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Full text of "Maryville Handbook [M Book] 1913-1914"

i 



The 

Maryville 
Hand Book 



VOL. IV 



Presented by the 

Christian Organizations 

of 

Maryville College 



Maryville College 
1913-14 



President's Message. 



The Maryville College Y. M. C. A. 
founded in 1877, is one of the oldest col- 
lege Y. M. C. A.'s in the world. For 
nine college quadrenniums it has effi- 
ciently served the interests of the young 
men of Maryville College. The Y. W. C. 
A. was organized in 1884, and reorgan- 
ized in 1888, and since the latter date has 
rendered an uninterrupted invaluable 
contribution to the welfare of the young! 
women of the institution. 

The President and the Faculty of the 
College are exceedingly appreciative of 
the fidelity manifested by the officers 
and members of these noble organiza- 
tions in the past; and cordially desire 
for the associations in the future the 
united and enthusiastic co-operation of 
all the young people in attendance upon 
the institution. May these time-honored! 
associations have the privilege of so 
mustering and drilling all the Christian 
students of all the classes and depart- 
ments and societies of the College, that 
all our Maryville men and women may 
fight well in this world-wide war in 
which our Lord goes forth "a kingly 
crown to gain." 

SAMUEL, TYNDALE WILSON, 

President. 



The 

Ellis-Chandler 

Company 



(Incorporated) 



' 'The One Price 
Store" 



CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS AND FUR 
NISHINGS FOR MEN AND BOYS. 



We also carry a full line of 

READY-TO-WEAR GOODS, FURNISH 

INGS AND SHOES FOR LADIES, 

MISSES AND CHILDREN. 



College Students 

GET YOUR 

WATCHES, JEWELRY, FOUNTAIN 

PENS, COLLEGE PINS, 

FOBS, ETC., 

From 

One of the "Bunch" 

Bring your repairs to me for the best 

work at reasonable prices. I want 

to meet you, Mr. "New-man." 

Come in; lets' shake hands 

on a good year's work. 

Eyes Tested and Glasses Fitted. 



A. E. McCulloch 

JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST 
MARYVILLE 

4 



J. N. BADGETT 

Company 

(Incorporated) 
DEPARTMENT STORE 

Wholesale and Retail 

THE HOUSE OF BARGAINS 

and 

STUDENTS' HEADQUARTERS. 

MARYVILLE TENNESSEE 



George & Mitchell 

"THE REXALL STORE" 



Students and Strangers More Than 
Welcome. 



Make our store your headquarters. 



S 



Our Drugs are Pure 
Our Prices are Right 



£ 



A Box of Liggett's Chocolates Will 
Please "Her." 

Your doctor will tell you your prescription 
is safe when filled by us. 



BAUM 

THE CLINCH AVENUE 

Florist 



KNOXVILLE 



TENNESSEE 



9k $x 



ALL THE 



Finest Flowers 

IN SEASON. 
Orders receive prompt attention. 

PAT QUINN 

Agent for 
Maryville and Vicinity. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Page 

Advertisements, Index 9 

Athletic Association 34-37 

Bible Study 20-28 

Calendar ....10 

Christian Associations: 

Y. M. C. A 18-26 

Y. W. C. A 27-29 

Ministerial 29 

Volunteer Band 29 

Churches 30 

College Colors 17 

College Publications 33 

College Song 17 

College Yell 17 

Directory of College Officers 14 

Drives from Maryville 33 

Faculty of Institution 12-14 

Greetings 2 

How to Matriculate 15-16 

Literary Societies 31-32 

Lyceum Course 48-49 

Mission Study 20-28 

Prayer Meeting 30 

Receptions 11 

Tramps from Maryville 38 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 
Banking: 

Bank of Blount County, 89. 

Bank of Maryville, 69. 
Catering and Lunch: 

City Bakery— Carter Bros., 62. 

H. J. Greenlee, 77. 

Peter Kern, Knoxville, 93. 

J. F. Reagan, 94. 
Clothing and Furnishings: 

J. N. Badgett Co., 5. 

Beaman's, Knoxville, 81. 

Cureton-Kennedy & Callaway, Knox- 
ville, 85. 

Ellis-Chandler Co., 3. 

Hall's On the Square, Knoxville, 54. 

McTeer Co., Knoxville, 58. 

J. H. Webb, Knoxville, 50. 

"Woods & Taylor, Knoxville, 57. 

D. F. Young, 78. 
Dentistry: 

Dr. John A. Goddard, 53. 

Drs. Huddleston and Tinsley, S2. 
Druggists: 

George & Mitchell, 6. 

Wells Bros., 43. 
Education: 

Maryville College, 39-40. 
Florist: 

Baum. Knoxville, 7. 
Groceries: 

F. R. Babcock, 53. 

G. A. Toole, 82. 
Hardware and Sporting Goods: 

Cruze-Lyons-Hayes, Knoxville, 73. 

Lowe-Hord, Knoxville, 66. 
Jewelry: 

Hope Bros., Knoxville, 96. 

A. E. McCulloch, 4. 
Laundry: 

Bell Laundry, Knoxville, 90. 
Music: 

Clark & Jones, Knoxville, 61. 
Photographer: 

A. L. Butcher, 86. 

Knaffl & Brakebill, Knoxville. 65. 

E. L. Webb, 42. 
Pressing and Tailoring: 

Reeves & Parks, 47. 
Printing: 

Maryville Enterprise, 44. 

Knoxville Lithographing Co., Knox 

ville, 70. 
Shoe Repairing: 

E. H. Key. 77. 



CALENDAR FOR 1913-1914. 



Fall Term 
1913. 

Sept. 9, Fall Term begins Tuesday 

Nov. 27, Thanksgiving Thursday 

Dec. 17, 18, 19, Examinations 

Wednesday-Friday 
Dec. 19, Fall Term ends Friday 

Winter Term 
1914. 

Jan. 1, Winter Term begins Thursday 

Jan. 14, Meeting of the Directors 10 

a. m Wednesday 

Mar. 18, 19, 20, Examinations 

Wednesday-Friday 
Mar. 20, Winter Term ends Friday 

Spring Term 

Mar. 24, Spring Term begins Tuesday 

May 31, Baccalaureate Sermon. . .Sabbath 
May 31, Address before the Y. M. C. A 

and Y. W. C. A : Sabbath 

June 1, 2, 3, Examinations 

Monday- Wednesday 
June 3, Class Day Exercises, 7:30 p. m. 

Wednesday 
June 4, Meeting of Directors, 8:30 a. m. 

Thursday 
June 4, Commencement 10 a.m. .Thursday 
June 4, Annual Alumni Dinner, 12 m. 

Thursday 
June 4, Social Reunion, 8 p. m. .Thursday 



10 






PRESIDENT'S RECEPTION 



To all the Students 

Will be given in Bartlett Hall, Friday 
afternoon, September 12. This should 
be attended by every student, to get ac- 
quainted with all the members of the 
Faculty, and with others. 

