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Full text of "Maryville College Handbook [M Book] 1923-1924"

IDENTIFICATION CARD 

Name 

Room 

Class 

Home Address 



In Case of Accident Notify. 



No. of Chapel Seat 

No. of Lab. Desk 

No. of Lab. Locker 

C^m. Locker No 

Student Council Representative. 



THE 

Maryville College 
Handbook 

VOLUME XIX 
PUBLISHED BY 

The Young Women's Christian 
Association 

AND 

The Young Men's Christian 
Association 

OF 

Maryville College 



Editor: 
William C. Crow 

Business Managers : 
John R. Stockton 
Stuart M. Rohre 
William C. Crow 

1923-1924 



FOREWORD 



The Young Women's Christian Associa- 
tion and the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation of Maryville College offer you who 
are coming to old College Hill for the first 
time, and to those of you who have been 
here before, this Handbook as a guide and 
counselor for your condxict and needs while 
in Maryville. 

This book cannot be expected to ba com- 
plete. It is only an attempt to give an 
index, or better, a key, to Maryville men 
and women in general, Freshmen in particu- 
lar, with which they can open the doors of 
learning and experience that confront them; 
so it is, with earnest apologies for mistakes 
of omission and commission and with thanks 
for the sincere aid received, that this key 
is put in the hands of Maryville men and 
women. 

THE EDITOR. 



INDEX 



Page 

Advice to the New Men 21 

Adelphic Union 48 

Advertisements 64 

Alpha Sigma 47 

Athenian 48 

Athletics, Intercollegiate 57 

Athletics, Y. M. C. A 42 

Bainonian . . . . , 46 

Band 52 

Big Sister Movement 26 

Blue Ridge 39 

Budget for the Y. M. C. A 45 

Chemistry Club • 55 

Chilhowean 50 

College Calendar 9 

Debate and Oratory 49 

Dramatic Club 51 

Foreword 3 

From Knoxville to Maryvllle 11 

Fred Hope 39 

Friendship Council of Y. M. C. A 41 

Friendly Hints ,.16 

Fellowship and Social Service of Y.W.C.A. .32 

Glee Club 52 

Good Samaritan in College 25 

Graduate Recitals 52 

Handbook 51 

5 



Highland Echo 50 

Hikes .40 

Hi-Trail Club 53 

Law Club 55 

Life Work Conference 40 

Mail 14 

Matriculation 12 

Membership in Y. M. C. A 35 

Ministerial Association 54 

Motion Pictures 41 

Nu Gamma Si&ma 27 

Officers of the Y. M. C. A 36 

Opening Social Events 12 

Parcel Post Rates 15 

Pre-Medical Club 55 

President's Message 7 

President Wilson 8 

Reading Rooms of Y. W. C. A 24 

Religious Meetings of the College 5 4 

Religious Meetings of the Y, M. C. A 43 

Rooms of the Y. M. C. A 37 

Schedule 62 

Social Activities of the Y. W. C. A 30 

Student Volunteer Group 54 

Sunday Afternoon Meetings of Y.W.C.A. ..29 

Swimming Pool 34 

Theta Epsilon 46 

To the Girls 19 

Who's Who in Maryville 56 

"Y" Bee 51 

Y. M. C. A. and Swimming Pool 4 

6 



PRESIDENT WILSON'S MESSAGE 

"The Maryville spirit," compounded riclily 
of sympathy, scholarship, spiritualitJ^ and 
service, owes its existence to the century 
long and united efforts of the Maryville fac- 
ulty and the Maryville students. Many thou- 
sands of Maryvillians have made their loyal 
contributions to the formation and perpet- 
uation of this historic and characteristic 
product of Maryville College. 

Among the most influential and earnest 
contributors to the making and keeping of 
this Maryville spirit, I am happy to testify 
that the Y. M. C. A. and the Y. W, C. A. 
have deservedly won high standing. For 
forty-six years and thirty-five years, re- 
spectively, they have rendered their con- 
structive and generous service. 

Among their many contributions of serv- 
ice to the new students, the Y's issue at a 
considerable expense, this nineteenth Mary- 
ville College Handbook. The new students 
will greatly appreciate the handbook and 
will profit largely by it. 

To all the new students I very heartily 
commend the work, the privileges, and op- 
portunities for service of the Y's; and all 
the members of the faculty unite with me in 
expressing the hope that the welcome ac- 
cessions of faithful workers from the body 
of new students will, this year, lift the as- 
sociations to the highest position of useful- 
ness and prosperity thus far attained. 

SAMUEL. TYNDALE WILSON. 
7 




President Samuel Tyndale Wilson 



THE COLI.EGE CALENDAR FOR 

1923-1924 

1923— 

Sept. 11, Tuesday, 8:00 a. in.-4:00 p. m. — 
Reg-istration for the first semester. 

Sept. 12, Wednesday, 8:30 a. m. — Opening 
chapel service. 

Sept. 12, Wednesday, 9:00 a. m.-3:00 p. m. — 
Org-anization of classes. 

Sept. 15, Saturday, 2:30 p. m. — Faculty, re- 
ception. 

Sept. 15, Saturday, 8:00 p. m. — T. M. C. A. 
and Y. W. C. A. receptions, 

Nov. 29, Thursday — Thanksgiving Day. 

Dec. 19, Wednesday, 3:00 p. m. — Christmas 
holidays begin. 

1924— 

Jan. 2, Wednesday, 8:30 a. m. — Class work 
resumed. 

Jan. 22-26, Tuesday-Saturday— First semes- 
ter examinations. 

Jan. 26, Saturday — First semester ends. 

Jan. 29, Tuesday, 8:10 a. m. — Second sem- 
ester begins. 

Feb. 3, Sunday, 6:30 p. m. — February meet- 
ings begin. 

Feb. 6, Wednesday, 8:30 a. m. — Meet!t-.<:i- of 
the directors. 

May 28, Wednesday — Examinations begin. 

9 



May 30, Fridas'-, 8:00 p. m. — Graduation ex- 
ercises of the Expression Department. 

May 31, Saturday, 3:00 p. m. — Annual ex- 
hibit of the Art Department. 

May 31, Saturday, 8:00 p. m. — Graduation 
exercises of the Music Department. 

June 1, Sunday, 10:30 a. m. — Baccalaureate 
sermon. 

June 1, Sunday, 6:30 p. m. — j^nnual ad- 
dress to the Y. M. C. A. and the Y. W. 
C. A. 

June 2, Monday, 8:00 p. m. — Bates Prize 
Oratorical Contest. 

June 3, 4, Tuesday, Wednesday — Examina- 
tions. 

June 3, Tuesday, 3:00 p. m. — Annual ex- 
hibit of the Home Economics Depart- 
ment. 

June 4, "Wednesday, 7:30 p. m. — Senior Class 
play. 

June 5, Thursday, 8:30 a. m. — Meeting of 
Directors. 

June 5, Thursday, 10:00 a. m. — Commence- 
ment. 

June 5, Thursday, 12:00 m. — Annual Alumni 
Dinner. 

June 5, Thursday, 8:00 p. m. — Social Reunion. 



PLAN YOUR WORK— WORK YOUR PLAN 
10 



GETTING STARTED 

1. From Knoxville to Maryville: 

When you arrive in Knoxville, inquire 
at the information bureau as to the time 
that the train or bus leaves. If the train 
does not leave as soon as you would like 
to come to Maryville, you are sure to find 
a bus leaving at almost any time. To get 
the bus, leave the Southern station, and go 
over the viaduct, and back down Gay street 
one block past the Holston National Bank 
building. If you are at the L. & N. sta- 
tion follow the car line to Gay street, and 
then turn to the right. Even if you come 
on the bus, it would be well for j'ou to buy 
your ticket all the way through in order 
that your baggage may be checked and out 
of your way, for it is cheaper for you to 
check your baggage over than to send it by 
express. When you arrive in Maryville, give 
j-our baggage check to the college truckman, 
for the college handles all luggage free. 
There will be some T. M. or Y. W. recep- 
tion committeemen to meet you. These 
committeemen serve as "walking informa- 
tion," so ask them all your questions. They 
will lead you to the dormitory you have 
signed for. 

Get your key and hold to it. A good 
start means a great deal. The student 
body welcomes you to Maryville. 
11 



2, Matriculation: 

Early arrival in Maryville is invariably a 
means of getting more comfortably started 
than otherwise. All freshmen should, if pos- 
sible, arrive by the afternoon of Monday, 
September 10. Registration and matricula- 
tion begin Tuesday, September 11, and the 
sooner it is out of the way the better. First, 
follow the crowd to Anderson Hall, and see 
the registrar to get your registration cards 
and a copy of the schedule of classes. Then 
make out j'our schedule with the help of 
some member of the faculty -who will be 
there to help you. After this, return your 
cards to the Registrar's office where they 
will be signed for you. This done, carry 
your card (hold to that card forever) to 
the Treasurer and pay your bills. By this 
time you will begin to wonder if you are 
ever going to be through with this job, but 
don't quit, for there is 3'et one thing to 
be done. Go to the book room, which is 
also on the first floor of Anderson Hall, 
and get your books, but don't forget that 
you are to have that card. If you live 
through this, you will be well qualified for 
the semester's work which lies before j'^ou. 

