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Full text of "Maryville College Handbook [M Book] 1935-1936"

IDENTIFICATION 



Name 

Room ........ 

Class 

Home Address 



In case of Accident Notify- 



No. of Chape] Seat 
No. of Lab. Locker 
Gym Locker No. . . 
Other notations . . . 



'^t<^ A 



The 

Maryville College 
Handbook 

VOLUME XXX 

1935-1936 

Archibald F. Pieper, '36 
Editor-in-Chief 

Abby Higgins, '37 
Associate Editor 

AxN" McCambridge, '37 
Associate Editor 

LeRoy C. Obert, '36 
Business Manager 

Published by tlie 

Young Men's and Young 

Women's Christian Associations of 

Maryville College 

MARYVILLE, TENNESSEE 



CALENDAR, 1935-1936 



SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 




S M T W T F S 


S M T W T P 


S 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


12 3 4 5 6 


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8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


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22 23 24 25 26 27 


28 


29 30 


29 30 31 

APRIL 
S M T W T F 




OCTOBER 
S M T W T F S 


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1 2 3 


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6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


5 6 7 8 9 10 


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13 14 15 16 17 IS 19 


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18 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


19 20 21 22 23 24 


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27 28 29 30 31 .. .. 


26 27 28 29 30 . . 
MAY 




NOVEMBER 


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2 


1 2 


3 4 5 6 7 8 


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3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


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30 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


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DECEMBER 


JUNE 




S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F 


S 


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..12345 


6 


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7 8 9 10 11 12 


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28 29 30 




JANUARY 


JULY 

S M T W T F 


S 


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1 2 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


12 3 

5 6 7 8 9 10 
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4 
11 
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26 27 28 29 30 31 . . 


AUGUST 




FEBRUARY 


S M T W T F 


s 


S M T W T F S 
1 




1 


"2 '3 '4 '5 "e '7 

9 10 11 12 13 14 


8 


'2345678 


15 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


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22 


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23 24 25 26 27 28 


29 


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30 31 





CONTENTS 



Calendar, 1935-36 2 

College Calendar, 1935-36 4 

Dr. Ralph Waldo Lloyd (Plate) 6 

College President's Welcome 7 

Editorial Preface 8 

Part. 

I. General Introduction to Maryville ... 9 
II. Y. M. C. A. and T. W. C. A 15 

III. General Student Activity 25 

IV. Athletics 35 

V. Songs, Colors, Schedules 47 

Advertisements 53 



MARTVILLE COLLEGE 



COI.I.EGE CALENDAR 

1935-1936 

First Semester 

1935 

Sept. 11-16, Opening Program: 

Sept. 11, Wednesday, 0:30 a.m. — New 
students report. Those registered 
may pay bills. 

Sept. 12, Thursday, 8:10 a.m. — Opening 
ciiapel service. Registration. 

Sept. 13, Friday — First meeting of 
classes. 

Sept. 14, Saturday, 8:00 p.m. — Y. W. C. 
A. and Y. M. C. A. receptions. 

Sept. 16. Monday, 8:00 p.m. — Faculty 
reception. 

Oct. 2, Wednesday. 9:00 a.m. — Fall meeting 
of the Directors. 

Oct. 25, Friday — Founders' and Homecoming 
Day. 

Nov. 28, Thursday — Thanksgiving Day. 

Dec. 18. Wednesday, 3:00 p.m. — Christmas 
holidaj'S begin. 

1936 
.Jan. 2, Thursdaj', 8:10 a.m. — Class work re- 
sumed. 

Jan. 28, Tuesday — First semester ends. 



Second Semester 

Jan. 30, Thursday — Second semester begins. 

Vrh. 1. Tuesday — Februar:\- mecting.s begin. 

Apr. 10, Friday, 4:00 p.m. to Apr. 14, Tues- 
day, 8:10 a.m. — Spring vacation 

Alay 4-8, Registration for 193fi-19.''.7. 

May 28 to Jun-^ 2. Commencement ii:o.gi-am: 



'M" HANDBOOK 



May 28, Thursday, 8:00 p.m. — Gradua- 
tion exercises of the Expression De- 
partment. 

May 29, Friday, 8:00 p.m. — Senior class 
play. 

May 30, Saturday, 8:00 p.m. — Graduation 
exercises of the Music Department. 

May 31, Sunday, 10:30 a.m. — Baccalau- 
reate service. 

May 31, Sunday, 7:00 p.m. — Vesper serv- 
ice. 

June 1, Monday, Alumni Day — 

3:00-5:00 p.m. — President's reception. 
7:00 p.m. — Annual Alumni Associa- 
tion Dinner. 

June 2, Tuo.«day. 8:30 a.m. — Fpring meet- 
ing of the Directors. 

June 2. Tuesday, 10:00 a.m. — Commence- 
ment. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 




DR. RALPH WALDO LLOYD 
President of Maryville College 



'M" HANDBOOK 



COLLEGE PRESIDENT'S 
AVELCOME 

As old and new students take up 
their residence and work on College 
Hill, they may be sure of the inter- 
est and friendship of every officer 
and faculty member. We hope and 
pray that 1935-1936 may be a truly 
great year. 

Coming from many places and 
backgrounds, you will find your- 
selves soon bound together by loyalty 
to your college and her ideals. May 
this bond bring new enrichment to 
every Maryville man and woman. 

Ralph Waldo Lloyd, 
President of Maryville College. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



EDITORIAL PREFACE 



The Maryville College Y. M. C. A., in col- 
laboration with the Y. M. C. A., presents this 
book to you. We trust that we present it to 
those who will learn to love this "Hill" as 
we love it. It is our hope that this book will 
find itself in the hands of one who is ready 
and willing- to carry the Maryville traditions. 

We know that you are deeply interested 
in Maryville College and, recalling our pre- 
college days, we feel that you are wonder- 
ing what the place is like. In the few brief 
pages that follow, it is our purpose to give 
you a glimpse of our campus. This hand- 
book comes to you from students whose love 
and knowledge regarding Maryville College 
is unquestioned. You can place full reliance 
upon the following pages. Take this book 
and use it. It will help you if you let it be 
your guide to the cainpus. 

Our campus is your cainpus. People here 
want to see you succeed. Take full advan- 
tage of your opportunities, but remember 
that Maryville College is yours to use and 
not to abuse. We trust that you will be a 
student worthy of the college you plan to 
attend. May success and happiness be 
yours. 

THE EDITORIAL STAFF. 



•M" HANDBOOK 



PART I 



GENERAL INTRODUCTION 
TO MARYVILLE 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



GENERAL, INTRODUCTION TO 
MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



This general introduction is not to give 
you a complete description of our College, 
for not even a whole book could do that. 
You must experi nee Maryville for yourself 
and after you have been here for a few 
months you will be as enthusiastic over it as 
we are. Maryville has the power of getting 
into the student's blood and making all of 
its stud.nts ardent advocates of its charm 
and worth. 

