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Full text of "Maryville College Handbook [M Book] 1929-1930"


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M" BOOK 

Volumne XXIV 
1929-30 



EDITOR 
J. Stuart James 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 

Helen Crowder 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
Homer E. McCann 



Publislied by 

The Young Men's and Young 

Women's Christian Associations 

of Mary vi He College 

:\rARYVILT.E, TENNESSEE 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



CONTENTS 



Alpha Sigma 46 

Athenian ; 47 

A Word to Freshmen 17 

A Student's Ten Commandments 23 

Bainonian 48 

Basketball 61 

Baseball 61 

Band 49 

Book Store •. 5 7 

Blue Ridge 44 

Calendar 8 

Class Customs 25 

Character (a poem) 14 

Chilowean 53 

Chemistry Club 52 

Dormitories 56 

Dining Hall 5 7 

Debating 66 

Football 60 

Fred Hope Fund 45 

Football Schedule 68 

Glee Singers 50 

Girl's Glee Club ; . 50 

Girls Athletics 64 

Hikes 43 

Highland Echo 53 

History 10 

Hi-Trail Club 52 

Libraries 56 

Life Work Conference 44 

Lyceum Course 45 

Law Club 51 

Location II 

"M" Book 53 

Ministerial Association 51 

Medical Attention 58 

Nu Gamma Sigma 42 

Opening Social Events 20 

Offer of College 16 

Orchestra 50 



•M" HANDBOOK 



Oratory 66 

Post Office . . . ._ 5 7 

President Wilson's Counsel 12 

Reading Room 41 

Student Council 49 

"Snap" 21 

Some "Don'ts" 22 

Song — "Alma Mater" 26 

Song — "Dear Old Maryville" 28 

State Clubs 52 

Theta Epsilon 46 

Track 61 

Tennis 62 

Track Records 71 

Who's Who 24 

Yells 29 

Y. M. C. A. 

Sketch of history 32 

Scope of work 33 

Officers ^ 3 4 

President's welcome 3 5 

Rooms 36 

Sunday meetings 3 6 

"Y" Athletics 3 7 

Y. W. C. A. 

Activities 39 

Officers 40 

President's welcome 41 

Reading room 41 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



DEDICATION 



It is with respectful admiration that we 
dedicate this, the tvventy- fourth volume of 
the "M" Book, to those Maryville men and 
women who have gone out into all fields, in 
all parts of the world, and there have be- 
come honorable leaders and worthy repre- 
sentatives of their Alma Mater and her 
ideals. 



'M" HANDBOOK 




MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



FOREWORD 



It is primarily in an effort to help the 
first-year men and women to become ac- 
quainted with the spirit, customs, and 
ideals of Maryville that this little book 
has been prepared. 

If it enables the new student to catch 
a vision, as nearly as is possible from the 
printed page, of the religious, social, ath- 
letic, and scholastic phases of life at Mary- 
ville; if it helps to orient him to his new 
surroundings, if it gives him an idea of 
the atmosphere of pleasantness and con- 
genality that pervades the institution — 
yet serves as a reminder that college is a 
place where things are accomplished with 
work, it will have served its purpose. 

In addition, it is designed to furnish in 
accurate and convenient form certain bits 
of information and advice that will be useful 
to every student possessing a copy. 

THE EDITOR 



•M" HANDBOOK 7 
^ 



BOOK I 



General 

Emulate the teakettle — though tip 

to its neck in hot water, 

still it singeth! 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



THE COLLEGE CALENDAR FOR 
1929-1930 



1929 

Sept. 10, Tuesday, 8:00 a. m. — Registra- 
tion of old students begins. 

Sept. 11, Wednesday, 8:10 a. m. — Opening 
chapel service. 

Sept. 11, Wednesday, 8:30 a. m. — Entrance 
examinations. 

Sept. 11, Wednesday, 8:30 a. m. — Photo- 
graphing of all new students. 

Sept. 11, Wednesday, 8:30 a. m. — Registra- 
tion of old students completed; regis- 
tration of Freshmen. 

Sept. 12, Thursday — First meeting of 
classes. 

Sept. 14, Saturday, 2:3 p. m. — Faculty 
reception. 

Sept. 14, Saturday, 8:3 p. m. — Y. M. C. A. 
and Y. W. C. A. receptions. 

Nov. 28, Thursday — Thanksgiving Day. 

Dec. 19, Thursday, 3:00 p. m. — Christmas 
holidays begin. 

1930 

Jan. 2, Thursday, 8:10 a. m. — Class work 
resumed. 

Jan. 18, Saturday — First semester examina- 
tions begin. 

Jan. 25, Saturday — First semester examina- 
tions end. 

Jan. 25, Saturday — First semester ends. 

Jan. 28, Tuesday, 8:10 a. m. — Second se- 
mester begins. 

Feb. 4, Tuesday, 8:10 a. m. — February 
meetings begin. 



'M" HANDBOOK. 



May 2 8, Wednesday — Second semester 
examinations begin. 

May 3 0, Friday, 8:00 p. m. — Graduation 
exercises of the Expression depart- 
ment. 

May 3 1, Saturday, 3:00 p. m. — Annual ex- 
hbit of the Art department. 

May 3 1, Saturday, 8:00 p. m. — Graduation 
exercises of the Music department. 

June 1, Sabbath, 10:30 a. m. — Baccalau- 
reate sermon. 

June 1, Sabbath, 6:30 p. m. — Annual ad- 
dress to the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. 

June 2, Monday, 8:00 p. m. — Bates Prize 
oratorical contest. 

June 3, Tuesday, 3:00 p. m. — Annual ex- 
h bit of the Home Economics depart- 
ment. 

June 3, Tuesday, 7:30 p. m. — Senior class 
play. 

June 4, Wednesday — Second semester 
examinations end. 

June 4, Wednesday, 3:30 p. m. — Senior 
Class-Day exercises. 

June 4, Wednesday, 7:3 p. m. — Annual 
meeting and banquet of the Alumni 
Association. 

June 5, Thursday, 8:3 a. m. — Meeting of 
the Directors. 

June 5, Thursday, 10:00 a. m. — Commence- 
ment. 



10 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



HISTORICAL SKETCH 



Maryville has grown from a class of 
five students who gathered about Dr. Isaac 
Anderson in 1819, to the foremost college 
in Tennessee, having an enrollment last year 
of 803 students from 42 different states 
and countries. Its growth has been phe- 
nomenal and the romance of its growth 
from a little log cabin to a completely 
equipped modern, up to date college has 
been chronicled by Dr. Wilson in his 
"Century of Maryville College" which you 
may read in the library. 

Grounds, comprising 2 70 acres of the 
most beautiful scenery in East Tennessee, 
on which rest 19 buildings; and an en- 
dowment of $2,253,000.00 do not form a 
complete basis upon which to judge the 
college. Numbered among its alumni are 
men who have distinguished themselves in 
every type of unselfish service. Familiarize 
yourself with Maryville's entire history. 
You are a Maryvillian — a student in one 
of the finest colleges in the South. 



The only failure a man ought to fear is 
failure in cleaving to the purpose he sees to 
be best. 



'M" HANDBOOK 11 



LOCATION 



Maryville, the county seat of Blount 
County, Tennessee, is a pleasant and thriv- 
ing community, numbering, together with 
the twin corporation of Alcoa, more than 
ten thousand inhabitants. It is widely 
known as "the town of schools and 
churches." It is located sixteen miles south 
of Knoxville, on the Knoxville and Augusta 
division of the Southern Railway, and on 
the paved highway No. 33, leading out from 
Knoxville to the south and the new Smoky 
Mountain National Park. Maryville may 
be reached from Knoxville by Southern 
Railway trains twice daily, and by busses 
leaving from the bus terminal station at 
State and Union Streets every forty-five 
minutes throughout the day. 

The town lies on the hills, one thousand 
feet above sea level, and enjoys the life-giv- 
ing breezes from the Chilhowees and the 
Smokies, a few miles away. Young people 
from the North and other sections are 
greatly benefited in health by their resi- 
dence at Maryville. 



Which wears out first, the seat of your 
trousers or the soles of your shoes? 



Have some ideals and sticks to them. 



12 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



PRESIDENT WILSON'S COUNSEL 



The wisest student is the one who has 
these two resolves at heart, and who con- 
sistently seeks to carry them into effect: 
( 1 ) the resolve to secure for himself the 
very best possible development through the 
agency of college life and curriculum; and 
(2) the resolve to contribute as much help- 
fulness and service to the institution and 
fellow-students as may be possible while in 
college. By such a policy, the college, 
the student himself, and his fellow-students 
will profit greatly. 

Allow me, as the oldest student now on 
the roll, to recommend very heartily to all 
students, new and old, the adoption and 
execution of this worthy policy. And I 
especially commend to you your alliance 
with the Christian Associations in their en- 
deavors to serve the College, the student 
body, and the kingdom of heaven through 
their year's work. For fifty-two years the 
Y. M. C. A. and for forty-five years the 
Y. W. C. A. have been rendering very im- 
portant service in many directions. They 
need and will appreciate your cooperation. 
Kindly give it to them. 

Sincerely yours, 

SAMUEL TYNDALE WILSON. 



'M" HANDBOOK 



13 







SAMUEL TYNDALE WILSON, 
M. A.. D. D., LL. D. 



14 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



CHARACTER 



I have to live with myself, and so, 
1 want to be fit for myself to know; 
1 want to be able as the days go by. 
Always to look myself in the eye. 
I don't want to stand, at the setting of sun, 
And hate myself for the things that I've 
done. 

1 don't want to keep on the closet shelf, 

A lot of secrets about myself. 

Nor fool myself, as I come and go 

Into thinking "Nobody else will know 

The kind of person I really am." 

I don't want to dress up myself in shar 

1 want to go out, with my head erect, 
I want to deserve all folks' respect. 
And here, in the struggle for fame and pel^ 
1 want to be able to like myself. 
1 don't want to look at myself and kno^ 
That I'm all bluff and bluster, and emptj 
show. 

1 never can hide myself from me; 
1 see what others may never see; 
I know what others may never know. 
I never can fool myself, and so 
Whatever happens, 1 want to be 
Self-respecting and conscience free. 