A Reception for Men 

Will be given in Bartlett Hall, Friday 
evening September 12. Come and spend 
a pleasant evening with the fellows. 

Reception for Women 

Will be given in the Y. W. C. A. Room 
in Voorhees Chapel, Friday evening, 
September 12. Every girl is cordially 
invited. 

Snap Social 

In Bartlett Hall, Friday evening, Sep- 
tember 19. Everybody invited to spend 
a pleasant evening. 



♦♦r~X^***<^>«>*^K^**«M"^K»* • 



FACULTY. 



COLLEGE DEPARTMENT 

Rev. Samuel Tyndale Wilson, D. D., 

President, and Professor of the English 

Language and Literature, and of the 

Spanish Language. 

Rev. Samuel Ward Boardman D.D., LL.D. 

Emeritus Professor of Mental and Moral 

Science. 

Rev. Elmer Britton Waller, M.A.* 

Dean, Professor of Mathematics, and 

Secretary of the Faculty. 

Jasper Converse Barnes, M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Psychology and Political 

Science. 

Henry Jewell Bassett, M.A. 

Professor of Latin. 

Phoebus Wood Lyon, M.A., Ph.D. 

Logic, History and Pedagogy. 

Rev. Clinton Hancock Gillingham, M.A. 

Registrar, Professor of the English Bible, 

and Head of the Bible Training 

Department. 

Francis Mitchell McClenahan, M.A. 

Professor of Chemistry and Geology. 

Edward George Seel, B.A. 

German and French. 

Mrs. Jane Bancroft Smith Alexander, B.A. 

English Language and Literature. 

Susan Allen Green, M.A. 

Biology. 

Annabel Person, B.A. 

Greek. 

George Harley Douglas, 

Assistant in Psychology Laboratory. 

Edwin Ray Hunter, 
Assistant in Chemistry Laboratory. 

Alma Mabel Armstrong, 

Assistant in Chemistry Laboratory. 

Julia Hale Dillon, 

Assistant in Biology Laboratory. 



'Died March 29, 1913. 

12 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

Fred Lowry Proffitt, B.A. 

Principal of the Preparatory Department, 

and Professor of Education. 

Margaret Eliza Henry, B.A. 
English. 

Mrs. Estelle Snodgrass Proffitt, B.A. 
Latin. 

Edgar Roy Walker, B.A. 
Mathematics. 

Mary Victoria Alexander, B.A. 
English and Bible. 

Alice Isabel Clemens, B.A. 

English. 

David Joseph Brittain, B.A. 
History. 

Anna DeVries, Ph.B. 
German and French. 

Almira Elizabeth Jewell, B.A. 
Latin and English. 

Mary Emma Renich, M.A. 
Physics and Mathematics. 

Olga Alexandra Marshall, B.A. 
Latin. 

Lloyd Helvetius Langston, 
Bookkeeping. 

Nannie Lee Broady, B.A. 

English. 

Hattie Bell Lester, 

Assistant in Physiology. 

Ralph Waldo Lloyd, 
Assistant in Physiology. 

Ella McCampbell, 
Assistant in Mathematics. 

Irving Kip Stearns, 
Assistant in Physics. 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS. 



Inez Monfort, 
Voice, History of Music, and Theory. 

Laura Belle Hale, 
Piano. 

Rev. Edwin William Hall, 
Vocal and Band Music. 

Rev. Thomas Campbell, M.A. 
Painting and Drawing. 

Edna Edith Zimmerman, Ph.B. 
Expression. 

Lester Everett Bond, 
George Edmund Williams, 
Physical Directors. 



DIRECTORY OF COLLEGE OFFICERS 



President's Office — Anderson Hall, first; 
floor, room 3. 

Dean's Office— Science Hall, second 
floor, room 13. 

Registrar's Office — Anderson Hall, first 
floor, room 4. 

Treasurer's Office — Anderson Hall, firsl 
floor, room 1. 

Principal of Preparatory Department-^ 
Anderson Hall, Fayerweather Annex, firsl 
floor, room 8. 

Post Office and Loan Library— Ander- 
son Hall, first floor, room 5. 

Manager of Co-Operative Boarding Clufc 
— Pearsons Hall, first floor. 

Director of Music Department — Voor- 
hees Chapel, basement, north entrance. 

Director of Expression — Voorhees Chap- 
el, second floor. 

Professors and Teachers — A special di 
rectory will be found posted on the col- 
lege bulletin board, Anderson Hall, firsi 
floor, west corridor. 



HOW TO MATRICULATE. 



ALL STUDENTS are requested to read 
carefully the following instructions re- 
garding registration and matriculation: 

Registration and Payment of Bills — 
Registration will begin on Tuesday morn- 
ing, September 9, 1913, in the Treasurer's 
office. Pay your tuition, science fees and 
room rent to the Treasurer and give in- 
formation that will be asked for, for the 
purpose of filling out your registration 
card. Be sure that you get the Treas- 
urer's receipt which you will need later 
for matriculation. 

The boarding club deposit will be made 
to the manager of the club. 

Book rent is to be paid to the Loan 
Library. 

Examinations — Let all students who 
have failed to take examinations present 
themselves to the professors under whom 
their studies were pursued and take ex- 
aminations before matriculating. No stu- 
dent will be admitted to his class until 
all delinquent examinations have been 
taken. A fee of fifty cents will be due 
for each such examination. 

Entrance examinations for new stu- 
dents are not charged for. Candidates 
for admission to the Freshman class who 
have taken their preparatory courses 
elsewhere, will be examined in the 
studies pursued by the Fourth Year Class 
of the Preparatory Department of this 
College, or in their equivalents unless 
they bring certificates that will be satis- 
factory to the Faculty; but a student 
thus receiving credit for a study pursued 
elsewhere will be conditioned until his 
subsequent work in the college course 
proves his efficiency in the study thus 
accredited. 

Candidates for admission to the Soph- 
omore, Junior, and Senior Classes are 
examined in the studies that have been 
pursued by the class which they wish to 



15 



enter, or others equivalent. Those bring- 
ing certificates of dismission from another 
college may, upon proof of their qualifi- 
cations satisfactory to the Faculty, be 
admitted to a corresponding standing in 
this college. Students from other insti- 
tutions will not be admitted into this col- 
lege unless honorably dismissed by their 
former instructors. 

An application blank for admission to 
the College or Preparatory Department 
may be had by addressing the Registrar. 

Matriculation— College Students. Old 
students, and new students that have 
previously sent in application blanks, 
have had their required work assigned 
by the Faculty Committees on Entrance 
and Advanced Standing. Present your 
registration card and Treasurer's receipt 
to the Registrar for assignment of studies. 
New students will first present their 
certificates and letters of recommendation 
to the Committee, on Entrance (Prof. 
Gillingham, Chairman), or the Committee 
on Advanced Standing, (Pres. Wilson, 
Chairman). Preparatory Students. All 
preparatory students will be matriculated 
by the Principal of the Preparatory De- 
partment in his office in Anderson Hall. 

