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Full text of "The "M" book of the University of Maryland"

^^ 



LIBRARY— COLLEGE PARK 




HEADQUARTERS 
for U. of M. 



The WILLARD 

Pennsylvania Avenue, 

14th and F Sts., 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



UNEXCELLED FACILITIES for 
BANQUETS and 
ENTERTAINMENTS 

Hosts to the '31 Jr. Prom. 

DELIGHTFUL COFFEE SHOP 

IVith Moderate Prices 
A la Carte Service 

Also Special Luncheon at $1.00 
Special Dinner at $1.25 

FRANK HIGHT, President 



IDENTIFICATION 



Name 



Home Address 



School Address 



P. O. Box _ .....Phone 



Fraternity 



In case of serious accident notify. 



Cyhe 

a 



'J/ " %ok 

of the 

L{nLversLtij of ^JHarijlaYLO 

1931- f 932 

Editor-in-Chief Stewart A. Collins 

Women's Editor Virginia Cronin 

Business Manager...-Lawrence J. Powers 

Associ3,te Editor Irvin O. Wolfe 

Supervising Editor -William H. Hottel 

STAFF 

Albert Benjamin Roome Gibson 

Alma Blandford Sannye Hardiman 

Marie Brueckner Arthur Pittaway 
Howard Stier 

VOLUME IV. 

Published Annually under the auspices 
of the University of Maryland Christian 
Association, College Park, Maryland. 



To You, the Class of '35, we present this 
"M" Book. 

It is but one evidence of our desire to assist 
you in every possible way to feel at home at 
Maryland. We hope that you may find here an 
accurate compendium of information concern- 
ing the organization and personnel of our 
university life. 

It has of course been impossible, because of 
the limitations of space, to include much 
valuable information. Where it was deemed 
advisable, we have tried to indicate where 
such information may be secured. You will 
find the M. C. A. office and members eager 
to help you in every possible way. 

In the compilation of the 1931-32 "M" Book 
the editors have had in mind not only the 
Class of '35, for whom the book is primarily 
intended, but also all other members of our 
university community who may have need of 
such a volume. It is our hope not only that 
w^e have been able to make available here 
much information needed by all, but that also, 
in a small way, we may have been able to 
incorporate something of the spirit and ideals 
of true Maryland men and women. , 

One feature of the present volume perhaps 
deserves particular mention. The map of the 
university in the center of the book is an 
innovation which we trust may prove espe- 
cially helpful to the new members of our 
Marj'land family. 

We desire to take this opportunity of thank- 
ing the many members of the faculty and 
student body, as well as firms and organiza- 
tions, who, by their generous cooperation and 
invaluable assistance have made the publication 
of the 1931-32 "M" Book possible. 

If it may be of some use to you who read 
it, our purpose will have been achieved. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Maryland Christian Association 16 

Student Pastors - - -- 20 

Romance of the University of Maryland 23 

Officers of Administration 26 

University Calendar - - -- 28 

University Regulations 30 

Infirmary Rules - 36 

Parking Regulations - - - 37 

Regulations of Student Activities 38 

Handling of Finances of Student Organi- 
zations - --- 39 

Constitution of Student Government As- 
sociation — - 42 

By-Laws of Women's Student Government 

Association — - 53 

Interfraternity Council Constitution.... 63 

Panhellenic Association — 69 

Omicron Delta Kappa — — 75 

Freshman Procedure 78 

Tips to Freshmen 79 

Fraternities 82 

Traditions 83 

Women's Traditions 85 

Map of Campus 86 

Wearers of the "M".- 90 

Athletic Records _ 92 

Maryland's Athletic Mentors 98 

Women's Athletic Association 99 

Student Publications 101 

Awards 102 

Fraternities 109 

Organizations 126 

Songs and Yells _132 

Mail Service ^^ . .^ 140 

Transportation Q.-T...Q..V-. J 141 




THANKS 

We are greatly indebted to the following 
organizations, whose co-operation has made 
this book possible: 



Omicron Delta Kappa 
Alpha Chi Sigma 
Alpha Psi Omega 
Scabbard and Blade 
Phi Kappa Phi 
Sigma Delta Pi 
Tau Beta Pi 
Alpha Zeta 
Pi Delta Epsilon 
Kappa Phi Kappa 
Chi Alpha 
Beta Pi Theta 
Theta Gamma 
Phi Sigma Kappa 
Sigma Nu 
Kappa Alpha 
Alpha Tau Omega 
Sigma Phi Sigma 
Alpha Gamma Rho 
Delta Sigma Phi 



Theta Chi 
Tau Epsilon Phi 
Phi Alpha 
Alpha Phi Sigma 
Sigma Tau Omega 
Phi Delta Theta 
Iota Nu Delta 
Alpha Omicron Pi 
Kappa Kappa Gamma 
Kappa Delta 
Alpha Upsilon Chi 
Towers Club 
Episcopal Club 
Footlight Club 
Student Grange 
Engineering Society 
The Livestock Club 
Opera Club 
Chess Club 
Presbyterian Club 



DEDICATION 

To Dr. Harry J. Patterson, whose character 
is transcendent, whose comradeship and en- 
thusiasm has been an inspiration, whose 
mature life has been devoted to the advance- 
ment of the University of Maryland, this, 
the 1931-32 Handbook, is dedicated. 




Doctor Harry J. Patterson 
Dean of Agriculture 



GREETINGS FROM THE PRESIDENT 



To the Students of the 

University of Maryland, 

On behalf of all the officers and teachers 
in the University, I extend greetings and best 
wishes and an offer to assist you in every way 
possible. A new chapter in one's life is 
opened when he or she first enters a univer- 
sity. Page after page will be written as the 
days pass. We all want the records on those 
pages to be so good that it will be a pleasure 
to review them in later years. 

Remember that countless others with no 
more ability than yours and often with even 
less, — have made good records in college. They 
overcame homesickness and discouragements. 
They selected their friends carefully. They 
did not postpone their studies. They sought 
help when it was needed. They liked their 
work because they felt that it was helping 
them to realize a great ambition. In doing 
their work well they knew they were reflecting 
credit upon their parents and upon their pre- 
paratory schools. 

A reasonable amount of time should be 
given to wholesome recreation and social ac- 
tivities, — but not too much. And the early 
spiritual training should be continued. 

The Christian Association Secretary and 
officers, the pastors of the local churches, and 
all of us who are in positions of responsibility 
want to help you. Do not hesitate to come 
and see us. 

Truly, 

R. A. Pearson, 

President. 



10 



Dr. Raymond Pearson 
President of the University of Maryland 



11 



GREETINGS FROM DEAN OF WOMEN 

To all new students entering our doors for 
the first time and to those of you who are 
returning, greetings and a hearty and sincere 
welcome. We are glad to welcome you to our 
campus and to our University. We hope the 
years spent here will be rich and fruitful. 

In order to get the most out of your college 
career you must live a well rounded life. 
Take some part in the campus activities ; how- 
ever, I would counsel you to choose wisely and 
select one or two instead of trying to spread 
yourself thin over the whole surface and take 
part in all. 

May your college years at Maryland be filled 
with such joy and contentment that you will 
look forward with eager anticipation to your 
return both as a student and as an alumnus. 
Sincerely yours, 

Adele H. Stamp. 



12 





Adele H. Stamp 
Dean of Women 



13 



GREETINGS FROM THE GENERAL 
SECRETARY 

It is a real pleasure to welcome every one 
of you — members of the Class of '35. Mary- 
land holds much for you. What she may be 
able to contribute to your life depends largely 
upon what you most desire and set out to 
attain. High and noble friendships await you. 
Keen intellectual adventure is yours for the 
taking. Spiritual values may become more 
real, and life take on such meaning and zest 
as you had scarcely dreamed was possible, 
during your four years of college. 

Yours is a great task. Civilization is not 
complete or fixed, but ever growing — changing. 
Grave and pressing problems are calling for 
solution. Millions whose lives have been 
dwarfed and thwarted by conditions beyond 
their control look to you for help in creating 
a social order in which more abundant life 
shall be possible for all. The task demands 
our best. I hope that many of you may come 
to know the joy of lives dedicated to a great 

cause. , . , 

It is my privilege to welcome you not only 
to the University, but particularly to its 
religious life. I hope you will quickly under- 
stand that all of the activities of the Maryland 
Christian Association and of the various de- 
nominational clubs are yours. You are invited 
to the fullest participation in each one ot 
them. We want you to help us make them 
what you would like to have them be. 

I shall count it a privilege to come to know 
personally as many of the class of '35 as pos- 
sible, and want you to feel free to call upon 
me for anything. 

Your friend, 

Virgil Lowder. 

14 




Virgil E. Lowder 
General Secretary 



15 



MARYLAND CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

The Maryland Christian Association is a 
fellowship of men and women on the campus, 
both student and faculty, who unite in the 
search for life at its best. For many in this 
fellowship the way is pointed most clearly by 
the life and principles of Jesus. All members 
of the student body and faculty who are in 
sympathy with its ideals and purpose are in- 
vited to join in the activities of this fellow- 
ship. There are no dues. 

The plans and program are determined and 
promoted by two cabinets of student mem- 
bers — one composed of men, the other of 
women students, — with the advice and aid of 
the M. C. A. Student Council, which is a 
larger body, including representatives of each 
fraternity and sorority, dormitories, day stu- 
dents, and other living groups on the campus. 
The cabinets meet separately once each week, 
and jointly once each month. The Council 
meets monthly. In all of their work the Cab- 
inets and Council have the advice and help of 
the General Secretary. 



The General Secretary 

Mr. Virgil E. Lowder, the General Secre- 
tary, is a graduate of Lynchburg College, 
Virginia. In addition to the work for his 
A. B. degree, Mr. Lowder has had two years 
of graduate work at Yale, and has taken 
several courses in education at Columbia Uni- 
versity. Besides considerable experience in 
religious work, Mr. Lowder has been interested 
in athletics. For two years he coached basket- 
ball, baseball, and tennis at one of the oldest 
preparatory schools in New England — the Hop- 
kins^ Preparatory School in New Haven, Con- 
necticut, where his teams achieved such suc- 
cess that he was made Director of Athletics. 

16 



Mr. Lowder was called to Maryland last 
September to assume the leadership of the 
religious work on the campus, and since that 
time rapid strides have been made toward 
the development of an active student religious 
fellowship. 

Advisory Board 

The work of the M. C. A. is given an added 
permanence and stability by the aid of an 
Advisory Board of twenty-one members, com- 
posed of prominent faculty members, alumnae, 
and friends of the work. This board advises 
on all the activities of the Association. The 
constituency of the Board for the year 1931-32 
is as follows : 

Dr. William B. Kemp, Chairman 

Dean Harry J. Patterson, Treasurer 

Prof. Earl S. Bellman, Secretary 

Dr. Albert F. Woods 

Rabbi Edward L. Israel 

Mr. Coleman Jennings 

Dean Marie Mount 

Dean Adele Stamp 

Dr. Harold F. Cotterman 

Dr. A. E. Zuker 

Mr. Geo. F. Pollock 

Prof. Geary Eppley 

Dr. Charles E. White 

Dr. Ronalds Taylor 

Rev. B. A. Matzen 
and six students to be elected after the open- 
ing of the school year. 

Freshman Work 

One of the most significant phazes of the 
Christian Association work is its service to 
Freshmen. This year, in connection with the 
Retreat of the two Cabinets, a selected group 
of Freshmen were invited to meet at Kamp 
Kahlert, on West River, for two days prior 
to the opening of school. A number of lead- 

17 



ing students and faculty members acted as 
leaders and speakers at the camp. Here the 
Freshmen have a wonderful opportunity for 
forming friendships and for facing some of 
the problems and opportunities of college life. 
The members of the association assist the 
Freshmen in many ways during the difficult 
first days of school, and at all times during 
the year. 

Social Activities 

During the year the M. C. A. conducts a 
number of social events as need arises. The 
first of these comes on the opening night of 
school, and is designed to aid the Freshmen 
to become acquainted with each other, and 
with some of the leaders in university life. 
The next big social event is the Maryland 
Mixer, which comes the second Friday of the 
school year. Here everyone has the time of 
his life, and gets acquainted with members of 
all the other classes and the faculty. Anyone 
who has ever attended a Maryland Mixer 
doesn't want to miss another one. 

Sunday Evening Meetings 

The M. C. A. conducts a Sunday Evening 
meeting and forum in the Home Ec Social 
Room each Sunday evening. Here prominent 
speakers are heard and many of those present 
join in the discussion. There is also good 
music, and a variety of interesting features. 
The programs are in charge of a student 
committee, who present a variety of interest- 
ing programs. 

Speakers and* Discussions 

One of the most important services ren- 
dered by the M. C. A. is that of bringing 
notable speakers to the campus to give ad- 
dresses and lead discussions on vital topics. 
Series of discussions are held from time to 
time on topics of interest to students. 

18 



WOMEN'S CABINET 

President — - Catherine Crawford 

Vice-President Dorothy Lane 

Secretary - Catherine Bixler 

Treasurer Catherine Leurs 

The Y. W. C. A., the woman's division of 
the M. C. A., was organized in 1924 and has 
become an active and enterprising group. Its 
aims are to create a spirit of fellowship and 
co-operation among the women students, to 
aid in formulating worthwhile ideals, and to 
help form strong Christian characters. 

Working in co-operation with the men's di- 
vision of the M. C. A. and with the inval- 
uable assistance of Mr. Virgil Lowder, the 
year 1930-1931 has been an exceptionally fine 
one. Some of the activities were : the Big 
Sister movement, the Maryland Mixer, the 
Good Will Seminar, and the sponsoring of 
excellent speakers. A Sunday evening vesper 
hour was also inaugurated. 

The Y. W. C. A. wishes to extend its 
greetings to the new students and invites them 
to join us in a wide awake, active organiza- 
tion. 

The Committee Chairmen are : 

Freshmen ._ —.Rachel Hoist 

Program Ruth Curtis 

Publicity _— Frances King 

Handbook Virginia Cronin 

Sunday Evening Hope Colborn 

Social — _ _ Sannye Hardiman 

Literature — Gertrude Nichols 

World Fellowship Elsie Stanforth 



19 



STUDENT PASTORS AT MARYLAND 



Baptist — Rev. B. P. Robertson, 17 Park Ave., 
HyattsviUe, Hy. 1003. 

Lutheran — Rev. Sam H. Kornmann, 1928 Kear- 
ney St., N.E., D. C. No. 4467. 

Methodist Episcopal — Rev. Herman McKay, 21 
Fawcett St., Kensington, Kens. 56-J. 

Methodist Episcopal (South) — Rev. C. I. 
Flory, 115 Maryland Ave., HyattsviUe, Hy. 

474. 

Presbyterian — Rev. B. A. Matzen, Berwyn, 
Ber. 20-W. 

Protestant Episcopal — Rev. Ronalds Taylor, 418 
Harvard Ave., College Park, Ber. 123. 

Roman Catholic — Rev. Leo J. Fealey, Berwyn, 
Ber. 60. 



20 



AD/i</M»$n^ATlON 





22 



THE ROMANCE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF 
MARYLAND 

1807—1856—1920, dates on the seal of the 
University of Maryland, are imbued with a 
story of progress that reads almost like a 
romance. 

In 1807 the College of Medicine, fifth oldest 
in the country, and the projenitor of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, was chartered, and its be- 
ginning marked a great step not only in the 
history of the State but one well in keeping 
with the vast progress of the nation in educa- 
tion. This charter of the College of Medicine 
of Baltimore was changed in 1812 to become 
the University of Maryland. 

1856 marked the chartering of the Maryland 
Agricultural College at College Park, second 
Agricultural College of the Western Hemi- 
sphere. This small college, though still in its 
early stages of existence, was one of the few 
to keep open in those precarious days of the 
Civil War, when the State of Maryland was 
torn by conflicting armies. 

In 1920, by Act of Legislature of the State 
of Maryland the present University of Mary- 
land was formed by the merging of the Mary- 
land State College at College Park and the 
University of Maryland at Baltimore, forming 
the strong institution now known. 

Many changes took place between the dates 
mentioned, one being the empowerment con- 
ferred by the State to the School of Medicine 
to "Annex other departments" and become the 
University of Maryland. The Dental College, 
then the first in the world, was added. 

1862, by Act of Congress, the Agricultural 
College was partially taken over by the State 
and named beneficiary of the Land Grant Act. 
It was entirely taken over by the State in 
1914, and in 1916 granted a charter as the 
Maryland State College. 

23 



THE COLLEGE PARK BRANCH 

The College Park Branch of the University 
is made up of the five colleges : Agriculture, 
Arts and Sciences, Education, Engineering 
and Home Economics, and also the Graduate 
School and Summer School. 

Maryland's Agricultural College is the sec- 
ond oldest in the Western Hemisphere and 
there are to be found there some of the 
original experimental plots started in 1888 still 
being farmed. 

The last ten years have seen an almost 
amazing advancement in this branch of the 
University. With a campus seriously handi- 
capped by the burning of its most important 
buildings and vsrith only a few inadequate 
structures to care for the students, a decade 
ago, a new university has grown in place of 
the old. 

With the advent of co-education in 1920, 
new arrangements were made to care for the 
girls until today there are, beside Gerneaux 
Hall, the "Y" Hut, a new Dormitory, Field 
House and refurbished Home Economics Build- 
ing and a Practice House for Home Eco- 
nomics. For the men : Sylvester Hall, Ritchie 
Gymnasium. Other buildings added in the 
past ten years include the Stadium, Field 
House, Dairy Building, Addition to the En- 
gineering Building, Horticultural Building, 
Library, Chemistry Building, Dining Hall and 
Central Heating Plant. 

Steadily increasing with the growth of the 
facilities the student body has well doubled 
itself. With a total of 300 students in 1915 
the count has grown to well beyond the 1500 
mark for last year. 



24 



THE BALTIMORE BRANCH 



The group of buildings located at the corner 
of Lombard and Greene Streets provides the 
available housing for the Baltimore division of 
the University. There are no grounds other 
than the sites of these buildings. The group 
comprises the original Medical School building 
erected in 1814, the University Hospital, the 
Law School building, and the School of Phar- 
macy which is located at 6 and 8 South Greene 
Street, in close proximity to the other three 
buildings. The enrollment in the Baltimore di- 
vision is close to sixteen hundred, which is 
about three hundred more than the undergrad- 
uate enrollment at College Park. The total 
number of students in the University of Mary- 
land, including the Summer school and the 
Graduate school is thirty-seven hundred. 

The School of Medicine of the University of 
Maryland is one of the oldest foundations for 
medical education in America, ranking fifth in 
point of age among the medical colleges of the 
United States. In the school building at Lom- 
bard and Greene streets in Baltimore was 
founded one of the first medical libraries and 
the first medical college library in America. 

Here for the first time in America, dissecting 
was made a compulsory part of the curriculum ; 
here instruction in Dentistry was first given 
(1837), and here was first installed independent 
chairs for the teaching of diseases of women 
and children (1867), and of eye and ear 
diseases (1873), 

The Baltimore College of Dental Surgery was 
chartered by the Maryland Legislature Febru- 
ary 1, 1840. It was the first institution ever 
organized to offer instruction in the art and 
science of dentistry. It has continued with an 
unbroken record and remains the oldest dental 
school in the world. 

25 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



Raymond A. Pearson, M.S., D.Agr., LL.D., 
President. 

H. C. Byrd, B.S., Assistant to the President ; 
Director of Athletics. 

H. J. Patterson, D.Sc, Director of the Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station ; Dean of the 
College of Agriculture. 

T. B. Symons, M.S., D.Agr., Director of the 
Extension Service. 

A. N. Johnson, S.B., D.Eng., Dean of the 
College of Engineering. 

T. H. Taliaferro, C.E., Ph.D., Dean of the 
College of Arts and Sciences. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Dean of the School 
of Medicine. 