3. Opening Social Events: 

How to begin a year, especially at a new- 
place, is often a question. At Maryville, 

12 



however, if you will let it, the stream of 
entertainment afforded by the various organ- 
izations will carry you over the time of 
newness until the time when you are ac- 
quainted with most of the places and many 
of the people. Of course there are innu- 
merable informal receptions at the train, 
and after you have arrived on the Hill. 

The two girls' literary societies, Bainonian 
and Theta Epsilon, have their receptions to- 
gether, usually around a big camp fire in 
the college woods. The boys' societies like- 
wise have theirs, which are equal to that of 
the girls. 

Don't miss the faculty reception. After 
you have run the gauntlet of the faculty 
line, suffering your hand to be wrung by 
one professor and then handed on to the 
next one to be treated in a similar manner, 
you will come out smiling that you have 
won your freedom and are ready for the 
refreshments. 

The Y. W. C. A. has its reception on Bald- 
win lawn, and has pl»nty of eats and a 
well-planned affair. The boys go to the 
woods with the Y. M. C. A. to cook bacon 
and meet each other. Then there is the 
Y. W. hike as well as that of the Y. M. 

If you miss those opening social events 
you will have left out one of the most im- 
portant things of the year. 

13 



MAIL SERVICE 

Bells of duty may not sound so pleasant, 
but that mail bell rings even more merrily 
than the dinner bell. Be sure to tell your 
friends to address your mail carefully, as 

follows: "Mr. Bob Wire, Carnegie Hall, 

College Station, Maryville, Tenn." If you 
room in town, and wish to get your mail at 
the college post office, use only "College 
Station." Outgoing mail is collected from 
boxes in the dormitories every morning and 
afternoon. Remember that the college has 
Uncle Sam's mail service down pat, and 
that you will receive the best of attention 
from the mailing of letters to the receiving 
and sending (?) of those good boxes of eats. 
Be sure to warn the people at home not to 
forget to send an occasional box. 



IN THE RUSH OP COLLEGE LIFE DO 

NOT FORGET TO WRITE HOME 

14 



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15 



FRIENDLY HINTS 

Get to Maryville on time. 

Smile when the old students meet you at 
the train. They want to help you, and cul- 
tivate your friendship, but do not expect 
them to g-o all the way, for you, too, must 
show a friendly disposition. 

Become familiar with the rules of the 
colleg-e. You will be furnished with a copy 
at some time during the first week, and are 
held responsible for them. 

If you are rooming in the dormitory, don't 
let the former occupant of the room sell you 
the radiator or the roller curtains. They 
come with the room. 

Don't let the noise in the dining room 
take your appetite, for there is sure to be 
some noise when seven hundred students are 
in one room. 

Reading or studying in chapel is not only 
poor manners, but is not in keeping with the 
chapel service. 

If you are entering Maryville with a cir- 
cle of friends, don't confine yourself to this 
group. Get acquainted with as many of 
your fellow-students as possible. 

Maryville is no place for the snob. Such 
people, if they come, do one of three things: 
leave for more hospitable surroundings, lose 

16 



their snobbishness, or remain outside the 
real life of the college. 

Don't be discourag-ed if you fail to attract 
the attention of the whole college in the first 
few weeks. It takes time and hard work 
to win Maryville's places of honor. You 
take a roundabout way by seeking notoriety. 
If you are a world-beater, don't tell every- 
one about it. You would have to prove it, 
and the college will find it out in time 
anyway. 

Remember the students who command 
the widest respect are those who put . the 
college first, then classes, then social af- 
fairs. Don't get the order mixed or allow 
anyone to confuse it for you. 

Don't let your juvenile reading determine 
your ideas about temptations in college. If 
your bringing up does not square with cer- 
tain things you will find in your new en- 
vironment, you need not therefore change 
your principles. You will not even be urged 
to change them, if you let your friends 
know in a straightforward way that your 
ideas of right and wrong are definite, and 
that you intend to live by them. Don't get 
your backbone confuse.d with your wish- 
bone. 

First, last, and always remember that you 
wnll get out of your college life exactly 

17 



what you put in. Give a minimum of time 
and energy to your work, and you will get 
minimum results. Give a part of yourself 
to some phase of the life of your college, 
and you will receive in return what has 
been prized by many generations of Mary- 
ville men and women before you, the rec- 
ognition of the college. You have presum- 
ably four years at Maryville to do as you 
please. You can get no more lasting sat- 
isfaction out of that period of time than 
by doing your bit, whatever it may be, to- 
ward leaving Maryville, when you graduate, 
a little better than it was when you entered. 



BEING COLLEGE BRED DOBS NOT MEAN 

A FOUR YEARS' LOAF 

18 



TO THE 6IBLS 

What is it like at Maryville? What shall 
I take with me? Doubtless you have asked 
yourself these two questions many times 
since you finally chose Maryville for your 
Alma Mater. You are probably "up to your 
ears" in sewing, while you are making plans 
and dreaming dreams of what college life 
is. For this reason we are writing this to 
tell you a little of what to expect in Mary- 
ville. 

To begin with, the dormitory rooms are 
furnished with a study table, two chairs, 
a dresser, washstand, and either a double- 
decker or two single beds. These few things, 
plus curtains, dresser scarfs, pillows, bed 
sets, pennants, pictures, etc., of your own 
bringing, w^ill make up a very attractive 
room, of the regular college-girl type. 

As for clothes, make most of them suit- 
able for school wear, because this kind of 
clothing Is what is worn here more than 
anything else. Besides, you will want to 
come prepared for swimming and for "gym," 
and a pair of knickers or riding trousers 
would come in mighty handy for hikes. 

We have study hour every night but Sat- 
urday, and then, after literary society, we 
have our feeds and other jolly times, so 
don't forget to pack a few old dishes, 

19 



spoons, etc., away with your other things. 
and I'm fairly certain that a chafing dish, 
if you have one, would not rust from dis- 
use at Maryville. 

There is a limit, naturally, upon the num^ 
ber of times that you may go to the show 
or to town, but as a rule, these regulations 
do not bother Maryville girls, for if you be 
athletic, you may always swim or play ten- 
nis, and if you be more studious, there is 
the library or the Y. W. C. A. reading room 
with its magazines, victrola and comfortable 
davenports. 

You may "moonshine" (that is, you may 
be with the boys) every day except Sunday 
from after dinner until 1:10 when the aft- 
ernoon classes begin. As Monday is our 
holiday, that afternoon from 1:30 till 4:30 
ia reserved for moonshine privileges. To 
church on Sunday mornings, to ball games, 
snaps, socials and functions in the chapel, 
you may also bring an escort. 

Maryville will be, for nine months, your 
home. We hope that you will find it a 
very happy and satisfactory one. 



20. 



ADVICE TO THE NEW MEN 

You are now a college man. The long 
anticipated experience has begun. Hence- 
forth, you constitute one among that two 
per cent of the nation's youth who have the 
opportunity to attend college. The respon- 
sibility is a big one. How will you meet 
it? The next four years will be what you 
make them. Plan your course and follow it. 
Resolve to carry out what you resolve to do. 

A Strong Body 

A primary requisite to the highest effi- 
ciency in life is a strong body. Now is the 
time to cultivate it. Don't be satisfied 
merely to be well. Lay up a reserve of 
physical strength upon which you can call 
in emergencies. By all means get into ath- 
letics. If you should never attain more 
than the rank of the lowest scrub, the ex- 
perience would be worth the effort. Go out 
for everything possible; be good in at least 
one sport. 

Your body is a more priceless treasure, a 
more wonderful device, than anything man 
can create. Preserve It. Beware of the 
candy or soft drink habit. Treat yourself 
to sweat-producing exercise and a bath once 
each day. 

21 



studies 

A good idea to throw away is tlie old fear 
of letting one's studies interfere with his 
college education. One of the saddest and 
most frequent comments of the older stu- 
dents and graduates is "If I had only stud- 
ied." Learn to know the joys of solving 
the perplexities of "Trig," of tracing out 
the hidden mysteries of Chemistry, of mas- 
tering the intricacies of "prose style." The 
most valuable habit you can perform, in the 
opinion of the writer, is the habit of doing 
your level best in each day's work, of mas- 
tering each step as it comes. 

It is also wise to study how best you 
can study, A copy of Whipple's "How to 
Study" can be found in the college library, 
and will give you some helpful directions 
as to the most efficient methods. Finally, 
cultivate with unremitting assiduity the 
habit of concentration, of doing each bit 
of work with all your energy directed upon 
it. 

