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Full text of "Maryville College Monthly, 1901-1902"

MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY 



Vol. IV. 



MARYVILLE, TENN., NOVEMBER, I90J. 



No. J. 




PHOTO BY FKEDERIC L. "WEBB, '02. 

ON CEDAR CREEK. 



A CHARMING Bir OF CAMPUS SCENERY. 



^ 



For beautiful scenery our colleg-e grounds can not be surpassed by any in the 
country. They are elevated and undulated; covered with groves of evergreens and a 
noble forest through which flow two beautiful streams, Cedar Creek and Duncan's 
Branch. From early spring till late autumn a profusion of flowers greets the eye, and 
in those old woods in any season the nature lover will find a new charm with each 
ramble. 



MARYVILLK COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



AUTUMN. 

"The autumn is old, 
The sere leaves are flying; 
He hath gathered up gold, 
And now he is dying." 
Autumn, — grand, silent, sad, and glori- 
ous, — that season of farewells when flow- 
er and leaf, insect and bird, all speak their 
departure, over which Tennyson meditates 
and questions the — 

"Tears, idle tears, I know not what they 

mean ; 
Tears from the depth of some divine des- 
pair 
Rise in the heart and gather to the eyes. 
In looking on the happy autumn fields. 
And thinking of the days that are no 
more." 
We, too, have looked upon "happy au- 
tumn fields." P"rom our study window we 
have gazed from the campus away north- 
west to the Cumberland Mountains, lost 
in wonder at the wealth of color displayed 
ir autumn's royal robes. In the exuber- 
ance of youth, wrapped up in a present joy, 
we have not thought of "the days that are 
no more." The past, with all its lost op- 
portunities, was forgotten, the present was 
everything to us, standing there entranced 
by the tranquil beauty of nature. 

Walking southeast of our study, we can 
see autumn in his saddest moods. Just 
i~eyond the football field there is a virgin 
forest which might be "the home where 
the weird sisters dwell." Everything is so 
still and creepy. Chinks of blue, but dim- 
h' seen through the tops of the trees in 
summer, are now becoming wider. The 
leaves no longer race vipward for sunlight, 
but droop like wearied laborers seeking 
rest. Hither and thither come the falling 
leaves, twirling through the air and cover- 
ing up the foothpaths of the forest. Foot- 
falls crush the dried leaves into mournful 
rnusic, and lengthening shadows add a 
sombre hue to the solemn requiem of an 
autumn day. 

Would you see autumn in his gayest 
and happiest moods? Here, on our own 



campus, east of the track that leads 
through the forest, and near to the spring, 
there is an open space where stand the 
ruins of an old homestead. Take up a po- 
sition on the knoll when the skies are clear 
and the sun is westering. Looking east, 
you will find yourself overlooking a valley 
studded with oak, hickory, pine, maple, 
chestnut and wild cherry, all blending to- 
gether in a gorgeous wealth of color. 
Away in the distance is Look Rock kiss- 
ing the sky and bathed in a blue mist. The 
hills are flecked and barred with gold; 
while the golden yellow, the russet brown, 
the orange and garnet of the maple make 
an autumn picture suggestive of the holi- 
ness and beauty and the beauty of holi- 
ness. Happy autumn scenes ! You soothe 
us in your restfulness ; we are stilled in 
your silence ; you cheer us in your har- 
mony, and make us hopeful in your death. 

Mae. 



THE AMERICAN STUDENT IN 
PARIS. 

Perhaps there is no city in the world 
more truly cosmopolitan than that which 
the French themselves delight in calling 
"the world's metropolis." Here flock 
wanderers from all quarters of the globe 
and from all classes of society, many of 
them to be swallowed up and made a part 
of that most conglomerate mass of hu- 
manity known as Parisians — for the Pa- 
risian is by no means necessarily a French- 
man — while others, though living in the 
midst of this surging throng and feeling 
the stimulus of its pulsing life, can never 
be said to form an integral part of it, for 
their motives and ideals have not been rad- 
ically changed by its influence. Unless one 
be anxious to shine in the highest social 
circles, where it is said the laws of eti- 
quette far outrank those of the famous 
Medes and Persians for rigidity, he will be 
able to enjoy a large amount of personal 
freedom and live practically as he pleases ; 
and this, of course, attracts Americans, 
who consider personal freedom their nat- 
ural heritage and resent the attempts of a 



MARYVILLE COLI.EGE MONTHLY. 



fatherland government to pry into their in- 
dividual affairs. 

Like all great cities, Paris is made up 
of several smaller cities, whose inhabitants 
differ considerably as regards pursuits and 
manner of life. The large American pop- 
ulation is divided between the region about 
the Arc de Triomphe and Trocadero, and 
the "Quartier latin." In the former is sit- 
uated the American Embassy, which forms 
the center of American society life in Par- 
is, and draws about it most of those Amer- 
icans who are merely on pleasure bent, but 
it is to the latter, immortalized by the pen 
of Du Maurier, that we wish to turn our 
attention. This quarter extends along the 
left bank of the Seine, with rather uncer- 
tainly defined eastern and western boun- 
daries, taking in the territory south of the 
river as far as the Boulevard Montpar- 
nasse. The Luxembourg Gardens divide 
it into two parts, the most northerly of 
which has as its central point the Sar- 
bonne, the College de France, the Ecole 
de Medecin and other buildings in the vi- 
cinity, which form a part of the University 
of Paris, while in the southern section are 
situated the art schools. However, the 
university and art students meet on com- 
m.on ground in the beautiful Luxembourg 
Gardens, and on the broad and shady bou- 
levards, Montparnasse and St. Michael, or 
"Old San Mick," as it is more familiarly 
dubbed by its frequenters. Probably the 
greater number of the Americans studying 
in Paris are artists ; for this reason the 
American Girls' Club, which provides a 
good home at reasonable rates, under the 
management of a competent woman, for 
thirty or more American girls, was located 
near the Boulevard Montparnasse. There 
an American is welcome to go any after- 
noon to drink a cup of tea, and enjoy the 
privileges of the library and reading 
rooms. In the neighborhood of this club 
is an American chapel, where services are 
held in English every Sunday. 

As there is no institution similar to this 
club in the vicinity of the Sorbonne, uni- 
versity students are obliged to seek tem- 



porary homes in the "pensions" or private 
boarding houses, which abound in this 
quarter, or in private families. Very fair 
accommodations can be secured at a 
slightly lower rate than is paid for similar 
ones in New York City, though the rates 
are probably somewhat higher than those 
in most of our other cities. In an average 
sized "pension," of from twelve to fifteen 
boarders, one will probably find himself 
sitting down to the table with representa- 
tives of half a dozen or more nationalities, 
among which, after the omnipresent 
Americans and Englishmen, the Germans 
and Russians will probably be most largely 
represented. The babel of tongues may 
at first seem a little confusing, but you will 
probably soon discover that they are all 
endeavoring to speak the common lan- 
guage, French, in their own melodious or 
unmelodious way, and if you are brave you 
will soon be mingling your dulcet accents 
in the general harmony. The French 
themselves, except the most highly edu- 
cated, do not generally speak or desire to 
speak any language but their own, and dis- 
courage the use of any foreign tongue, so 
that you are not annoyed, as in Germany, 
by their ^''anting you to teach them Eng- 
lish. 

The Sorbonne and also the College de 
France offer two kinds of lecture courses, 
those which are open to the public at large 
without the payment of any fee or the for- 
mality of registration, and those for which 
one must pay a small amount — about six 
dollars a term — and be registered as a stu- 
dent of the university. Among the latter 
courses are certain ones especially design- 
ed for foreigners, and in June, at the close 
ol the school year, examinations are given 
in these, which, if sucessfully passed, en- 
title one to a diploma from the Sorbonne. 

A young woman going to Paris with the 
purpose of attaining greater proficiency in 
the language, can probably not do better 
than enter the Franco-English Guild, 
which is situated in the Rue de la Sor- 
bonne number six, just across from the 
side entrance of the Sorbonne. This is a 



4 



MARYVILI.E COIvLKGE MONTHLY. 



private enterprise, which was originated 
by Miss Wilhams, an intelligent English- 
woman, who holds a position in the Nor- 
mal College at Sevres, near Paris. She 
employs several competent native lady 
teachers, who give courses in French, 
phonetics, grammar, rhetoric, history and 
literature, while she herself gives similar 
courses in English to French students. 
There are also frequent lectures given by 
well known professors of the university, 
and these are free to all members of the 
Guild, whether students or not. The class- 
es are small, seldom exceeding ten in num- 
ber, and in this way there is much chance 
for individual work. The instruction is, of 
course, entirely in the French language, 
and by the recitation method, except the 
lectures before mentioned. There is a 
good library and reading room free to all 
members of the Guild; also a kitchen and 
dining room, where the housekeeper 
serves lunch at noon and afternoon tea to 
those who desire it at very reasonable 
rates. The full course of study covers 
about three years, but many who are 
somewhat advanced to begin with finish it 
in one or two. At the end of the school 
year, about the middle of June, examina- 
tions are held, and the successful candi- 
dates are given certificates stating their 
ability to teach French or English in their 
native lands. The membership fee for the 
guild is two dollars for the year, and the 
tuition for all classes and lectures, inclu- 
sive, is two dollars a week. The great ad- 
vantages of this method if instruction are, 
that one is brought into direct personal 
contact with cultured French women, and 
receives many of the benefits of private 
instruction, combined with the stimulus of 
class-work ; further, there is opportunity 
for arranging exchange lessons in French 
and English and other languages, for there 
are generally some Germans, Russians, 
Poles and other foreigners who avail 
themselves of this opportunnty for learn- 
ing French. 

For anyone who can spend only the 
summer vacation in Paris, the courses of 



the Alliance Francaise give work similar 
to that done at the Sorbonne and Guild 
during the school years, and are eligible 
tor men as well. The Alliance has branch- 
es in some of our American cities, and has 
for its object the propagation of the 
French language among foreigners. Com- 
petent professors from various colleges in 
France spend their vacation in this work. 
The tuition is about the same as in the 
Guild. 

If one wishes to get most rapidly a 
practical knowledge of the language, and 
is willing to sacrifice accuracy to fluency, 
the Berlitz School, which is open all the 
year, offers the best advantages. There 
are, of course, many other good schools of 
language, and then every Frenchman is 
most eager to help you to learn his be- 
loved language correctly, so that lack of 
proficiencey can not well arise from lack 
of instruction. amanda l. Andrews. 



SCHOOL HUNTING. 

On a blustery March evening, my room- 
mate and I started for a fourteen-mile 
drive into the country. We were going 
out to corral and brand a couple of schools, 
and following the invariable and necessary 
custom of school-teachers, we borrowed a 
discouraged open buggy and a second- 
hand horse, with the weather-boarding 
torn off in spots. 

We had only a very hazy idea of the way 
we ought to take, hence I assumed control 
of the steering gear and availed myself of 
my naturally logical modes of thought by 
employing the method of exhaustion — -go- 
ing down every crossroad, until it faded 
completely out. If one has time to pur- 
sue original investigation in this way, it is 
highly satisfactory. One absolutely knows 
he can't go wrong, which is very comfort- 
ing in a strange country. 

About five miles out we drove up to a 
house to inquire our way. A large Leg- 
horn rooster in the yard gave us a long, 
searching look, glanced at the sun, now 
about an hour high, and dispersed himself 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



precipitately into the woods, followed by 
the terrified flock. The astute fowl was 
correct in his surmise. I was once a book 
agent, but am now living an upright life, 
except for an occasional outbreak of 
school-teaching. 

With a fresh direction, we continued our 
researches. This section affords unusual 
opportunities for the study of structural 
geology. When freshly molded it was 
placed on edge to dry, and as even the 
most cursory examination suffices to show 
that it would not repay the trouble of flat- 
tening out, it remains on edge to this day. 
There are other features peculiar to this 
country, one of which deserves mention, 
as it proves the theory of gradual adapta- 
tion to surroundings. As a result of the 
impossibility of digging graves, except 
with a steam drill, no one ever dies. 

By the method of exhaustion before 
mentioned, we finally arrived at the home 
of the leading director of the district. His 
wife told us that he had gone across the 
ridge to trade a turning-plow and some 
other luxuries for a young coon-dog. She 
was expecting him back, however, so we 
waited for him some time. As we after- 
ward learned, the neighbor had eight coon- 
dogs, and the director was applying the 
Civil Service method of competitive exam- 
ination in actual service to determine 
Vi'hich he should take. I tried to get my 
companion to mention this as an instance 
of the workings of the system in his grad- 
uating speech, but he wouldn't. 

Finally, I went to the top of the ridge 
and dropped a chip down the neighbor's 
chimney to attract their attention. The 
director started home at once, but we had 
to wait an hour on him, as it was three 
miles to the neighbor's. 

When he arrived, he told us that he "had 
been 'lowin' that Bije Zerkel and Shume 
Overby would teach the schools, fer they'd 
both bin to the larnin' and went through 
all the studiments, but they'd bin offered 
a job ov gittin' out crossties, that paid 
more than teachin', and so had tuck that. 



They waz amakin' forty-five cents a day 
an' board." 

Our contract concluded, and the old 
man's heart warmed by the gift of half my 
supply of "flat store tobacker," we started 
to return. Night had already fallen, or 
more strictly speaking, slid down. I drove, 
not by sight, but by a rather abnormal self- 
confidence, meanwhile entertaining my 
companion with an expurgated and diluted 
version of one of Sut Lovingwood's stories. 

While still nine miles from town, my 
self-confidence gave out, and I drove off a 
bank eight feet high. I landed on my ear 
in a mudhole, with my companion wrapped 
twice around my waist, after the fashion 
of a life-preserver, with the majority of the 
bu gg}' atop of us. 

We extricated ourselves, and my com- 
panion went to hunt a house and borrow a 
lantern, while I tried to get together a 
CiUorum of the buggy and harness. My 
room-mate met a large pond about forty 
yards up the road, and being naturally ab- 
sent-minded, forgot to go round it. I 
fished him out with a harpoon I always 
carry when I go out to hunt a school, and 
after I had remonstrated with him on the 
folly of trying to swim after eating board- 
ing-house cornbread, he went on to the 
house. 

The owner said he would be glad to ac- 
commodate us, but as he had been married 
only four years and had not yet got well 
started in house-keeping, he had neither a 
lantern or a lamp. 

Things looked darker than ever, but in 
the course of conversation with him, I 
learned that he expected to make a living 
for himself and wife by farming, so I at 
once saw a solution of the problem. I 
borrowed enough self-confidence from him 
to drive to town with. I still had some 
left when school was out, but used it all in 
breaking a young mule to plow. 

When I retire from professional life I 
shall buy that county and go to raising 
crossroads and dark nights. I shall con- 
trol the entire stipply of both products. I 
shall not allow a schoolhouse to be built 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



anywhere on the whole ranch, for I havc- 
a genuine sympathy for my fellow-teach- 
ers. You know the word sympathize 
means : to suffer with. J. S. C, '02. 



THE GREAT COMMISSION. 

(Dedicated to the Volunteer Band.) 

Go, tell the heathen nations, 

The Savior, Christ has come 
To save the poor, lost sinner, 

And bear him ransomed home. 
Proclaim the gladsome tidings 

Through all the earth away ; 
Show those who sit in darkness, 

There's dawned a glorious day. 

in each dark heart there's longing 

That naught has satisfied; 
In vain for help they're crying, 

Till Jesus blood's applied. 
No more to idols bowing 

Need the poor heathen fall — 
From all their hopeless bondage 

Our Christ can disenthrall. 

To thee whose soul is lighted 

By God's own Son of love. 
Now comes the Great Commission 

Sent from the throne above : 
"Go thou to every creature, 

And preach the gospel free ; 
Where'vr o'er earth thou goest, 

I'll ever with thee be." 

Thou hearest now the message, 

From heav'n sent to^ all ; 
Wilt thou, with quickened foot-step. 

Obey thy Master's call? 
He waits to hear thy answer 

What thou wilt for him do ; 
Go, tarry not nor linger. 

But be a worker true. 

Though rough be duty's pathway. 

Or billows o'er thee roll. 
In this take consolation 

And comfort to thy soul, 
That heaven's reward awaits thee 

When thou thy work ha '.t done; 
And then through countless ages 

Shalt praise the Matchless One. 

W. A. Campbell, ex-'Ol. 



"THE SAJNTS' QUARTER DECK." 

Some of the veterans who returned to 
the "Saints' Quarter Deck" at the ,end of 
vacation could hardly recognize their 
haunts of by-gone days. Indeed, the in- 
terior of Memorial Hall now rivals in mag- 
nificence Vanderbilt's palacial residence at 
Biltmore. The hand of a modern Raphael 
has adorned the inner walls. The new 
stairway that now rises in graceful spirals 
from the basement to the sacred abodes 
on the "Quarter Deck" surpasses in work- 
manship the handicraft of Phidias and Cal- 
limacus. The massive oaken doors that 
once withstood blows from battering rams 
that would have shattered the pillars of 
Chalons, those historic doors through 
whose enlarged keyholes the fire brigade, 
armed with water pails and rapid-fire 
squirt gtnis made nightly assaults upon 
tired and sleeping students, have been re- 
placed by doors of modern pattern, with 
knobs on both sides and fitted with fifty 
cent keys and patent spring locks. Each 
room has an air-tight closet, where moths 
do not corrupt and a fellow can hang his 
pants without the trouble of driving a 
spike-nail through the plastering on the 
wall. Iron bedsteads have succeeded the 
old bedbug incubators of the nineteenth 
century. .Some of these bedsteads have 
castors and roll about at night when they 
have a couple of nightmares hitched to 
them. The hall is also furnished with new 
bathtubs without any exposed steam- 
pipes that one is certain to sit down on, 
and with water-works that operate with- 
out waiting for the creek to rise. A 
"schwarze frau" makes up our beds and 
keeps our rooms tidy, and the new electric 
lights make one endless day, so that he 
who loves darkness better than light must 
forever shun the "Saints' Quarter Deck." 

An Inmate. 



The Chilhowee Literary Society cele- 
brated its decennial on Oct. 4 at the resi- 
dence of Mrs. Lamar, who was one of the 
charter members. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 




—Plwto by M'cbb. 
INTERIOR OF THE COLLEGE ELECTRIC LIGHT PLANT. 



THE NEW ELECTRIC LIGHT PLANT. 

Maryville College has for the past few 
years carried out a policy of expansion 
and extension until she has built up and 
equipped one of the finest college plants 
in the South. More recently, however, 
the corporation has inaugurated the pol- 
icy of centralizing, and as a result the mag- 
nificent heat and power plant was installed, 
then the water-works system, next the 
laundry, and more recently the electric 
light plant has been installed. 

The plant is of 25 kilo-watts capacity 
or a capacity of five hundred 50-watt 
lamps. 

The engine is a Russell automatic en- 
gine, of the latest patent, equipped with a 
Rites inertia governor. 

Directly connected with this is a 25-kilo 
watt, Type I, Bullock generator, gener- 
ating 220 volts at 300 revolutions per min- 
ute. 

The arrangement of the lighting is di- 
vided into six circuits, as follows : Arc 
lights on campus, arc lights in buildings, 
incandescent lamps in Memorial Hall, 



Baldwin Hall, Anderson Hall, and Bartlett 
Hall. 

The switchboard is of Tennessee mar- 
ble, carrying switches for six circuits — 
fused with non-arcing enclosed fuses. 
Volt meter and ammeter of the Keystone 
Electrical Instrument Company's manufac- 
ture. The rheostat is of the iron-clad type, 
mounted on the rear of the board. The 
board is mounted on wrought angle irons, 
and the apparatus is protected by improved 
lightening arresters. 

The arc lamps are the Toerring 200- 
hour 2,000-candle power lamps. 

The maximum loss in distribution is on- 
ly 5 per cent, from dynamo terminals to 
lamps. Especial care has been given to 
the question of uniform distribution. 

This plant is one of the few 220-volt 
plants that have been installed in this sec- 
tion of country. A careful investigation 
of this point by the committee satisfied 
them that this voltage suited them best for 
their requirements. 

The dynamo building is a wing built 
against the west end of the power house. 



MARYVILLE COI.LEGE MONTHLY. 



It is built of brick, the interior plastered 
and finished in white. The building was 
erected by A. B. Frye, contracting build- 
er, Maryville. 

The installation of the plant and the 
complete wiring of buildings and grounds 
was the work of J- A. Summers, contract- 
ing electrical engineer, Knoxville. 

The committee of directors who direct- 
ed the work of letting the contract, etc., 
was composed of the following: Major 
Ben Cunningham, Major Will A. McTeer 
and John Alexander. F. L. W. 



ANOTHER TERM BEGUN, 

The fall term of 1901 began September 
4, when the summer quietness of College 
Hill gave place to the hurry and bustle of 
incoming students. Two hundred and 
twenty-five are now enrolled (September 
23), and of this number eighty-five are new 
students. 

Many improvements have been made 
during the summer vacation upon the col- 
lege buildings and grounds. Bartlett 
Hall has been completed with the $1,500 
which was given by Mrs. Nettie McCor- 
mick, of Chicago. The electric light plant 
has been installed, and all the buildings 
have been rewired, and five arc lights 
placed upon the campus. 

The laundry has been erected and pro- 
vided with necessary machinery. In addi- 
tion to this new work, over one thousand 
dollars has been expended in renovating 
Memorial Hall and in other necessary re- 
pairs. An office for the President has 
been made out of a part of the old mathe- 
matical room in Anderson Hall. 

Some changes in the teaching corps 
have taken place. Prof. H. C. Biddle has 
resigned to accpt a place in the University 
of Cincinnati, and his position is now sup- 
plied by Prof. Albert F. Oilman. Miss 
Amanda Andrews, after a year's study in 
France and Germany, has returned and 
taken charge of her classes in modern lan- 
guages. 

Miss Henrietta Lord, who filled Miss 
Andrews' place during her absence, has 
charge of the library this year, together 
with some classes in rhetoric. 

Miss Helen Minnis, '97, takes charge of 
the Music Department, and Mrs. Nellie 
Bartlett Cort, '78, is now matron of Bald- 
win Hall. 

On Friday afternoon of the first college 
week, from 3 to 5 o'clock. President Wil- 
son gave a reception to all the students 



and teachers at Bartlett Hall. Refresh- 
ments were served, and teachers and scho- 
lars became better acquainted with each 
other during the social greetings. In the 
evening the Y. M. C. A. gave a reception 
to the young men at the Auditorium, and 
at the same time the Y. W. C. A. gave a 
reception to the young ladies at Baldwin 
Hall. 

On Friday night of the second week, a 
joint reception by the two societies was 
given in the auditorium of Bartlett Hall, 
and the address of welcome was delivered 
by Prof. Waller. 

The names and addresses of the new 
students, except those who come from 
Maryville, are as follows : ^ 

William H. Penland, Marshall, Nr C. 

John H. Mitchell, Coulterville, 111. 

Arthur C. Tedford, Panhala, India. 

Isabel S. Mitchell, Fowlerville, N. Y. 

Anna L. Morse, Atlanta, Ga. 

Earnest M. Adams, New Decatur, Ala. 

Marion Wallin, Big Laurel, N. C. 

Achilles A. Seraphie, Athens, Greece. 

Clinton H. Gillingham, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Willis K. Beecher, Worcester, N. Y. 

Lloyd E. Foster, Swannanoa, N. C. 

Charles B. Tedford, Panahala, India. 

Francis W. Gill, Sharon, O. 

Ethel M. Smith, Athalta, Ga. 

Edna R. Cort, Nahcotta, Wash. 

Joseph R. Curtis, Enslev, Ala. 

Darius B. Hill, Asheville, N. C. 

Seiji Sasaki, Japan. 

Charles M. Adams, New Decatur, Ala. 

Cora M. Cort, Nahcotta, Wash. 

Martha E. Gamble, Slate, Tenn. 

Robert L. Houston, Jr., Bank, Tenn. 

Ethel W. Smith, Johnson City, Tenn; 

Susie R. Gaines, Sweetwater, Tenn. 

Thomas McSpadden, Lillian, Tenn. 

Samuel E. McCampbell, Beverly, Tenn. 

Bertie L. Sharp, Trundle's X Road, 
Tenn. 

Mattie King, Church Hill, Tenn. 

Christopher R. Rankin. Knoxville, 
Tenn. 

James Farmer, Slate, Tenn. 

James R. Inman, Driskill, Tenn. 

Tames W. Blair, Loudon, Tenn. 

Samuel D. Blair, Loudon, Tenn. 

Nannie Hawkins, Church Hill, Tenn. 

Mary R. Sharp, Trundle's X Roads, 
Tenn. 

Charies W. Russell, South Rockford, 
Tenn. 

George W. Pavne, Knoxville, Tenn. 

Tospeh T. Webb, Nina, Tenn. 

Tsaac T. Hertzler, Concord, Tenn. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



Hubert N. Payne, Knoxville, Tenn. 

Victor McReynolds, Friendsville, Tenn. 

Robert E. McReynolds, Friendsville, 
Tenn. 

Delila A. Hall, Lucilla, Tenn. 
Andrew Peery, Slate, Tenn. 

Nannie J. Ayers, Warrensburgh, Tenn. 

Pruce P. McCampbell, Beverly, Tenn. 

Nathaniel L. Taylor, Elizabethton, 
Tenn. 

Lillie Wayland, Trundle's X Road, 
Tenn. 

Valentine M. Kirk, Thula, Tenn. 

John W. Dosser, Jonesboro, Tenn. 

Mary K. Cox, Louisville, Tenn. 

Nathaniel L. Bacon, Moiintainville, 
Tenn. 

Inez B. Simpson, Philadelphia, Tenn. 

Anna B. Cox, Louisville, Tenn. 

Frances R. Rankin, Knoxville, Tenn. 

Gertrude Adkins, Helenwood, Tenn. 

Alice B. Noble, Robbins, Tenn. 

Boyd Henry, Ipe, Tenn. 

David Keller, Knoxville, Tenn. 

Samuel F. Toole, Blue Grass, Tenn. 

Joseph J. Myers, Tang, Tenn. 

Joe McSpadden, Lillian, Tenn. 

Mima Myers, Tang, Tenn. 

Frederick A. Elmore, Chattanooga, 
Tenn. 

Albert R. Cadle, Powder Springs, Tenn. 

William Grififitts, Sale Creek, Tenn. 

James A. Pickel, Sweetwater, Tenn. 

Roy H. Beeler, Powder Springs, Tenn. 
Robert H. McCaslin, Sweetwater, Tenn. 



FAMINE AND PLAGUE. 

The Tuesday Evening Prayer Meeting 
of October 1 was led by Rev. Lyman B. 
Tedford, '77, of Panhala, India. He has 
been a missionary for twenty years in In- 
dia, and he spoke of the terrible and trying 
experiences of the missionaries during the 
famine and plague visitation of last year. 

His district was not so badly stricken as 
some, but many deaths occurred, first from 
the famine, and afterwards, during the wet 
season, from the plague which followed 
the famine. 

Under normal conditions of rainfall, it is 
said, that one-third of the vast population 
of India go to bed with empty stomachs. 

When the rainfall is deficient, famine 
sets in, and the work of relief by govern- 
m.ent and individuals must begin or the 
people will perish in vast numbers. 

The native Hindu who is able gives to 
his afHicted brother, but his relief is spo- 
radic and careless, sometimes doing as 
much harm as good. 



The mission station where Mr. Tedford 
was located fed at one time as many as 
?.,000 persons. The relief is of two kinds: 
gratuitous, and furnishing work to those 
who have the strength. Out of the 3,000 
about 500 were furnished work of different 
kinds. The mission board authorized the 
erection of a hospital, school houses, dwell- 
ings, repairing dwellings, digging pits for 
trees, wells, etc. 

Mr. Tedford described the method of 
gratuitous relie f and exhibited the small 
measure (% pint) and the coarse grain 
which was used at his station. 

Coming out early in the morning, they 
would find a large crowd, covering per- 
haps two acres of ground, waiting for the 
distribution of grain. After they were ar- 
ranged in order to prevent repeating, the 
small dole just sufficient to maintain life 
was given out. Many sad instances oc- 
curred. In one case a poor woman came 
and was waiting her turn, when some one 
saw that she had something under her gar- 
ment. 

"What is that?" 

"That is the corpse of my little girl." 

"Why don't you bury her?" 

"If t had buried her T should have 
missed this distribution of grain," was the 

reply. 

In another case the report was made that 
an old woman was dving in the waiting 
crowd. Mr. Tedford went up to the place 
and found an aged couple, with the hus- 
band supporting the wife and saving to 
her, in encouraging tones : "Hold out if 
\ou can. Don't die. Thev are going to 
give the grain pretty -soon." 

For certain parts of the country', in addi- 
tion to the famine, comes the difficulty of 
procuring suitable drinking water. At one 
time it was debated in the mission whether 
or not they would not have to leave that 
section on account of lack of drinking wa- 
ter. The mission well was 60 feet deep 
and 40 feet broad. In the morning it 
would have one and one-half foot of water 
and at night six inches. Over one thousand 
people came to that well every day. If it 
had not ben for that well the conse- 
quence in that town Avould have been se- 
rious. 

Over six hundred children are now in 
the hands of the mission, as a result of the 
famine, and the work of advancing the 
cause of Christ has been made easier 
among the natives, who saw that the for- 
eigners had saved them from starvation. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



For three years India has been scourged 
by famine and plague. Bombay, at times, 
has been almost ruined by the plague. In 
Mr. Tedford's district the plague raged 
after the famine, and owing to the care- 
lessness of the people it spread with great 
rapidity. After it had taken hold of a 
town, all would desert the town and go 
elsewhere. The mission rescued at one 
time two little children who stayed for two 
days beside the dead bodies of their pa- 
rents, insisting that their parents were on- 
ly "asleep." 

Out of this dark picture there shines the 
devoted efforts of missionaries of all de- 
nominations, who have braved death and 
suffering "In His Name." 



will be a grand one in the annals of the As- 
sociation and of her own spiritual life. 



Y. W. C. A. 

Every movement of society toward bet- 
ter things must encounter the spirit of the 
age. Either conflict or aUiance then en- 
sues. 



The orders given in Maryville College 
this fall read, "Advance all along the line !" 
In perfect harmony with the note of prog- 
ress, the Young Women's Christian Asso- 
ciation feel that greater achievements for 
Christ, among Maryville's young women, 
have already been begun. We wish to 
thank our kind friends who helped us send 
a delegate to Ashville last summer. The 
association has greatly prospered through 
their kindness. 



Our Decision Meeting held September 8 
was well attended, .and its influence will, 
we believe, be greatly for good during the 
coming months. 



^ As a result of the Bible Study Rally, 
September 15, a class of siteen members 
has been organized, which Mrs. Cort has 
kindly consented to teach. 



Before the issue of this journal the 
Mission Study Class will have been organ- 
ized, under leadership of Miss Mame Steb- 
bins. This class will study Lawrence's 
"Introduction to the Study of Foreign 
Missions." 



If every Christian student among the 
girls of Maryville College will lend a hand 
in an organized effort to serve the Master 
by enrolling in some department — prayer 
meeting, Bible or mission study — this year 



Requirements of membership may be 
If arned from the officers : Maude Yates, 
President ; Helen Post, Vice President ; 
Katherine Niccum, Secretary; Nellie Jack- 
son, Treasurer. 



Y. M. C. A. 



The past summer has been a busy one 
on College Plill. A general repairing and 
improvement has been made on all the 
College buildings. In this line Bartlett 
Hall has received its share. The donation 
of Mrs. McCormick has been received, and 
thus it has been possible to make another 
step toward the completion of our Asso- 
ciation home. As we entered the building 
at the opening of the term, we were 
pleased with the marked improvement thai 
had been made ; and we see more and more 
the magnificence of the building as it nears 
completion. 



The gymnasium has been finished, the 
v/alls plastered, wainscoted, and the wood- 
work painted. The stairways have been 
completed, and the woodwork in different 
parts of the building has been finished in 
hard oil. 

The most marked improvement is the 
papering of the halls, upstairs and down; 
and the completion of the rooms for stu- 
dents who wish to live in the building. 
There are six of these rooms, located in a 
very pleasant part of the building: com- 
modious, well lighted, and connected with 
the heating and electric-light system of the 
College. The interior of the building is 
shown to best advantage at night. Ad- 
justable arc lights have been placed in the 
auditorium and in the gymnasium, and 
clusters of small lights in the parlors. The 
reflection of the light from the oiled wood- 
work makes the parlors and halls especial- 
ly cheerful and pleasant. The task that is 
now before us is the furnishing of the par- 
lors and the completion and equipment of 
the plunge and bathrooms in the basement. 
We hope, in the present year, to make a 
move in this direction. 



In religious work, the Y. M. C. A. as a 
factor in Maryville College life enters the 
year with renewed earnestness and conse- 
cration. Many of the old workers of the 
Association have left us with the past 
year; but it is encouraging to note the in- 



MARYVILLE COI.I.EGE MONTHI^Y. 



terest of the newer workers as they put 
their shoulders to the wheel and as they 
plan and discuss the ways and means of 
exalting Christ in the life of every student. 



Will every young man in Maryville Col- 
lege not feel that of this work we wish him 
to be a part? Will you not visit as often 
as you can our Association home? And if 
you are troubled in your religious life, will 
you not feel that in the Y. M. C. A. you 
will find those who are longing to talk with 
you about Jesus Christ and his power to 



ATHLETICS 



Athletic sports, as a whole, are very 
promising this fall. We believe a greater 
variety of this feature of a college training 
will be enjoyed by the girls and boys of 
Maryville College this coming year than 
ever before. Notwithstanding the fact 
that baseball is out of season, the af- 
ternoon of Saturday, September 21st, was 
not allowed to go by without an interest- 
ing game between the College Department 
and the Preps. Each side having chosen 
temporary captains, Goddard for the 
Preps, and McCaslin for the CoUegiates, 
ihe teams in the eame were as follows : 



College. 



Preps. 



Tedford C Foster. 

Houston P Newman. 

McCaslin S. S Dosser. 

Walker IB McSpadden. 

Hunter 2 B Hill. 

Holzsinger 3 B Goddard. 

Henry R. F Penland. 

Curtis C. F Kelly. 

Hackney L. F Griffith. 

Umpire — -Prof. Gilman. 

Scoreman — Pickle. 

Houston pitched a steady game for the 
College boys considering his small amount 
of practice. Newman for the Preps, threw 
good speedy ball until his arm game out in 
the seventh, when Penland took his place. 
The CoUegiates had the better team, and 
soon ran the score ahead and kept it there, 
winning 29 to 17. 

College — Two baggers : Houston and 
Hunter. 

Preps. — Two Baggers : Dosser. 

SCORE. 

College 29 

Preps 17 



BOWLING ALLEY. 

The Y. M. C. A. Bowling Alley is now 
ready for use. Only the Y. M. C. A. 
members who have paid their dues are en- 
titled to play. All others are charged ten 
cents per game. Let all the boys become 
full members, with all the privileges in this 
line, and perchance we can arrange some 
exciting contests — say, College versus 
Preps. 

TENNIS CLUB. 

A new branch of athletics, deemed by 
some as "most elegant of all," has come 
into existence on our beautiful College 
Hill. Shortly after the opening of school, 
plans were laid for the organization of a 
tennis club. The enterprise obtained ready 
support, and now we have a club of thirty 
members, all gaining healthful exercise 
and pleasure from the game which can be 
played by both boys and girls together. 
The club has three courts almost finished 
and equipped — one back of Baldwin Hall, 
for the girls, and two just within the col- 
lege woods for the boys. To keep the 
courts in repair, buy balls, etc., an entrance 
fee of 25 cents is charged. The club owes 
its success, in a large measure, to the ac- 
tivity and interest of its President and 
Manager, Prof. Gilman. 

FOOTBALL. 

Good material has turned out this fall 
on the gridiron for this sport, and from ap- 
pearances we have a good show for inter- 
collegiate contests this season. The boys 
are pleased with the interest Prof. Ritchie 
is showing in the game this season. The 
Athletic Association voted $15 for addi- 
tional suits to fill ou the number for two 
teams. 

BASKET BALL. 

The young ladies of Baldwin are be- 
ginning their practice in this line. 

GOLF CLUB. 

The members of the Golf Club have al- 
ready repaired the links and had a few 
games. 

COLLEGE FIELD D.A.Y RECORDS. 

Maryville College has some Field Day 
records of which she may justly be proud. 
In the Field Day exercises of '01 two of 
the past records were broken : Pole vault, 
8 feet 10 inches, raised by F. E. Laughead 
to 9 feet 1 inch, and R. K. Beatty raised his 
own high kick record from 8 feet 8^2 
inches to 8 feet 10^^ inches. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



Maryville College Monthly. 



Vol. IV. 



NOVEMBER, 1901. 



No. 1. 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 



Editor-in-Chikf, 

Athenian, 

Bainonian, 

Alpha Sigma, 

Thkta Epsilon, - 

Y.M. C. A., 

Y. W. C. A. 

Athletics, 

ALtruNi, - - - 

Business Manager, 

Subscription Manager, 



ELMER B. WALLER 

DENNIS W.CRAWFORD 

HELEN E. ERWIN 

FRANK E. LANG-HEAD 

EMMA B. CALDWELL 

FREDERICK P. SOHELL 

HELEN M. POST 

- ARTHUR C.TED FORD 

JOHN W. RITCHIE 

FREDERIC L. WEBB 

JOSEPH S. CALDWELL 



Students, graduates and friends of the College are 
invited to contribute literary articles, personals and 
Items of general interest for publication. 
Subscription price, for eight numbers, 35 cents. 
Address all communications to 

Maryville College Monthly, 

Maryville, Tenn. 

Entered at Maryrille, Tenn., as Second-Class Mail Matter. 

We are all pleased with 
ments!' *^^. ^"^"7 improvements 
which have been made dur- 
ing the vacation on College Hill The 
completition of the Y. M. C. A. Building 
and the installation of our own electric 
plant are the most noticeable and expen- 
sive of the additions made this summer. 
In many other ways expenditures have 
been wisely made, and it is evident that 
the authorities are planning and working 
for larger things for Maryville College. 
The total cost of these improvements has 
been about $5,000, and this fact empha- 
sizes the necessity of the modern college 
having a large income and generous 
friends. 



Buildings and grounds 
Executive. ^^^^^ "°^ received, however, 
exclusive attention. Presi- 
dent Wilson has spent his vacation at 
Maryville planning for the more efficient 
development of our CTirriculum and for the 
better classification and supervision of the 
students. All students now upon entering 
college go to his office and are classified in 
such a way that they are much more easily 
advised and supervised than in former 
years. Other changes have been intro- 
duced which will strengthen the curri- 
culum and scholarship of the institution. 
President Wilson's election has been fav- 
orably commented upon by the secular and 
religious press, as w^ell as by the large 
body of graduates and friends of the col- 
lege. His inauguration will take place on 
October 21, and our next issue will con- 
tain an account of the proceedings. 



With this issue, the Mary- 
Monthly. ^'^^^ College Monthly begins 
its fourth year. Under its 
plan of management none of the editors 
derive any financial profit from the paper, 
but all receipts are expended upon it. 
Three thousand copies would have sup- 
plied our subscribers and exchanges last 
year, but 7,600 copies were printed, and the 
extra copies widely distributed. The reg- 
ular size of the paper last year was twenty 
pages, but one special issue contained 
thirty-two pages, so that the third volume 
of the Monthly has one hundred and sev- 
enty-two pages. 

The financial report is as follows : 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance from last year $0.56 

Subscriptions 50.25 

College advertisement 150.00 

All other advertisemuents 195.25 



$396.06 

EXPENDITURES. 

Printing 7,600 copies. $288.86 

Half-tone engravings 37.05 

Work and commissions 25.92 

Express from Cincinnati 17.99 

U. S. postage on 1,079 pounds. . . 10.79 

Miscellaneous 12.10 

Balance carried forward 3.35 



$396.06 
One of the objects of the Monthly is to 
encourage the students to write articles for 
it. A comparison of the three years will 
show that more articles were contributed 
during the third year by the students than 
at any other time. 

In order, however, to give a little incen- 
tive to the students enrolled this term, the 
Monthly offers a prize of five dollars for 
the best original story, containing 1,500 to 
2,000 words, written by a student of the 
College, and submitted by January 1, 1902, 
and a prize of three dollars for the second 
best story. The editors will appoint judges 
to decide the relative merits of the pro- 
ductions. Let a number of students en- 
gage in this friendly contest, and help to 
promote imaginative writing in the Col- 
lege. 



PERSONAL AND LOCAL. 

Isham O. Siler is now attending the Le- 
land Stanford University, of California, 
and is very much pleased with his new sur- 
roundings. 



MARYVILLE COLI.EGE MONTHLY. 



13 



The reception given to the students by 
President Wilson was very much enjoyed. 

The seniors recite to Professor Barnes 
in Psychology ,and to Professor Waller in 
Political Economy. 

Mr. Thomas Maguire, '01, was one of 
the officers of the Southern Student Con- 
ference, which met at Asheville in the lat- 
ter part of June. 

No college exercises were held on 
Thursday, September 19, the burial day of 
President McKinley, but students and 
teachers attended memorial services in the 
New Providence Presbyterian Church. 

Dr. Samuel W. Boardman, our former 
President, and now professor emeritus, is 
living at 17 Washington Place, Bloom- 
field, N. J. His health has improved, and 
he is called upon frequently to preach in 
various churches. 

Maryville College was well represented 
at the conference of Mountain Workers 
and Summer School of College Settlement 
Work, held at Tusculum in the early part 
of June. Among the speakers were Pres- 
ident Wilson, Dr. Elmore and Dr. Dun- 
can. The Maryville College Quartette was 
also present during the whole conference, 
and added much to the meetings with their 
inspiring gospel songs. 

During the past year the College has 
lost by death two faithful trustees — John 
C. McChmg and John P. Hooke. Mr. 
Hooke was trustee for the term of thirty- 
live years, and was one of the original 
m.embers appointed by the Synod imme- 
diately after the War. He was formerly 
the treasurer of the College, which office 
he held for nineteen years. During his 
thirty-five years of service he only missed 
two of the regular meetings of the Board 
of Trustees. 



Education and American Home Mis- 
sions. .Rev. Charles L. Thompson, D.D. 
Music. 
Benediction 



PROGRAMME. 
Inaugural of fifth President of Maryville 
College in New Providence Church, Mary- 
ville, Tenn., Mondav evening, October 21, 
1901, at 7 o'clock. 

Music. 
Invocation. Rev. John M. Richmond, D.D. 

Address of Induction 

Rev. W. H. Lyle, D.D. 

Inaugural Address 

Rev. Samuel Tyndale Wilson, D.D. 

Music. 
A Word for the Svnod of Tennessee. . . 

Rev. E. A. Elmore, D.D. 

Music. 



VACATION NOTES. 

Professor Sherrill went to the springs. 

Professor Newman visited relatives in 
Jefiferson County. 

Professor Walker spent the summer on 
his father's farm. 

Professor Ritchie did laboratory work in 
Chicago University. 

Professor Waller enjoyed the shade of 
his own vine and fig tree. 

Professor Gill divided his time between 
home and county normals. 

Professor Gilman spent the summer in 
the Great Smoky Mountains. 

Dr. Barnes did laboratory work in 
Psychology at Cornell University. 

President Wilson stayed in his office and 
corresponded with prospective students. 

And so it went. Some of us returned to 
our homes and from thence departed to 
the springs and mountains, and there put 
ill the fleeting hours playing golf and ten- 
nis and making "goo-goo eyes" — after the 
custom of the sons of men — at the per- 
ennial summer girl with Algernon De Vere 
novels. More of us, however, wended our 
weary ways back to the old home in the 
knobs, where we blended the joys of home 
and home-made pie, with a vision of a 
broad expanse of new ground corn and a 
span of soul-trying young mules. 

Old College Hill was a busy place this 
summer. Work was going on in all the 
buildings at once. The college expended 
a vast sum of money in repairing, renov- 
ating and decorating. Several of the stu- 
dents stayed on the Hill, and were em- 
ployed on this work, and. incidentally, had 
a world of fun "after the whistle blew." 
Several lawn parties and picnics enlivened 
things, and served as a reminder of high 
times of the past and a foretaste of good 
things in the future. 

College vacations are very pleasant sea- 
sons indeed; but, really, aren't thev more 
enjoyable after they become matters of 
historv and vou're all back in the whirl ? 

F. L. W. 



u 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



CLASS NOTES. 



SENIOR CLASS. 



The Class of "02 recently met and or- 
ganized for the year's work. Five of the 
old class are back on the Hill in good spir- 
its and striving hard to make the last year 
the best of all. At least two more mem- 
bers are expected to be in within the 
month and enter the ranks with those al- 
ready drilling. The newly elected officers 
are as follows : President, Arthur Holt- 
singer ; Secretary, Miss Mayme Stebbins ; 
Treasurer, Joseph Stewart Caldwell. The 
additional members of the class are Miss 
Helen Ervin and Frederic Lee Webb. 

Class Colors : Red and white. 

Class Flower : The daisy. 

Class Cheer : Who do ? 
We do ! 



SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Officers : President, M. B. Hunter ; Vice 
President, A. C. Tedford; Secretary, Lois 
Alexander. 

Class colors : Dark-green and garnet. 

Class yell: 

Ala gara gara garoo. 
Rickety kex hullabaloo, 
Ziss boom kallamazoo. 
Sophomore, Sophomore, 
Just a choice few. 

The Sophomores, this term, number 
twelve. In selecting our colors, we chose 
garnet to denote our loyalty to the Col- 
lege, and green to remind us of the green- 
ness of Freshmen days. Our people mix 
in all the College athletics, football, base- 
ball and tennis, and we have a handball 
team that challenges all comers. 

The members of our class are, without 
exception, religiously inclined. Among 
our number are three preachers, two mis- 
sionaries and several confidence men. 
Tedford formerly represented us in the 
mission field of India, but when the hard 
times struck the famine district he was 
compelled to return. Later, Dr. Quist 
was sent to the "Saints' Quarter Deck," 
where he is now doing missionary work. 
Our circle was completed by the return of 
Hunter and Dickie from their vacation 
in the mountains. The last-named are now 
engaged in the moonshining business. 



electing the following officers : President, 

Harry J. Bassett ; Vice President, Robert 

L. Houston ; Secretary and Treasurer, 

Mabel Broady. 

Katherine Niccum, James Felkner and 

Frank Gill are loyal supporters of their 

Executive Board. 
Class yell : 

Kemo. kimo rip tip, blay. 
Batter de bang, whooper away ; 
Freshmen, Freshmen, zip, zip, zing. 
Nineteen five is just the thing. 
The class, though small in number, will 

strive to attain the highest in their College 

career. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

The Junior Class met in College 
Chapel and elected the following officers 
for the fall term : President, Miss Nancy 
Gardner ; Vice President, R. Horace Mc- 
Caslin ; Secretary and Treasurer, E. L. 
Grau ; Class Editor, Horace McCaslin. 

The Junior Class is composed of six 
members this term, and, though small in 
number, we shall be the banner class of the 
College. 

Several new members are expected in 
after Christmas. 

Two of our classmates have been elected 
officers in the Athenian Literary Society: 
E. S. Grau, Censor; Dennis Crawford, 
Athenian Editor of the Monthly. 

Mr. T. G. Brown was called home Sep- 
tember 24 by the serious illness of his sis- 
ter. Later. We learned of the death of 
Mr. Brown's sister, before he reached her. 
We offer to our classmate the sincere sym- 
pathy of the class in the loss of his sister. 



FRESHMEN CLASS. 

The class met at the beginning of the 
term and, with due ceremony, organized. 



LITERARY AND SOCIETY NOTES. 

BAINONIAN SOCIETY. 

The Bainoian Society, to accommodate 
some of its members, has changed the 
time of meeting from 7:30 p. m. to 3:15 
p. m. 

The program of September 13 was well 
prepared and made an excellent beginning 
for the new term. At this meeting, the 
following officers were elected: Nancy 
Gardner, President ; Lois Alexander, 
Vice President ; Freddie Goddard, Secre- 
tary ; Lelia Cooper, Treasurer. 

The subject of our second meeting, 
"Our National Foes," was very appropri- 
ate in connection with the recent National 
loss. The program was as follows : 



MARYVILLE COLIyEGE MONTHLY. 



15 



Immigration Anna Atkinson 

Race Prejudice Lida Post 

The Struggle between Capital and La- 
bor Mabel Broady 

Vice Helen Ervin 

Recitation Ethel Smith 

Anarchy Pearl Clemens 

Bainonian Society has received fifteen 
new members since the beginning of the 
term. Mrs. Cort, who was a Bainonian 
many years ago, has been welcomed back 
as an honorary member. 



THE ATHENIAN SOCIETY. 

The year begins with the Athenian So- 
ciety in a very vigorous and prosperous 
condition. Early in the term the Societ} 
met, and the following ofificers were elect- 
ed for the ensuing term : President, F. L. 
Webb ; Vice President, F. F. Schell ; Sec- 
retary, Theron Alexander ; Treasurer, 
Dennis Crawford ; Censors — E. L. Grau, 
H. J. Bassett and Lester Stephenson. 

To the returning stfidents the Athenian 
Hall presents a different appearance. Dur- 
ing the summer some necessary repairs 
were made on the hall. The home of the 
Athenian is made much more beautiful and 
cheerful by these improvements. 

Friday, September 20, an open meeting 
was given. The carefully prepared pro- 
gram was well rendered and much enjoyed 
by the large audience. 

The Society begins its year's work with 
more earnestness and determination to 
make this year the most successful year in 
the Society's history. 



THETA EPSILON SOCIETY. 

The Theta Epsilon Society began work 
very earnestly and with encouraging pros- 
pects this year. 

The first business meeting was held Fri 
day, September 20, at 3 o'clock p. m. The 
m.eeting was called to order and was 
opened with prayer by the President, after 
which the election of officers took place. 
They are as follows : President, Maude 
Yates ; Secretary, Mary Wright ; Treasur- 
er, Mame Stebbins. After taking in sev- 
eral new members, the Secretary took ths 
Chair, and a short, but interesting, pro- 
gram was carried out. Recitations were 
given by Misses Maude Yates, Cora How- 
ard and Ada Hammontree. All the reci- 
tations were well delivered and were very 
enjoyable. The Theta Epsilon Journal was 
read by Miss Lula Goddard. Different 
members had select readings. 



Quite a number of "old" society girls 
are out of school this fall. 

Some of our absent members are trying 
to put into practice the little verse which 
says: "Ram it in, cram it in; children's 
heads are hollow," while others are at 
home recuperating in order to be on duty 
after Christmas. We hope to see them all 
back. 

Who are those in white and blue? 
They are "Thetas" — not a few. 
They take members ; that they do ! 
And they're waiting to take you. 
Welcome, all ye fair maidens ! 



ALPHA SIGMA SOCIETY. 

The Society of "Wise Brothers" has en- 
tered upon its twentieth year's work under 
very favorable auspices. A goodly num- 
ber of the veteran members are back again 
and are pushing the Society work with 
their accustomed vigor. Moreover, the 
membership is steadily increasing by the 
admission of new members, who bid fair to 
become stalwart Society men. The plan 
adopted last year to compel all members 
to attend regularly and to do active work 
is still being successfully carried out, and 
the high grade of Alpha Sigma literary, 
work will be maintained. 

At the first of the term, the Society re- 
organized and began preparations for re- 
pairing the hall. The officers elected are : 
President, Arthur Holtsinger; Vice Presi- 
dent, E. N. Ouist; Corresponding Secre- 
tary, L S. Caldwell ; Recording Secretary, 
F. E.'Laughead; Censors — A. A. Penland. 
M. B. Hunter and J. F. Hammontree. 

The first regular meeting of the Society 
this term was held P>iday night, Septem- 
ber 20. The topic debated was : Resolved, 
"That Republican forms of government are 
more conducive to the growth of anarchy 
than are monarchical forms." The judges 
decided in the affirmative. Resolutions 
were adopted in lionor of the late Presi- 
dent McKinley. The Society instructed 
the Secretary to send a copy of these reso- 
lutions to Hon. Henry R- Gibson, earnest- 
ly urging him to support in Congress such 
measures as, in his judgment, will be most 
effective in the suppression of anarchy. 

The Alpha Sigmas will hold their regu- 
lar meetings on Friday evenings, begin- 
ning at 7 o'clock. On one Friday evening 
of each month they will have a public 
meeting. Visitors are always cordially 
welcomed. 



i6 



llMARYVILIvE COLI<EGE MONTHI^Y 



ALUMNI ET ALUMNAE. ^ J 

R. W. Post, '99, was engaged in minister- 
ial work around Maryville during the sum- 
mer. Mr. Post returns to Western Theo- 
logical Seminary, Alleghany, Pa., for his 
senior year. 

Rob Elmore, "00, will take charge of the 
Academy at Ervin, Tenn. Mr. Elmore 
took an A. B. from Princeton last spring, 
distinguishing himself and Maryville Col- 
lege by standing in the first group and 
winning a Phi Beta Kappa key. 

Thomas Maguire, '01, has gone to Aus- 
tralia to take charge of a Congregation 
Church near Melbourne. 

Rev. Edgar L. Mason, '87, formerly pas- 
tor of the Presbyterian Church, at Bask- 
mg Ridge, New Jersey, was a visitor at 
Maryville during the opening days of the 
term. He has accepted a unanimous call 
to the Fort Sanders Church, at Knoxville. 

Emma Alexander, '01, will spend the 
winter in New York City, preparing for 
missionary work in Japan. 

S. A. Sherrill, '92, has taken charge of 
the schools at Carthage, Tenn. 

J. H. Newman, '96, who has been prin- 
cipal of the Boy's Farm School near Ash- 
ville. North Carolina, will enter McCor- 
mick Theological Seminary, Chicago. 

F. S. Campbell, '98, is pastor of the Pres- 
byterian Church at Cato, N. Y., and writes 
that he is enjoying his work. 



There's joy in leaving college 
With your feet upon the track 

For home, where "pap" and mother 
Will treat you as a "crack," 

And friends hail, "Well, old fellows! 
We're glad to see you back." 

There's joy in being bolstered 
With love's misguided gush, 

And giving ear to empty words 
From lives that never push; 

To sentimental nothings, 

With fingers raised in "Hush!" 

But the joy that yields true pleasure, 
And gives no after-shame. 

Is that from toiling bravely. 
Not heeding earthly fame; 

There's nothing half so joyous 
As working in "His Name." 




Appearance is not everything, but very impor- 
tant by way of introduction. 

Bad " first impressions " liave robbed many 
worthy men of splendid opportunities. 

Maryville boys who allow us to select their 
clothes will make good " first impressions." What 
follows depends on the boy. 

Suits from $5.00 to $12.50 (without our label) 
are cheaper than you will find elsewhere. 

Suits from 810.00 to $27.50 (with our label) are 
better than yon will find elsewhere. 

KNOXVILLE'S 

LARGEST CLOTHING HOUSE 

^Ik, "*!& •*'*• "*'*• "^'^ "^'^ "S'^ "&'<• "*'^ "S'^ •&'«' •&'<• "*'<• •*'<• "*'<• "&'^ 



Founded by General Assembly, 1826. 

Western Theological Seminary, 

ALLEGHENY, PA. 

Five professors and one instructor. Finely 
selected library of over 30,000 volumes. Beau- 
tifully located on West Park. The course is 
thorough and scholarly, but practical. The city 
affords numerous opportunities for missionary 
work. A high type of Christian life is empha- 
sized. For information apply to 

PROF. J. A. KELSO, Ph.D., 

A£,1,£6HENT, PA. 



Mac. 



M. C. STUDENTS 

WHILE IN KNOXVILLE 

Don't fail to include us in your calls. No 
matter whether you want anything in the 

... JEWELRY LINE ... 



or not, come in and look around We will 
always be glad to see you. 



We make a Specialty of Fine 
Repairing, Watches. Jewelry, Etc, 



Hope Bros., 519 Gay St. 

Sign of Big Clock. 



Fall and Winter Goods 

The place to buy is at 

INEWCOMER'S 



The Best in 

DRESS GOODS 

Ready-to-Wear Garments 

UNDERWEAR 

ART GOODS 

MILLINERY 

SHOES 

RIBBONS 

HOSIERY V 

Only one price ; and that is reasonable. Ask for 
samples or price by mail. All orders of $.5.00 or 
more, when accompanied by cash, will have the 
express, postage or freight paid. 

M. M. NEWCOMER & CO., 

402, 404, 406, 408 GAY ST., KNOXVILLE, TENN. 



:-^&Q=:^ 















% 



McTEER & COMPANY, 

CLOTHING and 
FURNISHINGS 

Next door to Third National Bank. KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

Mr. Win Tedford, formerly of Maryvllle, will be glad to see all his friends at ihe above place. 



N^ 






^ ^ THE PLACE TO LOOK ^ ^ 

For best quality .in everything in Furniture and House Furnishing Goods 
is the place where every article sold is guaranteed. It is extravagance — 
waste — to pay any price for poorly made furniture, that will go to pieces in 
a little while, and most of the low price furniture on the market to-day is 
that sort. The goods we sell are the cheapest in the world, when quality 
is considered . Our prices for well-made, substantial goods are very little 
higher than those quoted elsewhere for worthless stuff. If you want fur- 
niture for your home, we can supply the kind that will give satisfaction 
for a lifetime. 

ALLEN, STEPHENSON & CO., KNOXVILLE, TENN. 



^ 



) 
) 
) 
) 
) 
) 
) 
) 



3 Jtjtjijkjkjiji ASSETS, JANUARY I, 1901, $1,225,582.71 JtJt^JtJiJiJi 



The Oldest Life Insurance Company in America by Nearly 100 Years. 

Presbyterian Ministers' Fund 

FOR LIFE INSURANCE. 

Its death rate is the lowest because the lougevuy of ministers is the highest. 
It insures ministers Presbyterially governed only. It allows cash, loan, paid-up and 
extended insurance values in all its policy contracts. It writes insurance by corres- 
pondence, without the annoyance and expense of intermediate agents. Compare 
these annual premiums for f 1,000.00 insurance with other companies' : 



Age. 


Ordinary 
Life. 


20 Payment. 


20 Year 
Endowment 




Age. 


Ordinary 
Life. 


20 Payment. 


20 Tear 
Endowment. 


25 

30 
35 


19.21 

21.84 


.1;2S.96 
26,09 
28.76 


$41.36 
41.74 
42.35 


40 
46 
50 


$25.35 
30.12 
86.70 


$.S2.13 
86.51 
42.37 


$43.42 
45.35 
48.76 



Don't pay from lo to 30 per cent, more for insurance than it will cost you in the Fund. 
Don't allow estimates of future tontine dividends, or surplus returns, to deceive you. 



Send date of Birth for different Policies Issued by tlie Fund. 



Address PERRY S. ALLEN, Secretary, '"'i:;,^^.:^.-'- | 

8 I 



ELM STREET 
PRINTING WORKS 

Printing and Binding 



420-422 Elm Street, Cincinnati, O. 



THE PALACE STABLE 

A. C. MONTGOMERY, Proprietor. 

FirstClassHorses and Buggies to Hire 

Also Corn 3nci Hay for Sale. 

Maryville, Tenn. 

J. A. SUMiViERS, 
^ ELECTRICAL ENGINEER, J- 

Contracts taken for Complete 
Light and Power Plants .... 



KNOXVILLE. 



TENNESSEE. 



J. P. EDMONSON, 

Maryville, Tenn. 

LIVERY, FEED AND SALE STABLE. 

Good Veblrles and Driving Horses. 
Rates ""'"'""■■''»''' -^ 

Special Attention to Supplying Driving and 
Mountain Parties. 

GEORGE & TEDFORD 

Drugs, IVIeciicines 
and Chemicals . . 

Fancy and Toilet Articles, Sponges, Brushes, 
Perfumery, Etc. 

Prescriptions carefully compounded witii accuracy and dis- 
patch by competent persons at all hours of the day and night. 

A. K. HARPER, 

DEPARTMENT 
STORE 



Phones: New 1U6, Office. Old Sijl, Residence 

B. F. YOING, M. D., 

Eye, Ear, Throat 
and Nose .... 

409 Wall Street, Knoxville, Tenn. 

C. PFLANZE^ 

Dealer in 

ALL KINDS OF FURNITURE 

AND U^DERTAKER'S GOODS, 
MARYVILLE, - TENNESSEE. 

H. P. HUDDLESTON, 

DENTIST 



Students Give Your l_aundry 
Work to 

M. B. HUNTER, '04, 
Agent of the War Eagle Laundry 

IN' f;AST TKSNESSKK. 

WE GUARANTEE SATISFACTION. 



A. B. McTeer. 



A. Mc. Gamble. 



McTEER & GAMBLE, 

PHYSICIANS. 

OFFICE UPSTAIRS OVER GEORGE & TEDFOP.D"S 
DRUG STORE. 



Dr. McTeer, Res., 40. 



Dr. Gamble, Res., f>i. 



W. B. LAWRENCE, 

Maryville, Tenn., 
Carries a Full and Complete I ine of Furni- 
ture, Picture and Frames. 

Fine Caskets and Coffins, Burial Robes, Etc. 
Prices Reasonable. Call and Examine My Stock. 

J. F. RODGERS, 

Headquarters for 

FRUITS, NUTS AND CANDIES 

Bananas a Specialty. 

When you fail to Hnd anything you want in the line of 
Choice Fruits anywhere else, call on me. Stock always fresh 
and the best on the market. Next block to New Providence 
Church, Maryville. 

D. R. GODDARD & CO., 
Vehicles, Harness, Agricultural Implements, 

FIELD SEEDS AND FIELD STUFFS. 



COAI.— Nperlal Attention 
Given to Small Orders. 



Pbone S3. 



Office over 
Patton'8 .Jbwelry Stork. 



MAKTVILLE, TENN. 



MUSICAL MERCHANDISE 

I CARRY A RKAUTIFUI. MNE OF 

Violins, /Mandolins, Guitars, 

And Other Nirlnged Instrnments. 

Bows, Strings. Fittings. A L,arj^e Assortment of 

tlie ^.attest Sbeel Music. 

R. R. PATTON. Patton's Jewelry Store, Maryville. 



„ School Books < 
#lnahurry < 

#And at New York prices, singly / 
or by tlie dozen, may be obtained ' 
x?=^ second-hfijid or ne-uj, by any boy or 

(^^^ girl in the remotest hamlet, or any / 

V^^J' teacher or official anywhere, and ' 

^Delivery prepaid ( 

y^^\ Brand new, complete alphabetical 

(((^M)) caialogueyVtf^.of schoolbooksof a// ( 

publishers, if you mention this ad. 
EUfDS & NOBLE 
Cooper Institute New York City ' 




1901-1902. 



MHRY^ILLE COLLEGE 



FOUNDED IN 1819. 



FACTJ-L.TY. 



REV. SAMUEL T. WILSON, D.D., 

Prcfldent, and Professor of the English Language and 
Literature and of the Spanish Language. 

REV. SAMUEL W. BOARDMAN, D.D., LL.D., 

Emeritus Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 

REV. ELMER B. WALLER, A.M., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

JAMES H. M. SHERRILL, A.M., 
Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 

JASPER C. BARNES, A.M., Ph.D., 

Principal ot the Preparatory Department and Professor of 

the Science and Art of Teaching. 

REV. JOHN G. NEWMAN, A.M., 

Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

FRANK M. GILL, 

Bookkeeping and English. 

ROBERT P. WALKER, A. B., 

English Branches. 

JOHN W. RITCHIE, A.B., 

Biology. 

ALBERT F. GILMAN, S.B. , A.M. , 

Chemistry and Physics. 



MISS MARGARET E. HENRY, 

English Branches. 

MISS AMANDA LAUGHLIN ANDREWS, B.Ph., 

French and German. 

MISS HENRIETTA MILLS LORD, A.B., 

Ehetoric and English Literature. 

MISS HELEN I. MINNIS, B.L., 
Piano, Voice and Theory. 

MRS. A. F. GILMAN, 
Elocution. 

MRS. NELLIE B. CORT, A.B., 
Matron. 



MAJOR BEN CUNNINGHAM, 

Registrar. 

WILLIAM M. THOMAS, 

Janitor. 

