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Full text of "The "M" book of the University of Maryland"

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LIBRARY-COLLEGE PARK 




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The 

"M" BOOK 

of the 

University of Maryland 

1939-1940 

STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief Edtnond Chandler 

Business Manager William B. Diggs, Jr. 

Women's Editor Lois Kemp 

Sports Editor -Turner Timberlake 

Doris McFarland 



Associate Editors 



Orville Shirey 
William Maslin 
Lida Sargeant 
Mary Vaiden 



Published by the Student Government 
Association of the University of Maryland 

September, 1939 College Park, Md. 




Albrecht's Pharmacy 

serving our own 

HOME-MADE ICE CREAM 

Breakfast — ^Luncheon — ^Dinner 
Berwyn 580 Greenwood 3838 

Keep The Ola Hair Line 



s 



Trimmed 

at the 1 1 

Old Line Barber Shop 

Next to the Grill 

OCT 1 1941 fi 



FOREWORD 

This book is merely a collection of diversi- 
fied facts which are to be found in a number 
of different places, and are collected together 
in this small volume in order to help you to 
become better acquainted with the history, 
traditions, and general life of the University 
of which you are to become a part. 

We. the editors of the "M" book of the 
University, hope that the material that we 
have gathered may in some small way help 
you to ac{|uire a be^t ' understanding of your 
new life here. 

Of advice, you will find little, but what we 
do give we feel should be properly heeded in 
order that you may benefit by the mistakes 
that we who have gone before you have made. 

You are now on your own, make the most 
of it. and in any difficulty that you may find 
yourself, the editors of this book stand ready 
to help you. 

Make the most of these next four years, and 
beware of the most common malady of young 
collegians, Procrastination. 



ai928 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Introductory Section: 

Staff of "M" Book 1 

Foreword . 3 

Dedication 7 

Message from President Byrd 9 

Message from the Dean of Women 11 

Message from the Dean of Men 13 

Section I. ADMINISTRATION 15 

Officers of Administration 16 

History of the University 17 

Student Pastors 19 

Parking 20 

Infirmary Regulations 21 

Academic Regulations 22 

Section 11.^ STUDENT GOVERNMENT.. 25 
Functioning of Student Government 

Association 27 

Executive Council 28 

Handling of Student Finances 28 

Class Officers 30 

Women's League Rules 31 

Section III. STUDENT ACTIVITIES- 39 

Student Activities 40 

Committee on Student Life 40 

Omicron Delta Kappa Point System 41 

Student Publications 43 

Dramatics _ 44 

Glee Club 45 

Debate 45 

Opera Club 46 

Rossbourg Club . 46 

Y. W. C. A 46 



Section IV. FRATERNITIES 47 

Concerning Fraternities 48 

The Fraternity Criteria 49 

Panhellenic Constitutron 51 

Officers of the Panhellenic Association— 56 

Panhellenic Rush Rules _ 56 

Officers of the Interfraternity Council ... 59 

Constitution of the 59 

Rush Rules... 65 

Social Fraternities 66 

Social Sororities — _ ._ !}> 

Fraternity Phone Directory 79 

Honorary Fraternities 80 

ORGANIZATIONS 86 

Section V. ATHLETICS 93 

Highlights of 1938-39 Sports 94 

Coaching Staff 94 

Managers of Sports ._ 95 

Sports Schedules 95 

Lettermen 101 

Intramural Sports 103 

Minor Sports _ 104 

Women's Athletic Association... -104 

Track and Field Records - 105 

Section VI. SONGS, YELLS 106 

Index to Advertisers 135 




Hakvey T. Casbarian 



DEDICATION 

We, the Editors of the 1939-40 "M" Book, 
take pleasure in dedicating this year's edition 
to Harvey T. Casbarian, the genial and effi- 
cient Comptroller of the University. Financial 
counselor and friend to almost a generation 
of students, his helpful attitude towards their 
problems has made him a popular and re- 
si)ected administrative officer. Although, by vir- 
tue of his office, compelled to enforce what at 
times seem to be rather stringent University 
regulations, his sympathetic and considerate 
approach in applying them has tempered their 
effect so that many students who would other- 
wise have been unable to remain in the Uni- 
versity have been enabled to complete their 
college education. 

Mr. Casbarian's major duty, of course, is 
in the preparation and supervision of the Uni- 
versity budget, and in directing its general 
financial operations. During the past year his 
duties have been particularly exacting because 
of the many and varied responsibilities as- 
sociated with the large building program now 
nearing completion. 




Dr. H. C. Byrd 
President of the University 



GREETING FROM THE PRESIDENT 

To students entering the University for the 
first time, and to returning students, a hearty 
welcome is extended. Many changes have taken 
place on the campus since the last academic 
year and vastly improved facilities are avail- 
able. These include dormitories, dining halls, 
classrooms and laboratories. Some of the new 
buildings are not entirely completed but will 
be finished and in use during the late fall. 

To students coming back to the campus, to 
whom Freshman students naturally will turn 
for helpful advice I ask your help in introduc- 
ing the new students to the campus traditions, 
which mean much in University life. 

To new and old students we would emphasize 
that administrative officers, faculty and staff, 
are all anxious to extend every possible assist- 
ance in meeting your problems. Feel free to 
call on any of us at any time. 

With the splendid student body we now have, 
the enlarged physical facilities and the strength- 
ened teaching staff, we look forward to the 
coming academic year with full confidence 
that it will be successful for the university 
as a whole and successful individually for all 
students who will earnestly strive to meet their 
daily responsibilities. 

H. C. BYRD. 

President 




Dean Adele H. Stamp 
Dean of Women 



10 



GREETINGS 

May those of you who are returning and 
those of you who are entering our portals for 
the first time bring to this University stead- 
fastness of purpose, clarity of mind, courage, 
and enthuiasm. May our white pillared build- 
ings and green lawns become the center of a 
true college democracy. May the ability to live 
and work with people be inculcated in you. 
May your years at this University be happy 
and fruitful ones. This is my welcome to you. 

ADELE H. STAMP, 
Dean of Women 



11 




Geary Eppley 
Dean of Men 



12 



GREETINGS 

To those of you who are returning to carry 
on work already begun and to new students 
here for the first time, I extend greetings and 
a sincere welcome. 

You are now definitely associated with the 
University of Maryland, not for four years, 
but for life. Your acts will reflect upon the 
whole University, every member of the faculty, 
student body, and alumni. In other words, the 
University is a great cooperative institution 
in which we as a part of it must work to 
succeed and to help our fellowmen succeed. 
This is accomplished by becoming acquainted 
not only with your fellow students, but with 
the faculty and all the activities of the Uni- 
versity. 

If you will call on us you will find that 
the faculty and upper classmen will be only 
too glad to assist in any way possible to make 
your stay here at College Park enjoyable and 
instructive and your association with the Uni- 
versity of Maryland one you will always cherish. 

Sincerely, 

GEARY EPPLEY 
Dean of Men 



13 



OR 



STUDY PALLS- 



COME ON DOWN TO 



I WHEN HUNGER CALLS \\ 



TUC \/ ADCITV no II I ^ 



THE VARSITY GRILL 



|| The Hub of the Extra Curricula 
Unirersity 



E. F. ZALERAH, '25 

Owner (| 

14 




ADMINISTRATION 

Section 1 



15 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

H. C. Byrd, LL.D., D.Sc, President of the 
University. 

H. J Patterson, D.Sc, Dean Emeritus of Agri- 
culture. 

T. B. Symons, M.S., D.Agr., Director of the 
Extension Service, Acting Dean of the 
College of Agriculture. 

T. H. Taliaferro, C.E., Ph.D., Dean of the 
Faculty. 

Henry D. Harlan, A.M.. LL.B., LL.D., Dean 
Emeritus of the School of Law. 

E Frank Kelly, Phar.D., D.Sc, Advisory 
Dean of the School of Pharmacy. 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D., Dean of 

the School of Dentistry. 
Roger Howell. LL.B., Ph.D., Dean of the 

School of Law. 
J. M. H. Rowland, Sc.D., LL.D., M.D., Dean 

Emeritus of the School of Medicine. 
Annie Crighton, R.N., Superintendent of 

Nurses. Director of the School of Nursing. 
Andrew G. DuMez, Ph.G., Ph.D., Dean of the 

School of Pharmacy. 
A. J. Lomas, M.D., D.P.H., Superintendent 

of the University Hospital. 

C. O. Appleman, Ph.D., Dean of the Grad- 
uate School. 

H. F. Cotterman, Ph.D., Assistant Dean of 

the College of Agriculture. 
L. B. Broughton, Ph.D., Dean of the College 

of Arts and Sciences. 
W. Mackenzie Stevens, N.B.A., Ph.D., C.P.A. 

Dean of the College of Commerce. 

Harold Benjamin, Dean of College of Educa- 
tion. Director of Summer Session. 

16 



W. S. Small. Ph.D., Advisory Dean of the 

College of Education. 

S. S. Steinberg, B.E., C.E., Dean of the 
College of Engineering. 

M. Marie Mount, A.B., M.A.. Dean of the 
College of Home Economics. 

J. E. Metzger, B.S., M.A., Acting Director of 

Experiment Station. 

Thomas D. Finley, Lt. Col., Inf., U. S. Army, 
Professor of Militarj' Science and Tactics. 

Geary F. Eppley, M.S., Dean of Men and 
Director of Athletics. 

Adele H. Stamp, M.A., Dean of Women. 

H. T. Casbarian, B.C.S., C.P.A., Comptroller. 

W. M. Hillegeist, Director of Admissions. 

Alma H. Preinkert, M.A., Registrar. 

F. K. Haszard, B.S., Secretary to the Presi- 
dent 
Carl W. E. Hintz, A.M.L.S., Librarian. 

H. L. Crisp, M.M.E., Superintendent of Build- 
ings and Grounds. 

THE HISTORY 

1807 The College of Medicine of Maryland 
was organized in Baltimore. 
This was the fifth medical school in the 
United States. 

1812 The General Assembly of Maryland 
authorized the College of Medicine of 
Maryland to establish schools of divinity, 
law, and arts and sciences. The new 
institution was called the University of 
Maryland. 

1823 The University Hospital was organized. 
A regular school of instruction in law 
was opened in accordance with the act 
passed in 1812. 

17 



1840 The Baltimore College of Dental Sur- 
gery was founded. This was the first 
dental school in the world.. 

1841 The Maryland College of Pharmacy, 
the third oldest pharmacy college in the 
United States, was established. In 1904 
this college was annexed and named 
the school of pharmacy of the University 
of Maryland. 

1856 The Maryland Agricultural College was 
chartered. This was the second agricul- 
tural college in the Western Hemisphere. 

1862 The Maryland Agricultural College was 
made partially a state institution, and 
named as a beneficiary of the Land 
Grant Act. Under this act the College 
received the benefits from the sale of 
a portion of the western lands, and in 
return it was required to teach, in addi- 
tion to agriculture, the mechanic arts 
and military tactics. 

1882 A school of dentistry was added to the 
University. 

1889 A school of nursing was established in 

Baltimore. 
1914 Control of the Maryland Agricultural 

College was taken over entirely by the 

state. 
1916 The name of the Maryland Agricultural 

College was changed to the Maryland 

State College. 

1920 By an act of the State Legislature the 
University of Maryland, in Baltimore 
was merged with the Maryland State 
College, at College Park, under the 
name of the University of Maryland. 
At this time the school was made co- 
educational in all its branches. 

1923 The Baltimore College of Dental Sur- 
gery, oldest in the world, was merged 

18 



with the School of Dentistry of the 
University of Maryland, and called the 
Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, 
Dental School, University of Maryland. 
1939 Nine new buildings are in process at 
the College Park branch of the Univer- 
sity and three are being constructed in 
Baltimore. When these buildings are 
completed the physical plant of the Uni- 
versity will have been increased by 
thirty-five per cent. 



STUDENT PASTORS 

Most of the major religious denominations at 
Maryland have Student Pastors who minister 
especially to the students of their denomination. 
The Baptist, Episcopalian, Presbyterian, Lu- 
theran, Catholic, and Methodist students have 
denominational clubs which meet regularly 
during the year. 

Baptist — Rev. Albert K. Stockebrand, 3740 
37th St., Mt. Ranier, Hy. 277-W. 

Episcopal — -Rev. George W. Parsons, Parsonage 
College Avenue. 

Lutheran — Rev. Sam Kornman, 1516 Hamlin 
St., N.E., Washington, D. C, Decatur 
3118. 

Methodist — Rev. Joseph C. Sinclair, 11 Wine 
Avenue, Hyattsvlle, Md., Hy. 167-R. 

Methodist — Rev. J. R. Wood, 9 Owens Ave- 
nue, Hyattsville, Md., Hy. 33. 

Presbyterian — Rev. T. L. Coyle, 2900 Connecti- 
cut Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C, 
Col. 2025. 

Roman Catholic — Rev. Leonard Walsh, O.F.M., 
Franciscan Monastery. 1400 Quincy St., 
Washington, D. C, North 1883. 

19 



PARKING REGULATIONS 

The Automobile Parking Regulations are for 
the purpose of protecting the appearance of our 
campus as well as for personal safety and 
convenience. These regulations, which have 
been in operation for several years, have been 
found to be very beneficial to our campus. The 
following are the regulations proposed by our 
Campus Parking Committee and approved by 
the Adminstration. 

Automobiles must not be parked or stopped 
on any of the campus roads except to take on 
or discharge passengers. Hanging on cars is 
not permitted. Fast driving and rounding curves 
at a speed greater than fifteen (15) miles per 
hour is prohibited. Blowing horns in front of 
buildings disturbs class activities and is pro- 
hibited at all times. Driving off campus roads 
on grass is positively forbidden. Studests must 
not park in Visitors' Spaces located in front 
of the Agricultural and Library Buildings. 

