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Full text of "Maryville College Handbook [M Book] 1930-1931"

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IDENTIFICATION CARD 

Name 

Room 

Class 

Home Address , 



In Case of Accident Notify. 



No. of Chapel Seat 

No. of Lab. Desk 

No. of Lab. Locker 

Gym. Locker No 

Student Council Representatives; 



THE 

Maryville College 
Handbook 

VOLUME XXV 
1930-1931 



HOMER E. McCANN 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

JULIA TERRY 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 

ROBERT A. WEST 

BUSINESS MANAGER 



Published By 

The Young Men's and Young 

Women's Christian Associations 

of Maryville College 

MARYVILLE, TENNESSEE 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



CONTENTS 



FOREWORD 8 

DEDICATION 6 

COLLEGE CALENDAR 4-5 

BOOKS: 

I The College 9-16 

II Welcome 17-26 

III Y. M. C. A. and 

Y. W. C. A 27-36 

IV Activities 37-54 

V Athletics 5564 

VI Songs, Yells, 

Schedules 65-72 

VII Advertisements ....73-97 



«M" HANDBOOK 



CALENDAR 

1930-1931 



SEPTEMBER 
S M T W T F S 
•■ 1 2 3 4 S 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 



S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 7 
S 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 



OCTOBER 
■ M T W T F ■ 
12 3 4 

5 • 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 IS 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 2S 
26 27 28 29 30 31 -- 



S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 -- -• 



NOVEMBER 
S M T W T F S 
1 

2 3 4 S 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 



S M t W T F « 

12 

3 4 S • 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 14 15 IC 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 



DECEMBER 
S M T W T F S 
"12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 t 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 II 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 • 



S M T W T F S 
"12 3 4 5 8 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 



S M T W T F S 
" " " " 1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



8 M T W T F « 
12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 •- 



FEBRUARY 
S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 IS 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 



S M T W T F S 



3 1 4 S • 7 8 

t 10 :i 12 13 14 IS 
18 17 IS 19 20 21 23 
21 34 25 2« 27 28 29 
3031 " " 



aiARYVILLE COLLEGE 



THE COLLEGE CALENDAR FOR 
1930-1931 



1930 

Sept 9, Tuesday, 8:00 a. m. — Registra- 
tion of old students begins. 

Sept. 10, Wednesday, 8:10 a. m. — Open- 
ing chapel service. 

Sept. 10, Wednesday, 8:30 a. m. — En- 
trance examinations. 

Sept. 10, Wednesday, 8:30 a. m. — Pho- 
tographing of all new students. 

Sept. 10, Wednesday, 8:30 a. m. — Regis- 
tration of old students completed; 
registration of Freshmen. 

Sept. 11, Thursday — First meeting of 
classes. 

Sept. 13, Saturday, 2:30 p. m. — Faculty 
reception. 

Sept. 13, Saturday, 8:00 p. m. — Y. M. 
C. A. and Y. W. C. A. receptions. 

Nov. 27, Thursday — Thanksgiving Day. 

Dec. 12, Friday, 8:00 p. m. — Bates 
Prize oratorical contest. 

Dec. 18, Thursday, 3:00 p. m. — Christ- 
mas holidays begin. 

1931 

Jan. 3, Saturday, 8:10 a. m. — Class work 
resumed. Friday classes recite. 

Jan. 5, Monday — Saturday classes re- 
cite. 

Jan. 17, Saturday — First semester ex- 
aminations begin. 

Jan. 24, Saturday — First semester ex- 
aminations end. 

Jan. 27, Tuesday, 8:10 a. m. — Second 
semester begins. 

Feb. 3, Tuesday, 8:10 a. m. — February 
meetings begin. 



«M" HANDBOOK 



May 27, Wednesday — Second semester 
examinations begin. 

May 30, Saturday, 3:00 p. m. — Annual 
exhibit of the Art department. 

May 30, Saturday, 8:00 p. m. — Gradua- 
tion exercises of the Music De- 
partment. 

May 31, Sabbath, 10:30 a. m. — Bacca- 
laureate sermon. 

May 31, Sabbath, 7:00 p. m. — Annual 
address to the Y. M. C. A. and 
Y. W. C. A. 

June 1, Monday, 8:00 p. m. — Gradua- 
tion exercises of the Expression 
department. 

June 2, Tuesday, 3:00 p. m. — Annual ex- 
hibit of the Home Economics De- 
partment. 

June 2, Tuesday, 7:30 p. m. — Senior 
class play. 

June 3, Wednesday — Second semester 
examinations end. 

June 3, Wednesday, 3:30 p. m. — Senior 
Class-Day exercises. 

June 3, Wednesday, 6:30 p. m. — Annual 
meeting and banquet of the 
Alumni Association. 

June 4, Thursday, 8:30 a. m, — Meeting 
of the Directors. 

June 4, Thursday, 10:00 a. m. — Com- 
mencement. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



DEDICATION 



To Miss Clemmie J. Henry, who is a 
friend to all, both students and 
teachers, a sympathetic listener, a 
worthy and willing advisor, a high- 
minded Christian, an unselfish admin- 
istrator, and a devoted companion, and 
wholly embodied with the Maryville 
spirit, the Y. M. C. A. and the Y. W. 
C. A. respectfully and gratefully dedi- 
cate this twenty-fifth volume of the 
Maryville Handbook. 



"M" HANDBOOK 




MISS CLEMMIE J. HENRY 

Studeiit=Help Secretary 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



FOREWORD 

The purpose of this handbook is not 
to advertise Maryville College. The 
ever-increasing- number of young men 
and women who have left its halls for 
fields of meritorius and altruistic 
service have eulogized the college far 
more effectively than anything that 
might be said here. What then is our 
object in publishing this handbook? 
Briefly, it is to give a few practical 
and helpful suggestions to those who 
are about to enter college walls for 
the first time; to give to those who 
are just setting out on their bon voy- 
age through Maryville the key- with 
which they may open the doors of 
learning and experience that confront 
them; to aid them, in a small way, to 
catch the Spirit of Maryville in their 
very first days spent on College Hill 
which means a bigger and better man- 
hood and womanhood. 

New students, the four years you 
spend at Maryville will be busy years. 
The college "grind" affects everyone. 
But these years will pass quickly; too 
quickly, in fact. My advice to you 
then is that you strive for the BEST 
in those brief years that you may be- 
come a true Maryville man or woman. 

It is with the hope that the infor- 
mation and suggestions contained in 
this little handbook will serve you 
well in adjusting you to your new en- 
vironment and making your first 
years at Maryville worthwhile that we 
send you this copy of the Maryville 
Handbook. 

THE EDITOR. 



«M» HANDBOOK 9 
^^ 



BOOK I 



THE 
COLLEGE 



3iary\ii.le; college 



THE OFFER OF THE COLLEGE 



To be at home in all lands and ages; 
to count nature a familiar acquaint- 
ance and art an intimate friend; to 
gain a standard for the appreciation 
of other men's work and the criticism 
of your own; to carry in your pocket 
the keys of the world's library and 
feel its resources behind you in what- 
ever task you unde^itake; to make 
hosts of friends among the men of 
your own age who are to be leaders 
in all walks of life; to lose yourself 
in generous enthusiasms and cooper- 
ate with others for common ends; to 
learn manners from students who are 
gentlemen and form character under 
professors who are Christians — this is 
the offer of the college for the best 
four years of your life. 



"M" HANDBOOK 



11 



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12 MARYVILL.E COLLEGE 



HISTORICAL, SKETCH 

Maryville has grown from a class of 
five students who gathered about Dr. 
Isaac Anderson in 1819, to the fore- 
most college in Tennessee, having an 
enrollment last year of 786 students 
from 37 different states and countries. 
Its growth has been phenomenal and 
the romance of its growth from a lit- 
tle log cabin to a completely equipped, 
modern up to date college has been 
chronicled by Dr. Wilson in his "Cen- 
tury of Maryville College" which you 
may read in the library. 

Grounds, comprising 275 acres of the 
most beautiful scenery in East Ten- 
nessee, on which rest 19 buildings; and 
an endowment of $2,342,000 do not 
form a complete basis upon which to 
judge the college. Numbered arhong 
its alumni are men who have distin- 
guished themselves in every type of 
unselfish service. Familiarize your- 
self with Maryville's entire history. 
You are a Maryvillian — a student in 
one of the finest colleges in the South. 
LOCATION 

Maryville College is located in Mary- 
ville, Blount County, Tennessee, and is 
in the midst of a thriving and pro- 
gressive community. Maryville is six- 
teen miles south of Knoxville on the 
Knoxville and Augusta division of the 
Southern Railway, and on the paved 
highway. Route No. 33 leading from 
Knoxville to the South, and the new 
Smoky Mountain National Park. 
Maryville may be reached from Knox- 
ville by Southern Railway trains twice 
daily, and by busses leaving the 
Knoxville Bus Terminal at State and 
Union Streets every forty-five min- 
utes throughout the day. 



<M'> HANDBOOK 13 



BUILDINGS 

The sixteen buildings on the Hill are 
conveniently located from any spot on 
the campus; and a description is given 
here so that you will be able to recog- 
nize just where you are when you ar- 
rive next September. Walk with me 
up the "Corduroy," the path leading 
from town to the Hill. 

Directly in front of us is the gray 
frame building, Baldwin Hall, one of 
the girls' dormitories. To the right 
is the Voorhees Chapel, the dark red 
brick building in which the daily 
morning worship is conducted, and 
where all kinds of entertainments are 
held. Looking down Dodge Avenue 
from the Chapel is a large yellow 
brick building, Carnegie Hall, the 
men's dormitory; and across the street 
from Carnegie is Memorial Hall, a 
structure resembling Baldwin which 
is also a dormitory for women. 

In front of the Chapel is Anderson 
Hall, a red brick building, one of the 
three oldest buildings on the Hill. 
Here are located the offices of Presi- 
dent Lloyd where sympathetic, un- 
derstanding counsel is given to all 
who need it; Miss Clemmie's office 
where you go to find out about self- 
help; the treasurer's office where you 
will pay your bills; and the registrar's 
office. The Art room is also located 
on the same floor as the administra- 
tive offices as is the printing room. 
The rest of the building is devoted to 
classrooms, and a small gymnasium 
for girls on third floor. 