Maryville College was founded in 1819 by 
Isaac Anderson to supply the need for an 
educated ministry for the Southwest. The 
school continued vv^ith a slow, steady growth 
until the Civil War, which closed the Col- 
lege for fiv? years. In 1866 the institution 
was reopened with a vary small enrollment 
which, however, grew very rapidly. The en- 
rollment in 1900 was about 400, of whom 
only 80 were of college rank. Last year 
859 students, all of them of college rank, 
were enrolled. 

The function of the College has changed 
with the years to suit the varying needs of 
the people it served. About ten years ago 
the preparatory department was discontinued 
and the College became what it is now, a 
liberal arts college providing a cultural 
background. Maryville is on the approv d 
list of the Association of American Universi- 
ties and offers to the student who will work 
an education comparable to any to be ob- 
tained anywhere in the country. 

The city of Maryville is situated sixte n 
miles south of Knoxville, Tennessee, and is 



•'M" HANDBOOK 



the county seat of Blount County. It has an 
elevation of 1,000 feet and is one of the gate- 
ways to the Gr,at Smoky Mountain National 
Park, the newest of the national parks. The 
population of Maryville is 5,000, with an- 
other 5,000 living- in Alcoa, a twin commun- 
ity named for the Aluminum Company of 
America, which operates a large factory 
there. 

From the campus can be seen th.^ heights 
of the Smoky, Chilhowee, and Cumberland 
Mountains, green in Spring and often white 
with snow in winter. Truly the campus has 
a beautiful natural surrounding. Make up 
your mind now to spend some time in the 
mountains, for many opportuniti s will be 
offered to you to do so, sometimes for an 
ovfrnight hike. 

A description of the campus itself is dif- 
ficult to make. We have over three hundred 
acres of rolling campus, including an exten- 
sive College woods of pine and fir. On the 
campus proper are many cedars and other 
evergreens, and in addition hundreds of 
smaller trees and shrubs which have been 
set out in the past two years. Included also 
on the campus is a nine-hole golf course. 

Though there are twenty buildings on the 
campus they do not give the impression of 
being crowded. The school catalogue gives 
a sun^marized account of the principal ones, 
but do not try to memorize the names or 
anything like that before coming down. 
After a few days at Maryville you will have 
them all straightened out from the Alumni 
Gym to "Willard Memorial and be able to 
travel around like a veteran. 

Maryville still aims to lay a positive em- 
phasis on religion and morals. Students are 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



required to attend Sunday school and 
church. Attendance at daily chapel services 
is also required. While the College is or- 
ganically related to the Presbyterian Church. 
U.S.A., It is not sectarian in purpose or pro- 
gram, and students attend the church of 
their choice. The leading denominations 
have churches in Maryville. 

There are no social fraternities at Mary- 
ville and no dancing, as it is not felt that 
they are necessary or in harmony with the 
general aims and purposes of the school. 
There will be plenty of social activity, how- 
ever, sponsored by the "Y," the Student 
Council, and various other organizations and 
clubs. There are four societies, two for men 
and two for women, each of which presents 
a short, entertaining program ever Saturday 
night. 

To give an indication of the activities on 
the Hill we will list some of the clubs. The 
vocational clubs, mainly for study and fel- 
lowship along particular lines, are: Student 
Volunteers, Ministerial Association, Pre-Med- 
ical Club, Law Club, Chemistry-Physics 
Club, Language Clubs, Spanish, French, and 
German. There are numerous state clubs 
composed of students from the same section 
of the country, a Shakespeare Club, and 
honor societies for athletics, debate, dra- 
matics and scholarship. Some of these 
groups are described more fully in later 
pages of your "M" Book. The ones men- 
tioned hero are not all the clubs. There are 
others which will welcome you to their 
membership as you qualify and feel inclined 
to join. Of course, membership in a club 
Is not essential, but it always proves helpful 
and worthwhile. 



■M" HANDBOOK 



A distinct feature of the college is the 
extent of the country represented by the stu- 
dent body. They come from thirty-two 
states, as widely separated as Massachusetts, 
Florida, and California. Last year three 
foreign countries were represented by mem- 
bers of missionaries' families. Naturally 
there is a considerable variation in back- 
ground among these students and contacts 
with them are among the advantages of 
Maryville. 

A brief word about last year's sports rec- 
ord is pertinent for we are proud of the 
athletic department. Maryville won the state 
wrestling championship for the fourth suc- 
cessive year; we won the Smoky Mountain 
Conference basketball, track, and baseball 
titles. Come to Maryville prepared to sup- 
port the teams. They will appreciate your 
encouragement. Football starts right with 
the opening of school in September and 
practically all year there are athletic events. 

When you arrive in Knoxville, either in 
the bus or train station, look for someone 
with a Maryville tag. Some of the upper- 
classmen will likely be on hand to direct 
you over the last lap of your journey. You 
won't have any difficulty in finding the way 
over. 

Then when you land on the campus, mak» 
.vour way to one of the information desks 
or tables staffed by members of the Y. W. 
and Y. M. C. A. Make yourself known to 
them and they will direct you to your dor- 
mitorj'. Other students will be on hand in 
the dorms to help you with your baggage 
and assist you in finding your room. You 
may be bewildered a little at first, as there 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



always is some confusion, but it won't take 
you long- to get your bearings. 

You will be impressed with the friendly 
spirit shown at Maryville. There is no haz- 
ing or mistr.ating of the new students. 
Don't be afraid of asking questions or of 
borrowing a sheet or towel until your trunk 
comes. The older students have been 
through it all before and they are anxious 
to help you. The new girls will be especially 
taken care of by their "big sisters" arranged 
for by the Y. W. C. A. The fellows are not 
detailed off as "big brothers," but you won't 
find any lack of assistance. 

We do not think it necessary to finish this 
bri:f introduction wath any general advice 
or exhortation. You who are coming here 
even for the first time are college men and 
women and you can decide thing-s for your- 
selves. You will likely make mistakes at 
first, but you will Karn in a very short time 
to make the best adjustments to college life. 
Come to Maryville prepared to work, to 
maive friends, and, above all, to enjoy your- 
self. 



•M" HANDBOOK 



PART II 



Y. M. C. A. 

and 
Y. W. C. A. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



Y. M. C. A. PRESIDENT'S WELCOME 



DEAR FELLOWS: 

The "Y" extends to every new student a 
hearty welcome. We are happy that you 
will soon be with us at Maryville College. 
We are interested in you, and we shall do 
our best to make you feel at home. 

Your biggest questions will probably arise 
during the first few weeks. Please feel free 
to call upon any "Y" man for help — he will 
be looking for you. You look for him. 

Our program centers around vital everyday 
problems which we are trying to interpret 
in the light of Christ's teachings. We are 
working to make Christ master of body, 
mind, and soul; keeping before us the motto: 
"For to me to live is Christ." 