'M" HANDBOOK 15 



BOOK II 



Getting Acquainted 

The only way to secure friends 
to be one. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



THE OFFER OF THE COLLEGE 



To be at home in all lands and ages; to 
count nature a familiar acquaintance and 
art an intimate friend; to gain a standard 
for the appreciation of other men's work 
and the criticism of your own; to carry 
in" your pocket the keys of the world's 
library and feel its resources behind you in 
whatever task you undertake; to make hosts 
of friends among the men of your own age 
who are to be leaders in all walks of" life; 
to lose yourself in generous enthusiasms 
and cooperate with others for common ends; 
to learn manners from students who are 
gentlemen and form character under pro- 
fessors who are Christians — this is the 
offer of the college for the best four years 
of your life. 



'M" HANDBOOK 17 



A WORD TO FRESHMEN 



Every freshman that steps on a college 
campus is brim full of dreams and expec- 
tations. There is a feeling of elation at 
the neA' independence; perhaps he has cer- 
tain definite ideas of the things he will do 
with this independence. Every collegiate 
is covered with the glow of the promise 
which clings to what is not clearly known, 
but has been planned and hoped for and 
speculated about. How will it be different 
from high school? Will he make that 
team? What are college "activities" like 
and how hard is it to get into them? 
Courses of study: harder than in high 
school? — more interesting? New friends: 
the right kind? College friendships be- 
t een boys and girls: the correct collegiate 
attitude to take toward them? — dates — 
moonshiriing. 

Probably few analyze the situation in 
detail, but all know that it is momentous. 
Four years of freedom in a fascinating 
place. The student is temporarily un- 
hampered by the responsibilities that will 
soon overtake him, family hearth, business 
desk, political office, and others. He is 
free from many of the prejudices of his 
elders which will settle upon him all too 
soon. His is an ideal opportunity to view 
the past and contemporary life of his coun- 
try and the world with a critical but 
opened attitude and acquire the facts and 
habits with which to practice the fine art 
of living. 

The new student will encounter many 
difficulties on the campus, both from 
the college itself and from the student 
body. Let us examine some of them. 



18 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



"My Crowd" 

There is a false assumption that one 
must confine his friendships exclusively to 
his own group, or gang and that he must 
have such a group. If one does this he is 
cut off from intimate contact with opposite 
viewpoints, which alone is able to correct 
his narrowmindedness. College, with its 
great diversity of types and opinions, offers 
a superb opportunity for the student to 
enlarge his appreciation of other people's 
ideas and ideals. So don't be a "Sigma 
Delta Type" or "Our Gang Type" or any 
"Type" — be human and an individual. Make 
friends among students of several races, 
classes, and groups. 

Study 

College is not a four years loaf and the 
student who makes it that is a failure. 
Remember that you are in college primarily 
to work and to accomplish things thereby. 
To take one's studies seriously is Tiot synony- 
mous with accepting uncritically all that 
is spoken in lectures or written in text- 
books. You should learn from the start 
to react to what is told you. If your doubts 
arise, voice them modestly yet boldly until 
the matter is cleared up through discussion. 

Faculty Friendships 

Perhaps no group understands life so 
well as do college and university profes- 
sors. They are enough apart from the 
mad whirl of everyday existence to view 
it more calmly than most others. Get 
well acquainted with your teachers and 
talk to them often. They are good sports 
and are anxious to help you. Friendly as- ; 
sociation with them is priceless. 

Religion 

Some students enter college with the 
feeling that something drastic is going to 



'M" HANDBOOK 19 



happen to their religion. They wonder what 
the effect of college will be. "Loss of 
faith," "sophomoric skepticism," "religious 
conflict" — these familiar bogeys frighten 
us unnecessarily. If we suffer tension in 
our religious thinking in college days it 
means that we are growing and are think- 
ing deeply. The danger is that we will 
stop thinking too soon, under the impres- 
sion that we have arrived at the end. Don't 
make that great mistake — keep thinking. 
College should mean transition; it should 
not mean collapse. 

General 

College life, you will find, is immensely 
busy in its varied activities, but strive 
above all else to live a well-proportioned 
life, giving everything its just due and 
endeavoring to be fair to your better self. 
Let's hope that now and then you will be 
glad when the last one has lounged out 
of your room, to prop your feet on the 
desk and have a thought or two not 
compelled by assignments of even good 
form. Let's hope you will develop opin- 
ions on other than conventional dinner- 
topics, and that you will stand up for your 
convictions. Don't just follow the crowd. 
A good argument, hotly contested, that 
leaves you scowling thoughtfully in the 
dark for long before you drop off to sleep 
may not be good for your health, but it 
builds mental sinew. 

Search you after these things, then, new 
student, the habit of getting the stuff to 
build your own philosophy; the mental 
bravery to defend it when made; the art of 
making valuable friends and of talking to 
them when made; all of these things are to 
be found in four short but glorious years 
in college I 



20 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



OPENING SOCIAL EVENTS 



The social life at Maryville is well provid- 
ed for and no matter what your disposi- 
tion is there are occasions you will like. 
These opening entertainments will carry you 
over the time of newness and afford op- 
portunity for getting acquainted with your 
fellow students and to get the first glimpse 
of the true Maryville spirit. 

The Y. W. C. A. give their reception on 
Baldwin lawn and a good time awaits those 
who enjoy good "eats" and gossip. 

The Y. M. C. A. entertains the new 
men with a well planned, varied program 
which furnishes plenty of thrills. The re- 
ception is held out in the woods, in the 
dark of the moon, and light is supplied from 
the old stump which is sacrificed for the 
occasion. Kemp Davis is planning a big 
time at the "Pow Wow" this ye&r and 
every man wants to be in on it. 

The Societies hold their receptions soon 
after school opens. The two girls' societies, 
Banonian and Theta Epsilon have their re- 
ceptions together, usually around a big 
camp fire in the college woods. The boys' 
societies, Athenian and Alpha Sigma usually 
hold their receptions in their respective 
halls, where the new men are introduced 
to a society program and society "feed." 



When a man loses confidence in himself 
he makes the vote unanimous. It's up to 
you I 



'M" HANDBOOK 21 



On Saturday afternoon, September 1 4th, 
comes the Faculty reception. You are 
introduced to the professors while you are 
in their good graces, and those who attend 
this reception look back upon it as one of 
the most pleasant events of the opening 
week. Take this opportunity to become ac- 
quainted with the faculty who are your 
friends as well as instructors. 

Snap 

Snap is an institution on the Hill — it 
is the favorite out-door sport and when you 
hear the announcement in the dining room 
at lunch that "there will be a snap tonight 
on Baldwin Lawn" — prepare to go. 

How do you play it? We have played 
it for two years, but it is so simple and 
yet so intricate that we are not able to 
explain it. It will come natural to you 
though. Snap furnishes plenty of exercise 
and yet sufficient opportunities for a quiet 
chat with one whom you have snapped. 



Genius wins sometimes; hard work 
always. 



22 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



SOME "DON'TS' 



1. Don't try to make a "splurge" the 
first week. 

2. Don't skip classes. 

3. Don't be satisfied with the mediocre. 

4. Don't get the idea that Maryville 
lacks spirit. It is your job to see that she 
has spirit. 

5. Don't mumble a half-hearted greet- 
ing. Call everybody by name, and let him 
know you are interested in him. 

6. Don't push or shove when you are in 
a crowd. A college man thinks of others 
besides himself. 

7. Don't confine your associations t'o one 
group of students. Get acquainted with as 
many fellow-students as possible. 

8. Don't neglect your studies for less 
important things. 

9. Don't think it old-fashioned to boost. 

10. Don't think you are preparing for 
life. You are LIVING. This is the place 
to practice all your good theories of 
democracy and internationalism. 



COLLEGE COLORS 



Orange and Garnet. 



'M" HANDBOOK 23 



A STUDENT'S TEN COMMANDMENTS 



1. Thou Shalt Have No Other Gods 
Before Me. Thou shalt not in a far country 
forget the God of thy fathers. He is on 
the campus even as He is at home. 

2. Thou Shalt Not Make Unto Thee Any 
Graven Ima^e. Neither anything else shalt 
thou worship — -whether a social organiza- 
tion, athletic interests, or any outside 
activity. 

3. Thou Shalt Not Take the Name of the 
Lord Thy God in Vain, no not even in 
minced oaths. 

4. Remember the Sabbath Day, to Keep 
it Holy. Six days shalt thou labor and do 
all thy work, all thy studies; fill the 
seventh with those things acceptable to God. 

5. Honor Thy Father and Thy Mother 
by holding fast to the best that they have 
taught thee. 

6. Thou Shalt Not Kill hopes or ideals; 
no, nor the reputation of the girl or boy 
across the hall. 

7. Thou Shalt Not Commit Adultery. 
Respect the sacredness of love; regard it 
never lightly. 

8. Thou Shalt Not Steal either thy 
roommate's or neighbor's time, ideas, work 
or friends. 

9. Thou Shalt Not Bear False Witness 
Against Thy Neighbor neither in thy room 
nor thy society hall nor anywhere else 
among thy friends. 

10. Thou Shalt Not Covet thy friends' 
clothes grades, social position, nor any- 
thing else that thou hast not earned. 



No man is free who is not master of 
himself. 



24 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



WHO'S WHO ON COLLEGE HILL 



Alpha Sigma Morgan Biggs, Pres. 

Athenian Hayden Laster, Pres. 

Theta Epsilon Helen Crowder, Pres. 

Bainonian Helen Plant, Pres. 

Y. M. C. A J. Stuart James, Pres. 

Y. W. C. A Louise Carson. Pres. 

Athletic Association . .Robert Watkins, Pres. 

Basketball Ralph Waddell. Capt. 

Football Lowell MacDonald, Capt. 

Senior Class Frank Baker, Pres. 

Junior Class Travis Hitt, Pres. 

Sophomore Class . . . .Lee Calloway, Pres. 

Pi Kappa Delta ..Forrest Robertson,. Pres. 

Chilowean Frances Cortner, Editor 

Kemp Davis, Bus. Mgr. 

Highland Echo Jesse Pierce, Editor; 

Bruce Hunter, Bus. Mgr. 

Swimming Jack Coughlin, Instr. 

Men's Glee Singers ....Bob Overly, Pres.; 
Kenneth Davis, Bus. Mgr. 

Theta Alpha Phi Frank Baker, Pres. 

Law Club Travis Hitt. Pres. 

Ministerial Assn Philip Vogel, Pres. 

Chemistry Club . .Thomas Whitehead, Pres. 



"M" HANDBOOK 25 



CLASS CUSTOMS 



Inter-class athletics are enjoyed by all 
the students, many participating and many- 
cheering. The Seniors cheer for the Sopho- 
inores while the Juniors aid the Freshmen. 

