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Full text of "Maryville College Handbook [M Book] 1934-1935"

IDENTIFICATION 

Name 

Room 

Class 

Home Address 



In case of Accident Notify- 



No. of Chapel Seat 
No. of Lab. Desk . 
No. of Lab. Locker 
Gym. Locker No. . . 
Other notations . . . 



The 

Maryville College 
HanaDook 

VOLUME XXIX 

1934-1935 

Howard W. Kipp, '34 
Editor-in-Chief 

Phyllis Dexter, '35 
Associate Editor 

Helen Rusk, '36 
Associate Editor 

J. H. Magee, '35 
Business Manager 

Publislied by the 

Young Men's and Young 

Women's Christian Associations of 

Maryville College 

MARYVILLE, TENNESSEE 



CALENDAR, 1934-1935 





SEPTEMBER 








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CONTENTS 



Calendar 1934-35 2 

College Calendar, 1934-1935 4 

Dr. Ralph Waldo Lloyd (Plate) 6 

College President's Welcome 7 

Editorial Preface 8 

Part. 

I. General Introduction to Maryville ... 9 

II. Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C, A 15 

III. General Student Activity 25 

IV. Athletics 35 

V. Songs, Colors, Schedules 47 

Advertisements 53 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 

1934-1935 
First Semester 

1934 

Sept. 11-17, Opening- Program: 

Sept. 11, Tuesday. 1:00 p.m. — New Stu- 
dents report. 

Sept. 12, Wednesday, 1:00 p.m. — Place- 
ment examination. 
Sept. 13, Thursday, 8:10 a.m. — Opening 

Chapel service: Registration. 
Sept. 14, Friday. First meeting of Classes. 
Sept. 15, Saturday, 8:00 p.m.^T. W. C. 

A. and Y. M. C. A. receptions. 
Sept. 17, Monday, 8:00 p.m. — Faculty re- 
ception. 
Oct. 3, Wednesday, 9:00 a.m. — Pall meeting 

of the Directors. 
Oct. 26, Friday — Founder's and Homecoming 

Day. 
Nov. 29, Thursday — Thanksgiving Day. 
Dec. 19, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m. — Christmas 
Holidays begin. 

1935 
Jan. 3. Thursday, 8:10 a.m. — Class Work re- 
sumed. 
Jan. 29, Tuesday. First Semester ends. 

Second Semester 

Jan. 31, Thursday — Second Semester begins. 

Feb. 5, Tuesday — February Meetings begin. 

April 19, Friday, 4 p.m., to April 23, Tues- 
day, 8:10 a.m. — Spring Vacation. 

May 6-10, Registration for 1935-1936. 

May 30 to June 4, Commencement program: 

May 30, Thursday, 8:00 p.m. — Graduation 

exercises of the Music Department. 

May 31, Friday, 8:00 p.m. — Senior Class 

Play. 



■M" HANDBOOK 



June 1. Saturday. 8:00 p.m. — Graduation 
exercises of the Expression Depart- 
ment. 

June 2. Sunday. 10:30 a.m. — Baccalau- 
reate Service. 

June 2. Sunday, 7:00^ p.m. — Vesper Serv- 
ice. 

June 3, Monday. Alumni Day. 

3:00-5:00 p.m. — President's reception. 
7 :00 p.m. Annual Alumni Association 
Dinner. 

June 4, Tuesday, 8:30 a.m. — Spring meet- 
ing of the Directors. 

June 4, Tuesday, 10:00 a. in. — Commence- 
ment. 



6 MARTVILLE COLLEGE 




DR. RALPH WALDO LLOYD 
President of Maryville College 



'M" HANDBOOK 



COLLEGE PRESIDENT'S 
WELCOME 

I write this -word of greeting 
with hearty good will. 

This issue of the "M Book" will 
be used by students and faculty dur- 
ing the 1 1 6th year of the College. 
The organized program of the year 
begins on September ii, 1934, when 
freshmen report, and closes on June 
4> 1935. when seniors receive their 
diplomas. 

I wish to welcome every old and 
new student to the opportunities of 
the year. May each have health and 
joy as he enters into them. 

Ralph Waldo Lloyd, 

President of Maryville College. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL PREFACE 



For you, new student, this book is pub- 
lished by the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A, 
It is our hope you will find in it a spark 
of friendliness which will kindle a. fire of 
love for Maryville which will grow as you 
grow with Maryville. We hope this little 
Handbook will give you the intimate touch 
with the College that you cannot find in 
the Catalogue. We want you to get off to 
a good start here on our "College Hill," so 
we are endeavoring to bring to your atten- 
tion the things we think might be of inter- 
est and help to you. 

Use this book as your key in the first be- 
wildering months of your college life. This 
book is compiled by students who know the 
why's and wherefore's of Maryville, and 
are trying to pass on to you any information 
we have found to be of help and assistance 
to new students. 

So to you, new student, we dedicate this 
book. You are the Maryville of Tomorrow. 
You are the future Maryville. We have done 
our part and will be leaving soon, so to you 
we pass the torch and hope you will carry 
it on with all the honor of the past. 

The next four years will spell "oppor- 
tunity" for you. 

THE EDITORIAL STAFF. 



M" HANDBOOK 



PART I 



GENERAL INTRODUCTION 
TO MARYVILLE 



MARTVILLE COLLEGE 



GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO 
MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



New students, we who have spent several 
j'ears at Maryville College are convinced 
that our college is as good as. if not a little 
better than, any other we know anything 
about. It is our hope to make you love it aa 
we do, and with that end in view, we want 
to introduce you to "our hilltop crowned 
with cedar." 

Maryville is in East Tennessee, sixteen 
miles from Knoxville. From the campus you 
can see the dusky ridges of the Chilhowee, 
Smoky, and Cumberland Mountains. The 
town of Maryville and its twin city, Alcoa, 
together have 10,000 inhabitants. Your 
friends who have never heard of Maryville 
may know of Alcoa, named for the Alumi- 
num Company of America, which has a 
plant there. 

As to our weather, it does get cold, and 
it does rain in Sunny Tennessee, but spring 
comes early, and it stays warm well through 
October. 

Founded in 1819, Maryville College for 
over a hundred years has been striving to 
fulfill the altruistic purposes of its founder, 
Dr. Isaac Anderson. Traditions have been 
woven into the fabric that is Maryville — 
traditions that it is a privilege to have a 
part in carrying on. The Maryville spirit is 
something we cannot hand you on a silver 
platter: it is something that depends not 
only on what is already here, but also on 
what you bring. The Maryville spirit for 
you will be you in your relation to Mary- 
ville College. We can, however, tell you our 
side of it, give you a glimpse of the tradi- 
tional background of the college, so that 5'ou 
can begin framing your attitude. 