As we walk out of Anderson past 
the fountain, in front of us is the 
Book Store where desk and study 
equipment (except brains) can be 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



bought at reasonable prices. A 
branch of the United States Post Of- 
fice is located in the Book Room. 
From here mail is delivered to the 
dormitories and offices. Mail should 
be addressed: College Station, Mary- 
ville, Tennessee; with the addition of 
the name of your dormitory and your 
room number. The Book Store sup- 
plies a loan library called the James 
R. Hills Library, In 1888 Miss Sarah 
B. Hills of New York contributed a 
fund for the establishment of a loan 
library to aid students in obtaining 
textbooks at a reasonable loan. 

To the left of the Book Store, about 
half a square up the walk, is Pearsons 
Hall, the large red brick building with 
the white columns, another dormitory 
for women. Most upperclassmen room 
in Pearsons while Memorial and Bald- 
win accommodate the sophomores and 
freshmen. On the .first floor of Pear- 
sons is located the dining room where 
about six hundred of your classmates 
eat three times a day; and here's a 
hint: napkins are not provided so 
bring about half a dozen with your 
napkin holder. 

Behind Pearsons Hall to the left is 
the Ralph Max Lamar Hospital. A 
free clinic is held two times a week 
and in cases of slight illnesses no 
charge is made for nursing. How- 
ever, for an extended illness the pa- 
tient pays $7.00 for room, food and 
laundry per week. 

On leaving Pearsons Hall we shall 
go to Thaw Hall, the newest and larg- 
est building on the Hill. Just before 
reaching Thaw glance to the left and 
you will see the Willard Memorial 
where President Wilson lives. This 



"31" HANDBOOK 15 



memorial was built through a gener- 
ous g-ift of. Mrs. Jane F. Willard in 
memory of her husband. 

In Thaw Hall is located the Lamar 
Memorial Library which contains over 
30,000 books. The library is open 
twelve hours every day from Monday 
to Saturday. The museum is located 
in a room partitioned off the library 
to the left of the entrance. In this 
room are found collections of rare ob- 
jects from Japan, Korea, and China; 
relics of the Jndians who used to live 
in this region of Tennessee; antiqui- 
ties from the Civil War; a model of 
our own college when it was known 
as "The Log College"; and many other 
interesting and valuable objects rep- 
resentative of the .world around. 

On the second floor are located the 
Dean's Office, classrooms, the Y. W. 
Auditorium and the Y. W. Reading 
Room. In the reading" room are books 
of all types and magazines to suit 
every individual taste. The reading 
room is open throughout the day for 
the pleasure and the benefit of all 
girls who wish to take advantage of it. 

We now leave Thaw and take a 
short cut over to Bartlett and the 
swimming pool, passing to the left of 
Fayerweather Science Hall in which 
are located the chemistry, physics, 
biology, zoology, and home economics 
laboratories and lecture rooms. 

Bartlett Hall is one of the oldest 
Y. M. C. A. buildings in the South. 
It was completed in 1901, the brick 
being made by the students themselves 
under the leadership of Kin Taka- 
hashi, a Japanese student, at that time. 
In this building are contained the Y, 



16 MARYVILLE COL,IiEGE 



Auditorium, Y Store, parlors, a small 
gymnasium, and rooms for the offi- 
cers of the Y. 

The swimming- pool is located in a 
separate building at the left of Bart- 
lett, and the pool itself is twenty-five 
by seventy-five feet in dimensions. Be- 
hind Bartlett is the Alumni Gymnasium, 
one hundred and ten feet square, con- 
taining a maple floor and collapsible 
bleachers. 

As we walk out past the swimming 
pool, and into the college woods we 
come to the "House in the Woods" 
where the college pastor and his wife, 
Dr. and Mrs. William P. Stevenson, 
live. It is a beautiful English style 
red brick house where all students are 
cordially welcome at all times. 

This year the campus has been im- 
proved by the construction of paths 
and the purchasing of benches from a 
fund raised by the student body and 
faculty. The work on the paths was 
done by the men, who did the work 
free. We hope you will help keep the 
good work started this year. 



Students: — 

Be sure to remember when figuring 
the amount of cash you will need to 
see you thru college for the year, you 
should include the cost of the follow- 
ing: 

Club Dues Class Dues 

$4.00 for an Annual 

These are necessities, not luxuries. 



«M" HANDBOOK 1 



BOOK II 



WELCOME 



18 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



-|^>^ 



^: 



V 



SAMUEL TYNDALE WILSON, 

M. A., D. D., LL. D, 

President Emerituji of Maryville College 



"31" HANDBOOK 19 



DR. WILSON'S WELCOME AND 
FAREWT3LL 



They tell me that this page must be 
filled immediately. Since my successor 
has not yet, at this writing accepted 
the presidency of the College, I take 
this opportunity, as one of the surviv- 
ing charter members of the Maryville 
College Y. M. C. A. and as, by marriage, 
almost one of the charter members of 
the Y. W. C. A., and as an honorary 
member of both organizations for many 
college generations, to give you new- 
students the right hand of fellowship 
as I welcome you into the goodly serv- 
ice of these worthy associations; and 
to wave you a loving farewell as I en- 
trust to younger and abler hands the 
administration of the College that God 
has given u». 

The one supreme mission and purpose 
of tlieae Maryville associations should 
be to love and obey their Lord and 
Master Jesus Christ, and to endeavor to 
enthrone him in every heart on College 
hill. "To him be the glory both now 
and for ever. Amen." 

SAMUEL TYNDALE WILSON, 

President Emeritus. 



20 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 




PROF. GEORGE D. HOWELL, 
Dean of Men 



'M" HANDBOOK 21 



THE MACHINE SHOP 

"Man without' tools is nothing, — 
With tools he is all." This proverb of 
Thomas Carlyle in a certain sense 
should be the fundamental reason 
why you have chosen to come to col- 
lege. The tools of life are physical, 
mental, and spiritual ones, and happy 
is he who makes those so near to per- 
fection that they can stand the trials 
to which they are put in the toils, 
struggles, and temptations of life. 
Those tools may be abused; but so 
tempered ought they to be that they 
may be readily sharpened and put in 
shape. 

College attempts to fit you with 
knowledge to make tools of the ma- 
terial you already possess and like- 
wise how to use those tools. Con- 
sequently your college career is 
an apprenticeship, a recruit-training 
stage through which you pass where 
your physical, mental, and spiritual 
self is subjected to training and dis- 
cipline. This helps to fashion and to 
temper the tools you make. Ofttimes 
the apprenticeship will irk and chafe 
you, and unless you have enthusiasm 
and interest and pride in your work- 
manship, you will become a knocker, 
a kicker, and a chronic pessimist. 

The tools with which we each would 
work then must be serviceable. The 
aim of life is Service. And college is 
the lathe and machine shop in which 
the tools are fashioned, tempered and 
sharpened. In fact, "Service is one oi 
the ways by which a tiny insect like 
one of us can get a purchase on the 
whole universe." 

PROF. GEORGE D. HOWELL, 

Dean of Men. 



23 MAKYVILLE COLLEGE 




MISS MARY ELLEN CALDWELL, 
Dean of Women 



«M'» HANDBOOK 23 



WELCOME STUDENTS! 

Some one has said: "To live in 
hearts we leave behind is not to die." 

Of course, you will still be living 
in the hearts of those you have left 
behind when you come to college. It 
will be your privilege when you get to 
college to gain entrance in the hearts 
of many new friends who will make 
your life fuller and richer. In mak- 
ing these new contacts the college will 
meet you more than half way — to give 
you a welcome to all it has to offer 
you. 

The first greeting you receive will 
probably be from some member of the 
Christian Associations, the Y. M. C. A. 
and the Y. W. C. A. Next, the large 
family in the dormitory will give you 
a warm welcome in their circles. In 
these circles you will be privileged to 
form some of the most intimate and 
lasting friendships of your life, for 
no friendships are stronger or finer 
than those formed in the intimate 
relationships of dormitory life. 

You will be permitted also to enjoy 
all benefits to be derived from legal- 
ized MOONSHINE — the kind that only 
Maryville manufactures. 

Last, but not least, you will be ush- 
ered into the atmosphere of that in- 
tangible, but none the less real, some- 
thing we call the Maryville Spirit. 
This atmosphere is kept pure and 
wholesome thru Love, Loyalty, and 
Unselfish Service to others. And if 
you should go through college without 
having imbibed this Maryville Spirit, 
you will have lost one of the finest 
things Maryville has to offer you. 
YOU ARE WELCOME! 

MISS "MOLLY" CALDWELL, 

Dean of Women, 



24 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



AVELCOME MEN!!! 

Fellows: 

It is with a great deal of pleasure 
that 1 address this letter to every 
Freshman and new man intending to 
matriculate at Maryville this year. I 
want to assure you that you have 
made a wise choice, and that you are 
coming' among friends who are anx- 
ious to help you avail yourselves of 
the many opportunities which will be 
yours at Maryville. It is particularly 
in behalf of the Y. M. C. A. that I 
welcome you to our campus. 

The "Y" extends to you the hand 
of fellowship and in so doing hopes 
that you will enter heartily and' sin- 
cerely into the Organization and its 
work while here. It will go a long 
way toward making your college ca- 
reer a success. It will make your 
fellows in college respect you more. 
It will supply vital inspiration in 
times of need. It will broaden and 
deepen your concept of life. It will 
develop you in countless ways and 
make you a better college man. 

We are going to do everything pos- 
sible for you. If you desire help or 
information about anything, you will 
find a "Y" man ready and anxious to 
aid you. We want you to drop over 
to the Y. M. C. A. whenever you can 
and talk things over, because the of- 
ficers and cabinet members desire to 
meet and become well acquainted with 
each one of you as soon as possible. 

I am looking forward eagerly to the 
opening of college in a few days when 
I can greet you personally. 
Sincerely yours, 

"JESSE" JAMES. 
President "Y." 



''M" HANDBOOK 25 

WELCOME GIRLS!!: 

Dearest New Girls: 

I want to extend a hearty welcome 
to you all from the Y. W. C. A. Come 
on, let's fold our hands and wring 
them as we say, "Howdy." If you are 
lonesome come and see us and we'll 
drive away your blues; if you're 
happy, come see us and we'll g-ive you 
an ovitlet for your energy; if we can 
help you in any way come see us and 
we'll be thrilled to death. 