The Junior class publishes the College 
Annual, the Chilhowean. 

Class parties are held on Hallowe'en 
night. It is said that "Spooks" often steal 
the refreshments. 

The Junior class gives a banquet to the 
Seniors. 

The graduating class of 1922 started the 
custom of wearing distinctions. 

The Junior girls carry a daisy chain 
on Baccalaureate Sunday. 

The Alumni banquet is served by the 
Junior girls. 

During the Sophomore year your choice 
of major and minor subjects is handed to 
the registrar. 

The Juniors are responsible for the 
decoration of the stage for Commencement 
week for the Seniors. 

Only upper classmen are allowed to com- 
pete for the Bates prize, which is mentioned 
elsewhere in this book. 

Senior week is observed. 

Each class selects a candidate for May 
Queen. These girls then attend the queen 
at her throne. 



Keep back of the team when they are on 
the field. They are doing their best. 



26 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



SONGS 



Alma Mater 

Where Chilhowee's lofty mountains, 

Pierce the southern blue, 
Proudly stands our Alma Mater, 

Noble, grand, and true. 

Chorus: 
Orange, garnet, float forever. 

Ensign of our hill! 
Hail to thee, our Alma Mater! 

Hail to Maryville. 

As thy hilltop crowned with cedars 

Ever green appears; 
So thy memory fresh shall linger 

Through life's smiles and tears. 

Chorus: 
Lift the chorus, wake the echoes. 

Make the welkin ring! 
Hail the queen of all the highlands! 

Loud her praises sing. 

Chorus 



Don't forget to stand with uncovered 
head while the Alma Mater is being sung. 



ON DODGE AVENUE LOOKING TOWARD 
VOORHEES CHAPEL 



28 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



Dear Old Maryville 

I 

Near Chilhowee's mountain blue, 

Stands our Alma Mater true. 
Dear old Maryville, to thee we lift our song 

'Neath thy cedar grove so fair. 
We shall breathe the mountain air. 

While with merry hearts the chorus we 
prolong. 

Chorus 
Sing we a song of our dear college home. 

Fondly we love thee still. 
And where ever we may be. 

Fond Mem'ry turns to thee. 
Our Alma Mater, dear old Maryville. 

II 

As the morning sunbeams' light. 

Greets over Chilhowee's height. 
So our tribute, we as freely to thee bring. 

Youth's free homage full and free. 
We thus gladly render thee. 

Dear old Maryville, thy praise we freely 
sing. 

Ill 
To thee, guardian of our youth. 

Faithful guide to light and truth. 
We, thy children, bring our songs of 
grateful praise. 
And when we shall leave thy hill. 
We shall ne'er forget thee still. 

Dear old Maryville, the scene of happy 
days. 



'M" HANDBOOK 



YELLS 



Howee-How 

Howee-how Chilhowee 
Maryville, Maryville, Tennessee 
Who-rah, who-rah 
Maryville, Maryville!! 
Rah, rah, rah. 

(repeat) 

M-a-r-y-v-i-1-l-e 

M-a-r-y ville 

M-a-r-y-v ville 

M-A-R-Y-V-I-L-L-E 
Maryville, Maryville, Maryville. 

-C 'tory 

V-I-C tory 

V-I-C-T-O-R-Y 
Victory, Victory, Victory! 

"Fifteen" 

Raw — raw — raw — raw — raw 

Raw — raw — raw — raw — raw 

Raw — raw — raw — raw — raw 

TEAM, TEAM, TEAM!! 

On Maryville 

On, Oh, Maryville 
On, Oh, Maryville 
Plunge right thru that line 

Run the ball clear around old 

A touchdown sure this time 
Raw, Raw, Raw! 



30 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

5 The Old Chant. (Slow and low) 

Maryville Maryville 

You-don't-know-Maryville 
You - can't-lick - Maryville 
Maryville I Maryville I 

6 The Locomotive 

M — a — r — y — v — i — 1 — 1 — e 

M-a— r-y-v-i— 1-1-e 

M-a-r-y-v-i-1-l-e 

Maryville! 

7 The Orange and Garnet 

Here's to the Orange 
Here's to the Garnet 
Here's to the Boys 
In the Orange and Garnet! 



No man rises above his own thoughts. 



Leaders are chosen — rarely self-appointed 



•M" HANDBOOK 31 



BOOK III 



Undergraduate 
Activities 

The man who stopped on third to 

congratulate himself, never 

made a home run. 



32 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



Y. M. C. A. 



Brief Sketch of History 
The Young Men's Christian Association, 
like all great organizations, had its origin in 
one man. Sir George Williams of London, 
England. He was a poor lad, who worked 
in a drapery establishment in the city of 
London, but who found time to speak a 
word for his Lord and Saviour, Jesus Christ. 
Feeling the deep need for daily prayer and 
spiritual uplift, he called together a num- 
ber of his companions, and each morning 
they held a prayer meeting in an upper room 
of that establishment. Their group kept 
growing and soon they had quite a follow- 
ing. From this group grew what is today 
known as the foremost organization for 
the carrying of the Gospel of Jesus Christ 
to young men throughout the world. The 
Young Men's Christian Association. Ever 
since that date, 1844, this Association has 
continued to grow, until today it encircles 
the globe; bringing together young men 
and boys into a brotherhood that keeps 
alive the spirit of Christ. 

The Student Young Men's Christian As- 
sociation, of which V. e are a part, is one of 
the many branches of this great organiza- 
tion, and it works for the uplift and welfare 
of the young men in colleges throughout the 
world. Its membership runs into the thou- 
sands, and other Associations are being 
formed every year. Most associations have 
secretaries to head up the work, but the 
students of the college are the chief pro- 
moters and workers in the associations. 
They are student organizations, and it is the 
duty and privilege of everj' student to 
back them in the best_way possible. 



'M" HANDBOOK 33 



Purpose 

The purpose of the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association is to develop the three- 
fold man; spirit, mind, and body. In the 
publication of this "M" Book these phases 
of its program are set forth. 

Scope of Work 

The Y. M. C. A. of Maryville is a live 
and active organization. It seeks to serve 
the students at the college in every way 
possible not limiting its activities to strictly 
religious matters. We realize that if we 
accomplish the great aim of the Y. M. C. A. 
"a clean mind in a sound body" that we 
w.ll have progressed a long way on the 
road to religious salvation. The cabinet 
of the Y is made up of the most congenial 
and most representative of the Maryville 
students. They are always glad to oblige 
you in any way they can. Don't get the 
idea that the Y is a stagnant, lifeless, in- 
active, organization at Maryville, but a live, 
gro.'. ing, healthy organization in whose ac- 
tivities you are urged to take part, enjoy 
and derive benefit from. Don't hesitate to 
call on the Secretary when there is some- 
thing you want to know. If there is some- 
thing you want done ask him to do it. 
He is glad and willing to help you. The 
services held under the direction of the 
Y are the best, we have the best speakers 
procurable, interesting slides and motion 
pictures, and the most delightful song 
service imaginable. These things are for 
you — the "Y" is yours. Get in the habit 
of taking part in its activities and in com- 
ing to its meetings — you will never re- 
gret it. 



There is nothing quite so contemptible 
as a person with no respect for himself. 



34 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

Officers 

J. Stuart James. '3 1 President 

Carl M. Story, '3 1 Vice-President 

Morgan C. Biggs, '30 Secretary 

John B. Pectol, '30 Treasurer 

Cabinet 

Athletics Arthur Shaw 

Jack Coughlin 

Social activities Kemp Davis 

Lyceum course Hayden Laster 

Laurence Somers 

Bible study Robert Jones 

Membership Thomas Whitehead 

Intercollegiate relations . . .Stiles McMillan 

Deputations Russel Gilmore 

Hi-Y work Homer E. McCann 

Missions ." Philip Vogel 

Music Porter French 

Publicity Franklin Roberson 

In 192 7 the "Y" celebrated its fiftieth 
birthday. Fifty years of progress; fifty 
years of service to man, through Jesus 
Christ. This year the "Y" begins its fifty- 
third year. We are praying and working 
toward one great goal: to bring men to 
take an interest in Jesus Christ and to 
incite them to be doers of the Word and 
not hearers only. Jesus said, "Lo, I am 
with you always." That statement clears 
cur vision; deepens our interest; expels our 
fears and brings us to a realization of a 
great duty to the Master. The "Y" is a 
service sign — service to God. May God's 
blessing be upon its services and may men 
apprecaite all that He has done for them 
by obeying His word. 



'M" HANDBOOK 35 



Howdy Men! 



Fellows: 

In behalf of the Y. M. C. A. I want to 
bid you welcome to Maryville's campus. 
You have chosen the right college, now 
make the most of your opportunities. Work 
hard. Take an active part in student 
activities, athletics and forensics, but don't 
try to run the old place. Remember you 
are in college. 

The "Y" extends to you the hand of 
fellowship, and wishes to aid you in learn- 
ing how to live life at its best. The "Y" 
has no ambition to be merely another ac- 
tivity. If it can not supply some vital 
inspiration that will find expression in a 
better way of living, if it can not stimulate 
intelligent thought on some of the prob- 
lems that confront us, it will have failed in 
its larger tasks. Our success or failure 
V ill be to a large extent determined bj' 
the response of you Freshmen. Do your 
part. Be good college men by not neglect- 
ing the religious part of college life. 

Finally, meet and know the officers and 
cabinet. Come over to our rooms in the 
"Y" building, Barlett Hall, and talk things 
over with us. Remember the Y. M. C. A. 
is your friend. You can help it and it will 
greatly help you. 

Looking forward with pleasure to greeting 
you in a few days, I am 

Sincerely yours, 
"JESSE- JAMES, 
President "Y". 



36 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

Y. M. C. A. Rooms 

The Y. M. C. A. Rooms are located on 
the first and second floors of Bartlett Hall. 
You will notice in large white letters, 
"Y. M. C. A." on the large window just 
over the entrance. At the right as you go 
in you will find the "Y" Store where sta- 
tionery, candy, and other confections can 
be had. Then next to the store, and just 
around the corner, is the "Y" Reading 
Room, where you will find magazines, 
papers, and a Victrola for your use. At 
the left of the entrances is the auditorium 
V here the "Y" meetings are held. The 
gymnasium is also on the first floor. On 
the second floor is located the offices of 
the president and secretary, who will be 
glad to have you come in and get acquainted 
and to give you any assistance that you 
may desire. 

