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Full text of "Mass. Div. of Fisheries and Game Annual Report. 1962-1975"

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THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

'■.Deffri e^ Nodvi^Q. (&So*ne* '.DIVISION OT ttSKSKKS ^ND CAME, 

73 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON 



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COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAME 

Ninety- seventh Annual Report 
July 1, 1961 to June 30, 1962 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

The Board Reports -_--.-----»--------,-.* j_ 

Fisheries Program ------------------- 6 

Game Program --------------------- -^3 

Information and Education Program ----------- 21 

Land Acquisition Program --------------- 24 

Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit - - *■ 2 5 

Administration 

Table: How the Sportsman's Dollar was Spent - - - 2 7 

Appropriations and Expenditures ----- 2# 

Summary of Fish and Game Income ----- 29 

Receipts from Fishing, Hunting and 

Trapping Licenses ------- 30 

Analysis of Special Licenses - ^ - - - - - 31 

Legislation --------,.------ 32 

Summary of Outstanding Regulations - - - - 33 



Publication Approved by State Purchasing Agent #9 



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THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAME 
73 Tremont Street, Boston 8 



His Excellency, John A. Volpe, Governor of the Commonwealth, 
the Executive Council, the General Court, and the Board of 
Fisheries and Game. 



Sirs: 

I heve the honor to submit herewith the Ninety- 
seventh Annual Report of the Division oi Fisheries and Game, 
covering the fr'scal year from July 1, 1961 to June 30, 1962. 



Respectfully submitted, 
^ to 




K^iufJl, 



CHARLES L. MCLAUGHLIN, 
Director 






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ANNUAL REPORT OF THE FISHERIES AND GAME BOARD 
July 1, 1961, through June 30, 1962 



While detailed reports of all activities of the 
Division of Fisheries and Game will be found in the following 
pages, the Board of Fisheries and Game wishes to comment as 
f ollows : 

Funds 

The Board considers the most important problem facing 
it at the present time concerns revenue with which to operate 
the Division of Fisheries and Game and continue giving the 
public the outstanding service that has marked Division*, operations 
since establishment of the Board form of adminstration a number 
of years ago. 

At the close of the fiscal year on June 30, 1962, the 
Inland Fisheries and Game Fund showed a balance of $169,434,04. 
This was $54 > 470. 95 under the balance of the previous year. 

Your Board believes it is sound management to retain 
a balance of approximately $200,000 to help absorb fluctuations 
in revenue and to provide a reserve for use in other emergencies, 
such as natural disasters, that might damage Division installations 
The amount we have dropped below this desired reserve approximates 
the amount our revenue has decreased in the past year from a 
drop in license sales. If this trend continues, the Division may 
be in serious straits in another year. 

Additional income from the marine gasoline tax (see 
section on legislation) may help solve this problem to some 
extent . 

Your Board also feels an important problem is the 
matter of key personnel constantly being enticed away by better 
salaries in other states and the federal services. Over the 
years, a number of top personnel with several year's experience 
in Massachusetts have left for better income. Some of these men 
have been leaders who developed and led the Division's programs 
during the past ten years, bringing the Division from a back- 
ward status to its present prominence among state fish and game 
agencies. We believe that Massachusetts must realize it is 
competing with the rest of the country for top personnel, and 
place itself in a position to attract and hold the best tc o n 
available. 

It should be noted that economy of the strictest 
kind is being employed throughout the Division. Through the 
use of improved management methods including tighter controls, 
a policy of filling only the most essential vacancies, institution 
of automatic laborsaving devices where possible, and by having 
much of the basic research done by the University of Massachusetts 
Wildlife Research Unit and through funds from an outside grant, 
we have actually managed to provide increased and improved 
services on a total budget slightly less than last year. 

(1) 



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Legislation 

Several bills to facilitate Division operations, or 
to provide for important aspects of hunting and fishing, were 
passed in the 1961-1962 legislature. Most notable among the 
several items of legislation secured was the bill to earmark 
a portion of the unrefunded gasoline tax received from gasoline 
sold for use by boats toward establishment of public access 
sites on great ponds and the seacoast. Portions of the total 
funds will be allocated under this new law to the marine 
fisheries and boating programs of the Commonwealth, but a 
substantial amount is earmarked for acquisition and development 
of public access and a sum is also assigned to the general 
budget of the Division of Fisheries and Game • Receipt and 
expenditure of these funds will commence in the fiscal year 
beginning July 1 , 1963 . 

Another most important item of legislation secured 
was the bill to provide for licensing of commercial shooting 
preserves in Middlesex, Essex and Norfolk counties. While 
this means that hunters who use such facilities will have to 
pay commercial operators for the privilege, such areas should 
go a long ways toward providing additional hunting opportunity 
in these counties, our most heavily populated and posted areas. 

Regulations 

Your Board, acting on the advice of technical 
personnel of the Division of Fisheries and Game, and after 
two public hearings, established a split opening for the 
fishing season. The results were experienced during the last 
fiscal year. All available reports indicate that the plan, 
to have the opening day on streams follow the opening on ponds, 
produced more enjoyable fishing for all who participated, 
besides giving Division personnel time to do a more effective 
job of stocking and reducing the pre-fishing season loss of 
stocked trout in streams. 

L and Acquisition 

A sizeable area in Huntington, Worthington and 
Chester was acquired in the past year for addition to our 
system of public hunting grounds. Smaller portions were 
purchased as additions to the Northeast Area, and eminent 
domain proceedings were instituted to clear title to an area 
purchased in Phillipston. Expired leases on several public 
fishing areas were renewed. 

This program is the smallest in expenditure of 
any major program of the Division, not because of choice but 
because of legislative appropriations. Your Board hopes to 
expand land acquisition in the future, since a place to hunt 
or fish is the basic problem facing sportsmen. 

Property owners who might wish to sell or donate 
land to the Division are invited to contact the Board or any 
employee of the Division. They will be assured of their 
property remaining forever in the public trust as a con- 
servation area, devoted to multiple conservation uses for 
public benefit. 

(2) 









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Such areas as now exist are heavily utilized 
throughout the year for many forms of outdoor recreation be- 
sides hunting, without charge to the users. Bird watching, 
blueberrying , target practicing, camping, horseback riding, 
nature walks, and conservation-education field trips, are all 
popular ways of enjoying and utilizing the Division of Fish- 
eries and Game public hunting grounds. None of these uses 
contribute one cent to area acquisition and upkeep; the entire 
cost is borne by the Inland Fisheries and Game Fund, which 
is derived principally from sportsmen's licenses and federal 
excise taxes on firearms, ammunition and fishing tackle. 

F isheries Progr am 

Our second major river reclamation project was 
completed this year, with reclamation of 13 miles of the 
Squannacook River. 

The Squannacook reclamation, in which feeder streams 
were also treated, should produce good fishing for a longer 
period as reinfestation of trash fish species will be 
correspondingly delayed. In addition, ten trout ponds and 
four warmwater ponds were reclaimed. Results from the first 
major river to be reclaimed for fisheries management in Mass- 
achusetts, the Deerfield, indicate that the project was 
thoroughly successful although somewhat modified by our in- 
ability to reclaim the feeder streams. 

Trout propagation resulted in a larger poundage and 
a larger number of ' catchables 1 (trout six inches or more) 
being released. A decrease from last year in the total number 
of all sizes released in open waters is attributed to finger- 
lings . Significantly larger numbers of trout six to nine 
inches long and trout over nine inches were released this year, 
and a number of the fish were given "wild" coloration by special 
additives in the hatchery diet. 

A three -year grant of $12,000 per year from the U.S. 
Public Health Service is being used to establish and operate 
a laboratory at Westboro to determine pesticide and insecticide 
residue levels in aquatic and terrestial animals, fish and 
birds, and to determine tolerance to these poisons of certain 
species of fish. 

The Sunderland hatchery, our largest installation, 
was converted to a wholly yearling production schedule, in an 
effort to control a recurring disease problem. 

Innovations such as plastic egg-hatching jars, 
selective fish toxicants used in reclamation, automatic feeding 
devices and other means, contributed to increasing efficiency 
and decreasing costs. 

Game Program 

The game program was marked by a record production 
of cock pheasants, totalling 5^,450. A total of 72,93^ birds 
of both sexes were produced and released during the year. 
The average per-bird cost of pheasant production has been 
significantly reduced. 

(3) 



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Management work to improve public hunting grounds 
(also called wildlife management areas) continued, with hundreds 
of acres of new land being cleared, food patches planted and 
thousands of shrubs and trees planted to provide optimum cover 
and to retard successiin of unproductive forest growth. Hunter 
usage of public hunting grounds increased 19 percent over the 
previous year. One ecomomical result of such management work 
was approximately 50,000 board feet of lumber produced for use 
in Division installations. 

Turkey introductions for the most part seem to be 
doing as expected. Those made with wild stock have reproduced 
in our covers while those made with game farm stock have not 
been as successful. It is too early to say whether these 
introductions will result in birds which may be trapped and 
transferred to other covers and thus result in a huntable sur- 
plus. 

Waterfowl aerial census showed significant increases 
in the important species of ducks wintering in Massachusetts. 
Efforts continued to gain recognition at the federal 1 evel, 
where waterfowl regulations are initiated, for separate and 
more liberal waterfowl regulations for the northeastern states. 
Established procedures through the Atlantic Waterfowl Council 
have been made for several years in the effort to gain federal 
acceptance. At" the close of the year, Massachusetts joined 
with other states in the northeast in a direct appeal to the 
federal government . 

Information arid Education Program 

This program to acquaint our citizens with the wild- 
life resources of Massachusetts, and their conservation and 
utilization, and to familiarize the public with the policies 
and programs of the Division, continued on an expanded basis. 
A growing part of the program concerns provision of infor- 
mational aids such as laws and regulations, printed guides to 
hunting and fishing areas, and other information of value to 
sportsmen. 

A record number of news stories were issued during 
the year, averaging close to three releases a week. The use of 
television as an information medium continued to increase, 
with 31 separate feature shows presented, including one over 
a national network. The Division's television effort was 
honored with receipt of a first -place national award for 
excellence, awarded by the American Association for Conservation 
Information in June. 

This association also held its annual 21st international 
conference, at Provincetown, in June, with Massachusetts and the 
other New England states acting as combined hosts. 

The circulation of Massachusetts Wi ldlife , free bi- 
monthly magazine published by the Division, continued to grow. 
Net gain for the year was 4,019 subscribers, for a total at 
the close of the fiscal year of 36,676. Magazines are estimated 
to be read by an average of three persons including the 
subscriber, which would place our magazine's estimated reader- 
ship at more than 110,000. This is about or slightly above 
the average for similar magazines published by most states. 



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The Junior Conservation Camp came under the Division's 
full supervision during the year, and operation at the new 
site in central Massachusetts proved to be considerably 
improved, both from economic and curriculum viewpoints. 

With all these various formal mediums for spreading 
the message of conservation, the Division does not overlook the 
importance of personal contact between its personnel and the 
public. Most of such contact is maintained by District 
personnel, who alone participated in more than 2^2 meetings with 
sportsmen's clubs, civic groups, youth organizations and other 
gatherings, as well as hundreds of uncounted contacts with 
individuals in the normal course of duties. Other personnel 
ranging from Board members, to staff officers, to employees 
at all levels, also attended many similar meetings and had 
personal contact with the public on many occasions. The 
increasing numbers of visitors to our pheasant farms and trout 
hatcheries providers many opportunities for contact. 

Board Personnel 

Mr. Roger D. Williams, Natick, was elected Chairman, 
and Mr. Bert B. Wietupski, Hampden, was elected Secretary, at 
the meeting on March 2#, 1962 at the University of Massachusetts. 

There were no changes in Board personnel during the 
fiscal year. 

The Board expresses its sincere thanks to all 
Division personnel for their continued exemplary performance 
of duties. 



Respectfully submitted, 

s/ Roger D. Williams, Chairman 
Bert B. Nietupski , Secretary 
Harper L. Gerry, Member 
Lawrence Barbieri, Member 
F. Stanley Mikelk, Member 



(5) 



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FISHERIES PROGRAM 

A 'good deal of the emphasis in fisheries management 
undertaken during the 1962 fiscal year was placed upon the 
evaluation phase of previous reclamations. Ten ponds re- 
claimed during the past year had been reclaimed in the past. 
Four ponds totaling 193 acres were subjected to rotenone 
treatment as the first step toward proper warmwater management . 
A total of 192,969 trout, mostly fingerlings, were used to 
restock waters newly-reclaimed for these species, while 72,897 
warm-water fish of assorted species, predominantly largemouth 
bass, were used to restock managed warmwater ponds. 

The Squannacook River, and its tributaries, was also 
reclaimed for trout management. Approximately 13 miles of river, 
totaling 100 acres, were treated and restocked. Trout which had 
been liberated as fingerlings in the fall of 1961, following the 
reclamation, made a substantial contribution to fishermen's 
creels during the spring of 1962. Population samples made toward 
the end of the reporting period indicated a high rate of trout 
survival and a slow return of undesirable species. 

The three year evaluation phase of the Deerfield River 
reclamation was completed and required reports were submitted. 
The reclamation proved to be a success. Recontamination from 
un-reclaimed feeder streams is resulting in shortening the period 
in which the benefits of the reclamation show up in fishermen's 
creels. However the reclamation produced sustained fishing, a 
better quality of fish, and more fish in the creel, at a cost 
less than the same harvest would have been provided by stocking 
alone. The fisheries population of 49 ponds was checked by use 
of rotenone, electric shocking equipment, or both, and the re- 
sults analyzed to determine a basis for future management. 

Considerable time was expended by district personnel 
on the compilation of data to be included in the rights-of-way 
and access surveys of great ponds in Hampden, Hampshire, 
Franklin, and Worcester counties. Routine maintenance of 
physical plants and equipment continued to demand a large number 
of man-hours. Other time-consuming duties included stocking, 
reclamations, population spot checks, fish kill investigations, 
creel census, fish salvage, stream and pond surveys, public 
relations work involving club meetings, access problem work, 
and administration. 

Sterlization and Sex Reversal Studie s: 

Experimental work on the use of hormones and cas- 
tration agents to produce sterility in freshwater fishes was 
completed during the past period. A thorough screening of all 
probable compounds proved negative; the development 



(6) 



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of such a technique must be considered a failure when applied 
to field conditions. The future usefulness of information 
gleaned during the project cannot now be evaluated, but may- 
become apparent from the work of federal laboratories who 
have begun studies along similar lines, following Massachusetts' 
lead. 

A new technique developed and now in general use is 
the selective poisoning of certain species of fish in unbalanced 
ponds . The material in use has been shown to virtually 
eradicate sunfish from treated areas while not affecting other 
fishes. A technical paper regarding Massachusetts" work in 
this field was presented at an international wildlife meeting. 

A comprehensive '■ Trout Stream Management in Massachusett; 
bulletin, was published and is available to interested sports- 
men. It may be obtained from district, field, or administrative 
offices of the Division. 

Laboratory facilities at Field Headquarters, expanded 
to provide space for a rapidly-growing analytical program, 
are being used in bio-assay and chemical analyses. Water 
quality determinations with regard to industrial and domestic 
pollution are presently being carried out. A $12,000 grant 
from the U. S. Public Health Service implemented the insec- 
ticide study already in progress, and allowed for the pro- 
jection of this work over the Assabet, Concord, and Sudbury 
river drainages. Samples of soil and water, as well as 
tissues from fish, game, and humans, are being analyzed to 
determine residual levels of insecticides. The laboratory has 
furnished this information fo sportsmen's clubs, conservation 
organizations, the University of Massachusetts, and interested 
individuals. 

Creel Census Activit ies : 

Regular fisherman interviews were conducted during the 
past year on eight managed ponds within the Commonwealth, in- 
cluding Quabbin Reservoir. The latter, the only water of the 
group not on a reclaimed status, showed a decrease in total 
anglers. All others showed both an increase in fishermen and 
an increase in harvest . The census at Chaunce3 r Pond showed 
irrefutable proof that the experimental stocking of walleye 
pike was a definite success. 

Reclamation Program: 

During the past fical year, 14 great or state-owned 
ponds were rehabilitated for sport fishes, as follows: 



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■IRQIQL BOMBS EEGLAIMEU 



Pond 



Town 



Area in Acres 



Little Pond 
Mary's Pond 
Shubael Pond 
Hoosicwhisick 
York Pond 
Little Coachlace 
Scargo Lake 
Spectacle Pond 
Grews Pond 
Lovells Pond 



Plymouth 

Rochester 

Barnstable 

Milton 

New Marlboro 

Clinton 

Dennis 

Sandwich 

Falmouth 

Barnstable 



Total 



WARMWATER PONDS RECLAIMED 



Sherman Pond 
Long Pond 
Johns Pond 
Little Sandy Pond 



Brimfield 

Yarmouth 

Carver 

Plymouth 



43 
Si 
56 
23 
35 
9 
53 
91 
13 



400 



Total 



S6 
55 
23 



29 

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During the past fiscal year, 5 £,931 largemouth bass 
and 3, £66 chain pickerel were reared for initial stocking in 
the reclaimed warmwater ponds listed, and for corrective 
stocking in previously-managed areas. 

Marine Sport Fisheries Inventory : 

The Marine Sports Fisheries survey continued its 
inventory of marine sports fishing in Massachusetts' coastal 
waters. Results of the inventory indicate a continuing in- 
crease in the number of active small boats with fisherman 
success a little better than, that of the previous year. A 
report on the current year, 'in conjunction with and com- 
parison to the previous year's results, is nearly complete 
and will be published soon. 

Project personnel have started an ecological study 
of shallow water areas, creeks, bays, and tidal inlets in 
relation to winter flounder. 

Trout Propagation 



Trout releases from the five state fish hatcheries, 
including additions from the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 
totalled 1,672,683 trout. Of these, Massachusetts liberated 
1,63B,100 trout, of which over 162,000 catchables had been fed 
a special diet to improve their coloration. 

The federal hatcheries at Pittsford, Vermont; 
Nashua, New Hampshire; and Kartsville, North Attleboro, 
Massachusetts, released 234,5^3 trout to areas designated by 
this Division. 



Change -Over Program 

In a change-over to an all-yearling production of 
brook and brown trout at the Sunderland Hatchery, all brood 
stock and two-year-old fish were liberated, accounting for the 
increased poundage reported last year. The hatchery was 
completely disinfected to eliminate a disease problem that had 
plagued the hatchery for several years. 

Method of Incubation 

The Sandwich Hatchery initiated a new method of 
incubating trout eggs by using plastic egg-hatching jars six 
inches in diameter in place of 12-foot rectangular hatching 
troughs. Each jar contains approximately 35,000 eggs and two 
will hold more than one trough. This method has simplified 
the care of trout eggs by saving space in the hatchery building, 
as well as helping in the control of fungus. The monetary 
saving is considerable; fifteen jars can be purchased for the 
price of one trough. 

Nutrition 



The Cortland formula was revised to include 'full 
fishmeal ? ' which contains all the dried fish solubles in the 
same proportions as originally produced from the raw fish. 
Toasted soybean oil meal was substituted for cottonseed meal 
because it is cheaper, contains a high protein content, and has 



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less fat. This formula can be used for pelleting or as a 
mix to supplement meat feedings. 

Research feeding was carried on at all of the 
hatcheries with several brands of self-sustaining fish pellets. 
The success of this work varied with temperature, quality, 
and quantity of water. It was found that meat, added to the 
pellet diet, promotes growth during low water-temperature 
periods, 

Colo ration 

Experimentation was continued again this year at 
the Montague Hatchery, using all three species of trout. 
Various paprika brands containing 194 to 229 mgs. of calculated 
total carotene per pound were selected. Using a two percent 
concentration, trout were given essentially * wild 4 ' coloration 
for approximately two cents per pound. By starting paprika 
additives in late fall, fish could be colored for spring 
stocking. Egg fertility and fry quality appeared to improve 
with the addition of paprika. 

Water Resojurces_ 

The most important factor in the growth of trout is 
water temperature. Growth is nearly nil in water from the 
freezing point up to 3$° and increases rapidly as the temperature 
is increased. Personnel are constantly looking for additional 
well water which maintains a constant water temperature year- 
round. 

A 600-gallon capacity turbine water pump was 
installed to increase the water supply at Sunderland during 
periods of drought. This unit was placed at the opposite end 
of an existing water line and had to be used extensively from 
January through June because of a record' shortage of raiafall. 

Vermin Control 

The number of raccoons and predatory birds increased 
this year with noticeable losses of trout at all of the 
stations. Personnel are presently working with the U. S. Fish 
and Wildlife Service on a satisfactory method of control. 

Re construction 

Reconstruction this year at Sunderland was limited 
to cementing two raceways used in rearing brook trout. A new 
furnace was installed in addition to other general maintenance 
work. 



(10) 



The Palmer Station was used years ago chiefly for 
bass culture o During the past few years personnel have been 
engaged in reducing the surface area by filling in the sides 
of the ponds and building dikes for separation to raise trout. 
This work was continued this year. 

Most of the construction fund3 allotted to Sandwich 
were used for the reconstruction of another series of eight 
rearing raceways, #0' x 10* x 3' » with cement walls, dams 
and connecting drains, A few wells were salvaged and more 
were sunk to supply the added pond area. Four earthen pools 
at East Sandwich were sheathed with native pine. 

Rebuilding of raceways above the supply pond at 
Sutton was completed this year. Repairs were made to the 
sorting house and troughs installed for efficient use of that 
facility. A building on a hill to the north of the big pond 
was torn down and the materials salvaged. The hill on which 
the building stood was bulldozed into one-half of the big 
pond. Several 2" free-flowing wells were developed that 
materially helped in increasing production by 7*465 pounds 
over that of last year. This additional well water made 
conversion possible during the winter which accounts for the 
larger fish released from Sutton this year. 

The Montague Hatchery reduced the surface area of 
two large rearing ponds for better water circulation. The 
larger of the two units was separated by a cement dam to 
facilitate better management. Cement sides were built in 
the catch-pond on the back-stream system now used for rearing 
fingerlings. 



(11) 



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TROUT DISTRIBUTION IN MASSACHUSETTS FROM STATE AND FEDERAL 


HATCHERIES 


JULY 1, 1961 TO JUNE 30, 1962 




BROOKS BROWNS 


RAINBOWS 




finder 6" Over 6 W Under 6 ,? Over 6 jf 


Under 6" Over 6" 


TOTAL TROUT 


210,095 546,742 256,500 492,314 


133,200 228,832 


1,872,633 


Total Trout Distributed 6-9 ' 


7&B,723 




Total Trout Distributed 9" plus 


479,165 


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... 1,267,888 


Total Fingerlings (6" minus) 


604,795 


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,. 1,872,683 


POUNDAGE STOCKED 


BY STATIONS 





STATION 

Montague 

Palmer 

Sandwich 

Sunderland 

Sutton 



TOTAL LBS 

73,913 
38,795 
66,894 
157,596 
23,381 



State Poundage 360, 579 



North Attleboro 

Berkshire 

Nashua, New Hampshire 

Pittsford, Vermont 



17,234 

6,958 

15 , 844 

15,016 



Federal Poundage 



55,052 



GRAND TOTAL 415,631 



(This table does not show fish retained for brood stock) 



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GAME PROGRAM 

The game program continued as in past years*. 
Emphasis has always been in giving the hunter the most for his 
money. This includes not only stocking birds and animals to 
provide the best return, but altering the open seasons to take 
advantage of changes in the production of game species in the 
wild. Land is being acquired by lease or purchase as fast as 
money allows and multiple use of this land is being encouraged 
Division personnel are constantly combatting the ?i closed 
town !; problem by advising town officials and interested in- 
dividuals . 

The bulk of the research and management program is 
financed 75 percent by Federal Aid Funds (Pittman-Robertson) 
and is so designated in this report . 



FEDERAL AID PROJECTS 

W-9-D — Statewide Development Project 

As in the past, work on this project was done only 
on state-owned or leased management areas. These are the 
public hunting grounds which are located in the towns of 
Falmouth, Plymouth, West Bridgewater, Newbury, North Andover, 
Sudbury, Ayer, Westboro, Uxbridge, Hubbardston, Barre, 
Phillipston, Winchendon, Huntington, Chester, Peru, and 
Williamstown. The objectives are to make these areas accessible 
to the hunter; to provide best possible release sites for art- 
ificially reared game; and to encourage reproduction of in- 
digenous species. 

Maintenance : Headquarters buildings, storage sheds, 
and grounds were maintained by painting, cleaning, mowing, etc. 
Water control structures at Birch Hill, Hubbardston, and West- 
boro were checked regularly to keep them in proper operating 
condition. Bridges at Birch Hill and Hubbardston were checked 
for condition of planking and railings. Well over 50 miles 
of roads in all managment areas were maintained by gravelling, 
grading, snow plowing, and mowing or spraying the edges. Over 
1000 signs marking roads, entrances, and boundaries were 
erected or maintained. In addition, over 10,000 signs were 
erected marking safety zones. Over 230 acres of perennials 
such as hay and lespedeza were maintained. Over 900 wood duck 
nesting boxes were maintained or replaced. 

Development : Using a bulldozer, tractor-mounted 
brush cutters, herbicides, chain saws and axes, over 330 
acres of land were cleared for future food patches or to 
encourage natural succession. Over 18,000 trees and shrubs 
were planted as field borders and dividers and, in groups, 
to provide protective cover and food. Over 200 acres of annuals 
and perennials were planted for food patches during the 
spring and fall. 

Selective thinning in mature forests to encourage 
natural reproduction produced about 50,000 board feet of 

(13) 



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lumber for Division use. The growth and fruiting of abandoned 
or wild apple trees was encouraged by release cutting and 
pruning. 

Work continued on the Westboro beagle training 
grounds. Block cuttings were made in a grid pattern. Annual 
plantings of hay mixture and clover were top dressed. Trees 
and shrubs were planted to supply protective cover and food. 
Trapping was done to determine the current rabbit population. 
There was continued utilization of the area for training and 
trials. 

^J3J>^jl~Game PoB3ilatJ:PiL Jfeejad_ jmd_ _HarvgA% jjlgygiy 

Stj.tewi.de_ Be e r_ Harye s t_ .and^ Jierd. J^P-ffiPOS^iPi* 5 ^ ur ^ n S 
the 1961 deer season ( November* *14 t'o""December' 8) a a total of 
3 ? 0$4 deer were reported taken by hunters. Archers accounted 
for 45 deer during the archery season (November 14 to December 
S). During the shotgun week (December 3 to December &) , hunters 
reported taking l,56l bucks, 1,517 does and 6 deer were reported 
with sex not listed. Although the reported kill was IB percent 
less than the 14-year average , it was 5 percent better than the 
I960 season. A total of 6&L deer -were processed at the checking 
stations, which represents a 22.5 percent sample of the reported 
kill. The sex ratio of 1.0 males to 1.0 females has remained 
constant for a 15~year period. A seven percent decline in the kill 
was noted for the fawn class while a slight increase in the kill 
of 2- J year and older deer was noticed. Deer weights by age 
classes were the same as in previous years. An analysis of the 
deer kill in the towns surrounding the Quabbin area indicated 
that the protected Quabbin herd has little effect on the outside 
kill. The kill in those towns fluctuates similarly to the 
statewide kill and does not stay at an abnormally high level. 

Spring Quail Census and, J? pjp oila t i n Comj>^>si£ions County 
quail call indices" in I96T showed a significant decrease in the 
Plymouth County population as compared to I960. This decrease 
may have been influenced by the winter of 1960-1961 which was 
the most severe in 60 years. Barnstable and Bristol county 
populations showed no significant changes from I960. 

jgf inter Waterfowl Census and Harye s_t : Inventory 
flights made "along Yhe^ Massachusetts coast between October 16 
and December 2& showed a pattern of waterfowl distribution 
and population increase similar to those of I960. Increases were 
noted in all important species of waterfowl. The winter 
inventory, which was flown on January £, 9 and 10, showed an 
increase in total waterfowl recorded of 44 percent over 1961. 
Elack ducks were 29 percent higher than in 1961 and 31 percent 
higher than in i960. Canada geese were 41 percent higher than 
in 1961 and 64 percent higher than they were found to be 



(14) 



" 



■9 



in I960. All puddle ducks were 2& percent higher than in 1961 
and 27 percent higher than in I960. All diving ducks were 51 
percent higher than in 1961 and 15 percent higher than in I960, 

The I960 postal survey sampled approximately six 
percent of all waterfowl hunters in Massachusetts The total 
estimated kill was 55? 054 waterfowl of which 70 percent were 
bagged and the remainder were crippled and lost. This is a 
six percent decrease from 1959. There were fewer hunters , but 
they hunted more often. Seasonal success per hunter was the 
same, 2. $3 birds , but daily success was down about 1& percent. 
Black ducks made up 46 percent of the duck kill (comparable to 
1959) s but the estimated harvest was seven percent lower than 
in 1959 • The wood duck harvest was 56 percent lower than in 
1959. The scoter harvest was up 26 percent. The Canada goose 
harvest was up 10 percent. The harvest of all puddle ducks was 
down 13 percent and the harvest of all diving ducks was up four 
percent. 

Hunter Use of public. Hunt in& ^Grounds 1 i3s t ima te d 
usage on alTpublic~Tmnting areas was 47,d£)0 hunter trips in 
1961. Usage on ten comparable areas snowed an increase of 
19 percent over I960 and 32 percent over 1959 • Peak hunting 
pressure was on the first two Saturdays followed by opening 
day and succeeding Saturdays. The majority of hunters came 
from within a 20 mile radius of the hunting grounds except 
in three areas where the majority came from a radius of 20 
to 50 miles (Northeast, Fort Devens, Myles Standish). Hir.ting 
pressure during the week is noticeably higher on days after 
stocking has taken place. Pheasants and quail are killed in 
the greatest number, followed by cottontail rabbit, grouse, 
gray squirrel, white hare, woodcock and ducks. 

WqpJ._JDuck^JestJ.ng c Juccessj The check of nesting 
boxes in 19&. indicated that the resident breeding population 
of wood ducks has remained at a low level. While there has 
been no further decline in the recorded usage of nesting boxes, 
it is still far below the average number found in the yef^s 
prior to 1959. 

A trapping and banding program was carried out at 
Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge during September, 19 61. 




A total of 113 wood ducks were captured, 
consisted of 53 adults and 60 immatures, 
survival. 



The trapped sairple 
indicating poor brood 



Nesting boxes were refurbished and relocated during 
the winter in an effort to encourage better nesting succe c . :->. 



a^ 



%} 



■ I 



■ 



■Experimental. Turkey Stock ingj A summary of 
survival and reproduction"of wild turkeys released in Quabbin 
Reservation follows : Five hens and three toms were released 
in April , I960, and seven poults were produced that spring,. 
Mine additional hens were released in the fall of I960, and 
three toms and two hens in the spring of 1961. A minimum of 
16 wild turkeys , 12 hens and 4 toms, were present in the spring 
of 1961, and over 60 poults were produced., 4& of which survived 
until at least the first of September. The known population 
at that time was 64 birds. The turkeys became widely scattered 
and difficult to locate during the fall of 1961. Known 
mortality during the winter totaled ten turkeys. By April 
1962, 17 wild turkeys could be located within Quabbin., leaving 
37 unaccounted for. Unconfirmed reports suggested a portion 
of the 37 were still in the vicinity of the reservation in May 
of 1962. 

Eleven wild turkeys , three toms and eight hens, were 
released in Mount Washington in January , 1961. By Septembers 
the population consisted of two adult toms, four broodless 
hens, and one hen with four poults. These birds are still 
present. 

Twelve wild turkeys s three toms and nine hens, were 
released in April, 1961, in October Mountain State Forest. 
Two hens are known to have died. Two toms and five hens were 
located in June, 1962. A hen with three poults was reported 
during the summer. No information has been received on winter 
survival. 

On October 11, 1962, a release of 16 wild turkey 
poults, six toms and ten hens, was made near Otis. A hen 
and torn were known to have died before December 5« Reports 
suggest the birds moved south towards Connecticut, but nothing 
is known of over-winter survival. 

Mourning Dove Census; Data from 24 call-count routes 
in the spring of 1961 showed a breeding population index of nine. 
The 1962 survey, just completed, showed an index of ten. The 
average breeding index for states in the Eastern Management Unit 
was 7o3 in I960 and 7 61 in 1961. 

The number of doves counted in the fall was dis- 
appointingly low. On all management areas except in the south- 
east, doves were counted in the tens with a maximum of 4 7 seen 
on any day. Counts reached 500 at one area in the southeast 
and almost 200 at another. There was one observation during 
the day of about 500 doves on the Northeast Area. On the regular 
count, however, six days later, only 40 birds were reported. 



(16) 






** I 



ACTIVITIES SPONSORED ENTIRELY EY STATE FUNDS 



Stocking, 

Surplus pheasant brood stock was released in Hay 
and June. Cocks and hens of the year were stocked at twelve 
weeks of age in August. Adult cocks were released the week 
before and during the upland season on huntable private land,, 
Cocks were released twice a week on wildlife management areas 
throughout the season,. 

White hare were released after the season throughout 
the state to supplement brood stock . 

W&ite, jlare^ j3^udy, 

The objective of this study was to determine 
feasibility of holding and conditioning imported white hare 
at the game farms; to compare hunter success and survival 
data of conditioned hare versus unconditioned hare; to determine 
the feasibility of 'put and take'- hunting of snowshoe hare on 
public hunting grounds; and to evaluate the survival of 
imported hare. 

During the winter of 1961-1962 , the Division 
purchased 2,500 white hare which were imported from New 
Brunswick at a delivered price of ^3»35 each. All hare received 
were tagged with numbered ear tags» In addition, those hare 
released on the public hunting areas were further marked by 
toe clippings. 

Approximately 300 hare were weighed on arrival . 
Weights ran from 2.1 pounds to 3°7 pounds, with an average 
of 2»c5 pounds. The average weight of a native hare is 3»2 
pounds. Personnel at the game farms fed the hare a variety of 
foods including commercial rabbit pellets, horse feed, alfalfa 
meal, whole oats, and fresh apples. The period of time the 
animals were held ranged from 17 to 46 days. 

In general, all hare that were held regained 
lost weight and reached the average native hare weight of 
3«2 pounds within 14 to 17 days. 

Two experimental releases of hare were made during 
the open season. Half of the hare released were conditioned 
and the other half were released directly upon receipt from 
the dealer. The stocking success was checked by contacting 
rabbit hunters and by live trapping . Hunters were interviewed 
and ear tags were collected in the release areas each weekend 
during the hare season. Out of 30 hares released on the Birch 
Hill area, eight conditioned hares and four unconditioned 
hares were shot during the period January 9 to February 3, 1962. 



(17) 



wm 



h. 



In addition, eleven native hares were reported taken in the 
same covers. Only one conditioned hare was accounted for by 
gunning at the other release area, in Hopkinton, 

Intensive box trapping after the close of the 
season at the Birch Hill are an resulted in capture of 2$ hare 
of which three were conditioned, two unconditioned , and 23 native. 
From the compiled data,, it is possible to account for 73 percent 
of the conditioned hare and 40 percent of the unconditioned 
hare at this area, 

Dama^^JJom^aints 

District personnel checked 57 beaver complaints. 
These were handled by live trapping, by dynamiting, or by 
issuing permits to landowners to destroy the beaver. Live 
traps were issued to clubs and individuals to take care of 
rabbit complaints, 

PJ^J?Xi£iL Stations 

Five beaver pelt checking stations were maintained 
for two days at the close of the trapping season. A total 
of 669 pelts were examined. 

Surveys 

Three woodcock census routes were run to determine 
the spring breeding index, 

iSmergency Feeding 

Personnel from the Northeast District assisted 
in ground feeding waterfowl during a period of emergency. 

Field Trials 

Improvements were made to field trial grounds 
at Westboro and rfillowdale State Forest and aid was given in 
running trials, 

Communi ty_ Conse r va t ion Planning 

Considerable time was spent supplying information to 
professional town planners. Numerous conferences were held 
with other State and Federal agencies such as Soil Conservation 
Service, Corps of Army Engineers, and the United States Fish 
and Wildlife Service, to plan cooperative programs. Sportsmen's 
clubs, town conservation commissions, schools, and individuals 
were assisted in planning their conservation programs. 



(IS) 



. M I 



■ 



Land Acquisition 

District managers aided in the land acquisition 
program by examining land offered for sale and in gathering 
preliminary engineering data. 

Game Propagation 

An all-time high of 5& } 450 cock pheasants were 
distributed during this fiscal period of July 1, 1961 to June 
30, 1962. The increase in production was utilized by more in- 
season stocking and to satisfy increased hunting pressure on 
the Division's public shooting grounds. At the same tiire, there 
was an increase in the number of public hunting grounds that 
were made available to the sportsmen in Massachusetts, thus 
calling for more birds . 

Economy is still the keyword in game propagation how- 
ever. Unit costs have been considerably reduced by applying 
stringent controls and better methods . Routine maintenance 
continues to be a necessity with new pen construction and 
replacement of wire an annual chore . Enlargement and im- 
provement of the Sandwich and Wilbraham game farms has the 
priority over all new construction. A new brooder house was 
constructed at the Wilbraham Game Farm, using, for the first 
time on a Division game farm, an automatic self-feeder which 
should result in lower labor costs. 

Three farms participated in the white hare program 
described elsewhere in this report in cooperation with wild- 
life technicians to streamline the annual white hare holding 
program. 

A total of 2,566 Bobwhite quail were reared for 
release only on public hunting grounds. A small number of 
Coturnix quail were raised for field trial purpose? . 



(19) 






,.,. ,,—J, 



GAMS DISTRIBUTION 
July l s 1961 - June 30, 1962 



Pheasants Hens 

Adults; Spring and summer liberations 4,762 
Young; "A" stocking (12 weeks of age) 9,111 



■B ; 



•C", "PG- stockings (17-25 weeks old) 135 



"SR"" program 



„JfcgO 

14,463 



Cocks Total 

S19 5,5& v l 

£,430 17,541 

41,526 41,663 

5B,450 72,936 



Quail 

Adults; Spring and summer liberations 

Young; October and November liberations 



Bob white Coturnix Total 

14 3B5 399 

JUSSSi 2 2,554 

2,566 3^7 2,953 






White H are 

Northern varying, purchased 



2,500 



(OS) 



■ 



i 



■ 



INFORMATION AND EDUCATION PROGRAM 



The Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Game, like 
its sister agencies in every state, uses publications, news 
services, films, radio, television, exhibits, youth programs, 
and personal contact to increase public understanding of the 
needs and methods of conservation. Provision of helpful 
information such as printed guides to hunting and fishing areas, 
regulations, etc, is an essential part of the program, and 
all personnel are also concerned with improving public 
understanding of and cooperation with the policies and programs 
of the Division o 

Following are enumerated activities of the information 
and education program for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1962: 

News Services 

The public was kept informed throughout the year by 
press, radio and television, all of which have free access to all 
news sources within the Division, and receive the regular 
releases issued by the I&E section and district managers*, 

A total of 146 different news stories were issued 
during the reporting period via the following means: statewide 
releases from I&E - 58; area releases from district managers - 31; 
television news strips from I&E - 21; photo-feature releases by 
I&E and districts - 30. 

A number of feature articles, ranging from local 
stories to articles in national magazines, resulted from or 
were aided by assistance from Division personnel. 

Mas 3 achuse 1 1 sJWildl if e 

Circulation of this bi-monthly free magazine showed a net 
gain for the year of 4»019 subscribers, with a total mailing 
list at the close of the reporting period of 36,6760 Most 
similar publications are estimated to be read by an average of 
three persons per copy, which would place M as s > achuse st ts Wildlife 's 
estimated total readership at more than 110,000* In addition," 
approximately 2000 copies of each issue are distributed as 
single pamphlets in reply to inquiries that can be answered by 
information contained in the magazine. 

Audio-Visual Aids 



During the year, the audio-visual office prepared 
and presented 35 television programs. Nineteen of these were 
25-minute presentations on the "Dateline Boston 1 ' series over 
WHDH-TV, 12 were "Critter Corner" programs over WBZ-TV, and 
two were presented on the "RFD 3" program over WTIC-TV in 
Hartford. In addition, film was loaned to the ABC-TV network 
for presentation on "Editors Choice". 

The "Dateline Boston" series of programs prepared by 
the Division of Fisheries and Game received a first place 

(21) 






national award as the "best television program produced in 
cooperation with a state or provincial agency in 1961''. The 
program, viewed by the judges of the American Association for 
Conservation Information, concerned pollution in Massachusetts 
streams. 

During the reporting period the Division continued its 
cooperation \«ath radio stations in the Commonwealth through 
personal contact and tape recordings by personnel in the wildlife 
districts and other installations. 

One new film "A Place to Hunt'', was added to the film 
library. This film shows some of the work that goes into the 
management of a public hunting area and ends with a quail and 
pheasant hunt on Cape Cod, 

A total of 414 films were loaned to groups from the 
Division film library. These films were viewed by approximately 
33s 150 people. 

Ten exhibits at sportsmen's shows and fairs were 
assisted, primarily through provision of literature and live 
specimens by the district managers and I&E. Panel exhibits 
prepared by the I&iS Section were used on several occasions. 

Publications 



New publications added to the list maintained for 
free public distribution were Trout Stream Management in 
Massachusetts , a 94-page treatise on this complex subject, 
and the Sport Fishing Institute's Conservation Chart. A number 
of publications which had become depleted were recorded. 

The current year's Annual Report, Stocked Trout Waters 
Guide Fish an d ^Jjjan^ J^aws, Closed Towns List , Sportsmen's 
Organization List and Migratory Game Re gulations were compiled 
and published. 

Tours and Demo nstrations 

District personnel conducted eight "Show Me 5 ' tours 
wherein members of the press and prominent individuals were 
taken on conducted tours of Division activities. District 
personnel also conducted four field demonstrations for scout 
and sportsmen's groups, including one major public demonstration 
to promote fishing in Lake Monponsett, which was attended by 
over 300 people. 

Meetings 

District personnel attended or participated in 2#2 
meetings of sportsmen's clubs, civic groups, fraternal 
organizations, youth groups, etc. Other personnel throughout 
the Division participated in many similar meetings. Several 
personnel spoke at public school gatherings and other meetings 
as a conservation-education effort. 

(22) 



^H 



I »*7 



m 



The 21st annual international conference of the 
American Association for Conservation Information was held at 
Province town in June., I&E personnel coordinated the program, 
assisted by the southeast, northeast and central wildlife districts 

Conservation Education 



I&E personnel continued to assist in functions of the 
State Advisory Committee for Conservation Education. 

The 13th annual session of the Massachusetts Junior 
Conservation Camp, its first year under direction of the I&E 
Section, was run at Thompson ? s Pond, Spencer. A total of 119 
boys completed the two-week course. The new installation 
provides housing, messing , training and recreational facilities 
superior to the former site in the Berkshires. It also made 
possible a far more efficient operation, and improvement in the 
quality of the training given was evident even during this first 
year at the new site. At the close of the reporting period, 
plans for the 1962 camp were rapidly being completed. They 
included an expanded staff, increased number of campers , 
improved equipment, expanded and better coordinated instruction 
program, and the innovation of measurement and achievement 
tests. 

Printing^ Posters , Misc. 

I&E continued to handle all editing, printing and 
publishing functions for the Division. 

Approximately 11,000 '"Safety Zone" posters were 
distributed to landowners through the districts and direct 
from I&E, and the program of erecting metal highway signs 
calling attention to hunting safety zones was expanded by an 
additional 200 signs. 






(23) 



i 






■ 






During the year the Division took title to a thousand- 
acre tract of land in the towns of Huntington, Worthington and 
Chester thus opening up a new sizeable public hunting area. 
This area was acquired primarily for hunting and is near the 
mile-long tract of Little River purchased a few years ago. 

Negotiations were all but completed for the purchase 
of more land adjoining the Phillipston Area. Another tract 
adjoining this area, which did not have title acceptable to 
the state, was in the process of being acquired by right of 
eminent domain . The purchase price was agreed upon but eminent 
domain was the only way for the Division to acquire good title 
to the property,, The General Court passed bills filed by the 
Division asking for the right to use eminent domain in the 
acquisition of the above mentioned land and two parcels adjacent 
to the Peru area, which were in the same category- 

More small parcels were added to the Northeast area 
and negotiations were under way for che acquisition of a 
sizeable addition to this area. 

Many parcels varying in size from a few acres to 
sizeable tracts, which were brought to the attention of the 
Division as being on the market, were investigated but in all 
cases the asking price was beyond the means of the Division,. 
Negotiations to reduce the asking price to a figure more in 
keeping with our budget failed to succeed. 

A detailed ownership map of land along the Millers river 
was completed and attempts were made to purchase isolated parcels. 

Leases which expired on the public fishing grounds 
were renewed and ownership maps brought tip to date. 

Surveys were made of some of the Division holdings 
to establish boundary lines. 

The Realty Section handled all correspondence with 
other public agencies regarding lands owned by the Division 
and other related subjects, giving assistance whenever possible. 



(24) 



■ 



-y,fw\ 



MASSACHUSETTS COOPERATIVE WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNIT 



General: 



Dr Earl S. Deubler, Jr. was employed by the 
Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, University of 
Massachusetts, as Associate Professor of Fisheries Biology . 

The new Natural Resources Building on the campus is 
more than half finished and the Department should move in within 
the next year. 

Wild Turkey Project; 

Production of poults from wild turkey stockings has 
been very successful this year.. At least sixty known poults 
were produced in June, and survival in September has been good. 
One flock of fourteen turkeys on the East side of Prescott 
Peninsula has been observed* It is not known what parent stock 
is involved in this flock, but they may well be of pure West 
Virginia strain. A few birds were transferred from Mount 
Washington to October Mountain, and at least seventeen turkeys 
are on October Mountain. 

New England,, Cottontail, Study : 

A graduate student working on the productivity of 
the two species of cottontails found in Massachusetts is 
completing his thesis in absentia. This study is being 
continued on an island in Quabbin Reservation. 

C adwell_ forest, Study : 



A number of roads in Cadwell Forest were fertilized 
and seeded to clover by the previous investigator. These roads 
were receiving heavy utilization by deer, rabbits and grouse 
in the late summer. Two graduate students worked on this 
forest all summer experimenting with methods for clearing open 
areas in the second growth forests. 

Pe s t i c ide -Wildl i f e Pro je c t : 

A second contract with the Bureau of Sport Fisheries 
and Wildlife (United States Fish and Wildlife Service) was signed 
at the beginning of the fiscal year. A graduate student will 
conduct exhaustive laboratory tests to ascertain the rate of 
absorption and excretion of DDT in Towhees. It is hoped that 
some of these findings may be correlated with field observations 
and collections of the area. 

Woodcock Project: 

A second draft of a manuscript of twelve years of 
woodcock research was completed . 

(25) 



H 



■ 



Bird Control Project; 

Dr. David Wetherbec of the Bureau of Sport Fisheries 
and Wildlife who is assigned to the Cooperative Unit at the 
University, has been continuing intensive work on gulls, 
starlings and red-winged blackbirds, 

Wetherbee, David K„ & N, S* Wetherbee, 1961* Artificial 

Incubation of 3ggs of various Bird Species, and some 
Attributes of Neonates. Bird Banding, 32: 141 - 159c 

Sheldon, William G. & F. Greeley, 1962. Woodland as Wildlife 
Habitat. Publication 3$9, Forestry Series Mo. 9> 
Cooperative intension Service, College of Agriculture, 
University of Mass., Amherst. 

Sheldon,, William G. & JS, M. Pollack, 1962c Woodcock and Grouse - 



An Earlier Season, Mass. Wildlife, July-August, Vol 
, No. 4< 



XIII 9 No. 



Meanley, Brooke & D. K. Wetherbee, 1962. Ecological Notes on 

Mixed Populations of King Rails and Clapper Rails in 
Delaware Bay Marshes, Auk 79. 453-457 « 

Wetherbee, David K. & L. M. Bartlettj 1962. *Sgg Teeth and Shell 
Rupture of the American Woodcock, The Auk: 79, 117c 



(26) 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 
HOW THE SPORTSMAN'S DOLLAR WA S "SPENT 
Fiscal Year July 1, 1961 to June 30, 1962 



ADMINISTR ATION 3304-01 

Administration • 

Fish and Game Board. . . . . 

Information & Education 



0000000*0000000 



000000 



$33,309.79 

695.00 



0000000 



FISHERIES MANAGMENT 

Fish Hatcheries 3304-42 

Management 3304-42 
Striped Bass & Marine 

Fisheries Investigation 3304-46* 

Fish Restoration Projects 3304-47* 

Management 3304-51 



105,321.73 

9,372.53 
39,346.05 
71U?6J^ 



$39,004'. 79 7$ 
66,354.60 5* 



317,274c 53 24* 



226,416.39 17% 



WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT 

Game Farms 
Management 
Wildlife Coop. Unit 
Wildlife Restoration 

LAND ACQUISITION 



3304-51 

3304-51 71,376.43 
3304-44 7,990.33 
3304-53* 123,351.03 

3304-53* 



259,674.57 19* 

203,217.39 15* 
27 , 290.00 2* 



LAW ENFORCEMENT 



3303-05* 6,737.35 
3303-07 3,411.44 
1003-03 137,607.72 152,307.01 11* 



^Continuing accounts 

Expenditures under: 

3304-46 

3304-47 

3304-53 
reinbursed 75* by- 
Federal funds 



$1,347,540.33 100* 



RESERVE IN INLAND FISHERIES AND GAME FUND 
AS OF JUNE 30, 1962 - $169,434.04 



(27) 



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SUMMARY OF FISH & GAME INCOME 
July 1 P 1 961 to June 30. 1962 



Fishing s Hunting & Trapping Licenses 

Special Licenses 3 Trap Registration & Tags 

Alien Gun Permit 

Rents 

Misco Sales & Income 

Pittman-Robertson Federal Aid 

Dingell-Johnson Federal Aid 

Court Fines 

Refunds Prior Year 

Archery Stamps 



1,146, 633.00* 
4,945.16** 

33*25 

3,373-50 

7,994.65 

SO, 101 .26 

50,824.24 

6,830.20 

41.36 

4,475.00 



* See Detail Sheet #1 
** See Detail Sheet #2 



$1,305,352.12 



(29) 



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Detail Sheet #2 



ANALYSIS OF SPECIAL LICENSES ISSUED UNDER SECTIONS 48, 68A, 102- 
3-4„ 5-6-7 and 112-A, Chapter 131, Go L. during the FISCAL YEAR 
ENDED — June 30, 1962 



TYPE OF LICENSE 


NUMBER ISSUED 


RECEIPTS 


Trap Registrations: 
Initial 
Renewal 


114 
640 


$274.00 


Fur Buyers: 

Resident 
Non-Re sident 


27 


$270o00 


Taxidermists: 
Propagators: 

(Special Fish) 

Initial 

Renewal 


51 

19 
193 


$255 o 00 
$231 o 00 


(Fish) 

Initial 
Renewal 
Duplicate 


S3 
1 


$289 o 50 


(Birds & Mammals) 

Initial 

Renewal 


75 

230 


$1,215.00 


(Dealers) 
Initial 
Renewal 
Additional 


2 

£4 
373 


$635.00 


(Indo Bird or Mammal) 

Initial 

Renewal 


23 
55 


$55.50 


Shiners for Bait 
Duplicate 


247 

1 


$1,235.50 



Field Trial Licenses 



$30.00 



Quail for Training Dogs: 
Initial 
Renewal 



Tags : 



Game 
Fish 



13 
31 



2,583 
16,751 



$158.00 



$296.66 



TOTAL: 



(3D 



$4,945.16 



LEGISLATION 



The following laws directly affecting the Division of 
Fisheries and Game were enacted during the legislative session 
of 1962, 



CHAPTER 145, ACTS, 1962: 



CHAPTER 171, ACTS, 1962: 



CHAPTER 379, ACTS, 1962: 



CHAPTER 43#, ACTS, 1962: 



CHAPTER 441, ACTS, 1962: 



CHAPTER 451, ACTS, 1962: 



CHAPTER 507, ACTS, 1962: 



CHAPTER 620, ACTS, 1962: 



CHAPTER 715, ACTS, 1962: 



CHAPTER 66, Re solves, 1962 



CHAPTER 731, ACTS, 1962: 



An Act increasing the fine for the 
taking of Wild Turkeys. 

An Act requiring the wearing of a 
daylight fluorescent red or orange color 
clothing or material while hunting during, 
the deer season. 

An Act further defining the powers of 
the Director of the Division of 
Fisheries and Game relative to the 
propagation of fisho 

An Act permitting hunting on legal 
holidays. 

An Act authorizing the Director of the 
Division of Fisheries and Game to acquire 
certain lands in the town of Petersham. 

An Act authorizing the Director of the 
Division of Fisheries and Game to 
acquire certain lands in the town of 
Peru. 

An Act authorizing the Director of the 
Division of Fisheries and Game to 
convey certain land in the town of 
Mashpee . 

An Act authorizing the Director of the 
Division of Fisheries and Game to issue 
permits for commercial shooting preserves. 

An Act relative to the promotion and 
development of Marine Fisheries of 
the Commonwealth. 

Resolve providing for an investigation 
and study by the Division of Fisheries 
and Game relative to the feasibility 
of issuing free certificates or licenses 
to fish, hunt or trap to certain persons. 

An act authorizing the commonwealth to 
grant easements over, under, across and 
upon certain land, for the transmission 
of electric power, to Western Massachusetts 
Power Company. 

(32) 



SUMMARY OF OUTSTANDING REGULATIONS; AND REGULATIONS PROMULGATED BY 
THE DIRECTOR OF FISHERIES AND GAME DURING FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 
30, 1962. 



August 4» 1943 o Rules and regulations for the artificial 
propagation and maintenance of fish* 

August k 3 194^0 Rules and regulations for the artificial 
propagation of birds and mammals 

July 14s 1952, Rules and regulations for hunting with 
bows and arrows. 

August 12, 1953» Rules and regulations governing sale of 
protected fresh water fish by licensed dealers in Massachusetts. 

March 26, 1954» Rules and regulations governing the 
display of sporting, hunting, fishing, and trapping licenses in 
Massachusetts, effective April 9» 1954. 

January 2&, 1955° Rules and regulations relative to public 
fishing grounds in Massachusetts. 

April 3s 1956. Rules and regulations governing the taking 
of fish in interstate ponds lying between Massachusetts and New 
Hampshire, effective April 10, 1956. 

February 14» 1957 • Rules and regulations relating to the 
taking of carp and suckers for the purpose of sale. 

February 15, 1957 « Rules and regulations relative to the 
tagging of deer in Massachusetts. 

October 20, 1959 ° Rules and regulations for public shooting 
grounds and wildlife management areas in Massachusetts. 

October 20, 1959o Rules and regulations relating to the 
hunting of pheasants, quail and ruffed grouse in Massachusetts. 

November 1, 1959 • Rules and regulations relating to the 
hunting of deer in Massachusetts. 

September 10, i960. Interstate fishing regulations on 
Wall urn Lake. 

September 10, I960. Rules and regulations relating to the 
hunting and trapping of mammals in Massachusetts, 

September 10, I960. Rules and regulations relating to the 
hunting of hares and rabbits in Massachusetts, 

September 10, i960. Rules and regulations relating to the 
hunting of gray squirrels in Massachusetts. 

August 30, 1961. Migratory game bird regulations I96I-.I.962* 

(33) 






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October 1, 1961. Rules and regulations relating to 
hunting of pheasants, quail and ruffed grouse in Massachusetts. 

December 23 » 1961. Rules and regulations regarding Lake 
Garfield in the town of Monterey. 

April 16, 1962. Rules and regulations relating to the 
taking of certain fish in Massachusetts. 

May 10, 1962. Rules and regulations relating to the 
taking of shad in the inland waters of the commonwealth. 






PERSONNEL 

Retirements 9 1962 fiscal year 

J. Albert Torrey, Chief Game Culturist, May 31, 1962, 




(34) 




DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAME 
73 TttEMOWT STREET, BOSTON S 







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His Excellency, Bndicott Peabody, Governor of the 
Commonwealth, the Executive Council, the General 
Court, and the Board of Fisheries and Game. 

Sirs: 

I have the honor to submit herewith the Ninety- 
eighth Annual Report of the Division of Fisheries and 
Game, covering the fiscal year from July 1, 1962 to 
June 30, 1963. 



£~*& Respectfullv^submitted, 

1 FRANCIS Wo SARGENT* 
\ DIRECTOR 



V 



: W-' 



■ I 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAME 

Ninety-eighth Annual Report 
July 1, 1962 to June 30, 1963 

TABLE "OF CONTENTS 



In Memoriam — — . .— — _-*.— .-- 1 

Report of The Fisheries and Game Board — 2 

Game Program — — — ■ ■ —«——_— 6 

Fisheries Program — ■ — — — — -— • 13 

Land Acquisition Program — — .-„.— lg 

Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit - 20 
Information and Education Program ■ — — 22 

Administration 

Table: How the Sportsman* s Dollar was Spent- 26 

Appropriations and Expenditures 27 

Summary of Fish and Game Income — — — 28 
Receipts from Fishing, Hunting and — 29 
Trapping Licenses 

Analysis of Special Licenses 30 

Legislation 31 

Summary of Outstanding Regulations — 33 



Publication Approved by State Purchasing Agent #9 



IN MMORIAM 



CHARLES L. McLAUGHLIN 



Director of the Division of Fisheries and Game, 
passed away on January 4* 1963, as a result of 
injuries sustained in an auto accident. 

He began his career with the Division in 1940, 
working on pheasant research while a graduate student 
at the University of Massachusetts, After receiving 
his BS and MS degrees, McLaughlin served four years 
with the U, S. Marines. He returned to the Division 
in 1946 to work on deer studies, then left for three 
years as an instructor at the University of New 
Hampshire. McLaughlin returned to Massachusetts 
in 1949 as federal-aid coordinator. He was appointed 
Chief Game Biologist in 1954 and Director of the 
Division of Fisheries and Game in 1955 • 



LEWIS A. BRYANT 



Veteran culturist in charge of the Marshfield 
state game farm since September, 1941* passed away 
as a result of a heart attack on January 12, 1963. 

Beginning his career with the Division of 
Fisheries and Game at the Wilbraham game farm in 1930, 
Bryant was appointed assistant fish and game culturist 
in 1936 and remained in that capacity until his 
appointment and transfer as culturist in charge of 
the Marshfield game farm. 

- 1- 



■ 






H 

■ 



REPORT OF THE FISHERIES AND GAME BOARD 



In past years it has been the custom to devote this 
portion of the annual report to a summary of some of the 
more important highlights of the year's operations, other- 
wise reported in complete detail under the various section 
headings 6 

This year, however, your Board feels that there 
are certain fundamental problems, and our approach to 
solution of those problems, which should take precedence 
in the Board's report. 

The functions of the Division, also true for other 
modern fish and game agencies in states across the country, 
include such responsibilities as the acquisition and 
management of land and water areas for a multitude of 
different forms of outdoor recreation besides just 
hunting and fishing; vital wildlife research, reclamation 
of public waters to improve sport fishing, propagation 
of game birds and fish, education of youths and adults 
alike to the importance of wise use of all natural 
resources, establishment of sound conservation laws, 
providing technical guidance to private landowners, other 
conservation agencies, to town conservation commissions, 
community planners and highway construction agencies. 

It is important to realize that the total budget of 
this Division is almost entirely borne by sportsmen. 
Except for relatively limited funds from marine gasoline 
taxes and the federal accelerated public works program, 
this Division's revenue comes entirely from sale of 
fishing, hunting and trapping licenses, related permits, 
and federal-aid reimbursements accruing from federal 
excise taxes on firearms, ammunition and fishing tackle. 

Despite the fact that this Division's program is 
supported by sportsmen, all the citizens of Massachusetts 
share directly in its benefits. For example, 19 wildlife 
management areas are owned or controlled by this Division, 
all of which are open to public uses all year long. While 
hunters utilize these areas only during the short hunting 
seasons, picnickers, campers, hikers, school classes, 
youth organizations and a host of other re creationists can 
and do use the areas throughout the year. On one such 
area alone, last year, the number of recreation trips by 
the general public exceeded the number of trips by hunters 
by about 25 percent J This non-sportsman usage contributed 
nothing to the cost of acquiring and maintaining these areas, 

The aesthetic and economic importance of wildlife 
of all types to our citizens has been well established. It 
is sufficient to note that the Commonwealth's responsibility 
to maintain and manage our wildlife population for the 
benefit of all citizens is entirely charged to the Division 

-2- 









I ' 



of Fisheries and Game. 



Obviously the two major problems affecting our 
discharge of this responsibility are land and money. 
We cannot give a glowing report of land acquisition since 
this Division has never received sufficient funds for this 
purpose. We have been able to acquire several parcels by 
acquisition and the use of others through agreements with 
other agencies of the State and Federal governments, but 
the program is much too far behind the increasing need. 
The time is long past when the Commonwealth can safely 
ignore the rapidly increasing demand for public 
recreational areas and particularly for wildlife 
management areas and access sites to our ponds and streams. 
Hunter usage of wildlife management areas, for example, 
increased 7 percent last year and 21 percent over I960. 

A closely related problem, that of adequate 
funds to continue the Division's programs, is of prime 
importance. Accordingly, every effort has been made to 
closely analyze all operations of the Division. All 
budget requests of the Division are closely scrutinized 
and only the most essential items are retained. The 
Division's annual budget requests are basic, essential 
budgets without any luxuries whatsoever. Once a budget 
is appropriated, every expenditure is closely watched. 
Through the use of improved management methods, institution 
of labor-saving devices where possible, and through 
cooperative agreements with other agencies, we have 
actually managed to provide increased and improved services 
on a total budget considerably less than in former years. 

In the propagation field, we have greatly increased 
the number of pheasants reared and released. Our production 
of cock pheasants totalled 62,217 for the fiscal year just 
ended, about twice that of ten years ago plus 14,456 hens. 
Our production of trout totalled 1,667*706 fish including 
174,401 received from federal sources. This totals about 
a third of a million more than ten years ago. It is 
important to note that both records have been set with 
no increases in personnels at lower unit costs, and by 
facilities which are many years old and in need of repair 
and modernization. 




On January 4, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
lost a dedicated, unusually accomplished public servant 
in the unfortunate death of Fisheries and Game Director 
Charles L. McLaughlin. 

On March 1 of this year we were extremely fortunate 
to secure as director; Francis W. Sargent, an experienced 
administrator. Sargent has been Director of Marine 
Fisheries and Commissioner of Natural Resources in 
Massachusetts, and returned to Massachusetts from a four- 
year assignment as Director of the Outdoor Recreation 
Resources Review Commission in Washington, D. C. He 
immediately instituted, with the Board's approval, three 
separate studies of key problems affecting the Division. 



-3- 



■ i 



/, 






They are: A management analysis of the license 
structure, issuance, and sales procedures; a review of 
the salary and organizational structure of the Division; 
and a study of the needs and possible methods of 
increased land acquisition. 

The first of these, the license study, has been 
completed and a report filed with the Board o We have 
already adopted the first recommendation of this study, 
which is to convert our 14 different printed license 
forms to two simpler, basic forms. We anticipate an 
estimated savings of nearly $10,000 a year in printing costs 
from this one step. Other recommendations to improve the 
public service, through making these licenses more easily 
available to the public and by other changes in the 
licensing system, are under consideration. 

The study of Division salaries and organization is 
extremely important. The Division has been steadily 
losing its best professional personnel to other agencies 
both state and federal. We are faced with making replace- 
ments in key positions without any reservoir of professional 
personnel on which to draw. We have found that Division 
salaries are below the national average for similar 
positions in other states and extremely far below those 
for similar positions in the Federal service. 

The problem of acquisition of land for public 
recreation, fishing and hunting access is the subject 
of the third study. This is perhaps the most difficult 
of the three studies, and is just beginning to get underway. 
While the need for such areas is almost axiomatic, 
possible methods of financing their acquisition and 
development within the financial capabilities of the 
Division are not so easy to determine. 

Legislation Under Consideration 

Two major items for legislation are being considered 
for submission to the 1963-64 General Court. The first 
of these will be a proposal to change appropriate sections 
of Chapter 131 to provide authority for the Director of 
the Division of Fisheries and Game to appoint additional 
outlets for the sale of hunting, fishing, sporting and 
trapping licenses. 

It has been determined that Massachusetts is the 
sole state in the nation which does not sell even one 
of its various classifications of sportsmen's licenses 
through outlets other than town and city clerks and its 
main office in Boston. While the town and city clerks 
have performed and are performing excellent service, 
many of them frequently arising at early hours to provide 
licenses, your Board believes that additional outlets 
will not only help relieve some of this pressure on the 
clerks but will also improve the public service by making 

-4- 



WHM 






licenses more readily available, and serve also to secure 
some of the revenue that is now being lost through failure 
to accomodate the casual license buyer. 

The second item concerns disposition of the game 
farm at Marshfield. This farm is many years old and 
was originally intended for the rearing of waterfowl, 
rather than pheasants. It is extremely limited in land area, 
without room for expansion or improvement. In fact it is on 
the main street of the town, practically in the center. 
Your Board believes that it is an uneconomic operation 
without promise for the future, and proposes to dispose 
of the property. The annual production of this farm 
and its permanent personnel can be readily absorbed 
elsewhere in the Division without loss and in fact at 
considerable savings. 

The Board wishes to express its sincere appreciation 
to all personnel of the Division for their continued 
exemplary performance of duties, and wishes also to 
express its appreciation to the Governor, Executive 
Council, General Court, and to those other departments, 
agencies, members of public information media and the 
general public who have assisted and supported our programs 
in the past year. 

Board Personnel 

Mr. Roger D. Williams, Natick, was re-elected 
Chairman, and Mr. Bert B. Nietupski, Hampden, was re-elected 
Secretary, at the meeting on March 21, 1963, at Westboro 
Field Headquarters. 

The term of Mr. Harper L. Gerry, Shelburne Falls, 
expired October 6, 1962. 

Mr. fforry C. Darling, East Bridgewater, was 
appointed to the Board by Governor Volpe on December 
13, 1962. 

Respectfully submitted, 







S/Roger D. Williams, Chairman 
Bert B. Nietupski, Secretary 
F. Stanley Mikelk 
Harry C. Darling 



-5- 



H 



GAME PROGRAM 



The bulk of the game research and management program 
is financed 75 percent by Federal Aid Funds (Pittman- Robertson )• 
Propagation and other management activities are financed 
entirely by state funds. 

Feder al Aid Pro.iects 

W-^rD Statewide Developmen t Pro.lect 

This project is devoted to the development of our 
wildlife management areas. The program was similar to that 
of past years with emphasis on making the areas accessible to 
the hunter, encouraging reproduction of native game species 
and providing suitable sites for stocking our game farm 
pheasants and quail. This is our biggest project and occupies 
our district game management crews for about 60 percent of 
their time. Specific activities, well reported in previous 
years, were divided between maintenance of established 
buildings, bridges, roads, signs, etc. and the development 
of the land area itself. 

Multiple use of these areas has been encouraged 
during periods of the year other than the hunting season. 
Field trials were held both for bird and rabbit dogs. Target 
ranges have been established on some areas and shooting is 
allowed by permit. Camping has not been encouraged but large 
groups of Boy Scouts have been accommodated for Council 
Camporees. More and more thought is being given to multiple 
use where it will not interfere with the original intent of the 
areas. 

W-35-R Game Population Tre nd and Harvest Sur vey 

Statewide Ga me Harv est: Fifteen hundred postal cards 
representing 1.3 percent of licensed hunters were sent out to 
determine the kill of small game and deer. There was a 79.0 
percent return of questionnaires. Data were expanded to 
include the total estimated hunters. Each report equals 9#.0 
hunters. 



The majority (65.9%) of 
and 70 percent were successful. 



licensees contacted did hunt 



The kill of pheasants, grouse, quail, white hare, 
cottontail rabbit, raccoon, gray squirrel, and black ducks 
declined from I960. The kill of woodcock and other ducks 
increased. 



-6- 



,nV 



In regard to hunting pressure (preference)* 
pheasants were first, followed by grouse, cottontail 
rabbit, white hare, gray squirrel, woodcock, other ducks, 
black duck, quail and raccoon. 

For hunter success, those taking raccoon were first, 
followed in order by cottontail rabbit, gray squirrel, 
pheasant, black duck, grouse, white hare, woodcock, other 
duck, and quail • 

A majority (69.5%) of gunners reported hunting only 
on private lands, while $.& percent hunted only state 
management areas and 21.7 percent hunted both. 

The expanded sample indicated that there were 
52,03& deer hunters who reported a mean kill of ,0753 or 
total calculated kill of 3>91& deer. The reported kill 
directly after the season was 2,533 which is about 65 
percent of the calculated figure. In the past, it has 
been estimated that the reported kill was only about 
60 percent of the actual kill. The calculated figure 
(3»9lS), therefore, may be very close to the true kill. 

Statewidg__Deer Harvest: The 1962 reported deer kill 



figure T2,53<5y was 34 percent less than a ten-year average 
figure (3,371). A total of 2,53& deer was reported taken 
by hunters. Of these, 1,269 were males and 1,264 were 
females, plus 5 which were reported with no sex indicated. 
The even sex ratio of 1.0 males to 1.0 females has been 
a constant figure for 15 years. The gunners accounted 
for 2,516 white tails while the archers collected 22 deer. 
The reason for the reduced kill figure for 1962 was not 
determined. Kill figures for ten towns surrounding 
the 100,000 acre Quabbin watershed showed that this area 
has little influence on the statewide deer kill. 

Mortality data compiled for a ten-year period 
(1953 to 1962) for deer killed by means other than hunting 
show that an average of 5$7 deer are removed annually 
from the herd. Of the 5#7 deer, an average of 376 (64%) 
are killed by cars, 99 (17%) are killed by dogs, and 112 
(19%) are disposed of by drowning, illegal kill, injury, 
etc. 

Deer Herd Co mposition: During the 1962 (shotgun) 
season, a total of 657 deer were processed at the deer 
checking stations. These deer represent a 26 percent 
sample of the 2,53$ deer reported killed. A decline of 
546 deer was noted from the 1961 kill figure of 3>0#4 deer. 

A summary of age data shows the deer kill was 
composed of 2S percent fawns, 25 percent in the 1-1/2 year 
class, 19 percent in the 2-1/2 year class, 14 percent in the 
3-1/2 year class and the remaining 14 percent in the 4-1/2 
and older classes. This is comparable to the harvest of 
previous years. 

-7- 



An average male fawn weighed &3 pounds while the 
average 3- h year old male weighed 133 pounds. The weight of 
bucks increases roughly 40 to 50 pounds per year up to age 
3-i years. Eight to ten pounds are added annually by males from 
3-1 "to 5-i years. The average 5-i year old male weighs 200 pounds 

Female fawn weights averaged 7$ pounds. The does 
showed the greatest weight gain during the first year, adding 
roughly 40 pounds and weighing 117 pounds at 1-i years old. 
Weight gains in subsequent years are relatively slow, averaging 
about three pounds per year. The average 5-i year (and older) 
female weighed 146 pounds. 

Shotgun and ammunition size data showed that 69 
percent of the successful hunters used a 12-gauge gun; 26 percent 
of the hunters used a 16-gauge ; the 20-gauge gun was used by 4*5 
percent; and .5 percent used . 410, 2# and 10-gauge guns. 

Fifty-four percent of the hunters used slugs to kill 
their deer. Those using buckshot amounted to 26 percent and 20 
percent used both slugs and buckshot. 



Waterfowl 
percent 



Ce nsus : The total 1963 waterfowl count was 
down 13 percent from 1962. Black ducks were down IS percent. 
All puddle ducks were down 17 percent. Scoters, eiders and old 
squaws were down 7 percent. Other diving ducks were down 17 
percent. Canada geese were down 20 percent. In every case, 
except baldpate and scaup, the 1963 count was above the nine- 
year average figure (1955-1963). 

Mourn ing; Dove Census: The 1962 spring call count 

produced a breeding index of 11. There was an average of 5.4 

doves heard per route. The 1961 index was 9 with an average of 
4.3 doves per route. 

The fall count resulted in fewer birds seen than in 1961 
when the figures were disappointingly low. The maximum number 
seen on any management area was 400 and the majority of 
observations were less than 100. Counts on private land produced 
even fewer than on management areas. 

Wood Duck Nesting Success and Brood Survival : During 
January of 1962,"* all of the old nesting boxes at Great" Meadows 
Refuge were removed and 100 new boxes erected at previously marked 
sites throughout the marsh. Despite this refurbishment of the 
boxes, the nesting usage failed to show any improvement this 
year. Out of 97 boxes available, there were 43 nesting attempts 
of which 32 were successful, producing 322 ducklings. On the 
statewide sample check, the usage was 35 percent compared to 37 
percent in 1961 and 54 percent average for a seven-year period 
prior to 1961. 




-8- 



»v 



A trapping and banding program was carried out at 
Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge during the month of 
September 1962. A total of 144 individual wood ducks were . 
captured. The trapped sample consisted of 46 immature s 
and 9# adults. This is the most dismal juvenile to adult 
ratio ever encountered at Great Meadows and is symptomatic of 
the declining population. 

Samples were taken at Great Meadows Refuge for 
spectrophotometry analysis to determine if insecticide 
residues were present. Five wood ducks, ten soil samples, 
a golden shiner and a bullfrog were collected. The ducks 
and frog tested were negative but the golden shiner 
showed 14«2 p. p.m. of DDT. The soil samples have not yet 
been analyzed. 

Experimental Turkey Stocking: A wild turkey 
restoration experiment was instituted in Massachusetts in 
I960 with the objective of determining if a huntable 
population could be established. Twenty-two wild turkeys 
were released in Quabbin Reservation, c r intral Massachusetts, 
during I960 and 1961. Reproduction in 1961 resulted in 4# 
poults surviving until September 1961 when the total 
population was estimated to number 62 turkeys. Only 17 
turkeys could be located in the spring of 1962. Reproduction 
in 1962 amounted to 34 poults surviving until September 
1962 when the total population was estimated to be 50 
turkeys. Fifteen turkeys could be located in the spring of 
1963. 

Twelve wild turkeys were on Mount Washington in the 
spring of 1962. Over 20 poults hatched during the summer. 
Fifteen turkeys were moved to October Mountain State Forest 
during the summer of 1962. Twelve turkeys remained in 
the spring of 1963 . 

No more than five turkeys were in October Mountain 
State Forest in the spring of 1962. Seventeen additional 
turkeys were released during the summer of 1962. Two to 
seven turkeys remained in the spring of 1963* 

Sixteen turkeys released near Otis, Massachusetts 
in the fall of 196I evidently failed to establish a 
population. 

U tilization of Public Hunt in g G ro unds : Hunter usage 
on eleven areas was estimated at §0,000 man days in 1962 
which is a 7 percent increase over 1961. On ten areas 
which are comparable, usage in 1962 was up 21 percent over 
I960 and up 30 percent over 1959. The majority of hunters 
came from within a 20-mile radius of the management areas. 
Hunting pressure during the week was noticeably heavier 
on days after areas were stocked. A chjck of multiple 
use from April to October showed considerable usage 
falling into 29 different categories. None of these 

-9- 






r ,>.*; 



uses interferes with the original intent of the area 

and does not increase the work load of project personnel. 

Activities Sponsored. .Entire!^ 

Stocking; Surplus pheasant and quail brood stock 
was released in May and June, 
were stocked at twelve weeks 
cocks were released the week 
season on private lands open 
and quail of both sexes were 
on wildlife management areas, 



Cocks and hens of the year 
of age in August . Adult 
before and during the upland 
to hunting. Cock pheasants 
released throughout the season 



In connection with the Sportsmen ? s Club Pheasant 
Rearing Program, district personnel inspected club rearing 
pens and delivered pheasants to the 50 clubs participating. 

White hare were released after the season throughout 
the state to supplement brood stock. 

White Hare Study; Tag returns of 2,442 imported hare 
liberated during 19&2-63 in Massachusetts covers were 
tabulated. Only 60 tags were returned which represents a 
2.4 percent return on a state-wide basis. 

From the small sample of tag returns (25) it was 
possible to show that 14 or 56 percent of the liberated 
hare moved two or more miles from the release sites 
and generally in a northerly direction. Eleven or 44 
percent were shot within two miles of the release site. 

A box trap census and hunter survey indicated that 
native hare had a 41 percent survival from 1962 to 1963 
contrasted with a three percent survival for imported hare. 

After the close of the 1963 hare hunting season on 
February 5, 2,215 tagged hare were liberated. Of these, 1,199 
were conditioned or held on the game farms for an average of 
22 days. The remaining 1,016 were released on the date of 
arrival. To date, conditioning of hare has been an added 
expense and has not yet proven to be beneficial to survival. 

Two in-season experimental releases (1962-1963) of 
30 hare each have shown that hunters do not shoot out a 
hare population. 

The Division plans to stock hare in 1964. 



-10- 



Damage Complaints: District personnel handled 
an increasing number of "beaver complaints from both town 
officials and individuals. Complaints were solved by 
trapping and transplanting, issuing permits to destroy 
or destroying by dynamiting. 

Rabbit damage complaints were answered by supplying 
live traps and transplanting those taken. Advice was 
offered to many on how to cope with this frequent problem. 

Checking Stations: Five beaver pelt checking stations 
were maintained for two days at the close of the trapping 
season. A total of 5$9 pelts was examined. 

Surveys: Three woodcock consus routes were run to 
determine the spring breeding index. Woodcock wing 
envelopes were distributed to hunters for the collections 
of wings from fall-shot birds. 

Field Trials: Improvements were made and assistance 
given for running trials on the Westboro and Crane Wildlife 
Management Areas. 

Community Conservation Planning: Considerable 
information and assistance was given to professional town 
planners and town conservation commissions and school groups. 
Many interagency conferences were attended to assist 
cooperative programs with the Soil Conservation Service, 
Corps of Army Engineers and the United States Fish and 
Wildlife Service. 

Game Bird) Propagation: Of major importance was the 
severe we^aTTnlTrconditions during the month of February 
which caused extensive damage to our game farms, especially 
at the Wilbraham Game Farm where heavy, wet snow destroyed 
the majority of the covered pheasant pens. This resulted 
in costly repairs and replacements. Nevertheless total 
pheasant production for the 1963 season will not suffer. 

The last fiscal year showed an all-time high release of 
62,217 cock pheasants and 14,456 hen pheasants. 

Much progress has been made in converting many old oil 
brooders to modern gas brooders. In an effort to improve 
the hatchability and live ability of our present brood stock, 
new bloodlines were introduced through the cooperation of 
the New Jersey Division of Fish and Game. It should be 
noted that this is an experiment in an effort to improve, 
if possible, our present ringneck pheasant strain. 

During this period, white hare were again held at 
three of the game farms for conditioning prior to release. 

Other routine maintenance was conducted. 






-11- 



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.\* 




FISHERIES PROGRAM 



During the 1963 fiscal year the evaluation of fisheries 
management practices was continued. A significant amount of 
time was spent on testing new techniaues and the further 
development of basic tools. Among these were an assessment 
of the practicability of aerial application of fish control 
chemicals, the sophistication of electrical collection gear, 
the refinement of field water analysis and the further 
testing of selective fish eradication chemicals. 

The major emphasis of the fish management section was 
directed toward providing immediate sport fishing. The 
reclamation program (Table 1) was continued and trout 
stocking was implemented in conjunction with hatchery 
personnel, A study to determine areas suitable for trout 
both in streams and ponds was carried out by all fisheries 
units. During this period, 34»700 large -mouth bass were 
stocked in rehabilitated waters, as were 2,700 chain pickerel- 
These fish were procured from the Merrill Pond and Harold 
Parker rearing systems. Twenty-five thousand fish were 
restocked in the systems for the 1964 season. 

In addition to the aformentioned field activities 
and the following described major projects, it should be 
noted that District personnel perform a multitude of so 
called "trouble -shooting" tasks that are in many ways 
routine and yet which are in fact of great importance in 
fulfilling the duties and obligations of this Division to 
both the resource and the sportsmen. Among these are the 
constant efforts on the part of field units to further the 
development of access areas; their contributions to keeping 
the sporting public informed on matters vital to their 
sport; the constant checking and reporting of fish kills 
caused by numerous factors; and many mundane maintenance 
and administrative tasks that preserve the efficiency of 
the physical plants. 

Creel Census, Activities : 

During the last year regular fisherman interviews 
were continued on the eight ponds set up as an investigation 
unit. At Quabbin Reservoir a creel census was carried on 
at the three launching areas. The data for the previous 
year was analyzed and prepared in report form. During this 
period 64,000 trout fingerlings were stocked in the reservoir, 
as were 3&,650 marked yearling brown trout, 7,400 yearling rain- 
bows and 53,213 fingerling lake trout. This phase of the 
project will continue in order that the most profitable 
stocking rates, time and species combinations can be obtained. 






•13- 



M 



Four trout ponds on Cape Cod and three warm- 
water ponds in central Massachusetts were subjected to 
a creel census during the past year, including the 
ice-fishing season. 

Pesticide S tudies; 

Laboratory facilities at Westboro have been expanded 
to meet the growing demand for readily available analysis 
of polluted water, with the major emphasis on pesticides. 
The U. S. Department of Public Health increased its grant 
to the Division to $15,000.00 per year. During this past 
year the Massachusetts Audubon Society provided the 
Division with a gas chromatography laboratory for the rapid 
screening and identification of pesticide residues. The 
University of Massachusetts contributed monies and equipment, 
as did the New England Interstate Water Pollution Control 
Commission, the Connecticut River Watershed Council, the 
Farmington River Watershed Association, and the Westfield 
River Watershed Association. 

Water Quality Surveys: 

During this period a state-wide project aimed at 
determining thereasons for variable stocking success of 
fresh-water fishes was undertaken. There is reason to 
believe that this variance is related directly to the 
chemical characteristics of the water stocked. Since a 
large proportion of fisheries funds in Massachusetts are 
expended on stocking activities, it is important that 
factors which have a bearing on stocking survival be 
thoroughly investigated. 

Copies of all technical reports concerning any 
phase of fisheries research projects are available through 
the Division. 



-14- 



TABLE # 1 
TROUT WATERS RECLAIMED JULY 1, 1962 - JUNE 30, 1963 



Pond 

Chi cope e Reservoir 
Factory Hollow Pond 
Mill River 
Fearing Pond 
Rf>cky Pond 
Lout Pond 
Stiles Pond 
Pleasant Pond 
Lake Massapoag * 



Town 


Area in Acres 


Chicopee 


29 


Amherst 


S 


Amherst 




Plymouth 


24 


Plymouth 


20 


Plymouth 


IS 


Boxford 


61 


Wenham 


23 


Sharon 


353 



Warm-water Ponds Reclaimed 



Lake Snipatuit - 


Rochester 


710 


Long Pond 


Rochester 


33 


Widgeon Pond 


Plymouth 


24 


Sassaquin Pond 


New Bedford 


34 


Warner Pond 


Hadley 


63 


Campus Pond 


Amherst 


2 



* Two-story management 



-15- 



Trout Propagation 

Trout releases from the five state fish hatcheries, 
including additions from the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 
totalled 1,667,706 trout, of which Massachusetts liberated 
1,493,305 trout. 

The federal hatcheries at Pittsford, Vermont; 
Nashua, New Hampshire; Hartsville and North Attleboro, 
Massachusetts, released 174,401 trout to areas designated 
by this Division. 



In November, 1962, we received 200,000 lake trout 
eggs from the New York Conservation Department in exchange 
for eyed brook trout eggs. These lake trout eggs were 
reared at our Montague and Sunderland Hatcheries and the 
ressulting fry were stocked in the Quabbin Reservoir. 



We obtained 51#,000 early brown trout eggs which 
were taken from breeders kept under artificial lighting from 
the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Hatchery in Cortland, 
New York. The results of these early eggs will be compared 
with our stock for future consideration. 

Water Res ources 

We have found it advisable to check temperatures more 
closely to show the water resources at each station. Graphs 
of daily air and water temperatures are being compiled to 
give us a better understanding of growth potential. As a 
result of the extremely cold winter, some of our hatcheries 
failed to obtain normal growth in the brown trout species. 
Lack of precipitation during spring and summer greatly reduced 
the supply of water, necessitating the constant use of 
pumps. 



Trout Coloration 

An experiment for brightening colors in trout was 
set up at the Sunderland Hatchery using canthaxanthin (a 
synthetic coloring material). This product had been used 
successfully in coloring broilers when supplemented by yellow 
corn and dehydrated alfalfa meal. We were able to procure 
ten grams of canthaxanthin in beadlet form which we had 
incorporated into a medium-sized pellet at a 5 mg/lb level by 
our feed manufacturer. Three separate lets of 3,000 
each brook trout fingerlings 3-J* average length and each 
with independent water supplies were set up on October IS, 
1962. The first group labeled A was fed canthaxanthin, group 
B acted as a control and group C was fed paprika at a three 
percent level. Our photography department took slides of 
fish selected at random from each group in the beginning when 

-16- 



*:?.■>*• 



the experiment was set up, and then again on January 15th, 
March 14th and April 1st. Production sheets were 
maintained to record growth as well as visible color change. 
It was noted that group A, containing canthaxanthin, showed 
a slight increase in growth over groups B and C. After six 
months research there was no visible color change using 
canthaxanthin. 

Color research was continued at the Montague 
Hatchery using paprika containing 194 mgs. calculated total 
carotene per pound, incorporated into pellets at a three 
percent level. Observations indicate that the brown trout 
converted the yellows in paprika equally as well as brooks 
and rainbows transformed the red xanthophyll (a yellow 
vegetable pigment, C40H66O2, occurring in grain or leaves; 
oxygenated derivatives of carotene hydrocarbons). 

W armwater Trout 

Personnel at the Palmer Hatchery have been keeping 
brook trout in shallow ponds during the summer when high 
water temperatures prevail. These brook trout have produced 
excellent eggs and the resulting fry and fingerlings will be a 
welcome addition to the pond stocking program. 

Change-Over at Sunderland 

Sunderland recently completed a full year of producin 
only yearlings for distribution. All brood stock and two- 
year-olds were liberated in the spring of 1962 with the 
understanding that the hatchery personnel would have three 
years to completely sterilize the hatchery to eradicate a 
disease problem. This program was instituted on the advice 
of the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Disease Laboratory 
in Leetown, West Virginia. However, the hatchery personnel 
were unable to complete the sterilization program and are once 
again raising two-year-old of 9"+ size which will be stocked 
in the spring of 1964. The holding of 100,000 yearling trout 
which would have been liberated in the spring of 1963, and 
the fact that all trout were liberated in 19o2 accounts for 
the drop in poundage from this station. 



Construction 

Limited cons- 
Palmer and Sunderland, 

Sandwich and Sutton. Six concrete raceways #0' x 10 * x 3 V with 
connecting drains were 
wells were constructed 
series of eight wooden 
the use of a big open 
A 10'* transite sewer 1: 
upper ponds when being 



struction was carried on at Montague, 
with the bulk of funds going to 



completed at Sandwich and several new 
to supply these pools. At Sutton a 
raceways were constructed to replace 

pond to allow better hatchery management. 

.ine was installed to divert water from 
sterilized. 



-17- 



TROUT DISTRIBUTION IN MASSACHUSETTS FROM STATE AND FEDERAL HATCHERIES 

JULY 1, 1962 TO JUNE 30, 1963 



BROOKS BROWNS RAINBOWS 

Under 6 " Over 6 " Under 6 " Over 6 " Under 6 " Over 6 " TOTAL TROUT 
161,679 554,243 221,775 418,023 139,650 122,326 1,667,706 



Total Trout Distributed 6-9" 753,044 

Total Trout Distributed 9" plus 167,157 

Total Federal Trout Distributed 6" plus 174,401 

Total Catchables (6 yr plus) • 1,094,602 

Total Fingerlings (6 !? minus) 573,104 

Grand Total 1,667,706 

■ '.■ Bssaa sasaqaBs saa asnq tssaata fssssssassssmasBaam eaa ■ t an , ea m bc— ■ ■■■ ■ 

STATION POUNDAGE 

STATION TOTAL LBS . 

Montague 66,225 

Palmer 30,745 

Sandwich 71,194 

Sunderland 67,128 

Sutton 22,641 

State Poundage 257,933 

North Attleboro 10,466 

Hartsville 11,274 

Nashua, New Hampshire 12,921 

Pittsford, Vermont 5,o36 

Federal Poundage ♦ 40 , 497 

Grand Total 296,430 



(This table does not show trout retained for brood stock) 



fa 



LAND ACQUISITION PROGRAM 



During the past year leases for the continued use of 
a strip of land along the three branches of the Westfield 
River, the Farmington and Squannacook Rivers were renewed. 
Where possible, new leases were obtained. There was a natural 
loss of leased land along the Middle Branch of the Westfield 
River due to the taking of land by the Federal Government 
for the Little ville Flood Control project. 

Approximately seventy-five acres were added to 
the Wildlife management area known as West Meadows, located 
in West Bridgewater. Approximately 130 acres were added to 
the Peru wildlife area and a sizeable tract was added to 
the Phillipston area. 

At the close of the year signed options for the 
purchase of two sizeable tracts of land were held by the 
Division. Both of these areas will be beneficial and important 
in the overall plan of the Division to provide adequate fish 
and wildlife management areas throughout the state. 

Several other possible acquisitions were checked into 
some feeirg considered unsuitable either because of their size 
and the difficulties which would be encountered in adding more 
to the original area or because of price. 

The Division is trying to operate in a highly 
competitive land market. If it hopes to continue to add to 
the areas now under its control or add new areas, more funds 
will have to be made available for this purpose. 

The public fishing grounds program which has been 
in operation since 1932 has proven to be a sound and beneficial 
operation to the licensed fishermen of the state as well as 
the landowner. The landowners who have, through the years, 
leased their land to the Division certainly merit a well 
deserved thank you from all fishermen. Their compensation is 
small and their headaches many. Let us hope that they, in 
the years to come, will continue to cooperate with the Division 
and let us also hope that all fishermen will show their 
appreciation by making every effort to respect and protect 
the rights and property of these public spirited people. 

We regret that we cannot give a glowing report 
of land acquisition because this Division has never received 
sufficient funds for this purpose. We have been able to 
acquire several parcels by acquisition and the use of others 
through agreements wi£h other agencies, but the program is 



-IS- 



much too far behind the increasing need. The time is long 
past when the Commonwealth can safely ignore the rapidly 
increasing demand for public recreational areas and 
particularly for wildlife management areas and access sites 
to our ponds and streams. Hunter usage of wildlife 
management areas, for example, increased seven percent last 
year and 21 percent over I960. 

An intensive study of this problem is currently 
underway. While the need for such areas is so obvious as 
to be axiomatic, possible methods of financing their 
acquisition and development within the financial capabilities 
of the Division are not so easy to determine. 












-19- 



MASSACHUSETTS COOPERATIVE WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNIT 



The new Natural Resources building, known as 
Holdsworth Hall, neared completion during the reporting 
period. The new facilities for research and teaching 
wildlife and fisheries biology probably are unexcelled in 
the country. 

Wild ; Turkey Pro.je ct ; 

A very severe winter caused considerable 
mortality among turkey flocks in central Massachusetts 
during the past year. However, surviving birds should 
represent the hardiest stock, and production was 
excellent during the spring. High survival of poults 
has been recorded. At least one brood was reared on 
October Mountain. The relatively tame flock on Mt. 
Washington apparently has had poor production this year. 

A number of very reliable reports indicate that 
some turkeys in the central part of the state have dispersed 
to other possible ranges outside of Quabbin Reservation. 
Actual estimates of number can only be made after snowfall* 

New England Cottontail Study; 

An experimental study of the productivity of the 
Eastern and New England Cottontail on an island in Quabbin 
Reservoir is still in process. A number of each species 
were released during the spring and there has been production 
from both. 

C a dwe ll Forest Areaj_ 

Tabulation and cost of the most efficient method 
of clearing areas in second-growth hardwood forest of poor 
quality has been carried out. Definite effect on wildlife must 
await further clearings and planting. This is a long-range 
project. 

Pesticide-Wildlif e Pro ject : 

Laboratory experiments feeding various doses of DDT 
to a captive colony of Towhees as well as intensive field 
collections of this species in sprayed areas have continued. 
Initial findings suggest that migratory passerine birds 
are more vulnerable to DDT in the spring than in the fall. 



-20- 



Chemosterilant Studies: 



Dr. David K. Wetherbee and Dr. Bernard C. Wentworth 
have conducted basic research on the effect of chemicals, 
dyes, radiation and virus disease as agents to control 
populations of nuisance bird species. One dye proved 
effective in inhibiting hatching of Herring Gull eggs on Milk 
Island. Wetherbee *s work has received national recognition, 
not only for initial accomplishments but because of the 
pioneering aspects of his research. This is entirely 
supported by the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife and 
the Atomic Energy Commission. 



Woodcoc k Manu script; 

The second draft of a woodcock manuscript has 

been edited and reviewed by a number of biologists, and a 

third draft is being completed for what is hoped to be 
a final review. 



21- 




INFORMATION AND EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Like modern conservation agencies in every state, 
the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Game recognizes 
that public understanding and support of, and participation 
in conservation measures are basic necessities. 

As do its sister agencies in every state, this 
Division uses publications, news services, films, radio, 
television, exhibits, youth programs and personal contact 
to serve both the public *s need for information as well as 
the Divisions need for public understanding, cooperation 
and support <, The program is planned and directed within 
the information and education section and implemented 
primarily through the section and the district wildlife 
managers. All personnel of the division are expected to 
participate regularly in information and education activities. 

Following are enumerated activities of this 
program for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1963: 

News Ser vices 

A total of 151 separate stories, (five more than 
last year) were released as follows: statewide releases 
from I&E-&4; television news strips from I&E-16; area 
releases by district managers- 51 • In addition, almost 
constant contact with media representatives by I&E and 
district personnel resulted in a minimum of 35 feature 
articles outside of rod and gun columns. Assistance to 
free lance authors was given in the case of several national 
magazine articles. 

Massachusetts Wildlife 

Circulation of this bi-monthly free magazine showed 
a net gain for the reporting period of 5,443 subscribers, 
with a mailing list at the close of the reporting period 
of 42,119. Circulation growth, entirely by personal request 
of the individual desiring the magazine, continues at a rate 
of over 900 new names per issue. Additional methods of 
mailing list control are currently under study. 

Audio-Visual Aids 



I&E prepared and presented a total of 40 television 
programs, including 16 " Dateline Boston'' half-hour shows, 
30 ''Critter Corner" 15 minute shows, and four special shows. 
The section also supplied film used on the CBS network 
special show ''Silent Spring of Rachel Carson.''' 

The audio-visual supervisor was the only producer 
of a public service program asked by channel five to load 
a production session at a seminar held by channsl five for 
public service television personnel. 

-22- 






A number of radio recordings and other interviews 
were made by various personnel. 

The fifteen titles carried in the film loan library- 
were booked a total of 741 times before 59, 280 viewers. New 
films added during the year included "Our Wildlife Heritage" 
and a copy of the "Silent Spring" CBS show. Film usage 
this year was nearly double that of previous years, made 
possible by the addition of a clerk to the audio-visual 
office. Work was begun on a film on pheasant propagation. 

Seven exhibits at sportsmen's shows and fairs 
were participated in by district personnel in cooperation 
with I&E. 

Publications 

The publications inventory has been deliberately 
exhausted, to make way for replacement in the future by a 
limited number of specific titles of more widespread public 
information value. At the close of the reporting period, 
work was underway on a new publication on the pheasant 
in Massachusetts. 

The current year's Annual. Report^ Stocked Waters 
List, Fish and Game Laws Abstracts. Closed i Towns~Tist. " 
and Migratory Game Regulations were compiled and published 
by I&E. 

Tours and Demonstrations 



The Northeast District conducted three "Show Me" 
trips with members of the press, a field demonstration of 
fisheries activities for the Massachusetts Federation of 
Sportsmen's Clubs, and a demonstration of electric shocking 
equipment for a town conservation commission and forestry 
commission. 

The Central District took press representatives 
on three field trips, conducted two "show me" tours for 
sportsman's officials, participated in a three-day 
conservation education program for 500 scouts of the Mohegan 
Council, demonstrated trout stocking for the Mahar Regional 
High School rod and gun club, and demonstrated use of hunting 
dogs for the Leominster Jr. Sportsmen. 

The Western District made two tours with members of th, 
press and conducted three "show me" tours for the public. 

The Southeastern District made six tours with 
members of the press and conducted three field demonstrations 
on fisheries management for sportsmen's groups and boy scouts. 






I&E conducted a number 
groups of high school youths and 
connection with career guidance. 

-23- 



of special programs for 
guidance counsellors in 



District personnel attended or participated 
in 327 meetings of sportsmen 9 s groups, civic and fraternal 
organizations, youth and church groups, etc., besides 
numerous unrecorded meetings with individuals and various 
local groups to advise directly on wildlife management matters. 

Both I&E personnel and others throughout the 
Division participated in numerous unrecorded meetings as 
usual. 

The I&3 chief served during the year as secretary- 
treasurer of the American Association for Conservation 
Information, and was elected 2nd Vice President at the annual 
meeting in Nebraska in June. 

Conservation Education 






The I&E chief continued to assist in functions 
of the State Advisory Committee For Conservation Education. 
The I&E section works closely with the supervisor of 
conservation education in the Department of Education. 

The 14th annual session of the Massachusetts Junior 
Conservation Camp was conducted by I&E with the help of 
other Division personnel at Thompson ¥ s Pond, Spencer. A 
total of 123 campers were graduated. A 100-question test 
was devised and administered to the campers, and later 
administered to a control group of youth of the same age who 
had not attended this camp. The average scores of campers 
were about 20 percent higher than those of the control group, 
and the camper*s scores ranged from 96 percent to 45 percent with 
the majority in the &0 ? s. 

Sportfishing Award Program 

The I&E section inaugurated the Massachusetts 
Freshwater Sportfish Awards program with the beginning of 
fishing season last spring. Under this program, anglers 
reporting catches which equal or exceed specified size 
or weight minimums are awarded a bronze pin memorializing 
their catch. Plans are to award a special pi-i •forV't-he*- fyyp 
fish in each category at the end of the calendar year. 
All qualifying entries become part of the official records. 

Through this program, the angler receives official 
proof of his catch, but more important, the Division is able 
to establish a record of the better than average fish caught 
in Massachusetts. The record is useful both for rranagement 
purposes and to generally promote fishing in Massachusetts. 
Extensive and continous publicity is given the program and 
its results throughout the calendar year. 



-24- 



Immediate reaction to the new program was 
evidenced, with numerous reports of surprisingly large 
fish coming in by the end of the reporting period. For 
example, a 12-pound bass and a 12-pound trout were among 
the reports recorded by June 30. For the first time, 
official records are in existence to demonstrate that 
Massachusetts produces fishing of a quality that requires 
no apologies* 

Miscellaneous 

I&E continued to handle all editing, printing 
and publishing functions for the Division. 

Approximately 19>000 "Safety Zone' 1 posters were 
distributed free to landowners by the districts and i&Eo 

Twenty towns have permitted erection of metal 
highway signs calling hunter's attention to the safety zone 
law. 



-25- 



- I V". Jjr J 






fc 



June 30, 1963 

GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 
How The Sportsmen's Dollar Was Spent 



ADMINISTRATION 

Administration 3304-01 

Fish and Game Board " 

Information - Education n 

FISHERIES MANAGMgNT 

Fish Hatcheries 3304-42 

Management 3304-42 
Striped Bass & Marine 

Fisheries Investigation 3304-46 

Fish Restoration Projects 3304-47* 

Management 3304-51 



WI LDLIFE MANAGEMENT 

Game Farms 
Management 
Wildlife Coop. Unit 
Wildlife Restoration 

LAND AC QUISIT ION 

LAW ENFORCEMENT 

Deer Damage 

Public Hunting Grounds 
Conservation Officers - 
Salaries & Expenses 



3304-51 
3304-51 
3304-44 
3304-53* 

3304-53* 



3303-05* 
3303-07 



$90,931.26 

1.225.00 $92,156.26 7-1/5^ 
63,933.40 5-1/3* 



101,073.73 

10,673.33 
26,225.13 
69,962. 



303,179.35 23-2/3% 



207,945.14 16-1/5% 



257,377.93 20-1/10' 
69,962.46 
7 932.59 
127^072!l0 204,967.15 16* 

2,500.00 1/5* 



9,323.63 
7,343.20 



1003-03 123,256.42 144,923.30 11-3/10J 



*Continuing Accounts 

Expenditures under: 

3304-46 

3304-47 

3304-53 
reimbursed 75$ by Federal Funds. 



$ 1,232,433.03 100* 



RESERVE IN INLAND FISHERIES AMD GAME FUND 
AS OF JUNE 30, 1963 - $ 232,754.46 



-26- 



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-27- 









SUMMARY OF FISH & GAME INCOME 



Fishing 9 Hunting & Trapping Licenses 

Special Licenses , Trap Registration & Tags 

Alien Gun Permits 

Rents 

Misc. Sales & Income 

Pittman-Robertson Federal Aid 

Dingell Johnson Federal Aid 

Court Fines 

Refunds Prior Year 

Archery Stamps 



$ 1,179^792.34 * 
5,412.61 ** 

94.50 

J* 
■' 3,412.00 

3,503-28 

62,333.40 
37,025.51 

5,362.00 
44.37 

4,661.60 



* See Detail Sheet #1 
## t» « >< &2. 



$ 1,307,696.61 



-23- 



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-29- 



DETAIL SHEET #2 

ANALYSIS OF SPECIAL LICENSES ISSUED UNDER SECTIONS 4$, 68A, 102-3- 
4-5-6-7 and 112-A, Chapter 131, G. L. during the FISCAL YEAR ENDED 
JUNE 30, 1963 



TYPE OF LICENSE 



NUMBER ISSUED 



RECEIPTS 



Trap Registrations: 
Initial 
Renewal 

Fur Buyers: 

Resident 

Taxidermists: 

Propagators: 

(Special Fish) 
Initial 
Renewal 

(Fish) 
Initial 
Renewal 

(Birds & Mammals) 
Initial 
Renewal 

(Dealers) 
Initial 
Renewal 
Additional 
Duplicate 

(Ind. Bird or Mammal) 
Initial 
Renewal 

Shiners for Bait: 

Field Trial Licenses: 

Quail for Training Dogs : 
Initial 
Renewal 



Tags : 



Game 
Fish 



Commercial Shooting Preserve Tags 

" ,s " Posters 

Commercial Shooting Preserves: 



632 


$ 276.50 


27 


270.00 


59 


295.00 


13 

197 


223.00 


14 
81 


313.00 


64 
305 


1,235.00 


1 

82 

386 

1 


637.50 


21 


47.50 


246 


* 

1,230.00 


7 


70.00 


11 
35 


160.00 


2,498 
17 , 8 46 




1,550 
485 


405.11 


5 


250.00 


TOTAL: $5,412.61 






.30- 



M^sHM! 






LEGISLATION PASSED 



The following laws directly affecting the 
Division of Fisheries and Game were enacted during the 
legislative session of 1963» 



CHAPTER 346, ACTS, 1963: 



CHAPTER 3&L, ACTS, 1963: 



CHAPTER 291, ACTS, 1963: 



CHAPTER 102, ACTS, 1963: 



An act relative to the placing 
of poison for the purpose of 
killing certain mammals and birds. 

An act providing that permits issued 
by the Director of the Division of 
Fisheries and Game for commercial 
shooting preserves shall expire 
annually. 

An act relative to the molesting, 
attacking or killing of deer by dogs 
in Hampshire County and the towns 
of Hardwick, Barre, Petersham and 
Athol in Worcester County „ 

An act providing that the Director 
of the Division of Fisheries and 
Game be a member, ex officio, of the 
Pesticide Board in the Department 
of Public Health. 



CHAPTER 107, ACTS, 1963: An act relative to the possession of 

certain firearms in motor boats. 



CHAPTER 509, ACTS, 1963: 



CHAPTER 45S, ACTS, 1963: 



An act directing the Director of 
the Division of Fisheries and Game 
to prepare plans and specifications 
for a Fish Hatchery at the Quabbin 
Reservoir. 

An act authorizing the Director of 
the Division of Fisheries and Game 
to take by eminent domain certain 
land in the town of Petersham and 
Phillipston. 



-31- 



LEGISLATION UNDER CONSIDERATION 



Under consideration for submission to the next 
General Court is an enabling act to provide for authority 
for the Director to appoint additional outlets for the 
sale of hunting, fishing, sporting and trapping licenses, 
Massachusetts is the only state in the nation which does not 
sell any of its licenses through outlets other than town 
and city clerks and its main office. It is believed that 
establishing additional outlets will improve the public 
service by making licenses easier to purchase, by easing the 
burden on present outlets, and by a potential increase in 
revenue. 



Also under consideration 
to provide for disposal of the Mar 
the highest possible financial 
Fisheries and Game. This farm 
It is no longer in a favorable 
of its product, and. being small 
larftT for expansion and by reason of being in the town 
center, it no longer is considered an economic operation 
Production and permanent personnel of the farm will be 
absorbed by other installations. 



is an enabling act 
hfield game farm at 
return to the Division of 
will be closed in the fall, 
location for the distribution 
and restricted by lack of 



•32- 



-»..*• 



RULES AND REGULATIONS PROMULGATED BY THE DIRECTOR OF 
FISHERIES AND GAME DURING FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1963, 
AND StJMMARY OF OUTSTANDING REGULATIONS, 



August 4 9 194$ • Rules and regulations for the artificial 
propagation and maintenance of fish. 

August 1+9 194&o Rules and regulations for the artificial 
propagation of birds and mammals. 

July 14s 1952. Rules and regulations for hunting with 
bows and arrows . 

August 12, 1953o Rules and regulations governing sale 
of protected fresh water fish by licensed dealers in 
Massachusetts,, 

March 26, 1954* Rules and regulations governing the 
display of sporting, hunting, fishing, and trapping licenses 
in Massachusetts, effective April 9, 1954. 

January 2&, 1955. Rules and regulations relative to 
public fishing grounds in Massachusetts. 

April 3 9 1956. Rules and regulations governing the 
taking of fish in interstate ponds lying between Massachusetts 
and New Hampshire, effective April 10, 1956. 

February 14* 1957. Rules and regulations relating to the 
taking of carp and suckers for the purpose of sale. 

February 15 » 1957. Rules and regulations relative to the 
tagging of deer in Massachusetts. 

October 20, 1959. Rules and regulations for public 
shooting grounds and wildlife management areas in Massachusetts. 

September 10, i960. Interstate fishing regulations on 
Wallum Lake. 

September 10, i960. Rules and regulations relating to the 
hunting of gray squirrels in Massachusetts. 

December 23, 1961. Rules and regulations regarding 
Lake Garfield in the town of Monterey. 

April 16, 1962. Rules and regulations relating to the 
taking of certain fish in Massachusetts. 

May 10, 1962. Rules and regulations relating to the 
taking of shad in the inland waters of the commonwealth. 



1963. 



August 24? 1962o Migratory game bird regulations 1962- 



October 1, 1962. Rules and regulations relating to hunting 
of pheasants, quail, and ruffed grouse in Massachusetts. 

-33- 



January 1, 1963. Rules and regulations relating 
to the hunting of deer in Massachusetts* 

January 1, 1963. Rules and regulations relating to the 
hunting of hares and rabbits in Massachusetts. 