University Lane has been made a through 
traffic boulelvard and parking parallel there- 
with has been discontinued. 

Automobiles are to be put in the parking 
field until owners are leaving the campus, and 
there is to be no cruising around the campus. 

Spaces to be used by students for the park- 
ing of automobiles are: 

Women : Parking area north of University 
Lane and adjacent to the walk leading to 
Gerneaux Hall, except spaces 200 to 240 in- 
clusive and 272 to 310 inclusive. Men students 
are not permitted to park in this area. 

Men: Parking area near Calvert and Sil- 
vester Halls, except spaces 482 to 499 inclu- 
sive. Parking area between the Gymnasium 
and Silvester Hall. Parking area at Gym- 
nasium, except spaces marked "Reserved". 

Maryland State Officers have been detailed 

20 



to assist in maintaining these regulations, 
which are essential for maintenance of property, 
convenience, and personal safety. Any student 
who fails to observe these regulations may be 
deprived of the use of his car and driving 
privileges on the campus; continued violation 
tnay mean suspension from the University. 

The responsibility for parked automobiles 
rests with the car owner. For further infor- 
mation inquire at the Office of the Superin- 
tendent of Buildings and Grounds, Room 18, 
basement of Agricultural Building. 



INFIRMARY RULES 
RULES GOVERNING MEDICAL EXCUSES 

1. Students living in the dormitories, who 
are ill, and unable to attend classes must re- 
port to the INFIRMARY, between 8:00 and 
9:00 A. M. If they are too ill to go to the 
Infirmary, they must notify the MATRON 
before 8.30 A. M., so the Doctor can be called 
to the dormitory. If a student is taken sick 
at any other time he must report to the 
INFIRMARY, before going to his room. 

2. Medical excuses for classes missed during 
illness will be issued by the Infirmary physi- 
can or nurses, cmly when this procedure is 
followed. 

3. Office hours every day between 8.00 and 
9.00 A. M., except on Sundays. Evening office 
hours at 6.00 P. M. except Saturdays and 
Sundays. Office hours on Sundays by appoint- 
ment only. 

4. Doctor will have office hour from 12 to 1 
daily except Sunday. 

21 



5. A registered nurse is on duty at all hours 
at the Infirmary. Between 2.00 and 4.00 P. M., 
quiet hour is observed. During this time stu- 
dents are requested not to report, except in 
case of an emergency. 

6. Visiting hours are between 4.00 and 5.00 
P. M. and 7.00 and 8.00 P. M. daily. No 
visitor may see any patient until permission 
is first granted by the nurse. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

The Academic Regulations of the University 
may be obtained in pamphlet form from the 
Registrar's Office. 

In addition to these regulations rules govern- 
ing the Reserve Officers' Training Unit and 
the Eligibility Code for Intercollegiate Athlet- 
ics are included 

It is advisable that you familiarize yourself 
with the contents of this pamphlet. 



SANITARY 
GROCERY CO. 



22 



St. Andrew's Episcopal 
Church 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



Rev. George W. Parsons 

Rector ^ 

Services : 

9:45 A. M. — Sunday School. j 

11:00 A. M. — Morning Prayer and 'i 
Sermon. I 

Communion Service First ]' 

Sunday of Each Month ii 

Make St. Andrew's your church home ^ 
while in College Park. ]' 

You will find a cordial welcome at all 'i 
the services. The Rector will welcome ( 
an opportunity to greet and know you, l 

• • 

23 



To the students of the University j 
of Maryland (i 



Prince George's Bank 
and Trust Co. 



T. Howard Duckett, President 

Extends to you greetings and a 
welcome and invites you to make 
this bank your depository while 
at the University. 

Do not keep money in your room 
— pay your bills by check. 

This prevents loss, robbery, ex- 
travagance and disputes. 

The facilities of this bank are 
at your command. 



24 



OF HYATTSVILLE 




STUDENT 



GOVERNMENT 

Section 2 



25 




Tom Coleman 
President of S. G. A. 



26 



FUNCTIONING OF THE STUDENT 
GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION 

The Student Government Association of 
the University of Maryland is divided into 
several independent organizations. The Execu- 
tive Council, which is the supreme governing 
body, has power to establish student policy and 
retains final jurisdiction in all student govern- 
ing questions. Campus regulations are formu- 
lated and enforced by the Men's League and 
Women's League respectively. A faculty com- 
mittee known as the Student Life Committee 
supervises the work of all student governing 
groups. 

The president of the Student Government 
Association, who holds the highest student 
political office on the campus, is elected by the 
student body in the spring. The president 
supervises the work of all four organizations 
and acts as an ex-officio member of each. 

The vice-president of the S. G. A. acts as 
chairman of the Executive Council, thus ena- 
bling the president of the Association to act as 
a voting member and more adequately facilitate 
legislation. 

Meetings of the organization, which are 
closed to the public, are held twice each month 
or more often at the discretion of the president. 

All student activities under the Association 
are financed by an activities fee of ten dollars 
which is paid by the students upon entrance 
to the University. This fee is apportioned 
among the various organizations, so that ad- 
mittance to all dramatic, debate, and operatic 
performances is free and all publications are 
distributed without charge to those who have 
paid the fee. 



27 



EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 

President Tom Coleman 

Vice-President Bill McManus 

Secretary-Treasurer Judy Greenwood 

President of Men's League Jim Keho€ 

President of Women's League ..Bess Paterson 
President of Omicron Delta Kappa ..Dick Lee 

President of Senior Class Bill Brown 

Secretary of Senior Class Tempe Curry 

President of Junior Class Frank Davis 

Secretary of Junior Class Barbara Boose 

President of Sophomore Class Bill Holbrook 

Secretary of Sophomore Class — Virginia Mercer 



HANDLING OF FINANCES OF STUDENT 
ORGANIZATIONS 

In the spring of 1930, the Student Govern- 
ment Association passed a resolution to charge 
each student a general activities fee of ten 
dollars per year, which fee included payment 
of class dues and subscriptions to The Diamond- 
back, The Old Line, and The Terrapin. The 
Student Band and The Footlight Club were 
added to this group in 1931, and each stu- 
dent now receives tickets to the performances 
of the Footlight Club. Debate was added in 
1933, and further subsidized in 1934. A com- 
bined Men's and Women's Glee Club was also 
added in 1934. 

The money received is prorated among the 
aforementioned organizations according to a 
percentage schedule, arranged by the Student 
Government Association. The accounts of these 
organizations and all other general student 
organizations are grouped in one account and 
are placed under the supervision of a Faculty 
Adviser. At the beginning of the school year, 
each organization submits a budget for ap- 
proval, and then writes an order for each ex- 

28 



penditure to be made. This is checked against 
the budget and, if sufficient funds are available, 
is approved by the Faculty Adviser. Various 
firms with which the students deal are notified 
that the Student Government Association is 
not responsible for any debts contracted without 
the approval of the Faculty Advisor. Any stu- 
dent or individual contracting debts without 
an order is personally responsible. 

The records of each organization, which 
are always open for inspection, are kept at 
the central office. Furthermore, each organiza- 
tion treasurer keeps his own set of books, 
which serves as a check on the Central Office. 
All bills are vouchered, and the accounts are 
audited by the State Auditor at the end of 
each year. In the first Diamondback issue of 
the school year, a full statement is issued of 
all accounts handled by the Central Office 
during the previous year. A check is also 
maintained for the students upon the sale of 
tickets for all functions held by the Footlight 
Club, the Rossbourg Club, the Glee Club, and 
the Opera Club. 

Special Adjustments for Transfer Students 

A system has been worked out for transfer 

students so as to make them eligible for class 

activities. Transfer students are permitted to 

pay class dues that are in arrears as follows: 

Sophomore $2 Junior Class $4 

Senior Class $2 

However, University of Maryland students 
who fail to pay the dues for one or more years 
must pay the unpaid activity fee or fees in 
full to participate in the accumalative activities. 



29 



CLASS OFFICERS 

Senior Class 

President Bill Brown 

Vice-President Robert Wilson 

Secretary Tempe Curry 

Treasurer Jack Badehoop 

Men's Representative Thornton Race 

IVoinen's Representative Virginia Wood 

Historian .". Tommy St. Clair 

S erg eant-at- Arms Ralph Hammer 



Junior Class 

President Frank Davis 

Vice-President Gino Valenti 

Secretary Barbara Boose 

Treasu rer Dave Johnson 

Men's Representative Robert Rice 

Women's Representative Frances Rosenbusch 

Historian Libby Powers 

Scrgeant-at-Arms John Carter 

Jiinior Protn Chairman Gene Ochsenreiter 



Sophomore Class 

President Bill Holbrook 

l^ ice-President Jack Lambert 

Secretary Virgina Mercer 

Treasurer Dan McNally 

Men's Representative Henry Gay-Lord 

Women's Representative Mary Powell 

Historian Jane Howard 

Sergeant-at-Arms Larry McKenzie 



30 



WOMEN'S LEAGUE RULES 

I. Explanation of terms: 

Head resident — official chaperon or house 
mother. 

"Signing out" — filling out leave-of-absence 
slip with definite information: destination, es- 
cort, time of return. All women must sign 
out if they expect to be out after 7:30 P.M. 
Signing out for over-night permission must 
include the name and address and telephone 
number of the hostess. A "campus slip" (blue) 
must be signed if a woman leaces the campus 
planning to return before 10:15. If she plans 
to remain out after 10:15 she must be signed 
out on a "late leave" slip (white). 

"Signing in" — every woman must personally 
sign in on the corner of her slip upon return- 
ing to her residence. 

Late privilege — permission to remain out of 
residence from 6:30 until 10:15. 

Late leave — permission to remain out of resi- 
dence until 12:45. 

To carry — each class has an allotted number 
of late leave privileges. In certain cases, late 
leaves not used one month may be "carried" 
and used the next month. 

To borrow — In certain cases, late leaves may 
be borrowed from the month in the immediate 
future. 

II. Residence meetings: 

Attendance at residence meetings, which will 
be called from time to time, is compulsory. 
The attendance shall be checked by the moni- 
tors. The head resident is the only one who 
has authority to excuse girls from attendance 
at residence meetings. Those failing to attend 
will be brought before the Council. 

31 



III. Residence leaves: 

Freshman and Sophomore women must be in 
residences by 7:30 on week nights from Octo- 
ber 1 to April 1, and by 8:00 P.M. during 
September, April, May, and June. All women 
must sign out if they expect to be out after 
these specified times. Late leave privileges are 
granted as follows: 

Freshmen — 1, can carry but not borrow, 
taking not more than 2 in one month. 

Sophomore — 2, can carry and borrow, taking 
not more than 4 in one month. 

Juniors — 3, can neither carry nor borrow. 
Seniors — unlimited. 

Juniors and Seniors must be in residences 
by 10:15 on week nights. Freshmen may not 
go to the library in the evening without special 
permission of the head resident. 

Juniors and Seniors having conditions or 
failures must be in residences by 7:30 on 
week nights from October 1 until April 1, with 
the following late leave exceptions: 

Juniors — 3, can neither carry nor borrow. 
Seniors — 4, can neither carry nor borrow. 

All classes must be in residences by 10:45 
Friday and Sunday nights, unless late leaves 
are being taken, or later campus functions 
attended, and by 12:45 on Saturday night. 

There shall be one night each week when 
there may be no late leaves taken (the night 
to be determined by the individual residence). 
If, on this specified night, it is necessary for 
a girl to spend the night away from her resi- 
dence she must use a late leave unless this 
night happens to be the night before or the 
night of a holiday. 

3,2 



All University functions may be attended 
without late leaves. A woman student must be 
in her residence three-quarters of an hour after 
such functions as basket ball games, boxing 
matches, Footlight Club plays, Opera Club pro- 
jijrams, club meetings, etc. 

Swimming Clul) and Riding Club members 
must return to their residences by 10:15 P.M. 
from the meetings held off the campus. 

During examination week a girl may go 
home or she may stay out until 10:45 if she 
does not have an examination the next day. 
When all of her examinations are over she 
may go home or take late leaves which do not 
count against the number allotted to her. 

Moving-up day is May 1. From that day all 
Junior women who have a sufficient number of 
credit hours to be classed as Seniors (a mini- 
mum of 90 semester hours), and no conditions 
or failures, assume Senior privileges. All the 
other classes move-up accordingly. 

"Signing out" and "in" must be done by the 
woman whose name appears on the slip. The 
only exception to this rule is the following: 
a woman student may telephone the head resi- 
dent and ask that she be signed out. No woman 
may telephone to be signed out after 10:30 
P.M. 

All women having an engagement or plan- 
ning to spend the night at home must leave 
the residence by 10:00 P.M. on week nights 
and 10:30 on dance nights. 

No woman is permitted to spend the night 
away from her residence without written per- 
mission from home. This permission need not 
be secured for spending the night at her home 
or at her sorority house. 

Women planning to go horseback riding dur- 
ing the year must have written permission 
from home. 

33 



AU sorority presidents must notify the Office 
of the Dean of Women in advance as to date 
and time of pledge meetings, initiations, buffet 
suppers, teas, or any other sorority functions 
which continue after study hour begins. 

IV. Dances: 

To each women's residence there is sent wekly 
an official list of approved dances with the hours 
and place noted. This list should be consulted 
and the scheduled time of closing noted before 
signing out. 

In general, campus dances end at 12:30 on 
Friday night, and those who attend must be 
in their residences one-half hour after the sched- 
uled closing of the dance. Women must return 
from dances held off campus one hour after 
the scheduled time for closing. The exception 
to this ruling is the Junior Prom from which 
women may return as late as two hours after 
the scheduled closing hour of the dance. 

Dances held on Saturday night close at 12:00 
and women must be in their residences by 
12:45. 

