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Full text of "Masmid, 1961"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/masmid1961 



MASMID 
1961 



"TIME ON EARTH 

IS A PATTERN OF WHEELS WITHIN WHEELS - 

AND ON EACH OF THE WHEELS 

JUDAISM HAS SET ITS STAMP." 



THIS IS MY G-D 
HERMAN WOUK 



Man is a creature who, by his very nature, aspires 
to progress. The world has left the age of steel and elec- 
tricity; it has entered the age of space and the atom. 
Man is faced with a great choice: he has the tools with 
which he can eradicate pain, hunger, and disease; how- 
ever, with these same tools he can also destroy him- 
self and his earth. 

But material progress without a concurrent devel- 
opment in moral and spiritual values is extremely 
dangerous. Mechanism knows no right or wrong. If 
man is to profit by technical progress, he must be 
guided by an ethical code of values. The ideal of Juda- 
ism is the preservation and growth of these ethical prin- 
ciples—principles that will guide material prosperity. 




// 



DEDICATION 




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Dr. Seymour Lainoff 

Assistant Professor of English 



The purpose of a college education is two-fold; first, 
it prepares the individual for independent thought and 
action and, perhaps more important, it enables him to 
recognize his own intellectual limitations. In carrying 
out this program, education, faced with these seemingly 
contradictory goals, must mold the student by blending 
pride in himself with consideration for the opinions of 
others. In short, education must instill not only individ- 
ualism but humility. . 

Dr Seymour Lainoff is particularly successful m 
applying the two aspects of this program. We can remem- 
ber many pleasant, stimulating hours of exchange of ideas 
in his classes. He would never curtly dismiss a students 
comment or question; he was always willing to explore 
the opinions of others. We feel that he uniquely symbol- 
izes the successful blending of initiative and humility. 

Often the quiet, soft-spoken person is overshadowed 
by his more aggressive associates. Eventually, however, 
the deserving individual receives his due recognition. It 
is, therefore, with deep appreciation that we dedicate 
this Masmid to Dr. Seymour Lainoff. 



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TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Faculty 

Seniors 

Activities 

Literature 

Advertisements 

Senior Directory 



6 

38 

70 

102 

119 

136 



FACULTY 



We were the seed; our school, the soil; our 
teachers, the cultivators. It was by their efforts that we thrived; by 
their toil that we grew; by their labor that we were dedicated to truth. 



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Dr. Samuel Belkin 

President, Yeshiva University 



"It seems to me that there are four major dimensions into which all human knowledge 
naturally falls. These four dimensions may be called the four studies of man. The first of 
these is a study of the world into which we are born. The second dimension of human knowl- 
edge we may characterize as the study of the peoples among whom we are born. The third 
phase of knowledge, we may designate as the study of man himself. 

"For our moral purposes in life we are entirely dependent upon our spiritual heritage 
and religious experiences, upon the things which we classify as Divine Law rather than 
as the Laws of Nature. Recognition of the unalterable fact that the moral law is as binding 
on us as human beings as the laws of nature are on the cosmos, is of paramount importance 
for the survival of mankind. This moral and spiritual purpose of life in no way conflicts with 
the three branches of knowledge discussed above. On the contrary, it complements and 
supplements the knowledge man has acquired through centuries of living and thinking. 
It affords an end and ideal purpose for all the inventions and discoveries of the human mind. 
Only after we succeed in integrating the four phases of knowledge, can we hope to build a 
peace-loving society." 

Dr. Samuel Belkin 
"The Four Dimensions of Higher Education" 



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Mr. Norman B. Abrams 

Registrar of RIETS 



RELIGIOUS 
STUDIES 




Dr. Hyman B. Grinstein 

Director of Teacliers Institute 



ADMINISTRATION 




Rabbi Morris Besdin 

Chairman of Jewish Studies Program 




RIETS 





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TEACHERS 
INSTITUTE 






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Dr. Isaac Bacon 

Dean, Yeshiva College 



You are the thirtieth graduating class of Yeshiva College and thus join 
the ranks of the ever-growing number of Yeshiva men who are making impor- 
tant contributions in every area of American and Jewish life and are playing a 
particularly significant role in shaping the destiny of the American Jewish 
community. 

I should like to think that you who are now leaving these hallowed halls of 
learning have not been solely on the receiving end in the institutional partner- 
ship that exists between faculty, student body, and administration. I should 
like to think that when in years ahead your contributions to the growth of the 
college will be judged in terms of positive and negative aspects, the positive 
will dwarf the negative ones. 

I should like to think that as you leave the relatively sheltered life of 
Yeshiva College and come to grips with the sometimes cruel realities of life 
you will as Torah-true men, instilled with religious, ethical, and moral prin- 
ciples, draw upon the strength imparted to you at Yeshiva in building a 
meaningful and purposeful life. 

I wish each and every one of you who are graduating with the class of 
1961 farewell in the sense that you may truly fare well. 




YESHIVA 
COLLEGE 




Professor Morris Silverman 

Registrar 




Rabbi Ralph Schuchalter 

Assistant Registrar 





Rabbi Jerry Hochbaum 

Assistant Director of Admissions 



Rabbi David Mirsky 

Director of Admissions 





Dr. Moshe Carmilly 

Assistant Professor of Bible 



Dr. Moshe Reguer 

Instructor in Bible 




JEWISH STUDIES 





Rabbi Michael Katz 

Assistant Professor of Bible 



Mr. Hayim Leaf 

Assistant Professor of Hebrew 





Dr. Gershon Churgin 

Professor of Hebrew 



Dr. Asher Siev 

Assistant Professor of Hebrew 





Rabbi Harry Wohlberg 

Assistant Professor of Bible 



Dr. Milton Arfa 

Visiting Assistant Professor of Hebrew 








Dr. Irving Agus 

Professor of Jewish History 









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Dr. Alexander Litman 

Professor of Philosophy 




PHILOSOPHY 




Rabbi Joshua Shmidman 

Visiting Lecturer in Philosophy 



Dr. Arthur Hyman 

Associate Professor of Philosophy 




19 





Dr. Alexander Brody 

Professor of History and Economics 



SOCIAL 
SCIENCES 



Dr. Irving Greenberg 

Assistant Professor of History 




Mr. Nathan Goldberg 

Professor of Sociology 




Dr. Emanuel Rackman 

Associate Professor of Political Science 





Mr. James O'Connor 

Instructor in Economics 



Dr. Werner J. Cahnman 

Lecturer in Sociology 




Dr. Aaron M. Margalith 

Professor of Political Science 





Dr. Nathan Lander 

Assistant Professor of Sociology 



Dr. Joseph H. Lookstein 

Professor of Sociology 



Dr. Maurice Wohlgelernter 

Instructor in English 





LITERATURE 
and SPEECH 





Dr. Seymour Lainoff 

Assistant Professor of English 
Assistant Registrar 



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Dr. Irving Linn 

Professor of English 




Dr. Stanley Weintraub 

Visiting Assistant Professor of Speech 




Dr. David Fleisher 

Professor of Englisli 



Dr. Herberts. Robinson 

Visiting Professor of English 





Mr. Lewis Palter 

Instructor in Speech 



23 



Dr. Helmut E. Adier 

Associate Professor of Psychology 





PSYCHOLOGY 
and EDUCATION 




Dr. Tobias Wagner 

Lecturer in Education 




Dr. Burton Milenbach 

Lecturer in Psychology 








LANGUAGE 
and ART 





Professor Louis H. Feldman 

Assistant Professor of Classical History 




Dr. Sidney D. Braun 

Professor of French 




Dr. Nina Syniawska 

Lecturer in Russian 




IVIr. Murray H. Feder 

Lecturer in German 




Dr. Maurice E. Chernowitz 

Professor of Fine Arts 




Dr. Nathan Susskind 

Visiting Associate Professor of Yiddish 




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Dr. Ralph P. Rosenberg 

Professor of German 




Dr. Louis F. Sas 

Visiting Professor of Spanish 



Dr. Karl Adier 

Professor of IVIusic 






Dr. Eli M. Levine 

Professor of Chemistry 



CHEMISTRY 




Mr. Abraham Kasser 

Laboratory Assistant 



28 





Dr. Arnold Lowan 

Professor of Physics 



PHYSICS 




Dr. Joel Lebowitz 

Associate Professor of Physics 



30 




Dr. Leon F. Landovitz 

Assistant Professor of Physics 



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Rabbi Perez Posen 

Assistant Professor of Physics 





Dr. David Finkelstein 

Associate Professor of Physics 




MATH 



Rabbi Jonah Mann 

Instructor in Mathematics 





Mr. Charles Patt 

Teaching Fellow in Mathematics 



Dr. Azriel Rosenfeld 

Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics 






Mr. Harvey Z. Senter 

Teaching Fellow in Mathematics 





Dr. Harry E. Rauch 

Professor of Mathematics 





Dr. Leon Ehrenpreis 

Associate Professor of IVlathematics 



Dr. Henry Lisman 

Professor of Mathematics 



33 





Dr. Moses D. Tendler 

Associate Professor of Biology 



Dr. Meyer Atlas 

Professor of Biology 



BIOLO 




Dr. Herman DIugatz 

Instructor in Biology 




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Dr. Fred Goodman 

Assistant Professor of Biology 



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Dr. Menachem M. Brayer 

Consultant Psychologist 



Mr. Israel Young 

Assistant Professor of Guidance 




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Mr. Abraham Hurwitz 

Professor of Physical Education 
Director of Student Services 




GUIDANCE 




Dr. Eli Sar, M.D. 

Assistant Professor of Hygiene 





Dr. Samuel Sar 

Dean of Men 



Dr. Bruno Z. Kisch, M.D. 

Professor of The History 

and Philosophy of Science 

Medical Director 



Mr. Solomon Zeides 

Librarian 





LIBRARY 





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Mr. Aaron Gursky 



Mr. Joseph Shapiro 




SECRETARIES 





SENIORS 



Indeed, our residence at Yeshiva exposed us 
to a double portion. We, the students, bridging two worlds — the secular 
and the religious — synthesized these and, like young shoots that 
thrive best when supplied with both sunshine and water, we flourished, 
deriving our strength from the rays of Torah and the wells of science. 



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TZVI ABUSCH 


PHILIP ALTER 


HERBERT AMSTER 


History Tl— Bernard Revel 


English RIETS 


History RIETS 


Eranos 


Pi Delta Phi 


Tennis Team 




French Club 


S.O.Y. Representative 




Literary Club 


Jewish Forum Club 
Psychology Club 
Seforim Exchange 




ISIDOR Wl. APTERBACH 


ROBERT ASCH 


English RIETS 


Psychology RIETS 


MASM ID— Literary Editor 


Commentator — Circulation Staff 


Chess Team 


Swimming Team 


Literary Society — President 


Emergency Car Pool 


Chess Club— President 


Ice Skating Club 




Senior Varsity Show 




Basketball Intramural Team 




Psychology Club 






ALAN BALSAM 

Pre-Medical RIETS 

Pre-Med Society 
Biology Club 
Y.U. Drive 






PHILIP BALSAM 

Psychology Tl 

Commentator — Business Staff 
T.I. Student Council 
Blood Drive Committee 
Psychology Club 
Sociology Club 
Basketball Intramural Team 



RICHARD BARTH 

Mathematics RIETS 

MASMID— Typing Editor 
Student Court Justice 
Math Club— Vice President 
Tennis Team 
Math Club 
Physics Club 
French Club 
Pi Mu Epsilon- 



-Vice President 



GARY BAUM 

Pre-Dental JSP 

Varsity Basketball Team 
Commentator — Sports Staff 
Pre-Med Society 



Senior — Freshman Guidance 





SHAEL BELLOWS 

Sociology RIETS 

Pre-Law Society — President 

Sociology Club — Vice President 

Dorm Council 

Chairman — Dorm Repairs Committee 

Blood Drive Committee 

Senior Varsity Show 



MEYER BERGLAS 

IVlathematics RIETS 

Commentator— Associate Board 
Pre-Varsity Debating 
Math Club 






HERBERT BIALIK 

Pre-Dental Tl 

T.I. Student Council 
Co-op Staff 
Biology Club 
Psychology Club 
Pre-Med Society 
Physics Club 
Jewish Forum Club 



ALVIN BLUMENFELD 

Political Science Tl 

Pre-Law Society — Vice President 
Co-op Staff 

Blood Drive Committee 
Basketball Intramural Team 





ISRAEL BRAFMAN 

Biology RIETS 

Chairman— Club Coordinating Committee 
Sopiiomore Class Council 
Biology Club— President 
Biological Review— Editor 
Basketball Intramural Team 






RONALD K. BURKE 


HERSCHEL G. COHEN 


PERRY ECK 


Biology JSP 


IVlathematics RIETS 


Pre-Medical Tl 


MASM ID— Literary Staff 


■ Chairman — Tutoring Committee 


Commentator — Circulation Staff 


Chief Justice— Student Court 


Senior Class Vice President 


Commentator— News Staff 


Debating Society— General Manager 


Y.U. Varsity Debating Team 


Pre-Med Society 


Pre-Med Society— Secretary 


Pi Delta Phi 




Tennis Team 


Student Activities Committee 




Biology Society 


Examinations Committee 
Math Club 








MARVIN EDELMAN 


J. MICHAEL EPSTEIN 


Biology Tl 


History Tl — Cantorial Training Inst. 


Nir— Editor 


Senior — Fresiiman Guidance 


Co-captain Soccer Squad 


Dean's Reception 


Biology Society 


Choral Society— Vice President 




French Club 




Economics Club 




International Relations Society 



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MARTIN EPSTEIN 

Mathematics Tl 

Debating Team— Manager 

Basketball Team — Manager 

Co-op Staff 

Math Club 

Basketball Intramural Team 

Swimming Instructor 







HERSHEL FARKAS 

Mathematics RIETS 

President of Sophomore Class 
Commentator — Circulation Manager 
Alumni — Student Faculty Committee 
Canvassing Committee 
Pi Mu Epsilon 
Math Club 
Fencing Team 



SAMUEL FEDER 

Pre-Dental Tl 

Co-op Staff 
Tours Committee 
Tennis Team 
Pre-Med Society 
Basketball Intramural Team 



JACK FEIN 

Pre-Medical Tl 

Hebrew Literary Society 

— Co-chairman 
Tzohar— Editor-in-Chief 
Pre-Medical Journal— Editor-in-Chief 
Biological Journal— Associate Editor 
Pre-Med Society— Vice President 
Commentator Staff 
Blood Drive Committee 






AZRIEL FEINER 

Economics Tl 

T.I. Class President 
Co-op Staff 
Economics Club 
Zionist Club 



HARVEY FELSEN 

Political Science 



Tl 



Manager of Co-op 

Blood Drive 

International Relations Society 

Pre-Law Society 

Basketball Intramural Team 




NATHAN FINKIEL 

English RIETS 

Dean's Reception Committee 
Tours Committee 







GERALD STEPHEN FOGELMAN 


SAMUEL FRANK 


PHILIP FRIEDMAN 


IVIathematics RIETS 


English RIETS 


Pre-Medical RIETS 


Hamodea— Editor 


Kol— Editor-in-Chief 


Pre-Med Society 


Open Road Club— President 


MASMID— Literary Staff 


Chemistry Club 


R.I.E.T.S. Class President 


Student Court Justice 




Tennis Team — Co-manager 


Literary Club— President 
French Club— President 
Eranos— Vice President 
Pi Delta Phi 
Dormitory Council 
Senior — Freshman Guidance 







DANIEL FRIMMER 

Pre-Medical Tl 

MASM ID— Co-Sports Editor 
Commentator 

—Assistant Sports Editor 
Yavneh — Vice President 
Literary Society— Secretary 
Blood Drive — Class Chairman 
Tennis Team— Co-captain 
Senior Varsity Show 

—Business Manager 



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AARON FRUCHTER 

Mathematics RIETS 

Freshman Newspaper— Editor 
Hebrew Literary Magazine 

— Co-editor 
Pi Mu Epsilon 
S.O.Y. Coaching 





SAUL GANCHROW 

English RIETS 

Dean's Reception— Chairman 
Young Democrats— Vice President 
Pre-Law Society— Vice President 
Audio-Visual Committee— Co-chairman 
Senior Varsity Show 