June 1, 1963. Rules and regulations relating to the 
hunting and trapping of mammals in Massachusetts 






ij/t ;|; sj« >;c i\t 



-34- 




£ Oh 



MASSACHUSETTS .DIVISION 

OF 
FISHERIES AND DAME 




1964 



James M. Shepard, Director 
73 Tremont Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 



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Y////S 



His Excellency, Endicott Peabody, Governor 
of the Commonwealth, the Executive Council, 
the General Court, and the Board of the 
Division of Fisheries and Game. 



Sirs: 

I have the honor to submit herewith the 
Ninety-ninth Annual Rgpor-txcf. the: Division 
of Fisheries and Game, covering the fiscal 
year from July 1, 1963 to June 30, 1964. 



Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES M. SHEPARD 
DIRECTOR 






THE BOARD REPORTS 



The last fiscal year has been marked by a number of events of 
great significance to the future of hunting and fishing in Massachu- 
setts, indeed to the whole future of our wildlife resources. 

Perhaps most significant both immediately and in years to come 
was the Board's decision to sponsor a greatly accelerated program of 
land acquisition. Recognizing that wildlife habitat in Massachusetts 
is rapidly diminishing in the face of onrushing suburbia and its attend- 
ant housing developments, industrial expansion and creation of new 
highways, the Board voted at its January, 1964 meeting to adopt a pro- 
gram of wildlife land acquisition. 

Under this program, citizens who benefit by preservation of wild 
areas and enhancement of our wildlife populations, but who do not buy 
hunting or fishing licenses, would contribute at least indirectly to 
the program, while hunters, fishermen, and trappers would contribute 
directly. This will be achieved by establishing a continuing fund, 
earmarked solely for land acquisition, approximately one-half of which 
would come from the Commonwealth's General Fund and the remainder from 
an additional fee of $1.00 on all hunting, fishing, and trapping lic- 
enses. This legislation is being entered in the 1965-1966 legislature, 
and deserves your support, if you value the wildlife resources of 
Massachusetts . 



Another significant piece of legislation- proposed this year, and 
also entered in the coming legislature, is' the' bi'll to authorize appoint- 
ment of additional license sales agents. At present, Massachusetts is 
the only state in the Nation which does not sell even one type of sports- 
man ' s license through commercial outlets. All othet states sell one or 
more types through places such as sporting good stores, service stations, 
etc., but Massachusetts still restricts sales to only the Division's 
Boston office and the offices of city and town clerks. It is believed 
that this enabling legislation will reap considerable benefits both in 
revenue to the Division, and in tourist expenditures accruing to the 
economy of the Commonwealth. 

Sportsmen themselves are showing an increased sense of responsibil- 
ity for land acquisition activities. Of particular note was receipt by 
the Division this year of the deed to the Squannacook River land, being 
purchased by the Middlesex County League of Sportsmen's Clubs using don- 
ations from hundreds of individuals. The Board commends the Middlesex 
County League for this most unselfish and forward-looking action, and 
expresses its appreciation to all who have contributed to the project 
in any way. 

The Division received international recognition during the year, 
when several of its information and education materials placed highest 
in overall competition among the states and Canadian provinces. 

(1) 












w 



Significant help to needed construction and habitat improvement 
activities was received through the federal Accelerated Public Works 
program. Using federal funds, habitat work was done on the Downfall 
area, Myles Standish area and in the Fall River-Freetown state forest 
wildlife management area. Construction of needed facilities was ac- 
complished at the Wilbraham game farm and at the Andover rearing sys- 
tem, and a water control structure was constructed on the West Meadows 
area. 

Long range planning documents were completed for both the fish- 
eries and game programs, preparatory to qualifying for additional fed- 
eral recreation funds in the future. A most significant point made by 
both these studies is the fact that the population of Massachusetts may 
be expected to double within the lifetime of many of us. This can only 
mean increased demand for outdoor recreation, with fewer available land 
and water areas to produce the wildlife which is at the very core of 
most outdoor recreation. This poses the urgent necessity for aggressive, 
effective programs now, such as that proposed for the wildlife land 
acquisition account. As a step in this direction, the Board authorized 
establishment of a new Realty Section this year utilizing personnel and 
equipment already in existence, and thus bringing into one office all 
the records and responsibility for the vital land program. 

Another excessively dry year is now behind us, and this year was 
no exception in that district crews and hatchery trucks were heavily 
involved in assisting fire personnel in prevention and suppression of 
forest fires. The problem of water supplies at several of our hatch- 
eries was particularly acute, and demonstrates the need for additional 
land acquisition to protect watersheds, continuance on development of 
the proposed Quabbin fish hatchery, and other measures to insure future 
production of fish for Massachusetts' more than half-a-million anglers. 

Despite their difficulties, hatchery personnel produced a record 
total of 1,679,620 trout of all three species, with 1,047,045 of them 
in excess of six inches. 



This year for the first time, all fish released from state hatch- 
eries possessed "wild" coloration, achieved through special additives 
to the hatchery diet. This one factor reflected most creditably upon 
our propagation personnel's foresight and imagination in turning out a 
most attractive product. 

Pheasant production at our four game farms was again high, 69,905 
birds being released, of which 58,570 are legal cocks. Game farm per- 
sonnel have performed most creditably in producing large, well-feathered, 
hard-flying birds, in numbers not even speculated upon a few years ago. 

The hunting safety record in Massachusetts is constantly improving. 
The reporting period completed our second hunting season without a sin- 
gle accident involving a hunter either being mistaken for game or from 
being unseen in the line of fire. This fine record can be attributed 
directly to the wearing of fluorescent orange, a development for which 

(2) 



Massachusetts can take full credit. 

Pesticides and pollution are continual problems under study by 
your Division of Fisheries and Game. A total of 2,148 samples were 
processed in the pesticides laboratory at Westboro, in a process 
greatly speeded up by special equipment donated through the Massachus- 
etts Audubon Society. Personnel have also been actively working with 
the Department of Public Health in classification of streams and other 
factors involving pollution. 

Director Francis W. Sargent resigned effective December 30, 1963 
to accept appointment as Associate Commissioner of the Department of 
Public Works. The sportsmen of Massachusetts and this Board owe a 
debt of gratitude to Mr. Sargent for his outstanding record during the 
short time he was with us as Director. On January 6, 1964, former 
wildlife district manager James M. Shepard was appointed as director. 
Mr. Shepard is a career veteran of the Division of Fisheries and Game 
with 14 years' service, and the Board feels extremely fortunate that 
it was not only able to appoint a man so eminently qualified, but also 
that he should come from the ranks of outstanding division employees. 

The board accepted with regret the resignation of Allan S. Kennedy, 
Superintendent of the Bureau of Wildlife Research and Management, on 
June 30, 1964. 

Roger D. Williams, Natick, was re-elected Chairman of the Board, 
and Harry C. Darling, East Bridgewater, was elected Secretary at the 
meeting on March 31, 1964, at Westboro. Lawrence Barbieri, Great 
Barrington, resigned due to pressure of business activities on July 24, 
1963, and Edward Tierney of Pittsfield was appointed to fill his unex- 
pired term on May 21, 1964. Martin Burns of Newbury was appointed by 
Governor Peabody on November 27, 1963. 



The board of the Division of Fisheries and Game expresses its sin- 
cere appreciation to all personnel of the division for their continued 
exemplary performance of duties, and wishes also to express its apprec- 
iation to the Governor, Executive Council, General Court, and to those 
other departments, agencies, members of public information media and 
the general public who have assisted and supported our programs in the. 
past year. 






Respectfully submitted; 

Roger D. Williams, Chairman 
Harry C. Darling, Secretary 
F. Stanley Mikelk 
Martin Burns 
Edward J. Tierney 



(3) 



INFORMATION AND EDUCATION PROGRAM 



The Division of Fisheries and Game has long recognized that it can 
manage the wildlife resource of the Commonwealth for the good of all the 
people, and of the resource itself, only as effectively as the people 
themselves understand and appreciate the need for sound management, and 
in proportion to the degree of public confidence inspired by the Division 

Such understanding and support depends to a large degree upon an 
effective information and education program, such as that conducted by 
every state fish and game agency in the United States. While the pro- 
gram in Massachusetts is relatively small in terms of staff and budget, 
it annually produces informational and educational materials of quality 
and quantity comparable to that coming out of many other states with 
much larger operations. During the past fiscal year, the information 
and education program of the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and 
Game scored highest of any entry in international competition for 
awards judged by professionals in the public relations, education, pub- 
lishing, news services and audio-visual fields. Two first places and 
one second place in annual competition conducted by the American Assoc- 
iation for Conservation Information were received. 

The purpose of the program is to develop and maintain a state of 
public concern and effective action on behalf of all natural resources, 
with emphasis on those resources affecting wildlife. The commonly 
accepted public information media are used, plus youth education pro- 
grams in cooperation with educational agencies. 

While many time-consuming activities of the section cannot be 
numerically reported (the I&E section has the busiest telephone of 
any unit at field headquarters) certain activities can be numerically 
evaluated. 

Among these is the processing of mail. A one-year tabulation re- 
vealed that the I&E section produced over twice as much first class 
mail, exclusive of news releases and magazine mailings, as the other 
two staff sections at field headquarters added together. The volume 
of other classes was also proportionately higher. This is only natural, 
as most public inquiries are directed to the information office. 

In addition, information and education policy recognizes that cer- 
tain informational activities must be and are conducted on either a 
formal or an informal basis by most other units. The major units other 
than I&E engaged in I&E work are the four wildlife districts, although 
their efforts mainly take the direction of personal contact, working 
with organizations, press contacts, tours, giving technical advice and 
similar activities which usually defy accurate tabulation. 



(4) 



Following are enumerated activities of this program for the fiscal 
year ending June 30, 1964. 

News Services 

A total of 161 separate news stories were processed and distributed 
to all media as follows: I&E Section news releases - 97; I&E Section 
television news films - 28; and area news releases by district managers - 
36. 

Continual contact with press representatives (170 such contacts 
were reported by the districts alone; I&E keeps no records since such 
contacts are almost daily) , resulted in more than 50 special columns 
and feature articles. Assistance to free lance writers was given in 
connection with several national magazine articles. 

An outstanding article, written by the I&E chief, was published in 
a national magazine circulated to members of the National Federation of 
Women's Clubs. This article presented the case for hunting as an im- 
portant part of the total wildlife conservation picture, stressed the 
unique financial contribution of the nation's hunters to wildlife con- 
servation, and pointed out the fact that sound wildlife conservation 
depends upon continued, properly managed hunting. To our knowledge 
this is the first time that a national women's publication has carried 
a pro-hunting article. 

Photos were furnished to media on a number of occasions. 

Evaluation of News Clippings 

A count of news clippings received for the year shows that receipts 
increased 1,118 for a total for the 1964 fiscal year of 3,800 individual 
clippings. This is well above average returns. 

This is a raw count of individual clippings without regard for 
placement or size. The practice of evaluating in terms of column inches 
is valueless, since a paragraph with the right message is worth infin- 
itely more than a column of indifferent material. Further, it bears 
only a slight relationship to the number of news releases issued. The 
total of 3,800 during the year was achieved with 133 stories issued 
(161 less 28 TV films), while the previous year's total of 2,682 was 
gained with 135 stories issued (151 less 16 TV films). 

What the division does in its programs, which creates news, has 
more effect than anything else on publicity received. During the re- 
porting period there was a change of directors, adoption of a new land 
acquisition program, a new fishing promotion program, and a number of 
newsworthy special events, and the results are evident in increased 
usage of releases plus publicity not directly received from releases. 



(5) 



However, I&E increased its effort, releasing 97 stories and 28 
TV news strips as compared to last year's 84 stories and 16 TV news 
strips, while districts decreased from 51 stories in the 1963 fiscal 
year to 36 for this reporting period. Plans are under way to conduct 
an inservice newswriting course for district managers and certain other 
personnel in an attempt to improve this part of the program. However, 
it should be noted that much of the publicity achieved by districts is 
accomplished by personal contact with the press rather than by formal 
releases . 

Massachusetts Wildlife Magazine 

Subscriptions for this bi-monthly magazine stood at 48,344 as of 
the end of the fiscal year, a net gain of 4,909 for the year. The net 
gain reflects list-cleaning operations routinely conducted during the 
year. Since 2,962 undeliverable names were pulled, this means that 
7,871 new subscribers applied for the magazine during the year. 

During the year a study of methods of mailing list control was 
conducted, with reference to the various methods available, costs, and 
probable affect on subscriptions. The experience of other states and 
commercial publishers with similar subscription growth problems and 
attendant financial conditions plus consideration for personnel work 
loads indicates that the most applicable system for Massachusetts 
might well be to adopt a periodic subscription, to be renewed after 
a definite period of time. This should effect a continual process of 
cleaning of the mailing list with minimum deleterious effects on the 
budget and personnel requirements, and is currently under active con- 
sideration. In the meantime, the routine process of removing from the 
mailing list all names for which an undelivered copy has been returned 
by the post office will continue. 

Audio-Visual Aids 

The I&E section prepared and presented 18 "Dateline Boston" half- 
hour television programs and 14 "Critter Corner" 15-minute programs, 
and participated in five "Western Massachusetts Highlights" programs 
during the year. 

A new film, "Their Heritage", was completed during the year. This 
film depicts the benefits derived from wildlife management areas by the 
general public. 

A number of radio recordings were made with various stations by 
I&E personnel, and the districts reported participating in six programs 

The 16 film titles carried in the film loan library were booked 
a total of 742 times before 59,360 viewers. 



(6) 



Seven exhibits at sportsmen's shows and fairs were participated in 
by district personnel in cooperation with the I&E section. 



staff 



Hundreds of management photos were processed for the technical 



Publications 

Three new publications were added to the stock maintained for pub- 
lic distribution. These included "The Pheasant in Massachusetts", an 
updated edition of the "Wildlife Management Area Guide", and a brochure 
promoting the land acquisition program, entitled "Their Heritage". This 
last item was designed as a companion piece for the film of the same 
title. 



Work was begun on instituting an entirely new system of indexing 
and stocking the publication library, to greatly facilitate servicing 
of requests for information. It is now possible for a clerk to find, 
out of hundreds of titles, all publications, magazine articles or other 
bulletins on any one subject in a matter of seconds, thus speeding up 
the process and greatly simplifying the work load. 

The annual routine publications including the annual report , stock - 
ed waters list , fish and game laws abstracts , closed towns list , and 
others were compiled, published and distributed by I&E. As usual, I&E 
was wholly responsible for much of the writing or rewriting, editing, 
processing through printing, and distribution of all popular publica- 
tions. 



Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses 

The I&E section completed an exhaustive study of license design, 
procedures and sales methods during the year. While many recommenda- 
tions involving public relations, IBM methods, etc., were made, the 
immediate effect of this study was a newly designed license, which re- 
sulted in a savings in printing costs of $8,687 for the first year alone, 

In actual use, certain minor deficiencies in the design became 
apparent, and work was done on correcting these for next year's licenses 

Another major recommendation of the study was that the director 
should be authorized to appoint license sales agents in addition to 
city and town clerks, and legislation was entered to accomplish this. 
Failing of passage, it will be entered again in the next legislature, 
with certain ramifications to make it more acceptable to the city and 
town clerks. It was found in the study that Massachusetts is the only 
state in the Nation which does not sell any type of sportsman's lic- 
ense whatsoever through outlets such as sporting goods stores, and 

(7) 



that such a move should greatly improve public service as well as 
enhance revenue to the Commonwealth both in operating funds for the 
division and in the form of tourist expenditures accruing to the 
economy of Massachusetts. 

I&E routinely handles distribution of the plastic license holders 
to city and town clerks, with the assistance of field headquarters 
maintenance personnel. During the year, a new system of determining 
the size of shipments was initiated by the simple method of requiring 
clerks to order the specific number they might need for the next year. 
A survey found that about half the towns had more than one year's sup- 
ply on hand, while a few never received enough under the system used 
by the office formerly handling this job. The new system resulted in 
a savings of about $3 000 this year, as fewer supplies had to be ordered 

Conservation Education 

The Massachusetts Junior Conservation completed its 15th year 
with 13 8 boys completing the course in Spencer. Under supervision 
of the I&E chief for the past four years, the camp has grown in pop- 
ularity, evidenced by the waiting list that grows every year. This 
year the camp was filled in January, six months before it was scheduled 
to run. 

During the year the I&E chief received evidence of interest in 
financing building of an entirely new facility expressly designed for 
the camp. As a consequence, considerable time was spent in selection 
of a potential site and designing both building and site requirements. 
A portfolio setting forth all requirements including design of build- 
ings and other facilities, complete costs and other data, was com- 
pleted, and is currently under consideration by those interested. 

The I&E chief was active throughout the year in cooperating with 
the Department of Education, participating in both the Massachusetts 
Advisory Committee for Conservation Education, and the Conservation 
Education Editorial Board. He was appointed to these by the State 
Board of Education. 

Sportfish Awards Program 

The first full year of the sportfish awards program was completed 
at the midpoint in the reporting period, with the following State 
Fishing Records established: 



(8) 



Yellow Perch 16^ inches 

Calico 16% inches 

Walleye 5 lbs. 4 oz. 

White Perch 16 inches 

Brook Trout 19 inches 

Largemouth Bass 12 lbs. 1 oz 

Chain Pickerel 6 lbs. 



Bullhead 22% inches 

Lake Trout 13 lbs. 1 oz . 

Brown Trout 16 lbs. 12 oz. 

Catfish 25 3/4 inches 

Rainbow Trout 6 lbs. 13 oz. 

Smallmouth Bass 6 lbs. 6 oz. 

Bluegill 10% inches 






All winners were presented gold pins and plaques at the annual 
banquet of the New England Outdoor Writers 1 Association in January. 
This program is definitely proving its worth as a means of changing 
the image of Massachusetts to that of a true "fishing state". Ben- 
efits in terms of public relations, license revenue, and general pro- 
motion of fishing are already accruing. 

Meetings 

District personnel attended or participated in 330 meetings of 
sportsmen's groups, civic and fraternal organizations, youth and 
church groups, etc., besides numerous unrecorded meetings with indiv- 
iduals and various local groups to advise directly on wildlife mana- 
gement matters. A study by the University of Massachusetts of town 
conservation commissions revealed that the Division of Fisheries and 
Game led all other states and federal agencies in the number of in- 
stances of cooperation with the commissions. Both I&E and others 
throughout the division participated in numerous meetings with organ- 
izations as usual. 

The I&E chief serves currently as First Vice President of the 
American Association for Conservation Information, having being elected 
to this office at the annual conference in Texas last June, and also 
serves as the professional association's newsletter editor. 

Public Relations Programming 

More effective use of information and education means has been 
evident during the past year, with better coordination of efforts 
throughout the Division, in joint efforts to establish worthwhile 
conservation programs. A case in point is the effort launched at 
the year's mid-point to establish a Wildlife Land Acquisition Fund, 
in which every conceivable media and method is being used to obtain 
public understanding and support. Beginning with public meetings 
with key groups last January and later meetings, tie-ins with National 

Wildlife Week releases, letters to key individuals, production of the 
"Their Heritage" film and brochure as a tie-in specifically directed 



(9) 



to urban populations, magazine articles, staff meetings to acquaint all 
personnel with the program, use of releases and public appearances at 
every opportunity, TV programs and other measures strategically planned 
and executed, the program should be a classic example of wise use of 
information and education to achieve a desirable purpose. 

Tours and Demonstrations 

The western wildlife district conducted two tours of district 
activities for rod and gun clubs, and two tours for groups from summer 
camps. 

The central wildlife district conducted two tours, one of the 
Swift River property for delegates of the state council and county 
league of sportsmen's clubs, and another of a wildlife management area 
for representatives of the Audubon Society and groups of high school 
students . 

The northeast wildlife district conducted groups of sportsmen on 
tours of the Newbury Wildlife Management Area, and demonstrated the 
electric fish shocking boat to a group at the Harold Parker bass ponds. 

The southeast wildlife district conducted five demonstrations of 
activities in that district for public groups. 

Internal Communications 

As a means of informing all employees of current major activities 
and items of importance, the publication of "TOPICS" was continued. Six 
issues were published, in this the first full year of publication. "TOP 
ICS" was begun in the previous reporting period. 

The annual Division-wide employee's workshop was conducted in Feb- 
ruary with all sections cooperating. 

These two methods of keeping all employees informed and enabling 
an exchange of ideas throughout the Division, plus other improvements 
in the routine daily channeling of reports and other information through- 
out the Division, have contributed considerably to morale and effective- 
ness. 

Special Events 

Special events were utilized by the I&E section on several occas- 
ions. In May, opening ceremonies for the first public access site es- 
tablished by the New Public Access Board were conducted in cooperation 
with the central district. 



(10) 



Through January, February and March, the I&E Chief served as pub- 
licity chairman for the annual National Wildlife Week observance and 
all releases were slanted to the land acquisition needs of the Division, 

In January, the annual banquet of the New England Outdoor Writers' 
Association was utilized as a means of securing additional publicity 
for the sportfish awards program. 

In August, John Starret of the Division successfully swam the 
English Channel, and the I&E Chief was on hand to welcome him upon 
his return to the States, on behalf of the Governor and the Division. 
Releases and pictures concerning Starret were furnished to media both 
before and after the event. 

The annual telephone information service on the opening day of 
deer season was conducted as usual, and the same system of providing 
spot news to media was instituted this year on the opening of fishing 
season. 

Miscellaneous 

I&E continued to handle all editing, printing and publishing 
functions for the Division. 

Approximately 12,000 "Safety Zone" posters were distributed free 
to landowners by the districts and I&E. 

An additional 43 metal highway signs calling attention to the 
importance of sportsmen's observance of the safety zone law were 
erected by the districts. 






(ID 



GAME PROGRAM 



Dry weather and a forest fire danger caused the woods to be closed 
last fall, resulting in confusion about the opening of the waterfowl 
season and delaying the start of the upland season for about nine days. 
Despite this, all seasons were successful, and were extended after the 
deer season to make up for the loss. 

After many years of research, we feel that our pheasant and quail 
stocking programs have been developed to the point where we are getting 
the most return for the money spent. Studies of the white hare stocking 
program indicate that more value would be received if hare were released 
only during the season. Plans were made to reappraise the deer data 
collected during the past fifteen years to find clues to the decline in 
deer harvests since 1958. Providing a place to hunt is still considered 
the principal object of the Game Section. Acquisition of land for man- 
agement was accomplished to the extent of the limited funds available. 
Multiple use of Division lands was encouraged as much as possible with- 
out interference with the regular program. 

The bulk of the research and management program is financed 75 per- 
cent by Federal Aid Funds ( Pittman-Robertson) , and such projects are so 
designated in this report. 



FEDERAL AID PROJECTS 

W-9-D - Statewide Development Project 

The majority of the game section's time and effort is spent on 
this project. It consists of developing our wildlife management areas 
for public hunting, and is a year-round program, although activities 
are somewhat curtailed during the late winter on areas in the Berkshires. 
The work is broken down into the following categories: maintenance of 
office and storage buildings; construction and maintenance of water con- 
trols; maintenance of bridges; construction and maintenance of roads; 
maintenance and new posting of boundaries, entrances and special manage- 
ment signs; planting of wildlife trees and shrubs; spring and fall plant- 
ing of annuals and perennials for wildlife food and cover; thinning and 
clearing of woodland; control of undesirable plant species; encourage- 
ment of natural fruiting species; and maintenance of wood duck nesting 
boxes. In addition to cutting and planting on the Westboro Beagle 
Training Area, a yearly census is made of the cottontail population 
there . 

The management areas are located in Williamstown, Peru, Chester, 
Huntington, Winchendon, Hubbardston, Barre, Philiipston, Oxford, Uxbridge, 
Westboro, Newbury, Sudbury, Plymouth, West Bridgewater, Falmouth, and 



(12) 



Freetown. Emphasis is on pheasant hunting, but all areas provide other 
farm and forest game, and waterfowl are taken in limited numbers. Other 
sportsman uses are for field trials, dog training and target shooting. 
Although the areas are developed primarily for sportsmen, there has 
been a continual increase in year-round usage by the general public - 
a great deal of recreation is provided them by sportsmen's dollars. It 
is planned that this program will be increased many- fold to perpetuate 
the privilege of public hunting. 



W-3 5-R - Game Population Trend and Harvest Surve 



Y. 



Statewide Deer Harvest . During the 1963 Massachusetts deer hunting 
season (November 11-23 archery; December 2-7 shotgun), hunters reported 
taking 3,072 deer. Archers killed 24 deer and shotgun hunters reported 
taking 3,048 deer. The total kill was 18 percent lower than an eleven- 
year average of 3,750 deer. Although good to excellent hunting condi- 
tions prevailed throughout the shotgun season, there were only 534 more 
deer reported killed than during the 1962 season. 

The even sex ratio of 1.0 males to 1.0 females for the reported 
kill has remained constant for sixteen years. 

For the first time in the history of this project, Worcester County 
ranked number one for deer kills with 674 reported. Barnstable County's 
deer kill was 50 percent below an eleven-year average. 

Motor vehicles and dogs were the largest causes of deer mortalities 
other than hunting. 

A comparison of checking station and statewide reported kill data 
shows a high kill (44%) on the first day reported at checking stations. 
The statewide high kill (39%) was recorded the last day of the season. 

Deer Herd Composition . The reported deer kill for 1963 was 3,072 
deer. Of these, 690 deer representing a 22.5 percent sample were pro- 
cessed at eight checking stations. 

The sex ratio of deer checked was about even, males to females. 
The herd composition summary showed that 89 percent of the deer were 
found to be in the first four age classes. The fawn and 1-1/2 year age 
classes (55.5%) were similar with 28.0 and 27.5 percent respectively. 
The 2-1/2 year class made up 20 percent of the kill while the 3-1/2 
year deer accounted for 13.5 percent. The remaining 11 percent included 
the 4-1/2 and older age classes. 

The average male fawn weighed 81 pounds and the 1-1/2 year old 
buck weighed 127 pounds. Weights tend to level off for males at the 
3-1/2 year age class when they average 188 pounds. Up to this weight, 



(13) 



the bucks show an increase of 3 to 40 pounds per year. The weight 
increase of 4-1/2 year and older deer for 1963 was only two pounds. 

Doe fawn weights averaged 76 pounds. Female deer weights appeared 
to increase slowly after the 1-1/2 year class (117 pounds) and level 
off at the 3-1/2 year class (135 pounds). 

Winter Waterfowl Census . The winter inventory was flown on Jan- 
uary 6 and January 8, 1964. The flight included the whole coast from 
the New Hampshire line to the Rhode Island line and the islands of 
Nantucket and Martha's Vineyard. The total count of 130,700 ducks and 
geese was 25 percent higher than in 1963 and 46 percent higher than the 
ten-year average (1955-1964). Black ducks were up 13 percent over 1963 
and 26 percent over the ten-year average. Canada geese were up 64 per- 
cent over 1963 and 93 percent over the ten-year average. 

Mourning Dove Census . The 1963 spring count produced a breeding 
population index of 8. This is a 27.3 percent decrease from 1962. There 
was an average of 3.8 doves per route. There were 45 doves seen in 1963 
as compared to 32 in 1962, an increase of 40.6 percent. Because of low 
populations, no fall counts were attempted in 1963. 

Wood Duck Nesting Success and Brood Survival . In 1963, a total of 
forty-three nesting attempts by wood ducks were recorded at Great Mead- 
ows Refuge in Concord. This is similar to the usage obtained over the 
last five years, but hardly more than one-half the nests recorded on 
the average in the five years preceding 1959. The percentage of nests 
which hatched successfully and the number of ducklings produced were 
somewhat lower than last year, but this can be attributed to the unavoid- 
able disturbance which resulted from increased project activity. Pro- 
ject personnel resumed the banding of incubating females which had last 
been done in 1959. Thirty-six females were captured in the nesting 
boxes. Of these, 14 were found to be already banded. Definite inform- 
ation on the age ratio of the breeding population and the proportion 
of first-year nesting females cannot be determined until the nesting 
check of 1964. A total of 229 ducklings was web-tagged in the nesting 
boxes at Great Meadows and an additional ten ducklings were web-tagged 
on Buttrick's Pond. 






Banding traps were operated five days a week at Great Meadows from 
July 15 to September 27. A total of 379 new birds were banded and re- 
trap data indicated a large proportion of the resident population had 
been captured. Only 24 percent of the tagged ducklings were traced to 
flight stage and this suggested poor brood survival. A majority of the 
young birds trapped at Great Meadows had not hatched from nests on the 
refuge and must have originated from natural tree cavities in the surr- 
ounding areas. The age ratio shown by the September trapping was 1.9 
immatures per adult. Although this is an improvement over the ratio 
obtained in the last few years, it is still unsatisfactory and rein- 
forces other indications of poor brood survival. 

(14) 



Each duckling was web-tagged and the allanantoic membrane from 
the hatched remains of each nest were inspected for symptoms of incip- 
ient omphalitis. The very few incidents of protruding navel or hemorr- 
hage in the allantoic network appeared to preclude any likelihood that 
omphalitis could be a major mortality factor. 

A total of 13 5 wood duck eggs were collected from nests at Great 
Meadows Refuge and cultures were prepared from them to test for the 
presence of paratyphoid bacillus. In addition, 67 fecal swabs were 
taken from wood ducks at the refuge but neither the eggs nor the swabs 
revealed any of the causative agents of paratyphoid. 

Eggs collected at Great Meadows, the Sudbury-Concord Valley and 
two sites in central Massachusetts were analyzed for D.D.T. contamina- 
tion. They included 176 wood duck eggs, 27 black duck eggs, three blue- 
winged teal eggs, two hooded merganser eggs, and four Canada goose eggs. 
Thirty-six percent of the wood duck eggs from Great Meadows contained 
D.D.T. and 60 percent of those collected in the Sudbury-Concord Valley 
were contaminated . The wood duck eggs from central Massachusetts were 
negative. Over 90 percent of the black duck eggs from the Sudbury- 
Concord Valley were positive and contained on the average three times 
as much D.D.T. as the Great Meadows wood duck eggs. Evaluation of the 
data collected indicated that the insecticide was being picked up on 
the local breeding areas. Further study is needed to determine the sig- 
nificance of this contamination and its effect on the survival of young 
wood ducks . 

Experimental Turkey Stocking . A wild turkey restoration experiment 
was initiated in Massachusetts in 1960. Twenty-two wild turkeys were 
released in Quabbin Reservation, central Massachusetts, during 1960 and 
1961. The over-winter survival in the winter of 1960-1961 was 62 per- 
cent. Good reproduction during 1961 and 1962 was followed by an over- 
winter survival of 27 percent in 1961-1962 and 32 percent in 1962-1963. 
An artificial feeding program was tried on an experimental basis during 
the winter of 1963-1964 and 60 percent of the fall population survived 
the winter. Eight turkeys were transplanted to the Holyoke Range in 
Hampshire County on February 26, 1964. One hen was returned to the 
Quabbin Reservation on May 15 when it appeared that the hen would not 
otherwise have been bred. Including the above hen, there were 19 tur- 
keys present in May, 1964. 

Twelve wild turkeys were at Mount Washington in the spring of 1963. 
Only six poults produced during 1963 survived until fall when eleven 
adults were also present. Fifteen turkeys remained in the spring of 
1964. 






Two to seven turkeys were present in the vicinity of October Moun- 
tain State Forest in the Spring of 1963. One or possibly two broods 
were hatched during the summer. At least four turkeys were present in 
the spring of 1964. 

(15) 



A release of 16 turkeys near Otis, Massachusetts in 1961 did not 
establish a population. 

3304-21 Accelerated Public Works Program 

During the fiscal year funds were made available to provide fac- 
ilities and conduct habitat improvement on wildlife management areas, 
and to modernize and expand a state game farm to maintain production 
necessary to assuage hunting demand and wildlife management needs. 

Five specific jobs were undertaken with this capital improvement 
program, each of which was awarded to an outside contractor on the basis 
of the lowest bid received. They were: 

1. On the Downfall Wildlife Management Area in Newbury, 3 acres 
were marked for clearing. A combination office and storage building was 
planned and construction initiated there. 

2. Plans and specifications were prepared by the Soil Conservation 
Service for construction of a low-level dike and water control structure 
for a small marsh management program at the West Meadows Wildlife Man- 
agement Area in West Bridgewater. It is expected that work on this job 
will commence during the next fiscal year. 

3. In the Myles Standish Wildlife Management Area in Plymouth, 
plans were formulated to clear-cut a strip 500 feet wide and one mile 
long in an old burn area; about 15 acres within the planned cutting 
area had been previously cleared. Total acreage of habitat improvement 
amounted to 50 acres. 

4. A new wildlife management area is being developed in the south- 
ern portion of the Fall River-Freetown State Forest under this project. 
Plans specified clearing of 36 three-acre blocks with 15 miles of 20- 
foot wide access trails, and construction of four one-half acre parking 
areas on the periphery of the 1,000 acre tract. 

5. Plans and specifications were prepared by division personnel 
to construct two brooder houses (132 1 X 14' ) and exterior runway pens, 
an open- front storage building (45* X 20') and loading platform, and 

a covered pheasant driving pen (2,540' X 36') connecting covered pens 
with enclosed open range. 

White Hare Study 

In 1961, the Division started an evaluation of white hare and hare 
stocking projects. To date, the study shows that it is not necessary to 
condition hare on the various state game farms. Survival data suggested 
that there was no difference between conditioned hare (held in pheasant 
pens for a minimum of fourteen days) and hare released on date of arriv- 
al. 



(16) 



During January of 1964, a total of 1,136 white hare were released 
on the date of arrival. After the close of the hare season, February 5, 
a total of 1,347 hare were released. All 2,483 hare were ear-tagged. 

Many sportsmen expressed the opinion that such releases in season 
would be shot within a short period. Conversely, the tag return data 
show that only nineteen hare out of the 1,136 liberated were reported 
taken by gunners. 

Tag returns also showed that of the 2,215 hare released in 1963, 
only 3 7 tags were returned during the 1963-1964 hunting season. 

Division personnel will continue to compile hare data for a min- 
imum of six years to fully evaluate the hare stocking program. 

Wildlife District Activities 

Non-federal aid game projects in the districts are of numerous 
varieties. The one single project that consumed most of the time in 
the districts was the stocking of pheasants, quail, and white hare in 
the appropriate months. 

In other activities, the district crews controlled beaver, worked 
with sportsmen's clubs on various programs, aided in field trials, pro- 
vided technical assistance to town conservation commissions as well as 
to individuals, aided in writing town plans, operated deer checking 
stations during the shotgun season, and performed a host of other re- 
lated duties. 

Game Farms 

In an economy move, the number of division game farms was reduced 
from four to three with the closing of the Marshfield game farm at the 
end of the past rearing season. This closure was effected after care- 
ful investigation revealed that the division's entire game bird require- 
ments could be reared by the other three farms. 

In an effort to improve the present strain of ringneck pheasant, 
new brood stock was acquired. It was thought by many that other varie- 
ties could produce a larger, less cannibalistic, more disease-resistant 
bird. However, after extensive research, it was noted that our own 
variety of ringneck was superior to any available in other states or 
from private game breeders. 

The Wilbraham game farm system was greatly improved through con- 
struction of two brooder houses, storage sheds and covered pens. Their 
completion will greatly enhance the value of the farm in terms of pro- 
ductivity and efficiency. 






(17) 



Pheasant and quail production this year was above average; figures 
are shown in the table below. 

Routine maintenance work was carried out on all farms. 



GAME DISTRIBUTION 
July 1, 1963 - June 30, 1964 

Hens Cocks 
Spring and summer liberations 6, 167 771 
August liberations (12 weeks) 4,345 8,540 



Pheasant 
Adults: 
Young : 



October-November liberations 
(17-25 weeks) 

Sportsmen's Club Pheasant 
Rearing Program 



214 43,118 



609 6, 141 



Totals 



11,335 58,570 



Total 

6,938 

12, 885 

43, 332 

6, 750 
69,905 






Quail 



Coturnix Bobwhite Total 



Adults: Spring and summer liberations 
Young : October-November liberations 



24 


24 



707 



731 



3, 329 3, 329 
4,036 4,060 



White Hare 



Northern varying, purchased 



Total 



2,483 



(18) 



FISHERIES PROGRAM 



During the past fiscal year the fisheries section continued 
to conduct its research and management activities through internal 
revenues from license sales and outside monies for federal aid 
projects. 

Seven federal-aid projects were directed by personnel at the 
field headquarters in Westboro. Three of these were involved in 
research; the Quabbin Reservoir investigation, harvest studies on 
managed ponds, and the effect of water chemistry on fish survival. 
One project, statewide reclamations, was a development project, 
and one a coordination project; fish management coordination. The 
remaining two federal-aid projects were land acquisition programs, 
one on the Swift River, the other on the Squannacook River. 



(19) 



»>.. 






Quabbin Reservoir Investigations: 

The tenth year of study at Quabbin Reservoir ended with the close 
of the 1963 fishing season and subsequent analysis of data collected. 
The creel census agent, working at the three boat launching areas, inter- 
viewed 10,884 fishermen during the six months from April to October. 
Population studies were carried out by rotenone and gill net sampling 
to supplement creel census information. Conclusive evidence of lake 
trout reproduction obtained in the creel census was confirmed by pop- 
ulation studies. Recommendations for the coming season include out- 
lines for a life history study of this exotic fish which was introduced 
by yearly stocking from 1952 to 1957. Trout stocking consisted of 
20,000 yearling brown trout and 42,500 fingerling lake trout. 



Creel Census Project; 

In a creel census of three warm-water ponds in Central Massachusetts, 
an agent interviewed 565 anglers from April to October and 608 anglers 
from December to February. In a creel census of four reclaimed trout 
ponds on Cape Cod, an agent interviewed 1, 221 anglers from April to Oct- 
ober. Harvest data from successive years has been studied to determine 
the success of management techniques in warm-water and trout pond man- 
agement. To determine differential recovery on stocked trout of var- 
ious sizes a total of 50, 000 brown and rainbow trout were marked and 
released. 

Statewide Reclamation Project; 

Ten trout ponds totaling 484 surface acres were completely reclaim- 
ed, and one trout pond of 203 surface acres was partially reclaimed from 
the surface to the thermocline. Rotenone in powdered and emulsifiable 
form was used. These ponds were subsequently restocked in October and 
November with 44,000 fingerling, brook, brown and rainbow trout, and in 
March and April with 22,370 catchable-sized trout of the same species. 

Water Quality Survey; 

The statewide project initiated to determine the reasons for var- 
iances in the stocking success of fresh-water fish was enlarged in 
scope. Chemical constitutents of our natural waters were intensely 
sampled and analyzed in an effort to determine seasonal variations. 

A review of literature was undertaken to establish lethal concen- 
trations of toxic materials in soft waters. Designed to correlate our 
work with related studies being done throughout the United States, the 
research helped in determining which chemical constitutents are deemed 
important in maintaining adequate fishable populations. 

A total of 493 water samples were obtained from 51 ponds through- 
out the state. Taken on a monthly basis, these were analyzed for pH, 



(20) 



total alkalinity and iron content. Included in these water samplings 
were the five state fish hatcheries and Quabbin Reservoir. Analysis 
of this data shows marked variations during the four distinct seasons 
of the year. 

Plans for more detailed studies of the chemical make-up of our 
natural waters include the acquisition of an atomic absorption spect- 
rophotometer which determines the amount of metallic ions in water. 
Other complex equipment will be purchased to aid project personnel in 
determining any limiting factors to stocking success. 

Swift River Acquisition: 

Options to buy approximately 170 acres, including almost two miles 
of stream frontage, were obtained from three landowners. Options in- 
cluded outright purchases of stream banks and adjacent areas and, in 
one case, included a fishing easement 25 feet wide along approximately 
1,000 feet of stream bank. The option on the largest tract (104 acres) 
was exercised during the year; the other two options are still outstand- 
ing. This project was conceived and initiated principally by the man- 
ager of the central wildlife district who also represented the division 
in negotiations with the landowners. 






Pesticide-Insecticide Study; 

Laboratory facilities at Westbcro, although greatly expanded, have 
hardly been able to meet the ever-increasing demands for pesticide analy- 
sis. During the past year a total of 2,148 samples were processed. Sam- 
ples of many varieties came from a wide range of sources: fish and game 
specimens from Connecticut, New Hampshire, and New Jersey; samples from 
the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries; lake trout tissue for 
presence of insecticide residues; birds and fish suspected as victims 
of the careless use of pesticides, and others. Many of the samples 
were derived from several studies conducted: laboratory experiments to 
determine toxicity levels and concentrations of insecticides in various 
tissues; studies of the effects of pesticides on the biota of the Sud- 
bury, Assabet and Concord River systems, and from the Westfield, Farm- 
ington and Connecticut River systems. 









The cumbersome method of analysis using the spectrophotometer to 
determine insecticide content was largely replaced by the use of an 
electron-capture gas chromatograph provided by the Massachusetts 
Audubon Society. 

Financial assistance from the University of Massachusetts has tak- 
en the form of salaries of personnel and loans of equipment for conduct- 
ing studies to reveal the presence of DDT in songbirds and to show the 
effects of DDT on waterfowl. 



(21) 



TROUT WATERS RECLAIMED JULY 1, 1963 - JUNE 30, 1964 



POND 

Lake Saltonstall 
Millvale Reservoir 
Lake Pentucket 
Dug Pond 
White Pond 
Lake Lorraine 
Five Mile Pond 
Goose Pond 
Peters Pond 
Deep Pond 
Ashumet Pond 

Total 



TUWN 


ACRES 


LB/ACRE* 
60 


Haverhill 


41 


Haverhill 


30 


65 


Haverhill 


45 


64 


Natick 


48 


125 


Concord 


43 


107 


Springfield 


30 


112 


Springfield 


43 


48 


Chatham 


21 


73 


Sandwich 


121 


39 


Falmouth 


24 


127 


Mashpee 


203 


partial 



687 



*Estimated carrying capacity based on pounds recovered and percent of 

killed fish picked up. 

Millvale Reservoir was not completely picked up due to remoteness of 
the pond. 



(22) 



Other contributions of money to be used for salaries and equipment 
in pesticide studies were received from the New England Interstate Water 
Pollution Control Commission, the Farmington River Watershed Association, 
the Connecticut River Watershed Council and the Westfield River Watershed 
Association. 

Long Range Planning; 

In the best interests of Massachusetts citizens and in conformity 
with our fisheries policy of attempting "to supply the best possible 
fishing for the largest number of people over the longest period of 
time", and additionally, in cooperation with the Federal Bureau of Out- 
door Recreation, an intensive study has been initiated. This study 
entitled "Long Range Planning" is an endeavor to provide accurate in- 
formation upon which to base plans for developing a progressive and 
meaningful program for Massachusetts inland sport fisheries that will 
best meet the future needs and desires of our citizens. 

This study includes an inventory and appraisal of our surface wat- 
ers, their quality, area, type, productivity, availability and access- 
ibility. It relates the present resource to current fishing utiliza- 
tion and to potential future use. It reviews prior trends and manage- 
ment activities and projects past and current patterns so that future 
evaluations may be made. A survey of students in Massachusetts public 
schools, grades six through twelve, has been completed and the results 
analyzed. It is evident, based upon this survey and other data, that 
demands on Massachusetts sport fishing resources will be increased many- 
fold in the next 30-40 years. Finally, conclusions are drawn and recom- 
mendations made to direct division efforts into programs that will re- 
ward the Massachusetts angler seeking recreational satisfaction in the 
years ahead. 

Full consideration has been given to an expected Massachusetts 
population increase of 100% by the year 2,000, to predicted additional 
leisure time, more disposable income, better facilities for travel to 
recreational areas, and to a public more cognizant of the values inher- 
ent in fishing and other recreational pursuits than ever before in 
history. 

Trout Propagation 

State and Federal Hatchery Production 






A grand total of 1,679,620 brook, brown and rainbow trout weighing 
344, 844 pounds were distributed to Massachusetts public fishing waters 
during the past year. 

Production of the five state hatcheries totalled 1,465,973 trout 
weighing 300,440 pounds. Of this number, 833,398 fish were "catchables" 
(six or more inches in length). In addition, 42,452 lake trout finger- 
lings were reared from eggs obtained from the New York Conservation 
Department and released in Quabbin Reservoir. 

(23) 



TROUT DISTRIBUTION IN MASSACHUSETTS FROM STATE AND FEDERAL HATCHERIES 

JULY 1, 1963 to JUNE 30, 1964 



BROOKS 



Under 6" Over 6" 



301,875 464,957 



BROWNS 



Under 6" Over 6" 



197,000 449,976 



RAINBOWS 



Under 6" Over 6" 



133,700 132,112 



TOTAL TROUT 



1,679,620 



Total Trout Distributed 6" - 9" 
Total Trout Distributed 9" plus 
Total Federal Trout Distributed 6" plus 



538, 290 
295, 108 
213,647 



Total Catchables 6" plus 1, 047, 045 

Total Fingerlings 6" minus 632, 575 



Grand Total 1, 679, 620 






STATION 

Montague 

Palmer 

Sandwich 

Sunderland 

Sutton 

State Poundage 



North Attleboro 

Hartsville 

Nashua 

Federal Poundage 



STATION POUNDAGE 



TOTAL LBS 

69, 151 
42,464 
74, 196 
95,658 
18,971 



22, 000 
10, 533 
11,871 



300,440 



Grand Total 



44, 404 
344, 844 



(This table does not show trout retained for brood stock) 

(24) 



State hatchery releases were supplemented by 213,647 trout weigh- 
ing 44,404 pounds received from three federal hatcheries. 

Early Spawned Federal Hatchery Trout: 

Incubation of eggs at the Palmer Hatchery was discontinued in fav- 
or of receiving early-spawned fry and fingerlings from the federal hatch- 
ery at Attleboro. 

Lake Trout Program: 

Since research conducted at Quabbin Reservoir has revealed that a 
self-sustaining lake trout population now exists there, state hatchery 
facilities will no longer be required to produce lake trout for main- 
tenance stocking. This discontinuance of lake trout rearing will pro- 
vide much needed room for brook, brown, and rainbow trout. 

Cold Water Temperature Studies: 

Hatchery graphs compiled on water temperatures proved most helpful 
in evaluating our growth potential at all installations. Research was 
iniated at Sunderland by holding a small number of fry in specially 
constructed tanks inside one of the buildings. The growth of these 
fry was compared to a similar number of trout placed in outside pools. 
The experiment proved the need of having modern indoor facilities to 
advance growth in early spring. 

Trout Coloration: 



Through the years much experimentation has been carried on to 
improve commercial feeds for trout. Among these experiments are those 
involving the "brightening" of the colors in trout. Our trout were fed 
on dry self-sustaining pelleted feed enriched with paprika for three 
months. The paprika product contained a minimum of 194 mgs. calculated 
total carotene per pound, incorporated into fish pellets at a 3% con- 
centration. Hatchery personnel commenced feeding paprika January first 
so that all trout liberated last spring had essentially "wild" colora- 
tion at very little expense to the division. 

The experiment on a synthetic coloring additive, Canthaxanthin, was 
continued at the Sunderland hatchery. A trial lot of 2,750 brook trout 
was fed fish pellets containing 10 grams/ton Canthaxathin for six months 
The experiment was dropped in April after very little visible color 
change was noted. 

Construction 

The rebuilding of eight ponds 75' X 10* X 30" with eight inch 
concrete- walls heavily reinforced with H" rods was completed at the 



(25) 



Montague hatchery. The Palmer hatchery reconstructed four fingerling 
rearing ponds with concrete walls and new cement dams. Drainage was 
rearranged to provide continued operation of this section. Additional 
repair work consisted of installing wood siding in several other ponds 
at the Palmer hatchery. 

The Sandwich hatchery completed two concrete raceways connecting 
upper and lower sections of the hatchery for better use of existing 
water supplies. In addition, several new wells were installed in other 
sections of the hatchery. The back rearing ponds at Sunderland were 
completely rebuilt with new concrete dams, transite siding and drainage 
Many rearing units were repaired. Damage caused by a wind storm was 
cleaned up and all usable timber was salvaged. The Sutton hatchery 
installed additional wells and made changes in their trout sorting 
facilities. 

District Activities: 



Wildlife district management activities included stocking of trout 
and warm-water fish, care and maintenance of the two culture pond systems, 
public fishing areas and other state property, and stream improvement on 
the Mashpee River. District personnel investigated pollution and fish 
kill reports, represented the division at fairs and shows and in meetings 
with sporting groups and civic organizations, advised individuals and 
groups in matters of fish pond management and weed control and cooperated* 
with clubs in projects designed to supplement hatchery production of 
trout by contributions of additional club-reared fish. In late spring, 
routine duties were encumbered by the necessity to furnish tank trucks 
and drivers to counteract an unusually severe forest fire situation. 
Investigational work conducted by the districts included fish population 
checks in 49 ponds, a survey of streams and the Connecticut River, devel- 
opment of access to public waters and a survey of town-owned property 
in the Southeast. 



The successful operation and maintenance of the two culture pond 
systems was almost entirely a district accomplishment. The Harold 
Parker State Forest pond system in North Andover, cared for by personnel 
of the Northeast Wildlife District, yielded approximately 2,335 pounds 
of adult yearling and fingerling largemouth bass and about 15 pounds of 
smallmouths for release in public fishing waters. The Merrill pond sys- 
tem in Sutton, attended by personnel of the Central Wildlife District, 
produced about 475 pounds of pickerel and 75 pounds of large mouth 
bass which were released in public waters. 

Accelerated Public Works Program 

Utilizing Accelerated Public Works funds, construction of a new 
fish sorting and holding building was initiated at the Harold Parker 
pond culture system in Andover. Plans call for razing an existing wood- 
frame structure and construction of a new reinforced concrete building 
with concrete block gable ends and aluminum roof. Charles Construction 
Company of North Andover, low bidder, was awarded the contract for this 
job. 

(26) 




REALTY PROGRAM 



The Swift River in Belchertown is one of the best trout streams 
in the state. During the year, a sizeable tract of land along its 
banks was acquired by this division, making a good start in insuring 
this river's availability to sportsmen in the future. 

Other tracts of land were acquired in Petersham and Winchendon. 
At the close of the fiscal year, the division held options on two 
more sizable tracts along the Swift River and also held options on 
five other parcels throughout the state. 



A land ownership study was made along the Squannacook River in 
Townsend, Shirley, and Groton. 



While manager of the northeast wildlife district, Director 
Shepard conducted a detailed and thorough study of the future land 
needs of the division and sportsmen for wildlife and fisheries 
resource management and utilization. The Realty Section worked in 
cooperation with the director on this vital project. 



Leases which expired on public fishing grounds during the year 
were renewed. 



(27) 



MASSACHUSETTS COOPERATIVE WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNIT 



Wild Turkey Project 

A mild winter resulted in less mortality to turkey flocks than has 
occurred since stocking began in 1960. Eight turkeys, 2 gobblers and 6 
hens were trapped and stocked on the Holyoke Range; results of this 
transplant appear unsuccessful. Several broods have been produced on 
Prescott Peninsula. Many of the groups are wild, and accurate counts 
have not been made. At least one brood of 11 was observed on October 
Mountain. 

Pesticide-Wildlife Project 

Field and laboratory work on the effect of DDT on Rufous-sided 
Towhees was completed. Results of this study are dependent on com- 
pletion of chemical analyses of specimens at the Division's wildlife 
laboratory in Westboro. 

Cottontail Rabbit Project 

Experimental stocking of both species of Massachusetts Cottontail 
Rabbits ( Sylvilagus f loridanus and J>. trans itiona lis ) on an island in 
Quabbin Reservation was unsuccessful. At the end of the winter all 
rabbits had disappeared. 

Mourning Dove Study 



Graduate student Allan P. Richards has completed his Mourning 
Dove study and is writing his thesis Jj^ absentia . Several hundred 
doves were banded, over 100 nests studies, and distribution in the 
western part of the state (on the basis of coo counts) will be report- 
ed when Richards' thesis is completed. 

Chemosterilant Studies 



Studies by Dr. David K. Wetherbee on gull control have borne 
fruit this year. A black dye ingested by gulls gives promise of a 
practical method of controlling productivity in this species as well 
as in blackbirds and other nuisance birds. The embryo in the egg 
dies. This is a pioneer finding which may eventually become of 
great importance. 

Woodcock Project 

A new and highly efficient method of capturing woodcock on 
breeding grounds with mist nets was developed. The co-author of the 
woodcock manuscript withdrew during the year. This has necessitated 
extensive revision and rewriting of the manuscript which will be 
completed in the fall. 

(28) 






MASSACHUSETTS COOPERATIVE FISHERY UNIT 



Qu abbin Reservoir Projects 

Life History of the White Perch 

White perch were sampled during the summer and fall of 1964 for 
age and growth, feeding habits and condition factor data. The various 
sampling gear used included: gill nets, fyke nets, and hook and line. 
Certain concentrations of white perch were found, but collecting adequate 
samples proved very difficult. Some young of the year fish were finally 
located and captured by fyke nets late this fall. The project leader 
has become familiar with the area and problems involved in sampling 
and will begin an intensive sampling program this coming spring. 

Life History of the Rock Bass 



The very abundant rock bass in Quabbin Reservoir were readily col- 
lected during the 1964 field season. Fyke nets produced over 80 percent 
of the 1000 fish sampled. Fish ranging in size from several inches to 
nearly 12 inches were taken. However, most fish were less than seven 
inches in length. Basic life history data are currently being recorded 
for these specimens. A detailed stomach analysis has been initiated. 
Emphasis next summer will be placed on studies involving local popula- 
tion estimates and possible migratory behavior. 






Brown Trout Studies 

In a preliminary study 39 adult brown trout were collected and 
tagged in the Quabbin Reservoir from October 28 to November 20. A 
spaghetti type plastic bag was inserted in the backs of the larger 
fish, while a subcutaneous tag was placed in the belly of 17 smaller 
(117-220 mm.) immature trout seined from the tributary, Hop Brook. 
More effort will be made to tag trout next year in the tributaries and 
in the main reservoir as a full-fledged research project. The main goal 
of the project will be to obtain some information on the size of the 
brown trout population, their distribution and movements, homing tenden- 
cies, age and growth and relative success of their natural reproduction. 



Connecticut River Project 

Biological and Physical Survey of the Connecticut River 

A biological survey of the Connecticut River was initiated late in 
the fall of 1964. The two graduate students assigned to the survey will 
collect fish by various sampling means for species composition and dis- 
tribution. In addition, samples will be taken of the flora and fauna, 
water chemistry, bottom types and organisms, and some tagging of the 
important game species to obtain information on migration and movements. 
Mr. Leonard's project will concern the composition and distribution of 
the vertebrate biota of the river while Mr. Armour's project will con- 
cern the general ecology of the river. 

(29) 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 



HOW THE SPORTSMAN'S DOLLAR WAS SPENT 



ADMINISTRATION 

Administration 3304-01 
Fish & Game Board 

Information-Education " 

FISHERIES MANAGEMENT 

Fish Hatcheries 3304-42 

Management " 
*Fish Restoration Projects 3304-47 

Management 3304-51 

Plans Quabbin Hatchery 3 304-54 

WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT 

Game Farms 3304-51 

Management 3304-51 

Construction & Improvements 3304-21 

Wildlife Coop. Unit 3304-44 

*Wildlife Restoration 3304-53 



LAND ACQUISITION 



LAW ENFORCEMENT 



*Deer Damage 
Public Hunting Grounds 
Conservation Officers- 
Salaries & Expenses 



*3304-53 



3308-05 
3308-07 

1003-03 



$ 86,283.47 
622.60 



108, 840.26 
41, 542.58 
80,960.17 
20,000. - 



80,960.17 

30, 004.44 

7,475.84 

135, 520.51 



86,906.07 6% 
88,719.14 6% 



317,651.10 22% 

251,343.01 18% 

258,606.62 18% 

253,960.96 18% 

17,349.- 1% 



7, 897.49 
9,218.20 

136,166.06 153,281.75 11% 

$1,427,817.65 100% 



* Continuing Accounts 
Expenditures under: 

3304-21 50% reimbursable by Federal Funds, APW Program 

33 04-47 75% 

3 304-53 75% 

RESERVE IN INLAND FISHERIES AND GAME FUND 

AS OF JUNE 30, 1964 - 

$131, 101. 58 



(30) 



ACCOUNT NO. 

{304-01 

1304-42 

5304-51 

5304-54 



5304-21* 



)304-47** 



5304-53** 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DIVISION OF FISHERIES & GAME 



F iscal Year July 1, 1963 to June 30, 1964 



TITLE 

Administration 

Fisheries Management 

Wildlife Management 

Plans for Fish Hatchery 
Quabbin Reservoir 



EXPENDITURES 
APPROPRIATION & LIABILITIES 



$ 176, 561. 
474,692. 
444, 020. 

20, 000. 



$ 175,625.21 
426,491.36 
420, 526.96 

20, 000. 



REVERTED 
$ 935.79 
48, 200.64 
23,493.04 



$1,115,273. $1,042,643.53 $ 72,629.47 



CONTINUING 
APPROPRIATIONS EXPENDITURES 



BALANCE 
FORWARD 



Construction & Improv- 
ments to Fish Hatcher- 
ies, Game Farms and 
Wildlife Management 
Areas (Accelerated 
Public Works) 

Fish Restoration 
Projects 
(Dingell- Johnson) 



142,414 



30,004.44 



112,409.56 



108. 183.99 



Wildlife Restoration 
(Pittman-Robertson) 



21 9 , 7 11. 1Q 



41, 542.58 



152.869.51 



66,641.41 



66, 841 .59 



$ 470,309.09 $ 224,416.53 $ 245,892.56 



50% reimbursable by Federal Funds 



:* 



75% 



■I ii 



(31) 



SUMMARY OF FISH AND GAME INCOME 
July 1, 1963 to June 30, 1964 

Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses 

Special Licenses, Trap Registrations & Tags 

Alien Gun Permits 

Rents 

Misc. Sales and Income 

Pittman-Robertson Federal Aid 

Dingell-Johnson Federal Aid 

Court Fines 

Refunds Prior Year 

Archery Stamps 



$ 1, 145,313.50 * 
5,367.77 ** 

96.75 

3, 729.00 

4, 738.93 

55, 131.85 

15, 348.02 

8, 234.28 

1,683.14 

3, 621.10 

$ 1, 243, 264.34 



* See Detail Sheet #1 



** •• 



#2 



(32) 



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(33) 



DETAIL SHEET #2 



ANALYSIS OF SPECIAL LICENSES ISSUED UNDER SECTIONS 48, 68A, 102-3-4- 
105-6-7 and 112-A-B-C, Chapter 131, G.L. during the FISCAL YEAR 
ENDED 

June 30, 1964 



TYPE OF LICENSE 



NUMBER ISSUED 



RECEIPTS 



Trap Registrations: 

Fur Buyers: 
Taxidermists : 
Propagators : 



Initial 
Renewal 

Resident 



(Special Fish) 
Initial 
Renewal 

(Fish) 
Initial 
Renewal 

(Birds & Mammals) 
Initial 
Renewal 

(Dealers) 
Initial 
Renewal 
Additional 

(Ind. Bird or Mammal) 
Initial 
Renewal 



Shiners for Bait: 



Duplicates 

Field Trial Licenses: 

Taking of Carp & Suckers for Sale 

Quail for Training Dogs: 

Initial 
Renewal 



Commercial Shooting Preserves: 



Tags 



Tags: 



Game 
Fish 



107 
613 

25 

59 



19 

197 



5 
85 



77 
301 



4 

79 

372 



23 

45 

233 
2 

2 

1 



11 
32 

5 
500 

5592 
18, 342 



$ 260.25 
250.00 
295.00 

235.00 

280.00 

1, 288.00 



629.00 

45.50 

1, 166.00 
20.00 
10.00 

151.00 

250.00 
25.00 

279.60 
183.42 



TOTAL 



$ 5,367.77 



LEGISLATION 



The following laws affecting the Division of Fisheries and Game were 
macted during the legislative session of 1964. 



:HAPTER 145: ACTS, 1964 



An act prohibiting the altering of any license or 
permit issued by the Division of Fisheries and 
Game. 



:HAPTER 156: ACTS, 1964: 



ZHAPTER 192: ACTS, 1964: 



An act relative to the taking of Shad. 

An act making certain provisions of law relative 
to the closing of the hunting season by Proclam- 
ation of the Governor applicable to hunting on 
coastal waters. 



IHAPTER 390: ACTS, 1964 



An act permitting the Division of Fisheries and 
Game to issue permits for the trapping of certain 
birds. 



ZHAPTER 438: ACTS, 1964 



ZHAPTER 445: ACTS, 1964: 



ZHAPTER 52 7: ACTS, 1964 



:HAPTER 48:RESOLVES, 1964 



IHAPTER 62:RESOLVES, 1964 



An act authorizing the Public Access Board to 
provide public access to certain inland waters. 

An act authorizing the Director of the Division 
of Fisheries and Game to sell and convey certain 
property in the town of Marshfield. 

An act authorizing agents of the Division of 
Fisheries and Game of the Department of Natural 
Resources to remedy certain conditions caused 
by beavers. 

Resolve providing for an investigation and study 
by a special commission relative to the inland 
conservation laws. 

Resolve providing for an investigation and study 
by the Department of Natural Resources, the Div- 
ision of Fisheries and Game and the Metropolitan 
District Commission relative to the hunting of 
deer and to the poisoning of feeder streams of 
the Quabbin Reservoir. 









(35) 



RULES AND REGULATIONS PROMULGATED BY THE DIRECTOR OF FISHERIES AND 
GAME DURING FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1964, AND SUMMARY OF OUTSTANDING 
REGULATIONS. 



August 4, 1948. Rules and regulations for the artificial propa- 
gation and maintenance of fish. 

August 4, 1948. Rules and regulations for the artificial propa- 
gation of birds and mammals. 

July 14, 1952. Rules and regulations for hunting with bows and 
arrows. 

August 12, 1953. Rules and regulations governing sale of protected 
fresh water fish by licensed dealers in Massachusetts. 






March 26, 1954. Rules and regulations governing the display of 
sporting, hunting, fishing, and trapping licenses in Massachusetts, 
effective April 9, 1954. 

January 28, 1955. Rules and regulations relative to public fishing 
grounds in Massachusetts. 

April 10, 1956. Rules and regulations governing the taking of fish 
in interstate ponds lying between Massachusetts and New Hampshire, effect- 
ive April 10, 1956. 

February 14, 1957. Rules and regulations relating to the taking of 
carp and suckers for the purpose of sale. 

February 15, 1957. Rules and regulations relative to the tagging 
of deer in Massachusetts. 

October 20, 1959. Rules and regulations for public shooting grounds 
and wildlife management areas in Massachusetts. 

December 23, 1961. Rules and regulations regarding Lake Garfield 
in the town of Monterey. 

May 10, 1962. Rules and regulations relating to the taking of 
shad in the inland waters of the Commonwealth. 

January 1, 1963. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting of 
deer in Massachusetts. 

January 1, 1963. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting of 
hares and rabbits in Massachusetts. 

August 24, 1963. Migratory game bird regulations 1963-1964 



(36) 



i a UL' 



October 1, 1963. Rules and regulations relating to hunting of 
pheasants, quail, and ruffed grouse in Massachusetts. 






October 10, 1963. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting 
of gray squirrels in Massachusetts. 



October 21, 1963. Rules and regulations relative to the use of 
poison in killing mammals or birds 

December 15, 1963. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting 
and trapping of mammals in Massachusetts. 



January 1, 1964. 



Interstate fishing regulations on Wallum Lake. 



April 10, 1964. Rules and regulations relating to the taking 
of certain fish in Massachusetts. 



(37) 



RETIREMENTS - 1964 FISCAL YEAR 



Aug. 31, 1963 



Joseph Slaby, Conservation Helper, 
at Palmer Fish Hatchery- 



June 30, 1964 



Allan S. Kennedy, Supt., Bureau of 
Wildlife Research & Management 



(38) 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAME 

Ninety- ninth Annual Report 
July 1, 1963 to June 30, 1964 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Report of the Fisheries and Game Board 1-3 

Information and Education Program 4-11 

Game Program 12-18 

Fisheries Program 19-26 

Realty Program 27 

Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit 28 

Massachusetts Cooperative Fishery Unit 29 

Administration 

How the Sportsman's Dollar Was Spent 30 

Appropriations and Expenditures 31 

Summary of Fish and Game Income 32 

Receipts from Fishing, Hunting and Trapping 

Licenses 

Analysis of Special Licenses 34 

Legislation 

Summary of Outstanding Regulations 36-37 

Retirements 3 8 



Publication Approved by Alfred C. Holland, State Purchasing Agent #9 



t-i/V^t^-w^ 






yn. 



1965 



mm 





nua 




feport 



James M. Shepard, Director 

Government Center 

100 Cambridge Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 



ITS 

SMITE 

R5ASS. OFFICIALS 




20 



(Q&£ 




73 <Jnvrwnt> Sfiveet, ^eM&w 02/ffl 



His Excellency, John A. Volpe, Governor of the Common- 
wealth, the Executive Council, the General Court, and the 
Board of the Division of Fisheries and Game. 



Sirs: 

I have the honor to submit herewith the One-Hundredth 
Annual Report of the Division of Fisheries and Game, 
covering the fiscal year from July 1, 1964, to June 30, 
1965. 

This marks a most significant year in the century-long 
tradition of public service of this agency which is charged 
with managing and perpetuating the wildlife resources of 
the Commonwealth for the benefit and enjoyment of its 
more than five million citizens. I think it is most fitting 
as this agency marks its official Centennial Observance, 
that this report indicates both a continuance of this tradi- 
tion as well as major consideration for the future. 

I trust you will find it most informative and worthy. 



Respectfully submitted 

VJjAMES M 



'JAMES M. SHEPARD 



DIRECTOR 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAME 
One Hundredth Annual Report 
July 1, 1964 June 30, 1965 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Fisheries and Game Board 1-3 

Fisheries Program . 4-12 

Massachusetts Cooperative Fisheries Unit 13 

Game Program 14-21 

Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit 22 

Realty Program 23-24 

Information and Education Program 25-29 

General Administration 

How the Sportsman's Dollar Was Spent 30 

Appropriations and Expenditures 31 

Summary of Fish and Game Income 32 

Receipts From Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses 33 

Analysis of Special Licenses 34 

Legislation 35 

Rules and Regulations Promulgated 36-37 

Publication of this Document Approved by Alfred C. Holland, State Purchasing Agent 

800-3-66-942332 Estimated Cost Per Copy: $1.27 



FISHERIES AND GAME BOARD 

The 100th annual report of the Division of Fisheries and Game does more than just 
mark completion of another year, it also marks the end of a century (and the beginning of 
another) of public service by this state agency charged with properly managing wildlife 
resources of the Commonwealth for the benefit of its more than five million citizens. 

This report summarizes a number of outstanding achievements. While reported on in 
more detail in the various sections of this report, the Board wishes to comment on certain 
items of special importance. 

Early in the centennial year, the director wisely decided that unusual expenditure 
merely to observe a 100th birthday was not warranted. Accordingly, observance of the event 
was held to special activities which could be readily worked into existing activities with 
little added expense. In addition to publicity on the event through routine information means, 
a number of large brook trout were tagged with special tags, for the return of which each 
successful angler received a handsome, signed certificate. Similar plans were prepared 
for tagging a number of cock pheasants during the next fiscal period. Other similarly in- 
expensive observances are planned. 

Natural reproduction of lake trout at Quabbin Reservoir appears to be an accom- 
plished fact, foretelling continued good fishing for this species. 

Perseverance and dedication of our hatchery personnel again produced a large number 
of trout for stocking throughout the Commonwealth. This was in the face of the fourth year 
of continued drouth which produced tremendous water problems at all hatcheries. State pro- 
duction during the reporting period totalled 1, 981, 570 trout weighing 315, 258 pounds. When 
added to federally produced fish, this meant a total of 2, 111, 164 trout weighing 343, 793 pounds 
available to Massachusetts anglers throughout the season. 

An outstanding achievement was realized in April, when nearly 15, 000 landlocked 
salmon were stocked in Quabbin Reservoir. A gift of the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 
these fish may become the nucleus of a salmon fishery in Massachusetts, something that 
has not existed almost from the start of the division's 100-year history. 



Production of pheasants at our game farms continued high, with 68, 574 birds released 
to open covers throughout the state. Of this total, 51, 443 were cock birds. In addition, 
3, 020 quail and 2, 500 varying hare were released. 

Studies reveal that 76 percent of Massachusetts hunters succeed in taking game, and 
that harvests during the reporting period are on the increase. This speaks well for the 
quality of hunting in the Commonwealth, maintained in the face of decreasing wildlife habitat 
and hunting area. 




Waterfowl inventories along the coast during the winter months established that there 
were 37 percent more ducks wintering in Massachusetts than the average of the past ten 
years. 

Wild turkey introductions at Quabbin, Mount Washington and October Mountain appear 
to be holding their own. It appears that the population is remaining remarkably stable, but 



( 1) 



is not producing an increase at this time which could allow hunting. 



All personnel have been involved in providing conservation services to private indivi- 
duals and organizations to a greater degree than formerly. As the Commonwealth's chief wild- 
life conservation agency, the division is feeling increasing interest in wildlife on the part 
of the public, and is striving to meet this demand with the particular type of counsel and 
assistance that only this division can supply. 

Studies reveal that 58. 8 percent of Massachusetts hunlers hunt only on private land, 
while 34. 9 percent hunt both private land and division-controlled areas. The remainder 
hunt only division areas. However, the future is obvious; the time is not far off when 
hunters will depend more than ever on publicly owned areas. Accordingly, the division 
continued to seek ways and means of establishing more areas while alleviating pressure on 
private lands. Properties were added to the Swift River area, the Phillipston-Petersham 
area, Birch Hill, the Northeast Area, and the Podick hatchery. A tract was acquired on 
the Quaboag River, and two gifts, one a tract in Northboro, and the other a right-of-way to 
Knopp's Pond, Groton were received. 






Despite an 18 percent decrease in its budget, the information and education program 
continued its efforts to arouse public sentiment in favor of conservation and to acquaint the 
public with operations of the division. At the year's end, 52, 281 people were regularly 
receiving the division's magazine. 

International recognition of the division's program was received when the I&E Chief 
was unanimously elected president of the American Association for Conservation Information, 
an international professional association in the field. This action reflects the esteem in 
which this program is held by its peers in other states and Canada. 

A record number of youth were scheduled for the 17th annual junior conservation 
camp, with 150 boys completing the course. This program is unique in that it does not draw 
on the budget, being totally financed by tuition fees paid by the boy's sponsors. 

Division television programs received their third first-place award in international 
competition in the past four years. 

Division news releases, of which 143 were issued during the reporting period, con- 
tinued to be well received by the press, radio and television stations, who made wide use of 
them. 

Despite the fact that the end of the fiscal year showed a reserve of $250, 193. 61 in the 
Inland Fisheries and Game Fund, the Board does not feel that the division is in a particularly 
favorable financial condition. It is our policy to retain at least $200, 000 in reserve to cover 
emergencies and to provide for periods when revenue drops. In addition, increasing ex- 
penses for routine programs, the need for new programs to meet increased demands on our 
wildlife resources, and a recent history of poor finances make further demands upon our 
financial resources. 

At this time our legislation to secure matching funds for a much-needed land acqui- 
sition program has not been secured. Even if passed, this measure will not mitigate 
financial problems facing the division since these funds will be earmarked for a specific 
purpose and will contribute nothing to other activities of the division. However, 

(2) 






rwn 



the division does appear to be in a better financial condition than in recent years, due 
largely to extensive economics practiced at all levels, and to increased efforts to promote 
greater interest in hunting and fishing in the Commonwealth. 

Mr. Roger D. Williams, Natick, resigned as Chairman at the meeting on April 27, 
1965, due to his plans to move from the state. Mr. Harry C. Darling, East Bridgewater, 
was elected Chairman, and Mr. Edward Tierney, Pittsfield, was elected Secretary at this 
same meeting. There were no changes in Board membership during the reporting period. 



The Board of the Division of Fisheries and Game expresses its sincere apprecia- 
tion to all personnel of the division for their continued exemplary performance, and wishes 
also to express its sincere appreciation to the Governor, Executive Council, General Court, 
and to those other departments, agencies, members of public information media and the 
general public who have assisted and supported our programs in the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Harry C. Darling, Chairman 
Edward J. Tierney, Secretary 
Roger D. Williams 
F. Stanley Mikelk 
Martin Burns 



(3) 



FISHERIES PROGRAM 



Introduction 

Research and management activities were continued with emphasis being directed 
toward establishment of ground work data for future reference and inclusion of this data 
for successful management of game fishes. Three research projects, Quabbin Reservoir 
Investigations, Harvest Studies on Managed Ponds and Effect of Water Chemistry on 
Fish Survival, were continued, as well as one development project, namely, Statewide Re- 
clamations. Newly created projects include: Stream Development, Connecticut River 
Survey, Warmwater Research, and one land acquisition project at Sandy Pond, Plymouth. 
Continuation of two access projects, Swift River Acquisition and Squannacook River Land 
Acquisition, were incorporated in the activities. 

Projects were increased in scope to bring problem areas under study, to develop 
suitable habitat and successful stocking programs. Areas where information is lacking 
were taken under study to lend credence to heretofore accepted measurements and to 
delineate limiting factors in fish production. 



(4) 



Quabbin Reservoir 

The eleventh year of study at Quabbin Reservoir has been completed. The creel 
census agent interviewed 10, 066 fishermen from April to October, representing 53, 498 
angler trips. During this period, a total of 40, 259 pounds of fish were harvested. The 
most heavily harvested fish was the brown bullhead, followed by white perch, yellow perch, 
lake trout, largemouth bass, brown trout, sunfish, chain pickerel and rainbow trout. 
Changes in the trout catch were significantly noted with all other species of trout giving 
way to the growing lake trout population. Lake trout releases of illegal size fish increased 
3.2-fold due to the entrance of naturally spawned fish into the catch data. 

Sampling of test coves was conducted to obtain information on the composition of 
fish populations not indicated by angler census. 

Information concerning the life history of lake trout, the number and age of spawning- 
adults, sex ratios, food habits, and residual DDT was gathered and analyzed. 

Physical and chemical characteristics of the water and basin were taken to deter- 
mine the suitability of habitat for successful expansion of this fishery at the reservoir. 



B 

In 

m 



Stocking included 258 brood stock and two-year-old rainbow trout and 20, 000 brown 
trout. Indications of a developing and expanding lake trout fishery through natural repro- 
duction curtailed stocking of this species. 

Biological reconnaisance indicated that the reservoir possessed ecological niches 
suitable for the introduction of land-locked salmon without decimating the existing lake 
trout population. Accordingly, on 21 April, 1965, a total of 14,420 fingerlings were obtained 
from Craig Brook National Fish Hatchery, East Orland, Maine and stocked in Quabbin 
Reservoir. The possibility of transporting these fish long distances was established. 
Mortality was negligible with only two fish succumbing. Biologists are continuing their 
investigations to determine the survival rates of this initial stocking but expect no signifi- 
cant reproduction or establishment of a self-sustaining fishery. 



■ 

* -v. 






Water Chemistry Survey 

The statewide project to determine the effects of dissolved minerals on aquatic life 
was continued. The chief factors under study, which influence chemical equilibrium, are 
temperature, concentration of reactants and the specific chemical nature of the reacting 
substances. 

Research was undertaken to derive the theoretical accuracy of the anayltic processes 
and the probable rates of reaction occurring under natural conditions which affect aquatic 
life. 

Water samples from 157 stations were analyzed with an atomic absorption spectro- 
photometer and other quantitative equipment. Analyses of Quabbin Reservoir and the five 
state fish hatcheries were completed. Marked variations occur between winter and summer 
sampling. Limnogeographical maps are being prepared to assist biologists in planning 
stocking and aiding research. 



■ 



Plans for more detailed studies involving analysis of bottom types, ground water 

( 5) 



supplies and run-off are contemplated. 

Pesticide-Insecticide Study 

During the past year over 3, 000 samples of various fish and game species were 
analyzed for pesticide residues. The bulk of the investigations were concerned with a 
monitoring program, initiated in 1962, on the biota of the Sudbury, Assabet and Concord 
rivers. 

Incidental short-range investigations were carried out for the State of New Jersey, 
the University of Massachusetts, and various watershed organizations. Personnel from the 
Waltham Field Station served as apprentices in the laboratory prior to the establishment 
of a similar laboratory at Waltham. 

The use of an electron- capture gas chromatograph provided by the Massachusetts 
Audubon Society was continued. A cooperative program to study the effects of the insecticide 
"Sevin" on aquatic populations was undertaken with the Department of Natural Resources 
during their gypsy moth spraying program. A total of 480 samples were analyzed for this 
project. 

Financial assistance was received from the University of Massachusetts for personnel 
and equipment necessary to the implementation of studies on DDT and its relation to song- 
birds and waterfowl. 

The U.S. Department of Public Health granted the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries 
and Game a grant of $20, 000, renewable for three years, to establish a statewide stream 
monitoring program in the field of pesticide pollution. 

Statewide Reclamations 

Two warmwater ponds totaling 108 acres and three trout ponds totaling 178 acres 
were reclaimed. These ponds were subsequently restocked with trout fingerlings and with 
bass and pickerel yearlings reared in the state hatcheries and culture systems. Stocking 
was based on information obtained from the research project which evaluated harvest data 
of Cape Cod and central Massachusetts ponds. One additional pond was given a partial 
reclamation. 

Stream Access and Improvement Project 

This project was initiated to create fisherman access to streams by cutting stream- 
side trails, creating new roads, and improving existing roads for vehicle access. Four 
areas currently under improvement are: Birch Hill, Westville, West Hill and Swift River. 

Improvements are to be brought about through facilitating access in vehicles and on 
foot, and through betterment of fish populations by habitat improvement. 

District Activities 






Wildlife district management activities included care and maintenance of two culture 
pond systems, stocking of trout and warm-water fishes, maintenance of public fishing areas 
and habitat improvement. 

(6) 



An intensive creel census was conducted on opening day using ground and aerial 
counts. 

District personnel investigated fish kills, advised groups in fish pond management 
and cooperated with sportsmen's clubs in projects designed to provide increased interest 
in conservation. 

The Harold Parker State Forest Pond System in North Andover, cared for by the 
Northeast District, yielded approximately 1, 785 pounds of adult yearling and fingerling 
bass and a small amount of smallmouth bass. The Merrill Pond System in Sutton, attended 
by the Central Wildlife District, produced about 550 pounds of chain pickerel and 450 pounds 
of largemouth bass. All were released in public waters. 






(7) 






POND RECLAMATIONS 



POND 

Plunkett Pond 
Benedict Pond 
Whalom Pond 
Uncas Pond 
Jamaica Pond 
Wright's Pond 



TOWN 

Hinsdale 

Monterey 

Lunenburg 

Franklin 

Bo ston 

Medford 



ACRES 
73 
35 
99 
18 
61 
24 



LBS. /ACRE 
76 
126 
105 
132 
138 
105 



(8) 



TROUT PROPAGATION 

State and Federal Hatchery Production 

A grand total of 2, 111,164 brook, brown and rainbow trout weighing 343, 793 pounds 
were distributed in Massachusetts public waters during the past year. 

Production of the five state hatcheries totalled 1, 981, 570 trout weighing 315, 258 
pounds. The total number of catchables (six inches and over) were 1,467, 449. In addi- 
tion an inventory of 5, 100 lake trout fingerlings and yearlings were released in the Quabbin 
Reservoir in the fall of 1964 and spring of 1965. 

State hatchery releases were supplemented by 129, 594 trout weighing 28, 535 
pounds were received from three Federal hatcheries. 

Water Resources 

The drouth which has prevailed in the northeast did affect many of our hatchery 
installation during, the past year by reduced water flows through the hatchery systems. 
However, the installation of aerators and pumps and the re-use of some water made 
it possible for our fish culturists to attain a normal liberation of fish for the stocking 
programs. 

Lake Trout 



In 1962 it appeared that the lake trout introduced into Quabbin Reservoir during 
1952 - 1957 would not sustain themselves through natural reproduction therefor lake trout 
eyed eggs were again requisitioned through the Conservation Department of the State of 
New York for incubation at our Sunderland and Montague fish hatcheries. The resulting 
fingerlings were stocked in the Reservoir as previously reported. 

A similar request was again made early in 1963 for eyed lake trout eggs in an effort 
to promote the lake trout fishing. However, creel census returns in late 1963 revealed that 
the lake trout had finally become available in promising number for the fishermen. 




In view of the commitment to receive the eggs it was decided to incubate them and 
the resulting inventory of 34, 900 fingerlings was liberated in Quabbin during October, 1964, 
and a balance of 5, 100 was wintered at the Sunderland hatchery and planted in the Quabbin in 
June 1965. These fish were fin clipped for identification from the native population in the 
Reservoir. 

Nutritional Research 



During the past several years we have carried on research feeding with brands of 
pelletted fish food other than Silver Cup to determine their comparable results with the rations 
presently being fed at our hatcheries. On November 30, 1964, all feeding research was 
dropped due to low blood count and general losses from the two brands of food other than 
Silver Cup. 



(9) 



Coloration Work Continued 

The original intent of continuing this work was to provide the fishing public with 
more attractive catches. Research proved that colder waters failed to allow the fish 
to assimilate the food on an equal basis with hatcheries having warmer well water. 
Therefor, the additive Paprika which was incorporated into the pellets at a 3% level and 
fed three months starting in January was reduced to a 2% level and fed throughout the year. 
The change provided stocking fish of equal appearance from all hatcheries. 

We are continuing an interest in paprika containing a minimum of 194 mgs. of 
carotene per pound because of the concentration of vitamins discovered in this product 
and because this additive, when incorporated into the diet of brood stock, seems to 
effect fertility of eggs and results in more fry production. 

Construction 

The Montague hatchery completed two concrete raceways approximately 100 feet 
each, with an outlet for cleaning and water control. This work completes the section from 
the roadway down to the railroad tracks. 

The Palmer hatchery completed a series of cement raceways to accommodate the 
early advanced brook, brown and rainbow fingerlings from the U. S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service. Repairs were made to several existing ponds. Several 2" wells were driven for 
emergency water pumping. Due to the closing down of hatching operations the crew were 
busy through the winter trimming trees to reduce fire hazard. 









The Sandwich hatchery undertook construction of another block of six cement ponds 
which, when completed, will finish work in the area opposite the administration buildings 
and provide much needed parking area for visitors. 



A 10" gravel packed well was installed at East Sandwich complete with pump and 
supplied with three phase current. Some repair work was undertaken at the station with 
lumber from Birch Hill. Many new 2" wells were installed at both the hatcheries. 

The Sunderland hatchery reconstructed five south-center section ponds with concrete 
dams, with cleanouts and cement sides. Also two long ponds next to the lower roadway 
were reconstructed with concrete and cleanouts. Several new 2" wells were installed at 
both of these stations. 

The Sutton hatchery water system to the sorting house was completed by installa- 
tion of a new cement distributing box and new piping to the troughs. Many oak trees were 
salvaged for lumber and fuel for the hatchery. Several small wells were installed because 
of the continued drouth. 



Equipment 

Several new trucks were purchased; many new pumps and water aerators were 
acquired to keep our hatcheries in operation. 



( 10) 






Hartsville Hatchery 

The Federal fish hatchery at Hartsville will be operated by the Massachusetts 
Division of Fisheries and Game beginning July 1. 

Fish and Game personnel will continue the operation under the temporary dir- 
ection of a U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service supervisor. The U. S. F. W. S. is also leaving 
most of the fish stock and equipment there to expedite state operation. 



The Hartsville station has an annual production capacity of about 18, 000 pounds of 



trout. 



( ID 



TROUT DISTRIBUTION FROM STATE AND FEDERAL HATCHERIES 



JULY 1, 1964 TO JUNE 30, 1965 



BROOKS BROWNS RAINBOWS 

Under 6" Over 6" Under 6" Over 6" Under 6" Over 6" 



314,000 691,242 220,715 458,324 109,000 



317, 883 



TOTAL TROUT 



2, 111, 164 



Total Trout Distributed 6-9" 1, 017, 764 

Total Trout Distributed 9" plus 320, 091 

Total Federal Trout Dist. 6" plus 129, 594 

Total Catchables (6" plus) 

Total Fingerlings (6" minus) 

GRAND TOTAL 



1,467,449 

643,715 

2, 111, 164 



STATION POUNDAGE 

STATION TOTAL LBS . 

Montague Hatchery 77, 134 

Palmer Hatchery 41, 909 

Sandwich Hatchery 65, 379 

Sunderland Hatchery 115, 084 

Sutton Hatchery 15, 752 

State Poundage 

North Attleboro 11, 345 

Hartsville 6, 222 

Nashua, New Hampshire 10, 968 

Federal Poundage 

GRAND TOTAL 



315,258 



28, 535 
343,793 



(This table does not show trout retained for brood stock) 



( 12) 






MASSACHUSETTS COOPERATIVE FISHERY UNIT 



In conjunction with the Division of Fisheries and Game, the University of Massa- 
chusetts has initiated research projects involving Quabbin Reservoir, the Connecticut River 
and small artificial ponds in central Massachusetts. 

At Quabbin, 1, 600 specimens of both white perch and rock bass were studied with 
emphasis placed on age and growth, breeding habits, embryology and fecundity. 

The Connecticut River survey is designed to evaluate the recreational potential of 
that river. The feasibility of using aerial photographs to indicate present and potential land 
use for recreational development is being studied. 

Ecological, geological and physical survey of the river are coordinated with the 
Division of Fisheries and Game biological sampling and creel census work. 

Utilization of small artificial ponds in Massachusetts has increased in the postwar 
period. This study is designed to increase our present knowledge of the importance of 
these impoundments to develop a sound fish management program in this area. 



( 13) 



ANNUAL REPORT 



GAME PROGRAM 



We have attempted to conduct a balanced game program during the past year. Pro- 
pagation of pheasants and quail was still the largest budget item. Management of Division 
controlled lands for public hunting was the next highest. There was an increase in money 
spent on game research. Here again we tried to maintain a balance between basic and applied 
research. Acquisition of game management lands was at the bottom of the list in financial 
expenditure, but high in planning. With such limited acquisition funds, many areas were 
considered, but only a few could be given purchase priority. We were fortunate to have the 
bulk of our upland season during the regular period in spite of a woods closure in the 
middle of November due to extreme forest fire conditions. 

As reported in the past, the bulk of game research, management and land acquisition 
was financed 75 percent by Federal Aid Funds (Pittman-Robertson). Those projects are 
so designated in the following report. 



( 14) 






FEDERAL AID PROJECTS 

W-9-D - Statewide Development Project 

The development of wildlife management areas for public hunting was done on this 
project. It had a budget of $117, 000. 00. Work was done on 14 areas located in the towns of 
Williamstown, Peru, Chester, Huntington, Winchendon-Royalston-Templeton, Hubbardston, 
Barre, Oxford, Uxbridge, Westboro, West Newbury, Ayer-Shirley-Lancaster, Plymouth, 
Falmouth and Freetown. This work was scheduled for the entire year and consisted of: 
maintenance of office and storage buildings (94 man days) ; maintenance of water controls 
(3 man days); maintenance of bridges (25 man days); development and maintenance of roads 
(185 man days); posting of boundaries, entrances, roads etc. (272 man days); planting 
wildlife trees and shrubs (73 man days); planting herbaceous wildlife food and cover (371 man 
days); clearing land by bulldozer, brush cutter, axe and chain saw and spraying herbicide 
(634 man days); controlling undesirable plant species (6 man days); encouragement of 
natural fruiting species (5 man days); maintenance of wood duck nesting boxes (108 man days) 
In addition, about 30 man days were spent cutting and planting on the Westboro Beagle 
Training Area along with the annual census of the cottontail rabbit population located there. 



W-35-R - Game Population Trend and Harvest Survey 
Small Game and Waterfowl Harvest 

A return of 1089 postal cards or 73. 9 percent was obtained from the initial mailing 
of 1500 questionnaires. Each return was calculated to represent 100. 32 hunters. It was 
assumed that data from non-respondents would have been similar to that of the respondents. 



I 



The majority (69 percent) of 1963 licensees did hunt in 1964 and 76 percent of them 
were successful in taking some species of game. Ten percent of those who hunted spent 
their time in pursuit of deer only. 

Grouse, quail, white hare, raccoon, woodcock, gray squirrel, black duck and other 
duck all showed an increased kill over 1962. The pheasant kill was almost the same but the 
cottontail rabbit kill declined. 

In regard to hunting pressure (preference), pheasants were first, followed by grouse, 
cottontails, woodcock, white hare, gray squirrel, black duck, other ducks, quail and 
raccoon. 

For hunter success, the species were ranked in the following order: gray squirrel, 
other ducks, black duck, cottontail, rabbit, pheasant, grouse, white hare, woodcock, quail 
and raccoon. 

The majority (58. 8 percent) of the hunters reported using private land only for their 
sport. About 6 percent (6. 3) hunted only on state management areas. Approximately 35 
percent (34. 9) used both private land and state areas. 

There was a calculated total of 48, 856 deer hunters in 1964. The mean deer kill 
was . 0472 which gave a calculated total kill of 2306 deer compared with 2277 reported during 
the deer season. The greatest percent (30. 5) of deer hunters reported they hunted the 
whole week. Those hunting one day (Monday or Saturday) were next (29.4 percent). Next 

( 15) 






were those hunting two days (21. 4 percent) of which one day was Monday or Saturday. The 
remaining 19 percent hunted from three to five days. Those gunners who hunted all week 
were most successful followed by those who hunted only Monday or Saturday. 

Statewide Deer Harvest 

During the 1964 deer season, Massachusetts hunters reported killing 2277 deer. 
Shot gun hunters harvested 2260 deer of which 1063 were males and 1, 191 were females. 
Six hunters neglected to report the sex of the deer. Archery hunters bagged 17 deer (10 
males and 7 females). For the first time in 16 years, the sex ratio of the reported kill changed 
from an even ratio of bucks to does to a heavier kill of does (100 males: 112 females). 

A single factor that may have affected the 1964 deer kill was the severe ice conditions 
that persisted throughout most of the shotgun season. 

The reported kill per county fluctuated with Franklin County holding number one 
position. Berkshire County remained second and Worcester County dropped from number 
one position (for 1963) to number three position. 

Archers had a split season due to forest fire danger in the middle of November. 

The 1964 reported deer kill was 38 percent less than the average kill for the twelve, 
previous years. The largest percent of deer mortalities other than by legal hunting is 
caused by motor vehicles and dogs. 

Determination of the Quantity of Deer Range in Massachusetts 

All acreage was considered deer range after subtracting the amount used for human 
needs and activities such as homes or other dwellings, factories, airports, parks, roads 
and highways, market gardens, etc. Reported deer range does not necessarily signify the 
presence of a deer population. The final acreage figure will be further refined when such 
things as closed towns are considered. 

Deer range data are on file at Westboro for 351 towns and cities. From the cover 
survey data compiled in 1952, the estimated deer range in Massachusetts amounted to 
3, 955, 192 acres. The location of deer range per town or city has not been plotted on maps. 



Determination of the Removal Rate of Deer in Massachusetts 

Mortality data from kills caused by other than legal hunting are recorded by conser- 
vation officers. These were tabulated for the years 1961 through 1964. In order of impor- 
tance, motor vehicles (61%) and dogs (24%) caused 85 percent of the mortalities. The remain- 
ing 15 percent were made up from illegal gun kills; crop damage kills; unknown causes and 
miscellaneous causes. 



The average kill from all causes other than hunting was 446 deer per year. 

The average ratio of known sex deer kills for a four-year period, 1961 to 1964, was 
100 males to 117 females. Kills per month showed high female mortality in all months 
except during October and November. 



( 16) 



Deer were reported killed in 270 (77%) of the 351 towns and cities in Massachusetts. 

No evidence was found of deer deaths due to disease or starvation. 

Determination of Deer Hunting Pressure in Massachusetts 

Results of a deer hunter survey were analyzed. Due to the method used to conduct 
the survey, a statistical analysis was not possible. The calculated number of Massachusetts 
deer hunters was 48, 700. Roughly 50 percent of the 445 hunters interviewed reported 
killing a deer. Only ten hunters said they had wounded a deer. The average age of 443 
deer hunters was calculated to be 34 years. Married hunters outnumbered the unmarried 
hunters at a ratio of 100 to 38. Factors affecting the amount of time spent deer hunting 
are listed in order of importance: work; none (or nothing); finances; school; family; 
weather; health. 

The deer hunters interviewed hunted an average of three days. The computed minimum 
average number of miles traveled by those deer hunters was 95 miles round trip. Roughly 55 
percent (243) of 444 hunters interviewed had hunted deer for one to ten years. Successful 
hunters (301) reported killing 1, 443 deer or roughly five deer per successful hunter during 
that period. A large percent (73%) of Massachusetts deer hunters (326) said they shot the 
first deer they saw. Only 27 percent (116) indicated they were selective. When questioned 
on shooting preference the hunters' answers, in numerical order, were: 228-none (no pre- 
ference); 200-buck; 73-doe; 59-buck or doe; 3-fawn. 

The most popular deer hunting method in Massachusetts is the stand or still method. 
This method is followed in preference by stalking, tracking, drive and a combination of all 
four methods. Most deer hunters (81%) hunted in or with a party. The average party size 
was three hunters. Deer hunters used an average of one vehicle per party. 

During the 1964 deer week, the deer hunter spent an average of $26. The 419 hunters 
interviewed reported a total expenditure of $10, 856. 18. Deer were reported seen by 258 (58%) 
of the 445 hunters interviewed. A total of 600 deer were seen by 256 hunters or an average of 
two deer per hunter. Only 54 (12%) of the hunters interviewed reported killing a deer in 1963. 

Winter Waterfowl Census 



The winter inventory was flown on January 5 and January 6, 1965. The flight included 
the whole coast from New Hampshire to Rhode Island and the islands of Martha's Vineyard 
and Nantucket. The total count was 132, 500 ducks and geese which is 1.4 percent higher 
than 1964 and 37 percent higher than the ten- year average (1956-1965). Black ducks were up 
13. 7 percent over 1964 and 35. 2 percent over the ten-year average. Diving bay ducks (scaup 
golden-eye, buffle-head) were down 23. 9 percent from 1964 but up 3. 6 percent from the 
ten-year average. Diving sea ducks (scoter, eider, oldsquaw) were up 18. 1 percent over 
1964 and 62. 1 percent over the ten-year average. Canada geese were down 25. 9 percent 
from 1964, but were up 33. 3 percent over the ten-year average. 

Mourning Dove Census 

The 1964 mourning dove call count survey showed a breeding population index of ten. 
This is an increase of 25 percent over 1963 (eight). An average of 5. doves per route was 
heard. 

(17) 




There were 37 doves seen in 1964 compared to 45 seen in 1963. 

Spring Quail Census 

The 1964 spring census of quail in Barnstable, Plymouth and Bristol Counties 
showed no significant difference (. 05) from 1961 or a four-year average, 1958-1961. 
Apparently the quail population in southeastern Massachusetts is fairly stable. Although 
the index in Barnstable County is somewhat lower than previous years, it is not enough 
to be considered serious at this point. 

Wood Duck Nesting Success and Brood Survival 

In 1964, there were 38 nesting attempts by wood ducks at Great Meadows Refuge of 
which 31 were successful. These produced 364 ducklings. The banding of incubating fe- 
males was continued and 35 nesting hens were handled. An additional four females were 
checked and banded on boxes at Buttricks ponds. Twenty-six of these 35 birds were known to 
be old females and only four were known to be yearling birds. The five remaining hens were 
unbanded and untagged and may have been young birds which had originated from natural 
cavities outside the refuge. The disproportion of old birds indicates a failure in recruitment 
of young birds to the resident, breeding population. 

Dual incubation in a nesting box was recorded when a male and a female wood duck 
were found to be simultaneously occupying the same box. The male persisted in incubation 
with the female until the eggs hatched. 

Project personnel collected 190 wood duck eggs from eight sites in the Sudbury-Con- 
cord area and central Massachusetts for D.D.T. analysis. 

In connection with the insecticide studies, 98 ducklings, were hatched at the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts, hand-reared to four or five weeks of age and then released at Great 
Meadows Refuge. These ducklings, web-tagged at hatching, were leg-banded on release, 
and their survival and development traced through the summer trapping and banding pro- 
gram. 

Eighty-five percent (311) of the 364 ducklings which hatched on Great Meadows were 
web-tagged before they left the nesting box. Banding traps were operated five days a week 
from July 14 to October 2. Eighty-seven or 28 percent of the ducklings tagged at Great 
Meadows were recaptured. Of these, 71 or 23 percent of the total (311) were traced to flight 
stage. Twenty-six of the hand-reared birds were recaptured and traced to flight stage or 
beyond. The September age ratio of only 1. 5 immatures for each adult again indicated poor 
brood survival. 

A comparison with the table of development constructed during the previous study 
(1952-1954) showed that the hand- reared birds exhibited normal growth and development 
after release on the marsh, but the wild- reared population was stunted. It was surmised 
that a lack of readily available insect food might have been responsible for the stunted growth 
of ducklings at Great Meadows. 



( 18) 



B 



Experimental Turkey Stocking 

A wild turkey restoration experiment was initiated in Massachusetts in 1960. 
During 1960 and 1961 a total of 22 wild turkeys were released in Quabbin Reservation. The 
population has not increased since 1961, but has exhibited remarkable stability. During 
the summer of 1964, the number of poults produced, and the survival of poults from hatching 
to fall, was the lowest since stocking was terminated in 1961. Over- winter survival, how- 
ever, was the highest recorded to date. A winter feeding program was probably partly re- 
sponsible for the higher fall to spring survival. Twenty-one turkeys were present in April 
1965. 

At Mount Washington, eleven turkeys were released in 1961. This population has 
also exhibited no growth. Fifteen turkeys were present in September. Fifteen turkeys were 
observed in February, 1965 and most, if not all, probably survived the winter. This pop- 
ulation has been fed by residents of the area almost continuously since 1961. 

Twenty-nine turkeys were released on October Mountain State Forest in Washington 
during 1961 and 1962. One torn and three hens were present in April, 1964. At least two 
broods were produced. A minimum of 16 turkeys were present in September. Fourteen 
were fed during the winter. At least twelve turkeys were present in April 1965. 

Sixteen turkeys were released at Otis in 1961. There is no evidence that any turkeys 
have survived in the area. 

Eight wild turkeys were transplanted from Quabbin Reservation to the Holyoke Range 
in 1964. There apparently was no reproduction. Two hens were trapped and returned to 
Quabbin. One hen was killed by an automobile. The fate of the other five turkeys is un- 
known. 

Several effluent seepages in central Massachusetts were sampled during the summer 
of 1964 and the winter of 1964-1965. Fifty-one kinds of plants were found in 28 seeps 
during the summer. The estimated amount of plant material per square foot of seep during 
the winter was 16. 1 grams. 

Non- Federal Aid Work 

District personnel were involved in many game management activities which were 
financed entirely by state funds. Starting in the spring, they checked the pens of all clubs 
who applied for birds on the club rearing program. They delivered the six-week-old 
pheasants to those approved clubs. During the early summer there was the distribution of 
surplus brood stock. In the late summer and fall there were pheasants and quail to be re- 
leased following a pre-arranged schedule. White hare were stocked during December, 
January and February. 

There were numerous requests for conservation services. From spring to late fall, 
there were continual beaver complaints to answer. Traps were supplied for rabbit and raccoon 
damage complaints. Advice was given to many clubs, towns and individuals on conservation 
planning for their lands. Many wildlife management areas have target ranges. These were 
continually serviced and permits were issued for their use. Limited camping in conjunction 
with fishing and hunting trips was encouraged on some management areas. Permits were 



m 






( 19) 



issued for this activity. 

All district personnel were deputized and spent many man-days patrolling manage- 
ment areas during the upland season and deer week. They were alerted for duty during the 
fire season and provided both labor and equipment to combat forest fires. 



All beaver trappers are obliged to bring in their pelts to be counted, measured and 
tagged. District game crews manned those checking stations. In cooperation with the 
United States Fish and Wildlife Service, they ran census routes to determine the spring 
population of woodcock in Massachusetts. 

Many hours were spent assisting the Realty Section in land acquisition for game 
management areas. Land offered for sale was inspected. Priorities for acquisition were 
made. Negotiations were made with the landowners for options and with the town and city 
officials for permission to purchase. 

During the year forest game management plans were prepared for the major state 
forests. The purpose of these plans is to provide general guidance for an overall wildlife 
management project for forest game species. 



Game Farms 

The 1965 pheasant production was slightly below previous years due primarily to 
above normal rearing losses. Quail production was normal. 

New construction was limited. A new incubator cellar at the Sandwich State Game 
Farm will aid greatly the rearing program. Only a few pens were constructed but annual 
maintenance of previously built pens and buildings was continued. 

Investigations of newer and more economical methods of game bird propagation was 
conducted at all three game farms. 



I 



Game bird disease research was coordinated with the Massachusetts Cooperative Wild- 
life Research Unit, University of Massachusetts, in an effort to eliminate a few existing rearing 
problems. 

GAME DISTRIBUTION 
July 1, 1964 - June 30, 1965 




j 



Pheasant 



Totals: 



Adults: 
Young: 



Spring and summer liberations 
August liberations (12 weeks) 
October-November liberations (17-25 weeks) 
Sportsmen's Club Rearing Program 



Hens 



Cocks 



Total 



5, 574 




839 


6,413 


10,419 


3, 


103 


13, 522 


225 


40, 


575 


40, 800 


913 


6, 


926 


7, 839 



17,131 51,443 68,574 



Quail 



Adults: 
Young: 



Totals: 



Spring and summer liberations 
Fall liberations 

(20) 



484 

2, 536 

3, 020 



White Hare 

Northern varying, purchased 
White Hare 



2, 500 



Between the period of January 1, 1965 and February 28, 1965, a total of 2, 500 hare 
were purchased by the Division of Fisheries and Game for release in Massachusetts covers. 
All hare were ear tagged with numbered tags which were also stamped with a return address. 
The hare appeared to be in good physical condition. Some hare were released during the 
open gunning season. To date, tag returns have been minimal. 



The cottontail rabbit population appears quite high, 
apparently did not inhibit the cottontail population. 



The drought conditions of 1965 



Fur Report 

The 1964-1965 fur harvest as reported by twenty-one fur buyers is as follows: 



Muskrat 


34, 


235 


Mink 




914 


Otter 




31 


Skunk 




14 


Raccoon 

Weasel 




855 
16 


Red Fox 




29 


Grey Fox 




20 


Beaver 


1, 


196 



Field Trials 

Field trials held on division areas 
Beagle trials held on division areas 
Miscellaneous trials held on division areas 



12 
5 
4 



( 21) 



MASSACHUSETTS COOPERATIVE WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNIT 



Wild Turkey Project 

Although there was good survival of turkeys during the winter of 1963-64, there was 
low survival of poults. Approximately 21 turkeys in central Massachusetts were alive in 
September. A good brood was produced at October Mountain, with 14 turkeys alive in early 
fall. Fifteen turkeys were present in late summer at Mount Washington. 



Mourning Dove Study 

Allan P. Richards has completed the first draft of his thesis on mourning doves and 
the final report should be available next year. 

Woodcock Study 

The manuscript of the woodcock book is now in the hands of a publisher. 

Chemosterilant Studies 

A field pilot study on Nantucket of the gull reproductive inhibitor, Sudan Black, was 
initiated. Field work was transferred from Cape Ann to Nantucket and Muskeget Islands. 

Effect of DDT on Wood Ducks 

A pilot study on the effect of DDT on wood ducks was initiated. Difficulties in keeping 
ducks suggest that results will not be reliable. 

Black Duck Productivity on Beaver Ponds 

Graduate student Philip B. Stanton began a study of black duck productivity on beaver 
ponds of different ages. Final results will be completed and reported in 1965. 









WM 



(22) 



REALTY PROGRAM 

Prior to the start of the fiscal year Director Shepard submitted a new realty policy 
to the Administrative Board for its consideration. This policy was subsequently approved by 
the board and put into operation. 

Basically its purpose was to concentrate all land and water acquisition and leasing pro- 
grams in one place in the organizational set-up of the division. The new realty policy as 
adopted by the board called for the establishment of a Realty Section equal in status to the 
other sections in the division and charged with the entire responsibility of expeditiously ex- 
ecuting a program of land and water acquisitions contingent on appropriations made by the 
General Court. Purchase of land and water areas for fish and game purposes has become 
increasingly important in the last few years and at the same time increasingly difficult to 
accomplish. The director, fully cognizant of these facts, felt that the placing of all real 
estate activities of the division in one section would solidify the basic structure of the division 
and produce for sportsmen more land and water for each dollar spent. 

The realty policy as adopted also made provisions for a Realty Advisory Committee. 
This committee is composed of employees of the division and a representative from the Depart- 
ment of Natural Resources. The duties and responsibilities of this committee are to fully 
investigate, thoroughly discuss and consider all proposed land and water acquisitions filed with 
the realty chief and determine those deemed most advantageous to the needs of the division. 

These judicious actions have now manifested themselves in a step-up of acquisitions 
and a cutting down of the time between option and purchase. 

During the year the division received two very important gifts. One was a parcel of 
the land and the other a right-of-way to a pond. Mr. and Mrs. Jameson D. MacFarland of 
Northboro were the donors of approximately 80 acres of land in Northboro. How do we ade- 
quately thank people like Mr. and Mrs. MacFarland? This might best be left to the generations 
of wildlife, which will have a better home, more food and more protection because the Mac- 
Farlands were thoughtful and generous. Donations of land or water areas are always welcome 
and appreciated by the division. Willing to the division of lands or waters owned by one who 
loves and appreciates the outdoors and the vast world of nature will guarantee to future gener- 
ations a place to nuture their inherent right to know and love wildlife and to do their part to 
perpetuate its myriad of species and forms. 

The other gift to the division was a launching site and parking area on Knops Pond in 
Groton. This very valuable piece of property was given by the Squannacook Sportsman's Club. 
If there is one category of land which rates high on the priority list it is access points on 
ponds or rivers. The Squannacook Sportsman's Club is to be congratulated for their unselfish- 
ness in giving up the ownership of this launching site so that all fishermen can make use of 
and enjoy it. 

During the year, the division added two more parcels to its holdings on the Swift River, 
added to its Phillipston-Petersham area, to the Birch Hill area, to the Northeast area and a 
very important parcel to the Podick Hatchery holdings in Sunderland. At year's end, tran- 
sactions were completed for the purchase of a550-acre tract along the Quaboag River in Brook- 
field and West Brookfield, to be known as the Quaboag Valley Wildlife Management Area. 



I 



(23) 



Also in various stages of completion were tracts in Berkshire, Essex, Middlesex, 
Norfolk, Hampshire, Plymouth, Bristol and Worcester counties. 

The Realty Section handled many requests from other segments of the division for 
engineering and related work, and made preliminary investigations on many parcels which 
were offered for sale to the division but were ultimately refused because of title complications 
or other related reasons. 



(24) 



INFORMATION AND EDUCATION PROGRAM 

The Information and Education Program of the Division of Fisheries and Game con- 
tinued with its 17th year of operation, spearheaded by the Information and Education Section 
and assisted by other personnel throughout the division. Of particular note among those 
whose duties regularly include information and education functions are the four wildlife 
management districts, on whose collective shoulders fall most of the meetings with sports- 
men's clubs and other groups, working with various organizations, conducting information 
tours, giving technical advice to the public and to conservation groups, and carrying on con- 
siderable personal contact work. 