The following dances MAY BE scheduled 
for the hours noted; women students must re- 
turn one-half hour after the scheduled closing 
time: 

Sophomore Prom 1:00 

June Ball (Commencement Ball) 1:00 

Rossbourg after Junior Prom 1 :00 

Rossbourg during Commencement week — 1 :00 

Military Ball 2:00 

Junior-Senior German 2 :00 

Inter-Fraternity Ball 2:00 

Calvert Cotillion 2:00 

Christmas Rossbourg . 2 00 

Sorority and fraternity spring formals MAY 
BE 2:00 dances. Every woman may stay until 
the close of one formal. If she attends other 

34 



formals she must be in by 1 :00. A woman 
attending a formal on the campus or in the 
Park, must be in her residence by 2:30. At 
no time may a woman return from a spring 
formal later than 3:00. 

V. Visiting in men's residences: 

Women students may visit in a fraternity 
house or in a registered ofF-campus men's resi- 
dence only when an approved head resident or 
chaperon is present and only on the following 
days (on other days on the occasion that a 
special invitation to a fraternity social func- 
tion, as dinner or tea, has been issued) : 

Friday— 6:00 P.M. to 12:30 A.M. 

Saturday — 12:00 noon to 12:00 midnight. 

Sunday— 12:00 noon to 10:00 P.M. 

VI. Quiet hours: 

Quiet hours shall be observed from 8:00 in 
the morning until 12:00 noon, and from 1:00 
to 4:00 P.M. daily except Saturday and Sun- 
day, when it shall be from 11:00 P. M. to 
11:00 A.M. At night from 7:30 on. with inter- 
mission from 10:00 to 10:30, except Friday, 
.Saturday, and Sunday nights, when residences 
must be (juiet after 11:00 P.M. There shall be 
no bathing after 10:30 on week nights or 11:00 
P.M. on week-ends. 

No radios or musical instruments of any 
kind may be played during quiet hours. If this 
rule is not complied with, the musical instru- 
ment will be removed for an indefinite period. 

VII. Rooms: 

Rooms must be in order by 8:00 A.M., with 
the exception of Sundays and holidays, when 
they must be in order by 12:00 noon. 

Occupants of rooms are responsible for break- 
age or damage done to the furniture. Rooms 
will be checked by the head resident and 

35 



occupant in September as to the number and 
condition of articles in the room. The room, 
etc., will be checked again in June; any dam- 
age done will be charged to the student. 

There shall be no washing or ironing in 
rooms at any time. Hose may be laundered and 
hung on towel racks provided water does not 
drip on the floor. Any other laundry must be 
done in the laundry room provided for this 
purpose. A strict penalty will be enforced if 
any woman does laundry work in her room. 

VIII. Guests: 

Arrangements for the accomodation of over- 
night guests must be made with the head resi- 
dent. There is a fee of 75c per night. 

IX. Callers: 

Men callers may be entertained in the lobby 
or recreation rooms between 6:00 and 7:30 
P.M. on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and 
Thursday; on Friday between 6:00 and 10:30 
P.M. 

A man may wait in the residence after 
7:30 P.M. for his date provided he observes 
quiet hour. 

Salespeople shall not canvass in residences. 
An}' strange person seen in the hallways should 
be reported to the head resident. 

X. Penalties: 

1. Returning from late leaves, campus leaves, 
dances, library, or any campus function: 
1-4 minutes — loss of late privileges from 

Monday through Thursday night. 
5-9 minutes — loss of late privileges from 

Friday through Sunday night. 
10-15 minutes — loss of late privileges from 

Monday through Sunday night. 
Over 15 minutes — special consideration by 

Office of Dean of Women and League 

Council. 

36 



A woman who has lost her late privileges 
must return to her residence by 6:30 p.m. 
She may not go to the library or attend any 
campus or sorority meetings. She may not 
take any late leaves or attend any social func- 
tions on the Campus or in the Park. 

Any woman who has taken over her quota 
of late leaves loses, the following month, twice 
the number of late leaves she took above her 
quota. 

3. The penalty for untidy rooms, not sign- 
ing in or out, breaking quiet hour, and not 
attending residence meetings, consists of loss 
of late privilege for three consecutive days. 

4. If a woman is brought up before the 
League a second time for the same offense, the 
League reserves the right to penalize the woman 
as it sees fit according to the seriousness of the 
offense. 

5. Once a penalty is given it cannot be 
changed except by special consideration of the 
Women's League or the Office of the Dean of 
Women, 



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38 




STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Section 3 



39 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES OFFICE 

The Student Activities office is located in the 
north wing of the Student Center near the Stu- 
dent Government office. Ralph I. Williams, 
Assistant Dean of Men, will welcome any 
freshman who wishes to discuss any phase of 
student activities or student life. 

COMMITTEE ON STUDENT LIFE 

The Committee on Student Life is an ad- 
visory organization designed to assist and advise 
Student leaders in the conduct of the many 
undergraduate activities. This committee, which 
is composed of fifteen members of the faculty 
and staff of the University, functions as a 
guiding influence for the student body and 
endeavors to give its leaders the benefit of 
mature reasoning. 

Ralph I. Williams, Assistant Dean of Men 
and former President of the Student Govern- 
ment here, carries out the policies suggested 
by the committee and brings them directly to 
the undergraduates, with whom he is in con- 
stant contact. 

Members of the committee are Dean Geary 
Eppley, chairman; Dr. John Faber, Professor 
LeRoy Mackert, Dr. Charles G. Eichlin, Dr. 
Susan E. Harman, Dean Adele Stamp, George 
E. Pollock, Ralph I. Williams, Miss Frances 
Ide, Dr. Harold F. Cotterman, and Miss Alice 
L. Howard. 



40 



OMICRON DELTA KAPPA POINT SYSTEM 

MAJOR ACTIVITIES 

President, Student Government Associaton.. 10 

Scholarship (first four in Senior Class) 8 

President, Senior Class - 8 

President, Men's League 8 

President, Junior Class _ - 8 

Manager of Major Sport (Football, Basket- 
ball Baseball, Boxing, Lacrosse Track).. 8 

Colonel of R. O. T. C - 8 

Three letters in major sports in same year. 8 
Position on All-American team selected by 

recognized authority - ..- 8 

President, Interfraternity Council 8 

Editor, Diamondback, Terrapin, Old Line— 8 
Southern Conference Championship in Box- 
ing or Track —- 8 

Outstanding person in Dramatics 8 

Senior Varsity Cheerleader 8 

MINOR ACTIVITIES 

Scholastic Average 3.5 for all previous 

Vice President, S. G. A 6 

Vice President, Senior Class 6 

Vice President, Junior Class 6 

Chairman, Junior Prom .- 6 

President, Sophomore Class. 6 

Lieutenant Colonel, R. O. T. C 6 

Major, R. O. T. C. .- - 6 

Two or more letters in same major sport 
(not valid if candidate has a major in 

athletics) 6 

Manager of Varsity Rifle and Tennis — 6 

Place on All-Southern Conference Team or 
Honorable Mention on All-American team 

selected by recognized authority 6 

Manager, Freshman team, Major Sport 6 

Scholastic average of 3.2 4 

41 



President, Freshman Class 4 

Treasurer, Senior Class 4 

President, Rossbourg Club 4 

President, Honorary or Social Fraternity - 4 
Senior and Junior representatives to men's 

league -- 4 

Officer of U. of M. Intramural Association.. 4 

Captain, R. O. T. C - 4 

Officers of Publication Staflf other than 

named above 4 

President of any recognized extra-curricular 

activity 4 

Member, Varsity Debating Team 4 

Two or more letters in minor sports 4 

One letter in Major sport 4 

Manager, Freshman team minor sport 4 

Scholastic average 3.0 2 

Other class officers 2 

Lieutenant, R. O. T. C 2 

Member, any honorary fraternity or society . 2 
Active member of any recognized extra-cur- 
ricular activity or society for at least 

two years 2 

Other officers, Interfraternity Council 2 

One letter, Tennis or Rifle Team 2 

Other officers, Rossbourg Club 2 

Sophomore Representatives to Men's League . 2 

OMICRON DELTA KAPPA ELIGIBILITY 
CODE 

1. Character shall be the prime consideration 
for membership. 

2. Membership shall be confined to men. 

3. Juniors and Seniors only are eligible. 

4. The candidates must have at least one major 
activity and a total of sixteen points, un- 
less a Junior when he must have a total 
of twelve points. 

5. Any candidate who has gained his office 
through fraternity politics or in any fraudu- 

42 



lent manner shall be considered ineligible 
for membership. 

6. Candidate must have an average of at 
least 2.25 for his college studies to date. 

7. A Junior may present two six point minors 
as a major if he so desires. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

Three student publications are published by 
the University of Maryland undergraduates 
each year. These publications are: The Diamond- 
back, semi-weekly newspaper; The Old Line, 
monthly humor magazine; and The Terrapin, 
annual year-book. 

The staffs of each of the publications are 
composed of students from the freshman, sopho- 
more, junior and senior classes. The editors 
are chosen, except in unusual circumstances, 
from members of the senior class. These editors 
are selected each spring from a group of 
candidates by the outgoing editors and the 
Publications Board. Eligibility for positions is 
determined by length of service, ability, and 
freshman and sophomore staff records. 

Shortly after registration, a meeting of 
candidates for Student Publications is held 
under the supervision of the editors and busi- 
ness managers, questionnaires are then issued 
to determine the type of publication and de- 
partment in which the applicants wish to work. 
No previous experience is necessary to become 
a member of a publications staff. 

The Diamondback, semi-weekly newspaper, 
is published every Tuesday and Friday and 
contains complete University news and official 
bulletins with which every student should be 
familiar. Opportunities are afforded undergrad- 
uates to secure much valuable experience in 
advertising and editorial lines. The Terrapin 
is published in June, and contains a complete 

43 



record of the University work for the year, 
together with summaries of spring sports re- 
sults, a feature almost unique in college annuals. 
The Old Line brings cheer into our hearts 
eight times a year. 

Major officers of the publications for the 
year 1939-40 are: 

THE DIAMONDBACK 

Editor-in-Chief Allan C. Fisher 

IV omen's Editor — -. Bess L. Paterson 

Sport's Editor Murray A. Valenstein 

Business Manager Douglas S. Steinberg 

Circulaton Manager —Ralph J. Tyser 

THE OLD LINE 

Editor-in-Chief Betty D. St. Clair 

Feature Editor Charles F. Ksanda 

Art Editor ..Richard M. Lee 

Business Manager J. Kelso Shipe 

THE TERRAPIN 

Editor-in-Chief .. Robert Rice 

Women's Editvr Elizabeth Harrover 

Managing Editor George L. Flax 

DRAMATICS 

Even though the Footlight Club is hampered 
by inadequate facilities, it has produced a num- 
ber of fine plays during the past nine years. 

Under the able guidance of Ralph I. Williams, 
talented director, the thespians have staged 
successfully an average of four full length 
plays a year, and a number of one-act per- 
formances and comedy skits. 

During the past season the Footlight Club 
presented four plays: "Tovarich," "Ghosts," 
"First Lady," and "You Can't Take It With 
You." 

44 



Projects of the club consists of faculty and 
student teas, parties for poor children, and 
donations of baskets to the poor at Christmas 
and Thanksgiving. 

The club had a number of guest speakers on 
the subjects of personality, modeling, character, 
and charitable institutions. 

GLEE CLUB AND WOMEN'S CHORUS 

The Men's Glee Club and Women's Chorus 
have grown to be two outstanding campus 
organizations. 

Under the direction of Professor Harlan 
Randall, musical director of the University, 
these two groups have expanded to a total of 
ninety voices in the mixed chorus. These 
groups assisted in the concert given on the 
campus this year by the celebrated Nino Martini. 

The Glee Club and Women's Chorus gave 
two concerts during the winter, and in the 
spring the Glee Club went on a short tour. 

Try-outs are held at the beginning of the 
fall semester by Professor Harlan Randall. 

DEBATE 

The Calvert Debate Club has achieved a high 
position in campus activities in the four years 
it has been organized. Dr. Ray Ehrensberger, 
acting-head of the Department of Speech, is 
head of the committee of faculty advisers to 
the club. Schedules are arranged through the 
Student Activities Office. 

This year the club held a Intermural Debate 
tournament in which all the various clubs of 
the campus participated. The final winner was 
the Women's League. In addition to a northern 
tour, the men's team debated several times 
over the radio, and entertained Howard Uni- 
versity at a Panel debate here. The Women's 
team went on a trip to Richmond. 

Try-outs for the club are held during the 
first month of school. 

45 



OPERA CLUB 

Since its revival five years ago, the Opera 
Club, under the direction of Harlan Rasdall, 
musical director of the University, has pro- 
duced several successful operettas among which 
are Victor Herbert's "Sweethearts," Rudolph 
Friml's "Vagabond King," and Herbert's 
"Mile. Modiste." 

The club sponsored the First Varsity Show 
last spring. This show was such a success 
that plans are underway for another Varsity 
Show next year. It is expected that both an 
operetta and a Varsity show will be sponsored 
by the Opera Club during 1939-40. 

THE ROSSBOURG CLUB 

The Rossbourg Club was founded in 1891 
to serve as a social club for the students of the 
Maryland Agricultural College. Its name was 
derived from the Rossbourg Inn, oldest build- 
ing on the campus, which was a social center 
in the days of George Washington. 

For many years the Rossbourg Club has been 
giving dances here, and now offers five of the 
best dances on the Hill. Last year Rossbourg 
members danced to the music of such leading 
bands as Bunny Berrigan, Paul Tremaine and 
Artie Shaw. 

Y. W. C. A. 

The Y. W. C. A. was organized at the Uni- 
versity in 1930, but it was not until 1937 that 
the association functioned as an independent 
unit. 