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MURRAY GELLER 

English RIETS 

President of Student Council 
President of Junior Class 
Commentator— Assistant Copy Editor 
S.O.Y. Delegate 
Author— Director of Class Plays 
Religious Guidance Committee 

— Chairman 
Building Repairs Committee 
Chemistry Club 
Awards Committee 



47 





JONATHAN I. GINSBERG 

Mathematics RIETS 

Commentator— Rewrite Editor 
Tennis Team 
Math Team 
Tutoring Committee 



HOWARD ZEV GOLDBERG 

Economics Tl 

MASMID— Business Manager 
MASMID— Typing Staff 
Student Discount Committee 

— Chairman 
Freshman— Senior Smoker 

— Chairman 
Photography Club— Vice President 
Senior Varsity Show 





EMANUEL GOLDBLUM 

Psychology-Education 

Chavrusa Committee 



ARTHUR GOLDMAN 

Pre-Dental JSP 

Basketball Team— Manager 
Co-op Staff 
Pre-Med Society 





STANFORD MILTON GOLDMAN 

Pre-Medical Tl 

MASMID— Copy Editor 

Fencing Team 

Manager of Canteen 

Commentator— Assistant Copy Editor 

T.l. Student Council 

Publicity Committee 

Chemistry Club 

Pre-Med Society 

Sociology Club 



CALVIN GOLDSCHEIDER 

Sociology Tl 

Commentator— Assistant Copy Editor 
Curriculum Evaluation Committee 

— Chairman 
Dormitory Arrangements Committee 

— Chairman 
Sociology Club 
Senior — Freshman Guidance 
Senior Varsity Show 



ALVIN RUBINOFF GOLUB 

English JSP 

Dormitory Committee 
Pre-Varsity Debating 
Choral Society 
Senior Varsity Show 
Literary Society 
Political Science Club 
French Club 
Zionist Club 





GERALD GOLUB 

Sociology Tl 

Dormitory Council 
Wrestling Team— Manager 
Wrestling Team 
Co-op Staff 

Blood Drive Committee 
Mail Committee 
Ring Committee 
Hebrew Club 



WILLIAM GOLUB 

Hebrew RIETS 

Hebrew Club 
Chavrusa Committee 




STANLEY L. GREENBAUM 

Biology RIETS 

MASMID— Activities Editor 
Vocational Guidance Committee 

— President 
Biology Society — President 
Pre-Med Society 




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MICHAEL GREENEBAUM 

Physics RIETS 

MASMID— Copy Editor 

Physics Club— President 

Math Club 

Pi Mu Epsilon 

Alumni- 
Student Vocational Guidance 
Committee 

Senior— Freshman Guidance 

Chavrusa Committee 




LAWRENCE GREENFIELD 

Psychology Tl 

Chess Team 

Tzohar— Copy Editor 

Psychology Club— Vice President 

Physics Club 

Vocational Guidance Committee 

Curriculum Evaluation Committee 




RAYMOND GRODNER 

Sociology RIETS 

S.O.Y. Representative 

Y.U. Drive Collector 

Chabura Committee 

S.O.Y. Awards Committee — Chairman 

Matzo and Wine Committee 

Choral Society 




AVERY GROSS 

Mathematics RIETS 

President of Senior Class 

MASMID— Photography Editor 

Senior — Freshman Guidance Committee 

— Chairman 
N.S.A. Delegate 
Canvassing Committee 

— Associate Chairman 
Dormitory Committee 
Awards Committee— Chairman 





MARK GROSS 

Pre-Medical Tl 

Nir— Feature Editor 
Pre-Med Society 
Biology Club 
Chemistry Club 





AARON GUTMAN 

Pre-Dental JSP 

J.S.P. Student Council 
Biology Journal 
Biology Club 



JAMES JOSEPH MAIN 

Pre-Dental RIETS 

Fencing Team 
S.O.Y. Delegate 
Blood Drive Committee 
Biology Club 




KEITH WILLIAM HARVIE 

Pre-Medical JSP 

Wrestling Team— Assistant Manager 
MASM ID— Typing Staff 
Student Discount Committee 
Alumni-Faculty Committee 
Biology Club 
Chemistry Club 
Pre-Med Society 





MICHAEL HAUER 

Economics RIETS 

Fencing Team 

Ctiess Team 

CIness Club— President 



iVllCHAEL HECHT 

English RIETS 

MASM ID— Associate Editor 
S.O.Y.— President 
Junior Class— Vice President 
Literary Society-Vice President 
Medical Committee— Chairman 
Freshman Paper— Sports Editor 



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HOWARD STEPHEN JOSEPH 

Mathematics RIETS 

Executive Dormitory Committee 
Co-op— Record ryianager 
Tennis Team 
Math Club 



WILLIAM KANTROWITZ 

Mathematics Tl 

Vice President of Student Council 
MASM ID— Photography Editor 
Commentator — Photography Editor 
Class Newspaper— Editor 
Mathematics Club— President 
Public Relations Committee of 
Student Council— Chairman 
Author — Director of Class Plays 
Commentator— Typing Editor 
Pi Mu Epsilon— President 





BERNARD H. KAPLAN 

Hebrew Tl 

Commentator— Managing Editor 
Tennis Team— Captain 
Varsity Debating Society 
Pre-Law Society 
MASM ID— Literary Staff 
MASM ID— Sports Staff 
Basketball Intramural Team 






KENNETH KLEIN 

English Tl— Bernard Revel 

MASIVIID— Literary Staff 

Pre-Varsity Debating 

Raconter 

T.I. Class Representative 

Distribution Committee— Chairman 

Pre-Law Society 

Literary Club 



LOUIS KORNGOLD 

Pre-Medical Tl 

MASIVIID— Sports Editor 
Basketball Team — Captain 
Commentator — Sports Staff 
Pre-IVIed Society 
Biology Club 
Senior — Freshman Smoker 



LAWRENCE KRANES 

Psychology Ti 

Varsity Basketball Team 
Co-op Staff 
Psychology Club 





FRED KRAUSE 

Psychology RIETS 

Wrestling Team 
Psychology Club 
Sociology Club 
Basketball Intramural Team 



STANLEY KUPINSKY 

Sociology RIETS 

Commentator— Circulation Staff 

Sociology Club— Vice President 

Psychology Club 

Canvassing Committee — Chairman 

Curriculum Evaluation Committee 

Blood Drive 

Basketball Intramural Team 



/ 




MURRAY LAULICHT 

Chemistry RIETS 

Commentator— Editor-in-Chief 
Debating Society— President 
Yavneh Society— President 
Commentator— News Editor 
Sophomore Class Delegate-at-large 
Freshman Paper— Editor-in-Chief 
International Relations Society 

—Vice President 
Faculty— Student Examinations 

Committee— Head Student Delegate 
Chemistry Club 




RIETS 



MASM ID— Literary Staff 

Student Court Justice 

Chess Team 

Psychology Club— President 

Sociology Journal — Editor 

Curriculum Evaluation Committee 

— Co-chairman 
Dean's Reception 




MAX LEW 

English RIETS 

Kol— Editor-in-Chief 
Chess Team 

Class Newspaper— Copy Editor 
Literary Club— Vice President 
French Club— Secretary-Treasurer 
Jewish Historical Society 
—Secretary-Treasurer 
Senior— Freshman Guidance 
Food Committee 




JOSEPH LIFSCHITZ 

Political Science 



RIETS 



MASM ID— Activities Editor 
Student Activities Committee 

— Chairman 
Commentator— Circulation Manager 
Club Co-ordinator 
Dean's Reception — Co-chairman 
Zionist Club — President 
Pre-Law Society 

Freshman Class — Vice President 
Pre-Varsity Debating 






LESLIE LINDENBERG 

Pre-Medical JSP 

Pre-Med Society 
Biology Club 
Open Road Club 
Instrumental Group 



ALLEN L. MANDEL 

Psychology-Education R 

Class M.C. 

Senior— Freshman Smoker 

Hobby Club 




EDWARD ALAN MARON 

Pre-Medical Tl 

Commentator — Photography Staff 
Varsity Fencing Team 
IVledical Committee — Chairman 
Photography Club — Secretary 










BERNARD MATUS 

Pre-Medical Tl 

Photography Club— President 
Pre-Med Society 
Chemistry Club 



SHELDON MEINER 

Mathematics RIETS 

Physical Facilities Committee 

— Chairman 
Canvassing Committee 
Senior— Freshman Guidance 
Math Club 
Sociology Club 
Basketball Intramural Team 



JACK MERKIN 

English Tl 

Wrestling Team 
Dramatics Society 
Senior— Freshman Smoker 
Dean's Reception Committee 
Senior Varsity Show 
Ushers Committee 
Basketball Intramural Team 





MORTON MINCHENBERG 

History RIETS 

Chess Team— Captain 
Y.U. Drive— Chairman 
Chess Club— President 
International Relations Society 

— President 
Jewish Historical Society 

— Vice President 
S.O.Y. Delegate 
Pi Delta Phi 
Co-op Staff 
Student— Faculty-Judiciary Committee 



FREDERICK NATHAN 

History Tl 

Y.U. Drive 

Freshman and Sophomore Class 

Newspapers 
Chug Ivri 






STEVEN ALAN NISON 

Economics Tl 

Fencing Team— Manager 

New York Times Representative 

Co-op Staff 

Senior— Freshman Guidance 

Dormitory Mail Committee 

Photography Club 



GENE POTTER 

Pre-Medical JSP 

J.S.P. Student Council 

—Class Representative 
J.S.P. Publication— Editor-in-Chief 
Co-op Staff 
Medical Committe of Student Council 

—Chairman 
Bowling Team— Manager 
Bowling Instructor 




MARK PRESS 

Chemistry RIETS 

S.O.Y.— Vice President 
Dormitory Committee 
Chemistry Club 





BERNARD RACHELLE 

English Tl 

Dramatics Society 
Tours Committee 





MICHAEL REICH 

Chemistry RIETS 

Soccer Squad— Captain 
Swimming Team 
Pre-Med Society 
Chemistry Club 
Chess Club 
Biology Club 



JOSEPH S. REISS 

Pre-Medical RIETS 



Pre-Med Society— President 
Biology Club 






ALLAN D. RENKOFF 

Pre-Medical JSP 

Y.U. Drive Committee 
Pre-IVled Society 
Biology Club 
Photography Club 
Swimming Instructor 



JOSEPH RIFKIND 

Chemistry RIETS 

Chemistry Journal — Co-editor 
S.O.Y. Representative 
Dean's Reception Committee 
Chemistry Society — Secretary-Treasurer 
Physics Club 



EUGENE ROSHWALB 

Sociology RIETS 

Commentator — Business Manager 
Blood Drive Chairman 
Co-op— Assistant Manager 





TOBIAS ROTH 

Psychology RIETS 

Wrestling Team 
Wrestling Team — Manager 
Co-op— Assistant Manager 
Commentator Staff 
Psychology Club 



WILLIAM HARVEY ROTHCHILD 

Sociology JSP 

Student Court Justice 
Wrestling Team 
Sociology Club — President 
Student Council Mail Committee 
Dormitory Oneg Shabbat Committee 
Senior Varsity Show 





DAVID ARNOLD ROTHNER 

Pre-Medical RIETS 

MASMID— Business Manager 
Junior Class Student Council 

—Representative 
Chairman— Executive Council 

— College Dorm 
Dean's Reception Committee 
Tutoring Committee 
Tours Committee 



JESSE S. SALSBERG 

Psychology Tl 

TJ. Student Council 
Co-op Staff 
Psychology Club 
Sociology Club 





ARNOLD SCHEINBERG 

English RIETS 

Jewish Historical Society 

International Relations Society 

Eranos 

Dean's Reception Play 

Basketball Intramural Team 



RICHARD SCHLIFSTEIN 

Psychology, History Tl 

Eranos— President 
Eta Sigma Phi— President 
Social Welfare Club— President 
Open Road Club— President 




-.I^ 

K 




MARVIN SCHNEIDER 

Sociology RIETS 

S.O.Y. Delegate 

Bedikas T'fillin Committee 

English Club 





MATTHEW SHATZKES 

Mathematics RIETS 


DAVID SHEINKIN 

Pre-Medical Tl- 


-Bernard Revel 


Athletic Manager 
Varsity Fencing Team— Captain 
Basketball Intramural Team 
Y.U. Drive 


Fencing Team 
Pre-Med Society 







WILLIAM LOEB SHIMANSKY 

English Tl 

Co-op Staff 

Student Emergency Car Pool 
Literary Society 
Basketball Intramural Team 



BENJAMIN M. SILVERBERG 

Mathematics RIETS 

Food Committee— Chairman 
Matzoh Committee — Chairman 
Canvassing Committee 
Halachah Committee 
First Aid Committee 
Math Club 
Physics Club 



/ 





SHERMAN SIMANOWITZ 

Chemistry RIETS 

Chemistry Society— President 
Commentator— Art Editor 
Chemistry Journal— Co-editor 
Basketball Intramural Team 
Class Newspapers — Sports Editor 
Sergeant-at-Arms — Student Council 
Dean's Reception 
Senior — Freshman Guidance 
Physics Club 



62 






MELVIN STERN 


JOSHUA L STERNBERG 


H. NORMAN STRICKMAN 


Pre-Medical RIETS 


Pre-Medical RIETS 


History RIETS 


MASM ID— Associate Editor 


Raconter 


Jewish Historical Society— President 


Commentator — Associate Editor 


Kol 


International Relations Society 


Commentator — Copy Editor 


Pre-Med Society 


— Secretary-Treasurer 


Chemistry Club 


French Society 


Sociology Club 


Pre-Med Society 




Commentator — Circulation Staff 


Senior — Freshman Guidance 




Food Committee 


S.O.Y. Delegate 










JOSEPH TUCHMAN 

Physics RIETS 

Commentator — Circulation Manager 

Co-op Manager 

Bowling Team — Captain 

Math Club— Secretary 

Pi Mu Epsilon 

Physics Club 



RICHARD HARVEY VIENER 

Political Science RIETS 

Commentator — Circulation Staff 
Student Activities Committee 
Dean's Reception Committee 
Assembly Committee 
Ushers Committee 
Zionist Club 
Pre-Law Society 
Basketball Intramural Team 








m 






4 

'-.% 


f -Sf^ 


^9*r' 




i 


k1 


r^^ 


H^i 


i 


^1 


Im 




b 


J 


LiA 



SIMON WEINER 

Biology Tl 

Commentator Staff 

Senior — Freshman Guidance 

Chemistry Club 

Biology Club 

Chess Club 

Basketball Intramural Team 



SAUL WOHLBERG 

English RIETS 

Fireside Chats Committee 
Literary Club 
Music Appreciation Club 
Senior Varsity Show 




ILAN ZAMIR-HALPERN 

Pre-Medical Tl 

Nir— Co-editor 

Tzohar — Associate Editor 

Biology Society— Secretary-Treasurer 

Guidance Committee 

Chess Club 

Pre-Med Society 





MORRIS ZAUDERER 

Economics RIETS 

Economics Journal — Editor 
Commentator— News Staff 
Dormitory Council Representative 
Economics Club — President 
Audio-Visual Committee — Chairman 



SAUL EISENBUD 

YITZCHAK FRANK 

JACK SOLOMON GOLDBERG 

STEPHEN LEONARD HERMELE 




BERNARD MEYER ZAZULA 

Pre-Medical RIETS 

MASM I D— Editor-i n-Chief 
Tzohar— Associate Editor 
Sophomore Class Paper 

— Associate Editor 
Pre-Med Society— Secretary 
Fireside Chats Committee— Chairman 
Hebrew Club— Co-chairman 
Biology Club 
Senior— Freshman Guidance 



SENIOR DINNER 





"Dr., ah, ah. Rabbi Dr. Belkin" 





Mr. President 



66 







"Remember, this is not for journalism!" 




As a token of our appreciation 




«:: iWt # 



i&^M... 



GRADUATION 




Anyone have a needle? 




