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Full text of "Maryville Handbook [M Book] 1909-1910"

J. N. Badg'ett 
Company 



Incorporated 



DEPARTMENT STORE 

Wholesale and Retail 

The House of Bargains 

and 
Students' Headquarters 

MARYVILLE, TENNESSEE 



jlarpbille 
^antr poofe 



VOL. X 



PRESENTED BY THE 

Cl)rigtian 'Sisi^ocmtioM 

of 

JMarpbiUe College 



iWarpbiUe, tEennesisiee 

1909=1910 



PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE. 

This handbook is a welcome of the 
Christian Association to new students. 
The organizations that have provided the 
handbook will also extend their personal 
welcome as the recruits for 1909 10 ar- 
rive at Maryville. Meanwhile let me as- 
sure the prospective students that the 
members of the Faculty believe in the 
Christian Associations with all their 
heart, and rejoice in the unselfish work, 
the healthful influence, and the increas- 
ing prosperity of the Maryville College 
Young Men's Christian Association and 
Young Woman's Chi'istian Associa- 
tions. They earnestly urge the .stu- 
dents that enter the College this year 
to connect themselves with the respective 
Associations and to render it loyal and 
persevering service. The Association 
needs them and they need the Associ- 
ation. 

SAMUEL TYNDALE WILSON, 

President. 



Ellis, Chandler 
& Co. 



Kirschbaum Clothing ^ 
Mallory Cravenette Hats 
Carter & Holmes 
Neckwear 
Walkover Shoes for^Men 
Ladies' Shoes ^ ^ ^ 
Banners, Penants, Etc. ^ 
Spalding Athletic Goods 



Made to Measure Clothing 
a Specialty 



Strictly One Price to Alt 



CONTENTS. 



Page 

Advertisements 3-^ 

Athletic Association - U9-30 

Bible Stud3^ -- ^^ 

Calendar . . - ^ 

Christian Associations: 



Y. M. C. A. 
Y. W. C. A. 



.17-20 
.21-23 



• Ministerial -"^ 

Volunteer Band - : -^ 

College Colors ^ ^"^ 

College Publications - -S 

College Song ^^ 

College Yell - ■■• 1'^ 

Directory of College Offices 13 

Drives from Maryville "- 31 

Faculty of Institution.... 12-13 

Greetings - 

How to Matriculate 14-15 

Literary Societies 26-2T 

Lyceum Course 48-19 

Mission Study - 19 

Kote to Students 32 

Prayer Meeting - -" -^ 

Beceptions H 

B. B. Time-Table -■-- 41 

Tramps from Maryville 



4 






College Students 

Get Your 

Watches, Jewelry, Fountain 

Pens, College Pins, 

Fobs, Etc. 

From 

One of the "Bunch" 

Bring your repairs to 
me for the best work 
at reasonable prices. 
I want to meet 3^ou Mr. 
"New-man". Come in, 
let's shake hands on a 
good year's work. 

A. I McGULLQGH 

Watchmaker and Engraver 

Next Door Above Cafe 




gsss^mssEsaamm 



QtnrO Eiln 1 301 Gay street 
OlUld llUi I Corner Commerce 

Open till II 130 p.m. 

Qfnro Wft Q 31 2 W. Clinch Ave. 
OIUIC nUi U Next to Post Office 

Open till II p. m. 
Knoxviile, Tennessee 



Most Complete Stocks of 
Drugs and Sundries in the 
South. 

Most popular Fountains in 
Knoxviile. 

Agents for Huyler's, Dow- 
ney's and Fenway's Fine 
Candies. 

Sole agents for the Famous 
Rexall Remedies. 

Employs more Registered 
Pharmacists, more Graduate 
Pharmacists than all the 
other 2 3 Knoxviile retail 
drug stores combined. 

Popular Cigars at Cut Prices 



The Smarted 

CLOTHING 

The Fine^ 

FURNISHINGS 

The Mo^ StyHsh 

FOOTWEAR 

The Mo^ Correcfl 

HEADWEAR 

and the very choicest dress acces 
series 

FOR MEN 

The Headquarters for College Boys 




'(fe^^^^l^-^ 



412-414 Gay Street 
Knoxville, Tennessee 



Calendar for 1909-1910. 



FALL TERM. 
1000. 

Sept. 7, First Tei'iii begins Tuesdaj^ 

Nov. 2."), Tlianksg-iving- — Tliursday 

Dec. 20, Examinations begin Monday- 
Dec. 22, First Term closes Y/ednesday 

WINTER TERM. 
1910. 
Jan. 4, Winter Term begins. -Tuesday 
Jan. 12, Meeting of tlie Directors, 

10 a. m , Wednesday 

Mar. 15, Examinations begin Tuesday 

Mar. 17, T\^inter Term ends Tliursday 

SPRING TERM. 

Mar. 21, Spring Term begins Monday 

May 25, Examinations begin. Wednesdc 

May 29, Baccalaureate Sermon Sabbat 

May 29, Address before the Y. M.. 

C. A. and Y. W^ C. A. 

- Sabbal 

May 30, Expression Department 

Exercises, 10 a. m Mondj 

May 30, Music Department Grad- 
uates, 2:30 p. m Mond£ 

May 30, Annual Exhibition of the 

Adelphic Union Mond£ 

May 31, Music Department Cer- 
tificate Students, 10 

a. in Tuesda 

May 31, Meeting of the Directors, 

10 a. m TuesdE 

May 31, Annual Dinner of the 

Alumni, 12 m Tuesd£ 

May 31, Class Day Exercises.... Tuesds 
May 31, The Senior Class Con- 
cert Tuesda 

June 1, Commencement Wednesds 

June 1, Social Reunion WednesdJ 

8 



Kerns 
Candies 

are the acme of purity and 
excellence Made in our 
own plant by skilled work- 
men, trained under our own 
supervision, which insures 
that distinctive 

Kern Taste 

and quality which is so of- 
ten imitated, never dupli- 
cated. Insist on having 

a box |/CP|i|'C It will 
of Minil please her 

Receptions furnished with 
the choicest Creams and 
Cakes. 

Correspondence solicited 

PETER KERN CO. 

Knoxville, Tenn. 



Inai'a (Srill 



521 Gay Street 
Knoxville 



The most delightful refresh- 
ment store in Knoxville. 



Complete Menu at reasonable 
prices. 



A restaurant where a lady 
can go unattended as well as 
with an escort. 



Ask your friend to 

"Meet you at 

BOYD'S" 

10 



FACULTY RECEPTION 

to all the Students 

Will be given in Bartlett Hall 

Friday Afternoon, Sept. 10 

This should be attended by every student, to 

get acquainted with all the members of the 

faculty and with each other. 



A RECEPTION FOR MEN 

Will be given in Bartlett Hall 

Friday Evening, Sept, 10 

Come and spend a pleasant evening with the 

fellows 



RECEPTION FOR WOMEN 

Will be given in the Y. W. C. A. Room 

in Voorhees Chapel 

Friday Evening, Sept. 10 

Every girl is cordially invited 



SNAP SOCIAL 

fci Bartlett Hall, Friday Evening, Sept. 17 
Everybody invited to spend a pleasant evening 



11 



FACULTY. 