MRS. A. A. WILSON, 

Manager of the Co-operative Boarding Club. 

MISS H. M. KINGSBURY, 
Assistant Manager of the Co-operative Boarding Club. 



COURSES OF STUDY. 

The College offers nine groups of studies 
leading to the degree of A. B. , and also a Teach- 
er's Course. The curriculum embraces the various 
branches of Science, Language, Literature, His- 
tory and Philosophy usually embraced in such 
courses in the leading colleges in the country. 

SPECIAL ADVANTAGES. 

The location is very healthful. The community 
is noted for its high morality. Seven churches. 
No saloons in Blount county. Six large college 
buildings, bes'des the President's house and tvco 
other residences. The halls heated by steam and 
lighted by electricity. A system of waterworks. 
Campus of 250 acres. The college under the care 
of the Synod of Tennessee. Full corps of 
instructors. Careful supervision. Study of the 
Sacred Scriptures. Four literary societies. Rhe- 
torical drill. The Lamar library of more than 
10,000 volumes. Text-book loan libraries. 



THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

Competent and experienced instructors give 
their entire time to this department, while a 
number of the professors of the College depart- 
ment give a portion of their time to it. 

EXPENSES. 

The endowment of $225,000 reduces the ex- 
penses to low figures. The tuition is only $6.00 
a term or $18.00 a year. Room rent, light and 
heat bills, in Baldwin Hall (for young ladies) and 
Memorial Hall (for young men) is only $7.00 for 
the fall term, $5.00 for the winter term, and|3.00 
for the spring term. A Co-operative Laundry has 
been established. Instrumental music at low 
rates. Board at Co-operative Boarding 
Club ONLY ABOUT $1.30 a Week. Young ladies 
may reduce even this cost by work in the club. 
In private families beard as from $2.00 to $2.50. 
Other expenses are correspoudiugly low. 

Total expenses, $75.00 to $125.00 a year. 

The next term opens January 2, 1902. 



For Catalogues, Circulars or Other Information, address 

MAJOR BEN CUNNINGHAM, Registrar, Maryville, Tenn. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY 



Vol. IV. 



MARYVILLE, TENN., DECEMBER, I90I. 



No. 2. 




MARYVILLH'S NEW PRESIDENT. 
FEV. SA.V.UEL TYNDA'.E WILSON, D.D. 



Born in Horns. Syrii, 185S. Gradnaltd from Maryville, 1S78. Called to Chair of 
English Literature in Maryville, 1884. Became Senior Professor, 1891. Chosen 
President, 1901. 



( , 

INAUGURATION OF REV. SAMUEL T. WILSON, D. D„ AS 
I THE FIFTH PRESIDENT OF MARYVILLE COLLEGE..jc^^ 
V , J 



On Monday evening, Oct. l' 1 , IMOi, A'ew 
Providence Cluirch was filled to overflowing 
with stndents and teachers of the College, 
the peojjle of jMaryville and its vicinity, and 
many visitoi's from abroad. 

The graduate quartette, composed of Kev. 
John. B. Cresiwell, 'ST; Eev. Herman A, 
Goif, 'S5 ; Kev. John S. Eakin, '87, and 
Eev. John G. Xewmuin, '88, were present, 
and sang an opening piece, after which 
came the program of the evening, as fol- 
lows : 

Music. 
In vocation... Rev. John ]\I. Eichmond, D.D. 

Address of Induction 

Eev. W. H. Lyle, D. I ). 

Inaugural Address 

. . . .Rev. Samuel Tyndale Wilson, D. D. 
Music. 

A "Word for the Synod of Tennessee 

Eev. E. A, Elmore, D. D. 

^lusic. 
Education and American Home Missions 

Re\'. Charles L. Thompson, D. D. 

Music. 
Benediction. 
After the dousing add'ress, delivered by 
Rev. ('harles L. Thompson, D. D., secre- 
tary of the Presbyterian Home Board of 
I\ew York City, a number of letters were 
read from presidents of sister colleges, ex- 
pressing their regret at not being present 
and extending their best wishes to President 
Wilson. 

Prof. Thomas W. Jordan, dean of the T'ni- 
versity of Tennessee, and Pres. Samuel A. 
Coile, P. ])., of Greeneville College, were 
successively called u^Mn, and in brief speeeb- 
es conveyed their messages of regard and 
congratulations from the institutions wbicli 
they represented. 



The newly inducted jiresident was, at the 
close of the services, heartily greeted by a 
large number of friends, and congratulated 
upon the auspicions opening of his admin- 
istration. 

ADDKkSS OF IXDUCTIOX REV. W. H. XYLE, 

D. D. 

Maryville College is a great institutioo. 
Some other colleges are greater in age, great- 
er in their endowment, and greater in the 
number of students attending them, and, by 
consequence, greater in the extent of their 
influence. But still it is true that Mary- 
ville College is a great institution. It has 
a history of which its friends may well be 
in-oud. God's hand has guided it in all its 
history. It had for its founder the grand 
ami godly man, i)r. Anderson, who was its 
first president. The institution was found- 
ed for the glory of God, in the advancement 
of the kingdom of his Son Jesus Christ. 
])r. Anderson used this language in regard 
to tbe object of the institution : "Let the di- 
rectors and managers of this sacred insti- 
tution propose the glory of God, and the ad- 
^ancement^ of that kingdom pul-chased by 
tbe Wood of his only begotten Son, as theii" 
sole objects, and they need not fear what 
man can do." 

The institution ^truiigied with poverty all 
the days that Dr. Andea-son was its presi- 
ilcnt. He was its president at the time of 
his death in 185 Y. Dr. Eohinson then 
became its ]:)resident, and so continued till 
the outbreak of tlie war in 18(31. After the 
war Dr. Bartlett became its president, and 
did a grand woi'k for the College in helping 
to resuscitate it, and in bringing money io 
•t. And the College flourished under his ad- 
ministration. After his administration Dr. 
Boardman became his successor, and the Col- 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



lege had great prosperity under his admin- 
istration. Through all its history we can 
now see that the hand of God has been guid- 
ing it. 

On the 27th of May last, the Board of 
Directors, a more than usual number be- 
ing jjresent, elected Dr. Samuel T. Wilson 
as the fifth president of the College. After 
the first ballot the vote was made unanimous. 
Thus the Board has expressed its confidence 
in Dr. Wilson as a siiitable person tO' be its 
president, to follow in the line of men who 
have been illustrious in this office. 

Many things have conspired to lead to 
this choice. Dr. Wilson's long cormection 
with the College as one of its professors, his 
thorough knowledge of the workings of the 
institution, and his arduous and untiring la- 
bors for its success, are one thing. His pro- 
found and accurate scholarship is an- 
other. His strict integrity is another. His 
acute moral sense is another. His steadfast 
adherence to that which is right, regardless 
of popular sentiment, is another. His af- 
fability and gentlemanly conduct toward all 
men, even toward those who might differ 
from him, is another. His faith in God and 
devout piety, manifest in meekness and hu- 
mility, and in many other ways, is another. 
His sound common sense is another. 

These qualities all belonging to Dr. Wil- 
son, the Board of Directors and the friends 
of the College anticipate and believe that 
the College will have great success and 
prosperity under his administration as 
president. The Board also believes that it 
has had divine guidance in making this 
choice. 

In the first place, then, I may charge Dr. 
Wilson never to forget the responsibility 
that will be upon him in this office. A col- 
lege in any particular period of its history 
is miich what its president makes it. The 
character of the students will be, more or 
less, molded after his. It is said, and trii- 
ly, too, in a sense, that the country is mold- 



ed and governed by college-bred men and 
women. Here, in this age of the world, 
ministers are educated, and lawyers and phy- 
sicians and business men. Here women are 
educated who are shaping the character and 
the destiny of the families of the land- 
Should Dr. Wilson remain the president of 
this institution for a number of years, dur- 
ing that time many will come to the institu- 
tion and many will go. And they will go 
into all the callings and businesses of life. 
They will go into diffei-ent parts of the 
earth. And they will go with the impress 
of the president's character iipon them. And 
as college-bred men and women are shaping 
the destiny of the land and of the world in 
a very large measure, we readily see the re- 
sponsibility that is resting upon the presi- 
dent of this institution along this line. 

Then there will be responsibility for ad- 
vancement in the age in which we live. It 
is not for me to make any suggestions at 
this time in regard to this matter. But it 
is in the life of a college, the same as in 
the life of a church, or of an individual : 
stagnation is death. It is true that truth is 
eternal and never changes. But there may 
be improvement in the methods of obtain- 
ing truth and of presenting truth. And it 
will be expected of the president of this in- 
stitution to know the best methods in the old- 
er and larger institutions of the- land, so far 
as he may be able, and to shape this insti- 
tution accoTdingly. 

Then, there will be a responsibility in the 
matter of obtaining more money for the 
College. It is true that the entire respon- 
sibility of this matter will not be upon the 
president. But some measure of the respon- 
sibility will be his. A college rarely, if 
ever, gets done needing money. The more 
money it has, when rightly used, the great- 
er its power and influence. It will be ex- 
pected, therefore, of the president that he 
will studv the needs of the Colleo-e and that 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



he Avill win to it friends — ^men of wealth 
who will give it necessary financial aid. 

In the second place, have faith in God. 
Difficulties will always be presenting them- 
selves in the way of the management of a 
college. Trials will come. Any college 
that is doing the work of the Lord will have 
opposition. This is God's college. l^ot 
that any other Ghristian college is not his. 
Its work will be to break down the empire 
of Satan so far as it may have the power. 
And of course Satan will . not be friendly 
disposed toward an institution that is mak- 
ing war on Ms empire. The institution has 
ahvays had its enemies. It had them in the 
days of Dr. Anderson, aaid has had them 
ever since. More than forty years agoi I 
heard the noted Eev. G. S. White say, in 
an address in the old College chapel, that 
the devil had always had a peculiar spite at 
jVIaryville College, and the devil has al- 
ways had its spite at it in all its his- 
toa-y. He will continue his spite as 
long as he is unchained, and so long 
as the Collegei continues to^ do noble and 
earnest work for God and humanity. Hence 
the importance that the friends of the Col- 
lege', and especiajly the president, ishoaild 
have faith in God. God reigns. He is om- 
nipotent. He is the friend of every good 
institution, and of every man who is striv- 
ing to do his will. Let the president and 
the friends of the institution have faith in 
God, and notwithstanding the fact that dif- 
ficulties in the future may be like moun- 
tains, yet they will be removed and cast into 
the sea. I'his College is a church institu- 
tion, and not a State institution, and the 
church belongs to Christ. He is the Head 
and King thereof. And so he is the friend 
of the College. He is able to keep it. All 
power is his. He holds the stars in his right 
hand. And he loves this institution and has 
interest in it siicli as we can not have. 
Tjierefore we can expect him to defend It 
and help it. The president of this institu- 



tion may lay its interests and its wants down 
at the feet of Him "who has Uipon his thigh 
and upon his vesture a name written. King 
of kings and Lord of lords." He may do it 
with perfect confidence that the institution 
will be safe in his hands. He will safely 
gaiide the institution by his Holy Spirit. 

And now, as chainman of the Board of 
Directors and in behalf of the Board, I de- 
clare Dr. Samuel Tyndale Wilson to be the 
president of Maryville College. We hope 
and pray and believe that his administration 
of the institution as its president will be a 
brilliant one, and that the College will be 
greatly prospered during all the time tbat he 
shall be at its head. 

A WORD KKOM THE SYNOD OF TENNESSEE 

EEV. E. A. ELMOKE^ D. D. 

I have been asked to say a word for the 
Synod of Tennessee — to be a kind of hyphen 
between the two speeches of the evening. 

It is not necessary to say that the Synod of 
Tennessee is deeply interested in what is oc- 
curring here to-night, as we have already 
learned this evening what close tie exists be- 
tween College and Synod. Maryville Col- 
lege is the daughter of the Synod. From 
the birth of this institution in 1819 until 
this present time, there has never been a 
meeting of Synod that the welfare of the 
College has not been considered. 

Other colleges have been encouraged and 
commended, others adopted into the family; 
but Maryville is the flrsthorn. As a moth- 
er. Synod has cared for and advised her. 
!N^or has the College been unmindful of the 
fostering care of Synod. She has been an 
obedient, grateful daughter — accepting the 
will of the Synod as the law of her life and 
action — and returning to Synod scores of 
sons and daughters, ed\icated and trained to 
serve her here and represent her in foreign 
lands. We realize tbat the College is now 
entering upon a new era; that good Provi- 
dence that hath ever led her is setting before 
her an open door. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



23 



There have been two marked periods in 
the history of the College. One was from 
the birth of the institution imtil closed by 
the Civil War, in which it was a theological 
seminary or a seminary becoming a literary 
institution — a kind of evolution of college 
from seminary. Of this we have heard to- 
night. 

The second was from the opening of the 
College after the war until this present time. 
This was a period of adaptation of the Col- 
lege to new conditions in the South ; an hon- 
est attempt to solve problems growing out 
of the War. This period is marked by gen- 
eroais friends, rich gifts, heroic service on 
the part of teachers, a marvelous growth, and 
a determined and persistent effort to be true 
to pledges made by those who resuscitated 
the College. A splendid chapter, and one 
that will grow brighter in the coming yeai-s ; 
one of which the College need never be 
ashamed. All honoT to the noble men who 
from their love to Christ and their fellow 
men gave the best of their lives to write this 
chajDter in the history of Mai-yville College. 

Bixt we face to-night a new era. What it 
is to be the future must tell. There are 
some facts which must be reckoned with, as 
factors in making the future of the College. 

In the first place, in the South we are in 
the midst of a social and industrial revolu- 
tion. The South is to-day what it never 
has been before. We are passing out of the 
patriarchal into an industrial age. Keen, 
intense and revolutionary, we must face the 
future, not the past. We are to catch step 
with the twentieth century, and the College 
will have to fit itself to lead in the great 
movement. 

A second fact is, there is taking place a 
new adjustment of the school life of the 
South. The public school is soon to do a 
work it has never done before in the South. 
It is to beco'me the mighty educating influ- 
ence in the South. Enlightened public sen- 
timent will demand this and secure it. There 



are hopeful indications on every side. Al- 
ready there are 5,000,000 youth in the pub- 
lic schools of the South. 

The State universities are growing into 
a power ih&y have never had before. State 
university is a Southern idea, just as public 
school is a Northern idea. The time has come 
Avhen both ideas are accepted by the whole 
land. And now, as never before, is the 
power of the State university felt. With its 
State and national endowment; with scien- 
tific, meclianical, industrial and professional 
courses; with its farmers' institutes and ex- 
tension courses; with the tendency to adjust 
its course so as to make short and easy ihc 
passage from the high school to imiversity — 
it is bringing into the educational life a new 
factor, which is bound to exert great influ- 
ence. Again, we have come to the time when 
the denominational or small college is to be 
tested as never before. It is a question of 
the survival of the fittest Every such col- 
lege will have to prove its rigkt to exist. 
There ai'e to be fewer colleges rather than 
more. Germany, with her millions of in- 
habitants, has only twenty-one universities, 
while Tennessee alone has twenty-two col- 
leges and universities. The demand of the 
time is not for more colleges, but more col- 
lege — something more than a name; a cata- 
log-ue setting fo-rth wonderful advantages, 
and a local tradition. There must be a mod- 
ern course of study, equipped laboratories, 
and an education that will fit for to-day and 
to-morrow. Only the college that ought to 
live will live in this contest. 

We believe Maryville College will live. 
God has a future for her. All these years 
of growing usefulness are a prophecy of a 
great Avork yet to be done. Admirably situ- 
ated here in the central South, with new 
eqiiipment, with new opportunity, we believe 
she has a hopeful future. If there should 
be opposition, she is accustomed to it. She 
has always sailed a stormy sea. She has not 
lived because it was easy to live, but because 
she could not be killed. 



24 



MARYVILLE COLIyEGE; MONTHI.Y. 



But there are tiiree things the Synod will 
rejoice to see in Mary villa College. Eirst, 
that the College root itself in its native soil, 
gather about it old alumni, and gradually 
begin to "win its financial support as well as 
its patronage from the portion of the country 
in which it is located. This may not be pos- 
sible for some years, but it should be the 
one object kept in view. Let Maryville Col- 
lege not be' an exotic, but native growth; 
thoroughly identified with the life about 
her. The time is coaming for this. 

Secondly, that the College be Christian, 
yes. Christian to the core. As broad as pos- 
sible in scholarship, as original as possible 
in research, as refined as possible in culture, 
as successful as possible in athletics, as pop- 
ular as possible in public esteem, as rich as 
possible in money; but not satisfied with 
some of these, or all of these. l!^ot satisfied 
unless there is growth in the institution of 
Christian manhood and womanhood; unless 
the atmosphere of the College is Christian, 
and the ideals of the men and women going 
forth from its halls are Christian. Neveir 
let a professor of this institution say, as one 
of the professors of one of our larger insti- 
tutions is reported to have said: "We are 
not responsible for the character or the mor- 
als or the vices of our students; only for 
their instruction." Let this College con- 
tinue to accept responsibility for character 
as well as teaching. 

Thirdly, that the spirit of the founder of 
this institution — Isaac xinderson, of whom 
we have heard to-night, who one hundred 
years ago this very month came with his 
father's family within the bounds of this 
Synod — that his spirit shall ever abide and 
dominate this institution. Truth-seeking, 
fearless in loyalty to truth, catholic, patri- 
otic, public-spirited, deeply in sympathy 
with needs of men, missionary, forgetful of 
self, laboring to build up the kingdom of 
Jesus Christ, and doing all for the glory of 



God — let this spirit rule in this College, and 
coming generations shall bless her. 

To you, my dear brother, installed presi- 
dent of Maryville College, we look to secure 
these ends. You are her own son, trained 
in her principles, qualified by years of ex- 
perience in her service, feeling the sacredntss 
of her mission, enriched by the grace of 
God, you, we believe, will have but one aim 
— to broaden and enrich her life, and keep 
her true to her sacred trust. May the bless- 
ing of God rest upon you richly as you as- 
sume the arduous duties of this position, and 
may you be strong and of good courage, is 
the prayer of your brethren of the Synod. 

THE IIs'AUGUEAL ADDEESS. 
The Southern and Western Theologi- 
cal Seminary. 
By President Wilson. 
There are some endowments and legacies 
that are easy to co^mpute. They consist of 
values in gold and silver and bank notes, and 
may be expressed in terms of the dollar and 
its multiples. And good they are — at least 
in the case of educational institutions — and 
greatly to be desired. There are, however, 
other endowments and legacies that are hard 
to compute. They consist of such treasures 
as are conscientious endeavor, heroic fidelity 
and patient usefulness. 

The financial endowment and legacy that 
post-bellmn Maryville inherited from ante- 
bellum Maryville can easily and speedily be 
estimated in tei-ms of the dollar and a vei-y 
few of its multiples. The moral endowment 
and legacy tha.t post-bellum Maryville in- 
herited, can not be fitly estimated either in 
the cold enumeration of dollars and cents, or 
even in the Avarmer diction of appreciation 
and gratitude — 'though some day it imay be 
fitly expressed in the langiiage they speaK 
in that far-aAvay land of pure gold and un- 
erring assays. 

It was in his early ministry that Isaac 
iinderson read the biography of George 



MARYVILIvE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



25 



vVhitefield. The perusal of that book sec 
aflame in the sympathetic spirit ocf the young 
pastor a mighty enthusiasm that burned 
steadily, and almost fiercely, to the very end 
of life. The Southern and Western Theo- 
logical Seminary is the eloquent biography 
of Isaac Anderson. That collegiate biog- 
raphy, if so we may term it, can not but 
make the reader catch the healthful conta- 
gion of zeal for God, and, as the Hopkinsian 
expression was, of ''disinterested benevo- 
lence'' for man. However we Maryville 
people may, in coming times, delight our- 
selves in possible or realized Canaans ; or, 
on the other hand, may in disconsolate days 
be tempted to hang onr harps upon the wil- 
lows, it is certain that no power can rob us 
of our "Genesis and Exodus" — the epic 
story of the days of the beginnings of oair 
history, when God was among Maryville 
men, and when Maryville men walked to- 
gether with God. 

We stand at the close of the fourth presi- 
dency of Maryville College. With the be- 
ginning of the eighty-third year in the career 
of our beloved alma, riuUer, we also face with 
high hopes, and, we trust, with fitting am- 
bitions, the beginning of the twentieth cen- 
tury. ISTo fear lest we shall not be active 
and earnest, if we breathe in aright the ozone 
of tihe epoch. All our present plans and 
our future fidelity must be realized in that 
inviting future, if realized at all. Our lives 
and our work are in the future. What need, 
then, to speak of that which at last must 
be read in our performances, rather than in 
our purposes ? Let us rather pause to-night, 
for a few minutes, on the threshold of that 
future to cast our vision backward over the 
course the College has had to travel in order 
to reach its present vantagorg-round. Let us 
review together the first chapters of the his- 
tory of old Maryville. It shall be my pleas- 
ant privilege to tell you the story of those 
twenty years when our institution was known 
as the Southern and Western Theological 
Seminary. 



THE AXDEESON EAIIILY. 

One himdred years ago this very month a 
Scotch-Irish family was making its tedious 
journey in wagons down the valleys of the 
Shenandoah, the Blue Ridge, and East Ten- 
nessee, from Rockbridge County in Virginia 
to Grassy Valley, Knox Co., Tenn. Their 
old county was far-famed for its Xatural 
Bridge, but there had come to them the fame 
of cheap lands and plenty of them to be 
found on the frontier" in East Tennessee; 
and so they traveled nearly three hundred 
miles to share in the good of which they had 
heard. Among the seven children was a sal- 
low but stalwart youth who had just reached 
his majority. He was a religiously inclined 
young man, and had been studying theology 
with Rev. Samuel Brown, his home pastor 
in Rockbridge Co'unty, but he preferred to 
accompany his father's family to East Ten- 
nessee, here to complete his studies for the 
sacred office. The family found in Grassy 
Valley, about six miles from Knoxville, a 
location that pleased them, and there they 
made their Alabama. 

ISAAC ANDEKSOX. 

Isaac Anderson was reared a fanner's boj", 
but his parents sent him to a subscription 
school, and then to Liberty Hall, or Wash- 
ington Academy, of Lexington, an institu- 
tion that later on developed into Washington 
College, now known as Washington and Lee 
University. He could boast that his ances- 
tors were Presbyterians that fought for Prot- 
estantism and the House of Orange at the 
siege of Derry ; and, as one might guess, he 
was carefully reared in the religious faith 
of his fathers. In his studies, he was preco- 
cious, and read Latin when only seven years 
of age. His scholarly habits, thus early 
formed, were continued throughout his busy 
and care-filled life. Though he did not have 
the advantage of a collegiate education, he 
was a lifelong student. 

For a part of the year following his ar- 
rival in Tennessee, he read theoloffv Avith 



26 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



Dr. Carrick, one of the quartette of minis- 
ters that then composed Union Presbytery, 
and was one of the first two men licensed bj 
Union Presbytery, and was the second one 
ordained by the presbytery. His ordination 
occurred in October, 1802, a,t which time he 
Avas also installed pastor of Washington 
Church, then, as no\v, located ten miles north 
of Knoxville. During his pastorate of near - 
ly ten years, he conducted an academy in a 
"log college,'' as it was sometimes called, a 
four-roomed house erected on his own farm. 
Some of the logs of that historic building 
are still to be seen on the Samuel Harris 
farm. The copy of the biography of White- 
field, to which reference has been made, fell 
into his hands about the time of his onlina- 
tion. He was of a deeply religious nature, 
and Avas sensitive to noble impulses. The 
biography affected his life profoimdly, and 
sent him out on long tours to preach the gos- 
])el to neglected and remote settlements. 
There was especially a circuit of 150 miles 
which he traveled once a month for at least 
two years. The deplorable lack of religious 
privileges and of an intelligent minis L±y 
most painfully impressed his spirit. The 
opportimities of evangelistic work and the 
importimities of churchless communitie-o, 
wdien considered in connection with the lim- 
itations of time and strength and nerves, al- 
most led hi'm to despair. He could not mul- 
tiply himself. 

THE JfEED OF A SEMINARY. 

Tlie laborers v\'ere few, while the harvest 
AAas perishing. The possible gi'OAvth of Un- 
ion Presbytery was limited only by the scar- 
city of ordained ministers. He scanned the 
horizon in vain for the sight of reinforce- 
ments. Four, and then six, men were all 
that bore the standard of Presbyterianism 
in all the broad domain covered by Union 
Presbytery. I^ever before 1819 did as many 
as nine ministers attend a meeting of Union 
Presbytery. There was, in the Southland, 
no theological seminary to train a ministry; 



and there was only one college within the 
])Ounds of the presbytery, and it was a small 
secular school. The supply of educated men 
was, indeed, meager. The only ho'pe seemed 
to be the importation of preachers from the 
older States. And it seemed that the minis- 
ters in those States were unwilling to be im- 
ported in sufficient numbers toi avail much 
in supplying the widespread need. Appli- 
cation to the Home Missionary Society was 
made in vain. Dr. Anderson made only one 
trip JSTorth in his lifetime, and that was in 
1819. At that time he canvassed the As- 
sembly, and, on his return journey, he vis- 
ited the theological seminary at Prinoeton, 
but failed to get any one to venture intO' the 
wild and dubious Soiuthwest to the relief of 
Union Presbytery. He returned home 
in great despondency, for the zeal of God's 
cause was about to eat him up. He could 
secure neither men nor money with which to 
support men. Missionary societies were very 
few and yoimg and feeble in those primeval 
days, and conld render them no assistance. 
In his inaugural address, delivered in 1822, 
he said : "The necessity and importance of 
a theological seminary for this Western 
country spontaneously rose in the hearts of 
many individuals about the same time." 
Those individuals moved Union Presbytery, 
in 1819, to overtiire the Synod of Tennessee 
to establish such an institution. Several 
young men were just then led by revivals +o 
look toward the ministry as possibly their 
life calling. A very few, in addition, were 
willing to come here from other sections to 
be educated on Tennessee soil to be mission- 
aries on the frontier. 

A SEMINARY DECIDED UPON. 

The overture of Union Presbytery was 
adopted on Oct. 19, 1819, by the Synod 
while, by a happy coincidence, in session iu 
Maryville. 

Dr. Anderson himself had accepted a call 
from 'New Providence Church in 1811, and 
had removed to this town in ISTovember, 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



27 



1812. He looked upon tlie large chui-cli, 
built up during Dr. Gideon Blackburn's abl.i 
pastorate, as affording him a broader field 
of labour than be bad thitherto occupied. 

In 1819 the L^nited States bad a popula- 
tion less than five times the present ijopula- 
tion of the State of Tennessee. . Our State 
had only 400,000 inhabitants, or only ten in- 
habitants to the square mile. There were then 
forty-eight connties, while Blount Connty, 
aboiit twice its present size, had little more 
than one-half its present population. Great 
Shelby County conld boast a population (jf 
only 364. Maryville was a mountain ham- 
let containing a stone church, a log jail and 
a cluster of log and frame bouses. Dr. An- 
derson's boiise stood where the armory now 
stands. 'J'bere was, of coiirse, much more 
woodland than tbere is now, and the country 
was primeval forest interspersed with the 
cabins of those whoi had chosen a ho(ftie' In 
a "new country." 

Very ambitions, indeed, as coming from 
a partly reclaimed wilderness, does the con- 
stitution of the Southern and Western The- 
ological Seminary sonnd to us of to^-day. The 
villagers of East Tennessee, however, were 
in earnest, and in all seriousness the Synod 
invited the Synods of I^orth Carolina, South 
Carolina, Kentucky and Ohio — the next 
Younger sister of Tennessee — to co-operato 
with tbem in the establishment and main- 
tenance of the new institution. 

COJN'STIT'nTION OF THE SEMINARY. 

The constitution of the seminary is very 
elaborate, and consists of thirty-two articles'. 
Some of its i^rovisions are as follows : While 
the seminary was to be located and com- 
menced by the Synod of Tennessee, other 
sjmods and presbyteries might co-operate, 
and be entitled to all the rights and privi- 
leges of the Synod of Tennessee. Thirty- 
six directors, as now, were to^ compose the 
Board of Trustees, one^tbird of whom were 
to be Presbyterian laymen, and two-thirds, 
Presbyterian ministers. The first meeting 



of the Board was to be held on the 1st of 
January, 1820. The professors were to be 
"ordained ministers of the Presbyterian 
Church, not under thirty years of age, '-n 
good standing, and of good report, men of 
talents, science and learning," and were to 
serve "during good behavior." Their sala- 
ries were to fixed by the synod or presby- 
tery employing them. The vacation months 
were April, October, and one-half of Septem- 
ber ; only two and a half months, instead ot 
the four montb,s now generally given by the- 
ological seminaries. The course of study 
was to consist of the Greek Testament and 
the KebreAv Bible, Jewish antiquities, sacred 
chronology, Biblical criticism, metaphysics, 
didactic and polemic theology, church his- 
tory, church government, composition and 
delivery of sermons, and the duties of the 
pastoral care. The students were to be di- 
vided into three seminary classes. In meta- 
physics, Locke's Essay was prescribed; and 
In didactic theology, the works of Bad- 
dridge, Piidgely, "and othei-s." The funds 
of the institution were to be classified as 
permanent and contingent, and the form of 
devise was to be "as nearly the same with 
that used by the General Assembly for the 
tbeologicail seminary at Prlnceto^vn [sic] as 
the nature of the case would conveniently 
admit" Let us bear in mind that "Prince- 
town" Seminary was then only two years 
old. The students must be approv^ Chris- 
tians and membei-s of any evangelical church 
— for no discrimination was to be made 
against men of any denomination. In his 
Inaugural, Dr. Anderson said: "From these 
liberal views and a practice so liberal, it is 
hoped the institution will never depart." 
That boj^e has certainly been realized in 
all tbe history of the institution. There has 
never been any proselytism at ^arwille. 
Admittance to the seminary was to be by ex- 
amination, or by a diploma issued by some 
college. The only measures to be employed 
to enforce the doctrines taught were to be 



28 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY 



argument and evidence; and no one was to 
be censured or to have his privileges abridged 
unless he denied the doctrines of the Trin- 
ity, total depravity, regenei'ation, future re- 
wards and punishments, or the divinity and 
humanity of the Lord Jesus Christ, or any 
one of these doctrines. While teaching the 
general essentials of the Christian faith as 
held in common by all Christians, the pro- 
fessors were, of coiurse, also toi present and 
to defend the doctrines of the Westminster 
Confession of Faith. 

These thirty-two articles reveal the high 
ideals that were held by the little company 
of villagers and country preachers who 
framed this worthy instrument for the glory 
of God and the welfare of his Zion. Some- 
what ambitious and extravagant the scheme 
may seem when we recall the destitution of 
the frontiersmen who formed it; but it sure- 
ly does credit to their enlightened zeal, their 
benevolent purpose, and their Christian 
faith. 

Synod circulated four hundred copies of 
the constitution, accompanied by an address 
to the public in behalf of the contemplated 
seminary. Probably no copy of that his- 
toric prospectus has escaped the destroying 
agency of time. Synod also decided that, 
for the present, it would locate the school 
at Maryville, leaving it to some future syn- 
od to establish it permanently wherever the 
best interests of the institution might re- 
quire. Synod also appointed a c omm ittee 
empowered to make application to the State 
Legislature fo^r a charter for the Southern 
AKD Western Theological Seminary^ as 
they called their creation. 

THE FIRST DIRECTORS. 

In the roll of the thirty-six worthies that 
constituted the first directorate Avere James 
Gallaher, the redoubtable revivalist and au- 
thor of "The Western Sketch Book" and the 
"Pilgrimage of Adam and David;" Chas. 
Coffin, D. D., them president of Greeneville 
College, and, later, of East Tennessee Col- 



lege — now the University of Tennessee; Eob- 
ert Hardin and Williaim Eagleton, seven 
years later elected professoi-s in the semi- 
nary; John McCampbell, brother-in-law of 
Dr. Anderson and minister beloved among 
the churches; Abel Pearson, the millenarian 
author of "An Analysis of the Principles 
of the Divine Government;" Thomas H. 
Xelson, and the greater David iJ^elson, author 
of that classic of Christian apologetics, 
"The Cause and Cure of Infidelity;" Gid- 
eon Blackburn, D. D., once pastor at Mary- 
ville, then apostle to the Indians, and, la- 
ter on, founder of Blackburn University; 
I'lobert Henderson, D. D., the revered pastor 
of Hopewell Church, and author of twoi vol- 
umes of sermons; and James W. Stephen- 
son, D. D., for forty-two years a pastor in 
Maury County. Some of these directors, 
however, were ratheir hindrances than helps 
to the seminary. Dr. Blackburn and Mr. 
Hardin were respectively leaders in two of 
the three attempts made to remove the seim- 
inary from Maryville. 

ISAAC ANDERSON ELECTED PROFESSOR. 

The next act of Synod, however, was far 
more significant than were the actions al- 
ready noticed. This is the laconic record 
in the minutes of the Synod: 

"Synod proceeded (Oct. 20, 1819) to the 
election of a professor of didactic and po- 
lemic theology. Upon counting the votes it 
appeared that the Rev. Isaac Anderson was 
duly chosen." But for this action, all the 
mighty constitution and the resonant resolu- 
tions with their sounding Whe7-eases and 
Resolveds, might have died away in the 
startled air as a mere hrutum fulmen. When 
Isaac Anderson was balloted into the profes- 
sorship, there was created a Southern and 
Western Theological Seminary, even though 
there was no endowment, no buildings, no 
library, indeed, nothing except a constitu- 
tion and some resolutions. When Dr. An- 
derson gathered his five young candidates 
into a room of his own house, and began to 



MARYVILI.E COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



29 



teach tliean the lore of the gospel ministry, 
there Tvas anticipated in this mountain ham- 
let of ours that ideal institution of learn- 
ing that Garfield afterwards told of — one 
that consists merely of a slab seat with a 
student on ome end of the slab and a Mark 
Hopkins on the other end of it. 

(^Concluded next month.) 



Y. W. C. A. 

The girls of the College have sho^wn much 
interest in Y. W. C. A. work this fall. Ths 
regular devotional meetings are usually well 
attended, and the religious spirit shown is 
very encouraging. 

Some of our meetings have been especially 
helpful. The subject for October 13 was 
"God's Blessing upon Rest and Recreation." 
Mrs. Gilman, our leader, handled the subject 
skillfully. She gave tis some good sugges- 
tions on tile observance of the Sabbath as 
God's day of rest. 

Two of the meetings were led by Misses 
ISTicciun and Mitchell, taking the subjects, 
"The Xeed of Heroic SeK-denial" and "Two 
Women of High Rank and Great Oppoa-timi- 
ties, Jezebel and Esther." 

At one devotional sea-vice. Miss Yates, our 
delgate to the Southern Stixdeuts' Conference 
at Asheville, presented a very enthusiastic re- 
port of that confeirence. 

One of O'Ur most delightful services was 
conducted by Mrs. McCulloch, out under the 
trees in front of Baldwin Hall. The topic 
was "Perils of Student Life." She gave the 
girls a very practical talk that will long be 
remembered by all present. 

The Y. M. C. A. Mission Study Class has 
been united with that of the Y. M. C. A., and 
imder the leadership of Mr. F. L. Webb, is 
doing good work in the study of missions. 

The Bible Study Class, taught by Mrs. 
Cort, is one of the most interesting features 
of our Y. W. C. A. work. The course we are 
using, "The Life and Works of Jesus Accord- 
ing to ]\Iark," helps to make plain the lessons 
taught by Christ. And the leadei- brings the 



lessons home to the heart of each girl. We 
feel that much is being accomplished by this 
study. 

The week of prayer for the World's Asso- 
ciation was opened by our Y. W. C. A. Th? 
meetings held in Baldwin Hall parlor at 
11:45 each day were well attended. Much 
interest was manifested, many of the younger 
girls taking an active part. 

Altogether the work done by the Associa- 
tion this term has been, to a great degree, sat- 
isfactory. And, very much encouraged, we 
look forward to gr-eater things in the future. 
Keeping ever before us our motto, "Xot by 
might, nor by power, but by my Spirit, saith 
the Lord," we press forward in the service of 
Jesus our Lord. 



Y. M. C A. 

One of the most important branches of Y. 
M. C. A. work this year is that of Bible 
study. The results of last year's labors in 
this direction have justified special attention 
to this department this year. The courses 
are those mapped out by the International 
Committee, and are along definite lines lead- 
ing t-O' definite results. There are three of 
these classes: one in the "Harmony of the 
Gospels," led by J. S. Caldwell; one in the 
"Acts and Epistles," in charge of H. J. Bas- 
sett ; and the "Personal Workers" class, led 
by P. R. Dickie. Special references-books 
touching on the different points that come up 
in these studies have been purchased by 
the Association. 

Besides the classes refeiTed to, a Mission 
Study Class in conjimction with the Y. W. 
C. A. has been organized und^r the leadership 
of F. L. Webb. This part, of the work is be- 
ing greatly blessed ; and there are many in 
these classes who are testifying to the rare 
personal blessing, together with a clearer un- 
derstanding of the Bible in connection Avith 
historical fact, which they ai"e receiving by 
tlieir work in these studies. There are forty- 
three voting men enrolled in these classes, 
with an average attendance of thirty-three. 

The devotional meetings this fall have been 
especially encouraging, having been marked 
by a high religious tone, and the spirit of 
earnestness and sincerity: and by the first 
words of testimony for Christ by a mmiber of 
voung men. 



30 



MARYVII^IvE COIvIvEGE MONTHLY. 



Maryville College Monthly. 



Vol. IV. 



DECEMBER, 1901. 



No. 2. 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 



Editor-in-Chibf, * 
Atheniak, 

Bainonian, 
Alpha Sigma, 

THBTA EPSIiON, - 

Y. M. C. A., 
Y. W. C. A. 

Athletics, 
Alumni, - - - 
Business Manager, 
Subscription Manager, 



ELMER B. WALLER 

DENNIS W.CRAWFORD 

HELEN E. ERVIN 

FRANK E. LAGUHEAD 

EMMA E. CALDWELL 

FREDERICK F. SCHELL 

MA ME STERBINS 

- ARTHUR C.TED FORD 

JOHN W. RITCHIE 

FREDERIC L. WEBB 

JOSEPH S. CALDWELL 



Students, graduates and friends of the College are 
Invited to contribute literary articles, personals and 
Items of general Interest for publication. 
Subscription price, for eight numbers, 25 cents. 
Address all communications to 

Maryville College Monthly, 

Maryville, Tenn. 

Entered at Maryville, Tenn., aa Becoud-Ulass Mail Matter. 



^ It lias often been said t.liat "a 

Suggestion, woi'd to the wise is sufficient." 
It is even so. Likewise it may 
be observed that a single suggestion to a 
though-tf ul person or conunimity may be more 
availing in checking an evil than the resort- 
ing to force. Cea-tain it, is that in correcting 
a hurtful tendency, the best thing possible to 
do is to create a strong sentiment against it. 

There is something to which we, would di- 
rect the attention and thought, of the stu- 
dents; namely, a species of mild vandalism 
that for some time has been noticed on the 
hill. 

To develop our athletics and field sports 
to a high degree of perfection, we must have 
good grounds. To secure them, means time 
and an outlay of money. AM will agree that 
the students should co-Oipea-ate in this matter. 
Has this co-operation been given ? We cite 
a few facts, and leave yon to judge. 

At the opening of the term the Golf Club 
expended much time and considerable money 
in improvements on the links, yet scarcelv 
had the work been completed when the play- 
ers were subjected to petty annoyances; the 
holes filled, the tins destroyed, the greens 
tramped and scarred soi that recently much of 
the work had to be don© over again. 

Also the Tennis Club, after putting the 



three courts in elegant shape at no small ex- 
pense, are constantly troubled by unknovpn 
jDarties defacing the gro^unds. Although this 
may have been done thonghtlessly and with- 
out malice, yet it falls but little short of 
vandalism. 

A professor calls attention tO' another 
thing which we hopei will coine as a Siugges- 
tion toi the thonghtful. When wires — espe^ 
cially barbed wires — are strung on the cam- 
pus on football days to render it easier to ob- 
tain a voluntary collection froin the specta- 
tors, is it asking too much of the athletic so- 
ciety to. see that these wires are taken down 
before the mantle of night settles doiwn and 
finds some helpless student entangled in un- 
looked-for coils and bewailing his hurt feel- 
ings and clothes ? 

When chairs, tables, benches, etc., are bor- 
rowed and taken on the campus, is it asking 
too much of those who are soi eager to bor- 
row these articles, tO' retura them, after the 
fun, toi their accustomed places 1 

Fellow students, these are small things, it 
is true, hut they are worthy of consideration. 
May we not have the hearty co-operation of 
all in correcting these petty annoyances ? 



Op. 



The peoplei of Maryville and 
Bartlett. ^^^ vicinity showed their appre- 
ciation of Dr. Bartlett's life and 
labors by attending in large numbers the fu- 
neral services held in ISTew Providence 
Church. 

All College exercises were suspended dur- 
ing the day, and teachers and students in a 
body, after the services in the church, fol- 
low his remains to the quiet College cemetery 
where sleep many of his fo^rmer associates in 
college work. 

The union memorial service, held on Sun- 
day evening, JSTovember 3, was another mani- 
fesitation of the deep esteem in which he 
was held by the whole community. ' At this 
service a number of speeches were made set- 
ting forth the strong personality and char- 



MARYVILLE COI.LEGE MONTHLY. 



31 



acter of Dr. Bartlett, and tlie great good he 
had done for the College and the cause of 
education in East Tennessee. A co'mmittee 
•was appointed toi secure funds to erect some 
fitting movement to his memory. We trust 
that Dr. Bartlett's students will deem it a 
pleasure to contribute to this worthy ohjeot. 
Our next issue will contain an account of his 
life which is now being prepared. 



ATHLETICS. 



Let the golf delegatiou boast about the star 
playing of their little baud, still they can not 
compare with the progress and fun obtained 
by tke jolly twirlers of the tennis racquet 
since the last issue of the Monthly. The M. 
C. Tenuis Club has speut about $16 on fitr 
tings for its tliree courts. 

On Tuesday, October 29, a committee cho- 
sen by the president. Professor Oilman, 
started a tenuis tournament of five events. 
The events to be played were ladies' doubles, 
gentlemen's doubles, mixed doubles, ladies' 
singles and gentlemen's singles. Tlie two 
courts in the grove fitted up with "wire^ netting 
back-stops, were selected for the games. At 
the time this repoirt goes to the press we can 
report the winners of only the first two 
events. The finals in the ladies' doubles were 
played Friday, JSTiovember 1, by Miss Mary 
R. Sharp and Miss Lillie Wayland versus 
Miss Amanda L. Andrews and Miss Anna 
Atkinson. The event was skillfully won by 
Miss Wayland and Miss Sharp. Score, 6-2, 
6-4, 6-2. 

The two teams that AVon their way to the 
front for the finals in the gentlemen's doubles 
were Prof. J. W. Pitchie and J. M. Felknor 
versus Prof. A. P. Oilman and Otto Pflanze. 
Professor Ritchie and Felknor played a 
strong and interesting game, but Professor 
Oilman's quick net work and Pflanze's steady 
serve won the event. Score, 6-1, 2-6, 6-2. 

We have had exceptionally fine weather 
for our games so far. Monday, November 4, 



was the only day games were not played on 
account of rainy weather. 

FOOTBALL. 

A most interesting practice game was 
played Thursday, October 10. Foster and 
Brown each chose a team, and the gridiron 
was cleared for one of the neatest and pretti- 
est games witnessed, for a long time on Col- 
lege Hill. Although lx)th A^^re home teams, 
the boys played with snap and vim. Line-up 
as follows: 

FosTEE^s. Beown's. 

McReynolds C Payne 

French R. O Cochran 

Cui-tis R. T Henrv 

Cadle R. E Pendland, li. 

Henry L. Adams 

Blair L. T. Wilson 

Chandler L. E Laughead 

Houston R. H. B Foster 

Pendland, A. A. . L. H. B Hill 

BroAvn F. B ISTewman 

Kelly Q. B. . , Hackney 

BroAvn's team got the kick-off; and at 
the first run Foster's team brought the ball 
to the center of the field. During first half 
the interesting features Averre Foster's end 
runs and ]^eiA\Tnan's strong line bucks. A 
skillful end ran by Foster gave his team the 
only touch-doAvn of the first half. Houston 
made a touch-down for BroAvn's team during 
the second half; hoAvever, a fatal fumble on 
the part of Browm's team, near their goal, 
gave Foster's the ball, which Avith speedy line 
bucks secured a second touch-doAvn with goal 
kick. 

Several good plays Avere made during the 
rest of the game. Score in favor of Foster's 
team, 11-6. 

M. C. second team versus Knoxville High 
School. Professor Ritchie, manager of the 
College second team, seciired a game with 
Knoxville High School which was played 
Saturday, IvTovember 9. The game began 
aboiit 2 o'clock. Cadle, captain of the home 
team, Avon the toss-up for goal and took the 
west one. Maxwell, for Knoxville, won the 
toss for kick-off and save the ball to Marv- 



32 MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 

ville for* first kick-off. Following- was the the ball rapidly to. -within fo^^r yards of their 

line-up: goal, when time was up. 

Maeyville, Xnoxville H. S. Two luinutes. morei^ and we would have had 

Cochran C Williams another touch-down. So ended the first inter- 

-D^^i^ -L- ^ 1 iemigan scholastic game of the season. Score, 5-5. 

Keller L. T McGuire . ^ \ r t 

Penland L. E Murfey ^- ^- -^• 

Heniy K. G Condon __________ 

Taylor E. T Lloyd SOCIETIES. 

Payne R. E Brown bainonian society. 

Cadle L. H Maxwell 'J'j-^q Bainonians still maintain a lively in- 

McReynolds R. H Michaels ^^^.^^^ -^ ^^^.^ ^^^.^^ . ^^^ ^^^ members, ec- 

Kelly F. B Cooley ^ -^ 

Hackney Q. B Co^mick ^^^ ^O'^^. 

Knoxville started out with brilliant gains Two evenings of tbis month were given to 

by Ma^xwell, Michaels and Cooley in the early debates, which were well prepared, and very 

part of the game, but lost tlie ball on their entertaining. The other programs were made 

fifteen-yard linei Kelly and Taylor then "P «'f ^'^^^^^ ^''^ recitations, 
showed that their center rushes were eoing to ^'^ ^ctobei- 11, Bamonian Society met 

beastro^ngpartofthegame. Thf^ll stead- with the Theta Epsilons. A most enjoyable 

ily forged ahead to. the MaiTville go^al by Prog-^'am was given. We congTatulate the 

quick line iiishes, our boys showing good team ^hetas on their excellent work, 
work. At this point Maryville lost the ball Our Society has beg-im preparations for the 

by failure of an "ends-back" play, o.nly to mid-wint^ entertainment, and we hope to 

gain it quickly. Time was called when Mary- g^^^ ^ mtarestmg program in December, 
ville was twenty-five yards from her goal. ^he Athenian society. 

ISTio score 'T^® ^^^^ quarter of the society year ended 

The second half commenced with a long ^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^J *>f November. The o.fficers elect- 
kick-off by Knoxville. Penland advanced ^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^'^^ quarter are: President, 
the ball fifteen yards. McReynolds makes a Clinton H. Gillingham; Vice-President, Ar 
quick gain of eight yai'ds, followed by good ^^"^"^ C. Tedford, Secretary, R. H. McCaslin ; 
advances of Cadle, Taylor and Kelly. With- Censors, R. L. Houston, F. W. Gill and P. 
in twenty yards of goal Cadle made a pretty K. Dickie; editors of "The Athenian," E. M. 
run of fifteen yards, and McReynolds then Adams and E. L. Grau. 

made a neat buck of five yards, making first pecially, should be commended for their zeal- 
touch-down for Maryville in about the sixth The society has done splendid work this 

minute of the second half. ^^^'^- This is indicative that the old society 

Penland missed the goal-kick. Knoxville spirit is up, and that the members, realizing 

then kicked off and got the ball on fumble, ^^^ importance of society work, are attaching 

but forfeited fifteen yards in slowness, mth themselves more closely to and devot.ing much 

their line-up. In a quick advance by Knox- ™0'^e time to the work. Especially has this 

ville within fifteen yards of their goal, Mc- been true of the new members. The debate 

Reynolds made an especially effective tackle. ^^^ ^^en enlivened very much and made very 

At" this point Knoxville tried a quick fuU- interesting by their honest efforts. They ar-. 

back place-kick for goal and landed the pig ^ ^ commended for their good work, 
skin fairly between the goal posts. '' Another very noticeable feature of this 

Score, 5-5, and three minutes to play. Fine year's work is the more close observance of 

kick-off by Hackney. Maiyville advanced ^he rules agreed upon last year by the so- 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 33 

cieties as to the attendance of members. The The meeting was closed with prayer by 

members do not parley about paying their Miss ITancy Gardner. 

fines, but pay them in a gentlemanly way. At one of oi;r meetings the question, "How 

It has been the custom of the society thi.~ Can We Improve Our Society ?" was very 

jear to have brief character sketches of two ably discussed, and created much interest 

authors at every meeting, in addition to the among the girls. 

usual program. This is a vei-y important The papers upon the subjects, "How the 

part of the program, for it keeps fresh the Society Helps Hs" and "Trials of a College 

knowledge of the autliors and their works. Girl," presented by Misses Wright and Xo- 

Thus by the admission of this new course the ble, showed careful preparation. 

society has a truer sense of the work of a lit- Some of the good papers and recitations 

erary society. enjoyed by the society this term were given 

The increasing number of members affords by Misses Ayers, Jonnie McEeynolds, Hybar- 
a problem for considei'ation : whether the so- ger, Thomas, Adkins, Watson and Goddard. 
ciety shall again adopt the method of having Under the excellent teaching of Mrs. Gil- 
two divisioDiS or not. The active membershiy) man, we notice a marked improvement in the 
is so large that a member can participate literary work of the society, 
only once in three weeks. alpha sigma society. 

By decision of the faculty, the Athenian is The Alphas are making a proud record thi> 

the third in order of mid-winter entertain- tenn. Since the 1st of September they have 

ments. The Athenian mid-winter will occur considerably more than doiibled their active 

in January, being the first after Christmas. working force, besides adding to their honor- 

theta epsilon society. arv membership more than a score of the 

Society every Friday at 3:15 p. m. fairer sex. It will be pleasing to the mem- 

We were pleased to have Mrs. Cort and ijers that left us last year tO' learn that the 

Mrs. Tedford as visitoTs Friday, ISTovember society is being run on strictly business prin- 

8. We hopei they will come again. ciples, that the hall has been repaired, and 

We have had several interesting meetings that the society debt ^^-ill soon be liquidated, 

this fall term, one of which was an open meet- More than the usual interest is shown this 

ing. The Bainonian Society having accepted year in the literary work, and the debates 

our invitation, we had a well-filled hall. are the most prominent features of the week- 

The house was called to order by the presi- ]y programs. Here are some of the topics de- 
dent, and meeting was opened with prayer by bated this term : "Resolved, That the Tj. S. 
Miss Helen Post. After transacting the Government Should Proceed to Establish the 
business, the following program was carried Proposed Appalachian Park;" "Besolved, 
out: That College Courses Should Be Wholly 
Peading-"How Great Men Have Sho.^'n Elective ;" "Resolved, That Municipal Go. - 

Kindness to iVnimals" Annie ]\Iagill ernment Should be Xon-partisan : 'ixi- 

The Red Cross Movement. .Mame Stebbins solved. That Congress Should Enact La\\'s 

Life of Clara Barton Ada Hammontree ^o Banish from our Countrv Persons Proven 

Recitation, "Bay Billy" Gi;ace Gamble ^^ ^ Anarchists." 

My Lady's Plumes Flora Jones r\ i? -j ■ -l^ r\ ^ i -< -i ^i 

T-v 1 T5- J T J- 7 TT i J T3 , r^ . Oil ^ ridav ni2:ht, October 11, the societv 

Dead Birds on Ladiesr Hats and Bonnets . , ' 

Emma Caldwell ^^^Id their first open meeting of the term. 

rr-i- .■ ^ ic ■>■> ^- „ „r. Long beforer the opening hour it was evident 

Ihis was entirely a mercv meeting, so = . 

,1 . 1 ^ .'» Ti n \ J. , . that tlie Alpha Sis'ma Hall could not accom- 

the president merciiuliy called tor a motion ^ -, ^ ^ 

X -I- ^ inodate the audience that was 2:atherin2;, and 

tor adjournment. ' ^' 



34 



MARYVILIvE COLLEEG MONTHLY. 



the chapel doors were throiwn open to the vis- 
itors. After the invocation by Professor Gil- 
man, the presiding officer, Professor Gill 
made a very appropriate and encouraging 
talk to the society. The proigram was opened 
with an oration, "Victory in Defeat," by L. 
E. Foster. Following the oration was a comic 
joint declamation by C. C. Hale and A. A. 
Penland. The topic debated was, "Resolved, 
That the Advancement of Civil Liberty is 
More Indebted to Intellectnal Culture than 
to Force of Arms." The proposition was 
affirmed by F. E. Laughead and denied by 
E. ]Sr. Quistu The next number was a recita- 
tion hf Miss Lelia Cooper. Last came the 
"Alpha Sigma Advance," by Arthur Holtsin- 
ger. The program Avas well rendered and 
heartily applauded, and the meeting was a 
success in every respect. 

On the night, of ISTovember 1, the follow- 
ing officers were elected for the present half- 
term : President, J. F. Caldwell ; Vice-Presi- 
dent, F. H. Hope; Eecording Secretary, R. 
H. Buler ; Corresponding Secretary, E. IST. 
Quist; Censors, Brown, Wilson and Taylor. 

The Alpha. Sigma mid-winter entertain- 
ment A\all be held in the College chapel, Fri- 
day night, Januaiy • — . 



CLASS NOTES. 

JUNIOE CLASS. 

On October 13 Mrs. Crawford entei-tained 
the Junior Class, at her home on College Hill. 
Though the rain was coming doiwn in tor- 
rents, yet the Juniors were not to be disap- 
pointed. 

The evening passed away very quickly in- 
deed, and at a late hour refreshments were 
served, then the guests departed, all declar- 
ing it a very pleasant evening spent. 

Hugh Crawford was in Knoxville on busi- 
ness, October 18. 

Mr. W. L. Brown, of Philadelphia, visited 
his son, T. G. Brown, October 21. 

R. H. McCaslin was called to Madisonville 
IsTovember 5, by the death of his grandfather, 
Mr. J. Z. Magill. 




Appearance is not everything, but very impor- 
tant by way of introduction. 

Bad "first impressions" have robbed many 
worthy men of splendid opportunities. 

Maryville boys who allow us to select their 
clothes will make good " first impressions." What 
follows depends on the boy. 

Suits from $5.00 to $12.50 (without our label) 
are cheaper than you will find elsewhere. 

Suits from $10.00 to $27.50 (with our label) are 
better than you will find elsewhere. 

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LARGEST CLOTHING HOUSE 

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ALLEGHENY, PA. 

Five professors and one instructor. Finely 
sleeted library of over 30,000>olumes. Beau- 
tifully located on West Park. The course is 
thorough and scholarly, but practieal. The city 
affords numerous ojiportunities for missionary 
work. A high type of Christian life is empha- 
sized. For information apply to 

PROF. J. A. KELSO, Ph.D.. 

ALIiEOnENT, PA. 



M. C. STUDENTS 

WHILE IN KNOXVILLE 

Don't fail to include us in your calls. No 
matter whether you want anything in the 

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or not, come in and look around. We will 
always be glad to see you. 



We make a Specialty of Fine 
Repairing. Watches. Jewelry. Etc. 



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Sign of Big Clock. 



Fall and Winter Goods 

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Ready-to-Wear Garments 

UNDERWEAR 

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Only one price ; and that is reasonable. Ask for 
samples or price by mail. All orders of $5.00 or 
more, when accompanied by cash, will have the 
express, postage or freight paid. 

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402, 404, 406, 408 GAY ST., KNOXVILLE, TENN. 



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Next door to Third National Bank. KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

Mr. Win Tedford, formerly of Maryville, wHl be glad to see all his friends at the above place. 



^ ^ THE PLACE TO LOOK ^ ^ 

For best quality in everything in Furniture and House Furnishing Goods 
is the place where every article sold is guaranteed. It is extravagance — 
waste — to pay any price for poorly made furniture, that will go to pieces in 
a little while, and most of the low price furniture on the market to-day is 
that sort. The goods we sell are the cheapest in the world, when quality 
is considered. Our prices for well-made, substantial goods are very little 
higher than those quoted elsewhere for worthless stuff. If you want fur- 
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lor a lifetime. 

ALLEN, STEPHENSON & CO., KNOXVILLE, TENN. 



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The Oldest Life Insurance Company in America by Nearly 100 Years. 

Presbyterian Ministers' Fund 

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Its death rate is the lowest because the longevicy of ministers is the highest. 
It insures ministers Presbyterially governed only. It allows cash, loan, paid-up and 
extended insurance values in all its policy coutracts. It writes insurance by corres- 
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86 
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PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



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A. C. MONTGOMERY, Proprietor. 

FirstClassHorses and Buggies to Hire 

Also Corn and Hay for Sale. 

Telephone 78. MaRYVILLE, TeNN. 
Bear of Bank of Mary vUle. I'J-^iv i v , 



J. A. SUiViiVlERS, 

^ ELECTRICAL ENGINEER, ^ 

Contracts taken for Complete 

Light autl Power Plants .... 

KINOXVILLE. - - - TENNESSEE. 



Studen'ts Give Your l_auncfry 
Work to 

M. B. HUNTER, '04, 
Agent of the War Eagle Laundry 

KEST LA UM>KY I S I . A .-■ I I I-. \ N K-- ^. h.. 
WE GUARANTFE SATISFACTION. 



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Maryville, Tenn. 

LIVERY, EEEO AND SALE STABLE. 

Good Vehii-les aii<l l>rivins Ilorjtes. 
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Special Attention to Supplying Driving and 
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GEORGE & TEDFORD 

Drugs, IVIecJicines 
3ncl Chemicals . . 

Fancy and Toilet Articles, Sponges, Brushes, 
Perfumery, Etc. 

Freseriptions carefiiUv compounded with accuracy and dis- 
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OFFICE UPSTAIRS OVER (JFORGE & TEDFORD'S 
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Dealer in 

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J. F. KODGERS, 

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Bananas a Specialty. 

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Choice Fruits anywhere else, call on me. Slock always fresh 
and the best on (he market. Next block to New Providence 
Church, Maryville. 

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Vehicles, Harness, Agricultural Implements. 

FIELD SEEUS AND FIELD STUFFS. 



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MISICAL MERCHANDISE 

I CAKICV A BEAIJ'riFL'l. I.IKK OF 

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Bona. Slrln;f»i. Filtins-s. A I,ars»> AssortmeBt of 

the Latest Sheet .Viislo. 

R. R. PATTON. Pctton's Jewelry Store, Maryville. 



Translations 



Office over 

PvTTON'S JKWEl.RY STORK. 



MARYVII-LE, TENN. 



Literal, 50c. Interlinear, $1.50. 147 vols. 

Dictionaries 

German, French. Italian, Spanish, 
Latin, Greek, $2.00, and $1.0:'. 

Completely Parsed Caesar, 

Book I. Has on each page, tntetlinear 

translation, literal translation, and 
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Completely Scanned and Parsed Ae- 

■^ neid, Book I. $1.50. Ready Aitgusi,\<xx>. 

HINDS & NOBLE, Publishers^ 

^.5.6-i2-i3-i4Cooper Institute, N.Y. City. 
Sckoolbooks of all publishers at one store. 



1901-1902. 



MHRYIZILLE COLLEGE 



FOUNDED IN 1819. 



FACUI.TY. 



KEV. SAMUEL T. WILSOX, D.D., 

President, and Professor of the Knslish I.ansiiage and 
Literature and of tlie Spanisli Language. 

KEV. SAMUEL W. BOARDMAX, D.D., LL.D., 

Emeritus Professor of Mental and Moral SeieULe. 

REV. ELMER B. WALLER, A.M., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

JAMES H. M. SHERRILL, A.M., 

Professor of tbe Greeli Lnnjua^e and Literature. 

JASPER ('. BARNES, A.M. , Ph.D., 

Princiital of the Prop.-iratory Departiuent and Professor of 
the iseieiii-e and Art of Teaching. 

REV. JOHN G. NEWMAN, A.M., 
Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

FRANK M. GILL, 

Koolil;eeping and English. 

ROBERT P. WALKER, A. B., 

English Branches. 
JOHN W. RITCHIE, A.B., 

Kiolofry. 

ALBERT F. GILMAN, S. B. , A. M. , 

Chemistry and Physics. 



MISS MARGARET E. HENRY, 

English Branches. 

MLSS AMANDA LAUGH LIN ANDREWS, B.Ph., 
French and German. 

MISS HENRIETTA MILLS LORD, A.B., 

Rhetoric and English Literature. 

MISS HELEN I. MINNIS, B.L., 

Piano, Voice and Theory. 

MRS. A. F. GILMAN, 

Elocution. 

MRS. NELLIE B. COKT, A.B., 
Matron. 



MAJOR BEN CUNNINGHAM, 

Registrar. 

WILLIAM M. THOMAS, 

ilanitor. 

MRS. A. A. WILSON, 
Manager of the Co-operative Boarding Club. 

MISS H. M. KINGSBURY, 

Assistant Manager of the Co-operative Boarding Club. 



COURSES OF STUDY. 

The College offers nine groups <if studies 
eading to the degree of A.B. , and also a Teach' 
er's Course. The curriculum embraces the various 
branches of Science, Language, Literature, His- 
tory and Philosophy usually embraced in such 
courses in the leading colleges in the country. 

SPECIAL ADVANTAGES- 

The location is very liealthful. The community 
is noted for its high morality. Seven churches. 
No saloons in Blount county. Six large college 
buildings, bes des the Piesident's house and two 
other residences. The halls heated by steam and 
lighted by electricity. A system of vratervrorks. 
Campus of 250 acres. The college under the care 
of the SYNon of Tennessee. Full corps of 
instructors. Careful .supervision. Study of the 
Sacred Scriptures. Four literary societies. Rhe- 
torical drill. The Lamar library of more than 
10,000 volumes. Text-book loan libraries. 



THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

Competent and experienced instructors give 
their entire time to this department, while a 
number of the professors of the College depart- 
ment give a portion of their time to it. 

EXPENSES. 

The endowment of $225,000 re'luces the ex- 
penses to low figures. The tuition is only $6.00 
a term or $18.00 a year. Room rent, light and 
heat bills, in Baldwin Hall (for young ladies) and 
Memorial Hall (for young men) is only $7.00 for 
the fall term, $5.00 for the winter term, and $3. 00 
for the spring term. A Co-operative Laundry has 
been established. Instrumental music at low 
rates. Board at Co-operative BoARniNG 
Club ONLY ABOUT $1.30 a Week. Young ladies 
may reduce even this cost by work in the club. 
In private families beard as from $2. 00 to -$2.50. 
Other expenses are correspondingly low. 

Total expenses, $75 OU to $125.00 a year. 

The next term opens January 2, 1902. 



For Catalogues, Circulars or Other Information, address 

MAJOR BEN CUNNINGHAM, Registrar, Maryville, Tenn. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY 



Vol. IV. 



MARYVILLE, TENN., JANUARY, J902. 



No. 3. 




OUR LATE EX-PRESIDENT. 

REV. PETER MASON BARTLETT, D.D., LL.D. 
Third President of Maryville College. 



Born, Salisbury, Conn., February 6, 1820. Graduated Williams College, 1850; 
Union Theological Seminary, 1853. President Maryville College, 1869-1889. Died, 
Maryville, Tenn., Oct. 22, 1901. 



36 



MARYVII.I.E COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



THE FOOZLERS. 

CHAP TEE I. 