Friendship 

By far the most important by-product of 
college life is friendship. Before the year is 
over you should know every student at least 
by name. In the meantime, it is well for 
you to remember that you do not have to 
know a fellow's name in order to greet him 
22 ■ 



as you pass. Only one rule for forming 
friendships can be given, and it must be 
practiced: "To be a friend a man must show 
himself friendly." 

Permanent Values 

The fact should always be kept in mind 
that in college you are to decide upon the 
truly important things of life. Here you 
will learn to discriminate — to choose be- 
tween the many interests competing for your 
attention. The doors of the church will 
be open to you, the Christian Association 
will welcome you, the companionship of men 
and women who walk daily with the Friend 
of friends will be yours. It will remain for 
you to decide if you will avail yourself of 
these biggest things. At Maryville you will 
find opportunity not only to develop your- 
self physically, mentally and socially, but 
also to satisfy that most vital need and 
longing in every human heart — the yearn- 
ing for spiritual growth. The response to 
these opportunities will rest with you. 



SELF RESTRAINT IS THE FIRST STEP 

TO LEADERSHIP 

23 



% m. €. A. 




Y. W. C. A. Reading Room 



24 



THE PARABLE OF THE GOOD SAMARI- 
TAN IN COLLEGE 

Did you ever hear the parable of the Good 
Samaritan in an American College? 

A certain Freshman came down from home 
into college, and she fell among critics who 
said that her clothes didn't fit and that she 
was not stylish, and her personality was 
unfortunate, and they robbed her of her 
self-confidence and her enthusiasm, and de- 
parted, leaving her sick and sore at heart 
and half dead. And by chance a certain 
Junior passed her way, and when she saw 
her, she said, "What a good job those 
Sophomore critics did," and she passed by 
on the other side. And a certain Senior 
came that way, and she said, "Yea, verily, 
for she hadn't the making of a good liter- 
ary society girl," and she also passed on 
by the other side. But a certain Friendly 
Student, as she journeyed that way, came 
where she was, and had compassion on her 
and took her to her room, and bound up 
her wounds, pouring in understanding and 
sympathy and friendliness. And she put 
her on her feet again, and introduced her 
to her own friends, and was a friend to her. 

Which of these thinkest thou proved 
neighbor to the Freshman that fell among 
critics? 

25 



However, there is one exception to these 
American colleges, and that is old Mary- 
ville. It is full of "Friendly Students"; it 
is permeated with a democratic spirit; the 
Young Women's Christian Association is 
striving to satisfy your every need, to give 
you true friends, a good time, an under- 
standing of religion, and an opportunity for 
development and service. Freshmen friends 
and new girls, we are eager to welcome you 
with outstretched arms. 

ALICE ROBISON, 

Junior Y. W. C. A. President. 

DOROTHY WINTERS, 

Senior Y. W. C. A. President. 

BIG SISTER MOVEMENT 

All of us who have come to Maryville as 
strangers know just how much the Big Sis- 
ter Movement of the Y. W. means on Col- 
lege Hill. There is perhaps no other phase 
of Y. W. life which does more to create 
that feeling of friendship which predomi- 
nates at Maryville. 

Each new girl will have a Big Sister, and 
will probably be quite well acquainted with 
her by the time she reaches school, for all 
Big Sisters try to get in touch with their 
Little Sisters during the summer by mail. 
Those letters she will write you will be 
26 



full of valuable information, and you may 
ask her questions — just as many as you 
wish. 

Your Y. W. Big Sister will be quite as 
patient, as sympathetic, as lovable, as will- 
ing to help you through your first strange 
days at school, as a real true sister can be, 
and her friendship and helpfulness will re- 
main throughout the year. You may feel 
that your first Sunday away from home will 
be your "homesick" time, but with a 'Big 
Sister to take you to church and spend a 
pleasant afternoon with you, your lonesome 
day will quickly pass away, and your pros- 
pects for the year will doubtless seem 
brighter. 

LOIS HAYES. 

VIRGINIA WITHERINGTON. . 



NU GAIklMA SIGMA 

Did you ever feel jlike a stranger in a 
strange land? Did you ever go any place 
where everyone seemed to know everyone 
else, where they were all interested in 
things you were not familiar with, and 
where their conversation about those sub- 
jects sounded like Greek? You never felt 
quite so lonely in all your life, did you? 

Then on the other hand did you ever 
go to a big conference where you met doz- 

27 



ens of ffirls, likewise strangers, but who 
had come from all parts of the country for 
fellowship, for a discussion of personal prob- 
lems in order to bring the ideas of their 
communities to others? You will see these 
hundreds of girls dividing into smaller 
groups of ten or twelve, so that the con- 
ference may become more personal, so that 
friendships may become more intimate, and 
that all may have an individual part in 
the discussion. 

Did you ever think of college as a big 
conference? Well, it is; one that lasts for 
four long years. 

We want each new girl to enter right 
into our school life, to bring her new ideas 
to us, to show us where we need improving. 
So we have formed conference groups of 
about ten new girls with one of our finest old 
girls to help you until you elect your own 
chairman. This leader will make you fa- 
miliar with our campus activities, our Y. 
W. C. A. organization, and together you can 
talk over college problems; but best of all 
you will become friends, and immediately be 
grafted into the tree of Y. W. that is extend- 
ing its welcoming branches to all the girls. 

Three rahs for the Nu Gamma Sigma! 
MARY TIPPIT, Chairman. 
28 



Y. W. C, A. SUNDAY AFTERNOON 
MEETINGS 

WTiat do school girls like to talk about? 

Sundaes, hikes, clothes, exams; exams, 
clothes, hikes, sundaes. 

Well, we're planning to have every girl 
talking about the Sundays next year. 
Why? Simply because it is on Sunday aft- 
ernoon that the T. W. C, A. holds its 
weekly devotional meeting, and we are plan- 
ning to make that the brightest hour of all 
the week. 

We want to tell you of the three S's 
which help to make our Sunday meetings 
pleasant. 

First, Sociability. Every college girl 
wants lots of friends, and what better place 
is there to find them than In T. W.? Just 
try us on Sociability. We're truly longing 
to get better acquainted. 

Second, Service. If you miss the old C. 
E. at home, you'll want to enter right away 
into the work of T. W., and if you have 
never had the opportunity of being a mem- 
ber of a real, live Young People's Society, 
here's your chance for service on the Hill. 

Third, Spirituality. This is, of course, the 
biggest aim of our Sunday afternoon meet- 
ings, and the greatest source of enjoyment. 
After a busy, strenuous week we feel the 

29 



need of strength and refreshing, and so to- 
gether we seek Him who is the Bread of 
Life and the Water of Life. 

We are working for bigger and better 
meetings in 1923-1924 than we have had in 
the years past. Can we count on your sup- 
port? 

MARY BROADY, 
EVELYN FITTS. 

SOCIAL ACTIVITIES 

To every new girl coming to Maryville in 
September, there will be a warm feeling in 
our hearts for j^ou. We don't want you to 
have that homesick feeling that people gen- 
erally attribute to the new girl. No Mary- 
ville girl Is ever homesick for more than 
tv/o minutes. Don't think that you'll be 
left out when you descend those train steps, 
for we'll be right there to meet you and 
show you to your new home. 

Y. W. C. A. Reception 

For everybody to learn everybody else 
there will be an informal reception held on 
Baldwin lawn Saturday night, September 22. 
You can't help knowing everybody else; you 
just will! 

Breakfast Hike 

Then two weeks later on Monday morning 
we'll hike before the sun rises, and have 



breakfast out in the country. It's loads of 
fun; and then it is just beginning to be cool. 

Montvale Trip 

The best hike of all is our trip to Mont- 
vale for the week-end. There we are free 
from all but ourselves. We talk and walk 
and climb and cook and do anything else 
that we want to. 

Banquet 

There is our formal entertainment where 
we enjoy our own politeness, and besides 
the menu, we have another rare treat. Blue 
Ridge, our Southern Conference for T. W. 
C A., is discussed. We hope that you will 
become as enthusiastic as we who have al- 
ready been to this conference. 

May Day 

This crowns all the T. W. events for the 
year. 

It's beautiful, fairy-like and gorgeous. 
Just come and you'll see! 

MARGARET McKINNEY. 

LUCILE McRADY. 



A FRIEND IN NEED IS A FRIEND 
INDEED 

31 



WORLD FELrliOWSHIP AND SOCIAL, 
SEB^^CE 

An oriental banquet, a party and lots more 
Are merely an Inkling of all the things in 

store. 
The orphans like to see us come. 
They like the eats we bring. 
They like the games we play with them. 
They like the songs we sing. 
We're interested in missions, Fred Hope and 

all his crew. 
We .try in every little way 
To make his dreams come true. 
Last year we had an old clothes raid, 
A novelty, you'd say. 

We searched the town from left to right 
To make our project pay. 
Our aim is Christian fellowship, 
Frendship and love we'd bid. 
We'd have the girls to follow Christ, 
And do the things He did. 
We want you every one to know 
That service, come what may. 
Is woven in our purposes 
In every little way. 