Officers and chairman of the committees make 
up the cabinet which is the executive body of 
the Y. W. C. A. Women students interested 
in the work of the organization are urged to 
become members and participate in the activi- 
ties. 

46 




FRATERNITIES AND 
ORGANIZATIONS 

Section 4 

47 



CONCERNING FRATERNITIES 

The aim and dream of many a freshman is 
to attain membership in a great collegiate 
fraternity. To many, this dream means luxury 
of living, a sense of superiority, a good time 
among "brothers," and a shining pin to show 
the home folks. 

A fraternity or sorority should mean much 
more. It should mean closer companionship 
with other men or women with similar ideals 
who are pledged to raise the moral, educa- 
tional, and social standards of the group. 

In a few weeks many will have the oppor- 
tunity to join one of these lodges. The oppor- 
tunities for you to benefit from these affilia- 
tions are numerous, but please keep in mind: 

That your decision will probably have more 
effect on your future life than any you hive 
ever made in the past. 

That you are not an outcast if you do not 
receive the bid you wish, or any bid — you 
may be too intelligent instead of too back- 
ward to interest that particular organization. 

That many of the potentially fine men have 
been completely buried in their fraternities. 

That men in other fraternities may be worth 
cultivating or keeping as intimate friends. Some 
of your best friends in the Freshman Class 
will not be in your fraternity. Do not lose 
them. 

That you are entitled to know the financial 
set-up of any fraternity that rushes you. 

That it is neither any credit to you nor to 
a fraternity to obligate yourself before the 
official pledge day. 

And that your success or failure^ does not 
rely on whether you make a fraternity or not, 
but on the initiative and perseverence you show 
in either situation. Some men are actually made 
by fraternal affiliation; others submerged or 
ruined. Choose your course carefully, remem- 
bering that after pledge day your battle to 
prove your worth is only starting. 
48 



THE FRATERNITY CRITERIA 

(This article is printed by request of the 
Interfraternity Council) 

The National Interfraternity Conference was 
founded in 1909 for the purpose of discussing 
questions of mutual interest and to make such 
recommendations from time to time as it 
deems wise. It is composed of sixty-four 
national fraternities which meet strict quali- 
fications for membership. Its annual confer- 
ences are attended by about three hundred and 
fifty officers and alumni of the various frater- 
nities and about fifty deans of men and college 
presidents. It sponsors the National Under- 
graduate Interfraternity Conference, composed 
of delegates from the Interfraternity Councils 
on campuses all over the United States and 
Canada, which meets in conjunction with the 
Conference itself. It publishes a Year Book, 
the report of its annual meeting, in which much 
valuable information about college fraternity 
life is included. 

In the fall of 1934, the Executive Commit- 
tee of the Conference and the Educational 
Advisory Council reduced to writing the fol- 
lowing criteria in order further to advance co- 
operation between fraternities and educational 
institutions. The statement was subsequently 
approved by the American Association of Deans 
and Advisers of Men and by the Conference 
itself. It reads as follows: 

We consider the fraternity responsible for 
a positive contribution to the primary functions 
of the colleges and universities, and therefore 
under an obligation to encourage the most com- 
plete personal development of its members, 
intellectual, physical and social. Therefore, 
we declare: 

49 



1. That the objectives and activities 
of the fraternity should be in entire ac- 
cord with the aims and purposes of the 
institutions at which it has chapters. 

2. That the primary loyalty and re- 
sponsibility of a student in his relations 
with his institution are to the institution, 
and that the association of any group of 
students as a chapter of a fraternity in- 
volves the definite responsibility of the 
group for the conduct of the individual. 

3. That the fraternity should promote 
conduct consistent with good morals and 
good taste. 

4. That the fraternity should create 
an atmosphere which will stimulate sub- 
stantial intellectual progress and superior 
intellectual achievement. 

5. That the fraternity should main- 
tain sanitary, safe and wholesome phy- 
ical conditions in the chapter house. 

6. That the fraternity should incul- 
cate principles of sound business practice 
both in chapter finances and in Vhe busi- 
ness relations of its members. 

These criteria should be applied in close co- 
operation with the administrative authorities 
of the institutions. Detailed methods of ap- 
plcation will necessarily vary in accordance with 
local conditions. It is the purpose of the 
National Interfraternity Conference to offer 
detailed suggestions, after further study and 
investigation, regarding practical steps to make 
this co-operation effective. 



50 



CONSTITUTION OF PANHELLENIC 

ASSOCIATION 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

ARTICLE I— Name 

The name of this organization shall be the 
Panhellenic Association of the University of 
Maryland. 

ARTICLE II— Purpose 

The purpose of the Panhellenic Association of 
the L'niversity of Maryland shall be: 

1. To maintain on a high plane fraternity 
life and interfraternity relations within 
our college. 

2. To further fine intellectual accomplish- 
ment and sound scholarship. 

3. To cooperate with the college adminis- 
tration in the maintenance of high social 
standards. 

4. To be a forum for the discussion of 
questions of interest in the college and 
fraternity world. 

5. To compile rules governing rushing, 
pledging and initiaton on this campus. 

ARTICLE III — Organization 

1. The L'niversity of Maryland Panhellenic 
shall be composed of all members of 
eligible fraternities, while active mem- 
bers of their chapters. 

2. The University of Maryland Panhel- 
lenic's council shall be composed of three 
delegates from each chapter of the Na- 
tional Panhellenic fraternities represented 
on this campus, and from such other 
nationals and locals as the University of 
Maryland Panhellenic may see fit to 
admit to membership. 

3. Delegates from any one fraternity are to 
be the president, the rush chairman, and 

51 



one non-voting junior delegate. The jun- 
ior delegate of one year shall be the sen- 
ior delegate for the next year whenever 
possible. 

4. These delegates shall be elected by their 
respective chapters to serve for one col- 
lege year, assuming their duties at the 
May meeting. 

5. The names of the delegates shall be 
filed with the Dean of Women and with 
the Secretary of the Panhellenic Asso- 
ciation at the beginning of her term of 
office. Immediately upon receiving the 
names of the representatives, the Secre- 
tary shall send to each a copy of the 
Panhellenic Constitution. Familiarity 
with this constitution shall be promoted 
by special study thereof at the Panhel- 
lenic meeting during the first week of the 
first semester and at the representative 
sorority meeting. 

ARTICLE IV— Officers 

1. The officers of this Panhellenic Associa- 
tion of the University of Maryland shall 
be President, Secretary and Treasurer. 

2. The officers shall be chosen in rotatioti 
starting with the nationals, then the 
locals, which have been admitted to mem- 
bership, alphabetically, to serve for one 
collegiate year. 

3. The officers shall serve for a term of 
one year, the term of office to begin in 
May. 

4A. The duties of the officers shall be those 
usually devolving upon such officers. 

4B. In addition: The president shall keep 
on file the N.P.C. manual, reports, etc., 
and the Constitution, by-laws, rules of 
the University of Maryland Panhellenic; 
the secretary shall keep a file of the 
University of Maryland Panhellenic 

52 



minutes dating from the organization's 
inception, and a file of current corres- 
pondence. 

ARTICLE V — Meetings 

1. Regular meetings of the Panhellenic 
Association of the University of Mary- 
land shall take place the first Monday 
in every month at 4:10 p.m. 

2. Special meetings shall be called at the 
request of any chapter representative in 
the college Panhellenic, provided each 
representative is notified one day in ad- 
vance. 

ARTICLE VI— Voting 

1. A majority vote shall be necessary to fix 
the date of pledge day and make rules 
regarding rushing and to carry all other 
questions. 

2. The power of one vote shall be granted 
each undergraduate delegate (excepting 
the non-voting junior delegate) of each 
N.P.C. fraternity chapter on campus, 
and to such other national and local 
chapters on campus as the L'niversity of 
Maryland Panhellenic has admitted to 
full membership. 

ARTICLE VII— Regulations 

1. If any fraternity violates any regulations 
of this Constitution, any of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland Panhellenic's rushing 
rules, or the National Panhellenic Com- 
pact and Standards of Ethical Conduct, 
it shall be subject to penalties of the 
character prescribed by the National Pan- 
hellenics — namely : 

a. Deferred pledging. 

b. Deferred initiation. 

c. Deprivation of social privileges; so- 
cial privileges meaning all enter- 
tainment exclusive of formal rushing. 

53 



2. Any penalty, and the time it shall con- 
tinue, is to be decided by the University 
of Maryland Panhellenic Council. 

3. Every offense and penalty must be re- 
ported by the University of Maryland 
Panhellenic to the National President of 
the offending chapter and to the N.P.C. 
committee on College Panhellenics, within 
two days after penalty is determined. 

ARTICLE VIII— Penalties 

1. Any chapter pledging a new girl by an 
oral or written invitation before the 
pledge day shall be reported in writing 
to the Chapter President of the offending 
chapter and to the National President 

an officer of the Panhellenic Association. 

Penalty: The bids of the offending chap- 
ter shall be given out ten days 
after pledge day of the same 
year. 

2. Any chapter breaktng the ten-day rule 
shall be reported in writing by a Pan- 
hellenic officer to the Chapter President 
of the offending chapter and to the Na- 

hellenic Congress. 

Penalty: The offending chapter shall omit 
one regular rush function. 

3. Any chapter breaking Silence Period shall 
have the following penalty: 

Penalty: The offending chapter shall have 
one day deferred pledging. 

4. No girl who has signed and checked 
acceptance on a bid card or broken 
her pledge to one fraternity shall be 
asked to join another for one calendar 
year from the date on which a written 
explanation was received by the sorority 
to which the bid had been accepted. 
(Pledging is considered binding after the 

54 



signing of the official bid.) (Breaking a 
pledge shall consist of a written explana- 
tion to the chapter to which the girl is 
pledged.) 

Penalty: The bids of the chapter bidding 

such a girl shall be given out 

ten days after Pledge Day of 

the following year. 

5. In all cases where no specific penalty is 

prescribed, the Panhellenic Association 

shall have the power of fixing such a 

penalty. 

ARTICLE IX— Agreements 

1. Fundamental Panhellenic laws as em- 
bodied in the Panhellenic Compact and 
Standards of Ethical Conduct must be 
observed by the University of Maryland 
Panhellenic. 

2. All regulations and laws of the University 
of Maryland Panhellenic must be in har- 
mony with the rules of procedure for Col- 
lege Panhellenics as adopted by National 
Panhellenic Congress. 

ARTICLE X — Ammendments 
This constitution may be amended by a 
majority vote of the delegates of the Panhel- 
lenic Association of the University of Mary- 
land. 

BY-LAWS 

L Meetings shall be held in the lounge of the 
Old Library on the first Monday of each 
month at 4:10 p.m. 

2. All business meetings shall be conducted 
in accordance with Robert's Rules of Order. 

3. Three-fourths representation of the total 
number of members of the University of 
Maryland Panhellenic shall constitute a 
(luorum. 

4. The dues shall be fifteen dollars a frater- 
nity per year, payable not later than January 
first, with a fine of three dollars for late 
payment. 

55 



OFFICERS OF THE PANHELLENIC 

COUNCIL 

President Ann Irvine 

Vice-President Tempe Curry 

Secretary Mary Lee Ross 

PANHELLENIC RUSH RULES 1939-40 

1. The period of time from the arrival of new 
students in the fall until rushing begins 
shall be governed by the following rules 
termed "closed rushing": 

(a) No new students shall be allowed in 
sorority houses. 

(b) No sorority girl shall visit in new 
students' rooms or homes or enter- 
tain new student in their rooms or 
homes. This rule shall likewise ap- 
ply during the rush season. 

(c) No mention shall be made of sorori- 
ties except as an impersonal answer 
to a direct question of a new student, 

2. There shall be no rushing during the sum- 
mer or previous to the rush season, Nov- 
ember 5 to November 12, 1939. A party 
consisting of not more than three people, 
sorority and non-sorority, shall be con- 
sidered rushing. There shall be no rush- 
ing off campus (the campus consists of an 
area formed by the Girls' Field House, the 
Dairy, the Grill and the sorority houses). 
No rushees shall be "treated" outside _ of 
the sorority houses preceding and during 
rushing. There shall be no formal banquets, 
dances, or parties. 

3. Rushing shall begin on Sunday, November 
5, 1939 with Open House teas at every 
sorority house. No special invitations are 
issued to these teas (the office of the Dean 

56 



of Women issues a reminder to all non- 
soroiity women), but all girls interested 
in joining a sorority are invted to attend 
these Open Houses from 4 to 7 P. M. 
At these Open Houses verbal invitations to 
3 rush functions may be issued by each 
sorority. No week-end invitations may be 
issued at this time. 

4. Beginning on Monday, November 6, 
1939 and continuing until a Preference Tea 
on Sunday. November 12, 1939 each soror- 
ity will give verbal invitations to teas 
and dinners. The 15-15 rule shall be in ef- 
fect at teas, and the 10-10 rule shall be in 
effect at all other functions except the Open 
House teas and the Preference Tea. The 
15-15 rule s: When there are 15 rushees 
present at a rush function there may be an 
unlimited number of sorority members pres- 
ent, but if more than 15 rushees are present 
there may be only 15 sorority members 
The 10-10 rule reads the same substituting 
10 for 15. 

Invitations for the week-end may be issued 
any time after 8 A. M. Tuesday, Novem- 
ber 7, 1939. Week-end invitations shall 
mean Friday dinner to Saturday lunch or 
Saturday dinner to Sunday lunch. 

After a rushee has accepted a verbal invi- 
tation to a rush function, she shall be 
given a Panhellenic printed reminder card 
on which will appear the name of the soror- 
ity, the function and the date of the 
function. 

Each sorority will give a Preference tea 
on Sunday, November 12, 1939 from 4 to 
7 P. M. There is no limitation on sorority 
invitations to this function. Each rushee 
may accept two invitations. Each sorority 
shall present a list of invitations to the 
office of the Dean of Women by 9 A. M. 

