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Full text of "Maryville College Handbook [M Book] 1931-1932"

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IDENTIFICATION 



Name 

Room 

Class 

Home Address. 



In Case of Accident Notify, 



No. of Chapel Seat 

No. of Lab. Desk 

No. of Lab Locker 

Gym Locker No 

Student Council Representatives: 



THE 

Maryville College 
Handbook 

VOLUME XXVI 
1931-1932 

DONALD W. BRIGGS 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEP 

NATHALIA WRIGHT 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 

BENJAMIN P. GROVES 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
Published by 

The Young Men's and Young 

Women's Christian Associations 

of Maryville College 

MARYVILLE, TENNESSEE 



CALENDAR 


1931-1932 


SEPTEMBER 
S M T W T F S- 


MARCH 


S M T WT F « 


----12345 
( 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 2122 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 

OCTOBER 


■■--12345 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 2122 23 24 25 26 
272829 30 31 - - 

APRIL 


S M T W T F S 
1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 

NOVEMBER 

5 M T W T F S 


SMTWT FS 




3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 IS 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 

MAY 


S M T W T F a 


12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 1011 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
Z2 33 24 25 26 27 28 
2930 

DECEMBER 
S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 


JUNE 


S M T W T F « 


""12345 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 2122 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 - -- 

JANUARY 

S M T W T F S 


1 2 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 -- -- 

JULY 


S M T WT F S 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


FEBRUARY 

S M T W T F S 
"12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 
"12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 2? 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 





CONTENTS 

Foreword 6 

College Calendar 4- 5 

Books: 

I Welcome of the adminis- 
tration 7-16 

II The College 17-24 

III Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. 25-36 

IV Activities 37-52 

V Athletics 53-62 

VI Songs, Yells, Schedules 63-72 

VII Advertisements 73-88 



Maryville College 



THE COLLEGE CALENDAR FOR 

1931-1932 



First Semester 

1931 

Sept. 9 to 11, Registration: 

Sept. 9, Wednesday, 10:30 a. m.— 

Orientation program. 
Sept. 10. Thursday, 8:10 a. m. — Reg- 
istration. 
Sept. 11, Friday — 8:10 a. m. — Open- 
ing chapel service. 
Sept. 11, Friday — First meeting of 
classes. 
Sept. 12, Saturday, 2:30 p. m. — Faculty 

reception. 
Sept. 12, Saturday, 8:00 p. m. — Y. M. C. 

A. and Y. W. C. A. receptions. 
Nov. 26, Thursday — Thanksgiving Day. 
Dec. 17, Thursday, 3:00 p. m. — Christ- 
mas holidays begin. 

1932 

Jan. 2, Saturday, 8:10 a. m. — Class work 
resumed. 

Jan. 19, Tuesday — First semester ex- 
aminations begin. 

Jan. 26, Tuesday — First semester ends. 
Second Semester 

Jan. 27, Wednesday, 8:10 a. m. — Second 
semester begins. 

Feb. 2, Tuesday, 8:10 a. m. — February 
meetings begin. 

May 25, Wednesday — Second semester 
examinations begin. 

June 1, Wednesday — Second semester 
examinations end. 



'M" Handbook 



(Coniniencement Week) 

May 28, Saturday, 8:00 p. m. — Gradua- 
tion exercises of the Expression 
Department. 

May 29, Sabbath, 10:30 a. m. — Bacca- 
laureate service. 

May 29, Sabbath, 7:00 p. m. — Com- 
mencement week vesper service. 

May 30, Monday — 8:00 p. m. — Gradua- 
tion exercises of the Music De- 
partment. 

May 31, Tuesday, 8:00 p. m. — Senior 
class play. 

June 1, Wednesday, 3:30 p. m. — Senior 
class-day exercises. 

June 1, Wednesday, 6:30 p. m. — Annual 
meeting- and banquet of the Alumni 
Association. 

June 2, Thursday, 8:30 a. m. — Meeting 
of the Directors. 

June 2, Thursday, 10:00 a. m. — Com- 
mencement. 



Mapyville College 



FOREAVORD 

This book is published for the new 
student of Maryville Colleg-e. Its pur- 
pose is to act as a guide to the many 
activities, places, and customs of Mary- 
ville. It is a handy reference in a com- 
pact form, and knowledge of its con- 
tents is invaluable. 

The Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. 'send 
you this book, hoping that it will help 
you to adjust yourself to college life, 
and to be assured of the friendly feel- 
ings of everyone here, including 

THE EDITOR. 



'M" Handbook 



BOOK I 



WELCOME OF 
THE ADMINISTRATION 



Maryville College 




DR. RALPH WALDO LLOYD 
President 



'M" Handbook 



WELCOME FROM THE PRESIDENT 
OF THE COLLEGE 

The opening- of the Maryville College 
year is almost as new to me as to any 
Freshman. The last time I arrived on 
the Hill for that occasion was at the 
beginning of my senior year, seventeen 
years ago. But I well recall how hear- 
ty was the welcome given by the "Y's" 
to old and new students alike. I am 
glad to share in the experience again. 

Whenever during the year a student 
looks at this little book I trust he may 
be assured of the good will of the Col- 
lege. 

Those who come with earnest pur- 
pose, who find congenial friends of 
good character, who practise habits of 
industry and clean living, and enter 
into the spirit of the College — they will 
ever count the day of their coming a 
blessing. 

RALPH WALDO LLOYD, 
President of Maryville College. 



Maryville College 




DR. EDWIN R. HUNTER 
Dean of the Colleg-e 



'M" Handbook 



WELCOME FROM THE DEAN OF THE 
COLLEGE 

DEAR NEWCOMERS: 

Others are welcoming you to the re- 
lig-ious, social, and general cultural 
privileges of Maryville College, to 
which we all give you the heartiest 
welcome. May I add a special welcome 
to the classroom and curricular offer- 
ings of Maryville? 

Maryville is a standard, A-grade col- 
lege, fully accredited by the Association 
of Secondary Schools and Colleges of 
the Southern States, the regional ac- 
crediting agency. We think you 
newcomers have come to a good col- 
lege; it is our plan that by the end of 
your four-year stay, it will be a decid- 
edly better College. We shall, of 
course, be greatly indebted to you if 
that plan succeeds. 

We want to help you in becoming ad- 
justed to college ways. If you don't 
quite know what college is for, we'll 
be glad to try to help you to some an- 
swers. If you don't quite know how to 
plan your course, we'll be glad to give 
you all the help we can. 

We'd like you to believe that the 
members of the faculty are kindly-dis- 
posed persons who are eager to know 
you and help you. We want you to 
look upon the classrooms as friendly 
places, and to look upon the activities 
carried on there as cooperative efforts 
at general helpfulness, and we hope 
you'll not be afraid to come to the 
Dean's office, which is not a torture 
chamber, but a clearing house for 
friendly counsel. 

Very sincerely yours, 
EDWIN R. HUNTER, Dean. 



Maryville College 




PROF. GEORGE D. HOWELL 
Dean of Men 



"M" Handbook 



WELCOME FROM THE DEAN OF 

MEN 

Welcome to Maryville College. In 
welcoming you, let me say that Mary- 
ville College offers you all its facili- 
ties to use. You are selecting Mary- 
ville Colleg'e as your residence for the 
next nine months and we want you to 
feel at home and utilize all the College 
has to offer you. 

Maryville College offers you a broad 
and liberal education, an understand- 
ing and appreciation of the cultural 
and scientific achievements of man, 
past and present. We try to inspire you 
with a love of truth and beauty, and 
prepare you to live in society more 
effectively for yourself and more help- 
fully for others. We desire you to con- 
serve physical health, develop a higher 
moral character and religious life and 
so familiarize yourself with the general 
content, achievements and ideals of the 
several departments of knowledge 
that you may be well prepared to live 
consistently and uprightly before God 
and man. We trust that you will make 
friendships that will bless your life 
from among those with whom you live 
during your college sojourn, that those 
friendships may broaden your vision 
and enrich your .memories. 

Again, welcome to Maryville College. 
GEORGE D. HOWELL, 

Dean of Men. 



Maryville College 




MISS MARY ELLEN CALDWELL 
Dean of Women 



"M" Handbook 



WELCOME FROM THE DEAN OF 
AVOMEIV 

Some one has said: "To live in hearts 
we leave behind is not to die." 

Of course, you will still be living- in 
the hearts of those you have left be- 
hind when you come to college. It will 
be your privilege when you get to col- 
lege to gain entrance in the hearts of 
many new friends who will make your 
life fuller and richer. In making these 
new contacts the college will meet you 
more than half way — -to give you a wel- 
come to all it has to offer you. 

The first greeting you receive will 
probably be from some member of the 
Christian Associations, the Y. M. C. A. 
and the Y. W. C. A. Next, the large 
family in the dormitory will give you a 
warm welcome in their circles. In these 
circles you will be privileged to form 
some of the most intimate and lasting 
friendships of your life, for no friend- 
ships are stronger or finer than those 
formed in the intimate relationships of 
dormitory life. 

You will be permitted also to enjoy 
all benefits to be derived from legal- 
ized MOONSHINE — the kind that only 
Maryville manufactures. 

Last, but not least, you will be ush- 
ered into the atmosphere of that intan- 
gible, but none the less real, something 
we call the Maryville Spirit. This at- 
mosphere is kept pure and wholesome 
through Love, Loyalty, and Unselfish 
Service to others. And if you should 
go through college without having im- 
bibed this Maryville Spirit, you will 
have lost one of the finest things Mary- 
ville has to offer you. YOU ARE 
WELCOME. 