Henry D. Harlan, LL.D., Dean of the School 
of Law. 

Roger Howell, A.B., LL.B., Ph.D., Assistant 
Dean of the School of Law. 

E. Frank Kelly, Phar.D., Advisory Dean of 
the School of Pharmacy. 

Andrew G. DuMez, Ph.D., Dean of the School 
of Pharmacy. 

T. O. Heatwolb, M.D., D.D.S., Secretary of 
the Baltimore Schools. 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., Dean of the School 
of Dentistry. 

26 



W. S. Small, Ph.D., Dean of the College of 
Education. 

M. Marie Mount, M.A., Dean of the College 
of Home Economics. 

C. O. Appleman, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate 
School. 

Adele H. Stamp, M.A., Dean of Women. 

Alvan C. Gillem, Major Inf., Professor of 
Military Science and Tactics. 

Maude F. McKenney, Financial Secretary. 
W. M. Hillegeist, Registrar. 

Alma H. Preinkert, M.A., Assistant Regis- 
trar. 

Leonard Hays, M.D., University Physician. 

H. L. Crisp, M.M.E., Superintendent of Build- 
ings. 

T. A. HuTTON, A.B., Purchasing Agent and 
Manager of Students' Supply Store. 

Grace Barnes, B.S., B.L.S., Librarian (College 
Park). 

Ruth Lee Briscoe (Mrs.), Librarian (Balti- 
more) . 



27 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

1931-32 

COLLEGE PARK 



First Semester 

1931 

Sept. 15-16, Tues.-Wed. — Registration for 
Freshmen. 

Sept. 17, Thurs. — Upper Classmen complete 
registration. 

Sept. 18, Fri. — Instruction for first semester 
begins. 

Sept. 24, Thurs. — Last day to change registra- 
tion or to file schedule card without fine. 

Nov. 26, Thurs. — Thanksgiving Day. Holiday. 

Dec. 12, Sat., 12.10 P. M.— Christmas Recess 
begins. 

1932 

Jan. 4, Monday, 8.20 A. M. — Christmas Recess 
ends. 

Jan. 23-30, Sat.-Sun. — First semester exam- 
inations. 



Second Semester 

Jan. 18-22, Mon.-Fri. — Registration for sec- 
ond semester. 

Feb. 1, Mon. — Last day to complete registra- 
tion for second semester without payment 
of late registration fee. 

Feb. 2, Tues., 8.20 A. M. — Instruction for 
second semester begins. 

28 



Feb. 8, Mon.^ — Last day to change registration 
or to file schedule card without fine. 

Feb. 22, Mon.— Washington's Birthday. Holi- 
day. 

Mar. 22-30, Tues., 4.10 P. M. — Easter Recess. 
Wed., 8.20 A. M. 

May 16-20, Mon.-Fri. — Registration for first 
semester, 1932-1933. 

May tl-June 1, Tues. -Wed. — Second semester 
examinations for Seniors. 

May 30, Mon. — Memorial Day. Holiday. 

May 27-June 4, Fri.-Sat.- — Second semester ex- 
aminations. 

June 5, Sun., 11 A. M. — Baccalaureate Sermon. 

June 6, Mon. — Class Day. 

June 7, Tues., 11 A. M. — Commencement. 

Summer Term, 

June 13-18, Mon. -Sat. — Rural Women's Short 

Course. 
June 22, Wed. — Summer School begins. 

Aug. 2, Tues. — Summer School ends. 

Aug. 4-9, Thurs.-Tues.— Boys' and Girls' Club 
Week. 



FINANCIAL OFFICE 

The Financial Office is located in the Library 
Building, Main Floor. 

The office hours of the Cashier, are week- 
days— 9.00 A. M.-3.30 P. M. Saturday— 9.00 
A. M.-11.45 P. M. 

29 



UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS 



Registration 

1. Students should report to the Dean of the 
College in which they are registered, where they 
will receive a course card. New students must 
present a matriculation card. If this card has 
not been received by mail, arrangements for 
its issuance must be made in the Office of the 
Registrar, prior to reporting to the Dean. 

2. The course card, properly made out and 
approved by the Dean, will be taken to the 
Cashier's Office, where fees are paid and where 
Cashier certifies on course card that payment 
has been made. 

3. The course card and directory card are 
then taken to the sectioning committee. Room 
L-107, Morrill Hall, where section assign- 
ments are made. 

4. Freshmen will be assigned to certain 
groups for the period of the special Freshmen 
Exercises, and should report to that group 
immediately. 

5. On Wednesday, September 16, the student 
may obtain Class cards in Room EE-129 — 
Library Building. 

6. The student places his name, his college, 
and the date on the class cards and presents at 
the first meeting of each class the appropriate 
class card. Students are not admitted to classes 
without claas cards. Instructors will see that 
this rule is enforced. 

7. Within seven days after the opening of 
the semester, each student must file in the 
Office- of the Registrar, a schedule of his 
classes. A fee of one dollar is imposed for 
failure to do this. 

8. Students, who for adequate reasons, are 
more than ten days late in registering must 
secure permission for entrance into courses 

30 



from the instructors in charge of the course. 
Such permission if given must be indicated on 
the course card. A fee of from $3.00 to $9.00 
is imposed for late registration. 

9. Any change in course is made only on 
written permission from the Dean involved and 
is subject to a fee of one dollar after the first 
week of the semester. After securing such 
permission from the Dean, the student must 
present the same to the Registrar at once, who, 
in turn, issues the student a class card for 
the course he is entering and withdrawal card 
is sent to the instructor in charge of the 
course from which the student is withdrawing. 
Unless this is done, no credit will be given 
for the new course, and a failure will be re- 
corded for the course dropped. In general, 
withdrawal from courses other than elctive, 
will not be granted after the first six weeks of 
the course. 

10. A student, who desires to transfer from 
one college to another must petition the Dean 
of the college from which he wishes to with- 
draw on the regular form obtained from the 
Registrar. The transfer is effected when the 
blank properly approved is filed in the Office 
of the Registrar. 

Examinations and Marks 

11. Examinations at the end of each semes- 
ter complete the studies pursued to that point. 

12. The following grade symbols are used : 

A, B. C, and D — Passing. 
E — Condition. 
F — Failure. 
/ — Incomplete. 

13. Grade. A denotes superior scholarship ; 
?rade B, good scholarship ; grade C, fair schol- 
irship ; and grade D, poor but passing scholar- 
;hip. 

31 



14. A student who receives the grade of D 
in more than one-fourth of the credits required 
for graduation must take additional courses or 
repeat courses until he has the required num- 
ber of credits for a degree, three-fourths of 
which carry a grade above D. 

15. A student with a mark of E is condi- 
tioned. The grade E indicates that though a 
student has not failed in a course, has not pre- 
sented sufficient evidence to pass ; in the opin- 
ion of the instructor his record in the course 
has been sufficiently good to justify the pre- 
sumption that he may secure a passing grade 
by re-examination or by additional work with- 
out repeating the course. The grade E cannot 
be raised to a higher grade than D. 

16. A student with a mark of F has failed 
in the course. In case of failure in a required 
course a student must repeat the course. He is 
required to enroll in that subject again the 
first time it is offered, if possible. 

17. In case a condition or failure is incurred 
in an elective subject the student may be per- 
mitted to substitute only upon recommendation 
of the head of the Department in which the 
student is majoring and approval of the stu- 
dent's Dean. 

18. The mark of / (incomplete) is given 
only to those students who have a proper ex- 
cuse for not completing all the requirements 
of a course. The mark of / is not used to sig- 
nify work of inferior quality. In case where 
this grade is given, the students must com- 
plete the work assigned by the instructor by 
the end of the first semester in which that 
subject 1^ again offered, or the mark be- 
comes F. 

19. Work of grade "D," or of any passing 
grade, cannot be raised to a higher grade ex- 
cept by repeating the course. A student who 
repeats a course for which he has received 
credit for work done at the University or else- 
where, must meet all the requirements of the 

32 



course, including regular attendance, laboratory 
work and examinations. His final grade will 
be substituted for the grade already recorded, 
but he will not receive any additional credit 
for the course. 

20. A student must arrange with his instruc- 
tors at the beginning of a semester for the re- 
moval of a condition received in the previous 
semester. A fee of $1.00 will be charged for 
each regular condition examination. No in- 
structor will give a condition examination un- 
til a student presents a receipt showing the 
fee has been paid. Following each condition 
examination the instructor will report the re- 
sults to the Registrar. 

21. A condition not removed within the suc- 
ceeding semester becomes a failure. 

22. A student transferring to another college 
will consult with his new Dean regarding the 
ad.iustment of his record. A record of this ad- 
justment must be filed in the Registrar's Office. 

Absences 

23. A student is expected to attend punc- 
tually each class and laboratory exercise in 
each course. 

24. In case of extended illness which pre- 
vents the attendance of a student at his classes 
he should promptly notify his Dean. 

25. In case of absence 24 hours before or 
after a holiday, a student will be penalized by 
the payment of a special fee of three dollars 
for each course cut. Instructors will report 
such absences immediately to the office of the 
Registrar. 

Students desiring to be excused from classes 
before and after holidays must make applica- 
tion within one week before such holiday. In 
exceptional cases, such as sickness or death in 
the family, application for an excuse must be 
made within one week after the student re- 

33 



turns. No excuse for an absence before or 
after a holiday will be granted after the 
periods specified. 



Probations and Delinquencies 

26. If a student receives a mark of failure 
(F) in fifty per cent or more of the semester 
hours for which he is registered he is auto- 
matically dropped from the rolls of the Uni- 
versity. 

27. A student who does not make a passing 
mark in at least eight hours of work in which 
he is enrolled for a given semester, may not 
continue for the next semester without the per- 
mission of his Dean. Where such permission is 
given the student is on probation, and remains 
on probation until his deficiencies are removed. 
A notice of his probationary status will be 
mailed to the student's parent or guardian. 

28. A student while on probation shall not 
represent the University in any extra-curric- 
ular activity such as : participation in athletic 
contests, the Glee Club, dramatics, debating 
teams, etc. 

29. While on probation a student is required 
to report weekly to his Dean or faculty advisor 
with regard to his probationary status. 

30. The Dean shall recommend to the Presi- 
dent the withdrawal of any student who, in 
the opinion of his college faculty, is deemed 
undesirable, or who continues to do unsatisfac- 
tory work. 

31. Any student who has been dropped from 
the University or has withdrawn in order to 
avoid being dropped, and who is subsequently 
readmitted, is not eligible to represent the Uni- 
versity on any team, club, or association, until 
he has been in the University for a period of 
one semester from the date of his return and 
has satisfied the regular conditions of eligibil- 
ity. 

34 



Withdrawal from the University 

32. A student who desires to withdraw from 
the University must obtain the permission of 
his Dean on the regular form obtained from 
the Registrar and must have filled out a clear- 
ance slip. After these forms have been filled 
out they must be filed in the Oifice of the 
Registrar. A student who withdraws without 
following this procedure forfeits all claims 
for reimbursements, and is not entitled to a 
statement of honorable dismissal. 



UNIVERSITY MEN and WOMEN 

■ — are — - 

ALWAYS WELCOME 

— at the — 

Hyattsville M. E, Church 
South 

Maryland Ave. and Marion St. 
(Boulevard at north end R. R. bridge) 

Sunday Services : 

Public Worship 11 a. m., 8 p. m 

Sunday School 9.30 a. m. 

Epworth League 7.15 p.m. 

35 



INFIRMARY RULES 



1. All students paying the fixed University 
charges, who report at the Infirmary will be 
given medical attention, infirmary services and 
medicine, except for special conditions, such as 
major operations, eye, ear, nose work, etc. 

2. Students in need of dispensary service 
should report at the Infirmary between 8.00 and 
10.00 A. M., 12.00 and 1 P. M., and 6.00 and 
7.00 P. M. 

The University Physician is present at the 
noon sick call 

3. Students residing in fraternity and soror- 
ity houses will be treated by the University 
Physician the same as students living on the 
campus. 

When practicable, sickness should be reported 
before 9 A. M., to the University Physician 
(Phone Berwyn 68), or the Infirmary (Ber- 
wyn 85M). 

4. Students living at home, with relatives or 
guardians shall not be entitled to medical at- 
tention in their homes unless injured in some 
form of University activity. 

5. Students residing in fraternity, sorority 
or boarding houses may, upon order of the 
University Physician, be cared for in the in- 
firmary. Such students shall pay the Uni- 
versity an extra charge of $1.00 per day to 
cover cost of food and service from the Dining 
Hall. 

6. The University Physician will give med- 
ical supervision and treatment to employees 
(but not their families) of the University who 
work in the kitchen, dining hall, dormitories 
and dairy. 

7. Members of the faculty, clerical force, and 
students not paying fixed charges shall not be 
entitled to free treatment or medical attention 
by the University Physician or nurse, or to 
have the use of he Infirmary. 

36 



PARKING REGULATIONS 

The Automobile Parking Regulations are for 
the purpose of protecting the appearance of 
our campus as well as for personal safety and 
convenience. These regulations, that have 
been in operation for the past year, have been 
found very beneficial to our campus. The fol- 
lowing are the regulations proposed by the 
Campus Parking Committee and approved by 
the Administration : 

Automobiles should not be parked or 
stopped on any of the campus roads, except 
to take on or discharge passengers. Spaces 
to be used by the students for the parking 
of automobiles are designated as follows : 
Women Students — Area north of the County 
Road and adjacent to the road leading to 
Gerneaux Hall, except spaces No. 200-205 
and 222-224, inclusive. For those living in 
Gerneaux Hall use parking space on north 
side of road at the rear of the building. 
Men Students — Area in the rear of Sylvester 
and Calvert Hall, except spaces No. 300- 
312, inclusive. 
Temporary Parking for both Men and 
Women — On north side of the County Road 
in rear of the Engineering, Agricultural 
and Chemistry Buildings, except that por- 
tion marked "Reserved", in the rear of 
the Engineering Building. 
An officer of the Maryland State Police 
has been detailed to assist in maintaining 
these regulations, which are essential for 
property and personal safety as well as con- 
venience. Any student who fails to observe 
these regulations may be deprived of the 
use of his car and driving privileges on the 
campus and continued violations may mean 
suspension from the University. 
The responsibility for parked cars rests with 
the car owner. 

37 



REGULATION OF STUDENT ACTIVITIES 



Association of students in organized bodies, 
for the purpose of carrying on voluntary stu- 
dent activities in orderly and productive ways, 
is under the supervision of the Committee on 
Student activities, except those which are con- 
trolled by a special board or faculty committee, 
are under the supervision of the Committee on 
Student Affairs, subject to the approval of the 
President. Such groups are formed only with 
the consent of the Committee on Student Af- 
fairs and the approval of the President. With- 
out such consent and approval no student or- 
ganization which in any way represents the 
University before the public, or which purports 
to be a University organization or organization 
of University students, may use the name of 
the University in connection with its own name, 
or in connection with its members as students. 
Eligibility to Represent the University 

Only students in good standing are eligible 
to represent the University in extra-curricular 
contests. No student while on probation may 
represent the University in such events as ath- 
letic contests, glee club concerts, dramatic per- 
formances, and debates. 

Discipline 

In the government of the University, the 
President and faculty rely chiefly upon the 
sense of responsibility of the students. The 
student who pursues his studies diligently, at- 
tends classes regularly, lives honorably and 
maintains good behavior, meets this responsi- 
bility. In the interest of the general welfare 
of the University, those who fail to maintain 
these standards are eliminated. Students are 
under the direct supervision of the University 
only when on the campus, but they are respon- 
sible to the University for their conduct wher- 
ever they may be. 

38 



HANDLING OF FINANCES OF STUDENT 
ORGANIZATIONS 

A committee on associated student organiza- 
tions and activities, appointed by the Council 
of Administration, comprised of members of the 
faculty and staff, acts as advisers to the various 
organizations and as auditors of accounts. 

Any organization or activity handling $200.00 
or more during the year comes under the super- 
vision of the committee, and is subject to all 
rules and regulations laid down by it. 

Each organization has its own business man- 
ager, secretary and treasurer, who are required 
to submit reports of all transactions to the 
chairman of the committee as he may call for 
them. 

No expenditures exceeding $10.00 shall be 
made without the approval of the chairman of 
the committee, requests for such expenditures 
to be submitted to him with a statement as 
to funds on hand, or in ^ght, to cover the 
expenditure. 

A simple and uniform system of bookkeeping 
is employed by each organization. These books 
are open for inspection by the committee on 
student organizations and activities at any time, 
and submitted to it at the close of each semes- 
ter for audit. (A representative from the Uni- 
versity business office assists in this audit.) 

Written contracts are made by all organiza- 
tions for transactions involving $25.00 or more, 
and copies of these contracts are submitted to 
the chairman of the committee for approval 
before they are signed. 

Officers of all organizations furnish bonds for 
the faithful performance of their duties. Such 
bonds must be approved by the committee, and 
kept on file in the University business office. 

At the close of each year, financial state- 
ments, after being audited by the committee, 
showing all receipts and expenditures for the 
year are published in the Diamondback. 

39 



(^ovtf[miHr 




41 



CONSTITUTION OF THE STUDENT 
GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION 



PREAMBLE 



We, the Student Body of the University of 
Maryland, do believe that, in order to learn 
the responsibilities of citizenship, we should 
take upon ourselves the burdens of Student 
Government. 

By assuming this burden it will benefit us 
and we shall be a benefit to our Alma Mater ; 
and in agreement with the Faculty of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, we do organize Student 
Government as outlined by this Constitution. 

ARTICLE I.— Name. 

The name of this organization shall be The 
Student Government Association of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 

ARTICLE U.— Purpose. 

The purpose of this organization shall be : 

A. To conduct Student Government ; 

B. To handle all matters of student problems 
with the idea of promoting honorable conduct. 

ARTICLE III.— Membership. 

All regularly enrolled undergraduate students 
are eligible to membership in the organization. 
ARIICLE IV. — Representation. 

A. The officers of this organization shall be : 

1. The President, elected from the incom- 
ing Senior Class ; 

2. The Vic-President, elected from the in- 
coming Senior Class ; 

3. The Secretary, elected from the incom- 
ing Senior Class ; 

4. The Treasurer, elected from the incom- 
ing Senior Class. 

B. The upper house of this organization 
shall be : 

42 



1. The Executive Council, composed of the 
four Class Presidents and Vice-Presidents : 
one male representative and one female rep- 
resentative elected by each Class. Represen- 
tatives of the Freshman Class to be elected 
as soon as the class is organized. 

2. There shall be two Sub-Executive Coun- 
cils : 

a. One Sub-Executive Council, composed 
of male members of the Executive Council : 

b. One Sub-Executive Council, composed 
of all female members of the Executive 
Council and officers' of the Women's Stu- 
dent Government, the chairman thereof to 
be the President of the Women's Student 
Government. 

C. The lower house of this organization shall 
be : 

1. The Student Congress, composed of at 
least one Representative from each men's and 
women's fraternity house, each women's dor- 
mitory, each floor of Silvester Hall, each sec- 
tion of Calvert Hall, each men's dormitory 
having a major fraction of thirty and from 
men and women living off of the campus. 

2. Each unit shall be entitled to one rep- 
resentative for each multiple of thirty stu- 
dents and major fraction thereof. 
Adopted May, 1929. 

ARTICLE V. — Advisory Board. 

The Faculty Committee on Student Affairs, 
which by University Regulation has supervision 
over "all organized student activities, except 
those which are controlled by special board or 
Faculty Committees," shall constitute the Ad- 
visory Board of the Student Government Asso- 
ciation. 

ARTICLE YI.— Annual Meetings. 

There shall be one annual General Assembly 
at the first meeting in May of the Student Con- 

43 



gress for the installation of officers and the 
reading of the annual report. 

BY-LAWS 

ARTICLE I. — Duties of Officers. 