'M" HANDBOOK 



Maryville aims to broaden sympathies, 
promote thorough scholarship, emphasize 
religious life, and stimulate unselfish serv- 
ice. Your contacts from the start will be 
broadening-. You will meet students from 
nearly every state and some from foreign 
lands. You will find people with all types 
of backgrounds, with widely varying inter- 
ests and experiences. You will find these 
people interested in j'ou, in what you can 
contribute to their thought and activity. 
In scholarship your best of effort and ability 
will be demanded. The spiritual emphasis is 
represented by required church, Sunday 
School, and daily chapel attendance. Stu- 
dents may attend the church of their choice. 
The denominations represented in Maryville 
are Presbyterian, Baptist. Southern Method- 
ist, Northern Methodist, Christian, and 
Quaker. 

There are no social fraternities and soror- 
ities at Maryville, and we do not have 
dances, but do not feel that these are neces- 
sary to genuine college happiness. Our Y. 
M. and Y. W., our literary societies, our 
dormitory life more than make up for the 
lack of fraternity dances. Do not think 
there will be nothing to do. Part of Mary- 
ville tradition is to keep new students on 
the run for at least a week or two to keep 
that homesick tendency from developing. 

When you arrive in Knoxville there will 
probably be old students on hand to tell 
you how to get over to Maryville. If, how- 
ever, no one is there, you can take a taxi 
from wherever j^ou are to the bus station, 
where there is a bus leaving nearly every 
hour for Maryville. It is a good idea to buy 
your train ticket clear through to Mary- 
ville, so your trunk can go on over. Some- 
one will meet you at the bus station in 
Maryville and take you to the campus. 



12 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



From a central information bureau on the 
campus you will be taken to your dormitory 
room. Your room will be, like your college 
spirit, what you make it. You may have a 
heartsick, homesick moment when you first 
see the bare ugly room you are to live in. 
But curtains, bedspreads, lamps, rugs, and 
pictures can perform miracles on the room — 
and on you too while you are busy unpack- 
ing and arranging them. You will have to 
make a trip to town soon after your ar- 
rival to buy broom and dust pan. curtain 
rods, waste basket, tacks, and a good many 
things that you will keep thinking of as 
j'ou unpack. 

The first night there will be a Y. W. 
party for new girls. Your big sister, if she 
does not meet you at the station will be 
looking you up to take you to the party and 
do anything she can for you. She will 
lend you a sheet if your trunk does not get 
here in time, though you might try to get 
one in your suitcase, because big sisters 
sometimes run out of sheets. Your Nu Gam- 
ma leader will come to get acquainted with 
you and tell you about the first meeting of 
your group. Within a week or so the lit- 
erary societies will begin their rush pro- 
grams. For girls this means a two-week 
series of parties, at the end of which you 
will make the decision, "Shall I go Theta or 
Bainonian?" 

As to the appearance of the campus, it is 
commonly referred to as the Hill, and the 
Alma Mater calls it "our hilltop crowned 
with cedar." Within the last year an im- 
pressive wide stone stairway has been built 
up to the campus, and a great many new 
trees have been set out recently. Another 
new improvement is the appearance of a 
golf course on the campus. There are in all 



M" HANDBOOK 



eight tennis courts, and there is an excellent 
swimming pool. 

Back of the campus proper are the col- 
lege woods. Various organizations have pic- 
nics there, and it is a fine place to go for 
walks. There are two homes in the woods, 
one for so long the only one that it has be- 
come known as "The House in the Woods." 
It is the home of the college pastor. The 
other is the large and beautiful home of 
Mrs. Walker, who, since she moved into our 
woods, has proved to be a fairy godmother 
to the college campus. 

Of the buildings on the campus, ivy- 
covered Anderson is the most outstanding. 
It is the administration building, and you 
Avill many times during the next four years 
find yourself standing in line before one of 
its offices, to register or to pay bills. In 
Thaw Hall is the library on the first floor, 
and upstairs are class rooms. There are 
three women's dormitories, Memorial for 
freshmen, Baldwin for freshmen and sopho- 
mores, and Pearsons for upper classmen. 

Boys, after you get to College Hill, the 
first thing you do is find Carnegie Hall and 
look for that much-hunted and called-for 
man by the name of Mr. McCurry, better 
known as Mr. "Mac." He will assign you 
to your room. Don't be afraid to ask any of 
the fellows for advice or help, for they will 
always be glad to do anything they can for 
you. About the first or second night after 
you are here there is held a group get-to- 
gether where you will have an opportunity 
to meet all the fair damselr that bedeck our 
campus. It won't take long for you to get 
into the run of things, but until you do, 
every man on the campus will help you 
learn the ropes. There is no hazing here at 
Maryville. We are your friends and wish 
to help you. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



When things are finally somewhat settled 
• — when you have become acquainted with 
your roommate, found your way around the 
campus, taken the English placement and 
scholastic aptitude tests — and classes have 
begun, you will have to begin the important 
task of apportioning your time wisely be- 
tween curricular and extra-curricular activi- 
ties. There will be clubs that you will want 
to join. Literary societies and Christian as- 
sociations need your co-operation. Some in- 
terest in college sports is expected of you. 
When you join a club, do it wholeheartedly. 
Be ready to take part when asked to. to pay 
your dues, and to attend its meetings regu- 
larly. However, do not assume so many 
extra-curricular obligations that your aca- 
demic duties will have to be neglected. 



'M- HANDBOOK 



PART II 



Y. M. C. A. 

and 
Y. W. C. A. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



Y. M. C. A. PRESIDENT'S WEI.COME 



DEAR FELLOWS: 

In a short while you will be leaving home 
to come to Maryville to enter upon a new 
phase of your life. The "Y" is indeed happy 
that you have chosen Maryville College as 
your college, and we welcome each one of 
you to our . campus life. 

Perhaps you are wondering what we are 
like, at Maryville. Most of us are fellows at- 
tempting to live clean Christian lives. With 
your consent the "Y" "will introduce you to 
the fellowship of Christian boys and girls 
from more than thirty different states and 
countries, who will soon make you glad that 
you came to Maryville. 