MISS "MOLLY" CALDWELL, 

Dean of Women. 



Maryville College 



WELCOME FROM THE COLLEGE 
PASTOR 

I am grateful for the opportunity 
thus to welcome back to Colleg'e Hill 
former students as well as to address a 
word of cordial greeting to those com- 
ing to us now for the first time. The 
purpose bringing both classes of stu- 
dents is the same, namely, self-im- 
provement, growth, and preparedness 
for effective service in life. Maryville 
College is able to aid you in realizing 
your hopes, and is eager to do so. She 
has teachers and classes for the culti- 
vation of your minds; she provides 
physical directors and athletic fields • 
for the healthy exercise of your bodies; 
she supports a Y. M. C. A., a Y. AV. C. 
A., and other religious organizations 
and services for the nurture and 
strengthening of your souls. No char- 
acter is symmetrically developed that 
neglects any of these agencies for dis- 
cipline and training, and all of them 
combined will be powerless to benefit 
you without your interested attention 
and personal cultivation. 

It. is my special duty to remind you 
of these things from time to time, but 
I aspire to be more than your preacher 
— I wish to be regarded as your per- 
sonal friend, as one to whom you could 
feel you might go freely and confiden- 
tially for sympathy and advice in times 
of uncertainty and perplexity. So please 
remember that the "House in the 
Woods" is a place where you will be 
heartily welcomed at all times, and es- 
pecially at such times when you may 
feel the need of a little friendly advice. 
Cordially your friend, 
WILLIAM P. STEVENSON. 



"M" Handbook 



BOOK II 



THE COLLEGE 



Maryville College 



THE OFFER OF THE COLLEGE 



To be at home in all lands and ages; 
to count nature a faniiliai' acquaint- 
ance and art an intimate friend; to 
gain a standard for the appreciation of 
other men's work and the criticism of 
your own; to carry in your pocket the 
keys of the world's library and feel 
its resources behind you in whatever 
task you undertake; to make hosts of 
friends among- the men of your own 
age who are to be leaders in all walks 
of life; to lose yourself in generous 
enthusiasms and cooperate with others 
for common ends; to learn manners 
from students who are gentlemen and 
form character under professors who 
are Christians — this is the offer of the 
college for the best four years of your 
life. 



'M" Handbook 




Maryville College 



HISTORICAL SKETCH 

Maryville has grown from a class of 
five students who gathered about Dr. 
Isaac Anderson in 1819, to the foremost 
college in Tennessee, having an enroll- 
ment last year of 824 students from 35 
different states and countries. Its 

growth has been phenomenal and the 
romance of its growth from a little log 
cabin to a completely equipped, modern 
up to date college has been chronicled 
by Dr. "VS^ilson in his "Century of Mary- 
ville College," which you may read in 
the library. 

Grounds, comprising 275 acres of the 
most beautiful scenery in East Tennes- 
see, on which rest 19 buildings; and an 
endowment of $2,-324,000 do not form a 
complete basis upon which to judge the 
college. Numbered among its alumni 
are men who have distinguished them- 
selves in every tj'pe of unselfish serv- 
ice. Familiarize yourself with Mary- 
ville's entire history. You are a Ma'ry- 
villian — a student in one of the finest 
colleges in the South. 

LOCATION 

Maryville College is located in Mary- 
ville, Blount County, Tennessee, and is 
in the midst of a thriving and progres- 
sive community. Maryville is sixteen 
miles south of Knoxville on the Knox- 
ville and Augusta division of the South- 
ern railway, and on the paved highway, 
Route No. 33, leading from Knoxville 
to the South, and the new Smoky Moun- 
tain National Park. Maryville may be 
reached from Knoxville by Southern 
Railway trains twice daily, and by 
busses leaving the Knoxville Bus Ter- 
minal on Gay street, every forty-five 
minutes throughout the day. 



'AI" Handbook 



BUILDINGS 

The nineteen buildings on tlie Hill are 
conveniently located from any spot on 
the campus, and a description is given 
here so that you will be able to recog- 
nize just where you are when you ar- 
rive next September. Walk with me 
up the "Corduroy," the path leading 
from town to the Hill. 

Directly in front of us is the gray 
frame building, Baldwin Hall, one of 
the girls' dormitories. To the right is 
the Voorhees Chapel, the dark red 
brick building in which the daily 
morning worship is conducted, and 
where all kinds of entertainments are 
held. Looking down Dodge avenue 
from the Chapel is a large yellow brick 
building, Carnegie Hall, the men's dor- 
mitory; and across the street from 
Carnegie is Memorial Hall, a structure 
resembling Baldwin, which is also a 
dormitory for women. 

In front of the Chapel is Anderson 
Hall, a red brick building, one of the 
three oldest buildings on the Hill. Here 
are located the new offices of President 
Lloyd, where sympathetic, understand- 
ing counsel is given to all who need it; 
Dean Hunter's office, where you go for 
friendly advice on more things than 
grades; Miss Clemmie's office, where 
you may find out about self-help; the 
treasurer's office, where you will pay 
your bills, and the registrar's office. 
The printing room is also located on 
the first floor. The rest of the build- 
ing is devoted to classrooms, with the 
Art room and a small gymnasium for 
girls on the third floor. 

As we walk out of Anderson past 
the fountain, in front of us is the Book 
Store, where desk and study equip- 



Maryville College 



ment (except brains) can be boug-ht at 
reasonable prices. A branch of the 
United States Post Office is located in 
the Book Room. From here mail is de- 
livered to the dormitories and offices. 
Mail should be addressed: College Sta- 
tion, Maryville, Tenessee; with the ad- 
dition of the name of your dormitory 
and your room number. The Book 

Store supplies a loan library called the 
James R. Hills Library. In 1888 Miss 
Sarah B. Hills of New York contributed 
a fund for the establishment of a loan 
library to aid students in obtaining 
textbooks at a reasonable loan. 

To the left of the Book Store, about 
half a square up the walk, is Pea.rsons 
Hall, the large red brick building with 
the white columns, another dormitory 
for women. Most upperclassmen room 
in Pearsons while Memorial and Bald- 
win accommodate the sophomores and 
freshmen. On the first floor of Pear- 
sons is located the dining room where 
about six hundred of your classmates 
eat three times a day; and here's a 
hint: napkins are not provided so bring 
about half a dozen with your napkin 
holder. 

Behind Pearsons Hall to the left is 
the Ralph Max Lamar Hospital. A free 
clinic is held three times a week and in 
cases of slight illnesses no charge is 
made for nursing. However, for an ex- 
tended illness the patient pays $7 for 
room, food and laundry per week. 

On leaving Pearsons Hall we shall 
go to Thaw Hall, the newest and larg- 
est building on the Hill. Just before 
reaching Thaw glance to the left and 
you will see the Willard Memorial 
where President Lloyd lives. This me- 
morial was built through a generous 



"M" Handbook 



gift of Mrs. Jane F. Willard in memory 
of her husband. 

In Thaw Hall is located the Lamar 
Memorial Library which contains over 
30,000 books. The library is open 

twelve hours every day from Monday 
to Saturday. The museum is located in 
a room partitioned off the library to 
the left of the entrance. In this room 
are found collections of rare objects 
from Japan, Korea, and China; relics 
of the Indians who used to live in this 
region of Tennessee; antiquities from 
the Civil War; a model of our own col- 
lege when it was known as "The Log- 
College;" and many other interesting 
and valuable objects representative of 
the world around. 

On the second floor are located the 
offices of the Dean Emeritus, class- 
rooms, the Y. W. Auditorium and the Y. 
W. Reading Room. In the reading room 
are books of all types and magazines to 
suit every individual taste. The read- 
ing room is open throughout the day 
for the pleasure and the benefit of all 
girls who wish to take advantage of it. 

We now leave Thaw and take a short 
cut over to Bartlett and the swimming 
pool, passing to the left of Fayerweath- 
er Science Hall in which are located 
the chemistry, physics, biology, zoolo- 
gy, and home economics laboratories 
and lecture rooms. 

Bartlett Hall is one of the oldest Y. 
M. C. A. buildings in the South. It was 
completed in 1901, the brick being made 
by the students themselves under the 
leadership of Kin Takahashi, a Japan- 
ese student. In this building are con- 
tained the Y. M. C. A. Auditorium; Y 
Store, a small gymnasium, a room fit- 



Maryville College 



ted for playing- several games, includ- 
ing ping-pong and pocket billiards; 
and rooms for the officers of the "Y." 
The game room has been brought into 
existence during the past year, and has 
proved very popular. 

The swimming pool, where all the 
meets are held, is located in a sepa- 
rate building, to the left of Bartlett 
Hall. The pool itself is twenty-five by 
seventy-five feet. On school days 
women swim from 3 to 4 p. m.; men, 
from 4 to 5 p. m. 

Behind Bartlett is the Alumni Gym- 
nasium, one hundred ten feet square, 
equipped with a maple floor and col- 
lapsible bleachers. 

As we walk out past the swimming 
pool, and into the college woods, we 
come to the "House in the Woods," 
where the college pastor and his wife, 
Dr. and Mrs. William P. Stevenson, 
live. It is a beautiful English style 
red brick house, where all students are 
cordially welcome at all times. 



Students: — 

Be sure to remember when figuring 
the amount of cash you will need to see 
you through college for the year, you 
should include the cost of the follow- 
ing: 

Club Dues Class Dues 

$4.00 for an Annual 

These are necessities, not luxuries. 