All of these rooms are for the use of all 
the fellows on the Hill. Make use of their 
advantages and you will enjoy your college 
life more. 

The Sunday Meetings 

The Sunday Meetings occupy a prominent 
part in the Y. M. program. Last year the 
meetings were all well attended and much 
impetus was given to the movement by the 
whole hearted support of the fellows. 

The spiritual as well as the mental side 
is taken care of in these Sunday meetings 
which are held at 1 o'clock in Bartlett Hall. 
The practice was followed last year of hav- 
ing prominent men who have retained their 
contact with students to come make 
addresses and lead discussions. Programs 
have been outlined in advance and some 
very interesting, instructive discussions are 
in store for those who attend. 

Jt is planned to make music, both mass 



'M" HANDBOOK 37 



singing and special music, a feature of 
each meeting, even more so than it was last 
year. Get the habit of coming to the Y 
meetings. Spend the hour after dinner on 
Sunday at the Y auditorium. 

"Y" Athletics 

"Every Man in some Phase of the Y 
Athletic Program," and it is possible, for 
the Y athletic program covers every phase 
of sport. In the fall, class football is 
staged as part of the Y program. In the 
spring, there is inter-mural basketball, inter- 
class basketball, interclass baseball, an 
inter-class track meet, swimming meet, 
wrestling and boxing matches, tennis and 
horse shoe tournaments. Last year, 100 
men participated in the intramural basket- 
ball tournament. 

The gymnasium is completely equipped 
with mat, horses, parallel bars and other 
gymnastic apparatus. Bartlett Hall in 

V hich it is located is considered one of the 
finest Y. M. C. A. buildings in the South. 

The s\^ imming pool, located next to the 

Y building was built at a cost of $10,000 
and occupies a building 58 by I 10 feet 
long, 25 by 75 feet being the dimensions 
of the pool itself which is open the entire 
year. 

The Y. M. C. A. interclass track meet 
held in the spring is a feature of the entire 
athletic program. Bronze and gold medals 
are given to the winners in each event. 

Get into some form of athletics and keep 
yourself physically fit. You will derive 
a great deal of pleasure from your athletic 
competition. 



You can't be a howling success by simply 
howling. 



38 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 




'M" HANDBOOK 39 



Y. W. C. A. 



Activities 

One of the strongest organizations on 
the Hill is the Young Women's Christian 
Association. It functions from the week 
end before school begins in the fall until 
the last day of school in the spring. 

Before the freshmen arrive at Maryville 
plans are be!ng made by the Y. W. C. A. 
for making their life more pleasant, and 
to help them to get acquainted with their 
new environment. For this the big sister 
movement is carried out, whereby every 
new girl has an old girl as her "big sister," 
who corresponds with her during the sum- 
mer, meets her at the train, helps her to 
get settled, and is a big sister to her in 
every way possible. In this way new girls 
will feel that they have a friend as soon 
as they arrive. 

Aside from this there are hikes, socials 
and part'es for the new girls given by the 
Y. W. C. A. all through the year. 

Perhaps the biggest feature of Y. W. C. A. 
is the Sunday meetings. They begin the 
first Sunday afternoon and last all through 
the year. Programs are prepared which 
will give the girls opportunities for wor- 
ship together and discussion of topics of 
interest. 

Joint meetings with the Y. M. C. A. are 
held at various times during the year. 
There is always excellent cooperation be- 
tween the two organizations and working 
together thus they are able to accomplish 
great things. 

There are many things which the Y. W. 
C. A. sponsors. The Lyceum numbers, Life 



40 MARVVILLE COLLEGE 

Work Conference, May Day, Christmas 
carols, the orphanage and mission work. 
The circus and the Nu Gamma Sigma are 
some of its activities. With all of this 
>ou can not fail to realize the importance 
of Y. W. C. A. 



Y. W. C. A. 



Officers 

Louise Carson President 

Mary Deadrick Vice President 

Julia Terry Secretary 

Willie Nell Harold Treasurer 

Carol Cushman Nu Gamma 

Cabinet 

Programs Viola Petit 

Conferences Margaret H'aynie 

Music Jane Duke 

Eleanor Kuhlman 

Lyceum Mabel Dickerson 

Devotions Helen Gleason 

Social Helen Crowder 

Social Service Mildred Crawford 

Missions Fiorina Wallace 

Publicity Edith Nash 

Librarians Jane Morrow 

Obriene Covington 

Orphanage Gwendl^'n Green 

"Y" Store Georga Burke 

Roberta Hickman 

Posters Eloise Garret 

Athletics Olive Clopton 

World Fellowship Margaret Mevis 

Building Secretary Cora Hank 

Building Treasurer Hilda Farnham 



'M" HANDBOOK 



Welcome Girls!!! 

Dear New Girls: 

1 am glad you are coming to Maryville 
this year and on behalf of the Y. W. C. A. 
I want to welcome you to College Hill. 
You made a wise selection when you chose 
Maryville and I know you will like your 
college home. 

College offers so many opportunities for 
one's development outside of regular class- 
room work^ — important though this is — and 
I hope that you will take advantage of the 
many extra-curricular activities offered at 
Maryville for they play a large part in 
one's college life. 

Friendsh ps mean much in college. The 
kind of girls you will meeL in the Y. W. 
^. A. are the kind of girls worth know- 
ing and they want to be your friends. 
Vyhen you come to Maryville please count 
the Y. W. C. A. as your best friend for 
she v\ ants to help you all she can. 

I am looking forward with eagerness to 
meeting \ou in September and I'm sure we 
will have a great year together. 

Sincerely, 
LOUISE CARSON, 
Pres. Y. W. C. A. 

The Y. W. Reading Room 

The Y. W. C. A. has set aside this room 
where the girls may go to read or rest at 
any time they choose to do so. It is one 
of the best places to go and read and 
relax. There are all of the most popular 
magazines in it. There are books of all 
types from the classics to the most popular 
fiction. Not only is there reading material 
but there is also music. 'We have a Vic- 
trola that is quite an asset to the reading 



42 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



room. What more does one need to com- 
plete this ideal lounging room. 
Wnere is this Ideal Place? 

All paths lead to the Y. W. C. A. reading 
room. It is located on the second floor of 
Thaw Hall adjoining the Y. W. C. A. Audi- 
torium. You can't help finding it. 
When is it open? 

Most of the time and on certain after- 
noons during the week. A librarian or her 
assistant will be there so that books may 
be taken out. 

Nu Gamma Si^rma 

The Nu Gamma Sigma stands for New 
Girls Society and that is just what it is. 
All the new girls are divided into groups of 
ten with an old girl as leader. These 
groups meet once a week during the first 
few weeks of school. You see the purpose 
o, Nu Gamma is to make the new girl 
acquainted with college life. You will find 
yourselves in a strange and new environ- 
ment and naturally you will have prob- 
lems and questions. In the meetings of 
these groups your problems will be discussed 
and a solution will be found. 

You will form some beautiful friendships 
among the other new girls, as you hike 
together, chat together, and solve your 
problems. You will seem like sisters in 
one big family. The mother of the Nu 
Gamma Sigma is the Y. W. C. A. who is 
constantly planning new ways and means 
to make her daughters happy. This is the 
way we spell our name: 

Newness in thought. 

U-sefulness. 

Good fellowship. 

A-ction. 

Maternal love. 

M-astery of problems. 

A-ttractive ideas. 



'M" HANDBOOK 



HIKES 

We will all admit that Nature can 
not be surpassed when it comes to real 
beauty. Will you enjoy the hikes at M. 
C? What a foolish thought. Any red 
blooded boy or girl loves to get out in the 
mountains and along the clear, fast-flow- 
ing streams anywhere, but the mountains 
of East Tennessee are especially beautiful. 
To view the sunrise or the sunset from 
some lofty peak gives a fellow a thrill — a 
feeling of strength and freedom indescrib- 
able. One of the best hikes taken by the 
college is to the top of Thunderhead, a 
treeless dome in the Great Smoky Moun- 
tains, 5,700 feet above sea level. This 
is usually the big "Y" hike of the year and 
you are sure to have many long remem- 
bered experiences. Other trips are taken 
to Look Rock, Sunshine, Calderwood, Sheep 
Pen Cave and the dam at Cheoa, over 
which extends the longest single span 
cable in the world. All you need is a little 
"pep" and sure, you might need some "eats" 
and a couple of blankets. Get your bunch 
together and go. 



It is better to believe that a man does 
possess good qualities than to assert he 
does not. 



Better to remain silent and be thought a 
fool, than to speak and remove all doubt. 



44 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



JOINT ACTIVITIES OF Y. M. C. A. AND 
Y. W. C. A. 



Blue Ridge 

Each summer soon after commencement 
representatives from the college go to 
Blue Ridge, North Carolina, to attend the 
conference of all the southern college Y. M. 
and Y. W. C. A.'s. At this conference about 
two-thirds of the time is spent in listening 
to addresses by the most prominent student 
speakers in America and some of the lead- 
ing speakers of foreign countries, and in 
studying the important religious and social 
problems of the day. The remainder of the 
time is spent in rest and recreation, such 
as hikes and other various sports. The 
purpose of the conference is to make real 
to college men and women the facts of 
Christian experience. 

Blue Ridge is located in one of the most 
beautiful parts of the Blue Ridge mountains, 
sixteen miles east of Asheville, and has the 
finest conference grounds in the south. 
The inspirational lectures and wholesome 
atmosphere of the place leave a lasting im- 
pression that is worth a year of college 
work. Next June we want a large delega- 
tion from Maryville and perhaps there will 
be an opportunity for you to go. 



Life Work Conference 

Truly there has come no greater institu- 
tion on College Hill than the life work con- 
ference. This conference held in March 
under the direction of the Y. M. C. A. and 
Y. W. C. A. has been proven a worthy asset 
to the college. It was instituted with the 
belief that we as students should give con- 
sideration to definite plans for our life 
work. For three days real leaders come and 



'M" HANDBOOK 45 



give us their time and service in order to 
help us decide this great question. Leaders 
in nearly all the leading branches of work 
are represented — -medicine, law, the min- 
istry, missions, business, agriculture, teach- 
ing, coaching and a number of others. 
Don't fail to take advantage of this op- 
portunity when it comes. It costs you 
nothing and returns may be very great. 

The Lyceum Course 

Each year, as part of the varied activities 
sponsored by the "Y", a course of four 
Lyceum programs is given during the year 
in Voorhees Chapel. A fifth program, 
somewhat in the nature of an extra num- 
ber, is also given at some time during the 
year. In the year just past an excellent 
selection of Lyceum numbers was presented 
on the hill, and an even better group has 
been chosen for the year to come. 

