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Full text of "Maryville Handbook [M Book] 1900-1901"

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M ARWILLE 

landl 

Vol. III. 

Presented, by the 

VOUNG MEN'S 

AND 

VOUNQ VS/OMfCN'S 

Christian Associatioris 

Maryville College, 

Mar^^viUe, Tenr^. 

1900-1901. 



A, ECKEL, 

Book and General Jqb Printinq 

KNOXVittE.-TETTO; - ^^ 



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■>H ♦■^-^ 



GREETING. I 



WHIS booklet comes to you 
®jfe with the greetings of the 
Young Men's and Young Wo- 
men's Christian Associations of 
Maryville College. 

It is issued to introduce the 
work of the two Associations, to 
acquaint the new student with 
the ways and.'methods of associa- 
tion work, and to supply useful 
information to the students in 
general. 

We heartily welcome you to 
Baktlett Hall, our Association 
home, to the fellowship, and to 
the Sabbath afternoon meetings. 

Your strongest friendships will 
be those you form in the associa- 
tion. 

n With warm lieai'ts we welcome you, 
"Come thou and go with us." 



FOR 1900-1901. 

igoo. 

May 31, Con?rt?encement Tliurs<fav 

Sept. 4, Entrance Hxaminations .... Tuesday 
Sept. 5, First Term Begins .... IVedresday 

Nov. 29, Thaifksg^iving Thursday 

Dec. 18, E.\aHjin<itioRS begin Tuesday 

1901. 
Jan. 2, Second Te'ri^ beg-ins .... Wednesday 
Feb. 22, Washington's Birthday . . . . Friday 

Mar. 15, First Half-term ends Friday 

Mar. iS, Second Half-term begins . , . Monday 
May 22, Examinations begin .... Wednesdaj- 

May 26, Baccalaureate Sermon Sabbath 

May 26, Address before Y. M. C. A. and 

Y. W C. A. Sabbath 

May 27, Annual E.vhiliition Adelphic Union .Monday 
May 28, Annual Meeting Directors, 10 a. m. Tuesday 
May 28, Class Day Exercises . . Tuesdaj- 

May 28, The Senior Class Concert . Tuesday 

May 29, Commencement . . . Wednesday 
May 29, Annual Meeting Alumni . AVednesday 
May 29, Social Reunion . . . Wednesday 



OF 

marwille; college. 

Samuel Boardman, D. D., LL. D., 
President. 
Samuel T. Wilson, D. D., 
->J2iiotessor of the English Lan- 
guage and Literature and of 

the Spanish Language. 
Elmer B. Waller, A. M., 
Professor of Mathematics. 
James H. M. Sherrill, A. M., 
Professor of the Greek Language 
and Literature. 
John G. Newman, A. M., 
Professor of Latin Language and 
Literature. 
Henry 0. Biddle, Ph. D., 
Professor-Elect of Chemistry. 
Jasper G. Barnes, Ph. D., 
Professor of Pedagogy, and Prin- 
cipal of Academy. 
John W. Kitchie, A. B., 
Biology. 
Miss Henrietta M. Lord, A. B., 
French and German. 
Frank M. Gill, A. B., 
Bookkeeping and English. 
Robert P, Walker, A. B., 
English Branches. 
Miss Anice Whitney, Mus. B., 
Piano and Organ. 
— ' Mrs. Nita West, B. O., A. B.,; 
Elocution. 



OUR SONG, I 

X" Hail to Maryville"X 

Where Chiihoweo's lofty mountains 

Pierce tlie Southern blue, 
Proudly stands our Alma Mater. 

Noble, grand and true. 

Chorus. 
Orange, garnet, float forever. 

Ensign of our hill! 
Hail to thee our Alma Mater, 

Hail to Maryville! 

As thy hilltop crowned with cedarSv 

Ever green appears, 
So thy memory fresh shall linger 
Thro' life's smiles and tears. Cho. 

Lift the chorus, wake the echos, 

Make the welkin ring! 
Hail the queen of all the highlands 

Loud her praises sing, Cno. 




STUDENTS HAND-BOOK. 7 

I OLD MARVVILLE 



rrTHE COLLEGE WE LOVE 
^^^ was founded in 1819. It was 
born of the moral and spiritual 
needs of the earliest settlers of 
East Tennessee^chiefly Scotch- 
Irish Presbyterians— and was de= 
signed to educate for the minis- 
try men who should be native to 
the soil. The grand motive of the 
founder may be stated in his own 
words: "Let the Directors and 
Managers op this sacred Insti- 
tution PROPOSE the glory OF GOD 
AND THE ADVANCEMENT OF THAf 
KINGDOM PURCHASED RY THE BliOOD 

OF His only begotten Son as 
THEIR SOLE OBJECT.". Inspired by 
such a motive, Rev. Isaac Ander- 
son, D. D , gathered a class of 
five in the fall of 1819, and in 
prayer and faith began ttie work 
of his life. In forty-two years 

. the institution put one hundred 
and fifty men in the ministry. Its 
endowment, gathered by littles 

— ^irough all these years, was only 
sixteen thousand dollars. 



8 STUDENTS' HAND-BOOK. 

Then came the Civil War, and 
suspended the work of the insti- 
tution for five years, and the Col- 
lege came out of the general 
wreck with little save its good 
name and precious history. 



After the war the Synod of Ten- 
nessee, moved by the spirit of 
self-preservation and by a desire 
to promote christian education 
in the Central South, resolved to 
revive Maryville College. The 
institution was reopened in 1866. 
New grounds and new buildings 
were an imperative necessity. At 
this juncture Providence raised 
up Rev. T. J. Lamar to be the 
second founder of the College ; 
by his assiduous labors sixty-five 
thousand dollars were secured 
and Maryville College saved from 
extinction. 