'M" Handbook 



BOOK III 

Y. M. C. A. 

and 
Y. W. C. A. 



Maryville College 



MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT 
OF THE Y. M. C. A. 

FELLOWS: 

To every freshman and new student 
who is g-oing- to be with us this year 
we extend the right hand of Christian 
fellowship. I want you to know that 
the old men, and especially the "Y" 
men, are very much interested in you, 
and wish to do everything- possible to 
make you feel at home when you come 
among' us. So, in behalf of our asso- 
ciation, I welcome you one and all. 

I realize that you will have a host 
of perplexing problems arising after 
you reach the campus, and the Y. M. 
C. A. officers and cabinet will be only 
too glad to give you friendly advice or 
help you in any way possible. Do not 
hesitate at any time to come over to 
the Y. M. C. A. building for a chat, or 
stop any of the "Y" men on the carnpus 
as you seek information. 

My earnest desire is that our Y. M 
C. A. will mean something to you from 
the first days you are on the campus 
until you are ready to leave. I feel 
sure that the friendships you form 
while on the campus will be of lasting 
value to you, and there is no better 
way to seek friends than through your 
"Y" activities. I hope that your stay 
at Maryville College will be a period 
of character enrichment, and that you 
may enter into a deeper and fuller fel- 
lowship in Christ Jesus. 

In just a few days, fellows, we shall 
meet each other. Until then I shall be 
waiting expectantly. 
Sincerely, 
RALPH TEFFETELLER, 

President "Y." - 



'M" Handbook 



Y. M. C. A. 

Short History of the Association 

The Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion, Wke all great organizations, had 
its orig-in in one man. Sir Georg-e Wil- 
liams of London, Eng-land. He was a 
poor lad, who worked in a drapery 
establishment in the city of London, 
but M^ho found time to speak a word 
for his Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. 
Feeling- the deep need for daily prayer 
and spiritual uplift, he called tog-ether 
a number of his companions, and each 
morning- they held a prayer meeting in 
an upper room of that establishment. 
Their g-roup kept g-rowing- and soon 
they had quite a following-. From this 
g-roup g-rew what is today known as the 
foremost organization for the carrying- 
of the Gospel of Jesus Christ to young- 
men throug-hout the world, the Young- 
Men's Christian Association. Ever 
since that date, 1844, this Association 
has continued to g-row, until today it 
encircles the g-lobe; bring-ing- tog-ether 
young- men and boys into a brotherhood 
that keeps alive the spirit of Christ. 

The Student Young- Men's Christian 
Association, of which we are a part, is 
one of the many branches of this great 
org-anization, and it works for the up- 
lift and welfare of the young- men in 
colleg-es throug-hout the world. Its 

membership runs into the thousands, 
and other associations are being- 
formed every year. Most associations 
have secretaries to head up the work, 
but the students of the colleges are the 
chief promoters and workers in the as- 
sociations. They are student organiza- 
tions, and it is the duty and privilege 
of every student to back them in the 
best way possible. 



Maryville College 



Purpose 

The purpose of the Young Men's 
Christian Association is to develop the 
threefold man: spirit, mind, and body. 
And in its work on Colleg-e Hill these 
phases of its prog-ram are stressed. 
Scope of Work 

The Y. M. C. A. of Maryville is a 
live and active org-anization. It seeks 
to serve the students at the colleg-e in 
every way possible not limiting- its ac- 
tivities to strictly religious matters. We 
realize that if we accomplish the g-reat 
aim of the Y. M. C. A. "a clean mind in 
a sound body," that we will have pro- 
g-ressed a long- way on the road to re- 
ligious salvation. The cabinet of the 
Y is made up of the most congenial 
and most representative of the Mary- 
ville students. They are always glad 
to oblige you in any way they can. 
Don't get the idea that the Y is a stag- 
nant, lifeless, inactive organization at 
Maryville, but a live, growing, healthy 
organization in whose activities you 
are urged to take part, enjoy and derive 
benefit from. Don't hesitate to call on 
the secretary when there is something 
you want to know. If there is some- 
thing you want done ask him to do it. 
He is glad and willing to help you. The 
"Y" is yours. Get in the habit of tak- 
ing part in its activities and in coming 
to its meetings — you will never regret 
it. 



Christ is walking life's shores again! 
Christ is choosing his fishermen. 

With nets far spread for their haul- 
ing. 
Christ looks in at the office door! 
Christ is searching mill and store — 

It's you! It's you, He's calling. 



'M" Handbook 29 



Y. M. C. A. ADMINISTRATION 

Officers 

President Ralph B. Teffeteller 

Vice-President Alexander Duff 

Secretary Robert Overly 

Treasurer William Peacock 

Cabinet 

Athletics Clarence Bratschie 

David McArthur 

Social Activities Lawrence Somers 

Lyceum Course Donald Brig-gs 

Aubrey Bradshaw 

Music William Hannah 

Publicity Winn Barr 

New Students John Hendry 

Floyd Waters 

Gospel Teams Harry Wood 

World Fellowship Junius Allison 

Hi-Y Work Arthur Courtnay 

John Smerznak 

Advisory Board 

Class of 1932 

Dr. G. A. Knapp Dr. H. E. Orr 

Homer E. McCann 

Class of 1933 

Dr. R. W. Lloyd Dr. J. H. McMurray 

Benjamin Groves 

Class of 1934 

Dr. E. R. Hunter Prof. V. M. Queener 

Richard Orr 



Maryville College 



MESSAGE FRGTil THE PRESIDENT 
OF THE Y. W. C. A. 

Perhaps the big-g-est question in your 
mind just now as the opening of school 
draws near, is tliis: "What is Mary- 
ville like?" And perhaps you are just 
a little bit troubled at the thought of 
coming to a strange place. Please 
don't be. Y. W. is anxious to have 
each one of you as a friend and help- 
mate and I want to take this opportu- 
nity to bid you welcome and tell you 
that we are counting the minutes until 
we can say, "Howdy, friend!" 

"What is Maryville like?" Maryville 
carries out its name. It is a group 
which is merry. And we want you to 
come be merry with us. As you face 
this year, may it give you happiness, 
but also may it give you a deeper un- 
derstanding of human nature, a broad- 
er conception of life, and a larger ca- 
pacity for service. 

MERLE BEEBE, 
President of Y. W. C. A. 



^M" Handbook 31 



Y. W. C. A. 
Activities 

One of the strongest org-anizations on 
the Hill is the Young Women's Chris- 
tian Association. It functions from 
the week end before school begins in 
the fall until the last day of school in 
the spring. 

Before the freshmen arrive at Mary- 
ville, plans are being made by the Y. 
W. C. A. for making their life more 
pleasant, and to help them to get ac- 
quainted with their new environment. 
For this the big sister movement is 
carried out, whereby every new girl has 
an old girl as her "big sister," who cor- 
responds with her during the summer, 
meets her at the train, helps her to get 
settled, and is a big sister to her in 
every way possible. In this way new 
girls will feel that they have a friend 
as soon as they arrive. 

Perhaps the biggest feature of Y. W 
C. A. is the Sunday meetings. They 
begin the first Sunday afternoon and 
last all through the year. Programs 
are prepared which will give the girls 
opportunities for worship together and 
discussion of topics of interest. 

Joint meetings with the Y. M. C. A. 
are held at various times during the 
year. There is always excellent coop- 
eration between the two organizations 
and working together thus they are 
able to accomplish great things. 

The Y. W. sponsors many activities 
among which are aiding the Y. M. in 
the Lyceum Programs, the May Day, 
Circus, Carols at Christmas and Eas- 
ter. Nu Gamma Sigma, the orphanage 
and mission work. "With all of these 
you cannot fail to realize the impor- 
tance of the Y. W. C. A. 



Maryville College 



Nu Gainiiia Sigma 

The Nu Gamma Sigma stands for 
New Girls Society and that is just what 
it is. All the new girls are divided 
into groups of ten with an old girl as 
leader. These groups meet once a week 
during the first few weeks of school. 
You see the purpose of Nu Gamma is 
to make the new girls acquainted with 
college life. You will find yourselves 
in a strange and new environment and 
naturally you will have problems and 
questions. In the meetings of these 
groups your problems will be discussed 
and a solution will be found. 

You will form some beautiful friend- 
ships among the other new girls, as you 
hike together, chat together, and solve 
your problems. You will seem like 
sisters in one big family. The mother 
of the Nu Gamma Sigma is the Y. W. 
C. A., who is constantly planning new 
ways and means to make her daughters 
happy. This is the way we spell 6ur 
name: 

N-ewness in thought. 

U-sefulness. 

G-ood fellowship. 

A-ction. 

M-aternal love. 

M-astery of problems. 

A-ttractive ideas. 

The Y. W. Reading Room 

The Y. W. C. A. has set aside this 
room on the second floor of Thaw Hall 
where all girls may go at any time to 
read or rest or study. The room was 
redecorated last year, and the already 
comfortable atmosphere created by 
lounges, tables, magazines, and books 
was increased by the installation of a 
radio. Girls, this is your room; make 
the most of it. 