Fred Hope Fund 

Every spring we have a "Fred Hope 
Campaign drive," conducted by the Y. M. 
C. A. and Y. W. C. A., for the purpose of 
supporting the work of one of Maryville's 
sons in the mission field of Africa. Every 
year the student body makes voluntary 
contributions well over one thousand dollars 
for this work. 



Forgive others often — yourself never. 



Budget your time and your money. It 
pays. 



There is nothing that costs so little and 
goes so far as courtesy. 



46 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



LITERARY SOCIETIES 



Alpha Sigma 

The Alpha Sigma literary society has 
grown by leaps and bounds during the past 
ten years. Any male student of the college 
may become an active member by receiving 
a two-third vote of the members present 
at any regular meeting. It is not the aim 
of the society to secure as many members 
as possible, but instead to secure only those 
that are capable of upholding the high 
standards set by our predecessors. In other 
words it is quality and not quantity that we 
are striving for. 

Meetings are held every Saturday night 
and programs composed of solos, debates, 
quartets, etc., are given at this time. The 
training received here is worth more to 
you than anything else you could take up 
while at college. Freshmen, especially, 
should be interested in our work. 

Once each semester a joint meeting is 
held with our sister society, "Theta Epsilon." 
One play is given during the year. 

To all new students, we extend a hearty 
welcome to attend our opening meeting and 
see for yourself the kind of receptions we 
give. Don't forget us. We need you to 
make our society the. best on the Hill. 
Just follow the crowd on Saturday night. 

Theta Epsilon 

The Itierary societies at Maryville stand 
for a great deal. Theta Epsilon is one of 
the girls' societies and through it we develop 
a fellowship which is of great value to 
us here on the hill. We Thetas have high 
ideals and we are very loyal to these 
ideals. Each Saturday night we have good 



"M" HANDBOOK 47 



snappy, as well as instructive programs. 
We always enjoy these meetings together. 
Then come those joint meetings with our 
brother society, the Alpha Sigmas. You 
will enjoy these to the fullest. Every year 
Theta puts on a play and she is noted for 
her good productions. New girls, Theta 
will help you and you will help Theta, so 
vv e extend to you a welcome to come and 
join our ranks and help us to do big things 
for the year. We are anxiously waiting to 
meet you. 

Athenian 

The Athenian Literary Society was or- 
ganizeed in 1869, thereby giving it the dis- 
tinction of being the oldest literary organi- 
zation on College Hill. It's present mem- 
bership enrolls a large proportion of the 
male students of the college. The Athenians 
are noted for their loyalty to, and en- 
thusiasm for their society. The ideal of 
Athenian is to give her members such 
training as will enable them to secure the 
very best development during their college 
days; to promote a correct college spirit 
and love for Alma Mater. To accomplish 
this high ideal she provides weekly pro- 
grams of an interesting, instructive, and 
varied nature that are full of life, pep, 
and college spirit. The Athenian Literary 
Society extends a cordial invitation to all 
new men to attend the opening social of 
the society at the beginning of the year, and 
also a hearty invitation is extended to all 
new men to become Athenians. 



A friend is one who knows all about you 
and loves you just the same. 



" — but the greatest of these is love." 



48 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



Bainonian 

The Bainonian Literary Society is the 
oldest literary organization for girls on the 
Hill. It was organized in 1875, and ever 
since that time it has been an important 
factor in the student life. Many new girls 
are enrolled in it every year. The society 
provides for the development of the talents 
of every girl and tries to make her feel 
that the society is her own. A program 
of an interesting and instructive nature is 
provided every Saturday evening. Twice 
a year a joint meeting is held with our 
brother society, the Athenian. Bainonian 
stands for social as well as for literary 
development. It aids in the forming of 
friendships, and many good times are en- 
joyed by all who will take advantage 
of what she offers. We extend a hearty 
welcome to all new girls, and a wish that 
you may soon learn to love Bainonian as 
we do. 



Don't forget to raise your hat to the 
professors. 



It is a pleasure to give to a worthy cause. 



Sail under true colors. 



'M" HANDBOOK 49 



OTHER STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 



Student Council 

The Student Council was organized for 
the purpose of furnishing a representative 
body of students, who, by virtue of their 
position and influence in student affairs, 
shall be able to express the sentiment of 
the student body. They cooperate with 
the Faculty in maintaining Maryville College 
ideals and strive to put into execution such 
proposals which shall be for the best wel- 
fare of the school. 

The Council is composed of eight Seniors, 
six Juniors, four Sophomores and four 
Freshmen who take up matters brought 
before them for consideration. Any student 
may confer with his representative and 
present any matter which he thinks would 
be for the welfare of the student body. 

The Student Council is not student gov- 
ernment, but it seeks to summarize student 
opinion and to work with the Faculty in 
promoting desirable measures and prevent 
actions which are detrimental to the college. 

The Band 

One of the most important musical or- 
ganizations on the Hill is the college band. 
Membership in the band is open to any 
student possessing a fair knowledge of band 
music. In addition to giving concerts dur- 
ing the year, the members obtain the bene- 
fit of two weekly rehearsals under a trained 
director. All new students with musical 
training are urged to join the band at the 
beginning of the year. During the past 
year the band was composed of about 
twenty members. The band furnishes music 
for games and occasionally accompanies 
the teams on trips away from the college. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



Maryville College Glee Singers 

The best known Maryville organization 
in East Tennessee is the Maryville College 
Glee Singers, "The Merry Music Makers." 
This organization was formerly the Men's 
Glee Club which made such an enviable 
reputation. The Singers enjoyed a very 
successful season last year, giving concerts 
in the larger East Tennessee towns which 
received the praise and commendation of its 
several audiences. The annual home con- 
cert is the biggest event in the school 
calendar and is looked forward to by the 
entire student body. 

Orchestra 

The Maryville College Orchestra has been 
an important organization on the hill for 
many years. It has answered a long-felt 
neei and is now found to be indispensable. 

I he purpose of the orchestra is to serve 
the in'_ividual student and the general 
student body. 

Any student who can play sufficiently 
well is eligible to become a member. The 
training which the individual receives is of 
Inestimable value. 

Girls' Glee Club 

The club of most interest to the girls on 
the Hill is the Girls' Glee Club. Tryouts 
are held in the fall for places in the club. 
The club consists of eighteen selected and 
well trained voices, directed by Miss 
Francais Henry, the voice instructor. Plans 
are being made to put on an operetta or 
musical comedy in the early fall besides 
the regular spring concert. 

This is the second that it has been pos- 
sible to have this club and it is hoped that 
the coming year will bring new voices and 
a better concert. 



'M" HANDBOOK 51 



Law Club 

Say, fellows, are you interested in law? 
Well, then, come around to our meetings. 
The purpose of the Law Club is to help 
its members to familiarize themselves with 
the features of their contemplated life 
work and to develop high moral standards 
and ideals in connection with their profes- 
sion. 

The programs are made up mostly of 
mock trials, parliamentary drill and lec- 
tures on various phases of law. 

The Student Volunteer Band 

The College has, from its earliest history, 
been identified with foreign missions and 
has sent out one hundred and ten mis- 
sionaries into seventeen foreign countries. 
Since 1894 the students have maintained 
a Student Volunteer Band, composed of 
those who are pledged to enter some foreign 
feld, if the way be open. The Band meets 
weekly to study missionary fields and 
conditions. 

Ministerial Association 

Greetings to all students. This associa- 
tion is composed of all young men who are 
expecting to choose for their life work the 
Gospel Ministry. Its programs are made 
up of only that which is of the highest re- 
ligious and literary value. Opportunities 
for personal work, either in the mission, 
jail, or in the rural districts are numerous. 
The association invites all who expect to 
enter the ministry to join hands with us. 



Don't worry about what the fellows say 
you — unless it is true. 



52 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

Chemistry Club 

The Chemistry Club is composed of 
students who are taking more than one 
year of college chemistry. One year of 
chemistry is required for membership. 
Papers and lectures are given on the chemi- 
cal problems of the day by the students 
and professors of the department. 

Pre-Medical Club 

Students preparing for the practice of 
medicine have organized with a view to a 
better understanding of the problems and 
interests of the medical profession. 

its purpose is also to cultivate mutual 
fellowship. 

Hi-Trail Club 

The Hi-Trail Club was organized for the 
purpose of developing physical strength, 
increasing the knowledge of and love for 
the '"Great Outdoors." The membership in 
this club is restricted to twelve men. • To 
become a member of the Hi-trail Club one 
must have had at least one hundred miles 
of hiking experience and must present a 
thesis giving an account of such experi- 
ences and then be unanimously elected by 
the members. 



State Clubs 

We have thirty-six different states rep- 
resented at Maryville so naturally the 
students from the '"Home State"' should 
group together and form state clubs. The 
primary purpose of these clubs is the furth- 
ering of good spirit and friendsh p of those 
who are from the same section of the 
United States. Outside of the state of Ten- 
nessee itself N. Carolina has the largest 
club, although Alabama is a close second. 
You are sure to join your state club. 



"M" HANDBOOK 53 

COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS 
The Chilhowean 

Have you seen last year's Chilhowean — 
the college annual? You will enjoy look- 
ing it over. It is a summary of the 
year's events at Maryville, mostly in pic- 
ture form. 

The college days are never forgotten and 
how pleasant it is to bring back those old 
days by gazing at the pages of that old 
annual. The Junior Class puts out the 
annual each year and they always strive 
for perfection, trying each year to make 
the new annual an improvement over the 
old one. Frances Cortner, as Editor, and 
Kemp Davis, as Business Manager, have 
charge of the 193 edition of the Chilhowean. 

The Highland Echo 

The Highland Echo is the weekly publi- 
cation of Maryville College. It is a four- 
page five column paper, to which each 
student . subscribes when he matriculates. 
The Echo is conducted after the fashion of 
larger newspapers, carrying athletic reports, 
editorials, news items and others of interst 
to the students. Through this publication 
the students are enabled to keep in touch 
with all the activities of the Hill. The 
Editor-in-Chief for the coming year is Jesse 
Pierce and the Business Manager is Bruce 
Hunter. 

The Maryville College Handbook 

The Handbook, commonly known as the 
"M" Book, is the publication you have be- 
fore you. It is issued by the Y. M. C. A. 
and Y. W. C. A., and aims to be a small 
encyclopedia of information on the College 
life. Editor, J. Stuart James; Associate 
Editor, Helen Crowder; Business Manager, 
Homer E. McCann. 



