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Full text of "Maryville College Handbook [M Book] 1924-1925"

PROPERTY OF 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 
Maryville, Tenn. 



School Address 



Home Address 



THE 

Maryville College 
Handbook 



VOLUME XX 
1924-25 



EDITOR 
ROBERT W. BISHOP 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 
ALICE ROBISON 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
PAUL CRAGAN, JR. 



PUBLISHED BY 

The Young Men's And Young 

Women's Christian Associations 

Of Maryville College 

MARYVILLE. TENNESSEE 



INTRODUCTION 



The Young Men's and Young Women's 
Christian Associations of "Old Maryville" in 
the publication of this book aim to give guid- 
ance and counsel to those who may be new 
on the "Hill." It is supplementary to the 
catalog and contains information which has 
been accumulated by those who have been 
here more than one year and are already a 
part of our college family. This information 
is passed on to you who are new so that you 
may better get into the swing of college life. 

To you who have been here before and 
know something of the spirit of the college 
we hope this book may help you in some way 
to lighten your load of care that you may get 
the true Maryville spirit. 

These four years you spend on "College 
Hill" are after all only a small link in the 
chain of your life, but it is a most import- 
ant one. Life is too short and too moment- 
ous to live to yourself. We hope that through 
the association with fellow-students here you 
may get a glimpse of the spirit which is at 
the basis of your college and ours. To help 
you secure this fellowship is the purpose of 
the information in these pages and we Bend 
this book to you with our best wishes. 



GREETINGS FROM ALUMNI 



The Maryville College Alumni Association 
sends greeting to the readers of the Y. M. C. 
A. and Y. W. C. A. Handbook for 1924-25. 
The Alumni have for every student the most 
cordial good wishes for the success and hap- 
piness of the year. It seems so short a time 
since we were among your number and we 
feel so truly a part of the College that we 
are naturally interested in the success of the 
Christian Associations on the Hill, and in the 
service they are able to render the students. 

Almost all the alumni have been members 
of the Christian Associations and can bear 
personal testimony to the value of the ser- 
vice which they have rendered and are able 
to render. We recommend, therefore, that 
every new student join one of these associa- 
tions. Such connection will be found both 
a personal help and a means of service to 
others. We would also recommend that every 
old student join hand and heart to make the 
Associations a continuing and an increasing 
force for character building and right ideals 
on College Hill. 

MARYVILLE COLLEGE ALUMNI AS- 
SOCIATION. 

H. E. Orr, Secretary. 



CONTENTS 



Page 

A Word to the New Men 19 

Activities of the Y. W. C. A 27 

Advertisements 76 

Alpha Sigma Literary Society 45 

Athenian Literary Society '. 44 

Athletics, Intercollegiate 54 

Athletics. Y. M. C. A 33 

Bainonian Literary Society 44 

Big Sisters of Y. W. C. A 23 

Blue Ridge 35 

Budget of Y. M. C. A 37 

Chemistry Club 48 

Chilhowean 40 

College Band 51 

College Calendar. 1924-1925 89 

Church Directory 61 

Debate and Oratory 46 

Dramatic Club 48 

Football Schedule 1924 55 

Fred Hope Fund 36 

Friendship Council of Y. M. C. A 32 

Getting Started 12 

Girls' Glee Club 47 

Good Samaritan in College 22 

Graduate Recitals 51 

Greetings from Alumni 5 

Handbook 41 

Highland Echo 40 

6 



Hikes - 36 

Hi-Trail Club 49 

Tvventy-four Hours a Day at Maryville 29 

Introduction 4 

Law Club 49 

Life Work Conference 34 

Mail Service 14 

Membership in Y. M. C. A 31 

Men's Glee Club 47 

Ministerial Association 50 

Nu Gamma Sigma 24 

Of Interest to Girls 17 

Officers of Y. M. C. A 30 

Open Forum .28 

Opening Social Events 13 

Pre-Mcdical Club 48 

President Message ...ll 

President Wilson 10 

Reading Room of Y. W. C. A 26 

Religious Meetings of the College 52 

Religious Meetings of the Y. M. C. A 34 

Schedule of Classes 59, 60 

Sime "Do's" 15 

Some "Don't's" 16 

S'^ate Clubs 49 

Student Council , 42 

Student Volunteer Group 50 

Sunday Afternoon Meetings of the 

. Y. W. C. A._ 25 

Theta Epsilon Literary Society 43 

To N2vsr Students 12 

Who's Who in Maryville 53 

"Y" Bee. 41 

Y. M. C. A. Rooms 31 

Y. M. C. A. Inter-Class Track Meet Record....39 

7 



THE COLLEGE CALENDAR FOR 

1924-1925 



1924— 

Sept. 9, Tuesday, 8 :00 a. m.-4 :00 p. m. — 
* Registration for the first semester. 

Sept. 9, 10, Tuesday, Wednesday^ — Entrance Ex- 
aminations. 

Sept. 10, Wednesday, 8 :30 a. m. — Opening 
chapel service. 

Sept. 10, Wednesday, 9:00 a. m.-3 :00 p. m.— 
Organization of classes. 

Sept. 13, Saturday, 2:30 p. m.— Faculty re- 
ception. 

Sept. 13, Saturday, 8:00 p. m.— Y. M. C. A. 
and Y. W. C. A. receptions. 

Nov. 27, Thursday, — Thanksgiving Day. 

Dec. 15, Monday,— Classes move forard one 
day. 

Dec. 18, Thursday, 3:00 p. m.— Christmas 
holidays begin. 

1925. 

Jan. 2, Friday, 8:10 a. m. — Class work re- 
sumed. 

Jan. 17, Saturday, — First semester examina- 
tions begin. 

Jan. 24, Saturday, First semester examinations 
end. 

Jan. 24, Saturday — First semester ends. 

Jan. 27, Tuesday, 8:10 a. m. — Second semester 
begins. 



Feb. 1, Sabbath, 6:30 p. m.— February Meet- 
ings begin. 

Feb. 4, Wednesday, 8:30 a. m. — Meeting of 
the Directors. 

May 27, Wednesday.^Second semester ex- 
aminations bsgin. 

May 28, Thursday, 8 :00 p. m.— Bates Prize 
Oratorical Contest. 

May 29, Friday, 8 :00 p. m. — Graduation exer- 
cises of the Expression Department. 

May 30, Saturday, 3 :00 p. m. — Annual ex- 
hibit of the Art Department. 

May 30, Saturday, 8 :00 p. m. — Graduation 
exercises of the Music Department. 

May 31, Sabbath, 10:30 a. m. Baccalaureate 
sermon. 

May 31, Sabbath, 6:30 p. m. — Annual address 
to the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. 

June 2, Tuesday, 3 :00 p. m. — Annual exhibit 
of the Home Economics Department. 

June 2, Tuesday, 7 :30 p. m. — Senior Class 
Play. 

June 3, Wednesday, — Second semester ex- 
aminations end. 

June 3, Wednesday, 3 :30 p. m. — Senior Class- 
Day Exercises. 

June 3, Wednesday, 7 :30 p. m. — Annual Meet- 
ing and Banquet of the Alumni As- 
sociation. 

June 4, Thursday, 8 :30 a. m. — Meeting of 
the Directors. 

June 4, Thursday, 10:00 a. m. — Commence- 
ment. 




DR. SAMUEL TYNDAI.E WILSON 
President MaryviUe College 



PRESIDENT WILSON'S FOREWORD 



The Maryville College Y. M. C. A., or- 
ganized in March, 1877, was one of the ear- 
liest college associations ever established. On 
May 17, 1879, it took a leading part in the 
first Y, M. C. A., convention of East Ten- 
nessee. J. W. Rankin and S. T. Wilson, 
representing Maryville, were members of a 
committee appointed by this convention "to 
correspond with the Christian students in all 
the colleges of Tennessee with a view to hav- 
ing a Y. M. C. A., established in each institu- 
tion." 

The following explanation of the Y 
movement is found in the circular letter the 
committee sent to the colleges of Tennessee: 

"The grand object of the Association is to 
'promote spirituality. Christian fellowship, and 
aggressive work among its members,' to teach 
the Young Christian student to bear the yoke 
in his youth, and to bring the unconverted to 
the Savior." 

"The methods cf the work of the Associa- 
tion are various : prayer meetings, Bible 
classes, Sabbath schools, and missionary work 
in all its phases." 

"With Christian earnestness we urge you 
to organize and maintain an Association in 
your institution for God's glory, for your own 
edification, and for the salvation of your 
comrades." 