Miss Kittie Gordon was a fair Co-ed. 
Though an adept at the game of love, she 
was ahnost a total f aikire at golf. When she 
donned her natty suit of Gordon plaid, and 
her tain-o'-shanter "wi' the black-cock feather 
in it," as her father referred to it, and 
shouldered her bag of formidable-appearing 
<?lubs^ she looked like one of her brave ances- 
tors prepared to go out and do valiantly in a 
clan feud. Then it was — though charming 
at eveay phase of' her little self — that pretty 
IMiss Kittie was most bewitching aud played 
the mischief with big Charlie Dowdell. 

"Tad," as he was kno^vn by everj^ one on 
the Hill — up to the Profs, over to the Co-eds, 
and down to the Freshies — was the crack 
golfer, not only of the College, but the col- 
lege town. His room was hung with ribbons, 
pennants and clubs; while several trophy 
<3ups shone from his shelves as evidence of his 
prowess. But when it came to love. Tad was 
a foozler. He just '"couldn't sit aroimd and 
chatter like you jays," was the way he ex- 
pressed his inability to do the entertaining 
at the College functions. 

I'ad h-nd had a deep sorrow come into his 
life. His mother and sister had used lachry- 
mose argument very successfully in exacting 
a promise from the old fellow when he went 
up to College that he would "nevei-, never-" 
go in for football. It neiirly broke his spirit. 
The trainer said he'd make the best center 
the team would ever have. Suasion of 
eveo-y soTt was of no avail in changing 
his position, and every man on the cam- 
pus knew that he had prevaricated when 
he said, "Too risky, boys; couldn't think 
of it." Of course, the fellows regarded 
it as a mild scandal when, out of sheer 
desperation, he went up to the golf club- 
rooms and told Haverfoi-d to put in his 
name. Dowdell endured it with a grim for- 
bearance, and, in the days and weeks that 
follo^^'ed, practiced every golfing stroke and 



shot imaginable, with such purpose that he 
became a veritable Colonel Bogey to the 
older members of the club. 

It was at the beginning of Tad's Junior 
year tliat he met Kittie. She had just ar- 
rived, and was walking up from the station 
chatting with a bevy of yormg ladies. As 
they passed b}' the chapel going up to Hough- 
ion, old Tad noticed one of the girls carry- 
ing, in addition to a very small satchel, a 
plaid caddie^bag, with a full set of clubs, and 
strapped in with them a slender, pearl-han- 
dled umbrella. 

"Say, fellorws, are you on to that? I'd bet 
she can't play golf any more than a tin sol- 
dier. By Jove though, look at her. Say, 
she's out of sight. That outfit's all the in- 
troduction I want right now. Think I'U go 
down and look at my 'party gO'Wn' and see if 
it still lits me' — for I tell you like this — I'm 
going up to the fall opening at Houghton 
Friday night.'" 

The crowd chaft'ed him till he gTew bellig- 
erent and began bowling them dovm the 
steps when they separated — Tad making a 
bluif of going to his room in Milledge. What 
he did do, though, was to make a detour of 
the cam^Kis and came up to Houghton. He 
ascended the steps and rang for the matron; 
as he had made but one call there the year 
before, the estimable lady was quite sur- 
prised to see big Dowdell looming iip in 
front of her like a good-natiu-ed giant. 

"Good evening. Miss Greenlea, so glad to 
see you. Just came in yesterday or woiild 
have called sooner. Fact is, I came over to 
inquire about a young lady, Miss Gordon, of 
Ashland, my old chum's sister, you know. He 
said she might come dovm. to Botolph this 
year — wants me to look out for liea-." (This 
was pure fiction, every word of it.) "She 
plays golf, and as I saw a young lady just 
go in with clubs, I came over to look the 
matter up." 

Tad was ap]3arently so sincere that she 
never suspected that he was faking ; and he. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



37 



expecting a diffeireaut answer, was unable to 
reeei^■e her reply with much oomposiire. 

"Oh, I am so glad, Mr. Dowdell. A Miss 
Goa-don did come in with a golf set, but I 
am not sure whether she's from Ashland or 
not. She says that she's a perfect stranger 
here. Shall I send i;p your card ?" 

Dowdell was shaky as could be; he had 
put himself in a tight place, and was get- 
ting more al^ashed each moment. He never 
anticipated such a coincidence of names. 
Should he meet her ? His card-case was in 
his hand, but his nerve oozed out at his 
finger tips. 

"Thanks, Miss Greenlea, but I guess not : 
she'll be so awfully tired. I won't have her 
to cMne down, but I'll drop in a moment Fri- 
day night." 

"Oh, do, but allow me your card. I'll 
take it up and teill her aboxit you. She'll 
be glad to think that "[perhaps, after all, she 
isn't such a stranger." 

He gave up the slip of white cardboard 
rather reluctantly, and took his leave. 

From Wednesday on till Friday the mo- 
ments fairly dragged. He was in love, and 
knew it. Her petite figure, her rogaiish 
smile, as he saw her on the walks with groups 
of girls, simply "got away with him," as he 
confided to Diimigoole. And with all his 
impatience was a heavy feeling of dread that 
ho couldn't shake. However, he faced the 
inevitable and went up in co^mpany with his 
chum. They entered the brilliantly lighted 
parlors just as the co-eds in their dainty 
dresses were coming down. Miss Greenlea 
appi'oached Avith a young lady. "Miss Gor- 
don, peiTuitme to present Mi. Dowdell — he 
thinks he knows your brother." 

"I am pleased to meet you, Mr. Dowdell, 
but really I hardly tbink I am your friend's 
sister, because I have no brother." 

Tad weakened, and was getting quite con- 
fused. 

"ix't us sit here a moment," she said, and 



they sat doAA'n in a cox.\- cjniiar where they 
were standing. 

"Aren't you from Ashland r' he said, by 
way of covering his retreat. 
"Oh, no, I live at Xewton — " 
"But you do play golf <" 
*Tn a way, yes; but I enjoy the game very 
much. I've heard a great deal about your 
playing since I came in. How I should en- 
joy watching you. I think the links you 
have here are perfectly lovf'ly." 

Her manner was so artless that he was put 
at his ease at once, and forthwith talked golf 
volubly. 

"^ow, I say," he went on, "what are you 
going to dfi lo-morrow afternoon ?" 
"iSrothing pressing — " 

"Well, then, can't you let me go over the 
course with you ? I enjoy golf more than 
anything else I know. Then I want to see 
you play. You know there are so awfully 
few ladies who play in good form — " 

She became piquant at once — "Don't say 
bad things about lady golfers, or we shall not 
get on at all. I know lots of ladies who play 
in as good form as the men, and ever so much 
more gracefully." 

Others coming up, their tete-a-tete was in- 
terrupted, and he saw her no more rmtil the 
evening was over. She came to him, and said, 
with a smile that eifectually banished sleep 
from his pillow that night : 

"Good night. Thank you so much for your 
kind invitation. I'll be ready at two, but I 
am afraid — I don't — play in such — very 
good form." 

^V'ill Tad ever forget that first game that 
he played witli Kittie I It's hardly prob- 
able. They walked over to the clubhoiise, 
where a caddie was waiting with Tad's set. 
.is they walked he made an inventory of her 
clubs and gave a rimning commentary re- 
garding the oTitfit which had met his entire 
approval. 

"Who selected your set. Miss Gordon ?" 
"Ob, yA]-\a — he's a fiiu^ ]>layer — " 



38 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



"Sliofuld tliink so — knows how to select a 
club, at any rate — what does he say about 
your playing ?" 

Miss Kitty remained silent for a momeait, 
then laughed merrily: 

"Oh, it's 90 funny. Papa says that it's 
against the etiquette of the game to talk duT> 
ing a stroke, and he always tries to imagine 
that he's Avatching a drive when he thinks 
about it." 

They were now at the first teeing-ground. 
A waitijig caddie took charge of Miss Gor- 
don's chibs. The players took their drivei-s, 
and the caddies trotted off and stationed 
themselves to watch the balls. Tad teed a 
ball. ''Take the honor. Miss Gordon." 

Slie came forward and addressed the ball, 
Tad watching in breatliless interest and evi- 
dently confusing her. She gave the club a 
couple of "waggles" and drove — the club 
fanned the air and the ball sat serenely on 
the tee. Again she addressed and drove, but 
missed the globe. A third time she tried it, 
and with like results, though a shower of fine 
clods knocked the ball a yard or so. 

"So provoking ; please call my caddie." 

She said it with a woe-begone, self-con- 
demned look that softened old Tad instantly. 
His face had been a stiidy in surprises 
through the entire performance, and his si- 
lent apostrophes would look startling if 
printed. 

The old expert's fair opponent had played 
into his heart by tbat look and tbe smile 
that she gave him when he called the caddie. 
She selected her driving cleek and bravely 
made another attack — the caddie standing 
beMnd Tad and holding his hands over his 
mouth. The preparations were made with 
great care. Swinging, she caime down on the 
ball with great force, but topi>ed it. It ric- 
ocheted a few yai'ds and stopped. 

"You've played your second shot. Mow 
I'll drive and we'll follow your ball to- 
gether." 

He glanced to-ward the flag in the dis- 



tance, rested the club a moment by the ball, 
then, lightning-like, made the swing. The 
ball glanced white in the sun, seeming poised 
in mid-air, then gracefully curved down, sail- 
ing over tiie bunker out on the putting green, 
and rolled to an easy putt. 

"The best drive I've ever made, Miss Gor- 
don ; you miist have been the inspiration." 

"It surely must be as you say, for it's not 
my playing — that wouldn't put any compet- 
itor on his qui vive." 

They played through tlie green by easy 
stages, it took so much instiiiction. Tad did 
really enjoy coaching, but each time he 
touched her hands as he showed her poiints 
it thrilled him and made his blood run faster. 
At last they passed tlie yawning bunker and 
came up near his ball. 

"I can't p'utt very well, you know, Mr. 
Dowdell— " 

"Oh, that's all right. I've seen old golf- 
ers Avho weren't good at tbat at all. I'll hole 
out and then I'll coach you." 

He took his putter, looked along the putt, 
aoid, rising slightly on his toe, played a short, 
dextrous wrist shot, and holed. 

"T^^'o!" 

By dint of coaching and tlie ball having 
made one or two circuits of the green, it final- 
ly dropped into the hole, and Miss Gordon, 
who insisted on using a card, scored eigh- 
teen. 

It will not do to say too much about that 
afternoon. Tad enjoyed it immensely, but 
knew dead certain that he had fallen into a 
difficulty, and Cupid was unconcernedly 
standing by the hazard. 

As he went into his room, chuckling over 
Kittio's father's equivocal criticism of her 
style, Drumgoole called oiiit from the couch: 
"Who wins?" 

"Dowdell, mth none up and nine to play." 

"Yes, old man," came back, "and by next 
Commencement it will be tbe same score, but 
another game, and the Asbland girl gets the 
tropliy." 



MARYVILIvE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



39 



Drum's prophecy wasn't exactly fulfilled. 
Tad certainly improved Kittie's style, but lie 
blundered along worse than ever at her other 
and more especial game. He surely needed 
a caddie; for hunting around for lost balls 
compelled him several times that spring 
to give way to properly constituted matches 
consisting of the yoimg lady and Lars Allis- 
sen — Allissen, the very thought of whom net- 
tled him. Invariably he would go to Drum 
for sympathy, though each time liis chum 
woiild gravely say: "Bad play — must pay 
penalty stro-kes." 

The pooir fellow paid his strokes, but it 
nearly killed him. It was the farewell re- 
ception at Houghton. In the morning Kit- 
tie would be gone. How he had neglected 
his golden opportiinities. He went up with 
his mind made up to tell her all, but the 
first thing that met his eyes was the object 
of his quest surrounded by a gi'OUiD of ad- 
miring fellows. She beckoned him intO' the 
circle, but he could take only a half-heai"ted 
interest in the animated conversation. So 
all that he got to say was at parting after 
the reception was over, when, extending her 
gloved hand, she had thanked him profusely 
for his coaching: 

"I am glad to have been able to do' it. 
You are coming back next fall, are you not ? 
Well, then, Ave'll renew our acquaintance, 
which I've enjoyed so much." 

CHAPTER II. 

I^ext fall came and with it Tad, brawn- 
ier than ever, bronzed by the sea breezes, 
and even more full of life. But Tad was 
just a wee bit changed. Along with the mem- 
ory of Kittie he had carried, when he left 
(JoUege that June, a theory that he'd have 
to learn her gaone. So down at the big ho- 
tel, where he had gone with the "^^mater and 
the girls," he had devoted himself with an 
elephantine grace to the girls who swarmed 
like butterflies in the pavilions. He hadn't 
improved his style very markedly, but he 
felt that he "wouldn't foozle quite so badly." 



He had only been in a day, but he felt 
as though ho must go out and play a few 
practice strokes on the l>eloved course. He 
got out his clubs, rubbed them up, and went 
over to the clubrooms to see if they were 
open. He was approaching the clubhouse 
when he met "Sandy'' McGowan, the green- 
keeper. 

"Ye're no that early, Maister Dowdell — " 

"How's that, Sandy?" 

"Weel, that Miss Gordon, the lassie wha 
cuts the greens sae bad, is no far awa V' 

Sandy's boy — Tad's caddie — ^was there, 
and Tad collared him on the spot and started 
Ava Iking briskly through the green. It was 
a new proceeding to Don. She wasn't sight- 
ed fi-om the first hole, nor yet from the sec- 
ond, but when they were approaching three, 
and Don had climbed the bimker, he spied 
her beyond, playing towards four and near- 
ing "Adullani." This was the worst hazard 
on the course. A ravine — with a precip- 
ito'us bank with a few trees groT\-ing on the 
brink, behind which a fence fo-r protection 
AVas placed. Beyond this could be seen the 
tops of tall trees growing doAvn at the bot- 
tom, Avhere, in a shade almost tvrilight, ran 
College Creek. This hollow had punished 
many a pulled drive. Scarcely any one 
thought of going doA\m there for balls, biit 
wheta. Tad caught a glimpse of that trim 
figure in the familiar plaid, he slipped a coin 
into Don's hand and said : 

"See here, if a ball goes into AduUam, 
you're to go after it. l"es, and you're not 
to show up under a half hour, see ? All 
right — see that you're on to your job." 

Tad dropped a ball on the gToimd and 
lofted it over by the hole, slipped ai'ound, 
and, paying no attention to holing, picked 
it up, stepped to the teeing-gToimd and called 
sharply : "Fore !" 

Kittie turned quickly and called in her 
musical A'oice: "Drive awav." The ball 
skimmed along low, stnick the buidier, and 
fell dead. Dowdell joined Kittie, and near- 



40 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



ly relapsed into his old-time ^xaJ& at the gen- 
uineness of her greeting, but pulled himself 
together and concentrated his attention on 
hex- stroke. "Aw, tlhat's not qiiite right. 
Turn your club — so. That's it. 'Now — " 

What a stroke! The ball spun from the 
toe of the club and away over the fence into 
Adullam. Surely Tad was "coming." 

Dowdell, to all appearances, was disgusted 
at the flight of the ball, though he compli- 
mented her on the length of the shot. 

"Here you, Don," he called, "see if you 
can't hunt up that ball." 

"Say, Miss Kittie, we may just as well 
sit over here in the shade till that caddie 
gets back; he's silower than his father, and 
right now he's got a propoisition on his hands 
if he ever finds that ball." 

"Kitt.ie," he began again- — di-opping the 
Miss for the first time since they became ac- 
quainted — "I'm a Senior this year." 

"Yes, Mr. Dowdell—" 

"Oh, don't give us that ; sav Tad — " 

"Tad—" 

"That's it; but I mean I didn't think I'd 
be a Senior before I told you something I 
want to tell you right soon. You know It 
was just about this time last year when I 
met you — '' 

Peal after peal of laughter followed this. 
Tad didn't know what to think of the pro^ 
ceeding, but joined in. Suddenly a thought 
came to him. 

"You're thinking of my interest in a hy- 
pothetical chmn's hypothetical sister. Were 
you on ? I mean, did you see through that ?" 

"Oh, who couldn't? I'll admit, though, 
the names were remarkably coincidental, but 
that mythical chiim's sister — " and she 
laughed again — "that was as transparent as 
yoiir last coaching." 

"Well, Kittie, when I saw you going up 
]iast the chapel with your clubs, and that 
umbrella in Avith them, I was simply lofted. 
Then I went around, and things began to go 
mv way — and then, I eomnienceid to foozle." 



"True, very time," Kit chimed in demure^ 
ly; "but I wonder if that caddie is com- 
ing— " 

"ISTot for fifteen minutes yet; he's all 
right; I told him not to show his shocky 
head for half an hour — well, I paid penalty 
strokes all spring half, and Allissen parading 
around Avith you like—" 

"Whose fault, sir ?" 

"Did you love that; — brassie ?" 

"The idea !" — then a silence. Tad turned 
round on the log so he could see her face. 

"Kit, I've paid all the penalty strokes I 
am going to, and I am going to quit foozling, 
and now I want you for my partnei- in a 
threesome, with the old world for our Bogey 
competitor, over the course of life — through 
the green, over tbe bunkers, and hazards and 
aJl, to the end. Will you, Kit 1" 

"Yeis, Taddie — bunkers, hazards and all." 

Up the fence they heard a scrambling, and 
a voice, "Fo^md yer ball, sir — " 

The dismissed caddie carried two bags 
back to the clubhouse, but Kit and Tad con- 
tinued to arrange their thi'eesome. 

Abe Clevengee. 



INAUGURATION OF REV. SAMUEL T. 
WILSON, D.D. 

{Concluded from last month.) 
HISTOEICAI- DATA. 

Alost unfortunately for the completeness 
of the history of Mai-jwille College, all the 
official records of the directors of ante^bel- 
limi days are lost, as are also all registers 
of the students that were in attendance. ]^o 
catalogue Avas piiblished under Dr. Ander- 
son's administration, and none of the two or 
three published imder Dr. Robinson's presi- 
dency is in the possession of th/S College. 
No list of the ante-belhmi araduatefs is in ex- 
istence. Any help that may be given in recov- 
ering the historic facts of those early days 
will be most gratefully received and util- 
ized. The principal sources of information 
are the annual reports of the directors and 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



41 



the acts of the Synod as recorded in the Syn- 
odical minutes ; bnt, luihappily, eight of 
these ajinual reports of the directors were 
merely filed, and of course were lost. Some 
of the missing reports, however, are printed 
in the Calvinistic Magazine. The speaker 
has had typ6^\T.'itten all the acts of Synod 
relating to the College froan 1819 to 1862. 
The matter copied fills one hundred sheets 
of legal cap, with an average of nearly five 
hundred words to the page. The records of 
Union Presbytery also throw some light on 
our college history. The first five chapters 
of Dr. Robinson's "Memoirs of Dr. Ander- 
son," -althoiigh far too brief, have practically 
the authority of an autobiography of our 
first president. There are also, among 
other miscellaneous material, some early his- 
torical resumes, prepared for agents of the 
College, that furnish us important informa- 
tion relative to the successes and reverses 
encountered by old Maryville. Professor 
Crawford's address, prepared with the col- 
laboration of Professor. Lamar, who knerw 
personally of many matters mentioned there- 
in, is very helf)ful. So also are some remin- 
iscences of Professor Lamar, written for 
our College publications. A few printed 
sermons of Dr. Anderson's are still pre- 
served aanong the treasures of the College 
archives. 

THE OPEKING. 

Even the date of the first opening of the 
Seminary is not altogether certain. Ac- 
cording to the constitution, the Board was 
to hold its first meeting on Jan. 1, 1820, 
and its first report was made in the follow- 
ing October. The formal opening of the in- 
stitution took place three years after the 
adoption of its constitution, for Dr. Ander- 
son was not inaugurated until Sept. 25, 
1822. In 1824, the statement is made in 
the Synodical naiTative that the Seminaiy 
had been "but two years in operation." In 
the narrative of 1827, however, it is said 
the Seminarv "was foimded in 1821." The 



fact, probably, is that Dr. Anderson had 
some pupils in his own family from 1819 
to 1822, as he had even before the earlier 
date. Dr. Blackburn's son James was liv- 
ing with Dr. Anderson and studying He- 
brew under his gnidanoe in 1818, when his 
fatal illness seized him. In the sermon 
preached at the funeral of young Blackburn, 
Dr. Anderson speaks of the exemplary life 
the young Christian had lived in his home. 

THE I^TATJGURATION. 

The inaug-uration of Dr. Anderson was 
held in the great stone church that used 
to stand on tlie i>resent site of Cokunbian 
Hall, extending even over the vei^' spot 
where now the mortal remains of Dr. An- 
derson and his wife and his son Samuel lie 
awaiting the resurrection of the just. Part 
of the stone from that historic edifice is now 
built into a wall that protects the northern 
boundary of tlie historic ISTew Providence 
cemetery. Dr. Hardin preached a sei-mon 
at the inauguration and then Dr. Anderson 
preached another — the one in which he 
traced the chart by which the past course of 
Earyville College has been decided, and by 
which, I pray God, the future course of the 
institution shall forevermore be determined : 
"Let the directors^ and managers of this sa- 
cred institution propose the glory of God 
and the advancement of that kingdom pur- 
chased by the blood of his only begotten Son^ 
as their sole objects, and they need not fear 
what man can do." Dr. McCampbell. the 
brother-in-law of the president-elect, then 
delivered to Dr. Anderson a ''solemn, ear- 
nest and affectionate" charge; but a heaven- 
ly charge had already been delivered him 
by the Spirit of the living God. 

■PEOBLEMS TO BE SOLVED. 

ITow that the Southern and Western The- 
ological Seminary was really established, 
there presented themselves to its fotmders 
some veiw knotty problems. Its veiw exist- 
ence anywhere, and especially in the region 



42 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



it was designed to serve, was to be defended, 
first against zealots of other faiths who, in 
those days of extreme sectarianism, used ev- 
ery endeavor for the overthrow of the new 
Seminary; and then against adherents of 
its own doctrine and polity who for diffei*- 
ent reasons might desire its translation to 
another place. Then, too, those general 
problems that perplex every institution, 
were especially hard to solve in those pio- 
neer days — the problems of the supply of 
students, of the supply of teachers, and of 
the supply of the funds necessary for the 
support of both students and teachers. 

SECTAEIAJN^ OPPOSITION. 

It is hard for us, accustOimed as we are to 
the broader charity and more kindly de- 
nominational comity of these later days, to 
conceive a state of mind so prejudiced as to 
be capable of so utterly misjudging the mo- 
tives that had led Christian men to estab- 
lish a school of theology. But the fact is 
that from the time the constitution and the 
prospectus were published, for about a score 
of years, the most vicious, violent, unjust 
and absurd attacks were made upon the 
Seminai-y in public prints, in pulpits, iu the 
legislature and elsewhere. The allegation 
made against the institution was that it was 
part of an infamous conspiracy to secure a 
union of church and state. The calimmia- 
tors were either too full of ignorance or of 
bigotry to know, or too crafty to acknowl- 
edge, that the common-sense plan of train- 
ing their ministers in a school especially 
adapted for the purpose had already been 
adopted by all the larger denominations of 
Christendom. The Calvinistic Magazine 
published a list of twenty or more such insti- 
tutions. By a brilliant piece of satire, in 
which he employed the argument reductio 
ad ahsurdum to perfection, Eev. James G-al- 
laher, imder the ]>en name of "Valde Timi- 
dus," utterly silenced the battery of one of 
the most obstreperous of the assailants of 
the Seminary. The article was originally 



published in the Knoxville Register, in re- 
ply to articles written over the pen name of 
"Republican," and was republished in the 
Calvinistic Magazine of 1829. It proved by 
"Republican's" ovsm line of argument that 
all the religious denominations, all profes- 
sions and many trades were conspiring 
against the civil liberties of America. But 
'■'."ill Uiovigh vanquished, they could argue 
still." For more than a score of years the 
Seminary appealed in vain tO' the legisla- 
ture for a charter. Open assault and secret 
maneuvering availed to deny their request. 
It was not imtil 1842 that the institution 
could hold property in its own name; of 
course, that fact gTeatly hindered the work 
of the agents that were sent out to solicit 
aid, as those agents repeatedly lamented in 
their reports. An absurd and uni-easonable 
provision, foisted into the chai'ter by the 
legislature, vested the appointment of direc- 
tors in the county court of Bloim.t County. 
By amendments secured, one in the same 
legislature and the other in 1845, the ap- 
pointment of directors was taken away from 
the county court and vested in the Synod of 
Tennessee. After the securing of the char- 
ter, denominational opposition tO' the insti- 
tution rather rapidly subsided. 

NO OTH.EK SYJSrOD CO-OPERATES. 

We have seen that the Synod invited other 
synods to unite with it in the support and 
management of the Southern and Western 
"Theological Seminary. iTo synod, however, 
accepted the invitation. The following year 
the S_ynod of Xorth Carolina retaliated by 
asking the Synod of Tennessee to aid in en- 
dowing a professorship m the theological 
seminary at "Princeto\\Ti." The records of 
Synod preserve the following ciu't reply: 
"Oi-dered that the Stated Clerk write for 
answer that this Synod are not prepared to 
co-operate with the Synod of IN'orth Caro- 
lina in that concern, as they are engaged 
in building up a seminary in their own 
bounds." 



MARYVIIvIvE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



43 



The directors, however, had to lament the 
fact that not even all the meanbers of the 
Synod of Tennessee were friends of the 
Seminary. On the one hand, considerations 
of local convenience or prejudice, and on 
the other, doctrinal differences arising ont 
of the troubles that in 1837 culminated in 
the division of the Presbyterian Church, 
were operative even in so small a synod as 
was that of Tennessee. 

As a result of these influences, three sev- 
eral attempts were made to remove the insti- 
tution from Maryville. The first aud sec- 
ond were made in the first decade of its his- 
tory ; and the third in the fiftieis. 

tIBST ATTEMPT TO EEMOVE THE SEMINARY. 

The first effort was on this wise: There 
v/as a stro^ng party of Presbyterians west of 
the Cumberlands who very naturally wanted 
the new Seminary to be located within 
reaching distance of their churches. In 
those days, it required more time for a West 
Teniiesseean to reach Maryville than it does 
now for a Mary\'ille man to reach the San 
Prancisco Seminary. The S_}Tiod of 1821, 
convened in JSTashville, resolved, that the per- 
manent location of the Seminary should be 
decided at a meeting of Synod that should 
be held in West Tennessee'; a committee on 
location was appointed ; and Dr. Blackburn, 
then a Middle Tennesseean, was appointed 
chairman of a committee to cornier with com- 
missioners from the Synod of Kentucky, to 
attempt to make arrangements for co'-opera- 
tion in the building up of the South em and 
Western Theological Seminary. At Knox- 
ville, the following year (1822), the commit- 
tees were not ready to repoii;, and so were 
continued. At Murfreesboro, in 1823, the 
eonunittee to meet commissioners from the 
S^Taod of Kentucky was discontinued ; while 
the committee on the pennanent location of 
the Seminary presented a report that was dis- 
cussed "for a considerable time." Governor 
Carroll was inaugurated while SjTiod was in 
session. ]\Iurfre6sboro was then the capital 



of Tennessee. Synod adjourned to attend the 
exercises, and Drs. Henderson and Blackburn 
offered the public prayers on the occasion. 
When the great debate about the location of 
the Seminary came up between Drs. Black- 
burn and Anderson, most of the legislators 
were interested spectators. The East Tennes- 
seeans were in a ho'peless minority, for only 
six of them were present, but Dr. Anderson 
adopted the iSTapoleomc strategy of "Divide 
and conquer." He had Dr. Blackburn's plan 
read and discussed seriatim, and succeeded in 
showing its impracticability in all its parts. 
The debate was terminated by the adoption 
of a resolution that the decision as to the 
permanent location of the Southern and 
Western Thelogical Seminary should be "de- 
ferred to some futurei meeting." 
The Sotjthekn axd Western Theologicax 
Seminary. 
It \\'a.s a signal victory for the pastor of 
Maryville over the formei- pastor of Mary- 
ville. The folloiwing year (1834) at Colum- 
bia the battle was ended. After "mature con- 
sideration, Svnod resolved that the Southern 
and Westem Theolog-ical Seminary be and it 
hereby is permanently located at Mai^wille 
in East Tennessee;" but it recommended to 
rlie directors of the Seminary that thev re- 
linquish their claim to the subscriptions 
taken for the Seminary in West Tennessee. 
Alabama and Mississippi. 

Xot satisfied with the result, the transcmn- 
l)orlaiideTS asked the General Assembly to cut 
them O'ff to form the Synod of Tennessee. 
This action, if taken, would have given them 
the Sonthem and Western Theological Semi- 
nary by action of our highest church court. 
But the General Assembly, influenced by the 
representations made by East Tennesseeans, 
while granting the division of the Synod, left 
the name Synod of Tennessee -with the East 
Tennessee section, and called the ne^v divi- 
sion the S^-nod of West Tennessee. In their 
chagrin, the West Tennesseeans protested to 
tlie next General Assemblv against the decis- 



44 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



ion, but the action taken was not reversed or 
modified. So tlie Soiitlieirn and Western The- 
ological Seaninaiy came imder the control of 
East Tennesseeans. 

SECOND ATTEMPT TO EEilOVE THE SEMINARY. 

The second attempt to remove tliei Seminary 
from MarjAdlle was a peculiar one. Eeiv. 
Roheirt Haxdin was, in 1827, appointed agent 
of the Seminary, but, instead of canvassing, 
he entered into agreement at Danville, Ky., 
to remove the Southern and Western Theo'- 
logical Seminary to Danville, to consolidate 
it with tJie seminary tliat the Kentucky 
people had under contemplation. Them 
he caii'ied a round robin agreement 
throaighout Virginia and East Tennessee, and 
secured evexy Presbytierian minister's sigTia- 
ture ecscopt that of Ile^w Williaim Minnis. 
Mr. Minnis was one of the first graduates of 
the Seminary; and foa- nearly forty years 
proved himself a Stonewall in defense of his 
alma mater. Others surrendered, but he never. 
Dr. Anderson was at first crashed, and, in 
tears on accoimt of the ingratitude of the 
brethren, signed the round robin ; but he soon 
regained his nerve, and, with Mr. Minnis 
and liev. John McCamphell, snatched victory 
oiit of defeat. In a letter written at this 
time. Dr. Anderson said that he had nine- 
teen reasons why he vvais unwilling that the 
Seminary should cease its existence. The 
friends of Maryville rallied, and at the- meetr 
ing of Synod a resolution was adopted offer- 
ing toi raise $10,000 endowanent if the Gen- 
eral Assembly would take the Seminai*y 
under its official care, and permanently lo- 
cate it at Maryville. But the times were too 
near the disruption of the Presbyterian 
Church for the General Assembly to take 
under its care a frontier Ilopkinsian semi- 
nary. The delay, however, and the raising 
of the $10,000 subscription ])ut a quietus on 
Mr. Hardin's plan, and its author soon af- 
terward left the bounds of the Synod. After 
three years of waiting. Synod resoh-ed not. to 
renew its request to the General Assembly. 



THIRD ATTEMPT TO REMOVE THE SEMINARY. 

The third attempt to remove the institu- 
tion from Mai'yviUe occurred in 1855-6, the 
year before Dr. Anderson died, and long af- 
ter the Seminaiy had been called "Mar^wille 
College." The institution was in an unhappy 
condition, and reports made matters out 
worse than they were in reality. At Bloiunt- 
ville, in 1855, a committee was appointed to 
report on the general subject of "the building 
up, within the bounds of Synod, of a coUege 
and theological seminary of a high order." 
A majority reiport was made oipaning the 
way for the transfer of the institution from 
Maryville to some other place. Dr. William 
Minnis, thirty years after his first "Stone^ 
wall" service, presented a brief but incisive 
report opposing the transfer, for five conclu- 
sive reasons. The majority report, however, 
prevailed by a vote of 27 to 15. The special 
coanmittee appointed failed to get. a. majorit.y 
of its raettnbers together, but half of the com- 
mittee met and transacted business. The fol- 
lowing year (1856) Synod met at Athens., 
and l>y a decisive vote of 41 to^ 26 resolved 
that "it would be incixpedient. to accept the 
proposals to found a,nother literai\y and theo- 
logical institution within our bounds." The 
special conunittee was, lio\veA^er, granted the 
};rivilege of having its statement recorded. 
One hundred and forty $250 scholarships 
were subscribed, and the local Presbyterian 
Church and lot. were offered, on condition 
that Rogersville should be the site of the new 
institution. On the next day, Sept. 27, 1856, 
Rev. T. J. Lamar was elected Professor of 
Sacred Literatiure. The next year Dr. Roh- 
inson was elected president, and seemed to 
barmonize the discordant elements in the 
Synod. Xo furt.her attem]it was made tO' re- 
m0l^'e the instit.ution from its original loca- 
tion. 

We have, however, anticipated our story. 
Let us turn again to the earlier days. 

Besides the troubles that came froin ene- 
mies without and from brethren within, there 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



45 



were the pi'oblams to which, we have already 
a<h'c.iOfl — the supply of students, of teach- 
ers, and of funds for the suppoTt of students 
and teachers. 

THE SUPPLY OF STUDENTS. 

Where were the students to come from ? 
God answered the question. Gracious and 
repeated revivals visited a number of the 
churches, and many young men in those 
churches heard the call of God summoning 
them to the work of the gospel ministry. Dr. 
Anderson soon foimd that the size of his sem- 
inary would depend only upon his ability to 
help the yoauig me/n in tlieir financial stnu^- 
gles to secure the desired education. The 
question Avas not. Whence shall they come? 
but rather. How shall they stay ? A f er\v 
came from jSTerw England and 'New York, at- 
tracted, as are fifty or morre frdm outside of 
Tennessee each year in our own days, by the 
incomparable lonvness of the expenses at 
Ma.rjwille. In 1824 three Cherokees were 
numbered among the studemtsi. And the 
young men sharpened their sickles and went 
out into the white harvest-fields. In 1825 six 
theologues were licensed to preach. By 1826 
it could be said : "Already twelve young men 
have been sent out to preach the everlasting 
gospel." Three years later (1829) the di- 
rectors report foTty-one ministers, represent- 
ing three denominations, as already at work 
among the churches. In 1833 the directors 
write that "nearly sixty have gone out to 
preach." In 1840 they say that "fourscore" 
have entared the ministry ; while four years 
later Dr. Anderson himself says that, the in- 
stitution had sent out "nearly a hundred," 
who in turn had "gathered himdi-eds and 
hundreds into the fold of the Good Shep- 
herd." There was, then, evidently no dearth 
of possible students. But who were to in- 
struct them ? 

FACULTY A?TD TEACHEES. 

For several years after the founding of the 
institution. Dr. Anderson did all the teach- 
ing that was done in the theological depart- 



ment, and was aided by the young tJieolf^ues 
in the department that was, from the first, 
inevitable, and that soon came to be called 
"The Literary Department." His biogra- 
pher says of him that in those early years he 
often worked twelve hours a day in the class- 
room, sometimes beginning before breakfast. 
And yet he was pastor of jSTew Providence 
Church, and, besides bearing all the other re- 
sponsibilities of the school, he preached on 
every alternate Sabbath, from 1819 to 1829, 
at the Second Church at Knoxville — an or- 
ganization that he himself had founded. In 
1827 New Providence Church ranked thir- 
teenth in size among the Presbyterian 
churches of the United States; its member- 
ship numbered 467, and a few years later 
reached a total of 700. Eusebia and Baker's 
Creek A\^ere then the onl_y other Presbyterian 
churches in Blount Coimty. ^o wonder that 
the strain of so much "work should have been 
almost unendurable. An amendment to the 
constitution, adopted in 1821, even before 
the inaugTiration of Dr. Anderson, provided 
that "so soon a.s the fimds should justify it, 
the directors should appoint a tutor to in- 
struct in the requisite literatm-e such poor 
and pious youth of all Cha-istian denomina- 
tions, as were seeking an education for the 
gosi>el ministry, and should be found to need 
and merit charitable aid." The Seminary 
would have utterly failed had not the college 
work been superadded to it. 

In October, 1825, the directors reported 
that Rev. William Eagleton had been elected 
instmctor in languages and sciences — a 
rather broad field to occupy — and that he had 
agreed to enter upon the woi'k at the opening 
of the ensuing term ; but it is doubtful whetli- 
er he taught that year, for the follow- 
ing year (1826) the directors made an earn- 
est appeal to S^iiod to provide an assistant 
for Dr. Anderson. "After a course of near- 
ly six years' experience, they are fully con- 
vinced that it is utterly impossible for one 
man to attend to the ai'duous and vai-ie^'ated 



46 



MARYVILIvE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



Isic'] cbities of the Seminary. It is a pres- 
sure wliicli neither the body no-r mind of any 
man can long sustain. ... It is enough to 
bring any constitution, even the most elastic 
and durable, to a premature grave." Synod 
responded by electing, on Oct. 12, 1826, the 
Eevs. Eobert Hardin and William Eagletoai 
as professors, respectively, of Ecclesiastical 
History and Church Govermnent, and of 
Sacred Literature. The stated clei'k reported 
at the next Synod that Mr. Hardin had ac- 
cepted the position. William Eagleton was 
present when elected, and presumably ac- 
cepted the position without formal notifica- 
tion. But for soime reason, only one of these 
gentlemen served during the coming year, for 
reference is made in the eighth report (1827) 
to "the two professors." ErofessoT Hardin 
was evidently sent out on the agency that 
tenniuated so unsatisfactorily to Mary^^ille 
and, ultimately, to himself. Erofessor Eagle- 
ton probably sei-ved only three years, for on 
Dee. 5, 1829, he was dismissed by Union 
Eresbyteiy to unit© with Shiloh Eresbyteay. 
In 1829 the directoors retported the appoint- 
ment of Eev. Darius Hoyt, an alumnus of 
the Seminary, to be Erofessor of Langiiages, 
and of Mr. Chas. W. Todd to be Erofessor of 
Belles Lettres and History. Ei-ofessor Hoyt 
served until his death, which occuri-ed on 
Aug. 16, 1837, eight years after his election. 
ISTothing is known relative to Erofessor Todd. 
In 1831 the directors reported the election of 
Mr. Samuel McCracken as Erofessor of 
Mathematics and Natural Ehilosophy. He 
began work on J^ov. 1, 1831. In 1832 "the 
several professors" are referred to in the re- 
port. They must have been the three — Dr. 
Anderson, and Erofessors Hoyt and Mc- 
Cracken. Erofessor McCracken, after one 
yeai-'s sei-vice, resig-ned in October, 1832, 
because he had been called to a school 
of his o^-^vn denomination. The fact that 
he \\-as of another denomination may ex- 
plain same opposition that was made in 
Svnod to his election. 



Eev. Fielding Eope was elected his suc- 
cessor in October, 1832, and began teaching 
in May, 1833. In 1836 the Eaculty con- 
sisted of Dr. Anderson, Erofessor Eope and 
Erofessor Hoyt Rev. John S. Craig was 
elected • Erofessor of Langaiages to succeed 
Erofessor Hoyt on Sept. 3, 1810. The Board 
in 1810 asked for two additional professors, 
if practicable, and insisted that they must 
have at least one more. They said that three 
professors had hithea'to done all the woirk in 
the Seminary and College. At the date of 
the charter Ur. Anderson, Mr. Eope and Mr. 
Craig com]30'Sed the Faculty. ErofessoT 
Eope served eighteen years, and resigned in 
1850 for the lack of an adequate salary. 

So much for the suppl_y — the confessedly 
inadequate supply — of instructors. Xow let 
us turn to tlie more serious problem — that of 
the supply of the funds needed for the sup- 
port of teachers and students. 

THE SUPPLY OF FUNDS. 

The Seminary began without any endow- 
ment, income, or giiarantee fund. It con- 
sisted in 1825 of an extensive constitution,, 
thii'ty-six directors, a little brown house on 
Main Street, a president who presided only 
over the thirty-five students, for there was no 
Faculty to preside over. It was an era of 
very plain living and very hig'h thinking. 
The assets of the Seminary consisted of about 
one thousand dollars collected by Mr. E. ]^. 
Sawtell, with some donations of clothing,, 
books, cash, mostly from a few churches in 
East Tennessee, though one hundred dollars- 
came from the Eresbyterian Education So^ 
ciety. But the faith of the directors was 
strong. The report for 1825, sig"ned by Chas. 
Cofiin, chaii'man, said : "Enlightened by ap- 
propi*iat© instiTiction in all the doctrines and 
duties of Christianity, and inspired with 
these views, it is hoped and believed hun- 
dreds will issue from this fountain of science 
and piety who will spread a benign and salu- 
tary influence in the community on the tem- 
poral and eternal destinies of millions of 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



47 



mankind." Six tlieologues graduated and 
"were licensed in tliat year. 

Tlie struggle for existemoe during these 
first Hew years was a desperate one. It wo-nld 
have disheaTtened a Faint Heart; but Isaac 
Anderson was a Great JSeart. He always 
struggled ont on the side away from the City 
of Destniction. He found the students wait- 
ing at his door. What shoiild he do with 
them i For the first year or two he took the 
few students there were, into his OA^^^ house, 
or made whateA^er arrangements were feasi- 
ble for them, even paying their board in pri- 
vate families. In those early years such re- 
pO'rts as these were frequent: ''Twenty-eight 
out of thirty-five were supported by charity ;" 
''tweoQty-eight out of forty had free tuition, 
auid eighteeai had free board." In 1827, 
"o'Ut of forty-five students, forty-three had 
free tuition, and twenty-seven free board." 
After the first regnlar year's work, the num- 
ber of studeoats increased so that other pro- 
vision had to be made for theiu. 

A BOAEDIiS'G-HOUSE. 

Dr. Anderson, very foolishly in the estima- 
tion of the worldly wise, but providently as 
the outcome showed, purchased a boarding- 
house in 1823-4, paying $400 for two build- 
ings and one and a half lots, and employed a 
steward to prepare the food for his charity 
students. The salary paid was $100 and the 
board of the steward and family. This was 
as purely a venture of faith as was any of 
George Mueller's enterprises. Dr. Anderson 
had great confidence in God's providence, but 
very little confidence in his own powers as a 
beggar among men. He never served as 
financial agent. Once he told Rev. Thomas 
Brown, the most successful agent that served 
the College before the days f.f Professor La- 
mar, that he would not have had the faith to 
raise $6,000 in years. Dr. Eobinson says, 
"He never asked any man for a single dol- 
lar." But he certainly did ask for cornmeal 
'and meat for his boys. He and the directors 
made many appeals for the students in the 



boarding-house. Of course, some students 
paid part or all of their modest board bill, 
but not many did so. Where the $100 and 
the food for the boarding-hou.se were to come 
froim, he did not know. But the supplies 
came, sent by the power that winged the ra- 
vens to Elijah, and wrought wonders in the 
widow's cruse of oil and bai-rel of meal. But 
the boys did not fare sumptuously every day. 
"Sometimes the students are supplied with 
the necessaries, but rarely with the comforts 
of life; and sometimes are almost destitute 
of even the necessaries of life." Some re- 
markable deliverances came at times. On 
one occasion Dr. Emmons sent $70 from same 
charitable "female societies" of Massachu- 
setts ; in another year Dr. Alexandei* McGhee 
gave 1,886 poimds of pork; different 
churches sent contributions of food and 
clothing. The Synod sometimes appropri- 
ated the small sums in its treasury to the 
boarding-house. Occasionally, the boarding- 
house closed the year in debt. In 1827 the 
entire debt of the institution was $1,005.12^. 

SUNDRY COlSrTRIBUTIOyS. 

The contributions made were few enoiigh, 
but in the course of several years presented a 
motley list of benefactions to the institution. 
The following is an unclassified, though 
verbatim, list of A'arious contributions in the 
20's : ^^ests, socks, a patent plow, clover seed, 
salt, oven and pot, linen, a cooking-stove 
from ]Srew York, iron casting's, jeans, joints 
and middlings, flour, shirting, hauling, a sur- 
toait, shoes, young ai^ple-trees, oats, pant<a- 
loons, hauling from Boat Yard, free boarding 
of students l>y various Mai'vville families, 
cassinette, mixed cloth, linsey, corn, potatoes, 
cash, pork, bacon, woolen jeans, a box of 
medicine, paper, saddle, brick work, suspend- 
ers, crockery, pillow cases, beef, cornmeal, 
buttei", sugar, coffee, wood, a writing-table, 
dried fruit — 172 bushels of it! — ^wheat, 
books, old notes, towels, quilts, blankets, 
pocket handkerchiefs, slates, shirts, sheets, 
cravats, flannel shirts, cotton sheets, linen 



48 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



sheets, collars, fullecl elotli, skeins of yaxii, 
skeins of tliread, stick twist, strip cloth, one 
bunch of spice, co'nifortables, stockings, stock- 
ing yarn, bed-tick, bolster and pillows, one 
underbed, woolen bedtick, black broiadclotb., 
a new niarseilles vest, covered bnttons, hats, 
woolen pantaloons, cotton and linen pants, 
Bibles, chest hinges, window-catches, wash- 
ing, sewing, a county right to sell a machine 
for kneading dongh, another for cnttrng' 
hemp, wheat, rye, grass, etc., six fnr hats, 
fonrteen shoulders and seven jaws, forty 
pounds of lard, yarn for jeans (contribnted 
by the women of Baker's Creek and woven 
by the women of Maryville), and finally a 
patent mill for tanning leather, "the proceeds 
of which are to be appropriated for the edu- 
cation of young men of tlie Constitutional 
Presbyterian Church, studying for the gos- 
pel ministiy." 

THE COLLEGE FARM. 

Tlie boarding-house proved verv success- 
ful, and seems to have paid for itself the first 
year. The average cost of board was about 
two dollars a month. Two yea,rs later (1826) 
an additional aid to self-support, was secured 
in the purchase of the later far-famed Col- 
lege fann, and the introduction of the man- 
ual labor feature. The $2,500 the farm cost 
was paid for in part by the 'money collected 
in the agency of Eli J^. Sawtell. Those who 
received help were required to work on the 
fann a day, or at least half a day, eveiw 
week. The ]>roducts of the fann were to 
help su]>ply the boarding-house. This inno- 
vation Avag siiccessful from the beginning. 
The work did not interfere with the scholar- 
ship of the students, but rather improved it, 
benefited their health, and still further ve- 
duced the expense of living. Among other 
things, in 1S27 the students set out a large 
orchard. Dr. Andei'son aimounced that for 
every ten dollars in cash he would board a 
student for an entire year. An incidental 
benefit of the fann is gTavely referred to by 
the directors in lanoiiap'e that should be read 



in the light of the fact that ^Mai-yville was 
then a giddy little city of perhaps fifty log 
houses and about 250 inhabitants: "Being 
fully jjea'suaded that it would greatly con- 
duce to the prosperity of the Seminary and 
the comfoai: of the insti-uctors to have the in- 
stitution a little removed from the noise and 
confusion of the town," they had planned ere 
long to remove the entire institution to the 
farm. But the two establishments were never 
merged into one, and the boys continued their 
studies amid the din and glare of the metrop- 
olis of Blount. 

HELP AND SELF-HELP. 

It is not to be wondered at that the direc- 
toa's insisted that the expenses ^vIere lower 
than at any other school on earth, when we 
learn that before the Iwarding-house was es- 
tablished, board was furnished at froini twen- 
ty-five to thirty dollars a year; and that in 
the boarding-house it was reduced to about 
two dollars a month ; and that the farm re- 
duced it still further to about fifteen dollars 
a year, and that after the improvement to 
the farm had been deducted, it was only 
about $9.09 a year, or a dollar a month. 

For about five years all went well with the 
self-helj:) arrangement. The students were 
healthy, industrious, appreciative and rea- 
sonaljly contented, though sometimes on a 
short bill of fare. What they could not earn 
or bring from home, Dr. Anderson — and 
later on the Faculty- — ^gave them or forgave 
them. Sometimes Dr. Anderson gave the stu- 
dents as much as $600 in tuition and board- 
ing. 

THE EDUCATION SOCIETY. 

Twice Dr. CoiTielius, secretary of the Pres- 
b^i:erian Education Society, visited Maiy- 
ville — there were only a few seminaries to 
visit in those days — and twice did he and Dr. 
Anderson decide that it would not be best 
for the society to give the students any cash 
help. A later secretary of the saime society, 
however, the Eev. Mr. Owen, visited ]\Iary-. 
ville in 1831, and declared that he would not 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



49 



leia.ve until Dr. Anden-son had consented to al- 
low the students to become beneficiaries of 
his society. The oiffea' of forty dollars or 
moTe a year Avas veiy tempting to the poon 
boys in their struggles and hard fare, and, 
very natiirally, they sided with the winsome 
visitor, and some of them became so enthusi- 
astic as to sav that, if Dr. Anderson did not 
yield the i>oint, they wo-uld go to some insti- 
tutiou where they could receive the proffered 
aid. Finally Dr. iVnderson yielded the podnt. 
When the students foiind themselves in pos- 
session of a goodly amoimt of cash, titey loisit 
their love for th.e farm with its work, and for 
the boarding-house with its iincertain fare, 
and preferred to ]s.e&p bacheloir's hall or to 
board in private families. Thus the hitherto 
prosperous manual labor fann and the board- 
ing-house lost their prestige and popularity, 
and finally their very existence. 

THE NEW ERA. 

At first, howerv^er, these results did not all 
appear, and it seemed as if a new era had 
dawned upon the Seminary. In 1832 it 
was announced that one day's work a week, 
together with $7.50, would pay a year's board 
bill. The general announcement was also 
made, on the anthority of the Presbyterian 
Education Society, that no one who had read 
languages frottn three to six months meed 
turn away from the institution for the lack 
of funds. The new oa'der of things was not 
so picturesque nor so heroic, but it was a 
deal more comfoa-table. All that Avas needed 
to the continued prosperity of the Seminary 
was that the barrel should never give out. In 
1834 non-profes'soirs of religion wei'e for the 
first time admitted to the boarding-hall, and 
the rate of sixteen dollars, or eight dollars 
if they did manual labor, was fixed as the 
charge for each term. In 1836 the manual 
labor feature was definitely abandoned, and 
the old boiarding department went with it. 
A modified boarding-house was, however, es- 
tablisliod, where boiard coidd be obtained, at 
first for "sixteen dollars" a session, and later 
at "tweutv dollars" a session. 



A TJiAGEDY. 

All went well for awhile longer, but in 
1839 a tragedy occurred — the barrel gave 
out! Iliere arose a man that knew not 
"Isaac." His name was Eev. B. Labaree, 
the newly appointed secretar^^ of the Presby- 
terian Education Society. The new secre- 
tary made the conditions so galling to self- 
respecting men that the relations between the 
Seminary and tlie society came to an abrupt 
termination, and the numerous young theo- 
logiies were dmujwd out of their comfortable 
pensions into penniless want. 

The coming of the Education Society had 
terminated the days of the fann, the Ixtard- 
ing-honse, and, to so>me extent, self-reliance; 
the desertion of the Education Society at the 
end of ten years — in 1839 — practically ter- 
minated for all time the theological de- 
partment of the institution. Of course, there 
■ was a struggle, but it availed only to postpone 
somewhat the evil day. Dr. Anderson was 
deeply indignant and distressed, but there 
was ]io escaping the trouble. "Shall we be 
courted to the bosom of a benevolent society, 
and then diA'ca'ced without crime, or any 
change on onr part, e\ee]>t that Ave Avere stow- 
ing in facilities for imparting instruction'?" 

VIRTUAL DEATH OF THE THEOLOGICAL 
OEPARTMEXT. 

The loss of the sincAvs of Avar nearly ended 
the Avar. A Tennessee Education Society, 
with Pr(_ifessoa- Craig as treasurer, was organ- 
ized to supply so far as possible the loss sus- 
tained, but the appeals of Synod in its behalf 
were almost in vain. Students had to be 
turned aAvay for lack of funds, and the theo- 
logical department practically collapsed. 
Some Avent to other seminaries for their theo- 
logical training. The death of the Seminaiy 
nuiy be said to liaA'e occuri"ed in 1812, which 
also ha]ipens to synchronize Avith tlie date 
when the charter of ''^larvville College,'* as 
it was now first called, Avas at last secured. 
XcA'er after 1842, e^xcept in 1848, 1849 and 
1850 — Avhen there Avere four, ten and ten 



50 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



respectively — were there more tlian two theo^ 
logical studeints, and in 1856 and 1857 there 
were none. The class educated from 1848 
to 1850 was supported by special collections. 
With the exception of the three years men- 
tioned, the Seminary practically closed its 
service in 1842, twenty-three years after its 
constitution was adopted, and just twenty 
years from the inauguration of Dr. An- 
dei'son. 

"ilAKYVILLE COLLEGE." 

From the time of the charter onward the 
institution has been called JVLieyville Col- 
lege. From that date the College could ex- 
tend comparatively little financial help to^ the 
students, and most of the students paid their 
owa way. The attendance gradvially dimin- 
ished until in 1856 it reached forty-six, the 
loAV-water ma,rk from 1828 to 1861. During 
the latter part of the period, a nimiber of 
the students came from States fa.rtlier south, 
but at no time between 1850 and 1861 did 
the entire enrollment exceed sixty-six. A 
letter in the Atlanta Constituiion of Apr. 23, 
1886, gives the names of twenty-three citi- 
zens of De Kalb County, Ga., who had re- 
ceived the wliole or a part of their education 
at Marwille. Among them were three phy- 
sicians, four ministers, two judges, and such 
men as ^laj. Campbell Wallace, Col. Alex- 
ander M. Wallace, S. ^l. Inman and S. B. 
Hoyt. 

supplies for the teaching force. 

Xow let us notice the attempts to solve 
the problem of providing supplies for the 
teaching force. At first the imique specta- 
cle was presented of a man of Pauline spirit 
teaching for no return, but, the rather, la- 
boring with his own hands to supply the 
needs of tlie students imder his care. Dr. 
Anderson did not receive any regular salary 
at all until in 1830. In 1826, $100, from 
fmids collected f(jr the Seminai'y, was ap- 
propriated to Dr. ^Vmlerson as an acknowl- 
edgment of what tliey termed his "disinter- 
ested devotedness" to the int/?irest.s of the in- 



stitution. In 1830 it was ordered that the 
interest of the professorship funds should be 
paid to Dr. Anderson. From that source in 
1834 he received $338, and in 1840, the max- 
imum amonnt of $596. Even the largeT 
amount was, as the trustees expressed it, 
"small remuneration for his arduous labors 
in the institution." 

AGENTS. 

The directors employed many agents to 
can\"abs for funds in aid of the institution. 
Some of then; did not collect enoiugh to pay 
tJieir expenses and salary. Indeed, the only 
esipeeially successful agents were Rev. E. IST. 
Sawtell and Rev. Thomas Brown. 

TWO PROFESSORSHIPS. 

There were only two even partial endow- 
ments of professoirships in ante-bellum times; 
the one that of the chair of Didactic Theol- 
ogy, and the other that of Sacred Literature. 
Rev. Thomas Brown was instriunental in se- 
curing almost the whole of both these endow- 
ments. 

lu the annual report made in October, 
1829, these glad woirds were punctuated with 
an exclamation point: "A subscription has 
I>een obtained for founding the first profes- 
sorship, of $10,680 !" The subscription-list, 
containing the names of ahnost all the old 
Presbyterian families of Union Presbytery, 
is printed in full in the Calvinistic Magazine. 
But it was hard to collect the fund, as may 
be guessed when in the Board's letter to Dr. 
Thomas Anderson, their agent in 1853, they 
say that only $200 of the entire amount sub- 
scribed had ypit been collected. The total 
fund in 1834 was $3,237; in 1837, $4,978; 
in 1838, $5,618. But in the course of the 
years the greater part of the subscription was 
ci^llected, and other funds were added to it, 
until in 1858 the entire fund amounted to 
about $7,000. Professor Lamar states in a 
manuscript sketch of the College that $8,000 
of the $10,000 was collected, and that a part 
(if the amount was appropriated to the pfur- 
chaso of the farm for the Seminary. 



MARYVILLE COIvLEGE MONTHLY. 



In lS-t3, reallv iu the clyiiii^' days of the 
theological department, a resolution was 
adopted bv SjTiod providing- for tJie raising 
of feir.jOOO to estaWisli a professoi-ship of 
Sacred Litei-ature, the payments to be made 
in annual installments during a period of 
live years. The qualifications of the professor 
to be choseoi Avere also specified, in tlie origi- 
nal resolutions redative to tlie attempt to' se- 
cure the endownnent. "The professor to fill 
the chair of Sacred Literature sliall be a man 
who has received the highest advantages of 
education offered in the United States." The 
fact that the chai'ter did not give the Synod 
the power to elect the directors, hindered the 
securing of subscriptions. But when, in 
1845, the amejidment was secured, the can- 
vass was A'igoro'usly pushed by Rev. Thomas 
Brown, and on Oct. 10, 1846, he reported 
$15,185 as subscribed. It was voted in 1846 
that the professorship should be located at 
]\Iar}'ville for eight years, and at a meeting 
held I'eb. 3, 1847, the Board of Direc- 
tors acceyited the conditioins. In 1856, "that 
it might be pennanent/' the professorship 
was located at. Mar^ndllo for ten years more. 
What was sa'^'ed. of the fund after the war, 
S}mod, in 1870, merged into the endowment 
of ]\Iaryville College. 

The eoUectioin of the amount subscribed 
was very difficult, but in 1858 the professor- 
ship amounted to about $9,500. The funds, 
when once received, were carefully adminis- 
tered. Up to 1855 only thirty-eight dollars 
of the endowment of the chair of Didactic 
Theology, and none of the Sacred Literature 
Fund, had been lost. 

Besides these two rega;la.r endowment 
funds, thei"e was contributed for about ten 
successive years, 1833-1843, to the support 
of Rev. Fielding Pope and others, what was 
called the "Temporary Professorship Fund." 
The contributoi-s and amounts contributed 
were usually as follows : Samuel Rhea, $60 ; 
Rev. James King, $30; D. IL Shields & Co., 
$10; Ptev. Fred A. Ross, ^GO ■ W. S. Mc- 
Ewen, $30; total, $190. 



TUITIOX. 

The income from tuilion was verj' small 
in the early years, and, indeed, in the very 
nature of the case, was never lai'ge. In the 
early days it was largely remitted in the case 
of the theological students. However, it 
early came to be an iuijjortant element of the 
financial support of the school. In 1835 the 
directors say, "The professors are ahuost ex- 
clusiveh' dependent upon the tuition fees for 
their support." And yet as late as 1848 
only $453 in tuition fees was collected. In 
1850 the receipts from tuition fell so low 
that Professor Pope had to resign his posi- 
tion for lack of support. 

BUILDIXCtS. 

The ante-bellum buildings were few and 
modest. Dr. Au'lerson's residence was really 
the first Seminary building. The little bro^vn 
ho'use on Main Street, situated near his resi- 
dence, was, in Jiame, the first Seminary. Two 
houses made the home of the first boarding- 
house. The far'm that was purchased boasted 
a log structure upon it. 

In 18:^9 arrangements were made for the 
erection of a new building, 45 x 26 feet, two 
stories high, so that thei-e might be sepai-ate 
buildings for the theological students and- the 
literary students, as they were then called. 
Four years later (1833) the building was 
finished ready for rise except the putting up 
of a chinuiey, and the citizens had sub- 
scrilied sixty dollars towards the chimney. 
There was paid out on the building, that 
yeiar. the sum of $623. Two years later still 
(1835 ), the directors reported that they were 
then finishing the building. It evidently was 
capable of taking on a good deal of finish. 
Very hTimble indeed was the home of the 
Southern and Western Theological Seminary. 

THE WOKK BOXE. 

One man is not so impressive a sight as 
are tv,-enty, but one man in twenty years may 
acconijilish what twenty men could do in one 
year, or even moi"e than they. A modest 
school may not attract much public atte-ntion 
or applause, but in the coirrse of the years 



5^ 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



it may effect raoa-e than do soane more am- 
bitious schools of fe-Avea- years. With the 
facilities at command, and with the hindran- 
ces to be met, snrefy the okl Southern and 
Western Theological Seminary did as worthy 
service as any institution has ever rendered. 
"Dr. Anderson lived to educate 120 yonng 
meai for the ministi-y," says Professor La- 
mar. In 1840 the majority of the member- 
ship of all the preobyteries of the Synod of 
Tennessee was said to be made up of gradu- 
ates of _Alaryville; and but for the instiiic- 
tion of the Seminary, East Tennessee woiuld 
have no Synod. The graduates were also 
scattered all over the South and the West. 
At the same time, the institution, in spite of 
irs uaiv.e and fundamental purpose, educated 
many young men for law, medicine and other 
pursuits. What education Gov. Sam Honston 
had, he secured under Dr. Anderson. In the 
preamble of the charter (1842) it is stated 
that the institution had sent forth "sevei'al 
hundred alumni, many of whom are now the 
ornauients of the different learned profes- 
sions, and some of them membei's of the Na- 
tional aiid State Legislatures." 
co:N'CLrsio^". 
God never forgets faithfulness. lie builds 
an everlasting' monument to it. In Xew 
Providence Cemetery sleep the honored An- 
derson and Hoyt of the earlier days, while 
in the College woods rest the honored Lamar 
and Bartlett and Crawioa-d of the later days^ 
All of these professors, except Mr. Hoyt. 
have their monument of stone with Avhich 
friends have marked their resting-place. But 
crowning yonder hill is an institution that 
is an eudnring and sublime monimient that 
God has reared to their faithfulness, and to 
the faithfulness of their colleagues. The en- 
dowment itself that sustains the school, and 
the buildings that shelter it — not merely An- 
dei'son Hall, the Lamar Library and Bartlett 
Hall thai bear the names of some of them, 
but [Memorial Hall and Baldwin Hall and all 
the structures, whatever r.anies thev bear — 



declare that God is not unmindful of their 
labor of love, and that he has ordained it 
that their works shall follow them, l^o col- 
lege is made in a day ; and richly endowed 
indeed is that mstitntion that has behind its 
present and future eighty full years of un- 
sullied record of accomplished service for 
God and man I Encouraged by that past 
and by the benedictions of our God, we lift 
ho]:*ei'ul faces toward the future. The grave 
responsibilities of life seem to be rendeired 
even more A\'eighty and sobering when they 
are passed on to ns l")y men who bore those 
responsibilities so nobly that they ]>leased the 
Kino' in his olorv. 



IN MEMORIAM. 

Wednesday, October 23, was a sad day at 
tlie College. All work was suspended. The 
flag on the tower was dropped back at half- 
nmst. Xot a bell was heard. The Hill was 
in moairning ; the College was showing re- 
spect to the memory of Dr. Bartlett, who 
through so many years was intimately con- 
nected with the College. The death of this 
good man bronght sorrow into the joy of the 
inaugural of the new ]3resident. As Rev. 
Samuel Tyndale Wilson, I). D.. was being 
inducted into liis office as the fifth president 
cf tlie .Maryville College, Rev. Peter Mason 
Bartlett, D. 1)., LL. D., the third president, 
was entei-ing into a service vastly higher. 

The funeral ser'^'ices were held in I^ew 
Providence Church Wednesday afte-moon, at 
2 :80 o'clock. At 2 o'clock the students 
foruu'd in cdumn at Anderson Hall, and 
inarched to the church, where the entire east 
side was reseiwed for them. The services 
were conducted by Dr. McCulloch, pastor of 
the church of Avhich lie was an attendant for 
so many years ; Rev. J. G. XoAAmian, a stu- 
dent and graduate of the College diiring the 
presidency of Dr. Bartlett and now a profes- 
sor; and Rev. L. B. Tedford, of Panhala, 
India, a gTaduate also under the same ad- 
ministration. Thev were assisted bv Rev. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



53 



J. J. Eobinette, pastor of the M. E. Church 
ISTorth at ]\Iarvville, and Presiding Elder 
Ruble, of the same denomination, both old 
and valued friends of the deceased. These 
all spoke of his stalwart Christian charact^er 
and virtnes, his learning, his mighty influ- 
ence and the service he rendered to Mary- 
ville College, which must ever remain his 
most enduring niemoa-ial ; but none, referred 
so toucliinglv as did Professor Xe^^^nan to 
his tenderness, his sympathetic nature, the 
consolation he was wont to give to those in 
affliction and bereiavement, the kindness to 
all to whom he could do good, and his love 
for young people, especially children. All 
must remember the interest he took in the 
spiritual welfare of the students. He was 
always present at the College revivals and 
worked ■^^'ith his fellow ministers in bring- 
ing the gospel to the unsaved. 