The Last Mile 




68 




Our Grand Marshall 




Dr. Barnaby C. Keeney 
President, Brown University 




Rabbi Dr. Emanuel Rackman 
Doctor of Divinity, Honoris Causa 




ACTIVITIES 



And so, the inner self was formed: Jew, American, 
IVlodern. We sent forth exploring tendrils into the nooks and crannies, 
secured a firmer foothold, and thus, balanced against all winds, we 
stood. It was by our participation in those functions outside of the 
academic field that we gained the experience and the practical 
strength to weather the storms of life. 



CLUBS 




A recent bulletin from Yeshiva's Department of 
Public Relations takes note of the fact that "a wide 
range of social, cultural and athletic activities offers 
the student unlimited opportunities for intellectual stim- 
ulation and character growth." As yearly chroniclers 
of student activities of Yeshiva, here is MASMID's de- 
scription of these activities, the raw facts of "The Club 
Story." 

Starting with the Literary Society, a fitting club for 
the People of the Book, the highlight of the year was 
Dr. Linn's speech on "The Writer and Neuroses," a 
subject dear to the hearts of every student. This club 
also had a panel discussion on the topic "Is 'Lady 
Chatterley's Lover' Obscene?", a subject even dearer 
to our hearts. After a careful search, the words "physical 
contact" were found 417 times which makes the book 
automatically "asur". 

The Pre-Med Society, taking up where the Literary 
Society left off, featured numerous films on a wide 
variety of topics, e.g. "Natural Childbirth," "Childbirth 
With Complications," and "Birth Control" (in that order). 
Also shown were the films "Brain Surgery in Ten Easy 
Lessons" and "Infectious Diseases and Their Relation 
to Exams." That the Pre-Med Society continues to sur- 
vive although so few of our students are pre-med majors 
(most of them majoring in Rabbinics) never fails to 
surprise us. However, this is not our concern at present. 
Continuing where we left off, the members attended a 
demonstration of microscopes, extremely useful in lo- 
cating such minute items as Socol's Scholarships and 
Parker's Portions. 

The Biology Club put out a number of profound 
writings. One paper proved that Weissman's classical 
experiment (in which mice whose tails had been cut off 
gave birth to mice with tails) was completely unneces- 
sary. All he had to do was to look at the Jews, and the 
law of "Bris Milah." Dr. Tendler spoke on Evolution and 
advanced the radical proposal that man evolved from 
dust and not from apes. If this be so, there are whole 
hordes of future generations under our dorm beds. Dr. 
Belkin also contributed a monograph on marine biology 
entitled, "A Philosophy of Porpoise." 

The Chemistry Society, not to be outdone, devoted 
itself to distinguishing, by chemical procedure, between 
milchig and fleishig ions. It was unanimously decided 
that the hydrogen ion concentration of pure water 
should be batel b'rov, a decision to be included in the 
Club's first publication, "A Halachic Approach to Chem- 
istry." 

In the Electronics Club, the big news is station 
WZKPZ (whatever zounds kood please zend). These de- 
votees of blips, buzzes, and flashing lights are starting 
their own radio station right in Yeshiva Residence Hall. 



Open Road Club 



72 




The International Relations Society, in true demo- 
cratic spirit, gave equal time to a speaker from "the 
opposing side" for a talk on "Arabs and Israel" ("Why 
don't they believe us when we tell them that Israel 
doesn't exist?"). Ranging far and wide globally, the 
following talks were on "A Free and Independent Bul- 
garia" (a satellite seeking enough escape velocity for 
free flight) and "The Cuban Situation," appropriately 
scheduled during sephira. 



Max Lew, Editor of The Kol, 
publication of the Literary Society. 





Michael Greenebauni 
President, Physics Society. 



Stephen Goldberg, President, 
Music Appreciation Club. 




Barry Silber, Vice-President, Young Dems. 




Shael Bellows, President, Pre-Law Society. 




from left to right; William Kantrowitz, President, Math- 
ematics Society; Professor J. S. Frame, Minnesota State 
University; Professor H. Lisman; at installation of Soci- 
ety into Pi Mu Epsilon Honorary Fraternity. 



The Physics Club, tackling the topic from its point 
of view, produced the following equations: 

1. The Length (L) in cm. of a pair of tzitzis is directly 
portional to the size of a shirt (S) and inversely 
proportional to the temperature (K). All this is multi- 
plied by the factor R, known as the Rebbe's constant 
(a variable). Thus 

L- R(S). 

2. The boldness of the color scheme (S) of a Yeshiva 
boy's yarmulka is equal to the product of the Ego 
Quotient (E) of the wearer times the color of the wool 
available at Macy's at the time (M)- divided by the 
degree of affection of the girlfriend who made it {°A). 
This figure is then changed to light wavelengths by a 
conversion factor equal to the square of the gematria 
value of shatnes. Thus 



EM 



=A 



'-'- X (shatnes)- 



The Math Society had an eventful year. They had 
the pleasure of joining a National Mathematics Hono- 
rary Fraternity. An initiation ritual was immediately 
set up which included having to determine the square 
root of a matzoh (which is no mean feat in view of the 
shape of some matzohs). Stan Boylan delivered a talk 
on "Previously Puzzling Putnam Problems," after which 
it became downright impossible. William Kantrowitz 
spoke on "Computer Programming For Fun and Profit," 
while Benjy Volk lectured on "Operators," which sounds 
pretty suspicious, if you ask us. 

The Open Road Club (no connection with Jack 
Kerouac's organization) devoted itself to the improve- 
ment of the "Yeshiva look," and took as its motto: "4-D, 
but not 4-F!" Following Horace Greeley's advice to "Go 
West," the club had a Lag Ba-Omer Hike along the New 
Jersey Palisades. A Faculty-Student Picnic and a snow- 
ball fight were also listed among the activities. Bicycle 
trips were scheduled and many of the campus wheels 
made their appearance. And, of course, who can forget 
the early, early minyan? Probably most of us. 

Also taking to the open road, the Chess Society ini- 
tiated a series of tournament tours, matching the De- 
bating Society pawn for rebuttal up and down the land. 
At home, two exhibition matches were held. Pal Benko, 
wearing a jacket designed by Sheldon Socol, took 29 
out of 30 games. Lisa Lane, in her first encounter with 
Yeshiva hours, found her game slipping somewhat by 
3:00 AM and retired, finally, down 9 games. The woman's 
chess queen checked out at 4:00 AM, but the Society 
felt it was a good night and didn't feel rooked. 

The French Club, dedicated to the principle that 
the Montmartre has more to offer than Amsterdam Ave- 
nue, heard a talk by Dr. Braun on "Paris — 1960." Dr. 
Chernowitz' showing of French slides was not quite 
what the boys had in mind, but the cover of "Raconteur" 
more than made up for it. 

Pi Delta Phi, the French honor society, held its 
initiation in the spring. Twelve boys became members. 
After an impressive secret ritual, refreshments were 
served and music was supplied by the accomplished 
piano playing of M. Mickey Posnick. It was a real blast, 
champagne and all! 

This concludes our look at the social, cultural, and 
athletic activities at Yeshiva — the true story of what 
goes on during that delightful period fondly known as 
"Club Hour." 




from left to right: Calvin Goldscheider; William Roth- 
child, President, Sociology Club; Shael Bellows. 




Morton Minchenberg, President, 
International Relations Society. 




Abe Sofaer, President, History Club. 




The Beginning 



STUDENT COUNCIL 




EXECUTIVE COUNCIL— from left to right: Teddy Ber- 
man, Secretary; Murray Geller, President; William Kan- 
trowitz, Vice-President. 







"I'll refer it to a committee" 



Student Council is one of the most misunderstood 
organizations at the College. Many consider it as merely 
a forum where the school politicians can vent their dis- 
pleasure at the Administration. 

Many did not realize that Student Council is much 
more than that, that advancing the point of view of the 
student body to the Administration, though albeit an 
important function of Council, is not the exclusive one. 

Student Council serves as the sponsor of projects 
that are both student initiated and student operated. 
Prime examples are the Dramatics Society, the Co-op, 
and the Electronics Club, to name but a few. One of 
the boasts of this year's Student Council was that we 
would finance any reasonable project advanced by the 
student body. 

The nature of Student Council is such that it 
changes as the times necessitate the revision of its 
policies. The direction of such change is, in a large 
measure, determined by the students involved in its 
functioning. Student Council is what the student body 
wants it to be. 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF STUDENT COUNCIL 1960-61 

1. Improvement of living facilities in the senior dormitory. 

2. Inclusion of the Debating and Chess Societies as organs of 
Student Council. 

3. Passage of the Fleisher Report. 

4. Formation of a Reading Society. 

5. Acceptance of the Mathematics Honor Society. 

6. Acceptance of the National Debating Forensic Honor Society. 

7. Record-breaking blood drive. 

8. Publication of the 25th anniversary issue of The Commen- 
tator. 

9. First year of the functioning of the Dramatics Society that 
sponsored both the Dean's Reception and the Freshman Play. 

10. First Activities Calendar sponsored by S.C. 

11. First open-budget meeting in recent history. 

12. Record-breaking publication of The Kol, the S. C. literary 
magazine. 

13. Passage of a Student Court statute. 

14. Publication of "With Malice Towards None." 

15. Sponsorship of a free non-sectarian tutoring service for junior 
high school students in the neighborhood. 




SENIOR CLASS COUNCIL— from left to right: Avery 
Gross, Jack Goldberg, Hershel Cohen. 




JUNIOR CLASS COUNCIL— from left to right: Dave Lew, 
Levi Rothkoff, Joshua Muss. 




SOPHOMORE CLASS COUNCIL— from left to right: Ja- 
son Rosenblatt, Ephrem Hecht, Mordy Paru. 




FRESHMAN CLASS COUNCIL— from left to right: Alan 
Shapiro, Melvin Meier, Irwin Ruderfer. 





A few words in closing. 




Bernard M. Zazula 



MASMID 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



STAFF 



Editor-in-Chief— Bernard Zazula 

Associate Editors — IVlichael Hecht, IVlelvin Stern 

Art Editor— Jack Ness 

Photography Editors — Avery Gross, William Kantrowitz 

Literary Editor — Isidor Apterbach 

Business iVIanagers — Howard Goldberg, David Rothner 

Typing Editor — Richard Barth 

Sports Editors — Danny Primmer, Louis Korngold 

Copy Editors — Stanford Goldman, Michael Greenebaum 

Activities Editors — Stanley Greenbaum, Joe Lifschitz 



Art — Aaron Gutman, Pred Nathan, Barry Winet 
Business — Charles Maurer 
Literary — Zev Leifer, Eli Leiter, Charles Persky 
Photography — Barry Gottleib, Aaron Levine, Irv Klavan, 

C. I.Waxman, Robert Pransky 
Typing — Keith Harvie 



SPECIAL THANKS TO: 



Howard Wohl Associates 

IVlr. George Rubens 

Public Relations — Yeshiva University 

Miss Sara Zimmerman 

Mr. Baruch Kahana 

Mr. Martin Schneider 

and especially Howie Begel who tried to sleep through it all 





Avery Gross 



William Kantrowit7 




Mel Stern, Jack Ness 




Richard Barth 



Michael Hecht, Isidor Apterbach 




// ( 




Circulation Staff 



THE COMMENTATOR 




Murray Laulicht, Editor-in-Chief 



This year, the 26th in its history, The Commentator 
led a resolute although varied course. 

Under the guiding hand of its editor-in-chief, the 
newspaper printed more pages throughout the entire 
year than it has done in a long time and ended off by 
copping its 14th consecutive first class rating. 

Among the highlights of the year must be included 
the silver anniversary issue which focused reader at- 
tention on 25 years of conscientious reporting, featured 
the history of The Commentator, the various athletic 
teams, reports from an Austrian concentration camp, 
the Jewish community of Bombay as well as a vehement 
plea for the assumption of a single standard by the 
Gedolai Hador in regard to matters affecting the welfare 
of the Jewish State. 

Following this excursion into the distant ports of the 
world. The Commentator settled down to its avowed task 
of the year — that of arousing the student body and the 
Administration to the dire need of improving the cur- 
riculum in the religious divisions of the University. 

In an editorial entitled "With Malice Towards None", 
these divisions were scored on their failure to provide 
an adequate spiritual guidance program for the students 
and different plans were suggested. Unfortunately, al- 
though the editorial provoked wide controversy, not 
much was done this year to further this goal. 

In other fields of news reporting the students were 
kept abreast of the latest developments. Features in- 
cluded reviews of various theatrical and television pro- 
ductions, analyses of Student Council and its activities, 
reports from other college newspapers, articles on prob- 
lems confronting the student body such as penalties 
for overcutting and the bechina system, as well as the 
regular features containing a timely peg. 

A three part series on "synthesis" was printed and a 
regular column by the editor-in-chief was reinstated. 
The sports staff spotlighted various members of the 
athletic team and to further the cause of Zionism at 
Yeshiva an article on Israel was included in every issue. 

The Commentator succeeded in arousing student, 
faculty, alumni, and administration response and scores 
of letters from these sources were printed. 

Otherwise, Commentator was its usual self mixing 
humor and praise with wit and sarcasm — as the occa- 
sion arose. 




GOVERNING BOARD— from left to right: Murray Lau- 
licht, Joshua Muss, Bill Strauss, Charles Persky, Herb 
Bloom, Eugene Roshwalb, Murray Geller, Dave Segal. 




mu 

MNDI 




CO-OP 




The Cooperative Stores of Yeshiva, located in a suite 
of rooms on the fourth floor in the main building, is 
Student Council's link with the business world. Many 
articles, including shavers, records and books, are of- 
fered here for sale at discount prices. 

Also part of the Co-op setup is the canteen. From its 
machines come the candy and soft drinks that enliven 
many an otherwise boring class. 

Book Store Manager — Herbert Bloom 
General Store Manager — Harvey Felsen 
Canteen Manager — Joseph Tuchman 




DEBATING TEAM 



Amid sounds of distress and SOS signals, the 
debating season got under way. Early in January 
the Society learned that it, together with the Inter- 
national Relations Society, would be given an op- 
portunity to represent Israel at the forthcoming 
University Model United Nations in Montreal. 
Thus, the debaters had fulfilled one of their oldest 
hopes. 

The seven tours in i-'ebruary and March pro- 
duced a winning record, much to the surprise of 
everyone in the school, especially the debaters 
themselves. 

President Murray Laulicht and Secretary Ray 
Bloch dropped two quick debates at Houston (to 
Rice) and San Francisco (to California) before 
knocking over the University of San Francisco, 
Stanford, UCLA, Loyola of Los Angeles, USC, and 
the United States Air Force Academy. 

Bernard Kaplan and Murray Geller defeated 
Florida State University and the University of Flo- 
rida, following a defeat at the hands of Morehouse 
State. This duo also defeated a team of Miami 
lawyers who had postulated the abolition of the 
Electoral College. 

Other victories were recorded over Carnegie 
Tech, University of Chicago, Massachusetts, Trin- 
ity, Northeastern, and the Naval Academy. 

One month after compiling their 16-10 record, 
the orators were inducted into Tau Kappa Alpha, 
the national honorary forensic fraternity, culminat- 
ing a four-year effort at membership. 

The final event of the year (aside from the an- 
nual debates known jokingly as elections) was the 
fifth annual Yeshiva University Debating Tourna- 
ment which saw New York University gain perma- 
nent possession of the Metropolitan Debate 
Plaque. 

All in all, the orators enjoyed a fine year, one 
which, it is hoped, will be duplicated in terms of 
further expansion and further achievement. 



I 





standing, from left to right: Mel Granatstein, Bernard 

Kaplan, Murray Laulicht, President; Murray Geller, Dave 

Epstein. 

Seated, from left to right: Mitchel Wolf, Shep Melzer, 

Abe Sofaer, Campus Manager, Ronald Burke, Ray Bloch. 



83 




DEAN'S RECEPTION 



The Yeshiva College Dramatics Society launched 
its first season of existence this year with three suc- 
cessful productions. 

