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Full text of "Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife Annual Report 1976-1990"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2014 



https://archive.org/details/massachusettsdivOOmass 



To His Excellency, Michael S. Dukakis, Governor of the Commonwealth, 
the Executive Council, the General Court and the Board of Fisheries and 
Wildlife: 

I have the honor to submit herewith the one hundred eleventh and 
one hundred twelfth annual reports of the Division of Fisheries and Wild- 
life, covering the fiscal years of 1 July 1975 to 30 June 1976 and 
1 July 1976 to 30 June 1977. 



Matthew B. Connolly, Jr. 
Director 



Publication approved by Alfred C. Holland, State Purchasing Agent, 
No. 10251-4O-500-2-73-CR 



Cl3r 
hit/77 



State Library of Massachus 



The Board Reports 

Planning 

Fisheries 

Fish Hatcheries 

Wildlife 

Game Farms 

Information and Education 
Realty 

District Reports 
Western 

Connecticut Valley 

Central 

Northeast 

Southeast 
Legislation Passed During 1975-1977 
Personnel 
Financial Reports 




CONTENTS 



THE BOARD REPORTS 



Bradlee C. Gage, Chairman 
James .Baird 
Kenneth E. Burns 
Martin H. Burns 
Henry E. Russell 
Philip Stanton 
Roger D. Williams 

Fiscal Year 1975-1976 

Nineteen hundred seventy-six was a year of great progress in the Division 
of Fisheries and Wildlife and a year of noticeable change as the Division be- 
gan to operate under the state's reorganization program. The Division, 
erstwhile Division of Fisheries and Game, which had operated as an indepen- 
dent entity reporting to the Governor, was renamed the Division of Fisheries 
and Wildlife and placed in the Department of Fisheries, Wildlife and Recre- 
ational Vehicles under the direction of Commissioner Bruce Gullion. The 
traditional five-man governing board was retained with power to appoint the 
Director and set fish and wildlife regulations. Membership was expanded 
from five to seven members with the two new members selected especially to 
represent non-game interests. It was also stipulated that one of the Board 
members must be a professional biologist. The transition proceeded smoothly 
and the new members, James Baird and Philip Stanton, have added much needed 
expertise. 

Budgets 

Great pressure was brought to bear on the budgete of all state agencies 
during this year. Efforts to search out additional monies centered on dedi- 
cated funds and during the closing days of the legislative session, virtually 
all dedicated funds were eliminated. Last-minute efforts, however, restored 
the Inland Fish and Game Fund and restored a functional operating budget. 
The Board, through the Director, and with the assistance of the State Trea- 
surer's office, explored ways to better invest the surplus monies of the 
Inland Fish and Game Fund. Since the restoration of funds, it has revised 
its Investments with major emphasis on corporate bonds. 

Hearings 

Besides the required annual waterfowl hearing, the Board also held hear- 
ings during the year dealing with possible changes in both wildlife and fish- 
ing regulations. Among these hearings were sessions on the primitive weapons 
season, falconry, the "fish for fun" concept and squirrel regulations. 
As a result of the wildlife hearings, new regulations on falconry were 
adopted and regulations governing the squirrel season were altered. Two new 
programs were initiated. The first was the introduction of a primitive 
weapons season on deer. The Board felt that there was growing interest in 
hunting with black powder, muzzle-loading weapons and that such a season 
would provide increased recreational opportunities while in no way depleting 
the deer population. The second innovation was the institution of a "fish 
for fun" or catch-and-release program under which sportsmen in certain areas 
could fish all day, but were permitted a creel limit of only one trout for 
the day. The program was inaugurated on a one-year trial basis. 



-2- 



Land Acquisition 



The program of continued land acquisition proceeded as monies became 
available for wetland and upland purchases. Land acquisition has long en- 
joyed strong support from the Board as such acquisitions reflect the Board's 
conviction that well-placed wildlife management areas are an important part 
of the Division's programs. This year marked a strong start in the acquisition 
of large tracts in the Hockomock area and in the Central and Western Distric : . 

Appointments 

During 1975 James Shepard, director for many years, resigned to accept 
a position with Ducks Unlimited. After careful search, the Board appointed 
Deputy Director Colton H. Bridges as director recognizing a long career in 
which Nr. Bridges demonstrated both professional and administrative expertise. 
Richard Cronin, with a valuable and varied background within the Division, was 
appointed superintendent . 

Fiscal Year 1976-1977 

Fiscal 1977 was another year of great change within the Division marked 
again by a change of director and exploration of new program directions. This 
year the major innovation was year-round fishing. 

Progress during the second year of reorganization was smooth and there 
was close cooperation between the Division and the office of Commissioner 
Gullion. The enlarged Board continued to function well and legislation for 
management of non-game species came closer to reality. The Division dealt 
with the problems caused by the wreck of the tanker "Argo Merchant" and the 
resulting oil spill. It should be noted that the Division was at its best 
during this crisis actively involved In the water fowl clean-up and coordinating 
the many groups assisting in the effort. 

Personnel 

During the fall, the Board x?as faced with the resignation of two top 
administrators, Director Colton H. Bridges and Deputy Director Arthur Neill, 
who left to join Ducks Unlimited. Following their departure, the Board ap- 
pointed Lewis Schlotterbeck, a career employee, as deputy director and init- 
iated an extensive search for a director. After weeks of evaluating applica- 
tions and a day of interviews with a number of excellent candidates, a new 
director was appointed. He is Matthew B. Connolly, Jr., formerly director of 
Coastal Zone Management and an outstanding administrator. Although the ap- 
pointment was made from outside the Division, the strength of the Division 
was proven by the fact that several individuals from within the agency applied 
for the position and showed qualifications which warranted careful considera- 
tion. 

Hearings 

The annual waterfowl hearing in August produced no drastic changes. The 
prevailing "split season" was continued as the Board strove to maintain a 
functional compromise between the western area desire for early hunting and 
the desire of sportsmen in coastal areas for a late hunting season. The 
Board also held a hearing on game regulations. Minutes of this meeting are 
on file and the resulting changes are reflected in the 1978 abstracts . 



The major change came with the introduction of the year-round fishing 
season and the resulting elimination of "opening day". Informational meetings 
were held across the state as Division personnel met with interested clubs and 
sportsmen's leagues. The change was instituted after a public hearing with the 
understanding that this constituted a relatively drastic change of traditional 
patterns and that this change was to be monitored carefully. A great deal of 
information was gathered and awaits analysis and evaluation. 

Land Acquisition 

The Board met almost monthly with Floyd Richardson, Chief of Wildlife Land?, 
to review the Division's land acquisition efforts. Over 4,000 acres have been 
acquired in the Hockomock Swamp area. Large tracts have been purchased in the 
Berkshires and in the Central District. As more and more land within the 
Commonwealth is developed, increased hunter pressure is brought to bear on 
areas remaining open and the importance of the Division's wildlife management 
areas becomes increasingly apparent. It is fortunate that during the last few 
years of tight budgets, the Inland Fish and Game Fund had the surplus needed to 
continue the Division's active land acquisition program. 

In summary, the transition from Director Shepard to Director Bridges to 
Director Connolly has been smooth. The Division is financially strong. With 
the continued cooperation of the sportsmen, the legislature, and other state 
agencies, the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife continues to move ahead. 



-4- 



- 



Paul S. Mugford 
Senior Land Use Planner 



A formal commitment to initiate a continuous planning effort by the Division 
j.n 1975 led to the creation of a new position— Senior Land Use Planner. With 
this step, the Division recognized the value of an ongoing planning program to 
provide constant administrative and management guidance in establishing agency 
goals and objectives and to monitor and redirect agency progress toxzard their at- 
tainment. Co incidentally, the Division for the first time became a major partner 
in the Commonwealth's Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP) 
which unifies and guides statewide efforts to provide for all major forms of out- 
door recreation. The state plan (SCORP) thus addresses the needs and problems of 
an important segment of outdoor recreationists — those who are users of the wild- 
life resource. 

Massachusetts Fish and Wildlife Resources 

The Division's planning effort began with a complete inventory of the state's 
wildlife (vertebrates) which identified 489 species of fish, birds, mammals, rep- 
tiles and amphibians found in the Commonwealth. This large and varied resource 
includes 112 species which are used commercially or for sporting purposes — 
38 fish, 27 mammals, 44 birds, one reptile and two amphibians — and 377 others 
classified as "non-game" . The inventory included related data on Massachusetts 
fish and wildlife including species distribution, relative abundance, manner of 
utilization, identification of those increasing and decreasing in abundance or 
extending their range, those present in only limited numbers and those creating 
nuisance or economic problems. This complete inventory was published in 1975 as 
one element of the Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP) under 
the title, "An Inventory of Massachusetts Fish and Wildlife (Vertebrate) Re- 
sources". 

An Inventory of Fish and Wildlife Habitat 

As proper habitat is the key to fish and other wildlife abundance and diver- 
sity, an examination of this important resource was accomplished during 1976 as a 
second major segment of the state plan. In a state generally considered "urban", 
with a population of 5.7 million people and a human density of over 700 people 
per square mile, it was found that Massachusetts has a reasonable amount of good 
fish and wildlife habitat with a surprisingly high potential for improvement. 
Inland fishing waters of the state amount to 173,666 acres of which 153,759 are 
ponded (ponds, lakes, reservoirs) and 14,907 are flowing (rivers, streams). Abou : 
123,667 acres of all inland waters are accessible for fishing and some 49,999 are 
not available. Unusable waters include posted private waters, closed public 
Ty ater supplies and those with pollution problems. The greatest potential for in- 
creasing public fishing opportunities lies in development of new fishing oppor- 
tunities on closed water supplies and in pollution abatement efforts. 

Existing wildlife habitat acreage in Massachusetts, based upon vegetative 
cover and land use criteria, has been found to consist of the following: 



Agricultural 
, r Open Land 



Forest 
Land 



Wetland 



Land for Mining 
or 

Waste Disposal 



Urban 
Land 



Recreation 
Land 



686,733 



3,272,302 



362,165 



34,217 



782,916 



60,921 



Total land in Massachusetts: 5,199,254 acres 



-5- 



Documented changes in recent years indicate increases in land devoted to 
urban uses. Since 1950, urban land grew from 8.1 percent of the total land area 
to over 15 percent — an 87 percent increase. At the same time agricultural land, 
providing important wildlife habitat for many popular wildlife species, sustained 
about a 40 percent loss, declining from 20 percent of the total in 1951 to only 
13 percent in 1971. Forest lands lost to urbanisation and other uses have large- 
ly been replaced by the reversion of open lands to forest so that nearly two- 
thirds of Massachusetts remains forested. Similarly, some losses of wetlands in 
recent years have occurred, but such losses have been largely offset by creation 
of new wetlands by governmental agencies, agriculturists and private homeowners. 

Urbanization has had negative effects on wildlife-related recreation in two 

ways : 

1. Additional development in suburban and urban areas has destroyed wild- 
life habitat and thus, wildlife itself. 

2. Loss of wildlife habitat (former fields, forests, wetlands) has dimin- 
ished the amount of recreational space that can be shared by people. 

A study of individuals and groups that control fish and wildlife habitat in 
Massachusetts reveals that about 70 percent of all wildlife habitat in the 
Commonwealth is under control of agencies and interests that traditionally have 
had natural resource responsibilities and whose programs generally provide direct 
benefits to wildlife. 

Major Custodians of Fish and midlife Habitat in Massachusetts 

Owner or Controlling Agency Acres of wildlife Habitat 



State Agencies 


405,493 


Municipalities 


221,987 


Federal Agencies 


82,806 


Private Recreational, Sporting 


88,253 


Organizations 




Non-Profit Conservation, Social 


29,326 


Organizations 




Counties 


600 


Farmers 


600,000 


Forest Industries 


30,100 


Corporate Commercial Forests 


230,300 


Private Commercial Forests 


1,913,300 


Total 


3,607,170 



This study of wildlife habitat exposes strengths and weaknesses and reveals 
trends that have obvious implications for acquisition and management of lands by 
the state. The study was published by the Division in 1976 as an element of 
SCORP under the title, "A Look at Fish and Wildlife Habitat in Massachusetts". 

Ho w Massachusetts Uses, Values and Needs Its Fish and Wildlife 

A third element of the agency's plan, completed in 1976, thoroughly examinee 
traditional and new ways in which fish and other wildlife meet human needs. 
!Ii'man needs involve both consumers and non-consumers. Massachusetts consumer 
interests having direct ties to wildlife include the licensed and unlicensed 
hunters, fishermen and trappers, bait dealers, researchers and owners of shooting 



-6- 



preserves. Hunters, fishermen and trappers together number about 750,000. Mosr 
of them reside and enjoy their recreation in non-urban areas. Their recreation- 
al activities, which are wildlife dependent, involve millions of others: ad- 
ministrators, licensors, legislators, enforcement personnel, sporting goods 
dealers and manufacturers, and those in service professions. As renewable re- 
sources, fish and wildlife are managed to yield food and fur useful in the manu- 
facture of garments, toys and other products. In terms of food, Massachusetts 
wildlife is harvested in annual numbers exceeding four million with a total 
poundage of meat and fish of over two million at an estimated market value of 
$3,244,677. 

The annual fur harvest in Massachusetts is currently valued at around one- 
half million dollars consisting of upwards of 75,000 pelts. The three most 
valuable species in terms of net value are muskrat, raccoon and beaver. From a 
purely utilitarian aspect, Massachusetts wildlife used consumptively has an 
average annual market value between three and four million dollars. 

Many Massachusetts residents, other than consumers, benefit from the pre- 
sence of wildlife in intangible ways. Members of organized groups established 
for birdwatching and study number around 5,000 and another one-half million are 
involved with feeding of birds. Thousands of residents have heavy investments 
in sporting dogs trained and used on wildlife, and each year an estimated 67,000 
visits to state wildlife management area3 are made for non-hunting though wildlif 
related purposes. The study also estimated annual visits to Federal wildlife 
refuges in Massachusetts at 350,000 and to state and Federal fish hatcheries and 
game bird rearing stations at nearly 200,000. 

The 1975-1976 studies have shown that the need of Massachusetts citizens for 
wildlife has not diminished. On the contrary , it is increasing. Thus, in 
August of 1976, a Division of Fisheries and Wildlife plan appeared that estab- 
lished short and long-range goals and objectives in the areas of land acquisition 
fish and wildlife administration, fish and wildlife planning, fisheries research, 
fisheries management, wildlife research, wildlife management, engineering and de- 
velopment, and information- education. Program objectives include: 

Aggressive land acquisition for public fishing, hunting, trapping and non- 
consumptive enjoyment of fish and wildlife. 

Improved licensing and permit system that will reduce clerical time and 
errors and reduce printing costs. 

Development of plans for increased production of food and fiber on Division 
lands that will be compatible with wildlife objectives. 

Development of user aids ar.d facilities at wildlife management areas. 

Improvement of cultural methods to effect cost savings in fishery programs. 

Expansion of anadromous fish restoration efforts for major rivers. 

Improved capability to census and monitor wildlife populations. 

Better hunter distribution to improve the quality of the recreational ex- 
perience, safety and success. 

Surveying of Division properties and marking all boundaries. 



Expansion of program to improve public understanding of the values of fish 
and wildlife and the role of management in the proper conservation of these 
resources. 

Improvement and expansion of methods to disseminate fish and wildlife news 
to various communications media. 

Clearly, the contribution of Massachusetts fish and wildlife resources to 
the recreational, economic and commercial needs of the public is significant . 



-8- 



FISHERIES 

Peter H. Oat is 
Chief Aquatic Biologist 

Fiscal Year 1975-1976 



During Fiscal Year 1975, fisheries programs concentrated on eval- 
uating existing trout management programs, establishing strains of sea- 
run trout and northern pike, monitoring the movements and passage of 
anadromous fish in the Connecticut and Merrimack Rivers, as well as 
assessing the impact of the Bear Swamp and Northfield Mountain Pumped 
Storage Plants on the aquatic environment. 

Coldwater Fish Inv est igation 

The fish-for-fun (catch and release) regulations were evaluated 
at four public and one private stocked trout ponds. Results indicate 
that where the regulations are followed, as at the private pond, a sub- 
stantial number of trout are effectively recycled in the sport fishery. 
Where public access is high such regulations are not likely to accomplish 
their objective unless law enforcement expends extra effort to assure 
compliance with the regulations. Where access is limited or in more 
remote waters such regulations can be effective in assuring against rapid 
depletions of stocked trout populations. Background information and data 
were collected regarding the possible effect of extending sport fishing 
to a year-round season. 

Development of sea-run brown trout stocks focused on defining mi- 
gration patterns in streams and behavior patterns of Mashpee River trout. 
A first group of 6500 select sea-run smolts were released in April while 
21,000 sea-run brown trout eggs were taken to Sandwich Hatchery for the 
continuation of the selective rearing program. Initial plans for fishway 
development and stream improvement installation were coordinated with 
the Division of Marine Fisheries and Trout Unlimited. 

Fishing pressure at the Quabbin Reservoir remained relatively 
stable although the lake trout fishing declined to 962 fish, the lowest 
catch in four years. Fishermen reported the release of large numbers of 
sublegal fish. These fish should contribute significantly to the 1976 
and 1977 fisheries. The catch of rainbow trout fell almost in direct 
proportion to the decrease in stocking levels. This should improve in 
1976. 

Fisheries survey crews assessed the fauna and resource potential of 
the Nashua River Watershed. They also initiated survey work on the 
Hoosic and Farmington River Watersheds. 

Work began on a final report summarizing eight years of rainbow 
trout and brown trout-alewif e forage relationships at Hathaway Pond, 
Barnstable, and Higgins Pond, Brewster. Plans were formulated to 



-Q- 



determine the forage relationship between brown trout and smelt in 
recently reclaimed ponds. 

Warmwater Fish Investigations 

Studies concerning the population dynamics of smallmouth bass in 
Quabbin Reservoir were initiated. The information gleaned from this 
project should provide facts that will assist fisheries managers in 
formulating better bass management programs throughout the state. 

Winter creel surveys demonstrate a sustained interest in the 
northern pike fishery at Brimfield Reservoir. In conjunction with 
this program, minimum legal lengths for pike were increased to 28 
inches, while the daily creel limit was dropped to two pike per day. 

Initial plans and contacts were made with various lake associa- 
tions and conservation commissions for the purpose of enlisting and 
training volunteer technicians who would assist Division biologists 
and district managers in evaluating ongoing fisheries programs. 

Pumped Storage Power Plant Investigations 

The second full year of post-operational investigations at the 
Northfield plant and first year of post-operational investigations at 
Bear Swamp were completed. Both investigations include analysis of 
creel survey data, monitoring shifts in invertebrate populations and 
water quality as a means of evaluating the alterations in the fisheries 
of the Connecticut and Deerfield Rivers stemming from the construction 
and operation of these power projects. 

Connecticut River Anadromous Fish _Re storation 

Record numbers of shad, 346,725, were passed over the Holyoke 
Dam this year. More fish were passed with less stress and mortality 
as a result of improvements and modifications made by Holyoke Water 
Power Company. Tagging studies show that delay during shad migration 
was reduced approximately 80 percent because of fishlift improvement. 

Approximately 9,000 Atlantic salmon were released from the salmon 
imprint release pools on Tarkill Brook, Agawam, Massachusetts. While 
the salmon smolts were in the release pools, mortality was kept to a 
minimum, but vandalism still remains a major concern. 

Two returning adult Atlantic salmon were captured at the Holyoke 
fishlift facilities this - year — 23-pound, 40-inch female and an 
8.5-pound, 32-inch male. Both were transported to the Berkshire Na- 
tional Fish Hatchery. The female died shortly after being transferred 
to the hatchery while the male was used to fertilize approximately 
41,000 Atlantic salmon eggs of Penobscot River females. These eggs 
will be stocked into the Connecticut River as two-year smolts. 



-10- 



The four Connecticut River B asin states and Western Massachu- 
setts Electric Co. entered into formal hearings before the Federal 
Power Commission relative to fishways needed at Turners Falls Dam — 
the next barrier to anadromous fish above Holyoke. Midway through the 
hearing, the parties agreed to an out-of-court settlement that called 
for two fishways to be completed by 1931 and the third by 1934. Pre- 
liminary negotiations have been initiated between the four Connecticut 
River Basin states and New England Power Company relative to fishways 
at Vernon, Bellows Falls, and Wilder Dams. 

Merrimack River Anadromous Fish Restoration 

Monitoring of the Lawrence fishway has shown that a remnant shad 
run still exists in the lower portion of the Merrimack River. Several 
shad entered the fishway but none were observed successfully negotia- 
ting this antiquated facility. 

In an attempt to determine if shad spawning and nursery habitat 
still exists in sections of the Merrimack River, this Division, assis- 
ted by the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries and the New 
Hampshire Fish and Game Department stocked over 6 million fertile shad 
eggs from the Connecticut River in the Hooksett Pool, Hooksett, New 
Hampshire. Hatching success was between 55 and 65 percent. 

For the first time in many years, Atlantic salmon were stocked 
in Massachusetts waters of the Merrimack River. Approximately 2,200 
pre-smolts were reared for four weeks in floating stockout pens placed 
in the Artichoke River, Newburyport, Massachusetts. We will be able 
to determine just how successful this planting was by the numbers re- 
turning in 1978. 

Fiscal Year 1976-1977 

During Fiscal Year 1976 fisheries programs concentrated on 
assessing the impact of new fisheries regulations, negotiating with 
power companies with respect to fishway installations, and assessing 
the success of selectively reared sea-run brown trout. Additionally, 
we continued to monitor northern pike and smallmouth bass populations 
and completed investigations relative to the Northfield and Bear Swamp 
Pumped Storage projects. 

Coldwater Fish Investigations 

Creel survey counts were conducted by aerial observation at 18 
selected stocked trout ponds for the purpose of determining angler use 
in response to the new year-round fishing season. Additional surveys 
will be completed shortly. 

Continued investigations on the Mashpee River indicate that the 
progeny of selected sea-run brown trout are growing and surviving 



-11- 



significantly better than previous races of brown trout of hatchery 
origin. 

In the neighboring Ouashnet River, excellent progress is being 
made with the local chapter of Trout Unlimited with respect to instal- 
lation of stream improvement devices. 

Smelt were reintroduced to recently reclaimed Eiggins and Hatha- 
way Ponds in combination with fingerling and yearling brown trout. It 
is believed that this combination of forage and predator may signifi- 
cantly enhance the growth rates of brown trout. 

Angling pressure remained about constant at Quabbin Reservoir; 
however, the catch rate and total weight harvested were down 28.7 and 
14.3 percent from 1975. The lake trout catch increased to 1,799 or 
very near the 1974 level. Fishermen continued to release high numbers 
of sublegal lakers indicating good fishing for the next few years. 

Fisheries survey crews assessed the fauna and resource potential 
of the Hoosic and Farmington River Watersheds and initiated a biologi- 
cal survey of the Westfield Watershed. 

Warmwater Fish Inves t igations 

Smallmouth bass studies at Quabbin Reservoir indicate very 
little mixing of the population of bass inhabiting the fishing and non- 
fishing areas. Most Quabbin smallmouth do not enter the legal fishing 
area until they are approximately four years old. Growth rates in the 
open fishing area exceed those in the closed fishing area. 

Despite the fact that only an estimated 31 legal northern pike 
were removed from the Brimfield Reservoir complex, angler pressure and 
interest are high. Approximately 14,000 hours of angling were enjoyed 
during the ice fishing season. This represents about a quadrupling 
of the effort expended in the winter fishery prior to the introduc- 
tion of northerns, northern pike were also introduced into Ouaboag 
Pond. To date, however, there is no evidence of successful reproduc- 
tion. 

Initial investigations on Lake Wyman and Lake Cochituate using 
Division-trained volunteers are progressing well. To date these 
volunteers have conducted and are in the process of monitoring various 
physical, chemical, biological and social parameters that will provide 
the necessary data upon which to base future management decisions. 

Pumped Storage Plant Investigations 

The final year of post-operational investigations at the North- 
field and Bear Swamp Pumped Storage Projects were completed. Final 
reports and recommendations are being prepared. Nith respect to the 
Bear Swamp project on the Deerfield River, cold water releases of a 



-12- 



a minimum low flow of 100 c.f .s. will go a long way toward insuring 
higher quality trout fishing opportunity. 

Connecticut River Anadromous Fish Restoration 

Approximately 203,000 shad were passed over the Holyoke Dam 
this year. This indicates that roughly 65 percent of the shad popula- 
tion entering the mouth of the river were passed over the Holyoke 
Dam. Thirty other fish species, totaling 114,300 fish, were also 
observed being passed into the Holyoke pool. 

Creel surveys conducted below the Holyoke Dam and Turners Falls 
Dam indicate that a total of 3,300 shad were harvested by 9,265 
anglers during 20,337 hours of fishing. This represents slightly 
better recreation than during the past few years. 

Approximately 114,500 Atlantic salmon pre-smolts, weighing near- 
ly eight tons, were released into the Connecticut River Basin this 
year. From this allotment 23,000 were released in the vicinity of the 
Holyoke Dam. The exit channel at the Holyoke fishway was used as the 
imprint release site, instead of the pools at Tarkill Brook as last 
year . 

Seven returning adult Atlantic salmon have been reported this 
year; one found by a commercial shad fisherman, three taken by sport 
anglers, two seen at the Holyoke fishlift, one found dead above Holyoke 
Dam. Of these seven fish, three were reported dead and four were 
transported to Berkshire National Fish Hatchery for fall spawning. 

Negotiations with Hew England Power Company and the four basin 
states concerning fishways at Vernon, 3ellows Falls, and Uilder Dam 
appear to be progressing satisfactorily. 

Merrimack River Anadrom ou s Fi sh Res toration 

The Lawrence fishway was again monitored and while shad were 
observed entering the facility none were seen to negotiate its entire 
distance. Negotiations between the dam owners and fisheries agencies 
have begun concerning improving and constructing new fishways. Fund- 
ing appears to be the major problem . 

Approximately 1,677,500 fertile shad eggs were placed into the 
Merrimack River above Lowell. Hatching success was observed to be 50 
percent. This indicates viable spawning habitat. 

This spring 32,000 Atlantic salmon smolts were stocked directly 
into the Merrimack River above the Lowell Dam. All of the fish were 
marked with a cold brand for identification. 



-13- 



FISH HATCHERIES 



David Fredenburgh 
Chief Fish Culturist 



Fiscal Years 1975-76 and 1976-77 



Facilities 

During the past two years the hatchery system has been actively 
engaged in new construction and upgrading existing facilities. With 
the exception of building a new hatchery in 1969, little money has 
been spent for maintenance or construction of fish hatchery facilities. 
Deterioration of the stations had become noticeable. TTIthin this time, 
the Montague hatch house caved in. Ponds and raceway systems at 
Palmer were undercut by water, and the hatch house at Sunderland 
sagged. Although there were no major fish kills it became increasingly 
difficult to operate the hatcheries. Thus, in 1975, development was 
given high priority and by June 1977 all of the hatcheries had some 
improvements. 

McLaughlin: Domestic water system revamped; refurbished 
four vertical turbine pumps; preliminary and 
final design of pollution abatement facilities. 

Montague; New storage - office building. 

Palmer: New rearing system for hatch house* new water 

distribution system for hatch house and outside 
pools: new fiberglass above-ground tanks; site 
improvement for location of outside pools; new 
well, pump and piping to hatch house. The Division 
is currently in the nrocess of installing an ultra- 
violet light and filtration system for the reservoir 
water. 

Sandwich* Hew well to supply hatch house; new hatch hous« . 

Sunderland: New septic system for the hatch house. 



During 1975-1977 some policy guidelines were developed regarding 
production capabilities and the location for propagating various 
species of trout/salmon. The Sandwich Hatchery will be responsible 
for rearing coho salmon and sea-run trout along with the normal pro- 
duction of brown, brook and rainbow trout. The Palmer Hatchery will 
be responsible for rearing Atlantic and landlocked salmon only. 
Kokanee salmon will be raised at the Sunderland Hatchery for the near 
future. Due to the excellent facilities at McLaughlin, this hatchery 
has taken on part of the responsibility for the actual hatching and 
early rearing of trout. At the present time, most of the trout eggs 



-14- 



hatched at Division facilities come from the Federal government or are 
purchased from private sources. The McLaughlin Hatchery is presently 
developing a program for brood stock of brown and brook trout that 
are apparently resistant to furunculosis, a bacterial disease. The 
Sandwich Hatchery also maintains a brood stock program. 

One of the biggest problems facing the hatchery system is en- 
croachment by housing developments. This raises problems of sewerage 
disposal as a potential pollutant to ground water supplies, heavy 
demand on ground water, vandalism to the buildings and equipment, and 
poaching. During the past two years, there have been two instances 
of conflict. Housing developments have been proposed for lands 
adjacent to the Montague and Sunderland Hatcheries. The Division has 
actively opposed such developments and, to date, there has been no 
construction. The Division has been in contact with various citizens' 
groups about pollution from the McLaughlin, Sunderland and Sandwich 
Hatcheries, and the Division is currently exploring possibilities for 
funding a pollution abatement facility at McLaughlin. 

Stocking 

With the advent of the "year-round" fishing season, more emphasis 
is being placed on fall stocking. Through manipulation of strains and 
hatching time, hatcheries will be able to alter production schedules 
to include a fall stocking program. 

Costs 

The past two years have brought an Increase in costs for the 
production of trout and salmon. The increase in the cost of energy 
has had a direct bearing on fish rearing costs through such items as 
electricity to pump water, heating oil and gas, and gasoline to run 
vehicles. The collective bargaining law has increased salaries and 
overtime pay thereby adding to the financial load of the stations . 
Feed costs have increased approximately 40 percent during 1975-197/. 
The hatchery system has tried to reduce these increases by better 
scheduling of manpower, more efficient distribution of trout, decrease 
of heating and electrical costs and re-evaluation of the product 
raised. The Division is currently working toward raising a strain of 
trout that matures rapidly and that attains 9"+ stocking size in 18 
months rather than the traditional 27 months. Efforts are also being 
directed toward development of a strain that will be highly resistant 
to hatchery mortality. 



-15- 



WILDLIFE 



Chet M. IlcCord 
Chief of Wildlife Research 

Fiscal Year 1975-1976; 1976-1977 

Statewide Small Game Harvest 

A sample of 400 hunters (consisting of two subsaciples of 200) licensed 
in 1975 was surveyed by telephone to determine their harvest and participa- 
tion in small game hunting. Additional special questions concerned deer . 
and squirrel hunting. 

Hunter effort was greatest for pheasant, ruffed grouse, cottontail 
rabbit, woodcock, and ducks. Hunter success was greatest for pheasant, 
cottontail rabbit, ducks, ruffed grouse, and gray squirrel. Estimated 
harvests were greatest for ducks, cottontail rabbit, raccoon, pheasant, 
and gray squirrel. Due to the structure of the sampling procedure, sample 
totals may not accurately represent actual totals. However, useful trend 
information can be established. 

The estimated number of Ilassachusetts deer hunters was calculated as 
66,684 + 4.7 percent. Shotgun hunters ranked first (97.8%), with archery 
and primitive firearm hunters both comprising approximately 7.5 percent of 
the total. The sample estimate of 5^474 successful antlerless permit appli- 
cants was not significantly different from the actual total of 5,570. 

Host hunters had no opinion regarding the length of the squirrel season 
The majority (79%) of those desiring a change wanted an earlier opening date 

Another sample of 400 hunters was surveyed in 1976. Analysis of the 
results of this survey is in progress at the time of writing this report. 

Beaver 

A total of 1,135 beaver was taken by 107 trappers in 103 towns during 
the 1975-1976 beaver season. This take, is significantly less than both the 
1974-1975 take and a ten-year (1966-1975) take. Harvest trends from 1967- 
1971 to 1972-1976, however, significantly increased in all counties and re- 
gions. The estimated harvest valuation was $21,565. During the 1976-1977 
season, a total of 1,558 beaver were taken by 144 trappers in 119 towns. 
This represents an increase in harvest in all major counties and regions 
and a significant increase in Franklin, Hampshire, and Worcester Counties 
and the statewide total. The estimated harvest valuation of $45,057 is 
the greatest since beaver trapping was initiated in 1952. 

Otter and Fisher 

New regulations instituted in 1976 required all successful otter and 
fisher trappers to submit their pelts to an official checking station for 
examination. Voluntary turn- in of the carcasses of these species was re- 
quested at the same time. 

A total of 110 otter was taken by 65 trappers in 59 towns as opposed 
to 103 taken in 1975-1976 (based upon fur dealer reports); Nearly half 



-16- 



1 



(50 otter) were taken in November, with two- thirds (73 otter) taken in 
Conibear traps. A total of 23 fisher (plus two live-trapped for zoological 
purposes) were taken by 17 trappers in 17 towns, as opposed to two known 
taken in 1975-1976. About half (12 fisher) were taken in February, with 
13 taken in leghold traps. 

Ilourning Dove 

In 1976 and 1977, calling doves were counted on three randomized 
routes in cooperation with the U. S. Fish and Uildlife Service's annual 
mourning dove breeding population census. The total number of calling 
doves in 1976 decreased 52 percent from 1975 counts on two comparable 
routes. Data from one route were not available for 1975 and could not 
be compared. In 1977, the total number of calling doves on all (three) 
comparable routes increased 35 percent over 1976 counts. 

Quail 

Sixteen whistling-count quail census routes were conducted in three 
counties in 1977 of which 11 were comparable with routes surveyed in 1975. 
Preliminary analysis indicates no significant change in call indices in 
Bristol, Plymouth, and Barnstable Counties from 1975 to 1977. Increased 
background noise hinders the continued effectiveness of the whistle-count 
survey. 

Turkey 

In 1975-1976, turkeys in the Beartown State Forest showed increased 
signs of dispersal from the release area. Reports were received from 
several towns south and west of Beartown State Forest. Reports of turkeys 
to the north may include dispersed birds from releases in New York and 
Vermont. Broods were produced in at least two locations on and adjacent 
to Beartown Forest. 

In 1976-1977, Beartown area turkeys continued to show signs of pro- 
duction and dispersal. Reports in several new areas seem reliable, but 
need verification. Reports continue in northern Berkshire and adjacent 
Franklin County. Reports from Hampden County probably reprto<?x\t escaped 
penned stock. 

Black Bear 

In 1975-1976, applications for bear hunting permits were received 
from 433 sportsmen. Three bears, reported as females, were taken during 
the open season and two additional bear were illegally shot during deer 
week. New reports of 41 observations totalling 52 bear v;ere received from 
five counties. Two reports of problem bears were investigated. 

In 1976-1977, applications for bear hunting permits were received from 
430 sportsmen. Three bear, again reported as females, were taken during th 
open season and one male was illegally shot during deer week. 

One road kill was reported. New reports of 13 observations totalling 
12 bear were received from 10 towns. Results of the bear historical study 
and preliminary information from the population dynamics study were pub- 
lished as Research Bulletin 18, "The History and Status of the 31ack Bear 
in Massachusetts and Adjacent New England States". 

-17- 



Deer Research Project 



The 1976 statewide deer harvest for all deer seasons was 2,712 deer. 
During the 18 day archery season (8 llovember through 27 November) the 
archers harvested 94 males and 33 females or 127 deer. Hunters using 
primitive firearms harvested 49 deer (20 males and 29 females) during 
the three day hunt December 20 through December 22. Paraplegic deer 
hunters harvested one male and one female during the special two day 
season on Martha's Vineyard. During the six- day shotgun only deer 
season s December 6 through December 11, hunters reported taking 2 S 534 
deer. Of these 1,012 were males and 722 were females. 

The 1977 statewide deer harvest for all deer seasons was 3,207 deer. 
Archers took 142 deer (103 males and 39 females) during the 18 day season 
November 7 through November 26. During the primitive weapon season 
December 19 through December 23 hunters harvested 64 males and 65 females 
for a total of 129 deer. There were no deer harvested during the special 
two day season for paraplegics. During the shotgun only deer season 
(December 5 through December 10) hunters reported 2 S 936 deer. Of these 
2,151 were males and 785 were females. 

Hon hunting deer mortalities compiled during 1976 and 1977 are as follows 

Number of Number of 

Mortality Cause Deaths in 1976 Deaths in 1977 

Automotive 296 341 

Dogs 58 73 

Illegal 48 57 

Drowned 5 2 

Other & Unknown 35 33 



Total 442 511 



Falconry 

In 1975-1976 the Division licensed 13 falconers of which three were 
master falconers. In 1976-77 the number increased to 23 of which five 
were master falconers. The most commonly used birds were the Red-Tailed- 
Hawks and the Goshawks. During this period Massachusetts' Falconry Re- 
gulations were rewritten to comply with existing Federal Regulations. 



Gosling Transplant Program 

During fiscal year 1976, 43 goslings were transplanted to two sites 
in Central and Western Massachusetts ; 27 other geese were banded and re- 
leased on the capture sites. The following year only 20 goslings and two 
adults were transplanted to a single site. 

Goose flocks in the Framingham-Southboro area have declined from a 
high of 191 in 1973 to 110 in 1976. Breeding geese were observed or re- 
ported at eight areas on or near former release sites during 1976 brood 
checks. No brood checks were conducted in 1977. 



-18- 



Preseason Waterfowl Bandings 



With the airboat back in operation, preseason banding efforts got back 
into high gear after a two year hiatus. A total of 1,513 waterfowl and 
other birds were banded. This included 160 ducks banded as part of the 
Division's park waterfowl study. 209 wood ducks and 151 black ducks were 
banded in the wild. The remaining birds banded included a wide variety 
of waterfo\7l and other birds. 

In 1976 s 1,502 birds were banded including 502 wood ducks and 143 
blacks. The final year of park waterfowl banding netted 169 ducks. 

Winter Inventory Flights 

Winter inventory routes were flown during the first full week of January 
in 1976 and 1977. Biologists surveyed all of coastal Hassachusetts from New 
Hampshire to the Rhode Island line. The total waterfowl count in 1976 was 
121,016 - up 0.6 percent over 1975 and 14.6 percent over the 10 year average. 
Black duck numbers (17, GOO) were up 11.5 percent over 1975 but were down 13 
percent from the 10 year average. Scaup, sea ducks and Canada goose numbers 
were down from 1975 while mallard, golden eye, bufflehead and merganser number^ 
were up. In 1977, 116,166 waterfowl were counted, 4 percent less than in 
1976 but 7 percent over the previous 10 year average. Black duck numbers 
(19,690) were up 11 percent over 1976 but down 5 percent from the 10 year 
average. Scaup, mallards, sea ducks and Canada geese were down from the pre- 
vious year while goldeneye, bufflehead, canvasback and merganser numbers were 
up. 

Winter Trapping Program 

During 1976, a total of 1,713 birds were banded. This included 620 
blacks, 46 mallards, 91 mallard X black hybrids and 15 pintails taken during 
coastal trapping operations and 769 mallards, 39 hybrids, 45 blacks, 5 wild 
X domestic hybrids and 33 American coot trapped during this last year of park 
waterfowl banding operations. The winter of 1976-7 was exceptionally cold 
causing starvation conditions for some waterfowl. Because of this birds 
responded well to bait and 1*472 black ducks, 359 hybrids, 56 mallards, 
9 pintail, o wigeon and 1 wood duck were banded during coastal trapping opera- 
tions. 

Black Duck Imprint Program 

No releases of black ducks were made after 1975. Nesting checks of 
elevated cylinders in 1976 indicated that 7 black duck, 3 mallards and one 
hybrid nested in them. All but two black duck nests were successful. The 
first unhanded black duck was recorded nesting in 1976. 

During the spring of 1977, 4 black duck and 3 mallards nested in 
cylinders. This project is completed and a 5 year summary will be submitted 
for publication. 



-19- 



Park Wa t erfowl Investigations 



The park waterfowl project was inactive during fiscal years 1976 and 
1977 except for the banding described earlier. 

Wood Duck Dump lies ting Study 

Field testing to determine collar retention rates on color narked 
wood ducks and early morning nesting observations were conducted during 
the springs of 1976 and 1977. The tests indicated that collar loss was 
an insignificant factor and return rates indicated the collars did not 
affect hen survival. Ten dump nesting hens were observed and their actions 
recorded. Preliminary data indicate that most hens that dump eggs in other 
nests eventually establish nests of their own. 

Evaluation of Starlingproof Nestings Structures 

A summary of 6 years of comparative wood duck usage of cylinders 
and wooden boxes was published in The Wildlife Society Bulletin in the 
spring of 1977 (Vol. 5 ilo. 1 pp 14-18). Further checks of starlingproof 
cylinders conducted incidentally to other work in 1976 and 1977 indicated 
no significant changes in use. This segment of the research project is 
now finished. Various skylight lids were tested during 1976 and 1977 but 
investigators found no significant difference in wood duck acceptance of 
light lid boxes and boxes with regular lids, nor was there any difference 
in the rate of abandonment, although birds in boxes equipped with light 
lids were flightier than those in the control boxes. Starlings use light 
lid boxes significantly less frequently than control boxes. This difference 
was especially pronounced on the eastern Massachusetts study areas. 

Release of Hand Reared Wood Ducks 

No hand reared wood ducks were released in 197C or 1977. Two hens 
released in 1975 nested on Quabbin beaver ponds in 1976 along with one 
unhanded bird. No hand reared wood ducks were recorded at Turkey Hill 
Crook in 1976 but a hen released in 1975 was captured in late summer 
night-lighting operations. She appeared to be in company of a brood. 

Despite a prolonged power failure that resulted in loss of ducklings 
and eggs in llay, over 60 wood ducklings were raised in the Ayer Game Farm 
duck pen. Some of these ducklings will be released on Quabbin beaver ponds 
during late summer 1977. 

Coastal and Inland Wetlands Survey 

Chromatic enhancement of wetland cover types on black and white topo- 
graphical sheet was used in the first stage of identifying potential water- 
fowl habitat. 



-20- 



Management of Wildlife Areas 



There were three areas of effort in the project during 1975-1977; 
improvement of habitat, providing public access, and providing information 
for Management Area users. 

Wildlife Habitat Management : 

Division personnel created a five- acre wetland, built 350 new wood duck 
nesting boxes, and maintained 1000 ethers. Under this project Division per- 
sonnel planted approximately 1300 trees and shrubs and planted cover on 250 
acres of wildlife "openings 1 ' . An additional 325 acres were treated so that 
the land would remain open and that sprout growth would be encouraged. 165 
acres of woodland were cut selectively and an additional 100 acres were cleared 
to create new open areas. Management plans were completed for three wildlife 
management areas. 

Public A.ccess 

Division personnel constructed 16 miles of trails and maintained 100 
miles of roads and trails. Seven new parking areas were constructed and 45 
existing parking areas were maintained. In addition, 15 blinds were construc- 
ted on two waterfowl areas. 

Information Aids 

Division personnel constructed 550 signs and marked 21 miles of new 
boundaries. They also maintained 1500 existing signs and 190 miles of pre- 
viously marked boundaries. 



-21- 



GAME FART IS 



E. Ilichael Pollack 
Chief Game Biologist 

Fiscal Year 1975-1976 

Routine maintenance was performed at all farms. Vandalism continued 
at the Sandwich Game Farm. 

High feed costs still plague all game farm propagation efforts as 
well as those of commercial game bird raisers. Increases in the price 
of soybeans and corn have caused and perpetuated the sharp rise in feed 
costs. Other increased costs are reflected in the purchase of poultry 
netting and other supplies. 

Potential disease problems have been nonitored carefully at all 
game farms. 

CETA employees from the Gardner area assisted in improving bird- 
rearing facilities. 



Stockings during this fiscal period were as follows: 
Pheasants (cocks only) 





SR 


B 


C 


PG 


flisc 


Sandwich 


130 


2,064 


2,456 


8,028 




Wilbraham 


1,635 


4,264 


6,730 


5,321 


50 


Ayer 


2,348 


3,332 


5,940 


14,006 


100 




4,663 


9,660 


15,176 


27,355 


150 



Total 



Quail 



A total of 3,150 were released including approximately 400 used in 
field trials. 

White Kare 

White hare released numbered 192. 

* Does not include approximately 819 field trial birds and 4,626 adult 
brood stock released in early summer. 

Fiscal Year 1976 - 1977 

During this period, all game farms suffered severe winter damage to 
covered holding pens resulting in a financial setback of thousands of 
dollars. In addition, a fire at the Ayer Game Farm, caused by electrical 
malfunction, destroyed part of the old farmhouse. The damage was repaired 
and a new wiring system installed. 

The spiraling cost of game bird feed continued its upward path. The 
main cause of the feed increase was the market fluctuation of protein foods, 
particularly soybeans and corn. Feed costs increased 26 to 33 percent 
during this one year. 



Mortality due to disease, vandalism, and so forth was moderate. 



Maintenance at the Ayer Game Farm was accomplished with the aid 
of CETA program employees. Limited summer help was available at the 
Wilbraham and Sandwich Game Farms. 



Releases were made as follows: 



Pheasants (cocks only) 





SR* 


B* 


C* 


Sandwich 


10G 


2,196 


4,948 


Wi lb rah am 


2,225 


5,092 


6,052 


Ayer 


2,118 


2,740 


5.328 




4,443 


10,028 


16,328 



Quail 



PG * Misc . Total 
7,116 

5,324 91 

15,620 192 

28,060 283 54,693* 



Quail released numbered 2,882 including approximately 500 field trial 
birds. 

Unite Hare 

Three hundred ten (310) white hare were stocked. 



* SR - Sportsmen r s Rearing program 

B - Preseason stocking on private or town covers 

C - Inseason stocking on private or to\m covers 

PG - Stockings on wildlife management areas 

** Does not include approximately 926 field trial birds and 3,550 a'lult broo \ 
stock released in early sunner. 



-23- 



INFORMATION AITD EDUCATION SECTION 

Eleanor C . Horwitz 
Chief of Information and Tducation 



The Information and Education Section of the Division receives an 
average of 40 letters per day (10,000 a year) which require some form of 
disposition. Most require a response. Often the response can be a printed 
form, but frequently the request is one which must be answered with an in- 
dividual letter. To answer these inquiries and to inform sportsmen through- 
out the Commonwealth of facilities and regulations, the I & E section pro- 
duces and maintains a supply of abstracts of regulations for the current 
year, special regulations for migratory waterfowl, a list of stocked waters 
in the Commonwealth, and maps of 200 popular fishing ponds and 44 wildlife 
management areas. 

To provide information on a broader basis than is possible by direct 
correspondence, the Division issued eleven press releases (53 items) and 
five "Tips to Outdoor Writers" during 1975-1976. During 1976-1977, the 
Section issued nine press releases (36 items) and one "Tips to Outdoor 
Writers". Releases and "Tips" dealt with such issues of interest and con- 
cern to the sporting public as dog-restraining orders, season openings and 
changes in Division personnel. 

In cooperation with the Department of Commerce and Development, the 
I & E staff supervises the 3 Iassachusetts Sports Fishing Awards program. 
Under this program, awards were issued for record fish in seventeen cate- 
gories. 

The I & E Section also sponsored an art competition for the art work 
to be used on the following year's waterfowl stamp. The 1975-1976 competi- 
tion was won by William P. Tyner for his rendition of Captain Osgood's 
Canada goose. The 1976-1977 prize was awarded again to William Tyner for his 
painting of a golden-eye decoy. The winning designs were subsequently 
printed and reproduced on waterfowl stamps. 

Consideration was given to holding another competition for the art 
work on the archery stamp. This project was abandoned and art work was pro- 
vided by n commissioned artist. 

Perhaps the single major issuance of the Section during this period 
has been the magazine MASSACHUSETTS WILDLIFE which appears in 20-page, 
6x9 format, with two-color interior and full color cover. MASSACHUSETTS 
WILDLIFE appears bimonthly and is provided free to 26,000 interested sub- 
scribers. On 1 April 1976, Wildlife Journalist Jack Clancy assumed re- 
sponsibilities as Managing Editor of MASSACHUSETTS WILDLIFE. There were no 
issues printed between January and April 1976 because of a lack of funds and 
the resignation of former editor, 'Ted" Williams. The remaining four 

issues of 1976 were printed following Clancy's appointment. 

In addition to MASSACHUSETTS WILDLIFE , the Division produced one mono- 
graph, publishing James E. Cardoza's THE BLACK BEAR OF MASSACHUSETTS in 
1976. 

A major portion of the I & E effort was expended on visual educational 
material. Division photographers enlarged the file of photo exhibit materi- 
al and film available for Division productions. 



-24- 



This material was used to meet the needs of wire services and local 
newspapers treating hunting, fishing and conservation issues as well as for 
exhibits at the Eastern States Exposition, Sportsmen' s Show and many smaller 
shows throughout the Commonwealth. Film t alien by Division photographers 
was used in many TV segments and filming continued on coastal islands for 
the cooperative filming venture between the Massachusetts Audubon Society 
and the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife. A number of slide presentations 
were put together for showing by I & E personnel as well as Division biolo- 
gists. During this period, the Audio-Visual Coordinator presented 50 il- 
lustrated lectures to a variety of groups ranging from biology classes at 
the University of Massachusetts to civic and conservation groups. The wild- 
life Journalist presented 16 programs to various groups. 

During April of 1977, Massachusetts served as host for the 1977 Northeast 
Fish and Wildlife Conference. This required the Division's I & E staff to put 
forth a special effort coordinating audio-visual arrangements and participa- 
ting in host activities for the many visiting fish and wildlife professionals 
who attended. I & E personnel assumed these duties in addition to their 
regular activities of providing materials for the mass media, clubs, and pri- 
vate citizens. 



-25- 



REALTY 



Floyd Richardson 
Chief of Uildlife Lands 



The Division has long pursued an aggressive policy of land acquisi- 
tion. Lands are purchased or leased to protect fish and wildlife habitat 
in the face of encroachment by expanding towns and to provide open areas 
which will afford sportsmen and others the opportunity to enjoy the fish 
and wildlife resources of the Commonwealth . All Division lands are open 
to the general public without regard to race, creed , color, sex, handi- 
cap or age. During 1975-1976, the Division acquired a total of 6,644.25 
acres, bringing its total land holdings to 38,059 acres. 'lost lands were 
acquired with funds provided by a 1971 bond issue to protect wetlands, 
and a 500,000-dollar appropriation from the Inland Fish and Game Fund. 
Other lands were presented to the Division by individuals or groups. The 
Division gratefully acknowledges the important contributions made by these 
generous donors of wildlife lands. 

Land Acquisition Summary 

FY 1975-1976 



Hockomock Acquisition Project 1,121.00 Acres 

Fisk Meadows Acquisition Project 353.50 Acres 

Nissitissit River Acquisition Project 23.20 Acres 

Chalet Acquisition Project 515.00 Acres 

Squannacook River Acquisition Project 140.00 Acres 

Land Transfer (Clar-ps Pond) 60.35 Acres 

Birch Hill Acquisition Project 

Bolton Flats Acquisition Project 

Hinsdale Flats Acquisition Project 

Windsor Acquisition Project 

Stafford Hill Acquisition Project 

Housatonic Acquisition Project 

Rocky Gutter Acquisition Project 

Crane Pond Acquisition Project 

Mill Creek Acquisition Project 

Quaboag Acquisition Project 

Moose Hill Acquisition Project 

North Shore Salt Marsh Acquisition Project 

Minns Sanctuary 

Lake Snipatuit 



Totals 2,226.05 Acres 

Grand Total - 6,644.25 Acres 

Hockomock Acquisition Project 

This project has been notably successful throughout and during 1976 and 
1977, acquiring an additional 1,533 acres. Since the inception of the pro- 
gram, nearly 5,000 acres have been acquired from more than 200 o\*ners . This 
assemblage consists of acres of woodlands, marshes, meandering screams and 
open field, blended together forming an area which is used by practically 
every species of wildlife indigenous to Massachusetts. Although the megalop- 
olis will soon engulf the surrounding area, the Hockomock will retain its 
unspoiled character. 

-26- 



FY 1976-1977 

467.15 Acres 
31.00 Acres 
24.60 Acres 



1,507.35 Acres 
431.30 Acres 
537.00 Acre3 
805.00 Acres 
110.00 Acres 
127.00 Acres 
50.00 Acre3 
1.50 Acres 
232.45 Acres 
8.00 Acres 
30.50 Acres 
3.50 Acres 
1.80 Acres 
.50 Acres 



4,418.20 Acres 



1 : uabo?g Acquisition Project 



A few years ago, the Hamilton Rod and Gun Club in Sturbridge deeded a 
gift of 62 acres of land situated in Sturbridge and Brookfield to the Divi- 
sion of Fisheries and Wildlife. This gift was welcomed by the agency as it 
provided another area where sportsmen would be assured "a place to hunt". 
The acquisition of an eight-acre tract in Brookfield, contiguous with the 
given property, increases the size of the Division's holding and supports 
the Division's intent to provide "a place to hunt". 

North Shore Salt Marsh Acquisition Project 

A pircel containing 3.5 acres of coastal salt marsh in the Town of New- 
bury was purchased by the Jivisiori of Fisheries and Wildlife. This parcel is 
adjacent to, but does not abut, thirty-eight acres purchased by this agency in 
1970. 

Crane Pond Acquisition Project 

This wildlife management area is located within 3° miles of Boston. An 
additional 1.5 acres with frontage along the Parker River was acquired to 
further enhance and protect valuable wildlife lands. 

Lake Snipatuit 

This acquisition affords parking and access for persons using Lake 
Snipatuit in Rochester. The lake is noted for its warmwater fisheries. Large- 
mouth bass, pickerel, perch and bullheads inhabit th^.s shallow lake and offer 
a challenge to those who desire to wet a line". 

C halet Uildlife '.anapement Area* 

A gift of 515 acres of Ian-' was ~*resent3d to the Division of Fisheries 
and Wildlife by Berkshire Land and Timber, Inc. The area is located in the 
Towns of Windsor and Jalton and is accessible from Route n by Flintstcne 
P^oad. Mixed hard and soft woods found on this area furnish food and cover to 
deer, bear, rabbits, grouse, raccoons and squirrels. 

iiin ns Sanctuary 

A little under two acres of land in Princeton was given to this agency 
by Dr. Olive Gates. The gifted property abuts the existing 'linns Sanctuary 
which also was received as a gift from 1 'iss Susan "tinns in 1^2C. 

Clapps Pond (Land Transfer) 

The Department of Public Works deeded 63 acres of land in Provincetown 
to the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife to provide an access to Clapps Pond 
in exchange for a gore of land in Falmouth approximating five acres. 



Designates a new wildlife management area. 



Bolton Flats Acquisition Project* 



This important acquisition is located in Worcester County in the Towns 
of Harvard, Bolton and Lancaster, The area, once actively farmed, is 
bordered on the west by the Nashua PJLver and extends easterly to the Still 
River with small fingers of land abutting Route 110. The initial acquisi- 
tion comprises 481 acres. This acquisition project will develop into a 
wildlife management area second to none. The character of the land is such 
that it will offer something for everyone. 

H insdale Acquisition Project* 

The acquisition of 537 acres in the Town of Hinsdale, a small town in 
the Berkshires, is the nucleus of a new wildlife management area to be known 
as the "Hinsdale Flats". Uixed woodlands, alder runs, open fields and cat- 
tail marshes combine to provide food and cover for the variety of wildlife 
found here. The East Branch of the Housatonic River lazily winds its way 
through the property. Deep, dark, not-too-easily-accessible pools harbor 
trout to sustain fishing throughout the year. 

Windsor Acquisition Project* 

Prime wildlife lands were acquired to provide another wildlife manage- 
ment area. Eight hundred five acres, representing two acquisitions of land 
once devoted to farming. will now be managed for wildlife. Fields once 
planted to corn, alfalfa and hay to provide food for dairy herds will now 
provide food and cover for pheasants, deer, grouse and other wildlife. 

Birch Hill Acquisition Project 

Property contiguous to the lands owned by the U. S. Army Corps of En- 
gineers (4,500 acres) and licensed to the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, 
was purchased to further insure the sportsmen of future hunting and fishing 
lands. This acquisition, which consists of 1,5H7 acre3, affords easy access 
to the total area by many paved, dirt and woods roads. 

Fisk Ileadows Acquisition Project 

Fisk Headows is located in the northwest section of Hampshire County in 
the quiet hill town of Chesterfield. Here the outflow of Damon Pond, joined 
by other small streams and brooks, combine to create the Dead Branch which 
flows through the so-called Fisk lieadow and eventually empties into the 
East Branch of the Westfield River. The Fisk Meadow is a wetland bas^n pro- 
tected on three sides by precipitous woodland terrain. The Division of 
Fisheries and Wildlife initiated this project, recognizing the importance 
to wildlife of the wetland and adjoining uplands. To date, 389 acres have 
been acquired. The goal established by this agency to fully protect the 
area is nearly 50 percent realized. The fate of the remaining acreage is 
in the hands of the legislators and town selectmen. 

Housatonic Acquisition Project 

The addition of 127 acres to this important area not only increases 
the amount of huntable land, but provides more stream bank frontage on the 
Housatonic River. The lands acquired contribute hay lands bordered by 
hedgerows and a small wetlands area. 

* Designates a new wildlife management area. 



-28- 



i/ca^fcrd liill Acquisition P roject 

During 1976-1977, the Division acquired 110 acres of rolling farmlands 
adjacent to the Stafford Hill Wildlife Management Area. This acquisition 
also provides nearly one-half mile of road frontage, further protecting the 
area from encroachment of home construction. 

Rocky Gutter Acquisition Project 

Three new parcels were acquired, adding another 50 acres to this manage- 
ment area. This project was reactivated to increase Division of Fisheries 
and Wildlife ownership in an area which threatens to become a desirable area 
for single residences. 

Hill Creek Acquisition Project 

Ox Hill Pasture, as it once was called, was purchased by the Division 
of Fisheries and Wildlife to increase the Mill Creek Wildlife Management Area 
by 232 acres. The fact that Ox Hill Pasture affords another access into the 
already established wildlife area and that the pasture has considerable 
frontage on Hill Creek and Parker River makes this an attractive and important 
parcel. 

Nissitissit Hiver Acquisi tion P roject 

Stream bank purchases cont-fnued in this region with 47 additional acres 
acquired during 1975 to 1977. An ab»Moned railroad line provides access. 
This and two other parcels which contribute road frontage and stream beu>k 
along Sucker Brook (a stocked trout stream) , serve to enhance this area 
known for its fine trout fishing. 

Moose Hill Acquisition Project 

In the Moose Hill area, the Division offered a local farmer the use of 
20 acres of land that could not be used for hunting because of its proximity 
to a road and occupied dwellings in exchange for 30 acres abutting the 
existing management area. The 30 acres were deeded in fee to the Division 
of Fisheries and Wildlife as consideration for the agricultural use of the 
20-acre parcel. The parties involved all benefitted from this arrangement: 
sportsmen gained 30 additional huntable acres; the farmer received the use 
of 20 acres. Good relations were established between the landowner, the 
Commonwealth and the sportsman. 

Squannacook River Acquisition Project 

This is a continuing project in which property will be purchased to pro- 
tect the Squannacook River as it becomes available. During Fiscal 1975-1976, 
the Division acquired a 140-acre parcel along the river. This tract con- 
tributes not only stream bank, but also valuable road frontage. The acquisi- 
tion of road frontage is critical in preventing home construction which con- 
tributes river pollution through septic systems. Open road frontage protects 
against such pollution and also provides both undisputed access and ample 
parking. 



-29- 



WESTERN WILDLIF1 DISTRICT 

Winston Saville 
District Wildlife Manager 



Fiscal Year 1975-1976 

During Fiscal Year 1976, personnel of the Western Wildlife District: con- 
tinued managing the areas which have traditionally been their responsibility 
expanding into new areas when possible. During the spring of the year, they 
participated in the census of woodcock and mourning doves, running three census 
routes for woodcock and two for mourning doves. They participated in the 
acquisition of two tracts of land — purchase of Fisk Meadows Management Area 
(358.5 acres) and the 515-acre Chalet Wildlife Management Area which was re- 
ceived as a gift. On lands already within the Division's possession, District 
personnel continued maintaining boundary markers and establishing new ones. 
Specifically marked, during this fiscal year, was the Forbush Sanctuary in 
Hancock. 

In addition to the above, the District Manager or his appointed represen- 
tatives participated in a variety of public functions including: judging con- 
servation exhibits at the annual 4-H convention; providing lectures and slide 
shows at Berkshire Community College, the Central Berkshire School District, 
Lions, Kiwanis, Rotary and churches* attending meetings with the Berkshire Re- 
gional Planning Board and the U. S. Soil Conservation Service's Conservation 
District; participating in natural resource inventories for Berkshire, Hampden 
and Hampshire Conservation Districts; participating in the annual river clean- 
up project conducted by the Housatonic River Watershed Association; participa- 
ting in National Hunting and Fishing Day activities including consulting on 
25 to 30 exhibits, maintaining a fishing pond for children and sponsoring ac- 
tivities related to dog training and shooting safety; maintaining a permanent 
exhibit of Division activities at the Mount Grey lock Visitor's Center operated 
by the Department of Environmental Management; and attending 14 County League 
meetings in Hampshire, Hampden and Berkshire Counties as well as 15 sportsmen 1 U 
club meetings. 

The District Manager also participated in the C.E.T.A. program, supervis- 
ing a team of 12 C.E.T.A. workers assigned to the District during the summer 
months. C.E.T.A. personnel engaged in brush cutting and other forms cf habita 
improvement on the Housatonic and Peru Wildlife Management Areas. 

During this fiscal period, Western District personnel stocked 6,278 cock 
pheasants, 410 hen pheasants and 230 white hare, and handled 55 nuisance com- 
plaints related to beaver. 

Forty-four man days were expended on the kokanee salmon program, eight 
days on stream surveys, 18 days on trout creel census, 11 days on warrawater 
creel census, 12 days on stream access work at the Peru Wildlife Management 
Area, and nine days on pond chemistry surveys. In addition, ten man days vcr* 
spent at fisheries meetings and 17 man days were used for building maintenance 
Three man day3 were spent checking fish kills and pollution. The remaining 
time was spent on repairing, painting and maintaining fisheries equipment arc 
tank trucks. 

Western District personnel stocked 208,960 brook, brown and rainbow trout 
during this fiscal period. In addition to the trout, 22,200 kokanee salmcn fr 
ware released into the waters of Onota Lake in Pittsfield. 



-30- 



Fiscal Year 1976-1977 



This year, again, the District Manager and staff pursued traditionc.l man- 
agement and community relations activities. Census routes were the same as 
those run during 1975-1976. Thirty-one acres were added to the Fisk Meadow 
Wildlife Management Area, 127 were added to the Housatonic River Wildlife Man- 
agement Area and Stafford Rill Wildlife Management Area, Cheshire, 110 acres. 
In addition to these tracts new lands were acquired as follows: Hinsdale 
Flats Wildlife Management Area, Hinsdale, 450 acres; Moran Wildlife Management 
Area, Windsor, 800 acres. 

Regular maintenance of boundary markers continued including further marking 
of the Forbush Sanctuary where District staff also erected large signs and 
brushed a small area. During the year, the District Manager and/or his duly 
appointed representatives judged conservation exhibits at the annual 4-E con- 
vention; presented lectures and slide talks to groups at Berkshire Regional 
Community College, Central Berkshire School District, Lions, Rotary and church 
groups; attended 15 to 20 sportsmen's club meetings and another 15 meetings of 
the county leagues of Berkshire, Hampshire and Hampden Counties; continued 
participation in natural resource inventories for Berkshire, Hampden, Hampshire 
Conservation Districts; served as co-chairman of National Hunting and Fishing 
Day program for the area, continuing the same projects detailed for the 1975- 
1976 period; continued maintenance of the display of Division activities at 
the Mount Greylock Visitor's Center. 

During this period, District personnel stocked 4,381 cock pheasants and 459 
hen pheasants. White hare were not available from the usual source and thus 
were not stocked during 1976-1977. 

Fisheries personnel stocked 216,263 legal-size trout. In addition, 15,500 
kokanee salmon fingerlings were released Into the waters of Onota Lake, Pitts- 
tield, and Laurel Lake, Lee. Sixteen man days were spent on the kokanee salmcr- 
program, nine days on stream surveys and 12 days on trout pond surveys. 
District personnel also spent 17 days on warmwater pond surveys, three days on 
fisheries seminars, 15 days at the Springfield Exposition, Soil Conservation 
bervice and Berkshire Museum meetings . 

An additional 30 man days were spent for building, remodeling and material 
salvage of properties owned by the Division. 



-31- 



CONNECTICUT VALLEY WILDLIFE DISTRICT 

Herman Covey 
District Wildlife Manager 



Fiscal Year 1975-1976 

The Connecticut Valley Wildlife District covers 49 towns on both sides of 
the Connecticut River from the Vermont-New Hampshire borders to the Connecticut 
state line. There are three counties in this region and the District takes 
parts of all three, with the remaining towns covered by the Western District. 
Valley District towns are: Franklin County, 19; Hampshire County, 13; and 
Hampden County, 17, totaling 49 towns. The region is blessed with trout streams, 
lakes, ponds, and many scenic highways. The countryside has the rich farmland 
of the River Valley and the rolling hills and mountains around it. There are 
three trout hatcheries and one game farm located within the District. 

During the fiscal year, personnel from the Connecticut Valley District were 
involved in a variety of activities related to research on selected species of 
fish and wildlife and activities aimed at fish and wildlife propagation. 

In the course of maintaining and improving fisheries in the District, 
fisheries biologists assisted Quabbin-based research efforts with equipment and 
manpower; conducted a creel census to determine pressure on the trout fishery; 
assisted in the northern pike project at Brimfield Reservoir; assisted in the 
Connecticut River Shad Study by transporting alewives from Holyoke to Turners 
Falls; and conducted a creel census on the Connecticut River to determine pres- 
sure on the warmwater fisheries. Also, District personnel stocked streams and 
ponds in the Valley District with 183,050 trout and continued routine field and 
maintenance operations. 

Wildlife biologists assisted the duck project with manpower and equipment; 
trapped and removed problem ducks and geese; continued work on the wood duck 
nesting box program; screened and obtained military surplus equipment; main- 
tained signs, bar ways and gates on wildlife management areas; limed and 
fertilized the Swift River Wildlife Management Area; operated deer checking 
u cations in Belchertown and Williamsburg' recorded and tagged pelts of fur- 
bearers; dealt with 44 complaints about nuisance beaver; stocked 10,324 pheas- 
ants and 140 hare and handled 11 complaints concerning nuisance skunks and rac- 
coons . 

Fiscal Year 1976-1977 

During Fiscal 1977, personnel from the Connecticut Valley Wildlife District 
continued their activities in cold and warmwater fishery management, wildlife 
development, waterfowl and gane research, assorted game-related activities and 
participated in a variety of public information activities. 

Fisheries personnel stocked 193,000 trout in area streams and ponds; 
monitored water chemistry in stocked trout waters; provided District manpower 
and equipment for netting, stocking and other activities involved in the Quabbin 
study; assisted in the creel census and netting associated with the pike study 
and in the studies related to the Connecticut River shad and Atlantic salmon and 
conducted creel census on the Connecticut River. 



-32- 



District wildlife personnel engaged in the following activities: develope 
roads and grounds on wildlife management areas; assisted with manpower, equip- 
ment and materials for continued wood duck field studies; worked with experi- 
mental wood duck box light to deter starling use; trapped and removed problem 
ducks and geese; designed, constructed and installed duck blinds at the Ludlow 
controlled duck hunting area, including night work and weekends with volunteer 
work parties from the Western Massachusetts Duck Hunters Association who provid 
69 man days of labor: continued black duck population study, operated deer check- 
ing stations; recorded and tagged furbearer pelts; stocked 12,564 pheasants and 
51 hare; designed a plan and implemented farmer -cooperator use of Division 
property; trapped and removed or relocated problem beaver; handled nuisance 
animal complaints and continued routine operations and maintenance. 

The District Manager and staff participated in a variety of exhibits and 
educational sessions. Most notable in this area is that staff from the 
Connecticut Valley District built, manned and maintained the Division exhibit at 
the Eastern States Exposition in Springfield and the Sportsmen's Show in Boston. 
In addition, personnel from the District played an active role in the coordina- 
tion of activities for National Hunting and Fishing Day. District staffers con- 
ducted classes on wildlife activity for Holyoke Community College, 4-H groups, 
and taught and hosted the wildlife field trips for youngsters from the Divisiou 
sponsored Massachusetts Junior Conservation Camp. The manager and his staff 
also helped to set up the Northeast Fish and Wildlife Conference which was held 
in Boston. 

In activities not falling into categories already mentioned, District per- 
sonnel provided assistance at the Boston office; distributed licenses, permits 
and stamps to town and city clerks; monitored field trials on Division property; 
inspected and guided field trips for the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service to wet- 
lands developments for environmental impact statements; authored, submitted and 
implemented C.E.T.A. proposals to develop Division installations and attended 
numerous meetings. 



-33- 



CENTRAL WILDLIFE DISTRICT 



Carl S. Prescott 
District Wildlife Manager 



During fiscal years 1976 and 1977, personnel from the Central District 
worked on the development and maintenance of fourteen wildlife management 
areas. Projects undertaken and completed included: routine maintenance of 
one building and 124.5 miles of road (69.3 in 1976 and 55.2 in 1977); one 
bridge was built in 1977 and one parking lot was developed during each year; 
25 signs were Installed (17 in 1976, 8 in 1977) and 1,592 signs were rehabil- 
itated or otherwise maintained (1,392 in 1976, 200 in 1977). Land development 
included planting of 125 trees during 1976 and seeding of herbaceous plants on 
83 acres in 1976 and 39.5 acres in 1977. Timber management was carried out on 
19.25 acres during 1976 and on 130 acres during 1977. A little over four acres 
was cleared (.5 in 1976 and 3.6 in 1977) and vegetation control measures were 
used on 29 acres in 1976 and 21.5 acres in 1977. Nesting structures were 
established and existing structures were checked and repaired where necessary 
requiring District personnel to work on 192 structures in 1976 and 262 in 1977 . 
Additional manpower and time were spent on planning and project administration r 
custodial functions, and repair and maintenance of equipment. 

The following wildlife sanctuaries were inspected and boundary signs 
erected or maintained in FY 1977: Watatic Wildlife Sanctuary (139 acres), 
Minns Wildlife Sanctuary (142 acres) and the Day Mile Tree Sanctuary (13 acre.; 

Furbearers were tagged at beaver check stations during FY 1976 and 1977 
and consisted of 200 beaver in 1976 and 333 in 1977; 29 otters in 1977 and 14 
fisher in 1977. The tagging of otter and fisher in 1976 was not mandatory. 

Twenty-four beaver complaints were handled in FY 1976 and 23 in FY 1977. 

Timber management at Birch Hill Wildlife Management Area resulted in a 
harvest of 9,000 board feet in FY 1976 and 9,000 board feet in FY 1977. 

Game species were stocked on management areas and in open covers by 
District personnel. Pheasants stocked numbered 18,912 in FY 1976 and 19,032 
in FY 1977. Hare released numbered 20 in FY 1976 and 75 in FY 1977. 

Wildlife personnel assisted the Fisheries Section in stocking of streams 
and ponds during FY 1976 and FY 1977. 

Deer check stations were operated in Barre, Templeton and West Boylston 
during the open season in FY 1976 and 1977 and Central District staff assisted 
the Division of Law Enforcement on patrols during the open season on deer dur- 
ing these fiscal periods. 

District personnel also aided researchers working on the turkey project 
during FY 1976 by determining the number of birds present during the winter 
months. 

Fisheries personnel from the Central District attended four workshops re- 
lated to fisheries management. They assisted in projects originating at the 
Westboro Field Headquarters particularly the northern pike project (F-35-R-10; 
at East Brinfield Reservoir. This work involved stocking sublegal pike and 
noting the effects on the resident fish population in East Brinfield Reservoir. 

District fisheries personnel also conducted a survey of selected warm 
water lakes and ponds; an evaluation of cold water ponds; supplied manpower a;.^ 
equipment as well as service and maintenance of equipment. 

-34- 



A preliminary stream survey of Wekepeke Brook (Sterling -Leominster) was 
conducted as part of an overall evaluation of the brook as a trout stream. 
This was done to obtain line data needed to assess the impact of the construc- 
tion of Route 1-190. 

Additional work completed included erecting and maintaining signs at fish- 
ing and boat launch areas; posting Division-owned or leased land; assisting the 
wildlife crew in pheasant stocking and working on deer check stations. 

The Central District was allotted and stocked a total of 421,850 trout in 
selected ponds and streams of the District during the period of 1 July 1975 to 
30 June 1977. 

District personnel constructed or assisted in preparation of exhibits for 
two Boston Sportsmen's Shows and two Eastern States Exposition exhibits. In 
addition, the District set up and manned one exhibit for the 1975 National 
Hunting and Fishing Day at the Searstown Mall. The District Manager was on 
the 1977 Northeast Fish and Wildlife Conference committee. 

One major District news release regarding year-round fishing was released 
in 1977. Monthly contributions were made to Massachusetts Out-Of -Doors through 
the reporter covering the Central District. Numerous other news contributions 
were made when called upon. District personnel also participated in five radio 
shows. Four tour-lectures were given on state lands; two to 4-H groups, one 
to the University of Massachusetts students and one to the Tahanto Regional 
High School environmental class. Nineteen speaking engagements at sportsmen's 
clubs were accepted, including four seminars on various Division programs. 

Personnel attended 59 meetings which ranged from county leagues and sports- 
men's clubs to selectmen's, conservation commissions, and Tri-County Conserva- 
tion District meetings. Eighteen of these meetings concerned the construction 
of Route 1-190 and its impact on wetlands, ponds and streams. Significant road 
alignment changes were made as a result of this District's direct involvement 
and assistance rendered to the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 

Eleven five-year cooperative agreements on six different management areas 
were developed during the past two years. 

The District solicited aid from the Gardner Consortium of C.E.T.A. and 
secured ten participants in 1976. Six worked at the Ayer State Game Farm, four 
at Birch Hill. In 1977, the District assisted in securing eight participants 
for Ayer and eight for the Sandwich State Game Farm. In addition, the District 
had twelve N.Y.C. helpers in 1976 and fifteen in 1977. These people worked at 
the Wilbraham State Game Farm, Sandwich State Game Farm and the Westboro Beagle 
Area. 

Through the Fish and Wildlife Service, the District screened and froze 
military surplus equipment. Major items obtained through the program included 
a D3 bulldozer, six pickup trucks, one tractor, bandsaw, disc sander, two type- 
writers, adding machine, light table, drafting table, power hacksaw and other 
shop equipment. 

Preliminary meetings were held with the Nashua River Watershed Association 
and Nature Conservancy concerning the acquisition of 480 acres of agricultural 
land along the Nashua River. 



-35- 



Two new deer check stations were established, one on Route 2 and the other 
on the Massachusetts Turnpike. 

In addition, District personnel undertook two winter deer census flights 
and spent considerable time surveying winter range conditions. 

The District provided recommendations and assistance on land management 
to seven organisations. 



-36- 



NORTHEAST WILDLIFE DISTRICT 



Walter L. Hoyt 
District Wildlife Manager 

Fiscal Year 1975-1976 

Fiscal 1976 found Northeast District personnel heavily involved with both 
management and communication activities. During the course of the year, the 
manager or his designated representative attended 46 meetings: 26 county league 
meetings, 10 sportsmen's club meetings, and the remainder with other public and 
private groups. District personnel participated in the New England Sportsmen's 
Show, National Hunting and Fishing Day activities, the Topsfield Fair, the Essex 
Agricultural Fair, gatherings of the United Fly Tyers and fishing derbies 
sponsored by Bass Masters. 

Responding to public requests, the District granted 480 camping permits, 
primarily to Scouts, at the Squannacook Wildlife Management Area, and partici- 
pated in Acton High School's career guidance program. On a Federal level, 
District staff membeis cooperated with the U. S. Soil Conservation Service in de- 
veloping "team plans" for towns, and with the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 
executing various river basin studies. To serve the press, the District issued 
45 press releases, primarily dealing with fish stocking . 

In addition to these activities, District personnel continued to pursue 
traditional management operations. Among these were release of 7,000 pheasants 
and 154 white hare; conducting a woodcock census route; and assisting in natural 
resource inventories of designated towns and cities. During this period, 
District personnel posted sanctuary signs for Egg Rock, Milk Island, Carr Island, 
? n Island, and Boxford, painted a house at the Bill Forward Wildlife Management 
Area and arranged farmer-cooperative agreements there, and conducted a Cut-a- 
Cord program on the Northeast Wildlife Management Area. Staffers trapped and 
moved 14 nuisance beavers and tagged 53 beaver pelts, maintained 400 wood duck 
casting boxes and held back vegetation by applying herbicides to water chestnut 
growth in the Suasco drainage system. 

Two special pheasant hunts were conducted in the Northeast District, a 
special youth hunt which drew 15 participants and the first "controlled" pheas- 
ant hunt held in the Commonwealth. 

Fisheries activities involved the stocking of 220,000 trout in District 
ponds and streams, survey of potential trout waters, pH tests of trout waters, 
and maintenance and management of the Harold Parker bass system. Fisheries 
personnel continued their shad survey on the Merrimack River, general survey of 
six ponds and provided maintenance, for fish ladders on the Merrimack River at 
Lowell and Lawrence. 

Roads and signs were maintained at the Squannacook and Nissitissit Wildlife 
Management Areas; access and launching sites were maintained at the Delaney 
Wildlife Management Area, Baddacook Pond, Knops Pond, Mascopic Lake and Flint 
Pond. The Squannacook area itself was dedicated to the memory of Peter Bertozzi. 



-37- 



Fiscal Year 1976-1977 



During this year, the District continued work in its traditional areas and 
expanded its efforts in land acquisition and public services. In the course of 
the year, the District Manager or his designated representatives attended 47 
meetings— 30 meetings of county leagues, six of sportsmen's clubs, and 11 of as- 
sorted other organizations. The District Manager issued 120 press releases of 
which over 100 pertained to fish stocking activities. In addition, the Distric'. 
was called upon by the news media on at least 50 occasions including one by a 
radio station. Other public contacts during thi3 period included participation 
in two fishing derbies, National Hunting and Fishing Day, and five fairs or 
exhibits — New England Sportsmen's Show, Lowell Fly Tyers, Topsfield Agricultural 
Fair, Essex Agricultural Fair and Northeastern Sportsmen's Show. 

The District issued 298 target permits for the Northeast Wildlife Management 
Area and 434 camping permits for the Northeast and other management areas. Four 
hundred twenty of these permits were issued to Scout or school groups. The re- 
maining permits were issued to private individuals. Personnel from the District 
office participated in txtfo high school career days and provided numerous (but 
untabulated) instances of wildlife services, among them nuisance animal control, 
weed control and pond management. 

During the course of the year, there were a number of capital improvements 
at the District headquarters and on Division lands which were not completed dur- 
ing the fiscal year. The headquarters was re-roofed and painted. Considerable 
work was done on planning a dam for the Pantry Brook area, a road and bridge at 
Kent's Island and a new septic system for the headquarters. 

In line with the District's traditional activities, personnel were involved 
with the following: 

In the area of realty, District personnel initiated the purchase of 235 
acres in Rowley, three tracts with a combined area of 45 acres in Newbury, and 
three tracts with a total of 49 acres in Pepperell. 

Wildlife activities included the distribution of 6,456 pheasants and 12 
white hare. The controlled pheasant hunt on the Delaney Wildlife Management 
Area, Initiated in 1975-1975, was continued. As in the previous year, District 
personnel conducted a woodcock census and continued to assist the U. S. Soil 
Conservation Service in its inventory of natural resources of selected towns and 
cities. District personnel also dealt with furbearers, tagging pelts of beaver, 
otter and fisher in addition to live trapping and moving ten nuisance beaver. 

As part of their fisheries activities, District staffers tested designated 
trout streams and ponds for acidity and surveyed an additional 30 ponds under 
consideration for future stocking. Special surveys were inaugurated at the 
Burlington reservoir and at the upper and lower reservoirs in Saugus. Trout were 
stocked as in previous years and a general resurvey of trout waters was begun. 



-38- 



SOUTHEAST WILDLIFE DISTRICT 



Louis Hambly 
District Wildlife Manager 



Fiscal Year 1975-1976 

During 1975-1976, the staff of the Southeast Wildlife District continued 
traditional management and habitat improvement programs and gathered data for a 
variety of research projects. Included among the District's fishery activities 
were: conducting an analysis of water chemistry in selected trout ponds to deter- 
mine their potential for supporting trout populations; performing periodic pH 
checks on ponds and streams within the district; reclamation of Riggins Pond in 
Brewster and Hathaway Pond in Barnstable. This was coordinated with construction 
and installation of egg trays and floating hatch racks aimed at establishing a vi- 
able smelt population in the two ponds. In connection with the reclamation, 
District personnel undertook a program of biological sampling and creel census of 
fishermen at Higgins and Hathaway. In addition, Southeast District personnel 
assisted biologists from the Westboro office in their Investigations of Great 
Herring Pond. They participated in a general survey of the pond, carried out a 
creel census and built and installed artificial reefs made from discarded tires. 
During this period, the District initiated a survey of fish species in the 
Taunton River Drainage System — a project which continued through the end of 1976. 

llaintenance efforts were concentrated on the Rochester rearing system, public 
access sites and on signs throughout the district. 

Wildlife activities carried on within the district included the following: 
preparation and planting of 25 acres of annual grains and 38 acres of herbaceous 
cover; planting of trees and shrubs at three wildlife management areas; top 
dressing of 41 acres of perennial herbaceous cover, cutting and limiting trees 
and brush where needed. Areas so treated include 21 acres cut and 57 acres 
treated with herbicides at the Freetown Wildlife Management Area; 7^ acres cut 
over at the Crane Wildlife Management Area. Roads, trails, gates and fences re- 
quired maintenance at four wildlife management areas and parking areas were 
maintained at three. In addition. District personnel constructed and erected 
signs for six management areas, conducted hunter checks at three areas and con- 
tinued maintenance on two buildings on the Crane area. The Crane area was set up 
for field trials, group camping and horse shows. Planning efforts were concen- 
trated at West Meadows Wildlife Management Area where the dam was adjusted and 
projects were planned and laid out for incoming Y.C.C. workers, and at Freetown 
Wildlife Management Area where a wildlife management plan was devised. 

District personnel also participated in wildlife research projects capturing 
and banding 551 black ducks and mallards wintering along the coastline as well 
as banding other waterfowl and doves and maintaining and checking wood duck nest- 
ing boxes. 

During this period, personnel in the area stocked 12,015 pheasants, 3,100 
quail and 63 hare. 

In addition to these activities, the staff operated two biological and ten 
regular deer checking stations, investigated five beaver complaints, conducted 
-«?o woodcock census routes and 12 quail census routes, and investigated three 
deer damage complaints. They assisted in land acquisition and assisted landowners 
in dealing with bird and mammal problems, provided technical assistance to 
^ortsmen's groups, Conservation Commissions, planning groups and other organise - 
tions and individuals. The staff provided programs for school, Scout and other 
non-prof essional groups and participated, often as host, in 43 meetings. 



Fiscal Year 1976-1977 



Most of the activities carried out during this fiscal year were continuatii. & 
of projects undertaken during 1975-1976. Fisheries activities included continua- 
tion of water chemistry checks on trout ponds and pH checks on stocked waters, 
collection and stocking of smelt eggs in Higgins and Hathaway Ponds and modifica 
wion of the hatching racks in those ponds. Once again, biological survey and 
creel census were conducted on these ponds as well as Great Herring Pond; access 
sites and signs were maintained and the water control structure at the Rochester 
rearing system was rebuilt. Smallmouth bass were salvaged from Watuppa Pond and 
stocked into Peters Pond in Sandwich and Ashumet Pond in Falmouth. 

Wildlife activities on the management areas included preparation and planting 
of 5.5 acres of winter rye, 4 acres of herbaceous cover and a variety of shrubs 
and trees. Twenty-six acres of fields were mowed to control growth, 26 acres at 
Crane Wildlife Management Area were cut, and herbicide was applied on 23 acres at 
the Freetown Wildlife Management Area. Roads, trails, parking lots, gates and 
fences were maintained and signs were constructed and erected at six areas. 
District personnel continued the program of hunter checks and continued to improve 
facilities at the Crane area by pouring a concrete floor and installing electricit 
in the storage building. As in the previous year, the Crane area was prepared 
for special interest groups including campers, field trial groups and horse show 
participants. Management plans were developed for the Rocky Gutter Wildlife Man- 
agement Area and projects were laid out for Y.C.C. workers at West Meadows. 

Personnel continued their involvement in research projects capturing and 
banding 1,674 black ducks and mallards wintering along the coastline, constructing 
and checking wood duck nesting boxes, banding doves and running three woodcock 
census routes. 

Stocking for the district included release of 12,161 pheasants (11,318 cocks 
and 843 hens), 2,880 quail and 30 white hare. 

In addition, the staff continued to operate two biological and eleven regular 
deer checking stations. Two beaver complaints were investigated and box traps 
and advice were provided individuals reporting problems with other mammals cr 
birds. Division personnel provided technical assistance to sportsmen's clubs, 
Conservation Commissions and a variety of other organizations, participated in 
fish stocking and salvage, continued routine maintenance of equipment and 
participated in a total of 47 meetings. 



-40- 



LEGISLATION ENACTED DURING FISCAL YEAR 1976 



Chapter 493, Acts of 1975 : An act relative to the appraisal of damages 
caused by deer. Approved 15 July 1975. 

Chapter 499, Acts of 1975 : An act authorizing the Division of Fisheries 
and Game to grant certain easements to the Town of Falmouth. 
Approved 15 July 1975. 

Chapter 706 , Acts of 1975 : An act relative to the Executive Office of 
Environmental Affairs. Approved 25 November 1975. 

Chapter 811, Acts of 1975 : An act authorizing the Director of Fisheries 
and Wildlife to grant to the Town of Spencer an easement 
for purposes of water standpipe and water line installa- 
tions. Approved 22 December 1975. 

Chapter 115, Acts of 1976 : An act providing for the reimbursement of 
certain farmers for damage caused by deer or moose. 
Approved 20 May 1976. 

Chapter 178, Acts of 1976 : An act allowing certain non-residents of the 
Commonwealth to be issued complimentary hunting and fish- 
ing licenses. Approved 18 June 1976. 

Chapter 8, Resolves of 1976 : Providing for an investigation and study 
by the Secretary of Environmental Affairs relative to the feasi- 
bility of allowing fishing through the ice, under a controlled 
program, at the Wachusett Reservoir. Approved 1 June 1976. 



LEGISLATION ENACTED DURING FISCAL YEAR 1977 



Chapter 381, Acts of 1976 : An act relative to the payment of fees for 
antlerless deer permits. Approved 4 October 1976. 



-41- 



PERSONNEL 



Personnel changes during 1976 and 1977 include: 
Retirements 

Lawrence Bonney, Assistant Game Culturist, retired 1 August 1975 
after 27 years of service. 

James M. Shepard, Director, retired 31 August 1975 after 25 years 
of service. 

Madeline Ellis, Senior Clerk, retired 30 September 1975, after 28 
year3 of service. 

Stanley Jajuga, Skilled Conservation Helper, retired 28 July 1976 
after 25 years of service. 

Colton H. Bridges, Director, retired 13 November 1976 after 21 
years of service. 

Eleanor Kane, Senior Clerk, retired 7 'larch 1977 after 28 years 
of service. 

Others who left Division employment include: 

Jordan Bourgault, October 1975 
Ann Frances Cogavin, July 1975 
Ronald J. Kazlauskas, January 1976 
Hark C. Smith, April 1976 
Allan Thompson, January 1976 
Hilda Bevis, October 1976 
George Boudreau, October 1976 
Patricia Filleti, September 1976 
Benjamin Hogdon, August 1976 
Susan McNeil, July 1976 
Kenneth Norcross, June 1977 
Thomas O'Connor, September 1976 
Frank Zoly, July 1976 
Arthur Neill, October 1976 
Allan Falls, July 1976 
Edward F. Williams, January 1976 



Joining the Division were: 

Matthew B. Connolly, Jr., Director, December 1976 

Michael Brazauskas, Conservation Helper, May 1976 

John Clancy, Journalist, April 1976 

Richard Keller, Conservation Helper, May 1976 

Earl LaBonte, Conservation Helper, May 1976 

Marcia Walker, Conservation Helper, May 1976 

Raymond Wheeler, Skilled Conservation Helper, May 1976 

Gary Galas, Conservation Helper April 1977 

Philip Breen, Conservation Helper, Auguot 1976 

Arthur Duffy, Senior Clerk, August 1976 



_ 



-42- 



Diane Ferragamo, Junior Clerk, July 1976 
Michael Fillion, Conservation Helper, August 1976 
Linda Sacco, Junior Clerk, September 1976 
Martin Wrubel, Conservation Helper, August 1976 
Elizabeth Sienczyk, Senior Clerk, December 1976 
Louis Hambly, Jr., District Manager, January 1977 
John Hendee, Jr., Pish Culturiat, January 1977 
Ellie Horv7itz, Information-Education Chief, May 1977 
Arthur Leonard, Conservation Helper, May 1977 



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-46- 



SUMMARY OF FISH AND WILDLIFE INCOME 
July 1, 1975 to June 30, 1976 



Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses 


3304-61-01-40 


$2,568,416.23* 


Trap Registrations 


3304-61-01-40 


$ 


978.5-* 


Archery Stamps 


3304-61-01-40 


$ 


37,012.40* 


Special Licenses, Tags and Posters 




$ 


10,221.75* 


waterfowl Stamps 


3304-40-01-40 


$ 


5,978.50* 


Waterfowl Stamps — Ducks Unlimited 


3304-40-02-40 


$ 


22,444.00* 


Antlerless Deer Permits 


3304-61-14-40 


$ 


15,690.60 


Sear Permits 


3304-61-14-40 


$ 


240.00 


P.ents 


3304-63-01-40 


$ 


3,272.25 


Ml scellaneous Income 


3304-69-99-40 


$ 


725. s; 


Sales, Other 


3304-64-01-40 


$ 


5,053.75 


Refunds Prior Year 


3304-69-01-40 


$ 


1,300.41 


Court Fines and Penalties 


3303-41-01-40 


$ 


10,293.00 


Pittman-Robertson Federal Aid 


3304-67-01-40 


$ 


214,332.76 


ringell- Johnson Federal Aid 


3304-67-02-40 


$ 


203,647.7: 


Ariadromous Fish Projects Federal Aid 


3304-67-04-40 


$ 


43, 474. r- 


Mass • Mourning Dove & Woodcock Reimbursement 


3304-67-05-40 






Indirect Cost Reimbursement 


3304-67-67-40 


$ 


90,007.12 


Acquisition Projects Reimbursement 


3304-67-10-40 


$ 


104,330.6 


'•Jater Pollution Control Reimbursement of Services 


3304-62-01-40 


$ 


38,428.55 


Interest on Investments 


3395-60-01-40 


$ 


28,877.8': 






$3 


414,731.',/. 



*See Detail Sheet No. 1 
* ; *See Detail Sheet No. 2 



OTHER INCOME -INLAND FISHERIES AND GAME FUND 
Gasoline Tax Apportionment: $ 294,774.60 

Surplus in Inland Fish and Game Fund as of June 30, 1976 $1, 783, 29« . 37 







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Detail Sheet No. 2 



SPECIAL LICENSES, TAGS AND POSTERS 
Fiscal Year July 1, 1975 to June 30, 1976 



Ouantity 



Receipt 


Acct. 


Type of License 


& Unit 


Price 


Amour. ' 


3304- 


-61- 


■02- 


-40 


Fur Buyers 


















Resident Citizen 


24 




15.00 


360.00 










Non-Resident or Alien 


6 




50.00 


300. 0C 


3304- 


-61- 


•03- 


-40 


Taxidermists 


114 


@ 


10.00 


1,140.00 


3304- 


-61- 


■04- 


-40 


Propagators 
















Special Purpose Permits 


121 


(3 


1.00 


121.00 










Class 1 (fish) 


















Initial 


13 


<? 


7.50 


97.50 










Renewal 


147 





5.00 


735.00 










Class 3 (Fish) 


















Initial 


3 


@ 


7.50 


22.50 










Renewal 


70 


@ 


5.00 


350.00 










Class 4 (Birds & Mammals) 


















Initial 


132 




7.50 


990.00 










Renewal 


415 


(5 


5.00 


2,075.00 










Class 6 (Dealers) 
















Initial 


4 


@ 


7.50 


30.00 










Renewal 


51 




5.00 


255.00 










Additional 


274 


@ 


1.50 


411.00 










Class 7 (Individual Bird or Mammal) 


















Initial 


21 


(3 


3.00 


63 .00 










Renewal 


43 


(3 


1 00 


48 .00 










Importation Permits 


62 


@ 


5 00 


310.00 










Class 9 


















Falconry (Master) 


2 


(3 

VT 


25.00 


50 . 00 










Falconry (Apprentice) 


1 1 


(3 


25 00 

■ — / » 


275 .CO 










Class 10 (Raptor Breeding & Salvapp) 


2 


Q 


25.00 


SO ,00 










Take Shiners* 


19 




5.00 


95.00'« 


3304- 


-61- 


•05- 


-40 


Take Shiners 


121 


@ 


5.00 


605.00 


3304- 


-61- 


•06- 


-40 


Field Trial Licenses 


4 





15.00 


60. 0C 


3304- 


-61- 


•07- 


-40 


Taking of Carps & Suckers for Sale 










3304- 


-61- 


•08- 


-40 


Quail for Training Dogs 


















Initial 


15 


(3 


7.50 


112.50 










R.enewal 


36 


<§ 


5.00 


130.00 


3304 


-61- 


■10- 


-40 


Commercial Shooting Preserves 


10 


Q 


50.00 


500.00 


3304 


-61- 


■11- 


-40 


Trapping of Certain Birds 










3304 


-61- 


•12 


-40 


Mounting Permits 


7 


(3 


2.00 


14.00 


3304 


-61- 


■13 


-40 


Special Field Trial Permits 


39 


(3 


15.00 


535.00 


3304 


-64- 


-01 


-40 


Game Tags 


4,945 


@ 


.05 


247.25 










Fish Tags 


7,400 @ 


.01 


74.00 










Commercial Shooting Preserve tags & 


1,320 


(? 


.05 


66.00 










posters 


























10,221.75 


3304 


-61- 


-01 


-40 


Trap Registrations 


















Initial 


204 


@ 


2.00 


408. 0C 










Renewal 


375 


(3 


1.50 


562.50 










Duplicates 


3 




1.00 


8.0C 



978.5s 



"Inadvertently these licenses were deposited under Propagators' 
Receipt Account (#3304-61-04-40) ; should have been deposited 
index Licence!? to Take Shiners' Rec Account (#3304-61-05-40). 





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CO 



SUMMARY OF FISH AND WILDLIFE INCOME 
1 July 1976 to 30 June 1977 

I'iohing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses* 3304-61-01-40 $2,336,222.00 

Trap Registrations** 3304-61-01-40 $ 956. 0i 

Archery Stamps* 3304-61-01-40 $ 36,315.6^ 

Special Licenses, Tags and Posters** $ 9,952.75 

Waterfowl Stamps* 3304-40-01-40 $ 5,531.75 

Waterfowl Stamps - Ducks Unlimited* 3304-40-02-40 $ 20,108.00 

Antler less Deer Permits 3304-61-14-40 $ 15,023.78 

Bear Permits 3304-61-14-40 $ 239.50 

Rents 3304-63-01-40 $ 11,598.00 

Miscellaneous Income 3304-69-99-40 $ 1,088.32 

Sales, Other 3304-64-01-40 $ 16,895.25 

Refunds Prior Year 3304-69-01-40 $ 34.14 

Court Fines and Penalties 3304-41-01-40 $ 200.00 

Court Fines and Penalties 3308-41-01-40 $ 14,971.00 

Pittman-Robertson Federal Aid 3304-67-01-40 $ 232,982.05 

Dingell-Johnson Federal Aid 3304-67-02-40 $ 101,877.60 

Anadromous Fish Projects Federal Aid 3304-67-04-40 $ 1,426.85 

Indirect Cost Reimbursement 3304-67-67-40 $ 41,246.94 

Water Pollution Control - Reimbursement 3304-62-01-40 $ 43,004.05 
for Services 

Interest on Investments 3395-60-01-40 $ 54,789.5? 

Gasoline Tax Apportionment 3312-05-01-40 $ 305,339.21 

$3,249,802.36 

Surplus in Inland Fish and Game Fund as of 30 June 1977 $ 694,000.00 



*.0etail Sheet No. 1 
**D<?tail Sheet No. 2 



-53- 



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-5A- 



Detail Shast No, 2 



SPECIAL LICENSES, TAGS AID POSTERS 
Fiscal Year 1976-1977 

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-55- 



MASSACHUSETTS DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE 




TABLE 



The Board Reports 

Planning 

Fisheries 

Fish Hatcheries 

Wildlife 

Game Farms 

Ornithologist's Report 
District Reports 

Western District 

Connecticut Valley District 

Central District 

Northeast District 

Southeast District 
Information and Education 
Realty 
Engineering 
Organizational Chart 
Personnel 
Legislation 
Financial Report 



C73r 

c. I 
CONTENTS 

Page 
1 
A 
5 
8 
11 
18 
20 

25 
28 
31 
33 
35 
37 
AO 
A3 
AA 
A5 
A6 
A8 



Publication #1 1 ,2a.8-l48-12£-3-79-CR 

Approved by Alfred C. Holland, State Purchasing Agent. 



THE BOARD REPORTS 



Bradlee C. Gage, Chairman 

Kenneth Burns , Secretary 

Martin Burns 

Donald Coughlin 

George Darey 

James Baird 

Philip Stanton 



As required by law, the Administrative Board of the Division of 
Fisheries and Wildlife met monthly throughout the year, except during 
February. That meeting was cancelled because of the blizzard. 
Fiscal 78 marked the first full year of administration by the Division's 
new director, Matthew B. Connolly, Jr. Division morale is high and, in 
the Board's opinion, the Division is filling its role as the manager of 
the Commonwealth's fisheries and wildlife resources in an exemplary 
manner. 

New Board Members 

There were two changes in Board personnel during Fiscal 78. George 
Darey from Berkshire County and Don Coughlin from Barnstable County re- 
placed Henry Russell and Roger Williams as appointees on the Board. Both 
Henry Russell and Roger Williams have served the Commonwealth and the 
sportsmen well and will be missed. However, the new members are ably 
qualified and are welcome additions. It is particularly gratifying once 
again to have a Board member from Berkshire County which is a key hunting 
and fishing area. 

Board Concerns 

Besides its usual review of Division activities and hearings, the 
Board devoted some time to three specific areas: (1) concern with current 
salary levels of its professional staff in comparison to Federal and 
neighboring state salary levels; (2) concern over the status of Division 
equipment; and (3) non-game management. 

While the Board recognizes its limitations as far as being able to 
increase salary levels within the Division, it is concerned that current 
salary levels are falling behind. While money is not always the key or 
deciding factor in keeping professionals within the Division, it is an 
important factor. The Board has always taken a great deal of satisfac- 
tion in the high qualifications and professionalism of the technicians 
within the Division and is distressed when salary levels are not competi- 
tive with similar Federal positions or with neighboring states. 

The Board certainly recognizes the fiscal restraints necessary with- 
in the state, yet it is very concerned with the deteriorating quality of 
Division equipment — from cars to chain saws to boats. To do its job 
adequately, the Division needs good working equipment and the Board sup- 
ports fully the efforts of the Director to include new equipment as a 
priority budget item. 



2 



The Board is concerned over the long run as to how the Division 
will be involved in non-game management work. Over the past several 
decades, by legislative action, the Division has been deeply involved 
with many areas of non-game management — work it has done willingly and 
well. However, as the concern in non-game management increases, 
particularly at the Federal level, it appears that the Division will 
become more formally involved. The Board feels Division involvement 
in non-game management should become a legitimate Division function 
rather than being done outside the Division by Federal efforts or by 
another state agency. The Board, however, recognizes differences in 
philosophies and the practical aspects which complicate development of 
legislation acceptable to all parties. 

Hearings 

The Board conducted several hearings on proposed regulatory changes 
during Fiscal 78. In waterfowl hearings, the split season concept was 
continued and a season similar to that of the previous year was adopted. 
The Board recognizes that an ideal compromise between the coastal gunner 
and the inland waterfowl hunter is still not possible under current 
Federal guidelines. 

In dealing with squirrel regulations, the Board established a new 
concept in statewide regulations, looking at the state from the point of 
view of zones, recognizing that the urban eastern part of the state 
might well require different regulations than the rural western section. 

Division Activities 

In its role as "overseer" of Division activities the Board, in 
conjunction with the Director and his staff, monitored aspects of Divi- 
sion work at its monthly board meetings. Besides considering normal 
Division activities, the Board followed up its monitoring of monies 
spent in Canada on projects funded by the Massachusetts waterfowl 
stamp, explored long-range planning as to possible changes in the 
MASSACHUSETTS WILDLIFE publication, kept abreast of the anadromous fish 
restoration efforts in the Merrimack and Connecticut Rivers, explored 
the CETA and YACC programs starting in the Division, and followed 
closely the Northeast Regional Firearms Educational Marksmanship Center 
at Otis Air Force Base on Cape Cod. 

