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Full text of "Maryville College Handbook [M Book] 1922-1923"

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The Webb Studio 



Photos of Permanency and 
of Character 

KODAK FINISHING 
A Specialty 

The Best is the Cheapest 
Always 

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The 

Maryville College 
Hand-book 



Volume VIII 



Published by 

THE YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN 

ASSOCIATION 

and 

THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN 

ASSOCIATION 

of 

MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



Publication Committee 

Burr Bassel, Louise Gollmar, Dorothy Stivers, 

Warren W. Warman 



1922-1923 



-1— 



Maryville to Knoxville 



REO BUS LINE 



LEAVE KNOXVILLE 
6:45 A. M. 
9:30 A. M. 
11:30 A. M. 
3:00 P. M. 
5:50 P. M. 

LEAVE MARYVILLE, AT MITCHELL'S 
DRUG STORE 

5:45 A. M. 
8:30 A. M. 
12:30 P. M. 
2:00 P. M. 
4:30 P. M. 
5:30 P. M. 

NEW PHONES 2970 AND 1909-W 
—2— 



INDEX 

Page 

Adelphic Union 39 

Advice to Freshmen 15-16 

Alpha Sigma 37 

Athenian 38 

Athletic Association 22 

Bainonian 38 

Band 40 

Basketball Tournament 22 

Bell Schedule 14 

Big Sisters 30 

Blue Ridge 29 

Boy's Rules 19 

Cabinet Council 32 

Chilhowean 33 

CVass Customs 45 

College Calendar 8-9 

Debate and Oratory 41 

Dramatic Club 39 

Echo 33 

February Meetings 34 

Football Schedule 19 

Fred Hope Fund 34 

Friendship Council 31 

Glee Club 40 

Graduate Recitals 36 

Hikes 25 



If You Be A Girl 17-18 

Last Lap of Your Journey 12 

Life Work Conference 26 

Mail 14 

May Day 31 

Ministerial Association 35 

Montvale Hike 32 

Opening Social Events 13 

Orchestra 40 

President's Message 6 

Prizes and Contests 42-43 

Religious Meetings 27 

Schedule, First Semester 47 

Schedule, Second Semester 48 

Setting-up Conference 26 

Songs 21 

Southern College 28 

Student Volunteers 35 

Sunday Y. W. Services 31 

Swimming Pool and Y. M. C. A 3 

Theta Epeilon 37 

Track 23-24 

Vesper and Mid- Week Services 36 

Who's Who 46 

Wilson, President S. T 7 

Yells 20 

Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 11 

Y. M. C. A. Rooms 27 

Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 10 

Y. W. C. A. Rooms 30 



PRESIDENT WILSON'S MESSAGE 

This valuable little book has involved much 
labor and expense on the part of the Y. M. 
C. A. and Y. W. C. A. committees that have 
prepared it. The book and the labor that 
fnamed it have, however, been freely given for 
the advantage of the new students. This time- 
ly and welcome service is typical of the year- 
long effoi-ts of these Associations — everything 
they do is done with a view to contributing 
something helpful to the welfare of the stu- 
dent body of the institution. And this kind 
of generous service has been rendered the 
young men for forty-six years by the Y. M. 
C. A., and the young women for thirty-five 
years by the Y. W. C. A. 

Surely such a record of unselfish service 
calls for gratitude and cooperation on the 
part of all who love the Christian ideals and 
believe in the historic mission of M«aryville. 
The president and the faculty are deeply grate- 
ful to the Associations for their inestimable 
service to the College, and pray that during 
the year 1922-23 large accessions to the ranks 
of the fiaithful Y workers from among both 
old and new students may be enjoyed, and 
that God may abundantly bless the work of 
the new year. 

SAMUEL TYNC'ALE WILSON 




PRES. S. T. WILSON, D. D., LL. D. 



THE COLLEGE CALENDAR FOR 

1922-1923 

1922— 

Sept. 12, Tuesday, 8:00 a. m.-4 :00 p. m.— Reg- 
istration for the first semester. 

Sept. 13, Wednesday, 8:30 a. m. — Opening 
chapel service. 

Sept. 13, Wednesday, 9:00 a. m.-3 :00 p. m.— 
Organization of classes. 

Sept. 16, Saturday, 2 :30 p. m. — Faculty Re- 
ception. 

Sept. 16, Saturday, 8:00 p. m. — Y. M. C. A. 
and Y. W. C. A. receptions. 

Nov. 30, Thursday, — Thanksgiving Ray. 

Dec. 20, Wednesday, 3:00 p. m. — Christmas 
holidays begin. 

1923— 

Jan. 2, Tuesday, 8 :10 a. m. — Class work re- 
sumed. 

Jan. 23-27, Tuesday-Saturday, — First semester 
exiaminations. 

Jan. 27, Saturday, — First semester ends. 

Jan. 30, Tuesday, 8:10 a. m. — Second semester 
begins. 

Feb. 4, Sabbath, 6:30 p. m.— February Meet- 
ings begin. 

Feb. 7, Wednesday, 8 :30 a. m. — Meeting of the 
Directors. 

May 30, Wednesday, — Exiaminations begin. 



June 1, Friday, 8:00 p. m. — Graduation exer- 
cises of the Expression Department. 

June 2, Saturday 3 :00 p. m. — Annual exhibit 
of the Art Department. 

June 2, Saturday, 8 :00 p. m. — Graduation ex- 
ercises of the Music Department. 

June," 3, Sabbath, 10 :30 a. m. — Baccalaureate 
sermon. 

June 3, Stabbath, 6 :30 p. m. — Annual address 
to the Y. M. C A. a-nd Y. W. C. A. 

June 4, Monday, 8 :00 p. m. — Bates Prize Ora- 
torical Contest. 

June 5, 6, Tuesday, Wednesday, — Examina- 
tions. 

June 5 .Tuesday, 3 :00 p. m. — Annual exhibit 
of the Home Economics Department. 

Ji^ne 6, Wednesday, 7 :30 p. m. — Senior cLass 
play. 

June 7, Thursday, 8 :30 a. m. — Meeting of the 
Directors. 

June 7, Thursday, 10 :00 a. m. — Commence- 
ment. 

June 7, Thursday, 12 :00 m. — Annual Alumni 
Dinner. 

June 7, Thursday, 8 :00 p. m. — Social Reunion. 



PLAN YOUR WORK— WORK YOUR PLAN 



Y. W. C. A. CABINETS— SENIOR 

President Catherine Wilson 

V. Pres Alice McAnulty 

Secretary Mary Braady 

Treasurer Margaret McKinney 

W. R Sarah Witherington 

Devotional Winona Johnston 

Bible Study Ethel Swindler 

World Fellow Dorothy Winters 

Library Lucy Waddel 

Social Mary McSpadden 

Music M. E. Clemens 

Publicity Edith Longsworth 

Editor Reva Rankin 

Friendship C Margaret L^uke 

Social Service Lovise Sheddan 

JUNIOR 

President Mary Robison 

V. Pres Geraldine Odell 

Secretary Harriet Green 

Treasurer V. Witherington 

W. R Alice Robison 

World Fellow Dorothy Dickerson 

Bible Study Louise Gollm»ar 

Program Henrietta Jackson 

Social Service Eugenia Evans 

Social Hazel Bevan 

Music Sallie Higginbothom 

Publicity Mabel Higginbothom 

Library Alice Johnson 

Editor Evelyn Sandine 

—10— ' 



Y. M. C. A. CABINET 

Executive Committee 

President Roy S. Buffiat 

Vice Pres Sam. H. Franklin 

Secretary Emery C. Fritz 

Treasurer Beryl Pritchard 

Committeemen 

Athletic P. G. Rice 

Bible Study Francis Kinsler 

Conventions ■ John Hall 

Deputations Chester Karrick 

Lyceum W. S. Thompson 

Membership Harold Y. Van Orden 

Mission Study Arthur Kinsler 

Music Robert King 

Publicity R. A. N. Wilson 

Religious Meetings W. W. Warman 

Social Jesse Aldridge 

Social Service Ralph Armstrong 

LAST LAP OF YOUR JOURNEY 

On hearing "All out for Knoxville" you 
stride into one of the Knoxville stations 
(Southern or L & N). Maryville is not far 
now. Inquire at the information bureau as 
to the time that the train or bus leaves. Get 
on the tnain or bus and hold fast to your 
baggage checks. When you arrive in Mary- 
ville give your check to the college truckman 
for the college handles all luggage free. There 
will be some Y. M. or Y. W. reception com- 

—11— 



mitteeman to meet you. These committeemen 
serve as "walking informiation," so aslc them 
all youx' questions. They will lead you up the 
cindei' path and to the dormitory you have 
signed for. Get your key and, yea verily hold 
it fast. Next attend to getting your books 
(be patient) and then start to classes — a good 
start means a great deal. The student body 
welcomes you to Maryville. 

OPENING SOCIAL EVENTS 

People are naturally social beings and the 
sociial life at Maryville is well provided for. 
There ai-e occasions for the timid, for the 
social, for the religious, and for the literary 
studen:. 