Section 1. The President of the Student Gov- 
ernment Association shall preside at all meet- 
ings of the General Congress and shall be Sec- 
retary "ex-officio" of the Executive Council, 
but shall not have a vote therein. He shall 
present at the annual meeting of the General 
Assembly in May a report of the work of the 
Student Government Association during the 
preceding year. He shall appoint all special 
committees unless otherwise specified, in the 
motion providing for such special committees 
and fill all vacancies in standing committees 
not otherwise provided for in the By-Laws. He 
shall see that accurate minutes are kept of 
meetings of the Congress and of all Sub-Com- 
mittees, and that copies of the same are sub- 
mitted regularly to the Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Student Affairs. 

Sec. 2. In the absence of the President the 
Vice-President shall perform the duties of that 
office. The Vice-President shall preside at all 
meetings of the Executive Council. 

Sec. 3. The Secretary shall keep the minutes 
of the Student Congress, conduct its corre- 
spondence, and file with the Chairman of the 
Committee on Student Affairs and President of 
the Student Government Association the min- 
utes of each meeting of the Student Congress. 

Sec. 4. The Treasurer shall have charge of 
all money of the Student Government Associa- 
tion under supervision of the Committee on 
Student Finance and Auditing. 

Section V. — A. The duties of the Executive 
Council shall be : 

1. To consider all questions concerning the 

welfare of the Student body, as such ; 

44 



2. To review all costs acted upon and re- 
ferred to it by the Sub-Executive Councils : 

a. The Women's Council to handle all 
problems concerning women only ; 

b. The Men's Council to handle all prob- 
lems concerning men only ; 

3. To handle problems concerning both 
men and women ; 

4. To conduct all elections of the Student 
Government Association ; 

5. To propose and present motions to the 
Student Congress, provided that the rights 
of representatives to propose and present 
motions is not abrogated. 

B. Procedure. 

1. All decisions rendered by the Executive 
Council shall be by three-fourths vote in ju- 
dicial matters. Motions and resolutions may 
be presented by majority or minority report. 

2. The Vice-President of the Student Gov- 
ernment Association shall be President. 

3. The President of the Student Govern- 
ment Association shall be Secretary "ex of- 
ficio," whose duty shall be to keep up to 
date minutes of all meetings. 

4. All decisions of the Executive Council 
involving suspension or dismissal of indi- 
vidual students must be approved by the 
Committee on Student Affairs before being 
submitted to the President of the University. 
5. The Executive Council shall meet with 
the Committee of Student Affairs at such 
time and place as may be designated by the 
Chairman of the Committees. 

ARTICLE II.— Meetings. 

Section 1. The regular meetings of the Stu- 
dent Congress shall be held the second Thurs- 
day of every month at a time designated by 
the members, during the collegiate year, except 
when it falls on a holiday or a recess period. 

Sec. 2. Special meetings of the Congress 
shall be called by the President in the event 

45 



that important business demands immediate 
consideration. 

Sec. 3. The Executive Council shall meet the 
first and third Thursday of each month at an 
hour determined by its members. It shall hold 
special meetings at the call of its Chairman, 
or upon the request of six of its members. 

Sec. 4. Students who are not representatives 
can attend the Congress at any of its meet- 
ings, but they will have no vote. 

Sec. 5. Joint meetings of the Committee on 
Student Affairs and the Student Executive 
Council shall be held at such times as may 
be determined by the Chairmen of the two 
Committees. AH 

ARTICLE 3. — Elections. 

Section 1. All elections shall be by ballot of 
the Student Body at polls conducted by the 
Executive Council in the first week in May. 

Sec. 2. The President, Vice-President, Sec- 
retary, and Treasurer shall be nominated by 
the Executive Council. The Executive Council 
sh'all nominate not less than two or more than 
five candidates for each office. These nomina- 
tions shall be announced in the "Diamondback" 
at least two weeks prior to date of election at 
which time additional nominations may be 
made from the floor of the congress or by pe- 
tition signed by 26 members of the Student 
Body. 

1. Each candidate shall present one "snap- 
shot" of himself to the Executive Council at 
least two weeks before the election. 

2. The Executive Council must prepare 
a poster with the "snapshots" of all the can- 
didates on it and post said poster in a con- 
spicuous place on the campus at least ten days 
before the election. 

3. Place of Polls will be determined by the 
Executive Council and published at the time 
the nominees are announced. 

46 



Sec. 3. There shall be two elections by bal- 
lot, a primary and a final election. The two 
candidates receiving the highest number of 
votes on the first ballot shall be placed on the 
final ballot, and one of these two receiving 
the highest number of votes shall be elected. 

Sec. 4. The elections wiU be held at polls 
which will be open for one day from 8.00 A. M. 
to 5.00 P. M. and supervised by at least three 
members of the Executive Council, two men 
and one woman, who will remain at the polls 
all day. 

Sec. 5. Representatives to the Congress shall 
be elected by their respective sections within 
one month after they return to school in the 
fall of the year. 

1. The Executive Council shall conduct a 
census of each section within two weeks of 
their return to school in the fall. 

Sec. 6. In election of representatives to the 
Congress Students shall cast their votes in the 
section in which they reside. 

1. A representative from the Executive 
Council will conduct the election of representa- 
tives to the Congress in unorganized sections 
of the Student Body. 

Sec. 7. Only those students who are absent 
representing the University in the field of 
athletics or official student business may be al- 
lowed to vote by proxy. 

Sec. 8. The term of all officers shall be one 
year dating from the time of installation. 

1. Those elected shall be installed one week 
after election. 

Sec. 9. Nominations to fill any vacancies oc- 
curring in any office of the Student Govern- 
ment Association shall be made in accordance 
with Sections 1 to 4 inclusive of this Article. 

Section 10. Student Publications : The Fac- 
ulty Committee on Publications shall have 
general supervision of student publications. 
The recognized publications are: "The Dia- 

47 



mondback" (weekly), "The Old Line" (quar- 
terly), and "The Reveille" (annual). 

A. Only those students' who have served 
faithfully on "The Diamondback," "The Old 
Line" or "The Reveille" staff for one full 
scholastic year shall be eligible for a major 
office. 

1. The major offices on "The Diamond- 
back" staff are : 

Editor-in-Chief 
Business Manager 
Managing Editor 
Women's Editor 
Sports Editor 

2. The major offices on "The Old Line" 
staff are : 

Editor-in-Chief 
Business' Manager 
Women's Editor 

3. The major offices on "The Reveille" Staff 
are: 

Editor 

Business Manager 

Women's Editor 

B. With the exception of the Editor-in-Chief, 
and Women's Editor of "The Diamondback," 
who are appointed by the Faculty Advisor on 
Publications, all candidates for major offices 
on either publication shall be elected by the 
Student Government Association, but first they 
must be recommended to the Executive Council 
by the Faculty Advisor on Publications. All 
recommendations must be approved by the 
Executive Council before they can be placed 
before the Student Body to be voted upon. 

C. 'I'he elections for major offices shall be 
held on the same day that the Student Govern- 
ment Association officers are elected. 

D. Those elected to major offices on the pub- 
lications may be removed by the Student Ex- 

48 



ecutive Council in accordance with Article I, 
Section 5, B-1, upon recommendation by the 
Faculty Advisor of the Committee on Publica- 
tions for failure to fulfill their duties. 

E. "Diamondback." 

1. The Managing Editor and Business' Man- 
ager shall be elected from the incoming Junior 
Class. 

2. The Editor-in-Chief and Women's Edi- 
tor shall be appointed one week before the 
first meeting of the Congress in May. 

3. In case of a vacancy occurring in the 
position of Managing Editor or Business Man- 
ager through failure to return to school, or 
through resignation, or through removal, the 
Editor-in-Chief shall name a substitute who, 
with the approval of the Faculty Advisor on 
Publications, shall fulfill the duties of the of- 
fice for the remainder of the unexpired term. 

4. All other members of the staff shall be 
appointed by a committee consisting of the 
Editor-in-Chief, Business Manager, Wonien's 
Editor, and Faculty Advisor of the Committee 
on Publications. 

F. "Old Line." 

1. The Editor-in-Chief, Business Manager, 
and Women's Editor shall be elected from the 
incoming Senior Class. 

2. The other members of the staff shall be 
appointed by a committee consisting of the 
Editor-in-Chief, Business Manager, Women's 
Editor, and the Faculty Advisor of the Com- 
mittee on Student Publications, from the Stu- 
dent Body at large. 

G. 'Reveille." 

1. There shall be in addition to the Editor 
and Business Manager, an Advisory Editor 
and an Advisory Business Manager, who shall 
be the Editor and Business Manager of the 
preceding annual. 

2. The Editor, Women's Editor, and the 
Business Manager shall be elected from the in- 
coming Junior Class. 

49 



3. The other members of the staff shall be 
Editor, Business Manager, Women's Editor, 
and appointed by a committee consisting of 
the Faculty Advisor of the Committee on 
Student Publications, from the Student Body 
at large. 

Section XI. Student Managership (Athletic). 
There shall be a Student Manager and Assist- 
ant Manager of each sport. The Assistant 
Manager shall be elected from the incoming 
Junior Class, automatically becoming Manager 
in his Senior Year. Elections for Assistant 
Managers shall be held at the close of each 
sport season, at a time determined by the Ex- 
ecutive Council. 

A. The Manager of each sport shall be un- 
der the supervision of the Coach of that sport 
or someone appointed by the coach. 

B. Eligibility. 

1. The candidates to be eligible for Assist- 
ant Manager of the various sports at this 
University shall be subject to the same schol- 
astic requirements as the athletes who par- 
ticipate in those sports. 

2. All candidates to be eligible for Assist- 
ant Managers in any sport must be recom- 
mended in writing by the Coach of the sport. 

3. All candidates to be eligible must 
"scrub" the entire season. (By "entire sea- 
son" is meant all the practices of the squad 
involved. ) 

4. Any candidate to be eligible must report 
within one week after the call is issued by the 
Assistant Manager. 

C. Election. 

1. The elections of Assistant Managers 
shall be placed on a four point basis : 

a. The Executive Council shall have one 
vote: 

b. The Coach of that sport shall have 
one vote (if there is no Coach, the Director 
of Athletics shall vote as Coach) ; 

50 



c. The squad collectively shall have one 
vote ; 

d. If three men are selected by the three 
groups named above, the Executive Council 
shall have the right to cast the deciding vote 
for one of the three. 

2. Two votes for any one candidate shall 
be necessary for his election. 

3. The Executive Council shall have entire 
control over the voting and shall keep secret 
all results of the voting. 

4. The Executive Council shall make its 
vote unanimous for the candidate having the 
highest rating under the following point sys- 
tem : 

a. The Candidate shall be judged upon 
the following qualifications : 

( 1 ) Scholarship Reliability 

Initiative Personality 

Industry Executive Ability 

b. A maximum of ten points shall be 
allowed for each quality. 

c. The award of points shall be made by 
motion from the floor of the Council. 

5. The squad in voting shall consider 
the candidates according to the qualities named 
above. A plurality of the squad's vote shall be 
sufficient to determine the vote allotted to it. 

Section XII. There shall be a Head Cheer 
Leader and two Assistant Cheer Leaders. One 
Assistant Cheer Leader must be a member of 
the Junior Class. The Sophomore Assistant 
Cheer Leader shall be elected at the first meet- 
ing of the Congress in May from incoming 
Sophomore Class. This Sophomore shall auto- 
matically become the Junior Assistant Cheer 
Leader in his Junior Year and Senior Cheer 
Leader in his Senior year. This Senior Cheer 
Leader shall be Chairman of the Sophomore 
Committee on Freshman Regulations. No man 
shall be eligible for Sophomore, Junior, or 
Senior Cheer Leader who is engaged in any 
conflicting activity or major sport. 

51 



ARTICLE IV. — Freshman Class Organization. 

Section 1. The Freshman Class shall be or- 
ganized by the President of the Student Gov- 
ernment Association and the Senior Cheer 
Leader within ten days after the first day of 
instruction of each year. 

Sec. 2. Any organization desiring the use of 
the Auditorium on any Wednesday night when 
a Student Government Association Motion Pic- 
ture program has been scheduled, must pay the 
sum of twenty-five dollars ($25.00) to the 
Treasurer of the Student Assembly, and must 
secure the permission of the Executive Coun- 
cil at least three weeks previous to the date on 
which the Auditorium is to be used by that 
organization. 

ARTICLE X.— Amendments. 

These By-Laws may be amended at any meet- 
ing, if they pass the Executive Council, and 
if notice has been given in writing at the pre- 
vious regular meeting, and appended to the 
call for the meeting. A two-thirds vote of 
those present shall be necessary for the adop- 
tion of amendments. 



Wells Pharmacy 

ALFRED HYATT WELLS, Phar. D. 

427 Boulevard 

RIVERDALE, MARYLAND 

Phones: Hyatts. 475-476 
52 



By-Laws of 

WOMEN'S STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

ASSOCIATION 

1. LATE LEAVES. 

The attendance at any function which does 
not permit a girl to return to her dormitory 
by 7 :30 P. M. from October 1st to April 1st, 
and by 8 P. M. during September and after 
April 1st, with the exceptions noted below, 
shall be considered a late leave. After a late 
leave a girl must return by 12 :45 to her 
dormitory. 

Seniors may have 10 :15 privilege during the 
first semester. 

Late leaves per year shall be : Freshmen, 1 
per month ; Sophomores, 2 - per month ; Ju- 
niors, 3 per month ; Seniors, 4 per month. 
Seniors without conditions or failures may 
take late leaves at their discretion during the 
second semester, provided they sign up as 
usual. Seniors not taking late leaves during 
the second semester, must be in their dormi- 
tories by 10 :15. 

Seniors graduating in February and having 
no conditions or failures may take late leaves 
at their discretion, provided they sign up as 
usual. Freshmen shall not borrow late leaves. 
Sophomores may borrow and carry over their 
late leaves provided they do not exceed 3 a 
month. 

Any girl desiring to stay away from school 
for a period longer than her number of late 
leaves will permit, must consult Miss Stamp 
and the council about borrowing extra late 
leaves. 

May 1st shall be known as "moving up" 
day at which time Juniors assume the regular 
Senior privileges. Sophomores, the regular 
Junior privileges, and Freshmen, the regular 
Sophomore privileges. 

All University functions may be attended 
without late leaves. This includes fraternity 

53 



dances held in the Park during the week-ends 
and school dances held off the campus ; it does 
not include fraternity dances held during the 
week. 

School or fraternity dances held on nights 
before or on holidays do not require late leaves. 

Girls returning from late leaves must go 
into their dormitories immediately. 

No weekend spent away from the campus 
shall count as late leaves. 

Girls staying out over weekends must have 
the place at which they are staying approved. 

Attendance to educational plays, lectures, 
«tc., in turn shall be counted as educational 
late-leaves. 

Grange trips shall also be considered as 
educational late leaves. 

Girls going to the Congressional Library 
must return to their dormitories in time to 
be in bed by 11 :00. 

Girls who are employed in the Park or at 
the University may stay out to work without 
taking a late leave, provided they return to 
their dormitories in time to be in bed by 
10 :30. Only those girls who are taking care 
of children in the park may stay out until 
12:45 without taking a late leave. In case 
they cannot return to their dormitories by 
12 :45 they must get an excuse from the 
people whose children they are caring for, 
explaining why they could not get in sooner. 
They must be brought home. 

During examination week, girls may go 
home if they have no examinations the fol- 
lowing day and that will not count as a late 
leave. During examination weeks girls not 
having examinations the following day may 
have 10:15 leaves. 

Late leaves may be substituted for light- 
cuts and if a girl returns early from a late 
leave she may use her light for the same 
purposes as a light cut until 12 :45 when her 
late leave is over. 

54 



Definite information must be put on slips 
when late leaves involve staying aviray all 
night. Girls are to sign their own late leave 
slips and give address of destination when- 
ever possible, and must have the approval of 
the House Mother. 

Girls going home to vote must return to 
their dormitories by 10 :30 Tuesday night or 
be penalized a late leave. 

Girls may return as late as 12:45 after 
Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays, Easter 
holidays, and the end of the first semester. 

II. DANCES. 

It is understood that girls will return to 
their dormitories immediately after the close 
of all dances. No school dances count as late 
leaves so girls should return immediately 
after such dances. 

Girls must return from all campus dances 
by 12 :45 except the Sophomore prom, from 
which they must return by 1:15. 

The chaperons from University dances, fra- 
ternity dances and sorority dances must be 
approved by the Dean of Women. No Student 
in the dormitories may attend a non-college 
dance unless the chaperons have been approved 
by the Dean of Women. 

There shall be no dancing on Sunday. 

With permission of the House President and 
House Mother, girls remaining in their dormi- 
tories over the weekend may stay up until 
12:45 if the majority of the girls in the 
house have gone to a school function, provided 
Quiet Hour is observed from 11 P. M. to 
12:45 A. M. 

Every girl must be in by 4 A. M. Junior 
Prom night. 

A girl may stay until the end of her own 
sorority formal, but must come home imme- 
diately. She must be in at 12 :45 from any 
other formal. A non-sorority girl may stay 

55 



to one formal a year until the end, but must 
be in at 12 :45 from all others. 

Girls may stay until the end of the follow- 
ing dances but must return to their dormi- 
tories immediately after : Military Ball, Ju- 
nior, Senior German, June Ball, Inter-Fra- 
ternity Ball and Calvert Cotillon. 

Girls may go to Bill's or the Inns during 
a dance or afterwards, provided they are in at 
the specified time. 

III...House Regulations. 
I. HOUSE PRESIDENT. 

The duties of the House President shall be : 

a. To call and preside over house meetings. 
These shall be called by her at her own dis- 
cretion or at the written request of any five 
residents of her house. 

b. To be responsible for the general con- 
duct and welfare of her house in cooperation 
with the House Mother. 

c. To act as hostess of her house. 

d. To check up on girls at 10 :30 and see 
that lights are out. 

e. To see that quiet is preserved during study 
hours. 

f. To grant light cuts and to keep a record 
of those taken by each girl. 

g. To keep a record of the late leaves taken 
by each girl as shown by the late leave slips 
turned over each week to the House President 
by the House Mother. 

h. To grant special minor permissions after 
study hours begin. 

i. To appoint a girl to act in her place 
when she is absent. 

j. To authorize the payment of bills con- 
tracted by her house. 

Girls may go to Bill's after Quiet Hour 
provided they get permission from their House 
President and two girls must go together, 
stay there together, and come home together. 



Girls are allowed three-quarters of an hour 
to go to Bill's after 7 :30, provided they are 
in by 10:15. 

Two girls may go to Bill's after the fol- 
lowing campus functions, provided they are 
signed up : School movies, literary societies, 
basketball games, debates, musicales, plays, 
educational lectures, provided they return to 
their dormitories not later than 10:15. 

Girls must return to their dormitories im- 
mediately after leaving these functions or 
Bill's. 

II. 

Girls, with the exception of Seniors, shall 
be in their respective houses at 7 :30 P. M. 
from October 1st to April 1st and at 8 P. M. 
during September and after April 1st, except 
on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday nights and 
evenings before and after holidays, when they 
shall be in by 10 :30 P. M. 

Girls must return to their dormitories by 
10:15 after any athletic practice. 

A boy may study during exam week in the 
dormitories or sorority houses until ten o'clock 
with the permission of the House President 
and the House Mother. 

III. QUIET HOURS 

Quiet hour shall be observed from 8 in the 
morning until 12 noon and from 1 P. M. until 
4 P. M. daily except on Saturday and Sunday, 
when it shall be from 8 A. M. to 10 A. M. 
At night from 7 :30 on with intermission from 
10:00 to 10:30, except for Friday, Saturday 
and Sunday nights when houses must be quiet 
after 11 P. M. 

There shall be no bathing after 10:30 P. M. 
during week nights nor 11 :00 P. M. week- 
ends. 