Rev, Samuel Tyndale Wilson, D. D,, 

President, and Professor of the English 

Language and Literature,- and of 

the Spanish Language. 

Rev. Samuel W. Poardman, D. D., LL. D., 

Emeritus Professor or Mental and Moral 

Science. 

Rev. Elmer Briton Waller, M. A., 

Dean. Professor of Mathematics, and 

Secretary of the Faculty. 

Jasper Converse Barnes, M. A., Ph. D., 

Professor of Psychology and Political 

Science. 

Charles Hodge Mathes, M. A., 

Professor of Greek. 

Henry Jewell Bassett, M, A., 

Professor of Latin. 

Phoebus Wood Lyon, M. A., Ph.D., 

Logic and Histor3^ 
Francis Mitchell McClenahan, M. /'.., 
Professor of Chemistry and Phj^sics. 
Rev. Clinton Hancock Gillingham, M. A., 
Registrar, and Professor of Old Testa- 
ment History and Literature. 
Rev. Hubert Samuel Lyie, M. A., 
Professor of New Testament History and 
Literature. 
Paul Rodney Radcliffe, B. A., 
Principal of the Preptiraiory Department. 
Miss Margaret Eliza Henry, B. A., 
English. 
Miss Henrietta Mills Lord, M. A., 
French and German. 
Mrs. Jane Bancroft S. Alexander, B, A,. 
English Language and Literature. 
Miss Susan Allen Green, M. A., 
Biology and Geology. 
Fred Lowry Proffitt, B. A., 
Mathematics and Bookkeeping. 
Miss Virginia Estelle Snodgrass, B. A., 
Latin and Mathematics. 
Harvey Boyd McCall, B. A., 
Preparatoiy Branches. 
Miss Mary Victoria Alexander, B. A., 
Preparatory Branches. 
Miss Florence Keokee McManigal, B. A., 
Preparatory Branches. 
Miss Joan McDougall, 
Piano. 
Miss Inez Monfort, 
Voice, History, and Theorj'. 

12 



Rev. Edwin William Hall, 

Vocal Music, Expression, and Penman- 
ship. 
Mrs. Nita Eckles West, B. A., B. O., 
Expression. 
Rev. Thomas Campbell, M. A., 
Painting- and Drawing-. 
Miss Mary Gaines Carnahan, B. A., 
Assis*-ant in Spanish. 
Charles Henry Bunch, 
Assistant in Matlieniatics. 
Burrell Otto Raulston, 
Assistant in cnemistrj-. 
William Lester Haley, 
Assistant in Chemistry. 
Miss Ruth Browning Wilson, 

Assistant in Greek. .^ 

Miss Kate Edith Sheddan, 

Assistant in Bookl<;eeping-. 

Major Ben Cunningham, 

Trea suiter. 

Miss Mary Ellen Caldwell, B. A., 

Matron of Baldwin Hall. 

Mrs. Lida Pryor Snodgrass, 

Librarian, and Assistant Matron. 

Edward William Lodwick, 

Assistant Librarian. 

DIRECTORY OF COLLEGE OFFICES. 

President's O-ffice — Anderson Hall, first 
floor, room A. 

Dean's O-ffice — Anderson Hall, second 
floor, room 6. 

Registrar's O-ffice — Anderson Hall, first 
floor, room 8. 

Treasurer's O-ffice — Anderson Hall, first 
floor, room 1. 

Principal of Prepaw-aiory Department — • 
Anderson Hall, Fayerweather Annex, 
first floor, room 22. 

Post Office and Loan Library — Ander- 
son Hall, first floor, room 2. 

Manager of Co-operative Boarding 
Club— Baldwin Hall, first floor. Young 
men's entrance, east end of annex. 

Director's of Music Department — Voor- 
hees Chapel, lower floor, north entrance- 
Director of Expression — Anderson Hall, 
third floor, room 1.5. 

Professors and Teachers — A special di- 
rectory will be found posted on the Col- 
lege bulletin board, Anderson Hall, first 
first floor, west corridor. 



13 



HOW TO MATRICULATE. 



ALL, STUDENTS are requested to read 
carefuly the following instructions re- 
garding registration and maticulation: 

Registration will begin on 'Tuesday 
morning. September 7, 1909. E"^ery 'stu- 
dent, old and new, will fill out one of the 
registration cards to be found on the 
tables in the Treasurer's office. Kindly 
answer every question. Do not take it 
for granted that because you filled out a 
similar card last year that that will do. 
Kull, up-to-date information is needed for 
the current files, and will greatly oblige 
the College if given. 

(In the "Winter Term a white card will 
be fillecT out by students already in at- 
tendance on the College, the buff card 
being used only by those who were not 
present during the Fall Term.) 

Payment of Bills — After filling out the 
registration blank, pay your tuition, 
science fees, and room-rent bills to the 
Treasurer ,and take his receipt. Retain 
the registration card for matriculation. 

The Boarding Club deposit will be 
made to the Manager of the Club. 

Book rent is to be paid at the Loan 
Library. 

Examinations — Let all students who 
have failed to take examinations present 
themselves to the professors under whom 
their studies were pursued and take ex- 
aminations before matriculating. No stu- 
dent will be admitted to his class until 
all delinquent examinations have been 
taken. A fee of fifty cents will be due 
for each such examination. 

Entrance examinations for new stu- 
dents are not charged for. Candidates 
for admission to the Freshman class who 
have taken their preparatory course 
elsewhere, will be examined in the stu- 
dies pursued by the Senior Class of the 
Preparatory Department of this College, 
or in their equivalents imless they bring 
certificates that will be satisfactory to 
the Faculty; but a student thus receiv- 
ing credit for a study pvirsued elsewhere 

14 



will be conditioned until his subsequent 
work in the college course proves his 
efficiency i^ the study thus accredited. 

Candidates for admission to the Sopho- 
more, Junior, and Senior. Classes are ex- 
amined in the studies that have been 
pursued by the class which they wish to 
enter, or others equivalent. Those 
bringing- certificates of dismission from 
another college may, upon proof of their 
(lualilications satisfactory to the Faculty, 
l)e admitted to a corresponding standing 
in this college. Students from other in- 
stitutions can not be admitted into this 
college unless honorably dismissed by 
their former instructors. 

An application blank for admission to 
the College or Preparatory Department 
may be had by addressing the Registrar. 

Maticulation — All students will be ma- 
triculated in the Registrar's Office. Be- 
fore matriculating consult the Courses of 
Study and the Schedule of Classes that 
are posted in the halls. After having, as 
far as possible, selected j^our studies, 
present your registration card and Treas- 
urer's receipt, together with whatever di- 
plomas or certificates you may have from 
other schools, to the Registrar. Your re- 
ceipt will be given back to you, but the 
card will be retained for the office file. 
Your studies will now be assigned, ana 
your name regularly enrolled as a stu- 
dent of the institution in the class of 
which you are to be u member. 