^ 



In 1881 generous friends con- 
tributed an endowment fund of 
one hundred thousand doUar^T 
Tn 1891, Daniel Fayerweather be- 



STUDENTS' HANJ)-i;O0K. 9 

queathed to the College the sum 
of one hundred thousand dollars. 
The College was also made one of 
twenty equal participants in the 
residuary estate, and has receiv- 
ed the greater part of the two 
'hundred and fifty thousand dol- 
lars to which it is entitled by the 
provisions of the will. This mag- 
nificent donation has enabled the 
institution to enlarge its work 
and to enter upon a new era of 
usefulness and influence. 
•- .J* 
About seventy of the post bel- 
lum alumni have entered the min- 
istry while twenty-one have gone 
as foreign missionaries to fields 
in Japan, Si am, Korea, India, 
Persia, and Africa Several are 
laboring in missions in the west. 
All the alnmni are engaged in 
honorable pursuits. Students who 
have gone^ from the college to 
law, medical aiKV divinity schools 
have usually attained a liigli rank 
in their classes.. 

LOCATION. ^^^- 

Maryville is a pleasant and 



10 STUDENTS' HANl>-BOOK. 

thriving little town of about 
three thousand inhabitants, beau- 
tifully situated in eastern East 
Tennessee. The to^n is but sev- 
en miles from the Ohilhowee 
mountains whose strong, fresh 
breezes give it an ideal climate.^ 
Many large lime- and free-stone 
springs give an abundant supply 
of healthful water. There is no 
saloon in Blount county. Mary- 
ville has seven churches and is 
the seat of two other large edu- 
cational institutions. 



BUILDINGS AND CAflPUS. 

The College grounds consist of 
two hundred and fifty acres, and 
for beautiful scenery are not sur- 
passed by any in the country. 
They are elevated and undulat- 
ing, covered with a beautiful 
growth of evergreens and with a 
noble forest, and command a 
splendid view of the Cumberland 
mountains on the north, and the 
Smoky mountains on the south. 
The location is as remarkable for 
its healthfulness as it is for its 



STUDENTS* liAND-BOOK. ll 

beauty. The campus affords the 
choicest facilities for the devel" 
opment of athletics. On these 
grounds there are nine buildings, 
which were erected at a cost of 
^bout one hundred thousand dol» 
iars. 



t 



STUDENTS- HAND-BOOK. 



I. 



THE Y. M. C. A 



HISTORICAL SKETCH. 

The Young Men's Christian As-, 
sociation is a brotherhood of the' 
College who acknowledge Jesus 
Christ as their Teacher and Sav- 
ior, and seek to bring others into 
like relationship with Him. 

The Y. M. C. A. of Maryville 
College was organized March 2, 
1877. The idea was first suggest- 
ed by John A. Silsby to James 
B. Porter. These went to S. T. 
Wilson, and decided to push the 
matter. A meeting of students 
was called in the chapel March 2, 
at which twenty were present; 
they decided to organize at once. 
James B. Porter was chosen pres- 
ident and S. T. Wilson, our own 
Dr, Wilson, was the first secreta- 
ry. 

Maryville was one of the first 
colleges in the United States to 
have a Y. M. C. A. The advan- 



STUDENTS' HAND-BOOK. 13 

tages of the town associations 
were familliai* to the young men 
mentioned and suggested to them 
the establishment of a chapter in 
the college. 

Of the three who first talked 
■^-«=^'er the movement it is remark- 
able that all became Foreign 
Missionaries, James B. Porter 
going to Japan, S. T. Wilson to 
Mexico, and John A.. Silsby to 
China. 

James E. Rogers, now presi- 
drnt of Blackburn University was 
chairman of committhe on con- 
stitution. 

The years following the found- 
ing were years of aggressive chris- 
tian work. Sabbath schools were 
organizedin country school houses 
— a work that is receiving the 
attention of the Missionary Com- 
mittee again — and in many other 
ways did the Y. M. C. A. make it 
self felt. 



OUTLOOK. 

- All the noble labors of the As 
sociation were performed under 



14 STUDENTS- HAND-BOOR. 

the handicap of cramped quar-= 
ters, limited facilities and resour- 
ces, yet how abundant were the 
labors and how blest ! Fellow 
students, new and old, should 
not the work of the Y. M. C. A. 
in Maryville College, with its 
own commodious Association 
home and glorious opportunities 
be increased even a hundredfold? 



We give a sketch of the Bart^ 
lett Hall Movement in another 
part of this booklet, so you will 
get a knowledge of our associa- 
tion home, Bartlett Hall ; how by 
student pluck and effort we se- 
cured it; and all the advantages 
it gives you when you become a 
member of our college Y. M. C. A. 



The yearly membership fee 
with all Association privileges of 
Gymnasium, Bowling Alleys, etc. 
and the card certificate which 
gives the holder all privileges of 
city associations when traveling 
is only $1.00 per year, payment 



STUDENTS' H.VND-BOOlv 15 

in advance. Mr. New-Student 
are you going to be one of that 
one-hundred new members that 
are going to enlist with us this 
Fall? 

^^BLE STUDY. 

The importance of systematic 
Bible Study in an aggressive 
Christian life need hardly be em- 
phasized. If for no othei* than 
an educational reason, all men of 
the college are urged to join a 
class in Bible study at the begin- 
ning of the year, and to stand by 
it throughout the course, for a 
study which is not systematic 
and regular will be of little avail < 

After careful planning, the As- 
sociation has decided to offer the 
following courses for the coming 
year: 1900-'0l ! 