Books — After matriculation, text-books 
may be rented and stationery purchased 
at the Loan Library. 

Bulletins — Keep ears and eyes open for 
all notices that may be posted on the 
bulletin boards or read from the chapel 
rostrum. 

Classes — All Classes will meet for as- 
signment of lessons on Wednesday, Sep- 
tember 10, and all classes will recite on 
Thursday, September 11. First chapel 
exercise, Tuesday, September 9, at 8:10' 
a. m. Be on time. 



16 



COLLEGE COLORS 



Orange and Garnet. 



COLLEGE YELL 

How-we-how, Chilhowee, 

Maryville, Maryville, Tennessee, 

Hoo-rah! hoo-rah! 
Maryville, Maryville, 

Rah! rah! rah! 



COLLEGE SONG 



Where Cholhowee's lofty mountains, 

Pierce the southern blue, 
Proudly stands our Alma Mater, 

Noble, grand, and true. 

Chorus: 

Orange, garnet, float forever, 

Ensign of our hill! 
Hail to thee, our Alma Mater! 

Hail to Maryville. 

As thy hilltop crowned with cedars 

Ever green appears; 
So thy memory fresh shall linger 

Through life's smiles and tears. 

Chorus: 

Lift the chorus, wake the echoes, 

Make the welkin ring! 
Hail the queen of all the highlands! 

Loud her praises sing. 

Chorus: 



Y. M. C. A. 



Officers: 

President R. Wood Wright 

Vice President Addison S. Moore 

Secretary James K. Stewart 

Treasurer A. Garland Hinkle 

Chairmen of Committees: 

Membership John V. Stephens, Jr. 

Devotional Lester E. Bond 

Bible Study John A. Hyden 

Mission Study Aubrey W. Williams 

Music Harold H. Huddleston 

Evangelistic Victor C. Dotty 

HISTORICAL SKETCH. 

Maryville College was among the first 
in the United States to have a college Y. 
M. C. A. Three students first talked of 
the plan and then with seventeen others 
they met in the college chapel on March 
2, 1877, and organized themselves into an 
association. 

For twenty years after those twenty 
men formed the organization there was 
no Y. M. C. A. building, but by the faith- 
ful and strenuous efforts of loyal students 
a building was completed in 1897, where 
the Association is now so well located. 

THE OBJECT 



of the Association is to unite the Chris- 
tian students of the College in order tc 
strengthen their own Christian lives and 
to extend the cause of Christ among their 
fellow students. 

MEMBERSHIP 

TheAssociation is composed of active 
and associate members. The active mem- 
bership consists of men of the College, 
either students or members of the 
Faculty, who are members in good stand- 
ing of an evangelical church. Only active 

IS 



members have the right to vote in any 
meeting, or to hold office. Any man in 
College of good moral character may be- 
come an associate member. 

Until the past year a fee of one dol- 
lar and a half per year was attached to 
membership in the Association, but with 
the beginning of the year 1912-13 no .fee 
was charged, but pledges taken for free 
will offering from those becoming mem- 
bers. The pledge was not made a matter 
of compulsion, but in very few cases was 
no pledge made and at the end of the year 
the Association was able to report a mor« 
than doubled membership, amounting to 
one hundred and eighty-five, and an in- 
creased financial income. So well did the 
experiment work that it has become a 
settled policy of the Association. 

INVITATION 

All students who are in sympathy with 
the aims and methods of the Association 
are very cordially invited to unite with 
it and to join in its work immediately 
upon entering college. It will help you 
and help the Association, too. 

BARTLETT HALL 

Few, if any, College Associations in the 
South are better situated than our Y. M. 
C. A. is in this building. It is an orna- 
ment to the campus and of the greatest 
value to the men. It contains an ex- 
cellent auditorium, a reading room witn 
the best magazines and newspapers on 
its tables, and a library of three hundred 
volumes of valuable books for reading 
and for reference, a game room, office 
for the secretary and a good gymnasium. 
It has also athletic dressing rooms, with 
lockers, shower and needle baths, and 
bowling alleys. 

The building has electric lights and 
steam heat. It is for the members. This 
should become your second home while 
you are at college. 



19 



MEETINGS 

The devotional meetings of the Asso- 
ciation to which all members of the 
College are cordially invited, are held 
each Sunday afternoon in Bartlett Hall, 
at 1:15 o'clock, lasting from forty-five 
minutes to one hour. These meetings 
are usually led by students. They are 
men's meetings and are very helpful to 
college men whether they be Christian 
men or not. Frequently college pro- 
fessors, pastors and business men give 
addresses which are always enjoyed and 
are helpful. 

BIBLE STUDY 

The Bible Study of the Association will 
be conducted on the "Gray System" this 
year. The object of our course is to en- 
list men in daily devotional Bible study. 
The men meet together on Sundays with 
a student leader and discuss the work 
in the most helpful way. No student who 
seeks a liberal education or desires to fit 
himself for a life of service in the Mas- 
ter's cause can afford to miss taking 
some of our Bible study work. 

The following courses will be offered 
and others may be offered later: "Social 
Significance of the Teachings of Jesus." 
"Men of the Old Testament." "Life of 
St. Paul." 

MISSIONS 

The Association recognizes that no one 
can consider himself well read who has 
not some knowledge of the actual con- 
ditions existing in foreign countries. For 
this reason Mission study classes are 
organized on almost the same plan as the 
Bible study. Through these classes it is 
possible for the men of the College to 
come to a fuller appreciation of the ex- 
tent of the missionary enterprise, and 
the significance of the work being done 
by men and women who have given them- 
selves unselfishly to this great work of 
the church. 



SOUTHERN STUDENTS' CONFER- 
ENCE. 

In June of each year the representa- 
tives of the Christian Associations of the 
Southern Colleges meet for a ten days' 
conference at Black Mountain, North 
Carolina. Inspiring addresses by leaders 
in work for young men, Bible and Mission 
study classes conducted with special ref- 
erence to training men to lead the college 
groups, and helpful discussions on all 
phases of the Association work make this 
conference an invaluable aid to the Col- 
lege Y. M. C. A. The afternoons are de- 
voted to recreation and ample oppor- 
tunity is given to consult with the repre- 
sentatives of the International Committee 
and other speakers regarding the special 
problems of the local association. Mary- 
vilie always sends large delegations to 
this conference and the men who go re- 
ceive great benefit themselves and on 
their return add greatly to the effective- 
ness of the Y. M. C. A. in Maryville 
College. 

THE MARYVILLE SUMMER 
CONFERENCE 

The home association conducts a con- 
ference each summer during the week 
preceding the opening of college. It is 
held at Sheep-Pen Cave on the bluffs of 
the Tennessee River, nine miles from 
Maryville. About twenty men usually 
attend this conference, camping on the 
high bluffs of the beautiful river. It is 
a week of genuine out-of-door sport, 
rowing, swimming, fishing: a week of 
Christian fellowship with the leaders in 
college: a week of most valuable prepara- 
tion for the year's work. Professors, 
pastors, and traveling and local secre- 
taries visit the camp and make helpful 
addresses and enjoy camp life with the 
fellows. Students coming to the college 
for the first time will be cordially wel- 
comed at the camp. Come early and 
spend a day or two with the fellows and 
get this splendid introduction to college 
life, and catch the spirit of Maryville. 