A man may wait in the dormitories after 
7 :30 for his date, provided he observes quiet 
hour. 



Girls are allowed to visit during study hour 
if the visit is for the purpose of study. 

IV. MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS AND 
TYPEWRITERS 

Musical instruments may not be played dur- 
ing quiet hours. 

Typewriters shall come under the same rul- 
ing as musical instruments, as regards their 
operation, unless they are kept in a rocfm 
provided for them, in which room they shall 
be so far removed that they disturb no one. 

V. LIGHTS 

Lights must be out by 10 :30 P. M. except 
on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday nights and 
nights before and after holidays when they 
must be out by 11 P. M. 

Light cuts shall be allowed as follows : 
Freshmen 3, Sophomores 3, Juniors 4, Seniors 
5 per month. With permission of the House 
President and House Mother two extra light 
cuts may be granted if they think it neces- 
sary and more may be granted during exam 
week, but any taken exceeding this must be 
reported and must have permission of the 
council. These light cuts must be taken in 
the living room or in some room other than 
a sleeping room, unless both room mates are 
taking a light cut, in which case each girl 
shall be credited with a cut and the girls may 
remain in their own room. 

Before any kind of party may be given 
after 10 :30 P. M. permission must be granted 
by Miss Stamp. 

Girls may arise no earlier than 4 A. M. 

VI. ROOMS 

All rooms must be orderly by 8 :00 A. M. 

VI. REGISTRATION 

Any girl leaving College Park at any time 
shall register her destination at her dormitory. 

58 



Girls leaving their dormitory for meetings, 
library, social functions, etc., shall register 
destination at their respective dormitories. 

Freshmen girls may go to the library with 
permission of the House Director. 

With consent of the chaperon, a girl may 
attend a special committee meeting without 
taking late leaves. 

VIII. GUESTS 

Permission must be secured from the owner 
of the room for its use and from the house 
chaperon. 

IX. CALLERS 

Girls may have men callers at the dormitory 
after dinner until 7 :30 on Monday, Tuesday, 
Wednesday, and Thursday nights, on Saturday 
and Sunday afternoons, and on Friday, Satur- 
day and Sunday evenings until 10 :30. Callers 
may be in dormitories after mid-day on Sat- 
urday and Sunday. 

X. SMOKING 

Girls are not allowed to smoke or drink in 
any dormitory, on the campus, or at any 
function in any way connected with the Uni- 
versity. 

POINT SYSTEM 

The purpose of the Point System is to pre- 
vent a few girls from being overworked and 
to encourage and make it possible for more 
girls to share in campus activities. 

(Maximum: 25 points per year.) 

MAJOR 

1. President Student Govt. Assn 18 

2. Girls Editor of Reveille 18 

3. Girls Editor Diamondback — 18 

4. President Y. W. C. A... _ - 15 

5. House President 15 

6. Secretary of Grange _. - 15 

7. President of W. A. A.__ 18 

59 



8. Manager of Rifle Team 15 

9. Manager of Basketball.. _ 12 

10. Secretary Y. W. C. A 10 

11. Intercollegiate Debater _. 10 

12. President of Opera Club 10 

13. Captain of Rifle Team - 10 

14. Treasurer Y. W. C. A 10 

15. President of Theta Gamma _ 10 

16. President Le Circle Francais 10 

17. President Sigma Delta Pi 10 

MINOR 

1. Vice-President Student Gvt. Assn. 8 

2. Sec.-Treas. Student Govt. Assn 8 

3. Secretary Student Assembly 8 

4. Pres. Jr. League of Women Voters.... 8 

5. Class Rep. to Stud. Council 8 

6. Day Student Representative -.. 8 

7. Manager of Track 8 

8. Manager of Tennis — -.. 8 

9. Sec.-Treas. of Opera Club 8 

10. Pres. Latin-American Club 8 

11. Treas. Student Grange 8 

12. Captain of Basketball _ 6 

13. Sec'y W. A. A — 5 

14. Treasurer W. A. A _ 5 

15. Secretary of Literary Society 5 

16. Secretary of Dramatic Club 5 

17. Treasurer of Dramatic Club 5 

18. Sec.-Treas. of Theta Gamma.—. 5 

19. Treasurer of Literary Society 5 

20. Sec. Jr. League of Women Voters 5 

21. Treas. Jr. League of Women Voters 5 

22. Recorder of Points of Student 

Govt. Assn 5 

23. Vice-President Y. W. C. A __ 5 

24. Cabinet Member of Y. W. C. A._ 5 

25. Program committee Lit. Society. 5 

26. Reveille Staff 5 

27. Freshman reporter for Diamondback 5 

28. Sophomore Reporter for Diamondback 5 

29. Staff of Diamondback 5 

30. Organization Reporter 5 

60 



31. Secretary to Class — 5 

32. Asst. Sec.-Treas. Opera Club 5 

33. Sec. Latin-American Club 5 

34. Treas. Latin- American Club 5 

35. Secretary Le Circle Francais 5 

36. Treas. of Le Circle Francais 5 

37. Lady Asst. Lecturer of Grange 3 

38. Rec. Sec. of Episcopal Club 3 

39. Cor. Sec. of Episcopal Club - 3 

40. Vice-President of Opera Club 3 

41. Sec.-Treas. Bible Class .._ 2 

42. Vice-Pres Literary Society 2 

43. Vice-Pres. Home Econ. Club 2 

44. Vice-Pres. Bible Class 2 

45. Vice-Pres. of Class 2 

46. Vice-Pres. W. A. A 2 

47. Vice-Pres. Dramatic Club 2 

48. Vice-Pres. Jr. League of Women 

Voters 2 

49. Vice-Pres. Episcopal Club 2 

50. Vice-Pres. Latin American Club 2 

51. Vice-Pres. Le Circle Francais 2 

PUNISHMENTS 

Minor OflFenses 

Not signing up. Not being in bed by 10 :30. 
After three minor offenses — campus for 3 
days. 

Major OflFenses 

Breaking any rule other than signing up 
and being in bed on time. 

1. Returning late from late leaves: 

1-10 minutes — one weekend campus 
after 10 minutes-— one week campus 
after 15 minutes or later — special consid- 
eration by the council. 

2. Breaking Quiet Hour : 

1st offense — 3 day campus 
2nd offense — 1 week campus 

3. Taking too many late leaves : 

Take away two late leaves 

4. Smoking and drinking : 

61 



Suspension for six weeks after which a 
girl may not live in college dormitory. 

5. Violation of rule about going to Bill's : 

Privilege of going to Bill's taken away for 
2 weeks. 

6. Returning later than 10 :15 from campus 

functions : 

5 minutes — one late leave 
10 minutes — one late leave and three day 
campus. 

CAMPUS 

A campused girl shall have no social enjoy- 
ment in the dormitories outside of conversa- 
tion. That is, no dates, no dancing, and no 
playing of cards. She must go directly to and 
from classes, to the library, and to the post 
office. She shall enjoy no conversation while 
on campus, or accept no rides from anyone. 

The penalty for breaking a campus shall be 
a re-campus. 

Campused girls may attend sorority meet- 
ings. 



s9 ^m 

TERRAPIN INN 

Regular Meals 
Short Orders 

special Rates for Regular Board 
62 



THE INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL 
CONSTITUTION AND AMENDMENTS 



PREAMBLE 
(Adopted May 20, 1926) 
The name of this organization shall be The 

INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY 

OF Maryland. 

Membership in this organization shall consist 
of two representatives of each of the recog- 
nized competitive social fraternities of the 
University of Maryland ; and the purpose shall 
be to maintain a harmonious relationship be- 
tween the said University and the fraternities 
in the management of the affairs that pertain 
to fraternities ; and to accomplish this pur- 
pose, the following rules adopted by the Inter- 
fraternity Council are herewith incorporated 
as the Constitution of this organization. 

It is further agreed that the following fra- 
ternities shall be charter members of the Coun- 
cil : 

Delta Sigma Phi Theta Chi 

Sigma Nu Phi Delta Theta 

Phi Sigma Kappa Alpha Tau Omega 

Kappa Alpha Sigma Tau Omega 
Sigma Phi Sigma 

ARTICLE I. 

The officers of this organization shall be. 
President, Vice-President, and Secretary- 
Treasurer. 

These officers shall be nominated at the last 
meeting in May of each year. 

There shall be a majority vote required for 
the election of any officer. 

ARTICLE II. 

The duties of the officers of this organiza- 
tion shall be as follows : 

63 



Section 1. The President shall preside over 
all meetings ; see that order is maintained, and 
cast the deciding vote in case of a deadlock. 

Sec. 2. The Vice-President shall assume the 
duties of the President in the absence or inabil- 
ity of the President. The Vice-President shall 
also act as Chairman of all social functions. 

Sec. 3. The Secretary-Treasurer of this Or- 
ganization shall keep a true record of all pro- 
ceedings of the council and shall also have 
charge of all money belonging to the above 
Organization. 

ARTICLE III. 

The meetings of this Organization shall be 
held on the first and third Thursdays of each 
month, at 7 o'clock P. M. 

ARTICLE IV. 

This Constitution may only be amended by a 
three-fourths vote of all the represented frater- 
nities in the Council. 

ARTICLE V. 

Section 1. No fraternity shall offer a bid to 
any student who is in his first year at this in- 
stitution until 8 o'clock on the morning of 
pledge day. Pledge day shall be the first Tues- 
day in December. 

(a) A student entering this institution after 
pledge day may not be pledged until the second 
Tuesday in May. 

Sec. 2. The meaning of the word "Pledge" : 
No fraternity shall either directly or indirectly 
cause any student to commit himself in favor 
of or against any fraternity prior to pledge 
day of his first year at this Institution. 

Sec. 2. Be it further understood by the mem- 
bers of this Organization that those fraterni- 
ties desiring to offer persons bid to join their 
respective fraternities shall, on the day preced- 
ing pledge day, hand in to a designated im- 

64 



partial person, bids to those men whom they 
wish to offer the chance of joining their fra- 
ternity. These bids will in turn, at 8.00 P. M. 
pledge day, be handed to the person to whom 
they are addressed, and when he has marked 
them accepted, rejected or undecided, as he 
may choose, he shall return them to the afore- 
mentioned impartial person by noon of pledge 
day, who will in turn notify the several fra- 
ternities of the outcome of th'eir bids. 

ARTICLE IV. 

No fraternity may initiate any student un- 
less he has at least fifteen (15) units in high 
school subjects. 

ARTICLE VII. 

No fraternity may initiate any student until 
he shall have passed twelve (12) credit hours 
at the institution. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

Any student or group of students desiring to 
form a local fraternity must first submit to the 
Interfraternity Council a statement of the ob- 
ject and ideals involved, with a list of the pro- 
posed charter members. The Interfraternity 
Council within one month shall act upon the 
application and inform the petitioning group 
of its action. 

ARTICLE IX. 

A group of students, in order to become 
eligible to representation on the Interfraternity 
Council, shall be required : 

(a) To have functioned at this Institution 
for at least one year as a club. 

(b) To have functioned at this Institution 
for at least two years as a local fraternity, 
during which time it shall have abided by the 
Interfraternity Council rulings. 

65 



(c) To be a chapter in good standing of a 
competitive national, social, men's fraternity. 

ARTICLE X. 

No local fraternity shall petition for a char- 
ter in any national fraternity until after the 
group desiring nationalization has obtained the 
sanction of the Interfraternity Council. 

ARTICLE XI. 

It is herewith understood that all matters 
having relationship to the organization of fra- 
ternities and general fraternity affairs shall be 
presented to the Interfraternity Council. 

BY-LAWS 

1. All business of the organization unless 
otherwise provided for, shall be carried out in 
accordance with "Robert's Rules of Order." 

2. A representation of three-fourths of the 
total numbers of the Council shall constitute 
a quorum. 

3. Each fraternity represented at a quorum 
shall be allowed two votes. 

4. It is herewith understood by the members 
of the Interfraternity Council that any frater- 
nity which does not abide by the By-Laws of 
this Organization shall be subjected to a fine 
of twenty-five ($25.00) dollars, which shall be 
used to help defray the expenses of the An- 
nual Interfraternity Ball. This sum is to be 
posted by each fraternity on or before the 
date of the first meeting of the Interfraternity 
Council at the beginning of each year. 

It is further understood that the violating 
fraternity shall be suspended from the Inter- 
fraternity Council for one year, during which 
time the said fraternity shall abide by the laws 
of the Interfraternity Council. 

All violations of rules shall be fixed by a 
board of five (5) men representing five (5) 

66 



diflPerent fraternities exclusive of the violating 
group. These men shall be elected by and from 
the Council. 

5. Men not pledged to or belonging to any 
fraternity at the University of Maryland shall 
not become residents in any fraternity house 
except as approved by the Interfraternity 
Council. 

6. Each fraternity shall keep on file in the 
Registrar's Office a complete list, corrected to 
date, of all active and pledged members, in- 
cluding officers. 

7. Each fraternity shall keep on file in the 
Registrar's Office a complete up-to-date list of 
all men living in the chapter house. 

8. Rushing Rules. A. No fraternity shall 
hold an organized rusiM function until October 
15. Any fraternity function at which there 
are more than six first-year men present, and 
any function sponsored by one or more mem- 
bers of any fraternity in private homes, ho- 
tels, or similar places, at which there are more 
than six first-year men present, and at which 
there are no members of any other fraternity 
represented on the Council shall constitute an 
organized rush function. 

B. The time between the 15th of October and 
the beginning of the silence period shall be 
considered as the season for organized func- 

• tions. This time shall be divided into two 
equal parts during each one of which each 
fraternity shall hold not more than one or- 
ganized function. (Silence Period shall be 
from 8.00 A. M. of the day preceding pledge 
day until 12.00 noon of pledge day. During 
this time no upper-classmen may communicate 
directly or indirectly with any man who has 
attended this Institution less than one semester. 

C. During the time stipulated for organized 
rushing, no fraternity shall hold more than 
two organized rush functions. The dates for 
these functions shall be drawn by lots at some 
time previous to October 1st. 



D. Between October 15 and the Silence Pe- 
riod no fraternity shall entertain any first- 
year men after 7.00 P. M. on the nights of 
authorized functions. 

9. All Interfraternity Sports shall be gov- 
erned by the following rules : 

A. Only bona fide, active, undergraduate 
members of the fraternity chapters of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland may be eligible to take 
part in Interfraternity sports. 

B. No fraternity man may participate in 
any Interfraternity sport in which he has 
previously made an ofllicial Maryland letter. 

C. No man who has been a candidate of any 
freshman or varsity sport or who has taken 
part in a regular school game conflicting in 
season with any Interfraternity sport may par- 
ticipate in the Interfraternity sport. 

D. Any such additional questions or disputes 
as' may arise in Interfraternity sports shall be 
governed by the rules of the Southern Confer- 
ence. 

10. A standing committee of three men shall 
be appointed by the President to attend meet- 
ing of the Home and School Association of 
College Park and to report to the Council 
all matters discussed at said meetings. 

11. Any man breaking his pledge to a fra- 
ternity cannot be pledged by another frater- 
nity until one full year has elapsed. 



68 



PANHELLENIC ASSOCIATION OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ARTICLE I. Name. 

The name of this organization shall be the 
Panhellenic Association of the University of 
Maryland. 

ARTICLE II. Purpose. 

The purpose of the Panhellenic Association 
of the University of Maryland shall be : 

1. To work together for the good of the 
college and all its women. 

2. By cooperation to benefit the fraterni- 
ties of the college and to unify the interest 
of the fraternity and non-fraternity women. 

3. To regulate matters of local interest of 
women's social fraternities. 

ARTICLE III. Organization. 

1. This Panhellenic Association of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland shall be composed of two 
delegates from each chapter of the national 
fraternities represented in the institution and 
from such locals as they see fit to admit. The 
delegates from any one chapter shall be one 
senior and one junior, one of which shall be 
the president of the fraternity. 

2. Special meetings shall be called at the 
request of any chapter representative in the 
college Panhellenic, provided each representa- 
tive is notified one day in advance. 

3. These delegates shall be elected by their 
chapters to serve for one college year, assum- 
ing their duties at the May meeting. 

4. Clubs shall be admitted as local fraterni- 
ties on the unanimous vote of the Panhellenic 
Association only after they are recognized as 
such by the Senate. 

5. The name of the Senior and Junior rep- 

69 



resentative shall be filed with the Dean of 
Women and with the Secretary of the Pan- 
hellenic Association at the beginning of her 
term of office. Immediately upon receiving the 
names of the representatives, the Secretary 
shall send to each a copy of the Panhellenic 
Constitution. Familiarity with this constitu- 
tion shall be promoted by special study there- 
of at one Panhellenic meeting during the first 
week of the first semester and at the repre- 
sentative sorority meeting. 

ARTICLE IV. Meetings. 

1. Regular meetings of this Panhellenic As- 
sociation of the University of Maryland shall 
take place the first Tuesday in every month at 
4.10. 

2. Special meetings shall be called at the re- 
quest of any chapter representative in the 
college Panhellenic, provided each representa- 
tive is notified one day in advance. 

ARTICLE V. Officers. 

1. The officers of this Panhellenic Associa- 
tion of the University of Maryland shall be 
President, Treasurer, and Secretary. 

2. The officers shall be chosen in rotation, 
starting with the Nationals, then the locals, 
in order of their establishment at the Univer- 
sity to serve for one collegiate year. No. 1 
shall be President, No. 2 Treasurer, and No. 3 
Secretary. The following year No. 1 goes to 
the bottom of the list and No. 2 becomes 
President, etc. Example: 

President- 12 3 4 A O P 1 

Treasurer.- 2 3 4 1 Kappa Kappa G'ma 2 

J Secretary- 3 4 12 Kappa Delta 3 

^^ 4 12 3 Alpha Upsilon Chi.. 4 

3. The officers shall serve for a term of one 
year, the term of office to begin in May. 

4. The duties of the officers shall be those 
usually devolving upon such officers. 

70 



ARTICLE VI. Voting. 

1. A three-fourths vote shall be necessary to 
fix the date for pledge day and to make rules 
regarding rushing. A majority vote shall be 
necessary to carry all other questions. 

2. The power to vote shall be granted each 
delegate. 

ARTICLE VII. Penalties. 

1. Any chapter pledging a new girl by an 
oral or written invitation before Pledge Day 
shall be reported in writing by an officer of 
the Panhellenic Association to the Chapter 
President of the offending Chapter and to the 
Grand President and to the National Panhel- 
lenic Congress. 

PENALTY: The bids of the offending Chap- 
ter shall be given out ten days after Pledge 
Day of the same year. 

2. Any Chapter breaking the four-four rule 
(see By-Laws, Art. IV, g) shall be reported 
in writing by a Panhellenic Officer to the 
Chapter President of the offending Chapter 
and to the Grand President and to the Na- 
tional Panhellenic Congress. 

PENALTY: The offending Chapter shall omit 
one regular rush function unless the rule is 
broken later than two weeks before Pledge 
Day ; in such case the offending chapter shall 
forfeit one rush function the following year. 

3. Any Chapter breaking Silence Period shall 
have the following penalty: 

PENALTY: The offending chapter shall for- 
feit one rush function of the following year. 

4. No girl who has signed and checked ac- 
ceptance on a bid card or broken her pledge to 
one Fraternity shall be asked to join another 
for one calendar year from the date on which 
a written explanation was received by the 
sorority to which the bid had been accepted. 
(Pledging is considered binding after the sign- 
ing of the official bid.) (Breaking a pledge 

71 



shall consist in a written explanation to the 
Chapter to which the girl is pledged.) 
PENALTY: The bid of the Chapter bidding 
such a girl shall be given out ten days after 
Pledge Day of the following year. 
5. In all cases where no specific penalty is 
prescribed, the Panhellenic Association shall 
have the powe^ of fixing such a penalty. 