(1) "Studies in the Life of 
Christ" — Sharman. Messrs Ma- 
guire and Hammontree, Leaders. 

(2) Studies in the Parables 
and Miracles.— Mr. E. L. Grau, 
Leader. 

— (3) Bible Study for Personal 
Work.—Mr. P. R. Dickie, Leader. 



If. STUDENTS' HAND-BOOK. 

The Bible Study rally will be 
held the second Sabbath after- 
noon of the term in the chapel at 
2:00 P. M. The subject of Bible 
Study will be presented to you 
more fully and the year's classes 
organized. *^ 



MISSION STUDY. 

Short and practical courses are 
offered in the study of missions. 
While we are rightly spending 
much time in and upon the study 
of God's Word, it is but proper 
to spend time upon the study of 
God's Work. This work is Mis- 
sions. The study for the first 
term is: 

"The Evangelization of the 
World in this Generation." — 
Mott. Lealiier, F. L. Webb. 



The joint Missionary rally of 
Y. M an^Y. W- C. A. will be 
held in the chapel on the Sunday 
following the 'Bible Study rally 
at 2:(X) .f M. Let no studenr 
miss this meeting. 



STUDENTS" HAND BOOK. 17 

The college library has perhaps 
the best Missionary alcove in our 
Southland, and thus a magnifi- 
cent collection of the latest and 
best of Missionary books, pamph- 
lets, and periodicals are plac- 
'ed at the disposal of the students. 
The Y. M. C. A. is building up a 
working library, for the Mission 
and Bible Study departments, of 
such literature as will be helpful 
to leaders of meetings, members 
of study classes and individual 
students. Missionary and other 
religious periodicals will be found 
on our reading-room tables and 
students are welcomed to their 
use. 

OFFICERS. 

Pres., William D. Hammontree. 
Vice Pres-, Will T. Bartlett. 
Secretary, Paul E. Dickey. 
Treasurer, Howard K. Parker. 

CHAIRHEN OF COMMITTEES. 

Bible Study, Edwin L. Grau. 
Missionary, Frederic L. Webb. 
Devotional, Thomas Maguire. 
Finance, (To be appointed.) 
Music, H. T. Hamilton. 
Membership, Paul R. Dickey. 



18 STUDENTS' HAND-BOOK. 

THE BARTLETT | 
|h ALL movement! 



A STORY OF STUDENT PLUCK 

It all originated in the brain 
of the little Japanese student, 
ICin Takahashi, 9d, and the plans 
that he formulated wei-e so en- 
thusiastically -accepted by the 
students and have been worked 
out so strccessfully that the Bart- 
lett Hall Building Association 
is known far and wide. • 



In the spring of ^95 the faculty 
gave Kin permission to hold a 
mass meeting of the students to 
consider plans and methods for 
raising money to secure a Y. M. 
C. A. and Gymnasium Building, 
As a result the students organiz- 
ed themselves into an association 
with Kin as president and to so- 
licit funds, xlt the organization 
$1200 were contributed by the 
students and faculty. That sum- 
mer Kin solicited funds from in- 
dividuals and churches in East 



^in) DENT'S HAtJfD BOOK. 1^ 

Tennessee, But while he was out 
•engaged in soliciting the boys 
were out on the Gampua. 



MAKING 300,000 BRICK 




How We Made The Brick 



The Brick- Yard, 

This siimmer^s work in the 
brick-yai-d on the college grounds 
by the students of Mary ville Col- 
lege resulted in substantial aid to 
the building cause, and became -a 
matter of public interest. 



21 STUDENTS' HAND-BOOK. 




The Kilns. 

Having made the good begin- 
ning thro self-denying efforts of 
the students and of friends near 
by, Kin set out to seek help from 
other friends. In the fall and 
winter he solicited funds in the 
North, and in the summer of '96 
the foundation was laid. 



STi:i>KNrS^ I'AND-BOOK. 




Lack of funds now stopped the 
work; but Kin again sought dis- 
tant help. He carried the story 
of the earnestness of the students ; 
he showed the picture of a foun- 
dation ready for the walls that 
should shelter the religious soci- 
eties and foster health and 
strength of the students. Such 
liberal subscriptions were receiv- 
ed that when he returned in the 
spring of 1897 he had funds 



22 STUDENTS' IIAND-BOOK. 

enough pledged to warrant the 
erections of the walls, and by the 
close of the year the building ex- 
ternally was complete. 

.J* 

BARTLETT HALL is an orrxai-r- 
inent to the campus. It is a three 
story pressed brick structure, 
eighty-one by eighty-nine on the 
ground. It has a large audito- 
rium, gym, bowling alleys, read' 
ing rooms and parlor, secretary's 
and committee rooms. Tlie base- 
ment which is unfinished will 
contain the plunge and showers. 
A part of the second floor is de- 
voted to rooms for athletic men 
who desire to Jive close to the 
Gym. 

For many generations this edi- 
fiee will stand as a la^yment to 
the consecrated enS«i4s of a 
Christian student. 




STUDENTS' HAND-BOOK, 




HEL'-SD BUILD BARTLET 1 H ALL" 
STUDENT WORKMEN. 



STUDENT'S HA^^D-BOOK. 
^ THE Y. W. C. A. I 



The Young Women's Christian 
Association was organized in 188t — " 
and has proven a blessing to Ma- 
ryville College girls ever since. 