21 



CONSTITUTION OF THE YOUNG 

MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

OF 

MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



Article I — Name 

The name of this Organization shall be 
The, Young Men's Christian Association 
of Maryville College, and its object shall 
be to promote growth in grace and Chris- 
tian fellowship among the members and 
aggressive Christian work, especially by 
and for the students. 

Article II — Membership 

Section 1. The active membership of 
this Association shall consist of male stu- 
dents of this institution who are mem- 
bers in good standing of some evangelical 
church, and have been elected by a ma- 
jority vote of the members present at a 
regular meeting of the Association. Only 
active members can vote and hold office. 

Section 2. All male members of the 
Faculty with the same religious quali- 
fications as above are entitled to active 
membership in this Association. 

Section 3. Any male student of this 
institution presenting a good moral char- 
acter shall, upon majority vote of the 
members present at a regular meeting, 
become an associate member of this As- 
sociation. 

Section 4. No membership fee is 
charged, but a free will pledge is ex- 
pected of all who become members. 

Article III— Officers 

Section 1. The officers of this Associ- 
ation shall consist of President, Vice- 
President, Secretary, and Treasurer. The 
term of office shall be one year. 

Section 2. The President, Vice-Presi- 
dent and Treasurer shall be elected as 
follows: A nominating committee con- 
sisting of five active members, two only 



22 



of whom shall be members of the cabinet, 
shall be appointed by the cabinet to 
present nominations for these offices to 
the Association. This committee shall 
be appointed on or before the third Mon- 
day in November, and the Association 
shall meet in regular session on the first 
Monday in December, for the purpose of 
receiving nominations. The Committee 
shall name two or more men for each 
office and election shall be by ballot; 
which election shall occur on the second 
Monday in December, the Association 
meeting for that purpose on that date. 

Section 3. The Secretary shall be nom- 
inated by the advisory committee on or 
before the first Monday in May. The As- 
sociation shall meet to receive the nom- 
ination on the second Monday and on 
the third Monday to act upon the nom- 
ination. 

Section 4. The President shall appoint 
chairmen of the following standing com- 
mittees: Devotional, Membership, Mis- 
sions, Bible Study, Music and Evangel- 
istic, who shall hold office for a term 
equal to that of the President. These 
chairmen shall choose their own com- 
mitteemen from the active members of 
the Association. 

Section 5. The cabinet shall consist of 
the above named officers and the chair- 
men of the standing committees. 

Section 6. The President shall appoint 
an editor from among the active mem- 
bers of the Association at the time of the 
election of the Secretary, whose term 
shall be equal to that of the Secretary. 
Article IV — Duties of Officers 

Section 1. The President shall call and 
preside at all business meetings of the 
Association and cabinet, shall make all 
appointments herein provided for, and 
shall supervise the general work of the 
Association. 

Section 2. The Vice-President shall 
assume the duties of the President in 
case of his absence or disability. 



23 



Section 3. The Secretary shall keep a 
record of the business meetings of the 
Association, and of the advisory com- 
mittee, shall conduct the correspondence 
of the Association, shall have supervision 
of the library and papers of the Associa- 
tion, shall keep a record of the attend- 
ance on devotional services, shall file all 
topic cards, etc., shall compile committee 
reports, shall sign all orders on the 
treasury, from the general fund or the 
sinking fund of the Association. 

Section 4. The Treasurer shall receive 
and disburse all moneys of the Associa- 
tion and shall keep accurate accounts of 
the same;- shall pay out money only on 
the written order of the Association au- 
thorities, and shall keep separate ac- 
counts of the various funds turned over 
to him; shall receive vouchers for all 
payments, and his accounts shall be sub- 
ject to the inspection of an auditing 
committee at the end of the fall and 
spring terms. This auditing committee 
shall consist of two members, one a 
student active member who is not a 
member of the cabinet, to be appointed 
by the President; the other a member of 
the Faculty appointed by the advisory 
committee, from its own number. 

Section 5. The chairmen of all stand- 
ing committees except the music com- 
mittee, shall present written statistical 
reports of the work under their particu- 
lar supervision to the secretary at the 
end of each college term. 

The Devotional Committee shall pro- 
vide leaders for all devotional services 
and have general supervision of the de- 
votional work of the Association. 

The Membership Committee shall so- 
licit members for the Association, super- 
vise such activities as the conduct of an 
information bureau and the distribution 
of the Hand-Book, and shall collect all 
free will pledges made by members on 
joining the Association. 

The Mission Study Committee shall 
provide for mission study classes and so- 
licit enrollment of members in the same. 



The Bible Study Committee shall pro- 
vide for courses in devotional Bible study 
and secure interest and membership in 
them. 

The Music Committee shall have charge 
of the music at all the devotional ser- 
vices of the Association, and shall pro- 
mote the formation of musical organiza- 
tions within the Association. 

The Evangelistic Committee shall lead 
the Association in all movements for the 
salvation and moral uplift of the student 
body and the community. 

Section 6. The editor shall represent 
the interests of the Association in all 
student publications. 

Article V — Meetings 

Section 1. Twenty-five active members 
shall constitute a quorum for the con- 
duct of business. 

Section 2. Business meetings of the 
Association shall be held at such times 
as the constitution specifies for election 
of officers, etc., and such shall be known 
as regular meetings. Call meetings may 
be held at the call of the President or 
upon the request of ten members. Pub- 
lic announcement must be made at least 
twice of each regular or call meeting of 
the Association. 

Section 3. Devotional meetings shall 
be held weekly on Sunday afternoons. 

Article VI — The Advisory Committee 

Section 1. The Advisory Committee 
shall consist of nine members elected for 
three years, one third of the membership 
retiring annually. 

Section 2. Six members of the com- 
mittee shall be members of the Faculty, 
or of the Board of Directors of the Col- 
lege, and three shall be student active 
members of the Association. The com- 
mittee shall elect its own members and 
shall elect a chairman from its own num- 
ber annually. 

Section 3. The President of the Asso- 
ciation is ex-officio member of the com- 
mittee with vote, and the Secretary of 
the Association is ex-officio secretary of 
the committee with right to vote. 

25 



Section 4. A quorum shall consist of 
a majority of the members of the com- 
mittee. 

Article VII— Activities 

All such activities of the Association as 
the Lyceum Course, the Hand-Book, etc., 
shall be conducted by the President or 
those whom he shall appoint with the 
consent of the cabinet. 