Books — After matriculation, text-books 
may be rented and stationery purchased 
at the Loan Library. 

Bulletins — Keep eyes and ears open for 
rill notices that may be posted on the 
bulletin boards or read from the chapel 
rostrum. 

Cjasses — All classes will meet for as- 
signment of lessons on Wednesday, Sep- 
tember S, and all classes will recite on 
Thursday. September 9. First chapel 
exercise, Tuesday. September 7 at 8:20 
a. m. Be on time. 



COLLEGE COLORS. 



Orange and Garnet. 



COLLEGE YELL. 

How-we-how, Chilhowee. 

Maryville, MaryviHe, Tennessee. 
Hoo-rah! hoo-rah! 
Maryville, Maryville, 

Rah ! i-ah ! rah ! 



COLLEGE SONG. 



^Yhe^e Chilhowee's lofty mountains 
Pierce the southern blue, 

Proudly stands our Alma Mater, 
Noble, g-rand. and true. 

Chorus: 
Orange, garnet, float forever, 

Ensign of our hill! 
Hail to thee, our Alma Materl 

Hail to Maryville. 

As thy hilltop crowned with cedars 

Ever green appears,- 
So thy memory fresh shall linger 

Through life's smiles and tears. 

Chorus: 
Lift the chorus, wake the echoes, 

Make the welkin ring I 
Hail the queen of ah tne highlands! 
Loud her praises sing. 
Chorus: 



16 



Y. M. C. A, 



OFFICERS. 



President - S. C. Guigou 

Vice-President E. K. Slagle 

Secretary - H. E. Orr 

Treasurer G. M. Payne 



CHAIRMAN OF COMMITTEES. 



Membership-- : G. T. Wilson 

Devotional W. W. Astles 

Bible Study J. Yourd 

Missionary J. Jewell 

Entertainment G. R. Shelton 

Music Jackson Smith 



HISTORICAL SKETCH. 



Maryville College was among the first 
in the United States to have a College 
Y. M. C. A. Three students first talked 
of the plan and then with seventeen 
others they met in the college chapel on 
March 2, 1877, and organized themselves 
into an association. 

For twenty years after those twenty 
men formed the organization there was 
no Y. M. C. A. building, but by the faith- 
ful and strenuous efforts of loyal stu- 
dents a building was completed in 1897, 
where the Association is now so well lo- 
cated. 

THE OBJECT 

of the Association is to unite the Chris- 
tian students of the College in order to 
strengthen their own Christian lives and 
to extend the cause of Christ among 
their fellow students. 

17 



MEMBERSHIP. 

The Association is composed of active 
and associate members. The active mem- 
hersliip consists of men of the Colleg-e, 
either students or members of tlie Facul- 
ty, who are members in good standing of 
an evangelical church. Only active 
members have the right to vote in any 
meeting or to hold office. Any man in 
College of good moral character may be- 
come an associate member. 

The annual fee for membership is one 
dollar and a. half or one dollar for fall 
term or for winter and spring terms 
combined. This entitles the member to 
all the accommodations offered in the As- 
sociation building. 



NVITATION. 



All students who are in sympathy with 
the aims and methods of the Association 
are very cordially invited to unite with 
it and to .loin in its work immediately 
upon entering college. It will help j'ou 
and help the Association, too. 

BARTLETT HALL. 

Few, if any, College Associations in the 
South are better situated than our Y. M. 
C. A. is in this building. It is an orna- 
ment to the campus and of the g'reatest 
value to the men. It contains, on the 
ground floor, an excellent auditorium, a 
reading room with the best magazines 
and newspapers on its tables, and a librti- 
ry of three hundred volumes of valuable 
books for reading and for reference, a 
game room, office for the secretary, and 
good gymnasium. In the basement are 
athletic dressing rooms, with lockers, 
shower and needle baths, and bowling 
alleys. 

On the second floor there are rooms 
for as many as twelve students. The 
renting of these is in charge of the sec- 
retary. The building has electric lights 
and steam heat. It is for the members. 
This should become your second home 
while you are at college. 



18 



lyiEETINGS. 

The devotional meetings of the Asso- 
ciation to which all members of the Col- 
lege are cordially invited are held each 
Suiiday afternoon in Bartlett Hall Audi- 
torium at 1:1.") o'clock, lasting- from forty- 
tiye minutes to one hour. These meet- 
ings are usually led by students. They 
are men's meetings and are very help- 
ful to college men whether they be Chris- 
tian men or not. Frequently college pro- 
fessors, pastors, and busines men give 
addresses which are always enjoyed and 
are helpful. 

BIBLE STUDY. 

The Eible study of the Association will 
be conducted on the "Gray System" this 
year. The object of our course is to g-et 
men to do daily devotional Bible study 
and meet together on Sundays with a 
student leader and discuss the work in 
the most helpful way. No student who 
seeks a liberal education or desires to 
fit himself for a life of service in the 
Master's cause can afford to miss taking- 
some of our Bible study work. 

The following- courses will be offered 
and others may be announced later: "So- 
cial Significance of the Teachings of 
Jesus," "Men of the Old Testament," 
"Life of St. Paul." 

MISSIONS. 

No nvi^n can consider himself well read 
who does not know something- of the act- 
ual conditions in foreign countries. No 
Christian can know the extent of the field 
of labor for the Master who is not ac- 
quainted with more of it than he comes 
in contact with in his daily living-. No 
better means of instruction or of broad- 
ening 'a man's vision can be found than 
the study of missions. It gives the act- 
ual facts of the most important phases 
of life in the countries studied. Mission 
study classes will be organized early in 
the term and conducted on almost the 
same plan as the Bible study. 

Courses will be offered on China, India, 
and others to be announced later. 

19 



SOUTHERN STUDENTS' CONFER- 
ENCE. 

The Christian Association of tlie South- 
ern colleges hold a. ten days* conference 
at Black Mountain, N. C, each ..summer 
in June. A large tract of mountain land 
has bee;i purchased there, and a more 
ideal location for an outing could not be 
found. An atheletic field is being com- 
pleted and the grounds improved in every- 
way. 

The moral and spiritual uplift and 
Christian training of this conference 
cannot be known by one who has not at- 
tended some such meeting. It has 
changed many men's lives and has great- 
ly helped many men in deciding their 
life work. Maryville usually sends about 
six delegates to this conference. , 

THE MARYVILLE SUMMER CON- 
FERENCE. 

The home association conducts a con- 
ference each summer during the week 
preceding the opening of college. It is 
held at Sheep-Pen Cave on the bluffs of 
the Tennessee River, about nine 'miles 
from Maryville. About twenty men usu- 
ally attend this conference, camping on 
the high bluffs of the beautiful river. 
It is a week of genuine out-of-door sport, 
rowing, swimming and fishing; a week of 
Christian fellowship with the leaders in 
college; a week of most valuable prep- 
aration for the year's work. Professors, 
pastors, and traveling and local secre- 
taries visit the camp and make helpful 
addresses and enjoy camp life with the 
fellows. 