The Y. M. C. A. officers and cabinet are 
ready to serve you. Come to the "Y" build- 
ing at your convenience to talk it over with 
the fellows. 

I am personally interested in each one of 
you new men; I am hoping that you will 
enter into the wholesome, Christian atmos- 
phere of Maryville College and of our Y. 
M. C. A. 

Yours sincerely, 

ROBERT E. LODWICK. 

President Y. M. C. A. 



•M" HANDBOOK 



Y. W, C. A. PRESIDENT'S \A ELC03IE 



DEAR PROSPECTIVE MARYVltLIANS: 

If you like to plaj^ or sing, to mal<:e a 
speech or give a tea, to do social service 
worker to participate in athletics, or if you 
just like to be sociable, Y. W. C. A. wants 
you. 

If you like reverent devotional metings, 
stimulating discussion groups, inspiring mu- 
sic and literature, or intimate fireside chats, 
you want T. W. C. A. 

We are glad you are coming and we are 
planning to make j'ou love Maryville as we 
do. We hav^' enough faith in the merits 
of our college to say that our task won't 
be difficult. 

We will be on hand when you get here — - 
Big Sisters, Nu Gamma Leaders, and plenty 
of real friends. Then the fun will begin. 

Sincen ly yours, 

ELIZABETH KUNKEL, 
President Y. W. C. A. 



MARYVILL.E COLLEGE 



Y. M. C. A. ADMINISTRATION 

1935-1936 



Officers - 

President . Robert E. Lodwick 

Vice-President Archibald F. Pieper 

Secretary Robert D. Downes 

Treasurer Joseph T. Andrews 

Cabinet 

Athletics Frank Dean 

Harold Jones 

Boys' Work James Wade 

Le Roy Obert 

Fellowship James Chittick 

Alex Christie 

Lyceum Glover Leitch 

Mission Willis Garrett 

Music Gerald Beaver 

Store Donnell McArthur 

Worship Ralph Llewellyn 

Richard Schlafer 



*M" HANDBOOK 19 



Y. W. C. A. ADMINISTRATION 

President Elizabeth Kunkel 

Vice-President Katherine Orr 

Secretary Shirley Jackson 

Treasurer Ruth Chittick 

Nu Gamma Chairman .. .Mary Gladys Brown 
Program Chairman Martina Robison 

Assistant Helen Chambers 

Music Calista Palmer 

Devotions Ruth Romig 

World Fellowship Edith Nicolai 

Marjorie Fleming 

Mission Chairman Florence Bruno 

Orphanage Chairman Lois Brown 

Assistant Ruth Proffltt 

"Y" Store Manager Mary Gladys Brown 

Assistant Dorothy Mae Lewis 

Publicity Chairman Christine Hammett 

Athletic Chairman Catherine Smith 

Social Chairman Leone Ann Brown 

Assistant Lillian Crawford 

Lyceum Chairman Charlotte Upp 

Librarians Ruth McCampbell 

Florine Stevens 
Elizabeth Riemer 

"M" Book Chairman ....Ann McCambridge 
Assistant Abbey Higgins 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



Y. M. C. A. ACTIVITY 



"For me to live is Clirist." The T. M. C. 
A. is alive. It seeks to serve tlie students 
in every way possible to help them to posi- 
tive living. The cabinet is made up of rep- 
resentative and congenial Maryville fellows 
who will help you in any way they can. 

The "Y" places proper emphasis upon in- 
terclass athletics for those who can not par- 
ticipate in varsity competition. Football, 
tennis, swimming, basketball, track, wrest- 
ling, handball, and hiking are included in 
the athletic program. 

At the "Y" reading and game rooms in 
Bai'tlett Hall you will find a good radio and 
current magazines for your entertainment. 
Games provided to try your skill and to 
amuse you are checkers, chess, ping-pong, 
and pool. These rooms are maintained to 
make your college life happier; be sure to 
take advantage of the opportunities offered 
there. 

For you new men to get acquainted and 
to discover your talents and abilities, a 
fellowt-hip club is organized by the "Y" soon 
after the beginning of the school year. All 
new men are urged to become active mem- 
bers of this group. 

The Sunday afternoon meetings in Bart- 
lett Hall are for all the fellows on the hill. 
The programs are vital, short, and interest- 
ing. Special music, helpful discussions, and 
prominent speakers make these weekly meet- 
ings of value to every student. Most of the 
"Y" members have an opportunity to par- 
ticipate at some time during the year. 

The "Y" does offer many opportunities for 
you. Get in tho habit of taking part in its 
activities. 



'M" HANDBOOK 



Y. W. C. A. ACTIVITY 



Maryville's Y. W. C. A. has, for forty-seven 
years, purposed to help girls find satisfaction 
and peace in Christian living. Contributing 
directly to this aim are the programs of 
Sunday afternoon worship services, Nu Gam- 
ma Sigma groups. Big Sister movements, and 
participation in the East T nnessee Inter- 
racial Commission. 

The program of Y. W. C. A. also includes 
expressive activities such as semi-annual 
tennis tournaments, production of the May 
Day pageant, and a part in bringing Lyceum 
artists to the campus. For those interested 
in social work there are opportunities to 
help in the mission chapels and in the or- 
phanage. 

The organization maintains contacts with 
wider groups by sending delegates to the 
State ' Student Conference and the Blue 
Ridge Conf.rence for Southern Colleges and 
Universities. It is also affiliated with the 
World Student Christian Association. 



22 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



JOINT ACTIVITIES 



Joint Devotional Meetings 

Usually the devotional meetings of the 
Y. M. C. A. and the Y. W. C. A. on Sunday 
afternoons are held separately, but at vari- 
ous times joint meetings are held, in the 
conduct of which both organizations co- 
operate. The programs of these joint meet- 
ings are of a special character, and are very 
worthwhile. 

Fred Hope Drives 

This drive is not carried on by the "Y's", 
but is carried on by all the students of the 
school and we thought best to bring this 
to your attention. Fred Hope was a student 
at Maryville some years ago, but now he is 
in Africa, and each year a volunteer offer- 
ing is taken up by the school for Fred Hope 
and his work. 

Blue Ridgre Conferences 

Each spring, following commencement, a 
conference of Southern college Y. M. C. A.'s 
and Y. W. C. A.'s is held at Blue Ridge, 
North Carolina. The two organizations on 
College Hill regularly send delegates to these 
conferences. 

The Artist Series 

The Artist Series, sponsored jointly by the 
Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A., consists of 
about four numbers each year, including 
musical, literary, or other cultural enter- 
tainment. You will want to attend these 
programs, for you pay for them in with your 
student activities fund, and they are of 
great interest here at Maryville. 

Circuses 

Once a year the alumni gymnasium is the 
scene of a tremendous circus, put on jointly 
by the Y. M. C. A. and the Y. W. C. A. It's 
fun, and we are sure you will want to be 
in the circus or at least see it. 