The Y. W, C. A., of the College was or- 
ganized in 1884, with similar purposes. 

The new students are urged to unite with 
these Associations and to help forward these 
noble ends of service. 

SAMUEL TYNDALE WILSON. 

11 



TO THE NEW STUDENTS 



One of the most satisfactory things about 
experience is that it enables one to lend a 
helping hand to those who are about to travel 
the same course. Many hundred students 
have entered Maryville College and to a cer- 
tain degree, all have met the same problems, 
have been puzzled by the same questions, and 
you who are entering for the first time, will 
meet some of these same problems. The 
purpose of this "M" Book is to help point out 
the way by giving information that will be 
useful to you. 

GETTING STARTED 

Early arrival in Maryville is invariably a 
means of getting more comfortably started 
than otherwise. All should, and will find it 
distinctly to their advantage, to arrive in 
Maryville by the afternoon of Monday, Sep- 
tember 8th. Registration and matriculation 
begin on Tuesday, September 9th. and the 
sooner it is out of the way the better. When 
you arrive, give your baggage check to the 
college truckman and he will handle your 
luggage free. There will be Y. M., and Y. W., 
reception committeemen to meet you who will 

12 



be glad to direct you to your hall and give 
you any other assistance you may need. 

OPENING SOCIAL EVENTS 

The social life at Maryville is well provid- 
ed lor and no matter v/hat your disposition 
is there are occasions you will like. These 
opening entertainments will carry you over 
the time of newness and afford opportunity 
for getting acquainted with your fellow 
students and to get the first glimpse of the 
true Maryville spirit. 

The Y. W. C. A. give their reception on 
Baldwin lawn and a good time awaits those 
who enjoy good "eats" and gossip. The boys 
are the guests of the Y. M. C. A., who always 
have a well-planned program out in the 
college woods. Then there is the Y. M. 
hike as well as the Y. W., that you will en- 
joy. 

The societies hold their receptions soon after 
the opening of school. The two girls' boc- 
ieties, Bainonian and Theta Epsilon, have their 
receptions together, usually around a bi^ 
camp fire in the college woods. The boys' 
societies, Athenian and Alpha Sigma, like- 
wise have theirs, which are equal to that of 
the girls. 

On Saturday afternoon, September 13th you 

13 



will enjoy the faculty reception. Don't miss 
running the gauntlet of the faculty line and 
the refreshments. 

There are scattered throughout the year 
various social events for the proper develop- 
ment in your social life. 

MAIL SERVICE 

A branch of the United States post office 
at Maryville is located in Anderson hall. 
Students should have their mail addressed, 
College Station, Maryville, Tennessee, adding 
the name of the dormitory in which they 
room, and their room number, as Mr. B. A. 
Man, 319 Carnegie Hall, College Station, 
Maryville, Tennessee. If you room in town 
and wish to get your mail at the college post 
office, use only "College Station." Outgoing 
mail is collected from the boxes in the dor- 
mitories every morning and afternoon. 



True worth is in being, not seeming. 

In doing each day that goes by 
Some little good, not in dreaming 

Of great things to do by and by. 
For whatever men say in their blindness. 

And spite of the fancies of youth. 
There's nothing so kingly as kindness 

And nothing so royal as truth. 

14 



SOME "DO'S' 



1. Get to Maryville on time. 

2. Attend the opening receptions. 

3. Join the Y. M., or the Y. W. 

4. Learn the college songs and yells. 

5. Get into at least one useful campus ac- 
tivity. 

6. Go to class meetings and mix in class 
affairs. 

7. Talk to everybody. Be interested in 
everything. 

8. Watch the bulletin boards for announce- 
ments. 

9. Join a literary society. 

10. Take part in athletics. 

11. Keep yourself in first class condition, 
physically, mentally, morally, and spiritually. 

12. Spend your spare time on the campus. 

13. Make friends. Know everyone and let 
everyone know you. 

14. Be interested in your campus activities, 
and if you have an idea for improving them, 
tell people about it. 

15. Let the college teams know you are 
backing them. 

15 



SOME "DONT'S* 



1. Don't try to make a "splurge" the first 
week. 



2. Don't skip cl 

3. Don't be satisfied with the mediocre. 

4. Don't get the idea that Maryville lacks 
spirit. It is your job to see that she has 
spirit. 

5. Don't mumble a half-hearted greeting. 
Call everybody by name, and let him know 
you are interested in him. 

6. Don't push or shove when you are in a 
crov.d. A college man thinks of others be- 
sides himself. 

7. Don't confine your associations to one 
group of students. Get acquainted with as 
many fellow-students as possible. 

8. Don't neglect your studies for less im- 
portant things. 

9. Don't think it old-fashioned to boost. 

10. Don't think you are preparing for life 
You are LIVING. This is the place to prac 
tice all your good theories of democracy an'^ 
internationalism. 



16 



OF INTEREST TO GIRLS 



Once upon a time a "sweet girl graduate" 
of Home Town High School decided to go to 
college. As a result of long deliberation 
Maryville was the place chosen for her to 
attend. The night after this decision was 
reached our girl had a dream in which she 
thought she was going through the experience 
of the first few weeks in college. The dream 
was something like this : 

Upon her arrival in the town of Maryville 
she was met at the station by her Big Sister, 
v.ho directed her to the campus and helped 
her find her room. When she opened the door, 
she found that iher room contained two beds, 
tv70 chairs, a study table, and a bureau,. 
Luckily, she had brought with her, linens for 
her table, bureau, and bed, sofa cushions, 
pennants, pictures, and such things so that in 
a short time her room looked quite homely. 
Then she began to look about her and realized 
with a sigh of relief that the girls were wear- 
ing those sensible pretty clothes which are 
so appropriate for school wear. 

As she was going through the hall one day 
r-.he heard some girls talking about a hike — 
the knickers she had brought were just the 
thing for them ! And of course, a sv^imming 



suit and gym uniform were included in her 
wardrobe. 

The next notable event in the girl's dream 
was a Saturday feed, on which occasion she 
decided that her chafing dish and the old 
plates, spoons, glasses, etc., she had brought 
along with her would not come in amiss. 

Our girl awakened before her dream was 
complete, so let me add a few words. The 
things she dreamed, you will find to be reali- 
ties when you come, but do you know what 
moonshining is? At Maryville it is in per- 
fect accord with the eighteenth amendment, 
for it has nothing to do with it. When you 
are talking, walking, etc., with a represen- 
tative of the opposite sex you are said to be 
"moonshining." This sport is pursued at the 
noon hour (12:50-1:10,) on Monday after- 
noons (1:00-4:30,) to church on Sundays, at 
ball games, social functions at the chapel, 
and like occasions. 

So far as rules are concerned, you will not 
be hampered, for although there is a limit 
upon the number of times you go to tovrn 
either to shop or attend the movie, and you 
are expected to study in your own room dur- 
ing study hours, they are the things you would 
do even if there were no rules. 

If there are any questions about these or 
other things, just ask your Big Sister. 

18 



A WORD TO THE NEW MEN 



The time has come to which you have been 
looking forward or possibly half-hoping for 
the opportunity. When you come to college 
you will be thrust upon your own responsibil- 
ity and what you make out of the time you are 
here will depend entirely upon you. Getting 
the best out of your college course should be 
the main objective. 

One of the things necessary for getting the 
most out of your work will be the possession 
of a strong body. Efficiency demands that 
work be well done and this can only come 
when one is in the best physical condition. 
Athletics at Maryville has been developed 
to a very high standard during the past few 
years and every man is urged to take part 
in some form of athletics. If you are will- 
ing to go out and work hard for a place on 
the team don't fail to do so. To stand on 
the sidelines and say that you can do better 
than that will not suffice; you must get out 
there and show your mettle. If you don't 
feel like trying out for the team get into 
some form of athletics anyway ; something 
that wil produce a sweat each day. The body 

19 



is a wonderful device and all of its parts 
should be developed. 

Then the main purpose for which you are 
coming to college is to study and thus to 
exercise your mind and make it fullgrown. 
Some students come to college with the idea 
that it is to be a four years loaf and that 
"Dad" will pay the bills, but such students 
do not carry off college honors and are not 
of value to their communities. Enough good 
hard study to get your lessons in shape will 
not hurt your dignity in the least and your 
mind will be greatly benefitted by it. If 
you do your level best to get each days work 
as you go along and while you are studying, to 
do it with all your might you will find that 
studying is not such an ordeal as it is re- 
puted to be. If you do your work in such 
a way that you are honestly satisfied that you 
are doing your best, then there is not much 
danger of your teacher thinking otherwise. 