ARTICLE VIII. Amendments. 

1. This constitution can be amended by the 
three-fourths vote of the delegates of the Pan- 
hellenic Association of the University of Mary- 
land. 

ARTICLE IX. Scholarship Committee. 

1. An annual function shall be given in 
recognition of scholarship to all seniors hav- 
ing a 3.2 average for the entire college course. 

BY-LAWS 
I 

The dues shall be fifteen dollars ($15.00) 
a Fraternity per year, payable not later than 
January first, with special assessments when 
necessary. Fine for late payment will be 
three dollars ($3.00). 

II 

Printed copies of Rushing Rules shall be 
given to all Freshmen girls by the Dean of 
Women or the President of the University 
Panhellenic Association at the beginning of 
the scholastic year. 

Ill 

All new girls shall receive instructions by 
the Dean of Women at the beginning of the 
regular rush season, and shall have the con- 
stitution of the Panhellenic Association read 
to them at the time. 

IV 

All chapters may announce any expected 
visiting delegate and she may be asked to ad- 
dress the College Panhellenic Association. 

72 



GENERAL RUSH RULES 

A. No girl shall be asked to join a Frater- 
nity until she has matriculated. 

B. Any girl pledged to a Fraternity, but 
leaving college before she is initiated be con- 
sidered released from her pledge at the ex- 
piration of one year's absence from the col- 
lege. In case she returns, she is open to bids 
from all Fraternities. 

C. No Chapter shall initiate any girl until 
she has received a C average without Con- 
ditions or Failures for the semester preceding 
her initiation. 

D. Girls entering in the fall with advanced 
standing shall be under the same Rush Rules 
as Freshmen ; those entering at the beginning 
of the second semester may be bid at the end 
of three months. 

E. The time and length of the Rush Season 
for the following year shall be decided also at 
the regular meeting of the Panhellenic. 

F. The numiber of Rush Functions for the 
following season shall be decided also at the 
last regular meeting of the Panhellenic. 

G. A Rush Function shall consist of four 
or more Fraternity members and four or 
more rushees, and shall last not longer than 
six (6) hours. (This rule is subject to 
change.) 

H. Men shall be present at not more than 
two (2) Rush Functions. 

I. Expenses of each Fraternity for Rush 
Functions for one season shall not exceed One 
Hundred and Seventy-five dollars. ($175.00). 

J. Rush Functions in the summer shall con- 
sist of not more than two informal afternoon 
parties. Summer rushing shall last from June 
fifteenth to the day preceding Freshman Reg- 
istration. 

73 



K. There shall be a silence period in which 
no sorority shall communicate directly or in- 
directly with any new girl. Silence period 
shall begin at eight o'clock A. M. the day 
before Pledge Day and shall continue until 
twelve noon on Pledge Day. 

L. Each sorority at noon of Pledge Day shall 
give a list of the girls who have accepted bids 
to that sorority to the hands of each sorority 
and to the Dean of Women. 

M. Each girl shall receive and sign her 
preference card in a room occupied by only 
the Dean of Women and without leaving that 
room between the time of receiving the bid 
and signing it. 

N. Any sorority bidding outside of the reg- 
ular pledging season shall follow the ordinary 
rules as to notifying the other sororities and 
the Dean of Women of the acceptance of their 
bid, using a printed bid card, and receiving 
the signature of the girl, etc. 

O. All bids given out by sororities must be 
printed, or typed duplicates of the printed bid 
cards, and must be signed by the girl who is 
bid. All bids must be kept on file. 

P. These rules shall apply to all alumnae. 

VI 
The By-Laws may be amended or repealed 
by a three-fourths vote of all Panhellenic del- 
egates. 



74 



OMICRON DELTA KAPPA POINT 
SYSTEM 

Eligibility 

1. Character shall be the primary considera- 
tion for membership. 

2. The membership shall be confined to men. 

3. Only Juniors and Seniors are eligible. 

4. The candidate must have at least one ma- 
jor activity and several minor activities. 

List of Major Activities 

President of Student Government Association 10 

President of Executive Council 10 

President of Senior Class 10 

Scholarship (First four in Senior Class) 8 

Captain of Major Team (Football, Track, 

Basketball) 8 

Mgr. of Major Team (Baseball, Lacrosse).. 8 

Colonel R. O. T. C 8 

Editor and Bus. Mgr. Student Publications.. 8 

President of Junior Class 8 

President of Rossberg Club (Social Ac- 
tivity) — 8 

Oflicers of Student Assembly 8 

Officers of Student Assembly - 8 

Senior Cheer Leader 8 

Senior and Junior Representative to Execu- 
tive Council — - — 8 

Vice-President of Senior and Junior Class ... 8 
Three Letters in Major Sports in same year, 
this to be only recognition of Athletic 

Ability -.. - - -- 8 



Minor Activities 

President of Sophomore Class - -. 6 

Major R. O. T. C - - --- 6 

Junior Cheer Leader 6 

Captain of Minor Teams (Rifle, Cross 

75 



Country, Tennis) 6 

Manager of Minor Teams. 6 

President of Interfraternity Council 6 

Two or more Letters in same Major Sport 

(If Captain, it alone counts) 6 

President and Manager of Glee Club— 6 

Captain of Student Band 6 

President of Freshman Class _.,_ 4 

Sophomore Representative to Executive 

Council 4 

President of Honorary or Social Fraternity 4 

Captain R. O. T. C 4 

Other officers of School Publication Staff — 4 

Other officers of Rossburg Club 4 

President of any recognized Extra-curric- 
ular Activity 4 

Member Varsity Debating Team.— 4 

One letter in Major Sport 4 

Two or more letters in Minor Sport 4 

Chairman of Junior Prom Committee 4 

Other Class Officers 2 

Junior Prom Committee __ _ 2 

Lieutenant R. O. T. C __ 2 

Member of any Extra-Curricular Activity 

or Society for at least two years 2 

One letter in Minor Sport — 2 

Officer of Interfraternity Council ._. 2 

Member any Honorary Fraternity or So- 
ciety 2 



LIBRARY HOURS FOR 1930-31 

Monday until Friday 8.00 a. m. to 5.30 p. m. 

6.00 p. m. to 10.00 p.m. 

Saturday — 8.00 a. m. to 12.30 p. m. 

Sunday . — 2.30 p. m. to 5.30 p. m. 

6.00 p. m. to 10.00 p. m. 



76 



f C^t^MMtM 



^c -Xy^^ season/ 




77 



FRESHMAN PROCEDURE 

Freshman registration will take place Tues- 
day, September 15, beginning at 9 A. M. All 
freshmen are expected to register on this day. 
Thursday, September 17, is reserved for regis- 
trating the students of the three upper classes, 
and freshmen will not be registered on this day. 

Dormitories will be ready for occupancy by 
freshmen Monday, September 14, and the din- 
ing hall will be ready to serve dinner to fresh- 
men Monday evening at 5.30. 

Your baggage will be cared for by the Gen- 
eral Delivery Service department, basement of 
Agriculture Building. You must record on the 
baggage check where the baggage is to be de- 
livered. There is a charge of fifty cents (50c) 
on each piece of baggage delivered. It is im- 
possible to deliver all baggage the first day, 
therefore, you should arrange to bring part of 
your bedclothes with you. 

* There will be an Information Desk in the 
main hall of the Agriculture Building during 
Registration. The attendant will be glad to 
assist you as much as possible. 

A special program is planned covering the 
time between registration day, September 15, 
and the beginning of the instruction period, 
Friday, September 18, the object of which is 
to complete the organization of freshmen so 
that they may begin their regular work 
promptly and effectively on September 18. This 
program includes classification of all fresh- 
men students, medical examinations, psycholog- 
ical examinations, instruction in regard to the 
departmental and campus facilities and advis- 
ory conferences, conducted by the faculties of 
the several colleges for the students registered 
in those departments. 

* For detailed matriculation procedure, see 
Registration under University Regulations, 
page 30. 



78 



TIPS TO FRESHMEN 

Everyone at this University wishes to be 
your friend and they want to give you all 
possible assistance, but remember that you are 
a Freshman. It is apparent at all times, and 
when you attempt to hide it and appear so- 
phisticated the result is as prominent as a sore 
thumb. 

Do not imagine that you are lowering your- 
self by observing the Freshman Regulations. 
They are to impress upon you the idea that you 
are no longer a high school senior. You are 
beginning again, and as such, you must start 
"on the ground floor." By disregarding the 
rules, you are not being unique, or admired for 
your spirit of independence. You are merely 
laying the foundation for trouble with the 
sophomores. It is considered a mark of good 
class spirit, not servility, to act in accord- 
ance with freshman tradition. 

Get the speaking habit. A habitual cheery 
greeting to everyone on the campus will do 
more toward establishing your popularity than 
any other single act on your part. 

If you were a leader in high school, don't 
advertise it here. In all probability it is 
known already. Conversely, if you took little 
part in student affairs in your prep school 
don't be discouraged. Everyone is given plenty 
of opportunity at Maryland. There is at least 
one activity here that is suited to your tastes 
and ability ; find it and stick to it. Also, re- 
member that everyone cannot be a star athlete. 
Do not skip around from one activity to an- 
other needlessly, but on the other hand, do 
not waste time on one for which you find your- 
self unqualified. 

If you are living away from home don't for- 
get that the folks like to receive a letter, now 
and then. Establish a certain day for doing 
this, and then let nothing interfere. 

79 



Remember that you are your own master 
now. You have reached the age when you can 
differentiate between right and wrong. Your 
conduct on and away from the campus reflects 
upon the institution. In a large measure you 
have the good reputation of the University of 
Maryland in your hands. It remains for you 
to prove that this trust is not misplaced. 

"By your works you shall be known." No- 
where is this more true than on the university 
campus. Here at Maryland you cannot bask in 
the reflected glory of a prominent brother, 
father or other relative. Opportunities are 
yours ; make the most of them. 

Remember that when you enter Maryland 
you are considered a man. You can do as you 
please about your work ; nobody will make you 
do it. Be honest with yourself and always 
keep clearly in mind the fact that you are 
here for a life purpose. 

Don't get "wild" and waste your money ; re- 
member that there is a mother or a father at 
home who believes in you ; be a man. 

Don't fail to work hard ; it does not pay to 
get behind with your work. 

Don't study on Sunday ; you do not gain a 
thing by it ; you absolutely need one rest day 
in every seven ; don't loaf so much on week 
days, and then you will not have to study on 
Sunday. 

Don't think that profanity, cigarettes and 
drinking "booze" make a true college man. 

You will be judged more at Maryland by 
what you do than by what you say. 

Ask for advice from a faculty member ; re- 
member that he is your friend. 

Don't be afraid to say "No" and stick to it. 
There will always be company with you at 
Maryland. 

You will never "find" lime for anything — if 
you want time you must make it. 

80 



Don't pile up debts — they'll come fast enough. 

Come to the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation and let the "Y" serve you. 

Don't cut out athletics. Get into some form 
of them and benefit yourself. 

Look up your pastor as soon as possible. 

Don't cut out the literary society. Join it 
and get to work. 

Join a Bible class. This is one of the most 
important things to join as soon as you reach 
Maryland. You will like the discussions. 

Don't spend all your time with a few inti- 
mate friends, but get into sympathy with many 
of the fellows. 

Stick with that "bulldog tenacity" to any- 
thing good you undertake. 

Do all the good you can, but keep the 
knowledge of it under your hat. 

Do things in the right proportion. Don't be 
a "grind." 

Be a mixer and a credit to the college. 

Take part in student activities ; action speaks 
louder than words. 

Finally, be warned against trying to revo- 
lutionize the school in your first year. If you 
do not approve of the regulations the trouble 
is in your own disposition. They have not 
proved injurious to hundreds of students who 
have preceded you. It is your traditional duty 
to obey the rules during your freshman period, 
before you are in a position to recommend 
changes. 



81 



FRATERNITIES 



There are many advantages which may come 
to a man as a member of some social frater- 
nity, but the man who decides too hastily on 
the group with which he is to spend the four 
years of his college life will do little but re- 
pent. When a man is invited to join a certain 
fraternity, he should look forward and ask him- 
self whether its members are the ones he would 
care to associate with during his college career 
and have as fraternity brothers in after life. 
The person tendered a bid should consider it 
in a favorable light only if his ideals and the 
ideals of the fraternity which seeks him coin- 
cide. If his ideals differ widely from those of 
the fraternity, the man should be extremely 
cautious. It is not always advised, however, 
that he consider the fraternity entirely out of 
the question in this latter connection ; there is 
the possibility that he may eventually prove 
the means of raising the fraternity's standards. 

When a man accepts a bid to join a frater- 
nity, he should not be actuated solely by the 
benefits which he himself expects to derive 
from the connection. He should consider that 
as a member, he will have certain obligations 
and greater responsibilities to live up to. He 
should join with the purpose of reflecting 
credit upon his fraternity. 

Every fraternity wants its men to be among 
the most prominent in the College. This is 
one of the reasons why every new man should 
conduct himself in such a way as to improve 
the standing of his fraternity. His work and 
outside activities should do credit to his fra- 
ternity, benefit himself and bring satisfaction 
to his personal aims and ambitions. 



82 



TRADITIONS 



In the realization that the incoming fresh- 
men do not understand the traditions estab- 
lished by previous classes, it is the purpose of 
these rules to assist the freshman in finding 
his place among the students, to instruct him 
in the spirit of the student body, and to teach 
him a fundamental lesson — discipline. 

Freshmen are required to abide strictly by 
the following rules, which will be enforced by 
the student body through the Sophomore Com- 
mittee on Freshman Regulations. 

Freshman Regulations 

The following is taken from the Constitution 
of the Student Gk)vernment Association : 

"Article V, Freshman Regulations. Section 
I. The Freshman shall be governed by a stand- 
ard set of regulations drawn up by the Ex- 
ecutive Council. Section III. These regulations 
shall be enforced by the entire student body 
through the Sophomore Committee on Fresh- 
man Regulations : that is, penalties are im- 
posed by the Committee upon the complaint 
of an Upper-Classman of the infraction of 
Freshman Regulations." 

1. Freshmen must wear rat caps at all times 
when on campus. 

2. Freshmen must not smoke on the campus. 

3. Freshmen must keep hands out of their 
pockets. 

4. Freshmen must not cut across campus and 
must use only cinder and cement paths. 

5. Freshmen must refrain from wearing 
school insignia of any kind unless earned at 
this school. 



83 



6. Freshmen must enter and leave Adminis- 
tration Building by basement doors and must 
not loiter around front of the buildings. 

7. Freshmen must speak cheerfully to all 
members of the faculty, upper classmen, and 
members of their own class. The form of ad- 
dress shall be : for one person, "Sir" ; for a 
number, "Gentlemen." 

8. Freshmen must run all errands assigned 
to them by upper classmen and do all work 
assigned to them by Sophomore Committee on 
Freshmen Regulations. 

9. Freshmen must work on athletic field 
when requested. 

10. Freshmen must attend all meetings of 
the Assembly (occupying front rows) and all 
cheer practices, and must learn all college 
yells and songs. 

11. Freshmen must attend all games in a 
compact cheering section (no dates with girls 
at games). 

12. Freshmen must work in Diamondback 
office each Tuesday throughout the year. 

13. Freshmen must at all times carry an 
ample supply of matches. 

14. Freshmen must conduct themselves in a 
gentleman-like manner at all times on and 
around the campus. 



Dining Hall Courtesies 

1. Freshmen must line up in twos on lower 
steps of dining hall. 

2. Freshmen must fold their arms during 
announcements. 



84 



WOMEN'S TRADITIONS 



In order that the freshman girls may become 
acquainted with and perpetuate certain tradi- 
tions, the following list is given : 

1. It is the wish of the women of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland to help their incoming 
classmates to become acclimated to college life. 
For this purpose each one of the new students 
is adopted by an upper classman as a "little 
sister." When she arrives on the campus, she 
is greeted by her "Big Sister," who is ready 
to advise her about "the ropes." 

2. The incoming Freshman Class is expected 
to obey the "Rabbit Rules" made by the Soph- 
omore Class through the Sophomore Committee 
on Freshman Regulations. 

3. Women who excel in scholarship, leader- 
ship, citizenship and Christian character are 
eligible for the Women's Senior Honor Society 
in their senior year. On Baccalaureate Sun- 
day the outgong Woman's Senior Honor So- 
ciety selects the new organization from the 
Junior Class. 

4. Each year the Junior Class holds May Day 
celebration in honor of the Senior Class, out of 
which they select by ballot the Queen of the 
May and her four maids. 

5. On Class Day it has become traditional 
for the Senior girls to have a ceremony, 
marching around a blazing bonfire and throw- 
ing in their old books. 

6. The Women's Student Government Asso- 
ciation sends each year a delegate to the Na- 
tional Convention. 

7. The Woman's Executive Council holds an 
annual picnic at the end of the year. 

85 




UNIVERSITY BUILDINGS 

T — Agricultural Building 
A-E— Calvert Hall 
DD — Chemistry 
CC— Dairy 
H— Dining Hall 
P-Q-R — Engineering 
AA-1— Field House 
AA-2— Field House 
O — Gerneau Hall 
BB — Gymnasium 
N — Home Economics 
F — Horticulture 



I 



(Women's) 
(Men's) 

FF — Horticulture (new) 

I — Hospital 

EE — Library 

M — Librarj' (old) 




FRATERNITIES 

1 — Sigma Nu 

3 — Alpha Gamma Rho 

6 — Theta Chi 

7.— Phi Delta Theta 

8 — Alpha Tau Omega 

9 — Sigma Tau Omega 

10 — Phi Sigma Kappa 

11— Phi Alpha 

12 — Sigma Phi Sigma 

13 — Tau Epsilon Phi 

14— Iota Delta Nu 

15 — Kappa Alpha 

17— Delta Sigma Phi 
SORORITIES 
2 — Alpha Omicron Pi 
4 — Alpha Upsilon Chi 
5 — Kappa Kappa Gamma 

16— Kappa Delta 



L— Morrill Hall 
0-1 — Practice House 
Z— Silvester Hall 



AA — Stadium 

0-2 — Women's Dormitory 

J— "Y" Hut 



tVlHlEt/CS 




89 



WEARERS OF THE "M" 




Football 


Berger 

Carliss 

Chalmers 

Deckman 

Dent 

Hayden 

Keenan 


Koelle 

Krajcovic 

Norris 

Pease 

Pitzer 

Poppleman 

Rooney 




Cross Country 


Cooper 

Duncan 

Parks 


Shure 

Hammerland 

McGlathery 




Basket Ball 


Berger 
Chalmers 
Hess 
May 


Norris 

Ronkin 

Wilson 




Boxing 


Decker 
Dent 
Holloway 
Isemann 


Kenner 
Mech 
Rice 
Robbing 




Track 


Brown 

Cooper 

Flook 

Fouts 

Hawell 


Krajoovic 

O'Hare 

Reichel 

Shure 

Smith 



Lacrosse 

Deckman May 

Dixon Nicholson 

Harlan Norris 

Hockensmith Pugh 

Invernizzi Ronkin 

Lee Stieber 

Loughran Wood 



90 





Baseball 


Batson 




Gorman 


Berger 




Hauver 


Chalmers 




Maxwell 


Cramer 




Mcllwee 


Cronin 




Milburn 


Derr 




Sterling 


Garreth 


Tennis 


Wilson 


Bischoff 




Govbean 


Busick 




Wills 


Bridell 


Rifle 




Fisher 




Presley 


Gossom 




Silverberg 


Hoffman 




Spicknall 


Marshall 







u 



M" 



91 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 

Varsity 

Sept. 26 — Washington College at College Park. 

Oct. 3 — University of Virginia at College Park. 

Oct. 10 — Navy at Washington, D. C. (Grif- 
fith Stadium). 

Oct. 17 — University of Kentucky at College 
Park. 