Purpose of the overall program is to develop and maintain a state of public concern 
and effective action on behalf of natural resources, particularly those affecting wildlife. 
That this program and others like it in every state have been successful is axiomatic - never 
before in the history of this country has so much public and private concern for the condition 
of our natural resources and the natural beauty of our country been expressed. From White 
House to the residence of John Doe, America is concerned, and what's more important, be- 
ginning to act. 

This could only have happened as the logical result of years of public information and 
conservation education programs by those agencies concerned with resource management. 
But the job is not done; it can never be done. The pace must be maintained and expanded so 
that millions of new citizens each year become properly acquainted with the importance of 
conservation. In fact, there are many areas, many subjects and many mediums for the spread 
of information that have not been touched because information and education budgets and 
staffs have traditionally been too small. 

During the reporting period, the following activities which lend themselves to enum- 
eration were conducted: 

News Services 

A total of 143 separate news stories were distributed to media as follows: 



I 



I & E Section news releases: 97 
I & E Section television news films: 
District news releases: 14 



32 



An innovation by the I & E Section late in the fiscal year was a weekly series of 
"spots;" short items to be used as spot announcements on radio and tv and as fillers by 
newspapers. These were sent out in addition to regular news coverage. Initial results 
from newspapers have been very gratifying, particularly among the weekly papers. However, 
radio and tv usage has been difficult to determine. A mere handful of radio stations have 
replied to inquiries; a very few broadcasts have been heard by various employees. This does 
not mean that the spots are not being used, only that these media are impossible to monitor 
in the same degree that the newsclipping service monitors newspapers. The I & E Section 
has a standing weekly commitment to provide tapes of spots to one radio station. These 
have been well received. 









(25) 



A survey of newsclips resulting from division releases shows that 2, 838 clippings 
were received, a drop from last year to just above average usage. However, it should be 
noted that usage bears only incidental relation to the number of releases made. The news 
value of the story, its timing, and credence placed in it by the press still determine its 
usage. 

Continual personal contact with press personnel by districts and I & E personnel 
resulted in 12 feature articles and 42 columns in addition to those resulting from releases. 
I & E furnished additional pictures, information and writing assistance on numerous 
occasions to feature writers both in state newspapers and national magazines. 

Massachusetts Wildlife Magazine 

A total of 52,281 subscribers were receiving the magazine at the close of the reporting 
period, a net gain of 3,937. Nearly twice this number applied for the magazine, the net gain 
being influenced by the more than 3000 routinely dropped as "undeliverables" by reason of in- 
accurate address. Subscription promotion, never an active project, was discouraged during 
the reporting period as plans were underway to screen the full mailing list. The gain achieved 
represented solely those individuals who personally wrote to, or appeared at, the office of the 
magazine. Readership of the magazine is conservatively estimated in excess of 150,000. 

During the reporting period a complete study of mailing list control methods was 
completed. Recommendations to adopt a re-subscription method similar to those used by 
magazines for which a subscription fee is charged, were adopted. By the end of the next 
reporting period, the entire individual list will have been offered an opportunity to re-sub- 
scribe. Those who do not return the subscription coupon found in their magazine will be 
summarily dropped from the list. This process will be repeated every three years. 

Publications 






I 'N 



No new publications were added to the stock maintained for public distribution due to 
lack of printing funds, but work was continued and funds encumbered for a forthcoming ex- 
haustive treatise on the wood duck in Massachusetts. 

Routine publication by the I & E Section of the annual report, stocked waters list, 
fish and game law abstracts , closed town list , license forms and archery stamp was ac- 
complished. 

Advertising and Promotion Out of State 

During the reporting period the I & E chief completed a study of advertising and pro- 
motion needs and possibilities and made recommendations in a report to the director. This 
is presently under consideration by the Department of Commerce. 

Basically a choice of two programs was proposed. One would cost $199, 846 a year 
to bring in an estimated $551, 250 revenue in new license sales plus an estimated $10, 500, 000 
in additional business and tax benefits. The other would cost $77, 199 a year to bring in an 
estimated $183, 750 revenue in new license sales plus an estimated $3, 500, 000 in business 
and tax benefits. 

(26) 



Either program would involve advertising in out-of-state newspapers and magazines 
in the basic market area, out-of-state promotion through all news media, exhibitions at 
travel and sports shows out-of-state, provision of promotional literature, film circulation, 
and other promotion measures. The difference between the two programs would be largely 
a matter of extent of activity and staffing required to carry out the program. 

Conservation Education 

A total of 148 boys completed the 17th annual Junior Conservation Camp program, 
which is planned and directed by the I & E chief in cooperation with the Department of 
Natural Resources and Massachusetts Conservation, Inc. 

The I & E Chief continued to serve as the division's representative on the Massa- 
chusetts Advisory Committee for Conservation Education and the Conservation Education 
Editorial Board, both in cooperation with the Department of Education. 

Sportfish Awards Program 



The second year of the sportfish award program was completed, with gold pins and 
plaques awarded to holders of the following record catches for calendar 1964: 



Largemouth Bass 


—10 lbs. 




Bluegill 


11 inches 


Smallmouth Bass 


— 6 lbs. 


10 oz. 


Bullhead 


20 inches 


Chain Pickerel 


— 7 lbs. 


11 oz. 


Channel Catfish 


30 inches 


Rainbow Trout 


— 5 lbs. 


15 oz. 


Calico 


—17 1/2 inches 


Brown Trout 


—13 lbs. 


9 oz. 


White Perch 


15 3/4 inches 


Lake Trout 


—12 lbs. 


1 oz. 


Yellow Perch 


16 5/8 inches 


Walleye 


— 8 lbs. 


8 oz. 


Brook Trout 


18 inches 


Shad 


— 6 lbs. 


3 oz. 


Northern Pike 


— 13 lbs. 12 oz. 



I 






<v 



Standing all-time state records as of January 1, 1965 are: 



Largemouth Bass 


—12 lbs. 


1 oz. 


Brook Trout 


19 inches 


Pickerel 


— 9 lbs. 


5 oz. 


Shad 


—6 lbs. 13 oz. 


Walleye 


— 8 lbs. 


8 oz. 


Bluegill 


11 inches 


Lake Trout 


—13 lbs. 


1 oz. 


Channel Catfish 


—13 lbs. 8 oz. 


Brown Trout 


—18 lbs. 


8 oz. 


Calico Bass 


17 1/2 inches 


Rainbow Trout 


— 6 lbs. 


13 oz. 


White Perch 


16 inches 


Smallmouth Bass 


— 6 lbs. 


10 oz. 


Yellow Perch 


16 5/8 inches 


Northern Pike 


—13 lbs. 


12 oz. 


Bullhead 


22 1/2 inches 


Meetings 














Major professional recognition of an international scope was awarded the division 
I & E program when the I & E Chief was elected president of the American Association for 
Conservation Information at that international body's annual conference in Sun Valley, Idaho, 
in June. 

District personnel attended or participated in 222 meetings with sportsmen's groups, 
civic and fraternal associations, youth and church groups, besides numerous meetings with 



( 27) 



individuals and various local groups to advise directly on wildlife management projects. 
I & E personnel averaged about two such meetings per week throughout the year. 

Exhibits 






Districts and I & E participated in or aided a total of ten major exhibits at sports- 
men's shows and fairs during the reporting period. A few minor exhibits of limited dura- 
tion were also handled. 

Audio-visual aids 



The I & E Section prepared and presented 14 "Dateline Boston" half-hour television 
shows, nine "Critter Corner" 15-minute shows, appeared as a live tv guest on six occasions 
and as a radio guest on five, during the reporting period. A number of guest appearances 
by other personnel were arranged. Districts reported participating in 12 radio and/or 
tv guest appearances. Television programs of this division received a first-place award, 
for the third time in four years, from the American Association for Conservation Inform- 
ation. 



Approximately 59, 760 people saw division films at club showings exclusive of use 
on television. The 16 titles in the free-loan library were booked a total of 747 times. No 
new films were added to the library this year because of shortage of funds. 



The usual large quantity of management photos was processed for the technical 



staff. 



Internal Communications 

As a means of informing all employees of current major activities and items of im- 
portance, publication of "TOPICS" was continued as a report of staff meetings. Three issues 
were published during the reporting period. 

As usual, all division employees had opportunity to read I & E Section releases which 
are sent to all supervisors and brought to the attention of all employees. While it would 
be more desirable to send every employee personal copies of releases, this was not possible 
due to shortage of postage funds. 

The annual division-wide employee's conference was conducted in February with all 
sections cooperating. 

Special Events 

The I & EChief served as publicity chairman for National Wildlife Week, and a 
series of releases was issued stressing the theme on pollution, tying this in with water 
problems in Massachusetts. A proclamation proclaiming the observance was arranged 
with the office of the Governor. 






I 4 









In January the annual banquet of the New England Outdoor Writer's Association was 
utilized as a means of securing additional publicity for the sportfish awards program. 



(28) 



Telephone information services were again conducted on the opening days of deer 
and fishing seasons. 

In June, special attention was given to a meeting of northeast fish and game directors 
in Massachusetts. 

Tours and Demonstrations 



District personnel conducted ten separate tours for the press and 12 "Show Me" 
trips for public groups. 

The Western District conducted groups from sportsmen's clubs, the Izaak Walton 
League, Boy Scouts and residents of the Pittsfield area on four tours of the Peru Manage- 
ment area. 

The Central District conducted groups of bird watchers and two school classes on 
two tours of the Westboro Area. 

The Northeast District conducted a group of sportsmen's leaders on a tour of the 
Squannacook area. 



The Southeast District conducted field trips on several areas for the University of 
Massachusetts, Bridgewater State College, the Legislative Committee on Natural Resources, 
and the Northeast Fish and Game Director's Association. 

Miscellaneous 



About 6500 "Safety Zone" Posters were distributed by the districts and another 2500 
by the I & E Section. The districts also erected 26 additional metal "Safety Zone" highway 
posters, and 65 additional general educational posters of various types. 



I 



(29) 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 



How The Sport 


smen's Dollar Was Spent 










Administration 














Administration 


3304-01 


$ 110, 678. 01 










Fish & Game Board 


M 


600.00 $ 


111, 


278. 


01 


7% 


Information-Education 


11 


- 


72, 


955. 


81 


4 1/2% 


Fisheries Management 














Fish Hatcheries 


3304-42 


- 


335, 


639. 


46 


21% 


Management 


ii 


120, 948.98 










Construction & Improvements 


3304-21 


21, 650.00 










*Fish Restoration Projects 


3304-47 


52, 867.98 










Management 


3304-51 


89, 302. 85 










Fisheries Research Cooperative 


3304-55 


10, 000.00 


294, 


769. 


81 


18% 


Unit 














Wildlife Management 














Game Farms 


3304-51 


- 


242, 


827. 


91 


15% 


Management 


t! 


89, 302. 85 










Construction & Improvements 


3304-21 


90, 758.62 










Wildlife Research Cooperative 














Unit 


3304-44 


9, 060.21 










*Wildlife Restoration 


3304-53 


176,010.09 


365, 


131. 


77 


22 1/2% 


Land Acquisition 


*3304-47 


15, 038.00 












*3304-53 


21,466.00 


36, 


504. 


00 


2% 


Law Enforcement 














*Deer Damage 


3308-05 


5, 822. 75 










Public Hunting Grounds 


3308-07 


9, 944. 32 










Conservation Officers - 














Salaries & Expenses 


3360-01 


143, 730.43 


159, 


497. 


50 


10% 



I 



»** 



$1,618,604.27 100% 



* Continuing Accounts 

Expenditures under 3304-47 and 3304-53 
75% reimbursable by Federal Funds. 



Reserve in Inland Fisheries and Game Fund 
As of June 30, 1965 - $250, 193. 61 






(30) 



Appropriations and Expenditures 



Number 



Title 



Expenditures 
Appropriation & Liabilities 



3304-01 Administration 



3304-21 Construction & Improvements to 

Fish Hatcheries, Game Farms and 

Wildlife Management Areas 112, 409. 56 



3304-42 Fisheries Management 
3304-51 Wildlife Management 



3304-47** Fish Restoration Projects 
(Dingell Johnson) 

3304-53** Wildlife Restoration 

(Pittman-Robertson) 



481,695. 00 



112,408.62 
456, 588.44 



442,238.00 421,433.61 
$1,222,220.56 $1,174,664.49 



Reverted 



$ 185,878.00 $ 184,233.82 $ 1,644.18 



.94 

25, 106. 56 

20, 804. 39 
$ 47, 556. 07 



Continuing Balance 

Appropriations Expenditures Forward 



$ 119,120.41 $ 67,905.98 $51,214.43 

253, 841.59 197, 476. 09 56, 365. 50 

$ 372,962.00 $ 265,382.07;" $107,579.93 



** 75% reimbursable by Federal Funds 



(31) 



Summary of Fish and Game Income 



Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses 

Special Licenses, Trap Registrations & Tags 

Alien Gun Permits 

Rents 

Misc. Sales & Income 

Pittman- Robertson Federal Aid 

Dingell-Johnson Federal Aid 

Accelerated Public Works Projects 

Court Fines 

Refunds Prior Year 

Archery Stamps 



$ 1, 191, 084.50 * 
5, 645.26 ** 

155.25 

3, 291.00 

77, 739.51 

122, 847.02 

55, 337.68 

2, 200. 00 
7, 678.50 

20.40 

3, 675.90 
$ 1,469, 675.02 



■ 



* See Detail Sheet #1 



** See Detail Sheet #2 






( 32 ) 



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( 33) 



Detail Sheet #2 



Analysis Of Special Licenses Issued Under Sections 48, 68A, 102-3-4- 
105-6-7 and 112-A-B-C, Chapter 131, G. L. 



TYPE OF LICENSE 



Trap Registrations: 





Initial 




Renewal 


Fur Buyers: 


Re sident 


Taxidermists: 




Propagators: 


(Special Fish) 




Initial 




Renewal 




(Fish) 




Initial 




Renewal 




(Birds & Mammals) 




Initial 




Renewal 




(Dealers) 




Initial 




Renewal 




Additional 




(Ind. Bird or Mammal) 




Initial 




Renewal 


Shiners for Bait: 






Duplicates 



Field Trial Licenses: 

Quail for Training Dogs: 

Initial 
Renewal 

Commercial Shooting Preserves: 

Tags 
Posters 

Trapping of Certain Birds: 

Tags: Game 

Fish 



ER ISSUED 


RECEIPTS 


121 




657 


$ 285.25 


28 


280. 00 


72 


360. 00 


9 




204 


222.00 



83 



60 
320 



5 

82 
379 



27 
54 

221 

4 



18 
42 

4 

1, 000 

100 

8 

6, 240 
29, 501 

TOTAL: 



289. 00 



1,260. 00 



650. 00 

54. 00 

1, 107. 00 
20.00 

216. 00 

200. 00 

50. 00 

5. 00 

40.00 

312. 00 
295. 01 

$5,645. 26 






■ 



( 34 ) 



. 



LEGISLATION 



The following laws affecting the Division of Fisheries and Game were enacted 
during the legislative session of 1965 as of August 17, 1965: 



CHAPTER 76, ACTS, 1965: 



CHAPTER 129, ACTS, 1965: 



CHAPTER 435, ACTS, 1965: 



An act further regulating fishing by means of a 
bow and arrow. 

An act providing protection for the gray seal. 

An act authorizing the Commonwealth to grant 
easements over, across and upon certain land in 
the towns of Groveland and Georgetown, for the 
transmission of electric power, to Massachusetts 
Electric Company. 



CHAPTER 466, ACTS, 1965: 



An act providing that permits for commercial 
shooting preserves may be issued in all counties 
of the Commonwealth. 



CHAPTER 574, ACTS, 1965: 



An act directing the Director of the Division of 
Fisheries and Game to convey certain land in the 
town of Boxford to the County of Essex. 



CHAPTER 70, RESOLVES, 1965: 



Resolve further reviving and continuing the special 
commission established to make an investigation 
and study relative to the inland conservation laws. 



(35) 



RULES AND REGULATIONS PROMULGATED BY THE DIRECTOR OF FISHERIES AND 
GAME DURING FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1965, AND SUMMARY OF OUTSTANDING 
REGULATIONS. 



August 4, 1948, Rules and regulations for the artificial propagation and maintenance 



of fish. 



August 4, 1948. Rules and regulations for the artificial propagation of birds and 
mammals. 

July 14, 1952. Rules and regulations for hunting with bows and arrows. 

August 12, 1953. Rules and regulations governing sale of protected fresh-water 
fish by licensed dealers in Massachusetts. 

March 26, 1954. Rules and regulations governing the display of sporting, hunting, 
fishing, and trapping licenses in Massachusetts, effective April 9, 1954. 

January 28, 1955. Rules and regulations relative to public fishing grounds in Massa- 
chusetts. 

April 10, 1956. Rules and regulations governing the taking of fish in interstate 
ponds lying between Massachusetts and New Hampshire. 



February 14, 1957. Rules and regulations relating to the taking of carp and suckers 
for the purpose of sale. 



February 15, 1957. Rules and regulations relative to the tagging of deer in Massa- 
chusetts. 

October 20, 1959. Rules and regulations for public shooting grounds and wildlife 
management areas in Massachusetts. 



May 10, 1962. Rules and regulations relating to the taking of shad in the inland 
waters of the Commonwealth. 

January 1, 1963. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting of deer in Massa- 
chusetts. 

January 1, 1963. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting of hares and rabbits 
in Massachusetts. 

October 10, 1963. Rules and regulations relating to hunting of pheasants, quail, and 
ruffed grouse in Massachusetts. 

October 10, 1963. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting of gray squirrels in 

Massachusetts. 

October 21, 1963. Rules and regulations relative to the use of poison in killing 
mammals or birds. 



(36) 



December 15, 1963. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting and trapping of 
mammals in Massachusetts. 

January 1, 1964. Interstate fishing regulations on Wallum Lake. 

April 10, 1964. Rules and regulations relating to the taking of certain fish in Massa- 
chusetts. 

August 31, 1964. Rules and regulations for trapping of birds by farmers. 

September 1, 1964. Migratory Game Bird Regulations 1964-1965. 

April 1, 1964. Interstate Fishing regulations on Congamond Lake, Hamilton Reser- 
voir, Colebrook Reservoir, Perry Pond, Muddy Pond, and Breakneck Pond. 



(37) 



h 



^a-o' 



"D 



il 9 6 6 





nua 




feport 



* i 



■ ■ 









James M. Shepard, Director 

Government Center 

100 Cambridge Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 



iTATE LIBRARY CF MASSACHUSETTS 

APR 28 19G7 
BTATE HOUSE* BOSTON 



MASS. 



OFFISULS 



■ f *»•# 







1^6 



30 




e*/)tv6Uen/ 6^ ^eAaereefc a^uf^a^n& 



/00 






His Excellency, John A. Volpe, Governor of the Commonwealth, the 
Executive Council, the General Court, and the Board of the Division of 
Fisheries and Game. 

Sirs: 

I have the honor to submit herewith the One Hundred and First 
Annual Report of the Division of Fisheries and Game, covering the fiscal 
year from July 1, 1965 to June 30, 1966. 

While the annual report is customarily a record of accomplishments 
of the past year, this one is significant in that it not only begins a 
second century of public service for this agency, but also because it 
represents in a very real sense a crossroads for decision. 

As the Division of Fisheries and Game begins its second century 
of service, it is faced with greater public demand for additional services, 
higher costs for existing services, and a narrowing financial base. The 
record shows conclusively that the public at large benefits directly from 
services provided by this agency. At present the public at large does 
not contribute financially to those services. It is my belief that General 
Fund monies rightfully must be used to augment the limited sportsmen's 
license revenue upon which this Division has so long depended. 

Respectfully submitted, 







JAMES M. SHEP^RD 
DIRECTOR 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAME 



One Hundred and First Annual Report 



July 1, 1965 



June 30, 1966 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Fisheries and Game Board 1-2 

Fisheries Program 3-9 

Massachusetts Cooperative Fisheries Unit 6 

Game Program 10-17 

Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit 18 

Realty Program 19-20 

Information and Education Program 21-23 

General Administration 

How the Sportsman's Dollar Was Spent 24 

Appropriations and Expenditures 25 

Summary of Fish and Game Income 25-26 

Receipts From Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses 27 

Analysis of Special Licenses 28 

Legislation < 29 

Rules and Regulations Promulgated 30 



Publication of this Document Approved by Alfred C. Holland, State Purchasing Agent 
800-1-67-944217 Estimated Cost Per Copy: $.71 



FISHERIES AND GAME BOARD 

The One Hundred and First Annual Report of the Division of Fisheries and Game 
is significant, not only because it marks the start of the second century of public service 
by this agency, but also because it marks a crossroads at which revolutionary and 
basic decisions of great importance must be made. 

Experience has demonstrated emphatically that the general public, other than 
those who hunt, fish or trap, benefits directly for services provided by the Division of 
Fisheries and Game. At this time the general public does not contribute financially to 
support of these services. 

Today the Division of Fisheries and Game is faced with greater public demand 
for additional services, higher costs of existing services, and a narrowing financial 
base. The Board has no plans to ask sportsmen, who now almost entirely support this 
division, for additional funds. It -feels, rather, that the time has now come (indeed it 
may even be past due) when General Fund monies in sizeable proportions must be al- 
located to this division. 

Hunting and fishing in Massachusetts are important attractions to our 500-million 
dollar tourist industry. In excess of $100 million dollars a year is spent by those who 
hunt and fish in the Commonwealth, a significant contribution to businesses of many kinds. 
Providing places to hunt and fish, watch or otherwise enjoy wildlife, is the responsibility 
of the Division of Fisheries and Game. A recent study of public usage of several divi- 
sion areas indicated numerous ways in which people enjoy the areas in addition to hunt- 
ing and fishing. It is decidedly unfair that license fees alone have to bear the brunt of 
the cost of providing and managing such areas. 

During the past year the Board and staff of the division worked tirelessly to at- 
tempt a solution to this problem. Believing that the division would receive matching 
monies from the General Fund, the sportsmen of Massachusetts willingly accepted a 
$1.00 increase in the cost of licenses, with the provision that this would be earmarked 
by legislation for land acquisition and equalled by a matching appropriation from tax 
funds. This was not achieved. Instead, it appears that legislation will earmark in an 
indirect fashion only a portion of this increase, and will provide only a token matching. 
Further, it appears that legislation will provide funds from a two-million dollar bond 
issue, to include construction of a Quabbin fish hatchery and acquisition of land for out- 
door recreation, to be entirely repaid from the sportsmen's license money in ten years. 

While this is a step in the right direction, and certainly represents progress, again 
it is wrong that the sportsmen alone must pay for practically the entire program while 
all the public benefits. 

If the Division of Fisheries and Game is to continue present services, and provide 
the additional services required in the future, it is imperative that additional financing 
be obtained from the General Fund as is now the case in many other states. 

At any rate, the Board will fulfill its own pledge to the sportsmen, to spend the 
$1.00 increase in license fees only on acquisition of land. This may not mean all income 
received in any one year will be spent in that year, but over a period of years, as pur- 
chases can be carried out, amounts equal to this will be requested in the budget. The 
staff, in preparing their individual budgets, has been instructed to delete revenue from 
the license-fee increase entirely from their planning except for the specific purposes of 
land and water acquisition. 

Highlights of the past fiscal year were many. Of minor significance perhaps, but 
a step forward in terms of working facilities, the new quarters in the State Office Build- 



( 1) 




ing have proved a blessing. 

Winter survival and poult production of wild turkey introductions in central Massa- 
chusetts was approximately double that of previous years, as were the introductions in 
Mount Washington. Other plants, however, have only remained stable. 

Pheasant production at the game farms again was high, with 56,409 cocks and 
11,430 hens being released. Production was excellent at fish hatcheries, despite low 
water conditions, with 1,365,109 brown, brook and rainbow trout being distributed. An 
additional 29,293 trout were received from federal hatcheries. In addition, 10,118 land- 
locked salmon were released in Quabbin Reservoir, and 56,448 Atlantic salmon fry were 
obtained. These latter fish will be reared and stocked in Quabbin as fingerlings. 

The realty section completed its first full year as a staff section of the Division. 
More acreage was acquired, the time span between option and purchase was reduced, 
and concentration of all acquisition activities in one section strengthened the operating 
structure of the Division. 

Among acquisitions during the year were the gift of 265 acres on the Squannacook 
River from the Middlesex County League of Sportsmen's Clubs, purchase of three ad- 
ditional tracts on the same river by the Division, purchase of a tract of 170 acres on 
the Quaboag River, purchase of an access area on Sandy Pond, Plymouth, purchase of 
additions to the Swift River area, Phillipston- Petersham area, Little River in Hunting- 
ton, West Meadows area, Lawrence Brook in Royalston and the northeast district head- 
quarters area, and a gift of land in Templeton. 

We invite you to read carefully the more detailed reports contained herein of each 
program of the Division of Fisheries and Game. 

Mr. Harry Darling of East Bridgewater and Mr. Henry Colombo of Ashland were 
respectively elected Chairman and Secretary at the meeting on May 31, 1966. Mr. Henry 
Colombo was sworn in as a member of the Fisheries and Game Board by Governor Volpe 
on May 17, 1966. 

The Board expresses its sincere appreciation to all personnel of the division for 
their continued exemplary performance, and wishes also to express its sincere appre- 
ciation to the Governor, Executive Council, General Court, and to those other depart- 
ments, agencies, members of public information media and the public who have assisted 
and supported our programs in the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Harry C. Darling, Chairman 
Henry J. Colombo, Secretary 
Edward J. Tierney 
F. Stanley Mikelk 
Martin H. Burns 



(2) 



ANNUAL REPORT 
FISHERIES PROGRAM 



INTRODUCTION 

During the 1965-1966 year, the fisheries section conducted research and manage- 
ment activities, operating with revenue from license sales and outside monies for 
federal-aid projects. Continuing pro; ects include the Qaubbin Reservoir Investigations, 
creel census projects, Water Quality Survey and a development project designed to in- 
crease fisherman access to lakes and streams. A new federal-aid project was initiated 
to establish a more equitable distribution of trout throughout the state. Warm-water 
fisheries research was intensified and a workshop was held at Westboro to discuss prob- 
lems inherent in warm-water fisheries management. 



Quabbin Reservoir Investigations 

The twelfth year of study at Quabbin Reservoir was completed. Creel census 
agents interviewed 9,979 fishermen from April to October. During this period, a total 
of 75,658 fish were caught having a total weight of 65,565 pounds. A significant change 
in lake trout harvest was noted as naturally reproduced fish increased the harvest to 
over five times the number harvested the preceeding year. Future harvest should main- 
tain this level of fishing, as population sampling indicates a burgeoning population of 
undersize trout. 



Sampling of test coves was conducted to determine species composition which 
contribute to the fishery primarily as forage fish. 

Life history studies were continued to determine age and growth, food habits, 
parasitism and other population characteristics. 

The success of landlocked salmon, introduced in 1965, was studied. Indications 
are that the survival was high. However, continued surveillance is necessary to deter- 
mine the rate of survival and to conduct life history studies. As part of a continuing 
program to establish this species, 10,118 landlocked salmon were released. A total of 
56,448 Atlantic salmon fry were received from the Province of Quebec, Canada. These 
fish, reared at the Sutton Hatchery, will be released into the reservoir during the fall. 

Harvest Studies on Managed Ponds 

The creel census agent interviewed 956 anglers during the fishing season on four 
reclaimed trout ponds totaling 291 surface acres. Expanded seasonal pressure and 
harvest estimates indicate 5,142 anglers harvested 3,864.15 pounds of trout. The Cliff 
Pond creel census indicated that total angler pressure amounted to 79.1 hours with a 
harvest of 13.0 pounds per acre. Indications are that plants of large-sized fingerlings 
in a reclaimed situation seem to be economically and biologically justified. 

Reclamations 

Eleven ponds with a total surface area of 225 acres were reclaimed under a con- 
tinuing restoration program. Ten ponds were restocked with chain pickerel or large- 
mouth bass. One pond was suitable for trout and was restocked with yearling and adult 
brook and rainbow trout. 



(3) 



Pond Reclamations 



Pond 

Ezekial Pond 
Flax Pond 
Long Pond 
Rocky Pond 
Garrett Pond 
Nonesuch Pond 
Jordan Pond 
Dean Pond 
Big Hog Pond 
Rafe Pond 
Pickerel Pond 



Town 



Plymouth 

Bourne 

Wellfleet 

Plymouth 

Barnstable 

Natick-Weston 

Shrewsbury 

Upton 

Barnstable 

Brewster 

Plymouth 



Acres 
36 
22 
34 
20 
24 
40 
20 
4 
10 
10 
10 



Pounds/Acre 


69.9 


114.9 


58.7 


110.1 


23.4 


152.4 


328.62 


61.4 


16.1 



11.7 



Pre-impoundment studies of the middle branch of the Westfield River indicated 
that the game fish population was exceedingly low and growth was slow. Sampling re- 
vealed that an overpopulation of trash fish was pre sent. The completion of a water control 
dam induced the need for reclamation at this time. A total of 123.8 miles of stream of 
the middle branch and its tributaries were reclaimed which included approximately 100 
acres of water. Helicopter spraying was conducted on beaver impoundments and areas 
inaccessible by road. After reclamation, the stream was restocked with brook, brown 
and rainbow trout. 

Water Quality Survey 

The state-wide project to determine the reasons for variances in the productivity 
of fresh-water ponds was continued. Analysis of 126 selected waters was undertaken to 
determine seasonal variations of chemical constituents. Statistical evaluation indicated 
that a wide difference in chemical properties does occur. 

Plans for research into the biochemical relationship between fish and their en- 
vironment are being formulated. Additional complex equipment such as an infra-red 
spectrophotometer for precise measurements of important dissolved compounds will 
aid project personnel to determine limiting factors to stocking success and may increase 
our knowledge of factors which limit carrying capacity of our ponds. 

Connecticut River Studies 

The second of three years of harvest and population studies was carried out on 
the Connecticut River, concentrating on the segment of the stream between Turner's 
Falls and Holyoke and including the Oxbow at Northampton. Visits were made to the 
river at least once per week throughout an entire year of fishing to count and interview 
anglers. Samples of fish populations were taken by electro-fishing and netting. Integra- 
tion of localized segmental studies with overall pressure and harvest was accomplished 
by weekly aerial counts of anglers along the entire length of the river within Massachu- 
setts boundaries. 



(4) 



Warm-Water Fisheries Research 



Recent surveys of natural waters indicate that 75% of our ponds are suitable for 
warm-water fish such as bass and chain pickerel. Management techniques applied in past 
years have met with limited success. Records of 95 ponds in which some of the tech- 
niques were applied were reviewed as historical data. Fish samples were collected 
from 68 ponds to determine the effectiveness of previous corrective measures. In 
conjunction with total reclamation, sampling indicated that recontamination of these 
ponds occurred within a short period of time after management and that after five years, 
little improvement was noted in game fish populations. 

Six thousand landlocked alewives were introduced in the Congamond Lakes, South- 
wick, in an attempt to establish this variety in Massachusetts. This special breed of 
alewive should produce adequate spawn each year, insuring a readily available supply 
of forage fish. 

A two-day workshop was held at Westboro to determine the extent of warm- water 
management in the northeast. Representatives of the states from Maine to West Virginia, 
the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife and the Soil Conservation Service were present 
to discuss the problems involved in greater utilization of our warm-water fisheries. 



Trout Allocation 

Investigations of past stocking activities indicated that distribution of trout was 
based to a large extent upon tradition. This project was initiated to alleviate inequities 
that may be present in the present system. 



A review of practices both in this state and elsewhere, coupled with a question- 
naire sent to other states, was conducted and proved useful in providing guidelines for 
the establishment of a distribution formula. This formula will place the distribution of 
trout on a sound biological and economic basis. 

Plans were formulated to investigate and classify waters throughout the state to 
assure equitable and economic allocation of trout. 



Trout Stream Access 

Dwindling access to many good trout streams necessitated the initiation of a pro- 
gram to provide anglers with opportunities to fish. Three sites selected are within 
flood control areas usable for fish and game purposes under 25-year licenses. A fourth 
site, the Swift River, is owned by this Division. The areas are being developed with the 
construction of new gravel-topped roads, parking lots, opening of abandoned roads and 
the opening of streamside foot trails and "fishability" clearings. Information signs 
were constructed and posted, and red pine trees were planted to delimit state-owned 
property. Areas formerly unavailable to fishermen are now being opened, and hatchery 
vehicles are able to release trout in promising locations that were recently inaccessible. 

District Activities 



Care and maintenance of two culture pond systems was continued. The stocking 
of trout and warm-water fish was also carried out. Maintenance of public fishing areas 
and habitat improvement were intensified under a federal-aid program. 

Population sampling was conducted on 68 ponds as an evaluation of past manage- 
ment practices. Eleven reclamations of warm-water ponds to evaluate these practices 
were completed. These ponds were restocked with fish from the culture system. 



(5) 



District personnel investigated fish kills, advised sportsmen's groups in fish 
pond management, maintained exhibits in cooperation with sportsmen's groups to in- 
crease interest in conservation, cooperated with federal agencies on surveys involving 
interstate waters and cooperated with other state agencies toward the establishment of 
additional access sites. 




The Harold Parker State Forest Pond System in North Andover, cared for by the 
northeast district, yielded 1,808.2 pounds of large-mouth bass and 357.3 pounds of 
smallmouth bass. The Merrill Pond System in Sutton managed by the central district 
produced 278 pounds of largemouth bass and 290 pounds of chain pickerel. All were 
used in public waters. 



Pesticides Laboratory 

During the past year the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Game, in co- 
operation with the Massachusetts Health Research Institute and the United States De- 
partment of Health, Education and Welfare, continued a state-wide monitoring program 
aimed at a constant evaluation of pesticide residues in the waters of the Common- 
wealth. During this period over 495 fishes collected from 119 watershed stations were 
analyzed for chlorinated hydrocarbons. 

Massachusetts Cooperative Fishery Unit 

In conjunction with the Division of Fisheries and Game, the University of Massa- 
chusetts has continued research on the Connecticut River, Quabbin Reservoir and small 
artificial ponds. In addition, projects were initiated to increase the scope of the present 
Connecticut River studies and to investigate the ecology of warm-water ponds. 

The Connecticut River survey is designed to study the types of bottom material 
and the invertebrate organisms associated with them. A total of eight families of insects 
and seven groups of other invertebrates were identified. Quantitative results indicate 
that rubble harbors the most species of bottom organisms followed by muck, gravel and 
sand. 

Studies were continued on the composition and distribution of fish species in the 
river. Thirty-one species were captured and examined which included white sucker, 
black crappie, white perch, white crappie and walleye pike. A few brown and brook trout 
were also sampled. 

New research projects initiated include a study of the feeding habits of game fish 
species in the river, and an investigation of the ecology of the American shad, with an 
attempt to locate spawning sites. These projects are coordinated with the Division of 
Fisheries and Game biological sampling and creel census work. 

At Quabbin, life history studies were continued on white perch and rock bass with 
emphasis placed on age and growth, reproduction, food habits, fecundity and parasitism. 
These studies are coordinated with investigations conducted by the Division. 



with 



In coordination with the Division, a warm-water research study has been initiated 
three areas being selected for extensive biological and chemical investigations. 



Allied studies with the Water Resources Research Center are being conducted 
which include a stirvey of small artificial recreational ponds and the biological condi- 
tion of these impoundments. 



(6) 






Trout Propagation 

State and Federal Hatchery Production 

A grand total of 1,365,109 brook, brown and rainbow trout weighing 319,477 pounds 
were distributed in Massachusetts public waters last year. 

Production of the five state hatcheries totalled 1,365,109 trout weighing 290,194 
pounds. The total number of catchables (six inches or over) was 914,693. In addition, 
10,118 landlocked salmon were released in the Quabbin in the fall of 1965. 

State hatchery releases were supplemented by 29,293 trout weighing 29,283 
pounds received from five federal hatcheries. 

Water Resources 

Continuation of drought conditions affected the water resources at our hatchery 
installations. Reduced water flows with a subsequent drop in oxygen content was notice- 
able. However, emergency expenditures for electric power and the purchase of pumps 
and aerators made it possible for our fish culturists to attain a normal liberation of 
fish for the stocking programs. 

Nutritional Research 

The feeding research program was confined to pelleted fish food. Data acquired 
indicate a relationship between the dissolved oxygen levels in the water, food conversion 
and growth. Statistical analysis of the results and the charting of growth levels are 
pending. 

Fertility and Coloration 

Research feeding to evaluate the effects of both regular and defatted paprika on 
fertility and growth in yearling brown trout was continued. Additional research is nec- 
essary to evaluate the fertility of the test fish. These animals have been maintained on 
the same brand of pelleted food more than two years. The tests indicate that other 
brands have failed to sustain the fish in a healthy condition over two years. 

A coordinate study with the Agricultural Section of the University of Massachu- 
setts has advanced our understanding of vitamin A and its relation to fish nutrition. 

Salmon Rearing 

During the year, 56,448 salmon fry were received from the Province of Quebec 
for rearing at the Sutton Hatchery. Plans are to release these fish as three-to five-inch 
fingerlings in the fall of 1966. 

Construction 

The Montague Hatchery cleaned up reforested areas to reduce forest fire hazzards 
and made repairs to maintain existing structures. 

The Palmer Hatchery reconstructed several rearing pools with lumber and con- 
crete. Clearing of underbrush to reduce fire hazards was also accomplished. 

The Sandwich Hatchery completed construction of six cement ponds and the im- 
mediate area was graveled ready for blacktop. 



(7) 



Several new two-inch wells were driven to provide adequate water supply for in- 
creased rearing facilities. 

The 20 pond unit at East Sandv/ich on the west side was repaired. 

Banks were cleared in preparation for the construction of a double series of 
eight cement raceways with feed lines. 

Water exploitation work was undertaken for the installation of a new gravel packed 
well. Piping from this well will interconnect with existing pipes providing a source of 
water to all sections of the hatchery during emergencies. 

The Sunderland Hatchery extended electrical lines for pumps and aerators. Re- 
pairs were made to existing ponds and buildings. 

Several well points were installed at the Podick station in an effort to increase 
the water supply. Lumber was salvaged and plastic shelters were made available to 
advance rearing schedules. 

Equipment 

Two new distribution trucks were purchased. Eleven electric aerators, six elec- 
tric, two-inch water pumps and nine gasoline water pumps were purchased to relieve 
shortage conditions. Many other pumps were purchased for use on distribution trucks. 



(8) 



Trout Distributions from State and Federal Hatcheries 
July 1, 1965 to June 30, 1966 



BROOKS BROWNS RAINBOWS 

Under 6" Over 6" Under 6" Over 6" Under 6" Over 6" TOTAL 

210,450 432,577 93,200 264,290 146,766 217,826 1,365,109 

Total Trout Distributed 6-9" 486,358 

Total Trout Distributed 9" 287,784 

Total Federal Trout Dist. - 6" plus 140,551 

Total Catchables (6" plus) 914,693 

Total Fingerlings 6" minus 450,416 

GRAND TOTAL 1,365,109 

STATION POUNDAGE 

Berkshire Hatchery 13,673 

Montague Hatchery 70,583 

Palmer Hatchery 41,196 

Sandwich Hatchery 85,483 

Sunderland Hatchery 54,988 

Sutton Hatchery 24,271 

STATE POUNDAGE 290,194 

North Attleboro 16,658 

Pittsford Vermont 2,897 

Nashua, N. H. 8,812 

Bowden, W. Virginia 778 

Berlin, N. H. 138 

FEDERAL POUNDAGE 29,283 

GRAND TOTAL 319,477 

(This table does not show trout retained for Brood Stock) 



(9 



GAME PROGRAM 

Highlights of the game program were centered around both wildlife research and 
management of white-tailed deer and waterfowl, and development of state-owned lands 
for public hunting. 

The wildlife research and management activities were financed by monies derived 
from the sale of licenses and Federal Aid (Pittman-Robertson) funds. 



A summary of the year's work by Federal- Aid projects follows: 



W-9-D 



The majority of the game section's time and effort is spent on this project to 
develop our wildlife management areas for public hunting. Such an objective requires 
a great diversity of work programs: construction and maintenance of dams, dikes, 
roads and buildings; posting area boundaries; planting wildlife trees and shrubs; plant- 
ing annuals and perennials for wildlife food and cover in spring and fall; thinning and 
clearing woodlands; controlling undesirable plant species; encouraging natural fruiting 
species; and maintaining wood duck nesting boxes. On the Westboro Beagle Training 
Area, woodland cuttings and the planting of legumes, etc. are annual management activi- 
ties. 

The management and development of the Myles Standi sh State Forest Wildlife 
Management Area was greatly accelerated by temporarily transferring game farm per- 
sonnel during the winter months. Work on this highly important public hunting ground 
in southeastern Massachusetts during the past fiscal year resulted in the development 
of 2.5 miles of new access roads; 12 new hunter parking lots; brush cutting of 280 acres 
of land; clearing of 70 acres of land by use of a Rome harrow; and planting and main- 
tenance of 49 acres of wildlife food patches. 

Approximately 40,000 board feet of lumber were salvaged from thinnings and 
cuttings at the Birch Hill area. 

W-35-R 

Massachusetts' wild turkey restoration project was initiated in 1960. Twenty-two 
wild turkeys from three different stock types were released in Quabbin Reservation 
between 1960 and 1961. Successful reproduction has occurred during most years, but 
winter losses and high poult mortality during some years have offset population growth 
so that spring populations have remained relatively static. In April, 1965, 21 turkeys 
were present in the Quabbin area, the highest spring population since the project's ini- 
tiation. A winter feeding program during the 1964-1965 winter was thought to be partly 
responsible for high over-winter turkey survival. Nesting success was high during 1965, 
but poult mortality limited high juvenile recruitment. However, the fall population 
numbered approximately 54 turkeys. Mild winter conditions and artificial winter feeding 
were probably responsible for the over-winter survival of a minimum of 39 turkeys by 
April, 1966. (This figure does not include 11 turkeys moved to the Holyoke Range.) 

A transplant of wild turkeys from the Quabbin area to the Holyoke Range in 1964 
was unsuccessful in establishing a population. Another release of 11 turkeys was made 
in November, 1965. One juvenile torn was lost during the winter. Ten turkeys were 
present in April, 1966. 

At October Mountain State Forest in Washington, 29 turkeys were released during 
1961 and 1962. Eleven turkeys were released in 1961 at Mount Washington. Static popu- 
lations have persisted at both locations. At October Mountain, a minimum of 12 turkeys 
were present in April, 1965. At least two broods were produced but poult survival was 



■ 



(10) 



I • 



■ 



very low. Sixteen wild turkeys may have been present by September. Local residents 
fed at least seven during the winter. An estimated ten to twelve birds were present in 
April, 1966. At Mount Washington, 15 turkeys were present in April, 1965. At least 
four broods were produced. A minimum of 30 birds were reported present in Septem- 
ber. Some artificial food was provided for the turkeys and a local resident reportedly 
fed them during the winter. Twenty-seven wild turkeys were reported present in April, 
1966. 

Reports indicated a number of wild turkeys were seen in the Ashfield- Conway 
area. Tracks of two toms were located in January, 1966 at Ashfield. The origin of 
these birds was unknown. 

Poult mortality was at least 50 percent during 1965. The primary causes of 
mortality were not determined but some data were collected. A juvenile torn severely 
parasitized by Capilleria sp. was captured, and several turkey droppings that contained 
Ascaridia sp. were collected in January, 1966. 

Data gathered by direct observation indicated wild turkey broods frequented 
openings and fields during the summer. Most hens with broods moved to New Salem 
following hatching on the Prescott Peninsula where they constantly used grassy fields 
and pastured areas until September. Some information on food habits of broods during 
the summer of 1965 was obtained by observations. 

A winter feeding program started during the 1964-1965 winter was continued. 
Cob corn in wire basket feeders was provided for wild turkeys at New Salem during the 
1965-1966 winter. Some corn was made available to turkeys in western Massachusetts 
but most birds were sustained on artificial foods provided by local residents. Mild 
winter conditions and winter feeding were probably responsible for high over-winter 
survival of turkeys in the Quabbin area and at the western release sites. 

Thirty-six wild turkeys were live-trapped, wing-tagged and banded between June, 
1965 and February, 1966 in the Quabbin area. Eleven were transplanted to the Holyoke 
Range, the others released at the trap site. Population studies are facilitated by having 
marked birds in the population. 

Wood Duck Production and Survival Studies 

A live trapping and banding program was carried out at Great Meadows Refuge 
in Concord from July 14 to September 28, 1965. The purpose of this study was to trace 
the survival of wood ducks which had been tagged at hatching in nesting boxes on the 
refuge. However, the trapping program was severely hampered by the depredations of 
a group of otter which had escaped from a nearby estate. Only 19 percent of the tagged 
ducklings were recaptured and traced to flight stage. 

The tagging program allows the exact age of the ducklings to be determined at 
the time of recapture. A comparison of the growth rate and development of these known- 
age immature wood ducks was made with a standard table of development prepared 
during a previous study (1952-1954) on Great Meadows Refuge. This comparison has 
shown that the ducklings on this study area have been retarded in their growth and devel- 
opment during the past three years when compared with the previous standard. There 
is evidence that changes in the habitat have caused a lack of readily available insect 
food which might be responsible for the stunted growth and poor survival of ducklings 
at Great Meadows. 

In the spring of 1966, incubating females were again banded in the nesting boxes. 
The preponderance of aged females and the scarcity of first-year birds, which latter 



(U) 






should make up half the population, indicates the poor recruitment to the resident breed- 
ing stock. However, production was good this year and the number of ducklings hatched 
was the largest since 1958. 

A similar study was initiated of the wood duck population at the Greenough estate 
in Carlisle. The record of production and survival of birds from this area will be com- 
pared with the data from Great Meadows. Over 500 ducklings were web tagged at hatch- 
ing in 1966 and will provide the basis for the evaluation of the survival rate at both of 
these breeding areas. 

A monograph entitled "The Wood Duck in Massachusetts" by David Grice and 
John P. Rogers has been published by the division and is now available for limited dis- 
tribution. 

Aerial Census of Waterfowl 

The winter inventory was flown between January 4 and January 10, 1966. The 
flight covered the coastline from New Hampshire to Rhode Island and the islands of 
Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket. The total count was 96,300 ducks and geese, 27 per- 
cent less than in 1965 and four percent less than the ten-year average (1957-1966). Black 
ducks (22,400) were down 31 percent from 1965 and eight percent from the ten-year 
average. Diving bay ducks including scaup, golden-eye and bufflehead (31,500) were ten 
percent higher than both the 1965 count and the ten-year average. Other diving ducks 
including scoters, eiders and old squaws (34,000) were down 46 percent below 1965 and 
17 percent below the ten-year average. Canada geese (7,800) were three percent below 
1965 but 22 percent above the ten-year average. 

Five flights were made from October 13 to December 20 to make a periodic in- 
ventory of scoters, eiders and old squaws along the New Hampshire and Massachusetts 
coast. There was a build-up as follows during the census period: Scoters from 2,700 
to 33,700; eiders from 8,100 to 97,900; old squaw from to 300. 

Hunters using boats and decoys were counted to determine hunting pressure. Only 
ten rigs were observed during approximately 40 hours of flying. 

Winter Banding of Black Ducks 

The winter banding program was undertaken at the request of the U. S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service to provide a banded sample of the wintering black duck population in 
the Northeast coastal region. A special experimental late black duck season is under 
consideration and a banded sample of this population would aid in evaluating the efforts 
of such a season. 



Personnel working for the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Game banded 
a total of 1,824 ducks at coastal stations during the period December 21, 1965 to March 
18, 1966. Together with the banding conducted by the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 
the Newburyport area, this exceeded the quota of 3,000 newly banded birds requested 
for Massachusetts coastal stations. 

Banding under state auspices included 691 birds in Boston Harbor and 1,133 in the 
Cape Cod area. The great majority were black ducks (1,658), but 97 mallards were 
banded as were 69 black-mallard hybrids. In addition, 28 birds were captured that were 
already carrying bands from other stations. 






Most of the birds were taken in standard wire bait traps using whole corn as bait. 
The lack of a prolonged period of severe cold during the past winter permitted mussel 



(12) 







beds to remain accessible to ducks throughout the trapping period. For this reason, the 
birds remained in relatively good condition throughout the winter and the corn did not 
prove as attractive as would be expected under more severe conditions. 

Limited use of a cannon net was employed to capture 142 birds for banding. The 
ratio of repeats captured by the cannon net was lower than was the case with wire traps. 
If the winter trapping program is continued, expanded use of the cannon net is contem- 
plated. 

Waterfowl Wing Session 

For the third consecutive year, the waterfowl project leader assisted at a wing 
session held at the Patuxent Research Station in Laurel, Maryland. Over 20,000 duck 
wings sent in by waterfowl hunters in the Atlantic Flyway each year are identified, sexed 
and aged by technicians working at these stations. The data gathered from this wing 
sample are analyzed and used in setting the waterfowl regulations in this flyway. 

A sample collection of waterfowl wings was brought back and presented to wild- 
life students at the University of Massachusetts during a seminar of sexing and aging 
techniques. 

Deer Project 



During the 1965 deer season, hunters reported taking 2,242 deer. Of these, 1,181 
were males and 1,024 were females. No sex was reported for 37 deer. The sex ratio of 
the 1965 deer kill was 115 males to 100 females. This is a reversal of the 1964 kill 
ratio. 

Shotgun hunters killed 2,231 deer during the six-day season, December 6 through 
December 11, 1965 (1,170 bucks; 1,024 does and 37 of sex unreported). Archers shot 
eleven bucks during the archery season November 8 through November 20. 

Hunters neglected to report the location of 500 deer kills. 



Deer project personnel 
range on cover maps. 



are in the process of plotting 3,955,192 acres of deer 



The Division of Fisheries and Game and the Division of Law Enforcement have 
initiated a system of recording deer mortalities. To date, the cause of the highest known 
deer mortality, other than by hunting, is the motor vehicle (roughly 60 percent). Deer 
killed by dogs averages around 24 percent, with the remaining 16 percent of the kills 
caused by illegal shooting (jacking), crop damage kills, unknown and miscellaneous 
causes. 

The general health and weights of our Massachusetts deer appear to be excellent 
as observed at deer checking stations and during the collection of road kills. 

Although the concensus was that the hunting pressure during the 1965 season was 
not as heavy as in previous years, it was estimated that between 48,000 and 50,000 
hunters took to the woods in search of deer during the 1965 season. 

Using the 1965 reported deer kill figure of 2,242 deer, it is estimated that the 
minimal prehunting season deer population ranged between 8,500 and 10,500 deer. 

Statistical analysis of the deer data for a fifteen-year period indicates an over- 
shooting of the female segment of the deer population. The data indicate a history of 



( 13) 



■ 



_. 




overharvest of females followed by a number of years of herd-size recovery. During 
the middle 1950's , the female segment was overharvested for four years in a row and 
to date the herd size has not recovered. 

Utilization of Wildlife Management Areas 

The objectives of this study are as follows: 






1. To determine the hunting pressure on wildlife management areas. 

2. To determine the nature and extent of multiple use of wildlife management 
areas by the general public. 

A summary of the findings regarding hunter usage of these areas revealed that 
the total estimated usage of thirteen such areas was 49,428 hunter trips in 1965. This 
was 14 percent higher than an average of previous years. Peak usage was reported on 
the second Saturday followed by the first Saturday, opening day (Wednesday) and the 
succeeding Saturdays after the second. Average weekday usage was about 19 percent 
of Saturday usage. Weekday hunting was noticeably heavier after a stocking showing 
that hunters anticipated the stocking schedule. Local hunters still utilize the areas to 
the greatest degree. A large number of hunters were willing to travel over 50 miles 
for their sport and generally were the best equipped. 

A summary of the findings regarding multiple use of the division's wildlife man- 
agement areas is as follows: 

Multiple use activities reported outside of the hunting season are: camping, field 
trials, dog training, fishing, berry picking, bird watching, sight-seeing, parking, educa- 
tion, target shooting, horseback riding, ice skating. Total days of usage were not re- 
corded. Each area was rated in the categories of extensive, moderate, occasional or 
no usage. 

NON-FEDERAL AID PROJECTS 



■ 






. r' 



,-* 



Grouse Trapping and Transfer Project 

During the past several decades, Martha's Vineyard Island woodland areas have 
developed into potential ruffed grouse habitat. Since ruffed grouse are non-existent on 
Martha's Vineyard, seven or eight grouse were live-trapped and transferred to this 
island two years ago, but without success due to various factors. Therefore, during 
the past winter, an exerted effort was made to live-trap and transfer as many ruffed 
grouse as possible from areas closed to hunting. The final results reveal that 28 grouse 
were released on Martha's Vineyard. 

Early summer observations indicate that survival was excellent and at least one 
brood was noted. 

Sexing Day-old Pheasants by Down Color 

Working in cooperation with the Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research 
Unit, the game section is attempting to develop a technique of sexing day-old pheasants 
by down coloration, making use of sex linkage found in some pheasant types. 

In Massachusetts, only male pheasants are legal game. Hens are protected be- 
cause it has been shown that 40 to 60 percent of the annual pheasant kill Is derived from 
natural reproduction. Therefore, the Division of Fisheries and Game stocks only cock 
pheasants for the hunting season. 



( 14) 



: ¥ 



Annual game farm production is 55,000 to 57,000 cock pheasants. At present, 
day-old chicks are sexed by eye down markings. This technique, however, has resulted 
in a large number of birds being mis-sexed. One hundred percent true sex determina- 
tion can be made only after the pheasants are five to six weeks of age, but holding the 
birds this long results in considerable expense which the division would like to eliminate. 

After true sex determination has been made, the Division must rear the hens to 
at least twelve weeks of age in order to assure a minimum survival after release in the 
wild. In addition to feed costs, there are labor costs and the necessity for providing 
valuable pen space. A more efficient technique is needed which will allow game farm 
personnel to readily separate day-old pheasant hens from cocks. 

Project results to date have been gratifying. However, it should be noted that it 
may be several years before the technique will be fully developed. 

White Hare 



The Division of Fisheries and Game purchased, tagged and released 2,500 varying 
hare in 1965. Division personnel who released the hare reported them in good condition. 
It is felt that the handling and shipping stipulations required by the division resulted in 
livelier and healthier conditioned animals than in previous years. The handling and 
shipping stipulations are the results of research conducted by this division. 

All hare released by the division have a red metal tag attached to the ear. Hunters 
and other interested sportsmen are requested to return these to division Field Head- 
quarters in Westboro. Tag returns for the 2,500 hare released during the 1965 season 
totaled 78 tags, a three (3) percent return. 

For the 1966 season, hare release of 2,500, the tag returns to date are 33 tags or 
one (1) percent. 

The greatest number of tag data is compiled for hare released during the open 
gunning season (between January 1 and February 5.). To date, the tag data indicate 
that the carryover of hare is minimal. 









Cottontail Rabbit 

The cottontail rabbit population appears to be holding at a high level, 
and rabbit hunters can look forward to a good season. 

Miscellaneous 



Beaglers 



Miscellaneous activities of the Game Section included distributing game investi- 
gating and trapping beaver, tagging beaver pelts, providing landowners with technical 
advice, investigating Hatch Act applications and aiding in writing town natural resources 
reports. 

GAME FARMS 

Game farm production was greatly hindered this past year by disease and drought 
conditions. Uncontrollable disease problems at two of the game farms are being investi- 
gated by the Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit. Change of brood stock 
and diet may provide solutions to this problem. For more details, see the Massachusetts 
Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit report. 

Pheasant pens, electrical installations and buildings continued to require year- 
round construction and maintenance work at all game farms. 



■ 



• 



(15) 






As an economy measure, all brood stock were held at the Wllbraham and Sandwich 
game farms. These farms also furnished the Ayer Game Farm with both day-old and 
six-week-old pheasants for rearing purposes. 

To streamline pheasant distribution, several thousand 12- 14- week-old pheasants 
were shipped from the Wllbraham and Sandwich game farms to the centrally-located 
Ayer game farm for rearing. 



1965 - 66 TRAPPING SEASON, FUR HARVEST & VALUE 



SPECIES 
Muskrat 
Mink 
Otter 
Skunk 
Raccoon 
Weasel 
Red Fox 
Grey Fox 
Beaver 
Bob-cat 
Opposum 



O. TAKEN 


AVE. PRICE 


33,960 


$ 1.75 


1,058 


9.00 


59 


22.00 


40 


.50 


1,698 


3.00 


65 


.50 


75 


9.00 


33 


2.50 


1,445 


17.00 


unknown 




unknown 






Total Value 



VALUE 

$ 59,430.00 

9,522.00 

1,298.00 

20.00 

5,094.00 

32.50 

675.00 

82.50 

24,599.00 






$100,753.00 



( 16) 




GAME DISTRIBUTION 

July 1, 1965 - June 30, 1966 

pheasant Hens Cocks Total 

Adult: Spring and summer liberations 

Young: August liberations (12 weeks) 

October- November liberations (17-15 

weeks) 

Sportsmen's Club Rearing Program* 

Totals 11,430 56,409 67,839 



5,597 


856 


6,453 


4,272 


4,000 


8,272 


175 
1,386 


43,057 
8,496 


43,232 

9,882 



Quail 



Adult: 

Young: 

Totals 



209 
3,115 
3,324 



White Hare 



Northern Varying, purchased 



2,500 



♦Includes June 1966 distribution to clubs (125 hens; 1,676 cocks) 



( 17 ) 






M 




MASSACHUSETTS COOPERATIVE WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNIT 
Wild Turkeys 

Winter survival and reproduction of wild turkeys in central Massachusetts was 
approximately double* from the previous year. After six years of relatively stable 
numbers of survivors and poults, the birds now seem to have increased significantly 
and some have spread beyond the Quabbin area. The success of a plant of 11 turkeys on 
the Holyoke Range is still uncertain. Three of five hens accompanied by gobblers were 
seen near the original pi anting are a after the breeding season. There may still be poults 
in the area which have not been discovered. 

Eleven to 12 turkeys survived on October Mountain. No figures on reproduction 
are available. 

As in the central part of the state, the turkeys in Mount Washington appear to have 
doubled, with an estimated population of at least 50 on August 1, 1966. 

* About 100 on August 1 

Pheasants 

Three pheasant studies have been conducted by the Unit for the first time. 

1. Caged pheasants from game farms are being studied to determine causes of 
mortality in game farm birds. This is a two-year study and no conclusive findings are 
now available. 

2. Dr. Wentworth of the Unit, by cross-breeding, developed a stock of ring-necks 
which produce hen chicks of a light cream color whereas the cock chicks are the normal 
mottled color. This strain will eventually be used by all game farms, and sexing chicks 
successfully should approach 100 percent. 

3. Twenty-six pheasants were equipped with radio transmitters and followed from 
daylight to dark at the Birch Hill study areas. The purpose was to study the birds' 
wanderings and hunter success. Previously, from band returns, it was estimated that 
75 percent of the birds were shot and 3 to 5 percent died as cripples. It was found with 
the radio-equipped birds that heavy hunting pressure inhibited wandering. Nearly 85 
percent of the birds were shot near the release site. One bird survived 11 days and 
another 10 days, but most lasted less than 3 days. Cripple mortality from the radio- 
equipped birds was about 12 percent. 

Mourning Doves 

A Mourning Dove study initiated several years ago was finally completed. The 
history of dove population in western Massachusetts and recent results indicate a high 
increase in the number of breeding birds and a substantial population of wintering doves. 
Fifteen years ago doves were relatively scarce in the area. 

Bird Sterilization Studies 

Dr. Wetherbee has successfully demonstrated and studied the effectiveness of 
Sudan Black as a sterilant to control gulls. The compound has certain limitations and 
new chemicals with promise are now being screened and developed. 

Woodcock Book 

The University of Massachusetts Press approved the manuscript of Sheldon's 
woodcock book for publication and it should be off the press by March 1967. 



( 18) 



1 



■ 












REALTY PROGRAM 

The Realty Section functioned for its first full year as a separate section in the 
organizational setup of the division. This proved very successful as far as land and 
water acquisitions were concerned. More acreage was acquired, the time span between 
option and purchase was reduced and the concentration of all acquisition activities in 
one section strengthened and solidified the basic operating structure of the division. 

The Realty Section was pleased to have played a small part in the preparation 
of the final papers which conveyed as a gift from the Middlesex County League of Sports- 
men's Clubs, Inc. approximately two hundred sixty-five (265) acres of land along the 
Squannacook River in the Towns of Groton, Shirley and Townsend. To augment this 
valuable gift the division acquired three additional tracts of land along the river com- 
prising some one hundred fifty (150) acres and at year's end negotiations were being 
carried on to acquire several other parcels along and adjacent to the river in an effort 
to establish a sizeable wildlife management area. 

In the last report reference was made to the purchase of a sizeable tract along 
the Quaboag River as the first step in establishing a wildlife management area along 
the river. This year one hundred seventy (170) acres were added by purchase giving 
the division an acreage of approximately six hundred seventy-five (675) acres along 
and adjacent to the Quaboag River. 

The division has long recognized the necessity of taking action to acquire access 
points to ponds and lakes throughout the Commonwealth which, although they possess 
great fishing potentials, are inaccessable as far as the public is concerned. Since this 
particular type of acquisition is expensive and difficult to negotiate because adequate 
funds are unavailable, the division has not been in a position to undertake a program of 
this type. However, during this fiscal year a start was made and the division acquired 
an access area on Sandy Pond in Plymouth. This we hope is the beginning of a program 
which will see many acquisitions of this type in the future. 

Several acres were purchased to augment the present holdings in the Swift River 
Wildlife Management area and the Phillipston-Petershamarea. One hundred sixty acres 
were added to our ownership along Little River in Huntington. Purchases were made 
along Lawrence Brook in Royalston, adjacent to the Birch Hill area, and in the West 
Meadows area. A small parcel was added to the present holdings at the Northeast dis- 
trict Headquarters. 

The division is most grateful to Mr. L. Clifford Day of New Hampton, New Hamp- 
shire for his generosity in conveying as a gift the land owned by him in the town of 
Templeton. We are sure that Mr. Day could have sold his property at a handsome profit. 
Yet because of his life long interest in wildlife and forestry and his desire to see areas 
set aside to remain open and undeveloped for the use and enjoyment of generations to 
come he chose to forsake any monetary profits and place his property under the care 
and protection of the division. If we are to succeed in our efforts to provide open areas 
for public enjoyment and recreation we must have more men and women of Mr. Day's 
character and calibre come forward and give us a helping hand. 

During the year our engineer aided in preparing plans and specifications for all 
construction prospects undertaken by the division, and made surveys and partial sur- 
veys to establish and clarify line locations on several of our properties. He also in- 
vestigated and prepared the necessary reports of proposed acquisitions for the evalua- 
tion and consideration by the Realty Committee and prepared plans of several parcels 
for recording. 


















( 19) 



The Realty Section is most grateful to the district managers and district personnel 
for their complete cooperation. Their willingness to spend endless hours making con- 
tacts, obtaining the necessary information to complete transactions and assisting in 
every way they could has resulted in the division now being in a position to make sizeable 
acquisitions of necessary land and water in the future. In fact, the Realty Section ex- 
presses its sincere thanks to all personnel in the division for their help and cooperation. 
The procedures necessary to acquire properties are many times dull and uninteresting 
to personnel whose primary interest is wildlife management yet the cooperation of 
everyone was above criticism. 



m 4 



| 






( 20) 



->j\ 



^m 




INFORMATION AND EDUCATION PROGRAM 

The information and education program continued in its 18th year of operation, 
spearheaded by the Information and Education Section and assisted by personnel through- 
out the division. 

The primary purpose of this program is to develop and maintain a state of public 
concern and effective action on behalf of natural resources. That this does have effect 
is attested to by the current surge of concern over many aspects of natural resource 
management, particularly in the area of pollution. This program actively began efforts 
to arouse concern over pollution in the fifties; today there is promise that effective action 
is on the horizon. Similar results have been experienced in the fight against unwise use 
of pesticides. The information program, which deals with public attitudes, relies heavily 
upon factual information furnished it by research and management personnel. It also 
relies heavily upon personnel in the field who meet and talk with members of the public, 
opinion leaders and other influential persons. It relies most heavily, of course, upon 
public information media through which its message is transmitted. Activities in the 
area of mass-media, (a requirement before other informational efforts can hope to be 
effective), are reported herein. 

News Services 

A total of 158 separate news stories were distributed to media as follows: 



I & E Section news releases: 106 
I & E Section television news films: 
District news releases: 24 



28 



A total of 3,015 newsclips were received, an increase of 177 over last year. 

Continued personal contact with press personnel by I & E and others resulted in 
46 columns and features in addition to coverage resulting from news releases. I & E 
furnished pictures, information and writing assistance on numerous occasions to feature 
writers both in Massachusetts newspapers and national magazines. An increase in out- 
of-state coverage was noticeable. 

MASSACHUSETTS WILDLIFE Magazine 

A total of 36,121 subscribers were receiving this magazine at the close of the 
fiscal year. The drop from last year was the result of a year-long re-subscription 
process which has "cleaned" the mailing list. The re-subscription rate compares with 
average rates for such magazines nationally. At the present time, nearly 1000 new 
names are being added upon personal request only at the time of each issue. Current 
readership is conservatively estimated at three times the subscription figure. 

Publications 



"The Wood Duck in Massachusetts", 96 
delivered during the reporting period. The ] 



pages, two colors, was completed and 
& E Section also accomplished routine 

publication of the annual report, stocked waters list, fish and game law abstracts, closed 

town list, license forms and archery stamp. 

Conservation Education 

The I & E Chief continued to participate on the Massachusetts Advisory Committee 
for Conservation Education and the State Conservation-Education Editorial Board. 



(21) 



■ 



.'^ 






A total of 135 boys completed the Junior Conservation Camp program, which is 
planned and directed by the I & E Chief in cooperation with the Department of Natural 
Resources and Massachusetts Conservation Inc. 

The I & E Chief was active in the latter part of the reporting period in coopera- 
tion with the Massachusetts Audubon Society, helping to plan a national conference of 
the Conservation Education Association. 

Sportfish Awards Program 

The third year of the sportfish awards program was completed with gold pins and 
plaques awarded to holders of the following record catches for calendar year 1965: 



Species 

Large mouth Bass 
Smallmouth Bass 
Northern Pike 
Pickerel 
Rainbow Trout 
Brown Trout 
Lake Trout 
Walleye 
Bluegill 
Bullhead 

Catfish 
Calico 
White Perch 
Yellow Perch 

Brook Trout 
Shad 



Weight 



Length 



9 lbs. 8 oz. 


23 inches 


5 lbs. 9 oz. 


21 7/8 inches 


9 lbs. 


34 3/4 inches 


6 lbs. 8 oz. 


28 inches 


7 lbs. 4 oz. 


27 1/2 inches 


13 lbs. 1 oz. 


31 1/2 inches 


12 lbs. 3 oz. 


31 1/4 inches 


8 lbs. 8 oz. 


28 1/2 inches 


1 lbs. 


11 1/4 inches 


5 lbs. 8 oz. 


22 1/2 inches 


4 lbs. 9 oz. 


22 1/2 inches 


9 lbs. 8 oz. 


25 1/2 inches 


2 lbs. 9 1/2 inches 


18 inches 


2 lbs. 4 oz. 


16 3/4 inches 


1 lbs. 12 oz. 


16 1/2 inches 


1 lbs. 8 oz. 


16 1/2 inches 


2 lbs. 4 oz. 


19 inches 


5 lbs. 11 oz. 


23 inches 


5 lbs. 11 oz. 


26 inches 



■ 



I 



Standing all-time records of January 1, 1966, are: 



Species 

Large mouth Bass 

Smallmouth Bass 

Northern Pike 

Pickerel 

Rainbow Trout 

Brown Trout 

Lake Trout 

Walleye 

Shad 

Bluegill 

Bullhead 

Catfish 

Calico 

White Perch 

Yellow Perch 

Brook Trout 



Weight 



Length 



12 lbs. 


1 oz. 


25 3/4 inches 


6 lbs. 


10 oz. 


24 inches 


13 lbs. 


12 oz. 


38 1/2 inches 


9 lbs. 


5 oz. 




7 lbs. 


4 oz. 


27 1/2 inches 


18 lbs. 


8 oz. 




13 lbs. 


1 oz. 


31 inches 


8 lbs. 


8 oz. 


28 1/2 inches 


6 lbs. 


13 oz. 




1 lbs. 




11 1/4 inches 


4 lbs. 


9 oz. 


22 1/2 inches 


13 lbs. 


8 oz. 


30 inches 


2 lbs. 


9 1/2 oz. 


18 inches 


2 lbs. 


4 oz. 


16 3/4 inches 


2 lbs. 




16 5/8 inches 


2 lbs. 


4 oz. 


19 inches 






■ I 

m 



( 22) 



^H 



■ 



Meetings 

District personnel attended or participated in 271 meetings with sportsmen's 
groups, civic and fraternal association, youth and church groups, besides numerous 
meetings with town conservation commissions, individuals and various local groups to 
advise directly on wildlife management projects. I & E and other staff personnel parti- 
cipated in a similar number of such meetings. 

Exhibits 

Districts and I & E participated in 12 major exhibits during the year. A few ex- 
hibits of minor nature were also assisted. 

Audio- Visual Aids 

The I & E Section prepared and presented 21 half-hour "Dateline Boston" TV 
shows, four 15-minute "Critter Corner" shows, and appeared as a live guest on radio 
21 times. A number of guest appearances by other personnel were arranged. 

Approximately 45,440 viewers saw division films exclusive of television use. 
The 16 films in the library were booked a total of 568 times. One new film, "Water 
Going- Going" , on pollution, was completed during the reporting period. 

The usual large number of still photos for technical use were produced, as well 
as hundreds of prints for publicity and publications. 

Special Events 

The I & E Chief again served as publicity chairman for National Wildlife Week, 
and telephone news service was again conducted on the opening day of deer season. 

Five "Show Me" tours were conducted by district personnel for groups of sports- 
men, press, conservation commissions and legislators. 

Miscellaneous 

About 2800 "Safety Zone" posters were distributed by Districts and another 1500 
by the I & E Section. 

The I & E Chief served as president of the American Association for Conservation 
Information, the international professional association of conservation information 
personnel, throughout the year. 

The public information campaign conducted to establish flourescent orange as a 
safety color for deer hunting received a first-place award as the "outstanding public 
information campaign nationally." The award was presented in June by the American 
Association for Conservation Information. 

While it did not receive an award in the same competition, MASSACHUSETTS 
WILDLIFE magazine was rated "well above average", receiving 200 of a possible 240 
points for "fulfillment of conservation purpose." Not receiving a high award was under- 
standable - the magazine was in competition with 45 others, most of which expend far 
greater budgets on color printing, etc. 







(23) 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATION 
HOW THE SPORTSMAN'S DOLLAR WAS SPENT 



ADMINISTRATION 
Administration 
Fish & Game Board 
Information-Education 

FISHERIES MANAGEMENT 
Fish Hatcheries 
Management 

♦Fish Restoration Projects 
Management 
Fisheries Research Coop. Unit 

WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT 

Game Farms 

Management 
♦Damage by Wild Deer & Moose 

Wildlife Research Coop. Unit 
♦Wildlife Research Restoration 

LAND ACQUISITION 



LAW ENFORCEMENT 
Public Hunting Grounds 
Conservation Officers - 

Salaries & Expenses 
Conservation Equipment 



♦Continuing Accounts 

Expenditures under 3304-47 and 3304-53 
75% reimbursable by Federal Funds 



3304-01 


$106,405.34 






3304-01 


941.00 


107,346.34 


7% 


3304-01 




78,022.24 


5% 


3304-42 




311,299.74 


21% 


3304-42 


115,859.55 






3304-47 


39,351.91 






3304-51 


85,480.43 






3304-55 


10,000.00 


250,691.89 


17% 


3304-51 




259,340.92 


18% 


3304-51 


85,480.44 






3304-41 


5,214.50 






3304-44 


9,188.94 






3304-53 


128,868.31 


228,752.19 


16% 


♦3304-47 


11,078.00 






3304-48 


32,900.00 






3304-52 


29,900.00 






♦3304-53 


540.00 


74,418.00 


5% 


3308-07 


5,065.16 






3360-01 


142,571.00 






3360-13 


6,500.00 


154,136.16 


11% 



$1,464,007.48 100% 



I 


















RESERVE IN INLAND FISHERIES AND GAME FUND 
AS OF JUNE 30, 1966 - $ 497,442.06 



(24) 




Account 
Number 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DIVISION OF FISHERIES & GAME 

FISCAL YEAR JULY 1, 1965 to JUNE 30, 1966 

Expenditures 
Title Appropriation & Liabilities 



3304-01 Administration 

3304-42 Fisheries Management 

3304-48 Purchase of Land 
Squannacook River 

3304-51 Wildlife Management 

3304-52 Purchase & Development of Land 
for Wildlife Management Areas 



•3304-41 Damage by Wild Deer & Moose 

3304-43 Certain Improvements and Con- 
struction - Trout Hatchery 
East Sandwich 

♦3304-47 Fish Restoration Projects 

*3304-53 Wildlife Restoration 



*75% reimbursable by Federal Funds 



SUMMARY OF FISH & GAME INCOME 
July 1, 1965 t o June 30, 19 66 



Reverted 



$ 193,050.00 $ 185,368.58 $ 7,681.42 

447,000.00 427,159.29 19,840.71 

33,000.00 32,900.00 100.00 

440,500.00 430,301.79 10,198.21 

30,000.00 29,900.00 100.00 



$1,143,550.00 


$1,105,629.66 


$ 37,920.34 


Continuing 
Appropriation 


Expenditures 


Balance 
Forward 


$ 13,547.95 


$ 5,214.50 


$ 8,333.45 


20,000.00 




20,000.00 


86,164.43 


50,429.91 


35,734.52 


183,665.50 


129,408.31 


54,257.19 



$ 303,377.88 $ 185,052.72 $118,325.16 










v.y 



Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses 

Special Licenses, Trap Registrations and Tags 

Alien Gun Permits 

Rents 

Misc. Sales and Income 

Pittman-Robertson Federal Aid 

Dingell Johnson Federal Aid 

(25) 



$1,360,276.00* 
5,627.51** 

193.50 

3,768.50 

9,563.20 

96,731.92 

67,705.46 









: 



Accelerated Public Works Projects 
Court Fines 
Refunds Prior Year 
Archery Stamps 



♦See Detail Sheet #1 
**See Detail Sheet #2 



60,268.18 

5,532.50 

104.09 

2,939.10 

$1,612,709.96 



(26 ) 



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(27) 






ANALYSIS OF SPECIAL LICENSES ISSUED UNDER SECTIONS 48, 68A, 102-3-4 
105-6-7 and 112-A-B-C, Chapter 131, G. L. during the FISCAL YEAR ENDED 



'SlR 



June 30, 1966 



TYPE OF LICENSE 



NUMBER ISSUED 



Trap Registrations: 

Initial 



Fur Buyers: 

Taxidermist: 

Propagators: 



Renewal 
Resident 



(Special Fish) 

Initial 

Renewal 

(Fish) 
Initial 
Renewal 

(Birds & Mammals) 

Initial 

Renewal 

(Dealers) 
Initial 
Renewal 
Additional 

(Ind. Bfrd or Mammal) 

Initial 

Renewal 



Shiners for Bait: 

Duplicates 

Field Trial Licenses: 

Quail for Training Dogs: 
Initial 
Renewal 



97 
633 

24 

60 



14 
181 



6 
79 



66 
312 



1 

77 

383 



27 
63 

208 
4 

4 



20 

45 



RECEIPTS 



$ 97.00 
158.25 

240.00 

300.00 



28.00 
181.00 



30.00 
237.00 



330.00 
936.00 



5.00 
231.00 
383.00 



27.00 
31.50 

1,040.00 
2.00 

40.00 



100.00 
135.00 






Commercial Shooting Preserves: 
Commercial Shooting Tags 
Commercial Shooting Posters 
Commercial Shooting Game Tags 
Commercial Shooting Fish Tags 

Trapping of Certain Birds: 



10 

2,800 

1,201 

5,114 

11,501 



500.00 

570.76 
25.00 

$5,627.51 



(28) 



.4 I 



LEGISLATION 

The following laws affecting the Division of Fisheries and Game were enacted 
during the latter part of the legislative session of 1965 and during the legislative session 
of 1966: 



CHAPTER 768, ACTS, 1965: 



CHAPTER 801, ACTS, 1965: 



CHAPTER 237, ACTS, 1966; 



An act providing for the protection of the coastal 
wetlands of the Commonwealth. 

An act increasing the fees for sporting, hunting, 
fishing and trapping licenses. 

An act providing that the Director of the Division of 
Fisheries and Game and the Chairman of the State 
Reclamation Board be advisory members of the Com- 
mittee for Conservation of Soil, Water and Related 
Resources in the Division of Conservation Services 
in the Department of Natural Resources. 



CHAPTER 264, ACTS, 1966: 



An act extending the time within which firearms and 
bows and arrows may be used on Greylock State 
Reservation. 






CHAPTER 320, ACTS, 1966: 



CHAPTER 429, ACTS, 1966: 



CHAPTER 470, ACTS, 1966; 



CHAPTER 493, ACTS, 1966: 



CHAPTER 651, ACTS, 1966: 



CHAPTER 89, RESOLVES, 1966: 



An act authorizing the Commonwealth to grant to 
New Bedford Gas and Edison Light Company ease- 
ments on, over, under, and across certain land, for 
the transmission of electric power. 

An act authorizing the Division of Fisheries and Game 
to acquire certain land in the towns of Ware and 
Belchertown for fish and wildlife management pur- 
poses. 

An act directing the Department of Public Works that 
advance planning for highway construction shall pro- 
vide for the protection of water resources, fish and 
wildlife and recreational values. 

An act authorizing the Division of Fisheries and Game 
to acquire certain land in the towns of Ware and 
Belchertown for fish and wildlife management pur- 
poses. 

An act to provide for a special inland fisheries and 
game capital outlay program. 

Resolve providing for an investigation and study by 
the Department of Natural Resources of the inland 
wetlands in the Commonwealth. 



RETIREMENTS 

December 31, 1965: Mrs. Frances G. White, Senior Clerk (last day on payroll Nov. 30, 

1965) (Died June 25, 1966) 
June 4, 1966: George F. Pushee, Jr., Game Biologist 



( 29 ) 



#f*. 



RULES AND REGULATIONS PROMULGATED BY THE DIRECTOR OF FISHERIES AND 
GAME DURING FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1966, AND SUMMARY OF OUTSTAND- 
ING REGULATIONS. 

August 4, 1948. Rules and regulations for the artificial propagation and maintenance of 
fish. 

August 4, 1948. Rules and regulations for the artificial propagation of birds and mam- 
mals. 

July 14, 1952. Rules and regulations for hunting with bows and arrows. 
August 12, 1953. Rules and regulations governing sale of protected fresh-water fish by 
licensed dealers in Massachusetts. 

March 26, 1954. Rules and regulations governing the display of sporting, hunting, fishing, 
and trapping licenses in Massachusetts. 

January 28, 1955. Rules and regulations relative to public fishing grounds in Massachu- 
setts. 

April 10, 1956. Rules and regulations governing the taking of fish in interstate ponds 
lying between Massachusetts and New Hampshire. 

February 14, 1957. Rules and regulations relating to the taking of carp and suckers 
for the purpose of sale. 

February 15, 1957. Rules and regulations relative to the tagging of deer in Massachu- 
setts. 

October 20, 1959. Rules and regulations for public shooting grounds and wildlife man- 
agement areas in Massachusetts. 

May 10, 1962. Rules and regulations relating to the taking of shad in the inland waters 
of the Commonwealth. 

January 1, 1963. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting of deer in Massachusetts. 
January 1, 1963. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting of hares and rabbits in 
Massachusetts. 

October 10, 1963. Rules and regulations relating to hunting of pheasants, quail, and 
ruffed grouse in Massachusetts. 

October 10, 1963. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting of gray squirrels in 
Massachusetts. 

December 15, 1963. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting and trapping of mam- 
mals in Massachusetts. 

January 1, 1964. Interstate fishing regulations on Wallum Lake. 

April 1, 1964. Interstate fishing regulations on Congamond Lake, Hamilton Reservoir, 
Colebrook Reservoir, Perry Pond, Muddy Pond, and Breckneck Pond. 
April 10, 1964. Rules and regulations relating to the taking of certain fish in Massachu- 
setts. 

August 31, 1964. Rules and regulations for trapping of birds by farmers. 
September 1, 1965. Migratory Game Bird Regulations 1965-1966. 

February 2, 1966. Rules and regulations relative to issuance of permits to expose 
poisons for the control of mammal and bird species not protected by federal or state 
statutes. 



(30) 



v** 



1^3 

7 




MASSACHUSETTS 
DIVISION OF FISHERIES ANdHaME 

SECOND CENT 
OF SERVICE 



\ 







% M 






ANNUAL REPORT 



196? 

JAMES M. SHEPARD, DIRI 




COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Division of Fisheries and Game 
102nd Annual Report 



His Excellency 

GOVERNOR JOHN A. VOLPE 




JAMES M. SHEPARD 
Director 



I ISHERIES AND GAME BOARD 



FIS1 

HARRY C. DARLING, Chairman 

East Bridgewater 

BRADLEE E. GAGE, Secretary 

Amherst 

HENRY J. COLOMBO 

Wilmington 

MARTIN H. BURNS 

Newbury 

EDWARD J. TIERNEY 

Pittsfield 

STAFF 

JAMES M. SHEPARD 

Director 

->ELL A. COOKINGHAM 

Assistant Director 

1 BRIDGES 

'erintendent 

POLLACK 

gist 



His Excellency, John A. Volpe, Governor of the Commonwealth. 
the Executive Council, the General Court, and the Board ol 
Fisheries and Game: 

Gentlemen: 

I have the honor to submit herewith the One Hundred and 
Second Annual Report of the Division of Fisheries and Game, 
covering the fiscal year from July 1, 1966, to June 30, 1967. 

This year, instead of submitting a routine report of accom 
plishments, we have attempted to utilize the annual report b 
demonstrate major problems that affect wildlife -orientated out- 
door recreation now and in the future, and how this agency is 
going about meeting those needs. 

With the theme "The Second Century of Service," this di- 
vision of state government commends to your attention the K 
sential need for financial augmention of Massachusetts inland 
fisheries and wildlife programs presented by this report. 

Respectfully submitted, 



VJ James M. ShepardV Direct. >i 



CONTENTS 



Fisheries and Game Board 

Fisheries Management 

Land and Water Acquisition 

The Second Century is Here Center Spread 

Wildlife Management 

Information and Education 10 

More Than Meets the Eye 11 

Financial Reports ^ 

Fish Records, Legislation and 

Regulations Inside Back Cover 



! 



5M-1 2-67-946348 



Publication of this document approved by 
Alfred C. Holland, State Purchasing Agent 



Estimated Cost Per Copy: $.315 



(O 



THE BOARD REPORTS 7 ? 3 ^ 



XhE Division of Fisheries and Game is the sole agency 
of the Commonwealth expressly charged with manage- 
ment of all inland fish and wildlife resources of Massa- 
chusetts. This responsibility is not limited to "fish and 
game" but includes, by law, all wild species of birds, 
mammals and fish found within the confines of the 
Commonwealth. 

While attention in the past has been devoted primarily 
to fish and game species, the same work that improves 
hunting and fishing, whether it be research, land and 
water acquisition, planting of cover or other activities, 
automatically benefits non-game wildlife. By board policy, 
land and water areas owned or controlled by the divi- 
sion are available to and heavily utilized by non-conflicting 
public recreational uses the year around. 

The limited Inland Fisheries and Game Fund cannot 
be expected to support a multiple-use program which 
benefits all the public. Assistance from others who also 
benefit, perhaps by General Fund monies, is imperative. 

While more detail will be found elsewhere in this 
booklet, the board wishes to comment on the following 
highlights of the past year: 

Fish Stocking 

A total of 369,009 pounds of trout were reared and 
distributed throughout the state during the reporting 
period. This amounted to 1,348,711 brook, brown and 
rainbow trout. In addition, 10,850 landlocked salmon 
were placed in Quabbin reservoir. 

The board wishes to note the retirement on March 31, 
1967, of John Norell, culturist in charge of the Sunder- 
land hatchery, after 37 years of devoted service. The 
increasingly impressive production of our fish hatcheries 
is largely due to a staff of dedicated and hard-working 
personnel like Mr. Norell. 

The proposed Quabbin Hatchery appears to have 
suffered postponement because of insufficient funds. Con- 
nector's bids opened in June were all in excess of the 
12 million dollars allowed by bond issue. A request 
for the additional funds necessary to commence construc- 
tion of this badly needed new facility has been sub- 
mitted. It appears, however, that at least a year will 
pass before construction can begin. 

Fisheries Management 

Salmon arc beginning to come into the catch at Quab- 
bin Reservoir in worthwhile numbers and the catch of 
lake trout has increased. 

Work was nearly completed on the evolvement of a 
biologically sound and fair distribution system for trout 
i" streams. 

A major fisheries improvement program for the Con- 
necticut river is underway in cooperation with other 
agencies. Plans are to increase the available shad runs, 
and hopefully to bring salmon back to the river. 



The pesticides laboratory at Westboro continued to be 
an important adjunct of the fisheries program which con- 
tributes vital data of value to all interested in the purity 
of our waters. Now in its third year, the project is in 
cooperation with the Massachusetts Health Research In- 
stitute and the United States Department of the Interior. 

Wildlife Management 

Introduction of sharptail grouse to Nantucket, trans- 
plants of ruffed grouse from the mainland to Martha's 
Vinyard and transplants of wild turkeys marked efforts 
to introduce new species where possible. 

New deer regulations were adopted by the board be- 
fore the close of the fiscal year, requiring a permit to 
take antlerless deer. The 1966 season covered by this 
report was not affected by this, however. It was affected 
by regulations previously adopted by the board, provid- 
ing for a mandatory check of deer killed. This improved 
reporting system, now common in many deer states, re- 
sulted in a report of 3,404 deer taken. 

Field trials, dog training, berry picking, bird watching, 
sight-seeing, education, target shooting, wilderness camp- 
ing, horseback riding and ice skating continue to be 
popular uses of our areas in addition to hunting and 
fishing. 

The wood duck population remains in question. Massa- 
chusetts sportsmen again voluntarily approved a reduc- 
tion of the federally approved daily limit. Studies at 
Great Meadows revealed that, while nesting success was 
high, ducklings are retarded in development and there 
appears to be only about a 20 percent survival to flight 
stage. This study will be expanded to other areas to 
determine if this is typical of the statewide population. 

Winter inventory of waterfowl indicated a population 
136 percent over the average of the past 19 years, with 
the black duck wintering population up ten percent. The 
board wishes to commend the U. S. Bureau o\' Sports 
Fisheries and Wildlife for its granting of a special coastal 
black duck season which enables logical harvest o\' this 
unique, under-harvested late -wintering black duck popu- 
lation. 

The division cooperated in a study of inland wetlands, 
resulting in a legislative proposal to enact protective 
measures similar to that now in effect for coastal wetlands. 

Game Stocking 

Production of pheasants at division game farms con- 
tinued high, with 53,356 cocks and 15,493 liens reared 
and released. In addition, 3.532 quail were reared and 
released and 2,153 white hare were purchased ami 
stocked in suitable covers. Continual production o\ large 
numbers of well-feathered, sport) birds in the face o\ 
rising costs and without capital expansion is a tribute 
to dedication and perserverance o\' our game culturists. 

Lari.ls uV*<cl: Waters !.".*••; •' 
The board approved utilization i^~ a* bond is'sue in the 
amount of $800,000 to be expended as rapidlj as possible. 
as a means o\' speeding up the acquisition ^\ lands and 




I HARRY C. DARLING 
Chairman 
East Bridgewater 



BRADLEE E. GAGE 

Secretary 

Amherst 



HENRY J. COLOMBO 
Wilmington 



EDWARD J. TIERNEY 
Pittsfield 




MARTIN H. BURNS 
Newbury 



waters rather than waiting for funds to accumulate from 
license revenue. Bonds will be rcpayed from the dollar- 
per-license increase earmarked for acquisition. It ap- j 
pears that the interest rate on these bonds will actually | 
be less than the average rate of increase of real estate 
value. In effect the program thus has been expedited by 
three years without additional cost. Further, it has been 
carried out to date without adding to the staff. 

At this writing approximately 15 acquisitions are either 
completed or in final stages of completion and another 
20 are being actively worked on or investigated. Em- 
phasis has been on huntable areas, access to streams and 
smaller ponds, and to some degree on coastal marshes. 

Information and Education 

This program has dual purposes: to develop public 
concern for the wise management of our natural resources 
with emphasis on fish and wildlife, and to furnish infor- 
mation and guidance that will enhance public enjoyment 
of outdoor sports and improve cooperation with sound 
conservation programs. This effort for the third time 
received international recognition with receipt of a first- 
place award for excellence of its effective planning and 
utilization of diverse and complex media. 

Public Hearings 

The holding of public hearings to establish or reject 
regulatory proposals is a basic board function. A list of 
regulatory adoptions is included elsewhere in this book- 
let as required by law. Public hearings were held by the 
board on July 15, 1966 (rails, gallinules, woodcock and 
snipe seasons), August 26, 1966 (general waterfowl sea- 
sons), September 9, 1966 (deer regulations), and May 
26, 1967 (deer regulations). All regular monthly meetings 
were held, as well as two joint meetings with the Board 
of Natural Resources. 



Board Personnel 

Bradlee E. Gage of Amherst was appointed by Gover- 
nor Volpe on January 3, 1967, replacing Stanley Mikelk 
of Gilbertville whose term had expired. Mr. Mikelk's 
leaving was noted with public award of a special plaque 
and fishing tackle on behalf of the board and divisior 
staff. On June 20, 1967, Harry C. Darling was unani- 
mously elected Chairman and Bradlee E. Gage was 
unanimously elected Secretary. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Harry C. Darling, Chairman 
Bradlee E. Gage, Secretary 
Henry J. Colombo 
Edward J. Tierney 
Martin H. Burns 



FISHERIES MANAGEMENT 



1 ROJECTS continued during the past year included 
Quabbin Reservoir investigations, harvest studies on 
managed ponds, water quality studies, pond reclamation, 
stream access and development and warmwater fisheries 
research. 

Newly created projects include a study of shad in the 
Connecticut river and development of a stream trout 
stocking formula. 

Creel census reports indicate that 64,802 fishermen 
took 59,612 fish weighing 59,305 pounds at Quabbin 
Reservoir between April and October. An increase in the 
lake trout harvest was noted, also increased interest in 
landlocked salmon, with these fish beginning to come 
into the catch in worthwhile numbers. 10,800 landlocks 
were stocked this year. Creel census was also conducted 
on three reclaimed ponds. 

The statewide project to determine extent of variations 
of chemical constituents and possible limiting factors to 
freshwater fish survival was intensified. 

Pond reclamations totalling more than 480 acres were 
conducted for trout and smallmouth bass according to 
I the best use of each pond. Ponds so treated were Pleasant 
Pond, Wenham; Houghton's Pond, Milton; Lake Salton- 
stall, Haverhill; Great Pond, Truro; Sheep Pond, Brewster; 
Ashumet Pond, Falmouth; and Fearing Pond, Plymouth. 

Dwindling access to many trout streams necessitated 
continuation of the program to provide anglers with a 
place to fish. Roads, parking lots and the opening of 
streamside foot trails and clearings are all included. One 
important result is that hatchery trucks can now release 
i trout in locations that were formerly inaccessible. 

An investigation of past stocking methods and the 
formulation of a biologically sound and equitable stream 
trout stocking basis was conducted. Classification and 
investigation of waters throughout the state was com- 
pleted and incorporated into a distribution formula to 
be utilized in all future stocking. 

The final segment of a three-year harvest and population 
study on the Connecticut River was completed. Angler 
counts and fishermen interviews were made and coupled 
with weekly aerial counts of anglers on the entire length 
of the river within Massachusetts. Samples of fish popu- 
lations were taken by electrofishing and netting. 

Maintenance of two warmwater fish culture pond sys- 
tems and distribution of their product was continued. 
Maintenance of public fishing areas and habitat improve- 
ments were intensified. District personnel investigated 
fish kills, advised sportsmen's groups in fish-pond manage- 
ment, and cooperated with federal agencies on surveys 
of interstate waters. 

The Harold Parker pond system yielded 1679.4 pounds 
of largemouth bass and 338.8 pounds of smallmouths. 
The Merrill pond system produced 1028 pounds of 
largemouth bass adn 886 pounds of chain pickerel. 

The pesticides laboratory at Westboro, now in its third 
year of a cooperative project with the Massachusetts 





OPENING DAY SUCCESS 



MODEL OF QUABBIN HATCHERY 




Health Research Institute and the United States Depart- 
ment of the Interior, concluded the second segment with 
a report involving analysis of 603 fish samples collected 
from 91 locations throughout the state. 

In addition, analysis of fish from various other sources 
was accomplished. Sixty trout from hatcheries were ana- 
lyzed for DDT, DDE and TDE (DDD), as were ap- 
proximately 120 lake trout from Quabbin Reservoir and 
twenty miscellaneous fish and duck samples. 

In conjunction with the division, the University of 
Massachusetts continued research on the Connecticut Riv- 
er and various ponds. The Connecticut River study in- 
cludes investigation of ecology of American Shad and 
food habit study. 

Warmwater research placed emphasis on age and 
growth analysis and population estimates. An ecological 
survey was initiated in one pond and a program was 
initiated to study ecological characteristics of artificial 
ponds. 

Late in the fiscal year a cooperative effort between 
the division and other agencies was initiated on the Con- 1 
necticut to increase the shad population and hopefully : 
to return salmon runs to the river. State fisheries units ) 
of Connecticut, New Hampshire and Vermont, the U. S. I 
Fish and Wildlife Service, the University of Massachusetts, 
and the Northeast Utilities Service Company are involved. 

Over one million shad eggs were transferred from ai 
location in Connecticut to areas just below Vernon dam | 
and success of their hatching was observed. The river 
was mapped from Turner's Falls to Vernon. A tagging 
study was initiated at Holyoke and observations con- 
ducted on shad movement. 









HATCHERY PRODUCTION- 


1967 


Trout Distribution from State and 
Federal Hatcheries 


JULY 1, 1966 TO JUNE 30, 1967 




STATION 


POUNDAGE 




Station 


Pounds 


Totals 


Berkshire Hatchery 
Montague Hatchery 
Palmer Hatchery 
Sandwich Hatchery 
Sunderland Hatchery 
Sutton Hatchery 
STATE POUNDAGE 


24,897 
62,558 
51,705 
67,389 
103,106 
17,515 


327,170 


Berlin, New Hampshire 
Nashua, New Hampshire 
North Attleboro, Mass. 
Pittsford, Vermont 
FEDERAL POUNDAGE .... 


359 

12,928 

21 ,683 

6,869 


41,839 


Grand Total Poundage 
Total Numbers 




369,009 
1,348,711 


(This table does not show 


trout retained for breeders) 









LAND AND 

WATER 

ACQUISITION 



1.HE Realty Section was engaged at the year's opening 
iin acquiring several small parcels, principally in the 
Northeast Management Area, to round out boundaries. 
Four more parcels were acquired along the Squannacook 
'River, two being key pieces adjacent to present division - 
owned land. An interior parcel was purchased in the 
Phillipston Area. Approximately one hundred acres along 
the east brach of the Westfield River and another half- 
mile of the Little River were purchased. 

An $800,000 bond issue has been nearly expended in 
a greatly expanded land and water acquisition program. 
Beginning with a workshop for division employees in- 
volved in the program, the section has launched and 
carried out an acquisition program without increasing 
personnel by even one. As of this report, the nucleus of 
a new farm game area of over 300 acres in central 
Worcester County has been added. Another area in cen- 
tral Berkshire County of over 500 acres was in the 
final stages of acquisition. 

Most of the river-front land along the Millers between 
Athol and South Royalston and some 700 acres of other 
land in the area is in final stages. Purchase of nearly 
700 additional acres in Belchertown adjacent to the 
Swift River area was completed. Parcels are being added 
to the Quaboag area, the Chester area, and preliminary 
work on two additional areas was in progress. Land with 
water rights in Bristol County, nearly complete, offers 
opportunity for a new warmwater fish culture system. 
iA temporary use permit for the Knightsville area was 
obtained. 

Preliminary work on several coastal marsh areas and 
access sites to streams and smaller ponds is underway. 

While the State Access Board is doing yeoman work 
on larger ponds, the division feels that smaller waters 
also require attention. Accordingly, acquisition of access 
to streams and small ponds is being stepped up. Acqui- 
sition of coastal marshes to protect and preserve these 
vital sources of both recreation and marine life is vital 
to their future. A specific portion of available funds 
has been designated for these purposes. 

While the acquisition process is complex for any prop- 
erty, it is more so in the case of coastal marshes. De- 
termining property lines, finding lost chains of title and 
ambiguous deeds all tend to slow up the process. 

Land costs are following an upward spiral and large, 
contiguous tracts are becoming increasingly harder to 
find. Lake and pond access sites are fast being priced out 
of the division's capability. With multiple recreational 
and educational uses, as well as the mere fact of preser- 
vation of our outdoors, it is apparent that additional 
sources of funds for the purpose must be found. The 




DONATED BY SPORTSMEN'S CLUBS 

hunter and fisherman should not, and cannot, entirely 
support this program. 

A few properties have been acquired by gift. This is 
a commendable way to perpetuate the property and ex- 
press the giver's interest in conservation and the public 
good. There is no better way for a landowner to in- 
sure the perpetual preservation of outdoor values he has 
cherished than to give or bequeath such properties to 
this agency. 




m 



«*^> 











\4 



»■>• 






!* 









In conserving our outdoor areas 

opportunities delayed mean 

opportunities lost 

— President John F. Kennedy 



THE SECON, 



7f 



r irst organized as a cor 
Division of Fisheries and Gifti 
well into its second century (J 

The rest of this booklet! 
the Massachusetts wildlife ajjjf 
recent achievements, it conta 
is more important. 

Various estimates tell us 
by three or even four times 'ft 
lations increase geometrically^ 
202nd annual report will hsi 
record can stand as one of fc 
pearance of the values we he 

There will be more pec 
to enjoy outdoor Massachusei 
outdoors," or fish and wildh 
less action is taken TODAY; 
destroyed, or access to it cho 
for recreation except at pror 

A number of worthwh 
some are hard at work - but 
THE JOB NOW WHILII 

The Division of Fisher: j. 
waters, to be used by all wh< 
is a case in point. 

The program is primai; 
resources of the Inland Fis 
license revenue, federal exciil 
lated sources, this fund is wl It: 
and trapper. The only contr J 
of a 250 on the dollar reimbuej 
mum combined expenditure c ft 
tee that even this small partioi 

Just one meaningful pu h 

The 800-thousand-dollai m 
wildlife lands and waters th .f 
IT HAS TO BE REP^jl 
MEN'S LICENSE REVEI J 
for the outdoors and wildlife >fl| 
as those who now pay the bi 

The course for the futu 
purchased and reserved in 
too slowly and are subject to 
fits must share the cost. 

A proposal will be offer 1 i 
in that direction. We will as f 
acquisition and development 
itially, to be repaid from the 

By joint participation a|| 
chusetts can insure the futu 



3 



VTURY IS HERE! 



"865 and later renamed the 
ate wildlife agency is now 
vice. 

he 102nd annual report of 

more than a recounting of 

realization that the future 

ian population will increase 
lext 40 years. Since popu- 
)ne care to guess what the 

00 years from today? Our 
■ it can lead to utter disap- 
it-of-doors. 

ice more people who want 

1 not be places to call "the 
ittract and be enjoyed, un- 
ot be created. Water, once 
3pment, cannot be regained 

have been envisioned and 
le necessary funding to DO 
STILL BE DONE. 

e's acquisition of lands and 
iitdoors by whatever means, 

it on the limited financial 
rame Fund. Derived from 
sorting equipment, and re- 
:d by the hunter, fisherman 
s rest of the public consists 
lid acquisition up to a maxi- 
/ear-and there is no guaran- 
:ontinue another year! 
tal more than this. 

allocated for acquisition of 
only practically exhausted, 
ELY FROM SPORTS- 
sryone who has any concern 
t in it, benefits just as much 

Lands and waters must be 
;hip. Other methods move 
e. And everyone who bene- 

ate wildlife agency to move 
issue for lands and waters 
cy, totalling $1,000,000 in- 
d. 

n of all concerned, Massa- 
disappearing outdoors. 




WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT 




MASSACHUSETTS MOOSE 




JtvESEARCH and management directed towards deer, 
waterfowl and turkeys and development of wildlife man- 
agement areas marked the game program during the 
past year. 

Construction or maintenance of buildings, roadways, 
dams, bridges and other facilities, erection of signs, and 
planting of shrubs and food crops on wildlife manage- 
ment areas throughout the state were accomplished. 

A hunter questionnaire, done every second year, re- 
vealed that 8 1 percent of Massachusetts small-game hunt- 
ers are successful. The harvest of all species except water- 
fowl and ruffed grouse increased. Hunting effort was 
greatest on pheasants, followed by grouse, cottontails, 
squirrels, woodcock, white hare, black duck, other ducks, 
quail and raccoon, in that order. 

Private land continues to be important. More than 
half our hunters hunt only on private land (57%). Ten 
percent hunt only on wildlife management areas, and 34 
percent hunt both. However, pheasant hunters utilized 
state areas to a slightly greater degree than did other | 
hunters. 

Deer hunters reported 3,404 deer during the 1966 
season, of which 18 were taken by archers. Compulsory 
physical check of deer this year resulted in a higher 
reported figure than the former system. 

Motor vehicles account for the highest mortality of 
deer second to hunting, with 71 percent of the non- 
hunting total. Dogs take about 10 percent, illegal kills 
about six percent, and the remainder of the annual non- 
hunting mortality ( 1 3 percent) is by various lesser causes. 

Potential deer range statewide was delineated on eco- 
logical cover maps preparatory to comparison with pres- 
ent deer range. 

The wild turkey is believed to be firmly established in 
Quabbin, enabling transplants to the Barre area. Brood 
reports have been good in both areas. However, th 
status of other plants is questionable; some remain fairly 
static while others have dispersed. The Mount Washing 
ton flock, however, has increased. 

Mourning dove counts showed an increase of 400 per- 
cent on the Crane area, believed due to planting o: 
grain. Other counts show an increase with the exceptio 
of that at Myles Standish State Forest. 

A study of 13 wildlife management areas (about half 
the total available) indicated that they supplied 49,340 
hunter trips in the 1966 season. Peak usage as usual! 
occurred on Saturdays and opening day. Other uses ol 
these areas include field trials, dog training, fishing, wil- 
derness camping, berry picking, bird watching, sightsee- 
ing, education, target shooting, horseback riding and ice 
skating. 



DEER CHECKING 



Survival of wood duck ducklings at Great Meadows 
is poor. Only 20 percent of tagged ducklings could be 
traced to the flight stage. Those examined appear to be 
retarded in growth. Banding and study of wood ducks 
will be expanded to other areas to determine if the same 
situation exists across the state. At Great Meadows, there 
appears to be a poor recruitment of young birds to the 
resident breeding population. 

Winter inventory of waterfowl on the coast reported a 
total wintering population 136 percent greater than the 
average of the past 19 years. Black ducks alone were 
i up ten percent. 

Sea duck (scoter, eider, old squaw) concentrations were 
marked at Monomy Island, Cohasset, Brewster, Nantucket, 
Martha's Vineyard, Brant Rock and Barnstable. Build- 
ups occurred beginning in October with over 24,000 birds 
iseen. By November the' figure exceeded 37,000, and in 
January over 97,000. 

A total of 1578 black ducks were banded in a coopera- 
tive project between this division and federal personnel. 

Nesting studies on Canada goose were begun on the 
Sudbury Reservoir flock. Transfer of goslings from this 
flock to establish huntable populations is foreseeable. 

A division biologist assisted in a "wing session" at the 
Patuxent Research Station in Maryland for the fourth 
year. Over 20,000 duck wings sent in by hunters were 
identified, sexed and aged to provide part of the data 
used in setting waterfowl regulations. 

The Department of Natural Resources was assisted in 
a statewide inventory of inland wetlands, resulting in 
proposed legislation which would afford protection similar 
to that now in effect on coastal marshes. 

Importation of new species was marked by the intro- 
duction of 91 sharptail grouse (received from South 
Dakota) on Nantucket Island, and the transfer of 97 
ruffed grouse from the mainland to Martha's Vineyard. 

The beaver pelt harvest continues to increase. Trappers 
reported taking 1040 beaver from 96 towns with about 
63 percent coming from west of the Connecticut River. 

Research conducted over the past two years at the 
Ayer Game farm in cooperation with the Massachusetts 
Wildlife Cooperative Unit has developed an efficient 
technique of accurately sexing day-old pheasant chicks. 
This was accomplished through development of colora- 
tion charactersitics which differentiate the sexes at •this 
age. 

Preliminary research was also conducted with the unit 
to develop a strain of pheasants which would be accli- 
mated to stocking in submarginal and pole-stage hard- 
i wood areas. 

Other activities of the game program, largely accom- 
plished by the districts, included distribution of pheasants, 
quail and hare (see table), tagging beaver pelts, pro- 
viding technical advice to landowners, investigating Hatch 
'Act applications, participating in preparation of natural 
resource plans for towns, combatting forest fires, sup- 
plying traps for nuisance complaints, patrolling public 
areas during the upland season, cooperating with federal 
authorities in woodcock census, servicing field trials, and 
miscellaneous work. 





HEN, COCK DAY-OLD CHICKS 



GAME DISTRIBUTION 

JULY 1, 1966 — JUNE 30, 1967 

Pheasant 

Adults: Spring and summer liber- 
ations 6,972 1,101 8,073 

Young: August liberations (12 

weeks) 8,083 7,127 15,210 

October-November libera- 
tions (17-25 weeks) 438 40,168 40,606 

Sportsmen's Club Rearing 

Program 4,960 4,960 

TOTALS 15,493 53,356 68,849 

Qua/7 

Adults: 172 

Young: 3,360 

TOTALS 3,532 

White Hare 

Northern Varying, purchased . . . 2,153 







■ 

m 



INFORMATION 

AND 
EDUCATION 



TOP CAMPERS, DIRECTORS 
OF JUNIOR 
CONSERVATION CAMP 



The real substance of conservation 

lies not in the physical projects of government 

but in the mental processes of citizens 

— Aldo Leopold 



if\LL other things being equal, the deciding factor in 
whether conservation programs succeed or not is usually 
public understanding. 

The information and education program has dual pri- 
mary purposes; first, to develop public understanding of 
and concern for conservation, with emphasis on fish and 
wildlife, and secondly to provide informational services 
to the public which assist in enjoyment of the outdoors. 
Further, the program is responsible for developing public 
cooperation with all policies and programs of the division. 

However, money is basic to all endeavors. Much effort 
was expended during the year toward expansion of revenue 
sources primarily to support land and water acquisition. 

Increased activity was conducted just before and dur- 
ing both the fishing and hunting seasons to build interest 
in these sports. 

Constantly growing effort was put forth to acquaint 
the public with the pros and cons of firearms legislation 
and the role played by firearms and hunting in conser- 
vation. 