Another value which you will get out of 
college is the opportunity of associating with 
people from all parts of the country and some 
of your friendships will be very valuable to 
you. By all means make as many friends as 
possible and prove yourself friendly. The 
acquiring of this spirit in college will give 
you a more pleasant time while you are here, 
and will give you prestige in your community 

20 



when you leave here. If you do not know a 
fellow's name, greet him anyway for he 
may be new like yourself. Show yourself 
friendly and you shall have friends. 

Now as you are thrown on your own re- 
sponsibility at college you will have to learn 
to discriminate ; to choose between the many 
things that would take your time and atten- 
tion. The truly important things in life will 
have to be considered and decided. The doors 
of the church will be open to you, and the 
Christian Association will give you a warm 
welcome ; here you will find the companion- 
ship of those who walk daily with the Friend 
of friends. You only can decide what re- 
sponse you will make to these biggest things. 
At Maryville you will find an opportunity 
to develop yourself physically, mentally, bcc- 
ially, and most of all you will find the op- 
portunity to satisfy that most vital need and 
longing in every human heart — the yearning 
for spiritual growth. The way in which you 
avail yourself of these opportunities will de- 
pend upon you. 



That which constitutes the supreme worth of 
life is not wealth, nor position, nor ease, nor 
fame, not even happiness ; but service. Noth- 
ing at last counts but service, and that counts 
always. 



21 



Y. W. C. A. 



THE PARABLE OF THE GOOD SAMARI- 
TAN IN COLLEGE 

Did you ever hear the parable of the Good 
Samaritan in an American College? 

A certain Freshman came down from home 
into college, and she fell among critics who 
said that her clothes didn't fit and that she 
was not stylish, and her personality was 
unfortunate, and they robbed her of her 
self-confidence and her enthusiasm, and de- 
parted, leaving her sick and sore at heart 
and half dead. And by chance a certain 
Junior passed her way, and when she saw 
her, she said, "What a good job those 
Sophomore critics did," and she passed by 
on the other side. And a certain Senior 
came that way, and she said, "Yea, verily, 
for she hadn't the making of a good liter- 
ary society girl,' 'and she also passed on 
by the other side. But a certain Friendly 
Student, as she journeyed that way, came 
where she was, and had compassion on her 
and took her to her room, and bound up 
her wounds, pouring in understanding and 
sympathy and friendliness. And she put 

22 



her on her feet again, and introduced her 
to her own friends, and was a friend to her. 

Which of these thinkest thou proved 
neighbor to the Freshman that fell among 
critics ? 

However, there is one exception to these 
American colleges, and that is old Mary- 
ville. It is full of "Friendly Students ;" it 
is permeated with a democratic spirit; the 
Young Women's Christian Association is 
striving to satisfy your every need, to give 
you true friends, a good time, an under- 
standing of religion, and an opportunity for 
development and service. Freshmen friends 
and new girls, we are eager to welcome you 
with outstretched arms. 

Y. W. C. A. "BIG SISTERS" 

One of the hardest things about going away 
to college is leaving our family behind. But 
at Maryville, new girls aren't entirely with- 
out a family because they each have a "Big 
Sister." She is a girl who has been to Mary- 
ville and knows how to make her "Little 
Sister* 'feel at home there. She will write to 
you, new girl, during the summer, and we 
hope that if there are any questions you 
would like to ask concerning Maryville, you 
will give her the pleasure of answering them. 
Then when you come to Maryville, she will be 

23 



there to welcome you. She will help you find 
your room, help you matriculate, and introduce 
ycu to Maryville. Throughout the year she 
will be a friend who is ready both to share 
your joys and to help you face your problems. 
Nev/ Girls, Y. W. C. A. "Bier Sisters" bid 
you welcome. 

NU GAMMA SIGMA 

Did you ever feel like a stranger in a 
strange land ? Did you ever go any place 
uhere everyone seemed to know everyone 
else, where they were all interested in 
things you were not familiar with, and 
Vvhere their conversation about those sub- 
jects sounded like Greek? You never felt 
quite so lonely in all your life did you? 

Then on the other hand did you ever go to 
a cig conference where you meet dozens of 
girls, likewise stx-angers, but who had come 
from all parts of the country for fellowship, 
for a discussion of personal problems in 
order to bring the ideas of their communities 
to others ? You will see these hundreds of 
girls dividing into smaller groups of ten or 
twelve, so that the conference may become 
more personal, so that friendships may become 
more intimate, and that all may have an 
individual part in the discussion. 

Did you ever think of college as a big 
24 



conference ? Well, it is ; one that lasts for 
four long years. 

We want each new girl to enter right into 
cur school life, to bring her new ideas to us, 
to show us v/here we need improving. So we 
have formed conference groups of about ten 
new girls with one of our finest old girls to 
help you until you elect your own chairman. 
This leader will make you familiar with our 
campus activities, our Y. W. C. A., organiza- 
tion, and together you can talk over college 
problems ; but best of all you will become 
friends, and immediately be grafted into the 
tree of Y. W., that is extending its welcoming 
branches to all the girls. 

Three rahs for the Nu Gamma Sigma ! 

Y. W. C. A SUNDAY AFTERNOON 
MEETINGS 

What do school girls like to talk about? 

Sundaes, hikes, clothes, exams ; exams, 
clothes, hikes, sundaes. 

Well, we're planning to have every girl 
talking about the Sundays next year. 
Why? Simply because it is on Sunday aft- 
ernoon that the Y. W. C. A., holds its 
weekly devotional meeting, and we are plan- 
ning to make that the brightest hour of all 
the week. 

We want to tell you of the three S's 
25 



which help to make our Sunday meetings 
pleasant. 

First, Sociability. Every college jgirl 
wants lots of friends, and what better place 
is there to find them than in Y. W. ? Just 
try us on Sociability. We're truly longing 
to get better acquainted. 

Second, Service. If you miss the old C. 
E., at home, you'll want to enter right away 
into the work of Y. W., and if you have 
never had the opportunity of being a mem- 
ber of a real, live Young People's Society, 
here's your chance for service on the Hill. 

Third, Spirituality. This is, of course, the 
biggest aim of our Sunday afternoon meet- 
ings, and the greatest source of enjoyment. 
After a busy, strenuous week we feel the 
need of strength and refreshing, and so to- 
gether we seek Him who is the Bread of 
Life and the Water of Life. 

We are working for bigger and better 
meetings in 1924-25 than we have had in 
the years past. Can we count on your sup- 
port? 

THE READING ROOM 

Sooner or later you will all get acquainted 
with Thaw Hall, but there is one part of 
Thaw we want you to know first, — the Y. W. 
Reading Room. Just as the main walk leads 

26 



to Thaw so it is that the main corridors on 
second floor lead to the open doors of the 
reading room. There you may read the 
current topics of the day, classic and con- 
temporary prose and poetry, religious books 
and student publications. We know you are 
going to like the room, and always remember 
that we are at your service. 

ACTIVITIES OF Y. W. 

The Y. W., on College Hill is responsible 
for a great many of the activities the other- 
wise monotonous hum drum of school life. 
To it we owe the Big Sister Movement and 
the welcome which they receive when they 
first come. Throughout the y^ar their work 
continues in the various receptions, hikes, 
leas, and banquets which we enjoy. 

After the February meetings comes the 
Life Work Conference under the auspices of 
the Y. M., and Y. W. At Christmas and 
Easter time reverence and renewed devotion 
is inspired by the beautiful carols which 
awaken us in the morning. Each year at 
Christmas time a Y. W., play is given. 

One of the prettiest features of the year 
is the May Day Fete and the social committee 
is responsible for this. We are indebted to 
them for the many things they bring about 
for the development of each student. 

27 



OPEN FORUM 

Are you afraid you will drop out of the 
world when you come to college? Are you 
afraid you will be forced to go around all 
the time with a pack of books under your 
arm, a pair of specs on your nose, and a 
worried intellectual look on your brow ? Well, 
you are mightily mistaken if you are worry- 
ing over either of these questions, for you do 
neither at Maryville. You are made to feel 
that you have at least a little part in this 
big world, for we discuss the high points of 
interest in world affairs in Y. W., class 
room, chapel, everywhere from what kinds of 
shoes peoples of other nations wear to how 
we can secure world peace and what France 
should do with the Ruhr. Not a little part 
of our work comes in a free for all discussion 
that a group of students have each week 
on vital issues of the day in the "United States 
and other countries. This is one place at 
least when you have a chance to express your 
opinion ; timid, frank, radical, or otherwise 
without a member of the faculty grading you 
on it. Come on girls and add your part to 
the discussions on these subjects. 