54 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

THE ADVANTAGES OF THE 
SMUTTY STORY 



It advertises your ignorance. 
It displays your lack of a sense of de- 
cency. 

It indicates the state of your inner char- 
acter. 

It exhibits the nature of your soul. 

It shows your better self is being re- 
pressed. 

It illustrates the sordidness of your soul. 

It typifies the meagerness of your sources 
of entertainment. 

It proclaims the coarseness of your ideas 
of humor. 

It tells the inadequacy of your means of 
expression. 

It reveals the depths of defilement you 
have already reached. 

It proves to your friends how greatly they 
may be disappointed in you. 

It stultifies the testimony of those who 
said you were a good fellow. 

It soils the imagination of your hearers. 

It hangs vulgar pictures in the minds of 
others from which they may never escape. 



With the exception of a department 
store the campus is a complete city within 
itself. The college has provided for prac- 
tically all of our necessities and we en- 
courage every student to spend as much 
time as possible on the Hill. 



"M" HANDBOOK 



BOOK IV 



Student Accomodations 
and Conveniences 

Genius has rocked her biggest 

children in the cradle of 

hardship. 



56 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

DORMITORIES 

Memorial, Baldwin and Pearsons Halls 
are the girls' dormitories and together con- 
tain accommodations for 400 young ladies. 
All three halls are well equipped with 
modern conveniences and are kept in the 
best of condition. 

Carnegie Hall, a modern structure, re- 
cently erected, is one of the best dormitories 
in the South and contains rooms for 235 
young men. Every student is encouraged 
to room in one of the dormitories. You 
can get a great deal more of the spirit 
V, hich is characteristic of Maryville if you 
live in the dormitory and it is much more 
convenient than rooming in town. 

THE LAMAR MEMORIAL LIBRARY 

The Lamar Library is one of the largest 
college libraries in the State. The num- 
ber of books now on the shelves is over 
thirty thousand. The library is housed in 
attractive and commodious q'uarters in 
Thaw hall, and is open for the drawing 
of books, or for the consulting of volumes 
in the reference alcoves, for eleven hours 
every day from Monday to Saturday. 

THE LOAN LIBRARY 
James R. Hills Library. — In 1888 Miss 
Sarah B. Hills, of New York, contributed 
a fund for the establishment of a loan 
library, in order that students unable to 
purchase the necessary text-books might 
have the privilege of renting them at a 
nominal rate. By judicious management 
the income from this fund has grown until 
now the privileges of this library are open 
to all students, and all the regular text- 
books used in the institution may be either 
rented or purchased. 



'M" HANDBOOK 



COLLEGE STATION POST OFFICE 

A branch of the United States post office 
at Maryville is located on the campus. All 
tPie usual post office conveniences are 
furnished. Mail is delivered to the dormi- 
tores and offices. Students should have 
t'- i.- mail addressed, College Station, Mary- 
ville, Tennessee, adding the name of the 
dormitory in which they room, and their 
room number. 

BOOK STORE 

The book store is in the center of the 
campus, you will have no trouble locating 
it for the postoffice is located in the same 
building. The book store is maintained 
by the college for your convenience. Books 
n^-^y be either purchased or rented as you 
choose. Complete stationery and supplies 
are sold at nominal prices. 

DINING HALL 

The first floor of Pearsons is a popular 
pi'^ce at least popular three times a day 
% hen it is known as the dining hall. Sonie 
600 students "ate" in the hall last year and 
a good time is had around the tables. Well 
cooked, substantial food is served by the 
"waitresses." You v. ill like Pearsons Hall 
and "Pearsons style." Napkins are not 
provided, so bring along half a dozen 
vv.th your napkin holder. 



All sins have blue eyes and dimples when 
they are young. 



Don't fail to learn the college yells and 
songs. 



58 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

MEDICAL ATTENTION 

The Ralph Max Lamar Memorial Hos- 
pital is available for out-of-town students. 
In cases of slight illness no charge is made 
for nursing, but the patient pays $7.00 a 
week for the use of the ward, and for board 
and laundry. In cases of serious illness 
demanding more than ordinary time and 
attention, a nominal charge is also made 
for the nursing. 



SUCCESS 

It's doing your job that best you can 
And being just to your fellow-man; 
It's making money, but holding friends. 
And staying true to your aims and ends; 
It's figuring how and learning why. 
And looking forward and thinking high, 
And dreaming a little and doing much; 
It's always keeping in closest touch 
With what is finest in word and deed; 
It's being thorough, yet making speed; 
It's struggling on with a will to win. 
But taking loss with a cheerful grin; 
It's sharing sorrow and work and mirth 
And making better this good old earth; 
It's serving, striving, through strain and 

stress. 
It's doing your noblest — that's Success. 
— The American Press. 



I would be true for there are those who 
care. 



Cultivate a neat appearance, 



'M" HANDBOOK 59 



BOOK V 



Athletics 

and 
Forensics 

Here's to the fellora ■who goes and 
fights for MaryvUle always in a 
clean way. A fellow who has the 
never say die spirit. He's the 
kind of a chap we need and 
the kind that will make the real 
Maryvillian. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



ATHLETICS 



Maryville is represented by teams in 
every major college sport, and ranks with 
the leaders in this section of the country. 
The administrative control of athletics is 
centered in the Athletic Association. 

With L. S. Honaker and "Bob" Thrower 
as coaches of Maryville athletics, and hard 
fighting teams composed of loyal men, it 
is no wnoder that the Athletic Association 
has made such a stride forward during the 
last two years. A new day has dawned 
for Maryville in athletics because she has 
two live coaches, plenty of good material, 
added equipment, and a splendid field. 

Football 

F"ootball at Maryville is an institution. 
Its purpose is not only to \n in games but to 
make men — winning men. Maryville has the 
reputation of having one of the best con- 
ditioned teams in this section and the past 
football season was a success from the 
standpoint of games won and lost as well 
as from that of training men successfully. 
Maryville scored victories over Tusculun 
Collge, Cumberland University, King College, 
Carson-Newman College, Georgetown Col- 
lege, and Lenoir-Rhyne College, and then 
our boys traveled down to Atlanta to tie 
the strong Oglethorpe University team 6-6 
in what was perhaps the best and hardest 
game of the season. The year before Mary- 
ville tied Kentucky State with the same 
score. This fall we have a fairly heavy 
schedule, but with the promising material 
from last year the prospects are bright for 
another winning team of Orange and Garnet 
men. 



*'M" HANDBOOK 



Basketball 

Basketball at Maryville, as at other 
Southern colleges, is the leading winter 
sport. The season begins early in Decem- 
ber and lasts until about the middle of 
March. During the past season Maryville 
won games from the best teams of the entire 
section. She was runner-up in the Smoky 
Mountain Conference Tournament held at 
Kingsport, Tennessee, but lost in the finals 
to the crack team from Emory-Henry Col- 
lege by the score of 2 6-2 7. With six letter 
men back for next year, around whom 
Coach Honaker will build his team, Maryville 
is expected to have one of the best teams in 
the history of the college. 

Baseball 

Maryville perhaps excels more in base- 
ball than in any other sport. Although she 
does not encourage professional ball, yet 
there are some ten or twelve former Mary- 
ville baseball players who are making a 
mark for themselves in the major leagues. 
Among these are such men as John Stone 
and "Speedy" Ruble, of the Detroit Tigers. 
Last year Maryville won every college game 
and beat the Knoxville Smokies 6-4. Al- 
though the past season was not as good as 
some have been in previous years, as a 
whole it was very commendable. Freshmen, 
if you can play baseball go out and let us 
see what you have. 

Track 

Track and field sports are just beginning 
to take their rightful place in Southern 
College Athletics and at Maryville there is 
a very noticable incline in interest for this 
branch of sport. There is always a large 
group of cinder path artists who aspire to 
Maryville's winged honors and last season 



62 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



(this spring) about fifteen were awarded 
the winged "M." Maryville ran up high 
score on Lincoln Memorial University and 
the University of Chattanooga. To end 
the season she won by a high pointage the 
Smoky Mountain Conference track meet held 
at Emory-Henry College, Va. Track is 
really coming into its own at Maryville so 
just watch us show our heels to 'em next 
spring. If any of you fellows are good 
track men or think you are look up Coach 
"Bob" Thrower. 

Tennis 

Tennis is growing rapidly in popularity at 
Maryville. Last year we had on our 
schedule the University of Tennessee, Tus- 
culun, University of Chattanooga, and East 
Tennessee State Normal. In this sport, as 
in the others, we are producing winning 
teams. The prospects are good for a good 
reason this coming year. 



"M" HANDBOOK 63 

CONSTITUTION OF MARYVILLE COLLEGE 
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



ARTICLE VII 

1 . The following students shall be per- 
mitted to wear the Maryville "M": 

a. Members of the varsity football team 
^ ho have played fifteen quarters, b. Mem- 
bers of the varsity baseball team who have 
played as much as five innings per game 
in one-half of the scheduled games; or, a 
baseball pitcher who has pitched forty-five 
innings in scheduled games. c. Members 
of the varsity basketball team who have 
played one-half a game in each of the 
scheduled games. d. Members of the var- 
sity track team winning first place in a 
dual meet,, or in any other meet where three 
or more colleges are competing. e. Mem- 
bers of the varsity tennis team playing in 
one-half the tournaments of the year. 

2. The football "M" shall be an eight- 
inch block "M," the basketball "M" a six- 
inch block "M"; the girls' basketball "M" a 
five-inch block "M" with wings attached, 
and the tennis "M" shall be a script "M." 

3. All members of the second football, 
baseball, or basketball teams may wear the 
Maryville Monogram. 

4. No other students shall wear either 
the "M" or Maryville Monogram. 



If you can't boost, don't knock. 
Self respect — the corner stone of all 
virtues. 



64 MARYVlLLE COLLEGE 



GIRLS' ATHLETICS 



Point System of Athletic Awards 

Since the intercollegiate contests have 
been dispensed with the point system has 
been adopted. This gives every girl an 
equal chance to participate in every sport 
and a chance to win the coveted monogram, 
the small letter or the large letter and 
sweater. 

The honors are awarded as follows: 300 
points, Maryville Monogram M. C; 400 
points, small letter M; 500 points, letter and 
sweater. 