The devotional meetings which 
are held on Sunday afternoons in 
the music room at Baldwin Hall, 
give each one present an oppor- 
tunity to take part but do not re- 
quire participation. Leaders are 
appointed and topics selected by 
committees. The Association 
has recently purchased new hymn 
books for use in the devotional 
meetings. 

Mission and Bible study classes 
are usually conducted by ap- 
pointed members and result in 
good to those who attend them. 

Last year Mrs. McCulloch gave 
ouce a month in place of the reg- 
ular service aBible reading which 
w^as very highly appreciated. 

During the annual revival held 



STUDEiNTs- Hand-book. 25 

in the college, the Y. AV. 0. A. 
members organize daily prayer 
services among the girls. These 
entirely informal services of 
prayer and praise are especially 
helpful to joang Christians. 



The Association was inspired 
with new zeal by the visit of our 
traveling secretary, Miss Crosby, 
iast spring. Money was raised 
to assist in paying the expenses 
•of a delegate to the Asheville 
■Summer School in Junje. 

,^ 

The dues last year were twen- 
ty-five cents per term for active 
aiiembers. This includes the priv- 
ilege of using the Bartlett Hall 
Oymnasium four hours each 
week. 



^ 



To every Mary ville College girl^ 
tiew and old, the Young Women's 
Christian Association extends 
most hearty welcome. Come t© 
=our first meeting on the after- 



26 STUDENTS' HAND-BOOK, 

noon of September 9, enroll your 
name at once, and so identify 
yourself with the cause of right 
and gain help, not only for your- 
self but for others. 

OFFICERS. 

Pres., Carkib ArstingstalIp. 
Vice Pres., Emma Alexander. 
Secretary, Helen Post. 
Treasurer, Lena Hastings, 




STUDENT'S HAND-BOOK. 27 



THE STUDENT 
|. VOLUNTEER BAND. | 

"It is my purpose, if God per- 
-s-iiit, to become a Foreign Mission- 
ary." 

Leader, Miss Lena Ha&tings. 
Sec-Treas., Frederic L. Webb. 

The Student Volunteer move- 
ment for Foreign Missions was 
organized at NorthfieM in 1886 

The chapter in our own institu- 
tion was formed about four years 
laterby Sec'y Luce, and has prov- 
en a blessing to the college. 

The band has two oV)]ects — 
first to study the various needs of 
the different heathen countries, 
and to learn how to meet those 
needs; second, to interest others 
and arouse them \<S a realization 
of the condition of things as they 
are today in pagan and Roman 
Catholic lands. 



28 STUDENTS' HAND-BOOK. 

Two former Band members are 
now on the field : Mr. Kin Taka- 
hashi, ^95, in Y. M. C. A. work in 
Tokyo, Japan ,- and liev. Robert 
0. Jones, '94 and wife at Bang- 
kok, Siam. 



The past year has been one of 
very great interest- Systematic 
study, reading, conference, and 
the devotional meetings have 
bound the band closer and given 
the members greater zeal , 




STUDENTS' HAND-BOOK. 



THE CLASSES. 



CLASS OF I9OI. 

*" The Senior Class is composed 
of three young ladies and nine 
young gentlemen, gathered from 
three continents and represent- 
ing five states and countries. 
As the place of residence of the 
various members of the class is 
scattered so will their future oc- 
cupations be scattered among all 
the professions. One expects to 
engage in literary work, five in 
the ministry, two are intending 
to go to the foreign mission field, 
two will be pedagogues, one an 
electrical engineer, and one a 
lawyer. 
OFFICERS. 

Pres., Miss Pearl Andrews. 
Vice Pres., John E. Tracy. 
Sec-Treas., Thomas Maguire. 
Colors: Royal Purple and White, 
Yell, Rah rah rah, 

Rah rah rah, 

Rah rah rah, 
1—9—0 1. 



% STUDENTS' HAND.BOOk. 

CLASS OF 1902. 

Just about an even dozen will 
be the Junior contingent for the 
coming year of possibilities. 
Not a large class to be sure, but 
riot one to be lightly esteemed.- 
Their life work declaration if 
read would sound as awe inspir- 
ing as that of our doughty Sen- 
iors, tho they make no cosmopol- 
itan pretensions— simply styling 
themselves the '*Solid South 
Class." 

Any bit of Junior information 
desired can be obtained of the 

OFFICERS, 

Pres., Miss Helen Ertix. 
Vice Pres., Wm, Disney, 
Sec-Treas,, Richard Caldwell, 
Class Artist, A. B. McCulloch. 
Class Benedict, H. T Hamilton. 
Class Jester, Dick Caldwell. 
Colors, Red and White. 
Yell, Who do? 

We do, 

1^9-0-2 ! 

CLASS OF 1903. 

Much is expected of the great 



STUDENTS^ HAND-BOOK. 31 

class of '03. In their Freshman 
days they did many things that 
won them fame^ e. g. the giving 
of sumptuous banquets that nev- 
er come off, and defeating the 
combined Senior-Soph faction at 
Ijase ball. Therefore, having ar- 
rived at the estate of Sophomores 
they will be heard from again. 

OFFICERS. 

President, E. J. Kitchen. 
Vice Pres,, Nancy Gardiner. 
Secretary, Ed. L. Grau. 
Treasurer^ E. G. Alexander. 
Colors, Old Rose and Gray. 
Yell, Whoop-la-rah Whoop-Ia- 
reel 

Walk up I Chalk up I Freshman 
we I 

Freshmen^ Freshmen, 19031 

CLASS OF 1904. 