Of course there's fun just all the time; 
We're jolly as can be; 
And yet, our goal is set so high 
That everyone can see. '• 

32 



If you will come to Maryville 

(We'd lovo to have you here). 

We'll stand by you in all that's right. 

You need not have a fear. 

We need you up on College Hill. 

We need your thoughts and views. 

We'd like to have you tell us 

The very latest news. 

If you will only say the word, 

If you will come — well, oh, 

We'll take you with us round the world. 

If you should want to go. 

SOCIAL SERVICE AND WORLD 
FELLOWSHIP COMMITTEE. 



IN UNION THERE IS STRENGTH 
33 



|. m. (n. A. 




Swimming Pool 



INTRODUCTION 

In publishing this handbook the Young 
Men's Christian Association feels it is doing 
a real service for the students of Maryville 
College, especially the incoming students. 
The aim and purpose of the Christian As- 
sociation is to make every man on the Hill 
an active member, and a follower of Christ. 
We purpose to help to continue the fine 
spirit of fellowship which has been preva- 
lent among Maryville men and women since 
the founding of the college. Here's for a 
bigger and better association in Maryville. 

MEMBERSHIP 

In article two of the Y. M. C. A. Consti- 
tution we find that there are two kinds of 
membership, active and associate. The ac- 
tive membership consists of men who are 
members in good standing of evangelical 
churches, or professing Christians of the 
Protestant faith, and who liave been duly 
received and elected by the association. 
Only active members may vote and hold 
office. 

The associate membership consists of any 
male student of good moral standing who 
desires to join the association. These mem- 
bers are entitled to all privileges of mem- 

35 



bership, except those of voting and holding 
office. 

Let us get together and make this year 
the greatest in the history of Maryville. 

PKRSONNETL 

Officers 

President Sam H. Franklin, Jr. 

Vice-President Edward Hamilton 

Secretary Edgar Cathey 

Treasurer Verton Queener 

Committeemen 

Lyceum Hugh C. Clabough 

Membership Stuart M. Rohre 

Motioa Pictures. .William C. Crow 

Athletics Earle N. Riskey 

Bible Study M. Burl Pritchard 

Deputations Edward G. Cornelius 

Music Dewey M. Eitner 

Missions Clinton M. Puff 

Social Service Salmon Brown 

Religious Meetings William S. Smythe 

Publicity Harold T. Van Order, 

Delegations Perry G. Rice 

3&. 



Y. M. C. A. ROOMS 

When you finally land on Maryville Col- 
lege campus, and begin to explore its un- 
known recesses, you will eventually come to 
a large brick building. Near the top of it 
you will see a sign which reads "Bartlett 
Hall," and a little lower you will see "Y. M. 
C. A." written in large white letters. This 
is the home of the T. M. C. A. on College 
Hill, and is a place where all men on, the 
Hill may go for reading and recreation. 

Now when you have found this building 
go inside and make yourself at home. Just 
at the right of the entrance you will find a 
small room, which is the Y. M. C. A. store, 
and here you may get candy and other con- 
fections to supplement the menu that you 
will receive at the dining hall. A notice of 
the hours that the store is open will be 
posted on the door. Then,. right next to the 
store, and just around the corner, is the 
"Y" reading room, where you will find the 
latest magazines, and where you and your 
friends may gather, or write letters. Y. M. 
C. A. stationery may be bought at the "Y" 
store for a nominal sum. Make use of this 
room, for it will drive away, the blue feel- 
ing which comes during the first few days 
of school. At the left of the entrance is 
the auditorium where the members of the 

3/7: 



T. M. C. A. gather on Sundaj^ just after 
dinner for an hour of religious meeting and 
discussion. You will find these meetings full 
of help and inspiration. The gymnasium is 
also on the first floor. When you have thor- 
oughly explored the first floor, don't fail to 
go upstairs before you leave the building. 
Here you will find the T. M. C. A. office 
just over the entrance. This is the place 
where you find the president, vice-president 
and secretary. They will be glad to have 
you come in and get acquainted. Doubtless, 
they can help you over some of the diffi- 
culties which you may encounter. 

All these rooms are for the free use of all 
the fellows on the Hill, and the officers are 
willing and glad at all times to help you 
with your problems. Make use of these ad- 
vantages, and you will enjoy your college 
life much more. 



HAPPINESS IS A HABIT 

38: 



Bl^UE RIDGE 

Every spring we, the students of Mary- 
ville College, are represented at the great 
Y. M. C. A. conferences which are held at 
Blue Ridge, North Carolina, the finest con- 
ference grounds of the South. We always 
have had big delegations from Maryville at 
Blue Ridge, and next June we' expect to 
have more students than ever before vfli0 
will get the benefits of these conferences, led 
by such men as Robert E. Speer, Sherwood 
Eddy and John R. Mott. 

FRED HOPE 

Every year during the month of May w© 
have a "Fred Hope" Campaign drive, eon- 
ducted by the T. W. C. A. and the Y. M. 
C. A. 

Some years ago, Fred Hope, a student 
from Maryville, went to Africa as a mission 
worker. After overcoming stupendous ob- 
stacles, he finally succeeded in establishing 
a mission station there, which has grown 
since, and is now accomplishing great work 
in Christianizing and civilizing the natives. 
We are proud of our annual contributions 
which go toward helping the work of our 
friend and former fellow student, Fred Hope. 

S9 



LIFE WORK CONFERENCE 

All the students remember the Life Work 
Conference which was held in March. The 
messages g-iven by able speakers on prin- 
ciples which should govern the choice of 
one's vocation were nat only inspiring and 
instructive, but they were just the thing 
that naany of the students needed to help 
them decide their life calling. 

Every new student should look forward to 
the next Life Work Conference, for it will 
be of great value in the lives of all stu- 
dents. Whether you have decided on your 
life work or not this conference will do 
you much good. 

HIKES 

Have you ever felt the thrill of a hike? If 
not, you 'have missed a real treat, and half 
of your healthy life. One of the best hikes 
taken by the college men is the trip to 
Thunderhead, by the Y. M. C. A. This moun- 
tain is a treeless dome in the Great Smoky 
Mountains which is about 5,700 feet above 
sea level. This is the big hike of the year. 
Be sure to arrange to go. 

There are many points of interest which 
are much nearer Maryville than Thunder- 
head. Among these is the trip to Look 
Rock, to the Flats, to Sunshine or to Calder- 
wood, where the mountains are everyv/here. 

40 . 



Another fine place is at Sheep Pen Cave on 
the Tennessee River. Swimming and fish- 
ing, as well as a quiet rest, can be found 
here. 

There is no lack of places to wliich one 
might hike. All it takes is a little energy 
and vitality. Get your group of four to six 
together, and plan to go somev/here on a 
hike. If nobody in your bunch knows the 
way, see the Y. M., it will provide a leader 
for you. 

MOTION PICTURES 

Once every week the T. M. C. A. has a 
good motion picture show. Only the best 
of pictures are shown, and they are given 
to the student at cost, which ordinarily is 
ten cents for each show of five to eight reels. 
These shows will be on Saturday after the. 
meetings of the literary societies. Make 
your plans to go to literary society and then 
to the show afterward. 

THE FRIENDSHIP COUNCFL 

The Friendship Council is a new unit of 
the Y. M. C. A. It is one of the most pow- 
erful religious organizations on the Hill. The 
men who make up this council have had 
religious experience, and are sincere, pray- 
ing men, eager to do their part in toeing a 
friend to man and building up the kingdom 

4t 



of our Savior. This council seeks to build 
up the spiritual side of the life of the stu- 
dents. To accomplish this we have each 
taken the following pledge: 

Through prayer and by the grace of God, 
the Friendship Council aims to make every 
man on College Hill a professing Christian, 
a member of some church, and an active 
Christian worker. To accomplish this end, 
I promise to make my life as much like that 
of Jesus Christ as possible, to befriend, pray 
for and help in every way possible every 
man under my care, to attend every coun- 
cil meeting unless prohibited for a satisfac- 
tory reason. 

Athletics 

The physical department of the "Y" 
hopes to get every college man in some form 
of athletics. Intra-mural athletics will be 
developed to the utmost, providing every fel- 
low will co-operate with us. There are 
enough branches of athletics that every fel- 
low will be able to get into that which he 
likes best. Independent football teams will 
play on a regular schedule. There will also 
be a basketball league. Baseball, tennis and 
track will not be limited to the varsity play- 
ers. In the Gym there will be wrestling, 
boxing, tumbling and volley ball. Above all 
don't miss the opportunity to swim. 

42 . 



"The glory of a young man is his 
strength." We wish each fellow HEALTH 
for this school year, 

KELIGIOUS MEETINGS OF THE 
Y. M. C. A. 

Realizing that in order to get a really 
well-rounded education a fellow should be 
given an opportunity to attend and take 
part in religious activities as well as 'aca- 
demic and physical, the committee on reli- 
gious programs has worked out a suggested 
plan for the meetings for the first semester. 
This schedule immediately follows this 
article. 