You'll be coming from the North, 
the South, the East, and the West and 
we're glad, for we like a big cosmo- 
politan group of girls. I think friend- 
ships count so much in one's college 
life that I hope each one of you will 
meet and learn at least seven hundred 
of the eight hundred students here on 
College Hill. One way to do this is to 
get right into the Y. W. at the be- 
ginning of the year and show your 
interest in others. We are already 
your friends and we want you to be 
ours. 

Do you like to play tennis, pitch 
horseshoes, play a musical instrument, 
read, paint, sing, be in pageants, or 
even eat? If you do, Y. W. wants you 
and needs you. 

I just can't wait to really see you 
all and start our big year together. 
If I don't find you right away after 
school opens, I want to invite you now 
to come see me in room 12, Pearsons 
Hall. 

Cordially, 

CAROL CUSHMAN, 
Pres. of Y. W. C. A, 



26 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



FROM THE COLLEGE PASTOR 

I am grateful for the opportunity 
thus to welcome back to College Hill 
former students as well as to address 
a word of cordial greeting to those 
coming to us now for the first time. 
The purpose bringing both classes of 
students is the same, namely, self- 
improvement, growth, and prepared- 
ness for effective service in life. 
Maryville College is able to aid you 
in realizing your hopes, and is eager 
to do so. She has teachers and classes 
for the cultivation of your minds; she 
provides physical directors and ath- 
letic fields for the healthy exercise 
of your bodies; she supports a Y. M. 
C. A., a Y. W. C. A., and other re- 
ligious organizations and services for 
the nurture and strengthening of your 
souls. No character is symmetrically 
developed that neglects any of these 
agencies for discipline and training, 
and all of them combined will be 
powerless to benefit you wothout your 
interested attention and personal cul- 
tivation. 

It is my special duty to remind you 
of these things from time to time, but 
I aspire to be more than your 
preacher — I wish to be regarded as 
your personal friend, as one to whom 
you could feel you might go freely 
and confidentially for sympathy and 
advice in times of uncertainty and per- 
plexity. So please remember that the 
"House in the Woods" is a place where 
you will be heartily welcomed at all 
times, and especially at such times 
when you may feel the need of a little 
friendly advice. 

Cordially your friend, 
WILLIAM P. STEVENSON. 





«M»» HANDBOOK 


27 




BOOK III 






y. M. C. A. 






and 






Y. W. C. A. 











28 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



Y. M. C. A. 
Short History of the Association 

The Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion, like all great org-anizations, had 
its orig-in in one man, Sir Georg-e Wil- 
liams of London, Eng-land. He was a 
poor lad. who worked in a drapery 
establishment in the city of London, 
but who found time to speak a word 
for his Lord and Saviour, Jesus Christ. 
Feeling- the deep need for daily prayer 
and spiritual uplift, he called together 
a number of his companions, and each 
morning they held a prayer meeting 
in an upper room of that establish- 
ment. Their group kept growing and 
soon they had quite a following. From 
this group grew what is today known 
as the foremost organization for the 
carrying of the Gospel of Jesus Christ 
to young men throughout the world. 
The Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion. Ever since that date, 1844, this 
Association has continued to grow, 
until today it encircles the globe; 
bringing together young men and boys 
into a brotherhood that keeps alive 
the spirit of Christ. 

The Student Young Men's Christian 
Association, of which we are a part, is 
one of the many branches of this great 
organization, and it works for 
the uplift and welfare of the young 
men in colleges throughout the world. 
Its membership runs into the thou- 
sands, and other associations are 
being formed every year. Most 
associations have secretaries to head 
up the work, but the students of the 
colleges are the chief promoters and 
workers in the associations. They are 
student organizations, and it is the 
duty and privilege of every student to 
back them in the best way possible. 



«M» HANDBOOK 29 



Purpose 

The purpose of the Young Men's 
Christian Association is to develop the 
threefold man; spirit, mind, and body. 
And in its work on College Hill these 
phases of its program are stressed. 
Scope of Work 

The Y. M. C. A. of Maryville is a 
live and active organization. It seeks 
to serve the students at the college in 
every way possible not limiting its 
activities to strictly religious matters. 
We realize that if we accomplish the 
great aim of the Y. M. C. A. "a clean 
mind in a sound body" that we will 
have progressed a long way on the 
road to religious salvation. The cab- 
inet of the Y is made up of the most 
congenial and most representative of 
the Maryville students. They are al- 
ways glad to oblige you in any way 
they can. Don't get the idea that the 
Y is a stagnant, lifeless, inactive, or- 
ganization at Maryville. but a live, 
growing. healthy organization in 
whose activities you are urged to take 
part, enjoy and derive benefit from. 
Don't hesitate to call on the Secretary 
when there is something you want to 
know. If there is something you want 
done ask him to do it. He is "glad and 
willing to help you. The "Y" is yours. 
Get in the habit of taking part in its 
activities and in coming to its meet- 
ings — you will never regret it. 



Christ is walking life's shores again! 
Christ is choosing his fishermen. 

With nets far spread for their 
hauling, 
Christ looks in at the office door! 
Christ is searching mill and store — 

It's you! It's you, He's calling. 



30 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

Y. M. C. A. ADMINISTRATION 

Officers 

President J. Stuart James 

Vice-President Raymond Young 

Secretary Edwin Shelley 

Treasurer Richard Strain 

Cabinet 

Athletics Jack Coug-hlin 

Euel Nelson 

Social Activities Kemp Davis 

Aubrey Bradshaw 
Lyceum Course. .. .Homer McCann' 

Donald Bri&gs 

Music Porter French 

William Hannah 

Publicity William Graham 

Robert West 

Hi-Y Work Carl Storey 

Ralph Teffeteller 

Bible Study John Hendry 

Allen Foreman 
Missions Laurence Somers 

Advisary Board 

Class of 1931 

Dr. E. R. Hunter Prof. G. D. Howell 

Carl Storey 

Class of 1932 

Dr. G. A. Knapp Dr. H. E. Orr 

Homer E. McCann 

Class of 1933 

Dr. S. T. Wilson Dr. J. H. McMurray 

Benjamin Groves 



«M" HANDBOOK 31 



THE TEST OF A MAN 

The test of a man is the fight he 

makes, 
The grit that he daily shows, 
The way he stands on his feet and 

takes 
Fate's numerous bumps and blows. 
A coward can smite when there's 

naught to fear. 
When nothing his progress bars. 
But it takes a man to stand up aod 

cheer 
While some other fellow stars. 
It isn't the victory after all 
But the fight that a fellow makes. 
The man who, driven against the wall, 
Still stands erect and takes 
The blows of fate with his head held 

high 
Bleeding and bruised and pale. 
Is the man who'll win, in the by and 

by, 
P^'or he isn't afraid to fail. 
It's the bumps you get and the jolts 

you get 
And the shocks that your courage 

stands 
The hours of sorrow and vain regret 
The prize that escapes your hands 
That test your mettle and prove your 

worth. 
It isn't the blows you deal. 
But the blows that you take on this 

good old earth 
That shows if your stuff i« real. 

— Unknown. 



32 MARYVILLE COL,L.EGE 



Y. W. C. A. 



Activities 

One of the strong-est organizations 
on the Hill is the Young Women's 
Christian Association. It functions 
from the week end before school begins 
in the fall until the last day of school 
in the spring. 

Before the freshmen arrive at Mary- 
ville plans are being made by the 
Y. W. C. A. for making their life more 
Pleasant, and to help them to get ac- 
quainted with their new environment. 
For this the big sister movement is 
carried out, whereby every new girl 
has an old girl as her "big sis.ter," 
who ^corresponds with her during the 
summer, meets her at the train, helps 
her to get settled, and is a big sister 
to her in every way possible. In this 
way new girls will feel that they have 
a friend as soon as they arrive. 

Aside from this there are hikes, so- 
cials, and parties for the new girls 
given by the Y. W. C. A. all through 
the year. 

Perhaps the biggest feature of 
Y. W. C. A. is the Sunday meetings. 
They begin the first Sunday afternoon 
and last all through the year. Pro- 
grams are prepared which will give 
the girls opportunities for worship 
together and discussion of topics of 
interest. 

Joiiit meetings with the Y. M. C. A. 
are held at various times during the 
year. There is^ always excellent co- 
operation between the two organiza- 
tions and working together thus they 
are able to accomplish great things. 

The Y. W. sponsors many activities 
among which are aiding the Y. M. in 
the Lyceum Programs, the May Day, 



«M» HANDBOOK 33 



circus, Carols at Christmas and 
Easter. Nu Gamma Sigm^, the or- 
phanag"e and mission work. With all 
of these you cannot fail to realize the 
importance of the Y. W. C. A. 

Nu Gamma Sigma 

The Nu Gamma Sigma stands for 
New Girls Society and that is just 
what it is. All the new girls are di- 
vided into g-roups of ten with an old 
girl as leader. These groups meet 
once a week during the first few 
weeks of school. You see the purpose 
of Nu Gamma is to make the new girls 
acquainted with college life. You will 
find yourselves in a strange and new 
environment and naturally you will 
have problems and questions. In the 
meetings of these groups your prob- 
lems will be discussed and a solution 
will be found. 

You will form some beautiful 
friendships among the other new girls, 
as you hike together, chat together, 
and solve your problems. You will 
seein like sisters in one big family. 
The mother of the Nu Gamma Sigma 
is the Y. "W. C. A., who is constantly 
planning new ways and means to 
make her daughters happy. This is 
the way we spell our name: 

N-ewness in thought. 

U-sefulness. 

G-ood fellowship. 

A-ction. 

M-aternal love. 

M-astery of problems. 

A-ttractive ideas. 

The Y. W. Reading Room 

The Y. W. C. A. has set aside a room 
where the girls may go to read or rest 
at any time they choose to do so. It 
is yours; make the most of it. 