The Y. M. and Y. W. play an important role 
on College Hill. It is through these organiza- 
tions that a great part of the social activities 
are conducted. Various receptions are given 
the first week of school for the benefit of the 
student and faculty. Then the well known 
Maryvillian game of "snap" is played. Sprin- 
kled through the year rare week-end hikes, 
games, plays, etc., which you will enjoy. 

The societies have prepared a welcome. The 
girls' societies, Bainonian and Theta Epsilon, 
give a joint reception in the woods around a 
oamp fire. The boys are welcome to either 
Alpha Sigma or Athenian receptions which 
take place in the society halls, with "eats." 

—12— 



Every boy and girl becomes acquainted with 
the "House in the Woods." Informal gather- 
ings are held there, thanks to the hospitality 
of Dr. and Mrs. Stevenson. By the time you 
are ready for work you are no longer a 
stranger but one of the great student body. 

MAIL 

Bells of dvty may not sound so pleasant, 
but that mail bell rings even more merrily 
than the dinner bell. So be sure to warn 
your friends to address your mail carefully, 
as follows : Miss Ima Fresh Man, No. 13 
Pearsons Hall, College Station, Maryville, Ten- 
nessee. If you room in town but wish your 
mail sent here, "College Station " is sufficient. 



-13- 



LIVING BY BELL SCHEDULE 

Rising Bell 6 :00 

Breakfast 6 :51 

Chapel, 1st 7 :50 

Chapel, 2nd 8 :05 

Chapel, 3rd 8:10 

End 1st Period 9:25' 

End 2nd Period 10:20 

End 3rd Period 11:15 

End 4th Period 12 :10 

Dinner 12:21 

Beginning 5th class 1 :10 

End 5th class 2:05 

Close of classes 3 :00 

Supper 5 :41 

Study, 1st 6 :50 

Study, 2nd 7 :00 

Sunday 

Rising 6 :00 

Breakfast 6 :51 

S. S. Bell 9:00 

Dinner 12:21 

Y. M. C. A 1:00 

Y. W. C. A 1:25 

Supper 5:41 

Vesper 6 :40 



BETTER LATE THAN NEVER 
—14— 



ADVICE TO FRESHMAN 

You are about to become your own boss in 
one sense of the word. At home you were 
under the gx-idance and supervision of your 
parents. They probably told you what you 
could or could not do. But there is no one 
aere to help you make the 1000 and 1 little 
decisions as well as the more weighty ones. 
So it is the purpose of this article — not to 
preach a sermon, but to give you the benefit 
of the brief experience we have had as college 
students. 

You are one of the privileged few, one of 
the select as it were in having the opportunity 
to attend college because only about two per 
cent of our total population have this oppor- 
tunity. Ponder then in your mind the tre- 
mendovs responsibility that you have to so- 
ciety, to the home folks, and to yourself. 

In realizing this responsibility you will 
probably feel that every minute of your time 
must be put in on studies, and it is true enough 
that knowledge is power, but the term does 
not mean knowledge of books only. I would 
not say neglect yoi^r studies for other activities, 
and neither would I say neglect other activi- 
ties for your studies. There is always that 
"happy medium" that one should strive to 
maintain. 

—15— 



By all maans get into athletics — for your 
own health if for no other reason. You may 
not be a basketball star, a football hero, or 
a tennis champion, but you can leiarn to do 
these things as easily as you can learn the 
principles of psychology, social science, eco- 
nomics, philosophy and other mental activi^ 
ties. Study regularly, consistently, land con- 
scientiously, and play in the same way. Make 
every minute count. Athletics are not the 
only activities outside of class work — there 
are the literary societies, Y. M. C. A., Y. W. 
C, A., the church, and various clubs. They 
belong to you »and it is in them that you find 
your opportunities to serve. Make them better 
because you are a member. 

Last of all, I would not forget friendships. 
I do not believe a Senior ever comes to the 
end of his or her college days without real- 
izing to the fullest extent all that his or her 
friends have meant to him. There are only 
a few whom you call your best friends, but 
your acquaintances are many. In summing up 
this "advice" we find that the best student 
is the normal one who is not a bookworm, 

—16— 



but lat the same time makes his studies worth 
while, never forgetting the responsibility rest- 
ing upon him ; the one who does the most for 
others thus learning by experience the value 
and meaning of service ; and the one who 
keeps before himself always the Christian 
ideals which are the foundation of life itself. 



BEING COLLEGE BRED DOES NOT MEAN 
FOUR YEARS' LOAF. 



—17— 



IP YOU BE A GIRL 

Summer months hold busy, happy days foi" 
the girl mjaking ready to go away to school 
for the first time. Thei'e are clothes, dresser 
scarfs, bed sets, and curtains to keep the 
hands busy, and day dreams to fill the mind. 
We are hoping that when you come to Mary- 
ville, all these happy draams will be fulfilled, 
and we are writing this for you so that you 
may know what to bring with you and what 
to expect to find here awaiting you. When 
you plan your clothes, let most of them be 
suitable for school. Of course you lare plan- 
ning to make your rtx>m look nice, and you 
are probably wondering how that can best be 
done. Each room is furnished with a dresser, 
study table, two chairs, and two beds, or, 
maybe one a double-decker. That sounds like 
very little, but with a small rug or two, 
some pretty curtains, dresser and table scarfs, 
bed sets, trunk covers and cioshions you can 
make your room very attractive — and don't 
forget the pictures and pennants. 

On Saturday night there is no study hour 
and after the literary societies come the feeds 
and jolly times. Bring a few dishes and 
spoons with you and if you have a chafing 
dish or like don't leave it at home. 

Of course, you know that there are limits 
to the number of times you may go to town 

—18— 



or to the movies, but there are other ways 
to enjoy yourself. If it is a rainy day, there 
is the Y. W. reading room with its books, 
magazines, victrola and comfortable chairs. 
Then there are the athletic spoi-ts. Every 
girl should come prepared to swim, play tennis, 
and hike, for to do these things is what the 
healthy Maryville girls enjoy most. 

Perhaps you have been wondering when 
you can be with the boys, "moonshining" is 
the Maryville ruame for it. You may moon- 
shine until 1 :10 every day (except Sunday) 
after dinner, from 1 :30 to 4 :30 on Monday, 
for Monday is oi-r holiday, and to all games. 
Snaps, class parties, and entertainments at 
the chapel. You may also moonshine at church 
and then home. 

Come to Maryville with a smile ; we will 
greet you with a smile ; then we'll smile to- 
gether all the year through. 



B NATURAL 
—19— 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 

E. T. Norrr,aI, Sept. 30 — home. 

U. T., October 7 — Knoxville. 

Milligan, October 14 — home. 

Transylvania, October 21 — away. 

Open, October 28. 

Mercer, November 4 — Macon. 

U. T. Medics., November 11 — Knoxville. 

Emory and Henry, November 18 — Emory. 

Cumberland U., November 25 — home. 

King College, November 30 — Bristol. 

BOY'S RULES 

When you get your i-oom key you will re- 
ceive a copy of the rules for your benefit. 
Read them, but better yet, remember them — 
you may be sorry if you don't. Tobacco in 
any form is not allowed. Maryville realizes 
that better work and stronger men come from 
shunning the weeds, cuds, and butts. When 
Sunday comes do not forget Sunday School 
and Church — you are required to attend these 
services, but Vesper may substitute the church 
service. No sports are allowed on the Sabbath, 
but you can find a cool spot in the woods to 
talk with your boy friends. First, however, 
attend the Y. meeting (at one o'clock), then 
write Mother, or some relative or friend. 
Prof. Hyden and Mr. McCurry, Carnegie Hall 
proctors, will be your good friends and help 
you if you will let them. 

—20— 



YELLS 

Howee-How 
Howee-how Chilhowee 
Maryville, Mai^ville, Tennessee 
Who-rah, who-rah 
Maryville, Maryville 
Rah, rah, rah. 

(repeat) 

M-A-R-Y-V-I-L-L-E 

M-a-r-y ville 

M-a-r-y ville 

M-A-R-Y-V-I-L-L-E 
Maryville, Maryville, Maryville. 

V-I-C tory 

V-I-C ^tory 

V-I-C-T-O-R-Y 

Victory, Victory, Victory, 

"Fifteen" 

Raw — naw — raw — raw — ra w 

Raw — r*aw — raw — raw — raw 

Raw — raw — raw — raw — raw 

TEAM, TEAM, TEAM 

Three Rays. 

Ra — ay 

Ra — ay, 

Ra — ay, 
TEAM, TEAM, TEAM 

BOOST— DON'T KNOCK 
—21— 



SONGS 

Maryville will shine to-night, 

Maryville will shine, 

Maryville will shine alright, 

Maryville will shine 

will pine to-night, 

will pine 

When the moon goes up 

And the sun goes down 

Maryville will shine. 

"Tune Hot Time" 
Cheer, Boys, cheer. 
Old M. C. has the ball. 
Cheer, Boys, cheer. 