20 



Y. W. C. A. 



Our Motto: Not by might, nor by 
power, but by my spirit, saith the T^ord 
of Hosts. 

The Association is for you. 



Our Calendar. 

On your arrival — A hearty greeting". 
Your first niglit — A visit to your room- 
Opening of school — A reception for the 

new girls. 

Sunday morning 0:1."> — Bible classes. 
Sunday afternoon, 1:;^0 — Our devotional 

meeting. 

Whenever you wisli — Our assistance. 
After twenty years of existence Y^. W. 

C. A. was never more alive than now. 

Our Association. 

Wliy is it important? 

Because its .aim is the perfect devel- 
opment of womanhood, and for this pur- 
pose it seeks to put Christ first in indi- 
vidual and college life and to make the 
Association's relations the strongest of 
all college ties. 

Its Membership. 

Any Christian wlio is a member of 
an evangelical church is welcomed to 
active membersliip. All others are cor- 
dially invited to meet with us and join 
as associate members. We want to help 
you; we need you to help us. 

its Home. 

Our Association home, furnished by the 
efforts of the girls, is located in Voorhees 
Chapel. There we meet every Sabbath 
afternoon, and one of our meTiibers lead- 
ing our tlioughts, center our minds on 
higher things and commune with Him 
who can give us that peace which pass- 
eth understanding. It is a home of girls 
striving to serve the Heavenly Father 
with a more wliolehearted service. 

21 



Its Bible Study Course, 

We l.ave been having- three Bible 
classes. One in the Life of Christ; one 
in the Life of St. Paul; and one in The 
Message of the Prophets. These same 
classes will be offered this year with one 
additional: The Miracles and Parables 
of Jesus. The object of these courses is 
to stimulate voluntary daily devotional 
Bible Study. Every girl should enlist 
in. one of these classes. 

The Mission Study Class. 

This last fall we had two classes in 
Mission Study: "Aliens or Americans" 
and "Tlie Unfinished Task." In the 
spring, instead of having a regular class 
each girl pledged herself to read as many 
of the mission books, either biography, 
history or fiction, as uer time would per- 
mit. 

We have planned to have four classes 
this year. One on China led by one of 
our girls who was born in Cliina and 
whose father is still a missionary there; 
so she will be able to give the latest" re- 
ports from the mission fields besides 
telling the things she has seen herself. 
One will be on Islam led by one of the 
girls who studied this course at the 
Asheville conference and who heard the 
author of the book give several addresses 
on the subject. There will be another 
on Foreign Missions and one on Home 
Missions. 

We would like as many girls as 
can to join these classes. There is no 
subject more interesting nor one that 
needs our study more than missions. 
If we know the needs we can not help 
being willing to do our part in the 
work. Help is needed. 

Its Library. 

We regard the Sabbath as a day to 
be kept holy by quiet meditation and 
reading. For this purpose the Y. "W. 
C. A. has procured for the girls a library 
placed in the reading room at Baldwin 
Hall. Carefully selected books ana papers 
for Sabbath, magazines and secular pa- 
pers and quite a ntvmber of books for 
week day reading. 



32 



Its Fees. 

Just .")(i cents a year. 

What you get from it, if you go into 
it with a will, can not be bought with 
gold and silver. 

Its Systematic Giving. 

Our Association is a missionary asso- 
ciation. Tennessee and Kentucky have 
a missionary in Ceylon, and the associa- 
tions of the two states help to support 
her. Each girl is given an opportunity 
to pledge a certain amount to be paid 
the first Sunday in each month to be 
used for the support of our foreign mis- 
sionary. This is entirely voluntary. 
Some girls give one cent a month, some 
two, some five, some ten, just as God has 
prospered them. 

The Southern Students' Conference. 

The Summer Conference of the Y. W. 
C. A. is held at Asheville, N. C., every 
year in the early part of June. "" It con- 
sists of representatives from all the 
women's colleges and co-educational in- 
stitutions in the South, together with the 
leaders of the association work in dif- 
ferent parts of the United States. 

The purpose of the conference is to 
deepen the spiritual life of the girls in 
our Southern colleges and to lead them 
out into definite Christian service. 

Our association was represented by 
four delegates this summer: Ernestine 
Knapp, Adelaide Muecke, and Gladden 
Ewers. i 

Give us your help in this great work of 
the Young Women's Christian Associa- 
tion. We want you. 



Officers of Y. W. C. A.: 

President — Gladden Ewers. 
Vice-President — Kate Sheddan. 
Secretary — Lena Aikin. 
Treasurer — Willamette Bays. 
Editor— Belle Gray. 



Chairman of Committees: 

Social — Anna Kidder. 
Devotional — Nellie Pickens. 
Membership — Kate Sheddan. 
Financial — Willamette Bays. 
Poster — Josephine Mewer. 
Systematic Giving-^McLin Sheddan. 
Music — Belle Gray. 
Bible Study — Nellie Johnson. 
Missionary — Helen Silsb5^ 
Inter-collegiate — Loy Alexander. 

Volunteer Band. 

The Mission Band of Maryville College 
is composed of those whose purpose is, 
God willing, to spend their lives and ser- 
vices in foreign lands, those who have 
signed the Volunteer Declaration Card,, 
and whose watchword is the "Evangeli- 
zation of the world in this generation."^ 

The Band meetings', held every Wed- 
nesday, at ;):15 p. m., in the band room 
first floor, Voorhees Chapel have been 
rendered especially interesting, instruc- 
tive, anjj inspiring by the presence .and 
the words of information and counsel 
from the missionaries at home on fur- 
lough. 

All who are • interested are welcomed 
to the meetings and all who are plan- 
ning to be missionaries are asked to 
unite with the Band. The leader James 
Jewell. 



MINISTERIAL ASSOCIATION. 
Officers. 

President - H. B. Phillips 

Vice-President G. M. Payne 

Secretai^y - A. F. Campbell 

This is an organization composed of 
candidates for the Christian ministry of 
all denominations. its purpose is to 
gain strength by uniting the efforts of 
the men. Many inspiring addresses are 
heard by the Association each year, and 
no man who intends to become a minis- 
ter can afford not to join it. 

24 



TUESDAY EVENING PRAYER MEET- 
ING. 

This is an old institution of the College 
and since it was founded has had a 
lai'g-e attendance of students and towns- 
people. Many students who are not 
Christians attend thv-:se meetings and as 
many as will .receive rich blessings from 
them. On Tuesday eA'enings, from 6:30 
to 7:30 o'clock, the meetings are con- 
ducted in the Voorhees Chapel by some: 
member of the Faculty. Don't miss, 
them. 



CITY CHURCHES. 

New Providence Presbyterian, corner 
College and Main Streets, Rev. J. P. 
Calhoun. D. D. 



• Methodist Episcopal, E. Main Street, 
Rev. A. S. Beaman. 



Methodist Episcopal South, E. Main 
Street, Rev. G. W. Summers. 



Baptist. High Street, Rev. W. B. Rut- 
ledge. 