'M" Handbook 



Y. W. C. A. ADMIMSTRATIOX 

Officers 

I'resident Merle Beebe 

Vice-President Pat Henry 

Secretary Barbara Lyle 

Treasurer Betty Wilbar 

Cabinet 

Programs Naomi Willing-ham 

Nathalia Wright 

Music Ann Smartt 

Ellen Macrae 

Lyceum Virginia Crider 

Assistant Dorothea Thomsen 

Benefit Louise Avery 

Social Chairman Alma Schoeller 

Mildred McKenzie 

Athletics Iva Babcock 

Devotions PLUth Guthrie 

World Fellowship. . .Mary Ella Spenser 
Social Service: 

Orphanage Ruth Brocious 

Marie Schroerluke 

Missions Willimae Renegar 

Publicity Laura Jean Workizer 

Librarian Mary Swasick 

Y Store Georga Burk 

Assistant Mattie Sue McClure 

Building Secretary and Treasurer 

Mildred Purviance 

Advi.sory Board 

Mrs. Lloyd Miss Bassett 

Dr. Knapp Dr. McMurray 

Miss Hudson Mrs. Worley 

Mrs. McMurray 



Maeyville College 



TO THE WOMEN 

What is it like at Maryville? What 
shall I take with me? These are just 
a few of the questions that are enter- 
ing the minds of the prospective wom- 
en students and it is to you that we 
are writing- this message of what to 
bring and what to do. 

To begin with, the dormitory rooms 
are furnished with a study table, two 
chairs, a dresser, a small table, and 
either a double decker or two single 
beds. These few things, plus curtains, 
dresser scarfs, pillows, bed spreads, 
blankets, sheets, pennants, pictures, 
and other similar necessities and novel- 
ties of your own bringing, will make 
up a very attractive room. 

As for clothes, make most of them 
suitable for general school wear, be- 
cause this kind of clothing is worn 
here more than any other style. How- 
ever, you will want an evening dress 
for various social functions, and for 
the presentations, plays, Lyceum num- 
bers, and recitals that are given in the 
Chapel throughout the year. Be sure 
to bring" a swimming suit, and also a 
pair of knickers or riding breeches for 
hiking and other outdoor sports. 

We have study hour every night but 
Saturday, and then, after literary soci- 
ety meetings, we have our feeds and 
other informalities, so don't forget to 
pack a few old dishes, spoons, knives, 
a can opener, and other utensils for 
domestic purposes. 

There is a limit, naturally, upon the 
nujnber of times that you may go to 
the show or to town, but as a rule 
these regulations don't bother Mary- 
ville girls, for if you are athletic, you 



"M" Hanprook 



may swim or play tennis, or if you are 
more "serious-minded" there is the li- 
brary of the Y. W. C. A. Reading 
Room. We want you to avoid lopsided 
development and to enter heartily into 
every phase of college life and activ- 
ity. This is the simplest yet most ef- 
fective treatment for any unbidden 
pang of loneliness or homesickness. 

We hope you will feel always that 
there is waiting for you a kindly word 
from everyone on the campus. Inas- 
much as we may not know just when 
there is the desire or a need, we trust 
you will never hesitate to take the 
initiative in any matter of advice or 
opinion. 

With all the welcomes and greet- 
ings to you in this book different 
things are being offered to you. Per- 
haps one message, in a last paragraph, 
should ask something from you. You 
are coming to the college founded by 
a man whose guiding principle was to 
"do the greatest possible good on the 
largest possible scale." What this col- 
lege, founded on that principle, will 
be after you leave it, depends upon 
what principles you will live by while 
here, for colleges, after all, are living 
things only inasmuch as the students 
who attend them are vitally alive. \Ve 
ask you — we challenge you — to iden- 
tify your lives with the needs of Mary- 
ville College. Do not be in haste to 
discard the ideals and standards w^iich 
you bring with you to college, and 
above all, strive to follow the princi- 
ples which inspired the lives of the 
Maryville pioneers, who were them- 
selves followers of the Great Leader. 



36 Maryville College 



EACH IN HIS OWN TONGUE 

A fire mist and a planet, 

A crystal and a cell, 
A jelly-fish and a saurian, 

And caves where cave-men dwell; 
Then a sense of law and beauty 

And a face turned from the clod — 
Some call it Evolution, 

And others call it God. 

A haze on the far horizon, 

The infinite, tender sky, 
The ripe rich tint of the cornfields. 

And the wild geese sailing high — 
And all over upland and lowland 

The charm of the golden-rod — 
Some of us call it Autumn 

And others call it God. 

liike tides on a crescent sea-beach 

When the moon is new and thin, , 
Into our hearts high yearnings 

Come welling and surging in — ■ ' 

Come from the mystic ocean. 

Whose rim no foot has trod, — 
Some of us call it Longing, 

And others call it God. 

A picket frozen on duty, 

A mother starved for her brood, 
Socrates drinking the hemlock, 

And Jesus on the rood; 
And millions who, humble and name- 
less. 

The straight, hard pathway plod, — 
Some call it consecration. 

And others call it God. 

— William Herbert Carruth. 



"M" Handbook 37 



BOOK IV 



ACTIVITIES 

and 

PUBLICATIONS 



38 Mapyville College 



ACTIVITIES 

Let us call everything, outside of 
one's classroom work and studying, ac- 
tivities. Into \vhat activities are you 
going- to enter? 

The essentials for engaging in an 
activity are: First, the wish and will; 
second, the ability. Therefore, the 

first question you will ask yourself 
after you have read about the vari- 
ous possibilities will be, "What do I 
want to do?" 

After you have listed the things you 
would like to do, there comes the ques- 
tion, "Which of these am I able to 
do?" To be more definite let us con- 
sider, first, the previous training re- 
quired, and the preparation you have 
had; and second, the amount of time 
required, and the amount you can 
spare. 

Of course, a great deal of your in- 
formation must be gained after your 
arrival. A true perspective of such a 
situation can not be gained very easily 
without personal contact. However, 
learn as much as you can before you 
reach Maryville. 

There are two extremities. One may 
attempt to do everything, or attempt to 
do nothing. If one attempts to do 
everything, he will probably do every- 
thing, including his studies, very 
poorly. If one does nothing outside 
of his studies, he is missing more than 
he can realize. 

Maryville is anxiously awaiting you, 
expecting you to carry on. In guiding 
the helm of that good ship, all your 
own, My College Life, remember to 
keep it out of both rapids and stag- 
nant water, and to keep your compass 
true. THE EDITOR. 



"M" Handbook 



OPEIVING SOCIAL EVENTS 

The social life at Maryville is well 
provided for and no matter what your 
disposition is, there are occasions you 
will like. These opening entertain- 
ments will carry you over the time of 
newness and afford oportunity for get- 
ting- acquainted with your fellow stu- 
dents and to get the first glimpse of 
the true Maryville spirit. 

The Y. W. C. A. gives her reception 
in Ihe Alumni Gymnasium on the first 
Saturday night you spend at Mary- 
ville. This year we are going to have — 
???!! Better come and find out. 

The Y. M. C. A. entertains the new 
men at the same time on Saturday 
night with a well-planned, varied pro- 
gram which furnishes plenty of thrills. 
The reception is held out in the woods, 
in the dark of the moon, and light is 
supplied from the old stump which is 
sacrificed for the occasion. Don't for- 
get: your first Saturday night at 8:00 
o'clock. 

In the afternoon on Saturday the 
Faculty of the College holds a recep- 
tion to greet the newcomers and to 
renew acquaintances with old students. 
Take this opportunity to become ac- 
quainted with the faculty who are your 
friends as well as your instructors. 

The literary societies hold their open- 
ing social entertainments soon after 
school opens. Each women's literary 
society holds an individual rush week 
and all new girls are cordially invited 
to attend these special programs. The 
men's societies, Athenian and Alpha 
Sigma, usually hold their receptions 
in their respective halls where the new 
men are introduced to a society pro- 
gram and a society "feed." 



Maryville College 



REGULAR SOCIAL, ACTIVITIES 



"As You Like It" 

For many years Maryville has been 
searching, with a rather small degree 
of success, for a new sort of social 
device. The regular meetings and en- 
tertainments of the various societies 
were held as usual, but, as in the life 
of all schools, something else was 
needed. 

As every one knows, it is easy to 
do away with a thing, but the real 
job comes in finding soniething to 
take its place. The Student Council 
faced this situation and met it squarely, 
with the new device, "As You Like 
It." 

Once a month an evening of enjoy- 
ment is held in Thaw Hall. Each per- 
son spends half of the evening on ,the 
first floor and half on the secod. The 
Library on the first floor is converted 
into a large game room. Here you may 
play ping-pong, checkers, chess, rook, 
bunco, and other games. On the sec- 
ond floor is the Y. W. C. A. auditoriuin 
in which there is a small stage. In this 
room the main entertainment of the 
evening is enjoyed. Short movie reels 
are shown; vaudeville sketches are pre- 
sented, and all enter into the hearty 
fellowship by singing popular songs, 
under able leadership. At the end of 
the program, the evening is perfectly 
ended with refreshments. 

We hope that they will be "As You 
Like It," and if they aren't, we shall, 
with your help, try to make them that 
way. 



'M" HANnBOOK 



Mouiitain Hikes 

Two of the most enjoyable social 
events of the year are the fall and 
spring- mountain hikes. Usually a train 
is chartered for the trip, and a whole 
day is spent in the Smoky Mountains, 
a few miles from the colleg-e. On the 
spring- hike last year several trucks 
■ were hired and used for transporta- 
tion. In this way the various g-roups 
could go to several points, taking their 
own choice, and not necessarily all go- 
ing to the same place. It is probable 
that trucks will be used hereafter. 
"31oonsliiiiins-" 

Moonshining in Maryville is not 
what it is at other places. This name 
is applied to the art of enjoying, or 
enduring, the company of a member 
of the opposite sex. Last year the 
rules were radically changed. The 
new system, the Honor Rank Sys- 
tem for Girls, is complicated in de- 
tail, but in practice is very simple. It 
arranges the privileges according to 
the class of which the girl is a mem- 
ber, providing she is in good standing. 
The organization of the privileges was 
made upon ten ba.ses: the Christian 
character of the College, the maturity 
of the college student, the positive 
standpoint, the treatment of the essen- 
tial rather than the non-essential, the 
making of a fe-w rules which will be 
enforced, the treatment of general con- 
ditions rather than isolated situations, 
the normal relationships between the 
sexes, avoiding nagging, the trusting of 
individuals and establishing rules 
which have a reasonable chance for 
enforcement. 