Old has to fall. 

And when we hit that line 
There'll be no line at all 

There'll be a hot time in the old town to- 
night. 
Rah nah rah. Old M. C. has the ball 
We'll win this game or we'll eat them bones 

and all 
For when we kick that ball, there'll be no 

ball at all 
We'll have a victory to take home to-night. 
We come from College Hill 
We root for Mary\'ille 
Each boy is loyal, each girl is true 
We stand behind our men 
That's why they're sure to win 
What's the spirit of Maryville? (Leader) 
We're all for her. 



ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

With L. S. Honaker as coach of Miaryville 
athletics and hard-fighting taims composed of 
loyal men it is no wonder the A. A. made 
such a stride forward last year. Managing 
college sports is a big job, but with the sup- 
port from everyone, even the shouting students, 
another successful year in clean and fair 
athletics can be foreseen for 1922-23. Every- 
body get behind the A. A., and yell for all 
your might for the teams which don the 
orange-garnet uniforms. A new day has 
dawned for Maryville in athletics because she 
has a live coach, plenty of good material, 
added equipment, and a splendid new field. 

BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 

Besides the snappy varsity and peppy cliass 
games conducted every year a basketball tour- 
nament is held for the prep schools of East 
Tennessee on the college court. This tourna- 
ment is in charge of the Y. M. C. A. and 
promotes groat interest among the college 
students as well as nearby school representa- 
tives. Last year the Polytechnic School of 
Maryville won the loving cup only after a 
strenvous battle. If you want to see fast 
basketball — the kind that holds your interest 
to the end — be sure to see all the games of 
the tournament this year on our own court. 

—23— 



MARYVILLE FIELD DAY RECORDS 

100 yard dash, 1st, McGinley, 10 4-5 sec. 

120 yard high hurdles, McGinley, 18 sec. 

One mile run, Howell, 5 min. 2 3-5 sec. 

220 yard dash, McGinley, 23 2-5 sec. 

440 yard dash, James King, 59 sec. 

220 yard low hurdles, McGinley, 28 3-5 sec. 

880 yard dash, James King, 2 min. 27 1-5 sec. 

Two mile run, Howell, 11 min. 17 2-5 sec. 

Relay race, Athenian Soc, 4 min. 7 4-5 sec. 

Pole viault, Acton, 8 ft. 1 in. 

Shot-put, Thrower, 36 ft 2 in. 

High jump, Acton, 5 ft. 3 in. 

Discus throw, Wyncoop, 80 ft. 6 in. 

Broad jump, Acton, 20 ft. 3 in. 

Javelin throw, Jourolmon, 123 ft. 

Leading Countries 

(August 25, 1920) 

TRACK AND FIELD, SHOOTING, SKATING, 
YACHTING AND OTHER EVENTS .. 

United States 269 Holland 15 

Sweden 124 Canada 12 

Finland 112 Esthonia 8 

England 105 New Zealand 5 

Norway 66 Australia 5 

France 44 Czechoslovakia ... 4 

Italy 31 Spain 2 

Sovth Africa 20 Greece 2 

Belgium 18 Luxumburg 1 

Denmark 16 

—24— 



TRACK AND FIELD RECORDS OF 1920 
OLYMPIAD TRACK EVENTS 

100 Meter Dash— Won by Charles W. Paddock 

(U. S.) Time: 10 4-5 seconds. 
200 Meter Dash — Won by Allen Woodring 

(U. S.) Time: 22 seconds. 
400 Meter Run — Won by Rudd (South Africa). 

Time : 49 3-5 seconds. 
800 Meter Run— Won by Hill (EngHnd). 

Time 1 minute, 53 2-5 seconds. 
1.500 Meter Run— Won by Hill (England). 

Time: 4 minutes, 1 4-5 seconds. 
5,000 Meter Run— Won by Guillemot (France), 

Time: 14 minutes, 55 seconds. 
10,000 Meter Run— Won by Nurnii (Finland). 

Time : 31 minutes, 45 2-5 seconds. 
Marathon Run — Won by H. Kolehmainen 

(Finland). Time: 2 hours, 32 minutes, 

35 4-5 seconds. 
110 Meter Hurdles — Won by Thomson (Can- 
ada). Time: 14 4-5 seconds. 
10,000 Meter Walk — Won by Frigerio (Italy). 

Time: 48 minutes, 6 1-5 seconds. 
400 Meter Relay— Won by United States. 

Time : 42 1-5 seconds. 
1,600 Meter Relay— Won by England. Time: 

3 minutes, 22 1-5 seconds. 
3,000 Meter Team Race — Won by United 

States. Time : 8 minutes, 51 1-5 seconds. 
10,000 Meter Cross-Country Teatn— Won by 

Finland. 10 points. 

—25— 



ALL-HOUKD CHAMPIONSHIP 

Pentathlon — Won by Lehfonen (Finland). 

Decathlon — Won by Loveland (Norway). 

Field Events 

Running High Jump — Won by R. W. Ijandon 
(United States). Height: 6 feet 4 1-5 in. 

Running Broad Jump — Won by Peterson 
(Sweden). Distance: 23 feet 6 inches. 

Javelin Throw — Won by Myria (Finland). 
Distance : 215 feet, 9 inches. 

Shot Put— Won by Porkola (Finland). Dis- 
tance: 48 feet 9 inches. 

Pole Vault— Won by F. K. Foss (United 
States). Height: 13 feet 5 3-16 inches. 

Discus Throw — Won by Niklander (Finland). 
Distance: 146 feet 7 7-16 inches. 

Hammer Throw — Won by P. J. Ryan (United 
States). Distance: 173 feet 5 11-16 inches. 

Hop, Skip and Jump — Won by Timios (Fin- 
land). Distance: 47 feet 7 inches. 

HIKES 

This year has seen the beginning of a new 
organization that has long been needed at 
Maryville. Maryville's location near the beau- 
tiful Chilhowee's and the lofty Smokies, has 
natunally resulted in a great love among the 
students for the red-blooded spirit of hiking, 
and camping. For many years it h'as been 
a favorite method of spending week-ends 

—26— 



and holidays out in the mountains. Both 
boys and girls have availed themselves of 
these opportunities for good clean sport, but 
not until this year has any definite organi- 
zation been started for the directing and 
development of this great sport. 

The purpose of this organization is three- 
fold ; first, the development of physioal 
strength through clean exercise and out-door 
life ; second, the development and heighten- 
ing of a knowledge of, and a love for the 
"Great Outdoor" ; third, a more intimate 
knowledge of the mountaineers, less fortunate 
than ourselves because of less ladvantageovis 
environment, who are nevertheless of the 
purest blood found in America. 

Already many hikes and camps have been 
made by the members, so the first year of 
the life of the Hi-Trail Club has come to a 
successful close. The members are looking 
forward to next year with great hopes for 
many happy times and many hard, tough 
climbs. Let's go for a big year, and a' 
profitable one. 



ADELANTE, SIEMPRE ADELANTE. 
—27— 



THE Y. M.— Y. W. SETTING-UP CON- 
FERENCE 

Renewing an old and almost dead custom 
the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. Officials, 
Cabinet and Council Members, went lo Mont- 
vale, a' resort in the mount«alns some nine 
or ten miles south of Maryville, and there 
held a setting-up conference. 

A program for the coming year's work was 
thrashed out and all who attended the Con- 
ference returned to College Hill in a true 
spirit of service and consecration, prepared 
to carry out the heaviest and most effective 
year's program known for Maryville College 
Association work. 

THE Y. M.— Y. W. LIFE WORK CON- 
FERENCE 

There is not a student of 1922 who will 
forget the Life Work Conference held in 
March. The messages given by Dr. Weather- 
ford, Dr. Mitchell, Rev. Gilbert Lovell, and 
several other able speakers on Life Service 
and principles which should govern a choice 
of one's vocation were not only inspiring 
and instructive, but they were just the thing 
many students needed in helping them decide 
their life calling. 

Every new student should look forward to 

HOPE IS A DREAM OF MAN AWAKE. 
—28—. 



the coming Life Work Conference for it will 
be one of great portent and value in the lives 
of 'all students. Whether you have decided 
on the trend of your life or not the good this 
Conference will do you cannot be priced. 

Y. M. C. A. ROOMS 

When you hit the campus feeling a bit 
blue and homesick, go to the Association 
Rooms on the first floor of Bartlett and make 
yourself at home. There you will find mag- 
azines and books, piano -and music, a victrola. 
and a collection of pictures over which to 
ponder. 

If the dining hall menu doesn't suit your 
fancy, stroll over to the Y store and let the 
clerk fill that yearning. Then, if you have 
any complaints to make, or are in need of 
any assistance, call on the President and 
Secretary who room just above the veranda. 
They'll be glad to help you whether it is to 
find a room, to get into a table club, or to 
write to that girl back home. You see they've 
all been through it. 