Friends, W. Main Street, Rev. Joseph 
Hoskins. 



Confer as soon as possible with the 
pastor of the church of your choice. 
He is desirous of meeting you. You can 
not be a consistent Christian unless 3'ou 
are at home among God's people. 

25 



LITERARY SOCIETIES. 



MEN'S. 
Athenian. 

This is the oldest society on the Hill. 
Since it was organized its literary stand- 
ard has been hig-h and it has accom- 
plished much in the practical training of 
its members. 

Society Hall, third floor Anderson Hall. 

Society meets each Friday evening at 
(5:80 o'clock. 



Alpha Sigma. 

This society was the second one to bo 
organized for men at Maryville, and- al- 
though the number of charter members 
was small its roll has increased to more 
than one hundred active members during 
the last year. Its members have enjoyed 
tlie benefit of excellent training in speak- 
ing and various literary attainments. 

Society Hall, third floor Anderson Hall. 

Senior Section meets 6:30 o'clock each 
Friday evening. 

Junior Section meets 0:30 o'clock each 
Saturday evening. 

Each young man in college should join 
one of these societies, for they furnish a 
very important part of any college man's 
training. There are no fraternities in the 
College, and these societies furnish the 
warm fellowship of the Hill, as well as 
the literary training, 

26 



LADIES' 



Bainonian. 

The Bainonian Literary Society is true 
to its name; it's always up and "going. " 
It was organized in 1ST5. 

Our Friday afternoon meetings are 
well attended, owing to their interesting- 
programs and genuine old Bainonian 
spirit. 

Every girl who reads this is invited to 
listen to our opening program in Bain- 
onian Hall in September. It will be 
worth attending. Come and see for your- 
self. 



Theta Epsilon. 

This is the youngest literary society in 
college, although its numbers now com- 
pare favorably with the other society for 
girls, and its literary standard is of the 
highest type. 

A hearty welcome is extended to all 
new girls to attend me first meeting in 
September. 

These societies meet each Friday af- 
ternoon at 3:15 o'clocR ror their regular 
meetings and from time to time give 
public programs. 

The literarj^ society constitutes an im- 
portant part of each girl's college life 
and scarcely anyone fails to connect her- 
self with one of the societies. 

Adelphic Union. 

The four literary socTetles of the col- 
lege compose this organization. The 
Adelphic Union banquet and entertain- 
ment are two of the most important and 
enjoyable social events "Of Commencement 
week. 

Officers: 

A. C. Samsel President 

Gladden Ewers Vice-President 

James Jewell: Seci-etary and Treasurer 

27 



COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS. 



Maryville College Monthly. 



Editorial Staff: 

Tom Fred Campbell, Editor-in-Chief, 
Alpha Sigma. 

David J. Brittain. Athenian. 

Nan Maness, Bainonian. 

Clarice Hawkins, Theta Epsilon. 

Job B. Sellers, Y. M. C. A. 

Sadie Flake, Y. W. C. A. 

H. J. Bassett, Alumni. 

T. A. F. Williams, Athletics. 

S. C. Guigou, Business Manager. 



The Chilhowean. 

The College Year Book. 
Published by members of the Senior 
Class. 



The Maryville Hand Book. 

Published annually by the Christian 
Associations. 



The Bulletin. 

Published Quarterly. 
Official publication of the College, the 
first number of which is the College Cat- 
alogue. 



28 



ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. 



Athletics are conductea under the man- 
agenient of the Maryville College Ath- 
letic Association, witli a supervision by 
the Athletic Board of Control, composed 
of representatives from the student body, 
the Faculty, and the town of Maryville. 

The fee of $2.25 for the year secures a 
membership ticket which entitles the 
holder to admission to all the games of 
football, basketball, and baseball on the 
home grounds; to the wse of any athletic 
equipment and tennis courts; to a trial 
on the field for any of the organized 
teams, and to a vote in all meetings of 
the Association. 

The wearing of the 'varsity "M" is 
restricted to members of the 'varsity 
football, basketball, and baseball teams. 

Captains of Maryville Teams: 

Football — A. C. Samsel. 
■ Basketball, Boys — A. C. Samsel. 
Basketball, Girls— Ruth M^ilson. 
Track— S. W. McCulloch. 
Tennis — Clyde Murry. 
Baseball — Diui^ourg Thebaut. 



Football Schedule, 1909. 

Sept. 2.J — Tenn. Deaf and Dumb School, 
Campus. 

Oct. 2— North Carolina, Raleigh, N. C. 

Oct. 4 — Wake Forest College, Wake 
Forest, N. C. 

Oct. 12 — Central University, Danville, 
Ky. 

Oct. 23— Open Date. 

Oct. 30 — Grant University, Campus. 

Nov. 13 — Berea College, Campus. 

Nov. 20 — Virginia Polytechnical Insti- 
tute, Blakesburg, Va. 

Nov. 25 — University of Chattanooga, 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 

29 



STANDING TRACK RECORDS. 



Baseball Throw — S. R. Newman, 125 
yards. 

One Hundred Yard Dash— O. R. MagilL 
10 l-T) seconds. 

Putting Sixteen-pound Shot — J. L. 
Jones, 36 feet 4 inches. 

Running Broad Jump — E. L. Clemens, 
20 feet 2 8-4 inches. 

One Mile Run — W. A. l<'reidinger, 4 
minutes 58 3-4 seconds. 

Standing Broad Jump — T. W. Belk. 10 
feet 5 1-4 inches. 

Half Mile Run— J. A. Bell, 2 minutes 
16 3-4 seconds. 

High Jump — E. L. Clemens, 5 feet 6 3-4 
inches. 

Relay Race — Class of 1903, 4 minutes 
8 4-5 seconds. 

Pole Vault— E. L. Clemens, 10 feet 2 
inches. 

Forty Yard Dash— W. S. Green and D. 
McDonald, 5 seconds. 

Sixteen Pound Hammer Throw — S. R. 
Newman, 101 feet 7 inches. 

Discus Throw — T. Jennings, 102 feet 1 
inch. 

One Hundred and Twenty Yard Hurdle 
— R. L. Houston, 20 seconds. 

Quarter Mile Run— J. R. Clark, 55 4-5 
seconds. 



30 



TRAMPS FROM MARYVILLE. 

To Look Rock, a prominent point on 
Chilhowee Moinitain, overlooks Maryville, 
Knoxville and much of tlie East Tennes- 
see Valley from the Smoxy Range to the 
Cumberland Range. Eleven miles south 
of Maryville, two miles from Montvale 
Spi'ings. 

To Thunderhead Mountain, one of 
the highest points in the Smoky Moun- 
tain Range. About forty miles south- 
east of Maryville. Railroad to within 
five miles. 

To Gregory's Bald, about same height 
as Thunderhead Mountain and ten miles 
west of it on the main ridge of the 
Smokies. These two points are of special 
interest, as they are the "real wild 
mountains" with plenty of game for 
sportsmen. 

