indiana Ave. Phone 117J 

Mrs. Nora Singleton, 737 W. Broadway Phone 131J 

Mrs. Sam Russell, 215 Indiana Ave. Phone 1233J 

Mrs. T. J. Miles, 303 Indiana Phone 320M 

Mrs. Joe Mcllvaine, 101 Wilson Phone 794M 

Mrs. Robert Gass, 303 Indiana Phone 1475J 



YELLS AND SONGS 



39 



YELLS 



THE HOWEE-HOW 



Howee-how ! Chilhowee ! 
Maryville, Maryville, Tennessee! 

Hoo-rah! Hoo-rah! 
Maryville, Maryville, 

Rah, rah, rah! 

Howee-how ! Chilhowee ! 
Maryville, Maryville, Tennessee! 

Hoo-rah! Hoo-rah! 
Maryville, Maryville, 

Rah, rah, rah! 



THE OLD FIGHT YELL 



THE M-A-R-Y-V-I-L-L-E 



Yea, team! 

Fight! Fight! Fight! 
Yea, team! 

Fight! Fight! Fight! 
Yea, team! 

Fight! Fight! Fight! 
Yea!! FIGHT!!! 



M-a-r-y-v-i-1-l-e ! 

M-a-r-y-v-i-1-l-e ! 

M-a-r-y-v-i-1-l-e ! 
Maryville! Maryville! 
Maryville ! 



COLLEGE COLORS 
Orange and Garnet 



COLLEGE NICKNAME 
Highlanders or Scotties 



40 YELLS AND SONGS 



SONGS 



BAINONIAN SONG 

Our strong band can ne'er be broken, 

Sing her praises high; 
Far surpasses wealth unspoken 

Sealed by friendship's tie. 

Bainonian ! Bainonian ! 

Deep graven on each heart; 
We'll remain unwavering true 

When we from college part. 



THETA SONG 

Always to our Theta we will sing a song of praise, 

In our hearts we'll learn to love her through our college days 

Theta! Theta! Loyal to you we'll ever be; 

Theta ! Theta ! Happy sisters we — 

Your memory lingers through the years 

Through all life's smiles and tears; 

Theta! Theta! True we'll ever be. 



PART EIGHT 
ADVERTISEMENTS 




THE CHATTERBOX 



41 



FLOWERS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 
On the Hill or Back Home 

CLARK'S FLOWERS 

133 E. Broadway Phone 313 



OUR 
ADVERTISERS 

MAKE THIS BOOK POSSIBLE BY THEIR 
CO OPERATION AND SUPPORT. 

Please Patronize Them 

and mention the 
MARYVILLE COLLEGE HANDBOOK 

to them* 

THANK YOU! 

-"M" Book Staff 



BYRNE DRUG COMPANY 

PHONE 3 

42 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 

1812 * 1943 

John A. Mackay, President 

Three-year undergraduate course, leading to the 
Bachelor of Theology degree. 

Graduate work leading to the degrees of Master of 
Theology and Doctor of Theology. 

Students may enter in September, January and June. 

Application forms and other information can be 
secured from 

THE REV. E. H. ROBERTS 
DEAN OF STUDENTS 

Princeton, N* J* 



For the Finest in Flowers — 

COULTER'S GREENHOUSES 

Sevierville Pike, Maryville 
— PHONE 163 — 

We deliver to the dormitories 



WE WELCOME . . . 

College and Aircrew 

STUDENTS AND FRIENDS 

to the 

BROADWAY CAFE 

Across from Post Office Phone 9101 



43 



BAINONIAN 

WELCOMES NEW GIRLS 



We'll be happy to have you visit us, 
to help you in any way, and to pledge 
you as one of us. 



FELLOWS . . . 

A SINCERE WELCOME FROM- 

ATHENIAN 



OLD IN IDEALS 
NEW IN IDEAS. 



44 



Si Deus nobiscum, quis contra nos? 

THETA EPSILON 



. . . has a pep and a friendliness 
which you'll like. It invites you 
to become an active member. 



Where A Fellow 
Finds A Friend . . . 