A significant achievement in this regard was securing 
of a New England-wide resolution of fish and game di- 
rectors stating their combined position on firearms laws, 
which was published in the Congressional Record and 
widely quoted. Numerous news releases, public appear- 
ances and magazine articles were devoted to guns and 
hunting. 

Efforts to secure publicity outside the state, as an aid 
to tourist fishing and hunting revenue, were conducted. 



i 



At the year's end personnel were cooperating with the 
Department of Commerce and Development in the publi- 
cation of a comprehensive guide to outdoor recreation; 
in Massachusetts. They were also cooperating with two 
national television networks in hopes of securing national I 
coverage of Bay State sports. Increasing national maga- 
zine and out-of-state newspaper coverage was assisted 

A total of 124 news stories were issued; 94 via printed; 
news releases by the I&E Section and 12 by the district 
managers. Eighteen stories were released by television 
news film. Clippings received totalled 3,048 pieces. 

Two feature articles were placed by I&E and 13 newsji 
columns resulted from personal field contact by managers. 
Captioned groups of photos were issued before hunting 
and fishing seasons to two publications (1 national, 1 
state) and wire services were supplied photos on eight 
occasions. Members of the press were taken on 18 field 
trips. The press was almost constantly assisted in response 
to telephone queries. 

Six issues of MASSACHUSETTS WILDLIFE maga- 
zine were published, with circulation at the close of the 
fiscal year at 33,423 and growing with each issue. 

"Dateline Boston" television show was participated in 
1 9 times and guest spots were filled on a number of other 
tv and radio shows. More than 42,000 people viewed 
division films (532 bookings) other than on television. 

Eleven exhibits were conducted or assisted at major 
sports shows and fairs. 

An employee workshop was conducted during the 



10 



MORE THAN MEETS 
THE EYE 



In addition to easily visible programs, the division 
carries an increasing workload of cooperative activities 
with many other agencies. Requirements for our assis- 
tance have increased greatly in the past decade, includ- 
ing the following: 

(J. S. Army Corps of Engineers 

In determining the need for flood control, dredging 
and beach erosion projects, the division evaluates possible 
effects on fish and wildlife and presents recommenda- 
itions to prevent losses, or modifications which may ac- 
tually benefit fish and wildlife. 

(J. S. Soil Conservation Service 

Through a small watershed protection program, mul- 
tiple purpose flood control, fish and wildlife and recrea- 
tional projects can be undertaken on a cost-sharing basis 
I through a local sponsor. Effects on fish and wildlife are 
evaluated. 

Division of Water Pollution Control 

The division provided data necessary to protect and 
enhance fish populations in development of the state's 
water quality standards and classification of all waters. 
The planned water pollution abatement program will re- 
I quire considerable fish population evaluation. 

Department of Public Works 

Coordination of highway plans with fish and wildlife 
interests was promoted by directive from the U. S. Bureau 
of Public Roads and became necessary on all federally 
assisted projects. More recently, Chapter 470 of the 
Acts of 1966 further required coordination of state pro- 
jects. Closer liaison and a refined agreement with the 
Department of Public Works are needed if the intent 



winter and a joint staff meeting was held with the Massa- 
chusetts Audubon Society, as aids to overall work of 
the agency. 

"Wildlife Week" was observed by issuance of a Gover- 
nor's Proclamation, and participation in the Massachusetts 
Committee for Wildlife Week through numerous releases. 

At the close of the year planning was underway for 
expansion and improvement of the magazine's format 
iprovided a subscription fee can be charged. 

Annual publications such as licenses, laws, closed town 
i list, archery stamps, license sales manual, stocking list 
and annual report were published. 

The annual Junior Conservation Camp in cooperation 
with the Department of Natural Resources and Massa- 
chusetts Conservation Incorporated was conducted with 
142 boys completing the course. Continual assistance was 
given to the Department of Education. 



of protecting fish and wildlife resources is to materialize. 

Pesticide Board 

In addition to being an ex-officio member, the division 
has monitored pesticide concentrations in fish. Several 
special studies have been undertaken in conjunction with 
experimental pesticide application programs authorized 
by the board. 

Access Board 

Division representatives have been involved in the pub- 
lic access program since inception. The first five projects 
were constructed with Accelerated Public Works monies 
made available to this program by this division. 

Planning 

Regional and local planners have upon request been 
provided with numerous special reports concerning fish 
and wildlife resources. Division personnel now serve on 
study teams which assist towns in planning. 

Conservation Education 

In addition to having full responsibility for the Massa- 
chusetts Junior Conservation Camp in cooperation with 
Massachusetts Conservation Incorporated, the division al- 
so assists the Department of Education and serves on the 
state's Conservation Education Advisory Committee. 

Tourism 

The division actively assists the Division of Vacation 
Travel of the Department of Commerce and Develop- 
ment with respect to outdoor-orientated tourist travel 
promotion. 

Need 

Growing demands for such cooperative programs, and 
increasing requests from individuals, organizations and 
industries have been serviced in the past without ad- 
ditional personnel. It is evident that such activities will 
increase in the future and already pose the necessity for 
additional personnel. 

If the division is to live up to its responsibility of pro- 
tecting, maintaining and enhancing all of the fish and 
wildlife resources of Massachusetts it too will need assis- 
tance, in the form of sufficient personnel to function 
properly. Justice cannot be done to all programs unless 
such help is forthcoming. 




Massachusetts has as much 
to offer as any state 
and more than most - 
if we save it in time. 

-Lt. Governor Francis Sargent 



11 



Financial Report, July 1, 1966 To June 30, 1967 



HOW THE SPORTSMAr 

VDMIN1S1 K \l ion 

Administration 


J'S DC 

3304-01 
3304-01 
3304-01 

3304-42 

3304-42 
3304-47 
3304-51 

3304-55 

3304-5 1 


)LLAR \A 

$107,409.08 

'MS. (.4 

129.879.49 
55,322.96 

i)4.490.3l 
10.000.00 

94,490.32 

12,445.63 

9,380.69 

182,285.23 

3,800.00 
29,928.65 

29,753.00 
8,694.00 

166,000.00 

9,917.00 

145,993.00 

2,500 

60,000.00 

22,532.75 
.1 


IAS SPE 

$108,357.72 

78.068.98 

350.951.43 

289,692.76 
263,423.73 

298,601.87 

238,175.65 

158,410.00 

82,532.75 
1,868,214.89 

le 30, 

$591, ( 


NT 

69, 

4% 

19% 

16% 
14% 

16% 

13% 

8% 

4% 
100% 

370.88 


Board of Fisheries & Game 

Information - Education 

FISHERIES MANAGEMENT 
Fish Hatcheries 


Management 


Fish Restoration Projects 

Management 


Fisheries Research Coop. Unit 
\\ 11 Dl IFE MANAGEMENT 




3304-51 


'Damage b\ Wild Deer & Moose 
Wildlife Research Coop. Unit . . 
Wildlife Research Restoration 

LAND ACQUISITION 

Fish Restoration Projects 

Purchase of Land - Squannacook 
Purchase & Development of Land 
for Wildlife Management Areas 

Wildlife Restoration 

Acquisition of Land & Waters for 
Fish & Wildlife Management Pur- 
poses 

LAW ENFORCEMENT 

Public Hunting Grounds 

Natural Resource Officers — 


3304-41 
3304-44 
3304-53 

3304-47 
3304-48 

3304-52 
3304-53 

3304-60 
3308-07 
1003-00 
1001-02 
3304-54 

3304-43 


OTHER — Office of the 


CONSTRUCTION 

Plans & Specs, for Const 

Quabbin Fish Hatchery (a) 
'Certain Construction and 
Improvements to Trout Hatchery 


GRAND TOTAL: 


'Continuing Accounts 
(a) Expended bv BBC 
3304-47 — 3304'-53 75% reimbursable. - Federal Funds 

RESERVE IN INLAND FISHERIES & GAME FUND Ju 
1967 — 











A 

3304-01 

3304-42 

*3304-47 

3304-48 

3304-51 
3304-52 

•3304-53 
3304-60 

3304-62 

3304-41 
3304-43 

3304-56 
-75'. rei 


APPROPRIATIONS 

ccounl No. & Title 

Administration 

Fisheries Management 
Fish Restoration Projects 
Purchase of Land - Squan- 


i & EXPENDITURES 

A ... Expenditures & n , , 
Appropriation " Liabilities Reverted 

$ 187,189.00 $ 186,426.70 $ 762.30 

489,220.00 480,830.92 8,389.08 

76,975.52 59,122.96 17,852.56 

30,000.00 29,928.65 71.35 
458,231.00 452,404.36 5,826.64 

30,000.00 29,753.00 247.00 
199,525.19 190,979.23 8,545.96 

166,000.00 166,000.00 0.00 

2,500.00 0.00 2,500.00 

$1,639,640.71 $1,595,445.82 $44,194.89 

Continuing Fr . n ,,„ fl ,-„.,.,,.. Balance 
Appropriation.', t - x P l " a " un s Forward 

$ 15,611.45 $ 12,445.63 $3,165.82 

50,000.00 22,532.75 27,467.25 

15,000.00 15,000.00 
$ 80,611.45 $ 34,978.38 $45,633.07 


Wildlife Management 
Purchase & Development 
Land for Wildlife Manage- 


Wildlife Restoration 
Acquisition of Land & 
Waters for Fish & Wild- 
life Management Purposes 
Connecticut River Shad 
Study 


Damage by Wild Deer & 


Certain Construction & 
Improvements to Trout 
Hatchery — East Sand- 


Renovation of a Certain 
District Regional Head- 
quarters Building 

mbursable by Federal Funds 



SUMMARY OF INCOME 

Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses $1,412,139.75 

Special Licenses, Trap Registrations, Tags and 

Alien Gun Permits 6,006.66 

Rents 3,636.25 

Misc. Sales and Misc. Income 6,201.14 

Pittman-Robertson Federal Aid 127,482.10 

Dingell Johnson Federal Aid 73,229.22 

Court Fines 7,030.50 

Refunds Prior Year 191.44 

Archery Stamps 3,299.80 

TOTAL: $1,639,216.86 



ANALYSIS OF SPECIAL LICENSES 

TYPE OF LICENSE NUMBER ISSUED 

TRAP REGISTRATIONS: 

Initial 105 


RECEIPTS j 

$ 105.00 
153.75 

230.00 
350.00 

38.00 
204.00 j 

30.00 
234.00 

335.00 
1,029.00 

150.00 
213.00 
535.00 

25.00 
33.00 

955.00 

40.00 

: 

65.00 
150.00 

198.00 

400.00 

508.91 
25.00 | 
$6,006.66 j 


Renewal 


615 


FUR BUYERS: 

Resident 


23 


TAXIDERMIST: 


70 


PROPAGATORS: 

(Special Fish) 


19 




204 


(Fish) 

initial 


6 


Renewal 


78 


(Birds & Mammals) 


67 


Renewal 


343 


(Dealers) 

initial 


30 


Renewal 


71 




535 


(Ind. Bird or Mammal) 


25 


Renewal 


66 


SHINERS FOR BAIT: 


191 


FIELD TRIAL LICENSES: 


4 


QUAIL FOR TRAINING DOGS: 


13 




50 


ALIEN GUN PERMIT: 


88 


COMMERCIAL SHOOTING PRESERVES: . . . 


8 




2050 


Posters 


100 




5308 




13,601 


TRAPPING CERTAIN BIRDS: 


5 


TOTAL 








mmmaammmmmmmmmmummmmKm m 



RECEIPTS FROM FISHING, HUNTING & TRAPPING LICENSES 











Gross 


Fees 


Net 






Price 


Number 


Retained 


Returned 










Amount 


By Clerk 


to State 


cries 1 


Res. Cit. Fishing 


($ 5.25) 


102215 


$536,710.00 


$25,375.50 


$511,334.50 


2 


Hunting 


( 5.25) 


68649 


360,266.25 


17,054.75 


343,211.50 


3 


Sporting 
Minor Fishing 


( 8.25) 


46675 


385,066.75 


11,579.00 


373,487.75 


4 


( 3.25) 


15277 


49,647.75 


3,800.25 


45,847.50 


4A 


Female Fishing 


( 4.25) 


16544 


70,317.50 


4,108.75 


66,208.75 


5 


Minor Trap. 


( 3.25) 


250 


812.50 


62.25 


750.25 


6 


Trapping 


( 8.75) 


568 


4,966.50 


141.25 


4,825.25 


7 


Non-Res. 7-Day Fishing 


( 5.25) 


1787 


9,380.75 


445.25 


8,935.50 


9 


Fishing 


( 9.75) 


2214 


21,594.25 


542.50 


21,051.75 


9 


Alien Fishing 


( 9.75) 


556 


5,415.50 


137.75 


5,277.75 


10 


Non-Res. Hunting 


( 16.25) 


2065 


30,032.75 


381.00 


29,65 1 .75 


12 


Duplicate Licenses 


( .50) 


3115 


1,557.50 




1,557.50 


15 


Res. Cit. Sporting 


( Free) 


1 5642 








17 


" (Old Age Asst) 
Paraplegic and to the Blind 


( Free) 


864 














276421 


$1,475,768.00 


$63,628.25 


$1,412,139.75 



12 




















STANDING ALL-TIME 


MASSACHUSETTS FRESHWATER 


FISHING RECORDS 








THROUGH JUNE 30, 


1967 






Species 


Weight 


Length 


Girth 


Place Caught 


How Caught 


Date 


Caught by 


Largemouth Bass 


121bs. loz. 


25%" 


21%" 


Palmer River, Palmer 


bait casting 


5-9-63 


George Pastick, Fall River 


Smallmouth Bass 


61bs. 12oz. 


21" 




Pleasant Lk„ Harwich 


spinning 


5-14-67 


Thomas Paradise, Arlington 


Northern Pike 


241bs. 8oz. 


45>/ 2 " 


22" 


Onota Lake, Pittsfield 


live bait 


1-13-67 


Kris Ginwaith, Pittsfield 


Pickerel 


91bs. 5oz. 


291/2" 




Pontoosuc Lk. Lanesboro 




1954 


Mrs. James E. Martin, Stockbridge 


Rainbow Trout 


81bs. 4oz. 


26" 


16" 


Deep Pond, Falmouth 


live bait 


10-15-66 


Roger Walker, Eastondale 


Brown Trout 


191bs. lOoz. 


311/2" 


22 5 /s" 


Wachusett Res. Boylston 


spinning 


5-19-66 


Dana DeBlois, Sterling 


Lake Trout 


131bs. loz. 


31" 




Quabbin Res., Pelham 


trolling 


7-13-63 


LeeRoy DeHoff, Suffield, Conn. 


Shad 


6Ibs. 13oz. 














Walleye 


81bs. 8oz. 


281/2" 


I5/2" 


Quabbin, Hardwick 




7-15-65 


Joseph Schwartz, Holden 


Catfish 


121bs. 


28" 


18" 


Watershop Pd. Sprgfld. 


live bait 


5-28-67 


Altha Smith, Springfield 


Bluegill 


lib. 


11 1/4" 


91/2" 


Bog Pond, Norton 


spinning 


10-17-65 


Robert Barrett, Stoughton 


Bullhead 


51bs. 9oz. 


221/2" 


11 1/2" 


Conn. River, Hadley 


live bait 


6-8-63 


Mrs. Erna Storie, Chicopee Falls 




51bs. 8oz. 


221/2" 


14" 


Leverett Pd., Leverett 


live bait 


8-2-65 


Stephen Brozo, No. Amherst 




41bs. 9oz. 


221/2" 


II1/2" 


Conn. River, Chicopee 


live bait 


9-8-65 


Joseph Kida, Chicopee 


Calico 


21bs. 9'/20z. 


18" 


14" 


Merrimack, Lowell 


spinning 


6-8-65 


George Olsson, Lowell 


White Perch 


21bs. 4oz. 


16%" 


11%" 


Halfway Pd., Plymouth 


spinning 


9-9-65 


Richard Rock, Kingston 




21bs. 


16%" 


Hi/4" 


Halfway Pd., Plymouth 


spinning 


6-18-66 


Richard Rock, Kingston 


Yellow Perch 


21bs. 


16%" 


10%" 


Grt. Herring, Plymouth 


live bait 


5-9-66 


Anthony Scolaro, Braintree 


Brook Trout 


41bs. 12oz. 


20%" 




Mashpee, Falmouth 


live bait 


4-30-67 


Angelo Samerelli, Quincy 



RULES AND REGULATIONS 



'RULES AND REGULATIONS PROMULGATED BY THE 
DIRECTOR OF FISHERIES AND GAME DURING FISCAL 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1967, AND SUMMARY OF OUT- 
STANDING REGULATIONS. 

August 4, 1948. Rules and regulations for the artificial propa- 
gation and maintenance offish. 

August 4, 1948. Rules and regulations for the artificial propa- 
gation of birds and mammals. 

July 14, 1952. Rules and regulations for hunting with bows 
and arrows. 

August 12, 1953. Rules and regulations governing sale of pro- 
tected fresh-water fish by licensed dealers in Massachusetts. 

March 26, 1954. Rules and regulations governing the display of 
sporting, hunting, fishing, and trapping licenses in Massa- 
chusetts. 

January 28, 1955. Rules and regulations relative to public fishing 
grounds in Massachusetts. 

April 10, 1956. Rules and regulations governing the taking of 
fish in interstate ponds lying between Massachusetts and 
New Hampshire. 

February 14, 1957. Rules and regulations relating to the taking 
of carp and suckers for the purpose of sale. 

February 15, 1957. Rules and regulations relative to the tagging 
of deer in Massachusetts. 

October 20, 1959. Rules and regulations for public shooting 
grounds and wildlife management areas in Massachusetts. 

May 10, 1962. Rules and regulations relating to the taking of 
shad in the inland waters of the Commonwealth. 

January 1, 1963. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting 
of hares and rabbits in Massachusetts. 

October 10, 1963. Rules and regulations relating to hunting of 

pheasants, quail, and ruffed grouse in Massachusetts. 

October 10, 1963. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting 
of gray squirrels in Massachusetts. 

December 15, 1963. Rules and regulations relating to the hunt- 
ing and trapping of mammals in Massachusetts. 

January 1, 1964. Interstate fishing regulations on Wallum Lake. 

April I, 1964. Interstate fishing regulations on Congamond Lake, 
Hamilton Reservoir, Colebrook Reservoir, Perry Pond, Mud- 
dy Pond, and Breckneck Pond. 

April 10, 1964. Rules and regulations relating to the taking 
of certain fish in Massachusetts. 

August 3 1, 1964. Rules and regulations for trapping of birds by 
farmers. 



February 2, 1966. Rules and regulations relative to issuance of 
permits to expose poisons for the control of mammal and 
bird species not protected by federal or state statutes. 

September 10, 1966. Migratory Game Bird Regulations 1966- 
1967. 

January 1, 1967. Amendment to fishing regulations (re trout 
bag limit on section of Swift River). 

January 1, 1967. Rules and regulations regarding Ashfield Lake 
in town of Ashfield. 

July 1, 1967. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting of 
deer in Massachusetts. 



LEGISLATION 

The following laws affecting the Division of Fisheries and 
Game were enacted during the legislative session of 1967: 

CHAPTER 205, ACTS, 1967. — An act designating the fish 
hatchery on the Swift River in the town of Belchertown as 
the Charles L. McLaughlin Fish Hatchery. 

CHAPTER 243, ACTS, 1967. — An act authorizing the Divi- 
sion of Fisheries and Game to apply for and receive certain 
federal grants and to construct and equip a fish hatchery 
complex. 

CHAPTER 262, ACTS, 1967. — An act authorizing the Director 
of the Division of Fisheries and Game to acquire certain 
lands for fish and wildlife purposes without the consent of 
certain elected officers of a city or town wherein such 
lands lie. 

CHAPTER 511, ACTS, 1967. — An act authorizing the Com- 
monwealth to grant easements over, across and upon cer- 
tain land in the town of Sutton, for the transmission of 
electric power, to New England Power Company. 

CHAPTER 544. ACTS, 1967. — An act authorizing the Director 
of Fisheries and Game to designate certain poisons to issue 
sporting, hunting, fishing, or trapping licenses. 

CHAPTER 71. RESOLVES, 1967. — Resolve providing for an 
investigation and study by the Department of Natural Re- 
sources relative to the construction of certain recreation 
areas and other related matters. 

CHAPTER 78, ACTS. 1967. — Resolve providing for an investi- 
gation and study by the Department of Public Works relative 
to the law of eminent domain, construction of certain recrea- 
tional facilities, and certain highway and waterwaj improve- 
ments. 







RECREATION RESOURCES ARE 

AS MUCH A PART OF 

OUR NATIONAL RESOURCES 

AS ARE OUR MINERALS, 

OUR FUELS AND OUR FORESTS 

— President Dwight D. Eisenhower 



DIViyflMjOF^FISHERSIs AND GAME. 

EVERYOME-GAINS FROM 



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REP0RU%8 




COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Division of Fisheries and Game 

103rd Annual Report 



Lf»MSW* tm 



His Excellency 

GOVERNOR JOHN A. VOLPE 




^-^Cj-jSi 



JAMES M. SHEPARD 
Director 



FISHERIES VM) GAME BOARD 

HARRY C. DARLING, Chairman 

East Bridgewater 

BRADLEE E. GAGE, Secretary 

Amherst 

HENRY J. COLOMBO 

Wilmington 

MARTIN H. BURNS 

Newbury 

EDWARD J. TIERNEY 

Pittsfield 

• 

STAFF 

JAMES M. SHEPARD 

Director 

RUSSELL A. COOKINGHAM 

Assistant Director 

COLTON H. BRIDGES 

Superintendent 

E. MICHAEL POLLACK 

Chief Game Biologist 

LLIAM A. TOMPKINS 

ef Aquatic Biologist 

■-PH R. BITZER 

lief Fish Culturist 

HAPLIN, Chief 

Education 

HNSON 

hief 



^ 



His Excellency, John A. Volpe, Governor of the Commonwealth .' 
the Executive Council, the General Court, and the Board > 
Fisheries and Game: 

Gentlemen: 



I have the honor to submit herewith the One Hundred and 
Third Annual Report of the Division of Fisheries and Game, 
covering the fiscal year from July 1, 1967, to June 30, 1968. 

Concurrent with the theme of this year's annual report, that 
of "Public Service," I commend to your attention the very real 
diversity of public service to all citizens of the Commonwealth 
demonstrated by this report and respectfully urge your considera- 
tion of the vital necessity for financial augmention to meet in- 
creased demands for services and resulting benefits provided by 
these programs. 



Respectfully submitted. 



rW*~ fc. <&«*< 

\j James M. ShepardV Director 



CONTENTS 

Fisheries and Game Board 1 

Fisheries Management 3 

More Than Meets The Eye 6-7 

Wildlife Management 8 

Information and Education 10 

Lands and Waters Acquisition 1 ' ! 

Financial Reports 12 i 

Fish Records, Regulations and 

Legislation inside back cover 



5M-1 -69-948697 



Publication of this document approved by 
Alfred C. Holland, State Purchasing Agent 



Estimated Cost Per Copy: $.375 



n> 



THE BOARD REPORTS 



Hi 

hi 



1 UBLIC service," the theme of this year's annual re- 
port of the Division of Fisheries and Game, is an all-inclu- 
sive term that at first glance might appear not universally 
applicable to an agency whose first responsibility is fish 
and game and whose most obvious public is those who buy 
fishing and hunting licenses. 

There may have been a time when those interested in 
fish and game matters looked upon the state wildlife 
agency as being concerned only with the amount and qual- 
ity of hunting, fishing or trapping available. It is still true 
that the quality and quantity of outdoor recreation depend- 
ent upon wildlife resources is the chief responsibility of 
this agency. 

However, today's modern wildlife agency cannot begin 
to fulfill even this chief responsibility without becoming 
concerned and deeply involved with every aspect of natural 
resource management. And it is also very apparent that the 
benefits derived from fostering wildlife -orientated outdoor 
recreation — in short, by properly managing wildlife re- 
sources — accrue to the public at large as well as to those 
who hunt and fish. 

This is made most apparent by a study completed during 
the year of the economic benefits derived by the people of 
Massachusetts from hunting and fishing. The study, done 
by the University of Massachusetts and to be published in 
the next fiscal year, shows that sportsmen in Massachusetts 
contribute about 1 10 million dollars a year to the general 
economy through their purchases instigated by hunting, 
fishing or trapping. Around one million dollars of this 
comes to the state sales tax revenue, and about 1 Vi million 
in sportsmen's license revenue. 

Thus, preservation of our wildlife resources, the base of 
this "big business", is important to all citizens of the Com- 
monwealth. 

Sportsmen, through this expenditure, contribute a mone- 
tary value to the "gross product" of the Commonwealth 
more than ten times what is available from license revenue 
i" insure its continuation. It is the board's opinion that 
there is sound reason to increase the funds available to in- 
sure the future of our wildlife resources by utilizing part or 
all ot that portion of the sales tax revenue contributed di- 
rectly by hunting and fishing equipment purchases. Legis- 
lation to this end should be seriously considered. 

It is abundantly clear that license revenue alone cannot 
hope to get the job done. The first $800,000 bond issue to 
acquire wildlife lands and waters is expended, and resulted 
in acquisition of 3,760 acres and the encumbering of some 
additional acreage. Another bond issue is completely de- 
moted to construction of the new hatchery at Quabbin. Now 

■ are faced with an additional one-million dollar bond 
issue tor lands and waters and it is quite evident that the 
license revenue's ability to meet such payments is past. 

If we are going to take advantage of this to set aside the 




Members of the Board pictured above are: top row, left to right. 
Harry C. Darling, Chairman, East Bridgewater, Bradlee E. Gage, 
Secretary, Amherst; bottom row, left to right, Martin H. Burns, 
Newbury, Edward J. Tierney, Pittsfield, and Henry J. Colombo, 
Wilmington. 

land and waters areas that must be acquired if we are to 
have outdoor recreation places in the future, financial assist- 
ance must come from sources other than sportsmen's 
funds. 

It is only logical that the sales tax, heavily contributed to 
by sportsmen, be a source of such help. It is also logical 
that other public funds be used as well, since other mem- 
bers of the public enjoy these areas most of the year while 
hunters and fishermen use them onlv for a few months. 

Some examples of public benefits include hiking, wilder- 
ness camping, bird watching, berry picking, model airplane 
flying, sightseeing, snowmobiling, ice skating, horseback 
riding, photography and sportsman-orientated but non- 
contributive activities like target shooting, dog training and 
field trials. 

Unless they incidentally possess a hunting or fishing li- 
cense, these members of the public contribute not one red 
cent to the acquisition and development of the areas they 
enjoy. 

And of course there is the intangible but very real value 
of preservation of wild areas — so important to all our cit- 
izens' well-being in today's burgeoning era of home, fac- 
tory and highway construction. As some advocates of a na- 
tional wilderness area system have said. "One o\ the chief 
values of wilderness is just knowing that it exists." 

Some highlights of the 1968 annual report follow: 

Wildlife Management 

Efforts to produce readjl) discernible mafJtSngson 
old pheasant chicks, to enaBle separating cocks fcora hens, 
have succeeded. Considerable sax ings Efrf alread) being re- 
alized as a result. . , 

Encouraging progfrafc "i£ beihg n>ade*ui re^fcarch to de- 






velop a strain of pheasants that can utilize now unstocked 
submarginal and pole-stage hardwood areas. 

I sage of 22 wildlife management areas operated for 

public hunting increased 1 1 percent during the past year. 
Introduction of sharptail grouse to Nantucket remains ex- 
perimental, with limited reproduction being reported. 
However, re-introduction of ruffed grouse on Martha's 
V inyard appears to be succeeding. 

Although a subject of some controversy, the change in 
deer hunting regulations involving use of antlerless permits 
worked well and appears to be serving its purpose. The 
Board approved staff recommendations in instituting this 
method since it appeared to be the fairest method by which 
all would have equal opportunity to Obtain an antlerless 
permit, with fewer female deer being taken. That is exactly 
w hat happened, and it seems reasonable to expect that our 
overall deer herd will increase as a result. 

Fisheries Management 

A major revision of the system of allocating hatchery 
trout to streams was evolved during the year. At this writ- 
ing, however, work is not complete and the system is not 
\et in use. 

Quabbin reservoir creel census indicates a decline in 
lake trout and salmon catches, attributed to scarcity of 
suitable forage fish. The Metropolitan District Commission 
extended its permission to reintroduce smelt, and this was 
done. Additional numbers of salmon were also stocked. 
Meanwhile, the fisheries staff is actively seeking ways to 
control the smelt population so a repeat of former prob- 
lems should not occur. 

A great deal of effort was expended in a cooperative 
project with other states and the federal government to in- 
crease shad runs and restore Atlantic salmon in the Con- 
necticut river. Feasability studies were also implemented 
on the Merrimack, and we successfully secured promises of 
adequate cooling devices on a proposed nuclear power 
plant on the Connecticut to prevent harmful effects on the 
fishery. 

The pesticides laboratory at Westboro completed a 
three-year project involving analysis of 1,3 10 fish collected 
at 93 sampling stations throughout the state. 

Hatchery personnel produced and liberated 400,840 
pounds of trout during the fiscal year, a new high. This in- 
crease is attributed to increased water resources, a western 
rainbow trout now in production and the elimination of 
brood stocks in favor of egg purchases. 

Lands and Waters 

The first full year of the realty section's existence re- 
sulted in acquisition of land as previously noted. Additions 
were made to six existing areas and six totally new areas 
were established. Salt marsh, stream bank, and the site of a 
potential war m-water hatchery were secured as well. 

Of particular note to the board are the gifts received 



from public-spirited sportsmen's organizations and one in- 
dividual. Two clubs donated valuable land, and one indi- 
vidual gave land in memory of a relative. It is encouraging 
that such people feel that preservation of land they have 
enjoyed is a worthy public service. 

With current funds almost expended, it is imperative 
that other financial sources be found to augment the lim- 
ited fish and game fund, if this worthwhile program is to 
continue. 

Information and Education 

This program continued its work with the effects being 
seen in increased public awareness of the importance oi 
wildlife conservation, increasing cooperation with division 
programs of all kinds, growing success and cooperation in 
legislative matters, and repeated instances of national rec- 
ognition of the high quality of the overall division pro- 
gram. An important part of the program is information 
services to the public; providing kinds of information 
needed to properly utilize our wildlife resources. This and 
other phases, such as youth education, can continue and be' 
increased only if sufficient funds are available. 

The division lost its regular television series, which had 
been in existence for some ten years. Plans were finalized 
to enlarge Massachusetts Wildlife magazine and place it on 
a self-financing basis — however, necessary legislation was 
not approved. 

It is interesting to note that our information prograrr 
ranks in budget and staff-size low in the bottom third oi 
other states nationally — yet it has consistently been the 
cause of Massachusetts receiving credit for having an out 
standing wildlife program. 

Additional Activities 

The board wishes to call particular attention to the cen 
ter section in this booklet called "More Than Meets Tfr 
Eye." Here, a total of 32 activities conducted in coopera 
tion with other agencies or required by various statutes, be 
yond the usual fish and game program, are reported. 

All of these in some way involve wildlife conservation 
— and all in many ways represent direct public service t< 
all citizens, whether sportsmen or not. 

As most of these listed have come about in the past tei 
years, and the staff has not increased, they also demand in 
creased staffing and budgeting if the division is to fulfill it 
responsibilities. 



Respectfully submitted 

Harry C. Darling, Chairman 
Bradlee E. Gage, Secretary 
Henry J. Colombo 
Edward J . Tierney 
Martin H. Burns 



FISHERIES MANAGEMENT 



JflSHERY program activities during the past year cen- 
ered on Quabbin Reservoir investigations, Connecticut 
3.iver shad study, water quality studies, stream access and 
mprovement, trout allocation to streams, pond and stream 
•eclamation and warm-water fisheries investigations. 

New projects activated include a shad study on Palmer 
ind North rivers and an anadromous fish restoration feasi- 
bility study on the Merrimack River. 

Quabbin Reservoir creel census indicates that 59,000 
ishermen harvested 49,682 fish weighing 37,578 pounds 
iuring the season from April to October. Decreases in lake 
:rout and landlocked salmon harvest were noted and attrib- 
ited to scarcity of suitable forage fish. To rectify this prob- 
lem the Metropolitan District Commission extended per- 
mission to reintroduce smelt, and 100,000 gravid adult 
smelt and 50,000,000 viable smelt eggs were planted in the 
reservoir and tributary streams. ' An additional plant of 
25,000 landlocked salmon was carried out. 

The objectives of the water chemistry project were mo- 
dified to classify pond types according to stage of aging or 
eutrophication for correlation with fish productivity. 

Four ponds in the Southeast District totalling 228 acres 
were reclaimed for trout management: Sandy Pond, Plym- 
outh; Flax Pond, Brewster; Higgins Pond, Brewster; and 
Hathaway Pond, Barnstable. In addition, the Squannacook 
River, its tributaries, marshes and impoundments were 
treated with rotenone to reduce existing rough fish popula- 
tions and the drainage system restocked with trout. The en- 
tire Squannacook reclamation caused an interruption of 
less than four weeks in fall fishing and angling was re- 
sumed briefly before the trout season on streams closed. 

Warm-water fisheries investigations continued with em- 
phasis on age and growth analysis and population esti- 
mates. Landlocked alewives transplanted from New Jersey 
to Congamond Lakes for forage in two-story pond manage- 
ment were found to be successfully established. 

Maintenance of the two warmwater fish culture pond 
systems continued with 482 pounds of chain pickerel and 
495 pounds of largemouth bass produced and stocked from 
the Merrill Pond pond system, and 1,053 pounds of large- 
mouth bass and 248 pounds of smallmouth bass produced 
and stocked from the Harold Parker pond system. 

The cooperative effort involving the states of Massachu- 
setts, New Hampshire, Vermont and Connecticut and two 
Federal agencies, the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wild- 
ilife and the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries, to increase 
ishad runs and restore Atlantic salmon to the Connecticut 
River, was intensified. Some 5,600 Atlantic salmon smolt 
were stocked below the Holyoke dam. Another phase of 
'the venture culminated in the employment of a Federal co- 
ordinator to supplement, assist, and coordinate the various 
state projects on the river. 

Massachusetts project activities on the Connecticut 
River centered on a shad tagging study at Holyoke, in 






Hatchery visitors, shocking boat, above, 
taking shad eggs, below. 








which 1,000 adult shad were tagged, and the transfer of 
fertilized shad eggs to sections of the river above Turners 
Falls dam. Slightly over 2.8 million eggs obtained from 
Connecticut and below Holyoke were stocked to assess 
hatching success and growth. Of the 1 .2 million eggs 
stoeked above Turners Falls a year ago, a 70-percent hatch 
was observed and juvenile shad up to seven inches in 
length were collected at Turners Falls in mid-October 
which was excellent growth in a section of river to which 
shad have been denied access since 1798. Bottom mapping 
of the river between Vernon, Vermont and Turners Falls 
was completed. Tied in with shad population estimate 
studies, a creel census of the shad fishery below Holyoke 
was initiated. 

Northeast Utilities Service Company of Hartford, Con- 
necticut, continued to assist the Division in studies on the 
Connecticut River and provided two gifts of equipment- to 
the Division, a Wang electronic calculator with program 
unit and a Beckman DB-G spectrophotometer. 

In conjunction with Connecticut River studies and with 
assistance from the Office of the Attorney General, the Di- 
vision prepared and presented testimony before the Ver- 
mont Water Resources Board and the Senate Subcommit- 
tee on Air and Water Pollution relative to the threat of 
thermal pollution posed by the application of Vermont 
Yankee Nuclear Power Corporation to construct and oper- 
ate a nuclear-fueled steam electric station at Vernon, Ver- 
mont. The hearings resulted in agreement to construct 
cooling towers to eliminate adverse thermal effects to exist- 
ing and planned fisheries. 

Stream access and improvement work continued and in 
tensified on the Squannacook River. Assistance from local 



TROUT DISTRIBUTION FROM STATE 
AND FEDERAL HATCHERIES 



BROOKS 



JULY 1 , 1 967 TO JUNE 30, 1 968 
BROWNS RAINBOWS 



I 



TOTAL 
Under 6" Over 6" Under 6" Over 6" Under 6" Over 6" TROUT 
121,700 399,563 189,500 206,695 332,645 426,892 1,676,995 

Total Trout Distribution 6-9" 637,731 

Total Trout Distributed 9" plus 403,919 

Total Federal Trout Dist. 6" plus 109,440 

Total Catchables (6" plus) 1,151,090 

Total Fingerlings (6" Minus) 783,956 



GRANDTOTAL 1,935,046 

STATION POUNDAGE 
Station Total Lbs. 



Berkshire Hatchery 
Montague Hatchery 
Palmer Hatchery 
Sandwich Hatchery 
Sunderland Hatchery 



21,072 

89,856 

47,780 

1 1 1 ,900 

130,232 



State Poundage 400,840' 

North Attleboro 6,808 

Nashua, New Hampshire 18,412 



Federal Poundage 25,220 



GRANDTOTAL 426,060 

(This table does not show trout retained for brood stock) 



3oy Scouts greatly contributed to project progress on the 
iriver. 

The pesticide laboratory in Westboro operating in con- 
junction with Massachusetts Health Research Institute and 
funded with a grant from the Federal Water Pollution Con- 
trol Administration completed a three-year study involving 
analysis of 1,310 fish collected from 93 sampling stations 
throughout the state. A final report was prepared on the 
concentrations of DDT and metabolites DDE and DDD 
exhibited in fish from the major watersheds of the state and 
submitted to the Pesticide Monitoring Journal for publica- 
tion. Applications were prepared for continuation and ex- 
pansion of the project. 

Trout releases from our five fish hatcheries including ad- 
ditions from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, totaled 
109,440 fish or 24,61 1 pounds, of which Massachusetts 
liberated 1 ,676,995 fish or 400,840 pounds. These figures 
also include 12,367 fish or 19,554 lbs. of brood stock. 

The increased production in weight was due to several 
factors; increased water resources, a western type rainbow 
now in production; and brood stocks being released in 
favor of egg purchases. 

Two lots of eyed trout eggs were supplied by the New 
York Conservation Department, through their research 



unit at Rome, for incubation and a check on their resist- 
ance to disease. A second project consisted of immuniza- 
tion of trout fingerlings by incorporating antigen into their 
food. 

The coloration work which consisted of incorporating a 
2% level of paprika in the pelleted fish food was reduced 
to a 1 % level. This change failed to maintain the eye 
catching appeal of our stocking fish as observed from the 
higher level of this additive. 

Two brands of pelleted food were used during the year 
and the overall results tabulated. A continuation is ex- 
pected to fully valuate the results. 

Construction funds were limited with no improvements 
except at the Sandwich hatchery where a gravel-packed 
well was installed at the upper end of the hatchery system. 
This well was equipped with a Deming electric pump with 
a standby gas motor for use during power failures. 

The roadway at Sandwich was blacktopped for the con- 
venience of the public visiting the plant. 

Our hatcheries continue to receive many visits from or- 
ganized groups of children and other special tours. 

Specially constructed signs have been erected at the 
entrances of three of our larger hatcheries. 










Quabbin hatchery — first since 
1911 — nears completion in 
Belchertown 






MORE THAN MEETS THE EYE 



1. Hatch Act Chapter 220, Acts of 1965 

Inasmuch as modifications to lands bordering on inland 
waters can have significant effects upon tish and/or wildlife 
habitat, the Division of Fisheries and Game reviews all 
such applications and comments whenever appropriate. 

2. Massachusetts Conservation Council 
Participating b\ invitation, the Division of Fisheries and 

Game contributes to general understanding of fish and 
wildlife programs by informing the council of all programs 
and problems related to same. We participate fully in dis- 
cussions of statew ide conservation activities and needs. 

3. Town and Regional Planning 

The Division of Fisheries and Game cooperates with 
town and regional planners by furnishing comprehensive 
data derived from fish and wildlife inventories, and such 
data is assimilated by the planner into the overall long 
range planning for the area in question. 

4. Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Services 
The Division of Fisheries and Game sits in an advisory 

capacity with other state and federal conservation agencies 
to review and update programs especially the Cropland 
Adjustment Program and the Feed Grains Program, and 
particularly, how they may affect fish and wildlife. 

5. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Projects Fish and 
Wildlife Coordination Acts as amended. 

The Division of Fisheries and Game, in cooperation 
with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, acting under this 
act, reviews all corps projects in the planning stage, as- 
sesses affect of project on fish and wildlife, and prepares 
detailed recommendations relating to protection or en- 
hancement of the resource. 

6. Small Watershed Projects Public Law 566 — Wa- 
tershed Protection and Flood Prevention Act. 

The Division of Fisheries and Game participates ac- 
tively in this program and makes recommendations relat- 
ing to location, size, scope, and uses of works of improve- 
ment contemplated under this program. Fish and Wildlife 
benefits or damages are ascertained and evaluated. We also 
coordinate with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in prep- 
aration of their reports. 

7. S antral Resource Planning for Town Conservation 
Programs 

The Division of Fisheries and Game is a cooperative 
member of all Natural Resource Technical Teams which 
furnish technical assistance in inventoring any town's natu- 
ral resources and in preparing recommendations for pro- 
tection, enhancement and acquisition of same. 

8. Conservation Needs Inventory 

The Division of Fisheries and Game, after invitation by 
the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation 
Service, coordinates with other agencies and groups to de- 
termine and evaluate the needs of the state and areas of the 
state for protection and/or improvement of natural re- 
sources, particularly in rural areas. 

9. County Technical Action Panel White House Execu- 
tive Order 1 1307 

The Division of Fisheries and Game, by invitation, has 
cooperated with other state and federal conservation agen- 
cies in coordination of federal programs affecting agricul- 
tural and rural area development and planning. 



10. State Committee for Conservation of Soil, Water and 
Related Resources 

The Director of the Division of Fisheries and Game, as 
a member of a State Committee, participates in encourage- 
ment of conservation efforts, in developing policies relat- 
ing to conservation, in securing cooperation and assistance 
for other state and federal agencies and in allocation of 
monies and supervision of contributing programs under the 
authority of the Committee. 

11. Corps of Engineers Areas leased for Management 
Annual Management plans as conditions of licenses. 

Areas under control of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 
which are licensed and used by agreement by the Divisior 
of Fisheries and Game for fish and wildlife management 
purposes, are required to have on file annual management 
plans. We prepare annually, a plan for each area indicating 
usage and future estimates of usage, as well as financial 
reports of maintenance and other expenditures. 

12. D. P. W. Highway Coordination Instructional Memo 
2 1 -5-63- Bureau of Public Roads 

The Division of Fisheries and Game through the State 
Department of Public Works reviews all highway improve- 
ment to be undertaken with federal aid in order to safe- 
guard fish and wildlife interests. The program offers the 
state fish and game agency an opportunity to evaluate the 
effects of highways upon fish and wildlife and their habitat 
and to make recommendations prior to construction per- 
taining to protection or methods of mitigation of losses to 
the resources. 

13. Department of Public Works Highway Coordina- 
tion Chapter 470, Acts of 1.966 

The Department of Public Works is directed that ii 
highway construction, advance planning shall provide for ' 
the protection of water resources, fish and wildlife, and 
recreational values. 

14. Department of Public Works Scenic Highway 
Program Highway Beautification Act 

The Division of Fisheries and Game has coordinated 
with other agencies to nominate deserving Massachusetts 
highways as "Scenic Roads and Parkways." U.S. Depart- 
ment of Commerce program has evolved which contrib- 
utes federal aid for acquisition of roadside areas valued for 
aesthetics, recreation and access to natural or other highly 
desirable areas. 

15. Coastal Wetlands Protection Chapter 768 

The Division of Fisheries and Game coordinates with 
the Department of Natural Resources as a member of the 
coastal wetlands advisory committee, relative to protection 
of coastal wetlands. A report on evaluation of wildlife and 
wildlife habitat is prepared by us based on our records and 
on field investigation. 

16. Federal Power Commission — Fish and Wildlife 
Coordination Act. 

The Division of Fisheries and Game in cooperation with 
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, reviews all projects li- 
censed by the Federal Power Commission to assess effects 
of such projects on fish and wildlife and to make recom- 
mendations relating to protection or enhancement of same 

17. Massachusetts Pesticides Board Chapter 521, Acts 
of 1 962 as amended. 



Diverse Duties of State Wildlife Agency 
Perform Little-Known Services to Citizens 



I 



Members include Commissioner of Agriculture, Com- 
missioner of Public Health, Commissioner of Natural Re- 
sources, Commissioner of Public Works, Chairman of 
State Reclamation Board, Director of Fisheries and Game. 
Purpose to establish rules and regulations for use of pesti- 
cides within the Commonwealth, serve as a licensing 
agency and act on all matters pertaining to pesticides. 

18. Massachusetts Public Access Board Chapter 715, 
Acts of 1 962 as amended. 

Member agencies include Department of Natural Re- 
sources, Department of Public Works, Metropolitan Dis- 
trict Commission, Division of Motor Boats and Division of 
Fisheries and Game. Purpose is for acquisition and devel- 
opment of public access areas to inland and coastal waters 
of the Commonwealth. 

19. Federal Aid to Wildlife Restoration Act known as 
the Pitt man- Robertson Act 

The program provides 75% reimbursement on author- 
ized projects pertaining to wildlife research, management 
and acquisition. In fiscal 1 967 this assistance amounted to 
$127,000. 

20. Federal Aid to Fish Restoration Act, known as the 
Dingell- Johnson Act. 

This program provides 75% reimbursement on author- 
ized projects pertaining to fisheries research, management 
and acquisition. In fiscal 1967 this assistance amounted to 
over $73,000. 

21. Anadromous Fisheries Restoration Act 

This public law 89-304 passed in 1965 and provides 
50% reimbursement on authorized projects pertaining to 
anadromous fisheries research and management. A major 
Connecticut River investigation has been initiated under 
this program. 

22. 1968 Appropriation Act for Research on Migrating 
Birds other than Waterfowl 

This is a 100% reimbursement program which Massa- 
chusetts will participate in. 

23. U.S. Department of the Army Cooperative Plan 
Agreement for Conservation of Fish and Wildlife 

The Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Game to- 
gether with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have coordi- 
nated with U.S. Army personnel at Fort Devens, Massa- 
chusetts and have prepared a cooperative plan agreement, 
fish and wildlife management plans and have worked to- 
gether to create fishing and hunting opportunities and to 
improve existing opportunities for both army personnel gar- 
risoned at Fort Devens and civilians recreating on U.S. 
Army property. Plans are reviewed and updated each year. 

24. U.S. Department of the Air Force Air Force Regu- 
lation 126-2, 1965. 

The Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Game and 
the U.S. Air Force have coordinated to prepare a manage- 
ment and conservation plan for fish and wildlife on Air 
Force installations. Plans are being implemented and tech- 
nical assistance rendered to create and improve upon rec- 
reational fish and wildlife opportunities. Plans are re- 
viewed, updated and redrafted each year. 

25. Connecticut River Fisheries Compact 

I he objective of this program is to conduct joint re- 



search studies on Connecticut River anadromous and resi- 
dent fish populations and in engineering structure on the 
river as they relate to fisheries resource. Included on the 
compact along with Massachusetts Division of Fisheries 
and Game are the wildlife agencies of Vermont, Connecti- 
cut and New Hampshire and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service. 

26. U.S. Department of Public Health 
Commencing in 1962, the Massachusetts Health Re- 
search Institute under the direction and control of Massa- 
chusetts Division of Fisheries and Game. 

27. Atlantic Waterfowl Council 

This organization is represented by Fisheries and Game 
Directors and Waterfowl Technicians of the seventeen At- 
lantic States. The purpose is to review and institute pro- 
grams on waterfowl research and management which are of 
mutual concern to the states and the resources. Massachu- 
setts has been extremely active in this program since its in- 
ception in 1952. 

28. Interagency Committee on Natural Resources 

This committee representing all state recreational agen- 
cies, was originally established in 1943 by order of the 
Governor to review all the outdoor recreational programs 
of the Commonwealth. Following the publication of a state 
recreation report, the committee was then reorganized to 
review and act on all outdoor recreation projects submitted 
to the state designee of the Governor for approval under 
the BOR program. 

29. Land and Water Conservation Fund Act of 
1965 Public Law 88-578 

This federal act provides assistance in preserving and 
developing outdoor recreation resources. Funds are availa- 
ble to state outdoor recreation agencies, to assist in financ- 
ing approved projects. The Division of Fisheries and Game 
has prepared and submitted projects for approval. 

30. Land Law Review Committee 

This is a working committee on the International Asso- 
ciation of Game, Fish and Conservation Commissions with 
the objective of revising federal and state laws and policies 
pertaining to the use of federal lands. From these studies, 
recommendations are made and legislation promulgated to 
improve existing laws and policies and protect state rights. 
The Director of Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and 
Game is an active member of this committee. 

3 1 . Tourist Promotion 

The Division of Fisheries and Game actively assists the 
Division of Vacation Travel of the Department of Com- 
merce and Development in preparing promotional materi- 
als, answering inquiries, and generally promoting the fish- 
ing and hunting attractions of the Commonwealth. 

32. Conservation Education 

The Division has responsibility for reservations, instruc- 
tion, program planning, promotion, and overall supervi- 
sion of the Massachusetts Junior Conservation Camp in 
cooperation with Massachusetts Conservation Inc., and 
aids the Department of Education's Office of Conservation 
Education through representation on the Massachusetts 
Advisory Commission for Conservation Education. The 
Chief of Information and Education is an active, appointed 
member of this commission. 



WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT 




Airboat used for waterfowl banding 

\\ ESEARCH conducted over the past three years on 
the game farms has paid off in regards to sexing day-old 
pheasant chicks by total down coloration. The tedious task 
of sexing day-old pheasants by eye-field technique is a 
thing of the past. The development of this new sex-linkage 
method will result in great savings to the sportsmen. 

Progress has continued on research to develop a strain 
of pheasants which would be acclimated to stocking in sub- 
marginal and pole-stage hardwood areas. Numerous 
crosses of various pheasant species have been made, result- 
ing in approximately 100 hybrids being successfully 
reared. Several releases have been made of surplus birds. 
The work schedule will continue for several years to fur- 
ther enable specific selection of those birds demonstrating 
desirable traits such as budding, tree roosting, etc. 

Twenty-two wildlife management areas were maintained 
for recreational use for hunters, fishermen and the general 
public. Shrubs and wildlife food crops were planted, roads 
and trails constructed, signs erected, forest improvements 
made and dams, bridges, buildings and roads maintained 
on these areas. 

A study of the use on 1 3 of these wildlife management 
areas indicated 54,907 hunter trips were expended in 
1 967. This was an increase of 1 1 percent over the 1966 ef- 
fort. Peak usage occurred on opening day and on Satur- 
days. On the peak days the greatest number of hunters 
were on the area at opening hour and stayed approximately 
2'/2 hours. Multiple use of these management areas contin- 
ued to be high, with such uses as field trials, dog training, 



fishing, wilderness camping, berry picking, bird watching, 
conservation education, sightseeing, parking, snowmobil- 
ing, horseback riding and ice skating rating high. 

There was a 32 percent increase in the number of 
mourning doves heard calling on spring census routes. 
Plantings of annual grains on the Crane, Myles Standish 
and Northeast management areas continued to attract 
mourning doves during the fall. The number of doves on 
the Myles Standish area increased 17-fold when the 
acreage of grain was increased from six to 76 acres. 

The biennial quail census was conducted in Barnstable, 
Plymouth and Bristol counties. Counts of whistling quail 
were slightly higher in all counties than counts taken in 
1965. 

The wild turkey has been established in the Quabbin 
Reservation area and remains experimental in Mt. Wash- 
ington, Becket, Barre and Plymouth. Reproduction and re- 
cruitment by the Quabbin flock was excellent and the 1968 
breeding population was the highest since the project 
started. Recruitment of young was sufficient on other areas 
to maintain but not significantly increase existing flocks. 
The Quabbin flock has begun to spread into the towns of 
Leverett and Shutesbury. 

The 1966 introduction of sharptailed grouse to Nan- 
tucket remains in the experimental stage. Limited reprod- 
uction was reported in the summer of 1967 and small 
flocks were observed during the following winter. Breeding 
activity was reported in the spring of 1968. 

The introduction of ruffed grouse to Martha's Vineyard 
appears to be progressing very well. 

The annual harvest of beaver was 1 ,425. 

For the first time in Massachusetts deer hunting history, 
major changes in the rules and regulations for hunting of 
deer were in effect. Only antlered deer with antlers three 
inches or longer were legal deer. Anterless deer were har- 
vested by permit only. 

The compulsory deer check at division-operated deer 
checking stations continued. 

During the 1968 season hunters reported harvesting 
1,193. Of these deer, archers reported a harvest of 2 1 deer. 

Anterless deer hunting permit holders reported taking 
301 deer. 

The following is a break-down of deer mortality re- 
ported from January 1, 1967 to December 31, 1967. 

CAUSE NUMBER PER CENT 



Motor vehicles 


334 


65% 


Dogs 


62 


12% 


Unknown causes 


41 


8% 


Illegal 


48 


9% 


Crop damages 


4 


1% 


All other causes 


19 


4% 



Survival of wood duck ducklings at Great Meadows is 
poor. Only 20 percent of tagged ducklings could be traced 
to the flight stage. Those examined appear to be retarded 
in growth. Banding and study of wood ducks has been ex 
panded to include nine other areas in central Massachu 



setts. Recruitment of young birds to the breeding popula- 
tion appears to be below normal levels on most of the areas 
studied where ducklings had been tagged the previous nest- 
ing season. 

A total of 149,500 ducks and 9,500 Canada geese were 
counted on the winter inventory flights January 9 and Jan- 
uary 1 1, a 42-percent increase over the 19-year average in 
total number of wintering waterfowl. Most of the increase 
is due to larger winter concentrations of sea ducks which 
accounted for 101,200 ducks in the total count. 

Eight hundred ducks, including blacks, mallards, wood 
ducks, blue-winged teal and green-winged teal were 
banded during the summer, using an airboat rigged with 
lights. The banding was done throughout the state on riv- 
ers, ponds and marshes where waterfowl could be collected 
at night. The airboat is a 14-foot fiberglass model powered 
by a 125 H.P. Lycoming aircraft engine. Light is provided 
by 500 watt quartz lamps powered by a 3,000 watt gen- 
erator. This summer banding program will be continued 
next year. 

A total of 2,2 1 7 ducks were banded along the coast from 
January 20 to March 1, 1968. During the past three win- 
ters, state personnel have banded 5,000 black ducks as part 
of the data-gathering process for the special late black 
duck season. 

Canada goose nesting studies are being conducted on the 
Sudbury-Framingham Reservoir system. A gosling trans- 
plant program using birds produced on the reservoir has 
been conducted for the past two summers. To date, 1 10 
birds have been released in central Massachusetts and 
Berkshire County. Thirteen adult birds are included in the 
total. 

A division biologist assisted in a "wing-session" at the 
Patuxent Research Center for the fifth consecutive year. 
Over 20,000 wings were identified, sexed and aged to 
provide part of the data used in setting waterfowl regula- 
tions. 

MASSACHUSETTS COOPERATIVE 
WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNIT 
Wild Turkeys 

The Unit completed its investigations on the introduc- 
tion and survival of wild turkeys during the year. During 
the study populations were introduced and studied in 
Quabbin Reservation, Mount Washington, October Moun- 
tain, Myles Standish State Forest and the Barre area. The 
Quabbin and Mount Washington birds appear to have be- 
come established and have provided important information 
on survival in this state. The Division of Fisheries and 
Game has assumed the responsibility of further establish- 
ment efforts. 
Avian Sterilization 

Screening of chemicals for effectiveness as sterilants and 
studies of potential physiological markers has continued. 
The ecology study of Muskeget Island and its breeding col- 
ony of gulls is providing base-line information for future 
work on gull control. The effect of mestranol, the key in- 
gredient in human birth control pills, has been studied, 
using Japanese Quail, in the laboratory. Permanent steril- 
ity was attained and a new study on the effect of mestranol 
on reproductive performance of pigeons, mice and insects, 
under laboratory conditions, has been initiated. 



Woodcock 

A study completed this year found some evidence that 
adult and juvenile males arrive on the breeding grounds at 
different times. Surplus males will occupy territories aban- 
doned between early April and early May. Half of the male 
breeding population are adults and two periods of female 
activity were found coinciding with the two peaks of male 
courtship discovered earlier. 

A second printing of Dr. Sheldon's woodcock book is 
planned. 
Waterfowl 

A literature review and design of methodology for eval- 
uating toxicity of lead shot among mallards was completed. 
A new study of the ability of hunters to identify waterfowl 
species on the wing was initiated and is nearing comple- 
tion. Two studies of waterfowl in western Massachusetts, 
involving wood-ducks and Connecticut River waterfowl 
habitat have been started. 
Fruit-eating Birds 

Field research was completed on the breeding and nest- 
ing biology of the Baltimore oriole and a study of feeding 
behavior of robins is now underway. 
Nantucket Deer and Sharp-tailed Grouse 

A study of the use of various vegetative cover types by 
white-tailed deer on Nantucket Island has been operative 
and the field aspects of this study are nearing completion. 
Introduced sharp-tailed grouse on the Island avoided de- 
tection during the winter, but observation of courtship be- 
havior in the spring indicates that there has been some sur- 
vival and establishment is yet possible. 
Ruffed Grouse 

Studies of the energy balance in ruffed grouse during 
winter have been initiated and telemetry studies of grouse 
winter and spring behavior continue to provide valuable 
information on the means this species uses to conserve en- 
ergy and obtain food under severe climatic conditions. 
Highway Impoundments 

A study of potential wildlife use of impoundments cre- 
ated by Interstate 91 between Northampton and South 
Deerfield was initiated and this topic is expected to be en- 
larged upon in future studies by University faculty. 
Beaver Project 

Dr. Joseph S. Larson joined the Unit as Assistant 
Leader in November and has continued his studies of bea- 
ver which he initiated at the University of Maryland. Stud- 
ies of improved means of sexing beaver, population dy- 
namics and social behavior are among the general objec- 
tives. 
GAME DISTRIBUTIO!\ July 1, 1967 -June 30, 1968 

Pheasant Hens Cocks Total 

Adults: Spring and summer 7,274 793 8,067 

liberations 
Young: August liberations (12 weeks) 2,345 9.803 12,148 

October-November liberations 

(17-25 weeks) 96 43,078 43,174 

Sportsmen's Club Rearing 

Program 5,267 5.267 



'! 



Totals: 
Quail 
Adults: 
Young: 

Totals: 
White Hare 

Northern Varying, 



purchased 



9,715 58,941 68,656 

168 

3.705 

3.873 
2,500 










INFORMATION 

AND 

EDUCATION 



"The real substance of conservation 
lies not in the physical projects of government 
but in the mental processes of citizens" 



Leopold 



I 



JTOR the past 20 years, the Division of Fisheries and 
Game has made planned, organized and formal efforts to 
serve the public with needed information, to report prog- 
ress of its own programs and to educate both today's adults 
and tomorrow's to the importance of wise use of natural re- 
sources. In fact, twice during the past two decades, the in- 
formation and education program has received praise from 
state government study teams, who held it worthy of emu- 
lation by sister agencies. 

Despite being one of the lowest budgeted, smallest- 
staffed efforts of its kind in the country, the program has 
received widespread recognition among information and 
education professionals in wildlife conservation agencies of 
other states and the federal government. 

Of direct interest to those who provide the revenue upon 
which it operates is the fact that the Division of Fisheries 
and Game regularly furnishes, through its information pro- 
gram, complete and detailed reports of its activities, re- 
ceipts, expenditures and policies to all interested enough to 
get on the free mailing list or to ask for specific publica- 
tions such as the annual report. The agency also meets fre- 
quently with public organizations to discuss its programs. 
More than 300 such meetings were participated in by staff 
people, districts and others during the past fiscal year. 

Frequent news releases keep people informed through 
newspapers, magazines, radio and tv. A total of 143 were 
issued this year, including 86 releases by the information 
section. 20 tv news films and 37 releases by the districts. 

The bi-monthly magazine MASSACHUSETTS WILD- 
LIFE continued, with circulation reaching 38,554 at the 



close of the fiscal year. Approximately 3.9 individuals read 
each copy mailed. Plans to expand the magazine and to 
change to a fee system were finalized, but lack of legisla- 
tion prevented action. 

This year another approach to information efforts was 
tried, with a series of eight special "tip" releases sent to 
weekly papers and a pair of special "director's reports" 
sent to sportsmen's clubs. Response to both was favorable. 

Assistance to local and national press totalled some 1 80 
contacts. Numerous photos were supplied, as was informa- 
tion and printed material, and upon 12 occasions special 
feature articles were written and issued at key times. 

The section's audio-visual office took guest spots on tel- 
evision on 12 occasions, while districts handled three tv 
appearances and six radio spots. 

A total of 343 film bookings were processed, with 
27,440 people viewing division films. This activity is fall- 
ing into disuse, however, since budget-request cuts have 
prevented equipment acquisition and film purchase, 
thereby eliminating film production and acquisition of out- 
side-produced films. Most of the films formerly in the li- 
brary have been withdrawn because of wear and the re- 
mainder should be. 

A total of 460 awards were presented through the fresh- 
water sportfish awards program, (See all-time fish records 
tabulation inside back cover). The program this year was 
in cooperation with the Division of Tourism of the Depart- 
ment of Commerce and Development. 

The information section also assisted that division to 
produce a new, colorful "Outdoor Vacation Guide" as an 



10 



LANDS AND WATERS ACQUISITION 



JL HE first full year of the realty section's existence re- 
sulted in 3,760 acres of land acquired to preserve the fu- 
ture of recreation. It included additions to existing areas, 
i establishment of several new areas and fisherman access to 
! ponds and rivers. It also included several gifts of land from 
public-spirited sportsmen's clubs and one individual. In 
i addition to acquisitions, fisherman-access leases were re- 
newed on the Westfield, Millers, Farmington and Squanna- 
cook rivers. 

Additions to existing areas: 

Northeast Wildlife Management Area; nine new ac- 
quisitions totalling 265 acres with six more in the process 
of finalizing. 

Squannacook River Wildlife Management Area; one 
new acquisition of ten acres with five more parcels in the 
process of acquiring. 

Swift River Wildlife Management Area; two acquisi- 
tions totalling 672 acres bringing the total acreage on this 
area to approximately 900 acres with six or seven more 
potential acquisitions awaiting additional funds. 

Ouaboag River Wildlife Management Area; three new 
acquisitions totalling 73 acres raising the total acreage to 
approximately 700 acres. 

Chester Wildlife Management Area; one new acquisi- 
tion totalling 105 acres. Total acreage approximately 600 
acres. 

Phillipston Wildlife Management Area; one acquisi- 
tion of 348 acres bringing the total to approximately 1 ,500 
acres. 



aid to tourist promotion in the Commonwealth. 

Eleven exhibits at sportsmen's shows and fairs were ei- 
ther established or serviced at Topsfield, Bedford, Worces- 
ter, Barnstable, Becket, Springfield, Greenfield, Southboro, 
Gardner and Boston. 

Press tours of key division activities were conducted for 
some 1 8 members of the press, and a "show me" tour for 
about 45 people was conducted on the Squannacook River. 

Throughout the year a major international professional 
awards program was conducted for the American Associa- 
i tion for Conservation Information. 

Youth education was directly served through continued 
participation in the Massachusetts Advisory Commission 
for Conservation Education, and the operation of the Mas- 
sachusetts Junior Conservation Camp which graduated 1 43 
boys. 

The usual thousands of letters, requests for literature, 
posters, and other division printing were handled. 



New areas established: 

Cheshire Wildlife Management Area; in Cheshire, is 
composed mainly of open farm land and has all the neces- 
sary habitat requirements to establish a farm-game area in 
a section of the state where it is greatly needed. Three pur- 
chases were made totalling 450 acres with three more pur- 
chases in process. 

New Braintree Wildlife Management Area; two pur- 
chases for a total of 380 acres made with two and possibly 
three others in the process. This is another area which 
lends itself admirably to management for farm game. 

Leicester Wildlife Management Area; contains in the 
one purchase that was made, 327 acres with another parcel 
of over 100 acres in the process of acquisition. This area 
lends itself to the development for and management of a 
farm game area. 

Millers River Wildlife Management Area; this is a 
newly established management area and is actually in two 
sections with the 4,000-acre Birch Hill Wildlife Manage- 
ment Area between. Two purchases totalling approxi- 
mately 220 acres and including over a mile of river bank 
were made in Winchendon. On the other end of the Birch 
Hill Area in Athol and Royalston, 500-plus acres were 
purchased including over five miles of river frontage. Ex- 
cept for a few small isolated parcels this purchase guaran- 
tees the sportsmen access to the river from the old mill site 
in South Royalston to the mills in Athol. 

Becket Wildlife Management Area; one acquisition 
consisting of 234 acres of deer habitat located in one of the 
better deer areas in the Berkshires. 

Savoy Wildlife Management Area; one acquisition of 
40 acres in excellent deer country with two more purchases 
consisting of several hundred acres in the process. 

New acquisitions other than wildlife management 
areas: 

A potential warm-water hatchery is assured with pur- 
chase of 70 acres in Rochester. An access area to Lake 
Mascuppic in Dracut was acquired. In Royalston, 122 
acres on Lawrence Brook were purchased, plus another 39 
acres on the same brook in Winchendon. In Rutland, 80 
acres on the East Branch of the Ware River were acquired. 

A total of 133 acres of salt marsh in Ipswich, Essex and 
Newbury was acquired. 

Gifts of land: 

The Marblehead Fish and Game Club purchased and 
donated a key parcel of land within the existing Northeast 
Wildlife Management Area. The Audubon Sportsmen's 
Club donated 250 acres in Spencer, and Mr. Lester B. 
Woodbury of Springfield presented 27 acres of salt marsh 
in Ipswich, in memory of his mother. 



11 



J Financial Report, July 1, 1967 To June 30, 1968 



L ' 



HOW THE SPORTSMEN'S DOLLAR WAS SPENT 

VDMINISl R \l ION 

Administration 3304-01 $118,126.88 

Board of Fisheries and Game 3304-01 992.20 $119,119.08 5', 

Information-Education 3304-01 78,914.76 3', 

I ISH1 RI1 s PROGR WIS 

Fish Hatcheries 5304-42 347,992.29 1?', 

Fisheries Management 3304-42 141,710.09 

--li-.il Restoration Projects 3304-47 40,065.03 

Fisheries Management 3304-51 99,319.04 
I ishei ies Research i oop. 

I nit 3304-55 10.000.00 

"Anadromous Fish Restoration 3304-62 4. 309.70 295,403.86 139! 

u II IM II I PROGR Wis 

Game Farms 3304-51 279,910.01 129! 

Wildlife Management 3304-51 99,319.04 
'Damage r>\ wild Deer and 

Moose 3304-41 7. 135. 39 

Wildlife Research Coop. Unit 3304-44 7.832.06 

Wildlife Research Restoration 3304-53 179.143. 27 293,429.76 12', 

( ONSTRl CTION 

•Trout Hatchery, E. Sandwich 3304-43 25.807.77 
"Southeast District Storage 

Bldg 3304-53 14.965.00 

Central District Hdq. Building 3304-56 14.985.60 

'Quabbin Fish Hatchery 3304-63 833.13 

•Quabbin Fish Hatcher) 7801-01 310,450.44 367,041.94 15% 

1 VND ACQUISITION* 7801-02 415,784.42 17% 

1 \W 1 NFORCEMENT 

Public Hunting Grounds 3308-07 11,070.00 

C onservation Officers 

Salaries and Expenses 1003-00 182,742.00 

OTHER — Office of the 

Commissioner 1001-02 2,500.00 196.312.00 8% 

GRAND TOTAL $2,393,908.12 1009; 

RESERVE IN INLAND FISHERIES AND GAME FUND 

June 30. 1968: $249,948.25 

"Continuing Appropriations 
"75 Reimbursable by Federal Funds 
' ■ '50', Reimbursable by Federal Funds 

APPROPRIATIONS & EXPENDITURES 

Expenditures & 

Account No. & Title Appropriation Liabilities Reverted 

3304-01 Administration $ 199,318.00 $ 198,033.84 $ 1,284.16 

3304-42 Fisheries Management 500,511.00 489,702.38 .10,808.62 
►3304-47 Fish Restoration 

Projects 44,495.00 40.065.03 4,429.97 



3304-51 Wildlife Management 486,073.00 478,548.09 

"3304-53 Wildlife Restoration 

Projects 198,435.00 194,108.27 

3304-56 Renovation Central 
District Headquar- 
ters Building 15,000.00 14,985.60 

"3304-62 Anadromous Fish 
Restoration 
Projects 7,500.00 4,309.70 

$1,451,332.00 $1,419,752.91 

Continuing 
Appropriations 



3304-41 Damage By Wild Deer 
and Moose 

3304-43 Certain Construction 
& Improvements to 
Trout Hatchery, 
East Sandwich .... 

3304-63 Construction, Quabbin 

7801-01 Fish Hatchery 

7801-02 Land & Waters for 
Fish & Wildlife 
Management 
Purposes 



Expenditures 
14,144.82 $ 7,135.39 



57.467.25 

350,000.00 

1,198,778.05 



794,534.20 
$2,414,924.32 



25,807.77 

833.13 

310,450.44 



415,784.42 
760,011.15 



7,524.91 

4,326.73 

14.40 

3,190.30 

31,579.09 

Balance 

Forward 

$ 7,009.43 

31.659.48 
349,166.87 
888,327.61 

378,749.78 
$1,654,913.17 



'75', Reimbursable Federal Funds 
"50', Reimbursable Federal Funds 



SUMMARY OF FISH AND GAME INCOME 

Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses $1,51 1,1 16.00* 

Special Licenses, Trap Registrations, Tags and 

Alien Gun Permits 6,628.75** 

Rents 3,195.00 

Misc. Sales 7,809.20 

Pittman-Robertson Federal Aid 122,013.08 

Dingell Johnson Federal Aid 75,1 L6.70 

Anadromous Fish Projects Federal Aid 4,716.38 

Court Fines 8,465.86 

Archery Stamps 3,637.00 

Refunds Prior Year 470.42 

TOTAL: $1,743,168.39 



ANALYSIS OF SPECIAL LICENSES 

NUMBER 

TYPE OF LICENSE ISSUED 
TRAP REGISTRATIONS: 

Initial 71 

Renewal 497 

FUR BUYERS: 

Resident 23 

Non-Resident 2 

TAXIDERMIST: 63 

PROPAGATORS: 

(Special Fish) 

Initial 20 

Renewal 189 

(Fish) 

Initial 15 

Renewal 74 

(Birds & Mammals) 

Initial 85 

Renewal , . 330 

(Dealers) 

Initial 6 

Renewal 86 

Additional 528 

(Ind. Bird or Mammal) 

Initial 37 

Renewal 58 

SHINERS FOR BAIT: 194 

FIELD TRIAL LICENSES: 3 

QUAIL FOR TRAINING DOGS: 

Initial 18 

Renewal 46 

ALIEN GUN PERMIT: 42 

COMMERCIAL SHOOTING PRESERVES: 10 

Tags 1,050 

Posters 600 

Game Tags 5,040 

Fish Tags 15,500 

TRAPPING CERTAIN BIRDS: 3 

MOUNTING PERMITS: 16 

TOTAL: 



RECE1P 



23O.0( 
200.01 



315.01 



73. Ot 
545.01 



30.0( 
258.01 
528.0( 



489.51 

15.01 

16.0i 

$6,628.7i 



RECEIPTS FROM FISHING, HUNTING AND TRAPPING LICENSES 















Fees 














Gross 


Retained By 


Net 


Licenses 






Price 


Number 


Amount 


Town Clerk 
Or City 


Returned 
To State 


Series 


i 


Res. Cit. Fishing 


($ 5.25) 


1 17.467 


$ 616,711.75 


$29,160.25 


$ 587,551.50 




2 


Hunting 


( 5.25) 


62,948 


330,466.50 


15,597.50 


314,869.00 




3 


" Sporting 


( 8.25) 


50,814 


419,215.50 


12,557.50 


406,658.00 




4 


Minor Fishing 


( 3.25) 


15,498 


50,368.50 


3,854.25 


46,514.25 




4-A 


' Female Fishing 


( 4.25) 


20,983 


89,177.75 


5,210.00 


83,967.75 




5 


' Minor Trapping 


( 3.25) 


208 


676.00 


51.25 


624.75 




6 


Trapping 


( 8.75) 


456 


4,016.25 


1 1 1 .00 


3,905.25 




7 


Non-Res. 7 day Fishing 


( 5.25) 


1,957 


10,278.75 


484.50 


9,794.25 




9 


' Fishing 


( 9.75) 


2,750 


26,829.00 


670.00 


26,159.00 




9 


Alien Fishing 


( 9.75) 


595 


5,801.25 


148.50 


5,652.75 




10 


Non-Res. or Alien Hunting 


( 16.25) 


1,635 


26,605.50 


331.00 


26,274.50 




12 


Duplicate Licenses 


( .50) 


2,906 


1,453.00 


.00 


1,453.00 




15 


Res. Cit. Sporting 


( Free) 


19,712 


— 


— 


— 




17 


" (Old Age Asst.) 
Paraplegic and to the Blind 


( Free) 


1,213 




~ 








TOTAL: 




299,142 


$1,581,599.75 


$68,175.75 


$1,513,424.00 



12 



Check Returned Insufficient Funds 2,308.00 
$1,511,116.00 



STANDING 


ALL-TIME 


MASSACHUSETTS FRESHWATER 


FISHING RECORDS 












THROUGH JUNE 30, 


1968 






Species 


Weight 






Length 


Girth 


Place Caught 


How Caught 


Date 


Caught by 


Largemouth Bass 


12 lbs. 


i 


oz. 


25%" 


21%" 


Palmer River, Rehoboth 


bait casting 


5-9-63 


George Pastick, Fall River 


Smallmouth Bass 


6 lbs. 


12 


oz. 


21" 




Pleasant Lake, Harwich 


spinning 


5- 14-67 


Thomas Paradise, Arlington 


Northern Pike 


24 lbs. 


8 


oz. 


451/2" 


22" 


Onota Lake, Pittsfield 


live bait 


1-13-67 


Kris Ginthwain, Pittsfield 


Pickerel 


9 lbs. 


5 


oz. 


29>/ 2 " 




Pontoosuc Lk., Lanesboro 




- -54 


Mrs. James Martin, Stockbridge 


Rainbow Trout 


8 lbs. 


4oz. 


26" 


16" 


Deep Pond, Falmouth 


live bait 


10-15-66 


Roger Walker, Eastondale 


Brown Trout 


19 lbs. 


10 


oz. 


31 V2" 


22 s / 8 " 


Wachusett Res., Boylston 


spinning 


5-19-66 


Dana DeBlois, Sterling 


Lake Trout 


13 lbs. 


1 


oz. 


31" 




Quabbin Res., Pelham 


trolling 


9-13-63 


LeeRoy DeHoff, Suffield, Conn. 


Shad 


7 lbs. 


10 


oz. 


25'/2" 


19/2" 


Indian Head 


spinning 


5- -68 


William Spaulding, Whitman 


Channel Catfish 


13 lbs. 


8 


oz. 


30" 


19" 


Conn. Riv., Turners Falls 


live bait 


7-18-64 


Robert Thibodo, Northampton 


Walleye 


8 lbs. 


8 


oz. 


28 Vz" 


15/2" 


Quabbin Res., Hardwick 




7-15-65 


Joseph Schwartz, Holden 




8 lbs. 


8 


oz. 


28 »/ 2 " 


14%" 


Conn. Riv., Northampton 


spinning 


6-7-64 


Peter Yeskie, Northampton 


Bluegill 


1 lb. 






1 1 1/4 " 


9/2" 


Bog Pond, Norton 


spinning 


10-17-65 


Robert Barrett, Stoughton 


Bullhead 


5 lbs. 


9 


oz. 


22V2" 


1 1 1/2 " 


Conn. Riv., Hadley 


live bait 


6-8-63 


Mrs. Erna Storie, Chicopee Falls 




5 lbs. 


8 


oz. 


22/2" 


14" 


Leverett Pd., Leverett 


live bait 


8-2-65 


Stephen Brozo, No. Amherst 




4 lbs. 


9 


oz. 


221/2" 


1 1 1/2 " 


Conn. Riv., Chicopee 


live bait 


9-8-65 


Joseph Kida, Chicopee 


Calico 


2 lbs. 


9'/2 0Z. 


18" 


14" 


Merrimack, Lowell 


spinning 


6-8-65 


George Olsson, Lowell 


White Perch 


2 lbs. 


4 


oz. 


16 3 /4" 


1 1 % " 


Halfway Pd., Plymouth 


spinning 


6-9-65 


Richard Rock, Kingston 




2 lbs. 






16%" 


1 1 1/4 " 


Halfway Pd., Plymouth 


spinning 


6-18-66 


Richard Rock, Kingston 


Yellow Perch 


2 lbs. 






16%" 


10%" 


Grt. Herring, Plymouth 


live bait 


5-9-66 


Anthony Scolaro, Braintree 


Brook Trout 


6 lbs. 


4 


oz. 


24" 


14" 


Otis Reservoir, Otis 


spinning 


6-24-68 


Thomas Laptew, Granville 



JULES AND REGULATIONS 



LEGISLATION 



iULES AND REGULATIONS PROMULGATED BY THE 
DIRECTOR OF FISHERIES AND GAME DURING FISCAL 
r-EAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1968. 

uly- I, 1967. Rules and Regulations relating to the hunting of 

deer in Massachusetts. 
September 9, 1967. Migratory Game Bird Regulations 1967-1968. 
anuary 8, 1968. Emergency regulations were adopted to con- 
tinue all outstanding Rules and Regulations pending the 

promulgation of new regulations in accordance with Chapter 

802 of the Acts of 1967 which amended Chapter 131 and 

recodified the fish and game laws. 
\pril 8, 1968. 

Rules and Regulations relating to the taking of certain fish. 

Rules and Regulations regarding Ashfield Lake in town of 
Ashfield. 

Rules and Regulations relating to taking carp and suckers for 
sale. 

Rules and Regulations relative to public fishing grounds. 

Rules and Regulations governing the taking of fish in inter- 
state pond, Wallum Lake, lying between Mass. and 
Rhode Island. 

Rules and Regulations governing the taking of fish in inter- 
state ponds lying between Mass. and New Hampshire. 

Rules and Regulations governing the taking of fish in inter- 
state ponds lying between Mass. and Connecticut. 

Rules and Regulations governing the sale of protected fresh 
water fish by licensed dealers. 

Rules and Regulations for hunting with bows and arrows. 

Rules and Regulations relating to the hunting of deer. 

Rules and Regulations relative to the tagging of deer. 

Rules and Regulations relating to the hunting of hares and 
rabbits. 

Rules and Regulations for trapping of birds by farmers. 

Rules and Regulations relative to the hunting and trapping of 
mammals. 

Rules and Regulations relative to the issuance of permits to 
expose poisons for the control of mammal and bird 
species. 

Rules and Regulations relating to the hunting of pheasants, 
quail, and ruffed grouse. 

Rules and Regulations to the hunting of gray squirrels. 

Rules and Regulations for public snooting grounds and wild- 
life management areas. 

Rules and Regulations governing the display of sporting, 
hunting, fishing, and trapping licenses. 

Rules and Regulations for the artificial propagation and 
maintenance of birds and mammals. 

Rules and Regulations for the artificial propagation and 
maintenance offish. 



The following laws affecting the Division of Fisheries and 

Game were enacted during the legislative session of 1968: 

CHAPTER 214, ACTS, 1968: An act authorizing the carrying 
of firearms on Sunday for the purpose of sport target shooting. 

CHAPTER 530, ACTS, 1968: An act providing for the issuance 
of fishing licenses to certain mentally retarded persons without 
payment of fees. 

CHAPTER 534, ACTS, 1968: An act providing for the sale of 
the Sutton State Fish Hatchery by the Division of Fisheries 
and Game. 

CHAPTER 550, ACTS. 1968: An act authorizing the Director 
of the Division of Fisheries and Game to issue special cer- 
tificates allowing certain groups of mentally retarded persons 
to fish without payment of a fee. 

CHAPTER 554, ACTS, 1968: An act temporarily authgrizing 
the issuance to residents of the commonwealth while in the 
active military or naval service of the United States of 
special certificates without fee entitling them to hunt and fish. 

CHAPTER 639, ACTS, 1968: An act to provide for an inland 
fisheries and game land and water acquisition and develop- 
ment program. 

CHAPTER 718, ACTS, 1968: An act authorizing the director 
of the Division of Fisheries and Game to prohibit the pos- 
session or use of certain rifles in certain areas during the 
period between October first and April first. 






All of Wildlife . . . 
And All Who Appreciate 
Wildlife . . . Benefit From 
Fish and Game Programs 



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MASSACHUSETTS 
DIVISION OF 
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JAMES M.SHEPARD 
Director 

FISHERIES AND GAME BOARD 

HARRY C. DARLING, Chairman 

East Bridgewater 

BRADLEE E. GAGE, Secretary 

Amherst 

HENRY J. COLOMBO 

Wilmington 

MARTIN H. BURNS 

Newbury 

EDWARD J. TIERNEY 

Pittsfield 

STAFF 

JAMES M. SHEPARD 

Director 

RUSSELL A. COOKINGHAM 

Assistant Director 

COLTON H. BRIDGES 

Supt., Research & Mgt. 

E. MICHAEL POLLACK 

Chief Game Biologist 

LOUIS H. CARUFEL 

Chief Aquatic Biologist 

RALPH R. BITZER 

Chief Fish Culturist 

RICHARD CRONIN, Chief 

Information and Education 

JOSEPH H.JOHNSON 

Realty Chief 

DISTRICT MGRS. 

LEWIS C. SCHLOTTERBECK, S.E 

PAUL S. MUGFORD, Central 

EUGENE D. MORAN, W. 

WALTER HOYT, N.E. 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Division of Fisheries and Game 
104th Annual Report 



His Excellency 
GOVERNOR FRANCIS W. SARGENT 

STATE USRAHY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

JUL 1«70 

STAlf HMyflfe* BW3J.WIH 



His Excellency, Francis W. Sargent, Governor of the Common- 
» T />T»r« ealth ' the Executive Council, the General Court, and the Board of 
MASS- QSMCWkFisheries and Game: 




Gentlemen: 



IT -Ptr 



I have the honor to submit herewith the One Hundred and 
■Fiflrl Annual Report of the Division of Fisheries and Game, cover- 
ing the fiscal year from July 1, 1968 to June 30, 1969. 

I commend to your attention the very real diversity of public 
service to all citizens of the Commonwealth demonstrated by this 
report and respectfully urge your consideration of the vital necessi- 
ty for financial augmentation to meet increased demands for serv- 
ices and resulting benefits provided by these programs. 

Respectively submitted, 




James M. Shepard, Director 



CONTENTS 

The Board Reports -\ 

Fisheries Management 3 

Lands Acquired — For Everyone 6 

Wildlife Management 8 

Lands and Waters Acquisition 10 

Information and Education 11 

Financial Reports 12 

Regulations and Legislation inside back cover 

Fish Records and 

License Sales Back cover 



5m-4-70-046657 



Estimated Cost Per Copy: $.325 



II 







THE BOARD REPORTS 



1 HE quality and quantity of outdoor recreation that is 
dependent upon wildlife resources remains the primary re- 
sponsibility of this agency, as it has been in the past. 

Any attempts to meet this responsibility in this modern 
day and age would be futile if we didn't concern ourselves 
deeply with every respect and ramification of current nat- 
ural resource managment. 

The preservation and wise utilization of our natural re- 
sources is not only a vital necessity for esthetic reasons, but 
is rapidly becoming a matter of health and welfare and is, 
in fact, big business today. 

The 'Division of Fisheries and Game recognizes its re- 
sponsibility to the resources themselves and to the citizenry 
of the Commonwealth, and is forging ahead on several 
fronts to realize its short and long range goals. 

These are some of the highlights of the 1969 fiscal year's 
activities of the Division of Fisheries and Game: 

Fisheries Management 

Anadromous fish restoration programs continue to prog- 
ress through the cooperation of the states of Massachusetts, 
Connecticut, New Hampshire, and Vermont, and two Fed- 
eral agencies, the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and the Bu- 
reau of Commercial Fisheries, both of the Department of 
the Interior. 



Attempts are being made to restore Atlantic salmon and 
to increase shad runs in the Connecticut River. To this 
end, approximately 10,320 Atlantic salmon smolts were 
stocked below the Holyoke Dam in the Massachusetts 
portion of the river. 

An extensive shad-tagging study was conducted on the 
Connecticut River, while some 3,000,000 shad eggs, ob- 
tained below the Holyoke Dam from the Connecticut Riv- 
er, were stocked in the Merrimack River and certain coast- 
al streams in attempts to re-establish annual runs there. 

Bottom-mapping and depth studies were conducted in 
the lower portions of the Connecticut River between Hol- 
yoke and Enfield, while a creel census of the shad fishery, 
initiated in 1968, was continued. 

Modifications of the water quality project objectives 
were implemented to classify pond types according to the 
stage of aging or eutrophication for correlation with fish 
productivity. The liming of specific lakes of low fertility 
was combined into the project to determine if it would in- 
crease potential fertility. If proven feasible, this type of 
management would be of considerable value to the 
fisheries. 

Vital studies to monitor pesticide residues in our fish 
were continued at length during t he year. These studies 
were carried out through the laboratory facilities at West- 






■ 



boro, in the conjunction with the Massachusetts Health Re- 
search Institute and funded with a grant from the Federal 
Water Pollution Control Administration. 

One of the highlights of the entire hatchery operation 
was the completion and implementation of the new Charles 
L. McLaughlin Hatchery in Belchertown. Construction 
was initiated in November, 1967. The new facility's esti- 
mated annual production of some 200,000 pounds of 
trout w ill represent an increase in our total annual produc- 
tion from all hatcheries of about 35 percent. 

Hatchery personnel raised and liberated 382,713 
pounds of trout during the fiscal year. An additional 
30,591 pounds of trout were received from the U.S. Fish 



Wildlife Management 

Genetic research of the sex-linkage of ring-neck pheas- 
ants has paid excellent dividends. Our game culturists are 
now able to check day-old pheasant chicks to determine 
their sex with 100% accuracy, resulting in a substantial 
savings of time, effort and money. Previous methods of 
sexing day-old chicks took a great deal of time and effort, 
and resulted in errors as high as 25% or more. An in- 
creased number of birds can now be reared because of the 
accuracy of the new system, but equally important is the 
considerable savings in the amounts of pen space, feed and 
labor required for the job. 

Working in cooperation with the Massachusetts Audu- 
bon Society, a dove -banding project was undertaken to in- 
crease our available data on this species both within the 
state and within the Eastern Dove Management Unit. Pre- 
liminary returns indicated that Massachusetts-reared birds 
were shot in Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina and 
South Carolina. 

Studies on the forest-pheasant project have progressed 
well ahead of the original schedule outlined, excellent fer- 
tility and hatchability rates have produced a larger popula- 
tion of these birds than we had anticipated. 

Some of the 1,000 chicks produced during the spring 
will be placed on an island and on two other isolated sub- 
marginal land areas for further studies on survival and 
adaptation. 

Massachusetts deer hunters harvested 1,427 deer during 
the 1968 season, the second such antlered-deer-only season 
in the history of the Bay State. Antlerless deer could be 
harvested only by holders of special permits. 

Wild turkey studies were continued during the year, 
with efforts aimed principally at censusing the populations 
of wild turkeys previously released in several areas in the 
state. 

On the waterfowl front, studies continued on the wood 
duck and or; Canada goose nesting on the Framingham- 
Sudbury Reservoir system. Gosling transplants continued, 
with releases made, in Worcester, Franklin and Berkshire 
Counties. 



A total of 1,558 ducks were banded along the coast in 
January and February, mainly black ducks. Winter inven- 
tory flights and special flights just prior to and during the 
special scaup season were made during the fiscal year. 

District personnel continued extensive work on wildlife 
plantings and other development and maintenance work on 
the wildlife management areas. 

Information and Education 

This program continued in its efforts to inform and edu- 
cate the public-at-large and sportsmen in particular of the 
various ramifications of the Division's diverse public-serv- 
ice programs and projects. Continued use was made of the 
several media available for dissemination of news and in- 
formation; news released to all major newspapers, publica- 
tion of the official magazine, MASSACHUSETTS WILD- 
LIFE, radio and television programs or spot appearances 
whenever possible. 

Lands and Waters 

Three new wildlife management areas were established 
during the year, one in Conway, one in Lenox, and one in 
Savoy. The Conway area consists of some 525 acres of 
farm game land, with about 200 acres of cleared land used 
for pasture, the remainder in woodland. The Lenox area 
consists of 250 acres of flat, gently sloping land bordering 
the Housatonic River. The Savoy Area, 400 acres, is all 
wooded and has a good future potential for development 
and management. 

Total acreage acquired during the year was 2,514 acres, 
some of which consisted of areas abutting our present 
holdings. 

Options were received for about 1,700 acres in the 
Rocky Gutter section of Middleboro. The Bureau of Out- 
door Recreation has approved the acquisition and we are 
anticipating reimbursement of half the cost of the acquisi- 
tion from this agency. 

The Hampden County Council of Sportsmen's Clubs 
gave about 80 acres of land along the East Branch of the 
Westfield River to the division as a gift, for which we are 
most grateful. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Harry C. Darling, Chairman 
Bradlee E. Gage, Secretary 
Henry J. Colombo 
Edward J. Tierney 
Martin H. Burns 




FISHERIES MANAGEMENT 



1 HE 1969 fiscal year activities, programs and responsi- 
bilities of the fisheries section continued to progress under 
the following categories: Quabbin Reservoir investiga- 
tions, anadromous fish restoration on Connecticut, Merri- 
mack, North and Palmer Rivers, warmwater fisheries in- 
vestigations, water quality studies, pond and stream recla- 
mation, stream access and improvement, pesticide studies, 
trout allocation to state waters and streams and hatchery 
operations. 

During the season from April to October, Quabbin Res- 

■ ervoir creel census indicates that 47,416 anglers harvested 

i 41,302 fish weighing 34,868 pounds. Decreases in lake 
trout harvest were noted and attributed to egg and year 
class mortalities and scarcity of suitable forage fish. Land- 

i locked salmon harvest increased slightly over the previous 
year and is probably attributed to the 1967 plant of salmon 
smolts entering the catch. To alleviate the scarcity of for- 

i age fish 50,000 gravid smelt and 1 ,000,000 viable smelt 
eggs were planted in the reservoir and tributary streams. An 
additional plant of 3,200 landlocked salmon and 20,000 
nine-inch plus rainbow trout was carried out. 



The anadromous fish restoration program continues to 
forge ahead due to the cooperative efforts involving the 
states of Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont and 
Connecticut and two Federal agencies, the Bureau of Sport 
Fisheries and Wildlife and the Bureau of Commercial Fish- 
eries, to increase shad runs and restore Atlantic salmon to 
the Connecticut River. Approximately 10,320 Atlantic 
salmon smolts were stocked below the Holyoke Dam in 
Massachusetts. 

Massachusetts project activities on the Connecticut Riv- 
er centered on a shad tagging study at Holyoke, in which 
1,238 adult shad were tagged. In addition to tagging stud- 
ies, approximately 3,000,000 shad eggs obtained below 
Holyoke Dam were stocked in the Merrimack River and 
coastal streams. Bottom mapping and depths were record- 
ed in the lower Connecticut River between Holyoke and 
Enfield. The creel census of the shad fishery below Hol- 
yoke, initiated in 1968, for purpose of assisting in shad 
population estimate study, was continued. 

Creel census studies initiated during the 1968 fiscal year 
were conducted on the North and Palmer Rivers to mea- 



sure angler harvest of shad. Evaluation of shad restoration 
efforts through transplants of eggs and adults was contin- 
ued on the Agawam and Mattapoisett Rivers. 

During the I "-Hi 1 ) fiscal year, investigations were contin- 
ued on the warmwater fisheries which included age and 
growth analysis, population estimates, landlocked alewife 
transplant for forage in two-story pond management and 
the effect of weed control chemical use on pond fish 
populations. 

Maintenance of the two warmwater fish culture pond 
systems continued with 23 1 pounds of chain pickerel and 
332 pounds of largemouth bass produced and stocked from 
the Merrill Pond system, and 859 pounds of large -mouth 
bass and 290 pounds of smallmouth bass produced and 
stocked from Harold Parker pond system. 

Modification of the water quality project objectives were 
implemented to classify pond types according to the stage 
of aging or eutrophication for correlation with fish produc- 
tivity. In addition, the effect of liming specific lakes with 
low fertility was combined into the project to determine if 
it would increase potential fertility. 

Ten ponds totaling 358 acres were reclaimed for trout 
and warmwater fish management. The following districts 



and ponds were treated: South-eastern District — Hoxie 
Pond, Peters Pond and Pimlico Pond, Sandwich; Lout i 
Pond, Russell Pond and Moning's Pond, Plymouth; North- 
eastern District — Walden Pond, White Pond, Concord; 
Western District — Hallockville Pond, Plainfield Pond, 
Plainficld. 

Stream access and improvement work continued on the 
Squannacook River. Assistance from local Boy Scouts 
greatly contributed to project progress on the river. 

During 1968-1969 the pesticide laboratory in Westboro, 
operating in conjunction with Massachusetts Health Re- 
search Institute and funded with a grant from the Federal 
Water Pollution Control Administration, analyzed 379 fish 
collected from 77 sampling stations throughout the state. 
Individual analysis of these were conducted to determine 
the concentrations of DDT, DDE, DDD, Lindane, Hep- 
tachlor, A-BHC, Aldrin, Heptachlor Epoxide, Dieldrin 
and Endrin. Generally, in the samples analyzed, there was 
an increase in DDT residue from 1967-1968. In addition 
to the above, samples from about 25 different fish kills, 10 | 
miscellaneous samples and 75 individual fish from Quabbin 
Reservoir, were analyzed. 

During 1968-1969 a total of 1,508,683 fish or 382,713 



The Bay State angler may still find remote, quiet waters 
in wilderness settings to enjoy his sport. 





The ultimate objective — what father and son 

duet, like this one, wouldn't remember such a 

catch for years to come? 



pounds was liberated by our six hatcheries throughout the 
ponds and streams of the Commonwealth. An additional 
114,566 fish or 30,591 pounds were received from the 
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for stocking in 
Massachusetts. 

One of the highlights in hatchery operations was the 
completion and implementation of the new McLaughlin 
Hatchery whose construction was initiated in November 
1967. Approximately 200,000 pounds of trout are expect- 
ed to be produced annually increasing our total annual pro- 
duction by 35 percent. 

In order to place the new hatchery in current production 
i the bulk of yearling rainbow trout from the Berkshire 
Hatchery were transferred there. This caused a relatively 
slight production decrease in weight for the year as com- 
pared to last year. Also, the Berkshire Hatchery was re- 
leased by the state and returned to the U.S. Fish and Wild- 
life Service. 

Trout nutrition experiments are still in progress. Moni- 
toring of state hatcheries to detect disease and apply prop- 
er treatment were undertaken where necessary. 




TROUT DISTRIBUTION FROM STATE 
AND FEDERAL HATCHERIES 

JULY 1, 1968 TO JUNE 30, 1969 



BROOKS 



BROWNS 



RAINBOWS 



Under 6' 
77,450 



Over 6" 
519,029 



Under 6' 
50,000 



Over 6" 
65,395 



Under 6" 
284,780 



Over 6" 
512,029 



Total 

State Trout 

1.508.683 



Total Trout Distribution 6-9" 763,319 

Total Trout Distribution 9" plus 33,134 

Total Federal Trout Distribution 6" plus 114,566 

Total Catchables (6" plus) 1,211,019 

Total Fingerlings (6" minus) 412,230 

GRAND TOTAL 1 .623,249 

STATION POUNDAGE 

Station Total lbs. 

Berkshire Hatchery 4,843 

McLaughlin Hatchery 5.831 

Montague Hatchery 74,339 

Palmer Hatchery 46,651 

Sandwich Hatchery 139,580 

Sunderland Hatchery 111,469 

State Poundage 382,713 

North Attleboro 17,914 

Nashua. New Hampshire 12,677 

Total Federal Poundage 30.591 

GRANDTOTAL 413.304 

(This table does not show trout retained for brood stock) 



LANDS ACQUIRED 



The following list includes major holdings acquired by 
the division. Many of our more recent purchases were 
made possible by the one dollar increase in license fees. 



ated between the Knightville and the Littleville Flood Control 
lands. Deer, snowshoe hare, woodcock, grouse and cottontail rabbits 
are found on this area. This area is becoming increasingly popular 
to buffs of snow-mobiling as woodsroads and trails meander 
throughout this area. Small beaver impoundments also compliment 
the area and those who wish to hike of the beaten path for native 
trout fishing, find these small beaver ponds rewarding. 



STREAM ACCESS* 



348 Acres Total 



CHESHIRE WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA 

4hS Acres Farm-Game Area 

Location: Cheshire Western District 

The setting for this area is rolling terrain, typical of New England 
farmland. The area offers pheasant, rabbit and grouse hunting. Spec- 
tacular scenery greets the Sportsman as he traverses this area. Mt. 
Greylock looms to the west, the Hoosic Valley unfolds to the north, 
Cheshire Reservoir lies to the south, and the famous Berkshire hills 
and the Mohawk Trail lies to the east. 

This area is steeped in history. A stone tower was erected on this 
site by the Sons of the American Revolution as a monument to 
Colonel Joab Stafford, first settler of New Providence (Cheshire) 
and commander of the "Silver Greys" in the Battle of Bennington. 



LENOX WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA 



247 Acres 
Location: 



Lenox 



Farm-Game Area 
Western District 



This property is level farmland bordered on the east by the Hous- 
atonic River. Quality hunting for rabits, pheasants, grouse, wood- 
cock and other small game is one of the attributes of this area. The 
river provides exciting waterfowl jump shooting, typical of inland 
waterfowling. This area will provide a natural access to the river. 



CONWAY WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA 

525 Acres Farm-Game Area 

Location: Conway Western District 

Another typical New England farm with rolling terrain offering 
varied small game hunting. Poland Brook, a small trout stream 
flows through the property and has produced surprising results for 
those fishermen who have "wet a line" in this stream. 

Two well maintained town roads allow easy access to and from 
this area. 



One hundred and seventy-two acres have been acquired on the 
Little River that parallels Route 112 in the towns of Worthington 
and Huntington. This picturesque stream, stocked by the Division, 
provides quality fishing throughout the season. 

One hundred and seventy-six acres providing access to the East 
Branch of the Westfield River also will insure the fishermen of today 
and the future, a place to fish and call their own. 

*Eighty acres were given to the Division on the East Branch of the 
Westfield River in the town of Cummington by the Council of 
Sportsmen Clubs of Hampden County, Inc. 

* * * 

PAXTON WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA 

327 Acres Farm-Game 

Location: Paxton Central District 

This farm-game area that is destined to encompass some 500 
acres is within a mere 20 minute drive of the metropolitan area of 
Worcester. For the most-part this area is farmland, interspersed 
with hedgerows and woodlands. Game species that are found on 
this area include pheasants, grouse, snowshoe hare, woodcock and 
cottontail rabbits. 



SWIFT RIVER WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA 

697 Acres Farm-Game 

Location: Belchertown Central District 

An area unique because of its desirable location. This area lies 
south of the largest body of fresh water in southern New England, '■ 
the Quabbin Reservoir. The Swift River, the finest trout stream in 
Massachusetts, flows south from the Quabbin through this property, j 

Located on this area is the Charles L. McLaughlin Trout Hatch- 
ery, one of the largest trout rearing facilities in the Northeast. 

This area may well develop into one of the most important re- 
creational centers in all Massachusetts. 



SAVOY WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA 

420 Acres Forestland 

Location: Savoy Western District 

A softwood-hardwood forest type cover contributes to the snow- 
shoe hare, grouse and deer hunting to be enjoyed here. 

# * * 

BECKET WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA 

234 Acres Forestland 

Location: Becket Western District 

Deer, snowshoe hare, grouse and grey squirrel are species found 
on this area. A small pond provides limited fishing and some water- 
fowl action. 



CHESTER WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA 

1.600 Acres Forestland 

Location: Chester-Worthington-Huntington Western District 

Additional acreage to this area totals 633 acres. This area is situ- 



WINIMUSSET WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA 

510 Acres Farm-Game 

Location: New Braintree Central District 

A perfect blend of farmland, woodland and wetland characterizes 
this as an ideal wildlife management area. This particular area will 
provide countless hours of pleasurable hunting to the Sportsmen asj 
well as compatible uses that will be afforded the public. A small; 
stream flows across this property affording limited trout fishing. 

This area is rich in history as the area is reputed to have been the 
campground of the followers of King Phillip, one of the greatest of 
Indian Chiefs. 



PHILLIPSTON WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA 

752 Acres Forestland 

Location: Phillipston-Petersham Central District 

A composition of open and semi-open cover with woodlands, 
contributes to the theme of variable hunting. This area provides a 
variety of game species including deer, snowshoe hare, grouse, wood- 
cock, cottontail rabbits and grey squirrels. 



FOR EVERYONE 



QUABOAG RIVER WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA 

793 Acres Forestland 

Location: Brookfield - West Brookfield Central District 

Here is an area that offers multiple-use recreation. Access to the 
Quaboag River for fishing and other water oriented recreation. Wat- 
erfowl gunning as well as other types of hunting is in the offering on 
this area. The cover on this area is a mixed hardwood-softwood 
stand. 

* * * 
STREAM ACCESS 

1,303 Acres 

Access to four streams in this district add significantly to guar- 
anteeing the Sportsmen that their right to fish will be protected — 
one hundred and eighty-nine acres on the Swift River, 753 acres on 
the Millers River, 80 acres on the Ware River and 281 acres on 
Lawrence Brook. 

Gifts of land to this division within the Central Wildlife District, 
total 350 acres. These properties are located in — Templeton, a 
gift from Mr. L.C. Day; Northboro, donated by the MacFarland 
family and Spencer, donated by the Auburn Sportsmen Club. 

Through our mistake the Auburn Sportsmen Club did not receive 
the appreciation and recognition it so justly deserves. Due to the 
untiring efforts of the members of the Auburn Sportsmen Club, a 
prime small management area is provided. 

* * * 

CRANE WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA 
1,615 Acres Farm-Game 

Location: Falmouth Southeast District 

Fifty-three acres have been added to this area to increase the 
acreage from 1,562 to slightly over 1,600. This area of open fields, 
interspersed with scrub-oak and pine, harbors pheasants, quail, cot- 
tontail rabbits and deer. 

In addition to hunting, this area provides other uses such as dog 
training, wildlife photography, nature study, hiking and field trails. 

* * * 

WEST MEADOWS WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA 

222 Acres Farm-Game 

Location: West Bridgewater Southeast District 

Four additional acres enlarge this area comprised of a swamp and 
old abandoned fields. Species of game to be found on this area are 
waterfowl, cottontail rabbits, grey squirrels, grouse, deer and pheas- 
ants. 



ROCKY GUTTER WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA 

1,541 Acres Forestland 

Location: Middleboro Southeast District 

This area is one of the largest single purchases ever undertaken by 
this division. The terrain of this property is slightly rolling. Small 
marshlands compliment the area providing waterfowl and aquatic 
mammal habitat. 

A forest cover comprised of pine interspersed with varities of 
hardwoods is found throughout the area. Quail, grouse, snowshoe 
hare, woodcock, cottontail rabbits, waterfowl, raccoon and deer are 
species of game found on this large tract of land. 

Wood paths and trails allow easy access along with well-main- 
tained town roads. The recreational potential of this area is im- 
measurable. 

* * * 

ACCESS AND LAUNCHING SITE 

134 Acres 
• Location: Sandy Pond, Plymouth 

An access and launching site has been acquired on this pond. A 
parking area will accommodate 20-25 vehicles. 
This pond is a trout pond having been reclaimed in 1967. 



ADDITIONAL HATCHERY LANDS 

Seventy acres of land were acquired in the town of Rochester for 
a warm-water fish hatchery. 



CRANE POND WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA 

1,569 Acres Farm-Game 

Location: Groveland-Georgetown-West Newbury Northeast 

District 

Acquisitions totaling 250 acres have been added to this well 
known farm-game area. This area is comprised of semi-open fields, 
woodland borders and woodlots. 

* * * 

MILL CREEK WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA 

529 Acres Farm-Game 

Location: Newbury - Rowley Northeast District 

Additional acreage to this area has been acquired. Mill Creek is 
well known for its waterfowl and shore bird habitat. The area is 
bounded on the north by the Parker River, the Mill River bounds 
the west, bounded on the east by the Boston and Maine R.R., and 
enclosed by a small stream on the south. 



NORTHEAST WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA 

1,317 Acres Farm-Game 

Location: Newbury Northeast District 

Two hundred and thirty-two acres of prime land have been added 
to this section also known as the Downfall Area. Accepted and 
proven wildlife management techniques is transforming it into one 
of the leading farm-game areas in the Northeast District. Utilization 
of this area has been steadily on the rise. 

Open, brushy fields, interspersed with woodlots provide food and 
cover for the pheasants, grouse, woodcock, rabbits, squirrels and 
raccoon. 



STREAM ACCESS 

Four hundred and eighty acres (250 acres of this figure donated 
by Middlesex County League), have been acquired on the Squanna- 
cook River. This fine trout stream rises in New Hampshire and flows 
southeast into Massachusetts to later become part of the Nashua 
River. Acquisitions on this river were made in the towns of Groton, 
Townsend and Shirley. 

This stream not only furnishes exceptional trout throughout the 
season, but is enjoyed by canoe enthusiasts who seek the tranquility 
of the surrounding countryside. Many forms of wildlife can be en- 
countered as you glide noiselessly down this river. 

Any land acquisitions on this river are complemented by the 
more than 7,000 acres of Squannacook watershed land owned by 
Natural Resources Division of Forest and Parks. 

Small marshlands in Essex, Rowley, and Ipswich have been pur- 
chased. 



ACCESS AND LAUNCHING SITE 

209 Acres 

Location: Mascopic Lake Dracut - Tyngsboro 

An access and launching site has been established on this lake. 
Yellow perch, white perch, largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, and 
pickerel are some of the species that await the angler's lure. 

* * * 

Acknowledgement and appreciation are in order for the following 
gifts of land. 

Marblehead Fish and Game 

Lester B. Woodbury 

Middlesex County League 







WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT 



GAME FARMS 

Results of genetic research on sex-linkage of ring-neck 
pheasants have given the Massachusetts sportsmen excel- 
lent dividends. Now our game culturists are able to sex 
day -old pheasant chicks with 100% accuracy. In the past, 
sexing of day-old pheasant chicks using the eye -field tech- 
nique resulted in errors as high as 25 % . Thus, with this new 
sexing method, an increase in the number of cock birds can 
be reared, but most important is the savings in terms of pen 
space, feed, labor, etc. 

All other activities at the farms were of routine nature. 

DOVE BANDING PROJECT 

The objective of this banding project of mourning doves 
is to increase available data on this species within the state 
as well as the Eastern Dove Management Unit. By banding 
mourning doves in Massachusetts, increase knowledge of 
population dynamics, habitat needs and techniques for 
species management will be obtained. Working in coopera- 
tion with the Massachusetts Audubon Society, a total of 
2,101 doves were live-trapped and banded at eleven sites 
in Massachusetts. Preliminary returns from last year's 
banded birds reveal that Massachusetts-reared birds were 
shot in Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, and South 
Carolina. 