34 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



Y. W. C. A. ADMINISTRATION 



Officers 

President Carol Cushman 

Vice-President Julia Terry 

Secretary Naomi Willing'ham 

Treasurer Kathryn Hodges 

Nu Gamma Rachel Grubbs 

Cabinet 

Programs Merle Beebe 

Music Jane Duke 

Lyceum Lois Cupler 

Assistant Marion McMurray 

Benefit Mabel Dickerson 

Social Eleanor Henry 

Athletics Inez Hamrick 

Snap Ann Smart 

Devotions Esther Horton 

World Fellow.ship Sara Babley 

Social Service 

Orphanage Elizabeth V/ilbar 

Missions Mary Ludman 

Welcome Committee, Dorothy Kellar 

Publicity Zelma Alexander 

Librarian Mary McArthur 

"Y" Store Manager Georga Burk 

Assistant Wilhelmina Gruchy 

Building Sect. & Treas. . . .Cora Houk 
Advisory Board 

Mrs. Kathryn McMurray 

Mrs. Emma Lee W^orley 

Mrs. Sam Franklin 

Mrs. W. P. Stevenson 

Miss Clemmie Henry 

Miss Bonnie Hudson 
Miss Helen Gamble 



'M" HANDBOOK 35 



TO THE \\03IEN 

What is it like at Maryville? What 
shall I take with me? These are just 
a few of the questions that are enter- 
ing- the minds of the prospective 
women students and it is to you that 
we are writing- this message of what 
to bring and what to do. 

To begin with, the dormitory rooms 
are furnished with a study table, two 
chairs, a dresser, a small table, and 
either a double decker or two single 
beds. These few things, plus curtains, 
dresser scarfs, pillows, bed spreads, 
blankets, sheets, pennants, pictures, 
and other similar necessities and nov- 
elties of your own bringing, will make 
up a very attractive room. 

As for clothes, make most of thein 
suitable for general school wear, be- 
cause this kind of clothing is worn 
here more than any other style. How- 
ever, you will want an evening dress 
for various social functions, and for 
the presentations, plays, Lyceum num- 
bers, and recitals that are given in the 
Chapel throughout the year. Be sure 
to bring black bloomers for the re- 
quired gymnasium classes, a swim- 
ming suit, and also a pair of knickers 
or riding- breeches for hiking- and 
other outdoor sports. 

We have study hour every night but 
Saturday, and then, after literary 
society meetings, we have our feeds 
and other informalities, so don't for- 
get to pack a few old dishes, spoons, 
knives, a can opener, and other uten- 
sils for domestic purposes. 

There is a limit, naturally, upon the 
number of times that you may go to 
the show or to town, but as a rule 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



these regulations don't bother Mary- 
ville girls, for if you are athletic, you 
may swim or play tennis, or if you 
are more "serious-minded" there is the 
library of the Y. W. C. A. Reading 
Room at the extreme left end of Thaw 
Hall on second floor, where you may 
enjoy magazines, music, and comfort- 
able davenports. 

You may "moonshine" (that is, you 
may enjoy or endure, as the case may 
be, the company of the men) every 
day except Sunday from after dinner 
until 1:10 when the afternoon classes 
begin. As Monday is our holiday, the 
hours from 1:00 to 3:00 are reserved 
for moonshine privileges. To church 
on Sunday mornings, to ball games, 
snaps, social functions, you may be 
accompanied by an escort. Sunday 
traveling is deemed undesirable by the 
college a.uthorities so plan to leave the 
Hill on Saturday and return on Mon- 
day when you spend the weekend off 
the Hill. 

Maryville will be your college home 
for nine months, and we hope that 
you will find it a very happy and 
satisfactory one. 



If ye win through an African jungle, 
Unmentioned at home in the press. 

Heed it not; no man seeth the piston. 
But it driveth the ship none the less. 



'M" HANDBOOK 37 
_ ^ 



BOOK IV 



ACTIVITIES 



38 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



ACTIVITIES 



Extra-curricular activities, it must 
be admitted, are as a rule either over- 
stressed or under-stressed. There 
seems to be no way of eliminating this 
difficulty, except within the student 
himself. First we find a student who 
has never gotten "on the Boat," who 
hardly knows a soul on the campus, 
pores over books from morning- till 
night, and seldom thinks in terms out- 
side his studies. Then we run across 
one who does practically no studying 
at all, but can say he knows three- 
fourths of the people on the campus, 
is an athlete, or is a singer, actor, or 
whatnot, of note. 

The trouble of the first type is that 
at the end of his college career he 
finds himself at sea without a ship. 
Usually he doesn't know what to do 
with his book knowledge. The second 
comes to nearly the same end, if he 
finishes his college at all. Too often 
he flunks out. 

The ideal arrangement then, in ac- 
tivities and studies, as in practically 
everything else, is to find the eter- 
nally expounded "happy medium." 

How to find this ideal is a problem. 
The big trouble is that many students 
become so engrossed in their activi- 
ties that they find studies merely a 
dull drag. It is up to the student to 
work out his own salvation in this 
respect. ,Tust remember this — THAT 
ONE CAN'T DO EVERYTHING. 

Of course, we are not trying to dis- 
suade anyone from partaking of ac- 
tivities at all. No indeed. "We believe 



"M" HANDBOOK 39 



in them. We feel that in order to 
obtain a really rounded college career 
it is necessary to do many things be- 
sides merely studying. But we also 
feel, having seen many instances on 
both sides of the fence, that a student 
must curb his fervor for activities, 
just as he must curb his appetite for 
too strong doses of books. 

So let us say, as a parting word, 
that it should be the aim of every stu- 
dent to do what is justice in his own 
mind to his studies, and then find 
some activity which interests him, and 
in which he can enlarge his scope of 
acquaintances. In this handbook the 
new student will find an outline of 
practically every activit;v^ on the cam- 
pus, and if he is interested, all he 
needs to do is to look up the manager, 
coach, president, or director of that 
activity he likes to find out more 
about. All of them will be glad to 
help him get started in an activity. 
THE EDITOR. 

OPENING SOCIAL EVENTS 

The social life at Maryville is well 
provided for and no matter what your 
disposition is, there are occasions you 
will like. These opening entertain- 
ments will carry you over the time of 
newness and afford opportunity for 
getting acquainted with your fellow 
students and to get the first glimpse 
of the true Maryville spirit. 

The Y. W. C. A. gives her reception 
in the Alumni Gymnasium on the first 
Saturday night you spend at Mary- 
ville. This past year we had a Gypsy 
party with a campfire, fortune tellers 
and other gypsy entertainments. This 
year we are going to have — ???!! Bet- 
ter come and find out. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



The Y. M. C. A. entertains the new 
men at the same time on Saturday- 
night with a well-planned, varied pro- 
g-ram which furnishes plenty of thrills. 
The reception is held out in the woods, 
in the dark of the moon, and light is 
supplied from the old stump which is 
sacrificed for the occasion. Don't for- 
get: your first Saturday night at 8:00 
P. M. 

In the afternoon on Saturday the 
Faculty of the College holds a recep- 
tion to greet the newcomers and to 
renew acquaintances with old stu- 
dents. Take this opportunity to be- 
come acquainted with the faculty who 
are your friends as well as your in- 
structors. 

The literary societies hold their 
opening social entertainments soon 
after school opens. Each women's 
literary society holds an individual 
rush week and all new girls are cor- 
dially invited to attend these special 
programs. Bainonian will be the first 
society to entertain this year, and 
Theta Epsilon will entertain the fol- 
lowing week. The men's societies, 
Athenian and Alpha Sigma usually 
hold their receptions in their respec- 
tive halls where the new men are 
introduced to a society program and 
a society "feed." 

Other Social Activities 

Snap is an institution on the Hill — 
it is the favorite outdoor sport, and 
indoor sport as well. When you hear 
the announcement made in chapel or 
in the dining room that "there will be 
a snap tonight on Baldwin lawn" — 
prepare to go. 

How do you play it? We have 
played it for many years, but it is so 



«M" HANDBOOK 41 



simple and yet so intricate that we 
are' not able to explain it. It will 
come natural to you though. Snap 
furnishes plenty of exercise and yet 
sufficient opportunities for a quiet 
chat with one whom you have snapped. 

Moonshining- is the Maryville way of 
saying dating and it is this social ac- 
tivity which is desired by many who 
take full advantage of the time al- 
lowed for this activity. You are per- 
mitted to moonshine from 12:40 to 1:10 
every noon, from 1:00 to 3:00 on Mon- 
day afternoon, and to church, Ves- 
pers, games, chapel performances, and 
any college function. 

Two of the most enjoyable social 
events of the year are the fall and the 
spring inountain hikes. Trains are 
chartered for the trips and a whole 
day is devoted to mountain climbing 
in the beautiful Smokies just a few 
miles from Maryville. 

Joint Activities of Y. M. C. A. 
and Y. W. C. A. 
Lyceum 

Each year as a part of the varied 
activities sponsored by the Y's, a pro- 
gram of four lyceum numbers is pre- 
sented in the chapel. These numbers 
are chosen from the Redpath Chau- 
tauqua and the Bureau of Fine Arts, 
and are very entertaining and well 
received by the students. The cost 
is included in your student's activity 
fee paid with your semester bills so 
that you can enjoy all four numbers 
without having to worry about the 
admission. 

Fred Hope Fund 

Every spring we have a "Fred Hope 
Drive" for the purpose of supporting 



3k ARY^ II.l.E COLLEGE 



the work of Fred Hope, a former 
graduate of Maryville, who is in charge 
of a mission school in Africa. Every 
year tlie student body and faculty 
make voluntary contributions of one 
thousand dollars or over for this 
worthy cause. 

Blue Ridge 

Each summer, after commencement, 
representatives from the college g'o to 
Blue Ridg-e, North Carolina, to attend 
the conference of all the southern col- 
lege Y. M. C. A.'s and Y. W. C. A.'s. 
At this conference the time is spent 
in listening" to worthwhile addresses 
given by prominent leaders in Amer- 
ica and from foreign countries, study- 
ing religious and social problems' of 
the day, and enjoying the recreation 
afforded by the conference accommo- 
dations. 