Article VIII — Special Funds 

Section 1. All special funds, such as 
the Lyceum fund and the Hand-Book 
fund, shall be drawn upon by the duly 
appointed authorities for the manage- 
ment of such funds. Their written orders 
shall be retained by the Treasurer as 
vouchers for such disbursements. Said 
authorities shall present to the Treasurer 
an itemized account of all moneys re- 
ceived by them and shall turn over 
promptly all such moneys to the Treas- 
urer. They shall secure receipts from 
the Treasurer for all moneys turned over 
to him from their respective funds, and 
these receipts shall be furnished the au- 
diting 1 committee for their inspection up- 
on request. 

Section 2. All borrowing or appropri- 
ating of money from one fund for the 
maintenance of the other or for the gen- 
eral expenditure of the Association shall 
be done only by vote of the Association. 

Section 3. All moneys remaining in 
the treasury at the end of the college 
year shall be placed with the sinking 
fund on interest, except such a balance 
as the cabinet shall deem sufficient for 
the safe conduct of the Association fi- 
nances. 

Article IX — Amendments 

This constitution may be amended by 
a two-thirds vote of the members pres- 
ent, provided that that two-thirds is 
one-third of the active membership, the 
proposed amendment having been read 
and notice of its proposal given one week 
prior to action being taken upon it. 

Adopted May 21st. 1913. 

26 



Y. W. C. A. 



Our motto: Not by might, nor by power, 
but by my spirit, saith the Lord of Hosts. 
The Association is for You. 



Our Calendar 

On your arrival — A hearty greeting. 

Your first night — A visit to your room. 

Opening of school — A reception for the 
new girls. 

Whenever you wish — Our assistance. 

On Sunday morning, 9:00 — Bible classes. 

On Sunday afternoon, 1:30 — Our devo- 
tional meeting. 

Its Library" 

We regard the Sabbath as a day to be 
kept holy by quiet meditation and read- 
ing. For this purpose the Y. W. C. A. 
has procured for girls, libraries placed in 
the reading rooms at Baldwin Hall and 
Pearsons Hall. Carefully selected books 
and papers for Sabbath, magazines and 
secular papers and quite a number of 
books for week-day reading. 

Its Fees 

Just 50 cents a year. 

What you get from it, if you go into 
it with a will, can not be bought with 
gold or silver. 

The Southern Students' Conference 

The Summer Conference of the Young 
Women's Christian Association has been 
held at Asheville, N. C, for the past few 
years. This year the conference will be 
held in the early part of June at Black 
Mountain, N. C, fifteen miles north of 
Asheville. Here are found the new Y. W. 
C. A. and Y. M. C. A. buildings. This 
conference consists of representatives 
from all the women's colleges and co-ed- 
ucational institutions in the South, to- 
gether with the leaders of the Association 
work in different parts of the United 
States. 

27 



The purpose of this conference is to 
deepen the spiritual life of the girls in 
our Southern colleges and to lead them 
out into definite Christian service. 

Our Association is always represented 
at this conference, three or more girls 
going every year. 

Give us your help in this work of the 
Young Women's Christian Association. 
We want you. 

Its Bible Study Course 

An exceptional opportunity of attend- 
ing Bible Study classes is offered to the 
girls. The past year we had four Bible 
study classes, "Life of St. Paul," "The 
Miracles and Parables of Jesus," "Mes- 
sage of the Prophets," and a Teachers' 
Training Class. Some similar courses 
will be given this year. Come and get 
help from these classes and increase our 
numbers. 

Its Mission Study Course 

During the year several Mission Study 
classes are in progress. In these classes 
are studied, as texts, some of the latest 
and best Mission Study books, and great 
interest is shown in this study. Plans 
are being made for at least ten Mission 
study classes for this year. 

Join one of the classes and you will 
become interested in missions, thus help 
yourself and the Association in this 
great work. 



Officers of Y. W. C. A. 

President Mary Kate Rankin 

Vice-President Charlotte Dandes 

Secretary Anne Crane 

Treasurer Nellie Garrison 

Editor Julia Hale Dillon 



Chairmen of Committees 

Membership Charlotte Landes 

Devotional Cora Hopkins 

Finance Nellie Garrison 

Intercollegiate Zora Henry 

Bible Study Lischer Fletcher 

Missionary Grace Groenendyke 

Library Alma Armstrong 

Social Eva Samsel 



VOLUNTEER BAND 

Among the many useful organizations 
on College Hill the Student Volunteer 
Band is by no means of least importance. 
It is an organization of young people who 
intend to be foreign missionaries and 
whose watchword is the evangelization of 
the world in this, generation. 

The band meets every two weeks. At 
these meetings programs are rendered, 
to which spice is often added by the 
talks from missionaries home on furlough 
or by letters from the field. A hearty 
invitation is extended to everyone to 
meet with the band in its room in 
Voorhees Chapel. 



MINISTERIAL ASSOCIATION 



Officers 



President .George H. Douglas 

Vice-President Henry J. Wilson 

Secretary-Treasurer Wm. E. Moore 

Program Secretary ... .A. Garland Hinkle 
This is an association composed of 
candidates for the Christian ministry of 
all denominations. Its purpose is to gain 
strength by uniting the efforts of the 
men. Many inspiring addresses are heard 
by the association each year, and no man 
who intends to become a minister can 
afford not to join it. 



29 



TUESDAY EVENING PRAYER 
MEETING 



This is an old institution of the college 
and since it was founded has had a large 
attendance of students and townspeople. 
Many students who are not Christians 
attend these meetings and as many as do 
so receive rich blessings from them. On 
Tuesday evenings, from 6:30 to 7:30 
o'clock, the meetings are conducted in 
Voorhees Chapel by some member of the 
Faculty. Don't miss them. 



CITY CHURCHES 



New Providence, Presbyterian, corner 
College and Main Streets, Rev. Hubert S. 
Lyle. 



Methodist Episcopal, E. Main Street, 
Rev. Robert L. Stapleton. 



Methodist Episcopal, South, E. Main 
Street, Rev. John W. Browning. 



Baptist, High Street. 
Friends, W. Main Street. 
Christian, College Street. 



Confer as soon as possible with the 

pastor of the church of your choice. He 

is desirous of meeting you. You can not 

be a consistent Christian unless you are 
at home among God's people. 



30 



LITERARY SOCIETIES 



MEN'S 
Athenian 

This society exists for the purpose of 
training young men in public speaking, 
and its record vindicates this claim. Its 
government is democratic and a spirit of 
good fellowship prevails. 

Society Hall, third floor Anderson Hall. 

College Section meets each Friday ev- 
ening at 6:30 o'clock. 

Preparatory Section meets each Satur- 
day evening at 6:30 o'clock. 



Alpha Sigma 

This society was the second one to be 
organized for men at Maryville, and al- 
though the number of charter members 
was small, its roll has increased to more 
than one hundred active members during 
the last year. Its members have en- 
joyed the benefit of excellent training in 
speaking and various literary attain- 
ments. 

Society Hall, third floor Anderson Hall. 

Senior Section meets 6:30 o'clock each 
Friday evening. 

Junior Section meets 6:30 o'clock each 
Saturday evening. 

Each young man in college should join 
one of these societies, for they furnish a 
very important part of any college man's 
training. There are no fraternities in the 
college, and these societies furnish the 
warm fellowship of the Hill, as well as 
the literary training. 