FOREST PHEASANT PROJECT 

The work on this project has progressed ahead of the 
schedule originally outlined. We have a larger population 



than we anticipitated we would have at this time, as a re- 
sult of very good fertility and hatchability ( about 90% 
and 80% respectively). 

Selection pressure was placed on this year's stock for egg 
production, hours of incubation required for hatching and 
both egg and adult color. Some of the 1000 chicks pro- 
duced this spring will be placed on an island and two other 
isolated submarginal land areas. 

Next year's (1970) plans call for continued selection for 
egg production, hours of incubation and color of both the 
birds and their eggs. Additional effort will be placed on 
selection for body weight, wildness, date of hatch, spur 
length, shank length and rapid feathering. Birds will be 
placed on the same areas used in 1969 for field testing. 



Deer Project 

Massachusetts deer hunters harvested 1,427 deer during 
the 1968 deer season. This was the second antlered deer 
only season in the history of Bay State deer hunting. Ant- 
lerless deer harvest was by permit only. 

Thirty deer checking stations were manned by Division 
personnel to record the compulsory deer kill reports. 

The reported deer kill for the 1968 deer season is as fol- 
lows: 



Males 

Females 

Total 



Archery 


Shotgun 


Total 


21 


1,083 


1,104 


13 


310 


323 


34 


1,393 


1,427 



umber 


Percent 


456 


70 


74 


11 


29 


4 


7 


1 


84 


13 



Included in the above deer harvest totals are 421 deer 
reported by holders of antlerless deer permits. 

Deer mortalities caused by other than hunting were re- 
iported as follows: 

\Cause 

jMotor Vehicles 

(Dogs 

[Illegal 

jCrop damage 

jOther and Unknown 

Turkey Stocking Project 

An experimental release of wild turkeys was made in 
I Massachusetts during 1960 and 1961. Twenty-two wild 
turkeys from three different sources were released in 
i Quabbin Reservation during 1960 and 1961. Spring popu- 
lations remained relatively static through 1965 due prima- 
rily to high winter mortality and low juvenile recruitment 
I during same years. Population increases have occurred 
| since 1965, representing a reversal of the trend of a steadi- 
1 ly decreasing population to 1964. Mild winter conditions 
I and an artificial winter feeding program were probably re- 
I sponsible for the increased overwinter survival of wild tur- 
| keys during the 1965-1966 and 1966-1967 winters. The 
I wild turkey was considered established in the Quabbin 
area in 1967. The emphasis in the program was then shift- 
ed from intensive research on the Quabbin population to a 
i statewide population survey and restoration effort. The 
; 1968 breeding population was estimated to be 50 turkeys 
in the Quabbin area. Sixteen broods were raised and 83 
poults survived to September. The 1969 late winter/early 
I spring population was estimated to be 60 turkeys. 

The main flocks at each of the major release sites were 
! censused by direct search from snowmobiles and by count- 
ing tracks in snow during late winter. These late winter- 
early spring populations were estimated to be: Myles Stan- 
dish, 10; Mt. Washington, 12; October Mt., 31; Barre, 20; 
Douglas, 1 1 . 

A release of 12 turkeys was made in a new area in the 
town of Douglas during September, 1969. 

Waterfowl Project 

Wood duck nesting studies at Great Meadows National 
Wildlife Refuge indicated the poorest production of young 
in eighteen years. Population levels of nesting wood ducks 
on eight study areas in central Massachusetts remained the 
same as 1967 levels, but recruitment of young females to 
the breeding population was poor. 

Canada goose nesting studies continued on the Fram- 
ingham-Sudbury Reservoir system. The nesting population 
appears to number about thirty breeding pairs with many 
non-breeding birds present on this reservoir. Goose nesting 
occurs in many other areas in the Suasco watershed. 

Gosling transplants continued. Releases were made in 
western Worcester County, Franklin County, and Berk- 
shire County. Four tagged adult geese released at the Fer- 
nald State School in Templeton as goslings in 1967 were 
observed on the school grounds this year. Hunting recover- 



ies of released goslings have been reported from New Jer- 
sey, Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts. One 
goose was live-trapped at Bombay Hook National Wildlife 
Refuge in Delaware. 

Banding operations resulted in a total of 1,558 ducks 
being banded on the coast in January and February. Of 
these approximately 1,300 were black ducks, the remain- 
der were mallards and black-mallard hybrids. Nighlighting 
by airboat produced a total of 650 birds banded prior to the 
1968 hunting season. Species banded included black duck, 
mallard, wood duck, blue-winged teal, green-winged teal, 
pintail and black-mallard hybrid. 

The winter inventory count of waterfowl totalled 
120,500 birds. This was approximately 30,000 birds below 
the 1968 count, and could be attributed to a corresponding 
drop in the number of eiders observed during the inventory 
flights. The count this year was equal to the average count 
of the past ten years. 

Survey flights the day prior to the opening of the 1968 
Special Scaup Season revealed the presence of 14,000 
scaup on our coastal waters. Flights during the special sea- 
son revealed no significant hunter participation. 

Development Work 

Again much of the four wildlife districts' time was spent 
on development and maintenance of this division's wildlife 
management areas. Over 90 miles of roads were main- 
tained by graveling, brush cutting, etc. A total of 12,312 
trees and shrubs were planted along edges and through 
fields to provide travel lanes and food. In addition, over 
400 acres of spring and fall plantings were made or main- 
tained for wildlife food and cover on eleven wildlife man- 
agement areas. 

Other important activities were thinning and clearing on 
ten wildlife management areas to provide additional food 
and cover by cutting the overstory and encouraging the un- 
derstory; maintenance and construction of wood duck 
nesting boxes, and related work. 



GAME DISTRIBUTION July 1 


,1968- 


-June 30 


, 1969 


Pheasants 


Hens 


Cocks 


Total 


Adults: 


Spring and Summer 
liberations 


3,150 


285 


3,435 


Young: 


August liberations (12 weeks) 
October-November liberations 


3,503 


11,454 


14,957 




(17-25 weeks) 


250 


41,100 


41,350 




Sportsmen's Club Rearing 








Totals 


Program 


50 


4,998 


5 048 


6,953 


57,837 


64,790 


Quail 










Adults 








200 


Young 
Totals 








3,252 


3,452 


White Hare 








Northern Varying, purchased 






2,500 











>l ISSACHl SETTS COOPER YTIYK WILDLIFE 
RESEARCH I Ml 

The following projects have been worked on by mem- 
bers of the Cooperative Unit in the past year: 

Beaver Project 

Dr. Larson has developed a valid technique of determin- 
ing the sex of beaver of any age in the wild by the exami- 
nation of blood smears. 

\\ oodcock Projecl 

Dr. Sheldon found that there was no drop in the singing 
male woodcock population on the old census routes. 

Twenty random routes were established in the state this 
year, and two of these were run by Unit personnel. 

The Unit leader and Head Game Biologist from the di- 
vision attended a Wildlife Conservation symposium at the 
University of Maine in late June. 

Ecology and Physiology of Avian Sterility 

Drs. David K. Wetherbee and Bernard Wentworth con- 
ducted further intensive studies developing chemo-steri- 
lants for bird control. 

Dr. Wetherbee prepared a manuscript on the ecology, 
land history and natural history of Muskeget Island. This 
has been submitted for possible publication as a book. 

Sparrow Hawk Project 

Mr. Charles Keene was making an extremely interesting 
study of the role of tradition in nest site selection of the 
sparrow hawk. He has erected two hundred nest boxes and 
has had over fifty pairs under observation. Close to one 
hundred sparrow hawks have been banded. 



Black Duck Project 

Mr. John Grandy spent the winter in Cape Cod where] 
he initiated a study on the feeding habits and behavior oft! 
wintering black ducks. He completed vegetation transects' 
and collected some duck-gizzards. This study will be con- 
tinued for the next two years. 

Impoundment Project 

Mr. Harry Heusmann completed a study of the wildlife 
and recreational value of borrow-pits and other wetlands 
caused by highway construction. 

Waterfowl Investigation on the Connecticut River 

Mr. William Rockwell is completing the study of the 
waterfowl population and hunters using that part of the 
Connecticut River flowing through Massachusetts. 

In conjunction with this study he has evaluated the his- 
tory and current acreage of all wetlands in the Valley. 

Ruffed Grouse Studies 

Dr. Brander continued telemetry studies of Ruffed 
Grouse determining the food utilized and the occupied 
cover during the winter. 

Canada Goose Project 

Mr. James Cooper has been working since March at the 
East Meadows Ranch near Delta, Manitoba where he has 
initiated an intensive study of nesting Canada geese. 

This project is a cooperative undertaking financed by 
the Unit and the North American Wildlife Foundation. 

Cooper will continue this study for two more nesting,, 
seasons. 




LANDS AND WATERS ACQUISITION 



1 HE problems encountered almost daily in the adminis- 
tering of an acquisition program encompassing the whole 
state are of little or no interest to the average sportsman. 
His only interest is in the end result and he makes his 
judgement on the success of the program on this basis. Yet 
these problems and details are important and require much 
time, thought and effort. We have yet to make a purchase 
of land which was easy. 

There is always a problem cropping up unexpectedly 
which must be worked out and solved before progress to a 
successful conclusion can be made. The legal department 
of state government is a stern taskmaster and the adminis- 
trative branch unyielding on procedure. This is as it 
should be for the protection of the state, and also for the 
protection of the party conveying to the state. 

Notwithstanding the problems involved, however, prog- 
ress has been made in our long range acquisition program 



to provide an adequate supply, in every section of the state, 
of lands on which to hunt and waters on which to fish. 

Three new wildlife management areas were established 
during the year, one in Conway, one in Lenox and one in. 
Savoy. The Conway Wildlife Management Area contains 
525 acres with more in the process. It is a farm game area: 
consisting of around two hundred acres of cleared land 
used for pasture and mowing and the rest in woodland in 
various stages of development. It is a rolling topography) 
with Poland Brook flowing through and providing a sourc 
of water in the pasture areas. This area has excellent po- 
tential for development as a farm game area and we are 
hopeful of adding more acreage. 

The area in Lenox known as the Housatonic Wildlife 
Management area at present contains approximately 250 
acres and is part of a much larger area owned by other 
public agencies. 



10 



le area is almost flat land sloping gently from west to 
at the river bank with wet swampy land along the 
idering course of the Housatonic River. A good por- 
is open hay and pasture land. More acreage will be 
J — ~^ j n ^g near future. 

The Savoy Wildlife Area consists of over 400 acres, is 

t all wooded and has good potential for future development 
jand management. 

Other Wildlife Management areas to which more 

^acreage was added are as follows: 

'Crane Area — Falmouth 54 acres 

Northeast Area 117 acres 

Chester Area 420 acres 

1 jSquannacook River Area 65 acres 

New Braintree 38 acres 

Marshes along North Shore 38 acres 

J Total acreage actually acquired during the fiscal year was 

|p,514 acres. 

Options were obtained on approximately 1,700 acres in 
the Rocky Gutter section of Middleboro and they are being 
' processed at the present time. The Bureau of Outdoor Rec- 
reation has approved this acquisition and reimbursement 



of one half the total cost is anticipated from this agency. 
This will be the first time that this division will receive 
funds from this Agency. 

The Hampden County Council of Sportsmen's Clubs 
were very generous in giving to the division approximately 
80 acres of land along the East Branch of Westfield River. 
We are most grateful to them and their hard working land 
committee. If only other clubs and Leagues would follow 
suit. All gifts of land, frontage, access points, etc. are most 
welcome and useful for Division purposes. River access 
and roadside parking facilities were acquired on the Quaboag 
River in Warren, on the Squannacook River in Townsend 
and on the East Branch of the Ware River in Paxton. There 
is a great need for acquiring more access and parking areas 
to streams and the Division will make a special effort and 
concentrate on this phase of acquisition. 

As in the past, several parcels of land which were of- 
fered for sale were investigated and in some cases negotia- 
tions were started but never materialized. Cooperation 
from the other sections of the division has been excellent 
and we have also received much help from other state and 
federal agencies for which we are most grateful. 




INFORMATION AND EDUCATION 



1 HE education of adults of today and tomorrow in the 
wise use of out natural resources and the information of 
the general public in the ways and means of their fish and 
game division continues to be the goal of the information 
and education section. 

Of particular interest to those who provide its revenue, 
the license buying hunters, fishermen and trappers of Mas- 
sachusetts, and non-resident license buyers as well, the Di- 
vision regularly furnishes complete and detailed reports of 
its activities through its information program. A detailed 
and complete listing of the Division's receipts and expendi- 
tures is also publicly available to any person interested 
enough to get on the free mailing list and/or ask for specif- 
ic information on any program conducted by the Division. 

Many members of the agency attended countless meet- 
ings or various organizations during the fiscal year to dis- 
cuss Division programs and policies. 

Frequent news releases attempt to keep the public well- 
informed through the media of newspapers, radio, televi- 
sion and magazines. Pertinent new releases are issued not 
only by the information-education section, but also by the 
wildlife district personnel as well, for specific programs 
within their geographic scope of operations. 

Circulation of the Division's official magazine, MASS- 
ACHUSETTS WILDLIFE, continued throughout the year, 



with circulation at a figure of 41,000 at year's end. Earlier 
plans to expand the magazine and change to a fee system 
were stalled by lack of the necessary legislation. 

The Division's free loan film library reached an all-time 
low in distribution of films for viewing by various organi- 
zations and groups. Budgetary requests for monies to both 
maintain present film stocks and to acquire needed new 
films and equipment continue to be severely chopped out 
each year. Wear and tear of existing films has taken a heavy 
toll, with several films having to be retired from the active 
list. 

Several sportsmen's shows and fairs throughout the state 
featured exhibits put on by the Division, through the efforts 
of district personnel and the information-education section. 
Highlights of the year's exhibits was the display of live fish, 
trout and several warm-water species, at the annual New 
England Sportsmen's Show held at the War Memorial Au- 
ditorium of the Prudential Center in Boston. 

The Division continued to serve the youth of the Com- 
monwealth through its efforts in conducting the annual Ju- 
nior Conservation Camp, held at the Worcester County 4-H 
Center at Thompson's Pond in Spencer. 

During the fiscal year, thousands of letters, requests for 
literature and information, posters, pond maps and other 
Division printing were handled. 



11 



fr 



Financial Report, July 1,1968 To June 30,1969 



HOW THE SPORTSMEN'S DOLLAR WAS SPENT 



ADMIMSIRAHON 

Administration 3304-01 

Board of Fisheries and 

Game 3304-01 

Information-Education . 3304-01 

FISHERIES PROGRAMS 

Fish Hatcheries 3304-42 

Fisheries Management . 3304-42 
— Fish Restoration 

Projects 3304-47 

Fisheries Management . 3304-51 
"Fisheries Research Coop. 

Unit 

"Conn. River Shad 

Study 



SI IS.26S.33 



750.00 S119.OIS.33 A% 

78.944.99 3 r / f 



WILDLIFE PROGRAMS 

Game Farms 

\\ ildlife Management . . 
'Damage by Wild Deer & 

Moose 

Wildlife Research Coop. 

L'nit 

""Wildlife Research 

Restoration 

""Eastern Dove 

Management 

CONSTRUCTION 

"Trout Hatchery, East 

Sandwich 

Charles L. McLaughlin . 
"Trout Hatchery 



3304-55 
3304-62 

3304-51 
3304-51 

3304-41 

3304-44 

3304-53 

3304-64 



3304-43 
3304-63 
7801-01 

7801-02 



14S.3S9.63 



43,635.65 
100,027.85 



10.000.00 
14,176.09 



34S.953.79 



316,229.22 



10% 



— 265,165.25 » c i 

100.027.86 

14,444.55 

7,966.58 

172,431.65 

3,500.00 298,370.64 9 r /t 



9,496.20 
349,166.87 
888,289.15 1,246,952.22 40<7 C 



1020-0200 
1020-0000 



1000-0000 



LAND ACQUISITION* 

LAW ENFORCEMENT 

Public Hunting Grounds 
Conservation Officers 
Salaries and Expenses 
Other - Office of the 

Commissioner 

GRAND TOTAL: . . 

Surplus in Inland Fisheries & Game Fund 
as of June 30, 1969 . . . 

"Continuing Appropriations 
**50 r r Reimbursable by Federal Funds 
*"75 r r Reimbursable by Federal Funds 
"**100 r r Reimbursable by Federal Funds 



270,445.28 



11,070.00 
185,536.00 



2,522.00 199,128.00 6 r /c 

$3,143,207.72 100 r /r 



$816,988.85 



APPROPRIATIONS & EXPENDITURES 

Expenditures & 



Account No. & Title 


Appropriation 


Liabilities 


Reverted 


3304-01 Administration 


$ 203,760.00 


$ 197,963.32 


$ 5,796.68 


3304-42 Fisheries 










Management .... 


513,233.00 


497,343.42 


15,889.58 


""3304-47 1 '■ i !'•■ .i.ii.i 










Projects 


49,585.00 


43,635.65 


5,949.35 


3304-51 • . i J.J 1 1 i l 










Management .... 


485,250.00 


465,220.96 


20,029.04 


"•3304-53 !.!h. 










Restoration 


181,405.00 


172,431.65 


8,973.35 


"3304-62 Connecticut River 










Shad Study 


14,300.00 


14,176.09 


123.91 


3304-63 Construction, 










Quabbin 


349,166.87 


349,166.87 


0.— 




(Additional Funds) 








"•3304-64 Eastern Dove 










Management .... 


3,500.00 


3,500.00 


0.— 




$1,800,199.87 


$1,743,437.96 


$ 56,761.91 






Continuing 




Balance 






Appropriation. 


Expenditures Forward 


3304-41 


Damage by Wild Deer 










and Moose 


17,875.43 


14,444.55 


3,430.88 


3304-43 


Cert. Construction & 










Improvements Trout Hatchery, 








East Sandwich . . . 


56,659.48 


9,496.20 


47,163.28 


3304-60 


Acquisition Land & 
Waters for Fish 
& Wildlife 
Management 










Purposes 


50,000.00 




50,000.00 


7801-01 


Construction Quabbin 










Fish Hatchery . . . 


888,327.61 


888,289.15 


38.46 


7801-02 


Land & Waters for 
Fish & Wildlife 
Management 










Purposes 


378,749.78 


270,445.28 


108,304.50 


7802-01 


Land & Water 
Acquisition and 










Development 


1 ,000,000.00 


— 


1,000,000.00 




$2,391,612.30 


51,182,675.18 


$1,208,937.12 



"50% Reimbursed Federal Funds 

***75% Reimbursed Federal Funds 

""IM'i Reimbursed Federal Funds 



SUMMARY OF FISH AND GAME INCOME 

Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses. . 1,548, 809. 50 :S 
Special Licenses, Trap Registrations, Tags 

and Alien Gun Permits 7,081.25* 

Rents 3,505.50 

Misc. Sales 9,622.98 

Mass. Mourning Dove Reimbursement. . 3,500.00 

Pittman-Robertson Federal Aid 81,909.66 

Dingell-Johnson Federal Aid 60,515.61 

Anadromous Fish Projects Federal Aid . 6,307.69 

B. O. R. Reimbursement 30,000.00 

Court Fines 9,809.00 

Archery Stamps 4,140.70 

Refunds, Prior Year 693.45 

$1,765,895.34 
*See Detail Sheet No. 1 
**See Detail Sheet No. 2 

ANALYSIS OF SPECIAL LICENSES 






TYPE OF LICENSE NUM 
TRAP REGISTRATIONS: 


BER ISSUED 

94 
333 

21 
3 

72 

18 
187 

5 
83 

82 
369 

5 

85 

404 

35 
71 

. . 175 
4 

25 

49 

10 

2,250 

800 

3,940 

23,250 

1 

43 

30 


RECEIPTS 

$ 94.00 


FUR BUYERS: 


327.75 
210.00 




300.00 


TAXIDERMIST: . 


360.00 


PROPAGATORS: 

(Special Fish) 


90.00 


Renewal 

(Fish) 


540.00 
25.00 


Renewal 

(Birds & Mammals) 


249.00 
410.00 


Renewal 

(Dealers) 


1,104.50 
25.00 


Renewal 


255.00 
404.00 


(lnd. Bird or Mammal) 


34.50 


SHINERS FOR BAIT: 


35.50 
875.00 


FIELD TRIAL LICENSES: 


40.00 


QUAIL FOR TRAINING DOGS: 


125.00 


Renewal 

COMMERCIAL SHOOTING PRESERVES: 

Tags 

Posters 

Game Tags 


147.00 
500.00 

582.00 


TRAPPING CERTAIN BIRDS: 


5.00 


MOUNTING PERMITS: 


43.00 


SPECIAL FIELD TRIAL PERMITS: 


300.00 
$7,081.25 



RULES AND REGULATIONS 

RULES AND REGULATIONS PROMULGATED BY THE 
DIRECTOR OF FISHERIES AND GAME DURING FISCAL 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1969: 

April 11, 1969 Rules and regulations relating to the hunting of 
Pheasants, Quail and Ruffed Grouse in Massachusetts (per- 
taining to Youth Upland Game Training). 

May 29, 1969 Rules and regulations relating to the hunting and 
trapping of mammals in Massachusetts. 

In accordance with the authority vested in me by Section 5, 
Chapter 131, of the General Laws, as most recently amended 
by Chapter 802, Acts of 1967, and subject to the regulations 
hereinafter prescribed, I hereby declare an annual open season 
for the hunting and trapping of mammals as follows: 

A. Black bear may be hunted from October 20 to the follow- 
ing December 3 1. 

B. Mink, otter, and muskrat may be taken by trapping only 
from November 1 to the following March 1. 



12 



C. Opossum and raccoons may be hunted, except as provided 
in Section 70 of Chapter 131 of the General Laws and ex- 
cept as provided by Rules and Regulations relative to the 
hunting of deer in Massachusetts promulgated by the 
Director of Fisheries and Game, with or without the use of 
dogs from September 20 to the following December 31. 

D. Opossum and raccoons may be trapped from November 1 
to the following March 1. 

E. All mammals not herein mentioned except other mammals 
specifically protected by other laws or rules and regulations 
in Chapter 131 may be trapped from November 1 to the 
following March 1 and subject to existing laws may be 
hunted from January 1 to December 31. 

F. Beaver may be trapped from December 15 through March 
1 throughout the Commonwealth except on state forest 
sanctuaries, provided the pelts of all beaver lawfully 
trapped shall not be sold or otherwise disposed of until 
they are first brought to a designated representative of the 
Division of Fisheries and Game and tagged with a metal 
tag by said representative. All pelts must be tagged within 
two days after the closing day of the open season. 

In the foregoing provisions for open seasons, opening and clos- 
ing dates are inclusive. 

During the period from sunset of one day to sunset of the fol- 
lowing day, a person shall not hunt or take by hunting more 
than three raccoons, nor shall two or more persons hunting in 
one party kill or take more than six raccoons. 
In the foregoing provisions the word "hunt" in all its moods 
and tenses shall be construed so as to exclude the use of traps. 
A person shall not remove or attempt to remove a raccoon 
from any hole in the ground, stonewall, from within any ledge, 
or from under any stone, or from any hole in any log or tree. 

5. A person shall not kill or take more than one black bear. 

6. Except as otherwise provided in Chapter 131 of the General 
Laws, as amended, it shall be unlawful for any person: 

a. To have in his possession the green pelt of any fur-bearing 
mammal or any part of such pelt except during the open sea- 
son for such mammal and for ten days thereafter. 

b. To possess or have under his control a trap on the land of 
another where fur-bearing mammals might be found be- 
tween April 16 of any year and six o'clock ante meridian on 
the following November first, both dates inclusive. 

c. At any time to possess or have under control an unregistered 
trap on the land of another where fur-bearing mammals 
might be found. 

d. To possess or have under his control unless duly authorized 
as provided in clause "m" the registered trap of another. 

e. To trap on the enclosed land of another or on land posted as 
provided in section one hundred, without the written con- 
sent of the owner or occupant of such land. 

f. To trap in a public way, car road, or path commonly used as 
a passageway for human beings or domestic animals. 

g. To trap within ten feet of the waterline of a muskrat or bea- 
ver house. 

h. To tear open, disturb, or destroy a muskrat house, beaver 
house, or beaver dam. 

i. To trap with a steel or jaw trap, or a dead fall trap with a 
spread of more than six inches, or a "stop-thief trap, or a 
dead fall trap with an opening of more than six inches, or a 
choke trap, or a trap with teeth on one or both jaws, or a 
trap of the "conibear" type unless such trap is completely 
submerged in water, or a trap with two sets of jaws either set 
of which has a spread of more than six inches, or a combina- 
tion of one set of jaws of one size and another set of jaws of 
another size, one jaw of which is stationary and one free 
moving, or one or all jaws free moving with a spread of 
more than six inches, or a trap capable of taking more than 
one mammal at a time, except that beaver only may be tak- 
en by traps having a jaw spread of not less than five inches 
or more than seven and one-half inches or by a "conibear" 
type trap of any size if such trap is completely submerged in 
water. Nothing in this clause shall be deemed to prohibit the 
use of a stop-loss trap, so-called, having one movable arm 
attached, the purpose of which being to prevent an animal 






caught therein from gnawing his foot or leg. For the purpose 
of this clause, in determining the jaw spread of a trap, it 
shall be measured midway across the open jaws at right an- 
gles to the hinges from the extreme outside edges. 

j. To trap before six o'clock ante meridian on the opening day 
of any trapping season. 

k. To fail to visit at least once in each calendar day between 
the hours of four o'clock ante meridian and ten o'clock post 
meridian, all traps by him staked out, set, used, tended, 
laced, or maintained except that under the ice sets for bea- 
ver shall be visited at least once in each forty-eight hour 
period. 

1. To destroy, mutilate, or spring the trap of another. 

m. To take any fur-bearing mammal or predator from the trap 
of another unless he has upon his person a specific written 
authorization to do so, signed by the owner of such trap. 
The owner of traps may give such authorization to any per- 
son licensed to trap under this chapter for a period not to ex- 
ceed one week from the day he himself last tended his traps 
provided that notice of the giving of such authorization in- 
cluding the name and trapping license number of the person 
so authorized shall be given to the district natural resource 
officer and to the director within twenty-four hours after the 
same has been given. 

n. To set, use, place, locate, tend, or maintain a trap not bear- 
ing the name of the person or persons using the same in such 
a manner that it shall be legible at all times. 

o. Any trap set in violation of law shall be forfeited to the Com- 
monwealth by any officer empowered to enforce this chapter 
and shall be disposed of by the director in the best interests 
of the Commonwealth. 

7. If any part, section, or sub-division of these rules and regula- 
tions or the application thereof shall be held invalid, unconsti- 
tutional, or inoperative as to any particular person, persons, or 
conditions, the remainder hereof of the application of any such 
part, section, or subdivision to other persons and conditions 
shall not be affected thereby. 

8. Rules and regulations relating to the hunting and trapping of 
mammals which were promulgated on April 8, 1968 are hereby 
revoked and superseded by the foregoing. 

9. These rules and regulations shall become effective on July 1, 
1969 and shall remain in effect until amended or revoked. 

LEGISLATION 

The following laws affecting the Division of Fisheries and Game 

were enacted during the legislative session of 1969: 

Chapter 652 — An act exempting paraplegics from payment of a fee 
for a hunting license. 

Chapter 157 — An act further regulating the wearing of hunting 
clothes during the open deer season — deer hunters are now re- 
quired to wear a minimum of 400 square inches of hunter or- 
ange material. 

Chapter 757 — An act authorizing the Division of Fisheries and 
Game to exchange certain land in Barnstable County for other 
land of equal value — lands in question are these transferred to 
the Division of Fisheries and Game but requires eminent do- 
main authorization to clear title of the land. 

Chapter 566 — An act designating the Director of Fisheries and 
Game as a member of the Water Resource Commission and 
providing for the appointment by the Governor of an addition- 
al member of said commission. 

Chapter 17 — An act reducing the fee for the issuence of a nonresi- 
dent and alien Fur Buyer's license from $100.00 to $20.00 per 
year. 

Chapter 542 — An act authorizing the Division of Fisheries and 
Game to acquire land and construct a fishing pier at Cook 
Pond in the city of Fall River. 

Chapter 566 — An act authorizing the Director of Fisheries and 
Game to undertake a program of management to provide sport 
fishing at Cook Pond in the city of Fall River. 

Chapter I 1 — Resolve providing for an investigation and study by 
the Division of Fisheries and Game relative to constructing fish 
ladders on the obstructions in the Little River and Westfield 
River. 






STANDING ALL-TIME MASSACHUSETTS FRESHWATER FISHING RECORDS 

THROUGH JUNE 30, 1969 



Species Weight 



Length Girth 



24 lbs. 8 oz. 45 Vi" 22" 
9 lbs. 5 oz. 29V4" 



Largo mouth Bass 12 lbs. I oz. 25%' 

SmaJlmouth Bass 6 lbs. 12 oz. 2I" 
Northern Pike 
Pickerel 

Rainbow Trout 8 lbs. 4 oz. 26" 

Brown Trout 19 lbs. 10 oz. 3 1 '/2 " 

Lake Trout 13 lbs. 1 oz. 31" 

Shad 7 lbs. 10 oz. 25 V 2 " 

Channel Catfish 13 lbs. 8 oz. 30" 



Walleye 



9 lbs.. 3 oz. 



2 1 % 



16" 
>2% ' 

l9'/2' 

19" 



Bluegill 


1 lb. 




1 1 Va " 


9'/2 


Bullhead 


5 lbs. 


9 oz. 


22 W 


IP/2 




5 lbs. 


8 oz. 


22 Vi" 


14" 




4 lbs. 


9 oz. 


22 Vi" 


IIV2 


Calico 


2 lbs. 


9'/2 0z. 


18" 


14" 


White Perch 


2 lbs. 


4 oz. 


16%" 


11% 




2 lbs. 




16%" 


11 '/4 


Yellow Perch 






17'/ 4 " 




Brook Trout 


6 lbs. 


4 oz. 


24" 


14" 



Place Caught 

Palmer River, Rehoboth 
Pleasant Lake, Harwich 
Onota Lake, Pittsfield 
Pontoosuc Lk., Lanesboro 
Deep Pond, Falmouth 
Wachusett Res., Boylston 
Quabbin Res., Pelham 
Indian Head 

Conn. Riv., Turners Falls 
Assawompsett Pond, 
Lakeville 
Bog Pond, Norton 
Conn. Riv., Hadley 
Leverett Pd., Leverett 
Conn. Riv., Chicopee 
Merrimack, Lowell 
Halfway Pd., Plymouth 
Halfway Pd., Plymouth 

Otis Reservoir, Otis 



How Caught 


Date 


bait casting 


5-9-63 


spinning 


5-14-67 


live bait 


1-13-67 


live bait 


-J 

10-15-66 


spinning 


5-19-66 


trolling 


9-13-63 


spinning 


5- -68 


live bait 


7-18-64 


bait casting 




spinning 


10-17-65 


live bait 


6-8-63 


live bait 


8-2-65 


live bait 


9-8-65 


spinning 


6-8-65 


spinning 


6-9-65 


spinning 


6-18-66 




5-10-69 


spinning 


6-24-68 



Caught by 

George Pastick, Fall River 
Thomas Paradise, Arlington 
Kris Ginthwain, Pittsfield 
-54 Mrs. James Martin, Stockbridge 
Roger Walker, Eastondale 
Dana DeBlois, Sterling 
LeeRoy DeHoff, Suffield, Conn. 
William Spaulding, Whitman 
Robert Thibodo, Northampton 
William Spaulding, Whitman 



Robert Barrett, Stoughton 
Mrs. Erna Storie, Chicopee Falls 
Stephen Brozo, No. Amherst 
Joseph Kida, Chicopee 
George Olsson, Lowell 
Richard Rock, Kingston 
Richard Rock, Kingston 
Mathew Sergio, Brockton 
Thomas Laptew, Granville 



RECEIPTS FROM FISHING, HUNTING AND TRAPPING LICENSES 



Licenses 
Series 



1 Res. Cit. Fishing 

2 Res. Cit. Hunting 

3 Res. Cit. Sporting 

4 Res. Cit. Minor Fishing 
4-A Res. Cit. Female Fishing 

5 Res. Cit. Minor Trapping 

6 Res. Cit. Trapping 

7 Non-Res. 7 day Fishing 
9 Non-Res. Fishing 

9-A Alien Fishing 

10 Non-Res. or Alien Hunting 

12 Duplicate Licenses 

15 Res. Cit. Sporting 

17 Res. Cit. (Old Age Asst.) 
Paraplegic and the Blind 

18 Military or Naval 









Fees 










Retained by 


Net 






Gross 


Town Clerk 


Returned 


Price 


Number 


Amount 


Or City 


To State 


(5.25) 


120,302 


631,585.50 


29,837.50 


601,748.00 


(5.25) 


58,969 


309,587.25 


14,640.75 


294,946.50 


(8.25) 


53,610 


442,282.50 


13,276.00 


429,006.50 


(3.25) 


17,758 


57,713.50 


4,420.00 


■53,293.50 


(4.25) 


22,092 


93,891.00 


5,481.50 


88,409.50 


(3.25) 


194 


630.50 


48.25 


582.25 


(8.75) 


498 


4,357.50 


122.25 


4,235.25 


(5.25) 


2,269 


11,912.25 


563.00 


11,349.25 


(9.75) 


2,949 


28,752.75 


724.25 


28,028.50 


(9.75) 


773 


7,536.75 


191.75 


7,345.00 


(16.25 


1,623 


26,373.75 


327.00 


26,046.75 


( .50) 


3,021 


1,510.50 


— 


1,510.50 


(Free) 


19,115 


— 


— 


— 


(Free) 


2,248 


— 


— 


— 


(Free) 


2,309 


— 


— 


— 


307,730 $1,616,133.75 $69,632.25 


$1,546,501.50 




Check Returned Insufficient Funds 


2,308.00 




(Re-deposited) 














$1,548,809.50 



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sJ34JDttbpo»H Pl 3 'd 

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I 







•VERNOR 
■iCIS W. SARGENT 






JAMES M. SHEPARD 
Director 



FISHERIES AND GAME BOARD 

HARRY C. DARLING, Chairman 

East Bridgewater 

BRADLEE E. GAGE, Secretary 

Amherst 

HENRY J. COLOMBO 

Wilmington 

MARTIN H. BURNS 

Newbury 

KENNETH F. BURNS 

Shrewsbury 



STAFF 

JAMES M. SHEPARD 

Director 

RUSSELL A. COOKINGHAM 

Asst. Director 

COLTON H. BRIDGES 

Superintendent 

E. MICHAEL POLLACK 

Chief Game Biologist 

WARREN W. BLANDIN 

'ildlife Research 

LOUIS H. CARUFEL 

9f Aquatic Biologist 

RALPH R. BITZER 

Culturist 

HARD CRONIN 

d Education 

D H JOHNSON 



MGRS. 

S.E: 






COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETt 

Division of Fisheries and Game t 
105th Annual Report 



His Excellency, Francis W. Sargent, Governor of the Com- 
monwealth, the Executive Council, the General Court, and 
the Board of Fisheries and Game: 
Gentlemen: 

I have the honor to submit herewith the One Hundred 
and Fifth Annual Report of the Division of Fisheries and 
Game, covering the fiscal year from July 1, 1969 to June 
30, 1970. 

I commend to your attention the very real diversity of 
public service to all citizens of the Commonwealth demon- 
strated by this report and respectfully urge your considera- 
tion of the vital necessity for financial augmentation to meet 
increased demands for services and resulting benefits pro- 
vided by these programs. 

_ CTT q Respectfully submitted, 

fATE UB8MW OF MftSSMiHuSUl" James M. Shepard, Director 

NOV 2 1972 

state huuo., .**roN C0NTENTS 

The Board Reports 1 

The Superintendent's Report 3 

mao owvh fisheries Report 6 

The McLaughlin Hatchery — First 365 Days 12 

Sutton Fish Hatchery Sold 14 

Inter-Agency Cooperation Pays Off — Public Benefits 15 

Lands and Waters Acquisition 15 

Cooperation at Westfield Flood Control Area 18 

Legislation 18 

Game 19 

Massachusetts Cooperative Research Unit 23 

District Maintenance of Wildlife Management Areas 24 

Information and Education 25 

Financial Report, July 1, 1969 to June 30, 1970 31 

Standing All-Time Massachusetts Freshwater Fishing 
Records 33 



• THE COVER: Harassed by over-hunting and land 

^clearing, the wild turkey was one of the first game 

species to disappear from Massachusetts. But today, 

with a closed season and cleared land reverting to 

ts natural state, conditions favor a comeback. Im 

1966, the Division took over a restoration program 

from the University of Massachusetts' Cooperative 

Wildlife Unit. Careful research and continued stock- 

~2wj$ing have boosted the state's wild turkey population 

r , ,. from in 1959 to about 175 in the spring of 1970. 

IT i'- (Photo courtesy of Berkshire Eagle). 



Publication of This Document Approved By Alfred C. Holland, State Purchasing Agent 
2M-6-71 -049581 Estimated Cost per Copy $.823 




I 



C73f 
THE BOARD REPORTS fi 7 ° 



THE quality of outdoor recreation dependent on 
our wildlife resources is the primary responsibility 
of this agency. In the past, wildlife management was 
a relatively simple and direct process, but as our 
population explodes, the ecology of this state faces 
a hailstorm of new threats. So at every turn we must 
gear our operation to the particular crises at hand. 

WETLANDS 

The major threat to wildlife is the increasing de- 
struction of habitat. Today, inland and coastal wet- 
lands are perhaps the most valuable land areas we 
have. They are vital to the wildlife of this state, pro- 
viding countless species with food, shelter and nur- 
sery area. Without wetlands trout streams would 
dry up, public water supplies would drop past the 
danger mark, then fill with poisonous salts, and algae 
blooms. Lakes and ponds would be inaccessable, 
girdled with wide bands of cracked mud, and flash 
floods would destroy millions of dollars worth of 
property. Finally, wetlands themselves offer much 
in the way of outdoor recreation, providing the pub- 
lic with untold opportunities for nature study, fishing, 
hunting, boating, etc. 

No one in Massachusetts can afford to lose another 
wetland area regardless of alluring short-term profit. 
Yet, we continue to lose about 3,550 acres of coastal 
and inland wetlands annually. Present regulations 
are stop gap measures and need to be braced up 
quickly if we expect to save the wetlands we have 
left. 



Harry C. Darling, Chairman of the Fish and Game 
Board receives Wildlife Conservationist of the Year 
Award from Chester Spencer, President of the Massa- 
chusetts Wildlife Federation. 








Members of the Board pictured above are: top row, 
left to right — Harry C. Darling, Chairman; Bradlee E. 
Gage, Secretary; bottom row, left to right — Martin 
H. Burns, Kenneth F. Burns, and Henry J. Colombo. 



This past year, citizens of Massachusetts had the 
opportunity to strike a blow for the environment by 
pushing for the one piece of legislation that could 
preserve our wetlands forever. Senate Bill 643 would 
have allowed the Division of Fisheries and Game to 
acquire valuable wetlands using eminent domain pro- 
ceedings if necessary. This legislation seemed to 
be the answer that every conservationist was seeking. 
Yet, despite all the environmental fervor that has 
been sarcastically referred to as the "environmental 
kick," few rose to the occasion and the bill died. 

The number of the bill has now been changed 
to S780 and portions of it have been amended. It 
must pass if we are to preserve the quality outdoor 
recreation Massachusetts citizens enjoy today. 

Every dollar collected from the 1966 license in- 
crease and more has been tunneled into our land 
acquisition program. During fiscal 1967 the Division 
spent 970 of every dollar for land, $1.51 during fiscal 
1968, and 960 during fiscal 1969. This past year (fiscal 
1970) the figure was over $2.00. 

Thus, the dollar invested by the sportsman four 
years ago has paid off in 8,081 acres of well-man- 
aged wildlife habitat — 8,081 acres that will be pre- 
served forever in its natural state and always en- 
joyed by the general public. 

Certainly, the Rocky Gutter acquisition rates as 
the biggest land deal of 1970. The 1,541-acre tract 
contains the natural habitat necessary to support 
most types of wildlife naiive to Massachusetts and 
it is expected that the area will shortly become one 
of the state's best hunting spots. 



RESEARCH 

For 20 years this Division has been a leader in 
wildlife research and management programs and 
many of our biologists are considered experts in their 
fields. Research efforts in all phases of fish and 
wildlife biology are carried out at Westboro Field 
Headquarters. New tools such as air boats, ski mo- 
biles, cannon nets, diving equipment, air craft, com- 
puters, and chemicals make these jobs easier. 

The Division is continuing to update hatcheries 
and game farms, making them more efficient and 
less prone to disease. Certainly, our dramatic suc- 
cess at the McLaughlin Hatchery indicates we're 
on the right path. The fact only eight men were 
able to rear 205,000 pounds of trout attests to the 
efficiency in pool layout and feeding, and the low 
maintenance requirements of this new facility. 

Improvements at Sandwich have continued and 
plans have been made for improvements at Sunder- 
land. 

Advances in game farm production techniques 
have resulted in our being able to predict cock 
pheasant production with a greater degree of accu- 
racy. This has resulted in tremendous savings in 
food and labor costs. 

Research in disease control and the development 
of a forest pheasant is progressing on schedule. 

NEW FIELD HEADQUARTERS 

After 15 years, the Division has outgrown its pres- 
ent field headquarters in Westboro. 

The gift of two buildings and a large tract of land 
contiguous with our present Westboro Wildlife Man- 
agement Area seemed to be the answer to our prob- 
lem. But when the state Bureau of Buildings took a 




For 20 years the Division has been a leader in wild- 
life research and management programs. Here Pro- 
ject Leader Carl Prescott, and Bill Brigham follow up 
the signals from sonic tag in the belly of a Connecti- 
cut River shad. 



professional look at the old structures, we were ad- 
vised that it would be more feasible to build. Plans 
for tearing down the buildings are underway and the 
floor plans for a new facility have already been 
submitted. 




INCOME 

The Board is happy to report that license sales 
and other income have kept pace with inflation. Of 
course, we are realistic enough to realize this can't 
go on forever. With land prices, wages and cost 
of equipment spiraling upward, we will have to begin 
looking for new sources of income in the near future. 
There are many possibilities — help from the General 
Fund, license increases, special permit fees, and 
possibly the sale of trout and pheasant stamps. 

Edward J. Tierney, whose term expired October 
6, 1969, was replaced by Kenneth F. Burns of Shrews- 
bury on February 17, 1970. There were no further 
changes in Board membership during this reporting 
period. 

The Fish and Game Board expresses its sincere 
appreciation to all personnel of the Division for 
their continued exemplary performance, and wishes 
also to express its appreciation to the Governor, 
Executive Council, General Court, and to those other 
departments, agencies, members of public informa- 
tion media and the general public who have assisted 
and supported our programs in the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Harry C. Darling, Chairmai 
Bradlee E. Gage, Secretary 
Henry J. Colombo 
Kenneth F. Burns 
Martin H. Burns 

1 



THE SUPERINTENDENT'S 

REPORT 




Research and Technology 

EACH year this Division faces greater obstacles 
in its efforts to offer high quality outdoor recreation 
to Massachusetts sportsmen. Fiscal 1970 was no 
exception. Hampered by ever-increasing population 
pressures with their accompanying urbanization and 
environmental destruction, we have had to double our 
efforts — straining to stay just one jump ahead of the 
competition. 

America has long since passed the point in her 
social evolution where the sportsman's and the 
general public's interests could be separated. We 
must now take the initiative and lay down a firewall 
against the ecological devastation now raging across 
our state. 

Ironically, the very thing that got us all into this 
mess in the first place — technology — may get 
us out again. A few of the by-products of the age 
of science can be utilized as effective tools for 
restoring at least a fraction of the environmental 
quality this country once enjoyed. For example, the 
completion of the new Charles L. McLaughlin Hatch- 
ery was unquestionably the biggest shot in the arm 
that Massachusetts fishing ever experienced. Our 
original production goal — 200,000 pounds of trout 
— was surpassed the first year. 

Research, made possible by technological advance 
was one of the determining factors in making the 
McLaughlin venture a success. 

Hunters as well as fishermen have benefited from 
new research short cuts. The deer harvest continues 
its upward spiral with a 1969 kill of 2,002 — 612 more 
deer than the year before. This did not happen by 
accident. It is a direct reflection of the condition 
of one of the most thoroughly researched deer herds 
in the United States. Computer analysis has aided 
our biologists immeasurably and is one of the factors 
responsible for the near perfect condition of the 
herd. 

Computers also play a simple but vital role in the 
processing of antlerless permits. The number of per- 
mits issued can be easily regulated from year to 
year, depending on current food and herd conditions. 
The system is perhaps our most valuable manage- 
ment tool. 

Because of rapid expansion the herd is experien- 
cing after two years with the antlerless permit sys- 
tem in effect, the Division was able to increase the 
number of general permits issued for the 1969 sea- 
son, from 2,000 to 4,000. 

Our anadromous fish restoration effort on the 



Connecticut River has been another area dramati- 
cally affected by new research apparatus. Tagging for 
example, can be extremely important in studying 
wildlife movements, survival and other pertinent data. 
Sonic capsules were stuffed into the gullets of a 
number of shad netted on the River by Division 
personnel. Portable and land-based monitors were 
then employed to alert biologists to movements and 
migratory patterns. The system proved to be par- 
ticularly useful in recording the possible routes that 
shad take to bypass obstacles on their upward mi- 
grations. 

Routine tagging of shad taken in Division gill nets 
continued to provide the statistics needed to accu- 
rately estimate populations and determine migratory 
patterns. One shad tagged and released at the Holy- 
oke Power Dam on May 29, 1969 travelled 160 miles 
and was recovered by the Russian trawler Vitebsk on 
August 20. From Murmansk Russia the tag was mail- 
ed to the biological station at St. Andrews, New 
Brunswick and on, through channels, to Fish and 
Game Superintendent Colton Bridges in Westboro. 
The actions of the Russians in this matter received 
world attention and helped foster the spirit of in- 
ternational scientific cooperation that has accom- 
panied the space age. 

Though the Connecticut is still badly polluted, 
clean-up operations have progressed to the point 
where the Division has seen fit to initiate an Atlantic 
salmon restoration program. 

During the month of May, salmon smolts were 
stocked at Crowley's Marina, below the Holyoke 
Dam, for the third year in succession. From the 
initial plant of 5,600 in 1968, numbers of salmon 
stocked increased to 15,300 in 1969, and 54,000 in 
1970. Sharing research and management respon- 
sibilities were the three other Connecticut River 
Valley states — Vermont, New Hampshire and Con- 
necticut — the .Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wild- 
life and the U. S. Bureau of Commercial Fisheries. 

The technological "advance" of electric power 
proved ruinous for the ecology of the Connecticut 
and many other rivers. Although we now possess the 
technical equipment to overcome many of the prob- 
lems, no one is willing to pick up the tab for the fish 
ladders that could carry the shad and salmon back 
to their historic spawning grounds. 







Routine tagging of shad taken in Division gill nets 
continued to provide the statistics needed to accu- 
rately estimate populations, and determine migratory 
patterns. 



On April 24, Fish and Game officials from the 
four states and the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and 
Wildlife met with the Federal Power Commission 
and the various utility companies that control the 
barriers to fish migration on the Connecticut. 

The meeting resulted in no commitments by the 
utility companies. The Holyoke Water Power Com- 
pany maintained that they had done all they intended 
to do at their own expense as far as fish passage 
was concerned at the Holyoke Dam. 

At Turners Falls, the next upstream dam, the 
Western Massachusetts Electric Company asserted 
that fish passage would be incorporated into the dam 
only when determined feasible by the Federal Power 
Commission. 

Further upstream, Northeast Utilities reported that 
they had selected a two-foot per second entrance- 
exit channel at the Northfield Mountain pumped stor- 
age project instead of a lesser velocity recommended 
by four state agencies to minimize fish loss. 

The leap-before-you-look brand of technology con- 
tinues and at the moment, the combined efforts of 
all the conservation agencies in the country can't 
seem to check it. 

The tragedy of our present situation is that envi- 
ronmental exploitation is unnecessary. From an 
economic as well as an aesthetic point of view it is 
nothing less than idiotic. We can have technology 
without environmental decay and progress without 
exploitation if we are willing to pay for the controls 
science offers us. The Massachusetts Division of 
Fisheries and Game is doing everything in its power 
to seek out those controls and apply them where 
they'll do the most good. We have the support of 



many, but that support must be unanimous if we 
are to be successful in preserving the sportsman's 
future and, at the same time, the future of every 
Massachusetts citizen. 

Fish and Game Highlights — Fiscal 1970 

Black Bear . . . 

On October 28, 1969 two bears, believed at the 
time to be on a "drunken toot from apple jack," 
caught the public's eye when they cavorted on a 
hillside bordering a heavily-traveled highway in Flor- 
ida, Mass. To protect the vulnerable pair, Director 
James M. Shepard using emergency regulatory 
powers with the full backing of the Fish and Game 
Board, closed the black bear season. Massachusetts 
bears had stepped up from obscurity and into the 
national headlines. They would not step down for 
the rest of the fiscal year. 

Bear have always been an oddity in Massachu- 
setts, usually stumbled onto by a handful of deer 
hunters out of the many thousands that comb Bay 
State woods each fall. But now interest had been 
kindled and the bear controversy blazed hot through- 
out the winter and into early spring. 

Then on April 7, the five-man Fish and Game 
Board, at the request of Director Shepard, held a 
public hearing in Pittsfield for the convenience of 
those people expressing an interest in bear. 

Division personnel participating in the hearing 
were Assistant Director Russell Cookingham, Super- 
intendent of Research and Management Colton Brid- 
ges, and Winston Saville, Western District Game 
Manager. Other wildlife experts contributing testi- 
mony were Dr. Joseph Larson of the University of 
Massachusetts; two bear biologists from New York 
— Gene McCaffry and Bob Miller — and Massachu- 
setts Natural Resource Officer William Kulish. 

Almost to the man, the 75 sportsmen, conserva- 
tionists and preservationists in attendance favored 
some change in the existing regulations, ranging 
from a five-year moratorium to a shortened season. 

By May 5, the Board had made its decision and 
a news release issued to press and organizations 
on that date read as follows. "This fall, for the 
first time, bears may only be taken for one week — 
November 16 to November 21 — with rifles larger 
than .23 caliber. In addition, hunters must have 
special permits, restrict their hunting to "bear range 
counties" — Berkshire, Hampden, Hampshire, Frank- 
lin and Worcester — and tag and register their kills 
at official checking stations. 

". . . the Division feels confident that its new 
regulation will help protect our present bear popu- 
lation, ensure its continuing growth, and control the 
few animals that may become nuisances. Examina- 
tion of individual specimens is vital to the success 
of any biological survey and the new law will allow 
Division biologists to examine any kill and remove 
portions of it for study. Reports from checking sta- 
tions will also give the Division a yardstick with 
which to measure (and manage) the existing popu- 
lation." 

But the bear story hadn't ended yet and during 
the first week in June three different Massachusetts 
bears made the headlines. The first road kill in the 
state's history occurred on May 27, at 7:15 P.M. on 
the Mass. Pike near Russell. Two hours later another 
bear was struck by a car on the Mohawk Trail four 



miles east of Florida. This one, however, was luckier 
(see Information and Education, page 25) and am- 
bled off into the woods apparently unharmed. 

The following week another bear walked into Flor- 
ida, Massachusetts. Natural Resources officers drug- 
ged and moved the animal but it returned in a few 
days. Division Biologist Jim McDonough was called 
to the scene and destroyed the animal with an over- 
dose of tranquilizer. 

Hunter Orange . . . 

The following specifications were established tor 
defining hunter orange, that bright orange material 
that has reduced Massachusetts hunting accidents 
67 percent. "Hunter orange must be a daylight fluor- 
escent orange with a dominant wave length between 
595 and 605 manometers, excitation purity of not 
less than 85 percent and luminance factor of not 
less than 40 percent. 

Deer hunters were required to wear 400 square 
inches of the material (500 square inches on chest, 
back and head for the 1970 season). Hats were re- 
quired on wildlife management areas. 
Youth Upland Game Hunt . . . 

The first Division-sponsored youth upland game 
hunt for newly-licensed youngsters between the ages 
of 15 and 17, proved to be tremendously successful. 
Total youth participation was 44. Much was learned 
about hunting skills, good sportsmanship and gun 
safety. 

Shepard Appointed Committee Chairman . . . 

On September 11, 1969 Fish and Game Director 
James M. Shepard was appointed Program Commit- 
tee Chairman for the 1970 conference of the Inter- 
national Association of Game, Fish, and Conserva- 
tion Commissioners. Shepard also served on the 
Association's legislative committee for the year fol- 
lowing his appointment. 

Kenneth F. Burns Appointed to the Board . . . 

On February 23, 1970, Kenneth F. Burns of 425 
Grafton St., Shrewsbury — retired Police Chief of that 
town — was appointed to the five-man Fish and 
Game Board by Governor Francis Sargent. Burns 
succeeded Edward J. Tierney of Pittsfield whose 
I term had expired. 

Fresh Water Awards Presentation . . . 

At the ceremony held April 11, 1970 at the Divi- 
sion's new McLaughlin Hatchery in Belchertown, 
Commerce and Development Commissioner Carroll 
P. Sheehan presented awards to new holders of 
Massachusetts fresh water fish records. Two state 
records were broken with a 2-lb. 8-oz. white perch 
caught by Manuel P. Souza of North Dartmouth, and 
a 6-lb. 12-oz. bullhead caught by Gerard Giove, 17, 
of Everett. 

The Massachusetts Fresh Water Awards Program 
is sponsored by Commerce and Development and 
encourages fishing throughout the state. It has also 
proven to be a valuable indicator for fisheries man- 
agement. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Colton H. Bridges, Superintendent 



1 






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Black bear, usually an oddity in Massachusetts, walk- 
ed away with the headlines this year. Below: A teen- 
age hunter and his guide enjoy themselves on the 
first Division-sponsored Youth Upland Game Hunt. 






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FISHERIES 



RESEARCH and management programs of the 
fisheries section during the 1970 fiscal year con- 
tinued to progress under the following categories: 
Anadromous Fish Restoration Programs on Con- 
necticut, Merrimack, North and Palmer Rivers; Cold- 
water Fisheries Inestigations which included studies 
on Quabbin Reservoir, Littleville Reservoir and Onota 
Lake; Warmwater Fisheries Investigations which 
involved water quality, fish population and weed 
control studies, Pesticide Studies, Statewide Devel- 
opment and Propagation. 











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REPORT 



ANADROMOUS FISH RESTORATION PROJECTS 

The restoration of anadromous fish in the Connect- 
icut and Merrimack Rivers is continuing through the 
cooperative efforts of Massachusetts, Vermont, Con- 
necticut, New Hampshire, the Bureau of Sport Fish- 
eries and Wildlife, and National Marine Fisheries 
Service. 

In December of 1969, acting under state statute, 
with full concurrence of the other Connecticut River 
Basin states, the Division issued an order to the 
Holyoke Water Power Company for the construction 
of a fish barrier dam at Holyoke for the purpose 
of eliminating shad mortality and upstream migrant 
delays. The order was subsequently amended to 
suspend, on an indefinite basis, the dates for com- 
pliance in order to allow for informal discussions 
to proceed with the Federal Power Commission. 

An informal hearing was held in Chicopee on April 
19, 1970 and both the fishery interests and the Holy- 
oke Water Power Company maintained original posi- 
tions without compromise. 

The original order isued in December is being 
contested in U. S. District Court, Boston by the 
company. 

Massachusetts has been actively involved in sev- 
eral projects under the 1970 Anadromous Fish Pro- 
gram. This year the four states and Bureau of 
Sport Fisheries and Wildlife collectively stocked ap- 
proximately 53,000 Atlantic salmon smolts in the 
Connecticut River below the Holyoke Dam. In ad- 
dition, 1,095 adult American shad were tagged, rais- 
ing the number to 3,533 shad tagged in the last three 
years. Information gathered from tag returns will 
help in estimating the numbers of shad entering the 
tailwaters of the Holyoke Dam and will also reveal 
some of the migratory habits of shad native to the 
Connecticut River. 

Approximately 3,000,000 eggs were stripped from 
shad below the Holyoke Dam and planted in the 
Nemasket and Merrimack Rivers. Two hundred and 
fifty thousand eggs were planted in the Merrimack 
River below Concord, New Hampshire. This fall 
juvenile shad were present in considerable numbers 
at Garvin Falls, New Hampshire. 

The creel census on shad taken below Holyoke 
Dam indicates a substantial increase in the number 
of fishermen and number of fish caught at Holyoke. 
Creel census studies to measure angler harvest and 
shad utilization were also conducted on the Palmer 
and North Rivers. 




Connecticut River crew nets shad for tagging, below 
Holyoke Dam. Below: Shad carrying sonic tags are 
held in conditioning cage prior to release. 



b**^<^^S 



















SM&^L'H^ 



During the 1969-70 season, 1,830,737 trout weighing 
561.616 pounds were liberated in ponds and streams 
throughout the Commonwealth. 



Investigation of shad movements in the area 
that may be influenced by the Northfield Pumped 
Storage Plant were initiated in 1969-1970. The move- 
ments of 14 sonic-tagged shad were traced above 
and below the plant site. 

COLDWATER FISHERIES INVESTIGATIONS 

During the season from April to October, Quabbin 
Reservoir creel census indicates that 51,981 anglers 
harvested 54,727 fish weighing a total of 42,029 
pounds. These figures represent an increase of nine 
percent in the number of anglers, 20 percent in num- 
ber of fish caught, and 17 percent in total number of 
pounds of fish. However, in general, harvests of 
salmonids remained relatively stable with those of 

1968. The increase in the rainbow trout harvest was 
attributable to the stocking of 20,000 nine-inch plus 
fish in July, 1969. 

A total of 373 landlock salmon were harvested in 

1969. Even though salmon continued to increase 
in the angler harvest, a satisfactory sport fishery 
has yet to be achieved due to less than optimum 
numbers of spring yearling salmon available for 
stocking. Seventy-six percent of the salmon harvest 
originated from the 1967 yearling plant, 24 percent 



from the 1968 releases. No salmon spawning was 
documented on the tributary streams in the fall 
of 1968. 

Lake trout numbers continued to decline. The 
total harvest of lake trout was 1,275 fish. The growth 
rates of the present lake trout population increased. 
The average condition factor (W = KL 3 ) for 1969 was 
0.92 as compared to 0.79 in 1966. Approximately 
22,800 lake trout fingerlings were stocked and 
200,000 eggs were secured for hatching with re- 
sultant fingerlings to be released in Quabbin Re- 
servoir. 

So that the present population could be evaluated, 
no smelt were stocked in Quabbin Reservoir during 
the spring of 1970. Smelt were stocked prior to 1970 
to re-establish a forage base for salmonids. Stom- 
ach analysis of salmonids and other fish taken in 
1969 indicate that smelt are being utilized as food. 
Also, observations of spawning adults, and egg 
masses indicate a rapid re-establishment of smelt. 
The sex ratio of these smelt was 6:1, males to 
females. 



During the season from April to October, 51,981 
Quabbin anglers caught 54,727 fish — 20 percent 
more than the year before. Previous stocking of 
smelt by the Division may have figured into this 
increased harvest. 



8 




In order to alleviate any problems the smelt might 
create at the intakes.the feasibility of a self-cleaning 
screen is being studied by the consulting firm, Camp, 
Oresser and McKee. 

A creel census of Littleville Reservoir was car- 
ied out during the 1969 fishing season. Creel data 
was expanded, with the following results: 13,222 
inglers fished 43,515 hours and harvested 12,020 
rout weighing 2,377 pounds; 232 warmwater fish 
weighing 34 pounds were harvested. Trout made up 
92 percent of the total catch, with brown trout being 
:he most abundant species caught. This was due in 
Dart to the release of 2,000 fin-clipped brown trout 
Df which 72 percent (expanded data) were taken by 
anglers. Total pressure was 158 hours of angling 
per acre that resulted in a harvest of nine pounds 
per acre. 

Efforts to establish a coldwater fishery in Little- 
ville Reservoir probably have been nullified as re- 
contamination of warmwater fishes has occurred. 
Fish population sampling (205 pounds) revealed a 
species composition similar to that prior to re- 
clamation. 

The Kokanee salmon project for Onota Lake con- 
tinued into the third year with a release of 101,000 
fingerling salmon this past spring. These fingerlings 
resulted from the 200,000 Kokanee eggs obtained 
from the Connecticut Board of Fisheries and Game. 
Limited gill netting failed to recover any Kokanee 
salmon, but a more intensive sampling of Onota Lake 
will be initiated. Preliminary indication is that inter- 
specific competition from smelt may preclude Ko- 
kanee salmon establshment in the lake. 

During the past year, work progressed on the 
trout allocation program to the extent of having 
all streams in the state evaluated by District per- 
sonnel as to their relative degree of fishing intensity. 
In addition, all streams were looked at in view of 
the demand for angling that exists within a twenty- 
mile radius. Both of these additional pieces of data 
were incorporated into a computer program which 
is now capable of providing five transformations 
of various factors into a trout stocking figure for 
each individual stream. 

This work will continue to be reviewed with the 
objective of obtaining an equitable trout distribution 
system for our streams. 

The Charles River watershed was sampled at 28 
stations, using rotenone, electro-fishing gear, gill 
nets and a seine. Physical and chemical data were 
collected at each station. There were 4,213 fish 
collected representing 29 species. The fish sample 
by number consisted of 11.7 percent game fish; 31.3 
percent pan fish and 57.0 percent trash or forage 
fish. Of the fourteen species aged, only chain pick- 
erel exhibited growth rate above the. state average. 
The survey data, plus angler checks indicate that 
fish populations are underharvested. 



WARMWATER FISHERIES INVESTIGATION 

Seven jobs are providing data for the management 
of our warmwater fisheries. These deal with forage, 
new species introduction, angling pressure and 
effect of aquatic weed removal on fish. 

In the summer and fall of 1969, the present dis- 
tribution of a previously introduced population of 
land-locked alewives was determined throughout the 



three basins that make up Congamond Lakes. These 
forage fish are now well established and are being 
utilized as food by chain pickerel, brown and rain- 
bow trout. 

Ten walleyed pike were taken by electro-fishing in 
Lake Chauncey during 1969. These fish ranged 
between 16.0 and 25.0 inches in length and 1.5 to 
5.6 pounds in weight. No evidence of the 1968, 
1967 and 1966 year classes of walleye fry stocked 
in the spring of those years was discovered. 

Northern pike population samples from Brimfield 
and Cheshire Reservoirs were made with electro- 
fishing gear in the fall of 1969. One seven-inch north- 
ern was collected from Cheshire and none were 
collected from Brimfield. 

During the winter of 1969-70 an ice fisherman creel 
census carried out at both locations listed 38 north- 
ern pike between 9 and 33 inches caught in Cheshire, 
but none in Brimfield. It was concluded that the 
Brimfield introduction failed. 

An estimate of warmwater fishes harvested from 
Quabbin Reservoir showed the average length of 
largemouth bass checked to be 18.2 inches; small- 
mouth bass averaged 17.1 inches and chain pickerel 
22.5 inches. 

Emergent vegetation in Little Chauncey Pond, 
Northboro was treated with a pelleted form of 2, 4-D 
and 2, 4, 5-T. Fish population samples were taken 
before and after application. These samples, plus 



TROUT DISTRIBUTION FROM STATE 
AND FEDERAL HATCHERIES 

July 1, 1969 to June 30, 1970 

Brooks Browns Rainbows Total 

6 inches plus 6 inches plus 6 inches plus State Trout 

341,484 77,266 835,991 1,254,661 

Total Trout Distribution 

6 to 9 inches 881,925 

Total Trout Distribution 

9 inches plus 372,736 

Total Federal Trout 

Distribution 6 inches 

plus 88,294 

Total Catchables 

(6 inches plus) 1,342,955 

(6 inches minus) 576,076 

1,919,031 



STATION POUNDAGE 

Total lbs. 
Station: 

McLaughlin Hatchery 206,102 

Montague Hatchery 85,203 

Palmer Hatchery 10,800 

Sandwich Hatchery 117,042 

Sunderland Hatchery 142,469 

Total State Poundage 561,616 

North Attleboro 20,353 

Nashua, New Hampshire 6,950 

Total Federal Poundage 27,303 

Grand Total 588,919 

This table includes trout stocked in reclaimed waters. 
It does not include those retained for brood stock. 







Stream improvement by Boy Scouts and members 
Camp helps the Division provide quality trout fishing. 



visual observation of the effect of these chem- 
icals indicated that it eliminated emergent aquatic 
vegetation with no observed negative effects upon 
fish or animal life present in the pond. Similar re- 
sults were obtained from eight other ponds pre- 
viously treated for aquatic weeds by the Massachu- 
setts Division of Forests and Parks. Post treat- 
ment fish population samples revealed presence of 
typical populations of warmwater fishes in each pond 
except Stearns Pond in North Andover which was 
almost devoid of fish life. 

The relationship between water quality, basic fer- 
tility and standing crop could not be statistically 
analyzed in six ponds because of the wide ranges 
in variability, and limited sample size. 



Water quality background data is available on ap- 
proximately 125 Massachusetts waters. Work was 
to compile the data and analyze it for 
evaluation in terms of pond fertility, 
be anticipated from this computerized 
indexing of chemical data on 
(2) storage and retrieval of 



undertaken 

subsequent 

Benefits to 

data processing are: (1 

Massachusetts waters, 



information for ready accessibility in many desired 
combinations. 

Library material was screened and a questionnaire 
circulated to initiate a study that is expected to re- 
veal possibilities of edaphic alterations to favor fish 
production. Fertilization of lakes and ponds is not 
practical for Massachusetts water. However, liming 
appears to hold promise for waters of low fertility. 



10 



I 



PESTICIDES 

The Federal Water Pollution Control Administra- 
tion had been financially supporting the Massachu- 
setts Pesticide Monitoring Study over the past four 
years with a demonstration grant. In June of 1969, 
the FWPCA informed the Division of Fisheries and 
Game that the grant would terminate in January of 
1970, and in the interim the funds would be de- 
creased one-half and no additional research would 
be conducted. During the ensuing seven-month 
period, the results of the past four years of statewide 
pesticide monitoring were compiled and re-analysis 
of a representative fish from each of the 75 sampling 
stations revealed the presence of polychlorinated 
biphenyls. 

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's) are plasticizers 
used in the manufacturing of various products and 
have been identified in eleven of the seventy-five 
stations that were monitored in 1968. 

In February, 1970, the Massachusetts Division of 
Water Pollution Control awarded a $132,000 research 
grant to the Division of Fisheries and Game to con- 
tinue and expand the monitoring of major watersheds 
in the Commonwealth. 

During the twelve-month period, June 1969 through 
July 1970, the pesticide laboratory analyzed 107 
samples for pesticides and PCB's. Among these 
samples, 13 fish represented various fish kills, 17 
birds were analyzed for the Massachusetts Audubon 
Society and 75 fish were re-analyzed for the mon- 
itoring program. In addition, various other analyses 
were conducted in relation to the projects. Full co- 
operation was given to the Massachusetts Pesticide 
Board in formulating regulations on the use and 
application of hard pesticides. 



STATEWIDE DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS 

During 1969, maintenance and development of 
roads for fishermen access on the Squannacook 
River, Birch Hill Area, Westville Area and Swift River 
were continued. A boat ramp was constructed at 
Mascopic Lake with the assistance of the towns of 
Dracut and Tyngsboro. Debris jams were removed 
from the Squannacook River to create more acces- 
sible water for fishing through wading and canoeing. 

Also under the development project four ponds 
totaling 154 surface acres were reclaimed for trout 
and warmwater management. The following ponds 
were treated: Flax Pond and Higgins Pond, Brewster; 
Hathaway Pond, Barstable; and Stiles Pond, Boxford. 



FISH PROPAGATION ACTIVITIES 

Maintenance of two warmwater fish culture pond 
systems continued. Chain pickerel weighing a total 
of 205.6 pounds and largemouth bass weighing a 
total of 514 pounds were produced and stocked from 
the Merrill Pond system, Sutton. Five hundred and 
forty-one pounds of smallmouth bass and 317 pounds 
of largemouth bass were produced and stocked from 
the Harold Parker System, North Andover. 

During 1969-1970, 1,830,737 trout or 561,616 
pounds of fish were liberated in ponds and streams 
throughout the Commonwealth. An additional 88,294 
trout or 27,303 pounds were received from the Bureau 
of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife for stocking in Mass- 
achusetts. 



Palmer Hatchery was taken out of trout production 
and converted into an experimental salmon hatching 
and rearing station. The objectives are to provide 
smolts and yearling Atlantic salmon (sea-run and 
land-locked), Kokanee salmon, lake trout and 
other salmonoids for stocking the Connecticut River, 
Quabbin Reservoir and other experimental state 
waters. 

The McLaughlin Hatchery attained the anticipated 
trout production goal of 200,000 pounds for 1969- 
1970. Brook and brown trout culture were instituted 
for the first time at this station. 

Trout nutrition experiments are still in progress. 
Disease monitoring and proper treatment if neces- 
sary, were undertaken at state hatcheries. 

MASSACHUSETTS COOPERATIVE FISHERIES 
RESEARCH UNIT 

The following projects funded in part by the Di- 
vision of Fisheries and Game have been worked on 
by the Cooperative Unit in the past year: 

Connecticut River Shad Projects: 

Work continued on the Embryology of the Amer- 
ican Shad in the Connecticut River under various 
water temperatures. Spawning sites were tested 
based on meter net collections using "known aged 
eggs", and ways to improve shad fecundity were 
investigated. 

Studies are also being conducted on the migra- 
tion and behavior of the American Shad as affected 
by environmental parameters in the Connecticut 
River. 

The study on the distribution and abundance of 
juvenile shad in the Connecticut River above the 
Holyoke Dam, Massachusetts includes estimates of 
population size, mortality rate, migration time above 
the dam, as well as the patterns, controlling factors 
and time of migration for both adult and juvenile shad. 

Studies were completed on the relationship of 
available flora and fauna to the actual food intake 
of juvenile American shad in the Connecticut River. 
Also, the river between Holyoke and Turners Falls 
dam was assessed for its nursery potential. 

Blueback Herring Project: 

Studies on the life history aspect of the blueback 
herring in the Connecticut River are still being con- 
ducted. These fish, along with American shad, have 
passed over the Holyoke Dam since 1955. Approxi- 
mately 10,000 blueback herring were lifted over the 
structure in 1969. 

Creel Survey Design Project: 

An evaluation of the creel survey design used on 
Quabbin Reservoir has been recently completed. The 
study revealed that the creel survey design employed 
by the Division of Fisheries and Game is suitable for 
Quabbin Reservoir. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Louis H. Carufel 

Chief Aquatic Biologist 



11 






^Hi 




The McLaughlin Hatchery 
First 365 Days 



The McLaughlin Hatchery, the biggest single financial 
venture ever undertaken in the history of the Massa- 
chusetts Division of Fisheries and Game, was com- 
pleted March 1, 1969. The installation was built at a 
cost of $1.5 million, financed by bond money, to be 
paid back through revenues derived from Fish and 
Game licenses. 



Fish and Game administrators realized as far back 
as the early 50's that Massachusetts trout hatchery 
facilities were not adequate in size or numbers to 
produce trout in needed quantities. Charles L. Mc- 
Laughlin, Director of the Division during the late 50's 
and early 60's, first conceived the idea of the new 
hatchery and determined an approximate location. 
However, with his death in 1963, tentative plans dis- 
integrated. Initial planning was started once again 
under the administration of our present Director, 
James M. Shepard, and ground breaking took place 
in November of 1967. Sixteen months later, the hatch- 
ery was completed. 

Because of the availability of disease-free, high- 
quality eggs, rainbows were chosen for the first year 
of rearing. Rainbow trout can also be cultured suc- 
cessfully in a wider range of conditions that might 
occur in the operation of a new, untested hatchery. 
The first year was needed to evaluate the many vari- 
able conditions such as water quality, temperature, 
growth rates and other parameters of hatchery opera- 
tion that determine management procedures. 

Production started February 15, with the- reception of 
eyed eggs from a commercial hatchery in the state 
of Washington. In the past, other state hatcheries had 
found these eggs to be of a superior strain. 



Also, during the spring of 1969, about 85,000 year-old, 
disease-free rainbows were brought in from the Berk- 
shire Hatchery which was being phased out by the 
state. About 25,000 were earmarked for the Swift River 
and Quabbin Reservoir. This was a precautionary 
measure to prevent disease from other hatcheries 
from contaminating McLaughlin's water supply. The 
remaining 60,000 fish were to be held over for two- 
year-olds and stocked in the spring of 1970. 

Thus, by late spring of 1969, the hatchery contained 
80,000 yearlings and about 500,000 fingerlings, all 
rainbows. At this time the Division thought that at 
least two years would be required to fill the almost 
two miles of concrete rearing tanks with trout. 

The summer of 1969 proved that all speculations on 
growth were gross underestimates. The many com- 
plex factors that are necessary to efficiently produce 
trout — water quality, temperature, good hatchery 
design, nutrition and type and strain of fish — all 
began to dove-tail, indicating a successful and well- 
coordinated operation. 

By the fall of 1969, all of the 200 eight-by 50-foot 
rearing tanks were filled with rainbow trout. By the 
end of October, just eight months after hatching, the 



12 



fingerlings were averaging seven inches and better. 
The yearlings were well up in the 12-to 15-inch class. 

The hatchery was designed to produce 200,000 
pounds of trout on an annual basis but in the very first 
year of operation this goal was surpassed. 

Presently 400,000 rainbows and 55,000 browns are 
being raised for spring stocking in 1971. 

Although trout production is of course the primary 
purpose of a hatchery, public relation work through 
the accommodation of visitors can be a bonus benefit 
to fishing. Since the beginning of operation, the 
interest shown by people visiting the installation has 
been astonishing. If this interest continues, enlarged 
visitor facilities such as larger parking areas, perma- 



nent tour-guide personnel and audio-visual equip- 
ment, will be needed. It might be noted that a large 
percentage of the visitors are not license buyers, and 
therefore do not finance our program. Since Fish and 
Game is funded through license sales, visitors gain a 
great deal of knowledge and enjoyment solely at 
the expense of the sportsman. But decidedly, the 
investment is a sound one, for the future of fishing 
all over the state is in the hands of the general public 
— not just sportsmen. 

In summation, the first year of production would cer- 
tainly suggest that the McLaughlin Hatchery will add 
greatly in providing the needed trout to the manage- 
ment program in Massachusetts. It would also appear 
that stockable trout, will be produced at a lower cost 
and therefore offer the license buyer greater returns 
on his invested capital. 



^ 




13 



"Slfc if*' 



4& I ----- 




SUTTON FISH HATCHERY 



The Division sold its oldest hatchery to the Town of 
Sutton on March 10, 1970 due to critical water short- 
age. The Sutton Hatchery, which at one time served 
as a combination game farm — fish rearing facility, 
was purchased in the late 1800's. It operated 
until 1967. 

Water problems at Sutton have hampered fish rearing 
efforts for years. The hatchery was closed during 
World War II and when we reopened it in April of 
1946, water was scarcer than ever. In our annual 
report for that fiscal year we reported: "A gas shovel 
was hired to deepen the brook beginning on the 
hatchery property and extending up the brook to the 
source of headwaters. An attempt was also made to 
drive artesian wells but without success." 

In the years that followed expanding gravel pits in 
the immediate vicinity of the hatchery (see picture 
on right) disrupted local hydrology and compounded 
the water crisis. 

In addition to the Sutton Hatchery, two more facilities 
were phased out of trout production. These were 
Palmer Hachery (now devoted to salmon) and Berk- 
shire Hatchery (returned to the Federal government). 
The slack was taken up by the new Charles L. Mc- 
Laughlin Hatchery in Belchertown. Although the three 
hatcheries together employed two more men than 
McLaughlin, their combined output was only 30 per- 
cent of McLaughlin's present production. 



fy 




14 




LANDS AND WA TERS 
ACQUISITION 



IT is, for some reason, customary to elaborate on 
highlights in an annual report. However, in this case 
one or two acquisitions would be discussed at great 
length while the others would be reported with little 
or no discussion. 

The Division's acquisition program is predicated 
on the theory that every acquisition is important and 
will be beneficial to our sportsmen. Each proposed 
purchase is reviewed and thoroughly discussed by 



a land committee, the Director and the Board before 
final action is taken. This procedure is followed in 
all proposed acquisitions, whether they be for five 
acres or five hundred acres. 

Based on the size and location, the Rocky Gut- 
ter acquisition in Middleboro would have to be 
considered as one of the most important ones worked 
on in the past year. This purchase was for 1,541 
acres, with an additional 150 acres under option. 



INTER-AGENCY COOPERATION PAYS OFF - 
PUBLIC BENEFITS 

BUCK Hill Pond, a ten-acre, warm-water pond 
built by the U. S. Soil Conservation Service within 
the Buck Hill Conservation Center in Spencer, has 
received a stocking of several hundred fish of eight 
different species. Game Manager Robert Corrinet of 
the Central Wildlife District, Mass. Division of Fish- 
eries and Game, and technicians Walter Dauderis, 
Roscoe Bicknell and John Bicknell, working with 
Division of Forests and Parks personnel under the 
direction of Dann Colburn, successfully netted fish 
from Eames Pond in Paxton and transported them 
to the conservation pond. Eames Pond is being 
drained by Forests and Parks in preparation for re- 
pairs to the dam. 

The stocking will provide excellent fishing at Buck 
Hill since most of the fish are adults of substantial 
size including many trophy-sized pickerel, bullheads 
and crappies. This is the second stocking of fish 
made by the Division here. The numbers and variety 
of fish introduced are expected to meet all the 
immediate demands for fishing and should furnish 
plenty of breeding stock for reproductive purposes. 
Good recreational fishing is not the sole objective 
of fisheries management at Buck Hill Pond, however. 



The release of a large variety of species has been 
deliberate in order to provide optimum opportunities 
for fish identification, discussion of good and poor 
fisheries management practices, successful fishing 
techniques and other educational purposes. 

Paul Mugford, Central District Wildlife Manager, 
had high praise for the Buck Hill Conservation Cen- 
ter, a 70-acre conservation-demonstration area off 
McCormick Road, Spencer. Mugford said, "It is 
within easy walking distance of the Massachusetts 
Junior Conservation Camp and is owned by the 
Worcester County 4-H Center, Inc. Planning and 
development of the center is a classic example of 
inter-agency cooperation. Participating state, Fed- 
eral, and regional agencies include: theU. S. Soil 
Conservation Service, Agricultural Stabilization and 
Conservation Service, Massachusetts Division of 
Fisheries and Game, Massachusetts Division of For- 
ests and Parks, U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 
Worcester County Extension Service, Worcester 
County Conservation Districts, University of Massa- 
chusetts, and the Massachusetts Department of 
Education." 



¥ 



15 



The area now contains the natural habitat to support 
many species of wildlife and provides an excellent 
hunting area. It is anticipated that as soon as a 
sound wildlife management program is put into oper- 
ation. Rocky Gutter will become one of the most pop- 
areas in Eastern Massachusetts. It fills a void 
in an important section of the state. 

Long range plans for the development of the 
Swift River Wildlife Management area have been 
in the works for quite some time. Standing in the 
way of their completion, have been two key parcels 
that we have not been able to acquire. This year 
both were purchased. They should help this area 
realize its great potential. The 115-acre area, across 
the road from the McLaughlin Hatchery, is a vital pol- 
lution shield and was acquired when we became 
aware that it was being considered for development. 



Typical of sportsmen's concern for the environment 
was the recent gift of 200 acres of excellent wildlife 
habitat presented to the Division September 28, 1969 
by the Auburn Sportsmen's Club. 







The second acquisition at Swift River was the 
90-acre privately-operated camping area known asj 
Robin Farm. The Division purchased the land, build-, 
ings and all the facilities included therein. Besides; 
the river frontage, there are three small ponds! 
which will be utilized for a number of activities. It is 
anticipated that the large building known as the 
Lodge will be converted into the headquarters for 
the new wildlife district, as yet unnamed. It is further 
hoped that plans for the utilization of this area by 
fishermen will be formulated prior to next year's 
fishing season. 

Approximately 100 acres were added to the Ches- 
ter Wildlife Management Area, which is located in 
the Towns of Chester, Huntington, Worthington, and 
Chesterfield. The area now contains approximately 
1,650 acres and extends from the Knightville Flood 
Control Area, on which the Division has a use permit, 
to within a short distance of the Littleville Flood 
Control Area. Key parcels were also added to the 
Northeast Management Area in Newbury and the 
Winimesset Brook Management Area in New Brain- 
tree. 

Four parcels containing about 65 acres were 
added to the Squannacook River Area. Of these, 
three contained river frontage and access to the 
river. Two of the areas located just below the Har- 
bor Pond were key pieces in as much as the owners 
had been giving serious consideration to develop- 
ing them into camp sites. The V.F.W. parcel in 
West Townsend contains river frontage, a pond 
and ample parking area along Route 119. There is 
also potential for a ramp on this site. The fourth 
parcel, although not on the river, is a key piece 
inasmuch as it will make it possible for the Division 
to build a new access road in the West Groton sec- 
tion of the river. 

When acquisition guidelines were decided on three 
years ago it was agreed by all concerned that the 
acquisition of river frontage and access points should 
be stressed. Accordingly, an effort in this direction 
was made again this year. Our work received a big 
boost when the Council of Sportsmen's Clubs of 
Hampden County, Inc. gave us 80 acres along the 
East Branch of the Westfield River in Cummington. 
The Division is most grateful for this valuable gift 
which will, we know, enhance the enjoyment of 
countless fishermen and hopefully will inspire other 
organizations and individuals to make similar con- 
tributions. 

The Division purchased four acres on the Qua- 
boag River in the Town of Warren. This includes 
river frontage in addition to a well-established ac- 
cess point and a large parking area along Route 
No. 67. The area has always been very popular with 
fishermen and now they are assured of its continued 
availability. 

Thirty-two acres were purchased along the Quina- 
poxet River in Holden. This land is adjacent to river 
frontage owned by the M.D.C. and also contains 
ample space for parking. Seventy-two acres along 
the Millers River were purchased, adding another 
link to the extensive holdings owned by the Division 
along this river. 

The Division acquired part of another river, ex- 
cellent from the standpoint of both trout fishing and 
wilderness beauty. Working with the Pepperell Con- 
servation Commission and the Trust set up to pre- 
serve and protect the Nissitissit River, 63 acres were 



16 



purchased by this Division in the Town of Pepperell. 
This is a start in what is hoped will be an acqui- 
sition program similar to what has taken place on 
the Squannacook River. Middlesex County is indeed 
fortunate in having two high-calibre trout streams 
(the Squannacook and Nissitissit) within such a 
heavily populated County. The fact that most of 
the shore line along the Squannacook from its 
source to West Groton is now in public ownership 
should be a source of satisfaction for the Middlesex 
County League of Sportsmen's Clubs, who gave so 
freely of their time and money to make this a reality. 
It would seem that the group working to preserve 
the Nissitissit River will some day feel the same 
satisfaction. 

Salt marsh land, so important to ecology and, 
unhappily so exploited, became an important con- 
sideration in this year's reality program. Two ac- 
quisitions were added to our present holdings on 
the North Shore. The Division also moved South of 
Boston, purchasing 22 acres in the Town of Fair- 
haven. Our intent is to expand these holdings since 
fee title to salt marsh is a sure way to preserve it in 
its natural state. 

Personnel of the Section spend as much time as 
possible plotting the Division's land holdings on 
topographic maps and keeping the land inventories 
up-to-date. Surveys were run on several parcels 
being purchased and many prospective sellers were 
interviewed. 

This year, for the first time, the Division received 
a promise of Federal help in the acquisition program 
from the Bureau of Outdoor Recreation. The project 
papers for the acquisition of the Rocky Gutter pur- 
chase in Middleboro and the two purchases in Bel- 
chertown were submitted to that agency and 
subsequently approved. When the appraisals are 
approved by the B.O.R., a reimbursement up to fifty 
percent of the purchase price is anticipated. We 
would like to express our sincere thanks to Com- 
missioner of Natural Resources, Arthur W. Brownell 

— who acts as State Liaison Officer with the B.O.R. 

— for his guidance, and assistance in preparing 
these two projects. At first glance, one might think 
that any reimbursements would be credited to the 
land and water acquisition account and the monies 
could again be used for other acquisitions. However, 
this is not the way it works. When these reimburse- 
ments are received they will be credited to the 
Inland Fisheries and Game Fund. 

Now nearly everyone is expressing great concern 
about our environment. Almost daily, articles appear 
in our press decrying the desecration of our natural 
resources. This interest in our environment should 
be encouraged and applauded — provided those 
doing all the talking are willing to take action. Un- 
fortunately, the environment and its preservation 
doesn't seem as important when one is asked to 
personally contribute to the cause. As long as the 
state and federal government provide the money 
needed "conservation is great." 

Licensed sportsmen realized that our resources 
and environment were in trouble years before the 
drum beaters made headlines. Sportsmen's pleas 
for money to purchase and protect lands and waters 
from exploitation fell on deaf ears. "If the sportsman 
wants a place to hunt and fish, let him go out and 
buy it" was the prevailing attitude — even though 
millions were being made available to providefor other 




A key purchase was the 90-acre Robin Farm along 
the Swift River. From left to right: Joe Johnson, Chief 
of Realty; Henry Renouff, former owner; Director 
Shepard; and Bradlee Gage, Board Secretary. 



forms of outdoor recreation. To the everlasting credit 
of that great fraternity of men and women who enjoy 
hunting and fishing in Massachusetts, they rose to the 
occasion, and proved that America was worth pre- 
serving. They accepted a dollar increase in their 
license fees to make funds available for the acquisi- 
tion of land and waters throughout the state. Today, 
a few short years later, these same license holders 
can point with pride to the thousands of acres of 
land, and miles of stream bank they have acquired, 
and proclaim with justifiable pride, "We have ac- 
cepted your challenge and are acting with sincerity 
and determination." 

Respectfully submited, 

Joseph Johnson, Chief of Realty 



¥ 



17 




m 



IT 



>> 



w 







-,* 



^ 



COOPERATION 

At Westfield Flood Control 



Area 



IN November 1962, the Secretary of the Army 
granted a license to the Division for the use of about 
385 acres of land and water in the Westfield Reser- 
voir Area located in the Town of Sturbridge. Because 
waters impounded behind the Westfield Dam were 
expected to occasionally inundate the tract, per- 
manent roads were relocated at higher elevations. 
One of the original roads, Mashapaug Road, that 
follows the Quinebaug River, continued to be used 
by visitors to the area and by persons who were 
merely passing through. 

From 1963 to 1968, the Division maintained the 
road by patching, and cleaning ditches and culverts. 
However, by 1969 the road had seriously deteriorated, 
and the rehabilitation required was beyond our lim- 
ited capabilities. 

The problem was overcome through cooperation 
between the Division and the Town of Sturbridge 
Highway Department. After some reconnaissance 
and discussion, the town agreed to provide special- 
ized road maintenance machinery and experienced 
operators, while the Division chipped in with a work 
crew, other specialized equipment and the capital 
needed to pay for materials used. 

In two days of cooperative effort during the fall 
of 1969, the mile-long road was swept, thoroughly 
patched, a washed out culvert was replaced, and 
the entire road was sanded and sealed. 

Sturbridge is just one of a dozen towns that have 
cooperated in ventures that will increase recreational 
and sight-seeing opportunities in Massachusetts. 



%Z 




LEGISLATION 



The following laws affecting the Division of 
Fisheries and Game were enacted during the 
legislative session of 1970: 



Chapter 102 
Chapter 131 



Chapter 136 — 



Chapter 167 — 

Chapter 183 — 

Chapter 224 — 

Chapter 501 — 



Chapter 579 
Chapter 612 



Chapter 732 — 



An act increasing the penalty 
for importing and liberating cer- 
tain fish and game within the 
Commonwealth. 

An act prohibiting any person 
from hunting during the pheas- 
ant and quail season on public 
shooting grounds or Wildlife 
Management Areas where pheas- 
ant or quail are stocked without 
wearing a "hunter orange" cap 
or hat. 

An act shortening the bear sea- 
son to one week (from the third 
Monday in November to the fol- 
lowing Saturday) and permitting 
hunters with valid permits and 
using rifles with a .23 caliber 
bore and over to harvest one 
bear in any of the following 
counties: Berkshire, Franklin, 
Hampden, Hampshire, and Wor- 
cester. 

An act providing that action re- 
quired for the protection of cer- 
tain fisheries in inland waters 
be assigned to the Director of 
Water Pollution Control. 
An act further regulating the 
wearing of hunting clothes dur- 
ing the deer season. 
An act prohibiting hunting from 
a snowmobile. 

An act increasing the penalties 
for certain violations of the laws 
relative to hunting and fishing. 
An act providing for the transfer 
of certain land and buildings in 
the town of Westborough from 
the Department of Mental Health 
to the Division of Fisheries and 
Game. 

An act permitting fishing in Sil- 
ver Lake in the towns of Pem- 
broke, Halifax, Kingston and 
Plympton. 

An act relative to the injury and 
killing of fish and fish spawn in 
the inland waters of the Com- 
monwealth and requiring re- 
muneration for fish so injured 
or killed. 

An act providing aid to para- 
plegics while hunting. 



18 



GAME 



GAME FARMS: The sexing of pheasants by the use 
of sex-linkage has greatly reduced labor, feed, pen 
space, etc. 

Vandalism is still a major problem at two of our 
game farms. Several hundred valuable quail brood 
stock were stolen along with an undetermined num- 
ber of pheasants. All possible efforts are being taken 
to remedy this situation. 

FOREST PHEASANT PROJECT: This project is pro- 
gressing well. However, some problems were en- 
countered in mating of specific pheasant varieties. 
This past rearing season, over one thousand hybrid 
chicks were reared at the Ayer Game Farm. 

Approximately 200 surplus adult brooders were 
released on selected areas in the Quabbin Reserva- 
tion, Martha's Vineyard Island and southern Berk- 
shire County. In 1971, almost all male breeding stock 
may be captured from these releases in the wild. 
Birds will be restocked on all previously-mentioned 
areas. 

WOODCOCK PROJECT: During the springs of 1969 
and 1970, the Division conducted a randomized, 
singing-ground survey on nineteen routes, estab- 
lished by the Migratory Bird Population Station. Divi- 
sion of Fisheries and Game, and Bureau of Sport 
Fisheries and Wildlife personnel participated. Eight 
management singing ground routes were censused. 

During the periods July 7, 1969 through August 15, 
1969 and June 15 through June 30, 1970 Division 
personnel concentrated their efforts on the location 
of summer fields. Previously known summer fields 
in the Quabbin Reservation and potential sites in Cen- 
tral Massachusetts were checked. One brood of 
three chicks, and three immature males and females 
were banded in the 1969 period. The immature birds 
were captured by night-lighting. During the period 
April 25 to June 30, 1970, seven broods of 21 chicks 
were banded by the use of bird dogs. The peak 
hatching date for Central Massachusetts appears to 
be May 10. One immature female was banded by 
night-lighting in June 1970. Inclement weather dur- 
ing the last part of June 1970 greatly hindered opera- 
tions. No harvest data was collected during this 
reporting period. 



Top: Canada geese are herded into a net as part 
of an operation aimed at establishing a breeding flock 
in western Massachusetts. Middle: Immature ring- 
necks roost along a rafter at one of the game farms. 
Bottom: Black ducks trapped by a cannon net wait 
to be banded. 




19 



J, 



PROJECT: The ob- 
■oject is to increase 
iecies within the state as 
agement Unit. 

) June 26. 1969 through Septem- 
i total of 1.934 mourning doves were 
led at seven sites in Massachusetts, 
increase in effort in 1969, 167 fewer doves 
^d and banded. Banding schedules were 
leted and forwarded to the Migratory Bird Popu- 
lation Station. Laurel, Maryland. 

Mourning doves banded in Massachusetts during 
this period were known to be harvested by hunting 
in the following states: Alabama, Georgia, Maine, 
North Carolina. South Carolina, and Virginia. 
MOURNING DOVE CENSUS: Three mourning dove 
"coo-count" routes are surveyed annually in co- 
operation with the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 
In 1970. the total number of calling doves heard on 
all three routes increased 300%. 

STATEWIDE BEAVER HARVEST: As part of a move 
to conserve the state's furbearers, the 1969-70 beaver 
season was shortened to six weeks. The resulting 
harvest (605) was therefore considerably less than 
the 1.052 trapped the season before. Berkshire and 
Franklin Counties yielded more than half (323 beaver 
or 53.4°o) of this season's harvest. Also 59.5% of 
the beaver trapped this season were taken in De- 
cember. Conibear traps accounted for 397 beaver. 
Tot3l harvest value, $13 per pelt, was $7,852. 

WILD TURKEY RESTORATION STUDY: The fall, 1969 
Massachusetts turkey population on seven release 
areas totaled 258 turkeys. There were 105 turkeys in 
the Quabbin-New Salem population (prior to trap- 
ping). 56 in the Barre-Oakham area, 54 in the Octo- 
ber Mountain area (Becket-Washington-Middlefield), 
in the Town of Washington, 17 in the Douglas State 
Forest. 6 in Myles Standish Forest, and 2 on the 
Holyoke Range. Late winter-spring population was 
170 turkeys statewide. 

Twelve turkeys were trapped by cannon net in 

New Salem between September and November. 

Seven birds were transported to Douglas Forest, and 

five to the Barre-Oakham area. A drop-door trap 

was used with limited success during the winter. 

Winter feeding was conducted from January to March 

for the Quabbin, Douglas, and October Moun- 

nn flocks in order to increase the overwintering 

jopulation and to lure the turkeys to a central area 

to facilitate enumeration. 

Visual roadside counts, track counts, and coopera- 
r reports were used to determine the number of 
;eys in individual populations. Snowmobiles were 
used with success during the winter. 

CANADA GOOSE NESTING SUCCESS AND BROOD 

RVIVAL: Nesting data were collected from the 

jry and Framingham Reservoir systems. Twen- 

rts were started; 19 nests were successful, 5 

i were abandoned and 2 were destroyed by pred- 

. crow ?). Nesting success was 73.1 

2 eggs in the nests that were success- 

led, giving an 85.2 percent hatcha- 

size (including a clutch of ten 

twelve eggs) was 6.8 eggs. Average 



clutch size was 5.6 eggs excluding ten and twelve 
egg clutches; six eggs was the mode for clutch size, 
the range being three to twelve eggs. By mid-Aprii 
62.5 percent of all nests were initiated. No new nests 
were started later than the first week of May. Twenty- 
six nests were found on the study areas in 1968 and 
1969. There is no evidence that removal of goslings 
for transplanting has adversely affected the breeding 
population on the study areas, but may, in fact, be 
instrumental in holding the population at its present 
level, a desirable result in view of the nuisance com- 
plaints received in the vicinity of the study area in 
past years. 

ESTABLISHMENT OF BREEDING FLOCKS AND 
FLOCK HOLDING TECHNIQUES — CANADA GOOSE: 
Five trapping operations netted twenty-four goslings 
and two adult Canada geese which were banded, 
aged, sexed, color marked, transported and re- 
leased at three different sites. An additional two 
goslings, four yearlings, nine adults and one un- 
known were aged, sexed, banded and released at 
the trapping sites and nine returns and six foreign 
recoveries recorded. 

A three-year summary of the data indicates a 21.9 
percent recovery rate for transplanted geese. 

GOSLING TRANSPLANT PROJECT: In conjunction 
with the gosling transplant study, a total of 50 Canada 
geese were drive trapped in five different sites in 
eastern Massachusetts. Thirty-nine geese were 
banded and of these, 27 were transplanted on three 
sites in Central and Western Massachusetts. The 
transplanted birds were color banded for easy recog- 
nition. Eight non-color banded geese were banded 
and transported from the Sandwich to the Ayer 
Game Farm. 

The trapping also recovered five birds banded out 
of state and six repeats. Two geese trapped in 
Southboro and transported to Quabbin Reservoir 
last year were recaptured at Southboro this year, 
Birds banded last year were shot during the 1969 
hunting season in Massachusetts, Connecticut and 
New Jersey. 

PRESEASON BANDINGS: Preseason waterfowl band- 
ings for 1969 began with wood duck nest trapping. 
Thirty-six wood ducks and one hooded merganser 



GAME DISTRIBUTION 

Pheasants 

Adults: 

Spring and Summer 

liberations 
Young: 

August liberations 

October-November 

liberations 

Sportsmen Club 

Rearing Program 
TOTALS 
QUAIL 
Adults 
Young 
TOTALS 
White Hare 
Northern Varying, purchased 



July 1, 1969 — June 30, 1970 
Total 



Hens 



1693 






1693 



Cocks 



237 
13600 

44721 



5535 
64093 



1930 

13600 

44721 

5535 
65786 

950 
2686 
3636 

2500 



20 



were banded. Twelve other hand-reared wood ducks 
were banded and released. 

One hundred and sixty-five Canada geese were 
captured and banded by drive trapping in July. 

An airboat fitted with night-lighting equipment 
was employed to band 200 mallards, 91 black ducks, 
29 black X mallard hybrids, 143 wood ducks, 19 blue- 
winged teal, 54 green-winged teal, two gadwalls, 
one baldpate, one hooded merganser, 44 American 
coot, four common gallinules, four Virginia rails, 13 
sora rails, and four pied-billed grebes. 

WINTER BLACK DUCK BANDING: The Banding 
Committee of the Atlantic Waterfowl Council set the 
Massachusetts wintering black duck quota at 2,000 
birds. The Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and 
Game banded 1,937 blacks, 132 black X mallard 
hybrids, 41 mallards, seven pintails, one green- 
winged teal and one canvasback. In addition, 40 
birds, previously banded by other stations were re- 
covered. 

The birds were captured by the use of a cannon 
net in Boston Harbor area, while bait traps were 
used on sites at Buzzards Bay, Plymouth, Duxbury, 
Westport and on the mid-Cape. 

In addition to the regular black duck trapping 
effort, a special bait trap with an underwater en- 
trance was set up on Salt Pond in Falmouth to test 
the feasibility of trapping diving ducks. Thirty-seven 
canvasbacks, two red heads, and two hooded mer- 
gansers were banded. The program will be expanded 
next year. 

WINTER INVENTORY FLIGHTS: Winter inventories 

were taken from chartered planes from October 

through January. Two crews were used, one flying 

the coast from the New Hampshire line to the Cape 

Cod Canal and the other patrolling the remainder 

of the coast including the Cape and Islands. 

A total of 107,719 waterfowl were counted of which 

7.942 were black ducks. The 1970 total was down 

> from 1969, blacks down 44%. Based on the 

:en-year average, total waterfowl were down 16% 

and blacks down 29%. 

WOOD DUCK NESTING STUDY: Banding of wood 

ducks began in early April when incubating females 

5 captured, banded and returned to the nest. 

roduction on Great Meadow National Wildlife Ref- 

i declined for the third year in a row with only 

ducklings being produced from 13 nests. Juvenile 

:ruitment was up from 1968 but far below that 

isary for a stable population. Eleven successful 

sts on three other SUASCO Valley study areas 

produced 119 ducklings. 

n ten central Massachusetts study areas there 

448 ducklings including nine hooded mergan- 

This total is slightly higher than the 1968 pro- 

on figures, although the number of successful 

nests for both years was the same. 

nc°2? A S, UCK POPULATION STUDY (EVALUATION 
STARLINGPROOF NEST BOXES): Thirteen nest- 
tempts by eight wood ducks and five mallards 
i er i e Q 7n a o e m 69 starli ngproof nest boxes erected 
Seven nests were successful (one mallard 




Jim Cardoza, in charge of the turkey project, puts out 
corn for wintering turkeys. Below: Division waterfowl 
biologists evafuate starling-proof wood duck boxes. 




21 




Bob Bell vi I le fastens a band to a mallard's leg as 
part of a winter program that resulted in the banding 
of 1.937 blacks. 132 black X mallard hybrids, 41 mal- 
lards, seven pintails, one green-winged teal and one 
canvasback. 



and six wood ducks). There were no starling nests 
in any of the boxes, but there were reports of two 
grackle nests and several successful tree swallow 
nests. 

DEER 

Approximately 2,002 deer were taken during the 
6-day shotgun season and 37 during the archery 
season for a total of 2.039. This figure represented 
an increase over the 1968 kill of 612 deer. 

During the shotgun season 1,415 bucks and 587 
does were checked. Ten males and 27 females com- 
prised the archery kill. 

Corresponding figures for the 1968 shotgun sea- 
son had been 1,083 bucks and 310 does. For the 
1968 archery season the breakdown had been 21 
bucks. 13 does. 

DETERMINATION OF THE REPRODUCTIVE RATE 
OF DEER IN MASSACHUSETTS: Eighty female deer 
carcasses were aged and examined during a five- 
month period — January 1, through May 31, 1970. 



Corpora lutea counts were documented. The fol- 
lowing reproductive rates were determined from a 
five-year summary (1966-1970) of reproductive data. 
Age at Sample No. of Fawns 

Parturition Size Produced Reproductive rate 
Yearlings 104 23 100 does: 22 fawns; 

Two years 57 76 100 does: 133 fawns* 

Adults 111 193 100 does: 174 fawns 



DETERMINATION OF THE DEER HUNTING PRES- 
SURE IN MASSACHUSETTS: Based on 1,937 deer kill 
observations, it was determined that 66% of the suc- 
cessful hunters harvested a deer within 20 miles of 
their home town. 



DETERMINATION OF THE REMOVAL RATE OF THE 
MASSACHUSETTS DEER HERD: During the two- 
week archery season (November 10 through Novem- 
ber 22, 1969), archers reported taking 37 deer. It ap- 
pears that the archers were selective as 27 males and 
only ten females were reported. 

Director James M. Shepard issued the following 
number and types of anterless deer hunting per- 
mits: Sportsmen — 4,000; Special Nantucket — 400; 
and Landowner — 295; Permit holders harvested 
601 deer including 494 does, 107 button bucks and 
100 antlered males. 

The success ratio of the 4,000 sportsmen permit 
holders was one to six. The holders of the 400 spe- 
cial-Nantucket permits and the 295 Landowner per- 
mits enjoyed a success ratio of one to five. 

The top three counties in Massachusetts produc- 
ing the bulk of the deer harvest were Berkshire 
(563), Franklin (424), and Worcester (284). These 
three counties provided 62% of the deer harvested 
during the 1969 season. 

Massachusetts hunters took 71% of their deer on 
the first two days and last day of the regular season. 

There were 682 deer mortalities reported by 
Natural Resource Officers during the calendar year 
of 1969. Three hundred and ninety-seven of these 
were killed by motor vehicles; 166 by dogs, 39 by 
poaching; 16 by drowning; six by trains; and five 
by fences. Two deer were killed for crop damage 
and 51 deaths were attributed to miscellaneous and 
unknown causes. 

There was no evidence of disease or starvation 
during the period covered by this report. 



DETERMINATION OF SIZE OF THE MASSACHU- 
SETTS DEER HERD: The minimal herd size formula 
was revised to include fawn production of the year- 
ling, two-year old, three-year old, and older age 
classes of female deer. The 1969 pre-shotgun season 
deer herd size was calculated to be 11,972 deer. The 
projected size of the 1970 pre-hunting season herd 
was estimated to be 16,344 deer. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Warren W. Blandin, Chief of Wildlife Researcl 

E. Michael Pollack, Chief Game Biologist 



H 



22 



Top: An important breakthrough in pheasant rearing 
has been the development of sex-linked color pat- 
terns allowing male and female chicks to be easily 
distinguished. Darker chicks on the left are males. 
Middle: When the female chicks mature they are 
almost white. Bottom: The Division hopes to develop 
a "forest pheasant" that can take over for the ring- 
neck as Massachusetts returns to a forested con- 
dition. 



MASSACHUSETTS COOPERATIVE WILDLIFE 
RESEARCH UNIT 

Wood Duck: An intensive study of growth and 
survival rates of wood ducks fed on different 
levels of a protein diet is now underway. 

Beaver: Some pioneer work is being conducted 
on the population and behavior of a colony of 
beaver in Quabbin Reservation. 

Sparrow Hawk: A study is underway on homing, 
survival and other data pertaining to sparrow 
hawks. This small falcon is also being tested for 
effects of pesticides. 

Black Duck: Field work continues on the be- 
havior, dispersal and feeding habits of the 
wintering black duck in Nauset Marsh, Cape 
Cod. Crop samples and stomachs collected 
from Patuxent and elsewhere are being an- 
alyzed. Thorough descriptions of winter mari- 
time black ducks remain unpublished. 

Ruffed Grouse: Studies of habitat and feeding 
habits of ruffed grouse on Mt. Warner were con- 
tinued. 

Waterfowl Investigation on the Connecticut 
River: A thesis on the species of ducks using 
the river, and an estimate, by mail survey, of 
hunting pressure were completed. 

Bobcat Study: An intensive study of bobcats 
on Prescott Peninsula is being conducted. 
Seven bobcats have been caught and instrument- 
ed with radio transmitters. More sophisticated 
telemetry equipment had been purchased dur- 
ing the year, and daily contact with a number 
of cats has been possible. 

Canada Goose Project: A PhD candidate work- 
ing on nesting behavior of Canada geese, com- 
pleted another season at East Meadows Ranch 
near Delta, Manitoba. 



23 




.--... crs 







DISTRICT MAINTENANCE 
WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREAS 




WINNIMISSET MEADOWS: 
Constructed three parking areas. 
Arranged for and supervised cooperative agricultural- 
wildlife project with local farmers resulting in an 
agreement for annual planting and cultivation of 
field corn on 25 acres of which substantial blocks of 
standing corn will be left for wildlife and hunting 
cover. 

Erected 2000 feet of fencing to keep livestock out. 
Built 1 4 mile of new road for access to interior areas. 
Demolished, burned, buried and removed 5 buildings. 
Filled cellar holes and graded and reseeded all 
areas where buildings had been removed. 
Planned construction of wildlife pond and dam. 
Cleared 12 acres for wildlife with bulldozer. Graded 
and seeded same. 

Cleared 2 acres for wildlife with chainsaws. 
Erected new signs designating area as Wildlife 
Management Area and posted all boundaries. 
Planted several thousand fruiting and coniferous 
shrubs and trees. 
BIRCH HILL: 

Cleared 10 acres for wildlife and seeded same. 
Cut and hauled timber to produce 50,000 board feet 
of lumber. 

Reconstructed storage shed and poured concrete 
floor. 

Built 1 A mile new access roads. 
Maintained all existing roads, trails, signs, bridges, 
ramps, buildings and grounds. 

Constructed two new boat access ramps on Millers 
River for small boat use. 
FOUR CHIMNEYS: 

Cleared land and constructed parking area. 
Gravelled existing roads. 

Brush-cut roadsides and fields in early stages of 
succession. 

Constructed and erected all necessary signs. 
SWIFT RIVER: 

Demolished existing dwelling with bulldozer. 
Constructed large parking area. 
Constructed and erected signs as appropriate. 
PERU: 

Brushed three miles of road and one parking lot 
with tractor. 

Constructed and erected 25 signs. 
Marked three miles of boundary. 
Brush-cut two acres. 
KNIGHTVILLE: 
Repaired five miles of road. 
Constructed and erected 50 signs. 
Marked one-half mile of boundary. 
CONWAY: 

Constructed and erected 30 signs. 
Marked two miles of boundary. 