Our friend, our brother and our Lord, 
What may Thy service be ? 

Nor name, nor form, nor ritual word. 
But simply following Thee. 

28 



HOW TO LIVE ON TWENTY-FOUR HOURS 
A DAY AT MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

(This is how one erirl lived last semester.) 

6 :00-7 :00 Rise. 

Private devotions. 
Daily dozen. 

7-7 :25 Breakfast. 

7:25-8:10 Family worship. 

Put room in order. 

8 :10-8 :30 Chapel. 

8:30-10:20 Chemistry laboratory. 

10 :20-ll :15 English. 

11 :15-12 :10 Spanish 

12:10-12:25 Mail call in dormitory, 

Tidy up for lunch. 

12 :25-12 :50 Lunch. 

12:50-1:10 . Sociability. 

1 :10-2 :05 ... French. 

2 :05-3 :00 Bible. 

8 :00-5 :30 Recreation. 

College activities. 
Go to town. 

5:30-6:00 Dress for dinner. 

6 :00-6 :30 Dinner, 

6:30-7:00 SociabiI(ity. 

7 :00-9 :30 Study. 

9 :30-10 :00 Miscellaneous. 

10:00 Lights out. 



Let no one falter who thinks he is right. 
29 



Y. M. C. A. 



The purpose of the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association is to develop the three-fold 
man ; spirit, mind, and body. In the publica- 
tion of this "M" Book these phases of its 
program are set forth. In carrying out this 
program the Maryville spirit is developed and 
all work together for better college relation- 
ships. 

OFFICERS 1924-25 

Edgar Cathey, '25 President 

Raymond F. Anderson, '26 Vice-President 

Robert W. Bishop, '26 Secretary 

Edward G. Cornelius, '25 Treasurer 

COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN 

Charles R. Johnson. '26 Bible Study 

Stuart McC. Rohre, '25 Religious Meetings 

Salmon Brown, '26 Athletics 

Lonnie E. Milling, '26 Membership 

Wallace C. Merwin, '27 Social Service 

William S. Smythe, '25 Deputations 

Merlin F. Usner, '27 Missions 

Robert A. Broady, '25 Music 

Pain D. Graybeal, '26 Publicity 

Edward H. Hamilton, '26 Lyceum 

Charles E. Beech, '26..,. Delegations 

Dewey W. Eitner, *26 Colleifian 

30 



MEMBERSHIP 

In article two of the Y. M. C. A. Consti- 
tution we find that there are two kinds of 
membership, active and associate. The ac- 
tive membership consists of men who are 
members in good standing of evangelical 
churches, or professing Christians of the 
Protestant faith, and who have been duly 
received and elected by the association. 
Only active members may vote and hold 
ofiice. The associate membership consists of 
any male student of good moral standing who 
dseires to join the association. These mem- 
bsrs are entitled to all privileges of mem- 
bership, except those of voting and holding 
office. Let us get together and make this 
year the greatest in the history of Maryville. 
Y. M. C. A. ROOMS 

The Y. M. C. A. Rooms are located on the 
first and second floors of Bartlett Hall. You 
will notice in large white letters, "Y. M. C 
A." on the large window just over the en- 
trance. At the right as you go in you will 
find the "Y" Store where stationery, candy, 
and other confections can be had. Then next 
to the store, and just around the corner, is 
the "Y" Reading Room, where you will find 
magazines, papers, and a Victrola for your 
use. At the left of the entrances is the 
auditorium where the "Y" meetings are held. 

31 



The gymnasium is also on the first floor. 
On the second floor is located the offices of 
the president and secretary, who will be glad 
to have you come in and get acquainted and 
to give you any assistance that you may 
desire. 

All of these rooms are for the use of all 
the fellows on the Hill. Make use of their 
advantages and you will enjoy your college 
life more. 

THE FRIENDSHIP COUNCIL 

The Friendship Council is a unit of the Y. 
M. C. A, and is one of the most powerful re- 
ligious organizations on the Hill. The men 
on the council are those who have had religious 
experience, and are sincere, earnest, and 
praying fellows, eager to do their part in 
being a friend to man and thus building up 
the kingdom of God right here on the Hill. 
The purpose is expressed in the pledge as here 
given : Through prayer and by the Grace of 
God, the Friendship Council aims to make 
every man on College Hill a professing Chris- 
tian, a member of some church, and an ac- 
tive Christian worker. To accomplish this 
end, I promise to make my life as much like 
that of Jesus as possible, to befriend, pray 
for and help in every way possible every man 
under my care, to attend every council meet- 

32 



in? unless prohibited by a satisfactory rea- 
son. 

ATHLETICS 

In addition to the players making the 
varsity teams, the college is anxious to see 
everybody in some form of athletics. Watch- 
ing the varsity j?lay is lots of fun but the 
spectator, outside of getting a thrill now and 
then, or a punch in the ribs from an excited 
bystander, gets no particular goodout of it. 
There are many branches of athletics and no 
reason can be given why everybody shouldn't 
be doin^ something. And that is the aim 
of the physical department of the "Y," to 
promote and interest all into taking part. 
In the Fall there are the inter-class football 
teams, there is tennis, swimming, wrestling, 
and boxing. Last year tumbling appealed to 
a great many. During the winter months the 
big gymnasium is available for indoor track 
meets, volley ball, basketball leagues, and the 
regular apparatus work. We are especially 
desirous of getting everybody to patronize the 
swimming pool. There is no better benefit to 
be derived from any form of athletics than 
swiming. We have an excellent pool and 
more use should be made of it. Then in the 
Spring there is baseball, tennis, horseshoes, 
hiking, outdoor track v/ork, and the like. 

33 



Get into some form of athletics, for "the 
glory of a young man is his strength." 

LIFE WORK CONFERENCE 

During the last three years the Life Work 
Conference, held in March, has become one of 
the permanent institutions of the college. It 
was instituted with the belief that we as 
students should give some consideration to 
definite plans for our life work. For three days 
outstanding leaders come to us and give of 
their time and services in helping us decide 
this great question. Whether you have de- 
cided upon your life work or not this confer- 
ence will give you inspiration and help along 
many lines. We urge you to be thinking in 
terms of true service when the Life Work 
Conference comes along. 

RELIGIOUS MEETINGS OF THE Y. M. C. A. 

In keeping with the purpose of the Y. M. 
C. A., to develop a three-fold life, the Com- 
mittee on Religious Meetings has prepared a 
program which shall minister to the spiritual 
side of the man in the best possible way. 
These meetings which are held in the Y. M. 
C. A., auditorium each Sunday afternoon at 
one o'clock cover a wide variety of subjects 
ranging from discussions of personal prob- 
lems to a discussion of the choice of a life's 
work. It is virtually a clearing house where 

34 



all may speak freely giving their opinions and 
finding out what others think. As a usual 
thing students lead the discussions, but oc- 
casionally an outside speaker is brought in to 
talk on some subject in which you are inter- 
ested that you would like to have discussed ; 
the chairman of this committee will be glad 
to arrange such a meeting if you will give 
your suggestions to him. 

We should not hope to be strong in mind 
and body and neglect the spiritual side of our 
life, for it is just as important. In order to 
live life at its best we must develop all three 
sides of it. The "Y" exists soley for the 
benefit of the men on College Hill and it's 
rightful place is in the hearts of these men. 
We do not get anything valuable out of an 
activity unless we put something into it and 
the more we put into it the more wet get 
out fo it. So it is with the "Y ;" if we go 
into it with our best the best will come back 
to us. And in endeavoring to carry on this 
this development we must remember that "we 
can do all things through Christ who strength- 
eneth us." 

BLUE RIDGE 

Representatives from the College go each 
summer to Blue Ridge, North Carolina, to at- 
tend the conference of all the southern col- 
lege Y. M., and Y. W. C. A's. At this con- 

35 



ference about two-thirds of the time is spent 
in listening to addresses by the most promin- 
ent student speakers in America, and in 
studying the important religious and social 
problems of the day. The remainder of the 
time is spent in rest and recreation, such as 
athletics, hiking, etc. The purpose of the 
conference is to make real to college men and 
women the facts of Christian experience. 

Blue Eidge is located in one of the most 
beautiful parts of the Blue Ridge Mountains, 
sixteen miles east of Asheville, and has the 
finest conference grounds in the South. The 
inspirational lectures and the wholesome 
atmosphere of the place leave a lasting im- 
pression that is worth a year of college 
work. Next June we want a large delega- 
tion and the "Y" has a loan fund from which 
you can borrow money for expenses. 