It will be noticed that the program covers 
a great variety of subjects, and that the 
meetings will be conducted to a great ex- 
tent by the students. It is our belief, as 
fellow students, that our "buddies" will have 
a greater interest in the meetings when they 
have a definite responsibility in them than 
they would if only a selected few were called 
upon to take part. 

We have planned our work for the first . 
semester, fellows; now let's' with God's help 
work our plan. 



43 



SUGGESTED PKOGKAM FOR THE RELI- 
GIOUS MEETINGS or THE 
¥. M. C. A. 

Sept. 16, 1923 — Welcome, Dr. Wilson. 

Sept. 23 — Teamwork, Coach Bond. 

Sept. 30 — Our Purpose, Sam H. Franklin, Jr. 

Oct. 7 — Our Text-book, Bible Study Commit- 
tee. 

Oct. 14 — Blue Badge, Delegates. 

Oct. 21 — Athletics and the "Y", Athletic 
Committee. 

Oct. 28— Our College, Open Forum. 

Nov. 4 — Jesus the Teacher, Three Students. 

Nov. 11 — Service — the Ministry, Special 
Speaker. 

Nov. 18 — Society Meeting, Alpha Sigma Lit- 
erary, 

Nov. 25 — Deputations, Deputation Committee. 

Dec. 2 — Jesus the Physician, Three Students. 

Dec. 9— Service^the Law, Special Speaker. 

Dec 16 — Music, Music Committee. 

Dec. 23 — Holiday. 

Dec. 30 — Holiday. 

Jan. 6, 1924 — Jesus Our Example, Special 
Speaker. 

Jan, 13 — Service — General, Three Students. 

Jan. 20 — Society Meeting, Athenian Literary, 

Jan. 27 — Missions, Missionary Committee. 



FKOPOSED BUDGET FOR THE Y. M. C. A., 

1923-1934 

This proposed budget has been planned 
with two things in mind: first, of course, is 
the income; second, that tlie money should 
be expended in such ways that the student 
will get the maximum benefit. Soon after 
school opens. If it is found to be neces- 
sary,, this budget will be revised and pub- 
lished again. 

Conferences 

Blue Ridge §100.00 

Life work 100.00 

Other conferences 50.00 

General 

Administration 50.00 

Supervisory 75.00 

Reading room 75.00 

Bible study 50.00 

Motion pictures 100.00 

Programs 40.00 

Deputations 25.00 

Social 25.00 

Publicity 50.00 

Handbook 30.00 

Friendship Council 25.00 

Flowers 20.00 

Reserve 100.00 

Total $915.00 

45 



LITERARY SOCIETIES 

Bainonian 

At Maryville thrives Bainonian, the old- 
est girls' literary society. Many are the 
B's that buzz busily around this hive. The 
Spirit of Bainonian, the queen bee, sends 
out her B band in search of benefits which 
will build and store Bainonian with the best 
of beauty and blessing-s. All college season 
the Bs battle bravely and bring back honey 
from the hearts of the blooms they find. 
They blend their burdens into B bread and 
honey, so when they need it they have bal- 
anced rations and become broad and beau- 
tiful. These are the beginnings of B bread 
and honey — buoyancy, bravery, brilliance, 
boosting, broad-mindedness and being 
v/holesome. Tie beckon you. Will j'ou eat 
of our store, and help store up m.ore? We 
bid you welcom.e, and beg you to be B's of 
Bainonian. 

Theta Epsilon 

"W^e extend to you a hearty invitation to 
visit our society, and if you are pleased with 
us, we would enjoy having you as one of 
our members. Theta Epsilon aims to secure 
literary and social development for every 
girl. The literary and social programs have 
their places in the year's schedule as you 
46 



will find out, if you join us. Every old 
member of the society will tell you that she 
is a Theta born, and a Theta bred, and 
when she dies, she'll be a Theta dead. Join 
us and you will be saying the same thing. 

Alpha Sigma 

During each of the score of years the 
Alpha Sigma Literary Society has been in 
existence it has been one of the most im- 
portant organizations on the Hill. Its • two 
purposes are, to develop a hearty Christian 
fellowship among its members, and to aid 
them to attain the highest proficiency in 
oratory, debate, and general literary achieve- 
ment. The most careful training and 
consideration is given to all new men, 
and every opportunity is sought for their 
benefit and improvement. Pour years of ac- 
tive membership in this society is a great 
help in a preparation for a ifuture leader 
in forensics or a public speaker. Each year 
the members of this society give a play, the 
proceeds of which go to the improvement 
of the organization. The first meeting of 
the j^ear is given over to a welcome and 
general good time for the new men of the' 
college. It also has two joint meetings 
with its sister society, the Theta Epsilon, 
for the purpose of social benefit and en- 
joyment. 

47. 



Athenian 

The Athenian Literary Society holds the 
distinction of being the oldest literary so- 
ciety on the Hill. Its present membership 
enrolls a large proportion of the male stu- 
dents of the college. Some years ago it 
became necessary to divide the society into 
two sections. Each section meets in its 
hall on Saturday evening at 6:30. The ideal 
of Athenian is to give her membership such 
training as will enable them to secure the 
very best development during their college 
days; and to promote a correct college spirit 
and love for Alma Mater. To accomplish 
this ideal she provides programs of an in- 
structive, entertaining and varied nature 
that, are full of life, pep and college spirit. 
All new men are earnestly invited to attend 
the opening social of this society at the be- 
ginning of the year. All who believe in our 
motto, "Nothing Without Labor," are in- 
vited to become Athenians. 

Adelphic Union 

The four literary societies unite to form 
the Adelphic Union. This large organiza- 
tion elects its officers each spring. The 
honor of being president of the Adelphic 
Union is passed on from one society to the 
other in fixed order. 

The Adelphic Union gives a banquet each 
48 



j'ear to its membei's and friends. In May 
the banquet was a King Tut affair, and 
was enjoyed by many of the students. 

Debate and Oratory 

One of the strongest institutions for men- . 
tal development and leadership at Mary- 
ville is found in the excellent forensic pro- 
gram put on every year by the Pi Kappa 
Delta. 

The 1923 season has been marked by two 
new features, (1) the first debate tour ever 
made by a Maryville team, and (2) the re- 
vival of the Tennessee Oratorical League 
with Vanderbilt University, University of the 
South, Chattanooga University, Cumberland 
University, and Maryville College as the 
membership. There were thirty-nine judges' 
votes for the season, twenty-one of which 
were favorable to us and eighteen were cast 
for our opponents. Nine of the thirteen 
debates were held on foreign floors. 

Next year is before us; and those of us 
who believe Maryville has a right to a place 
in the forensic sun are ambitious for a 
strong schedule. Plans are under way for 
the holding of a forensic meet to determine 
the forensic championship of East Tennes- 
see, and hopes are high that we may be 
able to send a debate team to the national 
convention of Pi Kappa Delta. 
49 



PUBLICATIONS 

The Highland Echo 

The Hig-hland Echo Is the weekly publi- 
cation of Maryville College. It is a four- 
page, five-column paper, to which each stu- 
dent subscribes when he matriculates. The 
editor is elected from the Junior or Senior 
classes by the whole student body, and the 
business manager is appointed. The Echo 
is conducted after the fashion of larger 
newspapers, carrying athletic reports, news 
items, editorials, and other articles of in- 
terest to the students. Through the medium 
of the Echo each student is enabled to keep 
in touch with ail the activities of the Hill. 
The officers for the coming year are Verton 
M. Queener, '24, editor-in-chief, and Robert 
M. Baldwin, '25, business manager. 

The Chilhowean 

The Chilhowean is the college annual, pub- 
lished by the Junior Class. It is the official 
summary of the year's events, and is in real- 
ity a chapter in the history of undergradu- 
ate Maryville, One of the most pleasant 
features of college life is that memories of 
it are always present. It is the purpose of 
the Chilhowean to preserve these memories 
accurately. New ideas are alwaj'^s sought 
in order to faithfully portray all organiza- 
tions and activities. All friends of Maryville 

50 



join in commending- the spirit and work of 
each Junior Class as it attempts the pro- 
duction of the College Memory Book, the 
Chilhowean. 

Robert M. Baldwin will be the editor, and 
Ned Stewart, business manager, of next 
year's Chilhowean. 

The "Y" Bee 

The "Y" Bee is published weekly by the 
Y. M. C. A., and contains the announcement 
of the week's program for "Y" activities, 
such as hikes, swimming meets, field meets, 
boxing matches, games, and the Sunday aft- 
ernoon meetings. Editor, Harold Van Orden. 

Ihe Maryville College Handbook 

The Handbook is published by the Y. M. 
C. A. Editor, William C. Crow; Business 
Managers, John R. Stockton, Stuart M. 
Rohre, and William C. Crow. 

The Di-amatic Club 

"The Dramatic Club," or "Maryville 
Players," as they are better known, during 
the three years of its definite organization 
has established a permanent place for itself 
among the primary student activities. 
These players are known not only by the peo- 
ple of the college and town, but also by those 
in surrounding towns, and around our sub- 
urb, Knoxville. This club offers an invalu- 
51 



able opportunity to talented persons, and 
seems to be growing in popularity all the 
time. 