Co-ordinating all undergraduate dramatics, the So- 
ciety produced the annual Dean's Reception in an im- 
proved and polished form. In addition, it presented 
revivals of the Broadway plays, "No Time For Sergeants" 
and "The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial," the latter as the 
Freshman Play. 

OFFICERS OF DRAMATICS SOCIETY 
President — William Zeitz 
Vice-President — Teddy Berman 
Financial Secretary — Harold Basch 
Co-ordinator of Plays — Murray Mednick 





SOPHOMORE CLASS PLAY 
"The Year They Launched Atlas" 




JUNIOR CLASS PLAY 
"In Pursuit of Gelt" 




85 



TEAM'S RECORD 

Yeshiva Opponent 



53 


CCNY 


47 


62 


Quinnipiac 


71 


55 


Hunter 


66 


88 


Patterson State 


70 


78 


Hartwick 


83 


57 


Fairleigh 






Dickinson 


74 


65 


Bridgeport 


106 


66 


Adelphi 


88 


55 


LIU 


77 


70 


Pace 


50 


65 


Rider 


72 


50 


Pratt 


59 


68 


St. Francis 


91 


70 


C. W. Post 


88 


68 


NYU 


108 


71 


Brooklyn 


77 


50 


Fairfield 


65 


76 


Stewart Air 






Force Base 


65 




Coach Bernie "Red" Sarachek 




BASKETBALL 



Battle under the boards 



The age-old problem at Yeshiva — lack of time to 
get into condition coupled with lack of experienced 
players and inadequate practice facilities proved to be 
an insurmountable obstacle for the Yeshiva Basketball 
Team this year. 

The Mighty Mites went into a gruelling campaign 
of 18 games and emerged with a sorrowful 4-14 record. 

But although there weren't many victories, there 
were plenty of thrills. In the first game of the season, 
the inexperienced squad turned in a thrilling 53-47 vic- 
tory over CCNY which raised everybody's hopes for a 
successful season, but in the ensuing games, the Mites 
were often outclassed but not out-hustled. 

One of the toughest opponents which the Mites 
faced this season, was nationally ranked N.Y.U. 

The seniors on the team were Lou Korngold, cap- 
tain and playmaker and a former basketball star of 
Yeshiva University High School of Manhattan, and Gary 
Baum, rebounder and scorer, both veterans of four sea- 
sons. Both regretted that their last season could not 
have been more successful. 

High scorer of the team this year was Sam Gross- 
man who sank 363 points for a 21.3 average earning 
him a berth on the All-East Small College Conference 
Team. 





INDIVIDUAL RECORDS 






Games 


Total Points 


Average 


Baum 


17 


180 


10.5 


Garmise 


17 


13 


0,7 


Goldstein 


10 


87 


8.7 


Grossman 


17 


363 


21.3 


Korngold 


16 


79 


4.6 


Kranes 


11 


17 


1.6 


Wieder 


17 


52 


3i0 


Jacobson 


17 


50 


2.9 


Podhurst 


17 


181 


10.6 


Aaron 


7 


67 


9.5 





Slaughter in the Bronx 



^ ^ ^: ru 




Gary Baum 




from left to right: first row— Larry Kranes, Lenny Pincus, 
Shelley Wieder, Philip Burson. second row— Mike Wise, 
Howard Cohen, Lou Korngold, Kenny Jacobson, Stanley 
Labovitch. third row— Coach "Red" Sarachek, Sam 
Grossman, Mike Garmeise, Bob Podhurst. Marv Gold- 
stein, Gary Baum. 




Coach Arthur Tauber 



FENCING 



Displaying tine traditional form and skilled expres- 
sion of yesteryear's Taubermen, Yeshiva's fencers com- 
pleted their season with an 8-4 record. 

Pre-season forecasts foresaw Yeshiva finishing the 
1960-61 tour at the .500 mark. Early losses to Columbia, 
Rutgers of Newark and Brooklyn College would have 
corroborated such a premature choice had it not been 
for the accomplishments of the epee and saber teams. 

Yeshiva's fencers, although suffering from early 
losses and a lack of veteran aspirants began to move 
after their third defeat, and turned back Fordham Uni- 
versity. This turning point proved decisive, as the saber- 
men slashed to victories over Brooklyn Poly, University 
of Connecticut, St. Peters and Patterson State among 
others. 

Following its six consecutive victories, Yeshiva 
dropped a closely fought battle at Drew's New Jersey 
campus 14-13 and then went on to complete its 1960-61 
campaign by defeating Cooper Union 14-13. 




from left to right: Steve Nison, Manager, Warren Enker, 
Captain 1961-62, Coach Arthur Tauber, Matthew Shatz- 
kes, Captain 1960-61. 



louche 





You fenced brilliantly! 





TEAM'S RECORD 




Yeshiva Oppone 


6 


Columbia 


21 


19 


Farleigh 






Dickinson 


8 


11 


Rutgers- 






Newark 


16 


13 


Brooklyn 






College 


14 


15 


Fordham 


12 


16 


Jersey State 






Teachers 


11 


16 


Brooklyn Poly 


11 


15 


St. Peters 


12 


16 


U. of Conn. 


11 


14 


Patterson State 


13 


13 


Drew 


14 


14 


Cooper Union 


13 



INDIVIDUAL 
RECORDS 
Foil 

Farkas 17-14 
Shatzkes 19-12 
Sheinkin 17-14 

Sabre 

Enker 23-8 
Nusbacfier 18-6 
Wasserman 13-10 

Epee 

Konovitch 13-13 
Silber 8-9 
Hain 11-13 




from left to right: Warren Enker, Manny Wasserman, 
Noel Nussbacher, David Sheinkin, Matthew Shatzkes, 
Barry Konovitch, Jimmy Hain, Steven Rothman, Billy 
Silber. 



INDIVIDUAL 


RECORDS 






win 


loss 


tp 


Fred Lieber 


3 


7 


13 


George Brown 


2 


8 


10 


Benjy Liefer 


5 


5 


11 


Joe Rapaport 


1 


5 


5 


Phil Keehn 


2 


7 


8 


Bob Schwell 


7 


3 


27 


Jack Merkin 


8 


1 


38 


Warren Klein 


5 


5 


23 


Dave Lew 





1 





Mike Gross 





3 





Jack Deitsch 





1 





Phil Hirshenfeld 





1 







WRESTLING 



Getting acquainted 




The "Cinderella Team" of pre-season predictions 
did not fully materialize, but Yeshiva's Grapplers very 
nearly lived up to these optimistic predictions. That 
they did not, does not constitute failure, but rather 
serves to illuminate a hope for the coming season. 

The team, consisting of five two-year "veterans" 
and three rookies, in finishing with a 3-5-2 record com- 
piled a better record than any previous Yeshiva Wres- 
tling Team. 

The team was led by co-captains Jack Merkin and 
Bob Schwell whose 8-1 and 7-3 individual records, 
respectively, topped a previous individual 6-4 record 
set last year. 

Under the expert mentorship of Henry Wittenberg, 
the young Wrestling Team has arrived at the point 
where it can begin to hold its own in intercollegiate 
competition. 

The team returns next year at full strength with 
no losses due to graduation. 




strategy 





Final countdown 



TEAM'S RECORDS 




Team 




Y.U. 


Montclair 


25 


3 


Orange Community 


15 


16 


Columbia 


21 


15 


King's Point 


26 


8 


C.W. Post 


13 


23 


Fairleigh Dickinson 


16 


18 


Albany State 


24 


8 


Long Island 


18 


18 


Newark Rutgers 


15 


19 


Brooklyn Poiy 


17 


15 




from left to right, standing: Jerry Golub, Dave Lew, War- 
ren Klein, Jack Merken, Bob Schwell, Coach Hank Witten- 
berg. Sitting: Fred Lieber, George Brown, Benjy Leifer, 
Mike Gross, Joe Rapaport, Jack Deitsch, Phil Keehn. 



SEASON'S RECORD 




Yeshiva 
Pratt 5 


Opponent 
4 


lona 1 
Pace 3 
Brooklyn Poly 3 
Brooklyn (non league) 
Hunter 4 


8 
6 
6 
9 
5 


Long Island University 4 


5 




TENNIS 




Coach Eli Epstein 



Attempting to rebound from last 
year's losing season, Yesliiva's netmen 
faced the task of replacing five of last 
year's varsity members. 

This year's team was led by Senior 
Co-Captains Daniel Primmer and Bernard 
Kaplan. The remainder of the starting 
team included Joshua Muss — Junior, 
Jesse Hordes — Sophomore, and three 
capable Freshman — Ezra Goodman, 
Edw/ard Schlussel, and Jeff Tillman. Se- 
niors Herb Amster, Jonathan Ginsberg, 
and Ronald Burke joined the rest to make 
this year's team a well balanced one. 

In the absence of Eli Epstein, the 
varsity was coached by George Samet 
('60). Yeshiva is a member of the Metro- 
politan College Tennis Conference and 
competed in six league games. 




left to right, standing: Jess Hordes, Edward Schlussel, 

George Samet, assistant coach. Josh Muss, Danny 

Primmer. 

Sitting: Dave Gordon, Ezra Goodman, Maurice Reifman, 

Jeff Tillman 





Bishop to King three 



CHESS 





Won 


Lost 


J. Grossman 


41/2 


11/2 


B. Frankel 


4 


2 


S. Boylan 


21/2 


11/2 


B. Goldstein 


3 


2 


IVI. Hauer 


1 


4 


M. Minchenberg 





2 




Chess has been revived and invigor- 
ated with enthusiasm at Yeshiva this 
year. 

Early in the season the combined 
forces of the "A" and "B" teams defeated 
the cadets of West Point 7-1, for the 
first time in Yeshiva history. 

This year Yeshiva College's Chess 
Team joined the Metropolitan Intercolle- 
giate Chess League. 

Leading the "A" team this year were 
Joel Grossman, Barry Frankel, Stan Boy- 
lan, and Bob Goldstein. IVlarty Rossman, 
Joe Rappaport and iVlark Diskind played 
excellently for the "B" team. 

Senior members of the team were 
IVlorton Minchenberg, Lawrence Green- 
field, and Isidor Apterbach. 



THE MIGHTY KNIGHTS— left to right, standing: Joel 
Grossman, Joe Rapaport, Barry Frankel, Al Maimon, Mark 
Diskind, Max Lew. Sitting: Martin Rossman, Morton 
Minchenberg, Captain, Willy Goldstein. 




SENIOR LIFE 



Which way to the dormitory? 




We met the floor washer 
the keeper of the keys 
and the boss. 







We soon discovered the hazards of the old dorm 



and we prayed for deliverance. 




Instead they modernized the mailboxes 





and the beds. 




So we decided to hang it all and have a good old water 

fight . . . 




...BUT WE DID STUDY 







..AND PLAY 










n"a 



The Senior Class of Yeshiva College 
cordially invites you to attend its 

MID-WINTER CHAGIGAH 

Sunday Evening, January 8th, 1961 

ttt;7:30 o'cloc\ 

Klein Hall, Teshiva University 

526 West 187th Street, Tiew York City 




Admission 
Free 





AND CONTEMPLATE 







W"' 




^^1 


M 


■ 


^Kh^ 








1 


^^^H^^^^_ 


m 


m 






...AND SHARE FOND MEMORIES 






LITERATURE 



This was our background — a background rich and var- 
ied, that fostered our total development. It enriched us and we, nur- 
tured by the wisdom of the ages, stretched forth our limbs, heavy with 
budding life, into the sun, and there bore fruits of various kind. In a 
sense this literature section, the expression of our creativity, rep- 
resents the culmination of our development. 



^"\ '-/,// 




FAITH, AMBIGUITY and REBELLION 

Some Aspects of the 
Book of Jonah 



by Syd Goldenberg 
Winner of the Ephraim Fleisher Memorial Prize 

The most forceful element of the Book of Jonah is at 
once the most haunting and disturbing. It is the fact that the 
agonizing dialectic of Jonah's religious experience, proceed- 
ing from rebellion to faith to rebellion, is never fully resolved. 
If we say with Maimonides that before man may encounter 
G-D as his prophet, he must possess a fine, philosophical in- 
telligence, surely we must be disturbed when we read that 
"Jonah rose up to flee unto Tarshish from the presence of 
the Lord." And even more disturbing is Jonah's later outcry: 
"... I know that Thou art a gracious G-D, and com- 
passionate, Therefore . . . take, I beseech Thee, my life 
from me." 

The problem formulates itself: How are we to respond 
to the compelling tale of a man who sought to "flee unto Tar- 
shish" from the presence of G-D? How are we to cope with 
the anguish of a man who recoils at the thought of G-D's 
compassion, who finds G-D's mercy unbearable, who wishes 
to die because of G-D's love? In short, how are we to inter- 
pret the terrible paradox of the odyssey of Jonah? 

I 

Before approaching the text, I would like to clarify cer- 
tain general ideas which constitute the core of the present 
inquiry. 



It seems to me that Jonah's story is primarily a recon- 
struction of man's religious experience, conceived as a tensile 
alternation between faith and rebellion. The key to this dia- 
lectical tension is the inherently paradoxical nature of reli- 
gious experience— for it consists in the encounter of man with 
G-D, of the finite with the Infinite. Yet because the two poles 
in this encounter are irreducibly incommensurable, because 
man, in the last analysis, can never truly accommodate the 
infinite G-D within the constricted sphere of his finite experi- 
ence, there remains always a fundamental ambiguity in the 
religious encounter. 

I wish to suggest that this notion of the intrinsic polarity 
of man's relation to G-D, a polarity which issues in an im- 
penetrable ambiguity, is the key to the cumulative spiral of 
rebellion and faith that constitutes the Book of Jonah. 

This idea^ may be clarified if we consider that man, 
finite and fallible, can never have perfect understanding; his 
comprehension of the totality of things is irremediably limited 
by the intrinsic partiality of his nature. Thus, in the intricate 
but unbreakable order of existence, man, the part, cannot 
possibly encompass the whole. Yet it is only in terms of his 
relation to the whole that man's significance may be assessed. 
Here then is the crux of the religious predicament, for man 
is vitally, earnestly concerned with the significance of his 
existence. By his very nature, he must seek to know the 
whole; but, by his very nature he cannot comprehend it. 

To put this idea more carefully, one might say that 
man, by nature, makes two kinds of judgments: judgments 
of relevance- and judgments of significance. The first type 
of judgment is made in the context of science; the second in 
the context of religion. The first judgment establishes the 
connections between things in a coherent order (e.g. the 
connection between fire and oxygen) ; the second establishes 
the value of things in a gradual scale (where love outranks 
gambling). The first must assume the uniformity of nature 
(so that relationships discovered here and now will hold for 
the future and throughout the universe) ; the second must 
assume an immutable order beyond the empirical world. The 
first judgment derives from man's intelligence and his quest 
for understanding; the second derives from man's freedom 
and his quest for self -justification. Our present inquiry is 
concerned with the nature of this religious quest, the process 
by which man is led to the Infinite. 

Our first point is that man is aware that he can affect 
by his judgment the actions open to him; his understanding 
and its decisions may condition his choices. Man is conscious 
that, if his actions are only the outcome of a cumulative 
series of past events, his own reason, which understands his 
situation uncoerced by those events, is an irreducible factor 
in this series. 

Now "freedom" for man does not mean undetermined 
action, but self-determined action: and man is conscious of 
such self-determination when he affects his actions through 
rational judgment and decision. For if man is conditioned 
by his past, he knows that he is conditioned; and in this 
knowing he is liberated. His actions are then not imposed 
by external coercion, but deliberated and chosen by un- 
hampered reason. 

Because man possesses rational choice, he must be re- 
sponsible to himself; because he chooses always from among 
opposing alternatives, he must establish that his final choice 
has value. And since, for man, life itself is an option, since 



he takes it upon himself by deliberate, rational choice, he 
must also establish the significance of his very existence. For 
man alone, life is not given, but chosen; for man alone, 
existence must have value. 