Points shall be earned as follows: 

A. Teams. 50 points each team. 
Class teams — 

1. Basketball 6 players t^am 

2. Soccer 11 players team 

3. Volleyball 9 players team 

4. Baseball 9 players team 

5. Tennis 6 players team 

Squad of any team sport 20 points. 
Manager of any team sport 15 points. 
Captain of any teeam sport 10 points. 
Coach squad (basketball) 15 points. 
Perfect attendance 10 points. 

B. Tests. 

1. Swimming: Limit 50. 

2. Stunts: Limit 25. 

3. Archery: Limit 50. 

4. Track: Limit 50. 

5. Hiking: Limit 50. 



A wager is a fool's argument. 



'M" HANDBOOK 65 



C. Scholarship. 

1. An "A" average in academic work 

for any semester 20 'tc of points 
won in addition. 

2. A "B" average adds 10% of points 

won. 

D. Health. 

I. Observing health rules for one se- 
mester, 2 5 points. Two semesters, 
50 points. 



Athletic Program for the Year 

October — Soccer and Archery Practice. 

November — Basketball Practice. 

November — Soccer Tournament. 

December — Basketball Practice. 

January — Basketball Tourney. 

February — Volleyball Practice and Tour- 
ney. 

March — Baseball Practice and Tourney. 
Aerial Dart Practice and Tourney. 

April — Tennis Tourney. Track and Exam. 

May — Tennis Tourney. Swimming Test. 



66 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



DEBATING AND ORATORY 



Maryville has the distinction of having 
the Tennessee Alpha chapter of the National 
Honorary Forensic Fraternity, Pi Kappa 
Delta. This organization proves a great 
inspiration for those interested in any 
phase of forensics and membership in it is 
a coveted honor. Year by year forensics 
are coming into the foreground and are 
holding an important place in activities on 
College Hill. Maryville is also a member 
of both the Tennessee and the East Tennes- 
see Oratorical Leagues and always ranks 
high in these annual contests. 

After rather a dull beginning and a couple 
of defeats in debates, Coach Queener was 
able by hard work to get into shape some 
winning teams who scored victories over 
the University of Chattanooga and Lincoln 
Memorial University by unanimous decisions. 
An open-forum non-decision debate was 
held on the home platform with Centre 
College, of Kentucky. 

The regular Pi Kappa Delta Convention 
of the 13th Province, composed of Tennes- 
see, Kentucky, and Indiana, was held on 
the 8th and 9th of April up at Lexington, 
Kentucky. The Maryville delegation to the 
convention was composed of seven, besides 
Coach Queener and Dr. Hunter, and among 
them were men and women debaters, orators, 
and extemporaneous speakers. In the end 
Maryvill was the undisputed victor — winning 
the tournament by more than one hundred 
points. 

Only one varsity member will be lost 
by graduation this year and the prospects 
are bright for another successful forensic 
season. The national Pi Kappa Delta con- 
vention will be held out in Wichita, Kansas, 
this year and it is hoped that Maryville 
may send representatives to this. 



"M" HANDBOOK 67 

PRAYER OF A SPORTSMAN 

(Berton Braley) 

Dear Lord, in the battle that goes on 
through life 

I ask but a field that is fair, 
A chance that is equal with all in the strife 

A courage to strive and to dare. 
And if 1 should lose, let me stand the code 

With my faith and my honor held high; 
And if I should lose, let me stand by the 
road 

And cheer as the winners go by. 

And Lord, may my shouts be ungrudgingly 
clear, 
A tribute that comes from the heart 
And let me not cherish a snarl or a sneer 

Or play any sniveling part; 
Let me say, "There they ride on whom 
laurel's bestowed 
Since they played the game better than 
I." 
Let me stand with a smile by the side of 
the road, 
And cheer as the winners go by. 

So grant me to conquer, if conquer 1 can 

By proving my worth in the fray; 
But teach me to lose like a Regular Man 

And not like a craven I pray. 
Let me take off my hat to the warriors who 
strode 
To victory splendid and high; 
Yes, teach me to stand by the side of the 
road 
And cheer as the winners go by. 

— American Legion Weekly 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 






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'M" HANDBOOK 69 



THE TRUE MARYVILLIAN— 



I — NEVER questions the decisions of of- 
ficials. They are doing their best as they 
see it and doubtless much better than 
you could do. 

2 — NEVER makes deprecatory remarks 
about opposing teams. Cat-calls, hoots, 
hisses, and the like, are positive indications 
of ignorance, ill-breeding, or cowardice — 
usually of all. 

3 — NEVER says or does anything which 
will interfere with his opponents in the 
conduct of the contest. 

4 — NEVER lacks consideration of his 
opponents in their defeat. He remembers 
that they did their best and that he, too, 
will sometimes lose. 

5 — NEVER tolerates abuse of visiting 
teams or unsportsmanlike conduct toward 
them on the part of others. He is a gentle- 
man himself and demands gentlemanly con- 
duct of others, but he 

1 — ALWAYS applauds good play and ad- 
mires skill in his opponents. 

2 — ALWAYS remembers that he is a host 
and that visiting teams are his guests. 

3 — ALWAYS realizes that the reputation 
of the entire college may be tainted by the 
unsportsmanlike action of one individual. 

4 — ALWAYS shows consideration for 
those opponents who are so unfortunate as 
to be injured. 

5 — ALWAYS remembers that a friend of 
the team is a friend of the college. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



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"M" HANDBOOK 73 

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SAY! 

You See It's Like This — 



The advertisements which follow 
represent the standard dealers and it 
is through their co-operation that the 
"M" Book is made possible. The As- 
sociations would call the attention of 
every man and woman to them and 
heartily recommends each of them to 
the members of the incoming class, 
and to the old students. 

THEIR HONORABLE DEALINGS 
WITH MARYVILLE COLLEGE IN 
THE PAST IS AMPLE WARRANT 
FOR YOUR CONFIDENCE AND 
PATRONAGE IN THE FUTURE. 



IIMIIIMIIIIIIIItllllMinilllMIIIIMMIilllirillllllMlllillllllMMIIIIIIIMJIIMIIIIIIIIinilllllll 



74 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiii;iiiiiiiimiiiiiniiiiii!iiriiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiMiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiii 

MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

SAMUEL HYNDALE WII.SON, D. D., U.. D., 

President 

One Hundred and Eleventh Year 
Begins September 10, 1929 

Educational standards of the highest. 
Environment positively Christian. Ex- 

penses lowest possible. 

Enrollment, 803 young men and young 
women; 379 came from forty-one States and 
countries outside of Tennessee. Forty-seven 
professors and teachers. 

Endowment and property, $2,253,000. 
Campus, 275 acres. Sixteen large buildings. 

Entrance requirements, for admission to 
the Freshman class, fifteen standard units. 
Departments: Arts and Sciences, Bible and 
Religious Education, Home Economics, Pre- 
medical. Expression, Music, and Art. 

Expenses: Tuition, $50 a year. Room rent 
for each student, with two in a room, $30 
to $50 a year. Board, $3.50 a week. Text- 
books rented. Self-help opportunities. Full 
information sent upon request. Address 

THE REGISTRAR 
Marvville, Tenn. 



llllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllJIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIUIIIII 



"M" HANDBOOK 75 

iiiiiiiMitiiiiiiiiiiMMiiitiiiirniiiiiiiMiiMiMii'iiiriMiiiiiniiiriiMiiiMiiiiiiirjiiiMMJiiiii 

WE 

ARE TRULY 

APPRECIATIVE 

Of the patronage we received 
from Maryville College Students, 
and are proud of the service we 
render to them. 

Always the Newest 
in Style 

CHANDLER. 
SINGLETON CO, 

"The Home of True Economy^' 

iiiiitiiiiiMiiniiiiMiiiiiiMiiiiniiiiinriinriMiiiiiMiiiiiiniiiiiitMiiiniiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiii 



76 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

ItlllMllllllltlllliriMIMIIIIIilMlllllllllllinillllMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIttlllllllMnilMIIII 

C. C. WHITE 

College Street 

First Class Shoe Repairing 

"I Heel You and Save Your Soles" 
Our Store is Headquarters for 

FLORSHEIM SHOES, INTER- 
WOVEN SOX, CURLEE CLOTHES 

In Fact, Everj'thing in 

MEN'S and WOMEN'S WEAR 

We Appreciate Your Trade 

BADGETT STORE CO. 

Morton's Taxi & Transfer Co. 

Rent a New Car and Drive 
It Yourself 

SEE US FOR YOUR TRANSFER NEEDS 

BOTH PHONES 71 
Printing and Engraving 

MARYVILLE ENTERPRISE 

**/4 Good Newspaper^' 
JAS. B. HEDGE, Jr., OA^Tier 

Your Patronage is Appreciated 

IIIIIIIMIIIIIirilMlllllllllllllilllllllllllllMIMIIIIIMMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMinilllllllltlllMII: 



"M" HANDBOOK 77 

iiiiiii!fiMiiiriiiwM!!iiitnMiiiiiMiiiiiiiiniiiMiMiiMiiiiiMrii:iiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiti 

New Providence 
Presbyterian Church 

MAIN AND COLLEGE STREET 

WILLIAM H. CROTHERS, Pastor 

Bib^e School graded and con- 
ducted by a well qualified corps 
of officers and teachers; Chris- 
tian Endeavor Societies awake 
and active; the whole church 
forward-looking in plan and pur- 
pose 

STUDENTS CORDIALLY IN- 
VITED TO MAKE THIS 
THEIR CHURCH HOME 
WHILE IN COLLEGE 

!|MI|ll|l|l|llllllll|IMMiriMlllltllllllinillli;illlllllMIIMIIMIIIIIIIIIilMlllllllllirilllllll!|i 



78 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

iisiititiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiniiiMiiiiiiiiiniMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

CARLISLE'S 5c, 10c & 25c STORE 

Come to Carlisle's for your Hair 
Nets, Bobby Pins, Laces, Handker- 
chiefs, Silk Hosiery and Rayon Under- 
wear. Fresh Candies all the time. 
Note Book Fillers, Tablets and Box 
Paper. 

For your parties: Paper Cups, 
Plates, Napkins, Spoons and Forks. 