SUNDAY Y. M. C. A. MEETINGS 

Without the religious services college life is 
not complete. One of the most worthwhile 
meetings at Maryville is the Sunday afternoon 
gathering of young men who hear and discuss 

—29— 



problems such as athletics, "callings", and 
topics of student interest that deal with the 
social aTid religious phase of life. Special 
music numbers are often rendered. 

Dr. Wilson, our beloved president, will 
address the first assembly on September 17. 
I)'on't forget to go to Rartlett Hall at one 
o'clock every Sunday, and when you leave 
the hill you won't forget or regret having 
attended the Y. Meetings. 

SOUTHERN COLLEGE OF YOUNG MEN'S 
CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS 

Professional School of Graduate Grade for 

Training Association Secretaries in 

all Departments of Work 

FOUR QUARTERS OF TWELVE 

W^EEKS EACH 

STUDENTS CAN ENTER AT OPENING OF 

ANY QUARTER WITHOUT HANDICAP 

Fall quarter begins at Nashville, Tennessee, 
Wednesday, September 27. 

Winter quarter begins Tuesday, January 2, 
1923. 

Spring quarter begins, Wednesday, March 21. 

Summer quarter "begins at Blue Ridge, N. 
C, Friday, June 15. 

Cooperation with George Peabody College 

WRITE THE FOLKS OFTEN 
—30— 



for Teachers, Seamati A. Knapp School of 
Country Life, Vanderbilt University, Vander- 
bilt School of Religion, and Vanderbilt Medical 
College. 

Seven special professors of the College "as- 
sisted by the best teachers from all Nashville 
colleges, representing twenty million dollars 
of endowment at our disposal. 

College graduates can take advanced work 
rand secure M. A. degree in either Vanderbilt 
or Peabody while pursuing Association studies. 
Much of Association College courses will covnt 
toward Master's degree in these institutions. 

Special courses without degree for men who 
have equivalent of High School training but 
less than Sophomore work in college. 

— For full details write for catalogue — 



-31- 



SOUTHERN COLLEGE OF YOUNG MEN'S 

CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS 

Nashville : : Tennessee 

BLUE RIDGE 

The great Student Conferences of the South- 
land are held at Blue Ridge each June. Mary- 
ville is always well lepresented. The As- 
sociations have a permanent loan from which 
delegates may borrow for expenses. A drive 
is made each spring for delegates, and in the 
fall these give their reports. 

The Conference lasts ten days. The program 
is one of inspiration and technical help and 
fellowship without which no Association can 
carry on an effective campus schedule. The 
institute hours meet the needs of the various 
classes of students, and the technical hour 
gives special training in committee efficiency. 
A World Foinim hour gives excellent oppor- 
tunity for a proper perspective of the inter- 
national sitvwtion, and the problems of 
Christianity. Addresses by such men as Eddy, 
Fosdick, Brockman, Weatherford, White, and 
Speer afford in themselves a rare treat. 

Dr. Stevenson, the College Pastor, was a 
member of the Conference Faculty this past 
summer. Every year several of the students 
are awarded special scholarships for work on 
the Blue Ridge summer staff. 

—32— 



Blue Ridge is located in the heart of the 
Blue Ridge Mountains and is ta wonderful place 
for rest and recreation as well as conference. 
Year by year, as the work of the Associations 
extends into other fields, the delegation will 
be increasing. No student should miss this 
wonderful opportunity of meeting with 700 
of the chosen college students of the South- 
land. 

Y. W. C. A. ROOMS 

Just think what a good time you've been 
having at home lately reading books and 
magazines. Do you know that in the Y. W. 
C. A. rooms you can have just as good a time? 
There are two large rooms in Thaw^ Hall which 
are for your use. One, the Assembly Hall ; 
the other, the reading room which is furnish- 
ed with comfortable upholstered chairs and 
davenports, reading tables and victrola. Books 
and magazines, which may be obtained at any 
time, supp'ly one with interesting and instruc- 
tive reading material. 

Girls, you are cordially invited to be at 
home in the rooms during recreation periods 
and to enjoy the good times that only a room 
of its kind can offer. 



HAPPINESS IS A HABIT 



Y. W. C. A. BIG SISTERS 

A Big Sister is a girl who knows and loves 
Maryville, and wants to help you, Miss New 
Girl, to know and love you too. First of all 
through a personal letter, she welcomes you 
to the Hill. Finally when you reach Maryville 
yovr Big Sister will greet you. She will take 
you to your room, and in her you will find 
a friend. Little Sister, who is eager and 
willing to help you, not only through the 
strangeness of the first few days, but who 
will stand by you all year long. 

THE Y. W. C. A. FRIENDSHIP COUNCIL 

The Friendship Council of the Y. W. C. A. 
is an organization composed of fifty Y. W. 
girls and serves as a link between the Cabinet 
and the whole membership. 

To know and be a friend to every girl on 
the hill ; to spread the spirit of friendship ; 
and to do this for the good of the Y. W. and 
the carrying out of its purpose — this is the 
task of the Friendship Council. 

SUNDAY Y. W. SERVICES 

On Sunday afternoon the two associations, 
junior and senior, meet in their rooms in 
Thaw Hall for short devotional services. These 
meetings are led by students themselves, as 

A FRIEND IN NEED IS A FRIEND INDEED 
—34— 



a rule, and are very beneficial as a training 
for Christian leadership. Excellent programs 
are being arranged for next year, and both 
associations expect good attendance. Start 
early, and get the habit — you won't be sorry. 

MAY DAY 

All credit for the beauty and greatness of 
May Day is given to the Y. W. C. A. lassies. 
Different stunts, and the crov?ning of the 
May Queen are sights which you must look 
forward to. The election of the May Queen 
is also a very exciting feature. The May Day 
of 1922 was an enjoyable and beautiful affair. 

CABINET COUNCIL 

The council is composed of the Y. W. C. A. 
cabinets of the colleges of East Tennessee. 
Delegates from five colleges were here and 
with Miss Riggs and Miss Reed, Y. W. C. A. 
secretaries of the South Central field, to help 
in leading the discussions the meetings were 
most successful. 

With a Blue Ridge supper and car ride 
(given by the Board of Commerce of the city) 
the time w«as joyful as well as inspirational. 
Many new ideas were gained as to the Na- 
tional Y. W. C. A. organization, the duties 
of our local organization, the meaning of Y. 
W. C. A. membership, how to make Y. W. 

—35— 



more effective land how to live a more abundant 
life. Indeed we were never so proud of, and 
so pepped up for Y. W. C. A. 

A HIKE TO MONTVALE 

O Maryville girls, both old and new, 
Montvale this fall will welcome you. 
A hike, good eats, and lots of fvn 
Will bring great joy to everyone. 

Dear new girl, if you are planning to come 
to Maryville, you must plan also a weak-end 
camping party to Montvale Springs. Throvgh 
the Y. W. C. A., the expense is kept within 
the reach of every girl. 



EXPERIENCE IS A GREAT TEACHER 
—36— 



COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS 
THE HIGHLAND ECHO 

The Highland Echo is the weekly publication 
of Maryville College. It is a four page, five 
column paper to which each student subscribes 
when he matriculates. The Echo is conducted 
by student management, after the fashion of 
larger newspapers, carrying athletic reports, 
news items, editorials, and other articles of 
interest to the students. Through the medium 
of the Echo each student is enabled to keep 
in touch with all the activities of the Hill. 

THE CHILHOWEAN 

"The Chilhowean", a memory picture book 
showing all phases of student life and activi- 
ties of Maryville College stvdents, is com- 
piled and edited annually by each year's Junior 
Class. You will want one of these treasure 
mementos for every year you attend College, 
so remember the memory book, "The Chil- 
howean." 



WORK MAKES LIFE PLEASANT 
—37— 



FEBRUARY MEETINGS 

Maryville College is noted for many things, 
but the one thing for which she will always 
be remembered is her February meetings. 
The February meetings are the most vital 
period of the entire college year ; they are 
instrumental in erecting new standards of life ; 
they inspire some to active Christian service, 
they determine the destinies of her students. 
The measure of their influence can never be 
taken by mortals. 

For forty-five yoars the unwritten law of 
helpfulness to who needed the Saviour's love 
and friendship has prevailed in the hearts 
of the faculty and student-body of Maryville. 
With the help of the Holy Spirit, with the 
inspiration of songs, capable ministers, the 
devoted services of the faculty and student 
body, the success of the February meetings 
has been unequalled. Everyone looks forward 
to the February meetings with anticipation, 
and backward upon them as times of great 
blessing. 

FRED HOPE FUND 

. The students of Maryville have their own 
missionary in the foreign field. Fred Hope 
is a graduate of the college. Every spring a 
drive for voluntary contributions is miade. 
1922 was the biggest year, for $750 was pledg- 



ed to aid Fred Hope in his wonderful work 
among the dark sons of Africa. Let's get 
behind the 1923 drive. 

THE MINISTERIAL ASSOCIATION 

The Ministerial Association was organized 
in 1900 and is composed of the candidates 
for the Christian Ministry that are in at- 
tendance upon the college. It has for its 
object the enlistment of its members in vari- 
ous forms of active Christian work, and the 
discussion of themes relating to the work of 
the Ministry. Many inspiring addresses are 
heard each year from men of experience in 
the ministry. All men who intend to be- 
come ministers should join this Association 
whose motto is "Non ministrari sed minis- 
trare." 