FRED HOPE FUND 

Every Spring we have a "Fred Hope Cam- 
paign drive," conducted by the Y. M. C, A., and 
Y. W. C. A., for the purpose of supporting 
the work of one of Maryville's sons in the 
mission field of Africa. Last year the stud- 
dent body made voluntary contributions to 
the amount of $1125.00 for this work. 

HIKES 

To view the coming of day from a moun- 
36 



tain top and to see the vast landscape turn 
from the shadowy mists to the golden light 
of the morning, as the sun rises, is to ex- 
perience one of the greatest thrills in all 
your healthy life. One of the best hikes taken 
by the college men is to the top of Thunder- 
head, a treeless dome in the Great Smoky 
Mountains which is 5,700 feet above sea 
level. This is the big "Y" hike of the year, 
but trips to Look Rock, Sunshine, Calder 
wood. Sheep Pen Cave, and the dam at Cheoa 
are not to be missed. There is no lack of 
places to which one might hike. All it takes 
is a little energy and vitality, a couple of 
blankets, and don't forget the eats. Get 
your group together and take a hike occas- 
sionally. 

PROPOSED BUDGET FOR THE Y. M. C. A. 

1924-25 

This proposed budget has been planned with 
two things in mind: first, of course, is the 
income ; second, that the money should be 
expended in such ways that the student will 
get the maximum benefit. Soon after school 
opens, if it is found to be necessary, this 
budget will be revised and published again. 
CONFERENCES 

Blue Ridge $100.00 

Life Work 100.00 

Other conferenc3s 50.00 

37 



GENERAL 

Administration 150.00 

Supervisory 75.00 

Reading Room 75.00 

Bible Study 50.00 

Programs 40.00 

Deputations 25.00 

Social 25.00 

Publicity 50.00 

Handbook 30.00 

Friendship Council 25.00 

Flowers _ 20.00 

Reserve 100.00 

Total $915 00 



This day in honor I have toiled : 
My shining crest is still unsoiled ; 
But on the mile I leave behind 
Is one vv-ho says that I was kind ; 
And someone has a cheerful song, 
Because I chanced to come along. 
Sweet rest at night that man shall own 
Who has not lived his life alone. 



Write your name each day in gentleness, 
kindness, patience, courtesy. Good deeds are 
life's brightest stars. They shine in the day 
time as well as in the night. 

38 







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PUBLICATIONS 



THE CHILHOWEAN 

The Chilhowean is the college annual, pub- 
lished in May by the Junior Class. It is the 
official summary of the year's events, and is 
in reality a chapter in the history of under- 
graduate Maryville. One of the most pleas- 
ant features of college life is that memories 
of it are always present, and it is the pur- 
pose of the Chilhowean to preserve these 
memories accurately. New ideas are always 
sought in order to faithfully portray all or- 
ganizations and activities. The spirit and 
work of each Junior Class is commended as 
it attempts the production of the College 
Memory Book, the Chilhowean. The 1925 
edition has as Editor-in-chief, Robert W. 
Bishop, and as Business Manager, Joe C. 
Gamble. 

THE HIGHLAND ECHO 

The Highland Echo is the weekly publica- 
tion of Maryville College. It is a foura-page 
five column paper, to which each student sub- 
scribes when he matriculates. The editor is 
elected annually by the whole student body 
from the Junior or Senior class, and the busi- 

40 



ness manager is appointed. The Echo is con- 
ducted after the fashion of larger newspapers, 
carrying atletic reports, editorials, news 
items, and other of interest to the students. 
Through this publication the students are en- 
abled to keep in touch with all the activities 
of the Hill. The Editor-in-chief for the com- 
ing year is Francis C. Kinsler, '25, and the 
Business Manager is Howard T. Hill, '25. 

THE MARYVILLE COLLEGE HANDBOOK 

The Handbook, commonly known as the 
"M" Book, is the publication you have be- 
fore you. It is issued by the Y. M. C. A., 
and Y. W. C. A., and aims to be a small 
encyclopedia of information on the College 
life. Editor, Robert W. Bishop, Associate 
Editor, Alice Robison, Business Manager, 
Paul Cragan, Jr. 

THE "Y" BEE 

The "Y" Bee is published by the Y. M. C. 
A., and carries announcements of the week's 
program for "Y" activities, such as hikes, 
field and swimming meets, games, and Sun- 
day afternoon meetings. Poin D. Graybeal 
is the editor for the coming year. 



The Place to be happy is Here, 
The Time to be happy is Now, 
The "Way to be happy is to Make others so. 

41 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 



STUDENT COUNCIL 

The Student Council vvas organized for the 
purpose of furnishing a representative body 
of students, who, by virtue of their position 
and influence in student affairs, shall be 
able to express the sentiment of the student 
body. They co-operate with the Faculty in 
maintaining Maryville College ideals and strive 
to put into execution such proposals which 
shall be for the best welfare of the school. 

The Council is composed of eight Seniors, 
six Juniors, four Sophomores, and four Fresh- 
men who take up matters brought before them 
for consideration. Any student may confer 
with his representative and present any matter 
which he thinks would be for the welfare of 
the student body. When measures are passed 
by the Council and approved by the Faculty 
they are then put into operation. 

The Student Council is not student govern- 
ment but it seeks to summarize student opin- 
ion and to work with the faculty in promot- 
ing desirable measures and preventing ac- 
tions which are detrimental to the college. 
With the co-operation of all the students the 
Student Council will be an organization v.hich 

42 



will be permanent and of lasting value to the 
students. 

THETA EPSILON 

Someone said not long ago that fraternities 
mean more to a college man than his studies. 
Maryville has neither fraternities nor soror- 
ities, but we do have something that more 
than compensates for them- — our literary soc- 
ieties. Theta Epsilon is one of the girl's soci- 
eties and it is a wonderful means by which to 
make friends, enjoy social life, and benefit 
culturally. We Thetas are proud of what our 
society has done in the past, and the mid-, 
winter plays of the past two years. "Little 
Women" and "Smiling Through" have won 
her an enviable name on the Hill. We are 
makirig great plans for 1924-25 too ; a great 
mid-winter, lots of snappy programs, and 
plenty of good times socially. (Not the least 
of these are our joint meetings with our 
"brothers" — the Alpha . Sigmas. Wait until 
you know them !) But one event in the 
year overshadows all else — the coming of the 
new girls ! One good thing Theta does is 
to wear off the new feeling early and im- 
Dart that consciousness of real fellowship with 
the old girls. Theta doors are open to every 
new girl who will come in and do her part 
to make Theta better next year, and every 
Theta stands ready to lead you inside into 
real intimacy. So one and all we welcome 
you new girls ! 

43 



BAINONIAN 

The Bainonian Literary Society is the oldest 
literary organization for girls on the Hill. It 
was organized in 1875, and ever since that 
time it has been an important factor in the 
student life. Many new girls are enrolled in 
it every year, and two-thirds of girls in the 
class of 1924 are Bainonians. The society 
provides for the development of the talents of 
every girl and tries to make her feel that the 
society is her own. A program of an inter- 
esting and instructive nature is provided every 
Saturday evening. Twice a year a joint 
meeting is held with our brother society, the 
Athenian. Bainonian stands for social as 
well as for literary development. It aids in 
the forming of friendships, and many good 
times are enjoyed by all who will take ad- 
vantage of what she offers. We extend a 
hearty welcome to all new girls, and a wish 
that you may soon learn to love Bainonian 
as we do. 

ATHENIAN 

The Athenian Literary Society was or- 
ganized in 1869, thereby giving it the distinc- 
tion of being the oldest literary organization 
on College Hill. It's present membership 
enrolls a large proportion of the male students 
of the college. The Athenians are noted for 

44 



their loyalty to, and enthusiasm for their 
society. The ideal of Athenian is to give her 
members such training as will enable them to 
secure the very best development during their 
college days ; to promote a correct college 
spirit and love for Alma Mater. To accom- 
plish this high ideal she provides weekly pro- 
grams of an interesting, instructive, and var- 
ied nature that are full of life, pep, and col- 
lege spirit. From the Athenian Society has 
come three-fourths of the members of the 
Men's Forsenic League during the 1924 sea- 
son, and also the two men participants in the 
oratorical contests representing the college. 
The Athenian Literary Society extends a cord- 
ial invitation to all new men to attend the 
opening social of the society at the beginning 
of the year, and also a hearty invitation is 
extended to all new men to become Athenians. 