Men's Glee Club 

The Men's Glee Club has been organized 
for four years, and has had many good trips. 
It is a live and growing organization. The 
1923 club was heard from New Orleans to 
New York by radio. Jean McMurray, Presi- 
dent, and James Brown, Manager, are plan- 
ning many extensive trips for next year. If 
you can sing, we want you to try out for the 
club. 

The Band 

One of the largest and best musical or- 
ganizations at Maryville is the College Band. 
Harry Bannister, the experienced instruc- 
tor, conducts bi-weekly rehearsals of band 
music along every line, including high-class 
marches, waltzes, serenades, medleys and 
overtures. The t>and furnishes music at 
many entertainments and athletic contests. 
Concerts and parades also draw many 
hearers. Fellows who possess a fair knowl- 
edge of band music should join early. 

Graduate Recitals 

There is an old saying, which nobody 
doubts its truth, that our home talent is as 

52 



good as that which is imported. Old stu- 
dents will agree that the entertainments 
given by the Music and Expression Depart- 
ments are not to be surpassed. Among 
these entertainments graduate recitals take 
a high place. They are given in the spring 
by members of the graduating classes of 
expression, piano, and voice. They furnish 
an opportunity for cultural development 
along lines not pursued in the classroom and 
add much to the interest of the students. 

Hi-Trail Club 

The Hi-Trail Club was organized for the 
purpose of development of physical strength, 
heightening the knowledge of and a love 
for the "Great Outdoors," and gaining a 
more intimate knowledge of the mountain- 
eers. The membership In this club is re- 
stricted to twelve. To become a member 
of the Hi-Trail Club one must have had at 
least one hundred miles of hiking experience, 
and must present a thesis giving an account 
of such experiences, and be unanimously 
elected by the members. 

The members are looking forward to next 
year with hopes for as much fun and fellow- 
ship as has been prevalent during the year 
which has just passed. 
63 



Ministerial Association 

The Ministerial Association is composed 
of candidates for the Christian ministry 
who are in attendance upon the college. 
Its object is the discussion of themes re- 
lating to the work of the ministry. All 
men who expect to become ministers should 
join this association. 

Student Volunteers 

Tliis is an organization of the students 
who expect to go to the foreign field as mis- 
sionaries. Its weekly meetings are held on 
Thursday. The programs consist of book 
reviews, talks by missionaries and discus- 
sion. If it is j^our purpose to go to the for- 
eign field, join this group and get in line 
for your work. 

Religious Meetings of the College 

Maryville College is noted for many 
things, but the one thing for which she will 
always be remembered Is her February 
meetings. These meetings are instrumental 
in erecting new standards of life; they in- 
spire some to active Christian service, and 
in a measure determine the destinies of the 
students. 

Vesper service is conducted, every Sunday 
evening by our college pastor. Dr. William 

54 



Patton Stevenson. To the new students es- 
pecially this service is one of the most im- 
pressive of the services conducted on the 
Hill. The music is excellent, for the chants 
and anthems of the robed choir add much. 
Then follows a very inspiring- address. 

On Thursday morning you will hear an- 
other of these very helpful addresses by 
Dr. Stevenson. His sermons are meant for 
tha college students, so do not miss any 
of them. 

Chemistry Club 

The Chemistry Club is composed of stu- 
dents who are taking more than one year 
of college chemistry. One year chemistry is 
required for membership. This club dis- 
cusses the chemical problems of the day. 

L.aw Club 

Any student who intends to become a law- 
yer may be a member of this club. The 
programs are made up of mock trials and 
otlier things of interest. 

Pre-Medical Club 

This organization is for the sole purpose 
of helping those who are interested in this 
field of work. Any student taking a pre- 
medical course may become a member. 



WHO'S WHO IN BIARYVILLE 

Alpha Sigma Sam H. Franklin 

Athenian Edgar Martin 

Athletic Association Carl Schmidt 

Bainonian Lina Hodges 

Band Harry Bannister 

Basketball Earle Riskey 

Cheer Leaders Brown, Mintier 

Chilhowean Robert Baldwia, Editor 

Ned Stewart, Business Manager 

Highland Echo Verton Queener, Editor 

Robert Baldwin, Business Manager 

Field Day Earle N. Riskey 

Football Robert Thrower 

Glee Club Jean McMurray 

Junior Class Edgar Cathej. 

Maryville Players J. Lynn McClung 

PI Kappa Delta Sam H. Franklin 

Senior Class » Malcolm Miles 

Sophomore Class Raymond Anderson 

Student Council R. A. N. Wilson 

Tennis John M. Hall 

Theta Epsilon Mary Robison 

Track James Brown 

Y. M. C. A Sam H. Franklin 

Y. W. C. A., Senior Dorothy Winters 

Y. W. C. A., Junior Alice Robison 

56 



ATHT.ETICS 

Maryville is represented by teams in every 
major college sport, and ranks on equal 
terms with the leaders In- this section of the 
country. The administrative control of ath- 
letics is centered in the Athletic Association. 
The officers of this Athletic Association are: 
President, Carl Schmidt; Yice-TTesident, Guy 
Sneed; Secretary, Thelma Adair; Treasurer, 
F. L. Proffitt; Faculty Representatives, J. H. 
McMurray, G. A. Knapp; Student Represen- 
tatives, Margaret McKinney, Lucile Heis- 
kell, Earle Riskey, Doris Musick; Town Rep- 
resentatives, Dave Proffitt, Dr. Burchfield. 

"V^ith L, S. Honaker and L. E. Bond as 
coaches of Maryville athletics, and hard 
fighting teams composed of loyal nien, it is 
no wonder that the Athletic Association has 
made such a stride forward during the last 
two years. A new day has dawned for 
Maryville in athletics because she has two 
live coaches, plenty of good material, added 
equipment, and a splendid new field. It is 
hoped that the new gymnasium will be 
ready for use in the year 1923-1924. 
rOOTBALI. 

For the past two years Maryville has held 
the championship of the Appalachian Ath- 
letic Conference. Prospects are good for 
holding this championship for another 
year. 

67 



1923 FOOTBALL, SCHEDULE 

Sept. 22 — Mars Hill, at Maryville. 

Sept. 29 — Tusculum, at Maryville. 

Oct. 6 — University of Tennessee, at Knoxville. 

Oct. 12 — Milligan, at Johnson City. 

Oct. 20 — University of Kentucky, at Lexing- 
ton. 

Oct. 27 — Transylvania, at Maryville. 

Nov. 3 — Georgetown, at Georgetown. 

Nov, 10 — King, at Maryville. 

Nov. 16 — Emory and Henry, at Emory. 

Nov. 23 — East Tennessee Normal, at Mary- 
ville. 

Nov. 29 — Cumberland University, at Mary- 
ville. 

BASKETBALL 

Milligan disputed our claim to the cham- 
pionship of the Appalachian Conference of 
basketball of last season. A post season 
game was arranged. We went up and beat 
them in a business-like manner, tucked the 
cup under our arms and came home. Thus 
ended the most successful basketball sea- 
son in the history of Maryville. With hopes 
for a new grymnasium for next year, and all 
the players except one back, next year's 
team should prove one of the best in the 
South. 

58 



BASEBALL 

Maryville has always had a baseball team 
which would do credit to any school. The 
only trouble we have with our baseball team 
is that of keeping- our men away from the 
big league teams. The prospects for next 
year go to prove that Maryville's baseball 
record will continue to be improved. We 
are to lose only one man through graduation. 

TENNIS 
We had on our tennis schedule this year. 
Centre, Tusculum, Sewanee, East Tennessee 
Normal, and University of Tennessee. Ten- 
nis is growing rapidly in popularity at 
Maryville. In this sport, as in the others, 
we are producing winning teams. With all 
of this year's team back for next year we 
are sure to have a season which will result 
in many victories. 

TRACK 

The track work at Maryville is still in its 
infancy. However, the fact that we have 
had more men taking active part, and more 
intercollegiate meets this year than pre- 
viously goes to prove that track athletics are 
steadily improving, 

59 



This year we had two dual meets, one 
with the. University of Tennessee, and the 
other with Centre College. 

In both of these meets we took our share 
of first places. Maryville was also repre- 
sented in the first Relay Carnival of South- 
ern Colleges at Georgia Tech. With this fine 
beginning and with more meets planned for 
another year it should not be long before 
old Maryville should hold her rightful place 
with the rest of the southern schools just 
as she does in her other major sports. 