■M" HANDBOOK 



M GAMMA C'HAIR3IAN'S WELCOME 



GREETINGS, NEW GIRLS! 

Nu Gamma Sigma is that part of Y. W. 
C. A. designed to help you get acquainted 
with Maryville College and its students. As 
soon as you are registered your name is 
given to one of the Nu Gamma leaders and 
you become a part of her group. If you 
have registered early enough j-ou will re- 
ceive a letter from this leader during the 
summer and if you have any questions or 
desire any information, feel free to ask her. 
If you have not registered earlj^ enough to 
receive a letter during the summer you will 
be placed In a Nu Gamma group as soon as 
you arrive. Through these groups, which 
meet weekly for a month at the first of 
school, we hope you will learn to know 
Maryville, its traditions and ideals, and your 
contemporary, old and new students. The 
purpose of Nu Gamma is to give you a 
chance to know what to expect of Mary- 
ville and what Maryville expects of you and 
to make a definite place here for you at 
once. 

Consider this a personal note for each of 
you and feel that you already know me, 
and you will soon know your Nu Gamma 
leader. If you know two people here, you 
can no longer be a stranger. We two who 
know you and are known by you want to 
help you feel at home and introduce you 
to our other friends. 

All of Maryville is greeting you, but we 
want you to feel a very special welcome 
from Y. W. C. A. in general and Nu Gamma 
in particular. 

Sincerely, 

MARY GLADYS BROWN. 
Nu Gamma Sigma Chairman. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



WHO'S WHO AT MARYVILLE 



Alpha SigTtia Archibald. Pieper, Pres. 

Athenian David McArthur, Pres. 

Athletic Association . .James HoUaway, Pres. 

Bainonian . , Ellen Hitch, Pres. 

Chilhowean William Morgan, Editor 

Charles Luminati, Bus. Mgr. 
Women's Glee Club. . . .Calista Palmer, Pres. 

Glee Singers Carl Fisher, Pres. 

Highland Echo Bryan Payne, Editor 

Herbert Hunt, Bus. Mgr. 

Junior Class Thomas Bryan, Pres. 

Ministerial Association .. .Alex Christie, Pres. 

Pi Kappa Delta Archibald Pieper, Pres. 

Senior Class Moses Gamble, Pres, 

Sophomore Class David Maas, Pres. 

Student Coun. .Frank Atchison, Pres. Pro-tem 
Th:ta Alpha Phi... Leone Ann Brown, Pres. 
Theta Epsilon. . . . Mary Gladys Brown, Pres. 
Women's Glee Club ... .Calista Palmer, Pres. 

Y. M. C. A Robert Lodwick, Pres. 

Y. W. C. A Elizabeth Kunkle, Pres. 



"M" HANDBOOK 



PART III 



GENERAL STUDENT 
ACTIVITY 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



General Student Activity 



On the Maryville College campus there 
are enough organized activities to capture 
the interest and utilize the ability of every 
student. To some of these organizations 
you may belong by merely expressing the 
desire. Some, however, are run on a selec- 
tive membership basis, and in still others, 
such as the. honorary fraternities, member- 
ship is a distinction that comparatively few 
attain. 

Student Council 

The Student Council is composed of eight 
seniors, six juniors, four sophomores, and 
four freshmen. This body is not student 
government, but it represents student opin- 
ion and works with the faculty in promoting 
desirable movements. The members are 
elected by their classes as representing stu- 
dent sentiment. From the Council two com,- 
mittees are chosen, the Student-Faculty 
Committee and the Highland Echo Commit- 
tee. 



NATIONAL HONORARY FRATERNITIES 



Pi Kappa Delta 

Maryville has the distinction of having the 
Tennessee Alpha Chapter of the national 
honorary fraternity Pi Kappa Delta. In the 
spring of 193 5, representatives won first 
place in both men's and women's debate at 
the South Atlantic Convention. 



•M" HANDBOOK 



Theta Alpha Phi 

Talented dramatic students may, upon 
meeting certain requirements for member- 
ship, be initiated into the Tennessee Delta 
Chapter of the national honorary dramatic 
fraternity Theta Alpha Phi, located at 
Maryville. 

Sigma Alpha Psi 

The Maryville chapter of Sigma Alpha Psi 
was established in 1930. Membership is open 
to all men of the college "who maintain sat- 
isfactory scholarship and command the re- 
spect of their associates as athletes and 
gentlemen." Membership Is earned by meet- 
ing the requirenients of the various athletic 
tests in the presence of a responsible com- 
mittee. The object of the society is the en- 
couragement of the moral, physical, and 
mental development and training among col- 
lege students. 

Local Honoi-ary Fraternity 

Alpha Gamma Sigma was organized in the 
spring of 1934, for the purpose of motivat- 
ing high scholarship among students. Its 
requirements are equal to those of Phi Beta 
Kappa. Ten per cent of the graduating 
class may be admitted provided the mem- 
bers have a grade point ratio of 6.5, or 
somewhat more than a "B" average. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES 



There are on the Hill two sets of literary 
societies. Each set consists of a society for 
boys and one for girls that are known as 
brother and sister societies. Theta Epsilon 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



and Bainonian are the sister societies, re- 
spectively, of Alplia Sigma and Athenian. 

All four societies hold regular meetings 
every Saturday night. Each has its respec- 
tive hall. The meetings held here consist 
of short business meetings followed by pro- 
grams of varied sorts in which members of 
the society are expected to take part when 
called upon, in advance, by the program sec- 
retaries. Once a semester each set of so- 
cieties holds a joint meeting in which boys 
and girls co-operate on matters of program, 
decorations,, and refreshments. 

At the beginning of the year the women's 
societies sponsor rush weeks to introduce 
new girls to the members of each society. 
At the end of the two weeks taken by the 
rush program new girls are given the op- 
portunity to join either of the societies. 
Both groups are glad to receive new mem- 
bers, and there is a friendly rivalry as to 
which one can attract the larger number. 

Men make their choices as to society 
nipmbership by visiting regular meetings of 
each. 

There is another form of rivalry among 
the societies besides that of membership. 
Each society presents a play during the 
winter known as its mid-winter. A com- 
mittee of judges gives a decision as to the 
relatives merits of the plays, and the so- 
ciety presenting the best play is awarded a 
silver cup. The society receiving the cup 
three years in succession is the permanent 
owner of it. For the past two years Theta 
Epsilon has received the cup. 

We sincerely hope that each new student 
will find a place truly his in one of the 
organizations. Choose the one in which you 
feel you will be happiest after you have 
carefully considered each. Each society 
sends a hearty greeting to every new stu- 
dent. 



•M" HANDBOOK 



MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 

The five musical organizations on the 
campus provide an opportunity to develop 
musical talent. Three of the organizations 
are choral and two instrumental. 

The three choral organizations are the 
vesper choir, the Maryville Glee Singers and 
the Women's Glee Club. The Vesper Choir 
is composed of forty mixed voices chosen 
through try-outs by the choir director. In 
robes and surplices it serves at the Sunday 
evening services, and on week days without 
the robes leads the daily chapel singing. 