Moonshining is a privilege, make the 
most of it. 



Maeyville College 



JOINT ACTIVITIES OF Y. M. C. A. 
AND Y. W. C. A. 



liyceum 

Each year as a part of the varied 
activities sponsored by the Ys, a pro- 
gram of four lyceum numbers is pre- 
sented in the chapel. These numbers 
are cliosen from the Redpath Chau-' 
tauqua and the Bureau of Fine Arts, 
and are very entertaining to and "well 
received by the students. The cost is 
included in your student's activity fee 
paid with your semester bills, so that 
you may enjoy all four numbers with- 
out having to worry about the admis- 
sion. 

This year we will have four numbers. 
They are evenly distributed through- 
out the year and are composed of the 
best entertainers, both musical and 
otherwise, that can be obtained. Be 
sure to get your ticket when you .pay 
your bills. 

Fred Hope Fund 

Every spring we have a "Fred Hope 
Drive" for the purpose of supporting 
the work of Fred Hope, a former grad- 
uate of Maryville, who is in charge of 
a mission school in Africa. Every 
year the student body and faculty make 
voluntary contributions to the total of 
one thousand dollars or over for this 
worthy cause. 

Sunday Meetings 

Every Sunday afternoon throughout 
the year, the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. 
C. A. have their devotional meetings. 
Usually these organizations meet sep- 
arately, but at various times joint 
meetings are held. Members of botn 
prganizations help in conducting the 



'M" Handbook 43 



meeting's. Interesting' programs are 
presented, and, occasionally, discussion 
groups are conducted. 

Blue Ridge 

Each summer, after commencement, 
representatives from the college go to 
Blue Ridge, N. C, to attend the con- 
ference of all the southern college Y. 
M. C. A.s and Y. W. C. A.s. The time 
at this conference is spent in listening 
to addresses given by prominent lead- 
ers in America and foreign fields; in 
studying religious and social problems 
of the day, and in enjoying the recrea- 
tion afforded by the conference ac- 
commodations. 

Blue Ridge is located in one of the 
most beautiful parts of the Blue Ridge 
Mountains, sixteen miles east of Ashe- 
ville, and has the finest conference 
grounds in the South. Next year we 
want a large delegation to represent 
Maryville, and perhaps there will be 
an opportunity for you to go. 

Circus 

The annual Y. W.-Y. M. Circus is held 
each spring, at which time regular cir- 
cus acts, side shows, and other side- 
lights of a real circus are presented. 
A loving cup is given to the society 
presenting the best side-show. This 
is the second consecutive year in which 
Bainonian has won the cup, and ac- 
cording to the controlling regulations, 
this society now gains its permanent 
possession. Last year the Circus was 
just like Barnum's! — "Bigger and Bet- 
ter Than Ever!" It takes a great deal 
of work, but it is well worth while. 
Let's make it the "Biggest and Best" 
this year! 



Maryville College 



PUBLICATIONS 



The Chilho^vean 

Have you seen last year's Chilhowean 
— the college annual? It is a hand- 
some book, beautifully bound, contain- 
ing individual pictures of most of the 
students. It is a pictorial study of 
the preceding- year, published by the 
Junior Class, and is sold for $4.00. A 
copy is well worth having, both for 
the "present and for the future. Marga- 
ret Melody is editor, and Andrew New- 
comer is business manager for the 1932 
edition. 

The Highland Echo 

The Highland Echo is the weekly 
publication of Maryville College. It 
is a four-page, six-column paper to 
which each student subscribes when 
he pays his bills. The Echo is con- 
ducted after the fashion of larger news- 
papers, carrying athletic reports, edi- 
torials, news items, and other articles 
of interest to the students. Through 
this publication the students are en- 
abled to keep in touch with all tlie ac- 
tivities of the Hill. The editor-in-chief 
for the coming year is Weldon Hina, 
and the business manager is Alexander 
Jones. 

The "31" Handbook 

The "M" Handbook, usually called 
the "M" Book, is the little book you 
have in your hand. It is published by 
the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. in an 
effort to help give the new student 
as much information as possible. The 
staff this year includes Donald Briggs, 
editor; Nathalia Wright, associate edi- 
tor; Benjamin Groves, business man- 
ager. 



'M" Handbook 



STUDKNT COl NCIL 

The Student Council is organized for 
the purpose of furnishing a represen- 
tative body of students, who, by virtue 
of tlieir position and influence in stu- 
dent affairs, shall be able to express 
the sentiment of the student body. They 
cooperate with the Faculty in main- 
taining Maryville College ideals, and 
strive to put into execution such pro- 
posals as shall be for the best welfare 
of the school. 

The Council is composed of eight sen- 
iors, six juniors, four sophomores and 
four freshmen. Any student may con- 
fer with his representative and pre- 
sent any matter which he thinks would 
be for the advancement of the student 
body. 

The Student Council is not student 
government, but it seeks to summa- 
rize student opinion and to work with 
the Faculty in promoting desirable 
measures, and in preventing actions 
which are detriinental to the college. 

A committee appointed by the Presi- 
dent from the members of the council 
is the student part of the committee on 
selection for the Hi.uiiland Echo staff. 

A new standing organization, the 
Student-Faculty Committee, started its 
work last year. It meets in collabo- 
ration with a Faculty committee. In 
these meetings many problems are dis- 
cussed, and both student and Faculty 
ideas on the same subject can be easily 
realized and understood. The commit- 
tee makes for better understanding be- 
tween the two groups. 



46 Marvville College 



LITERARY SOCIETIES 

There are four literary societies on 
the Hill. The men's societies are the 
Athenian and Alpha Sigma. The wom- 
en's are Bainonian and Theta Epsilon. 
Athenian and Bainonian are brother 
and sister societies, as are Alpha Sig- 
ma and Theta Epsilon. 

The women's societies each have a 
rush week at the beginning- of the 
year. At the end of this time each new 
woman decides which society she will 
join. The men's societies have their 
first meeting on the same night, and 
ea<;h throws a big feed at that time. 
Each new man usually visits both so- 
cieties, and then joins the one of his 
choice. 

Each of the societies meets in its re- 
spective hall on every Saturday eve- 
ning. A short program of either, or 
both, literary and musical nature is 
enjoyed. Once each semester jqint 
meetings are held, when brother and 
sister societies join for a good social 
time. 

Every year each of the societies, 
with the help of its brother or sister 
society, presents a three or four-act 
play. A cup is presented by our Theta 
Alpha Phi Chapter for the best mid- 
winter, as it is called, of the year. 
Athenian won the cup this past year 
with "Shavings." Bainonian had won 
it the two years before. A society win- 
ning the cup three years in succession 
gains permanent possession. 

There is a great deal of fellowship 
and fun within the societies and a 
fine spirit among them. 

You just can't afford not to belong 
to a society. Come and join. 



'M" Handbook 



3IUS1CAL ORGANIZATIONS 

The Maryville Glee Singers are well 
known throughout East Tennessee. 
Last year the club was composed of 
twenty voices. About thirty are picked 
at the first tryout early in the fall, 
and later, after some weeks of prac- 
tice, a second tryout is held and twenty 
are retained. The Club presents an 
annual home concert and, last year, it 
broadcast from Knoxville. A member 
receives fine training- in singing all 
types of music for men's chorus ^w^ork. 
If you like to sing, don't neglect to 
try out. Robert Overly is P'-esident 
and Hubert Duncan is business man- 
ager for this year. 

Women's Glee Club 

The Women's Glee Club is a real in- 
stitution on College Hill. Tryouts are 
held in the fall. The regular number 
of members is eighteen, since most of 
the music is in three-part harmony. 
Last year a most artistic home concert 
was presented. Besides the regular 
chorus numbers, there were solos, du- 
ets, trios and tableaux. The club also 
gave a program in Maryville, as well 
as a half-hour's entertainment over 
the Knoxville broadcasting station. 
New girls, we are hoping that a large 
number of you will try out. The offi- 
cers for this year are: Ann Smartt, 
president, and Mildred Purviance, busi- 
ness manager. 

Vesper Choir 

The Vesper Choir, directed by Miss 
Frances Henry, is composed of 'forty- 
four of the best male and female voices 
in the College. The choir sings at the 
Vesper service every Sunday nig'ht, pre- 



48 Maryville College 

sents cantatas at Eastez* and Christ- 
mas time, and gives special programs 
on other occasions throughout the 
year. 

Orchestra 

The Maryville College orchestra was 
composed of twenty-four members last 
year, and is under the direction of Miss 
Mildred Butcher. Programs are given 
on frequent occasions, and last year 
the annual spring concert was sup- 
ported by a newly organized college 
chorus. 

Apart from the orchestra an eight- 
piece stringed ensemble is conducted, 
whose members usually belong also to 
the orchestra. 