Blue Ridge is located in one of the 
most beautiful parts of the Blue Ridge 
mountains, sixteen miles east of Ashe- 
ville, and has the finest conference 
grounds in the South. Next year we 
want a large delegation to represent 
Maryville and perhaps there will be 
an opportunity for you to go. 
Circus 

The annual Y. W.-Y. M. Circus is 
held each spring at which time reg- 
ular circus acts, side-shows, and other 
necessities of a true circus are dis- 
played. A loving cup is given to the 
society presenting the best side-show; 
it was won by the Bainonian Literary 
society last year. 

Sunday Meeting's 

Joint devotional meetings are held 
at intervals throughout the year and 
interesting programs are presented by 
members of both organizations. 



"M" HANDBOOK 43 

PUBLICATIONS 
The CliilhoAvean 

Have you seen last year's Chil- 
howean — the colleg-e annual? You 
will enjoy looking it over. It is a 
summary of the year's events at Mary- 
ville, and is published by the Junior 
Class. The price is $4.00, and it would 
be well for you to include it in the 
check you make out when you pay 
your semester bills. It is a book 
which you will want to have to recall 
to your memory more vividly the 
friends and events of your colleg-e 
days. Homer McCann is editor and 
Allen Foreman is business manag^er of 
the 1931 edition of the Chilhowean. 

The Highland Echo 

The Highland Echo is the weekly 
publication of Maryville College, It 
is a four-page six-column paper to 
which each student subscribes when 
he pays his bills. The Echo is con- 
ducted after the fashion of larger 
newspapers, carrying athletic reports, 
editorials, news items, and other arti- 
cles of interest to the students. 
Through this publication the students 
are enabled to keep in touch with all 
the activities of the Hill. The editor- 
in-chief for the coming year is Hessie 
Keeton, and the business manager is 
Kemp Davis. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



The Maryville Handbook 

The Handbook, commonly known as 
the "M" Book, is the publication you 
have before you. It is issued by the 
Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. and aims 
to be a small encyclopedia of infor- 
mation on the college life. The edi- 
tor this year is Homer McCann; 
associate editor, Julia Terry; business 
manager, Robert West. 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Student Council 

The Student Council is organi-zed 
for the purpose of furnishing a rep- 
resentative body of students, who, by 
virtue of their position and influence 
in student affairs, shall be able to 
express the sentiment of the student 
body. They cooperate with the Fac- 
ulty in maintaining Maryville College 
ideals and strive to put into execution 
such proposals which shall be for the 
best welfare of the school. 

The Council is composed of eight 
seniors, six juniors, four sophomores, 
and four freshmen. Any student may 
confer with his representative and 
present any matter which he thinks 
would be for the advancement of the 
student body. 

The Student Council is not student 
government, but it seeks to summar- 
ize student opinion and to work with 
the Faculty in promoting desirable 
measures and prevent actions which 
are detrimental to the college. 



«M» HANDBOOK 45 



LITERARY SOCIETIES 
Bainonian 

The Bainonian Literary Society is 
the oldest literary organization for 
women on the Hill. It was organized 
in 1875, and ever since that time it 
has been an important factor in the 
student life. The society provides for 
the development of the talents of 
every girl and tries to make her feel 
that the society is her own. Pro- 
g-rams are given every Saturday in 
Bainonian Hall on the second floor of 
Pearsons. Twice a year a joint meet- 
ing is held with our brother society, 
the Athenian. Bainonian stands for 
social as well as for literary develop- 
ment. It aids in the forming of 
friendships, and many good times are 
enjoyed by all who will take advan- 
tage of what she offers. Bainonian 
won two loving cups last year; one 
for the best mid-winter, and the other 
for the best stunt at the Y. M.-Y. W. 
Circus. We extend a hearty welcoine 
to all new girls, and a wish that you 
may soon learn to love Bainonian as 
we do. 

Athenian 

The Athenian Literary Society was 
organized in 1869 and is the oldest 
literary org^anization on College HilL 
Its present membership enrolls a 
large proportion of the men of the 
college, men who are known for their 
loyalty to and enthusiasm for their 
society. The ideal of Athenian is to 
give her members such training as 
will enable them to secure the very 
best development during their college 
days; to promote a college spirit and 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



a love for Maryville. To accomplish 
this hig-h ideal she provides vv^eekly 
program^ of an interesting, instruc- 
tive, and varied nature that are full 
of life, pep, and college spirit. The 
meetings are held in Athenian Hall 
on the third floor of Anderson. We 
extend to you men a cordial invita- 
tion to attend the opening meeting at 
the beginning of the year, and also a 
hearty invitation to become members 
of the organization. 

Tlieta Epsilon 

Theta Epsilon is the other girls' lit- 
erary society and through it is devel- 
oped a comradeship which is of gr^at 
value to the Thetas on the hill. Each 
Saturday night meetings are held in 
the society hall on the second floor of 
Pearsons Hall, and the programs are 
very entertaining and enjoyable. Joint 
meetings are held twice a year with 
Alpha Sigma, the brother society, at 
which time the get-together is en- 
joyed by all present. Every year 
Theta presents a play, and all Thetas 
work loyally for its success. New 
girls, Theta will help you and you 
will help Theta, so we extend to you 
a welcome to come and join our ranks 
and help us to do big things for the 
year. We are eagerly waiting to meet 
you. 

Alpha Sigma 

Alpha Sigma was organized in 1882 
and is a strong organization on the 
Hill. It is not the aim of the society 
to secure as many members as pos- 
sible, but instead to secure only those 
who are capable of upholding the 



<M" HANDBOOK 47 



standards set by our predecessors. 
Meeting's are , held every Saturday 
night in the society hall on third floor 
of Anderson, and programs composed 
of solos, debates, quartets, and other 
entertaining numbers are given at this 
time. One play is given during the 
year. To all new students we extend 
a hearty welcome to attend our open- 
ing meeting and see for yourselves 
just what we are. 



MUSICAL, ORGANIZATIONS 

Glee Sinsers 

The Maryville Glee Singers is a 
musical organization composed of 
eighteen to twenty men who have the 
best voices in the college. The Singers 
enjoyed a successful season last year, 
giving concerts in East Tennessee, and 
two home concerts. Porter French is 
the president of the Glee Singers for 
the coming year a.nd Edwin Shelley 
is business manager. 



Women's Glee Club 

One of the most sought-after posi- 
tions among the women of the college 
is membership in the Women's Glee 
Club. Tryouts are held in the fall for 
places in the club, which consists of 
eighteen selected and well-trained 
voices. The club is directed by Miss 
Frances Henry, the voice instructor. 
A most successful operetta was pre- 
sented last spring and the ability and 
talent of the club was demonstrated 
to all who attended the concert. Don't 
fail to try out for a position when th^ 
announcement is made in the fa,ll, 



48 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



Vesper Choir 

The Vesper Choir is composed of 
forty of the best voices in the Colleg-e, 
both men and women. The choir sings 
every Sunday night at the Vesper serv- 
ice, and gives special prog'rams 
throughout the year. Miss Frances 
Henry is the director. 



Orchestra 

The Maryville College orchestra was 
composed of twenty-four members last 
year and is under the direction of Miss 
Mildred Butcher. The purpose of the 
orchestra is to serve the individual 
student and the college in general. 

Concerts are given throughout 'the 
year and are appreciated by lovers of 
good music. Any student who can 
play sufficiently well is eligible to 
become a member. 



Band 

The band is composed of the men of 
the college who can play band instru- 
ments, and is under the direction of 
Miss Mildred Butcher. This organiza- 
tion furnishes music for games, and 
pep meetings. If you have been in 
your high school band or can play any 
kind of band instrument, Maryville 
will be glad to have you try out for 
her band. 



NATIONAL HONORARY 
FRATERNITIES 
Pi Kappa Delta 

Maryville has the distinction of hav- 
ing the Tennessee Alpha chapter of 



"M" HANDBOOK 41) 



the National Honorary Forensic Fra- 
ternity, Pi Kappa Delta. This organ- 
ization proves a great inspiration for 
those interested in any phase of foren- 
sics and membership in it is a coveted 
honor. At the national Pi Kappa Delta 
convention which was held in Wichita, 
Kansas, during- April, Maryville was 
represented by Coach Verton Queener, 
Forrest Robertson, and William Gra- 
ham. The latter two men entered the 
debate contest as well as the oratori- 
cal and extemporaneous contests, and 
displayed creditably the training they 
received at Maryville. 

Theta Alpha Phi 

■ The Tennessee Delta chapter of the 
national honorary dramatic fraternity, 
Theta Alpha Phi, is located at Mary- 
ville, and is composed of the talented 
students in dramatics. After a stu- 
dent has m.et the rigid requirements 
for membership he is initiated into the 
fraternity, and becomes a permanent 
member. Four new members were 
taken in this year. 

Sigma Delta Psi 

The Maryville chapter of Sigma 
Delta Psi, the national athletic fra- 
ternity, has been established the past 
year. Membership is open to all male 
students of the college "who maintain 
satisfactory scholarship and command 
the respect of their associates as ath- 
letes and gentlemen." Such member- 
ship is earned through meeting the 
standard requirements of the various 
athletic tests in the presence of a re- 
sponsible committee. The Maryville 
committee is composed of Dr. J. H. 
McMurray, Coach Honaker, Coach 
Thrower, Professor Howell, and Pro- 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



fessor Smith. John Taggart is tlie 
first Maryville man to wear the key of 
the fraternity. 

According to the constitution of 
Sigma Delta Psi, the object of the so- 
ciety shall be the encouragement of 
the moral, physical, and mental de- 
velopment and training among college 
students. 

ACADEMIC SOCIETIES 
Writers' Workshop 

The Writers' Workshop is composed 
of various faculty members, juniors, 
and seniors who are elected to mem- 
bership on the basis of literary ability. 
Each member submits two papers a 
year for criticism both adverse and 
constructive. Meetings are held every 
Wednesday in the Y. W. Reading 
Room. All the work is filed in the 
library and can be read by anyone 
who desires to do so. 

Lambda Tau Psi 

Lambda Tau Psi, the psychology 
club, is composed of about twenty mem- 
bers who are interested in the study 
of psychology in its various forms and 
its effects on society. Meetings are 
held once a week and interesting dis- 
cussions and research are carried on. 

diemistry Club 

The chemistry club is composed of 
students who are taking more than 
one year of college chemistry. Papers 
and lectures are given on the chemical 
problems of the day by the students 
and professors of the department. 