But the significance of life, once agreed upon, does not 
stand as a discrete, self-contained fact. Value is not a dis- 
connected term but a relation; a thing is valuable or signifi- 
cant only as related to a larger context, (e.g. Since man is 
sociable, friendship is good.) But if this larger context 
changes, all the relationships and values anchored in it will 
be radically dislocated. In a mutable context, values are in 
jeopardy; and such transitory, hazardous significance is not 
adequate for man. On the contrary, man requires a signifi- 
cance for his existence from which other values can be de- 
rived, which he can rely on throughout his life. Otherwise, 
all dedication is futile, all hard decision and suffering retro- 
spectively absurd and existence pointless. But all that is finite 
is mutable and the mutable jeopardizes value. Thus any finite 
context for man's existence cannot yield him enduring values; 
he therefore seeks to relate himself to a context which over- 
comes all "finitude", to an infinite Order, impervious to time, 
which alone can serve as an adequate ground for enduring 
values. 

Thus for value to be adequate for the duration of man's 
finitude, it must transcend that very finitude. 

And thus for value to be reliable for a lifetime it must 
be immutable for eternity. 

To summarize, one might say that man's finite life 
possesses meaning only if rooted in the context of an absolute' 
Order, a system of reference which is eternal, and immutable 
and intrinsically significant. It is man's critical finitude, 
which, coupled with rational choice and the quest for value, 
paradoxically leads him to the Infinite. This is so because 
finite human life has only extrinsic or relational significance 
(related to a larger context). Not so the absolute, which, in 
its self-sufficient immutability, confers value on the partial, 
but requires none. All other instrumental values may then 
be put into hierarchical perspective in ratio to their use in 
achieving maximum alignment of one's life with the immuta- 
ble structure of things. In sum, human life, inherently finite, 
seeks significance. The absolute Order, inherently infinite, 
confers significance.* And the one finds redemption in terms 
of the other. 

Thus, if we transpose Biblical religious doctrine into 
these categories, though we realize that it is not exhausted 
by them, we might say that man's salvation is rootedness in 
the Eternal; his life thus acquires imperishable value which 
overcomes its finitude, being identified with the laws of G-D, 
immutable, eternal, intrinsically good. As for sin, may not 
every instance of it, in the last analysis, be reduced to idolatry 
— the deification of the partial, the absolutization of the rela- 
tive? To relate one's life to mutable ends and to magnify 
them to an absolute is to perish in a vicious circle of un- 
redeemed finitude and to violate G-D's claim upon man. 

I am suggesting that religion is man's attempt to over- 
come the transitory futility of a purely partial existence by 
relating himself to an infinite Scheme, impervious to time, in 
the context of which his life has significance. 

The magnitude of man's faith now begins to grow clear; 
we see that his faith is essentially his struggle against his 
own finitude. Such a struggle must bear the burden of both 



maximum risk and maximum courage. For the Infinite which 
man seeks is only accessible to him through his own finite 
psyche. For this reason, faith must always act in the absence 
of certainty and the object of faith must remain incompre- 
hensible to the believer. For man, transcending his finitude 
by faith in the Infinite, is still finite. 

This, then, is the full measure of the religious paradox- 
man, caught in the ambiguity of his relative experience, must 
stand against the Absolute. 

His two responses to this condition are faith and re- 
bellion. Either way, he must endure the turmoil and face 
the risk of his predicament. Either way he has only his 
courage to sustain him across the abyss between the poles 
of his existence. To express the insurmountable nature of the 
chasm between man and G-D in religious experience, we 
shall call it "radical polarity." 

Faith attempts to bridge this chasm; rebellion defies it.^ 

II 

With these notions in mind, we shall attempt to clarify 
Jonah's experience. It seems that the prophet's rebellion 
occurs in two phases and on two different levels. The first 
phase is resolved in the belly of "the great fish"; the second 
climaxes in G-D's rebuke to Jonah for protesting the wither- 
ing of the gourd and the redemption of Nineveh. The present 
inquiry is an attempt to differentiate these rebellions and 
relate them to the idea of radical polarity. 

Jonah's first rebellion occurs the instant G-D confronts 
him with his mission. When "the word of the Lord came 
unto Jonah" demanding that he "proclaim their wickedness" 
to the people of Nineveh, Jonah sought to flee his Creator. 
We are told that G-D pursued this prophet and cast him into 
adversity and despair, at which point Jonah returned to faith. 

If we bear in mind the radical polarity of Jonah's en- 
counter with G-D and the circumstances of his final return, 
we might interpret this rebellion as a fundamental refusal 
to yield dominion to G-D, to accept G-D's sovereignty on His 
own terms. For Jonah is confronted, when G-D breaks in 
upon him, with the incomprehensible Infinite demanding 
unquestionable authority over man. 

I wish to suggest that Jonah's flight is a refusal to 
acquiesce to the supremacy of the unintelligible. 

To be sure, the incommensurability of the Biblical G-D 
is not unqualified — and the word "unintelligible" applied to 
Jonah's G-D must certainly be sharply distinguished from the 
totally arational G-D of the modern "existentialist" whose 
faith "by virtue of the absurd" culminates in Kierkegaard's 
antithesis between faith and reason, religion and ethics. On 
the contrary, the Biblical G-D, though his Nature is not in- 
telligible to man, is thoroughly consistent in His relation 
to him, and existence is a coherent scheme, a natural-moral 
order for which G-D is the final and absolute guarantee. 

But if not absurdity, a subtler ambiguity insinuates itself 
into the encounter of man with the Biblical G-D, an ambiguity, 
as it were, within the framework of G-D's consistent relation 
to man. For Jonah's difficulty as a finite man relating to G-D 
is not that G-D is inconsistent, but that he is infinite and that 
partial man cannot encompass the overall structure of things. 
Indeed, the universal G-D in whom all particular contradic- 
tions are reconciled, when viewed by man, himself particular, 
may appear to contradict Himself. That is, certain value- 



conflicts within G-D's consistent order may appear irreduci- 
ble. The outcome of this insurmountable irony is that man 
is often brought up hard against the blank wall of the in- 
scrutable. A paradox which in G-D's view is resolved may 
remain for limited man a hard, inexplicable surd. Thus 
value-conflicts may intrude, to a degree, into the ordered 
framework of existence under the living G-D and upset the 
placid current of religious certainty with the nagging under- 
tow of paradox. 

Now if we examine Jonah's situation, we find that his 
refusal to surrender to his Creator may be considered to stem 
from this margin of ambiguity inherent in the encounter 
with G-D. For the essence of this encounter consisted in G-D's 
unfathomable demand that Jonah offer mercy to Nineveh by 
warning it to repent before the Lord. The prophet was thus 
confronted with the paradox that the G-D of justice is also 
the G-D of mercy. But Jonah is affronted by the notion of 
offering mercy to the wicked while the righteous suffer; for 
the characteristic of human judgments is to limit — at a cer- 
tain point; justice and mercy become mutually exclusive, or 
one cannot survive the other. For man, there is "a time to 
love and a time to hate" ; there is a point at which one cannot 
forgive — one must destroy. But for the G-D of infinite justice 
and infinite love, there can be no hard disjunction between 
the two; at all times they are co-involved in Him and He 
sustains man with love even as He judges him. 

But for Jonah, no such fusion of justice and mercy is 
possible within the partiality of human moral judgments. 
Over against G-D, he asserts the independence and supremacy 
of human finitude and its standards of intelligibility and he 
rejects any moral order or authority which is not accessible 
to those standards. And if G-D refuses to shrink for man, 
Jonah will shrink from G-D. Thus, unable to heal the split 
or comprehend it, Jonah rebels. 

But though he refuses to accept G-D, Jonah cannot escape 
his need for Him; by his very nature, he must transcend his 
finitude to attain significance for it, and rest, by faith, in an 
immutable Order. Jonah must, therefore, seek a substitute for 
G-D. And, indeed, there is an order, infinite and eternal, yet 
amenable to human intelligence and in fact, the condition for 
intelligibility as such — the order of Nature. 

Jonah does not reject belief in G-D — he tells the sailors 
squarely that "I am a Hebrew and I fear the Lord." But it is 
the "G-D of Heaven, who made the sea and the dry land" 
that Jonah chiefly fears; essentially he has attempted to re- 
duce G-D from Hashem to Elokim/' to retain G-D only inso- 
far as He may be identified with the order of Nature and the 
hard sequences of justice, but excluding the personal Re- 



deemer Who loves and forgives, Who succors and sustains 
his creatures. 

But if the Biblical G-D is infinitely remote from the un- 
intelligible "absurd" of the existentialist, He is equally re- 
moved from the impersonal though intelligible Order of the 
naturalist. The G-D of Israel is Hashem-Elokim, the Principle 
of universal order, but also a Person who loves man and 
relates to him in Buber's terms, a Thou, not an It. Nature (for 
that is ^vhat Elokim without Hashem becomes) may be devoid 
of her ambiguity of the universal yet personal G-D, but the 
G-D of Israel is far more than an order, and what finally 
determines man's choice of one or the other is not just its 
intelligibility, but the way in which it grips his being. And 
Jonah's choice is inescapable — for the prophet, Elokim is 
not enough. Driven to the edge of despair, he utters the 
moving cry of his atonement: 

"I called out of mine affliction 

Unto the Lord, and He answered me; 

Out of the belly of the netherworld 
cried I, 

And Thou heardst my voice . . . 

The deep was round about me; 

The weeds were wrapped about my head. 

I went down to the bottoms of the 
mountains . . . 

Yet hast thou brought up my life 
from the pit, 

Lord my G-D. 

When my soul fainted within me 

1 remembered the Lord." 

Only when his soul faints, when he is driven to the 
periphery of despair, bankrupt of all idolatrous substitutes, 
naked and alone before G-D. does Jonah remember the 
Lord. Thus a further dimension of the polarity of man's 
encounter with G-D is disclosed — only man at his lowest 
point, devoid of false securities, when the chasm between 
man and G-D is greatest, is it most effectively closed. 

Be that as it may, the return of Jonah is complete: once 
again he stands as a son of Israel, under the covenant with 
his Creator, and once again he calls, with the intimacy of a 
trusting child, upon the Redeemer of Israel. Hashem-Elokim, 
"0 Lord my G-D." 




If the first phase of Jonah's rebellion was impelled by the 
difficulty of accepting G-D, the final phase is impelled by the 
greater difficulty of living with Him. 

Jonah, after successfully carrying G-D"s warning to the 
people of Nineveh and saving them from punishment through 
teshuvah, is bitter and sullen and wishes to die. He complains 
that G-D's mercy and forgiveness are unbearable. 

It appears that Jonah now feels the full force, in a con- 
crete situation, not just an intellectual apprehension, of the 
paradox of G-D's absolute justice and absolute love. His 
problem is essentially the problem of evil, transposed through 
the genius of the prophet into the problem of love. For G-D's 
love being universal, sustaining His whole creation as such, 
is undifferentiated. It supports all men, even when, according 
to human, moral judgment, they no longer deserve it. It 
seems that G-D's love for man refuses to abide by the par- 
ticular moral distinctions which alone enable men to do His 
Will. 

It is this last point which leads us to the center of the 
problem; to define it precisely, we may say that the religious 
paradox consists in the fact that the G-D who relates to man 
with undifferentiated, universal love, irreconcilable with 
man's particular moral judgments, is the same G-D who 
reveals Himself to man through particular love, in the pro- 
phetic encounter which legislates those judgments. 

Jonah clearly sees, with a brilliance he is not aware of, 
that it is the incommensurability of G-D's universal love and 
man's particular love which is at the bottom of the problem 
of evil. 

Thus G-D's own prophet is forced into the agonizing 
position of conveying G-D's moral distinctions to those who 
violate them — only to see that G-D seems to pay no regard, 
but grants blessedness to the wicked in a moment of teshuvah 
on their part while the righteous suffer. 

How does G-D answer the challenge of the prophet? He 
answers through the parable of the gourd: He exposes to 
Jonah the fact that the inconsistency does not lie with G-D 
but with His prophet. While Jonah sat brooding in the des- 
ert east of the city, G-D caused a gourd to grow and shield 
him from the heat; but "when the morning rose" G-D pre- 
pared a worm "and it smote the gourd that it withered." 



Jonah fainted in the sun. Again he was angered at G-D 
and wished to die. In the magnificent reply which closes the 
Book, G-D says to Jonah, in eiTect: "How can you expect Me 
to treat Nineveh as Elokim and you as Hashem?"' You have 
demanded that I treat Nineveh solely with order and justice, 
and yet when I allow natural law and justice to take their 
course, the gourd to wither and your impudence to be justly 
crushed, you are furious. I treat you as a G-D of natural — 
moral order and you protest, as if you deserved mercy, com- 
passion, forgiveness. And did you cry out from the bowels 
of the earth to the G-D of order? Did you turn from the 
limits of despair to the G-D of justice? You surely did not 
wish Me to decree immediate and exact justice upon you 
when you rebelled, but to sustain you with love in spite of 
your infidelity, to wait patiently for your teshuvah, and to 
accept you without condition when you returned. 

"But how can you dare demand that I violate my own 
unity? How can I treat you as Hashem, with the love that 
mitigates justice, if I do not the same for all my creatures?" 

For the living G-D, Hashem-Elokim, there can be no 
partiality; and Jonah is shamed into silence. 

Ill 

How may we summarize the teaching of this magnificent 
Book? It appears that the Biblical narrative illuminates a 
double failure on the part of Jonah and in so doing, provides 
a penetrating, unflinching anatomy of man's religious ex- 
perience. 

It seems that Jonah had failed to understand the nature 
of G-D's love and the full implications of the polarity of the 
encounter between man and G-D. Jonah did not understand 
that the ambiguity and paradox of man's relation to G-D 
is indispensable for the survival of man. Indeed, it is precisely 
because G-D loves man that He shields him from full under- 
standing. If it were not for the ambiguity inherent in the 
encounter, finite man could not possibly withstand the in- 
finite majesty of G-D breaking forth into the world. He could 
not possibly retain his identity and freedom, and be addressed 
as a separate person by G-D, but would surely be swept into 
the Infinite, his finite selfhood ineffably dissolved, his will 
and his response totally coerced. Therefore G-D addresses 
to man only finite imperatives which conserve his identity 
but jar with G-D's undisclosed infinity. But it is only to pro- 
tect man's identity from being consumed by the touch of 
the Divine that G-D mitigates His glory with a veil of 
ambiguity; only because He sustains finite man in love, does 
G-D remain hidden even as He is revealed.* 



^ii^t^^-' 




And it is the same Divine love which produces, in turn, 
the paradox of the continuing relation of G-D to man, the 
problem of evil. If by "love" we mean the action taken with- 
out any personal benefit, to sustain the individuality and 
allow for the fulfillment of another, this time-worn religious 
analogy surely stands. For it is only because of the undif- 
ferentiated love of G-D, which supports his creatures without 
regard for the distinctions which inhere in the particularity 
of man's condition, that the problem of evil exists. And yet 
without this, in a world governed solely by justice, man, as 
the Midrash points out, could not endure. But in the nature 
of things, F-D's vision is unalterably polar to man's, and 
must be, if man is to survive. The dichotomy is irreducible; 
and the problem of reward and punishment, in which G-D's 
universal decrees and man's particular deserts are reconciled, 
is a problem not solved in this world. 

Joanah had also failed to understand the true nature of 
the polarity between G-D and man. Had he understood, he 
would have realized that the dichotomy in G-D's relation to 
man is the necessary concomitant of the dichotomy in man 
himself; it is only because man is finite, yet seeking the 
Infinite, driven to struggle with that which he cannot behold, 
that G-D must remain ambiguous to him. The truth is that 
man must find a paradox in G-D because of the paradox 
in man: only a G-D both of justice and mercy could sustain 
finite man, grappling with the Infinite he cannot withstand. 
Jonah, in rebelling against the paradox of G-D, had only 
evaded the paradox of man. He had not understood that the 
root of the problem of suffering is not that G-D is too infinite 
but that man is too finite, not that G-D does not differentiate, 
but that man cannot help doing so. Jonah had not understood 
that the root of the problem of evil is that while man cannot 
love the whole unless he loves the individual, G-D cannot love 
any individual unless he loves the whole. '^ But neither can 
man find significance as an individual, which alone can re- 
deem his finitude, he transcends himself and confronts the 
whole. In other words, if we cannot reconcile the Universal 
and the particular, neither can we separate them. Thus he 
who reaches a full religious awareness will understand tha* 
to fully accept the condition of man is also to accept the 
dominion of G-D. 