Band 

The band is composed of the men of 
the college who can play band instru- 
ments, and is under the directioji of 
Miss Mildred Butcher. This organi- 
zation furnishes music for games and 
pep meetings. If you have been in 
your high school band or can play any 
kind of band instrument, Maryville will 
be glad to have you try out for her 
band. 



'M" Handbook 



NATIONAL HONORARY 
FRATERNITIES 



Pi Kappa Delta 

]MaryviIle has the distinction of Hav- 
ing- the Tennessee Alpha chaptei- of the 
National Honorary Forensic Fraternity 
Pi Kappa Delta. This organization 
proves a great inspiration for those in- 
terested in any phase of forensics and 
membership in it is a coveted honor. 

Theta Alpha Phi 

The Tennessee Delta chaptei' of the 
national honorary dramatic fraternity, 
Theta Alpha Phi, is located at Mary- 
ville, and is composed of the talented 
students in dramatics. After a stu- 
dent has met the rigid requirements 
for membership he is initiated into the 
fraternity, and becomes a permanent 
member. Seven new members were 
taken in this year. 

Sigma Delta Psi 

The Maryville chapter of Sigma Delta 
Psi, the national athletic fraternity, 
was established during the year 1930. 
Membership is open to all male stu- 
dents of the college "who maintain sat- 
isfactory scholarship and command 
the respect of their associates as ath- 
letes and gentlemen." Such member- 
ship is earned through meeting the 
standard requirements of the various 
athletic tests in the presence of a re- 
sponsible committee. 

According to the constitution of Sig- 
ma Delta Psi, the object of the society 
shall be the encouragement of the 
moral, physical, and mental develop- 
ment and training am.ong college stu- 
dents. 



Maryville College 



CLUBS 

Writers' Workshop 

The Writers' Workshop is composed 
of various faculty members, juniors, 
and seniors who are elected to mem- 
bership on the basis of literary abil- 
ity. Each member submits two papers 
a year for criticism, both adverse and 
constructive. Meeting-s are held every 
Wednesday in the Y. W. Reading Room. 
All the work is filed in the library, 
and can be read by anyone who desires 
to do so. 

Chemistry Club 

The Chemistry Club is composed of 
students who are taking- more than one 
year of college chemistry. Papers and 
lectures are given on the chemical 
problems of the day by the students 
and professors of the department. 
Pre-Medical Club 

The Pre-Medical Club, composed' of 
students who are preparing themselves 
to practice medicine, is organized for 
the purpose of better understanding 
the problems and interests of the med- 
ical profession. About twenty-five 
students belong to the organization. 
Home Economics Club 

The Home Economics Club is coin- 
posed of the girls who are majoring in 
Home Economics. Meetings are held 
each week, and many interesting proj- 
ects are carried on during the year. 
Laii^ua^e Clubs 

A French Club and a Spanish Club 
are organized for those students who 
are interested in learning more about 
these languages. Meetings are held 
twice a month, at which time French 



'M" HANnpnoK 



or Spanish is spoken exclusively 
throug-h the entire meeting'. Plays are 
presented and interesting" programs are 
g'iven throug-hout the year. 

Law Club 

Say, fellows, are you interested in 
la^w? Well, then, come around to our 
meeting's. The purpose of the Law Club 
is to help its members to familiarize 
themselves with the features of their 
contemplated life work, and to devel- 
op hig-h moral standards in connection 
with their profession. The programs 
consist, for the most part, of mock 
trials, parliamentary drill, and lectures 
on various phases of law. 

Ministerial Association 

This association is composed of all 
men "who are expecting- to choose for 
their life work the Gospel Ministry. 
Its prog-rams are made up only of that 
"Which is of the hig-hest relig-ious and 
literary value. Opportunities for per- 
sonal work are numerous, either in the 
mission, jail or in the rural district 
churches. The association invites all 
who expect to enter the ministry to 
join hands in a better understanding- of 
the Gospel. 

Student Volunteer Band 

The Colleg-e has, from its earliest his- 
tory, been identified with foreign mis- 
sions, and has sent out one hundred 
and ten missionaries into seventeen 
foreig-n countries. Since 1894, the stu- 
dents have maintained a Student Vol- 
unteer Band, composed of those who 
are pledg-ed to enter some foreig-n field, 
if the way be open. The Band meets 
every Monday at 4:45 m the Y. W. 



Maryville College 



Auditorium to !^tudy missionary fields 
and conditions. 

Art Club 

The Art Club is composed of about 
fifteen members of the college -who 
are talented in different phases of 
art. AVork is carried on throughout 
the year, and during- the week of 
Commencement an exhibit of the work 
accomplished during that year is held 
in Anderson Hall. 

State Clubs 

"We have thirty different states rep- 
resented at Maryville, so naturally the 
students from the "home state" should 
group together and form state clubs. 
The primary purpose of those clubs is 
the furthering of good spirit and 
friendship of those who are from tlie 
same section of the United States. 

Hi-Trail Club 

To become a member of this club 
one must have at least one hundred 
miles of hiking experience, and then 
must be unanimously elected by the 
members. 



'M" Handbook 



BOOK V 



ATHLETICS 



Mafyville ("ollece 



ATHI.KTICS 



Maryville is represented by teams in 
every major colleg-e sport, and ranks 
with the best in this section of the 
country. The administrative control 
of athletics is centered in the Athletic 
Association. 

With lu. S. Honal^er and "Bob" 
Tlirower as coaches of Maryville ath- 
letics, and hard-fighting" teams com- 
posed of loyal men, it is no wonder that 
liie Athletic Association has made such 
a stride forward daring the last two 
years. A ne^v day has dawned for 
Maryville in athletics because she has 
two live coaches, plenty of good mate- 
rial, added equipment, and a splendid 
field. 

Football 

Football at Maryville is an institu- 
tion. Its purpose is not only to win 
games but to make men — winning men. 
Maryville has the reputation of having 
one of the best conditioned teams in 
this section, and the past football sea- 
son was a success from the standpoint 
of games won and lost, as well as from 
that of training men successfully. 

This year the team had a very heavy 
schedule, playing Mars Hill, Univ. of 
Tennessee, Tennessee A^^esleyan, Uni- 
versity of Kentucky, Emory-Henry, 
Carson Newman, Milligan, and Lenoir 
Rhyne. Coach Honaker has a good 
right to have high hopes for this year. 
He will have some fine material. 



"M" Handbook 



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Ba»iketball 

Basketball at Maryville, as at other 
Southern colleges, is the leading winter 
sport. The season V^egins early in De- 
cember and lasts until about the middle 
of March. During the past season Mary- 
ville won games from the best teams 
of the entire section. And with a num- 
ber of letter men back for next year, 
around whom Coach Honaker will build 
his team, Maryville is expected to have 
one of the best teams in the history 
of the college. 

Baseball 

Maryville perhaps excels more in 
baseball than in any other sport. Al- 
though she does not encourage profes- 
sional ball, yet there are some ten or 
twelve former Maryville baseball play- 
ers in the major leagues. Among these 
are such men as John Stone and 
"Speedy" Ruble, of the Detroit Tigers. 

Freshmen, if you can play baseball 
come out and prove what you can do. 

Track 

Track and field sports are just begin- 
ning to take their rightful place in 
Southern college athletics and at Mary- 
ville there is a very noticeable incline 
in interest for this branch of sport. 
There is always a large group of cin- 
der path artists who aspire to Mary- 
ville's winged honors and last season 
(this spring) a large number were 
awarded the winged "M." Track is 
really coming into its own at Maryville 
so just watch us show our heel to 'em 
next spring. If any of you fellows are 
good track men or think you are, look 
up Coach "Bob" Thrower. 



"M" Handbook 




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Maryville College 



Tennis 

Although it is classified as a minor 
sport, tennis is very popular at Mary- 
ville. This past season our team rated 
as one of the best college teams in the 
South. They lost only one match on 
their schedule, which included the U. 
of Chattanooga, Howard, U. of Ala- 
bama, Birmingham Southern, Middle 
Tennessee Teachers, and Centre Col- 
lege. This year should be a banner 
year in tennis. 

Wrestling 

Wrestling has come to the front rap- 
idly. Last year our team had four 
meets, and it boasted of having a 
Southern champion in its midst. Our 
mat men are raring to go, and ready 
to make new conquests. 

"Y" Athletics 

"Every man in some phase of the 
'Y' athletic program," is the wi&h of 
the Y. M. C. A. And it is possible, for 
the "Y" athletic program covers every 
phase of sport: In the fall, the annual 
cross-country races and interclass 
football; in the spring, interclass base- 
ball, interclass track meets, basketball, 
wrestling, boxing, tennis, and horse- 
shoe tournaments. The gymnasium it- 
self is equipped with mats, horses, par- 
allel bars and other gymnastic appa- 
ratus. 

The Y. M. C. A. interclass track 
meet held in the spring, is a feature 
of the entire athletic program. Bronze 
and gold medals are given to the win- 
ners in each event. 

Get into some form of athletics and 
keep yourself fit. You will derive a 
great deal of pleasure from j^our ath- 
letic competition. 



'M" Handbook 59 



CONSTITUTION OF MARYVILLE 

COLLEGE ATHLETIC 

ASSOCIATION 



ARTICLE VII 

2. The football "M" shall be an eight- 
inch block "M," the basketball "M" 

a. Members of the varsity football 
team who have played fifteen quarters. 
b. Members of the varsity baseball 
team who have played as much as five 
innings per game in one-half of the 
scheduled games; or a baseball pitcher 
who has pitched forty-five innings in 
scheduled games. c. Members of the 
varsity basketball team who have 
played one-half a game in each of the 
scheduled games, d. Members of the 
varsity track team winning first place 
in a dual meet, or in any other meet 
where three or more colleges are com- 
peting, e. Members of the varsity ten- 
nis team playing in one-half the tour- 
naments of the year. 