Land Acquisition 

A strong program of land acquisition continued, backed enthusiasti- 
cally by the sportsmen, the Director and his staff, and the Board. The 
Board continued to meet on almost a monthly basis with Floyd Richardson, 
Chief of Wildlife Lands, to review land acquisition efforts and to for- 
mally move to expend Division monies for specific tracts of land. 

While the Board remains committed to land acquisition, it recog- 
nizes that dwindling funds in the future may force cutbacks from the 
present level of expenditures. However, the Board's objective remains 
to ensure that the equivalent of one dollar per license is earmarked 
for land investment. 



3 



In summary, the Division continues its strong position, fulfilling 
its role as manager of the Commonwealth's fisheries and wildlife re- 
sources. The Board appreciates the continued efforts of the sportsmen, 
the legislature, and other state agencies in its efforts to move ahead. 



_ 



PLANNING 



Paul S. Mugford 
Senior Land Use Planner 



The Division's commitment to a full-fledged and continuous planning 
effort, initiated in 1975 with the appointment of a planner to the staff, 
was intensified by the addition, in August 1977, of two more planners. 
The appointments of the two assistant planners, John J. Jonasch and 
Thomas J. Early, created a three-man team and led to the institution of 
the first fully comprehensive agency planning program. Experienced 
planning specialists from the United States Fish and Wildlife Service 
are assisting the Division in developing comprehensive planning and ap- 
propriate Division expenditures which qualify for reimbursement under 
the federal aid to fish and wildlife programs. 

Comprehensive fish and wildlife planning can function to assist 
state wildlife agencies in improving management and decision-making 
processes. It is a system for more effective management of fish and 
wildlife resources involving all fish and wildlife activities in partic- 
ular and all activities which have an impact on natural resources in 
general. The key elements are (1) it focuses on output and benefits 
rather than input and activities and sets measurable objectives; (2) 
it is geared toward decentralization and thus involves key people at all 
levels; and (3) it evaluates alternative agency actions and selects 
those that are more cost effective. 

Following formal acceptance of the Division's comprehensive plan- 
ning proposal by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, an Over- 
view Committee was established within the Division to guide and monitor 
the planning effort. The Overview Committee is comprised of the Director 
and all senior staff members including District Wildlife Managers. 

During the fiscal year, planners and other Division personnel began 
to develop a strategic fish and wildlife plan involving (1) a complete 
review of all fish and wildlife statutes, rules and regulations to re- 
define and confirm agency authority and responsibility; (2) the develop- 
ment of an updated statement of the agency's goal; (3) the identifi- 
cation of the animal species or habitat types that will be the focus for 
developing measurable program output (benefits); (4) the use of field, 
telephone and mail surveys for the purpose of assessing current and fu- 
ture usage, or use opportunities involving fish and wildlife and (5) the 
identification and assembly of specific resource data to enable fore- 
casting of both supply and utilization of the state's fish and wildlife 
resources . 

The Division's decision to enter into comprehensive planning was not 
made in haste. It was undertaken because of a deep-seated desire to em- 
ploy the best decision-making methods available and to develop the same 
degree of performance in fish and wildlife management that is evident in 
the progressive business community. 




Peter H. Oatis 
Chief Aquatic Biologist 



During Fiscal Year 1978, fisheries programs concentrated on 
evaluating trout management programs, surveying the Westfield River, 
evaluating strains of sea-run brown trout as well as assessing selected 
northern pike and smallmouth bass fisheries. Biologists also initiated 
projects that solicited the aid of volunteer groups such as Trout Un- 
limited and the Bass Anglers Sportsmen's Society in attempting to 
establish a fishery monitoring network. A statewide angler preference 
survey was conducted and the information gathered from it proved very 
helpful in the planning efforts of the fisheries staff. Finally, at 
least 88 Atlantic salmon returned to the Connecticut River, 23 of which 
were captured at the Holyoke fishlift. 

Salmonid Investigations 

Quabbin Reservoir continues to lead the state in salmonid harvest 
and production during 1977. The lake trout catch was the best to date 
with approximately 2,268 fish taken. Good numbers of rainbow trout in 
excess of one and one-half pounds each were also reported from Wachusett 
Reservoir, Lake Mattawa, Lake Onota, Ashumet and Johns Ponds. 

Despite the fact that many were creeled prior to emigrating to local 
estuaries, adult sea-run brown trout captured in Cape Cod coastal streams 
demonstrated excellent growth rates and showed promise of becoming one of 
the state's more valuable salmonid resources. Interest in these fish is 
spreading and local volunteers of the Southeast Chapter of Trout Un- 
limited have donated considerable time and money, under Division guidance, 
toward improving access and cover along more than 1,800 feet of the 
Quashnet River, Falmouth. 



6 



A detailed survey of salmonid habitat in the Westfield River water- 
shed was completed. Results indicate excellent reproduction of both 
brook and brown trout in the tributaries and upper reaches of the main 
branches. However, low flows and fast runoff preclude the establishment 
of larger trout in the lower reaches during the summer months with the 
exceptions of those reaches in the vicinity of cool tributary inflow. 

Creel surveys conducted on the upper Deerfield River indicated that 
there is rapid exploitation of trout during the summer months and that 
trout numbers drop rapidly despite the fact that there is good trout- 
supporting water. 

The fishery will be the subject of a future hearing relative to 
instituting catch-and-release regulations, perhaps for the 1979 fishing 
season. 

Lake Studies 

Considerable time and effort were directed at organizing and train- 
ing volunteers for lake monitoring projects. Primary emphasis was in 
cooperation with the Lake Wyman and Lake Cochituate associations. Al- 
though these groups demonstrate a great deal of enthusiasm in the initial 
stages, many volunteers drop by the wayside when the routine aspects of 
monitoring lose their glamour. Contacts with groups such as Bass Anglers 
Sportsmen's Society show more promise in establishing a fisheries network. 

A new Federally-aided lake survey study is being developed. Biolo- 
gists on this project will monitor 50 lakes across the state per year 
and promulgate fisheries management recommendations based on data ob- 
tained . 

Evaluation of tire reefs in natural ponds lacking adequate bass 
cover indicate that these structures are attracting and are being used 
by many species including bass. Plans are to apply this technique 
wherever it will be beneficial. Projects such as reef building and in- 
stallation offer excellent projects for local residents and angling 
clubs . 

Pike angling, particularly during the winter, continued to attract 
many anglers to the recently-stocked Brimfield Reservoir and Quaboag Pond 
areas. Anglers spent approximately 23,000 hours in 4,500 trips to catch 
55 legal and 322 sub-legal pike at Quaboag Pond alone. Growth rates of 
these pike continue to be among the best in North America with some hav- 
ing attained a weight of 20 pounds in five years. 

Five water supplies closed to angling were surveyed with special 
emphasis placed upon determining bass population statistics. This in- 
formation provides excellent data on the mortality and growth rates of 
unfished populations; data which are vital for future fisheries manage- 
ment . 

The fruits of ten years of concentrated effort and a great deal of 
money began to ripen with the known returns of at least 88 Atlantic 
salmon to the Connecticut River. Of these fish, 23 were captured at the 
Holyoke fishlift, 54 at the Rainbow Dam fishway on the Farmington River 
in Connecticut and 11 others at various locations within the watershed. 



7 



Despite the fact that all but five died prior to spawning, their return 
is certainly cause for excitement. Biologists are looking forward to 
1982 when the first pure strain of Connecticut River salmon are expected 
to return. Approximately 130,000 smolt were released this year, 31,000 
at Holyoke. 

The shad run amounted to 144,700 this season. It is estimated that 
this represents about 35 to 45 percent of the shad population entering 
the river. The creel survey indicates that 4,200 anglers fished 11,250 
hours to creel 3,600 shad. These results are significantly lower than 
last year but it is felt that this is primarily due to the nature of 
spring freshets and temperatures which allowed a short and fast run. 
Much of the access at Turners Falls was eliminated this year because of 
construction on the Cabot Station headgate fishways. 

On the Merrimack fishway, plans are almost complete for the Essex 
Dam; hopefully plans for passage at Lowell will be resolved in the near 
future. Approximately 750 adult shad and 780,000 fertile shad eggs were 
released into the Hooksett pool to document hatching success and nursery 
habitat in the upper river. A total of 25,800 salmon smolts were also 
released just above the Pawtucket Dam at Lowell. These fish are expected 
to return in 1980 and will form a nucleus for Merrimack River brood 
stock. 

Massachusetts Cooperative Fishery Unit 

Studies conducted through the Massachusetts Cooperative Fishery Unit 
under the sponsorship of the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and 
Wildlife are as follows: 

Movement and Interaction Among Three Species of Trout (Rainbow, 
Brown and Brook Trout) in Cushman Brook, Massachusetts by S. E. Malone; 
The Relationship Between Phytoplankton and the Reproduction of Crustacean 
Zooplankton in Nature by 0. R. Sarnelle; and White Sucker Population 
Dynamics in Two Streams in Western Massachusetts by S. P. Quinn. 




David Fredenburgh 
Chief Fish Culturist 



During Fiscal 1978, the hatcheries continued to undergo additional 
physical improvements financed with development monies. 

The Sandwich Hatchery completed construction of a new hatch house 
and associated water supply equipment. A gravel-packed well was re- 
juvenated at the East Sandwich station and a chain-link fence was in- 
stalled at the main station. Several meetings were held in anticipation 
of the proposed coho salmon hatchery to be constructed at East Sandwich. 
This new station is expected to produce coho salmon as well as sea-run 
brown trout. 

The Sunderland Hatchery has undergone changes through the efforts 
of CETA employees assigned to the station. Starting in April, 12 workers 
were employed at Sunderland to complete jobs that otherwise would not be 
done by the normal work force. This includes such jobs as rebuilding 
ponds, cutting trees and brush, and painting which are scheduled to be 
completed by September. 

The CETA program was also utilized at the Montague Hatchery. Four 
workers were assigned to that hatchery to clear brush, rebuild rearing 
ponds and build a storage shed. The Montague Hatchery experienced the 
worst case of vandalism that has occurred at a hatchery in recent his- 
tory. Vandals destroyed about 10,000 yearling rainbow trout by blocking 
up the water supply. Plans are being formulated to prevent such losses 
in the future. 

The McLaughlin Hatchery undertook to make some physical changes by 
the installation of chain-link fencing around the entrance perimeter as 
well as around the display pools. It is hoped that these minor security 
measures will reduce the number of after-hours visitors as well as oc- 
casional poaching. The hatchery experienced severe mortalities due to 
low pH conditions in the water supply coupled with poor quality feed. 
Culturists at the hatchery are presently trying to remedy both condi- 
tions . 



9 



The Palmer Hatchery continues to change toward production of 
Atlantic salmon. During the past year, water purification equipment 
has been purchased and installed and associated pumps, valves and 
pipes have been put in place for operations. It is expected that the 
hatchery will be operational during the fall of 1978. 

Specialized programs such as production of coho and kokanee 
salmon, sea-run brown trout and the culturing of disease-resistant 
species continued to be high priority work at the hatcheries. Develop- 
ment of programs for specialized situations will very likely prove to 
be an important aspect of hatchery operations in the future. 

As in the past, the hatcheries took advantage in utilizing all 
volunteers, individuals and groups to perform hatchery tasks. Other than 
the previously-mentioned CETA group, the hatcheries used volunteers from 
high schools and colleges. Used correctly, this type of assistance can 
be very beneficial. The hatchery section will encourage such programs in 
the future. 





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Chet M. McCord 
Chief of Wildlife Research 



The Wildlife Research Section is charged with the responsibility 
of providing the Division with the information necessary to make sound 
wildlife management decisions. The task is one of monitoring wildlife 
populations as well as the environmental and social factors which in- 
fluence those populations so that the status and trend of the wildlife 
resource can be known. When a wildlife population, for example, gets 
too low or too high, then it is this Section's job to recommend and 
provide supportive information on changes in regulation and management 
and to transmit these recommendations to the Fish and Wildlife Board. 
This year, those recommendations led to the following changes: 

The cottontail season was changed to a zoned season with a main- 
land zone (20 October to 28 February) and a zone for Dukes County and 
Nantucket (15 November to 28 February). Previously, the season ran 
from 20 October to 28 February statewide. The season on the islands 
was changed to correspond with the long-established snowshoe hare 
season . 

The snowshoe hare season was changed to a zoned season with eastern 
and western zones divided by the Connecticut River and a third zone con- 
sisting of Dukes and Nantucket Counties. Hunting in both eastern and 
western zones open 20 October. Closing date in the eastern zone remains 
on the traditional date, 5 February. As the western zone has superior 
hare habitat, the season there was extended to 28 February. The Dukes 
and Nantucket zone season now runs from 15 November to 28 February. 

The jackrabbit season was contradictory in the law and regulation 
so the language was clarified and the season was shortened to compensate 
for the loss of black-tailed jackrabbit habitat. The season opens 
15 November and closes on 31 December and is now limited to Nantucket 
Island . 



The bobcat trapping season was shortened by about 60 days so that 
it now runs from 1 November to 31 December. The bobcat hunting season 
was moved away from deer week to open on 20 December and close on 8 March 
instead of 28 February. These changes were instituted to tighten the 
regulatory controls on the bobcat population in light of rising fur 
prices. A limit for both trapping and hunting seasons was set at 50 with 
a requirement that all pelts must be tagged before being sold. Carcass 
collection was instituted on a voluntary basis. 

The fisher season was shortened to avoid overtrapping this vulner- 
able furbearer. Last year, 60 percent of the harvest was taken during 
the second half of the season. To relieve this pressure, the latter part 
of the season was eliminated. The current season opens 1 November and 
closes 31 December. Carcass collection was continued on a voluntary 
basis . 

Clarification of antler length measurement for deer was necessary 
because there was no standard measurement to determine if a "spike" with 
antlers near the three- inch minimum was legal or illegal. 

The upland game bird season was closed each day at one-half hour 
after sunset except on wildlife management areas to aid Law Enforcement 
personnel in controlling deer poaching. 

Northeast Wildlife Management Area controlled hunt days were identi- 
fied and the area was closed early on days before controlled hunts to al- 
low undisturbed stocking of pheasants. 

Written permission to enter bat caves was required to protect both 
humans and bats at the John F. Kelly Memorial Forest and wildlife manage- 
ment area in the Town of Chester. 

Squirrel season regulations were changed to lengthen the season to 
close 2 January instead of 30 November in the eastern zone and to allow 
the use of rifles in the western zone. The season bag limit was also re- 
moved as the studies showed the expanded season would not damage the re- 
productive capabilities of the squirrel population. 

Research activities of the Section during the fiscal year related 

to: 

Squirrel Season Evaluation 

The object of this study was to evaluate the one-year experimental 
squirrel season in order to determine the feasibility of an extended 
squirrel season for Massachusetts. 

The Massachusetts squirrel season was changed in 1976 from a 
straight season from 20 October to 30 November to an eastern zone with 
the same dates and a western zone opening 13 September and closing 
31 December. Additionally, rifles were banned statewide for squirrel 
hunting. The early western zone season (13 September to 20 October) ac- 
counted for 72 percent of the total hours hunted and 69 percent of the 



total squirrels harvested. The western zone accounted for 87 percent 
of the total hours hunted. Telephone survey data in 1975 showed the 
percentage of squirrel hunters in both the eastern and western zones 
was 22 percent. However, with the new regulations in 1976, the percent- 
age of squirrel hunters in the eastern zone dropped to 16 percent but 
increased in the western zone to 29 percent. Adults, spring juveniles 
and summer juveniles accounted for 56 percent, 25 percent and 19 percent, 
respectively, of the total harvest. Spring juveniles were present during 
the first week of the season. Adult females with enlarged mammary glands 
composed 23 percent, 23 percent, and 22 percent, respectively, of the 
total harvest during the first three weeks of the season and were prac- 
tically absent after the eighth week. Approximately 7 percent of the fe- 
males with enlarged mammary glands were judged to actually be nursing 
young, based on vascular development and external characteristics of the 
mammary glands. The early season appears to have increased hunting with- 
out adversely affecting the reproductive capabilities of the squirrel 
population . 

Deer 

During this fiscal year, the statewide harvest of deer taken during 
the fall of 1977 was 3,107 deer. This was an increase of 395 over the 
1976 harvest of 2,712 and, as such, an indication that the herd is grow- 
ing according to the Division's management objectives. 

There are four separate deer seasons in the state. During the three- 
week archery season (7 to 26 November), archers reported taking 103 males 
and 39 females for a total of 142 deer. This was an increase of 15 over 
the 1976 harvest of 127. The six-day shotgun season (5 to 10 December) 
saw hunters reporting a total of 2,835 deer; 2,051 of them males, 784 
females. This was an increase of 12 percent from the 2,534 deer harvested 
in 1976. The final deer season during which hunters used smooth-bore 
primitive firearms (19 to 21 December), 130 deer were netted, evenly 
divided between males and females (65 males and 65 females) . This was 
almost three times higher than the 1976 kill of 49. No deer were taken 
during the special two-day hunt for disabled sportsmen. 

Preparing for these seasons, the Division received over 34,000 ap- 
plications for the 4,500 antlerless deer permits to be allotted. Sports- 
men receiving these permits took a total of 1,018 deer; 107 adult males 
and 911 antlerless deer (including 17 3 button bucks or male fawns) . In 
addition, 397 permits were issued to farmer-landowners who took 16 males, 
6 button bucks and 46 females for a total of 68 deer. This brought the 
level of success for all antlerless deer permit holders to 1:4 on the 
mainland. On Martha's Vineyard, the success ratio was 1:5, while on 
Nantucket it was 1:3. 

The breakdown of the 1977 deer season harvest shows that 70 percent 
of the harvest came from the four western counties, Berkshire, Franklin, 
Hampden and Hampshire. Worcester County contributed 9.5 percent of the 
state harvest and Barnstable County contributed 6.2 percent. The island 
of Dukes County reported 6.2 percent of the harvest while another 6.2 
percent were reported from Nantucket. Deer management Zones I and II 
contributed only 3.4 percent of the overall statewide harvest. 



In an assessment of non-hunting deer mortality, from 1 January 1977 
to 31 December 1977, natural resource officers reported 511 deer killed. 
Of these, 208 were males, 267 females and 36 were reported with no in- 
dication of sex. The major cause of mortality was collisions with 
motor vehicles which accounted for 341 fatalities. Dogs killed 73 deer 
and 57 deer were taken illegally by poachers. Twenty-eight deer died of 
unknown causes and 12 of a variety of other causes. 

Statewide Small Game Harvest 

A random sample of 400 small-game hunters (two subsamples of 200) 
licensed in 1977 was surveyed by telephone to determine their harvests 
and participation in hunting. Additional special questions concerned 
deer, squirrel and raccoon hunting. 

Response data were transferred to computer cards and are in the 
process of being tallied by cooperators. 

Beaver 

A total of 1,666 beaver was taken by 165 trappers in 120 towns during 
the 1977-1978 season. This is the second highest take on record and the 
record number of successful trappers. This take was significantly higher 
than either the 1976-1977 take or the five-year (1973-1977) average take. 
Two of five western counties (Worcester and Franklin) showed statistically 
significant increases; however, a third county (Berkshire) showed no 
significant change, and two others (Hampshire and Hampden) showed statis- 
tically significant decreases. Pelt prices dropped sharply to an average 
of $14.66 per pelt for an estimated harvest valuation of $24,423.56. 

Otter and Fisher 

During 1977-1978, a total of 163 otters were taken by 72 trappers in 
72 towns for a mean of 2.3 otter per successful trapper. This compares 
with a take of 110 and a mean of 1.7 for 65 successful trappers in 1976- 
1977. The fisher take increased despite a two-month reduction in the 
season, from 25 in 1976-1977 to 37 in 1977-1978, with 21 trappers taking 
fisher in 26 towns for a mean of 1.8 fisher per successful trapper. 
Worcester (50) and Berkshire (43) Counties provided the most otter while 
Worcester (15) yielded the most fisher. Otter were taken primarily in 
November and December and fisher primarily in November. A total of 95 
otter and 12 fisher carcasses were received from cooperating trappers. 
Initial results of tooth sectioning were inclusive due to staining 
problems and teeth are being recut . Thirty-eight (38) other reproductive 
tracts showed a mean of 1.05 corpora lutea each. 

Mourning Dove 

Calling doves were counted on three "randomized" routes in coopera- 
tion with the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service's annual mourning dove 
breeding population census. The number of calling doves increased on 
two routes and decreased on one, with the total for all three routes in- 
creasing 35 percent from 1976 to 1977. 



Turkey 



Turkey populations in the southern Berkshires remain concentrated 
around the Beartown State Forest area, but dispersal continues to occur 
at a good rate except to the east. Based on the extent of sightings, 
production appears good. Few mortalities were reported during the 
severe 197 7-1978 winter. Turkeys continue to be reported in northern 
Berkshire and Franklin Counties, probably as a result of influx from 
neighboring states. Planning should be initiated for a future open 
season on turkeys. 

Black Bear 

Applications for bear hunting permits were received from 441 
sportsmen. No bear were reported taken during the open season, possibly 
reflecting early denning by the bears. One road kill was reported. 
New reports of 33 observations totalling 50 bear were received from 18 
towns. Sows with cubs were reported from three locations. Three nui- 
sance complaints were investigated. 

Waterfowl 

Gosling Transplant Program 

A snowstorm on 10 May, which left 150mm of wet snow, resulted 
in nest desertion by a number of Canada geese. Only nine goslings were 
observed in the Southboro-Framingham flock and only a single bird 
hatched off at Bristol-Blake in Norfolk. As a result, no transplants 
were made. The June census indicated only 90 geese down from 110 last 
year and 191 in 1973. No nest checks were made of transplant sites. 

Preseason Waterfowl Bandings 

A total of 975 birds were banded by airboat nightlighting , 
bait trapping and net trapping during the 1977 preseason banding segment. 
This total includes 117 hand-reared wood ducks. Wild-banded waterfowl 
include 274 wood ducks, 175 mallards, 125 black ducks, 8 mallard x 
black hybrids, 66 green-winged teal, 26 blue-winged teal, 10 hooded 
mergansers and 1 mallard x domestic hybrid. Also banded were 3 sora 
rails and 2 gallinules. A cooperator banded an additional 104 least, 
21 semi-palmated, 14 solitary, 12 spotted and 3 pectoral sandpipers - , 
5 semi-palmated plovers, 7 killdeer and 2 lesser yellowlegs. 

Airboat operations were curtailed in mid-September due to a 
damaged propeller. 



Winter Inventory Flights 



A total of 158,540 waterfowl were counted during the January 
1978 winter inventory, up 36 percent from 1977 and up 62 percent over 
the previous ten-year average. Black duck numbers (30,711) were up 56 
percent over 1977, and up 73 percent from the ten-year average. Canvas- 
backs and goldeneyes were down from 1977, but only goldeneyes fell below 
the ten-year average. All other species were up. Mergansers and mal- 
lards showed exceptionally large increases. 

Winter Trapping Program 

The winter of 1977-1978 was moderate and typical of most 
winters in Massachusetts with periods of severe cold broken by warm 
spells. As a result, most bays and harbors remained open or were iced 
in for only brief periods of time, unlike last year when these same 
areas remained ice-locked for several weeks. Black duck wintering counts 
were the highest since 1969 with nearly 31,000 birds counted during the 
winter inventory flight. 

Division personnel and their cooperators banded a total of 551 
black ducks, 89 mallard x black hybrids, 39 mallards, 7 green-winged teal, 

6 pintail and 1 wigeon. 

Black Duck Imprinting Program 

This project has been completed. A manuscript detailing the 
results of the five-year study was submitted for publication. Attempts 
to develop cylinder-using populations of black ducks in order to reduce 
nest destruction were unsuccessful. 

Park Waterfowl Investigations 

A park mallard winter census was last run in 1973 when 9,671 
mallards and 1,888 black ducks were counted at 116 locations in 13 cities 
and 55 towns. In order to determine if the park waterfowl population 
has changed during the last five years, the census was repeated during 

7 to 19 January 1978. A total of 11,952 mallards, 1,690 black ducks, 109 
American wigeon and 16 pintail along with a few ringnecks, wood ducks, 
green-winged teal and hooded and redbreasted mergansers were counted at 
126 locations in 12 cities and 54 towns during the 10 to 19 January survey 
period . 

In order to determine if the winter population had increased or 
decreased in the state during the last five years, 25 areas were selected 
for their stability. These areas were isolated from each other and in- 
cluded no new sites that were censused in 1978 but not in 1973. The 1973 
count for this segment of the population was 5,232 mallards and 939 black 
ducks. The 1978 tally was 5,156 mallards and 560 black ducks, decreases 
of 1.5 and 40.4 percent respectively. The mallard decrease is insignifi- 
cant. The black duck counts during both surveys are questionable since 
the biggest flocks of blacks were from coastal locations where "park" 
blacks trade back and forth between mallard flocks and "wild" wintering 
black ducks. Thus it is difficult to positively identify certain groups 
of park black ducks. This problem does not exist on isolated inland park 
type situations. 



Wood Duck Dump Nesting Study 



Three hens that established their own nests were confirmed as 
previously laying in nests that were eventually incubated by other hens. 
Four other hens suspected as dump nesters also established their own 
nests. Two hens confirmed as dumping eggs, were never found incubating. 
The results of this study will be summarized for the 1976 to 1978 period. 

The techniques used in marking dumping wood ducks were published 
in the Journal of Wildlife Management (Vol. 42, No. 2; pp 29-32, 1978). 

Evaluation of Starlingproof Nesting Structures 

Skylights , 100 x 100mm, built into the tops of wood duck boxes 
proved to be of questionable value as a starling deterrent. Wood duck ac- 
ceptance of light-lid equipped boxes was satisfactory and starling usage 
on eastern study areas was low, but on areas in the western half of 
Massachusetts, starlings used the skylight boxes as readily as they did 
control boxes and wood duck acceptance was poor. 

Release of Hand-Reared Wood Ducks 

A total of 53 immature birds were released on Nantucket Island 
where a box erection program by private groups commenced in 1977. An 
additional 52 birds, raised by a cooperator, were released in Berkshire 
County . 

Coastal and Inland Wetlands Survey 

Wetland complexes, identified on black and white topographic 
sheets by color coding, were given eight-digit identification numbers. 
These wetlands will eventually be recorded on computer cards to allow easy 
information retrieval. 

Relationships of Canada Geese to Commercial Shellf isheries 

Sixty-five percent of questionnaire respondents reported 
problems with Canada goose/shellfish depredations. Field observations 
could not support these claims although depredations by mallards, black 
ducks and a herring gull were observed. 

Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit 

Studies conducted through the Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Re- 
search Unit under the sponsorship of the Massachusetts Division of Fish- 
eries and Wildlife were "Acclimation of Stocked New Brunswick Hare ( Lepus 
americanus ) in Massachusetts" by W. Shultz; "Land Use Changes and the 
Massachusetts Deer Herd" by P. J. Sczerzenie and "A New England Animal 
Identification and Damage Guide for Urban, Suburban and Agricultural 
Areas" by J. Harding. 




GAME 



FARMS 




E. Michael Pollack 
Chief Game Biologist 



During this fiscal period, major pen construction was accomplished 
at the Ayer Game Farm. The CETA program was of great aid in supplying 
labor. All pens destroyed by the previous winter storms were either 
repaired or replaced with new pens. 

Other major construction projects were conducted at the Wilbraham 
Game Farm where new brooder yard pens were built and repairs made to 
roofs, electrical and water systems. 

Game bird production was higher than scheduled due to various fac- 
tors including better disease control and other good management tech- 
niques; however, heavy, freezing rains during the distribution season re- 
sulted in deterioration of pheasants. Tails were lost as a result of 
becoming wet, being matted and frozen to the ground. 

All game bird feed formulas were updated in search of better nutri- 
tion and lower food costs. However, feed costs continued to climb but 
not as sharply as in previous years. 



Game Farm Production 
1977-1978 



Pheasant 





SR 


A 


B 


C 


PG 


Misc . 


Total 


Sandwich 


170 




1,804 


5,286 


6,286 




13,546 


Wilbraham 


1,925 




4,816 


5,892 


7,520 


115 


20,268 


Ayer 


2,580 


100 


2,940 


4,240 


28,604 


100 


24,758 


Totals 


4,675 


100 


9,560 


15,418 


28,604 


215 


58,572* 


* Does not 


include approximately 800 


field 


trial birds 


or 5,000 


adult 



brood stock released in early summer. 



Quail 

A total of approximately 3,000 quail, produced at the Sandwich Game 
Farm, were released on wildlife management areas in the Southeast District. 

White Hare 

A total of 840 white hare, purchased from a source in New Brunswick, 
were released during this period. 



CKNiTneiceiCT 



Bradford Blodget 
State Ornithologist 



Legislative Work 

One of the ornithologist's chief occupations in 1978 was in efforts 
to prepare and guide passage of a non-game, threatened and endangered 
species bill, originally filed by the Division and later re-drafted and 
filed in Senator Carol Amick's name as S-1496. The ornithologist at- 
tended and chaired numerous meetings during the year to arrive at lan- 
guage acceptable to the many parties interested in this bill. The chief 
features of this bill were (1) establishment of a non-game, threatened 
and endangered species advisory council of seven members appointed by 
the Secretary and charged with the task of advising the Director on 
matters pertaining to non-game; (2) authorization of the Director to 
conduct specific investigations into non-game species of wildlife as well 
as wild plants; (3) promulgation by the Director of a list of threatened 
and endangered species of wildlife and wild flora within the Commonwealth, 
as well as rules and regulations to effect appropriate conservation of 
same; (4) provisions for the Director to carry out full-scale conservation 
programs for non-game species including acquisition of land; (5) estab- 
lishment of penalties and fines; and (6) creation of a non-game fund to 
bear all expenses of the non-game program and to which would be credited 
annually $120,000 from the State Recreational Areas Fund and $30,000 from 
the Metropolitan District Commission's Parks District Fund, as well as 
all special gifts, grants-in-aid, and so forth. 

This bill did not pass and the ornithologist has continued to work 
closely with Senator Amick's Special Endangered Species Study Commission 
to draft legislation for 1979. At this time, it appears that the bill 
will be re-filed in the 1979 session with the same wording as the 1978 
version (S-1496). However, the funding provisions are being re-examined 
with the possibility of going to a voluntary check-off scheme on income 
tax refunds, a system which proved successful in Colorado. 



21 



The ornithologist also monitored H-83, a bill amending Chapter 131, 
Sections 4 and 5, to extend the Division's authority to investigate and 
regulate reptile and amphibian populations. This is important since no 
species of reptiles and amphibians are currently protected including 
many rare species of special concern; e.g., the bog turtle, Plymouth 
red-bellied turtle and timber rattlesnake. Other species such as the 
bullfrog, spotted salamander and snapping turtle are presently subject 
to unregulated commercial harvest. 

S-810, a bill amending Chapter 131, Section 26A, to afford full pro- 
tection to all endangered species listed by the U. S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service in the Federal Register , was closely followed. This bill would, 
in effect, deregulate certain species such as the American alligator 
which have been delisted by the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service as well 
as deregulate certain species of caiman, thereby legalizing them for 
trade. While this means that certain species now protected would have 
been removed from the list, the total number of species protected would, 
in fact, have been increased enormously by adoption of the U. S. Fish 
and Wildlife's list of threatened and endangered species of wildlife 
and plants. The existing statute would have been improved by giving it 
flexibility to change as additions and deletions are made to the Federal 
list. 

February was completely devoted to the Division's 1978 legislative 
package as the chief planner, who ordinarily handles legislative affairs, 
was called to jury duty. The ornithologist attended most hearings of the 
Committee on Natural Resources and Agriculture and testified on over 40 
bills on a variety of subjects affecting the Division. In these activi- 
ties, the Division was fortunate in having the assistance of Julie Post, 
an intern from Pine Manor College. 

In addition, the ornithologist monitored the progress of the Federal 
non-game bill, H.R. 10255 which, had it passed, would have made funding 
available to the states to develop strategic plans for non-game species. 

On 4-6 October, the ornithologist attended and addressed a meeting 
on non-game species sponsored by the Northeast Section of the Wildlife 
Society at the Wetlands Institute in Stone Harbor, New Jersey. At this 
meeting, representatives of various states discussed their programs, 
funding and legislative matters pertaining to non-game work. 

Education 

During the 1978 year, the ornithologist presented programs on some 
of the Division's non-game activities to the Nature Training School in 
Paxton, the Cape Cod Bird Club in Brewster, the University of Massachusetts 
Chapter of The Wildlife Society in Amherst, the South Lancaster Academy 
in South Lancaster and the Massachusetts Wildlife Federation in Bedford. 
He is currently engaged in development of a slide presentation dealing with 
non-game birds which will be used in conjunction with 1979 efforts to pass 
the non-game bill. 



22 



Oil Spills 

We were fortunate in 1978 in not having any major oiled bird emer- 
gency. The most serious situation arose following the grounding of the 
"Global Hope" in Salem Harbor during the February blizzard. In response 
to this, I worked closely with the U. S. Coast Guard Strike Team and Al 
Jackson of the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. A collection station 
was established at the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries Cat 
Cove Station, to which the public was instructed to bring all birds 
rescued. Only four birds were brought in. On a recovery operation with 
the U. S. Coast Guard, James Cardoza and the ornithologist ascertained 
that most bird mortality occurred on Cat Island, North and South Goose- 
berry Islands and other islands in outer Salem Harbor. The final 
estimate of oiled birds associated with this spill was fixed at 110 
birds, 102 of which were common eiders, 29 of which were known victims. 
Thirteen birds were recovered — a common loon, a rednecked grebe, a mal- 
lard, nine common eiders and a redbreasted merganser. All succumbed 
but the rednecked grebe which was rehabilitated at the Massachusetts 
Audubon Society, Lincoln, and later released. 

Some of the "Global Hope's" oil is believed to have remained in 
Cape Cod Bay for the duration of the winter with oil coming ashore in 
Truro and Wellfleet on outer Cape Cod. Little mortality of birds could 
be demonstrably associated with this spill. 

Two small inland spills were investigated, one at Hyannis and the 
other at Institute Pond in Worcester, both of which were promptly cleaned 
up and did not result in serious mortality. 

On 11-13 January, the ornithologist attended a conference entitled 
"In the Wake of the Argo Merchant" at the University of Rhode Island's 
Center for Ocean Management Studies. 

Tern Management Program 

A draft planning document detailing 44 known tern colonies, their 
present ownership, management agency, other cooperators and pertinent 
access information has been prepared. Of the 44 colonies, 23 colonies 
now managed by the Massachusetts Audubon Society, are slated to come 
under Division management in 1980. 

The ornithologist visited four tern colonies in 1978 — Tinker's Is- 
land, Salem (50 pairs of common terns), Fairhaven Salt Marshes (Massachu- 
setts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife property, with eight pairs of 
least terns), Third Cliff, Scituate (30 pairs of least terns), and Forth 
Cliff, Scituate (10 pairs of least terns). 

On 9 August, the ornithologist coordinated a statewide meeting of 
tern wardens and agencies involved in tern conservation at the Cape Cod 
National Seashore for the purpose of assembling statewide census data 
and assessing the status of the populations in the Commonwealth. 

A total of 1,424 pairs of least terns in 36 colonies was recorded, 
with some particularly large concentrations at Nauset, Eastham and 
Orleans (229 pairs), Nantucket (270-plus pairs), Kalmus Beach, Hyannis 
(70 pairs), Crane's Beach, Ipswich (63 pairs) and Duxbury Beach, Duxbury 
(60 pairs) . 



23 



This species is geographically the most widespread and appears to 
be stable in numbers. Common terns numbered 4,119-plus pairs in 22 
colonies, off eight percent from 1977 even when missing data are con- 
sidered. The largest colonies of this species were 1,900 pairs in the 
Monomoy Wilderness, Chatham, 500 pairs at Bird Island, Marion, 515 pairs 
at Gray's Beach, West Yarmouth, 350 pairs at Plymouth Beach and 260 pairs 
at New Island, Orleans and Eastham. Roseate terns totaled 1,608 pairs at 
six locations, with 77 percent (1,290 pairs) concentrated at Bird Island, 
Marion, and 18 percent (290 pairs) in the Monomoy Wilderness, Chatham. 
No Man's Land, Chilmark, and the Monomoy Wilderness remain the strong- 
holds for the Arctic tern with 20-plus and 15 pairs respectively out of 
a state total of 53 pairs in five colonies. 

Breeding Bird Atlas 

During the year, the ornithologist has worked closely with Richard 
Forster of the Massachusetts Audubon Society in planning the future of 
the Breeding Bird Atlas. Costs of computerizing and publishing the data 
have been derived. A large cadre of volunteers continued to work the 
989 atlas blocks. Most of the blocks are now covered. The ornithologist 
personally covered a set of 36 undercovered blocks centered in the Brook- 
fields. The district offices also contributed data. All data are cur- 
rently stored on master sheets at the Massachusetts Audubon Society 
headquarters in Lincoln. Because of the amount of field work remaining, 
a decision was made this year to extend the field work for one more 
season . 

Already the data generated from this effort have proved useful in at- 
tempting to assess the bird populations in Environmental Impact Statements 
and to emphasize species in the state which are geographically restricted. 

Exotic Animals Task Force 

In May, the Director established a special task force to review all 
laws and regulations covering the possession of exotic animals, with the 
ornithologist serving as chairman. At this writing, expanded husbandry 
and maintenance regulations have been drafted and final recommendation 
for revisions of the "Exemption List" should be completed soon. Target 
date for completion of the Task Force report is 31 January 1979. 

Cooperative Endangered Species Agreement 

On 5 September, a letter of application was filed with the U. S. Fish 
and Wildlife Service for a cooperative agreement under Section 6 of the 
Federal Endangered Species Act of 1973. If approved, the Massachusetts 
Division of Fisheries and Wildlife would be eligible for two-thirds grant- 
in-aid reimbursal of approved projects. 

The ornithologist will continue to supply materials to the Service to 
assist in their evaluation of the Division's qualifications to enter such 
an agreement. 



24 



Coastal Dredging Projects 

During the course of the year, the ornithologist reviewed copies 
of project applications received from the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers. 
Many project descriptions involve pier construction or rip-rap installa- 
tion and have little bearing on wildlife. Of principal concern are the 
dredging operations which can have both beneficial and deleterious ef- 
fects on wildlife (specifically sea birds). During 1978, the ornitholo- 
gist inspected a dredging rig operation in progress at Harding's Beach 
Point, Chatham. The spoil deposition on the point should provide an 
excellent substrate for nesting least terns in 1979. 

Nuisance Animal Services 

An enormous amount of time was spent over the past year answering 
telephone inquiries regarding skunks, raccoons, squirrels, pigeons and 
other nuisance animals. Over 246 complaints were handled at Boston for 
the period January to September 1978 through telephone consultations. 

Other Activities 

List of Birds of Massachusetts . Despite the fact that the birds of 
Massachusetts have been heavily studied and are for the most part very 
well known, an official up-to-date list of the birds of the Commonwealth 
has been lacking. During 1978, the ornithologist prepared such a list. 
This document includes 415 species that occur or have occurred in 
Massachusetts, as well as ten others of "hypothetical" status. A total 
of 200 species are indicated as having bred in Massachusetts at some time. 
This list also indicates species which are rare, local or infrequent as 
breeders, as well as a frequency for each species; e.g., vagrant, migrant, 
or winter resident. Infrequent vagrants that have appeared on six or 
fewer occasions since 1900 are detailed in an appendix. It is intended 
that this list will be maintained and revised annually. 

List of Species for Special Consideration in Massachusetts . The 
office received about 110 requests for information on endangered species 
during 1978. This specialized list is broken down into three parts. 
Section I, listing Federally "threatened" and "endangered" species that 
occur in the Commonwealth as well as other species that the Division has 
recommended to the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, should be so classi- 
fied; Section II listing state local and state rare species; and Sec- 
tion III, peripheral species. 

Worcester County Field Records . In addition to regular work assign- 
ments, all 1977 field records were processed during the January to April 
period, edited and published in "The Chickadee," a journal of the Forbush 
Bird Club. 



Western District 



Winston S. Saville 
District Wildlife Manager 



Western District personnel stocked 5,350 cock pheasants and 363 
hen pheasants during 1977-1978. Approximately one half of the cock 
birds were stocked on Division-owned or leased property. White hare 
were received by the district in February of 1978 and a total of 175 
were stocked into covers in the southeast section of the district. 

Spring woodcock census routes were run in the towns of Hancock 
and Worthington. The woodcock run in Southwick was not completed this 
year. As in previous years, spring mourning dove census routes were run 
in the towns of Granville, Lee and Lenox. 

Wood duck management within the district included maintenance of 76 
nesting boxes, the construction of 35 nesting boxes, the monitoring of 20 
research nesting boxes and the release of 50 pref light wood ducks. Live 
trapping and transplanting of beaver is a major district activity, 
particularly during the summer months. During this fiscal year, beaver 
were live trapped from 47 colonies. In all, a total of 46 beaver were 
captured and released into more remote portions of the district. 

The district received five reports of bear damage or problems; two 
beehive destructions, one vegetable crop (corn) damage, one turning over 
of trash barrels in a roadside parking area, one series of continuous 
bear sightings near a residence. 

Wild turkeys are doing well in the Beartown State Forest and they 
are dispersing into the surrounding areas. Sightings of turkeys have 
been reported throughout the district, particularly along the New York 
and Vermont state lines where other successful wild turkey restoration 
programs are being conducted. 

In fishery-related activities, district personnel stocked 152,525 
brook, rainbow and brown trout during this report period. The district's 
fall trout stocking program in 1977 again involved the release of a total 
of 7,000 brown and 10,000 rainbow trout into the district's better lakes 
and waters. No kokanee salmon fingerlings were stocked during this re- 
port period due to the total egg mortality at the hatchery. 

Summer activities included pond surveys with emphasis on bass 
management. Other points of focus included investigation of the chemistry 
of stocked ponds, collection of fish samples for PCB analysis, and in- 
vestigations of polluted waters. Several days were spent on the F-34-D 
project on the Peru Wildlife Management Area. This project provides for 
and maintains access to streams on Division-owned properties. 

The fisheries manager also worked with the Hawley State Forest Con- 
servation Camp presenting a program on fish management techniques to 70 
youngsters . 



26 



During the year, the Western District added 113 acres to the 
Division's wildlife land holdings, bringing the district total to 11,144 
acres. The purchase, made this year, was made as part of the Peru Wild- 
life Management Area. Approximately 100 acres of the acquisition is in a 
fresh-water marsh, making it a most important addition to this mostly- 
forested management area. 

Maintenance, this year, included activities on seven wildlife manage- 
ment areas, including installation of 70 signs; maintenance of 1.2 miles 
of trail on the Canada Hill, Moran and Peru wildlife management areas; 
posting of six miles of boundary, two miles each on the Housatonic Valley, 
Moran and Hinsdale Flats wildlife management areas; cutting brush on six 
acres of the Housatonic Valley Wildlife Management Area; planting 500 
arborvitae on the Housatonic Valley Wildlife Management Area and 200 white 
spruce on the Hinsdale Flats Wildlife Management Area; and maintenance of 
five parking lots on the above management areas. 

During this report period, nine buildings were removed from the Moran 
Wildlife Management Area and two were removed from the Hinsdale Flats 
Wildlife Management Area. Most of the buildings had been completely 
vandalized. They were removed for aesthetic and safety reasons. One 
building was salvaged for lumber, the others were used for training exer- 
cises by local fire departments. 

A five-year farming contract was initiated on the Hinsdale Flats Wild- 
life Management Area. This will allow the farmer to cut and maintain a hay 
crop under conditions that will leave a stand of hay sufficient for pheas- 
ant cover in the fall. Similar contracts are contemplated for the Moran 
and Housatonic Valley wildlife management areas. 

The district headquarters was remodeled during this fiscal year. A 
storage room that was part of the original building was converted into a 
bunk room, a small storage room and a meeting room and office combination. 

As might be expected, public relations activities were many and varied 
Possibly the high point of this reporting period was the dedication of the 
Division's property in Windsor as the Eugene Moran Wildlife Management Area 
Dedication of the public access fishing pier at Onota Lake, Pittsfield, was 
another well-attended event. 

District personnel attended an average of two County League and 
sportsmen's club meetings a month in addition to attending meetings of 
community service clubs, such as Lions, Rotary, Kiwanis and Boy Scouts. 
Lectures and slide programs were presented at the Central Berkshire Re- 
gional School District and Berkshire Community College. There were also 
several meetings relative to a trout stocking program for Russell Pond and 
a meeting relative to the problem of posted land in Tyringham. 

Division personnel maintained the permanent wildlife exhibit at Mt . 
Greylock's visitor center in Lanesboro and provided staff for exhibits at 
the Eastern States Exposition and the Western Massachusetts Sportsmen's 
Show. In addition, district personnel attended meetings with the Soil 
Conservation Service, Soil Conservation District, Scenic Rivers, Berkshire 
County Regional Planning Board and the Division of Law Enforcement. 



27 



The Western District contributed to the completion of a natural re- 
source inventory for the Town of Heath in this report period. 

The Division of Fisheries and Wildlife also co-sponsored the first 
annual Housatonic River canoe race. 



Connecticut Valley District 



Herman Covey 
District Wildlife Manager 



The Connecticut Valley District covers 49 towns on both sides of 
the Connecticut River from the Vermont and New Hampshire borders to the 
Connecticut state line. There are three counties in this region and the 
district takes in parts of all three, with the remaining sections of the 
three counties falling into the Western District. The region is blessed 
with trout streams, lakes and ponds and is traversed by a number of scenic 
highways. The countryside boasts the rich farmlands of the valley proper 
surrounded by rolling hills and some mountains. The Division has five 
installations in this area aside from the district headquarters; 
Wilbraham State Game Farm and fish hatcheries at Montague, Sunderland, 
Belchertown and Palmer. These are primarily trout-rearing facilities, 
but the station at Palmer is currently being converted to production of 
Atlantic salmon. 

The district is staffed by a district manager, game manager, fisher- 
ies manager, one skilled conservation helper and three conservation help- 
ers . 

During Fiscal 1978, the Valley district staff pursued regular and 
traditional management and maintenance operations. One of the most vis- 
ible of these is the stocking of pheasant, hare and trout. Twelve thou- 
sand eight hundred fifty-six (12,856) pheasants were stocked during this 
year; 2900 of these birds were stocked in open covers prior to the open 
season, 6024 were stocked during the season. An additional 3932 birds 
were stocked on wildlife management areas. Sportsmen's clubs in the area 
received 1525 cocks and 80 hens to be used in their pheasant rearing pro- 
gram and a surplus brood stock of 484 cocks and 1174 hens was released 
to selected covers throughout the district in the hope that they could 
continue natural production in the wild. One hundred eighty (180) hare 
were stocked in open covers during this period. Hare are stocked to aug- 
ment native populationsand to establish hare colonies in suitable 
habitat . 

Trout stocking is tallied by the calendar year rather than the fiscal 
year, so figures available are those for calendar 1977. During this 
period, a total of 177,515 trout were stocked — 112,470 into streams, 
65,045 into ponds — weighing a total of 82,774 pounds. 

In addition to stocking, the district's fisheries staff assisted in 
Division (and other) research projects participating in the transport of 
Atlantic salmon from Vermont to Connecticut, assessment of fish resources 
in the Quabbin Reservoir, and surveying fishermen and their catch. They 
participated in netting and creel census associated with the northern 
pike project, assisted in the Connecticut River shad and Atlantic salmon 
projects, and provided manpower for the procedures involved in a large- 
mouth bass inventory. Concurrently, they monitored water chemistry on 
many ponds, investigated fish kills and participated in workshops. 



29 



District personnel also assisted Division biologists in many wildlife 
research projects, among them wood duck field studies. Wildlife problems 
reported to the district were investigated and the staff trapped, removed 
and relocated numerous beaver and raccoons in addition to dealing with 
instances of problem ducks and geese. 

During the deer season, district personnel operated deer checking 
stations and assisted law enforcement officers by supplying men for full- 
time patrol duty. Cooperation with law enforcement was carried on through- 
out other hunting and trapping seasons as well. District personnel also 
recorded and tagged pelts of beaver, bobcat, otter and fisher. 

Other efforts within the district focused primarily on maintenance 
and improvement of lands and property. Four Adirondack shelters were in- 
stalled on the Swift River management area, logging was carried out on 
some areas and two pheasant racks were constructed for carrying birds on 
trucks. Roads and grounds were maintained and areas were posted with 
Division signs. Barways and gates were kept in good repair and equipment 
was maintained on an ongoing basis. 

To keep the public apprised of the activities within the district, 
the district office issued area new releases and participated actively in 
local Hunting and Fishing Day observances as well as the Western Massachu- 
setts Fly Tyers workshop. It was personnel from this district who built 
the Division's exhibit shown at the Eastern States Exposition in Spring- 
field and the Sportsmen's Show in Boston and who provided the bulk of 
maintenance for the exhibit while it was housed in Springfield. On other 
occasions, district staffers conducted classes and field trips for students 
from Holyoke Community College, regional high school and the University of 
Massachusetts Wildlife Unit. The district manager participated in numerous 
meetings with such diverse groups as Hampden, Hampshire and Franklin County 
Sportsmen's Councils, the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, classes from the 
University of Massachusetts and the Smith school, Westfield River Watershed 
Committee, Greenfield YMCA and regional law enforcement hearings. 

In addition to ordinary management and public contact activities, 
during 1977-1978, the district manager became deeply involved in the CETA 
program and was instrumental in securing CETA assistance for the entire 
region. In this capacity, he participated in planning and implementation 
of a project designed for the Wilbraham State Game Farm. The first project 
scheduled at the game farm was extended to a full year and the contract was 
expanded to $92,000. Thirteen positions were initiated and the crew began 
rebuilding the Wilbraham installation. A second project, planned for the 
same facility, involved 12 positions and $73,000 for the purpose of up- 
grading the farm. This project, too, has been implemented. 

A third project was designed and initiated for the Palmer Experimental 
Salmon Station and the Swift River Wildlife Management Area. Twelve posi- 
tions and $73,000 of contract funds have been allocated for this project. 
At the hatchery, crews under this program provided general repairs and de- 
velopment aimed at refurbishing that hatchery. At Swift River, the crew 
engaged in a variety of forestry activities including construction of a 
woods road, thinning of dense stands, cutting along woodland borders, and 
some general logging. In addition, the crew installed culverts as needed, 
repaired a decaying water control structure and built a new pond complete 
with flashboard control and suitable for waterfowl nesting. 



30 



These projects have been notably successful not only in improving 
the Commonwealth's wildlife lands and facilities but also in providing 
on-the-job training to participants in many different areas. Among the 
skills acquired, all participants attained Class II driver's licenses. 
Skills and experience gained have enabled participants to qualify for a 
greater variety of jobs. 

Based on these successful projects, all of which have been extended 
to one year — the maximum allowable — the manager was asked to assist the 
Chief Fish Culturist in planning a project for the upgrading of hatcher- 
ies at Montague and Sunderland. This was accomplished with 16 positions 
established under the CETA program including funding of $92,000. This 
brings the total CETA participation in the Valley District to four proj- 
ects totaling $450,000 with the bulk of those funds being paid out as 
salary to CETA employees who are acquiring new skills. 



Central District 



Carl S. Prescott 
District Wildlife Manager 



During Fiscal 1978, personnel from the Central District worked on 
the development and maintenance of six wildlife management areas. Much 
time was spent at the new Bolton Flats area with four parking lots being 
developed and a footbridge being erected over the Still River. Four 
major identification signs were constructed and erected and 54 other 
boundary and informational signs posted. Eight hundred wildlife trees 
and shrubs were planted and four local farmers were signed up for five 
years under cooperative farming agreements. These agreements are de- 
signed to allow the use of agricultural portions of wildlife management 
areas with an assurance that suitable food and cover crops will be left 
for fall and winter resident and migrant wildlife species. The district 
now has 11 farmers working on six different areas. 

Other areas receiving district attention during Fiscal 1978 were 
Birch Hill, Quaboag, West Hill, Barre Falls and Hubbardston. One 
hundred fifty-three acres of herbaceous seeding, two acres of clearings 
and six acres of vegetation control were completed on these areas. Four 
hundred eighty-nine signs were produced and maintained. 

The district maintained 164 wood duck nesting boxes and added 17 new 
ones to new areas. It received 22 beaver complaints and trapped and re- 
located three animals. Fifty other types of nuisance animal complaints 
were received and three required direct district assistance. Twenty- 
three live traps were loaned and advice was given to the other complain- 
ants. 

Forty-seven towns and 11 wildlife management areas received pheas- 
ants. In all, 18,292 birds were released. In addition, 2,055 club birds 
were released bringing the total of pheasants released in the district to 
20,347. One hundred six snowshoe hare were also liberated. 

In the fall of 1977, ten ponds and seven streams were stocked with 
16,000 rainbow trout. During the spring of 1978, 107 streams and 30 ponds 
received 58,000 9-inch plus and 20,000 6 to 9-inch rainbow trout, 4,300 
9-inch plus and 20,000 6 to 9-inch brown trout, and 6,200 9-inch plus and 
46,000 6 to 9-inch brook trout. A major public relations problem de- 
veloped over the reduction of numbers of trout allotted to Lake Quinsiga- 
mond caused by a serious sewage problem during the spring of 1978. 

Yearling largemouth bass were released in Putnam Park in Rutland and 
the Buck Hill conservation area in Spencer. The district fisheries crew 
sampled the Quinapoxet Reservoir. Additional samples were collected at 
Wekepeke Brook to obtain further data about the brook in preparation for 
evaluating the impact of the construction of 1-190 on its aquatic life. 



32 



District representatives attended 41 meetings during Fiscal 1978 
including meetings with the Department of Public Works in relation to 
the construction of 1-190, meetings with the Division of Law Enforcement, 
the Worcester County League, the Corps of Engineers, conservation com- 
missions, and so forth. The district participated in staffing the 
Eastern States Exposition and the Boston and Boxborough sportsmen's shows. 
Thirteen speaking engagements were accepted and delivered. District per- 
sonnel participated in two radio shows and over 30 newspaper articles 
were written with information provided by district personnel. 



I 



i 



Northeast District 



Walter L. Hoyt, Jr. 
District Wildlife Manager 



The Northeast District performed its primary functions of stocking 
fish, pheasants and varying hare; of managing seven wildlife management 
areas and five sanctuaries; of providing all forms of public information; 
of providing wildlife services; and of taking the initial steps in the 
purchase of land. Some 6,556 pheasants, 86 varying hare and 250,000 
trout were released to augment native populations. An additional 500 
pheasants were released through the sportsmen's rearing program. Roads, 
trails, clearings, parking lots, boundaries and signs were maintained 
on wildlife management areas. New openings, trails and roads were de- 
veloped as planned in the W-9-D and F-34-D programs. 

The Northeast District continued to be the only district to conduct 
two controlled hunts; one for waterfowl at the Delaney Wildlife Manage- 
ment Area and one for upland game at the Northeast Wildlife Management 
Area. Approximately 200 permittees used the target range at the North- 
east Wildlife Management Area. Wilderness camping, primarily at the 
Squannacook Wildlife Management Area, drew approximately 400 campers, 
mostly Scouts. 

The five sanctuaries, four of which are islands, were posted to 
safeguard and insure their primary intent. In addition, we cooperated 
with the Information and Education staff in the preparation of a pamphlet 
on sanctuaries. 

The Northeast District continued to be the only district still pro- 
viding a youth upland game training program. This hunt is co-sponsored 
by the Essex County sportsmen. This year, 20 youths took advantage of 
the hunt. 

The Northeast District continued to operate the Division's only 
warmwater rearing system with 500 largemouth bass brood stock and 2,600 
5 to 9-inch fish released into state waters from this hatchery which is 
located on the Harold Parker State Forest in Andover. 

The district manager attended numerous evening meetings including 
22 County League meetings, six sportsmen's club meetings, and 11 general 
meetings such as conservation commissions. He also provided news re- 
leases to over 35 newspapers, two radio news releases and participated 
in two high school career days. The District provided professional wild- 
life services to about 55 individuals and organizations. 

Exhibits and personnel to man them were provided for National Hunting 
and Fishing Day at the Lowell Sportsmen's Club; Lowell Fly Tyers annual 
show in Pelham, New Hampshire; the Topsfield Fair in Topsfield and the 
Essex Agricultural Fair in Hawthorne. We also cooperated with other 
districts in the New England Sportsmen's Show in Boston and the North- 
eastern Sportsmen's Show in Boxborough. 



34 



The Kent's Island, Mill Creek and Martin Burns' tracts located in 
Newbury and Rowley were combined into a single management unit and 
dedicated as the William Forward Wildlife Management Area. 

The district live trapped and moved 14 nuisance beaver, steered 
trappers to other nuisance beaver and provided advice on the control of 
many other nuisance species. 

We cooperated with Field Headquarters personnel on 12 Federally- 
aided research and/or management projects; e.g., woodcock census, 
waterfowl inventory flights, deer checking stations, and so forth. 

The district manager reviewed numerous resource impact plans and 
statements; e.g., Section 404 of the Federal Water Pollution Act, 
Environmental Monitor, and wrote statements on many of them. Very close 
cooperation with the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service was maintained on 
Section 404 permit applications. 

Improvements to facilities included installation of a new gas tank 
and a new septic system and paving of front driveways, all at the district 
headquarters in Acton. 

The district cooperated with the Division of Marine Fisheries in 
maintaining existing fishways on the Merrimack and Charles Rivers. 

We also joined with planning personnel in making application to the 
Corps of Engineers for a management agreement for lands acquired along 
the Charles River for natural valley flood storage. 

The district cooperated with the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service 
and the Corps of Engineers in their preliminary study of the Neponset 
River and with the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service in preparation of 
their endangered areas study. 



Southeast District 



Louis S. Hambly, Jr. 
District Wildlife Manager 



Throughout 1977-1978, the staff of the Southeast District continued 
traditional management and habitat improvement programs and gathered 
data for a variety of fish and wildlife research projects. Among these 
were the stocking of 146,500 trout. During the fall of 1977, 4,166 
cock pheasants were stocked as preseason and in-season stockings. An 
additional 6,182 cock pheasants were stocked on wildlife management 
areas at that time along with 2,765 quail. During the spring of 1978, 
115 cock pheasants and 1,000 hens were released in open covers of good 
pheasant habitat. One hundred seventy-eight white hare were stocked 
in open covers and wildlife management areas during January and February. 

Routine maintenance was practiced on all wildlife management areas. 
This included planting 20 acres of annual grains, 15 acres of herbaceous 
cover, top dressing 55 acres of perennial herbaceous cover and planting 
of over 2,100 shrubs and herbs at Myles Standish State Forest Wildlife 
Management Area. Division personnel maintained ten miles of trails on 
five management areas and provided repairs and improvements on parking 
areas at six wildlife management areas. A parking area was created at 
the newly-dedicated Hockomock Wildlife Management Area. 

Four management areas required repairs of gates and/or fences 
while signs were erected at seven areas. Division personnel thinned 
trees and brush on two management areas, applied herbicides to maintain 
wildlife clearings and trails at Freetown Wildlife Management Area and 
planned a timber harvest at Rocky Gutter Wildlife Management Area. 
Maintenance of buildings and structures during this period involved re- 
pairs to two buildings on the Crane Wildlife Management Area, destruction 
and cleanup of a building on the Hockomock Wildlife Management Area, and 
adjustments and repairs to the dam at West Meadows Wildlife Management 
Area. This area was fortunate to have the services of a YACC crew which 
cleared a half-acre forest area, cleared stream banks of brush and debris 
and undertook cuttings to improve stands of timber. 

Other activities on the management areas included setting up the 
Crane area for field trials, a horse show and group camping as well as 
participation in a program to assist in acquisition of other lands for 
wildlife. 

In the course of aiding other sections of this agency and other 
agencies in research projects, biologists from the Southeast District 
constructed, maintained and checked wood duck nesting boxes. New boxes 
were built and installed at four management areas. Nesting boxes for 
bluebirds were erected and maintained at two wildlife management areas. 
Assisting in another Division study, district personnel collected duck 
gizzards for a study on the amounts and effects of lead ingested by 
waterfowl. Additional research on waterfowl is carried out by the U. S. 
Fish and Wildlife Service and district personnel aided their data 



36 



gathering process by capturing and banding a total of 604 ducks along 
the coast line. More local research involved personnel in running 
three routes to take a census of woodcock and 16 routes to take a census 
of quail. 

Staff of the fisheries section was heavily involved in conducting 
an analysis of water chemistry in selected trout ponds to determine the 
ponds' potential for supporting trout. Periodic checks of pH were car- 
ried out on various ponds within the district and 120 tons of agricul- 
tural lime was spread over two great ponds with a history of severe pH 
problems during the spring. Viable smelt eggs were stocked into two re- 
claimed trout ponds to provide a self-sustaining forage population. 

Both adults and viable eggs of American shad were stocked into the 
Taunton River system to re-establish the historic shad run in that water- 
shed. Smallmouth bass, taken from closed waters, were transferred to 
formerly reclaimed trout ponds containing suitable habitat for smallmouth 
bass in an effort to provide biological control of less desirable fish 
species. A program of monitoring walleye pike at Assawompsett Pond was 
initiated . 

Fisheries personnel assisted in Division research efforts on tire 
reefs at Great Herring Pond, Plymouth, on the enhancement of conditions 
for sea-run brown trout and on the survey of fish populations in closed 
waters . 

Technical assistance was provided to the general public in many 
forms as personnel from the Southeast District investigated fish kills, 
operated five deer checking stations, two of which were biological sta- 
tions, investigated a beaver complaint and tagged 106 beaver and 6 otter 
pelts. Specific technical assistance was also provided to sportsmen's 
clubs, conservation commissions, planning groups and other groups or 
individuals who called requesting same. 

In addition to these activities, the district staff continued regular 
maintenance of vehicles, equipment, buildings and policed Division 
properties . 



INFORMATION & EDUCATION 



Eleanor C. Horwitz 
Chief of Information and Education 



The Information and Education Section continues to receive a large 
volume of mail, averaging 40 letters per day, or over 10,000 letters 
per year. Most of these letters are requests for some form of informa- 
tion. The bulk of them can be answered with a map or a brochure but 
there are many that require an individual answer. Responding to such 
queries is probably the Section's most time-consuming function. 

In order to answer such inquiries and to keep sportsmen throughout 
the Commonwealth informed about the latest regulations and opportunities, 
the Section prepares and maintains a supply of regular publications in- 
cluding abstracts of regulations, abstracts of special regulations for 
migratory birds, the annual report, an abstract of the Commonwealth's 
Fox-Bartley (gun) law, a list of waters stocked with trout, a list of 
wildlife management areas stocked with pheasant, and maps for 200 popular 
fishing ponds and 44 wildlife management areas, and a fishing guide to 
Massachusetts waters. 

In addition to answering direct queries, the Section maintains a 
constant flow of information to radio, television and the press by issu- 
ing press releases on items of interest. During 1977-1978, the Section 
issued 12 press packages comprising 85 releases. These releases dealt 
with regulations, season openings and closings, unusual events, publica- 
tions of interest and public hearings. "Tips to Writers" were not 
issued during this year. 

The Section's major publication, MASSACHUSETTS WILDLIFE, was issued 
six times during the year. Subscription circulation has grown and is in 
excess of 30,000. Consideration was given to using the center spread 
pages as such and to increasing the size from 24 to 32 pages. 



38 



Other publications issued by the Division during 1977-1978 were 
"Quabbin Area, A Sportsman's Guide", a 20-page booklet dealing with 
opportunities and restrictions, as well as history, of the Quabbin area. 
Two flyers on wood ducks and wood duck housing were developed for 
distribution at the Division's exhibit which featured cavity nesting 
ducks of Massachusetts. Also developed for the exhibitions was a flyer 
introducing the Division and describing Division operations. These 
materials were distributed at four major shows: Eastern State Exposition 
in Springfield, Western Sportsmen's Show, Springfield; New England 
Sportsman's Show, Boston; and the Eastern Outdoor Exposition in Boxboro. 
All of these exhibits hosted the Division's display on cavity nesters 
which included a pool with live birds, a mounted photographic exhibit, 
and a slide projection "tour of Massachusetts' wildlife." In addition 
to the four major shows, the Division participated in a number of small 
shows, field days, and so forth sponsored by sportsmen's or other resource- 
based groups. Among these were Earth Day, Topsfield Fair, and National 
Hunting and Fishing Day activities. 

For the past 14 years, the Division has sponsored the Massachusetts 
Sport Fishing Awards Program in cooperation with the Department of Com- 
merce and Development. Under this program, bronze pins are given for 
qualifying entries in 17 categories and top prizes consisting of gold pins 
and plaques are awarded to the anglers with the largest fish in each cate- 
gory. The presentation is made at the New England Sportsman's Show. 

The Section also continued its sponsorship of the competition for the 
migratory bird hunting stamp. In 1977 competition, top honors were 
awarded to William Tyner for his rendition of A. Elmer Crowell's preening 
black duck. Honorable mention was awarded to Rany Julius of East Bridge- 
water, Massachusetts and Eileen Buzzanco of Mt . Kisco, New York. 

There was some consideration of holding a competition for artwork to 
be used on the archery stamp, but this idea was again rejected in favor 
of commissioning an artist to provide a design. Artwork for the 1977 
stamp was provided by artist Russ Buzzell. 

The Audio-Visual Aids staff continued to work on the production of 
two feature-length films — one on the Commonwealth's wildlife and one on 
Division activities. They also continued to utilize all possible photo 
opportunities increasing the Division's file of both black and white and 
color photographs. Many of these were used for Division exhibits and 
publications while over 150 were sent to newspapers and free-lance writers 
requesting same. Film footage was provided for the Massachusetts Audubon- 
Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife film project and for use 
on a variety of television shows including Channel 5's Bill O'Connell 
show and Channel 27 's Jack Woolner Show. 

Other Section activities during the 1977-1978 period include revising 
and updating the mailing lists for press releases and petitioning for a 
special educations rate permit which would allow the Division to mail bulk 
material at a greatly reduced rate (petition approved) ; preparation and 
distribution of two radio "spot" announcements, one in the fall dealing 
with fall fishing opportunities in the Commonwealth, the other in the 
spring dealing with problems caused by people picking up young wild 



39 



animals; coordination of a conference which brought together the Division 
of Fisheries and Wildlife and the Division of Law Enforcement for a dis- 
cussion of problems and opportunities faced by both agencies. Representa- 
tive Richard Dwinell and Commissioner Bruce Gullion addressed the groups 
as guest speakers. Other sessions were chaired by members of both Divi- 
sions. The Section also coordinated efforts leading to the dedication of 
the newly-purchased Hockomock Swamp area as the Hockomock Swamp Wildlife 
Management Area and the turkey farm situated thereon as the Erwin S. 
Wilder Wildlife Management Area. 

As in the past years, the Division continued to play an active role 
in the administration and operation of the Massachusetts Junior Conserva- 
tion Camp sponsored by the Division, the Massachusetts Department of En- 
vironmental Affairs and the Fund for the Preservation of Wildlife and 
Natural Areas. Camperships were solicited, campers were enrolled and 
Division personnel led sessions in wildlife management, fishery management, 
and pond and stream ecology. At the conclusion of the two-week session, 
the Division, through the Information and Education Section, administered 
an examination and subsequently participated in the successful graduation 
of 146 campers. Also, as in the past years, Section personnel continued 
to provide films and talks to school and civic groups — this year numbering 
50 and including such diverse groups as 4-H groups, Cub Scout "fathers' 
night", Trout Unlimited, YACC groups, The Wildlife Society (University of 
Massachusetts Chapter), and the Trailside Museum. 

This year, in addition to educating youngsters, attempts were made to 
reach adults in a more formalized way. Preliminary work was initiated 
toward establishing an adult education program relating wildlife use to 
the use of other natural resources. A volunteer group of sportsmen educa- 
tors met on six occasions, participated in field trips and developed a 
series of ten lesson-outlines which can serve as a guide in setting up an 
extension level or adult education course. Through the group's efforts, a 
grant was made available that will cover student materials when the program 
goes into effect. Work is proceeding on this project. 



Realty 



Floyd Richardson 
Chief of Wildlife Lands 



Introduction 

Recreational demands on publicly-owned lands increase with each 
succeeding year. Loss of open space continues at an alarming rate. The 
ravenous appetite of the developer places serious demands on vacant land. 
This demand breeds competition which results in skyrocketing land values. 
Lands classified as junk land a few years ago are now considered prime 
building lots. 

Unfortunately, lands lost to development are lands lost forever. 
Efforts by this Division to reserve lands through acquisition in no way 
stem the tide. There is some solace, however, in knowing that these lands 
will provide unlimited recreational opportunities and will not be lost. 
The expenditure of one and one-half million dollars for hunting and fish- 
ing lands during this fiscal year typifies this agency's concern. Three 
thousand seven hundred and forty-five (3,745) additional acres are now in 
the public domain. 

Hockomock Acquisition Project 

To further complement this distinctive and unique area, two parcels 
of five hundred forty-five (545) acres in total were acquired and became 
part of a complex known as the Hockomock Swamp. One hundred twenty (120) 
acres were acquired in the Town of West Bridgewater. These consist of 
mixed woodlands and marshlands and provide a connecting link with other 
Division-owned areas. This parcel provides 1500 feet of road frontage 
and 1200 feet of stream bank on the Town River. Another tract, consist- 
ing of 425 acres, situated in the Town of Norton and the City of Taunton 
was also a valuable addition. The area acquired was once a flourishing 
turkey farm. Numerous range fields, hay covered and interspersed with 
shrub growth, provide ideal habitat for farm game. Acceptable management 
practices will metamorphose this erstwhile turkey range into a wildlife 
management unit second to none, fulfilling a definite need in this region 
of the Commonwealth. 



41 



Rocky Gutter Acquisition Project 

Seven acquisitions, totaling 1158 acres in the Town of Middleboro, 
significantly enlarge this versatile wildlife management area. Rocky 
Gutter presently boasts an area nearly 3000 acres in size. The lands 
acquired were of extreme importance as they were concentrated in the 
proximity of Rocky Gutter Street. This effectively prevents development 
and extinguishes the threat of residences being constructed in the heart 
of the area. 

Peru Acquisition Project 

The Peru Wildlife Management Area is located in central Berkshire 
County approximately 20 miles east of the City of Pittsfield. Rolling 
hills, typical of this region, covered by mixed forests and fields of 
wild blueberry, valleys with occasional beaver ponds and marshes fed by 
small, clear trout streams, grace this area and lend a rural wildlife 
atmosphere. This area has been in Division ownership for over 20 years. 

A section of 113 acres of property abutting Division-owned land and 
with considerable frontage on Route 143 and Mongue Road was acquired. 
The new addition increases the size of this popular management area to 
2638 acres. 

Squannacook River Acquisition Project 

A small cart path which acted as a right-of-way was seriously 
threatened by plans to construct homes on either side. The configuration 
of the winding cart path would eventually create problems for owners of 
these homes and would jeoparize sportsman-landowner relations. This 
potential problem was eliminated by the purchase of the two building lots 
containing 3.37 acres in total. Unimpeded access is guaranteed by this 
acquisition . 

Windsor Acquisition Project 

This area, located in the Berkshire hill town of Windsor, and named 
in the memory of the late Eugene D. Moran, is gaining popularity with 
sportsmen. Two hundred twenty-seven (227) additional acres were acquired 
enlarging the area to 1,022 acres. The acquired property, once farmland, 
contributes prime wildlife lands, additional access and protection from 
residential development. 

Bolton Flats Acquisition Project 

Efforts to enlarge this excellent wildlife area were rewarded by 
three acquisitions in the towns of Bolton and Lancaster. One hundred 
eighty-one (181) acres of prime farmland having considerable frontage on 
Route 117 and Route 110 make an invaluable contribution. Access, parking 
and uninterrupted land control are but a few of the benefits provided by 
the new addition. Bolton Flats, long recognized as a unique and excep- 
tional wildlife area, has steadily grown since the initial acquisition of 
the former Hy-Crest Farm. Sportsmen are now the benefactors of nearly 
900 acres. 



42 



Hinsdale Flats Acquisition Project 

The perimeters of this wildlife unit were extended with the 
acquisition of 409 acres. Four separate property transactions yielded 
farmlands, marshes and woodlands. An additional 1800 feet of road 
frontage was gained along the Skyline Trail and the Division acquired 
increased control along the banks of the Housatonic River. These 
properties appreciably augment this comparatively new wildlife manage- 
ment area, bringing it to 1000 acres. 

Birch Hill Acquisition Project 

One thousand ninety-one (1091) acres of attractive hunting and 
fishing lands were added to the Birch Hill Wildlife Management Area in 
the towns of Royalston and Winchendon. Two hundred (200) acres came to 
this agency as a gift with the remaining 891 acres being acquired by 
purchase. These lands further insure the sportsmen of today and to- 
morrow an area where they can pursue their sport without the threat of 
eviction . 

Quaboag River Acquisition Project 

One of the major objectives of our acquisition program has been 
stream bank ownership. Public ownership eliminates the problems and 
aggravations encountered by the general public when trespassing on 
privately-owned stream-side properties. A Quaboag River acquisition 
project was initiated to place in public domain lands adjacent to this 
valuable resource. Additionally, it would provide a connecting corridor 
with the wildlife management area of the same name. Two parcels were 
acquired in the Town of Brookfield. The Ludlow Corporation donated a 
five and one-half (5.5) acre parcel situated on the north bank of the 
river and adjacent to Route 148. The second acquired parcel, containing 
16.5 acres, is located on Long Hill Road and contributes additional road 
and stream frontage. 

Gosnold Acquisition Project 

The General Services Administration of the United States of America 
transferred the ownership of a parcel of land on Naushon Island in the 
Town of Gosnold to our agency at no cost. The property, consisting of 
4.35 acres, was obtained by the United States government in the year 
1817 to establish a lighthouse station and has been in government owner- 
ship ever since. The property is located on the easterly side of 
Naushon Island in an area commonly known as Tarpaulin Cove. The premises 
were conveyed as a reserve for the conservation of wildlife. 

Leased Fishing Waters 

Our leasing program entered its forty-fifth year during this fiscal 
period. Although the number of leased properties have diminished over 
the years, eight miles of river frontage are still available to fishermen. 
Renewal leases which will not expire until 1983 offer fishing privileges 
on the East and Middle Branch of the Westfield River in the towns of 
Cummington, Chesterfield, Middlefield and Worthington and on the Clam 
River in Sandis field. 



Engineering 

John Sheppard 
Conservation Engineer 

Field Headquarters, Westboro 

Exterior development of the Field Headquarters included the recently 
completed construction of a 3,000 square foot storage and workshop com- 
plex. This facility should help alleviate the currently congested storage 
problems at this installation. 

Also completed during Fiscal 1978 at the Field Headquarters was a 
10,000 square foot employees' parking area and a new 4,000-gallon capacity 
fuel storage system. 

Interior development at this complex included a new fisheries labora- 
tory and a wildlife laboratory. These labs were badly needed to enhance 
and update the Division's research facilities. 

Hatcheries 



Construction of the new hatch house at the Sandwich hatchery has been 
completed. Development at this complex also included a new pump for the 
hatch house and the redevelopment of an existing well. A new heating 
system was installed in the old hatch house. 

A new water supply system, vertical turbine pumping system and sump 
tank were constructed as part of the new water treatment unit at the 
Palmer Experimental Salmon Station. Also, storm windows were installed 
on the existing hatch house. 

New protective security fencing was installed at the McLaughlin 
Trout Hatchery. 

Districts 



A new district headquarters building was constructed at the Connecti- 
cut Valley District in Belchertown. This building is a 4,000-square foot 
complex incorporating offices, workshop and garage areas. 

A fuel storage system and new septic system were upgraded at the 
Northeast District headquarters complex in Acton and a new gas pump was 
installed at our Southeast District headquarters facility at Buzzards Bay. 

In the Central District, we completed the paving of ramp and parking 
areas at the headquarters building in West Boylston and gravel parking 
areas were constructed at the Bolton Flats, Winimusset and Four Chimneys 




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PERSONNEL 



Personnel changes during Fiscal 1978 were: 

Retirements 

Thomas McMahon, Conservation Skilled Helper, 30 July 1977 

Appointments 

Bradford Blodget, State Ornithologist, 5 July 1977 
William Hearn, Conservation Helper, 6 September 1977 
Richard Solomon, Conservation Helper, 6 September 1977 
Philip Warren, Conservation Helper, 14 November 1977 
Eleanor Mitchell, Principal Clerk, 14 August 1977 
Cynthia Hatch, Junior Clerk and Stenographer, 17 January 1978 
Nancy Williams, Junior Clerk and Typist, 30 April 1978 
Michael Syslo, Conservation Helper, 8 May 1978 
Howard Krieser , Conservation Helper, 18 June 1978 

Promotions 

Roscoe Bicknell, Conservation Skilled Helper, 9 October 1977 
David Ford, Conservation Skilled Helper, 27 November 1977 
Robert Madore, Aquatic Biologist, 11 December 1977 
William Humberstone, Conservation Skilled Helper, 29 January 1978 
John Boudreau, Game Bird Culturist, 19 February 1978 

Resignations 

Joseph Comick, Conservation Helper, 30 July 1977 

Paul Matulis, Conservation Helper, 15 August 1977 

Philip Breen, Conservation Helper, 20 August 1977 

Stephen Rideout, Aquatic Biologist, 27 August 1977 

Susan Shwom, Junior Clerk and Typist, 31 August 1977 

Gary Simpson, Conservation Helper, 1 October 1977 

Dianne Ferragamo, Junior Clerk and Typist, 19 November 1977 

Robert Schleyer , Conservation Skilled Helper, 25 February 1978 

Maria Lena, Junior Clerk and Typist, 1 April 1978 

Philip Warren, Conservation Helper, 20 May 1978 



LEGISLATION 



The following is a compilation of titles of bills affecting wildlife 
or of particular interest to the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife which 
were enacted during the fiscal period 1977-1978. 

Chapter 113 - An act further regulating the issuance of sporting, 
hunting, fishing and trapping licenses. Effective 27 July 1978. 

Chapter 276 - An act relative to the loss of licenses for certain 
fish and game violations. Effective 21 September 1978. 

Chapter 387 - An act providing for the noncriminal disposition of 
certain fish and game and marine fishery violations. Effective 
10 October 1978. 

Chapter 453 - An act making certain corrective changes relative to 
the law authorizing the Commissioner of Fisheries, Wildlife and Recrea- 
tional Vehicles to convey certain land in Georgetown to Joanne C. Stanley 
and to convey other land to William E. Handren in exchange for certain 
land. Effective 17 July 1978. 

Chapter 473 - An act relative to permits issued for certain aqua- 
cultural purposes. Effective 15 October 1978. 

Chapter 505 - An act transferring control of certain land at Gardner 
State Hospital to the Executive Office of Environmental Affairs. Effec- 
tive 17 October 1978. 

Chapter 506 - An act authorizing the Commonwealth to take four 
certain tracts of land in the towns of Spencer and Leicester. Effective 
2 August 1978. 

The 1977 legislative session ran into 1978 with the result that 
Commonwealth business was not concluded until January 1978 and late-passed 
legislation could not be included in the Annual Report for Fiscal Year 
1977. Thus these bills, although they are legitimately part of the 
previous year's annual report, are included here. 

Chapter 387 - An act authorizing and directing the Department of 
Fisheries, Wildlife and Recreational Vehicles to convey a certain parcel 
of land and to grant an easement over a certain parcel of land to the 
Town of Lenox for sewerage purposes. Effective 11 July 1977. 

Chapter 542 - An act further regulating license requirements for 
falconers and the sport of falconry. Effective 22 December 1977. 

Chapter 593 - An act increasing the penalties for certain violations 
of law relative to ferrets and fitchews. Effective 1 July 1978. 



47 



Chapter 679 - An act prohibiting the use of certain animals as lures 
or bait. Effective 23 January 1978. 

Chapter 881 - An act directing the Commissioner of Fisheries, Wild- 
life and Recreational Vehicles to convey certain land in Georgetown to 
Joanne C. Stanley and to convey other land to William E. Handren in ex- 
change for certain land. Effective 30 December 1977. 

Chapter 921 - An act further regulating field trials under the con- 
trol of the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife. Effective 3 April 1978. 

Chapter 971 - An act relative to the commercial harvest of eels in 
the waters of the Commonwealth. Effective 11 April 1978. 

Chapter 983 - An act reducing the fee for hunting and fishing 
licenses for certain persons over sixty-five years of age. Effective 
1 January 1979. 



FINANCIAL REPORT 



Nancy Melito 
Head Administrative Assistant 



The Division of Fisheries and Wildlife is funded, by and large, 
through the sale of fishing, hunting, trapping and other special licenses. 
Additional income is realized through Federal Aid reimbursement, other 
miscellaneous sales, income and donations. Operating monies are appro- 
priated on a fiscal year basis from the Inland Fish and Game Fund through 
enactment by the Legislature after consideration of the Division's budget 
request. The following report is the record of actual expenditures and 
income for the fiscal year 1978. 

In the first section entitled "How the Sportsmen's Dollar Was Spent", 
in general, increases in expenditures were the result of normal salary 
increments and the prevalent inflationary factor. Land acquisition de- 
creased 26 percent or $1,885,700 from the previous fiscal year as the 
Division neared the end of expenditure of the original $5,000,000 bond 
issue for this specific purpose. 

The third section, "A Summary of Fish and Wildlife Income" shows a 
decrease of 43 percent or $6,450 less than the 1977 fiscal period in 
antlerless deer application receipts. This occurred because of a change 
in Division procedure, but the resultant cutback in clerical time in- 
volved in processing same, more than compensates for the dollar decrease. 
A significant decrease of approximately 18 percent or $59,797 less than 
the 1977 fiscal year occurred in Federal Aid reimbursement. Considerable 
monies anticipated, particularly in the area of land acquisition, were 
not realized because of additional procedural requirements imposed by 
the Federal government. However, it is felt that these monies will be 
received in the new fiscal year. 

Detail Sheet No. 1 which is an analysis of fishing, hunting and sport- 
ing license and stamp sales indicates, as is usual from year to year, 
fluctuations in the various categories. Perhaps not notably, but inter- 
estingly enough, 25,135 waterfowl stamps were issued in 1977; 25,134 in 
1978. 

The ultimate result of operation in the 1978 fiscal year shows a 
deficit in the Inland Fish and Game Fund of $292,414.70 which the Division 
hopes to resolve mainly through cutbacks in expenditures, stepped-up efforts 
to realize more Federal Aid monies, an increase in user fees and legisla- 
tion to increase the share of the fuel tax. 



49 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE 
General Administration 
Fiscal Year July 1. 1977 to June 30. 1978 
"HOW THE SPOETSMEBPS DOLLAR WAS SPEW!" 



ADMINISTRATION 
Administration 

Board of Fisheries and Wildlife 
Inf ormation-Educ ation 
FISHERIES PROGRAMS 
Fish Hatcheries 
♦♦Fisheries Management 
Fisheries Cooperative Unit 
WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT 
Game Farms 
♦♦Wildlife Management 
Wildlife Cooperative Unit 
Damage by Wild Deer & Moose 
LAND ACQUISITION 
♦♦♦Acquisition of Upland Areas 

and Inholding on Existing Areas 
♦♦♦Coastal and Inland Waters 

Acquisition 
ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION 

♦Development and Improvement of 

Facilities for Public Use 
♦Renovation of Lyman School 
♦Pollution Abatement (McLaughlin) 
♦Fish Screens (Quabbin Reservoir) 
♦Fish Rearing Facilities (Palmer 
and McLaughlin) 
SECRETARY. ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS 

Office of Secretary (3$) 
DEPARTMENT OF FISHERIES. WILDLIFE 



AND RECREATIONAL VEHICLES 
Commissioner's Office (50$) 
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT 



2310-0200 
2310-0300 
2310-0200 

23IO-O6OO 
23IO-O6OO 
23IO-O6OO 

2310-0 AGO 
2310-0400 
23IO-O4OO 
2310-0800 



2310-0310 
2670-9016 

2310-0300 

2670-8753 
2670-9021 
267O-9O22 

2670-9023 
2000-0100 

2310-0100 



Natural Resources Officers' Salaries 
and Expenses (30$) 
Hunter Safety Training (100$) 
TRANSFERS FROM FUNDS 



Group Insurance 
Settlement of Certain Claims 
RETIREMENT ASSESSMENT (.2$) 
INTEREST ON BONDED DEBT 
MATURING SERIAL BONDS AND NOTES 



2020-0100 
2O2O-O3OO 

1590-1007 

0612-1000 
0699-2800 
0699-2900 



324*524,05 
196,361.66 

601,840.70 

428,525.29 

459,879.83 



6.80$ 
4.1* 

12.62$ 

8.99$ 

9.64$ 



499,801.88 10.49$ 



689,027.25 14.44$ 



322,524.05 
0. 



413,525.29 



470,837.18 
15,000.00 
13,964.70 



179,099.66 
509,927.59 

356,687.69 
5,282.09 



361,969.78 7.59$ 
5,865,77 .11$ 

34,874.03 

355,058.09 
58,426.30 

182,515.66 
101.90 
178,449.78 
77,845.00 



.73$ 



7.44$ 
1.22$ 

3.83$ 
.01$ 
3.74$ 
1.63$ 



Continuing Appropriation 

**Portions of expenditures 60$ or reimbursable by Federal Government 
**Certain Land Acquisitions are 50$ reimbursable by Federal Government 



50 



COMMONWEALTH OF MAS S ACHUSETTS 
DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE 



APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
Fiscal Year July 1, 1977 to June 30, 1978 



ACCOUNT NO. TITLE 



2310-0200 
2310-0400* 
2310-0600* 
2310-0800 



Administration 
Wildlife Management 
Fisheries Management 
Damage by Wild Deer & Moose 



APPROPRIATIONS 
527,942.00 
952,547.00 
1,138,041.00 
13,988.00 



EXPENDITURES 
& LIABILITIES 

518,885.71 

945,717.01 

1,030,365.99 

13,964.70 



TOTAL REVERSION 
9,056.29 
6,829.99 
107,675.01 





2,632,518.00 2,508,933.4' 123,584.59 



CONTINUING 
APPROPRIATIONS 



EXPENDITURES BALANCE FORWARD' 



^310-0300 Development & Improvement 
Facilities for Public Use 
2310-0310** Acquisition of Upland Areas 

& Inholding on Existing Areas 
2670-8753 Certain Renovations to 

Lyman School Building 
2670-9016** Acquisition of Coastal & 

Inland Wetlands 
2670-9021 Pollution Abatement: 
McLaughlin Hatchery 
2670-90 22 Fish Sereens: 

Quabbin Reservoir 
2670-9023 McLaughlin & Palmer 
Hatcheries 



549,045.87 

379,733.00 

36.39 

724,630.16 

66,104.65 

4,105.37 

. kx5± - 

1,723,659.95 1,051,153.81 



356,687.69 
179,099.66 

510,084.37 
5,282.09 



192,358.18 
200,633.34 
36.39 
214,545.79 
60,822.56 

4,105.37 



!,506.14 



* Portions of expenditures 6Cff or 75% reimburseable by Federal Government 

* Certain Land Acquisitions are 50^ reimburseable by Federal Government 



51 

SUMMARY OF FISH AND WILDLIFE INCOMK 
July l t 1977 to June 30, 1978 



*Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses 


3304-61-01-40 


$2,277,993*30 


**Trap Registrations 




1 ,301 .00 


*Archery Stamps 


,, 

ft 11 It II 


39,659.^0 


**Special Licenses, Tags and Posters 




9,739.25 


"Waterfowl Stamps 


3304-40-01-40 


5,614.15 


"Waterfovl Stamps - Ducks Unlimited 


3304-43-02-40 


20,177.60 


Antlerless Deer Permits 


3304-61-14-40 


8,571.50 


Bear Permits 


tl ft ft tt 


220.50 


Rents 


3304-63-OI-4O 


11,915.24 


Miscellaneous Income 


3304-69-99-40 


838.32 


Sales, Other 


3304-64-99-40 


6,761.85 


Refunds Prior Year 


3304-69-01-40 


984.48 


Court Fines and Penalties 


3308-41-01-40 


12,372.50 


Pittman-Robertson Federal Aid 


3304-67-01-40 


190,885.58 


Dingill- Johns on Federal Aid 


3304-67-02-40 


84,177.21 


Anadromous Fish Projects Federal Aid 


3304-67-04-40 


23,723.63 


Reimbursement for Services 


3304-62-01-40 


4,937.00 


Interest on Investments 


3395-60-01-40 


51,799.50 


Gasoline Tax Apportionment 


3312-05-01-40 


305. 579.72 


Transferred From Other Funds 




1S.4D3.20 






3,079,654.73 


Deficit in Inland Fish and Game Fund as 


of June 30, 1978: 


292,414.70 



"Detail Sheet No. 1 
**Detail Sheet No. 2 



52 



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Detail Sheet #2 



SPECIAL LICENSES , TAGS AND POSTERS 



Receipt Acct, 



3304-61-02-40 



3304-61-03-40 
3304-61-04-40 



3304-61-05-40 

3304-61-06-40 
3304-61-08-40 

5304-61-10-40 
5304-61-12-40 
i304-6l-13-4O 
i304-64-01-40 



.304-61-40 



e of License 



Quantity 
& Unit Price 



Amount 









480.00 


v?p = t (ipnt. Citizens: 


32 @ 


15.00 




3 @ 


50.00 


150.00 




120 © 


10.00 


1,200.00 








128.00 




128 © 


1.00 


oxass 1 ^risny 








XI IX Oldi. • 


13 @ 


7.50 


97.50 


Rpnpwal * 


139 @ 


5.00 


695.00 


Class ? (Fish) 






30.00 


Tni t t a! • 

xiil OXal« 


4 © 


7.50 




64 @ 


5.00 


32O.OO 


Class 4 (Birds & Mammals) 






682.50 


Tni "hi • 


91 © 


7.50 


1 IOJ 10 « CI -J- • 


414 @ 


5.00 


2,070.00 




1 @ 


4.25 


4.25 




1 @ 


1.00 


1.00 


Tn*5 fci ^1 • 




7.50 


-30.00 


Renewal: 


48 @ 


5.00 


2L0.00 


ArirH fA onal : 


ZiA3 ® 


1.50 


664. 50 


Class 7 (Individual Bird or Animal) 






36.00 


Initial: 


12 @ 


3.00 


Renewal: 


44 @ 


1.00 


44.00 


Tmnortati on Pprmits: 


33 © 


5.00 


1 65.00 


Class 9 (Falconry) 








Ma qt.prs • 


5 O 


25.00 


125.00 


Atyrvrpnti cps: 




25.00 


225.00 


General: 


4 @ 


25.00 


100.00 


Class 10 








Raptor Breeding: 


4 3 


10.00 


40.00 


Rantor Salvase : 




1.00 


3.00 


Take Shiners 


111 © 


5.00 


555.00 


Duplicate: 


1 © 


1.00 


1.00 


Field Trial Licenses: 


4 © 


15.00 


60.00 


Initial: 


10 © 


7.50 


75.00 


Renewal: 


34 © 


5.00 


170.00 


flnmrnpfri al Shoo+.i np Ptpsptvps* 


8 © 


50.00 

y\*t • ' V> 


7,00.00 


Monn+i dp Ppr*nrn + s» 




2.00 


26 00 


Special Field Trial Permits: 


35 © 


I5.OO 


525.00 


Game Tags: 


7,790 © 


.05 


389.50 


Fish Tags: 


350 © 


.02 


7.00 








$9,739.25 


Trap Registrations: 








Initial: 


283 © 


2.00 


566.OO 


Renewal: 


490 © 


1.50 


735.00 



$1,301.00 





His Excellency, Edward J. King, Governor of the Commonwealth, the Executive 
Council, the General Court, and the Board of the Division of Fisheries and 
Wildlife. 



Sirs : 

I have the honor to submit herewith the One Hundred and Fourteenth 
Annual Report of the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, covering the ' 
fiscal year from 1 July 19 78 to 30 June 19 79. 



Respectfully submitted, 

I Richard Cronin 
Director 



Publication #1 1 ,880-53-25O-u-S0-CR 

Approved by Alfred C. Holland, State Purchasing Agent. 



C73r 



INDEX 



The Board Reports 

Planning 

Fisheries 

Hatcheries 

Wildlife 

Game Farms 

Ornithologist's Report 
Districts 
Western 

Connecticut Valley 

Central 

Northeast 

Southeast 
Information and Education 
Realty 

Maintenance and Development 
YACC 

Personnel 
Legislation 

How the Sportsmen's Dollar is 



Page Number 
1 
3 
5 
9 
12 
20 
22 

26 
29 
32 
33 
36 
38 
41 
44 
45 
46 
48 

Spent 49 



Bradlee E. Gage 
Chairman 
Fisheries and Wildlife Board 



As required by law, the Administrative Board of the Division of Fish- 
eries and Wildlife met on a monthly basis throughout the year. Following 
a policy set several years ago, the Board moved its meetings around the 
state, holding sessions in Turners Falls, Pittsfield and Belchertown, as 
well as its usual meeting place at the Westboro Field Headquarters. 

In the Board's opinion, the Division is continuing to fulfill its 
role as the manager of the state's wildlife resources. There continues 
to be a high level of both professional competence and morale. 

Personnel 

In June 1979, the Board learned, with much regret, of the resignation 
of the Division's director, Matthew B. Connolly, Jr., who was leaving to 
accept a position with Ducks Unlimited, Inc. This will be a loss to both 
Che state and the sportsmen. The Board immediately set out to search for 
a replacement. 

There was one replacement on the Board. After many years of faithful 
and valuable service, Martin Burns decided not to seek, reappointment. His 
experience and common sense will be sorely missed. The Board is fortunate 
in having a very qualified replacement, Nancy Begin, also from Essex County. 
As an agriculturist and avid sportsperson, Mrs. Begin is a most welcome ad- 
dition. 

Hearings 

A principal function of the Administrative Board is the establishment 
of regulation. Regulations and regulatory changes can come about only after 
public hearings. The Board recognizes that regulatory changes are sometimes 
disturbing to many sportsmen, yet, it also realizes that there are changes 
occurring in the state, in fish and wildlife populations, and in fishing 
and hunting pressures. As a result, possible regulatory changes must be 
considered. The hearing plays an important role as it presents the major 
opportunity for the Board to hear an interchange of views among the Division 
biologists, the sportsmen, and the general public. 

Several key hearings were held during Fiscal 1979. The annual water- 
fowl hearings were held in August with a large turnout of duck hunters 
present. The controversy of early-versus-late hunting inland versus coastal 
hunting, and the need to make immediate decisions to comply with Federal 
time requirements are factors which combine to make this a complex hearing. 



_ 



-2- 



Ia May, a heariag oa possible chaages ia the primitive weapoas seasoa 
eaded almost a year's study aad review by the Board. This culmiaated ia 
Juae with the uaaaimous decisioa to revert to the origiaal iateat of the 
Board at the time whea this seasoa was iaitially established — to utilize 
the true primitive muzzle loader or replica, as well as to tightea up 
specific regulatioas regardiag permissible types of shot, powder aad so 
forth. 

Other heariags dealt with establishmeat of a stream catch-and-release 
program oa a very limited basis. Recogaiziag chaagiag coaditioas aad ia- 
creased fishiag pressures ia the Commoawealth, the Board agreed to try aa 
experimeatal catch-aad-release program oa the upper oae aad oae-half miles 
of the Deerfield River. 

The opeaiag of the raccooa seasoa was moved from September to mid- 
October, aad thea, after a subsequeat heariag, was moved back to 1 October. 

Divisioa Activities 

Ia its role as "overseer" of Divisioa activities, the Board ia coajuac- 
tioa with the Director aad his staff, at various times duriag the year 
touched oa almost all facets of Divisioa activities. This raaged from fre- 
queat brief iags oa budgets, legislative bills, aad geaeral Divisioa programs 
to specifics such as the hoped-for Otis Air Force Base shootiag facility. 

Board Coaceras 

Two major coaceras of previous reports, uaduly low pay for Divisioa 
prof essioaals aad aatiquated equipmeat, still remaia. Uaf ortuaately , from 
a realistic poiat of view, the Board caa do little about chaagiag this situ- 
ation other thaa to offer support to the Director ia his efforts to correct 
this. It is gratifyiag to see a start ia the budget which has some moaies 
set aside for the replacemeat of equipmeat. 

Divisioa reveaue aad iaflatioa are serious coaceras faciag both the 
Board aad the Director. Historically, the Divisioa has paid its owa way 
with the sportsmea's licease moaies as the backbone of the budget. However, 
iaflatioa aad outside costs are iacreasiag Divisioa expeases much more 
rapidly thaa reveaue caa iacrease. This is both a short-term aad loag-term 
problem. Fortuaately, the Divisioa, the Board aad the sportsmea of the 
state recogaize the problem aad are moviag to meet it. 

A last coacera is over the area of laad acquisitioa. The state, ia 
geaeral, aad the sportsmea, ia particular, have gaiaed from the Divisioa 's 
stroag laad acquisitioa program of the past 15 years. With tighteaiag 
budget restraiats, it appears that moaies for laad acquisitioa will be 
negligib le. 

In summary, the Board is satisfied that the Division is performiag its 
role in state government in an exemplary manner with a high degree of pro- 
fessionalism. With continued cooperation of the sportmen, the legislature, 
and other state agencies, the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife will con- 
tinue to move ahead. 





Paul S. Mugford 
Senior Land Use Planner 



The Division's commitment to a businesslike, well-ordered planning 
process was confirmed in September of 1977 with the implementation of 
"Comprehensive Wildlife Planning." This action ties the Division to a con- 
tinuous Federally-assisted program that undertakes to improve fish and 
wildlife management effectiveness by providing sound data and a range of 
alternatives upon which administrative decisions will be based. Comprehen- 
sive planning will emphasize program outputs and benefits rather than in- 
puts and activities. It will develop a data bank of natural resource sup- 
plies, needs, and financial and manpower resources upon which management 
decisions will rely, as well as providing managers with evaluations of 
alternative strategies and costs associated with meeting program objectives. 

In 1979, a team of three planners began to assist in the development 
of methodologies for compiling and assessing data on wildlife and wildlife 
habitat supplies and on resource user demands and satisfactions. Consider- 
able existing data was assembled by biological staff and surveys initiated 
to obtain additional data. In late fall of 1978, and again in the spring 
of 1979, some 2000 telephone interviews were completed gathering additional 
up-to-date information on species preferences, harvests, and related data 
from Massachusetts-licensed anglers. All data is currently being computer- 
ized in anticipation of subsequent retrieval and analysis . 

"Comprehensive Wildlife Planning" will produce two things: firstly, 
a strategic plan that will tell us where we want to go, and, secondly, an 
operational plan that will tell us how to get there. As a whole, "Compre- 
hensive Wildlife Planning" will: 



1. Encourage the agency to set measurable objectives that pro- 
mote action rather than reaction. 

2. Provide well-ordered sets of alternatives for decision- 
makers . 

3. Alert other resource users to wildlife requirements. 



4. 



Strengthen the agency's position in negotiations with other 
resource users. 



-4- 



5. Expose and examine opportunities and problems. 

6. Mobilize and allocate the agency resources needed to accom- 
plish objectives. 

7. Evaluate progress toward stated objectives. 

8. Eliminate piecemeal decisions. 

9. Serve as the basis for all management decisions. 

A third phase of "Comprehensive Wildlife Planning" will involve con- 
tinual updating of operational plans as a result of performance controls 
and evaluations . 



FISHERIES 

Peter H. Oatis 
Chief Aquatic Biologist 



Since the commitment to comprehensive planning and programmed manage- 
ment, made in October 1977, the Fisheries efforts have been directed at 
compiling, consolidating and coordinating reams of pertinent information 
about resource supply and users that are vital for establishing and evalu- 
ating the Division's fishery program objectives. 

Fisheries programs are now broken down into the following categories: 

a. Lake Fisheries 

b. Stream Fisheries 

c. Anadromous Fisheries 

d. Specialized Fisheries 

e. Technical Assistance 

Division managers and biologists have been active on all segments of 
the program; data collection and processing, as well as maintaining the 
day-to-day operation of active projects. Activity under these categories 
are: 

Lake Fisheries 

Fifty lakes, ten in each management district, were surveyed to update 
physical and biological assessments. From the data collected, plus his- 
toric information, standards for fish growth assessment, stock density and 
productivity were established. Detailed maps of the lakes were produced 
along with updated fisheries information relative to access, species pre- 
sent and competitive water uses were printed and made available to the 
public. Specific fisheries management recommendations were established, 
priorities were set, and recommendations were implemented where possible. 

Extended efforts were made in cooperation with the Divisions of Water 
Pollution Control and Water Resources in developing a computer-operated, 
data-storage information bank. This program is now operational and should 
greatly facilitate storage and retrieval of current information pertaining 
to the lakes of the Commonwealth. It will also highlight information gaps 
and eliminate much duplication of effort by all agencies collecting lake 
data. 