ALPHA SIGMA 

The Alpha Sigma Literary Society has been 
and is one of the most important organiza- 
tions on the Hill. It is the purpose of the 
society to develop a hearty Christian fellow- 
ship among its members, and to aid them 
to attain the highest proficiency in ortary, 
debate, and general literary achievement. The 
most careful training and consideration is 
given to all new men, and every opportunity 
is sought for their benefit and improvement. 

45 



Four years of active memberships in this soc- 
iety is a great help in the preparation for a 
future leader in forensics or as a public 
speaker. Every year the society gives a 
play, the proceeds of which go to the im- 
provement of the organization. The first 
meeting of the year is given over to a wel- 
come and general good time for the new 
men of the college. It also has two joint 
meetings with its sister society, the Theta 
Epsilon, for the purpose of social benefit and 
enjoyment. We extend to all new men a 
welcome to join the Alpha Sigma. 



DEBATE AND ORATORY 

Debate and oratory hold a prominent place 
in the student activities at Maryville. Each 
year an excellent program is put on by Pi 
Kappa Delta. The 1924 schedule included a 
triangular and two dual debates for men and 
two dual debates for women. Besides these 
contests, the hopes and ambitions of 1923 were 
realized when we sent four representatives to 
the National Convention of Pi Kappa Delta, 
where our men participated in several debates 
and an oratorical contest. The two weeks trip 
also included debates with colleges of Ten- 
nessee, Kentucky, and Indiana. A freshman 
debate with the University of Tennessee was 
a feature of the year's program, and a similar 

40 



contest v>ill probably be arranged for this 
year, thus affording an unusual opportunity 
for forensic development among first year 
students. Maryville is a member of both 
the Tennessee and East Tennessee Orotorical 
Leagues, which hold annual contests. Next 
year is before us ; lets make it the biggest yet. 



MEN'S GLEE CLUB 

The Men's Glee Club is an organization that 
has become one of the main features of Mary- 
ville College. A whole week is taken each 
year for a trip to different towns of East 
Tennessee. The 1924 Club sang in such towns 
as Lenoir City, Greenville, Johnson City, 
Kingston, Har-^iman, and Knoxville. The 
home concert was one of the best programmes 
given on the Hill last year. An extensive trip 
is being planned for next year by the Busi- 
ness Manager, Joe C. Gamble, that will carry 
the club in the State of Alabama or Kentucky 
as well as to the nearby towns. To be mem- 
of the club the man has to be able to sing 
with a fair degree of accuracy. Why not 
come out next year and help the men or- 
ganize the sixth club which promises to be the 
best yet? 

GIRL'S GLEE CLUB 

The Girl's Glee Club is the youngest or- 
ganization of its kind and one of the most 

47 



promising in Maryville College. This year it 
was composed of thirty of the best voices on 
the Hill. The concerts was one of the most 
attractive and interesting presented durinj; 
the year. Much credit is given to Miss Caro- 
line Crawford for the excellence of the work 
as given by the Club. The success of the or- 
ganization lies with the girl students and let 
us make it a real, live organization, one of 
harmony in every respect. 

THE DRAMATIC CLUB 

The Dramatic Club, better known as the 
"Maryville Players," has established a per- 
manent place for itself among the primary 
student activities. This club offers an in- 
valuable opportunity to talented students and 
is growing in popularity all the time. These 
players are known not only by the college a'-:d 
tov^ns people, but also by those in surrounding 
towns, and in our suburb, Knoxville. 

PRE-MEDICAL CLUB 

This club is made up of those students tak- 
ing the pre-mcdical course. The organiza- 
tion's purpose is for the discussion of sub- 
jects relating to medical science ; to create a 
personal interest in the profession of medicine, 
and to cultivate mutual fellowship. 
CHEMISTRY CLUB 
The Chemistry Club is composed of students 
48 



who are taking more than one year of col- 
lege chemistry. One year of chemistry is re- 
quired for membership, Papeijs and lec- 
tures are given on the chemical problems of 
the day by the students and the professors of 
the department. 

LAW CLUB 

Students who are contemplating entering 
the profession of law may become members of 
the club. The programs are made up of mock 
trials and other things of interest. 

HI-TRAIL CLUB 

The Hi-Trail Club was originated for the 
purpose of developing the physical strength, 
increasing the knowledge of and the love for 
the "Great Outdoors." The membership in 
this club is restricted to twelve. To become 
a member of the Hi-Trail Club one must 
have had at least one hundred miles of hik- 
ing experience, and must present a thesis 
giving an account of such experiences and be 
unanimously elected by the members. 

STATE CLUBS 

A number of State Clubs have been formed 
upon the campus and have continued their ac- 
tivity from year to year. The clubs mix 
business with pleasure and have as their pri- 
mary purpose the furthering of good spirit and 

49 



friendships among those who are from the 
same sections of the United States. An- 
nouncements of meetings are made in chapel 
an dall students are urged to affiliate with 
their state club. 

MINISTERIAL ASSOCIATION 

Greetings to all students. This association 
is composed of all young men who are expect- 
ting to choose for their life work the Gospel 
Ministry. Its programs are made up of only 
that which is of the highest religious and lit- 
erary value. Opportunities for personal work, 
either in the mission, jail, or in the rural dis- 
tricts are numerous. The association invites all 
who expects to enter the ministry to join 
hands with us and as a united band "press 
toward the mark for the prize of the high 
calling of God in Christ Jesus." 

STUDENT VOLUNTEERS 

"The evangelization of the world in this 
generation" would be quite possible if each 
Christian would seek to discover his true re- 
lationship to others in the light of Christ's 
life and ideals of service. Believing this, a 
group of students have been naturally drawn 
together with the purpose of serving on the 
foreign field. Their meetings are held every 
Thursday evening that they may further pre- 
pare by study and be strengthened in their 



purpose by fellowship with God and ecah 
other. If you are considering this form of 
service, seek out this group for strengthen- 
ing your interest. 

THE COLLEGE BAND 
One of the best and largest musical or- 
ganizations on the Hill is the College Band. 
Bi-weekly rehearsals of band music along 
every line, including high class marches, 
waltzes, serenades, medleys, and overtures 
are conducted by an experienced instructor. 
Fellows who possess a fair knowledge of band 
music should join early. The band furnishes 
music at many entertainments and athletics 
contests. Concerts and parades draw many 
hearers. 



GRADUATE RECITALS 

There is an old saying, which nobody doubts 
its truth, that our home talent is as good as 
that which is imported. The old students 
agree that the entertainments given by the 
Music and Expression Departments are not 
surpassed. These entertainments are given 
in the Spring by the members of the graduat- 
ing classes of expression, piano, and voice. 
They furnish an opportunity for cultural de- 
velopment along lines not pursued in the class- 
room and add much to the interest of the 
students. 



COLLEGE RELIGIOUS MEETINGS 

One of the most outstanding events for 
which Maryville is famous is her February 
meetings. For ten days each year the Chris- 
tians way of life is presented in an extensive 
way. During these Meetings new standards 
of life are adopted ond the destiny of the 
students is determined to a great extent. 
Marsrville is very fortunate in having a full- 
time college pastor. Dr. William Patton Steven- 
son, who conducts the Vesper service each 
Sunday evening. The anthems and special 
music by the robed choir add much to the 
impressiveness of this service. The addresses 
as given by Dr. Stevenson apply in a very 
practical way to student life. The mid-week 
service is conducted at the chapel hour on 
Thursday morning. These addresses are pre- 
pared for the students and are very helpful. 



There is no life so humble 
That if it be true and genuinely human 
And obedient to God, it may not hope 
To shed some of his light. 



If you complain of lack of opportunities 
ju'll miss what you have. 



It is not the leap at the start but the steady 
going on that gets there. 

52 



WHO'S WHO IN MARYVILLE 



Alpha Sigma Francis C. Kinsler 

Athenian Edward G. Cornelius 

Athletic Association Carl Schmidt 

Bainonian Virginia Witherington 

Band Robert A. Broady 

Baseball Earl McCall 

Basketball G. Lewis Veech 

Cheer Leaders Brown, Swartz 

Chilhowean Robert W. Bishop, Editor 

Joe C. Gamble, Business Manager 

Girl's Glee Club Margaret Lewis 

Highland Echo .... Francis C. Kinsler, Editor, 
Howard T. Hill, Business Manager 

Field Day Salmon Brown 

Football Edward H. Hamilton 

Men's Glee Club Dewey W, Eitner 

Junior Class Poin D. Graybeal 

Maryville Players Harry Gauding 

Pi Kappa Delta Edward G. Cornelius 

Senior Class Jean G. McMurray 

Sophomore Class John C. Crawford,Jr. 