STUDENT VOLUNTEERS 

This is a group of students who, having a 
common purpose in life — that of serving God 
and man on the foreign field — gather together 
every Thursday night. There are at present 
thirty-six members. Their meetings might 
be called a "spiritual power house" from 
which they draw inspiration, and where they 
may discfss problems, if i)ossible with ex- 
perienced missionaries. 

"FEAR GOD AND TAKE YOUR OWN PART" 
— Roosevelt. 



VESPER AND MID-WEEK SERVICES 

In 1917 Dr. and Mrs. William P.atton Stev- 
enson came to make Maryville their home 
and the "House in the Woods" the students' 
home. One of the enjoyable parts of Mary- 
ville which we owe to our college pastor is 
the vesper service. These meetings are con- 
ducted every Sunday evening by I>r. Steven- 
son. To the new students especially this is 
one of the most impressive services on the 
Hill. The music is always excellent, for the 
chants and anthems of the robed choir add 
much. Then follows an address. 

On Thursday morning, at chapel, you will 
hear another very helpful sermon by Dr. 
Stevenson. His sermons are meant for col- 
lege students, so do not miss tany. 

GRADUATE RECITALS 

There is an old saying on the hill that our 
home talent is as good as that which is im- 
ported. Old students will agree that the 
entertainments given by the Expression and 
Music Departments are not to be surpassed. 
Among these entertainments the graduate reci- 
tals naturally take a high place. They are 
given in the Spring by members of the grad- 
uating classes of expression, piano, and voice. 

WORK— FOR THE NIGHT IS COMING 
—40— 



They furnish an opportunity for cultural de- 
velopment along lines not persued in the 
class-room, and add much to the interest of 
the students. 

ALPH> SIGMA 

Membership in the Alpha Sigma Literary 
Society should be the goal of every new man 
who is to attend Maryville. The popularity 
of the organization is demonstrated by the 
fact that inen in every rank of college activi- 
ties belong. 

Not only does the society provide a demo- 
cratic medium through which to make friends, 
and enable members to stand with composure 
while speaking, but it also offers thorough 
training for prospective debate candidates. 
The Alpha Sigmas had a majoi:ity in the 
Men's Forensic League during the 1922 sche- 
dule, and produced the winner of the College 
Oratorical contest for the last two years. 

Prospective student, we, the Alpha Sigm»a 
Literary Society extend to you a heart wel- 
come to join us. 

THETA EPSILON 
We're Thetas born and we're Thetas bred 
And when we die we'll be Thetas dead. 

These are our sentiments and Theta wel- 
comes all new girls. We invite you to visit 
our society, land we should be very happy to 
have you join Theta. Theta Epsilon aims to 

—41— 



secure literaiy and social development for 
everybody. Theta Epeilon enjoys and looks 
forw^ard to the joint meetings with her brother 
society. Alpha Sigma. 

ATHENIAN 

The Athenian Literary Society holds the 
distinction of being the oldest literary organi- 
zation on "The Hill", having organized in 
1869. Its present membership' enrolls a large 
proportion of the male students. The Athen- 
ians are noted for their loyalty to, and en- 
thusiasm for their society. 

The ideal of Athenian is to give her mem- 
bers such training as will enable them to 
secure the very best development during their 
college days ; and to promote a correct college 
spirit and love for Alma Mater. To accom- 
plish this high ideal she provides weekly pro- 
grama of an entertaining, instructive, varied 
nature that are full of life, pep, and college 
spirit. Every Saturday evening a bunch of 
college fellows gather at the sign of the 
"Owl and Crescent" for the Athenian Society. 

SELF RESTRAINT IS THE FIRST STEP 
TO LEADERSHIP 



BAINONIAN 

The Bainonian is the oldest girls' literary so- 
ciety on College Hill and for almost half a cen- 
tury it has played an important part in the col- 
lege life. It may be said that the purpose 
of this society is "to educate and entertain" 
for neither the educational nor the recreational^ 
parts are neglected in the year's schedule. 

To every new girl Bainonian extends a 
hand of friendship, and welcomes you to the 
college family. Before you have been within 
the walls many weeks may you join heartily 
in {he refrain : 

"Bainonian, Bainonian, Deep graven on 
each heart 

Will be found unwavering true, when we 
from college part." 

THE ADELPHIC UNION 

The four literary societies unite to form 
the Adelphic Union. This large organiza- 
tion elects its officers each spring. The 
honor of being president of the Adelphic 
Union is passed on from one society to an- 
other in a fixed order. The 1922-23 officers 
are President, Stella McCall ; Vice President, 
Charles Ellis ; Treasurer, Jean McMurray. 

A WORD TO THE WISE IS SUFFICIENT 



The Adelphic Union gives a banquet each 
year to its members and friends. In May 
the banquet was a Dutch affair, and was en- 
joyed by tall. 

DRAMATIC CLUB 

"The Maryville Players", the college dra- 
matic club during the two years of its definite 
organization has established a permanent place 
among primary stvdent activities. The club 
believes that wholesome entertainment is one 
of the most effective cultural influences. 
Under the efficient directorship of the teach- 
ers of the Department of Expression it has 
presented several excellent plays. 

THE BAND 

One of the largest land beet musical or- 
ganizations on college hill is the Maryville 
College Band. It is in charge of an experienc- 
ed instructor. In the bi-weekly rehearsals 
the band furnishes musical training along 
every line of band music including high class 
marches, waltzes, serenades, medleys, and 
overtures. The band furnishes music at many 
entertainments and athletic contests. Con- 
certs and parades lalso draw many hearers. 
Fellows who possess a fair knowledge of band 
music should join early. 

IN UNION THERE IS STRENGTH 
—44— 



ORCHESTRA 

The Maryville College Orchestra has been 
an important orgianization on .the hill for 
many years. Besides furnishing music for 
the Mid-winters and other special entertain- 
ments, it occasionally gives a special pro- 
gram at the morning chapel exercises. Not 
only do the orchestra members rehearse to- 
gether every week, but they have formed a 
clvb and enjoy pleasant evenings together 
which creates good fellowship. Anyone having 
sufficient ability is invited to join the or- 
chestra. 

MEN'S GLEE CLUB 

The Men's Glee Club has been organized for 
three season's work, and has had three good 
trips. It's a live and growing organization. 
If you can sing, we wiant you to try out for 
the club. 

DEBATE AND ORATORY 

One of the strongest institutions for mental 
development and leadership at Maryville is 
found in the excellent forensic program put 
on every year by the Forensic League, the 
literary societies, and the recently organized 
forensic fraternity, Pi Kappa C'elta. 

The debate record of Maryville for last 
year was a great one. Out of eight inter- 
collegiate debates enjoyed by men and women 

—45— 



debaters, seven resulted in victories for the 
Orange Garnet standard. Against the oi>- 
ponents six points Maryville received eighteen. 
Tusculum, Milligan, and Roanoke, all schools 
having excellent debating records, were strong 
opponents. 

In oratory last year Maryville was not so 
fortunate, for in the intercollegiate Oratorical 
contest her place was sixth. This year sen 
unusual effort will be made to put Maryville 
at the top of the list, as well as in debating. 

The organization of the Tennessee Alpha 
chapter of the Pi Kappa Delta honorary for- 
ensic fnaternity last year has already done 
much toward stimulating more interest in 
forensics and toward a bigger program for 
this year. 

PRIZES AND INTRA-MURAL CONTESTS 

TEMPERANCE PRIZE: The Board of 
Temperance and Moral Welfare of the Pres- 
byterian church, annually provides a cash 
prize of twenty-five dollars to be given to the 
student who prepares and delivers the most 
effective speech on the subject of temperance. 
This contest is usually carried on in con- 
nection with the class room work of the re- 
quired sophomore English course, English 1, 

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT 



and is given as a first prize of fifteen dollars 
and a second prize of ten dollars. 

CHEMISTRY PRIZE : A prize, is offered an- 
nually to the woman student in chemistry who 
writes the best paper on some subject of 
chemical investigation. This prize is the in- 
come from a fund provided by Miss Sara F. 
Hillman of Pittsburg. In 1921 it was a prize 
of twenty-five doUars. 

RUSH STRONG MEDAL: By the provisions 
of the will of the late Rush Strong, of Knox- 
ville, a twenty-five dollar gold medal is given 
annvally to the student of the college who 
writes the best essay on the subject, The Value 
of Truth. This contest is, as a rule, conducted 
among the students of the Freshman classes 
in Rhetoric. 

THE ENGLISH PRIZE: The English 
teachers of the college have, during the past 
year, established a prize for the best literary 
production by a college student. The prize 
consists of ten volumes of the work of stand- 
ard authors. 