2. The football "M" shall be an eight- 
inch block "M," the basketball "M" 
a six-inch block "M" ; the girls' basket- 
ball "M" a five-inch block "M" with 
wings attached, the tennis "M" shall 
be a script "M" ; a standard four-inch 
block "M" shall be awarded to point 
winners in the minor sports. 

3. All members of the second foot- 
ball, baseball, or basketball teams may 
wear the Maryville Monogram. 

4. No other students shall wear 
either the "M" or Maryville Monogram. 



Any letter or monogram won by a 
student at another school must not be 
worn while the student is enrolled at 
Maryville. 



Maryville College 



WOMEN'S ATHLETICS 



Point System of Athletic A^vards 

Since the intercolleg-iate contests 
have been dispensed with the point 
system has been adopted. This gives 
every g-irl an equal chance to partici- 
pate in every sport and a chance to win 
tlie coveted monogram, the small letter 
or the large letter and sweater. 

The honors are awarded as follows: 
300 points, Maryville Monogram M. C; 
400 points, small letter M; 500 points, 
letter and sweater. 

Points shall be earned as follows: 

A. Teams. 50 points each team. 
Class teams — 

1. Basketball 6 players team 

2. Soccer 11 players team 

3. Volleyball 9 players team 

4. Baseball 9 players team 

5. Tennis 6 players team 

Squad of any team sport, 20 points. 
Manager of any team sport, 15 points. 
Captain of any team sport, 10' points. 
Coach squad (basketball), 15 points. 
Perfect attendance, 10 points. 

B. Tests. 

1. Swimming: Limit, 50. 

2. Stunts: Limit, 25. 

3. Archery: Limit, 50. 

4. Track: Limit, 50. 

5. Hiking: Limit, 50. 

C. Scholarship. 

1. An "A" average in academic work 
for any semester, 20% of points 
won in addition. 

2. A "B" average adds 10% of points 
won. 

D. Health. 

1. Observing health rules for one 
semester, 25 points. Two semes- 
ters, 50 points. 



"M" Handbook 



ATHLETIC BOARD OF CONTROL 



President 
LEA CALLOWAY 

Vice-President 
INEZ HAMRICK 

Secretary 
BLUNDEN FERGUSON 

Faculty Representatives 

DR. McMURRAY 
PROFESSOR QUEENER 

Men Representatives 

DON WILSON 

CHARLES RICHARDSON 

Women Representatives 

MARTHA STOREY 

IVA BABCOCK 

Town Representatives 

GEORGE CRAWFORD 

"TURKEY" SMITH 



62 Maryville College 



WHO'S WHO ON COLLEGE HILL 



Alpha Sig-ma Robert West, Pres. 

Athenian George Osborne, Pres. 

Athletic Association ...Lea Calloway, Pres. 

Bainonian Julia Terry, Pres. 

Basketball John Stone White, Capt 

Chilhowean. Margaret Melody, Editor 

Chilhowean ,. .Andrew Newcomer, Bus. Mgr. 

Football Lea Calloway, Capt. 

Glee Singers Robert Overly, Pres. 

Glee Singers. .. .Hubert Duncan, Bus. Mgr. 

Handbook Donald Briggs, Editor 

Handbook Benjamin GroTes, Bus. Mgr. 

Highland Echo Weldon Hina, Editor 

Highland Echo . .Alexander Jones, Bus. Mgr. 

Junior Class Allen Anisbury, Pres. 

Ministerial Ass'n Alexander Duff, Pres. 

Pi Kappa Delta Robert West, Pres. 

Senior Class George Osborne, Pres. 

Sophomore Class Joseph Quinlan, Pres. 

Student Council Robt. West, Pres., pro tern. 

Theta Alpha Phi Donald Briggs, Pres. 

Theta Epsilon Naomi Willingham, Pres. 

Track Wilson Felknor, Capt. 

Women's Glee Club . . Ann Smartt, Pres. 
Women's Glee Club . Mildred Purviance, 

Bus Mgr. 

Y. M. C. A. Ralph Teffeteller, Pres. 

Y. W. C. A Merle Beebe, Pres. 



'M" Handbook 63 



BOOK VI 



SONGS 

YELLS 

SCHEDULES 



64 Makyville College 



SONGS 



Alma Mater 

Where Chilhowee's lofty mountains, 

Pierce the southern blue, 
Proudly stands our Alma Mater, 

Noble, grand, and true. 

Chorus: 

Orange, garnet, float forever. 

Ensign of our hill! 
Hail to thee, our Alma Mater! 

Hail to Maryville. 

As thy hilltop crowned with cedars 

Ever green appears; 
So thy memory fresh shall linger , 

Through life's smiles and tears. 

Chorus 

Lift the chorus, wake the echoes. 

Make the welkin ring! 
Hail the queen of all the highlands! 

Loud her praises sing. 

Chorus 



Don't forget to stand with uncov- 
ered head while the Alma Mater is be- 
ing sung. 



'M" Handbook 



Dear Old Maryville 

I 
Near Chilhowee's mountain blue, 
Stands our Alma Mater true. 

Dear old Maryville, to thee we lift 
our song-. 
'Neath thy cedar grove so fair, 
We shall breathe the mountain air, 
While with merry hearts the chorus 
we prolong-. 

Chorus: 

Sing we a song- of our dear coUeg-e 
home. 

Fondly we love thee still. 
And where ever we may be, 
Fond mem'ry turns to thee. 

Our Alma Mater, dear old Maryville. 

II 

As the morning- sunbeams' lig-ht 
Greets over Chilhowee's heig-ht, 

So our tribute, we as freely to thee 
bring-. 
Youth's free homag-e full and free, 
We thus gladly render thee, 

Dear old Maryville, thy praise we 
freely sing-. 

Ill 

To thee, g-uardian of our youth. 
Faithful g-uide to lig-ht and truth. 
We, thy children, bring- our song-s of 
g-rateful praise. 
And when we shall leave thy hill, 
We shall ne'er forg-et thee still. 

Dear old Maryville, the scene of hap- 
py days. 



66 Maryville College 



The Old Pep Song- 

We've got the rep, rep, rep, of old 

Maryville! 
We've got the pep, pep. pep, of old 

College Hill! 
We've got the strength to knock 'em 

stiff 
And never know the diff, 
For we're from Maryville of Tennessee. 



The New Pep Song- 
Here we go! Here we go! 
Down the field to crush the foe. 

As the Scotties go marching along. 
Men of might! Men of fight! 
Orange, garnet, waving bright 

While we make the Hill merry with 
song. 
Then it's hi, hi, hi. 
We'll win this game or die. 

Highlanders! Fight to the end. 
Rah! Rah! 
And we won't be done 
Until the victory's won 

For the pride of our hearts — Mary- 
ville! 



YELLS 



Howee — Ho^v 

Howee — howte Chilhowee 
Maryville, Maryville, Tennessee 

Hoo-rah, Hoo-rah! 
Maryville, Maryville!! 

Rah, rah! 



'M" Handbook 67 



M-a-r-y-T-i-l-l-e 

M-a-r-y ville 

M-a-r-y ville 

M-A-R-Y-V-I-L-L-E 

Maryville, Maryville, Maryville 

"Fifteen" 

Rah — rah — rah— rah — rah 

Rah — rah — rah — rah — rah 

Rah — rah — rah — rah — rah 

Team, Team, Team! 

The Old Chant. (Slow and low) 

Maryville ■. Maryville 

You -don' t-know -Mary ville 

You -can' t-lick -Mary ville 

Maryville! 

The Locomotive 

M a r— y v i- — 1 1 e 

M — a — r — y — v — i — 1 — 1 — e 

M-a-r-y -v-i-1-l-e 

M-a-r-y-v-i-1-l-e 

Maryville! 

The Orange and Garnet 

Here's to the Orange 
Here's to the Garnet 
Here's to the Boys 
In the Orange and Garnet! 



College Colors 

Orange and Garnet 



68 Maryville College 



SIX-DAY AVEEK 

At last we have it. Beginning with 
this year Maryville College classes will 
be extended over six days of the week 
instead of five, as formerly arranged. 

The five-day week has many disad- 
vantages. The ideal situation, which is 
to have the classes of each course meet 
every other day, was impossible under 
the old system. A student with a fairly 
heavy schedule was necessarily crowded 
for time, and attending class until 
three o'clock on Saturday was almost 
inevitable. 

Under the new system, each student 
will have a fair amount of free time 
every day. Nearly all classes in each 
subject will meet on alternating days, 
and no classes will meet after 11:15 
on Saturday. 



Following i 


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F. S. 


8:10- 8:30 




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c 


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c 


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d 


D 


d 


D 


d 


1:10- 2:05 


E 


e 


E 


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2:05- 3:00 


f 


F 


f 


F 


f 



'M" Handbook 



69 



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Maryville College 



PLAY THE GAME 

There's a breathless hush in the Close 
tonight — 
Ten to make and the match to win — 
A bumping- pitch and a blinding light, 
An hour to play and the last man in. 
And it's not for the sake of a ribboned 
coat 
Or the selfish hope of a season's 
fame, 
But his Captain's hand on his shoulder 
smote; 
"Play up! Play up! And play the 
game!" 