«3I" HANDBOOK 51 



Pre-Medical Club 

The pre-medical club is organized 
for students who are preparing them- 
selves to practice medicine for the 
purpose of better understanding the 
problems and interests of the medical 
profession. About twenty-five stu- 
dents belong to the organization. 

Lang-uage Club.s 

A French Club and a Spanish Club 
are organized for those students who 
are interested in learning more of 
these languages. Meetings are held 
twice a month at which time only 
French or Spanish is spoken throughout 
the meeting. Plays are given and in- 
teresting programs are held through- 
out the year. 

La^v Club 

Say, fellows, are you interested in 
law? Well, then, come around to our 
meetings. The purpose of the Law 
Club is to help its members to famil- 
iarize themselves with the features of 
their contemplated life work and to 
develop high moral standards in con- 
nection with their profession. The 
programs consist, for the most part, of 
mock trials, parliamentary drill and 
lectures on various phases of law. 

3Iinisterial Associatiou 

Greetings to all students. This as- 
sociation is composed of all men who 
are expecting to choose for their life 
work the Gospel Ministry. Its pro- 
grams are made up of only that which 
is of the highest religious and literary 
value. Opportunities for personal 
work, either in the mission, jail, or in 
the rural district churches are numer- 



52 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



ous. The association invites all who 
expect to enter the ministry to join 
hands in a better understanding of the 
Gospel. 

Student Volunteer Band 

The college has, from its earlies his- 
tory been identified with foreign mis- 
sions and has sent out one hundred 
and ten missionaries into seventeen 
foreign countries. Since 1894, the stu- 
dents have maintained a Student Vol- 
unteer Band composed of those who 
are pledged to enter some foreign 
field, if the way be open. The Band 
meets every Monday at 4:45 in the 
Y. W. Auditorium to study missionary 
fields and conditions. 

Art Club 

The Art club is composed of about 
fifteen members of the college who are 
talented in different phases of art. 
Work is carried on throughout the 
year, and during the week of Com- 
mencement an exhibit of the work ac- 
complished during that year is held 
in Anderson Hall. 

Home Economics Club 

The Home Economics Club is com- 
posed of the girls who are majoring in 
Home Economics. Meetings are held 
each week and many interesting pro- 
jects are carried on during the year. 

State Club» 

We have thirty-six different states 
represented at Maryville, so naturally 
the students from the "home state" 
should group together and form state 
clubs. The primary purpose of these 
clubs is the furthering of good spirit 



«M" HANDBOOK 53 

and friendship of those who are from 
the same section of the United States. 
Outside the State of Tennessee, North 
Carolina has the most representatives, 
fifty-three; with Ohio and Kentucky- 
tying for second place, each having 
thirty-seven members. Be sure to join 
your state club. 

Hi-Trail Club 

The Hi-Trail Club was organized for 
the purpose of developing physical 
strength, and increasing the knowledge 
and love for nature in its primitive as 
well as civilized state. The member- 
ship in this club is limited to twelve 
men. To become a member of the club 
one must have had at least one 
hundred miles of hiking experience and 
must present a paper giving an ac- 
count of such experiences, and then 
must be unanimously elected by the 
members. 



You are an integral part of Maryville. 
Don't be the weakest link in the al- 
ready strong chain. 
On the strength of one link in the cable 

Dependeth the might of the chain; 
Who knows when thou mayest be 
tested? 

So live that thou bearest the strain. 



MARYVILLE COLIiEGE 



WHO'S WHO AT MARYVILLE 

Alpha Sigma .... Kemp Davis, Pres. 
Athenian Richard Strain, Pres. 

Athletic Association . . Lowell McDon- 
ald. Pres. 
Bainonian .... Mabel Dickerson, Pres. 

Basketball Kemp Davis, Capt. 

Baseball Robert Watkins, Capt. 

Chilhowean Homer McCann. 

Editor. 

Football Carl Storey, Capt. 

Glee Singers .... Porter French, Pres. 
Edwin Shelley, Bus. Mgr. 

Handbook .... Homer McCann, Ed'itor; 
Robert West, Bus. Mgr. 

Highland Echo . Hessie Keeton, Editor; 
Kemp Davis, Bus. Mgr. 

Junior Class .... Glenn Murray, Pres. 

Law Club Stuart James. Pres. 

Ministerial Association . . Leland Gil- 
more. Pres. 

Pi Kappa Delta Mildred Craw- 
ford. President. 

Senior Class .... Donald Benn, Pres. 

Sophomore Class .... Donald Briggs, 

Pres. 
Student Council . .Richard Strain, Pres. 

(Pro. tern.) 
Theta Alpha Phi . . William Graham, 

Pres. 
Swimming ...... Jack Coughlin, Instr. 

Track Leighton Abshear, Capt. 

Y. M. C. A J. Stuart James. Pres. 

Y. W. C. A Carol Cushman. Pres. 



<M" HANDBOOK 55 

- _ . 



BOOK V 



ATHLETICS 



56 3IARYVIIiLE COLLEGE 



ATHLETICS 



Maryville is represented by teams in 
every major college sport, and ranks 
with the leaders in this section of the 
country. The administrative control 
of athletics is centered in the Athletic 
Association. 

With L. S. Honaker and "Bob" 
Thrower as coaches of Maryville ath- 
letics, and hard fighting- teams com- 
posed of loyal men, it is no wonder 
that the Athletic Association has made 
such a stride forward during the last 
two years. A new day has dawned 
for Maryville in athletics because she 
has two live coaches, plenty of good 
material, added equipment, and a splen- 
did field. 

Football 

Football at Maryville is an institu- 
tion. Its purpose is not only to win 
games but to make men — winning 
men. Maryville has the reputation of 
having one of the best conditioned 
teams in this section and the past foot- 
ball season was a success from the 
standpoint of games won and lost as 
well as from that of training men suc- 
cessfully. 

This fall we have a fairly heavy 
schedule, playing the University of 
Tennessee, the University of Kentucky, 
Carson-Newman. Milligan, Mars Hill, 
Howard, Emory-Henry, Lenoir-Rhyne, 
and Tennessee Wesleyan. But with 
the promising material from last year 
the prospects are bright for another 
winning team of Orange and Garnet 
men. 



Students. keep behind Maryville 
teams, because they are doing their 
best for Maryville. 



«M» HANDBOOK 



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58 :»TARYVILLE COLLEGE 



Basketball 

Basketball at Maryville, as at other 
Southern colleg-es, is the leading winter 
sport. The season begins early in 
December and lasts until about the 
middle of March. During- the past sea- 
son Maryville won games from the best 
teams of the entire section. And with 
a number of letter men back for next 
year, around whom Coach Honaker 
will build his team, Maryville is ex- 
pected to have one of the best teams 
in the history of the college. 

Baseball 

Maryville perhaps excels more in 
baseball than in any other sport. Al- 
though she does not encourage pro- 
fessional ball, yet there are some ten 
or twelve former Maryville baseball 
players who are making a mark for 
themselves in the major leagues. 
Among these are such men as John 
Stone and "Speedy" Ruble, of the De- 
troit Tigers. 

Freshmen, if you can play baseball 
come out and prove what you can do. 

Track 

Track and field sports are just be- 
ginning to take their rightful place in 
Southern College Athletics and at 
Maryville there is a very noticeable 
incline in interest for this branch of 
sport. There is always a large group 
of cinder path artists who aspire to 
Maryville's winged honors and last 
season (this spring) a large number 
were awarded the winged "M." Track 
is really coming into its own at Mary- 
ville so just watch us show our heels 
to 'em next spring. If any of you 
fellows are good track men or think 
you are, look up Coach "Bob" Thrower. 



'M" HANDBOOK 



59 












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3IARYVILLE COLLEGE 



Tennis 

Tennis is growing' rapidly in popu- 
larity at Maryville. The past season 
we had on our schedule such teams as 
the University of Tennessee, the Uni- 
versity of Chattanooga, Georgetown, 
Tusculum. Centre, Catawba, and Ten- 
nessee-Wesleyan. In this sport, as in 
others, we are producing winning 
teams. The prospects look good for 
the coming season. 

"Y" Athletics 

"Every man in some phase of the 
*Y' athletic program," is the wish of 
the Y. M. C. A. And it is possible, 
for the "Y" athletic program covers 
every phase of sport. In the fall, the 
annual cross-country races and inter- 
class football; in the spring, interclass 
baseball, interclass track meets, basket- 
ball, swimming, wrestling, boxing, 
tennis, and horseshoe tournaments. 

The gymnasium is equipped with 
mats, horses, parallel bars and other 
gymnastic apparatus. 

The swimming pool, located next to 
the Y building was built at a cost of 
$10,000 and occupies a building 58 by 
110 feet long, 25 by 75 feet being the 
dimensions of the pool itself which is 
open the entire year. 

The Y. M. C. A. interclass track meet 
held in the spring is a feature of the 
entire athletic program. Bronze and 
gold medals are given to the winners 
in each event. 

Get into some form of athletics and 
keap yourself physically fit. You will 
derive a great deal of pleasure from 
your athletic competition. 



"M" HANDBOOK 61 

CONSTITUTION OF aiARYVILLE 
COLLEGE ATHLETIC 
ASSOCIATION 



ARTICLE VII 

1. The following students shall be 
permitted to wear the Maryville "M": 

a. Members of the varsity football 
team who have played fifteen quarters, 
b. Members of the varsity baseball 
team who have played as much as 
five inning's per game in one-half of 
the scheduled games; or, a baseball 
pitcher who has pitched forty-five 
innings in scheduled games, c. Mem- 
bers of the varsity basketball team 
who have played one-half a game in 
each of the scheduled games, d. Mem- 
bers of the varsity track team winning 
first place in a dual meet, or in any 
other meet where three or more col- 
leges are competing. e. Members of 
the varsity tennis team playing in one- 
half the tournaments of the year. 

2. The football "M" shall be an 
eight-inch block "M," the basketball 
"M" a six-inch block "M"; the girls' 
basketball "M" a five-inch block "M" 
with wings attached, the tennis "M" 
shall be a script "M"; a standard four- 
inch block "M" shall be awarded to 
point winners in the minor sports. 