Dr. Bartlett loved flowers, and in death as 
in life he was surrounded by them. The 
students and teachers of the College sent a 
beautiful floral piece as a tribute of respect 
to their late ex-president. 

According to his request, he was laid to 
rest in the College cemetery, near to the 
graves of his associates. Professor Bartlett — 
his brother — Professor Lamar and Profesr 
sor Crawford. It was sunset when the con- 
course of sorrowing friends turned from the 
little plot of sacred ground down by the old 
woods, and the brilliant hues of the sky 
seemed to speak of the beauties of the city 
beyond, now the home of our old friend. 

The Synod of Tennessee, which was in ses- 
sion at Dandridge, telegTaphed its m^essage 
of sympathy and condolence. 

The Senior Class met Thursday, October 
24, and ]>assed the following resolutions : 

"Whereas, Almighty God hath called his 
seiwant. Rev. Peter INIason Bartlett, D. D., 
and hath taken him unto himself aftea- a life 
of usefulness, in fullness of years, "as a 
shock of com fully ripe coimeth to his sea- 
son;" and 

Whereas, The Ptev. Peter Mason Bart- 



lett, D. U., was for many years president of 
Maiyville College, and to him more than any 
other man, as a result of his wi.se solution 
of tlie difficult problems presented at the re- 
oj)ening of the College at the close of the 
war, is due her material prosperity and her 
prestige amoing educational institutions of 
the South ; and 

Whereas^ He, by his philanthropy during 
the years of his presidency, assisted so many 
needy yoimg men and women in their strug- 
gles for an education; and 

Whereas, We all loved him for his friend- 
ship, in addition to his valuable service to 
our alma mater, which were to him labors of 
love; 

Therefore, Be it resolved by the Senior 
Class of -Maryville College that we thus ex- 
press O'ur sincere spnpathy for the l>ereaved 
family, with the prayer that the consolation 
which was so often given by our deceased 
friend 'may now be Avitli those to whom this 
affliction has come. 

Be it resolved, that these resolutions be- 
come a part of the records of the Senior 
Class, and 

Be it further resolved, that these resolu- 
tions be published in the Coelege Mo^-th- 
LY, the Maryville Times, and that a copy be 
sent the bereaved family. 

Joe S. Caldwell, 
Frederic Lee Webb, 
Helex Ervix^ 
MAiiE Stebbixs, 
Aethttr Holtsixger. 

The words spoken by Prof. John Grant 
iS^ewman, '87, at the last service, so voice the 
tribute of res]iect that all Dr. Bartlett's 
friends have expressed, that we print it en- 
tire: 

REQtTIESCAT IX PACE. 

The peaceful end has come. Xature has 
]junctured this earthly life with a period. 
The lips, which have trembled in sympathy 
with other burdened souls, are this day closed 
in silence. The voices, accustomed to speak- 
ing comfort to others, has become uiute. The 
heart, which always beat in ready i-esponse to 
the joys or sorrows of other hearts, doubling 
their good and sharing their evil, is at last 
senseless to joy or pain or sorrow or suffer- 
ing. The soul which lived in this once 
strong house, so Avell built and so perfectly 



54 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



cared for; the sonl which looked out upon 
humanity and upon all the works of God 
with such peculiar sti*ength, and which de^ 
lighted always in His gilory; the soul which 
dwelt here among us for more than eighty 
years, has left its honse of day and has gone 
to those mansions which are eternal in the 
heaveus. Dr. Peter Mason Bartlett has 
"fallen on sleep." 

What a beautiful Scripture that is ! "He 
fell on sleep." The death of a righteoxis 
man is a peaceful sinlving to rest. It is an 
exit from the earthly home and an entrance 
into the heavenly ; and this exit is made as 
easily, as gracefully, as peacefully as is the 
de]>arture of a child to its cot at nightfall, 
when it, with lips fresh from prayer, "jSTow 
I lay me doA\'n to sleiep," has kissed its fond 
parents an affectionate good night. The 
child is gone to sleep. From such a home 
secure, as this, God would instruct us. From 
such living poetry the Almighty wonld in- 
spire and encourage us. To the great Father, 
whose hands are ever spread in gentle bene- 
diction over his children's heads, this silence, 
this eud of life which we call death, is only 
i peaceful sleep. He tells us so. And our 
friend. Dr. Bartlett, has only fallen on sleep. 
The time of av/akening Avith refreshed pow- 
ers, the coming forth to new glories, will be 
on the morrow. For as we have borne the 
image of the earthly, we shall also bear the 
image of tlie heavenly. With this hoi|>e, dear 
friends, comfort yonr hearts. 

As a specimen of physical manliood, Dr. 
Bartlett was as nearly perfect as any one I 
ever knew. His frame was as strong as iron, 
his muscles like steel. Is^ot one in a thon- 
sand of the bom sons of men live as long 
as did he, and not one in five hundred of 
those who are so abundantly blessed with 
number of years, come to the end of life so 
vigorous, so strong, so nearly perfect in every 
part of the physical, as was he. As was 
his body, so was his mind. He was always 
a man of strong intellectual powers, and 
these he retained in a wonderful manner up 
to the last. 

Thei'e are many characteristics of this man 
which are wortJiy of our attention and emu- 
lation. I wish to mention but three. 

His deep interest in the culture and moral 
development of the youth of this section of 
countrv, is one of these characteristics. 



Many a yoimg man, many a, yoim.g woman, 
in eastern Tennessee has felt the influence of 
Dr. Bartlett's friendly words of advice and 
kindly encouragement. This interest was 
felt not only while he was president of that 
college on the hill yonder — the position he 
occupied there gave this characteristic scope, 
aiid may have intensified it — but the interest 
he felt for the young people was not an as- 
sumed interest,; it was heart-deep and life- 
long. The sun to-day will hardly set on mem 
and women who have felt this power of Dr. 
Bartlett's. Those friends of his live all over 
this and other lands, who would gladly be 
here to-daj^ to speak a kindly word or to let 
fall a silent tear as a loving tribiite to tihe 
memory of him to whom they owe so much. 
The news of his decease will bring sadness tO' 
many a heart. Many men and women have 
been led into intellectual perstiits and into 
true wisdom's ways by that stro^ng hand now 
imotionless ujjon that quiet breast. He has 
actually gone out into the highways, and has 
compelled the youth of this land to come into 
a better and nobler manhood and woman- 
hood. 

Another trait which others might pass 
lightly by, but which always appealed to me, 
■was his tender regard for children. "\^Tlat 
parent whose children have come into close 
contact witJi this form now lifeless, has not 
noticed this tenderness 'I Always yonng in 
heart himself, he dearly loved the sweet buds 
of humanity. That such an affection was 
his by nature, no one who knew him will 
deny. That o-enial smile with which he 
greeted the children, his gentlu caresses, his 
loving words, were as truly characteristic of 
him as was his strong body. And scores of 
persons here present will remember that that 
love for the little spotless ones of our homes 
has often and again been shown, not only by 
touches of affection toward the children them- 
selves, but that it has foimd expi-essioai be- 
foire the throne of grace in that line so often 
iucorjiorated into his iDnblic and private pray- 
ers: "God bless the dear children, r.::d bring 
them into thy fold." 

Then, too-, when we who have come here 
to-day to pay a last tribute of respect to the 
memory of this departed friend, have our^ 
selves been passing throngh the bitterest afflic- 
tions of onr lives; though others have at 
aA-Btf Quon %>&£ 'sa tjitav japirai. uaaq saxui^ ipus 



MARYVILLK COLLEGE MONTHLY 



evei- slu-passed, in expressions of sympathy 
and love, tlie tenderness he sJiowed. Mar^'- 
ville and the church have lost in him a friend 
whose s_\anpathy in sori'ow and siiffering has 
not been surpassed in our coanmiuiity. 1, 
as one Avho has been stimulated b.y his exam- 
ple and woids of encouragement to try to 
make a stronger and bettor life ; as one who 
has felt his kindness of heart to my Oiwn 
dear children ; as one who lias felt his deep 
sympathy at a time wlieai the clouds were 
lianging low and the darkness was dense; I, 
who have tested theee qualities of Dr. Bart- 
lett, and know Avhat he has been to me in 
these ways, bless God for the good which has 
crane to me throngh his servant. We cherish 
liis memoiry ; we telieve his spirit has gone 
back to God who a-ave it ; we tenderly lay his 
bodv to rest. ''Requi-escat in pace." 



THETA EPSILON FNTFR TAINMENT. 

The annual entertainment of the Theta 
Epsilon Literary Society was held in the 
chapel of the College, Friday evening, De- 
cember 13. The young ladies of the soeietv, 
and their friends, worked faithfully in the 
afternoon, and had the au-ditorimn very ar- 
'tistieally decorated with holly and flowers 
and the society colors. 

]\rrs. A. F. Gilman was the presiding offi- 
cer, and just at eight o'clock she asked the 
audience to rise, and Prof. J. W. Ritchie 
gave tlie in^'ocation. The subject of the 
program Avas, "Old Days in Tennessee," and 
it was a program of which both the Thetas 
and their Tennessee audience may well be 
proiul. 

The literary progTam was divided into 
seven parts: ''Eloquent Days'' — Indian 
Days, Frontier Days, Patriotic Days, Lov- 
ing Days, Mountain Days and School Days. 
Lender "Eloquent Days" were two recitations 
— "Landon C. Ilaynes' Tribute," by Miss 
Ella Hybargei-; and "On the Banks of the 
Tennessee," by Lulu Goddard. Under "In- 
dian Days" was a selection, "Aborigines," 
by ^Fiss Xaney Milsaps. Miss Anna Magill 
f,p.:ke of the "Frontier Days" in an oration, 
••'A Tennes-sce Hero." ^liss Anna's hero was 



the bold frontiersman, David Crockett. Miss 
Grace Gamble's declaiination, "The Battle of 
King's Mountain," represented the patriotic 
days of the Revolution. Under "Losing 
Days" Miss Johnnie McReynolds recited 
">rajor Jones' Courtship." One of the best 
numbers on the program came under "Moun- 
tain Days" and was an oration by Miss Ada 
llannnontreo. The last number of the lit- 
erary program was "The Old-time School," 
by Miss Grace Badgett. 

While the literary ju'ogTam was well re- 
ceived, the unusual nimibers were even more 
popular. This part of the program consisted 
of instrumental and vocal solos, and selec- 
tions by the Theta Epsilon Quartette. The 
flrst musical number was a piano solo by Miss 
Carrie Bittle, and the next a selection by the 
quartette. The quartette singers were Misses 
Magill, Yates, Howard and Goddard, and 
during the evening they received several en- 
thusiastic encores. Miss Y^'ates' vocal solo 
was well received. Miss Cora Howard sang 
a solo and was heartily encored. The sec- 
ond number of instrumental music was a vio- 
lin solo by Miss Anna Goddard. Miss God- 
dard was called back for a second selection. 
The last of the ]>rogram was a selection by 
the quartette. The benediction was prc^ 
noimced by President Wilson. 

Iliis society, though the youngest society 
in the College, has had the honor foa* several 
■\-ears of presenting some of the most superior 
entertainments ever given in the College. 
The entertainment this year- has elicited for 
the 2>articipants the applause and congratu- 
lations of their competitors. 



Fredeeick II. Hope received, during the 
closing days of College, the sad intelligence 
of the death of his brother Chester at his 
home in Flat Rock, 111. The young man was 
a good Christian yoimg man, so our fellow 
student sorrows not as they "which have no 
hope." The sympatliies of the student bodv 
are with him in his affliction. 



56 



MARYVILLE COI.I.EGE MONTHLY. 



ryvil College Monthly. 



Vol. IV. 



JANUARY, 1902. 



No. 3. 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 



Editor-in -CHiEr, 
Athenian, 
Bainonian, 
Alpha Sigma, 

THKTA EPSIIiON, - 

Y.M. C. A., 
Y. W. C. A. 

Athletics, 
Alumni, - - - 

Business Manager, 
Subscription Manager, 



ELMER B. WALLER 

DENNIS W.CRAWFORD 

HELEN E. ERVIN 

FRANK E. LAGUHEAD 

EMMA. E CALDWELL 

FREDERICK F. SCHELL 

MA MB STERBINS 

- ARTHUR C.TEDFORD 

JOHN W. RITCHIE 

FREDERIC L. WEBB 

.JOSEPH S. CALDWELL 



Students, graduates and friends of the College are 
Invited to contribute literary articles, personals and 
Items of general interest for publication. 
Subscription price, for eight numberx, Sn centx. 
Address all communications lo 

Maryville College Monthly, 

Maryville, Tenn. 

Entered at Maryrille, Teun., ae Secoud-Class Mail Matter. 



An Important 
Mission. 



President Wilson expects 
to leave Maiyville about tlie 
middle of Janua,ry, and 
spend two months in traveling in the intei-est 
of tbe College. This trip is taken in ac- 
cordance with the resolution passed by the 
Board of Trustees at the May meeting. The 
expenses and wants of the College are gTow- 
ing more rapidly tlian its income, but by a 
systematic campaigTi, carried on evei-y year 
by the president, it is hoped that some of the 
most pressing needs may be supplied. The 
president will have the best mslies of the 
students and teiachea-s as he goes out upon 
this important mission. 



The MaryvHIe 
Type. 



There are two general 
t^-pes of mind : the one cre^ 
ative, the other receptive. 
These two are frequently combined in the 
same individual, but every teacheir whoi has 
turned a class froun purely receptive to pure- 
ly constructive work, has been amazed at the 
utter helplessness of some of his most intel- 
ligent students, while others, wfeo have been 
considered dullards and drones, produce re- 
sults that are no less astonishing. It is not 
that the recei}3tive student is illogical. He 
can draAv con'ect conclusions from given 
facts. But he lacks the mental inquisitive^ 



ness that gives him the stimulus and power 
to discover facts for himself. 

The mental aspect of the individual is 
largely natural. Some minds trend so strong- 
ly to the receptive or to the creative that it is 
impossible to alter their character. But 
many well-balanced minds are sufficiently 
plastic to be influenced very markedly by 
their environments, and tliis capabilit)^ of y&- 
sponding to influences gives rise to the differ- 
ent college and university types. The great 
difference in these tj^^es, from the intellec- 
tual standpoint, is in the mental viewpoint 
and not in the knowledge that has been ac- 
quired ; in the manner of attacking proiDiems 
and not in already gathered data conccTning 
these problems. 

From a similaxity of atmosphere and envi- 
ronment, many institutions must produce the 
same t^'pe. Also, every curriculum trains a 
student to a certain degree in both absorptioai 
and construction, so that types are not as dis- 
tinct as many suppose. Yet we believe a 
study of Maryville students and alimini will 
show that IMaryville (college produces the 
absorptive, rather than the constructive, type. 
We belie(\"e this is also true of other small 
schools, to a greater extent than it is of the 
larger schools. Curricula are necessaTily 
more fixed in smaller coUeg-es. Libraiw and 
laboratory" equipments are limited, and sub- 
jects are selected which can best be taught 
without these, which gives more rigidity and 
definiteness. Text-books are more closely 
folloAved, and this, again, is conducive of in- 
flexibility. Above all, each student covers a 
wider rtuige of subjects in the smaller schools, 
and this precludes the possibility of anything 
but elenientaiy work. The higher regions 
of any subject are the regions of uncertainty 
and doubt, and this the student never reach- 
es. ]\Iooted questions which do arise, can 
not be investigated for lack of time, and the 
student accepts the views of his author or his 
teacher. In reference to this, one of the 
most successful of our modeaii text-book au- 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



57 



tliO'i's says : ''Our inodGni education must 
rise above fourteen-weiek courses. A young 
mind is natiiradly inquiring, the power of ob- 
servation is good, and tlie reasoning faculties 
verj' acute, but in need of systematic train- 
ing. But tlie custom of reciting a text, often 
blindly learned and quickly forgotten,, insteiad 
of developing these faculties, so blunts them 
that most- students, by the time they have 
reached college, are no longer good observ- 
ers with inquiring minds and good reasouing 
powers. Tlieir aim in education is absorp- 
tion of knoiwledge, not training of faculties. 
This, I believe, is the most fiuidameiitaUy 
important error in our educational methods/' 

To give more training in constructive 
work, one sniall college requires each stu- 
dent t(j protluce an original thesis during his 
Senior year, as a substitute for some coui'se 
of study. These theses must be cnide, foa' 
they are first effoa-ts, but tliey compel each 
student tO' think once for bimself, and they 
give hiin a giimjise of the vigor and inde^- 
pendeaice of intellect necessary to meet un- 
known problems, and of those qualities with 
which the self-taught iman so ofteu outstrips 
his college brother. In addition to this, the 
de\'elopment of the local resources of his- 
tory, politics, sociology, biology and geology 
would be a real coiutribution to the world's 
kno^^■ledg■e. 

The trend of modern education seems to 
be away from the receptive. This is prol> 
a1>]y because our education has been special- 
ized in that direction. ]\[arvvillo is mov- 
ing in the line of progress, but the above 
plan seems to ]n'esent an additional oi>por- 
tuiiity for reaching' the desired end. 



ak 



PERSONALS AND LOCALS. 

Pj!OF. "Bob" Walker ])urclnised a 
as a Xmas gift for — himself. 

Mk. C. ]S^. ]\rAGiLL, '!»9, was a chapel vis- 
itor several times during the past month. 

Rev. Charles Marstgis' has been secured 
to teach classes in Eniilish Literature and 



take charge of the Library during the rest of 
the College year. 

Mil. J. 11. ^E^yMA^^, '00, will teach the 
classes \vhich formerly recited to 2Ir. Wal- 
ker. 

Miss Mary Sharp can-ies the honor of }^ 
ing the cliampion lady tennis-plaver of the 
Hill. 

The Xew Year's prayer-meeting was held 
in the chapel from 8 :30 to 9 :30 a. m., and 

was well attended. 

A EECEPTiox for the students was given 
by the Paculty and teachers on Friday after- 
noon at Bartlett Hall. 

Miss A^-drews has resigned her position 
as teacher of Modern Languages, and :^Hss 
Henrietta Lord will take her classes. 

A Physical Director from Butler. Pa., 
has been secured for the gymnasiimi, and he 
will enter upon his duties this month. 

A VERY pleasant party was given on Xew 
Year's eve by Dr. Wilson and his wife to 
the Faculty and teachers of the College. 

The Bainonian Society gave their mid- 
winter entertainiment on December 7, and the 
large audience enjoyed the "Scotch" evening. 

The Sophomore Class wish to thank Dr. 
and Jilrs. Wilson for the pleasant party they 
ga\-e us at their home one evening last tenn. 

There were eleven members of the Soph- 
omore Class last tenn, and we expect the 
spring term to add a few names to the list 
of "Wise Fools." 

C. H. GiLLixGHAM s]>ent the "hoUydavs"' 
at his home in Philadelphia, Pa. Before 
leaving he ga\'e his friends a spread at liis 
nxhui in Memorial. 

The announceiment of the engagement of 
^liss Amanda Andre^vs and Prof. Eobert 
Walker was made at the close of the tenn. 
All extend hearty congratulations. 

The farewell social was given the last 
Thursday night of the term, in Bartlett Hall. 
A lariie attendance of students and friends 



58 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



of tlie College made tlie occasion oue of tlie 
most pleasant receptions of the tei-m. 

B. H. BAR:yAED^ of Barnardsville, one of 
last year's fello^vs, sj>ent a few days in Mary- 
ville and vicinity holiday week. Mr. Bar- 
nard has been teaching the past fall. 

De. Baeives is another professor who has 
recently opened his home as well as his heart 
to his classes. The Psychology students were 
the recipients of a very enjoyable jiarty a 
few evenings ago, at the Doctor's beantifnl 
home on Indiana Avenne. 

Peof. E. B. Waller entea-tained his class 
in Conic Sections at his home on the Hill, 
Thursday night before examinations. The 
evening was most delightfully spent, and at 
the close, dainty refreshments wei*e sei'ved. 
The professor is a royal entertainer, and the 
thanks of the class are his. 

The Alpha Sigmas trebled their member- 
ship last tOTm, and paid off the society debt. 
This teirn the society meetings will be held 
in the society hall every Friday evening at 
G :oO. All new students are cordially invited 
to visit our meeting. President, P. E. Laug- 
head ; Vice-President, T. G. Browm ; Corre 
sponding Secretaiy, A. A. Penland ; Eecoird- 
ing Secretary, L. E. Foster; Censors, Hope, 
Caldwell and Iloltsinger. 

Rev. Iveikor Hagop BAs:MAjiA]!f, a native 
Annenian, lectured to an appreciative audi- 
ence in the College chapel ]\Ionday night, 
December 9. His subject was "Gonstantino- 



ple, Turkey and Amienia." The gentlem,an 
exhibited several Annenian and Turkish cos- 
tTunes and explained many of the customs of 
Orientals. His instnunental music was es- 
pecially good, and he also sang some Greek, 
Turkish and Annenian songs. 

A eecejntt Tuesday evening praj'er-meet- 
ing was on the subject, "Sky Pilots of the 
Xorthwest." The meeting was under the di- 
rection of the Student Volunteer Band, and 
was led by Frederic Lee Webb, '02. The 
topics presented were as follows: "Sky Pi- 
lot.; oir. Work Among the Ranchmen," by 
the leader ; "Phases of Alaskan Work," Miss 
Xoble ; "James Evan, Apostle of the iSToirth," 
Miss Andrews; "Black Pock; or. Work in 
rhe Camps," Joe. S. Caldwell, '02. The 
meeting was interesting and profitable. 

Peofessoes Eitchie and Walker have re- 
ceived appo'intments as teachers in the Phil- 
ippine service. They had filed their appli- 
cations mth the Commission just before Com- 
]n en cement last spring, and, having received 
no ])irevioius communication fro^m the Com- 
mission, their appointment came rather as a 
surprise both to them and the CoUeg-e man- 
agement. The teachers and students will be 
very sorry indeed to lose two popular and 
efficient members of the teaching force, but 
wish them the best success in tlieir work. 
Their sailing orders assign them to U. S. 
transports leaving San Francisco, Febru- 
arv 1. 



FALL TERM CALENDAR. 



SEPTEMBEE. 



2. Joe Caldwell arrives on the Hill early. 
and goes out to the Smoky ^loaintains. 

.3. Bassett puts the Registrar's joint in 
shape, and prepares to meet the invading 
army. 

4. The wheels begin to turn. 

5. Pickle and McCaslin arrive. 

fi. The receptions at Baldwin and Bart- 
letr. Tom Brown and Professoi" Waller 
make the speeches of their lives. 



9. Baldwin begins to look more cheerful 
imd homelike. After all, there are no girls 
like "oni'^n." 

13. In the afternoon, Prexy's reception ! 
Ice-cream and "things!" In the evening, 
the Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. function. Pickle 
sees visions. Later, a spread at Killwell's 
fi'om the fragments of the afternoon affair. 

14. Pickle posts a notice: "I, Ego Boan- 
erges Pickle, do hereby declare to Colleg-e 
Hill, esjjecially Baldwin Hall. that, so far 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



59 



as I know my own mind, I am a Lady's 
Man. So iieilp me, Major Ben." 

16. The "horse" went up. Pickle is seen 
musing ovea- this eindorsemeait to his thesis: 
^'ICUKAMCJ." 

20. The Village Improvement Society, in 
order to shrink and season same new and 
very green material, takes Beecher, Seraffi, 
Griffitlis and Curtis out after watermelons. 
See Appendix A. 

21. The Improvement Society holds a 
spread — ^mostly watennelons — at Schell's 
joint. 

22. The gi'een timber is considered to be 
somewhat shranken. Te laiidamus Joihn 
Crawfoird and Creed Wilson. 

28. Dickie goes in for Senior girls, also 
begins to perpetrate blank verse gems. 

OCTOBEE. 

4. Gillingham a.rrives from Pennsy with 
a dress-suit case. 

12. Junior party at Crawford's. G-raw 
initiates Gillingham" s spike^tail — so also do 
the Chi Lambdas. 

14. Schell's whiskers growing abnor- 
mally. 



parochial squiil^gun. Whiskers quit the 
business. 

1!». Baldmn Hall girls go to Look Rock. 

15. Caldwell sprays the whiskers with the 
Ditto Memorial boys. Prexy said: "Xow. 
boys, live upright lives and keep out of Fac- 
ulty meetings." — !!!!!! ! ! ! 

22. Hope comes in fi-om Illinois, bring- 
ing in a barrel of apples. F. H. is sur- 
prised at the nmnber of his friends. 

28. Hope waits each day now by Profes- 
sor Gill's door foi- — the elevator. 

30. Baldwin girls meet to decide whether 
Griffitlis is an infant industry that should 
be fostered by protection or suppressed by 
taxation. Decided 4-1 for the latter. 

31. Hallowe'en. Birthday part}' — stao- 
— for Caldwell by the Sut Lovingood Club 
at the clubrooms in Bartlett Hall. 



XOVEMBEK. 

1. Fostei- enjoys the fniits- 



-and flower?: 
-of a broken leg, and expresses thanks to 
tlie Baldwin gilds. 

2. Baldwin Reception — most delightful 
thing of tlie season. "Guanty" Rankin S'ew- 
man and Miss Ethel have "such a lovely 
time" with some taffy. See Appendix B. 




APPENDIX A. 

Regarding Beecher, Seraffl, et al., and their watermelon deal. 



6o 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 




APPENDIX B. 

On the subject of Newman's taffy. 

4. jMass-meeting of the football team to time, so they sa.j. C'lii Lambda decided 

re-form, and also resuscitate lost m.embers. that the Soi lis are moral, so they were not 

8. "The young ladies must be getting fe^'^'en a dispensation, 

tired of going out to watch the fellows play 28. Thanksgiving — moonshine ad lib. 



tennis. 

9. Baldwin decides that she isn't "so 
wear5^" 

15. College spirit and big bonfires. 

1 0. The great M. C. vs. K. H. S.'^ootball 
gams. Knoxville arrives without a brass 
hand, but with a mascot. Baldwin girls 
with, tin horns "queer" the latter. Kelly's 
boys fix the line up. 



29. Walker, Ritchie and Webb play "co^ed 
golf." 

3('. Caldwell (Killwell) goes to the C. E. 
Convention, and takes ill. 

•".1. Jal dwell, much improved, returns 
homo. 

DECEilBEK. 

6. Bainonians entertain. Sasaki insists 
on showing Miss Kingsbuiy a good time. 



20. Armstrong decides that he will — in Ritchie gets an "Andrews" brassie for a 

future — leave his dog home on Bible morn- birthday present, 
ing-s. 9. Ah, ha, McCaslin ! You will steal 

22. Sophs entertained by Prexy. A good moonshine, will you? 




APPENDIX C. 
Descriptive of Prof. Walker's Philippine School. 




appi<:ndix d. 

Advertising the latest work on the Philippines. 



•62 



MARYVIIvLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



13. Tlieta girls have their anmial mora] 
sbOiW. Griff says that he'll ''stag it." 

14. Proftssors Ritchie and Walker get 
Phib'ppine appointments as sclioolteaohers, 
at $1,200 per annum. 

16. Professor AValkei sees a vision of his 
school in the far-off isle — 'Vhere every pros- 
pect pleases and only man is vile" (see Ap- 
l>endix C), and hears himself as he gives 
English insti'uction : 

"Here, yon black chunk of midnight — this 
is a club." 

? l 

"Yes, club, driver, golf clnb." 
I I 

"Glnh, 'Andrews' clnb." 

? ? 

"That's right — 'Andrews' clnb, and don't 
jon forget it. 

19. Parewell rece]>tion. Professor Walker 
spends e^'ening at Baldwin. Schell goes to 
"Florida," believing with Brer Fox and Brer 
Kabbit that "Andrews" is a good name to 
conjure with. 

20. Professor Ritchie gets all kinds of 
sailing orders for Manila, and buys tivo 
trunks. Also announces the latest work on 
the Philippines — "The Ritchies," by Brer 
Rabbit, in two volumes, with clasps, one long 
quarto, half calf, rough edges; the other, 
small 32mo, full silk cloth, sumptuous bind- 
ing, gold edges. (See Appendix D.) 

24. And we all hung up oxir little stock- 
ings. 

25. Baldwin learns the sigiiificance of mis- 
tletoe berries. Abe. 



The Ministerial Students' Association of 
Alaryville College has done very satisfactory 
work this term. The Association holds 
its regular meeting tlie last Saturday of each 
month. The topics discussed were as fol- 
lows : September 23, "Echoes of Our Smn- 
mer Work.'' October 12, "Plans for the 
Year's Work in the Country Sunday-schools." 
Rev. Mr. Marston was present, and gave a 
report of the Sunday-schools and the need of 
three t-eachers. October 26, "]\letJiods of Per- 
sonal Work." Dr. Wilson gave us a very 
interesting talk, which was appreciated by 
all the members and visitors. December 14, 
"Am I My Brother's Keeper ?" The Asso- 
ciation consists of nine members. Several 
more will be expected next term. 




Appearance is uot everything, but very impor- 
tant by way of introduction. 

Bad "first impressions" liave robbed many 
wortliy men of splendid opportunities. 

Maryville boys wiio aHovr us to select their 
clothes will make good "first impressions." What 
follows depends ou the boy. 

Suits from $5.00 to $12.50 (without our label) 
are cheaper than you will find elsewhere. 

Suits from SIO.OO to $27.50 (with our label) are 
better than you will find elsewhere. 

KNOXVILLE'S 



LARGEST CLOTHING HOUSE 



^«> •&'«. .M*. ^l^ .M*. ^t<. ^t^ ^t<. ^J^ ^t«. ^t*. ^'«. •&'«. ^f«. ^p ^!4 



Founded by General Assembly, 1825. 

Western Theological Seminary, 

ALLEGHENY, PA, 

Five professors and one Instructor. Finely 
sleeted library of over 30,000 volumes. Beau- 
tifully located on West Park. The course is 
thorough and scholarly, but practieal. The city 
affords numerous opportunities for missionary 
work. A high type of Christian life is empha- 
sized. For information apply to 

PROF. J. A. KELSO, Ph.D., 

Al,I.,EGHENT, PA. 



.y*. .y*. ^!«- .^T*. .y*. ^c ^e. ^i^ .^;«. ^i<. -tie. ^w. :Sjfe^«i^ ^4. 



i9^^QQQQQQQQQi3asa«i««««s«s ■ p^H and^Yintcr Goods 
M. C. STUDENTS I ^^^ p'«*^« *° ''"y '^ «^ 

WHILE ,N KNOXVILLE NEWCOMER'S 

Don't fail to include us in your calls. No 
matter whether you want anything in the 

... JEWELRY LINE ... 

or not, come in and look around We will 
always be glad to see you. 



We make a Specialty of Fine 
Repairing^, Watclies, Jewelry, Etc, 



Hope Bros., 519 Gay St. 

Sign of Big Cloclt. 



The Best in 

DRESS GOODS 

Ready-to-Wear Garments 

UNDERWEAR 

ART GOODS 

MILLINERY 

SHOES 

RIBBONS 

HOSIERY 

Only one price ; and that is reasonable. Ask for 
samples or price by mail. All orders of $5.00 or 
more, when accompanied by cash, will have the 
express, postage or freight paid. 

M. M. NEWCOMER & CO., 

402, 404, 406, 408 GAY ST., KNOXVILLE, TENN. 



■^•&J'&^-&j-&^&^&J.&J.^^^^^^^Z&-l^Z^^^Z 



!:f.^-§:&&;^.^;©&;^©©^©^^^©^©^ 






S 



^ 



McTEER & COMPANY, 



CLOTHING and 
FURNISHINGS 



% 






415 GAY STREET, 

Next door to Third National Bank 



KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

Mr. Will Tedfoi-d, formerly of MaryvUle, will be glad to see all his friends at the above place. 



■^ 




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^ ^ THE PLACE TO LOOK ^ ^ 

For best quality in everything in Furniture and House Furnishing Goods 
is the place where every articfe sold is guaranteed. It is extravagance — 
•waste— to pay anv price for poorly made furniture, that will go to pieces in 
a little while^ and most of the low price furniture on the marlset to-day is 
that sort. The goods we sell are the clieapest in the world, when quality 
is considered. Our prices for well-made, substantial goods are very little 
higher th*n those quoted elsewhere for worthless stuff. If you want fur- 
niture for your home, we can supply the Iviud that will give satisfaction 
for a lifetime. 

ALLEN, STEPHENSON & CO., KNOXVILLE, ENN. 



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^^^.^^^^ ASSETS, JANUARY I, 1901, $1,225,582.71 ^j*^^^*^^ 
The Oldest Life Insurance Company in America by Nearly 100 Years. 



Fund 



Presbyterian Ministers' 

FOR LIFE INSURANCE. 

Its dealh rate is the lowest because the lougevicy of miuisters is the highest. 
It insures ministers Presbvterially governed only. It allows cash, loan, paid-up and 
extended insurance values in all its policy contracts. It writes insurance by corres- 
pondence, without the annoyance and expense of intermediate agents. Compare 
these annual premiums for $l",0U0.00 insurance with other companies' : 



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€ 
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Age. 


Ordinary 
Life. 


20 Payment. 


20 Year 
Endowment 




Age. 


Ordinary 
Life. 


20 Payment. 


20 Tear 
Endowment. 


26 
30 
35 


.$17.21 
19.21 
21.84 


$23.96 
26,09 
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$41.36 
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Don't pay from 15 to 30 per cent, more for insurance than it will cost you in the Fund. 



Send date of Birth for different Policies Issued by the Fund. 



Address PERRY S. ALLEN, Secretar), ''•''™;^;™p"«T°'' 



ELM STREET 
PRINTING WORKS 

Printing and Binding 



420-422 Elm Street, Cincinnati, O. 



THE PALACE STABLE 

A. C. MONTGOMERY, Proprietor. 

FirstClassHorses and Buggies to Hire 

Also Corn 3nd Hay for Sale. 

S^eaTJ^kotM,u-yville. MaRYVII.LE, TeNN. 

J. A. SUMiViERS, 
J' ELECTRICAL ENGINEER, J- 

Contracts taken for Complete 
Light and Power Plants .... 

TENNESSEE. 



Students Give Your l_aundry 
Work to 

M. B. HUNTER, '04, 
Agent of the War Eagle Laundry 

BEST I.ALNDHV IN KASI' I !•: \ VK^^SKK. 
i WE GUARANTFE SATISFACTION. 



KNOXVILLE. 



J. P. EDiMOINSON, 

Maryville, Tenn. 

LIVERY, EEED AND SALE STABLE. 

Oood Vehicles and Urivlng- II<irNe». 
Kates Reason :il>ie. _^r— - . 

Special Attention to Supplying Driving and 
iMountain Panics. 

GEORGE & TEDFORD 

Drugs, l^edicines 
and Chemicals . . 

Fancy and Toilet Articles, Spouges, Brushes, 
Perfumery, Etc. 

Prescriptions carefully compounded with accuracy and dis- 
patch by competent persons at all hours of the day and night. 



A. K. HARPER, 

DEPARTMENT 



STORE 



A. B. McTEEH. 



A. .Mf. GA.MBLE. 



McTEER & GAMBLE, 

PHYSICIANS. 

OFFICE UPSTAIRS OVER GEORGE & TEDFORU'S 
DRUG STORE. 



Phones: Dr. McTeer, Res., 40. 



Dr. Gamble, Kes., 62. 



W, B. LAWRENCE, 

Maryville, Tenn., 
Carries a Full and Complete 1 ine of Furni- 
ture, Picture and Frames. 

Fine Caskets and Coffins. Burial Robes, Etc. 
Piic-s ReasonabI"-. Call and Examine My Stock 



J. F KODGERS, 

IIead«|iiarter.>4 for 

FRUITS, NUTS AND CANDIES 

Bananas a Specialty. 

When you fail to lind anything you want in the line of 
Choice Fruits any wliere else, call oh me. Stock always fresh 
and the best on the market. Next block to N'ew Providence 
Church, Maryville. 



D. R. GODDARD & CO., 

Vehicles, Harness, Agricullural Implements, 

FIELD SEEDS AND FIELD STIFFS. 



C<»AI.— imperial Attention 
Given to Small Orders. 



Pbone S3. 



Phones: New IHij, Office. Old :W1, Residence 

B. F. YOING, M. D., 

Eye, Ear, Throat 
and Nose .... 

409 Wail Street, Knoxville, Tenn. 

C. PFLANZE, 

Dealer in 

ALL KI^DS OF ^ URMTURE 

AND U^DERTAKER'S QOODS, 
MARYVILLE. TENNESSEE. 

H. P. HUDDLESTON, 

DENTIST 



MISICAL MERCHA^DISE 

I CARRY A BKAl TIFri. LINE OF 

Violin«, Mandolins, Guitars, 

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MARYVILLE, TENN 



Yalemenknowand the^Vt^i' f^nr'e-^ T'nitm 
says • " The question of what in the world to 
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4-5-6-12-13-14 Cooper Institute, New York 

Schoolboots of all publishers at one store 



1901-1902. 



MHRY^ILLE COLLEGE 



FOUNDED IN 1819. 



FAOUi:.TY. 



REV. SAMUEL T. WILSON, D.D., 

President, and Professor of the English Language and 
Literature and of the Spanish Language. 

REV. SAMUEL W. BOARDMAN, D.D., LL.D. 

" Emeritus Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 
REV. ELMER B. WALLER, A.M., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

JAMES H. M. SHERRILL, A.M., 
Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 

JASPER C. BARN^ES, A.M. , Ph.D., 

Principal of the Preparatory Department and Professor of 

the Science and Art of Teaching. 

REV. JOHN G. NEWMAN, A.M., 
Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

FRANK M. GILL, 

Booklieeplng and English. 

ROBERT P. WALKER, A. B., 

English Branches. 

JOHN W. RITCHIE, A.B., 

Biology. 

ALBERT F. GILMAN, S. B. , A.M. , 

Chemistry and Physics. 



MISS MARGARET E. HENRY, 

English Branches. 

MISS AMANDA LAUGHLIN ANDREWS, B. Ph. , 

French and German. 

MISS HENRIETTA MILLS LORD, A.B., 
Rhetoric and English Literature. 

MISS HELEN I. MINNIS, B.L., 
Piano, Voice and Theory. 
MRS. A. F. GILMAN, 

Elocution. 

MRS. NELLIE B. CORT, A.B., 

Matron. 



MAJOR BEN CUNNINGHAM, 

Registrar. 

WILLIAM M. THOMAS, 

.Janitor. 

MRS. A. A. WILSON, 

Manager of the Co-operative Boarding Club. 

MISS H. M. KINGSBURY, 

Assistant Manager of the Co-operative Boarding Club. 



COURSES OF STUDY, 

The College offers nine groups of studie 
eading to the degree of A.B. , and also a Teach 
er's Course. The curriculum embraces the various 
branches of Science, Language, Literature, His- 
tory and Philosophy usually embraced in sucli 
courses in the leading colleges in the country. 

SPECIAL ADVANTAGES. 

The location is very healthful. The community 
is noted for its liigh morality. Seven churches. 
No saloons in Blount county. Six large college 
buildings, bes'des the President's house and two 
other residences. The halls heated by steam and 
lighted by electricity. A system of waterworks. 
Campus of 2.50 acres. The college under the care 
of the Synod of Tennessee. Full corps of 
instructors. Careful supervision. Study of the 
Sacred Scriptures. Four literary societies. Rhe- 
torical drill. The Lamar library of more than 
10,000 vohimes. Text-book loan libraries. 



THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

Competent and experienced instructors give 
their entire time to this department, while a 
number of the professors of the College depart- 
ment give a portion of their time to it. 

EXPENSES. 

The endowment of $225,000 reduces the ex- 
penses to low figures. The tuition is only $6. 00 
a term or $18.00 a year. Room rent, light and 
heat bills, in Baldwin Hall (for young ladies) and 
Memorial Hall (for young men) is only §7.00 for 
the fall term, $5.00 for the winter term, and $3. 00 
for the spring term. A Co-operative Laundry has 
been established. Instrumental music at low 
rates. Board at Co-operative Boarding 
Club onlt about $1.30 a Week. Young ladies 
may reduce even this cost by work in the club. 
In private families beard as from .$2.00 to $2.50. 
Other expenses are correspondingly low. 

Total expenses, $75.00 to $125.00 a year. 

The next term opens January 2, 1902. 



For Catalogues, Circulars or Other Information, address 

MAJOR BEM CUNNINGHAM, Registrar, Maryville, Tenn. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY 



Vol. IV. 



MARYVILLE, TENN., FEBRUARY, J902. 



No. 4. 



ALL FOR FAME. 

I had been Botanical Professor in \'ale 
University seventeen years at the time of 
the following story.. In the Spring- of lSi)S 
the L'niversity of Paris conducted a com- 
petitive botanical convention, in which the 
famous botanists of the world were to ex- 
hibit their most complete collections of rare 
and beautiful flowers. 

Prof. B. M. Gordonia, of Harvard, and 
I, of Yale, were the only two, American 
competitors ! Packing our collections with 
extreme care, and sailing from New York 
on March 13th, we arrived in Paris on 'the 
22nd. The convention was planned to last 
ten days. Competent judges from famous 
educational institutions were to decide on 
the merits of the dififerent collections. The 
following day was spent in arranging the 
various collections in the beautiful botan- 
ical hall that faced the wonderful Luxem- 
burg Gardens. The following ten days 
were of great interest and enthusiasm to 
the fifty or more famous botanists who 
sailed from the four quarters of the globe. 
Collections of rare beauty and nicety of 
arrangement were praised and admired bv 
the judges and privileged nobility of the 
city. Prof. Gallileo Saraphie, of the Uni- 
versity of Athens, presented a magnificent 
display of pressed flowers and leaves from 
over twenty dififerent nations. In addition 
to his pressed specimens, he had preserved 
in glass jars a most beautiful assortment of 
flowers and fruits suspended in a liquid 
clear a crystal, which showed off the natural 
colors. The judges awarded him second 
place, although my Yale collection almost 
ran him a close tie. But the honor of first 
was destined to belong to a Frenchman, 
M. Lagens-Malplaquet. Malplaquet had 
been at the head of the Natural Science de- 
partment of the University for over forty 
years. Malplaquet's collection was certain- 
ly beautiful, and of great variety and ele- 



gance ; still, in numbers Gallileo Saraphie's 
far surpassed his. However, Alalplaquet 
had spent thousands of francs in his travels, 
wending his way with native guides 
through the jungles of the Amazon, in 
searcli ot the l^raznian orchids; down in 
the heart of Africa, hiring the little forest 
dwarfs with shining beads to lead him to 
the haunts of the jungle lily (Rosa Sil- 
varum). He hafl specimens of this beauti- 
ful flower measuring thirteen inclies across 
the corolla. This botanical enthusiast was 
certainly attaining his heart's desire, of pos- 
sessing a collection in rarity second to 
none. His crowning glory, and also the 
feature that gave him the first rank, was 
the discovery in a certain remote oasis in 
the great Sahara Desert of an entirely new 
family of flowers of rare beauty, and beau- 
tiful, wax-like appearance. He had just 
returned from his African tour, and had 
named this flower "Miraculum Deserti."' 
Malplaquet had but one specimen of the 
flower, which was the admiration and won- 
der of the whole convention. Though in 
the flower onlv one color predominated 
("orange in this one), still the exquisite 
shading was of a quality never before seen. 
The beauty of the whole flower was en- 
hanced by each petal in the outer fourth of 
its length parting into beautifully shaded 
feathery ribbons, like those of a fine ostrich 
plume. 

On the closing day of the convention, ]M. 
Deloufrappet. President of the University 
of Paris, announced that the faculty would 
give a prize of 500,000 francs for the finest 
collection of two hundred rare flowers, all 
of which were to be preserved in glass jars 
of crvstal alcohol. I was sitting next to 
Malplaquet at the time and saw his face 
light up with almost a fierce triumph as he 
heard Deloufrappet's marvelous offer. He 
gave an inward chuckle, and, pulling out 
a small note-book, gazed intently at some 



64 



MARYVILIvE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



sheets of parchment he had in it. As he 
had the book open in his hand. Gahileo 
Saraphie asked him some question. The 
moment Malplaquet turned his head to 
answer, a gentle gust of wind caused two 
of the bits of parchment to flutter down at 
my feet. Suddenly a strange sense of 
curiosity took hold of me. and 1 swittly 
stooped and picked the slips up. (ilancing 
hurriedly at one of them .these words met 
my eye: "Haunt of the 'Miraculum Des- 
erti.' as reported by Mohammed Ali : Oasis 
of Insala, Tazile Plateau, 23 degrees and 
i3 minutes X. Lat., and 8 degrees and 13 
minutes E. Long." That was enough. Im- 
pelled bv some power, I thrust the slips into 
my coat pocket, just as JNIalplaquet turned 
around and returned the book to its former 
place. Here my Yankee nature surged up 
within me. ]\lalplaquet's actions during the 
whole convention had been haughtiness 
personified; and his long experience and 
fame caused hiiu to almost sneer at those 
he thought Ihs inferiors. Now, here I had 
the exact location of this new wonder, and 
the greatest variety of this flower would 
surely win the .^(»(),i)()() francs the following 
Spring. 

As it would be hard to tell when Mal- 
plaquet would start on his journey for Sa- 
hara, I made all haste to return my collec- 
tion to the Yale Museum, and buy my out- 
fit for an immediate start. iMay 1st found 
me in the great Mohammedan liarbor of 
Tripoli. ^ly outfit was as complete as 
monev could buy, my heavy glass jars of 
crvstal alcohol having come in perfect con- 
dition. Having gone to the American con- 
sul's quarters, I laid my plans before him. 
He told me the Tazile Plateau was one of 
the wildest places in all Sahara, and the 
onlv possible way of reaching it. and re- 
turning with a whole skin, was to join one 
of the large caravans that traveled from 
Tripoli far into the interior of the Sahara, 
circling from oasis to oasis almost as far 
as Timbuktu, and back again by another 
route. This special class of caravans, he 
said, make their journeys in search of lion 



and tiger skins, precious stones and ostrich 
plumes, all of which bring handsome prices 
in the European markets. 

\\'e both went to the Arabian part of the 
city owned by the caravan Sheiks, who had 
their camel stables and granaries in that 
place. The great desert caravans always 
started from this point. "The most influ- 
ential Sheik I know," said the consul, "is 
old Mohammed Ali. He doubtless stops 
at the Oasis of Insala, or will do so for a 
few more gold mohurs. It is wonderful 
what these Orientals will do for a little glit- 
tering gold." To my great delight. Mo- 
hamed was to start the next day ; but when 
I mentioned Insala, he shook his head, 
dubiously, stroking his long white beard. 
"Bv the Beard of Mohammed !" he said, 
"the lion skins of Insala are the finest in 
Africa. Bismilla ! I have known them to 
sell for eight mohurs apiece to the French 
traders. But listen, thou blue-eyed trader; 
the Mahabdur hills about Insala contain 
bandits as fierce as the very lions they trap. 
Still. Mohammed Ali has Arabs who can 
shoot as straight as the rays of the sun, and 
before whose keen spears even the Insala 
brigands have fled in days gone by. Lis- 
ten, O child of a lucky moon," and here the 
old Sheik's black eyes sparkled at thought 
of the gold that might be waiting for him. 
"Listen, O adventurer; Mohammed Ali 
knows what goal you are seeking." Here 
the old Sheik gazed upon the loads of the 
five camels I had hired to luring my outfit to 
Ali's cam]). I saw him cast a keen glance 
at the immense leathern panniers of four of 
the camels, which contained the large glass 
jars. "Ha. ha! You, like the learned 
Frenchman, are after the rare flowers of 
Insala? And how did you find out that the 
Paradise Flower existed ? B}^ the Beard of 
Allah ! I thought the white-haired stranger 
would better keep the secret which seemed 
his life's treasure. Ah. well. The desert 
ca not forever hold her secrets. Stranger, 
give me four hundred gold mohurs, and 
you shall have five camels, a tent with one 
of mv trustiest Arabs to cook the best food 



MARYVILLE COLIvEGE MONTHLY. 



65 



I can' faniish you durinj^- the whole jour- in it, tied to the ])ole. is Shah Jehan mv 

Jiey." revered donkey. He shall pick out the' cul- 

The consul scowled when he heard the prit. Now, every man of you in turn p-o 

price. "Twice too much," he muttered to into the tent, pull the donkey's tail and rc- 

.me, aside, "hut you had better accept, turn to his place. When the thief pulls the 

Ofifer him three hundred, and the extra donkey's tail, he will bray. Proceed!" 
hundred if your journey's end is gained. Every man, with troubled face, per- 

After some parley, Mohammed Ali con- formed his duty and returned. Then \li 

sented. "Be it so," he said ; "and, further, went to the beginning of the line and 

you shall taste of the hospitality of a true placed his face into each man's hands 

follower of the Prophet." Thirty men were passed, when, as he laid 

The next day we started. .Vli's caravan his face into the next man's hands, he sud- 

numbered two hundred camels, with their denly started back, and in most vehement 

drivers, and six score chosen horsemen for terms accused the man of the theft ; where- 



protection. Mohammed himself rode his 
favorite steed, a beautiful white Arabian 
donkey. The sturdy, long-eared beast had 
been dedicated to Allah as the finest speci- 
men of its race, and Ali treated it as ten- 



upo nthe wretch groveled in the dust like 
a dog, and slinking ofif, produced the bag of 
gold from a remote camel saddle. 

How had the Sheik done it? \\'hy. that 
is simple enough. Every innocent man had 



derly as a child. I paid Ali one hundred boldly pulled tlie donkey's tail, (which was 
gold mohurs as evidence of good faith, and rubbed with a fragrant oil), bnt the o-uiltv 
carried the rest of my money, five hundred child of the desert, trembling within, dared 
more of the gold pieces, some in a leather not pull the donkey's tail in fear that the 
belt which I constantly wore, and the rest inevitable bra}- would ctMidemn him to the 

ash. So he had simply gone into the tent 
and come out again. So when IMohammed 
Ali made his round, and buried his face into 
a pair of hands which did not have the 



in a bag which I kept in a grip that was 1 
always near me. 

Day after day passed, and we graduallv 
neared Insala, where I vowed to outwit the 



sneering Malplaquet and obtain the assort- peculiar smell, he at once safely accused the 
ment of the 'Aliraculum" which would gain 
me the great prize. 

One day at twilight, after a slight skir- 
mish with some robbers who had attacked 
us, just as the tents were pitched for the 



owner to be the thief. 

At last we came to the Oasis of Insala. 
and, true to his promise, Ali gave me a 
band of his sturdy armed Arabs to act as 
guard. Setting out with mv five camels 



night, on returning to my tent, I noticed m\' loaded with the jars of crystal alcohol. 



bag of money was gone from my grip. I 
inmiediatelv told the Sheik, who looked 
very grave. "At day-break, good stranger. ' 
he said, "I will do all I can to get your 
money back. Such a disgrace can never 
happen in All's caravan." 

When morning dawned and the time 
came to start. Ali suddenly summoned all 
the camel drivers, who numbered about 
fifty, to come and stand in a ring aliout the 
great heap of baggage in the center of the 
camp. "A great disgrace has come to our 
caravan. We have in our midst a black- 
liearted thief. ?^Ien, vender is my teut. and 



der the guidance of a swarthy resident of 
the oasis, we set out for the little vale where 
alone, Johansing, the guide, said, the Para- 
dise Flower bloomed. We were plodding 
on to\yards our goal, when I noticed in the 
sand the unmistakable tracks of a Euro- 
])ean shoe. I had thought I was the onlv 
foreigner within hundreds of miles. "Has 
any white man been this way of late?" 
"Yes," said Jhansing, "a white-haired 
stranger came to Insala just yesterdav. He 
had only one camel, which was loaded with 
big glass bottles, i le rode a white horse, 
and with him were two ]\Ioors c)f Algiers. 



66 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



"Thunder !" I exclaimed. "Malplaquet has 
missed his parchments, and must have 
started immediately after the convention." 
Those 500,000 francs glittered in my eyes, 
and grasping my revolvers, I told the Arabs 
to hasten on toward the longed-for vale. 

On approaching the spot, as minutely 
described by the precious parchments, I 
heard shots and fierce growls. Hastening 
forward and bursting through some thick 
underbrush, we found ourselves spectators 
of a desperate conflict between three men 
and four of those fierce desert Hons. But 
we had arrived too late to be of assistance. 
Two of the men, whom we recognized as 
Moorish soldiers, were, though fighting 
bravely with their rapiers, borne to the 
ground by three of the savage brutes. The 
third man, whom I recognized as ]Mal- 
plaquet, was defending himself valiantly 
against the fourth lion. Again and again 
did the old man's dagger taste of blood; 
but just as I was running up to help the 
Frenchman, the lion, with a determined 
spring, sank his fangs into the old man's 
throat. 

At that instant, my Arabs came up and 
dispatched the lions with their spears. On 
looking around, after all was quiet again, I 
perceived the fierce conflict had had other 
spectators, whom I was very happy to meet. 

There, peacefully nodding their beautiful 
heads in the morning zephyrs, and standing 
in a picturesque group by themselves, were 
about twenty lovely specimens of the 
"Miraculum Deserti." 

To make a long story short, I will say 
it was wonderful how these spectators 
helped me to win the Parisian prize of the 
following Spring, .\rthur c. tedford. 



CONVOLVUU >. 

"I can't imagine what's the matter with 
the child!" Convolvulus listened. It was 
Aunt Crete's thin, sweet voice. 

"Of course you can't ! There isn't any- 
thing wrong with her," came in decided 
tones from Aunt Cordie. "Don't worry 
about Convolvulus. She's just growing. 



Give her time to show of what material 
she's made." 

"But, Cordely, she's so discontented. I 
can't stand seeing her little face all puck- 
ered up. What would her father say?" 

"Well, I beheve the girl is only finding 
out that she has a conscience. That's what 
we all have to do some time. But I hate 
to see her moping around as much as you 
do, Lucretia Willecks, though, for all you 
say, you know she's the sweetest little girl 
in seven counties !" 

"Why, Cordelia ! Of course she is. If — ." 
Here Aunt Crete's mental processes were 
interrupted by the smell of burning bread. 
She ran to the kitchen and jerked her sec- 
ond panful out of the oven. 

The subject of these remarks leaned 
back, thankful that she was out of sight, 
and drew down her pretty mouth into a still 
more doleful droop. What was wrong with 
her? Everything, she told herself. How 
could she help being miserable when she 
was so wicked? It would be more wicked 
to act as if she were satisfied with herself. 
Tears were very near the surface. But the 
afternoon sun was very warm, and soon a 
curly head nestled against one of the veran- 
da's white pillars and its owner was fast 
asleep. 

Perhaps Convolvulus' father might have 
given some wise counsel, had her aunts not 
been so unwilling to send him anything ex- 
cept a good report of their charge. Upon 
her mother's death he had gone West 
leaving his tiny baby to the kind hearts and 
hands of his tw^o spinster sisters. Although 
a busy man, he took time and trouble to 
write occasionally, sending money, and 
usually asking for "another picture of ni}- 
girl." The day his daughter's eyes first 
blinked at him in the soft light of early 
sunrise, he called her his pink morning- 
glory and named her Convolvulus. 

The little maid on the south veranda 
awoke, rubbing her eyes drowsily. She 
smiled at her sleepy image in the hall mir- 
ror as she passed. But when she appeared 
before Aunt Crete and Aunt Cordie, they 



MARYVILLK COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



67 



saw a flower face framed in damp ringlets. 
Convolvulus walked straight to the table 
where Aunt Cordie sat, sewing. 

"Aunt Cordie, what day is to-day ?" 

"The sixteenth^ dear." 

"Well, it's almost time to send papa his 
birthday present, isn't it? And, please, 
Aunt Cordie, let me pick it out this year, 
won't you?" asked Convolvulus, her face 
brightening. 

Aunt Cordie looked astonished, but smil- 
ing. 

"Why, yes, child; this afternoon, if you 
want to do so. What do you intend to get 
for him?" 

"I don't know yet. I'll look at the things 
in the store first." She put on her white 
sun-bonnet. 

"Get something" dainty, darling," called 
Aunt Crete. 

"Get something useful," said Aunt Cor- 
die. 

"I do hope she'll make a good choice," 
fretted Aunt Crete, taking up her work- 
again. 

Aunt Cordie sewed steadily on. 

But there were no misgivings an hour 
later, when Convolvulus walked in and 
shyly held up a booklet, its pearly white 
covers strewn with sprays of morning-glory 
vine in blossom, and tinted in delicate 
shades of pink and green. On the front 
cover, in gilt letters, were the words : 
"Morning-Glories for the jNIorning Watch." 

"I thought this might remind papa of 
me, and besides, O aunties, let me read you 
just a little!" 

Her selection was merely a sketch of an 
unselfish life. At the close of a happy girl- 
hood the wife of a young missionary ac- 
companied her husband to his v.ork in the 
China Inland Mission. Her days had been 
brimful of gladness. If she was asked the 
secret of her joyousness, she said, "Jesus 
does satisfy." But would Jesus continue to 
satisfy, if happiness were gone? Thrown 
into tb" midst of dreadful perils, she lost 



both husband and baby, yet her beautiful 
spirit triumplu«l. The constant refrain that 
rang through her letters was still : "Jesus 
does satisfy. Jesus does satisfy.'' 

The reader's voice trembled more than 
once in the narrative. Yet the final sweet 
testimony came in tones clear and resonant, 
if they were girlish — the tones of one who 
for the first time sees the way plainly and 
immediately enters upon it. 

The aunts looked first at their niece antl 
then at each other. Convolvulus had 
solved her own difficulties. C)r. rather, 
Christ had met her between printed pages 
and had revealed himself as the One who 
alone can satisfy the longing heart and fill 
the hungry soul with his goodness. 

The little book had been glorified in Con- 
volvulus' eyes. Her father's birthday that 
year was remembered with a gift with 
which it cost heartache to part, although 
his daughter hid her grief and gave her 
new-found treasure as loyally as she would 
have given him her life. 

The message had wrought its work in a 
pure young heart. Would it aiTect a hard- 
ened, reckless man? One to whom this 
world's goods were all and in all, save his 
child ? Save his child ! Ah ! linman love 
often proves an entering wedge for the 
Spirit in a s'rambering conscience. 

Convolvulus was anxiously a\^"aiting her 
father's customary note of thank;. Instead 
came a telegram : 

"Henry ^^'illecks badly hurt. A\'ants his 
child." 

In that unually quiet, orderly home was 
bustle and confusion. The days and nights 
on the cars passed like in a dream. Aunt 
Cordie took care of everything. Thev 
reached their destination in time for Con- 
volvulus' father to look on her and die. 

After her first passionate weeping Con- 
volvulus noticed that her birthday present 
lay beside him in the bed. It was open at 
the story of "Jesus does satisfy," and there 
were traces of tears on the margin. 

HELEX ir. POST. 



68 



MARVViIXE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 




Tedtord. '01. Gillinsham. Goddnrd. J.H.Alexander. ^\ ebb, '02. 

j< i..,iklin, 'i^;.. "• ^V. L'rawlord , 'ua. 

Gi-au M.i Unssett. '115. Gili, 'Hi. MfUasliu, '1)3. 



THE ATHENIAN MIDWINTER EN- 
TERTAINMENT. 

The Athenian Society gave its thirty- 
third annnal mid-winter entertainment Fri- 
day niglit, Jannary ."Mth. in r>artlett Hall. 
Regardless of the inclemency of the 
weather, a large andience assembled in the 
beantifnlly decorated auditorinm and list- 
ened attentively to the well-rendered pro- 
gram. The auditorinm. with all its decora- 
tions, had assumed almost a palatial ap- 
pearance. An arch, covered with cloth 
having the society color and garnished with 
holly, extended across the entire stage, 
while footlights illuminating the back- 
ground and the flowers along the front, 
added much to the attractiveness and 
beauty of the scene. The room was also 
very artistically festooned and bordered 
with red bunting. 

About eight o'clock the presiding officer. 
Professor Waller, announced the beginning 
of the exercises, and asked the Rev. L. B. 
Tedford to make the invocation. 

The chorus, composed of thirteen of rhe 
society members, then rendered the Ath- 
enian song. This beautiful song is original, 
having been written and comi)osed a few 



years ago by Athenian members. The first 
speech of the evening was a reading by 
Mr. E. L. Grau. The title of his selection 
was "Lasca." The speaker delivered the 
Texan story in such a real way that an in- 
tent listener could almost realize himself as 
being on the plains of the Southwest. 

The next number on the program was an 
oration by ]\Ir. R. H. McCaslin. His sub- 
ject was "Admiral Schley." The great 
Schley-Sampson controversy has doubt- 
lessly awakened the interest of the people 
to such an extent that they fully appreci- 
ated the just and earnest tributes given by 
Mr. McCaslin to the great hero and victor 
of Santiago. The A. L. S. Quartette then 
favored the audience with two select songs. 
The evening's subject for discussion was : 
"Resolved, that the United States should 
adopt the plan of initiative and refer- 
endum." The affirmative was ably upheld 
by Mr. C. H. Gillingham. He cited the 
success of its v\'orking in Switzerland, and 
also showed how it would be a potent 
factor in the abolishment of political rings 
and other frauds practiced in the govern- 
ment of our country. The negative side of 
the question was defended by Mr. Bassett, 



MAKYVILLi: COLLKGI- MONTHLY. 



6 J 



who at once began to tear down t!ie afurm- 
ative arguments. In addition to his refuta- 
tion, he proved the impracticaljihty cf the 
adoption of the scheme in so thorough a 
manner that he rightly deserves the appel- 
lation of "Little Giant."' 

Two more selections were then given 1)\- 
the quartette. 

The second oration of the evening w-as 
made by Mr. D. W. Crawford, on the great 
sailor, Paul Jones. He showed the con- 
stant heroism always manifested by our 
naval commanders and the fair example for 
imitation this first hero of our navy was 
for heroes to come. 

Mr. Arthur Tedford gave a reading. 
"Ben Hur," which was very heartily ap- 
preciated by the audience. 

Mr. James Goddard then sang a bary- 
tone solo. The important part of the pro- 
gram, for which everyone was waiting in 
expectation, was "The Athenian Annual," 
edited this year by Mr. Frederick Lee 
Webb. Mr. Webb exhibited more than 
ever his wit and humor in this issue. The 
quartette gave another beautiful selection. 
The members of the quartette are : Robert 
Franklin, first tenor; F. W. Gill, second 
tenor; James Goddard, first bass; Theron 
Alexander, second bass. 

The benediction was pronounced by Dr. 
McCulloch. 

The entertainment was a success in ever\ 
respect. The Athenian Society has added 
another successful exhibition of its literary 
attainments to the long list it has already 
made in the past thirty-five years. 

THE GREEN AND WHITE. 

"ALUS VOLUMUS PROPIUS." 

"We aim higher than others" in many 
things, but when it comes to weather we 
have to be satisfied with whatever kind 
happens along. 

The Bainonian mid-winter entertainment 
was given on the night of December dth, a 
liight unfavorable to any but witches' 
projects. But circumstance favored the 
society in a more important matter, name- 



1} . the selection <:\ a ])r(.-.-iding ofificc-r. Mr.-, 
L. B. Tedf(jrd, our fir.-t ])resident. was pre- 
vailed u])on to himor the event by acei-pt- 
ing the chair. 

As the evening's ins])irati()ii wa.s tO:.bc 
drawn from Scotch S(jurces, the nnisic (en- 
cores of course excc])ted) was ci Cale- 
donia's contribution. Three juipil > of Mi.v- 
]\Iinnis, the Alisses Sharpe, Mitchell and 
McGinley, rendered a very sweet jjiano trio, 
a medley of Highland airs. ]\liss Minni>. 
herself a Bainonian, executed llie instru- 
mental solo entitled "Tam O'Slianter," in 
a manner in keeping with her high repute. 

The Bainonian Quartette, including Mi:-s 
Minnie ]\icGinley, first soprano : Miss Mary 
Cox, second soprano: Miss Norma Patton. 
first alto, and Miss Cora Cort, second alto, 
permitted us the pleasure of hearing their 
rendition of "Annie Laurie" and "Pduc 
Bells of Scotland." Of this quartette, only 
one had been, even for a year })revious, a 
member of Maryville College, or had ever 
participated in a Bainonian entertainment. 
Though amateurs, and as such justifiable in 
choosing simple music, the quartette,, sac- 
rificing its own convenience, chose songs iit 
harmony with the theme of th.e evening. 