57 



Friday, November 10, 1939. Notices to 
rushees will be placed in their mail boxes 
by Friday afternoon. Rushees shall come 
to the office of the Dean of Women by 
noon Saturday, November 11, 1939, and 
make their acceptances. 

8. All rushees must be out of sorority houses 
by 7:30 P.M. on Monday through Thurs- 
day nights and 7 P.M. Sunday nights. 

9. At 7 P.M. Sunday, November 12, 1939 a 
silence period will go into effect which 
will last until 5 P.M. Tuesday, November 
14, 1939. During the silence period con- 
receiving bids must be in the Office of the 
versations between sorority girls and rushees 
are limited to "Hello". A list of girls 

Dean of Women by 9 A.M. Monday, 
November 13, 1939. Non-sorority women 
will be informed that they have received 
bids by a letter from the Office of the Dean 
of Women. These letters are put in the 
mail boxes by 9 A.M. Tuesday, November 
14, 1939. Girls receiving a letter shall go 
to the office of the Dean of Women any 
time between 9 A.M. and 4:30 P.M. Tues- 
day to sign individual preference cards. 
Signing a preference card is binding. Tues- 
day at 5 P.M. shall be the formal pledge 
hour, but no notice of girls receiving bids 
shall be posted. 

10. There shall be no alumnae present during 
rushing, and all rules are binding on soror- 
ity pledges as well as members. 



58 



OFFICERS OF THE INTERFRATERNITY 
COUNCIL 

President - Joseph Merritt 

Vice-President — Page Fullington 

Secretary-Treasurer _ Douglas Cassel 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL 
CONSTITUTION AND AMENDMENTS 

(Adopted May 20, 1926) 
The name of this organization shall be 
THE INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL OF 
THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Membership in this organization shall con- 
sist of two representatives of each of the 
recognized competitive social fraternities of 
the University of Maryland; and the purpose 
shall be to maintain a harmonious relation- 
ship l)et\veen the said University and the fra- 
ternities in the management of the affairs that 
pertain to fraternities: and to accomplish this 
purpose, the following rules adopted by the 
Interfraternity Council are herewith incorpo- 
rated as the Constitution of this organization. 

It is further agreed that the following fra- 
ternities be charter members of the Council: 
Delta Sigma Phi Sigma Phi Sigma 

Sigma Nu Theta Chi 

Phi Sigma Kappa Phi Delta Theta 

Kappa Alpha Alpha Tau Omega 

Lambda Chi Alpha Alnha Gamma Rho 

Alpha Lambda Tau 
ARTICLE I 

The officers of this organization shall be 
President, Vice-President, and Secretary-Treas- 
urer. 

These officers shall be nominated at the last 
meeting of March of each year. 

59 



There shall be a majority vote required for 
the election of any officer. 

Elections of officers shall be held at the 
last meeting in May. 

ARTICLE II 

The duties of the officers of ths organization 
shall be as follows: 

Section 1. The President shall preside over 
all meetings ; and see that order is maintained. 
He shall have no vote, not even in the case 
of a tie. 

Sec. 2. The Vice-President shall assume the 
duties of the President in the absence or in- 
ability of the President. The Vice-President 
shall also act as Chairman of all social func- 
tions. 

Sec. 3. The Secretary-Treasurer of this or- 
ganization shall keep a true record of all pro- 
ceedings of the council and shall also have 
charge of all money belonging to the council. 

ARTICLE III 
The time and place of meetings of the coun- 
cil shall be left to the discretion of the Coun- 
cil. The time and date of the following meet- 
ings shall be set at the preceeding meeting 
unless the Council is willing to let the Presi- 
dent set the time and the place. A three-fourths 
vote is re(;uired. 

ARTICLE IV 
This Constitution may only be amended by 
a three-fourths vote of all the represented 
fraternities in the Council. 

ARTICLE V 

Section 1. Any student entering the Uni- 
versity after pledge day may be pledged at 
any time during the year or any succeeding 
year after pledge day. 

Sec. 2. The meaning of the word "Pledge"; 
No fraternity shall either directly or indi- 
rectly cause any student to commit himself in 

60 



favor of or against any fraternity prior to 
pledge day of his first year at this institution. 

ARTICLE VI 

No fraternity may initiate any student un- 
less he has at least fifteen (15) units in high 
school subjects. 

ARTICLE VII 
No fraternity may initiate any student un- 
til he shall have passed twelve (12) credit 
hours at the institution. 

ARTICLE VIII 

Any student or group of students desiring 
to form a local fraternity must first submit 
to the Interfraternity Council a statement of 
the object and ideals involved, with a list of 
the proposed charter members. The Inter- 
fraternity Council within one month shall act 
upon the application and inform the petitioning 
group of its action. 

ARTICLE IX 

A group of students, in order to become 
eligible to representation on the Interfraternity 
Council, shall be required: 

(a) To have functioned at this institution 
for at least one year as a club. 

(b) To have functioned at this Institution 
for at least two years as a local fraternity, 
during which time it shall have abided by the 
Interfraternity Council rulings. $ 

(c) To be a chapter in good standing of a 
competitive national, social, men's fraternity. 

ARTICLE X 
No local fraternity shall petition for a 
charter in a national fraternity until after 
the group desiring nationalization has obtained 
the sanction of the Interfraternity Council. 
ARTICLE XI 
It is herewith understood that all matters 
having relationship to the organization of 

61 



fraternities and general fraternity affairs shall 
be presented to the Interfraternity Council. 

AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION 

OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL 

I 

The roll call of the Council shall consist 
of the calling of the names of the members 
delegated to the Council by the individual 
fraternities as well as the roll call of the 
fraternities themselves. 

II 

The fraternity whose member holds the office 
of President of the Interfraternity Council 
siiall have two (2) other members on the Coun- 
cil. 

Ill 
It is prescribed that the President, of each 
of the fraternities comprising the Council, 
upon his election automatically become a repre- 
sentative to the Council. 

The second representative to be a Sopho- 
more or Junior, elected or appointed as the 
club sees fit. 

IV 
No person may hold office on the Council 
unless he has been a member of the Council 
for at least a year. 

a. More than three absences from meetings 
of the Council within this period will pre- 
vent a member's holding office. 
V 
No club will be allowed a vote in the 
Council, unless all assessments levied by the 
Council have been paid in full. 
VI 
The three officers of the Interfraternity 
Council shall be non-voting members and each 
Club shall have two additional members. 

62 



VIT 

P>ach fraternity belonging to the Council 
shall pay $12.00 annually, payable October 1. 
VIII 

The president of the Council shall have 
the power to call special meetings. 



BY-LAWS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF 

MARYLAND INTERFRATERNITY 

COUNCIL 

1. All business of the organization unless 
otherwise provided for, shall be carried out 
in accordance with '"Robert's Rules of Order." 

2. A representation of three-fourths of the 
total number of the Council shall constitute 
a quorum. 

3. Each fraternity represented at a quorum 
shall be allowed two votes. 



AMENDMENTS 

1. A fine of one dollar ($1.00) will be im- 
posed on any fraternity not represented at a 
Council meeting regardless of the circumstances. 

2. Any fraternity not abiding by the Consti- 
tution and By-Laws will be subject to not less 
than ten (10) or more than fifteen (15) dollar 
fine, unless penalty is otherwise provided for 
in the Constitution or By-Laws. 

3. The President shall at the first meeting 
of the school year appoint the following stand- 
ing committees: 

Social Committee 

This committee shall consist of a chairman 
and three other members who shall have 
charge of the annual Interfraternity Ball, and 
shall arrange and conduct any other social 
functions deemed necessary by the Council. 
The Vice-President shall be chairman of this 
committee as prescribed in Section 2, Article 
II of the Constitution. 

63 



Rush Committee 

The Rush Committee shall be composed of 
a chairman and three other members, no two 
of which shall be from the same fraternity. 
It shall be the duty of this committee to en- 
force the existing rush rules. 

Athletic Committee 

This committee shall have charge of the 
Bowling and Ping-Pong tournaments, and also 
any other athletic contests that may be decided 
upon by the Council. It shall consist of a chair- 
man and two other members. 

Scholarship Committee 

This committee shall consist of a chairman 
and two other members. It shall acquire from 
the Registrar the facts necessary in deciding 
the winner of the annual Interfraternity Schol- 
arship Cup or any other scholastic award that 
might be decided upon by the Council, and 
shall report their findings in a regular meet- 
ing of the council. 

Handbook Cotnmittee 

Shall consist of a chairman and two other 
members. It shall have charge of the assem- 
bling of information concerning Fraternities 
and its dissemination to the Freshmen. Until 
such a time that it is financially possible to 
print handbooks, the articles will be printed in 
a special section of the '"M" book. 

Seminar Committee 

This committee shall be composed of a chair- 
man and three other members. They will have 
charge ' 

ternity Seminar, to be held before or during 
Rush season. 

4. All serious complaints on violation of 
rules of the Council shall be submitted to the 
Council in written form to insure definite ac- 
cusation. 

64 



5. A $25.00 fine shall be placed on a fra- 
ternity for bringing false accusations unless 
accusations were submitted to the Council 
beforehand in written form. 



INTERFRATERNITY RUSH RULES 1939-40 

1. There will be a non-rushing period from 
the first day of registration until classes start. 
Rushing is permissable prior to and after this 
period. 

2. Starting the first day of classes no rushee 
will be allowed in the house after 7:30 p. m. 
except on Fridays and Saturdays during rush 
period. 

3. From the day classes begin, there will be 
two weeks of rushing which will end Sunday 
at 4 p. m. There will then be a twenty-four 
hour silence period before bids are signed. 

4. There will be a $1.00 pledge fee placed 
upon all applicants for bids and any subsequent 
pledges by the Interfraternity Council. 

5. Rules two and three will not apply to any 
rushees living in fraternity houses, if such 
cases exist. 



A alpha 
B beta 
r gamma 
A delta 
E epsilon 
Z zeta 
H eta 
theta 



GREEK ALPHABET 

I iota 

K kappa 

A lambda 

M ^u 

N nu 

H ^i 

O omicron 

n pi 



p rho 
2 Sigma 
T tau 
Y upsilon 
<j) phi 
X chi 
qr psi 
^ omega 



65 



SOCIAL 


FRATERNITIES 



PHI DELTA THETA 

Founded at Miami University in 1848 

Maryland Alpha established here in 1930 

Officers: 



Preside nt 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasu rer 



. Kelso Shipe 

-Frank Davis 
—Richard Lee 
-Leonard Otten 



Members: 



Philip Anderson 
Turner Baley 
William Brendle 
Thomas Daves 
Carl Goller 
Lawrence Haskin 
Brinkley Hayman 
Lawrence Hodgins 
Park Holland 
James Jones 
Sevend Jordan 
Francis Kenney 

Ray W 



Robert King 
Richard Landsdale 
Robert Lodge 
Gene Ochsenreiter 
Thornton Pfeil 
William Purdum 
David Shaw 
John Suit 
Lewis Tarbett 
Samuel Tuttle 
Theodore Vial 
Joseph White 
orthington 



THETA CHI 

Founded Norwich College in 1856 

Mtaryland Alpha Psi established here in 1929 

Officers : 

President Julius W. Ireland 

Vice-President Richard K. Bannon 

Secretary Morgan L. Tenny 

Treasurer Carroll S. ^utton 



66 



Members: 



Edward Altman 
Robert Ayres 
Robert Baldwin 
Anson Biggs 
Douglass Cassel 
George Chapline 
Harold Earp 
Eliot Harwood 
James Kemper 

Henry 



Allan Nauss 
Ellsworth Nowell 
Huyette Oswald 
George Pendleton 
Charles Rauscb 
Oakley Roach 
Staley V. Sanner 
John Scott 

Worthington H. Talcott 
F. Wyatt 



ALPHA TAU OMEGA 

Founded at Virginia Military Institute in 1865 

Epsilon Gamma Chapter established here in 1930 

Officers: 

President — Norman Holzapfel 

Vice-President Joseph Park* 

Secretary Morton Taylor 

Treasurer Robert Cartee 

Members: 

Robert Benbow William King 

John Brinckerhoff John Krump 

William Brown Harvey Kruzeburg 

Edmond Chandler George Lawrence 

David Crockett James Martin 

Bruce Davis Donald Maxy 

Burton Davis James Meade 

Howard Elliott Frank Mears 

Jay Emrey Basil Mishtowt 

Theodore Fletcher Michael Panciotti 

Dunreath Grover Franklin Peacock 

Roman Hales Charles Piozet 

Wilson Hancock Daniel Prettyman 

John Harn William Rea 

Neal Hathaway Elmer Reese 

Norman Hathaway^ Eugene Riley 

Wendel Healey William Sietz 

Arthur Horn Harold Smelzer 

Richard Hutchinson Floyd Soule 

David Johnson Walter Spelzberg 

Richard Kern Richard Stuver 



67 



KAPPA ALPHA 

Founded at Washington and Lee University 

in 1865 
Local Beta Kappa chapter established here 

in 1914 

Officers : 

President William Grahm 

Vice-President William Booze 

Secretary G. James Heil 

Treasurer H. John Badenhoop 

Members: 

Charles Allen Joseph Mehl 

Alan Bradley Harry McGinnis 

Joseph Burk William Miller 

John Carter J. Leo Muller 

Harold Cotterman Nelson Phelps 

W. A. H. Council! Victor H. Pool 

George DeWitt Robert Saum 

Hoover Duff W. Arthur Seal 

Adrian Goode Jordan Sexton 

Landis Hill Frank Thompson 

Frank Heyer Ashton Thumm 

Emmet Kavenaugh Gary Todd 

Charles Mehl Rocco Zaino 



SIGMA NU 

Founded at V. M. I. in 1868 
Maryland Delta Phi established here in 1918 



Officers: 