The Freshman class will organ- 
ize early in the term and will be 
in evidence shortly after. Any- 
one who attends the first foot- 
ball game will corroborate thig; 
statement. 



3-2 STUDENTS' HAND-BOOK. 

RECEPTION I 

COMMITTEE. 



When you are picking up youi* 
grip off the car floor as the traiiT 
pulls in to Maryville, you will 
hear a mighty shout from the vi- 
cinity of the depot and pieces of 
this chorus will be flying round 
your ears: 

How-we-how, Chil-how-ee 

Maryville, Maryville, Tennessee 

Hoo-rah, hoo-rah, 

Maryville, Maryville, 

Rah, rah, rah. 

On looking out you'll see a lot 
of fellows and young ladies with 
orange and garnet ribbons on 
their caps. Those folks ark us, 
the Reception committee. When 
we say "Howdy" that means we 
are friends and you're in good 
hands. We look after your bag- 
gage, take you to the Hill and 
make everything easy for you. 
That's what we're kept for; so 
don't be afraid to command us. 
We're at your service. 
HOWDY. 



STUDENTS' MAlSfi) BOOK. 33 



LITERARY 
I SOCIETIES. I 

--41HE ATHENIAN 
Organized 1868. 

The name Athenian in Mary= 
ville College is a synonym foi* 
Progress, Push and Painstaking 
work. The A. L. S. is the oldest 
student organization in the col- 
lege. Tho she is very conserva- 
tive, she is, but in a very good 
sense, like the Athenians of old, 
in that she is alu-ays considering 
"some nev\^ thing.*' 

Old principles combined v^Mth 
original and up-to-date methods 
have kept the society vigorous 
thro all her years. 

The society is divided into tw^o 
sections: The Senior section for 
college men, meets Friday nights ; 
the Junior section for preparato- 
ry students, meets Saturday 
nights. At the monthly Open 
Hall the public is invited. 



34 STUDEKTS' nAKD-BOOK. 

Many a victory has Athene 
scored on the fields of Oratory, 
Literature and Debate; and re- 
cently Music has engaged her at- 
tention. 

The A. L. S. Glee Club was one 
of the features last year, ^Yh■l7e" 
the A. L. S. Quartette on their 
concert tour made many friends 
for the college. 

OFFICERS. 

President, W. T. Ramsey, '00. 
Vice Pres., Thomas Maguire, '01, 
Secretary, John E. Tracy, '01. 
Treasurer, W. P. Jones, '04, 

THE ALPHA SIGflA. 

The literary society is an im- 
portant factor in Maryville Col- 
lege work and every student of 
this institution should join one 
of the societies. 



The vVlpha Sigma was organiz- 
ed in 1884 and has ever since" 
been doing good work. The so- 



STUbENTS' Handbook.. .5» 

ciety is divided into two sections, 
each with its own officers, the 
members of the collegiate de- 
partment and of tne senior pre^ 
paratory class are members of 
the Senior section and all the 
"other preparatory students are 
members of the Junior section. 
The seniors meet on Friday 
night and the Juniors on Satur^ 
day. 

Once a month an open meeting, 
to which the public is invited, is 
held in which members of both 
sections take part. In Decem- 
ber or January the annual mid' 
winter exhibition is held. 

A medal is given at the end of 
the year to the member of the so* 
ciety who has been most faithful 
in his attendance and work in so- 
ciety during the year. Mr. H. 
C. Rimmer received the medal 
for 1900. 



_ Alpha Sigma extends a hearty 
welcome to all new students and 
asks you to visit her before you 



;j6 STUDENTS' hand-book:. 

join any literary society and de- 
cide on the merits of the two so- 
cieties which one you wall join. 

OFFICERS. 

Pres , Clay CuNNiNGnAM, '00, — 
Vice Pres., R. M Caldwell, '02, 
Secretary, W. B. Disney, '02, 
Treas., W. D. Hammoxtree, '01. 

THEBAINONIAN. 

This society was organized in 
1875. Last year, which marked 
the society's Silver Jubilee, was 
a year of progress and prosperity. 
The membership was large and 
attendance good. 

Solid, painstaking work is ex- 
pected of the members and am- 
ple proof that the society meets 
its required standard is given 
every Friday evening at its meet- 
ings. 

Two of the essays read at the 
Bainonian Mid-Winter Enter- 
tainment have occupied the place 
of leading articles in the college 



STUDENTS' HAND-BOOK 87 

monthly: ''Gerusalemme Liber- 
ata" in February number and 
"Orlando Furioso'* in the March 
issue. 

The Bainonian meets Friday 
evenings at 6:30 in Bainonian 
Hall. New students warmly 
w^elcomed. Come and see ! 

OFFICERS. 

President, Emma Alexander, *01, 
Vice Pres., Helen Post, '04, 
Secretary, Elva Barton, '02, 
Cor. Sec, Nettie Walk&r, '04. 

THETA EPSILON. 

The Theta Epsilon society was 
organized in 1894, and since that 
time energetic work and untir- 
ing zeal have made it a success. 

The society continues to grow 
in spite of difficulties, and dur- 
ing the past year it had a larger 
membership and a greater inter= 
est than ever before. 

The new Hall has been recent- 



as STUDENTS' liAlND-BOOK. 

ly decorated and refurnished and 
is now a delightful society home. 
A Friday evening spent here is 
both highly pleasant and profit- 
able. 

The meetings have the three- 
fold features of debate, music 
and literary work. Listening to 
the discussion of some popular 
and interesting subject the most 
timid girl will soon grow brave 
and enter into the discussion 
with hearty good will. The girl 
who does not join one of the so- 
cieties leaves off the most impor- 
tant part of her education. 