We hope that you are coming to college 
with a willingness to co-operate, because 
the "Y" can help to make your four years 
at Maryville a period of character building, 
to aid in providing you with a "clean mind 
in a sound body." "Seek Christ, for in Him 
we live" is our theme for the coming school 
year, and we suggest that you make this 
your theme, because you cannot realize the 
best that is in you physically, mentally, and 
spiritually unless you live in Christ. 

Please feel free to call upon me at all 
times for any services which I can give you. 
The Cabinet and the other "Y" members 
Avill do their utmost to solve your problems 
and to aid you in every way. We invite 
you to use the "Y" building for your pleas- 
ure and convenience. 

May your life on College Hill result in 
your living happily and vi^hole-heartedly in 
Christ Jesus. 

Sincerely yours, 

EARLE W. CRAWFORD, 

President Y. M. C. A. 



"M" HANDBOOK 



Y. W. C. A. PRESIDENT'S WELCOIME 



DEAR MARYVILLIAN-TO-BE: 

You may have been a Floridian or a New 
Yorker all your life, but if you've never been 
a Maryvillian. don't miss the chance! Be- 
cause you have still to be one of the stream 
of students heading Chapelward of a morn- 
ing. somehow sharing each other's moods. 
You have still to see Anderson Hall with 
all its echoes of another century or to look 
out on the campus bewitched by moonlight 
or to delight in the blue ranges of moun- 
tains to the south. 

What I am trying to say is there is a 
something pervading the Hill that we hope 
you'll find even if you can never define it as 
anything more than the Maryville Spirit. 

As one girl to another. I carhe to Mary- 
ville with all the eager expectancy which I 
hope you are bringing too. I don't know 
what experiences await you here, but I am 
truy glad you are coming. Our Y. W. C. A., 
which is yours too. has as its highest goal 
a "full and creative life" for every girl and 
if in any degree we can unfold that life for 
you we will find real joy in doing it. 

With high hopes that these coming days 
will be among the very happiest of your 
life, 

Sincerely, 

DOROTHY NETHERY, 

President Y. W. C. A. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



y. M. C. A. ADMINISTRATION 

1934-1935 



Officers 

President Earle W. Crawford 

"Vice-President Hugh R. Crawford 

Secretary Glover Leitch 

Treasurer Samuel Waid 

Cabinet 

Athletics O'Neal Gray 

Archibald Pieper 

Boys' Work James Shaw 

Clifford Williams 

Fellowship Douglas Carhart 

Arthur Herries 

Music Harold Truebger 

Store Herman Magee 

Worship Alexander Christie 

Robert Lodwick 



•M" HANDBOOK 19 



Y. \V. C. A. ADaHNISTRATION 

President Dorothy Nethery 

Vice-President Violet Webb 

Secretary Fern Metzger 

Treasurer Katharine Orr 

Nu Gamma Theresa Frey 

Cabinet 

Devotional: 

Program Secretaries Martha Martin 

Edith Nicolai 

Music Joyce Fields 

Devotions Betty Brevier 

World Fellovifship Martina Robison 

Dorothy Lewis 
Social Service: 

Mission Florence Bruno 

Orphanage Barbera Whitmore 

Dolores Burchette 
Business: 

"Y" Store Lorena Mae Dunlap 

Benefit Number Maria Wynn 

Publicity Bobbie Reveley 

Social: 

Athletics Florence Hyde 

Social Eleanor Johnson 

Elizabeth Kunkel 

Lyceum Grace Proffitt 

Librarians Elizabeth Peterson 

Ruth Romig 
Abbie Higgins 

"M" Handbook Helen Rusk 

Phyllis Dexter 



ADVISORY BOARD 

Class of 1935 

Mrs. Lloyd Mrs. Pflanze 

Mrs. Wright 

Class of 1936 

Miss Beebe Miss Johnson 

Class of 1937 

Miss Bassett Miss Meiselw^it? 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



Y. M. C. A. ACTIVITY 



"Seek Christ, for in Him we live" is the 

motto of the Y. M. C. A. for the coming- year. 
The "Y" aims to give you a program of 
clean Cliristian living in body, mind and 
spirit. It has one aim and that is to help 
you. The "Y" is here for you, so be sure 
and use it to the fullest extent. 

The "Y" turns a great deal of its time to 
developing athletic activities for those ^vho 
for some reason or other can not go out for 
varsity competition. Football, soccer, swim- 
ming, basketball, tennis, wrestling, handball, 
hiking, track are on the program of the "Y". 

If you tire of that, try checkers, ping- 
pong, chess, pool or just come to the "Y" 
reading room and "gang" with the fellows 
as they listen to the radio, read, or engage 
in wholesome Christian fellowship. 

To help develop the mind and spirit, 
meetings are held every Sunday afternoon 
in Bartlett Hall. Various programs are car- 
ried out. Soinetimes there are speakers, 
other times there is discussion, and still 
others may be musical programs. These 
programs have always proved to be of help 
to the members of the "Y" and we hope 
you will be able to participate in them and 
make them a part of your life here at 
Maryville. 

The "Y" offers other opportunities for 
you, and we hope you will make the "Y" 
program your program and help it as it will 
help you. 

It is for you; are you going to make use 
of it? 



'M" HANDBOOK 



Y. W. C. A. ACTIVITY 



The most worthwhile thing a new girl at 
Maryville College can do toward launching 
herself on the nrost successful and happiest 
four-year cruise toward graduation is to sign 
her name to a Y. W. C. A. pledge card. 
An active member of "YW" has a source 
of inspiration, an outlet for her ability and 
enthusiasm, a feeling of belonging that she 
will find in no other organization. The 
home of "YW" on our campus is in the 
back part of Thaw Hall on the ground floor. 
Our quarters there were completed only two 
years ago, and we are proud to invite you 
new girls to visit them just as soon as you 
can. There is a fireplace, an inside bal- 
cony, and alcove, a kitchen, a radio, a magr 
azine rack, and a small circulating library. 
Here in our rooms we have our Sunday aft- 
ernoon meetings, in which we enjoy the 
fellowship with each other and feel a more 
intimate relationship with God. 

We have our fingers in a good many cam- 
pus pies. You can see from the list of cabi- 
net positions the range and nature of "YW" 
work. Perhaps its most spectacular activity 
is the May Day fete. A May Queen, elected 
from and by the Senior Class, is escorted 
by attendants from each class down the 
wooded slopes of the natural amphitheatre 
in the college woods, across a rustic bridge 
to the natural stage, where she is crowned 
and rules over a pageant in which several 
hundred students take part. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



JOINT ACTIVITIES 



Joint Devotional Meetings 

Usually the devotional meetings of the 
T. M. C. A. and the Y. W. C. A. on Sunday 
afternoons are held separately, taut at vari- 
ous times joint meetings are held, in the 
conduct of which both organizations co- 
operate. The programs of these joint meet- 
ings are of a special character, and are very 
worthwhile. 