ALPHA SIGMA 



45 



THE 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

SERVES ALL STUDENTS' NEEDS 

Military and Civil 



STATIONERY ~ PENCILS - SWEAT SHIRTS 

T-SHIRTS - PENNANTS - POST CARDS 

NOTE BOOK COVERS AND FILLERS 

♦♦♦also*** 

College Station Post Office 



46 



The Ministry of 
Vital Importance 



General Hershey said recently, "Congress has 
recognized the necessity of religious guidance and edu- 
cation as vital to the welfare of the Nation." So students 
for the ministry are deferred by draft boards. 

We are selecting the strongest campus leaders for 
training. Competitive scholarships covering all expenses 
are available. But no promising man will be turned away 
for lack of funds. 

Chicago is the center of theological education in 
America, with eleven seminaries here, because of the 
great advantage of this area. 

For 1 15 years our Seminary has trained the majority 
of all Presbyterian ministers in the great Mississippi 
Valley. 



Write for further information. 

McCORMCK THEOLOGICAL 
SEMINARY 

2330 NORTH HALSTEAD ST., CHICAGO 



J. Harry Cotton, President 

J. Walter Malone, Vice-President 



47 



For Artistic Flower Arrangements — 


'—— — ——— % 


FOX 


FLORISTS 




609 East Broadway 




Phone 1977 



J. JVL NICELY GROCERY 

GET YOUR KNICK KNACKS AT NICELY'S 

—just 200 yards from the West Gate 
of the Campus* 



SMITH'S RESTAURANT 

119 Broadway 

SANDWICHES — LUNCHES 
HOT AND COLD DRINKS — DINNERS 



CITY DRUG CO. 

Harry M. Bird — Oren D. Lowe 

Phone 66 Maryville, Tenn. 

— Maryville's Leading Prescription Store — 



48 



COLUMBIA 
THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Decatur, Ga* 
~ Founded 1828 — 

WELL EQUIPPED FACULTY 

EXCELLENT LIBRARY 

MODERN BUILDINGS 

SPACIOUS CAMPUS 
IN THE HEART OF THE SOUTH 
For information, address 

J. McDowell Richards 

President 



THE WEBB STUDIO 

E. L. WEBB, Prop. 

PHOTOS OF PERMANENCY 
and CHARACTER 

"The Best Is the Cheapest— Always" 



49 



The YMCA and th< 

The CHAT 

• . . THE ONLY STUDENT-OPERATE! 

Sandwiches 

Cookies 

Cake 

Candy 



Located in the center of the campus and operated 
jointly by the YMCA and YWCA. 



50 



fWCA Invite You to 

rERBOX 

lEFRESHMENT STORE ON THE HILL 

Cold Drinks 

Ice Cream 
Fruit 

Necessities 



"Where the fellows keep trim, and the girls stay 
slim; and your date'U wanta' hang around/' 



51 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

Maryville, Tennessee 



ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FIFTH YEAR 
BEGINS SEPTEMBER I. 1943 



Maryville College is one of the important church- 
related institutions of America, and seeks to be true to the 
noblest traditions of the association of education and 
religion. Its directors are elected by the Synod of Mid- 
South of the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. 

It is a Christian liberal arts college with the purpose 
of providing a general cultural education. During the 
war period it is also rendering a special service in its 
Army Air Forces college training program. 

Its fees are deliberately kept at a low level for the 
benefit of those who might not be able to attend other- 
wise. This makes earnest cooperation on the part of all 
an essential factor. 

It desires to select its students on the basis of prep- 
aration, earnestness, capacity, character, and co-opera- 
tiveness. 



52 



THE OFFICERS AND MEMBERS 
of 

THE NEW PROVIDENCE 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

INVITE YOU TO MAKE THEIRS 
YOUR CHURCH HOME 



Church School 9:15 

(Classes for College Students) 

Morning Worship 10:30 

Evening Worship 7:30 

Midweek Service (Wednesday) 7:15 



The Minister's Study is at the Church. He 
is eager to render any possible service. 



JOHN A. McAFEE 

Minister 

E, R, HUNTER 

General Supt* Church School 



53