Oct. 24 — Virginia Military Institute at Rich- 
mond, Va. 

Oct. 31 — ^Virginia Polytechnic Institute at 
Blacksburg, Va. 

Nov. 7 — Vanderbilt University at Nashville, 
Tenn. 

Nov. 21 — Washington and Lee at College Park. 

Nov. 26 — Johns Hopkins at Baltimore. 

Dec. 5 — Western Maryland at Baltimore. 
Varsity "B" 

Oct. 17 — Catholic University Frosh at College 
Park. 

Oct. 31 — Georgetow^n University Frosh at Col- 
lege Park. 

Nov. 7 — Western Maryland Frosh at College 
Park. 

Freshmen Football 

Oct. 23 — University of Virginia. 

Oct. 31 — V. M. I. Freshmen at Lexington. 

Nov. 6 — Washington and Lee Freshmen at 

Lexington. 
Nov. 14 — St. John's Freshmen at College Park. 
Nov. 26 — Navy "B" team at Annapolis. 

BASKETBALL RECORD, 1930-1931 

Md. Opp. 

Gallaudet 38 27 

Virginia Military Institute 38 18 

Washington and Lee 36 21 

Duke ...._ 32 24 

Loyola _ 30 33 

Johns Hopkins 33 20 

92 



Virginia Military Institute 44 20 

Virginia Poly — 33 16 

Virginia 31 34 

Washington and Lee - 28 17 

Catholic University 24 21 

North Carolina 33 31 

Washington College - 32 33 

Virginia — 34 21 

Western Maryland 45 35 

St. John's 32 27 

Navy 33 36 

Johns Hopkins 31 22 

FOOTBALL RECORD, 1930-31 

Md. 0pp. 

Washington College - 60 6 

Yale -- 13 40 

North Carolina - 21 28 

St. John's 13 21 

Virginia Military Institute 20 

Virginia 14 6 

Washington and Lee — 41 7 

Virginia Poly 13 7 

Navy 6 

Johns Hopkins 21 

Vanderbilt 7 22 

Western Maryland 7 

VARSITY LACROSSE 

Md. Opp. 

Georgia 20 3 

Washington College 8 1 

Western Maryland 15 

Syracuse 12 2 

Penn State 13 

St. John's ..-_ ..-.-- 2 3 

Rutgers .._ 10 3 

Johns Hopkins 8 6 

Navy .._... - - 8 1 

VARSITY TENNIS 

Md. Opp. 

American University 5 3 

Washington and Lee _ 2 1 

93 



Georgetown (rain) 

Western Maryland 4 5 

Hampden- Sidney 2 7 

St. John's _ 6 3 

William and Mary 2 7 

Virginia - 9 

William and Mary (rain) 

Hampden-Sidney 2 7 

Richmond University (rain) 
Johns Hopkins (rain) 
Richmond University (rain) 

Virginia Poly 5 4 

Georgetown _ — 1 8 

Navy _ 1 8 

Delaware ..— 7 2 

BOXING/ 

Md. Opp. 

Washington and Lee 2 5 

V. M. I. 3 4 

Washington and Lee 3 4 

VARSITY BASEBALL 

Md. Opp. 
Virginia Poly (rain) 

Washington and Lee 3 1 

V. M. I 10 1 

Georgia (rain) 

Georgia ._ 1 9 

North Carolina State 7 

North Carolina (rain) 
Penn State (rain) 

North Carolina 2-4 4-8 

Harvard - — - 8 7 

Virginia 10 1 

Washington and Lee.. 10 6 

Virginia Poly - ....9-14 4-7 

North Carolina State 3 4 

West Virginia — 6 5 

Princeton 8 

Virginia (rain) 

V. M. I - 5 7 

94 



Navy _. - 6 2 

Army - - 10 3 

Washington and Lee 5 6 

Washington and Lee 3 4 

VARSITY CROSS-COUNTRY 

Md. Opp. 

Virginia Poly — - 34 21 

Navy 37 18 

St. John's 20 35 

Catholic University - 17 38 

Johns Hopkins 19 36 

VARSITY TRACK 

Md. Opp. 

V. M. I.... 43 83 

Washington and Lee 34 92 

Virginia 30 96 

Catholic University 69 57 

Navy ._ 25 101 

William and Mary 33 92 

Johns Hopkins — 651/4 60% 



LEONBERGER MUSIC CO. 

Everything Musical 

928 New York Ave., N. W. 

Washington, D. C. 

Phone: National 3562 

95 



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98 



WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



President .__.Rhoda Hatton 

Vice-President -_ Lou Snyder 

Secretary Mary Solomons 

Treasurer ...Elizabeth Bonthrom 

Recorder of Points Florence Peter 

The Women's Athletic Association was or- 
ganized in the fall of 1924 by a small group 
of girls who realized the need of an associa- 
tion to sponsor and supervise women's athletics 
at the University. The purpose of the or- 
ganization when founded was to supervise 
girls' athletics, to promote more and better 
sports, to encourage good sportsmanship ; and 
to provide an incentive by presenting letters 
to individuals and trophies to winning teams. 

Rifle and basketball were the first sports 
which received the attention of the Associa- 
tion. Maryland is especially fond of its rifle 
team, which last year won the national wom- 
en's team championship of the United States. 
The team has also turned out four national 
individual champions. Besides the sports al- 
ready mentioned the athletic program last 
year included hockey, soccer, volley ball, base- 
ball, and track. The soccer season was con- 
cluded with a play day with George Wash- 
ington University. Under the direction of 
Miss Ball, the athletic director, individual 
sports were introduced last year. These in- 
cluded riding, hiking, golf, and archery. The 
latter was probably the most popular and ex- 
cited quite a bit of interest last spring. An 
inter-class track meet brought to a close the 
program for the year. 

The constitution of the association was re- 
vised last year, and a new and much more 
expansive point-system was drawn up and 
adopted. 



91921 



Hyattsville Hardware Co. 

CUTLERY, TOOLS AND BUILDERS' 
HARDWARE 

B. P. S. Paints, Oil and Glass 

Phone, Hyatts. 205 

S, STATELAND 

The Only Tailor in Town 

Expert Dry Cleaning 
Pressing and Repairing 

ON THE BOULEVARD 

(Next to College Inn) 
Phone, Ber. 242 

100 



/iCTlVATIES 



^ 




yiii.%)^^^ ^ 



? 



101 



STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

Each undergraduate at Maryland is required 
to pay a blanket sum of $10.00 on the day of 
registration. This provides for a year's sub- 
scription to the "Diamondback," the weekly 
published every Tuesday during the school 
year, year's subscription to the "Old Line," 
quarterly published four times during the 
school year, and the "Reveille," annual which 
is issued about June 1st. 

Major officers of the publications for the 
term 1931-32 are: 



The Diamondback 

Editor-in-Chief -... Gordon K. Zimmerman 

Managing Editor William Needham 

Business Manager Lawrence Powers 

Women's Editor .Eleanor Margerum 

Circulation Manager ...Hume Mathews 



The Reveille 

Editor-in-Chief- Harry Hasslinger 

Women's Editor - Audrey Jacobs 

Business Manager Albert Benjamin 

Supervising Editor William H. Hottel 



The Old Line 

Editor-in-Chief William R. McCallister 

Business Manager ...James Greeley 

Woman's Editor Rosalie Goodhart 

Supervising Editor _.William H. Hottel 



102 



AWARDS 



Byrd Citizenship Prize.- Henry J. Whiting 

Woods Citizenship Prize Elgar S. Jones 

Silvester Medal.. Louis W. Berger 

Maryland Ring Joseph H. Deckman 

Goddard Memorial Medal Mark W. Woods 

Sigma Phi Sigma Medal John R. Shipman 

Herman Memorial Medal.... Chas. T. Mothersead 

Woman's Senior Honor Society Cup, 

Felisa F. Jenkins 

The Alumni Cup, 

Cadet Sergeant James C. Greely 

Diamondback Medals, 

Gibbs Myers, Arley Unger, Ruth Miles 

Reveille Medals, 

Irvin Wolf, Minna Cannon, H. W. Gerry 

Old Line Medals, 

James E. Andrews, Jr., Arley Ungar, 
Elizabeth Mims, S. Chester Ward. 

Governor's Cup, 

Co. B, commanded by Capt. Wm. E. Roberts 

Military Faculty Cup, 

Lieut. Col. H. J. Whiting 

Military Medal Sergeant Morton Silverberg 

University of Maryland Prize (Sabre), 

ffl Capt. Wm. E. Roberts 

Third Corps Area Silver Medal, 

Cadet Gordon H. Livingston 



103 



Managers 

Football -•- Wm. Luney 

Baseball - -- - - -F. G. Baldwin 

Track - T. E. Myers 

Cross-Country .— Herbert Eby 

Lacrosse - H. R. Gibson 

Basketball _ John Hisle 

Tennis — R. C. Oberlin 

Rifle - — M. Shoemaker 

Captains 

Rifle - - William Spicknall 

Cross-Country _ _ ...not elected 

Basketball not elected 

Lacrosse — - not elected 

Baseball ....not elected 

Tennis — not elected 

Track not elected 

Senior Class 

President-,- .Charles May 

Vice-President — Charles Fonts 

Secretary Isabelle Toulson 

Treasurer Theodore Meyer 

Junior Class 

President Lawrence Plumley 

Vice-President Ralph Williams 

Secretary Betty Smaltz 

Treasurer Edward Connolly 



104 



Sophomore Class 

President Edward Quinn 

Vice-President Harold Naughton 

Secretary -._ _ Gretchen Van Slyke 

Treasurer Charles Rittenhouse 

Interfratemity Council 
President - Charles Fonts 

Executive Council 

Senior Representatives — 

William Lines 
Elizabeth Norton 

Junior Representatives — 

Richard Murdock 
Esther Hughes 

Sophomore Representatives — 
John Simpson 
Betty Goodyear 



THE MODE 

F at ELEVENTH ST., N. W., 
Washington, D. C. 

NEW FALL LINE OF 
TWO-TROUSER WORSTED SUITS 



$33.75 



Catering to Snappy College Dressers 
105 



CO-ED WHO'S WHO 



Y. W. C. A. 

President Catherine Crawford 

Vice-President Dorothy Lane 

Secretary Catherine Bixler 

Treasurer — Catherine Leurs 

Women's Student Government Association 

President - Evelyn Harrison 

Vice-President Dorothy Leaderer 

Secretary-Treasurer Sarah Brokaw 

Recorder of Points Jane Hoist 

Student Publications 

Women's Editor "Reveille" Audrey Jacobs 

Women's Editor "Diamondback", 

Eleanor Margerum 

Women's Editor "Old Line" 

Rosalie Goodhart 

Women's Athletic Association 

President Rhoda Hatton 

Vice-President .,Lou Snyder 

Secretary _.._ Mary Solomons 

Treasurer _ Elizabeth Bonthron 

Recorder of Points. ...Florence Peter 

Secretary of the Student Government 

Association ..Minna Cannon 

Pan-Hellenic Congrress 
President Evelyn Harrison 

106 



Theta Gamma 
President _ Kathryn Siehler 

League of Women Voters 
President - Virginia Cooke 

Blazers 

Rhoda Hatton Ruth Reed 

Eloyse Sargent 

Co-Ed Wearers of the "M" 

Dorothy Blaisdell Dorothy Lane 

Elizabeth Bonthron Catherine Luers 

Ruth Diggs Betty Mulligan 

Agnes Gingell Kathleen Nestor 

Margaret Herring Florence Peter 

Louise Hersperger Ruth Reed 

Felisa Jenkins Lou Snyder 

Vera Klein Margaret Wade 

Irene Knox Rosa Lee Reed 
Josephine Knox 



Pearson and Crain, Jewelers 

C. A. Pearson B. A. Crain 

Diamonds — Watches — Maryland Rings 
and All Jewelry 

1329 F St., N. W. 

National 697? 
107 




108 



FRATERNITIES 



HONORARY 



ALPHA ZETA 

National Honorary Agricultural Fraternity 
Founded at Ohio State University in 1897 
Chartered at University of Maryland, 1920 

President Wm. M. Kricker 

Vice-President Ralph L. England 

Secretary Manville E. Coblentz 

Treasurer -..Howard L. Stier 

G. Edward Connelly F. Lines 

W. M. Hanna J. W. Stevenson 

J. H. House 

TAU BETA PI 

National Honorary Engineering Fraternity 
Founded at Lehigh University in 1885 
Chartered at University of Maryland, 1929 

President - ....Theodore Bishoff 

Vice-President .— John R. Beall 

Secretary Ralph W. Watt 

Treasurer .— Myron Creese 

J. R. Burger R. H. Skelton 

H. W. Cooper S. S. Steinberg 

A. N. Johnson J. J. Velten 
J. Miller 

SCABBARD AND BLADE 

National Honorary Military Fraternity 
Founded at the University of Wisconsin in 

1904 
Chartered at University of Maryland, 1922 

President Parker Faber 

Vice-President - Claude Smith 

109 



Secretary George Openshaw 

Treasurer Edmund Whitehead 

C. Ackerman G. I-i. Munson 

L. W. Berger G. F. Openshaw 

T. Bishoff C. P. Reichal 

C. W. Cissel J. O. Rooney 

J. Doerr J. W. Scott 

S. P. Faber M. Silverberg 

J. C. Greeley C. H. Smith 

A. C. Hayden W. L. Spicknall 

J. W. Hisle R. T. Sterling 

R. Koelle E. W. Tippett 

W. M. Kricker A. Turner 

W. T. Lines R. Watt 

C. Miller E. G. Whitehead 

PI DELTA EPSILON 

National Honorary Journalism Fraternity 
Founded at Syracuse University in 1909 
Ch'artered at University of Maryland, 1930 

President _._ Gordon K. Zimmerman 

Vice-President William M. Kricker 

Secretary-Treasurer H. Wilmer Geary 

D. Beeman W. Lines 

A. Benjamin W. McCallister 

J. Decker W. Needham 

H. Eby L. Powers 

J. Greeley N. Prince 

H. Hasslinger W. Wray 

BETA PI THETA 

National Honorary French Fraternity 
Founded at City of Birmingham 
Chartered at University of Maryland, 1929 

President _.Alma Hickox 

Vice-President Elizabeth Norton 

Secretary Doris Lanahan 

Treasurer __ _ Carl Pergler 

L. Babcock M. Ferrier 

D. Bishop D. Hammerlund 

V. Daiker M. Herring 

110 



A. Hickox 
W. Hisle 

D. Lederer 

E. Norton 
K. Nester 
M. Rugge 



C. Smith 

E. Stanforth 

E. P. Beardsley 
K. Bixler 

S. Brokaw 

F. Peter 



WOMEN'S SENIOR HONOR SOCIETY 

Founded at the University of Maryland, 1925 
Rosalie Goodheart Eloyse Sargent 

Virginia Cooke Margaret Herring 

I PHI KAPPA PHI 

National Honorary Fraternity 
Founded at University of Maine in 1897 
Chartered at University of Maryland, 1922 

President - - -C. F. Kramer 

Vice-President C. G. Eichlin 

Secretary-Treasurer C. E. White 

C. O. Appleman F. Maisch 

E. C. Auchter Paul Marth 
H. E. Besley J. E. Metzger 

F. B. Bomberger Marie Mount 
L. E. Bopst DeVoe Meade 

L. B. Broughton H. B. McDonnell 

H. C. Byrd J. B. S. Norton 

M. Coffin E. I. Oswald 

H. F. Cotterman H. J. Patterson 

M. Creese B. B. Powell 

C. Degman R. G. Rothgeb 

G. Eppley A. L. Schrader 
C. G. Eichlin E. H. Schmidt 
H. Gwinner W. S. Small 

C. B. Hale T. H. Taliaferro 

R. Hays W. T. L. Taliaferro 

W. E. Hunt R. V. Truitt 

A. N. Johnson Paul Walker 

V. Kalmbach R. M. Watkins 

C. F. Kramer C. P. Welsh 

W. B. Kemp C. E. White 

R. Lawless L. G. Worthington 



111 



G. Haines C. M. Conrad 

F. H. Evans C. P. Schley 

CHI iCLPHA 

Local Honorary Women's Journalistic Fra- 
ternity 
Founded at University of Maryland in 1929 

President Ruth Gilbert 

Vice-President - Alice Brennan 

Secretary .__. Edith Stinette 

Treasurer _. _.Eleanor Margerum 

A. Brennan E. Margerum 

M. Cannon E. Sargent 

R. Gilbert E. Stinnette 

R. Goodhart 

ALPHA PSI OMEGA 

National Honorary Dramatic Fraternity 
Founded at Fairmont State College in 1925 
Chartered at University of Maryland, 1929 

President Gordon K. Zimmerman 

Vice-President Virginia Cooke 

Secretary-Treasurer Hume Mathews 

W. Cowherd A. Kennedy 

J. Decker E. Margerum 

H. Eljy G. RuM 

R. Goodhart K. Spessard 

li. B. Goodyear R. Williams 
C. B. Hale 

OMICRON DELTA KAPPA 

National Honorary Leadership Fraternity 
Founded at Washington and Lee University 

in 1914 
Chartered at University of Maryland in 1927 

President - Wm. A. Kricker 

Vice-President .—Alfred A. Pease 

Secretary-Treasurer Jerry Geary 

L. Berger W. Kricker 

H. Geary A. Pease 

112 



L. Wolf J. Greeley 

R. Carreth C. Fouts 

J. Lee C. May 

E. M. Gi;e T. Meyer 

W. Dent H. O. Eby 

C. Smith E. Ronkin 
• G. K. Zimmerman 

SIGMA DELTA PI 

National Honorary Spanish Fraternity 
Founded at University of California in 1919 
Chartered at University of Maryland in 1922 

President — _ Eloyse Sargent 

Vice-President Rhoda Hatton 

Secretary __ _ _._ Alma Hickox 

Trea.su rer Laura Nevius 

W. Ackerman M. A. Santine 

M. Bogdanow E. Sargent 

W. Clark W. Willse 

W. Cissel D. Hammerlund 

Ruth Greenwood G. Openshavi^ 

R. Hatton D. Zabel 

A. Hickox N. Person 
L. Nevius 

THETA GAMMA 

Local Honorary Home Economics Fraternity 
Founded at the University of Maryland in 
1924 

President Kathryn Siehler 

Vice-President Esther Hughes 

Secretary Selma Reynolds 

Treasurer _ __.....Ruth Huiit 

Eloyse Sargent Phyllis Oberlin 

Elizabeth Bonthron Selina Reynolds 

Esther Hughes Katharine Seihler 
Ruth Hunt 

SIGMA XI 
President Dr. E. C. Auchter 

113 



Vice-President Dr. W. B. Kemp 

Secretary-Treasurer Dr. M. M. Haring 

C. O. Appleman G. S. Langford 

E. C. Auchter W. G. Malcolm 

L. B. Broughton H. B. McDonnell 

B. E. Carmichael J. E. McMurtrey 

C. M. Conrad J. E. Metzger 
H. B. Cordner J. B. Norton 
E. N. Cory H. J. Patterson 
T. Dantzig R. A. Pearson 
N. L. Drake E. M. Pickens 
A. G. DuMez D. I. Purdy 

C. G. Eichlin R. C. Reed 

PROFESSIONAL 



KAPPA PHI KAPPA 

National Professional Educational Fraternity 
Founded at Dartmouth College in 1922 
Chartered at University of Maryland in 1929 

President - - 

Vice-President — 

Secretary -— _. ___ 

Treasurer __ 

J. D. Doerr R. B. Stull 

J. W. Eby H. E. Hasslinger 

S. P. Faber CM. Lewis 

J. H. House C. F. Warner 
H. L. Stier 

ALPHA CHI SIGMA 

National Professional Chemical Fraternity 
Founded at University of Wisconsin in 1902 
Chartered at University of Maryland in 1927 

President Thvamas G. Davis 

Vice-President Ronald F. Brovsm 

Secretary — Esdras Gruver 

Treasurer Harry M. Duvall 

H. R. Baker R. F. Brown 

L. B. Backus H. F. Connick 

114 



W. L. Crentz 
T. G. Davis 
H. M. Duvall 
H. F, Ferguson 
E. S. Gruver 
B. H. Keener 



T. B. Smith 
O. L. Spencer 
J. B. Sweeney 
L. E. Williams 
J. A. Yourtree 



SOCIAL 

KAPPA ALPHA 

Wellsley Avenue Berwyn 104 

Founded at Washington and Lee in 1865 
Beta Kappa Chapter established at U. of M., 
1914 

President P. D. Fellows 

Vice-President C. Miller 

Secretary G. K. Zimmerman 

Treasurer J. R. Beall 

F. Baldwin J. Monk 

T. Blanch W. Piggot 

W. Bonnet R. Reuling 

J. Clark R. Roberts 

P. Cronin C. Ross 

R. Davidson E. Siddall 

L. Gingell J. Simpson 

R. Goldsborough G. Small 

J. Harris R. Spire 

D. Imirie F. Stieber 
P. Kiernan G. Stratman 
J. Krajcovic R. Veneman 

R. Lampson G. Worthington 

E. Magill J. Settino 
E. Maloney E. Carliss 
J. Mayhew R. Koelle 
T. Miller A. Pease 

J. Mitchell J. L. Plumley 

SIGMA NU 

College Avenue Berwyn 161 

Founded at Virginia Military Institute in 1869 
Delta Phi Chapter established at U. of M. in 
1917 



115 



President ....J. C. Norris 

Vice-President J. W. Hisle 

Secretary _ _ J. D. Doerr 

Treasurer R. C. Schmidt 

L. Berger G. Hackensmith 

E. Besley W. Luney 
A. Buscher A- McCauley 

F. Buzzard T. NefF 
H. Carter J. Norris 
V. Chalmers H. Norwood 
S. Chase J. Poppelman 

G. Cole J. Pruitt 
J. Doerr R. Schmidt 

F. Ebaugh J. Scott 
P. Faber H. Shinn 
T. Gravatte D. Snell 

J. Hassell E. Tippett 

W. Hauver R. Wilson 

D. Hay W. Wood 

C. Hayden A. Woods 

J. Hisle J. Zirch'el 

SIGMA PHI SIGMA 

College Avenue Berwyn 90 

Founded at University of Pennsylvania in 1908 
Delta Chapter established at University of 
Maryland, 1916 

President Charles W. Fouts 

Vice-President George Openshaw 

Secretary Frank B. Hines, Jr. 