The Maryville Glee Singers is a male 
chorus of eighteen or twenty voices. This 
chorus gives at least one concert every year. 
The Women's Glee Club is a similar organ- 
ization for women. 

The combined choral organizations went 
to Cincinnati, Ohio, on May 21-24, 1935, and 
sang at the Presbyterian General Assembly. 

The two instrumental organizations are 
the band and orchestra. The orchestra has 
a concert every year and plays at many 
other functions. 

RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS 



Besides Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. there 
are three other outstanding religious activi- 
ties. The Ministerial Association and Stu- 
dent Volunteer Band are organizations for 
those interested in the ministry and missions 
respectively. The ministerial group holds 
weekly meetings, but its most important 
activity is that embodied in four standing 
cominittees which conduct regular preach- 



30 MARTVILLE COLLEGE 

ing and pastoral work in the county prison, 
the county almshouse, the McGhee Street 
Chapel, and the country churches in the 
vicinity of Maryville. 

The Student Volunteer group is composed 
not only of those who have pledged them- 
selves to the foreign field, but of those who 
are interested in this form of Christian 
work. Regular meetings of the group are 
held Sunday evenings after vespers. Some 
phase of missionary work is considered, and 
frequently missionaries on furlough provide 
valuable and inspiring first hand material. 

Another religious activity is the annual 
series of February meetings. The fii'st series 
was held in 1877, and they have been held 
every year since. The object of the Febru- 
ary meetings is a deepening of the spiritual 
life on the campus and a strengthening of 
the spiritual attitude conducive to greater 
seriousness of thought and action. The 
speaker for the meetings is a prominent re- 
ligious leader of the day, chosen long be- 
forehand with the purpose of the meetings 
as the objective in selection. 

CLUBS 



Writers' Workshop 

Students who show interest and ability in 
literary work may be elected to the Writers' 
Workshop. The members are elected from 
the faculty and the junior and senior 
classes. Each member writes and reads 
aloud for criticism one paper a semester. 

"M" Club 

The "M" Club membership is restricted to 
those girls who have earned the college 
letter by participation in athletic activity 
and the keeping of health rules. 



'M" HANDBOOK 



Pi Upsilon 

The Hi-Trail Club is a hiking club limited 
to twelve men. Its activities include hikes 
to nearby mountains several times each sem- 
ester. 

Home Economics Club 

Home Eg majors have formed a club as 
the medium for the performance of practical 
projects in their various fields of interest. 



Chemistry-Physics Club 

In this club students interested in the two 
sciences composing its name meet to perform 
experiments in these fields. 



Nature Club 

The Nature Club is for those interested 
in botany, zoology, and related sciences. To 
be admitted you are required to take a test 
on general scientific knowledge. The club 
has carried out two outstanding projects in 
the past two years: (1) the tagging of the 
trees on the campus with their common and 
botanical names and (2) the beginning of a 
botanical garden in the college woods. At 
its weekly meetings students or faculty 
members give talks on subjects in the field 
of natural science. 



Pre-Medlcal Club 

This club is composed of those whose ma- 
jor interest lies in the practice of the med- 
ical profession, and aims to create a better 
understanding of the problems and interests 
of this field today. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



Language Clubs 

For students interested in modern lan- 
guages, there is opportunity to gain con- 
fidence in tlie use of the tongue, to increase 
your Itnowledge of foreign customs, and to 
have a lot of fun in the French, German, 
and Spanish clubs. 

State Clubs 

Wherever j'ou come from there is almost 
sure to be someone else from there too. with 
whom you can form an organization named 
after your part of the country. There is a 
club for nearly every state represented by 
the student body. The purpose of the clubs 
is purely social. 

Publications 

There are two student publications, the 
weekly "Highland Echo" and the annual 
"Chilhowean." The "Highland Echo" is a 
newspaper, reporting campus news. Twelve 
freshman apprentices are chosen by exam- 
ination of samples of their writing called for 
by th.ir English teachers. 



'M" HANDBOOK 



33 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



BELL SCHEDULE 



6:00 A.M. Rising Bell. 

6:56 A.M. Breakfast Bell. 

7:50 A.M. First Chapel Bell. 

8:05 A.M. Second Chapel Bell. 

8:30 A.M. First Hour Class. 

9:25 A.M. Second Hour Class. 

10:20 A.M. Third Hour Class. 

11:15 A.M. Fourth Hour Class. 

12:10 P.M. Fourth Class Dismissal. 

12:17 P.M. Dinner. 

1:10 P.M. Fifth Hour Class. 

2:05 P.M. Sixth Hour Class, 

3:00 P.M. Class Dismissal. 

5:55 P.M. Supper. 

6:45 P.M. First Study Bell. 

7:00 P.M. Second Study Bell. 

Extra Sunday bells are scheduled as follows: 

1:00 P.M. For Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. 

Meetings. 

6:45 P.M. First Vesper Bell. 

6:55 P.M. Second Vesper Bell. 

7:00 P.M. Third Vesper Bell. 



'M" HANDBOOK 35 



PART IV 



ATHLETICS 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



MARYVILLE ATHLETIC POLICY 

In this modern day of education, in which 
the nature of curricula demands confinement 
and concentration on the part of the stu- 
dent, athletics, when sanely administered, 
become a vital part of wholesome living. 
Maryvill^, we are proud to say, is well ac- 
coutered in this respect, for her athletic pol- 
icies embody both varsity and intramural 
sports. 

A member of the Smoky Mountain Ath- 
letic Conference, composed of nine smaller 
colleges and univv^rsities in East Tennessee 
and Western North Carolina, Maryville en- 
joys the prestige of being the largest col- 
lege within the conference. But her direc- 
tors arj not content to sit by and enjoy that 
chance distinction. Instead, the close of 
every college year finds Maryville at the top 
of the conference in some sport or another. 
During the past year, under the excellent 
direction of Coaches Honaker and Thrower 
and Assistant Coach Boretsky, Maryville 
teams swept through five championships 
within the conference and the state of Ten- 
ness e. Among these were three — track, 
baseball, and basketball — within the Smoky 
League, the other two being state champion- 
ships in baseball and wrestling. Coach Bob 
Thrower's championship grapplers this year 
suffered their first defeat in five years, win- 
ning the title regardless. These are only a 
few of the sporting honors which Maryville 
team heap upon themselves every year. 
More to be considered here is the brand of 
good sportsmanship by which Maryville Col- 
lege is known both far and near. 

As is the practice in many colleg s Mary- 
ville does not buy her sportsmen. In fact. 



•M" HANDBOOK 37 



so firmly has that glamorous old tradition 
of athletic glory been implanted in the 
hearts of Maryvillians that her varsity men 
frown readily upon the idea of receiving 
mon^y for their services. Thus it becomes 
more of an honor for the student to win a 
place on the team, for since he cannot be 
bought he must prove himself worthy scho- 
lastically, and, of course, physically. 