Miss Lois Alexander and Miss Cora 
Cort, essayists whose merits had been 
tested in our weekly meetings, gave new 
evidence of their powers in excellent paper^ 
on "Earlier and Later Scotch \\'riters.'" 

"Robbie Burns," with his poems like 
"homespun cloth of gold," was a general 
favorite. From his writings came "The 
Cotter's Saturday Night," given by ]\liss 
Niccuni. Also, hearts were comforted by 
Miss Nellie Jackson's declaring that "A 
Man's a Man for a' That." 

"The Duel," a tragic selection from Sir 
Walter Scott's "Lady of the Lake," was 
recited with feeling and intensity by Miss 
Nancy Gardner. 

P)arrie's "Anld Licht Idylls" yielded "The 
Courting of T'howhead's P.ell, ' which, as 
spoken by INIiss Freddie t;uddard, drew 
forth peals of laughter from th^ audience. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY 



A very affecting bit of pathos out of "The 
Stickit Minister," by S. R. Crockett, was 
given^by Miss Nannie Broady. 

The efforts of the Misses Norma Patton 
and Lelia Cooper, of whose talents it is our 
town's pride to make use on public occa- 
sions, added lirilliancy to the evening's per- 
formance. 

But the success of the night was due not 
only to the skill of the well-known partici- 
pants, but certainly in as great a degree to 
the hard work and indisputable ability of 
some of our younger members, on the mid- 
winter program for the first time in their 
lives. 

As a fitting close,. "Comin' Through the 
Rye" was sung behind the curtain by Miss 
Cox and pantomimed in front by five of the 
most graceful girls of the society, in. Greek 
robes. 

And all went home, taking as souvenirs 
l)ictures of Scott and Burns, and a last looK 
at the bonnie flag of Scotland, the silver 
cross of St. Andrew on a patch of azure 
Scottish skv. 



Y. M. C A. NOTES. 

The following brief review indicates the 
work of the Y. jNI. C. A., as carried out up 
to the end of January : 

Gymnasium work has taken a definite 
form and system. F. W. Cleeland, of But- 
ler, Penn., has been secured as physical 
<lirector, and this department of Associa- 
tion work is under his direction. Regular 
<laily class exercises are in operation, and 
basket ball teams have been organized. 

Several new sources of revenue have 
been devised. A check-room for wraps, 
hats, rubbers, etc., has proved a successful 
experiment during the college socials, 
which arc now held in Bartlett Hall. The 
large attendance at these socials and the 
consequent inconveniences in disposing of 
wraps have made this check-room a neces- 
sity. The receipts are placed in the Y. M. 
C. A. treasury, and the Association appre- 
ciates the support wiiich its friends have 
given this system Ijy their patronage. 



Application has been made by the literary 
societies for the use of the auditorium in 
giving their entertainments. This has been 
granted, and 10 per cent, of the gross re- 
ceipts are to be paid to the Y. M. C. A. for 
the use of the building. 

The interest in Bible Study has been kept 
up throughout the year. A beginning class 
in "The Harmony of the Gospels" has 
been organized for the benefit of those who 
have entered school the second term. Four 
classes are now at work, with a total en- 
rollment of forty-five. 

The Sunday afternoon devotional meet- 
ings have been profitable and well attended. 
A praver circle, in which a number were 
deeplv interested, was organized, and held 
short services every night for several weeks 
at the beginning of the term. 

The usual campaign committee looked 
after the new students, and a reception was 
given to them in Bartlett Hail. The re- 
vised roll shows 47 active and S associate 
members of the Association. 

At the last meeting of the Board of Di- 
rectors the building committee of Bartlett 
Hall made its final report, which is as fol- 
lows : 

The receipt of fifteen hundred dollars in 
the early part of the year, from Mrs. Nettie 
McCormick, of Chicago, enabled your com- 
mittee to finish the construction of the 
building, which has been upon your hands 
for the past six years. With this generous 
gift, the interior of the gymnasium and the 
interior of the second floor in front were 
completed. Radiators were placed in the 
students' rooms and in the gymnasium, at 
a cost of $135.35. The wiring of the entire 
building for electric lights, together with 
the outside connections, cost $107.70. 

Outside of the basement of the gym- 
nasium, where at present, without sewer 
connections, it would be inadvisible to place 
baths and closets, as called for by the plans, 
very little remains to be done, and the un- 
expended balance in the treasury of $ir)9.20, 
together with good subscriptions, which 
ought to net $75, will be sufficient to pay 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



71 



for some minor improvements about the 
building: 

As this is the last report of the building 
committee, it may not be inappropriate to 
give the chronology of this edifice, which 
now crowns College Hill as a monument to 
the initial zeal of our Oriental graduate, 
Kin Takahashi. 

In 1895 the bricks were made. 

In 1896 the foundations laid. 

In 1897 the building erected and en- 
closed. 

In 1898 gymnasium part opened for use. 

In 1899 Y. M. C. A. part opened for use. 

In 1900 McCormick Auditorium finished. 

In 1901 completion of the building. 

The name of the first contributor on the 
treasurer's book is J. M. Sexton, who gave 
$1 in June, 1895. The long list of other 
subscribers has been published in the Col- 
lege Monthly during the past years. The 
latest donor, (but let us hope not the last, 
for the rooms need to be furnished) is Ben- 
jamin Reed, of Parkersburgh, Pa., who 
gave ten cents. 

The total amount received, including 
-$4,000 from the College, is $13,086.75. De- 
ducting some of the traveling expenses of 
the various solicitors, it will be fair to say 
that in round numbers the building has cost 
so far $12,500. And the late Dr. Grey, of 
Chicago, when he went through the build- 
ing, a short time before his death, ex- 
pressed great surprise that it had been 
erected for such a small amount of money. 
The general usefulness of the building and 
its beneficial effects upon the student body 
is becoming more and more apparent as 
time passes. 

We recommend that the committee be 
discharged. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ELMER B. WALLER, 

Chairman of Committee. 



JUNIOR CLASS NOTES. 

The past term has been a memorable 
one. We look back on it as pleasantly and 
profitably spent. Chemistry has opened its 



treasures and wonders, and shown us how 
to dissolve the elements with H- S 04, the 
nature of which substance I'rown has 
learned to his grief. Logic has shown us 
its wonders and how to put our thoughts 
in syllogistic form. Our class throughout 
the term has made progress, and its record 
as a hard-working class is surpassed by 
none other. And this term we intend that 
the banner of the Junior Class shall float 
high above all others. 

The Junior yell, as selected by the class, 
is as follows : 

Rah, rah, ree ; rah, rah, ree. 
Juniors, Juniors, 1903 ; 

Hoorah ! Hoorah ! 
Juniors, Juniors, 
Rah, rah, rah ! 

Two new members have joined our class 
this term — Miss Mollie Gamble and Mr. 
Robt. Franklin. 

The Junior Class has organized a basket 
ball team, which is ready to receive and 
accept challenges from any class. The team 
is as follows : 

E. L. Grau, center. 

H. R. Crawford, forward. 

T. G. Brown, forward. 

Robt. H. McCaslin, guard. 

Robt. Franklin, guard. 

The first game will be played with the 
Sophomore Class. 

Juniors are well represented in the of- 
ficial positions of the literary societies. E. 
Lysander Grau is president of the Athenian 
Literary Society; Thos. G. Brown, vice 
president of the Alpha Sigma ; Hugh Craw- 
ford, an Athenian Censor, and Dennis W. 
Crawford, treasurer of the Athenian So- 
ciety. 

The class is well represented by minis- 
terial students, four being in the class — E. 
L. Grau, Robt. O. Franklin. D. W. Craw- 
ford and Robt. H. jNIcCaslin. IMr. Frank- 
lin has charge of the four churches this 
term. 

R. H. ]\IcCaslin has charge of the jail 
work, while JNIr. Grau is engaged in Sun- 
day School work, and is the president of the 
Ministerial Association. 



72 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



Maryville College Monthly. 



Vol. IV. 



FEBRUARY, 1902. 



No. 4. 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 



eijMer b. waller 

dennis w.crawford 

helen e. ervin 

FRANK E. LACiUHEAD 

EMMA E CALDWELL 

FREDERICK P. SCHELL 

MAME STERBINS 

- ARTHUR C.TEDFORD 

JOHN W. RITCHIE 

FREDERIC L. WEBB 

JOSEPH S. CALDWELL 



Editor-in-Chikf, 
Athenian, 
Bainonian, 
Alpha Sigma, 

THETA EPSIIiON, - 

y. M. C. A., 
Y. W. C. A. 

Athletics, 

Alumni, - - - 

BcsTNEss Manager, 

SUBSCRIPTIfN MANAGKK, 

students, gr»diiat6s and friends of the College are 
Invited to contribute lltcrarv arilciea, personals and 
items of general interest for publication. 
Subscription price, for eight numbers, i5 cents. 
Address all commuiiications to 

Maryville Collbge Monthly, 

Maryville, Tenn. 

Enteredat MaryTille, Tei n., an Second-ClaBs Mail Matter. 

Last yeai- only three stories 
Sto7iM. ^^'^''*^ submitted for the prize 
offered by "The Monthly." 
This year five stories were handed in, and 
the winner of last year was not a contest- 
ant. On January 24th, Major W. A. Mc- 
Teer, the chairman of the judges appointed 
by the editors, awarded the prizes in chapel. 

Mr. Arthur C. Tedford was awarded the 
first prize of five dollars and Miss Helen M. 
Post the second prize of three dollars. The 
two prize stories are printed in this issue. 

During the past two year there has been 
a decided gain in this class of writing, as 
the files of 'The Monthly" will show. The 
poetic muse, however, has deserted us or is 
hiding very successfully in some of the 
college buildings. 



One of the real needs of 
, ^spi??tt Maryville College is "college 
spirit." The student body 
should more loyally support her athletic 
teams. Perhaps it is hardly a fair compari- 
son to refer to the spirit shown, or rather 
that was not shown, in football during the 
fall term, as only one inter-collegiate game 
was played. It is different, however, this 
term. The boys expect to turn out a first- 
class base ball team. The team should be 
accorded good and hearty support, whether 
in victory or in defeat. 



Base ball is a game in which "rooting" is 
a great factor towards winning. Let a 
team play even against great odds, and if it 
is accorded hearty and loyal support by a 
large and enthusiastic crowd of. "rooters" 
the chances for victory will be greatly in- 
creased. 

Not many of us can make cither the col- 
lege basket or base ball team, but all of us 
can come out to the game and cheer for 
the teams in a manner which will not onlv 
be an inspiration to the players, but also 
a credit to the college. 

Maryville's "co-eds" have always been 
loyal supporters of the "orange and gar- 
net," but the boys at times fell short of 
what is no more than their duty. 

So let us all, as the basket ball season 
continues, and the base ball season opens, 
resolve that we will one and all come out to 
the games( with our flags and banners, and 
with all our zeal and energy help by oui^ 
"rooting" to raise the standard of our ath- 
letics higher and to cheer our teams on to- 
victory. 



Giving- 



The story of what five hun- 
dred dollars will do in a col- 
lege treasury was beautiful 
told by Frances J. Hosford, in the "Ad- 
vance," some months ago. A brief state- 
ment of the facts may encourage those who 
are now asked to give scholarships to 
Maryville College : 

A bequest to Oberlin of a Miss Jones,, 
of Syracuse, N. Y., of $529, was placed on^ 
interest in 1859, "for the benefit of needy 
and deserving young ladies." The interest 
only has been loaned, and wlien repaid has 
been loaned again. About $300 per year is 
now available. Altogether, 329 loans have 
been made, aggregating $7,369. In the 
year 1879, $545 was loaned, more than the 
original sum. Many worthy women have 
thus been tided over and enabled to 
promptly complete the course of study, who 
might otherwise have failed to do so. 
Among the number are several foreign mis- 
sionaries and city doctors, some college 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



73 



professors, and at least one woman of 
national reputation. After relatint;- these 
facts, the writer says : 

"When thus placed under the control of 
vital forces, the activity of money is tre- 
mendous in power and unlimited in dtira- 
tion. The woman who founded this Loan 
Fund has lain in the grave for nearly half 
a century. A few years more and no living 
being will retain a memory of that vanished 
life. And yet, with the manuuon of un- 
righteousness she has made to herself an 
ever-increasing company of friends, and 
they have received her into everlasting hab- 
itation." 

While our President is now abroad so- 
liciting for the college, what a pleasing sur- 
prise it would be for our treasurer to re- 
ceive a scholarship fund of this character 
from some one at home, either as a thank- 
offering or as a debt due to Christian edu- 
cation ! 



PERSONALS AND LOCALS. 

William Sevier, '95, is teaching this year 
in North Carolina. 

The Co-Operative Boarding Club serves 
one hundred and fifty students. 

The second term opened with the usual 
number of students. The enrollment is 
302. 

John E. Tracy, "01, is in the law school 
of the University of Wisconsin, at Madison, 
Wis. 

Fred B. Stewart, who was in college in 
'99-'00, is at Maryland Medical College, 
Baltimore, this year. 

We have received a pamphlet entitled 
"Baptism for Service," published by Rev. 
J. T. Reagan, Lohrville, Iowa. 

The laundry is giving good satisfaction, 
and Mrs. A. A. Wilson deserves the thanks 
of the college for her enterprise. 

The two dormitories are well filled this 
term. Baldwin Hall has forty-eight girls 
and Memorial Hall forty-nine boys. 

More than sixty girls were present at 
the Y. W. C. A. reception, given in the 



parlor of ilaldwin Hall on l-'riday evening. 
the ;')d of January. 

The faculty is big and strong, 
As all the students know ; 
They make the lessons good and long 

So as to see us grow. 
The attendance upon the Tuesday even- 
ing prayer meetings is very gratifying, as it 
is not unusual to have more than one hun- 
dred students present. 

All girls are cordially invited to attend 
the devotional meetings of the Y. W. C. A., 
held every Sunday afternoon at two o'clock , 
in the parlor of Baldwin Hall. 
The alcoves of Lamar contain 
Books never known to fail. 
And they who search with might and main 
Their secrets will unveil. 
H. C. Rimaner, '00, after a year's study 
in McCormick Seminary, is supplying three 
mission churches in Northern W'isconsin. 
His address is Stratford, Wis. 

Dr. W. J. Trimble, of Vineland, N. J., 
formerly of Chattanooga, will conduct the 
usual ten days' evangelistic services in the 
college, beginning on the 3d of March. 

Rev. Robert C. Jones, '94, is located at 
Petchaburie, Siam, and the "Bi-Monthly 
Letter" published by the jNIission tells of 
some of the experiences which he and his 
wife have had. 

President Wilson left jNIaryville on Janu- 
ary IT for a two months' trip in the interest 
of the college. He will visit Cincinnati. 
Chicago, Pittsburgh, New York and Phila- 
delphia. 

Mr. Frank Cleeland, the physical direc- 
tor of the gymnasium, has entered upon his 
duties this term. He is from Butler, Pa.. 
and was a student in Washington and Jef- 
ferson College last year. 

J. Rol Simpson, who organized and was 
leader of the college brass band from '91; 
to '98, is at present express messenger be- 
tween Birmingham, Ala., and Greenville. 
Miss. 

The Asembly Herald contains an article 
by Dr. Thompson on his visit to ]Maryville 



74 



MARYVILLE COLI.EGE MONTHIvY. 



and the Synod of Tennessee, in which he 
speaks in high terms of our famous gradu- 
ate quartette. 

The Bible study class, organized by the 
Y. W. C. A. this term, has fifteen members. 
This makes a total of twenty-eight in the 
Bible classes of the society. Mrs. Cort con- 
ducted the New Year's meeting of the As- 
sociation. 

Rev. Ralph D. Smith, a former student 
of the college, after his return from China, 
where he was engaged in the mission work, 
has lately accepted the position as secre- 
tary to the Los Angeles Bible Institute, in 
California. 

A letter from Dr. Boardman, Bloomfield, 
N. J., shows that he is still greatly inter- 
ested in the progress of the college and in 
the contemplated services in March. Some- 
thing from his pen would be very accept- 
able to his friends and the "College Month- 
ly." 

On Sunday, December 1st, the funeral 
services of Mr. A. A. Wilson were held at 
Baldwin Hall. Mr. Wilson had reached a 
ripe old age, and was ready to depart to 
the better land. He leaves a widow and 
one son, to whom the sympathy of the col- 
lege is extended. 

John W. Dosser, who entered college 
last September, but later enlisted in the 
U. S. Navy, is at present cruising in West 
Indian waters. He says that he likes the 
sailor's life well enough, although he is 
anxious to get back to the "States" again. 

The students and teachers at the begin- 
ning of the term were shocked at hearing 
of the sudden death of Henry Penland near 
his home at Marshall, N. C. He was cross- 
ing a narrow foot-bridge and fell off into 
the raging stream. He was a graduate of 
the Farm School at Asheville, and had only 
been one term in Maryville College, but his 
pleasant manner and Christian character 
had made him many friends. 

The January meeting of the Board of 
Directors of the College was held on Jan- 
nary 15, with fifteen trustees in attendance. 



Reports from the president, executive com- 
mittee and special committees were heard 
and acted upon. Among the transactions 
were the repeal of the fifteen-year age limit, 
the discharge of the building committee of 
Bartlett Hall, and the establishment of 
prize scholarships in various schools and 
academies. 

The event of December was the Rough 
House given in honor of the birthday of 
Professor Ritchie, by the Sut Lovingood 
Dialect Literature Club, of which the pro- 
fessor is Patriarch. The dispensation was 
given in Bartlett Hall reading-room. At 
nine o'clock the gentleman was carried 
from his apartments in Memorial Hall to 
the banquet hall in a sedan chair borne by 
eight members of the club. The club is not 
superstitious, so the number that gathered 
round the board was thirteen. While the 
company lingered over the coffee, toasts 
were proposed and drunk off with bump- 
ers of coffee. Two of these speeches de- 
serve special mention because of the quality 
of their wit : Professor Ritchie's response 
to "The Future Tense of the Girl I Left 
Behind Me,'' and Professor Walker's "The 
Fellows of the Hill." 

The Butler Times, Butler, Pa., has the 
following account of the marriage of two of 
our graduates : 

"Miss Sara Pearl, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Isaac Andrews, of this place, and Prof. 
John W. Richie, of Maryville College, 
Maryville, Tenn., were united in marriage 
at the home of the bride's parents. Center 
avenue, at 8 o'clock, January 16th, the 
ceremony being performed by Rev. J. S. 
Richie, of Plain Grove, a brother of the 
groom, assisted by Rev. E. R. Worrell, pas- 
tor of the Second Presbyterian Church, of 
this place. Miss Andrews is a graduate of 
Maryville College and has been a success- 
ful teacher in the Butler public schools the 
past term. She resigned her position a 
short time ago, the time of her marriage 
having been hastened by the appointment 
of Prof. Richie to a position in the pro- 
posed normal and agricultural school at 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY, 



75 



Manila, I'liilippine Islands. A reception 
was tendered the bride and groom during 
the evening', which was attended by quite 
a number of friends. Mr. and Mrs. Richie 
■expect to sail for Manila February 1st. The 
groom is a native of Sparta, III. 

"The young people have the hearty con- 
gratulations and good wishes of a large 
circle of friends and acquaintances." 

The Maryville College crowd in Hydcn, 
Ky., gathered socially in the parsonage 
parlor on Thanksgiving evening. The walls 
were decorated with class and college pic- 
tures and colors. Dr. Wilson's photo was 
framed in a triangle of three beribboned 
diplomas. On the tables were catalogues, 
college monthlies and photographs. We 
looked with reverence upon the pictured 
faces of Dr. Anderson, Dr. Bartlett and 
Dr. Boardman. How the old feeling came 
back as we recalled happy days on the dear 
old cedar-crowned hill, and laughed again 
at the old jokes ! The member of the crowd 
who represents the class of '03 hustled the 
'01 picture out of the conspicuous place 
which its owner had selected for it, and 
triumphantly hung one tied with red and 
white there. (The '01 was hung up again, 
all right !) The '93 picture, gay with orange 
and garnet, contained the pictures of two 
of the party. The member who expects 
to begin his first term after Xmas has been 
overwhelmed with wise advice. The mem- 
ber who attended in '00 passed around his 
photos and played on his guitar. Upon re- 
quest, the professor read a college poem 
written in '93 by himself and another. 
(James were played, the crowd partook in- 
formally of candied popcorn and apples, 
and after singing — as every Maryville Col- 
lege crowd should — "Orange, garnet, float 
iorever," separated. Each took as a souve- 
nir, a card in which was tied the colors, and 
i>n which was written the date. 



A UNIQUE WORK IN JAPAN. 

"The Presbyterian" of April ITth, 1901, 
contains a full account by the Rev. F. S. 
'Curtis of the work of Kin Takahashi, "94, 



in Japan during the past year. Wc quote 
only the first part of the article : 

"A unique door of opportunity has re- 
cently been opened to us in an entirely new 
field — at Hirao, a large village a few miles 
College, Tenn., and is a graduate of that 
distant from the town of Yanai. Mr. Taka- 
hashi, a native of this village, recently sent 
us, together with a letter of introduction 
from Mrs. Winn, of Osaka station, a very 
pressing invitation to come and help him 
in connection with some work he was carry- 
ing on with a company of young men. This 
young man has made quite a remarkable 
career in America. He was for two' years 
captain of the football team of Maryville 
college. Through his personal efforts, eight 
thousand dollars were raised for a Young- 
Men's Christian Association building for 
use in connection with this institution. 
After thirteen year in the United States, he 
returned to Japan and engaged in the Asso- 
ciation work in Tokyo; but health failing, 
for many months he has been laid aside 
from such active service. However, in 
spite of weakness, he has been letting his 
light shine in his native place. In this town 
there are some seven thousand people, and 
in the immediate vicinity the number would 
reach twenty thousand. There is a large 
number of the better class of Japanese in 
the place, and their zeal for education is 
shown in the flourishing schools, which 
have an attendance of twelve hundred 
pupils. Mr. Takahashi saw an opportunity 
for wor kamong the graduates of the 
higher school, and formed a literary club 
with twenty-three members. After drilling 
seven or eight of the young men for public 
exhibition, he sent a request to Yamaguchi 
for assistance, which was gladly given.'' 

The sequel to this article appeared in 
"The Maryville Times" of August 31, 1901. 
in a long letter from Kin himself. The lit- 
tle society expanded to a regular school. 
He organized a literary society and taught 
the boys to speak and debate "after the 
dear old ]\Iaryville style." A small tuition 
was charged, and the school, beginning 



76 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



with forty-seven scholars, now has one 
hundred and twenty, with the prospects of 
many more. 



ATHLETICS OF THE FUTURE. 

MARYVILLE's TRIUMI'HS .\T TllK OLV.Ml'IC 
GAMES IN ATHENS DUE TO THE EFFI- 
CIENCY OF OUR LON(;-WlSlIEn-F()R 
ATHLETIC DIRECTOR, MR. 
i'm a. COMING. 

[Extract from M. C. Y. M. C. A. Secre- 
tary's books of '02-'03. 1 

At last ^fr. I'm A. Coming, our athletic 
director, arrived on College Hill. It was 
on the first Thursday after the beginning 
of the fall term of '02-'03. Mr. Coming 
was met at the train by quite a party of Col- 
lege boys, all curious to catch the first sight 
of the noted athlete who had agreed to 
leave his splendid position as assistant mas- 
ter of gymnastics of Yale University, and 
come to train the athletic material of Mary- 
ville College in acceptance of a handsome 
offer of $1,000 a year by President Wilson. 
When the train pulled in, the boys recog- 
nized their man by "Yale" in blue letters 
on his cap and athletic jersey. It is super- 
fluous to say they were pleased in his ap- 
pearance. His superb proportions and 
well-knit figure showed them a magnificent 
specimen of a college-bred athlete. After 
a hearty welcome to the newcomer, the 
party, led by Sam IMcCambell, and other 
particular enthusiasts, turned their faces 
towards the Hill. 

At the College door they were met by 
President Wilson, who had that pleasant 
sparkle in his eye which the boys had learn- 
ed to know always meant something out 
of the ordinary. "Glad to have you with 
us, Mr. Coming," said the Doctor, extend- 
ing his hand. "I am sure this afternoon's 
mail has brought something which will 
please you all [drawing a letter from his 
pocket and opening it]. Mr. Carnegie 
sends a check for $1,000 to fit up the gym- 
nasium, and sends five competitors to the 
Grand Revival of Olympic Games at Ath- 
en-s in the spring." 



Cheers upon cheers rent the air at the 
announcement, and dozens of reil M. C.;- 
caps were tossed heavenward. 

The next day ]\Ir. Coming had his plans 
lor the fall term completed. Ajjparatniis to 
the value of $1'25 was at once ordered, land 
four drill classes of thirty minutes each 
were organized, lasting daily from three to 
five o'clock. 

Although, during the previous spring. 
Maryville had regained her old-time valor 
in baseball, and had scored several victories 
for herself in this line, it could not compare 
with the honor and excitement of compet- 
ing in the international games at Athens, 
which were only a few months distant. 
Still, the baseball skill was not to profit u^ 
much, for it was a game peculiar only to 
the United States and would not be in- 
dulged in at Athens. The long, hard train- 
ing was to be in discus throwing (which 
was the delight of Saraphie's heart), high 
and broad jumping, pole vaulting (in which 
Laughead had run up his record to 12 feet 
1 inch), in the old and noble s])ort of arch- 
ery, hurdle racing, and many other athletic 
features. 

As the school term proceeded, the pro- 
fessors were growing more and more 
pleased at the ciuality of the general schol- 
arship among the boys (the girls, of course,, 
alway do well); and as the days sped by, 
declared that never yet had a school year 
started with such a fine record. Wherein 
lay the reason ? a. t. 

(^To he coiitiiuu'd in our ui'.rt issue.) 



GOLF. 

The season just closed has been the most 
prosperous one yet enjoyed by the College 
Hill Golf Club. The club has nineteen 
members, and bids fair to double the enroll- 
ment by spring. We shall soon lose two 
of the charter members and officers, Pres- 
ident Robert Pierce Walker and VicqPresr- 
ident John Woodside Ritchie, who leave on 
February 1 for Manila,- P. I., to lay out a 
golf course on the Island of Luzon, and in- 

cidentall}' teach in the Government schools 



MARVVILLK COLLEGE MONTHLY 



77 



Late in Fcbi"uar\- the cluli will hold a 
tournament for the open ciiarn])ionship of 
the College. A committee has concluded 
all arrangements regarding entries, rulings 
and handicaps for the event, and all mem- 
bers are looking forward with much eager- 
ness to the contests, lioth singles and 
foursome will be played. 

Mr. W. \Y. Woodrufif. Jr., of Knoxville. 
has authorized the chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Tournament to offer a prize of a 
jfiine club to the winner of the singles. 

The tournament will be played on the 
new course, which is now being completed. 
The new links have been accurately sur- 
veyed, and are one and one-fourth miles 
in circuit : and is a six-hole course. 

To go around the links : Tee off from the 
Hilltop in front of Anderson Hall, drive 
down The Incline towards the old turn- 
table. If you go over the fence, you are in 
Oblivion : if you pull and land on the rock}' 
front drive, you've found Destruction. 
From such hazards as these this hole in 
Perdition. Hole No. 2 is The Cedars, way 
over on the west side of the campus by 
I]ryan's. In following your drive you climl) 
The Smokies. To go to the next hole — 
The Trysting Place, at '"The Stile b)' the 
Red Barn'" — drive east through Paradise 
Alley, an open stretch between two rows of 
lieautiful cedars, then across The Bad 
Lands. ."-Smyrna, a clump of fig-trees, is a 
wicked little hazard by the green. Pick up 
your ball, walk uj) Boardman Avenue to 
The Target — the next teeing-ground — the 
big cedar that both Sherman's an.d Wheel- 
er's soldiers practiced ui^on in the "days 
of '61." Drive over to The Pines. The 
putting-green is bounded by The ^^'ilder- 
• ness. The next hole is Chilhow^ee. You 
tee in Paradise. A^our first hazard is Don- 
der und Blitzen, two trees in the line of the 
hole; beyond them is The Goal, next The 
Pit, ascend The Steep and hole out. The 
last hole is Prex. Tee from The Stadium, 
by the running-track. A good drive may 
])ut you across Bogey Lake, but it is safe to 
go either to the left on to the Prairie or to 



the right over on liie (iridiron. iiither 
will give you a pretty shot into The Grove 
by the green. 

Accept the invitation of the club and 
come out anrl watch the tournament. 

\Vi:i;b, '02. 



SOPHOMORE NOTES. 

Officers: President, M. B. Hunter: Vice- 
President, A. C. Tedford: Secretary, Lois 
Alf xand.r. 

Class colors: Dark green and garnet. 
Cla.ss yell : 

Ala gara gara garoo, 
Rickety kex hullabazoo, 
Zis boom kallamazoo. 
Sophomore, Sophomore, 
Just a choice few. 
The Sophomores this term are the most 
expansive class on the hill; if none of us 
have fallen by the wayside in the mid- term 
examinations, we still number eleven. Half 
of us are boys; indeed, when we paired for 
our first class party, we found that a little 
more than half of us were that way, which 
means that one of the boys must excercise 
enough diplomacy to substitute a girl, or he 
must needs go to parties alone. 

On Wednesday night, October 30, cur 
class was entertained at the elegant home 
of President and Mrs. Wilson. The occa- 
sion was in honor of the twentieth birthday 
of Mrs. Willson's nephew, our vice-pres- 
ident, xArthur Tedford. The Sophomores 
present w- re Misses Goddard, Alexander, 
Post and Bryan, and Mess s. Tedford, Hun- 
ter, Ouist, Dickey, Lewis and Laughead. 
Mr. Gillingham and Mi ses Katherine Nic- 
cum and Cora Howard were Sophomores for 
the occasion. The evening was spent in 
playing crokinole, Jenkins and other games 
until nine o'clock, when we were ushered 
into the dining room and served to the most 
delicious refreshments of ice cream, cake, 
bananas, chocolate and chocolate caudj-. 
After refreshments vre were favored with 
recitations by Messrs. Gillingham and 
Tedford and Miss Fieddie Goddard, and a 
cla s poem by Mr. Dickey. At 10:30 we took 
our leave of our genial host and hostess, 
and slowh" wended our waj- across the 
campus, making the night melodious (?) 
with our "ala gara gara garoo.'' 



78 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



THE NEW MINERAL COLLECTION. 

Prof. A. F. Gilmau has had his fine col- 
lection of New England minerals brought 
from his old home and placed in the Col- 
lege Museum as a loan. The collection 
contains about four hundred valuable speci- 
mens, nearly all from the New England 
States, many of them from the rich min- 
eral localities of Hoddam, Chester, North- 
ampton and the other famous fields and 
mines. The group of actinolites. spodu- 
menes, diasporcs and tourmalines are es- 
pecially fine. 

The professor has taken much interest in 
mineralogy, and has long been an ardent 
collector of minerals. This collection has 
been awarded prizes. It makes quite an 
addition to our already valuable collection. 



THE CIGARETTE'S SOLILOQUY. 

My aim in life, and my only one, is sim- 
ply to have a lot of fun. The rarest sport 
and the greatest joy I alway have with a 
half-grown boy. I play with him all my 
latest tricks, until his liver is out of fix, his 
stomach weak and his heart impaired, his 
lungs dried up, and his parents scared, for 
fear that consumption's deadly grip into 
the grave may cause him to slip. What do 
I give him for all this fun? I give him a 
breath that's good (to shun). A nervous 
system shaky and frail, a hollow eye, and a 
visage pale, a constitution so undermined 
that the least success he'll hardly find. Oh, 
say! for fun and unbounded joy, give me a 
chance at a half-grown bov I — Exchange. 



EXCHANGES. 

We have received a few exchanges so 
far, and shall be glad to receive many 
more. We had about one hundred ex- 
changes last year, and should be glad to 
increase this number, as we have put an 
exchange table in. the library, where the 
students may have ready access to them 
and learn about other institutions and 
schools. Those received include : The 
Doane Owl, The Oracle, Otterbein Aegis, 
The Earlhamite, The Oberlin Review, The 
Killikilik, M. IT. Aerolith, The Black and 
Red. 




Arguments are all right, but here are facts. 

The styles for men are made in New York. 
That is where our clothing is made. 

The designer for the wholesale clothing manu- 
facturer learns as promptly as the Fifth Avenue 
tailor concerning future styles. 

No tailor can buy any better cloth than the 
cloihing manufacturer, and it stands to reason the 
manufacturer can buy at lower prices. 

In regard to workmanship; the best journey- 
man tailors are engaged by the year by the clothing 
manufacturer. Naturally he works cheaper thaa 
by the job with the merchant-tailor. 

This finishes the discussion on style, cloth, 
cost and make; now comes tlie test — the fit; to 
settle this see our suits; trv 'em, wear 'em. 

BRAND AU & KENNEDY, ™?g^T'-'^ 



^t^ ^It, .jj{. ^i^ ^i<. ^1^ .^I«. -isU, •*'<• -JK. .>'<. .x'i- -j'^ .xi*" •sji' ■ill' 

'Ji? ^i? ^i^ Vf? -^i? ^71? ^1? ^1^ ^J? ^I^ ^S^ ^i^ W ^T? ^l5^ ^l^ 



Founded by General Assembly, 1S2-5. 

Western Theological Seminary, 

ALLEGHENY, PA. 

Five professors and one instructor. Finely 
sleeted library of over 30,000 volumes. Beau- 
tifully located on West Park. The course is 
thorough and scholarly, but practical. The city 
affords numerous opportunities for missionary 
work. A high type of Christian life is empha- 
sized. For information apply to 

PROF. J, A. KELSO, Ph.D., 

ALI.EGHENV, PA. 



.iT^ ^1^ ^li. .ji,? .if«, .^I^ .iti .jti- .jii. ^i^. .jt^ vV^ -iSi •iii- .^J/ •XII' 
"^A^ ^If 'iW' ^A^ ^Ai- ^A'i- ^^ ^A^ ^t^ ^A^ W '^i* ^sf ^I*- ^u ^i^ 



M. C. STUDENTS 

WHILE IN KNOXVILLE 

Don't fail to include us in your calls. No 
matter whether you want anything in the 

...JEWELRY LINE... 



or not, come in and look around. We will 
always be glad to see you. 



Newcomer of Knoxville 



HAS A 



We make a Specialty of Fine 
Repairins. Watches. Jewelry, Etc, 



Sign of Big Clock. 



Branch Store in Mary ville 

GOODS ON DISPLAY 
FRESH FROM THEIR 
GREAT STORE. 



Spring and Summer Goods on display 
from and after March first. 



Jt ^ KNOXVILLE PRICES J- J- 

Mrs. Rosa M.Cawood, Agent 

^ Main Street, opposite the Postoffice .^ 

Hope Bros., 519 Gay St. 

M. M. NEWCOMER & COMPANY 

NEW DEPARTHENT STORE 

^^^^^^^^^^m^^m^^^^^^^^^ i 402, 404, 406, 408 Gay St.. Knoxville, Tenn. 



iH 



McTEER & COMPANY, 

CLOTHING and 
FURNISHINGS 



415 GAY STREET, 

Next door to Third National Bank. 



KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

Mr. Will TecUord, formerly of Maryville. will lie glad to see all his friends at the above place. 



(1^ 






M 



':^-^-^-c^-!^-a^-e='-e=}-c=>-c=3-c=>-e^-c:^-^-i=l-a::' 



cr 

c 
c 
c 



^ ^ THE PLACE TO LOOK ^ ^ 

For best quality iu everytliing iu Furniture and House Furnisliiug Goods 
is tlie place wliere every article sold is guaranteed. It is extravagance — 
waste — to pay any price" for poorly made furniture, tliat v^-ill go to pieces ia 
a little wliilej and most of the low price fu'uiture on the market to-day is 
that sort. The goods we sell are the cheapest in the world, when quality 
is considered. Our prices for well-made, substantial goods are very little 
higher than those quoted elsewhern for worthless stuff. If you want fur- 
niture for your home, we can supply the kind that will give satisfaction 
for a lifetime. 






I .atjt.5t^^^^ ASSETS, JANUARY I, 1901, $1,225,582.71 

9 
9 
9 
O 

O 

O 



The Oldest life Insurance Company in Ameria by Nearly 

Presbyterian Ministers' 

FOR LIFE INSURANCE. 



t^* fc?* t^* ^* «^* e^" e^* 

193 Years. 

Fund 



Its death rate is the lowest becaiise the longericy of ministers is tlie highest. 
It insures ministers Presbyterially governed only. It allows cash, loan, paid-up and 
extended insurance values in all its policy contracts. It writes insurance by corres- 
pondence, without the annoyance and expense of intermediate agents. Compare 
these annual premiums for $1,0U0. 00 insurance with other companies' : 



.„„ Ordinary 
-*^Se. Lite. 


20 Payment. 


20 Year 
Endowment 




Ag-e. 


Ordinary |,„ p^y^ent. 


20 Tear 
Endowment. 


25 $17.21 
SO 1 1!).21 
35 1 2I.S4 


I23.9G 
26.09 
28.76 


««.86 

41.74 
42.35 




40 
45 
50 


$25.35 1 $32.13 
.30.12 1 36.51 
.36.70 i 42.37 


:f43.42 
45.35 
48.76 



Don't pay from 15 to 30 percent, more for insurance than it will cost you in the Fund. 
Don't allow estimates of future tontine dividends, or surplus returns, to deceive you. 



Send date of Birth for different Policies Issued by tlie Fund. | 

c 

Address PERRY S. ALLEN, Secretar)', '"tZSZL'T" f 

O € 

i3 © 



ELM STREET 
PRINTING WORKS 

Printing and Binding 



420-422 Elm Street, Cincinnati, O. 



Students Give Your l-aundry 
Work to 



THE PALACE STABLE 

A. C. MONTGOMERY, Proprietor. ^^ g^ HUNTER '04 

FifStClaSSHOrSeS and Buggies to Hire Agent 0/ the war E^gle Laundry 



Also Corn and 

3hone 78. 
Bear of Bank of Maryvilie 



I a y f o r Sale. 



J. A. SUiViMERS, 
Jt ELECTRICAL ENGINEER, ^ 

Contracts taken for Complete 
Liaht and Power Plants .... 



KNOXVILLE, 



TENNESSEE. 



J- P. EDMONSON, 

Maryville, Tenn. 

LIVERY, FEED AND SALE STABLE. 

tiood Vebicles and Itriviiijj^ Horsea*. 
Kates WiXKHtii;!!*!*-- — ^. — > 

Special Attention to Supplying Driving and 
Mountain Parlies. 

GEORGE & TEDFORD 

Drugs, IVIedicines 
and Chemicals . . 

Fancy and Toilet Articles, Spouues, Brushes, 
Perfumery, Etc. 

Prescriptions carefully compounded with accuracy and des- 
patch by competent persons at all hours of the day and night. 

A. K. HARPER, 

PEPARTiVlENT 
STORE 



Phones: New 1146, Oflice. Old 301, Residence 

B. F. YOUNG, M. D., 

Eye, Ear, Throat 
and Nose .... 

409 Wall Street, Knoxviile, Tenn. 



C. PFLANZE, 



Dealer in 



ALL KINDS OF FURNITURE 

AND UNDERTAKER'S QOODS, 
MARYVILLE. - TENNESSEE. 



H. P. HUDDLESTON, 

DENTIST 



Office over 
PvTTON's Jewelry Store. 



BEST LAUNDRY IN KAS P II'NNKsSKK. 
WE GUARANTEE SATISFACTION. 



A. B. Ml Teeu. 



A, Ml . liAMIiLE 



McTEER & GAMBLE, 

PHYSICIANS. 

OFFICE UPSTAIRS OVER UEORGE & TEDFORD'S 
DRUG STORE. 



Dr. McTeer, Res., 4n. 



Dr. (iamhle. Res., 62. 



W. B. LAWRENCE, 

Maryville, Tenn,, 

Carries a Full and Complete Line of Purni- 
tore, Picture and Frames. 

Fine Caskets and Coffins, Bunal Robes, Etc. 
Prices Reasonable. Call and Examine My Stock 



MARYVILLE TENN 



J. P. RODGERS, 

Headqiiarlers for 

FRUITS, NUTS AND CANDIES 

Bananas a Specialty. 

When you fail to find anything you want in the line of 
Choice Fruits anywhere else, call on me. Stock always fresh 
and the best on the market. Next block to New Providence 
Church, Maryville. 

D. R. GODDARD & CO., 
Vehicles, Harness, Agricultural Implements, 

FIELD SEEDS AND FIELD STUFFS. 



COAL. — Nperial Attention 
Given to Small Orders. 



Phone 83. 



MUSICAL MERCHANDISE 



I ('ARKY A BKAITIFUI. 1/ 

Violin*, /Vlandoh'ns, 



NK OF 

Guitars, 



And Other *>trin{i;ed Instrnnients. 

Bows, Sirin;;N. Filting'.s. A L,ar^«* AssortmeBt of 

the Latest Sheet naislo. 

R. R. PATTON. Patton's Jewelry Store, Maryville. 



L/ompletely Parsed Caesar 

Gallic War. Book I. 

BY REV. J.\MES B, FIXCH, M. A.. D. D. 

CLOTH— $1.50 POSTPAI D— JOOPAGES. 

The Latin words in the Latin order just as 
Caesar wrote them: with the exact literal 
En^l.sk equivalent of each Latin word directly 
\].nAtt\l{i liter I tied): and with a second. eleg;ant 
translation in the *iiargin; also with Footnotes 
in which eT-t ly ivot d is coinpletely parsed, and 
all construciions explained, with References to 
the leading Latin grammars. Each pag^e com- 
plete—Latin te.xt, interlinear literal transla- 
tion, fnarginal flowinc translation, parsing — 
all at a glance iv'thoiit iiirn-ng a leaf! 

Ci)m;)lotely Sraiincd aiiii Parsoil Aciieiii, 1. Ready August, 19011. 

HINDS & NOBLE, Publishers, 

4-S-ft-i2-i3-i4 Cooper ln=t tute, N. V. City^ 

Schoolbooks of all publishers at one sti*re. 



1901-1902. 



MARYyiLLE COLLEGE 



FOUNDED IN 1819. 



FACUl^TY. 



REV. SAMUEL T. WILSON, D. D. , 

President, and Professor of the English Language and 
Literature and of the Spanish Language. 

REV.|SAMUEL W. BOARDMAN, D.D., LL.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 

REV. ELMER B. WALLER, A. M. , 
Professor of Mathematics. 

JAMES H. M. SHERRILL, A.M., 
Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 

JASPER C. BARNES, A.M. , Ph.D., 

Principal of the Preparatory Department and Professor of 
the Science and Art of Teaching. 

REV. JOHN G. NEWMAN, A.M., 
Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

FRANK M. GILL, 

Bookkeeping and English. 

ALBERT F. GiLMAN, S.B. ,A.M. , 
Chemistry and Physics. 

REV. CHARLES MARSTON, A.M , 

History and English Literature. 

JONATHAN H. NEWMAN, A.B., 

English Branches. 

MISS MARGARET E. HENRY, 

English Branches. 



COURSES OF STUDY. 

The College offers nine groups of studies 
leading to fthe degree of A. B. , and also a Teach- 
er's Course. The curriculum embraces the various 
branches of Science, Language, Literature, His- 
tory and Philosophy usually embraced in such 
courses in the leading colleges in the country. 

SPECIAL ADVANTAGES. 

The location is very healthful. The community 
is noted for its high morality. Seven churches- 
No saloons in Blount county. Six large colleoe 
buildings, besides the President's house and two 
other residences. The halls heated by steam and 
lighted by electricity. A system of waterworks. 
Campus of 250 acres. The college under the care 
of the Synod of Tennessee. Full corps of 
instructors. Careful supervision. Study of the 
Sacred Scriptures. Four literary societies. Rhe- 
torical drill. The Lamar library of more than 
10,000 volumes. Text-book loan libraries. 

For Catalogues, Circulars or 



MISS HENRIETTA MILLS LORD, A.B., 

French and German. 

JOSEPH FRANKLIN IDDINS, Supt. Pub. Inst., 

English Branches. 

MISS HELEN I. MINNIS, B.L., 

Piano, Voice and Theory. 

MRS. A. F. GILMAN, 
Elocution and Rhetoric. 

MRS. NELLIE B. CORT, A.B., 

Matron. 

JOSEPH S. CALDWELL, 

Assistant in Biology. 

FRANK W. CLEELAND, 

Physical Director. 



MAJOR BEN CUNNINGHAM, 

Registrar. 

WILLIAM M. THOMAS, 

Janitor. 

MRS. A. A. WILSON, 

Manager of the Co-operative Boarding Club. 

MISS H. M. KINGSBURY, 

Assistant Manager of the Co-operative Boarding Club. 



THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 
Competent and experienced instructors give 
their entire time to this department, while a 
number of the professors of the College depart- 
ment give a portion of their time to it. 

EXPENSES. 

The endowment of $22.5,000 reduces the ex- 
penses to low figures. The tuition is only $6.00 
a term or $18.00 a year. Room rent, light and 
heat bills, in Baldwin Hall (for young ladies) and 
Memorial Hall (for young men) is only 17.00 for 
the fall term, $.5.00 for the winter term, and $3. 00 
for the spring term. A Co-operative Laundry has 
been established. Instrumental music at low 
i-ates. Board at Co-operative Boarding 
Club ONLY ABOUT $1.30 a Week. Young ladies 
may reduce even this cost by work in the club. 
In private families beard as from $2.00 to $2. .50. 
Other expenses are correspondingly low. 

Total expenses, $75.00 to $125.00 a year. 

The Winter term opens January 2, 1902; the 
Spring term. March 17, 1002. 

Other Information, address 



MAJOR BEN CUNNINGHAM, Registrar, Maryville, Tenn, 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY 



Vol. IV. 



MARYVILLE, TENN., MARCH, 1902. 



No. 5. 



HOW PAPPY WAS -PLUM FOOLED." 

Pakt 1. 
plottin'g. 

Spring had rctnrnccl to Long Pine Cove. 
The arbutus was trailing her rosy-tinted 
wreath over the rocky mountain sides, and 
the delightful scent of the delicate blos- 
soms was luring the bees from the "gums" 
behind many a little cabin home. All 
through the cove the bustle of preparation 
for the plowing and planting of the cleared 
fields was another proof that the season 
of new life was at hand. 

In a field at the upper end of the cove a 
young woman was working alone. She 
had broken the cornstalks that remained 
bladeless from the crop of the previous 
year, and was gathering the stones that 
were so abundant on the surface of the 
soil, and piling them in tall cairns, that the 
field might be more easily plowed. 

She had been engaged at this tiresome 
work all the afternoon, and was quite 
weary. When the sun was just about an 
hour high, she was aroused from her ab- 
straction by the clanking of chains. Quick- 
ly shading her eyes with her hands, she 
looked in the direction of the sound, and 
saw coming out of the fringe of timber 
above her a young man, mounted on a 
small mule. He had evidently been work- 
ing in the fields, for the plow harness was 
upon the beast, and the traces looped upon 
the hames were rattling together. Catch- 
ing sight of the red sun-bonnet, he waved 
his hand to her and dismounted. Throw- 
ing the bridle over a fence rider, he was 
soon striding toward her. 

"What y' doin', Cordie?" 

"]es' a-pilin' them rocks, so's pappy kin 
plow a few in here. How's 't happen y're 
comin' daown this-a-way?" 

"Well, I'd bin a-plowin' up 't th' Laurel 
Ridge, 'n' Bud Todd 'lowed es 'e kem pas' 



'at 'e '■ced a woman pilin' rocks daown en 
ole Wash VVilletts' stalk graoun', 'n' then 
I got t'r'd 'n' started out t' hunt a boss 
swap," he added, facetiously. 

"I'm pow'rful glad t' see y', but I don't 
know what t' think about y'r bein' here. 
Ef pappy wus t' come araoun' here 'n' fin' 
you, thar'd be no eend ov a bad time. He's 
jes' a-gittin' wus about y' all th' time." 

"Well," he said slowly, but with feeling, 
"I cain't unnerstan' y'r pappy. I ain't 
never done erry thing t' git th' ole man 
s' daown on me. I've alius tried to conduct 
m'se'f es a perfesser ort t', "n' never made 
'im no trouble, 'n' don't owe hiin 'r enybidy 
else th' wuth ov a squirrel hide" — 

"I know; but pappy 's sot agin y', 'n' 
keeps a-gittin' wuss sot." 

" 'Tain't right 't all. Xow he favors 
Gul Nedbetter all 'e kin — "n' Gul's pore 
cattle. I ain't got es much Ian' es Gul, but 
mv pappy's never bin tuck up fur stillin' 
'n' sich."' 

"'l^hings '11 change some time, C3'arson. 
Hit cain't alius stay like this. Pappy '11 
shore come t' reason atter while." 

"Now, Cordie, y' know we're promised 
this good while, 'n' don't y' reckon ef we'd 
go raoun' t' th' ole 'Squire's 'n' git married, 
'at that wouldn't fetch 'im?" 

"Hit mout ; but, Cyars', nobidy '11 ever 
marry you 'n' me but Preacher Bryson, 
over in Hutchins' Cove ; he married 
mother, 'n' he's t' marr}^ me." 

"Cordie, y're right. Come t' think about 
hit. I don't want no 'Squires messin' 
raoun' me when Brother Bryson's araoun' : 
but, then, 'e ain't; 'e's over on Sittico 
Creek, a-holdin" ov a meetin' ; but 'e 'U be 
back by 'n' by, 'n' then we'll fool y'r 
pappy." 

" 'Taint jes" th' right thing t' do, but, 
then, 'e 's jes' made 's. I'm jes' s' tired o' 
hearin' 'im bemean you, 'n' talkin' all th' 
time what a likely feller Gulliver is, I c'd 



8o 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



jes' run off t' th' mounting, 'n' I will when 
th' time comes. But, Cyars', we've got t' 
act deceited about this, 'r pappj^ '11 fin' out ; 
hit's all right with motlverrsiieiikes y':"^ 

After a few more words they parted, and 
none too soon, for old Wash sought his 
daughter a few minutes after Carson had 
ridden back into the woods. His anger 
scarcely knew bounds when he found 
whose beast had made the hoof-marks be- 
side th.e fence where the path crosses the 
fields to the road. 

His hard words were received with no 
show of resentment, and as they neared 
home she mustered her spirits and gave a 
deceitful smile of pleasure as she saw Gul 
tie his roan by the block and wait their ap- 
proach. The visitor tried to explain his 
business — something about a froe to rive 
the clapboards for a wonderful "four-pen" 
barn he would build after harvest ; but 
Cordie was not a whit less cordial than her 
father in pressing him to enter and tell 
what he v/anted after supper. Under such 
circumstances it is not remarkable that he 
stayed, and the young lady of the home 
made the evening so pleasant for him that 
he left with his head in the clouds. And so 
irreproachable had been her behavior that 
nothing was said about Carson Hepburn 
after the guest had departed. 

And in the fortnight that followed there 
was little to say anent the unfavored suitor. 
He continued his plowing until the last 
furrow had been thrown ; then it was heard 
that he had gone to the county-seat on 
business ; then it was talked at the store 
and postoffice that he had been seen at 
Preacher Bryson's meetings at Sittico. 
These were all items of interest to old 
Wash, and lie felt assured that Gul would 
make hay during tliis interval of sunshine. 

The first hint that Cordie had of her 
lover's return was on the third Sabbath 
after the meeting. She had walked across 
the fields from her home, and had just 
come to the path through the thicket 
at the foot of the knoll on which stands 
the little white frame church, when she 



saw waiting for her Lorena Hepburn. 
Wheji she came up, Lorena beckoned her 
to come to her, and she walked hack be- 
hind a tangle of laurel, green briars and 
rhododendron, which made a most effec- 
tive screen. 

"I've got somethin' t* tell y'." 

"What is it, Lureny?" 

"Cyarson kem back las' night, 'n' wants 
t' know if y' c'n meet 'im up by th' lick-log 
after dinner ; 'n' 'e said t' tell y' 'at he'd told 
me about you-uns' troubles, 'n' 'at I wus 
a-goin' t' holp y' all I c'd." 

"Hit's good o' y' t' do all this, 'n' I'm 
pow'rful oblceged t' y'. Y' c'n tell 'im I'll 
be thar soon 's I kin ; but I cain't stay long, 
becuz I'm a-lookin' fur Gul t' come 'n' see 
me this evenin' shortly atter dinner, 'n' 
I dasn't disappint "im, 'r pappy '11 go t' 
chairgin' agin. But hit's all right." 

The girls exchanged glances, and Lorena 
knew that her brother's interests were safe. 

Thev went up to the church separately, 
so as to avoid the slightest hint of sus- 
picion : but once at church, thev mingled 
with tJTe other girls as usual, walking in the 
old graveyard between services, as they 
had done every sunny Sabbath since they 
were little girls, and as their mothers and 
grandmothers had done before them. 

The dinner over that day, Cordie con- 
trived to slip out unobserved, and managed 
to remain unmissed for an hour. She 
climbed the steep knob behind the house, 
and was soon at the old log where the 
cattle were salted. At first she thought 
she was the first at the trysting-place, but 
a familiar form appearing from behind a 
tree truid^— undeceived her. 

"Difl y' hev trouble in gittin' away?" 
he asked, after their first greetings had 
been exchanged and they were sitting close 
by each other on the gnarled old log. 

"Xo; but I'll hev t' be pow'rful easy 
goin' in. I'm 'spectin' comp'ny this 
evenin'." 

"Yes, Lureny told me." 

"Gul hev bed a sight o' good times sence 
y've bin layin' holed up, 'n' 'e 'pears t' be 



MARYVILLK COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



8i 



en better sperrits than I've seed 'im fur 
quite a spell. Hit's goin' t' be kind o" hard- 
like t' drap 'im s' unexpected 'n' unbe- 
knownst t' "im : but" — 

"Everythin^-'s all right, Cordie ; 'n' ef we 
don't hev no 'sturbamints in our projec'^, 
w'v, ne.x' Sunday night Brother Bryson "ii 
say how es you air Mis' Hepburn." 

"Now hit's this-a-vvay," and he unfolded 
his plan to her while she listened with 
bated breath to his ingenious scheme to 
outwit an unreasonable parent. The fact 
that Preacher Bryson had given his sanc- 
tion was sufficient for her, and she con- 
sented to every detail. She was to inveigle 
Gul into taking her to "night meetin' " at 
the church the next Sabbath night ; Carson 
and Lorena would be waiting by the fence 
in the thicket at the foot of the knoll ; then 
when the meeting would be over and the 
groups of worshipers go down the hill, in 
the good-natured confusion arising as they 
climbed the fence, Cordie would leave Gul 
and step aside in the darkness, and Lorena 
would go off with him. When he would 
notice the difference, even though but a 
moment later, it would be too late to do 
more than express his chagrin and accept 
his fate. Preacher Bryson would be in 
waiting at some appointed place, and in a 
few minutes the faithful lovers would be 
joined. 

Cordie assented to it all, and bidding 
Carson a hasty good-by, hastened down to 
the home, and returned to the family un- 
suspected. 

Gul arrived ere long, and the night meet- 
ing of the following Sabbath, when a visit- 
ing preacher with a wide reputation would 
hold forth, was discussed, and it was only 
natural that such an ardent suitor should 
embrace the offered golden opportunity to 
continue the pursuit of the prize. 



Part II. 

THE WEDDING IN THE CAVE. 

The moments of the intervening week 
sped on swift wings. Sabbath came, but 



the event of Sabbath was the night meet- 
ing. 

The meeting was a success. The visiting 
Ijrother was eloquent. The perspiration 
ran (l.)\\n his face in little rivers as he 
lal)ored, painting vivid word pictures of the 
final end and estate of lost sinners. He 
lined out the closing hymn, which was re- 
ceived with much satisfaction by the ap- 
preciative audience : 

"Lord, what a thoughtless wretch was I, 

To mourn, and murmur, and repine; 
To see the wicked placed on high. 

In pride and robes of honor shine. 
But oh, their end, their dreadful end ! 

Thy sanctuary taught me so ; 
On slippery rocks I see them stand, 

And fiery billows roll below.'' 

And the service closed. 

There was a goodly number present, and 
about half the congregation wended their 
way down the little hill side path. Gul and 
Cordie were accompanied by several wor- 
shipers, the Todds, the Ghorleys, the Wil- 
letts, and a few others living near old 
Wash's farm. It was an ideal night for 
such l)usiness as Cordie had on hand, a 
dark, mist}' night, only an occasional star 
visible. As they came to the fence Gul 
climbed first to assist the others in crossing 
in the darkness. As he was stepping over 
he put his foot on a loose rail and was 
neatly sent sprawling. In the laughing and 
chaffing that followed, the girls cleverlv 
exchanged places. As soon as Cordie 
reached Carson's side they stealthily fol- 
lowed the fence to the "big road." By tor- 
tuous bypaths they crossed through wood- 
land and fields. During all this time she 
had asked no questions, but when he pre- 
pared to cross another fence and the bulk 
of the mountain loomed up just ahead of 
them, she whispered: 

"Whar 're we goin' to, Cyars'?" 

"Up t' th' cave." 

"Th' cave I" 

"Yes. Brother Bryson 'lowed es we'd 
better meet "im thar, becaze ef 'e went t' er 
house 'e might be 'spicioned, 'n' ef Gul gits 



82 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY 



t' rampaigin' raoun', 'e mout axerdently git 
on er wa'm trail. But y' ain't afeard?" 

"N-o ; but it seems like a quare place t' 
marry en." 
; "So 'tis." 

By this time they had come into a wilder- 
ness of sassafras and blackberries, and a 
moment later the hollow sound of their 
steps indicated the proximity of a cavern 
of some sort. Hepburn found the entrance 
without difificulty, and throwing his arm 
around Cordie, half carried her down the 
steep incline and through the narrow open- 
ing in the great lime rocks and into the 
spacious atrium of the cave. Their foot- 
falls woke reverberating echoes. Carson 
essaved to speak an assuring word, but 
his voice had such a sepulchral tone that 
she clutched his arm in alarm. The flare 
of a pine torch sprung up in front of them, 
then another. A startled bat fluttered by 
on leathern wing and brushed their faces. 
\A'hat an uncanny place for a wedding! 
Cordie was right. It certainly was "a 
quare place." 

However great the fears of the young 
bride had been a moment previous, they 
disappeared like the fog banks of her na- 
tive mountains under the smile of the 
morning sun, as she looked into the benev- 
olent countenance of her old friend, the 
venerable Preacher Bryson, as he came to- 
Avard them from the adjoining chamber. 
He took both her hands in his, and in the 
kindly tones that had won him friends 
without number up and down the moun- 
tains, said : 

"Well, gurl, this es quare, ain't it? I 
used t' court raoun' this ole cave when I 
wus young like Cyars' thar; but I never 
'lowed es I'd marry in thar,'' then he 
laughed a mellow, contagious laugh, 
"Cyars' hes bean a-tellin' me all you-uns' 
troubles. Hit's a sight, t'at's a fac'. Your 
pappy '11 be all right in a day 'r two, atter 
'e gits t' missin' y' frum home. I married 
him 'n' y'r mammy, 'n' you-uns air a better 
lookin' couple way yander, 

"Now, when Cyars' kem up t' Sittico, I 



wus jes' taperin' off a big meetin'. 'E told 
me 'e'd a pair o' license en 'is pocket, but 
nobid}' c'd use 'em but me, 'n' — well, I 
reckon we'd better be a-usin' of 'em, too. 
Hit's a naycheral curios' ov a place, but 
hit's es good es a chu'ch house fur courtin' 
'n' marryins." 

Thcv walked l)ack into the cave to a 
place that the mountain folk had called the 
■'dancin' floor." It was a level space sur- 
rounded by magnificent limestone columns, 
fluted and wreathed by Nature's own hand; 
pointed stalactites were pendant above, 
and the drops of water upon them shone 
like jewels in the light of the torches. 

The *:orches were handed to Jerry 
Hearon, a loyal friend of the groom, whose 
fealty had won for him the honor of wed- 
ding guest and witness. Jerry often de- 
clares that he never expects "t' see tli' beat 
jv hit, fur ennything purty." The vener- 
able preacher, with hoary head and his 
long, silvered beard, a very patriarch in 
appearance ; the stalwart groom ; the 
blushing bride, simply attired in her Sab- 
bath dress. It was an impressive sight. 

But leave for a time the happy bridal 
scene and go to the erstwhile favored 
suitor. As the little group journeyed from 
church, fortune seemed to favor the run- 
aways. Gul tried his best to be agreeable 
to the whole party, and carried on an ani- 
mated conversation with old Wash, ad- 
dressing now and then an occasional ques- 
tion to IvOrena, which she answered in low 
monosyllables. At the gate, though, he 
lingered until the family had gone in. Then 
she said,"i« an undisguised voice: 

"What y' stoppin' fur? Ain't y' a-goin' 
t" take me home ?" 

"Home! Gal, what y' mean? What air 
you doin' here, Lureny Hepburn? Say, 
how'd y' come here?" 

"W'y y' tuck m' arm at th' fence, that's 
how; 'n' y' ain't never led go ov hit sence." 
"Lureny, whar's Cordie Willetts?'' 
"Don't know." 
"Don't, eh ; the Jim Tom ! Yo're foolin' 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



83 



wif me. Now you quit. Whar is she, I 
say?" 

"Don't know no more'n you do. All I 
know 's 'at y" tuck m" arm 'n' ain't led go 
ov hit sence. Now y' take me home." 

"No, I don't, nuther. I'm er goin' en 'n' 
ax Wash ef he's bean projec'in' wif me" — 

"No, sir; you jes' come along home wit 
me.'' 

There was no mistaking the seriousness 
of the situation. Those determined words 
meant trouble, so he obeyed, but with mis- 
erable grace. They went round by the 
"big road," because Lorena was insistant 
upon that point ; it was so much farther, 
and -would give the wedding party so much 
more time for the playing of their parts. 
And so it happened that Preacher Bryson, 
on his little sorrel, and the bride and 
groom came out of the woods short-cut 
and up to the house, and met face to face 
Gul and the headstrong Lorena. 
. "What's this? What's this all mean?" 
Gul asked his companion, savagely. 

".\x Brother Bryson." 

Cordie heard the question, and answered 
for herself. 

"Hit's this-a-way. Gul — now don't go t' 
gittin' tored up. Cyars' 'n' me 's bin prom- 
ised fur a long time, 'n' th' time wtis set 
fur t" night. I hated t' fool y', but wus jes' 
obleeged t' doh it, so 's t' git the ups on 
pappy" — 

Brother Bryson interrupted : "Hit were 
sharp ov 'em, wa'n't hit? Now, Gul, you 
jist take this en good part. Her pappy 'U 
come raoun' all right, 'n' don't y' go t' 
gittin' spunked up. Hit were a pow'ful 
joke." 

"Whar wus th' weddin'?" asked Gul, 
sullenly, but interested. 

"En th' cave." 

"Th' cave ! The Jim Tom ! You uns 
shore did 't 'bout slick as foxes. Well, I 
won't say much more. 'N' this gal's a 
slick one, too," he added, thinking to re- 
lease Lorena's arm, " 'bout es slick es 
erry one o' y'. I'll drap daown t' y'r house, 
Cordie, 'n' tell y'r pappy hit's all over 'n' 



fix 't up fur you-uns. 'E'll take on ef 'e 
don't know whar y' air. Fur y' fooled me, 

an' hit's all right.'' 

There was a stormy session in front of 
the fireplace at old Wash's that night; but 
the old man finally listened to reason when 
the mother's arguments were backed by 
Gulliver. Within the time limit set by 
Brother Bryson he "came around," declar- 
ing that he had been "plum fooled, becase 
he wus too big a fool t' holp hit." 

Whether Carson and Cordie "lived 
happy ever afterwards" remains to be 
seen ; but their honeymoon, which is not 
yet over, has been all that even the storv- 
liooks could desire. 