Our society means to go for- 
ward fj-om the very start of the 
term. AVe bid you a cordial wel- 
come to our Hall, and desire you 
to visit us before joining a soci- 
ety. 



OFFICERS 

President, Cora McGulloph. 
Vice Pres., Mayme Mai.colh. 



STLL)ENTS" HANJ^-BOOK. 39 

Secretary, Mollie Gamble, 
Treasurer, Annie Magill. 

ADELPHIC UNION. 

This is a union of the four lit* 
erary societies for the strengthen- 
-ingof the fellowship between the 
societies. The union gives an ex- 
hibition during Commencement 
week, and this is considered one 
of the events of the college year. 



40 STUDENTS' HAND-BOOK. 




Athletic Association Officers. 

Pres., Will T. Bai.tlett, 
Vice Pres., George L. Du:!srcAN/ 
Secretary, Ira McTeer, 
Treasurer, Reuben Larso^i. 

TRACK, 

Standing Records of tlie College, 

Putting 16=lb. shot— 36 feet 4 
inches, Joe L. Jones. 

Throwing 16-lb. hammer— 7S 
feet 2 inches, J. N. Davis. 

Pole Yault— 8 feet 10 inches, 
T. W. Belk. 

Throwing Base Ball^-117 yards^ 
Donald McDonald. 

100 Yards Dash — lO^g seconds, 
E. M. King. 

440 Yards Dash— 56 seconds, J. 
L. Jones. 

Mile Run — 4 minutes 40 sec- 
onds, R. G. Levering. 

Standing High Jump— 4 feet 6 
Inches, T, W, Belk. 



STUDENTS' HAND-BOOK. 41 

Standing Broad Jump— 10 feet 
h% inches, T. W. Belk. 

Standing Hop, Step and Jump- 
80 feet 10 inches, R. K. Beatty. 

Standing Three Jumps — 31 feet 
_3_inches, T. W. Belk. 

Kunning High Jump- -2 feet 1 
inch, J. B Jones. 

Running Broad Jump — 19 feet 
6>^ inches, George A. Malcom. 

Running Hop, Step and Jump- 
62 feet % inch; T. W. Belk. 

High Kick— 8 feet 8K inches, 
R. K. Beatty. 

FOOT BALL. 

We have always stood well in 
foot ball. Some of the best 
teams in the eastern-south have 
been kicked out by our canvas^ 
backs. The Athletic Association 
is optimistic concerning our 
work this Fall. Do you play 
foot ball? If so, "Get in the 
game." 

BASE BALL. 

The Maryville Base-ball rec- 
ords are enviable. Clean play- 
ing and victory winning are two 
things that the association es"- 



42 STUDENTS' HAND-BOOK. 

pects of every player from first 
team captain to "second sub on 
the Freshman scrnb. '^ This sum- 
mer three of our 19(X) team are 
playing with city teams in the 
South. 

GOLF. 

This noble sport has been in- 
troduced in the college and the 
College Golf Club has Links on 
the college grounds to which the 
student who is any ways cranky 
about the game wiH be given full 
freedom, 

TENNIS. 

Two fine courts, one at Bald- 
win for the young ladies and the 
Co-ed Court in FeM day GroTe in- 
vite you to bi-iiTg your racquets 
and play " Forty -loves^'' to your 
heart's content. 

THE GYflNASIUM, 

This has been mentioned in 
connection with Bartlett Hall sa 
we'll only say that it is a good 
one and you w^ant to Join the YT" 
M. C. A, and get the good of it. 



V^tUiDENTS' HAN'D-BOOK. 43 

l>HOTOQRAPHY. 

Is photography a field sport? 
We say yes. There is'nt any- 
thing that will do you so much 
good either as lugging a camera 
*%iHL»ss country, 'long streams and 
■over mountains; and you never 
saw a place where you had as 
many chances to use one as you 
will find here. Bring a camera, 
•either Buy, Boreow or Bum it; 
foufc BRING it. 




STUDENTS' HAND-BOOK. 




THE ORCHESTRA. 

Nothing contributes so much to 
the success of a student affair of 
any kind as good student music. 
We have it. Several live rival 
organizations keep everything 
moving. The orchestra, Mr. G. 
W. Henry, '01, Leader, will be an 
undoubted success. Several va- 
cancies are to be filled. Do you 
play the the flute, bassoon, 
French horn, or claronet? Just 
tell Mr. Henry about it. 

THE BAND. 

The McTeer Peerless Concert 
Band has helped both the college 
and town on to success many, 
many times. It is a twenty piece 
band, ably directed by H. T. 
Hamilton, '02 and C. W. Henry, 
'01. These men have made it 
the popular organization that it 
is. Vacancies in claronets and 
piccolos are to be filled. Can't 
you bring yours down with you? 



STUBENT^S HAND-BOOK. 45 

ULEE CLUB. 

Prof. Newman will be pleased 
to have you assist him in getting 
out a strong college glee club. 
Speak to him early about the 
jiiatter. The Athenian society 
had also a glee club last year. 

QUARTETTE. 

Each of the four literary socie- 
ties, the Adelphic Union, the 
Christian Associations have their 
quartettes. These are always 
popular and in constant demand 
in town and on the hilL 




40 STUDENTS' HAND-BOOK. 

POINTS OF I 

INTEREST. 



The new student will find in 
the immediate surroundings -q^' 
the college many beautiful and 
captivating bits of scenery. The 
Chilhowee and Great Smoky 
Mountains which are in easy 
I'each are a wonderland, a land 
of romance. Charles Egbert 
Craddock found here the scenes 
and characters for some of her 
most charming books. 