Fred Hope Drives 

This drive is not carried on by the "Y's", 
but is carried on by all the students of the 
school and we thought best to bring this 
to your attention. Fred Hope was a student 
at Maryville some years ago, but now he is 
in Africa, and each year a volunteer offer- 
ing is taken up by the school for Fred Hope 
and his work. 

Blue Ridge Conferences 

Each spring, following commencement, a 
conference of Southern college Y. M. C. A.'s 
and Y. W. C. A.'s is held at Blue Ridge, 
North Carolina. The two organizations on 
College Hill regularly send delegates to these 
conferences. 

The Artist Series 

The Artist Series, sponsored jointly by the 
Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A., consists of 
about four numbers each year, including 
musical, literary, or other cultural enter- 
tainment. You will want to attend these 
programs, for you pay for them in with your 
student activities fund, and they are of 
great interest here at Maryville. 

Circuses 

Once a year the alumni gymnasium is the 
scene of a tremendous circus, put on jointly 
by the Y. M. C. A. and the Y. W. C. A. It's 
fun, and we are sure you will want to be 
in the circus or at least see it. 



'M" HANDBOOK 



NU GAMMA CHAIRMAN'S WELCOME 



DEAR NEW GIRLS: 

New -Gamma Sigma is the part of the Y. 
W. C. A. that is specifically yours from the 
start. You will be assigned to a Nu Gamma 
leader as soon as your name is registered in 
the office. This leader will write to you dur- 
ing the summer if your application is ac- 
cepted early enough, and she will be among 
the first to greet you when you arrive next 
fall. You will meet with her in a sinall 
group of new p-irls, once a week for a month 
or two. In these meetings you will become 
acquainted with other new girls and be led 
in worthw^hile discussions of college life, 
what you can hope to get out of it, and 
what you will be expected to put into it. 

Y. W. tries through Nu Gamma to show 
new girls just how much we really do want 
you, and to help you find at Maryville the 
happiness we have found through our asso- 
ciation with Y. W. C. A. Nu Gamma is an 
informal type of organization. Its group 
discussions are outlined to help you in fitting 
into the Maryville atmosphere. 

All Maryville is sending a hearty welcome 
to you new girls, but Nu Gamma is particu- 
larly happy for its peculiar privilege of 
sending you a very special greeting and of 
expressing our high hopes for you as you 
become a new part of our Christian Associa- 
tion at Maryville. 
Sincerely, 

TESS FREY, 
Nu Gamma Sigma Chairman. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



WHO'S WHO AT MARYVILLE 



Alpha Sig-ma Louis Krainock, President 

Athenian Bryan Payne. President 

Athletic Association. .. .Charles Lewis. Pres. 

Bainonian Lorena May Dunlap, Pres. 

Chilhowean Alexander Christie. Editor 

Bryan Payne, Bus. Mgr. 
Girls' Glee Club. .. .Leone Ann Brown, Pres. 

Glee Sing-ers Robert Lodwick, Pres. 

Highland Echo Violet Webb, Editor 

James Smith, Bus. Mgr. 

Junior Class Archibald Pieper, Pres. 

Ministerial Assoc Wm. Talmage, Pres. 

Pi Kappa Delta Earle Crawford, Pres. 

Senior Class Newman Smith, Pres. 

Sophomore Class Bill Morgan, Pres. 

Student Council Leland Shanor 

(Pres. Pro Tem) 

Theta Alpha Phi Ernest Lowe, Pres. 

Theta Epsilon Rena Joyner, Pres. 

Y. M. C. A Earle Crawford, Pres. 

Y. W. C. A Dorothy Nethery, Pres. 



'M" HANDBOOK 2 5 



PART III 



GENERAL STUDENT 
ACTIVITY 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



General Student Activity 



On the Maryville College campus there 
are enough organized activities to capture 
the interest and utilize the ability of every 
student. To some of these organizations 
you may belong by merely expressing the 
desire. Some, however, are run on a selec- 
tive membership basis, and in still others, 
such as the honorary fraternities, member- 
ship is a distinction that comparatively few 
attain. 

Student Council 

The Student Council is composed of eight 
seniors, six juniors, four sophomores, and 
four freshmen. This body is not student 
government, but it represents student opin- 
ion and works with the faculty in promoting 
desirable movements. The members are 
elected by their classes as representing stu- 
dent sentiment. From the Council two com,- 
committees are chosen, the Student-Faculty 
Committee and the Highland Echo Commit- 
tee. 



NATIONAL HONORARY FRATERNITIES 



Pi Kappa Delta 

Maryville has the distinction of having 
the Tennessee Alpha Chapter of the national 
honorory forensic fraternity Pi Kappa Delta. 
At the national convention at Lexington. 
Kentuckj% in the spring of 1934, Maryville 
representatives ranked high in oratory and 
extemporaneous speeches, and made a fine 
showing in debate. 



■M" HANDBOOK 



Theta Alpha Phi 

Talented dramatic students may, upon 
meeting certain requirements for member- 
ship, be initiated into the Tennessee Delta 
Chapter of the national honorary dramatic 
fraternity Theta Alpha Phi, located at 
Maryville. 

Signna Alpha Psi 

The Maryville chapter of Sigma Alpha Psi 
was established in 1930. Membership is open 
to all men of the college "who maintain sat- 
isfactory scholarship and command the re- 
spect of their associates as athletes and 
gentlemen." Membership is earned by meet- 
ing the requirements of the various athletic 
tests in the presence of a responsible com- 
mittee. The object of the society is the en- 
couragement of the moral, physical, and 
mental development and training among col- 
lege students. 

Local Honorary Fraternity- 
Alpha Gamma Sigma was organized in the 
spring of 1934, for the purpose of motivat- 
ing high scholarship among students. Its 
requirements are equal to those of Phi Beta 
Kappa, Ten per cent of the graduating 
class may be admitted provided the mem- 
bers have a grade point ratio of 6.5, or 
somewhat more than a "B" average. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES 



There are on the Hill two sets of literary 
societies. Each set consists of a society for 
boys and one for girls that are known as 
brother and sister societies. Theta Epsilon 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



and Bainonian are the sister societies, re- 
spectively, of Alpha Sigma and Athenian. 