The men's athletic program is under the 
capable direction of Coach Lombe S. Hon- 
aker and Coach Bob Thrower, two men who 
have given long service to the college and 
who have kept in contact with all late de- 
velopments in the t chnique of coaching. 
You will find that these coaches are at once 
genial, just, understanding, and efficient men, 
always ready to help YOU develop YOUR 
athletic potential to team calibre. 

Maryville teams often play much larger 
colleges and universities, for it is felt that 
valuable experience can be gathered here. In 
these contacts it never fails to become evi- 
dent that the Maryville spirit is a strong 
one to be reckoned with, and that every- 
where her teams have gone they have im- 
pressed onlookers with their fight. 

It may be that you are not prepared to 
take part in any athletic events. Be that as 
it may, come with at least the idea to sup- 
port her teams with that loyalty which they 
deserve. Upon your shoulders will rest the 
continuity of the Maryville program, that of 
a broad athletic value in a Christian College 
whose aim is to build character. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



VAKSITY SPORTS 



Football 

Your spine tingles and your heartbeat 
quickens when, under the bright power 
lamps, the timekeeper's shrill whistle 
streams out across the cool night air of 
Wilson Field, for then the football season, 
the biggest season in Maryville sportdom, 
has opened. With the donning of the mole- 
skins competition commences in all pigskin 
camps around the conference, and often 
waxes hot before the season ends. 

Intense training starts about two weeks 
before the opening of the college year, so 
if you are planning to come out, make up 
your mind to report as early as possible for 
practice. Every year finds a squad of nearly 
fifty men working hard for those coveted 
eleven positions on the varsity. With Coach 
Honaker as head coach and Coach Bob 
Thrower assistant, there is plenty of hard 
work to be done prior to varsity considera- 
tion, but this does not mean that they will 
forsake you, if you make on the scrub team, 
for the varsity interests. As good coaches 
always are, they are interested in you and 
what you can do^ whether now or next year. 

As has been mentioned before, Maryville 
competes in the Smoky Mountain Athletic 
Conference, in which her men and coaches 
command respect for their consistently good 
sportsmanship. 

Let's go, men — out for practice the first 
week and show us what you have. There is 
a place open on the varsity for you. Are 
you going to fill it? 

Basketball 

For the past few years, in fact, ever since 
basketball became organized within the con- 
ference, Maryville handlers of the sphere 



"M" HANDBOOK 39 



have hovered around the top of the honor 
list. Only this last year the Scotties, as they 
are known collectively, smashed conference 
routine to march through a thirteen-game 
conference schedule undefeated. The sport 
comes under the guidance of Coach Honaker, 
who wastes neither time nor energy in pro- 
ducing the most polished machine possible. 
Practice begins along near the end of the 
football season and together with the usual 
long schedule draws the season well on into 
March before bringing it to a close. 

If j'ou have the stuff and feel that you 
can show it, then you're the man Coach 
Honaker wants, for conference rivalry is 
hot and wearying-. And don't forget, he 
wants your good sportsmanshiii as well as 
your body. 



Baseball 

It is said by many people in many perti- 
nent circles that Coach Honaker is one of 
the best baseball coaches in the South, and 
true it is that he has sent his share, yea, 
more than his share, of good men up the 
long trail to big league baseball. So strong 
are his teams that it becomes hot news 
around the conference when another team 
happens to cinch the crown over the High- 
landers. 

Prospects begin to gather around the dia- 
mond about the first of March for pre-season 
limbering tactics, the ole sport talk begins 
to burble down in the village, and everybody 
knows that Coach is about to begin another 
march to conference supremacy. A long 
schedule is played, many trips are taken, 
and everybody is amply repaid in good times 
for energy expended. 

If you can play baseball. Coach Honaker 
wants you, for he must build into his cham- 
pionship structures the very soundest ma- 
terial he can find. 



MARYVir.LE COLLEGE 



Tra«k and Field 

The college records in track and field 
events which you will find listed a bit far- 
ther on are challenges to you to come out 
and show Coach Thrower what you can do. 
One look at Coach Bob and you will under- 
stand why he is so well liked by his men, 
why he builds every year conference cham- 
pions, and why he still holds the college 
record for the shot put. One thing is cer- 
tain; he never asks a man to do on the track 
or field what he cannot do himself. 

Track practice gets under way about the 
middle of March and holds sway until the 
first week or two in May. The schedule 
calls for six or more meets, among which 
is the state track and field meet and the 
Smoky Mountain Conference meet, which 
was held at Maryville last year, and which 
will be held at Lincoln Memorial University 
this year. 

Coach Thrower offers a great many de- 
partments in which you may be able to dis- 
play skill. We'll be watching for you. 



■M" HANDBOOK 



MINOR VARSITY SPORTS 



Cross-Country 

Each year for the last five years we have 
been hoping to have a cross-country team, 
but have always been unable for the simple 
reason that we can find no competition! 
But we have reasonable proof to believe 
that Tennessee is going to have one next 
year and wants to run against us, and of 
course we will have a team. Be that as it 
may, we always have a good cross-country 
race one a year for the school championship. 
This race is run during one of the home 
football games and has enjoyed a great deal 
of interest. A large cup is given to the 
winner by the Y. M. G. A. This race is five 
miles long and the record is 27 min., 26.8 
sec. Can you beat that? Whether you can 
or not, let's see you out for the cross- 
country this fall. 

Wrestling 

No sport has more favor with the students 
and town people than does wrestling. Coach 
Thrower al'ways has a winning team. In 
fact, he hasn't lost a match since he took 
over the sport four years ago. This season 
there were eight matches and of course 
Maryville took all eight, even going to far 
as to beat Vanderbilt 40 to and the Uni- 
versity of Tennessee 35 to 5. There is al- 
ways room on the wrestling team for you. 
There are eight different weights, and you 
sure can fit in there somewhere. Let's see 
you out when Coach Thrower gives the first 
wrestling call. 

Tennis and Swimming: 

Coach Fischbach handles these two sports 
and does a very fine job of it. He has win- 
ning teams, many trips are taken, and you 
can't help liking to work under this coach. 
Maryville has made a very good showing 
in both tennis and swimming during the last 
season so if you can wield the racquet or 
paddle the water, let's see you out. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



INTERCLASS SPORTS 



Here's where you fellows shine who can't 
quite make the varsity, yet have a little 
ability in any one of the lines of sports. 
The Y. M. C. A. conducts interclass competi- 
tion in everything- from checkers to football. 
Each sport counts so many points, and the 
class which gets the most points for the 
entire year gets a cup. You have no fear 
of varsity competition in these sports, for 
all "letter" men and men on the present 
squads are ruled out of the events, and it is 
left entirely up to those who do not go out 
for varsity competition. 



LETTERS AND MONOGRAMS 



Desigms 

Football: Garnet sweater bearing garnet 
letter "M" S inches by 8 inches. 