Thus the vision of the Book of Jonah is a vision of the 
inexpungable polarity of religious existence in which man 
must endure a chasm with paradox on either side; devoid of 
certainty but forced to act, his only alternatives are rebellion 
or faith. 

And as we conclude our analysis we are also in a position 
to understand that the pivot of the Book of Jonah is teshuvah. 
For it is teshuvah which constitutes the essence of man's 
relation to G-D as the G-D of love and mercy, as the personal 
Redeemer of His creation. Teshuvah has no place in an im- 
personal Order of existence; Spinoza declared that atonement 
is unbefitting a rational man. Without teshuvah, however, the 
spiral of rebellion and faith in Jonah could never occur; the 
first rebellion would be the last, justice would descend upon 
the rebel and the inexorable order of things would indiffer- 
ently grind all error into ashes. But the G-D of Jonah will not 
be reduced to justice alone; the personal G-D of infinite 
love sustains even His creatures who violate His Name. And 
the Book of Jonah declares that it is teshuvah alone which 
supports the unyielding struggle between man and his G-D. 



It is fully granted that the above interpretation is no 
more than an individual response to an inexhaustible, enig- 
matic allegory. It takes the Book of Jonah, not only as an 
attempt to justify G-D's ways to man, but also to explore the 
gap between them. I have taken Jonah to focus on the rhythm 
of man's successive responses to the radical polarity of his 
existence, alternately issuing in the yearning struggle to 
unify the poles, expressed in faith, and the futility of such 
union, expressed in rebellion. 

The Book seems to proclaim in the unfinished silence of 
its ending that the antithetical tension of Jonah is the per- 
manent condition of man, and that it is precisely in his 
struggle to integrate this antithesis that man is delivered of 
the vision and impelled to the faith which redeem his life. 
Jonah relentlessly proclaims that the greatness of man 
is the relentlessness of spirit, that this is intrinsic to G-D's 
order and the human situation, that it is an irreducible 
tension which yields no facile solution, and will suffer neither 
the humanist displacement of G-D nor the scholastic sub- 
mergence of man. 

On the contrary, man must accept that, as a limited 
human, he can only know the absolute by the peril of faith — 
it must be by peril because he is limited, but it must be 
absolute because he is human. And finally. Jonah declares 
that, though we may face this unyielding tension with acqui- 
escence or rebellion, the restlessness of man shall never end. 

FOOTNOTES 
iJn the following discussion, I shall alternately consider 
religion in general and religion involving a personal G-D. 
The former I call "religion", the latter, "Biblical religion". 
Also, in the discussion of the former I shall use impersonal 
concepts such as "Order" or "Structure", in the latter, the 
concept of G-D. I am attempting, in this way, to develop 
universal concepts of the nature of religion as such, in order 
to illuminate particular religions ( in this case Biblical Juda- 
ism). I would also like to point out that many of the ideas 
in the ensuing discussion I owe to my teacher. Prof. A. 
Litman. 
-The phrase is Dr. Litman's. 

•''By "Absolute" throughout the essay I mean "Impervious to 
time" (i.e. external and immutable self-sufficient and intrin- 
sically significant ) . The "Absolute" means the total structure 
of things, a structure impervious to time. (The definition is 
Dr. Litman's.) 
■^The definition is from Will Herberg, Judaism and Modern 
Man, Meridian Books, New York, 1959. 
"cf. Dostoevsky's formulation of the nihilistic viewpoint: 
"I shall persist in- utter metaphysical defiance, infinitely 
lovely, supported only by my moral insight. I shall offer 
absolute resistance to the ultimate principle and shall 
despise it." 
Quoted by E. Frank, Philosophical Understanding and Re- 
ligious Faith. New York, 1945. p. 38. 

•''This key idea of Jonah's dichotomy between Hashem and 
Elokim and the inconsistency of this dichotomy, I received 
from my teacher. Rabbi Moses Tendler. 
"Again, I wish to note that this interpretation originated with 
Rabbi Tendler. 

*cf. The article by Emil L. Fackenheim, "The Dilemma of 
Liberal Judaism," in Commentary, Oct.. 1960. 
^cf. Article by Sam Ajzinstat, "Religion and Rebellion in 
Judaism" in Reflections, Toronto Hillel Organization, 1960. 



A PERIOD 
OF CHANGE 



by Martin Mantel 

Winner of the Jerome Rabbins Memorial Prize 

for best short story. 

Pierre Mwambe stirred, feeling the corrugated surface 
of the tin sidings chill his back. Slowly his eyes grew ac- 
customed to the sickly dawn glow filtering past the cracks 
and he began to wonder what he was doing beneath the tin 
shack. Then, seeing the even, surrounding carpet of grey 
dust, he was easy. Thinking seemed to depend on seeing for 
Pierre. Lying on his back and staring wide-eyed at the 
dirty, plank floor overhead he began to remember . . . 

Pierre had Ilonga blood according to his mother but he 
could never be sure; she, with her half-sister, had left the 
tribe early to find servant work with the whites. His mother 
was twelve then, but by the time Pierre was born she was 
twenty-eight and an old hag with swollen spittle-colored gums 
that emerged sickeningly from between her few teeth as 
she grinned (he supposed now that she was happy with the 
whining bundle that sucked at her shriveled teats — that 
was always the way with her between the babies ) . Pierre 
thought: "If she couldn't remember how many of them she 
buried, then how could she remember her tribe?" And 
then you had to add the fact that she left when she was only 
twelve. Time makes everything dim. That is why he couldn't 
picture his father, who ran off when Pierre was eight to find 
work in a distant factory. 

But his mother continued to have babies nonetheless with 
an indefinite succession of transient workers whom she re- 
ferred to as "mes bonhommes" all with her open mouthed 
good-humor. Pierre recalled the grin well as he did the way 
her thin and slack breasts hung limply against her chest. 




"She is a wicked witch," he thought, and two years after 
his father ran away he followed suit, leaving behind a noisy 
brood of children and the last clinging bundle that seemed 
to glow from the sallow flesh drawn taut across his mother's 
scrawny frame. 

A sudden shiver made the muscles of his face twitch and 
he shifted fitfully from his position. "Why do these thoughts 
haunt me?" He relived the bitter days spent straying in the 
village gnawed by hunger until he collapsed senseless in the 
dusty filth paving the dirt gutter, days of his quivering vision 
yearning desperately after the delirious images that floated 
by unconcernedly. Those few days of starving desolation, 
of ravenous searching through the stinking garbage heaps 
were more to Pierre than events to be remembered. They 
were part of his identity. They had made him practical. 

Such was Pierre's condition that when a group of French 
travelling missionaries caught sight of the child's bloated 
form drawing thin gasps of stale gutter air and rescued him 
from sure death, the boy was too weary, too hungry to know 
the compassionate hands that laid him gently on the back of 
the motor lorry, too hurt also to feel thankful for his miracu- 
lous salvation. But Pierre was obedient if not grateful, and in 
the course of two or three weeks he learned the rudiments of 
being a good houseboy to Pere Moriot and M. Reyne. The 
Pere in turn allowed him to become a member of the party 
and was civil enough. Once, in fact, during a short and pain- 
ful interview Moriot questioned Pierre about his family and 
home but he turned away and didn't answer. 



"It's quite obvious," said Reyne. "that he is content with 
his most recent adventure, the young scamp. I'm not sure we 
do right in keeping him along." 

Pierre had kept facing the wall, for all his childish impu- 
dence; there was a murderous threat he imagined, an omen 
of something terrible emerging from the shallow blue pools 
sunk in M. Reyne's face. 

Even when he grew older, leaving the priests to serve the 
families which took him in for short periods, Pierre could 
not rid himself of these earliest traces of terror. In the class- 
rooms, too, where, on occasion, because of overcrowded 
schools the boy was allowed to sit in the back and discovered 
that he was superior in his studies to many of the colonist 
children — even as he learned to hate the chattering mass of 
fair-skinned Europeans — the same mysterious awe lurked 
within him, damming back the hot-tempered outbursts he 
might have blurted out against the injustices he endured. 
Here the boy ironically succeeded, for his tense restraint was 
taken by everyone for stupid docility. So convincing was 
Pierre's air of dull servility that his instructors never both- 
ered to probe his sensitive intelligence although they were 
continuously amazed by the quality of his work. Instead, they 
tacitly assumed that he received help from the other students 
although he wasn't popular, it being additionally puzzling 
that inferior students could supply him with perfectly done 
assignments. 

When he was eighteen and through with the government 
school, Pierre was turned down for an opportunity to attend 
a European University on a scholarship. "The boy is too 
sullen," they all agreed, "an academic freak." A week after 
graduation he joined the guards. 

Someone above was awake now and Pierre cut short his 
reflecting to listen better. Dust had thoroughly caulked what- 
ever cracks once made it possible to see between the planks, 
but it didn't shut out sound. A bed was creaking and a body 
twisting resentfully to its edge. Two feet made contact with 
the wood near Pierre, leaving the boards in quivers as they 
reacted to the pressure above. Rustlings, the sound of clothes 
removed, clothes donned. He wondered whether it was a man 
or a woman and decided, after listening longer, that he 
couldn't tell. Again the boards sagged; this time in a steady 
sequence like piano keys. He or she was leaving, giving 
Pierre at last the chance to stretch his aching limbs. Inclining 
his way towards a thin slit of yellow, he found the opening 
of the night before. 



Pushing a rock aside, he craned his neck viewing either 
side of the alley, seeing nothing move but a woman's receding 
outline. Retreating, he surveyed the ground for any posses- 
sions he might have dropped and, struck by a frantic fear, 
reached wildly for his holster. The gun was still there. He 
sighed relieved, removed the ancient revolver and inspected 
the chambers carefully. The empty part from the shot he had 
fired yesterday evening emitted a faintly acrid odor. Reaching 
for his belt, Pierre removed one cartridge and loaded the 
groove, snapping the barrel smoothly into its position. Then, 
returning the gun to its leather shield, he grabbed forth his 
cork helmet and scraped his way past the opening. 

Pierre winced at the blinding inundation of morning sun, 
swaying weakly for some steps until his feet accepted the 
reality of the dust-packed alley and began to carry him away 
from the already indistinguishable shack, in a direction away 
from the woman. He didn't want to pass the marching ground 
though, being afraid, and, therefore, wove through a maze of 
miserable hovels towards the road that led away from Kasala. 
Approaching the outskirts of town, Pierre could smell the 
green dew-beaten grass and the thick brown soil of the newly 
plowed fields. He could hear the creakings and rustlings of 
people being roused and the actions of dressing. He sensed 
the noise accelerating with the start of an infant's howling 
cries that mingled with the animal noises in a cacophony of 
sounds. Hastening pace, he began to count the houses re- 
maining before the last one closest to the road. He knew the 
sign would say — "Gelea — 69 Kilometers." He had passed 
it many times before. 

Suddenly a civil worker in a white shirt gave Pierre a 
start by crossing his path just as he neared the pebbled road- 
side. The short man was walking at a brisk clip whistling an 
incoherent melody that rose and fell with his labored breath. 
In his haste, he paid no regard to the dishevelled guard 
member who hurried past him and scampered for the shallow 
camouflage bordering the quiet road. Pierre didn't have to be 
afraid of being seen. It was not unusual for the local police 
guards to patrol the village, especially on the day after a 
demonstration. 

Once seated on the soft cushion of earth. Pierre became 
aware of his thumping heart. He strained nervously to see 
the marching ground in the distance. It was empty. The rau- 
cous shrieking of the wild birds joined the jungle croakings 
in frantic counterpoint. Somewhere the hoarse coughing of 
a car starting mingled with the general confusion. His body 
swayed grudgingly to the rhythm, "Why did I leave the vil- 
lage?". . . Pierre lurched forward pressing his eyes against 
the balls of his hands in a vain effort to shut out the rising 
flood of panic that tormented his imagination. He groaned 
aloud, unable any longer to submerge the writhing images 
of the evening before. 





He saw himself again at the head of the marching ground 
before the Supervisor's office and felt the tension of his grip 
on the butt of his revolver. He shuddered at the incarnation 
of the brutal mob violently waving their clenched fists and 
placards in the dimming light. Like a horrible beast the in- 
furiated crowd roared, striking fear into his heart. It began 
to converge upon the whitewashed wooden building hurling 
vile curses, shouting "Kill the Whites!" and "Death to the 
traitors!" It made as if to rip Pierre limb from limb. He was 
retreating erratically, his knees working wildly. The other 
guards were nearby, infected with the same fear of immediate 
destruction. They shouted frantically "Stay back!", "Don't 
move!", "We'll shoot!!" and brandished their guns with 
jerking movements, pointing them in all directions. Never 
before had there been such an outbreak in Kasala. There were 



mild demonstrations, yes — the captain of the guards had 
even warned his company that signs of new violence were 
developing, but nothing could have made him imagine this. 
Two of the guards threw down their guns and ran, one of them 
joining the crowd. Then, as a great wound opens, the crowd 
gushed towards the remnants of the company with a deadly 
vengeance. The captain began firing into the mob. The crisp 
crack of the first shot lost itself in the chaos and was soon 
joined by the firing of many bullets, into the air, the crowd, 
everywhere. 

For Pierre the first was like hearing a chain snapped. 
The next moment was minutes long during which he 
forgot his identity and could only think of his mother's 
idiotic grin, her weary frame, and the terror he felt for the 
Whites. Like pincers, the fear and shame tore away at his 
reserve, at the mold imprisoning him, and reeling blindly 
from the confusion and panic that racked his quaking body, 
he felt an overpowering animal oneness with the gaping 
monster that swallowed him alive. His open eyes, unseeing, 
saw him numbly draw the revolver. "I can throw it away!" 
he thought shocked. Behind him the captain roared "Shoot ! ! " 
and Pierre froze completely, his finger paralyzed on the thin 
and worn trigger. In an instant's vision he saw an old crone 
in line with his barrel, lighted by a nearby torch. She was 
being pushed forward by the crest of the mob. She blazed 
like an apparition in Mwambe's eyes. Her breasts were bare 
and corroded, her toothless mouth contorted with murder — 
the image of his mother! Sinking into an ocean of despair, 
Pierre knew at once with the crowd the overwhelming misery, 
both his and theirs. He knew, he knew. Then, within him 
something evil and foul, that had festered over a lifetime, 
over generations, for time immemorial — contracted. And 
the chamber exploded thrusting its projectile like a plow into 
the chest of the woman and she slumped, slowly, almost 
gracefully to the ground. 

The others were still firing into the crowd when the 
dazed Pierre ran . . . 

"Where can I go?" he wondered. A voice said, 

"Report for duty as if nothing happened," but that was 
senseless. 

A lone cloud stared dully at him from the cobalt sky com- 
manding him to rise. He shuffled some meters, paused, and 
looked eastward, away from the road. "The Ilonga's camp 
is about forty kilometers from here." Mwambe's feet moved 
noisily over the underbrush, but the noise was masked by 
the approving screeches of the birds. 





On the Thirteenth 
Year of the State 



by IsiDOR Apterbach 



Alone, alone 

An unheard moan 

A lark that flew too high 

To sing and trill 

Above the hill 

And in a lonely sky 

What can be said to years of toil, 

To sombre Truth, in words of song? 

What need of hammer has our gong? 

With every breeze the tired tunes 

O shrouded time reverberate 

And heavy numbers, soon and late, 

Bow our laden souls with further grief. 

Nay, glorious was our time of seed 

And ours, my people, every deed 

The world names lightly: good; 

For who are we but Amram's son? ' 

And yet we cannot sing of joy 

When all about, in bated breath. 

We hear the Gentile's sentence: 'death, to death' 



Halevi's rhyme with lance transpierced 

And holy Meir's unshrieved end 

And every Jewish garment rent 

For bitter loss of martyred kin; 

Our eye is blinded by a sea of wailing blood. 