STANDING TKACK RECORDS 

100-Yard Dash — McGinley, 1923, 10 seconds. 
220-Yard Dash — McGinley, 1923, 23 2-5 sec. 
440-Yard Dash — Threlkeld, 1915, 53 sec. 
SSO-Yard Run — Miller, 1914, 2 min. S sec. 
One Mile Run — Howell, 1922, 5 min. 2 3-5 sec. 
2-Mile Run — Templin, 1923, 12 min. 11 sec. 
High Jump — Acton, 1922, 5 ft. 3 in. 
Broad Jump — Bush, 1915, 21 ft. 2 in. 
Pole Vault — Butler, 1915, 11 ft. 1 in. 
Discus Throw — Williamson, 1914, 96 ft. 8 in. 
Javelin Throw — Jourolmon, 1922, 123 ft. 
16-lb. Shot Put — Thrower, 1923, 37 ft. 8 in. 
High Hurdles— McGinley, 1923, 16 4-5 sec. 
Low Hurdles — McGinley, 1923, 26 4-5 sec. 
One Mile Relay— Class of 1916, 1914, 3 min. 
56 1-5 sec. 

60 



CONSTITUTION OF MARYVILLE COL- 
LEGE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

ARTICLE VII 

1. The following students shall be permit- 
ted to wear the Maryville "M" : 

a. Members of the varsity football team 
who have played fifteen quarters, b. Mem- 
bers of the varsity baseball team who have 
played as much as five innings per game in 
one-half of the scheduled games; or a basis- 
ball pitcher who has pitched forty-five in- 
nings in scheduled games, c. Members of 
the varsity basketball team who have played 
one-half a game in each of the scheduled 
games. d. Members of the varsity track 
team winning first place In a dual meet, or 
any other meet where three or more colleges 
are competing, e. Members of the varsity 
tennis team playing in one-half the tourna- 
ments of the year. 

2. The football "M"' shall be an eight- 
inch block "M," the baseball "M" a seven- 
inch straight "M," the basketball "M" a six- 
inch block "M" ; the girls' basketball "M" 
a five-inch block "M," the track "M" a five- 
inch block "M" with wings attached, and 
the tennis "M" shall be a script "M." 

3. All members of the second football, 
baseball, or basketball teams may wear the 
Maryville Monogram. 

6. No other students shall wear either the 
"M" or the Maryville Monogram. 
61 



Sixth 

Hour 

2:05 to 

3:00 












Fifth 

Hour 

1:10 to 

2:05 












Fourth 

Hour 

11:15 to 

12:10 












Third 

Hour 

10:20 to 

11:15 












Second 
Hour 

9:25 to 
10:20 












First 

Hour 

8:30 to 

9:25 














>> 

4) 

Eh 


m 

<u 

1 


3 


> 

'0 


i 



62 





Sixth 

Hour 

2:05 to 

3:00 














Fifth 

Hour 

1:10 to 

2:05 














Fourth 
Hour 

11:15 to 
12:10 














Third 

Hour 

10:20 to 

11:15 




— 


— 










Second 

Hour 

9:25 to 

10:20 






First 

Hour 

8:30 to 

9:25 


















6) 


>> 

1 
1 


1 


u 

i 



63 



DONT FORGET 

TO PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 

The Christian Associations would call the 
attention of every man and woman who 
reads this book to the advertisements which 
follow. All of the standard dealers are rep- 
resented in these pages. Patronize them, 
and OKLT them, for it is through their co- 
operation that the Handbook is made pos- 
sible, and the Associations heartily recom- 
mend each and everyone of them to the 
members of the incoming class, and the old 
students. 

THEIR HONORABLE DEALINGS WITH 
MARYVILLE COLLEGE IN THE PAST 
IS AMPLE WARRANT FOR TOUR 
CONFIDENCE AND PAT- 
RONAGE IN THE 

FUTURE. ■ ; . I ■ 



64 



All Old Students Know 

And New Students Soon 
Find the Way to 

MARTIN'S 

Opposite the Southern Station 

The Popular Drug 
Store 

Only a Step from the Hill 



Bostonian Red Cross 

Famous Shoes for Men Shoes for Ladies 

Wilson Bros. Furnishings 

Where Quality Counts, We Win 

H. N. Bird ^ Go. 

MARYVILLB, TENN. 



65 



Kodaks J A 

rr .1 A -^^ 

loilet Articles 
Sodas 

In fact, eveything to be haxl in a Mod- 
em Drug Store 

"IVe Are Alji^ays Clad to See You' 

MITCHELL^S DRUG ; 
STORE mif«c> 

Maryville, Tennessee. ,: 
Phones No, 3 Ml 
Jno. H. Mitchell Chas. R. McDaniel 



^ 



New Providence 

Prestyterian 

CWrcli 

MAIN AND COLLEGE STREEt 

Bible School graded and conducted 
by a TPell qualified corps of officers 
and teachers; Christian Endeavor 
awal^e and active; the whole church 
fortvard-looking in plan and purpose. 

Students Cordidll'^ Invited to Ma\e 

This Their Church Home 

While in College 



67 



TKe Western 
Theological Seminary 

Pittsburg^ Pa, 
A Seminary for College Graduates 

A complete, mod- 
e r n theological 

curriculum, with 
elective courses 
leading to the de- 
gree of B.D., is of- 
fered to students 
of all denornina- 
tions. 

Graduate courses 
of the University 
of Pittsburg, lead- 
ing to the degrees 
of A.M. and Ph.D., 
are open to prop- 
erly qualified stu- 
dents of the Semi- 
nary. ..^Two en- 
trance prizes of 
$150 each. Post-graduate fellowship of $500. 
Exceptional library facilities. All buildings 
are new, with modern equipment. Social 
hall, gymnasiuhi and students' commons. 
— For information apply to — 
PRES. JAMES A. KELSO, PH.D., D.D. 




68 



Brotli( 



Stinnet Brotners 

Transfer and Taxi Service 

SERVICE DAY AND NIGHT 

When You Come to Maryville Call up 
Stinnet for Your Trunk 

Maryville-Knoxville Taxi 

TWO DODGE CARS, ONE BUICK 
ONE STUDEBAKER 

Seasonable Prices — Good Drivers 

Bell Phone 247 Peoples Phone 333 

Clyde E. Stinnet 
^ Homer C. Stinnett 

103 WASHINGTON AVENUE 
MARYVILLE, TBNN. 



69 



UNION 
THEOLOGICAL 

SEMINARY 

Richmond, Va. 

oldest largest 

best endowed 

Southern Presbyterian 
Seminary 

It Is conservative In Its doctrine. At 
the same time it has always been a 
leader In the Introduction of new and 
timely methods of theological teaching. 



70 



Norton Hard^vare 
Company 

HARDWARE 
SPORTING GOODS 

Where Your Patronage is Appreciated 

Gennett Records 

JUSTIFY EVERY ANTICIPATION OF 
MUSIC LOVERS 

, HEAR THEM AT THE 

MARYVILLE FURNITURE 
COMPANY 

Bring us your picture ^rame work. See us 
for the latest hits in sheet music. 



71 




To The . 

N enf comer : 

You can obtain your Sweater, 
Jersey, Shoes, Football equip- 
ment, or anything in the ath- 
letic line, by mail from our At- 
lanta store almost as easily as if you called 
in person. 

Catalogue on Request 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

74 N. Broad St Atlanta, Ga. 



REDPATH LYCEUM BUREAU 

BIRKINGHAM, ALABAMA 

Booking leading Lrecturers, Musical Com- 
panies, Entertainers and Chautauqua. 

"PAPER" 

FOR EVERY PURPOSE 

' LOtJISVILLE PAPER CO. 

,*" Incorporated 

LOUISVILLE, KT. 

72 



For the many little things you need, like 
Coat Hangers, Towel Bars, Soap Boxes, Can-i 
dies. Candle Sticks, Waste Baskets, Hair 
Pins, Hair Nets, Wash Cloths, Shoe Polish, 
Tablets, Notebooks, Pencils and Box Paper- 
come . to our store. 

We appreciate your patronstge, and save 
you money on your purchases, 

Wright's 10c Store 

"Where a Little Money Goes a Long Way'?. 



Lane Tkeological 
Seminary 

CINCINNATI, OHIO 

Spacious Campus, Commodious Build-* 

ings and Refurnished 

Dormitory. 

Ten minutes' ride from heart of the city. 

For information write to the President, 
WTLLIAM McKIBBSN, D.D., I.I..D. 



THE LOUISVILLE 
PRESBYTERIAN 

THEOLOGICAL- 

SEMINARY^^^A 

BRILLIANT FACULTY 
MODERN CURRICULUM 

Situated in the heart of the institu- 
tional section of a great metropolis, 
with all the added advantages of these 
associated institutions. 

Write for particulars to 
JOHN M. VANDER MEULEN 

President 

109 E. Broadway Louisville, Ky. 



74 



C. C. WHITE 

SHOE REPAIRING-^ '^ 

College Students Given Careful Attention 
Thanks for the Past Year 



Army Salvage Store 

219 COLLEGE ST. 
GET YOUR HIKING GOODS HERE 



PROFFITT'S 

^, EVERYTHING FOR MEN, WOBIEN: , ' ^. 
AND CHILDREN'S WEAR 



Long's Confectipnery 

The Home of Good .Food and Sanitation. 
Choice Confectionery, Soft Drinks. 