All four societies hold regular meetings 
every Saturday night. Each has its respec- 
tive hall. The meetings held here consist 
of short business meetings followed by pro- 
grams of varied sorts in which members of 
the society are expected to take part when 
called upon, in advance, by the program sec- 
retaries. Once a semester each set of so- 
cieties holds a joint meeting in which boys 
and girls co-operate on matters of program, 
decorations, and refreshments. 

At the beginning of the year the women's 
societies sponsor rush weeks to introduce 
new girls to the members of each society. 
At the end of the two weeks taken by the 
rush program new girls are given the op- 
portunity to join either of the societies. 
Both groups are glad to receive new mem- 
bers, and there is a friendly rivalry as to 
which one can attract the larger number. 

Men make their choices as to society 
membership by visiting regular meetings of 
each. 

There is another form of rivalry among 
the societies besides that of membership. 
Each society presents a play during the 
winter known as its mid-winter. A com- 
mittee of judges gives a decision as to the 
relatives merits of the plays, and the so- 
ciety presenting the best play is awarded a 
silver cup. The society receiving the cup 
three years in succession is the permanent 
owner of it. For the past two years Theta 
Epsilon has received the cup. 

We sincerely hope that each new student 
will find a place truly his in one of the 
organizations. Choose the one in which you 
feel you will be happiest after you have 
carefully considered each. Each society 
sends a hearty greeting to every new stu- 
dent. 



•M" HANDBOOK 



JMUSICAIi ORGANIZATIONS 



The five musical organizations on the 
campus provide an opportunity to develop 
musical talent. Three of the organizations 
are choral and two instrumental. 

The three choral organizations are the 
vesper choir, the Maryville Glee Singers, and 
the Women's Glee Club. The Vesper Choir 
is composed of forty mixed voices chosen 
through try-outs by the choir director. In 
robes and surplices it serves at the Sunday 
evening services, and on week days without 
the robes leads the daily chapel singing. 

The Maryville Glee Singers is a male 
chorus of eighteen or twenty voices. This 
chorus gives at least one concert every year. 
The Women's Glee Club is a similar organ- 
ization for women. 

The two instrumental organizations are 
the band and orchestra. The orchestra has 
a concert every year and plays at many 
other functions. The band plays at football 
games, making its most spectacular show- 
ing- at the night games between halves. 

REMGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS 



Besides Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. there 
are three other outstanding religious activi- 
ties. The Ministerial Association and Stur 
dent Volunteer Band are organizations for 
those interested in the ministry and missions 
respectively. The ministerial group holds 
weekly meetings, but its most important 
activity is that embodied in four standing 
committees which conduct regular preach- 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



ing and pastoral work in the county prison, 
the county almshouse, the McGhee Street 
Chapel, and the country churches in the 
A'icinity of Maryville. 

The Student Volunteer group is composed 
not only of tjliose who have pledged them- 
selves to the foreign field, but of those who 
are interested in this form of Christian 
work. Regular meetings of the group are 
held Sunday evenings after vespers. Some 
phase of missionary work is considered, and 
frequently missionaries on furlough provide 
valuable and inspiring first hand material. 

Another religious activity is the annual 
series of February meetings. The first series 
was held in 1877, and they have been held 
every year since. The object of the Febru- 
ary meetings is a deepening of the spiritual 
life on the campus and a strengthening of 
the spiritual attitude conducive to greater 
seriousness of thought and action. The 
speaker for the meetings is a prominent re- 
ligious leader of the day, chosen long be- 
forehand with the purpose of the meetings 
as the objective in selection. 



CLUBS 

Writers' Workshop 

Students who show interest and ability in 
literary work may be elected to the Writers' 
Workshop. The members are elected from 
the faculty and the junior and senior 
classes. Each member writes and reads 
aloud for criticism one paper a semester. 

"M" Club 

The "M" Club membership is restricted to 
those girls who have earned the college 
letter by participation in athletic activity 
and the keeptng of health rules, 



"M" HANDBOOK 



Pi Upsilon 

The Hi-Trail Club, nationally known as 
Pi Upsilon, is a hiking club limited to 
twelve men. Its activities include hikes to 
nearby mountains several times each sem- 
ester. 

Home Economics Club 

Home Ec majors have formed a club as 
the medium for the performance of practical 
projects in their various fields of interest. 

Chemistry-Physics Club 

In this club students interested in the two 
sciences composing its name meet to perform 
experiments in these fields. 

Nature Club 

The Nature Club is for those interested 
in botany, zoology, and related sciences. To 
be admitted you are required to take a test 
on general scientific knowledge. The club 
has carried out two outstanding projects in 
the past two years: (1) the tagging of the 
trees on the campus with their common and 
botanical names and (2) the beginning of a 
botanical garden in the college woods. At 
its weekly meetings students or faculty 
members give talks on subjects in the field 
of natural science. 

Pre-Medical Club 

This club is composed of those whose ma- 
jor interest lies in the practice of the med- 
ical profession, and aims to create a better 
understanding of the problems and interests 
of this field today. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



Languagre Clubs 

For students interested in modern lan- 
guages, there is opportunity to gain con- 
fidence in the use of the tongue, to increase 
your knowledge of foreign customs, and to 
have a lot of fun in the French, German, 
and Spanish clubs. 

State Clubs 

Wherever you come from there is almost 
svire to be someone else from there too. with 
whom you can form an organization named 
after your part of the country. There is a 
club for nearly every state represented by 
the student body. The purpose of the clubs 
is purely social. 

Publications 

There are two student publications, the 
weekly "Highland Echo" and the annual 
"Chilhowean." The "Highland Echo" is a 
newspaper, reporting campus news and re- 
flecting campus thought. Twelve freshman 
apprentices are chosen by examination of 
samples of their writing called for by their 
English teachers. 



'M" HANDBOOK 



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•M" HANDBOOK 



PART IV 



ATHLETICS 



36 MARTVILLE COLLEGE 



MARYVILLE AND ATHLETICS 
IN GENERAL 



College and athletics are always linked up 
in the same thought. Although Maryville 
does not specialize in athletics to the ex- 
clusion of scholarship, nevertheless it has a 
very broad program of athletics which fits 
each and every student. Maryville is not 
mercenary in her sports and pays no foot- 
ball players, basketball players, or any 
other kind of player. Here, athletics is a 
sport, not a profession. 

Maryville always has good teams, and 
more often than not it has winning teams. 
Of course we all like to win, but to win is 
not the main point, but wholesome sports- 
manship is stressed. It is an honor to make 
any of the teams at Maryville, for your 
scholastic standing must be high and your 
ability undoubted. 