-6- 



Stock assessments of bass and pickerel clearly demonstrate the need 
for revisions in statewide regulations governing these species and will,, 
no doubt, influence the decisions of the Fisheries and Wildlife Board as 
they address proposed management schemes for these species. 

The use of the computer and survey designs give the Division the 
ability to focus on the fisheries problems and potentials unique to each 
lake. The implementation of unique programs, and objectives should greatly 
enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of lake fisheries. 

Stream Fisheries 

Concurrent with the lake fisheries investigations, stream survey crews 
have been actively assessing all stocked trout waters. We now have good 
information about wild trout supplies and production, as well as information 
on the survival of stocked trout. When this data is combined with use 
information currently being collected by field observations and telephone 
survey inquiries, program objectives will be set and implementation will be- 
gin. Much of the data, at this point, indicates that we have a number of 
streams in Worcester and the counties to the west that produce good trout 
populations on their own. Current stocking allocations to these streams 
can be redirected to other waters where they will be put to better use. 
Stream data will soon be processed by computer programs in cooperation with 
other state agencies. This capability and the classification systems being 
developed will greatly enhance ability of staff biologists to comment upon 
and evaluate the numerous environmental impact reports which are addressed 
each year. This data is also of paramount importance in resolving cases 
subject to mitigation and setting priorities for Division development proj- 
ects such as placing of stream improvement structures, fish barriers or 
protective devices, and land purchases that require the expenditure of 
thousands of dollars. 

Anadromous Fisheries 

Present efforts focus primarily on the Connecticut, Merrimack and 
Charles Rivers. Shad and salmon passage at Holyoke was the second highest 
on record at 256,000 and 19 respectively. In total, 51 salmon were taken 
from the watershed for brood stock purposes. Mortality of captured salmon 
was low and, as of this writing, over 107,000 salmon eggs have been taken 
at the Berkshire Federal Fish Hatchery. The young produced from Connecticut 
River returns should greatly enhance the restoration efforts in the years 
to come. This year also marked the completion of the Turners Falls fishway 
which will provide shad with an additional 20 miles of spawning and nursery 
habitat denied them since 1797. The sport fishery at Turners Falls is ex- 
pected to become the best on the river. 

On the Merrimack, two salmon were creeled by sportsmen fishing below 
the Essex Dam for shad. The catch of salmon gives some indication of the 
improved water quality in the area. A small but intense shad fishery exists 
at Lawrence with many anglers getting 10 to 20 fish per day. As the run of 
fish increases, the potential fishery at Lawrence and Lowell will provide 
thousands of hours of recreation for Northeast anglers. 



-7- 



Fish passage facilities at Essex and Pawtucket dams will soon become 
a reality. The Lawrence Hydroelectric Company has initiated construction 
of a fishway at Lawrence scheduled for completion by the spring of 1981. 
Several companies are currently interested in developing hydro facilities 
at Lowell in full recognition of their fish passage responsibilities. 

The transportion of 1,100 shad from the Connecticut to the Charles 
River was sufficient to produce young in the Newton-Needham area. These 
young are expected to migrate this fall and return to the Charles River 
three and four years from now. Similar efforts were successful last year. 
Significant shad increases are expected in the Charles by 1981 and 1982. 

Specialized Fisheries 

These fisheries entail unique programs designed to lend diversity and 
particular qualities not commonly found within the state, to certain areas. 
They entail the maintenance of unique populations of fish or the imposition 
of unique regulations designed to enhance the quality of an existing fish- 
ery that could not otherwise be maintained without the expenditure of addi- 
tional funds and energy. 

Northern pike fisheries certainly fall into this category. This year, 
the Division was fortunate enough to be able to purchase additional supplies 
of pike from Minnesota with the financial assistance of the Metropolitan 
District Commission. These fish were stocked to maintain the thriving 
fisheries at East Brimfield Reservoir and Quaboag where individuals up to 
18 pounds have been caught as well as to provide for introduction at Lake 
Attitash, Amesbury; Charles River, Newton; Ponkapoag Pond, Canton; Lake 
Quinsigamond, Worcester; Hammond Pond, Newton; Chequaquet Pond, Barnstable, 
Snipatuit Pond, Rochester; Lake Rohunta, Orange; and Lake Buel, Monterey. 
Pike introductions to the above waters were primarily based upon the recom- 
mendations produced by the previously-cited lake investigations. As a re- 
sult, there will be pike fishing opportunities in all five management 
districts. Information obtained this summer indicates that many such legal 
pike, averaging 18 to 22 inches, were caught this summer. Many of these 
fish will be approaching the legal length of 28 inches by late spring of 
1980. Recognizing that the availability of pike for stocking is something 
on which we cannot rely, a one-year commitment from the State of Pennsyl- 
vania for 10,000 eight-inch tiger muskie, to be delivered during September 
1980, has been obtained. These fish lend themselves readily to common 
cultural techniques and will provide the basic information as to whether 
rearing them is a feasible project for Massachusetts to undertake in the 
mid-1980s. 

Sea-run brown trout also fall into this category. To date, this pro- 
gram is still in the developmental stages, but results are extremely en- 
couraging. Numerous fish in the five to ten-pound category have been 
creeled, catching the attention of national fishing magazines which note 
that the fishing is a challenge for the dedicated angler willing to brave 
the elements in pursuit of extremely wary prey. Program assessments by 
Project Leader Joseph Bergin, at professional meetings, have influenced 
the State of Maine in undertaking a similar program for their southern 
coastal waters. 



-8- 



Although selective rearing of brood stock has significantly enhanced 
growth and survival, hatchery problems have led to less than optimal 
supplies of smolts. This program and the Massachusetts Division of Marine 
Fisheries' coho program both received a financial boost in the form of 
federal aid from the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service which is currently 
being used to upgrade production facilities at the state fish hatchery at 
Sandwich. Hopefully, in the near future, both of these programs will have 
numbers and quality of smolts necessary to meet immediate and long-range 
program objectives. 

Nineteen seventy-nine was also the first year that the Division ex- 
perimented with catch-and-release regulations along the upper mile and a 
half of the Deerfield River. Pressure during the early part of the season 
was low as anglers pursued trout they could creel, but as supplies dwindled, 
the recreational value of the fishery in this section of the river became 
apparent . 

By mid- June, angler counts indicated a significant fishery along the 
upper reach that continued throughout the summer months. The objective of 
doubling the summer use and catch at no additional expense, in terms of 
stocking, was easily met. The quality of the fishery in the designated area 
served to attract anglers from across the state and from as. far away as New 
Jersey and Michigan, giving an economic boost to a portion of the state that 
is heavily reliant upon the tourist industry. Angler comments recorded by 
the creel agents overwhelmingly expressed favor of the program. 

In conjunction with the volunteer efforts of Ilo Howard, the section is 
participating in initiating an urban angler program designed to draw atten- 
tion to inner city fishery resources. This program is currently focused on 
Boston. With the proper funding, volunteer participation and coordination, 
similar programs will, in future, be available to such areas as Lawrence- 
Lowell, Springfield-Holyoke, and Fall River-New Bedford. Both the fisher- 
ies supplies and potential anglers represent untapped resources that can be 
developed in the years to come. 

Technical Assistance 

This is a new project that was basically set up to allow the Division 
to become eligible for Federal Aid for activities that always were part of 
ongoing programs. 

These activities include consulting with other Federal, state and local 
government agencies as well as private citizens and organizations on matters 
of mutual concern. Such activities include review and comment of environ- 
mental impact assessments, local fisheries assessments, tagging operations, 
fish kill investigations and advice to private pond owners. It is estimated 
that approximately 20 to 25 percent of staff time is currently spent in 
activities of this nature with every indication of this workload increasing 
as numerous agencies become increasingly aware of the importance of maintain- 
ing environmental integrity in the light of the respective missions of their 
individual agencies . 



HATCHERIES 



David Fredenburgh 
Chief Fish Culturist 



Fiscal 1979 proved to be a fairly good year for the Commonwealth ' s 
hatcheries. Although production was lower than normal, the quality of 
trout was higher. Production was down slightly because of a large finger- 
ling mortality during Fiscal 1978. The outlook is bright for Fiscal 1980 
due to low mortality, less vandalism and poaching, and generally better 
available water supplies. 

The Palmer Experimental Salmon Hatchery finally began Atlantic salmon 
production in March 1979. This installation has been under renovation 
during the past six years and the Division's efforts to produce salmon 
were hit or miss. The hatchery is designed to produce about 60,000 smolts 
per year. Due to the design and construction, other cold-water species 
could be cultured there in the future if and when the production of salmon 
is no longer necessary. The hatchery could easily be converted to programs 
dealing with fish culture research, brood stock or a trout production sta- 
tion. The success of the Palmer renovation is a tribute to the diligence, 
expertise and dedication of the hatchery staff. 

The East Sandwich hatchery is also presently being renovated for the 
production of coho salmon. This is a joint project between the Division 
of Fisheries and Wildlife and the Division of Marine Fisheries. The proj- 
ect is being funded by the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, Marine 
Fisheries, U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisher- 
ies Service. After securing funding and a design, the site work was com- 
pleted during the summer. 

The design of the hatchery is essentially the same as at Palmer. 
Above-ground round fiberglass tanks were specified and ordered and a sump 
tank for reservoir water was built. The coho hatchery is expected to be 
in operation by the fall of 1980. As was the case with the Palmer hatch- 
ery, the project is being designed by in-house staff and will be construc- 
ted, wherever possible, by Division personnel. 

It must be mentioned that the YACC crew at both Sandwich and Palmer 
(covering the hatcheries in Palmer, Belchertown, Sunderland and Montague) 
completed many projects that otherwise could not have been done. Among 
there were: 



-10- 



1. Building a pump house annex at Palmer hatchery. 

2. Rebuilding pools at the Sandwich hatchery. 

3. Clear cutting and liming ten acres at McLaughlin hatchery. 

4. Installing a security fence at the Montague hatchery. 

5. Building a restroom at the Sunderland hatchery. 

The Sunderland hatchery again had the opportunity to hire an eight- 
member CETA crew to rebuild two series of fish ponds. This project was 
completed along with several lesser projects such as brushing out areas, 
mowing lawns and rebuilding some water structures. 

General fish culture activities continued on a normal basis at all 
three of the hatcheries in the Valley. Many maintenance programs were 
increased due to additional personnel from CETA and YACC and additional 
funding from the Development account. Because of these programs and 
extra effort by hatchery staffs, the hatcheries are in better shape than 
usual. 

A present priority is the completion of the East Sandwich coho hatch 
ery. This construction must progress so that production will be underway 
by the end of the calendar year 1980. 

Another high priority item is developing solutions for pollution 
problems caused by some of our hatcheries. The McLaughlin pollution proj 
ect has been at a standstill for too long and must be budged off dead 
center. 

Along with these goals, the hatchery aims to maintain present produc 
tion but align that production to accommodate the needs of fishery manage 
ment programs. 



-11- 



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WILDLIFE 



Chet McCord 
Chief of Wildlife Research 



The Wildlife research section is charged with the responsibility of 
providing the Division with the information necessary to make sound wild- 
life management decisions. The task, is one of monitoring wildlife popula- 
tions, as well as the environmental and social factors which influence 
those populations, so that the status and crend of the wildlife resources 
can be determined- When a species' population, for example, gets too high 
or too low, then it is this section's role to recommend Co the Fish and 
Wildlife Board changes in regulations and provide supportive information 
about these changes. This year, the section's recommendations led to the 
following regulatory changes: 

The crow season was b rough into conformity with Federal guidelines as 
crows are protected by the Migratory Treaty Act and are, therefore, a 
federally-protected species. Under these federally-established guidelines , 
the season may be up to 124 days long but it may not include the peak nest- 
ing season. The Massachusetts season had been split with the first segment 
opening 1 January and closing 31 March and the second segment opening 
19 August and closing 30 September. Other states had opened their seasons 
for only a few days a week and thereby extended the 124 days over a longer 
period. Under new regulations, the season now opens 1 January and runs to 
10 April, then reopens 1 July and runs to 31 December. In both segments, 
crows can be hunted on Fridays, Saturdays and Mondays only. 

The primitive firearms season was studied extensively this year. How- 
ever, the Board did not come to any conclusion. The primary problem was 
that the season had developed into something very different from what was 
originally intended. Under the original concept, the season was to provide 
an opportunity for sportsmen to hunt as their forefathers did during the 
period around the 1850s. The type of weapon used at that time was a key 
factor and was to be limited to caplock, flintlock, tubelock, wheel-lock 
or matchlock. A problem developed when the definition of caplock was not 
tight enough to eliminate such innovations as a modified shotgun or an 
adapter plug which would convert any shotgun into a "muzzle loader." This 
conflict of new technology with the traditions of the past should be con- 
cluded early next year. 



-13- 



Th e raccoon hunting regulations were modified to eliminate a grey area 
in the wording which could have been interpreted to mean that a limit of 
raccoons had been taken if three animals were run with dogs even though no 
raccoons were taken or killed. 

Wildlife management area regulations were changed starting with the 
Westboro Wildlife Management Area where there was a problem with horseback 
riders and no effective regulations to stop hunting in the beagle area. 
New regulations were passed which state that it is not permissible to 
possess, lead, ride, and so forth a horse on the Westboro area and that the 
beagle area is closed to all hunting. Problems had also developed with the 
hunting hours on wildlife management areas during the pheasant season. Under 
old regulations, it was illegal to hunt on any wildlife management area be- 
fore sunrise or after sunset from 10 October to 2 January. The original 
intent of that regulation was that reduced hours be in effect during the 
pheasant season. Unfortunately, the wording of the old regulation included 
all upland game birds. Thus, when the ruffed grouse season was extended, 
the limited hunting hours were extended as well. The Board defined the 
length of time the restricted hours would be in force on wildlife management 
areas by limiting them to the pheasant and quail season, and further noting 
Chat the reduced hours applied only to wildlife management areas that were 
stocked with pheasant and quail. 

Other wildlife management area regulations included the establishment 
of permits for harvesting timber and other activities. Formerly it was il- 
legal to remove anything from a wildlife management area including berries, 
nuts and other wild crops. The term "field" was redefined to eliminate 
problems with people driving on and making new roads on Division lands. 
Finally, new rules were passed to eliminate possession of alcoholic beverages 
without a permit. 

New Federal regulations stimulated changes in the Massachusetts laws 
regarding exposure of poisons in the control of wildlife. Minor changes were 
made in the regulations regarding exposed chemicals to bring them into con- 
formity with new Federal and state standards. 

Wildlife sanctuaries have been an important but small part of the 
Division's management in past years, but regulations had not been adopted 
governing sanctuary use. State laws do provide the basic framework but 
allow the Division to draft regulations. An eleven-point regulations package 
was adopted which defined activities which would be illegal on sanctuaries — ■ 
including hunting, trapping, removal of vegetation, dumping, campfires — and 
established an opening and closing time for these areas. 

Since Penikese Island is a wildlife sanctuary, but is also used in part 
by a school, a special regulation was passed which allowed the school's use 
of the area. Restriction of the area and permissible activities were defined. 

The special hunt for paraplegic sportsmen used to open during the first 
full week in November. This was changed to the last week in October to avoid 
conflicts with the opening of the archery season. 



-14- 



The Newbury Wildlife Management Area has traditionally been the site of 
a controlled pheasant hunt on days of high hunting pressure. On Saturday 
mornings, for example, the area would be opened to the first 200 hunters 
and then the area would be closed at noon and restocked with pheasants for 
an afternoon hunt. This afternoon hunt proved undesirable and the Board 
moved to eliminate the afternoon stocking. In addition, technical changes 
were made in regulations dealing with the controlled waterfowl hunt on the 
Delaney Wildlife Management Area. 

Falconry field trial regulations were adopted which permitted holding 
of falconry meets and made allowance for participation by out-of-state fal- 
coners . 

Research activities of the Wildlife Section during the fiscal year re- 
lated to: 

Beaver 

A total of 1016 beaver were taken by 128 trappers in 110 towns during 
the 1978-1979 season. This was 650 less than in 1977-1978 and 248 less than 
a ten-year (1969-1978) average harvest. As predicted, low fall pelt price 
with resultant reduced trapper effort was probably a major factor in the 
overall decline in the harvest. 

Otter and Fisher 

During 19 78-1979, a total of 121 otters were taken by. 64 trappers in 73 
towns for a mean of 1.9 otter per successful trapper. This compares with a 
take of 163 and a mean of 2.3 for 72 trappers in 1977-1978. The fisher 
harvest increased from 37 in 19 77 to 45 in 19 78 with 26 trappers taking 
fisher in 25 towns for a mean harvest of 1.7 fisher per successful trapper. 
Worcester (32), Franklin (20), and Berkshire (18) Counties provided the most 
otter, while Worcester County yielded the most fisher (23). Otter were taken 
primarily in November and December, and fisher primarily in November. A 
total of 70 otter and 37 fisher carcasses were received from cooperating 
trappers. The mean age of otter taken in 19 78-1979 were 2.54 years and for 
fisher 1.68 years. This compares with a 1977-1978 mean age of 2.56 for 
otter and 1.5 for fisher. 

Mourning Dove 

Calling doves were counted along 17 randomized routes in cooperation 
with the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service's annual mourning dove breeding 
population census. The total number of calling doves on three comparable 
routes increased 117 percent from 1977 to 19 78, but decreased 39 percent 
from 1978 to 1979. Fourteen new routes were added in 1979 providing a com- 
bined total of 103 calling doves. 

Bobwhite Quail 

Whistling quail were tallied along 18 routes in three southeastern 
Massachusetts counties in early summer of 19 79. The weighted call indices 
for Barnstable, Bristol and Plymouth Counties showed no significant differ- 
ence from 1977 indices. Annual indices were significantly different from a 
four-year mean index for Barnstable and Plymouth Counties. 



-15- 



Turkey 

Turkeys in western Massachusetts continue to expand in numbers and 
distribution with birds now reported throughout Berkshire County, most of 
Franklin County and parts of Hampshire and Hampden Counties. A spring 
gobbler season is a practical reality and is recommended for 1980. Nine 
turkeys were trapped in Berkshire County in March 1979 and transplanted to 
Hubbardston State Forest in Worcester County. Based on a population model 
incorporating annual productivity and mortality, the spring 1979 breeding 
population in Massachusetts was estimated at 750 turkeys. 

Black Bear 

A record number of 574 bear hunting permit applications was received 
during 19 78. The legal kill of five bears was the greatest since the 
season was changed in 19 70. The mean age of bear taken by hunting was 5.55 
years. One train mortality and one capture-related death also were recorded. 
New reports of 51 observations totaling 65 bear were received from 32 towns. 
Ten nuisance complaints were received with apiary and corn damage pre- 
dominating. One unsuccessful attempt at translocation was made. 

Deer 

Three male and three female deer were harvested by paraplegic hunters 
in Nantucket and Berkshire Counties during the special two-day season, 
2-3 November. During the 18-day (6-25 November) archery season, bowmen re- 
ported 167 deer — 101 males and 66 females. Mainland archers reported 148 
deer taken — 92 males and 56 females. The four mainland counties with the 
highest archery harvest were Berkshire (52 deer) , Franklin (21 deer) , Hamp- 
den (14), and Hampshire (28 deer). On Nantucket Island archers reported 16 
deer (7 males and 9 females). Two males and 1 female deer were reported 
by Martha's Vineyard bowmen. 

Shotgun hunters reported harvesting 2652 deer during the six-day 
(4-9 December) shotgun only deer season. Of these, 1896 were males (172 
male fawns) and 756 were females. Mainland shotgun hunters reported 1606 
adult males, 119 buttonbucks and 613 females for a total of 2338 deer. The 
top-ranking deer producing counties are: Berkshire (1047), Franklin (500), 
Hampden (242) and Worcester (208). Nantucket shotgun hunters reported 143 
deer (63 adult males, 28 male fawns and 52 females). On Martha's Vineyard, 
a total of 118 deer were taken (47 adult male, 24 male fawns and 47 females) 
and 54 deer were removed from Gosnold Island. 

During the special three-day primitive firearms deer season 
(18-20 December) , the muzzle loaders reported harvesting 183 deer statewide 
(69 males and 114 females) . During this season, the most important counties 
were Franklin, 61; Hampshire, 27; Worcester, 24; and Berkshire, 9. 



-16- 



Waterfowl research activities conducted during the fiscal period in- 
cluded the following: 

Gosling Transplant Program 

A final report was prepared summarizing results of the gosling trans- 
plant program from 1967 to 1979. A total of 427 geese were transplanted to 
12 sites in central and western Massachusetts. Released geese nested on 
six of the release sites and at least five other nonrelease sites. More 
extensive nesting was suspected based on data gathered for the breeding 
bird atlas. Assistant Game Biologist James Pottie and Project Leader H W 
Heusmann presented a paper on the taxonomy of eastern Massachusetts geese 
at the Thirty-Sixth Annual Northeast Fish and Wildlife Conference held in 
Providence, Rhode Island. Measurements of adult geese indicated that three 
subspecies were represented in Eastern flocks — the interior race, the 
Atlantic race, and the giant race — with evidence of extensive interbreeding. 

Preseason Waterfowl Bandings 

A total of 1110 birds were banded during the 1978 preseason banding 
segment. This total included 111 hand-reared wood ducks. Wild-banded water- 
fowl included 291 wood ducks, 294 mallards, 142 black ducks, 22 mallard x 
black hybrids, 111 green-winged teal, 73 blue-winged teal, 2 wigeon, 1 pin- 
tail and 1 mallard x unknown hybrid. Also banded were 2 soras, 2 gallinules 
and 1 coot. A cooperator banded an additional 20 least, 7 semi-palmated , 
1 solitary and 14 spotted sandpipers, 2 semi-palmated plovers and 3 killdeer. 

Winter Inventory Flights 

A total of 168,869 waterfowl were counted during the January 19 79 winter 
inventory, up 7 percent over 19 78 and 49 percent over the 10-year average. 
Black ducks (13,931) were down 55 percent from 1978 and 33 percent below the 
10-year average. Mallards, mergansers, buffleheads and canvasbacks were all 
down substantially from last year, but still above the 10-year average. 
Goldeneyes were unchanged from 19 78, down 14 percent from the 10-year aver- 
age. Exceptionally high counts were recorded for scaup (25,736), sea ducks 
(89,099) and Canada geese (16,192). 

Winter Banding Program 

The winter of 1978-1979 was atypical with unusually mild conditions pre- 
vailing until early February when a record-breaking cold spell set in, freez- 
ing over most bays and harbors. Some starvation resulted. Fortunately, the 
earlier mild weather meant most birds were in excellent condition prior to 
the cold weather, enabling them to survive the freeze. Division personnel 
and cooperators banded 1216 black ducks, 154 mallard x black hybrids, 49 
mallards, 14 pintail, 2 wigeon and 3 green-winged teal. 

Black Duck Imprinting Project 

A final report summarizing the results from 19 71 to 19 79 was presented 
at the Thirty-Sixth Annual Northeast Fish and Wildlife Conference by Project 
Leader H W Heusmann, former Chief of Wildlife Research Warren Blandin, and 
Connecticut Valley District Game Manager Peter R. Pekkala. Black ducks were 
released annually on three areas during 19 73-19 75. Single releases of ducks 



-17- 



were made on three additional areas in 1975. A total of 219 male and 245 
female black ducks were released. At least 11 percent of the females nested. 
Although 287 ducklings were hatched out in cylinders, only 1 nonreleased 
black duck was known to have nested in a cylinder during the study. This 
lack of yearling recruitment led us to conclude that the project was un- 
successful. 

Park Waterfowl Investigations 

Banding data for 5783 mallards banded in 19 Massachusetrs parks during 
the years 1970-1976 was tabulated and summarized by banding site, year, age 
and sex. This data will be sent to the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in 
Laurel, Maryland for computer analysis to determine survival rates. 

Wood Duck Dump Nesting Study 

The final report for this study was accepted for publication by the 
Journal of Wildlife Management . The results, presented by Project Leader 
H W Heusmann, Field Agent Robert Bellville, and Assistant Game Biologist 
Richard G. Burrell, indicated that prior presence of eggs in nest boxes did 
not affect nest initiation or nest attendance by wood ducks. Their attempts 
to artificially create dump nests using game farm wood duck eggs was only 
marginally successful and no large broods resulted. They also discovered 
that 75 percent of hens that dumped one or more eggs in nests eventually in- 
cubated by other wood ducks later incubated clutches of their own, and con- 
cluded that dump nesting was beneficial to box-using populations of wood 
ducks . 

Evaluation of Starlingproo f Nesting Structures 

Waterfowl usage on eight ponds in eastern Massachusetts, where all boxes 
were equipped with 100 x 100mm skylight lids, was 38 percent. Starling usage 
was nine percent. On three eastern Massachusetts ponds, where boxes were 
equipped with both light lids and control lids, wood duck usage for light lids 
was 20 percent; whereas their use of boxes with control lids was 55 percent. 
Starling use of light lids was zero while their use of control lids was 22 
percent. In western Massachusetts, eight areas were tested for light lid 
versus control lid acceptance. Here, wood ducks and/or hooded mergansers 
used five percent of the skylight-equipped boxes and 35 percent of the control 
boxes, while starlings used 33 percent of the skylight boxes and 13 percent of 
the control boxes. 

Waterfowl Gizzard Shot Survey 

A total of 1266 gizzards were examined since this study's inception. 
Shot ingestion rates varied from one percent for Cape Cod to 3.5 percent for 
Buzzards Bay. Gizzard examination in past years was by manual examination 
under a dissecting scope. Future examinations will be made by x-raying or 
f luoroscoping gizzard contents. 



-18- 



The W-9-D project is concerned mainly with the management of wildlife 
management areas. However, wood duck nesting boxes are erected and main- 
tained on this project. 

During Fiscal 1979, the following projects were completed under 
Project W-9-D: 

Three headquarters buildings were maintained on the Birch Hill, Martin 
Burns and Crane Wildlife Management Areas. Eight storage buildings were 
maintained on the Housatonic Valley, Birch Hill, Martin Burns (2), Crane 
Wildlife Management Areas and at Central (2) and Western Wildlife Districts. 
Three dams were maintained on the West Meadows and Swift River (2) Wildlife 
Management Areas. One footbridge was built on the Martin Bums Wildlife 
Management Area. 

A gravel road of .3 miles was constructed for access to the Swift River 
Wildlife Management Area. Roads and trails were maintained by graveling, 
grading, cutting brush, limbing overgrown trees and plowing snow. In all, 
a total of 77.8 miles of roads were maintained. 

Four new parking lots were constructed on the Bill Forward (1) , Birch 
Hill (1) and Hockomock (2) Wildlife Management Areas. In addition to these, 
existing gravel parking lots were maintained by graveling and grading while 
grass lots were maintained by mowing. In all, a total of 45 lots were main- 
tained on 13 areas. 

Fifteen waterfowl blinds were maintained on the Delaney and Ludlow 
Wildlife Management Areas. Blinds were maintained by replacing and repaint- 
ing broken boards and supports. Informational signs were posted and repaired 
on 28 management areas. Among these were carved area entrance signs, signs 
indicating times of sunrise and sunset, area rules and regulations and vari- 
ous directional signs. In all, a total of 985 signs were erected and main- 
tained. Signs were supplemented by metal boundary markers placed on corner 
bounds and along back land and white area designation signs placed along 
roadsides. Between signs and boundary markers, a total of 58.2 miles of 
management area boundaries were marked. 

Trees and shrubs were planted to establish hedgerows for wildlife food 
and cover. Species planted include Scotch pine, red pine, dogwoods, honey- 
suckle, hanking cherry, autumn olive and crabapple. A total of 1800 shrubs 
and 450 trees were planted on the Bolton Flats, Myles Standish and Swift 
River areas. In other locations, fields were limed and fertilized to produce 
adequate cover and portions of fields were planted to annual grains to pro- 
duce food and cover strips. In all, a total of 148 acres were limed, 
fertilized and planted. On other areas, the Division undertook cooperative 
farm agreements where a farmer planted a crop of hay and left portions un- 
harvested for wildlife food and cover. About 600 acres of fields were 
maintained in this manner. 

A special project was undertaken at the Swift River Wildlife Management 
Area where one acre was cleared to regenerate a degenerated clone of male 
aspen for improved ruffed grouse habitat. 



-19- 



In other sections, brush encroaching on fields and cleared areas was 
controlled by mowing with a rotary brush cutter, hand cutting and herbicides. 
Under this segment, a total of 422.5 acres were controlled. 

The W-9-D project extended beyond maintenance and development in 1979. 
Under the other portions of this project, over 800 wood duck boxes were con- 
structed, erected and maintained statewide in suitable wood duck habitat. 
Approximately 2.5 miles of rotten barbed wire fencing was removed from the 
Hinsdale Flats and Erwin S. Wilder Wildlife Management Areas and a burned- 
out building was removed from the Wilder area. 

Additional time was spent on management of water levels on the Delaney 
area, project administration, area inspections, managed public hunts and in 
the repair and maintenance of equipment. 




During this fiscal period, 1 July 1978 to 30 June 1979, major pen 
construction was accomplished at all the game farms. The CETA and YACC 
programs were of great aid in supplying labor. All pens destroyed during 
the previous winter storms were either repaired or replaced with new pens. 

Game bird production was normal with the utilization of good manage- 
ment techniques. Vandalism occurred at all the farms resulting in a 
small loss . 



All game bird feed formulas were updated in an effort to obtain 
better nutrition and lower food costs. However, feed costs continued to 
climb although not quite as sharply as in previous years. 



-21- 



Game Farm Production 
1978 - 1979 



Pheasant 



Game Farm 


SR 


A 


B 


C 


PG 


Misc* 


Total 


Sandwich 


250 




1,744 


4,178 


4,956 


400 


11,528 


Wilbraham 


1,920 




4,040 


8,248 


5,168 


550 


19,926 


Ayer 


2,517 


100 


3,424 


4,488 


13,761 


800 


25,090 


Totals 


4,687 


100 


9,208 


16,914 


23,885 


1,750 


56,544 



Quail 



*Misc. - Field trial birds, displays, youth hunt, etc. 



A total of approximately 3,000 quail, produced at the Sandwich State Game 
Farm, were released on the wildlife management areas in the Southeast Wild- 
life District. In addition, approximately 500 quail were distributed . for 
field trial purposes. 



White Hare 



A total of 825 white hare were purchased from a source in New Brunswick, 
Canada. Releases were made in all five districts . 



STATE ORNITHOLOGIST'S REPORT 



Bradford G. Blodget 
State Ornithologist 



The State Ornithologist is responsible for the conservation and man- 
agement of nongame and endangered species, working closely with the Chief 
of Wildlife Research, as land management decisions have an effect on non- 
game as well as on game. Nuisance animal problems have both game and non- 
game aspects. A broad array of environmental impact studies and environ- 
mental notification forms are received annually, but only a small percent- 
age of them receive rigorous review and comment. Most of these projects 
have potential effects on both game and nongame. 

Biologically, the population dynamics of "game" species are not 
always very different from those of "nongame" species. As State Ornithol- 
ogist, I have tried to work toward cooperation with the game biologists 
and an integrated approach to comprehensive wildlife management. 

In keeping with this philosophy, I have taken pains to point out that 
lands owned and managed by the Division provide habitat for hundreds of 
nongame species along with game species, a fact that is frequently over- 
looked by sportsmen and nonsportsmen alike. Pursuing this, I have encour- 
aged people who express a vague desire to "help wildlife" to purchase a 
license regardless of whether or not they intent to hunt. 

The Division's nongame and endangered species program continued to 
suffer from lack of funding. However, in addition to dealing with problem 
wildlife matters, exotic wildlife permit operations, and consulting with 
individuals on nongame and endangered wildlife, the following areas of 
activity have been paramount in Fiscal Year 19 79. 

Legislative Work 

Work continued on a nongame bill that would be acceptable to the Divi- 
sion of Fisheries and Wildlife. The Ornithologist attended many legislative 
meetings pertaining to the nongame bill. At this writing, the Division- 
favored bill filed by Senator Carol Amick, S-1986, differs substantially 
from a House version, H-855, filed by Representative Joseph Manning of 
Milton. The latter version contains much troublesome language and would 
likely be incompatible with existing Division programs. The apparent ir- 
reconcilability of these two bills makes the prospect of a nongame bill 
emerging from the present legislative session very doubtful. 

The Ornithologist also testified before the Committee on Taxation in 
support of S-1341, a bill that would have allowed individuals to designate 
funds for nongame wildlife by an income-tax refund check-off. 

As in 1978, the State Ornithologist testified in favor of several other 
bills: one to extend the Division's authority to investigate and regulate 
reptile and amphibian populations, and another that would amend Section 26A 
of Chapter 131 relative to the endangered species list. These two bills 
seem to have brighter prospects for passage. 



-23- 



Cooperative Endangered Species Agreement 

During FY 1979, Che State Ornithologist filed qualifying documentary 
material with the United States Fish and Wildlife Service in support of 
the Division's application for a cooperative agreement for the management 
of endangered species of fish and wildlife. Final agreement, under which 
the Division will be eligible for two-thirds (2/3) grant-in aid monies for 
approved endangered species projects, is expected in August 1979. 

Endangered Species Activities 

In April 19 79, an administrative bulletin detailing special handling 
procedures for endangered species was distributed in all district offices. 

In January 1979, the Division participated in the National Wildlife 
Federation's nationwide bald eagle census. A total of eight bald eagles 
and one golden eagle was recorded in the Commonwealth. Except for a bald 
eagle at Nantucket Island, all the wintering eagle population was found to 
be concentrated (as expected) in the Quabbin Reservation. Reports of sum- 
mering eagles within the Quabbin Reservation persist, but no nesting is 
believed to have occurred. The Division continues to monitor for breeding 
activity and continues to be interested in hacking eaglets in the Quabbin 
area, but a formal project application has not yet been submitted to the 
United States Fish and Wildlife Service. 

In February, the State Ornithologist attended a meeting of cooperators 
in the peregrine falcon restoration effort at Albany, New York. The Divi- 
sion has continued its full support for the Peregrine Fund's restoration 
project at Mount Tom in Holyoke. Six birds were released at this hacking 
station in 1979. The permit section issued a 1979 depredation control 
permit in conjunction with the peregrine work for the control of great 
homed owls in the vicinity of the release site. The Ornithologist field- 
checked certain historic eyries for signs of nesting activity with negative 
results. Monitoring of these sites will be continued in the future since 
the increasing population of released birds annually increases the likeli- 
hood that a natural nesting will occur. 

During the winter months, a peregrine tiercel wintered in downtown 
Boston, frequently roosting on a ledge of the McConnick State Office Build- 
ing. Despite telescopic scrutiny, it could never be determined with ab- 
solute certainty whether this individual was a banded specimen released 
by the Peregrine Fund or an unbanded Arctic bird. The State Ornithologist 
inspected this site with Dr. Thomas Cade and personnel from Cornell Univer- 
sity, who installed a special nesting structure should the wintering bird 
attract a falcon and attempt to nest. This possibility did not materialize 
as the bird departed during early March. The site, however, is likely to 
attract birds in the future and could even be used as a hacking station. 
Some further structural modifications will be made at the site to render it 
more attractive as a nest site. 

During FY 1979, the Ornithologist continued to work closely with the 
U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service in development of a proposal listing the 
Plymouth red-bellied turtle as an endangered species and delimiting 
"critical habitat" for this species in the Town of Plymouth. A hearing on 



-24- 



this matter will be conducted in Plymouth by the Service on 4 August 1979. 
The Division continues Co assist in and monitor Federally-funded life 
history studies of the turtle being conducted by Dr. Terry Graham, Profes- 
sor of Biology at Worcester State College. During FY 19 79, the Division 
also agreed to manage a 183-acre land parcel bordering Gunner's Exchange 
Pond purchased by the Nature Conservancy with the ultimate intention of 
selling the property to the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 

Tern Management Project 

Due to lack of funds, the Division's operation in this important wild- 
life management area continues to be a largely passive one, confined to a 
coordinating role. No field work was carried out by Division personnel 
during the 19 79 nesting season. The Ornithologist organized a meeting of 
all field cooperators at the Cape Cod National Seashore Headquarters at the 
conclusion of the 19 79 breeding season. In 19 79, the least tern population 
increased 17 percent over 19 78 to reach an historic high of 1,7 34 pairs, 
thus seemingly confirming the belief that least tern populations may be the 
most resilient of all to habitat modification resulting from human activi- 
ties. This nesting year, common and roseate terns posted substantial in- 
creases over 19 78 of 33 and 20 percent to 6,168 and 2,023 pairs respective- 
ly, while the Arctic tern population declined 15 percent to 45 pairs. No 
population estimate was available for the Arctic tern for Noman's Land, 
which could account for the drop in pairs. The roseate tern figures are 
being watched particularly closely as, worldwide, the roseate tern is known 
to nest in only a few large colonies, Bird Island, Massachusetts being one 
of them. 

Great Blue Heron Investigation 

On 12-13 June, the State Ornithologist, with the assistance of James 
Cardoza and Winston Saville, conducted a statewide inventory of all known 
great blue heron rookeries in the Commonwealth. Historical data are poor 
for this wader, but it has apparently never been a widespread nester in the 
Commonwealth. This year's inventory resulted in the confirmation of 28 
active nests distributed among six locations — three in Berkshire County and 
one each for Worcester, Middlesex and Franklin Counties. Although the 
boundaries were not confirmed, it appeared that nine of the nests were on 
Division-owned lands — eight on the Becket Wildlife Management Area and one 
on the Bertozzi Squannacook Wildlife Management Area. Eight were counted 
at the Suasco Impoundment in Westboro which is managed for wildlife by the 
Division. Another six turned out to be within or nearly within the bound- 
aries of the Otis State Forest. Four were found in Wendell on the property 
of the Connecticut Valley Resource Council. The last was at Three Mile Pond 
in Sheffield which is in the process of being cut and drained. It is en- 
tirely possible that additional rookeries exist. Without exception, all 
rookeries located were in drowned timber associated with beaver flowages 
except for the Westboro rookery which exists in drowned timberland behind 
a man-made impoundment. It is recommended that these rookeries be monitored 
annually. 



-25- 



Breeding Bird Atlas 

This spring marked the sixth and final season of data collection for 
the Massachusetts Breeding Bird Atlas. The State Ornithologist continued 
to assist in field work associated with this project, covering a 36-block 
area in the south-central part of the Commonwealth. Collected data will 
be developed, keypunched, and computerized for storage. It is hoped that 
the data collected over the last six years can be published. The State 
Ornithologist will continue to work closely with the Massachusetts Audubon 
Society and will assist with this project wherever possible. 

Exotic Animals Task Force 

The final report of the Exotic Animals Task Force was presented to 
the Director in June 19 79. Included in this report are recommendations 
relative to the artificial maintenance and propagation of birds, mammals, 
reptiles and amphibians and a recommendation on the Exemption List. The 
Task Force's report is currently under staff review. Recommendations for 
its implementation will be made early in FY 1980. 

Other Activities and Miscellaneous 

The State Ornithologist prepared a revised second edition to the of- 
ficial list of Birds of Massachusetts first published by the Division in 
1978. This document becomes Fauna of Massachusetts Series Number One. 

Because of the high volume of nuisance animal calls and lack of office 
personnel, record keeping relative to nuisance animal calls in the Boston 
Office was discontinued on 30 September 19 78. 

There were no oil spill incidents in FY 1979 requiring bird rescue and 
damage assessment operations. 



Western Wildlife District 




Winston Saville 
District Manager 



Probably the most "visible" activity of the District in any given 
year is the stocking of fish, pheasants and hare. During Fiscal Year 
1979, Western District personnel were heavily involved in such stocking. 
During the fall of 1978, 7700 rainbow trout were released into the better 
streams and ponds of the district and 7000 kokanee fingerlings were 
stocked in Laurel and Onota Lakes. The following spring, 114,426 brook, 
brown and rainbow trout were released into stockable waters and an 
additional 85,800 kokanee fry were stocked into Laurel and Onota. Per- 
haps the stocking that generated the greatest interest among anglers 
was the 19 January stocking of 400 Northern pike, received from Minnesota 
and stocked into Lake Buel, Monterey. 

During the fall, District personnel also stocked 5268 cock pheasants. 
Of these, 1040 were stocked prior to the opening of the season, 4228 were 
stocked during the season (2968 on wildlife management areas and 1260 in 
open covers) , and an additional 413 birds (50 cocks and 363 hens) were 
released in the spring to both open covers and wildlife management areas. 

White hare, received on 13 February 1979, were stocked in suitable 
covers in Great Barrington, Hawley, Heath, Hinsdale, New Marlborough, Rowe, 
Savoy and Windsor. 

Another area which received considerable attention from District staff 
was that of surveys. Two surveys were conducted of woodcock singing 
grounds , mourning doves were surveyed through four call routes and a survey 
was conducted of great blue heron rookeries. Fisheries staff conducted a 
creel census on the newly-designated catch-and-release area on the upper 
Deerfield River to assist in assessing use and determining the success of 
the new program in that area. 

During the winter months, game section staff assisted in the wild 
turkey project, cooperating with Project Leader James Cardoza in locating, 
baiting, trapping and tagging birds. These birds were taken in the Berk- 
shires and transplanted to northern Worcester County where, it is expected, 
they will become the nucleus for a new turkey population. 



-27- 



The District was also involved with the bear project. Records were 
kept on bear sightings and District personnel provided advice and assis- 
tance in dealing with five specific complaints related to bear, three in- 
volving damage to beehives. During the bear hunting season, bear were 
checked at the District office and tooth samples were taken for subsequent 
age analysis. 

Also checked during the appropriate seasons were beaver and other fur- 
bearers. District staff check and tagged pelts, gathered pelt measurements 
and harvest information, and collected carcasses for transmittal to the 
Westboro Field Headquarters. 

As in the past, this District hosted a part of the special hunt for 
paraplegic sportsmen. Following the special hunt, District personnel 
distributed materials needed for the conduct of the three general deer sea- 
sons. During these seasons, District personnel operated a checking station 
at District headquarters in Pittsfield and, during the shotgun season, the 
staff operated three additional checking stations, including a mobile sta- 
tion designed and constructed in a remodeled Air Force surplus van which is 
now available as a mobile project vehicle. 

Additional research efforts were related to the wood duck project as 
District personnel maintained 136 wood duck structures, among them 45 new 
nesting boxes and 17 starlingproof cylinders. 

Land management, during this period, involved rehabilitation; i.e., 
liming, fertilizing, and seeding of a .6 mile trail on Canada Hill which had 
formerly served as a skidding road. A half-mile trail on the Peru Wildlife 
Management Area also received special attention. Twenty-two and a half 
acres were mowed to maintain established clearings. These were: 

Canada Hill, 6 acres 
Peru, 2 acres 

Hinsdale Flats, 1-1/2 acres 
Housatonic Valley, 8 acres 
Stafford Hill, 5 acres 

Other activities included the maintenance of parking lots at the Housa- 
tonic and Stafford Hill Wildlife Management Areas. A storage barn, obtained 
in a recent land purchase, was cleaned and the materials contained in the 
barn were salvaged. A bridge was constructed on the Hinsdale Flats area 
and the staff assisted in drawing up environmental assessment reports for 
certain management activities on these and other Division-owned properties. 

Much of the District Manager's time has been devoted to the Division's 
interface with both the sporting and nonsporting public. He attended 
monthly meetings of rod and gun clubs and county leagues and participated 
in two trappers association meetings. In addition, he addressed five com- 
munity club meetings, participated in two radio talk shows, and provided 
slide and discussion presentations to Berkshire Community College groups 
as well as to groups from local high schools. 



-28- 



District personnel participated in staffing the Division's exhibits 
at the Eastern States Exposition and took part in a variety of smaller 
exhibits and field events among which was the second annual canoe race on 
the Housatonic River which is co-sponsored by the Division. 

Contacts were maintained with town and city clerks through the pre- 
sentation of a special program at the clerks' annual dinner meeting. 
District personnel also helped to establish six new license sales outlets 
in the area. 

In service to other organizations, the District Manager joined forces 
with staff from the Westboro Field Headquarters in conducting two training 
programs for personnel of the Berkshire District of the Department of En- 
vironmental Management. Approximately 100 trainees attended each session 
which was, by all accounts, most useful and successful. 

The efforts of the District staff were augmented by the assistance of 
crews from CETA and the YACC programs. Under the supervision of District 
personnel, the CETA workers reclaimed several fields that were reverting 
to woodlands while the YACC crew converted a building next to the District 
headquarters into workshop and office space, took part in numerous salvage 
operations, and cleared a five-acre safety zone on the Moran Wildlife Man- 
agement Area. 

Preliminary investigations were initiated into the possibility of 
changing the location of the District headquarters. However, no action 
has been taken on this proposal at the present time. 

Editor's Note: The District Manager's perennial willingness to assist in 
youth programs was recognized this year when Win Saville became the recipi- 
ent of the Gene Moran Conservation Award, given each year for service to 
youth by the Wahconah Regional High School Rod and Gun Club. 



Connecticut Wley District 



Herman Covey 
District Wildlife Manager 



The Connecticut Valley District covers 49 towns on both sides of the 
Connecticut River from the Vermont and New Hampshire borders to the 
Connecticut state line. There are three counties in this region and the 
District takes in parts of all three, with the remaining sections of the 
three counties falling into the Western District. The region is blessed 
with trout streams, lakes and ponds and is traversed by a number of 
scenic highways. The countryside boasts the rich farmlands of the valley 
proper surrounded by rolling hills and some mountains. The Division has 
five installations in this area aside from the District headquarters — 
Wilbraham State Game Farm and fish hatcheries at Montague, Sunderland, 
Belchertown and Palmer. These are primarily trout-rearing facilities, but 
the station at Palmer is currently being converted to production of Atlan- 
tic salmon. 

During Fiscal 1979, the Valley District staff pursued regular and 
traditional management and maintenance operations. One of the most vis- 
ible of these is the stocking of pheasants, hare and trout. A total of 
15,660 pheasants were stocked during this year; 3000 of these birds were 
stocked in open covers prior to the open season, 8604 were stocked during 
the season. An additional 4050 were stocked on wildlife management areas. 
Sportsmen's clubs in the area received 1550 cocks and 25 hens to be used 
in their pheasant rearing program and a surplus brood stock of 272 cocks 
and 1596 hens were released to selected covers throughout the district 
in the hope that they could continue natural production in the wild. One 
hundred eighty-five hare were stocked in open covers during this period. 
Hare are stocked to augment native populations and to establish hare 
colonies in suitable habitat. 

Trout stocking is tallied by the calendar year rather than the fiscal 
year, so figures available are those for calendar 19 78. During this period, 
a total of 169,150 trout were stocked — 106,050 into streams, 63,700 into 
ponds — weighing a total of 91,996 pounds. 

In addition to stocking, the District fisheries staff assisted in 
Division (and other) research projects, participating in the transport of 
Atlantic salmon from Vermont to Connecticut, assessment of fish resources 
in the Quabbin Reservoir, and surveying fishermen and their catch. They 



-30- 



participated in netting and creel census associated with the Northern pike 
project, assisted in the Connecticut River shad and Atlantic salmon projects, 
and provided manpower for the procedures involved in a largemouth bass in- 
ventory of ten ponds. Concurrently, they monitored water chemistry on many 
ponds, investigated fish kills and participated in a variety of workshops. 

District personnel also assisted Division biologists in many wildlife 
research projects, among them wood duck field studies. Wildlife problems 
reported to the district were investigated and the staff trapped, removed 
and relocated numerous beaver and raccoons in addition to dealing with in- 
stances of problem ducks and geese. 

During the deer season, District personnel operated two deer checking 
stations and assisted law enforcement officers. Cooperation with law enforce- 
ment was carried on throughout other hunting and trapping seasons as well. 
District personnel also recorded and tagged pelts of beaver, bobcat, otter 
and fisher. 

Other efforts within the district focused on maintenance and improvement 
of lands and property. Among these were the development and maintenance 
of signs, barways and gates. Designated areas on the wildlife management 
areas were cut and cleared in accordance with the wildlife management plan, 
while other areas were fertilized and/or planted. In all, eight acres were 
limed and fertilized, two acres were planted to hay mix and clover. Other 
lands were leased to a f armer-cooperator and to this end a farmer cooperative 
lease agreement was designed and implemented. 

To keep the public apprised of the activities of the District and the 
Division, the District staff built and helped staff the Division's exhibit 
at the Springfield-based Eastern States Exposition. The District Manager 
conducted classes of wildlife activities for Holyoke Community College, 
regional high schools, 4H groups, and YACC groups. He participated in four 
radio shows in Orange, Westfield and Greenfield, and participated in numerous 
public meetings. Among these are the meetings of the Hampden, Hampshire and 
Franklin County Sportsmen's Leagues, meetings of the Connecticut River Ad- 
visory Committees, meetings of the Scenic Rivers Committee and various meet- 
ings with the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U. S. Army Corps of En- 
gineers,, the R.C.& D. section of the U. S. Department of Agriculture, and 
meetings of numerous sportsmen's clubs and associations. As last year, the 
District Manager was heavily involved with programs involving CETA personnel 
and this year also with YACC personnel. 

The District Manager and Chief Fish Culturist, working together, se- 
cured a CETA project for the Sunderland hatchery. The program ran from May 
through September. They attended numerous meetings, devised a work plan, 
entered contract negotiations, and conducted interviews. Once started, the 
project was administered by the Chief Fish Culturist. 

The District Manager also worked on a CETA plan for the Wilbraham State 
Game Farm. After many meetings, preparing proposals, and so forth, the 
changed requirements in annual salary — with ceiling on earnings set at 
$7,090 — our rates are higher so we no longer qualify under the program. 



-31- 



YACC 

The District Manager has a new program assigned to the District co 
administer. There is a supervisor and 10 participants in this Young Adult 
Conservation Corps project. Six participants are stationed at the District 
and four are stationed at the Wilbraham State Game Farm. The work is 
varied in scope and covers a wide range of job experiences. This prepares 
the individual to be familiar with different jobs and, as a result, quali- 
fies him for more types of work, in future employment. The work accomplish- 
ments under the program were as follows: 

Cemented garage floor, 40 ft. by 50 ft.; built cement block building 
for storage of flammable fluids; painted storage building; clear cut area 
for grouse management; cut logs and hauled to yard site; stacked lumber; 
cut and burned brush on woodland border; made signs with cut letters, 
painted and erected; assisted game farm operations; built rearing pens; re- 
paired and maintained buildings (carpentry, plumbing and roofing); picked up 
roadside trash and cleaned up boat ramp; cleaned up after logging operations 
cut logs; remodeled bathroom at YACC office building; assisted in District 
activities (fish stocking, beaver, shocked fish, stocked hare and planted 
shrubs); erected signs for field trials and marked plantings; constructed 
field trial building (dug footings, poured cement foundation, erected cement 
blocks, installed windows and roofs; building will be completed next year); 
finished comfort stations near field trial building; erected new chimney on 
resident house; landscaped around headquarters; maintained grounds; poured 
foundation footing and boarded up back and side of pavilion for storage; 
erected deer-proof fence; assisted setting up exhibit at Springfield; re- 
paired duck blinds at Ludlow; did clerical work and took messages over 
telephone in absence of District Manager. 

This program has been so successful that the Recreational Conservation 
and Development officers for Franklin County (USDA) contacted the District 
Manager for assistance in developing a YACC proposal. As this work must be 
done on public lands, Division management areas will benefit from the R.C. 
& D. program. Education efforts combining the forces of the R.C. & D. staff 
and the district staff will continue as part of this cooperative program. 



G. Christopher Thurlow 
District Wildlife Manager 



During Fiscal Year 1979, personnel from the Central Wildlife District 
worked on the development and maintenance of four wildlife management areas. 
In cooperation with the YACC program and personnel, this District maintained 
44.6 miles of roads, developed 33 hunter information signs, maintained 116 
boundary and other information signs. Approximately 500 wildlife shrubs 
were planted and 86 acres were brush cut. Three cooperative farmers were 
added for agricultural work on wildlife management areas making a total of 
14 farmers working on 10 areas. 

The District maintained 162 wood duck nesting boxes and added 10 new 
boxes to new areas. We received 31 nuisance beaver complaints and relocated 
eight beaver. Seventy-two other types of nuisance animal complaints were 
received and 11 required direct District assistance. Sixteen live craps 
were loaned. 

Forty-seven towns and eleven wildlife management areas received pheas- 
ant stocking. A total of 18,690 birds were released in the district. 
One hundred fifty-six snowshoe hare were released. 

During the fall of 1979, 12 ponds and one river were stocked with 
15,000 rainbow trout. During the spring of 1979, 106 streams and 30 ponds 
received 51,800 9-plus rainbow trout, 26,200 6-9 inch rainbow trout; 
9700 9-inch plus brown trout, 3500 6-9 inch brown trout, 125 12-inch plus 
brown trout; 3250 9-inch plus Eastern brook trout, 54,000 6-9 inch Eastern 
brook trout, and 750 12-plus inch Eastern brook trout. 

A total of 15 stocked streams in the French and Quinebaug River drain- 
ages were sampled during July and August. Samples indicated fair carryover 
of stocked trout but little natural reproduction was apparent. Ten ponds 
were sampled in June of 1979 to determine future management objectives. 
An extensive sampling program and creel census was undertaken at Wachusett 
Reservoir during the spring and summer of 1979. 

Technical assistance was provided to one club and two private landowners 
in June. Maintenance was provided at five ramps and management areas with 
sign maintenance and trash collection comprising the bulk of the work. 




Walter L. Hoyt, Jr. 
District Wildlife Manager 



The Northeast District performed its traditional and primary functions 
of stocking fish, pheasants and varying hare; of managing seven wildlife 
management areas and five sanctuaries; of providing all forms of public 
information on wildlife; of cooperating with other state, local and Federal 
agencies; of providing exhibits for major wildlife-oriented events; and of 
helping to control nuisance wildlife. 

Three new projects were initiated in the Northeast District this 
year. The first was the incorporation of the Young Adult Conservation 
Corps program into District activities. Two YACC groups of one supervisor 
and six corpspersons were located in the District, one at District head- 
quarters and one at the Martin Burns Wildlife Management Area in Newbury. 
The crew based at Newbury made a major contribution toward bringing the 
William Forward, Martin Burns and Crane Pond Wildlife Management Areas 
back, on the long-range schedule of maintenance and development by creating 
openings, parking areas, trails and repairing roads. Significant individ- 
ual projects include construction of a bridge and gate, rebuilding of the 
rifle range and building a 6000-foot barbed wire fence to enclose grazing 
cows admitted for control of vegetation. The YACC crew at District head- 
quarters were integrated directly into Districtwide activities. Their major 
contribution was a fisheries survey of trout streams which included mapping 
of 36 streams and electrofishing 20 others. Other important work included 
general work at the Ayer Game Farm (including construction of a nature 
trail), construction of approximately 140 routed, wooden signs, and clear- 
ing openings , trails and roads on management areas . Both crews aided the 
salmon restoration project by manning the trap on the Merrimack River. 

The second project involved the arrival of Barbara Terkanian, wildlife 
artist for the I & E program, funded by CETA, who used the Northeast Dis- 
trict as home base while creating an impressive list of illustrations. 
These included illustrations of warm and coldwater fish species commonly 
found in Massachusetts, covers for the Fauna of Massachusetts Series 
(Massachusetts Bird List, Mammal List, etc.), programs for dedications, a 
display of the Charles River, and the cover of this report. 



-34- 



A third project was the initiation of an Urban Angler Program designed 
to provide new opportunities for potential anglers in urban areas. Prepar- 
ations are currently underway for this project which is expected to hold a 
premiere workshop on 22 September, National Hunting and Fishing Day. 

District personnel stocked 6244 pheasants (another 550 were released 
through the sportsmen's rearing program), 114 varying hare and 196,475 
trout. 

Management activities on wildlife management areas include development 
and maintenance of roads, trails, fences, buildings, clearings and signs; 
water level control and waterfowl management areas ; wildlife plantings and 
seedings; and fertilizing and liming of fields. A controlled upland hunt 
was conducted at the Martin Burns Wildlife Management Area and a controlled 
waterfowl hunt was held on the first four days of the season on the Delaney 
Wildlife Management Area. 

Approximately 250 permits were issued to use the target range at the 
Martin Burns Wildlife Management Area, and 350 Scouts, school children and 
other individuals camped "wilderness style" on various management areas. 

On a regional basis, the District staff controlled water chestnut in- 
festations on the Sudbury-Assabet-Concord River systems and maintained 287 
wood duck boxes . 

All five sanctuaries were posted and bounds were marked as required. 

The District and Essex County League of Sportsmen's Clubs co-sponsored 
the Youth Upland Training Program. Seventeen youths participated. 

The District continued to operate the bass-rearing system located on 
the Harold Parker State Forest. Some 227 largemouth bass brood stock, 250 
yearlings and 24,525 fingerlings were distributed to eight ponds. 

Exhibits and individuals to man them were provided for National Hunting 
and Fishing Day at the Concord Rod and Gun Club , Lowell Fly Tyers Annual 
Show in Dracut, the Tops field Fair in Tops field, and the Essex Agricultural 
Fair in Hawthorne. We also cooperated with other Districts and Field Head- 
quarters in the New England Sportsmen's Show in Boston and the Eastern 
Fishing and Outdoor Exposition in Boxborough. 

District personnel attended numerous evening meetings. These included 
29 County League, eight sportsmen's clubs, eight general (i.e., Watershed 
groups), and two Conservation Commission meetings. Formal news releases 
were provided to approximately 40 newspapers and three radio stations. In- 
formal information was given to sportswriters on a regular basis. The 
District Manager participated in two Career Day programs and various pro- 
grams for Scouts. 

District staff participated in 16 nuisance beaver control operations, 
provided advice on nuisance animals and picked up injured, sick or trapped 
animals as time and manpower permitted. 



-35- 



Cooperative farmer programs were continued on two wildlife management 
areas . 

The District Manager worked with the planning staff in the preparation 
of a fish and wildlife management plan for lands purchased by the U. S. Army 
Corps of Engineers for the Natural Valley Storage Project located along the 
Charles River. Two meetings were attended with town officials and several 
with sportsmen's groups. 

The District Manager reviewed and commented on numerous resource impact 
plans and statements under Section 404 of the Federal Water Pollution Act 
and under Coastal Wetlands Acts. 

We also cooperated with Field Headquarters personnel on 18 federally- 
aided research and/ or management pro j ects including woodcock census , water- 
fowl inventory flights, and the staffing of deer checking stations. 





Louis S. Hambly, Jr. 
District Wildlife Manager 



Throughout Fiscal Year 1979, the staff of the Southeast District con- 
tinued traditional management and habitat improvement programs and gathered 
data for a variety of fish and wildlife research projects. Among these 
were the stocking of 124,700 trout. During the fall of 19 78, 4250 cock 
pheasants were stocked as preseason and inseason stockings. An additional 
6055 cock pheasants were stocked on wildlife management areas at that time 
along with 2655 quail. During the spring of 1979, 106 cock pheasants and 
140 hens were released in open covers of good pheasant habitat. Two hundred 
white hare were stocked in open covers and wildlife management areas during 
February. 

Routine maintenance was practiced on all management areas. This in- 
cluded planting one acre of annual grain, top dressing 124 acres of peren- 
nial herbaceous cover and planting over 1250 shrubs and trees at the Myles 
Standish State Forest Wildlife Management Area. Division personnel and the 
Young Adult Conservation Corps (YACC) maintained 8.8 miles of trails on 
three management areas and provided repair and improvements of parking 
areas at six wildlife management areas. Two new parking areas were created 
at the Erwin S. Wilder Management Area in Taunton. Thirteen parking areas 
were created at the Rocky Gutter Management Area by YACC personnel. 

Five management areas required repairs of gates and/or fences, while 
signs were erected at seven areas. Division personnel and YACC personnel 
thinned trees and brush on three management areas. Maintenance of buildings 
and structures during this period involved repairs to two buildings on the 
Crane Wildlife Management Area, destruction and cleanup of a building on 
the Wilder Management Area, and adjustments and repairs to the main dam and 
emergency spillway at the West Meadows Wildlife Management Area. 

Other activities on the management areas included setting up the Crane 
area for field trials, a horse show and group camping, as well as participa- 
tion in a program to assist in acquisition of other lands for wildlife. 
The turkey farm was plowed, raked and old wire was pulled out of fence rows 
in preparation for the festivities conducted at the dedication ceremony to 
re-name that 450-acre section of the Hockomock Swamp to the Erwin S. Wilder 
Wildlife Management Area. 



-37- 



In the course of aiding other sections of this agency and other agencies 
in research projects, biologists from the Southeast District constructed, 
maintained and checked wood duck nesting boxes. New boxes were built and in- 
stalled at four management areas. Nesting boxes for bluebirds were erected 
and maintained at two wildlife management areas. 

Assisting in another Division study, District personnel collected duck 
gizzards for a study on the amounts and effects of lead ingested by waterfowl. 
Additional research on waterfowl was carried out by the U. S. Fish and Wild- 
life Service and Division personnel aided their data-gathering process by 
capturing and banding a total of 1198 ducks along the coastline. More local 
research involved personnel in running three routes to take a census of wood- 
cock and four routes to take a mourning dove census. 

Staff of the Fisheries section was heavily involved in conducting a 
survey on selected ponds to determine species composition and growth and to 
determine the productivity of the ponds. Periodic pH checks were carried out 
on the trout ponds in the Southeast District to determine which ponds were 
being severely affected by acid rainfall. 

In an effort to provide biological control of less desirable fish species, 
smallmouth bass were salvaged from closed waters and transferred to selected 
trout ponds containing suitable habitat for the bass. 

Smelt were monitored in one of the reclaimed trout ponds to determine if 
the population was self-sustaining. 

Fisheries personnel assisted in Division research on tire reefs at Great 
Herring Pond, Plymouth, on the enhancement of conditions for sea- run brown 
trout, and on the stocking of Northern pike in warm-water ponds with suitable 
habitats . 

Technical assistance was provided to the general public in many forms 
as personnel from the Southeast District investigated fish kills, operated 
four deer checking stations, two of which were biological stations, investi- 
gated a beaver complaint and tagged seven beaver, seven otter, and two bob- 
cat pelts. Specific technical assistance was also provided to the Marine 
Biology Laboratories of Woods Hole, sportsmen's clubs, conservation commis- 
sions, planning groups, and other groups and individuals who called to re- 
quest technical assistance. 

In addition to these activities, District personnel continued regular 
maintenance of vehicles, buildings and equipment, and policed the Division's 
properties. Division personnel also provided many interesting and important 
work experiences in both fisheries and wildlife for YACC personnel. 



INFORMATION & EDUCATION 



Ellie Horwitz 
Chief of Information and Education 



To meet its mandate of disseminating information about wildlife and 
about sporting opportunites , the Information and Education office responds 
to more than 10,000 inquiries a year. Some of the requests can be 
answered by mailing a map or a publication, but many others require a 
specific, personal response. Letter writing is probably the section's 
most time-consuming task. 

To assist in answering inquiries and to keep sportsmen throughout the 
state abreast of regulations, news, and opportunities, the section prepares, 
updates, and distributes a variety of regular publications. Among these 
are the abstracts of fish and wildlife regulations, abstracts of migratory 
bird regulations, abstracts of the Fox-Bartley firearms law, spring and 
fall trout stocking lists, a listing of best bass ponds, listings of check- 
ing stations for freshwater sportfishing awards and for the tagging of deer. 
The section also maintains maps of 200 popular fishing waters and over 45 
wildlife management areas. 

During Fiscal Year 1979, the section also issued a number of other pub- 
lications. Included among these are revised editions of the popular 
Quabbin Guide and a reprinting of the Division flyer. A series of listings 
was initiated on the fauna of Massachusetts. To date, publications have 
been issued on the Birds of Massachusetts , Species for Special Consideration , 
and Mammals of Massachusetts . A second series was inaugurated with flyers 
available on the local history and natural history of beaver, wild turkeys, 
yellow perch and wood ducks. A commercially-printed guide to the Division's 
12 wildlife sanctuaries, prepared and illustrated by CETA-funded employee, 
Marilyn Komins, was also published. 

Additional printing tasks involved the section in obtaining materials 
for the support of Division activities; e.g., signs, decals , shoulder 
patches, business cards, and programs for the dedication of the Erwin S. 
Wilder Wildlife Management Area. 



-39- 



In addition to responding to direct inquiries, the section maintains 
communications with many writers and other representatives of the press, 
radio and television. During 1978-1979, the section issued 15 press pack- 
ages comprising 129 news items. These are also routinely sent to 
conservation-related organizations and license sales outlets. During this 
period, the section also issued 12 "Tips to Outdoor Writers" (15 items), 
a series which speeds especially timely news to active writers . This 
year, the "Tips" included notices of such topics as pike stocking, results 
of the antlerless deer permit drawing, and an oil slick problem. 

As the mailing list for press releases continues to increase, renewal 
coupons were sent out enabling the Division to reduce its mailing list 
and, at the same time, update names and addresses on the press list. An 
update of the organizations list is planned for 1979-1980. 

As in the past, the section provided an added service to outdoor writers 
in the form of a deer week "hot line" which provided information on the deer 
harvest from telephone reports. 

The series of Wildlife Portraits continued with natural history arti- 
cles and photographs prepared by Peter Mirick and Sharon Dean, issued bi- 
weekly to more than 20 news outlets. 

Additional articles were provided by the Information and Education 
staff as features for the Beacon Publications chain (three wildlife articles) 
and for the Outdoor Message (six articles) . 

The section's primary publication, Massachusetts Wildlife , edited by 
Jack Clancy, was issued six times during the year. Circulation has grown 
to more than 37,000 and plans are underway to reduce circulation by use of 
a renewal coupon in a future issue. Further study was accorded possible 
changes in format such as going to 32 pages and possibly adding color in the 
centerfold. No action has been taken on this. 

The audio-visual arts staff completed work on two wildlife films, a 
35-minute film on Massachusetts Wildlife and a 45-minute film on Division 
activities. The bulk of the photographers' efforts, however, were devoted 
to using all possible photo opportunities to increase the Division's file 
of black and white and color photographs. The photographers provided mater- 
ials for Massachusetts Wildlife and to meet other inhouse needs for documenta- 
tion and illustration. Transparencies and 8x10 black and white prints were 
provided to more than 30 newspapers and additional photographic prints were 
produced and exhibited at a variety of shows. 

While photo exhibits sufficed for smaller exhibitions, more was re- 
quired for large shows. The Information and Education section, through its 
photographic staff, was heavily involved in designing, creating and producing 
an impressive display on beavers in Massachusetts which was highlighted at 
the Eastern States Exposition in Springfield, the Western Sportsmen's Show 
in Springfield, the New England Sportsmen's Show in Boston and the Eastern 
Fishing and Outdoor Exposition in Boxborough. 



-40- 



Film produced by the section was provided for 20 television shows, and 
section personnel participated in nine television shows including Boston's 
Channels 4, 5 and 7 and Worcester's Channel 27. When not personally in- 
volved in radio and television shows, the section made arrangements for 
guest appearances of appropriate members of the research and district 
staff. In addition to participating in radio and television shows, section 
personnel presented more than 50 programs to Scouts, school groups, civic 
groups and career education workshops . 

For the past 15 years, the Division has co-sponsored the Massachusetts 
Freshwater Sportfishing Awards program with the Department of Commerce and 
Development. This year, two categories, carp and white catfish, were added 
bringing the total number of categories to 19. Publicity is issued regular- 
ly for the program which provides a bronze pin to anyone submitting a 
qualifying entry, and a gold pin and plaque to the angler taking the largest 
fish in each category. Presentation of the awards is made at the New England 
Sportsmen's Show. 

The section also continued its sponsorship of the competition for the 
Massachusetts migratory bird hunting stamp. In the 1978 contest (for the 
1979 stamp) , artist Randy Julius of East Bridgewater won top honors for his 
painting of a ruddy turnstone decoy. The painting was subsequently repro- 
duced on stamps and distributed to license sales outlets as was the archery 
stamp commissioned from Massachusetts artist, Gordon Morrison. 

With art of impressive quality on Massachusetts stamps, attention was 
turned to the artistic quality of other Division publications. The appear- 
ance of even inexpensive publications has been greatly improved by the addi- 
tion to the staff of two wildlife artists, Barbara Terkanian, funded through 
the CETA program, and Tim Messier, funded through YACC. 

Other section activities included preparation of two radio spot packages, 
a four-spot package dealing with fall fishing, and a six-spot package dealing 
with spring fishing opportunities. 

The section also coordinated a joint conference of this Division with 
the Division of Marine Fisheries which was held for a day of sharing projects 
and problems of interest to both agencies. 

As in the past, the Division continued to play an active role in the ad- 
ministration and operation of the Massachusetts Junior Conservation Camp, co- 
sponsored by the Division, the Department of Environmental Affairs, and the 
fund for the preservation of wildlife and natural areas. Camperships were 
solicited, campers were enrolled and Division personnel led sessions in wild- 
life management, fisheries management, and pond and stream ecology. At the 
conclusion of the two-week session, the section administered an examination 
and subsequently participated in the graduation of successful campers. On 
a smaller scale, the Division was also involved with the Marlboro Conserva- 
tion Camp, but this was in a teaching capacity only. 

Additional efforts were made toward establishing sportsmen- taught adult 
education workshops. After a series of meetings with the Division of Continu- 
ing Education and the Extension Service, the program was revised and a proto- 
type workshop series is planned for fall in Winchendon. Other educational 
activities involved section personnel in assisting in preparation for an 
urban angler program to be initiated in the fall of 19 79. 



_ 




Floyd Richardson 
Chief of Wildlife Lands 



Introduction 

The reduction of acquisition funds drastically curtailed the purchase 
of wildlife lands during this fiscal period. However, an additional 
1097.4 acres of wildlife lands were acquired. Nine existing wildlife 
management areas were improved by these purchases. Each parcel purchased 
met a definite need of the contiguous management area. Road frontage, 
interior holdings, peripheral parcels, access and stream frontage were 
the important contributions realized with the acquisition of these lands. 

Bolton Flats Acquisition Project , 655.1 acres 

Sportsmen have enthusiastically supported this project. The popularity 
of the Bolton Flats Wildlife Management Area has increased steadily. The 
development of a compatible "farmer-cooperative" program and the efforts 
expended by District personnel are transforming this fertile valley into a 
wildlife management area second to none. 

Two new acquisitions provided an additional 34-1/2 acres. Road front- 
age on Route 110 plus a large paved parking area were realized with these 
newly-acquired lands. 

Rocky Gutter Acquisition Project , 2954.8 acres 

Three acquisitions were consummated to enlarge and further protect this 
area. One hundred seventy-eight additional acres consisting of woodlands 
and wetlands complement the area by affording additional road frontage and 
access . 

Hockomock Acquisition Project , 4782.7 acres 

The "Hock" is the largest, single management area in ownership of the 
Division. The safeguarding of this outstanding inland wetland has become a 
reality with the numerous acquisitions since the inception of the project. 

Two additional acquisitions provided lands in the Town of Easton and 
the Town of West Bridgewater to increase the total acreage to 4782.7 acres. 



* 



-42 



Chalet Acquisition Project , 723.0 acres 

Excellent deer, hare and grouse habitat was acquired with the purchase 
of 208 acres in the Towns of Windsor and Dalton. These newly-acquired lands 
join the existing 515 acres to provide a promising upland wildlife manage- 
ment area. 

Housatonic River Acquisition Project , 661.7 acres 

An important segment was added to this wildlife management area with 
the purchase of 49 acres in the Town of Lenox. The parcel has one-half mile 
of road frontage and its acquisition prevents the encroachment of single 
and multiple-dwelling residences. Three thousand-foot stretch of river 
frontage was also obtained by this acquisition. 

Quaboag Wildlife Acquisition Project , 1036.4 acres 

The objective of this project was to enhance the existing wildlife man- 
agement area and to protect the Quaboag River from encroachment. This river 
is well known for its warmwater fisheries. The successful introduction of 
Northern pike has increased the popularity of this valuable area. 

A gift of 14 acres was received by the Division from Mr. John Richard- 
son, providing river frontage and parking on Route 148. The Division pur- 
chased 172 acres along the river. Some of these lands provide not only ad- 
ditional river frontage, but contribute valuable road frontage as well. 

Phillipston Wildlife Acquisition Project , 2012.7 acres 

The proximity of this wildlife management area to Worcester, Fitchburg 
and Gardner, and its accessibility has brought it considerable public use. 
Excellent habitat resulting from past lumbering operations harbors game 
species such as deer, rabbits, woodcock and grouse. 

The newly-acquired parcel of 147 acres is located on the northwest side 
of the management area. Additional access via a 100-foot strip of land ad- 
jacent to Queen Lake Road (Route 101) is also a part of the purchase. 

Crane Pond Acquisition Project , 2101.0 acres 

The nucleus of this management area was purchased from the Department 
of the Interior, through the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, in the late 
1950s. Subsequently, abutting parcels which have become available were pur- 
chased to enlarge and enhance this area. 

Two parcels fronting Forest Street in Newbury and containing slightly 
less than five acres were acquired. This acquisition prevents the construc- 
tion of two residences which would have eliminated 40 acres of huntable land. 

Birch Hill Acquisition Project , 3027.1 

A 230-acre parcel was presented to the Division as a gift from Mrs. 
Theodora Adams. This valuable land connects with a section of land previous- 
ly given by the same donor and consisting of 200 acres. The donated land 
will provide sportsmen with exceptional deer, grouse and hare hunting oppor- 
tunities. 



-43- 



Summary of Land Acquisitions 
Fiscal Year 1979 



Area Name 



Town 



Acreage 



Bolton Flats 

Rocky Gutter 
Chalet 

Hockomock 

Housatonic 
Ouaboag 
Phillipston 
Crane Pond 
Birch Hill 



Lancaster 
Bolton 

Middleboro 

Windsor 
Dalton 

Easton 

West Bridgewater 
Lenox 

Brookfield 
Phillipston 
Newbury 
Royalston 



21.50 
13.00 

178.00 

168.10 
39.90 

48.36 
11.20 

49.00 

186.00 

147.00 

4.70 

230.65 



Totals 



1097.41 




Maintenance&Development 



John P. Sheppard 
Chief, Maintenance and Development 



Field Headquarters, Westboro 

A new visitor parking area has been constructed at the Field Head- 
quarters. Interior renovations continued on the headquarters building. 
During this period, improvements included electrical work and additions to 
the existing heating system. In addition, a new paging system was in- 
stalled. 

Hatcheries 

The fuel storage system at the Sandwich hatchery has been modernized 
and its capacity increased. Security fencing has also been installed at 
this facility. 

The existing water supply reservoir at the Palmer Experimental Salmon 
Hatchery was cleaned during the past year and work has begun on a 150 ft. 
by 75 ft. roof structure to cover the existing salmon-rearing ponds. 

Game Farms 

A new fuel storage system has been installed at the Ayer Game Farm and 
the paving of existing roads and parking areas was completed. 



The existing driveways at the Northeast Wildlife District Headquarters 
building in Acton have been paved. 

In the Southeast Wildlife District, a new fuel pump was installed at 
the headquarters building at Buzzards Bay. Also, gravel parking areas were 
constructed at the Wilder Wildlife Management Area in Taunton. 

A new heating system was installed and some electrical work has been 
completed at the residence at the Bolton Flats Wildlife Management Area in 
the Central Wildlife District. Also in that district, the drives at the 
Birch Hill Wildlife Management Area office have been paved. 

A new roof was installed at the residence at the Connecticut Valley 
Wildlife District Headquarters complex in Belchertown. 



Districts 



_ 



YACC 

During this fiscal year, the Division's work, force was augmented by 
about 60 members of the Young Adult Conservation Corps, authorized under 
Title I of the Youth Employment and Demonstration Projects Act of 1977, 
and administered by Co mmi ssioner Richard E. Kendall of the Massachusetts 
Department of Environmental Management. 

Assigned to 11 different Division installations around the state, 
the participants, who ranged in age from 18 to 23, took part in what has 
been called, "one of the best YACC programs in existence." 

Under this program, the YACC crews participated in a variety of 
activities which included construction of buildings, bridges and roadways, 
renovation of existing facilities, handling calls relating to nuisance 
animals, participating in biological projects, conducting creel surveys, 
thinning tree stands, thus providing openings for wildlife and/or firewood 
for Division installations, participating in the Division's stocking efforts, 
manufacturing conservation signs, and providing artwork, maps, and layout 
for a wide variety of Division publications. 

The corpspersons have been integrated into almost all aspects of the 
Division's program and have assisted in completing many much-needed projects 
that would, without their participation, have had to be deferred. 



Personnel Changes 
Fiscal Year 1979 



Retirements 



Job Title 



Date 



R. Bicknell 
H. Blake 

Deceased 

Walter Kurpaska 

Resigned 

N. Lucido 

N. Williams 

A. Chares t 
J. Hendee 
J. Rossi 

M. Brickley 
M. Syslo 
R. Solomon 

Appointments 

N. Williams 
E. Bennett 
G . Moo re 
L. Majka 

D. Kelley 
T. Staples 

E. Lech 
P. Mirick 
J. McGurn 

J. Rozkuszka 

R. Costello 

B. Dobson 
M. Brickley 

C. Nazzaro 

J. Nowakowski 
M. Ciborowski 
V. Lopez 

Promotions 

J. Besse 
L. Hollings 
C. Thurlow 

J . Skowron 
P. Salie 



Conservation Skilled Helper 
Conservation Skilled Helper 



Conservation Helper 



Senior Clerk/Typist 
Junior Clerk/ Stenographer 
Junior Clerk/Typist 
Fish Culturist 
Conservation Helper 
Junior Clerk/Typist 
Conservation Helper 
Conservation Helper 



Junior Clerk/Typist 
Conservation Helper 
Conservation Helper 
Conservation Helper 
Junior Clerk/Typist 
Conservation Helper 
Conservation Helper 
Conservation Helper 
Conservation Helper 
Conservation Helper 
Senior Clerk/Typist 
Junior Clerk/Typist 
Junior Clerk/Typist 
Junior Clerk/Typist 
Conservation Helper 
Conservation Helper 
Conservation Helper 



Assistant Fish Culturist 
Conservation Skilled Helper 
Wildlife Restoration Project 

Field Agent 
Assistant Fish Culturist 
Conservation Skilled Helper 



10/30/78 
07/27/78 



03/12/79 



12/21/78 
12/09/78 
08/21/78 
01/06/79 
11/25/78 
05/26/79 
09/23/78 
11/28/78 



07/30/78 
07/23/78 
10/01/78 
09/17/78 
07/09/78 
09/24/78 
09/10/78 
11/26/78 
07/30/78 
08/27/78 
05/13/79 
07/09/78 
04/26/79 
06/21/79 
05/27/79 
11/27/78 
03/26/79 



04/28/79 
10/07/78 
09/15/78 

11/26/78 
07/29/78 



-47- 



Promotions (Continued) 



Job Title 



Date 



c. 


Zobka 


Fish Culturist 


B. 


Dobson 


Senior Clerk/Typist 


A. 


Go la 


Conservation Skilled Helper 


F. 


Soroco 


Senior Bookkeeper 


C. 


Hatch 


Senior Clerk 


S. 


Early 


Conservation Skilled Helper 


J. 


Boudreau 


Assistant Game Culturist 


w. 


Humberstone 


Conservation Skilled Helper 


p. 


Orrizzi 


Conservation Skilled Helper 


H. 


Duf ault 


Wildlife Area Supervisor 


A. 


Myers 


Conservation Skilled Helper 


J. 


Robinson 


Conservation Skilled Helper 



04/15/79 
04/01/79 
05/27/79 
04/01/79 
12/27/78 
07/23/78 
12/10/78 
11/26/78 
10/29/78 
07/30/78 
10/01/78 
07/30/78 



The following individuals were appointed supervisors of YACC crews dur 
ing Fiscal 1979. Their appointments are not included with those of the 
Division as, in this capacity, they are officially Maintenance and Construe 
tion Foremen of the Department of Environmental Management. 

Walter Dauderis 
Winston Neale 
William Hearn 
Carl Zobka 
John Kostro 
Edward Kraus 
Frank Putnam 
David Carlson 
Robert Garabedian 



-48- 



Legislation 



Bills affecting wildlife or of particular interest to the Division of 
Fisheries and Wildlife which were enacted into law during the period 
1 July 1978 to 30 June 1979 are as follows: 

Chapter 387 

An act providing for the noncriminal disposition of certain fish and 
game and marine fishery violations. 

Approved (signed by Governor) 12 July 1978. 
Effective 10 October 1978. 

Chapter 453 

An act making certain corrective changes relative to the law authorizing 
the Commissioner of Fisheries, Wildlife and Recreational Vehicles to convey 
certain land in Georgetown to Joanne C. Stanley and to convey other land to 
William E. Handren in exchange for certain land. 

Approved (signed by Governor) 17 July 1978. 
Effective upon signing. 

Chapter 473 

An act relative to permits issued for certain aquacultural purposes. 

Approved (signed by Governor) 17 July 1978. 
Effective 15 October 1978. 

Chapter 505 

An act transferring control of certain land at Gardner State Hospital 
to the Executive Office of Environmental Affairs. 

Approved (signed by Governor) 19 July 1978. 
Effective 17 October 1978. 

Chapter 506 

An act authorizing the Commonwealth to take four certain tracts of land 
in the towns of Spencer and Leicester. 

Approved (signed by Governor) 19 July 1978. 
Effective 17 October 1978. 



-49- 



FINANCIAL REPORT 

Nancy Melito 
Head Administrative Assistant 



Through careful management of monies received from the sale of 
licenses, Federal Aid reimbursement and other miscellaneous sources of 
income, the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife has, historically, been a 
self-supporting agency. All such income is deposited in the Inland Fish 
and Game Fund for expenditure for division operations as approved by the 
Legislature on a fiscal year basis. 

However, as a result of rising costs caused basically by 
inflation and accompanying salary increments, a deficit in the amount of 
$292,iilU.CO existed at the close of business on June 30, 1978. Even with 
severe curtailment of expenditures in the subsequent year, and an overall 
increase in income of $888,662.00, the deficit in 1 979 has grown to 
$762,2ii1 .00. The following is a report of the actual financial trans- 
actions during the 1979 fiscal year. 

The section entitled "A Summary of Fish and Wildlife Income" 
reflects an increase of $821,578.00 in Federal Aid monies in comparison 
to the previous fiscal year. A considerable portion of this reimburse- 
ment was realized through the approval of various land purchases. 

With the reorganization of the Court system, deposit of fines 
by Court personnel into the Inland Fish and Game Fund declined. During 
this transition period, various accounting procedures had to be resolved 
with the result that fines to be credited to special funds were held in 
a State Treasurer's account pending proper assignment. 

During this fiscal year over sixty sporting good stores were 
authorized to sell licenses. As itemized on Detail Sheet No. 1, "Receipts 
from Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses", there was an increase in 
sales of 16,901 licenses; notably, 10,120 in the resident fishing category. 
The convenience of these additional store outlets with extended sale hours 
is probably responsible to a considerable degree for this license issuance 
increase. 

This year also reflected a sharp rise in archery hunters from 
7,931 in 1978 to 9,011 in 1979. It appears that this sport is growing in 
popularity. Perhaps some of the contributing factors include the longer 
season for archery hunting, the continued improvement of our deer herd and 
the prohibitive cost of out-of-state licenses during this economically 
stressful time. 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE 
Fiscal Year July 1, 1978 to June 30, 1979 



Administration 

Administration 
Information-Education 



Fisheries Programs 
Fish Hatcheries 
♦♦Fisheries Management 

Fisheries Cooperative Unit 

Wildlife Programs 
Game Farms 
♦Wildlife Management 
Wildlife Cooperative Unit 

Damage by Wild Deer 
and Moose 

Land Acquisition 

* ♦"♦Acquisition of Upland Areas and 

Inholding on Existing Areas 

* ♦**Coastal and Inland Waters Acq. 

Engineering and Construction 

-"■Development and Improvement of 
Facilities for Public Use 

Secretary, Environmental Affairs 
Office of Secretary (3$) 

Department of Fisheries, Wildlife 
and Recreational Vehicles 
Commissioner' s Off ice ($0%) 

Department of Environmental Management 
Natural Resources Officers' 
Salaries and Expenses (30$) 
Hunter Safety Training (100$) 

Transfers from Fund 
Group Insurance 
Settlement of Certain Claims 

Retirement Assessment (.2$) 

Interest on Bonded Debt 

Maturing Serial Bonds and Notes 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES 

^Continuing Appropriation. 
♦"•Portions of expenditures 60$ or 75$ reimbursable by Federal Government. 
•"♦"Certain land acquisitions are 50$ reimbursable by Federal Government. 



DOLLAR WAS 


SPENT" 




Account No. 


Expenditures 




2310-0200 
231 0-0200 


32ii,010.l8 
202 , 86a.Ua 
526,87u-62 


11.95$ 


2310-O6CO 
2310-0600 
2310-0600 


638,195.26 
Uli3,2u2.10 

i5j00o.oo 
1,096,1*37-36 


21.87$ 


2 31 0-0li00 
2310-OliOO 
2310-OUOO 


U60,389.92 

U87,071 .59 
15,000.00 
962,a6l .51 


21 .83$ 


2310-0800 


15,U55«53 


.35$ 


2310-0310 
2670-9016 


222, 829- Oli 
5,191 .hh 
228,020.1x8 


5.18$ 


2310-0300 


196,599.16 


u.u6$ 


2000-0100 


6,786.00 


.15$ 


2300-0100 


U5,002.00 


1 .02$ 


2020-0100 
2020-0300 


li05,9UO.OO 
59,668.00 


9-20$ 
1 .35$ 


1590-1007 
1 590-1006 


193,u96.00 
500.00 


U.39$ 
.01$ 


0612-1000 


221 ,262.00 


5.02$ 


0699-2800 


85,595.00 


U9h% 


0699-2900 


365,000.00 


8.28$ 




$a,li09,097.66 


100.00$ 



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0, CO 



SUMMARY OF FISH AND WILDLIFE INCOME 



July 1 , 1978 to June 30, 1979 



♦Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses 


330U-61 -01 -UO 


$2,373,53U.25 


♦Trap Registrations 


!1 t1 tl 11 


1 ,216.50 


♦Archery Stamps 


II II If If 

✓ 


U5, 059.50 


*Waterfowl Stamps 


330U-UO-O1 -ItO 


5,691 .15 


*Waterfowl Stamps - Ducks Unlimited 


330U-UO-02-UO 


20,705.6C 


♦a-Special Licenses, Tags and Posters 




9,735.90 


Antlerless Deer Permits 


330U-61 -1U-U0 


9,693*00 


3ear Permits 


II II II IT 


287.00 


Rents 


330U-63-01 -UO 


1U,222.50 


Miscellaneous Income 


330U-69-99-UO 


620.23 


Sales, Other 


330U-6U-99-UO 


3,050.95 


Refunds Prior Year 


330U-69-01 -UO 


383.70 


Court Fines and Penalties 


3308-U1-01-UO 


U, 775.00 


Pittman-Robertson Federal Aid 


33CU-67-01 -UO 


066, 91 7. U7 


Eing ell -John son Federal Aid 


33CU -67-02 -UO 


225,695. 1U 


Anadromous Fish Projects Federal Aid 


330U-67-OU-UO 


32,689.3U 


Interest on Investments 


3395-60-01 -Uo 


1U,210.U2 


Gasoline Tax Apportionment 


3312-05-01 -Uo 


317,770.00 
$3,9U6,257.65 


Deficit in Inland Fish and Game Fund as 


of June 30, 1979: 


$762, 2U1 .00 



♦Detail Sheet No. 1 
♦♦Detail Sheet No. 2 



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Detail Sheet #2 



SPECIAL LICENSES , TAGS AMD POSTERS 
July 1, 1978 to June 30, 1979 

Receipt 

Quantity Account 



Receipt Acct. 


Type of License 


& Unit 


Price 


Amount 


Total 


330U-61-O2-UO 


Fur' Buyers 












Resident Citizens: 


31 a 


15.00 


U65.00 






Non-Residents or Aliens: 


6 a 


50.00 


300.00 


765.00 


330U-61 -O3-U0 


Taxidermists : 


107 a 


10.00 


1070.00 








1 a 


3.00 


3.00 


1,073-00 


330U-61 -Oh-UO 


Propagators 










Special Purpose Permits: 


136 a 


1 .00 


136.00 






Class 1 (Fish) 












Initial : 


18 a 


7.50 


135.00 






Renewal : 


139 a 


5.00 


695.00 






Class 3 (Fish) 












Initial : 


13 a 


7.50 


97.50 






Renewal: 


65 a 


5.00 


325.00 






Class U (Birds & Mammals) 












Initial : 


89 a 


7.50 


667-50 






Renewal : 


U32 a 


5.00 


2, 160. CO 






Class 6 (Dealers) 












Initial: 


8 a 


7.50 


60.00 






Renewal : 


U8 a 


5.00 


2li0.00 






Additional : 


207 a 


1 .50 


310.50 






Class 7 (Individual Bird or 












Mammal) 












Initial : 


7 a 


3.00 


21 .00 






Renewal: 


35 a 


1 .00 


35.00 






Importation Permits 












Fish 


10 a 


5.00 


50.00 






Birds or Mammals 


31 a 


5.00 


155.00 






Class 9 (Falconry) 












Master: 


6 a 


25.00 


150.00 






Apprentice: 


7 a 


25.00 


175.00 






General : 


5 a 


25.00 


125.00 






Class 10 












Raptor Breeding: 


3 a 


10.00 


30.00 






Raptor Salvage 


U a 


1 .00 


U.oo 


5,571.50 


330U-61 -05-UO 


Take Shiners: 


100 a 


5.00 




500.00 


330U-61 -06-UO 


Field Trial Licenses: 


3 a 


15.00 




U5.oo 


330U-61 -08-UO 


Quail to Train Dogs 












Initial : 


6 a 


7.50 


U5.00 






Renewal : 


29 a 


5.00 


1U5.CO 


190.00 


330U-61-10-UO 


Commercial Shooting Preserves: 


8 a 


25.00 




U00.00 


330U-61-12-UO 


Mounting Permits: 


9 a 


2.00 




18.00 


330U-6l-13-liO 


Special Field Trial Permits: 


37 a 


15. CO 




555.00 


330U-6U-01 -ho 


Game Tags: 


7,298 a 


.05 


36U.90 






Fish Tags: 


12,500 a 


.02 


250.00 






Posters : 


70 a 


.05 


3.50 


61 8.1x0 



$9,735.90 



MASSACHUSETTS DIVISION OF 
FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE 





Director 



^£eve*etf S/a/tonUd// £§iu/cUnp, government Center 
100 ^andritfye i/Let, SSo^on 02202 



His Excellency, Edward J. King, Governor of the Commonwealth, the Executive 
Council, the General Court, and the Board of the Division of Fisheries and 
Wildlife. 

Sirs : 

I have the honor to submit herewith the One Hundred Fifteenth and One 
Hundred Sixteenth Annual Reports of the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, 
covering the fiscal years from 1 July 1979 to 30 June 1980 and 1 July 1980 
to 30 June 1981. 




Director 



Publication No. 1286U -100-62-7-82-C JR. 
Approved by John Manton, State Purchasing Agent 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page Number 



The Board Report 1 

Planning 4 

Fisheries 6 

Fish Hatcheries 10 

Wildlife 12 

Game Farms 23 

Nongame and Endangered Species 25 

Districts 33 

Information and Education 3 7 

Realty 42 

Maintenance and Development 46 

Personnel Actions 48 

Legislation 51 

How the Sportsman's Dollar is Spent 53 



Bracilee E. Gage 
Chairman 



The administrative Board of the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife 
met on a monthly basis throughout the year and followed its practice of 
moving the meetings around the state — from the Berkshires to Cape Cod — 
not only to familiarize Board members with the Division's many facilities 
but also to make it possible for interested citizens from all parts of 
the Commonwealth to take part in and attend Board meetings. 

Personnel 

With the resignation in June 1979 of Director Matt Connolly, Jr., 
the Board began searching for a replacement. It was decided early in the 
process to seek a replacement director within the Division rather than 
look afield. In July 1980, the Board selected Richard Cronin as director 
noting that his extensive experience with the Division would serve the 
state, the sportsmen, and the resource well. 

While many personnel changes were made in the Division, two in par- 
ticular, required approval by the Board. Carl Prescott was appointed 
Superintendent of the Bureau of Wildlife Research and Management, and 
Bradford G. Blodget was appointed Assistant Director of Nongame and En- 
dangered Species. 

Fiscal 1981 brought three changes on the Board itself brought about 
by the departure of James Baird, Donald Coughlin and Philip Stanton. The 
Board and the Commonwealth were fortunate to have the services of these 
three members during the adoption of nongame regulations and during the 
establishment of the nongame program. They were replaced by Jack Sylvia, 
Richard Kleber and Colton H. Bridges who have quickly joined in to con- 
tinue the work of the Board. 



With notice that the Board 
actions, a personnel report was 



was responsible for all Division 
made part of the monthly agenda. 



personnel 



-2- 



Hearings 

A major part of Board work continues to be in the area of regulatory 
changes. During fiscal year 1980, a number of the changes made were 
simply housekeeping items which related to changes in language or to 
other non-controversial matters. Others, more controversial, or more far 
reaching are worthy of special note. During FY80 , three hearings stood 
out. The annual waterfowl hearing was, as always, well attended. After 
considerable testimony, the Board voted an experimental three-segment 
split season hoping that such a season would offer the best combination 
for both coastal and inland gunners; early and late gunners. 

Another key hearing dealt with an experimental bearded "gobbler" 
season limited by weapons, areas, and issuance of a limited number of 
permits. This season was extremely successful and raises hopes of even 
better seasons in the future. 

Nongame management was the focus of another well-attended hearing 
which dealt with setting of regulations, long overdue, for dealing with 
endangered species, wildlife and plants as well as the setting of regula- 
tions for propagation and maintenance of wildlife in captivity. 

Other hearings and ensuing Board decisions dealt with changes in deer 
hunting hours, taking of sea-run trout, legal size limits for bass and 
pickerel, mandatory return of carcasses of bobcats and changes in date 
for the special deer hunt for paraplegic sportsmen. 

Fiscal Year 1981 saw its share of controversial hearings, too. After 
two public hearings, one in the eastern part of the state and the other in 
the western part, the Board initiated a limited hunting season on coyotes. 
Besides the unprecedented double hearing aimed to allow everyone ever.' 
possible opportunity to comment, the Board considered many technical re- 
ports and an unusually large volume of mail. 

The waterfowl hearing was, as always, difficult due to the conflict- 
ing needs and hopes of coastal versus inland hunters and of those who 
prefer to hunt early or late. An additional problem was raised this year 
by a Federal prohibition of lead shot in certain areas. While this was 
not generally well accepted by waterfowl hunters, the Board felt the need 
to support United States Fish and Wildlife Service guidelines while con- 
tinuing to gather local data as best possible. 

There were, of course, also housekeeping items and the Board decided 
that in the event that changes proposed are of a minor and non-controversial 
nature, hearings could be held as part of the regular monthly meeting. 

Other Activities 

In its role as overseer of Division activities, the Board participated 
in an ongoing review of Division activities, reviewed all personnel actions, 
and considered possible new programs as well as potential or existing 
problem areas. Programs such as the introduction of tiger muskies or grass 



-3- 



carp, use of Division facilities, for example, Penikese Island, formation 
of a nongame advisory committee and, of course, finances were discussed 
in detail. The Board appreciates the continued cooperation of the 
Director and his staff in making the monthly meetings productive. 

Concerns 

As in previous reports, the main concern is, unquestionably, the 
Division's finances. The Board, the Division and the sportsmen still 
want, very much, to "pay their own way" and to operate within their own 
resources. Considering the tightness of General Court monies, and the 
fact that under such a regimen funds for the Division would undoubtedly 
be meager, this is probably the only practical approach. It does mean, 
however, that with increasing costs, close control must be maintained over 
expenses while doing all possible to maximize revenues. The Board under- 
stands that in order to maintain financial independence, it may be neces- 
sary to cut back slightly on some programs. It should be noted, however, 
that by allowing more flexibility in management within the Division, the 
Board has encouraged many programs to become more cost effective. Despite 
belt tightening, however, it appears that the cost of permits and licenses 
will have to be raised to maintain the status quo. It is hoped that any 
increase will not be such as to reduce participation by the Commonwealth's 
sportsmen. 

A second concern deals with funding of nongame programs. At the 
present time, the Division is, rightfully, involved with nongame management. 
During the past years, meaningful regulations have been established to 
deal with nongame species. To carry out its mandate in the nongame area, 
the Division needs a source of nongame funds as sportsmen's license fees 
are limited and cannot be stretched to cover current programs as well as 
expanded nongame programs. 

Brief mention should be made again, in closing, of the need to raise 
salary levels of the Division's professional staff. During 1980 and 1981, 
several key people moved to similar work in other agencies at much higher 
levels of pay. 

Summary 

The Board feels that the Division is performing in an efficient manner 
under, often, very trying conditions. There is a high degree of profession- 
al competence. With continued support from the sportsmen, the general pub- 
lic, the legislature, and other state agencies, the Division will continue 
to move ahead. 





Paul S. Mugford 
Senior Land Use Planner 



During Fiscal Year 1980, the planning team continued to work with the 
Division's senior staff toward the development of a comprehensive fish and 
wildlife management plan. This planning effort will increase agency effec- 
tiveness. The costs of the planning project itself are 75 percent Federally 
reimbursable. 

The project involves setting an objective for each program that is, 
insofar as possible, subject to measurement or evaluation. Annual review 
will allow comparison of achievements to a project's initial objectives. 
It is divided into three phases: Strategic Planning, Operational Planning 
(implementation) and Performance Control and Evaluation. 

Preliminary to providing overall program direction, the following goal 
statement was developed and adopted by the senior staff: 

"In recognition of the ecological, recreational, scientific, educational, 
and commercial values of wildlife and in consideration of the complex- 
ities of human/wildlife interactions having occasional negative impacts 
on man's interests, it shall be the goal of the Division of Fisheries 
and Wildlife to perpetuate and enhance the wildlife resources of the 
Commonwealth to the extent practicable, by the intelligent application 
of sound management techniques. Implicit in this effort is the neces- 
sity to manage for the long-term benefit of the wildlife population as 
a whole and not for the short-term benefit of individual animals." 

An agency program structure was selected that would focus on specific 
fish and wildlife species or, in some cases, species groups. For each 
species appropriate information has been assembled or targetted for acquisi- 
tion. In order to update existing records, the planners, assisted by other 
staff members, completed a telephone survey of 4,000 licensed anglers and 
obtained statistics on harvests, species preference, and waters fished. 
This data, along with similar data obtained from small game and trapping 
harvest surveys was analyzed, categorized and stored in the University of 
Massachusetts computer bank for future use. Immediate access to this in- 
formation is available via a terminal which, since January 1980, has been 
in use at the Wes thorough Field Headquarters. 



-5- 



Major accomplishments of the planning project during Fiscal 1981 were: 
the design and implementation of a new cost accounting system; development 
of measurable program objectives and strategic management plans for several 
selected species; continued analysis of fisheries and wildlife user supply/ 
demand data; and near completion of the stream inventory system which will 
provide a quantified directory of all named streams in the Commonwealth. 

As strategic plans near completion, the Division staff can begin to 
develop five-year operational work plans. In order to assist staff members 
charged with the responsibility of drawing up operational plans, the plan- 
ning staff has drafted an operational handbook which will facilitate de- 
velopment of work proposals. 

Finally, in compliance with Federal planning standards and NEPA regu- 
lations, the Division solicited public review and comment on its proposed 
program structure. Copies of the announcement were sent to selected 
groups and individuals and the "Environmental Monitor" published by the 
Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs. The request was 
for anyone to submit "concerns and proposals relating to those problems, 
issues, and needs that they believe should be considered." A sole response 
was received. 




FISHERIES 

Peter Oatis 
Chief Aquatic Biologist 



Anadromous Fish Management 

The dedication of the Turners Falls fishway on the Connecticut River 
highlighted the fisheries activity for 1980. The activation of this facil 
ity marks the first time since 1897 that anadromous species such as shad 
and salmon have had access to the river above the falls and into Vermont 
and New Hampshire waters. With the completion of the fishway in Vernon, 
Vermont, later this year, the 1981 run of shad will have free access 
throughout their historic range on the Connecticut River. At the Holyoke, 
Massachusetts fishway, activity was brisk, a new record of approximately 
390,000 adult shad were passed and 120 adult salmon were captured and 
shipped to state and Federal hatcheries for brood stock purposes. In all, 
160 adult salmon were accounted for, including those found dead, the 
sport catch, etc. Clearly, the money and manpower expended on this proj- 
ect are beginning to return healthy dividends. 

With the dedication in 1981 of the new fishway at the New England 
Power Company's dam in Vernon, Vermont, American shad gained complete ac- 
cess to their historic spawning and nursery grounds in the Connecticut 
River. Within a few generations, most of this habitat will be occupied 
and there will be a significant increase in the population. The spring 
run of Atlantic salmon was the best in nearly two hundred years. As of 
October 1981, 516 adult fish have been accounted for, the great majority 
of them presently reside in selected state and Federal hatcheries through- 
out the basin. The projected egg production may well exceed one million 
and should definitely put the development of a true Connecticut River 
strain of salmon on a solid basis. 