THE BATES PRIZE IN ORATORY: The 
Rev. William H. Bates, D.D., of Greeley, 
Colorado, has provided the college with a 
prize fund for a contest in oratory. This 
contest is open in one year to the men of 
the Senior and Junior classes and in the other 

—47— 



year to the women of the Senior and Juniof 
classes. In 1922 the young woman will com- 
pete for the prize. The amount of the prize 
in 1921 was forty-five dollars. This contest 
is one of the features of Commencement week. 

T. T. ALEXANDER BIBLE ORATION 
PRIZE: Through the magnificent gift of a-n 
ananymous friend of Maryville and Christian 
education $100 is given annually to the winner 
of a Bible oration prepared from a list of 
themes on ChristiaTi Doctrines. In 1922 (the 
firet year) Siam H. Franklin won the prize. 
This year it is likely that the contest will be 
open to girls only. 



THE INDOLENT MAKE LITTLE HEADWAY 
—48— 



WHO'S WHO IN MARYVILLE 

Alpha Sigma Leslie Poe 

Athenian Verton Queener 

Athletic Assn : Charles Partee 

Bainonian Mary McSpadden 

Band Hai'ry Bannister 

Basketball Jean McMurray 

Cheer Leaders Brown, Poe 

Chilhowean S. H. Franklin, editor 

V. Queener, bus. mgr. 

Echo David King, editor 

S. Houston, bus. mgr. 

Field Day P. G. Rice 

Football Howard SuUinger 

Forensics Ralph Armstrong 

Glee Club Robert King 

Junior Class Margaret McKinney 

Maryville Players M. M. Boyer 

May Day H. Bevan, M. McSpadden 

Pi Kappa Delta V. Queener 

Senior Class Charles Ellis 

Sophomore James King 

Student Vol James Jackson 

Tennis John Hendricks 

Theta Epsilon Margaret Weeks 

Track Giles McGinley 

Y. M. C. A R. S. Buflfat 

Y. W. C. A C. Wilson. Sr. 

Mary Robison, Jr. 

A PERSON IS KNOWN BY HIS DEEDS 



CLASS CUSTOMS 

Inter-class athletics are enjoyed by all the 
students, many participating and many cheer- 
ing. The Seniors cheer for the Sop'homores 
while the Juniors aid the Freshmen. 

The Junior class publishes the College An- 
nual, the Chilhowean. 

Class parties are held on Hallowe'en night. 
It is said that "Spooks" often steal the re- 
freshments. 

The Junior class gives a banquet to the 
Seniors. 

The graduating class of 1922 has started the 
custom of wearing distinctions. 

The Junior girls carry a daisy chain on 
Baccalaur«iate Sunday. 

The Alumni banquet is served by the Junior 
girls. 

During the Sophomore year your choice of 
major and minor subjects is haiided to the 
registrar. 

The Juniors are responsible for the decora- 
tion of the stage for Commencement week 
for the Seniors. 

—50— 



Only upper classmen are allowed to com- 
pete for the Bate's prize, which has been 
mentioned elsewhere in this book. 

Senior week is observed. 

Each class selects a candidate for May Queen. 
These girls then attend the Queen at her 
throne. 



BIRDS OF A FEATHER FLOCK TOGETHER 
—51— 



. i .. i .. i .. i .. i .. i .. i .. : .. i .. | .. : .. i .. i .. i .. i .. i .. i .. i .. i .. i .. : .. i .. i .. i .. j .. i . 



ONE 

MINUTE 

PLEASE 



BEFORE 

MAKING YOUR 

PURCHASE, PLEASE 

CONSULT THIS HAND BOOK. 

PATRONIZ E OUR ADVERTISERS 

AND TELL THEM YOU SAW 

THEIR AD IN THIS 

BOOK. DON'T 

FORGET. 



' I " I " H"I"I"I"I"I " I " I " I " I"I"I - I"I-I"I"1"M"I"I " I " I - 

—52— 



Kodaks 

Toilet Articles 

Sodas 

In fact everything to be had in a 
Modern Drug Store 

"We are always Glad to See You" 




DRU6ST0PE 



Maryville, Tennessee 

PHONES No. 3 
Jno. H. Mitchell Chas. R. McDaniel 

, I .. I .. I .. I .. I .. I .. I .. I .. I .. I .. I .. I ..i.. i ,. i .. i .. i .. t .. i .^. I ., I .. I .. I .. H . 

—53— 





Sixth 

Hour 

2 :05 to 

3:00 














Fifth 

Hour 

1:10 to 

2:05 














Fourth 
Hour 

11:15 to 
12:10 












1 


Third 
Hour 

10 :20 to 
11:15 












Second 
Hour 

9:25 to 
10:20 














First 

Hour 

8 :30 to 

9:25 
















1 


>> 

1 

c 

1 


1 

3 


>> 





Norton Hardware 
Company 



HARDWARE 

SPORTING GOODS 



Where Your Patronage is 
Appreciated 



. i .. H n i .. i .. i .. :. . : .. i ..i.. i .. i .. i ..i.. : .. i ., i ,. i .. i ,. i .. i ., i ., i ,. i .. i .. i . 

—55— 





Sixth 

Hour 

2 :05 to 

3:00 














Fifth 
Hour 

1:10 to 
2:05 












M 
H 

^ tt 


Fourth 
Hour 

11:15 to 
12:10 












ll 
is 


Third 
Hour 

10:20 to 
11:15 












Second 
Hour 

9 :25 to 
10:20 












5- 


First 

Hour 

8:30 to 

9:25 
















1 


1 

B 

1 


3 




1 



■ t"l"t"t"l"I"I"l"I"I"l"l"I"l"l"I"l"l"I"I"I"I"I"I"l"I - 

Waggoner's 
Drug Store 

PRESCRIPTIONS 

CIGARS— TOBACCO—PIPES 

CANDY 

Magazines — and best fountain service in town 

BOTH PHONES 

No. 66 
MARYVILLE - TENNESSEE 



HOPE BROS., INC. 

JEWELERS 
MARYVILLE 



vvvv*; 



—57— 



MEMORANDUM 



—58— 



. ^ ■ I „ ^ ■ ^ ■ I„: n H ^^ I ^^ H ^^ I ^^ I ^^ I ^^I^^ H ^■ I ^^ ^ ^ I ^^ I ■. I M I ■. I ■■ I ■. ^ 

Dr. S. E. Crawford 

DENTIST 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING 

WHEN HUNGRY— COME TO THE 

South Side Store 

F. R. BABGOGK & GO. 

PHONE 141 



The Busy Bee Cafe 

"THE HOME OF GOOD FOOD AND 
SANITATION" 



GIVE US A TRIAL 



Just Around th« Corner from the 

Southern Depot 

KNOXVILLE - TENNESSEE 

. i .. i .. i .. i ., i ,. i .. i .. | .. : .. i .. : .. i .. i .. : ,. i .,i.,:.. i .. t .. i .. i .. i .. i .. H .. i . 

—59— 



MEMORANDUM 



■ l"I"t"I"I"I"I"I"l"t " I"I"! " I"I"I"I"I"I"l"l"I"!"l"M" 

Wright's 

5, 10 and 25c Store 
Best Hair Nets 5c & 10c 
2-in-1 Shoe Polish 10c 

WHERE A LITTLE MONEY GOES 
A LONG WAY 



Toilet Articles, Ribbons, Laces, Hosiery, Hand- 
kerchiefs, Candy — Complete Line Box 
Stationery and School Supplies 



Tillery & Bogle 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 
TRUNKS— BAGS— SUITCASES 

AND 

ALL THE LATEST HITS IN VICTOR 

RECORDS 



—61— 



EVERYTHING 

— that a student 
wears! 

READY-TO-WEAR 

MILLINERY 

SHOES 

TOILET ARTICLES 

PIECE GOODS 

MEN'S SUITS AND 

FURNISHINGS 

—AND BY A COMPARISON OF PRICES 
YOU WILL FIND OURS ALWAYS BEST. 

Chandler-Singleton 
Dept. Store 

—62— 



. : .. : .. : .. | .. i ., i .. : .. t .. i .. : .. i .. i .. i .. : .. : .. | .. : .. H .. i .. : .. i .. i .. | .. | .. t . 

New Providence 
Presbyterian Churcii 

Main and College Street 
WM. E. GRAHAM. D. D., Minister 



Bible School graded and conducted by a well 
qualified corps of officers and teachers ; Chris- 
tian Endeavor awake and active ; The Whole 
Church forward-looking in plan and purpose. 



STUDENTS CORDIALLY INVITED 

TO MAKE THIS THEIR CHURCH-HOME 

WHILE IN COLLEGE 



.I.■ ^ . I ■. I .. I .. I .. ^ ■ : .. ^ ■ : .■^. ^ ■ : ■■ I .■I.■:■■ I .. I ■. ^ ■ ^ ■^■ I ■■ I ■■ ^ . ^ . I . 

—63— 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

Samuel Tyndale Wilson, D. D., LL. D., Pres. 

ONE HUNDRED AND FOURTH YEAR 
BEGINS SEPTEMBER 12, 1922 

Educational standards of the highest En- 
vironment, positively Christian. Expenses low- 
est possible. 