Treasurer Robert Welsh 

L. R. Chiswell C. P. Merrick 

R. Garreth G. F. Openshaw 

M. J. Glynn K. Y. Stahl 

J. A. Lee R. T. Sterling 

G. L. Mclntire T. W. Tower 
M. B. Shank A. G. Brandau 
C. W. Fouts F. B. Hines 
H. R. Gibson E. D. Kelley 
A. L. Hauver R. Lovell 

L. J. Jones C. Pfau 



116 



L. J. Powers 
D. C. Shaffer 
J. J. Velten 
G. E. Webber 
J. E. Welch 
R. G. Welch 
M. Dickey 
D. R. Dorsey 
H. T. Kelly 



W. A. Mcllwee 
C. A. Van Horn 
T. H. Wilson 
F. Cutting 
W. Roberts 
E. Spies 
C. Hauver 
W. Queen 



PHI SIGMA KAPPA 

Dartmouth Avenue Berwyn 218 

Founded at Amherst College in 1873 
Eta Chapter established at University of Mary- 
land, 1921 



President 




Vice-President 


............... 


Secretary — 




Treasurer — . 




John Albrittain 


H. Knobloch 


R. Carter 


R. Murdock 


H. Eby 


W. Needham 


J. Franklin 


C. Spicknall 


H. Geary 


D. Devendorf 


J. Greely 


T. Edwards 


G. Matthews 


C. Lewis 


C. Rinehart 


R. Morin 


J. Roth 


H. Mosher 


L. Schneider 


W. Rafferty 


A. Turner 


C. Seay 


W. Wray 


W. Steiner 


J. Doyle 


R. Wiley 


J. Fissel 


F. White 


J. Huebsch 





DELTA SIGMA PHI 

Wellsley Avenue Berwyn 323 

Founded at College of New York in 1899 
Alpha Sigma Chapter founded at University 
of Maryland in 1924 

President _ R. G. Shure 



117 



Vice-President W. P. Dent 

Secretary H. S. Eskridge 

Treasurer _ J. E. Loughran 

C. Berry E. Newcomer 

H. K. Clayton H. Rickets 

R. L, Clopper W. Robbins 

H. Eskridge T. O. Rooney 

J. Krauss G. Ruhl 

J. Henry L. Schnebly 

J. T. Bishop J. Sanford 

J. Burton R. Shire 

V. Hart A. Toombs 

J. E. Loughran B. Sugrue 

A. Mackall A. Tayman 

J. Mathews J. O. White 

T. McGann R. W. White 

C. May B. Keener 

H. Naughton D. Yauch 



THETA CHI 

Princeton Avenue Berwyn 214 

Founded at Norwich University in 1856 
Alpha Psi Chapter established at University 
of Maryland in 1929 

President — — Don Hammerlund 

Vice-President - Ted Meyer 

Secretary - Meredith Flook 

Treasurer — Robert Somers 

C. Albaugh C. Pergler 

H. Biggs E. Whitehead 

C. W. Cissel C. Briddell 

W. Eby A. J. Benjamin 

M. Flook J. Busick 

Don Hammerlund S. Coughland 

A. Hershberger W. Lappen 

J. Horton F. Nordenholz 

E. Knowles R. Williams 

A. Lake J. Randolph 

Karl Mech M. Lewis 

T. Meyer J. Riley 

M. Murphy R. Somers 

118 



E. Melvin 
J. Pollock 
H. Troth 
R. Greenlee 
W. Home 



K. Rose 
R. Wherry 
C. Haas 
C. Tingley 



ALPHA GAMMA RHO 

Princeton Avenue Berwyn 75 

Founded at Ohio State University of Illinois in 

1909 
Alpha Theta Chapter established at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1928. 



President 

Vice President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



„_..M. Smith 
-M. Coblentz 

L. Eyler 

.E. Connelly 



A. Bikle 

F. Blood 

R. Burdette 

J. Clark 

M. Coblentz 

E. Connelly 

J. Cotton 

C. Cunningham 

G. Davis 
H. Davis 

D. Derr 
C. Eiler 

R. England 
W. Ensor 

L. Eyler 

G. Gienger 



M. Hanna 
W. Hastings 
H. Holter 
J. House 
W. McCann 
W. Parish 
G. Pielke 
C. Reichal 
M. Smith 
K. Spessard 
W. Spicnall 
H. Stier 
M. Sutton 
H. Washburn 
Wintermoyer 



ALPHA TAU OMEGA 

College Avenue Berwyn 165 

Founded at Virginia Military Institute in 1865 
Maryland Epsilon Gamma Chapter established 
at U. of Md. in 1930 

President Robert C. Reeder 

Vice-President Robert Allen 

Secretary .William Dunbar 



119 



Treasurer Claude Smith 



W. Aldridge 
E. Aldridge 
J. Allen 
R. Allen 

D. Blennard 
R. Cleveland 

E. Cuslren 
T. Davis 
W. Durbar 
I. Ebaugh 
W. Etienne 
R. Every 

G. Hammond 
H. Hasslinger 
R. Haas 
A. Kennedy 



W. Lang 

E. Lank 

F. Lawrence 
R. Maxwell 
J. McDonald 
D. Murray 
R. Poole 

R. Reeder 
R. Schall 
J. Shipman 
C. Smith 
R. Stull 
J. Twilley 
C. Warner 
T. Webster 

G. Wolfe 



PHI DELTA THETA 

College Avenue Berwyn 280 

Founded at Miami University in 1848 
Maryland Alpha Chapter established at Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1930 

President - J. W. Stevenson 

Secretary ._. Robert Scott 

Treasurer John Bowie 

J. H. Bowie R. MuUendore 

R. Baldwin D. Parks 

E. Brower T. H. Penn 

H. Carroll N. Prince 

E. Edwards M. Roberts 
J. Decker R. E. Scott 

T. Duley E. Shrewsbury 

R. Garrett T, Stone 

D. Hunt J. W. Street 

F. Invernizzi H. G. Street 
W. Kricker J. Stevenson 
C. Kakel, Jr. A. Sullivan 
A. Lawrie F. Walters 
Otto Matheke H. Welsh 

H. Mays K. Wooden 

120 



SIGMA TAU OMEGA 

College Avenue Berwyn 250 

Local fraternity founded at University of 
Maryland in 1921 

President - .William Lines 

Vice-President William Linkins 

Secretary Edw^in Beardsley 

Treasurer John Miller 

P. Ambrose W. Rice 

E. Beardsley W. Roberts 
R. Brown H. T. Fetty 

F. Burton J. Bowen 
H. Ferguson R. Higgins 
W. Gifford C. H. Hoffman 
M. Hatfield L. Holt 

W. Lines C. White 

W. Linkins C. Mothersead 

C. W. Lung N. Viers 
P. H. Lung S. Physioc 
H. Mathews S. Lore 

T. A. Mowatt E. Clark 

J. Miller H. McNew 

IOTA NU DELTA 
Dickenson Avenue 

Local fraternity founded at University of 
Maryland in 1929 

President — - R. H. Orwig, Jr. 

Vice-President J. Devlin 

Secretary J. Brooks 

Treasurer ._ J. R. Lloyd 

D. Booth A. Gruver 
J. Booth E. Gruver 

J. Brooks J. Harrington 

S. Burbage H. Higham 

W. Burslem G. Hoffman 

C. Curry J. Lank 

R. Daiker R. Lipin 

J. Devlin R. Lloyd 

J. Duncan W. McCallister 

121 



W. Onley 
R. Orwig 



A. Pittaway 
J. Small 



TOWERS CLUB 

President - Harry Sigelman 

Secretary — Adrian Taterka 

Treasurer Lawrence Katz 

S. Fox C. Rosenstock 

M. Hendlich S. Silber 

J. Herman S. Weinman 

L. Leof R. F. Wertlreimer 
B. Manekin 

TAU EPSILON PHI 

Hopkins Avenue 

Founded at Columbia University in 1910 
Tau Beta Chapter established at University of 
Maryland in 1924 

President Irving Applefeld 

Vice-President — M. Silverberg 

Secretary -_. _ Abe Karasik 

Treasurer .— — - M. Scherr 

I. Applefeld Abe Karasik 

L. Baumohl S. Karpel 

A. Cohen L. Levine 

D. Cohen E. Ronkin 

M. Cohen Irving Sadovirsky 

Morris Cohen M. Scherr 

S. Edlavitch A. Schwartz 

H. Fein Benj. Spigel 

J. Feldman M. Silverberg 

N. Frankel M. Stern 

J. Friedman S. Suwalsky 

W. Jacobson J. Zimring 
M. Kaplan 

PHI ALPHA 

Columbia Avenue Berwyn 301 

Founded at George Washington University in 
1914 

122 



Epsilon Chapter established at University of 
Maryland, 1919 



President 

Vice-President .. 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



R. Blechman 
G. Chertkof 
S. Hass 
N. Jacobson 
S. Lemer 
J. Levin 
M. Mersel 
H. Rasinsky 



-V. Rosenthal 

J. Levin 

S. Rosen 

D. Spain 



S. Rosen 
D. Rosenfeld 
V .Rosenthal 
J. Schloss 
J. Shephard 
D. Spain 
L. Teilel 
F. Zimmerman 



ALPHA OMICRON PI 

College Avenue Berwyn 224 

Founded at Barnard College in 1897 
Pi Delta Chapter established at University of 
Maryland in 1924 

President Claire Clemson 

Vice-President Minna Cannon 

Secretary Eloyse Sargent 

Treasurer _ ____Ruth Curtis 

J. Arnold C. Hood 

M. Bates A. Jacobs 

A. Blandford B. Jarrett 
E. Brueckner B. Kent 
M. Burdette * E. Lettel 

B. Cannon M. Medlinger 

D. Claflin E. Meyer 
H. Colborn N. Person 

V. Cronin Eloyse Sargent 

R. Curtis S. L. Short 

C. Finzel K. Siehler 
R. Gilbert D. Simpson 
R. Goodhart G. Van Slyke 
B. Greenbow K. Young 

E. Hammock 



123 



KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA 

College Avenue Berwyn 233 

Founded at Monmouth College in 1870 
Gamma Psi Chapter established at University 
of Maryland in 1929 

President Evelyn Harrison 

Vice-President - Judy Herring 

Secretary Wilma Coleman 

Treasurer _ Lelia Smith 

D. Bunke E. Howard 

W. Clark E. Hughes 

W. Coleman M. Ingersoll 

M. Cotterman H. Jones 

K. Dennis F. King 

R. Diggs E. Marjerum 

H. Farrington M. Mayo 

M. Ferrier A. Mister 

D. Fowler M. Mudd 
R. Grant K. Nestor 

E. Hannigan G. Nichols 
S. Hardiman F. Peter 
E. Harrison R. L. Reed 
J. Harveycutter E. Remley 
L. Hersperger M. Ricketts 
M. Herring 

M. Rugge M. Stone 

D. Shipley M. White 

Ann Smaltz M. Winkler 
Lou Snyder 

KAPPA DELTA 

Yale Avenue Berwyn 275 

Founded at Virginia State Normal in 1897 
Alpha Rho established at University of Mary- 
land in 1929 

President .— — Elizabeth Norton 

Vice-President — - Catherine Luers 

Secretary _ Virginia Cooke 

Treasurer Vera Klein 

M. Boyd V. Cooke 

A. Brennan E. Ehle 

124 



E. Ensor L. Nevius 

C. Farnham E. Norton 

C. Fitzgerald E. Palmer 

E. Fritvh Lillian Plager 

A. Gingell R. Reed 

E. Goodyear L. Reinohl 
A. D. Hall R. Rickey 

D. Hopkins D. Rombach 
M. Kerr M. Rosenfield 
V. Klein E. Stinette 
D. Lanahan J. Stotler 

D. Lane I. Toulson 

D. List M. Walton 
C. Luers R. Wellman 
V. Luers M. Wells 

F. McCubbin 

ALPHA UPSILON CHI 

Princeton Avenue Berwyn 227 

Local sorority founded at University of Mary- 
land in 1926 

President Doris Zabel 

Vice-President E. Stanforth 

Secretary _._ Virginia Daiker 

Treasurer Doris Bishop 

L. Arrow R. Nelson 

L. Babcock E. Oberlin 

S. Brokaw Janette Owens 

M. Clagett E. Rekar 

C. Crawford S. Reynolds 

R. Greenwood Claire Shepherd 

R. Hatton M. Smith 

J. Hoist M. Solomon 

R. Hoist E. Stanley 

A. Lynham D. Titcomb 

E. Miller F. Welsh 

CAMPUS ORGANIZATIONS 



FOOTLIGHT CLUB 

Director -.. Charles B. Hale 

President _ .Gordon K. Zimmerman 



125 



Vice-President ....Virginia Cooke 

Secretary Rosalie Goodhart 

Treasurer _ _ Herbert Eby 

A. Brennan E. Margerum 

W. Cowherd H. Mathews 

J. Decker M. Ricketts 

R. Diggs G. Ruhl 

E. Ehle C. Van Horn 

W. Hoover S. L. Short 

A. Kennedy R. Williams 

W. Kricker M. Winkler 

OPERA CLUB 

Director B. Louis Goodyear 

President Kenneth Spessard 

Vice-President Virginia Tawes 

Secretary-Treasurer Dorothy Titcomb 

D. Beeman L. Levine 

A. J. Benjamin H. McDonald 

D. Bishop K. Mech 

C. Bixler R. Murdock 

E. Brueckner E. Miller 
M. Burdette L. Reinohl 

B. Cannon L. Saylor 

D. Claflin Isabel Seipt 
R. Edmonds S. Sewalsky 
B. Goodyear H. Sigelman 

B. Greenhow L. Steinwedel 
S. Hollins T. Stone 

C. Hood V. Wooden 
L. Katz 

LIVESTOCK CLUB 

President J. W. Stevenson 

Vice-President W. E. McConn 

Secretary H. L. Stier 

Treasurer .- - __-W. H. Parish 

J. T. Bishop M. Callis 

R. F. Burdette M. E. Coblentz 

J. F. Burton G. E. Connelly 

D. J. Bransfield J. E. Clark 

126 



J. p. Dean 
N. T. Doyle 
R. L. England 
C. M. Eiler 
B. H. Evans 
E. Gilbert 
I. Gilbert 
J. Halipt 
J. H. House 



W. M. Hanna 

B. F. Havilick 
Mary Ingersoll 
A. F. Nicholson 
N. Shriver 

C. W. Sebold 
M. Smith 

E. W. Weitzell 

F. Winternioyer 



PRESBYTERIAN CLUB 

President - Stewart Collins 

Vice-President . John Bowie 

Secretary _ Doris Lanahan 

Treasurer , Marjorie Mowatt 

E. Beardsley E. Miller 

J. Bowie M. Mowatt 

W. Horn K. Rowe 

R. Hunt R. Roush 

B. Goodyear C. Shepherd 

D. Lanahan D. Titcomb 

W. Lappen W. Parish 

D. List V. Wooden 

P. Lung M. Woods 

EPISCOPAL CLUB 

Chaplain .....Rev. Ronalds Taylor.S.T.D. 

President Robert Stowell 

Vice-President Virginia Luers 

Treasurer John Yourtee 

Recording Secretary Charlotte Fitzgerald 

Corresponding Secretary Frances McCubbin 

Mrs. R. Taylor D. Beeman 

Dr. W. T. L. G. Brouillet 

Taliaferro D. Bunke 
Mrs. W. T. L. J. Campbell 

Taliaferro R. Chambers 
Dr. H. J. Patterson W. Etienne 
Mr. and Mrs. T. Gonder 

E. R. Conner S. Hardiman 
L. Backus F. Harveycutter 



127 



J. Hoist 
R. Hoist 
C. Hood 
J. Horton 
E. Jones 
C. Luers 
A. Lynes 
L. Lynham 
S. Marshall 
A. Maxwell 
R. Maxwell 
T. Meyer 



E. Morsell 
E. Remley 
M. Robertson 
A. Shaw 
E. Shrewsbury 
M. Stone 
M. Sutton 
I. Toulson 
M. Wade 
M. White 
C. Yauch 



U. OF M. CHESS CLUB 

President - - - - -Richard Trey 

Vice-President J. Yourtee 

Secretary-Treasurer Edmund Yocum 

L. Backus S. Miller 

F. Burton E. Margerum 

J. Brooks J. B. S. Norton 

L. Beer D. Rombach 

E. B. Daniels R. Stowell 

T. Dantzig J. Schloss 

S. Deehl T. Smith 

E. Degman J. T. Spann 
R. Diggs T. B. Symons 
H. Geary P. Steffey 

A. Gregory H. Stimpson 

A. Hardesty C. Tompkins 

F. Haszard B. Westfall * 
R. Irey L. Wittes 

E. S. Johnston A. Yadinac 

R. Lloyd E. Yocum 

H. Mathews J. Yourtee 

C. Miller A. E. Zucker 



ENGINEERING SOCIETY 

President - Fred Burton 

Vice-President -— John W. Street 

Treasurer — — Ed Kelley 

Secretary -— — Arnold Smoot 

128 



Prof. W. Bailey 
J. Bowie 
J. C. Brooks 
W. Burdick 
J. Burger 
P. Cooper 
Prof. M. Creese 

C. Crump 

E. R. Cushen 

F. Cutting 

D. E. Davis 
J. Deckman 
R. Dorsey 
H. Eskridge 
S. Fillippone 

D. Fisher 

W. A. Fisher 

M. Flory 

R. Gibson 

C. H. Gifford 

H. R. Greenlee 

C. Haas 

J. Hall 

J. Hamilton 

Prof. D. Hennick 

E. Herrell 
Prof. L. Hodgins 

F. Holloway 
H. B. Hoviston 
W. Jacobson 
C. Kabel 

S. Kibler 
J. C. Lank 
E. Lawton 



A. Lewis 
t>. Lore 

C. Mason 
H. Mathews 
G. McClurg 
A. Medbery 
E. Melvin 
R. Messick 

D. Miller 

G. M. Miller 

J. Mitton 

R. Murdock 

J. Munson 

R. Orwig 

L. Powers 

C. Rahe 

H. Rhind 

L. Roberts 

R. D. Schall 

Prof. R. Skelton 

E. Shrewsburg 
W. Slaughter 
W. Smith 

R. W. Sonen 

Prof. S. S. Steinberg 

G. Teal 

T. Towers 

R. Watt 

T. Webster 

J. West 

C. Whalin 

E. Whitehead 

O. Wildersteiner 

E. Willse 



129 



Overnight Accommodations 

Rooms with Private Baths 

and 

Free Garage 

Lord Calvert Inn 

NEAR CAMPUS 

Coffee Shop and Restaurant 

Delicious Sandwiches and Pastries 
Special Plate Lunches and Dinners 

SODA FOUNTAIN 
MODERATE PRICES 

We are Equipped for Banquets 
and Private -Dinners. 