The passage at Holyoke was again the most active fishway on the 
river. In all, 375,000 shad, 319 salmon, 400,000 blueback herring, 53,000 
lamprey and 400 striped bass passed through and, with the exception of 
salmon taken to hatcheries, continued their passage upriver. 

Additional progress was made on the Merrimack River. The Lawrence 
hydroelectric project at the Essex Dam, started in 1980, was nearly com- 
pleted and is scheduled to become operational in late summer of 1982 in 
time for the 1982 shad and salmon run. Besides opening up an additional 



-7- 



twelve miles of shad habitat, this fish passage will serve as the trapping 
location for salmon whose progeny will form the basis for establishing a 
Merrimack River strain and will provide the first accurate assessment of 
the size of existing anadromous runs. 



The emergency regulation closing the Connecticut and Merrimack Rivers 
to salmon fishing passed this spring to avert a potential overharvest of 
salmon brood stock, was later deemed unnecessary. Henceforth, angling for 
salmon on these rivers will be permitted year-round in Massachusetts. The 
daily creel limit has, however, been lowered from two to one salmon per day 
and the minimum length remains at 15 inches. Smolt stocking totalled 77,000 
and 100,000 for the Connecticut and Merrimack Rivers respectively during the 
spring of 1981. Three-year operational plans for salmon and shad restora- 
tion in the Merrimack and Connecticut Basin were completed and are now 
available for public inspection. 



Attempts to hasten restoration of shad via the stocking of gravid 
adults into available spawning habitat were undertaken on the Merrimack, 
Charles and Taunton Rivers by trucking in suitable fish from the Holyoke 
f ishway . 



Lake Management 

The information provided by numerous biological surveys of lakes and 
ponds prompted the Fisheries and Wildlife Board to establish new minimum 
length restrictions on black bass and chain pickerel. As of 1 January 1981 
bass must be 12 inches and pickerel 15 inches long before they can be 
harvested. Information relative to the existing exploitation of bass in 
selected lakes and ponds is being assessed through the joint efforts of 
Division biologists working in cooperation with the Massachusetts Bass 
Federation on a bass tag return and reward program. 



Fifty lakes were surveyed by fisheries crews to assess fish population 
abundance, diversity, growth, water quality and lake accessibility. Recom- 
mendations were developed in accordance with fisheries objectives and 
existing manpower and fiscal limitations. 



Forage was enhanced for trout by releasing smelt at Asnacomet Pond, 
Hubbardston; Cliff Pond, Brewster; Spectacle Pond, Lancaster; and Lake 
Mattawa, Orange. Landlocked alewives were transported from Lake Congamond , 
Southwick, to Lake Singletary, in Sutton, in an effort to encourage the 
growth of black bass and yellow perch. 

Following recommendations stemming from the 1980 survey, attempts to 
improve pan and game fish populations via prey and predator stockings were 
initiated at selected lakes. 



The esocid (pickerel, pike, etc.) management program was finally put 
on a sound bais. No longer will we be dependent upon occasionally avail- 
able supplies of northern pike purchased from a Minnesota dealer. Instead, 
plans were made to introduce tiger muskie to selected waters. This species 
lends itself to hatchery culture on an economical basis and will, hopefully, 
place the management of our large esocid fisheries on an even keel with a 
consistent supply. Additional benefits should accrue through much-needed 
predation on stunted panfish populations. 



-8- 



The Pennsylvania Fish Commission graciously gave Massachusetts 10,000 
tiger muskie fingerlings in September of 1980. These hybrids, which re- 
sult from crossing northern pike with muskellunge have the growth potential 
of both species and the appetite to match. They should thin out many 
poorly-growing, overpopulated pan and rough fish populations and provide 
some excellent angling within the next few years. Pennsylvania also sup- 
plied an additional 100,000 tiger muskie fry during the spring of 1981. 
These fish have been growing well at the Roger J. Reed Hatchery and will 
be released in the fall. By 1982, the following waters will have received 
initial or secondary stockings of tiger muskie: Buffumville Reservoir, 
Lake Manchaug, Webster Lake, Flint Pond, Massapoag Pond, Otis Reservoir, 
Pontoosuc Lake, Cook Pond, Lake Nippenicket, Spy Pond, Lake Cochituate, 
Bassetts Pond, Plainfield Pond, Thousand Acre Swamp, Connecticut River Ox- 
bow, East Brimfield Reservoir, Red Bridge (Chicopee River), Quaboag Pond, 
Dark Brook Reservoir, Indian Lake, Lake Pearl, and Whitehall Reservoir. 

It is expected that some of the fish released in the fall of 1980 
will attain the minimum legal length of 28 inches during the 1982 fishing 
season . 



During 1980, the Quabbin fishery enjoyed the best year on record as 
far as lake trout and smallmouth bass fishing were concerned. Mainte- 
nance of the water at near-spillway level for the past five years has 
contributed significantly to the successful spawning and production of 
these favored game species. Despite the increases in trout and bass popu- 
lations, the smelt forage base responded positively to the increase in 
water storage. A new state record for lake trout was set at 20 pounds 12 
ounces on 14 June . 



Adequate shore and boat access continues to be a problem at many 
lakes while excessive weed growth impairs the use of many additional 
acres of potentially fishable water. Funding for new access sites must 
be given a higher priority and additional funds must be obtained to main- 
tain existing access sites. This Division must also commit itself to 
taking the lead in investigating inexpensive methods of controlling large 
areas of aquatic weeds on a cost-effective basis. The use of the white 
amur is one control method which holds some potential, but it needs Board 
approval before it can be tried. 

Many of Massachusetts' well-known trout ponds are beginning to show 
signs of increasing acidity. Kettle ponds such as Higgins , Shubael, 
Pimlico, Mary's and Fearing 's desperately need to be treated with lime- 
stone if they are to maintain their fishery potential. Numerous other 
waters including Quabbin Reservoir are in jeopardy due to acid rainfall. 
Loss of fish habitat in the Quabbin alone could mean a loss of 13 percent 
of the total inland water acreage presently open to angling. This year, 
Quabbin produced at least 8,300 legal lake trout including a new state 
record of 20 pounds 12 ounces, not to mention thousands of smallmouth 
bass and rainbow trout and hundreds of landlocked salmon. It is a fishery 
to be guarded with care . 



Stream Management 



A total of 186 streams were surveyed , 80 in 1980 and 106 in 1981, 
to assess their potential for supporting trout, angling use and water 
quality. All information is presently being computerized. This informa- 
tion will greatly influence future regulations and stocking practices 
designed to increase angling benefits without increasing costs. 



Brood stock collection for sea-run brown trout was about average 
during both years. Protection for the young fish was inaugurated in 1981 
when the Fisheries and Wildlife Board voted to close the lower reaches 
of five sea-run brown trout streams from 15 March to 31 May each year and 
to reduce the creel limit from six per day to 2. By the spring of 1982, 
the sea-run brown fry and fingerlings should have new quarters at the 
East Sandwich hatchery. 

The Quashnet River restoration project continued with Trout Unlimited 
volunteers contributing at least 12,000 man hours, removing one third of 
a mile of brush in and along the stream bed. They also installed numerous 
overhead and wing deflector cover devices to increase the stream's trout 
holding capacity. 

During 1981, the Division embarked upon its first commercial eel sea- 
son. Presently, only fifteen licenses are issued and vital statistics on 
eels taken are being collected and analyzed to determine the future of 
this fishery. 

Technical Assistance 

The need to consider alternatives to imported oil has stimulated the 
development of both new and abandoned hydroelectric projects. The impact 
of such projects on fisheries habitat are presently being examined and 
resolutions to potential problems are being resolved as a pre-requisite 
to licensing. Additional fish surveys are being conducted in conjunction 
with the Department of Environmental Quality Engineering to determine 
levels of toxicants in fish flesh and the effect of chlorinated effluent 
from sewage treatment on fish populations. 

Numerous fisheries programs are now functioning on the Division's new 
computer. These programs are easing the duties of biologists who formerly 
spent many winter months processing and analyzing data that had been col- 
lected during the spring and summer. These new computer services have 
freed staff members to investigate more areas with greater accuracy than 
previously . 

Urban Angler 

Under the direction of Ilo Howard, numerous volunteers, donations 
from tackle manufacturers, retail outlets, recreation and conservation 
commissions and government agencies were coordinated to bring fishing in- 
formation and know-how to over 800 inner city residents. A total of 22 
clinics were held introducing old and young anglers to fishing methods, 
cleaning and cooking the catch, and where to go in the immediate vicinity 
of their homes. Response is favorable and demand for additional clinics 
is high. 





With the advantages of full staffing and development funding, the 
hatcheries experienced good years in 1980 and 1981. Overall, production 
remained excellent and even set a record during 1981 when the Division 
stocked 1,290,775 trout weighing a total of 475,849 pounds. Not only 
were there many fish, but they were of very high quality. 

During 1980, the Palmer Salmon Hatchery (rededicated as the Roger 
Reed Salmon Hatchery) received 29 adult Atlantic salmon from the Connect- 
icut River. These fish were in good shape compared to fish brought in in 
previous years. New techniques of handling and treating returning fish 
at Federal and state salmon hatcheries appear to be the major factors con- 
tributing toward increased quality and survival. Unfortunately, the pro- 
gram at this hatchery suffered a severe setback on Labor Day 1980 when 
the salmon were lost because of a water pump failure and a coincidental 
failure of the alarm system. Modifications were made in both water and 
alarm systems to ensure that this will not happen again. 

Construction on a new coho rearing unit at the East Sandwich hatchery 
came to a standstill in 1980 because of the necessity of filing for permits 
with the local historical commission. Design was completed, however, and 
the project was reactivated during the spring and summer of 1981 as con- 
tracts were awarded for the water system, the hatch house, a pool cover, 
and chainlink fence. 

In March of 1981, the Division received word of a $50,000 appropria- 
tion to build a tiger muskie (northern pike x muskellunge) hatchery. These 
fish have been used extensively in New York and Pennsylvania as a manage- 
ment tool to control pan and rough fish and they are also excellent game 
fish. The Roger Reed Salmon Hatchery at Palmer was selected as the site 
for rearing the tiger muskies primarily because of the reservoir/well 
system which allows temparture control. Contracts were put out on five 
thirty-foot long fiberglass tanks and on automatic feeders. During May 
of that year, 50,000 newly-hatched "tigers" were received from Pennsylvania 
and by 30 June 1981, they were at the Reed hatchery and thriving. 

Although not singled out for comment, the other hatcheries — McLaughlin, 
Bitzer and Sunderland — continued a high level of production and contributed 
materially to the success of the hatchery program. 



-11- 



FISH PRODUCTION 



1979-1980 
No. Stocked 



McLaughlin 

Rainbow Trout 254,868 

Brook Trout 146,697 

Brown Trout 92 ,000 

Totals 493,565 

Montague 

Rainbow Trout 3 7,250 

Brook Trout 19,475 

Brown Trout 1, 7 00 

Totals 58,425 

Sunderland 

Rainbow Trout 62,021 

Brook Trout 69,900 

Brown Trout 96,850 

Kokanee Salmon 

Totals 228,771 

Palmer 

Rainbow Trout 81,565 

Brook Trout 20,300 

Brown Trout 297 

Landlocked Salmon 17,920 

Atlantic Salmon 

Kokanee Salmon 

Totals 120,082 

Sandwich 

Rainbow Trout 122,000 

Brook Trout 38,150 

Brown Trout 18,178 

Coho Salmon 11,000 

Totals 189,328 

Grand Total 1,090,171 



Weight 1980-1981 Weight 

(lbs.) No. Stocked (lbs.) 

204,720 229,157 112,384 

35,036 168,833 55,901 

19,915 145,751 38,229 

259,671 543,741 206,514 

30,859 61,800 61,341 

22,399 17,500 12,656 

1,620 

54,878 79,300 73,997 

69,317 65,850 48,333 

30,881 55,050 26,144 

31,515 83,350 25,965 

29,000 211 

131,713 233,250 100,653 

15,307 

5,228 140,548 8,327 

700 13,946 7,436 

1,280 

7,200 1,200 

15,000 2_5 

22,515 176,694 16,988 

55,310 106,230 39,121 

13,828 47,040 18,703 

5,884 37,520 16,303 

500 67,000 3,570 

75,522 257,790 77,697 

544,299 1,290,775 475,849 



WILDLIFE 



Chet M. McCord 
Chief of Wildlife Research 



The Wildlife research section has the responsibility to provide the 
Division with the data necessary to make the many management decisions 
facing a natural resource agency today. Many of the monitoring tasks 
involved in keeping tabs on wildlife populations remain unchanged, but 
the field of wildlife research is becoming more and more complex with 
the advent of law suits aimed at challenging many of the tenets of natural 
resource philosophy. While the job of monitoring wildlife populations and 
other social and environmental factors continues along with adjusting 
management regulations as needed, the added responsibilities of defending 
natural resource management in the courts has been an unwelcome addition. 



This was illustrated during FY1980 with the circumstances relating 
to bobcat management. During the mid-1970s, several antihunting groups 
took up the bobcat as their banner species. Although the cat was abundant 
nationally, these groups were able to convince people that the cat was in 
danger of extinction due to overtrapp ing . Their cause was enhanced by the 
listing of all felids on Appendix II of the Treaty'on International Trade 
in Endangered Species. Such listing was without biological justification 
but the antihunting groups took advantage of the situation in this state 
by introducing bills in the state legislature to ban the taking of bobcats, 
and by challenging export of bobcat pelts in Federal court. All these 
activities r-iquired extensive counter efforts which cut into the basic 
priorities of the section. 



During FY1981, a similar problem arose with management of coyotes. 
The coyote came into this state 25 to 30 years ago, and has since expanded 
its range statewide. It is hunted and trapped, frequently without limit, 
in all adjoining states except Rhode Island; yet, coyote numbers continue 
to increase showing, as in the West, that the animal is able to flourish 
despite traditional hunting and trapping seasons. During FY1981, the 
Fisheries and Wildlife Board voted to open a limited hunting season with 
a mandatory carcass turn-in and a pelt-tagging requirement. This season, 
which would provide much needed population data, was vigorously opposed 
by antihunting and humane groups whose arguments were almost exclusively 
philosophical . 



-13- 



A minimum of controversy marked the Division's successful re- 
establishment of a wild turkey population — the culmination of a project 
which had started in 1972 — and the initiation, in FY 1980, of the first 
turkey hunting season in more than 100 years. This was a limited season 
with hunting by permit only during the first two weeks of May, a period 
when hens would be nesting and thus secluded, while gobblers would re- 
spond readily to calls. To protect nesting hens which forage during the 
afternoons, the season was set to run from one-half hour before sunrise 
to 11:00 A.M. (See Footnote 1, page 21.) 

Another major change during FY1980 restricted weapons which could be 
used during the primitive firearms season. (See Footnote 2, page 21.) 

Also in the bobcat season, there had been voluntary carcass collec- 
tions for two years which provided about 60 percent of bobcat carcasses 
for analysis. This was not an adequate sample in view of the small number 
of bobcats being taken; therefore, the Board made the carcass turn-in 
mandatory . 

The basic premise of pelt tagging is to permit an accurate and con- 
trolled enumeration of the fur harvest. Nontransferability of tags was 
an essential, but hitherto unstated, component of this monitory system. 
Since there was at least one instance where an individual attempted to 
transfer tags from pelt to pelt, it was important to clearly state the 
prohibition against this activity and to define the duration the tag must 
remain on the pelt. So the Board stated that the tags were nontransfer- 
able and had to remain on the pelt until the pelt was dressed. 

To prevent any conflicts with the opening of the archery season, the 
paraplegic season was changed from opening the first Monday in November 
to the last Monday in October. 

During FY1981, responding to indications that the beaver population 
was depressed in the western part of the state, the Board voted a zoned 
season for trapping beaver with later opening dates for the western zone. 

The otter season was also moved back to slightly reduce that harvest 
to bring it in line with Division objectives, and the season was opened 
at the same time as beaver since trapping methods were similar for both. 
The western zone was opened 15 December and the zone east of the Connec- 
ticut River was opened 23 November. All closed on the last day of 
February . 

The fisher season was cut from 61 to 30 days due to an exceptional 
rise in harvest from 48 to 169. The biological data derived from the 
harvest continues, however, to show the population in good health and in 
no danger presently. Additionally, it was proposed that the 220 Conibear 
trap be made legal on land when set in a tree six feet above the ground. 
This proposal was not approved. 



-14- 



Research activities during the reporting period were as follows: 
Waterfowl 

Preseason Banding 

Seven hundred ninety-nine (799) birds were banded during the 

1979 preseason banding: 270 wood ducks, 324 mallards, 109 black 
ducks, 16 mallard x black hybrids, 38 green-winged teal, 29 blue- 
winged teal, 1 pintail, 1 American wigeon and 1 hooded merganser. 
Also banded were 2 coot and 2 soras. A cooperator banded an addi- 
tional 5 least sandpipers and 1 killdeer. 

Five hundred thirty-four (534) ducks were banded during the 

1980 preseason banding: 274 wood ducks, 167 mallards, 63 black ducks, 
7 mallard x black hybrids, 12 green-winged teal, and 11 blue-winged 
teal. Also banded was 1 sora. A cooperator banded an additional 

150 least sandpipers, 27 killdeer, 17 solitary sandpipers, 17 
spotted, 11 semipalmated , 2 pectoral and 1 western sandpiper, 1 semi- 
palmated plover and a lesser yellow legs. 

Winter Inventory Flights 

A total of 183,688 waterfowl ere counted during the January 
1980 winter inventory, up 9 percent over 1979 and 56 percent over 
the ten-year average. Black ducks, 20,417, were up 47 percent over 
1979, 7 percent above the ten-year average. Mallards, canvasbacks 
and sea duck numbers were up from last year, while mergansers, scaup, 
goldeneyes and Canada geese were down. Buffleheads were unchanged. 

During the January 1981 winter inventory, 136,353 waterfowl were 
counted, down 26 percent from 1980 but 8 percent over the ten-year 
average. Black ducks (24,736) were up 21 percent over 1980, 28 per- 
cent above the ten-year average. Only scaup numbers were significant- 
ly higher than in 1980. Extensive ice conditions and severe weather 
resulted in low counts for most other waterfowl. 

Winter Banding Program 

The winter of 1979-1980 was an exceptionally mild one with brief 
cold spells in February that froze over mussel flats in many bays and 
harbors. A total of 668 black ducks were banded by the Division. 
Parker River National Wildlife Refuge personnel banded an additional 
535 black ducks under their permit, thus exceeding the state's quota 
of 1,000 black ducks required by the United States Fish and Wildlife 
Service . 

The Division participated in the third year of a black duck re- 
ward band study. A total of 120 reward bands were placed on wintering 
black ducks by Division and Refuge personnel. 

The winter of 1980-1981 began with an extremely cold period 
shortly before Christmas that lasted through the third week of 
January. This resulted in extensive icing along coastal areas and 
deprived black ducks of food sources. Ducks came readily to bait 
sites allowing banders to achieve their quotas by the end of January. 



-15- 



The Division cooperated with the Massachusetts Audubon Society in an 
emergency feeding program. Fortunately, conditions moderated in 
early February and losses to starvation were minimal. 

A total of 954 male and 592 female black ducks were banded. 
These, along with 180 males and 63 females banded by the personnel 
of the Parker River National Wildlife Refuge, exceeded the state's 
quota of 400 males and 600 females. The high ratio of males to 
females (1.7:1) means we must band nearly 1,600 black ducks to get 
the 600 required females. Furthermore, since hybrids make up about 
18 percent of the birds banded and mallards and other species another 
4 percent, we must band 2,000 birds or so to insure banding 600 fe- 
male black ducks. Finally, because of the prevalence of previously- 
banded birds in our flocks, it is necessary to actually capture 
2,400 birds to achieve the 600 new female black ducks required, about 
a quarter of the total birds handled. 

Park Waterfowl Investigations 

Data from park mallard landings were run through several computer 
models to determine survival rates. The resultant data show that park 
waterfowl can be divided into three categories: park residents, local 
residents, and wild migrants. While most birds remain within 50 km 
of a park, more than a quarter of the birds move over 100 km to nest. 
Mallards banded during the winter months tend to winter in the same 
area during succeeding years. The survival rate of wintering park 
mallards was 61 percent for males and 48 percent for females. Parks 
are important to the ecology of the mallard in Massachusetts and vir- 
tually all wintering by mallards in the state occurs in parks. In 
this manner, the parks are important to both year-round residents and 
wild-nesting birds. Any management plans for the mallard in the 
Northeast must consider the role of parks in the ecology of the mal- 
lard. 

Wood D uck Po pulation Study 

A final version of a bulletin summarizing wood duck research in 
Massachusetts from 1970 to 1980 was completed and sent to the Assabet 
Valley Regional Vocational Technical High School for printing. It is 
expected to be available in 1982. 

Relationship of Canada Geese to Commercial Shellf isheries 

Field observations and examination of goose gizzards did not 
verify claims that Canada geese ingested shellfish. The feeding ac- 
tivities of geese over shellfish beds did disrupt and expose clams 
to the elements and to possible ingestion by other predators including 
black ducks and mallards. 

Waterfowl Gizzard Shot Survey 

By the end of FY1980, a total of 2,342 waterfowl gizzards had 
been checked manually for ingested shot. In April 1980, a sample of 
gizzards was also fluoroscoped to develop a correction factor for 



-16- 



shot missed by manual examination. This was determined to be 35 per- 
cent. Because ingestion rates were below 2 percent in Barnstable 
and Bristol Counties, the three steel shot zones in them were elimi- 
nated . 

During the 1980-1981 season, we solicited gizzards only from 
black ducks and mallards taken in our remaining steel shot zones in 
Essex and Plymouth Counties. The samples were sent to the North- 
eastern Diseases Research Center, Storrs, Connecticut where they were 
X-rayed. These results were combined with findings from previous 
years. The total ingestion rates to date indicate a 12.3 percent 
rate for the Wareham-Weweantic River area and hence a need for con- 
tinued steel shot zoning. The rate for the Plymouth Bay area was 
4.3 percent, below the 5 percent guidelines set by the United States 
Fish and Wildlife Service. This area was removed from steel shot 
regulations. The total ingestion rate for the Essex County steel 
shot zone is 5.6 percent but the highest levels are on the Parker 
River National Wildlife Refuge. The rate for the marshes south of 
the Parker River is only 3.6 percent. 

Based on these findings, observations of wintering populations 
and analysis of banding and distribution data, we recommend that the 
steel shot requirement be restricted to the Parker River National 
Wildlife Refuge and Plum Island and the marshes 150 yards south of 
the Parker River northwards to the New Hampshire line. 

Experimental Waterfowl Seasons Appraisal 

Responses from 422 Massachusetts waterfowlers indicate a pre- 
ference for a three-segment season with hunting during 10-20 October, 
11-29 November and 20 Decmeber-10 January. The Thanksgiving weekend 
appears to be the single most popular hunting period. Fifty-three 
percent of the waterfowlers hunt geese, 21 percent hunt specially 
for sea ducks and 13 percent for scaup. Forty-eight percent of 
waterfowlers hunt in steel shot zones. Comments by hunters indicate 
a desire for Sunday hunting in Massachusetts and the belief that we 
do not need steel shot zones. 

The 1979-1980 waterfowl season harvest was below that for 1978- 
1979, despite the three-way split option. Unusually mild tempera- 
tures throughout the season delayed migration resulting in very low 
harvest during November and the middle segment, normally a period of 
peak migration. During 1980-1981, there was no experimental season. 

Wetlands Assessment Study 

Wetland maps, previously developed based on 1971-1972 mapping 
data, were used to initiate a card file on wetlands of potentially 
moderate to high waterfowl value. To date, 71 areas in northern 
Worcester County have been identified. Each area was given a ten- 
digit code number. The first three digits identified topographic 
map, the next three town, and the final four digits the wetlands 
complex. The wetlands acreage was determined for each wetland type 
and the total size of the wetland indicated on the card as well as 
the type breakdown. 



-17- 



Wood Duck Nest Box Study 

Both summer and winter box checks showed 188 nest attempts in 
1979, but 17 nests were missed during winter checks while 16 boxes 
reported to have nests during the winter checks were, in fact, un- 
used during the summer of 1979. The nests thus reported were left 
over from earlier years. Boxes that had unreported nests were 
missed because (1) boxes were used twice in one season, (2) boxes 
had fallen down by the time of the winter check, and (3) nesting 
sign had disappeared. 

In 1980, summer checks indicated 176 nest starts, a usage rate 
of 34 percent. Winter checks by district personnel indicated 178 
nests for a 35 percent usage rate. 



Deer 



The 1979 statewide deer harvest for all seasons was 3,002 deer, one 
below the 1978 harvest of 3,003. This breaks down as follows: 

During the 18-day archery season, mainland archers reported har- 
vesting 186 deer (139 males, 47 females). The Nantucket archers reported 
11 deer (6 males and 5 females) . One male and no females were reported by 
Martha's Vineyard bowmen. The statewide archery harvest was 198 deer (146 
males and 52 females). 

Paraplegic deer hunters harvested 2 deer (2 males) during the special 
two-day season. 

During the special three-day primitive firearms season, 98 deer were 
reported statewide (48 males and 50 females). Ninety-four deer were taken 
on the mainland and 4 on Nantucket Island. 

During the six-day shotgun season, hunters harvested 2,706 deer. 
Of these, 1,957 were males (177 male fawns) and 749 were females. A total 
of 2,580 deer were harvested on the mainland. Hunters reported 168 deer on 
Nantucket Island, and 98 deer on Martha's Vineyard. The top four deer- 
producing counties were Berkshire, Franklin, Hampden and Hampshire, in that 
order . 

The 1980 season brought the largest harvest since the antlerless deer 
permit system was instituted in 1968. The statewide total was 3,494 deer 
with 74 percent of the harvest reported once again from Berkshire, Franklin, 
Hampden and Hampshire Counties. During this season, more antlered males 
were taken than in the year of Highest Harvest (1958) when deer of any 
sex could be taken without permits. 

Archery continues to increase in popularity. The three-week season 
had more participants and a higher harvest than ever before. The 1980 
archery harvest was 239 (181 males; 52 females). 

Paraplegic hunters took 3 deer, 5 from Berkshire County and 3 from 
Nantucket . 



During the primitive firearms season, hunters reported 211 deer (83 
males and 123 females). 



-18- 



Deer (Continued) 

As always, the bulk of the harvest came during the week-long shotgun 
season during which, in 1980, hunters reported harvesting 3,035 deer. Of 
these, 2,205 were males (232 male fawns) and 830 were females. A total 
of 2,743 deer were taken on the mainland, 162 from Nantucket, 76 from 
Martha's Vineyard, and 55 from the Gosnold Islands. 

Beaver 

A record harvest of 2,121 beaver was taken by 189 trappers (also a 
record) in 114 towns during the 1979-1980 season. This take was 1,105 
more than in 1978-1979 and 861 more than a ten-year (1970-1979) average. 
Extremely mild and unusual weather conditions in December 1979- January 
1980 permitted an extended period of ice-free trapping, resulting in the 
season's high take. 

The revised 1980-1981 beaver season permitted trapping west of the 
Connecticut River from 15 December to 28 February and east of the river 
from 23 November to 28 February. During these periods, a total of 906 
beaver were taken by 135 trappers in 97 towns. This take represented a 
decrease of 1,215 from 1979-1980. The decreased take was reflected in all 
counties; however, the percentage from each county remained relatively con- 
stant from 1979-1980 to 1980-1981. The take west of the Connecticut River 
and the November take reflected the restrictions imposed by the revised 
season, with 434 beaver (47.9%) taken in the western zone and 225 (24.8%) 
taken in November in 1980-1981 as compared to 1,232 (58.1%) and 804 (37.9%) 
in 1979-1980. 

Otter and Fisher 

During 1979-1980, a total of 157 otters were taken by 95 trappers in 
76 towns for a mean of 1.6 otters per successful trapper. This compares 
with a take of 121 and a mean of 1.9 for 64 trappers in 1978-1979. A 
record harvest of 169 fisher was taken in 1979, with 54 trappers in 43 
towns averaging 3.1 fisher per successful trapper. Otter were taken pri- 
marily in Worcester (47), Berkshire (32) and Franklin (23) Counties; 
fisher were harvested principally in Worcester (82), Franklin (38) and 
Middlesex (34) Counties. The mean age of otter taken in 1979-1980 was 
2.46 years and fisher 2.30 years. This compares with 1977-1978 mean ages 
of 2.54 for otter and 1.68 for fisher. 

In 1980, the otter season was shortened to coincide with the beaver 
season. The fisher season was also shortened from 61 to 30 days. During 
the revised season, 85 trappers took a total of 143 otters in 78 towns 
for a mean take of 1.7 otter per successful trapper. This compares with 
a take of 157 and a mean of 1.6 in 1979-1980. The fisher take decreased 
from 169 in 197 9 to 115 in 1980, with 48 trappers taking fisher in 43 
towns for a mean catch of 2.4 fisher per successful trapper. Worcester 
(49), Berkshire (23), and Essex (21) Counties yielded the most otter; 
Worcester (67) and Franklin (31) Counties produced the most fisher. The 
mean age of otter taken in 1980-1981 was 3.06 years, as compared to a 
mean age of 2.38 in 1979-1980. 



-19- 



Coyote 

The Fisheries and Wildlife Board approved a coyote hunting season, 
with mandatory pelt checking, to commence in the fall of 1981. 

Mourning Dove 

The total number of calling doves on three long-term standardized 
routes in 1980 increased 32 percent from 31 to 41 doves. Counts on all 17 
routes conducted increased 38 percent from 134 to 185 doves heard. 

The total number of calling doves on those three standardized routes 
decreased five percent from 41 to 39 doves during 1980-1981. Counts con- 
ducted on all 17 routes decreased only one percent (185 to 183) from 1980 
to 1981. 

Turkey 

Massachusetts' first turkey hunting season since 1851 was held in 
May 1980 in Berkshire and Franklin Counties. A total of 1,250 permits 
were allotted with a total of 72 turkeys taken in 22 towns during the two- 
week season. Berkshire County yielded 66 turkeys and Franklin County 6. 
The greatest harvest was on opening day (21), with 3 to 9 turkeys taken 
each day thereafter (except 13 May, with none). The average hunter used 
a box call and a 12-gauge shotgun with No. 4 shot. Adult turkeys weighed 
from 13.3 to 21.3 pounds, gutted ; immatures from 12.5 to 14.4 pounds, gutted. 
Fifty-three or 74 percent of the turkeys taken were adults. 

No turkeys were captured during late-winter trapping efforts. These 
negative results were attributed to mild weather which permitted more free 
movements and easier feeding by the turkeys. 

The second spring gobbler season was held during a two-week period in 
May 1981. A total of 2,500 permits were allotted, with 136 birds taken in 
26 towns. Berkshire County yielded 131 birds and Franklin County 5. 
Three-quarters of the take was during the first week. Adult turkeys 
weighed 14.1 to 21.0 pounds, gutted; immatures 11.5 to 15.2 pounds, gutted. 
Adults comprised 62 (46%) of the total taken. Two eight-year-old banded 
birds were shot, including one from the 1973 Beartown release. 

Sixteen turkeys (10 hens, 6 toms) were captured during winter trapping 
efforts. Thirteen birds (9 hens, 4 toms) were released in Hubbardston 
State Forest, Worcester County. The 3 remaining birds were released on 
the DAR State Forest, Goshen, Hampshire County. 

Black Bear 

A record number of 880 bear permit applications was received during 
1979, surpassing the previous record of 574 in 1978. Three bears were 
taken by legal hunting, including one each in Berkshire, Franklin and 
Hampshire Counties. One depredation kill was recorded and one bear was 
found dead of unknown causes. New reports of 35 observations involving 
46 bears were received from 26 towns. Twelve nuisance complaints were re- 
ceived, including beehive, corn, and blueberry depredations and residential 



-20- 



and trash problems. Arrangements were initiated with the Massachusetts 
Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit (CWRU) regarding an expanded bear 
study . 

During 1979-1980, a record number of bear permit applications (1,103) 
was received, producing a record kill of 10 bears since mandatory check- 
ing was established, and a record bear (467 pounds dressed) for Massachu- 
setts. Five bears were killed by hunters in Berkshire County and 5 in 
Franklin County. Two road kills and one nuisance kill were also reported. 
New reports of 68 observations totaling 85 bear were received from 38 
towns. Nine nuisance complaints were received, including beehive and 
corn depredations. 



Wildlife Species Files 



A wildlife species filing system was begun in 1979 to maintain data on 
distribution, harvest, seasons and management of wildlife species in the 
Commonwealth. At the present time, files for 137 species, not including 
waterfowl, have been initiated and a computer program on wildlife distribu- 
tion is in preparation. 



-21- 



Footnote 1 

The first turkey season in the state's history took place during the 
first two weeks of May. This period was selected as the time when most 
hens are nesting and, therefore, unavailable, but gobbling is still high 
and toms can be called readily. The gobbling is most intense during the 
early morning and drops off during the afternoon. For this reason, and 
as a protection for hens which leave their nests to feed during the after- 
noon, hunting was limited to the period from one-half before sunrise to 
11 o'clock in the morning. 

It was further limited to Berkshire and Franklin Counties and was by 
permit only. A total of 1,250 permits were issued by a random drawing 
process. These permits had to be carried in the field and included a tag 
which had to be attached to the turkey at the time of kill. 

Weapons were restricted to shotguns no larger than 10 gauge using 
shot sizes from No. 2 to No. 6 or bows and arrows of at least forty-pound 
pull at 28-inch draw with arrows that had well-sharpened steel broadhead 
blades not less than seven-eighths of an inch in width nor greater than 
one and one-half inch. Baits, traps, dogs, live or artificial decoys and 
electronic callers were prohibited. 

Hunters were limited to one bearded turkey which was to be presented 
whole (although entrails may be removed) at an official checking station 
for tagging within 24 hours of the taking. 

Footnote 2 

Beginning in 1980, original or replica flintlocks and caplocks of the 
type used before 1865 are the only weapons permitted during the Massachu- 
setts special three-day "primitive firearms" deer season. The decision, 
rendered by the Fisheries and Wildlife Board at their June 1979 meeting, 
came after a year of study during which the Board reviewed the original 
intent of the season and the methods of hunting presently in use. Over a 
period of six years, technological innovations had so stretched the word- 
ing of the regulations that the weapons being used were almost as good as 
a modern shotgun. For example, a pre-1865 caplock or flintlock had no 
break-open breech and all firing mechanisms were exposed. When the humid- 
ity was high, the weapon was unlikely to fire. Innovations like the H & R 
Huntsman changed that. The Huntsman has a break-open breech and has all 
firing mechanisms enclosed so they are protected from the elements. Old 
style percussion caps were replaced by a modern shotgun primer which made 
the weapon fire as dependably as a modern shotgun. 

Innovations continued with adapter or converter plugs which would 
fit into any shotgun instantaneously, making it into a "primitive fire- 
arm." Projectiles went from the old round balls, fine for 50 yards or 
so, to ballistically more desirable rifled slugs. Smokeless powder was 
used in place of black powder. It became apparent that regular shotgun 
shells could be cut in half with the brass and placed in the breech as 
a "converter plug" and the slug loaded from the muzzle to meet the defini- 
tion of a muzzle-loaded or primitive weapon. 



-22- 



Footnote 2 (Continued) 



All of these improvements were producing an increase in the harvest. 
In particular, the harvest of does had doubled each year for several 
years and at that rate, the kill would have an impact on the Division's 
deer management program in two to three years. 



With this in mind, the Board evaluated a number of regulations de- 
signed to restore the original intent of the season. In rendering the 
decision, the Board precluded the use of the H & R Huntsman, converter 
plugs and scopes. Permissible powder was limited to black powder, Pyro- 
dex, or other synthetic substitutes as approved by the National Muzzle 
Loading Rifle Association, and projectiles were limited to a single, 
round, lead ball. In addition to firming up regulations on allowable 
weapons and accessories, the Board adopted new wording to clarify defini- 
tions of a muzzle-loading weapon and an unloaded weapon. 




E. Michael Pollack 
Chief Game Biologist 



During FY1980, major pen construction was continued at all game 
farms, a project in which CETA and YACC crews were most helpful in supply- 
ing labor. Pens needing maintenance were repaired or replaced with new 
pens. Repairs on brooder house roofs, water lines and electrical systems 
were conducted at all game farms. Production during this period was 
normal despite the recurrence of vandalism. Feed costs continued to 
climb although not as sharply as in previous years. Control of disease 
and cannibalism resulted in production of high quality birds, and research 
into the use of automatic feeding and watering devices which may reduce 
labor costs was continued at all game farms. 

FY1981 was a "banner year" for all three farms. The quality of the 
birds released was superb! They were fat birds, excellent flyers with 
long tails which stand as a tribute to the hard work of game farm person- 
nel. Game farm staffs also continued to explore ways to reduce rearing 
costs, losses due to disease, etc. as rising costs of feed and utilities 
continued to plague the program. 



During both 1980 and 1981, the Sportsmen's Club Pheasant Rearing 
Program was active in raising and releasing several thousand birds. 



-24- 



Garae Farm Production 
1979-1980 



Pheaant 



Game Farm 


SR 


A 


B 


C 


PG 


Misc.* Totals 


Sandwich 


250 




1,744 


4,906 


6,052 


425 13,377 


Wilbraham 


1,960 





3,572 


8,888 


7,108 


550 22,078 


Ayer 


2,590 


64 


2,592 


4,784 


13,676 


770 24,476 


Totals 


4,800 


64 


7,908 


18,578 


26,836 


1,745 59,931 


Quail 














A total of 


approximately 3,000 quail 


, produced 


at the Sandwich State Game 


Farm, were 


released on 


the 


wildlife 


management 


areas in 


the Southeast 


Wildlife District. In 


addition, approximately 


500 quail 


were distributed 


for field 


trial purposes. 










White Hare 














A total of 


594 white hare were purchased from a 


source in New Brunswick, 


Canada. Releases were 


made 


in all five districts. 










1980 


-1981 






Pheasant 














Game Farm 


SR 


A 


B 


C 


PG 


Misc.- Totals 


Sandwich 


220 




1,712 


3,052 


4,780 


790 10,554 


Wilbraham 


1,425 




3,540 


8,880 


6,728 


124 20,697 


Ayer 


2,335 


60 


2,960 


4,999 


12,564 


526 23,444 


Totals 


3,980 


60 


8,212 


16,931 


24,072 


1,440 54,695 



Quail 

A total of approximately 4,200 quail, produced at the Sandwich State Game 
Farm, were released on the wildlife management areas in the Southeast 
Wildlife District. In addition, approximately 600 quail were distributed 
for field trial purposes. 

White Hare 

A total of 572 white hare were purchased from a dealer in New Brunswich, 
Canada . 

* Miscellaneous - Approximate numbers of birds for field trials, displays, 
youth hunts, etc. 



NON-GAME AND ENDANGERED SPECIES 



Bradford G. Blodget 
Assistant Director 
Nongame and Endangered Species 

In November 1979, I was appointed to this new post within the Division, 
bearing chief responsibility for the management and conservation of nongame 
and endangered species. Because of the often superficial distinction be- 
tween game and nongame species, coordination with game biologists has been 
and remains close to assure an integrated approach to wildlife management 
in the Commonwealth. The program, still in its infancy, has been inhibited 
by a lack of funds expressly set aside for a nongame program. Since 
January 1980, however, there has been a staff member — James Morash, State 
Ornithologist — whose responsibilities will include maintenance of nongame 
records as well as state ornithological information. 

Morash, however, left his position as State Ornithologist in February 
1981 and, as of 30 June 1981, the post remains unfilled owing to continuing 
financial uncertainties of the agency as a whole. Without a source of non- 
game revenues of its own, the Nongame and Endangered Species Program con- 
tinues to be dependent on the Inland Fish and Wildlife Fund. Cutbacks in 
that fund will likely be passed on, in part, to the Nongame and Endangered 
Species Program. 

At the Federal level, impacts were felt as well, with austerity cuts 
in many programs including the elimination of grant-in-aid funding to the 
states for the continuation of the state/Federal endangered species coopera- 
tive program. 

Despite abundant evidence of a gloomy, short-term outlook, the long- 
term forecast looks good. National public opinion polls have indicated 
clearly public interest in wildlife programs and in innovative revenue 
sources which can provide funds for exciting and progressive programs. 

Statutory and Regulatory Matters 

The following changes in laws, rules and regulations having a bearing 
on nongame and endangered species took effect in FY1980: 

1. Sections 4 and 5, Chapter 131, Massachusetts General Laws, were, 
effective 5 October 1979, amended by Chapter 614 of the Acts of 
1979, granting the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife clear 



authority to investigate, manage and regulate reptiles and amphib- 
ians. Rules and regulations pertaining to the taking of reptiles 
and amphibians from the wild within the Commonwealth were published 
in the Massachusetts Register (Issue 206), dated 17 April 1980 and 
became effective upon publication. Found at 321 CMR part 3.05, 
these rules and regulations state, among other things, that no 
person shall disturb, harass or take by any means a Plymouth red- 
bellied turtle or any one of five species of endangered or 
threatened marine turtles. Twenty-five species may not be pos- 
sessed except under special permit. No species may be taken for 
commercial sale unless under permit. The snapping turtle becomes 
the only reptile or amphibian that may still be taken at any time 
and with no limits. Bullfrogs may be taken only from 16 July to 
30 September inclusive, with a possession limit of six. 

Section 4, Chapter 131, Massachusetts General Laws was, effective 
13 November 1979, amended by Section 1, Chapter 726 of the Acts of 
1979, giving the Director explicit powers to investigate all non- 
game wildlife and wild plants and to promulgate rules and regula- 
tions establishing a list of species recognized by the Commonwealth 
to be endangered and threatened. Such rules and regulations, after 
a public hearing, were published in the Massachusetts Register 
(Issue 206) and became effective 17 April 1980. Found at 321 CMR 
part 8.01, these regulations define the terms "endangered" and 
"threatened" and adopt in total the United States List of Threatened 
and Endangered Wildlife and Wild Plants. In addition to species 
on the Federal list, the small whorled pogonia , as well as the 
Plymouth red-bellied turtle, which as of 17 April 1980 had still 
not been listed by the Fish and Wildlife Service, was listed as 
"endangered" on the state list. The turtle was listed as "en- 
dangered" by the Federal government effective 2 May 1980. 

Effective 13 November 1979, Chapter 726 of the Acts of 1979 amended 
Section 26A of Chapter 131 by striking out the old statutory list 
of endangered species and substituting in place thereof provisions 
that no person may se 11 any species or part of said species that 
appears on the Commonwealth's list of endangered species without 
obtaining a permit from the Division under provisions of Section 
23, Chapter 131. 

Section 90 of Chapter 131, Massachusetts General Laws was, effec- 
tive 13 November 1979 to provide penalties of up to $1,000 or im- 
prisonment for up to a year or both for selling any endangered 
species or parts thereof in violation of the provisions of Section 
26A. 

The "Exemption List" (the list of animals, excluding domestic 
animals, which may be imported, maintained or possessed without a 
permit and which is found at 321 CMR part 9.01) was substantially 
revised and published in the Massachusetts Register (Issue 206) , 
17 April 1980, to become effective 16 July 1980. 



-27- 



In December 1979, responding to certain new responsibilities pertain- 
ing to wild plants stated in Section 1, Chapter 726 of the Acts of 1979, 
the Division investigated the possibility of requesting an amendment to 
our endangered species cooperative agreement to expand it to encompass 
wild plants. In an opinion from the office of the Attorney General of 
the Commonwealth dated 4 March 1980, it was indicated that a jurisdictional 
conflict relative to wild plants appears to exist between the Division of 
Fisheries and Wildlife and the Department of Environmental Management. 
This matter remains under study and no further action is anticipated at 
this time. 

No changes in laws, rules or regulations having a bearing on nongame 
or endangered species took effect in FY 1981 except that, "Chinchilla de- 
rived from captive stock" was added to the "Exemption List" found at 321 
CMR 9 .01 (7) (b) (12) . These mammals may not be imported, maintained or pos- 
sessed without permits. 

Nongame Legislation 

The Division adopted a dramatically new position on nongame legislation 
in FY 1980. After seven years of struggle, it was recognized that further 
expenditure of time and energies was no longer justifiable. It had become 
apparent that entrenched philosophical positions would forever doom nongame 
bills. More significantly, a thorough review of Massachusetts statutes re- 
vealed that the Division already had a clear mandate to operate a nongame 
program. Attention was, therefore, focused on ways to obtain funding for 
the nongame program. To this end, the Division supported S-1142, a bill 
that, if passed, would have established an income tax check-off scheme for 
nongame funds. It was, however, not passed into law and so, early in FY 
1981 another bill was filed to establish the income tax check-off. This 
system, originated in 1978 in Colorado, has proved so successful that by 
June 1981, fourteen states had a nongame check-off system. 

This legislation is of critical importance since it would provide a 
source of "up front" money which is essential for participation in Federal 
grant-in-aid programs. To date, the Division has been limited in the ex- 
tent to which it can participate in such programs for nongame because of 
the lack of a suitable source of nongame "up front" funds. 

At the Federal level, the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act of 1980, 
often referred to as the Forsy the-Chaf ee Act, was signed into law. Its 
primary purpose is to provide financial and technical assistance to the 
states for the development, revision and implementation of conservation 
plans and programs for wildlife, and particularly emphasizes planning for 
nongame, fish and wildlife conservation and management. Although Congress 
authorized up to $5,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 1982 to 1985, the 
Administration's proposed FY 1982 budget does not include funding for im- 
plementation of this act. 



-28- 



Policy _Rel ative to Possession of Wild Animals as Pets and the Maintenance 
of Private Menageries 

A major decision was made in June 1980 to become effective 1 July 1980, 
to discontinue the practice of issuing permits for the possession of wild 
animals (non-exempt) for the purpose of pets or private menageries. This 
decision also applies to skunks, including captively-propagated descented 
animals that had been commonly sold in pet stores. Animals held under 
permits prior to 16 July will be "grandfathered." Permits will continue 
to be issued in instances where the animals are desired for bona fide educa- 
tional, scientific or occupational uses or for purposes of commercial prop- 
agation . 

Cooperative Endangered Species Agreement 

During FY 1980, a cooperative agreement for the management of endan- 
gered species was consummated between the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service 
and the Division. Signed at the end of August 1979, the agreement means 
that the Division is eligible for two-thirds grant-in-aid monies for ap- 
proved endangered species projects. 

The agreement was renewed effective 1 October 1980 and again on 
1 October 1981. Under the agreement, preparation of a Federal Aid applica- 
tion for an endangered species project was initiated and effective in 
October 1980. Agreement was reached for studies totalling $84,000 (of 
which the Federal share was 556,000). 

Peregrine Falcon 

Early in FY 1980, six peregrine falcons released at Mount Tom 
hacking site disappeared under mysterious circumstances. In conjunc- 
tion with the Division of Law Enforcement, a news release was issued 
seeking information on these birds or any clues regarding the circum- 
stances of their disappearance, without any results. As a result of 
this loss, hacking activities at Mount Tom were suspended indefinite- 
ly. Use of a site atop an office building in downtown Boston remains 
under consideration. In mid-April, the State Ornithologist field 
checked 14 former eyries in western Massachusetts for nesting activ- 
ities, with negative results. 

No peregrines were hacked in the Commonwealth during FY 1981. 
However, one wild nesting pair was confirmed on 8 June 1981 by Rene 
Bollengier, Jr., former leader of the Eastern Peregrine Recovery Team 
in Crowford Notch, New Hampshire. Two young were fledged. This was 
an event of great importance to ornithologists and it indicates that 
wild nesting peregrines may eventually recolonize Massachusetts. 

Bald Eagles 

On 11 January 1980, the Division coordinated a statewide mid- 
winter bald eagle survey in conjunction with the National Wildlife 
Federation. A total of 25 bald eagles was recorded, with all birds 
within the Quabbin Reservation except for one at Wellfleet. This 
count, an increase from eight in January 1979, was the highest count 
in recent years and possibly reflected improved productivity and 
survival and the unusually ice-free Quabbin Reservoir. 



-29- 



On 9 January 1981, the Division coordinated the third statewide 
bald eagle midwinter survey. Fifteen eagles were estimated in the 
Quabbin Reservation, three along the Merrimack River, two in the 
Connecticut River Valley, and one at Martha's Vineyard. At the end 
of January, eagles along the lower Merrimack River increased to 
seven immatures, reminiscent of the numbers present there in the late 
1940s when eagles regularly wintered there. Some of these birds were 
observed utilizing the Division's Carr Island and Ram Island Wildlife 
Sanctuaries downstream from the "chain bridge" in Salisbury. 

Indiana Bat 

In March 1980, biologists from the Division entered the Old 
Emery and Macia Mines in the Town of Chester to inspect bat hibernacu- 
lar for the presence of Indiana bats reported there in 1938-1939. 
None were found but five individuals were found of the uncommon small- 
footed bat. In April 1981, the mines were resurveyed. Although no 
Indiana bats were found, 487 bats were recorded of which 214 were 
examined and identified. Those so examined were 140 Little brown bats, 
54 Keen's bats, 19 Eastern pipistrelles and 1 small-footed bat. 

Plymouth Red-Bellied Turtle 

In May 1981, the Massachusetts State Ethics Commission cleared 
up possible conflict of interest in Dr. T. E. Graham's research on the 
Plymouth red-bellied turtle under contract with the Division while 
salaried at Worcester State College. Once the contract was signed, 
special tarred turtle traps, line nets and four fyke nets were pur- 
chased for continuing studies. 

Significant progress was made in life history studies on this 
rare reptile. Special Petersen disc tags were applied to assist in 
identification of individual turtles and to advise finders not to 
molest the turtles and to assist the Division by promptly reporting 
sightings . 

In June, using Pitocin , gravid females were induced to lay 29 
eggs. These will be incubated and hatchlings will be overwintered 
and "head-started" the following season. Also, in FY 1981, expanded 
effort was made to examine predation levels and to identify specific 
nest ing areas . 

Tern Management 

The Division's operation in this important area continues to be large- 
ly confined to advisory and coordination functions. The Division became 
involved in a new management dimension with the United States Fish and 
Wildlife Service in a major gull control effort aimed at reducing the gull 
population at Monomoy Island where the huge gull population combined with 
erosion of the north island at Monomoy Wilderness Area threatens the exist- 
ing tern colony there. State Ornithologist Morash participated in a gull 
census 19-22 May which resulted in a final estimated total of 18,587 pairs 
of nesting herring and great black-backed gulls in an approximate ratio of 
5:1. In the designated control area, 1,406 nests were treated 4-5 June 
with DRC 1339 and a known total of 2,131 dead gulls were retrieved through 



-30- 



12 June. The Division believes that an ongoing gull control program will 
eventually have a positive effect on the tern population and will continue 
to support gull control efforts, even encouraging its expansion. 

To the disappointment of the Division, the Fish and Wildlife Service 
discontinued the gull control program at Monomoy and opted to control gulls 
by shooting and nest destruction only in the vicinity of the Monomoy tern- 
ery, authorizing the Massachusetts Audubon Society to experiment with gull 
harassment techniques at Muskeget Island. It is the Division's position 
that such strategies underestimate the magnitude of the gull problem and 
will not beneficially affect the tern population in the Commonwealth in the 
long run. Stop-gap gull control measures will more likely be overwhelmed 
by the reproductive potential of the gulls, resulting in the eventual loss 
of more habitat. The problem is so large that even severe gull control 
measures would probably not yield demonstrable results for three to four 
years . 

For the second year in a row, tern inventory results for 1980 indicate 
gains of approximately 15 percent for both least and common terns, with 
compiled results of 2,040+ pairs of least terns and 7,299+ pairs of common 
terns, compared with 1979 totals of 1,734+ and 6,168+ pairs respectively. 
However, it appears that roseate terns slipped 8 percent from 2,023 pairs 
in 1979 to 1,868 pairs in 1980 and Arctic terns dropped some 13 percent 
from 45+ pairs to 39 pairs. Arctics at Monomoy fell from 18 pairs in 1979 
to only 4 pairs there this year. This change was partially offset by in- 
creases at Nauset Beach and Plymouth Beach, which two locations harbored 
almost two-thirds of the Commonwealth's Arctic tern population. 

During the prime census period of 1-20 June, least terns were known 
to be breeding at 40 stations compared to 38 in 1979. Commons were found 
at 23 (v. 21), roseates at 9 (v. 7) and Arctics at 7 (v. 8). 

Ninety-six (96) percent of our roseate population appears to be spread 
between Bird Island (1,400 pairs) and Monomoy (400 pairs). About 83 per- 
cent of all common terns were concentrated at five sites which, in order 
of size were: Monomoy (3,400 pairs), Gray's Beach (760 pairs), New Island 
(740 pairs), Bird Island (600 pairs) and Plymouth Beach (550 pairs). Least 
tern colonies of over 100 pairs were recorded at Nauset Heights and Nauset 
Spit (both 180 pairs), Sarson's Inlet area at Martha's Vineyard (135 pairs), 
Chappaquidick Island (130 pairs), Duxbury Beach (120 pairs) and Nashawena 
Island (108 pairs) . 

The number of pairs of common terns, after rising slowly for the past 
two years, was lower in the 1981 breeding season (June), declining 23 per- 
cent from 1980 to 5,625 pairs. This was the lowest since 1978 when 
4,119+ pairs were recorded. The decline is believed to be principally at- 
tributable to the breakup of the Monomoy colony, exascerbated by the vir- 
tual absence of vacant habitat elsewhere in the Commonwealth. The Monomoy 
colony sustained continual habitat loss due mainly to erosion of the great 
black-backed gull colony. Although probably not as severe a factor as the 
foregoing, observers questioned for the first time whether growth and ex- 
pansion of the laughing gull population (embedded within the tern colony) , 
which reached 1,000 pairs in 1981, might not actually be starting to 



-31- 



emerge as a negative factor. In addition, great horned owl and black- 
crowned night heron predation became more severe in 1981, leading to re- 
peated night desertions and the eventual relocation of most of the 
roseate terns. 

The remaining species declined insignificantly. Least terns 
1,856+ pairs, down from 2,040+ pairs in 1980. Roseate terns were 
about one percent from 1980 to 1,851 pairs. Arctic terns dropped 
third year in a row, reaching 31 pairs, the same as in 1977. 

Great Blue Herons 

For the second year, a statewide inventory of great blue heron rook- 
eries was conducted in June 1980. Forty-eight (48) active platforms were 
located which produced an estimated combined total of 116+ young. The 
distribution was similar to that of 1979 with a total of seven rookeries — 
three in Worcester County and two each in Franklin and Berkshire Counties. 
The largest rookery was at Westboro, where up to 15 platforms were built 
or repaired and occupied in the Suasco impoundment. Three of these nests 
appeared to be "practice" nests built by pre-adult birds. The other 12 
nests all produced young — three with two young, one with three, two with 
four, five with five and one with six. Elsewhere, single nests were con- 
firmed at Hardwick and Petersham. 

In June 1981, all known or reported great blue heron rookeries were 
field checked. Seven rookeries were found to be active — four in Worcester 
County, two in Berkshire County, and one in Franklin County. Active nests 
totaled 97 with production estimated at 276 young or about 2.8 young per 
nest. Rookery sizes ranged from 41 to 3 active nests. 

The Division feels that these data are potentially very valuable as 
baseline information as any future disruptions in productivity might serve 
as an early warning sign of acid rain or other environmental contaminants. 

Osprey 

Total osprey pairs breeding in the Commonwealth increased to 34+ pairs. 
Active nests numbered 11 at Martha's Vineyard, 20 in the Westport River 
Basin, 2 on Naushon Island and 1 at Round Hill, Marion. In June, a field 
trip was made to inspect the Westport colony under the guidance of Gilbert 
and Josephine Fernandez, whose tireless efforts have helped the cause of 
the Westport colony. The Division is indebted to Augustus Ben-David, whose 
vigilance and professional management has resulted in a growing osprey 
population at the Vineyard. 

During 1981, nongame personnel continued to work supportively with 
the Fernandezes in management of ospreys in the Westport area and with 
Gus Ben -David at Martha's Vineyard. Between these two major colonies, 7 7 
young ospreys fledged in 1981. Maintenance of the Westport and Martha's 
Vineyard osprey colonies has been carried out by the Fernandezes and Gus 
Ben-David. Productivity has now improved to a point that additional nesting 
platforms must be provided to foster continued growth and recovery of the 
population in areas where the species formerly nested. 



fell to 
off 

for the 



-32- 



In accordance with this need, the nongame program planned and initi- 
ated a major osprey nesting platform installation program in 1981 in con- 
junction with the Commonwealth Electric Company which agreed to donate 
poles and installation equipment. It is expected that up to eight in- 
stallations will be made in FY 1982. 

Other 

Lesser investigations were made in FY 1980 on the bog turtle and the 
red-spotted newt. No specimens of the former were found at possible sta- 
tions in Berkshire County. The newt is one of several species currently 
in demand for use by schools. Two permits have been issued to allow com- 
mercial collection for this purpose. Such permits have been carefully de- 
signed. The permittee must report annually the number of specimens taken 
and precise collection sites. Such information will be essential for 
monitoring these populations and the permittees have been notified that 
failure to produce the required information may result in the termination 
of their permits. 

Work on the breeding bird atlas project slowed due to a lack of funds. 
The staff at Massachusetts Audubon Society is continuing to compile and 
assess these valuable data for what is still hoped will be eventual pub- 
lication . 



-33- 



DISTRICT REPORTS 




Northeast District, Walter L. Hoyt, District Wildlife Manager 
Southeast District, Louis Hambly, District Wildlife Manager 
Central District, G. Christopher Thurlow, District Wildlife Manager 
Connecticut Valley District, Herman Covey, District Wildlife Manager 
Western District, Winston Saville, District Wildlife Manager 



The five wildlife management districts serve as the Division's opera- 
tional arms, implementing research and management programs, serving as 
liaison with sports/conservation groups, reaching out to the general public, 
and maintaining the Division's lands and installations. Personnel from all 
five districts stocked trout, pheasants and varying hare in the appropriate 
seasons and operated checking stations where hunters checked in deer and, 
where appropriate, turkeys, while trappers checked their pelts. District 
staff members took part in ongoing research projects including waterfowl 
inventory and banding along the coast and collection of waterfowl gizzards 
for biological assay from areas in the Northeast where shot ingestion was 
being studied. Woodcock and mourning dove census counts were made and 
field personnel assisted Westboro staff in a statewide survey of the mast 
crop. Field crews also assisted the wood duck research project by check- 
ing and maintaining nesting boxes and putting up new structures in new 
locations as needed. This participation ranged from checking a limited 
number of boxes in the Connecticut Valley District which does not have an 
abundance of wood ducks to maintenance of about 350 boxes in the Northeast 
District which does. At the same time, staff of the Southeast District 
built and erected bluebird boxes (24 in 1980, 24 in 1981) in an effort to 
provide nesting areas for Sialis . 

Fisheries Section staffs were heavily involved in conducting surveys 
on selected ponds and streams to determine species composition of fish 
populations, growth rates and productivity of the waters. Periodic pH 
checks were carried out on trout ponds to assess the effects of acid pre- 
cipitation. Specific fisheries projects found crews from the Central 
District moving smelt eggs from Lake Quinsigamond to Comet Pond, Hubbard- 
ston while crews from the Southeast salvaged smallmouth bass from closed 
waters and moved them to open waters in need of additional predators 
(1500 in 1980; 620 in 1981). The Southeast crews also assisted biologist 
John Lindenberg in research on the use by fish of artificial reefs made 
from discarded tires. 



-34- 



A most innovative fisheries project was initiated by the Fisheries 
staff of the Northeast District in conjunction with staff from the South- 
east District in 1980. Approximately 2,500,000 eyed walleye eggs were 
obtained from the State of New York Department of Fisheries and Wildlife. 
These eggs were reared at the Attleboro Fish Hatchery and 15,000 three to 
five-inch walleyes were released into Assawompsett Pond, Lakeville. Dur- 
ing 1981, an additional 15,000 fingerlings, raised from the eggs obtained 
in 1980, were released into Assawompsett Pond and an additional 100,000 
fry were stocked into adjoining Long Pond. 

Because of heavy commitments of manpower in other areas, the bass- 
rearing facility at Harold Parker State Forest was not in operation during 
either 1980 or 1981. 

Personnel from the Connecticut Valley District assisted Division bi- 
ologists working at the Holyoke fishlift facility and, during 1981, built 
two holding tanks for Atlantic salmon. The District's game manager as- 
sisted the Division's bear project by building a live trap for bear during 
180. Personnel from the Western District participated in the wild turkey 
program by assisting in winter trapping and transfer of birds from the 
Western District to areas designated by Project Leader James Cardoza. 

District Managers represented the Division at sportsmen's clubs and 
at County League meetings. They studied and commented on environmental as- 
sessments and environmental impact reviews; they cooperated with local 
conservation commissions and worked closely with local watershed associa- 
tions. They and other members of the District staffs provided technical 
assistance to individuals and groups requesting such aid. As one aspect 
of such aid, District staff responded to complaints regarding damage caused 
by beaver activity. The bulk of these complaints came from the Northeast 
(25 in 1980; 15 in 1981) and the Western District (54 man days in 1980; 
75 man days in 1981). In addition to dealing with beaver problems, staff 
members provided guidance to citizens requesting assistance with other 
forms of wildlife. 

Representatives of the districts visited all license sales installa- 
tions to provide licenses, stamps, regulations, and so forth and to gather 
outdated material. They also maintained supplies of necessary forms at 
Freshwater Sportfishing award outlets. 

In many cases, District Managers and members of their staffs addressed 
civic and school groups, sportsmen's clubs and scout groups in an effort 
to acquaint them with the needs of wildlife and the operations of the 
Division. District Managers in the Northeast and Connecticut Valley took 
part in radio programs designed to spread the information still further. 

Another aspect of reaching the public came through District participa- 
tion in shows and fairs. District staff assisted the Westborough Informa- 
tion and Education Section in building, setting up, and staffing exhibits 
for the Eastern States Exposition, the Boston Sportsmen's Show, and the 
Eastern Fishing Exposition in Boxborough. In addition, Districts partici- 
pated in local events related to Hunting and Fishing Day and a variety of 
sportsmen's and agricultural fairs. 



-35- 



The Northeast District fisheries manager took, a leading role in 
assisting with the Division's Urban Angler program which began and 
flourished during FY 1980 and 1981. Supporting this program of outreach 
to first-time anglers in urban settings, the District fisheries manager 
constructed display materials and participated in 25 clinics (12 in 1980; 
13 in 1981) . 

A large part of the responsibility of each District is the care and 
maintenance of all Division properties within its jurisdiction. Meeting 
this mandate, District crews performed routine maintenance on buildings, 
fences, roads and trails. Gates were erected as needed, signs were posted 
along boundaries and in special use areas. Roads and parking lots were 
plowed. Trees were marked for timber cuts. Fields and open areas were 
limed, fertilized, seeded or planted to shrub as needed while wooded areas 
were thinned or cleared where required. Although most areas are used with- 
out special preparation, certain properties were specially set up for 
group camping, field trials and even military exercises (Southeast). Staff 
of the Northeast District prepared and operated controlled hunts on the 
Delaney and Martin Burns Wildlife Management Areas during 1980 and 1981, 
while staff from the Connecticut Valley District did the same on the Ludlow 
Wildlife Management Area. Crews from the Southeast District became in- 
volved in extensive brushcutting (161 acres in 1980) and building demoli- 
tion on the Crane Wildlife Management Area (three buildings in 1980; 26 
buildings in 1981) . 

During 1980 and 1981, fiscal reductions at the Federal level cut into 
YACC and CETA programs. These programs had, in the past, provided crews 
of trainees which had been based at District headquarters and which had 
allowed youngsters to learn techniques of construction and land management 
while assisting regular Division crews in maintenance and management opera- 
tions. By June 1980, the YACC crew at Newbury was phased out and by the 
end of Fiscal 1981, all crews were gone. This is a great loss of fine, 
enthusiastic assistance, especially in the Northeast District where crews 
conducted a forest inventory and drew up a forest management plan for the 
Nissitissit River Wildlife Management Area, and in the Connecticut Valley 
District where crews had cut woodland border, operated a sign shop, con- 
tributed to general maintenance and completed construction of a field 
trial building. 



-36- 



STOCKING 



Pheasant (including birds taken to sportsmen's clubs for rearing and 
eventual release in open covers) 

1980 1981 



Northeast District 6,566 6,890 

Southeast District 12,727 13,032 

Central District 15,000 15,000 

Connecticut Valley District 16,556 16,837 

Western District 5,921 6,113 

Quail 

Northeast District - 400 

Southeast District 4,200 3,550 

Varyin g Hare 

Northeast District 118 113 

Southeast District 120 181 

Central District 118 120 

Connecticut Valley District 164 120 

Western District 113 60 

Trout 

Northeast District 214,000 240,000 

Southeast District 141,000 170,000 

Central District 188,000 91,050 

Connecticut Valley District 144,408 197,615 

Western District 208,926 207,328 

Salmon 

Western District 16,941 30,000- 

326* 



*Kokanee Salmon 
""Atlantic Salmon 



INFORMATION & EDUCATION 



Ellie Horwitz 
Chief 

Information and Education 



During Fiscal 1980 and 1981, the Information and Education Section 
continued to address its mandate to inform sportsmen and other interested 
members of the general public about wildlife-related matters by any means 
available. One aspect of this involves direct response to direct mail or 
telephone inquiries. This is, perhaps, the most time-consuming part of 
the information program as many queries require specific, personal re- 
plies. Others can be answered by sending an appropriate publication, and 
still others can be forestalled by making fish and wildlife information 
generally available. To this end, the Section issued 15 press packages 
comprising 115 news items in 1980 and 14 packages containing 122 items in 
1981. In addition, some news items were disseminated as "Tips to Outdoor 
Writers." In general, emphasis was placed on regulations, regulatory 
changes, and areas of exciting progress such as the first turkey hunting 
season held in Massachusetts in more than 100 years. 



To further advise the public about wildlife issues and progress in 
wildlife management, a series of four taped radio announcements was 
produced in FY1980 and FY1981. The tapes were sent to major radio sta- 
tions throughout the Commonwealth while press materials were sent to news- 
papers, radio and television stations, sportsmen's clubs, and a variety 
of other organizations which have expressed an interest in wildlife affairs. 
Although the radio list has held steady at about 25 stations, the press 
and clubs list has grown year by year, becoming increasingly unwieldy. 
Rising postal costs have made general mailings prohibitive. As a result, 
the Section undertook a radical pruning of the release distribution list. 
Renewal forms were sent to all release recipients and all nonrespondents 
were deleted. By the end of June 1981, the mailing list had been reduced 
to 450. 



The press release program came under scrutiny as the Chief analyzed 
clipping returns, identified more and less successful items, and mapped 
locations of press release use. A report on press use of releases for 
1970 to 1980 was prepared and submitted to the Director. This report 
highlighted the facts that interest in wildlife issues, if anything, has 
increased. Coverage is more uniform, month by month, than it was ten 
years ago and is higher in the heavily populated eastern areas than had 
been supposed. The press coverage accorded to the restoration of wild 
turkeys was singled out for special attention. Clippings were separated 
for use in a volume which documented the intense public interest in the 
return of this impressive bird. 



-38- 



To further keep the public informed, the Section updated, published 
and distributed the Division's annual publications including: Abstracts 
of Fish and Wildlife Regulations, Abstracts of Migratory Bird Hunting 
Regulations, Abstracts of the Fox-Bartley firearms law and of the Common- 
wealth's dog-restraining order. In addition, the Section provided up-to- 
date tables of hunting hours, lists of ponds and streams slated for 
spring and fall trout stocking, best ponds for bass fishing, locations of 
northern pike and tiger muskie stockings, locations of mandatory check 
stations for deer hunters, and locations for check stations for submitting 
entries to the Massachusetts Freshwater Sportfishing Awards program. Among 
these "regular" publications, are maps of over 200 ponds and waterways and 
of 45 wildlife management areas. Because of the increasing cost of print- 
ing and paper, a nominal charge — five free, others five cents each — was 
set for these maps which had been available previously without cost. To 
further assist anglers, the Section published new maps and notes developed 
through fisheries surveys. These maps were bound by district (eight to 
twelve maps per district) and offered for sale at 50 cents apiece. The 
first set (five booklets) became available in 1980; the second became 
available in 1981. Angler response was enthusiastic and the Section ex- 
perienced some difficulty in keeping up with the demand. 

Demand was also high for publications which expanded two series 
initiated during FY1979. Listings and records of abundance were provided 
for Reptiles and Amphibians of Massachusetts by James C. Cardoza and Peter 
Mirick and for Freshwater Fish of Massachusetts by David Halliwell. The 
series of natural history flyers was expanded to include the bald eagle, 
shad, Atlantic salmon, chickadees, white-tailed deer, snipe, bullfrogs, 
and bullheads, and a special flyer was produced to assist cub scouts in 
meeting the requirements for the wildlife merit badge. As supplies of 
most of these publications were only moderate, stocks were depleted rapid- 
ly and reprinting became an ongoing project. Reprinting was also necessary 
for the fishing flyer printed in cooperation with the Boston Globe and 
distributed through the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife 
offices and at shows. A full revision of the flyer is underway and com- 
pletion is expected in FY1982. Supplies of the Sportsmen's Guide to the 
Quabbin Area , published in cooperation with the Metropolitan District Com- 
mission, were also exhausted. A second edition was printed in FY1980 and 
as those are already out of date and virtually gone, a third edition, 
fully updated, is planned for FY1982. 

To keep up with the increased number of publications and the increase 
in requests for publications, it became necessary to issue a list of pub- 
lications available from the Division. Such a list was first printed in 
FY1980 and was revised in FY1981. 

Publication of the series "Wildlife Portraits" was halted as a result 
of increasing costs and relatively lim ited use. The series remains avail- 
able to newspapers and/or educators for the price of duplication and 
handling. Despite this, numerous wildlife articles were prepared for 
publication in magazines and newspapers, especially papers of the Beacon 
chain, the Outdoor Message and Mass achusetts Out-of-Doors . In this, the 
Section was aided materially by the services of three interns: Sharon Dean, 
Louise Sharpies and Gary Goldenberg in FY1980 and by intern Bill Davis in 
FY1981. 



-39- 



Massach usetts Wildlife continued as the Division's most visible and 
popular publication. As a result of escalating costs, it was published, 
however, only four times a year rather than six. The subscription list 
continued to grow to a record high of 42,000 in early 1981. This was a 
mixed blessing in view of rising postal costs. In February 1981, the 
Division staff and Massachusetts Wildlif e readers were jolted by the sud- 
den death of Managing Editor Jack Clancy. In March, the management of 
the magazine passed to Peter Mirick who has maintained the high quality 
of the magazine and has initiated a program to update the subscription 
list . 



Along with an increasing demand for publications , there has been an 
increasing demand for photographs. Thus, during FY1980 and 1981, Audio- 
Visual Coordinator Jack Swedberg worked with CETA trainee, Barbara Terkan- 
ian and YACC employee Ann Youngstrom. Together, they completed a color 
coding of some 20,000 color transparencies and completed a cross-indexed 
file of an estimated 35,000 black and white negatives. These pictures as 
well as a library of film clips are now accessible. Still pictures and 
film are added as time permits. The pictures and films are used by Divi- 
sion biologists in presentations, in Division publications, in public 
press and on many major TV stations. Staff members appeared on and pro- 
vided film footage for a variety of TV shows ranging from news to panel 
shows to magazine format shows such as Bill O'Connell's sports on 
Channel 7 and the Jack Woolner show on Channel 27. 



During FY1981, a number of long-term projects produced visible re- 
sults. Audio-Visual Coordinator Swedberg initiated contact with the Pitts- 
field branch of General Electric Company which has, in turn, expressed an 
interest in revising and producing the Division's 22-minute film, 
"Massachusetts Wildlife" with a mixed optical sound track and professional 
narration. GE would provide a print of the completed film to each wild- 
life district and two to Field Headquarters. Film prints would then be 
available for loan or purchase through the Massachusetts Division of 
Fisheries and Wildlife. Completion of this project is anticipated in 
fall of 1981. 



Photography was completed for a film story on the life of herons in 
Massachusetts. This project, in progress for the past few years, also has 
an outside sponsor. Production and distribution will be handled by the 
private funding group and completed prints will be donated to the Division. 
A similar arrangement has been made for a film on the Merrimack River and 
for a slide show for youngsters on wildlife in Massachusetts. Both of 
these last are still in progress. Also nearing completion is a slide show 
on the Massachusetts Junior Conservation Camp. It is hoped that external 
sponsors will be available to cover the cost of duplication of materials 
and distribution. 

In a somewhat unusual service project, Division photographers photo- 
copied the entire collection of paintings by Louis Agassiz Fuertes , 
presently housed in the State House Archives. Four by five color negatives 
and transparencies were made of 91 of the original 93 paintings — two of 
the original paintings are missing. It is hoped that a limited edition 
of full-sized lithographs can be prepared from these negatives and offered 
for sale. 



-40- 



During the reporting period, Section personnel made an average of 75 
live appearances each year addressing class groups, civic groups and sports- 
men's organizations, and representing the Division at a variety of annual 
meetings. Many of these contacts involved actual teaching either in 
Division headquarters or at schools. In some cases, staff members became 
involved in summer camp programs, most notably conservation camp programs 
in Marlboro and Berlin. In addition, the Division continued to bear major 
responsibility for administration and teaching at the Massachusetts Junior 
Conservation Camp, now in its thirty-second and thirty-third years. Addi- 
tionally, pilot programs were launched into the area of adult education. 
One such program was held in Winchendon during 1980, another was held in 
Pittsfield in 1981. Although enrollees proclaimed the course worthwhile, 
the outreach was small for effort expended and there are no plans to con- 
tinue such courses in 1982. 

Other responsibilities involved the Section in promoting and adminis- 
tering the Freshwater Sportfishing Awards program under which anglers were 
recognized for outstanding catches in any of 20 categories. New categories 
added during this reporting period included carp, white catfish and tiger 
muskies . 

Special certificates were designed and prepared in 1980 to recognize 
hunters who took outstanding deer. 

An additional promotional program was introduced in 1980 under the 
title, "Sponsor a Pond." Under this program, participating groups could 
sponsor a number of tagged trout by obtaining prizes to correspond to each 
tag. Ten groups participated during the first year, placing 250 tagged 
fish and obtaining a return rate of about 70 percent. Twenty-five groups 
put out 650 tagged fish in an expanded 1981 version of the program called 
"Tags 'n' Trout." Again response rate was high with some sponsors report- 
ing that 90 percent of the tags had been returned. Prizes ranged from 
fishing tackle to down clothing and even a canoe. 

Another promotional program initiated in 1980 involved production of 
a special Christmas envelope and promotion of licenses as Christmas gifts. 
The program and the decorative envelopes were well received. 

Selection of designs for and production of the Commonwealth's water- 
fowl stamp took on new proportions as the competition — in its eighth and 
ninth years — drew 54 and 60 entries from all over the nation, an increase 
of almost 100 percent over 1979. The location of the judging was moved 
from the Division's Boston office to the Peabody Museum, Salem where all 
entries remained on display for a week. 

The design for the archery /primitive firearms stamp continued to be 
commissioned. The 1980 design was prepared by Barbara Terkanian of Concord; 
the 1981 design was a donation by Randy Julius of East Bridgewater, winner 
of the 1979 and 1981 waterfowl stamp contests. 

Displays were designed and built for the major sportsmen's shows, 
each aimed at drawing attention to some area of interest in Massachusetts' 
wildlife scene. Thus, the 1980 exhibit at the Eastern States Exposition, 
the Boston Sportsmen's Show and the Boxborough fishing exposition focused 



-41- 



on the restoration of the wild turkey. Live animals were shown in a 
specially-constructed display; specially-produced materials told about the 
subjects and their current status. Exhibits in 1981 drew attention to 
white-tailed deer (increasing in numbers and health on decreasing range) 
and on the coyote (newest member of our wildlife scene) . Other displays 
during the year focused on the Division's various activities. A large 
display area was arranged at the entrance to the Division's Boston office 
and it has housed a succession of exhibits dealing with wildlife, hunting, 
fishing and wildlife art. 

Arrangements — and where needed, programs — were made for Board meetings 
and public hearings, and for such special events as the swearing in of 
Director Richard Cronin and a tour of McLaughlin Hatchery by Governor 
Edward J. King. Special events included dedication of wildlife management 
areas honoring Martin Burns, Hiram Fox and Eugene Moran, in 1980, and 
Erwin Wilder, in 1981, and dedication of the Roger Reed Salmon Hatchery. 
Section personnel also coordinated activities related to National Hunting 
and Fishing Day. 

In addition to the assortment of projects already outlined, the 
Information and Education staff reviewed and revised the policy statement 
as it relates to information and education activities and submitted budget 
proposals for FY1982 and FY1983. 




Floyd Richardson 
Chief of Wildlife Lands 



REALTY 



The Realty Section is charged with the responsibility of locating 
lands in areas where wildlife lands are needed or in areas where acquisi- 
tion would enhance existing wildlife lands. This involves initial iden- 
tification of suitable areas, negotiation and carrying out all operations 
pertinent to land purchase. It also includes supervising any land trans- 
fers involved in providing land gifts to the Division. At the present time, 
the Division controls more than 44,000 acres. During FY-1980, the Realty 
Section secured almost 1,000 acres of new wildlife lands, some by purchase, 
some by transfer, some by gift. Budget cuts in FY-1981 severely reduced 
the Division's purchasing power; nevertheless, the Section secured an addi- 
tional 175 acres of land for wildlife. 



Bolton Flats Acquisition Project , 661.9 acres. An additional 6.8 
acres of land was added to this popular area. The property purchased was 
an interesting composite of pasture lands and marsh, embracing the Still 
River in the Town of Bolton. Although small in size, the acquisition con- 
tributes significantly to the area. 

Hockomock Acquisition Project , 4,832.7 acres. This particular acqui- 
sition had been in "limbo" since 1974. Title problems compounded with 
probate procedures finally were resolved, allowing the purchase of 50 im- 
portant Hockomock acres. 

Its position relative to other Division lands and Route 24 increased 
the importance of this acquisition which was finally completed on 24 June 
of this year. 

Housatonic River Acquisition Project , 702.1 acres. These 40 acres 
came to the Division, a gift from Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Stein. Their gener- 
ous contribution is gratefully acknowledged. 

This valuable wildlife land, commonly known as bottom land, is 
characterized by growth of aspen, cherry, maple and willow trees, and is 
accented by brushlands and occasional marshlands. The donated land con- 
tributes another segment of river corridor, continuing a program initiated 
in 1969 to provide and preserve wildlife lands along the Housatonic River. 



FY-1980 



-43- 



Quaboag Wildlife Acquisition Project , 1,042.1 acres. Although this 
acquisition is relatively small in size (less than six acres), this ir- 
regularly-shaped lot extends to the river's edge. It fills an important 
niche, providing additional public land on the Quaboag River in the Town 
of Brookfield. 



Muddy Pond Project , 7 2.0 acres. Muddy Pond, located in the Town of 
Carver, is a manmade and privately-owned pond built to furnish water for 
cranberry bogs. The acquisition of this 72-acre pond provides the sports- 
men a fishing area for all times. This acquisition could not have occurred 
without the cooperation of the Board of Selectmen and the foresightedness 
of the inhabitants of the Town of Carver. The town voted by warrant to 
provide this Division with an easement across town land for access to the 
pond in addition to an area for parking. 

Minns Sanctuary , 1.0 acres. Dr. Olive Gates donated an acre of land 
abutting the Minns Wildlife Sanctuary. She had previously donated another 
parcel to the agency in 1976. 

Parker River Acquisition Project , 730.0 acres. Twenty-six acres of 
land fronting on Hay Street in the Town of Newbury were added to this 
management area which has afforded the public a wide variety of recreation- 
al opportunities. 

North Shore Salt Marsh Acquisition Project , 415.9 acres. The Nature 
Conservancy donated 20 acres in the Salisbury marshes, bringing Division 
holdings in the area to 415 acres. Four parcels of property within the 
marshes will provide waterfowlers with huntable lands in public ownership. 

Downfall Acquisition Project , 1,480.9 acres. This acquisition of 38.5 
acres abutting the Downfall Wildlife Management area both enlarges and 
complements this heavily-used management area. 

Gosnold Acquisition Project , 3.5 acres. The General Services Admin- 
istration of the United States of America transferred ownership of a parcel 
of land on Cuttyhunk to the Division. This transfer is cost-free. 

Phillipston Acquisition Project , 2,747.7 acres. Northwest of the 
existing Phillipston Wildlife Management Area, a satellite management area 
of 735 acres was conveyed to this Division during this fiscal period. Ex- 
tensive road frontage along Route 101 was but one of the numerous benefits 
of this purchase. The East Branch of the Swift River has its beginning in 
a valley extending through the middle of the property. Lumbering opera- 
tions, past and present at this site, have improved conditions for wild- 
life. The removal of the mature trees eliminated crown cover, allowing 
the sun to reach the forest floor. This, in turn, accelerated vegetative 
growth, providing food and cover for wildlife. Sportsmen and the recrea- 
tionists alike will appreciate this new addition. 



-44- 



FY-1981 

Housatonic River Acquisition Project , 782.2 acres. Two additional 
acquisitions to this area assisted in fulfilling the planned objective of 
providing a publicly-owned corridor of land along the Housatonic River. 
This corridor now extends from South Street, Pittsfield, to Woods Pond in 
Lee. Including lands owned by the City of Pittsfield, Audubon, and the 
Town of Lenox, 1000-plus acres are now available for public use. 

Birch Hill Acquisition Project , 3,097.1 acres. A 70-acre parcel, 
with frontage on New Boston Road in the Town of Royalston, was acquired. 
This land is contiguous to the Division's Birch Hill area. Lumbering 
operations of the past have accelerated woody sprout growth providing 
abundant food and cover for wildlife. 

Nissitissit River Acquisition Project , 294.1 acres. This acquisition 
in Pepperell provides public access to the Nissitissit River via Prescott 
Street and insures river access for fishermen and parking. 

North Shore Salt Marsh Acquisition Project , 425.9 acres. A gift of 
ten acres, more or less, was presented to the Division by Mrs. Lillian D. 
Herrick. The land, a mixture of marshland and upland, abuts other lands 
in Fisheries and Wildlife ownership in the Town of Ipswich. 

Pantry Brook Acquisition Project , 410.9 acres. An area well known to 
waterfowlers located in the Town of Sudbury was increased in acreage by an 
acquisition of 10 additional acres. The property purchased contributes 
prime nesting cover for many species of upland game. 

Crane Pond Acquisition Project , 2,108.0 acres. Called the "Hale 
Sprout Land," this acquisition filled a void in contiguous Division owner- 
ship. Although 3.5 acres seem insignificant, the purchase guarantees 
public land status for the area for all time, and so protects the integrity 
of the rest of the Crane Pond area . 

Concord River Acquisition Project , .25 acres. Access to the Concord 
River is afforded by this property. Canoe and cartop boats can be launched 
directly into the river to accommodate fishing enthusiasts. The property, 
with its 100 feet of stream frontage, is located in Billerica adjacent to 
Route 4 in a section known as Rio Vista. 



-45- 



Area Name 
Bolton Flats 
Quaboag Area 
Parker River 
Minns Sanctuary 
Phillipston Area 
Muddy Pond 
Housatonic Area 
Gosnold Area 
Hockomock 

North Shore Marshes 
Downfall Area 



Summary of Land Acquisition 
Fiscal Year 1980 

Town 

Bolton 
Brookf ield 
Newbury 
Princeton 

Phillipston/ Petersham 

Carger 

Pittsf ield 

Cut tyhunk 

Bridgewater 

Salisbury 

Newbury 



Total 



Acreage 
6.80 
5.70 
26.00 
1.06 
735.00 
71 .00 
40.40 
3.45 
50.00 
20.00 
38.50 
998.91 



Birch Hill 
Crane Pond 
Housatonic River 
North Shore Marshes 
Nissitissit Area 
Pantry Brook 
Concord River Area 



Fiscal Year 1981 
Royalston 
Groveland 
Pittsf ield 
Ipswich 
Pepperell 
Sudbury 
Billerica 



70.00 
3.50 
80.11 
10.00 

.50 
10.30 

.25 



Total 



174.66 




Maintenance&Development 



John P. Sheppard 
Chief of Maintenance and Development 



Some of the activities of this section have already been mentioned 
under hatchery and game farm improvement activities. A summary of engineer- 
ing and development during FY 1980 and 1981 is noted here. 

Hat cheries 

A 150-foot by 50-roof roof over the Atlantic salmon pools at the Roger 
Reed Hatchery, Palmer, has been completed, security fencing was installed 
and, in 1981, test and observation wells were drilled, tiger muskie tanks 
were installed, and contracts were awarded for a 12-inch deep well and deep 
well turbine pump. 

Work began on a new facility for raising coho salmon and sea-run brown 
trout at the East Sandwich station of the Sandwich Fish Hatchery. Construc- 
tion began on an extensive underground water supply and drainage system, and 
specifications were designed and contracts awarded for a new hatch house, a 
roofing structure, security fencing, a two-stage vertical pump and bowl as- 
sembly, redevelopment of the existing well, 15 exterior and 18 interior tanks. 

During this period, site preparation activities at East Sandwich were 
completed along with the filling of old raceways and planting of 100 American 
arborvitae . 

Another two-stage vertical pump and bowl assembly was installed at the 
McLaughlin hatchery in Belchertown. 

Game Farms 

A new electrical system was installed in the hatch house at the Ayer 
Game Farm and a new heating system was installed in the residence on the Ayer 
farm grounds. At the Wilbraham Game Farm, cut-back asphalt was procured and 
applied to existing roads. 

Districts a nd Management Areas 

The water system at Northeast District Headquarters was repaired and an 
alarm system was installed at the Southeast District Headquarters. 



-47- 



A new access road and parking area were constructed at the Martin Burns 
Wildlife Management Area, Newbury. Heavy metal security gates were installed 
at the Westboro Field Trial and Management Area. This proved sufficiently 
successful that in 1981 other structural steel gates were installed on other 
Division lands. 

Other 

Vapor recovery systems were installed on many of the existing fuel stor- 
age systems in use at Division installations. 

The Engineering Section also provided technical assistance to other 
agencies within the Department including assistance to the Public Access 
Baord for boat ramps on the Charles River, Waltham; Moosehorn Pond, Hubbard- 
ston; Comet Pond, Hubbardston, and a public access facility at the Parker 
River, Newbury. 



-48- 



Retir ements 

Name 
H. Dufault 
Resignat ions 

M . Barr 

B. Dobson 

R. Garabedian 

C. Keane 
J. Marini 
T. Palermo 
J. Pottie 
T. Taylor 
R. York 

Appointments 

A. Aittaniemi 
K. Corey 

K. Hickey 
L. Hollings 
J. Kostro 

E. Kraus 

E. Mitchell 

N. Pratt 

M. Rosenfeld 

E. Siwicki 

Promo tions 

B. Blodget 

R. Keller 
W. Neale 

C. Prescott 



Personnel Action 
Fiscal Year 1980 

Job Title Date 

Conservation Skilled Helper 12/01/79 



Junior Clerk 08/30/79 

Senior Clerk-Typist 04/05/80 

Conservation Helper 02/09/80 

Junior Clerk-Stenographer 09/08/79 

Conservation Helper 01/26/80 

Assistant Aquatic Biologist 09/17/79 

Assistant Game Biologist 08/11/79 

Conservation Helper 11/10/79 

Conservation Helper 09/01/79 



Assistant Game Culturist 08/26/79 

Conservation Helper 10/14/79 

Conservation Helper 11/11/79 

Unit 2 - return to permanent position 12/30/79 

Unit 2 - return to permanent position 12/30/79 
Conservation Skilled Helper 

Conservation Skilled Helper 06/29/80 
Reinstated from YACC 

Permanent reassignment - Head Clerk 07/01/79 

Conservation Helper 09/04/79 

Conservation Helper 12/30/79 

Conservation Helper 11/11/79 



Assistant Director of Nongame and 
Endangered Species 
Assistant Aquatic Biologist 
Conservation Skilled Helper 
Superintendent of the Bureau of 
Wildlife Research and Management 



10/28/79 

09/23/79 
12/31/79 
08/26/79 



-49- 



Personnel Action 
Fiscal Year 1981 

Retir ements 





Name 


JOD 11 Lie 


Date 


M. 


Lane 


KjU Uoci VaLlULl QclpcL 


n? / ?a /si 


Deceased 






J. 


Clancy 


Wll CLJ_ lie J UU L Ual lbL 


n? / ?n /ri 


Resigned 






M. 


Fillion 


Cr\ ncoTTra f i nn LI o 1 nor 
VAJ llbci VaUlULl ncipcl 


07 / ?s /fin 


S. 


Early 


UJ U.O cl VaL 1U U, ilcl L)fc:L 


m /OA/fin 


P. 


Cameron 


conservation neiper 




E. 


Bennett 


ujnseivaiion neiper 


no /DA / fin 


C. 


773 TO 


junxor Lier k.— lyp is c 


no /n/, / sn 


c. 


Lee 


Conservation Helper 


ns / i a / fin 

UO / ID/ OU 


E. 


Sienczk 


Senior Clerk— Stenographer 


n 7 / 1 9 / an 
u / / 1Z / ou 


L. 


(Champa) Izbicki 


Junior Clerk— Typist 


no / ?n / sn 
uy / zu / ou 


P. 


Salie 


uonservacion orcxxxea nexper 


no / ?q /fin 


K. 


Hely 


junior u x e r tc— lypxst 


i n/n /sn 

1U / J 1 / OU 


S. 


Lonergan 


Conservation Helper 


ii / 9i / an 
11 / Zl / ou 


D. 


Kelly 


junxor tier tc— i^pis u 


11/17 /fin 

11/ 1//OU 


A. 


Duffy 


Senior Clerk 


ii / n7 / fin 

11/ Uj / OU 


J. 


Starrett 


Conservation Skilled Helper 


10/30/80 


J. 


Rozkuszka 


Conservation Helper 


12/27/80 


D. 


LeBlanc 


Assistant Fish Culturist 


01/10/81 


N. 


Melito, II 


Junior Clerk-Stenographer 


12/26/80 


J. 


Holt 


Conservation Helper 


m /9i /fii 

Ul/ Zl / Ol 


J. 


Mo rash 


uxm c uuxo g J.S l 


09/11 /fii 

U^. / 11/ Ol 


J. 


Holland 


ienior LierK. - iypibc 


m /i /fii 

U J / lj / Ol 


J. 


Dascoli 


Lunservaiion neiper 


n9 / 9fi /fii 

U^/ ^O/ Ol 


L. 


(Champa) Izbicki 


junior uierK. - lypisc 


nA /i a /fii 

UH/ X*f/ Ol 


M. 


Rosenf eld 


Conservation Helper 


n ^ /m /fii 

U 3 / Ul / Ol 


J. 


Jonasch 


Assistant Aquatic Biologist 


o 1 ^ /m /fii 

UJ / U J / Ol 


P. 


Coll ins 


ujnservacion tiexper 


UJ / Uj/ Ol 


Appointments 






M. 


Brazauskas 


Conservation Helper 


1 1 /no, /fin 

11/ U7/ OU 


C. 


McEvoy 


jenior tietK-iypiaL 


ns /m /so 

uo/ uj/ ou 


L. 


(Champa) Izbicki 


Junior Clerk- Typist 


08/31/80 


L. 


(Champa) Izbicki 


Junior Clerk- Typist 


11/09/30 


I. 


Howard 


Senior Clerk-Stenographer 


09/07/80 


J. 


Dascoli 


Conservation Helper 


09/15/80 


K. 


Hely 


•Junior Clerk- Typist 


09/22/80 


R. 


Thomas ian 


Conservation Helper 


10/27/80 


D. 


Viera 


Conservation Helper 


11/24/80 


N. 


Melito, II 


Junior Clerk-Stenographer 


09/23/80 


S. 


Towns end 


Conservation Helper 


09/29/80 


J. 


Almeida 


Conservation Helper 


09/29/80 


J. 


Holt 


Conservation Helper 


09/14/80 



-50- 



Appo intments (Cont.) 

Name 

D. Spigarolo 

P. Nelson 

D. Chesmore 

D. D'Angelo 

E. Pignatello 
M. Mas ley 

T. Staples 

A. Pellegri 

E. Richard 

P. Sutcliff 

Reappointments 

C. Zobka 
J. Skowron 
E. Bolduc 
I . Howard 

Transfers 

G. Galas 

D. Bielicki 



Job Title 

Conservation Helper 
Conservation Helper 
Senior Clerk 
Junior Clerk- Typist 
Junior Clerk- Typist 
Assistant Fish Culturist 
Fish Cultuirst 
Conservation Helper 
Junior Clerk-Typist 
Junior Clerk- Typist 



Assistant Fish Culturist 
Conservation Skilled Helper 
Conservation Helper 
Conservation Helper 



Conservation Helper, 
Connecticut Valley District 
Conservation Helper, 
Wilbraham Game Farm 



Date 

12/28/80 
02/22/81 
03/01/81 
02/09/81 
02/09/81 
01/19/81 
04/12/81 
04/12/81 
05/17/81 
11/10/80 



04/12/81 
04/12/81 
04/12/81 
01/18/81 



10/12/80 
10/12/80 



Promo tions 

R. Wheeler 

C. McEvoy 

P. Mirick 

E. Pignatello 

K. Corev 



Conservation Skilled Helper 
Senior Clerk-Stenographer 
Wildlife Journalist 
Senior Clerk-Typist 
Assistant Aquatic Biologist 



12/07/80 
01/25/81 
03/16/81 
03/29/81 
06/07/81 



Transfers from YACC Program 



M. Wrubel 

W. Dauderis 

E. Kraus 

C. Avers 

D. Carlson 



Conservation Helper 
Leave of Absence 
Conservation Skilled Helper 
Conservation Helper 
Conservation Skilled Helper 



06/29/81 
01/26/81 
06/28/81 
06/28/81 
06/29/81 



-51- 



Legislation 

Enacted During Fiscal Years 1980 and 1981 

Chapter 404 - Acts of 1979. An Act Relative to the Hunting of Wild 
Turkeys . 

Effective 18 October 1979 

Chapter 587 - Acts of 1979. An Act Increasing the Fee for a Duplicate 
Sporting, Hunting, Fishing or Trapping License. 

Effective 31 December 1979 

Chapter 614 - Acts of 1979. An Act Relative to Reptiles and Amphibians 
Effective 3 January 1980 

Chapter 618 - Acts of 1979. An Act Providing for the Sale of the 
Western Wildlife District Headquarters, so-called, by the Division of 
Fisheries and Wildlife. 

Effective 3 January 1980 

Chapter 726 - Acts of 1979. An Act Providing for the Listing of En- 
dangered Wildlife and Wild Plant Species. 

Effective 11 February 1980 

Chapter 767 - Acts of 1979. An Act Amending License Fees for Hunting, 
Fishing, and Trapping. 

Effective 1 January 1980 

Chapter 84 - Acts of 1980. An Act Relative to Registration and Iden- 
tification of Traps. Under this act, the Director shall provide by regula- 
tion that the registration numbers and name of the owner of a trap be af- 
fixed to each trap. 

Effective 1 January 1981 

Chapter 154 - Acts of 1980. An Act Further Regulating Rules and Regu- 
lations Relative to Great Ponds. (Any rules established by a town regu- 
lating hunting and fishing in great ponds must be approved by the Director 
of the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife.) 

Effective 30 August 1980 

Chapter 391 - Acts of 1980. An Act Directing the Division of Fisheries 
and Wildlife to Grant an Easement over a Certain Parcel of Land in the Town 
of Montague for Sewerage Purposes. 

Effective 7 July 1980 

Chapter 572 - Acts of 1980. An Act Authorizing the Commissioner of 
Administration to Set Fees and Charges Paid to the Commonwealth. 



Effective 1 July 1980; expires 31 December 1982 



HOW THE SPORTSMAN'S DOLLAR 

IS SPENT 



Nancy A. Melito 
Head Administrative Assistant 



At the close of the 1980 fiscal year, there was a deficit of $677,449 
in the Inland Fish and Game Fund. Our prime concern in the 1981 fiscal 
year was to curtail rising operational costs wherever possible and explore 
the possibility of additional sources of revenue. 

In the course of the year, two major developments occurred which con- 
siderably augmented our income — an 11.5 percent increase in license pur- 
chases and recovery of indirect cost monies totalling $702,632, applicable 
to fiscal years 1978 through 1981. Consequently, through careful manage- 
ment of operations and additional revenues realized, the deficit was re- 
duced by 90 percent to $66,885. 



COMMDNWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE 
Fiscal Year July 1 . 1980 to June 30 , 1981 

"HOW THE SPORTSMEN'S DOLLAR WAS SPENT" 



Admini 3 1 ration 

Admini st ration 
Information -Education 

Fisheries Programs 
Fish Hatcheries 
♦♦Fisheries Management 

Fisheries Cooperative Unit 

Wildlife Programs 
Game Farms 
♦xWildlif e Management 
Wildlife Cooperative Unit 

Land Acquisition 
♦♦♦Acquisition of Upland Areas and 
Inholding on Existing Areas 

Engineering and Construction 

♦Development and Improvement of 
Facilities for Public Use 

Equipment 

Purchase of Equipment 

Secretary, Environmental Affairs 
Office of Secretary (3$) 

Department of Fisheries, Wildlife 
and Recreational Vehicles 
Commissioner's Office (50$) 

Department of Environmental Management 
Natural Resource Officers' 
Salaries and Expenses (30%) 
♦♦Hunter Safety Training (100$) 

Transfers from Fund 
Group Insurance 
Salary Adjustments 
Fuel Oil Adjustments 
Tiger Muskie Program 
Settlement of Certain Claims 

Retirement 



Account No* Expenditures 

2310-0200 1*95,060.56 
2 31 0-0200 121 1 ,56$. 03 

616,625-59 

2310-0600 799, 297. 8U 

2310-0600 511, 021*. 3U 

2 31 0-0600 1 8,000.00 

1,328,322.18 

2310-01*00 603,366.1*1* 
2310-01*00 612,670.39 
2 31 0-01*00 18,000.00 
1,23^,036.83 



2310-0310 1*9,939. 9U 

2310-0300 71*, 971 .81* 

2310-0315 72,130.71 
2000-0100 9,li6L.65 

2300-0100 61,577.1*1* 



2020-0100 39U,1*68.11* 
2020-0300 61,607.87 



1590-1007 202,31*9.98 

85,361 .00 
5,500.00 
50,500.00 
1 1 ,5oo.oo 
31*5,210.98 

0612-1000 21*2,085.51 

0699-2800 70,1*63.75 

0699-2 900 165,000.00 

70,213.1*6 
$1*,796, 118.89 

♦ Continuing Appropriation 

** Portions of expenditures 60$ or 75$ reimbursable by Federal Government. 



Assessment 

Interest on Bonded Debt 

Maturing Serial Bonds and Notes 

Increase in Continuing Accounts 
Brought Forward 



Percentage 
12.86$ 

27.70$ 

25.73$ 
1.01*$ 

1.56$ 
1.50$ 
.20$ 

1.28$ 



8.23$ 
1.28$ 



7.20$ 
5.o$$ 
1.1*7$ 
3.1*M 

1.1*6$ 
100.00$ 



-54- 



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* t - 



SUMMARY OF FISH AND WILDLIFE INCOME 



July 1 , 1 980 to Jun 


e 30, 1981 






♦Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses 


330U-61 -01 • 


-UO 


3,360,17U.10 


♦Trap Registrations 


330U-61 -01 • 


-UO 


1 ,390.00 


♦Archery/Primitive Firearms Stamps 


330U-61-01- 


-Uo 


71,636.70 


■aWaterfowl Stamps 


330ii-UO-01 • 


-Uo 


6,59U.OO 


Waterfowl Stamps - Ducks Unlimited 


330U-UO-02- 


-Uo 


20,632.00 


♦♦SDecial Licenses . Tai?s and Posters 






10.8U5.05 


Antlerless Deer Permits 


330U-61-1U- 


-Uo 


9,830.90 


Turkey Permit Applications 


330U-61-1U- 


-Uo 


2,986.06 


Turkov PpTr,iit,s 


330U-61 -Ik 


-Uo 


1 1 .305.00 


Ben- Permits 


330U-61-1U- 


-Uo 


1 ,101 .00 


Rents 


330U-63-01 • 


-Uo 


18.523.11 


Miscellaneous Income 


330U -69-99- 


-Uo 


3,302.65 


Sales, Other 


330U-6U-99- 


-Uo 


29.55U.oU 


Refund s Prior Tear 


330U-69-01 • 


-U0 


U.7U6.55 


Court Fines and Penalties 


3308 -U1 -01- 


-Uo 


22,563.99 


Pittman-Robertson Federal Aid 


330U-67-01 • 


-Uo 


UU6, 776.51 


Ding ell -John son Federal Aid 


330U-67-02- 


-Uo 


220,1U6.6U 


Anadromous Fish Projects Federal Aid 


330U-67-0U- 


-Uo 


35.718.96 


Indirect Cost Reimbursement 


330U-67-67 


-Uo 


561 . 31 1 . 96 


Interest on Investments 


3395-60-01 • 


-Uo 




Gasoline Tax Apportionment 


3312-05-01- 


-Uo 


330,8U2.92 


Transfers from General Fund: 
Salary Adjustment 

Reimbursement on half-price licenses 
Fuel Oil Adjustment 
Tiger Muskie Program 


3360-95-02- 
3360-95-08 
3360-95-09- 
3360-95-09- 


-36 
-Uo 
-36 
-36 


85,361 .00 
U7,3U0.30 
5,500.00 
50,500.00 


Accounts Payable Reversions 






U7,053-79 
5,U05, 737.23 



Deficit in Inland Fish and Game Fund as of June 30, 1981 66,885.30 



♦See Detail Sheet #1 
♦*See Detail Sheet #2 



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-57- 



Detail Sheet #2 



SPECIAL LICENSES , TAGS AND POSTERS 
July It 1960 to June 3C 1981 ~ 



Quantity 



Receipt 
Account 







& Unit Price 




Total 


jjyJH **u 1 *uc "UU 


* UI JL/lAjT fcJX 3 














32 @ 


15.00 


Jifin no 

ij. UVJ • WW 






Unn-Resident,?; or Aliens 2 


ll 9 


*i0.00 


200.00 

fa WW • WW 


680 . 00 

WWW • WW 


liol±-6i -oi-liO 




100 9 


10.00 1 


000.00 








1 9 


1 .00 


1 .00 

• .uu 


1 001 .no 

1 , UU 1 • UU 


H0)i-6l -Oii-liO 


Propagators 












Special Purpose Permits: 


122 9 


1 on 


100 m 

1 c£ • w 






Class 1 (Fish) 












Initial: 


20 9 


7 <o 
( Ou 


1 <n nn 

1 «UU 






Renewal: 


1lili 9 


cj nn 

p ♦ UVJ 


70n nn 
f cu *uu 






Class 3 (Fish) 












Initial : 


12 a 


7 <n 

1 .?u 


on nn 






Renewal: 


7U 9 


< no 

7 »UU 


170 on 
»uu 






Class h (Birds, Mammals, Amphibians) 










Initial : 


119 9 




Aop <n 








*i1 3 9 




^6^.00 






Class 6 (Dealers } 












Initial: 


13 9 


7.*>0 


07 cCn 






Renewal : 


56 9 


J • WW 


280.00 

b w W • WW 






Additional: 


155 9 


1 .*i0 

• • ^w 


2^2 ^0 






Class 7 (Individual Bird or 


Mammal) 










Initial: 


9 9 


3.00 


?7 on 






Renewal : 


35 9 


1 . uu 


J?»uu 






Importation Permits 












Fish: 


2 9 


2 . UU 


1 n nn 






Birds or Mammals 


38 9 


.UU 


1 on nn 

1 ;A/ »uu 






Class 9 (Falconry) 












Master: 


5 9 


no 


12*1.00 






Apprentice: 


12 9 


C J • WW 


inn nn 






General : 


7 9 


2*? 00 


i7<.nn 






Class 10 (Falconry) 












Raptor Breeding: 


1 9 


1 0.0O 

1 u • WW 


10.00 






Class 11 (Falconry) 












Raptor Salvage: 


6 9 


1 .00 

1 • UU 


A nn 


6 197 *i0 

U, f »>u 


HOli-61 -0*>-liO 


Take Shiners: 


128 9 


C nn 


£\)iC\ nn 






Duplicates 


2 9 


9 no 
£ • ww 


)• nn 


A)>l> nn 


nn)i-6i -o/.-Ln 


Field Trial Licenses: 


6 9 


1 K nn 




on nn 


110)i-6l -H7-3in 
JJ04~0 1 — U f ~l\\J 


Taking of Eels: 


15 9 


c nn 

«wu 




"37cf nn 




Quail to Train Dogs 












Initial : 


5 9 


7.50 


37.50 






Renewal : 


25 9 


5.00 


125.00 


162.50 


330U-61 -10-U0 


Commercial Shooting Preserves: 8 9 


50.00 


iiOO.OO 


330li-6l-12-U0 


Mounting Permits: 


18 9 


2.00 




36.00 


330U-61 -1 3-U0 


Special Field Trial Permits: 


25 « 


15.00 




375.00 


330ii-6l!-01 -kO 


Tags and Posters 












Fish Tags: 


10,750 9 


.02 


215.00 






Game Tags: 


9,011 9 


.05 


1*50.55 






Posters: 


370 9 


.05 


18.50 


68L.05 



.05 



-58- 



SUMMARY OF FISH AND WILDLIFE INCOME 
July 1 , 1979 to June 30, 1980 



*Fishing, Hunting and Trapping 


_i censes 


3304 


-61-01 


-40 


$2,714,534. 


55 


*Trap Registrations 




3304- 


-61-01 


-40 


1 ,556. 


50 


*Archery Stamps 




3304- 


-61-01 


-40 


52, 189. 


40 


*Waterfowl Stamps 




3304- 


-40-01 


-40 


7,438. 


30 


*Waterfowl Stamps - Ducks Unlim 


i ted 


3304 


-40-02 


-40 


22,925. 


70 


**Special Licenses, Tags and Posters 








10,440. 


99 


Antlerless Deer Permits 




3304 


-61-14 


-40 


9,496. 


55 


Bear Permits 




3304- 


-61-14 


-40 


437. 


50 


Turkey Permit Applications 




3304 


-61-14 


-40 


2, 188. 


00 


Turkey Permits 




3304 


-61-14 


-40 


5,385. 


00 


Ken ts 




3304 


-63-01 


-40 


16,837. 


20 


Miscellaneous Income 




3304 


-69-99 


-40 


1 ,083. 


45 


Sales, Other 




3304 


-64-99 


-40 


1 1 ,399. 


46 


Refunds Prior Year 




3304 


-69-0 1 


-40 


487. 


27 


Court Fines and Penalties 




3308 


-41-01 


-40 


17,097. 


90 


Pi ttman-Robertson Federal Aid 




3304 


-67-01 


-40 


567,976. 


72 


Di nge 1 1 -Johnson Federal Aid 




3304 


-67-02 


-40 


268,332. 


85 


Anadromous Fish Projects Federa 


1 Aid 


3304 


-67-04 


-40 


67,408. 


96 


Interest on Investments 




3395- 


-60-01 


-46 


240. 


00 


Gasoline Tax Apportionment 




3312 


-05-01 


-40 


299,709. 
$4,07^, 165. 


00 
30 


Deficit in Inland Fish and Game 


Fund as of 


June 30, 


1980 




$67 7,449. 


00 



*Detai I Sheet No. I 
**Detail Sheet No. 2 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE 
Fiscal Year July I, 1979 to June 30, 1980 

"HOW THE SPORTSMEN'S DOLLAR WAS SPENT" 



Adm i n i strat i on 

Admi n i strat ion 

I nformat ion-Education 



Fisheries Programs 
Fish Hatcheries 
** Fisheries Management 

Fisheries Cooperative Unit 



Account No. 

2310-0200 
2310-0200 



2310-0600 
2310-0600 
2310-0600 



Expend i tures 

472,540.53 
142,949.54 
615,490.07 



729,508.31 
505, 100.49 
15,000.00 
I ,249,608.80 



13. 



26.99% 



Wildlife Programs 
Game Farms 
** Wildlife Management 

Wildlife Cooperative Unit 



2310-0400 
2310-0400 
2310-0400 



552,753.07 
517,925.31 
15,000.00 
I ,085,678.38 



23.45% 



Land Acquisition 

* ***Acquisition of Upland Areas and 2310-0310 

Inholding on Existing Areas 2670-9016 

* ***Coastal and Inland Waters Acq. 

Engineering and Construction 

^Development and Improvement of 

Facilities for Public Use 2310-0300 
Certain Renovations to Lyman 

School Building 2670-8753 

Egu i pment 

Purchase of Equipment 2310-0315 

Secretary, Environmental Affairs 

Office of Secretary (3%) 2000-0100 

Department of Fisheries, Wildlife 
and Recreational Vehicles 

Commissioner's Office (50%) 2300-0100 

Department of Environmental Management 
Natural Resource Officers' 

Salaries and Expenses (30%) 2020-0100 

Hunter Safety Training (100%) 2020-0300 

Transfers from Fund 

Group Insurance 1590-1007 

Retirement Assessment (.2%) 0612-1000 

Interest on Bonded Debt 0699-2800 

Maturing Serial Bonds and Notes 0699-2900 
Total Expenditures 



76,454.82 
175,000.00 
251 ,454.82 



131 ,919.38 

30.24 
131 ,949.62 

71 ,855.41 
7,016.00 

47,956.00 



405,898.00 
58,403.00 



216,828.58 

250,715.32 

72,095.00 

165,000.00 
$4,629,949.00 



5.43% 



2.85% 
I .55% 

. 15% 
I .04% 



8.77% 
I .26% 



4.68% 
5.42% 
I .56% 
3. 



100.00% 



^Continuing Appropriation. 
**Portions of expenditures 60% or 75% reimbursable by Federal Government. 
***Certain Land Acquisitions are 50% reimbursable by Federal Government. 



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-62- 



#2 



SPECIAL LICENSES, TAGS AND POSTERS 
J uly I , 1979 to June 30, I960 

D ece i ot 

Quantity Account 



Rece i pt 


Acct . 


Type of Licenses 


& Unit 


Pr i ce 








3304-6 1 ■ 


-02-40 


Fur Buvers 


















Resident Citizens: 


30 


i 


1 5.00 


450.00 










Non -Res idents or Aliens: 


5 


% 


50.00 


250.00 


700. 


00 


3304-6 1 ■ 


-03-40 


Tax t derm i sts : 


103 


@ 


10.00 


I 030.00 












1 


e 


5.00 


5 . 00 


1 ,035. 


00 


3304-6 1 


-04-40 


Propagators 


















Special Purpose Permits: 


1 35 


e 


1 .00 


1 35.00 










Class 1 (Fish) 


















Initial : 


32 


% 


7.50 


240.00 










Renewa 1 : 


137 




5.00 


685.00 










Class 3 (Fish) 


















Initial : 


17 


§ 


7.50 


127.50 










Renewa 1 : 


75 




5.00 


375.00 










Class 4 (Bi rds & Mammals) 


















Initial: 


1 19 


% 


7.50 


892.50 










Renewa 1 : 


445 


% 


5.00 


2,225.00 










Class 6 (Dealers) 


















Initial : 


1 3 


% 


7.50 


97.50 










Renewa 1 : 


50 


g 


5.00 


250.00 










Add i t i ona 1 : 


216 


§ 


1 .50 


324.00 










Dup 1 i cates : 


1 


§ 


2.00 


2.00 










Class 7 (Individual Bird or 


















mamma 1 ) 


















Initial : 


7 


@ 


3.00 


21 .00 










Renewa 1 : 


190 


% 


1 .00 


190.00 










Importation Permits 


















Fish: 


3 


% 


5 .00 


1 5.00 










Bi rds or Mamma 1 s : 


26 


% 


5.00 


1 30.00 










Class 9 (Falconry) 


















App ren t i ce : 


8 


@ 


25.00 


200.00 












12 


@ 


25.00 


300.00 










Class 10 (Falconrv) 


















Raptor Breed i ng : 


3 


@ 


10.00 


30.00 










Raptor Salvage: 


6 


§ 


1 .00 


6.00 


6,245. 


50 


3304-6 1 


-05-40 


Take Sh i ners : 


124 


% 


5.00 


620.00 












1 


% 


3.50 


3.50 


623. 


50 


_^ -J \J \J \ 


-06-40 


Field Trial Licenses: 


2 


% 


1 5.00 




30. 


00 


3304-6 1 


-08-40 


Qua i 1 to Train Dogs 


















Initial : 


8 


% 


7.50 


60.00 










Renewa 1 : 


12 


§ 


5.00 


60.00 


120. 


00 


3304-61 


-10-40 


Commercial Shooting Preserves: 


10 


% 


50.00 




500. 


cc 


3304-61 


-12-40 


Mounting Permits: 


6 


@ 


2.00 




12. 


00 


3304-F | 


- 1 3-40 


Special Field Trial Permits: 


35 


% 


1 5.00 




525. 


00 


330- -64 


-01-40 


Tags and Pesters 


















bame T ags : 


7,944 


% 


.05 


397.20 










F i sh lags : 


12,452 


% 


.02 


249.04 










Posters • 


75 


g 


.05 


3."/ 5 


649. 





$ I0,440.V9 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



FEB 9, 6 1985 

MASSACHUSETTS STATE LIBRARY, 



19*1 
ANNUAL 
REPORT 



Division off 
Fisheries & Wildlife 





Director 



^iwMtm ^fiibAevUeb and 

100 C &amlritfy* -9Leet. SSo^m 02202 




His Excellency, Michael S. Dukakis, Governor of the Commonwealth, the Executive 
Council, the General Court, and the Board of the Division of Fisheries and 
Wildlife. 



Sirs: 

I have the honor to submit herewith the One Hundred Seventeenth and One 
Hundred Eighteenth Annual Reports of the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, 
covering the fiscal years from 1 July 1981 to 30 June 1982. 




^spectfully submitted, 

i chard Cronin 
irector 



Publication No. 13885-50-50-1-85-CR 

Approved by Daniel Carter, State Purchasing Agent 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PAGE NUMBER 



The Board Reports 1 

Planning 4 

Fisheries 5 

Fish Hatcheries 9 

Wildlife 11 

Game Farms 19 

Nongame and Endangered Species 21 

Districts 25-37 

Information and Education 38 

Realty 41 

Maintenance and Development 44 

Personnel Actions 46 

Legislation 48 



How the Sportsman's Dollar is Spent 



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THE BOARD REPORTS 



George Darey 
Chairman 



During 1981-82, the Massachusetts Fisheries and Wildlife Board continued 
its policy of conducting monthly meetings and public hearings at various 
locations around the Commonwealth. Five hearings were conducted during this 
period on a variety of topics ranging from minor wording changes in regulations 
to sweeping changes in deer season regulations. 

Personnel 

While there were numerous changes in personnel (see p. 46) as in any year, 
this year had no major changes within the Division staff, although the Board 
noted with sadness the passing of William Humberstone who had long served the 
Division at the East Sandwich Game Farm. There was a change in Board composition 
during the year as former chairman Bradlee Gage announced that he would not 
seek reappointment. Gage had one of the most distinguished careers in the 
Board's leadership position taking the agency through some trying times. 
Gage- was replaced on the Board by Laurence Fountain of Springfield. Prior to 
Gage's resignation, the Board held elections for new officers and selected 
George Darey of Lenox as Chairman and Nancy Begin of Topsfield as Secretary. 

Specific Actions 

Specific actions taken during the year involved policy, regulatory and 
financial operations of the Division. Early in the year, a nongame advisory 
committee was appointed to assist the Assistant Director of Nongame and 
Endangered Species with the operation of that program and to provide guidance 
where appropriate. In this capacity, the Board worked to encourage passage of 
a proposed nongame checkoff program already successfully in use in many other 
states. The nongame program is taking shape even without this much needed 
program and during this year, concluded a working agreement with the Massachusetts 
Audubon Society to support eagle restoration in the Commonwealth. 

In the area of game regulations, the Board considered and accepted 
changes in the farmer/ landowner deer hunting permit system tightening existing 
eligiblity requirements. Beginning in 1982, farmer permits are available 
only to a farmer, defined as one who makes 50% of this total annual income 
from the land in question, or to a member of his immediate family. The land 
in question must be open to public deer hunting and the permit is valid for 



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that land only. For those who enjoyed the privilege of a farmer's deer permit 
in past years, but who could not qualify under the new definition, a grand- 
father option was included which could be exercised at the Director's 
discretion. 

Landowners, defined as those holding at least 300 acres of land open 
to public deer hunting, were also restricted to one permit per parcel for 
themselves or any member of their immediate family residing with them. 
Permits are further limited to one per family. 

Deer hunting regulations were modified adding an extra day to the special 
hunting period for paraplegic sportsmen and permitting bowhunters to take a 
second deer of either sex. 

Fishing regulations - a year-round season was established for the 
taking of Atlantic salmon in waters where such taking is permissible. To 
facilitate keeping track of shifting dates when summer trout regulations 
are in effect, the Board established calendar dates for the transition with 
summer regulations in effect from April 15 to September 10. Future regulations 
and regulatory changes should be keyed to these dates to minimize confusion. 

The bag limit on bullfrogs , long a matter of contention, was changed 
from 6 frogs per day to 12 frogs per day with a possession limit of 24 and 
a provision that greenfrogs be included with bullfrogs in this regulation. 

Financial considerations, always in the realm of Board concern, were 
very much in evidence during the year as new administrative procedures were 
established by the Legislature which permit changes in fee structure to be 
made through the office of Administration and Finance gather than through the 
legislature as in the past, eliminating the need for extensive lead time and 
public hearings. The Board evaluated the new procedure noting its greatly 
increased efficiency but voted that despite this option and because of the 
importance of cooperation with supporting groups that they would continue to 
hold public meetings on any major fee changes . A number of minor fee changes 
were implemented however. Pursuant to discussions conducted in 1981, the 
Board eliminated the $1 application fee for the turkey permit . In addition, 
and because of growing interest on the part of collectors in waterfowl and 
archery/primitive firearms stamps, it was voted to increase the prices on 
back issues of the waterfowl stamp . 

Issues of Concern 

During the course of the year, the Board discussed many issues in depth 
on which it took no action other than remanding the subjects for further 
study or for decision at a later date. Among these were: 

Policy - the Board continued to review a policy document drafted by a 
staff committee intended to replace the previous policy issued in 1958. 

Bear Season - the current bear season presents a number of problems 
related to timing and method of harvest. The present season is too late to 
assist farmers in reducing crop depradation and is occasionally so late that 



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bears have already denned. As it is the last New England bear season, there 
is a potential that the season will attract too many bear hunters. The 
Division is also concerned about the use of electronic devices, which could 
adversely affect the season. Proposals to meet these problems were considered 
and input from a public hearing was held for decision next year. 

Deer Season - consideration of changes in existing deer hunting 
regulations stemmed from the fact that the herd is close to carrying capacity 
in some portions of the state and it is the desire of the Division to 
fine tune the management system in such a way that the herd can be controlled 
at an acceptable level. This too was held for decision at a future date. 

Dove Season - The possibility of a dove season was considered and voted 

down. 

Finances - Finances have always been an issue of concern to the Board 
and never more so than during this year. With over a half million dollars 
cut from the budget, it appeared that it would be necessary to curtail 
programs and production, reduce staff and close one district office, one 
game farm and one fish hatchery. Planning was well underway for this 
unfortunate move when a supplementary budget was passed by the Legislature 
and signed by the Governor. Special thanks from the Board to Governor 
Edward J. King for his faith and support as shown by his submitting a 
special bill for this agency. 



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PLANNING 



Kristine L. Corey 
Junior Planner 



Fiscal year '82 saw the retirement of Senior Land Use Planner, Paul 
Mugford, following the transfer of Junior Planner, John Jonasch to another 
agency. Not only did the planning staff sustain the loss of their expertise, 
but financial constraints have prevented the filling of their positions as 
well. Despite this severe reduction in staff, the comprehensive planning 
effort has continued to receive support and make progress. 

In the process of re-evaluating the project, the administration 
designated a Planning Committee to oversee the project and become more 
actively involved in the completion of the agency's comprehensive plan. 
This new committee consists of the Director, the Deputy Director of Field 
Operations, the Assistant Directors of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Nongame 
and Endangered Species, the Federal Aid Administrator, the Chief of 
Information and Education and the Planner. The contributions of this 
group have proved extremely valuable. 

Perhaps the most significant accomplishment in planning this year was 
the completion of the first draft strategic plan, consisting of an intro- 
duction, overview and management plans for selected species. This document 
will provide long-range direction for Division activities and will be the 
foundation for developing operational plans. 

Other planning activities included the. gathering of small game data 
via a telephone survey, the completion of an inventory of named streams 
within the Commonwealth, and the development of training aids to be used in 
communicating planning functions and techniques to agency personnel. 



FISHERIES 

Peter Oatis 



Assistant Director, Fisheries 



Anadromous Fish Management 
Merrimack River 

The hydro-electric facility at the Essex Dam began operations in 
September, 1981. Construction and design problems however prevented the 
successful operation of the fishway during the spring run of salmon and 
shad. Despite the fact that fish were unable to pass the dam, the spring 
fishery appeared to prosper. An estimated twenty-five salmon were taken 
along with hundreds of shad. Many salmon and shad were still in the pool 
area below the powerhouse as late as mid-July. 

Fewer smolts were released (67,000) than in the spring of 1981, 
(100,000), but the additional release of 200,000+ parr will contribute 
significantly to the run of salmon during the next few years . As in the 
past, adult shad were transferred from the lower Connecticut River to 
potential spawning sites upstream. The young shad produced via these 
interbasin transfers should greatly hasten the speed with which shad 
re-establish themselves once suitable access is secured at upriver dams. 

It now looks as though fish passage at the Pawtucket Dam in Lowell 
may become a reality by the spring of 1985. If such is the case, anadromous 
species will be able to travel at least to Manchester, New Hampshire, by 
the spring of 1985. 

Connecticut River 

As expected, the 1982 salmon run reflected the low availability and 
reduced stocking of smolts during the spring of 1980. A total of 67 adults 
were captured, (11 at Holyoke) , and used for development of brood stock. 
The release of 225,000 high quality smolts throughout the basin in 1982 
should greatly enhance the expected adult returns of 1984. Approximately 
41,000 of these smolts were reared at the Reed Hatchery in Palmer. 

A great deal of time was spent by the basin states and federal agencies 
in updating and developing future Atlantic salmon operational plans. The 
Connecticut River Salmon Compact was submitted to Congress for ratification. 
When in effect, the Compact will bestow salmon management authority on its 
Commissioners throughout the entire mainstream of the river. 



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The population of shad appears to be stable with about 295,000 
passing Holyoke; while blueback herring populations reflect on expanding 
population as 587,000 adult bluebacks passed through Holyoke. 

Over 8,000 adult shad were shipped to augment restoration efforts of 
that species in Rhode Island, Pennsylvania and Eastern Massachusetts 
(Charles and Taunton Rivers). Additionally, over 3,600 shad were shipped 
above Vernon, Vermont to augment restoration and population enhancement 
in upriver areas. A creel survey of the shad fishery in Holyoke indicates 
that between 10,500-11,000 anglers annually fish for and catch over 10,000 
shad. 

Stream Management 

To complete data required by comprehensive planning efforts and 
to provide a sound aquatic classification system, fishery crews stationed 
at the five District Headquarters sampled a total of 151 stations within 
115 priority-one stocked trout streams throughout the Commonwealth. 

Stream survey data is used as input to developing a data base for a 
management system which will facilitate analysis, synthesis and sub- 
sequent stream fishery resource classification. 

Project Leader, David B. Halliwell, as a Ph.D. candidate at the 
University of Massachusetts, Department of Forestry and Wildlife, sub- 
mitted an approved dissertation prospectus entitled: "A Classification 
of Streams in Massachusetts". A major objective of this research project 
is to develop a classification of habitats in Massachusetts streams based 
on their relative natural productivity and capability to sustain various 
types of fish populations as well as sport fishing opportunity; special 
emphasis is directed at native/wild trout production in Massachusetts. 
It is expected that these efforts will greatly enhance the management 
decisions that the Division makes with respect to the protection and 
stocking of trout and enhancement of the Commonwealth's streams and 
rivers . 

Sea Run Brown Trout 

During September and October of 1981, fisheries crews collected 56 
adult sea-run brown trout that produced 70,000 fertile eggs for future 
fisheries development. These young fish will be liberated in coastal 
streams during March and April of 1983. The quality of young sea-run 
brown trout reflects the recent improvements installed at the Sullivan 
section of the Sandwich Hatchery complex. 

The Quashnet River restoration is progressing on schedule. Personnel 
from the Sandwich Game Farm spent a great deal of the winter clearing an 
additional 1,500 feet of stream bank. Their efforts were followed by 
cleaning of an additional 300 feet of stream bank and installation of five 
overhead covers by volunteers from Trout Unlimited. 



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Similiar stream bank and potential sea-run brown trout fishery 
development actions were initiated on the Mattapoisett River with the 
assistance of the Mattapoisett Fin, Fur and Feather Club. 

During the spring of 1982, the Fish and Wildlife Board declared that 
the fly fishing only area of the Swift River, Belchertown, would become 
a catch and release fishery (flies only) on a year round basis beginning 
January 1, 1983. They also set aside the downstream stretch of the Swift 
River bounded by the Route 9 bridge (to the north) and Cady Lane (in the 
south) to catch and release fishing, artificial lures only, during the 
months of July, August and September. Documentation as to the degree 
of success of these new regulations will be recorded during the summer 
of 1983. 

Lake Management 

Information provided by numerous biological surveys of lake and ponds 
is aiding in the evaluation of the newly increased length limits for black 
bass and chain pickerel. Additional water chemistry analysis indicates 
that a great many ponds in the southeast and north central portion of 
the state are either threatened or endangered by increased acid input 
primarily emanating from acid rain and snowfalls. To counteract this 
input, Division personnel have limed twelve ponds classified as critical 
at the rate of one-half ton lime per acre; total 695 acres. In addition, 
the agency is cooperating with numerous federal, state and private agencies 
and universities to assess the magnitude and effects of acid rian. 

Northern Pike 

Numerous pike stemming from the last stocking of available fish 
from Minnesota in 1979, have shown up in the fishery as 12 to 20 pounders. 
There are also unconfirmed reports that many small pike have been caught 
and released in the Brimfield Reservoir complex. If this is true, future 
efforts may focus on capturing some adults that could be used to produce 
young for stocking other lakes and reservoirs where reproducing populations 
are desired. 

Tiger Muskies 

Approximately 50,000 tiger muskie fry received from the state of 
Pennsylvania were reared to produce 22,000 fingerlings at the Reed Hatchery 
in Palmer. These fish were released into selected ponds across the state 
in accordance with management recommendations stemming from the survey and 
inventory of lakes and ponds . 

The first legal sized tiger muskie was caught in Lake Cochituate 
during the summer of 1982, while numerous reports of such legal fish being 
caught were noted. 

Bass 

Division staff finished the job of stocking adult smallmouth bass 
into formerly reclaimed trout ponds and successfully reared young walleye 



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for Lake Assawompsett in an attempt to establish a source of state brood 
stock for future development purposes. 

Alewives 

Landlocked alewives were transferred from Lake Congamond, Southwick 
to Little Alum Pond, South Pond, Brookfield and Lake Chauncy, Westboro. It 
is hoped that new populations will become established and will enhance 
the growth of native game species. Recent investigations indicate that 
the 1981 release of alewives in Lake Singletary, Millbury were successful 
in becoming established. 

Quabbin 

The Quabbin continues to provide excellent lake trout, smallmouth 
bass and bullhead fishing for the estimated 56,400 anglers that fished the 
reservoir last year. Although the smelt population appears to be down, 
condition factors of all game fish are very good. A small isopod is 
apparently providing an excellent source of food for lake trout. 

For the first time since the mid- 1970' s, landlocked salmon, the 
result of a release in 1980, are returning in good numbers despite the 
increase in the minimal legal harvest length from 15 to 18 inches. Within 
the next few years, Quabbin is expected to become self-sufficient with 
respect to securing sufficient eggs for brood stock production. 

Technical Assistance 

A great deal of time and effort was spent investigating and commenting 
upon potential impacts of hydro-power development at numerous dams across 
the state. Additional time was spent collecting fish samples for numerous 
toxic waste investigations such as the creosoteproblem at Hocomoco Pond, 
Westboro and the concern about mercury in the Concord River. 

There were numerous fish kills of which only one was noteworthy. 
That problem killed thousands of carp in the Merrimack River through 
infectious dropsy. Initial ground work was also prepared to obtain board 
permission to import hybrid amur for the purpose of controlling nuisance 
aquatic vegetation in many lakes and ponds across the state. 



HATCHERIES 



David Fredenburgh 
Chief Fish Culturist 



During fiscal year 1982, the hatcheries produced 1,163,000 fish 
weighing 437,625 lbs. Of that total number, 940,600 were catchable size 
trout . 

The East Sandwich Coho Sea-Run Brown Trout Hatchery was completed and 
dedicated on October of 1981 to the memory of Arthur Sullivan, long-time 
newsman and outdoor writer. The dedication was well attended by state and 
federal officials, sportsmen's club members, and local citizens. A three 
man staff will eventually be assigned there on a permanent basis. 

The Roger Reed Salmon Hatchery (Palmer) had a successful year with 
the production of 41,400 sea-run salmon. A total of 154 adult salmon were 
held at the hatchery. One hundred and nine of these fish were spawned 
yielding 500,000 eggs. The hatchery also housed tiger muskies and during 
this first year of production, 10,050 fish were raised and stocked. 

Due to budgetary problems, it was decided to deed the Podick Springs 
section of the Sunderland Hatchery to the Federal Fish and Wildlife Service, 
which plans to use it as an Atlantic Salmon holding facility. Because of 
the reduced production at Sunderland, staffing will be reduced by one person. 

Normal maintenance projects were carried out at all the other hatcheries 
with no major construction activity. 



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-11- 



^WILDLIFE 



Chester M. McCord 
Assistant Director, Wildlife 



The Wildlife Research Section consists of one chief, three game 
biologists, two assistant game biologists, one restoration project field 
agent, and one conservation helper. This staff is responsible for research 
and management of approximately 75 species of mammals, birds, reptiles, 
and amphibians which are traditionally hunted, trapped or otherwise 
taken for food, animal products, or sport. Additionally, the section is 
responsible for administering the Division's falconry program for 
coordinating development of the Division's wildlife management areas, 
and for recommending to and advising the senior staff and Fisheries and 
Wildlife Board on matters of administration regulation, and policy relative 
to the Commonwealth's wildlife resources. The section oversees three 
Federal Aids in Wildlife Restoration Projects (W-9-1, W-35-R, and W-42-R) 
comprising about 35 research jobs in addition to about five other jobs 
conducted by the Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit and 
supervised by the Division. Section biologists also coordinate with the 
Realty, Planning and Nongame Sections when particular expertise on 
wildlife matters is needed. Summaries of current studies underway follow. 

Waterfowl 



Preseason Banding 



A total of 735 birds were banded during the 1981 preseason banding 
segment; 285 wood ducks; 293 mallards; 51 black ducks; 12 mallard x black 
hybrids; 56 greenwinged teal; 32 bluewinged teal; 1 American wigeon, 1 
hooded merganser; 1 American coot and 3 pied-billed grebes. A cooperator 



-12- 



banded an additional 320 least sandpipers; 181 semipalmated sandpipers; 
16 pectoral; 11 spotted; 7 solitary and 1 western sandpiper; 12 semi- 
palmated plover; 29 killdeer; 13 lesser yellowlegs and 1 snipe. 

Waterfowl Inventory Flight 

A total 158,453 waterfowl were counted during the January winter 
inventory up 16% from 1981 and 18% over the previous 10 year average. 
Mallards, mergansers, goldeneyes, sea ducks and Canada geese numbers were 
all up compared to 1981. Bufflehead and scaup were basically unchanged. 
Weather conditions prior to flight were mild and most coastal areas were 
ice free. 

Winter Banding Program 

The winter of 1981-82 was near normal with a severe cold spell that 
began the second week in January and continued into February. While 
icing was extensive during this period, there was no evidence that black 
ducks were unduly stressed. Division personnel and their cooperators 
banded a total of 627 male and 494 female black ducks. These, along with 
267 male and 139 female black ducks banded by the personnel of the Parker 
River National Wildlife Refuge, exceeded the state's quota of 400 male 
and 600 females required by the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Division 
personnel also banded 183 mallard x black hybrids, 19 mallards, and 26 
pintails . 

Wood Duck Population Study 

A bulletin, Wood Duck Research in Massachusetts, 1970-1980 , was printed 
by the Assabet Valley Regional Vocational Technical High School in May 1982. 
The bulletin, number 19 in the Massachusetts series, summarizes nesting 
histories, disease and pesticide effects on wood ducks, yearling productivity, 
the effects of dump nesting, the effects of starling competition and examines 
the migration pattern and harvest of Massachusetts 1 reared birds . This 67 
page bulletin is available through the Division's Westboro office for $2.00. 

Wood Duck Nest Box Study 

1981-82 was the final segment of a three year study to compare District 
winter box checks with actual spring-summer production. On a statewide basis, 
the three year results indicate the correlation between winter and summer 
box checks was very close; under 1% difference. However, accuracy was lower than 
this figure implies. Nests were missed for a variety of reasons during 
winter box checks, but other nests were reported in boxes that had no duck 
usage the previous summer. Reporting of "extra" nests was particularly 
prevalent in the North Central and Concord Regions where District personnel 
reported 13% more nests than were found during summer checks . In the rest 
of the state, District personnel reported 7.6% fewer nests during winter 
checks than were found during summer checks. Steps will be taken to address 
the over-reporting rate in problem areas. This study has concluded that 
winter box checks require a 5-10% revision upwards to determine actual 
wood duck population levels. 



-13- 



Park Waterfowl Investigations 

A manuscript, "Movement and Survival Rates of Park Mallards" was 
published in the 1982 fall issue of The Journal of Field Ornithology 
and a second manuscript on the effects of hunting on park mallard pop- 
ulations was submitted to the Wildlife Society Bulletin . 

Experimental Waterfowl Season Appraisal 

In 1981- 82, Massachusetts experimented with a zoned waterfowl season 
with a split in each zone. This season found widespread acceptance; 75% 
of 200 active waterfowlers surveyed in telephone interviews approved of 
the season dates, while 55% preferred the zone system to the former two 
segment statewide season and 34% had no opinion. Forty-one percent 
preferred the zoned system to the alternative three segment seasons, while 
34% again had no opinion. Harvest under the first year of zoning was 
lower than in previous years . 

Deer 

The 1981 statewide deer harvest for all seasons combined was 5,011 
deer, which is an increase of 1,517 over the 1980 harvest of 3,494. 
Seventy-five (75) percent of the deer harvest was reported in the four 
western counties of Berkshire, Franklin, Hampshire and Hampden. Worcester 
County contributed 12 percent (608 deer) of the total harvest and 
Barnstable County, three percent (148) . The islands of Dukes and 
Nantucket Counties contributed two percent (79 deer) and three percent 
(147 aieer) of the total. Management zones I and II combined contributed 
four percent (214 deer) to the overall total. 

A total of 4,321 deer were taken during the December shotgun-only 
season, including 2,789 antlered males and 1,532 antlerless deer. Archers 
took 418 deer (263 bucks, 155 does) and primitive firearm hunters bagged 
264 (107 bucks, 157 does). Paraplegic sportsmen harvested eight (5 bucks, 
3 does) during their special season. 

Successful archers were permitted, for the first time ever, to obtain 
a special permit to take a second deer during either the shotgun or 
primitive firearms season. This bonus permit resulted in the taking of 
44 "second" deer (30 bucks, 14 does). 

A total of 45,727 applications were received for an allotment of 
6,300 antlerless deer permits for the 10 deer management zones and 480 
additional farmer -landowner permits were issued. 

Natural Resource Officers reported a total of 625 non-hunting deer 
mortalities during calendar year 1981. Road kills (439, 70%) were the 
most prevalent source of mortality, followed by illegal kill (81, 13%), 
dogs (36, 6%) and miscellaneous causes (64, 11%) . 

Beaver 

During the 1981-82 zoned beaver season, a total of 594 beaver were 
taken by 96 trappers in 86 towns. This take represented a decrease of 312 



-14- 



(34%) from the 1980-81 take. The decrease in take was most pronounced 
in Berkshire, Hampshire and Worcester Counties, with the take in Essex 
and Hampden Counties increasing slightly. The east and west zones 
reflected nearly identical decreases. Changes in the monthly distribution 
of the take were most evident in eastern Massachusetts. 

Otter and Fisher 

The 1981-82 otter season extended from December 15 to February 28 
west of the Connecticut River and November 23 to February 28 east of the 
river. The 1981 fisher season extended through the month of November. 
During the season, 54 trappers took a total of 90 otter in 56 towns for 
a mean take of 1.7 otter per successful trapper. This compares with a 
take of 143 and a mean of 1.7 in 1980-81. 

The fisher take remained stable at 116 (115 in 1980) , with 54 trappers 
taking a mean of 2.1 fisher each in 46 towns. Berkshire (26) and Worcester 
(23) Counties yielded the most otter and Worcester (73) and Essex (17) 
the most fisher. A total of 35 otter and 114 fisher carcasses were 
received from cooperating trappers. The mean age of otter taken in 1981-82 
was 1.88 years and of fisher 1.41. This compares with 3.06 for otter and 
2.20 for fisher in 1980-81. All (2,100%) of the otter aged 2.5 and above 
and 22 (68.2%) of the fisher aged 1.5 and above during 1981-82 had been 
bred. This compares with figures of 38.8 percent for otter and 51.1 
percent for fisher in 1980-81. Average corpora lutea counts were 2.0 and 
2.3 for otter and fisher respectively, in 1980-81, and 3.0 and 2.5 in 1981- 

Coyote 

Massachusetts' first coyote hunting season was initiated in the fall 
of 1981. A total of 18 coyotes were taken by 14 hunters in five counties 
and 16 towns during the 1981-82 hunting season. Two-thirds of the kill 
was in November, with 10 (56%) animals taken by hunters seeking coyote. 
Eighty percent of those taken were young-of-the year. 

Bobcat 

The total harvest of 34 cats was comparable to the 36 taken in 1980-81 
Hunting with dogs accounted for 16 kills, trapping 13, four road kills and 
one incidental kill. The harvest was very similiar to previous years in 
all categories. 

Mourning Dove 

The total number of calling doves on three long-term randomized 
routes increased 14 percent from 39 to 44 doves during 1981-82. Counts 
on all 17 comparable routes decreased 4 percent (183 to 175) from 1981 
to 1982. 



-15- 



Bobwhite Quail 

The 1981 weighted call indices for Barnstable, Bristol and Plymouth 
Counties and for the statewide total showed no significant difference 
from 1979 or from a five-year (1971-79) mean index. Comparisons between 
comparable routes only for 1981 and the five-year mean disclosed a 
signficant change in Barnstable County call indices. 

Turkey 

Massachusetts' third spring gobbler season was held during a two-week 
period in May 1982. The hunting zone was revised from previous years to 
include all or part of three counties. A total of 3,000 permits were 
allotted, with 198 birds taken. The participation rate was 89.3% (2,679) 
and the success rate 7.4 percent. Berkshire County yielded 176 turkeys, 
Franklin County 18, and Hampden County 4. Adult turkeys weighed 14.8 - 20.0 
pounds (gutted); immatures 10.1 - 15.0 pounds (gutted). Three bearded 
hens were taken. Adult males comprised 111 (56.1%) of the total kill. 

Seventy-seven turkeys (38M, 39F) were taken during winter trapping 
efforts, with a mean capture rate of 0.55 turkeys /trap -hour and a mean 
success rate of 73 percent. Twenty-two birds (7M, 15F) were released on 
Mt. Toby State Forest, 24 (8M, 16F) on the Holyoke Range, 11 (4M, 7F) in 
the D. A. R. State Forest, 8 males in West Brookfield State Forest, and 7 
males on the Millers River Wildlife Management Area. Four toms were 
released at the capture site in Tyringham and one hen was a capture 
mortality. 

Black Bear 

A total of 988 bear hunting permit applications were received 
during 1981. Two male bears were taken by hunters, including one each 
in Franklin and Hampden counties. Two road kills, one nuisance kill, 
and one illegal kill were also recorded. New reports of 55 observations 
totalling 73 bears were received from 37 towns. Fourteen nuisance 
complaints were received, including beehive and livestock depredations, 
residential complaints, encounters, and miscellaneous problems. 

Wildlife Species Files 

The wildlife species filing system begun in 1979 was expanded to cover 
137 species and updated through 1981-82. An interactive computer program 
on wildlife distribution was developed. Collation of the data base for 
this program is in progress . 

Falconry 

During fiscal year 1982, 24 people were sent information on falconry. 
12 people applied for and took the falconry exam, 9 of these people passed 
the exam, had their mews inspected, and went on to become falconers. As 
of July 1, 1982, there were 32 licensed falconers, in all categories 
combined in Massachusetts. 



-16- 



Woodcock 

Division biologists prepared assessment on the effects of a heavy 
snowfall in early April, 1982 on the woodcock breeding population. 
Because woodcock breeding populations were down 37% in Massachusetts, 
the Fisheries and Wildlife Board reduced the bag limit on woodcock from 
five to two in the fall of 1982. 

Wildlife Development 

The W-9-D Project deals mainly with management of the Division's 
Wildlife Management Areas, and also encompasses the construction and 
maintenance of nesting structures throughout the state. Management 
of the wildlife areas includes habitat management, development and 
maintenance of public access facilities, delineating areas through 
posting of signs and boundary markers. 



-17- 



Listed below are jobs completed during this period. 



Job No. 



Name 



Description 



Buildings 



Maintenance of 16 buildings 
on 10 areas . 



Dams 



Maintenance of 1 dam on the 
Swift River Wildlife Manage- 
ment Area. 



Bridges 



Roads § Trails 



Fences 



Construction of 1 foot bridge 
on the Bolton Flats Wildlife 
Management Area . 

Maintenance of 2 vehicular 
bridges on the Martin Bums 
and Bill Forward Wildlife 
Management Areas . 

Construction of 1.2 miles of 
trails on the Swift River and 
Crane Wildlife Management Areas 

Maintenance of 0.7 miles of 
fences on two areas . 



Parking Lots § 
Waterfowl Blinds 



Constructed one parking lot 
on the Popple Camp Wildlife 
Management Area. 



Maintained 55 lots on 15 areas 



Maintained 15 blinds on 2 areas 



11 



12 



13 



Signs §• Boundary 
Markers 

Tree § Shrub 
Planting 

Herbaceous Seedings 



Erected and maintained 1,279 
signs on 27 areas. 

Planted 1,525 shrubs and 200 
trees on 3 areas . 

Planted and/or maintained by 
liming and fertilizing 256.5 
acres of fields on 9 areas. 



15 



Vegetation Control 



Controlled unwanted brush 
encroaching on fields and 
cleared areas; 263.5 acres 
controlled by bruahcutting, 
32.5 acres by herbiciding. 



21 



Timber Management 



Selectively cut 11 acres 
of forest on 3 areas. 



Jobs (Continued) 



-18- 



22 Nesting Structures Constructed and maintained 

1,220 wood duck nesting 
boxes statewide. 



Constructed 6 osprey 
nesting platforms in the 
Southeast Wildlife District. 



30 
31 



Managed Public 
Hunts 

Custodial Functions 



34 



Gates 



Controlled hunting was 
administered for 3 areas. 

Management Areas were 
regularly inspected to 
review work and assess 
effects of management and 
public use. 

Constructed 13 gates on 3 
areas . 



Maintained 10 gates on 4 areas . 



-19- 




E. Michael Pollack 
□lief Game Biologist 



Fiscal Year 1982 was a difficult time for the Propagation Section. 
From March 15 through April 20, we experienced below freezing temperatures 
at Wilbraham and Ayer Game Farms . Average temperatures for this period 
at Ayer was 24°F. On April 9-10, a blizzard arrived. Results were 
disastrous in spite of the attempts of game farm personnel to continuously 
"pick-up" eggs before they froze. During this period, over 50,000 pheasant 
eggs were discarded.. Egg production of 1,800 dropped to 400. In addition, 
several hundred hens were killed in the blizzard. The exact number of 
frozen eggs could not be immediately determined. However, they did appear 
during the incubating and hatching process. 

During normal years, the Division's incubating and hatching schedule 
is completed by mid-June in six hatches. However, this year, due to 
inclement weather conditions noted above, hatching continued through late 
July. Late hatches always bring problems. Hatchability and viability 
are greatly lowered. Egg production is greatly reduced when brood stock 
start to molt. 

In addition, at this time, the farms experienced difficulty with a 
poor lot of game bird feed. The chicks refused to eat and many starved to 
death. However, our troubles did not cease there. For the first time in 
several decades, we were hit with an unknown virus which caused a high 
chick mortality. The University of Massachusetts poultry specialist 
worked extensively on the problem, but without success. Efforts were made 
to offset this by importing chicks from Pennsylvania. These too were 
affected by the virus, resulting in high losses. 

Game farm personnel worked hard and for long hours under the worst 
conditions in order to produce the more than 50,000 birds needed for the 
fall stocking. 



-20- 



Game Farm Production 
Fiscal Year 1982 



Pheasant 



Game Farm 


SR 


A 


B 


C 


PG 


Misc* 


Totals** 


Sandwich 


170 




1,600 


2,860 


8,056 


300 


7, 564 


Wilbraham 


1,755 




3,456 


7,400 


7,564 


350 


20,175 


Ayer 


2,020 


60 


2,392 


5,868 


12,423 


300 


22,763 


Totals 


3,945 


60 


7,448 


16,128 


28,043 


950 


50,502 



♦Miscellaneous - Cocks and hens for field trials, displays, youth hunt, etc. 

approximate number. In addition, approximately 3,500 brood 
stock were liberated. 
**Total numbers are for cock birds only. 



Quail 



A total of approximately 4,675 quail produced at the Sandwich State Game Farm were 
released on the wildlife management areas in the Southeast Wildlife District. In 
addition, approximately 600 quail were distributed for field trial purposes. 



White Hare 



A total of 800 white hare were purchased from a dealer in New Brunswick, Canada 
for release in suitable covers. 



-21- 




NON-GAME AND ENDANGERED SPECIES 



Bradford G. Blodget 
Assistant Director 
Nongame and Endangered Species 

The Nongame and Endangered Species Program continued operations in 
fiscal year 1982 despite severe funding shortages. Revenues were augmented 
by the establishment of a special Bald Eagle Trust set up to receive a 
$10,000 grant from the Massachusetts Audubon Society and the initiation of 
Federal Aid for the osprey and purple martin projects. These and other 
highlights of the year's operations follow. 

Nongame Advisory Committee 

A seven-member committee was named by the Director in September 1981 
to assist and advise the Assistant Director on all matters pertaining to the 
Nongame and Endangered Species Program. This committee will eventually play 
an important oversight role in the administration of the program if the 
voluntary income tax check-off provision becomes law. Members were selected 
to represent a broad range of views and expertise from all areas of the 
Commonwealth. Richard T. Kleber, the Fisheries and Wildlife Board member 
especially interested in nongame and endangered species was named Chairman 
to provide a direct tie-to-the-Board and to assure that the Committee's 
views are transmitted to the Board. The other six members include: 
Kathleen S. Anderson, Director of Manomet Bird Observation, Middleboro; 
Robert A. Clark, Photographer and Naturalist, Petersham; Marilyn Flor, 
Audubon Teacher, Lenox; Karsten Hartel, Curator of Fish, Museum of 
Comparative Zoology, Cambridge; Gwilym Jones, Professor of Mammology at 
Northeastern University, Framingham; and Rudolph Stone, Naturalist, Holyoke. 
The Committee has established a pattern of meeting monthly with the Assistant 
Director to discuss problems and offer suggestions. 



-22- 



Nongame Income Tax Check-off Legislation 

Legislation to establish a voluntary check-off system for nongame wild- 
life passed the legislature, but was vetoed by Governor King in the closing 
hours of the session. The veto apparently came in response to concerns 
in the Revenue Department that the check-off might get out of hand and result 
in an avalanche of requests for different causes. So far, the experiences 
of the 20 other states that have check-offs have not borne out this fear. 

The Division continues to feel that the check-off, refiled in the 1982 
session, is the fairest and most desirable funding scheme for nongame pro- 
grams. The Division points out that wildlife warrants the special provision 
of a check-off because of the role of government as a public trustee in 
the stewardship of wildlife resources. This principle has been an integral 
part of U. S. Supreme Court decisions and of American wildlife laws since 
the late 19th century. Court actions have established that wildlife is the 
collective property of all the citizens -- not private property of individuals 
or groups. Because wildlife is held by the Division as a public trust, it is 
most appropriate that a public document -- the income tax form -- be utilized 
to solicit funds to care for the public's collective property. Furthermore, 
wildlife needs have not historically been funded by General Fund and in the 
legislature wildlife needs often experience trouble competing with social 
issues for limited public funds. 

Bald Eagle Trust 

A special trust was established under provisions of Section 7, Chapter 
131, M.G.L. in the Office of the State Treasurer for the express purpose 
of receiving a grant of $10,000 from the Massachusetts Audubon Society to 
be used only for the hacking of bald eagles . These funds were used mainly 
for materials to build a hack tower, associated equipment, and to pay a 
graduate student's stipend to safeguard the young birds. 

Endangered Species Cooperative Agreement 

The Division's agreement with the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service which 
allows Federal reimbursement of approved endangered species activities was 
renewed October 1, 1981 . 

Bald Eagle Hacking Project 

Two eaglets were obtained from the State of Michigan and flown to the 
hack site on Prescott Peninsula within Quabbin Reservation on June 10. Both 
birds successfully fledged July 29, 1982. Each was banded, wing tagged 
and equipped with a tail-mounted radio transmitter. Activities are under- 
way to increase the number of eaglets to four to six in 1983. 

Bald Eagle Winter Survey 

Statewide survey and inventory activities carried out January 8, 1982 
revealed the presence of 10 bald eagles and three golden eagles. 



-23- 



Plymouth Red-Bellied Turtle 

Basic life history research work on this endemic continued during fiscal 
year 1982. A decision was made to focus more attention on reconnaissance 
activities to attempt to locate all populations. Semi-annual progress 
reports on the status of this work are on file with the Division. 

Nongame Wildlife for Special Consideration in Massachusetts 

Work was substantially completed on a second edition of this listing. 
Sixteen "Endangered", three "Threatened", 23 "State Rare", 39 "State Local", 
and 15 "Peripheral" species are listed with a brief account of their range 
in the Commonwealth. The new list contains a complete, revised introduction 
and a new section detailing the Division procedure that will guide further 
amendments of the document. At the same time, staff of the Natural Heritage 
Program (DEM) completed work on a companion document, "Native Plants for 
Special Consideration in Massachusetts". Both lists will be issued by the 
Division as Fauna of Massachusetts Series Numbers 5 and 6 early in fiscal 
year 1983. 

Other Nongame Species Projects 

Great Blue Heron Inventory - In 1982, Division biologists located nine 
(9) active great blue heron rookeries in the Commonwealth. Total 
active nests numbered 125 and there were 240 plus young fledged. 
Average production per nest was 2.2 young. 

Purple Martin - Division personnel at the Ayer Game Farm built 24 
purple martin houses . An additional two were constructed at the 
Assabet Valley Regional Vocational Technical High School. By the 
end of fiscal year 1982, 16 units had been installed at various 
places around the state. Cooperating agencies in the installation 
of houses included the Allen Bird Club, Felix Neck Trust, Holyoke 
Wildlife Club, Massachusetts Audubon Society, Northeast Utilities 
at Northfield Mountain Recreational Area, Trustees of Reservations 
and the Worcester Science Center. A substantial emphasis in the 
Purple Martin restoration effort is aimed at encouraging nesting 
box construction and proper installation by the private sector. 
At the end of June 30, 435 inquiries for information have been 
handled and plans mailed. 

Osprey - During fiscal year 1982, the Division continued the 
cooperative osprey restoration project with Commonwealth Electric 
Company. Poles were installed at Washburn Pond in Mashpee, the old 
fish rearing station in Rochester and at Talbot's Point in Sandwich. 
In addition, the Division cooperated with Dr. Edward Shannon in the 
placement of three utility poles in the Hummock Pond area of Nantucket 
and furnished certain hardware to the Gilbert Fernandezes for additional 
poles and the Division provided technical assistance in their place- 
ment. The Fernandezes have been volunteer wardens for the Westport 
River Osprey Group for many years. During the 1982 nesting season, 
three were 51 active nests. Thirty-five (35) nests produced young, for 
a total of 67 fledged (1.91 young/successful nests). Ospreys nested 



-24- 



for the first time at Nantucket in 1982. However, none of the Division 
installations were used by ospreys in 1982. It is anticipated that as 
the population continues to increase, at least some additional poles 
will be colonized over the next five years and will hopefully constitute 
an expansion of the species' currently very limited range in the Common- 
wealth. 

Tern Management - The Division's involvement in management was low 
key during the 1982 nesting season due to lack of nongame funding 
and personnel. As in prior years, the Division coordinated a 
meeting of tern wardens and other cooperating individuals and 
organizations for the purpose of assessing the status of the tern 
populations . 

Normal settlement and colony establishment by least tern was 
severely belated in 1982 by protracted rains and recurrent storms, 
a situation that made census taking of least terns even more 
difficult then usual. Nevertheless, after all adjustments, the 
1,812 pairs found were comparable to the 1,856 pairs in 1981 and 
suggested little fundamental change of the base population. The 
common tern nested at 22 stations in 1982 (compared with 18 in 
1981) and total pairs rose to 7,577. Increases in various colonies 
seemed to more than offset a 25 percent drop in the Monomy colony. 

Roseate terns numbered 1,986 pairs in the 1982 nesting season, con- 
tinuing a stable population at Bird Island in Marion. Unfortunately, 
the Arctic Tern population declined in 1982, dropping to 23 pairs 
distributed among seven colonies. This continues a steady decline 
from the 53 pairs in 1978. The reasons for this decline are not 
known. 

Salamander Survey - Division personnel participated in the statewide 
"Salamander Watch" intended to develop more definitive information on 
the fossorial mole or ambystomid salamanders. Division personnel, 
concentrating in the Worcester County area, recorded a new site for 
the mabled salamander, two new sites for the blue-spotted salamander 
and at least a dozen sites for the spotted salamander. On a state- 
wide basis, sightings were recorded from 52 towns in 11 counties. 
All data will be stored on the Massachusetts Natural Heritage 
Program data banks . 



-25- 



NORTHEAST DISTRICT 



Walter Hoyt 
District Manager 



The Northeast District performed its traditional functions of stocking 
fish, pheasants and varying hare; of managing seven wildlife management areas 
and five sanctuaries; of cooperating with other state, local and federal 
agencies; of providing exhibits for major wildlife oriented events; and, of 
controlling nuisance wildlife. Research projects were conducted in cooperation 
with or under supervision of Westboro biologists. 

Wildlife 



District personnel stocked 6,160 pheasants and 140 varying hare. In 
addition, we trapped and moved 15 beaver; provided advice for many nuisance 
problems received by phone and picked up about 20 sick, injured or trapped 
animals . 

Cooperative farmer programs were continued on the Martin Burns and 
William Forward Wildlife Management Areas. 

We cooperated with research personnel on such research projects as 
woodcock census, dove census, waterfowl inventory, assessment of wood duck 
box use, a mast survey and operation of deer checking stations. 

Activities on Wildlife Management Areas included development and 
maintenance of roads, trails, fences, buildings, clearings and signs; 
water level control on the Delaney Wildlife Management Area; wildlife 
planting and seedings; and fertilizing and liming of fields. Controlled 
hunts were continued on the Martin Bums Wildlife Management Area and the 
Delaney Wildlife Management Area. Land purchased by the Corps of Engineers 
as part of the Charles River Natural Valley Storage Project were identified 
and posted. A cooperative wildlife management plan was initiated with the 
US Army Corps of Engineers . 

Three hundred and twenty-five permits were issued to use the target 
range at the Martin Burns Wildlife Management Area. This range was moved 
to a new location in 1980. The new location has worked to the benefit of 
all. 

Five sanctuaries were posted and bounds marked as required. 



-26- 



Fisheries 

Approximately 225,000 trout were stocked in suitable ponds and streams 
during the spring. An additional release of approximately 6,000 catchable 
size trout and 3,000 fingerlings was made in the fall. Considerable time and 
effort was devoted to the biological survey of streams and ponds in cooperation 
with the fisheries research section. 

Six boat access ramps were maintained as required. 

The bass rearing system at the Harold Parker State Forest was not 
operated this year. 

Miscellaneous 

The District and Essex County League of Sportsmen co-sponsored the 
Youth Upland Training Program. Seventeen youths participated in the hunt 
and twenty-four took the training session. 

Exhibits and manpower were provided for National Hunting and Fishing 
Day at the Concord Rod and Gun Club, Lowell Flytyers Annual Show in Dracut, 
and the Topsfield Fair. The district cooperated with other Division personnel 
in the New England Sportsmen's Show in Boston and the Northeastern Sportsmen's 
Show in Boxborough. 



-27- 



SOUTHEAST DISTRICT 



Louis S. Hambly, Jr. 
District Manager 



Throughout the fiscal year 1982, the staff of the Southeast Wildlife 
District continued traditional management and habitat improvement programs 
and gathered data for a variety of fish and wildlife research projects. 

Wildlife 



During the fall of 1982, 4,630 cock pheasant were stocked in suitable 
covers under private ownership and 8,056 cock pheasant and 4,500 bobwhite 
quail were stocked on wildlife management areas. A total of 200 varying 
hare were stocked in the open covers and wildlife management areas during 
February. 

Routine maintenance was practiced on all wildlife management areas. 
This included the planting of 3.0 acres of buckwheat and millett and 2.0 
acres of winter rye at the Crane Wildlife Management Area and 4.5 acres 
of rye at the Myles Standish State Forest Wildlife Management Area. 60 
acres of perennial cover were top dressed with lime and fertilizer and 
1,150 shrubs and trees were planted in center hedgerows at the Myles 
Standish Quail Area. One hundred acres was top dressed at the Crane 
Wildlife Management Area and a total of 350 acres of fields and woods were 
brushcut. Three new two acre clearings in the Crane Quail Area were laid 
out and three 500 foot safety zone strips were laid out and cut near the 
periphery of the quail area and pheasant area due to increased development 
of adjacent private property. 

Other activities conducted on Wildlife Management Areas included 
the cutting of cedar poles in the Hockomock Swamp Wildlife Management Area 
by personnel from the Sandwich Game Farm and the cutting of brush and trees 
from clearings at the Freetown State Forest Wildlife Management Area. 
District personnel erected and maintained the signs, gates and parking lots 
at all eight wildlife management areas in the district plus set up the 
Crane Area for field trails, horse shows, and military training exercises. 

In aiding Division research projects, District personnel checked 
wood duck boxes, and erected bluebird boxes and purple martin houses. 
They participated in mast surveys, woodcock, mourning dove, and quail 
census routes. Coastal winter duck banding resulted in 966 ducks being 



-28- 



banded. Two biological deer checking stations were operated by district 
employees and controlled deer hunts for the archery, shotgun and primitive 
firearms seasons were conducted at the Otis Camp Edwards Military Reservation 
for 3,434 participants. 

Fisheries 

In addition to the stocking of 177,000 trout in the streams and ponds 
of the Southeast Wildlife District, personnel were also involved in 
conducting surveys of selected ponds and streams to determine the species 
composition and growth patterns. pH and total alkalinity were sampled on 
trout ponds to determine their continued suitability for receiving fish 
due to acid rainfall. In an effort to provide biological control of 
undesirable fish, 709 smallmouth bass brood stock were salvaged from closed 
waters and transferred to selected trout ponds. 

Fisheries personnel assisted in Division research on tire reefs at 
Great Herring Pond, Plymouth, the collection of brood stock sea-run brown 
trout, and in the rearing, stocking and sampling of walleye pike at 
Assawompsett Pond, Lakeville. The Rochester rearing system was opened to 
public fishing and a gate was erected at the entrance to improve security 
of the area. 

In addition to the above, personnel routinely maintained trucks and 
tractors, equipment, buildings and policed the 15,000 acres of Wildlife 
Management Areas in southeastern Massachusetts . 



-29- 



CENTRAL DISTRICT 



Chris Thurlow 
District Manager 



During fiscal year 1982, personnel from the Central Wildlife District 
worked on the development and maintenance of seven wildlife management areas. 
Buildings were maintained or removed from Winimussett and Bolton Wildlife 
Management Areas. A foot bridge was constructed at the Bolton Wildlife 
Management Area. Other wildlife management areas receiving attention 
during fiscal year 1982 were Westboro, Hubbardston, Barre Falls, West Hill 
and Birch Hill. 

Birch Hill Wildlife Management Area personnel spent considerable time 
developing and constructing storage sheds and overhead doors for all the 
storage garages and sheds. In addition, they cut and milled 8,000 board 
feet of pine lumber. 

Wildlife 



All district personnel assisted in continuing research projects 
such as the acorn mast study, the salamander breeding census, woodcock 
and mourning dove census, fur -bearer tagging and operation of deer checking 
stations. Personnel also assisted in a loon nesting platform study on 
Worcester Water Supply Reservoirs, constructed the Eagle Hacking Tower 
for Bald Eagle Re -introduction on the Quabbin Reservoir, and assisted 
the University of Massachusetts, Bear Tagging Study leader in monitoring 
a radio-collared bear roaming Worcester County. 

During the winter months, district personnel checked and maintained 
250 wood duck nesting boxes, repaired and maintained trucks and provided 
similiar service to other equipment. 

District game personnel tagged and conducted a pheasant banding study 
to evaluate open covers. 16,260 cock pheasants were released in eleven 
wildlife management areas and 47 towns. 1,670 sportsmen's club birds 
were delivered and 850 excess brood stock hens were released in suitable 
covers. 220 snowshoe hare were released. 

Other district activities included handling of nuisance animal 
complaints, delivering permits and licenses, checking nuisance beaver 



-30- 



and deer complaints. 
Fisheries 

District fisheries personnel conducted field surveys of 27 streams 
and eight ponds. In the spring, 154,100 trout were stocked into 101 
streams and 32 ponds. In the fall, 12,250 trout were stocked into 10 
ponds. In addition, 7,500 tiger muskie hybrids were stocked into five 
ponds. Other activities included transferring landlocked alewives from 
Congamond Reservoir to Lake Chauncy and South Pond. Vandalism cancelled 
smelt egg collection at the Wachusett Reservoir. 

Miscellaneous 

Considerable time was spent setting up and staffing fish and wildli 
exhibits at the Eastern States Exposition in Springfield, and Sportsmen' 
Shows in Boston and Boxboro. 

District personnel assisted the Division of Law Enforcement during 
the deer season, fishing season and smelt runs. 



-31- 



CONN. VALLEY DISTRICT 



Herm Covey 
District Manager 



Wildlife 



The District Game Section stocks pheasants, snowshoe hare and delivers 
young birds to various clubs under the pheasant rearing program. They 
handle numerous complaints of animals causing problems such as beaver, 
raccoon, skunk, squirrels, deer, bear and coyote. • 

They monitor pheasant covers open to hunting and assist the Division 
of Law Enforcement, on request, during deer season, assisting officers as 
needed. 

The District stocks all town covers that are open to hunting just 
before the open season, and selected covers three to four times during 
the season through mid-November. Management areas are stocked just before 
the season opens and usually twice a week through most of November. Birds 
provided for club rearing programs are free to those clubs that enroll and 
meet certain criteria. These birds are released at maturity into local 
covers. Surplus brood stock are released in early June. They are capable 
of producing late hatches to supplement any native birds grown in the wild. 

Broodstock Release 



Cocks 



Hens 



Club Rearing Program 
Broodstock Released 
Total - Both Sources 



1,430 
333 
1,763 



65 
2,405 
2,470 



-32- 



Prior to Hunting Season 



Cocks 



Open Covers - Towns 
Management Areas 
Total Fall Release 



10,796 
4,416 
15,212 



During fiscal year 1982, other activity was conducted under specific 
projects as follows: 



Besides routine surveillance of each wildlife management area, the 
activities include maintenance of gravel roads and parking lots, unloading 
and spreading lime and fertilizer, planting trees and shrubs, replacing 
and maintaining boundary markers and signs, plowing snow, maintaining 
vehicles and equipment, installing culverts, maintaining buildings and 
grounds, replacing gates, pruning trees, frost seeding exposed areas, 
cleaning up roadside trash, and maintaining wood duck nesting boxes in 
the District. 

District personnel deliver doe permit applications, licenses, law 
abstracts, primitive weapons, hunting stamps, turkey hunting applications, 
and waterfowl applications to town clerks and other license outlets. 
They operate deer check stations at Williamsburg and Belchertown, as well 
as a turkey checking station in Greenfield. They assisted biologists 
netting mature turkeys and relocating them to other areas of the state. 
They monitored mourning dove census routes and continued the study of 
mast crops . 

The district maintains records on species taken by licensed sportsmen 
such as deer, bear, coyotes, beaver, bobcat, otter and fisher. We 
participate in the bear study project of the Wildlife Co-Operative Unit 
at the University of Massachusetts, capturing, tagging and installing 
radio transmitters on the black bear to monitor movement, assess range and 
identify populations. In addition, the district handles nuisance bear 
complaints and instructs bee keepers on ways to prevent damage. 

A controlled waterfowl hunt is conducted on the Ludlow Wildlife 
Management Area. Permanent blinds are maintained on the area for photography 
and nature observation during the closed season. District personnel 
maintain wood duck nesting boxes and collect blood samples from waterfowl 
taken by hunters. 

Fisheries 

Trout stocking is another major function of the Districts. This 
district stocks selected ponds in mid-winter for ice fishing interests 
and selected ponds and streams in the fall. Most of the allotment is 
however scheduled for release in April, May and June. 



Wildlife 



-33- 



Total Trout Stocked 



Ponds 


6"-9" 


14,200 


Fish 




3,706 


lbs. 




9+" 


60,950 


Fish 




41,676 


lbs. 


Streams 


6"-9" 


74,000 


Fish 




19,321 


lbs. 




9+ M 


34,100 


Fish 




23,356 


lbs. 


Totals 


6"-9" 


88,200 


Fish 




23,027 


lbs. 




9+" 


95,050 


Fish 




65,032 


lbs. 


Grand Totals 




183,250 


Fish 




88,059 


lbs. 



In addition to trout stocking, the District fisheries staff assisted 
other districts with manpower and equipment to complete their stocking 
programs. We continue to monitor pH in streams and ponds prior to stocking, 
give technical advice to the public on specific water related problems, 
repair and maintain equipment, and respond to other state and federal agencies 
in need of information or assistance. 

Fisheries research activity is conducted under specific projects as 
follows: 

Conn. River Atlantic Salmon Restoration 

The district provided 44 man days monitoring fish passage at Turners 
Fall Dam Fishway viewing window. Staff assisted in the site selection process 
to locate the new adult Atlantic salmon holding station with the Federal 
Fish and Wildlife Coordinator. Two radio interviews on the restoration 
program helped to explain the programs. 

Fisheries Survey and Inventory 

District staff continued to assess fish populations in selected lakes 
and streams. They conducted creel checks and maintained electrofishing gear. 

Nongame and Endangered Species 

The District Manager assisted in the annual eagle count of wintering 
eagle populations at the Quabbin Reservoir. We also offer assistance as 
required for the Eagle Hacking Program at Quabbin. 

Young Adult Conservation Corps 

A corps of young people between the ages of 16 and 23 worked on projects 
at our hatcheries, game farms and district office under the supervision of a 
Division employee. 

Activities of this corps included cutting woodland borders . around field, 
burning brush, milling and stacking lumber, making signs, picking up trash, 
fertilizing and liming fields, planting shrubs, landscaping, repairing ranges, 
constructing raceways, installing fish propagation tanks, repairing water 
control structures, maintaining project equipment. Unfortunately, the federal 
funding was withdrawn and the program ended. 



-34- 



WESTERN DISTRICT 



Tom Keefe 
District Manager 



Wildlife 



Personnel from the Western District participated actively in many 
of the Division's research activities. To do this, they manned deer check 
stations during archery, shotgun and primitive firearms seasons and they 
participated as hosts in the Berkshire section of the special deer hunt for 
paraplegic sportsmen. In all, and including the time needed to distribute 
antlerless deer permit applications, as well as time needed to investigate 
non-hunting deer mortality reports, approximately 88 man days were spent 
on deer research. 

A district wide census was conducted as in the past to determine 
numbers of mourning doves and woodcock. Within these surveys, district 
staff conducted four dove call routes and two routes which monitored 
woodcock singing grounds for a total of five man days. 

Game personnel investigated sightings and maintained records of turkey 
sightings throughout the year. They made contact with key landowners 
and scouted prime turkey areas in preparation for mid-winter live- trapping 
efforts. During the winter period, district staff worked with the research 
biologist on trapping and translocating birds. In addition to field work, 
this involved construction of a net- launching box as well as maintenance 
of equipment and shipping crates. During the spring turkey season, district 
staff manned check stations and delivered materials as needed. 

Turning their attention to the black bear project, district personnel 
attended seminars conducted by the Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit, 
University of Massachusetts, Amherst, on immobilization of bear. They 
participated in two efforts to radio tag bears and met with a piculturist 
to discuss prevention of damage to hives . 

As in the past, district personnel participated in the collection of 
carcasses of bobcat, coyote, fisher and otter and the tagging and measuring 
of pelts; a project which took an estimated 10 man days. 



-35- 



In a study related to the abundance of these and other major game 
species, personnel surveyed previously marked red and white oak trees 
throughout the district and tabulated acorn counts. Further investigations 
into fruit and nut production in other parts of the district were continued 
as well (10 man days) . 

Fisheries 

Personnel from the Division's fisheries crew were involved in both 
pond and stream surveys. Data from these investigations will be used 
to map ponds as well as to determine base line measurements of chemical 
parameters which can be used for future research. Approximately 63 man 
days were expended on these projects. 

Nongame Projects 

Western District personnel participated in the annual January eagle 
watch covering western Massachusetts and monitoring areas where eagles 
might be found. Staffers also participated in a summer survey for the 
nongame program, this one assisting the Assistant Director for Nongame 
and Endangered Species in locating colonies of gTeat blue herons and 
conducting an inventory of birds using these rookeries. Total time 
expended on these nongame projects estimated at approximately 6.5 man 
days . 

Maintenance of Wildlife Management Areas 

This program involved a wide variety of minor but time consuming 
maintenance and area improvement tasks . Personnel maintained the storage 
buildings at the District Headquarters, and at the Housatonic Valley 
and Stafford Hill Wildlife Management Areas. They maintained a footbridge 
on the Hinsdale Flats Wildlife Management Area and nine parking lots on 
five management areas (Housatonic Valley, Stafford Hill, Knightville, 
Eugene Moran and Hy Fox) . In addition, they limed a h mile trail on the 
Hy Fox Wildlife Management Area, mowed and cleared a three mile trail 
on the Housatonic Valley Wildlife Management Area and raked and maintained 
culverts on a % mile road on the Moran Wildlife Management Area. Boundaries 
were maintained and markers were placed on 6.2 miles of wildlife management 
boundary . 

A total of 161 acres on four wildlife management areas were placed 
into farming or grazing under agreements between private cooperators and 
the District. Personnel monitored cooperators' activities including 
cutting dates, liming and fertilizing, fence maintenance and fee collection 
to assure conformity with the agreements. 

District staff mowed a total of 35.5 acres on six wildlife management 
areas and maintained a total of 129 wood duck nesting boxes on these areas . 

Project administration and custodial functions on management areas 
occupied an estimated total of 53.5 man days. 



-36- 



Stocking 

Stocking of game and fish constitute an important part of the activities 
of any district and this district undertook four stocking operations during 
fiscal year 1982. 



Hens Cocks 

Pheasants - 

Spring Releases 484 
Club Reared Birds 
Fall Stocked, Towns 
Fall Stocked, WMA's 

484 

Grand Total - 7,272 



White Hare - 

111 released on the following areas: 
Peru, Moran, Savoy, Hinsdale Flats, and Windsor State Forest 



Trout - 

173,000 brown, brook and rainbow trout released into area ponds, 
lakes and streams. 



Kokanee Salmon - 

30,000 kokanee were released into Onota Lake, Pittsfield and Laurel 
Lake, Lee. This will be the final stocking of this species into 
Massachusetts waters . 



Tiger Muskies 

Were released into four district ponds. Approximately 3,580 
of these northern pike hybrids were released into Pontoosuc 
Lake, Pittsfield, and Otis Reservoir. 

The fish stocked were 5"-8" long. They were stocked in Otis, 
Upper Spectacle Pond, Sandisfield and 1,000 acre ponds in New 
Marlboro. They become legal in the creel at 28". 



76 
440 
2810 
3460 
6788 



-37- 



Miscellaneous 

In addition to the activities detailed above, district personnel 
continued to provide services in other areas as in previous years. Prime 
among these services is technical assistance to state, federal and private 
agencies as well as to private individuals. Another major service of the 
District involves dealing with complaints about animal damage. 23 man 
days were spent evaluating and processing deer damage reports and 51.5 
man days were spent dealing with complaints about beaver activity. Other 
activities involved outreach through participating in shows such as the 
Eastern States Exposition which involved 16 man days and routine participation 
in local exhibitions and meetings. 




-38- 



I 



INFORMATION & EDUCATION 



Eleanor C. Horwitz 
Chief 

Information and Education 



The Information and Education Section continued to address its mandate 
of disemminating information about wildlife to specific and general publics 
and by providing educational programs where and as possible. As in the past, 
the most time consuming portion of this was direct response to public inquiries 
by telephone and letter. All requests received were handled as were numerous 
requests for story material from writers who subsequently used such materials 
to publicize wildlife opportunities and to promote a greater understanding of 
wildlife among their readership. 

Press Releases 

In addition to responding to direct inquiries, the section maintains 
an open line of communication with outdoor writers, sportsmen's clubs, 
conservation groups and town clerks through irregularly issued press releases. 
Effective distribution of releases requires up-to-date mailing lists. To 
this end, two of the Division's lists -- the list of writers and the list of 
sportsmen's clubs underwent extensive purging and revision. The results 
were a notable decrease in number of items per mailing with an increase in 
release use as shown through press clipping analysis. During fiscal 1982, 
the section issued 17 press release packets comprising 97 items plus ten 
"Tips to Outdoor Writers" which are mailed directly to active members of 
the working press. Fifteen items were issued as "Tips" bringing the total 
of release items to 112. Returned newsclips were analyzed as received and 
it was noted that during 1981, the Division received an average of 150.5 
clips per month with two months registering 200 clips or better. 

Publications 



As a further aid in responding to public inquiry and in keeping the 
public abreast of news and regulations, the section prepares, maintains 
and updates a variety of publications including Abstracts of Fish and 
Wildlife Regulations, Abstracts of Regulations Pertaining to Migratory 
Birds, spring and fall trout stocking lists, lists of deer checking stations, 
sportfishing awards weighing stations, maps available through the Division, 
and waters for fishing bass, northern pike and tiger muskies. 

During this year, the section began a major reprinting and reorganization 
of its file of 200+ maps of ponds and wildlife management areas throughout the 



-39- 



state. Map files are being alphabetized, stocks are being replenished and 
where needed, maps are being redrawn. Some of the information contained in 
the maps and in the aforementioned lists has been used for informational 
flyers and leaflets including a fishing flyer prepared for the Division by 
the Boston Globe and a sportsman's guide prepared by Procupine Enterprises 
through the Middlesex News. 

A number of special publications were issued this year, among them 
natural history flyers on the coyote, snipe, brown bullhead, yellow perch, 
a guide for handicapped sportsmen entitled "A Handicap is not a Disability", 
a manual on Bowhunting in Massachusetts and a technical monograph entitled 
The Wood Duck in Massachusetts . 

Preparation of "Wildlife Portraits'' a series of articles and photographs 
provided without cost to newspapers, was halted due to decreased manpower 
and a reduction in use. 

During this year, we noted with sadness the untimely passing of Massachusett 
Wildlife editor Jack Clancy. His position was assumed by Peter Mirick, 
Conservation Helper in the Wildlife Section who had produced "Wildlife Portraits" 
Although continuing his duties as leader of the Mast Evaluation Project and 
coordinating the first statewide Salamander Survey, Mirick prepared three 
issues of Massachusetts Wildlife . In addition, Mirick carried responsibility 
for section operations while Section Chief Ellie Horwitz was on maternity 
leave from October 1981 through March 1982. 

Displays 

Audio-visual personnel continued to provide outstanding support to all 
sections of the Division documenting projects and providing photographs and 
film as needed for presentations of all varieties. These presentations 
included regulatory sessions before the Fisheries and Wildlife Board, talks 
to sportsmen's clubs, civic organizations and school groups. A special 
educational seminar was held during this period by Mr. James Kenelly, 
University of Massachusetts. The seminar dealt with new procedures and 
techniques to improve graphics used in presentations by biologists and offered 
the staff suggestions for more effective ways to utilize the capabilities 
of the Division's photographic resources. 

In addition to providing support services, the photographers prepared 
large displays focussing on Atlantic salmon for use at the Eastern States 
Exposition in Springfield, the Sportsmen's Show in Boston and the Eastern 
Fishing Exposition in Boxborough. In addition to preparation, transport 
and maintenance of the major displays, they provided photographs for numerous 
small displays which were used at smaller exhibitions and special events. 
Two display boards were constructed to hold variable materials and a folding 
display board was created to feature Division publications. 

Filming continued with special emphasis on shorebirds and on the eagle 
restoration project and footage was filed for future use. A slide show on 
reptiles and amphibians was completed as was one for young audiences on 
Wildlife in Massachusetts. This latter will be issued in cooperation with the 



-40- 



Massachusetts Wildlife Federation. While not completed, work continued 
toward creation of a nongame slide show for the Commonwealth. 

Conservation Camp 

The section continued its traditional role as publicity agency and 
registration center for the Massachusetts Junior Conservation Camp in Spencer. 
In addition to providing needed pre-camp services, Section staff members 
made arrangements for teaching programs, tours, fish stocking and actually 
taught sessions on fisheries and wildlife. As co-sponsors of the camp, 
the Division was involved throughout the program up to and including 
graduation and the awards ceremony. Section staff also provided educational 
sessions for the Marlboro Junior Conservation Camp. 

Stamps 

An archery/primitive firearms stamp design was donated by artist Randy 
Julius of East Bridgewater. This design was reproduced and the 1981 stamp 
sold to all bowhunters pursuing deer and to participants in the three day 
primitive firearms season on deer in addition to stamp collectors. 

The 1981 waterfowl stamp competition, held to select the design for 
the 1982 stamp, drew more than 40 entries to the judging and exhibition 
held at the Peabody Museum in Salem. The winning painting was John Eggert's 
rendition of a Greater Yellowlegs carved by Fred Nichols of Lynn. 

Special Promotions 

More than 400 applicants received bronze pins through the Freshwater 
Sportfishing Awards Program. Two of them established new state records, 
Nicholas Lambert with a 30 lb. 4 oz. carp and Fred Goodwin with a 7 lb. 
4 oz. white catfish. 

The Tags 'n' Trout Program continued operation with somewhat tightened 
regulations. This year, sponsors were required to honor each tag with a 
prize worth $20 or better to avoid angler disappointment after often extensive 
drives to collect their prizes. In all mine groups, 190 tagged fish provided 
sportsmen with an opportunity to glean $3800 of prizes. 

Undoubtedly, the most exciting special promotion came with the inititaion 
of the eagle restoration project under the leadership of audio-visual 
supervisor Jack Swedberg. Under Swedberg's leadership, a 30 foot tower 
was constructed on the shores of Quabbin Reservoir (see nongame report) and 
two eaglets arrived on June 11 commemorating the 200th anniversary of the 
selection of the bald eagle as the national symbol of the United States. 
This brought many interviews and drew attention to the Division and specifically 
to the emerging nongame program. A press day which drew 37 media representatives 
was hosted on June 18 and media interest remained high. 

Other 

This year's Section efforts were especially assisted by intern Dan Monahan 
who undertook the project of clearing out and cleaning portions of the Hunting 
and Fishing Museum collection. 



-41- 




REALTY 



Floyd Richardson 
Chief of Wildlife Lands 



Historically, this agency has reluctantly divested title to property 
in its ownership and then only for specific reasons. Public need however, 
in the form of water supply, highway construction, utilities, etc., takes 
precedence over wildlife demands placing the Division in a tenous, yet 
conciliatory situation. 

Proposition 2H spawned severe financial restraint curtailing planned 
programs and influenced every segment of government. Because of these 
restrictions, Podick Springs, a satellite station to the Sunderland Hatchery 
was destined to cease operations. The sixty acres, buildings and raceways, 
would (inevitably) fall victim to vandals. At the same time, however, the 
U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service was formulating plans for the construction 
of a salmon holding facility in conjunction with the restoration of the 
anadromous Atlantic Salmon in the Connecticut River. Podick Springs with 
its proximity to the Connecticut River was ideally suited. A transfer of 
the hatchery from state to federal control would certainly be in the best 
interests of the Commonwealth. The hatchery would remain operative and 
productive thereby enhancing the salmon restoration project. If in the 
future the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service suspended operations and declared 
the property surplus, the Division would have preference in reacquiring 
by transfer. Consequently, a transfer of the hatchery was enacted by 
Chapter 741 Acts of 1981 becoming effective January, 1982. 

Our acquisition program continued in a low-key manner with the limited 
funds available. 

Nine parcels were acquired totalling two hundred and forty-three acres. 
Six of the parcels were given to our agency by conservation-minded persons. 



-42- 



Their names and property locus are as follows: 



Kineslev Fall 


Pittsf ield 


2 


.0 


acres 


Mary Weston 


Pittsfield 


6 


.3 


acres 


Alex § Cecil Gay lord 


Pittsfield 


5 


.9 


acres 


Francis Paddock 


Lenox 


15 


.0 


acres 


Lucretia I Is ley 


Newbury 


5 


.7 


acres 


A. Stakutis 


Brookfield 


3 


.5 


acres 



The Division of Fisheries and Wildlife is extremely appreciative to the 
above-named for their generosity. 

HOUSATONIC RIVER ACQUISITION PROJECT 

811.4 acres 

Four parcels of property adjacent to the Housatonic River were given 
to this agency. These gifts enlarge the area by twenty-nine acres. 

WINDSOR ACQUISITION PROJECT 

1102.0 acres 

The western perimeter of this management area contains some of the 
best wildlife cover and habitat the Berkshires have to offer. The addition 
of two parcels, with a combined acreage of 80 acres, provide protection and 
access . 

DOWNFALL ACQUISITION PROJECT 

1486.0 acres 

Another important segment of wildlife property was vested into the 
Division. This parcel of woodland and marshland converge to offer ideal 
wildlife habitat. Additionally, this parcels' importance is mirrored by 
the fact it was the only privately owned parcel within our management area 
in that particular sector. 

QUABOAG ACQUISITION PROJECT 

1045.6 acres 

Situated on the southwestern side of Quaboag Pond and also fronting 
the Quaboag River, this valuable parcel provides additional protection and 
enlarges the corridor presently owned by the Division. 



-43- 



MILLERS RIVER ACQUISITION PROJECT 

1857.3 acres 

Access, parking and excellent wildlife cover, are but a few of the 
features offered by this property. Mixed stands of hard and softwoods, 
occasioned by lowland raarshed and woodsroads combine to provide an ideal 
wildlife area that abuts other wildlife lands in Division stewardship. 



SUMMARY OF LAND ACQUISITION 
FISCAL YEAR 1982 



AREA NAME 

Hous atonic River 

Moran Area 
Downfall Area 
Quaboag River 
Millers River 



TOWN 

Pittsfield 
Lenox 

Windsor 

Newbury 

Brookfield 

Athol 



ACREAGE 
14.20 

80.00 
5.70 
3.50 
125.00 



Total 



243.40 



-44- 




Maintenance&Development 



John P . Sheppard 
Chief 



Maintenance and Development 



Some of the activities of this section have already been mentioned 
under hatchery improvement activities. A summary of engineering and 
development projects for fiscal 1982 is noted here. 

Hatcheries 

Work was completed at the East Sandwich station of the Sandwich Fish 
Hatchery. The work consisted of construction of an underground water supply 
and drainage system, a new hatch house, roof structure, security fencing, 
a two-stage vertical group and bowl assembly and 15 exterior and 18 interior 
tanks. Dedication of said facility as the Arthur Sullivan Anadromous Fish 
Hatchery took place in the fall of 1981. Because of the insufficiency of 
the existing well water supply at this station, a contract was awarded to 
redevelop the existing supply well. 

At the main station of the Sandwich Fish Hatchery, a contract was 
awarded for a new gravel packed well. 

At the Palmer Experimental Salmon Station, six new tanks were delivered 
for use in the tiger muskie project. A new pump was installed and associated 
well work completed. A new 1,300 foot water distribution line was completed 
at this facility and the existing entrance roadway was paved. 

A vertical turbine pump and bowl assembly was installed at the McLaughlin 
Trout Hatchery in Belchertown. 

During this period, new roofs were installed on existing structures 
at the Montague and Sunderland Fish Hatcheries. 

Districts and Management Areas 

A contract was awarded for the regrading of the existing roadway 
and parking lot at the West Meadows WMA in West Bridgewater. Structural 
steel security gates were installed at a number of locations on wildlife 
management areas statewide. 



-45- 



Oth er 

The engineering section also provided technical assistance to other 
agencies within the Department including assistance to the Public Access 
Board for boat ramps at Comet Pond, Hubbardston, Snipatuit Pond, Rochester 
Monponsett Pond, Halifax and the Charles River in Waltham among others. 



-46- 



PERSONNEL ACTIONS 



Sixty-one personnel changes were undertaken during this fiscal year 
with the majority being promotions and retirements. The Division notes 
with sorrow the passing of William Humberstone, Skilled Conservation Help 
at the Sandwich Game Farm, on October 13, 1981. 



Retirements 



Name 



Job Title 



Date 



M. Perry 
P. Mugford 
W. Saville 
F. Bohlman 
J. Bigos 
L. LaBrie 
P. Mahoney 
W. Jajuga 
J. Robinson 
J . Kennedy 



Junior Clerk § Typist 
Senior Land Use Planner 
District Wildlife Manager 
Conservation Skilled Helper 
Conservation Helper 
Conservation Skilled Helper 
Game Bird Culturist 
Game Bird Culturist 
Conservation Skilled Helper 
Fisheries Manager 



08- 14-81 

09- 04-81 
02-06-82 
01-30-82 
01-29-82 
09-25-81 

08- 12-81 

09- 04-81 
12-05-81 
04-23-82 



Resignations 

S. Chase 

E. Pignatello 

C. McEvoy 

M. Brazauskas 

J. Jonasch 

P. Collins 

K. Hickey 

Appointments 

S. Foster 
W. Davis 
J. Kirvin 



Senior Clerk $ Typist 
Senior Clerk § Typist 
Senior Clerk § Stenographer 
Conservation Helper 
Assistant Aquatic Biologist 
Conservation Helper 
Conservation Helper 



Conservation Helper 
Conservation Helper 
Conservation Helper 



11-28-81 

08- 17-81 

09- 27-81 
04-27-82 

08- 08-81 
07-24-81 

09- 26-81 



05- 12-82 
04-27-82 

06- 30-82 



Appointments (Continued) 





Name 


Job Title 


Date 


M. 


Dumont 


Conservation Helper 


06-27-82 


K. 


Amara 


Junior Clerk § Typist 


06-14-82 


Promotions 






M. 


Berberian 


Prin. Clerk § Sec. to Dept. Head 


12-13-81 


T. 


Keefe 


District Wildlife Manager 


03-09-82 


C. 


Smith 


Confidential Secretary 


12-13-81 


N. 


Limosani 


Senior Clerk § Stenographer 


02-14-82 


D. 


St. James 


Conservation Skilled Helper 


03-22-82 


w. 


Dauderis 


Assistant Fish Culturist 


05-23-82 


A. 


Akins 


Assistant Fish Culturist 


09-30-81 


E. 


Bo 1 due 


Conservation Skilled Helper 


05-02-82 


L. 


Hoi lings 


Conservation Skilled Helper 


06-13-82 


H. 


Krieser 


Conservation Helper 


03-21-82 


W. 


Davis 


Conservation Skilled Helper 


05-24-82 


P. 


Orizzi 


Conservation Skilled Helper 


05-24-82 


A. 


Minalga 


Game Bird Culturist 


09-29-81 


J. 


Boudreau 


Game Bird Culturist 


03-14-82 


G. 


Galas 


Conservation Skilled Helper 


05-16-82 


K. 


Condon 


Senior Clerk § Typist 


02-21-82 


C. 


Ayers 


Assistant Fish Culturist 


08-30-81 


F. 


Sorocco 


Principal Clerk 


02-14-82 


A. 


Scotia 


Principal Clerk 


03-21-82 


P. 


Mirick 


Publicity Agent 


10-04-81 


E. 


Garofano 


Head Clerk 


01-23-82 


R. 


Costello 


Senior Bookkeeper 


12-15-81 


A. 


Gola 


Wildlife Rest. Proj . Field Agent 


05-02-82 


Other 






J. 


Nowakowski 


Conservation Helper 


01-06-82 


D. 


Spigarolo 


Junior Bacteriologist 


06-28-81 


E. 


Horwitz 


Publicity Agent 


04-04-82 


N. 


Limosani 


Senior Clerk § Typist 


01-04-82 


D. 


Viera 


Conservation Helper 


06-29-91 


M. 


Brideau 


Conservation Helper 


07-19-81 


P. 


Orizzi 


Conservation Helper 


04-04-82 


G. 


Galas 


Conservation Helper 


03-28-82 


J. 


Dixon 


Fisheries Manager 


05-25-82 


R. 


Lewis 


Junior Clerk § Typist 


02-24-82 


K. 


Corey- 


Junior Planner 


04-16-82 


S. 


Towns end 


Conservation Helper 


05-02-82 


P. 


Mirick 


Wildlife Journalist 


04-04-82 


T. 


Staples 


Conservation Skilled Helper 


05-16-82 


R. 


Costello 


Senior Clerk § Typist 


03-21-82 



-48- 



LEGISLATION 



Enacted During Fiscal Years 1981 and 1982 

Chapter 76 - Acts of 1981. An Act Establishing the Sandy Neck 
Governing Board of the Town of Barnstable. 

Chapter 268 - Acts of 1981. An Act Providing a Penalty for the 
Possession of an Altered, Forged or Counterfeited License to Carry a 
Firearm or a Firearm Identification Card. 

Chapter 286 - Acts of 1981. An Act Further Regulating the Sale of 
Ducklings. 

Chapter 541 - Acts of 1981. An Act Further Regulating the Sale of 
Ammunition. 

Chapter 571 - Acts of 1981. An Act Providing for Economic Incentives 
for Consumers to Return Used Beverage Containers and to Encourage the 
Conservation of Materials and Energy Through the Recycling and Reuse of 
Such Containers. 

Chapter 597 - Acts of 1981. An Act Further Regulating the Sale and 
Transfer of Firearms. 

Chapter 598 - Acts of 1981. An Act Further Regulating the Sale of 
Firearms. 

Chapter 628 - Acts of 1981. An Act Providing for a Massachusetts 
Clean Lakes and Great Ponds Program. 

Chapter 661 - Acts of 1981. An Act Relative to the Use of Certain 
Weapons During the Primitive Hunting Season. 

Chapter 716 - Acts of 1981. An Act Concerning the Establishment of 
a Connecticut River Atlantic Salmon Commission. 



-49- 



Chapter 741 - Acts of 1981. An Act Authorizing the Division of 
Capital Planning and Operations to Convey Certain Land in the Town of 
Sunderland to the Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service. 

Chapter 758 - Acts of 1981. An Act Relative to Certain Fish and Game 
Fees (Increase Fee Retained by Clerk) . 

Chapter 760 - Acts of 1981. An Act Transferring the Division of Law 
Enforcement from E.0 c E.A. to the Department of Fisheries, Wildlife and 
Recreational Vehicles. 

Chapter 767 - Acts of 1981. An Act Providing for Certain Improvements 
of the Personnel Administration in the Commonwealth and its Political 
Subdivisions (Civil Service Reform) . 

Chapter 808 - Acts of 1981. An Act Making Appropriations for the 
Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1982 to Providing for Supplementing Certain 
Existing Appropriations and for Certain New Activities and Projections 
($400,000 authorized a budgetary supplement). 



Chapter 39 - Acts of 1982. An Act Providing for the Use of Special 
Equipment by Handicapped Hunters. 

Chapter 287 - Acts of 1982. An Act Relative to the Acquisition by 
the Department of Environmental Management of South Cape Beach Town of 
of Mashpee. 

Chapter 602 - An Act Authorizing the Commissioner of Administration 
to Set Fees and Charges Paid to the Commonwealth. 



FINANCIAL REPORT 



Nancy Mel i to 
Head Administrative Assistant 



As the Division continued in the 1982 fiscal year to reduce 
expenditures and realize revenues, wherever possible, the Inland Fish and 
Game Fund notably evolved from a deficit condition (-$66,885.) at the 
beginning of the year to a surplus of $137,334. at fiscal closing on June 
30, 1982. 

Additional financial information, as detailed below, has been 
included in this year's annual report to summarize how the Inland Fish and 
Game Fund surplus or deficit is determined at the close of the accounting cycle 
Also, the format of the "Summary of Revenue Credited to the Inland Fish and 
Game Fund" has been changed through the use of categorical headings which it 
is hoped will more clearly illustrate revenue sources. 



CHANGES IN 
FISH AND GAME FUND BALANCE 
July 1, 1981 to June 30, 1982 



1981 

Continuing Accts. Brought Forward 
0612-1000 

Retirement Assessment $22,219-82 
2310-0300 

Dev. & Imp. of Facili- 
ties for Public Use 64,245.91 



$86,465.73 



1982 

Continuing Accts. Brought Forward 
0612-1000 

Retirement Assessment $17,271.48 
2310-0300 

Dev. & Imp. of Facili- 
ties for Public Use 39,262.45 
2350-0100 
*Law Enforcement 52,500.00 
Reserve for Encum- 
brances 1 4 ,894 .48 

$123,928.41 



1982 
1981 



$123,928.41 
-86,465.73 
$ 37,462.68 (Increase)** 



Balance July 1, 1981 (Deficit) -$ 66,885.30 

Total Revenue/Credits + 4,937,836.50 

Total Expenditures - 4,696,154.39 

Increase in Continuing Accts. Brought Forward 37,462.68 ** 

Balance June 30, 1982 (Surplus) +$ 137,334.13 



*$52,500. Supplementary Appropriation 

for Division of Law Enforcement 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE 
July 1, 1981 to June 30, 1982 

"HOW THE SPORTSMEN'S DOLLAR WAS SPENT" 



Account No. Expenditures 

Admini st rati on 

Administration 2310-0200 $ U5U,Ui1 .29 

Information -Education 2310-0200 lUl ,831 -99 $ 596,273-28 

Wildlife Programs 

Game Farms 2310-01:00 778,382.17 

Wildlife Management** 2310-CUOO 661*, 1*77.03 

Wildlife Cooperative Unit 2310-01*00 l6,0Q0.C0 1 ,1*60,359-20 

Fisheries Programs 

Fish Hatcheries 2310-01*00 697, 203- 71* 

Fisheries Management** 2310-01*00 1*06,252.85 

Fisheries Cooperative Unit 2310-01*00 18,000.00 1 ,1 21 ,1*56-59 

Nongame and Endangered 
Species Program 
Administration, Management 

and Research ' 2315-0100 32,202.79 

Land Acquisition 

Acquisition of Upland 
Areas and Inholding on 

Existing Areas*-** 2310-0310 1*9,931-19 

Engineering and Construction 
Development and Improvement 
of Facilities for Public 

Use* 2310-0300 85,210.87 

Dept. of Fisheries, Wildlife 
and Recreational Vehicles 
Natural Resource Officers' 

Salaries and Expenses 2020-0100 (30%) 1*39,1*91 -93 

Hunter-Safety Training**** 2020-0300 (100#) 66,311-69 

Transfers from Fund 

Group Insurance 1590-1007 21*6, 237-27 

Salary Adjustments 1*8,385.00 

Retirement Assessment (.2%) 0612-1000 283,286.33 

Interest on Bonded Debt 0699-2800 67,508.25 

Maturing Serial Bonds 

and Notes 0699-2900 199,000.00 

Total Expenditures $1*, 696,1 5U-39 
* Continuing Appropriation 

** Portions of expenditures 60% or 75$ reimbursable by Federal Government 

*** Certain land acquisitions are 50% reimbursable by Federal Government 
****100£ reimbursable by Federal Government 



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SUMMARY OF REVENUE CREDITED 
to the 

INLAND FISH AND GAME FUND 
July 1, 1981 to June 30, 1932 



Collected by Agency: 



F i s hi ng , Hun t ing & Trapping Licenses* 
Trap Registrations* 
Archery Stamps* 
Waterfowl Stamps* 

Waterfowl Stamps-Ducks Unlimited 
Special Licenses , Tags & Posters** 
Antlerless Deer Permits 
Bear Permits 

Turkey Permit Applications 

Turkey Permits 

Rents 

Refunds Prior Year 
Sales , Other 
Miscellaneous Income 



Collected by State Treasurer: 

Fines and Penalties 

Interest and Discount on Revenue 



Federal Aid Reimbursements: 

Pittman-Rober t son Federal Aid 
Dingell-Johnson Federal Aid 
Anadromous Fish Projects- 
Federal Aid 
Endangered Species Federal Aid 
Indirect Cost Reimbursement 



Taxes 



Gasoline Tax Apportionment 
Transfers from General Fund: 
Salary Adjustments 

Reimbursement on Half Price Licenses 

Reversions (Accounts Payable) 
Total Revenue : 



3304-61-01-40 
3304-61-01-40 
3304-61-01-40 
3 304-40-01-40 
3304-40-02-40 



3304-61- 
3 304-6 1- 
3 304-61- 
3304-61- 
3304-63- 
3304-69- 
3304-64- 
3304-69- 



14-40 
■14-40 

14-40 
■14-40 

01-40 
■01-40 

99-40 

99-40 



3308-41-01-40 
3395-60-01-40 



3304-67-01-40 
3304-67-02-40 

3304-67-04-40 
3304-67-11-40 
3304-67-67-40 



3 312-05-01-40 



$3 ,236 ,960 
1 , 287 
90 , 851 
7,847 
22,876 
11,363 
12 , 200 
982 
4,273 
13,320 
18 , 705 
492 
11 , 745 
2,682 



$3,43 5, 586 



1C 
Of 
0( 
0< 
6 
2< 
5< 
1 

2 

o 



30,338.5' 
8 , 056 . 5 



38,395.0 



432,759.9 
174 ,534.1 

67,738.9 
20,010.7 
229 , 167 . 8 



924 , 211.6 



$ 372,050.8 



$ 48,385.0 
67 , 671.7 



$ 116,056.7 
$ 51 , 536 . 2 



$4 ,937,836. 5 



*See Detail Sheet #1 
**See Detail Sheet #2 



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De'ta i I Sheet #2 I 



SPECIAL LICENSES , TAGS AND POSTERS 



Receipt Account 
3304-6 1-02-40 

3304-6 1-03-40 
3304-6 1-04-40 



July 1, 1981 to June 30 



1982 



3 304-64-0 1-40 



Type of License 

Fur Buyers 

Resident Citizens: 
Non-Res idents or Aliens 

Taxidermists 



Quantity S 
Unit Price 



29 
8 
92 



@ 15 
§ 50 
§ 10 



00 
00 
00 



Amo un t 



4 35.00 
400.00 



Propagators 

Special Purpose Permits : 144 I 1.00 144.00 
Class 1 (Fish) 

Initial : 

Renewal : 
Class 3 (Fish) 

Initial : 

Renewal : 
Class 4 ( Birds , Reptil 

Initial : 

Renewal : 
Class 6 (Dealers ) 



49 @ 7.50 

14 2 @ 5.00 

17 § 7.50 

7 3 @ 5.00 
.es , Mammals ) 

113 @ 7.50 

525 @ 5.00 



367 
710 

127 
365 

847 
2625 



50 
00 

50 
00 

50 
00 



Initial: 


10 


@ 


7 . 


50 


75 


.00 


Renewal : 


56 




5 . 


00 


280 


00 


Additional : 


14 2 


@ 


1 . 


50 


2 13 


00 



Class 7 (Individual 

Initial : 

Renewal : 
Importation Permits 

Fish : 

Birds or Mammals: 
Class 9 (Falconry) 



Bird or Mammal) 

6 § 3 . 00 18.00 

33 @ 1.00 33 . 00 

5 @ 5 . 00 25.00 

45 @ 5. 00 225.00 



Master : 


6 


@ 


25 


00 


150 


00 


Appr e n t ice: 


23 




25 


00 


575 


00 


General 


8 


@ 


25 


00 


200 


00 



Class 10 
Raptor 
Class 11 



( Falconry) 
Breeding : 
( Falconry) 



2 @ 10.00 



20.00 



Tags and Posters 



Re c e l pm 
Accouil 

Total ] 



8 3 5 . 0] 

9 20 . 01 











Raptor Salvage: 


10 


@ 


i 


.00 


: : , : : 


7,0 101 


3 304- 


6 1- 


05- 


40 


Take Shiners : 


119 


@ 


5 


00 






3 304- 


6 1- 


06- 


40 


Field Trial Licenses: 


5 


@ 


15 


. 00 




75 


3304- 


6 1- 


07- 


40 


Taking of Eels 


8 


@ 


2 5 


.00 




2001 


3 304- 


6 1- 


08- 


40 


Quail to Train Dogs 






















Initial : 


8 


§ 


7 


50 




60, 










Renewa 1 : 


28 


i 


5 


00 




140 


3 304- 


6 1- 


10- 


40 


Commercial Shooting 






















Pres erves : 


11 


@ 


50 


00 




5 50 j 


3 304- 


61- 


12- 


40 


Mounting Permits: 


2 


@ 


2 . 