Abe Clevengcr. 



THE RETREAT OF FERGUSON'S 
CANNONEERS. 

It was the 2d of January, 1863. Those 
who are conversant with history will re- 
member this as the third and last dav of 
the battle of Murfreesboro. 

Two days earlier the armies of Rose- 
crans and Bragg had found themselves 
facing each other on opposite sides of Stone 
River. On the night of December 30, Gen- 
eral Bragg shifted his line of fortifications 
and threw his left wing across to the west 
side of the river, and in the morning the 
llower of his army, twenty thousand 
strong, confronted the Laiion right, which 
Avas under the command of General Mc- 
Cook. While the Confederates were cross- 
ing the stream under cover of darkness, 
the Lmion commander was forming his 
plan to concentrate his troops on his left, 
mtending in the morning to crush the Con- 
federate right. McCook's command was 
weakened to support Thomas in the center 
and Crittenden on the left. 

Thus the two Generals, with nearly equal 
forces and equal advantages, had formed 
the same plan of battle. In the morning, 
before Rosecrans realized the danger that 
threatened his right, Bragg began a furious 
attack, and by noon had hurled ^McCook's 



84 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY 



broken columns back upon the Union cen- 
ter. The brunt of the battle now fell upon 
General Thomas, and but for the magnifi- 
cent courage of the division of General 
Hazen, who, with only thirteen hundred 
men, withstood the terrible onslaughts oi 
the enemy until nightfall, the Union army 
would have been swept from the field. 
That night more than seven thousand 
Union soldiers were missing from the 
ranks. 

Xew dear's morning found the defeated 
army strongly posted with shortened lines, 
but with a manifest disposition to fight. 
General Bragg grew wary of his stubborn 
antagonist, and the day was spent in recon- 
noitering and skirmishing. In the after- 
noon Rosecrans ordered Crittenden, to 
cross over with the left wing and to fortify 
the steep range of hills that lies along the 
vallev east of Stone River. Thomas had 
already posted artillery on the blufYs back 
of the west bank, and Avith both sides 
of the stream fortified, Rosecrans could 
throw his reserve forces across to 
strengthen either wing of his army. Crit- 
tenden posted his guns along the range of 
hills, and then hastily threw up a line of 
intrenchments for his infantry beyond the 
artillerv and at right angles with the river. 
The Confederate right was already sta- 
tioned almost parallel with Crittenden'^ 
forces and farther down the stream, be- 
tween the L^nion line and the town of Mur- 
freesl)oro. 

Earlv m the morning of the 2(1, the battle 
broke out anew on the east side of the 
river, and for several hours there was ter- 
rific cannonading in that quarter. Near 
the mi'kllc of the afternoon, the Union 
commander discovered that General Bragg 
was keeping up his artillery fire to conceal 
the movements of his troops farther doAvn 
the river. Before the reserves could cross 
to the support of Crittenden, the Confeder- 
ates v.ere massed against the I'nion left, 
which was forced foot by foot to withdra^v■ 
to the east bank under the protection of 
the LInion guns. '\ 



Lest the Confederates should outflank 
him, Rosecrans began to move his infantry 
back to the west bank. At this point on 
Stone River the fords are shallow and the 
valley is about eighty rods wide. On eacli 
side, nearly a furlong from the stream and 
running parallel with it, is a range of steep 
hills. While Crittenden's infantry was 
huddled in the narrow plain between tffe 
river and the east batteries, the eastern 
hills concealed their movement from the 
Confederate right. Most of the troops 
were on the west side before the movement 
was detected by the enemy. 

All this time the artillery had been pour- 
ing a deadly fire into the Confederate in- 
trenchments, half a mile to the east. The 
moment Bragg learned of the Federal re- 
treat a swift horse dashed down his line 
of works, and the next moment the can- 
noneers could see the enemy leaping over 
their breastworks and forming for a 
charge. This was the critical moment for 
the Federal cannoneers. They were left 
unsupported by infantry. Less than half a 
mile away fifteen thousand of the enemy's 
troops were moving across the level plain 
at the double-quick. Should the Confed- 
erates reach the crest of the hills and seize 
the cannons, they would immediately turn 
til em upon Crittenden's solid masses of in- 
fantry in the valley below. That would 
mean the annihilation of the L'nion army. 
The battle must change to a race. 

To add to the confusion of the gunners, 
a regiment of North Carolina mountain- 
eers had swept round the I'nion flank, and 
having crept aloiig the thickly wooded hill- 
side, were now emerging from the wood- 
land ?. quarter of a mile to the left, and 
were pouring in a deadly cross-fire. The 
Confederate batteries far down the river 
had found the range, and the air was ablaze 
with bursting shells. The grand army of 
Rosecans was doomed! But. no! The 
artillery commander was a man of un- 
daunted courage. Above the roar of battle 
the trumpet tones of Captain Ferguson 
rang down the line to limber the guns. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



«5 



With the precision of clockwork the gun- 
ners hmbered the tiekl pieces, the phinging 
artillery horses sprang to their places, and 
the batteries swung round and began the 
bold dash that meant victory or defeat to 
the Xorthern army. To gain the ford from 
their position the batieries must follow a 
narrow wagon road, almost impassable, 
and for several rods inclosed by perpen- 
dicular bluffs. Down this steep and dan- 
gerous pass the maddened horses plunged. 
Captain Ferguson, mounted on a great 
black charger, was the last man to leave 
the hill. As he left the top of the ridge, he 
glanced back at his pursuers, who were 
rushing madly on after the retreating ar- 
tilleryman. The swiftest runners were 
scarcely forty rods behind him. Even as 
he wheeled his horse to follow the bat- 
teries down the road, the Captain's heart 
sank within him. For just as the cavalcade 
was passing through the narrow gulch a 
shell burst directly over the foremost of 
the guns, overturning a caisson and killing 
two of the artillery horses. The galloping 
teams behind were unable to stop, and can- 
nons, caissons, horses and men were piled 
upcjn one another, and the whole retreat 
was blocked. 

Here was a second Bull Run. But only 
for an instant did the commander hesitate. 
Then he dashed down to the surging", 
struggling mass, seized the battery flag, 
wheeled his horse, and rode back up the hill 
straight for the charging enemy. When 
he reached the crest of the hill, the yell- 
ing enemy were half way up the other side, 
not a hundred paces away. He reined his 
charger, and waving the flag defiantly, he 
began tiring his revolver into their broken 
ranks. In an instant he received the fire 
from a whole platoon. Though the great 
horse reared and plunged as a bullet struck 
him and another shattered the flagstafif, 
the rider was unhurt. He held his ground, 
and, flinging out the long folds of his tat- 
tered flag, he tauntingly challenged the 
enemy to come on. 

Instinctivelv the soldiers halted. Here 



was a Cnion officer l^earing the L'nion flag. 
Xo man was dare-devil enough to face 
such (jdds alone. Xo battalion would allow 
their flag to fall into the enemy's hands 
without a stubborn fight. On the farther 
side of the hill nnist be other Federal 
troo]is, ])erhaps jxjsted batteries. It was 
evident that the officer on the foaming 
steed was trying to draw them into an 
ambush. 

The veteran troops of Bragg would not 
be trapped by a single man. They were 
too well disciplined to rush with broken 
ranis upon an unseen foe. As if by in- 
stinct the panting soldiers began to fall in 
line. In five minutes their formation was 
-ci^mpleted, and a solid column, ten men 
abreast, started on the double-quick for 
'he top of the hill, where the artillery had 
disappeared. 

For the first time Ferguson looked back 
where he had left his entangled battalions, 
and lie gave a shcnit of triumph. The can- 
noneers had righted the caisson, cut the 
traces of the disabled horses, and without 
leaving a single gun to fall into the hands 
of the eneni}-, were already clashing across 
tne narrow valley, and in a moment more 
vv'ould plunge through the shallow stream 
to safet}-. The glittering bayonets were 
almost upon him when Ferguson once 
more waved his flag in triumph, wheeled 
jiis horse, and dashed down the ra\"ine with 
the speed of the wind. 

It was the work of a few minutes for the 
artillery to cross and take position on the 
west bank of Stone River, with the in- 
fantry drawn up on either flank. As the 
strong column of Confederates poured 
over the ridge and filed down the danger- 
ous ravine into the valley below, they were 
greeted with a volley of musketry and a 
roar of artillery. At the same moment the 
heavy guns on the western highlands and 
the infantry of General Thomas began 
their work of death. It seemed that a solid 
flame leaped into that valley of death and 
swept away whole platoons of the fright- 
ened and dumfounded foes. The Confed- 



86 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



erates were trapped; they could not cross 
the stream in the face of that deadly fire ; 
they had no time to throw up intren.ch- 
ments ; the level plain afiforded them no 
shelter. Huddled together within range of 
twenty thousand Union muskets, their 
ranks melted away like snow beneath an 
April sun. 

As soon as the Confederates were 
thrown into confusion, Crittenden crossed 



the stream, swept them back over the 
ridge, and before nightfall the Union army 
had regained the ground that the day 'had 
lost them. ., 

That night, as. forty thousand battle- 
worn L'nion soldiers shivered around their 
campfires, they could hear Bragg's wagon- 
train rattling over the frozen ground to- 
ward JNlrirfreesboro. In the morning the 
enemv had gone. Frank E. Laughead. 




IjAUOHEAD, •im. 
HOLTSINGER.'UJ. 



BEELER, 

QUIST, '04 



HOl'E. 
CALDWELL, '02. 



ALPHA SIGMA'S MIDWINTER EN- 
TERTAINMENT. 

J^riday night, January 31, was the date 
of the Alpha Sigma midwinter. This was 
the society's twentieth annual entertain- 
ment, and was held in liartlett Hall. 

Th.e Alphas and their lady friends had 
spared no pains in the decoration of the 
auditorium; beautiful festoons of the so- 
ciety colors hung from the ceiling and 
chandeliers, and over the stage rose a del- 
icate arch, draped with orange bunting and 
entwined with sprigs of ivy. About the 
foot of the stage was a display of flowers, 
while upon the wall back of the arch hung 
a large portrait of the society's first Presi- 



dent,- Prof. J. G. Newman. On the right 
was a picture of Washington, and on the 
■eit a battle scene, "An August morning 
with Farragut." 

L. B. Bewley, the Alpha's standard- 
bearer of looi, was presiding officer. 
Alvjut 8 o'clock he asked the audience to 
rise, and Dr. Barnes spoke the words of 
invocation. After a word of greeting by 
the presiding officer, the program was 
opened with a song of welcome by the 
Alpha Sigma Quartet. The quartet sing- 
ers were Messrs. Whitlow, Newman, Wil- 
son and Penlancl. 

The nmsical numbers on the program, 
besides the selections by the cjuartet, were 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



«7 



a piano solo by Misses Mary and Betty 
Sharp, and a song by the chorus. The 
chorus was composed of the Alp'Ka Sigma 
and Theta Epsilon Quartet. The Thetas 
were Misses Yates, Goddard, Howard and 
Weisgerber. The song by the chorus, 
"Come where the LiHes Bloom,"' was per- 
haps the most popular feature of the even- 
ing program.. 

The literary exercises were declamations 
by INIessrs. Holtsinger and Beeler, a debate 
by F. H. Hope and F. E. Laughead. an ora- 
tion by J- S. Caldwell, and a paper by E. N. 
Quist. The declamations were entitled, 
respectivel}-, "Tennessee" and "Against 
Flogging in the Xavy." 

The subject debated was : "Resolved, 
That municipal politics should be non-par- 
tisan." F. H. Hope affirmed the proposi- 
tion. He dwelt on the corruption of the 
political parties in the cities, and argue 1 
that municipal politics should be divorced 
from the national parties. He maintained 
that the problems confronting the cities 
are distinct from the national and State 
issues, and that municipal campaigns 
should be conducted on local issues, re- 
gardless of State and national politics. The 
negative speaker showed that non-partisan 
reforms have never accomplished more 
than temporary relief. He showed, fur- 
ther, that the cities" most appalling evils, 
such as the growing power of private 
tnists and corporations, are beyond the 
power of municipal governments, and can 
be controlled only by the State and na- 
tional legislatures. The speaker main- 
tained that the cities, to deal successfully 
wnth the!?e issues, must retain their alliance 
with the national parties. He held that 
the national parties are the only permanent 
political organizations, and that all the 
branches of our government are so inti- 
mately related that the reformation of 
jntinicipal politics can best be accomplished 
by reforming the great national parties, 
and by thus elevating city. State and na- 
tional politics together. 

The subject of Mr. Caldweirs oration 



was "Xapoleon's Influence on American 
History.' The speaker referred to the 
time of our second war with England, and 
presented a fact that can not be ignored, 
that the Americans had to contend with 
but a sm.all portion of the British troops, 
while the flower of England's army was en- 
gaged in the campaigns against Napoleon. 

The last, but not the least, of the literary 
productions was the ever-popular Alpha 
Sigma Advance, by E. X. Quist. After 
reading the .\dvance. ^Ir. Quist favored- 
the audience with a chalk talk on "Evolu- 
tio'T.'" 

The audience was then dismissed by Dr. 
:\IcCulloch. 



THE ATHENIAN SOCIETY. 

Tlie t;Mni opened with most of the 
Athenians back in their customary places, 
inspired with the determination to make 
the year the liest in the Society"s history. 
Several old members who were not with us- 
last term have again taken their places in 
the Society ranks, and the long list of ac- 
tive members has been considerably in- 
creased by the addition of new members. 
The attendance has gained to a marked 
degree over- last year's good record. At 
most of the meetings the hall has been 
filled to its usual seating capacity. 

The large alumni picture has been re- 
modeled and again placed in the hall. This 
picture makes a beautiful and valuable or- 
narnent to the lately repaired home of the 
Athenians. As yet the frame is not filled 
with pictures, and the Society would be 
verv glad to receive the pictures of all her 
loyal Alumni. 

There has been a striking advancement 
along all the lines of progress, and espe- 
cially has the debate improved over that 
of last year. Every program has been care- 
fully prepared and rendered with credit to 
the participants. 

On February 22:1 an open meeting was 
given in honor of the occasion. A special 
program was arranged, and the exercises 
of the evening were a fitting tribute to tl.e 
ereat Father of our Country. 



88 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



Maryville College Monthly. 



Vol. IV. 



MARCH. 1902. 



No. 5. 



EDUORIAL STAFF. 



Bditok-is-(Jhikk, 

Athenian, 

Bainonian. 

Alpha Sigma, 

Thbta Epsilon, - 

Y.M. C. A., 

Y. \V. C. A. 

Athletics, 

Alumni, - - - 

Bosinkss Manager, 

SUBSCRll'TIoN MANAGKK, 



ELMER B. WALLER 

DENNIS V\ . CRAWFORD 

HELEN E. ERVIN 

FRANK E. LAUCiHEAD 

EMMA E. CALDWELL 

FREDERICK F. SCHELL 

MA. ME STEBBINS 

- ARTHUR C.TEDFORD 

JOHN W. RITCHIE 

FREDERIC L. WEBB 

JOSEPH S. CAJ.DWELL 



Students, grncluates and friends of the College are 
Invited to contrlbuie literary arilcles, personals and 
items of general interest for public-aiiou. 
Subscription price, for fi(/hl iiuiiibcrs, M cents. 
Address all coniuiuiilL-ations lo 

Makyville College Monthly, 

Maryville, Tenn. 

Eutercd >t M»ryTille, Teiin., as Secoud-Claes Mail Matter. 



There are a dozen of the 
Military Drill. College boys belonging to 
the National Gnards ar 
this place. All the boys agree that the ex- 
ercise and drill that they receive are well 
worth the time spent. Maryville College 
has enough students to maintain a splendid 
military company, and it would add to our 
standing as an educational institution to 
have a well equipped company. 

The prime object of both the gymnasium 
and the military company is to afford 
healthful exercise to the largest possible 
number of students. The gymnasium may 
very easily fall far short of this object. 
Gymnasium exercise is not usually com- 
pulsory, and the average student, if he 
takes advantage of it at all, does so very 
irregularly. 

The military company better fulfills its 
object ; it provides exercise that is vigor- 
ous without being violent ; it may be either 
outdoor or indoor exercise ; it comes at 
regular periods ; it will accommodate any 
number of students; a student may be- 
come proficient in it, even if he is not a 
developed athlete : it gives him an easy, 
manly carriage ; it is a most valuable 
school of obedience ; it provides that part 
of one's education which no patriotic citi- 
zen can lightly esteem. 



LOCALS AND PERSONALS. 

Have you had the mumps ? 



Thirteen new members have been re- 
ceived into the Y. W. C. A. this term. 



The .\thletic Association recently pur- 
chased a bill of baseball goods from the 
Woodruff Hardware Company, of Knox- 
ville. 



Mrs. T. T. Alexander was present at the 
February meeting of the Y. W. C. A., and 
spoke very interestingly of her life as a 
missionary in Japan. 



The Sophomore class gave a party in 
honor of the Seniors at the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. F. H. Lamon Wednesday night, 
February 19th. The evening, from 7 to 10, 
was delightfully spent in games and other 
amusements. A short program was ren- 
dered, consisting of recitations by Misses 
Bryan and Wayland and Mr. Hunter, and 
a class poem by Mr. Dickey. Refresh- 
n";enls of oranges and bananas were served. 



The College members of the National 
Guard visited Knoxville Wednesday, Feb- 
ruary 5tli, and marched in the Schley pa- 
rade. The Maryville Company composed 
the guard of honor and marched imme- 
diately behind the Admiral's carriage.. 
They also formed the guard at the 
Woman's Building, where Admiral and 
Mrs. Schley held their reception. The 
Guards will probably be given a week's 
encampment at Chickamauga in May. 



The Marietta (Ohio) Register has the 
following account of the marriage of two 
of our late teachers in the College : 

"The prettiest wedding of the winter 
season was that of Mr. Robert Walker,, 
of Maryville, Tenn., and Miss Amanda 
Andrews, of Marietta. The wedding wa; 
held Tuesday evening, at the home of the 
bride's parents. Professor and Mrs. Martin 
R. Andrews, corner of Wooster and Mus- 
kingum Avenues. The ceremony was per- 
formed by Rev. Dr. J. R. Nichols, in the 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



89 



presence of alwut fifty of the contracting- 
young people's friends and relatives. 

"The rooms of the beautiful home were 
yerv. tastefully deciarated with roses, smilax 
iind carnations. Everything showed the 
touch of the artist's hand in arrangement, 
and the effect was very beautiful. 

"The ceremony was performed in the 
parlors, the service being said by Dr. 
Nichols in his very impressive style. Miss 
Winifred Palmer acted as bridesmaid, and 
Mr. Lowry, of Cincinnati, performed the 
functions of best man. 

"The bride was exquisitely gowned for 
the occasion, and appeared very beautiful. 
The attending ladies were each dressed 
very effectively. 

"After the ceremony a season of con- 
g'-atulations was indulged in, and Mr. and 
Mrs. Walker were wished many happy 
vears of wedded life together. The bride 
IS a charming young lady, and received tho 
showers of good wishes in her usual mod- 
est and becoming manner. Mr. Walker 
was a stranger to most of the guests, but 
impressed them very favorably by his per- 
sonality. 

"After the congratulations had been ex- 
tended, a splendid wedding banquet was 
served, the enjoyment of which was not 
the least of the pleasures, of the evening. 
There were twelve seated at the bride's 
table, which had received the especial at- 
tention of the caterer, and was a splendid 
work of art. A lovely centerpiece of lace 
held a large bunch of bride's roses and 
white carnations, while other portions of 
the table were decorated with flowers and 
trailing green. 

"The cutting of the wedding cake was 
performed before the assembled guests, 
and was witnessed with great interest. 
Miss Winifred Palmer was the fortunate 
recipient of the ring. Mr. Ripley received 
the thimble and Miss Mills the ten-cent 
piece. 

The banquet was served in splendid 
style. Mrs. Hutchman. Mrs. Fleming, Miss 
Shaw and Miss Dickinson assisting. 

"Mr. and Mrs. Walker received many 
beautiful and valuable wedding gifts, as the 
l<ind remembrances of their many friends. 
Many of them were r?.re and exquisite 
works of art. and graced the receiving 
table beautifully. 

"Mr. and Mrs. Walker left for Washir.,- 
ton and Xew York, and on the 13th will 
commence the long journey to the I'iiilip- 



pine Islands, where Mr. Walker has a gov- 
ernment api^ointment. ,, 

"The bride is one of Marietta's best 
known and most accomplished young 
women. Though out of the city for several 
vears, her friends always held her in re- 
membrance. She is highly educated, being 
a graduate of the Marietta College for 
Women, and of Painesville. She also took 
a post-graduate course in one of the largest 
universities in Germany. During the past 
tvi'o years she has been engaged as in- 
structor in Maryville College. Tennessee. 

"Mr. Walker is a well educated man, and 
one of the best known and highly respected 
citizens of Maryville. He is a man of 
staunch character and splendid habits, and 
his friends expect to hear of his rapid rise 
to fame and fortime. His present appoint- 
ment will keep him in the Philippines fof a 
number of years, where a good oppor- 
tunity is open." 



ATHLETICS OF THE FUTURE. 

(COXCIA'PEU.) 

Readers of the February Monthly will 
remember the prominent part Mr. Pm A. 
Coming ]:ilayed in the first part of this 
storiette. 

Let them also rememT:)er that the first 
chapter was written some time before 
Christmas, when the athletically inclined 
students were wondering when in the 
world our physical director, whom the 
Faculty had been so long promising us, 
v.'onld arrive. So the article was written 
in hope it might help touch the heart of 
Dame Fortune (the Faculty) to hasten op- 
erations. In response to our desires, in- 
stead of the fictitious Mr. P'm A. Coming, 
the physical director arrived in the person 
of Mr. Frank Cleeland. of Pennsylvania, 
who lias set the athletic ball (especially 
basket ball) rolling in an encouraging- 
style. 

To be sure, our theme was "Athletics 
of the Future." and we certainly shall tri- 
umph noblv at the imaginary Olympic 
games ; for we were going to send soiue 
athletes of note, such as Sam McCambeli. 
for the broad jump, Clyde Hale for. the 
five-mile run. also three others. But what 



90 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



sa}' yon, loyal Maryville College student, 
to change the theme to "Athletics of the 
Present"? Have we not now the means to 
bring- old Maryville rapidly to the front in 
athletics ? Bartlett Hall, considered one 
of the finest Y. ~M. C. A. buildings and 
gymnasium in Tennessee, is being rapidly 
provided with apparatus, and now has a 
director who is willing and anxious to help 
the ^laryville College boys obtain supple 
and active bodies. 

Take a look at our baseball prospects. 
Here we have intending to play with us 
this season Mr. Will Bartlett, a represent- 
ative of Maryville's successful baseball 
davs of the past, and who ought to form 
the nucleus of another strong and vic- 
torious team. We have excellent material 
for this sport, and have already secured a 
fine stock of mitts, bats, balls, etc., in addi- 
tion to the fine McCormick suits for the 
first team. 

Then let us glance at the College Hill 
Golf Club, of which Fred. Webb is chief. 
Under his guidance the links have been 
laid out anew, and Mr. Woodrufif, of 
Knoxville, recognizing the new club's 
merit, has offered a fine prize to the win- 
ner of the spring tournament. 

Our fine start in tennis, too, must not be 
overlooked. Spring is the ideal season for 
this delightful game ; so let the member- 
ship of this club increase, in order that 
we may have another tournament before 
school closes. It might be well, however, 
to limit the number of entries for each 
player, in order to play off the tournament 
faster than the one held in the fall. 

All in all, fellow students, let us as u 
body support our college athletics, and 
each be the proud possessor of mens sana 
in corporc sano. 



SOI'HS \S. JUNIORS. 

February 4th the Sophs gathered up a 
team and played the Juniors a game in 
reply to their challenge. The Sophomores 
fared badly, being defeated, 25 to 4. 

Line up : 

o-). '03. 

Ted ford Brown 

Dickie Crawford 

Forwards 

Mitchell Center Grau 

Pate McCaslia 

Lewis Franklin 

Guards 



COLLEGE vs. PREPS. 
' ' A good, stif¥ game took place between 
College and Preps on February nth. The 
first half was very close, but the Preps ran 
up the score 28-16 in their favor in the 
second. 

Line up : 

College. Preps. 

Tedford McSpaddon 

Crawford Kelly 

Forwards 

Franklin Center French 

Brown Payne, G. 

Cleeland Payne, H. 

Guards 

The girls of Baldwin have taken a good 
deal of interest in the game, and are think- 
ing of a public game. 



BASKET BALL. 

The month of February has seen some 
lively times in this line. Still, we regret we 
liave not had anv inter-scholastic contests. 



ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION SOCIAL. 

The Faculty gave the Association men 
charge of the regular W^ashington's Birth- 
day Snap Social. Accordingly the Finance 
Committee in the interests of baseball, 
composed of R. H. McCasHn, Frank Clee- 
land and Arthur Tedford, arranged a 
musical and literary program to precede 
the social, which was held the evening of 
Friday, February 21st. A charge of ten 
cents was made. 

The following enjoyable program was 
rendered: 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



91 



Chairman of the evening, Robert Houston 

Invocation Paul R. Dickie 

Quartet Bainonian 

Recitation Miss Wayland 

Vocal Solo Miss Cox 

Recitation C. H. Gillingham 

Quartet Theta Epsilon 

Recitation Miss Patton 

Vocal Solo F. W. Cleeland 

Recitation Miss Cooper 

Quartet Y. M. C. A, 

Benediction Prof. J. G. Newman 

Snap Social. 

The Snap Social following was of the 
usual quality. 

Net receipts for baseball after deducting 
hall rent and cost of printing programs 
were $15.65. 

The Y. M. C. A. check-room took in $5. 



THE ALPHA SIGMA OPEN MEETING 

The Literary Societies' public meetings 
this year have been unusually successful. 
These meetings are now held in the Col- 
lege Chapel, and the young ladies of i'ald- 
win are permitted to attend. Below is the 
Alpha Sigma program as it was rendered 
Saturday night, March ist : 

Invocation Professor Sherrill 

Recitation, "Darius Green and His 

Flying Machine" . . . . F. E. Laughead 

Music A. S. Quartet 

Oration, ".\ Peculiar People'' 

Arthur Holtsinger 

Debate, "Resolved, That the slanderer is 
a more pernicious character than the 
flatterer." Affirmative, J. W. Mitchell, 
J. F. Hammontree ; Negative, I^. E. 
Foster, E. N. Quist. 

Vocal Solo! Miss Maude "^'ates 

Oration. "Abraham Lincoln"' 

W. C. Vaught 

A. S. Advance A. M. Callwell 

Benediction Prof. J> H. Newman 




Arguments are all right, but here are fact^. 

The styles for ineu are made in New York. 
That is where our clothing is made. 

Tlie designer for the wliolesale clothing manu- 
facturer learns as promptly as tlie Fifth Avenue 
tailor concerning future styles. 

No tailor can l^uy any better cloth than the 
clothing manufacturer, and it stands to reason the 
manufacturer can buy at lower jirices. 

In regard to workmanship: the best journey- 
man tailors are engaged by the year by the clothing 
manufacturer. Naturally he works cheaper tliau 
by tlie job witli the merchant-tailor. 

This finishes the discussion on style, cloth, 
cost and make; now comes the test — the lit: to 
settle this see our suits; try 'em, wear 'em. 

KNOXVILLE 



BRANDAU & KENNEDY, 



TENN. 



If'ounded by General Assembly, 1M5. 

Western Theological Seminary, 

ALLEGHENY, PA. 

Five professors and one instructor. Finely 
sleeted library of over 30,000 volumes. Beau- 
tifully located on West Park. The course is 
thorough and scholarly, but praetieal. The city 
affords numerous opportunities for missionary 
work. A high type of Christian life is empha- 
sized. For information .tpply to 

PROF. J. A. KELSO, Ph.D.. 

ALLEOHENT, PA. 



iS!*. •M- ^t«- •HI' «>'^ -Hfy •t!ti> -iit^ ^i«. -iie^ ^K- ■Hi' ^st- •at' -ts^ j^ 



JEWELRY AT 


Newcomer of Knoxville 


POPULAR PRICES 

We would not have you think 
that because we are the lead- 
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that our stock is not adapted 
to the needs and ability of all. 
It is. We have just what 3'ou 
want and quality considered 
prices here are lower than 
anywhere else. See if the3r're 
not. You're always welcome. 


Tl/\3 /V 

Branch Store in Mary ville 

GOODS ON DISPLAY 
FRESH FROM THEIR 
GREAT STORE. 

Spring and Summer Goods on display 
from and after March first. 

^ ^ KNOXVILLE PRICES J- > 

Mrs. Rosa M.Cawood, Agent 

S Main Street, opposite the Postoffice J^ 


HOPE BROTHERS 

519 GAY ST.. KINOXVILLE, TENN. 


M. M. NEWCOMER & COMPANY 

NEW DEPARTHENT STORE 

402, 404, 406, 408 Gay St.. Knoxville, Tenn. 



•M^.^m 






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CLOTHING and 
FURNISHINGS 



4(5 GAY STREET, 

Next door to Third National Bank. 



KNOXVILLE, TENN. ^ 

^0 Mr. Will Tedford, formerly of MarvvlUe. will be glad to see all his friends at the above place. -iV) 



c 



^ ^ THE PLACE TO LOOK ^ ^ 

For best quality iu everything in Furniture and House Furnishing Goods 
is the place where every article sold is guaranteed. It is extravagance — 
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is considered. Our prices for well-made, substantial goods are very little 
higher than those quoted elsewherf for worthless stuff. If you want fur- 
niture for your home, we can supply the kind that will give satisfaction 
for a lifetime. 

ALLEN, STEPHENSON & CO., KNOXVILLE, TENN. 






^A-) 



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FOR LIFE IINSURANCE. 

Its death rate is the lowest because the longevity of ministers is the highest. 
It insures ministers Presbyterially governed only. It allows cash, loan, paid-up and 
extended insurance values in all its policy contracts. It writes insurance by corres- 
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Ordinary 
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20 Payment.l E„lllS^nt. 



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48.78 



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Send date of Birth for different Policies Issued by the Fund. 



Address PERRY S. ALLEN, Secretary, """^.^rpm.'t"" 
i 



'W*^ 



ELM STREET 
PRINTING WORKS 

Printing and Binding 

DIPLOMAS AND COLLEGE CATALOGUES. 
420-422 Elm Street, Cincinnati, O. 



THEPAL4CE STABLE 

A. C. MONTGOMERY, Proprietor. 

FifstGlassHorses and Buggies to Hire 

Also Com and Hay for Sale. 

ifa?ofTaALfMarvviUe. MaRYVILLE, TeNN. 

J. A. SUMMERS, 

J- ELECTRICAL ENGINEER, J- 

Contracts taken for Complete 
Light aud Power Plants .... 



Students Give Your l_aundry 
Work to 

M. B. HUNTER, '04, 
Agent of the War Eagle Laundry 

BEST LAUNDRVIN KAST TKNNESSEK. 
WE GUARAINTEE SATISFACTION. 



KNOXVILLE. 



TENNESSEE. 



J. P. EDMONSON, 

JVlaryville, Tenn. 

LIVERY, FEED AND SALE STABLE. 

Oood Veliic-les and Driving Horses. 
Kates Reasonable. ^ — -^ 

Special Attention to Supplying Driving and 
Mountain Parties. 

GEORGE & TEDFORD 

Drugs, MIedicines 
and Chemicals . . 

Fancy and Toilet Articles, Sponges, Brushes, 
Perfumery, Etc. 

Prescriptions carefully compounded with accuracy and dis- 
patch by competent persons at all hours of the day and night. 

A. K. HARPER, 

DEPARTMENT 
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Phones: Xp« 1146, Office, i lid 301, Residence 

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409 Wall Street, 



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C. PFLANZE, 

Dealer in 

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AND UNDERTAKER'S GOODS, 
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DENTIST 



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McTEER & GAMBLE, 

PHYSICIANS. 

OFFICE UPSTAIRS OVER ItEORGE X- TEDFORD'S 
DRUG STORE. 



Phones: Dr. McTeer, Res., 4ii. 



Dr. Oamble, Res., «f. 



W. B. LAWRENCE, 

Maryville, Tenn, 
Carries a Full and Complete Line of Furni- 
ture, Picture and Frames. 

Fine Caskets and Coffins. Burial Robes, Etc. 
Prices Reasonable. Call and Examine My Stock 

J. F. RODGERS, 

Headquarters for 

FRUITS, NUTS AND CANDIES 

Bananas a Specialty. 

When you fail to find anything you want in the line of 
Choice Fruits anywhere else, call on me. Stock always fresh 
and the best on the market. Se-xt block to N^ew Providence 
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Vehicles, Harness, Agricultural Implements, 

FIELD SEEDS AND FIELD STIFFS. 



COAL,— Nperlal Attention 
Given to Small Orders. 



Pbone $3. 



MISICAL MERCHANDISE 

I CARRY A BEAtTIFUI, MME OF 

Violin*, Mandolins, Guitars^ 

" " And Other strinffed Instruments. 
Bows. Sirinss. Fittinjs:s. A I.argf Assortment of 
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R. R. PATTON. Patton's Jewelry Store, Maryville. 



Have you got to 

speak a piece? 



Office oTer 
Fttton'b Jewelry Store. 



MARYVILLE TENN. 



Well, we don't know of any kind of •' effort,*' from 

I the schoolboy's " recitation " or the echoolgirrs "read- 
ing." and along through the whole echonl and college 
career, down to tlie " re&ponee to toas'b" at the la&t 
I ■' class dinner," that is not provided for among :— 

I Commencement Parts, including '"etforts" for all 
other occasions. $1.50. 
Pros anrt Cons. Both sides oi live questions $1.50. 
I Playablt Plays. For scliool and parlor. $1 50. 

College Men's' Three- Minute Declanmtionn $1.00. 
I College Mai'/ s' Three- Minute Readings. $1.00. 

Pieces for Pme-Speaking Contests. $1.00. 
. Acme Declamation Book. Paper, 30c. Cloth. 50c. 
I Handy Pteces to Speak. 108 on separate cards. 50c. 

I List of "Contents" of any or all ot above free on re- 
quest if you mention this ad. 

I HI]n)S & IVOBLE, Fablisbers 

1 4-5-13-14 Cooper Institute N. T. City 

SchooU/ooks of all publishers at one store. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY 



Vol. IV. 



MARYVILLE, TENN., APRIL, 1902. 



No. 6. 



THE MARYVILLE "MR. DOOLEY" ON 
SEASICKNESS. 

Ye see, Hinnessy, we wint on board the 
McClillin in the afthernoon,but the wind was 
howling of Sandy Hook and we anchored 
at the foot of the Goddhess of Liberthy till 
da-r-r-k. We were a gh-reat crowd, Hin- 
nessy, could and hunghry and cross ; but 
the Ouarthermasther smiled and said wo 
should have stipper and beds, which same 
we had. The governmint's a gh-reat insti- 
tvition, Hinnessy. What it promises you it'll 
do, ayther fer yersilf or yer gr-a-ndchil- 
dhren. 

The nixt mornin', as I turned out, who 
should I see but me friend Hogan. 

"How are ye?" sez I. 

"P'oine," sez he. "I'm a regular say- 
dog," sez he. 

■'We're on our way to Manila," sez he. 
We wint on dick and, be hivins, Hin- 
nessy, there we lay at the foot of the 
Statue of Liberthy ! 

"Why ar'n't we goin'," sez Hogan to 
a sailhor, 

"Prince Hinry isn't in," sez the sailhor. 
"We don't want to disappoint him," sez 
he. 

We wint to breakfast and then Prince 
Hinry came. The Illinois ana the Olympia 
and some ither vissils wint out to meet 
him, but the McClillin rode proudly at her 
anchor, and whin the Prince came along 
she tooted her fistle and the Prince bowed 
and thin we were ofif. 

"Why don't they go straight.^'" sez the 
Mis.sus. 

"They're thryin' to avoid the bhoys," sez 
Hogan's woife. 

"'Tis a good plan for ye to follow yer- 
self," sez Hogan ; fer ye see, Hinnessy, 
Hogan's just been married. 

"We're goin' back," sez Hogan's woife. 
"I'll ax the officher why," sez she. 



"Shure, ma'am, we'll anchor in the har- 
bor to-night," sez he. "They're tistin' the 
insthrumints. The Captain thought we 
might attract the needle," sez he. 

"Be hivins, the Captain knows his busi- 
ness," sez Hogan. 

We had a foine dinner, Hinnessy, and 
thinks I, "I'll have wan male more." So 
I had baked feesh and veal cutlets, and 
topped it off with icecrame and cake. Thi-i 
we wint on dick, and may the saints pre- 
sarvc us, Hinnessy, but we were passin' 
right out of the harbor and the waves were 
beginnin' to rholl. 

"We're on the bosom of the deep," sez 
Hogan. "How d'ye loike it, Jawn?" sez 
he. 

"I don't loike it," sez I, "it's too neglijav. 
I'd rather have it starched and ironed out 
smooth," sez I. 

The ship rholled more and more, and 
afther while wan girl started fer the rail. 
Thin another wint, and another, 

"I think I'll take a walk," sez I; and, as 
I wint around the dick I heard thim tellin' 
the ould .story, Hinnessy, yeVe heard about 
the felly who was sthandin' by the rail, and 
whin they axed him if he was waitin' for 
the moon to rise, he said: "No, I haven't 
swallied the moon." 

When I came back Hogan sez: 

"How d'ye feel now, Jawn?" 

"I think I'll join the rail b-i-r-ds," sez 
I. 

Thin I saw a chap who was fixing up a 
camera, for a shot along the rail, drop it 
and sthart for the edge himsilf. "I'll take 
the picture fer ye," sez another passengher : 
and thin I saw a sthairway and ran down it 
to a quiet place on the lower dick. 

Wei!, Hinnessy, I waited a minute and 
thin some wheels run round inside me an- 
atomy. 

"Her-up," sez I. 

"Strike one," sez I. 



96 



MARYVILIvE COLI.EGE MONTHLY 



Thin the wheels wint again. 

"Her-up," sez I. 

"Are ye goin' to foozle," sez I. 

"Heave-ho ! my hearty !" sez a passin' 
sailhor lad. 

"Her-up!" sez I again; and this time, 
Hinnessy, 'twas a beautiful drive to deep 
cinter, and me feesh sailed over the rail 
to the wather below. 

I lay down in me bunk and pretty soon 
the Missus came in with a quiet way. 

"How are yez?" sez I. 

"J awn," sez she, "ye remimber I tould 
ye I'd give up everything fer ye?" 

"Yes," sez I. 

"I've done it," sez she. 

"Ye're a brave girl; I'll buy ye a lunch 
whin we reach Gibraltar," sez I. 

"I won't need it before," sez she. 

Then Hogan came down, and I sez, 

"How d'ye feel, Hogan?" 

"Ouarely,'' sez he. 

"Don't give up the ship," sez I. "Have 
ye had any suppher?" sez I. 

"No," sez he, "I've been on dick," sez he. 

"I've had two supphers," sez Hogan's 
woife, comin' in ; "wan down and wan up ; 
I guess I'm sick," sez she. 

"Well, Hinnessy, at tin o'clock that night 
Hogan lowered his colors and thin he and 
I wint to our quarthers below. Oh ! 'twas 
a gr-a-nd chorus of wan hundhred and 
thirty-noine. 

"Her-ope," sez the basses, led by a big 
Nebraskan on me right. 

"Her-ap !"' sez the barytones, and a 
Michigander above came out strong. 

"Her-up !" sez the sicond tinors, and, 
Hinnessy, a little dood from Boston was 
leadin' thim gr-a-nd. 

"Her-ip !" sez the first tinors, and a big 
tall Georgian was singin' with thrue South- 
ern spirit. 

I joined the tinors, Hinnessy, and I could 
hear Hogan singin' barytone, and me 
friend Bewley was doin' foine on the lead. 
Oh ! 'twas wonderful, Hinnessy, ivery wan 
of us throwin' his soul and his suppher 
into it, and whin the suppher was done we 



wint deeper, and I found some Baldwin 
biscuits and a lad near-by brought up some 
ha-r-rd tack he got in Cuby in noinety- 
eight. But I missed me opportunity, Hin- 
nessy ; I ought to be the cham-pean wrest- 
ler of the wor-rld ! I could have throwed 
anything. 

After a while I wint aslape and dreamed 
I was on the Ferris wheel, and it was run- 
nin' away, and thin I was loopin'-the-loop 
on a camel, at the Pan-American, and thin 
the divil had me in a see-saw. 

"Lit me ofif," sez I. 

"Go where they don't make ice," sez he. 

"With pleasure," sez I, "if ye'll let me 
off," sez I. 

In the mornin' I was wake and dizzy, 
and I lay there till Hogan came staggherin' 
along. 

"Are ye dh-r-unk," sez I. 

"Worse," sez he. "Get up," sez he, "ye 
mustn't lie there and die." 

"I'm lying here to Hve," sez I ; but I got 
up and wint on dick, and the waves were 
runnin' thremcnjous, and when wan would 
throw us over and wet us, some one would 
say : 

"Isn't it gh-r-and — her-up !" 

"We're dancin' on the billows," sez Ho 
gan. 

"I want to be on the outside whin there's 
dancin' goin' on," sez I ; and Hogan's woife 
started to smile and decided she wouldn't 
Just then the Missus came up smiHn'. 

"How are ye ?" sez I. 

"All quiet along the Potomac," sez she. 
"How are ye ?" 

"Ye won't be a widdy before noon," 
sez I. 

Well, Hinnessy, I was sick for days and 
days, and then the docther came to see 
me. 

"What's the matter," sez he. 

"I'm say-sick," sez I. "I'm loike a 
manuscript — it ruins me to roll me," 
sez I. 

Thin he took me to the hoshpital ; and 
a big naygher gave me a bath and beef tea 
and brandy, and, Hinnessy, if that naygher 



MARYVILLE COI.LEGE MONTHLY. 



97 



iver comes to Maryville admit him fer me 
saice, for he saved me loife and me remains. 
But, before we got to Gibraltar I felt bet- 
ter, and it's a gr-a-nd place to- land', it is — 
sc4kL,as the Prudential Inshurance Com- 
pany, as PvQJ. Wallers sez — and thin I was 
all right, Hinnessy, and it's a foine toime 
I'm havin' now. Oh rever. 

John Woodside Ritchie, '98. 
Malta, March 14, 1902. 

PRESIDENT WILSON'S TRIP. 

It costs twenty thousand dollars a year 
to provide the young people that throng the 
halls of the Maryville College the educa- 
tional advantages they come to seek. To 
pay the salaries of the twenty-five or more 
teachers, officers and employees that are re- 
quired to conduct a college of such high 
grade, is itself a very expensive matter. 
Then, too, there is the unending and great 
necessary outlay demanded in the heating, 
the lighting, the repairing and the insuring 
of the ten buildings, the care and the im- 
provement of the extensive campus, the 
supply of water, and the bills for printing, 
school supplies and the like. For several 
years there has been an annual deficit, the 
income from all sources not being sufficient 
to provide for all the outlay. 

The present college year opened with the 
financial problem more serious than for 
several years past. By the action of the 
directors, last May, taken in view of the ne- 
cessities of the case, the endowment was 
in efi'ect reduced from about $250,000 to 
about $225,000, by the transfer of $26,500 
to Swift Memorial Institute. So the prob- 
lem v/as to overcome a deficit that last 
year amounted to $1,500, and an additional 
one of $1,590, the interest of the $26,500 nO' 
longer in the endowment. In short, a pos- 
sible deficit of $3,000 had to be provided 
against ; and the earnest desire of the fac- 
ulty and the directors was to do so with as 
little increase of expense to the stitdents 
as possible. The glory of Maryville, from 
its foundation, has been that scores of 
students that otherwise would have been 



unable to secure an education, have been 
enabled to com.plote a course of study with- 
in its hospitable walls simply because its 
terms were lower than those of most insti- 
tutions of similar grade. 

With a view to continuing this inexpen- 
siveness the faculty recommended to tho 
directors that the tuition be increased only 
$6.00; and. in order to work as little hard- 
ship as possible, that this $6.00 be collected 
for the last half of the second term — the 
period now called the spring term. The 
directors adopted the faculty's recommen- 
dation, and fixed the tuition at $18.00 a 
year, an average of only $2.00 a month, 
certainly little enough for one of the best 
colleges of the South. 

The faculty then spent much effort in re- 
adjusting the work so that the same 
amount of work could be done by a some- 
what smaller body of instructors. They 
succeeded in their attempt, and economized 
to the extent of the greater part of a thous- 
and dollars. The necessary expenses in- 
curred in the renewing of Memorial Hall, 
however, amounted to about a thousand 
dollars. So it became evident, early in the 
year, that unless additional funds could be 
secured from some source, the threatened 
deficit could not, after all, be averted. 

It has, for some years, been felt that new 
friends must be raised up for the college, in 
order that it be enabled to enter into the 
work providentially opened before it. Since 
the death of Prof. Lamar there has been 
com.paratively little systematic effort to in- 
terest the benevolent in the history and the 
claims of Maryville College. The donors 
to Prof. Lamar's great achievement — the 
$100,000 endowment fund — have all long 
been dead. Had it not been for the provi- 
dential coming of the Fayerweather legacy, 
the development of the college would have 
been checked. As it is, that development 
must now also be untimely checked if ad- 
ditional endowment be not secured. 

With the authorization of the directors, 
President Wilson spent two months during 
the recent winter term, in visiting different 



98 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



cities of the North, with a view to intro- 
ducing the college to a new constituency of 
friends. During his trip he visited eight 
cities and presented the claims of the insti- 
tution to a considerable number of million- 
aires and other wealthy people, and made 
the acquaintance of many prominent per- 
sons, whose moral sttpport is an absolute 
necessity in securing access to the wealthy 
men who have confidence in their judg- 
ment. The trip was, necessarily, a very 
hurried one, and not much could then be 
done toward following up the introductory 
call. That will be done in the future, as 
opportunity ofifers. Yet there were some 
immediate results. Enough help from gen- 
erous donors was secured to enable the 
college to close the year without debt, and 
several important pledges were received re- 
garding future gifts. There were also some 
verv encouraging indications favorable to 
the hope for some large gifts in the future. 
There indications will, cf course, be careful- 
ly watched and followed up. Enough money 
was secured to enable the Students" Work 
Fund to have the largest bank account it 
has had since its estabhshment. 

The great kindnesses shown President 
Wilson in different cities made a most un- 
pleasant and difficulty work much easier 
than it would otherwise have been. The 
graduates of Mai-yville College, whom he 
met in six several States, did everything 
in their power to advance his mission. Their 
loyalty and zeal were very inspiring. 

The difficulties to be ancountered in such 
a campaign are very great. Wealthy men 
are, most of them, more interested in aug- 
menting than in distributing their wealth ; 
while those noble exceptions who look upon 
their money as a trust from God are so 
widely known for their benevolence that 
they are simply inundated with appeals of 
every conceivable variety, many of which 
are in behalf of causes of especial personal 
interest to themselves, through local or 
other associations. Such men are made 
trustees and officials of many benevolent 
enterprises, and naturally give to those en- 



terprises. Their time, during office hours, 
is so taken up by the exacting demands of 
business that, however well chsposed they 
may be toward all worthy causes, it is often 
simply impossible to give even five minute.^ 
to any of the horde of college presidents 
and representatives of ecclesiastical, na- 
tional and municipal charities, and promo- 
ters of the almost inconceivably long hst 
cf enterprises, general and personal, who 
crowd their waiting rooms. To give what 
is asked, even during one month, would, 
in some cases, reduce the wealthiest to 
penury. 

Most of these capitahsts, worn with the 
cares of their immense business interests, 
are unwilling to receive the calls of im- 
portunate strangers after they have retired 
to the privacy of their home. Nor can we 
much blame them' for this inhospitality. It 
is of the nature of self-defense. The 
knowledge that they are wealthy and bene- 
volent subjects them to such incessant, in- 
discriminate and annoying appeals that 
were they not to take measures to protect 
themselves against the horde of beggars, 
they would have no time left for the man- 
agement of their business interests, or the 
enjoyment of the privacy of home Hfe. 

Most of these benevolent rich men are 
interested in colleges in their own section, 
and contribute to them ; and very natural- 
ly are not interested in far-away Southern 
institutions, of which they have heard lit- 
tle or nothing. Then they insist that the 
local friends of Southern schools should 
give more to those institutions as an evi- 
dence of their real interest in them. Others 
urge that there are too many small colleges 
in the South, and that in the interests of 
economy and efficiency there should be 
consolidation of similar colleges wherever 
feasible. This year there were also' special 
difficulties to be encountered by a repre- 
sentative of Maryvilie that required patient 
effort to meet and remove. Many of those 
whose interest in Maryvilie was confidently 
expected were absent from home in search 
of health, or a milder winter — for the past 



MARYVILI.E COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



99 



winter was the most severe experienced for 
many years — or in prosecution of business. 
In spite of these and other difificulties. 
the outcome of Dr. Wilson's trips was 
very encouragingf. Besides the liberal do- 
nations collected, several pledges of valu- 
able help in the future were received, the in- 
terest of a number of wealthy men and wo- 
men was aroused, misuderstandings were 
corrected, and a solid basis was laid for 
svstematic work in the future. The remark- 



able service rendered by Maryville College. 
when once understood, engages the sympa- 
thy and will secure the support of thought- 
ful men. There is also a decided interest 
in Southern colleges being awakened bv 
the Southern Educational Association, re- 
cently organized in New York City. This 
is also an epoch of gifts to colleges. There 
is a better day before us, but there is also 
patient and persistent work to do in hasten- 
ing it. 




THE SCHOOL-HOUSB, WALKER'S VALLEY. 



A NEW EDUCATIONAL WORK IN THE TENNESSEE 

MOUNTAINS. 



It is not often that the editors of the 
"Monthly" give valuable space for the pro- 
motion of enterprises that do not directly 
concern the college. But this new work, 
although not immediately connected with 
the institution has taken hold on the sympa- 
thies of the college people — and has found 
among them ardent promoters. This fact, 
and also that it originated in the college 
town, and above all, that it is for the benefit 



and elevation of the people of our own be- 
loved mountains, give ample reason why 
the magazine is adding its influence toward 
arousing interest in this very important 
educational movement. 

Last autumn, the Chilhowee and Tuesday 
Clubs of Maryville, jn conjunction with the 
Newman and Ossoli Circles of Knoxville, 
decided to engage in educational work in 
the East Tennessee mountains. The decis- 



TOO 



MARYVII.LE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



ion was inspired by an article contributed 
to the INIarv'ville paper by a g-entleman 
who had just finished teaching a two 
months' school in Walker's Valley, in the 
mountains above Tuckalecchee Cove. This 
was the first school taught in the little val- 
ley since white men made it their home. 

Recently a short visit to the valley was 
made, at the request of the ladies, for the 
purpose of determining the exact needs, 
that the work be more definitely arranged 
and thus insure success in the execution. 

The valley is located on the middle prong 
of Little River, between Fodder Stack 
Mountain and Timbered Ridge, and about 
four and one-half miles from Tuckalecchee 
Cove. It is very inaccessible. The river 
must be forded eight times between Tucka- 
leechee and the valley. The road, which in 
many places is simply a bridle trail, winds 
along the mountains. In many places it is 
dug out of the perpendicular mountain side, 
and as one traverses that road — seemingly 
nothing but a scratch along the clifif — he 
hears the roar of the torrent far below his 
feet, and can see the foam and green water ; 
while above his head, hundreds of feet, 
towers the dizzy heights. 

There are eight families living in the 
place, and these have thirty children en- 
titled to public school privileges. They are 
eager for an education. Mr. Dunn, the 
former teacher, says the children were at- 
tentive, studious, and v>'ell behaved. He 
administered scarcely any discipline during 
the session. 

The distance from the nearest public 
school is four and a half miles, and with 
eight swift fords of the river to cross en 
route, it is readily seen why the residents 
of Walker's Valley have not availed them- 
selves of public instruction. 

Then a reason why the school was not 
established within the valley sooner should 
now be presented. That part of the district 
is very sparsely settled, and the per capita 
money for school purposes would amount 
to a very limited sum ; so former school 
boards, in administering the funds, thought 



it wise to concentrate efforts and centralize 
the work in Tuckalecchee. This method 
held for years, until Mr. William Walker 
importuned the authorities, and the school 
of two months, just mentioned, was the re- 
sult. A two months' session with ten 
months' vacation seemed such a travesty on 
the whole school system that the interested 
club women became unanimous for an im- 
proved condition of affairs. 

The women's plan, in brief, is to hold a 
two months' summer school, during the 
months of July and August, closing when 
the public school teacher appears to take 
up the work in September. The summer 
school will use the vState text books, and 
all the instruction will be given by a highly 
equipped teacher. The course of study will 
be unbroken through the session, the only 
change being a change in teachers. Now 
in addition to the regular school work, the 
summer school teacher will teach the girls, 
in her home, sewing and housekeeping. She 
will teach the children music, for which 
ihey are especially anxious, and will hold a 
Sabbath-school. It will be a grand oppor- 
tunity for the people, and they realize it 
and will give the teacher a hearty welcome, 
and do all in their power for her comfort. 
They have promised to build a log-house, 
with two rooms and a porch, in a beautiful 
location by the house that will be used for 
a school-house, for a teacher's residence. 

The present school building is an old log- 
house that was given for the purpose to 
serve as a makeshift until something more 
pretentions and comfortable can be afford- 
ed. The furniture consists of some benches 
made by inserting wooden pins into hewed 
puncheons. 

The work is one of the most thoroughly 
practical plans to give assistance to worthy 
people in need that can be imagined. The 
people are kind, hospitable, eager to learn. 
All they need is the opportunity. This they 
covet for their children. 

Mr. Walker, a resident and leading spirit 
of the valley, and Mr. Dunn, the teacher 
of the vallev children and the warm friend 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



lOI 



of every person there, have explained the 
situation to Miss Margaret Henry, of 
Maryville, and she will be very glad to con- 
fer with any one who would like to make 
a contribution to this work. There are 
numberless things to be done toward es- 
tablishing and carrying on this work, and 
even the smallest contributions will be re- 
ceived with gratitude. If any one would 
like to contribute books or school furnish- 
ings they can be used to good advantage. 

It is the hope of the editors that some of 
the many Maryville graduates and ex- 
students, who are now settled and engag- 
ed in business and professional pursuits in 
various parts of the country, may be con- 
strained by this statement of facts regard- 
ing the work, to contribute to it of their 
means, and thus have a part in educational 
matters back at the old college town. 

F. L. W. 



A SQUIB. 

It was a dark rainy night. Approxi- 
mately dark as old days in Egypt. The 
wind howled dismally as it usually does 
when October is waning. There was 
quiet in Bartlett Hall. This portended no 
good, for quiet at Bartlett is as the calm 
which precedes the hurricane — death deal- 
ing and destructive. From across the 
campus came the wailing notes of the plain- 
tive violin and the shufiP.e of feet. Oh, 'tis 
the Juniors making merry with their con- 
freres. Hughie and Dennie have opener, 
wide their doors. There is revelry. 

A door opens. It is the great door of 
Bartlett. A small figure stands for a 
moment on the portico. He looks for a 
minute to see if he is observed, then de- 
scends the step and is lost in the darkness. 
Look, there he is again. See, he stands be- 
neath the glare of the arc-light in front of 
Fayerweather and looks at his watch. 

The watch appears to be a silver repeater, 
of antique workmanship ; surely it is at least 
nine centimetres in diameter. He takes 
note of the time ; gives the stem a few 
turn.s, and is off. 



But we have observed him. He appears 
suspicious. We will shadow him. He i? 
short of stature, slight built and wears no 
beard. He wears glasses and looks inno- 
cent. He has a large umbrella under his 
arm, and carries a large roll of electric light 
wire. He don't look like an electrician. 
This excites our suspicions. In the other 
hand he carries a pail of yellow paint and a 
brush. He looks more like a clerk than a 
painter. Our nerves are on a strain. This 
is exciting. 

He has stopped at the library. He is up 
to something. He ties his wire to the door- 
knob. What a mystery. He runs from 
tree to tree with his wire, until it is all 
played out, and the cedar grove is but a 
maze of wire meshes. Oh! this is terrify- 
ing. What next? The paint! Swiftly he 
runs along the wire, coating it thickly. 
Drip, drip, drip. Better keep away from 
the cedars. 

Hark ! The revelry has ceased, the re- 
velers approach. The rascal has flown. 

Abe. 



THE ATHENIAN SOCIETY. 

The Society has entered upon the last 
term of the current year. Its present of- 
ficers are: Hugh R. Crawford. President; 
Robert Franklin, Vice-President ; Robert 
L. Houston, Secretary; Leonard McGinley, 
Librarian ; Arthur Tedford, Frank Cleeland 
and W. F. Lewis, Censors. 

During the part of the year preceding 
this term the ordinar^^ programs consisted 
of essavs, declamations, character sketches, 
the debate and "The Athenian," but the 
political spirit of the members has Seen so 
aroused by the recent elections that the 
Society decided to have a program in which 
the political number is the dominant fea- 
ture, to take the place, at times, of the 
usual program. So, in accordance with this 
act, the Society proceeded to organize a 
■'Model House of Representatives." It -was 
arranged on the 28th of March and the 4th 
of April that the "Model House" will con- 
vene, and take the place of the debate 



MARYVIIvLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



every other Friday night during the re- 
mainder of the year. The President and 
Secretary were unanimously elected Speak- 
er and Clerk of the "House." At the ses- 
sion, April 4th, bills were presented, and 
the first reading heard. The "House" then 



adjourned to com^ene on the i8th of April. 
In this session the great inter-oceanic canal 
bill will be acted upon, and it is expected 
that the calmest deliberation and best 
judgnient will be displayed in the consider- 
ation of this sfreat bill. 




montavillk flowers, 



THE COMMENCEMENT RECITAL UNDER THE AUSPICES OF 

THE SENIOR CLASS. 

Montaville Flowers in the Interpretive Monologue "Ben Hur." 

The class of '02 have been exceedingly ium of New Providence Church, Monday, 
fortunate in securing talent for the annual May 26. 
recital, which will be given in the Auditor- Beecher has said. '"The real benefactors 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



103 



of mankind are the men and women who 
can raise their fellow-beings out of the 
world of corn and money ; wno can make 
them forget their bank accounts by inter- 
esting them in their higher selves ; who can 
lift them above the realm of the common and 
sordid, and make them feast on being's 
banquet." 



Such a man is Montaville Flowers. 

Mr. Flowers presents a story involving 
many characters of widely differing man- 
ners and voices, and conflicting purposes 
and deeds. Unless well given, a mono- 
logue of such complications and elaborate- 
ness is apt to descend into a farce, and the 
speaker into a caricaturist to be laughed at. 
He must be natural; he must not overdo; 
he must not become monotonous ;he should 
not allow the auditor to become drowsy and 
uninterested. He must be dramatic, bm 
subdued ; he must read with proper 8nd fit- 
ting tones, but he must not really act in a 
theatrical sense. 

Mr. Flowers meets every demand, and 
meets them all pleasingly. He is an im- 
personator of great versalitv and wide re- 
source. He succinctly tells the story in dia- 
logue, culled from the original ; happy in 
his choice of passages, because keeping in 
mind that the dramatic quality is the indis- 
pensable essential to prevent monotony. 
Thus he has a story full of spirit, and one 
that in itself holds an audience. He de- 
velops it with evenness, and throughout it 
wears the language of the author. — The 
Louisville Courier-Journal. 



The best Lyceum Agencies of America, 
the leading attractions of the platform, and 
widely separated and dififering audiences 
declare Montaville Flowers to be a great 
artist and unexcelled in his profession ; and 
further that no one presents so wide a range 
of refined literature with such uniform ex- 
cellence; and no one in his profession, in 
every recital offered and before every grade 
of audience, has m.et with such certain and 
general acceptability. 



Concerning this gentleman's work Gen. 
Lew Wallace, the author of "Ijen-Hur," 
gives the following indorsement: 

"It was a most excellent arrangement of 
pjcn-Hur, and Mr. Flowers displayed splen- 
did judgment in his adaptation. It meets 
with my hearty approval. His elocution- 
ary power is admirably suited to the work. 
He presents scenes and incidents of the 
plot in a charming manner, and his work 
in the presentation was, by far, the best I 
have ever heard. Mr. Flowers' work has 
my approval. It is the revival of the ancient 
Kastern custom of story-telling. It is a re- 
creation of a lost art. It is in safe hands 
with this young man, and will prove an at- 
tractive form of high-class platform work. 
1 wish him orreat sucess." 



EXCHANGES. 

The Mirror, a neat little magazine. 



Delaware College Review for Alarch has 
two g-ood stories. 



Princeton llnivei-sity Bulletin has scien- 
tific articles well worth reading. 



Why is a kiss over a ware like a straw 
hat? Answer — Because it isn't felt. 



Gray Jacket is a welcome member of our 
exchange table. The March number con- 
tains some excellent stories. 



March Gates Index good thoughout. 
Poem, 'T Wonder Why," show's keen dis- 
cernment on part of writer. 



"The Test of Vengeance that Failed," 
is a story of special merit in March Kendall 
Collegian. Good exchange column. 



Wheaton College Record has a good 
ring. Poem in March number, "Light of 
the World," deserves special mention. 



Out of the numerous good articles in the 
March number of Tennessee University 
Magazine, "Tiger! Tiger!" is especially in- 
teresting. 



I 4 



MARYVILIvE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



Maryville College Monthly. 



Vol. IV. 



MARCH, 1902. 



No. 5. 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 



Editor-in-Chibf, 

Athenian, 

Bainonian, 

Alpha Sigma, 

Theta Epsilon, - 

Y. M. C. A., 

Y. W. C. A. 

Athletics, 

Alumni, - - - 

Business Manager, 

Subscription Manager, 



ELMER B. WALLER 

DENNIS W. CRAWFORD 

HELEN E. ERVIN 

FRANK E. LAUGHBAD 

EMMA E. CALDWELL 

FREDERICK F. SCHELL 

MAME STEBBINS 

- ARTHUR C.TED FORD 

JOHN W. RITCHIE 

FREDERIC L. WEBB 

JOSEPH S. CALDWELL 



Students, graduates and friends of the College are 
Invited to contribute literary articles, personals and 
Items of general interest for publication. 
Subscription price, for eiglit iiumbem, S5 cents. 
Address all communications to 

Maryville College Monthly, 

Maryville, Tenn. 

Entered at HsrTTille, Tenn., as Second-ClaBs Mail Matter. 



As a result of the ten 
Dr. Trimble. days' evangelistic serv- 
ices in the college chapel 
there were twelve conversions, and a gen- 
eral quickening of spiritual life among the 
student body. This was the fourth time 
that Dr. Trimble had held services in the 
college, and his genial personality and ripe 
Christian experience added much to the 
efifectiveness of his preaching. 

The third term began 
Third Term. March i8th, with the loss 

of only one day for en- 
rollment and classification. 

In addition to the usual reasons which 
always cause a diminution of our number 
in the springtime, we had this year unus- 
ual sickness among the students, and an 
extra tuition fee. Notwithstanding, how- 
ever, these conditions, the enrollment has 
reached two hundred and fifty two, which 
is as large an attendance as usual for this 
time of year. 



Oollege 
Settlement. 



The article in this is- 
sue, which describes the 
contemplated educational 
work in Walker's Valley this summer, 
ought to stimulate one or two of our read- 
ers to make a contribution to this cause. 
There is little excuse for the indiflference of 



our taxpayers to the claims of the public 
schools, but imtil public opinion drives our 
Solons to give the children a fair chance by 
increasing the tax for school purposes, 
there ought to be centers of educational 
influence started and continued in selected 
places, under the care and direction of 
our college teachers and graduates. 



General 

Educational 

Board. 



One of the most en- 
couraging signs for the 
vSouth is the formation of 
the General Educational Board tO' further 
in every possible way the cause of educa- 
tion in parts of the country where it is 
most needed. We shall all await with in- 
terest to see its method of procedure, and 
whether practical arguments will be used 
with our legislators to accomplish speedy 
lesiilts in procuring increased appropra- 
tions for the public schools. If the Board, 
with Dr. Harper, can convince our denom- 
inational colleges that their only hope for 
future expansion is in consolidation and 
federation, it will succeed where ecclesiasti- 
cal bodies in the past have failed. 