To Abram's Falls. A fall of sixty feet 
in a large mountain creek in the west 
end of Cade's Cove, between Chilhowee 
Mountain and Smoky Mountain, twenty- 
five miles south of Maryville. Plenty of 
fine mountain scenery and game. 

To Sheep-Pen Cave. A large cave 
in the high marble bluffs on the Ten- 
nessee River, nine miles west of Mary- 
ville, two miles from Louisville. Excel- 
lent 'swimming and boating. 



DRIVES FROM MARYVILLE. 

To Montvale Springs, a beautiful sum- 
mer resort at the foot of Chilhowee 
Mountain, nine miles south of Maryville. 
Beautiful mountain scenery and fine min- 
eral and sulphur water. 

To Walland. a small town in Little 
River Gap of Chilhowee Mountain. Fine 
river and mountain scenery; ten miles 
southeast of Maryville. 

To Wildwood, summer resort with ex- 
cellent mineral and sulphur water; good 
hotel; seven miles east of Maryville. 

To Knoxville, largest city in East Ten- 
nessee. Sixteen miles north of Mai-y- 
ville; good pike road. 



31 



To Louisville, small town on L. & X. 
Railway and Tennessee river. Good 
boating-; seven miles west of Maryville; 
pike road. 

We recommend to the patronage of 
Maryville students the firms whose ad- 
vertisements appear In this book. Care 
has been taken to admit no advertise- 
ments except of firms in every way relia- 
ble and trustwortliy, n,na students deal- 
ing with the houses advertised are sure 
to find their treatment both courteous 
and satisfactory. 



32 



INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS. 

Art and Photography: 

Aristo Studio, E. L. Webb 68 

Attorneys: 

T. N. Brown 53 

Will A. McTeer- 45 

Banking: 

Bank of Maryville.. 39 

Catering: 

Peter Kern Co - 9 

City Bakery 34 

Clothing and Furnishings, 

J. N. Badgett Co ..-. 1 

Beaman's ,. ...51 

Ellis, Chandler & Co 3 

Ldwery & Cureton Co 7 

G. T. Wilson 55 

Coal: 

Maryville Transfer & Coal Co 43 

Confections: 

Peter Kern Co 9 

City Bakery 34 

Harley Vineyard 65 

Dental Surgery: 

Dr. John A. Goddard 71 

Dr. H. P. Huddleston 61 

Doctors: 

J. E. McCulloch 53 

A. Mc. Gamble 59 

Druggists: 

George & Mitchell. , 71 

Kuhlnian's 6 

Dry Goods* 

J. N. Badgett t 

Education: 

Maryville College 36-37 

Florist: 

Baum : 73 

Footwear: 

J. N. Badgett 1 

Beaman's 51 

Ellis, Chandler & Co. 3 

Lowery & Cureton Co 7 

Furniture: 



33 



Tell me what you eat and I 11 tell you what 
you are. 



The City Bakery 

The best place in town to 
eat. Quick service and 
first class accommodations; 

Special attention given to 
Banquets, Spreads a n .d 
Afternoon Luncheons. ^ 

Catering for Class Socials 
our specialty. 



Cold Drinks, Ice Cream, 
Fruits, Steere's Chocolates 

C. S. MEANS, Proprietor 



34 



W. B. Lawrence & Co Oa 

Groceries: 

F. R. Babcock 50 

Harley Vineyard 65 

Ice Cream & Soda: 

Peter Kern Co ..- 9 

Boyd's Grill 10 

George & Mitchell..... 71 

Kuhlman's 6i 

City Bakery 34 

Insurance: 

J. H. Newman 61 

Jewelrj^: 
Drew McCullock 5 

Laundry: 

Bell Laundry 69 

Livery: 

Mary^'ille Transfer & Coal Co 43 

R. B. Oliver 67 

Millinery: 
J. N. Badgett & Co 1 

Pressing- Club: 

Norcross & McGinley 65 

Schonbrunn's 47 

Printing: 

Knoxville Printing & Box Co 57 

Restaurant: 

Boyd's Grill 10 

City Bakery 34 

Shoe Repairing: 
L. M. Bayless 47 

Transfer Co. : 

Maryville Transfer & Coal Co 43 

Y. M. C. A. Lyceum Course 48-40 



35 



Maryville College 

1819-1909 

Rev. Samuel Tyndale Wilson, D. D., President 



I. ITS PURPOvSE. 

To give its studenta a tliorough, mod- 
ern Christian education. 

II. ITS PAST. 

. Founded in ISIO, by Rev. Isaac Ander- 
son, D. D., and the feynod of Tennessee, 
it has contributed ninety years' wortliy 
service to tlie carrying- out of tlae pur- 
pose of its founder. Thousands of its 
former students are scattered over tlie 
world. 

III. ITS PRESENT. 

Every passing year shows increasing 
prosperity and brings a brigliter outlook. 
Within six years the instit^^tion has near- 
ly doubled the number- of its students; 
the College department making a gain 
of 133 per cent. Maryville College is an 
East Tennessee institution, enrolling 
more than five hundred Tennesseans 
every year. It is a national institution, 
enrolling annually more than a hundred 
students from twenty- eight States and 
countries other than Tennessee. 

IV. ITS PLANT. 

It has property of aii kinds, amounting 
to 6.50.000; eieveji buildings, including the 
new Ralph Max Lamar Memorial Hos- 
pital, waterworks, sewerage, steam heat, 
electric lights, and bathrooms. Two new 
dormitories will be built this year. 

V. ITS COLLEGE CURRICULUM. 

It offers, as courses of study, ten 
groups of studies: Classical, Greek, Latin. 
English. Modern Languages, Chemistry, 
Biology, Mathematics, Economics and 



36 



Political Science, and English Litei'ature. 
All of these courses leacT to tlie degree of 
B. A. 

A^I. ITS OTHER DEPARTMENTS. 

1. Prepai'atory — Four years' course, of- 
fering- fifteen units. 

2. Bible Training — Thorough instruc- 
tion in the English Bible and mission 
methods. 

3. Teachers" — Six j^ears" course. Cer- 
tificate granted. 

4. Bookkeeping — Business college sys- 
tem. 

5i. Music — Vocal and instrumental 
courses leading to graduation. 

6. Expression — Course leading- to grad- 
uation. 

7. Art — Drawing free. Painting in oil 
and water colors. 

VII. ITS HEALTHFULNESS. 

Maryville is located in a country that 
has long- been a health resort. Mountain 
ozone, piu'e water, altitude 000 feet; cam- 
pus of 28.") acres. Gymnasium. Indoor 
and outdoor sports. Manual labor. 

VIII. ITS MORAL ATMOSPHERE. 

Tennessee has no saloons. Maryville 
is a quiet, law-abiding town, filled with 
church-going- people. The College is 
strongly Christian, ana the discipHne is 
careful. The Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. 
are very efficient. The Bible is a text- 
book for every student. 

IX. ITS INEXPENSIVENESS. 

1. Tuition is $6.00 a term. No inci- 
dentals except in the Science laborato- 
ries. 

2. Room-rent for each student, with 
two in a room, .^l."* to .$2o a year._ 

.8. Board in Co-operative Boarding 
Clulj of 400 members, ^l.G'> a week. 