31 



LADIES' 



Bainonian 



The Bainonian Literary Society was 
founded in 1875 and has been gaining 
ever since. It has always stood for the 
highest and best literary work. To be a 
member of the Bainonian means to have 
an opportunity for training in speaking 
before an audience, for drill in parlia- 
mentary ruling, and for social inter- 
course with your fellow students. Every 
girl who reads this is invited to listen to 
our opening program in Bainonian Hall 
in September. It will be worth attending. 
Come and see for yourself. 

Theta Epsilon 

The Theta Epsilon Literary Society 
offers an excellent opportunity to all new 
girls who are desirous of developing their 
literary ability. It is a society where 
every member is asked to take active 
part in the society work, which includes 
music, reading, orations, original poems 
and stories, essays and debates. 

Our book of programs for the year 
shows our literary standing. A hearty 
invitation is given to all new girls to 
join the "Eloquent Daughters" who meet 
in their society hall in Pearsons on Fri- 
day evening at 6:30. 

The literary society constitutes an im- 
portant part of each girl's college life 
and no one should fail to connect herself 
with one of the societies. 



ADELPHIC UNION 
The four literary societies of the college 
compose this organization. The Adelphic 
Union banquet and entertainment are 
two of the most important and enjoyable 
social events of Commencement Week. 

Officers 

President Lester E. Bond 

Vice-President Mary B. Boggs 

Secy.-Treas Andrew B. "Waggoner 

32 



COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS 



The College Monthly 

Editorial Staff: 
Geo. T. Liddell, Editor-in-Chief. 
A. B. Waggoner, Athenian. 
Grace Groenendyke, Bainonian. 
Edna Dawson, Theta Epsilon. 
Ralph W. Lloyd. Y. M. C. A. 
Julia H. Dillon, Y. W. C. A, 
John A. Hyden, Athletics. 
Mary Kate Rankin, Exchange. 
H. J. Bassett, '04, Alumni. 
Edgar L. McBee, Business Manager. 



The Chilhowean 

The College Year Book. 
Published by members of the Senior 
Class. 



The Maryville Hand Book 

Published annually by the Christian 
Associations. 



The Bulletin 

Official publication of the College, the 
first number of which is the College Cat- 
alogue. 



ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



Athletics are conducted under the aus- 
pices of the Maryville College Athletic 
Association, with a supervision b3' the 
Athletic Board of Control, composed of 
representatives from the student body, 
the Faculty, and the town of Maryville. 

All students of the College are mem- 
bers of the Athletic Association without 
fee, and are entitled to a vote in all its 
meetings. Season tickets admitting the 
holder to all games of Football, Basket- 
ball and Baseball are furnished by the 
Association at a total cost of about $3.00 
for the year. 

Members of the 'Varsity Football, Bas- 
ketball and Baseball Teams and win- 
ners of points in Intercollegiate track 
meets are entitled to wear the 'Varsity 
"M." 



Captains of Maryville Teams 

Football Lon Badgett 

Basketball Boys Reid Garrison 

Basketball Girls Eva Samsel 

Baseball Chas. E. Dawson 

Track Carl E. Smock 



Managers of Maryville Teams 

Football, 1913 Jas. F. Brittain, Jr. 

Basketball Boys, 1912-13, R. Wood Wright 

Basketball Girls, 1912-13, 

Mayme R. Maxey 
Baseball, 1913 Ralston W. Carver 

Track, 1912-13 David W. Proffitt 

Tennis, 1912-13 Laurence L. Cross 

Physical Director Lester E. Bond 

::i 






ATHLETIC BOARD OF CONTROL 



1913-1914 

President Wiley B. Rutledge, Jr. 

Vice-President Jas. F. Brittain, Jr. 

Secretary Edwin R. Hunter 

Treasurer David J. Brittain 

Official Buyer Prof. F. L. Proffitt 

Faculty Representative 

Pres. S. T. Wilson 

Faculty Representative 

Prof. F. M. McClenahan 

Town Representative 

Dr. J. A. McCulloch 

Town Representative 

Charles D. Chandler 

Student Representative 

Charles E. Dawson 

Student Representative Pat Quinn 

Student Representative 

Alma M. Armstrong 

Student Representative 

Madge T. Reagan 



35 



STANDING TRACK RECORDS 



Baseball Throw — S. R. Newman, 125 
yards. 

One Hundred Yards — R. L. Houston, 10 
2-5 seconds; C. E. Smock, 10 2-5 seconds. 

Putting 16-lb. Shot— J. L. Jones, 36 
feet 4 inches. 

Running Broad Jump — A. H. Fillers, 20 
feet 5% inches. 

Mile Run — W. A. Freidinger, 4 minutes 
58 3-4 seconds. 

Standing Broad Jump— T. W. Belk, 10 
feet 5 1-4 inches. 

Half Mile Run— F. L. Miller, 2 minutes 
10 1-5 seconds. 

High Jump — E. L. Clemens, 5 feet 6 
3-4 inches. 

One Mile Relay — Freshmen 1916, 3 
minutes 52 seconds. 

Pole Vault— E*. L. Clemens, 10 feet 2 
inches. 

16-lb. Hammer Throw — S. R. Newman, 
101 feet 1 inch. 

Discus Throw— T. Jennings, 102 feet 1 
inch. 

120-yard Hurdles— R. L. Houston, 20 
seconds; R. M. Rankin, 20 seconds. 

120-yard Low Hurdles— Smith O'Hair, 
17 1-5 seconds. 

Quarter Mile Run— H. W. Threlkeld, 53 
seconds. 

220 -yard Low Hurdles— W. C. Freels, 
28 2-5 seconds. 

Forty Yard Dash — W. S. Green and D. 
McDonald, 5 seconds. 

36 



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Chattanooga Univ. 

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TRAMPS FROM MARYVILLE 

To Look Rock, a prominent point on 
Chilhowee Mountain; overlooks Maryville, 
Knoxville, and much of the East Tennes- 
see Valley from the Smoky Range to the 
Cumberland Range. Eleven miles south 
of Maryville, two miles from Montvale 
Springs. 

To Thunderhead Mountain, one of the 
highest points in the Smoky Mountain 
Range. About forty miles southeast of 
Maryville. Railroad to within five miles. 

To Gregory's Bald, about same height 
as Thunderhead Mountain, and ten miles 
west of it on the main ridge of the 
Smokies. These two points are of special 
interest, as they are the "real wild moun- 
tains," with plenty of game for sports- 
men. 

To Abram's Falls. A fall of sixty feet 
in a large mountain creek in the west 
end of Cade's Cove, between Chilhowee 
Mountain and Smoky Mountain, twenty- 
five miles south of Maryville. Plenty of 
fine mountain scenery and game. 

To Sheep-Pen Cave. A large cave in 
the high marble bluffs on the Tennessee 
River nine miles west of Maryville, two 
miles from Louisville. Excellent swim- 
ming and boating. 