3. All members of the second foot- 
ball, baseball, or basketball teams may 
wear the Maryville Monogram. 

4. No other students shall wear 
either the "M" or Maryville Monogram. 



Any letter or monogram won by a 
student at another school must not be 
worn while the student is enrolled at 
Maryville. 



MARYVILLE COL,L.EGE 



AVOMEN'S ATHLETICS 



Point System of Athletic Awards 

Since the intercolleg-iate contests 
have been dispensed with the point 
system has been adopted. This gives 
every girl an equal chance to partici- 
pate in every sport and a chance to 
win the coveted monogram, the small 
letter or the large letter and sweater. 

The honors are awarded as follows: 
300 points, Maryville Monogram M. C; 
400 points, small letter M; 500 points, 
letter and sweater. 

Points shall be earned as follows: 

A. Teams. 50 points each team. 
Class teams — 

1. Basketball 6 players team 

2. Soccer 11 players team 

3. Volleyball 9 players team 

4. Baseball 9 players team 

5. Tennis 6 players team 

Squad of any team sport 20 points. 
Manager of any team sport 15 points. 
Captain of any team sport, 10 points. 
Coach squad (basketball) 15 points. 
Perfect attendance 10 points. 

B. Tests. 

1. Swimming: Limit 50. 

2. Stunts: Limit 25. 

3. Archery: Limit 50. 

4. Track: Limit 50. 

5. Hiking: Limit 50. 

C. Scholarship. 

1. An "A" average in academic w^ork 

for any semester 20% of points 
won in addition. 

2. A "B" average adds 10% of points 

won. 

D. Health. 

1. Observing health rules for one 
semester, 25 points. Two se- 
mesters, 50 points. 



"M» HANDBOOK 63 

ATHLETIC BOARD OF CONTROL, 

President 

LOWELL Mcdonald 

Vice-President 
RICHARD STRAIN 

Secretary 
BLUNDON FERGUSON 

Faculty Representatives 

PROFESSOR HOWELL 

COACH THROWER 

Male Representatives 
TOM CASH 
LEA CALLAWAY 

Female Representatives 
IVA BABCOCK 
INEZ HAMRICK 

Town Representatives 

GEORGE CRAWFORD 

"TURKEY" SMITH 



The only way you can g'et the door 
of Opportunity open is to Push, not 
Knock. 



64 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



A PRAYER FOR THE CAMPUS 

O Thou whose feet have climbed life' 

hill. 
And trod the path of youth. 
Our Savior and our Brother still. 
Now lead us into truth. 



The call is Thine; be Thou the Way, 
And give us men, to guide; 
Let wisdom broaden with the day, 
Let human faith abide. 



Who learn of Thee the truth shall find. 
Who follow, g-ain the goal; 
With reverence crown the earnest mind. 
And speak within the soul. 



Awake the purpose high which strives, 
And, falling, stands again; 
Confirm the will of eager lives 
To quit themselves like men: 



Thy life the bond of fellowship. 
Thy love the law that rules. 
Thy Name, proclaimed by every lip. 
The Master of our schools. 

Rev. Louis F. Benson, 1894. 



'M» HANDBOOK 65 
. 



BOOK VI 



SONGS 

YELLS 

SCHEDULES 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



SONGS 



Alma Mater 



Where Chilhowee's lofty mountains. 

Pierce the southern blue. 
Proudly stands our Alma Mater. 

Noble grand, and true. 

Chorus: 

Orange, garnet, float forever, 

Ensign of our hill! 
Hail to thee, our Alma Mater! 

Hail to Maryville. 

As thy hilltop crowned with cedars 

Ever green appears; 
So thy memory fresh shall linger 

Through life's smiles and tears. 

Chorus: 

Lift the chorus, wake the echoes. 

Make the welkin ring! 
Hail the queen of all the highlands! 

Loud her praises sing. 

Chorus 



Don't forget to stand with uncovered 
head while the Alma Mater is being 
sung. 



«M»» HANDBOOK 67 



Dear Old Maryville 

I 

Near Chilhowee's mountain blue. 

Stands our Alma Mater true. 
Dear old Maryville, to thee we lift our 
song-. 
'Neath thy cedar grove so fair. 
"We shall breathe the mountain air. 
While M'^ith merry hearts the chorus 
we prolong. 

Chorus 

Sing- we a song of our dear college 
home. 

Fondly we love thee still. 
And where ever w^e may be. 

Pond Mem'ry turns to thee. 
Our Alma Mater, dear old Maryville. 

II 

As the morning- sunbeams' light, 

Greets over Chilhowee's height. 
So our tribute, we as freely to thee 
bring. 
Youth's free homage full and free. 
We thus gladly render thee. 

Dear old Maryville, thy praise we 
freely sing. 

Ill 

To thee, guardian of our youth. 

Faithful guide to light and truth. 
We, thy children, bring our songs of 
g-rateful praise. 
And when we shall leave thy hill. 
We shall ne'er forget thee still. 

Dear old Maryville, the scene of hap- 
py days. 



68 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



THE PEP SONG 

We've got the rep, rep, rep, of old 

Maryville, 
We've g-ot the pep, pep, pep, of old 

College Hill. 
We've got the strength to knock 'em 

stiff 
And never know the diff 
For we're from Maryville, Tennessee. 
Rah! Rah! 

On MaryvUle 

On, Oh. Maryville 

On, Oh, Maryville 

Plunge right thru that line 

Run the ball clear round old 



A touchdown sure this time 

Raw. Raw, Raw! 
On, Oh. Maryville 
On. Oh, Maryville 
Fighting for fame 
Fight, fellows, fight 
And we'll win this game, 

YELLS 



Howee-Hove 

Howee-how Chilhowee 
Maryville. Maryville. Tennessee 
Who-rah. who-rah 
Maryville. Maryville!! 
Rah, rah. rah. 

(repeat) 



«M" HANDBOOK 



M-a-r-y-v-i-1-l-e 

M-a-r-y ville 

M-a-r-y ville 

M-A-R-Y-V-I-L-L-E 
Maryville, Maryville, Maryville. 

-I-C tory 

V-I-C tory 

V-I-C-T-O-R-Y 
Victory, Victory, Victory! 

"Fifteen" 

Rah — rah — rah — rah — rah 

Rah — rah — rah — rah — rah 

Rah — rah — rah — rah — rah 

Team, Team, Team! 

The Old Chant. (Slow and low) 

Maryville Maryville 

You -don' t-know -Mary ville 

You-can't-lick-Mary ville 

Maryville! 

The Locomotive 

M a r y^— V i 1 1 e 

M — a — r — y — v — i — 1 — 1 — e 

M-a-r-y-v-i-1-l-e 

M-a-r-y-v-i-1-l-e 

Maryville! 

The Orange and Garnet 

Here's to the Orange 
Here's to the Garnet 
Here's to the Boys 
In the Orange and Garnet! 



Colleg^e Colors 

Orange and Garnet 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



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MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



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«M» HANDBOOK 73 

IIIIIIMIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 

ONE MINUTE, 
PLEASE! 

BEFORE 

MAKING YOUR 

PURCHASE, PLEASE 

CONSULT THIS HANDBOOK. 

PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 

AND TELL THEM YOU SAW 

THEIR AD IN THIS 

BOOK. DON'T 

FORGET. 

CLAUDE C. SMITH 

Exclusive Ladies' Store 

FEATURING FINE FEATHERS HOSE 

and 

BROWN BUILT SHOES 

205 Main (Broadway) 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



74 MARYVILLE COLLSGE! 

lllllllllllllllllltlllllllllllllllllllllllllllMltMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 

PALACE THEATRE 

"No Place on Earth Will You Have 
Better Talking Pictures" 

SERVICE BARBER SHOP 

"We Appreciate Student 
Business" 



Students — — 

We Are Always Ready 
to Serve You 

DELICIOUS FOOD 
SANDWICHES 
DRINKS 
SWEETS 

THE SANDWICH SHOP 

IMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIII 



«M" HANDBOOK 75 

iiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiriiririiiiiiiiriiiiiri 

First Methodist 
Episcopal Church 

EAST MAIN STREET 

W. H. REAGAN, Pastor 

MISS NELLIE G. WILSON, 
Director of Religious Education 




"AN OPEN DOOR" 

You are welcomed, cordially, to the 
service and fellowship of this church. 
Make it your home! Let its ministry 
serve you. 

iiniiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiriiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMriiiiiMi 



76 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiu 

MORTON'S TAXI & TRANSFER CO. 

Rent a New Car and Drive 
It Yourself 

SEE US FOR YOUR TRANSFER NEEDS 

BOTH PHONES 71 

Our Store is Headquarters for 

FLORSHEIM SHOES, INTER- 
WOVEN SOX, CURLEE CLOTHES 

In Fact, Everything in 

MEN'S and WOMEN'S WEAR 

We Appreciate Your Trade 

BADGETT STORE CO. 



STUDENTS— 

Let us supply you with the many little 

things you will need Garment Hangers, Waste 

Baskets, Curtain Rods, Brooms, Mops, Shoe 
Brushes, Shoe Polish, etc.. Toilet Soap, Tooth 
Brushes, Tooth Paste, Nail Files, Ribbon, Laces, 
Wash Cloths and Handkerchiefs. A complete 
line of Box Paper, Tablets, Note Books, Pen- 
cils, etc. 

WE ASSURE YOU PROMPT AND 
COURTEOUS SERVICE 

WRIGHT'S 5c, 10c & 25c STORE 

We Always Appreciate Your 
Patronage 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiirriiriiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiii 



«M" HANDBOOK 77 

iiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiii 

WE 

ARE TRULY 

APPRECIATIVE 

Of the patronage we receive 
from Maryville College Students, 
and are proud of the service we 
render to them. 

Always the Newest 
in Style 

CHANDLER- 
SINGLETON CO. 

''The Home of True Economy^^ 

IMIIIIIIIMIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIillllllllMI 



78 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

ItlllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIinilllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 

VIADUCT SERVICE STATION 

The . General Tire — Vesta Batteries 
Gulf Pride Oil — Aviation Grade Gas 

We Honor Gulf Courtesy Cards 
PHONE 164 END OF VIADUCT 



Printing and Engraving 

MARYVILLE ENTERPRISE 

"A Good Newspaper" 
JAS. B. HEDGE, Jr., Owner 

Your Patronage is Appreciated 

RESPONSIBILITY 

Opportunity brings Responsibility. No one 
may lightly set aside either without loss of 
character and courage. Success conies only to 
those who boldly meet Responsibility and carry 
it bravely through. 