4. Text-books rented. General Libra- 
ry free. 

For catalogues address Registrar of 
Maryville College, Maryville. Tenn. 



September 5 to 11. 



38 



A man's thougfhts g-enerally constitute his 
" table of contents." 

THE OLD RELIABLE 

Over 20 Years of Successful Banking 

The 
BANK of MARYVILIE 

Commenced Business Oct. 1, 1885 

Total Assets, October 1, '85, $ 24,209.39 
Total Assets, July 1, '08 - 323,565.22 



Our facilities for taking care of 
our customers are unsurpassed. 
We will highly appreciate any 
business you may intrust to us. 

YOUR DEPOSITS 
Will Receive Our Best Attention 

Money loaned on satisfactory 
terms. Interest paid on specified 
time deposits. 



OFFICERS 

WIIvI, A. McTEER, - President 

JOHN HUFFSTETI.ER, Vice-President 
JO BURGER, - - Cashier 

J. A. COX, - Assistant Cashier 



39 



September 12 to 18. 



40 



Luck's a fool, the door to success is alwa^"' 
marked " Push" 



"The College Route" 

Knoxville & 
Augusta R. R. 



Excellent train service between 
Maryville and Knoxville, making 
close connection at Knoxville 
with through and local trains to 
all points North, East, South 
and West. 



No. 
6 Lv 
2 *' 

4 " 


Following is condensed 
schedule : 

Mar'vl. 6 a.m. Ar. Knox. 6.45 a.m. 
" 9.35 a.m. " " 10.15 a.m. 
" 5.05 p.m. " " 5.45 p.m. 


1 Lv. 
3 " 
7 " 


Knox. 7.30 am. Ar. Mar'vl. 8.10 a.m. 
3.00 p.m. " " 3.40 p.m. 
6.00 p.m. " " 6.40 p.m. 


W. P. HOOD, Supt. 



41 



September 19 to 25. 



42 



Attend the Association Devotional Meeting- 
Sunday afternoons at 1:15 o'clock. 



O. T. STANLtY 

Maryville Transfer 
& Coal Co. 

Dealers in 

''blue GEM" 
''JELLICO BLOCK' 

COAL 



Office at K. & A. Depot 



All Kinds of Transfer Work 
Promptly Done at Reasonable 
Prices. 

Our representative will meet 
students at Southern R. R. Depot 
Knoxville. They will see that 
your baggage is safely delivered 
to your boarding house or dor- 
mitory. 



43 



September 26 to October 2. 



44 



Y. W. C. A. Devotional Meeting. 

Sundays. 1:30 p m- 



WILL A. McTEER 

ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR 

Office, Over Bank of Maryville 

Main Street 

IVIARYViLLE, TENN. 



AVhen figuring the amount of 

cash you will need to see you 

thru college for the year, 

you should include the 

cost of the following: 

Y. M. C. A. Membership 

Lyceum Course 

Literary Society Fee 

Athletic Association 

>lembership 

and a year's subscription to the 

College Monthly 

These are necessities, not 

luxuries. 



45 



October 3 to 9. 



46 



l,et j'our grades represent your own knowledge 



For First-Class Work at Low- 
est Prices, See 

SGHONBRUNN'S 

Steam Cleaning, Dyeing and Frencii 
Dry Gleaning Works 

BOTH PHONES 1300 

Main Office and Works 

COR. WALNUT ST. and ASYLUM AVE. 

KNOXVILLE. TENN. 



L M. BAYLiSS 

Boots and 
Shoes -^ 

Repairing Neatly Done 
on Sliort Notice 

STUDENTS' PATRONAGE SOLICITED 

MARYVILLE, - TENN. 

47 



8 a:xnoxt] 



o 
o 

o 

8 

o 
o 
o 

o 



, |. m. 01. A. ■■ 

o 

o 

8 SIXTH 

8 

8 I^REMIER .LE< 

o 

8 I^IST i^OR 1909-10 

8 CHICAGO GLEE CLUB 

8 ITALIAN BOY'S O 

O 

8 DR. De\\ 

O 

O FR 

O 



8 TICKETS FOR THE 

O 

o 

P^iJOOOOOOOQOQOOGQOOOOOGOOQOi 

48 



oocoooooooosoocoooeoooooog 



EMEISTT 



\tmm GInura? 



= o 

o 

o 

URE COITRSE . I 

^OUTH I 

© 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 

4ESTRA g 

MILLER g 

I:RICK ward, Tragedian g 

ALLACE BRUCE AMSBURY ® 



TIRE COURSE, Sl.50 g 

O 
Q 

49 ■ 



October 10 to 16. 



Habits form the index to a man's character. 

CASH 

Rings Loud at 

BEAMAN'S 

219 GAY STREET 

KIMOXVI L-l-E'S 

Only Spot Cash 

Store 



BEAMAN'S 

''Diamond'' Shoes 

FOR MEN 
FOR WOMEN 

$3.50 and $4.00 

Have only one fault— 
They last too long 



Guaranteed Burrojap 
Patents for Men, $4 and $5 



NOKOUTHATS, - - $2, S2.50 
HOWARD HATS - - - - $3 

51 



October 17 to 23. 



Don't deceive yourself. You can not afford to 
miss the Tuesday evening prayer meeting:. 



T. N. BROWN 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 



J. A. Mcculloch, m. d. 

Physician and Surgeon 

Office Hours: 8 to 10 a.m., and 1 to 3 p.m. 

Front Office 
Over George & Mitchell's Drug Store 

Telephones, Residence 86, Office 98 



53 



October 24 to 30. 



54 



Cultivate a neat appearance. 



^TT A neat and tidy appear- 
jj ance may not indicate what 
manner of man you are, but it 
does influence your fellow's esti- 
mate of you. First impressions 
are often lasting. 



^ 



See 

G. THOMAS WILSON 

Student Representative of 

Chicago Tailoring Co. 

When you want to fit your per- 
son and your purse. 



Tom makes 'em right. 



55 



October 31 to November 6. 



56 



To touch your hat to professors is an evidence 
of respect. 



WHEN HUNGRY 

COME TO THE 

SOUTH SIDE 
STORE 

F. R. BABCOCK & CO. 
PHONE 141 



A. Mg. gamble, M. D. 

Office Over George & Mitchell's Drug Store 

Office Phone 133 
Residence Phone 62 

WARYVILLE, - TENNESSEE 



57 



November 7 to 13. 



58 



Printing 
Binding 
Photo-Engraving 



Largest and Best Equipped 
Plant in East Tennessee 



w 

Kttoxutlk f rtnttttg $c 
10X Ql0mpattg 

Cor. State and Union Sts. 
Local and Long Distance Phones 



59 



November 14 to 20. 



60 



Attend the Y. M. C. A. Reception at Bartlett 
Hall, the first Friday Evening. 