The men's program is under the capable 
direction of Coaches Honaker and Thrower. 
You can't help but like these men, for they 
will teach you the game and give you a good 
opportunity to prove yourself. There is no 
favoritism with these coaches; each man has 
the same chance. 

Maryville has often played schools far 
bigger and stronger than itself, but has al- 
ways had the reputation of being a fighter. 
Everywhere you go people will say that 
Maryville has "fight" and "spirit." 

So come to Maryville with the idea of 
either seeing or playing with the teams of 
the school. It is up to you to have Mary- 
ville continue in its program of a good 
broad athletic value in a Christian College 
whose aim it is to build character. 

But remember, college isn't college with- 
out athletics; but neither is college college 
without scholastic standing. So strike a 
happy medium and be a real Maryvillian. 



"M" HANDBOOK 



VARSITY SPORTS 



Football 

Football is the first sport Marj^ville intro- 
duces to you. The training prog-ram starts 
with the opening of school in the fall, so if 
you are planning to come out for football 
make up your mind before you get here and 
report as soon as it is practical. Each year 
there is a squad of about 50 men who are 
all working for those coveted 11 places on 
the Varsity Team, so you see it takes hard 
work to get anywhere here at Maryville. 
But even if you are only a scrub, the coach 
is interested in you and will teach you foot- 
ball. Coach Honaker is in charge of this 
sport and let us tell you he knows his foot- 
ball and knows how to teach it. 

Maryville plays in the Smoky Mountain 
Conference and has had its share of cham- 
pionships, but every now and then it steps 
out of its class to give the big schools a 
lesson in spirit and sportsmanship. This 
year they are going up to Kentucky and 
teach the boys up there a few fundamentals 
in football. 

Let's go, men — out for practice the first 
week, and let's see what you have. There 
is a place on the varsity for you — are you 
going to fill it? 

Basketball 

Basketball is started as soon as football 
is over, and is also under the direction of 
Coach ' Honaker. A large squad is usually 
handled at first, but due to the nature of 
the game the squad is pared down through- 
out the first few weeks until it reaches 
about 10 or 15. But don't be discouraged. 
If you are of basketball material, be out 
there on the hardwood floor when the first 
practice is called, and show the coach what 
you are made of. You can make the squad 
if you want to — let's see you want to. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



There is a long schedule which lasts about 
six weeks, in which time all types of teams 
are played, but the most interesting and ex- 
citing are those played against our strong- 
est rivals in the Smoky Mountain Confer- 
ence. 

Baseball 

Now we have come to the sport in which 
Maryville is right at home. They say Coach 
Honaker is about the best baseball coach 
in the South. Let's see you come out and 
find out if this is true or not. Practice 
starts in March, and by that time you will 
be so used to having Maryville have winning 
teams that you will want to come out and 
make this a winning one also. 

A long schedule is played, many trips 
are taken; so let's see you in a Maryville 
baseball suit when March rolls around next 
year. 

Track and Field • 

Now we really have hit Maryville's stride. 
When it comes to track teams. Maryville 
just can't be beat. If Coach Thrower can't 
make a runner out of you, it's because your 
legs must be tied together. The day Mary- 
ville is beaten in track — well, we never think 
about that. There are about six track meets 
a year, one of whicli is usually with the 
University of Tennessee, and Maryville has 
lost to Tennessee two times in a row now, 
but by a few points, and this year we are 
out to get them and will get them. Are you 
going to be one of the men on the team? 
Look at the track records in this book and 
see if you think you can break them. If 
you can, don't come to Maryville and tell 
everybody about it; just keep quiet and 
when spring rolls about come out to the 
track and break all the records you can 
and we will be glad to place your name 
any place on the list. 



'M- HANDBOOK 



MINOR VARSITY SPORTS 



Cross-Country 

Each year for the last five years we have 
been hoping to have a cross-country team, 
but have always been unable for the simple 
reason that we can find no competition! 
But we have reasonable proof to believe 
that Tennessee is going to have one next 
year and wants to run against us, and of 
course we will have a team. Be that as it 
may, we always have a good cross-country 
race one a year for the school championship. 
This race is run during one of the home 
football games and has enjoyed a great deal 
of interest. A large cup is given to the 
winner by the Y. M. C. A. This race is five 
miles long and the record is 27 min., 26.8 
sec. Can you beat that? Whether you can 
or not, let's see you out for the cross- 
country this fall. 

Wrestling 

No sport has more favor with the students 
and town people than does wrestling. Coach 
Thrower alwajs has a winning team. In 
fact, he hasn't lost a match since he took 
over the sport four years ago. This season 
there were eight matches and of course 
Maryville took all eight, even going to far 
as to beat Vanderbilt 40 to and the Uni- 
versity of Tennessee 35 to 5. There is al- 
ways room on the wrestling team for you. 
There are eight different weights, and you 
sure can fit in there somewhere. Let's see 
you out when Coach Thrower gives the first 
wrestling call. 

Tennis and Swimming 

Coach Fischbach handles these two sports 
and does a very fine job of it. He has win- 
ning teams, many trips are taken, and you 
can't help liking to work under this coach. 
Maryville has made a very good showing 
in both tennis and swimming during the last 
season, so if you can w^ield the racquet or 
paddle the water, let's see you out. 



MARTVILLE COLLEGE 



INTERCLASS SPORTS 



Here's where you fellows shine who can't 
quite make the varsity, yet have a little 
ability in any one of the lines of sports. 
The Y. M. C. A. conducts interclass competi- 
tion in everything- from checkers to football. 
Each sport counts so many points, and the 
class which gets the most points for the 
entire year gets a cup. You have no fear 
of varsity competition in these sports, for 
all "letter" men and men on the present 
squads are ruled out of the events, and it is 
left entirely up to those who do not go out 
for varsity competition. 



LETTERS AND MONOGRAMS 



Designs 

Football: Garnet sweater bearing garnet 
letter "M" 8 inches by 8 inches. 

Basketball: Garnet sweater bearing garnet 
letter "M" 6 inches by 6 inches. 

Baseball: Garnet sweater bearing garnet 
letter "M" 7 inches by 7 inches. 

Track: Garnet sweater bearing- garnet let- 
ter "M" with wings. 5-inch block. 

Wrestling: Letter "M", 5 inches by 5 
inches. 

Tennis: Letter "M", 5 inches by 5 inches. 

Swimming-: Letter "M", 5 inches by 5 
inches. 

The letter for women's athletics is more 
decorative in form and the monogram con- 
sists of an "M" and a "C" superimposed 
upon each other. 