DRIVES FROM MARYVILLE 

To Montvale Springs, a beautiful sum- 
mer resort at the foot of Chilhowee 
Mountain, nine miles south of Maryville. 
Beautiful mountain scenery and fine 
mineral and sulphur water. 

To Walland, a small town in Little 
River Gap of Chilhowee Mountain. Fine 
river and mountain scenery; ten miles 
southeast of Maryville. 

To Wildwood, a summer resort with 
excellent mineral and sulphur water; 
good hotel; seven miles east of Maryville. 

To Knoxville, largest city in East Ten- 
nessee. Sixteen miles north of Maryville; 
good pike road. 

To Louisville, small town on L. & N. 
Railway and Tennessee River. Good 
boating; seven miles west of Maryville; 
pike road. 

38 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



1913-1914 



Rev. Samuel Tyndale Wilson, D. D., 
President 



I. ITS PURPOSE 

To give its students a thorough, modern 
Christian education. 

II. ITS PAST 

Founded in 1819 by Rev. Isaac Ander- 
son. D. D., and the Synod of Tennessee, 
it has contributed ninety-four years' 
worthy service to the carrying out of the 
purpose of its founder. Thousands of its 
former students are scattered over ibe 
world. 

III. ITS PRESENT 

Every passing year shows increasing 
prosperity and brings a brighter outlook. 
The enrollment of the institution has 
steadily increased until at present it num- 
bers seven hundred and two students. 
Nearly five hundred of these are Tennes- 
seans, while two hundred and ten come 
from thirty-eight states and countries 
other than Tennessee. 

IV. ITS PLANT 

It has property of all kinds, amounting 
to $800,000; eleven buildings, water works, 
sewerage, steam heat, electric lights and 
bathrooms. 



V. ITS CURRICULUM 
It offers as courses of study, nine 
groups of studies leading to the degree 
of B. A.: Classical, Modern Languages, 
Science, Mathematics, Education, Eng- 
lish Literature and History, Philosophy 
and Psychology, Economics and Political 
Science, and General. 

VI. ITS OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

1. Preparatory — Four years' course of- 
fering sixteen units. 

2. Bible Training— Thorough instruc- 
tion in the English Bible and Mission 
methods. 

3. Teachers' — Six years' course. Cer- 
tificate granted. 

4. Bookkeeping — Business college sys- 
tem. 

5. Music — Vocal and instrumental 
courses leading to graduation. 

6. Expression — Course leading to grad- 
uation. 

7. Art — Drawing free. Painting in oil 
and water colors. 

VII. ITS HEALTHFULNESS 
Maryville is located in a country that 
has long been a health resort. Mountain 
ozone, pure water, altitude 1,000 feet, 
campus of 235 acres. Gymnasium. In- 
door and outdoor sports. Manual labor. 
VIII. ITS MORAL ATMOSPHERE 
Tennessee has no saloons. Maryville is 
a quiet, law-abiding town, filled with 
church-going people. The College is 
strongly Christian, and the discipline is 
careful. The Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. 
A. are very efficient. The Bible is a text- 
book for every student. 

IX. ITS INEXPENSIVENESS 

1. Tuition $6.00 a term. Incidental fee 
$1.00 a term. No other incidentals ex- 
cept in the Science laboratories. 

2. Room rent for each student, with 
two in a room, $15 to $32 a year. 

3. Board in Co-Operative Boarding 
Club of 400 members, $1.75 a week. 

4. Text-books rented. General Libra- 
ry free. 

For catalogues address Registrar of 
Maryville College, Maryville. Tenn. 

40 



ONE 

MINUTE 

PLEASE! 



BEFORE 

MAKING YOUR 

PURCHASE, PLEASE 

CONSULT THIS HAND BOOK. 

PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 

AND TELL THEM YOU SAW 

THEIR AD IN THIS 

BOOK. DON'T 

FORGET. 









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Good 

ADVICE 



Go. To 

WELLS BROTHERS 

For 

EXPERT 

PRESCRIPTION 

SERVICE. 

Drink at our Fountain. 



You are Always Welcome at 



The Nyal Store 



Phone 68. 



43 



YOU can depend on 
artistic printing, correct 
spelling, neat arrange- 
ment, prompt delivery, 
and classy paper when 
you order from 

The Enterprise Print Shop 



Maryville, Tennessee. 




Special attention is given to Class and 
Society printing. Headquarters for type- 
writer paper. 

Recommendations: Those who have 
had us do their work. 

JAMES B. HEDGE, Jr., Proprietor. 

4 4 



45 



46 



Don't 
Be a Tight- Wad 

BE A SPORT 

and 

GET YOUR CLOTHES PRESSED 

at the 

Student's Pressing 
Club 



Reeves & Parks 

Proprietors. 



Work called for and delivered. Lo- 
cated in basement of Carnegie. 



ANN'OD 

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PREMIER X. 
OF TI 

ATTRACTIC 

Chicago Glee Club 
Byron W. King 
The 



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Apollo Concert Co. 3 
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52 



SOUTH SIDE STORE 

Feasl Supplies 
Notions 
Dry Goods 

Stationery, Confectionery, Toilet Articles. 

F. R. Babcock & Co. 

Two Blocks South of the Campus. 
Phone 141. 

John A. Goddard 
Dental Surgeon 



Students cordially invited to call when 
in need of dental work. Fair treatment 
and satisfaction guaranteed. 



Office, up stairway next door to Badg- 
ett Company. 

BOTH PHONES: 
Peoples' 241. Bell 56 

53 



College Men! 

Take Notice 

Hall's 

"On the Square" 

Is the real 

STYLE 'HEADQUARTERS 

IN 

EAST TENNESSEE 
Knoxville 

B O iB 

54 



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55 



56 



Woods & Taylor 

Knoxville 

THE PROGRESSIVE 
STORE 



CORRECT CLOTHES FOR MEN AND 
WOMEN. 



Students: You are always welcome at 
the "New Daylight Corner" — we'll greet 
you gladly — we'll treat you kindly — we'll 
appreciate your patronage. 



"LEARN The Woods & Taylor Way" 

Woods & Taylor 

Wall and Market. Knoxville, Tenn. 



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60 



Clark & Jones 

The Complete Music Store 

510 GAY STREET. 
KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE. 
Offer for your convenience a 

Mail Order Department 

Service second to none in the South. 

All orders filled the day received, from 
a stock well selected from the foremost 
presses of the world. 

A postal card will get our catalogs and 
place you on our mailing list to receive 
the supplements as they come out from 
time to time. 

LET US FILL ALL YOUR ORDERS. 



61 



4 M 5^^^^HW M ^W^^♦«J^«J M i M J^♦I*^ 4 »♦«5^ M JK , 



The City Bakery 



CARTER BROS., Proprietors. 

We welcome all college students. Here 
you will find the most convenient place 
in the city to get your meals. We carry 
a complete line of fresh breads cakes and 
pies. 

TRY OUR FOUNTAIN DRINKS. 
THEY ARE GREAT!!! 