We herewith present some of 
the most popular places of inter- 
est and give a word concerning 
each. 



Mont Vale Springs, a delight- 
ful nine miles tramp or drive. 
Climb two-and-half miles from 
springs to Look Kock and see 
some scenery that is scenery. 

Monkey House, where the boys" 
camp. Be sure to go when chest- 



STUi>ENTS' HAKD-BOOK. 4? 

imts are ripe. 

Mt. Nebo, near the Little Kiv- 
er water gap. Fine scenery. 
Tramp or drive. 

Alleghany Springs, a day's 

drive and a mountain climb, and 

""every inch of the trip interesting, 

Wild Wood, five miles tramp 
and "Let's go swimmin'.'' 

Sheep Pen Cave, eight miles, 
Grand scenery and all right 
boating. 

The College Woods, two hun* 
dred acres of virgin forest. Take 
a v\'alk there every day and dis- 
cover a new charm with each 
ramble. 

Camping Parties, to the Chil- 
howee and Smoky mountains and 
the Tennessee river are bits of 
pleasuring often indulged in by 
the students. Of course you 
must try it too. Go sometime to 
The Balds, Monkey House, Ma- 
ple Spring, Abram's Falls or 
Thunder Head. John E. Tracy, 
_oi* Fred Webb will tell you how 
to go, what to take and the like, 
Just ask 'em. On any of these 



48 STUDENTS^ HANJJ-BOOK. 

Jaunts you canH afford to leave 
your camera behind. 



While waiting for your train in 
Knoxville run out and see: 

St. John's Church. 

City Water Works. 

New Bridge. 

Market House. 

Public Library. 

University of Tennessee and 
drop in at Y. M. C. A. Building. 




NOTE. 

It is expected that evei-y stud- 
>eiit will patronize our adver- 
tisers. They are reliable firms. 
It is by their help that we have 
been enabled to i^resent this 
Hand-Book to you. Be i>atri- 
otic in this respect. Examine 
-carefully the list of advertisers., 
and go to them when you want 
finything in their line. 

This is Important. 



Maryville Bollege, 

riARYVILLE, TENN. 

REV. S. W. BOARDMAN, D. D. LL. D. 
President. 

Will begin its eighty-second 
year on September 4, 1900. The 
college with its eight buildings, 
its endownieut of :f250,000, its 
sixteen professors, and its body 
of 400 students, is every year 
increasing its usefulness. There 
are nine groups of studies lead- 
ing to the degree of A. B. Ex- 
penses are remarkably low. 
Board in the Co-operatis-e club 
of 175 is only $1.25 a week. Tu- 
ition, $12.00 a 3^ear. Room-rent, 
steatti heat and electric light 
bills, only $14.00 a year. 

Maryville is a moral and 
healthful town. No saloons in 
the county. 

For catalogues etc. apply ta 
Benjamin Cunningham. 
Registrar, Maryville, Teun. 



MARYVILLE ADVERTISERS. 

MARYVILLE STEAM 
LAUNDRY. 

' The Steam Lauiidry at'Mary- 
ville is located eonvenientiy to 
the Collejre, ai'd an a^eiit — ^^one 
of the students— will attend to 
all the \v(,i k in that line. 

Your laundry eolhcted and 
delivered to your rooms. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 
MaryvHle Steam Laundry. 



J. F. RODGERS, 

DEALER IN 

FTT-cLlts and CQj-nx3-±es. 

BA??A>AS a specialty. 

Agent Hrmr Ftram Laundry. 

MARTVILLE, TENX. 

W. H. HENRY, 

Class of '56 

Best Coal! 

Best Price, 

Student Patronaie Solicit'od.. 



A. B. MCTEER. A. M. GAMBLE. 

DRS. McTEER & GAMBLE, 

Physicians & Surgeons. 

County Physicians, Physicians to the 
Industrial Home fov the whites, Physi- 
ei^an.- to the Industrial Home for the 
colored. 



OYSTERS 



IN EVERV_ 
STYLE 

THOMAS LILIARD'S 
Oyster Parlors 

September opens College and 
the oyster season, and the boys 
are invited back to the old place. 

G. B. ROSS, 

Student's Headquapters for 

Candies, Nuts, Ice Cream and 
Cold Drinks ^ 

Rooms for Rent. 

Three well furnished' rooms, stove or 
grate as preferred, at $3-^00 per month,- 
students furnishing light and fuel. 

AppJy to 

MRS. GEORGE HUFFSTETLER, 

Two rooms on first floor well furnish'- 

ed, 7 minutes walk from colhge. $8.00 

per month, students furnisng light anrf 

fiuel. Apply to _ 

MRS. H. V. POST. 

Indiana Ave: 



lllllllllllllllllllllllll!i;illl:!lll!illl!lli!l!lll!!ilillllllllllllll!ll|i!llll'!l!y!0^ 



George & Tedford, 

mmm aaii chemists. 

DEALERS IN 

Drugs and Medicines, 

TOILET ARTICLES, 

STATIONERY AND FANCY 

GOODS. 



It is the correct thing to stop 
and rest at our 

SODA FOUNTAIN. 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiii»iiiiiiHii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!ii!!iniiiiiiiiiii«iiiiiiiiiiii!iBiiiii!:iiii[ii 



THE OLD RELIABLE. 

The Bank of Maryvillc^ 

Offers the people of Blount 
County a safe and reliable de- 
pository for their funds, guar- 
anteeing Fair and Honorable 
Treatment, Careful and Prompt 
Attention. 