President 

Vice-President- 
Secretary 

Treasurer 



-Frederic Hewitt 
__ Harry Vollmer 
- Donald Murphy 
Samuel Hatchett 



Andrew Altman 
Amos Burlin 
Ralph Burlin 
Robert Chaney 
Jack Cherry 



Members : 

Charles Joyce 
Henry Kimball 
James Lanigan 
David Leonard 
Richard Leister 



68 



Francis Crelly 
Robert Dammeyer 
William Diamond 
Albert Dieffenbach 
James Edgerton 
Halbert Evans 
Marshall Garrett 
Jack Hargreaves 
Robert Harmen 
William Jack 
John Jones 



Thomas Lewis 
William McMahon 
John Mortin 
Walter Mulligan 
Oscar Nevares 
Howard Randall 
Samuel Robertson 
Edwin Schmitt 
Peter Snyder 
Hugh Walton 
Wade Wood 



PHI SIGMA KAPPA 

Founded at Massachusetts Agricultural College 

in 1873 

Maryland Eta established here in 1931 

Officers : 

President Page Fullington 

Vice-President — Robert C. Rice 

Secretary Hugh Downey 

Treasurer Harry B. Hambleton 



Members: 



Harry Anderson 
James Burnside 
Shelton Clemmer 
Robert Cook 
Thomas Crouch 
Neal Dow 
Allen Fisher 
Donald Fugitt 
Aldrich Hambleton 
Walter Hawley 
Willard Jensen 
William Katzenberger 
Jerry Hege 

Thomas 



John Lane 
Paul Lanham 
Frank Machin 
Charles Parvis 
William Shoenhaar 
Orville Shirey 
Frank Smith 
William Souder 
Hammond Rau 
Boyd Taliaferro 
John Wade 
Thomas Watson 
William West 
Wharton 



69 



DELTA SIGMA PHI 

Founded at the College of the City of New 

York in 1899 

Maryland Alpha Sigma established here in 1924 

Officers: 

President William McManus 

Vice-President Thomas Brookes 

Secretary George Evering 

Treasurer Donald Markline 

Members: 

John Ackerman North Longfield 

Clarence Becker John Luntz 

William Filbry Arthur Moon 
Jose Grave de Peralta William Oberle 

Edward Harlan Herbert Roesler 

Vincent Hughes Richard Sullivan 

William Johnson Howard Valentine 

SIGMA PHI SIGMA 

Founded at the University of Pennsylvania 

in 1908 

Maryland Delta established here in 1916 

Officers: 

President _ _ Douglas Steinberg 

Vice-President Tom Coleman 

Secretary William Landy 

Treasu rer LeRoy GarlitZ 

Members: 
Harold Ajctell William Maslin 

Harry Boswell Norman Miller 

Kenneth Clark Harry Ovitt 

Albert Coleman Roy Peters 

Thomas Coleman Robert Russell 

Daniel Derrick Frank Seitz 

LeRoy Garlitz James Sloan 

James Hartman Robert Van Horn 

Frederick Hicks Jack Weber 

Fletcher Jones Bond Weber 

Henry Kennedy Donald Wick 

William Landy Robert Wilson 

Herbert Linsley 

70 



ALPHA GAMMA RHO 

Founded in 1908 at Ohio State University- 
Maryland Alpha Theta chapter established here 
in 1928 
Officers: 

President ..Louis Ahalt 

Vice-Presi(ient George Hoshall 

Secretary Howard Bailey 

Treasurer Vernon Foster 

Members: 

Glenn Bosley Charles Jubb 

William Beyer Clayton Libeau 

William Brosius Harry Matthews 

Mason Butler Joseph Merritt 

Howard Crist Joseph Pohlhaus 

David Sheibley William Redding 

Carol Forsyth Robert Stevens 

Thomas Galbreath Frank Taylor 

Richard Jenkins Morris Todd 

Bradley Jones Charles Treakle 
Roscoe Whipp 



LAMBDA CHI ALPHA 

Founded at Boston University in 1909 

Maryland Epsilon established here in 1932 

Officers: 



President. 




Wilhiir 


Herbert 


Vice-Presi 


dent 


...Richard 


Carroll 


Secretary.. 
Treasurer. 




TWnrvin 


Ander 




John 


Gifford 




M< 


>tnbers: 




Donald 


Corridon 


David Kelly 




Donald 


Damuth 


Milton Kimbel 




William 


Esmond 


James Miller 




LeRoy 


Harris 


LeRoy Nelson 




Wilbur 


Jeffreys 


Edward Nyler 




Nelson 


Jones 


Charles Schaefer 


Herman 


Kaiser 


Wilbur Yocum 





71 



TAU EPSILON PHI 

Founded at Columbia University in 1910 

Maryland Tau Beta established here in 1935 

Officers: 

President Milton Lehman 

Vice-President Norman Himelforb 

Secretary Marvin Mandell 

Treasurer Norman Tilles 

Members: 

Lawrence Auerbach Bernard Klawans 

William Bralove Albert Kleiman 

Abraham Ginsburg Jayson LeFrak 

Daniel Horowitz Milton Mulitz 

Gilmore Hyman Arthur Peregoff 

Leonard Katz Alvin Salganik » 
Herbert Young 

SIGMA ALPHA MU 

Founded at City College of New York in 1909 
Maryland Sigma Chi established here in 1933 

Officers: 

Prior Leo H. Siegel 

Recorder David A. Abrams 

Exchequer Frank C. Borenstein 

Members : 
Sidney Berman Stanley Mann 

Alfred Bernstein Albert Molafsky 

Norman Finberg Marvin PolikoflF 

Eugene Fisher Harvey Steinbach 

Robert Hyman Robert Tarkas 

Louis Klein Ralph Tyser 

Alvin Lavenstein Murray Valenstein 

PHI ALPHA 

Founded at George Washington University 

in 1914 

Maryland Epsilon established here in 1919 

Officers : 

President- Burton Borden 

Vice-President George Flax 

Secretary Daniel Kaufman 

Treasurer Irving Lipsky 

72 



SOCIAL 
SORORITIES 



KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA 

Founded at Monmouth College in 1870 

Gamma Psi Chapter established at University 

of Maryland in 1929 

Officers: 

President Tempe Curry 

Vice-President Betty Hottel 

Secretary Margaret Kemp 

Treasu rer Peggy Smaltz 

Members: 

Helen Bedell Tillie Logan 

Muriel Booth Reba Mclndoe 

Alice Cann Mary Millikan 

Betsy Carson Betsy Mumma 

Tempe Curry Bess Patterson 

Barbara Davis Mary Powell 

Gayle Davis Martha Rainalter 

Charlotte Eisele Ruth Richmond 

Edith Farrington Susan Rinehart 

Marianna Grogan Patricia Royster 

Elizabeth Harrover Margaret Smaltz 

Betty Hottel Betty Snavely 

Mary Ellen Hunter Alden Tucker 

Margaret Kemp Betty Lou Tydings 

Margaret Kibler Clare Upson 

Doris Kluge Dorothea Wailes 

Jane Kraft Helen Welsh 

Eleanor Kuhn Virginia Wood 



73 



DELTA DELTA DELTA 

Founded at Boston University in 1888 

Alpha Pi Chapter established at University of 

Maryland in 1934 

Officers : 

President _ ...Ann Irvine 

Vice-President Emma Shelton 

Secretary Lorraine Jackson 

Treasurer ..— Mary Jane Harrington 

Members: 

Mildred Bland Sugar Langford 

Evelyn Bullock Irene Leighton 

Alice Burkins Polly Logan 

Carolyn Clark Mary MacLeod 

Dorothy Dennis Martha Meriam 

Judith Greenwood Einily Peters 

Edwina Hambleton Mary Ellen Pyle 

Laura Hastings Tommy St. Clair 

Treva Hollingsworth Rita Scheffler 

Bette Holt Margaret Seiter 

Catherine Huff Grayson Smith 

Rose Jones Hateva Smith 

Edwina Lambertson Margaret Wallace 
Doris Willingham 

ALPHA XI DELTA 

Founded at Lombard College in 1893 

Beta Eta Chapter established at the University 

of Maryland in 1934 

Officers : 

President Lucille Hornman 

Vice-President Lois McComas 

Secretary. Esther Mullinix 

Treasurer... Katharine Shea 

Members: 

Dorothy Aiello Harriet Kirkman 

Catherine Aiello Geraldine Kreider 

Genevieve Aitcheson Elizabeth Owens 
Jean Albert Katherine Perkins 

74 



Shirley Connes Shirley Pfeiffer 

Dorothy Davis Lois Teal 

Alice Deitz Louise Teller 

Maryan Donn Margaret Thurston 

Mary Engel Katharine Turner 

Virginia Keys Helen Williams 

KAPPA DELTA 

Founded at Virginia State Normal in 1897 

Alpha Rho Chapter established at University 

of Maryland in 1929 

Officers: 

President Mary Lee Ross 

Vice-President Elaine Danforth 

Secretary Katherine Bohman 

Treasurer Marian Bond 

Members : 
Randa Beener Ruth Koenig 

M. Virginia Bolden Helen Kuhn 
Josephine Bragaw Ann Longest 
Mary Brice Doris McFarland 

Betty Cissel Dorothy Nellis 

Erin Ellis Betty Porter 

Betty Flannigan Marie Richards 

Margaret Ford Noami Richmond 

Mary Henderson Betsy Ross 

Ann Hoen Ethel RuoflF. 

Hildreth Kempton Lida Sargeant 
Bernice Jones Doris Schutrumpp 

Judy King Adria Smith 

Laura Wilkins 

ALPHA OMICRON PI 

Founded at Barnard College in 1897 

Pi Delta Chapter established at University of 

Maryland in 1924 

Officers : 

President Sara Anne Vaiden 

Vice-President Katherine Short 

Secretary Mary Helen Cook 

Treasurer Catherine Foote 

75 



Members: 



Barbara Boose 
Betty Brookens 
Mary H. Callander 
Beatrice Fennel 
Helen Groves 
Marguerite Hall 
Mary Jane Haskell 
Jane Howard 
Geraldine Jett 
Lois Kemp 
Martha Jane Legge 
Lucille Leighty 



Ellen Lutzer 
Earla Marshall 
Eurith Maynard 
Elizabeth Powers 
Jean Ramer 
Estelle Rr^ i? 
Betty Raymond 
Jean Reese 
Beverly Reinstedt 
Billie Jane Rittase 
Frances Rosenbusch 
Jeanne Santamarie 



PHI SIGMA SIGMA 

Founded at Hunter College, New York City, 

in 1913 
Beta Alpha Chapter, formerly Beta Pi Sigma 
local sorority, founded at University of Mary- 
land in 1936 

Officers : 

President Jean Lowenthal 

Vice-President Lee Adele Fisch 

Secretary June Yagendorf 

Treasurer Selma Schultz 

Members: 
Mildred Baitz Lillian Powers 

Pearl Ettin Ruth Rubin 

Bertha Katz Lenore Schultz 

Gladys Lieberman Rosalind Schwartz 
Beatrice Shuman 

ALPHA SIGMA 

Local sorority founded at University of Mary- 
land in 1936 
Officers: 

President Audrey Hornstein 

Vice-President Bernice Kress 

Secretary Ethel Rosenfield 

Treasurer Muriel Gordon 



76 



Members: 



Anita Einbinder 
Hortense Finklestein 
Sue Gussac 
Esther Handler 
Maxine Harzenstein 



Helen Michelson 
Freda Seigel 
Ruth Surosky 
Rita Vane 
Miriam Yaffe 



ALPHA DELTA 

Founded at the University of Maryland in 1938 
Officers: 

President Margaret Wolfinger 

Vice-President —Ruth Evans 

Secretary Ann Jarboe 

Treasurer June Schmidt 

Members: 

Marie Augustine Doris Groves 

Isabelle Butler Philomena Osso 

Shirley Byers Mildred Oursler 

Catherine Gilleland Maxine Trout 

KAPPA ALPHA SIGMA 

Local sorority founded at University of Mary- 
land in 1937 
Officers : 

President Martha Hickman 

Vice-President Barbara Skinner 

Secretary Anna Voris 

Treasurer Margaret Menke 

Members: 

Dorothy Campbell Catherine Kurzenknabe 

Edith Christensen Irene Nichols 

Virginia Davis Hilda Ryan 

Clara Goldbeck Charlotte Stubbs 

Dorothy Hussong Mildred Stubbs 

Elizabeth Johnston Marie Turner 



77 



Members : 

Bernard Aiken Raphael Ehrlich 

Louis Bindes Joseph Fishkin 

Howard Bonnett Irving Schumacher 

Sidney Dorfman Fred Schulman 

Morton Steinbach 



ALPHA EPSILON 

Founded at University of Maryland in 1936 
Officers : 

President . Maurice SchlenofF 

Vice-President- Armand Tori 

Secretary : Robert Mendelson 

Treasurer Morton Cohen 

Members : 

Ralph Aarons Joshua Liese 

Harold Dillon Daniel Schmuner 

Milton Singer 



! Make the 

College Park Pharmacy 



Your Headquarters 
While at Maryland 

1 1 The Rexall Drug Store 

S. Cawthome, Mgr. 

s Free Fast Delivery 



78 



FRATERNITY AND SORORITY 
DIRECTORY 

Alpha Delta - Dorm B 

Gr. 3800, Branch 85; Gr. 3806 after 9:30 

Alpha Gamma Rho — Berwyn 75 ...Princeton Ave. 

Alpha Omicron Pi — ^Berwyn 224 ...College Ave. 

Alpha Sigma 521 Hopkins Ave. 

Mrs. Lane's, Gr. 2845 

Alpha Tau Omega — Berwyn 165 College Ave. 

Alpha Xi Delta— Gr. 1020 Wellesley Ave. 