'M" HANDBOOK 



THE WEARING OF INIARYVLLLE 
LETTERS 



INIaryville letters and sweaters are to be 
worn only by those who have won them in 
the various sports. Those winning letters 
will be so desig-nated by the coaches. Any 
violation of this rule is frowned upon by 
students and facultJ^ Any good Maryville 
student who is loyal to the school would 
never wear a letter unless he or she has 
earned it. 

Any letter or monogram from any other 
school, be it high school or college, can not 
be worn while you are at Maryville. Several 
times this rule has been violated especially 
by the women students. Maryville has no 
way of enforcing this ruling but by the will 
of the students. We hope your loyalty to 
Maryville will not allow you to break this 
rule. So leave all your high school letters 
at home and come to college with the idea 
of having a Maryville "M" on your sweater 
. in the near future. Anyone is proud to 
v.ear a Maryville "M". 



MARTVILLE COLLEGE 



WOMEN'S ATHI.ETICS 

Point System of Athletic Awards 

Since the intercollegiate contests have 
been dispensed with the point system has 
been adopted. This gives every girl an equal 
chance to participate in every sport and a 
chance to win the coveted monogram, the 
small letter or the large letter and sweater. 

The honors are awarded as follows: 300 
points, Maryville Monogram "M.C." ; 400 
points, small letter "M"; 500 points, letter 
and sweater. 

Points shall be earned as follows: 

A. Teams. 50 points each team. 
Class Teams — 

1. Basketball 6 players team 

2. Soccer 11 players team 

3. Volleyball 9 players team 

4. Baseball 9 players team 

5. Tennis 6 players team 

Squad of any sport, 20 points. 
Manager of any team sport, 20 points. 
Captain of any team sport, 15 points. 
Perfect attendance, 10 points. 

B. Tests. 

1. Swimming: Limit, 50 points. 

2. Stunts: Limit, 25 points. 

3. Archery: Limit, 50 points. 

4. Track: Limit, 50 points. 

5. Hiking: Limit, 50 points. 

C. Scholarship. 

1. An "A" average in academic work for 
any semester, 20% of points won in ad- 
dition. 

2. A "B" average adds 10% of points won. 

D. Health. 

1. Observing health rules for one semes- 
ter, 25 points. Two semesters, 50 points. 



•M" HANDBOOK 



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"M" HANDBOOK 4 5 



ATHLETIC BOARD OF CONTROL 



President 
CHARLES LEWIS 

"Vice-President 
REX ALLEN 

Secretary 
LOUIS KRAINOCK 

Faculty Representatives 
DR. J. H. McMURRAY 
MISS JESSIE HERON 

Men Representatives 
ARCHIBALD PIEPER 
WILBUR LOESSBERG 

Girl Representatives 

NINA GAMBLE 
GRACE PROFFITT 

. Town Representatives 
DR. BYRNE 
JO. GAMBLE 



MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



ATHLETIC NOTES 



•M" HANDBOOK 47 



PART V 



SONGS, COLORS, 
YELLS 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



COLLEGE SONGS 



The Alma Mater 
I. 

Where Chilhowee's lofty mountains 

Pierce tlie southern blue, 
Proudly stands our Alma Mater, 

Noble, g-rand, and true. 

II. 

As thy hilltop crowned with cedars, 

Ever green appears; 
So thy memory fresh shall linger 

Through life's smiles and tears. 

III. 

Lift the chorus, wake the echoes. 

Make the welkin ring! 
Hail the queen of all the highland! 

Loud her praises sing. 

Chorus after each stanza: 

Orange, garnet, float forever, 

Ensign of our hill! 
Hail to thee, our Alma Mater! 

Hail to Maryville, 

Note. — An erect standing position and an 
vincovered head are prerequisite to a re- 
spectful attitude toward the Alma Mater at 
a time when it is being played or sung. 



"M" HANDBOOK 



Dear Old Maryville 

I. 

Near Chilhowee's mountain blue. Stands our 
Alma Mater true. 
Dear old Maryville, to thee we lift our 
song. 
'Neath thy cedar grove so fair, We shall 
breathe the mountain air, 
While with merry hearts the chorus we 
prolong. 

II. 

As the morning sunbeam's light Greets thee 
o'er Chilhowee's height. 
So our tribune. We as freely to thee bring. 
Youth's true homage full and free, We thus 
gladly render thee. 
Dear old Maryville, thy praise we freely 
sing. 

III. 

To thee, guardian of our youth, Faithful 
guide to light and truth. 
We, thy children, bring our songs of 
grateful praise. 
And when we shall leave thy hill. We shall 
ne'er forget thee still, 
Dear old Maryville, the scene of happy 
days. 

Chorus after each stanza: 

Sing we a song of our dear college home, 

Fondly we love thee still. 
And wherever we may be. Fond mem'ry 
turns to thee. 

Our Alma Mater, dear old Maryville. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



The Old Pep Song 

We've got the rep, rep, rep, of old Maryville! 
We've got the pep, pep, pep, of old College 

Hill! 
We've got the strength to knock 'em stiff 
And never know the diff. 
For we're from Maryville of Tennessee. 



The New Pep Song: 

Here we go! Here we go! 
Down the field to crush the foe, 

As the Scotties go marching along. 
Men of might! Men of fight! 
Orange, garnet, waving bright 

While we make the Hill merry with song. 
Then it's hi, hi. hi. 
We'll win this game or die. 

Highlanders! Fight to the end. 
Rah! Rah! 
And we won't be done 
Until the victory's won 

For the pride of our hearts — Maryville! 

College Coloi-s 

Orange and Garnet 

College Nickname 

Highlanders or Scotties 



'M" HANDBOOK 



COLLEGE YELLS 



The Howee — How 

Howee-how! Chilhowee! 
Maryville, Maryville. Tennessee! 

Hoo-rah! Hoo-rah! 
Maryville. Maryville, 

Rah, rah, rah! 

Howee-how! Chilhowee! 
Maryville, Maryville. Tennessee! 

Hoo-rah! Hoo-rah! 
Maryville. Maryville, 
Rah, rah, rah! 



The Old Fight Yell 

Yea, team! 

Fight! Fight! Fight! 
Yea, team! 

Fight! Fight! Fight! 
Yea, team! 

Fight! Fight! Fight! 
Yea!! FIGHT!!! 



The M-a-r-y — ville 

M-a-r-y — ville! 
M-a-r-y — ville! 
M-a-r-y — ville! 
Maryville! Maryville! Maryville! 