CHESHIRE: 

Planted 3,000 multiflora rose, 250 hetzi juniper, 500 
highbush cranberry. 
Constructed and erected 50 signs. 
Marked two miles of boundary. 
LENOX: 

Band-cut one -half acre. 
Brush-cut five acres. 
Constructed and erected 20 signs. 
Marked one mile of boundary. 
BECKET: 

Constructed and erected 15 signs. 
Marked one mile of boundary. 
CHESTER: 
Capped one well. 
MYLES STANDISH: 

Maintained 11 miles of roads by limbing overhanging 
trees, brush-cutting roadsides, bulldozing and har- 
rowing roadsides. 
Constructed and erected 40 signs. 
Planted 77 acres with annual grains. 
Thinned and cleared 105 acres. 
CRANE: 

Painted and repaired two buildings. 
Maintained 11 miles of roads by limbing overhanging 
trees, brush-cutting roadsides, bulldozing and har- 
rowing roadsides. 

Constructed and maintained eight acres of parking 
lots. 

Constructed and erected 100 signs. 
Planted 5,000 shrubs and trees. 
Planted 20 acres with annual grains. 
Top-dressed 20 acres of fields. 
Thinned and cleared 1071/2 acres. 
FREETOWN STATE FOREST: 
Erected 20 signs. 
ROCKY GUTTER: 
Constructed and erected 30 signs. 
CRANE POND: 

Installed two culverts in road system; some grading, 
gravelling and top dressing. 

Constructed one new lot including clearing of trees, 
brush, grading and gravelling. 
Added gravel to existing two lots. 
Boundary surveys were made and marked along 
1,900 feet of boundary. 

About 20 wooden signs for hunter control were 
erected at strategic locations throughout the area. 

(continued on page 31) 






24 



iJSggfr 



INFORMATION 

AND 

EDUCATION 



POPULATION pressure and accompanying des- 
ruction of our environment has pushed this Division 
nto a new role. So that we may continue to meet 
)ur obligations to the citizens of Massachusetts, we 
lave found it necessary to meet the enemy before 
le meets us. A case in point is our present realty 
)rogram. In addition to managing wildlife, we are 
low obliged to rescue land from the clutches of 
'Progress" so that we will have the land to manage. 



MASS. WILDLIFE HIGHLIGHTS 

I Massachusetts Wildlife, the Division's official mag- 
izine (circulation 45,000) is reflecting this overall 
)0licy change and is presently laying the ground- 
work for a major expansion in editorial scope. 
Hunting, fishing and current Division programs still 
eceive adequate coverage but, if the magazine is 
o succeed, it must be more than a sporting pub- 
cation. As a state conservation agency we have a 
esponsibility to both consumptive and non-con- 
umptive users of wildlife resources. We offer the 
lublic a conservation magazine in the belief that 
ostering a sense of environmental responsibility 
3 in the best interests of every citizen of the state. 
f the environmental quality of America is ever to 
>e restored it will come about only through a uni- 
ersal effort by the American people. 
! It is the I and E Section's job to make the public 
iware that the sportsman's and civilization's in- 
erests are presently indistinguishable and that both 
ire inextricably bound to the land organism. In 
neeting this responsibility, our most valuable work- 
ig tool is the magazine. 







V 

\ 









Central Wildlife District Manager Paul Mugford pre- 
sents the first Friend of Wildlife Award to Stephen 
"Red" Skorupski, Proprietor of Skorupski Brothers' 
Fuel Oil and Service Station, Wilbraham, in recogni- 
tion of his contribution of a heavy-duty culvert for 
use on a Wildlife Management Area. Below: Young 
fishermen enjoy themselves at the Massachusetts 
Junior Conservation Camp. 



25 




MASSACHUi 




There is another important angle to be considered 
in the editorial expansion of Massachusetts Wildlife. 

Sportsmen all over this country are continually be- 
ing painted as rapacious gluttons of wildlife re- 
sources whose single purpose is to kill. It is our 
conviction that they have been woefully undersold 
and that their interest in wildlife extends far beyond 
the particular species they happen to be pursuing. 
Indeed, if it had not been for the combined efforts 
of sportsmen, today's society would be without any 
meaningful conservation programs or legislation. 

Understanding and appreciation of nature can turn 
an unproductive hunting or fishing trip into a re- 
warding adventure afield and transform a productive 
one into a meaningful ritual of renewal that reaffirms 
a man's age-old status in a functioning ecology. 

Thus, if our magazine can instill in its non-sporting 
readers a genuine love and knowledge of nature and, 
at the same time, enlarge the sportsman's world, 
there are few programs this Division could sponsor 
that will pay greater long and short term dividends. 

Tracing Mass. Wildlife's evolution through fiscal 
1970, we first encounter Director Shepard's editorial 
in the July-August, 1969 issue. The following para- 
graph is particularly indicative of the shift. 

"I feel that this Division should play a greater part 
in improving the total environment in Massachusetts 
because that which is good for wildlife is good for 
man. This Division, through its magazine, will en- 
deavor to educate the public to the dangers of our 
environmental problems. We are concerned with all 



forms of wildlife, not just game. We will be con- 
cerned with TE (total environment). We will en- 
courage statewide talent working in various prob- 
lems of our environment, to author articles in this 
publication." 

In the same issue the center spread — "Doves 
Tell AN" — reports on the continuing banding study 
of doves (classified as songbirds in Massachusetts), 
carried on as a federal-aid research project under 
the auspices of the Pittman-Robertson Act, the Massa- 
chusetts Division of Fisheries and Game and the 
Massachusetts Audubon Society. 

Dick Cronin's articles in the January-February 
issue is the next focal point. Dovekies — little pen- 
guin-like birds of the North Atlantic that are fre- 
quently driven inland by "nor-easters" — are hardly 
game birds, but the piece was well received, for the 
sportsmen's realm is all outdoors. 

Freshwater turtles are interesting and, for the 
most part, an unfamiliar part of the sportsman's 
world. Whether hunting or fishing, he encounters 
them consistently. If he can identify a certain species 
when he sees it instead of shrugging it off as "just 
another turtle," his total outdoor experience will have 
been enriched and, even, if he draws a blank as far 
as game is concerned, he can never really go home 
empty-handed. 

Terry E. Graham, a NASA Fellow affiliated with the 
Zoology Department at the University of Rhode Island, 
contributed "Sportsman's Guide to Massachusetts 



26 



OTfllSIJrjS 



JjiACHUSETTS * 




ETTS 






MARCH-APRIL, 1970 




r 



^AiS*^ 




"reshwater Turtles," a well-written piece with a sep- 
arate write-up and illustration for each indigenous 
turtle. How many readers had been aware that their 
state played host to ten different species? And ex- 
cluding the well-known "snapper" and "paint", how 
many of the remaining eight could they identify? 

Finally, in the January-February, 1970 issue, an 
article by Aquatic Biologist Lee Lyman — "The First 
Big Step" — outlines the legislative measures Massa- 
chusetts has taken in controlling the use of hard 
pesticides. Lyman is presently supervising a pesti- 
cide monitoring program funded by the Massachu- 
setts Health Research Institute, Inc. with a grant 
from the U. S. Department of the Interior's Federal 
Water Pollution Control Administration. The program 
is of vital interest not only to sportsmen, but to 
every resident of the state. 

There were other points of interest in content, 
although not related to the trend discussed above. 
"Fall Fishing Across the Bay State" an excellent story 
(September-October) by Peter Marshall of Ashland 
was one example. A new kind of cover for the No- 
vember-December issue featuring the painting "Con- 
templating Female Mallard" by Albert C. Barker, a 
Natural Resource Instructor at Essex Agricultural and 
Technical Institute in Hathorne, was another. The 
painting was the first piece of artwork to be used for 
a cover of Mass. Wildlife. 

Director Shepard's editorial in the same issue 
discussed the antlerless permit system and outlined 
its dramatic effects on the growth of the herd. The 



issue also contained informative pieces on wild 
turkey, Bay State trapping, and trout propagation. 
This last story, by our top fish culturist, Bob Macom- 
ber, was reprinted in a national magazine. 

Appearing on the last page of the November- 
December issue was a picture of a hapless Canada 
goose entwined in a plastic six-pack carrier. The 
picture was reprinted with due credit in four maga- 
zines. 

YOUTH 

Perhaps the most worthwhile program we have 
ever sponsored is the Massachusetts Junior Con- 
servation Camp. The twenty-first session was held 
during the first two weeks in July with 139 boys 
completing the two-week course. 

Sportsmens clubs led the list of sponsors with 33 
clubs sending 76 boys. Other sponsors included 
garden clubs, high school fish and game clubs, coun- 
ty leagues, Kiwanis, Rotary, Grange, Parks and 
Recreation, women's clubs, and trust companies. 

A course in firearms safety was offered by the 
DNR's Division of Law Enforcement. Training was 
also given in stream improvement, fly and spin cast- 
ing, fly tying, small boat safety, rifle and shotgun 
shooting, basic camping, forest management and 
forestry practices, forest fire control, soil conserva- 
tion, archery, fisheries, and wildlife management. 



27 







Arthur Silva, Director of the Massachusetts Junior 
Conservation Camp prepares to award trophies to 
the 1969 winners. 



In the July-August issue of Mass. Wildlife local 
outdoor columnist Arnie Korenblum reported on 
the youth program sponsored by the Marlboro Fish 
and Game Association. The program, unmatched 
in any part of the country accommodates 100 boys. 
Its setup is very similar to the Massachusetts Junior 
Conservation Camp. 

In his editorial appearing in the March-April, 1970 
issue — "Take a Youngster Fishing" — Director 
Shepard examined the moral benefits imparted by 
a healthy life in the outdoors and pointed to hunting 
and fishing as means to an end. "What better place 
is there than a fishing trip to learn about oneself 
and Nature?" Shepard wrote. 



NEWS RELEASES 

Frequent news releases, some circulating to more 
than 2000 individuals and organizations, keep the 
public informed as to stories breaking in and outside 
the Division. Pertinent releases are issued not only 
by the I and E Section, but also by Wildlife District 
Personnel whenever developments within their geo- 
graphic scope of operations require an open line to 
the public. 

Occasionally, a story of major proportions breaks 

and more often than not the angle is human interest. 

By the end of fiscal 1970, phantom bears seemed 

to be emerging from the woodwork of the Westboro 

and E office. Apart from the bear hearings and 

subsequent developments, which is a story in itself, 

Massachusetts bears were popping into the headlines 

over the state. 'Bruins in Trouble" — released 

Dctober 28, 1969 — made it all the way to Time. 

strange actions of two bears on a Florida, Mass. 

ide had caused considerable speculation among 

lokers. The general consensus was that the pair 

"drunken toot." Dr. Streeter, a local veteri- 

sportsman, explained. "This is not uncom- 

:ows and bears. Bears gorge themselves on 

gitate the pulp and retain the cider. 

acts like a hillbilly still and alcohol 

e by-product." 



This incident, however, was just the beginning, 
On May 27, two hours after the first bear ever to be 
killed on a Massachusetts highway had met his de- 
mise on the Mass. Pike in the vicinity of Russell, 
another more fortunate bruin was struck by a car 
in Williamstown. Unimpressed by the entire pro- 
ceedings, the durable animal glanced contemptu- 
ously over his shoulder at the startled driver and 
sauntered off into the woods. 

A week later a Bay State bear was in the news 
again. Apparently driven by hunger, a fully grown 
but emaciated bear (80-lbs.) ambled into a populated 
section of Florida, Mass. After Natural Resource 
officers had drugged and moved the bear, it re- 
turned to civilization and attempted to break into a 
house. Fish and Game Biologist Jim McDonough 
rushed to the scene and found no other alternative 
than to destroy the animal with an overdose from his 
tranquillizer gun. 

Apparently the cycle is beginning again for on 
October 28, 1970 the bears were right back where 
they started from — two of them, younger and row- 
dier than last year's team — on the same Florida 
hillside and, believe it or not, during the same week. 
This year, though, it doesn't look like alcohol was 
involved in either incident. It's only a guess, but 
at the moment the most plausible explanation seems 
to be that the bruins were tame and, in keeping with 
the times, had made the drug scene with a little 
unsolicited human assistance. 



EXHIBITS 

The Fish and Game exhibit at the 1970 New En- 
gland Sportsman's show featured waterfowl for the 
first time in the Division's many years of participation. 
Live pairs of the following species were displayed 
in a 25-foot long pool: baldpate, American eider, 
Redhead, black, mallard, wood duck. There were two 
pairs of pintails, green-winged teal and blue-winged 
teal. 

Ed Shaw, noted North Shore taxidermist, donated 
his labor in mounting a Canada goose, two male mal- 
lards and one male wood duck in life-like landing 
posture. This year's exhibit concentrated on aes- 
thetics. Next year's will be aimed at education. 

Throughout fiscal 1970 the Division also set up 
exhibits at the Topsfield Fair; the Norfolk County 
Conservation Commission's meeting; Zayre's Depart- 
ment Store Camping Show; the Mid-Cape Sports- 
men's Club Show, Hyannis; the Gardner Show; the 
Agawam Show; and the Grafton State Hospital Show. 

The Division also provided assistance, advice and 
equipment to a number of sportsmen's organizations 
interested in setting up exhibits. Included in these 
organizations were the Middlesex, Essex, Norfolk and 
Barnstable County Leagues of Sportsmen. 



SPEAKING ENGAGEMENTS 

In the Northeast and Central Wildlife Districts, 113 
individual programs on Division activities were pre- 
sented during the fiscal year — to sportsmen's clubs, 
leagues of sportsmen, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Cub 
Scouts, Grange, school groups, garden clubs, 4H 
clubs and numerous other social organizations. Films 
and slide shows were frequently used to supplement 
talks. 



28 




Sportsmen all over this country are continually 
being painted as rapacious gluttons of wildlife 
resources whose single purpose is to kill. It is 
our conviction that they have been woefully un- 
dersold and that their interest in wildlife extends 
; >eyond the particular species they happen 
to be pursuing. 

ictured on this page are non-game species of 
particular interest to sportsmen, which were fea- 
tured in a recent issue of Massachusetts Wild- 
lite. These remarkable shots were taken by John 
edberg, Field Editor for World Wildlife Illus- 
trated. Above: A nesting goshawk launches a 

ontal attack on the intruding Swedberg. Below: 
A young screech owl plays peek-a-boo from a 
hollow tree. 



- 



■*1 




> \ • ' 



29 




Taxidermist Ed Shaw casts an appraising eye on 
assistant Burt Robbins as he tacks on the hide of 
a wild boar. Ed mounted specimens for our exhibit 
at the New England Sportsman's Show as well as 
our rapidy growing museum. Below: Live ducks 
paddle around an artificial pool — part of the Divi- 
sion's exhibit at the 1970 New England Sportsman's 
Show. 




Total speaking engagements for the other two 
Districts were estimated at 110. The I and E Chief 
attended the usual routine meetings. 

INFORMATIONAL MEETINGS 

In the Central District, personnel hosted a winter 
meeting inviting the press, sportsmens clubs, edu- 
cators, Scout leaders, and interested individuals. 
The meeting was intended to acquaint people with 
lesser known Division activities. Personnel and proj- 
ect leaders from Westboro were asked to detail their 
programs and projects. Despite one of the season's 
worst winter storms, 24 persons attended. Interest 
was keen and attendees expressed desire to make 
the event a semi-annual affair. 

Central District personnel also met on several 
occasions with the owners of properties adjacent 
to Connors Pond, Petersham. In an effort to ensure 
fishermen usage of this pond and its source — the 
east branch of the Swift River — the Division coor- 
dinated its activities with the Petersham Gun Club. 
Meetings were held with landowners and special 
regulations were established permitting controlled 
use of the fishery. (Other District involvement at 
Connors Pond included trout stocking, development 
of access trails and parking areas, the erection of 
signs, and the seeding of the shoreline to improve 
the area for waterfowl.) 

Also in the Central District, personnel participated 
in teaching efforts at the summer youth training 
school for Grange members, at various Boy Scout 
and Girl Scout training sessions and at Framingham 
State College. 

CONSERVATION CLUB 

The Division played a major role in assisting 
others to set up, organize and plan the programs 
for a young peoples' conservation club in Westboro. 
Goals were suggested and programs offered for the 
future. 

MUSEUM 

The Division's museum on the third floor of the 
Westboro Field Headquarters underwent a rapid 
expansion during the fiscal year. A few of the major 
contributions received include: 1. a fly display of j 
wets, dries and streamers tied by former Fish and 
Game Director Horatio S. Dumont and contributed i 
by his son John; 2. an antique salmon rod made by 
J. E. Tulip and donated by his son Jerry; and 3. a 
mounted snowy owl donated by Clarence E. Hinkley. 

FinalTy, Ed Shaw — acknowledged above for his 
kind assistance in mounting specimens for our ex- 
hibit at the New England Sportsman's Show — has 
also volunteered to mount legally-harvestable shore 
birds in Massachusetts. When complete, the display 
will contain over 70 birds. The Division will be grate- 
ful for all legally-taken contributions. Birds will be 
accepted by Ed at his studio at 742 Broadway, U.S. 
Rt. 1, Everett. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard Cronin 

Chief, Information and Educatior 



30 



continued from page 24) 

Twenty-three Torengo crab apple trees and 20 Washi- 
ngton Hawthorne trees were planted. 
Permanently established fields were top-dressed with 
ime and fertilizer. 

[Four acres of Timothy were seeded and three and 
Dne-half acres of buckwheat and millet used. 
Twelve acres were cleared with chain saws and 
I'otary cutters. 

Eight and a-half acres of brush and foliage were 
sprayed. 

-ive miles of roadside were either foliage sprayed 
Dr brush-cut. 
DOWNFALL: 

Approximately 10.25 miles of roads were maintained 
n some form. Culverts were installed where neces- 
sary and roads were top-dressed with additional 
gravel. 

Boundary surveys were made and marked along 
10,500 feet of boundary. Two-hundred metal boun- 
jary markers were used and 415 signs were erected 
:hroughout the area. 

Mmost 4,000 feet of trail were marked with various 
ype signs. Thirty-five new wooden signs were con- 
structed. 



Twelve Torengo crab apple and 31 Washington Haw- 
thorne trees were planted. 

Thirty-two acres of permanently established fields 
were top-dressed with fertilizers. 
Twenty acres of timothy were seeded and two acres 
of buckwheat, millet, canary grass mix was also 
planted. 

About 15.5 acres were cleared by chain saw and 
rotary cutters. 

Twelve and a half miles of roadside were brush-cut 
and/or foliage sprayed. 

Twenty-five acres of stumps and 41 acres of brush 
were foliage sprayed. 

A total of 247 nesting boxes were maintained and 34 
were replaced. Replacement parts, covers and pred- 
ator guards were also made. 

About an acre of scattered water chestnut plants were 
sprayed on the Sudbury-Assabet River system using 
kerosene and 2, 4-D. 
PANTRY BROOK: 

Key boundaries were established and 20 signs 
erected. 



FINANCIAL REPORT 
JULY 1, 1969 TO JUNE 30, 1970 



RECEIPTS FROM FISHING, HUNTING AND TRAPPING LICENSES 

















Fees 


















Retained by 


Net 














Gross 


Town Clerk 


Returned 


Licenses 






Price 


Number 


Amount 


or City 


To State 


Series 


No. 


1 


Res. Cit. Fishing 


(5.25) 


122,630 


643,807.50 


30,445.50 


613,362.00 


Series 


No. 


2 


Res. Cit. Hunting 


(5.25) 


56,439 


296,304.75 


14,000.75 


282,304.00 


Series 


No. 


3 


Res. Cit. Sporting 


(8.25) 


56,449 


465,704.25 


14,005.25 


451,699.00 


Series 


No. 


4 


Res. Cit. Minor Fishing 


(3.25) 


18.303 


59,484.75 


4,561.75 


54,923.00 


Series 


No. 


4-A 


Res. Cit. Female Fishing 


(4.25) 


24,097 


102,412.25 


5,983.00 


96,429.25 


Series 


No. 


5 


Res. Cit. Minor Trapping 


(3.25) 


199 


646.75 


49.50 


597.25 


Series 


No. 


6 


Trapping 


(8.75) 


652 


5,705.00 


161.25 


5,543.75 


Series 


No. 


7 


Non-Res. 7 day Fishing 


(5.25) 


2,184 


11,466.00 


542.25 


10,923.75 


Series 


No. 


a 


Non-Res. Fishing 


(9.75) 


3,078 


30,010.50 


761.50 


29,249.00 


Series 


No. 


9-A 


Alien Fishing 


(9.75) 


1,071 


10,442.25 


267.75 


10,174.50 


Series 


No. 


10 


Non-Res. or Alien Hunting 


(16.25) 


1,821 


29,591.25 


357.75 


29,233.50 


Sei'ies 


No. 


12 


Duplicate Licenses 


(.50) 


2,958 


1,479.00 


— 


1,479.00 


Series 


No. 


15 


Res. Cit. Sporting 


(Free) 


16,688 


— 


- — 


— 


Series 


No. 


17 


Res. Cit. (Old Age Asst.) 
Paraplegic and to the Blind 


(Free) 


1,419 


— 


— 


— ■ 


Series 


No. 


18 


Military or Naval 


(Free) 


5,882 
313,870 1 


— 


— 


— 




,657,054.25 


71,136.25 


1,585,918.00 












Refunds 






37.75 








$1,585,880.25 



31 







3TSMENS DOLLAR WAS SPENT 

















946.57 


61 1.62 


4', 








101,634.24 


8' i 


















167,372.87 


16', 






I58,f 










- 6 






cement 


i 


120.443.97 






rch 












.2841 


It'. 000.00 






nadromous 














28,8 


363,947.93 


12', 


PROGRAMS 










ms 


1070-2400 




284,283.61 


9', 


ment 


-2400 


120,443.98 






Wild 












■2451 


11,105.27 






.arch 










I" nit 


1070-2141 


8,365.71 






oh 












' " 1-2 


202,1 U.67 
















i-nt 


1070-2502 


3.500.00 


345,556.63 


11', 


ENGINEERING AND CONS' 








field 










[quarters 


1070-0093 


14.160.00 






ruction and 










Improvements, 










Sandwich 


1070-2304 


10.111.45 






j n Plans for 










■ ins 


1070-2310 


25.000.00 


49,271.45 




LAND ACQUISITION 










Acquisition of Land & 










Lers tor Fish »v. 










Wildlife Management 










Pui | 


1070-2204 


50.000.00 






l-and & Waters for 










Kish & Wildlife 










Management 










Pit ; 


1070-9012 


76,003.40 






l-and £ Water 










Acquisition & 










Development 


1070-9013 


401.705.04 


52 1.708.44 


18', 


DEPT. NATURAL RESOURCES 








Supervision Public 










Hunting & Fishing 










Grounds 


1020-0200 


12.607.20 






ural Resou: 










Officers - Salaries & 










Expenses 


1020-0000 


199,186.19 






Office of the 










Commissioner 


1000-0000 (a) 


112.206.82 


324,000.21 


11', 



I 'tanned to be restored to Inland Fish & Game Fu 
GROUP INSURANCE 

HOARD OF RETIREMENT (Two Years) 
Pensions 
■ KING SERIAL BONDS 
INTEREST ON DEBT SERVICE ON BOND 

^Continuing Appropriations 

Reimbursable Federal Funds 

Reimbursable Federal Funds 

. Reimbursable Federal Funds 



nd) 



37.785.95 

78.000.00 

200,000.00 

83,600.00 



APPROPRIATIONS & EXPENDITURES 




i% 

3',<; 

7 '/< 
3% 



$2,977,775.95 100 r /, 



Ur„unl No. & Title 



Expenditures 
Appropriation & Liabilities Reverted 





Administration 
Repairs u> Field 


$ 218,409.00 


$ 216,248.86 


$ 2,160.14 




Headquarters isldg. 
Acquisition of Land 


20,000.00 


14,160.00 


5,840.00 




and Waters 
• ies 


50.000.00 


50,000.00 


— 




Management 


627,216.00 


626,232.56 


983.44 




n A nadromous 


25,000.00 


25,000.00 


— 




ation 


25,000.00 


23,856.60 


1.143.40 




Project 

Wiln i ment 
Wildl i 


51.115.00 
534,675.00 


50,787.67 
525,171.56 


327.33 
9,503.44 




•ation** 


204,820.00 


202,141.67 


2,678.33 




• ment'-'" 


3,500.00 


3,500.00 


— 




$1,759,735.00 


$1,737,098.92 


$22,636.08 



' ■ . ■ 

Imp- i rout 

ndwich 
.- by Wild 



Continuing Balance 

Appropriations Expenditures Forward 



9011 


Construction 
Quabbin Fish 










Hatchery 


38.46 


— 


88.41 


9012 


Land & Waters 
for Fish & Wildlife 










Management Purposes 


108.304.50 


76,003.40 


32,301.1(1 


9013 


Land & Water 
Acquisition and 










Development ] 


,000,000.00 


401,705.04 


598.294.M 




$1 


.168.876.12 


$198,925.16 


$669,950.91 


50'/, 


Reimbursed Federal Funds 








75-; 


Reimbursed Federal Funds 








Oil', 


Reimbursed Federal Funds 









<i a ] 



SUMMARY OF FISH AND GAME INCOME 

Fishing, Hunting and Trapping 

Licenses $1,585,880.25* 

Special Licenses, Trap Registrations 

and Tags 7,240.60*' 

Archery Stamps 4,373.95 

Rents 4,488.25 

Miscellaneous and Sales 35,323.64 

Court Fines 13,142.50 

Refunds Prior Year 2,882.17 

Pittman-Robertson Federal Aid 104,732.87 

Dingell-Johnson Federal Aid 68,537.79 

Anadromous Fish Projects 

Federal Aid 7,560.59 

Mass. Mourning Dove 

Reimbursement 3,500.00 

$1,837,662.61 
*See Receipts from Fishing, Hunting, and Trapping 
Licenses. 
* *See Analysis of Special Licenses. 

TRANSFERS TO INLAND FISHERIES 
AND GAME FUND 

Interest on Investments $ 23,090.92 

Gasoline Tax Apportionment 249,591 

Surplus in Inland Fisheries & Game Fund 

as of June 30, 1970 $431,94848 

ANALYSIS OF SPECIAL LICENSES 

Number 
Type of License Issued Receipts 

TRAP REGISTRATIONS: 

Initial 112 $ 112.00 

Renewal 278 278.00 

Duplicate 1 

FUR BUYERS: 

Resident 24 240.("i 

Non-Resident 3 60.00 

TAXIDERMIST: 

PROPAGATORS: (Special Fish) 82 410.00 

Initial 23 115.00 

Renewal 178 534.00 

(Fish) 

Initial 14 70.0 

Renewal 80 240.00 

(Birds & Mammals) 

Initial 102 ."1""" 

Renewal 391 1,178.00 

(Dealers) 

Initial 6 80.00 

Renewal 80 2-1 

Additional 534 

(Indiv. Bird or Mammal) 

Initial 38 

Renewal 76 

SHINERS FOR BAIT: ( 1 duplicate) 159 

FIELD TRAIL LICENSES: 3 

QUAIL FOR TRAINING DOGS: 

{j^- 1 -. % ?: 

Renewal >« " 

COMMERCIAL SHOOTING PRESERVES: 12 

TRAPPING OF CERTAIN BIRDS; 3 

MOUNTING PERMITS: 15 ,';'' ' , 

SPECIAL FIELD TRIAL PERMITS: 30 

TAGS: 

Game 5,172 

Fish 22,000 

Commercial Shooting .... 500 

$7,240.6" 



17,163.28 



37,051.83 
2,264.61 



32 



STANDING ALL-TIME MASSACHUSETTS FRESHWATER FISHING RECORDS 

THRU JUNE 30,1970 



Species 


Weight 




Length Girth 


Place Caught 


How Caught 


Date 


Largemouth Bass 
Smallmouth Bass 


12 lbs. 


1 


oz. 


25%" 


21%" 


Palmer River, Rehoboth 


bait casting 


5-9-63 


6 lbs. 


12 


oz. 


21" 




Pleasant Lake, Harwich 


spinning 


5-14-67 


Northern Pike 


24 lbs. 


8 


oz. 


45 y 2 " 


22" 


Onota Lake, Pittsfield 


live bait 


1-13-67 


Pickerel 


9 lbs. 


5 


oz. 


29%" 




Pontoosuc Lk., Lanesboro 




- -54 


Rainbow Trout 


8 lbs. 


4 


oz. 


26" 


16" 


Deep Pond, Falmouth 


live bait 


10-15-66 


Brown Trout 


19 lbs. 


10 


oz. 


31%" 


22%" 


Wachusett Res., Boylston 


spinning 


5-19-66 


Lake Trout 


13 lbs. 


1 


oz. 


31" 




Quabbin Res., Pelham 


trolling 


9-13-63 


Shad 


8 lbs. 


4 


oz. 


26" 


19" 


Palmer River, Rehoboth 


fly casting 


5-14-70 


Channel Catfish 


13 lbs. 


8 


oz. 


30" 


19" 


Conn. Riv., Turners Falls 


live bait 


7-18-64 


Walleye 


9 lbs. 


3 


OZ. 






Assawompsett Pond, 
Lakeville 


bait casting 




Bluefrill 


lib. 






11%" 


91/2" 


Bog Pond, Norton 


spinning 


10-17-65 


Bullhead 


5 lbs. 


9 


oz. 


22%" 


11%" 


Conn. Riv., Hadley 


live bait 


6-8-63 




5 lbs. 


8 


oz. 


22%" 


14" 


Leverett Pd., Leverett 


live bait 


8-2-65 




4 lbs. 


9 


oz. 


22%" 


11%" 


Conn. Riv., Chicopee 


live bait 


9-8-65 


Calico 


2 lbs. 


9M 


! OZ. 


18" 


14" 


Merrimack, Lowell 


spinning 


6-8-65 


White Perch 


2 lbs. 


4 


oz. 


16%" 


11%" 


Halfway Pd., Plymouth 


spinning 


6-9-65 




2 lbs. 






16%" 


11%" 


Halfway Pd., Plymouth 


spinning 


6-18-66 


Yellow Perch 


2 lbs. 


5 


oz. 


17%" 


12" 


Wachusett Res., Boylston 


spinning 


4-23-70 


Brook Trout 


6 lbs. 


4 


oz. 


24" 


14" 


Otis Reservoir, Otis 


spinning 


6-24-68 



Caught by 

George Pastick, Fall River 
Thomas Paradise, Arlington 
Kris Ginthwain, Pittsfield 
Mrs. James Martin, Stockbridge 
Roger Walker, Eastondale 
Dana DeBlois, Sterling 
LeeRoy DeHoff, Suffield, Conn. 
Warren L. Taylor, Warren 
Robert Thibodo, Northampton 
William Spaulding, Whitman 

Robert Barrett, Stoughton 
Mrs. Erna Storie, Chicopee Falls 
Stephen Brozo, No. Amherst 
Joseph Kida, Chicopee 
George Olsson, Lowell 
Richard Rock, Kingston 
Richard Rock, Kingston 
Arnold Korenblum, Marlboro 
Thomas Laptew, Granville 



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MASSACHUSETTS 
DIVISION OF 

FISHERIES AND GAME 




I 



NNUAL REPORT 1971 

We All Need Fish and Wildlife 








GOVERNOR 
FRANCIS W. SARGENT 










--'.. 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Division of Fisheries and Game 
106th Annual Report 



His Excellency, Francis W. Sargent, Governor of the 
Commonwealth, the Executive Council, the General Court, and 
the Board of Fisheries and Game: 

Gentlemen: 

! have the honor to submit herewith the One Hundred and 
Sixth Annual Report of the Division of Fisheries and Game, 
covering the fiscal year from July 1 , 1 970 to June 30, 1971 . 

James M. Shepard, Director 

CONTENTS 

The Board Reports 1 

Fisheries 3 

Game 9 

Realty 15 

Information and Education 16 

Legislation 22 

Financial Report 23 

Freshwater Fish Records 24 



Director 
JAMES M. SHEPARD 



DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAME 

Board 

ROGER D WILLIAMS, Chairman 
Sudbury 

BRADLEE E. GAGE. Secretary 
Amherst 

HARRY C. DARLING, 
East Bridgewater 

KENNETH F. BURNS 
Shrewsbury 

MARTIN H. BURNS 
Newbury 

JAMES M. SHEPARD 
Director 

RUSSELL A COOK INGHAM 
Asst. Director 

COLTON H. BRIDGES 
Superintendent 

E. MICHAEL POLLACK 
Chief Game Biologist 

WARRENW. BLANDIN 
Chief of Wildlife Research 

LOUIS H. CARUFEL 
Chief Aquatic Biologist 

RALPH R. BITZER 
Chief Fish Culturist 

RICHARDCRONIN 
Chief Information and Education 

JOSEPH JOHNSON 
Chief of Realty 

District Wildlife Managers 

Western District 

EUGENE D MORAN 

Central District 

PAUL S. MUGFORO 

Northeastern District 

WALTER HOYT 

Southeastern District 

LEWISC. SCHLOTTERBECK 



WE ALL NEED FISH AND WILDLIFE: 
Focus of the 1971 annual report 

EVERY addition to the fast-growing Endangered List bears this 
special warning-"the environment that supports you and every 
other life form on earth is having trouble supporting one more 
species.'' The emergency is not one to be left just to 
conservationists for it affects every inhabitant of earth. The loss 
of a species is an awesome tragedy, but at last we are beginning 
to see that tragedy, not as an isolated event, but as symptom of a 
much larger tragedy-the slowdecay of earth's environment. 

This recent perception imparts an importance to wildlife much 
more than aesthetic or even economic. The condition of wildlife 
mirrors our chances for survival. Half a century of wildlife 
management has demonstrated beyond all doubt that the ONLY 
way to maintain and restore wildlife on any permanent basis is 
to maintain and improve the environment that supports it. We 
live in that environment too, and if enough of us can learn to see 
wildlife as the "canary in the coal mine'' and respond swiftly and 
intelligently to its warnings, man may yet live to be an old 
species. 



THE COVERS: 1. An eastern brook trout 
rises to a well-placed dry fly. The voracious 
"brookie," now the only naturally 
occurring salmonid in Massachusetts, is 
technically not a trout but a char - a 
descendant of arctic char landlocked by 
ancient glaciers: 2. Now in the final hours 
of incubation, this hen ruffed grouse is 
reluctant to flush from her nest despite 
intruding photographer. (Photos by Jack 
Swedberg). 



Publication of this document approved by Alfred C. Holland, State Purchasing Agent. 
2M 7 72 051939 Estimated Cost Per Copy: $.65 





AT 






The Board Reports 

Legislation 

ALTHOUGH the "Permanent Protection Wetlands 
Bill" has not yet passed, an all-out effort by many 
personnel on almost all levels has done much to 
ensure its passage next year. This is perhaps the 
most important piece of legislation ever introduced 
on behalf of fish and wildlife in Massachusetts. 

We are especially pleased with the new 
amended version of Section 42 of Chapter 131. The 
original law forbade the discharge of wastes that 
pose any threat whatsoever to the inland fishery. 
In addition to the discharge of wastes the amended 
version forbids manipulation or alteration of flows 
or water levels to the extent that directly or 
indirectly injures or kills the fish or fish spawn 
therein. The fine-twice the value of the fish lost- 
goes to the Fish and Game Division. 

Personnel 

In October of 1970 the Board welcomed back an 
old friend-Roger Williams-who, upon moving back 
to Massachusetts from Connecticut, was appointed 
by Governor Francis W. Sargent to the Board and 
elected by the members as Chairman~a position he 
had held from May of 1 961 to April of 1 965. 

In May of 1 971 a testimonial dinner was held for 
Russell A. Cookingham, former Assistant Director 
of this agency and now Director of the New Jersey 
Fish and Game Division. Cookingham left a lasting 
mark with his development of Division programs in 
the Southeast Wildlife District and his 
demonstrated ability in administration in such 
areas as work on the Access Board, recodification 
of Fish and Game laws, and budget. He will be 
missed greatly by all who had the privilege to work 
with him. The Board and Division employees wish 
Russ the best of luck in his challenging new duty as 
New Jersey Fish and Game Director. 

Hearings 

The Board was encouraged by the large turnout 
of waterfowlers at our first meeting in Gardner 
Auditorium at the Boston State House. The facilities 
in the auditorium proved to be ideal and we hope, 
for the convenience of waterfowlers, that future 
hearings can also be held there. 




Board members pictured above are: Top row, left to right-Roger 
D. Williams, Chairman; Bradlee E. Gage, Secretary. Bottom row, 
left to right-Martin H. Burns, Kenneth F. Burns, Harry C. Darling. 






At a testimonial dinner held in his honor retiring Chief Fish 
Culturist, Ralph Bitzer, receives a gold watch from Fish and 
Gome Director James M. Shepard. The watch was a gift from 
Division employees in appreciation of Bitzers 53 years of 
dedicated service. (Mrs. Bitzer on right.) 




HMD 



As a result of a hearing in Berkshire County the 
Board voted to protect black bear, cutting the 
season from year-round to one week-the third 
Monday in November to the following Saturday. All 
bear hunters must have a special permit, harvest 
only bear with shotgun only, and, if successful, 
check the bear in at an official Fish and Game 
station for tagging and biological study. 

The Board conducted one of its more interesting 
official meeting-hearings in a unique atmosphere 
at the Wahconah Regional High School in Dalton as 
guests of the student Rod and Gun Club. The 
subject considered was the protection of bobcat, 
red and gray fox. The Division's Board and staff, 
together with school officials and local 
conservationists, enjoyed a luncheon prepared by 
Wahconah's home economics section. The 
experimental meeting came in response to 
Governor Sargent's suggestion that state agencies 
bring government to the people. 

Deer 

The once controversial antlerless deer permit 
system has proved successful. We are most pleased 
with the program's progress and the widespread 
support of Massachusetts sportsmen. 

This year's deer harvest was up 1 6 percent which 
is testimony enough to the program's effect on the 
size of the herd. The professional staff of the 
Division is to be congratulated for a first-rate job. 

Quabbin 

The Quabbin Reservoir continues to shine as one 
of New England's top warm and coldwater 
fisheries. The first reported spawning run of 
landlocked salmon late in the fall was encouraging. 

Creel census work continues to document the 
value of this cooperative program between the 
MDC, the Fish and Game Division and fishermen. 
Hopefully our aquatic biologists along with MDC 
experts can find an acceptable solution to the 
overabundance of smelt. 

Land 

The Division's realty program continues to be one 
of this agency's best investments of the 
sportsman's money, a LONG-TERM investment 
whose returns will be realized by present 
generations and generations yetV'j'nborn. 

An exchange between the Division and General 

Electric of 63 acres for a 1 5-acre easement and the 

sale to the Division of another.44 acres for $1000 

were important buildinq blocks* in. J+i^ -tee-Lenox 
r ° ••••• • • • 

Housalonic River area. 



The Division is putting together a report on the 
land acquisition program, detailing where the 
sportsman's dollar has been spent. By the time of 
our next annual report the booklet should be 
available to the public. 

Inter-agency Cooperation 

Cooperation between this Division and fish and 
game agencies in other states has increased in 
recent years. One notable example of this 
cooperation occurred in February with the liming of 
327-acre Wallum Lake in Douglas. Rhode Island and 
Massachusetts, whose border is bisected by the 
lake, applied 350 tons of lime, thus reducing the 
acidity of the water and increasing the productivity 
for coldwater species. Both states have had 
cooperative trout stocking programs in Wallum 
since the original cooperative reclamation. 

Anti-hunting Sentiment 

We are becoming increasingly alarmed at the 
growing anti-hunting hysteria presently sweeping 
the country. Director Shepard and the International 
Association of Game, Fish and Conservation 
Commissioners are to be applauded for their solid 
stance in the defense of hunting as a sport. 

Field Headquarters 

In last year's report we commented on the fact 
that the Division had outgrown its present Field 
Headquarters. We also pointed out that a large 
tract of land with two buildings on it was given to 
the Division by the Westboro State Hospital. It was 
recommended by the Bureau of Buildings that the 
structures be destroyed and new buildings erected 
in their place. 

This past year bids were put out for the removal 
of the buildings and material. The site, overlooking 
Lake Chauncey, is an ideal location for the new 
Field Headquarters. 

The Board would like to take this opportunity to 
thank all those who make this agency function~a 
dedicated staff, the Governor and legislature, the 
media, town, county, state and Federal agencies, 
and a dedicated following of sportsmen. 



Respectfully submitted, 
Roger D. Williams, Chairman 
Bradlee E. Gage, Secretary 
Harry C. Darling 
Kenneth F. Burns 
Martin H. Burns 



^ 




imm 

photo by Werner Meinel 



DURING the 1971 fiscal year, fisheries research 
and management programs continued in the 
general areas of anadromous fish, coldwater fish, 
and warmwater fish studies, development 
activities and special study projects on pesticides 
and the Northfield Mountain pumped storage 
project. 

Anadromous Fish Restoration 

The Connecticut River continued to serve as the 
focal point for Massachusetts anadromous fish 
efforts. The program on the Connecticut is a 
coordinated endeavor involving the four basin 
states--Massachusetts, Connecticut, New 
Hampshire and Vermont--as well as two Federal 
agencies, the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife 
and National Marine Fisheries Service. The 
coordinated program is premised on extending 
American shad to the limits of their historic range, 
Bellows Falls, Vermont, and restoring a run of 
Atlantic salmon. 

In accomplishing these objectives shad 
population, behavior, and utilization studies have 
been in progress in Massachusetts. Creel census 
indicates that the shad is an important sport fishing 
resource at Holyoke with 17,558 anglers catching 



14,522 shad during the spring run. 

Shad behavior studies, using conventional and 
ultrasonic tags, show interesting results on fish 
movements in the river. Shad movements have 
been determined in the Turners Falls Canal and 
from below the Northfield Mountain pumped 
storage project tailrace upstream to Vernon, 
Vermont. Other migratory behavior and potential 
delay at the Holyoke dam was evaluated by 
tagging 1,223 adult shad below Holyoke. During 
the past four years 4,756 shad have been tagged. 

A plant of 24,380 Atlantic salmon smolt was 
made in the spring of 1971 by the four states and 
Federal fishery agencies. Four tags from fish 
stocked in 1970 were returned from the Bay of 
Fundy, Nova Scotia. Such data further substantiated 
suitability of the lower 84 miles of the Connecticut 
River for seaward migrating Atlantic salmon 
smolts. The Palmer Hatchery produced 4,450 
Atlantic salmon smolts for the Connecticut River 
program. 

In any anadromous fish restoration program fish 
passage problems at major barriers must be 
resolved. To this end the four basin states with 






if,'S , «>r 



A Connecticut River shad is tagged as part 
of a coordinated program aimed at 
extending the species to the limits of its 
historic range, Bellows Falls, Vermont. 



assistance of their respective Attorneys General 
petitioned the Federal Power Commission in 
January 1971 to hold a formal hearing on fish 
passage problems which existed at Holyoke, 
Turners Falls, Vernon, Bellows Falls and Wilder 
dams. In May of 1971, the Holyoke Water Power 
Company reversed its position and indicated 
willingness to fund and negotiate for expanded fish 
passage facilities at the Holyoke dam which 
opened the way toward initial meetings. 

Two other anadromous fish projects, dependent 
to a large degree on the Connecticut River shad run 
for fertilized eggs, were continued in 1971. For 
both projects 3.5 million shad eggs were stripped 
and fertilized in egg-taking operations on the 
Connecticut River. 

The southeastern Massachusetts shad study was 
designed to determine feasibility of restoring shad 
to streams through plants of fertilized eggs and 
transfer of adults, in addition to obtaining 
information on the existing fishery. Approximately 
300,000 fertilized shad eggs were stocked in the 
Agawam River below Halfway Pond and 54 adult 
shad consisting of 33 males and 21 females were 
netted in the North River, transported and stocked 
in the Mattapoisett River, Rochester. Creel census 
on the Palmer River indicated 1 ,208 anglers and a 
catch of 351 shad. The North River produced 456 
shad for 2,298 anglers and yielded a new state 
record for American shad of 8-Vt pounds. 

The Merrimack River anadromous fish project, a 
cooperative venture between Massachusetts and 
New Hampshire continued with low-level activity in 
the Massachusetts portion. Fertilized shad egg 
plants were concentrated in the New Hampshire 
section. 

The Division also provided assistance to the 
Division of Marine Fisheries in rearing coho salmon 
at the Palmer Hatchery. Fertilized shad eggs were 
jointly obtained and stocked by the Division of 
Marine Fisheries in the Nemasket and Charles 
Rivers. 

Coldwater Fish Investigations 

The trout and salmon hatching and rearing 
program continues to provide the basis for the 
coldwater fisheries program. Several coldwater 
fisheries investigation projects are in progress for 




the purpose of evaluating utilization and 
management of the hatchery product. 

The eighteenth year of continuous management 
evaluation at Quabbin Reservoir indicated that 
from April through October 60,231 anglers 
harvested 70,939 fish weighing 53,293 pounds. The 
number of anglers increased 16 percent over the 
previous year, while the number and pounds of fish 
harvested by anglers increased 30 to 27 percent, 
respectively. Total harvest of salmonids increased 
5.6 percent over 1969 levels. The harvest of 
landlocked salmon increased to 887 fish, lake trout 
to 1,454, and rainbow trout to 4,424. 

The smelt population continued to expand and 
the biological impact as a forage fish was evident 
in increased average condition factor (W=KL3) on 
both landlocked salmon (0.86) and lake trout 
(0.97). The 1 971 spring smelt run expanded into 1 5 
tributaries; as a result Division personnel 
destroyed partial egg masses in nine tributaries. 
No treatment was carried out on six streams. (This 
constituted a net gain in smelt production of two 
streams since smelt were present in only four 
tributaries in 1969.) Partial control was deemed 
necessary due to smelt clogging screens, 
chlorinator, and generator in the water distribution 
system during the summer of 1970. The screening 
study by Camp, Dresser & McKee was completed 
with plans and specifications for the Winsor Dam 
outlet. Additional problems in the Wachusett 
aqueduct were encountered so before screen 
installation feasibility can be determined more 
study will be required. 



Salmonid stocking in the reservoir was increased 
to exert biological control on the expanding smelt 
population. Some 36,200 catchable rainbow trout, 
27,000 spring yearling landlocked salmon, and 
66,500 lake trout fingerlings were stocked. All of 
the lake trout and 12,500 landlocked salmon had 
been hatched and reared at the Palmer Hatchery. 

The second year of study on Littleville Reservoir 
was completed. Creel census indicated 12,966 
anglers harvested 9,347 trout weighing 5,232 
pounds and 1,301 warmwater fish weighing 253 
pounds. Fishing pressure on this 275-acre reservoir 
amounted to 165 hours of angling per acre and a 
harvest of 20 pounds of fish per acre. With the 
warmwater fish population re-established, 
reclaimed trout pond status was terminated. Future 
plans are to manage Littleville as a two-story 
fishery. 

In August 1970, a temperature profile and 
vertical distribution of dissolved oxygen was 
determined for 43 ponds. Thirteen ponds contained 
a percentage volume of trout water (70° F. or less 
temperature and containing 5 ppm of dissolved 
oxygen). 



Trout-forage-fish relationships involving sea-run 
alewives in Higgins and Hathaway Ponds entered 
the third year of study. The objective of this project 
is to determine if reproduction from sea-run 
alewives stocked in trout ponds serves to increase 
condition factor and growth of rainbow trout. Four 
years are required to complete the study with 
rainbow trout after which the project is to be 
replicated using brown trout. 

In an effort to provide additional angling 
opportunity for coldwater species and endeavor to 
establish kokanee salmon in Onota Lake, 94,200 
fingerlings reared at the Palmer Hatchery were 
stocked. During the year three kokanee salmon up 
to 1 1 inches in length were caught by anglers. Fall 
fish sampling only yielded one kokanee. 
Preliminary indications are that inter-specific 
competition caused by the smelt population may 
prove to be the limiting factor in establishing any 
significant kokanee salmon fishery in Onota Lake. 

To determine coldwater fish potential in streams 
where this capability is largely unknown or may 
have changed, the Housatonic River drainage 



Massachusetts Trout Distribution from 
State and Federal Hatcheries 



Brook Trout 
State 138,500 

Federal 75,000 

Total trout distributed 
Total trout distributed 
Total Federal trout 
Total catchables 
Total fingerlings 



Brown Trout Rainbow Trout 



1 16,790 
45,000 

6"-9" 

9" plus 
6" plus 
6" plus 
6" minus 



722,179 
9,554 

303,015 
674,464 
129,544 
,107,023 
324,194 



Hatchery Poundage 



Hatchery 




Total lbs. 


Charles L. McLaughlin 


Hatchery 


214,865 


Montague Hatchery 




75,593 


Palmer Hatchery 




500 


Sandwich Hatchery 




107,182 


Sunderland Hatchery 




106,635 


Total State 




504,775 


Total Federal 




28,037 


Grand Total 




532,812 



Total 

977,469 

129,554 
1,107,023 



This table includes all trout stocked for fishing and management 
purposes. It does not include interhatchery shipment or retained ^ 

brood stock. ^* ' 









Fish and Game photo by John Lindenberg 

Assistant Aquatic Biologist John Lindenberg, an experienced skin diver, used an underwater camera, 
donated to the Division by the Greater Lowell Fly Tyers, to photograph these rainbows being stocked 
through the ice. Here and on other occasions Lindenberg observed the fish to disperse over the entire pond 
almost instantly. 



The graph below depicts the increase in size of Division trout 
since 1968. 




+ FISH 



6-9" FISH 



' "<<>. 



i 969 



1970 



1971 



system was investigated. Twenty-eight stations 
were sampled for fish using rotenone, electro- 
fishing gear, gill nets and seine. A total of 14,176 
fish were collected representing 27 species. Based 
on abundance the five most common species 
ranked in order were white sucker, blacknose 
dace, brown trout, longnose dace and brook trout. 
Chemical and physical data indicated the drainage 
contained extensive coldwater fish habitat. 



Warmwater Fish Investigations 

All warmwater fish study activities were 
continued in 1970 with the addition of analysis of 
fish for mercury content. 



In Congamond Lakes where a forage study is in 
progress on landlocked alewives, the vertical 
distribution of this species was determined 
throughout the year. In the spring they were found 
to range from surface to bottom with a heavy 
concentration close to the bottom. In the summer, 
they were distributed evenly down to the 
hypolimnion. In the fall and winter under ice cover, 
landlocked alewives tended to stay in the middle 
layers of water, avoiding both surface and bottom. 
Forage value of landlocked alewives appears quite 
high for chain pickerel. 

Results of Lake Chauncey fish sampling showed a 
further decrease in the walleye population. Only 
three adults were sampled ranging from 1 5.5 to 20 
inches in length. No evidence of the 1 968, 1 967 and 
1966 year classes of walleye fry stocked as 
experimental maintenance plants was found. This 
demonstrated the folly of attempting to introduce 
or sustain a walleye population in the presence of 
an existing fish population through stocking fry. 

The northern pike population in Cheshire 
Reservoir was found to be increasing. The winter 
ice fishery for northern pike more than doubled, 
increasing from 317 pounds in 1970 to 636 pounds 
in 1971. On 21 February 1971 one party fishing the 
north basin of the lake caught a total of 52 pounds 
of northern pike with the largest of the five fish 
measuring 39.5 inches and weighing 19 pounds. 
Growth rates of northern pike from Cheshire are 
rapid and average at age group: I, 1 1 .2; II, 21 .0; III, 
30.1 ; and IV, 33.8 inches. 

Evaluation of weed control practices and effect 
on fish populations continued at Little Chauncey 
with an additional application of 2,4-D pellets to 
suppress emergent aquatic vegetation. Since the 
Department of Public Health conducted a weed 
control project for Billington Sea, Plymouth, 
employing sodium arsenite, the Division, due to 
concern of adverse effects of this herbicide on the 
aquatic ecosystem, initiated a two-year study. The 
treatment program consisted of an application of 
6,000 gallons of sodium arsenite to kill submerged 
aquatic vegetation. Plankton, benthic organisms 
and fish served as the focal point for pre and post- 
treatment investigations. 

To determine if mercury, an environmental 
contaminant, was present in fish from 
Massachusetts, 59 fish collected from 27 statewide- 
scattered sample sites were analyzed for mercury 
content at the Field Headquarters in Westboro. A 
Perkin-Elmer, Model 303, Atomic Absorption 
Spectrophotometer was used for analyses. Sample 
cross checks were made with four other 
laboratories with close agreement of results. 
Analysis of tissue revealed mercury concentrations 
from 0.03 to 1 .36 ppm. Eight of the 24 fish collected 




The Division's laboratory at Westboro Field Headquarters 
is equipped to monitor statewide trends in mercury, 
pesticide and PCB pollution. 



from 1 1 streams contained mercury at or above the 
0.5 ppm level. With the exception of two alewives 
collected in the vicinity of a known mercury 
pollution source on the Taunton River in Dighton all 
fish containing mercury in excess of 0.5 ppm 
consisted of predators; walleye, smallmouth bass, 
largemouth bass and chain pickerel. These fish 
were collected from the Housatonic, Connecticut, 
Millers and Merrimack Rivers. Fourteen of the 35 
fish collected from lakes and ponds contained 
mercury above the 0.5 ppm level. With the 
exception of a redbreast sunfish from Billington 
Sea, Plymouth, all fish above the 0.5 ppm level 
were predators or of a predator size. Salmonids 
collected from the wild were found to contain low 
levels of mercury, 0.32 ppm or less. Twenty-two 
trout from the McLaughlin, Sandwich, Sunderland 
and Montague hatcheries were also analyzed and 
found to contain levels ranging from 0.0 to 0.10 
ppm. 






Survey and inventory work to update information 
on pond fish population status was carried out on 
15 ponds during the summer months. 



Development Activities 

At Wallum Lake, Douglas, 175 tons of ground 
limestone was spread on the ice at the northern 
portion of the lake in Massachusetts. The Rhode 
Island Division of Conservation spread an equal 
quantity on the southern portion of the 327-acre 
interstate lake. Previously, poor trout survival had 
been attributed to low pH conditions at Wallum and 
the liming operation was designed to correct this 
condition. A pH of 5.0 in January prior to liming 
increased to 6.5 after ice-out in April. The lake will 
be checked periodically to determine term of 
improvement. 

Four ponds in southeastern Massachusetts 
totaling 329 acres were reclaimed for trout 
management. The ponds were Fearing, Little and 
Sandy, Plymouth, and Peters, Sandwich. Following 
reclamation in November and December 45,480 
rainbow trout fingerlings were stocked in the 
treated ponds. 

Additional work consisted of fishing area 
maintenance and improvement. Roads were 
maintained and improved for fishing access on the 
Squannacook, Westville and Birch Hill Wildlife 
Management Areas. A parking area and boat 
launching ramp were constructed at Little 
Chauncey Pond, Northboro, and facilities enlarged 
at Chauncey Pond, Westboro. 

Pesticide Studies 

The first year of study on pesticides funded in 
part by the Division of Water Pollution Control as 
Research and Demonstration Project 70-9 was 
completed. The major objectives of the study are to 
monitor major watersheds of the state to 
determine pesticide pollution trends and 
investigate the use of freshwater mussels as 
indicator organisms. 

During the year, 85 fish from sixteen sample 
stations were analyzed. The trend of DDT and its 
analog residues in fish appears to portray a 
general decline from 1 968 to 1 970. This may in part 
be due to developed capability to separate 
polychlorinated biphenyls and/ or restrictions 
imposed on the use of DDT in Massachusetts. 
Polychlorinated biphenyls were found present in 
fish samples from nine streams. 

Additional study on continuous flow low-level 
exposure of mussels is planned to determine rate 
of tissue concentration of materials in respect to 



elapsed time. Also, field use of mussels is planned 
to demonstrate whether biological monitoring can 
be employed to establish general locus of the 
source of compound introduction in streams. 

Northfield Resident Fish Study 

In January 1969 the Division proposed certain 
resident fish studies in the Connecticut River north 
of Turners Falls to Northeast Utilities Service 
Company. The study proposal was in accordance 
with conditions imposed by the Federal Power 
Commission in issuing the Northfield Project 
license to the company. The study objectives were 
to determine effect, if any, of the operation of the 
Northfield Mountain pumped storage project on 
fish in the river. 

In September 1970, the study, which is funded 
completely by the company, was initiated. Broad 
facets of the study will include investigating the 
fish population complex and relative abundance, 
angler utilization of the fishery, invertebrate 
community, and water chemistry parameters. This 
work will be conducted over a four-year period on a 
pre and post-pumped storage operational basis. 

Massachusetts Cooperative Fishery Unit 

Three projects financially supported by the 
Division of Fisheries and Game were conducted by 
the unit located at the University of Massachusetts. 

The first study concerned the behavior and 
migration of shad as affected by environmental 
parameters in the Connecticut River. Twenty-eight 
shad were tagged with sonic tags and behavioral 
patterns were monitored. The purposes of the 
study are to determine relationship of swimming 
rates with spawning activities and schooling 
intensity, and behavior of shad lifted over the 
Holyoke dam. 

Another study involves a method of storing shad 
sperm or "milt" for future use in artificially 
fertilizing eggs. Shad spawning activities, 
characteristics of spawning areas and location of 
potential spawning sites are also part of this study. 

The third Unit project is investigating some 
aspects of the life history of the blueback herring in 
the Connecticut River. Age and growth, spawning 
period, fecundity and food habits of juveniles are 
being determined. 

All three studies relate to the Connecticut River 
and the Division's interest in the anadromous fish 
restoration program. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Colton H. Bridges, Superintendent 



&& 




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THE primary objective of wildlife research and 
management is to insure the preservation of native 
species in the wild and to harvest wisely only 
surplus numbers of those few species termed 
"game." Intelligent harvest implies a prior 
knowledge of how many animals are required to 
maintain a wildlife population at a desired level. 
Evaluating the population structure of a particular 
species and its interrelationships with other plants 
and animals in the wildlife community is 
necessarily a basic function of wildlife research. 

Complementing research findings is the 
application of management techniques to arrive at 
desired wildlife population levels, thus insuring the 
continuity of the wildlife source, and where 
applicable, providing a harvestable surplus crop. 

White-tailed Deer Project 

The 1971 harvest of deer totaled 2,403. Of this 
number, 36 were taken by archers during the 12- 
day archery season, November 16 through 
November 28, 1 970. The harvest was composed of 
1 ,598 males and 769 females from a total of 2,367 
deer taken during the shotgun season. Twenty-four 
males and 12 females were taken during the 



Fish and Game photo by Bill Byrne 

archery season. The harvest represents an increase 
of 364 deer above the 1969 figure. Twenty-six 
percent of the total harvest was taken in Berkshire 
County. The counties of Berkshire, Franklin and 
Worcester accounted for 62 percent of the 
statewide harvest. Gunners took 58 percent 
(1,379) of the total harvest on the first and last 
days of the season. 

Antlerless deer permits were issued in the 
following categories: 



Sportsmen (mainland Massachusetts) 
Nantucket 
Farmer landowner 
Total 



6,000 
400 
347 
6,747 



The success rate of permit holders was 1 in 6 
considering both male and female deer. Thus, 
antlerless deer permit holders accounted for 48 
percent (1,141) of the total 1970 harvest. 

Natural Resources Officers reported 698 non- 
hunting deer mortalities through the period 
January 1 to December 31, 1970. Of this number, 
324 were males and 321 females. No sex data 
were given for 43 additional deer. 




Above: Chief of Wildlife Research, Warren Blandin, steadies 
recently captured wild turkey poult while Project Leader Jim 
Cardoza measures primaries to determine age. Below: A wild 
turkey bolts into the air immediately after release. A far cry 
from their sluggish domestic cousins, wild birds are excellent 
flyers capable of speeds in excess of 50 mph. 




Motor vehicles accounted for 57 percent (400) of 
the total non-hunting mortalities; dogs accounted 
for 29 percent (204) of the non-hunting mortalities. 
These two categories represent 86 percent of all 
reported non-hunting deer mortalities. Fifty 
percent of all non-hunting mortalities occurred 
between January 1 and April 30, 1970. During the 
same time, 95 percent of the dog kills were 
reported. These data represent a two percent 
increase over the 1969 non-hunting mortalities 
(682). They also show a change in the male-female 
sex ratio in the kill. The 1969 non-hunting 
mortalities occurred in the ratio of 47.0 males to 
53.0 females as compared to 50.1 males to 49.9 
females in 1970. 

Ninety female deer collected between January 1 
and May 31, 1971, were examined. Their 
reproductive rates were as follows: 



Age Class 

Yearlings 
Two-year-old 
Three-years + 



Number 
in Sample 

27 
16 
41 



Number 
of Fetuses 

8 
26 
70 



Reproductive Rate 

0.24 Fawns per doe 
1 .63 fawns per doe 
1.71 fawns per doe 



Based upon the study of statewide deer harvest, 
non-hunting mortalities and reproductive rates, 
recommendation was made that the deer herd be 
managed as three separate units: 

Unit I Mainland Massachusetts 
Unit II Nantucket Island 
Unit III Martha's Vineyard Island 
The distribution of antlerless deer permits should 
be designed to regulate the deer harvest in each 
unit with the objective being to produce a large 
enough female segment to sustain the breeding 
population, while at the same time producing an 
increasing number of male deer for harvest. A 
substantial increase in total harvest of deer in this 
state will require that the size of the breeding 
population be permitted to expand for several 
more years under the permit system before the 
system can be used to regulate and maintain herd 
size at a level that will permit a satisfactory 
sustained yield of adult males. 

Hunter Utilization of Wildlife Management 
Areas 

Total estimated hunter effort of 14 wildlife 
management areas was 43,664 hunter trips. The 
most heavily utilized area was Birch Hill (7,200 
hunters), followed by Myles Standish (6,277), 
Crane (5,499), and Northeast (4,049). Housatonic 
Valley (685) and Quaboag (686) had the least 
usage of the areas surveyed. 

Local hunters continue to be heavy users of 
wildlife management areas. However, hunters in 



10 



the 20-50 mile distance group frequented certain 
areas (Myles Standish, Northeast) and on one area 
(Crane), hunters from beyond fifty miles 
predominated. Game bag data were collected on 
five areas. A total of 2,253 hunters were contacted, 
of whom 657 (29.2 percent) had taken at least one 
unit of game. Eight hundred thirty-one units of 
game of eight species were recorded during the 
nine-day sample period. 

Black Bear 

Recent regulation changes shortened the season 
on black bear and established a permit 
requirement and a mandatory check. Applications 
for permits were received from 214 individuals. 
These applicants were subsequently contacted by 
postal questionnaire, and a response of 177 (82.7 
percent) was achieved. Ninety-four persons hunted 
bear in 1970, of whom 45 had hunted bear in 
previous years. The average bear hunter expended 
14.5 hours during 1.9 days in pursuing his quarry. 
Seven hunters saw bear, but none succeeded in the 
harvest of one during the legal season. 

All available recent reports of bear were 
collected. Reports of 138 sightings involving 150 
bear were collected for the period 1952-1971. 
Berkshire and Franklin counties yielded 110 
reports (75.8 percent) and Hampden, Hampshire 
and Worcester counties comprised the remainder. 
A report on the history of the black bear in 
Massachusetts is being prepared. This report will 
detail trends in distribution and populations of the 
bear from pre-colonial times to the present. 

Beaver 

A total of 509 beaver were trapped in 79 
Massachusetts towns during the 1970-71 beaver 
season. Worcester, Berkshire and Franklin counties 
together yielded two-thirds (67.8 percent or 345 
beaver) of the season's harvest. Half the beaver 
(51.1 percent) were trapped in the first month of 
the season. The Conibear trap was used to take 397 
beaver, or 61 .5 percent of the harvest. The average 
price of a Massachusetts beaver pelt was $10, 
yielding an estimated harvest value of $5,090. 
Moving of nuisance beaver continued to be an 
expensive and time-consuming job for Division 
personnel. 

Turkey 

The fall 1970 Massachusetts turkey population 
on six central release areas totaled 237 turkeys. 









Fish and Game photo by Bill Byrne 

Above: A Canada goose flaps and runs over the surface 
water in courtship display. Below: A wary gander stands 
while mate broods young. 

photo by Werner Meinel 



of the 
guard 




11 




Populations on individual areas were as follows: 
Quabbin - New Salem (103); Barre - Oakham (50); 
October Mountain Area (29); Town of Mt. 
Washington (28); Douglas State Forest (24); Myles 
Standish State Forest (3). Thirty additional birds 
were present in dispersed flocks. The late-winter- 
early-spring population was 1 09 turkeys statewide. 

The turkeys of game farm ancestry, which lacked 
the strength and instincts necessary for survival 
and were a threat to the genetic health of the 
established population, were live-trapped in the 
Town of Mt. Washington using a narcosis-inducing 
chemical agent. Dispersal of turkeys from release 
sites in Barre, Douglas, and New Salem continues. 
This trend is encouraging, and public cooperation is 
requested in reporting turkeys in order that 
population movements may be carefully 
monitored. 

The Northeast Turkey Committee met in 
Falmouth, Massachusetts in October 1970. Turkey 
biologists from eight agencies discussed pertinent 
aspects of turkey research and management in 
their respective states. 

Pre-hunting Season Waterfowl Banding 

A total of 1 ,1 77 waterfowl and marsh birds were 
banded during the months of April through October 
1970. Banding was accomplished by several 
methods including nest trapping, bait trapping, 
cannon netting, airboat night lighting, and release 
of hand-reared birds. The banding total included 
377 wood ducks, 333 mallards, 174 black ducks, 25 
black x mallard hybrids, 3 mallard x domestic 
hybrids, 58 green-winged teal, 51 blue-winged teal, 
3 hooded mergansers, 1 American merganser, 1 
pintail, 50 freshwater coot, 21 sora rails, 1 1 pied- 
billed grebes, 7 common gallinules, 1 American 
bittern, 50 Canada geese and 7 screech owls. 



Winter Waterfowl Banding 

Division personnel along with three cooperators 
banded a total of 2,303 ducks at 30 locations using 
bait traps and/ or cannon nets, during the period 
January 1 to February 5, 1971. One thousand four 
hundred and fifty-three ducks were banded on 
coastal areas of which 1 ,330 were black ducks. An 
additional 850 ducks were banded at park-type 
inland sites. These included 662 mallards, 103 
blacks, 78 black X mallard hybrids and 8 other 
ducks. 

An experimental diving duck trapping program 
was hampered by poor weather conditions and the 
only bird caught was a male bufflehead. 

Wood Duck Nesting Study 

Wood duck duckling production on Suasco Valley 
watershed study areas fell 17 percent from the 
1970 average although the number of nest 
attempts increased by three. The lower production 
figure for 1 971 is due primarily to a slightly smaller 
average clutch for the 1971 nests. 

Duckling production on 1 central Massachusetts 
study areas fell 29 percent from 1970 and was 
down 13 percent from the previous three-year 
average. Part of the decline was due to the 
draining of one of the study areas limiting its 
attractiveness to nesting wood ducks. 

A check of several non-study wetlands indicated 
a slight increase in production. No numerical 
calculations can be made because of egg taking on 
some of the areas in past years. 

Forest Pheasant Project 

During the fiscal year 1,421 hybrid forest 
pheasants were released on Prescott Peninsula, 
Quabbin Reservation, and Martha's Vineyard. The 
releases were comprised of all adults. Survival and 
reproduction was noted on Martha's Vineyard in 
contrast with Quabbin Reservation releases where 
only one known hen survived the winter. Two 
males were live-trapped on Martha's Vineyard and 
used for breeding purposes. For unknown reasons 
fertility of hybrid matings has greatly declined. 

Working in cooperation with the University of 
Massachusetts, attempts were made to incorporate 
more copper pheasant blood lines into the present 
hybrid pheasant flock. However, numerous 
difficulties in handling this forest pheasant were 
experienced. 

Plans for the coming period will be to release this 
year's production on the same release site with 
continued major emphasis on associated fertility 
problems. 



12 



Woodcock Project 

During the spring of 1 97 1 , the Division conducted 
a randomized woodcock singing ground survey on 
17 routes established by the Migratory Bird 
Population Station. Division of Fisheries and Game, 
U.S. Army, and Bureau of Sports Fisheries and 
Wildlife personnel participated. 

Also during this period, Division personnel mist- 
netted and banded a total of 81 "singing males" 
plus two adult females. Two broods of woodcock 
chicks totalling seven chicks were also banded. No 
harvest data was collected during this period. 

Game Farms 

Theft of game birds at our East Sandwich Game 
Farm resulted in losses of over 400 bobwhite quail 
and over 1700 pheasants. All stolen birds were 
selected brood stock which greatly hampered the 
1971 production schedule. 

Efforts to use more automation and control game 
bird diseases at all game farms continue. 

Dove Banding Project 

The Dove Banding Project in Massachusetts was 
carried out from July 2, 1970 through October 2, 
1970 in cooperation with the Manomet Bird 
Observatory, Manomet, Massachusetts. A total of 
2040 doves were banded at 1 1 sites between 
central and eastern Massachusetts. At three of 
these sites (Wilbraham Game Farm, Newbury 
Wildlife Management Area, and Sandwich Game 
Farm) banding was done by Massachusetts Division 
of Fisheries and Game cooperators. Banding was 
done by Air Force personnel at Westover Air Force 
Base and the remaining seven sites were manned 
by personnel from the Manomet Bird Observatory. 
Sites at which 100 or more birds were banded are 
as follows: 

South Orleans 102 

Crane Wildlife Management Area 111 
Myles Standish State Forest 1014 

Newbury Wildlife Management 

Area 230 

Wilbraham Game Farm 392 

Westover Air Force Base 100 

As of this writing there have been 20 recoveries 
reported to us of doves banded in 1970. The 
recoveries are from eight states from 
Massachusetts to Florida. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Warren W. Blandin, Chief of Wildlife Research 
and E. Michael Pollack, Chief Game Biologist 



Below, top to bottom: 1. Division biologists use their 
personal bird dogs to locate woodcock nests. 2. After eggs 
hatch the woodcock crew returns to band young (Bill 
length indicates hatching date). 3. When birds flock to 
fields on summer evenings they are spotted with hand- 
held aircraft landing lights, netted and banded. 








Development and Maintenance 
of Wildlife Management Areas 




THE object of this program is to develop and 
maintain hunting and fishing areas with capability 
of supporting maximum wildlife populations. 
Concurrent with this objective, the management 
area offers other forms of outdoor recreation such 
as nature study, hiking, horseback riding, 
snowmobiling, bike riding, picnicking, berry 
picking, dog training, etc. Development objectives 
are aimed at supplying the maximum amount of 
good wildlife cover on the available amount of land 
for the maximum number of users. Maintenance 
objectives are to preserve natural cover, maintain 
existing cover, and keep management facilities 
usable. 

Wildlife carrying capacity is increased through 
agricultural planting for farm-oriented wildlife, 
manipulation of forest cover types for forest game 
and water control development for waterfowl and 
fishes. This is accomplished through grain 
plantings, brush cutting, herbiciding, timber 
harvests, tree and shrub plantings, and 
constructing dams, dikes, and channels. 

Equally important is the development and 
maintenance of management facilities such as 
buildings, roads and trails, parking lots, bridges, as 
well as posting and replacement of signs and 
boundary markers. These facilities provide easier 
access for both the area users and area managers. 

Long range management plans are being 
prepared for all the wildlife management areas. In 
1971, management plans were completed for the 
Crane, Crane Pond, Stafford Hills, Myles Standish, 
and Downfall Wildlife Management Areas. 

During fiscal 1 971 , $92,761 was spent in carrying 
out this program. Below, listed by activity, is the 
breakdown of work done. 



1. Maintenance of Buildings: 

2. Maintenance of Dams: 

3. Maintenance of Bridges: 



1 Residence 
7 Storage 

4 Headquarters 

7 Dams 

6 Vehicular 

2 Foot 



4. Construction of Roads and Trails: 3 Trails - 1 1 .2 miles 
Maintenance of Roads and 88 Trails - 91 .2 miles 

Trails: 3 Roads -7 miles 



5. Construction of Fences: 
Maintenance of Fences: 



3 Fences - .5 miles 

4 Fences- 1 mile 



6. Construction of Parking Lots: 3 Lots 

Maintenance of Parking Lots: 45 Lots 



7. Maintenance of Water Gates: 



1 Gate 



8. Construction and Erection 

of New Signs: 33 Information 

306 Boundary 

Reposting and 

Maintenance of Signs: 1,067 Information 

410 Boundary 

9. Planting Trees and Shrubs: 2,275 Trees 

7,000 Shrubs 

10. Planting Annual and Perennial 

Grains and Grasses: 344 Acres 

11. Creation of Wildlife Clearing: 44 Acres 



12. Control of Vegetation: 



13. Timber Management: 



133 Acres- brushcutting 
33 Acres - herbiciding 

32 Acres - selective cutting 



14. Construction and Maintenance 

of Wood Duck Nesting Boxes: 880 Boxes 



GAME DISTRIBUTION 

July 1, 1970 to June 30, 1971 



u 



PHEASANT LIBERATIONS: 




August 


6,910 


October - November 


40,166 


Sportsmens Club Rearing 




Program 


6,942 




54,018 


Miscellaneous Releases: 




Hybrids 


1,421 


Brood Stock (Spring release) 


3,879 


Field Trials, Youth Hunt, etc. 


1,076 


QUAIL LIBERATIONS: 




Public Hunting Grounds 


3,340 


Field Trials 


150 


Brood Stock (Spring Release) 


50 




3,540 


HARE LIBERATIONS: 




Distributed in March 


1,101 



14 



fM 



REALTY 



AT the beginning of the year the Realty 
Committee reviewed the acquisition program and 
determined that the most prudent course to follow 
would be an all-out effort to add acreage to the 
existing management areas. Many of our areas, 
the Northeast Area in particular, contain several 
interior parcels which are privately owned. While 
these parcels remain undeveloped there is no 
problem, but when homes are constructed the 
huntable area within the mangement area is, in 
many instances, greatly reduced. Wildlife 
management techniques were found to be more 
easily executed and far more successful on 
solid tracts. It is also easier to set up a workable 
system of controls during that part of the season 
when hunter concentration is at its peak. 

The fact that we were also coming to the end of 
available money for acquisition indicated that the 
best course to follow was to add to the lands we 
already had rather than spread ourselves thin on a 
random acquisition program. This strategy, 
however, did not rule out the Division's efforts to 
acquire coastal wetlands, salt marsh, river frontage 
and access sites. 

Accordingly, during the year, acreage was added 
to the Squannacook River, Moose Hill, Millers River, 
Stafford Hill, Housatonic River, Canada Hill, 
Quaboag and Northeast Wildlife Management 
Areas. 

River frontage was acquired along the Millers 
River as well as the Housatonic and Quaboag 
Rivers. Salt marsh acreage was added to the north 
shore marshes already in Division ownership. 

The Realty Section prepared and distributed 
maps of all the management areas before and 
during the hunting season. It also prepared a 
booklet entitled "The Time to Report and Reflect,'' 
an accounting to the public of monies already spent 
for acquisition. In it each management area was 
described and its location shown on a map. 
General comments on the realty program were 
also included. 

Much time was spent in surveying questionable 
property lines on different areas, and a 
concentrated effort was made to make the master 
Land and Building Inventory as accurate as 
possible. 

Staff members assisted District Managers and 
District personnel in locating lines when the 
management areas were being marked. Federal 
funding participation was prepared and 
periodically checked by staff members. 

Preparing maps for Federal and other state 
agencies engaged in studies and land usage 
planning occupied another area of the staff's time. 



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A special wetlands team from the University of Massachusetts 
made up of students and faculty specializing in wildlife, soil 
conservation, hydraulic engineering and landscape architecture, 
canoe the vast Hockomock Swamp. The trip was organized by 
the Division as part of its campaign to acquire this important 
piece of wildlife habitat. 



We would be remiss if we failed to acknowledge 
the wonderful cooperation and encouragement 
given us throughout the state. We have tried to live 
up to this splendid backing by being prudent and 
thrifty in administering acquisition funds. We know 
that public ownership of lands and waters in every 
part of the state is necessary for maintaining a 
quality environment both for humans and wildlife. 

If we are to continue to live up to our obligations 
of offering the public fish and wildlife to observe, 
study and harvest, we cannot in good conscience 
adopt the policy of acquiring needed lands at any 
cost. Had we adopted this policy, the available 
funds would have been depleted long ago, and we 
would have found our work a lot easier--with less 
than half the land we have today to show for the 
investment. Our policy has been and will continue 
to be one of careful conservatism based on the 
principle of "the best buy for the least 
expenditure.'' In this regard we are particularly 
indebted to all those generous conservationists 
who have sold us land at reduced prices in the 
knowledge that that land would be preserved 
forever in its natural state. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joseph Johnson, Chief of Realty 



¥ 



15 






A beaming Major Mudd displays Division's AACI Av 
best T.V. conservation program of the year. The 
winning movie was aired as part of the Major Muc 



Information 



News Releases 



DURING fiscal 1971 the I and E Section published 
27 major news releases each of which consisted of 
two or more news items. 

Again the media cooperated in relaying the 
information to the public quickly and accurately. 
The outdoor writers of the state continue to be the 
most important circuit in this information channel. 

The mercury scare provided the topic for the first 
news release of the year. In the release the 
Division announced that its water quality section 
was going to study mercury in the state's entire 
wildlife community. At that time mercury levels in 
indigenous fish and wildlife remained below the 
danger mark. 

In one release that detailed the editorial 
expansion of the Division's magazine we included 
an appeal for manuscripts and photographs 
pertaining to wildlife or the environment. (Since 
the magazine is still offered to the public free we 
were unable to offer payment for accepted 
material.) As a result of the release we received 
several high-quality stories and two excellent 
photo series. 

A release during the month of October reported 
the Northeast Turkey Symposium held in Falmouth, 
Mass. The Bay State has a small but solidly 



16 





rw 



•*; -CL 



ication 



Skeet Shooting at the Conservation Camp. 



established turkey population which, along with 
the Pilgrim-Cape Cod tradition, made 
Massachusetts an ideal state to host the 
conference. 

One release, entitled "That Odd-looking 
Pheasant," received the widest use of any release 
of the year. (The "odd-looking" pheasant was the 
hen "dilute," a blond variant developed by the 
Division in cooperation with the University of 
Massachusetts so that hens and cocks could be 
immediately identified after hatching.) 

Another widely-used release reported the first 
recorded spawning run of landlocked salmon in 
Quabbin Reservoir. Eggs collected in main feeder 
streams were taken to the Palmer salmon 
hatchery. 

The Massachusetts deer herd has traditionally 
been an important subject for news releases. The 
first in the annual series of deer-oriented releases 
discloses the number of antlerless permits to be 
issued the coming fall. (This year the number was 
6000.) Also included in the release is the scheduled 
date of the public drawing and an invitation to the 
public to attend. The next "deer releases" remind 
sportsmen of the upcoming archery season and 
report the early successes. Deer regulations for the 
shotgun season and the list of checking stations are 



published over the course of several releases. 
Finally, when deer week begins, the I and E Section 
keeps an open line to the outdoor writers, 
informing them by phone and news release as to 
how the annual harvest is shaping up. 

Another function of the "deer releases" is to 
inform the public about various protective 
measures such as rifle bans and dog-restraining 
orders. 

Very shortly after the NBC special "Say 
Goodbye" the I and E Section learned that one 
sequence in the film rated as the year's worst piece 
of yellow journalism. It depicted a mother polar 
bear writhing in her death throes as her stunned 
offspring watched pathetically. Director Shepard, a 
member of the Executive Committee of the 
International Association of Game, Fish, and 
Conservation Commissioners, informed us that the 
footage had been acquired from the Alaskan Fish 
and Game Department and used without 
permission. It had actually depicted a mother bear 
drugged with a tranquilizer gun. After a quick 
examination and tagging, the bear had been 
released unharmed. This brazen assassination 
attempt on the sportsman's character was promptly 



17 







Right to left: Bruins superstar Bobby Orr and Coach Harry Sinden start out on their first pheasant hunt as 
guests of the Division. Bobby swings on a bird, misses an easy shot, and, with characteristic humility, laughs 
at himself. 



laid before the public via the news release route. 

The mystery of the drunken bear (See Annual 
Report, 1970) was finally solved, and a news 
release summed up the whole incident, which 
spanned two years. Natural Resource Officers 
Hammond and Kulish were successful in obtaining 
a conviction for the owner of a roadside bear 
display who had been illegally releasing "surplus" 
bears, drugged for easy transport. 

Because the I and E Section had been constantly 
bombarded with requests for topo maps we 
published a news release asking for the names and 
addresses of Geodetic Survey map outlets in the 
state. The response was so overwhelming that we 
were able to prepare a nearly complete list of 
outlets that is available to anyone requesting it. 

Governor Francis W. Sargent, former Director of 
this agency, appealed to sportsmen and 
environmentalists to clean up rivers, streams, 
ponds and lakes during Earth Day. Our news 
release carried his request and was met with 
impressive response especially by sportsmen's 
clubs who provided much of the leadership for the 
various projects undertaken. 

Finally, the I and E Section made use of the news 
release medium to publicly thank the Hampshire 
County League of Sportsmen's Clubs for their 
special award which they presented to Board 
member Bradlee Gage for his "sportsmanship and 
dedicated work for the benefit of all sportsmen in 
Massachusetts." 

Help From Other Agencies 

The Division received fine cooperation over the 
year from other state agencies such as the 
Department of Natural Resources, MDC, Public 



Works, Public Health, Public Safety, etc. 

While it is usually unwise to single out one 
agency for praise, the Department of Commerce 
and Development assists us in so many ways that it 
deserves special consideration. The Department 
provided a tour guide for our largest and most 
modern trout-rearing facility--the Charles L. 
McLaughlin Hatchery. Also, Commerce and 
Development continues to support our Division in 
the Freshwater Fishing Contest. In addition to 
publicizing the sport of fishing, the program 
provides our fisheries biologists with valuable 
information as to species distribution and growth. 
During the New England Sportsmen's Show the 
Department assists us in our displays, and awards 
large plaques to the record holders of all 
freshwater fish categories. 

Wetlands 

The Division launched its campaign for the 
passage of its most important piece of legislation 
ever-the "Permanent Protection Wetlands Bill"-- 
with an all-out effort by the Information and 
Education Section and special wetlands coordinator 
Warren Blandin, Chief of Wildlife Research. After 
the initial hearing before the Massachusetts 
Natural Resources Committee, the I and E Section 
published a story "Save Our Wetlands" in the 
March-April edition of MASSACHUSETTS WILDLIFE. 
The piece was aimed at alerting the public to the 
ecological value of wetlands. Over 10,000 reprints 
of the four-page story were distributed around the 
state. 

Slides and movies outlining the need for 
wetlands preservation were prepared and 
presented to the public by Division personnel. T.V. 



18 



Right, top to bottom: 1. A BIG MESS FOR A LITTLE VOLUNTEER. 
Earth Day, 1970 was an encouraging first step, and the Division 
tried to keep the spirit alive through 1971 with a special four- 
part serial in MASSACHUSETTS WILDLIFE: 2. This young barred 
owl, captured on film by Jack Swedberg, was featured (courtesy 
of WORLD WILDLIFE ILLUSTRATED) in a special issue of 
MASSACHUSETTS WILDLIFE devoted entirely to birds of prey. The 
issue marked further expansion in editorial scope (See 1970 
Annual Report); 3. Charles Murphy of Concord displays his 
decoy-carving talent as part of the Division's exhibit at the New 
England Sportsman's Show. 



coverage focused on the preservation of the vast 
Hockomock Swamp in the Bridgewater-Easton- 
Taunton area. 

Museum 

The state Fish and Game Museum, the 
inspiration of former outdoor writer Mike Beatrice, 
continues to grow. 

The museum is presently housed in temporary 
quarters on the third floor at Westboro Field 
Headquarters (on the right off Route 135, toward 
Northboro from Route 9). 

Taxidermist Ed Shaw has offered to mount a pair 
of every legally harvestable waterfowl found in the 
state. Birds are contributed by waterfowl hunters. 
The birds donated during this past season went a 
long way toward filling the shelf space that will 
eventually house 70 pairs of waterfowl. 

Exhibits 

The Division's nine-day exhibit at the New 
England Sportsmen's Show again featured 
waterfowl. This year the display's theme was 
educational and centered around the identification 
of seven live, paired species. Corresponding birds 
were mounted and labeled on a rotating drum in 
the center of the pool. Drum and mounted birds 
were provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 
Parker River branch. Also at the exhibit, Division 
personnel distributed pamphlets entitled "Know 
Your Ducks'' which contained illustrations and brief 
write-ups of all our native waterfowl. 

Television Programs 

That Odd Looking Pheasant" (see News 
Releases) was also the title of part of the Major 
Mudd Show, a two-hour children's program 
appearing on WNAC. At that time I and E Chief Dick 
Cronin summarized the Division's impressive 
accomplishment of developing sex-linked color 
patterns in pheasants for easy sexing after 




fTJEgp" 



19 



) 



Youth In The Outdoors 



MajsacluuH'ttJ 

Wildlife 



SEPTEMBEROCTOBER. 1970 



NOVEMBER-DECEMBER, 1970" 






JULY-AUGUST. 1970 




hatching. As visual aids Cronin used footage taken 
by Division photographers and live birds, both 
normal and "dilute." The show won the Division a 
first prize in national competition for the best 
conservation television show of the year. The 
award was presented by the American Association 
for Conservation Information. 

District i and E Work 

In addition to many miscellaneous information 
and education services, personnel from the four 
wildlife districts published 41 formal news 
releases, attended and/ or spoke at 248 meetings 
(mostly at sportsmen's clubs), conducted 22 T.V. 
shows and six radio shows and prepared or 
assisted in the preparation of 12 exhibits at various 
fairs and sportsmen's shows. 

Massachusetts Wildlife 

HABITAT DESTRUCTION 

The rate of land destruction and abuse is 
increasing at an alarming rate, and while available 
wildlife habitat dwindles, the public demand for 
wildlife-for both consumptive and non- 
consumptive uses-increases. It has become 
obvious to all active conservationists that the single 
greatest threat to wildlife is habitat destruction. 

With this in mind the editors of MASSACHUSETTS 
WILDLIFE have steered the magazine away from its 
traditional role as a sporting publication and 
toward a new role as a conservation journal. 

The shift has not been an easy one, and in some 
circles has kindled resentment. But in fulfilling its 



obligations to the sportsmen and general public of 
this state, the Division is convinced that the 
magazine must change with the times. We are 
losing our fish and wildlife at a shocking rate 
because we are losing the habitat that supports 
and produces them. The old days when sportsmen 
could afford to be aloof and bask in the certainty of 
ever-continuing sport have passed. Unless 
sportsmen concentrate on the MAKING as well as 
the TAKING, the future of their sport will be sealed 
in concrete and asphalt. 

In the March-April issue, traditionally a fishing 
edition, we took a somewhat different tack this 
year by replacing the four-page list of stocked trout 
waters with a special section on the value of 
wetlands as fish and wildlife producers. (The 
stocked trout list was printed separately and 
mailed to those who requested it.) 

In addition to the wetlands section, the issue 
contained an editorial by Director James M. 
Shepard imploring fishermen to ensure the future 
of their sport by supporting the "Permanent 
Protection Wetlands Bill." 

"....The time has come," Shepard wrote, "for 
Massachusetts anglers to concentrate less on 
what's being done for them and more on what they 
can do for fishing. The fresh and saltwater fisheries 
of this state are ecologically riveted to wetlands 
and, unless something is done to check wetland 
exploitation, the day may not be far off when that 
stocking list won't be worth a six-cent stamp." 

Earth Day 1970 was one of the most encouraging 
events we have witnessed. At last people other 
than sportsmen were voicing concern about the 
environment that sustains our lives and the lives of 
every other life form. 



20 



MMMmii4 



Wildlife 

JANUARY-FEBRUARY, 1971 



?< 



't 




In an effort to keep the Earth Day spirit alive the 
editors conducted a survey in which they queried 
every school in the Commonwealth as to Earth Day 
activity. In a four-part serial entitled "Earth Day 
Honor Roll" we reported in detail the activities of 
all participating schools, concluding with a 
summary of what we considered to be the best 
ideas. 

It was our hope that the series provided: l. a 
motive for schools that had not had programs to get 
going the following year; 2. an index of ideas from 
which teachers with little knowledge of the 
environment could choose activities appropriate 
for their particular situations. The four issues in 
which the series appeared were made available to 
any Massachusetts teacher requesting them. 

Finally, in the September-October issue we 
reported on the Division's mercury monitoring 
program, hoping to increase public involvement in 
environmental problems confronting fish and 
wildlife such as chemical pollution. 



THE ANTI-HUNTING BUG 

Recognizing anti-hunting sentiment as perhaps 
the second greatest threat to the sportsman's 
future and ultimately to the future of wildlife, we 
have also directed our effort at educating non- 
hunting conservationists who could easily become 
ANTI-HUNTING protectionists. 

In a state where five and a half million people 
compete for five and a half million acres, the anti- 
hunting bug is especially virulent, and under these 
circumstances we believe that our editorial 
approach is the best investment of the sportsman's 



dollar that we can make. We feel we can help him 
little by indulging him with a steady diet of tired- 
out hunt-fish copy that he can pick up at any 
newstand for 50 cents. 

A Democrat addressing a houseful of Democrats 
is often wasting his effort -- he has their votes 
already. We feel that we do not have to convince 
the sportsmen of the pleasure and benefits that can 
be derived from hunting and fishing. We have 
therefore tried to select articles of general interest 
to all conservationists, not just sportsmen. 
Hopefully the material has broadened the 
sportsman's world and enriched his outdoor 
experience, but more important, it has increased 
our readership (now about 46,000) to include non- 
consumptive users of wildlife resources. If we can 
show them that hunting and fishing have an 
important place in wildlife conservation we will 
have accomplished a great deal. 

Articles like "The Path of the Monarch'' (May- 
June) are popular with everyone with an interest in 
nature, not just hunters. The same issue also 
contained an important educational message for 
non-hunters-a well-reasoned defense of hunting 
entitled "A Letter to Heather'' by Director Shepard 
which generated more national response than any 
previously published piece. We feel that a single 
editorial like this, mixed with articles on the 
environment, conservation, game and non-game 
species, is definitely more effective in promoting 
our cause than an issue full of hard-sell hunting. 

The very fact that sportsmen could finance a 
whole issue devoted to birds of prey (January- 
February) demonstrates that they are not "blood 



-"•*> 






■ 



'■rfi- 






I 



21 






mongers lusting after living targets. The Director's 
editorial in that issue-"The Hunter and the Non- 
Hunted '--points this out. 

In a new one-page section~"Man and the 
Balance -we have touched on the most timely and 
important environmental news, again attempting 
to recruit a new crop of readers, then educate them 
to the sportsman-conservationist way of thinking. 

The wildlife crosswords by Doug Jackson 
incorporate all phases of our program and wildlife 
conservation in general. Confining crosswords to a 
single subject is tremendously difficult, yet 
Jackson does it consistently and masterfully. The 
crosswords have proved a most effective education 
too. If a reader can figure out for himself that h-a- 
w-k "fills the owl's niche diurnally and is protected 
in Mass. (See January-February crossword), the 
knowledge stays with him longer than if he is told 
outright. 

ARTWORK 

Finally, we have begun to mix artwork with 
photos (See covers). We purchase covers when 
funds are available. For interior work we rely on 
young artists who are willing to accept publicity in 
lieu of payment. We send them xeroxed copies of 
future stories if time permits and let them use their 
own inventiveness in coming up with appropriate 
drawings. 

YOUTH 

Continuing the youth campaign (See Annual 
Report 1970) in an effort to recruit new and 
energetic conservationists for the future, the 
editors of MASSACHUSETTS WILDLIFE published a 
special issue devoted to youth in the outdoors 
(July-August). The big attraction was a photo story 
by Richard Cronin featuring Bruins superstar Bobby 
Orr and coach Harry Sinden on their first pheasant 
hunt. When Bobby blew an easy shot Dick snapped 
some top-notch "laugh-at-yourself" photos as 
Bobby reacted with characteristic humility. Other 
articles included in the issues were: "The City Set 
Goes Fishing,'' by James E. Early and Tony Spinelli- 
a report on the Urban Fishing Program co- 
sponsored by the Hale Reservation, the Boston 
Recreation Department, the U.S. Bureau of Sport 
Fisheries and Wildlife, and the Massachusetts 
Division of Fisheries and Game; "1970 Youth 
Upland Game Bird Season," by Bill Pollack and 
Donald Hawkins-a story on the Division's youth 
hunt; Conservation Summer School," by Dick 
Cronin-a history of the Massachusetts Junior 
Conservation Camp; and the first of the Earth Day 
series. 



Also appearing in the special youth issue was an 
editorial by Director Shepard discussing the 
importance of preparing youth to deal with the 
environmental crises they will shortly inherit. 

"Conservation," Shepard wrote, ". . . must begin 
with youth because youth is America's most 
important natural resource. In five years, over half 
our population will be under 25. They must have 
constructive attitudes, but more important, they 
must understand the problems they'll be facing." 
Admittedly our youth campaign is a long-range 
program with long-range returns but it is this type 
of "think-to-tomorrow" planning that ultimately 
proves the most valuable. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard Cronin, Chief of Information and 

Education 



Legislation 

The following laws affecting the Division of 
Fisheries and Game were enacted during the 
legislative session of 1971. 



Chapter 60-- An act authorizing trapping by 
certain unlicensed minors 
between the ages of 12 and 15 
when accompanied by an adult. 

Chapter 149--An act increasing the penalties 
for certain violations of the laws 
relative to the protection of 
flood plains and inland 
wetlands. 

Chapter 498-- An act giving towns the 
authority to set boating 
regulations relative to speed, 
horsepower, boating hours, etc. 

Chapter 876-- An act prohibiting the 
importation, possession and 
sale of foreign and domestic 
endangered mammals and 
reptiles such as alligators, 
wolves, and certain species of 
cats. 



22 



Financial Report July 1, 1970 to June 30, 1971 









RECEIPTS FROM FISHING, HUNTING AND TRAPPING LICENSES 










Fiscal Year July 1, 


1970 to J 


une 30, 1971 




















Fees 


















Retained 


Net 














Gross 


by Town Clerk 


Returned 


Licenses 






Price 


Number 


Amount 


or City 


To State 


Series 


No. 


1 


Res. Cit. Fishing 


(5.25) 


123,615 


648,978.75 


30,594.95 


618,383.80 


Series 


No. 


2 


Res. Cit. Hunting 


(5.25) 


59,219 


310,899.75 


14,665.75 


296,234.00 


Series 


No. 


3 


Res. Cit. Sporting 


(8.25) 


57,886 


477,559.50 


14,771.25 


462,788.25 


Series 


No. 


4 


Res. Cit. Minor Fishing 


(3.25) 


18,079 


58,756.75 


4,503.50 


54,253.25 


Series 


No. 


4-A 


Res. Cit. Female Fishing 


(4.25) 


24,212 


102,901.00 


6,009.25 


96,891.75 


Series 


No. 


5 


Res. Cit. Minor Trapping 


(3.25) 


218 


708.50 


54.25 


654.25 


Series 


No. 


6 


Res. Cit. Trapping 


(8.75) 


581 


5,083.75 


143.00 


4,940.75 


Series 


No. 


7 


Non-Res. 7-day Fishing 


(5.25) 


2,323 


12,195.75 


578.00 


11,617.75 


Series 


No. 


9 


Non. Res. Fishing 


(9.75) 


3,675 


35,831.25 


905.25 


34,926.00 


Series 


No. 


9-A 


Alien Fishing 


(9.75) 


808 


7,878.00 


198.25 


7,679.75 


Series 


No. 


10 


Non-Res. or Alien Hunting 


(16.25) 


2,271 


36,903.75 


448.25 


36,455.50 


Series 


No. 


12 


Duplicate Licenses 


(.50) 


3,414 


1,707.00 




1,707.00 


Series 


NO. 


15 


Res. Cit. Sporting 


(Free) 


17,631 








Series 


NO. 


17 


Res. Cit. (Mentally Ret.), 
Paraplegic and to the Blind 


(Free) 


1,059 








Series 


No. 


18 


Military or Naval 


(Free) 


7,189 








Series 


NO. 


19 


Paraplegic Hunting 


(Free) 


4 








322,184 


1,699,403.75 


72,871.70 


1,626,532.05 



HOW THE SPORTSMEN'S DOLLAR WAS SPENT 

ADMINISTRATION 

Administration 1070 0000 $ 126,33605 

Board ol Fisheries & Game 1070 0000 35000 126,686.05 5% 

Information Education 1070 0000 92,956 88 3% 

FISHERIES PROGRAMS 

Fish Hatcheries 1070 2300 454,857 65 17% 

Fisheries Management 1070 2300 186,418.15 

•• «Fish Restoration Projects 1070 2342 55,834.76 

Fisheries Management 1070 2400 139,821.96 

Fisheries Research Coop. Unit 1070-2341 10,000.00 

• 'Certain Anadromous Fish Proj 1070 2322 25.745.62 417,820.49 16% 

WILDLIFE PROGRAMS 

Game Farms 1070 2400 280,490 09 11% 

•Damage by Wild Deer 1070 2451 9,256.31 

Wildlife Management 1070 2400 139,821.97 

Wildlife Research Coop. Unit 1070 2441 8,499.56 

••• Wildlife Restoration Projects 1070-2461 219,081.04 

•••• Eastern Dove Management 1070 2502 3,500.00 380,158.88 14% 

ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION 

Demolition of Bldgs. Westboro 1070 0093 28,000.00 

Feasibility Study, BBC " 1070 0094 15,000.00 

Const 8. Improv. E. Sandwich 1070 2304 61,686.00 

New Well, McLaughlin Hatchery 1070 2317 50,391 00 155,077 00 6% 

LAND ACQUISITION 

Land 8. Waters for Fish and 

Wildlife Management Purposes 1070 9012 30,874.95 

•Land & Water Acquisition 
and Development 1070-9013 91,675 64 122,550.59 5% 

DEPT. NATURAL RESOURCES 

Supervision Public Hunting 

and Fishing Grounds 1020 0200 14,019.45 

Natural Resources Officers 

Salaries and Expenses 1020 0000 226,749 17 240,768 62 9% 

RETIREMENT ASSESSMENT 50,000 00 2% 

GROUP INSURANCE 48,392 00 2% 

INTEREST ON DIRECT DEBT 74,800 00 3% 

SERIAL BONDS AND NOTES 200,000 00 7% 

TOTAL 2.644,558 25 100% 

• Continuing Appropriations 

• • 50% Reimbursable Federal Funds 
• • • 75% Reimbursable Federal Funds 

• • • • 100% Reimbursable Federal Funds 



APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 



Account No & Title 



Expenditures 
Appropriation & Liabilities Reverted 



1070 0000 Administration 

1070 0093 Demolition of Certain Bldgs., 
Westboro 

1070 2300 Fisheries Management 

1070 2304 Construction 8. Improvements 
East Sandwich, Hatchery 

1070 2317 New Well McLaughlin Hatchery 

1070 2322 Anadromous Fish Projects • • 

1070 2342 Fish Restoration Proiects • • • 

1070 2400 Wildlife Management 

1070 2461 Wildlife Restoration* • • 

1070 2502 Eastern Dove Management* • • 



S 230,143 00 S 219.642 93 S 10,500 07 



60,000.00 


28,000 00 


32.00000 


647,439.00 


641,275 80 


6,163.20 


62,051 83 


61,686 00 


36583 


60,000.00 


50,391 00 


9,609 00 


27,181 00 


25,745 62 


1.43538 


58.307 00 


55,834 02 


2,47224 


562,895.00 


560,134.02 


2,760.98 


220.898 00 


219.081 04 


1.816 96 


3,50000 


3.S00 00 





SI. 932, did 83 SI, 865. 291 17 S 67.123 66 



Continuing Balance 

Appropriations E x pencil fu res Forward 



1070 2451 


Damage by Wild Deer 
and Moose 


S12.470 61 


9,256 31 


3,214 30 


1070 9011 


(a) Construction F.sh Hatchery 
Belchertown 


38 46 




38 461 al 


1070 9012 


(a) Lands & Waters for Fish 
& Wildlife 


32,301 10 


30.874 95 


1.426 15(a) 


1070 9013 


Land 8. Water 
Acquisition 8, Development 


598,294.96 


91.675 64 


506.619 32 




643,105 13 


131.806 90 


511.298 23 



• • 50% Reimbursed Federal Funds 

* • • 75% Reimbursed Federal Funds 

• • • • 100% Reimbursed Federal Funds 

(a) Expiration Date 6 30 71 






■ 





1 

•v3 


"*v* 






1 H 


■■.;,.* 


~-t 




-,1 




1 








nfi 


* 4 


L*S 


m 








23 



,' "--- - 



SUMMARY OF FISH AND GAME INCOME 

Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses $1,626,532.05 

Special Licenses, Trap Registrations and Tags 7,293.65 

Archery Stamps 5,357.80 

Rents 4,557.75 

Miscellaneous and Sales 5,770.30 

Court Fines 11,472.00 

Refunds Prior Year 1,434.06 

Pittman- Robertson Federal Aid 201,440.81 

Dingell-Johnson Federal Aid 95,749.22 

Anadromous Fish Projects Federal Aid 13,262.34 

Mass. Mourning Dove Reimbursement 3,500.00 

Reimbursement for Services 1,758.86 

Const. & I mprovements - Reimbursement .100,000.00 

$2,078,128.84 



TRANSFERS TO INLAND FISHERIES 
AND GAME FUND 

Gasoline Tax Apportionment $256,658.03 

Surplus in Inland Fisheries & Game Fund 

as of June 30, 1971 328,965.13 



ANALYSIS OF SPECIAL LICENSES 



NUMBER 

TYPE OF LICENSE ISSUED RECEIPTS 

TRAP REGISTRATIONS: 

Initial 116 $ 116.00 

Renewal 285 285.00 

Duplicate 1 .50 

FUR BUYERS: 

Resident 19 190.00 

Non-Resident 3 60.00 

TAXIDERMIST: 90 450.00 



PROPAGATORS: 

(Special Fish) 

Initial 

R ene wa I 1 77 

(Fish) 

Initial 

Renewal 

(Birds & Mammals) 

Initial 

Renewal 435 

(Dealers) 

Initial 

R ene wa I 79 

Additional 422 

(Indiv. Bird or Mammal) 

Initial 40 

R enewa I 74 

SHINERS FOR BAIT: 151 

(1 duplicate) 

FIELD TRIAL LICENSES: 4 

QUAIL FOR TRAINING DOGS: 

Initial 36 

R ene wa I 66 

COMMERCIAL SHOOTING PRESERVES:.. 13 

TRAPPING OF CERTAIN BIRDS: 1 

MOUNTING PERMITS: 4 

TAGS 

Game 5,053 

Commercial Shooting 1,200 

Quail 200 

Posters 900 

Fish 15,500 

FIELD TRIAL PERMITS: 30 







13 


65.00 


177 


531 .00 


7 


35.00 


80 


240.00 


123 


615.00 


435 


1,305.00 



Freshwater Fish Records 



FRESHWATER FISHING RECORDS FROM JULY 1 , 1 970 TO JUNE 30. 1 971 



$ 7,293.65 



10.00 
237.00 
422.00 



40.00 
37.00 

755.00 
.50 

40.00 



180.00 
198.00 

650.00 

5.00 

4.00 



367.65 
155.00 

300.00 






Species 


Weight 


Length 


Girth 


Place Caught 


How Caught 


Date 


LM Bass 


10 lb. 


lloz. 






Sampson Pd., Carver 




12/ 31/70 


SM Bass 


5 1b. 


80Z. 


21" 


16" 


Billington Sea, Plymouth 


spinning 


4/23/71 


N. Pike 


18 1b. 


12oz. 


39 W 


I8V2" 


Cheshire Res. 


ice tackle 


2/21/71 


Pickerel 


7 1b. 


12oz. 


29" 


22" 


Assabet River 


spinning 


6/ 1/71 


R. Trout 


7 1b. 


8oz. 


24 1/2" 


15%" 


Shubael, Barnstable 




4/17/71 


Brown Trout 


8 1b. 


14oz. 


25" 


17" 


Middle Pd., Southwich 


trolling 


5/ 2/71 


L. Trout 


13 1b. 


6oz. 


33" 




Quabbin, Pelham 


trolling 


4/17/71 


Shad 


8 1b. 


8oz. 


28" 


17" 


North R., Hanover 


spinning 


5/ 6/71 


Channel Catfish 


7 lb. 




25" 


14" 


Warner Bk., N. Hadley 


live bait 


5/ 12/71 


Walleye 


81b. 


1 oz. 


28 1/4" 


17%" 


Connecticut River 


spinning 


4/ 28/71 


Bluegill 


1 lb. 


4 0Z. 


11" 


IOV2" 


Ashley's, Brockton 


casting 


4/ 22/ 71 


Bullhead 


1 lb. 


10 oz. 


15 1/ 8" 




Mashpee-Wakeby 


live bait 


11/ 3/70 


Calico 


2 lb. 


90Z. 


18" 


13V2" 


Savory's, Manomet 


ice tackle 


1/ 24/71 


W. Perch 


2 lb. 


12oz. 


17" 


13" 


Herring, Plymouth 


trolling 


5/21/71 


Y. Perch 


1 lb. 


120Z. 


17" 


9%" 


Coonamesset River 


ice tackle 


2/ 14/71 


Brook Trout 


3 lb. 


12 OZ. 


20%" 




Deep Pd., Falmouth 


spinning 


9/ 11/70 


Salmon 


8 1b. 


1 oz. 


26" 


16" 


Quabbin, Pelham 


trolling 


5/26/71 



Caught by 



Bronislaw Kislowski, Brockton 
Peter Palavanchi, Plymouth 
John LaFlam, Florence 
Ronald Bouley, Waltham 
John St. Croix, Medford 
Chester LaPlante, Westfield 
Alan Storm, Gardner 
Richard C. Brown, Norwell 
John Wise, Sunderland 
Chester Skowron, Turners Fall! 
Ralph Smith, Brockton 
E.B. Meslin, Johnston R.I. 
Charles Godin, Manomet 
Manuel P. Souza, Dartmouth 
Ronald Jatrinski, Clinton 
Louis Carvalho, Jr. Dartmouth 
Raymond C. Wier, Wellesley 



24 



STANDING ALL-TIME MASSACHUSETTS FRESHWATER FISHING RECORDS 

Through June 30, 1971 



Species 


Weight 


Length 


Girth 


Place Caught 


How Caught 


Date 


M Bass 


121b. 


loz. 


25%" 


213/4" 


Palmer R., Rehoboth 


bait casting 


5/ 9/63 


M Bass 


61b. 


12 oz. 


21" 




Pleasant Lk., Harwich 


spinning 


5/14/67 


. Pike 


24 lb. 


8oz. 


45V2" 


22" 


Onota Lk.,Pittsfield 


live bait 


1/13/67 


ickerel 


91b. 


5oz. 


29 Vi " 




Pontoosuc Lk., Lanesboro 




/ 54 


. Trout 


81b. 


4 0Z. 


26" 


16" 


Deep Pd., Falmouth 


live bait 


10/ 15/ 66 


rown Trout 


191b. 


lOoz. 


31 1/2" 


22 5/8" 


Wachusett Res., Boylston 


spinning 


5/ 19/ 66 


. Trout 


131b. 


6oz. 


33" 




Quabbin Res., Pelham 


trolling 


4/17/71 


had 


81b. 