The sun, drowned in a scarlet flood, 

Beams not with white, but, inflamed spears 

And in that plague of constant night, 

Dimmed with tears, the Jewish light 

That only mothers' eyes express 

Th' unvoiced questions pierce the ear 

"What horrid crime from birth to bear. 

My little babe, to be a Jew. 

My little one that's dead, 1 ask. 

Was this your G-D appointed task?" 

II 

"And can the tide refuse to flow 

When bidden by th' unseen power? 

Or can the opening flower 

Say 'Nay I'll but be plucked by jealous maids'? 

'Twas ours to grow and spread huge limbs 

That, stretching to the very rims 

Of heaven, shade the evil race of man; 

And ours, so close to G-d were we, to burn 

For every heathen's sin until he learn 

From us the ways of G-d." 

Ill 

No drop, no single wail of stricken child 
But belies these shameless words 
And rips the fragile chords 
Connecting heart with brain 
And mad we go into a world 



Or madly are we thither hurled 

If this be our unenvied lot. 

Away, away, philosopher. 

Not human thoughts, artificer. 

Are these — but dead men speak so. 

Cans't seek eternity in grains 

Of sand or tear the veil from time? 

But know that yours', a soul in crime 

More evil does than ever Torquemada 

'Tis ours to live, to laugh and sing. 

And not exult the private sting 

Our race is heir to. 

Alas, why rouse what numbness sealed 

And pluck at wounds when yet unhealed 

The heart, of every nerve the seat. 

What can be said to years of toil, 

To sombre Truth, in song? 

IV 

But sing a new and wanton strength 

For ours, the last in heavy chains 

Enclosed; and first tha' in manly freedom strains 

Of spirits that our fathers lacked — 

Of angry pride and swelling shout 

That drain the swamps and, un'strained, rout. 

Barbarian-like, the very elements 

That seek our death. Once more by tents 

The Southern desert's filled; 

Again the heady cry of life 

From lusty throat in healthy strife. 

Is heard above a land thought dear. 

The right to live and that do die 

'Bove all, the greatest right — to try — 

Is ours. 




Symphony ofjCife 



by Arnold Sheinberg 

A rose is plucked 

A note is struck 

A wave is lulled into endless oblivion 

A child dies 

And the Maestro conducts the eternal symphony of Life 

Never ceasing, always leading 

The crescendo of Wars 

End in the calm, calm melody of Peace 

Sweet, beautiful Ecstasy 

Mortal and G-dly music in Harmony 




you am' t SO sweet 

siveet potato as t/a think 

you am 

by Richard Schlifstein 

Oh. little yam 

I know what you am 

You are a potato, full of starch. 

What keeps my belly on the march. 

You make me fat ! 
You dirty rat! 
Scram, 
Yam! 



MBMh 



Zhe KevolutloH of the Potato 



by Richard Schlifstein 

Why die as your brothers and sisters have died? 

Boiled in oil, and become french-fried. 

Or wake up one morning to a horrible scene 

That you've gone through the guillotine. 

You find your head all in a mash 

Or you're in a Mulligan Stew, or part of a hash 

Then you might as well be dead — 

For what is life if you can't get a-head? 

From your homes you're uprooted, you're sent overseas, 

Or skinned alive during kitchen K.P.s 

Yes, I admit to you it is no life 

Without any children or a wife. 

Here is a plan for you to do 

Follow the instructions that I tell you : 

Take your first letter, which is a "p" 

Cross it out. and make it a "t" 

Then take the first letter out of "me" 

And change il for the first letter of "thee" 

Now the last step, Mr. Potato 

Put on rouge, and you're a t-o-m-alo ! 




As we leave Yeshiva, ready to go along our many ways, the University 
is in the throes of a massive building program. Across the street from the 
new dorm, now beginning to wax ancient, a new building is rising — a class- 
room-administration building ready to house the planners of future under- 
takings. And in midtown plans are being prepared for other edifices to house 
an evergrowing student body. 

And so it goes on and on, the same old story of expansion and progress. 
But for what purpose? Is it just to increase Yeshiva's prestige, and through 
it that of American Jewry, in the academic community? 



115 




Perhaps this is what some people are hoping for 
— another Harvard out of a divinity school, with no 
religious division to speak of. 

But this is not Yeshiva's purpose, nor that of its 
administrators. Rabbi Dr. Menachem Kasher, director 
of the University's project to publish the Gaon of Ro- 
gashov's commentaries on two milleniums of Jewish 
thought and Rabbi Dr. Emanuel Rackman, religious 
leader and Professor of Political Science, are given 
places of honor. And while the JSP student and many 
of his fellow comrades in the other religious divisions 
may still not be able to understand the synthesis that 
is Yeshiva University — a University which requires 
the learning of Talmud as well as secular science — it 
is there. It exists in every individual. ,;rS 



Jjl 






When Yeshiva expands, it does so with a purpose. 
Progress is important in any institution, but here at Ye- 
shiva it is progress rooted in tradition that counts. 




ADVERTISEMENTS 




120 



Compliments of 



LORSTAN STUDIOS 



Best Wishes 

to the 
Class of '61 



M. WEISBROD 



121 



D5H5HSE5E5HSH525E525E5H5aSSHSHS2SH5H5JS3S2SHS552S2SHS2SESES2SH5HS2S2SH5HSE5HSHSESSS2S2SHSH5H5H5H5H5H5S5iEE^ 



In Honor of my Nephew 



MARK GROSS 



Good luck and best wishes to 
our son and brother 


Congratulations to 


ALVIN R. GOLUB 

(AVI) 


GERALD GOLUB 

on his graduation 


and his classmates 




MR. AND MRS. IRVING GOLUB 


A FRIEND 


CHARLOTTE AND STUART 





Congratulations to our son 



ELI LEITER 



THE LEITER FAMILY 



Best wishes and congratulations to 
PERRY ECK 

MR. & MRS. SALO ECK 
& FAMILY 



Best wishes to our son 



SHAEL 



MR. & MRS. SAM BELLOWS 



Congratulations to 
ALAN BALSAM 

MOTHER, DAD, JOEL 



123 



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To our son RICHARD 

'May the Torah be your guiding 

light always" 



MR. & MRS. JACOB BARTH 



IVlazel Tov and Best Wishes 

to 

MELVIN STERN 

and the Graduating Class 



MR. & MRS. STERN 
MR. & MRS. TERSHEL 



3 Congratulations to 


Best Wishes to a 


lI 

a HERSHEL FARKAS 


IRVING g 

5 


] on his graduation 

3 


D 

D 
G 


I MR. & MRS. ISAAC PINCHUK 

lJ 


MR. & MRS. MORRIS BRAFMAN, I 




ANNETTE AND MUTTI I 


3 Hotel Riverside Plaza 


1 


3 253 West 73rd St. 


n 


^ New York, N. Y. 

3 

<] 

3 
3 

?SiSH52S2S25252SESSS2SHSESHSS52SE52SHSE55SSS25E5SSH5ESES2SSS2SJ52SE5ES2SESSS25E5E5H 


D 

SHE5JS2S2SH5H525HSE52SHS2SHSH2SJS2S2SS5E5E5HSJSHS2S2S2SHS2S2SHS2SESHS2S5S2SJS;S25 



In Revered Memory of 



HERMAN PRESS 

Beloved Husband, Father, Grandfather 



In memory of 

Brother and Uncle 

WILLIAM GLASSENBERG 

from 

MR. & MRS. JOSEPH VIENER 

IDELLE H. VIENER 

RICHARD H. VIENER 

RONALD S. VIENER 



In Honor of the Graduation 
of 

GERALD FOGELMAN 

Editor-in-Chief of 
Ha Modea 



A FRIEND 



Mazel Tov and Best Wishes 

to 

SHELDON MEINER 

upon his graduation 



MOM, DAD, HELEN, RHODA, 
MARVIN, STEVEN 



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Mazel Tov and Best Wishes 

to 

DAVID 

on the occasion of his graduation 



THE ROTHNER FAMILY 

Chicago, Illinois 



Congratulations to 
WILLIAM SHIMANSKY 



Mr. &Mrs. I.Shimansky 
Mr.&Mrs. I. Fisher 
Mr.&Mrs.T. Rutte 

Mr. & Mrs. L Applebaum 



Congratulations to 
EDWARD A. MARON 



GRANDMA BLUMENTHAL 
& FAMILY 



Congratulations to 
Our Grandson 

AVERY 



MR. and MRS. SAMUEL I. GROSS 



S^lSlSiSiSSSSlSlSlSlSlSiSlSlSlSlSlSiSlSlSSlSSSSlSSlSiSS 



Congratulations to 



JOSEPH LIFSHITZ 

on the occasion of 
his graduation 



Congratulations 
to 



HESH COHEN 

On His Graduation 




Best Wishes to 
WILLIAM GOLUB 

On His Graduation 



MOTHER AND FATHER 



5E5E5H5H525E5J5J5ESH5H5H5E5E5H5ESE5H5Z52S!S25SSH5E5H5H5H5H5H5B52Sa5E5H5HSi5ESH5a5H5E5HSESa5ES25E525HSH^^ 



127 



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M. MARSHALL LANDY 



Aircraft Leasing — Purchase and Leasebacks 



iVIiami International Airport 
Miami 48, Florida 



Congratulations to 



STANFORD M. GOLDMAN 

and his Classmates 

From 
MR. & MRS. BENJAMIN KURMAN 

REV. & MRS. AARON GLATZER 

MR. & MRS. 2IGMUND TWERSKY 

MR. & MRS. SAMUEL SANDLER 

MR. MOISHE SOMERFIELD 



C. B. SNYDER ORGANIZATIONS 



REAL ESTATE - INSURANCE 



61 Newark Street 
Hoboken, New Jersey 



Congratulations to 

STANFORD M. GOLDMAN 
and His Classmates 

From 

Rabbi & Mrs. Mordechai Goldman, Rabbi M. Solomon, 

The 0. Goldmans, The A. Deitelbaums, The J. Behr's 

and the I. Solomons 



Best Wishes From 

ROYAL LANES 

Where Yeshiva College Bowls 

Congratulations to 
DAVE SHEINKIN 

MR. and MRS. SHEINKIN 
and BROTHER BENSON 



Congratulations to 
JOSEPH REISS 

From 

BEST FORM FOUNDATION 

38-01 47th Ave. Long Island, N, Y. 



HERBERT AMSTER 

"Congratulations in this happy 
hour of your Graduation" 

PINKAS & CLARA AMSTER 



Congratulations to 
J. MICHAEL EPSTEIN 

From 

MOM, DAD&LYNNE 

"BUBBY" MARY 

AUNT JEAN, UNCLE SAM 

COUSINS JEFFREYS. MARTIN 



To Bernard Kaplan with great love 
for future success 

MOM & DAD, JOEL, HARRIET & STUART 
UNCLE JACK & AUNT MITZI 
BARBARA, JUNE & GEORGE 



GABRIEL FROME 

INSURANCE & MUTUAL FUNDS 

4546 Bergenline Ave. 
Union City, N. J. 



Tel. N. Y. Wl 7-4642 



N. J. UN 3-3600 



Congratulations to 
HOWARD 

MR. & MRS. WILLIAM JOSEPH 

ZELDA&HIRSH 

MR. & MRS. BERNARD FINKELSTEIN 

DR. & MRS. SIDNEY FINKELSTEIN 



Congratulations 
to 

JACK FEIN 

ON HIS GRADUATION 



CONGRATULATIONS TO 
THE CLASS OF 1961 

MR. and MRS. JESSE GINSBERG 



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Best Wishes to HOWARD GOLDBERG 
upon his graduation 



MASTERCRAFT INDUSTRIES INC. 

109 Lanza Avenue Garfield, N. J. 

(The home of SOOTMASTER VACUUM CLEANERS) 

TeL GRegory 1-2780 



Yesiva University Women's 
Organization 

Brooklyn Division 

MRS. ABRAHAM BURSKY, Pres. 



Compliments of Congregation 

SHOMREI EMUNAH 

14th Ave. & 52nd St. 
Brooklyn 19, N. Y. 



To Our Dear Son & Brother BENJAMIN 

May he always continue his search 

for knowledge and truth 

RABBI & MRS. SILVERBERG 

SHIRLEY, BURT, SHERMAN, 

DOROTHY & DAVID 




Congratulations and Best Wishes to 

ALLAN L. MANDEL 

On His Graduation 

MR. & MRS. LEO ZELINGER & FAMILY 



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Compliments from 

A FRIEND 

of 

TZVI ABUSCH 



Mazel Tov to 

MICHAEL GREENEBAUM 

from your 

GRANDFATHER, MOM, DAD 
& AKIVA 



Congratulations to 
FREDRICK NATHAN 

MOM, DAD & HARVEY 



Congratulations to 
SAUL GANCHROW 

MR. & MRS. HARRY WOLL 



Best Wishes to 

SAUL GANCHROW 

MOM, DAD, MENDY, JACQUE, SHEILA 

& GLADYS 



Congratulations to MICHAEL GREENEBAUM 

GREENLEAF SPORTSWEAR 

15 West 36th Street New York 18, N. Y. 

Wl 7-6125 

Nat Leifer Max Greenebaum 



CONGRATULATIONS 
to 



ROBERT ASCH 

On His Graduation 



Congratulations to 
DANIEL FRIMMER 

On His Graduation 

PanchanowerY.M.B.S. INC. 



WILLIAM HERMAN INSURANCE 

5 Beekman St. 
New York 38, N. Y. 

Congratulations to BERNARD ZAZULA 

On His Graduation 

MOTHER & GRANDMOTHER 



Congratulations to My Grandson 



Upon His Becoming Bar-Mitzvah 
MRS. MOLLIE ZEISEL 



Congratulations and Best of Luck to 

ALLEN MANDEL From His 
PARENTS and GRANDMOTHER 



GOTTFRIED BANKING COMPANY 

715 Eleventh Avenue 
New York 19, N. Y. 



ABE ROSENBERG 

Strictly Kosher 

MEAT & POULTRY MARKET 

751LydigAve. Bronx, N. Y. 

TAImadge 9-7433 



Best Wishes to TZVI ABUSCH On His 
Graduation 

MR. and MRS. MOSES FIEBER 



Congratulations to SHOLOM 
On His Graduation 



DAD & ESTHER 



Congratulations to ISIDOR APTERBACH 
From His 

PARENTS, GRANDMOTHER & SISTER 



"THE ARISTOCRATS OF KOSHER CATERING" 
TENNENBAUM CATERERS 

3roadw/ay Central Hotel Little Hungary 



MazelTov to My Grandson MORTON MINCHENBERG 
On the Occasion of His Graduation 

From His 

ZADA 



Best Wishes and Lots of Luck to 
ALLAN MANDEL On His Graduation From 

MR. & MRS. H. SCHIOVITZ & FAMILY 
MR. ABRAHAM BERNE 



SELWYN-POMEROY COMPANY INC. 

INTERIOR DESIGNERS 



Brooklyn 26, N. Y. 



BUckminster 8-3700 



Phone CHickering 4-5542 - 3 - 4 - 5 

G.A.F. SEELIG INC. 

WHOLESALE MILK & MILK PRODUCTS 
524-532 West 29th Street New York 



Congratulations to Our Nephew and Cousin 
SHERMAN On His Graduation 

From the 

FUCHS FAMILY 



Mazel Tov to Our Grandson 

SHERMAN SIMANOWITZ 

On His Graduation 

GRANDMA & ZEIDE 



SHOP AT PIONEER 

2521 Broadway (between 93rd & 94th St.) 
N. Y. C. 



Compliments of 

EASTERN VENDING COMPANY 

(Leon Holtzer) 



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Congratulations to RICHARD SCHLIFSTEIN 

From 

A FRIEND 



Congratulations to RICHARD 

MR. & MRS. LOUIS SCHLIFSTEIN 
AND SISTER DORI 



Congratulations to 
RICHARD SCHLIFSTEIN 



Mazel Tov and Best Wishes to Our Cousin 
JOSEPH REISS On His Graduation 



SAM & MOLLY 



Congratulations to Our Son ARNOLD 
On His Graduation 

MR. & MRS. SCHEINBERG 



Compliments of 
DR. MURRAY STRONGIN and FAMILY 



Congratulations to the Graduating Class 
of 1961 From 

THE ROSHWALB FAMILY 



VESTED INCOME PLANS INC. 