00 




4 


3304- 


6 1- 


13- 


40 


Special Field Trial 






















Permits : 


30 


@ 


15 . 


00 




4501 



Game Tags : 


8952 


@ 


.05 


447 


60 




Fish Tags : 


3050 


4 


.02 


6 1. 


00 




Posters : 


300 


l 


.05 


15 . 


00 


5 23 



J 



$11 , 363fl 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MAR 1 4 1985 

MASSACHUSETTS STATE LIBRARY, 

1983 
ANNUAL 
REPORT 




Division of 
Fisheries & Wildlife 

m 

639M3 
C73r 
1983 





Director 



400 ^amkiefye f^Leet, SSorfon 02202 



His Excellency, Michael S. Dukakis, Governor of the Commonwealth, the 
Executive Council, the General Court, and the Board of the Division of 
Fisheries and Wildlife. 



Sirs: 

I have the honor to submit herewith the One Hundred Nineteenth 
Annual Report of the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, covering the 
fiscal year 1 July 1982 to 30 June 1983. 




Publication No. 13, 943-47-150-2-85-CR 

Approved by: Daniel Carter, State Purchasing Agent 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PAGE NUMBER 



The Board Reports 1 

Planning 4 

Fisheries 5 

Fish Hatcheries 9 

Wildlife 11 

Game Farms 2 1 

Nongame and Endangered Species 23 

District Reports 27 

Information and Education 30 

Realty 34 

Maintenance and Development 37 

Personnel Actions 38 

Legislation 41 

How the Sportsman's Dollar is Spent 42 



-1- 



THE BOARD REPORTS 



George Darey 
Chairman 



As in the past, the Board has continued its policy of holding its 
monthly meetings around the Commonwealth in locations selected to facilitate 
public participation and to allow board members to become familiar with 
new acquisitions or with sites of special interest. In addition, the Board 
continued to hold public hearings on issues ranging from routine matters, 
such as setting waterfowl season dates, to specific changes, such as the 
public meetings on changes proposed for deer hunting regulations or for 
trapping procedures. 

Personnel 

The Board noted with deep sorrow the passing of long time Board member 
Kenneth Burns on July 29, 1982. Burns had served the Board for 12 years. 
During the following months, Ray Whitaker of Winchendon was appointed 
Board representative from the Central Wildlife District to fill Burns' 
unexpired term. The Board notes also the passing on August 26, 1982 of 
former Board member Harry Darling. Staff during this period remained 
relatively stable marked only by routine appointments, promotions and 
retirements. One change of special note however, came with the departure 
of Assistant Director of Wildlife Research, Chet McCord, who left the 
wildlife profession to enter the ministry. His position is, at the 
present time, unfilled. 

Specific Actions 

The Board reviewed the status of furbearers in the Commonwealth and, 
as a result, voted changes in trapping dates and regulations . After two 
years of zoning, it was noted that there is now a surplus of beaver in 
the western zone. It was further noted that zoning is no longer necessary 
so it was voted that the season be opened statewide beginning November 23. 
Trap sizes and sets too were considered and changes made as recorded in 
the minutes. 

After extensive consideration during both 1982 and 1983, the Board 
initiated changes in bear hunting regulations establishing a split season 
with hunting permitted for one week beginning the last Monday of September 
(dogs permitted) and another week beginning the third Monday in November 
(dogs prohibited) . Hunting hours were established as ^ hour before sunrise 
to 4 hour after sunset to accord with other hunting hours. Weapons were 



limited to rifles .23 caliber or larger, bows and arrows as used in the 
archery deer season, muzzleloaders , .44-. 775 caliber, and pistols (see 
regulations) .357 magnum during the first of the two weeks. Pack size 
was limited to six dogs with replacement of no more than two per day and 
no relaying. The use of radio telemetry equipment in hunting bears was 
prohibited and telemetry on dogs was limited to training periods. 

Following the Division's proposal, extensive study by the Board and 
a prolonged period of public input marked by a series of informational 
meetings, changes were made in the deer hunting regulations . Ecologically 
based zones were adopted to replace counties as the basic unit of deer 
management. Zones will be accepted in 1982-83 and deer management will be 
shifted to the zones for the 1983 deer season. The shotgun season was 
lengthened to nine days throughout most of the state. It remained at six, 
however, on the Cape and the Islands. A two deer limit (only one of which 
may be antlerless) was established statewide, again excepting the Cape and 
the Islands. Archery hunting regulations were amended to permit bowhunters 
to possess a shotgun in their vehicle and a provision was passed permitting 
handicapped bowhunters to utilize a mechanical bow release. While changes 
in the dates of the primitive firearms season were rejected, the Board 
authorized the Director to permit the use of rifled barrel flintlocks 
but not caplocks during the primitive firearms season. 

Numerous changes were effected in fisheries regulations stemming 
from presentations and public hearings held during the previous year. 
These included establishment of an open season on Atlantic salmon year' 
round, establishment of an 18" size limit on brown trout or landlocked 
salmon taken from Quabbin Reservoir, and a two brown trout limit on all lakes 
and ponds. Twenty streams were added to this list of waters where the 
limit is six trout per day. Snagging of fish was prohibited. Special 
regulations in effect at Lout Pond, Plymouth and Windsor Reservoir, Dalton 
were eliminated and a new catch and release area, operational from July 1 
through Labor Day, to be established on the Deerfield River. 

After many years of groundwork, transfer was completed on lands of 
the former Gardner State Hospital . A tract of 1,600 acres was transferred 
from the Department of Mental Health to the Division of Fisheries and 
Wildlife. This area, to be known as the High Ridge Wildlife Management 
Area, offers outstanding opportunities for hunting, fishing and wildlife 
observation. As it is easily accessible from a number of populous areas, 
the Board anticipates that the tract will meet a wide variety of needs 
and interests. A regional office of Law Enforcement was authorized to 
use a surplus building by the Fisheries and Wildlife agency. The presence 
of this office will help control the area use. 

Other Concerns 

On a number of occasions, the Board has considered introduction of the 
white amur , a sterile hybrid fish, much touted for its role in weed control 
and seen as a possible alternative to environmentally questionable chemical 
agents. Mindful of the hazards of ill-considered introductions, the Board 
has adopted a cautious stance toward this proposal requesting the most 
thorough review of information regarding status of the amur in other areas 



-3- 



and experiences with the amur which might be relevant to the Commonwealth. 
Although a number of requests have been received from areas which would 
like to be considered as experimental sites for such introduction, the 
Board has not ^aken action on the proposal at this time because of the 
complications which could result from such introductions. 

Finances are always a matter of concern and the Board notes with 
pleasure the healthy state of the Division's finances which have survived 
the crisis of the previous year. Programs have remained intact and license 
sales appear solid despite a fee increase in March, 1982 and a succession 
of bad weekend weather during the spring of 1983, which is a key time for 
fishing license sales. Settlement of a long process of union contract 
negotiations resulted in considerable salary increases for many Division 
staff members. As a result, agency employees have gone from the lowest 
paid, as noted in a national survey of fish and wildlife employees, to 
a slightly higher than median position, thus, meeting a long-term goal 
for the Fisheries and Wildlife Board of highest priority. 

Planning within the Division continues to move forward both in 
development of a policy document and in creation of a strategic and 
operational plan. The Board has partially reviewed the policy document 
and will continue this process as needed and looks forward to reviewing 
the planning documents at a later date. 

The Board again reviewed the status of Massachusetts Wildlife 
which has, for financial reasons, been reduced to a single issue per year. 
Although groundwork has been prepared for subscription fees to be handled 
by a private non-profit conservation group and inquiries have been made 
of legislators regarding the possibility of establishing a fund or account 
to process subscription income, no action has been taken on this to date 
because of the complications involved. 

This year, again, the Board worked hard to obtain passage of a 
nongame checkoff provision. The bill, passed during the last fiscal year, 
was vetoed in the last moment. While the program is still far from reality, 
the latest version of the bill has been accepted by participating groups, 
passed by the legislature and prospects for its being signed into law are 
promising . 



-4- 



PLANNING 



Kristine L. Corey 
Junior Planner 



The Division's comprehensive planning effort focussed on the completion 
of a strategic plan draft for public review and input. Several additional 
species plans were completed and incorporated, as well as comments received 
from an earlier in-house review. This draft plan encompasses all areas of 
agency responsibility and, once approved, will become the basis for future 
work plans. 

Planning was the central theme for an all day employees conference 
held in March at the Marlboro Fish and Game Association. Attendees were 
informed by section chiefs of agency progress and plans in preparation for 
their involvement in the development of work plans. 

The annual meeting of northeast regional federal aid administrators 
focussedbn fish and wildlife planning efforts in the northeast. Massachusetts, 
along with Maryland and Pennsylvania, was invited to present the scope, 
status, problems and benefits of its planning program to those states in 
attendance . 



_5- 




FISHERIES 



Peter H. Oatis 
Assistant Director of Fisheries 



Anadromous Fish Management 
Merrimack River 

The Essex Fishway in Lawrence became operational in the fall of 1982. 
Sixteen Atlantic salmon were recovered and sent to the U. S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service in Nashua, New Hampshire. Interpretation of growth 
patterns on scales indicate that 25% of the run came from upriver releases 
of salmon fry. 

Although the fishway had some serious mechanical problems during the 
spring of 1983, it did successfully pass 5,508 shad, 4,797 herring, 2,835 
lamprey, 91 salmon and 50 striped bass. These fish, with the exception 
of the salmon, were provided access to the twelve miles of river between 
Lowell and Lawrence. Salmon were removed to the hatchery. Also, an 
additional 2,000 adult shad were transported from the Connecticut River 
to the upper Merrimack in an attempt to hasten the development of shad 
resources . 

Plans were approved for a fishway to be constructed at the Pawtucket 
Dam in Lowell by 1985. 

Jurisdictional problems arising between inland and marine fisheries 
relating to differences in regulations pertaining to the taking of salmon 
remain to be resolved. 



-6- 



Connecticut River 

The Connecticut River Atlantic Salmon Compact legislation was finally 
ratified by Congress. The compact allows citizen input on the development 
of salmon fishing regulations on the main stem of the Connecticut River. 
Anadromous fish passage at Holyoke totalled 530,000 shad, 450,000 herring, 
29,000 lamprey, 346 striped bass and 25 Atlantic salmon. 

Fish passage at Turners Falls was greatly improved due to modification 
of the pools at the Cabot Station. An estimated 12,705 shad successfully 
used the passage. This represents a significant increase over the 11 
shad, which negotiated the passage, in 1982. 

A total of 375,000 salmon smolts were released and are expected to 
return as adults in the spring of 1985. Strategic and operational plans 
for salmon restoration were completed and approved by the Policy Committee 
for Anadromous Fish Management of the Connecticut River. 

Hydrodevelopment in the upper basin continues to remain a concern 
especially in the tributaries capable of supporting natural production of 
salmon. 

Fisheries Survey and Inventory 

These studies provide base line data essential to managing and 
assessing inland fish resources and the impact of various environmental 
or sport fishing factors on natural or stocked fish populations. During 
the year, biological crews surveyed 113 stations on 80 streams bringing 
the total number of streams recently surveyed to 471 between 1979-1982. 
Seventy percent of these streams receive hatchery trout and 63% were 
found to support wild trout populations. Collections in the Millers 
River Watershed when compared with similiar surveys done in 1957 and 1968 
demonstrated significant changes in pH and loss of certain species known 
to be sensitive to acidity. 

Part I of the Massachusetts Stream Classification Program - Inventory 
of Rivers and Streams (completed in conjunction with the Division of Water 
Pollution Control) was completed and published in July. 

The Division maintained its annual creel survey of Quabbin Reservoir 
and continued investigations pertinent to smelt abundance. An estimated 
55,158 anglers spent 362,438 hours fishing the Quabbin to catch over 
45,000 fish. Major species harvested included lake trout and smallmouth 
bass. To augment future salmonid supplies, 17,300 landlocked salmon 
yearlings were released in May. These fish are expected to reach the 
legal 18 inch minimum length late in the summer of 1984. 

Fisheries crews also evaluated fish populations at 35 lakes and 
ponds throughout the Commonwealth. Recommendations stemming from these 
surveys provided the basis for introducing smelt and landlocked alewife 
populations into Lake Mattawa, Lake Chauncy, Five Mile Pond, Little 
Alum and Lake Lorraine. They also provide the data necessary for evaluating 



-7- 



the recent imposition of the 12 inch minimum length limit on bass. 
Introductions 

The introduction of tiger muskie yearlings predicated upon data 
stemming from these investigations was greatly curtailed as a result 
of the deliberate posioning of young muskies in the hatchery by vandals. 
The surviving muskies were released in the A-l Site, Westboro, Lake 
Quannapowitt , Wakefield, and Santuit Pond, Mashpee. In an effort to 
augment the diversity of game fish available within the state, a limited 
stocking (34,000 fingerling walleye) were released in Assawompsett Pond, 
Lakeville. It is hoped that these fish will support some limited 
recreation but more importantly serve as a brood supply of a desirable 
strain of walleye that may be introduced to other selected water access 
in the state during the next ten years. 

Technical Assistance 

Fisheries biologists and managers responded to numerous requests 
for technical assistance from other governmental and private agencies. 
Such requests cover the gamut of subjects ranging from assessing potential 
impacts of developing hydropower, evaluating various wetland alteration 
permits, collecting fish for toxic waste analysis and participating on 
numerous environmental and regulating committees. 

On the development side, Division personnel initiated the installation 
of stream improvement devices, the catch and release area of the Swift 
River in Belchertown, repaired roadways along the Squannacook River and 
limed three ponds: Big Sandy Pond, College Pond and Fresh Pond all in 
Plymouth. The purpose of liming these waters is to counter the potentially 
harmful effects associated with the increasing acidification of these 
waters . 

Considerable time, effort and money will have to be expended in 
the coming years as the impact of chronic release of sulphates and 
nitrates; the fundamental material for acid rain, continues to be a 
major source of unchecked pollution. 

Urban Angler 

Volunteer efforts, channeled through the Urban Angler Program, 
resulted in the certification of 75 fishing instructors. Eight fishing 
clinics were conducted exposing about 240 noice anglers to the art of 
fishing. Special assistance was also provided to the state of New 
Hampshire in helping them to set up a similiar urban fisheries program. 
Work with law enforcement officials culminated in a series of papers and 
regulation abstracts printed in Laotians and Himory. The Urban Angler 
Coordinater attended numerous sportsmen's and social events for the 
purpose of demonstrating fish cooking and preparation. 

The Urban Angler Coordinator presented the Massachusetts Urban 
Angler approach and program at the National Urban Angling Symposium 



-8- 



in Grand Rapids, Michigan. 

The sea-run brown trout program continued to receive the support and 
interest of its dedicated followers. Unfortunately, disease still ranks 
as a major problem with the culture of young smolts. Until this problem 
is resolved, there will be no expansion of this potentially great fishery. 



David Fredenburgh 
Chief Fish Culturist 



During fiscal 1983, the hatcheries produced 1,490,800 fish weighing 
508,950 lbs. Of that number, 1,164,700 were catchable size. 

Through authorization of a bond issued to the Division of Water 
Pollution Control, this Division received funding to construct the 
pollution control project at the McLaughlin Hatchery. The appropriation 
is 750,000 dollars and should be sufficient to do the final engineering 
work and actual construction. This is a project that has been in the 
works for over ten years. Hopefully construction will begin within the 
year . 

The tiger muskie program suffered a severe set back when vandals 
threw poison into the tanks killing over 11,000 fish. Only one tank 
escaped untouched leaving about 4,000 living fish. 

As expected, the Atlantic Salmon run was reduced in numbers from 
the previous year. Only 11 adult salmon were held at the hatchery 
resulting in the spawning of 35,000 eggs. The hatchery is also involved 
with raising Landlocked Salmon for stocking the Quabbin Reservoir. 

A new gravel-pack well was constructed at the Sandwich Hatchery. 
This will be used as backup for the main well that has been in 
continuous use for over 20 years. The Division has been involved with 
a local developer who plans to build a condominium project adjacent 
to the hatchery. Attention was given to the potential ground water 
pollution and surface runoff as it might affect the hatchery. The 
State Attorney General's Office, as well as the Department of 
Environmental Quality Engineering, assisted in developing a plan that 
the developer must follow as to minimize the effects of construction on 
the hatchery. Normal maintenance projects were carried out at all the 
other hatcheries with no major construction activity. 



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-11- 




Wayne F. MacCallum 
Assistant Director for Wildlife 



The Wildlife Research Section consists of one chief, three game 
biologists, two assistant game biologists, one restoration project field 
agent, and one conservation helper. This staff is responsible for 
research on and management of approximately 75 species of mammals, birds, 
reptiles, and amphibians which are traditionally hunted, trapped or 
otherwise taken for food, animal products, or sport. Additionally, the 
section is responsible for administering the Division's falconry 
program) for coordinating development of the Division's wildlife management 
areas, and for recommending to and advising the senior staff and Fisheries 
and Wildlife Board on matters of administration, regulation, and policy 
relative to the Commonwealth's wildlife resources. The section oversees 
three Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Projects (W-9-D, W-35-R, and 
W-42-R) comprising about 35 research jobs in addition to abour four other 
jobs conducted by the Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit 
and supervised by the Division. Section biologists also coordinate with 
the Realty, Planning and NonGame Sections when particular expertise on 
wildlife matters is needed. Summaries of current studies underway follow. 

WATERFOWL 

Pre-season Banding 

A total of 905 birds were banded during the 1982 pre-season banding 
segment; 404 wood ducks, 255 mallards, 90 black ducks, 6 mallard x black 
hybrids, 74 bluewinged teal, 67 greenwinged teal, 2 pintail and 1 hooded 
merganser . 



-12- 



Waterfowl Inventory Flight 

A total of 106,176 waterfowl were counted during the January 1983 
winter inventory, the lowest count in 10 years. Black ducks (16,843) 
were 27% below last years count and 19% below the 10 year average. Most 
species of waterfowl were down from last year except buffleheads and 
Canada geese. 

Winter Banding Program 

Unseasonably mild weather resulted in the poorest black duck trapping 
season on record - only 34 black ducks, 2 mallard x black hybrids, 22 
mallard and 19 pintails were banded. Thirty-six ducks were sampled for 
D.V.E. as part of a flywaywide monitoring program. 

Wood Duck Nest Structure Study 

Plastic wood duck nest structures were created by modifying gray, 5 
gallon plastic buckets with an entrance hole, wooden lid and drainage 
holes. These buckets were put up on angle irons, nailed to poles or 
mounted on top of stumps and equipped with wooden tunnel predator guards, 
plastic trash can lid predator shields, or aluminum downspout predator 
guards. Wooden boxes were of standard type. In addition, some areas 
had horrizontal stove pipe nest structures used in a previous starling 
deterrent study. 

No duck nests were started in either boxes or plastic buckets on 
13 new areas established the winter of 1981-82. Usage on 14 established 
wood duck box areas ran 22% for 45 buckets, 45% for 179 boxes and 33% 
for 12 cylinders. Boxes and cylinders were benefited by having previously 
been used by hens in past years. 

Biological Tagging of Wood Ducks 

This is an experimental technique developed at the Univeristy of 
Florida which allows northern hatched wood ducks to be identified by 
their blood parasite loads. It is necessary to establish baseline 
data for infection rate. To this end, Massachusetts-collected blood 
smears were read, and training sessions were held for a Maine Fish 
and Game Department Technician and two Worcester State College students. 

Park Waterfowl Project 

A total of 12,899 mallards, 1,672 black ducks, 1,976 Canada geese, 
124 coot along with 25 wigeon, 15 wood ducks, 17 pintails and 4 green- 
winged teal were counted at 140 locations in 81 communities across 
Massachusetts during the 13-24 January survey period. The 1983 mallard 
count was 3.6% higher than the previous 1978 count while the black duck 
count was down 1.0%. 



-13- 



Experimental Waterfowl Season Appraisal 

Massachusetts waterfowl harvest in 1982-83 declined 14% from the 
previous year, similar to a flyway decline but well below 3 other 
New England states. The state zoning experiment was changed to divide 
the inland zone into a western and central portion, each with independent 
seasons . 

TURKEY RESTORATION 

The fourth Massachusetts spring gobbler hunt was held during a two- 
week period in May 1983 in Berkshire County and parts of Franklin and 
Hampden counties. A total of 3,016 permits were allotted, with 184 
turkeys taken. The participation rate was 89.5% (2,685) and the hunter 
success rate was 6.8%. Berkshire County yielded 156 turkeys, Franklin 
County 16, and Hampden County 12. Adult turkeys weighed 13.0 - 21.9 
pounds gutted and immatures 10.3 - 17.0 pounds gutted. Adult males 
comprised 100 (54.3%) of the total kill. It is recommended that the 
entire area west of the Connecticut River be opened to turkey hunting 
in 1984. 

Eighty-five turkeys (55F, 30M) were captured and processed during 
winter trapping, for a mean capture rate of 2.60 turkeys per trap-hour 
and a mean success rate of 84.4%. Sixteen birds (12F, 4M) were released 
on West Brookfield State Forest; 17 (13F, 4M) in the Miller's River 
Wildlife Management Area, and 25 (18F, 7M) in Dudley, Worcester County. 
Eleven toms were legbanded and released at the capture site and 16 
additional birds (12F, 4M) were instrumented for study under Unit Job 
IV-4. 

MOURNING DOVE 

The total number of calling doves on three long-term standardized 
routes decreased 45% during 1982-83. Counts on all 18 comparable routes 
decreased 22% (226 to 175) from 1982 to 1983. 

WOODCOCK 

As a result of 33% decrease in the 1982 Woodcock Singing Ground 
Census, the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife Board elected to decrease 
the daily bag limit on woodcock from 5 birds to 2 birds during the 1982 
woodcock season. The reason for the dramatic decrease in birds was a 
major snowfall in April. Harvest during the 1982 season was subsequently 
reduced by 37%. 

Unfortunately, two April snowstorms struck again in 1983. Woodcock 
censuses were run on 12 randomized singing ground survey routes between 
28 April and 12 May. Counts showed that the number of woodcock heard per 
route had decreased to 1.31 birds; the lowest ever recorded in Massachusetts. 
The Division again recommended to the Fisheries and Wildlife Board that a 
2 woodcock per day bag limit be imposed for the fall of 1983 hunting season. 



-14- 



FALCONRY 

For Fiscal Year 1983, the ranks of the falconers remained stable with 
16 apprentice, 11 general and 6 master falconers permits issued. The more popul 
bird was again the redtailed hawk. Two breeding and nine salvage permits 
were also issued. 

BEAVER 

The 1982-83 beaver season was changed to run from 23 November to 28 
February statewide. During this season, a total of 584 beaver were taken 
by 77 trappers in 83 towns. This take represented a decrease of only 10 
beaver (1.7%) from 1981-82. Changes were most evident in Franklin (harvest 
down) and Hampshire counties in the western zone and Essex and Middlesex 
counties in the eastern zone (harvest up) . Kit beaver approximated slightly 
more than one-third of the harvest, approaching levels similar to that 
prior to the record harvest of 1979-80. Average pelt prices were the 
lowest recorded since 1970-71. 

OTTER AND FISHER 

The 1982-83 otter season was revised to run from 23 November to the 
last day of February, statewide. The 1982 fisher season (as in 1981) 
extended through the month of November. During these seasons, 47 successful 
trappers took a total of 106 otter in 60 towns for a mean take of 2.3 
otter per successful trapper. This compares with a take of 90 and a 
mean take of 1.7 in 1981-82. 

The fisher take increased from 116 in 1981 to 140 in 1982, with 64 
successful trappers taking a mean of 2.2 fisher each among 58 towns 
(54 trappers, mean of 2.1 in 1981). 

Worcester (32), Berkshire (16), and Franklin (14) counties yielded 
the most otter, with Worcester (73), Franklin (31), and Essex (26) 
the most fisher. Nine preliminary aquatic furbearer zones were developed 
with zone 02 (30) the highest in otter take. 

A total of 28 otter and 136 fisher carcasses were received from 
cooperating trappers. The mean age of otter in 1982-83 was 1.97 and 
of fisher 1.56. This compares with 1.88 for otter and 1.41 for fisher 
in 1980-81. All (5, 100%) of the otter aged 2.5 and above and 15 (71.4%) 
of the fisher aged 1.5 and above taken during 1982-83 had been bred. 
This compares with figures of 100% for otter and 68.2% for fisher in 
1981-82. Average corpora lutea counts were 2.4 and 2.9 for otter and 
fisher, respectively, in 1982-83 and 3.0 and 2.5, respectively, in 
1981-82. 

BOBCAT 

A total of 37 bobcats were taken in 1982-83, including 18 by 
hunting, 14 by trapping, and five road kills. The mean take per hunter 
was 1.1 and per trapper 1.2. Bobcats were trapped predominantly in 
November (71.4%) and hunted in January (55.6%). Bobcats are low in 
trapper selectivity (7.1%) and moderately high (55.5%) in hunter 



-15- 



selectivity. In 1982-83, bobcats were taken in 27 towns in five counties. 
Immature bobcats (0.5 age class) comprised 38.2% of the take. 

COYOTE 

A total of 31 coyotes were taken by 24 sportsmen in 22 towns and six 
counties during the 1982-83 hunting season. Two-thirds of the kill was in 
November, with nearly one-half (48%) taken by hunters targeting for coyote. 
Pups comprised 54% of the harvest, as compared to 80% in 1981-82. Eight 
non-hunting mortalities were recorded. 

FURBUYER HARVEST TALLIES 

A total of 29 furbuyers submitted annual reports, of these, 11 did not 
buy any furst from Massachusetts trappers or hunters. The remaining 
18 purchased 25,482 muskrat , 810 mink, 105 otter, 46 skunk, 11,657 raccoon, 
81 fisher, 820 red fox, 336 grey fox, 628 beaver, 27 bobcat, 35 coyote, 
165 oppossum, and 22 weasels. 

The results of four fur auctions held by the Bay State Trappers 
Association were weighed and tabulated to give a yearly average. The 
average prices for 1982-83 were muskrat $3.51, mink $17.64, otter $27.06, 
skunk $.60, raccoon $5.36, fisher $95.97, red fox $34.87, grey fox $32.64, 
beaver $11.43, bobcat $75.27, coyote $22.80, oppossum $.80. 

BLACK BEAR 

Several changes in the bear hunting regulations were made in 1982- 
including extending the season to two weeks, prohibiting radiotelemetry 
devices, and restricting use and pack size of hunting hounds. A total 
of 823 bear hunting permit applications were received in 1982 and 13 
bears were taken, all during the first week of the season. This was the 
greatest kill on record. Nine males and four females were taken from 
Berkshire (1), Hampden (1), Franklin (5) and Hampshire (6) counties. 
Ten non-hunting mortalities were tallied, including seven road kills, 
one illegal kill, one nuisance kill, and one capture mortality. Eleven 
nuisance complaints, including seven beehive depredations, were recieved. 

DEER 

The 1982 statewide deer harvest for all seasons combined was 4,002 
deer, which is a decrease of 1,009 over the 1981 harvest of 5,011. 
Seventy-six (76%) of the deer harvest was reported in the four western 
counties of Berkshire, Franklin, Hampshire and Hampden. Worcester County 
contributed 11% (435 deer) of the total harvest and Barnstable County 
2% (99). The islands of Dukes and Nantucket counties, contributed 2% 
(80 deer) and 3% (136 deer) of the total. Management Zones I and II 
combined contributed 4% (175 deer) to the overall total. Hunters' 
bag limit was changed to two (2) deer, - one of which could be an antlerless 
deer . 

A total of 3,265 deer was taken during the December shotgun-only 
season, including 2,210 antlered males and 1,055 antlerless deer. Archers 
took 446 deer (264 bucks, 182 does) and primitive firearm hunters bagged 282 



-16- 



(116 bucks, 166 does). Paraplegic sportsmen harvested 9 (5 bucks, 4 does) 
during their special season. 

Successful hunters taking an antlered male during any season were 
allowed to hunt and take a second deer - but during the shotgun season only, 
a hunter must have been issued an antlerless permit to harvest an 
antlerless deer. 

A total of 46,392 applications were received for an allotment of 
antlerless deer permits for the 14 deer management zones and 475 additional 
farmer-landowner permits were issued. 

Natural Resource Officers reported a total of 680 non-hunting deer 
mortalities during calendar year 1982. Road kills (436, 64%) were the 
most prevalent source of mortality, followed by illegal kills (48, 7%), 
dogs (118, 17%), and miscellaneous causes (78, 12%). 

STUDIES CONDUCTED UNDER CONTRACT WITH THE MASSACHUSETTS COOPERATIVE WILDLIFE 
RESEARCH UNIT 

In July 1982, a contract (renewable annually) was instituted with the 
Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit at the University of 
Massachusetts, to conduct studies under the Federal Aid in Wildlife 
Restoration Act applicable to the needs and interests of the Division. 
Studies on black bear and raccoon, formerly funded under a smaller Division 
grant, were transferred to contract funding. Two new contract studies, 
on bobcat and wild turkey, were instituted in the fall of 1982. 

1 . Black Bear Home Range, Movements, and Habitat Use in Massachusetts 

Intensive monitoring efforts ended in July 1982. Location data from 
29 bears (9 males - 20 females) were analyzed with the aid of the "Telem" 
program compiles 1:24000 map overlays showing time, date, and locations in 
desired time-date intervals for each bear. Overlays were used in conjunction 
with a detailed habitat map of the main study area (about 300 sq. km.). 
Preferred and important seasonal habitats were identified to determine 
effects of habitat on home range size, range quality and bear densities. 
Collars were changed on all denned bears during February and March 1983. 
Three new bears were instrumented in August 1982 and one yearling male 
recaptured. Three more new bears were instrumented in June 1983 and one 
male and one female recaptured. 

The next phase of the bear study will be preparation of the final 
report of home range, movements, and habitat use, followed by initiation 
of a new job on bear reproduction and sow-cub behavioral interactions. 

2 . Population Dynamics, Home Range, and Movements of Raccoons in Western 
Massachusetts 

The final report on this job was completed by PhD candidate Glenn 
Olson. An abstract is presented below. 



-17- 



The value of raccoon pelts in Massachusetts has increased from $1,447 
in 1964 to $558,840 in 1981, while harvest has increased from 965 to 23,000. 
During 1980 and 1981, 496 raccoons were collected. A sex ratio of 52.1% 
males and 47.9% females were found with 47.9% juveniles in the sample. 
Mean number of placental scars per breeding female was 3.60 (N=62) , with 
29.0% of females having placental scars. Juvenile females comprised 50.4% 
and 84.6% of yearling females failed to breed. A positive correlation 
(p 0.05) was found between female body weight and number of placental scars. 
Body weight and length varied (p 0.05) with area of the state from which 
raccoons were harvested. During the two seasons, an additional 2,649 pelts 
were examined and a correlation between pelt length and age/sex categories 
(p 0.01) was discovered. Raccoons from exploited and unexploited areas 
were intensively monitored in western Massachusetts. Juvenile yearlings 
comprised 60.7% of exploited population and only 25.0% of unexploited 
populations. Mean age of the exploited population (1.82 years) was 
significantly lower than the unexploited population (3.52 years). Both 
populations selected against heavily wooded areas. Activity patterns 
were similar in each area with onset of activity at 1900 hr., a lull 
at 0000 hr. and activity ceasing at 0700 hr. Population density was 
lower in the exploited area, while mean number of placental scars per 
adult female was higher. Raccoons visited 90% of their home ranges within 
20 days of radio-tracking. Exploited adult female home ranges were 
significantly larger than unexploited adult males. Management recommendations 
included continuing to monitor harvest, sex and age ratios, and establish 
guidelines for future management decisions. 

3 . Ecology and Status of the Bobcat in Western Massachusetts 

Trapping started in December 1982 and continued through March 1983. 
Nine bobcats (5 males - 4 females) captured 33 times in box traps, were 
weighed, measured, and collared with radio-transmitters. Movement, 
activity, and habitat data are presently being obtained. One female 
apparently had kittnes in May and lost her transmitter in June; retrapping 
efforts were unsuccessful. 

Snow-tracking data were obtained from 12 days of tracking 6 collared 
bobcats (3 males - 3 females) . Snow-tracking observations have been made 
to evaluate habitat use, feeding habits, behavior, and intraspecif ic 
interactions . 

Thirty-two harvested bobcat carcasses were obtained from the 
Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife. Sex, age and female 
reproductive status were determined from the carcasses, along with weight 
and length measurements. The digestive tract contents were removed for 
food habits analysis. 

4 . Wild Turkey Population Dynamics 

Trapping efforts in January and February 1983 provided 16 birds 
(4 males, 12 females) for the study. All instrumented birds were monitored 
through the winter to obtain data on habitat use and survival. Monitoring 
efforts during and following spring dispersal concentrated on hens in order 
to detect onset of nesting behavior. All hens will be monitored through the 



-18- 



breeding season to provide information on productivity. Hens with broods 
will be monitored through the summer to obtain data on brood habitat use. 

Three hens died during the winter monitoring period; 2 were lost to 
predation and 1 may have been illegally killed. Three hens were also lost 
during the breeding season in what appears to be similar cases of harness 
breakage . 

WILDLIFE SPECIES FILES 

The final report for this study was completed, covering the two 
systems described below. 

A manual filing system consolidating information on classification, 
distribution, harvests and trends, literature and life history on the 
vertebrate wildlife of Massachusetts was developed. Files were established 
on 86 game, unprotected and falconry birds and mammals; 79 "species for 
special consideration"; and four other species. These files are updated 
periodically. 

An interactive computer program was developed to generate distributional 
information on the wildlife of Massachusetts. Data can be generated 
either by location or by species. About 12,100 line entries pertaining 
to mammals have been coded, of which about 6.8% has been computerized. 
Additional coding and entries pertaining to mammals have been coded, of 
which about 6.8% has been computerized. Additional coding and entries 
will be made periodically. A User's Manual for this program was developed. 

MAST SURVEY 

District offices surveyed their oak plots in August to determine 
acorn production. There were 89 permanent oak plots across the state 
consisting of 39 white oak plots (374 trees) and 50 red oak plots (488 
trees) . These plots were all surveyed during August to determine acorn 
production. In addition, a subjective mast report was distributed to 
interested volunteers throughout the state, to collect general data on a 
wide variety of wildlife food crops. 

White oak production was again nearly a complete failure all across 
the state except for Central District which attained a poor rating. 
Red oak production was also very low, with failure everywhere except 
Southeast and Western Districts which achieved poor ratings. Cherry, white 
ash, dogwood, blackberry and raspberries seemed to produce well while 
production from other soft mast species was relatively low. 

STATEWIDE WILDLIFE DEVELOPMENT (W-9-D PROJECT) 

The "9-D" Project is concerned with the operation of our wildlife 
management areas. 

This includes all public access work such as roads, trails, parking 
lots and signs, as well as actual wildlife habitat work such as field 
management, forest management and planting. The project has an additional 



-19- 



function in that it is responsible for the erection and maintenance of 
nesting structures, i.e., wood duck boxes, loon nesting rafts on Quabbin 
Reservoir, and osprey nesting platforms. 

Below is a summary of work done between 1 July 1982 and 30 June 1983: 

1. Buildings : Maintained 17 buildings on 10 areas. 

2. Dams : Maintained 3 water control structures on 3 areas. 

3. Bridges: Maintained 1 vehicular bridge and 2 foot bridges on 2 

areas . 

4. Roads and Trails : One-half mile of trail was developed on one 

area, 47.5 miles of roads were maintained on 6 
areas, and 32.7 miles of trails were maintained 
on 14 areas. 

5. Fences : A fence of 0.9 miles was erected on one area and 7.6 miles 

were maintained on the same area. 

6. Parking Lots : Three lots were constructed on one area and 53 lots 

were maintained on 13 areas. 

7. Waterfowl Blinds : A total of 15 waterfowl blinds were maintained 

on 2 areas. 

8. Signs : One hundred sixty-four signs were erected on 6 areas and 

8.5 miles of boundaries were posted on 4 areas. 

In addition, 1,262 signs on 29 areas were maintained and 60.5 
miles of boundaries were checked and reposted on 27 areas. 

9. Tree and Shrub Planting : On 4 areas, a total of 1,100 shrubs and 

100 trees were planted. 

10. Vegetation Control : Brush was controlled on 296 acres in 15 wildlife 

areas . 

11. Timber Management : Nine acres was selectively cut on 2 areas. 

12. Nesting Structures : One hundred fifty-six wood duck nesting boxes 

were erected statewide and 940 boxes were 
maintained. Three osprey nesting platforms were 
constructed in the Southeast District and 3 
loon nesting rafts were placed on Quabbin Reservoir. 

13. Herbaceous Seeding : Fields were maintained by planting and fertilizing 

on 8 areas totalling 291 acres and an additional 
1,671 acres of open land on 19 areas were managed 
by co-operative agreements with local farmers. 



-20- 



14. Clearing : Two acres of a red maple stand was cleared on one area to 

promote sprout growth. 

15. Water Level Management : Water levels were manipulated on one area of 

160 acres to encourage growth of emergent 
vegetation. 

16. Managed Public Hunts : Managed public hunts were held on 4 areas (2 

for waterfowl, 1 for pheasant, 1 for deer). 

17. Gates : Newly constructed gates totalled 16 on 6 areas, and 26 gates 

were maintained on 8 areas. 

18. Fence Removal : Approximately, one-half mile of old fencing was 

removed from 1 area. 



Additional time was spent by the project leader and District personnel 
in planning work, submitting reports and ordering supplies. 

District personnel also spent time repairing and maintaing equipment 
bought for and used on the project, and time was also used in inspecting 
ongoing work and checking each area. 



-21- 




E. Michael Pollack 
Chief Game Biologist 



Game farm personnel performed routine maintenance such as pen 
replacement and construction. Efforts continued to automate the Division's 
propagation operation. Feed formulas and management techniques were 
reviewed to update this important program. 



-22- 



Game Farm Production 
Fiscal Year 1983 



Pheasant 



Game Farm 


SR 


A 


B 


C 


PG 


Misc .* 


Totals** 


Sandwich 


50 




1,008 


1,696 


4,016 


600 


6,770 


Wilbraham 


1,890 




2,780 


4,768 


5,140 


150 


14,728 


Ayer 


2,435 


60 


1,504 


4,428 


8,316 


550 


16,743 


Totals 


4,375 


60 


5,292 


10,892 


17,472 


1,300 


38,241 


^Miscellaneous 


- Cocks 


and hens 


for field 


trials , 


displays, ; 


youth hunt, 


etc . 



approximate numbers. 
**Totals are for cock birds only. 



Quail 



A total of approximately 2,820 quail, produced at the Sandwich Game Farm, were 
released on the wildlife management areas in the Southeast Wildlife District. In 
addition, approixmately 600 quail were distributed for field trial purposes. 



White Hare 



A total of 800 white hare were purchased from a dealer in New Brunswick, Canada 
for release in Massachusetts covers. 



-23- 




NON-GAME AND ENDANGERED SPECIES 



Bradford G. Blodget 
Assistant Director 
Nongame and Endangered Species 



The Nongame and Endangered Species Program continued operations in 
Fiscal Year 1983 despite ongoing funding difficulties. Administration 
cuts in endangered species Federal-aid monies allotted to Massachusetts 
were mostly offset by alternate Federal-aid arrangements under the Pittman- 
Robertson Act. The program's basic budget was augmented by the Bald Eagle 
Trust established in Fiscal Year 1982. 

Despite funding shortfalls, Fiscal Year 1983 was a year of significant 
progress for the program. The program was strengthened by the new ad-hoc 
Nongame Advisory Committee appointed in Fiscal Year 1982. The Committee 
took a particularly bold and vigorous lead in solving the program's historic 
funding problems, supporting legislation that would establish a nongame 
wildlife check-off on the state income tax form. The same legislation would 
further strengthen the program by transferring the Massachusetts Natural 
Heritage Program from the Department of Environmental Management into the 
Division of Fisheries and Wildlife. Work continued on a number of projects 
including Bald Eagle Restoration, Plymouth Red-bellied Turtle Studies, and 
various wildlife inventories. Highlights of the year's operations include: 



-24- 



Nongame Advisory Committee 

This seven-man committee met monthly during Fiscal Year 1983 with the 
Assistant Director and provided guidance and direction on numerous issues. 
Included in their discussions were (1) review and revision of the Division 
Policy (2) development of a statement of goals and objectives (3) planning 
priorities (4) identification of strategies to effect passage of the Nongame 
Check-Off Legislation (5) program budget including consideration of added 
staff and (6) general programmatic review. The Committee also discussed 
promotional techniques to make the income tax check-off successful (if the 
measure becomes law) . Tentative plans were developed for an art contest 
to develop a program logo. The Eastern Cougar Study, the Impact of Human 
Visitation to Quabbin Reservation on the Bald Eagle and the Plymouth Red- 
bellied Turtle Study was discussed at length. 

Income Tax Check-off Legislation 

The Division continues to press for the check-off as the fairest and 
most desirable funding scheme for nongame programs at this time. Included 
in this legislation as written are certain provisions intended to streamline 
and strengthen the nongame program such as the transfer of the Natural 
Heritage Program into the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife. 
This would strengthen the existing Nongame and Endangered Species Program, 
as functions would be merged and unnecessary duplication eliminated. 
Management cannot predict the eventual outcome of the legislation, but it 
appears more likely than ever before that eventual passage will occur. In 
anticipation of passage, Fiscal Year 1985 draft expenditure plans will be 
developed based on anticipated revenue of $400,000 in the first year. 

Bald Eagle Restoration 

Bald Eagle hacking activities continued at Quabbin Reservoir. Two 
eaglets secured from Michigan were raised on the hack tower, equipped 
with wing-tags and tail-mounted radio transmitters and released on 
July 29, 1982. One assumed female flew to Ottawa, Canada shortly after 
release and was not tracked beyond that point nor seen again as of June 
30, 1983. The assumed male continued to frequent the Quabbin area right 
through the period. 

Michigan declined to provide birds for translocation in 1983 due to a 
serious dip in productivity in that state. Program personnel working in 
conjunction with the states of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, the Province 
of Manitoba, the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Canadian Wildlife 
Service, developed a complicated arrangement whereby Massachusetts would 
receive four Manitoba-born eaglets in early July, 1983. This project 
will continue through 1986. 

Bald Eagle Winter Survey 

Statewide survey activities on January 8, 1983 revealed 23 bald eagles 
and three golden eagles. Twenty bald eagles and all the golden eagles were 
counted in Quabbin Reservation. 



-25- 



Plymouth Red-bellied Turtle 

Despite continued netting of turtles and investigation of new leads 
by Terry Graham, the research contractor, no new populations have been 
found and the estimated population estimate remains at about 250 animals. 
Addition of new increments of life history data have slowed and reports 
indicate that the population is experiencing extremely poor recruitment 
due in the main to severe predation by skunks and raccoons. Accordingly, 
a decision was made in Fiscal Year 1983 to begin moving away from basic 
life history studies in favor of directed management actions. 

Nongame Wildlife for Special Consideration in Massachusetts 

A second edition of this listing was produced in Fiscal Year 1983 
and quickly became dubbed "The Massachusetts Redbook." A comparison 
listing, Native Plants for Special Consideration in Massachusetts was 
also produced in conjunction with the Natural Heritage Program. 

Great Blue Heronry Inventory 

Active nests in the state rose from 124 in 1982 to 191 in 1983. Brood 
size among all colonies was 2.9 young/nest compared to 2.2 in 1982. Total 
known production of 489 young was more than double the 240 young counted in 
1982. 

Tern Inventory and Management 

Roseate Tern experienced the most dramatic change in 1983, dropping 
24% from 1,986 pairs in 1982 to 1,502 pairs in 1983, the lowest number of 
pairs recorded since 1978 when 1,322 pairs were recorded. Unfortunately, 
Monomoy, Chatham has been lost as a secondary colony with only Bird Island 
remaining as a principal site. In 1983, 93% of the Roseate population were 
at Bird Island. 

The Artie Tern picture continued to deteriorate badly with a fifth 
straight year of decline from 53 pairs in 1978 to only 18 pairs at five 
stations in 1983. 

On a brighter note, Common Tern numbers rose to 7,909 pairs at 20 
stations compared to 7,577 pairs at 22 stations in 1982. Least Tern 
continued a rising trend reaching their highest level in history at 
1,112 pairs. The mainland-nesting Least Terns seems to be a chief 
beneficiary of management by string-and-stake posting, whereas the larger 
terns nest mostly on off-shore islands where the benefits are not as 
dramatic and obvious. Also, the nesting habits of the larger terns 
seem to place them in direct competition with gulls for limited island 
nesting space. 

Piping Plover Survey 

During the 1983 nesting season, data on this coastal-nesting shorebird 
were collected incidental to tern colony census efforts. Seventy (70) 
pairs were reported from 33 stations. The world population of Piping 
Plover may not exceed 1,600 pairs and concern has grown that the species 



-26- 



is vanishing in many parts of its range. Few historical records are 
available. Preliminary information suggests that Massachusetts may harbor 
one of the largest breeding populations in the United States. This 
inventory will be expanded in 1984 with more systematic data collection. 

Bat Studies 

Inspection of western Massachusetts bat hibernacula produced the 
following tallies of bats present: Bats Den Cove, Egremont - 10 little 
brown bats, 18 Pipistrelles , 6 Keen's Bats, 1 big brown bat and 3 
unidentified Myotids; Chester Emery Mines - 207 little brown bats, 83 
Keen's Bats, 25 Pipistrelles, 1 unidentified Myotid. No Indiana Bats 
an endangered species were discovered at either location. Each year, 
program biologists examine additional hibernacula; gradually a more 
complete picture of the status of these mysterious and often misunderstood 
mammals is emerging. 

Breeding Bird Inventory 

High Ridge Wildlife Management Area - On May 28, June 2 and 3, a 
general breeding bird inventory was conducted at High Ridge in Gardner. 
Eighty specieswere found including high numbers of bobolinks and chestnut- 
sidea warblers. Program plans call for similiar surveys elsewhere which 
will enable the Division to keep a record of lists on its management areas 
and wildlife lands. 

Osprey Project 

During Fiscal Year 1983, in conjunction with Commonwealth Electric 
Company, osprey nesting poles were installed at South Cape Beach, Mashpee 
and the North River Marshes in Marshfield on March 24, 1983 and at Federal 
Pond in Carver, June 15, 1983. The program supplies technical guidance in 
site selection and Commonwealth Electric Company provides hardware, manpower 
and equipment at a cost of about $600/installation. 

The Osprey Project is clearly beginning to bear fruit. A record number 
of ospreys (60 pairs) nested in Massachusetts during 1983 and produced a 
record number of young (123), a figure nearly double the young fledged in 
1982. 



-27- 



DISTRICTS REPORTS 



Northeast District, Walter L. Hoyt, District Wildlife Manager 
Southeast District, Louis Hambly, District Wildlife Manager 
Central District, G. Christopher Thurlow, District Wildlife Manager 
Connecticut Valley District, Herman Covey, District Wildlife Manager 
Western District, Tom Keefe, District Wildlife Manager 



The five wildlife districts are the field units of the Division of 
Fisheries and Wildlife working directly on Division properties, conducting 
field research under the supervision of project biologists and serving as 
liaison with sports, conservation groups and the general public. During 
the 1983 fiscal year, personnel from all districts stocked trout, pheasants, 
and varying hare and operated checking stations at which hunters checked 
in deer, turkeys and where trappers checked in their pelts. They assisted 
the Department of Law Enforcement in enforcing wildlife regulations and 
monitored controlled hunts at the Delaney Wildlife Management Area (Northeast) , 
Otis Air Force Base (Southeast) and Ludlow Wildlife Management Area 
(Connecticut Valley) . 

District staff members also took part in on-going research projects 
such as waterfowl inventory and the mid-winter eagle survey. They conducted 
mourning dove and woodcock censuses, and took part in a statewide mast crop 
survey. Staff members of the Connecticut Valley District also became 
involved in work on the black bear research project being conducted through 
the University of Massachusetts, while members of the Western District staff 
worked closely with research personnel from Westboro and from the University 
on the wild turkey program. In this context, they scouted birds, made and 
maintained contact with landowners and assisted in trapping birds to be 
moved to other portions of the Commonwealth. Field crews assisted the 
wood duck research program by putting up, cleaning and maintaining wood duck 
nesting boxes as needed and the Southeast District staff did the same with 



-28- 



houses for purple martins. 

As in the past, District personnel responded to public inquiries, 
picked up injured animals and fielded complaints about nuisance animals 
by providing advice, loaning traps and where necessary, by moving beaver. 
During this year, the District staff members also took on additional 
activities as the Nongame and Endangered Species Program gathered momentum. 
Staff members from the Central and Connecticut Valley Districts assisted 
in the eagle restoration project at Quabbin, staff of the Western Wildlife 
District became involved in the statewide survey of heron rookeries, staff 
of the Northeast District surveyed sanctuaries for unusual plants and animals 
and confirmed the presence of the rare silverling on the Carr Island Sanctuary, 
Salisbury. Staffers from all districts participated in the statewide survey 
of breeding salamanders. 

Fisheries staff members of all districts were heavily involved in 
conducting investigations into the water chemistry of selected ponds and 
streams to determine species composition of fish populations, growth rates 
and productivity of the waters. Special emphasis was placed on monitoring 
the pH of these waters as concern increased over the accelerating acidification 
of ponds in the Commonwealth. The only mitigation measure practiced was 
liming which was undertaken on Laurel Lake, Lee; Comet Pond in Hubbardston; 
and eight ponds in the Southeast District. 

The fisheries staff participated in fisheries surveys as needed and 
in projects specialized to their area. This brought staff from the Northeast 
District to the Essex Dam where they assisted in monitoring and operating 
the new fish lift. Staff of the Connecticut Valley District prepared special 
cages for trout which they used to monitor trout survival prior to stocking 
the Millers River for the first time in 20+ years while staff of the Southeast 
District assisted in efforts to improve the Mattapoisett River for the sea-run 
brown trout fishery. 

Time not spent in the above mentioned activities was spent in technical 
review of a wide assortment of projects deemed to have a possible impact on 
fisheries or wildlife and in maintenance of vehicles, facilities and wildlife 
management areas. This activity which forms a large portion of the 
responsibilities of the Districts, involved maintenance of roadways and 
parking areas, posting of boundaries, cutting, brushing, mowing and planting. 
In both the Connecticut Valley and Central Districts some of the lumber cut 
for removal was subsequently milled and the Birch Hill area of the Central 
District reported milling more than 10,000 of pine lumber. Major improvement 
efforts were focussed on the Crane Pond Wildlife Management Area and Myles 
Standish Wildlife Management Area in the Southeast District and on the High 
Ridge Wildlife Management Area in the Central District. 

Division staff members distributed hunting/ fishing licenses and related 
stamps, regulations and informational material to over 450 license sales 
outlets, and picked up sales returns from the same. Personnel from most 
districts participated in one or more major exhibits helping to make the 
Division and its activities more visible to the general public and respond 
to inquiries from the sporting public. In addition to doing this at 
exhibits, such as the Eastern States Exposition, the Eastern Fishing 



-29- 



Exposition, the Boston Camping and Outdoor Show and the Topsfield Fair, staff 
members presented programs for clubs, civic organizations, sportsmen's groups 
and school groups as possible. 




-30- 



I 



INFORMATION & EDUCATION 



Ellie Horwitz 
Chief 

Information and Education 



Press Contacts 

Expansion of existing programs made fiscal 1983 a very active year 
for the Information and Education Section. Emphasis was placed on 
increasing press response to Division news. During the year, the section 
issued 16 press release packets comprising 108 individual release items 
and another eight packets comprising 13 items which went only to outdoor 
writers on the TIPS list. In all, the Section mailed out 121 press releases 
in 24 packets to a total of 1,501 outlets (media, sportsman's clubs, 
conservation organizations and town clerks) . Press reponse was excellent 
with an analysis of press release use for calendar year 1982 showing an 
average of 188.67 instances of press release use per month. This 
represents a significant increase in coverage over the previous high 
of 163.4 per month (1979) and the 1981 average of 150.5 clippings per 
month. Four months saw clipping returns of 200 clips or better which has 
been the criterion for a prime month. 

In addition to the releases, members of the press and electronic 
media were invited to participate in six special events during the year: 
a press tour of the eagle hacking site at Quabbin, previews of the eagle 
film and slide show in Boston and Springfield, an outdoor writer's day 
at the Westboro Field Headquarters, the release of wild turkeys in Northern 
Worcester County, the first stocking of the Millers River in 25 years and 
a media day related to salmon restoration. Numerous writers and television 
crews availed themselves of the opportunity. In addition, the Division 
worked with Channel 7 (Boston) to produce a deer season special focussing 
on central and southeastern Massachusetts. 

In addition to the above Division-initiated programs, the Section also 
responded to hundreds of inquiries for information and materials from 
journalists and reporters . Staff members provided fact sheets, photographs, 
radio interviews and television appearances. One such request led to a 
series of short radio spots for station WDLW (Waltham) which was ultimately 
run as a series of 13 sponsored wildlife news spots run at intervals 
throughout the week. 

Private citizens too sought out the Division for information regarding 
legal questions, questions of natural history, information on Division 



-31- 



lands and other public lands, and requests for assistance in vacation 
planning, etc. To meet those needs, staff members Horwitz, Mirick, and 
D'Angelo fielded telephone inquiries and mailed out more than 10,000 
items (maps, permits, regulations) in addition to providing personal 
written responses whenever needed. 

Publications 

Many of the inquiries were answered with Division publications. 
During the year, all annual publications (regulations, stocking lists, 
fishing access information and other routine publications) were updated. 
In addition, the Section prepared and produced a map of the newly 
established deer hunting zones, combined state and federal waterfowl 
hunting regulations, provided a listing of pond maps available, published 
five new pond map booklets, a list of fish in Massachusetts and brochures 
on bald eagles in Massachusetts, the Sportfishing Awards Program, the 
Waterfowl Stamp Program and mole salamanders. Initial steps were taken 
to prepare a revised edition of the highly popular Sportsmen's Guide to 
the Quabbin Area which needs extensive revision and should be printed 
in a more uniform fashion than in the past in order to meet the demand. 

"MASSACHUSETTS WILDLIFE", the Division's prime publication was 
reduced to a single issue because of financial constraints. This issue 
was published in March and offered 32 pages instead of the usual 24. In 
light of the difficulties of supporting Massachusetts Wildlife and the 
reduction in publication over the past years, Editors Mirick and Horwitz 
spent considerable time exploring alternative sources of funding for the 
magazine. Avenues investigated involved both private and state channels 
as well as participation in a cooperative group for state wildlife 
magazines . 

Exhibits 

As in other years, the Division participated in a number of shows 
designed to increase program visibility. During 1982-83, the selected 
focus was on the restoration of the bald eagle. Information and Education 
staff worked closely with District personnel in preparing exhibits for 
the Eastern States Exposition in Springfield, the Camping and Travel 
Exposition in Boston, the Eastern Fishing Exposition in Boxborough and 
the Framingham Sportsmen's Show. In addition, photographs and display 
materials were prepared for District participation in shows in their 
areas. Hundreds of thousands of visitors passed through these exhibits 
and viewed the replica of the hacking tower, a bald eagle and a photo 
exhibit which documented the project itself. 

Shows 

All members of the Section participated in presenting slide and 
film shows to both technical groups and general audiences. Many of 
the programs dealt with the eagle restoration project, but others involved 
the deer program, turkey restoration and Division activities in general. 



-32- 



Groups requesting such services from the Division included school groups, 
garden and civic clubs, sportsmen's groups, senior citizens, the 
Massachusetts Herpetological Society, outdoor writers and hunter safety 
coordinators. When the Division offered a graduate seminar to wildlife 
students at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, the Section not only 
put on one of the sessions, but prepared slides and visual material for 
use by the biologists offering all of the other sessions. Section Chief 
Ellie Horwitz presented a paper on the Section's Tags 'n' Trout Program 
to the Information Session of the Northeast Fish and Wildlife Conference. 

Photography 

In addition to the many support functions performed by the Section's 
photographers, they both continued to increase the Division's still photo 
and film collection by photographing project activities and general wildlife 
throughout the Commonwealth. Photographer Byrne spent many days shooting 
material for use in a future nongame slide show and both he and photographer 
Swedberg polished and completed a slide presentation for children prepared 
by the Division in conjunction with the Massachusetts Wildlife Federation. 

Special Programs 

The Freshwater Sportfishing Awards Program drew 400 entries during 
the year and six new weighing stations joined the program. Two new state 
records were set, one for lake trout and one for bluegill. Ex-tern Steve 
Quinn from the University of Massachusetts tabulated sportfishing awards 
data from 1970 through 1982 and presented a paper on his findings at the 
Northeast Wildlife Conference. Tags 'n' Trout drew 15 participating 
groups during the summer of 1983, which sponsored 395 specially tagged fish 
in 16 bodies of water. Prizes offered and publicity issued by local 
sponsors were excellent and sportsmen enjoyed the program as evidenced 
by their return of 60% of the tags. 

National Hunting and Fishing Day - The Division again coordinated 
signing of the Governor's proclamation and publicized activities sponsored 
by clubs relating to the day. 

The Waterfowl Stamp Program celebrated its 10th anniversary with a 
gala show at the Peabody Museum won by Randy Julius for his painting 
of a Redhead Drake. This was followed by a special luncheon for invited 
guests. The highlight of the luncheon was the unveiling of a stamp 
history/album entitled "A History of Waterfowl Stamps in Massachusetts" 
prepared by C. G. Rice and published by the Peabody Museum. 

Archery Stamps - This year's archery stamp was printed from a drawing 
donated to the Division by artist John Eggert. 

Conservation Camp - As in the past, the Section was heavily involved 
with the Massachusetts Junior Conservation Camp. This involvement ranges 
from participating in Board sessions which voted to separate the camp 
from the existing Fund for the Preservation of Wildlife and Natural 
Areas and establish it as a separate entity through publicity for the 
camp, registration of campers and making arrangements for the actual 
camp session. 



-33- 



During early 1983, a new brochure was prepared for the camp and a 
new medical form was adapted from the American Pediatric Association. 
In an effort to increase scholarship funding available to prospective 
campers, section staff approached prospective d onors and obtained 
undesignated scholarships from the Digital Equipment Corporation, from a 
private donor and from the Middlesex County League of Sportsmen's Clubs. 
Staffer Peter Mirick joined forces with district game manager Peter 
Pekkala to teach the wildlife segment of the program while members of 
the fisheries section taught the segment on lake and pond ecology. A 
similar teaching program was conducted later in the summer for the 
Marlboro Junior Conservation Camp. 

Wildlife Projects 

Section staff members continued their participation in projects 
outside the information area with photographer Jack Swedberg taking the 
lead in the Division's eagle restoration program (detailed in the nongame 
section) with photographer Bill Byrne deeply involved in assisting on the 
project. Journalist Peter Mirick coordinated part of the statewide survey of 
salamanders and continued to serve as consultant on herpetological matters, 
while section leader Horwitz continued to participate in survey and inventory 
of bats. 

Other 

No discussion of ongoing projects can touch on all of the activities 
of the Section. During this past year, activities of the Section included 
participation in the Division's overall planning process and preparation 
of a policy document to supercede the previous policy written in 1957. 
Participation in planning for a proposed herd reduction program to take 
place at Crane Reservation, Ipswich, preparation of a special holiday 
envelope for those who like to give sporting licenses as gifts, inauguration 
of an in-house newsletter called "The Whispersheet" and preparation of two 
issues of the same, maintenance of a statewide deer season hotline to 
gather and give out information on deer season results, establishment of 
a certificate program for hunters taking noteworthy deer, updating of the 
mailing list of sportsmen's organizations and preliminary investigation 
together with staff of the Massachusetts Audubon Society, of the 
possibility of Massachusetts participation in a national education project 
entitled Project WILD, pioneered in the western states and offering an 
educational curriculum based on wildlife. 



-34- 




REALTY 



Floyd Richardson 
Chief of Wildlife Lands 



This report does not disclose the procedure nor the effort expended 
to acquire a parcel of land. To list and explain the steps necessary 
would be lengthy and uninteresting. 

Consequently, the following is an annual disclosure of the results 
achieved by this Realty Section. 

Housatonic River Acquisition Project 811.9 acres 

A gift of land containing one-half acre was gratefully received 
by the Division adding another segment to the planned corridor along the 
Housatonic River. This area provides multiple-use recreation with its 
scenic river paths that afford waterfowl and songbird observation, 
forest lands, wetlands and agricultural lands so vitally important to 
the wildlife species indigenous to the area while the River also provides 
for the fishing and canoeing enthusiasts. 

Windsor Acquisition Project 1,147.0 acres 

An acquisition of a 45 acre parcel in the Town of Windsor adjacent 
to the Moran Wildlife Management Area which contributes additional access 
and excellent wildlife land. The property consisted of hard and softwood 
trees interspersed with high-bush blueberry, wild apple trees from 
abandoned farms of yesteryear, and a profusion of wild raspberry growing 
adjacent to an open pasture. An additional amenity included with this 
acquisition was approixmately one-half mile of Windsor Brook, a stocked 
trout stream. 



-35- 



Hinsdale Flats Acquisition Project 1,063.0 acres 

Acquiring this 117 acre parcel permits 1,400 feet of ready-access 
to the management area from Route 8, its westerly perimeter. 

Diversity of cover and wildlife food is offered through open fields, 
brushlands, forest and marshland and further enhances the management area 
of which it has become a part. 

Millers River Acquisition Project 1,932.3 acres 

Two parcels containing a total of 75 acres under one ownership were 
acquired in the Town of Athol. Their importance to the wildlife management 
area, aside from their contribution of food and cover for wildlife, was the 
fact that each was an interlocking parcel providing contiguous ownership, 
eliminating previous breaks in the chain of ownership. 

This project now extends from the Town of Royalston to the south side 
of the Millers River in Athol where it abuts Athol Conservation Commission 
lands . 

Phillipston Acquisition Project 2,799.5 acres 

Queen Lake Road, Route 101 runs through the Phillipston Wildlife 
Management Area. An acquisition of 51 acres in the Town of Phillipston 
became an important connecting link between Division lands on each side 
of the above-mentioned road. This acquisition furnishes additional 
wildlife lands, joins two large segments of Division land and prevents 
encroachment by development. 

Crane Pond Acquisition Project 2,122.6 acres 

A gift of land was presented to this Division by one Mary D. Steele. 
The parcel contained 18 acres in the Town of West Newbury lying east of 
Middle Street. The gifted property consists of a freshwater marsh and 
adjoins other Dision owned lands originally known as the Crane Pond Area. 



-36- 



SUMMARY OF LAND ACQUISITION 
FISCAL YEAR 1983 

Area Name 
Housatohic River 
Moran Area 
Hinsdale Flats 
Millers River 
Phillipston Area 
Crane Pond 



Town Acreage 

Pittsfield .50 

Windsor 45.00 

Hinsdale 117.00 

Athol 75.00 

Phillipston 51.75 

West Newbury 18.10 



TOTAL : 



307.35 



-37- 




Maintenance&Development 



John P. Sheppard 
Chief 



Maintenance and Development 



Hatcheries 

A vertical turbine pump and bowl assembly was installed at the 
McLaughlin Hatchery in Belcher town. 

Districts 

The regrading of the existing roadway and parking area at the West 
Meadows Wildlife Management Area was completed. 

A new canoe and small boat access was constructed at the Hockomock 
River, Hockomock Wildlife Management Area. 

The existing security system was updated and installed at the Central 
Wildlife District office. 

All existing drives and parking areas at the Southeast Wildlife 
District office have been repaved. 

New storm windows were installed at the Division owned residence in 
Harvard, Massachusetts. 

Structural steel security gates were installed at various locations 
statewide . 

Field Headquarters - Westboro 

New storm windows and ceiling insulation were installed at the Field 
Headquarters. Also bituminous concrete paving of all roadway and parking 
areas at the above area were completed. 



The engineering sections also provided assistance in the design and 
construction of public boat launching facilities at Fort Pond, Lancaster 
and White Pond, Concord. 



Other 



-38- 



PERSONNEL ACTIONS 



Sixty-three personnel changes were undertaken during this fiscal 
year with the majority being promotions and appointments. The Division 
notes with sorrow the passing of John Kostro, Conservation Skilled 
Helper on October 21, 1982. 



Retirements 





Name 


Job Title 


Date 


A. 


Scotia 


Principal Clerk 


02-28-83 


F. 


Sorocco 


Senior Clerk & Typist 


12-31-82 


J. 


Petronino 


Assistant Game Culturist 


08-14-82 


L. 


Majka 


Conservation Helper 


03-26-83 


A. 


Souza 


Conservation Helper 


09-01-82 


A. 


Roman 


Fish Culturist 


11-30-82 


W. 


Neale 


Wildlife Mgmt . Area Supervisor 


08-17-83 


G. 


Kuczma 


Assistant Fish Culturist 


08-26-83 


F. 


Tarsa 


Conservation Helper 


08-17-83 


Resignations 






K. 


Condon 


Senior Clerk & Typist 


08-14-82 


C. 


McCord 


Administrator II 


03-31-83 


K. 


Amara 


Junior Clerk & Typist 


08-28-82 


T. 


Staples 


Conservation Skilled Helper 


01-01-83 


M. 


Pottle 


Junior Clerk & Typist 


09-21-83 



-39- 



Appointments 
Name 



Job Title 



Date 



M. Marenghi 

C. Croken 

E. Robidoux 
P. Holland 
M. Flynn 

A. Foley 

G. Zima 

J. Hahn 

M. Pottle 

R. Maietta 

C. Campbell 

D. Rose 

W. MacCallum 

J. Williams 

J. Hazard 

M. LaFleur 

Promotions 

P. Sutliff 

C. Croken 
R. Costello 

D. D'Angelo 
J. Almeida 
J. Kirvin 
A. Pellegri 

F. Pietryka 
M. Masley 
P. Jackson 
A. Scotia 
C. Croken 
N. Limosani 
D„ Carlson 
P. Sutliff 
R. Thomas ian 
M. Marenghi 

E. LaBonte 

Other 



Stenographer 

Stenographer 

Typist 

Typist 

Typist 



Junior Clerk & 
Junior Clerk & 
Senior Clerk & 
Junior Clerk & 
Junior Clerk & 
Conservation Helper 
Conservation Skilled Helper 
Fish Culturist 
Junior Clerk & Typist 
Conservation Helper 
Junior Clerk & Typist 
Conservation Helper 
Administrator II 
Assistant Fish Culturist 
Conservation Helper 
Junior Clerk & Typist 



Senior Clerk & Typist 
Senior Clerk & Typist 
Senior Bookkeeper 
Senior Clerk & Typist 
Assistant Game Culturist 
Conservation Skilled Helper 
Assistant Fish Culturist 
Fish Culturist 
Fish Culturist 
Fisheries Manager 
Principal Clerk 
Senior Clerk & Stenographer 
Principal Clerk 

Wildlife Mgmt. Area Supervisor 
Senior Bookkeeper 
Conservation Skilled Helper 
Senior Clerk & Typist 
Conservation Skilled Helper 



01-02-83 

09- 27-82 
04-17-83 

10- 29-82 
04-10-83 
01-03-83 

09- 07-82 

01- 09-83 

02- 28-83 

01- 23-83 

10- 12-82 

02- 05-83 

09- 08-83 

10- 09-83 
07-17-83 
09-25-83 



08-18-82 
01-02-83 
01-02-83 

08- 29-82 

09- 27-82 
01-23-83 
12-26-82 

10- 31-82 
12-26-82 
08-29-82 
01-02-83 
10-02-83 
10-02-83 
10-02-83 
10-02-83 
10-02-83 
10-02-83 
07-17-83 



D. Rose 

M. Dumont 

R. Norton 

D. Bielecki 

N. Pratt 

C. Ayers 

J. Nowakowski 



Conservation Helper 
Conservation Helper 
Conservation Helper 
Conservation Helper 
Conservation Helper 
Conservation Skilled Helper 
Conservation Helper 



05- 22-83 
01-06-83 
09-05-82 

06- 27-82 
05-22-83 
12-26-82 
05-21-83 



-40- 



Other (Continued) 





Name 


Job Title 


Date 


J. 


Besse 


Assistant Fish Culturist 


10-30-82 


c. 


Campbell 


Junior Clerk & Typist 


03-19-83 


J. 


Besse 


Assistant Fish Culturist 


12-26-82 


M. 


Brideau 


Conservation Helper 


05-21-83 


W. 


Minior 


Wildlife Rest. Proj . Field Agent 


08-14-83 


J. 


Kerr 


Conservation Helper 


08-28-83 


R. 


Maietta 


Conservation Helper 


08-30-83 


G. 


Galas 


Conservation Helper 


07-17-83 



-41- 



LEGISLATION 



Enacted During Fiscal Years 1982 and 1983 

Chapter 39 - Acts of 1982. An Act Providing for the Use of Special 
Equipment by Handicapped Hunters. 

Chapter 287 - Acts of 1982. An Act Relative to the Acquisition by the 
Department of Environmental Management of South Cap Beach in the Town of 
Mashpee . 

Chapter 602 - Acts of 1982. An Act Authorizing the Commissioner of 
Administration to Set Fees and Charges Paid to the Commonwealth. 



Chapter 330 - Acts of 1983. An Act Relative to Funding for Nongame 
Wildlife Programs in the Commonwealth. 

Chapter 404 - Acts of 1983. An Act Authorizing the County Commissioners 
of Berkshire County to Acquire Certain Park Land in the Town of Windsor four 
Highway Purposes. 

Chapter 538 - Acts of 1983. An Act Increasing the Surety Bond of Persons 
Authorized to Issue Licenses for the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife. 



Chapter 610 - Acts of 1983. An Act Relative to the Connecticut River 
Salmon Compact. 

Chapter 617 - Acts of 1983. An Act Authorizing the Division of Capital 
Planning and Operations to Grant a Certain Easement Over Certain Land in 
the Town of Middleboro. 



Chapter 658 - Acts of 1983. An Act Protecting the Connecticut River. 

Chapter 656 - Acts of 1983. An Act Designating a Certain Section of 
the Lake Quinsigamond Bridge in the Town of Shrewsbury in Honor of Kenneth 
F. Burns. 



-42- 



COMMQNWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE 
July 1, 1982 to June 30, 1983 

"HOW THE SPORTSMEN'S DOLLAR WAS SPENT" 

Account No , Expenditures 



Administration 
Administration 
Information-Education 

Wildlife Programs 
Game Farms 

Wildlife Management** 
Wildlife Cooperative Unit 

Fisheries Program 
Fish Hatcheries 
Fisheries Management** 
Fisheries Cooperative Unit 

Nongame and Endangered 
Species Program 
Administration, Management 
and Research 

Land Acquisition 

Acquisition of Upland 
Areas and Inholding on 
Existing Areas*** 

Engineering and Construction 
Development and Improvement 
of Facilities for Public 
Use* 

Dept. of Fisheries, Wildlife, 
and Recreational Vehicles 
Natural Resource Officers' 

Salaries and Expenses 
Hunter Safety Training**** 

Transfers from Fund 
Group Insurance 
Salary Adjustments 

Retirements Assessment (.2*) 

Interest on Bonded Debt 

Maturing Serial Bonds 
and Motes 

Total Expenditures 



2310-0200 $ 518,278.60 

2310-0200 153,167.78 $ 671,W46.38 



2310-OUOO 5U9,lU3.77 
2310-OUOO 811,812.58 
2310-OUOO 72,000.00 l,ii32,956.35 



2310-OUOO 791,396. U3 

2310-OUOO 612,635.23 
2310-OUOO 72,000.00 1,U76,031.66 



2315-0100 U4,199.92 



2310-0310 101,391.25 



2310-0300 96,782.68 



2350-0100 (30*) 
2350-0101 



1590-1007 

0612-1000 
0699-2800 

0699-2900 



51414,932.12 
111,029.38 



310,719.86 
265,150.00 

149,1462.03 
55,953.50 

19U, 000.00 

$5,3514,055.13 



Percentage 



12.5U* 



26.77* 



27.57* 



.83* 



1.89* 



1.81* 



10.18* 
2.08* 



5.80* 
14.95* 

.93* 

1.05* 

3.6o£ 
100.00* 



* Continuing Appropriation 

** Portions of expenditures 60* or 75* reinbur sable by Federal Government 

*** Certain land acquisitions are 50* reimbursable by Federal Government 

**** 100* reimbursable by Federal Government 







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-44- 



SUMMARY OF REVENUE CREDITED 
TO THE 

INLAND FISH AND GAME FUND 
July 1, 1982 to June 30, 1983 



Collected by Agency : 



Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses* 
Trap Registrations* 
Archery Stamps* 
Waterfowl Stamps* 

Waterfowl Stamps - Ducks Unlimited* 

Special Licenses, Tags & Posters** 

Antlerless Deer Permits 

Bear Permits 

Turkey Permits 

Rents 

Refunds Prior Year 
Sales, Other 
Miscellaneous Income 



Collected by State Treasurer : 

Fines and Penalties 

Interest and Discount on Revenue 



Federal Aid Reimbursements : 

Pittiran-Robertson Federal Aid 
Dingell-Johnson Federal Aid 
Anadromous Fish Projects-Federal Aid 
Endangered Species Federal Aid 
Indirect Cost Reimbursement 



Taxes 



3304-61-01-40 
3304-61-01-40 
3304-61-01-40 
3304-40-01-40 
3304-40-02-40 

3304-61-14-40 
3304-61-14-40 
3304-61-14-40 
3304-63-01-AO 
3304-69-01-40 
3304-64-99-^0 
3304-69-99-40 



3308-41-01-40 
3395-60-01-40 



3304-67-01-40 
3304-67-02-40 
3304-67-04-40 
3304-67-11-40 
3304-67-67-40 



$3,588,802.05 
1,295.56 
104,249.50 
7,031.20 
21,569.50 
15,866.75 
30,777.95 
4,120.00 
13,260.75 
17,271.37 
5,030.69 
24,238.39 
1,^39.76 
$3,834,743.47 



36,300.00 
24,757.53 
$ 61,057.53 



504,439.58 
266,566.72 
164.9 7 
43.213.93 
246.338.85 
51,060,724.05 



Gasoline Tax Apportionment 
Transfers from General Fund 



3312-05-01-40 



344,705.71 



Salary Adjustments 

Reimbursement on Half Price Licenses 
Reversions : 
Accounts Payable 
Total Revenue: 



3360-95-02-36 
3360-95-08-40 



265,150.00 
67.183.25 
$ 332,333.25 

70,067.35 

,7 f n .631. Q 



* See Detail Sheet irl 
** See Detail Sheet #2 



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-46- 



Detail Sheet #2 



SPECIAL LICENSES . TAGS AND POSTERS 
July 1. 1982 to June 30, 1983 



Receipt Account 
3304-61-02-40 

3304-61-03-40 
3304-61-04-40 



3304-61-05-40 
3304-61-06-40 
3304-61-07-40 
3304-61-08-40 



3304-61-10-40 

3304-61-12-40 
3304-61-13-40 

3^04-64-01-40 



Type of Licenses 

Fur Buyers 

Resident Citizens: 
Non-Re si dents or Aliens: 

Taxidermists 



Propagators 



Quantity & 
Unit Price 



25 @ 15.00/25.00 
4 © 50.00/75.00 
86 @ 10.00/20.00 



Receipt 
Account 
Amount Total 



595.00 
275.00 



Special Purpose Permits :131 


@ 


1.00 


131.00 


Class 1 (Pish) 












Initial: 




35 


@ 


7.50/15.00 


375.00 


Renewal : 




145 


@ 


5.00/10.00 


1435.00 


Class 3 (Pish) 












Initial : 




11 


<§ 


7.50/15.00 


135.00 


Renewal : 




74 


© 


5.00/10.00 


730.00 


Class 4 (Birds, Reptiles, Mammals) 




Initial: 




51 




7.50/15.00 


585.00 


Renewal : 




436 


@ 


5.00/10.00 


4325.00 


Class 6 (Dealers) 












Initial : 




16 


® 


7.50/15.00 


217.50 


Renewal : 




41 


® 


5.00/10.00 


405.00 


Additional : 




98 


@ 


1.50/ 5.00 


986.50 


Class 7 (Individual Bird or 


Mammal ) 




Initial: 




3 


Q 


3.00/ 5.00 


34.00 


Renewal : 




31 


@ 


1.00/ 2.00 


62.00 


Importation Permits 












Pish: 




3 


9 


5.00/ 7.50 


15.00 


Birds or Mammals: 




42 





5.00/ 7.50 


277.50 


Class 9 (Falconry) 












Master: 




6 


@ 


25.00 


150.00 


Apprentice: 




17 


@ 


25.00 


425.00 


General : 




12 


& 


25.00 


300.00 


Class 10 (Falconry) 












Raptor Breeding 




3 


@ 


10.00 


30.00 


Class 11 (Falconry) 












Raptor Salvage: 




14 


@ 


1.00 


14.00 


Take Shiners: 




100 


@ 


5.00/10.00 




Field Trial Licenses 




9 


@ 


15.00 




Taking of Eels: 




3 


@ 


25.00 




Quail For Training Dogs 










Initial: 




5 


@ 


7.50/15.00 


37.50 


Renewal : 




25 


© 


5.00/10.00 


125.00 


Commercial Shooting 












Preserves: 




10 


© 


50.00 




Mounting Permits: 




5 


Q 


2.00 




Special Field Trial 












Permit: 




24 





15.00 




Tags and Posters 












Game Tags: 


5,745 





.05/. 10 


324.75 


Pish Tag 3 


2, 


200 





.02/. 05 


110.00 


Posters 




40 


© 


.05/. 10 


2.00 



£70.; 
17Q5.: 



.■0632.=: 
980. c-: 
135.0C 
75.0c 



162.5c 

500.0: 
io.:-: 



360.: 



436^ 



$15866.7; 



-47 



CHANGES IN 
FISH AND GAME FUND BALANCE 
July L . 19b2 to June ?0, 1983 

Balance July 1, 1982 (Surplus) 

Total Revenue/ Credits 

Total Expenditures 

* Increase in Continuing Accounts Brought Forward 
Balance June 30,1983 (Surplus) 



$ 137,334,13 
5,703,631.^1 
-5,354,055.13 

3 222,C4o.;6 



1982 

Continuing Accts. Brought Forward 



1933 

Continuing Accts. 3rou£x:t Forward 



Retirement Assessment (C612-1000) 517,271.48 Retirement Assessment (06l2-lC00) 3257, S08.' 

24,965.( 



Dev. 3c Imp of Facilities for 
Public Use (2310-0300) 



Dev. db Imp. of Facilities for 
39,262.45 Public Use (2310-0300) 



Law Enforcement (23=0-0100) 
Reserve for Encumbrances 



52,500.00 Acquisition of Upland Areas and 

Inholding Areas (2310-0310 ) 568. 7 

l4,cQ4.48 Reserve for Encumbrances 10 c , ^o.c 

$123, 92b. 41 33ic,792.- 



1983 $388,792.46 
1982 -123.928. 41 
* 32b4,c'64.C5 



— 1 



■I 



Massachusetts Division 
of Fisheries and Wildlife 
Annual Report 
1984 



c . I ibrarv ol Massachusetts 
State ^brar/ Boston 
State House, » 




400 ^asmtrity S/beet, Slorfim 02202 



His Excellency, Michael S. Dukakis, Governor of the Commonwealth, the 
Executive Council, the General Court, and the Board of the Division of 
Fisheries and Wildlife. 



Sirs: 

I have the honor to submit herewith the One Hundred and Nineteenth Annual 
Report of the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, covering the fiscal year 
1 July 1983 to 30 June 1984. 



Respectfully submitted, 

O 




chard Cronin 
Director 



PUBLICATION : #14>31-60- 300-5-1 3-86-CR 

Approved by Daniel Carter, State Purchasing Agent 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PAGE NUMBER 

The Board Reports 1-3 
Planning 4 
Fisheries 5-9 

Fish Hatcheries 10-12 

Wildlife 13-22 

Game Farms 23-24 

Nongame and Endangered Species 25-30 

District Reports 31-35 

Information and Education 36-41 

Realty 42-45 

Maintenance and Development 46-47 

Personnel Actions 48-49 
Legislation 50 
How the Sportsman's Dollar is Spent 



1 



THE BOARD REPORTS 



George Darey 
Chairman 



1984 proved to be a momentous year for the Division of Fisheries and 
Wildlife. Early in the fiscal year (July 26) the Governor signed the 
Nongame Wildlife Bill into law establishing a fund which would support 
expanded nongame activity and which authorized collection into that fund 
through a refund checkoff on state income tax forms. This posed a most 
exciting challenge as Division personnel were called upon to become 
involved in fund raising while the Division examined ways to expand the 
nongame effort and to incorporate the Natural Heritage Program which had 
been transferred to the Division from the Department of Environmental 
Management in the same bill. The Board salutes the Division on the smooth 
transition and the subsequent effective operation of the program. Fund 
raising progressed well. Initial projections had set the expected 
income as "just under $300,000." In fact, the fund received $380,000. 
Shortly after establishment of the Fund, a Nongame Advisory Committee 
was formally appointed. By May, that committee had completed an initial 
one year plan for the program and the Division had hired an Assistant 
Director, Dr. Thomas French, to head up the program replacing Brad Blodget 
who had chosen to serve as State Ornithologist. 

This was just one of the many programs overseen by the Board in the 
pursuance of its regular duties. As in the past, the Board continued to 
consider a wide variety of issues, some of which have lead to changes in 
regulation while others had non-regulatory conclusions. Issues which were 
examined resulting in changed regulations include examination of the status 
of migratory birds and subsequent establishment of migratory bird hunting 
regulations, consideration of economic factors related to pheasant rearing 
which led the Board to approve the taking of hen pheasants west of a line 
beginning at Route 3 at the New Hampshire line continuing south to Route 
495 and then south along Route 121 to the Rhode Island border. Other 
items established by regulation were: 

— establishment of a controlled deer hunt at the High Ridge Wildlife 
Management Area 

— expansion of turkey hunting to all counties and parts of counties 
west of the Connecticut River and increase of the number of permits 
to 3,800 



— elimination of the permits required for the taking of frogs 



2 



— establishment of a moratorium to run for one year from May 17, 1984 
on the taking of Atlantic Salmon from the Merrimack River or any 

of its tributaries or the Connecticut River or any of its 
tributaries 

— elimination of the requirement that all arrows be labelled with 
the owner's name and address 

— a change in regulations pertaining to the taking of furbearers 
and specifically moving the dates for taking beaver to 
November 15 - the last day of February and changing the dates 
for taking otter to November 1 - December 15 with the requirement 
that otter carcasses must be given to the Division for analysis 

— on the non-regulatory side, the Board approved a strategic plan 

for the Division and established guidelines for public participation 
at working Board meetings 

The Board also spent time in consideration of issues not fully resovled 
during this year. One such was the status of Massachusetts Wildlife 
given the fact that gradually increasing costs have reduced publication to 
a single issue per year. This is the culmination of a trend the Board has 
seen in the past years as publication has gradually been reduced by 
increasing costs. At this point, it is apparent that in order to resurrect 
this outstanding publication, that a subscription system will have to be 
implemented. The Board has instructed the Information and Education Section 
to review possible subscription systems and has requested the Director 
to pursue establishment of a designated fund and of initial capital to 
establish such a system. 

The Board also spent a great deal of time in consideration of the 
goose hunting issue which arose on the Danvers/ Salem area. (This issue 
arose when certain residents complained about noise and shots from hunters 
legally hunting geese on the Beverly side of the Danvers River. 

The financial status of the Division has been fairly secure during 
this period with a healthy revenue from hunting and fishing licenses and 
half of the funding for the new nongame program being provided by the 
general fund. This, combined with a reduction in the amount needed for 
support of the Division of Law Enforcement, made it unnecessary to seek 
any increase in license fees despite increasing costs. Land acquisition 
became a high priority as the Division received allocations of $5 million 
for acquisition of land along coldwater rivers and streams; $5 million for 
additions to existing Division lands and $5 million for the purchase of 
inholdings within Division areas. 

This year also saw a strengthening of personnel as, in addition to 
Dr. French, the Division acquired the services of Wayne MacCallum who 
became Assistant Director for Wildlife Research in August of 1983 



3 



and Joy Merzer, Information and Education Consultant for the nongame program. 
Along with this, there was a broad upgrading of secretarial staff in Boston 
increasing stability in this area. The Board itself was strengthened by 
the addition of John F. Creedon, Brockton, as regional representative 
from the Southeast. 



4 



PLANNING 



Kristine L. Corey 
Junior Planner 



The Fish and Wildlife Board gave approval in October, 1983 to release 
the draft Strategic Plan for formal public review. Notices were published 
in newspapers statewide» in the Environmental Monitor , a bimonthly publication 
of the Executive Office of Environmental Affairs, and copies were sent to 
the central planning agency and each regional planning agency. Copies 
of the plan were available for review at the Boston Office, Westboro Field 
Headquarters, and each District office. About two dozen individuals or 
groups took this opportunity to inspect the document over a 45 day comment 
period. Only three written comments were received. 

The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service also reviewed the draft Strategic 
Plan and provided comments based on an evaluation of complince with federal 
aid planning standards and noting that on the whole, only minor changes 
needed to be made. The Wildlife Section, however, did not meet with 
federal approval primarily due to a deficiency of measurable objectives. 
Under the belief that the current plans adequately address Division needs, 
it was requested that the wildlife section be allowed to proceed in their 
planning effort without major modification of species plans. 

The decision was made to continue federal aid funding on a project 
basis until it becomes feasible to implement program funding through 
planning. Data processing capabilities which would allow this option are 
not presently available in-house . Initiatives have been developed as part 
of an agency ADP plan to justify the need for upgrading the Division's 
computer capability. A request has been filed to reactivate a vacant 
junior planner position, preferably to be filled by a planner with skills 
in data processing. 



5 




FISHERIES 



Peter H. Oatis 
Assistant Director of Fisheries 



Quabbin Investigations 

Smelt were observed spawning in six of ten monitored streams. Estimates 
of egg deposition and hatching observed at all six streams indicate that 
deposition varied with the amount of available spawning habitat while 
survival ranged from a high of 84% in Gibbs Brook to 57% in Egypt Brook. 
Laboratory studies to determine the effect of acidity upon smelt egg 
fertilization proved inconclusive and will be redone in 1985. A new state 
record lake trout, 21 lb. 13 oz., caught in Wachusett Reservoir, broke the 
existing 21 lb. 3 oz . Quabbin record. Lake trout anglers creeled 6,565 
lakers and released an additional 3,591 fish. Catch rates and total catch 
of smallmouth bass indicate good survival of the 1980-81 year classes of 
bass. Creel estimates reveal a total catch of 54,242 bass of which only 
7,022 were creeled. These figures reflect the concious effort on the part 
of many bass anglers to limit their creel instead of creeling their limit. 
Rainbow trout continued to demonstrate poorer survival and contribution 
to the catch than other species. Only 979 rainbows were taken. However, 
for the second consecutive year , a good class of landlocked salmon (18,150 
from Reed Hatchery plus 5,000 from New Hampshire) were released. The creel 
survey indicates that at least 1,642 sub-legal fish, average 14 to 17 inches, 
were caught. We expect numerous 18" (legal) salmon to enter the harvest 
during the summer and fall of 1984. 



6 



The heavy rains that occurred in late May caused the release of 33,000 
unscheduled brown trout and display pool trout from McLaughlin Hatchery into 
Quabbin. The catch of a new state record rainbow trout (13 lbs.) eclipsing 
the existing record (8 lbs. 5 oz.) by 4 lbs. 11 oz. certainly reflects the 
release of display pool fish. 

Experiments were also conducted with caged trout and salmon of 
selected tributaries to assess the potential impact of low pH and high aluminum 
content. Differential survival of caged fish documented and defined early 
spring toxic zones off the mouth of the west arm tributary streams. Further 
investigations along these lines will be underaken during the summer of 1984 
in an attempt to define the time duration of these acutely toxic areas. 

Stream Improvement 

The efforts of volunteers and Connecticut Valley District personnel 
continued to improve stream habitat throughout the catch and release area 
of the Swift River below Windsor Dam. Dam repairs at the Merrill Pond System 
were completed. 

Three ponds in the Southeast District: Fresh Pond, Big Sandy Pond and 
College Pond, all in Plymouth, received 80 tons of limestone to combat 
increasing acidity. It was determined that the Division would have to prepare 
a generic Environmental Impact Report to continue its pond and lake liming 
program. Preparation of this statement is underway. Scoping sessions were 
held in Boston and Orleans during May and the report is expected to be completed 
by the fall of 1984. The report lays out basic criteria that a water body 
must meet before it is determined that the addition of limestone will be 
beneficial to combat increasing acidity. 

Smelt eggs were transported from Quinsigamond Lake and Wachusett 
Reservoir to Fort Pond, Lancaster; Lake Mattawa , Orange; South Pond, Brookfield; 
and to the state of New Hampshire. Landlocked alewives were transported 
from Singletary Lake to Webster Lake. These introductions will augment 
the existing base of forage species. The introductions are predicated upon 
through fish surveys and analysis of plankton availability. 

Anadromous Fish 

The dedication of the Bellows Falls Fishway was a high point of the 
Connecticut River Restoration Program. With the completion of this project 
by New England Electric Company, salmon have access to a significant portion 
of their historic spawning range and shad will have access to suitable habitat 
beyond this historic range . 

A total of 87 salmon returned to the Connecticut, 66 were removed from 
the Holyoke Fishway which also passed 500,000 shad. Improvements in the 
fishway at Turners Falls resulted in the successful passage of 4,300 shad 
and two salmon. 



7 



Anglers enjoyed a banner year of shad fishing in Holyoke. The successful 
fishing is attributed to ideal water conditions and large fish attraction to 
Holyoke prior to the heavy rains of the Memorial Day weekend. 

Connecticut River 

A total of 410,000 salmon smolts were released into the Connecticut 
River, of these, 30,000 were produced at Roger Reed Hatchery and were 
released into the Massachusetts section. 60,000 parr fry were stocked into 
the Deerfield Watershed. 

Merrimack River 

Ground was broken for construction of the Lowell Hydro Facility. Although 
operation is not expected until late 1985 or early 1986, the fishway, over 
the Pawtucket Dam, should be operational by the spring of 1985. 

Although highwater and some mechanical problems continued to impede 
efficient operation of the Essex Fishway in Lawrence, 5,488 adult shad and 
100 salmon were passed. An unusual 77% of the salmon run was comprised 
of grilse - precocial males with only one winter at sea. This may indicate 
excellent survival of the 1983 smolt migration or a greater influence. Salmon 
stocking amounted to 67,000 smolt, 23,300 parr and 525,000 fry. 

The creeling of salmon from the Merrimack and Connecticut Rivers 
was protected by regulatory action of the Fisheries and Wildlife Board on 
May 17, 1984. 

New regulations pertaining to the taking of salmon in the Connecticut 
River will be promulgated by the Connecticut River Atlantic Salmon Commission 
in 1985. No legislation action was generated on H. B. 113 which would define 
inland-marine jurisdictions on the Merrimack River. 

An initial creel survey of the shad fishway at Lawrence indicates 4,020 
anglers spent 9,934 hours to catch 6,147 shad. Release rates approximated 
72%. The state shad record, established as 9 lbs. 10 ozs. from the Connecticut 
River in 1983 was tied with by a shad from the Merrimack River caught in May 
in Lawrence. Anglers harvested approximately seven salmon prior to the 
closure of the fishway. 

Sea-Run Brown Trout 

Thirteen days of broodstock collection yielded 19 males and 25 females 
averaging 18 to 20 inches. These fish plus five recycled females produced 
65,000 eggs. Once again, infections at all stages of development from 
brood fish through smolt production, continued to plague this program. Of 
the 34,000 eggs collected in 1982, only 18% (6,362) survived to the smolt 
stage by March of 1984. Despite these problems, the program continues to 
attract the interest of many anglers. It is hoped that reassignment of 
personnel at the East Sandwich Hatchery will help in resolving the difficulties 
encountered in rearing these fish. 



5 



Fisheries Surveys : Streams and Lakes 
Streams 

Biologists intensively sampled 73 biological and 67 chemical replicates 
on 130 streams across the state. These data will aid in establishing estimates 
of variation for streams sampled between 1979-1982. Parameter studies include 
fish abundance, species diversity as well as chemical and physical properties 
of the streams. 

The results of the impact of increasing acidification on the Millers 
River Watershed were presented at numerous conferences in both oral and 
poster presentations. Part II of the Massachusetts Stream Classification 
Program - Physical Characteristics (stream length, gradient, watershed area, 
etc.) was drafted in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Water 
Pollution Control. 

Lakes 

District and Headquarters personnel completed fisheries assessments 
surveys at 30 lakes and ponds. These assessments provide the basis for 
establishing and evaluating lake fisheries regulations, documentry need 
and niche for prey or predator introductions (e.g. smelt, alewives, pike 
and tiger muskies) or aquatic weed problems. Since 1979, three hundred 
lakes have been survyed. These waters encompass the most heavily fished 
lakes in the state. Operating on a sound data base, future lake fisheries 
efforts will be directed towards more intense management addressing unique 
problems associated with these more popular lakes. 

Additional surveys at lesser used lakes will be conducted in conjunction 
with environmental assessments. These surveys will include evaluating the 
effects of mitigative programs, evaluation of dredging and drawdown operations 
or monitoring the effects of acidification. 

Intense assessments of tiger muskie and northern pike introductions are 
to be conducted in 1985. Additionally, the need for special regulations 
designed to address specific fisheries problems at specific lakes will again 
be brought to the Fisheries and Wildlife Board for their deliberations. 

Acid Rain Monitoring 

The Division continued to cooperate and fund the Acid Rain Monitoring 
Program through the Massachusetts Water Resource Research Center. Collections 
were completed for approximately 28% of the state's water bodies. Plans were 
formulated for completing the sampling on all state waters during 1984-1985. 
Initial findings generated to date indicate that many lakes and streams located 
in Southeast and Northcentral Massachusetts are already in a critical or 
acidified state with respect to their ability to buffer additional acid inputs. 

The Division is planning to mitigate the effects of aquatic acidification 
where and when practical through the addition of ground limestone. Numerous 
studies and investigations to resolve acid problems are in the initial 
planning stage. 



9 



Technical Assistance 

A great deal of time and effort was directed at investigating, commenting and 
formulating Division positions regarding relocation of Route 2 in Erving . 
Additional assistance was provided to the Division of Water Pollution Control 
in sampling fish from rivers and lakes that pose potential heavy metal and 
Dioxin problems. 

Urban Angler 

Over 350 students attended learn-to-fish clinics in Brockton, Canton, 
Randolph, Georgetown, Taunton, Wellesley and Worcester. 33 instructors 
participated and donated over 1,000 hours of volunteer time. Special events 
included participation in Boy Scout Jamborees, the Springfield Exposition, 
the Boxboro Sportsmen's Show and Kiwer and Carp Festival in Taunton. The 
coordinator also worked with fisheries staff members in other states to 
initiate similar programs in Connecticut and New Hampshire. 



10 




HATCHERIES 



David Fredenburgh 
Chief Fish Culturist 



During the 1984 fiscal year, the hatcheries produced 1,311,978 fish 
weighing 536,076 pounds. Of that number, 673,975 were nine inches or better. 
In addition to the production figures, there was 136,500 fignerlings produced 
at the McLaughlin Hatchery for distribution to the other hatcheries. 

Normal maintenance projects were carried on at all of the hatcheries. The 
East Sandwich Hatchery continued upgrading its facilities including a project 
which involved renovating an existing building into an office. Also at 
East Sandwich, pools were re-built and additional netting was installed to 
lessen bird predation. 

Along with normal maintenance and activities, Sunderland Hatchery completed 
fencing around many pools to reduce predation by Great Blue Herons. The 
fencing around the ponds greatly reduced this problem. The hatchery has 
also increased its efficiency by the use of rainbow trout eggs received in 
early fall. These eggs allow the hatchery to produce catchable yearlings 
rather than two year fish. 

The tiger muskie program at the Roger Reed Hatchery suffered another 
set back when these fish were poisoned for the second year. Intense 
investigations were carried out and plans were developed to expand the 
fencing perimeter, put partitions around the tanks, construct a substantial 
cover over the tanks and increase lighting. The hatchery personnel have 
been very successful in producing Atlantic Salmon smolts. 

The pollution control project at the McLaughlin Trout Hatchery finally 
got underway with the selection of the engineering firm, Fay, Spofford and 
Thorndike, to update existing plans, prepare the bid package and be involved 
with construction. The Ciocca Construction Corporation of Springfield, 
Massachusetts was notified on June 5, 1984 that they were the successful 
contractor with a bid price of $545,000. Completion date for the project 
is expected to be in early December. 



Because of an extremely heavy rainfall during the end of May, the water 
reached record spillway levels at the reservoir, and the pumping station at 
the McLaughlin Hatchery was threatened with high water from the flooding 
Swift River. A decision was made to evacuate the hatchery of fish and 
shut the electricity off. A total of 600,000 fish were evacuated to both 
the Palmer and Sunderland Hatcheries, as well as the Quabbin Reservoir. 
The river flooded to the level of the pump house floor before receding 
early in June. All in all it was a successful move to and from the 
hatcheries. Little damage was done to the hatchery due to the flood waters. 



12 



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13 




Wayne F. MacCallum 
Assistant Director of Wildlife 



The Wildlife Research Section consists of one chief, three game biologists, 
two assistant game biologists, one restoration project field agent, and one 
conservation helper. This staff is responsible for research on and management 
of approximately 75 species of mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians which 
are traditionally hunted, trapped or otherwise taken for food, animal products, 
or sport. Additionally, the section is responsible for administering the 
Division's falconry program, for coordinating development of the Division's 
wildlife management areas, and for recommending to and advising the senior 
staff and Fisheries and Wildlife Board on matters of administration, regulation, 
and policy relative to the Commonwealth's wildlife resources. The section 
oversees three Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Projects (W-9-D, W-35-R, 
and W-42-R) comprising about 35 research jobs in addition to about four other 
jobs conducted by the Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit and 
supervised by the Division. Section biologists also coordinate with the 
Realty, Planning, Nongame and Information Sections when particular expertise 
on wildlife matters is needed. Summaries of current studies underway follow. 

WATERFOWL 

Pre-season Banding 

Airboat nightlighting and bait trapping was used to band 477 wood ducks, 
230 mallards, 69 black ducks, 15 mallard x black hybrids, 24 blue-winged teal, 
and 19 green-winged teal. 



14 



Statewide Goose Census 

In late December, the Division conducted its first statewide goose count, 
in conjunction with the annual Audubon Christmas Bird Count. Division personnel 
covered areas of Massachusetts not covered by the Audubon bird counts. A total 
of 21,704 Canada geese were counted, 8,536 in inland areas and 13,168 along 
coastal towns. 

Mid-Winter Waterfowl Inventory 

A total of 286,413 waterfowl were counted during the January 1984 winter 
inventory, the highest count in more than 20 years due to the presence of 
215,890 ducks. Black ducks (20,401) were up 21% over last year but unchanged 
(-1%) from the 10 year average. All other waterfowl were up well above last 
year's low count except scaup (-63%) and geese (-5%). 

Winter Banding 

December and January averaged below normal temperatures but were 
characterized by alternating cold and warm spells. Only 222 black ducks, 
53 mallard x black hybrids, 3 mallards and 1 pintail were banded. 

Wood Duck Nest Structure Study 

No duck nests were started in plastic buckets on 13 new areas established 
during the winter of 1981-82, but seven wood ducks and one hooded merganser 
nested in wooden boxes on the same areas. Usage on 14 established wood duck 
box areas ran 30% for 46 buckets, 47% for 170 boxes and 25% for 12 metal 
cylinders. Success rate was 100% for nests in cylinders, 86% in boxes and 57% 
in buckets. 

Biological Tagging of Wood Ducks 

A total of 493 blood smears were read from birds sampled between 6 August 
and 15 October 1983. The blood parasite infection rate for birds from southern 
New England (primarily Massachusetts) was 89.4% for 1982 vs. 77.9% in 1981 
and 79.3% in 1980. 

Wood Duck Production Study 

One hundred seventy-seven nest starts were 
structures on 50 areas across the state. There 
duck hatches and nine hooded merganser hatches. 