What will Maryville College young men and 
women students do with the responsibilities 
which a College training automatically places 
upon them ? The answer is found in the future. 

Bureau of Fine Arts 

Solon H. Bryan, Manager, 
ASHEVILLE, N. C. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiMiiiriiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



«M'» HANDBOOK 79 

iiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



^Photographs Live 
Forever^' 



THE WEBB STUDIO 

E. L. WEBB, Prop. 

Photos of Permanency and 
of Character 



Kodak Finishing 
A Specialty 

THE BEST IS THE CHEAPEST 
—ALWAYS 

illiltlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllUllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



80 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

GREETINGS 

Students, Welcome to 

Walker's Drug Store 
and Tea Room 

128 Main (Broadway) 

We Thank You for the Business 

of Last Year and We Will 

Be Glad to Serve You 

Again 

Come to See Us and 

"SAY IT WITH 

FLOWERS" 

Baum's Home of Flowers 

133 E. Main Street (Broadway) 
HUGH M. CLARK, Mgr. 

iiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



«M" HANDBOOK 81 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiMiiiiiiinii 

COLLEGE CLEANERS 

Hey, Fellows ! 
IT PAYS TO LOOK WELL 

And We Can Make You Look Well 

With Our Modern Methods of 

Cleaning and Pressing 

Give Your Work to 

JACK COUGHLIN 

and 

GEORGE VICK 

In Room 313 

COME IN AND SEE US — 
ALWAYS WELCOME 

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82 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiitiiiiiitiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

CITY SHOE REBUILDERS 

217 Main (Broadway) 

"Supreme Quality and Service" 

We Are Represented on 
the Hill by 



HENDRY SHINE 



and 



LAUNDRY SERVICE 

J. M. HENDRY, Mgr. ROBERTA ROBISON, 

325 Carnegie Hall Memorial Hall 



MAXWELL COLLEGE CLOTHES 

Catering to All Students 
— Always — 

FIRST IN STYLE 
BEST IN VALUE 
LOWEST IN PRICE 

We Appreciate Your Valued 
Patronage 

Maxwell Clothing Co. 

402 S. Gay St. 

KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

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"M»» HANDBOOK 83 

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New Providence 
Presbyterian Church 

Main and College Street 

WILLIAM H. CROTHERS, 
Pastor 

Bible School graded and conducted 
by a well qualified corps of officers 
and teachers; Christian Endeavor So- 
cieties awake and active; the whole 
church forward-looking in plan and 
purpose. 

Students Cordially Invited 

to Make This Their 

Church Home While 

in College 

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84 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinriiiiiiiii! 

WEAVER'S 

Delicious Cooked Food 

Excellent Service 

609 Gay St. 

KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

Across from 
the Tennessee Theatre 

PAUL KERR 

Office, First National Bank Bldg. 
MARYVILLE, TENN. 

New York Life Insurance Company 

Assets $1,600,000,000.00 

BUY ALL YOUR MUSIC 

From 

CLARK & JONES 

in Knoxville 

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"M" HANDBOOK 85 

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The First Baptist 
Church 

"^ Church With a Message'' 
REV. W. R. DEAL, D. D., 

Pastor 

A cordial invitation is extended to 
the College folk to worship with us 
and enjoy our fellowship. 

An "Up-to-date" Sunday School 
and well organized B. Y. P. U. af- 
fords you a place of religious training. 

WE WANT YOU 

"Go to Church and Feed Your Soul 
on the Bread of Life*' 

WELCOME WELCOME 

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86 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

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S. E. CRAWFORD 

Dentist 
First National Bank Building 

L. C. OLIN, M. D. 

Room 302, First National Bank Bldg. 

Tel.: Res., 84; Office, 746 
Office Hours: 8-11 A. M.— 3-7 P. M. 

R. F. GRAF & SONS 

A. I. A. 

Architects and 
Structural Engineers 

Builders of Thaw and Carnegie 

KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

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«M»» HANDBOOK 89 

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A Minister of the Gospel 

SHOULD BE 

a man of prayer; 

SHOULD BE 

acquainted with men * 
and their ways; 

SHOULD KNOW 

God and His Ways, 

AND KNOW 

how to represent Him, 

To accomplish such things for 
its students is the aim of 

UNION THEOLOGICAL 
SEMINARY 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 

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90 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiniiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiirMiiiiiiitiiiiMriiiMiiiiiiitiiiiMiiiiMiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiHi 

Monroe's Confectionery 

College Street 

LUNCHES 
FRUITS 
CANDIES 
DRINKS 
ICE CREAM 

We Appreciate College 
Trade 

CARLISLE'S 5c, 10c & 25c STORE 

Come to Carlisle's for your Hair 
Nets, Bobby Pins, Laces, Handker- 
chiefs, Silk Hosiery and Rayon Under- 
wear. Fresh Candies all the time. 
Note Book Fillers, Tablets and Box 
Paper. 

For your parties: Paper Cups, 
Plates, Napkins, Spoons and Forks. 

A I\ew Store With a Clean 
New Stock 

CARLISLE'S 5c, 10c & 25c STORE 

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«M" HANDBOOK 91 

The Moody Bible Institute of Chicago 

REV. JAMES M. GRAY, D. D., LL. D., President 

Founded by the Great Evangelist and Chris- 
tian Educator, D. L. Moody, in 1886. 

TRAINING FREE Educational Department 

The object of the Institute is expressed in 
the service rendered by its students in all parts 
of the world, who are pastors, evangelists, mis- 
sionaries, teachers, directors of religious educa- 
tion, gospel singers, Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. 
C. A. secretaries, rescue mission superintend- 
ents, deaconesses and workers in Sunday Schools 
and Boys' and Girls' Clubs. 

This is divided into a Day School, Evening 
School, and Correspondence School. The Gen- 
eral Course of the Day School is covered in 
two years. Its enrollment last year was 1,038. 
Six other courses are Missionary, Pastors, Music, 
Christian Education, Jewish Missions, and 
Swedish-English. Advanced work is taken in 
these courses covering longer periods of time. 

The Evening School permits students to take 
work equivalent to the Day School, making 
them eligible to the same diploma, though it 
necessarily covers a longer period of time. A 
shorter course is possible, however, leading to 
a certificate. The enrollment last year was 
1,216. 

The Correspondence School is for those who 
cannot attend the Institute in person. Fourteen 
courses are offered in different methods of 
Bible Study, Practical Christian work. Evan- 
gelism, Christian Evidences, etc. For these a 
limited fee is charged. The enrollment last 
year was 12,647. 

Catalog of the Day and Evening Schools, 
and Prospectus of the Correspondence School 
mailed free. ADDRESS 

The Moody Bible Institute of Chicago 

153 Institute Place, Chicago Ave. Station, 
Div. MC30 CHICAGO, ILL. 



92 MARYVIIiLE COLLEGE 

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Everything Good to Eat 

M. M. ELDER 

CASH CARRY STORE 

103 Main St. (Broadway) 

"The Best Service is Self 
Service^^ 

Visit the 
Leading Small 
City Store of 
East Tennessee 

PROFFITT'S 

"The Best Place 
to Trade'' 

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«M" HANDBOOK 93 

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The Western Theological Seminary 

FOUNDED BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

1825 — A SEMINARY FOR COLLEGE 

GRADUATES 

A complete modem 
iheological curriculum 
is offered to students 
of all denominations. 

Elective courses 
leading to degrees of 
S. T. B. and S. T. M. 

Graduate courses of 
the University of Pitts- 
burgh, leading to de- 
grees of A. M. and 
Ph. D., are open to 
properly qualified stu- 
dents of the Seminary. 

Exceptional library 
facilities. 

Two entrance prizes 
of $250 each. Two 
post-graduate fellow- 
ships of $600 and 
$800. 

All buildings are new, with latest modern 
improvements. Social hall, gymnasium, and 
students' commons. 

For information, apply to 

JAMES A. KELSO 

President, 
N. S., PITTSBURGH, PA. 




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94 MARYVILLE COI.LEGE 

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CHARLES R. COULTER 



FLORIST 

Pot and Cut Flowers 

Decorations and Floral Designs 

People's Phone 163 
MARYVILLE, TENN. 

See Our Representative 
on the Hill 

Complimentary 
from 

Lowe & Campbell 
Athletic Goods Co. 

"Equipment for All College 
Athletics" 

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"M" HANDBOOK 95 

iiiiiiiiiriiiiiiijrniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

Y. W. C. A. STORE 

Third Floor, Pearsons Hall 

GIRLS— 

When You Want Good 

Things to Eat — 

Come to the 

"Y" Store 

CAKES CANDIES 

FRUITS COLD DRINKS 

SANDWICHES RELISHES 

AND OTHER COLLEGE 
NECESSITIES 

^^Patronize the ISaborhood Store** 

GEORGA BURK, 

Manager 

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96 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 

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Y. M. C. A. STORE 

In the "Y" Building 

Good Things to Eat: 

CANDY 

CAKES 

FRUIT 

ICE CREAM 

DRINKS 

COLLEGE NECESSITIES 

With Each and Every Purchase 
We Give Our Good Will 



SUMPTER LOGAN, 

Manager 

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Established 1859 

"The Mitchells haoe been printing 

over fifty years 




The plant complete. Bookmaking in 
its entirety under one roof and one 
supervision. Complete service. Edito- 
rial, Composition, Presswork, Plates and 
Binding. Output limited to the manu- 
facture of books, colors, and business 
literature. 

SPECIAL DEPARTMENT FOR 

UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

Annuals, Handbooks, Catalogues, 

Diploma Cases, Brochures, Text Books, 

Laboratory Manuals, Engraving, Steel 

Die stamping, etc. 

Makers of Mitchell-Made SUPER- 
FINISH book covers, the beautifully 
grained, highly Embossed and artistically 
colored line. 

Wm.MitchellPrintingCo. 

Edition Printers and Binders 

GREENFIELD, INDIANA 

This book is from our press.