The Old Chant 

Ma — ry — ville; Ma — ry — ville; 
You — don't — know — Ma — ry — ville ; 
You — can't — beat — Ma — ry — ville. 
MARYVILLE!!! 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



BELL vSCHEDULE 



6:00 A.M. Rising Bell. 

6:56 A.M. Breakfast Bell. 

7:50 A.M. First Chapel Bell. 

8:05 A.M. Second Chapel Bell. 

8:30 A.M. First Hour Class. 

9:25 A.M. Second Hour Class. 

10:20 A.M. Third Hour Class. 

11:15 A.M. Fourth Hour Class. 

12:10 P.M. Fourth Class Dismissal. 

12:17 P.M. Dinner. 

1:10 P.M. Fifth Hour Class. 

2:05 P.M. Sixth Hour Class. 

3:00 P.M. Class Dismissal. 

5:55 P.M. Supper. 

6:45 P.M. First Study Bell. 

7:00 P.M. Second Study Bell. 

Extra Sunday bells are scheduled as follows: 

1:00 P.M. For Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. 

Meetings. 

6:45 P.M. First Vesper Bell. 

6:55 P.M. Second Vesper Bell. 

7:00 P.M. Third Vesper Bell. 



"M" HANDBOOK 



You Are Always Welcome 
At 

PROFFITT^S 

DEPARTMENT 
STORE 

''The Students' Store" 
Owned and Operated 

By 

Maryville College Men 
COLLEGE CLEANERS 

Quality Cleaning and 
Pressing 

LELAND SHANOR, Agt. 

Carnegie Hall 



MAHYVILLB COLLBOB 



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Photos ot Penn.iniMicN .ind 

ot Cli.ir.ictcr ! 

i 

Kod.ik Finijihiixg a Spivialtv \ 



I'diblc S.liuiuuhc-S 

lVlu"ioiis Sal.ids 

Hot and Cold Sod.is 

B<^ttor U'o Crt'.im 
tttiJ Our >\cc"i !.:i.'^ 

Frozen Frint SalaJ 

W'x> \.\ui SiuH*l> You WuU AuytUuis 

CITY DRW; COMPANY 

J 0-4 Brv>.»d^«a\ 



"M" HANDBOOK 



STERCHI BROS. 

\M':i<<)Mi:S YOll TO IMAinviI-l F- 

\isU Our I'Ycr S«"al«'s As 
OHvii As You Mk«' 

If in Need of 

Radios, Rugs, Lamps 

TIRES, WALL PAPER 

or 

ANY FURNITURE ITEM 

Don't Fail to Visit Us 

STERCHI BROS. 



Byerley's Grocery Store 

Fresh Salad, Fruits, Vegetables 
for Outings 

Everything for Every Occasion 



Flowers For All Occasions 

On the Hill or Back Home 

CLARK'S FLOWERS 

133 E. Broadway Phone 313 



56 MARTVILLE COLLEGE 



WELCOME, STUDENTS 

To 

Leonard Smitk s 
Grocery 

Fruits, Vegetables 

Meats 



Southern Dairies 
Ice Cream 

On Sale At 

ALL GOOD STORES 



•M" HANDBOOK 



NORTON 
HARDWARE CO. 

Paints 

Hardware 

Sporting Goods 

Electrical Appliances 

Where Your Patronage is 
Appreciated 



PHONE NO. 18 



BUY 

Bunte Candies 

at 

Y.M.C.A. and Y.W.C.A. 

Stores 

YOU'LL LIKE THEM 

Sam Toole Candy Co, 

Knoxville, Tcnn. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



CHANDLER-SINGLETON 
COMPANY 

DEPARTMENT STORE 



Whether It's Drugs or Sodas, Your 
Needs Can Best Be Served At 

MARTIN'S 

Two Modern Drug Stores 
Prescriptions Carefully Compountled 



For 

GOOD SANDWICHES 

and 

HOME-MADE PIES 

Go To 

TURNER'S CAFE 



"M" HANDBOOK 



Maryville College 

MARYVILLE, TENNESSEE 

Founded in 1819 



Through more than a century Mary- 
ville College has steadily gained in 
standards, enrollment, equipment, 
program, and influence. 

With 56% of its 800 students coming 
from the Southern Appalachian area, 
the College serves the region for 
which it was founded; yet with many 
States represented, it avoids the lim- 
itations of provincialism. 

Christian in purpose, history, and 
program, Maryville sends men and 
women to strengthen the Christian 
cause throughout the world and the 
Church. 

By sacrificial endeavor student ex- 
penses are kept astonishingly low, 
and self-help opportunities are pro- 
vided. 

RALPH WALDO LLOYD 
President 



60 MARTVILLE COLLEGE 



Y.W.C.A. Store 

Third Floor, Pearsons Hall 

GIRLS! GIRLS! 



When hunger or thirst 
You wish to appease, 
Come to the "Y" Store — 
We aim to please. 

Ice Cream Candy 

Cold Drinks Sandwiches 
Fruit Cakes 

Everything from Soup to 
Nuts 

LORENA MAY DUNLAP 

LEONE ANN BROWN 

Managers 



'M" HANDBOOK 



STUDENTS 


Trade At 


Y. M. C. A. Store 


CANDY 


CAKES ICE CREAM 


FRUIT DRINK 


and Necessities 


All Sold at 


Y. M. C. A. STORE 


On First Floor of Bartlett Ha!l 


PAY US A VISIT 


And let us have a chance to show you 

the quantity and quality of products 

sold here. 


J. H. MAGEE, Mgr. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



CARLISLE'S 

5c AND 10c STORE 

With a complete stock of clean, 
new merchandise, we are prepared 
to serve you promptly and to your 
entire satisfaction. 
We appreciate the patronage of 
College students, and welcome you 
to our store. 

CARLISLE'S 

5c AND 10c STORE 



PLEASE PATRONIZE 

OUR 

ADVERTISERS 

and mention 

The Maryville College 
Handbook 

to them. 
THANK YOU 

It is the advertisers who make fchLs 
hook possible. 

J. H. MAGEE, Business Mgr. 



•M" HANDBOOK 




64 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 




L. C. OLIN, M.D. 

309 Court Street 
Tel.: Residence, 84; Office, 746 f 

I Burchfield Hospital 

EYE, EAR, NOSE, 

THROAT 

Court Street 

Opposite Court House 

Dr. Thos. G. Stanley 

DENTIST 
Second Floor Wells Building 

I Dr. John M. Cox 

DENTIST 
Bank of Blount County Building