Canada Goose Parts Collection Survey 

A network of cooperators was established through a series of goose sex 
and aging workshops held across the state. Measurements were taken on 247 
geese either bagged by sportsmen or collected by Parker River National Wildlife 
Refuge personnel. Data collected were computerized by Connecticut wildlife 
personnel. The measurements will aid in determining the origin of geese 
harvested in Massachusetts. 



recorded in 558 available 
were 138 successful wood 



15 



Experimental Waterfowl Season Appraisal 

In 1983, Massachusetts modified its zoned waterfowl season by dividing 
the inland zone into a western and central zone. This was coupled with black 
duck harvest restrictions. Only one black duck was allowed daily in the 
western and central zones. We continued with a two black duck bag in the 
coastal zone but did not allow black duck hunting during 10 days in December, 
resulting in a 40 instead of 50 day season for black ducks. The central and 
coastal zone both opened 24 October after the start of the pheasant season. 
The waterfowl harvest remained generally unchanged but the wood duck harvest 
declined 62% from prezoning years while the black duck harvest declined 30%. 

SMALL GAME 

A total of 603 hunters were contacted to attain a sample of 400 small 
game hunters licensed in 1983. Hunters were surveyed to determine their 
participation and harvests during the 1983-84 hunting season. 

Sampled totals were expanded to provide an index of total hunter 
participation, total hunter success, and total harvest. Average harvests 
were calculated as mean take. Pheasant, ruffed grouse, and cottontail were 
the preferred species ranked by hunter effort and hunter success. Pheasant, 
cottontail, and gray squirrel predominated in the bag. 

The majority of waterfowl hunters (44%) hunted only in the coastal zone. 
Among all waterfowl hunters, an estimated 8,655 (51.6%) hunt the coastal zone, 
6,295 (37.5%) the central zone, and 1,574 (9.4%) the western zone. 

Hunters were also queired in this survey regarding deer hunting activity. 
The estimated number of deer hunters was calculated as 83,144, an increase of 
6.2% over 1981-82 estimates. The number of participants engaging in archery 
and primitive firearms hunting increased by two-thirds over 1981-82; however 
shotgun hunters increased by only 5%. 

BEAVER 

The 1983-84 beaver season ran from 23 November to 29 February statewide. 
During this season, a total of 531 beavers were taken by 72 trappers in 
78 towns, for a mean take of 7.4 beaver per successful trapper. This take 
represented a decrease of 53 beaver (-9.1%) from 1982-83. Decreases were 
most evident in Essex-Middlesex (-47.3%), Hampden (-41.4%), and Berkshire 
(-38.5%) counties and in Zones 06 (-96.2%), 04 (-51.8%), and 01 (-46.7%). 
Increases were evidenced in Hampshire (+161.5%) and Worcester (+28.3%) counties 
and in Zone 03 (+25.3%). Trapper take decreased in December and increased in 
February, Pelt prices continue to be low. 

Commencing in 1984-85, the beaver season will run from 15 November until 
the last day of February: with the provision that no Conibear-type traps 
greater than #110 or equivalent shall be allowed after 15 January. 



16 



OTTER AND FISHER 

During the 1983-84 otter season, 58 successful trappers took 119 otter 

in 59 towns in nine counties for an average of 2.0 otter per successful 

trapper. This compares with a harvest of 106 and an average of 2.3 in 1982-83. 

The fisher take decreased from 140 in 1982 to 124 in 1983, with 57 
successful trappers taking an average of 2.2 fisher each among 49 towns in 
seven counties (64 trappers averaging 2.2 in 1982). 

Worcester (55), Essex (15), Hampden (13), and Franklin (12) counties and 
Zones 03 (37) and 02 (25) yielded the most otter and Worcester (63) , Essex 
(23), and Franklin (17) counties the most fisher. 

A total of 46 otter and 121 fisher carcasses were collected. The mean 
age of otter in 1983-84 was 1.97 and of fisher 1.62. This compares with 1.97 
for otter and 1.56 for fisher in 1982-83. One-half (J^ 50%) of the otter aged 
2.5 and older and 19 (79%) of the fisher aged 1.5 and above during 1983-84 had 
been bred. This compares with figures of 100% for otter and 71% for fisher in 
1982-83. Average corpora lutea counts were 2.5 for otter and 3.1 for fisher 
in 1983-84, and 2.4 and 2.9 respectively in 1982-83. 

Commencing in 1984-8 5, the otter season will run from 1 November until 
15 December, with mandatory carcass turn- in. 

BOBCAT HARVEST EVALUATION 

A total of 28 bobcats were taken in 1983-84, including 14 by hunting, 
13 by trapping, and one road kill. The mean take per successful hunter 
(N=13) was 1.1 and per successful trapper (N=ll) was 1.2. Bobcats were 
trapped most frequently in November (92.3%) and shot in January (71.4%). 
Target selectivity is low for trapping (15.4%) and moderately high (64.4%) 
for hunting. In 1983-84, bobcats were taken in 19 towns in five counties. 
Kittens (0.5 age class) comprised 20% of the take. The average pelt price 
($50.92) was the lowest since 1977-78. 

COYOTE INVESTIGATIONS AND HARVEST SURVEY 

A total of 34 coyotes were taken by 25 sportsmen in 26 towns and six 
counties during the 1983-34 hunting season. Nearly two-thirds (65%) of 
the kill was in November, with 11 hunters (32%) targeting specifically for 
coyote. Immature coyotes comprised 72% of the harvest. Fourteen mortalities 
from causes other than sport hunting were recorded. 

MOURNING DOVE CENSUS 

The total number of calling doves on three long-term standardized routes 
decreased 29% during 1983-84. Counts on all 18 comparable routes increased 
14% (175 to 200) from 1983 to 1984. 



17 



BOBWHITE QUAIL CENSUS 

The 1983 weighted call indices for Bristol County showed no significant 
change from the 1981 Bristol index or from a five-year (1973-1981) index of 
consistent routes. The 1983 weighted index for Plymouth County showed no 
significant change from the 1981 Plymouth index. Indices from all other 
counties and from the statewide total showed significant or highly significant 
changes from the 1981 Plymouth index. Indices from all other counties and 
from the statewide total showed significant or highly significant declines 
from 1981 indices and from a five-year (1973-1981) mean index, both for all 
routes and for consistent routes only. 

WOODCOCK 

The 1983 woodcock season harvest increased 12% over 1982, but was 21% 
lower than 1981. 

The 1984 spring woodcock singing ground census count averaged 1.39 birds 
per route as compared to 0.67 birds per route in 1983; an increase of 107%. 
However, because of two disastrous springs (1982,1983) the excellent recovery 
returned the population to only slightly above the 1982 estimate of 1.27 birds 
(a record low at that time) . 

The spring of 1984 was colder than normal and a six-day period of rain in 
late May produced a rainfall of over nine inches in some sections of 
Massachusetts . 

Because of this rainfall and the cold spring, good woodcock survival was 
doubtful, and because the singing ground census was still low, the Fisheries 
and Wildlife Board voted to continue with a two bird daily bag limit which had 
been in effect since 1982. 

WILD TURKEY RANGE AND HARVEST EVALUATION 

The fifth Massachusetts spring gobbler hunt was held during a two-week 
period in May 1984 in all counties and parts of counties west of the 
Connecticut River. A record number of 3,818 permits were allotted, for 
which a total of 5,376 applications were received. A record kill of 208 
turkeys was attained, with a sportsman participation rate of 3,467 (91.2%) 
and a hunter success rate of 6.0%. The Berkshire county kill was 143 (69%); 
Franklin county 32 (15%); Hampden county 21 (10%); and Hampshire county 12 
(6%). Adult males totalled 123, or 59% of the total kill. 

Winter weather conditions hampered trap-and-transplant . A total of 25 
turkeys (11 females, 14 male) were captured and processed. Twenty-one 
turkeys (11 females, 10 male) were released in Groton, Middlesex county, 
and an additional four toms were banded and released at two capture sites. 

Recommendations for the 1985 season are to: 

1. Increase season length to three weeks, beginning the first Monday 
in May. 



18 



2. Divide the three weeks into two periods — the first week and the 
second and third weeks combined. 

3. Issue permits at the same rate as in 1984, but with equal number of 
permits (3,800) for each period. 

4. A hunter can apply for only one period, but can designate a second 
choice. 

FALCONRY 

During 1984, the ranks of the falconers remained stable with 15 apprentice, 
nine general and six master falconry permits issued. The most frequently 
flown bird was the red-tailed hawk. Four breeding permits and 23 raptor 
salvage permits were also issued. 

DEER 

The 1983 statewide deer harvest for all seasons combined was 4,525 deer 
which is an increase of 514 over the 1982 harvest of 4,011. Seventy-four 
percent of the 1984 harvest came from the counties of Berkshire, Franklin, 
Hampshire, and Hampden. Worcester County contributed 12% (570 deer) of the 
state deer harvest and Barnstable County contributed 2% (115 deer). The 
islands of Dukes and Nantucket counties contributed 2% (154 deer) and 3% (137 
deer) respectively. The remaining counties of Essex, Middlesex, Norfolk, 
Bristol, and Plymouth contributed 5% (208) deer to the overall harvest. 

A total of 3,801 deer was taken during the December shotgun season; of 
this total, 2,670 were males and 1 ; 131 were female deer. Archers took 413 
deer (282 males, 131 females) and primitive firearm hunters harvested 303 
deer (122 males, 181 females). Paraplegic sportsmen took three males and 
five females during their special hunt. 

Successful hunters taking an antlered male during any season were allowed 
to hunt and take a second deer — but during the shotgun season a hunter must 
have been issued an antlerless permit to harvest an antlerless deer. 

A total of 44,535 antlerless permit applications were received before 
the 1983 season. Seven thousand, two hundred sportsmen permits and 464 
farmer-landowner permits were issued for mainland Massachusetts. The 1983 
harvest of antlerless deer by permit holders was 1,372 deer. 

Natural Resource Officers reported 467 non-hunting deer mortalities 
during the 1983 calendar year. Deer-vehicle collisions accounted for 73% 
of non-hunting mortality. Illegal kills, dogs, unknown causes, crop damage, 
and drowning accounted for the remainder of non-hunting mortalities. 

BLACK BEAR 

A total of 774 bear hunting permits were issued during 1983-84. Ten 
bears were taken; eight during the first period of the season and two during 



19 



the second period. Eight males and two females were taken from Berkshire (5) , 
Franklin (3), Hampden (1), and Hampshire (1) counties. Seven non-hunting 
mortalities were reported, including two road kills, two found dead, one 
nuisance kill, one capture mortality, and one euthanized. Seven nuisance 
complaints, including four beehive depredations, were received. 

STUDIES CONDUCTED BY THE MASSACHUSETTS COOPERATIVE WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNIT 

1 . Wild Turkey Population Dynamics 

Five of 16 birds instrumented during winter 1982-83 remained available 
for study as of 1 December 1983. These birds were monitored through February 
to obtain data on winter habitat use. 

Trapping efforts in February and March provided 23 additional birds 
(20 females, 3 males) for the study. Monitoring efforts during and following 
spring dispersal concentrated on hens in order to detect onset of nesting 
behavior. All hens will be monitored through the breeding season to provide 
information on productivity. Hens with broods will be monitored through the 
summer to obtain data on brood habitat use. 

Seven birds died during the report period. Three hens were lost to 
predation; one in the fall and two during the spring dispersal/nesting season. 
Two males were also lost through predation, and two were shot during the legal 
hunting season. 

2 . Ecology and Status of the Bobcat in Western Massachusetts 

The second trapping season started in December 1983 and continued through 
March 1984. Eight adult bobcats (5 males, 3 females) captured 12 times in 
box traps, were weighed, measured, and collared with radio-transmitters. 
Movement, activity, and habitat data are presently being obtained. Four 
radio-collared bobcats died during the past year. 

Snow-tracking data were obtained from 12 days of tracking seven collared 
bobcats (4 males, 3 females) . Snow-tracking observations have been made to 
evaluate habitat use, feeding habits, behavior, and intraspecif ic interactions. 

Twenty-seven bobcat carcasses were obtained for this study from the 
Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife. Sex, age, and female 
reproductive status were determined from the carcasses, along with weight 
and length measurements. The digestive tract contents were removed for food 
habits analysis. 

3 . Black Bear Home Range, Movements, and Habitat Use in Massachusetts 

This job was completed and a thesis prepared and approved. Findings 
are summarized below. A new job investigating sow-cub interactions, 
reproductive success, and cub survival will be initiated 1 July 1984. 



20 



Between May 1980 and July 1983, 63 different bears were captured and 
tagged in western Massachusetts. Thirty-five of these bears (13 males, 
22 females) were radio collared and 24 (6 males, 18 females) were intensively 
monitored for over 20 months. Home ranges^ 318 square kilometers for adult 
males, 28 square kilometers for adult females, 34 square kilometers for sub- 
adults, and 12 square kilometers for yearlings. Home ranges did not 
represent exclusive terriorities f or either males or females, but were 
familiar core areas with fluid edges. Considerable overlap in ranges were 
observed in all sex and age classes. Round-the-clock activity monitoring 
showed that bears were active at all times of the day, and showed crepuscular 
tendencies only in summer. Summer activity peaks occurred at dawn and dusk. 
Spring and fall activity peaked at dusk. Bears exhibited no nocturnal activity 
in any season except limited early evening activity in the June -July breeding 
period. Habitat use by all bears coincided with major seasonal food sources. 
Wetlands were highly preferred in spring and early summer. Skunk cabbage 
( Symplocarpus foetidus ) and grasses growing in wooded wetlands, constituted 
most of bears' early spring diet. Bears used abandoned fields, clearcuts, 
and other berry-producing areas in late summer. Hardwood stands were important 
in fall, as acorns and beechnuts were major fall food items. Wetland edges 
and "corridors" along streams were major travel routes in all seasons. Bears 
denned usually from mid-November to mid-April. Most dens (62.5%) were in 
slash piles left by logging operations. 

Detailed findings are presented in the thesis, "Home Range, Movements, 
and Habitat Preferences of Bi ac k Bear in Western Massachusetts" by Kenneth 
D. Elowe. 

FURBUYER TALLIES 

A total of 27 furbuyers submitted annual reports; of these, nine did 
not buy any furs from Massachusetts trappers or hunters. The remaining 18 
purchased 30,281 muskrat, 516 mink, 68 otter, 11 skunk, 6,585 raccoon, 
75 fisher, 489 red fox, 214 gray fox, 313 beaver, 23 bobcat, 18 coyote, 
138 opossum, and 4 weasels. 

The results of four fur auctions held by the Bay State Trappers Association 
were tabulated to give a yearly average. The average prices for 1983-84 
were muskrat $4.30, mink $22.40, otter $35.31, fisher $110.11, opossum $1.57, 
raccoon $10.84, red fox $41.45, gray fox $36.28, bobcat $50.92, beaver $16.26, 
and coyote $21.02. 

MAST SURVEY 

District offices surveyed their oak plots in August to determine acorn 
production. There were 90 permanent oak plots across the state consisting 
of 40 white oak plots (368 trees) and 50 red oak plots (482 trees) . These 
plots were all surveyed during August to determine acorn production. In 
addition, a subjective mast report was distributed to interested volunteers 
throughout the state, to collect general data on a wide variety of wildlife 
food crops. 



21 



White oak production was a complete failure all across the state. Red 
oak production was much better although still a poor rating in every district 
except Northeast which had a failure. Cherry, blackberry, raspberry, blue- 
berry, and crabapple seemed to produce well while production of all others 
was relatively low. 

WILDLIFE DEVELOPMENT 

The Development Project is responsible for operations on 52 Wildlife 
Management Areas, totaling 61,000 acres. The project also has responsibility 
for the construction, erection, and maintenance of nesting structures 
statewide. 

The work done on wildlife management areas provides for public useage 
and safety and improves existing habitat for wildlife. 

Below is a summary of work done between 1 July 1983 and 30 June 1984: 

JOBS PROVIDING FOR PUBLIC USE 

1. Buildings : Maintained 14 buildings on 7 areas. 

2. Bridges : Maintained 2 bridges on 2 areas. 

3. Roads and Trails : Constructed .7 miles of trail on 1 area and maintained 

48 miles of roads and 17 miles of trails on 11 areas. 

4. Parking Lots : Four lots were constructed on 1 area and 61 lots were 

maintained on 13 areas. 

5. Blinds: Fifteen waterfowl blinds were maintained on 2 areas. 

6. Signs and Boundary Markers : A total of 354 signs were erected on 9 areas 

and 11 miles of boundaries were marked on 4 areas. An additional 1,057 
signs were repaired and maintained on 25 areas and 94 miles of boundaries 
were checked and reposted where needed on 25 areas. 

7. Managed Public Hunts : Controlled hunts were held on 4 areas; two for 

waterfowl, one for upland game, and one for deer. 

8. Gates : Thirteen gates were erected on 4 areas and 39 gates were maintained 

on 9 areas. 

9. Building Removal : Seven abandoned buildings were removed from 1 area. 

JOBS FOR IMPROVING WILDLIFE HABITAT 

1. Dams : One dam was maintained. 

2. Fences : Four miles of fences were maintained on 1 area. 

3. Tree and Shrub Planting : Five areas had 600 shrubs and 1,025 trees 

planted for hedgerows and field border improvement. 

4. Herbaceous Seedlings : Personnel planted and/or maintained fields by 

mowing or spreading lime and fertilizer. A total of 242 acres of 
fields were managed on 7 areas. In addition, 1,671 acres of fields 
on 19 areas were managed by cooperative agreements with local farmers. 

5 . Clearing : Nine acres were cleared on 1 area to create herbaceous 

habitat for bob-white quail. 

6. Vegetation Control : Brush was controlled on 14 areas with a total of 

222 acres being affected. 



22 



7. Timber Management : Two acres were cut selectively on 1 area. 

8. Water Level Management : Water levels were manipulated on 1 area of 

160 acres to. encourage emergent vegetation. 

9. Nesting Structures : A total of 166 wood duck nesting boxes were constructed 

for statewide distribution and 936 boxes were checked and repaired. 
Four osprey nesting platforms were constructed in southeastern 
Massachusetts, bringing the total number constructed under this program 
up to 15 platforms. Six loon nesting rafts were placed on Quabbin 
Reservoir. One-hundred bluebird nest boxes were constructed and 
distributed to the five wildlife districts for installation. 

Additional time was spent by personnel in planning work, submitting 
reports, ordering supplies, maintaining equipment used on the project, 
inspecting ongoing work and checking each area. 



23 




E. Michael Pollack 
Chief Game Biologist 



During the 1982 and 1983 pheasant rearing season, all the game farms 
experienced a highly contagious viral disease causing a 50% or higher chick 
mortality. 



The disease was finally identified by the University of Connecticut 
Wildlife Disease Department as "rotavirus." Mortality of the chicks occurred 
between 3-15 days and could not be controlled by any treatment. 

Starting in the fall of 1983, all farms conducted a vigorous sanitary 
program; fumigated all equipment and buildings and closed farms to non-essential 
traffic, i.e., visitors. In addition, all broodstock was released and new 
broodstock acquired from New York State. 



The results of a such a stringent program paid off as 1984 resulted 
in no evidence of rotavirus. Mortality to date has been normal. 



24 



Game Farm Production 
1983 

Pheasants 



Game Farm 


SR 


B 


C 


PG 


Totals 


Ayer 


1,795 


1,436 


3,892 


10,408 


17,531 


Wilbraham 


1,985 


2,960 


6,716 


6,132 


17,793 


Sandwich 


125 


1,192 


2,832 


6,076 


10,225 


Totals 


3,905 


5,588 


13,440 


22,616 


45,549 



Quail 4,170 



No white hare purchased due to poor trapping conditions in New Brunswick during 
winter of January-February 1984. 



25 




NON-GAME AND ENDANGERED SPECIES 



Bradford G. Blodget 
State Ornithologist 



The Massachusetts Nongame and Endangered Species Program was first 
established by the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife in 1977. As a 
result of the passage of Chapter 330 of the Acts of 1983; often referred 
to as the Nongame Checkoff Bill (see legislative section) , the Nongame 
and Endangered Species Program was able to expand its programs in Fiscal 
1985. The program's full time staff now includes the Assistant Director 
for Nongame and Endangered Species, the State Ornithologist and Information 
Specialist. Checkoff funds first became available in the 1985 Fiscal 
Year so the program is expected to develop even further over the next year. 

Another new development was the transfer of the Massachusetts Natural 
Heritage Program from the Department of Environmental Management to the 
Division of Fisheries and Wildlife. The Massachusetts Natural Heritage 
Program has been operated since 1978 cooperatively between the Commonwealth 
and The Nature Conservancy and, during this period, has primarily been 
funded from the General Fund through periodically renewed contracts. The 
Nongame and Endangered Species Program work closely together to identify 
and protect populations of rare plant and animal species and unique natural 
communities. 



26 



Passage of the Nongame Checkoff Bill was a Legislative landmark for 
the Nongame and Endangered Species Program. Versions of this bill had been 
debated by the state legislature since 1978. This law now provides a funding 
source for the Nongame and Endangered Species Program through a state income 
tax checkoff as well as through direct donations to the Nongame Wildlife 
Fund. All contributions are voluntary and will be federally tax deductable. 
These funds will be used for operation of the Nongame and Endangered Species 
Program, including nongame inventory, research, management, education, 
administration and land acquisition. The law also officially established a 
seven member Nongame Advisory Committee which replaced a similar Ad-Hoc 
Committee appointed by the Director in 1981. 

As previously mentioned, the Massachusetts Natural Heritage Program 
was also transferred to the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife in Fiscal 
1984 through the transfer of its line item in the state's budget. A total 
of 640 new records of rare plant and animal species and significant natural 
communities were added to the Massachusetts Natural Heritage Program's 
computerized data base during the year, bringing the total to 2,210 records 
by the end of June 1984. Although the Greenway Planning Program is 
budgeted in the same line item, this program will continue to be administered 
primarily by the Department of Environmental Management. 

Restoration Projects 

Bald Eagle 

Four young eagle chicks which arrived from Manitoba, Canada in Fiscal 
1983 successfully fledged from the hack tower at Quabbin Reservoir in Fiscal 
1984. A film, "Home Free," based on the Division's efforts to raise and 
release these young eagles in 1983 was completed and will be released shortly. 

During Fiscal 1984, six additional bald eagle chicks were brought to 
the Quabbin area from Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. Five of these birds 
fledged successfully in Fiscal 1985. The sixth chick died of an intestinal 
bacterial infection while being raised at the tower. 

The annual Winter Bald Eagle Survey was held this year on January 7 . 
As in the past, the greatest number of eagles, 17 bald and one golden, 
were seen at Quabbin Reservoir. Bald eagles were also reported from the 
lower Merrimack River (2), Nantucket (1), Assawompsett Pond (2), and the 
Connecticut River (3) . The statewide totals were 25 bald eagles and one 
golden eagle. 

Common Loon 

During calendar 1983, restoration efforts continued in cooperation 
with the Metropolitan District Commission. Although six loon nesting rafts 
were put out at Quabbin, none were used by nesting loons. Five pairs of 
loons were known to have attempted nesting during the summer of 1983, but 
no chicks fledged. 



During calendar 1984, a cooperative proposal with the Metropolitan 
District Commission and the Massachusetts Audubon Society was submitted 
to the North American Loon Fund. A $2,000.00 grant was awarded which 
provided stipends for two loon wardens. Nesting rafts were again put 
out in spring 1984, but none was used. Four pairs of terriotiral loons 
began nesting before the end of June. 

Peregrine Falcons 

Before the end of Fiscal 1984, preparations were made for the arrival 
of six young peregrine falcons from the Peregrine Fund's captive breeding 
facility at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. A hacking site was 
selected on the roof of the federal J. W. McCormack Post Office and Court 
House Building in downtown Boston. 

Two hack site attendants were hired prior to the arrival of the 
six chicks on July 17 (in Fiscal Year 1985). 

Research Projects 

Plymouth Red-bellied Turtle 

Dr. Terry Graham of Worcester State College was awarded his third 
contract from the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife to conduct research 
on the distribution, population density and structure, and natural history 
of the Plymouth Red-bellied Turtle. His research was also designed to 
evaluate the chemical and biological parameters of ponds where the turtles 
are known to occur. Between July 1, 1983 and the end of September, 39 
different individual red-bellied turtles were captured at Federal Pond, 
two at Crooked Pond and one at Dunham Pond. Foods of nine individuals 
at Federal Pond were analyzed. 

A study of factors threatening recruitment into the existing population 
including predation of eggs and young, environmental stress, and low egg 
production, resulted in several management recommendations. Data for 
turtle captures in spring 1984, and for the water quality parameters of 
the ponds for the entire fiscal year are still in preparation by Dr. Graham. 

Inventory 

Coastal Colonial Waterbird Survey 

In spring 1984, the Nongame and Endangered Species Program initiated 
and coordinated a coastal colonial waterbird survey for the state. This 
survey was conducted in cooperation with the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service 
National Park Service, Trustees of Reservations, Massachusetts Audubon 
Society, and many private individuals. This survey is part of a complete 
east coast effort by the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service to document the 
status of colonial waterbirds. The survey results will be completed in 
Fiscal 1985. 



28 



Terns 

The 1984 annual tern census and inventory began in June. This 
will be the Eight Annual Tern ;Survey coordinated by the Division of 
Fisheries and Wildlife. Data will be available following the September 
meeting in Wellfleet. The 1983 report was issued in fall of 1983. Fifty 
colonies with a total of 7,909 pairs of Common Tern were recorded as 
were 18 pairs of Artie Tern, 1,502 pairs of Roseate Tern, and 2,112+ 
pairs of Least Tern. Seventy-plus pairs of Piping Plover were also recorded 
in association with 30 tern colonies. In 1984, Piping Plover were separately 
inventoried by the Massachusetts Natural Heritage Program. 

Inland Great Blue Herons 

With assistance from four cooperators, the Nongame and Endangered 
Species Program staff completed the 1983 survey of Great Blue Heron 
colonies. In 1983, 13 colonies were found to contain a total of 191 active 
nest platforms and produced approximately 500 young. By contrast, in 1979, 
six known colonies contained 28 active nests. The number of nesting Great 
Blue Herons known in Massachusetts continues to increase annually. 

The 1984 survey was begun and results will be available later this 

fall. 
Bats 

Coordinated by Jim Cardoza of the Division Wildlife Research Section, 
the annual mid-winter bat survey was completed and the results were tabulated 
for the Chester emery mines. A total of 872 bats were reported in the Old 
Mine, including 153 little brown bats, 113 keen's bats, 15 eastern pipistvelles, 
and 591 unidentified myotis . The Macia mine contained 57 little brown bats, 
90 keen's, 19 pipistvelles, and six myotis . Checks at other locations 
included the Tantiusques Mine in Sturbridge (3 little brown, 2 keen's) and 
Bat's Den Cove in Egremont (2 little brown, 11 pipistvelles). 

Bog Turtle 

Three gravid females were discovered in a unique calcareous fen in 
western Massachusetts in June 1984. This represents the first population 
of this rare reptile ever documented in Massachusetts. Only one previously 
documented specimen had been reported from the state. Continued inventory, 
research, and management is planned to insure the security of this newly 
discovered population. 

Land Acquisition 

During Fiscal 1984, nine properties in the state were identified for 
possible acquisition. In conjunction with the Massachusetts Natural Heritage 
Program, land acquisition priorities were designed to consider the global and 



29 



and state significance of the species and natural communities that are present 
and can be protected on a site. Negotiations are underway for two properties 
but no agreements have been reached as yet. 

Staff and Budget 

Staff Changes 

In March 1984, Dr. Thomas French took over as Assistant Director for 
Nongame and Endangered Species and Brad Blodget assumed his former position 
as State Ornithologist. Joy Merzer began in January 1984 as a contracted 
Information Specialist for the program. Joy worked with Ellie Horwitz during 
Fiscal 1984 primarily on promotion for the Nongame Wildlife Fund. 

These promotional efforts included preparation of public service 
announcements for television and radio^ production of an award-winning 
brochure and a poster by Boston University's Ad Lab, numerous radio and 
television interviews by the Nongame and Endangered Species Program staff 
and Advisory Committee Members, and many other presentations around the state. 

Other Affiliated Staff 

The Nongame and Endangered Species Program continues to benefit from 
inventory and management efforts of staff in the Division's game section. 
Some of the primary contributions in Fiscal 1984 were from Bill Davis (osprey 
pole program, purple martin house program, bald eagle project, and others), 
Jim Cardoza (bat surveys), Jack Swedberg (bald eagle project), Bill Byrne 
(bald eagle project), Peter Mirick (reptile and amphibian issues)- Dave 
Halliwell (nongame fish issues) , Ellie Horwitz (program promotion and bat 
survey). Without the efforts of these staff members, many of the nongame 
projects of Fiscal 1984 could not have been accomplished. 

Massachusetts Natural Heritage Program 

Major research and inventory projects for rare animal species included 
grassland bird surveys; a coastal inventory of Piping Plover, American 
Oystercatcher, and Willet; contracts to outside researchers for the study of 
rare lepidoptera, rattlesnakes, and small mammals; and the organization of 
the third annual statewide salamander survey. 

Highlights of botanical field work in Fiscal 1984 included the discovery 
of three rare native plant species never before seen in Massachusetts, and 
the rediscovery of a dozen rare species not seen in the state for the past 
50 to 100 years. 

A total of 851 projects from a variety of sources, including federal 
and state environmental regulatory processes, municipal governments, 
private conservation groups, and private consultants were reviewed by the 
staff during Fiscal 1984. Of these, 130 (15.4%) had rare species within 



ir study areas, and comments were prepared for the appropriate agenc 
address potential mitigation or protection measures. 



31 



DISTRICT REPORTS 



Northeast District, Walter L. Hoyt, District Wildlife Manager 
Southeast District, Louis Hambly, District Wildlife Manager 
Central District, G. Christopher Thurlow, District Wildlife Manager 
Connecticut Valley District, Herman Covey, District Wildlife Manager 
Western District, Tom Keefe, District Wildlife Manager 



The wildlife districts are the operating field units of the Division of 
Fisheries and Wildlife working directly on Division properties, conducting 
field research under the supervision of project biologists and serving as 
liaison with sportsmen, conservation groups and the general public. During 
the 1984 fiscal year, personnel from all districts stocked trout, pheasants, 
and operated checking stations at which hunters checked in deer, turkeys 
and where trappers checked pelts. They assisted the Division of Law 
Enforcement in enforcing wildlife regulations and monitored controlled hunts 
at the Delaney Wildlife Management Area and Martin Burns Wildlife Management 
Area (Northeast) , Otis Air Force Base (Southeast) and Ludlow Wildlife 
Management Area (Connecticut Valley) . 

A major focus of District activities was on habitat management on a 
variety of areas owned or managed by the Division. Activities in this 
area were concentrated on planting shrubs and grasses, liming acidic soils, 
fertilizing and cutting of brush and, where appropriate, timber. Farmer/ 
cooperator agreements were redrawn as needed confirming private management 
activities which benefit wildlife primarily, but not exclusively, by 
cultivating and leaving food crops for wildlife. Special efforts in the 



32 



Central District involved preparation of wildlife lands in the recently 
acquired High Ridge Wildlife Management Area - where 12 old buildings 
were removed with the help of demoliiton specialists from the U. S. Army 
and a special planting program was undertaken under the Liberty Tree 
Program through which 2,000 trees and shrubs were planted, roads were 
brushed out and stream improvements were installed over a two month period. 
In the Southeast, habitat management efforts focussed primarily on 
established properties at the Crane Wildlife Management Area and on the 
Myles Standish State Forest. 

While the primary thrust of activities on the management areas was 
for the improvement of wildlife habitat, other activities were carried out 
to benefit human users of the properties. In this regard, district crews 
improved roadways and parking areas and posted signs as needed. 

District staff members also took part in such continuing research 
projects as waterfowl inventory and the mid-winter eagle survey. They 
conducted censuses of mourning dove (4 districts) , woodcock (4 districts) , 
took part in a statewide mast crop survey (3 districts) and counted quail 
(southeast district only) . Staff members of the Connecticut Valley District 
were especially involved in work on the black bear research project being 
conducted through the University of Massachusetts, while members of the 
Western District staff worked closely with research personnel from Westboro 
and from the University on the wild turkey program. In this context, they 
scouted birds, made and maintained contact with landowners and assisted in 
trapping birds to be moved to other portions of the Commonwealth. Field 
crews assisted with the wood duck research program by putting up, cleaning 
and maintaining wood duck nesting boxes as needed; Northeast District 
personnel assisted in the inventory of great blue heron rookeries and 
the Southeast District staff did the same with houses for purple martins. 
Four martin houses were erected; forty were checked and serviced. 

Staff from the Northeast District was involved in the continuing 
controversy over deer management on the Crane Reservation, Ipswich, a 
property of the Trustees of Reservations and the issue of waterfowl feeding 
vs. hunting along the Danvers River. 

As in the past, District personnel responded to public inquiries, 
picked up injured animals and fielded complaints about nuisance animals 
by providing advice, loaning traps and where necessary, by moving beaver. 
During this year, the District staff members also took on additional 
activities as the Nongame and Endangered Species Program gathered 
momentum. Staff members from the Central District and the Connecticut 
Valley District continued to assist in the eagle restoration project at 
Quabbin . 

Fisheries staff members of all districts were heavily involved in 
monitoring water chemistries of selected ponds and streams to determine 
species composition of fish populations, growth rates and productivity 
of the waters. Special emphasis was placed on examining the pH of these 
waters in the Commonwealth. Mitigation measures (liming) were undertaken 



33 



on Sandy Pond, Fresh Pond and College Pond, Plymouth; surveys were conducted 
at Waldo Pond, Brockton; Assawompsett Pond, Lakeville; and 10 streams. 
Permission to undertake liming operations was denied by local Conservation 
Commissions for Schoolhouse Pond, Chatham; Bakers Pond, Orleans; and Great 
Pond, Truro. 

The fisheries staff participated in fisheries and acid rain surveys as 
needed and in projects specialized to their area. This brought staff from 
the Northeast District to the Essex Dam where they assisted in monitoring and 
operating the fishlift. The Northeast District finally closed the former 
Harold Parker State Forest bass rearing facility — inoperative for many 
years — and the ponds, formerly closed, were reopened to public fishing 
as were the ponds of the Southeast's Rochester Rearing System. Staff of 
the Connecticut Valley District and Central District gathered fish for 
the young eagles being raised at Quabbin. Southeast District assisted 
in efforts to improve the Mattapoisett River for the sea-run brown trout 
fishery. 

In the Connecticut Valley, district personnel were involved with the 
beginnings of a program to improve fish habitat on the upper portion of the 
Swift River. Two local sportsmen's clubs had raised $1000.00 each. This, 
with matching funds from T.U.'s Mellon Foundation, provided $6000.00 
for the program. Division crews joined volunteers in developing a trail 
and constructing wing deflectors, a foot bridge and half-log covers which 
were placed in two-three feet of water as escape cover topsoil and were 
seeded. This program is expected to vastly improve fishing on the Swift 
River below the Winsor Dam in Belchertown. 

Time not spent in the above-mentioned activities was spent in technical 
review of a wide assortment of projects derived to have a possible impact 
on fisheries or wildlif e, in technical assistance and in maintenance of 
vehicles, facilities and wildlife management areas. 

District staff members distributed hunting/ fishing licenses and 
related stamps, regulations and informational material to over 450 
license sales outlets, and picked up sales returns from the same. Personnel 
from most districts participated in one or major exhibits helping to 
make the Division and its activities more visible to the general public 
and respond to inquiries from the sporting public. In addition to doing 
this at exhibits, such as the Eastern States Exposition, the Eastern 
Fishing Exposition, the Boston Camping and Outdoor Show and the Topsfield 
Fair, staff members presented programs for clubs, civic organizations, 
sportsmen's groups, and school groups as possible. 

SPECIAL NOTE OF APPRECIATION 

While District crews met and dealt with a wide variety of events and 
conditions, one deserves a special note as fast staff action averted a 
crisis at the Division's largest hatchery. 



34 



After a long wet period and an extended rain on the evening of May 30-3 lnd 
with rising waters of the Swift River about to drown the main pump house at 
the McLaughlin Hatchery, the decision was made to evacuate the entire 
station. Water was rising at 1.5 inches per hour and it became necessary 
to pull the main switch and shut off all power. All staff of the 
Connecticut Valley District were called to meet the emergency and to assist 
hatchery personnel in the transfer of over 500,000 trout. Adult trout 
went to Sunderland while fingerlings went to the Palmer Station. Show 
pool fish were released into Quabbin. The call back started at 8:00pm 
and the men remained on the job until noon the following day. 

The dedication shown by all involved warrants a special vote of thanks. 



35 



STOCKING 



NORTHEAST 



SOUTHEAST 



Trout 



Pheasant 



189,355 



4,800 



141,590 
15,000 

cocks 8,476 
hens 1,910 



Quail 

Hare 

Salmon 



4,170 



CENTRAL 



CONN. 
VALLEY 



WESTERN 



144,500 
7,500 

12,400 
2,250 
1,395 



155,387 
10,396 



207,208 



4,476 
1,620 



10,000 



147 



Tiger Muskie 



10,000 



36 




\ 

INFORMATION & EDUCATION 



Ellie Horwitz 
Chief 

Information and Education 



Press Contacts 

The growth in press coverage noted in Fiscal Year 1983 continued through 
Fiscal Year 1984 with the section issuing 22 press release packets comprising 
130 actual release items. These releases were mailed to an average of 1,700 
outlets including newspapers, radio/TV stations, sportsmen's clubs, conservation 
organizations, town clerks and sporting goods stores. Press response to 
the releases continued to increase and an analysis of clippings for the 
calendar year 1983 showed that . Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and 
Wildlife material was being used on an average of 240 times per month with 
nine months showing a rate of clipping returns considered "prime" (200+) . 

In addition to issuing releases, the section hosted ten special events 
including a press tour of the eagle hacking site at Quabbin which drew 54 
writers and television representatives; dedication of the Roger Reed Hatchery, 
Palmer; signing of a proclamation establishing National Hunting and Fishing 
Day in Massachusetts; dedication of the trout hatchery at Podick Springs; 
release of wild turkeys in Groton (2) ; a press day in the field with the 
bear research team; a press event focussing on transport of a bald eagle 
which had been found shot^, from a South Shore veterinary facility to NRO 
Thomas Ricardi; a general information day for outdoor writers and a press 
conference for the Nongame Fund. A special series of articles, one per 
month, on Division activities was prepared for the Outdoor Message at 
their request by Peter Mirick for a period of three months. 



37 



Special attention was focussed on working with staff of the Trustees 
of Reservations to develop public and press advisory materials and procedures 
to be used in a program to reduce the deer population on the Trustees' 
Crane property through a controlled hunt. The proposed hunt was cancelled 
by the Trustees less than 24 hours before the hunt was to begin, plunging 
information staff into a program of calling prospective hunters, alerting 
all press outlets and providing information to a much surprised press corps. 

The radio show, pioneered with WDLW, continued with a fall radio series 
of 13 weeks of three one minute shows aired six times a week and broadcast 
from September through January. As a commercial sponsor purchased broad- 
casting time, these spots were aired during morning and evening drive times. 

In addition to these programs, the Division responded to direct 
inquiries for information and materials from print and electronic 
journalists . 

Private citizens also sought out the Division for answers to questions 
regarding natural history, wildlife research programs, Division policies, 
public lands, vacation planning, etc. To meet those needs, the Information 
and Education Section mailed out more than 10,000 items (maps, permit 
applications, regulations, publications) and provided personal written 
responses as needed. 

Publications 

Many inquiries were answered with Division publications. As always, 
all annual publications (regulations, stocking lists, fishing access 
information, lists of towns having special hunting regulations, and other 
routine publications) were updated. The Boston Herald agreed to publish 
a sportsmen's calendar using information supplied by the Division, and the 
Boston Globe continued to print the joint Globe/Division fishing guide. 

In addition, the section joined forces with the University of 
Massachusetts in planning and preparing two series of flyers, one on 
Natural History and one on Animal Damage Control which was subsequently 
printed by the Cooperative Extension Service. In all, 11 leaflets were 
issued. 

Massachusetts Wildlife continued to operate at a reduced level. In 
view of the launching of the Nongame Wildlife Fund, section staff determined 
to devote the year's one issue to a celebration of the Nongame Program — an 
issue which was very well received. At the same time, Editors Mirick and 
Horwitz continued to explore options to make the magazine self-supporting. 
An outline of projected production and promotional costs was developed to 
assist Director Cronin in his negotiations to establish a separate fund 
for the magazine. This was considered necessary to enable the magazine to 
meet its expanding obligations once it moves to a subscription basis. 



38 



Exhibits 

As in other years, the Information and Education and District staff 
participated in a series of shows and fairs to increase Division visibility 
and to facilitate communication with members of the general public. During 
1983-1984, the exhibit subject combined warmwater fish and fishing, with 
wildlife research, represented in the exhibit by a bobcat. Information and 
Education staff worked closely with District personnel to prepare live- 
animal exhibits and related materials for the Eastern States Exposition, 
Springfield; the Eastern Fishing Exposition, Boxborough and the newly 
established Springfield Sportsman's Show. In addition to these major 
shows, smaller exhibits were established and staffed at the Greenfield 
and Topsfield Fairs. Table-s-top display units were purchased to assist in 
meeting needs for display material for one and two day shows throughout 
the Commonwealth. 

Programs 

All members of the section participated in presenting slide and film 
shows to both technical groups and general audiences. While this year 
saw a heavy emphasis on shows explaining the nongame program, other popular 
programs involved wildlife in Massachusetts' turkey restoration, Division 
activities and programs designed specifically for the particular audience. 
These groups included school groups, garden, sportsmen and civic clubs, 
senior citizens, church groups, etc. In addition to presenting such 
programs as possible, the section's photography staff created slides to 
enhance programs given by biologists and District personnel. 

Photography 

Division photographers continued to document Division-related 
wildlife activities on film to increase the Division's library of still 
photos and film footage. Photographers Swedberg and Byrne worked closely 
with members of the Nongame staff to produce a slide show on the Nongame 
Program. This program, prepared as a coordinated slide tape production 
in both 25 minute and 10 minute versions has been extremely popular with 
groups seeking information and entertainment. As additional photographs 
were generated, a problem arose in developing a system, long neglected, 
whereby photographs could be organized in an efficient manner to make them 
accessible to Division staff. Volunteer Anne Youngstrom worked with the 
photographers to revitalize the system currently in use and to update 
photography files. 

Education 

In addition to general school programs mentioned under "Programs" 
and the instruction provided at the Massachusetts Junior Conservation Camp, 
special programs were offered to Ducks Unlimited 's Greenwings, and to 
two sessions of Project Adventure, an enrichment program of the Westboro 
schools. A workshop for teachers on teaching about wildlife was held at 



39 



the request of the Concord Public School System and conversations with the 
Audubon Society continued on the subject of Massachusetts' involvement 
in Project WILD. 

Special Programs 

Nongame Promotion 

Unquestionably, the single most important "special project" addressed 
by the Information and Education Section during the period was the preparation 
of material for and launching the first campaign to obtain contributions to 
the newly established Nongame Wildlife Fund. The Fund, and a checkoff 
provision on the. Massachusetts Income Tax to generate donations was established 
by the Massachusetts Legislature and signed into law by Governor Michael S. 
Dukakis on July 26, 1983. Shortly thereafter, plans were initiated to 
develop promotional materials. Some 35 groups with wildlife related programs 
were solicited to co-sponsor the new program and to assist with distribution 
of promotional material. Donations were solicited to allow the printing 
of these promotional materials and funds were received from the Massachusetts 
Audubon Society, the Sierra Club and the Middlesex County League of Sportsmen's 
Clubs. A crash course in basic advertising was provided to section Chief 
Ellie Horwitz by faculty members of Emerson College and Boston University. 
This latter institution also offered the services of a group of young 
advertising pre-prof essionals through AdLab, a senior and graduate seminar 
in advertising. The AdLab team worked with Division staff to prepare basic 
promotional material including a poster, a program brochure, small cards 
for general distribution and a print ad using the slogan "Line 36B is for 
the birds. . ." Press releases were issued to introduce the program, special 
releases were generated to assist legislators in promoting the program among 
their constituents and special press packages were created to meet press 
demand for information about the new program and about specific individual 
projects. Fifteen, 30 and 60 second radio spot announcements were 
developed and Ellie Horwitz worked with Channel 5 in the production of a 
30 second television spot. Efforts were made to solicit the services 
of a special spokesman - contacts were made with Bill Cosby, Larry Bird 
and Big Bird (Carroll Henderson). In all cases, arrangements proved 
impossible in view of the limited time frame. 

Once initial plans had been established and print materials were 
in preparation, effort was turned to distribution of posters and brochures. 
Posters were placed in town clerks' offices, tax preparer's offices, in 
libraries and in veterinary offices. Brochures were available at all of 
these outlets as well as at offices of affiliated groups and at meetings 
of clubs and organizations. Appearances for program director Dr. Thomas 
French and for Commissioner Walter Bickford were booked on all major 
television stations and many radio stations. Additional radio appearances 
were made by other members of the Nongame staff and by members of the Nongame 
Advisory Committee. The task of generating these bookings and monitoring 

the use of radio/TV materials was taken on in January by Joy Merzer who 
joined the staff as Information Consultant for the Nongame Program. By 



40 



the end of June, this program had netted $388,070.00. 

Freshwater Fishing Awards 

Four hundred and seventy-five applications were received for recognition 
under this program. Annual winners were recognized in a special awards 
ceremony held at the Eastern Fishing Exposition. New state records were 
set for American shad and carp. The Tags 'n' Trout program, sponsored 
cooperatively by the Division and numerous civic groups, clubs and sporting 
businesses placed 375 fish in 15 bodies of water. Tag return rates were 
60% and, at the conclusion of the program in September, 100% of the 
participating groups sent in the requested reporting materials. 

Conservation Camp 

The section continued in its traditional role which involves pre-camp 
administration, publicity and general record keeping. To facilitate this 
and for the convenience of the camp nurse, a new health record form was 
prepared. Publicity for the camp was woven into numerous Division shows 
and press releases. Special publicity for the camp was offered through a 
special display at the Framingham Sportsmen's Show and through the develop- 
ment of a slide set showing camp activities. Once camp opened, section 
staff joined other Division staff as instructors. Section staff also 
prepared and administered a final examination and took part in graduation 
ceremonies. 

Waterfowl Stamps 

The stamp program, now into its 11th year, drew 67 entries to the 
Peabody Museum of Salem. The winning painting was a white winged scoter 
carved by Captain Samuel Fabens and painted by Joseph Cibula of Marstons 
Mills. 

Archery/Primitive Firearms Stamp 

This year, for the first time, sportsmen hunting with historic 
firearms during the three day "primitive/ f irearms/deer season" were 
required to purchase the same stamp used by bowhunters earlier in the 
year. The design for the stamp was prepared on commission by Graphic 
Artist David Gabriel of Dorchester. 

Wildlife Projects 

Information and Education staff members continued their active 
participation in the Division's wildlife research and management programs 
in many ways. Both Jack Swedberg and Bill Byrne continued their active 
role in the Eagle Restoration Program with Jack especially involved as 
Restoration Project Leader. Peter Mirick continued to coordinate the 
Division portion of the statewide breeding salamander survey and to serve 



as Division Herpetologist . Ellie Horwitz continued to participate in the 
statewide bat inventory. 

Other 

In addition to the aforementioned activities, section staff members 
participated in many other programs and projects. The annual deer season 
hotline was in operation throughout deer season and hunters taking note- 
worthy deer were offered attractive commemorative certificates. Early sale 
of licenses was encouraged by the preparation of Christmas gift envelopes 
and a Christmas gift campaign. 

Staff members Horwitz, Mirick and Swedberg were active participants 
in the New England Outdoor Writers. Horwitz and Mirick served that group 
as Chairmen of the Annual Awards Committee. 



42 




REALTY 



Floyd Richardson 
Chief of Wildlife Lands 



The enactment of Chapter 723 Acts of 1984 can only be described as 
land-mark legislation. Capital outlay monies totalling 162 million dollars 
to acquire, preserve and protect open space became the responsibility 
of seven state agencies. 

Fiscal Year '84 also ushered in the Nongame Tax Checkoff bill. 
A portion of the funds collected under this program would be for the 
specific purpose of acquiring rare, threatened or endangered species habitat. 

The planning, accountability and responsibility for the implementation 
of this environmentally important program rests with the Realty Section. 
The new dimension created by the multiple funding sources presents new 
challenges. The implementation and committal of funds which will follow 
will benefit all having a genuine interest in the great out-of-doors. 



43 



Millers River Acquisition Project 2,067.3 acres 

One hundred and thirty-five (135) acres of exceptional wildlife lands 
add significantly to this management area. The newly acquired parcel is 
fringed with a wetland marsh on its western perimeter. Stockwell Road, its 
northern boundary provides access and off-road parking, while the eastern 
and southern boundaries abut other Division lands. Mixed hardwoods and 
softwoods offer habitat for deer, turkey, varying hare, grouse and other 
game species. The acquired parcel, once a flourishing farm, bears apple 
trees, grape-vine tangles, wild raspberry bushes, and stone walls. These 
elements benefit all species of wildlife. 

Gardner Acquisition Project 1,783.7 acres 

The management and control of the former Gardner State Hospital lands 
was transferred to the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife. Rolling hill- 
sides, open meadows, forestlands and marshland blend together to provide a 
promising wildlife management area. 

Two adjoining parcels were acquired to enlarge the area by an additional 
110 acres. These parcels contribute both forest lands and open lands 
adjacent to Smith Street. 

Bitzer Trout Hatchery 150.6 acres 

This hatchery, long known as the Montague Trout Hatchery, produces 
excellent, large, "line-busting" trout. Water quality is one of the 
contributing factors responsible for the hatchery's success. 

A proposed residential development site directly opposite the hatchery 
was made known to the Division. The development site was perched directly 
over an acquifer which is the water supply for the hatchery. 

The imminent threat of water pollution caused by the proposed 
development and the potentially disasterous affect it would have on the 
hatchery, united sportsmen, town officials, and the Connecticut River 
Watershed Council and this agency. The concern of these groups immediately 
spawned action. 

The Connecticut River Watershed Council opted to purchase the property 
then convey the property to the Division when funds became available. 
Sportsmen held raffles and received donations specifically for the acquisition 
and assisted in its purchase. 

Subsequently, title to the property was recorded in the name of the 
Commonwealth February 14, 1984. 

The Division of Fisheries and Wildlife is most grateful to the 
sportsmen, the Montague town officials, the Connecticut River Watershed 
Council and others too numerous to mention in this report who responded so 
enthusiastically and generously thereby averting contamination of an extremely 
important water resource. 



44 



Hinsdale Flats Acquisition Project 1,147.7 acres 

The Hinsdale Flats has matured into a wildlife area that has sensitive 
habitat for numerous wild species of plants and animals. It plays host 
to every indigenous species of game in Massachusetts. In addition, it 
provides a challenging and well-known trout stream. 

This year two parcels were purchased to add another 85 acres to the 
area. The larger parcel provides shoreline on Muddy Pond. The second 
parcel is situated northerly of Bullards Cross-Road adding frontage on 
Cady Brook. Both parcels contribute wildlife food and cover to the manage- 
ment area. 

Bolton Flats Acquisition Project 734.4 acres 

Fronting Route 110 in the township of Lancaster, this newly acquired 
15 acre addition adjoins one of the more popular wildlife management areas. 
The new addition, with its dense cover and rich soils, provides ideal 
woodcock habitat . 

Moose Hill Acquisition Project 509.5 acres 

A small but important parcel of wildlife land recently acquired 
enlarges and provides protection for this wildlife area. Twelve (12) 
acres of woodland gently slope downward in an easterly direction to combine 
with a wetlands area. Mature oak trees growing throughout the parcel 
provide mast, a valuable wildlife food. 

Phillipston Acquisition Project 2,929.5 acres 

Consisting of woodland and abutting a beaver swamp, this parcel will 
significantly contribute to the wildlife community. The above-mentioned 
marsh is noted for the several successful wood duck nests prevalent 
throughout the flowage. The Cushing's gift is gratefully accepted. 
The Cushing Family of Gardner were most generous and sympathetic to 
wildlife by deeding 130 acres of wildlife land to the Division. 



SUMMARY OF LAND ACQUISITION 
Fiscal Year 1984 



Area Name 
Millers River 
High Ridge 
Bitzer Hatchery 
Bolton Flats 
Moose Hill 
Hinsdale Flats 
Phillipston 



Town 

Royalston 

Gardner 

Montague 

Lancaster 

Paxton 

Hinsdale 

Phillipston 



Acreage 
135.0 
110.0 
10.0 
15.0 
12.0 
45.7 
135.0 



TOTAL: 496.7 



46 




Mamtenance&Development 



John P. Sheppard 
Chief 

Maintenance and Development 



Hatcheries 

Contracts were awarded and work began on construction of a wastewater 
treatment facility at the McLaughlin Hatchery, Belchertown, which will process 
waste-laden waters from the raceways prior to discharging them into the 
Swift River. A new flow monitoring system was installed at that same hatchery 
to ensure consistent conditions for the trout. Existing wells were redeveloped 
at the Sandwich and East Sandwich Hatcheries to improve water supply and a 
contract was let out to do the same for an existing well at the Sunderland 
Hatchery and to install a new water supply line. Development at the Palmer 
Hatchery, plagued with vandalism, involved relocating the existing fence 
to move visitors further away from tanks and raceways. 

Districts 

A major reconstruction of existing roadway and parking facilities 
was completed at the District Headquarters in Belchertown and improvements 
were made on the residence at the station. Additional paving of road and 
driveway was completed at the Western District Headquarters in Pittsfield. 

Field Headquarters - Westboro 



New floor coverings were installed on both first and second floors 
giving the facility a more "finished" appearance. Three free-standing glass 



47 



cases were built and installed in the McDonough Wildlife Museum leaving a need 
for only one case — to house the fishing rod collection. 

Hunter Safety Facility (Gardner) 

This facility is just coming on line and extensive work is required to 
make the existing building serviceable. During this year, storm windows 
were installed as were an oil burner and a hot water unit. A contract 
for vinyl siding of the building was issued and awarded. 

Public Access Facilities 

Four areas received engineering attention during Fiscal Year 1984. 
A new canoe and cartop boat access was designed and built along the Hockomock 
River, Bridgewater. A new concrete slab, walls, concrete pads and wooden 
post barriers were constructed and installed at Fort Pond, Lancaster. This 
completes construction of the access facility at the pond. A new retaining 
wall was built and the existing roadway was reconstructed at White Pond in 
Concord. This now complete facility offers improved access and additional 
parking facilities. 

Another parking facility with a wooden post perimeter was completed 
at Webster Lake, Webster in initiation of a revision of the public access 
facility. Design work was also completed for a new ramp, concrete slab 
and wall at Webster Lake and contracts for the work have been awarded. 



PERSONNEL ACTIONS 



Thirty-five personnel changes were undertaken during this fiscal 
year. They are: 



Retirements 





Name 


Job Title 


Date 


G. 


Kuczma 


Assistant Fish Culturist 


08-26-83 


W. 


Neale 


Wildlife Mgmt . Area Supervisor 


08-17-83 


P. 


DeMarco 


Conservation Skilled Helper 


05-27-84 


J. 


Maslanka 


Conservation Skilled Helper 


12-31-83 


R. 


F . Deane 


Conservation Helper 


03-31-84 


A. 


Kleinot 


Principal Bookkeeper 


06-30-84 



Resignations 



M. Pottle 
R. Mietta 
C. Croken 



Junior Clerk & Typist 
Conservation Skilled Helper 
Senior Clerk & Stenographer 



09-30-83 

11- 26-83 

12- 31-83 



Appointments 

Name Job Title Date 



J. Hazzard 




Conservation Helper 


07- 


-17 


-83 


J. Kerr 




Conservation Helper 


08 


-28 


-83 


W. MacCallum 




Assistant Director — Wildlife 


09 


-08 


-83 


M. LaFleur 

ill J-Jd-L J. U L 




Junior Clerk & Typist 


09 


-25 


-83 


J. F. Williams 




Assistant Fi^h Culturist 


10 


-09 


-83 


R . Lu ra<3 

IV • i—i l_L » — CI o 




Conservation Helner 


11 


-27 


-83 


R. E. Taylor 




Assistant Fish Culturist 


01 


-08 


-84 


J. Shampang 




Conservation Helper 


04 


-29 


-84 


T W French 




Assi stanf Director for 


03 


-05 


-84 






Nonpame & Fndant?ered Snecies 








PTOTnol - i on <5 

X. 1. L/ LLLW L. -L. *— ' LIS 












D. Carlson 




Wildlife Mgmt. Area Supervisor 


10 


-02 


-83 


R. Thomas ian 




Conservation Skilled Helper 


10 


-02 


-83 


N. Limosani 




Principal Clerk 


10 


-01 


-83 


C Croken 




Senior Clerk ft StenoprAnhpr 


12 


-31 


-83 


P. Sutliff 




Senior Bookkeeper 


10 


-02 


-83 


M. Marenghi 




Senior Clerk 


10 


-02 


-83 


A. M. Akin 




Game Bird Culturist 


12 


-04 


-83 


J. S. Gromaski 




Conservation Skilled Helper 


02 


-26 


-84 


S. Foster 




Assistant Game Culturist 


03 


-11 


-84 


M. Wrubel 




Conservation Skilled Helper 


07 


-01 


-84 


K. Weaver 




Conservation Skilled Helper 


10 


-02 


-83 


Other 












C. Ayers 




Conservation Helper from 


10 


-02 


-83 






Conservation Skilled Helper 








B. Blodget 




State Ornithologist 


04 


-08 


-84 


Positions Deleted 










Junior Clerk & 


Stenographer, Grade 5, Boston Office 








Senior Clerk & 


Typist 


, Grade 7, Boston Office 








Staffing Pattern Change 








Right of Way Negotiator to Wildlife Restoration Project 








Field Agent 






08 


-14 


-83 


Conservation Helper to Senior Bookkeeper 


09- 


-14 


-83 



50 



LEGISLATION 



Enacted During Fiscal Year 1984 

Chapter 330 - Acts of 1983. An Act Establishing the Nongame Wildlife 
Fund Along with the Nongame Advisory Committee and Authorizing Income Tax 
Refunds to be Credited to the Nongame Wildlife Fund. 

Chapter 516 - Acts of 1983. An Act Defining "Firearm" and Regulating 
Ownership, Possession or Carrying of a Sawed Off Shotgun. 

Chapter 538 - Acts of 1983. An Act Increasing the Surety Bond Required 
of Persons Authorized to Issue Licenses for the Division of Fisheries and 
Wildlife from $2000.00 to $6000.00. 

Chapter 610 - Acts of 1983. An Act Authorizing and Directing Massachusetts 
to Join With the States of Connecticut, New Hampshire and Vermont along with 
the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service 
in a Common Compact for Management of the Salmon in the Connecticut River. 

Chapter 617 - Acts of 1983. An Act Authorizing the Granting of an 
Easement Over Lands of the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife in Middleboro 
to William Couto for the Purpose of Installing an Electric Power Line to the 
Couto Cranberry Bogs. 

Chapter 656 - Acts of 1983. An Act Designating a certain Section of 
the Lake Quinsigamond Bridge in the Town of Shrewsbury, in Honor of Kenneth 
F. Burns, a late member of the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife Board. 

Chapter 658 - Acts of 1983. An Act Regulating the Interbasin Transfer 
of Water by the Water Resources Commission. 



FINANCIAL REPORT 



"HOW THE SPORTSMEN'S DOLLAR WAS SPENT" 
Account No. Expenditures 



Administration 

Administration 2310-0200 
Information-Education 2310-0200 

Wildlife Programs 
Game Farms 

Wildlife Management** 
Wildlife Cooperative Unit 

Fisheries Programs 
Fish Hatcheries 
Fisheries Management** 
Fisheries Cooperative Unit 

Nongame and Endangered 
Species Program 
Admin., Mgmt. and Research** 2315-0100 

Construction 

Development and Improvement of 
Facilities for Public Use* 2310-0300 

Land Acquisition 

Acquisition of Upland Areas & 
Inholding on Existing Areas* 2310-0310 



2310-0400 
2310-0400 
2310-0400 



2310-0400 
2310-0400 
2310-0400 



Equipment 

Purchase of Equipment 

Dept. of Fisheries, Wildlife, 
and Recreational Vehicles 
Natural Resource Officers' 
Salaries and Expenses (15% ] 

Hunter Safety Training*** 

Transfers from Fund 
Group Insurance 
Salary Adjustments 



2310-0315 



Pension Reserve Fund 



Retirement Assessment 



Interest on Bonded Debt 



.2%) 



Maturing Serial Bonds & Notes 
Total Expenditures 



2350-0100 
2350-0101 



1590-1007 
2310-7001 



0612-1000 
0699-2800 
0699-2900 



$ 468,455.51 
232,199.12 



675,589.62 
756,195.77 
72,000.00 



830,818.99 
644,554.93 
72,000.00 



$ 700,654.63 



1 ,503,785.39 



1 ,547,373.92 

20,743.08 

44,326.15 

140,359.30 
262,556.01 



301 ,51 1 .31 
145,358.96 



533,066.00 
221 ,822.36 

181 ,924.00 

338,026.42 

44,592.50 

194,000.00 

,180,100.03 



Percent- 
age 

1 1 .34% 



24.33% 



25.04% 



,34% 



.72% 



2.27% 



4.25% 



4.88% 
2.35% 



8.62% 
3.59% 

2.94% 

5.47% 

.72% 

3 . 1 4% 

100.00% 



Continuing Appropriation 

Portions of expenditures 60% or 75% reimbursable by Federal Government 
100% reimbursable by Federal Government 



Account No. 

2310-0200 
2310-0315 
2310-0400 
2315-0100* 



2310-0300 
2310-0310 



2670-9016 



Account No, 

2310-0500 

2310-0550 
2315-0100* 



2310-8821 

2310-8840 

2310-8841 
2310-8842 

2310-8843 



APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
Fiscal Year July 1, 1983 to June 30, 1984 



Inland Fish and Game Fund Accounts 



Administration 
Purchase of Equipment 
Wildlife Management 
Nongame Mgmt. & Research 



Appropriations 

71 1 ,309.58 
274,000.00 
3,065,246.36 
22,740.50 
4,073,296.44 

Continuing 
Appropriations 



Development & Improvement 
of Facilities-Public Use 107,374.25 
Acquisition Upland Areas; 
Inholding on Existing Areas 298 ,608 .75 

405,983.00 

Capital Outlay 
Appropriation 



Expenditures 
& Liabilities 

700,654.63 
262,556.01 

3,051 ,159.31 
20,743.08 

4,035,1 13.03 



Expenditures 

44,326.15 

140,359.30 
184,685 .45 

Expenditures 



Acquisition of Coastal 
& Inland Wetlands 



5,545.49 



General Fund Accounts 



Appropriations 



Natural Heritage & 
Greenway Planning 
Acid Rain Investigation 
Nongame Mgmt. & Research 



155,000.00 
50,000.00 
22,740.50 

227,740.50 » 

Capital Outlay 
Appropriations 



Expenditures 
& Liabilities 



144,197.34 
47,350.00 
20,743.08 

212,290.42 



Expenditures 



Wastewater Treatment 
Facility, McLaughlin 
Hatchery (Alloc, of 

2310-8827) 
Acquisition of Cold Water 
Streams for Conservation 
& Recreation 
Associated Costs 

(2310-8840) 
Acquisition of Land to 
Existing Wildlife Manage- 
ment Areas 
Associated Costs 

(2310-8842) 



750,000.00 

3,760,000.00 
240,000.00 

7,050,000.00 
450,000.00 



21 ,807 .23 



Total 
Reversions 

10,654.95 
1 1 ,443.99 
14,087.05 
1 ,997.42 
38,183.41 

Balance 
Forward 



63,048.10 

158,249.45 
221 ,297.55 

Balance 
Forward 

5,545.49 



Total 
Reversions 



10,802.66 
2,650.00 
1 ,997.42 

15,450.08 

Bal ance 
Forward 



12,250,000.00 



21 ,807.23 



728,192.77 

3,760,000.00 
240,000.00 

7,050,000.00 

450,000.00 
12,228,192.77 



*Nongame Mgmt. & Research expenses were funded by 
the Inland Fish and Game and General Funds (50% each) . 



SUMMARY OF REVENUE CREDITED 
TO THE 

INLAND FISH AND GAME FUND 
July 1, 1983 to June 30, 1984 



Collected by Agency: 



Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses* 


3304 


-61 


-01 


-40 


$3 .458 ,720 


.50 


Arrhprv StamDS* 


3304 


-61 


-01 


-40 


1 03 ,31 3 


.80 


Tran Rpffi st rations* 


3304 


-61 


-01 


-40 


1 ,205 


.00 


Uafppfowl Stamns* 

VV CI 1 X ' VV X k ' Ks CU11 L/ O 


3304 


-40 


-01 


-40 


6 562 


.40 


Waterfowl Stamps - Ducks Unlimited* 


3304 


-40 


-02 


-40 


1 9 ,784 


.00 


5>npcia1 r.irpnsps Taers ft Postprs** 










1 4 ,446 


55 


a p f i pp] p«3 ■= nopr Pprmits 

n l 1 U - X V 1 X Vrf O i— ' 1— ' U W 1 X X 1 1 ] X v l_; 


3304 


-61 


-1 4 


-40 


39 ,662 


.50 


Bear Permits 


3304 


-61 


-1 4 


-40 


3 ,440 


.00 


Turlcev Pprmits 


3304 


-61 


-1 4 


-40 


12,613 


.00 


Rents 


3304 


-63 


-01 


-40 


1 6 ,524 


.90 


Sales Other 


3304 


-64 


-99 


-40 


21 ,410 


.80 


Refunds Prior Year 


3304 


-69 


-01 


-AO 


3 ,573 


.05 


m i <3pp l "| anpous Income 


3304 


-69 


-99 


-40 


1,113 


45 












$3,702,369 


.95 


Collected by State Treasurer: 














Pinps and Ppnal tips 


1108 


-41 


-01 


-40 


10 185 


.22 


Interest and Discount on Rpvpnup 


3395 


-60 


-01 


-40 


58 916 


47 












$89 101 


69 


Federal Aid Reimbursements: 














Pi f fm^n-Rnhprt ^nn P H ^ p 1 A i H 

1 1 O OllJClIl llUUCl UuUIJ L CUCl dx n xu 


_> \J " 


-67 




-40 


686 7Q? 


IP 


Dingell-Johnson Federal Aid 


3304 


-67 


-02 


-40 


344,195 


.97 


Anadromous Fish Projects-Federal Aid 


3304 


-67 


-04 


-40 


16,346 


.28 


Endangered Species Federal Aid 


3304 


-67 


-1 1 


-40 


3,633 


.55 


Indirect Cost Reimbursement 


3304 


-67 


-67 


-40 


359,369 


.67 












$1 410 337 


79 


Taxes: 














Gasoline Tax Apportionment 


3312 


-05 


-01 


-40 


374,304 


.00 


Transfers from General Fund: 














Salary Adjustments 


3360 


-95 


-02 


-36 


231 ,978 


.36 


Reimbursement on Half Price Licenses 


3360 


-95 


-08 


-40 


75,132 


.25 












$307,110 


.61 


Reversions: 














Accounts Payable 










50,407 


.40 


TOTAL REVENUE 










$5,933,831 


.44 



* See Detail Sheet #1 
** See Detail Sheet #2 





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Detail Sheet #2 











SPECIAL LICENSES, TAGS 


AND 


POSTERS 
















July 1 , 1 983 to June 


30, 


1984 


























Receipt 












Quantity & 






Account 


Receipt 


Account 


Type of License 


Unit Price 


Amount 


Total 


3304 


-61 


-02 


-40 


Fur Buyers 




















Resident Citizens: 


22 


e 25.00 


550 


.00 












Non-Residents or Aliens: 


4 


@ 75.00 


300 


.00 


850.00 


3304 


-61 


-03 


-40 


Taxidermists 


89 


e 20.00 






1 ,780.00 


3304 


-61 


-04 


-40 


Propagators 




















Special Purpose Permits: 


32 


@ 1 .00 


32 


.00 












Class 1 (Fish) 




















Initials: 


47 


@ 15.00 


705 


.00 












Renewals: 


165 


i 10.00 


1 ,650 


.00 












Class 3 (Fish) 




















Initials: 


1 1 


@ 15.00 


165 


.00 












Renewals: 


74 


§ 10.00 


740 


.00 












Class 4 (Birds, Reptiles, 


Mammals ) 
















Initials: 


47 


§ 15.00 


705 


.00 












Renewals: 


321 


§ 10.00 


3,210 


.00 












Class 6 (Dealers) 




















Initials: 


8 


§ 15.00 


120 


.00 












Renewals : 


56 


@ 10.00 


560 


.00 












Additional Stores: 


108 


@ 5.00 


540 


.00 












Class 7 (Individual Bird or Mammal) 
















Initials: 


2 


§ 5.00 


10 


.00 












Renewals: 


29 


§ 2.00 


58 


.00 












Importation Permits 




















Fish: 


2 


§ 7.50 


15 


.00 












Birds: 


30 


@ 7.50 


225 


.00 












Class 9 (Falconry) 




















Masters: 


6 


@ 25.00 


150 


.00 












Apprentices: 


12 


@ 25.00 


300 


.00 












General : 


10 


§ 25.00 


250 


.00 












Class 10 (Falconry) 




















Raptor Breeding: 


4 


§ 10.00 


40 


.00 












Class 1 1 (Falconry) 




















Raptor Salvage: 


24 


§ 1 .00 


24 


.00 


9,499.00 


3304 


-61 


-05 


-40 


Take Shiners 


89 


§ 10.00 






890.00 


3304 


-61 


-06 


-40 


Field Trial Licenses 


8 


§ 15.00 






120.00 


3304 


-61 


-07 


-40 


Taking of Eels 


2 


§ 25.00 






50.00 


3304 


-61 


-08 


-40 


Quail for Training Dogs 




















Initials: 


7 


§ 7.50 


52 


.50 












Renewals: 


25 


§ 5.00 


125 


.00 


177.50 


3304 


-61 


-10 


-40 


Comm. Shooting Preserves 


9 


§ 50.00 






450.25* 


3304 


-61 


-12 


-40 


Mounting Permits 


2 


§ 2.00 






4.00 


3304 


-61 


-13 


-40 


Special Field Trial Permits 


5 


@ 15.00 






75.00 


3304 


-64 


-01 


-40 


Tags and Posters 




















Game Tags: 4,688 


@ .10 


468 


.80 












Fish Tags: 1 ,000 


§ .05 


50 


.00 












Posters: 


320 


@ .10 


32 


.00 


550.80 



14,446.55 
*250 deposited in incorrect 
receipt account number. 



CHANGES IN 
INLAND FISH AND GAME FUND BALANCE 



Fiscal Year July 1, 1983 to June 30, 1984 

Balance July 1, 1983 (Surplus) $ 222,046.36 

Total Revenue/Credits 5,933,831.44 

Total Expenditures -6,180,100.03 

Decrease in Continuing Accounts Brought Forward* 305 ,862 .08 

Balance June 30, 1984 (Surplus) $ 281,639-85 



C ontinuing Accounts Brought Forward 
Retirement Assessment (0612-1000) 
Develop & Improve Facilities for 

Public Use (2310-0300) 
Acquisition of Upland Areas and Inholding 

on Existing Areas (2310-0310) 
Reserve for Encumbrances 



1983 
$257,808.71 

24,965.02 

568.75 
105,449.98 
$388,792.46 



1984 
$24,028.29 

57,236.07 

1 ,665.27 
.75 

$82,930.38 



1984 
1983 



$ 82,930.38 
-388,792.46 
*$305,862.08 



CHANGES IN 
N ON GAME WILDLIFE FUND BALANCE 

Fiscal Year July 1 , 1983 to June 30, 1984 



Collected by State Treasurer 
Nongame Tax Checkoff 



Receipt Account No, 
3015-59-01-40 



Amount 
$326,371 .03 



Collected by Division 
Sales, Other 
Miscellaneous, Other 
Federal Aid Reimbursement 
Indirect Cost Allowance 
Balance June 30, 1984 (Surplus) 



3015-64-01-40 
3015-69-01-40 
3015-67-01-40 
3015-62-01-40 



356.31 
2,905.19 
5,153.43 
3,284.50 
$338,070.46 



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Massachusetts Division 
of Fisheries and Wildlife 
Annual Report 
1985 




State Librar 
State 




Massachusetts 
i^/ Bpsfon 




v 




Director 



fie Tj&mm&st u*ea€m 

deveretf S/a/fonda// ^i§iu/dina, ~$oifeiwment 
/00 ^amhuta* .%<eei Bolton 02202 




His Excellency, Michael S. Dukakis, Governor of the Commonwealth, the 
Executive Council, the General Court, and the Board of the Division of 
Fisheries and Wildlife. 



Sirs: 

I have the honor to submit herewith the One Hundred and Twentieth Annual 
Report of the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, covering the fiscal year 
1 July 1984 to 30 June 1985. 



Respectfully submitted, 



lichard Cronin 
)irector 



PUBLICATION: #14, 774-51-250- 3-87-CR 



MR 
Cl3r 
c I 



Table of Contents 



PAGE NUMBER 



The Board Reports 1-3 

Fisheries 4-9 

Fish Hatcheries 10-11 

Wildlife 12-20 

Game Farms 21-22 

Nongame and Endangered Species 23-27 

District Reports 28-30 

Information and Education 31-35 

Realty 36-38 

Maintenance and Development 39 

Personnel Actions 40^-41 

Legislation 42-43 

How the Sportsman's Dollar is Spent 44-49 



Cover design by George DiRolf 



1 



The Board Reports 



George Darey 
Chairman 



Throughout 1985, as in the past, the Fisheries and Wildlife Board melded 
public input with biological findings and recommendations to generate policies 
that benefit and perpetuate wildlife, streamline Division operations and, where 
possible, create programs to meet needs expressed by the public relating to 
wildlife. In this role, the Board held monthly meetings in locations around 
the state and held five (5) public hearings and informational meetings where 
and when needed . 

These hearings dealt with such annually recurrent issues as the turkey 
season, establishment of waterfowl season dates, and a review of the antlerless 
deer hunting permit program. On these issues the Board voted to retain the 
turkey hunting season as it was during the previous year, continue the zoned 
waterfowl hunting season through a second year and add an additional 1,000 
antlerless deer permits on the recommendation of staff biologists. 

Early in the year, a press conference was held to announce that the Nongame 
Wildlife Fund had reached $368,000.00 in contributions (the final total for the 
year proved to be $380,000.00). The Board commended the Division for staff 
efforts on behalf of the fund as well as for their achievements in the many 
programs flourishing under the Nongame program. The Board's kudos to the Nongame 
program were echoed by the Governor who presented the program with one of the 
state's first "Pride in Performance" awards. 

A wide variety of special issues occupied the Board's attention during the 
year, prime among them consideration of a proposal to reduce the number of 
game farms from three to two as an economy measure. Under a proposal formulated 
by the Division, it was demonstrated that the greatest savings would be realized 
by closing the Wilbraham Game Farm and increasing production at the remaining two 
farms to maintain production at the needed level. This proposal generated 



2 



considerable public comment and a variety of alternatives were considered. 
After careful review, it was decided to close the farm as recommended and 
relocate staff to other Division installations. 

Another issue requiring public hearings and generating public comment 
came in the form of a proposal to regulate taking of Atlantic salmon from 
the Merrimack River. Based on information presented by Division staff, the 
Board considered passage of a regulation, promulgated as an emergency 
regulation in 1985, prohibiting salmon fishing downstream of the Essex Dam 
in Lawrence and limiting to one salmon the fishery between the Essex Dam 
and the Route 104 bridge on the Pemigewasset River. 

Other issues which occupied the Board did not require public hearings. 
Among these was the continuing consideration a concern expressed by officials 
of Beverly relating to waterfowl hunting on the Danvers River in the area of 
Kernwood Bridge. The Board reviewed all public safety aspects and ultimately 
voted to advise hunters against shooting within 500 feet of a particular 
channel marker on the south side of Kernwood Country Club Point and to ban 
such hunting if Beverly would ban feeding and attracting of birds to the 
area — a provision submitted for consideration in a town-wide referendum. 

The Board also addressed the issue of a state proposal to relocate Route 2 
in the Erving area. With a number of alternatives proposed by the state, and 
a recommendation from the Division to support improvements on the existing 
Route 2, the Board members reviewed all options and conducted field trips to 
the area in question. The Board opted to support the recommendation endorsing 
improvements to the existing roadway with an alternate position noting that the 
southern route as proposed would be an acceptable second choice. 

During the January meeting, visitors gathered to observe the Board as 
the Trustees of Reservations presented a proposal to address the overpopulation 
of deer on their Crane Reservation property in Ipswich. The Board heard 
findings based on research by Dr. Aaron Moen of Cornell University and the 
Trustees' action recommendations based on those findings. In addition, the 
Board heard testimony of Division biologists and a statement from the Massachusetts 
Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. Following review of all of 
the submissions the Board voted to permit The Trustees of Reservations to 
embark on its herd reduction program as outlined in a memorandum of understanding 
between The Trustees of Reservations and the Fisheries and Wildlife Board. 

Other Board actions included consideration of a possible license fee 
increase. Although Director Cronin noted that the Division was operating "in 
the black" and that no increase was needed, the Board approved such an increase 
should it become necessary. The Board also voted to dedicate the Sunpoke Lake 
Project, built by Ducks Unlimited with donations from Massachusetts, to the late 
Warren Blandin. 

Certain other issues occupied the Board's attention prompting the Board to 
request information for future review from the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries 
and Wildlife staff. Items in this category were a proposed extension of the 
primitive firearms season, a review of the status of the Housatonic River relative 
to the presence of PCBs, a status report on beaver in the Commonwealth, a review 



3 



of Division publicity programs, and a review of the year-round open fishing 
season prompted by requests for restoration of the traditional opening day. 
Another issue which the Board chose to review was that of additional Catch and 
Release fishing areas. The Board also requested the wildlife section to 
investigate the possibility of a study of fawn mortality. While this could not 
be initiated immediately, the Board has been assured that such a study would 
begin during or about 1986. To bring Board members up to date on activities 
around the Commonwealth, District Managers presented an overview of activities 
and unique areas within their regions. 

In examining members priorities for the upcoming year, the Board determined 
that one of their highest priorities was the establishment of Massachusetts 
Wildlife as a self-supporting publication. Legislative action will be required 
to implement this and to this end a proposal was included in the Division's 
budget request to establish a revolving fund for the magazine. Although that 
proposal was eliminated by the legislature, Director Richard Cronin has agreed 
to puruse the matter in hopes of having the fund reinstated. 

Another high priority for the Board is improving forest management on lands 
held by the Division both for wildlife and for possible potential income. To 
this end, it was noted that it would be vital to obtain the services of a 
trained individual who would view forestry from a wildlife perspective. Within 
the year such a person was hired and forest wildlife specialist John Scanlon 
joined the staff and began surveying Wildlife Management Area boundaries in 
the Western District. 

A source of satisfaction to both the Division and the Board was the 
completion, during this fiscal year, of the Division's policy document and 
of an initial five-year plan by the nongame section. This is the first Division 
policy since 1957 and the first nongame plan ever. Both documents were reviewed 
and approved by the Board and now serve as guidelines for Division program 
development. 



4 



Fisheries 




Peter H. Oatis 
Assistant Director of Fisheries 



Survey and Inventory Investigations 
Streams 

A total of 162 sites on previously unsurveyed streams were sampled and 
assessed for fisheries use and potential. Data collected from this study 
are being used in conjunction with historic information to generate an automated 
stream classification system that will aid fisheries managers and biologists 
in determining stocking rates, issuing recommendations or orders of conditions 
in response to future watershed development projects. Considerable time 
was also spent in assessing the impact of acidification on stream fisheries 
primarily within the Millers River Watershed. A cooperative effort with the 
U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service to evaluate acidified stream mitigation 
techniques was initiated. 

Lakes and Ponds 

Fisheries biologists, fisheries managers and technicians completed field 
surveys at 18 lakes this year. Data have been analyzed and compiled in 
respective lake reports. 

This information will be used in future planning and regulatory 
operations. Pond maps will be updated with access, depth and fisheries 
information for distribution to the public. 



Quabbin Reservoir Investigations 

The annual creel survey indicates that an estimated 44,648 anglers fished 
262,394 hours to catch 32,397 fish, primiarly lake trout, smallmouth bass and 
landlocked salmon. Thirty-thousand, four hundred and eighty landlocked salmon 
yearlings were released into the reservoir. The landlocked salmon released in 
1983 and 1984 provided the anglers with a harvest of over 1,500 legal salmon 
and approximately 14,000 sublegal salmon which were released. It is hoped 
that many of these fish will appear as legal fish in future years. 

Recent sampling efforts throughout the watershed demonstrate that the 
effects of acidification are readily apparent. For example, mobilization of 
aluminum, mercury and vanadium since the early 1960 f s is apparent from sediment 
and tree core sample analysis. Caged rainbow trout failed to live more than a 
few days in known acid impacted tributaries and coves of the reservoir. 
Autoposies revealed that their deaths were due to low pH and high aluminum 
concentrations. Additional investigations ongoing at Quabbin include 
determining the effect of acidification on spawning success of smelt and lake 
trout . 

The thirty-year water quality data-base for the Quabbin Reservoir and 
its main tributaries has been computerized and is presently undergoing analysis. 
Significant trends in alkalinity, pH, water level and fish produdction are being 
examined in an effort to better understand the existing impacts of acidification 
and to aid in the development of accurate models that will assist resource 
managers in developing strategies for countering the negative impacts of 
acid rain. 

Angler Characteristic Mail Survey 

Approximately 2,000 survey questionnaires were mailed to anglers selected 
at random from across the state in proportion to license sales in their town. 

To date, 534 responses have been returned. Data from this and future 
surveys will be used in planning, evaluation, economic and regulatory 
deliberations. Returns are presently being computerized for analysis which 
should be completed in the near future . 

Sea-Run Trout 

This year biologists initiated a series of studies designed to evaluate 
spawning and survival of the wild sea run brook trout population in the 
Mashpee River. Broodstock collection of sea run brown trout (30 adults) 
was less than anticipated, however, the egg take (44,000) and survival were 
better than expected. Hopefully, this year class will provide approximately 
20,000 yearlings when released in the spring of 1986. The fishery continues 
to provide excellent opportunities for those willing to spend the effort 
necessary to catch wild sea run browns. 



6 



Acid Rain Investigations 

Working in conjunction with the Massachusetts Water Resources Center of 
the University of Massachusetts, the initial screening of all streams and lakes 
within the Commonwealth has recently been completed. This information, which 
could not have been generated without the assistance of numerous individual 
volunteers and volunteer laboratory services, provides a complete set of base 
line dataagainst which resource managers can assess changes in aquatic 
acidification or acid neutralizing capacity. Unfortunately, the data indicate 
that approximately 40% of our inland waters can be considered threatened by 
continuing acidification. 

Other investigations conducted in cooperation with the Massachusetts 
Audubon Society and the Division of Water Pollution Control are being conducted 
at Great and Ryder Ponds in Truro in order to assess in greater detail the 
impacts associated with current liming practices designed to mitigate the 
effects of increased acidification. A great deal of staff time and effort 
are also directed at the preparation of a Generic Environmental Impact 
Assessment of the Divisions Mitigative Pond Liming Program. 

Technical Assistance 

Increasingly staff time is being spent providing technical assistance 
to other federal, state and municipal agencies concerned with the conservation 
of aquatic resources and wetlands. Regular participation with such agencies 
as the State Pesticide Board, Energy Facility Siting Council, Interbasin Transfer 
Commission, Corps of Engineers and DEQE is necessary if Massachusetts' inland 
fisheries are to be protected and enhanced. 

Extensive fish sampling efforts were conducted in conjunction with the 
Division of Water Pollution Control at the Charles River, Assabet River, 
Blackstone River, Lower Connecticut Basin, Millers River, Nashua River, 
Hocomoco Pond and Lake Winthrop. Samples were analyzed for PCB's and such 
heavy metals as mercury and lead. 

Staff members are also participating on a monthly basis with the 
Division of Water Resources as a member of the inter-basin transfer 
committee. 

Urban Angler 

This unique program which is designed to introduce or re-introduce anybody 
to the enjoyment found in sport fishing through the training and instruction of 
dedicated volunteers is just beginning to bear fruit. This year we completed 
preparation of a training manual entitled Bluegill Basics that all instructors 
must study prior to conducting their series of angling clinics. 

Program volunteers also assisted greatly in participating in a number 
of sportsmen's shows and special events that focussed public attention on the 
values of good sportsmanship and wise use of our aquatic resources. 



Anadromous Fish 



Connecticut River 

The Holyoke fishway began operations on April 25, 1985 and shut down on 
July 15, 1985. Fishway activities were monitored by Massachusetts Cooperative 
Fisheries Research Unit personnel. Over 480,000 American shad, 630,000 
blueback herring (a new season record) , 285 Atlantic salmon (the second highest 
number trapped at Holyoke), 369 striped bass and 40,000 sea lamprey passed 
through the facility. A record number of salmon, 43, were observed in a 
single day. Approximately 6,400 shad were transported from the Holyoke facility 
to other New England restoration programs; New Hampshire, Rhode Island, 
Pennsylvania and other Massachusetts rivers. The fishway was operated in 
the fall in an attempt to capture additional salmon, but none was recovered. 
A total of 306 adult Atlantic salmon were recovered river wide this year. 
Most of these were held at Federal broodstock holding facilities. 

The Turners Falls fishway s were operated from mid-May to the end of 
June. This facility was also manned by the Massachusetts Cooperative 
Fisheries Research Unit personnel. The Gatehouse fishway passed 3,855 
American shad, 301 blueback herring, three Atlantic salmon and 1,809 lampreys 
into the Turners Falls pool. The shad figure represents only approximately 
10% of the total number of shad passed through the Cabot Station fishway 
(31,000) indicating a serious problem with fish passage in the canal system. 
Northeast Utilities has begun looking into this problem by conducting shad 
radio-telemetry studies in the canal. Northeast Utilities has also prepared 
a preliminary permit (to FERC) to construct an additional hydro wheel, Unit 
7, at Cabot Station. The Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife has 
been actively participating in the review of this project. 

The Connecticut River Atlantic Salmon Commission prepared and adopted 
salmon fishing regulations for the mainstem of the river. These regulations 
are to be incorporated into the existing fishing regulations in each of the four 
basin states. 

Division personnel also participated in bi-monthly Technical and Policy 
Committee meetings. We also were involved in several sub-committees directed 
at resolving specific questions related to the salmon and shad programs. 

Over 320,000 Atlantic salmon smolts were released this past spring at 
five stocking locations located throughout the basin. This represents the 
second largest release in the history of the program. Over 40% of these were 
released in Massachusetts; 107,000 at Turners Falls, 17,300 in the Deerfield 
River and 17,300 in the Millers River. An additional 64,000 salmon fry were 
also released in the Bear and South Rivers of the Deerfield Basin. The 
Massachusetts Cooperative Fisheries Research Unit personnel assessed some of 
these rivers and found good survival and growth of salmon fry stocked in 1984 
and 1985. 

The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service has begun negotiating with Northeast 
Utilities for land to construct a research laboratory in the vicinity of Cabot 



8 



Woods, Turners Falls. This facility will allow students and research biologists 
to conduct studies relating to fish passage, anadromous fish and riverine ecology. 

Merrimack River 

The Lawrence fishway began operations on May 1, 1985 and closed down on 
July 22, 1985. This facility was operated by the Massachusetts Division of 
Fisheries and Wildlife and the Massachusetts Marine Fisheries. During this 
time, we observed over 13,000 American shad, 202 Atlantic salmon, 23,000 
herring, 18,000 sea lamprey and 110 striped bass. 

New Hampshire Fish and Game transported 980 adult shad from the Holyoke 
trapping facility to the Merrimack River. They were released in the Concord, 
New Hampshire area. The New Hampshire Fish and Game also transported 110 
adult shad from the Lawrence trapping facility to the Nashua River. There 
should be fish passage at the two lower most barriers on the Nashua in the 
very near future so it is important to begin restoring American shad to this 
river. The State of Maine also transported shad from the Lawrence fishway. 
They released approximately 150-200 fish to their Androscoggin River. 

Most of the 212 returning adult salmon were transported to the Nashua 
National Fish Hatchery in New Hampshire. Thirty-six of these were released 
into the Pemigewasset River, (New Hampshire) because of potential disease 
problems. Some of these were fitted with radio tags to allow U. S. Fish 
and Wildlife Service biologists to monitor their movements. 

Scale analysis of the 212 salmon indicated that 43% were a result of the 
fry stocking program and the remaining 57% resulted from smolt stockings. 
The sex ratio was 63% females and 37% males, 92% of the fish were 2-sea-winter 
fish 2% were 3-sea-winter fish and 6% were grilse. 

Eggs taken from the recovered broodstock brought in 458,000 for next 
year's programs. 

Over 158,000 smolts, 16,000 parr and 148,000 fry were released through- 
out the basin. 

A creel census was conducted below the Essex Dam to monitor the shad sport 
fishery. While the data have yet to be analyzed, it appears that the sport 
fishery was almost equal to that noted in previous years (4,000 anglers, 9,900 
hours of recreation catching 6,000 fish). Incidental catch is estimated at 
12-15 Atlantic salmon. 

The project leader attended several North Atlantic Salmon Conservation 
Organization Research Committee meetings. The Division was charged with 
preparing a salmon tagging program to evaluate high-seas interception of 
U. S. salmon. This proposal was given to the North Atlantic Salmon Conservation 
Organization Commissioners and was reviewed by the various working groups. 



9 



Proposed Sewalls Falls hydro project: The Division became an intervener 
of this project because of its potentially detrimental effects on the salmon 
and shad restoration program. 

Fish passage at Lowell is near completion. It should be ready for field 
testing and operations in 1986. The power plant at this facility has been in 
operation for most of 1985. It will probably take a few years to obtain 
optimum performance from this complex fish passage facility. 

The Policy and Technical Committees have begun negotiations with Public 
Service of New Hampshire with regard to upstream and downstream fish passage, 
and minimum flows at Amoskeag, Hookset, Garvins Falls, Eastman Falls and Avers 
Island, the next five barriers to fish passage on the Merrimack. 

Both the Connecticut and Merrimack Rivers were closed to Atlantic salmon 
fishing in 1985. 

Fisheries Development 

Large Esocids 

Significant improvements in the culture of large esocids, tiger muskie 
and northern pike were made at the Roger Reed Hatchery. New fiberglass 
rearing tanks were installed and removed from the fence area in an attempt to 
keep the program safe from the vandalism that we have experienced in recent 
years. Approximately 10,000 yearling tiger muskie are scheduled to be released 
this spring. The Division also received about 10,000 northern pike fry from 
the state of Rhode Island. These fish will be reared through the yearling 
stage at Reed Hatchery. Pike produced from this system will be used to 
stabilize those fisheries initiated with pike purchased through a private 
dealer from Minnesota. This latter source of pike while producing excellent 
fish is unreliable because of the dependence upon natural production. This 
year, we were able to purchase 12,000 yearlings from Minnesota. These fish 
were released only into waters which had received shipments of pike from this 
source in the past. 

Walleye 

Attempts to establish a spawning population of walleye in Assawompsett 
Pond via the release of fry reared at the Attleboro National Fish Hatchery 
appear to be at least partially successful. During this spring, two pound 
nets were fished from February 28, to April 2. 1985. A total of 124 walleye 
were caught and tagged. Seventeen of these fish were females. A few walleyes 
were reported, by reliable anglers, as caught from the Nemasket and Taunton 
river systems. If the population of mature walleye continues to show evidence 
of growth in subsequent years, a portion of their eggs will be used as stock 
for release into other waters deemed capable of supporting a walleye fisheries. 



10 



Fish Hatcheries 




David Fredenburgh 
Chief Fish Culturist 



During the 1985 fiscal year, the hatcheries produced 1,087,600 fish 
weighing 455,893 pounds. Of that number, 448,000 were classified as 9"+ 
and over 150,000 were in the 12+ category. 

Normal maintenance was carried out at all the hatcheries. 

The pollution control project was completed at the McLaughlin Hatchery. 
The project was bid at $545,000. Because the project was not completed on 
time, the contractor was charged for completion damages of $18,000.00. 

Plans were finally formulated to re-build the Sunderland Hatchery. The 
other four facilities have had some degree of upgrading in the past years and 
are in relatively good condition. Sunderland is the last hactchery to receive 
an upgrading. The plans are to consolidate the rearing facility beside the 
entrance to the driveway. The present area will be filled in with gravel 
and above ground fiberglass tank will be utilized. A new gravel-pack well 
and water system well will be constructed. This project will be completed 
in segments as the money is appropriated. Anticipated completion date is 
1989. 

At Sandwich a new well was completed that will help augment the existing 
ground water supply. 



12 




Wayne F. MacCallum 
Assistant Director of Wildlife 



The Wildlife Research Section is responsible for the management of the 
approximately 75 species of birds, mammals, reptiles and amphibians which are 
traditionally hunted or trapped. Principal activities of the section include 
monitoring of population levels and annual harvest, development of 
recommendations concerning regulations and policy relative to the Commonwealth's 
wildlife resources, planning and implementation of habitat management programs, 
development of Division funded University of Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife 
Research Unit studies, technical assistance to other agencies and private 
citizens experiencing problems caused by wildlife, development and implemenetation 
of wildlife research programs qualifying for federal grants. Summaries of 
current programs follow. 

WATERFOWL 

Preseason Banding 

A total of 1,049 ducks were banded during the 1984 preseason period; 
567 wood ducks, 249 mallards, 69 black ducks, 9 mallard X black hybrids, 43 
bluewinged teal and 119 greenwinged teal. A new airboat came into use in 
late August, the old boat having been given to the U. S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service. The new boat has a 260hp Lycoming engine, providing considerably 
more power than the old boat. The additional power and flat bottomed hull 
construction allow operation in shallower water than the old boat and a 
special polymer shield on the bottom is puncture resistant reducing "down time" 
for hull repair. 



Mid-Winter Waterfowl Survey 

A total of 246,511 waterfowl were counted during the January 1985 winter 
inventory, the second highest count in more than 20 years due to a seaduck 
count of 166,658, of which 132,073 were eiders. Black ducks (23,091) were 
up 13% over both last year's count and the previous 10 year average. 
Mergansers were also at a record high with a count of 20,630, 180% above the 
10 year average. Scaup were up over last year but below the 10 year average 
and most other ducks were down from last year. Canada geese were up 10% over 
last year, but 5% below the 10 year average. 

Winter Banding 

Division personnel and cooperators banded 806 black ducks, 147 mallards X 
black hybrids, 21 mallards, and 16 pintail. These along with 570 black ducks 
banded by Parker River National Wildlife Refuge allowed the state to meet its 
quota of 600 female and 400 male black ducks. 

Wood Duck Nest Structure Study 

Four wood duck and one hooded merganser used plastic buckets on 13 study 
areas while six wood ducks and two mergansers nested in wooden boxes in 1984. 
This was the first use of plastic buckets on these areas. Usage on 15 
established areas ran 43% for 46 buckets and 57% for 170 boxes. Success rate 
was 50% in buckets and 78% in boxes. In 1985, five wood ducks used buckets 
on the new areas while six wood ducks and two mergansers nested in wood boxes. 
Usage on the 15 established areas ran 41% for 46 buckets and 59% for 169 
boxes. Success rates were 63% in buckets and 91% in boxes. 

Biological Tagging of Wood Ducks 

The project leader volunteered to assist Jim Thul of the Florida Game and 
Freshwater Fish Commission in examining blood smears for parasites. Thul 
sent up 150 smears collected in Virginia in October. The project leader 
accomplished the task and reported the findings to Thul for inclusion in analysis 
of southeastern states data. 

Wood Duck Production Study 

During the 1984 nesting season, 195 nest starts were recorded in 522 
available structures on 50 areas across the state. There were 130 successful 
wood duck hatches and six hooded merganser hatches. A week of rain in late 
May 1984 led to extensive flooding and a loss of a number of clutches during 
the peak week of hatching. In 1985, 195 nest starts were recorded in 532 
available structures. There were 130 successful wood duck hatches and six 
merganser hatches.. This was the most successful season in seven years. 

Park Waterfowl Project 

A paper "The Role of Parks in the Range Expansion of the Mallard in the 
Northeast" was presented at: Waterfowl in Winter, a symposium and workshop held 
in Galveston, Texas 7-10 January 1985 and at the winter technical section meeting 
of the Atlantic Waterfowl Council in Savannah, Georgia 19-22 February 1985. 



14 



Canada Goose Parts Collection Survey 

Measurements were taken from 113 geese killed by hunters from various 
parts of the state and from 24 geese found dead of lead poisoning on the Parker 
River National Wildlife Refuge during the 1984-85 hunting season. These data 
were added to the 247 measurements made in 1983 and are currently on file with 
the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife. 

Measurements were also taken from 45 adult geese drive-trapped by Parker 
River National Wildlife Refuge personnel in Newbury during July 1984 to get 
some baseline data on breeding resident geese in northeastern Massachusetts. 
In addition, 15 adult geese were measured during a trap and transplant program 
conducted at the Worcester Science Center. 

Experimental Waterfowl Season Appraisal 

The 1983-84 season was the first year Massachusetts was divided into 
three zones. Waterfowl harvest was down 5% from the 1981-83 seasons when the 
state was divided into two zones and down 30% from the prezoning years of 
1978-1980. Major decreases in harvest were recorded for wood ducks and black 
ducks. Special black duck harvest restrictions were imposed along with zoning 
in 1983-84 and resulted in a 27% decline in the black duck harvest. 

MOURNING DOVE 

The total number of calling doves on three long-term standardized routes 
increased 25% during 1984-85. The total of counts on all 18 routes decreased 
6% (200 to 187) from 1984-85. 

TURKEY 

The sixth Massachusetts spring gobbler hunt was held in May 1985 in all 
counties and portions of counties west of the Connecticut River. The season 
was extended to three weeks, consisting of a one-week first period and a two- 
week second period. Sportsmen were allowed to apply for and hunt during only 
one of the two periods. A total of 3,800 permits were allotted for each hunt 
period, of which 3,468 were issued for the first period and 2,250 for the 
second period. A record kill of 309 turkeys (226 first period, 83 second 
period) was attained with an overall participation rate of 88.4% (5,072) and 
a hunter success rate of 6.1%. The Berkshire County kill was 213 (69%); 
Franklin County, 39 (13%); Hampden County, 34 (11%); and Hampshire County, 
23 (7%). Adult males (200) comprised 65% of the kill. 

Winter weather conditions again hampered trap-and-transplant . Only 7 
turkeys (1 IF, 4 IM, 2 AM) were captured for a mean capture rate of 0.13 birds 
per trap hour and a mean capture success of 44%. This is the poorest capture 
rate and success rate since 1980, when no birds were captured. The six males 
were transferred to Middleboro, Plymouth County. The single hen was released 
at the capture site. 



WOODCOCK 



The Fisheries and Wildlife Board continued the two bird daily limit on 
woodcock which had been in force since 1982. Although woodcock have made a 
good recovery, the census indicated that levels were still below the long-term 
average . 

Daily hunting success improved slightly during the 1984 season but fewer 
hunting trips per hunter slightly decreased the total bag of birds. 

The 1985 spring census of woodcock showed that populations have improved 
for the second year in a row. The spring was warm and dry through the peak of 
hatching and production was anticipated to be excellent. The Division recommended 
to the Board that the daily limit of woodcock be liberalized to three birds. 

BEAVER 

The 1984-85 beaver season was changed to run from 15 November to 28 February 
statewide, with no Conibear-type traps larger than size //110 or equivalent 
allowed after 15 January. During this season, a total of 1,052 beaver were 
taken by 95 trappers in 101 towns, for a mean take of 11.1 beaver per successful 
trapper. This take represents an increase of 521 beaver (98.1%) over 1983-84. 
Increases occurred in all counties and regions, but were most pronounced in 
Essex (+ 766.7%), Hampden (+ 170.6%), and Worcester (+ 166.9%) counties and 
the Eastern region (+ 153.7%). The harvest in the Eastern region (713 beaver, 
67.8%) is the greatest on record. Pelt prices increased to an average of 
$18.26, but continue to be below the ten-year average. 

OTTER AND FISHER 

During the 1984-85 otter season, 68 successful trappers took 142 otter in 
70 towns in ten counties for an average of 2.1 otter per successful trapper. 
This compares with a harvest of 119 and an average of 2.0 in 1982-84. 

The fisher take increased from 124 in 1983 to 140 in 1984, with 58 
successful trappers taking an average of 2.4 fisher each among 54 towns in 
seven counties (57 trappers averaging 2.2 in 1983). 

Worcester (80), Franklin (16), and Essex (15) counties and deer management 
zones 03 (39), 04 (35), and 02 (27) yielded the most otter, while Worcester 
(75), Essex (25), and Franklin (21) produced the most fisher. 

A total of 130 otter and 138 fisher carcasses were collected. The mean 
age of otter in 1984-85 was 2.17 and of fisher 1.55. This compares with 1.97 
for otter and 1.62 for fisher in 1983-84. Ten of 12 otter aged 2.5 and older 
and 14 of 15 fisher aged 1.5 and older showed evidence of reproductive activity. 
Average corpora lutea counts were 2.5 for otter and 3.0 for fisher in 1984-85, 
as compared to 2.5 and 3.1 respectively in 1983-84. 