ATHLETIC NOTES. 

Our easy victory over Wildwood has 
only shown us the quality of our college 
base ball team.. 

Captain Foster has got the boys down 
to good playing condition, and the home 
team supporters were pleased with the good 
work. Drew McColloch did the honors 
in the pitcher's box. Will Bartlett is play- 
ing in his usual excellent form, and fills a 
very im.portant place in the team. Will 
Griffith is Captain of the second team. 

WESTWOOD vs. MARYVILIvB. 

The Wildwood base ball team crossed 
bats with the Maryville College boys on 
the college grounds, April ist. 

This was the first game of the season, 
outside of the practice games, and much in- 
terest centered upon this game. It was a 
raw, cold day, and the college boys played 
remarkably well, considering the first 
same and the unfavorable weather. 



MARYVILLE COI.I.EGE MONTHLY. 



105 



The game was one-sided from beginning 
to end, and not close enough to be very 
interesting. 

The home team had the choice of play, 
and they took their time at bat, and the 
visiting team took the field. Bartlett was 
the first batter, and he drew a base on 
balls. Hill was next, and he also walked to 
first base. Foster was the third man, and 
he got to first on Murphy's error. The 
bases were now full, and Houston stepped 
up to the plate; he recognized the oppor- 
tunity that he had, and when he found the 
ball he put it over the right field fence and 
out of sight, making a home run and bring- 
ing in three other runs. The college boys 
made ten runs in the first inning, and this 
gave them a good start, and at no time 
during the game did the Wildwood boys 
come up anywhere near this score, as they 
made only seven runs during the whole 
game. The principal features of the game 
were: A home run by Houston; two-base 
hits by Bartlett and Kelley. 

McCclloch pitched in fine form, striking 
out twelve men, and allowing only one man 
to walk to first base. He played a cool 
and careful game all through, and kept the 
hits well scattered. 

Foster also played a good game behind 
the bat, having no passed balls, making no 
errors, and catching two high and difBcult 
foul balls. 

. The fielding of the college team was es- 
pecially good. Those who made uo errors 
were: Foster, Goddard, Houston, Kelley 
and Keeble. 

Dunn played the best game for Wild- 
wood, making two two-base hits and one 
single hit, and making two of the scores. 

Dunn and Waters were the only men 
who played without making errors. Waters 
also made two runs. 

llie final score was 17 to 7 in favor of the 
Maryville College team. Time, 2 hours, 5 
minutes. Umpire, John McCulloch. 

M. D. Ex. 97. 



THE SENIOR BANQUET. 

The most delightful social event of the 
year has just passed into history. The 
banquet of the Senior Class was given on 
the night of April 4th, at the beautiful home 
of Major Ben Cunningham, the college 
Registrar; and so long as memor)- shall 
serve those who gathered round that festal 
board, the recollections of that evening 
will give a thrill of pleasure. 

The table was charmingly decorated. The 
red blossoms of the japonica and the white 
of cherry and plum paid a graceful com- 
plimiCnt to the class, as they formed the 
class colors. 

Hand painted souvenir menus and place 
cards were laid at each cover. The dainty 
repast consisted of the following: 

MENU. 
Saratoga Potatoes. 

Cream Cheese. Chicken Salad. 

White and Brown Bread. 
Pickles. Olives. 

Red and White Neopolitan Ice Cream, 
White Cake. 

Bonbons. Oranges. 

Black Cake. Cofifee, 



The guests lingered long over the cofifee, 
which was itself worthy of a poet's praise — 
having come from "Far Araby," the gift of 
the Major's eldest son, Edwin Cunningham, 
M. C, '93, United States Consul to Aden — 
and enjoyed a feast of reason. Major Ben 
acted as toastmaster, and he filled his office 
perfectly, his witty speeches were quite a 
feature of the occasion. 

The toasts were: "Our Host and Hos- 
tess," Mr. Holtsinger, '02. "The Class of 
'02," Mr. Schell, '06. "The Ladies," Mr. 
Dickie, '04. "The Absent Ones," ]\Ir. R. 
I\L Caldwell. Ex.-'o2. "The Senior ^'aca- 
tion," Mr. Jo. S. Caldwell, '02. 

The responses to the toasts were full of 
sparkling wit and humor, and will not be 
forgotten for many a day. 



io6 



MARYVII.LB COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



Mr. Dick Caldwell, in his speech, said 
that fifty years hence would see many 
changes in the personnel of the class and 
their coterie of friends. For instance, Maj. 
Cunningham, then a hale and hearty old 
gentleman, of one hundred and ten or 
thereabouts, will have seen himself succeed- 
ed as Registrar by his son, Ben, Jr. 

In those days Ben, Jr., will have found 
among his father's old papers, the following 
in Maj. Ben's handwriting: 

I met a little college girl. 

Nineteen years old (*she said), 

Her head adorned with many a curl, 
Her beauty made me glad. 

Of Seniors, in the Senior Class, 

How many may ye be? 
"We're ten," replied the little lass. 

And wondering, looked at me. 

"You're ten," said I, "my little maid 
And pray how may that be? 

Yourself and Mayme are the girls. 
Of boys there are only three. 

"Yourself and Mayme, Joe and Fred 

And Arthur do survive ; 
If all the class but these are dead 

Then ye are only five." 

"But we are ten," the m.aiden said ; 

"Five at Maryville stay. 
Sad tears for Elva and Mabel we shed 

When they both went away. 

"Bill Disnev went awav, alas I 

Bill Keehle to U. of T. 
Poor Dick, he failed exams, to pass 

And he was gone, you see." 

This class I bade to share my board, 
And furnished them some tovs ; 

I fed them from my ample hoard. 
They played with my two bovs. 

And when the feast and play were past 

The maiden said to me, 
"What think ye now about our class. 

How many think ye there be ?" 

"You're wrong," said I, and I was 
then, 
"Your class is all alive. 
For there is neither five nor ten. 
But rather ten times five." 
— Senex. '02. 




Althongh this is dispntediby some, the matter is not 
present open for discussion. 



Arguments are all right, but here are facts. 

The styles for meu are made in New York. 
That is where our clothing is made. 

Tlie designer for the wholesale clothing manu- 
facturer learns as promptly as the Fifth Avenue 
tailor concerning future styles. 

No tailor can buy any better cloth than the 
clothing manufacturer, and it stands to reason the 
manufacturer can buy at lower prices. 

In regard to workmanship; the best journey- 
man tailors are engaged by the year by the clothing 
manufacturer. Naturally he works cheaper than 
by the job with the merchant-tailor. 

This finishes the discussion on style, cloth, 
cost and make; now comes the test — the fit; to 
settle this see our suits; trv 'em, wear 'em. 

BRANDAU & KENNEDY, "T^'i':'-'^ 



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Founded by General Assembly, 1826. 

Western Theological Seminary, 

ALLEGHENY, PA. 

Five professors and one instructor. Finely 
sleeted library of over 30,000 volumes. Beau- 
tifully located on West Park. The course is 
thorough and scholarly, but practical. The city 
affords numerous opportunities for missionary 
work. A high type of Christian life is empha- 
sized. For information apply to 

PROF. J. A. KELSO, PhX)., 

Al,l,EOHENT, PA. 






JEWELRY AT 
POPILAR PRICES 

We would not have you think 
that because we are the lead- 
ing house of East Tennessee 
that our stock is not adapted 
to the needs and ability of all. 
It is. We have just what you 
want and quality considered 
prices here are lower than 
anywhere else. See if they're 
not. You're always welcome. 


Newcomer of Knoxville 

^HAS A 

Branch Store in Mary ville 

GOODS ON DISPLAY 
FRESH FROM THEIR 
GREAT STORE. 

Spring and Summer Goods on display 
from and after March first. 

J' J- KNOXVILLE PRICES ^ J- 

Mrs. Rosa M.Cawood, Agent 

^ Main Street, opposite the Postoffice J^ 


HOPE BROTHERS 

519 CAY ST., KNOXVILLE, TENN. 


M. M. NEWCOMER & COMPANY 

^EW DEPARTHENT STORE 

402, 404, 406, 408 Gay St.. Knoxville, Tenn. 



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McTEER & COMPANY, 

CLOTHING and 
FURNISHINGS 

415 GAY STREET, VTVrr%V\7TT T Th XPTMIM 

Next door ta Third National Bank. JS.i.N WZ^ V ll^l^C, lliiNi^. 

Mr. WUI Tedford, formerly of Maryville, will be glad to see all his friends at the above place. 



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^ ^ THE PLACE TO LOOK ^ ^ 

For best quality In everything in Furniture and House Furnishing Goods 
is the place where every "articre sold is guaranteed. It is extravagance — 
■waste — to pay any price for poorly made furniture, that will go to pieces in 
a little while, and most of the low price furniture on the market to-day is 
that sort. The goods we sell are the cheajiyst in the world, when quality 
is considered. Our prices for well-made, substantial goods are very little 
higher than those quoted elsewhere for worthless stuff. If you want fur- 
niture for your home, we can supply the kind that will give satisfaction 
for a lifetime. 

ALLEN, STEPHENSON & CO., KNOXVILLE, TENN. 



CS^ 



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J-J-J-J^J.^.^^ ASSETS, JANIARY I, 1901, $1,225,582.71 J. J. J> J. J. J. J. | 



The Oldest Life Insurance Company in Ameria by Nearly 100 Years. 

Presbyterian Ministers' Fund 

FOR LIFE INSURANCE. 

Its death rate is the lowest because the longevity of ministers is the highest. 
It insures ministers Presbyterially gOTemed only. It allows cash, loan, paid-up and 
extended insurance values in all its policy contracts. It writes insurance by corres- 
pondence, without the annoyance and expense of intermediate agents. Compare 
these annual premiums for $1,000.00 insurance with other companies' : 



1 Age. 


Ordinary 
Life. 


20 Payment. 


20 Tear 
Endowment 




Age. 


Ordinary 
Life. 


20 Payment. 


20 Year 
Endowment. 


85 

80 
35 


$17.21 
19.21 
21.84 


$23.96 
26.09 
28.76 


$11.36 
41.74 
42.35 


40 
45 
50 


$25.35 
80.12 
36.70 


$32.13 
36.51 
42.37 


$43.42 
45.35 
48.76 



Don't pay from 15 to 30 per cent, more for insurance than it will cost you in the Fund. 
Don't allow estimates of future tontine dividends, or surplus returns, to deceive you. 



Send date of Birth for different Policies Issued by the Fund. 



Address PERRY S. ALLEN, Secretary, 



9«©0«000«0rt00««000©©©0000«e©< 



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Stephen Girard Building, 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



ELM STREET 
PRINTING WORKS 



Printing and Binding 

DIPLOMAS AND COLLEGE CATALOGUES. 
420-422 Elm Street, Cincinnati, O. 



THE PALACE STABLE 

A. C. MONTGOMERY, Proprietor. 

FirstClassHorses and Buggies to Hire 

Also Corn and Hay for Sale. 

giaTa^Lf Maryville. MaRYVILLE, TeNN. 

J. A. SUiViiViERS, 

^ ELECTRICAL ENGINEER, J- 

Contracts taken for Complete 
Light and Power Plants .... 



KNOXVILLE. 



TENNESSEE. 



J. P. EDiViONSON, 

Maryville, Tenn. 

LIVERY, FEED AND SALE STABLE. 

Good Vebicles and Drlvlngr Horses. 
Kates """""•"«'*'*' J ^ 

Special Attention to Supplying Driving and 

Mountain Parties. 

GEORGE & TEDFORD 

Drugs, IWIedicines 
and Chemicals . . 

Fancy and Toilet Articles, Sponges, Brushes, 
Perfumery, Etc. 

Prescriptions carefully compounded with accuracy and dis- 
patch by competent persons at all hours of the day and night. 

A. K. HARPER, 

DEPARTMENT 
STORE .... 



Phones: New 1146, Office. Old 361, Residence 

B. F. YOUNG, M. D., 

Eye, Ear, Throat 
and Nose .... 

409 Wall Street, Knoxville, Tenn. 

C. PFLANZE, 

Dealer in 

ALL KINDS OF FURNITURE 

AND UNDERTAKER'S QOODS, 
MARYVILLE. - TENNESSEE. 



H. P. HUDDLESTON, 

DENTIST 



Offloc OTer 
Ftttok'b Jbwklry Stork. 



MARYVILLE TKN» , 



Students Give Your Laundr 
Work to 

M. B. HUNTER, '04, 
Agent of the War Eagle Lauriry 

BEST LAUNDRY IN EAST TKNNKSSEJ-: 
WE GUARANTEE SATISFACTION. 



A. B. McTeer. 



A. Mc. (tAM 



McTEER & GAMBLE, 

PHYSICIANS. 

OFFICE UPSTAIRS OVER GEORGE St. TEDFORD'S 
DRUG STORE. 



Phones: Dr. McTeer, Res., 4ii. 



Dr. Gamble, Res., «2. 



W. B. LAWRENCE, 

Maryville, Teno, 

Carries a Full and Complete Line of Furni- 
tare, Picture and Frames. 

Pne Caskets and Coffins, Burial Robes, Etc. 
Prices Reasonable. Call and Examine My Stock 

J. F. RODGERS, 

Headquarters for 

FRUITS, NUTS AND CANDIES 

Bananas a Specialty. 

When you fail to find anything you want in the line of 
Choice Fruits anywhere else, call on me. Stock always fresh 
and the best on the market. Next block to New Providence 
Church, Maryville. 

D. R. GODDARD & CO., 
Vehicles, Harness, Agricultural Implements, 

FIELD SEEDS AND FIELD STUFFS. 



COAli— Special Attention 
Given to Small Orders. 



Pbone 83. 



MUSICAL MERCHANDISE 

I CABRT A BEAUTIFCL LINE OF 

Violins, Mandolins, Guitars, 

" And Otber Stringed Instruments. 

Bon'S, Strlng^s, Fittings. A Large Assortment of 
tbe Latest Sheet Music. 

R. R. PATTON, Patton's Jewelry Store, Maryville. 



3 ^5z i^^ i^^ :_t :5f5^ it^ i^^ r^;^ =Vt z^:^ 3^^ - 
3zV^ ztti :«=:«= =3rt:rW= ^«: =Wr i*^ :^^ :ttzC 

U-PI-DEE. 

A new Co-ed lias alighted in town. 

U-pi-dee. U-pi-da! >ki^ 

In an iip-to-datest tailor-made gown,U-pi-de-i-da ! ff^ff 
The boys are wild, and prex is, too, 
You never saw such a hulla-ba-loo. 

CHORUS. — U-pi-dee-i-dee-i-da! etc. 
Her voice is clear as a soaring lark's. 
And her wit is like those trolley-car sparks ! 
When 'cross a muddy street she flits, 
The boys all have conniption fits I 
The turn of her head turns all ours, too. 
There's always a- strife to sit in her pew ; 
'Tis enough to make a parson drunk. 
To hear her sing old co-ca-che-lunk ! Ct^ 

MThe above, and three other new verses to U-PI-DEE. T!, {] 
and NEW WORDS, catchy, up-to-date, to many JJOtI 
others of the popular OLD FAMILIAR TUNES: be'- TT IT 
tibti ^''^'^^ ^""^ FAVORITES ; and also many NEW SONGS. l^UU 

tt ft SONGS OF ALL THE COLLEGES. tfMf 

jtWt Copyrighi. Price, $1.^0, postpaid. iftxt, 



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Schoolbooks of' all publishers at one stare 
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1901-1902. 



MHRY^ILLE COLLEGE 



FOUNDED IN 1819. 



FACUT^TY. 



REV. SAMUEL T. WILSON, D.D., 

President, and Professor of the English Language and 
Literature and of the Spanish Language. 

REV. SAMUEL W. BOARDMAN, D.D., LL.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 

REV. ELMER B. WALLER, A.M., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

JAMES H. M. SHERRILL, A.M., 
Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 

JASPER C. BARNES, A.M., Ph.D., 

Principal of the Preparatory Department and Professor of 

the Science and Art of Teaching. 

REV. JOHN G. NEWMAN, A.M., 

Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

FRANK M. GILL, 

Boolckeeping and English. 

ALBERT F. OILMAN, S.B. ,A.M. , 

Chemistry and Physics. 

REV. CHARLES MARSTON, A.M., 

History and English Literature. 

JONATHAN H. NEWMAN, A.B., 

Englisli Branches. 

MISS MARGARET E. HENRY, 

English Branches. 



COURSES OF STUD Y 

The College offers nine groups of studies 
leading to [the degree of A.B. , and also a Teach, 
er's Course. The curriculum embraces the varioug 
branches of Science, Language, Literature, His- 
tory and Philosophy usually embraced in such 
courses in the leading colleges in the country. 

SPECIAL ADVANTAGE S 

The location is very healthful. The community 
is noted for its high morality. Seven churches. 
No saloons in Blount county. Six large college 
buildings, besides the President's house and two 
other residences. The halls heated by steam and 
lighted by electricity. A system of waterworks. 
Campus of 250 acres. The college under the care 
of the Synod of Tennessee. Full corps of 
instructors. Careful supervision. Study of the 
Sacred Scriptures. Four literary societies. Rhe- 
torical drill. The Lamar library of more than 
10,000 volumes. Text-booli loan libraries. 

For Catalogues, Circulars or 



MISS HENRIETTA MILLS LORD, A.B., 

French and German. 

JOSEPH FRANKLIN IDDINS, Supt. Pub. Inst. , 

English Branches. 

MISS HELEN L MINNIS, B.L., 

Piano, Voice and Theory. 

MRS. A. F. OILMAN, 

Elocution and Rhetoric. 

MRS. NELLIE B. CORT, A.B., 
Matron. 

JOSEPH S. CALDWELL, 

Assistant in Biology. 

FRANK W. CLEELAND, 

Physical Director. 



MAJOR BEN CUNNINGHAM, 

Registrar. 

WILLIAM M. THOMAS, 

Janitor. 

MRS. A. A. WILSON, 

Manager of the Co-operative Boarding Club. 

MISS H. M. KINGSBURY, 

Assistant Manager of the Co-operative Boarding Club. 



THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

Competent and experienced instructors give 
their entire time to this department, while a 
number of the professors of the College depart- 
ment give a portion of their time to it. 

EXPENSES 

The endowment of $225,000 reduces the ex- 
penses to low figures. The tuition is only $6.00 
a term or $18.00 a year. Room rent, light and 
heat bills, in Baldwin Hall (for young ladles) and 
Memorial Hall (for young men) is only $7.00 for 
the fall term, $5.00 for the winter term, and $3. 00 
for the spring term. A Co-operative Laundry has 
been established. Instrumental music at low 
rates. Board at Co-operative Boarding 
Club ONLY ABOUT $1.30 a Week. Young ladies 
may reduce even this cost by work in the club. 
In private families board as from $2.00 to $2.50. 
Other expenses are coirespondingly low. 

Total expenses, $75.00 to $125.00 a year. 

The Winter term opens January 2, 1902; the 
Spring term, March 17, 1902. 

Other Information, address 



MAJOR BEN CUNNINGHAM, Registrar, Maryville, Tenn. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY 



JiVol. IV. 



MARYVILLE, TENN., MAY, J902. 



No. 7. 



THE FITFH ANNUAL CONFERENCE FOR EDUCATION IN 

THE SOUTH. 



Athens, Ga., April 24 to 26, 1902. 

Several hundred delegates were present, 
and before the opening session they visited 
many interesting historic spots in the city. 
They were driven past many beautiful, old, 
ante-bellum residences, whose spacious, 
white-columned porticoes and well kept 
lawns spoke of other days in the "old 
South," when culture and wealth and 
learning laid the foundations of the institu- 
tions that now open wide their portals to 
this Educational Conference. 

They lingered for a little space to view 
the old, double-barreled cannon, which was 
gathered from a rubbish heap after the 
Civil War, and now stands in a little park 
in front of the city headquarters. 

It is the only one of its kind in the v/orld, 
and was invented in Athens in 1863, by 
William Gilleland, and was cast in an 
Athens foundry. It was never fired but 
once ; it proved a failure as an implement 
of war, as no chain could be found strong 
enough to hold the two balls together till 
their united force mowed down the enemy. 

In looking at it, the happy thought up- 
permost in every mind was, that both 
North and South, in this Conference, are 
uniting in the invention of some weapon 
of warfare whereby the ranks of illiteracy 
and degradation in our entire country may 
be overthrown. 

The delegates also visited the l)irthplace 
of Henry W. Grady ; the old Harden home 
place, where John Howard Payne, author 
of "Home, Sweet Home," visited his 
sweetheart, Miss Mary Harden, and gave 
her the original copy of that immortal 
song, which, it is said, lies buried with her; 
the home of Crawford W. Long, the dis- 
coverer of anesthesia ; the old home of the 
Cobbs, and the beautiful home of the 
Lumpkins, of deeper interest to the Mary- 
ville delegate, since Dr. P. M. Bartlett, 
who gave the best years of his life to the 
building up of Maryville College, married 
a granddaughter of Governor Lumpkins, 
of Athens, Ga. 



The Conference was called to order and 
presided over during its sessions by ^Ir. 
Robert C. Ogden, the happiest, most 
genial and efficient presiding officer. He 
is a man already past his three-score years,. 
the real head of the two greatest dry goods 
stores in the world. In "Success," May,. 
1902, can be found a sketch of his inter- 
esting life, which is well worthy the read- 
ing, as it shows how honesty, truthfulness,. 
fidelity and unremitting toil have fitted 
him for the place he holds in the business 
and educational world. 

He has thrown himself heart and soul 
into the educational movement of this new 
century. He gives his time and his money 
without stint. He brought with him to 
this Conference, entirely at his own ex- 
pense, a company sixty-five in number,. 
m_ost striking in personnel. There were 
merchant princes, railroad presidents,, 
bankers, philanthropists, university lead- 
ers, noted divines, editors of the world's 
foremost periodicals, versatile writers, 
deep thinkers and practical executors of 
the world's best work. 

The South also joined its best forces 
with those from the North. There were 
strong, earnest, "educational Governors" 
and State Superintendents, noted educa- 
tors, jurists. Senators and orators. Each 
spoke out of a full heart, not for the sake 
of mere oratory, but for the sake of the 
cause. Each spoke of the present needs 
or hindrances or progress along educa- 
tional lines in his State, and each ventured 
to forecast for the future what the South 
will be when every child, white and black,, 
enters into its rightful inheritance, that 
training for head, hand and heart which 
the industrial conditions in the South de- 
mand to-day, and which those abreast of 
the times see is the only solution of the 
difficult problems now confronting the 
South. 

_ Those privileged to attend these ses- 
sions felt themselves i?pon the threshold 
of an educational crisis. Through the 



112 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



open portals of this century is issuing a 
new tide in the affairs of men. 

There are glorious combinations of time 
and talent and wealth for the warfare 
against illiteracy. 

Twenty-seven per cent, of the people in 
the South can not read or write ; the aver- 
age length of school term per year is one 
hundred and seven days ; the average num- 
ber of days' schooling given to each child 
is three per year. The South has 2,275,000 
female illiterates. What a motherhood for 
our children's most impressionable years ! 

It is well to look the truth square in the 
face, and the truth should rouse us to free 
ourselves from such conditions. The diffi- 
culties that beset the South in its educa- 
tional work are many, chief among them 
the sparseness in population per square 
mile, the necessity of maintaining two 
school systems, one for each race, and the 
-poverty of the South. 

But a brighter day is dawning for the 
South. It produces sixty-six per cent, of 
the cotton crop of the world. Its varied 
natural resources are being rapidly devel- 
oped ; its manufacturing interests are in- 
creasing yearly. Already it spends $30,- 
000,000 for the education of its children. 
The awakening has come, and the work is 
along most practical lines, as the following 
quotations will show : 

Dr. Charles D. Alclver, President of the 
North Carolina State Normal School at 
Greensboro, made his report as one of the 
District Directors. Dr. Alclver said in 
substance : 

"Everything is bright for education in 
North Carolina. We have taken an in- 
ventory of our needs, and will supply them. 
\Ye have had about thirty elections on the 
subject of local taxation for public schools, 
and in only three or four cases was the 
cause of education defeated. During the 
past year four hundred libraries have been 
established in our rural schools, one-third 
of the money coming from the State. 

"A vigorous campaign for rural schools 
in North Carolina has been inaugurated. 
A conference of teachers was held at 
Raleigh, where declarations were made 
against illiteracy, and an address to the 
people of North Carolina on that subject 
was issued. A campaign has been inaug- 
urated to improve school houses and to 
urge the people to levy local taxes. The 
press has very kindly aided in the dissemi- 
nation of useful information, and the 



preachers are being urged to preach at 
least one sermon a year on the subject of 
popular education. 

"The county of Guilford raised $4,000 
for rural education, which amount was du- 
plicated by the general Education Board." 

Several Southern States, notably North 
Carolina, X'irginia and Alabama, have al- 
ready commenced, under the leadership of 
their Governors, brainy, active, progressive 
and far-seeing men, an active propaganda 
for the betterment of the rural schools. 

Governor Aycock, of North Carolina, 
with the battle-cry of "Free schools for 
all," has set the Old North State aflame 
with enthusiasm. 

Dr. Alderman declared that the bulk of 
the population of Louisiana and jNIissis- 
sippi regarded taxation with less aversion 
than any State he knew of. They have 
learned the lesson from the levee tax im- 
posed to protect them from the inroads of 
the Mississippi, and they somehow make 
the subtle connection of thought that their 
children need just as much protection for 
the submerging flood of ignorance. The 
old leaders have plowed the ground well, 
and deserve all the credit for this favorable 
state of the public mind. 

Nor must the South work unaided and 
alone. 

The Peabody Fund was established in 
1867 by George Peabody, who gave 
$3,500,000 to be devoted to education in 
the Southern States. In 1882 John F. 
Slater, of Connecticut, placed in the hands 
of trustees $1,000,000 for the purpose of 
"uplifting the lately emancipated popula- 
tion of the Southern States and their pos- 
terity." This, in addition to ]\Ir. John D. 
Rockefeller's recent gift of $1,000,000 to 
the Southern Education Board, swells the 
Southern educational fund to $6,000,000, 
independent of all smaller gifts. 

The purposes of the Conference and its 
Southern Education Board, organized last 
year, as outlined by I\Ir. W. H. Baldwin, 
Jr., are as follows : First — To promote ed- 
ucation in the whole country, irrespective 
of race, sex or creed. Second — To develop 
public schools, especially rural schools. 
Third — To encourage self-help,, the urging 
of local taxation for schools. Fourth — 
The training of school teachers, especially 
in the industrial departments. Fifth — To 
co-operate with institutions already estab- 
lished, and to aid in their maintenance and 
improvement. Sixth — To co-operate v.-ith 



MARYVILLE COI.LEGE MONTHLY. 



"S 



•otlier institutions of learning. Seventh — 
To collect educational statistics. Eightli— 
To furnish information regarding educi>- 
tion, and to be the clearing-house of educa- 
tional statistics. Xinth — To furnish the 
press with information looking to the ad- 
vancement of education interests. Tenth — 
To promote every form of deserving edu- 
cational work. 

The Convention was invited to the State 
by the Georgia Legislature. The address 
of welcome was given by Clark Howell, 
President of the Senate. 

Other noteworthy addresses were those 
■of Dr. W. T. Harris, United States Com- 
missioner of Education, on "Educational 
Supervision" ; JNIr. Robert C. Ogden's 
"Annual Address" : Dr. Albert Shaw, ed- 
itor of the "Review of Reviews," on 
'"School Equipment and Reinforcement" ; 
Hon. C. B. Aycock, Governor of North 
Carolina, on "Education and the Volun- 
tary Tax"; Hon. Hoke Smith, of Georgia, 
on "Popular Education as the Primarv 
Policy of the South" ; Prof. P. P. Claxton, 
of Tennessee, on "The Publication Bureau 
of the Southern Education Board"; Carle- 
ton B. Gibson. Superintendent of Schools, 
Columbus, Ga., on "Education Through 
Handicraft""; Lawton B.. Evans, Superin- 
tendent of Schools of Augusta, Ga., on 
"The Child of the Operative" ; Dr. Edwin 
A. Alderman, President of Tulane L^niver- 
sity, of New Orleans, La., on "The Child 
and the State"" ; Dr. Hamilton Mabie, of 
New York, on "Co-operation in Educa- 
tional Efifort." Not one discordant note 
was struck throughout the entire Confer- 
ence. 

Governor Aycock, of North Carolina, 
said : "I count it more gain to meet here 
in this fraternal spirit and discuss these 
questions than all the millions that could 
flow into the treasury of this movement." 
Mr. Hamilton ^Nlabie, of New York, said 
that he believed the day would come when 
on squares of Northern cities would stand 
statues of Lee and Jackson, and that, in 
like manner, Southern cities would honor 
that hero of our nation, Abraham Lincoln. 

One spirit, one aim, one deep under- 
current of enthusiasm pervaded every ses- 
sion of the Convention. Each member 
felt himself drawn thither by the provi- 
dence of God to see the needs, the possi- 
bilities and the plans of the work as a 
whole, ajid from that broader outlook to 
become, as never before, a part of that 



mighty working force which is to revolu- 
tionize the schools of our beloved South- 
land. :\Iargaret E. Henry. 

Maryville, Tenn. 



THE ANECDOTAL SIDE OF THE 
♦'OLD MAN." 

When the Old Grad. comes up to the 
Hill after years of absence, he usually 
crosses the lower style wearing a thought- 
ful air. Doubtless he assumed this de- 
meanor when, seated in the familiar old 
coach of the K. & A. flyer, he watches the 
panorama from the window, presenting to 
him many bits of landscape that recall his 




THE "OLD MAN." 



student life. The first glimpse of the 
mountains suggests the driving parties to 
Look Rock, "Stolen moonshine" and Fac- 
ulty meetings. Little River brings memo- 
ries of hot afternoons cooled down to the 
point when a man could live a moral life 
by a plunge into the placid waters beneath 
those great birches, whose boughs sweep 
the stream ; and later the plunge, followed 
by a gourd full of milk surreptitiously ob- 
tained at some farmer's cool spring house. 
Bv the time the train has siehted "the 



114 



MARYVILIvE COI.LEGE MONTHLY. 



cut" he is leaning out of the car eager to 
see the lofty cupola of Anderson, and his 
memory unraveling many a choice half- 
forgotten yarn of those old days. But 
when he cHmbs the cedar-covered slope 
he comes not as a student, but as a wan- 
dering son of Alma ]\Iater. 

A figure strikingly familiar approaches. 
He is carrying a couple of wrenches and 
a length of pipe. A benevolent collie and 
an aggressive terrier attend him. Smiles 
of recognition light up each countenance ; 
a wrench is dropped, and the honest hand 
that held it is brushed across a trouser 
leg, and then a hearty hand-clasp. 

"Old ^lan, I'm glad to see you." 

'•Howdy, George; howdy. When d'ye 
come ?■" 

Ten minutes later they may be found in 
a quiet place behind ^Memorial on a couple 
of much-repaired chairs, swapping yarns. 

The Old ^ Ian— bless his buttons. To the 
old student he stands out sharper in mem- 
ory than anything else in the institution, 
even counting in Prexy and the faculty of 
the boarding-hall. 

In the days of the old regime "Old Man 
Thomas" was proctor of Memorial, and 
the old boys remember well the vigils kept 
by the oldVoundsman. His three thumps, 
then a pair of twinkling eyes peering round 
the edge of the door, then "All in?" 
"Good-night," then his shufifling step re- 
treating down the corridor. And the stu- 
dent would be left on his honor till after 
studv hours. Sometimes this confidence 
would be shattered, and then a fellow 
would be laid for, and usually about the 
time the water wo aid come swish from 
"Third"' a cheerful voice would say, 
"That's all right. See you Tuesday night." 
And he would, but to his discomfiture. 

The Old :\Ian likes to teh of the time 
that he took Welsh's cork vmder by meet- 
ing him while busy doing some "choice 
dirt" out near Baldwin. A short run, and 
"Pud" never smiled again. 

He also smiles when he remembers Hal- 
lowe'en, '95, when he pursued Sam Hous- 
ton, '98, across the campus in the dark, and 
old Sam caught his toe in a tuft of sedge 
and sprawled his si.x-foot-six length over 
quite an area. 

There was great preparation made once 



to celebrate Hallowe'en, and in a quiet 
way the Old jNIan got on. He didn't care 
to patrol the campus all night, btit devised 
a siick scheme. He got his loading tools, 
and industriously loaded twelve-gauge 
shells all that afternoon. He used bird 
shot in all of them, and this finally roused 
the curiosity of one fellow, who was, by the 
way, the ringleader. An inquiry brought 
no response from the old man. But the 
fellow was persistent, and finally got his 
information. After being bound to secrecy, 
he was told that there was going to be 
som.e "devilment" that night, and that 
some fellows were going to get "scared 
up." "Yoti see, fine shot like that won't 
hurt nobody." That night the hill was 
cjuiet as the tomb. 

But there is not space to tell of the old 
man's fun with Strawberry Post, of Tam- 
many ]Miser, Long John Davis, John 
Ritchie and his "horses." Xor Bill Keeble, 
nor yet many others of the old guard. Yet 
we must tell of once when he proved that 
even a faculty man could be fooled. 

Professor Goff had the coldest room in 
.Anderson, and usually had a continuous 
chill from November till April. The old 
man, in his official capacity of engineer, 
was constantly in demand to "Get us just 
a little more heat, please," and always tried 
to do as he was bid. Once, however, when 
the pipes burst and not a suggestion of 
heat could be secured — the mercury stood 
at ten below — his inventive powers were 
taxed to the utmost. Chapel time, and still 
no heat. A happy thought ; seizing Pro- 
fessor GofT's thermometer, he ran into Dr. 
Barnes' lecture-room and cooked it over 
his radiator, then returned it to its place. 
Just then came in Professor G. 

"Think you'll have no trouble this morn- 
ing. Professor. \\"i\\ you look at your 
thermometer?" 

"Ah, 71. Well, that's good. I'm cer- 
tainly obliged." 

And then ofif went the Professor's top- 
coat, and he perspired profusely the re- 
mainder of the day. 

IMany a time when the Old Alan has 
been ver}- sick, he would receive a written 
pledge, signed by all his "hall boys," that 
they would stand by the rules and give no 
troitble to the powers that be until his re- 
turn. These papers the Old Alan keeps as 
priceless treasures. F. L. W., '02. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



"5 



THE MERCIFUL SIDE OF THE "OLD 
MAN." 

To the ]\[aryville student in whom the 
"Old Plan's" accurate scrutiny detects any 
littleness or meanness, the statement that 
such an clement as mercy enters into his 
make-up may seem incredible. He is the 
relentless and implacable enemy of the 
deadbeat, the shirk, and the sneak. Woe 
to the man who tries to get even with 
some one whom he dislikes by irrigating 
him with a bucket of slop from a third- 
floor window ! Woe to the even meaner 
man who "puts up a horse" in which un- 
just criticism of a professor or unkind ridi- 
cule of a fellow student is the end aimed 
at 1 The "Old Man" opens on the trail of 
such a one with the untiring energy of a 
grevhound. and the offender finds it just 
as impossible to avoid betraying himself 
when under the "Old Man's" searching 
cross-examination as it is to outrun him on 
the campus. He who attempts to carry 
out a joke which does real damage, or 
which has anything maliciously mean 
about it, is sure to be called to meet with 
the Faculty, and he meets there, too, with 
an exact account of what he has done. At- 
tempts to beg ofif when caught are utterly 
ttseless ; indeed, they only add to the enor- 
mity of the offense in the "Old Man's" 
A'iew of it. 

But for the fellow in whose pranks there 
is nothing but clean, wholesome, good- 
humored fun, there is no terror in the 
"Old Man's" approaching footsteps. If 
such a boy is found in the act of "putting 
lip the horse*' or breaking into Baldwin's 
kitchens in a futile search for edibles, INIr. 
Thomas will give instant chase, with loud- 
voiced threats of demerits, disgrace, and 
probable expulsion ; but it is seldom indeed 
that he overtakes such a one. If the boy 
thoughtlessly keeps within the glare of the 
'Campus lights, Mr. Thomas will run him 
down merely to keep up his reputation. 
His grieved and surprised remarks on dis- 
covering the identity of the culprit would 
put to shame any but the most hardened, 
and many a weak-kneed boy has aban- 
doned a promising career as a practical 
joker as a result of taking one of the "Old 
Man's" lectures too seriously. 

Two years ago those in charge of an 
Alumni banquet learned of a plot to steal 
a part of the refreshments, and the writer 
2i^ked -\Ir. Thomas to assist in preventing 



the theft. We did not forget that he was 
roaming about the building with all the 
vigilance and latent ferocity of a dozen 
bulldogs ; so when the crowd was gone he 
was called in. 1 sat out a big bowl, put 
into it a quart of the finest strawberries, 
and covered them with ice cream. When 
the last berry had disappeared and the 
"Old Man" leaned back in his chair with 
a long-drawn sigh, I caught sight of the 
softened look in his eye, and knew that 
I had completely won his heart. I was 
thenceforth a "trusty."' 

Since that time it has only been neces- 
sary to suggest that his customary morn- 
ing inspection of the buildings is super- 
fluous, in order to be sure that a "horse" 
put up the night before will remain undis- 
covered and undisturbed until chapel. 

Sometimes, when, upon a nightly ma- 
rauding expedition, his ponderous foot- 
falls have been heard in the distance, it is 
best to seek cover, if possible; but I once 
concealed myself behind an inch sapling, 
near an electric light, and within six feet 
of the walk, while he went slowly past in 
total unconsciousness ( ?) of my presence. 

But the evil-doer, he who delights in any 
form of meanness pure and simple, has an 
easy time when compared with the un- 
happy mortal who has enjoyed the "Old 
Man's'' confidence and has broken his tacit 
agreement to "act white." He will find, 
instead of a good friend, a silent Nemesis, 
who can not see the slightest good in any- 
thing he may do, who will listen to no flat- 
tery, who will hear no promises, who will 
wait patiently for the slightest infraction 
of the rules, and then quietly track him 
down in s]:)ite of the most careful plans to 
escape detection. 

To those whom he can trust he is an- 
other man. Alany a prank has he over- 
looked, many a discouraged fellow has he 
cheered up, and many are those to whom 
he has advanced a few dollars to help over 
a tight place, asking only in return, "Xow, 
have all the fun you can, but don't do any 
meanness that will give me trouble." And 
to the credit of human nature be it said, 
that there are few indeed who betray the 
"Old [Man's" confidence. T. S. C "02. 



The gentlemen from Pea Ridge, in ven- 
turing a game with jNIaryville College on 
April 19, were vanquished to the tune of 
15 to 14. 



ti6 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



OUT IN THE WORLD. 

(A Fancy.) 

CHAPTER I. 

It was the morning after the great dis- 
aster. Grim Silence paraded hke a specter 
to and fro upon College Hill. 

The fine old campus had, the night be- 
fore, been the battle-ground of the fierce 
elements. 

Alas and alas ! who of that happy crowd 
of students and professors that had as- 
sembled only the evening before to listen 
to the Seniors' Ivy Planting exercises, 
would have dreamed of the awful calamity 
that was hovering over both them and 
their dear old Alma Mater? Ah, would 
that it were only a dream ! 

But no. The most ravaging cyclone 
that the South had ever experienced, only 
a few hours ago vented its rage along a 
narrow path in East Tennessee, and our 
beloved old college buildings swelled the 
list of its victims. 

Still, how strange are the workings of 
Nature ! The narrow path of the unwel- 
come visitor had left Baldwin and Bartlett 
Halls standing; but the howling fiend, en- 
tering the cedar-covered campus from be- 
tween the President's mansion and the 
Crawford residence, had, though leaving 
these last two buildings safe and sound, 
snatched up the library. Science, Anderson 
and Memorial Halls in its arms, and scat- 
tered them to the four winds of the earth. 

Ah ! a sad day it was to be for the friends 
of Maryville College when the sun rose in 
all_ his splendor over the great heaps of 
ruins, and when the news was flashed all 
over the United States and the world. 



CH.\PTER II. 

Dickie (just waking up in the Lamar 
mansion): "Great Caesar's ghost! what 
awful dreams I did have! Whew! quarter 
past seven ! Well, if I want some break- 
fast" — 

He springs witli hungry agility for his 
school uniform, and soon is on his way 
toward Baldwin. He soon spies Hunter, 
Bassett and Schell perched up on top of 
the ruins of Anderson Hall, weeping as if 
their hearts would break. 

"Wa-wa-wa — well, what's this ?" 

But no words were necessary to tell the 
sad tale. 

"Well, fellows," said Hunter, bravely 
wiping the tears from his eyes, "it's very 



evident that there's no more school for us' 
in Maryville for many a long day to come. 
Boys, we've got to get out and zvork. Just 
look here," and pulling a copy of the New 
York Tribune, he points to a column and 
reads : 

"Wanted — L'ncle Sam wants one thou- 
sand college men to help him build his 
great Isthmian Canal, along the Nicaragua 
rouie. Only those ready to brave hard- 
ships need apply. Promotion in propor- 
tion to merit. For particulars address 
Rear Admiral John G. Walker, Chief En- 
gineer, Washington, D. C.' 

"Just the thing!" exclaims Dickie. 

"I'm ready for it," mutters Schell. 

"I tell you, fellows, let's go down to join 
L^ncle Sam's forces on the isthmus, and 
show what sort of stuff we are made of, 
and get a hold of part of the fabulous sums 
that are sure to be made. Then I tell you, 
fellows, let us turn it all over to Dr. Wilson 
to rebuild Maryville College."' 

"Agreed;' say all but Bassett, who de- 
clared that he must stay and keep books 
for Dr. Wilson, and keep within hail of 
Kansas. 



CHAPTER III. 

Oh, happy day ! Hunter writes to Rear 
Admiral Walker, applies for positions for 
self, Dickie and Schell, and delights the 
hearts of these honorable gentlemen by 
reading in three days the reply of accept- 
ance from Rear Admiral Walker. They 
take the train for Tampa, Fla., where, , 
being provided with outfits, they set sail 
for Greytown, Costa Rica, in the gulf 
steamer Sultana, on May 9th. 

On the way Dickie has quite an adven- 
ture. Just before sailing he read about the 
wreck of a large trading vessel with a rich 
cargo and several wealthy capitalists on 
board, just ofi the coast of Honduras. On 
approaching the place of the wreck he spies 
the dorsal fins of immense sharks swim- 
ming about the supposed site of the dis- 
aster. 

"Say, Bre'r Schell," says he, "let's get 
permission from the captain to catch one 
of those big shark. We might nip one 
that has swallowed some of the valuables." ' 

vSo, hailing Htmter, the three bait an im- - 
mense hook, which one of the sailors gave- 
them, with an old yellow cat that had 
slipped on board at Tampa, and which the 
captain was only too glad to get rid of. 

Schell then thinks of something, and.' 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



117 



telling them to hold on a moment, runs 
clown to the state-room, and soon re- 
appears with a tin box full of Baldwin bis- 
cuits, which the matron had presented him 
as a parting gift. 

"Just you bide a wee," says he, "till I 
entice those sharks this way with these 
delicacies." 

Then he begins flipping the savory mor- 
sels far out into the briny deep. Soon 
great fins are seen cutting the waves close 
by. The next step is to fasten on a strong 
manilla rope to the hook, and then toss the 
yowling yellow tomcat over the rail. Pres- 
ently the three Maryvilleites spy a tremen- 
dous old shark, with phosphorescent lights 
playing about his hungry jaws, make for 
kitty as he goes bouncing along over the 
billows in the wake of the steamer. 

Hark ! A breathless silence, a heart- 
rending me-o-o-ow ! from Tommy, a sud- 
den tightening of the rope, and the fun is 
on. By this time the stern was crowded 
with passengers and sailors, and good, 
lusty help was given on the windlass with 
which our dauntless friends were pulling 
the monster on board. 

At length the great flapping old fellow 
was making things pretty lively on deck. 
The valiant Dickie with an ax soon induced 
the unwilling visitor to part with his head 
and tail ; then all was "quiet along the Po- 
tomac" again. At once began the work of 
carving and investigation. Well, talk 
about your variety ! That old chap con- 
tained everything, from oysters up to din- 
ner plates. But as yet no valuables. Sud- 
denly Schell made a dive into a remote 
corner of the shark's stomach, and very 
slyh', though unnoticed by the rest, 
slipped something among the few remain- 
ing biscuits in his tin box. After some 
further research without any very import- 
ant finds, save a pair of rather ragged 
Regal shoes, which probably one of the 
tmfortunate capitalists had worn, our he- 
roes tossed the remains of the big fish 
overboard, and descended to their cil^in 
to take a needed rest. 

Schell now, with an exceedingly wise 
look, opens his tin box and takes out what 
appears like a sealskin wallet before the 
eyes of his comrades. 

Their imaginations know no limit. Tear- 
ing it open, the three see a roll of crisp 
greenbacks unroll before their eyes. Five 
hundred thousand dollars ! Enough to 



erect a magnificent building for Maryville 
College ! 



CIIAl'TKR IV. 

Arriving at Greytown on the i6th, our 
friends first mail home the money in in- 
stallments, to escape suspicion, and then 
set to work with a will. Schell, through 
his previous experience with the squirt- 
gun, soon receives a promotion to chief of 
the hydraulic engineers. Dickie and Hun- 
ter also, through grit and perseverance,, 
are raised to positions of importance. 

The canal was finished in exactly ninety 
days, and our three friends pulled into the 
beautiful little city of JNlaryville about Sep- 
tember Tst, to be delighted with the stone 
towers and marble minarets of the new 
]\raryville rising to the skies before their 
joyful eyes. Arthur C. Tedford, '04.- 



The 



IV V DAY. 

-enior class celebrated Ivv Da\^ 



Monday afternoon, Alay 5, on the campus 
by Fayerweather Hall. The exercises were 
attended by a large concourse of friends 
from town and the entire force of college 
people. Seats, draped in the colors of the 
four classes, were arranged on the lawn for 
the college men and women. The front 
facade of Fayerweather was draped in red 
and white, the Senior colors, and the bal- 
cony was decorated in fluttering class and 
college flags and pennants. All the classes- 
attended with flying colors. 

Class President Arthur Holtsinger was 
ill and unable to be present — a matter of 
regret to all — and Professor E. B. \\'aller 
was chosen by the class to preside over the 
occasion. President Wilson oft'ered the 
prnver of invocation, after which Professor 
Waller made the welcome address in be 
half of the class. He said, among other 
things, that though the class was not large 
m lunnbers, yet it was large in efficiency, 
and was already known far beyond the 
college walls. In testimony whereof he 
read from the Wooster College "A"oice" 
the Senior poem read at the banquet a few 
davs ago, which had been published in the' 
college mazagine. and thus found its way 
to the exchange table of that Northern' 
magazine. Miss ^Nlavme Stebbins. the Ivy 
poetess, was next introduced, and pre- 
sented the Ivy poem. This beautiful crea- 
tion was much enjoyed by all. The next 
number was the singing of the Ivv song^ 



iiS 



MARYYILIvE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



■"Alma Mater," by the Senior and Sopho- 
more classes. The voices of the singers 
"were assisted by violin accompaniment, by 
Miss Mary Alexander and Arthur Tedford, 
'04. After the Ivy song, the Ivy oration 
was delivered by Frederic Lee Webb. The 
subject of this oration was the class motto, 
"Gradatim" (step by step). At the con- 
clusion of this number the audience walked 
around to the front of the building, where 
the ivy was planted. Miss Helen Ervin, 
using a silver-handled trowel tied with the 
•class ribbons, officiated at this very import- 
ant rite. The next feature of the occasion 
-was the "Burial of the Class Treasures and 
Funeral Oration," by Joseph Stewart 
Caldwell. The treasures had been col- 
lected through the four years' history of 
the class organization, and were too pre- 
cious to be taken away from the old hill. 
Among them were to be found Miss 
Ervin 's rattle-box, which had been the 
corniort in many a trying hour of the 
youngest member of the class ; Professor 
A\'aller"s and Mr. Bassett's taws, or "shoot- 
'Crs"' ; the '01 scalping knife, and the famous 
old squirt-gun, which had, with the forty- 
nine notches on the plunger, helped make 
the class famous. These were buried in 
a grave close to the ivy vine, and the large 
■"class stone" laid upon it. 

Scarcely had this ceremony been per- 
formed when one of those depraved, wilt- 
ing spring showers took a place, all un- 
announced, on the program, and the as- 
semblage adjourned, led by the Junior con- 
tingent, Vvdio had the good of their new 
"ducks"' at heart, to the lobby of the hall, 
where the remainder of the exercises were 
held. The four classes sung in chorus the 
college song, "Orange, garnet, float for- 
ever," and following this was pandemo- 
nium, for about the time it takes to play 
•one inning, for the class yells, and joint 
■organization yells, and college yells, and 
other yells, not a few, were given ; and the 
■shower fled whence it came. 

The exercises then closed, peace and 
harmony prevailing. Senex, '02. 



Thy love. O mother, dear, 

-And thoughts of this, our foster home, 
We'll keep through coming years, 

When sundered far we roam ; 
When answering to Life's call 

On Duty's plane, 
We plight our honor here 

To shield thv 'lustrious name. '02. 



FUNERAL OF HON. THOMAS DUNN 

ENGLISH, M,D., LL D., AUTHOR 

OF "BEN BOLT." 

I have attended this afternoon, at the 
House of Prayer, which is High Church 
Episcopal, in Newark, the funeral of the 
phvsician, lawyer, poet, dramatist, novelist 
and statesman. Dr. Thomas Dunn English. 
The door-plate on front of his late resi- 
dence, ^7 State Street, Newark, bears sim- 
ply "Dr. English." He was born in Phila- 
delphia, June 29, 1819; studied medicine at 
the University of Pennsylvania ; but was 
admitted to the l)ar in 1842. He resided 
for some years in X'irginia, but since 1856 
has lived in New Jersey. Sixty years ago, 
in 1842, at the age of twenty-three, he 
wrote the five stanzas, containing in all 
forty lines, which became at once widely 
popular, and which has given him a rep- 
utation ever since. He has written a good 
deal for the press, and published several 
volumes, but none of them have attracted 
much attention. He is said to have been 
somewhat annoyed by the fact that he was 
known chiefly by "Ben Bolt." The poem 
assumes to be from an old man, addressed 
to an early, faithful and only surviving 
schoolmate. He was asked to write a sea 
song, but failed ; wrote "Ben Bolt" without 
giving it a name, and told the editors to 
burn it if they saw fit. They liked it. 

"Grass grows on the master's grave, Ben 
Bolt, 
The spring of the brook is dry ; 
And of all the boys that were schoolmates 
then. 
There are only you and I." 

It was something to see to-day, after 
sixty years, the only surviving companion 
of Ben Bolt carried out at last to his own 
burial in Fairmount Cemetery. Nearly 
fiftv vears after the composition of this 
little poem Dr. English was nominated 
for Congress ]:)y the Democrats, and it is 
said was literally sung into the office by 
the constant use of "Ben Bolt" as a cam- 
paign song, though tune-writers said at 
first it wouldn't sing. He served for two 
terms about 1890. It affords a striking 
illustration of the possible power of a hap- 
pi!v conceived and well-written bit of com- 
position, and also of the especial value that 
sometimes attaches to the first productions 
of very young authors. The first sap of 
sugar maples is the sweetest. This, how- 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



119 



•ever, does not apply to all trees. Dr. 
English published, among other things, 
"The Mormons," a drama ; three novels 
under his own name, besides others, and a 
series ol ballads on events in American 
history, in Harper's Magazine. He pub- 
lished "Poems" in 1855, "American Bal- 
lads" in 1S79, "Boys' Book of Battle 
Lvrics" in 1S85. Later he wrote a poem 
on tne blowing up of the Maine. After 
■coming to Nevr- jersey he practiced medi- 
cine. Interest in "Ben Bolt" was lately re- 
vived in Du jMaurer"s "Trilby." The So- 
■ciety of American Authors, of which Dr. 
English was a member, s.nit a beautiful 
bunch of palms,, which symbolized victory. 
The Celtic Club sent a large Celtic cross, 
and the Jeffersonian Club a large wreath 
of roses and greens. Ex-LTnited States 
Senator and Mrs. Smith sent a large floral 
piece, and Congressman R. W. Parker and 
]N'Irs. Parker another. The placid features 
of the departed author were seen at the 
house. He was of Scotch-Irish descent, 
his ancestors having been also Quakers. 
The Celtic Club attended as a body, and 
a delegation from the United Irish League. 
That org.a.nization also sent a floral harp 
over five feet in height. General James 
Grant AVilson and Senator Smith were 
among the honorary pall-bearers. The 
body v>-as borne by members of the Celtic 
Club. A surpliced choir of fifty male 
voices chanted the musical parts of the 
Episcopal service, which was conducted by 
the rector. Rev. John S. Miller, assisted by 
Rev. Cyrus S. Durand. Thus has passed 
away one of the very last of the poets who 
flourished in the first half of the last cen- 
tury, with Poe, Morris, N. P. Willis, Dana, 
Pierpoint and others. S. W. B. 

Bloomfield. N. J., April 4, 1902. 



Y. W. C. A. NOTES. 

vSeldom have Baldwin girls entertained 
a more delightful guest than Miss Frances 
Bridges, Traveling Secretary of the Young 
Women's Christian Association. 

Her short stay of little more than thirty- 
six hours, including the fourth Sunday of 
April, was filled to the brim with friendly 
■criticising and catechizing, and especiallv 
with the good counsel and good cheer that 
■always attend her visits. 

At our afternoon meeting Miss Bridges 
first touched briefly on the "high points" 
in the history and development of the 



Young Women's Christian Association. 
Then the work and needs of the American 
Committee were discussed by her, and our 
attention was called to the city department 
in particular. 

The Cabinet met with the Secretary at 
the close of this session. Rememljering 
last year's experience, the members of that 
body had come well primed with facts con- 
cerning the history, aim and present activi- 
ties of the Y". W. C. A. But we were agree- 
ably surprised by being invited to ask the 
Secretary questions instead of her putting 
them to Us. 

In the evening Miss Bridges spoke on 
the Toronto Convention, and impressed 
three questions of Mr. Speer's address 
there. These were : "What place in our 
thoughts does Jesus Christ occupy? In 
our aitections? In our life purposes? 

Miss Bridges is a graduate of Smith Col- 
lege, and to her perfect culture and broad 
humanity is due in no slight degree her 
success as a secretary. Her retirement 
from official duties at the year's end is 
much to be regretted. 



The Ministerial Students' Association of 
Maryville College has held four regular 
monthly meetings since the Christmas hol- 
idays. It will hold its last regular meeting 
on the 17th of May. 

The various subjects for discussion at 
the several meetings of the Association 
have been very ably and thoroughly dis- 
cussed. 

The subject discussed at its first meet- 
ing, February i, was "Foreign Missions." 
Rev. Air. Tedford made an address on 
India, where he has labored for over 
twenty years. 

The topics treated on Alarch i and 
March 29 were : "Am I my brother's 
keeper?" and "How can we best help 
those who have just been converted?" 

C)n April 2"/ Rev. Mr. Tedford again 
addressed the Association. His theme was, 
"Francis Xavier's Work in India and the 
Work of His Successors.'' 

Dr. Wilson will speak before the Asso- 
ciation at its next regular meeting on 
"^Ministerial Students' Relationship to 
Su.mmer Work." 

The Association desires to express to 
Rev. Air. Tedford its heartfelt appreciation 
of the interest that he has taken in its 
behalf. 



I20 



MARYVILI.E COLLEGE MONTHLY 



Maryville College Monthly. 



Vol. IV. 



MAY, 1902. 



No. 7. 



EDHORIAL STAFF. 



Editor-in-Chikf, 

Athenian, 

Bainonian, 

Alpha Sigma, 

Theta Epsilon, - 

Y. M.C. A., 

Y. W. C. A. 

Athletics, 

Alumni, - - - 

Business Manager, 



ELMER B. WALLER 

DENNIS W.CRAWFORD 

HELEN E. ERVIN 

FRANK E. LAUGHEAD 

EMMA E. CALDWELL 

FREDERICK F. SCHELL 

MAME STEBBINS 

- ARTHUR C.TEDFORD 

JOHN W. RITCHIE 

FREDERIC L. WEBB 



Subscription Manager, JOSEPH S. CALDWELL 

Students, grnduates and friends of the College are 
Invited to contribute literary anlcles, personals and 
items of general interest for publication. 
Subscription price, for eight numbers, 25 cents. 
Address all coihmunications to 

Maryville College Monthlt, 

Maryville, Tenn. 

Entered at Maryville, TeLn., as Secoud-Class Mail Matter. 



ATHLETIC'. 

The Gvm looks deserted. 



Cleeland is on the move getting ready 
for field dav. 



Wildwood got pretty badly beaten by 
the M. C. team on April i. (See April 
number for report of this game.) 

It is really quite interesting to see Phillip 
make goo-goo eyes when he notices the 
girls watching' him playing tennis. 



BASEBALL I BASEBALL ! ! BASEBALL ! ! 

Eight games played during April, all 
having big crowds and plenty of rooting. 

April i8 saw another game between 
Maryville College's second team and 
Friendsville. The fates were against us, 
so we lost, 1/ to 20. 

The Golf Club is having a good time, 
and losing balls as fast as ever. Professor 
Daunt Xewman and Sam McCampbell ap- 
parently think there is nothing like it. 



Tennis Club members have been on the 
hustle. Though our membership is down 
to fifteen, still our courts this spring are 
strictly O. K., and if you want to see some 
good playing, just take a stroll out our 
wav. 



On April 5 our second team boys played 
Friendsville Academy a good game on the- 
home diamond. Friendsville did not score- 
until the sixth inning, as a result of their 
general weak batting. Farmer put up a 
fine game, striking- out fourteen, while 
Hafley struck out only five. Our boys did 
good work, and won with a score of 15 to- 
2. Dr. John McCulloch, umpire. 



April 12 found our boys again lined up' 
against Wildwood, but this time at Wild- 
wood. The grounds were simply miser- 
able in comparison with ours. This time- 
the Wildwooders found the ball pretty 
often, in spite of jNIcCulloch's pitching. 
Wildwood got the lead by running in six 
scores in the eighth. ^Maryville made six 
scores in the ninth, but she began too late,, 
losing the game by 13 to 15. AlcCulloch 
struck out nine, and Dunn, Bartlett and 
Goddard made double plays twice. Dr. 
John McCulloch, umpire. 



stand that we also knew something about 
the game of baseball. There were very few 
errors during the game. The best batting- 
was done by Bartlett, who got a three-base 
hit, two two-base hits, several singles, also- 
six assists, three put-outs and no errors. 
Good batting by Goddard, Foster, Mc- 
Spadden and Houston. The Grays' fine 
battery v/as their strong point. 

The score kept pretty even throughout 
the entire game, and at the last of the ninth 
stood 9 to 9. The Grays had last bats, and' 
after Ira McTeer made the telling run the 
game was called finished, 9 to 10 in favor- 
of the Grays. Every one went away be- 
lieving it to have been the finest game of 
the season, and also that the Maryville- 
College boys had been only slightly out- 
played by the visitors. 

Positively the finest game of the season 
was on April 26, when the Mountain Grays 
played Maryville College at ^Maryville. 
Their battery consisted of two professional' 
players, Wiley Davis, pitcher, and Ira Mc- 
Tear, catcher. jNIaryville College pitched 
McCall for this game, who played in very 
good form. The game was both close and' 
hard, for our boys gave them to under- 

April 17, Seniors-Sophs., vs. Juniors- 
Freshies. — Well, this was a game! Fun?' 
I should say so ! All of Baldwin out. 
Plenty of class spirit. Good playing and 
bad playing. Juniors and Freshies made- 



MARYVILIvE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



12f 



four scores in the first, then no more vmtil 
the fifth inning, when they made five more 
runs. Houston pitched during the first 
part of the game for the Juniors-Freshies, 
and Hugh Crawford during the rest of the 
time. Holtsinger pitched a good, steady 
game for the Seniors-Sophs. Every good 
play was heartily applauded by supporters 
of "that particular side, and very often it 
was that the air was rent by yells and toots 
from the extensive grandstands. 

Some of the especially entertaining fea- 
tures of the game were Grau's cake-walk- 
ish prancing about second base, a home 
run by Houston, Vaught's thoroughly 
cooling the air by repeatedly fanning it 
with a baseball bat, Dickie's three-base hit, 
Grau's making five out of the seven errors 
on the Junior-Freshie side, and also many 
other points too numerous to be men- 
tioned. 

The Senior-Sophs, put up a noble fight, 
and lost the day only like Napoleon at 
Waterloo. 

Score: Seniors-Sophs., 7; Juniors- 
Freshies, 14. 



PROGRAM OF COMMENCEMET EX- 
ERCISES AT MARYVILLE 
COLLEGE. 

[May 21-23, Wednesday to Friday — Ex- 
aminations. 

May 23, Friday night — Annual banquet 
of the Adelphic G'nion Literary Society. 

May 25, Sabbath morning — Baccalau- 
reate sermon by President Wilson. 

Mav 25, Sabbath night — Annual address 
before the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. 

May 26, ]\Ionday morning — Llndergrad- 
uate exercises. 

May 26, Monday night — Senior class re- 
cital : Montaville Flowers in the inter- 
pretive monologue, "Ben Hur." 

]\Tay 2^, Tuesday morning — Annual 
meeting of the Board of Directors. 

May 27, Tuesda}' morning — Undergrad- 
uate exercises. 

May 27, Tuesday afternoon — Class day 
exercises. 

May 27, Tuesday night — Annual exhibi- 
tion of the Adelphic L'nion Literary So- 
ciety. 

Wednesday morning — Commencement 
exercises. 

May 28, Wednesday night — Annual 
meeting of Alumni Association. 

Alay 28, Wednesday night — Reception. 



JUNIOR CLASS NOTES. 

Junior Yell — T\ah rah ree, rah, rah ree, 
Junior, Junior 1903. Hurrah, hurrah, 
Junior, Junior 1903. 

On Sunday, April 2/', Robert O. Frank- 
lin dedicated his church at Caledonia, Dr. 
Wilson preaching the sermon. 



vSeveral new members are expected to 
join our class next year, and the high rec- 
ord made this year will be continued. 



The Astronomy Class, m studying the 
heavens, discovered a new planet, the name 
of which is "Rendrag," the l:)rilliancy of 
Vvhich outshines Sirius. 



The Junior Class is again represented iii 
the official positions of the Athenian Liter- 
ary Society. Mr. Hugh Crawford was elect- 
ed President, and Robert Franklin, Vice.-' 
President, for this term. 



Mr. and ]\Irs. Joseph Alollvaine invited 
the Juniors and their friends to a party at 
their home on the evening of March 26th, 
and a very enjoyable evening was spent. 
Refreshments were served, and all left de- 
claring the evening most pleasantly spent, 
those present were: Misses Coxe, Inger- 
soll, Gardner. Gamble, Watson and Cort. 
^lessrs. D. W. Crawford. H. D. Crawford. 
F. G. Brown, R. H. .McCaslin and R. O. 
Franklin. 



Our President, iNIiss Gardner, will spend 
the summer at her home in Salyersville, 
Ky. I\Ir. Grau will spend the summer at 
Dante, Sweetwater and Chattanooga. H. 
and D. W. Crawford will remain on the 
Hill. R. FT. ]\IcCaslin will spend the vaca- 
tions at his home in Sweetwater and in the 
mountains, with E. S. Grau, on a fishing 
trip. T. G. Brown will be at his home in 
Philadelphia, while Robert O. Franklin 
will continue his work with the four 
churches under his charge. 



On April 26 the Junior and Freshman 
classes, with a few of their friends, met at 
Baldwin Hall for an early breakfast, and 
then went for a picnic to the mountains. 
It had been rumored that the Sophomores 
were going to steal our dinners, but we 
quietly gave the sleepy Sophs, the slip, and 
left for the mountains, going first to "The 
Tannerv." ^^'hile there one of the hacks. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



■experienced some exciting times, being 
:£tuck in the mud with a team that couldn't 
be backed out. The party then went back 
to Mt. Nebo for dinner, and late in the 
afternoon started for jNIaryville, arriving 
at Baldwin Hall at 6:30 o'clock. 