H. P. HUDDLESTON 



The Students' 
Dentist 



DENTISTRY IN ALL 
ITS BRANCHES 

Office: 2nd Floor Gamble-Waller Bldg. 
Main St. MARYVILLE 



Union Central 
Life 

J. H. NEWMAN 

General Agent 

Cor. Clinch and Prince Sts. 
KNOXVILLE, - TENNESSEE 

61 ■ 



November 21 to 27 



62 



The Morning Watch sweetens life. 
Observe it. 



(0 


rO-DATE 

TO 


FOR UP-1 

HO 


Q. 



u 

> 

I- ^ 
0) 9 



I- 

O 



LU 



cc 

UJ 

X 
Q_ 
< 

CD ? 
O mS 

L_ CD S 

o ^ 



CL u 

z 

-. UJ 

C/) o 
UJ 1 



CO 



63 



November 28 to December 4. 



64 



Your clothes can be made to 
last twice as long as they ordinar- 
ily would, if you keep them well 
cleaned and pressed. 

We do first-class work at a 
price suited to your purse. 

Four Suits cleaned and pressed, 
$1.00 

The Students Pressing Club 

Norcross & McGinley 



THE 

CONVENIENT 

STORE 



FINE CANDIES 

Including Steere's Chocolates 

Fruits, Stationery 

and Notions 
Groceries and Cold Drinks 



Corner College and Depot Streets 

HARLEY VINEYARD 



December 5 to 11. 



66 



You will be a better Maryville man if you 
know a lot of other Maryville men. 



Robt. B. Oliver 

LIVERY 



Up-to-date rigs of every 
kind. 

Special attention given to 
students. 

SEE US BEFORE YOU 
GO DRIVING. 



PHONE 17 



67 



December 12 to 18. 



68 



Keep in touch with some church. 

FASHIONABLE 
LAUNDERERS 



JL 



BELt 

lAUNDRV 



"Put Your Duds in Our Suds" 

People who Know declare our 
worK is incomparable. It is 
worth a trial. We solicit 
your patronage. .• .• .• .* 

Bell Laundry Co. 

642-644 Asylum Avenue 

Knoxville, Tennessee 

Branch Office, 309 W. Clinch Ave. 



Student Representative 
Wm. F. Buchanan, calls for and 
delivers work on College Hill. 



69 



December 19 to 25. 



70 



Leaders are chosen; rarely self-appointed. 

George & Mitcheii 

Druggists 

Carry the finest line of Station- 
ery and Toilet Articles 
in Town. 
Our Soda Fountain is purely 

sanitary. Try it. 
Prescriptions carefully com- 
pounded, day or night. 



John A. Goddard 

DENTAL SURGEON 



Students cordially invited to 
call when in need of dental 
work. Fair treatment and 
satisfaction guaranteed. 



71 



December 26 to January 1. 



72 



Genius has rocked her biggest children in 
the cradle of hardship, 



Paum 

The Clinch Ave. 

Knoxville, Tennessee 
All the 

Fine^ Flowers 

in Season 

Orders Receive 
Prompt Attention 



W. H. MARSH 

Agent for 
Maryville and Vicinity 



January 2 to 



January 9 to 15. 



January 16 to 22. 



January 23 to 29. 



January 30 to February 5. 



78 



February 6 to 12. 



79 



February 13 to 19. 



80 



February 20 to 26. 



81 



February 27 to March 5. 



March 6 to 12. 



83 



March 13 to 19. 



81 



March 20 to 26. 



85 



March 27 to April 2. 



86 



April 3 to 9. 



April 10 to 16. 



April 17 to 23. 



89 



April 24 to 30. 



90 



May 1 to 7. 



91 



May 8 to 14. 



92 



May 15 to 21. 



93 



May 22 to 2\ 



94 



OFFICERS 




E. B. WALLER, President | 


JOHN H. PICKENS, 


Vice-Pres. 1 


JOHN M. CLARK, Cashier | 


J. E. ROWAN, As. 


3't Cashier 

dition of 


Statement of the Con 


BANK OF BLOUNT COUNTY | 


at the close of business De 


c. 31, 1907 


RESOURSES 


Loans and Discounts 

Overdrafts 


$217,755.32 
1,047.33 

3.722.67 

500.00 

3,942.00 

56,948.06 


. Banking' House, Fui^ni- 

ture and Fixtures.. 

Otiier Real Estate 

Expenses and Taxes Pd 
Due from 

Banks $45,095.65 

Cash in Vault..$ll, 853.41 




$283,915.38 


LIABILITIES 




Capital Stock Paid in 

Surplus and Undivided 
Profits 


. $48,900.00 

. 9,993.89 
. 225,803.99 

None 
217.50 


Individual Deposits 

Notes and Bills Redis 
counted 






$283,915.38 


DIRECTORS 


G. R. Henry, S. 


L. George, 


J. M. Clark, 




E. B. Waller, John H. 


Pickens, 


J. N. Badgett, W. 


L. Russell, 


T. F. Cooper, S. L. Davis, | 


E. Huffstetler, C..T. 


Gates, Sr. 1 



You. may bluff your professors, but you can 
not bluff your fellow-students. 



W. B. Lawrence & Go. 

The Students' 

FURNITURE DEALER 




Don't get homesick; make 
your room ns home like as pos- 
sible. We carry a full line of 
all kinds of Furniture and can 
make your college home cheer- 
ful at a triflinR- cost. 



W. B. LAWRENCE & CO. 



96 



CALENDAR-Collegiate Year 



Septum BEK, 1909 



T«fOVEMKEK, 1900 



SIM 



T W T 



F S 



S M T 



W 



T F S 



I 1 

7! 8 

1415 

21 22 

28! 29 



Decembek. lf»00 



6 7 
13 14 
20 21 

27 28 



6 7 
18,14 

2021 

27.28 



2 81 4 
9 10! 11 



29 80 



17118 
24 25 
81 __ 



January. 1910 


Aprit., 1910 






-- 






1 










1 


2 


2 


8 


4 


5 6 


7 


8 


3 4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


9 


10 


11 


12 18 


14 


15 


1011 


12 18 


14 


15 


16 


16 


17 


18 


19 20 


21 


22 


17|18 


19 20 


21 


22; 23 


23 


24 


25 


26 27 


28 29 


24 25 


26 27 


28 


29,80 


30 


31 




1 




^ . ' 


1 




^_L. 


February, 1910 


May, 1910 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


1 


2 


8 


4 


5 


6 


7 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


1] 


16 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


18 


14 


18 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


20 


21 


22 


28 


24 


25 


22 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


27 


28 


- 


-- 


-- 




-- 


29 


^0 


31 


-- 


-- 


-- 


~- 


March, 1910 


June, 1910 




-- 


I 


2 8 


4 


5 








1 


2 


3, 4 


fi 


7 


8 


9,10 


11 


12 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


1011 


13 


14 


15 


16|l7 


18 


19 


12 


18 


14 


15 


16 


17 18 


20 


21 


22 


23 24 


25 


26 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 25 


27 


28 


29 


30 81 


- 


-- 


26 


27 


28 


29|30