Ice Cream delivered to any part of the 
city. Be sure to give us a call. 



62 






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66 



We Want Your Business 



HARDWARE 
HOUSE FURNISHINGS 
SPORTING GOODS 
FARM MACHINERY 
FERTILIZERS 



Lowe-Hord 

Hardware 
Co. 

ON MARKET SQUARE 
KNOXVILLE, :— :— : TENNESSEE. 



67 



W V «M W fi&jy % .<?M fe $>;J) 1 &»]) % ($»p 



THE OLD RELIABLE. 
Over 20 Years of Successful Banking. 

The Bank of Maryville 

CAPITAL and SURPLUS $70,000. 



Our facilities for taking care of our 
customers are unsurpassed. We will 
highly appreciate any business you may 
intrust to us. 

YOUR DEPOSITS 
Will receive our best attention. Money 
loaned on satisfactory terms. Interest 
paid on specified time deposit. 



OFFICERS: 

Will A. McTeer President 

J. A. Goddard Vice-President 

Jo Burger Cashier 

J. A. Cox Asst. Cashier 



1 <%j \sjhs hjEis hj$jji h$J k$J 

69 






Every Modern Facility for the Production 

of High Class Lithographing 

and Printing. 



College Catalogs and Annuals 
of the Better Class. 



COMMERCIAL STATIONERS. 
ENVELOPE MAKERS. 



State and Union Streets. 

KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE 

70 



71 



72 




7:: 



Be Sure to Remember 

The 
Lyceum Course 

When figuring the amount of cash you 

will need to see you thru College for the 

year, you should include the cost of the 

following: 

Y. M. C. A. MEMBERSHIP PLEDGE 

LYCEUM COURSE 

LITERARY SOCIETY FEE 

ATHLETIC TICKETS 

and a year's subscription to the 
COLLEGE MONTHLY 



These are necessities, not luxuries. 



75 



E. H. KEY 

Boots and Shoes 

REPAIRING NEATLY DONE ON 
SHORT NOTICE. 

Students' Patronage Solicited. 

MARYVILLE, TENNESSEE 

GREENLEE 

DINING 

Hall 



ROOMS AND BOARD. 

The place where you can get big 
home-cooked meals at a price 
that you can afford. 
Special attention to Athletic Teams, 
Committee Meetings, Class Parties, 
Lyceum Parties and Banquets. Ev- 
erything clean and sanitary. 



77 





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CASH RINGS LOUD AT 



B 



eamans 



219 Gay Street. 

Knoxville's 

ONLY SPOT CASH STORE 

Beaman's 

Diamond Shoes 

For Men and Women 

$3. 50 and$4. 00 

Have only one fault — they last too long. 

GUARANTEED BURROJAP PATENTS 

For Men 

$4.00 and $5.00. 

See our Ladies' Shoes at $2, $2.50 and $3. 

81 



Huddle^ton 
and Tinsley 

The Students' Dentists 
DENTISTRY IN ALL ITS BRANCHES. 
Office: 2nd Floor Ellis-Chandler building. 
MAIN STREET MARYVILLE 

G. A. Toole 

Staple and Fancy 

G ROCERIES 

Confectioneries, Frurts, Nuts, 

Raisins, 

Roasted and Salted Peanuts 



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85 



Photos 



of 

QUALITY, STYLE and PERMANENCE. 

Any size and any price. 

If we can't please you, it don't cost you 
a cent. All we ask is a chance to please 
you in work and price. All work de- 
livered in from 1 to 4 days. 

We take the utmost pains with your 
Kodak Finishing and save you half on 
the cost. 

A. L. Butcher, Prop. 
Cyco Studio 

Over Kithcart Harness Store 
MARYVILLE, — — TENNESSEE 






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•>>)) %$jj) iyi^J %]gjj) %MJ%^J%Mp 

OFFICERS: 

W. L. Russell Acting President 

John M. Clark Cashier 

J. E. Rowan Asst. Cashier 

Statement of the Condition of 

Bank of Blount County 

Resources: 

Loans and Discounts $230,959.32 

Overdrafts 5,412.60 

Banking House, Furniture and 

Fixtures, etc., 8,094.95 

Due from Banks ...... 89,538.11 

Cash In Vault 12,084.77 

$346,089.75 

Liabilities: 

Capital Stock $50,000.00 

Undivided Profits 13,770.75 

Individual Deposits 282,319.00 

$346,089.75 

DIRECTORS: 

R. G. Montgomery 
C. T. Cates, Sr. 
S. L. Davis 
John M. Clark 

E. M. Huffstetler 
T. F. Cooper 
J. N. Badgett 
W. L. Russell 
M. H. Gamble 
C. T. Cates, Jr. 



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Fashionable 
Launderers 

"PUT YOUR DUDS IN OUR SUDS" 

Give Us Your French Dry Cleaning and 
Laundry Work. 

WE WILL PLEASE YOU. 

Bell Laundry Go. 

642-644 Asylum Avenue 

KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

Branch Office, 309 W. Clinch Avenue 

A 



BELL 
IMINDK. 



Student Representative: 

PAT QUINN 

Calls for and delivers work on College Hill 



91 



92 



Kern 's 
Candies 

Are Renowned For 

QUALITY, 

PURITY and 

EXCELLENCE 

A Box Is Always Acceptable 

KERN'S 

ICE CREAM 

BREAD and 

CAKES 

Lend the Finishing Touch to Wed 

dings and Receptions. 

"If it's from Kern's it's the Best" 

Correspondence solicited. 

Peter Kern Co. 

KNOXVILLE, TENN. 
93 



Go to 

J.F.REAGANS 

FOR 

Confectioneries 

There you will Find the 

PALACE ICE CREAM PARLORS 

Delicious Drinks at the Fountain 

Special Attention Given to Class and 

Social Parties. 

Cream Delivered to all Parts of the City 



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Hope Bros. 

519 Gay Street 

Knoxville, Tennessee 



Leading Jewelers 

of 

Ea£l Tennessee 

ANNOUNCEMENTS, INVITATIONS and 

VISITING CARDS 

Richly Engraved in our Own Plant. 



Established 1868 



96 



CALENDAR— COLLEGIATE YEAR 

1913 



IEPTEMBER 



M T WT 


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OCTOBER 

.... 1 2 31 4 


6 7 8 9 10 11 


13 14 15 16jl7!l8 


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27 28 29 


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31 





NOVEMBER 



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301 .... 









DECEMBER 




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JANUARY 




APRIL 




.. 1 2; 3 




1 2 


3 4 


5 6 


7 8 9 10 


5 6 7 


8 9 


10 11 


12 13 


14J1516 1" 


12l 13 14 


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17 IS 


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2122 23 24 


19 20 21 


22 23 


24 25 


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26 27 28 


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MAY 


2 3 4i 5 6 7 
9 10 11112 13 14 






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6 7 


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24 25 26 
31 .. .. 


27 28 


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MARCH 


JUNE 


2 


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11 


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27 28 


21 


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26 27 


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28 


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