A New Store With a Clean 
New Stock 

CARLISLE'S 5c, 10c & 25c STORE 



Complimentary from An 

Athletic Goods 

Friend 



IIIMIHIIIIIIMIIIIIIMIIMtlllHIIIIMniMlllinilllllllllllltltMIIMIMIIIMIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIMIII 



"M" HANDBOOK 79 

MIIMIIIIIIIIIIilllllllillllMII'>Mllllllirillllllll!MlllllillllllllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIMMIiniin 

The Western Theological Seminary 

Founded by the General Assembly 1825 
A Seminary for College Graduates 

A complete 
modern theolog- 
ical curriculum is 
offered to stu- 
dents of all de- 
nominations. 

Elective 
cour. es leading 
to degrees of S. 
T. B. and S. T. 
M. 

Graduate 
courses of the 
University o f 

Pittsburgh, lead- 
ing to degrees of 
A. M. and Ph. 
U., are open to 
properly quali- 
fied students of 
the Seminary. 

Exceptional li- 
brary facilities. 

Two entrance prizes of $250 each. A post- 
graduate fellowship of $600. 

All buildings are new, with latest modern 
improvements. Social hall, gymnasium, and 
students' commons. 

For information, apply to 

JAMES A. KELSO 

President, 

N. S., PITTSBURGH, PA. 

iiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiKiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiu;i!iiiiiiiiiiiiir. 




80 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

IIIIIIIIIHMIMMMIMIIllMllllirilMlliMMIIIIIIIIinMMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIMIlllllllMlllllil 

CHARLES R. COULTER 

FLORIST 

POT AND CUT FLOWERS 

Decorations and Floral Designs 

People's Phone 163 
3IARYVILLE, TENN. 

Comer Fowler, Representative 
on the Hill 

O.B. HARRIS-TAXI & TRANSFER 

(Behind Byrne's) 

RENT A NEW FORD 
DRIVE IT YOURSELF 

Why can O. B. Harris rent ears cheaper 
than the other man? 

On account of the large volume of business 
and small overhead expense? 

We Have All Makes of Cars 
Fords in Latest Model 

PHOXE 132 

IIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIillllllllllilllllllMINIIIIMIIinilllllllllllllllllUlllinilllHIIII 



'M" HANDBOOK 



81 



IMIMIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIII 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiniiiriiiiniiiiii 



First Methodist 
Episcopal Church 

EAST MAIN STREET 

J. W. BROYLES, Pastor 

MISS NELLIE G. WILSON, 
Director of Kelig:ious Education 




"AN OPEN DOOR" 
You are welcomed, cordially, to the 
service and fellowship of this church. 
Make it your home! Let its ministry 
serve you. 

.IMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIinillllllllMMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIillMIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIII 



82 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

iiiiMiiirnrriihiiiiiiniitMiiiiMMiiiMiMiiiiiiitMiiiMiiiiiiiMiiiiitiMMiiiiiiiinnniiiiiirii 

Everything Good to Eat 

M. M. ELDER 

CASH CARRY STORE 

103 MAIN ST. 



"Self Service is the Best 



STUDENTS— 

Let us supply you with the many 
little things you will need — Garment 
Hangers, Waste Baskets, Curtain Rods, 
Brooms, Mops, Shoe Brushes, Shoe 
Polish, etc.. Toilet Soap, Tooth 
Brushes, Tooth Paste, Nail Files, Rib- 
bon, Laces, Wash Cloths and Handker- 
chiefs. A complete line of Box Paper, 
Tablets, Note Books, Pencils, etc. 

We assure you Prompt and Cour- 
teous Service. 

WRIGHT'S 5c, 10c & 25c STORE 

We Always Appreciate Your 
Patronage 

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"M" HANDBOOK 83 

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REMEMBER— 

the call to the ministry ordi- 
narily conies through ordinary 
channels — the possession of 
not unusual talents — the sight 
of leaderless, groping souls — 
sometimes a simple reminder 
such as this: — this advertise- 
ment may be your call. 

Union Theological 
Seminary 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 

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84 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

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Norton Hardware Co. 

Paints 

Hardware 

Sporting Goods 

Electrical Appliances 

Where Your Patronage is Appreciated 

PHONE No. 18 



CLAUDE C. SMITH 

Exclusive Ladies' Store 
FEATLRIXG FINE FEATHERS HOSE 

205 Main St. Come See Us 

THE BANK 
OF MARYVILLE 

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"M" HANDBOOK 85 

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The First Baptist 
Church 

"^ Church With a Message"^ 

REV. J. R. JOHNSON, D. D., 
Pastor 

A cordial invitation is extended to 
the College folk to worship with lis 
and enjoy our fellowship. 

An "Up-to-date" Sunday School 
and well organized B. Y. P. U. af- 
fords you a place of religious training. 

WE WANT YOU 

"Go to Church and Feed Your Soul 
on the Bread of Life"^ 

Welcome Welcome 

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86 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

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W. S. JOHNSON 

Jeweler 
MARYVILLE, TENN. 



S. E. CRAWFORD 

Dentist 
First National Bank Building 

HUFF BROTHERS 

Everything for Men and Women in 

Fancy Silks, Dress Goods 

and Shoes 

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"M" HANDBOOK 87 

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BYRNE DRUG CO. 

Equipped 
to Serve You 

Main St. 
MARYVILLE, TENN. 



Boys, there will come a time when 
you want to deliver a special 

message to^to — well, just 
"Say It With Flowers'' 

Baum's Home of Flowers 

133 East Main St. 
HUGH M. CLARK, Manager 

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88 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

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GREETINGS 

Students, Welcome to 

Walker's Drug Store 
and Tea Room 

128 Main Street 

OPPORTUNITY 

Maryville College gives young men 
£nd women an opportunity to equip 
themselves for Service to Mankind, the 
Nation and the World in a way that 
will assuredly bring peace, satisfaction 
and success. It is an opportunity that 
does not come to every one. 

Bureau of Fine Arts 

ASHEVILLE, N. C. 

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"M" HANDBOOK 89 

The Moody Bible Institute of Chicago 

Rev. James M. Gray, D. D., President 

Founded by the Great Evangrelist and 

Christian Educator, D. L. Moody, in 1886 

TRAINING FREE 

Educational Department 

The object of the Institute is expressed in 
the service rendered by its students in all 
parts of the world, who are pastors, evangel- 
ists, missionaries, teachers, directors of re- 
ligious education, gospel singers, Y. M. C. A. 
and Y. W. C. A. secretaries, rescue mission 
superintendents, deaconesses and workers in 
Sunday Schools and boys' and girls' clubs. 

This is divided into a Day School, Evening- 
School and Correspondence School. The Gen- 
eral Course of the Day School is covered in 
two years. Its enrollment last year was 
1238. Five other courses are Missionary, 
Pastors Religious Education, Jewish Mis- 
sions, and Swedish-English. Advanced work 
is taken in these courses covering longer 
periods of time. 

The Evening School permits students to 
take work equivalent to the Day School, 
making them eligible to the same diploma, 
though it necessarily covers a longer period 
of time. A shorter course is possible, how- 
ever, leading to a certificate. The enroll- 
ment last year was 861. 

The Correspondence School is for those 
who cannot attend the Institute in person. 
Fourteen courses are offered in different 
methods of Bible Study, Practical Christian 
Work, Evangelism, Christian Evidences, 
etc. For these a limited fee is charged. 
The enrollment last year was 10,047. 

Catalog of the Day and Evening Schools, 
and Prospectus of the Correspondence 
School mailed free. Address 

THE MOODY BIBLE INSTITUTE 
153 Institute Place Chicago, Illinois 



90 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

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R. F. Graf J. R. Graf 

H. R. Graf 

R. F. GRAF & SONS 

ARCHITECTS 

and 

STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS 



Members of the American Institute 
of Architects, Licensed Archi- 
tects and Engineers of the 
State of Tennessee 



Knoxville, Tenn. 



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"M" HANDBOOK 91 

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COLLEGE 
PRESSING CLUB 

HEY, FELLOWS! 
IT PAYS TO LOOK WELL 

And we can make you look well 
with our modern methods of Cleaning 
and Pressing. 

Give your Work to 

NICK WHITE and ALTON PARTEE 
in Room 313 



QUALITY AND SERVICE 
ALWAYS 

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92 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

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Stinnett Transfer Co. 

Transfer and Taxi Service 
Service Day and Night 

WHEN YOU COME TO MARYVILLE 

CALL UP STINNET FOR 

YOUR TRUNK 

Maryville-Knoxville Taxi 
Three Dodge Cars, One Ford 

REASONABLE PRICES- 
GOOD DRIVERS 

701 — Phones — 333 

BUD STINNETT 

103 Washington Avenue 
MARYVILLE, TENN. 

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"M" HANDBOOK 93 



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''''Photographs Live Forever"^' 

THE WEBB STUDIO 

Photos of Permanency and 
of Character 



Kodak Finishing 

A Specialty 

THE BEST IS THE CHEAPEST 
—ALWAYS 

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94 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

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Y. M. C. A. STORE 

In the "Y" Building 

Good Things to Eat: 

CANDY 

CAKES 

FRUIT 

ICE CREAM 

DRINKS 

With Each and Every Purchase 
We Give Our Good Will 



SUMPTER LOGAN, 

Manager 

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"M" HANDBOOK 95 

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Y. W. C. A. STORE 

Third Floor, Pearsons Hall 



Visit the Y. W. C. A. Store and 
your appetite can be satisfied. 
We carry Candies, Pastries, Ice 
Cream and College Necessities. 
Do not fail to come in and pay 
us a visit. 



ROBERTA HICKMAN, 
Manager 

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MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



Jhe^oums loremosi 
{jolle^e^nnual Cn^ra\>ers 



™tOL TOKWING CO 



(34- FOURTH -AVE -N. 

NASHyiLLE,TENN. 




DESffilpifSj;^ ENGRAVERS 
BEST SOUTHERN ANNUALS 



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Established 1859 
' ' The Mitchells have been printing 
over fifty years 



Wlht OLD. , 

^Frtess Ml 



.'^m 



The plant complete. Bookmaking in 
its entirety under one roof and one 
supervision. Complete service. Edito- 
rial, Composition, Presswork, Plates and 
Binding. Output limited to the manu- 
facture of books, colors, and business 
literature. 

SPECIAL DEPARTMENT FOR 

UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

Annuals, Handbooks, Catalogues, 

Diploma Cases, Brochures, Text Books, 

Laboratory Manuals, Engraving, Steel 

Die stamping, etc. 

Makers of Mitchell-Made SUPER- 
FINISH book covers, the beautifully 
grained, highly Embossed and artistically 
colored line. 

Wm.MitchellPrintingCo. 

Edition Printers and Binders 

GREENFIELD, INDIANA 

This book is from our press. 



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