Enrollment, College, 503 ; Preparatory School, 
312 ; Total 815 young men and young women ; 
323 came from thirty-four states and countries 
outside of Tennessee. Faculty of eighty-six 
professors, instructors and assistants. 

Endowment and property, $1,600,000.00 Camp- 
us, 250 acres. Sixteen large bvildings, includ- 
ing the new Thaw Memorial Hall. 

Entrance requirements, for admission to the 
Freshman class, fifteen standard units. De- 
partments : College, Bible Training, Home Ec- 
onomics, Pre-medical, Teachers', Expression, 
Music, Art and the Preparatory School. 

Expenses: Tuition, $24 a year. Room rent 
for each student, with two in a room, averages, 
$38 a year. Board, $3.50 a week. Text-books 
rented. General library free. Self-help op- 
portunities. Ftill information sent upon re- 
quest. Address. 

CLINTON H. GILLINGHAM, D. D., Registrar 

MARYVILLE : : TENNESSEE 

—64— 




NELSON AMERICAN STANDARD DIBLE 

The Message of the Ages 
Clarified in text and cor- 
rected according to old- 
est authentic manuscripts, 
lately discovered. The 
wisest Bible scholarship 
of all principal Evangel- 
ical denominations con- 
tributed all its resources 
to the revision work of 

inB|HHH|^^H| the American Standard 
^^^^^^^Hli The American Standard 
~ ^^^^^^^^^^ Bible text has been 
adopted by all leading 
Colleges, Theological 
Seminaries, Y. M. C. A., 
Y. W. C. A. and Bible 
Schools throughout the United States. 
Nelson Bibles in all sizes, types and styles of 
binding are obtainable wherever Bibles are sold 
FREE BOOKLET— An attractive ?6-page 
booklet entitled "The Story of Our Bible," 
published at 10c per copy, telling how the 
Bible came down through the ages, and con- 
taining many facts of vital interest, will be 
sent FREE on request to any one mentioning 
this advertisement. 
THOMAS NELSON & SONS. Authorized Publishers of the 

American Revision Committee 
381 N. Fourth Ave. New York 

Thos. Nelson & Sons, 381 N. Fourth Ave., New 
York City. Dear Sirs— Please send me FREE 
copy of your book entitled, "The Story of Our 
Bible." This does not obligate me in any way. 

Name 

Street No City 




. l ,. ] ., | ,. l ,. l„l„i„i„i „ i „ ; ., i ,. i ,. H"I " l - H " H"l"H"H - 

UNION 

Theological Seminary 

Richmond, Virginia 

"The best seminary in the South and in my 
judgment, the best in the United States — James 
J. Vance, D. D. 

Union Seminary is the school in which the 
Southern Presbyterian Church trains the larg- 
est proportion of its preachers and mission- 
aries. It was founded in 1812. 

It is conservative in doctrine. 

At the same time it has always been a 
leader in the introduction of new and timely 
methods of theological teaching. 

MAINTAINS A SIMPLE STANDARD OF 

LIVING— KEEPING EXPENSES OF ALL 

STUDENTS AT A MINIMUM 

For Information, Address 
W. W. MOORE, D. D., L. L. D., President 

' M -« H"I"I"I " I"I"I " I"I " I"I"I " I " I " I " I"I " I " I - I " I " I " I ' 



i .. i .. i .. : .. i .. i .. i .. i .. i .. i .. H " i"i " i " i " i " i " i " i " i " i " i " i " i " i " 



R. F. GRAF J. R. GRAF 

H. R. GRAF 



R. F. Graf & Sons 

Architects 
and Structural Engineers 

KNOXVILLE - TENNESSEE 



—67— 



ALKAHEST 

Lyceum System 



Incorporated 1902 



THE LEADING SOUTHERN AGENCY FOR 

THE BEST CHAUTAUQUA AND 

LYCEUM ATTRACTIONS 

ATLANTA - GEORGIA 



[P^h-KrebTcoSI 

i^L^ L6uisvillc,Ky. ^^^ 



COLLEGE ANNUAL 

CXPER.TS 

\Jfalf{ones arid Zinc Etchings^ 

COLLEGE ANNUALS 



.. i .. i .. i ..i.. i .^ ^ .. i .. i .. i .. i .. : .. i .. i .. i .. i .. i ..i..i..i.. i ..i..H..H- 

—68— 



^4I^^^^^. I ..J..^.^.t..t..I..I»I»I« I «»I "I «»l« I"I " I - I " I ' 

The Moody Bible Institute 



OF CHICAGO 



Founded in 1886 by 
D. L. Moody 



FREE INSTRUCTION IN DAY AND EVEN- 
ING CLASSES. COURSES IN THE BIBLE. 
GOSPEL MUSIC, AND PRACTICAL CHRIS- 
TIAN WORK. 

THE CORRESPONDENCE DEPARTMENT 
OFFERS EIGHT DIFFERENT BIBLE COR- 
RESPONDENCE COURSES. 

CATALOGUE, OR PROSPECTUS OF THE 
CORRESPONDENCE COURSES SENT ON 
REQUEST. 



— Address — 

THE MOODY BIBLE INSTITUTE 

153 INSTITUTE PLACE 

CHICAGO - ILLINOIS 

—69— 



^„I„l„l„l„l„|„i„;„i ., ;„i„i„i„i ,. |„; .. i .. i ,. i .. i .. i .. i .. | .. ; .. i . 

ANNOUNCEMENT 

Y.M.G.A. Y.W.G.A. 
LYCEUM COURSE 

EIGHTEENTH SEASON 
MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



ATTRACTIONS FOR 1»22 - 23 

GAPPY RICKS 

Modem Play 

TOM SKEYHILL 
Lecturer 

CASI FAN TUTTI 
Play 

THE APPOLLO CONCERT COMPANY 

The tickets are included in the students 
activity fee 

.H^■^■H■.H»H^'^'I^^^^I^^I^^I^^^'^'I^^I^^^^ ^ ^ I ^^ ^ 4'4-^ 

—70— 



i i i 

LANE THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

Modern Theological Curriculum. Two Cours- 
es. Elective leading to the degree of B. D. 

Affiliation with the University of Cincinnati 
for graduate work and degrees, and also for 
a combined college course and seminary course 
in six years. 

Chartered in 1829, "to educate pious young 
men for the Gospel Ministry." Qualified stu- 
dents from every evangelical Church admitted 
on the same terms as those from the Presby- 
terian Church. A cosmopolitan stvdent body 
drawn from eight denominations, twenty col- 
leges, and eleven states. 

Scholarship aid may be supplemented by 
preaching done under the sx^pervision of the 
Faculty. 

Dormitory rooms, lecture rooms, chapel and 
corridors newly renovated and refurnished. 
Building throughout steam-heated and electric- 
lighted. 

— Address — 

PRESIDENT WILLIAM McKIBBIN, 

D.D., LL.D. 

■i..i..i..i.. i . ,i .. ] .. : ..i..|..i..^.i,.i..:,.:..t.,j..i..i,. : ..t..j..j..|.. ; . 

—71— 



, 1 ., I „ 1 „ ! , ; „ I n ; „ l M l„i ., i„i„| „ ; „ i n ]„i„i„i „ i„i , M „ i ., i„i , 

Redpath Bureau 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA. 

Merrit Craft 

Mgr. 

LYCEUM AND CHAUTAUQUAS OF 

SUPERIOR QUALITY 

Spalding 
for Sport 

The Spalding Trade 
Mark is the never- 
failing guarantee of 
all that is best in 
athletic implements, 
clothing for all games, 
sporis and p'hysical 
upbuild. 
It pays to get the Best — 

A I ways 
A. G. SPALDING & 

BROS. 

74 No. BROAD ST. 

ATLANTA 

"PAPER" 

FOR EVERY PURPOSE 

LOUISVILLE PAPER CO. 

Incorporated 
LOUISVILLE - KENTUCKY 







DRINK LIME COLA 

"GOOD TO THE LAST DROP" 

OUR SPECIALTY 

— Also All Flavors of Soda Water — 

Maryville Bottling Co. 

MARYVILLE - TENNESSEE 



MODERN FIREPROOF 

EUROPEAN PLAN 

St. James Hotel 

A. A. LANGHORNE, Mgr. 

"The Home of the Traveler" 

KNOXVILLE - TENNESSEE 

"You Will Feel at Home With Us" 



c 

1 

c 

8 
















u 

8 
















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u 

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WHEN YOU THINK OF GOOD THINGS TO 

EAT— THINK OF WIGGINS 

CASH CARRY STORE 

WE INVITE ALL OF THE COLLEGE BOYS 

AND GIRLS TO VISIT OUR STORE 

WE ASSURE YOU THAT YOU WILL FIND 

ALL YOU WANT IN THE WAY OF EATS 

AND THE PRICE WILL BE RIGHT 

W. L. Wiggins 
Gash Garry Store 

No. 2 

Where you save the pennies, nickles 
and dimes 

Just below Post Office— M. M. ELDER, Mgr. 