Delta Delta Delta— Berwyn 253„..College Ave. 
Delta Sigma Phi — Berwyn 151.— Wellesley Ave. 

Kappa Alpha — Berwyn 104 Wellesley Ave. 

Kappa Alpha Sigma Club Mrs. Summer's 

Gr. 2557 18 Oak St. 

Kappa Delta — Berwyn 275 Gerneaux Hall 

Kappa Kappa Gamma Princeton Ave. 

Berwyn 233 

Lambda Chi Alpha — -Berwyn 250 ...College Ave. 

Phi Alpha ... Howard Ave. 

Phi Delta Theta — Berwyn 280 College Ave. 

Phi Sigma Kappa — Berwyn 339 ...Dartmouth Ave. 

Phi Sigma Sigma — Berwyn 229 College Ave. 

Sigma Alpha Mu Behind Gym-Armory 

Berwyn 211 

Sigma Nu — Berwyn 161 College Ave. 

Sigma Phi Sigma — Berwyn 90 College Ave. 

Tau Epsilon Phi — Berwyn 31 1... Wellesley Ave. 

Theta Chi — Berwyn 214 Princeton Ave. 



79 



HONORARY 
FRATERNITIES 



ALPHA ZETA 

Honorary Agricultural Fraternity. 

Founded at Ohio State University in 1897. 

Maryland Chapter established here in 1920. 

Officers : 

Chancellor.. Vernon Foster 

Censor Fred Kef auver 

Scribe J. William Brosius 

Treasurer William Redding 



Members: 



Charles C. Astle 
J. William Brosius 
Allan H. Brown 
Mason Butler 
James Brownell 
Julian Crane 
Howard Crist 
Lawrence Faith 
Vernon Foster 
Fred Kefauver 
Robert Lowe 
Frank McFarland 
Robert Rappleye 
George Vogt 



Martin Muma 
Robert Nichols 
Joseph Peaslee 
William Redding 
David Shebley 
Maron Wheatley 
Fred Winkler 
Clarence Phillips 
William Harman 
James Beattie 
David Johnson 
Lee Crist 
Tom Reid 
Jack Weber 



80 



ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA 

National Women's Freshman Honor Society. 

Founded at the University of Illinois in 1924. 

Chartered at the University of Maryland in 

1932. 

Officers: 

President .- Doris McFarland 

Vice-President' Virginia Mercer 

Secretary Catherine Perkins 

Treasurer Elizabeth Funk 

Members: 

Jeanette Baldwin Virginia Mercer 

Mildred Bodine Doris McFarland 

Lydia Ewing Mary Parlett 

Elizabeth Funk Catherine Perkins 

Elizabeth Harrover Beatrice Shuman 

Bertha Katz Charlotte Stubbs 

Doris Kluge Charlotte White 

Irene Kuslovitz Judy Woodring 



ALPPHA PSI OMEGA 

National Honorary Dramatic Fraternity. 
Founded at Fairmount State College in 1925. 
Chartered at University of Maryland in 1929. 

Officers: 

President Judy Greenwood 

Vice-President David Seidel 

Secretary-Treasurer — Irvin Cook 

Members: 

Mildred Baitz Irvin Cook 

Albert Coleman Judy Greenwood 

David Seidel 

81 



ALPHA CHI SIGMA 

Professional Chemical Fraternity 

Founded at the University of Wisconsin in 1902 

Established at the University of Maryland in 

1928 

President Howard Fawcett 

Vice President- Richard Clark 

Recorder David Drawbaugh 

Master of Ceremonies Edward Wharton 

Reporter Kenneth White 

Treasu rcr — _ Jack Marzolf 

BETA ALPHA PSI 

National Honorary Accounting Fraternity. 

Founded at the University of Illinois in 1919. 

Chartered at the University of Maryland in 

1936. 

Officers: 

President Benton Borden 

Vice-President . Albert Dieffenbach 

Seer eta ry -Treasurer George Flax 

Members: 

Bert Anspon Edwin Harlan 

Francis Beamer James Healey 

William Brown Stanley Kummer 

E. Hoover Duff Gino Valenti 

OMICRON NU 

National Honorary Home Ex;onomics Fraternity 

Founded at Michigan State College in 1912 

Established at the University of Maryland in 

1937 

Officers: 

President ._ Elizabeth Burroughs 

Vice-President .— Jane Kraft 

Secretary-Treasurer Elizabeth Waugh 

82 



PI DELTA EPSILON 

National Honorary Journalistic Fraternity 

Founded at Syracuse University in 1909 

Chartered at the University of Maryland in 1930 

Officers : 

President.... William Brown 

Vice-President Tommy St. Clair 

Secretary-Treasurer .Mary Jane Harrington 

Members: 
Bruce Davis Bess Pater son 

Allan Fisher Robert Rice 

Carl Goller Mary I.ee Ross 

Betty Hottel Kelso Shipe 

Sugar Langford Douglas Steinberg 

Richard M. Lee Morgan Tenny 

Charles Morris Rali)h Tyser 

Murray Valenstein 

PHI KAPPA PHI 

Senior Honorary Scholastic Fraternity 

Founded at the University of Maine in 1897 

Established at the University of Maryland 

in 1920 

President Dr. Edgar Long 

Vice-President Dr. M. V. Woods 

Secretary-Treasurer.... _ Dr. Svirbely 

Faculty Members 
C. O. Appleman C. F. Kramer 

L. E. Bopst H. B. McDonnel 

L. B. Broughton J. E. Metzger 
C. C. Bruce J. B. S. Morton 

Myron Creese H. J. Patterson 

H. F. Cotterman R. G. Rothgeb 

David Dew A. L. Schrader 

L. P. Ditman W. S. Small 

C. G. Eichlin W. A. Stanton 

Geary Eppley W. T. L. Taliaferro 

I. C. Haut R. V. Truitt 

H. A. Hunter Claribel Welsh 

W. B. Kemp C. E. White 

L. G. Worthington 

83 



OMICRON DELTA KAPPA 

Honorary Society for the Recognition of 

College Leadership 

Founded at Washington and Lee University 

in 1914 

Sigma Circle established at the University of 

Maryland in 1927 

Omicron Delta Kappa is the national honor- 
ary fraternity which recognizes men who have 
attained renown on their campus in the vari- 
ous fields of collegiate activity, such as publi- 
cations, dramatics, athletics, and the like. Mem- 
bership is determined by the Omicron Delta 
Kappa Point System, together with qualifica- 
tions of scholarship, initiative, character, and 
ability to lead. The pledges of the society are 
"tapped" each year at special fall and spring 
ceremonies. Omicron Delta Kappa sponsors the 
Calvert Cotillion, one of the outstanding events 
of the winter social season. 

Officers : 

President — Richard M. Lee 

Vice-President William B rown 

Secret a ry-Treasurer Kel so Shi pe 

Members: 

Wayne Fitzwater George Seeley 
James Kehoe Warren Steiner 

Edward Miller Thomas Wharton 

TAU BETA PI 

National Honorary Engineering Fraternity 

Founded at Lehigh University in 1886 

Chartered at University of Maryland in 1920 

Officers: 

President... _ .....George Malcolm Lapoint 

Vice-President... Ralph Rector 

Secretary ....Joseph Marzolf 

Treasurer Prof. Myron Creese 

Members: 
Bowen Shaw 

84 



LATCH KEY SOCIETY 

Local Honorary Sports Manager Fraternity 

President Norman Miller 

Vice-President — Richard M. Lee 

Secretary-Treasurer - Harold Axtell 



MORTAR BOARD 

Mortar Board is the women's national honor 
society which gives recognition for outstanding 
Service, Scholarship, and Leadership. Junior 
women are tapped for membership on May 
Day. To belong to Mortar Board is one of 
the highest honors to be bestowed upon a Jun- 
ior woman student. The pin is a small plack 
Mortar Board. 

The Women's Senior Honor Society of the 
University of Maryland became a chapter of 
Mortar Board on December 8, 1934. 

Officers: 

President.... Ann Ames 

P^ ice-President Mary Lee Ross 

Secretary Elizabeth Harrover 

Treasurer ..Tommy St. Clair 

Members: 

Marian Bond Betty Hottel 

Ternpe Curry Sugar Langford 

Judith Greenwood Bess Paterson 



85 



ORGANIZATION 



THE Editors of the "M" 
Book for 1939-40 wish to 
take this method of thank- 
ing H. G. Roebuck & Son, Bal- 
timore, Md., Ralph Williams, 
Assistant Dean of Men, and 
Carlisle Humelsine, Assistant 
Editor of Publications, Univer- 
sity of Maryland, for their help 
in putting out this book. 



86 



AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL 
ENGINEERS 

Chairman William H. Watkins 

V ice-Chairman Joseph Kaminski 

Secretary-Treasurer Joseph Marzolf 

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL 

ENGINEERS 

President— Edward Kemp Bebb 

J^ice-President Ralph Rector 

Other officers fo be chosen. 

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MECHANICAL 
ENGINEERS 

President Francis C. Morris 

Vice-President.. L. Kemp Hennighausen 

Treasurer Richard K. Bamman 

Secretary — To be selected in the fall. 

BAPTIST STUDENT UNION 

President Ann Calhoun Ames 

Secretary Ruth Wegman 

Treasurer ....Robert Rappleye 

BLOCK AND BRIDLE 

President Joseph Polhaus 

Vice-President Robert Stevens 

Secretary Edith Farrington 

Treasurer George Hoschall 

Reporter Benton Gatch 

CALVERT DEBATE CLUB 

President Frank Davis 

Vice-President Richard M. Lee 

Secretary .Elizabeth Powers 

Women's Manager Charlotte White 

Temporary Men's Manager Bertram Sacks 

87 



DAYDODGERS 
President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



CLUB 

Betsy Ross 

Lida Sargeant 

Bessie Arnold 

Paul Edwards 



DEMOCRATIC CLUB 

President Norman Miller 

Secretary Helen Chaires 

Treasii rer Me rl e P r eble 



EPISCOPAL 

President 

Vice-President 

Treasu rer 

Secretary 

S erg eant-at- Arms 

FOOTLIGHT 

President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



CLUB 

...Douglas Steinberg 

William Maslin 

Caroline Gray 

Charlotte White 

Thornton Race 

CLUB 

David Seidel 

Alan Waite 

Sugar Langford 

Gino Valenti 



FRENCH CLUB 

President Gail Davis 

Vice-President Mary Carson 

Secretary Louise Gardner 

Treasurer John Moore 

FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 

President Louis Ahalt 

Vice-President Jake Hoshall 

Secretary Mordecai Welling 

Treasu rer Arthu r Rudy 

GERMAN CLUB 

President Helen Brooks 

Vice-President Patricia Ann Royster 

Secretary Virginia Hodson 

Treasurer Gunther Werner 



88 



HOME ECONOMICS CLUB 

President — Virginia Wood 

Vice-President Francis Rosenbusch 

Secretary Barbara Boose 

Treasurer .Shirley Conner 



INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB 

President Richard M. Lee 

Vice-President Harry Hutson 

Secretary Gertrude Plumer 

Treasurer Katharine Short 



LUTHERAN CLUB 

President ..William Brown 

Vice-President Margaret Zimmerman 

Secretary Lucille Kornmann 

Treasurer Eleanor Kephart 

MEN'S GLEE CLUB 

President Robert Kinney 

Vice-President Alwyn Powell 

Secretary-Treasurer Armand Terl 

METHODIST CLUB 

President.. Dan Prettyman 

Vice-President Steven Jones 

Secretary Elnora Lyon 

Treasurer Mary Lee Aylesworth 

New officers will he elected »n the fall. 



NEWMAN CLUB 

President Joseph Polhaus 

1st Vice-President Alice Blum 

2nd Vice-President .Dent Abell 

Recording Secretary Anna Lee Mudd 

Corresponding Secretary Harry Matthews 

89 



OPERA CLUB 

President Irvin Cook 

Vice-President- Gino Valenti 

Secretary Elizabeth Powers 

Treasurer Robert Kinney 



PERSHING RIFLES 

Captain Thomas Riley 

Executive Lieutenant Robert Laughead 

Junior Officers — To be elected. 

RIDING CLUB 

President Howard Randall 

Vice-President- -„ ___Garland Fairbanks 

Secretary. . Mary Henderson 

Treasurer Betty Jullien 



ROSSBOURG CLUB 

President "Rip" Hewitt 

Vice-President Jim Kemper 

Secretary Leo Mueller 

Treasurer - Bill McManus 

Junior Representative Charles Joyce 



SPANISH CLUB 

President Jose Sanchiz 

Vice-President James Malcolm 

Secretary Martha Meriam 

Treasurer Francisco Lanza 



STUDENT BAND 

Captain Gibson Wilson 

Drum Major Paul Siebeneichen 

First Sergeant Jack Weber 

Business Manager Richard Hart 

Quartermaster Sergeant Howard Kluge 

90 



STUDENT GRANGE 

Master .William Brosius 

Overseer — Louis Ahalt 

Lecturer Esther Mullinix 

Secretary Marjory Enfield 

Treasurer Vernon Foster 

Chaplain Scott Whiteford 

Steward Carroll Forsyth 



TERRAPIN SWIMMING CLUB 

President Howard Randall 

Vice-President Don Murphy 

Secretary Marjorie Berger 

Treasurer Jack Hargreaves 



TERRAPIN TRAIL CLUB 

President John Secrest 

Vice-President Orville Greenwood 

Secretary Georgianna Calver 

Treasurer.. Edward Rehberger 



WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

President Vivian Bono 

Vice-President Isabel Butler 

Secretary-Treasurer Jean Ramer 

WOMEN'S CHORUS 

President Marion Bond 

Secretary Elizabeth Barber 

Treasurer Esther Gross 



Y. W. C. A. 

President Elaine Danforth 

Vice-President Lida Sargeant 

Secretary -Bernice Jones 

Treasurer... Mary E. Brice 

91 




FRANK M. DOBSOX 

Coich, Football and Track 



92 




ATHLETICS 
SECTION 5 



93 



HIGHLIGHTS OF THE 1938-39 INTER. 
COLLEGIATE SPORTS PROGRAM 

Football 

Won State Championship from Western 
Maryland College 14-8 at Baltimore Stadium 
on October 15, 

Cross Country 

Placed Second in the Southern Conference 
Tourney with 58 points. 