Basketball: Garnet sweater bearing garnet 
letter "M" 6 inches by 6 inches. 

Baseball: Garnet sweater beaming garnet 
letter "M" 7 inches by 7 inches. 

Track: Garnet sweater bearing garnet let- 
ter "M" with wings, 5-inch block. 

Wrestling: Letter "M", 5 inches by 5 
inches. 

Terinis: Letter "M", 5 inches by 5 inches. 

Swimming-: Letter "M", 5 inches by 5 
inches. 

The letter for women's athletics is more 
decorative in form and the monogram con- 
sists of an "M" and a "C" superimposed 
upon each other. 



"M" HANDBOOK 



THE WEARING OF MARYVILLE 
LETTERS 



Maryville letters and sweaters are to be 
worn only by those who have won them in 
the various sports. Those winning letters 
will be so designated by the coaches. Any 
violation of this rule is frowned upon by 
students and faculty. Any good Maryville 
student who is loyal to the school would 
never wear a letter unless he or she has 
earned it. 

Any letter or monogram from any other 
school, be it high school or college, can not 
be worn while j^ou are at Maryville. Several 
times this rule has been violated, especially 
by the women students. Maryville has no 
way of enforcing this ruling but by the will 
of the students. We hope your loyalty to 
Maryville will not allow you to break this 
rule. So leave all your high school letters 
at home and come to college with the idea 
of having a Maryville "M" on your sweater 
in the near future. Anj'one is proud to 
wear a Maryville "M". 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



WOMEN'S ATHLETICS 



Point System of Athletic Awards 

Since the intercollegiate contests have 
been dispensed with the point system has 
been adopted. This gives every girl an equal 
chance to participate in every sport and a 
chance to win the coveted monogram, the 
small letter or the large letter and sweater. 

The honors are awarded as follows: 300 
points, Maryville Monogram "M.C." ; 400 
points, small letter "M"; 500 points, letter 
and sweater. 

Points shall be earned as follows: 

A. Teams. 50 points each team. 

Class Teams — 

1. Basketball 6 players team 

2. Soccer 11 players team 

3. Volleyball 9 players team 

4. Baseball 9 players team 

5. Tennis 6 players team 

Squad of any sport, 20 points. 
Manager of any team sport. 20 points. 
Captain of any team sport, 15 points. 
Perfect attendance, 10 points. 

B. Tests. 

1. Swimming: Limit, 50 points. 

2. Stunts: Limit, 25 points. 

3. Archery: Limit, 50 points. 

4. Track: Limit, 50 points. 

5. Hiking: Limit, 50 points. 

C. Scholarship. 

1. An "A" average in academic work for 
any semester, 20% of points won in ad- 
dition. 

2. A "B" average adds 10% of points won. 

D. Health. 

1. Observing health rules for one semes- 
ter. 25 points. Two semesters, 50 points, 



*M" HANDBOOK 






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Sept. 2 
Sept. 2' 
Oct. 4. 
Oct. 11 
Oct. 19 
Oct. 25 
Nov. 1 
Nov. 9 
Nov. 1( 
Nov. 2i 


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V. of Kentucky 

Hiwassee 

Tusculum 

Lenoir-Rhyne 

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East Tenn. Teachers 

Middle Tenn. Teachers 

Carson-Newman 

(Thanksg:ivinff) 



■M" HANDBOOK 



PART V 



SONGS, COLORS, 
YELLS 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



COLLEGE SONGS 



The Alma Mater 
I. 

Where Chilhowee's lofty mountains 

Pierce the southern blue, 
Proudly stands our Alma Mater, 

Noble, grand, and true. 

II. 

As thy hilltop crowned with cedars, 

Ever greL>n appears; 
So thy memory fresh shall linger 

Through life's smiles and tears. 

IIL 

Lift the chorus wake the echoes, 

Make the welkin ring! 
Hail the queen of all the highland! 

Loud her praises sing. 

Chorus after each stanza: 

Orange, garnet, float forever 

Ensign of our hill! 
Hail to thee, our Alma Mater! 

Hail to Maryville. 

Note.— An erect standing position and an 
uncovered head are prerequisite to a re- 
spectful attitude toward the Alma Mater at 
a time when it is being played or sung 



M" HANDBOOK 



Dear Old Maryville 

I. 

Xrar Chilhowee's mountain blue, Stands our 
Alma Mater true. 
Dear old Maryville, to thee we lift our 
song. 
'Neath thy cedar srove so fair, We shall 
breathe the mountain air. 
While with merry hearts the chorus we 
prolong. 

II. 

A.S the morning sunbeam's light Greets thee 
o'er Chilhowee's height. 
So our tribune, We as freely to thee bring. 
Youth's true homage full and free, We thus 
gladly render thee. 
Dear old Maryville, thy praise we freely 
sing. 

III. 

To thee, guardian of our youth. Faithful 
guide to light and truth. 
We, thy children, bring our songs of 
grateful praise. 
And when we shall leave thy hill, We shall 
ne'er forget thee still, 
Dear old Maryville, the scene of happy 
days. 

Chorus after each stanza: 

Sing we a song of our dear college home. 

Fondly we love thee still, 
And wherever we may be. Fond mem'ry 
turns to thee. 

Our Alma Mater, dear old Maryville. 



50 MARYVILLB COLLEGE 



The Old Pep Song: 

We've got the rep, rep, rep, of old Maryville! 
We've got the pep, pep, pep, of old College 

Hill! 
We've got the strength to knock 'em stiff 
And never know the diff, 
For we're from Maryville of Tennessee 



The New Pep Song 

Here we go! Here we go! 
Down the field to crush the foe. 

As the Scotties go marching along. 
Men of might! Men of fight! 
Orange, garnet, waving bright 

While we make the Hill merry with song 
Then it's hi, hi, hi. 
We'll win this game or die. 

Highlanders! Fight to the end. 
Rah! Rah! 
And we won't be done 
Until the victory's won 

For the pride of our hearts — Maryville! 



College Colors 

Orange and Garnet 

College Nickname 

Highlanders or Scottise 



*M" HANDBOOK 



COIiLBGE YELLS 



The Howee — How 

Howee-how! Chilhowee! 
Maryville, Maryville. Tennessee! 

Hoo-rah! Hoo-rah! 
Maryville. Maryville, 

Rah, rah, rah! 

Howee-how! Chilhowee! 
Maryville, Maryville. Tennessee! 

Hoo-rah! Hoo-rah! 
Maryville. Maryville, 

Rah, rah, rah! 



The Old Fight Yell 

Yea, team! 

Fight! Fight! Fight! 
Yea, team ! 

Fight! Fight! Fight! 
Yea, team! 

Fight! Fight! Fight! 
Yea!! FIGHT!!! 



The M-a-r-y — ville 

M-a-r-y — ville! 
M-a-r-y — ville! 
M-a-r-y — ville! 
Maryville! Maryville! Maryville! 