Exchange Sold on all the Princi- 
pal Cities. 

Interest paid on Time 

Deposits. 

OFFICERS: 

P. M. Bartlett, President. 
\ViLL A. McTeek, Vice President. 

Jo. Burgee, Cashier. 

J. A. GoDDARD, Asst. Cashier. 

DMAS. KIRK. BART. McKENZIE. 

KIRK & McKENZIE'S 
STABLES. 

We make a specialty of supplying 

Driving and Mountain Parties. 
Finest Turnouts. 
Sest Horses in Town. 

student Patronage Solicited 




mimm 

Metrchant Tailors. 

Suits to order from $12.00 up. ; 

A perfect fit aud satisfaction 
guaranteed. 

Cleaning and Repairing neatly 
(lone. 

They also carry a completej 
line of Gents' Furnishings, 
Boots and Shoes, including the 
justly famous" Monarch "Shirts 
the "Arrow" brand Collars and 
CufTs, and the "Clover" brand 
Boots aud Shoes. 

In the new Waller & Gamble 
building, next door to S. Aj 
Patton's Jewelry v^tore. 



KNOXVILLE ADVERTISERS. 




Athletic Goods* 

Wq are Headparters for Atljletic Goods.- 

Indian Clubs, 
Dumb ^ells, 
Striking Bags, 

WHitELV E)tERCISER3, 

Base Ball Goods, 
Croquet SETS, 
Lawn Tennis. 
Golf Supplies, etc. 

Hardware, Stoves, TinWare,Cuts 

lery, Houise Furnishing QoodS) 

£tc. 

lellow WOODRUFF Retail 

Front. HARDWARE CO. ^^^^' 



OOK AND QeNEkAL 
PRINTING 
FFICE. 

ALEXANDER ECKEL, Prop. 

7043^ GAY ST. KNOXVILLE, TENN. 



B 

O 



JOB PRINTING 
i-wFFICE. 



High Grade Photography 

Brakebill & McGoy. 

117 Gay 8t. 
KNOXVILLE, TENN. 



CLARK & JONES, 
MUSIC DEALERS. 

t. 0. Box 57. 510 Gay St. 

MOitlLLE, TEM* 

Carry a complete stock of the 
latest Popular aud Classic Mus-^ 
ic: National Edition of TO cent 
music, FolioSj etc. Also the 
celebrated "Regal'' Mandolins 
Guitars, Baujos, aud all kinds 
of Musical Merchandise. 

Factory representatives Col- 
umbus Phonograph Co. (4raph* 
ophone records and supplies. 

Write for Catalogue. 



^.C.WILEY^ 

Manufacturing 

Opticians 

Dealer in 

Everything Optical. 

Headquarters for 
Photo Supplies 

KODAKS, 
PREMO, 
POCO, 
CYCLONE 

CAMERAS. 

510 Gay St. 
Knoxville, Tenn. 



DOLL 6l CO. 

Booksellers & Stationers. 

512 Gay Street, 
KNOXVILLE, - TEWN- 

We carry everythiug in the 
Book and Stationery line and 
can supply the wants of all stii- 
dents, 

• Write us for prices. Located 
next to Mc Arthur & Sons Co. 

->-H0PE BROS.-^ 

Jewelers & Stationers. 
Engraving Cards 

AND 

Embossing Paper. 

_ 519 Gay St., 
KNOXVILLE, TENN, 



G, S. CRANE, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

Trusses, Artificial Limbs, 

AND 

Appliances for all Kinds of Defori^ 
ities, 

SURGICAL INSTKUMEXTS 

Ground ain1 Repaired. 
RAZORS 

Hollow-ground, etc., etc. 

708 Gay St. KNOXVILriE, TEXX. 
TO THE STUDENTS 

OF 

Maryville College 

We think we can show you 
one of the strongest line of 
Men's $3.50 Shoes to be found 
anywhere, and would be glad 
to have you call and let us show 
them to you Remember we 
carry a full line of Shoes and 
Hats. 

BRADLEY & HAYNES, 

509 Gay Street. Knoxville, 
Next door to E. T. Nat. Bank. 



fi 



)^ 



HcTEER & CO. 

415 Gay Street, 

KNOXVILLE, TENN., 

Always keep the most coniplete line of 

Clothing and 
Furnishingf 
Goods 

In the City, 

At prices as low as 
the LOWEST. 

Call and see us. 



L. B. SMITH, President. 

MISS CARRY IVY, Assistant Principal. 

Day and Night Sessions. 

Young^s ^^jj o^ 

College of A (^ 
Shorthand "^ \^ 
And <H> 

Typewritinge r^ 



716 and 718 Prince Street, 
Knoxville, - - Tenn, 

Old Phone 925. 

8teao^iM[)hic Help V 

FURMISHED ON 

SHORT NOTICE, "^ 

Sole Agents for the 

New Gentury Galigrapl). 




MEMORANDA 



'ailor made goods at Bittle.Webb & Go's 



MEMORANDA 



See Bittle, \Yebb it Co. about it. 




MgTEER & GAMBLE, 



Attorneys and Gouncellors at Uw 

maryvilL'e', "Venn 




^ 



Kits &WAMPLER 

CITY BARBERS. 

l33--v-±te S-fc-ixcien-fc Ciistioxn. 

— . IFlDCSt CXass "Woirik:, 

^Jlegan-t) iBa-fcli Koonxs, 
:E3-^e3r37- tiling' 03-eaxi. 



i:|i|;!;iii' 

ii!!';i;ii-;;:;