LET US PROVE IT 
75 



THE MOODY 
BIBLE INSTITUTE 

I OF CHICAGO 

I Founded in 1886 by D. L.. Moody 

Free instruction in day and evening 
cleisses. Courses in the Bible, Gospel Music, 
and practical Chrisliem work. 

The Correspondence Department offers 
eight different Bible correspondence courses. 

Catalogue, or prospectus of the corre- 
spondence courses sent on request. 

ADDRESS 

The Moody Bible Institute 

153 Institute Place 
Chicago, III. 



tSuSH-KREBSXoS] 
b^ LduisvillcTKy. ^^IL 



COLLEGE ANNUAL 

EXPERTJS 

GO LLE Q£hm U AL S 



ALKAHEST 

Lyceum System 

Incorporated 1902 

THE LEADING SOUTHERN AGENCY FOR 

THE BEST CHAUTAUQUA AND 

LYCEUM ATTRACTIO^^S 

ATLANTA, GEORGIA 



TT 



Y. M. C. A. STORE 

Candies 

Pastries 

Iqe Cream 

AND 

College Necessities 

WE APPRECIATE YOUR 
PATRONAGE 

If you don't see it — ask for it. We 
don't mind telling you why we don't 
have it. 

Were Here to Serve You 

STUART M. ROHRE 
Ma?iager 



'i^. 



Y. W. C. A. STORE 

Third Floor, Pearsons Hall 

*'When a feller needs a friend" 
The **Y" Store will be the one. 

CANDIES 

CANNED GOODS 

SALTED PEANUTS 

PIES 

SANDWICHES 

1 ICE CREAM 

HAIR NETS 

CHEWING GUM 



All proceeds go to the Blue Ridge Loan 
Fund of the Y. W. C. A. 



79 



Maryville College 

Samuel Tyndale WilsoB, D.D., I.I..D., Pies. 

ONE HUNDRED AND FIl TH YEAR 
BEGINS SEPTEMBER 11, 1923 

Educational standards of the highest En- 
vironment positively Christian. Expenses 
lowest possible. 

Enrollment, College, 557; Preparatm.y 
School 244; Total SOI young men and 5 0img 
women; 34S came from thirty-four states 
rnTcountries outside of Tennessee. Faculty 
orninety-sevcn professors, instructors and 
assistants. „„ „„ 

Endowment and property ?1.600,000.00 
Campus, 250 acres. Sixteen large buildings, 
including the new Thaw Memorial Hall. 

Entrance requirements, for admission to 

Expenses: Ttiition. $24 a year. Room rent 
forTach student, with two ^^ g^^^^^^"^;,,^!,. 
erages $38 a year. |°f^J;^/'ifi,'rary free. 
Sf/h^er op^TAunitier ^Filn information 
sent upon request. Address. 

CLINTON H, GILMNGHAM, D.D. 

Registrar 

Maryville, Tennessee 



80 



LYCEUM PROGRAM 

FOR THE COLLEGE YEAR, 1923-1924 

COSI FAN TUTTI OPERA 
COMPANY 

OR 

THE IRENE WILLIAMS 
COMPANY 

VIVIAN PLAYERS 
In "Six Cylinder Love" 

BEVINELL R. FORD 
Lecture and Demonstration 

VERNON AND HIS CLEVE- 
LAND QUINTET 

Hugh C. Clabough, Manager 



81 



BUREAU 
OF ENGRAVING 



INCORPORATED 



Engravers of College 
Annuals 



Minneapolis, Minn. 



•fWBi^WW" 



MODERN riBEPROOr 

EUROPEAN PLAN 

St. James Hotel 

A. A. LANGHORNE, Mgr. 
"The Home of the Traveler" 

KNOXVILLE, TENN. 
"You Will Feel at Home With Us'" 



Tke Busy Bee Cafe 

"THE HOME OF GOOD FOOD AND 
SANITATION" 

GIVE US A TRIAL 



Just Around the Comer from the 
Southern Depot 



KNOXVILLE. TENNESSEE 



83 



R. F. Graf J.R. Graf 

H. R. Graf 



R. F. Graf ^ Sons 
ARCHITECTS 



And 



Structural 



Engl 



ineers 



Members of the American Institute 
of Architects. Licensed; Architects and 
Engineers of the state of Tennessee. 



Knoxville, Tenn. 



84 



Maryville to KnoxviUe 

REO BUS LINE 

LEAVE KNOXVILLB 
At 700 S. Gay St., Near the Office of "The 
KnoxviUe Sentinel." 
6:45 A. M. 
8:30 A. M. 
9:30 A. M. 
11:30 A. M. 
3:00 P. M. 
4:15 P. M. 
5:10 P. M. 
6:00 P. M. 

LEAVE MARYVILLE, AT MITCHELL'S 
DRUG STORE 

5:15 A. M. 

5:25 A. M. 

5:45 A. M. 

8:00 A. M. 

8:30 A» M. 
10:00 A. M. 
11:15 A. M, 
12:30 P. M. 

2:00 P. M. 

3:00 P. M. 

4:30 P*. M. 

NEW PHONES 2970 AND 1909-W 

61 



A. H. DAILEY 

Florist 



Of Kn6xville, was represented on College 
Hill for the last two years by Roy S. Buffat, 
who has turned the agency over to ED. 
HAMILTON and ED. CATHET, who are 
both worth while fellows, and will be glad 
to serve you v/hen you want flowers for any 
occasion, such as Banquets, Recitals, Birth- 
days, Mother's Day, Easter, and any other 
time you so desire. 



Knoxville 
Litkograpliing Co. 

PUBLISHERS OF ALL KINDS OF 
COLLEGE CATALOGS 

'The place where they keep the Quality up' 



M. DUKE 

MERCHANT TAILOR 

The Home of Good Tailoring:, Cleaning:, 
Pressing-, Dyeing and .Repairing 

Between Wiggins' Cash-Carry Store and 
Post Office. 

MASON MANN is agent on the Hill. ' See 
him, he looks good; such lovely eyes and 
little feet. 



Drs. Gamble and Burchfield 

Eye, Ear, Nose and 
Throat 



Tennessee Enterprises 

Incorporated 

MARYVILLE. TENN 

Palace Theater Princess Theater 

"Home of Paramount Pictures" 



DR. S. E. CRAWFORD 

DENTIST 
First National Bsink Building 

DRINK PARFAY 

•'Good to the Lrast Drop" 
Our Specialty 

Also All Flavors of Soda Water 

MABYVILLE BOTTLING CO. 

MARYVILLE, TENN. 

Montvale Springs 
Hotel 

The Place to Entertain 
Your Visitors 

We are prepared to serve special dinners 
up to 150 plates. 

For further information, write 

^,. LUDWIG PFLANZE 

Maryv^ille, Tenn. Bell Phone 56 



Tke First Baptist 
Gkurck 

**A Church With a Message* 

Rev. J. R. Johnson, Th.M. 
Pastor 

A cordial invitation is extended to 
the College folk to worship with us and 
enjoy our fellowship. 

An "Up-to-date** Sunday School 
and well organized B. Y. P. U. af- 
fords you a place of religious training. 

WE WANT YOU 

**Co to Church and Feed Your Soul 
on the Bread of Life** 

Welcome Welcome 



^9 



MOTION PICTURE 
DEPARTMENT 

OF THE 

Y. M. C. A. 

Spend Your Saturday 

Evenings on 

The Hill 

Go to Literary Society. Picture 

Show Immediately 

Follows 

Only the best and most entertaining 
pictures are shown 

These Shorvs Are Not Run for Profit. 
You Get Them at Cost. 



90 



THE Y. W. G. A. 

AND 

THE Y. M. C. A. 

WISH TO EXPRESS THEIR 
THANKS 

To the friends of the College who 
have contributed in a financial way to 
this book, which was made possible 
by our advertisers and through gener- 
ous gifts of 

MR. JAMES GETAZ 

AND 

MR. JOHN WEBB 

These people have often helped the 

College and its organizations. 

For all of their favors 

we are truly 

grateful. 



^91 



cl WE 

ARE TRULY APPRECIATIVE 

Of the patronage we received from 
Maryville College Students, and are 
proud of the service we render to them. 

...5>iA '•rn-' .. 

Always the Newest 
In Style 

Chandler-Singleton 
Company 

"The Home of True Economy" 



92 



The Webb Studio 




Photos of Permanency and 
OF Character 

Kodak Finisliing 
A Specialty 

The Best is the Cheapest Aliva^s 



n 



BUY ALL YOUR MUSIC 

FROM 

CLARK ^ JONES 

Riviera Theater BldiT. 
Knoxville 

Mail Orders Promptly Filled 



W. p. MILLIGAN 

SHOE HOSPITAL 

If It's Shoe Trouble We'll Fix It 

All College Work Called for and Delivered 

SEE W. S. SMYTHE 

Our Only Representative on the "Hill"