The Old Chant 

Ma — ry — ville; Ma — ry — ville; 
You — don't— know— Ma — ry — ville ; 
You — can't — beat — Ma — ry — ville. 
MARYVILLE!!! 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



ATHLETIC NOTES 



'M" HANDBOOK 



Maryville College 

MARYVILLE, TENNESSEE 



Maryville College is one of the 
important church-related institutions 
of America, and seeks to be true to 
the noblest traditions of the associa- 
tion of education and religion. 

It is a liberal arts college with 
the purpose of providing a liberal 
education. It is not a professional 
or pre-professional school, although 
its courses form sound foundational 
preparation for professional study. 

It desires to select its students on 
the basis of preparation, earnestness, 
capacity, character, and co-oper- 
ativeness. 



MARTVILLE COLLEGE 



BAINONIAN 

Welcome, new girls, to our campus. 
Bainonian wishes to congratulate you 
on your choice of a college. We are 
interested in you and it is our desire 
to make you feel perfectly at home on 
our campus. We extend to you a cor- 
dial invitation to enjoy the friendship 
of our society. 



ATHENIAN 
LITERARY SOCIETY 

Meet Your Friends at 
ATHENIAN 

THETA EPSILON 

Si Deus nobiscum, ciuis contra nos. 
It is in this spirit that Theta Epsilon 
welcomes you to our campus. Theta 
extends to you an invitation to be- 
come an active member. 



ALPHA SIGMA 

Alpha Sigma is pleased to ext nd its 

welcome to you. Alpha Sigma wants 

to be younr friend. Have you any 

objections? 



'M'- HANDBOOK 



STUDENTS 

Trade At 

Y. M. C. A. Store 

CANDY 

CAKES ICE CREAM 

FRUIT DRINK 

and Necessities 

All Sold at 

Y. M. C. A. STORE 

On First Floor of Bartlett Hall 

PAY US A VISIT 

And let us have a chance to show you 

the quantity and quality of products 

sold here. 

DONNELL McARTHUR, Mgr. 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



Y.W.C.A. Store 

First Floor, Pearsons Hall 

GIRLS! GIRLS! 

When hunger or thirst 
You wish to appease. 
Come to the "Y" Store-^ 
We aim to please. 

Ice Cream Candy 

Cold Drinks Sandwiches 
Fruit Cakes 

Everything from Soup to 
Nuts 



MANAGERS 

MARY GLADYS BROWN 
DOROTHY MAY LEWIS 



"M" HANDBOOK 57 



WRIGHT'S 

5c AND 10c STORE 

We appreciate the patronage of 
College students, and welcome you 
to our store. 
''You can't go wrong at Wright's" 

WRIGHT'S 

5c AND 10c STORE 

M. M. ELDER 

Cash and Carry Store 

GxROCERIES AND MEATS 

PLEASE PATRONIZE 

OUR 

ADVERTISERS 

and mention 

The Maryville College 
Handbook 

to them. 
THANK YOU 

It is the advertisers who make tJiis 

book possible. 
L. C. OBERT, Business Manager 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



NORTON 
HARDWARE CO. 

Paints 

Hardware 

Sporting Goods 

Electrical Appliances 

Where Tour Patronage is 
Appreciated 

PHONE NO. 18 
BUY 

Bunte Candies 

at 

Y.M.C.A. and Y.W.C.A. 
Stores 

YOU'LL LIKE THEM 

Sam Toole Canay Co. 

Knoxville, Tenn. 



"M" HANDBOOK 59 

Soutkern Dairies 
Ice Cream 

On Sale At 

ALL GOOD STORES 

For 

GOOD SANDWICHES 

and 

HOME-MADE PIES 

Go To 

TURNER'S CAFE 

Student, We Welcome You 

CITY SERVICE 
CLEANERS 

"Serves You Right" 

Phone 9155 Marjville, Tenii, 

Agents: Battaglia Bros. 

"DICK AND JIM" 

Camegrie 



60 MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



WELCOME, STUDENTS 

To 

Leonard Smitli's 
Grocery 

Fruits, Vegetables 

Meats 



CHANDLER-SINGLETON 
COMPANY 

DEPARTMENT STORE 



Whether It's Drugs or Sodas, Your 
Needs Can Best Be Served At 

MARTIN'S 

Two Modern Drug Stores 
Prescriptions Carefully Compoujided 



'M" HANDBOOK 



STERCHI BROS. 

WELCOMES YOIT TO MAUYVII.I.E 

Visit Our Free Scales As 
Often As You Like 

If in Need of 

Radios, Rugs, Lamps 

TIRES, WALL PAPER 

or 

ANY FURNITURE ITEM 

Don't Fail to Visit Us 

STERCHI BROS. 

Phone 666 

McBrayer Skoe Shop 

Expert Shoe Repairing 

Under Wright's 

Agent— WIN ROSS 

Carnesie 



Byrne Drug Company 

Maryville, Tennessee 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 



Edible Sandwiches 

Delicious Salads 

Hot and Cold Sodas 

Better Ice Cream 
and Our Specialty 

Frozen Fruit Salad 

Made in Our Store by Our Own 
Girls 

We Can Supply You With Anything 
Sold by a Modern Drug Store 

CITY DRUG COMPANY 

204 Broadway 



Byerley's Grocery Store 

Fresh Salad, Fruits, Vegetables 
for Outings 

Everything for Every Occasion 



Flowers For All Occasions 

On the Hill or Back Home 

CLARK'S FLOWERS 

133 E, Broadway Phone 313 



'M" HANDBOOK 



You Are Always Welcome 

PROFFITT^S 

DEPARTMENT 
STORE 

''The Students' Store" 
Owned and Operated 

By 
Maryville College Men 

COLLEGE CLEANERS 

Quality Cleaning and 

Pressing 

Agents: 

DOROTHY IVIAE LEWIS 

Pearsons 

BILL, MORGAN 

Carnegie 

The Coffee Skop 

Wliere Students Are Welcome 

Sandwiches, Sodas, Lunches 

Next to Capitol Theater 



64 MARYVILLE COLT.EGE 



'^Photographs Live 
Forever" 

THE WEBB STUDIO 

E. L. WEBB, Prop. 

Photos of Permanency and 
of Character 

Kodak Finishing a Specialty 



Bank of Maryvilie 

MARYVILLE, TENN. 

Capitol TLeater 

Select Photoplays 



i|«ii ,„, m lui nil fill till 111! nil III! nil im »•!• 



L. C. OLIN, M.D. 

309 Court Street 
Tel.: Residence, 84; Office, 746 

Burchfield Hospital 

EYE, EAR, NOSE, 

THROAT 

Court Street 

Opposite Court House 

Dr. Thos. G. Stanley 

DENTIST 
Second Floor Wells Building 

Compliments of 

BLOUNT NATIONAL 
BANK 

Maryville, Tennessee