8oz. 


28" 


17" 


North R., Hanover 


spinning 


5/ 6/71 


hannel Catfish 


131b. 


8oz. 


30" 


19" 


Conn. R., Turners Falls 


live bait 


7/18/64 


i/alleye 


91b. 


3oz. 






Assawompsett Pond, Lakeville 


bait casting 




luegill 


1 lb. 




IT/4" 


9'/2" 


Bog Pd., Norton 


spinning 


10/17/ 65 


ullhead 


51b. 


9oz. 


22'/2" 


IT/2" 


Conn. R., Hadley 


live bait 


6 / 8/63 




51b. 


8oz. 


22 Vi" 


14" 


Leverett Pd., Leverett 


live bait 


8 / 2/65 




41b. 


9oz. 


22 Vi" 


IT/2" 


Conn. R., Chicopee 


live bait 


9 / 8/65 


alico 


21b. 


9'/2 oz. 


18" 


14" 


Merrimack, Lowell 


spinning 


6 / 8/65 




21b. 


9oz. 


18" 


13'/2" 


Savorys Pd., Manomet 


ice tackle 


1/24/71 


V. Perch 


21b. 


12oz. 


17" 


13" 


Herring Pd., Plymouth 


trolling 


5/21/71 


'. Perch 


21b. 


5oz. 


173/4" 


12" 


Wachusett Res., Boylston 


spinning 


4/ 23/ 70 


(rook Trout 


61b. 


4oz. 


24" 


14" 


Otis Res., Otis 


spinning 


6/24/68 


almon 


8 1b. 


loz. 


26" 


16" 


Quabbin Res., Pelham 


trolling 


5/ 26/ 71 



Caught by 

George Pastick, Fall River 
Thomas Paradise, Arlington 
Kris Ginthwain, Pittsfield 
Mrs. James Martin, Stockbridge 
Roger Walker, Eastondale 
Dana DeBlois, Sterling 
Alan Storm, Gardner 
Richard C. Brown, Norwell 
Robert Thibodo, Northampton 
William Spaulding, Whitman 
Robert Barrett, Stoughton 
Mrs. Erna Storie, Chicopee Falls 
Stephen Brozo, Amherst 
Joseph Kida, Chicopee 
George Olsson, Lowell 
Charles Godin, Manomet 
Manuel P. Souza, Dartmouth 
Arnold Korenblum, Marlboro 
Thomas Laptew, Granville 
Raymond C. Wier, Wellesley 



Massachusetts Freshwater Fish Awards 
Program 

DURING fiscal 1971 the Department of 
Commerce and Development continued to give the 
Division and the freshwater fishermen of 
Massachusetts the backing needed to make the 
Freshwater Fish Awards Program a success. 

This year salmon were added to the 16 other 
categories. For the present, landlocked salmon 
over five pounds will be recognized as eligible for 
the competition. Hopefully Atlantic salmon will be 
entered as another category in the near future 
when the Division's Connecticut River salmon 
restoration program bears fruit. 

During fiscal 1971 the standing all-time records 
for lake trout, shad and white perch were broken 
(See listings). 

The standing all-time records run on a fiscal year 
basis, ending June 30. 

The award plaques end at the close of the 
calendar year and are presented at the New 
England sportsmen's show in late January or early 
February. 





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COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Division of Fisheries and Game 
107th Annual Report 



GOVERNOR 

FRANCIS W. SARGENT 




Director 
JAMES M. SHEPARD 

DIVISION OF FISHERIES AND GAME 

Board 

ROGER D WILLIAMS, Chairman 

Sudbury 

BRADLEE E GAGE. Secretary 
Amherst 



His Excellency, Francis W. Sargent, Governor of the Com- 
monwealth, the Executive Council, the General Court and the 
Board of Fisheries and Game: 

Gentlemen: 

I have the honor to submit herewith the One Hundred and 
Seventh Annual Report of the Division of Fisheries and Game, 
covering the fiscal year from July 1, 1971 to June 30, 1972. 

James M. Shepard, Director 

CONTENTS 

The Board Reports 1 

Legislation 2 

Fisheries 3 

Wildlife 8 

Information and Education 14 

Realty 18 

Financial Report 19 

Freshwater Fish Records 20 



HARRYC DARLING. 
East Bridgewater 



KENNETH F. BURNS 
Shrewsbury 



MARTIN H. BURNS 
Newbury 



JAMESM SHEPARD 
Director 



PAUL S. MUGFORD 
Acting Asst. Director 



COLTON H BRIDGES 
Superintendent 



E. MICHAEL POLLACK 
Chief Game Biologist 



WARREN W BLANDIN 
Chief of Wildlife Research 



RICHARDCRONIN 
Chief, Information and Education 



JOSEPH JOHNSON 
CHIEFOF REALTY 



District Managers 

Western District 

EUGENE D MORAN 

Hubbard Ave., Pittsfield 

Phone 447 9789 

central District 

■ . S PRESCOTT 
Temple St. W Boylston 
Phone 835 3607 

Northeastern District 

WALTER HOYT 
86, Acton 
' 3 4347 

Southeastern District 

.'.HLOTTERBECK 
R f o No 3, Buzzard's Bay 



Wetlands are more than vital to wildlife — they are the very 
foundation on which this resource is built. Drain a swamp and 
you directly drain our wildlife resource. The widespread 
argument that "the animals will just go somewhere else" un- 
derscores the ignorance of nature so prevalent in our society. 
During fiscal 1972 the Fish and Game Division succeeded in its 
two-year effort to obtain a $5 million bond issue for the purchase 
and permanent protection of key wetland areas. This is just the 
first step. The real work remains to be done; it must come 
through meaningful protective legislation — something that we 
currently do not have. Wetlands are difficult to develop but 
because we have exploited much of our upland wildlife habitat 
we are now steering our bulldozers into these wet islands of 
wilderness. Time is running out for wetlands and our wildlife. 




THE COVERS: 1. A ruffed grouse drums on 
log; 2. a red fox pup at den. (photos by Jack 
Swedberg). 



-*£** 



Publication of this document approved by Alfred C. Holland, State Purchasing Agent. 
2M 6 73 082674 Estimated Cost Per Copy: $.64 







The Board Reports 



At the 1971 waterfowl hearing the five-man Fish 
and Game Board voted to accept the waterfowl 
biologists' proposal for a three-year experimental 
zoned season. A season of this nature is designed 
to provide hunting in each zone at the most 
favorable time without allowing excessive harvest. 
The season should go a long way toward providing 
the inland and coastal waterfowlers a common 
meeting ground in a conflict that has existed for 
many years. 

One of the highlight's of this year's activities was 
the deeding of a 162-acre parcel to the Division of 
Fisheriesand Game by the Western Massachusetts 
Electric Company (Robert E. Barrett Jr., 
President) in the name of Northeast Utilities. The 
land, to be known as the Pauchaug Brook Fish and 
Wildlife Management Area, is located along the 
Connecticut River. 

Quabbin Reservoir continues to smash state 
fishing records, and Division fisheries personnel 
continue to closely monitor the pulse of one of the 
most productive and important freshwater 
fisheries in the state. The success of the existing 
fishery at Quabbin is due in large measure to 
superb cooperation that has been possible bet- 
ween the Division of Fisheries and Game and the 
MDC. 

After exploring all possible sources of revenue 
the Fish and Game administration elected to in- 
crease license fees. There was virtually no other 
choice if existing programs and services were to be 
maintained at their current levels. The last in- 
crease in any license fee had come in 1960. In- 
flation in addition to an expanded operation had, 
over the last decade, stretched the Division's 
financial resources to the breaking point. 




Board members pictured above are: Top row, left to right - 
Roger D. Williams, Chairman; Bradlee E. Gage, Secretary. 
Bottom row, left to right— Martin H. Burns, Kenneth F. Burns, 
Harry C. Darling, 



Regional meetings were held in the hope that the 
Division and sportsmen could work together to 
develop a program for increased revenue that 
would answer the Division's needs and, at the 
same time, satisfy the sporting public. The Division 
advocated "user fees" in the form of a trout & 
pheasant stamp. 

On September 10 the Board held a regulatory 
hearing and made a decision that permitted fisher 
to be trapped November 1 to March 1 ; the beaver 
season was moved back one month — now 
November 15 to March 1. 

Archery season for deer was extended from two 
to three weeks. A muzzle-loading deer season was 
rejected because of a conflict in legal definitions 
between smooth-bores and rifled muzzle-loaders. 

The Division's waterfowl section has embarked 
on an imprinting program at the Ayer Game Farm. 
"Imprinting" refers to a process in the early stages 
of a duckling's development through which it forms 
an association bond with parent and immediate 
surroundings. The program could result in a 
significant increase in ground nesting ducks using 
a structure off the ground to help reduce nest 
predation and increase numbers of birds nesting 
on a pond. 

On October 6. 1971, Governor Francis W 
Sargent signed into law one of the most important 
bills in the history of the Division of Fisheries and 






State Library of Massachusetts 
State House, Boston 



Game. Known as the "Permanent Protection 
Wetlands Bill," the legislation provided $5 million 
to purchase inland and coastal wetlands. The 
passage of this bill was made possible by a con- 
certed etfort over the past two years by Division 
personnel, conservationists, sportsmen and key 
members of the Legislature. 

The Board voted down an extension of the trout 
season for this year but did vote to increase the 
daily limit of kokanee salmon in Onota Lake from 
two to five; the former 15-inch kokanee limit was 
abolished. 

The Board established a smelt season by hook 
and line on Quabbm and Onota to help control 
smelt numbers and, at the same time, increase the 
recreational potential of the two bodies of water. 
The drop in the daily bag limit on salmonids from 
10 to five should result in an increased population 
of these smelt-controlling fish. 

The Board changed the daily bag limit on trout 
from 12 of any length to 12 with only six of the 12 
10 inches or greater in length. 

Finally, the Board established two experimental 
fly fishing only areas — one on the Swift River in 
Belchertown, the other on the Nissitissit in Pep- 
perell. 

The Board was disappointed that the first 
paraplegic hunt had to be cancelled for want of a 
suitable area in which to conduct it. Hopefully 
Division biologists can locate a new area next year. 
The Board held its January 1972 monthly 
meeting as guests of the Sherman Exposition at the 
New England Sportsmen's Show, Hynes 
Auditorium at Boston's Prudential Center. At the 
same time the Board was able to tour the Division's 
exhibit on wild turkey and also view choice Fish and 
Wildlife Museum pieces displayed by Commerce 
and Development in cooperation with the Fish and 
Game Division. 

An especially important milestone this year was 
the agreement with Holyoke Water Power Co. on 
fisheries management for the Connecticut River. 
The firm agreed to enlarge present fish passage 
facilities over its dam and to continue work on the 
program with mutually accepted methods and 
goals for handling increased fish runs. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Roger D. Williams, Chairman 

Bradlee E. Gage, Secretary 

Harry C. Darling 

Kenneth F. Burns ^ 

Martin H. Burns f 



Chapter LEGISLATION 

125 — An Act Further Regulating The 
Transfer Of Protected Species Of 
Fish, Birds And Mammals And 
Exempting Certain Zoos From The 
Law Prohibiting The Sale, Possession 
Or Importation Of Such Species. 

127 — An Act Protecting- The Gray Wolf, 
Giant Otter and All South American 
Otters Of The Genus Lutra. 

135 — An Act Authorizing Shooting On 
Commercial Shooting Preserves On 
Certain Sundays. 

221 — An Act Authorizing Certain En- 
forcement Officers To Enter Upon 
And Pass Over Private Lands In The 
Performance Of Their Duties Relative 
To The Fish and Game Laws. 

223 — An Act Further Regulating The 
Procedure For Importing Inland Fish 
and Wildlife Into The Commonwealth. 

261 — An Act Further Regulating The 
Discharge Of Firearms Within A 
Certain Distance From Buildings. 

322 — An Act Designating The Montague 
State Fish Hatchery In The Town Of 
Montagne As The Bitzer State Fish 
Hatchery. 

416 — An Act Authorizing The Division Of 
Fisheries And Game To Lease Certain 
Land In The Town Of Paxton To Said 
Town. 

422 — An Act Providing For An Annual Deer 
Hunt For Paraplegics. 

445 — An Act Relative To Hunting Certain 
Birds of Prey. c . 

¥ 






FISHERIES 






After being tagged by Division fisheries biologists a Quabbin lake trout returns to his element. 



photo by Jack Swedberg 



During the 1972 fiscal year, fisheries research 
and management programs continued in warm 
water fish studies, development activities and 
special study projects on pesticides, the Northfield 
Mountain Pumped Storage Project, and the Bear 
Swamp Pumped Storage Project. 

Anadromous Fish Restoration 

The bulk of this Division's anadromous fish in- 
vestigations continue to emphasize the restoration 
program for American shad and Atlantic salmon in 
the Connecticut River. Negotiations were com- 
pleted with the Holyoke Water Power Company for 
expanded fish passage facilities at the Holyoke 
dam. A settlement agreement was signed by the 
company and directors of the fish and game 
agencies of Massachusetts, Connecticut, New 
Hampshire and Vermont and forwarded to the 
Federal Power Commission. The agreement 
provides enlargement and modification of present 
lift facilities to a capability of passing 1,000,000 
American shad and 40,000 Atlantic salmon. 

The extremely wet and cold spring of 1972 
exerted a negative influence on the shad fishery at 
Holyoke. Creel census data indicates that both the 
shad catch and fishing effort were down to about 
half of the 1971 level, although the catch per unit 
effort did not differ greatly from previous years. 
Approximately 6,802 shad were creeled by 8,000 
fishermen during 21,252 hours of angling. Since 
the population of shad entering the river was not 
significantly lower than recent years, it is felt that 



the decrease in the sport catch at Holyoke is more 
a function of less fishing effort due to inclement 
weather rather than any significant decrease in 
fish availability. 

High water emanating from the dam spillway 
throughout most of the run prevented many shad 
from entering the fishlift. Subsequently, only 
25,473 shad were passed, as opposed to 52,273 in 
1971 and 65,751 during 1970. Apparently, many of 
the fish that failed to find the fish elevator dropped 
downstream and commenced spawning. More than 
12,600,000 fertile shad eggs were obtained in the 
section of the river between Willimansett and 
Massachusetts Turnpike bridges. This figure 
represents a three-fold increase in the best 
previous take of 4,000,000 obtained during 1970. 
These eggs were planted in a cooperative effort 
with the Massachusetts Division of Marine 
Fisheries and the New Hampshire Department of 
Fish and Game, into the Charles. Taunton, Agawam 
and Merrimack Rivers, as part of an intensive effort 
to restore their once-existing shad runs. Attempts 
to induce artificial spawning of shad through the 
use of various hormones were unsuccessful 

In the Merrimack River the emigration of juvenile 
shad resulting from fertile egg transplants has 
been documented for the past three years. Yet it 
will still be a few years before any significant 
numbers of adult shad are expected to return to 
the river. 

The Palmer Hatchery produced 8.300 Atlantic 
salmon smolts for the Connecticut River program 
All these fish were released via the recently con- 
























■ : 



structed salmon stockout pond located on the 
Salmon River in Connecticut. 

The southeastern Massachusetts shad in- 
vestigation revealed that the sport fisheries of both 
the Palmer and the North Rivers were down about 
half of the previous year's level. The Palmer River 
yielded 143 shad to 731 anglers fishing 1,767 
hours, while the North River yielded 222 shad to 
963 anglers fishing 2,443 hours. However, as with 
the Connecticut River, the catch per effort was not 
significantly different than that experienced in 
recent years. 

The Division also provided assistance to the 
Division of Marine Fisheries coho program by 
rearing these fish to the smolt stage at the Palmer 
Hatchery. 

Coldwater Fish Investigations 

The trout and salmon hatching and rearing 
program continues to provide the basis for the 
coldwater fisheries program. The coldwater fish 
investigations continue to evaluate our salmonid 
management practices. Basically, this involves a 
continual survey of our coldwater resources in the 
formulation of policies designed to generate the 
most equitable and practical distribution of our 
hatchery trout. The annual Quabbin Reservoir 
creel census, conducted from April to October, 
indicates the harvest of landlocked salmon and 
lake trout dropped considerably to 234 fish and 
540 fish respectively, while rainbow and brown 
trout harvest remained relatively stable at 4,521 
and 52 fish respectively. However, 70,665 anglers 
took an estimated 94,205 fish weighing 72,428 Ijbs. 
These figures show a significant increase in the use 
of the reservoir compared to the previous year 
when 60,231 anglers landed 70,939 fish weighing 
53.293 lbs. 

The smelt population continued to expand. Smelt 
utilization by salmonid predators ranged from 70- 
80 % throughout the entire year. To minimize water 
distribution problems, 50,000 adult spawning 
smelt and 30,000,000 eggs were shipped from the 
Quabbin to neighboring states of Connecticut, 
Vermont and Rhode Island; in addition, smelt eggs 
in nine brooks were treated with a total of 400 lbs. 
of copper sulfate and 50 lbs. of caustic soda. The 
screening study conducted by the engineering firm 
of Camp. Dresser & McKee was approved with 
plans made for screen installation in 1973. 

During the year, the reservoir was stocked with 






Above: fisheries crew applies rotenone to a Massachusetts 
pond; below — processing fish sample. 







100,000 lake trout fry, 26,000 landlocked salmon, 
and 9,200 catchable rainbow trout. 

The final year of creel census study at Littleville 
Reservoir was completed. The data indicates that 
11,495 anglers harvested 5,477 trout weighing 
3,046 lbs. An additional 536 warmwater fish 
weighing 119 lbs. were also creeled, while 215 
trout and 2,071 warmwater fish were reported as 
being released. Total fishing pressure amounted to 
137.7 hours per acre producing approximately 11.5 
lbs. of fish per acre. The unauthorized introduction 
and subsequent establishment of smelt in Lit- 
tleville Reservoir precludes any attempt to 
establish kokanee salmon at this site. Littleville 
Reservoir will continue to be managed as a two- 
story fishery. 

During August and early September of 1971, the 
temperature profile and vertical distribution of 
dissolved oxygen was determined for 32 ponds. 
Fourteen ponds were found to contain a volume of 
trout water in accordance with Massachusetts 
standards (70° F. or less in temperature and 



Massachusetts Salmon id Distribution trom 
State and Federal Hatcheries 

Brook Trout Brown Trout Rainbow Trout Total 

State 262,300 135,450 665,500 1,063,250 

Federal 42,000 43,000 900 85,900 







1.148,150 


Total trout distributed 


6"-9" 


290.250 


Total trout distributed 


9" plus 


646,150 


Total Federal trout 


6" plus 


65.900 


Total catchables 


6" plus 


936,400 


Total fingerlings 


6" minus 


212,750 


Hatchery Poundage 




Hatchery 




Total Lbs. 


Charles L. McLaughl 


n Hatchery 


212.200 


Montague Hatchery 




87,650 


Palmer Hatchery 




2,100 


Sandwich Hatchery 




88,050 


Sunderland Hatchery 


123,200 


Total State 




513,200 




Number Weight in pounds 


Coho salmon 


65.200 


2,660 


Kokanee salmon 


40,000 


23 


Atlantic salmon 


8.600 


1,060 


Landlocked salmon 


10.600 


530 


Lake trout 


49.850 


121 




Hauling shad on the Connecticut. 



photo by Jack Swedberg 



containing 5 ppm or more of dissolved oxygen or 
greater than 10 percent of the pond's volume). The 
pond volumes comprised of definable trout water 
ranged from trace amounts to 54 percent. 

The rainbow trout / sea-run alewife forage 
relationship study at Higgins and Hathaway Ponds 
was completed. The findings indicate that young-of- 
the-year alewives provide very little forage for 
rainbow trout. Furthermore, the total biomass of 
trout in ponds lacking alewives was greater due to 
lack of competition from the forage fish. The first 
year of study testing brown trout with sea-run 
alewives was initiated. Favorable results are ex- 
pected from this experiment since the brown trout, 
once attaining the size of 9 inches, is known to use 
available forage fish to a much greater extent than 
either the rainbow or the brook trout. 

The stream survey inventory segment sampled 
35 of a projected 79 stations within the Chicopee 
River Basin. Standard biological, chemical and 
physical methods were employed to determine the 
resource potential of this watershed. All data will 
be analyzed and presented in final form during 
1973 when the remaining 44 stations will be 
sampled. 

The attempts to establish kokanee salmon in 
Onota Lake appeared to be showing some promise. 
In mid-November 37 individuals averaging 14V2 
inches were collected. Five females from this group 
produced 4,400 eggs while the estimated spawning 
population was set at 80; in addition, ap- 
proximately 39,000 one-inch fingerlings were 
planted earlier in the year. Kokanee salmon are 
beginning to appear consistently in the creels of a 



■ 






few fishermen at Onota Lake. Angler harvest of 
kokanee is expected to increase when more 
fishermen learn how to catch this recently- 
introduced species 

Warmwater Fish Investigations 

The presence of landlocked alewives in 
Congamond Lakes indicate that they have a high 
forage value for both cold and warmwater game 
species. Future plans include the introduction of 
these fine forage fish into other selective waters 
throughout the state. 

The northern pike population in Cheshire 
Reservoir is still expanding with this year's harvest 
of 988 lbs. providing a 36 percent increase over the 
1971 catch. However, the fishing pressure was also 
significantly up over recent years. The largest pike 
checked by creel census agents measured 40.3 
inches and weighed 17.9 lbs. Scale analysis 
revealed that this fish was six years old. Further 
scale analyses of other pike taken from the 
reservoir indicate that these fish attain a minimum 
harvest length of 20 inches prior to their third year. 
The recommendation to raise the minimum legal 
length of northern pike from 20 to 25 inches is 
currently being considered. It is felt that action 
along these lines would insure that a creeled pike 
had spawned at least once prior to being har- 
vested. 

The inability of fish dealers in Minnesota to 
supply us with approximately 3,000 yearling pike, 
unfortunately postponed for another year the 
stocking of this species into Brimfield Reservoir. 

The post-treatment evaluation of the use of 
sodium arsenite for weed control on 269-acre 
Billington Sea in Plymouth was completed. The 
application of 6,000 gallons of this herbicide ap- 
parently affected the adult population structure of 
most pan and rough fish. The scarcity of in- 
vertebrates after application temporarily sup- 
pressed the growth rates of fish that normally 
would have utilized the benthic organisms during 
the year of treatment. The following post-treatment 
year saw a return to more normal conditions with 
respect to fish growth rates and invertebrate 
production, while the loss of adult fish was 
replaced with subsequent growth of juveniles. 

During May through November, 35 ponds were 

sampled to determine warmwater angling 

potential The majority of the ponds sampled 

amed from 11 to 30 percent game fish by 




A fisheries biologist displays kokanee salmon taken from Onota 
Lake, Pittsfield. 



weight of the total population. Only five of the 
ponds contained less than 10 percent game fish by 
weight. 

A study which hopefully will provide a basis for 
estimating the existing standing crop of fish in a 
pond based upon water chemistry parameters 
should be completed within the next year, while the 
pesticide investigations have drawn the following 
conclusions: the amount of DDT residues found in 
the environment has apparently stabilized in spite 
of the DDT ban in this state. Levels are expected to 
remain constant for many years due to the non- 
biodegradable nature of this compound. The only 
other hard pesticide found consistently throughout 
the state was Dieldrin, its highest concentrations 
were found in the vicinity of fruit orchards and 
cranberry bogs. 

Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) residues were 
found in 14 rivers as compared with nine the 
previous year. These industrial pollutants are 
expected to increase further since, like DDT, they 
concentrate in food chains and have many paths 



Right: four steps in landlocked salmon management 
turing, stripping, tagging, releasing. 

photos by Jack Swedberg 



cap- 



into the natural environment. A study was con- 
ducted of the high PCB residue levels in the 
Housatonic River at Pittsfield. The source was 
located and the situation was corrected. In- 
vestigations on the use of freshwater mussels as 
indicator organisms of pesticide contamination 
were continued. Although all the data has yet to be 
completely analyzed it looks as though mussels can 
be used as indicators of pollution; however, they 
do pose certain limitations. Their physical 
requirements and filtering habits appear to make 
them more appropriate as qualitative rather than 
quantitative indicators. 

Pumped Storage Power Process Investigations 

Pre-operational studies to determine the en- 
vironmental impact of the Northfield Pumped 
Storage Project on the fisheries of the Connecticut 
River went into the second year of the in- 
vestigation, while similar studies concerning the 
effect of the Bear Swamp Pumped Storage Project 
on the upper Deerfield River were initiated. Both of 
these investigations are financed by the Northeast 
Utilities Service Company and New England Power 
Company respectively. Biologists are assembling 
and analyzing data concerning resident fish 
species complex, creel census, diversity of benthic 
organisms and water quality parameters. 

Massachusetts Cooperative Fishery Unit 

Five investigations were financially supported by 
the Division of Fisheries and Game through the 
Cooperative Fisheries Unit located at the 
University of Massachusetts in Amherst. Three of 
these projects are related to the anadromous fish 
investigations concerning the migration, behavior, 
and spawning activities of adult and juvenile shad 
in the Connecticut River, while another in- 
vestigation dealt with the effects of mercury 
deposition and its effects of early development on 
the white sucker. The last project related the 
abundance and growth of fish from polluted and 
non-polluted segments of the Ware River drainage. 
Respectfully submitted, 
Colton H. Bridges, Superintendent 



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photo by Jack Swedberg 



photo by Bill Byrne 



WILDLIFE 



Introduction 

The wildlife research program has many facets. 
For example, the dove and quail surveys are 
concerned with monitoring the general status of 
breeding populations, while the objective of the 
gosling transplant program is to establish breeding 
populations in uninhabited but suitable range. The 
deer study is tied closely to an examination of the 
population biology of the herd, the end product 
being sound deer harvest recommendations. Still 



GAME DISTRIBUTION 



July 1,1971 to June 30, 1972 



PHEASANT LIBERATIONS: 




August 


4,497 


October— November 


39,908 


Sportsmen's Club Rearing 




Program 


6,712 


Miscellaneous (Youth Hunt, 




displays, experiments, etc.) 


466 


Brood Stock (Spring Releases) 


3,878 


Hybrids 


565 


Field Trials (35) 


1,350 


TOTAL 


57,376 


QUAIL LIBERATIONS: 




Public Hunting Grounds 


3,368 


Field Trials 


400 


TOTAL 


3,768 


HARE LIBERATIONS 




Released in 




January& February 


2,500 


TOTAL 


2,500 



another avenue of research is the kind and degree 
of use by sportsmen and the non-hunting and 
fishing public on Division-owned lands. 

The dividing line between game research and 
game management is difficult to define in many 
cases. Frequently research and management 
activities are indistinguishable. The case of 
waterfowl banding to evaluate population levels, 
mortality rates, or the effects of certain 
management operations is an example. Habitat 
manipulation and a determination of its effects on 
game populations is both research and 
management. 

The Division of Fisheries and Game is involved 
intensively in both of these broad areas of concern. 
The annual summaries of project activities that 
follow will illuminate the extent to which the state's 
wildlife resources are being nurtured, studied and 
evaluated. 

Statewide Beaver Harvest 

A total of 1,358 beaver were trapped in 93 towns 
by 94 trappers during the 1971-1972 beaver 
season. This catch is 849 more than in 1970-71 and 
352 more than a ten-year (1962-1971), 1,006 — 
beaver average. Berkshire, Franklin and Hamp- 
shire counties together yielded nearly three- 
fourths (73%) of the season's harvest. More than 
half (53.2%) of the beaver trapped were taken in 
December. The Conibear trap was used to take 912 
beaver (67.1 % of harvest). The average price of a 
Mass. beaver peit was $17, yielding a total harvest 






valuation of $23,086 — the highest valuation 
recorded in 16 years. 

Mourning Dove Census 

Calling doves were counted on three randomized 
census routes in cooperation with the U.S. Fish & 
Wildlife Service's annual mourning dove breeding 
population census. An increase occurred on all 
three routes censused. The total increase from 
1971 counts was 33 percent. 

Spring Quail Census 

The 1971 spring quail census in Barnstable, 
Bristol and Plymouth counties was comparable to 
the 1969 average and a four-year (1958-1961) 
average. Comparison of call indices indicates the 
possibility of an increasing quail population. This 
trend is especially evident in Bristol County. 
However, decreases in the number of routes 
surveyed have reduced the sample size to the point 
where the analysis of call indices does not reflect 
any but gross changes. 
White-tailed Deer 

The antlerless deer permit system was continued 
for the fifth consecutive year. Permits issued 
totaled 7,270 in the following categories: Farmer- 
landowner — 270; Nantucket Island — 400; 
Martha's Vineyard — 600; Sportsmen — 6,000. 
The total deer harvest was 2,284 (2,405 in 1970) 
of which 36 were taken by archers. Of 2,248 deer 
harvested during the shotgun season, 1,872 were 
taken on the mainland, 163 were taken on Nan- 
tucket, and 213 were taken on Martha's Vineyard. 
The sex composition of the harvest was 1,359 
males and 889 females. Permit holders accounted 
for 1,314 deer during the shotgun season; 425 of 
these were males (including 253 button bucks). 
The success rate of antlerless deer permit holders 
was 1 in 6 for Farmer-Landowner and Sportsmen 
permittees; 1 in 4 for Martha's Vineyard per- 
mittees and 1 in 3 for Nantucket Permit holders. 

A decrease (compared to 1970) of 208 adult 
males was noted in the 1971 harvest, while the 
harvest of female deer increased by 125 animals 
(shotgun season only). Future management efforts 
will be directed toward expanding the size of the 
breeding population via the permit system to 
reverse this harvest trend. 

Reported non-hunting deer mortalities totalled 
694 deer; 320 males, 341 females, and 33 deer of 
which the sex was not reported. Motor vehicles 
accounted for 373 deaths, dogs 219, illegal kills 39. 
fences 7, drownings 6, trains 5, unknown causes 
41, and deer taken because of crop depredations 4. 
Six hundred ninety-eight non-hunting mortalities 
were reported in 1970. 



Berkshire, Barnstable and Franklin counties 
accounted for 50.7 percent of the reported non- 
hunting mortality (25.2, 13.4 and 12.1 percent 
respectively). The reporting rate was greatest in 
the months of March (17.7%), February (15.4%) 
and November (12.1%). 

Sixty-three female deer were examined between 
the period 1 January through 31 May 1972 to 
determine the reproductive rate of the herd. The 
data collected agreed statistically with data 
collected over the past six breeding seasons. A 
summary of these data for the years 1966 to 1972 
is shown in the table: 

Age Sample Size Reproductive Rate 

Yearling 158 0.27 fawns per doe 

Two years 84 1.39 fawns per doe 

Over two years 181 174 fawns per doe 

Seven of 21 yearlings examined in 1972 were 
pregnant. Five fawns were identified and the 
remains of embryonic structures in two other 
animals were found. Eleven two-year-old does 
examined were carrying a total of 17 fawns. Thirty- 
one does" three years of age or older were included 
in the sample. Twenty-six of these were pregnant 
and collectively were carrying 49 fawns. These data 
indicate the importance of older-aged does in the 
population. In this sample, older-aged deer (49 
percent of sample) produced 67 percent of the 
fawns. Our statistical tests indicate that the road- 
kill sample of does from which the reproductive 
data are derived is similar in age composition to 
the data derived from the deer season harvest of 
does, and therefore, should be fairly representative 
of the reproductive characteristics of the herd. 
Hunter Utilization of Wildlife Management Areas 

Total estimated hunter effort on fourteen wildlife 
management areas was 33,622 hunter trips. This is 
a decrease of 1.9% from the 1970 effort. 

Peak usage occurred on the first Saturday, 
followed by the second Saturday and opening day. 
Usage on a weekday after stocking was ap- 
proximately 1.6 times that of a weekday after no 
stocking. 

Local hunters continue to be the heaviest users 
of wildlife management areas, although on peak 
days hunters in the 3.280 kilometer range 
predominated on three areas (Crane. Myles 
Standish, Northeast.) 

Game bag information was collected on six areas. 
On the five state areas. 1.943 hunters were con- 
tacted of whom 631 (32.5% ) had taken at least one 
unit of game. Known harvest on these five areas 
totaled 889 animals of nine species. Pheasant 
(771 or 86 7"") comprised the majority of the 






harvest. 

Hunter success was greatest on days after 
stocking (41.7%), followed by opening day 
(37.1%). Saturdays (31.3%), and days after no 
stocking (17.9%). Hunter competition on peak 
days probably lessens the sportsman's chance of 
success on those days. Hunter success per- 
centages for all five areas were greater in 1971 
than in 1970. Greatest success was found at 
Wimmusset (44.4%), followed by Crane (41.4%), 
Housatonic Valley (32.1%), Northeast (29.8%), 
and Swift River (23.6%). 
Black Bear Population Dynamics 

Applications for bear hunting permits were 
received from 200 sportsmen. None, however, 
succeeded in taking a bear during the legal season. 

Sixteen reports, involving 28 bear, were received 
from cooperators. Reports by county were as 
follows: Franklin (6), Berkshire (5), Hampshire 
(3). Hampden (1), Worcester (1). 
Gosling Transplant Program 

Three transplants of Canada goose goslings were 
made from the Southboro-Framingham area in 
1971. A total of 59 goslings were transplanted in 
central and western Massachusetts of which 48 
were banded with orange and black plastic leg 
bands in addition to standard Federal bands. A 
total of 60 goslings, 7 yearlings and 22 adult 
Canada geese captured by drive trapping were 
banded. 

During the spring of 1971, one color-marked 
goose was observed during spring migration in the 
company of a large flock of unmarked geese on 
Cheshire Reservoir. 

A pair of geese of which the female was color 
marked nested at Adams Pond, Oakham. It is not 
known if the nest was successful. A pair of color- 
marked geese did hatch off seven goslings on 
Creek Pond in Otis. 

During the spring of 1972 the same female 
apparently returned with an unmarked male and 
hatched 6 goslings. Three pairs of geese of which 
one bird was color marked were observed in 
Sandisfield. It is not known if the geese nested 
successfully. Two pairs of geese nested suc- 
cessfully on the Quabbin Reservoir; one pair was 
known to be color marked. 
Winter Trapping Program 

Coastal Trapping. Extremely mild winter con- 
ditions hindered coastal trapping. Normally birds 
respond well to bait trapping when conditions 
become severe enough to regularly freeze over the 
tidal flats, thus limiting a ready supply of mussel 
and other marine organisms. This did not happen 
during the winter of 1971-1972. Success on inland 
Jtes was also limited by poor ice conditions which 



prevented or hindered cannon netting on some 
areas. 

State personnel, along with three cooperators, 
banded a total of 1,426 ducks at 27 locations using 
bait traps and /or cannon nets. Six hundred 
nineteen (619) ducks were banded as part of the 
regular winter black duck trapping program. Black 
ducks made up 77.1 percent of the total ; mallard x 
black hybrids 11.1 percent and mallards 7.4 
percent. The park mallard winter banding program 
netted 613 mallards, 135 mallard x black hybrids, 
42 black ducks, 13 mallard x domestic hybrids and 
4 other species. Thirteen ( 13) hand-reared mallard 
x black hybrids were also banded and released at 
Norumbega Park, Auburndale. 
Preseason Waterfowl Banding 

A total of 1,211 waterfowl and marsh birds were 
banded during the period from March 18 to Oc- 
tober 15. The number of birds banded by various 
techniques is as follows: airboat nightlighting — 
496; bait trapping — 384; cannon netting— 109; 
drive trapping — 95; nest box trapping — 70; 
released hand-reared ducks — 54; and hand- 
captured ducklings — 3. 

Wood ducks made up 28.4 percent of the total, 
mallards, 27.9 percent; black ducks, 11.0 percent; 
Canada geese, 7.8 percent; American coot, 4.0 
percent; blue winged teal, 1.7 percent and 
miscellaneous species made up 12.9 percent of the 
total. In addition to the banding of waterfowl, blood 
smears were taken from 485 birds and sent to Dr. 
Gordon F. Bennett of Memorial University of 
Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada 
for processing. The program will be continued in 
1972 after which the results will be analyzed and 
conclusions drawn concerning blood parasite in- 
festation levels. 

Winter Inventory Flights 

Winter inventory flights were made on January 4 
and 6, 1972. Coastal Massachusetts, from the New 
Hampshire line to the Rhode Island line was 
surveyed. The total waterfowl count was 131,364 of 
which 24,578 were black ducks. The black duck 
count was up 174.6 percent from 1971 and 4.5 
percent from the ten-year average. Canada geese 
( 14,339) were up 87.5 percent from 1971 and 75.1 
percent from the ten-year average. All other 
species were above the 1971 count and all but sea 
ducks were above the ten-year average. The in- 
creases can probably be attributed to an ex- 
ceptionally mild winter as is evident from the 
comparatively large number of green-winged teal 
and American coot seen during the January flight. 

Monthly fall flights showed the effect of 
Massachusetts' experimental waterfowl zoning 



10 



seasons. There was an unusual buildup of black 
ducks in November before the coastal waterfowl 
season opened with numbers during the December 
flight falling near normal. 

Black Duck Imprint Program 

Fifty-six black duck eggs were received from the 
Delaware Department of Fish and Wildlife in May of 
1971. Forty-five of these eggs were hatched at the 
Sandwich Game Farm and the ducklings reared by 
Ayer Game Farm personnel. Forty-four ducklings 
were raised to maturity. A 75 by 80-foot pen with a 
45 by 50-foot pool was constructed during the 
summer of 1971. The ducklings were placed in the 
pen at eight weeks of age and held over winter. 
Ducks were segregated into two sections of the 
pen, apparent pure-strain black ducks in one half 
and questionable types (possible mallard blood) in 
the other. Thirteen questionable drakes were 
released and only males with typical black duck 
characteristics were kept for breeding. Thirteen 
drakes and 19 hens were retained for breeding. 
The breeding stock was supplemented by coastal- 
trapped wild black duck hens. 

These birds laid a total of 172 eggs of which 132 
hatched. Ducklings were brooded in nesting 
cylinders for 24 hours after hatching and then 
moved to brood pens. Upon reaching four weeks of 
age ducklings were moved from the brooders at 
Sandwich Game Farm to the Ayer Game Farm. 
They will be held over winter and released on 
selected areas during the spring of 1973. 

Wood Duck Nesting Study 

Wood duck production on the Great Meadows 
National Wildlife Refuge increased slightly for the 
second year in a row with 60 ducklings being 
produced from seven nest attempts. Thirteen 
additional ducklings were hatched by a wild hen 
incubating game farm wood duck eggs. Production 
was also up slightly on SUASCO study areas with 
108 ducklings produced from 14 nest attempts. 
One nest was destroyed by a raccoon. The aban- 
donment of a second nest on the same area was 
attributed to raccoon molestation. 

Production on central Massachusetts areas was 
down 12 percent with 372 ducklings being 
produced from 36 nest attempts. The major reason 
for the decrease is attributed to raccoon predation. 
At Nipmuc Pond in Mendon, an apparently un- 
dersized raccoon slipped through the predator 
guards of several boxes and killed three incubating 
hooded mergansers and two female wood ducks. It 
also destroyed a third nest before incubation could 
be started. One wood duck nested successfully in 
1972 versus eight wood ducks in 1971. A raccoon 
was also responsible for killing an incubating hen 



at Bristol-Blake in Norfolk and caused the aban- 
donment of a second nest. 

Wood duck production on non-research areas 
was up slightly. Increases were noted on the 
Concord River and on a number of other areas in 
Middlesex and Essex County. This increase was 
slightly negated by an increase in nest losses due 
to vandalism, nest predation, storms and high 
water.Over half the recorded nest loss was due to 
raccoon activities. 

Production in southeastern Massachusetts in- 
creased greatly over 1970 and 1971 with 56 nest 
attempts on five study areas versus 36 in 1970. 
Duckling production was up more than 40 percent 
over 1971 (502 versus 344). 

Statewide, wood duck production appears to be 
slowly increasing. It is hoped that the Division will 
be able to increase its box erection and main- 
tenance program accordingly. 

Evaluation of Starling-Proof Nesting Cylinders 

Wood ducks successfully nested in 11 of 69 
available starling-proof nesting cylinders 
distributed across the state. One hooded 
merganser also nested successfully. A total of 101 
wood ducks and 12 hooded mergansers were 
produced. Utilization of cylinders has increased 
from five nests on three areas in 1970 (59 
available boxes) to 12 nests on six areas in 1972 
(69 available boxes). 

No starlings have been observed in the boxes 
since the program started although several grackle 
nests have been discovered. 

Statewide Development 

This project is concerned with the development 
and maintenance of wildlife management areas; 
the construction, erection and maintenance of 
wood duck nesting boxes; and the preparation of 
15-year work plans for management areas. 

Development consists of creating access to 
management areas and improving wildlife habitat. 
Access is created through the construction of roads 
and trails, parking areas and bridges. Informational 
and boundary signs are posted on all areas. 
Methods used to improve wildlife habitat are: 
managing forested areas through selective cutting 
and clear cutting; planting herbaceous seed for 
food and cover (i.e., millet, buckwheat, rye. swit- 
chgrass, reed canary grass, timothy, alfalfa, etc.); 
planting trees and shrubs; controlling noxious 
invading vegetation through brush cutting and 
application of herbicides; improving the forest 
understory through brush cutting to promote 
sprout growth and cover; and management of 
wetland areas by manipulation of water levels to 
allow growth of emergent vegetation, either 



11 



v 



atural or planted, to produce food and cover. 

Maintenance is concerned with keeping existing 

ities and existing developed sections in good 

This includes: keeping buildings in good 

repair; paintingand replanking bridges; graveling, 

iding, filling holes, and brush cutting roads; 
reposting and repairing signs; and top dressing 
and brush cutting fields. 

Wood duck nesting boxes are checked annually 
to determine usage, replace broken parts, replace 
missing boxes, replace broken or rotten poles, and 
renew nest box shavings. Usually, new boxes are 
also constructed and erected on areas that 
previously had no boxes. 

Below is a summation of project work for fiscal 
1972. 



Trails 

Parking Lots 
Signs 

Trees 

Shrubs - 



Created 1.1 miles of new trails 

Constructed 3 new lots 

Constructed 152 new information 
signs: marked 8 miles of boundaries. 

Planted 200 hetzi juniper and 500 
red pine 

Planted 2.000 multiflora rose and 
500 autumn olive. 






ev 



T 



Mi! 




, **' 



K} 




:,<.:" .-»-*- 



An airboat and high-intensity lights have proven invaluable in 
capturing waterfowl for studying and banding. 






Herbaceous F'tlds - 

Clearing - 
Vegetation Control — 

Timber Management 

Wood Duck 
Nesting Boxes - 



Planted and maintained 401 acres of 
fields 



Cleared 43 acres of forested land 

Brush cut and hand cut 268 acres 
and treated 148 acres with herbicide. 

Selectively cut 21 acres of forested 

land 

Constructed and erected 46 nest 
boxes on areas that previously had no 
boxes 



Project Administration — Expended 193 days; including 
planning, supervision, ordering 
materials, preparing monthly and 
annual reports, and project renewals. 



Plans 



Maintenance: 



Completed plans for the Birch Hill 
and Delaney Wildlife Management 
Areas 



Buildings 8 buildings 
Dams 10 dams 
Bridges 10 bridges 
Roads 5 miles 



Trails 99 7 miles 
Parking Lots — 55 
Signs 728 signs and 25 

miles of boundaries 
Wood Duck Nesting Boxes - 

744 boxes 



Mourning Dove Banding Project 

The objectives of this project are to gain in- 
formation on the mourning dove population in 
Massachusetts and to provide data on how many 
doves produced here are harvested by hunters in 
states south of Massachusetts where there are 
legal seasons on doves. 

The 1971 mourning dove banding project was 
conducted from 13 July 1971 through 23 Sep- 
tember 1971. A total of 2163 doves were banded, 
an increase of 123 over the 1970 figure of 2040. 
Doves were banded at nine sites in eastern 
Massachusetts by personnel of the Manomet Bird 
Observatory, cooperators of the Massachusetts 
Division of Fisheries and Game, and by personnel 
at Fort Devens Army Base. 

The majority of doves, 2161, were captured in 
two foot square wire traps designed for the pur- 
pose of trapping doves; the traps are baited with 
cracked corn or white millet and placed on the 
ground in open fields. The personnel at Fort 
Devens built 24 new traps in 1971 with materials 
purchased with project funds. The remaining 62 
doves were captured in nylon mist nets designed 
for catching wild birds. 

As of July 1972 we have had twenty-two reports 



12 



of doves that were banded during the 1971 project. 
These reports have come from the following 
states: Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, Maryland, 
Virginia, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, and 
Massachusetts. Fifteen of these reports are a 
result of hunting harvest; the remaining seven are 
of doves found dead or trapped alive and released 
after the band number was noted. 

Game Farms 

In an effort to reduce construction costs, em- 
ployees at the Ayer Game Farm designed and 
constructed a new type of rearing pen, using plastic 
netting in place of galvanized poultry netting. This 
resulted in using less labor and materials, and, of 
particular value was its ability to withstand heavy, 
wet snow. In addition, annual repairs and 
replacements to brooder houses, buildings, rearing 
pens, etc. were made. 

Losses due to theft at the Sandwich Game Farm 
were stopped when the culprit was apprehended. 
Over 1500 game birds were stolen at this farm but 
vandalism to both pens, property, and game birds 
was experienced at all installations. 

Heavy losses by mammalian predation occurred 
at the Ayer Game Farm when over 1000 birds were 
killed. 

Disease losses were moderate during this fiscal 
period. However, pulmonary edema or "marble 
spleen" — a strange disease in pheasants — still 
occurs in our flocks. Birds die suddenly for no 
apparent reason. This disease will be investigated 
thoroughly by the aid of the newly created Nor- 
theast Wildlife Disease Research Unit at the 
University of Connecticut. It is hoped that 
knowledge of how the disease spreads, what 
treatments are effective, and preventive measures 
will be discovered. 

At the Sandwich Game Farm a new waterfowl 
display was constructed creating the largest 
waterfowl exhibit in the northeastern United 
States. Such species as pintail, gadwall, wood duck, 
hooded mergansers, shoveler, redhead, can- 
vasback, all species of teal, blue and snow geese, 
mute swans, and numerous others will be viewed 
annually by visitors. 

Forest Pheasant Project 

Approximately 565 hybrids were released on 
Prescott Peninsula, Quabbin Reservation, and 
Martha's Vineyard. The releases of adults revealed 
poor survival on Prescott Peninsula while good 
results we r e observed on the Vineyard. Besides the 
problem of poor survival in forested areas, the 
reproduction of brood stock at the Division's game 
farms and the University of Massachusetts was 



extremely low. Studies are now underway to try to 
determine the cause of the low reproductive 
performance and to obtain information on an in- 
dividual basis in order to facilitate selection of a 
superior population. The limited data available at 
this time suggests that the hybrids are later 
maturing than the present game farm stock. 

However, due to the lack of good release sites, 
rearing facilities, and budgetary problems, it ap- 
pears that this project should be discontinued or 
transferred to the University of Massachusetts' 
Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences. 

Massachusetts Woodcock Project 

The objective of this woodcock project is to in- 
crease the available data on this species within 
Massachusetts as well as the present range of 
woodcock as part of a Federal research project on 
webless migratory game birds. 

Seventeen randomized singing ground routes 
established by the Migratory Bird Populations 
Station were surveyed using both Division of 
Fisheries and Game personnel and Bureau of Sport 
Fisheries and Wildlife cooperators. 

A total of 200 woodcock captures was made in 
1971-1972 which included six recaptures and 13 
repeats. This total includes two mortalities. 

Division personnel concentrated their efforts on 
mist-netting and locating summer concentration 
fields. A total of 97 new birds was netted by this 
method. The sex ratio was 92 males to five females. 
Brood banding by the use of bird dogs resulted in 
five broods banded with a total of 11 chicks. Again, 
low brood capture was due to inclement weather 
during the peak hatching period (about May 10) in 
central Massachusetts. High nest losses were 
noted caused by nest desertion and predation. 
Night lighting resulted in 70 new birds banded. 

Federal Aid Project W-35-R-13, Game Population 
Trend and Harvest Survey, Job 1-1, Statewide Small 
Game Harvest, revealed the following important 
woodcock data : 

1. The expanded number of hunters seeking 
woodcock increased by 6,200 from the reported 
20,551 in 1968 to 26,727 in 1970 

2. The 1970 expanded bag take showed 67,886 
woodcock harvested. 

Experimental Turkey Stocking 

Massachusetts turkey populations were sur 
veyed by direct observation, track counts, and 
cooperator reports. Turkey populations on central 
Massachusetts areas (Quabbin. Barre. Douglas) 
declined from 1970 71. This decline was probably 



13 






due to decreased winter survival following the 
cessation of winter feeding (1970-71). and by cold 
spring rains which adversely affected clutch 
hatchability and poult survival. Western District 
populations of game farm stock (October Moun- 
tain. Mt. Washington) have also declined, as a 
result of deliberate efforts to remove this inferior 
stock. In two other areas. Myles Standish Forest 
and the Holyoke Range, only stray birds remain. 

Six turkeys (2 adult female, 3 juvenile female, 1 
juvenile male) were trapped by cannon net in 
Hamilton's Orchards. New Salem during Sep- 
tember 1971 and transferred to Horse Mountain, 
Hatfield. One adult female was killed by a dog two 
months later. Another cannon net shot was made 
during November near Underhill Brook on Prescott 
Peninsula. Seven turkeys (1 adult male, 3 adult 
female. 3 juvenile female) were captured. All were 
banded, wing tagged, and released at the capture 
site. 

The recently apparent dispersal of Quabbin- 
trapped turkeys from Barre. Douglas, and the 
Quabbm itself is encouraging. However, the rate 
ind extent of dispersal, the survivability of the 
turkeys, and the degree of inherent wildness is 
inferior to that observed in restoration work in 
other states which used solely wild-trapped stock. 
In orderto maximize success and minimize delay in 
the statewide restoration project, high-quality, 
wild-trapped stock should be obtained and 
released on suitable areas in western and central 
Massachusetts, with future trap and transplant 
efforts based on stock from these new populations. 
Through the cooperation of the New York State 
Department of Environmental Conservation, a few 
wild-trapped turkeys have already been obtained. 
The project leader, and a University of 
Massachusetts graduate student trapped seven 
turkeys (1 adult male. 2 immature male. 1 im- 
mature female. 3 adult female) in Allegany State 
Park. Cattaraugus County. New York in March 
1972. and released them in Beartown State Forest, 
Berkshire County. Massachusetts. Hopefully, 
enough more can be obtained to bring the total 
released to fifteen turkeys. 

Mr. Walter M. Tzilkowski, a graduate student at 
the University of Mass., is conducting an in- 
vestigation of the habitat utilized by transplanted 
wild turkeys, with special emphasis' being given to 
areas used for nesting, brood-rearing, and winter 
feeding. In conjunction with this, one turkey from 
the Horse Mountain release, two from the Prescott 

(Continued on Page 19) 




*?i-7-;' .'-.-■ : «,', ■'. .;"■' 

klsh . :". :..■■■■/!*■ l;*,;.^-; 
Photo by Dick Smith 

Musket shooting on National Hunting and Fishing Day — part of 
a nationwide effort on the part of sportsmen to educate the 
public. 



Information and 
Education 



The Massachusetts Fish and Game Division has 
always enjoyed good communication with the 
public because of its policy of allowing any and all 
employees to openly discuss any phase of their 
immediate duties. This allows the Division to have 
150 people engaged in public relations. The 
Division has always benefited from this kind of 
honest communication. 

In addition to their other duties the District 
Managers are responsible for disseminating in- 
formation to the public. This regional program has 
been in effect for 23 years and has been highly 
successful in bringing government to the people. 

During Fiscal 1972 the districts, Westboro field 
headquarters and the Boston office handled 450 
informational meetings throughout the state. Many 
problems and misunderstandings are averted with 
this type of communication. 

Regarding the wetlands bond issue, the I and E 
section prepared a movie on the Hockomock 
Swamp, a slide show for lecture use by the districts, 
a special brochure, and assisted the Mass. 
Audubon Society in the publication of a magazine 
designed to foster interest in wetlands protection. 

An effort was made to help sportsmen and en- 
vironmentalists find unspoiled areas by preparing 
a list of topographic map outlets. 

For the firs* National Hunting and Fishing Day, 



14 



the Division assisted sportsmen's clubs where 
possible and hosted open houses at game farms, 
hatcheries and at the Westboro Wildlife 
Management Area. Approximately 45 clubs hosted 
similar open houses. 

"Turkeys Under Glass" was the Division's 
exhibit at the New England Sportsmen's Show. A 
live pair of wild turkeys (male and female) in their 
natural habitat proved an instant success. 

In addition to the turkey exhibit 300 items from 
the Division's Fish and Wildlife Museum were 
displayed at the Sportmen's Show cooperatively 
with Commerce and Development. 

The Magazine 

There is a tendency among I and E'ers to stress 
information and to ignore education. Almost 
without exception state fish and game agencies are 
extremely energetic in providing information about 
their fish and wildlife programs, but too much of 
the information is designed to solicit support for 
these programs and too little is designed to 
educate. 

The public is informed through news releases, 
lectures, TV programs, radio programs, leaflets, 
magazines, annual reports. But one can be jrv 
formed without being educated. Education is the 
process by which raw information is organized and 
stashed away for future use. Facts relating to the 
environment are bricks — nearly worthless by 
themselves but when laid and cemented with the 
mortar of education, they are the foundation on 
which an individual can build his outdoor 
philosophy. Does it really matter, for instance, if a 
person can rattle off the names of birds and 
mammals but is incapable of grasping the inherent 
good in a simple predator-prey relationship and 
advocates the shooting of "bad" raptors because 
they eat "good" game birds? Does it really matter if 
an individual knows how our trout are raised, 
where they are stocked and how to go about cat- 
ching them if he sees trout fishing as simply a 
method of collecting meat? 

Like other I and E people in other state fish and 
game agencies we occasionally find our program 
foundering in a lot of loose "information"; every 
now and then we stop and ask ourselves where 
we're going. With the magazine we have attempted 
to set a course and to put the education back into 
our information and education program. 

Massachusetts Wildlife is not a sporting journal. 
We are not nearly as interested in the simple acts 
of hunting and fishing as in the philosophy that 
underlies - or should underlie - hunting and 
fishing. 

In the May-June issue Dann Colburn rats to our 
readers on 45 of his favorite bass hot spots Dann 



£ 



f X 





The Massachusetts Junior Conservation Camp is directed by 
Massachusetts Conservation Incorporated, a non-profit cor- 
poration chartered tor the purpose ot conservation-education in 
cooperation with the Massachusetts Department ot Education, 
Massachusetts Department of Natural Resources, and 
Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Game. 

and the rest of us know enough about bass not to 
worry much about these little gold mines getting 
"cleaned out" so we offered them to other 
fishermen in the hope that an underharvested 
resource would get more attention. We hope 
anglers found the two-page list useful, but, for our 
money, the list itself wasn't one tenth as important 
as the single paragraph that preceded it: 

". . . Do not treat (this list) as a complete guide to 
Massachusetts bass fishing, just as a collection of 
one fisherman's favorite spots. I hope you enjoy 
them as much as I have. All I ask is that you fish 
quietly, cleanly, with your mind open to the pond 
and the beauty that surrounds it, that you go not as 
a taker but as a participant." 

In the July-August issue the editors tackled a 
sticky problem— woodchuck hunting. For some 
time we have been defining conservation as the 
wise use of our natural resources so how were we 
supposed to justify a type of hunting in which 99 
percent of the time the game is left to rot on the 
ground? "Pest control" rationalization won't work; 
occasionally woodchucks may become pests; in 
those cases where they are, though, we should be 
addressing ourselves to pest-control agents, 
certainly not hunters who harvest and utilize a 
resource in the true spirit of conservation. The 
statement that there are always plenty of wood- 
chucks — while quite correct — is irrelevant to the 
topic at hand. Our concern is not what woodchuck 
hunting does to woodchucks but what it does to 
hunters. No matter how you slice it shooting 
something anything and leaving it where it 
falls is lousy conservation Woodchuck hunting is 
quite popular in Massachusetts and we weren't 
about to curb it any by coming out against it in our 
little magazine. A ban on woodchuck hunting 
wasn't what we were really after anyway; we did 
not object to shooting woodchucks. we objected 
only to wasting woodchucks And. again, it was not 



15 






the actual waste itself that bothered us but the 
overall cheapening effect that such waste has on 
the grand sport of hunting. 

Accordingly we published a straight-forward 
cle on woodchuck hunting and obtained per- 
mission from Remington to tun three woodchuck 
recipes beside it. The recipes appeared in obvious 
places, along with the following editor's note: 

"The editors of Massachusetts Wildlife strongly 
urge hunters not to let the woodchucks or, for that 
matter, any other game they harvest go to waste. 
Three recipes for woodchuck, taken from the 
Remington Wild Game Cookbook , courtesy of 
Remington Arms, appear on the following pages. 
Try them; they're delicious." 

One of the most widely used arguments against 
hunting is its alleged damaging effect on wildlife 
populations. The bare biological fact is that there 
isn't any -- not now with modern management 
techniques and adjustable game laws. We are 
losing our wildlife at an alarming rate, but not to 
hunting; the single decimating factor is habitat 
destruction. We can present this fact as straight 
information until we're blue in the face and the 
reaction among readers will invariably be the same 

hunters will applaud, anti-hunters will hiss and 
spurn our effort as "propaganda." Here is a superb 
opportunity for a bit of education. If we resist the 
temptation to force-feed our readers, and let them 
draw their own conclusions from low-key and 
honestly-worded illustrations, then we will have 
succeeded in our objective. The November- 
December issue carried a curious little piece en- 
titled "Monument to the Past." In it the life and 
death of the passenger pigeon was recorded. Even 
after a century of uncontrolled exploitation the 
passenger pigeon flourished. He survived in the 
face of set guns, nets, burning pots of sulfur, clubs, 
canoe paddles. He fed a nation until that nation 
destroyed his habitat the virgin hardwood 

forests -- then he vanished swiftly and forever. 
This straight history was all the article contained 
and it wasall it had to contain. Any editorializing on 
our part would have weakened our position and 
given it the scent of propaganda. 

Fish and game agencies are arms of state 
government and because they are, many have the 
unjustifiable notion that they should evade con- 
troversial issues. Conservation by its very nature is 
controversial and if I and E sections are con- 
scientious about living up to their written 
obligations they must not duck when the flak gets 
thick. People in state government have been 
typecast as pompous politicians unwilling to 




Twelve half-hour TV shows on Division projects were prepared 
for Channel 6, 1 for Channel 56, 1 for Channel 4. 



commit themselves on any given issue. Because 
many otherwise honest and energetic state em- 
ployees see this stigma as an expected norm that 
attends their particular office much of the written 
material that flows out of state agencies is 
spineless and veiled in verbosity. State agencies 
should do the job that the public created them for 
even if it means offending certain segments of the 
public. Accordingly we have attempted in our 
magazine to publish hard-hitting, tersely-worded 
articles on environmental subjects. And, in those 
cases where exploiters have been government 
agencies or powerful corporate interests we have 
not hesitated to name names. For example, an 
article on the rape of the Millers River appeared in 
our May-June issue; in it we listed every known 
polluter together with those polluters who have 
defied clean-up orders from the Division of Water 
Pollution Control. Another article, in the January- 
February issue, examined the problem of oil 
pollution and the governmental and corporate 
negligence and greed that permits it. 

Finally, in our editorials we have dealt with such 
delicate topics as "eco-pornography" (July- 
August), slob "sportsmen," (May-June), and the 
divisive bickering among environmentalists over 
the morality of hunting (January-February). 

Photography 

The I and E section was most fortunate in ob- 
taining the full-time services of two highly skilled 
wildlife photographers. Jack Swedberg, an ex- 
perienced and eminently qualified wildlife 
photographer now heads the photo section. 
Swedberg has worked primarily in Massachusetts 
and has a wide knowledge of the state's ecology; 



16 



Right: robins and water snake, each a vital link in a complex 
chain of life. Part of the Division's I and E effort has been to 
educate the public to the fact that there is no such thing as a 
"bad" creature or, for that matter, a "valuable" one. All life forms 
have proven their worth by their very existence and how man 
perceives them hasn't one shred of cosmic relevance, (photos by 
Bill Byrne). 

he has published photos in virtually every major 
conservation magazine in America. His films have 
received national recognition. Bill Byrne, trans- 
ferring from the deer project, has had professional 
training in wildlife management and wide ex- 
perience in wildlife photography; he will be 
working under Swedberg's direction. 

New field photo subjects under the Division's 
new photography set-up have included: turkey, 
duck (nesting and brood), barred owl, Canada 
goose, snow goose, woodcock (nest), grouse 
(nest), wood duck (nesting in natural cavity), 
songbirds, gulls, cormorants, pheasants, 
goshawks(in flight), hummingbirds, various 
waterfowl, beaver, deer, foxes, snakes, frogs, 
flowers. 

A new filing system for stills and movies has been 
implemented. Books containing numbered contact 
sheets categorize mammals, birds, reptiles, am- 
phibians, fish, insects, plants, wildlife management 
projects alphabetically by species. 

Colored stills have been filed by subject in closed 
metal trays. Each tray contains 600 35mm tran- 
sparencies, filed by species in groups of 30. 

Movies have been filed on reels according to 
subject. Each has been labelled by species on the 
outside of the can. 

Twelve half-hour TV shows on Division projects 
were prepared for Channel 6, 1 for Channel 56, 1 
for Channel 4. Regular news spots were released to 
all major networks. 

A slide show entitled "Ecology" was prepared 
and set to music; a film entitled "Song of the 
Waterfowl" was also prepared and set to music. A 
comprehensive film on the wood duck project was 
put together for lecture use by Division personnel. 

The photo section requested the location of 
certain subjects via news releases. The experiment 
proved most rewarding. 

Forthcoming were 4 goose nests, 3 wood duck 
nests in natural cavities, 1 grouse nest, 2 woodcock 
nests, 1 red fox den, one otter fishing area, 1 black 
bear with cub. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard Cronm, 

Chief of Information and Education 



^ 



17 




i..,-. 








• 






"«#&£ 



■■«,:' 



Sfs&i 



w 









The Permanent Protection 

Wetlands Act will help the 

Division of Fisheries and 

Game preserve the state's 

most productive wildlife 

habitat. (Photo by Floyd Richardson) 



REALTY 



During the past year the Division has been the 
recipient ot tour gitts of land, each of which was a 
valuable addition to the Division's ever increasing 
acreage. 

The Western Massachusetts Electric Company 
donated to the Division a gift of 150 acres of prime 
farmland situated in the Town of Northfield. The 
area is already being managed for wildlife by the 
district personnel. We are sure that any state or 
local agency interested in the preservation of open 
space would have been most grateful for this 
generous gift. 

The Squannacook Sportsman's Club was most 
generous when it decided to give us a parcel of land 
on the beautiful Baddacook Pond in Groton, which 
they had acquired. We feel quite sure that sport- 
smen during this and many more fishing seasons to 
come will find this parking area both convenient 
and useful. We hope they will realize that the area 
was given for everyone's use by fellow sportsmen. 

The Hamilton Rod and Gun Club was also the 
generous donor of some 62 acres of land in the 
Towns of Brookfield and Sturbridge, which they 
originally acquired for their own use. This area is 
close to a Division-controlled wildlife management 
area and is a very valuable addition to our holdings 
throughout the state. 

In December the Division was pleasantly sur- 
prised with the offer of a 25-acre parcel in the 
Town of Uxbndge. The site is unique in that it has a 
two-mile long canal and many ecological features 
which make it most attractive. The site was 
evaluated by Division personnel. They determined 
that it had excellent fish and wildlife potential. 
Consequently. Mrs. Rose N. Marcus of Worcester, 
owner of the property, presented the deed, tran- 



sferring ownership to the Division. We are grateful 
for Mrs. Marcus's generosity. 

A long discussed acquisition was completed with 
the acquisition of approximately three acres on 
Cook Pond in Fall River. Plans to clean up this 
pond, build a pier and parking lot with a good ac- 
cess road are now in the preliminary stages of 
development. More land was added to the Swift 
River Area, the Crane Pond and Downfall Areas. A 
large tract of salt marsh was acquired in Ipswich 
and a very valuable parcel was acquired along the 
Mashpee River in Mashpee. 

The acquisition of several other parcels was 
planned in this fiscal year. However, great dif- 
ficulties were experienced in obtaining the 
necessary approvals to employ title examiners and 
appraisers. Consequently, the completion of these 
acquisitions was delayed and in some cases we will 
probably lose the land as a result of these delays. 

Much time was spent by the staff in classifying 
land and bringing the Master Land Inventory up-to- 
date. We are required to submit each September a 
revised and updated inventory. It may be of in- 
terest to know that as of July 1, 1972 the Division 
owned 24,939.8 acres throughout the state. 

Each year the staff receives many inquiries from 
residents of the state about our interest in 
acquiring their land. We make a sincere effort to 
check into these offers to determine the suitability 
of the property to our needs and other related 
information necessary before a decision can be 
made dn what action will be taken in each case. 
This entails an investment of time and travel, but 
we feel that if a landowner is interested enough to 



18 



contact us, then we should show interest by 
checking into the matter. Many times the land 
offered is not suitable for our needs, but we advise 
the owner of other agencies that might be in- 
terested in the property. 

The enactment of the Coastal Marshes and 
Inland Wetlands Act (Chapter 839 Acts of 1971) 
which is adequately covered in other sections of 
this annual report, heralded the beginning of an 
important new program for the Realty Section. 

In the administration of funds provided in the 
previous bond issue for land acquisitions we felt a 
moral obligation to expend these funds as 
economically and prudently as possible. We see no 
reason to change our policy in the administration of 
coastal marshes and inland wetlands. Since we do 
not have permanent staff members to handle title 
examinations and appraisals, we are entirely 
dependent on the hiring of consultants to do this 
work. This method of operation could be ad- 
ministratively sound and economical if those 
outside the Division who must approve the em- 
ployment of these consultants could develop a 
system whereby action could be taken in a matter 
of a couple of weeks rather than have the ap- 
provals drag on for months as has been the case in 
many instances. This is a bottleneck which has 
slowed our acquisition program down considerably 
and has caused some sellers to become concerned 
that we are not going to purchase their land. 



Work has started on the Hockomock Swamp 
area, which will be a major program of acquisition. 
We are most appreciative and grateful to the Board 
of Selectment of the Town of Easton for providing 
us with the office space necessary to establish a 
project headquarters in the area of acquisition. 
This is a major acquisition undertaking and will 
involve between five and six thousand acres when 
completed. There are literally hundreds of small 
parcels of land within the swamp area and 
progress will be slow and tedious. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Joseph H. Johnson 
Chief of Wildlife Lands 



¥ 



WILDLIFE (continued from page 14) 

Peninsula flock, and one from the Beartown release 
were equipped with back-pack radiotelemetry 
units for monitoring the birds' movements. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Warren W. Blandin, 

Chief of Wildlife Research 
and E. Michael Pollack, 

Chief Game Biologist 



¥ 



Financial Report July 1, 1971 to June 30, 1972 

RECEIPTS FROM FISHING, HUNTING AND TRAPPING LICENSES 















Fees Retained 
















by Town Clerk 


Net Returne 


Licenses 






Price 


Number 


Gross Amount 


or City 


To State 


Series No. 


1 


Res. Cit. Fishing 


(5.25) 


127,530 


669,532.50 


31,646.75 


637,885.75 


Series No. 


2 


Res. Cit. Hunting 


(5.25) 


57,914 


304,048.50 


14,36950 


289,679.00 


Series No. 


3 


Res. Cit. Sporting 


(8.25) 


60,455 


498,753.75 


14,986.75 


483.767.00 


Series No. 


4 


Res. Cit. Minor Fishing 


(3.25) 


19,358 


62,91675 


4,82375 


58.093.00 


Series No. 


4-A 


Res. Cit. Female Fishing 


(4.25) 


26,015 


110,563.75 


6,459.50 


104,104.25 


Series No. 


5 


Res. Cit. Minor Trapping 


(3.25) 


215 


698.75 


5350 


645.25 


Series No. 


6 


Res. Cit. Trapping 


(8.75) 


599 


5,24125 


147.25 


5.094.00 


Series No. 


7 


Non. Res. 7-day Fishing 


(5.25> 


2,393 


12,563.25 


594.75 


11,968.50 


Series No. 


9 


Non. Res. Fishing 


(9.75) 


3,999 


38,990.25 


986 50 


38.00375 


Series No. 


9-A 


Alien Fishing 


(9.75) 


1,022 


9,964.50 


25225 


9.712.25 


Series No. 


10 


Non. Res. or Alien Hunting 


(16.25) 


2,575 


41,84375 


494 00 


41,34975 


Series No. 


12 


Duplicate Licenses 


( .50) 


3,469 


1,734.50 




1.734.50 


Series No. 


15 


Res. Cit. Sporting 


(FREE) 


17,542 








Series No. 


17 


Res Cit. (Mentally Ret.) 
Paraplegic and to the blind 


(FREE) 


856 








Series No. 


18 


Military or Naval 


(FREE) 


7,128 








Series No. 


19 


Paraplegic Hunting 


(FREE) 


36 










331,106 


1,756.851.50 


74.81450 


1.682037.00 



19 







APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 



Expenditures 






Account No & Title 


Appropriation 


& Liabilities 


Reverted 


1070 0000 


"Stration 


252,961 00 


S 228,774 97 


$24,186.03 


1070 7300 


Management 


687,386.00 


663,577.13 


23,808 87 


1070 7322 


Anadromous Fish Projects 


22,000.00 


20,624 97 


1,375.03 


1070 2342 


■-toration Projects 


54,960.00 


53,825.03 


1,134,97 


1070 2400 


Wildlite Management 


577,927.00 


564,654.21 


13,272.79 


1070 7461 


Wildlife Restoration 


221,525.00 


220,020.39 


1,504.61 


1070 2502 


Eastern Dove Management 


3,500 00 


3.500.00 






SI, 820, 259. 00 


SI. 754, 976. 70 


$65,282.30 






Continuing 




Balance 


1070 2451 


Damage by Wild Deer 


Appropriations 


Expenditures 


Forward 




and Moose 


513,420.30 


S 8,731.56 


$4,688.74 


10702302 


Replacement Hatchery House 








Sunderland 


50,000.00 




50,000.00 


10702303 


Pollution Abatement 










McLaughlin 


15,000.00 




15,000.00 


1070 2305 


Replacement Upper Pools 










Sandwich 


35,000.00 




35 ,000.00 


1070 2463 


Construction Storage Build 


ng 








Newbury 


12,200.00 




12,200.00 


10709013 


Land and Water Acquisition 








and Development 


506,619.32 


92,647 26 


413,972.06 


10709016 


Coastal and Inland 










Wetlands 


5,000,000.00 


5,000,000.00 




S5, 632, 239. 62 


$101,378.82 55,530,860.80 



•*60'- Reimbursed Federal Funds 
***75'- Reimbursed Federal Funds 
•* **100 '- Reimbursed Federal Funds 



HOW THE SPORTMEN'S DOLLAR WAS SPENT 



Board of Fisheries & Game 


10700000 


512.00 


127,018.33 


5* 


Information Education 


1070 0000 




101,756.64 


4* 


FISHERIES PROGRAMS 








Fish Hatcheries 


1070 2300 




453,525.09 


18? 


Fisheries Management 


1070 2300 


$210,052.04 






• * *Fish Restoration Projects 


1070 2342 


53,825.03 






Fisheries Management 


1070 2400 


142,294.47 






Fisheries Research Coop. Unit 


1070-2341 


10,000.00 






••Certain Anadromous Fish 








17* 


Projects 


1070 2322 


20,624.97 


436,796.51 




WILDLIFE PROGRAMS 










Game Farms 


1070 2400 




280,065.27 


11* 


Wildlife Management 


1070 2400 


142,294.47 






Wildlife Research Coop. Unit 


1070 2441 


8,360.72 






• Damage by Wild Deer 


1070 2451 


8,731.56 






•••Wildlife Restoration Projects 


1070 2461 


220,020.39 






• **Eastern Dove Management 


1070-2502 


3,500.00 


382,907 14 


15* 


LAND ACQUISITION 










•Land & Water Acquisition 










and Development 


1070 9013 




92,647.26 


4* 


DEPT. OF NATURAL RESOURCES 








Natural Resources Officers 










Salaries and Expenses (26'.) 


1020 0000 


236,132.00 






Supervision Public Hunting 










and Fishing Grounds ( 1 00 -. ) 


10200200 


14,270 00 






Office of the Commissioner (.004) 


10000000 


2,223.70 






Office of the Sec. of 










Environmental Affairs (2 '. ) 


0450-1400 


2,110.00 


254,735.70 


102 


RETIREMENT ASSESSMENT 


0612 1000 




60,000.00 


2'/. 


GROUP INSURANCE 






59,041.00 


2 2 


INTEREST ON BONDED DEBT 


1079 8000 




90,375.00 


42 


SERIAL BONDS AND NOTES 


1079-9000 




200,000.00 


8 2 



ADMINISTRATION 
Administration 



'Continuing Appropriations 
**60". reimbursable Federal Funds 
***75'. reimbursable Federal Funds 
* * ** 1 00 '■ reimbursable Federal Funds 



$2,538,867.94 100 2 






Massachusetts Freshwater Fish Awards Program 

During Fiscal 1972 the Massachusetts Freshwater Sportfishing Awards Program continued through financial 
assistance from Division of Tourism and the Department of Commerce and Development. 

The second year with salmon on the list saw a new state record — an increase of 1 lb. 4 oz. The new record, 9 lbs. 5 oz. 
is held by John E. Courtney of Auburn. 

The catfish record fell to Wayne Briggs, Belchertown who took a 13 lb. 14 oz. fish from Metacomet Pd., Belchertown. 

The award plaque ceremony was held at the New England Sportsmen's Show, Hynes Auditorium. 






Species 

LM Bass 
SM Bass 
N. Pike 
Pickerel 
R Trout 
B Trout 
L Trout 
Shad 
Salmon 
Catfish 
Walleye 
Bluegill 
Bullhead 
W. Perch 
Y Perch 
Brook Trout 
Calico 
"'out 



Freshwater Fish Records 

FRESHWATER FISHING RECORDS FROM JULY 1, 1972 to JUNE 30, 1972 



Weight 

91b. 12 C 

6 lb 8 c 
171b. 14>A< 

51b. 12 c 

51b. 15 c 

11 lb. 9 < 

121b. 5 c 

8 1b. 4 ( 

91b. 5 ( 

131b. 14 ( 

7 lb 8 
1 lb, 3Uoz. 
4 lb. .02 oz 
21b. 8 oz. 
lib. 5 oz 

31b. 

1 lb, 12 oz 
51b. 15 oz. 



Length Girth 



OZ. . 



25" 
20" 
40'.." 
26" 
24' ?" 
25.5" 
31' 2" 
25' /' 
27.1" 
29 6" 
30' i" 

11' 7" 

19' /' 
15'.." 

15*8" 

19" 

15'.." 

24'?" 



19.25' 
16" 

18 3 4" 

14' ?" 

13' 2" 
20" 
173 S " 
15'.)" 



15" 
914" 
12" 
11" 
9" 
12" 



Place Caught How Caught 

Muddy Pd., Carver live bait 

Wachusett Res., Boylston fly fishing 

Cheshire Res , Cheshire ice tackle 

Halfway Pd., Plymouth ice tackle 

Sluice Pd., Lynn spinning 

Wachusett Res., Boylston live bait 

Wachusett Res., Boylston live bait 

Chicopee R., Chicopee spinning 

Quabbin Res. trolling 
Metacomet Pd., Belchertown 

Quabbin Res. Iiv e bait 

Red Bridge, Three Rivers bait casting 

Dickinson Lk., Lunenburg live bait 
Lake Wickaboag, W. Brookfield ice tackle 

Brigham Pd., Hubbardston ice tackle 

Sawmill Pd., Sharon spinning 

Triangle Pd., Plymouth live bait 

Sluice Pd., Lynn R Trout 



Date Caught by 

9 27 71 Kenneth King, Guild Rd., Brockton 

8 19 71 Arnold Korenblum, 3 Whitelock Dr., Marlboro 

1 13 72 Lewis Spiewak, Jr., 29 Copley Terrace, Pittsfield 

2 9 72 William Bunker, 411 Laurel St., Bridgewater 

4 15 72 George Booth, 20 West St., Marblehead 

5 io 72 Otis Bates, 173 Highland St., Clinton 

4 24 72 Robert Whittier, 135 Winter St., Clinton 

5 18 72 Walter Ruszala, 150 Orchard St., Chicopee 

9 5 71 John Courtney, 45 Winbrook Dr., Auburn 
9 15 71 Wayne Briggs, P.O. Box 925, Belchertown 

4 22 72 David Bassett, 803 East St., Amherst 

6 12 72 Michael Morse, 68 Sparrow Dr., Springfield 

5 2 72 Richard Dicker, 115 Buttrick Ave., Fitchburg 

2 13 72 Reqina M. Ramonas, Lakeview Ave., W. Brookfield 

12 4 71 George Furmanick, 946 Main St., Clinton 

4 18 72 John Schuko, 63 Poll io Ave., Stoughton 

4 29 72 Arthur Stetkis, 85 Howard St., Brockton 

4 15 72 George Booth, 20 West St., Marblehead 



(Continued on page 21) 



20 



SUMMARY OF FISH AND GAME INCOME 

#Fishing, Huntingand Trapping Licenses $1,682,037.00 

**Special Licenses, Trap Registrations and Tags 7,569.65 

Archery Stamps 5,757.40 

Rents 4,378.00 

Miscellaneous and Sales 12,047.17 

Court Fines 10,335.00 

Refunds Prior Year 98.97 

Pittman-Robertson Federal Aid 131,449.37 

Dingell-Johnson Federal Aid 111,504.69 

AnadromousFish Projects Federal Aid 28,469.89 

Mass. Mourning Dove and 

Woodcock Reimbursement 6,981.83 

Reimbursement for Services 22,118.61 

Bureau of Outdoor Recreation 

Reimbursements 125,000.00 



TAXIDERMIST: 



85 



$2,147,747.58 



*See Receipts from Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses 
** See Analysis of Special Licenses 

TRANSFERS TO INLAND FISHERIES 
AND GAME FUND 

Interest on Investments 4,537.50 

Gasoline Tax Apportionment 281,810.15 

Surplus in Inland Fisheries & Game Fund 
as of June 30, 1972 $155,810.86 

ANALYSIS OF SPECIAL LICENSES 

Number RECEIPTS 
TYPE OF LICENSE ISSUED 
TRAP REGISTRATION: 

Initial 113 $113.00 

Renewal 314 314.00 

Duplicate 1 .50 

FUR BUYERS: 

Resident 19 190.00 

Non-Resident 5 100.00 



PROPAGATORS: 

Class 1 (Special Fish: ) 

Initial 19 

Renewal 181 

Class3(Fish) 

Initial 12 

Renewal 79 

Class 4 (Birds & Mammals) 

Initial 125 

Renewal 483 

Class6 (Dealers) 

Initial 7 

Renewal 76 

Additional 440 

Class 7 (Indiv. Bird or Mammal) 

Initial 44 

Renewal 80 

SHINERS: (for bait) 152 

FIELD TRIAL LICENSES: 8 

QUAIL FOR TRAINING DOGS: 

Initial 18 

Renewal 72 

COMMERCIAL SHOOTING PRESERVES 13 

TRAPPING OF CERTAIN BIRDS: 2 

MOUNTING PERMITS: 11 

TAGS: 

Game 4403 

Commercial Shoot. Pres. 

Pheasant 1120 

Quail 300 

Posters 400 

Fish 13.300 



425.00 



95.00 
543.00 



60.00 
237.00 



625.00 
1,449.00 



35.00 
228.00 
440.00 



44.00 
40.00 

760.00 

80.00 

90.00 
216.00 

650.00 

10.00 

11.00 



SPECIAL FIELD TRIAL PERMITS: 



37 
TOTAL: 



311.15 
133.00 

370.00 



$7.56965 



STANDING ALL-TIME MASSACHUSETTS FRESHWATER FISHING RECORDS 

Through June 30, 1972 



Species 



Weight 



LM Bass 


121b. 


loz 


SM Bass 


61b. 


120Z 


N Pike 


24 1b. 


8oz 


Pickerel 


9 1b. 


5oz 


R Trout 


8 1b. 


4 0Z 


Brown Trout 


191b. 


10 oz 


L. Trout 


131b. 


6oz 


Shad 


81b. 


8oz 


Channel Catfish 


131b 


14oi 


Walleye 


91b 


3oz 


Blueqill 


1 lb. 


oz 


Bullhead 


51b. 


9oz 




5 1b. 


8oz 




4 1b. 


9oz 


Calico 


21b. 9 


1 voz 




2 1b. 


9oz. 


W. Perch 


2 1b. 


12oz. 


Y. Perch 


21b 


5oz. 


Brook Trout 


61b. 


4 0Z. 


Salmon 


91b. 


5 0Z. 



Length 

25'.." 
21" 
45' /' 
29' j" 
26" 
31' /' 
33" 
28" 
29 6" 

11'.." 
22' 2" 
22' /' 
22' i" 
18" 
18" 
17" 
17'.." 
24" 
27 1" 



Girth 


Place Caught 


How Caught 




Date 




21%" 


Palmer R , Rehoboth 


bait casting 


5 


9 


63 




Pleasant Lk., Harwich 


spinning 


5 


14 


67 


22" 


Onota Lk , Pittsfield 
Pontoosuc Lk . Lanesboro 


hve bait 


1 


13 
54 


67 


16" 


Deep Pd , Falmouth 


live bait 


10 


15 


66 


22 s b" 


Wachusett Res., Boylston 


spinning 


5 


19 


66 




Quabbin Res , Pelham 


trolling 


4 


17 


71 


17" 


North R , Hanover 


spinning 


5 


6 


71 




Metacomet Pd , Belchertown 




9 


15 


71 




Assawompsett Pd., Lakeville 


bait casting 








9' 2" 


Bog Pd , Norton 


spinning 


10 


1/ 


65 


11 Vj" 


Conn , R , Hadley 


live bait 


6 


8 


63 


14" 


Leverett Pd , Leverett 


live bait 


e 


2 


65 


11' /' 


Conn R ., Chicopee 


live bait 


9 


8 


65 


14" 


Merrimack, Lowell 


spinning 


6 


8 


6b 


13' s" 


Savorys Pd , Manomet 


ice tackle 


1 


24 


/I 


13" 


Herring Pd ., Plymouth 


trolling 


5 


2. 


/I 


12" 


Wachusett Res , Boylston 


spinning 


4 


23 


10 


14" 


Otis Res , Otis 


spinning 


6 


24 


68 




Quabbin Res. 




9 


5 


/I 



Caught By 



George Pastick, Fall River 
Thomas Paradise, Arlington 
Kris Ginthwain. Pittsfield 
Mrs James Martin, Stockbndqe 
Roger Walker, Eastondale 
Dana DeBlois. Sterling 
Alan Storm, Gardner 
Richard C Brown, Norwell 
Wayne Brigqs, Belchertown 
William Spauldinq, Whitman 
Robert Barrett, Stoughton 
Mrs I rna Storie. Chicopee Falls 
Sti phi n Brozo. Amherst 
Joseph Kida. Chicopee 
ie Olsson. Lowell 
Charles Godin, Manomet 
Manual P Souza. Dartmouth 
Arnold Korenblum. Marlboro 
Thomas Laptew. Granville 
John E Courtney. Auburn 



21 









*t 






PBLi 




Division of 
FISHERIES and GAME 

Field Hcadquort<-r% 
WESTBORO. MASS 01581 



Second Cla I 

POSTAGE P/ [I 

ot Worcester, f 



MASSACHUSETTS 
DIVISION OF 
FISHERIES 
AND GAME 

Ten Years of Progress 

ANNUAL REPORT 1973 




■ ■ 



■ 



^r- 



I V 




Governor 

FRANCIS W. SARGENT 




Director 
JAMES M. SHEPARD 

DIVISION OF FISHERIES ANDGAME 

Board 

ROGER D. WILLIAMS, Chairman 

Sudbury 

BRADLEE E. GAGE, Secretary 
Amherst 

HARRY C. DARLING, 
East Bridgewater 

KENNETH F. BURNS 
Shrewsbury 

MARTIN H. BURNS 
Newbury 

JAMES M. SHEPARD 
Director 

PAULS.MUGFORD 
Acting Asst. Director 

COLTON H. BRIDGES 
Superintendent 

E.MICHAEL POLLACK 
Chief Game Biologist 

DAVID FREDEN BURGH 
Chief Fish Culturist 

WARREN W. BLANDIN 
Chief of Wildlife Research 

RICHARDCRONIN 
Chief, Information and Education 

JOSEPH JOHNSON 
Chief of Realty 

District Managers 

Western District 

EUGENE D.MORAN 

Hubbard Ave., Pittsf ield 

Phone: 447 V789 

Central District 

CARLS PRESCOTT 

Temple St., W. Boylston 

Phone : 835 3607 

Northeastern District 

WALTER HOYT 

Box 86, Acton 
Phone: 263 4347 

Southeastern District 

LEWIS C SCHLOTTERBECK 
RFD No. 3, Buzzard's Bay 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Division of Fisheries and Game 
108th Annual Report 



His Excellency, Francis W. Sargent, Governor of the Com- 
monwealth, the Executive Council, the General Court and the 
Board of Fisheries and Game: 

Gentlemen: 

I have the honor to submit herewith the one hundred and 
eighth annual report of the Division of Fisheries and Game, 
covering the fiscal year from July 1, 1972 to June 30, 1973. 

James M. Shepard, Director 
CONTENTS 

Ten Years of Progress 1 

The Board Reports 3 

Fisheries 5 

Wildlife 8 

Information and Education 11 

Legislation 14 

Realty 15 

Financial Report 16 

Freshwater Fish Records 18 



Ten Years of Progress: More than any ten-year period in the 
Fish and Game Division's history, the decade since 1963 has 
seen drastic change both in our overall program and philosophy. 
During this period fish and wildlife management has evolved to 
established science. Much hypothesis has crystalized into time- 
tested theory. As rapid and dramatic as the change has been, we 
are only just beginning to accelerate, just scratching the surface 
of a vast potential for fish and wildlife restoration. Most en- 
couraging of all — more so even than the technical advances — 
has been the sudden development among the general public of 
an environmental conscience; the "Land Ethic" that Aldo 
Leopold could only dream about has at last begun to surface in 
our society as a reality. This new philosophy is readily apparent 
inside the Fish and Game Division and in those who are served 
by the Division. At last we are coming to realize that hunting and 
fishing — like all outdoor recreation — is synonymous with a 
healthy environment. More and more, as is evidenced by our land 
acquisition program, the Division is concerning itself with not 
just fish and wildlife but the foundation on which these 
resources rest. Today that foundation is crumbling everywhere, 
but if conservationists can keep the pace they have set for 
themselves over the last decade, there is much hope for the 
future. 



Cover pnoto by Jack Swedberg 



THE COVER: A plump ringneck was not the 
important thing collected this morning; a 
memory was. 



In describing progress in annual reports there is 
a tendency to gloss over the many trials and 
tribulations that inevitably take place in any 
progressive program. Certainly the Division went 
through some trying times in the years 1963 to 
1973. There was inflation, ever-present budget 
restrictions, unrest among sportsmen over deer 
management and conflict over the Division's ef- 
forts to establish a modern stream-stocking policy. 

Nevertheless, the Division has emerged from 
this ten-year period in generally fine shape and 
with a dramatic record of accomplishment. 

Two board members have served the Division for 
nearly the full period. To these two men — Harry 
Darling (12-3-62 to 10-6-72) and Martin Burns 
(11-27-63 to 10-6-73) we dedicate the 1973 An- 
nual Report. 

Harry Darling was at the helm of the Board for 
six years during the ten years. He took over for 
Roger Williams who left the state for business 
reasons. Darling graciously made the motion to re- 
elect Roger Williams Board Chairman when 
Williams returned to Massachusetts in October of 
1970. Williams' first term as Chairman had been 
from 1961 to 1965, his second from 1970 until the 
present. 

Darling's devotion to the principles of a non- 
partisan Fish and Game Board goes back to 1948 
when he helped lay the groundwork for legislation 
that established the Board system. 



The Board 

The Fish and Game Board was established in 
1948, and has since proven to be a stable and 
workable system of government. During the last 
ten years 11 men have served on the Fish and 
Game Board. The five present members have 
averaged five years each for a total of 25 years. The 
present Director, James M. Shepard, has served for 
the last nine years and has had a chance to cement 
a professional working relationship with the Board. 
This situation has permitted the evolution of well- 
coordinated leadership with the added strengths of 
continuity and experience. 

In 1963 Fish and Game income was about $1.3 
million — surplus about $.25 million. In 1973 an- 
nual income had doubled — surplus close to $.5 
million. 

Yet the demand for services has outstripped the 
increase in revenue. The Division made a plea for 
funding help based on a study which indicated that 
sportsmen contribute more than $110 million to 
the economy of the state. There is an additional $1 
million contributed in state excise taxes and $1.5 



Ten Years of Progress 




One of the many large abandoned farms purchased by the 
Division with sportsmen's funds. While providing top-notch 
hunting, the land is also used for other forms of recreation. In five 
years after the $1 license increase the Division bought 10,000 
acres at an average cost of $ 150 per acre. 



million for licenses. While the passage of a $5 
million bond issue aimed at wetland purchase and 
protection indicates that increasingly the 
Legislature is responding to these figures and is 
aware that the Fish and Game Division is the most 
efficient land-purchasing agent, much more is 
needed. 

The Fish and Game Division has made a 
tremendous contribution to hunter safety 
throughout the nation by developing the color 
"hunter orange". Hunter orange shows up in the 
woods like a warning beacon yet does not frighten 
most animals. 

The Boston office's move to the new State Office 
Building was certainly a highlight of the 60's. 

The establishment in 1971 of the Fish and 
Wildlife Museum by Director Shepard and Mike 
Beatrice will provide a sense of history for future 
conservationists. 

The Division has endeavored to educate 
youngsters as to proper hunting techniques and 
gun safety. An important beginning has been the 
Youth Upland Hunt. 

Land Acquisition 

Unquestionably the greatest accomplishment in 
the last 10 years has been in the field of land 







In 1963 the Middlesex County League of Sportsmen's Clubs 
purchased a large tract of land on the Squannacook River and 
gave it to the Fish and Game Division as an example to other 
organizations. The dedication took place in 1966, the same year 
that the $1 license increase for land went into effect. Left is Dick 
Cronin, then Northeast District Manager. Right, Jack Dixon, 
Northeast Fisheries Manager. 

acquisition. A dozen important parcels were given 
to the Division by sportsmens clubs, county 
leagues and public spirited citizens. 

Prior to 1963 Fish and Game controlled 19 
wildlife management areas which totaled 24,500 
acres. Of these the Division owned seven. The 
other 12 were leased or used with some form of 
agreement in cooperation with other state and 
federal agencies. 

In 1964 the Board authorized a realty section. A 
$1 increase in license fees went into effect in 1966. 
The increase in revenue was used for land 
acquisition. The same year the Division added an 
engineer to its staff. 

The Information and Education Section along 
with key staff members took on the biggest selling 
job in Division history when it publicized the need 
for the proposed $5 million bond issue for wetland 
acquisition. Two years of hard work resulted in 
success. 

Since 1963 the Division has purchased for public 
use approximately 13,000 acres for about $2.5 
million. The agency now owns and /or controls 
43,000 acres, with many acres being added all the 
time. 
Wildlife 

It has also been a productive 10 years for wildlife 
management. Labor saving devices in other game 
farms permitted one game farm to be closed and 
sold. Today there are twice as many male 



pheasants raised with less expense than there 
were in 1963. This has resulted in part from a 
breakthrough in sex linkage developed by the 
Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Game. The 
technique allows culturists to differentiate bet- 
ween male and female pheasants immediately after 
hatching instead of the former six- to seven-week 
period. 

The Division managed 19 wildlife management 
areas in 1963. Today it manages 35. These areas 
are used by the public for all types of recreation — 
not just hunting and fishing. 

Wild turkey populations have been re- 
established in suitable range throughout the state. 
The flocks are small, but at last showing signs of 
growing. Problems with domestic genes have 
hampered us in the past but, our biologists are 
aware of the problem and the situation at last 
appears to be under control. 

Introduction of game birds in vacuum habitat has 
taken place — sharp-tailed grouse for Nantucket, 
ruffed grouse for Martha's Vineyard, Canada geese 
for western Massachusetts. 

Fisheries 

Great progress has been realized in fisheries 
management during the last 10 years. Improved 
access to great ponds and large rivers resulted 
from legislation enacted in the early 60's. 

Lake trout were firmly established in Quabbin 
Reservoir. Smelt problems were solved. The 
potential of Quabbin to produce landlocked salmon 
was proven. 

The Division shut down three hatcheries that 
had produced 60,000 pounds of trout. The same 
number of men were able to rear 200,000 pounds 
of trout at the Division's new McLaughlin hatchery 
in Belchertown. 

One of the deactivated trout hatcheries was re- 
fitted for modern salmon production. 

The Connecticut and Merrimack Rivers show 
great promise for anadromous fisheries. Joint 
efforts of Federal and state agencies during the 10 
years since 1963 have created much optimism for 
restoring shad and Atlantic salmon to historic 
significance. 

Since 1963 trout production in poundage has 
increased by about a third. 

To increase interest in fishing and produce some 
potentially valuable data the Division, with the 
financial backing of the Division of Commerce and 
Development, implemented the Freshwater 
Fishing Awards Program in 1963. Since that year 
all existing records have been broken save for one 
12 pound 1 ounce largemouth bass. 

All in all it has been a fabulous ten years. The 
forecast for the next ten is even better. 



The Board Reports 



The Fish and Game Board is proud to present to 
the citizens of the Commonwealth the 108th An- 
nual Report of the Massachusetts Division of 
Fisheries and Game. 

This year began with a number of innovative 
programs dealing with fish and wildlife con- 
servation. The Board quickly began a hectic 
schedule of regulatory hearings, followed by an all- 
around busy year for Director Shepard and his 
staff. 

The black duck imprinting program is an 
ingenious method of coping with the crippling loss 
of habitat that Massachusetts is experiencing 
every day. As one branch of the agency tries to 
establish more breeding by native waterfowl under 
artificial conditions, another branch is working 
hard to purchase and protect remaining wetlands 
for natural breeding. This well-coordinated effort is 
typical of the agency's attempts to provide well- 
balanced and efficient programs. 

Massachusetts celebrated National Hunting and 
Fishing Day on September 23, 1972. The Board 
feels that this is a significant day in the lives of our 
citizens in that it honors the contribution of 
fishermen and hunters to fish and wildlife con- 
servation. Both the President and Governor 
Sargent signed proclamations in recognition of the 
contribution of 55 million American sportsmen to 
the conservation of the nation's renewable natural 
resources. 

The Board held a hearing early in the year to 
establish a milestone toward specialized, quality 
hunting. The Board granted a three-day "primitive 
weapons deer season" to begin the Monday 
following the regular shotgun season in December 
of 1973. Our regulation could not provide for the 
use of rifles or the establishment of a special fee as 
both would depend on a vote by the Legislature. 

The Board was pleased to learn of the ap- 
pointment of Dr. Donald R. Progulske to head the 
Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management 
at the University of Massachusetts and to 
acknowledge the fine job of Professor Arnold D 
Rhodes Department head for 16 years. 

Professor Rhodes has returned to full-time 
teaching at the University's Forestry School. 




Board members pictured above are: Top row, left to right - 
Roger D. Williams, Chairman; Bradlee E. Gage, Secretary. 
Bottom row, left to right— Martin H. Burns, Kenneth F. Burns, 
Harry C. Darling. 

The Massachusetts Conservation Camp (having 
completed its 23rd session) continues to be a vital 
part of the Division's education effort. Youngsters 
receive expert training in the skills of hunting, 
fishing and nature study. The Division is proud of 
the many camp graduates who currently have 
leadership roles in environmental fields. 

In August of 1972 Peter Pekkala, Game Manager, 
was assigned to the Connecticut Valley District to 
open an office at the Swift River Wildlife 
Management Area. This will bring Division 
programs closer to the people, establishing 
communications and a better knowledge of wildlife 
problems in towns that, in the past, were on the 
fringes of the Western and Central Districts. 
Westerly towns in the Connecticut Valley District 
are Colrain, Shelburne, Conway, Williamsburg, 
Westhampton. Southampton. Westfield and South- 
wick On the eastern boundary the towns are 
Warwick. Orange, New Salem. Ware, Palmer and 
Monson In the near future, a permanent District 
Manager and full District crew will work out of the 
Belchertown facility. 









Where possible the Division assisted the 
Massachusetts Citizens to Save Open Space in 
pushing their Farm Referenda. These were written 
into the November ballot to enable the Legislature 
to amend the Constitution and assess farmland for 
its current rather than its potential use. The 
referenda received an overwhelming "yes" vote so 
that the Legislature can proceed in this important 
step to slow the destructive and unplanned 
development of our remaining open space. 

At the waterfowl hearing held on August 18, the 
Board elected to continue for a second year the 
three-year experimental zoned waterfowl season. 
The season is designed to spread hunting op- 
portunities over a greater area. 

A much needed increase in license fees went into 
effect on October 11. This was earlier than ex- 
pected. Administrative personnel thought the new 
fees would go into effect January 1, 1973. However, 
an oversight in stipulating effective date made the 
bill law 90 days after it was signed by the Governor 
even though no licenses were available. The 
Division made an effort through every available 
medium to contact 56,000 sportsmen before the 
90-day deadline of October 11, 1972. The effort 
was somewhat successful as 31,000 bought 
licenses during that period; 25,000, however, paid 
the 66 percent increase. Hunting and fishing 
licenses went from $5.25 to $8.25. Archery stamps 
went from $1.10 to $5.10. 

For the first time in Massachusetts waterfowl 
hunting history, the sea duck opening was delayed 
because of the red tide. An estimated 300 birds of 
various species were found dead — none after 
October 3. The sea duck season opened with the 
regular duck season on October 20. 

The Board was pleased to honor two brothers — 
Ralph and Harold Bitzer whose combined 

service to the Division totaled 105 years (the 
Division itself is 107 years old). On October 14, the 
Montague Fish Hatchery had its name changed to 
the Bitzer State Fish Hatchery. Harold retired with 
50 years' service and Ralph with 55 years' service. 

The first paraplegic deer hunt was a success in 
terms of enthusiasm and participation of nine 
paraplegics and the cooperation of Fish and Game 



personnel. No deer were taken but all concerned 
felt that the effort was worthwhile. 

The archery season harvest of 77 deer was a 
significant milestone. It nearly doubled the 
previous year's take and indicated that the ant- 
lerless permit system can be made to work ef- 
fectively. 

Another headache that the administration had to 
cope with was the printer's failure to deliver the 
1973 licenses for potential Christmas sales. Final 
delivery took place the second week in January. 
Director Shepard and Law Enforcement Director 
Ken Crossman worked out a plan whereby in- 
dividuals who planned to hunt, fish and trap could 
participate but would, at a later date, have to 
furnish proof of purchasing a 1973 license. 

In an effort to increase the recreational op- 
portunities of Massachusetts fishermen, the Board 
voted on March 30 to begin the fishing season the 
Saturday preceding Patriot's Day and end the 
regular season the Sunday following the third 
Saturday in October. A special extension, not to 
include reclaimed trout ponds, runs from the end of 
the regular season to the last day in February with 
a two-fish-per-day limit. 

In closing, we would like to thank the men and 
women of the Fish and Game Division for another 
year of outstanding performance. We are con- 
tinually impressed with the overall spirit and 
dedication that we see in the Fish and Game 
Division. We would also like to thank en- 
vironmentalists — whether they be consumptive or 
non-consumptive users of fish and wildlife — for 
their support without which we would cease to be a 
significant force for the preservation and 
restoration of the environment and the fish and 
wildlife resources that it supports. Lastly, we would 
like to thank other state agencies and members of 
the Legislature and executive branch for their 
continued assistance and cooperation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Roger D. Williams 

Bradlee E. Gage 

Harry C. Darling 

Kenneth F. Burns 

Martin H. Burns 




photo by Jack Swedberg 

Above: William Harper of West Acton took this record laker — 16 
lbs. 8 oz. — but soon lost it to Paul Drenzek of Ware who took a 
17 lb. 13 oz. laker. Right: Division fisheries personnel check 
Quabbin salmon. 






FISHERIES 



■ 



Anadromous Fish Restoration 

THE majority of the Division's anadromous fish 
programs continued to center around the 
restoration and enhancement of Atlantic salmon 
and American shad in the Connecticut River. 
Unfortunately, the failure of the Federal Power 
Commission to act swiftly in issuing a direct order 
to the Holyoke Water Power Company relative to 
the enlargement of the existing fish passage 
facilities, set the completion schedule for planned 
modifications back at least one year. On the 
brighter side, the functional designs for the 
proposed fishway at Turners Falls were completed, 
reviewed and accepted by all concerned, and 
presently final designs are on the drawing board. 

As in 1972, the abnormally wet and cold spring 
plus cancellation of the annual shad derby spon- 
sored by the Holyoke Water Power Company, 
produced a negative effect upon the sport fishery 
at Holyoke, where an estimated 4,403 anglers 
creeled 3,387 shad during 11,277 hours of angling. 



The fishlift at Holyoke passed 22,649 adult shad 
which was only one-third of what it passed during 
its best year, 1970. The high water and cool tem- 
peratures plus the fact that the number of shad 
entering the river was down considerably from 
previous years all contribute to the low passage 
figure. 

The spawning and production of juvenile shad, 
the result of releasing 1,575 adult shad above the 
Turners Falls dam, was documented, and migration 
patterns of adult shad in the vicinity of the North- 
field Mountain Pump Storage Plant were deter- 
mined for various stages of plant operations. 

Approximately 4,000,000 fertile shad eggs were 
shipped from the Connecticut River to the 
Nemasket, Charles and Merrimack Rivers 

The completion of two salmon smolt imprint 
stockout pools, a gift of RASA (Restoration of 
Atlantic Salmon in America) at Tarkill Brook, 
Agawam, on the Mawaga Sporting Club property 
and the release of 11,000 smolts at the brook 
highlighted this year's salmon restoration efforts. 




Fin clipping provides 

valuable information on harvest. 



photo by Jack Swedberg 



Coldwater Fish Investigations 

Surveys, inventories and creel census designed 
to evaluate the Division's current management 
programs form the majority of the coldwater in- 
vestigations. Creel data from Quabbin Reservoir 
indicate 72,404 anglers caught 95,074 fish during 
407,713 hours of fishing. Salmonids provided 27% 
of the harvest by weight while smallmouth bass 
continued to dominate the game species. Both 
salmon and lake trout catches were up significantly 
from the previous year. An estimated 1,345 lakers 
and 1,076 salmon averaging 5.1 lbs. and 1.8 lbs. 
respectively were taken while 1.3 lb. rainbows 
formed most of the salmonid harvest numerically. 

Although the high water and significant rise in 
reservoir level aided lake trout production, heavy 
spring silt loads served to decrease smelt 
production. No smelt control was necessary during 
the spring of 1973 nor should it be in the coming 
years due to the installation of water intake 
screens to be completed in 1974. 

Creel censuses were initiated on the Swift and 
Squannacook Rivers to assess species utilization, 
holding capabilities, angler harvest, and effect of 
the stream season extension. 

Harvest of kokanee salmon, 201, at Onota Lake 
was much less than hoped for and provided very 
little in the way of increased angling. 



During August and early September of 1972, the 
temperature profile and vertical distribution of 
dissolved oxygen was determined for 27 ponds. 
Twenty-one of these contained a volume of trout 
water in accordance with Massachusetts standards 
(70°F or less and 5 ppm or more of dissolved 
oxygen within the same layer). These volumes of 
coldwater habitat ranged from 1.5 to 100% of total 
pond capacity. 

The brown trout / sea-run alewife forage 
relationship study at Higgins and Hathaway Ponds 
reached the halfway mark. As was the case with 
rainbow trout, young-of-the year alewives ap- 
peared to provide very little in the way of forage to 
brown trout and in fact may be detrimental to fast 
growth through competition for the invertebrate 
food base. 

Biological and chemical surveys conducted at 77 
stations throughout the 721-square-mile Chicopee 
River Watershed were completed. Since last 
surveyed, in 1943, relatively little change has 
occurred in most tributary streams; however, the 
disappearance of smallmouth bass from the 
watershed is significant. 

Warmwater Fish Investigations 

The northern pike population of Cheshire 
Reservoir continued to expand during 1972-73. 



The winter harvest, 988 lbs., was almost double 
that of the previous year's catch. The release of 
905 compared to 423 sublegal pike is a further 
indication that the pike population is increasing. 
The desirability of this species is evidenced by a 
significant increase in total pressure; an estimated 
5,284 ice fishermen fished 31,693 hours December 
1972 to February 1973. 

Plans have been made to release 3,000 yearling 
northern pike in Brimfield Reservoir as soon as 
they become available. 

The first experimental tire reef units were in- 
stalled at Little Chauncey Pond, Westboro. 
Biologists will observe fish colonization and homing 
tendencies of the various species associated with 
these structures. 

From May through November, 25 ponds were 
sampled to determine angling potential, species 
complex, abundance and growth rates. 

Pesticide monitoring was continued on 20 rivers 
and indications are that hard pesticide levels are 
beginning to decrease while industrial pollutants, 
polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) levels continue to 
increase. Since these pollutants act similarly to 
hard pesticides with respect to food chain con- 
centration and effect, it is essential that their levels 
be constantly surveyed. 

Pumped Storage Power Process Investigations 

The first year of operational studies to determine 



the environmental impact of the Northfield 
Pumped Storage Project on the fish of the Con- 
necticut River was initiated, while the second year 
of pre-operational studies concerning the effect of 
the Bear Swamp Pumped Storage Project on the 
fish of the upper Deerfield River continued on 
schedule. These studies are financed by the 
Northeast Utilities Service Company and the New 
England Power Company respectively. These 
studies include creel census as well as monitoring 
benthic invertebrate populations and water quality 
parameters. 



Massachusetts Cooperative Fishery Unit 

Seven investigations were financially supported 
by the Division of Fisheries and Game through the 
Cooperative Fishery Unit at the University of 
Massachusetts. Two students received Master's 
Degrees for their studies of shad behavior in the 
Connecticut River. 