Boulevard — Below Gate 
Hvatt 1231 



130 



MlSCtttiMEOUS 




131 



SONGS AND YELLS 



ALMA MATER 

(Maryland! My Maryland!) 

Thy sons and daughters throng thy door. 

Maryland ! My Maryland ! 

Maryland ! oh Maryland ! 
Their hearts and hopes they bring to thee, 
And place them in thy custody. 
Proud hearts that pledge their love for thee : 
And place them in thy custody, 
Proud hearts that pledge their love for thee : 
They come from mountain, farm and shore, 

Maryland University ! 



Go forth, brave youth, throughout the state : 

Maryland ! My Maryland ! 
And by your actions, show her great : 

Maryland ! Our Maryland ! 
Thy Alma Mater's name and fame. 
Oh keep alive her holy flame. 
Until all hearts as one exclaim, 

Maryland ! My Maryland 



Cheer, three times cheer, and one cheer more 

For Maryland ! Dear Maryland ! 
Send forth that cry from hill to shore : — 

Maryland University ! 
Fair Mother of our brightest dreams. 
Blest giver of life's precious things. 
To thee each heart its service brings : — • 
Maryland ! My Maryland ! 



132 



i 



MY MARYLAND 

The despot's heel is on thy shore, 
Maryland ! My Maryland ! 

His torch is at thy temple door, 
Maryland ! My Maryland ! 

Avenge the patriotic gore, 

That flecked the streets of Baltimoi-e, 

And be the battle queen of yore, 
Maryland ! My Maryland ! 

Thou wilt not cower in the dust, 

Maryland ! My Maryland ! 
Thy gleaming sword shall never rust, 

Maryland ! My Maryland ! 
Remember Carroll's sacred trust, 
Remember Howard's war-like thrust. 
And all the slumb'rers with the just, 
Maryland ! My Maryland ! 



Madelon 



In the very heart of Maryland, 

In the heart of every Maryland man. 

There's a spirit so endearing 

It will win your heart and hand. 

For she doth hold sway. 

She will win the day. 

And her glorous men will ever win the fray. 

Chorus 

Then it's Hurrah ! Hurrah ! for Maryland. 
Then it's Hurrah ! Hurrah for U. of M. 
With her banners ever streaming high. 
She will always win or die, 
Never forget the glories of the past. 
Carry on triumphant to the last, 
For we love, we love Old Maryland, 
Hurrah ! Hurrah ! Hurrah ! 



133 



Victory Song: 

Down on the field they're fighting. 

Pride of the Black and Gold, 

Men, every one of them. 

Warriors of U. of M. 

Our honor they'll uphold. 

On toward the goal they're marching. 

It will not take them long. 

So, let's give a cheer, 

For the men we hold dear, 

And sing to them our Victory Song. 

Chorus 

Maryland, we're all behind you ; 

Wave high the Black and Gold, 

For there is nothing half so glorious 

As to see our men victorious ; 

We's got the team, boys, 

We've got the steam, boys, 

So keep on fighting, don't give in ! 

(Shout) M-A-R-Y-L-A-N-D ! 

(Sing) Maryland will win! 



All Hail! to Our Maryland 

Let us sing to Alma Mater 

University of Maryland, 
Let us deck her o'er with glory, 
With triumph and honor, hand in hand : 

University of Maryland, 

The college so dear to our hearts, 
We'll cheer for the teams which are all so 
great. 

Its praises ring, from State to State ; 
Along the well-worn trail of victory 

Maryland will follow on and on, 
And the colors in the lead. 

Will be Black and Gold, indeed, 
All Hail ! to Our Maryland. 

S. W. FiSHKIN, '30. 

134 



Who Owns This Team? 

Who owns this team ? , 

Who owns this team? 

Who owns this team ? the people say. 

Why, we own this team. 

Sure, we own this team. 

M-A-R-Y—L-A-N-D— HURRAH ! 



Who'll win this game? 

Who'll win this game? 

Who'll win this game? the people say. 

Why, we'll win this game. 

Sure, we'll win this game. 

M-A-R-Y^L-A-N-D— HURRAH ! 



Who owns this town 

Who owns this town 

Who owns this town ? the people say. 

Why, we own this town. 

Sure, we own this town, 

M-A-R-Y—L-A-N-D— HURRAH ! 



U. of M. 

(Tune, Caisson Song) 
Keep the ball away from them. 
Keep that pigskin a-rolling along ! 
Up the field, down the field, 
Not an inch of ground we'll yield. 
Keep that pigskin a-rolling along ! 
Then it's Whiff! Wham! Whack! 
Hear that Maryland quarterback 
Shout out his signals loud and strong I 
Where'er you go, you will always know 
That the pigskin is rolling along, 

(Shouted) Maryland! Maryland! 
Keep that pigskin a-rolling along ! 

135 



Sons of Maryland 

(Tune, Sons of America) 

Sons of the Gold, 

Sons of the Black, 

Fight, No spirit lack. 

Your Alma Mater 

Needs you today. 

To help win the fray. 

Shoulder to shoulder. 

Back to back. 

We'll fight together 

For the Gold and Black. 

Fair Sons and Daughters 

Of Maryland 

Upon you all vict'ries stand. 



Chorus 
Sons of Maryland, 
Old Maryland needs you ! 
Stands by your colors, boys. 
And to them e'er be true ! 
Fight for old Maryland, 
Old Liners ! Stand, 
Defenders of the Black and Gold 
Throughout this land, 
Team ! Team ! Team ! 



Here's to Old U. of M. 

Here's to old U. of M. 
We're out to win again. 
Come, give a rousing cheer. 
And press on to Victory, 
For we're out to win this fray. 

We'll show how to play. 

For our boys will fight to the end 
For U. of M. 

136 



AND NOW WE'LL SING OF 
MARYLAND 

And now we'll sing of Maryland, 

Of Maryland the Free, 
Of mountains, fields and sparkling bays. 

All glorious to see. 



Chorus 

And now we'll sing of Maryland, 
And on through all the days. 
From Eastern shore to Western hills 
We'll join to sing her praise. 



And now we'll sing of Maryland, 

Where people want to learn 
The truth and all that's best, for which 

Mankind doth ever yearn. 

Dr. and Mrs. R. A. Pearson. 



Senior Cheerleader Edward Tippett 

Junior Cheerleader Loring Gingell 

Sophomore C/ieerZeoder.....-Cleveland Van Horn 





Yea, 


Maryland 


Yea, Maryland ! 
ight 'em ! Fight ' 


Yea, Team ! 
em ! Fight 'em ! 




Maryland U ! 


Mary — land- U. 
Mary- land U. 
Maryland — Rah 
Maryland Rah - 
Hoorah Hoorah 

Mary land 
TEAM TEAM- 


-Rah 
Rah 

TEAM! 



137 



U. M. Rah 

U. M. Rah! Rah! 

U. M. Rah! Rah! 

U. Rah! 

M. Rah! 

U. M. Rah! Rah! 

Whistle ! Boom ! Rah ! 

Team ! Team ! Team ! 



Hoo-Ray 

Hoooo Ray ! 

Hoooo ^Ray ! 

Hurrah! (Team) (Player) (Maryland) 



Locomotive 

M-M-M A-A-A R.R-R Y-Y-Y 

L-L-L A-A-A N-N-N D-D-D ! 

Maryland ! ! 
Team ! Team ! Team ! ! 



Defiance 

He— Haw— Ho— Go- -Mar— y— land ! 
He— Haw— Ho— Go— Mar- y— land ! 

(Continuous) 
He — Haw — Ho — Go — Mar — y — land ! 
He— Haw— Ho — Go— Mar— y— land ! 

(Snappy) 
Team ! Team ! ! Team ! ! 



COOPER S CORNER 

Regular Meals Short Orders 

Meal Tickets 

ROOM and BOARD 
138 



If you want the best music for your 
dances, call the Old Line Orchestra 

Walter Harris 
Samuel Fishkin 
Arthur Pittaway, Mgr. 

Phone Hyatts. 777-R 

George Washington Steamer Orchestra 
Summer 1931 



College 
BAR— B— Q 

Sandwich Shop 

AT GATE 
139 



MAIL SERVICE 

Outgoing Mail collected on Cannpus at 7.15, 
9.30 and *11.00 A. M., 4.00 P. M. 

Leaves Campus Post Office — 7.30, 10 and 
*11.30 A. M., and 4.30 P. M. 

Incoming Mail at Campus Post Office — 8.40 
and 11 A. M. and 2 P. M. 



*Saturdays only. Last collections and delivery. 

I 

ALL-STATES INN 

The College Home 
Meals at All Hours 

Home Cooking Free Dancing 

Special Rates to Students 

Baltimore Blvd. 

Berwyn, Maryland 

Ber-284 

140 



TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES TO AND 
FROM COLLEGE PARK 

Branchville-Treasury Street Car. 

Washington Railway and Electric Company. 

Branchville Cars leave Treasury Building, 
15th and G. Streets, N. W., for College Park, 
as follows: Week Day Schedule — *5.04, *5.06, 
5.15. 5.45, 5.55, 6.15, 6.30, 6.45, 7.00, 7.12, 
7.27, 7.45 A. M., every 30 minutes thereafter 
until 4.15 P. M. 4.40, 4.45, 4.50, 5.00, 5.15, 
5.30, 5.45, 6.00, 6.15 P. M., every 30 minutes 
thereafter until 12.15 A. M. 12.55 A. M. Sun- 
day Schedule— *5. 40, *6.06, 6.10, 6.45 A. M.. 
every 30 minutes thereafter until 12.15 A. M. 
12.55 A. M. 

Treasury Cars leave College Park 

for 15th and G Streets, N. W., as follows : 

Week Day Schedule— 5.39. 6.07, 6.37, 6.52, 
7.07, 7.22, 7.38, 7.53, 8.04, 8.19, 8.36, 9.06 
A. M., every 30 minutes thereafter until 5.06 
P. M. 5.21 P. M. 5.31, 5.36. 5.41, 5.51, 6.06, 
6.21, 6.36, 6.51, 7.06 P. M., every 30 minutes 
thereafter until 12.07 A. M., *12.56, *1.04, 
*1.44 A. M. Sunday Schedule— 6.40 A. M., 
every 30 minutes thereafter until 11.40 P. M. 
12.07, *12.56, *1.04, *1.44. 

*These cars leave or arrive at Car Barns at 
Eckington. 

Baltimore-Washington Local Trains, 

stopping on signal to receive and discharge 
passengers at College Park. Baltimore and 
Ohio Railroad (July 12, 1931). 

Leave Union Station. D. C, for College 
Park— Daily— 7.25 A. M. ; 11.00 P. M. Ad- 
ditional trains — Week day — 6.15 A. M., 12.30, 
5.05, 6.20 P; M. Saturday only— 1.30 P. M. ; 
Sunday— 6.00 P. M. 

Leave College Park for Baltimore — Daily 
7.39 A. M., 11.16 P. M. Additional trains— 

141 



Week day 6.33 A. M., 12.48. 5.21, 6 36 Sa 
urday 1.43 P. M. Sunday--6.19 P. M 

Leave Camden Station for College Park 
Daily -6.25 P. M.. 8.00 P. M. Week div 



uany -b.^io P. M., 8.00 P. M. Week dav 
5.45 A. M., 6.50 A. M.. 5.40 P. M ^ 

r- Jf^^'^^P^'lH'^^ ^^'■^ *■«'■ Washington daily- 

University of Maryland-Washington Bus 

Washington Railway and Electric Companj 
Maryland. "" ^*^^^'^' ^^ ^- *° University o^ 
Buses leave 15th and H Streets. N. E 
fiYn l"^l^"' ^""^^^ ^°"'' °" the half hour fron 
oH^^f ■ ^; ""f^ 11-30 P. M. (Week days ar 
additional bus at 5.30 A. M. 

Streets N. E.-^Buses leave the campus every 
hour at one minute after the hour from 7.01 

^U^- ,"k^'' ^^-^^ ^- M- ^Week days an ad- 
ditional bus at 6.01 A. M.) 

Laurel-Washington Bus. 

10th and E Streets. N. W.. to Laurel. 

Buses leave 10th and E Streets. N. W. every 

kTa^^aa *^".,"?i""tes after the hour from 

til P- f- k"*'' ^•^•^^ P- ^- arriving at Col- 
lege Park about on the hour. 

Laurel to 10th and E Streets, N. W. 
Buses leave Laurel every hour on the half 
i^n'rJ'Tn^-^' ^- ^- ""^" 11-30 P- M.. arr?v- 
Jofe the hoTr" "^"'^ "' "^°"* *"" "^*""*^^ »^- 

'Baltimore-Washington Bus. 

503 14th St.. IsT W Washington to Southern 
•Hotel, Baltimore. 

142 



Buses leave 503 14th Street, N. W., Wash- 
ington, for Baltimore every hour on the half 
bour from 7.30 A. M. until 11.30 P. M.. with 
the exception of 9.30 P. M. These buses ar- 
rive at College Park on the hour. 

Southern Hotel, Baltimore, to 503 14th St., 

N. W. 

Buses leave the Southern Hotel for Wash- 
ington every hour on the half hour from 7.30 
A. M. until 11.30 P. M., with the exception of 
9.30 P. M. These buses arrive at College 
Park forty minutes after the hour. 



* Important — The Nevin Bus Line is restrict- 
ed to inter-state service, that is, from Wash- 
ington to points in Maryland, or vice versa. 
Tickets cannot be sold between two points 
within the state. 

**Baltimore-Washinfirton Bus 

People's Rapid Transit Company, Inc. 

Buses leave Union Bus Depot, 1336 New 
York Ave., N. W., Washington for Baltimore 
6.45 A. M., every hour on the hour from 
8.00 A. M. until 8.00 P. M. and in addition 
at 12.15 P. M., 4.30 P. M., 9.30 P. M., 11.00 
P. M, and 12.00 Midnight. These buses ar- 
rive at College Park about 35 minutes after 
leaving Washington. 

Buses leave Union Bus Terminal, Liberty 
and Redwood Streets, Baltimore, for Wash- 
ington every hour on the hour from 7.00 
A. M. until 8.00 P. M., and in addition at 
4.30 P. M., 5.30 P. M., 10.00 P. M.. 12.00 
Midnight, 1.00 A. M., and 4.30 A. M. These 
buses arrive at College Park about 70 minutes 
after leaving Baltimore. 



**Important — Service between Washington 
and Laurel is interstate only ; between Laurel 
and Baltimore intrastate. 



143 



Sanitary Grocery Co. 

Service 

and 
Quality 



Phone, Hyatts 345 

Keystone Printing Co., Inc. 

(Anglin Bros.) 
WE PRINT THE DIAMONDBACK 

Baltimore Street Hvattsville, Md. „ 

1 

144 



TO THE STUDENTS 



We recommend to your 
attention the -flMltfHlM^ ad- 
vertisers, who have helped 
to make this book possible, 
from a financial standpoint. 
Care has been taken to so- 
licit only reliable firms. In 
case you buy as a result of 
this advertisement, please 
make mention of this book 
to the merchant. 



145 



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Boys, we want 

YOUR CLOTHING 
BUSINESS 

The Pres. of our firm 
agrees to give Md. 
students 5''/c off of all 
purchase prices — to 
get you started. H. Lee Smith, Pres. 

CLOTHES for MEN 





(Incorporated ) 
"KNOWN THE WORLD OVER" 




N. W 



N. W. 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 



147 





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The Finest in 
FLOWERS 

Since 1889 




GUDE BROS. 
CO. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



CHANEY'S GARAGE 

Opposite Campus 
GENERAL REPAIR WORK 

GAS AND OILS 

Phone Ber. 69-W 

149 



To the students of the University 
of Maryland 



Prince George's Bank 
^ Trust Co. 

OF HYATTSVILLE 

Extends to you greetings and a j 
welcome and invites you to make 
this bank your depository while at 
the University. 

Do not keep money in your room 
— pay your bills by check. 

This prevents loss, robbery, extra- 
vagance and disputes. 

The facilities of this bank are at 
your command. 



150 



University Bowling 
Alleys 

(Under New Management) 

8 ALLEYS 

Meet Your Friends Here 

HEALTHY RECREATION 



Expert Shoe Repairing 

College Park Shoe Repair 

W^ashington - Baltimore Blvd. 

Moderate Prices — Quick Service 
Expert Workmanship 



151 



GINGELL S MOTORS 

BERWYN. MARYLAND 

FORD 

Radios Ford Trucks 

On Washington-Baltimore Blvd. 

at 

Berwyn, Maryland 

Phone, Ber. 199 



NUNNALLY^S 

The Candy of the South 

The meeting place of the Washington 
and Maryland student bodies 

1208 F Street, N. W. 

1035 Conn. Ave., N. W. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



152 






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163 



Ikrjrland Dairy Prodfccts 

f jjes^t Door to Arcade Theatre 



Drop In and Make Yourself 
At Home 



H. W. Spiller, Prop. 
Hyatt. 1114 

jfirBt baptist Church 

HYATTSVILLE, MD. 

REV. B. P. ROBERTSON, D. D., Pastor 

Invites you to all its services. 

''Why not make this home like church your 
church home?" 

Services 

Sunday School __ -- 9.30 A. M. 

Preaching - ....11.00 A. M. 

B. Y. P. U.- - - 7.00 P. M. 

Preaching 8.00 P. M. 

Prayer Meeting... ....Wednesday, 8.00 P. M. 

154 




drctos Episcopal 
Church 



COLLEGE PARK, MD 



Rev. Ronalds Taylor, S.T.D. 
Rector 

Services : 

8.00 A. M. — Early Communicm 

9.45 A. M. — Sunday School. 

n.OOA. M. — Morning Prayer and 
Sermon. 

Communion Service First 

Sundav of Each Month 
At 11.00 A. M. 

Make St. Andrew's your church 
home while in College Park- 

You will find a cordial welcome at 
all the services. The Rector will 
welcome an opportunity to greet 
and know you. 



"'RcjJ-Tajfloc" ■ Baltimore 



1931 



Calendar 



1932 



JULY. 


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• OCTOBER. 


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- DECEMBER. 


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JANUARY 


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FEBRUARY. 


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MARCH. 


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APRIL. ^ ( 


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MAY. 1 


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JUNE. 




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..1 


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::