26 Broadway 
New York 5, N. Y. 



Best Wishes to CHAIM NACHUM 
On His Graduation 

MR. & MRS. BEN STRICKMAN 



Congratulations and Best Wishes 
to WILLIAM KANTROWITZ From 

MR. & MRS. MORRIS KAPUSTIN & 
FAMILY 



Congratulations to WILLIAIVl KANTROWITZ 
From His Uncle and His Aunt 

RABBI & MRS. DAVID KAPUSTIN 

Philadelphia 49, Pa. 



Mazel Tov and Best Wishes fo' Future Success 

to My Son WILLIAM KANTROWITZ 

Upon His Graduation 

MRS. ROSE KANTROWITZ 



Congratulations to FRED KRAUSE 
On His Graduation 

MR. & MRS. AARON ROSENBAUM & FAMILY 



Best Wishes to MEYER BERGLASS 
On His Graduation 

MR. AND MRS. DAVID J. COHEN 



Congratulations to 
LARRY GREENFIELD 



MOTHER, JUDY& RUTH 



Mazel Tov to MORTY on his Graduation 

From 

Father, Mother, Sister Judy, and Uncle Dave, 
Aunt Gertie, Cousins Alex, Joel and Jackie 



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134 



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CONGRATULATIONS TO 

STANLEY GREENEBAUM 

My Nephew & Cousin Jack Merkin From Mrs. Samuel 

Baron & Her Son Jerome 
Our Son Jack From Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Merkin 
Brother Steven From Francine Nison 
Steven Nison From the Myerowitz Family 
Avi Blumenfeld From Marlene & Shalome 
Larry Kranes 
Simon Wiener 



COMPLIMENTS OF . . . 

Emjay Photographers 201 E. Broadway, N. Y. C. 
Nat Kaplan's Men's Shop, 41 Main Street, Spring 

Valley, N. Y. 
Louis Bogopulsky 
Atlas Welding & Boiler Co., Inc., 1104 Webster Ave., 

Bronx, N. Y. 
Mr. Hyman Lerman 
Mr. & Mrs. Ben Nisson 

Progress Fuel Oil Co., 720 New Lots Ave., B'klyn, N. Y. 
Sol Schwartz & Sons, Jamaica, N. Y. 
Andrews Barber Shop, 1499 St. Nicholas 
Mr. & Mrs. Harry Nierman 
Northern Pharmacy, 5009 Broadway 
Mr. Moses Gordon & Daughter 
Judith Goldman 

Mr. & Mrs. Harold Greenberg & Son 
Heights Theater, 150 Wadworth Ave. 
Heights Firestone Store, 502 W. 181st Street 
Avon Luncheonette Supplies, 407 W. 13th St., N. Y. C. 
Victors Dry Cleaners, 519 W. 181st Street 

(10% Student Discount) 
Save-On-Servicecenter, Inc., 2470 Amsterdam Ave. 

(183rd Street) 
Mel & Grace Stern 

SK Coffee Company, 101 E. Second Street, N. Y. C. 
William Leinwand Wholesale Hardware, 93 Reade 

St., N. Y. C. 
Simon S. Panush, 401 Broadway, N. Y. C. 
Parkside Caterers, 199 a Parkside Ave., B'klyn 

IN 9-0355 
Webster Plumbing Supply, 1758 Webster Ave., Bronx 



CONGRATULATIONS TO 

MORTON MICHENBERG 

Mrs. Helen Klappholz 

My Nephew Morton Michenberg Mr. Meyer Diamond 

Samuel Frank — From Etta Arams & Toby & Ellen 

Lifshitz 
Samuel Frank From A Friend 
Eli Leiter From Rabbi Gordon 

Our Son Max From Rabbi & Mrs. Abram Lew & Family 
Stanley Kupinsky From Thrifty Fuel, 24 New Ave., 

Yonkers, N. Y. 
Our Brother Max From Paulette & Maurice, Ellen & 

Maurice 
Herbert Bialik From Mom, Dad & Brothers 
Tzvi Abusch From A Friend 
Tzvi Abusch From Sam & Minnie Plotnick 
Mr. & Mrs. Sam Blumenfeld 



COMPLIMENTS OF . . . 

Keshnar Poultry, 1351 39th St., B'klyn, N. Y. 

Paramount Calendar & Novelty Co. 

A Friend of Herbert Bialik 

Mr. & Mrs. I. Becker In Memory of Our Son Larry 

Kinor David Kosher Provisions Corp., 4708 13th Ave., 

B'klyn 
Dave's Foodtown, 483 Belmont Ave., Springfield, Mass. 
Schneiders Meat Market, Strictly Kosher, 2035 Grand 

Ave., Bronx 
Mr. & Mrs. Ira Bernstein, Springfield, Mass. 
Mr. & Mrs. Ernest Wernick, Longmeadow, Mass. 
Dr. Lowell Bellin, Springfield, Mass. 
Nathan Goldstein, Springfield, Mass. 
Artistic Cleaners & Dyers, 1729 University Ave., Bronx 
Padawer & Steigman Inc. 
Mr. Irving Greenberg, Springfield, Mass. 
Mr. & Mrs. Murray Burke, Springfield, Mass. 
Mr. Ben Swirsky of Springfield, Mass. 
A Friend of Gerald Fogelman 
C. B. Snyder Organizations Realties, 61 Newark Street, 

Hoboken, N. J. 
Victor Laulicht 
A Friend of Herb Bialik 
A Friend of Stanley Kupinsky 
Morris Horovitz 

Nissim Hizme, Hebrew Jewelry Inc. 
Security Fuel Corp., 838 Morton Street, Dorchester 
Henry Dolinsky 

Inwood Meat Market Inc., 565 W. 207th St. 
Kramash & Mattisson, 1420 College Ave. 
Millinery Manufacturing Corp., 214 Main Street, 

Holyoke, Mass. 
Winfield Hats, Inc., Holyoke, Mass. 
A Friend 

Hallmark Cards, 1426 St. Nicholas Ave. 
Starlight Laundry, 2077 Washington Ave. 
Atlantic Interiors, Inc., 977 Flatbush Ave., B'klyn, N.Y. 
College Luncheonette, Across from Main Building 
S. Hellman & Sons (Strictly Kosher Meat & Poultry) 

52 Main St., Spring Valley 
Joe's Barber Shop 

Liberty Fashion Clothing Co., 68 E. Broadway 
Mr. & Mrs. Ben Strickman 

Dr. Ernest Spillinger, 2125 Cruger Ave., Pelham Park- 
way Sta,, Bronx, N. Y. 
Mr. & Mrs. Israel Reiss 
Tredeasy-Rugby Shoe Shop, 5005 Church Ave., B'klyn 

3, N. Y. 
Silberts Kosher Market, Washington 
Gilbert & Katkin Kosher Delicatessen & Restaurant, 

1446 St. Nicholas 
Babka Pastries, 2525 B'way, N. Y. C. 
Larry Bernath 

Graham Distributors, Inc., 53 Graham Ave., B'klyn, N. Y. 
J & G Superette, 2045 Grand Ave. 



Compliments of 
MR. and MRS. 

REUBEN E. GROSS AND FAMILY 



WHERE TO FIND US: 



Tzvi Abusch 

808 Adee Avenue 
Bronx 67, New York 
Philip Alter 
15 Ciaxton Blvd. 
Toronto, Canada 
Herbert Amster 
713 East 175th St. 
Bronx, New York 
Isldor M. Apterbach 
325 West 93rd St. 
New York, New York 
Robert Asch 
83 West 33rd St. 
Bayonne, New Jersey 
Alan Balsam 
101-28 97th St. 
Ozone Park 16, N. Y. 
Philip Balsam 
1262 Stratford Ave. 
Bronx 72, N. Y. 
Richard Barth 
1705 Asylum Avenue 
West Hartford 17, Conn. 
Gary Baum 
65-17 Parsons Blvd. 
Flushing 67, N. Y. 
Sbael Bellows 
6041 N. Lawndale Ave. 
Chicago, Illinois 
Meyer Bergias 
58 South Madison Avenue 
Spring Valley, N. Y. 
Herbert Bialik 
415 Grand Street 
New York, N. Y. 
Alvin Blumenfeld 
1711 Morris Ave. 
Bronx, N. Y. 

Israel Brafman 

736 Eastern Parkway 
Brooklyn 13, N. Y. 
Ronald K. Burke 
361 Belmont Avenue 
Springfield 8, Mass. 
Herschel G. Cohen 
92 Pleasant St. 
Brookline 46, Mass. 
Perry Eck 

300 Riverside Drive 
New York, N. Y. 
Marvin Edelman 
321 West 90th St. 
New York, N. Y. 
Saul Eisenbud 
437 Morris Park Ave. 
Bronx 60, N. Y. 
J. Michael Epstein 
1236 49th St. 
Brooklyn 19, N. Y. 
Martin Epstein 
241 Crystal Terrace 
Hillside, New Jersey 
Hershel Farkas 
777 Foster Ave. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Samuel Feder 

2230 Washington Ave. 
Silver Springs, Md. 
Jack Fein 
1319 51st St. 
Brooklyn 19, N. Y. 
Azriel Feiner 
9720 Kings Highway 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Harvey Feisen 
102-43 68th Avenue 
Forest Hills 75, N. Y. 
Nathan FInkiel 
325 Legion St. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Gerald Stephen Fogelman 

1312 N. 13fhSt. 
Reading, Pa. 
Samuel Frank 
155 Wellington Hill 
Mattapan, Mass. 
Yitzchak Frank 
8 Ingalls St. 
Worcester 4, Mass. 
Philip Freidman 
1095 Ralph Avenue 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Daniel Frimmer 

868 50th Street 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Aaron Fruchter 

1126-51 Street 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Saul Ganchrow 

239 Remsen Avenue 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Murray Geller 

1430 Seagirt Blvd. 
Far Rockaway 91, L. I. 
Jonathan I. Ginsberg 
110-36 67 Road 
Forest Hills 75, N. Y. 
Howard Zev Goldberg 
18 Jeffrey Place 
Monsey, N. Y. 
Jack Solomon Goldberg 
5372 Prince of Wales 
Montreal, Canada 
Emanuel Goldblum 
144 Isabella Ave. 
Newark, New Jersey 
Arthur Goldman 
30 Dongan Place 
New York 40, N. Y. 
Stanford Milton Goldman 
2143 N. 59th Street 
Philadelphia 31, Pa. 
Calvin Goldscheider 
3706 Barrington Rd. 
Baltimore 15, Md. 
Alvin Rubinoff Golub 
110 High Street 
Perth Amboy, N. J. 
Gerald Golub 
510 West State St. 
Trenton 8, New Jersey 



William Golub 

568 Bristol St. 
Brooklyn 12, N. Y. 
Stanley L. Greenbaum 

119 Rodney St. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Michael Greenebaum 

1241-55th St. 
Brooklyn 19, N. Y. 
Lawrence Greenfield 

1450-49 Street 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Raymond Grodner 

785 East 181 Street 
Bronx, New York 

Avery Gross 

11 Belmont Terrace 
Staten Island 1, N. Y. 
Mark Gross 

200 West 86 Street 
New York, N. Y. 

Israel Grossberg 
881 Washington Ave. 
Brooklyn 25, N. Y. 
Aaron Gutman 
37 College Dr. 
Jersey City, N. J. 
James Joseph Hain 
206 Robertson Ave. 
Danville, Va. 
Keith William Harvey 
59 Lloyd Lane 
Monticello, N. Y. 
Michael Hauer 
95 S. 9th Street 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Michael Hecht 
1495 Morris Avenue 
Bronx, N. Y. 

Stephen Leonard Hermele 
245-62 62nd Avenue 
Douglaston 62, N. Y. 
Howard Stephen Joseph 
1148 Beach 12th St. 
Far Rockaway 91, N. Y. 
William Kantrowitz 
217 Henry Street 
New York, N. Y. 
Bernard H. Kaplan 
1037 Neilson Avenue 
Far Rockaway, N. Y. 
Kenneth Klein 
1918 East 18 Street 
Brooklyn 29, N. Y. 
Louis Korngold 
300 West 109th St. 
New York 25, N. Y. 
Lawrence Kranes 
2005 Monterey Ave. 
Bronx, N. Y. 
Fred Krause 
323-53 Street 
West New York, N.J. 
Stanley Kupinsky 
460 East 181 Street 
Bronx 57, N. Y. 



Murray Laulicht 

822 Emerson Ave. 
Elizabeth, N. J. 
Eli Lelter 

603 Beach Terrace 
Bronx, N. Y. 
Max Lew 

5835 Kings Highway 
Brooklyn3, N. Y. 
Joseph Lifschitz 
398 Crown St, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Leslie Lindenberg 
1110 Boulevard 
West Hartford, Conn. 
Allen L. Mandel 
5121 -17th Ave. 
Brooklyn 4, N. Y. 
Edward Alan Maron 
8793-21 Avenue 
Brooklyn 14, N. Y. 
Bernard Matus 
1555 Grand Concourse 
Bronx 52. N. Y. 
Sheldon Meiner 
268 East Broadway 
New York 2, N. Y. 
Jack Merkin 
112 Westbourne Pkwy. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Morton Minchenberg 
229 Goldsmith Ave. 
Newark 12, N.J. 
Frederick Nathan 
1414 - 45 Street 
Brooklyn 19, N. Y. 
Steven Alan Nison 
Crane Road 
Ellington, Conn. 
Gene Potter 
195 Bay 29 Street 
Brooklyn 14, N. Y. 

Mark Press 

1753 53 Street 
Brooklyn4, N. Y. 
Bernard Rachelle 
65 Hillside Ave. 
New York, N. Y, 
Michael Reich 
73 Arlosonoff St. 
Haifa, Israel 
Joseph S. Reiss 
130 Hooper St. 
Brooklyn 11, N. Y. 

Allen D. Renkoff 

Old Pecos Road 
Santa Fe, New Mexico 
Joseph Rifkin 
2180 Holland Ave. 
Bronx, N. Y. 
Eugene Roshwalb 
504 Grand St. 
New York, N. Y. 
Tobias Roth 
383 M. Grand St. 
New York, N. Y. 



David Arnold Rothner 

4911 No. Central Park Ave, 
Chicago 25, Illinois 
William Harvey Rothchild 
34 Vadnais St. 
Holyoke, Mass. 
Jesse S. Salsberg 
129 West End Ave. 
Pompton Plains, N. J. 
Arnold Scheinberg 
122 Brightwater Court 
Brooklyn 35, N.Y. 
Richard Schlifstein 
2232 Brigham Street 
Brooklyn 29, N.Y. 
Marvin Schneider 
74 - 16th Street 
Fall River, Mass. 
Matthew Shatzkes 
1711 University Ave. 
Bronx 53, N. Y. 
David Sheinkin 
616 East 17th St. 
Brooklyrt25, N.Y. 
William Loeb Shimansky 
502 East 95th St. 
Brooklyn 12, N. Y. 
Benjamin M. Silverberg 
180 East 40th Street 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Sherman Simanowltz 
500 A-Grand St. 
New York 2, N. Y. 

Melvin Stern 

141-32 70th Road 
Kew Garden Hills 67, N.Y. 
Joshua L. Sternberg 
504 Grand Street 
New York 2, N.Y. 
H. Norman Strlckman 
195 Kingston Ave. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Joseph Tuchman 
857 New Lots Avenue 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Richard Harvey Viener 

731 WhittierSt, N. W. 
Washington 12, D. C. 
Simon Weiner 
1467 Taylor Ave. 
Bronx 60, N. Y. 
Saul Wohlberg 
5402 15 Avenue 
Brooklyn 19, N. Y. 
Ilan Zamir-Halpern 
Haifa, Israel 

Morris Zauderer 
410 Crown St. 
Brooklyn 25, N. Y. 
Bernard Meyer Zazula 
57 St. Paul's Place 
Brooklyn, New York 



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