Student Council Jean G. McMurray 

Tennis Nathan R. Haworth 

Theta Epsilon Myrtle Ardis 

Track James W. King 

Y. M. C. A Edgar Cathey 

Y. W. C. A - „ Mary Tippit 

63 



•ATHLETICS 



Maryville is represented by teams in every 
major college sport, and ranks with the lead- 
ers in this section of . the country. The ad- 
minitrative control of athletics is centered in 
the Athletic Association, 

With L. S. Honaker and L. E. Bond as 
coaches of Maryville athletics, and hard 
fighting teams composed of loyal men, it iis 
no wonder that the Athletic Association has 
made such a stride forward during the last 
two years. A new day has dawned for 
Maryville in athletics because she has two 
live coaches, plenty of good material, added 
equipment, and a splendid new field, 

FOOTBALL 

Football at Maryville has always been the 
leading sport. For the past three years Mary- 
ville has held the championship of the Ap- 
palachian Athletic Conference. The pros- 
pects are bright for a good team next Fall, 
and the schedule shows that many hard fought 
grid battles are in store. 



If your luck isn't what it should be, put 
a "P" before it, and continue to try. 

64 







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55 



BASKETBALL 

Carson-Newman disputed our claim to the 
championship of the Appalachian Conference 
of basketball last season, but no game could 
be arranged to see which were the champions. 
Our schedule for the past year included the 
best teams in this section and with the same 
men for the coming year we are looking for- 
ward to one of the biggest years in basket- 
ball yet. 

BASEBALL 

Baseball at Maryville has always been one 
of the most popular sports. In baseball as 
well as all other sports, Maryville has made 
much progress in the last three years. The 
1924 schedule included such teams as Kentucky 
State, V. P. I, and Tennessee. Athough 
Maryville does not encourage her athletes to 
play professional ball, she has sent ten or 
more men to the leagues during the last two 
years. 

TRACK 

This field of sport is beginning to take a 
leading place in athletics of the southern col- 
leges and Maryville is doing her part to aid 
it. Last year we had three dual meets ; the 
University of Tennessee at Knoxville, Centre 
at Danville, Ky., and Georgetown at George- 
town, Ky. In all three meets Maryville ehowed 

56 



up well and twelve men met the requirements 
for their letter. Next year should be the 
best year that Maryville has ever had since we 
lose no one by graduation and a good schedule 
is bing arrangd. 

TENNIS 

Tennis is growing rapidly in popularity at 
Maryville. Last year we had on our schedule 
the University of Tennessee, Tusculum, and 
East Tennessee State Normal. In this sport, as 
in the others, we are producing winning teams. 
The prospects are good for a good season this 
coming year. 



CONSTITUTION OF MARYVILLE COL- 
LEGE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

ARTICLE VII 

1. The following students shall be permit- 
ted to wear the Maryville "M:" 

a. Members of the varsity football team 
who have played fifteen quarters, b. Mem- 
bers of the varsity baseball team who have 
played as much as five innings per game in 
one-half of the scheduled games ; or a base- 
ball pitcher who has pitched forty-five in- 
nings in scheduled games, c. Members of 
the varsity basketball team who have played 
one-half a game in each of the scheduled 
games. d. Members of the varsity track 

57 



team winning first place in a dual meet, or 
any other meet where three or more colleges 
are competing. e. Members of the varsity 
tennis team playing in one-half the tourna- 
ments of the year. 

2. The football "M" shall be an eight- 
inch block "M" the baseball "M" a seven- 
inch straight "M," the basketball "M" a six- 
inch block "M ;" the girls' basketball "M" 
a five-inch block "M," the track "M" a five- 
inch block "M" with wings attached, and 
the tennis "M" shall be a script "M." 

3. All members of the second football, 
baseball, or basketball teams may wear the 
Maryville Monogram. 

6. No other students shall wear either the 
"M" or the Maryville Monogram. 



The shortest way to do many things is to 
do only one thing at a time. 



The only failure a man ought to fear is 
failure in cleaving to the purpose he sees to 
be best. 



While some people are saying "It can't be 
done," they are constantly being surprised by 
somebody doing it. 

68 





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60 



CHURCH DIRECTORY 



New Providence Presbyterian 

Comer College and Main 

Streets 

First Baptist 
Depot and High Streets 

Metliodist Episcopal South 
East Main Street 

Methodist Episcopal 
East Main Street 

Christian 
College Street 

Friends 
West Main Street 

61 



ADDRESSES 



62 



ADDRESSES 



63 



ADDRESSES 



64 



sassanaav 



65 



ADDRESSES 



66 



ADDRESSES 



67 



ADDRESSES 



68 



MEMORANDUM 



69 



MEMORANDUM 



70 



MEMORANDUM 



71 



MEMORANDUM 



MEMORANDUM 



73 



MEMORANDUM 



74 



MEMORANDUM 



75 



SAY! 

You See It*s Like This- 



'fHE advertisements which follow 
represent the standard dealers 
and it is through their co-operation 
that the *'M'* Book is made possi- 
ble. The Associations would call 
the attention of every man and 
woman to them and heartily recom- 
mends each of them to the members 
of the incoming class, and to the old 
students. 



THEIR HONORABLE DEALINGS 
WITH MARYVILLE COLLEGE IN 
THE PAST IS AMPLE WARRANT 
FOR YOUR CONFIDENCE AND 
PATRONAGE IN THE FUTURE. 



76 



How to Find the BEST Drug 

Store in Town 

Ask Anyone who was here 

last year, they will say 

Badgett-Costners 

Three Doors Below 
Palace Theatre 

Branson Sisters Studio 

PHOTOGRAPHERS 

WE INVITE MARYVILLE STUDENTS 

713 South Gay St. 

KNOXVILLE. TENNESSEE 

Ctiandler-Singleton Co. 

DEPARTMENT STORE 
The Home of True Economy 



''Everything Good to Eat'' 

UNITED THRIFT STORE 
NO. 2 

Where You Save the Pennies, Nickles and Dimes 
301 MAIN ST. M. M. ELDER, Mgr. 

Norton Hardware 
Company 

Hardware 
Sporting Goods 

Where Your Patronage is Appreciated 

78 



All Old Students Know 

AND NEW STUDENTS SOON 
FIND THE WAY TO 

MARTIN'S 

Opposite the Southern Station 

THE POPULAR DRUG 
STORE 

Only a step from the Hill 

PROFFITT'S 

EVERYTHING FOR MEN, WOMEN. 
AND CHILDREN'S WEAR 

H. P. HUDDLESTON 
DENTIST 

WELLS BUILDING 



79 



M. DUKE 

MERCHANT TAILOR 



The Home of Good Tailoring, Cleaning, Pressing, 
Dying, and Repairing 

Between Wiggb's Cash-Carry Store and Post Office 

Wallace C. Merwin is our agent on the Hill at 
315 Carnegie HaU 

He is a little fellow about six feet tall, a brunette with black 
wavy hair. 



Knoxville 
Lithographing Co. 

PUBLISHERS OF ALL KINDS OF COLLEGE 
CATALOGS AND ANNUALS 

"The Place Where They 

Keep The Quality Up" 

The 1925CHILHOWEANi8 from the press of the 
Knoxville Lithographing Company. 



80 



Hammcrmill Bond Stationery 

200 Sheets— 100 Envelopes-^ 1.00 

Printed with your name and address or any form of not 
over four lines—thirty letters to line. Remit with order to 

VAN'S 

1131 Market Sh - - - Chattanooga, Tenn. 

A ffinll^gr Printrb Annual 

IS A WORK OF ART-THE 

PERFECTION OF BOOK 

MAKING 

Just Ink and Paper do not make 

A College Annual 
Combined with these must be ex- 
perience brains and artistic ability 
of a high order. Write us f < r quo- 
tations, giving the num.ber of books 
wanted and the number of pages. 
Mention any special features 
desired. 

QloUrgp Prtnttttg Qlnmjtattg, 3ur. 

416 West Main St. Louisville. Ky. 



S. E CRAWFORD 

DENTIST 

Fir^ National Bank Building 

81 



Y. M. C. A. STORE 

Is Here To Serve You 

Candies 

Pastries 

Ice Cream 

AND 

College Necessities 

If you don't see it, ask for it. We don't 
mind telling you why we don't have it. 

Service is Our Motto 

STUART M. ROHRE 

MANAGER 



82 



Maryville College 

Samuel Tyndale Wilson, D.D., LL.D., Pres. 

ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTH YEAR 
BEGINS SEPTEMBER 9, 1924. 

Educational standards of the highest. Environment 
positively Christian. Expenses lowest possible. 

Enrollment, College, 626; Preparatory School, 1 70; 
Total 796 young men and young women; 359 came from 
thirty-eight states and countries outside of Tennessee. Fac- 
ulty of ninety-seven professors, instructors, and assistants. 

Endowment and property, $1 ,750,000.00. Cam- 
pus, 250 acres. Sixteen large buildings, including the new 
Thaw Memorial Hall. 

Entrance requirements, for admission to the Fresh- 
man class, fifteen standard units. Departments: College, 
Bible Training, Home Economics, Pre-Medical, Teach- 
ers', Expression, Music, and Art. 

Expenses: Tuition, $30 a year. Room rent for each 
student, with two in a room, averages $38 a year. Board, 
$3.50 a week. Text-books rented. General library free. 
Self-help opportunities. Full information sent upon re- 
quest^^ Address: 

CLINTON H. GILLINGHAM, D.D. 

Registrar 

Maryville, Tennessee 



83 



Y. W. C. A. STORE 

THIRD FLOOR, PEARSONS HALL 

CANDIES 

CANNED GOODS 

SALTED PEANUTS 

CHEWING GUM 

SANDWICHES 

ICE CREAM 

HAIR NETS 

PIES 

"When a feller needs a friend*' 
The "Y" Store will be the one. 



All proceeds go to the Blue Ridge Loan 
FundoftheY.W. C.A. 



84 



Sgrpum program 

SEASON 1924-25 
Auspices Y. W. C. A.-Y. M. C. A. 



Frederick Warde 

SHAKESPEARIAN READER 

Marriage of Figaro 



Smith-Spring-Holmes 
Concert Co. 

Metropolitan Male 
Quartette 



EDWARD H. HAMILTON 
Manager 

86 



Mmon ®l|f nlogtral 

Richmond, Virginia 



AMPLE SCHOLARLY 

EQUIPMENT FACULTY 



SPECIALTY— The making of practical preach- 
ers for world wide evangelization. 



Maryville College and Union Semin- 
ary have served the same field for more 
than one hundred years. 



86 



1 



R. F. Graf J. R. Graf 

H. R. Graf 



R. F. Graf & Sons 

ARCHITECTS 

And Structural 

Engineers 



Members of the American Institute of 
Architects, Licensed Architects and 
Engineers of the State of Tennessee. 

KNOXVILLE, TENN. 



87 



The Western 
Theological Seminary 

PITTSBURG, PA. 
A Seminary for College Graduates 

A complete, modern 
theoljgical curriculum, 
with elective courses 
leading to the degree 
of S. T. B. and S. T. M. 
is offered to students 
of all denominations. 
Graduate courses of the 
University of Pitts- 
burg, leading to the de- 
gre^-s of A M. and Ph. 
D., are open to proper- 
ly qualified students of 
the Seminary. Two en- 
trance prizes of $150 
each. Post- graduate 
fellowship of $500. 
Exceplional library 
facilities. All buildings are new, with modern 
equipment. Social hall, gymnasium and students' 
commons. 

—For information apply to— 
PRES. JAMES A. KELSO, PH.D., D.D. 




88 



THE MOODY BIBLE INSTITUTE 

OF CHICAGO 

Rev. James M. Gray, D.D., President 

Founded by the £rreat evang^elist and Christian 

educator, D. L. Moody, in 1886 

TRAINING FREE 

Educational Department 

The object of the Institute is expressed in 
the service rendered by its students in all 
parts of the v.'orld, who are pastors, evangel- 
ists, missionaries, teachers, directors of re- 
ligious education, gospel singers, Y. M. C. A. 
and Y. W. C. A. secretaries, rescue mission 
superintendents, deaconesses and workers in 
Sunday-schools and boys' and girls' clubs. 

This is divided into a Day School, Evening 
School and Correspondence School. The Gen- 
eral Course of the Day School is covered in 
two years. Its enrollment last year was 
1238. Five other courses are Missionary, Pas- 
tors Religious EduQation, Jewish Missions, and 
Swedish-English. Advanced work is taken in 
these courses covering longer periods of time. 

The Evening School permits students to take 
work equivalent to the Day School, making 
them eligible to the same diploma, though it 
necessarily covers a longer period of time. 
A shorter course is possible, however, leading to 
a certificate. The enrollment last year was 861. 

The Correspondence School is for those who 
cannot attend the Institute in person. Eight 
courses are offered in different methods of 
Bible TStudy, Practical Christian Work, Evan- 
gelism, Christian Evidences, etc. For these a 
limited fee is charged. The enrollment last 
year was 10,047. 

Catalog of the Day and Evening Schools, 
and Prospectus of the Correspondence School 
mailed free. Address 

THE MOODY BIBLE INSTITUTE 

153 Institute Place Chicago, Illinois 

89 



For the many little things you need, 
the Coat Hangers, Towel Bars, Soap 
Boxes, Candles, Candle Sticks, Waste 
Baskets, Hair Pins, Hair Nets, Wash 
Cloths, Shoe Polish, Tablets, Notebooks, 
Pencils and Box Paper— come to our 
store. 

We appreciate your patronage, and 
save you money on your purchase. 

Wright's 10c Store 

"Where a Little Money Goes a Long Way" 



ALKAHEST 
Lyceum Sy^em 

Incorporated 1902 

THE LEADING SOUTHERN AGENCY FOR 

THE BEST CHAUTAUQUA AND 

LYCEUM ATTRACTIONS 

ATLANTA, GEORGIA 





Touring: Car ! 


Schedule 




MARYVILLE AND 


KNOXVILLE 


Terminal : 


Terminal : 


Mitchell's 


Drug Store 


713 


S. Gay St. 


Leaves Maryville 


Leaves Knoxville 


5:00 


A.M. 


7:30 


A.M. 


5:30 


A.M. 


8:10 


A.M. 


5:30 


A.M. 


8:50 


A.M. 


6:00 


A.M. 


9:30 


A.M. 


7:00 


A.M. 


10:20 


A.M. 


7:50 


A.M. 


11:20 


A.M. 


8:25 


A.M. 


12:20 


P.M. 


9:00 


A.M. 


1:00 


P.M. 


9:50 


A.M. 


1:40 


P.M. 


10:30 


A.M. 


2:20 


P.M. 


11:00 


A.M. 


3:00 


P.M. 


12:15 


P.M. 


3:40 


P.M. 


1:00 


P.M. 


4:15 


P.M. 


1:50 


P.M. 


4:30 


P.M. 


2:30 


P.M. 


4:30 


P.M. 


3:00 


P.M. 


4:45 


P.M. 


3:40 


P.M. 


5 :30 


P.M. 


4:25 


P.M. 


6.15 


P.M. 


5^05 


P.M. 


7:30 


P.M. 


5:40 


P.M. 


8:30 


P.M. 


6.15 


P.M. 


9:30 


P.M. 


7:00 


P.M. 


10:30 


P.M. 



Where time is duplicated on schedule we run 

extra cars 

WE ALSO MAKE SPECIAL TRIPS 

New Phone 2962 Old Phone 9110 



91 



WILLIAM H. CROTHERS 
PASTOR 



Cordially invites you to share in 
its program of worship, study, 

FELLOWSHIP and SERVICE. 

Note particularly the Sabbath 
Morning hours. 

BIBLE SCHOOL, 9:15 

Special classes, with well qual- 
ified teachers, for college 
students. 

MORNING WORSHIP, 10:30. 

You will be welcomed as an affiliate 
member of this church during your 
student years while retaining member- 
ship in your own church at home. 



92 



The Webb Studio 

rail 

• 

Photos of Permanency and 
OF Character 

Kodak Finishing 
A SPECIALTY 

The Best is the Cheapest Always 



L.uke's Candy 
Kitchen 

FOR BETTER 
CONFECTIONS 

Gennett Records 

JUSTIFY EVERY ANTICIPATION OF 
MUSIC LOVERS 
HEAR THEM AT THE 

Martjville Furniture 
Companij 

Bring us your picture frame work. See us for the 
latest hits in sheet music. 

94 



EASTMAN KODAKS 

WHITMAN'S CANDIES 

TOILET ARTICLES 

SODAS 

In Fact, Everything to be Had in a 
Modem Drug Store 

We Jlte. jJlwa\)S glad to See You 

Birchfiel Drug 
Companij 

Maryville, Tennessee 
BOTH PHONES NO. 3 

95 



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