Other studies included ecology of kokanee 
salmon in Onota Lake, biology of spottail shiners, 
food habits of juvenile shad and game fish below 
Holyoke Dam and effect of mercury on early 
development of white suckers in the Mill River. 
Respectfully submitted, 
Peter H. Oatis 
Chief Aquatic Biologist 



¥ 



STATE TROUT STOCKED 


1972-73 


















6" 


69" 


9-12" 


12-14" 14+ 


Weight 


TOTALS 












SUNDERLAND 












Rainbow 
Brook 


82.000 
15.500 


59.580 
137.100 


425.697 
59.579 


97.939 


4,360 375.062 
48.910 


Rainbow 




19.500 


90,000 




85.091 


Brown 


21.000 


107.438 


28.045 




58.586 


Brook 




70.000 


4,900 




14.756 




118.500 


304.118 


513.321 


97.939 


4.360 482.558 


Brown 




23.400 






4,700 














Total 




112.900 


94.900 




104,547 




























Number 


Weigh' 


Average per lb 
















Rainbow 


669.576 


375.062 


1 78 






MONTAGUE 












Brook 


212.179 


48.910 


4 33 






Rainbow 


32.000 


2,650 


78,000 




73.159 


Brown 


156 483 


58586 


2 67 






Brook 


15,500 


34500 






6.796 




1.038.238 


482.558 








Total 


47.500 


37,150 


78,000 




79.955 




























FEDERAL TROUT 








Mclaughlin 














56 


69 


9+ 


Number 




Rainbow 




23.630 


188,097 


97.939 4,360 


144,797 














Brook 




16.000 


52.729 




19.570 


Brook 


15.000 


1644 




16 644 




8rown 


18,000 


66.638 


3.000 




21.678 


Brown 


20.000 


35547 




55.547 




Total 


18,000 


106.268 


243.826 


97,939 4,360 


186 045 




35.000 


37 191 




72191 
















STATE PRODUCTION SALMON 








SANDWICH 














Number 


Weight 








Rainbow 


50,000 


13.800 


69.600 




72.015 


Coho Salmon 


66 380 


3 363 








Brook 




16.600 


1,950 




7788 


Kokanee Salmon 


112223 










Brown 


3.000 


17 400 


25 045 




32.208 


Atlantic Salmon 


1200 


■ 








Total 


53.000 


47.800 


96.595 




112.011 


t'ocks 


19 850 


1 458 










Introduction 

The arrival of wild turkeys from New York State 
during the fiscal year is cause for happiness among 
hunters and nature lovers alike. During the next 
few years Division personnel will be watching 
closely to ascertain the successful establishment of 
released birds. Additional stocking sites are 
planned already, and hopefully, with a truly wild 
strain of eastern wild turkeys in our woodlands the 
"year of the turkey" will be close at hand. 

Our management program is expanding as 
manpower and finances permit. The acquisition of 
additional lands statewide has placed district 
personnel under a rigorous schedule of posting, 
boundary marking, development of public access 
sites, and general management and maintenance 
work. To meet the additional demands of an ex- 
panding program a fifth district has been 
established in the Connecticut River valley. Several 
years will be required before the district, quartered 
on the Swift River Wildlife Management Area, 
becomes fully operational and well-equipped. 

The scope of game research and management 
activities performed by division personnel are 
highlighted in the pages that follow. 

Statewide Beaver Harvest 

A total of 1674 beaver were trapped by 105 
trappers in 92 towns during the 1972-73 beaver 
season. This record take is 316 more than last 
season, and 600 more than a ten-year ( 1963-1972) 
average. Berkshire and Franklin counties together 
yielded 967 beaver (54.1% of the harvest). For the 
second season in a row, the take west of the 
Connecticut river increased, and that east of the 
river decreased. Over one-third (37.8%) of the 
beaver were taken in the first two weeks of the 15- 
week season. The average pelt price of $20, 
coupled with the high harvest, produced a record 
harvest valuation of $33,480. 



WILDLIFE 



Drake wood duck about to 
be released after banding. 



Wild Turkey Restoration Study 

Emphasis on the turkey restoration study has 
been shifted from the Quabbin strain birds of semi- 
game-farm ancestry to wild-trapped Eastern 
turkeys. Through the courtesy of the New York 
Department of Environmental Conservation, seven 
turkeys were trapped and transferred to Beartown 
State Forest, Berkshire County, in March 1972. 
This cooperative program continued in 1973 with 
the acquisition of ten additional turkeys (five adult 
males, four immature males, one adult hen), which 
were also released in Beartown. Further releases 
are planned for 1973-74. Should this stocking 
prove successful, surplus birds will be trapped and 
transferred to other areas in the Berkshire area, 
and thence to other suitable locations statewide. 



Black Bear Study 

Bear hunting showed an increase in popularity in 
1972, with 420 individuals requesting a permit, as 
opposed to 200 in 1971, and 214 in 1970. All 
hunters were sent a questionnaire and 336 usable 
returns (80 L) were received. Two hundred and 
thirteen persons did hunt bear in 1972, of whom 
187 hunted specifically for bear, and 26 hunted 
only incidentally while bow-hunting for deer. The 
average bear hunter expended 16.8 hours during 
2.4 days in pursuing his quarry. Berkshire and 
Franklin counties were the most heavily hunted, 
with the towns of Florida, Monroe, Rowe, and Savoy 
being favored locations. Sixteen hunters saw bear 
during the season and one hunter took a bear, a 
165-pound female, taken in Savoy on opening day. 
This was the first bear legally harvested since 
1969. One other bear was illegally shot in 
Royalston during deer week. 

Hunters reported 179 bear sightings via the 
questionnaire. These and other current reports are 
being aggregated to determine the distribution of 



bear in Massachusetts. Concurrently, historical 
records of bear are being located in old books and 
papers, and a published bulletin on the history and 
status of the bear in Massachusetts and adjacent 
states is planned for mid-1974. 

White-tailed Deer 

The 1972 deer harvest totaled 2,291 animals of 
which 76 were taken during the three-week ar- 
chery season. Sixty-six percent of the harvest 
(1,504 deer) were males; males comprised 61 
percent of the 1971 harvest ( 1,385 of 2,284 deer). 

The number of mainland antlerless deer permits 
was reduced from 6,000 to 4,000. Island permit 
allocations remained unchanged with Nantucket 
receiving 400 and Martha's Vineyard receiving 
600. The total number of permits issued statewide, 
including landowners, was 5,326. Permit holders 
took 1,066 deer. Management goals are to expand 
the size of the deer population in areas that can 
carry more deer, and to increase the size of the 
deer harvest while maintaining a male:female 
harvest ratio of approximately 3 males per female. 



Gosling Transplant Program 

Twenty-six goslings six to ten weeks old were 
trapped and transplanted to western 
Massachusetts. Two complete checks of gosling 
transplant sites were made in the spring of 1972. 
Two broods hatched on the Quabbin Reservoir but 
only one brood of six goslings was observed. Both 
adults observed with the brood were color marked. 
A pair of adult geese and a brood were also ob- 
served at Thousand Acre Swamp, New 
Marlborough in 1971 and a nest of six eggs was 
located in 1972. Cooperators have reported three 
pairs of marked birds that have raised broods on or 
near release sites. 



Preseason Waterfowl Banding 

A total of 1,393 birds were banded during the 
1972 preseason banding period. The number of 
birds banded by various techniques is as follows: 
airboat night-lighting 838 (30 birds banded with 
Great Meadows NWR bands); bait trapping, 249; 
cannon netting, 81; drive trapping, 126; nest box 
trapping, 69; miscellaneous, 30. Mallards (531), 
wood ducks (220), black ducks (149) and Canada 
geese (129) comprised the bulk of the bandings. 

Despite a poorly running airboat, a record 
number of waterfowl and marsh birds were banded 
by this method during the 1972 season. The 
success rate of 41.9 birds per trip exceeded the 
1971 high of 27.3 birds per trip. 



Winter Trapping Program 

State personnel along with three cooperators 
banded a total of 955 ducks at 22 locations using 
bait traps or cannon net. Four hundred sixty-nine 
ducks were banded on the coast as part of the 
regular winter trapping programs. Black ducks 
made up 81.9 percent of this total, mallards 10.6 
percent, and mallard black hybrids, 7.5 percent. 
The park mallard winter banding program resulted 
in the banding of 378 mallards, 29 black ducks, 74 
mallard X black hybrids and 5 mallard X domestic 
hybrids. The 1973 winter banding season was the 
poorest in several years. 



Winter Inventory Flights 

Winter inventory flights were made on 9-10 
January 1973. Coastal Massachusetts from the 
New Hampshire to Rhode Island line was surveyed. 
The waterfowl count of 79,687 was down 38 
percent from 1972, 40 percent from the ten-year 
average. Black ducks were down 22 percent from 
1972, 16 percent from the ten-year average. Scaup, 
sea ducks (notably scoters) and Canada geese 
were also down. Buffleheads were up and 
goldeneyes remained unchanged from both 1972 
and the ten-year average. 

A November flight prior to the opening of the 
coastal gunning season revealed a build-up of 
puddle ducks and diving ducks as well as Canada 
geese above population levels normally observed 
during the November flights in past years. This is 
believed to be related to the special Massachusetts 
zoning hunting season. Hunting was not allowed in 
the coastal zone until late November. 



Black Duck Imprint Program 

One hundred thirty-two black ducks reared from 
eggs produced by black breeding stock at the Ayer 
Game Farm were held over winter at Ayer. Fifty- 
four females and 58 males were released on 
selected areas during the spring of 1973: 19 
females and 18 males at the Ipswich Audubon 
Sanctuary, Topsfield; 13 females and 16 males at 
the Bristol Blake State Reservation, Norfolk; and 
22 females and 24 males at a beaver park within 
the Quabbin Reservoir boundaries, New Salem. 

Nesting cylinders had been erected on the 
release areas the previous winter. Nests were 
initiated in two of 10 cylinders at Topsfield, in three 
of 12 cylinders in Norfolk and in two of 15 cylinders 
located on beaver ponds in the Quabbin. All seven 
nests were successful although in one. only two of 
nine eggs hatched. 






Evaluation of Starling-Proof Nesting Cylinders 

Wood ducks nested in 17 out of 67 functional 
cylinders. Thirteen of the nests were successful; 
one nest was flooded out, one destroyed by a 
raccoon and two were abandoned for unknown 
reasons. One sparrow hawk nested successfully in 
a cylinder as did a black duck released during the 
black duck imprint study. Wood duck usage of 
experimental boxes has increased steadily since 
the inception of the program in 1970 when wood 
ducks nested in only 6 of 59 boxes. Area usage 
dropped, however during 1973, with wood ducks 
using cylinders on only four out of 19 areas versus 
six out of 19 in 1972. However, eight of the 19 
areas involved in this year's study had no wood 
duck usage in either wooden boxes or cylinders. No 
starlings have nested in the cylinders since the 
start of the program. 



Wood Duck Production Study 

In 1973, emphasis was shifted from the study of 
general reproduction data to several specific dump 
nest studies. The first of these involved the 
development of an automatic color marking device 
that will mark incubating female wood ducks as 
they enter the nest box predator guard. While the 
device itself successfully marked birds, tests are 
being made to develop a better marking solution 
that will last several weeks on a bird. 

A second study concerned the development of 
artificial dump nests by adding game farm wood 
duck eggs to normal sized nests. Previous studies 
in Massachusetts have indicated the wood ducks 
can frequently raise a larger number of ducklings 
than they normally do. 

In conjunction with these studies, data was also 
collected on general reproduction. The results 
indicate a rising trend in the number of nesting 
wood ducks across the state. Production estimates 
based on data from 30 sites, indicate that wood 
ducks have increased in numbers slightly over 
1972 with total production up 30 percent since 
1970. 

Game Farms 

Efforts were continued to automate the rearing 
of day-old chicks by the use of automatic feeders. 
At the Wilbraham Game Farm, two brooder houses 
were equipped with automatic feeders as a result 
of obtaining surplus equipment through state 
agencies. 

Rearing pen construction has been improved by 
the use of synthetic material for top wire. Nylon 
netting was used with excellent success at the Ayer 
Game Farm, which has reduced construction costs 



by 50 percent. Other maintenance work was 
comprised of building new bird house runways and 
guard fences. 

Mortalities at several game farms were high due 
to an outbreak of sleeping sickness. Major mortality 
from eastern encephalitis occurred at the 
Wilbraham farm starting in late September. Over 
one thousand birds died among the growing stock 
as a result of this infection. 

Following diagnosis of the infection at the 
Wilbraham farm, the immediate area was sprayed 
by helicopter using three ounces of malathion per 
acre to control the mosquito population. Affected 
groups were "specked" to prevent feather pulling 
which is known to be a means of transmitting the 
disease among pheasants following introduction by 
mosquitoes. 

Although mortality among pheasants may be 
very high, the bird is a relatively poor host for the 
virus and is not an important host in transmitting 
the disease to other birds or animals. 



GAME DISTRIBUTION 
July 1, 1972 to June 30, 1973 

PHEASANT LIBERATIONS: 

August— 12 weeks old 7,640 

October — November 41,005 
Sportmens Club Rearing 

Program 7,145 

TOTAL 55,788 

Miscellaneous Releases: 

Hybrids 821 

Brood Stock (Spring release) 

Field Trials, Youth Hunt, etc. 1,103 

QUAIL LIBERATIONS: 

Public Hunting Grounds 2,755 

Field Trials 687 

Brood Stock (Spring release) 

TOTAL 3,442 

HARE LIBERATIONS: 

Distributed in March 1,591 



Respectfully submitted, 

Warren W. Blandin, Chief of Wildlife Research 

E. Michael Pollack, Chief Game Biologist 






¥ 



10 





Mass. Conservation Campers learn rifle shooting (top). Winners 
of awards for conservation-related activities (above). 



Information and 
Education 



PART of the I and E Section's function is assisting 
in the administration of the Conservation Camp. I 
and E input includes booking, collecting funds for 
participants, providing films and offering training 
in fish and wildlife conservation. 

The Conservation Camp completed its 23rd 
session this year with 150 boys showing 
superlative interest, cooperation and overall good 
behavior. For the first time two boys won in two 
categories: Paul Pajak, sponsored by Mahar 
Regional High School, took first in rifle and casting. 
Larry Wood, sponsored by Wankinquoah Rod and 
Gun Club, placed second in archery and rifle. 

Another I and E function that provides a lot of 
interest as well as some potentially valuable in- 
formation is the freshwater fishing awards 
program sponsored by the Department of Com- 
merce and Development and implemented by Fish 
and Game. 

The state record lake trout — 13 lb. 6 oz„ set in 
1971 by Allan Storm of Gardner — was broken with 
a 13 1b. 10V2OZ. fish taken July 4, 1972 by Joe Kulig 
of Palmer. Kulig held the title for one day, then lost 
it to William Harper of West Acton who took a 16 1b. 
8 oz. laker. This last fish measured 34 inches, had a 
girth of 20 inches and was checked at Gate 8 of 
Quabbin. A 17 lb. 13 oz. laker caught by Paul 
Drenzek of Ware broke this record. The fish was 
34'/4 inches long, had a girth of 21 3 4 inches and 
was 11 years old. 

The longest, but not the heaviest, fish ever 
reported into the freshwater fishing contest was 
registered by Richard B. Deres of Worcester. It was 
a northern pike measuring 46 1 /? inches — one inch 
longer but three pounds lighter than the 24 lb. 6 oz. 
record fish taken from Onota Lake by Chris Gin- 
thwain of Pittsfield. 

A 10 lb. 28% inch walleye taken by Eric 
Christenson of Stow broke the existing state 
record. The fish turned out to be 14 years old. 

The I and E Section supported farmers on the 
Environmental Bill of Rights and the Farmland 
Referendum. Fish and Game was firmly committed 
to support the Massachusetts Citizens to Save 
Open Space in their effort to protect vanishing 
farmland, greenbelts and watersheds. 



11 









An appeal in a news release for a worm snake 
brought favorable response. At least three of these 
very small snakes were found along southern 
sections of the state and kindly donated to the 
Division to be photographed as illustrations for an 
article on snakes published in Massachusetts 
Wildlife. The article was written by Terry E. Graham 
and intended to offset fear of snakes. The dead 
giveaway to the only two poisonous snakes in 
Massachusetts (the copperhead and timber rat- 
tler) is the vertically elliptical pupil and pit or heat- 
sensing hole between eye and nostril. 

Governor Francis Sargent signed into law a bill 
that sets apart the fourth Saturday in each Sep- 
tember as National Hunting and Fishing Day. The I 
and E Section coordinated the Division's efforts in 
this regard. 

The 1972 archery stamp featured an American 
Indian drawing. The idea was contributed by Mark 
Malchik with the printing design prepared by 
Boston Globe artist Cyril Neuwelt. 

The Division worked with sportsmen in providing 
a "youth upland bird hunt" for 15- and 17-year- 
olds who had graduated from the state hunter 
safety course. 

On September 28, 1972 the Division's ad- 
ministration discovered that the increase in license 
fees thought to go into effect on January 1, 1973 
had to go into effect 90 days after signing of the bill 
because the effective date was omitted on the final 
draft. 

The I and E staff took on one of the biggest jobs in 
its history in trying to locate 50,000 sportsmen 
before October 11, 1972 (the deadline for buying a 
1972 license). After October 11 the same license 
that cost $5.25 cost $8.25, and an archery stamp 
cost $5.10 even though the stamp read $1.10. It 
was apparent that the Division had an obligation to 
contact all sportsmen. All types of media were used 
to the fullest. The Division owes a great debt to 
newspapers, T.V. and radio. Later, records revealed 
that 20,470 hunters and 1,462 archers were not 
contacted and paid the new price. From a positive 
viewpoint, over 30,000 hunters and 4,000 archers 
were informed and bought licenses at the old rates. 

As if the Division didn't have enough problems in 
trying to locate 50,000 sportsmen and instruct 
them to buy their licenses, more public relations 
problems were heaped on us in the waterfowl field. 
The sea duck opening (scheduled for the 23rd of 
September) had to be postponed and all sea duck 
hunters located in order to protect them from the 
remote possibility of eating a bird contaminated by 
the red tide. Division officials felt that there was 
little danger, but better safe than sorry. 



On October 14, the Fish and Game Board and 
administrative staff held a rededication ceremony 
at the Montague Hatchery to honor Ralph and 
Harold Bitzer whose combined service in fish 
hatcheries computed to 105 years. 

At the dedication address, Fish and Game 
Director James M. Shepard pointed out the 
ceremony was also in honor of those sportsmen 
who have assisted in the construction and main- 
tenance of certain facilities at the hatchery. In the 
30's, sportsmen's clubs raised thousands of dollars 
for the "Montague Fund" earmarked for con- 
struction of tanks, pools, roads and tree planting. 
This kind of cooperative spirit continues today with 
citizens, sportsmen's clubs and leagues purchasing 
and giving land for wildlife habitat. 

Fiscal 1973 will go down in history as one of the 
most difficult years for the Fish and Game 
Division's public relations effort. In addition to the 
two problems cited above, the printer failed to 
deliver the 1973 licenses on time. It was bad 
enough to think they would not be in for early 
Christmas sales; to find out that they would not 
even be in the hands of the Town and City Clerks 
until around January 15 turned the situation into a 
disaster. Fortunately Director James M. Shepard of 
the Fish and Game Division and Director Kenneth 
A. Crossman of Law Enforcement worked out a 
reasonable solution to the difficult problem by 
which an individual who planned to hunt, fish or 
trap within the framework of the law should par- 
ticipate and later be required to furnish proof that 
he had purchased a 1973 license as soon as the 
licenses were available. 

A mistake made by a UPI writer on the dog- 
restraining order resulted in national confusion 
and eventually a correction. Meanwhile Fish and 
Game was criticized for its attitude evidenced by 
UPl-stated shoot-to-kill order on coyotes. (The UPI 
writer apparently thought dogs found in the wild 
chasing deer had to be coyotes.) 

The Magazine 

The theme of this year's annual report being 
"Ten Years of Progress," it seems fitting to briefly 
discuss the progress which has occurred in 
Massachusetts Wildlife over the past decade. In 
terms of format, the progress has not been as 
dramatic as we would have liked. We have obtained 
a color cover, but are still confined to 21 nine by 
six-inch pages. 

Although Massachusetts Wildlife is the smallest 
of all the state magazines, it does enjoy a national 
reputation for journalistic excellence, containing 



12 




photo by Jack Swedberg 

Director James M. Shepard (fifth from left) chats with sport- 
smen during fly tying demonstration on National Hunting and 
Fishing Day. 



photographs and articles that consistently out- 
shine material published in the much larger 
magazines. 

Our paucity of paper has given us two unat- 
tractice alternatives: 1. say nothing and look 
pretty; 2. say something and look ugly. We chose 
the latter, using a cramped 8-point type face with 
no leading and leaving little white space in our 
layout. Although this makes the magazine less 
readable, those who are willing to brave the fine 
print get something for their effort. 

We hope that in the future we will be able to 
obtain the funds necessary to publish a magazine 
that can compete in format with those of our sister 
agencies. 

Usually, we try to print three in-depth feature 
articles per issue. Two are contributed by 
dedicated conservationists both inside and outside 
the Division for whom a chance to educate the 
public and possibly slow the pace of current en- 
vironmental carnage is payment enough. The third 
is written by Massachusetts Wildlife's Managing 



Editor, who, as a paid employee of the Fish and 
Game Division, can afford to spend the time 
necessary to research and write an environmental 
article of the quality demanded by such journals as 
Audubon and National Wildlife. 

As an education tool, Massachusetts Wildlife 
continues to decry environmental degradation, 
promote rapport between consumptive and non- 
consumptive users of wildlife, instill in the general 
public a respect for and understanding of life and 
the water and land that makes life possible, and 
keep the public informed as to what we as a con- 
servation agency are doing to protect and restore 
the fish and wildlife resources of the Com- 
monwealth. 

It seems that traditionalists are at last beginning 
to accept the magazine's new role as an en- 
vironmental journal instead of a sporting bulletin. 
Straight hunt-fish copy may be had at any 
newsstand for pocket change. We are not a hunting 
and fishing club, and the articles we publish on 
game and fish have to do with our management of 
these resources, not just how to harvest them. We 
are not equipped to compete with the three 
national hunting and fishing magazines, but as a 
local voice for the environment — which with in- 
creasing frequency is being correctly recognized as 
synonymous with hunting and fishing — we feel 
that we can offer the sportsman a very substantial 
return on the not-very-substantial portion of his 
license revenue allocated to magazine production. 

High points in this year's volume of 
Massachusetts Wildlife in the three categories of 
Environment, Natural History, and Management 
include the following: Under Environment: "The 
Great Land Gouge and How to Curb it," July- 
August, an article supporting the farmland 
referendum; "The Rubbish in Our Wake," on the 
solid waste crisis, September-October; "Instant 
City," decrying the proposed rape of Warren, Mass., 
March-April. Under Natural History: "The 
Peregrine Symptom" and "Flowers Unseen," both 
in the July-August issue and dealing with the 
peregrine falcon and orchids respectively; 
"Feathered Jewels," September-October, on 
hummingbirds; "The Passing of the Heath Hen" 
and "Snakes of Massachusetts," both appearing in 
the November-December issue; "A New Look at 
Castor" and "The Squirrel Freak," both in the 
January-February 1973 issue and dealing 
respectively with beavers and flying squirrels; "To 
Shoot an Eagle," March-April, on photographing 
eagles in Quabbin; and "Meet New England's New 
Wolf," May-June. Under Management: "The 
Woodcock — Everybody's Bird," September- 
October; "Return of the Cavity Nesters," 



13 









November-December (hooded mergansers and 
wood ducks); "Welcome the Wild Goose," on the 
Division's goose management program, January- 
February 1973; "Pond Reclamation," March-April; 
"Bugging Does Pay," on the electronic surveillance 
of wildlife, May-June. 

Editorials by Director James M. Shepard dealt 
with : National Hunting and Fishing Day; land use; 
ignorance and prejudice concerning the new wolf; 
the energy crisis; the rape of our watersheds by 
such Federal bureaucracies as the Corps of 
Engineers, Soil Conservation Service, TVA and 
Bureau of Reclamation; and a plea to plug the hole 
in the Wetlands Act created by the infamous 
Agricultural exemption. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard Cronin 

Chief of Information and Education 



¥ 



RETIREMENTS 

Dorothy Childs — Retired 3-31-73 as Prin- 
cipal Bookkeeper from the Boston Office 
after 18 years' service with the Com- 
monwealth. 

Walter Covell — Retired 8-26-72 as Con- 
servation Helper at the Sandwich State 
Game Farm after 19 years' service with 
the Commonwealth. 

Roy Foster — Retired 4-30-73 as Con- 
servation Skilled Helper at the Ayer State 
Game Farm after 21 years' service with 
the Division of Fisheries and Game. 

Kenneth Mudgett — Retired 9-30-72 as 
Conservation Helper from the Ayer State 
Game Farm after 21 years' service with 
the Commonwealth. 

Thomas F. Palmer, Jr. — Retired 1-31-73 as 
Conservation Skilled Helper from the 
Southeast Wildlife District after 21 years' 
service with the Commonwealth. 

Albina P. Tessier — Retired 12-31-72 as 
Head Administrative Assistant, Boston 
Office, after 42 years' service with the 
Commonwealth, 22 of which were with the 
Division of Fisheries and Game. 

Stanley Torrey — Retired 2-28-73 as 
Assistant Game Culturist at the Sandwich 
State Game Farm after 26 years' service 
with the Division of Fisheries and Game. 



William Tyback — Retired 7-29-72 as Con- 
servation Skilled Helper from the Sand- 
wich State Game Farm after 21 years' 
with the Division of Fisheries and Game. 

Richard Woolner — Retired 6-23-72 from the 
Westboro Field Headquarters as Wildlife 
Photographer after 13 years' service with 
the Division of Fisheries and Game. 

Harry C. Darling — Retired 10-6-72 as Board 
member. Appointed to the Board, Division 
Fisheries and Game 12-13-62, 10 years' 
service. 



LEGISLATION 

Chapter 

573 — An Act Further Regulating the Licensing of 
Propagators and Dealers of Certain Birds and 
Mammals and Increasing the License Fees 
therefor. 
Approved July 6, 1972 

580 — An Act Transferring Certain Land in the Town 
of Westboro from the Department of Mental 
Health and the Trustees of the Westboro 
State Hospital to the Division of Fisheries & 
Game. 
Approved July 6, 1972 

706 — An Act Further Regulating Licensing 
Programs and Fees Relative to Fish, Birds 
and Mammals. 
Approved July 13, 1972. 

782 — An Act Further Protecting the Inland 
Wetlands and Flood Plains of the Com- 
monwealth. 
Approved July 18, 1972. 

784 — An Act Relative to the Protection of Wetlands. 
Approved July 18, 1972. 

156 — An Act further Regulating Trapping by Minors 
and the Issuance of Minors Certificate of 
Competency in the Safe Handling of Firearms. 
Approved April 9, 1973. 

206 — An Act Prohibiting the Issuance of Trapping 
Licenses to Certain Non-resident Citizens of 
the United States. 
Approved April 19, 1973. 

402 — An Act Relative to the Law, Shooting on 
Commercial Shooting Preserves on Certain 
Sundays. 
Approved June 13, 1973. 



14 



REALTY 



WITH the closing of the 71-72 fiscal year, it was 
sadly noted that monies from our existing bond 
issue were running dangerously low. We realized 
that the continuing acquisition of important 
uplands, providing areas for the pursuit of all 
outdoor recreation, would end all too soon. We are 
experiencing an era of expanding population 
coupled with an exodus from city dwelling to 
suburban living. This creates an insatiable appetite 
for land to accommodate sprawling shopping 
centers, multi-family complexes and a network of 
highways, all of which consume open space with 
reckless abandon. Lands lost to development are 
lands lost forever! The need for land has created a 
competitive and speculative market resulting in 
skyrocketing prices. 

Fortunately, there are those who are con- 
servation-minded and foresighted enough to 
realize the shortcomings of developing open space. 
This was the case of an acquisition in the Town of 
Charlton in Worcester County. Two hundred 
eighty-seven acres offering open fields, in- 
terspersed with hedgerows, surrounded by 
woodlands and complemented by marshes, 
provides an area where all species of wildlife are 
found. The owner o of this property conveyed it to 
this agency at 50/o below an offer made him by a 
developer. We sincerely appreciate his generosity. 

Eighteen acres were acquired in the Town of 
Chesterfield in Hampshire County. This parcel, 
adjacent to the East Branch of the Westfield River, 
is assurance that the property will remain natural 
and open to the general public. This property is 
located in the well-known "Chesterfield Gorge," an 
area acquired by various agencies of the Com- 
monwealth and providing a wilderness fishing and 
wildlife area. 

Several parcels of property abutting the Crane 
Pond and Downfall Wildlife Management Areas in 
the Northeast were purchased. These acquired 
properties were in holdings or periphery lots in 
jeopardy of becoming house lots. The impact 
caused by the construction of a residence adjacent 
to a wildlife area is profound. The propagation of ill 
feelings toward hunting proliferates with each 
season. This feeling is mirrored by the posting of 
land. To circumvent this situation, the only avenue 
open is acquisition. 




photo by Jack Swedberg 

No Division activity is as critical to the future of hunting and 
fishing as the land acquisition program. Though man's work is 
painfully evident in this aerial shot of the Westboro area, the 
amount of undeveloped land is surprising. 

An access area to the Millers River in Win- 
chendon, Worcester County, was also acquired. 
This particular parcel, although small, has frontage 
on Route 12 connecting an 80-acre parcel 
previously purchased by this agency. 

Access to Baker's Fond and parking space was 
purchased in the Town of Orleans in the County of 
Barnstable. Baker's Pond provides excellent 
fishing for trout. 

Additional acreage was added to the Squan- 
nacook River, again insuring for the future. 
Sportsmen are to be commended for their initial 
land purchase and continuing cooperation here. 

The Realty Section embarked on its wetlands 
acquisition program. The approval of Chapter 839 
provided a sum of $5,000,000 to be expended for 
the acquisition of coastal wetlands and inland 
wetlands. The Hockomock Swamp located in the 
Towns of Easton, Raynham, and Taunton in the 
County of Bristol, and West Bndgewater and 
Bridgewater in Plymouth County, became one of 
the top priorities of the Realty Section. Preliminary 
acquisition procedure included researching land 
ownership within the area containing 5000-plus 
acres, determining the periphery of the area for 
amicable purchase or eminent domain, compiling a 
list of landowners and their addresses, etc. all 
time-consuming procedures. 

A large-scale map had to be drafted which 



15 



"V 



assembled all parcels by ownership found in the 
area of contemplated acquisition. This horrendous 
task was undertaken by Division personnel and 
volunteers. Persons interested in this project 
contacted the Division indicating a genuine in- 
terest in the eventual preservation of this valuable 
wetland. 
Mr. Dennis Johcouer, an engineer, was one of 

those interested enough to donate his expertise 
and time to draft a map depicting properties in the 
Hockomock. Long, tedious, eye-straining hours 
were put into compiling the map and this agency is 
exceptionally grateful to Mr. Jolicouer. 

Special thanks is also in order for the assistance 
given by Mr. John Grant of Easton. Mr. Grant 
devoted considerable time and effort obtaining 
names of landowners in the Easton section of the 
"Hock." He was also responsible for directing the 
acquisition of some 137 acres of town-owned 

property by this agency. 

Personnel in the Easton Town Hall are to be 

highly commended for their understanding, 

assistance, and readiness to help the Division of 

Fisheries and Game in its effort to purchase the 

"Hock." And to the many others who volunteered 

their services, too numerous to mention in this 

report, the Division extends its thanks. 

Today, the Hockomock Swamp Acquisition 

Project is successfully showing signs of fruition. 



Leaving the southeastern portion of our state, we 
travel to a deep, clear and cool lake in New Hamp- 
shire called Potanipo Pond, the birthplace of the 
Nissitissit River. This river winds toward the sea, 
entering Massachusetts in a small town in the 
northeastern section called Pepperell. 

The Nissitissit meanders in serpentine grace to 
merge with the Nashua. Tall trees protectingly 
extend their limbs over this stream, keeping the 
water cool and shadowed. Thus is born a fine trout 
stream. 

Realizing that this beautiful river was about to be 
raped by development, a group called the 
Nissitissit Watershed Association moved ahead 
with acquisition plans. This same group en- 
couraged the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries 
and Game to acquire portions of the watershed in 
Massachusetts. To date approximately 75 acres are 
in various stages of acquisition, nearing 
finalization. 

Plans to acquire marshland and adjacent 
uplands along the Parker River went beyond the 
stage of discussion and efforts towards this goal 
commenced. This project, too, is showing 
satisfactory results and will be commented on in 
the next annual report. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Floyd Richardson 



Financial Report July 1, 1972 to June 30, 1973 

RECEIPTS FROM FISHING, HUNTING AND TRAPPING LICENSES 













Fees Retained by 


Net Returned 


Licenses 


Price 


Number 


Gross Amount 


Town Clerk /city 


to State 


1 


Res. Cit. Fishing 


* (5.25) 


24,046 


126,241.50 


5,989.75 


120,251.75 


1 


Res. Cit. Fishing 


(8.25) 


118,194 


975,100.50 


29,306.75 


945,793.75 


4-A 


Res. Cit. Female Fishing 


* (4.25) 


5,558 


23,621.50 


1,385.25 


22,236.25 


2 


Res. Cit. Hunting 


•(5.25) 


24,515 


128,703.75 


6,092.50 


122,611.25 


2 


Res. Cit. Hunting 


(8.25) 


28,711 


236,865.75 


7,116.25 


229,749.50 


3 


Res. Cit. Sporting 


* (8.25) 


4,997 


41,225.25 


1,246.25 


39,979.00 


3 


Res. Cit. Sporting 


(13.50) 


46,908 


633,258.00 


11,629.00 


621,629.00 


4 


Res. Cit. Minor Fishing 


•(3.25) 


2,468 


8,021.00 


615.00 


7,406.00 


4 


Res. Cit. Minor Fishing 


(6.25) 


13,969 


87,306.25 


3,486.75 


83,810.50 


9-A 


Res. Alien Fishing 


*(9.75) 


210 


2,047.50 


51.25 


1,996.25 


5 


Alien Fishing 


(11.25) 


873 


9,821.25 


213.75 


9,607.50 


9 


Non-Res. Cit. Fishing 


»(9.75) 


1,011 


9,857.25 


252.00 


9,605.25 


6 


Non-Res. Cit. / Alien Fishing 


(14.25) 


2,578 


36,736.50 


636.75 


36,099.75 


7 


Spec. Non-Res. Fishing 


•(5.25) 


1,829 


9,602.25 


456.25 


9,146.00 


7 


Non-Res. Cit. / Alien 7-Day Fishing 


(8.25) 


460 


3,795.00 


113.75 


3,681.25 


8 


Non-Res. Cit. / Alien Hunting (Sm. G.) 


(20.25) 


496 


10,044.00 


121.00 


9,923.00 


9 


Non-Res. Cit. / Alien C.S.P. 3-day 


(16.25) 


35 


568.75 


4.25 


564.50 


5 


Res. Cit. Minor Trapping 


•(3.25) 


72 


234.00 


18.00 


216.00 


10 


Res. Cit. Minor Trapping 


(6.25) 


157 


981.25 


39.00 


942.25 


6 


Res. Cit. Trapping 


•(8.75) 


178 


1,557.50 


44.00 


1,513.50 


11 


Res. Cit Trapping 


(11.50) 


440 


5,060.00 


107.75 


4,952.25 


12 


Duplicate Licenses 


• (.50) 


1,345 


672.50 




672.50 


12 


Duplicate Licenses 


(1.00) 


2,083 


2,83.00 


- 


2,083.00 


10 


Non-Res. Cit / Alien Hunt. 


•(16.25) 


989 


16,071.25 


204.25 


15,867.00 


13 


Res. Alien Hunting 


(16.25) 


395 


6,418.75 


6.00 


6,412.75 


14 


Non-Res Cit / Alien Hunt. (B.G.) 


(35.25) 


343 


12,090.75 


84.25 


12,006.50 



16 



15 Res. Cit. Sporting (over 70) 

15 Res. Cit. Sporting (over 70) 

17 Res. Cit. Fishing (Blind & Para) 

16 Res. Cit. Fishing (BlindS Para) 
19 Res. Cit. Hunting (Para) 

17 Res. Cit. Hunting (Para) 

18 Res. Military-Naval Sporting 
Res. Military-Naval Sporting 



*FREE 


3,087 


FREE 


16,011 


*(FREE) 


194 


(FREE) 


663 


* (FREE) 


11 


(FREE) 


78 


(FREE) 


1,746 


(FREE) 


697 



* Rates Prior to Oct. 11, 1972 
After October 10, 1972 



* 72,256 
233,091 



* 367,855.25 
2,020,129.75 



■ 16,354.50 
52,865.25 



* 351,500.75 
1,967,264.50 



TOTAL 
Refunds 



SUMMARY OF FISH AND GAME INCOME 

Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses $2,318,629.00 

Special Licenses, Trap Registrations and Tags 10,651.85 

Archery Stamps 13,619.30 

Rents 4,862.00 

Miscellaneous and Sales 5,050.30 

Court Fines 1 1,391.10 

Refunds Prior Year 226.95 

Pittman-Robertson Federal Aid 148,392.49 

Dingell-Johnson Federal Aid 66,613.12 

Anadromous Fish Projects Federal Aid 9,174.65 

Mass. Mourning Dove and 

Woodcock Reimbursement 6,07345 

Reimbursement of Services 34,658.20 



$2,629,342.41 
* See "Receipts from Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses" 
** See "Deposit" 

OTHER INCOME — INLAND FISHERIES AND GAME FUND 

Interest on Investments $ 3,300.00 

Gasoline Tax Apportionment $295,562.95 

Surplus in Inland Fisheries and Game Fund 

as of June 30, 1973 - $444,051.07 

HOW THE SPORTSMEN'S DOLLAR WAS SPENT 



305,347 2,387,985.00 


69,219.75 


2,318,765.25 








136.25 








2,318,629.00 


FISHERIES PROGRAMS 








Fish Hatcheries 


2670 2300 




464,873.45 16 


Fisheries Management 


2670 2300 


5203,316.48 




** Fish Restoration Projects 


2670 2342 


65,241.41 




Fisheries Management 


2670 2400 


125,257.14 




Fisheries Research Coop. Unit 


2670 2341 


7,500.00 




** Certain Anadromous Fish Proj. 


2670 2322 


20,711.00 


422,02603 14 


WILDLIFE PROGRAMS 








Game Farms 


26702400 




325,649.03 11 


Wildlife Management 


26702400 


$125,257.14 




Wildlife Research Coop. Unit 


2670 2441 


4,807.50 




* Damage by Wild Deer 


2670 2451 


8,438 25 




* • Wildlife Restoration Projects 


2670 2461 


225,501.24 




* * Eastern Dove Management 


2670 2502 


2,625.00 


366,629.13 13 


ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION 








Repl. Hatch House, Sunderland 


26702302 


$ 49,942.72 




Repl. Upper Pools, Sandwich 


2670 2305 


64,927.00 




Constr. Storage Bldg., Newbury 


2670 2463 


12,178.00 


127,047.72 4 


LAND ACQUISITION 








• Land 8. Water Acquis. & Devel. 


2670 9013 


J 185.289 70 




• Coastal & inland Wetlands 


26709016 


12,123.80 


197,413 50 7 



ADMINISTRATION 








Administration 


26700001 


J130.734.63 




Board of Fisheries and Game 


2670-0001 


158 48 J 130,893.11 


4 


Information Education 


26700001 


97,713.86 


3 



DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES 

Natural Resources Officers 
Salaries and Expenses (26 ) 

Supervision of Public Hunting 
and Fishing Grounds (100 ) 

Hunter Safety Training (100 ' ) 

Office of Commissioner (.4 ) 

SECRETARY, ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAi 

( .2 
RETIREMENT ASSESSMENT (.2 

GROUP INSURANCE 
INTEREST ON BONDED DEBT (100 
SERIAL BONDS AND NOTES (100 



t Continuing Appropriation 
> 60 percent reimbursable Federal Funds 
i 75 percent reimbursable Federal Funds 
■ 100 percent reimbursable Federal Funds 



2620 1000 


S251.738.S0 






2620 0200 


15,050.00 






2620 0300 


45,745.00 






2600 0100 


2,477.20 


315,010 70 


10.9 


RS 








20000200 




3,089 82 


r. 


0612 1000 




76.000 00 


3 






60,078 84 


2 


0699 2800 




100,900.00 


4 


0699 2900 




250.000 00 


8 




J2.937.325 19 


100 



APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 



Account No. and Tltlt 



Appropriation 



Total 
Expenditure! Reversion 
and (including 

Reserve Liabilities Reserve) 



2670O00I Administration | 

2670 2300 Fisheries Management 

2670 2302 Repl Hatch House, Sunderland 

2670 2303 Pollution Abatement, McLaughlin 

Hatchery 

2470 230$ Repl Upper Pools, Sandwich 

2670 2322 Anadromous Fish Prolects •• 

2670 2343 Fish Restoration Prolects ••• 

7670 3401 WildUfe Management 

3670 34*1 Wildlife Restoration Prolects ••• 

3670 3463 Construction of Storage Bldng., 

Newbury Mgmt Area 

3670 3403 Eastern Dove Management .... 



349,150 00 t 8,90300 
719,710.00 37,25500 
50.000 00 



15.000 00 
65,000.00 
22,000 00 
70,730 00 
602.825 00 
241,100 00 

12,200 00 
3.500 00 



1,100 00 
5,21900 
24,683.00 
14,625 00 



228.606 97 J 20,543 03 
668,189 93 51,530 07 
49.943 73 57 28 



64,927 00 
20,711.00 
65.341 41 
576,163 31 
325,501 24 

12,17800 
2,625 00 



15.000 00 
73.00 
1,289 00 
5.48859 
26.661 69 
15,598 76 

22 00 

875 00 



$2,051.215 00 192,658 00 11,914,086.58 $137.128 42 



2670 2451 Damageby Wild Deer 8. Moose 
2670 9013 Land Acquisitions. Development 
2670 9016 Coastal & Inland Wetlands 
3670 9021 Pollution Abatement. McLaughlin 

Hatchery 
2670 9022 Fish Screens. Ouabbin Reservoir 
2670 9023 Fish Rearing Facilities. 

McLaughlin 8. Palmer Hatcheries 



. • 60 percent reimbursable Federal Funds 
»• 75 percent reimbursable Federal Funds 
. . 100 percent reimbursable Federal Funds 









Balance 


Continuing 






(excluding 


Appropriations 


Reserve 


Expenditures 


Reserve) 


J 14.715 74 


$185 00 


$ 8.438 25 


$ 6.093 49 


408.999 74 




185.289 70 


223.710 04 


5.000.000 00 




12.123 80 


4.987.176 20 


92.900 00 






92,900 00 


110.000 00 






110.000 00 


rl« 47.100 00 






47.100 00 


$5,673.715 48 


$185 00 


$305,851 75 


$5,467,671 73 



17 



Freshwater Fish Records 1973 



Species 


Weight 


Length 


Girth 


Place Caught 


How Caught 


Date 




LM Bass 


10 lb 


15 oz. 


23" 


18' 2" 


Norwich Lk., Huntington 


bait casting 


10-13 


73 


SM Bass 


51b. 


7 oz. 


21" 


\6W 


Quabbin Res. 


bait casting 


9-15 


73 


N. Pike 


25 lb. 




45" 


22" 


Onota Lk., Pittsfield 


live bait 


2- 5 


73 


Pickerel 


7 1b. 




25" 


10' 2" 


Rohunta Lk., Orange 


spinning 


9 3 


73 


R Trout 


6 lb. 


'j oz. 


26" 


13" 


Jamaica Pdj Jamica Plain 


bait casting 


9 2 


73 


B. Trout 


81b. 


14 OZ. 


28" 


17' j" 


Spectacle Pd., Sandwich 


spinning 


7-22 


73 


L. Trout 


171b. 


13 OZ. 


34' e" 


21%" 


Quabbin Res. 


live bait 


5-20 


73 


Shad 


7 1b. 


12 oz. 


28" 


17" 


Indian Head R. 


fly fishing 


5- 4 


73 


6almon 


81b. 


10' 2 OZ 


31%" 


14' 2" 


Quabbin Res. 


fly fishing 


4-17 


73 


Catfish 


11 lb. 


5 c. 


27" 




Metacomet Pd. Belchertown 


trolling 


6- 1 


73 


Walleye 


11 lb. 




29 3 .." 


17'/2" 


Quabbin Res. 


spinning 


6-11-73 


Bluegill 






12" 
12" 


13'V 


Red Brook Pd. 




73 
73 


Bullhead 


3 1b. 


8 OZ. 


12" 
19" 


12" 


Pembroke Res.,iPembroke 


live bait 


73 
5-28-73 




41b. 




W" 


Wa 


Mashpee PU., Mashpee 


bait casting 


10- 8-73 


W. Perch 


1 lb. 


4 OZ. 


15' 2" 


11 W 


Davol PW.,Wcstport 


bait casting 


7- 5-73 


Y Perch 


21b. 




16' 2" 


9" 


Flax Pd., Yarmouth 


bait casting 


8 - 73 


Brook Trout 


21b. 


13 oz. 


18" 


12" 


Rumford R., Foxboro 


spinning 


428-73 


Calico 


31b. 




18" 


143/4" 


Ames Pd., Andover 


ice tackle 


1-23-73 



Caught by 

Lawrence LaCaresse, 47 Stonina Dr., Chicopee 

Henry Penny, 58 Jennings St., Worcester 

Ralph Fiegel, Yokum Rd., Richmond 

Joan I. Monahan, 45 Pratt Ave., Lowell 

Frank Keegan, 14 St. John St., Jamaica Plain 

John J. Pickrell, 8 Price St., Quincy 

Paul J. Drenzek, 2 Cherry St., Ware 

Jerry Grozioso, '81 Whiton Ave., Quincy 

John P. Yurkinas, 167 Vernon St., Worcester 

Mike Owen, 13 Emerson Ct., Amherst 

Bbb Methot, Pinebrook, Belchertown 

Robert Silva, 61 Scraggy Neck Rd., Cataumet 

Ernest Horn, 95 Turnpike Rd., Westboro 

Clifford Razee, 42 Pleasant St., Chartley 

Ron Smith, 99 Gladstone, Brockton 

Edmund B. Meslin, Anson Brown Rd., Johnston, 

James Kasper, 171 Plymouth St., Bridgewater 

Mark Kline, 93 Brandies Rd., Newton 

Donald J. Sapienzo, 272 Central, Foxboro 

William V. Twiraga, 60 Easton, Lawrence 



STANDING ALL-TIME MASSACHUSETTS FRESHWATER FISHING RECORDS 

Through December 31, 1973 



Species 


Weight 




Length 


Girth 


LM Bass 


121b. 


1 


oz. 


25%" 


213/4" 


SM Bass 


7 1b. 






22'/2" 


14'/2" 


N. Pike 


25 1b. 






45" 


22" 


Pickerel 


91b. 


5 


oz 


29 W 




R. Trout 


81b. 


4 


oz. 


26" 


16" 


B. Trout 


191b. 


10 


oz. 


31 W 


22Va" 


L. Trout 


171b. 


13 


oz. 


34'/2" 


213/4" 


Shad 


81b. 


8 


oz. 


28" 




Salmon 


91b. 


5 


oz. 


27.1" 




Catfish 


131b. 


14 


oz. 


29.6" 




Walleye 


11 lb. 






293/4" 


17'/2" 


Bluegill 








12" 
12" 
12" 




Bullhead 


51b. 


9 


oz. 


22' 2" 


ll'/2" 




5 1b. 


8 oz. 


22' 2" 


14" 




4 1b. 


9 


oz. 


22'2" 


IIV2" 


W. Perch 


21b. 


12 


oz. 


17" 


12" 


Y. Perch 


21b. 


5 


oz. 


1734" 




Brook Trout 


61b. 


4 


oz. 


24" 




Calico 


2 1b. 


9 V 


oz. 


18" 


14" 




2 lb. 


9 


oz. 


18" 


13'/z" 




3 1b. 






18" 


143/4" 



Place caught 

Palmer R., Palmer 
Lovells Pd., Barnstable 
Onota Lk., Pittsfield 
Pontoosuc Lk., Lanesboro 
Deep Pd., Falmouth 
Wachusett Res., Boylston 
Quabbin Res. 
North R., Hanover 
Quabbin Res. 

Metacomet Pd., Belchertown 
Quabbin Res. 



Conn. R., Hadley 
Leverett Pd., Leverett 
Conn. R., Chicopee 
Herring Pd., Plymouth 
Wachusett Res., Boylston 
Otis Res., Otis 
Marrimac R., Lowell 
Savorys Pd, Manomet 
Ames Pd,, Andover 



How caught 


Date 




bait casting 


5 9-63 




8-20-72 


live bait 


2- 5-73 




1954 


live bait 


10-15-66 


spinning 


5-19-66 


live bait 


5-20-73 


spinning 


5-6-71 




9- 5-71 




9-15-71 


spinning 


6-11-73 




1973 




1973 




1973 


live bait 


6- 8-63 


live bait 


8- 2 


65 


live bait 


9- 8 


65 


trolling 


5-21 


71 


spinning 


4-23 


70 


spinning 


6-24 


68 


spinning 


6 8 


65 


ice tackle 


1-24 


71 


ice tackle 


1-23 


73 



Caught by 

George Pastick, Fall River 
Marshall C. Hunter, Marion 
Ralph Fiegel, Richmond 
Mrs. James Martin, Stockbridge 
Roger Walker, Eastondale 
Dana DeBlois, Sterling 
Paul J. DrenzeX Ware 
Richard C. Brown, Norwell 
John E. Courtney, Auburn 
Wayne Briggs, Belchertown 
Bbb Methot, Belchertown 
Robert Silva, Cataumet 
Ernest Horn, Westboro 
Clifford Razee, Chartley 
Mrs. Erna Storie, Chicopee Falls 
Stephen Brozo, Amherst 
Joseph Kida, Chicopee 
Manual P. Souza, Dartmouth 
Arnold Korenbluitn, Marlboro 
Thomas Laptew, Granville 
George Olsson, Lowell 
Charles Godln, Manomet 
William V. Twiraga, Lawrence 



Division of 
FISHERIES ond GAME 

f if Id Hcodquortcrs 
WESTBORO. MASS 01581 



Second CIojs 
POSTAGE PAID 
of Worcester, Mo 






A [J N U A L REPORT 



19 7 4 

AND 

19 7 5 



)ITS 



;fon 



THE CONflO II HEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

DIVISION OF FISHERIES A 11 D 6 A H E 

100 CAM BRIDGE STREET 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02202 



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MR 



His Excellency s Michael S. Dukakis, Governor of the Commonwealth, 
The Executive Council s the General Court and the Board of Fisheries 
and Game. 

I have the honor to submit herewith the one hundred ninth and 
one hundred tenth annual reports of the Division of Fisheries and Game. 
covering the fiscal years of 1 July 1973 to 30 June 1974 and 1 July 
1974 to 30 June 1975. 



James II. Shepard 
Director 



State ! : ' 3tt 

n 



Approved by Alfred C. Holland, State Purchasinc Ap.ent. Publication No. 0074 






Table of Contents 



The Board Reports 

Fisheries 

Wildlife 

Information and Education 

Realty 

Personnel 

Legislation 

Financial Reports 



Page 

1 

5 

8 
15 
17 

21 
22 
24 



^m 



The Board Reports 

The Fish and Game Board is pleased to summarize highlights of the fiscal 
years 1974 and 1975, in the interest of economy, to a mimeographed document 
covering a two-year span from 1 July 1973 to 30 June 1975. 

Fiscal 1974 

Ground breaking for the first fishing pier ever constructed on an inland 
pond was begun at Cook Pond, Fall River, in July. The construction bid was 
awarded to D. W. White Construction Company of Acushnet in the amount of 
$77,000. An associated parking area and boat-launching ramp were included m 
the project, planned and engineered for the Division by Tibbetts Engineering 
Company of New Bedford. 

At the Board's August meeting, Chairman Roger Williams welcomed a new 
appointee, Henry E. Russell of Brookline, to the Board. Mr. Russell, a former 
Board member, replaced long-time member and past Chairman Harry C. Darling of 
East Bridgewater. 

In September, the Board voted to open to night hunting of raccoon those 
wildlife management areas not stocked with pheasant. Experimental openings 
were also approved for one year at the Swift River and Birch Hill Wildlife 
Management Areas where pheasant are stocked. 

A limitation of 4,000 mainland antlerless deer permits was again approved 
to encourage further deer herd expansion, taking advantage of a low harvest 
and mild winter the previous year. 

Encephalitis was present at two of the Division's game farms. An initial 
quarantine was lifted prior to the hunting season. The Division maintained 
close watch of the disease problem, identified by public health officials as 
an eastern strain of the disease. The overall effect of the outbreak was 
minimal and resulted in low pheasant mortality. 

The Division's operating budget was approved at $2.6 million and four 
fisheries and three wildlife accounts were incorporated into single operating 
accounts. 

The Board sought and obtained the assistance of the Secretary of Environ-^ 
mental Affairs in securing approval for negotiating, title search and appraisa, 
services needed to accelerate land acquisition programs in the Hockomock Swamp 
in southeastern Massachusetts. As of October 1973, 2,700 acres were already 
under option. Funding was previously made available under a $5 million bond 
issue. 

A ruling by the Attorney General supported the Board's contention that 
the Division's procedure in selecting antlerless deer permits did not consti- 
tute a lottery since application fees— used to defray administrative costs- 
were deposited into the Inland Fisheries and Game Fund. The program came undei 
review as a result of an accusation of the permit system by the Northampton 
City Clerk. 

At the October 1973 meeting, the Board concurred that a meeting with the 
Secretary of Environmental Affairs would be held on 31 October at the Boston 
Holiday Inn at which time the latest proposals on governmental reorganization 
would be reviewed. 



-1- 



During the December meeting, the Board considered proposals relating to a 
non-game species program, year-round fishing on the Connecticut River and the 
naming of a special study committee to address means of working constructively 
with an anti-trapping group. 

The energy crisis and its adverse effects upon Division programs stimu- 
lated planning at the Board's January 1974 meeting aimed at a reduction in fuel 
consumption of 25 percent while insuring program continuity. 

Emergency regulations limiting the daily bag of northern pike to one and 
setting fishing regulations for Wallum Lake to coincide with those of Rhode 
Island were discussed and adopted at the Ilarch meeting. The Board also re- 
viewed falconry regulations formulated by representatives of the M.S. P. C. A., 
Boston Zoological Society, Massachusetts Audubon Society, Massachusetts Divi- 
sion of Law Enforcement and Division personnel headed by Warren Blandin, Chief 
of Wildlife Research. A formal regulatory hearing on the proposed regulations 
was scheduled for 19 April at Greenfield. 

Upon the suggestion of the City Council of Fall River, the Board voted to 
name the recently-completed fishing pier, parking area and boat-launching ramp 
at Cook Pond the Matthew J_. Kuss Fishing Facilities , in honor of Representative 
Kuss who played a major role in conceiving and guiding the project through the 
legislative process. 

A request of the Director was made by the Board to explore the advisabil- 
ity of seeking a five-year license for those over age 70 at a cost of $1 and 
to seek alternate and expanded licensing outlets. Recognition and appreciation 
was expressed for the donation of postage money to the Division by waterfowl 
hunting groups which xrould permit a waterfowl hunter survey regarding the con- 
cept of zoned waterfowl hunting seasons. 

Nominations of Roger Williams to continue as Chairman and Bradlee Gage 
as Secretary were made and voted affirmatively. On whether to support a 
designation of the Parker River Wildlife Refuge as a wilderness area, the Board 
voted to favor instead a continuation of its existing status and instructed 
Director Shepard to record the Board's position at a 25 April hearing. 

In order to encourage maximum reporting of returning Atlantic salmon pre- 
viously released in the Connecticut River, the Board accepted the recommenda- 
tions of the Fisheries staff and voted to establish emergency regulations al- 
lowing a legal taking of two Atlantic salmon per day with a minimum length of 
15 inches in the Connecticut River. 

At an evening meeting in Greenfield on 19 April, the Board at a public 
hearing voted approvals of year-round fishing on the Connecticut River and 
falconry rules and regulations as presented by Division biologists. 

Division biologists at the June 1974 meeting proposed that for the purpose 
of improved deer management the Massachusetts mainland be divided into eight 
hunting zones. The Board approved the zoning proposal with antlerless deer 
permits to be allocated proportional to management objectives in each zone. 

The first Massachusetts waterfowl stamp legislation wa3 signed into lav; 
by the Governor (Sargent) in late June. Under the act, all waterfowlers are 
required by law to purchase a waterfowl stamp, eighty cents of which is ex- 
pended by Ducks Unlimited, Inc. for protection and development of waterfowl 
habitat in the Atlantic Maritime Provinces of Canada — breeding grounds of most 
waterfowl passing through Massachusetts. 

-2- 









1 1 



The Board expressed approval of the Division's process with land acquisi- 
tion and paid tribute to the Director and Realty staff for the substantial 
number of wetland acquisitions completed during the last year. 

Fiscal 1975 

After a lengthy series of meetings , studies and deliberations by the Board 
over a period of two years during which time numerous proposals for reorganiza- 
tion of state government were made to and by the Board, the final reorganization 
legislation was signed by the Governor on 16 August 1974 — to become effective 
on 1 July 1975. Under its provisions, the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife 
(formerly Fisheries and Game) became, along with the Division of Marine Fisher- 
ies, the Division of Marine and Recreational Vehicles and Public Access Board 
functions, a member of a new Department of Fisheries, Wildlife and Recreational 
Vehicles headed by a Commissioner. Certain privileges were retained under re- 
organization — the appointment of the Director and approval of the Superintend- 
ent were retained by the Board, as were policy decisions and regulatory author- 
ity. Budgetary and personnel matters, however, came under the purview of the 
Commissioner and the Secretary of Environmental Affairs of the Executive De- 
partment . 

With the effective date of reorganization, 1 July 1975, the Board adds 
two members (a wildlife biologist and one having particular interest in non- 
game and endangered species), bringing the Board's membership to seven. 

At its waterfowl regulatory hearing in August, the Board also permanently 
adopted regulations allowing the taking, in the Connecticut River, of two 
Atlantic salmon per day with a 15-inch minimum length and it amended wildlife 
management area regulations by authorizing the Director to establish appropri- 
ate rules to control detailed situations peculiar to specific wildlife manage- 
ment areas. 

On 27 September 1974, the Board heard a proposal at a public hearing to 
establish a statewide quail season. At its regular meeting on 25 October, 
the Board accepted the recommendations of the Division biologists that such 
a proposal was biologically unsound and it refused to vote an extension of the 
hunting boundaries beyond the five southeastern Massachusetts counties. 

Considerable concern was exhibited by the Board during the fall over the 
extent and magnitude of agency budget reductions mandated by the administration. 
The Board held some fear that while buildings, equipment and programs were 
deteriorating, the Division's "surplus" account was continuing to grow and 
there remained concern that attempts to raid such a surplus for non-wildlife 
programs might be made. 

A delay in the expected December delivery by the printer of 1975 licenses 
resulted in a joint administrative decision by the Directors of Fisheries and 
Game and Lax; Enforcement that holders of 1974 licenses would be able to 
lawfully participate in hunting, fishing and trapping until new licenses were 
received in January. 

Emergency regulations were declared in December for the closure to the 
taking of northern pike through the ice in East Brimfield Reservoir, Holland 
Pond, Long Pond and the Quinebaug River. The purpose \*as to prevent over- 
harvest of recently-introduced pike. 



-3- 



■ 



Because of anticipated crowds attending Bicentennial celebrations at 
Concords the Board in January endorsed emergency regulations postponing by one 
day the fishing season opening at Walden and White's Ponds. 

Fishing regulations were adopted at the April 1975 public hearing relative 
to exempting from the year-round season on the Connecticut River the Oxbow sec- 
tion at Northampton; increasing the minimal legal length of northern pike to 
28 inches and reducing the daily bag to one* allowing only 2 brown trout per 
day with a minimum legal length of 15 inches at Quabbin Pveservoir; making 
permanent the "Fly Fishing Only" areas on the Swift and Nissitissit Rivers; 
and initiating a catch-and-release experimental program designed to increase 
recreational opportunities on four designated ponds. 

In May 1975, the Board voted to rename the Squannacook River Wildlife 
Management Area in honor of Peter E. Bertozzi of West Groton who, prior to his 
passing, had played a leading role in adding significant acreages of conserva- 
tion lands to Division control for public recreation. 

Budgetary concerns continued to attract a great deal of the Board's atten- 
tion as well as the growing surplus, much of which was not interest-producing. 
Director Shepard was asked to explore with the Treasurer's office the advis- 
ability of increasing those surplus funds delegated to interest-bearing ac- 
counts from the historical level of $80,000 to at least $250,000. 

The Board, in reviewing accomplishments of the previous year, felt that 
the Division's aggressive land acquisition program which provides multiple 
recreational and educational opportunities to all citizens without prejudice 
or discrimination is a source of satisfaction and a meaningful beginning upon 
which future administrations should build. 

R.espect fully submitted, 

Roger D. Williams, Chairman 
Bradlee E. Gage 
Kenneth F. Bums 
Uartin H, Burns 
Henry E. Russell 



-4- 



■ 



■ 



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.i' 



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■ 



i 



Warmwater Fish Investigations 

Northern pike and largenouth bass provided the focal point of warmwater 
investigations. Creel census of ice fishermen at Cheshire Reservoir during 
1974 revealed a sharp drop in both fishing pressure and harvest. However, the 
most alarming decline is in the release of only 29 sub legal pike. During the 
winter of 1972, 905 sublegal pike were reported released. It is strongly 
suspected that chemical control of weeds during the summer of 1972 inflicted 
heavy losses on the young pike that use such areas as nursery habitat. Efforts 
were also directed towards the establishment of a pike population in 420-acre 
East Brimfield Reservoir, Sturbridge. Approximately 3,000 yearlings averaging 
14 inches were shipped from Red Lake, Ilinnesota and released late in December 
1973. Since northern pike are relatively rare in Massachusetts and have a 
growth potential far exceeding that of the chain pickerel, regulations govern- 
ing the harvest of this species were changed to take advantage of the greater 
growth potential of this fish as well as to use its predatory nature to prevent 
overpopulation of non-game species. Hopefully, the pike released in the 
reservoir complex will mature and spawn successfully during the spring of 1975. 

Pumped Storage Power Plant Investigations 

Two full years of post-operational investigations at the Northfield plant 
and the first year of operational investigations at the Bear Swamp plant were 
completed. Both investigations included analysis of creel census data, moni- 
toring shifts in fish, invertebrate populations and water quality as a means 
of evaluating the alterations in the Connecticut and Deerfield Rivers resulting 
from construction and operation of these pox^er projects. 

Massachusetts Cooperative Fishery Unit 

A great majority of the investigations supported by the Division of Fish- 
eries and Game through the Cooperative Fishery Unit at the University of 
Massachusetts centered around shad investigations in the Connecticut River. 
Other studies included the effect of mercury deposition on early development 
of white suckers and evaluation of kokanee salmon in Lake Onota, Pittsfield. 

Anadromous Fish Studies 

The major highlights of the shad and Atlantic salmon restoration efforts 
included the completion of Phase I of the modifications to the fishway at 
Hadley Falls (Holyoke) and the capture of the first live Atlantic salmon from 
that fishway. The modifications to the Holyoke facility enabled 114,132 adult 
shad to enter the Holyoke pool. This figure represents a 75.4 percent increase 
over the best previous season, 1970, when 65,750 adult shad were passed. 
Additionally, two adult Atlantic salmon were recovered. One was taken by 
commercial fishermen operating in the lower Connecticut River and the other 
was found dead along the banks of the Connecticut River in Agawam. Approxi- 
mately 10,000,000 fertile shad eggs were stripped from adult shad in the 
Connecticut River and transported to New Hampshire and Massachusetts sections 
of the Merrimack River during the springs of 1974 and 1975. Follow-up in- 
vestigations of these egg plants revealed that significant shad-spawning 
territory is available in the upper reaches, a substantial run of shad can be 
anticipated in relatively few years. Spring netting of the Merrimack River 
failed to capture significant numbers of adult shad. It is believed that 
either those shad captured are strays wandering from their natal rivers or 
that very limited shad habitat exists below the dams at Lawrence and Lowell. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Peter H. Oatis 

Chief Aquatic Biologist 






State Trout Stocked 
1973-1974 and 1974-1975 









1973- 


•1974 








1974-1975 




Hatchery 




6" 


6-9" 


9-12" 


12"+ 


6-9" 


9-12" 


12"+ 


Sunderland 
















Rainbow 
Brook 
Brown 
Totals 






50,000 
20,000 
25,000 
95,000 


50,000 

25,000 

30,000 

105,000 






65,000 

55,000 

120,000 


45,000 

30,000 

27,000 

102,000 




Bitzer 




















Rainbow 

Brook 

Brown 


20 
10 


,000 
,000 


40,000 


75,000 






45,000 


73,000 




Totals 


30 


9 000 


40,000 


75,000 


45,000 


73,000 


McLaughlin 




















Rainbow 

Brook 

Brown 






112,000 

80,000 

100,000 

292,000 


157,000 


12, 


,000 


112,000 

138,000 

76,000 

326,000 


164,000 


14,800 


Totals 


157,000 


12, 


000 


164,000 


14,000 


Sandwich 




















Rainbow 

Brook 

Brown 






15,000 
25,000 
40,000 


75,000 

5,000 
80,000 






40,000 


60,000 

14,000 
74,000 




Totals 


40,000 


Palmer 




















Rainbow 

Brook 

Brown 








8,000 

1,500 
9,500 






30,000 


9,000 




Totals 


30,000 


9,000 



H 






Total State Production of Trout 







1973- 


■1974 






1974-1975 






6" 


6-9" 


9-12" 


12"+ 


6-9" 


9-12" 


12"+ 


Rainbow 


20,000 


162,000 


365,000 


12,000 


182,000 


351,000 


14,800 


Brook 


10,000 


155,000 


25,000 




248,000 


30,000 




Brown 




150,000 


36,500 




131,000 


41,000 





Totals 



30,000 467,000 426,500 12,000 561,000 422,000 14,800 



-7- 



HH 



Wildlife 



Introduction 



Division efforts in wildlife research during fiscal 1974 and 1975 have 
focused on obtaining better information with which to manage the wildlife 
populations of the Commonwealth. Current projects range from studies on the 
history of management practices to basic life history studies, to relntroduc- 
tion of native species 9 to management of existing populations. A proposal for 
a non-game and endangered species wildlife program was presented to the 
Legislature in December 1973 but the bill was still under consideration at the 
end of 1975. 

White- Tailed Deer Project 

The one-week shotgun season accounted for the largest portion of the 
total deer harvest. In 1973 s a total of 2,037 deer were taken, followed by 
2,666 in the 1974 season as the herd continued to increase. Antlerless deer 
permits were issued at the same level (5,000) in both 1973 and 1974, and 
farmer-landowner antlerless deer permit requests were also at about the same 
level, 349 and 358, respectively. The total kill ratio of males to females 
taken In the harvest similarly indicates a healthy harvest situation with 
1,477 males to 644 females in 1973 and 1,949 males to 332 females in 1974. 
This ratio is what it should be in light of our management objectives. 

Three additional autumn deer seasons were offered in 1973 and 1974. The 
three-week archery season harvest was up from 77 in 1973 to 87 in 1974. The 
paraplegic season produced the first successful hunters In 1974 on Martha's 
Vineyard when deer were taken by two of the 14 participants. The three-day 
primitive firearms season following the shotgun season produced a harvest of 
seven deer in 1973 and 26 in 1974. 

The total harvest in 1974 of 2,781 deer was up about 30 percent, or 660 
animals, over the 2,121 taken in 1973. 

Non-hunting deer mortalities reported by Natural Resource Officers for 
the two-year period, 1973 and 1974, were as follows: 



Mortality Cause 

Automotive 

Dogs 

Illegal 

Drowned 

Others and Unknown 

Totals 



Numb 


er 


of 


Deaths 


in 


1973 




322 






36 






23 






9 






30 





Numb 


er 


of 


Deaths 


in 


1974 




329 
23 
34 
11 
33 





420 



430 



Statewide Beaver Harvest 

A total of 1,639 beaver were taken by 123 trappers in 106 towns during 
the 1973-1974 beaver season. Berkshire and Franklin Counties together yielded 
888 beaver, or 54.2 percent of the harvest. Over one half (53.6%) of the 
beaver were taken in the first two weeks of the 15-week season. The approxi- 
mate point-of-sale value of the harvest was $29,500. 



-8- 






Harvests dropped slightly In 1974-1975, with 1,441 beaver being taken by 
115 trappers in 102 towns. This take was 198 less than in 1973-1974, but 247 
more than the ten-year (1965-1974) average. Berkshire and Franklin Counties 
together yielded 838 beaver. Again, one half (721) of the harvest was taken 
in the first two weeks of the season. The approximate point-of-sale value of 
the harvest was $36,025. 

Mourning Dove Census 

Calling doves were counted on three randomized census routes in coopera- 
tion with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's annual mourning dove breeding 
population census. The total number of calling doves in the spring of 1974 
decreased nearly two thirds as compared to 1973 counts. In 1975, however, the 
total number of calling doves increased 11.5 times over 1974 on two comparable 
routes. Analysis of long-term trends, nevertheless, indicates a significant 
downward trend in Eastern Unit dove populations. 

Spring Quail Census 

The 1973 spring quail census in Barnstable, Bristol, and Plymouth Counties 
showed no statistically significant difference in call indices from the 1971 
average or from a four-year (1958-1961) average. In 1975, however, Bristol 
County showed a significant decrease from the 1958-1961 index, and Plymouth 
County showed decreases both from the 1958-1961 and from the 1973 call index. 

Experimental Turkey Stocking 



Through the courtesy of the New York State Department of Environmental 
Conservation, Division of Fi3h and Wildlife, a number of wild-trapped turkeys 
were again made available for transplanting to Massachusetts. In September 
1973, twenty turkeys (five adult hens and fifteen poults) were captured in 
Allegany State Park, New York, and released in Beartown State Forest, Berkshire 
County, bringing the total released since spring 1972 to 37 turkeys. 






Sightings were uncommon for the first year, but reports since then Indi- 
cate that birds have dispersed east and west of the release site, and one re- 
port of a brood was received during the summer of 1974. Should reproduction 
and dispersal continue as projected, the Beartown flock will be used as a 
source of stock for future statewide releases. 






Black Bear Population Dynamics 

During the fall of 1973, applications for bear hunting permits were re- 
ceived from 309 sportsmen. No bears were reported taken during the open 
season, though one cub was killed by an automobile earlier in the year. Two 
instances of problem bears were investigated, both involving citizens who un- 
necessarily harassed bears, thus leading to confrontations. 

In 1974, bear hunting permit applications were received from 390 sports- 
men and two bear were taken during the open season. Two instances of nuisance 
bears were investigated. 

A comprehensive report on the history and status of the bear in Massachu- 
setts is nearing completion. 



-9- 






&»$?< 



m 



■ 



Trap Study 

A committee was appointed in early 1974 by Director Shepard to study the 
problems of and alternatives to the steel leghold trap. The committee, com- 
posed of trappers, non-trappers, and professional biologists, initiated an 
intensive information-gathering effort which resulted in the rather shocking 
and inescapable conclusion that there was no reliable basis for answering 
questions that underlie a rational revision of trapping in the direction of 
minimizing pain. Consequently, the committee recommended to Director Shepard 
a detailed study designed to evaluate several trapping devices. 

This study has been designed and reviewed by biologists from all over 
this country and Canada. Support for the study is provided by the Federal 
government, the Canadian Association for Humane Trapping, the Division, the 
Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and the Wood- 
stream Corporation. 

Gray Squirrel Study 

Squirrel hunting regulations were evaluated from other states in an effort 
to determine why squirrels were not a more popular game animal in Maesaohuoptt<3. 
Results showed most states ranked squirrels a» a top game species. The popu- 
larity of squirrel hunting was significantly related to the length of the 
season before leaf fall. On the average, about 40 percent of the season in 
other states occurred before leaf fall, but in Massachusetts the season does 
not open until after leaf fall. Massachusetts also has the second shortest 
squirrel season (41 days) in the nation while the average is 120 days. 

Recommendations are being prepared in an effort to increase the utiliza- 
tion of this resource. 

Grouse Habitat Studies 

The forests of the state have generally grown past the optimum habitat 
stage for ruffed grouse and the potential value of the timber resource has 
increased steadily. Realizing that this resource will be harvested sometime 
in the future, the Division has begun to investigate the possibilities of 
stimulating production of good ruffed grouse habitat through normal timber 
harvesting operations. Cooperation with the Division of Forests and Parks and 
the University of Massachusetts is being investigated in order to provide the 
best study design for this work. 

Gosling Transplant Program 

In fiscal year 1974, a number of Canada goose drive trapping operations 
occurred in eastern Massachusetts. Fifty-seven goslings were captured and 
transplanted to four sites in central and western Massachusetts and 52 other 
geese were banded and released. During fiscal year 1975, forty-two goslings 
were transplanted and 27 other geese banded. Brood checks that year confirmed 
three broods of goslings by transplanted adults and three other broods of 
probable transplant origin. An analysis of recovery data indicated a 24 per- 
cent recovery rate for all geese transplanted since 1967 with approximately 
half the birds being recovered out of state. 



-10- 









HI 



Preseason Waterfowl Bandings 

Preseason banding work followed gosling transplant activities. However, 
budgetary problems which prevented needed airboat repairs eliminated night- 
lighting and curtailed bait trapping activities during the summers of both 

1973 and 1974. As a result, only 262 wild ducks were banded during the 1974 
preseason trapping operations although 163 park waterfowl were also banded. 
In 1974, a total of 354 wild birds and 402 park ducks were banded. 

Winter Inventory Flight s 

Winter inventory flights were flown during the first full week of January 
in 1974 and 1975. Coastal Massachusetts from New Hampshire to the Rhode Island 
line was surveyed, including Cape Cod and the Islands. The total waterfowl 
count in 1974 was 127,043, up 59.7 percent from 1973 and dovm 4.7 percent from 
the ten-year average. Black ducks were up 15.4 percent from 1973, down 7.5 
percent from the ten-year average. Mallards, bay ducks, sea ducks and Canada 
geese were all up over 1973. The 1975 count of 120,278 waterfowl was down 
slightly from 1974 and the ten-year average. Black ducks were down 23 percent 
from 1974. Mallards, most bay ducks, sea ducks and Canada geese were up over 
the 1974 counts. 

Winter Trapping Program 

During 1974, state personnel along with three cooperators banded a total 
of 1,917 ducks at 30 locations using bait traps and cannon nets. Some 524 
ducks were banded a3 part of the regular winter black duck trapping operation 
(78 percent blacks). The park waterfowl program netted 1,189 mallards, 33 
black ducks and 165 mallard-black hybrids. A total of 2,247 waterfowl were 
banded at 32 locations in 1975; 1,120 during black duck banding work (81 per- 
cent blacks) and 1,127 during the park waterfowl phase of the program (85 per- 
cent mallards) . 

Black Duck Imprint Program 

During the spring of 1974, a total of 45 female and 55 male black ducks 
were released on three sanctuary areas In eastern and central Massachusetts. 
Nesting cylinders had been previously erected in 1972. In addition to the 

1974 release, an unknown number of black ducks released in 1973 had over- 
wintered in the vicinity of the release sites. A total of ten nest attempts 
were recorded on the sites of which nine were successful. Nests were 
established in cylinders by both 1973 and 1974 released birds. 

Game farm-held black ducks produced over 700 eggs but faulty incubators 
and high duckling mortality rates limited production. Approximately 200 black 
ducks were reared to flight stage. 

A total of 125 female and 111 male black ducks were released in the spring 
of 1975. These included both yearling birds and surplus breeding stock. One 
or more nests were established on five of six release sites. Nests were 
established by eleven of the 1975 released hens while three hens released in 
previous years returned to nest. A total of 110 black ducklings were hatched 
in cylinders. Further releases of 21 female and ten male black ducks were 
made during midsummer of 1975 as this project is considered unsuccessful and 
will be terminated. 



-11- 



*».V. 




Park Waterfowl Investigations 

A summer park waterfowl census of the greater Boston area was conducted 
in 1974. A total of 2,071 mallards and 248 black ducks was observed on 56 
different areas (40 percent of available sites) . The summer count was ap- 
proximately 56 percent of the winter count conducted on the same geographic 
area during January 1973. 

Two special censuses to count broods were run the summer of 1975, one in 
May and a second late June-early July. These censuses revealed that there 
was brood production on 41 percent of the wetlands within the greater Boston 
areas and that there was an average of 2.4 broods per area. A total of 2,673 
waterfowl was seen of which 675 were ducklings. 

Evaluation of Starlingproof Nesting Cylinders 

During 1974, wood duck nest starts were recorded in 27 out of 82 cylin- 
ders. However, only sixteen nests were successfully incubated to term. 
Cylinders were used on eight of 22 areas, fourteen of which had concurrent 
wood duck usage in wooden boxes. In 1975, there were 22 nest starts on five 
areas of which fifteen were successful. Web tagging data indicate that there 
is no strong tendency for wood ducks hatched in cylinders to return to cylin- 
ders to nest, but rather that wood ducks hatched in cylinders may nest in 
wooden boxes as frequently as they do in the cylinders. No starling nests 
have been recorded in the cylinders since the program was initiated in 1970. 

Wood Duck Dump Nesting Study 

A wood duck dump nest is a nest in which two or more wood ducks lay eggs 
but only one hen incubates the clutch. Dump nests normally make up about 25 
percent of the nests found in Division boxes. The waterfowl research crew is 
attempting to learn more about this biological phenomenon through a series of 
research projects. 

One project tested the effects of the prior presence of eggs in a box to 
determine if wood ducks that dump nest, but do not incubate later, establish 
a nest of their own. Several marking devices were tested under both laboratory 
and field conditions in 1974. Further tests were conducted in 1975. The use 
of a rubber-band collar with a colored vinyl tag promises to be the most 
feasible, with a 67 percent success rate. 

Release of Hand-Reared Wood Ducks 

The release of twelve pairs of adult wood ducks on two beaver ponds of the 
Quabbin Reservoir in April of 1975 resulted in two confirmed nests by released 
hens and a third successful nest believed to be the product of a released hen. 
The release of five adult hens at Turkey Hill Brook, Paxton, resulted in one 
hen establishing a successful nest. 



-12- 






M - ■ 









Game Farm Research 

During the two-year reporting period, a cooperative research project on 
Eastern Equine Encephalitis in pheasants was continued with the Department of 
Veterinary Science at the University of Massachusetts and the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health. 

Many blood samples were collected from representative pens of pheasants 
on all three game farms. When work on these samples is completed we should 
have a better understanding of the epizootlology of the disease by comparison 
of numbers of serums with antibodies before and after clinical disease. Virus 
isolations at the Ayer farm demonstrated that the infection occurred in a 
considerable number of pens without appreciable clinical signs or mortality. 
Fitting the birds with anti-pecking "peepers" is credited ttfith being effective 
in minimizing transmission of infection and mortality. 

One controlled experiment has been completed to evaluate the effective- 
ness of a commercial adjuvanted E.E.E. vaccine for pheasants, a product widely 
used in pheasants in New Jersey. Little or no protection value was demon- 
strated, although as much as one half a horse dose was used twice at a four- 
week interval before challenge. All vaccinated birds also developed viremia 
following challenge. A second trial is in progress. 

A member of E.E.E. virus isolates has been screened to determine if there 
are marked differences in virulence for pheasants among field isolates. A few 
of the isolates tested have limited ability to kill pheasants; most of the 
isolates from mosquitoes, horses and songbirds can kill pheasants without 
adaptation. 

Management 

Efforts to increase automation at all game farms, especially in the 
brooding of pheasants were stepped up during these fiscal years. This has 
resulted in large labor savings. Surplus equipment acquired from other state 
agencies has allowed the Division to install automatic feeders in one breeder 
house at the Wilbraham Game Farm. 

Routine maintenance, repair and construction was done at all farms. Feed 
formulas and feeding procedures were revised which resulted in a decrease in 
feed costs. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Chet M. McCord 

Chief of Wildlife Research 

E. Michael Pollack 
Chief Game Biologist 



-13- 



H 






Game Distribution 




Pheasant Distribution 7/1/73 to 6/30/74 


7/1/74 to 6/30/75 

- - ■ 


August 8,940 


9,298 


October-November 43 , 164 


44,010 


Sportsmen's Club Pheasant 6,035 


5,543 


Rearing Program 




Miscellaneous (youth hunt, 185 


146 


displays, etc.) 




Brood Stock (spring releases) 5,185 


1,772 


Hybrids 200 


- 


Field Trials (24) 898 


(18) 802 


Totals 64,607 


61,571 


Quail Liberations 




Public Hunting Grounds 1,960 


2,880 


Field Trials (10) 483 


(10) 502 


Totals 2,443 


3,382 


Hare Liberations 




Released in January and 109 


1,110 


February 





I 



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■ 



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- I- 






Information and Education 

Increasing public interest in wildlife and the environment is reflected 
in the magnitude of postal inquiries, estimated at over 10,000 during fiscal 
1974 and 1975, handled by the Information-Education staff. Although many re- 
quests can be satisfied by return mailings of preprinted information, an In- 
creasing number demand a response — possible only by personal and sometimes 
lengthy correspondence. 

The production of informative materials attempts to reduce inquiries by 
the timely dissemination of facts. During the reporting period, 33 general 
news releases and nine mailings to outdoor writers were produced. Staff mem- 
bers published and maintained a library of 200 maps of popular fishing ponds 
and 44 maps of wildlife management areas for the benefit of fishermen and 
hunters. 



Responsibility for coordination and reservation bookings for the Junior 
Conservation Camp falls annually to the I and E Section as well as participa- 
tion in training programs offered to the 150 boys who attend. 

In cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Commerce and Develop- 
ment, the Division's I and E staff supervises the Massachusetts Sports Fishing 
Awards Program involving year-round review of freshwater fish entries in seven- 
teen categories. This program has clearly established Massachusetts as a 
producer of record fish unsurpassed in the Northeast. 

The educational effort is extended throughout the state by means of ex- 
hibits, demonstrations, radio and television specials and audio-visual aids of 
infinite variety. The staff prepared or assisted at twelve major exhibits 
during the two-year period including annual appearances at the New England 
Sportsmen's Show at Boston and the Eastern States Exposition in Springfield. 
The 1974 exhibit featured a variety of shore birds and the 1975 show included 
a pair of river otter — both exhibits telling of the variety of native 
Massachusetts wildlife and the importance of protecting suitable wildlife 
habitat. 

The Division's bimonthly magazine, Massachusetts Uildlife , continued to 
publish timely and thought-provoking articles on land use problems, wildlife 
of the Quabbin Reservoir area, the eastern cougar, black bear, the Merrimack 
River and numerous other environmental and wildlife- related subjects. The 
publication is a function of the five-member I and E staff but major responsi- 
bility falls to the managing editor. Massachusetts Wildlife consistently in- 
cluded three or four major articles in each issue although handicapped by 
limitations on both space and size. A format greater than the current 9 by 12 
inch page size would be highly desirable and could more effectively utilize 
the excellent photography produced by the Division's two wildlife photographers. 
Regrettably, budget limitations prevented the publication of the May-June 1975 
issue. 



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The I and E staff employed several methods to publicize the construction 
and dedication of the Division's first fishing pier built at Cook Pond, Fall 
River. The project warranted a high degree of exposure since it marked a new 
approach to improved fishery management in an urban area and included original 
design engineering to facilitate use by handicapped anglers restricted to 
wheelchairs. 



-15- 






At the request of the court, extensive publicity was given to the appre- 
hension and subsequent conviction of vandals who wantonly slaughtered prime 
trout displayed in the visitor pool at the Division's McLaughlin hatchery in 
Belchertown. It was suggested by the hearing's judge that the excellent 
police work by Natural Resource Officer Albert Brighenti and other investi- 
gators together with wide news coverage might be a deterrent to others who 
might contemplate similar vandalism. 

Upon the passage of the first waterfowl stamp law in Massachusetts, the 
I and E section began a search for appropriate art work and selected a fine 
painting of a decoy from among several submitted. Thus began a series which 
the Division intends to perpetuate at a high level of printing and art quality, 
a factor which should make the Massachusetts stamps of interest to collectors. 

The production of audio-visual material was severely reduced by budgetary 
limitations but the Division's staff photographers developed a full length, 
52-minute documentary on native animals and wildlife management in the Quabbin 
Reservation as well as several thousand feet of footage to be subsequently 
combined with other footage in the development of new film presentations. In 
addition, two prime-time film shows on the life history of the beaver and the 
wild turkey were prepared for showing over Channel 6, New Bedford, and three 
one-half hour wildlife films were developed for showing on Channel 57, Spring- 
field. On seasonal events or unusual wildlife-related stories, thirty brief 
short-run specials were made and used in news broadcasts by Channels 4, 5 and 
7, Boston. 



Films and 35mm slide shows dealing with fish and wildlife research and 
management were prepared for use by Division biologists in conjunction with 
their educational activities. An estimated 200 showings were recorded during 
the reporting period of all types of films. Most of these were used at 
schools, sportsmen's clubs, environmental citizen groups and exhibits. 



The Division continued to provide color and black and white prints to 
wire services and various news media relating to Massachusetts wildlife and 
associated recreation. 

I and E staffers appeared on six talk shows for Channel 6 and presented 
programs at scores of gatherings of conservationists and educators across the 
state. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard Cronin 

Chief of Information and Education 



-16- 



** 



Realty 

An aggressive land acquisition program continued to provide lasting pro- 
tection for fish and wildlife resources of the Commonwealth by bringing under 
the control of the Division 3644.5 additional acres during Fiscal 1974 and 
another 2252.25 acres in 1975. Host acquisitions xrere wetlands with funding 
provided by a $5 million bond issue approved in Fiscal 1972. Program emphasis 
was placed on acquisitions of lands bordering existing wildlife management 
areas and other publicly-accessible recreation lands and waters. At the close 
of Fiscal 1975 it is evident that new funding will be needed to continue the 
essential program of permanently protecting fish and wildlife habitat in both 
wetland and upland locations. The Division is most grateful for the continu- 
ing interest shown by generous donors of wildlife lands, a number of whom made 
significant gifts to the Commonwealth during the reporting period. 

Hockomock Acquisition Project 

The Hockomock Swamp reputedly is the largest remaining inland wetland in 
New England. The attributes possessed by this unique and remarkable natural 
resource are many and the swamp's worth challenges the expertise of those who 
would attempt to attach to it a value in dollars and cents. 

To permanently protect this significant wetland (a mere forty-minute 
drive from downtown Boston) , the Division initiated its largest single 
acquisition project ever attempted early in June of 1972. Progress was slow 
during the early stages of the program. However, the assemblage of parcels 
began when in Fiscal 1974 a total of 1,078 acres of Hockomock became public 
domain, and in Fiscal 1975 an additional 1,499 acres were purchased. 

The properties acquired were as varied in their utilitarian roles as 
they were irregular in shape. Road frontage was acquired on every major high- 
way within the project area to insure access. Properties bordering the Snake 
River, Hockomock River, Town River and Black Brook were also protected as well 
as shore property on 354-acre Lake Nippenickett and Nunkets Pond. 

Ownerships were obtained by negotiated purchase. Acquisitions by this 
process usually require repeated visits to the landowner before an agreement 
is reached. The involvement of time, consequently, is considerable. 

Parker River Acquisition Project 

In the Town of Newbury, Essex County, picturesque farmlands once provided 
a livelihood for those who tirelessly and patiently "lived with the land". 
Fields of timothy, brome grass, and lush clover furnish food and cover for the 
countless species of wildlife found here. These farmlands are embellished by 
adjoining marshlands. Such marshlands, nourished by the beautiful Parker 
River, provide high-quality habitat for shorebirds, waterfowl and aquatic 
mammals . 

A Division application for Federal funding assistance, through the Bureau 
of Outdoor Recreation's Land and Uater Conservation Fund (B.O.R.), was sub- 
mitted and approved. Subsequent to the approval, the estate of the late 
John P. Marquand, a noted author, was purchased. Four hundred seventy-seven 
acres, the nucleus of the project, was conveyed to the Division in 1974, and 
in Fiscal 1975, another 237 acres was added. 



-17- 



Crane Pond 

Two acquisitions in Fiscal 1975 of 111 acres in Georgetown, Groveland and 
West Newbury bring the total acreage of this wildlife management area to 
2094.9. 

Swift River 

Three hundred acres in Ware, including a modern 10-roon house and garage, 
and 3,600 feet of river frontage were purchased, adding significantly to the 
total value of the Swift River Wildlife Management Area — now encompassing 
1413.5 acres and offering further protection to a fine trout stream. 

Westboro 

Via a transfer from the Department of Mental Health and the Trustees of 
Westboro State Hospital, 153 acres of woodland and shore frontage on Lake 
Chauncey was added to the Division's Westboro Wildlife Management Area in 
Fiscal 1975. 

Housatonic River 

Acquisitions in Pittsfield, Lenox and Lee have enlarged Division holdings 
in this river valley to 485.7 acres and have provided, in addition to public 
open space protection, an additional 5,000 feet of shoreline on Woods Pond and 
4,600 feet of frontage on the Housatonic River. The area is rich in fish and 
wildlife including waterfowl and furbearers. 

Millers River 

Protection of huntable land for deer, hare and grouse was the object of 
the Fiscal 1974 acquisition of 853 acres of unspoiled land adjacent to the 
Division's Millers River Wildlife Management Area in Athol and Royalston. This 
important acquisition connected other Division properties forming a unit of 
1,553 acres, and insures excellent access to a major river which may offer 
prime fishing as pollution abatement progresses. 

Peterson Swamp 

In Halifax, 250 acres of forest, wooded swamp, marsh and open fields was 
purchased in an area between Monponsett Pond and Silver Lake. 

Additions to Existing Lands 

During the reporting period, land purchases were made which added to and 
further protected Division holdings at the Squannacook Wildlife Management 
Area, Shirley; Rocky Gutter Wildlife Management Area, Middleboro; Mill Creek 
Wildlife Management Area, Rowley, and Pantry Brook Wildlife Management Area, 
Sudbury. Additional salt marshes in Rowley and Salisbury uere acquired which 
brought the total coastal wetlands designated as the North Shore Wildlife 
Management Area to 310.2 acres. Federal Aid to Fisheries Restoration funds 
assisted in the purchase of 183.63 acres adjacent to the Missitissit River 
Wildlife Management Area and the Division acquired 1.7 acres adjacent to the 
Sandwich State Fish Hatchery as added protection. 



-18- 



■tfi. 



tern 






Gifts 

During Fiscal 1974 and 1975, gifts of land totalling 459.3 acres were 
deeded to the Division. They included a 15-acre island in the Connecticut 
River donated by the Connecticut River Watershed Council, Inc. Shepherd Island 
was formerly used for an anchoring point for cables stretching to the river's 
east bank as booms to intercept newly cut logs headed downriver. A sandy beach 
stretches along the wooded island's easterly shore and from its westerly shore 
one can observe a sheltered mainland cove where migrating waterfowl stop to 
rest and feed. 

Once again the Middlesex County League of Sportsmen's Clubs has made a 
significant contribution with the presentation to the Division of a twenty- 
acre parcel in Pepperell, situated on the Nissitissit River. This gift of 
frontage on a trout stream considered by many to be one of the finest in the 
state, will help to insure the perpetuation of quality freshwater angling for 
generations to come. 

In Chester, a 267-acre tract of woodland with frontage on Walker Brook, 
a state-stocked trout stream, was deeded to the Division by Kelly Enterprises, 
Inc. , a Pittsfield lumber company. The property also includes an abandoned 
emery mine, one of the few locations in Massachusetts where the endangered 
Indiana bat is found. Hunters will benefit, too, from this most generous gift 
since the area is good habitat for deer, grouse and hare. 

A gift of .3 acres further strengthened the holdings of the Division at 
its BItzer Fish Hatchery in Montague, named for Harold and Ralph Bitzer, two 
former employees of the Division, the latter of whom is also the donor. 

Finally, lands in Northbridge, Mendon and Uxbridge, along both banks of 
the West River, were given to the Division by E. Kent Swift, Jr. This 157- 
acre area includes a variety of habitat types — large open fields, hedgerows, 
stone walls, apple trees, forests and wetlands. The hunter and non-hunter 
alike will find much to enjoy in this diverse area and the trout fisherman 
will appreciate the excellent public access to one of the better streams in 
the region. 

The above-mentioned gifts are gratefully acknowledged and represent 
properties of considerable value. The foresight and generosity of each donor 
and his obvious love of the great out-of-doors labels him as a giant among his 
fellowmen. The Division of Fisheries and Game, on behalf of all sportsmen and 
conservationists, extends to each benefactor the true hand of friendship. 



-19- 



Summary of Land Acquisitions 
Fiscal 1974 and 1975 



Area Name 
Hockomock Swamp W.M.A. 

Parker River W.M.A. 
Crane Pond W.M.A. 

Swift River W.M.A. 
Westboro W.M.A. 
Housatonic Valley W.M.A. 
Millers River W.M.A. 
North Shore W.M.A. 
Rocky Gutter W.M.A. 
Squannacook W.M.A. 
Peterson Sx>;amp W.M.A. 
Shepherd Island W.M.A. 
Nissitissit River W.M.A. 
E. Kent Swift W.M.A. 

Chester W.M.A. 
Mill Creek W.M.A. 
Pantry Brook W.M.A. 
Sandwich Fish Hatchery 
Bitzer Fish Hatchery 



Totals 



3644.5 



2252.25 





Acreage 


Acreage 


Town 


1974 


1975 


East on 9 Taunton, Raynham, 


1078 


1499.10 


Norton, Bridgewater, West 






Bridgewater 






Newbury 


467 


237 


Georgetown, Groveland, 




111 


West Newbury 






Ware 


300 




Westboro 




153 


Lenox, Lee, Pittsfield 


107 


25.4 


Athol, Royals ton 


353 




Rowley, Salisbury 


93 


23 


Middleboro 


17.5 




Shirley 


20 




Halifax 


250 




Northampton 


15 




Pepperell 


20 


183.63 


Northbridge, Mendon, 


157 




Uxb ridge 






Chester 


267 




Rowley 




.10 


Sudbury 




8.12 


Sandwich 




1.7 


Montague 




.3 



-20- 






■ 



1 






Personnel 



Retirements 

Eleanor Dox^ler, on 27 December 1974, as Principal Clerk in the Boston 
office. Employed by the Division since 4 February 1963 after previous 
service at Monson State Hospital. 

Joseph Johnson, on 31 December 1974, as Chief of Realty in the Boston 
office. Employed by the Division since 21 August 1939. 

Robert Corrinet, on 22 January 1975, as Game Manager in the Central 
Wildlife District. Employed by the Division since 11 September 1951. 

Robert Macomber, on 30 June 1975, as Fish Culturist at the Sandwich State 
Fish Hatchery. Employed by the Division since April 1935. 



Deaths 

Eugene D. Ho ran, on 10 July 1973. Employed by the Division since 
1 June 1955. At his death, he was the Western District Wildlife Manager in 
Pittsfield. 

George Wood, on 2 May 1974. Employed by the Division since 1 August 1955 
At his death, he was Fisheries Manager, Southeast Wildlife District in 
Buzzards Bay. 



-21- 






Legislation Enacted During Fiscal Year 1974 

Chapter 129 of the Resolves of 1973 : Resolve providing for an investigation 
and study by the Division of Fisheries and Game relative to certain hunting, 
fishing and wildlife matters. Signed: 17 September 1973. 

Chapter 496 of the Acts of 1973 : An act relative to the use of certain raptors 
for hunting purposes. Signed: 2 July 1973. 

Chapter 769 of the Acts of 1973 : An act providing for emergency projects under 
the law relating to the protection of the inland wetlands of the Commonwealth. 
Signed: 17 September 1973. 

Chapter 879 of the Acts of 1973 : An act authorizing the State Treasurer to re- 
ceive funds from the Director of the Division of Fisheries and Game. 
Signed: 4 October 1973. 

Chapter 900 of the Acts of 1973 : An act authorizing the Director of the Divi- 
sion of Fisheries and Game to acquire certain land in the Town of Falmouth for 
wildlife management purposes. Signed: 11 October 1973. 

Chapter 1071 of the Acts of 1973 : An act requiring persons owning certain 
animals to be licensed by the Department of Natural Resources. 
Signed: 21 November 1973. 

Chapter 420 of the Acts of 1974: An act providing for a Massachusetts water- 
fowl stamp. Signed: 26 June 1974. 

Legislation Enacted During Fiscal Year 1975 

Chapter 667 of the Acts of 1974 : An act providing for the quarantine of cer- 
tain diseased fish, birds, mammals, reptiles and amphibians. 
Signed: 31 July 1974. 

Chapter 786 of the Acts of 1974 : An act authorizing the Division of Fisheries 
and Game in the Department of Natural Resources to grant an easement on cer- 
tain land in the Town of Conway. Signed: 9 August 1974. 

Chapter 796 of the Acts of 1974 : An act prohibiting the use of certain traps 
or other devices for the capture of fur-bearing mammals. 
Signed: 12 August 1974. 

Chapter 806 of the Acts of 1974 : An act establishing an Executive Office of 
Environmental Affairs. Signed: 12 August 1974. 

Chapter 813 of the Acts of 1974 : An act further regulating the protection of 
wetlands. Signed: 13 August 1974. 

Chapter 30 of the Acts of 1975 : An act relative to the penalty for the unlaw- 
ful possession of a deer. Signed: 25 February 1975. 

Chap t er 147 of the Acts of 1975 : An act requiring the approval of the Director 
of the Division of Waterways or the Director of the Division of Marine and 
Recreational Vehicles of rules and regulations relating to hunting and fishing 
on great ponds. Signed: 24 April 1975. 



-22- 



■ 



■■■Hi 



Chapter 162 of the Acts of 1975 : An act redefining the term "loaded shotgun 
or rifle" in the law relative to inland fisheries and game. Signed: 
30 April 1975. 

Chapter 217 of the Acts of 1975 : An act further regulating the issuance of 
minor's certificate of competency in the safe handling of firearms. 
Signed: 16 May 1975. 

Chapter 334 of the Acts of 1975 : An act relative to the enforcement of viola- 
tions of the wetland act. Signed: 13 June 1975. 



-23- 



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-29- 



SUMMARY OF FISH AND GAME INCOME 
1 July 1973 to 30 June 1974 

Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses 

Special Licenses, Trap Registrations and Tags 

Archery Stamps 

Antlerless Deer Permits 

Rents 

Miscellaneous and Sales 

Court Fines 

Refunds Prior Year 

Pittman-Robertson Federal Aid 

Dinge 11- Johnson Federal Aid 

Anadromous Fish Projects, Federal Aid 

Massachusetts Mourning Dove and Woodcock Reimbursement 

Reimbursement of Services 



$2,522,620.75* 

$ 10,985.25** 

$ 25,787.90 

$ 16,352.85 

$ 5,467.25 

$ 2,734.11 

$ 15,029.00 

$ 964.76 

$ 149,029.34 

$ 223,925.41 

$ 3,609.07 

$ 

$ 19,426.18 

$2,995,931.87 



*See Detail Sheet No. 1 
**See Detail Sheet No. 2 



OTHER INCOME-INLAND FISHERIES AND GAME FUND 



Interest on Investments 

Gasoline Tax Apportionment 

Surplus in Inland Fisheries and Game Fund as of 
30 June 1974 



$ 5,803.28 
$ 291,536.36 
$ 891,093.24 



-30- 



M 



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SUMMARY OF FISH AND GAME INCOME 
1 July 1974 to 30 June 1975 

Fishing, Hunting and Trapping Licenses 

Special Licenses , Trap Registrations and Tags 

Archery Stamps 

Waterfowl Stamps, Ducks Unlimited 

Waterfowl Stamps 

Antlerless Deer and Bear Permits 

Rents 

Miscellaneous and Sales 

Court Fines 

Refunds Prior Year 

Pittman-Robertson Federal Aid 

Dingell- Johnson Federal Aid 

Anadromous Fish Projects, Federal Aid 

Massachusetts Mourning Dove and Woodcock Reimbursement 

Reimbursement, Acquisition Projects 

Reimbursement of Services, Water Pollution Control 



$2,567,290.30* 

$ 11,487.65** 

$ 29,947.20 

$ 23,148.80 

$ 6,209.95 

$ 15,532.70 

$ 5,653.75 

$ 11,045.55 

$ 12,263.75 

$ 388.29 

$ 210,496.42 

$ 35,513.61 

$ 56,330.46 

$ 4,644.72 

$ 153,526.58 

$ 35,390.16 
$3,178,869.89 



*See Detail Sheet No. 1 
**See Detail Sheet No. 2 



OTHER INCOME AND INLAND FISHERIES AND GAME FUND 



Interest on Investments 

Gasoline Tax Apportionment 

Surplus in Inland Fisheries and Game Fund as of 
30 June 1975 



$ 3,450.23 



$ 291,615.00 
$1,152,344.32 



-31- 



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Detail Sheet No. 2 
DEPOSITS 
Fiscal Year 1 July 1973 to 30 June 1974 



3304-61-01-40 Trap Registration 





Initial 


103 


@ 


$ 2.00 


$ 


366.00 




Renewal 


351 


@ 


$ 1.50 


$ 


526.50 




Renewal (Duplicate) 


1 


@ 


$ 1.00 


$ 


1.00 


3304-61-02-40 


Fur Buyers 














Resident Citizen 


22 


<§ 


$15.00 


$ 


330.00 




Non-Resident or Alien 


7 


@ 


$50.00 


$ 


350.00 


3304-61-03-40 


Taxidermist 


85 


@ 


$10.00 


$ 


850.00 


3304-61-04-40 Propagators 














Special Purpose Permit 


90 


@ 


$ 1.00 


$ 


90.00 




Class 1 (Special Fish) 














Initial 


16 


(h 


$ 7.50 


$ 


120.00 




Renewal 


150 


@ 


$ 5.00 


$ 


750.00 




Class 2 





@ 


No fee 








Class 3 (Fish) 














Initial 


9 


@ 


$ 7.50 


$ 


67.50 




Renewal 


75 


@ 


$ 5.00 


$ 


375.00 




Class 4 (Birds and Mammals) 














Initial 


80 


@ 


$ 7.50 


$ 


592.50 




Renewal 


438 


@ 


$ 5.00 


$ 2 


,190.00 




Class 5 


5 


@ 


No fee 








Class 6 (Dealers) 














Initial 


8 


<a i 7.5 


$ 


60.00 




Renewal 


66 


@ 


$ 5.00 


$ 


330.00 




Additional 


402 


@ 


$ 1.50 


$ 


603.00 




Class 7 (Individual Bird 














or Mammal) 














Initial 


20 


@ 


$ 3.00 


$ 


60.00 




Renewal 


63 


9 


$ 1.00 


$ 


63.00 




Importation Permits 














Fish 


8 


@ 


$ 5.00 


$ 


40.00 




Birds and Mammals 


33 


fl 


$ 5.00 


$ 


165.00 


3304-61-05-40 


Take Shiners 


110 


@ 


$ 5.00 


$ 


550.00 




Duplicate 


1 


@ 


$ 1.00 


$ 


1.00 


3304-61-06-40 


Field Trial License 


6 





$15.00 


$ 


90.00 


3304-61-07-40 


Taking of Carp and Suckers 
for Sale 












3304-61-08-40 


Quail for Training Dogs 














Initial 


14 


@ 


$ 7.50 


$ 


105.00 




Renewal 


60 


@ 


$ 5.00 


$ 


300.00 


3304-61-10-40 


Commercial Shooting Preserves 


14 


o 


$50.00 


$ 


500.00 


3304-61-11-40 


Trapping of Certain Birds 




@ 


$ 5,00 


$ 


200.00* 


3304-61-12-40 


Mounting Permit 


7 


Q 


$ 2.00 


$ 


14.00 


3304-64-01-40 


Game Tags 


7315 





$ .05 


$ 


365.75 




Fish Tags 


18100 





$ .01 


$ 


181.00 


3304-61-13-40 


Special Field Trial Permit 


28 


@ 


$15.00 


$ 


420.00 


3304-61-14-40 


Special Permits 














Bear 


309 


@ 


$ .50 


$ 


154.50 




Deer (Landowner /farmer) 


349 





$ .50 


$ 


174.50 




. 


Total 




$10 


,985.25 



-34- 



■ 



■ 



m 



DEPOSITS Detail Sheet No. 2 

Fiscal Year 1 July 1974 to 30 June 1975 



3304-61-01-40 


Trap Registration 














Initial 


252 


@ 


$ 2.00 


$ 


504.00 




Renewal 


341 


@ 


$ 1.50 


$ 


511.50 




Duplicate 


4 


Q 


$ 1.00 


$ 


A. 00 


3304-61-02-40 


Fur Buyers 














Resident Citizen 


27 





•515.00 


* 


405.00 




Non-Res ident or Allen 


8 


@ 


$50.00 


$ 


400.00 


3304-61-03-40 


Taxidermist 


102 


Q 


$10.00 


$ 1 


,020.00 


3304-61-04-40 


Propagators 














Special Purpose Permit 


169 


@ 


$ 1.00 


$ 


169.00 




Class 1 (Special Fish) 














Initial 


17 


@ 


$ 7.50 


$ 


127.50 




Renewal 


154 


@ 


$ 5.00 


$ 


770.00 




Class 3 (Fish) 














Initial 


6 


@ 


$ 7.50 


$ 


45.00 




Renewal 


72 


@ 


$ 5.00 


$ 


360.00 




Class 4 (Birds and Mammals) 














Initial 


113 


@ 


$ 7.50 


$ 


847.50 




Renewal 


416 


@ 


$ 5.00 


$ 2 


,030.00 




Duplicate 


1 


@ 


$ 1.00 


$ 


1.00 




Class 6 (Dealers) 














Initial 


3 


@ 


$ 7.50 


$ 


22.50 




Renewal 


60 


@ 


$ 5.00 


$ 


300.00 




Additional 


330 


@ 


$ 1.50 


$ 


570.00 




Duplicate 


3 


@ 


$ 1.00 


$ 


3.00 




Class 7 (Individual Bird or Mammal) 














Initial 


27 


(3 


$ 3.00 


$ 


81.00 




Renewal 


51 


(a 


$ 1.00 


$ 


51.00 




Importation Permit 














Fish 


42 


@ 


$ 5.00 


$ 


210.00 




Birds and Mammals 





@ 


$ 5.00 






3304-61-05-40 


Take Shiners 


137 


<a 


$ 5.00 


$ 


685.00 


3304-61-06-40 


Field Trial License 


5 


@ 


$15.00 


$ 


75.00 


3304-61-07-40 


Taking of Carp and Suckers For Sale 





e 


$10.00 






3304-61-08-40 


Quail for Training Dogs 














Initial 


20 


Q 


$ 7.50 


$ 


150.00 




Renewal 


48 


@ 


$ 5.00 


$ 


240.00 


3304-61-10-40 


Commercial Shooting Preserves 


14 


@ 


$50.00 


$ 


700.00 


3304-61-11-40 


Trapping of Certain Birds 





@ 


$ 5.00 






3304-61-12-40 


Mounting Permit 


5 


@ 


$ 2.00 


$ 


10.00 


3304-64-01-40 


Game Tags 


632 


@ 


$ .05 


$ 


316.40 




Fish Tags 


15 , 800 


@ 


$ .01 


$ 


158.00 


3304-61-13-40 


Special Field Trial Permit 


34 


@ 


$15.00 


$ 


510.00 


3304-64-01-40 


Commercial Shooting Preserve 
Pheasant tags s posters 


725 


@ 


$ .05 


$ 


36.25 


3304-61-14-40 


Special: Bear (320); Deer (393) 


713 


@ 


$ .50 


$ 


356.50* 


3304-61-04-40 


Class 9 Falconer License 


2 


C 


$25.00 


$ 


50.00 




Class 10 Raptor Breeding and 


3 


@ 


$25.00 


$ 


75.00 




Salvage License 












3304-69-99-40 


Miscellaneous Donation 








$ 
$11 


3.00* 
,847.15 



* Included in summary figures. 



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