BOBCAT 

A total of 36 bobcat were taken in 1984-85, including 13 by hunting, 21 
by trapping, and two road kills. The mean take per successful hunter (N=ll) and 



16 



successful trapper (N=17) was 1.2 each. Bobcats were trapped most frequently 
in November (18, 85.7%) and shot in January (5, 41.7%). In 1984-85, bobcats 
were taken in 26 towns in five counties. Juveniles (0.5 age class) comprised 
16.7% of the take, with an average placental scar count of 2.4 scars/animal 
with countable tract. The average pelt price was $56.22. 

COYOTE 

A total of 42 coyotes were taken by 29 sportsmen in 29 towns and six 
counties during the 1984-85 hunting season. Over one-half (52.4%) of the kill 
was in November, with the same number and percentage hunting specifically 
for coyote. Immature coyotes comprised about two-thirds (65.7%) of the kill. 
Fifteen additional mortalities, principally road kills, were tallied during 
1984-85. 

FUR HARVEST 

The value of the Massachusetts fur harvest increased 34% from the 
previous year. 

BLACK BEAR 

A total of 878 bear hunting permits were issued for the 1984 bear hunting 
season. A record number of 17 bear were taken, including 16 in the first 
period and one in the second period. Eight males and nine females were taken 
in Berkshire (6), Franklin (6), Hampshire (4), and Hampden (1) counties. 
Six non-hunting mortalities were recorded including two illegal kills, one 
nuisance kill, one road kill, one found dead, and one euthanized. Three 
nuisance complaints (2 involving bees) were received. 

COOPERATIVE WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNIT STUDIES 

Wild Turkey Population Dynamics 

Major flock dispersals occurred during the first three weeks of April. 
Hens moved an average of 5.42 km from center of their winter range to their 
nesting area. 

Seventeen of 20 monitored hens (85%) are known to have attempted nesting. 
Ten of 17 (59%) initiated incubation during last week of April and first two 
weeks of May. Six of 17 first nesting attempts (36%) were successful. Average 
clutch size was 12.6 (N=5) . Average brood size was 11.2 (N=5) . As of 20 
June, one of six unsuccessful hens (17%) had attempted re-nesting. 

Ten birds died during the report period. Five hens (4 immature, 1 mature) 
were lost through predation. One hen (immature) succumbed to a fungus infection 
of the crop. Two hens (immature) are believed to have died as a result of 
handling, and 2 hens (1 immature, 1 mature) died of unknown causes. 

Black Bear Sow Cub Interactions and Reproductive Success 

Seven adult females that were potential cub producers in 1985 were followed 
intensively on foot from early September through denning to construct a profile 



17 



of each female's major fall food sources. Evidence of feeding activity was 
collected about every three days on each female, and samples of food items were 
analyzed for protein, fat and fiber. One female died in mid-September and 
another disappeared in late October 1984. The remainig five were followed 
through denning. 

Between 5 February and 13 February, dens of the five remaining single, 
adult females were visited. Females were weighed, measured and milk and blood 
samples were drawn. New cubs were counted, sexed, weighed, and marked with small 
temporary ear tags. Four of five sows produced 12 cubs (4:3:3:2). Dens were 
visited again in the last week of March. Females and cubs were weighed again 
and milk and blood samples were drawn from the sow. Cubs were fitted with small, 
expandable radio collars that were designed to break off in about 2-3 months. 
This will help to determine causes of mortality to young cubs. 

Families have been followed intensively since emergence to compile a spring 
food profile and to determine how the sow's spring nutritional state may affect 
cub survival until weaning. 

Milk and blood samples are being analyzed to try and correlate chemistry 
parameters with nutritional condition of the sow. 

Ecology and Status of the Bobcat in Western Massachusetts 

A radiotelemetry study of bobcat ( Felis ruf us ) ecology was initiated to 
determine the status of this important furbearer in western Massachusetts. 
This study has now been completed. Home range, movement, activity, habitat use 
and social structure data were collected on 16 radio-tagged bobcats during 
1982-85. Male home ranges averaged 116.8 Km (SD-41.2, N=8) while female home 
ranges averaged 77.5 Km (SD=68.9, N=6) . These were similar to home ranges 
reported for bobcats in other northeastern states. Bobcat movement was variable 
between seasons and sexes. Mean daily movement was 2.34 ± 2.22 Km for males and 
1.88 ± 1.50 Km for females. Greatest daily movement was during summer and fall. 
Mean hourly travel distances was 404 ± 440 m. Activity data varied seasonally 
with bobcats most active during all hours of the day in summer and fall and 
primarily nocturnal in winter. Preferred habitat types were regenerating forest, 
small hardwoods and other early successional stages. Cottontail rabbits 
( Sylvilagus sp.) were most frequently hunted by bobcats and were the 
predominant prey species observed in food habits analysis of digestive tracts 
and scats. The sex ratio of harvested bobcats was 1.04 males per female. Ages 
of harvested bobcats were typical of a healthy population with 23% juveniles 
and 19% yearlings. Reproductive tracts of female bobcats indicate low 
reproductive rates by first year of implantation and percent of females with 
placental scars. Of six radio-collared females monitored through the 
reproductive season, only one had kittens. Six radio-collared bobcats died 
from natural causes; two bobcats were killed by predators and pneumonia, gastric 
enteritis, a motor vehicle, and old age/starvation killed one each. Social 
structure as exhibited by home range distribution appeared variable. Extensive 
excursions by adult bobcats were observed during breeding and fall seasons. 
Indirect evidence suggests a lack of territoriality among bobcats in western 
Massachusetts. Large home ranges with extensive overlap, disjunct home ranges, 
seasonal excursions, and seasonal shifts in home ranges indicate a certain degree 



18 



of nomadic behavior. The low incidence of scent-marking behavior observed 
from snow-tracking data also suggests a lack of territorial behavior in this 
population of bobcats. 

DEER 

The 1984 statewide deer harvest for all seasons combined was 4,477 deer. 
This total closely followed the increasing harvest trend started in 1967 when 
the antlerless permit system was established. The four western counties of 
Berkshire, Franklin, Hampshire and Hampden accounted for 72% (3,216 deer) 
of the reported harvest. Worcester County recorded 499 deer killed (11% 
of the total harvest). Essex, Middlesex, Norfolk, Bristol, Plymouth, and 
Barnstable Counties reported 403 deer killed (9%) . The islands of Dukes 
and Nantucket Counites contributed 200 (4% ) and 159 (3%) deer to the total 
harvest respectively. 

Shotgun season hunters harvested 3,650 deer (82% of total harvest), 
including 2,203 antlered and 1,447 antlerless deer (defined as deer having 
no antlers or having antlers less than 3" in length) . Archers harvested 470 
deer (251 antlered, 219 antlerless) and primitive firearm hunters killed 346 
deer (78 antlered, 268 antlerless). Paraplegic hunters took two antlered and 
nine antlerless deer during their special season. 

Approximately 38,400 valid antlerless deer permit applications were 
received prior to the public drawing in October. Permits were allocated to 
8,150 sportsmen and 424 farmer/ landowners . The odds of a permit holder 
harvesting an antlerless deer during the shotgun season were about 1 out of 
6. 

Natural Resource Officers reported 408 non-hunting deer mortalities 
during the 1984 calendar year. Deer killed by motor vehicles accounted for 
80% of the reports, dog kills (10%), and other causes (10%). 

FALCONRY 

During 1984 there were 32 active falconers. Five of the falconers had 
breeding permits and 29 Raptor Salvage permits were issued. The salvage 
permittees treated a total of 229 raptors; of these 97 (42%) were released 
back to the wild. 

MAST PROJECT 

The mast project was designed to provide a record of mast production 
from year to year on both a statewide and regional basis and to compare 
records of mast production with game harvest data. This project was dis- 
continued after a five year trial because the data gathered provided 
inconclusive measurements concerning regional mast production. 

FOREST MANAGEMENT PROGRAM 



The Division's forestry inventory was initiated in May, 1985. In 
cooperation with the University of Massachusetts Department of Forestry and 



19 



Wildlife, and the Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit, the Division 
hired two undergraduate students (one forestry major and one wildlife major) 
to conduct field surveys from 1 June through 31 August 1985. Field work 
began on the Savoy Wildlife Management Area in the Western District, and 
involved the establishment of inventory sample plots on a grid system 
throughout the management area. Data from 71 sample plots yielded information 
on: (1) the volume and variety of existing forest products (timber and 
firewood) , (2) the abundance of woody and herbaceous vegetation on the 
forest floor (which relates directly to wildlife habitat quality) , and (3) 
the specific location of various forest stands. Arrangements were made for 
the inventory data to be analyzed through an existing computer program under 
the direction of UMass Forestry Professor Joe Mawson. In addition to these 
data, boundary lines for the management area were determined and marked in 
the field. 

The forestry management program will concentrate on management areas 
in the Western District first, then into the Connecticut Valley and Central 
Districts where each wildlife management area will be evaluated. 

STATEWIDE DEVELOPMENT 

The Statewide Development Project is charged with the operation of 
Wildlife Management Areas and the construction and maintenance of nesting 
structures . 

Wildlife management area operations include habitat management, as well 
as public access work and area administration, such as planning and manage- 
ment of controlled hunts. 

Nesting structure work includes the statewide erection and maintenance 
of wood duck nesting boxes, osprey nesting platforms, and bluebird nest 
boxes. Loon nesting rafts are also constructed and maintained on Quabbin 
Reservoir. Below is a summary of activities during Fiscal Year 1985: 

1. Buildings : Maintained 15 buildings on 11 areas. 

2. Dams : Maintained 7 dams on 4 areas. 

3. Bridges: Constructed 3 foot bridges on 3 areas and maintained 8 bridges 

on 5 areas. 

4. Roads and Trails: Constructed 3.8 miles of trails on 2 areas and maintained 

119.3 miles of roads and trails on 15 areas. 

5. Parking Lots: One lot was constructed and 95 lots were maintained on 21 

areas . 

6. Waterfowl Blinds : Waterfowl blinds (15) were maintained on 2 areas. 

7. Signs and Boundary Markers : Erected 991 signs on 7 areas and marked 1.0 

miles of boundary. Maintained 1,559 signs on S8 areas and checked 107 
miles of boundaries on 30 areas. 

8. Tree and Shrub Planting : Planted 1,160 shrubs and 415 trees on 5 areas. 

9. Herbaceous Seedings : Planted and top-dressed 147 acres on 8 areas and 

oversaw cooperating farming of 803 acres on 9 areas. 

10. Clearing : Four acres were cleared on 2 areas. 

11. Vegetation Control : Unwanted brush was controlled with a tractor drawn 

brush cutter, by handcutting, and with herbicides. A total of 315 
acres on 13 areas were cut and 88 acres on 2 areas were treated with 
herbicide . 

12. Timber Management: Selective cuts were made on 13 acres in 3 areas. 



20 



13. Nesting Structures : Erected 177 wood duck boxes, 220 bluebird nest boxes, 

7 osprey nesting platforms, and 5 loon nesting rafts. Maintained and 
checked 941 wood duck nest boxes. 

14. Water Level Management : Manipulated water levels to encourage emergent 

vegetation over 163 acres on 2 areas. 

15. Managed Public Hunts : Managed hunts were held on 4 areas. 

16. Prune and Release Trees : Pruned and eliminated vegetative competition 

from around 368 fruit-bearing trees and shrubs. 

17. Gates : Constructed 2 gates on 2 areas and maintained 23 gates on 6 areas. 



Additional time was spent in administering the project, inspecting areas, 
and maintaining equipment used on the project. 



21 



Game Farms 




E. Michael Pollack 
Chief Game Biologist 



On December 14, 1984, the Fish and Wildlife Board, upon recommendations 
of the Director, voted to close the Wilbraham Game Farm in order to reduce the 
cost of the game farm program. Consolidation into a two game farm system has 
resulted in substantial labor savings. 

The Ayer and Sandwich Game Farms are now geared to produce the annual 
scheduled production of 44,000 pheasants and approximately 3,500 bobwhite quail. 
Upon closure of the Wilbraham Game Farm, all propagation supplies, materials, and 
equipment were transferred to the remaining two farms. 

Continuous efforts are being made to reduce both feed and labor costs. Four 
new bulk feeders were purchased. The purchase of pheasant feed in bulk reduces 
feed costs considerably. 

New pheasant pens were constructed at the Ayer Game Farm allowing the 
rearing of 5,000 or more pheasants. Other pens will be constructed in the coming 
year. Upon completion of these projects, the Ayer farm may be capable of 
distribution to all districts except the Southeast. 

During this reporting period, the Sandwich Game Farm experienced an outbreak 
of Fowl Cholera. The end result required the Division to acquire (at no cost) 
pheasant eggs from New York, Pennsylvania and New Jersey state game farms. 



22 



Pheasant Production 
1984 



Farm A SR. B C PG Total 

Sandwich 120 1,164 2,140 6,236 9,660 

Ayer 48 1,735 1,528 4,328 12,336 19,975 

Wilbraham 2,420 2,912 9,528 5,948 20,808 



Totals 48 4,275 5,600 15,996 23,520 50,443 



Quail Production: 3,600 
White Hare Purchased: 800 



23 



^ * Nongame and Endangered Species 



Bradford G. Blodget 
State Ornithologist 



This was a milestone year for the Nongame and Endangered Species Program. 
Fiscal 1985 was the first year that funds were made available from the Nongame 
Wildlife Fund Checkoff on the State Income Tax Form. The approved budget 
of $297,436.00 was a significant increase over the $45,481.00 of 1984. 
Approximately one-third of this budget was set aside for land acquisition. 
Due to unwilling sellers only one small land purchase was made and the 
unused monies reverted back to the Nongame Wildlife Fund for future use. 

The first new program to be established with checkoff funds was a 
Peregrine Falcon Release Project in downtown Boston. This project is the 
Division's first major wildlife restoration effort placed in an urban setting 
and quickly became the center of frequent media attention. If successful, 
this restoration project effort will lead to the first breeding pair of 
peregrine falcons in Massachusetts since 1951. 



24 



Peregrine Falcon Restoration 

A release site was constructed on the roof of the federal John McCormack 
Post Office and Court House Building. On July 17, 1984, six young falcons 
were placed in their hack box. These birds were released on July 26th. 
By early September, three of the six had learned to hunt on their own and 
had left Boston to migrate south for the winter. Of the three that did not 
disperse, one broke a wing and was returned to the Peregrine Fund in Ithaca, 
New York as a future breeder, one was killed by an airplace at Hanscom 
Air Field, and one was killed by flying into a window. 

Six young were received on June 7, 1985 for the upcoming Fiscal Year 
1986 release. 

Bald Eagle Restoration 

Six young birds from Cape Breton, Nova Scotia were placed on the hack 
tower at Quabbin Reservoir on June 14, 1984. One died unexpectedly of an 
intestinal infection on July 15th, but the remaining five were released in 
good health on July 26th. 

Eight young birds were received from Nova Scotia on June 21, 1985 for 
the upcoming Fiscal Year 1986 release. 

Bald Eagle Winter Survey 

The survey for the winter of 1984/1985 was conducted on January 11, 1985. 
A total of 28 bald eagles (15 adults and 13 immatures) was observed statewide. 
Twenty-one of these (11 adults and 10 immatures) were found at Quabbin Reservoir. 
During the same survey, three golden eagles were recorded, all at Quabbin. 

Plymouth Red-bellied Turtle 

A contract with Dr. Terry Graham of Worcester State College to conduct 
research on the natural history and management of the Plymouth Red-bellied 
Turtle was continued. 

A "headstart" program was begun by placing 10 hatchlings in the New 
England Aquarium i n November, 1984 and releasing these turtles at a much 
larger size on June 26, 1985. By keeping these young turtles in a warm 
climate and feeding them all winter, they grew to a much larger size and 
were released with a significantly better chance of survival. 

Piping Plover 

Over 30 observers reported seeing a total of 131 breeding pairs of Piping 
Plover at 38 sites. Massachusetts continues to have more breeding pairs of 
these plovers than any other East Coast state or province. A cooperative 
study entitled "Management, Habitat Selection and Population Dynamics of 
Piping Plovers on Outer Cape Cod, Massachusetts" was begun by Ms. Laurie 
Mclvor at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. 



25 



Tern Inventory and Management 

Results of the annual tern census, coordinated by the State Ornithologist, 
Bradford Blodget, yielded 11,518 breeding pairs in the state. This included 
7,548 pairs of Common Tern at 24 sites (up 9% from 1984), 2,338 pairs of Least 
Tern at 43 sites (slightly less than 1984), 1,618 pairs of Roseate Tern at 
eight sites (down 11% from 1984), and 14 pairs of Arctic Terns at four sites 
(the same as 1984) . The most noteable change was the nearly complete collapse 
of the Monomoy-North Common Tern colony. In 1985 only 290 pairs remained; down 
from 3,400 pairs in 1980, and 1,200 pairs in 1984. 

Osprey 

This was a record year for nesting osprey. A total of 103 nests were 
occupied; 88 of them were successful (75%), producing 145 fledged young. 
Each successful nest produced an average of 2.2 young. 

Nest poles were erected for osprey prospecting outside of their current 
nesting range at Quabbin Reservoir and on Plum Island. The present breeding 
range includes localities in Barnstable, Bristol, Dukes, Nantucket and Plymouth 
Counties . 

Common Loon 

During 1985, the Nongame and Endangered Species Program, Metropolitan 
District Commission and Massachusetts Audubon Society, received a joint grant 
from the North American Loon Fund. This grant made possible the hiring of 
a Loon Warden to gather data on the status, productivity and causes of 
disturbance to the Common Loon at Quabbin Reservoir. Six pairs of loons were 
monitored at Quabbin and one at Wachusett Reservoir. Eggs were laid by three 
of the Quabbin pairs and one chick was hatched. 

Great Blue Heron Colony Inventory 

During June 1985, the State Ornithologist conducted an inventory of all 
known Great Blue Heron colonies in the state. An estimated 308 nesting pairs 
were counted, continuing the rising trend evident since 1979. These results 
were up 32% from 1984 and up 61% over 1983. A total of 25 colonies was recorded, 
of which 15 were located in Worcester County. The largest colonies were in 
Dunstable (67 pairs) and Phillipston (44) . Mean brood size at about 60 days 
among all colonies was conservatively 2.79 young. Estimated total production 
was 717 young; up 34% from 1984. Overall results show that the Great Blue 
Heron continues to flourish in Massachusetts and that productivity and 
recruitment are excellent. 

Bluebird and Purple Martin Management 

During Fiscal Year 1985, approximately 250 bluebird houses were built in 
Division shops. The Demonstration Bluebird Trail at High Ridge Wildlife 
Management Area in Gardner and Westminster , begun in 1984, was expanded. This 



NONGAME & ENDANGERED SPECIES PROGRAM 
FY 1985 EXPENDITURES 




Salaries $ 48,113. 

Species Inventory, Research & Mgt. $ 39,495. 

Promotion $ 20,069. 

Education $ 7,175. 

Administration & Maintenance $ 4,908. 

Travel (including advisory committee) $ 2,259. 

Land Acquisition $ 1,700. 



$ 123,722. 



27 



trail is being developed to provide 
visit to actually see bluebirds and 
bluebirds. Five pairs of bluebirds 



the general public with a place they can 
to show how a trail is built to attract 
nested in boxes along the trail in 1985. 



Studies continued in 1985 to determine the efficiency of installing 
purple martin house units about the state. As of June 30, 1985, units had 
been installed at 39 sites. Of these units, six were "support" units at 
existing colonies, 13 were "satellite" units located within 25 miles of 
existing colonies and 19 were "prospecting" units located more than 25 miles 
from known colonies. Utilization has been generally poor. "Support" units 
enjoyed the best success with 75% utilized to some degree, but none of the 
19 "prospecting" units was occupied. 



Results thus far seem to show that units are useful in augmenting and 
strengthening existing colonies, but of little use in expanding the species' 
range. New colony establishment seems to be an extremely slow process that 
seems to depend on the vagaries of weather and other natural factors, social 
factors and just plain chance. 



Because of the investment in houses already made, units will continue 
to be monitored for occupancy. However, production of new units has been 
suspended . 



Bat Studies 



During the winter of 1984-85, Division staff visited the Rowe Copper 
Mine, the Chester Macia Mine and the Old Chester Mine to survey hibernating 
bat populations and to search for the endangered Indiana bat, Myotis sodalis . 
A total of 4,047 hibernating bats of four species were counted but no Indiana 
bats were found. In order of importance the species included Little Brown 
Myotis (2,903), Keen's Myotis (585), unidentified Myotis (including Little 
Brown and Keen's - 521), Eastern Pipistrelle (36), and Big Brown Bat (2). 

Nongame Fiscal Year 1985 Project Expenditures 

Species, Inventory, Research and Management 

Bald Eagle - Quabbin release program and winter survey $12, 860, 

($10,000 from Bald Eagle Trust Fund) 

Plymouth Red-bellied Turtle - Research, management and $10,527. 

Headstarting program 

Peregrine Falcon - Boston release program $ 3,900. 

Bats - winter surveys $ 429. 

Bluebird and Purple Martin house construction $ 97. 

Rare species inventories - Mass. Natural Heritage Program - $10,710. 

including rare plants and animals 

Land Acquisition 

Great Blue Heron colony - Dunstable, MA $ 1,700. 



28 



District Reports 



Northeast District, Walter L. Hoyt, District Wildlife Manager 
Southeast District, Louis Hambly, District Wildlife Manager 
Central District, G. Christopher Thurlow, District Wildlife Manager 
Connecticut Valley District, Herman Covey, District Wildlife Manager 
Western District, Tom Keefe, District Wildlife Manager 



The five wildlife districts are the field units of the Division of 
Fisheries and Wildlife. They work directly on Division properties and serve 
as the Division's presence throughout the Commonwealth. Staff from the 
District offices conduct field research under the supervision of project 
biologists, conduct stocking programs and serve as liaison with sporting and 
conservation groups. During Fiscal 1985, personnel from all districts released 
trout, pheasant, quail in the Southeast District, hare, tiger muskies 
and northern pike in a variety of woods and waters. They operated stations 
where hunters checked deer and turkey and where trappers registered the pelts 
they had taken. They distributed licenses, abstracts and other materials to 
hunting/ fishing license sales outlets and they assisted officers from the 
Division of Law Enforcement in ensuring public adherance to wildlife regulations. 
In addition, certain Districts conducted special hunts at the Delaney Wildlife 
Management Area (Northeast) , Otis Air Force Base (Southeast) , Ludlow Wildlife 
Management Area (Conn. Valley) and a special deer hunt for paraplegic sportsmen 
(Western) . 

Throughout the year, District staff members participated in on-going 
research efforts such as the mid-winter eagle survey, black duck banding 
program, the waterfowl inventory, census of mourning doves and woodcock, 
survey of great blue heron rookeries, monitoring of the mast crop and checking 
pH levels of ponds and streams. Special surveys brought Western District crews 
into the field checking streams and ponds for PCB's to assist the Division of 
Water Pollution Control and to assist a crew from Field Headquarters in the 
annual bat inventory. Staff from the Connecticut Valley District became involved 



29 



with research teams from the University of Massachusetts conducting research 
on black bears. Field crews assisted the wood duck research program by 
monitoring and maintaining wood duck boxes and Central District staff built 
and maintained houses of bluebirds establishing a demonstration trail on the 
Gardner Wildlife Management Area. 

As usual, District crews were on hand to assist the public in dealing 
with issues of animal damage. In this context, staff members provided advice, 
loaned traps and undertook animal removal operations where beaver were 
obstructing waterways. 

District personnel reviewed the Environmental Monitor for projects 
having an impact on wildlife, and offered comments where appropriate. They 
also took part in a variety of training sessions on such objects as animal 
immobilization, lake drawdowns, acid rain and telemetry. 

Crews from both Western and Connecticut Valley Districts participated 
in the turkey translocation program by scouting potential capture sites, 
baiting such sites and where birds were taken, assisting in transferring them 
to their new home area. Western District crews also transported, where they 
were met by a crew from the Southeast District, pheasant eggs donated to 
Massachusetts by New York State. The Eagle Restoration Program occupied staff 
of the Connecticut Valley District during the summer as they assisted in site 
preparation and gathering food for the young birds. During the same period, 
District staff members worked weekends with volunteer crews from the Western 
Massachusetts Chapters of Trout Unlimited, Western Massachusetts Fly Fishermen, 
and the New England Fly Fishermen to improve the upper section of the Swift 
River. To date, this effort has paid off in the establishment of four wing 
deflectors made of logs and stone and the placement of 75 half log fish shelters. 
The joint effort has drawn much public interest as reflected by positive press 
coverage. A new initiative in the Valley involves the formation of a 
Connecticut Valley Action Program Committee made up of representatives of 
the 19 cities and towns along the Connecticut River and including among its 
members the Connecticut Valley District Manager. This group has met to identify 
problems along the river and gather recommendations for action. 

Three new osprey nesting platforms were erected in the Southeast District 
with assistance from District crews. This district also monitored walleyes 
which are uncommon in the state. Their survey of Assawompsett Pond netted 
over 100 fish. Eggs were taken from these fish, fertilized and subsequently 
returned to the pond to test for viability. Preliminary results indicate that 
the eggs were fertile and viable. 

Crews from the Northeast District expanded their management activities 
to take in the 2,640 acres in eight communities abutting the Charles River 
(Charles River Natural Valley Storage Area) . Management responsibility for 
this vital area has been transferred to the Division by the U. S. Army Corps 
of Engineers. 



30 



The majority of the time not spent in research projects was spent in 
maintenance and improving the wildlife management areas within the Districts 
with each District having management responsibility for 2,700 acres (Connecticut 
Valley) to 15,200 acres (Central) of wildlife lands. On these areas, District 
crews cut back brush and opened fields. In one of the largest operations of the 
year, crews from the Central District opened 50 acres of old fields on the 
High Ridge Wildlife Management Area in Gardner. In addition to clearing lands, 
crews planted shrubs and trees as needed, limed and fertilized, marked 
boundaries, maintained and repaired bridges, roadways and parking areas. In 
addition, District personnel serviced transport and field equipment, maintained 
stream and pond shocking gear, boats and a variety of vehicles. District Managers 
arranged cooperative agreements with local farmers who were permitted to utilize 
Division lands in exchange for practices which enhance the fertility of the 
land and for leaving food and cover crops for wildlife. On other lands, 
contracts were arranged for selective logging to benefit wildlife and to provide 
material for Division construction projects. In the Western District, a 
cooperative agreement was signed to permit a maple sugaring operation on a 
wildlife management area in exchange for woodland improvements selective 
cutting and a fee. 

While the obligations filled most of the District crews' days, all 
districts reported an increasing number of public contacts. These ranged 
from providing technical assitance to such groups as the U.S.D.A., University 
of Massachusetts, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Town Selectmen, and other 
state agencies as well as to private citizens confronted with animal nuisance 
or damage problems to staffing of booths at shows, exhibits and fairs. 

As in the past, District staff continued to attend public meetings on 
issues related to wildlife, make press contacts, respond to press inquiries 
and participate in radio and television programs describing or explaining 
Division programs. 



31 



Information and Education 




Ellie Horwitz 
Chief 

Information and Education 



Press Contacts 

Communication with the public through the news media continues to 
be a key function of the Information and Education Section. At this point, 
coverage of Division activities is good and the number of direct inquiries 
from both print and electronic reporters is increasing. Fiscal Year 1985 
saw a continuation of the upward trend in coverage and use of press releases 
that has been noted in the past few years. Calculated on a calendar year 
basis (figures are for calendar year 1984) the section issued 34 press release 
packets for a total of 164 press release items. These items were sent to 
a list of 1,500 recipients of which 356 were media representatives while 
others included 428 sportsmen's clubs, 351 town clerks and a number of sporting 
goods stores. These releases plus special press events brought a total of 
3,901 press clippings or an average of 325 clippings per month. This shows 
a continued increase over the previous high level of 240 per month (1983). 

Special events for the press were hosted on the occasion of: the 
arrival of six young bald eagles from Nova Scotia and their subsequent release; 
the arrival of young peregrines; an official announcement of the results of 
the nongame checkoff; a volunteer effort to upgrade a portion of the Swift 
River in Belchertown; the Governor's signing of the annual proclamation of 
National Hunting and Fishing Day (September) and his signing of a similar 
announcement proclaiming Acid Rain Awareness Week (April) , the establishment 
of a sanctuary for the protection of the endangered Plymouth Red-bellied 
turtles; and a special "hot-line" to convey up-to-the-minute information on 
the progress of the deer hunting season. 



32 



In addition to these releases and events, section personnel responded 
to requests for information from writers, reporters and radio/ television 
journalists. Potential tourists as well as interested citizens also requested 
information and a sizable fraction of staff time was devoted to responding 
to both telephone and written inquiries. 

Publications 

Many of the inquiries received were answered with Division publications. 
As is section practice, all annual publications (abstracts, waterfowl 
regulations, stocking lists, fishing access information and other routine 
materials) were updated. Popular publications including fishing map booklets, 
lists of fauna and natural history flyers were reprinted. Prior to reprinting 
each publication was reviewed and, where needed, updated. Because of the rush 
to update and revise existing brochures, no new brochures were prepared, however, 
a new series of information sheets, inaugurated in Fiscal Year 1984, was expanded. 
This series, produced in cooperation with the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service 
and the Cooperative Extension Service, now includes six natural history titles 
and three leaflets on recognizing and dealing with animal damage. In view of 
the growing number of publications, the Division's publications list was enlarged 
and reissued. 

During this period, funds were available for only one issue of 
Massachusetts Wildlife . The single issue was devoted entirely to the issue 
of acid rain and examined the effects of acid rain on a wide variety of natural 
resources. As it appears that budget constraints will not permit the Division 
to expand publication under the current system, it has become top priority 
to establish a subscription system and staff members worked closely with the 
Director to stimulate passage of a bill to permit establishment of such a 
system and to develop procedures for handling subscriptions should such a 
system be approved. 

Exhibits 

As in other years, the Division took part in a variety of shows to increase 
Division visibility and to bring staff members in contact with the general 
public. The featured species for the 1984-1985 shows were turkey and trout. 
As in previous years, Information and Education personnel worked closely with 
District staff in preparing exhibits for the Eastern States Exposition 
(Springfield), The Eastern Fishing Exposition (moved from Boxborough to 
Worcester) and the Springfield Sportsmen's Show (taken on in lieu of the 
former Boston Travel and Camping Show) . District crews used these materials 
for Regional fairs including Topsfield Fair (Northeast), The Fair in 
Worcester (Central) — a show which provided the Division two hours of prime 
time on WTAG, a major Worcester station, Greenfield Fair (Conn. Valley), and 
the Bridgewater Sportsmen's Show (Southeast). In addition to these "traditional" 
shows, the section staff brought a Division presence and exhibit to the annual 
meeting of the Massachusetts Association of Conservation Commissions and to 
the New England Environmental Conference. 



33 



Hundreds of thousands of visitors passed through these exhibits, purchased 
licenses, asked questions and became better acquainted with the Division and 
its activities. 

Shows 

All members of the section participated in presenting slide shows, 
seminars and films as appropriate to both general and technical audiences. 
While programs dealt with all aspects of Division activities, the prime focus 
was on the activities of the burgeoning Nongame Program and specifically on 
eagle restoration. Groups requesting such programs included school groups, 
civic groups, sportsmen's and garden clubs, senior citizen's groups and an 
increasing number of groups from neighboring states. 

Photography 

During the year, both photographers continued to increase Division files 
by photographing and documenting field projects and by creating special graphics 
for presentations by staff administrators and biologists. While no specific 
films or slide shows were planned, photographs were taken for possible future 
programs on Division activities and on coastal nesting birds. Special emphasis 
has been focussed on obtaining photographs appropriate for nongame fund posters 
and for brochures which are in preparation or have been projected for future 
publication. 

Special Programs 

Nongame and Endangered Species Program 

Promotion of the Nongame Wildlife Fund and the associated tax checkoff 
was the key issue for the Information and Education Section during this year. 
During the first year of this promotion, efforts had been aimed at rapid 
production of basic publicity materials and the fund had garnered a total of 
$338,070.00. 

With soraehwat more lead time, consultant Joy Merzer compiled a report 
on first year performance of nongame funds across the nation and determined 
that Massachusetts came in with returns behind those of only two states, 
New York and Colorado. Poster and brochure materials were revised, meetings 
were held with tax preparers, a 30 second television spot was prepared, the 
slide show was updated and expanded, and appearances were booked for nongame 
staff members on a wide variety of radio and televisions shows (average 10/mo. 
during tax season) . Special articles were prepared for the newsletters of 
wildlife and environmental organizations and for the Department of Law 
Enforcement's newsletter. A nongame fund segment was included in all Division 
shows and exhibits and a special exhibit on wetlands was prepared for inclusion 
in the Boston Flower Show. This exhibit was awarded third place among small 
exhibits. A variety of staff members, including District staff presented 
programs focussing on the nongame slide show and on the film Home Free, a 27 



34 



minute documentary which chronicles the eagle restoration project. This film 
was selected by Channel 2 for use in its own fund raising effort and, with 
Division and Audubon staff responding to donors, became the single greatest 
fund raising program of the year. 

Looking ahead, plans were made for promotion in 1985-86, initial meetings 
were held with potential consultants at the Halyard Group (an advertising 
group) and at Communications for Learning (producers of television and visual 
materials) . Some investigationswere also initiated to determine companies 
and groups which match employee contributions as a way to agument fund income. 

Following the footsteps of the nongame program, the Department of Public 
Health successfully establishedasimilar checkoff on the tax form — this one 
for organ transplants. Section personnel met with Department of Public Health 
staff to assist them in setting up their promotional campaign for this fund. 

At the close of the fiscal year, consultant Joy Merzer left the program 
and a search was initiated for a successor with an advertising background. 

The Freshwater Sportfishing Awards Program 

The program continued to grow with 500+ entries in 20 categories which set 
six new state fishing records. In a move to standardize regulations, participating 
stations were required to obtain certified scales for future use. This proved 
no problem and while a few stations dropped the awards program, others were 
ready to take their place. 

Tags 'n' Trout 

This program was continued as in previous years. This year local sponsors 
sponsored 488 tagged trout at 18 locations offering anglers a donated prize 
program with a minimum value of $8,700.00 and an actual value which considerably 
higher. A number of sponsors asked to extend the program into fall fishing. 
This will be considered for the future. 

Waterfowl Stamp Program 

The annual competition was again held at the Peabody Museum in Salem. 
Fifty-five entries were considered before judges selected a Ruddy Duck carved 
by Joe Lincoln and painted by Randy Julius. 

Archery/Primitive Firearms Stamp 

This stamp was prepared as a donation to the Division by artist George 
DiRolf of Shrewsbury whose design involves the point and fletching of an arrow. 

Massachusetts Junior Conservation Camp 

As in the past, the section was heavily involved with the Massachusetts 
Junior Conservation Camp, which is now an independent entity operated by the 
Massachusetts Junior Conservation Camp, Inc. Division involvement ranges from 



35 



preparation and distribution of publicity, registration of campers, 
participation on the camp board in an ex-officio capacity, making arrangements 
for the actual camp session and teaching both fisheries and wildlife sessions. 

Project WILD 

After much consideration, the Division committed the necessary funds to 
become a partner in Project WILD. Following this, an educational coalition 
was established with the Massachusetts Audubon Society which will co-sponsor 
the program and assist in its distribution. An advisory committee of educators 
was established and initial workshops were held, one to train teachers and one 
to train future facilitators. To aid in publicity, a brochure and a sampler 
were designed and printed, and articles about the program were prepared for 
the newsletter of the American Nature Study Society and for the Journal of the 
Massachusetts Science Teachers Association. 

Wildlife Projects 

Section staff members continued their participation in projects outside 
the information area with photographer Jack Swedberg taking the lead in the 
Division's eagle restoration program (detailed in the nongame section) with 
photographer Bill Byrne deeply involved in assisting on the project. Jack 
was honored for his efforts as Man of the Year by the Eagle Foundation and 
Home Free was selected as an outstanding Film of the Year by The Wildlife Society. 
Journalist Peter Mirick coordinated part of the statewide survey of salamanders 
and continued to serve as consultant on herpetological matters, while section 
leader Ellie Horwitz continued to participate in survey and inventory of bats. 

Other 

Numerous other projects rounded out the section's activities and involved 
staff members in many facets of Division activities. During this year, the 
Division Policy was finally completed and readied for final editing and publication. 
To accompany this document, a "mission statement" was also prepared for Division 
use . 

A storage area was prepared for museum materials, a complete inventory 
was conducted, and new cases were constructed to increase display space. Intern 
Michael Picchieri cleaned and restored the museum's bird mounts under the 
direction of staff from The Worcester Science Center. 

Intern Cindy Slocum assisted the section providing art and graphics for 
brochures and displays from February 1985 through the end of this fiscal year. 

Section Chief Horwitz and Journalist Peter Mirick served as awards committee 
for the Northeast Outdoor Writers Association. Horwitz also served on the 
Education Committee of The Wildlife Society and as Northeast Liaison for the 
Association of Conservation Information. 



Floyd Richardson 
Chief of Wildlife Lands 



Funding made available by Chapter 723 MGL opened new horizons for 
the Realty Section. Unbridled latitude in acquisition endeavors presented 
the Division with the opportunity to acquire: lands adjacent to existing 
wildlife management areas; lands adjacent to major rivers; rare, threatened 
or endangered species habitat; coldwater streams; and other lands determined 
to be threatened. 

The benefits the public will realize from the above-mentioned programs 
of acquisition will be immeasurable. The majority of lands described 
herein are lands acquired with this open-space monies. 



Phillipston Acquisition Project 



3,229.5 Acres 



This unique management area has provided countless hours of enjoyment 
to sportsmen and "out-of-doors" enthusiasts alike. Benefits include cross- 
country skiing on the numerous wooded roads that spider web the area, berry 
picking where the silence is punctuated only by song birds, and grouse 
exploding from a thicket when you least expect it. 

As the Division entered this fiscal year, the threat of development 
focused on the western perimeter of this unspoiled area. Three hundred acres 
and 3,500 feet of Williamsville Road frontage were in danger of being 
developed. Fortunately, the owner enjoyed wildlife and appreciated wildlife 
lands. He refused a lucrative offer from a developer and sold to the Division 
at a considerably lower price. 

High Ridge Acquisition Project 1,795.7 Acres 

A comparatively new management area, High Ridge is maturing into a 
compatible wildlife area. Additional acquisitions are becoming increasingly 
difficult because of the proximity of a community developing rapidly both 
industrially and residentially . The construction and completion of Route 190, 
a direct route from central Worcester, is the major factor contributing to 
the increased growth rate. 

Despite these pressures, the Division has acquired a twelve (12) acre 
parcel, lending additional food and wildlife cover adjacent to Smith Street. 

Fox Den Acquisition Project 748.0 Acres 

Two large acquisitions created a new wildlife management area in the 
Town of Worthington, County of Hampshire. The combination of these two 
acquisitions place 748 acres of woodlands in Division ownership. 

Ownership, which originates on West Street, runs westerly over undulating 
topography to the Middle Branch of the Westfield River. Hardwood trees — oak, 
maple, beech, ash and birch with softwood stands of pine, hemlock and 
spruce — comprise the woody plants. Remnants of apple orchards are scattered 
throughout the area. 

This picturesque hilltown has become a popular residential development. 
Unfortunately, development spells destruction of wildlife habitat, so these 
acquisitions come at a most opportune time. 

Hinsdale Flats Acquisition Project 1,219.7 Acres 

Seventy-two acres of wildlife habitat were added to this management area 
which extends from the Washington/Hinsdale town line to the Middlefield Road. 
The East Branch of the Housatonic River, in its serpentine pattern, graces the 
area providing habitat for waterfowl, aquatic mammals, and trout. 



38 



Birch Hill Acquisition Project 3,179.6 Acres 

The Division owes a debt of gratitude to the officials of the Town of 
Winchendon who made this 82 acre acquisition possible. Their concern for the 
environment coupled with their determination and effort to place this land in 
public ownership was responsible for these lands being deeded to the Division. 

Birch Hill has long been a favorite hunting and fishing area. Open 
fields, hedgerows, woodlands, and marshlands blend to provide a well-balanced 
wildlife area. Two well-stocked trout streams complete the area. 

Bolton Flats Acquisition Project 740.9 Acres 

A triangular parcel of woodland, fronting Route 117 in Lancaster, was 
acquired to add another seven acres to the popular Bolton Flats Management 
Area. 

Land adjacent to this area, potentially available, is relatively scarce 
and expensive. Future acquisitions are expected to be difficult. 

Elbow Meadow Acquisition Project 5.0 Acres 

This area is considered one of the largest Great Blue Heron rookeries in 
Massachusetts. Encroaching residential development and the loss of remoteness 
necessary for this rookery spelled disaster. Concern for the well-being of 
the rookery precipitated an acquisition plan developed cooperatively with the 
Dunstable Conservation Commission. The plan to create a protective buffer zone 
was formulated. An 83-acre parcel was acquired by the town and the Division 
added a five acre parcel. Funding from the Nongame Income Tax Checkoff proceeds 
made this first acquisition possible. 

Quaboag Acquisition Project 1,101.4 Acres 

Four new parcels of river front property were placed in Division owner- 
ship. These parcels ensure permanent protection of that segment of the 
Quaboag River. They comprise 55.8 acres and are located both in Brookfield 
and West Brookfield. 

With the above-mentioned acquisitions, approximately five miles of 
Commonwealth ownership on the river is realized. 

North Attleboro Federal Hatchery Project 36.46 Acres 

Title to a thirty-six and one-half acre parcel of land was vested into 
the Division. This transaction without cost is considered a transfer resulting 
from a "reverter clause" in a deed of the Commonwealth to the United States 
Fish and Wildlife Service. 

Language in the deed explicity instructs and directs the return of any 
portion of the conveyed premises no longer utilized for propagation of fish. 
Route 95 cut off a segment of the hatchery. This isolated property is no longer 
an integral part of the hatchery, thus precipitating the transfer. 



39 



Maintenance and Development 




John P. Sheppard 
Chief 

Maintenance and Development 



Hatcheries 

Work was completed on the construction of the wastewater treatment 
facility at the McLaughlin Hatchery, Belchertown. An existing well was re- 
developed at the East Sandwich Anadromous Fish Hatchery. A new boiler 
and oil burner unit were installed at the residence at the Palmer Hatchery 
and new vinyl siding was installed at the residence at the Sunderland 
Hatchery. Also a new 8" PVC water line was installed at the Sandwich 
Hatchery. 

Hunter Safety Building - Gardner, Massachusetts 

A new roof was installed at the aforementioned building and extensive 
renovations were undertaken on the outside of the building including vinyl 
siding . 

Public Access Projects 

(1) New plantings at the Lake Quinsigamond boat ramp in Shrewsbury. 

(2) Design development started on canoe and cartop boat ramp at North 
Pond - Hopkinton. 

(3) Concrete slab installed and miscellaneous repairs conducted at 
Monponsett Pond in Halifax. 

(4) Concrete slab installed and repairs conducted at Big Alum Pond 
in Sturbridge. 



Personnel Actions 



Eighteen personnel changes were undertaken during this fiscal year, 
They are: 



Appointments 
Name 



Job Title 



Date 



S. Williams 

A. Cancellieri 

J. Sousa 

J. Scanlon 

E . Ramey 

S. Shea 

K. Miller 

J . Ayre 



Game Biologist, Westboro 02/24/85 

Principal Bookkeeper, Boston 03/10/85 
Assistant Fish Culturist, McLaughlin 04/01/85 

Junior Planner, Westboro 05/13/85 

Sandwich Game Farm, Sandwich 06/03/85 

Senior Bookkeeper, Boston 06/30/85 

Senior Clerk, Boston 05/05/85 

Junior Bacteriologist, McLaughlin 09/09/84 



Retirements 



Name 



Job Title 



Date 



Curtis 
Kleinoit 
Ellison 
Deane 



J . McDonough 



Conservation Skilled Helper, Southeast 07/15/84 

Chief Administrative Clerk, Boston 06/30/84 

Fish Culturist, Bitzer Hatchery 11/02/84 

Conservation Skilled Helper, Bitzer 03/31/84 

Game Biologist, Westboro 10/19/84 



Resignations 



D. Spigarolo 

E. Robidoux 
D. Rose 

P. Sutliff 



Junior Bacteriologist, McLaughlin 08/01/84 

Senior Clerk, Boston 04/19/85 

Conservation Helper, Western District 04/16/85 

Senior Bookkeeper, Boston 05/17/85 



Transfer 



M. Magenghi 



Senior Bookkeeper to Junior Clerk Typist 03/31/85 
on a half-time basis. 



42 



Legislation 



Enacted During Fiscal Year 1985 

Chapter 77 - Acts of 1985. An act further regulating public access 
to information in the Massachusetts Natural Heritage Program Data Base. 

Chapter 95 - Acts of 1985. An act imposing administrative penalties 
for certain environmental violations. 

Chapter 130 - Acts of 1985. An act authorizing the transfer of the 
care, custody and control of certain parcels of lands in the Town of Bourne 
from the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife and the Buzzards Bay Water District- 
to the Department of Public Works for highway purposes. 

Chapter 197 - Acts of 1985. An act increasing the penalties for the 
dumping of rubbish on public land, in or near coastal or inland waters or on 
the property of another. 

Chapter 219 - Acts of 1985. An act allowing for a turkey hunting season 
in a certain area of the Mount Grey lock State Reservation. 

Chapter 231 - Acts of 1985. An act relative to the Division of Law 
Enforcement, Department of Fisheries, Wildlife and Environmental Law 
Enforcement . 

Chapter 254 - Acts of 1985. An act further regulating commercial 
shooting preserves. 



3 



Chapter 329 - Acts of 1985. An act authorizing the shooting of certain 
wounded migratory game birds from a powered boat. 

Chapter 349 - Acts of 1985. An act further regulating the carrying 
of dangerous weapons. 

Chapter 435 - Acts of 1985. An act authorizing the Towns of Dracut and 
Tyngsboro to enter into an agreement with the Town of Pelham in the State of 
New Hampshire for the purpose of watershed management and lake restoration for 
Long Pond. 

Chapter 483 - Acts of 1985. An act authorizing the reproduction of the 
Fuertes Bird Paintings. 

Chapter 528 - Acts of 1985. An act authorizing DCPO to permit the General 
Electric Company to transfer certain easements in land of the Commonwealth. 

Chapter 573 - Acts of 1985. An act relative to certain capital outlays. 
(Section 12 amends land acquisiton bill by obligating the general fund rather 
than the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife) . 

Chapter 590 - Acts of 1985. An act limiting acid rain and acid disposition. 

Chapter 630 - Acts of 1985. An act relative to fees for issuing hunting 
and fishing licenses (clarifies section 17 of Chapter 131). 

Chapter 734 - Acts of 1985. An act relative to the Quabbin Watershed 
Advisory Committee of the MDC. 

Chapter 756 - Acts of 1985. An act establishing the Lake Buel Restoration/ 
Preservation District in the Towns of Monterey and New Marlborough. 

Chapter 767 - Acts of 1985. An act relative to certain dams. 

Chapter 770 - Acts of 1985. An act authorizing use of the Division of 
Fisheries and Wildlife Nongame Wildlife Fund to acquire other than fee interests 
in certain property. 



44 



How the Sportsman's Dollar is Spent 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE 
July 1, 1984 to June 30, 1985 



Account No 

2310-0200 
2310-0200 



2310-0400 
2310-0400 
2310-0400 



2310-0400 
2310-0400 
2310-0400 



2310-0300 



Administration 
Administration 
Inf ormation-Education 

Wildlife Programs 
Game Farms 

Wildlife Management-* 
Wildlife Cooperative Unit 

Fisheries Programs 
Fish Hatcheries 
Fisheries Management** 
Fisheries Cooperative Unit 

Construction 

Development & Improvement of 
Facilities for Public Use* 

Land Acquisition 

Acq. of Upland Areas & Inhold- 
ing on Existing Areas* ** 2310-0310 

Equipment 

Purchase of Equipment 2310-0315 

Dept. of Fisheries, Wildlife 
& Recreational Vehicles 
Natural Resource Officers' 

Salaries and Expenses (15%) 2350-0100 

Hunter Safety Training*** 2350-0101 

Transfers from Fund 

Group Insurance 1590-1007 
Salary Adjustments 2310-7001 
Central Reproduction 

Retirement Assessment (.2%) 0612-1000 

Interest on Bonded Debt 0699-2800 

Maturing Serial Bonds & Notes 0699-2900 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES 



Expenditures 

$ 494,263.75 
243,443.34 



673,795.73 
762,789.83 
72,000.00 



847,886.66 
650,273.82 
72,000.00 



Percent- 
age 

$ 737,707.09 13.03% 



1,508,585.56 26.64% 



1,570,160.48 27.72% 



82,079-15 1.45% 



171,366.06 3.03% 



187,742.25 3.31% 



330,875.52 5.84% 
182,524.75 3.22% 



218,294.00 3.85% 

64,467.00 1.14% 

1,063.74 .02% 

381,091.82 6.73% 

33,231.50 .59% 

194,000.00 3.43% 



$5,663,188.92 100.00% 



* Continuing Appropriation 

** Portions of expenditures up to 75% reimbursable by Federal Government 
*** 100% reimbursable by Federal Government 



APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
Fiscal Year July T, 1984 to June 30, 1985 



Inland Fish and Game Fund Accounts 

Expenditures 



Total 



Account No. 


Appropriations 


& Liabilit 


ies 




<- f r? 


2310-0200 Administration 


787,193.00 




.09 


49,485 


.91 


2310-0315 Purchase of Equipment 


271 ,713.00 


187,742 


.25 


83,970 


.75 


2310-0400 Wildlife Management 


3,300,085.00 


2 ,278,746 


.04 


22' ,336 


• 96 




4,358,991 .00 


4 ,304 ,195 


. --. 


354,795 


.62 



2310-0300 
2310-0310* 



Continuing 
Appropriations 

Dev. & Imp. of Facilities 
for Public Use 138,417.10 

Acq. of Upland Areas & In- 
holding on Existing Areas 268 ,687 .09 

407,104.19 

Capital Outlay 
Appropriation 



2670-9016 



Acq. of Coastal & Inland 
Wetlands 



Account No, 
2310-0500 

2310-0550 
2310-0551 



Natural Heritage & 
Greenway Planning 
Acid Rain Program 
Acid Rain Research 



5,545.49 

General Fund Accoun ts 

Appropriations 

185,000.00 
333,000.00 
86,500.00 
604,500.00 

Continuing 
Appropriation 
2310-0310* Acq. of Upland Areas & In- 
holding on Existing Areas 89,562.36 

Capital Outlay 
Appropriations 

2310-8821 Wastewater Treatment 

Facility, McLaugh. Hatch. 728,192.77 
2310-8840 Acq. of Cold Water Streams 3,760,000.00 
2310-8841 Associated Costs 240,000.00 
2310-8842 Acq. Adjacent to Existing 

Wildlife Mgmt. Areas 7,050,000.00 
2310-8843 Associated Costs 450,000.00 

12,228,192.77 



Expenditures 

82,079. 1 5 

131 ,503.70 
213,582.85 

Expenditures 
1 ,604.50 

Expenditures 
& Liabilities 

161 ,363.29 
325,874.00 
7,500.00 
494,737.29 

Expenditures 
43,834.57 

Expenditures 
491 ,470.55 



Balance 
Forward 

1 93 ,52 1 .34 

Bal ance 
Forward 

3,940.99 



Total 
Reversions 

23,636.71 
7,126.00 
79,000.00 
109,762.71 

Balance 
Forward 

45,727.79 

Bal ance 
Forward 

236,722.22 
3,760,000.00 
240,000.00 

7,050,000.00 

-_ 450,000.00 

491,470.55 11,736,722.22 



Nongame Wildlife Fund Account 



2315-0100 Nongame Program 



2310-6004 Bald Eagle Trust 



Appropriation 
298,207.00 

Trust Fund Account 

Appropriation 
9,443.93 



Expenditures 
& Liabilities 
192,159.14 



Expenditures 
4,997.9^ 



Total 
Reversions 
106,047.86 



Balance 
Forward 



4,445.99 



*75% Inland Fish and Game Fund; 25% General Fund. 



46 



•SUMMARY OF REVENUE CREDITED 
TO THE 

INLAND FISH AND GAME FUND 



July 1, 1984 to June 30, 


1 985 






Collected by Agency: 


Receipt Acct 


. No 


Amount 


Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses* 


3304-61 -01 


-40 


$3 ,923 ,552 .98 


Archery Stamps* 


3304-61-01 


-40 


1 1 1 ,262 .60 


Trap Registrations* 


3304-61 -01 


-40 


1 ,374 .00 


Waterfowl Stamps* 


3304-40-01 


-40 


6 ,093 .60 


Waterfowl Stamps-Ducks Unlimited* 


3304-40-02 


-40 


1 9 ,490 .40 


Special Licenses, Tags & Posters** 






17,126.00 


Antlerless Deer Permits 


3304-61 -1 4 


-40 


39,104.00 


Bear Permits 


3304-61-14 


-40 


4,390.00 


Turkey Permits 


3304-61-14 


-40 


25,150.10 


Rents 


3304-63-01 


-40 


18,173.95 


Sales, Other 


3304-64-99 


-40 


28,778.96 


Refunds Prior Year 


3304-69-01 


-40 


3 ,248 .46 


Miscellaneous Income 


3304-69-99 


-40 


455 .61 








$4,198,200.66 


Collected by State Treasurer: 








Fines and Penalties 


3308-41 -01 


-40 


34,1 1 1 .85 


Interest and Discount on Revenue 


3395-60-01 


-40 


101 ,156.18 








$1 35 ,268 .03 


Federal Aid Reimbursement: 








Pittman-Robertson 


3304-67-01 


-40 


650,865.86 


Dingell- Johnson 


3304-67-02 


-40 


305,370.44 


Anadromous Fish Projects 


3304-67-04 


-40 


15,113.74 


Endangered Species 


3304-67-1 1 


-40 


6,916.67 


Indirect Cost Reimbursement 


3304-67-67 


-40 


326,835.61 








$1 ,305,102.32 


Taxes: 








Gasoline Tax Apportionment 


3312-05-01 


-40 


385,121 .52 


Transfers from General Fund 








Salary Adjustments 


3360-95-02 


-36 


65,531 .00 


Reimbursements on Half Price Licenses 


3360-95-08 


-40 


69,491 .75 



$135,022.75 
Reversions 

Accounts Payable 88,951 .40 



TOTAL REVENUE 



$6,247,666.68 



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SPECIAL LICENSES, 


TAGS A 


ND E 


02 


TERS 








• 






July 1 , 1 984 to 


June 2 


0, 1 


985 


























Receipt 














Quant 


.ity Sc 




Account 


Rece 


ipt 


Ac 


count 


Type of License 




Uni 




Price 


Amount 


Total 


220 


-61 


-02 


-40 


Fur Buyers 
Resident Citizens: 




23 


8 


25 .00 


575.00 












Non-Residents or Aliens: 


4 


3 


75 .00 


200.00 


375.00 


220^ 


-61 


-03 


-40 


Taxidermists 






@ 


20.00 




1 ,540.00 


230.4 


-61 


-04 


-40 


Propagators 






















Special Purpose Per 


nits: 


209 


3 


i .00 


209.00 












Class 1 (Fish) 






















Initials: 




39 




15.00 


585.00 












Renewals: 




163 


,a 


1 .00 


1 ,630.00 












Class 3 (Fish) 






















Initials: 




18 


§ 


15.00 


270.00 












Renewals: 




78 




10.00 


780.00 












Class 4 (Birds, Reptiles, 


Mammals) 














Initials: 




56 


§ 


15.00 


840.00 












Renewals: 




371 


§ 


10.00 


3,710.00 












Class 6 (Dealers) 






















Initials: 




15 




15.00 


225.00 












Renewals: 




52 


§ 


10.00 


520.00 












Additional Stores 




214 




5. 00 


1 ,070.00 












Class 7 (Individual 


Bird 


or Mammal) 














Initials: 




1 

i 


§ 


5.00 


5.00 












Renewals: 




13 




2.00 


26.00 












Importation Permits 






















Fish: 




3 


§ 


7.50 


22.50 












Birds: 




65 


§ 


7.50 


487.50 












Class 9 (Falconry) 






















Masters: 




14 




25.00 


350.00 












Apprentices: 




25 




25.00 


625.00 












General: 




14 


§ 


25.00 


350.00 












Class 10 (Falconry) 






















Raptor Breeding: 




10 




10.00 


100.00 












Class 11 (Falconry) 






















Raptor Salvage: 




22 


§ 


1 .00 


22.00 


11 ,827". 00 


3304 


-61 


-05 


-40 


Take Shiners 




99 




10.00 




990.00 


3304 


-61 


-06 


-40 


Field Trial Licenses 




38 


§ 


15.00 




570.00 


3304 


-61 


-07 


-40 


Taking of Eels 




4 




25.00 




100.00 


3304 


-61 


-08 


-40 


Quail for Training Dogs 




















Initials: 




3 


§ 


7.50 


22.50 












Renewals: 




13 




5.00 


65.00 


87.50 


3304 


-61 


-10 


-40 


Comm. Shooting Preserves 


6 




50.00 




300.00 


3304 


-61 


-12 


-40 • 


Mounting Permits 




3 




2.00 




6.00 


3304 


-61 


-13 


-40 


Special Field Trial Permits 


12 




15.00 




180.00 


3304 


-64 


-01 


-40 


Tags and Posters 
Game Tags: 


3, 


905 


§ 


.10 


o o o f— o 

390 .50 












Fish Tags: 


5, 


200 




.05 


260.00 












Posters 












650.50 



17,126.00 



CHANGES IN 
INLAND FISH AND GAME FUND BALANCE 



Balance July 1, l 9S^ (Surplus) 3 2Si .629 .35 

Total Revenue/Credits 6 ,247 ,666 .53 

Total Expenditures -5,663,188.92 

^Increase in Continuing Accounts Brought Fcrvarc -104,908.18 

Balance June 20, "98^ ; Surplus) 3 "6* ,2C? .-2 



Continuing Accounts Brought Forward ' 98^ " 985 

Retirement Assessment (0612-1000) S2^ ,025 .29 3 -5,383.53 

Develop & Improve Facilities for 

Public Use (2210-0300) 57,226.07 39,454.22 

Acq. of Upland Areas and Inholding 

on Existing Areas (2310-0310) 1,665.27 133,390.08 

Reserve for Encumbrances .75 20 ,377 .79 

$82,930.38 $187,338.56 

1985: $187,838.56 
1984: -82,930.38 
*$104,908.18 



CHANGES IN 

NONGAME WILDLIFE FUND BALANCE 

Balance July 1, 1984 (Surplus) $338,070.46 

Total Revenue/Credits 264,642.89 

Total Expenditures -192,159.1a 

Balance on June 30, 1985 $410,554.21 




1986 

Annual Report 






Director 



^evey^tt Sfa/tonUtii/ ^at/t/inij, ^ovewtmeni Center 
100 (fiamtrufye 38o*6m 02202 



His Excellency, Michael S. Dukakis, Governor of the Commonwealth , the 
Executive Council, the General Court, and the Board of the Division of 
Fisheries and Wildlife. 



Sirs: 

I have the honor to submit herewith the One Hundred and Twenty-First 
Annual Report of the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, covering the fiscal 
1 July 1985 to 30 June 1986. 



Respectfully submitted, 



-7? /flit* 

Wayne F. MacCallum 
Acting Director 



Table of Contents 



PAGE NUMBER 

Highlights of 1986 I-II 

The Board Reports - 1-5 

Fisheries 

Fish Hatcheries 12-13 

Planning 14 

Wildlife 15-24 

Nongame and Endangered Species 25-30 

District Reports 31-33 

Information and Education 34-37 



Realty 



38-41 



Personnel Actions 42-43 
Legislation 44 
How the Sportsman's Dollar is Spent 45-50 



Highlights of 1986 



Nineteen eighty-six was marked by the advent of some significant new 
orograms, the expansion of existing programs and authorization for certain key 
new programs. 

New programs initiated during this year include a new forestry /wildlife 
program headed by John Scanlon, formerly a consulting forester for Bay State 
Forestry Service, and the establishment in Massachusetts of Project WIID, a 
classroom-oriented wildlife program suitable for Grades K-12. 

Programs expanding are lead by the land acquisition program. During 
this year, the legislature and Governor approved a capital outlay of 11.5 
billion dollars for land purchase. To meet this mandate, a realty staff 
member was added to each wildlife district. By the end of the reporting 
period, the staff had increased Division holdings by 1,156 acres. The salmon 
restoration program was enhanced by the opening of a fish passageway at Lowell 
on the Merrimack River and by the signing of a comprehensive plan for the 
management of anadromous fish species on the Merrimack. This plan calls for 
the development of five fish passages at five dams. The deer program hit a new 



I 



high in the 1985 season with hunters taking a total of 5,289 deer. Press 
coverage also set records as newspapers around the state responded to Divi- 
sion press releases, programs and events by printing an average of 374 news 
items each month or an estimated 12 items about the Division, Division pro- 
grams, or Division personnel each day. 

Looking ahead, the Division will move in some new directions. Land 
acquisition will increase as a result of the bond issue. In order to reduce 
Division expenses, approval was obtained to place Massachusetts Wildlife on 
a subscription basis. Following an initial outlay for Fiscal Year 1987, the 
magazine should become self-supporting. Another new program will see the 
Division moving into the wildlife art field as the Legislature has autho- 
rized the Division to prepare and sell prints made from the art of Louis 
Agassiz Fuertes which is housed in the Commonwealth archives. 

The outlook for the Division's restoration programs is promising. One 
shorebird, the piping plover, was granted endangered status during this year 
and now enjoys the protection such listing entails. 

During this year we note, with sadness, the passing of Herman Wiesner, 
who died on January 6, 1986 during the performance of his management and 
maintenance responsibilities. 



II 



1 



The Board Reports 



George Darey 
Chairman 



The Massachusetts Fisheries and Wildlife Board is charged with the 
responsibility of establishing regulations for the perpetuation, utilization 
and conservation of wildlife throughout the ConTnonwealth . In addition, the 
Board provides oversight of the activities of the Division of Fisheries and 
Wildlife, authorizes its activities and endeavors to assist Division administrators 
in streamlining Division functions. The seven unpaid members of this Board 
address their responsibilities through monthly working meetings which are held 
in various locations around the state to facilitate public access to the Board 
and its activities. At these meetings, the Board solicits biological input 
from staff of the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, considers public 
testimony on regulatory matters and examines a wide variety of materials relevant 
to the subjects under consideration. 



2 



During Fiscal 1986, the Board held 13 working meetings and seven (7) 
public hearings on regulatory matters. They also promoted six informational 
meetings relating to deer management (2) , the Nongame program (3j and a proposal 
to introduce white amur to Massachusetts (1) . In addition, they obtained in- 
depth briefings on numerous Division programs and they discussed and considered 
a wide variety of issues relevant to Division operations, wildlife-related 
requests and environmental issues in the Commonwealth. 

Two issues high on the Board's list of priorities, held over from 1985, 
were to establish the Division's magazine, MASSACHUSETTS WILDLIFE, on a 
subscription basis in a move toward allowing the publication to become self- 
supporting and to improve forest management on Division-held properties and 
where possible, generate income from the sale of timber on such lands. Both 
of the goals were realized during this year. 

In July 1985, the legislature authorized a one-time expenditure to 
permit the Division to revise the magazine and establish a subscription system. 
The first subscription issue was published a year later and sent to an initial 
5,000 subscribers. Also during that month, wildlife forester John Scanlon 
joined the Division and began surveying wildlife management areas in the Western 
District and conducting inventory on those areas. 

This was the year in -which the Board first grappled with the issue of 
the federal mandate to utilize non-toxic shot for waterfowl. To make this 
transition feasible, the Board directed the Division to introduce legislation 
allowing larger shot sizes than those currently permitted. The Board also 
took a strong stand on the issue of the number of hunting days allowed 
Massachusetts waterf owlers . On three occasions, letters were sent to the 
U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service requesting extra days in lieu of days lost to 
the Commonwealth ' s "No Sunday Hunting" provision. 

A major item for consideration during this year was the possibility of 
introducing the white amur or some hybrid from thereof to serve as a weed 
control agent in selected waters and specifically in Lake Chebacco, Essex. 
This item was discussed in depth during six of the thirteen working sessions. 
At the conclusion of the June discussion, the Board voted to continue to 
investigate the feasibility of using the white amur and to evaluate proposals 
on a pond-by-pond basis. 

The Board also addressed the issue of PCB contamination of portions of 
the Housatonic River. The Board received copies of a report issued by General 
Electric detailing options for the cleanup of the contaminants. In reviewing 
these options, the Board expressed concern that certain ones would contain the 
contamination but would destroy important wildlife habitat and impact local 
fish and wildlife. The Division was specifically concerned as a major landowner 
along that section of river and generally concerned in its role as monitor 
of wildlife populations. 

The proposed establishment of microwave towers adjacent to Hawley State 
Forest, as part of the Air Force's GWEN System, also posed a threat to key 
wildlife habitat. Members of the Board visited the area and considered 
alternatives prior to opposing the proposal. 



3 



Issues relating to operation of the Division involved concern with the 
existing salary scale, one of the lowest in the nation, and led to Board 
concern about the Division's ability to retain staff, especially upper management. 
Housing for Division staff became an issue when the state mandated that rates 
on housing located on state-owned properties be set at fair market rates. 
As this did not consider the oversight and emergency service responsibilities 
of employees currently in such housing, it appeared that the ruling might 
adversely affect security and safety at hatcheries and game farms. Vehicles 
came under Board scrutiny when the Department of Administration and Finance 
proposed to conduct all auction/ sales of used state vehicles and deposit funds 
from such sales into the general fund. This was resolved and revenues from 
the sale of used Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife vehicles 
will be deposited in the Inland Fish and Game Fund. Concern was raised over 
the possible need for an increase in license fees. This was averted by savings 
affected by placing the magazine on subscription, by a substantial saving in 
game farm operations, and by an increase in license sales during Fiscal Year 
1985. An additional financial problem was averted when Division administrators 
arranged continuation of federal funding to this agency despite federal 
concerns over procedures in other agencies which, under the block funding 
methods currently in use, could have curtailed disbursement of federal funds. 

Other concerns which occupied the Board's attention included an 
investigation into regulations of the Division of Forests and Parks as they 
might affect hunting or trapping along the Appalachian Trail and response to 
a complaint filed regarding a research project on diamond-backed terrapins. 

At the Board's request, updatings were provided by Division staff on 
forestry and habitat improvement on wildlife management areas, on the Division's 
publicity program and four updatings were provided on the status and progress 
of MASSACHUSETTS WILDLIFE, a review of falconry regulations and a briefing on 
the history of the fee and the permit system for fur bearer trapping. 



Issues Presented at Public Hearings Were: 

(1) Waterfowl regulations and consideration of issues relative to 
non-toxic shot. This is an annual hearing to set season 
dates and regulations. Seasons were set. 

(2) A proposal relative to the hunting of coyotes and the sale of 
their pelts. The Board rejected the proposal to open coyote 
hunting during the shotgun deer season, retained existing 
regulations and requirements. 

(3) A proposal to extend the area open to turkey hunting. 

(4) A proposal to change regulations pertinent to deer hunting in 
Ipswich and Essex. (Accepted) 



(5) A proposal to permit the trapping of coyotes, two hearings (at 
the request of the Massachusetts Trappers Association) . 
(Rejected) 

(6) A proposal relative to the use of Conibear traps, two hearings 
(at the request of the Massachusetts Trappers Association) . 
(Proposal referred to study) 

(7) A proposal to change regulations pertaining to the harvesting 
of beaver and muskrat, two hearings (at the request of the 
Massachusetts Trappers Association) . (Rejected) 

(8) A proposal to revise and clarify regulations pertaining to the 
possession and maintenance of wild animals. Two hearings 
held on this issue. (Accepted) 

(9) A proposal to establish additional catch -and -re lease fishing 
areas in the CoirrrDnwealth , two hearings. 

Accepted : Portions of the East Branch of the Westfield River, 

the Deerfield River, the Swift River and the entirety 
of the Quashnet River. 

Rejected : The Quinepoxet River 

Tabled : The Mashpee River and Higgins Pond 

(10) A proposal to regulate fishing tournaments, two hearings. (Tabled) 

(11) A proposal to close Whetstone Brook to fishing, two hearings. 
Fish populations have declined dramatically in Whet stone Brook 
over the past 20 years; a change which may be attributable in 
part to acidification. Over a five-year period, the Division 
will conduct a study to determine the effects of an experimental 
technology in mitigation of the effects of acid conditions in streams. 
(Accepted) 

Other Actions Taken by the Board Included: 

A vote to oppose establishment of microwave towers in Hawley. 

Selection of format and frequency for the new MASSACHUSETTS WILDLIFE. 

Acceptance of a proposal to initiate a fawn mortality study through 
the Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit. 

Issuance of a letter of reprirtend to the project leader of a study on 
diamond-backed terrapins. 

A vote to oppose any legislation establishing a dove season. 

A vote to authorize the Director to close the Connecticut River to 
Atlantic salmon fishing for a 90-day period. 



FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE BOARD MEMBERS 



George Darey, Chairman 

Nancy Begin 

Col ton H. Bridges 

Ray Whitaker 

Jack Creedon 

Laurence Fountain 

Gwilym Jones 



6 



Fisheries 




Peter H. Oatis 
Assistant Director of Fisheries 



Acid Rain Investigations 

The Acid Rain Monitoring Project conducted through the Massachusetts 
Water Resources Research Center at the University of Massachusetts successfully 
completed Phase II, the initial screening of the entire state for pH, 
alkalinity and heavy metal analysis. This effort, when combined with the first 
phase, utilizes over 2,700 sampling sites across the state and provides a 
strong basis for the design of Phase III which will entail monitoring of 
approximately 800 sites on a quarterly basis for the next ten years. The 
data gathered to date clearly indicate that a significant portion of our 
inland aquatic resources are threatened by continuing acidification. About 
seventeen percent of our water bodies are now classified as critical or acidified 
(alkalinity values less than 2ppm), forty percent are endangered (alkalinity 
values are below lOppm), and have very little capacity to buffer additional acid 
load. 



An aquatic research review committee was established for the purpose 
of soliciting and reviewing research proposals designed to investigate the 
impacts of acidification on aquatic resources. Requests for proposals 
went out through a variety of publications and 13 proposals were submitted 
and reviewed. Of these, three were accepted for funding. They include a 
study designed to explain the mechanism for mercury methylation which 
is greatly accelerated in acid waters and causes increased amounts of 
mercury in fish. Other studies include one to better define the pathways 
by which aluminum enters acid waters. Another offers funding for water 
chemistry analyses on the impact of acidification on salamander populations 
in vernal ponds. 

The fisheries section completed and presented a paper entitled "A 
Preliminary Economic Assessment of Liming Lakes in Massachusetts" at the 
Northeast Fish and Wildlife Conference in Hershey, Pennsylvania. The section 
also funded and assisted the Massachusetts Audubon Society with the second 
year effort of assessing the impacts of liming Cape Cod kettle ponds. The 
project also funded and assisted Dr. Paul Kostecki of the University of 
Massachusetts in two projects, the first dealing with determining potential 
impact of acidification and heavy metal increases on the reproduction of 
rainbow smelt. The second was an investigation of the possibility of devising 
an indicator of stress in fish populations subjected to increasing levels of 
acidification. 

A major effort aimed at evaluating mitigative techniques applicable to 
stream environments was initiated with the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 
The Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife applied for and received 
a National Acid Precipitation Program grant in excess of $500,000 that will 
enable us to determine the costs and advantages of dosing flowing waters 
with lime on a demand basis. After an extensive screening process, acid- 
impacted Whetstone Brook in the Wendell State Forest was selected as the 
study area. The study is designed to run over a five-year period with the 
first few years being used to accurately assess base-line information and 
the next three years for deterinining the effects of liming on the stream 
biota. Gauging stations have been installed by the U. S. Geological Survey, 
detailed maps of the study area have been prepared and the water chemistry 
analytical laboratory has passed all quality control and assurance standards. 
Extensive prelminary biological investigations were initiated and a project 
leader, Dr. Kenneth Simmons, was hired through the Cooperative Fisheries 
Unit at the University. 

We also completed an Environmental Impact Report for a generic liming 
permit and signed an agreement with Living Lakes, Inc., a non-profit group, 
as a means of defraying the costs of liming several acidic lakes. Through 
this agreement, six acidic Cape Cod kettle ponds were limed. Follow-up 
investigations relative to the impact and assessment of benefits of the 
liming are being evaluated by the contractor at no cost to the Division 



8 



or the Carmonwealth. Some additional lakes will be treated with lime 
during fiscal year 1988. 

The threat of increasing acidification of our inland waters is very 
real and will likely place increasing demand on fisheries staff resources. 
The mitigative strategies being developed are an effort to maintain the 
existing fisheries and represent a stopgap measure that will hopefully buy 
time until actual causes of acidification can be addressed. 

Fisheries Development 

The bulk of the effort in this project was spent with Trout Unlimited 
volunteers working under the direction of staff biologists. Members of the 
Southeast Chapter of Trout Unlimited cut willows in the Quashnet River 
Sections Three and Four, removed sand barriers in Section Five and constructed 
a one hundred -foot spawning channel in Section Four. Pioneer Valley Chapter 
members completed Operation Restore commitments by filling, loam-topping 
and planting grass on the last stream deflector in the catch -and -re lease area 
of the Swift River. 

Planning and land clearing for anticipated improvements at the Sunderland 
Trout Hatchery progressed on schedule as did the production of 3,700 Northern 
pike and 4,700 tiger muskie at the Reed State Fish Hatchery. The successful 
netting of 40 mature walleye from Assawompsett Pond in Lakeville gave same 
indication that the Division may soon have a supply of fish from which to 
develop f ishable populations of walleye in a few selected waters of the 
Commonwealth . 

Anadromous Fish Investigations 
Connecticut River 

Fish passage at the Holyoke Dam was very successful this year due to low 
water and early installation of the flashboards across the dam. A total of 
481,668 shad, 632,225 blueback herring, 40,308 lamprey, 369 striped bass 
and 285 Atlantic salmon were passed through the facility. Approximately 
6,298 shad were transported from Holyoke to other river basins throughout 
the Northeast. 

Fish passage at Turners Falls was better than in previous years but there 
is still a major impediment to upstream migration between the Cabot Station 
and the spillway and gatehouse fishways. Shad passage at Cabot was 31,000 
and the spillway fishway was 843; however, passage through the gatehouse, 
and hence access to up-river areas, was only 3,855 shad (12%) . Observations 
at the log sluice spillway indicate that at least half of the shad passed 
at Cabot Station did return to the lower river. Shad angling data were not 
tabulated this year, but a new world record of 11 pounds, 4 ounces was set 
by Robert Thibodo of Northampton. 



During the fall, 32,800 salmon parr reared at the Peed Hatchery were 
marked with coded wire tags. These fish were released into the Millers 
and Deerfield Rivers as smolts during the spring of 1986. Subsequent salmon 
rearing activity at Reed Hatchery will be focused on the production of adult 
salmon females for the purpose of increasing egg and fry supplies. These 
juveniles will be planted throughout the basin in coldwater streams for the 
purpose of increasing the number and quality of Connecticut River smolts. 
The salmon smolt production potential within the Massachusetts portion of 
the basin is currently being assessed through the efforts of the Massachusetts 
Cooperative Fisheries Research Unit. Initial investigations are in progress 
along the Bear and South Rivers within the Deerfield drainage. 

Merrimack River 

Although hampered by mechanical difficulties at Essex Dam, the 13,086 
shad passed represent a 138% increase in passage. Doubtless the low water 
conditions and early installation of the flashboards contributed significantly 
to the increased efficiency of the shad lift operation. A total of 23,112 
herring were also passed along with 18,403 lamprey, 110 striped bass and 212 
Atlantic salmon. Based upon interviews with 169 anglers fishing below the 
Essex Dam, we estimate the fishery supported 2,239 angler trips (7516 hours) 
and a catch of 4,633 shad. Approximately 81% of the shad caught were released. 
A few salmon were known to be caught and released, but none were reported 
by the anglers that were interviewed. 

The fishway at Pawtucket Dam in Lowell is nearing completion and should 
be ready for the 1987 spring run. Unfortunately, there has been vandal ism 
on the recently completed spillway ladder. 

Considerable efforts are also being expended to forestall problems to 
the salmon program that may occur if a license is issued to develop hydropower 
at Sewalls Falls, New Hampshire. Discussions with Public Service Company 
of New Hampshire were also initiated to develop a schedule for the construction 
of upstream fish passage facilities at their five facilities which pose 
barriers to upstream passage along the main stem of the river. 

Fisheries Survey and Inventory 

Observation of 21 tributaries to the Quabbin Reservoir for evidence of 
smelt reproduction indicated that egg deposition was light with the exception 
of a 400 foot section of Underhill Brook. Low water levels in the reservoir 
(down 8 feet) preclude access to spawning habitat in many of the streams. 
Although only trace amounts of young-of-the-year smelt appeared on the Nash 
Hill screens later during the summer, the condition of both lake trout and 
landlocked salmon did not reflect any significant loss of forage base. At 
sjaabbin/ the creel agent interviewed 6,836 boat anglers during the season. 
Overall, angling activity in terms of trips was down 12%, fishing pressure 
in terms of hours was down 20% and the total harvest was down 31% in numbers 
and 14% by weight when compared to the previous year. This drop is attributed 
to extremely poor spring weather and to the fact that the reservoir water level 
was down about eight feet. This was the third consecutive spring that the 



10 



reservoir was stocked with salmon smolts. Early indications are that the 
salmon are growing very well and numerous sub- legal (15-17 inch) fish are 
being caught and released. Creel data reveal that a significant amount of 
angling pressure formerly directed at lake trout has been redirected to 
salmon. The changed increase in the minimum legal length of salmon to 18 inches 
will be monitored for the next few years to see if the new regulation has 
in fact improved the quality of salmon fishing in the reservoir. Smallmouth 
bass fishing declined in about the same proportion as the pressure; however, 
the average weight of the fish appearing in the harvest increased by 16%. 
Subsequent scale reading will reveal whether this increase in the size of 
fish is due to anglers being more selective or there was poorer survival in 
some of the year classes that are just entering the fishery. 

District crews and staff biologists conducted biological surveys of 23 
lakes and 64 streams during the year. Information is being tabulated and 
computer programs are being developed for the rapid assimilation and analysis 
of all lake and stream inventory data. When compiled, the data will greatly 
facilitate future fisheries planning and environmental impact assessment 
investigations. The results of 573 angler questionnaires from around the 
state are also being tabulated and analyzed. The social and economic information 
gleaned from this exercise will also be used in the development of future 
fisheries regulations and management practices. 

Poor hatchery survival of sea-run brown trout young continue to hamper 
the program in reaching its goal of 6% adult return from a release of 25,000 
smolts. Although summer sampling in the streams indicates that post stocking 
survival is at least 8% for sub-adults, poor returns of adults indicate that 
additional effort must be expended to determine what the limitLiq factors 
are to adult survival in the estuary. 

Technical Ass istance 

An increasing amount of staff time is being allocated to the Toxics 
in Fish Program. This program is a cooperative effort between this Division, 
the Division of Water Pollution Control and the Department of Public Health. 
The purpose is to collect and analyze fish from areas suspected to be 
contaminated with toxic substances that may be assimilated by fish and thus, 
become a public health hazard. This year's efforts focused primarily on 
the Ten Mile and Sudbury Rivers. Realization of the problem in these rivers 
has prompted this Division to initiate broader investigations relative to 
deternuning the impacts of toxic substances upon the aquatic wildlife resources. 

A wide variety of environmental impact reports were reviewed and commented 
upon as were numerous project permit applications. Much progress is being 
made with respect to (computerizing the resource data presently on file at 
Field Headquarters. Because of their familiarity with data base programs, 
fisheries staff have also assisted staff members from other sections of the 



Division in establishing files for license sales, equipment inventories and 
federal aid accounting processes. 

Aquatic Resource Education 

The Wallop-Breaux amendment to the Sportfishing Restoration Act now 
permits the expenditure of up to 10% of the federal matching money allocated 
to each state by the Act for the purpose of educating the public about aquatic 
issues. In April of 1986, the section completed the application for funds 
that will support an aquatic education program. Present plans call for the 
state supported Urban Angler Program and the aquatic segment of Project WILD 
to be funded by this Wallop-Breaux fund. This will place the programs on a 
more solid financial basis and allow production of numerous other aquatic 
educational materials. Because the program makes extensive use of volunteer 
services that can serve as the state's share of the program costs, the program 
will be funded essentially 100% by federal dollars. Future educational materials 
to be produced by the program include a book describing the distribution of 
freshwater fish throughout the Commonwealth and a series of four color posters 
depicting the freshwater fish of the state. These posters will be distributed 
to all middle schools in the state. 



12 



Fish Hatcheries 




■ 



David Fredenburgh 
Chief Fish Culturist 



During fiscal year 1986, the Division's hatcheries produced 967,494 fish 
weighing 513,936 pounds. Of that number, 627,171 measured 9 inches or more. A 
detailed breakdown of production is included in the accompanying table. 

Most of the operations were routine and involved normal fish production 
and maintenance at five fish hatcheries. 

One unusual project was the beginning of a rejuvenation for the Sunderland 
Hatchery. A sum of thirty thousand dollars was allocated to construct an 
18" x 24" gravel-packed well for the hatchery designed to produce 500 gallons 
per minute. It is hoped that the cost of construction will be met through a 
bond issue rather than trying to fund the project out of the existing develop- 
ment account. 

The McLaughlin Hatchery continued with the yearly maintenance program of 
turbine pump replacement. This has allowed the hatchery to operate with nunimal 
pumping problems. 

A new six-inch well was installed at East Sandwich primarily to supply 
water to the hatchhouse in the event of a failure in the main well. The new well 
is designed to produce 100 gallons per minute. 

At both Montague and Sunderland Hatcheries, wire grids were installed over 
selected sections of ponds and raceways to discourage birds, particularly great 
blue herons, from taking fish. These net grids are presently being evaluated for 
effectiveness. In general, it was a good production year with the sizes and quality 
of fish being above normal. 



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14 



PLANNING 



After many years of effort, the Division's long range plan was completed 
and published in January of 1985. Federal funding for the planning process 
was curtailed in April 30, 1985. These factors, coupled with the resignation 
on July 1, 1985 of Kristine Corey who had headed the Division's planning office, 
combined to halt formal planning activities for the time being. During this 
fiscal year there was no activity in the planning program. 



15 




Wayne F. MacCallum 
Assistant Director of Wildlife 



The Wildlife Research Section is responsible for the management of the 
approximately 75 species of birds, mammals, reptiles and amphibians which are 
traditionally hunted or trapped. Principal activities of the section include 
monitoring of population levels and annual harvest, development of recommendations 
concerning regulations and policy relative to the Commonwealth's wildlife 
resources, planning and implementation of habitat management programs, develop- 
ment of Division-funded University of Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research 
Unit studies, technical assistance to other agencies and private citizens 
experiencing problems caused by wildlife, development and implementation of 
wildlife research programs qualifying for federal grants. Summaries of current 
programs follow. 



16 



WATERFOWL 

Pre-Season Banding 

A total of 1,363 marsh birds were banded during the 1985 pre- season 
period; 559 wood ducks, 444 mallards, 118 black ducks, 18 mallard black 
duck hybrids, 78 blue-winged teal, 124 green-winged teal, 5 common moorhens, 
12 soras and 1 Virginia rail. The majority (1,294) of birds were captured 
by air boat nightlighting. Other ducks were banded by bait trapping or 
nest box trapping. 

Mid-Winter Waterfowl Survey 

A total of 111,540 waterfowl were counted on the 1986 mid-winter 
survey, down 55% from last year, due primarily to a drop in the number of 
eider ducks observed. Black duck numbers, 21,820, were near average while 
numbers of mallards, canvasbacks and Canada geese were up substantially. 

Winter Banding 

The winter of 1985-86 was generally mild and afforded poor banding 
conditions. This was the third such winter in the past four years. Only 177 
black ducks were banded along with 59 hybrids, 22 mallards, and 8 pintails. 
Hybrids comprised 23% of the mallards and black ducks banded with the highest 
rate again in the Plymouth-Duxbury area where the hybrid rate was 36%. 

Canada Goose Study 

No insert included. 

Wood Duck Nest Structure Study 

Five wood ducks used plastic buckets on 15 new study areas while six 
wood ducks and two hooded mergansers nested in wooden boxes. Box usage on 
15 established wood duck production areas was 41% for 46 buckets and 59% 
for 169 boxes. The nesting success rate was 63% in buckets and 91% in boxes. 

Wood Duck Production Study 

There were 216 wood duck and 12 hooded merganser nest starts in 548 
available structures on 50 wood duck production areas across the state. There 
were 189 successful wood duck hatches and 10 merganser hatches. The increased 
population appears to be a reflection of reduced harvests associated with 
season opening dates of October 20 or later. 

Experimental Waterfowl Season Appraisal 

After two years of zoning with the state divided into three zones, the 
waterfowl harvests was 2.6% below the average harvest experienced when the 
state was divided into only two zones and 29% below the pre-zoning average. 
Major declines were recorded in harvest of black ducks and wood ducks due, 
in large part, to harvest restrictions aimed at protection of black ducks. 



T7 



Massachusetts achieved a 27% black duck harvest reduction in 1983 
followed by a 30.4% reduction in 1984. A complete analysis of 1985 waterfowl 
harvest returns is not available at this time, but it appears that Massachusetts 
will easily exceed the federal requirement of a 25% reduction in black duck 
harvest over the three-year period. 

Woodcock 

The bag limit on woodcock was increased from two in 1984 to three birds 
in 1985 due to an increasing breeding bird index and an anticipated good 
breeding season due to favorable weather conditions. 

Hunter success in 1985 increased with 1.8 birds bagged per day as compared 
to 1.4 in 1984. The seasonal bag also increased from 6.6 in 1984 to 9.1 in 
1985. 

Production (brood survival) in 1985 remained good with 2.7 immature s 
reported for each adult hen. 

The 1986 spring singing-ground census showed an increase of 29%, up from 
1.50 to 1.94 birds counted per survey route. Singing-ground counts are still 
below the long-term average, but have continued to improve since 1982 when a 
soring snowstorm severely affected the breeding woodcock population. 

Mourning Dove Census 

Due to manpower limitations and the limited usefulness of dove survey 
information, the number of dove survey routes in Massachusetts was decreased 
from 18 in 1985 to eight in 1986. The number of calling doves on three long- 
term routes increased 67% from 1985 to 1986. Counts on eight comparable 
routes increased 9% (101 to 110 doves) from 1985 to 1986. 

Bobwhite Quail Census 

The 1985 weighted call index for Plymouth County showed a significant 
increase over the 1983 index. The 1985 weighted index for Bristol County 
showed a significant decrease over a five-year (1975-83) mean index. Indices 
for all other counties and the statewide total showed no significant change 
when comparing 1985 indices to 1983, to the five-year mean (all routes) and 
to the five-year mean (comparable routes only) . 

White-Tailed Deer 

Following a review of 1985 activities, an informal long range planning 
effort was initiated. This effort identified the following goals: 



13 



(1) Develop a conceptual management model that incorporates 
habitat, humans and deer. 

(2) Establish data bases that document habitat, humans, and 
deer trend data for the state. 

(3) Develop a deer population model that reconstructs deer 
population dynamics for the past 15 years. 

(4) Develop carrying capacity guidelines for each deer management 
zone that include both human and habitat factors. 

(5) Identify research needs to supplement model development. 

Substantial progress was made toward each goal in 1986. The management 
model uses a systems approach that recognizes three components (habitat, 
humans, and deer) , the interrelationships among these components, and the 
dynamics associated with the components. Data bases were established for 
each component. Future work will include automating these data bases in 
order to improve analysis efforts. A working deer population model was 
developed using a computer spreadsheet. This model appears adequate to 
describe population dynamics associated with past population trends. The 
model is still in a development stage but is operational at present. Carrying 
capacity estimates have been established and are being analyzed. Changes in 
these estimates may follow future research efforts. Research was initiated to 
improve understanding of fawn mortality, winter weather severity, deer herd 
condition, and population dynamics. 

During the regular 1986 deer seasons, 5,610 deer were harvested by hunters. 
This is the highest harvest on record. Archers harvested about 10% of the 
deer during a three-week season. Shotgun hunters took 81% of the deer during 
a nine-day season in December. Approximately 9% of the harvest occurred in 
the three-day primitive firearm season. The female harvest rate is such that 
it will allow continued growth in herd productivity and in the deer population. 
Antlerless permits were allocated based on relative herd size and carrying 
capacity determinations for each management zone. Although management goals 
will allow overall growth in the state's herd, steps were taken to reduce or 
stabilize growth in those zones where human population density is high and/or 
deer hunters approach carrying capacity. 

Future management efforts will be directed towards meeting established 
goals and continuing on-going research. Goals and progress will be reviewed 
each year in order to refine research efforts. 

Furbearer 

A total of 23 fur buyers submitted annual reports; six did not buy any 
furs from Massachusetts trappers or hunters. The remaining 17 purchased 22,476 



19 



muskrat, 556 mink, 52 otter, 5,339 raccoon, 764 red fox, 8 skunk, 103 gray 
fox, 509 beaver, 79 opossum, 10 bobcat, 84 fisher and 12 coyote. 

The results of four fur auctions held by the Bay State Trappers 
Association were weighted and tabulated to give a yearly average. The average 
prices for 1985-86 were muskrat $3.21, mink $17.45, otter $25.60, raccoon 
$12.81, red fox $22.68, gray fox $22.84, beaver $23.15, opossum $1.05, 
bobcat $37.80, fisher $102.32 and coyote $21.60. 

Falconry 

During 1986, there were 34 licensed falconers in Massachusetts — 10 
apprentice, 16 general and 8 masters. Six breeding permits were issued and 
27 raptor salvage permits. Raptor rehabilitators treated 343 birds of which 
141 were released back to the wild. 

Wildlife/Forestry Program 

The first of three objectives for the wildlife/ forestry program is to 
build an inventory data base for each wildlife management area (WMA) held 
by the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife. To date, this has been achieved 
on three areas and part of a fourth, totalling 4,000 acres (the 420-acre Savoy 
WMA, the 2,000-acre Hy Fox WMA, the 1,200-Fox Den WMA, and 400 acres of the 
2,800-acre Peru WMA) . The second objective of the program is to use the 
inventory data to design and carry out commercial forest cutting operations 
that improve wildlife habitat by providing a variety of forest age classes 
(0-10, 10-25, and 25+ year classes) interspersed with herbaceous openings. 

The first such commercial operation has been initiated on the Hy Fox 
WMA in the towns of Chester and Worthington. A contract for the commercial 
sale of 350,000 board feet of timber and 700 cords of firewood was awarded 
to Gagnon Brothers Logging Company of Goshen, Massachusetts after a competitive 
bid procedure which attracted bids from six logging companies. The contract 
requires the establishment of herbaceous openings of 2-5 acres, in what was 
formerly extensive mature forest, relatively heavy cutting in mature hardwood 
stands of poor conmercial value (to regenerate early successional stage forest 
and improve long-term conmercial value) , and selective cutting in mature pine 
and mix hardwood forest (to enhance growth of oo-dominant trees and to provide 
regeneration of desirable species such as red oak) . Revenue from the sale are 
being used for the construction of access roads, installation of locking gates 
(to reduce R.V. damage to roads) , and preparation of herbaceous openings. 

The third objective of the wildlife/ forestry program is to determine the 
response of wildlife populations to management. Breeding song birds were chosen 
for census because they can be sampled accurately and relatively easily by sound, 
and the variety of bird species occurring on an area over time reflects changes 
in habitat quality. A breeding bird census was conducted on 1,000 acres of the 
Hy Fox WMA prior to cutting from May 31 to June 10, 1986 (85 species found) , 
and the census will be repeated annually in cut and uncut areas each spring for 
the next three to five years. 



2: 



The forestry program continues to benefit from interaction with the 
Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit and the University of 
Massachusetts Department of Forestry and Wildlife by hiring senior level and 
graduate students for inventory work (through the efforts of Wendell Dodge of 
the Cooperative Unit) , and by using a computerized inventory data program 
(courtesy of Jow Mawson of the Department of Forestry and Wildlife) . 

Work planned for the immediate future includes forest inventory on the 
Peru, Becket, and Chalet WMAs , a second commercial sale on the Hy Fox (MA, 
and a commercial sale on the Fox Den WMA. 

Wild Turkey Range and Harvest Evaluation 

The seventh Massachusetts spring gobbler hunt was held in May 1986, with 
the three-week season (as in 1985) consisting of a one-week first segment 
(May 5-10) and a two-week second segment (May 12-24) . The open hunting zone 
was expanded and included the following areas: Berkshire and Franklin coun- 
ties, those portions of Hampden and Hampshire counties west of the west bank 
of the Connecticut River, and that portion of Worcester County west of state 
Route 31 and north of state Route 9. Hunters were allowed to apply for and 
hunt during only one segment of the season, but could hunt anywhere in the 
open zone. A total of 6,750 permits were allocated for each segment of which 
3,873 were issued for the first period and 3,045 for the second period. A 
record number of turkeys — 444 — were taken; 329 the first period and 115 in the 
second period. Hunters had an overall participation rate of 89.1% and an over- 
all success rate of 7.2%. The Berkshire County kill was 282 (63.5%) with 
Franklin (66) second and Worcester (36) third. Adult males comprised 270 (61%) 
of the take. 

Although winter trapping was again hindered by the lack of snow, Division 
staff and Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit personnel succeeded 
in capturing 25 turkeys for translocation. Nineteen birds (8 adult female, 
5 immature female and 6 immature male) were released on Rocky Gutter WMA, 
Middleboro, and five (immature male) were released on Bolton Flats WMA, Bolton. 
One immature male was injured and was not released. 

Statewide Beaver Harvest 

The 1985-86 beaver trapping season ran from November 15 to February 28 
statewide as in 1984-85. Conibear traps larger than size No. 110 or the 
equivalent were not allowed after January 15. During this season, a total of 
1,044 beaver were taken by 90 trappers in 105 towns, with a mean take of 11.6 
beaver per successful trapper. This take represents a decrease of eight 
beaver (0.8%) from 1984-85. Harvests increased by more than 20% in Berkshire, 
Franklin, and Middlesex counties and in the western region. Decreases of more 
than 20% occurred in Hampshire and Worcester counties and in the eastern re- 
gion. For the third consecutive year, harvests in the eastern region exceeded 
those in the western region. 



21 



Statewide Otter and Fisher Investigations 

During the 1985 otter season, 55 successful trappers took 98 otter in 
60 towns in eight counties for a mean take of 1.8 otter per successful trapper. 
This compares with a harvest of 142 and a mean take of 2.1 in 1984. 

The fisher take increased from 140 in 1984 to 152 (the second highest 
take recorded) in 1985, with 55 successful trappers taking an average of 2.8 
fisher each among 47 towns in eight counties. In 1984, 58 successful trappers 
took an average of 2.4 fisher each. 

Worcester (35) , Essex (14) , Berkshire (13) , and Franklin (12) counties 
and Zones 03 (29) , and 02 (22) yielded the most otter, while Worcester (99) , 
Franklin (27) , and Middlesex (13) produced the most fisher. 

A total of 98 otter carcasses and 151 fisher carcasses were received 
from cooperating trappers. The mean age of otter in 1985 was 2.21 and of 
fisher 1.39. This compares with 2.17 for otter and 1.55 for fisher in 1984. 
Eleven of 14 otter aged 2.5 and older and 14 of 18 fisher aged 1.5 and older 
showed evidence of reproductive activity. Average corpora lutea counts were 
2.4 for otter and 2.9 for fisher in 1985, as compared to 2.5 and 3.0 respectively 
in 1984. 

Bobcat Harvest Evaluation 

A total of 23 bobcats were taken in 1985-86, including 16 by hunting, six 
by trapping, and one depredation kill. The mean take per successful hunter 
(N=14) was 1.1 (range: 1-2) and per successful trapper (N=2) was 3.0 (range: 
1-5) . All trapped bobcats were taken in November, while February (7, 44%) was 
the most successful month for hunting. During the 1985-86 season, bobcats 
were taken in 15 towns in six counties. Juveniles (0.5 age class) comprised 
45% (9) of the sample (20) . 

Coyote Investigations and Harvest Study 

A total of 31 coyotes were taken by 25 sportsmen in 23 towns and six 
counties during the 1985-86 hunting season. The majority (13, 42%) were 

aken in November with the same number and percentage targeting specifically 
for coyote. Six other mortalities, including four road kills, one illegal 
kill, and one accidentally-trapped animal were recorded during the 1985-86 
report period. 

Black Bear Reproductive Success and Cub Survival in Massachusetts 

Six adult females that were potential cub producers were followed intensively 
on foot from early September through denning, as in previous years, to construct 
a profile of major fall food sources for each female. 

Dens of these six females were visited during the first week of February 
1986 and cubs were counted, sexed, tagged, and weighed. Only three cubs were 



22 



born in two litters to six females, due primarily to the shortage of mast 
crops in some areas during the fall of 1985. In late March, one cub was 
collared and was subsequently followed intensively through May, when it 
slipped its collar. 

Data analyses are complete and the final report is being prepared. 

Black Bear Distribution and Harvest Investigations 

A total of 921 bear hunting permits were issued for the 1985 hunting 
season. A total of 14 bear were taken during the two-week split season, 
including 13 during the first segment and one during the second segment. 
Five males and nine females were taken in Berkshire (5) , Franklin (4) , 
Hampshire (3) , and Hampden (2) counties. Two non-hunting mortalities, both 
road kills, were recorded. Only one nuisance bear report was received. 



Cooperative Unit Studies 

Harvest Surveys and Analyses 

A random sample of 1984 hunting license purchasers from each Massachusetts 
county was surveyed by mail questionnaires in March. Of 1,247 sampled 
individuals, 439 (35.20%) returned questionnaires. An additional 355 non- 
respondents were contacted and interviewed by telephone in April resulting 
in 794 (63.67%) total contacts. Statewide game harvest estimates were tabulated 
for various small game species. 

An estimated 74,764 (SE= 2,082) individuals hunted in Massachusetts 
during the 1985-86 hunting season. Total hunting license sales and percentages 
of individuals who purchased licenses in 1984 and hunted in Massachusetts 
during the 1985-86 season were tabulated. 

White-tailed deer was the most sought game animal with approximately 
62,150 (SE= 2,067) hunters seeking them. Pheasant was the most sought small 
game species with an estimated 42,487 (SE= 1,995) hunters seeking. Reinaining 
game and fur bearer species and estimated harvests will be compared with results 
from a second survey to be conducted in 1987. 

Mortality of White-tailed Deer Fawns in Western Massachusetts 

Ordering of equipment and materials delayed field work and hence the 
capture of adult does. Fifteen bait sites were established in southern 
Berkshire County in mid-February. Deer usage of bait sites was very good. 
However, due to lack of suitable snow cover and an early spring, deer usage 
of bait sites became very sporadic in March, making immobilization attempts 
unsuccessful . 

Clover traps were installed in late March. Because of absence of snow 
cover, deer had alternate foods and would not enter traps for bait. Trapping 
and immobilization were discontinued on May 4. 



23 



One doe was irrmobilized and collared in March and monitored through 
parturition. Despite intensive ground searches her two fawns could not be 
located until they were 8-10 days old, and would avoid searchers. These two 
fawns are currently being monitored through activities of the dam. 

During April and the first two weeks of May, spotlight census and 
surveys of areas were conducted to identify probable fawning sites. Ground 
searches were conducted from May 20 through June 12. Six fawns were captured 
and fitted with radio collars. These fawns will be monitored through fall 1986. 

Summer trapping of adult females will be attempted in late June-July 
using salt as bait in clover traps. Winter baiting and trapping will begin in 
mid-December. 

Wild Turkey Population Dynamics 

Birds instrumented during the last reporting period were monitored 
through December 1985. Hens with broods were intensively monitored to determine 
poult survival and brood habitat use. Vegetation at brood locations was measured 
in order to characterize preferred habitat. Trapping operations were conducted 
January - February to recapture instrumented or banded birds. A final report 
is in preparation. 

Statewide Development (W-9-D) 

The following jobs were performed on wildlife management areas throughout 



the state during Fiscal 1986: 






Building Maintenance 


15 


buildin 


Dam Maintenance 


5 


dams 


Bridge Maintenance 


6 


bridges 


Road and Trail Maintenance 


103 


miles 


Parking Lot Constructed 


1 


lot 


Parking Lots Maintained 


86 


lots 


Maintenance of Blinds 


15 


blinds 


Posting Boundaries 


132.: 


. miles 


Posting Signs 


2296 


signs 


Planting Trees and Shrubs 


2100 


plants 


Maintenance of Fie