■ i ., i .. i .. i .. i .. i .. i .. i .. i ..:..i.. i .. i .. i .. : .. i .. i .. t .4^. : .. : .. j .. j .. j .. j . 

—75— 



1 

1 
















2 
1 

































-76— 



. i .. i .. i ., i .. i .. i .. : .. i ..i..i..:..i..i..i..i..i..i..i.. i ..i.^4^4'4«4* 

Stinnet Brothers 

Transfer and Taxi Service 

SERVICE DAY AND NIGHT 

When you come to Maryville call up 
Stinnet for your trunk. 



2 DODGE CARS— REASONABLE PRICES 

Good Drivers 



Bell Phone 247— Peoples Phone 333 



Clyde E. Stinnet 
Homer C. Stinnet 



103 Washington Avenue 
MARYVILLE - TENNESSEE 

—77— 



5 

% 

.S 
IS 

§ 
















1 

































—78— 



4.4.4-H'4-^^:^^^^^^I•^^■ ^ ■^4^4"^H«4"^^^^4^^'4-^ 



Claude Smiths 

READY-TO-WEAR STORE 

SOLICITS YOUR PATRONAGE 

GOOD GOODS AND MODERATE PRICES 
OUR MOTTO 



J. R. BLACK, D. O., M. D. 
LINNIE K. BLACK, D. O. 

GENERAL PRACTICE 

X-RAY AND LABORATORY EQUIPMENT 

Both Phones — Office and Residence 

21 WELLS BLDG. 

C. C. WHITE 
SHOE REPAIRING 

COLLEGE STUDENTS GIVEN CAREFUL 

ATTENTION 

Thanks for the Past Year 

.i..i..i..i..:..i..i..i..i..i..i..i..i.^4^. : .. i .. i .. : .. i .. i .. i .4^^ 

—79— 



MEMORABLE OCCASIONS 



1 

£ 
















5 
i 

1 
















iJ 
a 
















1 
o 

















—80— 



• M " M " l " l " H - l " H " l " H " H"H"H"I"t"l"t"I"l - 

F. A. ZOLLER, M. D. 

GENERAL PRACTICE 
Both Phones— Res. 172 Bell— 260 Peoples 

Office 278 BeU 

OFFICE OVER BADGETT STORE CO. 

MAIN ST. 



GENNET RECORDS 

JUSTIFY EVERY ANTICIPATION OF 
MUSIC LOVERS 

HEAR THEM AT THE 

Maryville Furniture Co. 

BRING US YOUR PICTURE FRAME WORK 



W. P. MILLIGAN 

SHOE HOSPITAL 

IN BASEMENT UNDER SPRAKER-ATKINS 
STORE 

—81— 



MEMORABLE OCCASIONS 



A! 

♦J 
■^ 

I 

CO 

o 

O 
§ 

Q 

c 
.2 

u 
O 



•I"rv 






The Enormous Volume of our 
Business is Strong Evidence 
of Our Ability 

TO CLEAN, PRESS AND REPAIR CLOTH- 
ING SO THOROUGHLY THAT THOSE WHO 
TRY US 

TRY AGAIN 

YOU OUGHT TO BECOME FULLY INFORM- 
ED REGARDING OUR HOFFMAN SANI- 
TARY METHOD OF PRESSING CLOTHES. 
SUPPOSE YOU TELL US YOU'RE INTER- 
ESTED THAT'S ALI^WE'LL CALL. 

Merritt The Tailor 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK BLDG. 




Bell 



298 



Phone 202 — Peoples 

PROPRIETORS 

O. S. MERRIT N. A. RAULSTON 

. i .. i .. i .. i ., i .. i .. H»i-i .. M .. i .. i ., : .. i .. : .. i .. i .. i .. i .. H -' i " i - i - 



MEMORABLE OCCASIONS 



1 
















1 

1 
















a 
















a 
1 

o 

















—84— 



■ i .. i .. H»i » i » i " i " i " i":»i"r"i"i": " i " r " : " i " i " i " : " i "H- 

COLLEGE JEWELRY, CLASS PINS AND 
RINGS 

DIAMONDS 
WATCHES 
JEWELRY 

Buy in Maryville 
— from — 

A. E. McCULLOCH 



Badgett Store Co. 

IS ALWAYS AT YOUR SERVICE 

WITH A COMPLETE 

LINE OF 

STANDARD MERCHANDISE 

FLORSHEIM SHOES CURLEE CLOTHING 

ECLIPSE SHIRTS 

BUSTER BROWN SHOES FOR LADIES 



^^,4.4«H-HH-4-4«H-H~H-H--I«H-+-H--H- 



MEMORANDUM 



l .. l .. ; ., l ., I ., l ., l .. I .. M .. M"l " M"l"I"I"l"I"I"I"I"I"I"l" 

The First Baptist 
Church 

"A Church With a Message" 
REV. J. R. JOHNSON, Th. M„ Pastor 



A cordial invitation is extended to the College 
folk to worship with us and enjoy 
our fellowship 
An "Up-to-date" Sunday school and well or- 
ganized BYPU affords you a place of 
religious trtaining. 
We want You ! 



"Go to Church and feed your soul on th« 
Bread of Life." 



WELCOME WELCOME 

. | .. i .. i ., i .. i .. i .. i .. i .. | .. i .. i .. i .. i .. i .. i .. i .. i .. i .. i .. i ., i .. t .. t .. : .. i .. t . 

—87— 



MEMORANDUM 



y^HIS YEAR BOOK is just one 

m^ J of the manj) published by us 
^^"^ this >>ear. TKe fact tbat most 
of tKe College Publications tKrougKout 
this Southeastern Section are products of 
our presses is sufficient evidence, we be- 
lieve, of our ability to produce the -Oery 
highest quality of v7ork and is proof of 
our reputation for making deliveries "on 
time." Our service is complete, — in- 
cluding dra\Oings, grouping, retouching, 
engraving, designing and printing in one 
or more colors, '8? '^ *?? "li? 



Knoxville Lithographing 
Company 

Knoxville - Tennessee 

"A Place Where They Keep the Quality UP!" 
—89— 



. i .. H " H .. i ..i.. i .. i .. i ., : .,i.. i ..i., : ..i.. i ..i..:..i..i..i.. i .. : ., i .. i . 

The Western 
Theological Seminary 

Pittsburg, Pa. 

A Seminary for Col- 

legre Graduates 

A faculty of ten pro- 
fessors offer a com- 
plete, modern theolog- 
ical curriculum, with 
elective courses lead- 
ing to the degree of 
B. D. 

Graduate courses of 
the University o f 
Pittsburg, leading to 
degrees of A. M. and 
Ph. D., are open to 
properly qualified stu- 
dents of the Semi- 
nary. Two entrance 
prizes of $150 each. 
Exceptional library facilities. All buildings 
are new, with modern equipment. Social hall, 
gymnasium, and students' commons. Term 
opens Sept. 19, 1922. 

— For information apply to — 
PRES. JAMES A. KELSO, Ph. D.. D. D. 




—90- 



Y. M. C. A. 

AND 

Y. W. G. A. 

Stores 



'THE SUPPLY STORE ON THE CAMPUS' 



CANDIES PASTRIES 

ICE CREAM 

COLLEGE NECESSITIES 



ALL PROCEEDS GO TO THE Y. M. C. A. 
AND THE Y. W. C. A. 

^■^I^^I^a^^I^^ I ^^ I ^^I^^I^^^4-^4«4-^4-H'^-^4^^^>H-H■ 

—91— 



4.4»4«H^4^4-^'^^-^^4«^^^^^^^!■^^^I^^I^^!^^I^^!^■I^^I^ 

Campbell Pharmacy 

OPPOSITE THE SOUTHERN DEPOT 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES 

DRUGS, TOILET ARTICLES, 
SODAS AND ICE CREAM 



'OUR PRICE IS RIGHT' 



M. DUKE 
THE TAILOR 

THE HOME OF GOOD 

TAILORING, CLEANING, REPAIRING, 

DYEING. PRESSING 

BEHIND WIGGINS CASH CARRY STORE 
MARYVILLE, TENN. 

The Students Barber 
Shop 

BASEMENT FIRST NAT'L. BANK BLDG. 
"RICK, SAM, PETE" 

COME SEE US 

—92— 



. H » I . .l .. i n i .,i.,i..i., i .,i„ i .. : ., i .i., i ., i ..i..i..i..H"H " H' 

Stuart & Badgett 
DRUGS 

214 MAIN STREET 



MOST COMPLETE AND MODERN DRUG 
STORE IN THE CITY 



Attractive Prices — Service — Quality 



COME AND VISIT US 



Ellis-Proffit Co, 

THE BEST PLACE 
TO TRADE 



THE PLACE TO GET 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE AT A REASON- 
ABLE PRICE 



, i .. i .. i .. i .. i .. i .. i .. H .. i .. i .. i .. i .. : .. i .. i .. i .. i .. i ., i ., in " r " H '