The sand of the desert is sodden red — 
Red with the wreck of a square that 
broke; 
The Catling's jammed and the colonel 
dead, 
And the regiment's blind with dust 
and smoke. 
The river of death has brimmed' his 
banks. 
And England's far and Honor a name, 
But the voice of a schoolboy rallies the 
ranks, 
"Play up! Play up! And play the 
game!" 

This is the word that year by year, 

While in her place the School is set, 
Every one of her sons must hear. 

And none that hears it dare forget. 
This they all with joyful mind 

Bear through life like a torch in 
flame. 
And falling, fling to the host behind — 

"Play up! Play up! And play the 
game!" 

— Henry Newbolt. 



"M" Handbook 



ONE MINUTE, 
PLEASE! 



Before making your purchase, 
please consult this 

Handbook 



Patronize our advertisers and tell 
them you saw their ad in this book. 

Don't Forget 

Dorothy's 
GIFT SHOP 

Where you will find new gift items 
and greeting cards in 

Badgett-Costner Drug Store 



Maryville College 



Druid Hills Tea Room 

An Ideal Place for Parties 
and Banquets 

PHONE 639 
On Knoxville Highwaj'' 

Burchfield Hospital 

EYE— EAR— NOSE— THROAT 

Court Street 
Opposite Court House 

PRINTING and ENGRAVING 

JNIaryville Enterprise 

"A Good Newspaper" 

JAS. B. HEDGE, Jr., Owner 

Your Patronage is Appreciated 

Morton's 
Taxi and Transfer Co. 

Rent a New Car and 

Drive It Yourself 

See Us For Your Transfer Needs 

BOTH PHONES 71 



'M" Handbook 



'Photographs Live 
Forever" 



THE WEBB STUDIO 

E. L. WEBB, Prop. 

Photos of Permanency and 
of Character 



KODAK FINISHING 
A Specialty 

THE BEST IS THE CHEAPEST 
—ALWAYS 



76 Maryville College 

The Place to Eat 

Sandwiches, Soft Drinks, Salads 

Plate Lunches, 25c and 35c 

HAZEL EVANS, Mgr. 
Next to Evans Hotel 

PALACE THEATRE 

''No Place on Earth Will 

You Have Better Talking 

Pictures" 

WELCOME STUDENTS: 

For eleven years we have been 
supplying students with the many 
little things needed every day. We 
sincerely appreciate your patron- 
age, and assure you courteous 
service and complete satisfaction. 

WRIGHT'S 

5 and 10c Store 

"Where a little money goes a 
long way" 



'M" Handbook ^^ 



COLLEGE CLEANERS 

Hey, Fellows ! 

IT PAYS TO LOOK WELL 

And We Can Make You Ll)ok 

Well With Our Modern 

Method of Cleaning 

and Pressing 

Give Your Work to 

COLLINS— VICK 

In Room 313 

COME IN AND SEE US— 

Always Welcome 



78 Maryville College 

GREETINGS 

students, Welcome to 

Walker's Drug Store 
. and Tea Room 

128 Main (Broadway) 

WELCOME STUDENTS 

We are glad you are with us 

again. 

Drop in and see us. We will be 

glad to 

"SAY IT WITH FLOWERS'' 

for you. 

B A U M ' S 

Home of Flowers 

133 E. Main St. (Broadway) 

HUGH M. CLARK, Mgr. 



'M" Handbook 79 



New Providence 

Presbyterian 

Church 

Main and College Street 

WILLIAM H. CROTHERS 
Pastor 

Bible School graded and conduct- 
ed by a well qualified corps of 
officers and teachers; Christian 
Endeavor Societies awake and 
active; the whole church forward- 
looking in plan and purpose. 

Students Cordially Invited 

to Make This Their 

Church Home While 

in College 



Maryville College 



S. E. CRAWFORD 

Dentist 

First National Bank Building 

L. C. OLIN, M. D. 

Room 302, First National Bank Bldg. 

Tel.: Res., 84; Office, 746 
Office Hours: 8-11 a. m.— 3-7 p. m. 

Chandler- S ingleton 
Company 

Department Store 

Friendly Five Shoes 
Wayne Knit Hosiery 

We Keep the Quality Up 



'M" Handbook 



The First Baptist 
Church 

"A Church With a Message" 

Rev. Wiley Roy Deal, D. D., 
Pastor 

A cordial invitation is extended 
to the College folk to worship 
with us and enjoy our fellowship. 

An "Up-to-date" Sunday School 
and well organized B. Y. P. U. af- 
fords you a place of religious 
training. 

WE WANT YOU 

''Go to Church and Feed Your 
Soul on the Bread of Life" 

Welcome Welcome 



Maryville College 



Monroe's Confectionery 

College Street 

LUNCHES 
FRUITS 
CANDIES 
DRINKS 
ICE CREAM 

We Appreciate College 
Trade 



CARLISLE'S 

5 and 10c Store 

With a complete stock of clean, 
new merchandise, we are prepared 
to serve you promptly and to your 
entire satisfaction. 

We appreciate the patronage of 
College students, and welcome you 
to our store. 

CARLISLE'S 

5 and 10c Store 



'M" Handbook 83 



MARYVILLE 
COLLEGE 

RALPH W. LLOYD, D. D., 

President 

One Hundred and Thirteenth Year 
Begins September 9, 1931 

Educational standards of the high- 
est. Environment positively Chris- 
tian. Expenses lowest possible. 

Enrollment, 824 young men and 
young women; 395 came from thirty- 
five States and countries outside of 
Tennessee. Forty professors and 
teachers. 

Endowment and property, $2,500,- 
000. Campus, 275 acres. Nineteen 
buildings. 

Entrance requirements, for admis- 
sion to the Freshman class, fifteen 
standard units. Departments: Arts 
and Sciences, Bible and Religious 
Education, Home Economics, Ex- 
pression, Music, and Art. 

Expenses: Tuition, $50 a year. 

Room rent for each student, with two 
in a room, $30 to $50 a year. Board, 
$3.50 a week. Text-books rented. 
Self-help opportunities. Full infor- 
mation sent upon request. Address 

THE REGISTRAR, 

Maryville, Tennessee 



84 Maryville College 

Everything Good to Eat 

M. M. Elder 
Cash Carry Store 

103 Main St. (Broadway) 

"The Best Service is Self 
Service'' 

NEW STUDENTS 

and 
OLD STUDENTS 

Are Always Welcome at 

PROFFITT'S 

The Student's Store 



'M" Handbook 



The 
Western Theological Seminary 

FOUNDED BY THE GENERAL ASSEM- 
BLY, 1825 — A SEMINARY FOR 
COLLEGE GRADUATES 

A complete theo- 
logical curriculum is 
offered to students 
of all denominations. 



Elective courses 
leading to degrees of 
S. T. B. and S. T. M. 

Graduate courses 
of the University of 
Pittsburgh, leading 
to degrees of A. M. 
and Ph. D., are open 
to properly qualified 
students of the Sem- 
inary. 

Exceptional library 
facilities. 

Two entrance 

prizes of $300 each. 
Two post-graduate 
fellowships of $600 
and $800. 




All buildings are new, with latest modern 
improvements. Social hall, gymnasium, and 
students' commons. 

For information, apply to 

JAMES A. KELSO 

President 
N. S., Pittsburgh, Pa. 



86 Maryville College" 

Coulter's Greenhouses 

FLORIST 

Pot and Cut Flowers 

Decorations and Floral Designs 

People's Phone 163 
Maryville, Tenn. 

GEORGE H. OSBORN, JR. 

Representative 
341 Carnegie Hall 

NORTON 
HARDWARE CO. 

Paints 

Hardware 

Sporting Goods 

Electrical Appliances 

Where Your Patronage is 
Appreciated 

PHONE No. 18 



'M" Handbook 87 



Y. W. C. A. STORE 

Third Floor, Pearsons Hall 

GIRLS! GIRLS! 

When you are hungry, 
When you are thirsty, 
Come to the "Y" Store. 

ICE CREAM CANDY 

COLD DRINKS SANDWICHES 

FRUIT CAKES 

And many other necessities 
— from Soap to Soup 

All surplus is applied on our 
Y. W. C. A. Building Fund 



GEORGA BURK, 
Manager 



Maryville College 



Y. M. C. A. STORE 

In Bartlett Hall 

FELLOWS: 

This store is maintained for 
your convenience. We hope you 
will patronize it when you want 
good things to eat. 

Candies 
Cakes Ice Cream 

Fruit Drinks 

College Necessities 

With each and every purchase 
we give our good will. 



JESSE WILLIS, 
Manager 



— f 



EsiahUihed 1859 

'"Uhe <Mitchells have been printing 

over Jift^ years,' ' 

^ii_aii_iia.^Hii— nil-— niH^Ra—iii— 111—1)11— ii4* 




he plant complete. Bookmaking in its 
entirety under one roof and one super- 
vision. Complete service. Editorial, 
Composition, Presswork, Plates and Binding. 
Output limited to the manufacture of books, 
colors, and business literature. 

SPECIAL DEPARTMENT FOR 
UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

Annuals, Handbooks, Catalogues, Diploma 
Cases, Brochures, Text Books, Laboratory 
Manuals, Engraving, Steel Die stamping, etc. 

Makers of Mitchell-Made SUPERFINISH 
book covers, the beautifulljy' grained, highly? 
Embossed and artistically colored line. 
^•_aK_iH-_aa_ai^aa^aa_^ai_M.,i_aa^a(|» 

WM. Mitchell printimg Co. 

Edition 'Printers and finders 
GREENFIELD, INDL^NA