The Junior and Freshman classes chal- 
lenged the Senior and Sophomore classes 
to a baseball game, and on April 17 the 
game took place. It resulted in a com- 
plete victory for the Junior-Freshman 
■classes. The line-up for the Junior-Fresh- 
man was as follows : 

Houston Pitcher 

McCaslin Catcher 

■Cleeiand First base 

'Grau Second base 

Eranklin Third base 

H. Cravrford Short-stop 

Brown Right field 

D. Crawford Center field 

A'aught Left field 

Among the features of the game were 
Houston's pitching, Grau's work on sec- 
ond base and Cleeland's on first base. The 
score was 14 to 7 in favor of the Junior- 
Freshman classes. 



AVc Sophomores, the jewel class, 

Are happy all the day, 
Because three things have come to pass. 

Of which I now portray. 




Arguments are all right, but here are facts. 

The styles for meu are made in New York. 
That is where our clothing is made. 

The designer for the wholesale clothing manu- 
facturer learns as promptly as the Fifth Avenue 
tailor concerning future styles. 

2\o tailoi can buy any better cloth than the 
clothing manufacturer, and it stands to reason the 
manufacturer can buy at lower prices. 

In regard to workmanship; the best journey- 
man tailors are engaged by the year by the clothing 
manufacturer. Isaturally he works cheaper than 
by the job with the merchant-tailor. 

This finishes the discussion on style, cloth, 
cost and make; now comes the test — the tit; to 
settle this see our suits: trv 'em, wear 'em. 

BRANDAU & KENNEDY, "TnT'-'^ 



^Ik "^I^ "*'^ "'■'^ -J'^ "i'^ "^'^ "S'^ •'''^ "*'^ "*'<• •*'*• "J'^ •*'*• -^'^ ^!^ 



The first we're sure all understand. 

It is oitr tiger yell. 
Which Tedford broitght from Hindoo land, 

Thus rings out like a bell. 

The second is our pretty girls ; 

They number almost nine ; 
As none are of the inatron's pearls. 

We moonshine all the time. 

The third we whisper in your ear. 

Of work done in advance. 
By two who'll skip their Junior year 

And make the Seniors prance. 

So let each have class spirit pure. 
And show his colors more ; 

F'or then the goal is his for sure, 
A^':th worthy '"Sophomore." 

Rttpert, '04 . 



Founded bj General Assembly, 1825. 

Western Theological Seminary, 

ALLEGHENY, PA. 

Five professors and one instructor. Finely 
sleeted library of over 30,000 volumes. Beau- 
tifully located on West Park. The course is 
thorough and scholarly, but practical. The city 
afiords numerous opportunities for missionary 
work. A high type of Christian life is empha- 
sized. For information apply to 

PROF. J. A. KELSO, Ph.D., 

ALLEGHENY, PA. 



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JEWELRY AT 



Newcomer of Knoxville 

HAS A 



POPILAR PRICES Branch Store in Maryville 

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We would not have you think 
that because we are the lead- 
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that our stock is not adapted 
to the needs and ability of all. 
It is. We have just what you 
want and quality considered 
prices here are lower than 
anywhere else. See if the3^'re 
not. You're always welcome. 



HOPE BROTHERS 

519 GAY ST., KNOXVILLE, TENN. 



GOODS ON DISPLAY 
FRESH FROM THEIR 
GREAT STORE. 

Spring and Summer Goods on display 
from and after March first. 

J- J* KNOXVILLE PRICES J- J- 

Mrs. Rosa M.Hawood, Agent 

Jt Main Street, opposite the Postoffice J^ 

M. M. NEWCOMER & COMPANY 

NEW DEPARTflENT STORE 

4Q2, 404, 406, 408 Gay St., Knoxville, Tenn. 



McTEER & COMPANY, 

CLOTHING and 
FURNISHINGS 



r^ 



415 GAY STREET, 

Next door to Third National Bank. 



KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

Mr. WiU Tedford, formerly of Marj-ville, wiU be glad to see all his friends at the above place. 






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^ ^ THE PLACE TO LOOK ^ ^ 

For best quality in everytliing in Furniture and House Furuisliing Goods 
is tlie place wliere every "article sold is guaranteed. It is extravagance — 
waste — to pay any price for poorly made furniture, that will go to pieces in 
a little while, and most of the low price furniture on. the market to-day is 
that sort. The goods we sell are the cheapest in the world, when quality 
is considered. Our prices for well-made, substantial goods are very little 
higher than those quoted elsewhere for worthless stuff. If you want fur- 
niture for your home, we can supply the kind that will give satisfaction 
for a lifetime. 

ALLEN, STEPHENSON & CO., KNOXVILLE, TENN. 



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JiJ,jtjtjijiji. ASSETS, JANUARY I, 1901, $1,225,582.71 Jkjijijijkjtjt 
The Oldest Life Insurance Company in Ameria by Nearly 100 Years. 

Presbyterian Ministers' Fund 

FOR LIFE INSURANCE. 

Its death rate is the lowest because the longevicy of ministers is the highest. 
It insures ministers Presbyterially gOTerned only. It allows cash, loan, paid-up and 
extended insurance values in all its policy contracts. It writes insurance by corres- 
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1 

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20 Year 
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■ 26 

i 30 
' 35 


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19.21 
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.«;28.96 
26.09 
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$41.36 
41.74 
42.3.5 


4d 
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30.12 
36.70 


$32.13 
36.51 
42.37 


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45.35 
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Send date of Birth for different Policies Issued by the Fund. 



Address PERRY S. ALLEN, Secretary, 



Stephen Girard Building, 
PHILADELPHIA, PA, 



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PRINTING WORKS 



Printing and Binding 

DIPLOMAS AND COLLEGE CATALOGUES. 
420-422 Elm Street, Cincinnati, O. 



Students Give Your Laundry 
Work to 



THE PALACE STABLE 

A. C. MONTGOMERY, Proprietor. I |^ g^ HUNTER '04 

FirStClaSSHOrSeS and Buggies to Hire Agent of tlie war Eagle launiry 



Also Corn and Hay for Sale. 



'Telephone 7S. 

Bear of Bank of Marrville. 



Maryville, Tenn. 



J. A. SUMiVlERS, 

^ ELECTRICAL ENGINEER, J- 

Coutracts taken for Complete 
Light and Power Plants .... 



KINOXVILLE. 



TENNESSEE. 



J. P. EDMONSON, 

Maryville, Tenn. 

LIVERY, EEED A\D SALE STABLE. 

Good Vebii-les and Driving Horses. 

Kates il<»a«nt.:ihla. _, . — . 

Special Attention to Supplying Driving and 
Mountain Parties. 

GEORGE & TEDFORD 

Drugs, IVIedicines 
and Chemicals . . 

Fancy and Toilet Articles, Sponges, Brushes, 
Perfumery, Etc. 

Prescriptions carefully compounded with accuracy and dis- 
patcli by competent persons at all hours of the day .and night. 

A. K. HARPER, 

DEPARTMENT 
STORE .... 



BEST LAUNDRY IN KAST TK^^"ES•^KK 
WE GUARANTEE SATISFACTION. 



A. B. McTeeb. 



A. MlJ. fiAM E. 



McTEER & GAMBLE, 

PHYSICIANS. 

OFFICE UPSTAIRS OVER GEOR&E & TEDFORD'S 
DRUG STORE. 



Phones: Dr. McTeer, Res., 40. 



Dr. Gamhle, Res., 6-2. 



W. B. LAWRENCE, 

Maryville, Tenn, 

Carries a Full and Complete Line of Furni- 
ture, Picture and Frames. 

Fne Caskets and Coffins, Burial Robes, Etc. 
Prices Reasonable. Call and Examine My Stock 

J. F. RODGERS, 

Headquarters for 

FRUITS, NUTS AND CANDIES 

Bananas a Specialty. 

When you fail to find anything you want in the line of 
Choice Fruits anywhere else, call on me. Stock always fresh 
and the best on the market. Next block to New Providence 
Church, Maryville. 

D. R. GODDARD & CO., 

Vehicles, Harness, Agricultural Implements, 

FIELD SEEDS AND FIELD STUFFS. 



CrtAL,— Sperial Attention 
Given to Small Orders. 



Pbone 83. 



Phones: New 1146, Office. Old .%!, Residence 

B. F. YOUNG, M. D., 

Eye, Ear, Throat 
and Nose .... 

409 Wall Street, Knoxville, Tenn. 

C. PFLAN^E, 

Dealer in 

ALL KINDS OF FURNITURE 

AND UNDERTAKER'S GOODS, 
MARYVILLE. - TENNESSEE. 

H. P. HUDDLESTON, 

DENTIST 



Office over 
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flag-days, national holi- 
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1901-1902. 



MHRY^ILLE COLLEGE 



FOUNDED IN 1819. 



FACUTLTY. 



REV. SAMUEL T. WILSOX, D.D., 

President, and Professor of the English Language and 

Literature and of the Spanish Language. 

EEV. SAMUEL W. BOAEDMAX, D.D., LL.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 

EEV. ELMER B. WALLER, A.M., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

JAMES H. M. SHERRILL, A.M., 
Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 

JASPER C. BARNES, A.M., Pli.D., 

Principal of the Preparatory Department and Professor of 
the Science ancl Art of Teaching. 

REV. JOHN G. XEWMAX, A.M., 

Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

FRANK M. GILL, 

Bookkeeping and English. 

ALBERT F. GILMAN, S.B. , A.M. , 
Chemistry and Physics. 

REV. CHARLES MAESTON, A.M , 
History and English Literature. 

JOXATBAX H. XEWMAX, A.B., 

English Branches. 
MISS MAEGARET E. HENRY, 

English Branches. 



MISS HENRIETTA MILLS LORD, A.B., 

French and German. 

JOSEPH FEANKLIX IDDIXS, Supt. Pub. lust. , 
English Branches. 

MISS HELEN L MIXNIS, B.L., 
Piano, Voice and Theory. 

MES. A. F. GILMAX, 

Elocution and Rhetoric. 

MES. XELLIE B. COET, A.B., 

Matron. 

JOSEPH S. CALDWELL, 

Assistant in Biology. 

FRANK W. CLEELAND, 

Physical Director. 



MAJOR BEN CUNNINGHAM, 

Registrar. 
WILLIAM M. THOMAS, 

Janitor. 

MRS. A. A. WILSOX, 

Manager of the Co-operative Boarding Club. 

MISS H. M. KINGSBUET, 

Assistant Mivnager of the Co-operative Boarding ( 



COURSES OF STUDY 

The College offers uine groups of studie 
leading to ftlie degi-ee of A.B., and also a Teacli_ 
er's C-ourse. The curriculum embraces the variou g 
branches of Science, Language, Literature, His- 
tory aud Philosophy usually embraced in such 
courses in the leading colleges in the country. 

SPECIAL ADVANTAGES 
The location is very healthful. The comnmnity 
is noted for its high morality. Seven churches^ 
No saloons in Blount county. Six large college 
buildings, bes'des the President's house and two 
other residences. The halls heated by steam and 
lighted by electricity. A system of waterworks. 
Campus of 250 acres. The college under the care 
of the Synod of Tennessee. Full corps of 
instructors. Careful supervision. Study of the 
Sacred Scripture^. Four literary societies. Rhe- 
torical drill. The Lamar library of more than 
10,000 volumes. Text-book loan libraries. 

For Catalogues, Circulars or 



THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

Competent and experienced instructors give 
their entire time to this department, while a 
number of the professors of the College depart- 
ment give a portion of their time to it. 

EXPENSES 

The endowment of §22.5,000 rediicfs the ex- 
penses to low figures. The tuition is only $6.00 
a term or S18.00 a year. Room rent, light and 
heat bills, in Baldwin Hall (for young ladies) and 
Memorial Hall (for young men) is only §7.00 for 
the fall term, $5.00 for the winter term, and $3.00 
for the spring term. A Co-operative Laundry has 
been established. Instrumental music at low 
rates. Board at Co-operative Boarding 
Clxjb ONLY ABOUT §1.30 A Week. Young ladies 
may reduce even this cost by work in the club. 
In private families beard as from §2.00 to $2.50. 
Other expenses are corresponl iigly low. 

Total expenses, $75 00 to ^.^.J.OO a year. 

The Winter term opens January 2, 1902; the 
Spring term, March 17, 1902. 

Other Information, address 



MAJOR BEN CUNNINGHAM, Registrar, Maryville, Tenn. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY 



Vol. IV. 



MARYVILLE, TENN., JUNE, J902. 



No. 8. 




PROF. ELMER BlUTTOX WALLER, 
Editor-in-Chief. 



FREDERICK LEE WEBB, '02 
Business Manager. 



TO A FRIEND. 

Our friendship is enrolled above 
By him who binds our hearts in love. 

Thy way must be apart from mine, 
Yet we may live with true resolve 

In presence of thy Guide and mine. 

Perhaps not often we may meet 

While surging waves between us reek, 

And meet the clouds to form a vail — 
To hide thee whom my eyes still seek, 

While I as thou must onward sail. 

If on the way I signal thee, 

My earnest message this will be: 

Oh, steer thou straight and steer thou 
true, 
Tlie stars of heaven that shine for me 

Reveal the path of life for you. 

And on that shore there's no sad heart, 
No tears for friends from whom we part. 

But we in love responsive meet — 
And those who sojourned here apart 

Are friends forever, communion sweet. 
Howard Martin Welsh, '99. 



COMMENCEMENT, '02. 

It has been said by the editor of one of 
our college contemporaries that Com- 
mencements are pretty much the same the 
country over, and that an account of the 
happenings of Commencement Week isn't 
especially interesting to exchange editors. 

This may be true. 

It is also true that there are other peo- 
ple in the world besides exchange editors, 
and, strange to say, a number of them en- 
joy reading this prosy matter. TheOldGrad, 
amid his duties in a distant State, or even 
far awav in a foreign land, awaits with an 
impatient interest the arrival of his college 
magazine, the one medium of communica- 
tion that keeps him in perfect touch with 
his Alma Mater. To pass by such an im- 
portant and so delightful season as Final 
Week, with but a simple reference in the 
"Locals" column, is to do an injustice of 



128 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



such proportions that the old student finds 
forgiveness a hard matter. 

So, as in former years, the editors of the 
[Monthly have decided to devote enough 
space to Commencement news to give an 
adequate idea of the happenings of the last 
davs on the Hill. 



Another pleasant Commencement season 
has passed, and another class has left 
Alma Maters walls to go out to seek 
their place in the new life. The roll of 
graduates this year is: Mr. Joseph 
Stuart Caldwell, Jefiferson City, Tenn. ; 
Miss Helen Elaine Ervin, Wartburg, 
Tenn.; Mr. Arthur Holtsinger, Dan- 
dridge, Tenn.; Miss Mame Stebbins, 
Grand View, Tenn., and Mr. Frederic Lee 
Webb, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

While the graduates of 1902 were few 
in number, it is the voice of the students 
and Faculty that they have a large place in 
the hearts of those left behind on the Hill. 



"The Week" in our American colleges 
begins with the beautiful and imposing 
serA'ices of Baccalaureate Sabbath. To 
an old Maryville alumnus the scenes of 
this day must ever remain uneffaced in 
memory. This year these services were es- 
pecially impressive, and as usual, held in 
the college church — New Providence Pres- 
byterian Church. President Wilson 
preached the baccalaureate sermon, and 
was assisted in the exercises by Rev. Ed- 
gar C. Mason, '87, of Knoxville, and Rev. 
George D. McCulloch, D.D., the College 
pastor. 

The sermon was one of the. most mas- 
terly discourses that President Wilson 
has ever delivered. His theme,^"The Seen 
and the Unseen" ; his text, "For the things 
that are seen are temporal ; but the things 
that are unseen are eternal." The sermon 
Avas grand, and the charge delivered to 
the class touching. 

There are two other services always held 
on Baccalaureate Sabbath. The first is the 



Final Joint Missionary Meeting of the 
Y. M. and Y. W. C. A., held on Sabbath 
afternoon. It is of increasing interest from 
year to year, and is one of the indicators 
of the increasing mission interest in the 
College. There were present at this meet- 
ing the Tedford family, who, after enjoying^ 
a year's furlough here, at Mr. and Mrs. 
Tedford's Alma Mater, will soon return to 
their post at the mission station of Kol- 
hapur, India. Miss Cora Bartlett, '80^ 
who has been visiting her old college home 
before returning to her field at Teheran,. 
Persia, was present, and addressed the 
meeting. 

This year Maryville is sending two more 
workers afield — Rev. Richard W. Post,. 
'99, and IMiss Mame Stebbins, '02, who sail 
early in the autumn for Siam, where Rev.. 
and Mrs. Robert C. Jones, '94, await them. 
Two young men from the Sophomore class 
volunteered for the foreign work the past 
year. 

The evening's exercises were under the 
auspices of the two Christian Associations. 
Rev. Edgar C. Mason, '87, pastor of the 
Ft. Sanders Presbyterian Church, Knox- 
ville, delivered before these organizations 
his lecture, "The True Value of the Com- 
monplace." Mr. Mason's thoughts were 
sound and calculated to make men better, 
and were clothed in beautiful language and 
exact rhetoric. 



The Class Day Exercises were held in 
the chapel, Anderson Hall, Tuesday after- 
noon. The old chapel was crowded for 
many of the people of Maryville and alsa 
of the residents of Blount County received 
their education at Maryville College, and 
they still retain their old love for the in- 
stitution, and are always present at its 
high days and festivals. 

Class President Holtsinger presided 
over the exercises. After the invocation 
by Dr. J. J. Robinette, Miss Helen Ervin, 
the former President of the class, and the 
class musician, rendered a beautiful pianO' 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



I29> 



solo. Following this Mr. Holtsinger de- 
livered the salutator}' and class oration, 
"L^niversal Education," a strong plea for 
the higher education of the masses. The 
Seniors, assisted by their loyal supporters, 
the Sophomores, then sang their class 
song, "Sweet Bunch of Daisies." This 
pretty blossom has been the class flower 
through all the years of their pilgrimage. 
The class prophecy was foretold by the 
Class Prophet, Miss Mame Stebbins, who 
spoke the oracles with a delightful am- 
biguity, unequaled by any save the Del- 
phian priestess herself. Once more the 
audience was treated to a musical selection 
— a piano solo by Miss Bittle. Mr. Joseph 
Stuart Caldwell made the annual address 
to the undergraduates. This number had 
been awaited with much interest by all, 
and this interest was manifested in a 
variety of ways down in the class seats. 
The Juniors were in mortal terror and 
withal somewhat wrathy, striving to pre- 
sent a smooth front ; the Sophs all 
jollied ; the Freshs uneasy ; the Preps 
disinterested ; the Faculty anxious, not 
knowing what might be brewing or 
what would happen next, for all knew 
that those depraved Sophs had pur- 
loined the white duck trousers of the 
Junior men, and were even then wearing 
them and displaying them to the best pos- 
sible advantage as they served in the 
capacity of Senior ushers. But all who 
were anticipating a brilliant exhibition of 
Caldwell's satire were doomed to disap- 
pointment. His opening sentence robbed 
the undergrads of all their thunder, and 
his whole address was one of deep feeling 
and pathos. PJis theme was "The Best 
Things of College Life." The response 
was made by Mr. Frederick Field Schell, 
one of the most representative men on the 
Hill. Though a Senior preparatory man 
by class, he has been identified with all 
the college enterprises, and in a social way 
has been at all the functions of all the four 
classes. His speech was considered one 



of the finest uf the occasion. Mr. Fred- 
eric Lee Webb made the farewell address 
for the class of 1902. His subject, "Fare- 
well, Old Hill," was presented in a unique 
way. 

The last number on the program was ti.e 
singing of the college song, "Orange, Gar- 
net, Float Forever." This song, wliich all 
the college people love, was sunc: with a 
will by the entire audience. 

Scarcely had the last note d.ed away 
when the deep roar of the Senior cheer: 

"Who do? 
We do. 
19-02!" 
Resounded, and after the three times 
three had been given, the sharp staccato 
of Juniors followed, then Sophs, then the 
Freshmen, then the joint organization 
yells, and lastly all joined in the rousing 
old cheer that is now heard round the, 
world : 

"Howee how, Chil-howee — 
Maryville, Maryville, Tennessee."' 

After the class exercises were over the 
audience repaired to the lawn between An- 
derson and Baldwin, where they partoofc 
of a collation served by the young ladies- 
of the Y. W. C. A. 



But the great day of the feast was' 
Wednesday. On that day the young men 
and young women who have been spend- 
ing year after year within Marvville's walls, 
in faithful, diligent toil, saw the consum- 
mation of their labors and longings. The 
weather was ideal, and this fact, taken ire 
consideration with the small class, in- 
creased the appreciative powers of the 
Commencement visitors, many of whom 
declared that this year's exercises were 
the most enjoyable they ever attended. 
The Commencement music was furnished" 
by Miss Lillian Kirby and Mr. James God- 
dard, soloists, and I\Irs. Bartlett, Miss 
Helen Minnis and ]\Hss Carrie Bittle. 

The orations were marked by being al- 
most absolutely parallel in merit. All were- 



I30 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



characterized by height of thottght, purity 
of langaiage and diction ; and all were uni- 
formly well delivered. 

The Commencement parts in the order 
■of their presentation were as follows : "The 
Best Gift of the Past Century" — a thesis 
xipon the new type of mind that has been 
produced in the college and university 
trained men — Joseph Stuart Caldwell, B. 

A. in the classical group ; "The Battle of 
the Languages," describing the triumphs of 
the English branch of the Aryan tongue 
over the other languages of the world, 
Helen Elaine Ervin, B. A. in the classical 
group; "War vs. Arbitration," an argu- 
ment for the peaceful and peaceable meth- 
ods of arbitration in the settling of national 
matters of dispute, Arthur Holtsinger, 

B. A. in the mathematics group ; "Geolo- 
gy, the Art," a plea for the assignment of 
geology, because of its immense value to 
man, a place among the useful arts. 
Mame vStebbins, B. A. in the modern lan- 
guages group; "The Iconoclastic Stone," 
a thesis upon the fulfillment of the 
prophecy in the book of Daniel concerning 
the "stone cut out of the mountain without 
hands," representing the missionary aspect 
■of the church, its conflicts and conquests, 
Frederick Lee Webb, B. A. in the chemis- 
try group. 

The degrees were conferred by Presi- 
dent Wilson. The President's farewell 
message to the members of his first class 
were words of exhortation such as a father 
would give to his own children. He bade 
them "Farewell"'— "travel well" to the end 
of their journeys. 

And thus closed the Commencement 
Fxercises incident to the Eighty-third 
Academic Year of INIaryville College. 

COMMENCEMENT NOTES. 

The Senior recital, Montaville Flowers 
in the interpretative monologue, "Ben 
Hur," was one of the finest entertainments 
•ever given in this citv. 

President and Mrs. Wilson entertained 



the graduates of this year and their parents 
at dinner Commencement day. 

Miss Henry, Miss Lord, Mr. and Mrs. 
Gilman will attend during the vacation 
the summer school at Knoxville ; Professor 
\\'aller will study at Cornell University, 
and Professor Barnes at Chicago Uni- 
versity. 

Among the delightful functions given in 
honor of the class of 1902, in the closing 
days, were those at the beautiful homes of 
Mr. and Mrs. John H. Webb, Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Tedford, Mr. and Mrs. J. Monroe 
Goddard, and Dr. and Mrs. Barnes. 

JNTiss Stebbins will make the first great 
break in the class ranks. She will soon 
become a bride, and, with her husband. 
Rev. Richard W. Post, '99, will sail in the 
early autumn for Siam. 

INIr. Holtsinger has accepted an offered 
position, and September will find him oc- 
cupying the principal's chair in an Okla- 
homa Academy. 

Miss Ervin will spend the coming year 
with her parents at her old home, at Rock- 
wood, at work on her music. 

^Ir. Caldwell will spend this summer and 
the next two or three years at some uni- 
versity, probably Chicago, fitting himself 
for teaching the biological sciences. 

]Mr. Webb will spend the summer teach- 
ing and preaching in Walker's \'alley. In 
September he will enter Lane Theological 
Seminarv, Cincinnati, Ohio. 



CLASS SONG. 

(Tune, "Sweet Bunch of Daisies.") 

I. 
Sweet golden daisies 

In a shining chain ; 
Flowers of our old class. 

Bringing thoughts again — 
Whisper now softly 

How the bright days sped 
We were together 

'Neath the White and Red. 

Chorus — 

Sweet bunch of daisies 
Plucked on the Hill, 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



131 



Cherish these flowrets 

Ever we will. 
Classmates in parting, 

Pledge to be true — 
j\laryville forever ! 

And dear '02. 

IL 
Dainty v.'hite daisies 

Twined with colors gay, 
Here mid the cedars 

We would ever stay. 
Now comes the parting, 

Sad away we turn ; 
Love strong within us 

Evermore shall burn. 
Chorus — 

Frederic Lee Webb, '02. 



ATHLETICS. 

Field Day. Friday, May 16. 

Our annual Field Day this year afforded 
much amusement and interest to both 
spectators and participants. However, not 
a single college record came anywhere 
near being broken. We have had splendid 
athletic material in school throughout the 
college year, but lack of systematic train- 
ing failed to produce anything out of the 
usual in gymnastic feats. 

The college boys are certainly grateful 
to the merchants of Maryville for their 
hearty co-operation in offering prizes for 
the several events. The different events 
took place in the presence of a large crowd 
of college and town enthusiasts, and our 
physical director, INIr. Frank Cleeland, had 
had the grounds nicely prepared, and the 
race tracks were in excellent condition. 

Mr. Cleeland used for the Field Day the 
rules of the Western Intercollegiate Ama- 
teur Athletic Association. We regret that 
we are unable to print the first and sec- 
ond winners. Nevertheless, the following 
is the synopsis, showing Robert Houston 
to be the first all-around athlete, and 
Joseph Farmer second: 
(Taken from the Western Intercollegiate 
Amateur Athletic Association 
Handbook.) 

Rules oi the Championship Games — 
Rule II., Section 2. 



Points shall be counted as follows : The 
first place in each event shall count five 
points, the second place in each event shall 
count three points. In case of a tie in any 
place the points shall be divided. 



Sherrard, !>-!y-S-5 
Walker, 3 
Farmer, .5-3-3-3-.3 
Brown, 3-3 



=18 
= 3 

= 6 



3 firsts, 1 sec 
1 



ond 



Houston, .5-3-.5-8-.'3-.5-3-3=30 

McSpacden, 5 =5 

Keney,3 = 3 

Mitchell, 5 = .5 

Newman, .5-.5-5 =1.5 

Chandler, 5 = 5 

Easterly, 3 = 3 

Parham, 5 =5 

Rankin, 3 =3 



TENNIS TOURNAMENT. 

One of the most interesting features of 
Field Day was the finish of the tennis- 
tournament, which had been started the 
afternoon before. The entering teams- 
were five in number, and consisted of the 
following players : Frank Cleeland and 
Miss Henrietta Lord, Arthur C. Tedford 
and Miss Anna Atkinson, Will Bartlett and 
Miss Susie Gaines, Otto Pflanze and Miss 
Mary Sharp, Philip Guigou and Miss Ethel 
Smith. 

Mr. Woodrufif, of KnoxviDe, very gen- 
erously ofTered afine $3 tennis racquet as 
a prize to the couple winning-. The racquet 
was won after a most interesting final 
series of sets, by Will Bartlett and Miss 
Susie Gaines. The result, of course, was- 
that Miss Gaines took a tine tennis racquet 
with her to her home in Sweetwater, as a 
souvenir of the tennis days at old IMary- 
ville. 

These are the prize donors of Maryville: 
Bank of Maryville, Bank of Blount Coun- 
ty, Bittle, Webb & Co.; McNutt & Co.r- 
J. F. Rodgers. Maryville Times, D. R. 
Goddard, F. H. Lanion, George & Ted- 
ford. Badgett, Young & Co.. G. A. Toole,. 
]. B. Glenning, photographer: ]. H.. 
Greer, Racket Store, S. A. Patton. M. CI. 
students should remember these mer- 
chants and give them their patronage for 
the interest our business men have sh.owrfe 
in their sports. 



132 



MARYVIIvLE COI.LEGE MONTHLY 



STANDING RECORDS OF THE COLLEGE. 

Putting i6-pound shot, 36 feet 4 inches; 
J. L. Jones. 

Throwing 16-pound hammer, 78 feet 2 
inches; J. N. Davis. 

Pole-vault, 9 feet i inch ; F. E. Laug- 
liead. 

Throwing baseball, 117 vards; Donald 
McDonald. 

Forty-yard dash, 5 second ; W. S. Green 
-and D. McDonald. 

Hundred-yard dash, 10^ seconds; E. iNI. 
King. 

The 440-yard dash, 56 seconds ; J. L. 
Jones. 

Mile run, 4 minutes 40 seconds ; R. G. 
X,evering. 

Standing high jump, 4 feet 6 inches, T. 
■W. Belk. 

Standing broad jump, 10 feet 5!4 inch- 
•£s: T. W. Belk. 

Standing hop, step and jump, 30 feet 10 
Inches ; R. K. Beatty. 

Running high jump, 5 feet i inch ; J. B. 
Jones. 

Running broad jump, 19 feet 63/2 inch- 
■€S ; George A. Malcom. 

High kick, 8 feet io>4 inches; R. K. 
Beatty. 



UPTOERGRADUATE EXERCISES. 

The undergraduate exercises of this 
Commencement have been of more than 
ordinary merit. Miss Minnis, of the Music 
Department, and Mrs. Gilman, of the Elo- 
•cution Department, had at their command 
"the best talent in the institution, and un- 
-der their training the musical and literarv 
iiumbers alike were successful in their 
presentation. 

The following names of the pupils of 
•fhese de|>artments. taking part in the un- 
dergraduate recitals of Monday and Tues- 
day mornings of Final Week, may be 
Samihar to old students. 
• Misses Margaret Eckles, Venora Gill, 
"Sara Goddard, Nellie Jackson, Annie 
Magill, Henrietta Muecke, Mary Coxe, 
Garrie Bittle, Dora Greer, Emma Waller, 
Nancy Gardner, Myrtle George, Lillie 



Wayiand, Isabel Mitchell, Mary Sharp, 
Nina Johnson, Maude Carpenter, Leona 
Watson, Maud Bryan, Grace Leather- 
wood, Maude Yates, Jennie Crawford, 
Marian Ingersoll, Lelia Cooper. 

Messrs. Fred ProfBlt, Frank W.Cleeland, 
Frank W. Gill, Frederick F. Schell, Robert 
Franklin. 

The most brilliant of all the undergrad. 
events was the annual exhibition of the 
Adelphic Union, held Tuesday night in 
New Providence Church. 

The presiding officer was the President 
of the organization. Miss Maude Yates. 
The college societies were represented as 
follows : Athenian, Messrs. Dickie and 
Gill; Bainonian, Misses Broady and Pat- 
ton ; Theta Epsilon, Misses Gamble and 
Weisgerber ; Alpha Sigma, Messrs. Pate 
and Vaught. In place of the debate a sym- 
posium of discussions was presented on 
the question: "Wh.qt is the best form of 
government?" The recitations and orations 
were high class and well delivered. The 
musical numbers were perhaps the most 
popular on the program. They consisted 
of vocal and instrumental solos, and selec- 
tions by the society quartets and Adelphic 
chorus. 



EXTRACTS FROM PRESIDENT WIL- 
SON'S REPORT TO THE 
TRUSTEES. 

The problem before Directors and 
Faculty at the opening of the year was a 
very serious one. With a deficit of the 
two preceding years amounting to $2,615, 
and with an additional loss of $1,590, the 
interest on the $26,500, set aside for Swift 
Memorial Institute, the prospect for the 
year was not flattering. The Faculty de- 
termined that they w^ould aid the Board as 
much as possible in the premises, and so, 
after much effort, readjusted the entire 
work of the College in such a way as to 
economize about a thousand dollars. Most 
of the work conducted by Dr. Boardman 
was taken by Professor Waller and Dr. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



i'33 



Barnes, and the readjusting made neces- 
sary by this addition to their work was 
done in the Preparatory Department, so 
that no efficiency was lost to the work of 
the College. In addition to this substantial 
saving, a term's work of my department 
was arranged for at no added expense to 
the college treasury, thus allowing me to 
make my Northern trip without involving 
any expense for a substitute teacher. 
■ Besides the five active professors, four- 
teen assistant teachers have served either 
a part of the year or the whole of it. Three 
of this number, Messrs. Ritchie and 
Walker and Miss Andrews, severed their 
connection with the college at Christmas 
to accept positions offered in the Philip- 
pines. 

During the year I have prepared and 
put through the press (i) 750 copies of a 
circular letter to alumni, old students and 
friends, asking for suggestions of names 
of prospective students or possible donors. 
Many replies were received, and valuable 
help given by the replies. 

(2) A six-page folder (3,000) distributed 
principally in county normals last season. 

(3) Two thousand of the twenty-two 
page inauguration supplement to the 
Maryville College Monthly. This will pre- 
serve the history of our first twenty years 
in permanent form. 

(4) Five hundred copies of a twenty-four 
page souvenir of Maryville College, con- 
sisting of cuts representing college scenes. 
It was my most effective document during 
my trip, and will be of help next year. 

('5) Two thousand two-page circulars 
containing on one page an epitome of the 
"history of the College ; on the other was 
a di.scussion of Money and Maryville. 

(6) One thousand seven hundred and 
fifty copies of the College catalogue. To 
get the benefit of second-class postage 
rates we have numbered our catalogue as 
a number of a quarterly college bulletin. 

(7) Professor Waller published 5,600 
copies of eight numbers of the College 



Monthly. This periodical ranks high 
among college publications, and brings us 
students. 

I stayed at the college at the beginning 
of the second term long enough to classify 
the students and see all in running order, 
and then on January 17 I started north on 
the trip authorized by the Board. I se- 
cured $1,705 from different donors. It is 
very important that we continue these 
trips, for only by insistence and persistence 
can we get people interested in a school 
off in a remote corner of the country. 

It is absolutely necessary for us to con- 
tinue our student aid for the coming year. 
This is done at no expense to the College. 
Many worthy young people are able to en- 
ter a college, if only a small amount of help 
be extended them, or if an opportunity be 
given to work out a small sum each month. 
I shall see to it that a fund for next year 
shall be secured that will help some such 
worthy and self-reliant young people. 

The religious condition of the College is 
better than usual. Our historic Tuesday 
evening meeting has had decidedly the 
largest attendance it has ever had, and the 
interest has been evenly sustained from the 
opening decision meeting down to the 
Seniors' farewell meeting. The Y. M. C. A. 
has had about sixty members. It has its 
Bible Classes and Personal Workers' 
Class, and has had its representatives at 
the Asheville summer Y. ]\I. C. A. Bible 
Conference. It has for two years sup- 
ported a native missionary in China at an 
expense of $50. The new building is a 
great service to the Christian work of the 
College. 

The Y. W. C. A. has had about forty 
members, and is also an active association. 
Mrs. Cort has taught one of the Bible 
cla5,^es with great acceptance. The as- 
sociation will send a delegate to the Ashe- 
ville Summer Conference. 

The candidates for the ministry, fifteen 
in number, have sustained a ministerial 
association with great interest and ad- 



134 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



vantage,, the object being to promote per- 
sonal work. The members have conduct- 
ed Sabbath-schools in the county, and re- 
ligious services in the jail and elsewhere, 
and several have been in demand as 
preachers, some going as far as fifty miles 
to supply pulpits. 

One of our Seniors is a candidate for the 
ministry and a student volunteer. One of 
the young ladies of the Senior class is ac- 
cepted as a missionary to Siam. I give 
herewith the church affiliation of the stu- 
dents as they reported it upon matricula- 
tion. Several have since joined the differ- 
ent churches. Presbyterian, 140; Metho- 
dist, 51 ; Baptists. 15; Friends, 4; Congre- 
gationalists, 3 ; Campbellites, i ; Greek 
Church, I ; total, 215. 

Of those not church members 50 prefer 
the Presbyterian Church ; 45 the Metho- 
dist, 20 the Baptist, 3 the Friends, and one 
each the Congregationalists and Men- 
nonite, Thirty-six express no preference. 

Among the improvements of the year 
are the further beautifying of our campus, 
the overhauling of Memorial Hall and 
Baldwin Hall and the chapel, the erection 
and operation of the laundry, and the com- 
pletion of Bartlett Hall. I recently ordered 
350 opera chairs to seat Bartlett Hall 
auditorium. The Co-operative Club has 
continued its extraordinary career of suc- 
cess under the able management of Mrs. 
A. A. Wilson and Miss Kingsbury. Al- 
most all the colleges of East Tennessee 
have imitated it, but I believe that none 
have equaled it. 

Our Needs.— As the President of the 
Board puts it, "We need $100,000 addi- 
tional endowment and $100,000 for a stu- 
dent aid fund." 

We need scholarships and library en- 
dowment, and almost everything except 
new buildings. And even a new chapel 
would be acceptable if it were endowed. 
Meanwhile we shall make the most of what 
we have. 



ALUMNI NOTES. 

The ]\[aryville College Alumni Associa- 
tion convened in Baldwin Hall, May 28, at 
7 o'clock. After prayer by Prof. E. B. 
Waller the Association proceeded to the 
election of officers for the ensuing year. 
The new ofiFicers are as follows : Presi- 
dent, Edgar C. Mason, "87 ; Vice President, 
Frederic Lee Webb, '02 ; Secretary, Sam- 
uel T. Wilson, '78. The Executive Com- 
mittee for 1902-3 consists of John C. Craw- 
ford. '97; Miss Edythe Goddard, '97, and 
Miss Helen Minnis, '98. 

After a short address from Mrs. Keith 
Follett, '81, on the subject of the President 
Bartlett Memorial Fund, the company ad- 
journed to the banquet hall and enjoyed 
the feast of good things provided for the 
promotion of good fellowship. 

Mr. Mason made a happy toastmaster, 
and presided over the destinies of the oc- 
casion v/ithout the slightest suggestion of 
the dignity that chills. 

The speeches of the evening were : "The 
Ideal Alumnus," Frederic L. Webb, '02: 
"Ghosts," Miss Cora Bartlett, '80; and 
"The Young Lady in Business," Miss Mar- 
garet Rowan, 'Sy ; Mr. James A. Goddard, 
'71, and Miss Henrietta Lord, '00, were the 
members of this year's Executive Commit- 
tee who were present at the meeting of 
the Association. The others, John N. 
Ritchie, '98; Mrs. Pearl Andrews Ritchie, 
'oT, and R. P. Walker, '94, are now resi- 
dents of Manila, P. L, teaching in the 
United States schools. 

Miss Ellen Alexander, Rev. R. W. Post 
and Rev. H. M. Welsh were the members 
of the '99 class on the Hill during the 
week. 

Kin Takahashi, '95, is seriously ill at 
his home, in Japan. 

"97 had quite a reunion this year. Four 
representatives were present : Misses 
Edythe Goddard. Nell McSpadden; 
Messrs. John C. Crawford and Edward 
Montgomery. 

Rev. Judson Miles and Miss Mabel Mc- 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



135 



Neal, '93. people of Hyden, Ky., spent a 
pleasant season with the old Hill friends. 

Hon. T. N. Brown represented the '"jy 
class, and was quite a prominent figure at 
the Association. It was through Mr. 
Brown's efiforts that the time of the alumni 
meeting has been changed from evening 
to afternoon to make it more convenient 
for the alumni to attend, and. also not to 
conflict with the hours of the College 
Social Reunion, Commencement night. 

Several classes were represented by 
but one member. These were '80, with 
Miss Cora Bartlett, of Teheran, Persia ; 
■98, Miss Helen Minnis ; '88, Mrs. Edgar 
Mason; '87, Rev. Edgar Mason; '74, J. 
Monroe Goddard ; '81, Mrs. Keith Follett. 

Messrs. William Bartlett, William 
Henry, William Hammontree and Miss 
Lena Hastings, kept '01 in remembrance. 

The Alumni Quartet, Rev. Messrs. John 
G. Newman, '88; John Creswell. '87; John 
Eakin, '^y, and H. A. Gofif, '85, are having 
great success in their work in New York 
this summer. They were lionized at the 
General Assembly and New York church- 
es. Their latest invitation is to spend the 
summer in evangelistic work in Philadel- 
phia, singing in the great tent meetings 
about to be held there. 

Miss Margaret Rowan represented "87, 
and Miss Mary E. Caldwell was the rep- 
resentative of '91, 

Mrs. Nelhe Cort and Dr. S. T. Wilson 
represented the famous old '78 class. 

Next year should see present three times 
the number of alumni that came this year 
to the gathering of Old Grads. Let each 
one of the old students use his efiforts in 
awakening an interest and enthusiasm in 
the Association and College afTairs. 



MEETING OF THE BOARD OF DI- 
RECTORS. 

The annual meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of the College was held Tuesday 
morning. May 2y. The following mem- 
bers were present : Rev. J. AL Alexander, 



Rockford ; Dr. R. L. Bachman, Knox- 
ville; Hon. T. N. Brown, Maryville; Major 
Ben Cunningham, Maryville; Dr. C. A. 
Duncan, Knoxville ; Rev. W. A. Ervin,. 
Rockwood ; Rev. Charles Marston, Mary- 
ville ; Colonel John B. Minnis, Knoxville; 
Joseph A. Muecke, Kingston; Rev. E. C. 
Mason, Knoxville; Rev. J. N. McGinley,.. 
New Market ; Hon. W. A. McTeer, Mary- 
ville; Rev. J. H. McConnell, Maryville;, 
Dr. J. M. Richmond, Knoxville, and Dr. 
J. W. C. Willoughby, New Decatur, Ala. 

Tn the absence of the President, Rev. W. 
H. Ivyle, D.D., Dr. C. A. Duncan presided. 
A resolution, expressing sympathy with 
Dr. S. W. Boardman on account of his re- 
cent illness, was passed. 

Dr. Willoughby and E. C. IMason were 
appointed a committee to convey to Pro- 
fessor Shcrrill, resigned, an expression of 
the appreciation of the Board for his faith- 
ful and efficient services as Professor of 
Greek. The Executive Committee was 
appointed, and consists of the following 
members : Hon. W. A. McTeer, Hon. T. 
N. Brown, Rev. J. H. McConnell, Rev. J. 
M. Alexander and Rev. W. R. Dawson. 

It was resolved that the Board of 
Directors hereby puts on record its hearty 
approval of the movement towards con- 
solidation or confederation of the three 
Colleges within the bounds of our Synod. 
The Board also expressed its full and com- 
plete approval of the work done by Presi- 
dent Wilson while soliciting for the Col- 
lege, and also for the advancement and im- 
provement of the work of the College. 

The Faculty was authorized to grant 
free certificates of graduation to every one 
who satisfactorily completes the prepara- 
tory curriculum. 

It was decided that hereafter the prices 
of the rooms in Baldwin and :Memorial 
Halls for students will range from $12 to 
S18 a term. After acting upon the various 
reports submitted by the different officials 
and committees, the Board adjourned to 
meet again in January. 



136 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



Maryville College Monthly. 



"Vol. IV. 



JUNE, 1902. 



No. 8. 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 
(Bditor-in-Chimf, - ELMER B. WALLER 

-A.THBWIAN, - - DENNIS W.CRAWFORD 

Baihonian, - - HELEN E. ERVIN 

Alpha Sigma, . FRANK E. LAUGHBAD 

Theta Epsilow, - - EMMA E. CALDWELL 

Y. M.C. A., - - FREDERICK F. 8CHELL 

-if. W. C. A. - - MAME 8TEBBINS 

Athletics, - _ - ARTHUR C.TED FORD 

ALUMNI, - - - - JOHN W. RITCHIE 

BusiNsss Mahaqer, - FREDERIC L. WEBB 

SUBSCBIPTION Mahagbb, JOSEPH S. CALDWELL 

Studeats, graduates and friends of th* College are 
tnvlted to contribute literary articles, personals and 
Items of general Interest for publication. 
Subscription price, /or eight numbers, t5 cents. 
Address all communications to 

Mabtvillk Collboe Mohthlt, 

Maryville, Tenn. 

■nUrad at MarjTille, Tenn., »g Second-CIaas Hail Mstter. 



SYNOPSIS OF THE ANNUAL RE- 
PORT OF THE FUNDS OF THE 
MARYVILLE COLLEGE. 



PERMANENT FUNDS. 

ENDOWMENT PROPER. 

Amount last year $247,364 19 

Notes secured by first mort- 
gage 209,352 40 

Subscription notes 623 00 

Purchase money note 1,800 00 

Knoxville City Bond 500 00 

Smith Fund, invested in Wis- 
consin Central Railway — 

Bonds $15,000 00 

Stock 15,000 00 30,000 00 

'Overdrawn 1900.. $1,129 27 

■Overdrawn 1901.. 1,485 84 2,615 11 

Electric light plant 2,500 00 

$247,390 51 
Less overdrawn 26 32 

$247,364 19 
The income from the above funds is in 
the following condition : 

Bearing interest at 6 per cent, per an- 
num, payable semi-annually — 
TSTotes secured by first mort- 
gages $209,352 40 

'Subscription notes, no security 623 00 
Turchasc money note, lien re- 
tained 1,800 00 

Knoxville City Bond 500 00 

Total $212,275 40 



Bearing 4 per cent, per annum, payable 

semi-annually — 

Preserved Smith Fund invest- 
ed in first-mortgage bonds 
on the Wisconsin Central 
Railway, in custody of Pro- 
fessor Henry Preserved 
Smith, Special Trustee, un- 
der the provision of the do- 
nation 1 5,000 00 

Stock in Wisconsin Central Railway, no 

dividends now being paid — 

Preferred stock $ 7,500 00 

Common stock 7,500 00 

$ 15,000 00 
This stock is also held by Professor 

Henry Preserved Smith, Special Trustee, 

under the provision of donation. 
Overdrawn — 

1900 .....$ 1,129 27 

1901 1,485 84 

$ 2,615 II 

Electric light plant 2,500 00 

$247,390 51 

Less overdrawn 26 32 

$247,364 19 
The present condition of the income on 

the above — 

Active and bearing 6 per cent. 

per annum, paid promptly. .$204,075 40 

Bearing interest at 6 per cent., 
but payment suspended by 
reason of litigation and set- 
tlements of estates 8,200 00 

Active bearing 4 per cent, per 

annum 15,000 00 

Unyielding, railway stock.... 15,000 00 

Overdrafts 2,615 11 

Electric light plant 2,500 00 

$247,390 51 

Less overdraft 26 32 

$247,364 19 

CAMPUS, GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS. 

The campus and adjacent 
grounds consist of 232 acres, 

originally costing $ 8,568 00 

Improvements on streets, grad- 
ing and walks 1,250 00 

Total $ 9,818 00 

There are nine buildings and 

out-buildings, costing- $ 87,700 00 

Laundry, added this year 600 00 

Total $ 88,300 00 

Water supply improvements 

cost $ 2,700 00 

Grand total $100,818 00 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



137 



GENERAL EXPENSE. 
IReceived from — 

Contributions $ 875 00 

Diplomas 55 00 

Heat 565 25 

Interest 13,513 7i 

Lights 328 GO 

Loan expense 375 00 

Laboratory fees 161 GO 

Music ' 248 75 

Picked up 142 92 

Pasture 41 15 

Refund 174 32 

Rooms 496 25 

Rents 151 00 

Transferred 160 92 

Tuition 4,709 50 



84— $2,615 II 
750 00 



Total receipts $21,997 79 

IDisbursed to — 

Advertising $ 190 46 

Annuity 399 84 

Clerical 2 75 

Campus 512 79 

College Monthly 112 50 

Draying l6 30 

Evangelistic 54 65 

Expense of soliciting 226 35 

Executive Committee .... 20 05 

Freights 55 16 

Fuel 1,587 78 

Insurance 20 10 

Janitress 74 5° 

Lights 40 35 

Matron 17 go 

Miscellaneous 174 53 

Postage 1 16 90 

Printing 163 25 

Refund 60 81 

Repairs 1,465 g6 

Salaries ii,995 70 



Sanitary 

Stationery 

Science Department 

Supplies 

Sweeping 

Swift Memorial .... 

Taxes 

Telephone 

Y. M. C. A 

Total expenses $19,363 82 

Paid loan from 

Loan Library.. $ 433 89 
3n treasury 2,200 g8 2,633 97 



92 55 

18 40 

429 21 

538 10 

59 85 

795 00 

24 00 

54 58 

45 30 



To endowment fund, 

IQGI 1,485 

To Swift Memorial 

(June I) 

Total :$J,3^ii 

Deducting from this the amount in the 
treasury, there still remains for the past 
three years a deficit of $1,165.03. 

CASH BALANCE. 

J. G. Craighead, Int. Fund $ 45 00 

Expense fund 2,200 g8 

Willard scholarship 15 00 

Lamar Library Fund 86 

Lamar Library Interest 30 78 

Loan Librarv 525 91 

Total . . .' .$2,817 63 

In bank .$1,631 74 

In till 1,143 07 

Endowment overdraft 26 32 

Adams overdraft 16 50 

Total .$2,817 63 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ben Cunningham, Treasurer. 



$21,997 79 
There is due from expense fund — 
'To endowment fund, 

1900 $1,129 ^7 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER OF 
THEY.M.CA. 

The past year has been a successful one 
in the Y. M. C. A. from a financial point 
of view. The Budget adopted by the As- 
sociation at the beginning of the collegiate 
year called for an expenditure of $200. Not 
only has this amount been raised, but 
omitting the item of $58 collected for the 
College for heat and lights in Bartlett Hall, 
the receipts for the year amount to $61.63 
more than the sum required to meet the 
items specified in the Budget. 

The following is a statement of the con- 
dition of the treasury at this date : 

MISSION FUND. 

Dr.— 

To total receipts from subscrip- 
tions $ 50 ~l 

Cr.— 

By amount for support of native 

worker in China 5^^ 75 

asheville conference fund. 

Dr.— 

To total receipts from subscrip- 
tions S 28 52 

To gross receipts from Commence- 
ment social 27 95 

Total ...$56 47 

Cr.— 

By expense at Commencement 

social $ 15. 70 

By program fees for three dele- 



138 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE MONTHLY. 



gales to Asheville I5 oo 

Balance on hand (for expenses of 

delegates to Asheville) -S 77 

$56 47 

FL'ND FOR FURNISHING PARLORS, EARTLETT 
HALL. 

Dr.— 

To receipts from checkroom $17 35 

To gross receipts from Rogers' 

lecture 14 60 

To rent of auditorium and parlors 

of Bartlett Hall 12 10 

To rent of sleeping rooms in Bart- 
lett Hall . 86 75 

Total $130 80 

Cr.— 

By amount paid to college for fuel 

and lights in Bartlett Hall $ 58 GO 

By expf^-nses Rogers' lecture 5 95 

By amount paid for bookcase.. ... n 50 

Balance on hand (to be expended 
this summer in furnishing the 

parlors in Bartlett Hall) 55 35 

Si 30 80 
general fund. 
Dr.— 

To balance from last year $ 11 64 

To amovmt received for member- 
ship fees 48 95 

To sundry receipts 32 66 

Total . . $93 25 

Cr. — 

By amount paid for blackboard 

for Bible study class $3 00 

By cash paid for books for Y. M. 
'C. A. Library ^ 8 82 

By amount expended for Bible 
study and mission study text 
books, to be sold to members of 
the Bible and Mission Study 
classes 34 68 

By sundry expenditures 23 21 

Balance on hand 23 54 

$93 25 

SUMMARY. 

Cash in treasury, September, 1901.$ 11 64 
Total receipts during the year. . . . 319 63 

$331 27 
Total expenditures during the year $226 61 

Balance on hand 104 66 

Total $331 27 

H. J- Bassett, 
Treasurer of the Y. AL C. A. 
Maryville, Tenn., June 3, 1902. 




Arguments are all right, but here are facts. 

The styles for men are made in New York- 
That is where our clothing is made. 

The designer for the wholesale clothing manu— 
facturer learns as promptly as the Fifth Avenue- 
tailor concerning future styles. 

No tailor can buy any better cloth than the- 
clothing manufacturer, and it stands to reason the- 
manufacturer can buy at lower prices. 

In regard to workmanship ; the best joumey- 
man tailors are engaged by the year by the clothing- 
manufacturer. Naturally he works cheaper than 
by the job with the merchant-tailor. 

This finishes the discussion on style, cloth, 
cost and make; now comes the test — the fit; to 
settle this see our suits; try 'em, wear 'em. 

BRANDAU & KENNEDY, "TnT""^ 



•^^ •&!<. ^\t, ^t«. ^V, ^I«. ^H, ^ ^ti. ^l^ ^t«. ^}(, ^t(. ^(^ ^t«. ^!«> 



Founded by General Assembly, 1826. 

Western Theological Seminary, 

ALLEGHENY, PA. 

Five professors and one instructor. Finely 
sleeted library of over 30,000 volumes. Beau- 
tifully located on West Park. The course is- 
thorough and scholarly, but practieal. The city 
affords numerous opportunities for missionary 
work. A high type of Christian life is empha- 
sized. For information apply to 

PROF. J. A. KELSO, Ph.D., 

ALLEOHENT, PA. 



JEWELRY AT 


Newcomer of Knoxville 

H A C^ A 


POPILAR PRICES 


Branch store in Mary vile 


We would not have you think 
that because we are the lead- 
ing house of East Tennessee 
that our stock is not adapted 
to the needs and ability of all. 
It is. We have just what you 
want and qualit}^ considered 
prices here are lower than 
anywhere else. See if they're 
not. You're always welcome. 


GOODS ON DISPLAY 
FRESH FROM THEIR 
GREAT STORE. 

Spring and Summer Goods on display 
from and after March first. 

S- J- KNOXVILLE PRICES J- j» 

Mrs. Rosa M.Hawood, Agent 

^ Main Street, opposite the Postoffice J« 


HOPE BROTHERS 

519 GAY ST., KNOXVILLE, TEINN. 


M. M. NEWCOMER & COMPANY 

NEW DEPARTHENT STORE 

402, 404, 406, 408 Gay St.. Knoxville, Tenn 



'r^^m^m 









^ 






McTEER & COMPANY 



CLOTHING and 
FURNISHINGS 



^ 415 GAY STREET, 

Next door to Third National Bank 



#., 



KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

Mr. Will Tedford, formerly of Maryville, will be glad to see all his friends at the above place. 



m 



^ 















oe at THE PLACE TO LOOK oe ^ 

For best quality in everything in Furniture and House Furnishing Goods 
is the place where every article sold is guaranteed. It is extravagance — 
waste — to pay any price lor poorly made furniture, that will go to pieces in 
a little while, and most of the low price furniture on the market to-day is 
that sort. The goods we sell are the cheapest in the world, when quality 
is considered. Our prices for well-made, substantial goods are very little 
higher than those quoted elsewhere for worthless stuff. If you want fur- 
niture for your home, we can supply the kind that will give satisfaction 
for a lifetime. 

ALLEN, STEPHENSON & CO., KNOXVILLE, TENN. 









S 5 

g Jkjtjtjijkjt^ ASSETS, JANIARY I, 1901, $1,225,582.71 Jt^^^^^J^ \ 
9 I 

§ The Oldsst Life Insurane Company in Ameria by Nearly 100 Years. S 

9 i 

9 
9 

9 
9 

9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 



Presbyterian Ministers' Fund 

FOR LIFE INSURANCE. 

Its death rate is the lowest because the longevity of ministers is the highest. 
It insures ministers Presbyterially governed only. It allows cash, loan, paid-up and 
extended insurance values in all its policy contracts. It writes insurance by corres- 
pondence, without the annoyance and expense of intermediate agents. Compare 
these annual premiums for $1,000.00 insurance with other companies' : 



I Age. 


Ordinary 
Life. 


20 Payment. 


20 Year 
Endowment 




Age. 


Ordinary 
Life. 


20 Payment. 


20 Tear 
Endowment. 


«6 
SO 
.35 


$17.21 
1S.21 
21.84 


.$23.96 
26.09 
SK.76 


$41.36 
41.74 
42.35 


40 
45 
50 


$25.35 
30.12 
S6.70 


$32.13 $43.42 
86.51 45..S5 
42.87 48.76 



S Don't pay from 15 to 30 per cent, more for insurance than it will cost you in the Fund. e 
5 Don't allow estimates of future tontine dividends, or surplus returns, to deceive you, g 



Send date of Birth for different Policies Issued by the Fund. 



Address PERRY S. ALLEN, Secretary, "*""" """' ""'"■'• 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



I 



ooS 



ELM STREET 
PRINTING WORKS 



Printing and Binding 

DIPLOMAS AND COLLEGE CATALOGUES. 
420-422 Elm Street, Cincinnati, O. 



THE PALACE STABLE 

A. C. MONTGOMERY, Proprietor. 

FirstClassHorses and Buggies to Hire 

Also Corn and Hay for Sale. 

lf:FTB\ll Of Maryville. MaR YVILLE, TeNN. 

J. A. SUMiViERS, 

^ ELECTRICAL ENGINEER, J- 

Contracts taken for Complete 
Light and Power Plants .... 

KNOXVILLE. ... - TENNESSEE. 

J. P. EDMONSON, 

Maryville, Tenn. 

LIVERY, EEED AND SALE STABLE. 

Good Veblcles and Driving: Horsea. 

Special Attention to Supplying Driving and 
Mountain Parties. 

GEORGE & TEDFORD 

Drugs, Medicines 
and Chemicals . . 

Fancy and Toilet Articles, Sponges, Brushes, 
Perfumery, Etc. 

Prescriptions carefully compounded with accuracy and dis- 
patch by competent persons at all hours of the day and night. 

A. K. HARPER, 

DEPARTMENT 
STORE .... 



Phones: New 1146, Office. Old 361, Residence 

B. F. YOING, M. D., 

Eye, Ear, Throat 
and Nose .... 

409 Wail Street, Knoxviiie, Tenn. 

C. PFLANZE, 

Dealer in 

ALL KINDS OF FURNITURE 

AND UNDEKTAKER'S OOODS, 
MARYVILl-E. - TENNESSEE. 

H. P. HUDDLESTON, 

DENTIST 



Olllce over 
Ptttok'b jbwklry Stork. 



MABTVILLE TENS 



Students Give Vour l.aundry 
Vtfork to 

M. B. HUNTER, '04, 
Agent of the War Eagle Laundry 

BEST LAUNDRY IX EAST TENNESSEE. 
•WE GUARANTEE SATISFACTION. 



A. B. McTEEK. 



A. Mr. Gamble. 



McTEER & GAMBLE, 

PHYSIQANS. 

OFFICE UPSTAIRS OVER GEORGE & TEDFORD"S 
DRUG STORE. 



Phones: Dr. McTeer, Res., 40. 



Dr. Gamble, Res., W.. 



W. B. LAWRENCE 

Maryville, Tenn, 

Carries a Full and Complete Line of Furni- 
tvrCf Picture and Frames. 

Fne Casket* and Coffins, Burial Robes, Etc. 
Prices Reasonable. Call aad Examine My Stack 

J. F. RODGERS, 

Headqnartera for 

FRUITS, NUTS AND CANDIES 

Bananas a Specialty. 

When you fail to find anything you want in the line of 
Choice Fruits anywhere else, call on ine. Stock always fresb 
and the best on the market. Next block to New Providence 
Church, Maryville. 

D. R. GODDARD & CO., 

Vehicles, Harness, Agricultural Implements^ 

FIELD SEEDS AND FIELD STIFFS. 



COAlr-Nperlal Attention 
Cllven to Small Orders. 



Pbone 83.. 



MlSiCAL MERCHANDISE 

I CABRT .4. BEACTIFCL, LINE OF 

Violins, Mandolins, Guitars^ 

And Otber Strlngped Instramenta. 

Bovra, Strings, Flttlng^s. A liRrgo Assortment Of' 

tba Latest Sbeet 91 asle. 

R. R. PATTON, Patton's Jewelry Store, MarjfYille. 




We buy 
school-books 



And we iend free to my tppUcant ooT 
I "Books "Wanted" Catalogue of over 2,000 

echool-bookfi, with the prices at which 
we accept tccond'hand M well M new 
books. I 

We pay casli 

For all marketable school-bocks, or if ' 
desired, we credit conBig^menta on ac- 
count, to be paid by ub in other achool* i 
booka from tune to time as needtd^ \ 

EIKSS k KOBLZ 
4 Cooper lutl tute Hew T«rk City 

Mention this ad. 



W3 




1901-1902. 



MHRY^ILLE COLLEGE 



FOUNDED IN 1819. 



FACUI^TY. 



REV. SAMUEL T. WILSOX, D.D., 

President, and Professor of the English Language and 
Literature and of the Spanish Language. 

!REV. SAMUEL W. BOARDMAN, D.D., LL.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 

EEV. ELMER B. WALLER, A.M., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

JAMES H. M. SHERRILL, A.M., 

Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 

JASPER C. BARXES, A.M. , Ph.D., 
'Principal of the Preparatory Department and Professor of 
the Science and Art of Teaching. • 

EEV. JOHX G. NEWMAN, A.M., 

Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

FRANK M. GILL, 

Booklceeping and English. 

ALBERT F. GILMAN, S.B., A.M. , 

Chemistry and Physics. 

REV. CHARLES MARSTON, A.M., 
History and English Literature. 

JONATHAN H. NEWMAN, A.B., 

English Branches. 

MISS MARGARET E. HENRY, 

English Branches. 



MISS HENRIETTA MILLS LORD, A.B., 

French and German. 

JOSEPH FRANKLIN IDDINS, Supt. Pub. Inst. , 

English Branches. 

MISS HELEN L MINNIS, B.L., 
Piano, Voice and Theory. 

MRS. A. F. GILMAN, 

Elocution and Rhetoric. 

MRS. NELLIE B. CORT, A.B., 

Matron. 

JOSEPH S. CALDWELL, 

Assistant in Biology. 

FRANK W. CLEELAND, 

Physical Director. 



MAJOR BEN CUNNINGHAM, 

Registrar. 

WILLIAM M. THOMAS, 

Janitor. 

MRS. A. A. WILSON, 

Manager of the Co-operative Boarding Club. 

MISS H. M. KINGSBURY, 

Assistant Manager of the Co-operative Boarding Club. 



■ COURSES OF STUDY 

The College offers nine groups of studie 
leading to/the degree of A. B. , and also a Teach- 
er's Course. The curriculum embraces the various 
branches of Science, Language, Literature, His 
tory aud Philosophy usually embraced in such 
courses in the leading colleges in the coi;ntry. 

SPECIAL ADVANTAGES 

The location is very healthful. The community 
is noted for its high morality. Seven churches 
No saloons in Blount county. Six large college 
buildings, beskles the President's house and two 
other residences. The halls heated by steam and 
lighted by electricity. A system of waterworks. 
Campus of 2.50 acres. The college under the car 
of the Synod of Tennessee. Full corps of 
instructors. Careful supervision. Study of the 
Sacred Scriptures. Four literary societies. Rhe- 
torical drill. The Lamar library of more than 
10,000 volumes. Text-book loan libraries. 

Tor Catalogues, Circulars or 



THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

Competent and experienced instructors give 
their entire time to this department, while a 
number of the professo:i;s of the College depart- 
ment give a portion of their time to it. 

EXPENSES 

The endowment of $225,000 reduces the ex- 
penses to low figures. The tuition is only $6. 00 
a term or $18.00 a year. Room rent, light and 
heat bills, in Baldwin Hall (for young ladies) and 
Memorial Hall (for young men) is only $7.00 for 
the fall term, $5.00 for the winter term, and $3. 00 
for the spring term. A Co-operative Laundry has 
been established. Instrumental music at low 
rates. Board at Co-operative Boarding 
Club ONLY ABOUT $1.30 a Week. Young ladies 
may reduce even this cost by work in the club. 
In private families beard as from $2.00 to $2.50. 
Other expenses are correspondingly low. 

Total expenses, $75.00 to $125.00 a year. 

The Winter term opens January 2, 1902; the 
Spring term, March 17, 1902. 

Other Information, address 



MAJOR BEN CUNNINGHAM, Registrar, Maryville, Tenn.