Basketball 

Lost the Conference title against Clemson 
after winning from Richmond and North Caro- 
lina State. 

Boxing 

Won the Southern Conference title with IS 
points. 

Baseball 

Won fourteen out of the eighteen games 
scheduled, winning ten straight games begin- 
ning with an 8-4 victory over Georgetown. 
Indoor Track 
Finished second in the Southern Conference 
Indoor Track competition winning six of the 
twelve individual championshps. 
Track 
Team finished the season undefeated and 
placed third in the Conference tourney. 
Lacrosse 
Lacrosse team won the Wingate Memorial 
Trophy, emblematic of the 1939 intercollegiate 
lacrosse team championship. 

MARYLAND COACHING STAFF 

Geary Eppley, Head Track Coach, Director of 

Athletics. 
C. Leroy Mackert, Physical Education Head, 

Director of Intramural Program. 
Frank M. Dobson, Head Football Coach, 

Associate Track Coach. 

94 



John E. Faber, Head Lacrosse Coach, assist* 
ant Football and Basketball Coach. 

H. Burton Ship ey, Head Basketl)all, and 
Baseball Coach. 

Harvey L. Miller, Head Boxing Coach. 

Leslie Bopst, Head Tennis Coach. 

G. F. "Rosy" Pollack, Frosh Baseball Coach. 

Albert Heagy, Football Line Coach, Frosh 
Basketball Coach. 

Albert Woods, Frosh Football Coach. 



MANAGERS OF VARSITY SPORTS 

Football _ -Norman Miller 

Basketball William Heil 

Boxing James Healy 

Baseball Charles Bastian 

Track Carl Goller 

Tennis.- Bert Morris 

Rifle Joseph Marzolf 

Cross Country William McManus 

Lacrosse Richard Lee 



ATHLETIC RECORDS — 1938-39 

VARSITY FOOTBALL 

(Coach, Frank M. Dobson) 

LAST YEAR'S SCHEDULE 

U. of Md. 0pp. 

L'niversitv of Richmond 6 19 

Penn State College 33 

Syracuse University 53 

Western Maryland College 14 8 

Lhiiversity of Virginia. 19 27 

University of Florida 7 21 

Virginia Military Institute 14 47 

(ieorKctow n University . . 7 14 

Washington and Lee University .19 13 

95 



THIS YEAR'S SCHEDULE 

September 30 — Hampden-Sydney College 
October 7 — Western Maryland College 

14 — University of Virginia 
21 — Rutgers University 
" 28 — University of Florida (Home- 

coming) 

November 4 — Penn State College 
" 11 — Georgetown University 

" 18 — Virginia Military Institute 

" 25 — Syracuse University 

" 30 — Washington and Lee University 



VARSITY BASKETBALL 

(Coach, Burton Shipley) 

LAST YEAR'S RESULTS 

U. of Md. Opp. 

Richmond 34 41 

Clemson 45 35 

Davidson 44 27 

Pennsylvania 24 36 

Army 25 45 

Navy 37 • 47 

Duke 37 34 

North Carolina 34 32 

Hampden-Sydney 34 25 

Virginia 31 21 

Duke 60 44 

North Carolina 66 41 

North Carolina State 40 46 

Georgetown 25 39 

Washington and Lee 39 37 

William and Mary 49 57 

St. John's College 48 20 

V. M. I 53 35 

Catholic University 40 38 

George Washington 24 37 

Washington College 47 37 

96 



Southern Conference Tournament at Raleigh, 

North Carolina. 
Maryland 47 — Richmond 32 
Maryland 53 — North Carolina State 29 
Maryland 27 — Clemson 39 

THIS YEAR'S SCHEDULE 

December 12 — Western Maryland College 

" 14— Randolph-Macon 

January 1 — Clemson 

" 3 — Pennsylvania at Philadelphia 

" 4 — Rutgers at New Brunswick 

" 9— Duke 

" 13 — Richmond 

" 17 — Georgetown at Washington 

19— V. P. I. 

" 20 — Washington and Lee 

" 26 — North Carolina State at Raleigh 

" 27 — Clemson at Clemson 

" 29 — ^South Carolina at Columbia 

" 30 — Duke at Durham 

31— Virginia 
February 3- — ^Johns Hopkins 

" 7 — V. M. I. at Lexington 

" 8 — Washington and Lee at Lexingrton 

" 14 — Washington College at Chester- 

town 

" 17 — Catholic University 

22— V. M. I. 

" 24 — George Washington 

" 29-March 2 — Southern Conference 
Tournament at Raleigh 

VARSITY CROSS COUNTRY 
(Coach, Geary Eppiey) 

LAST YEAR S RESULTS 

U. of Md. 0pp. 

Virginia 26 29 

North Carolina 31 24 

Navy 31 24 

Second in the Southern Conference Cross Coun- 
try with 58 points. 

97 



THIS YEAR'S SCHEDULE 

October 1^1 — Virginia at Charlottesville 
" 21 — Navy at Annapolis 

" 30 — University of North Carolina 

at Chapel Hill 
November 20 — Southern Conference Cross 
Country 
" 21 — National Collegiate Cross Coun- 

try at Michigan State 

VARSITY BOXING 
(Coach, Lt.-Col. Harvey Miller) 

LAST YEAR'S RESULTS 

U. of Md. 0pp. 

Duke University 5 3 

Catholic University 4 4 

Virginia 4 4 

North Carolina State 4 4 

Rutgers 6J^ 154 

Army 4^^ 3^4 

Won the Southern Conference title with IS 
points. 

BOXING 
THIS YEAR'S SCHEDULE 

January 13 — Duke 

" n — Catholic University at Washing- 
ton 
February 3 — University of Virginia 

" 10 — University of North Carolina 

VARSITY BASEBALL 
(Coach, Burton Shipley) 

LAST YEAR'S RESULTS 

U. of Md. 0pp. 

Ohio State 3 4 

Rutgers 3 

Vermont 24 5 

Dartmouth 10 

98 



V. p. I 22 5 

V. M. I 4 5 

W. and L (rain) 

Boston College 12 14 

Michigan _ - — 4 2 

Michigan 6 

Richmond - (rain) 

Wm. and Mary (rain) 

Georgetown 8 4 

V. P. I _ 24 8 

Duke .- 9 8 

Washinpton College 6 5 

Wm. and Mary (rain) 

Richmond 8 5 

Washington College - 5 2 

Lafayette — 10 6 

Rutgers 8 6 

Georgetown 4 

THIS YEAR'S SCHEDULE 

March 23 — North Carolina at Chapel Hill 
" 25 — Duke (doubleheader) at Durham 

26 — Virginia at Charlottesville 
" 30 — Dartmouth 

April 1 — Vermont 

'' 6 — Washington College at Chestertown 

" 12 — Michigan 

" 13 — Richmond at Richmond 

" 17 — George Washington 

" 20 — Richmond at Richmond 

" 22 — William and Mary at Williamsburg 

" 2i — Randolph-Macon at Ashland 

" 26 — North Carolina 
29— Duke 

May 2 — Washington and Lee 

" 4 — -William and Mary 

" 6 — North Carolina State 

'' 8 — Georgetown at Washington 

10 — Virginia 
" 11 — Georgetown 



91928 



13— V. M. I. 
14 — George Washington 
16 — West Virginia 

17 — Washington and Lee at Lexington 
18 — V. M. I. at Lexington 

VARSITY LACROSSE 

(Coach, Jack Faber) 

LAST YEAR'S RESULTS 

U. of Md. 0pp. 

Mt. Washington 11 1 

Harvard 13 3 

Penn State 18 2 

St. John's ' 20 6 

Rutgers 12 

Princeton 7 4 

B. A. C 5 6 

Navy 5 3 

Hopkins 3 6 

THIS YEAR'S SCHEDULE 

March 23 — Mt. Washington 
April 1 — ^Dartmouth 

" 4 — Harvard 

" 6— Loyola 

" 17 — Army at West Point 

" 20 — -Rutgers at New Brunswick 
27 — Penn State at State College 
May 4 — Princeton at Princeton 

" 11 — Navy at Annapolis 

" 18 — Johns Hopkins 

VARSITY TRACK 
(Coach, Geary Eppley) 

LAST YEAR'S RESULTS 

U. of Md. Opp. 

Dartmouth 63 63 

V. P. I 85 41 

V. M. I 751^ 505^ 

100 



William and Mary 85 41 

Washin;jrton and Lee 11 49 

Won Class B Mile Relay Championship of 
America in the Penn Relay. 

THIS YEAR'S SCHEDULE 

March 23 — South Carolina at Columbia 
(tentative) 

" 30 — Florida at Gainesville, (tentative). 
April 6— V. P. I. at Blacksburg 
13— V. M. I. 

" 20 — Rutgers at New Brunswick 

" 27— Penn Relays at Philadelphia 
May 4 — Virginia 

" 11 — Army 

" 18 — South Carolina 

VARSITY TENNIS 

(Coach, Leslie Bopst) 

LAST YEAR'S RESULTS 

U. of Md. 0pp. 

Michigan 3 6 

Richmond 8 1 

Richmond — 6 3 

Duke 4 5 

North Carolina State 5 1 

North Carolina University. 2 7 

Catholic University — _ 9 

LETTERMEN OF THE CAMPUS IN ALL 
VARSITY SPORTS 

Football 

Ralph Albarano George Lawrence 

Francis Beamer Edward Lloyd 

Frank Blazek Leo Mueller 

John Boyda Joe Murphy 

Elmer Bright Richard Shaffer 

Robert Cochrane Frank Skotnicki 

Joe Devlin Robert Smith 

William Krouse Fred Widener 

101 



Cross Country 

Robert Condon James Kehoe 

Halbert Evans Roy Skipton 

Thomas Fields Mason Chronister 



Nathan Askin 
Newton Cox 



Boxing 

Herman Raisin 
Morton Steinbach 



Basketball 

Francis Beamer Pershing Mondorff 

Adam Bengoechea Gene Ochsenreiter 
George De Witt William Rea 

Richard Shaffer 



Baseball 



Adam Bengoechea 
Robert Burns 
Burton Culver 
Frank Dwyer 



Hugh Keller 
Frederick Maisel 
Pershing Mondorff 
Earl Springer 



Track 

Mason Chronister Allan Miller 
Joseph Devlin Vernon Miller 

Thomas Fields Charles Morris 

James Kehoe Joseph Murphy 

Gene Ochsenreiter 



Lacrosse 



Charles Allen 
William Bond 
William Cole 
John Grier 
James Heil 
George Lawrence 



Nathan Askin 
Philip Burkom 
James Burnside 
James Hardy 



Jack Mueller 
Leo Mueller 
Milton Mulitz 
Oscar Nevares 
Jordan Sexton 
Gary Todd 

Tennis 

Lawrence Lichliter 
Joseph Morris 
Jack Phillips 
Albert Ritzenberg 

102 



J 



Rifle 



Dean Evans 
Raymond Hodges 
Allen Imus 
Willard Jensen 
Robert Laughead 



Jack Marzolf 
Joseph Marzolf 
George Meeks 
Enos Ray 
Thomas Riley 



INTRAMURAL PROGRAM 

The 1939-40 Intramural Athletics season was 
the most successful the University has had 
since intramural competition was initiated into 
the sports program three years ago. 

The men's and women's physical f^ducation 
department cooperated to offer competition in 
twenty-two sports. Handball, badminton, and 
shuffleboard courts, together with an indoor 
archery range were opened. 

The minor sports program was given a great 
deal of impetus by the energy and enthusiasm 
of the men's department. They organized and 
officiated at games under the supervision of 
student leaders. 




10.1 



MINOR SPORTS DIRECTED BY THE 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 

Soccer. Varsity and Frosh teams are under 
the leadership of "Stew" McCaw, Physical 
Education Instructor. The Varsity team is a 
member of the Maryland Intercollegiate League. 

Wrestling. The Varsity and Frosh squads 
are coached by "Stew" McCaw, Physical Edu- 
cation instructor. The Varsity squad schedules 
outstanding meets with leading wrestling aggre- 
gations. 

Golf. The Varsity Team had dual meets with 
the universities of Baltimore, and Georgetown, 
and with the U. S. Military Academy. The 
squad also entered the Washington Intercol- 
legiate tourney. 

W. A. A. 

The Women's Athletic Association is an or- 
ganization formed to promote and supervise 
athletics among the women students of the 
University. 

Membership is open to all women students, 
and a complete program of major and minor 
sports is carried on under the direction of 
the women's physical education department. 

Major sports are hockey, soccer, tennis, 
track, basketball, volleyball, and softball. Minor 
activities include golf, darts, archery, table- 
tennis, shuffleboard, and badminton. 

Class and intramural tournaments are spon- 
sored in each of the major sports. All awards 
are made on the basis of a point system. 
Requirements are: 

Freshmen numerals — 400 points; An "M", 
the Sophomore Award, 900 points; Junior 
Award, 1,400 points; and Senior Award, 1,900 
points. Last year the coed rifle team became 
affiliated with the W. A. A. and is now included 
as part of the point system. 

104 



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105 




Kelso Shipe. Head Cheerleader 
Ethel McCardell Ben Gatch 

Elaine Danforth Gene Howard 

Jean Cissel 

ALMA MATER 

(Maryland! My Maryland!) 
The sons and daughters throng thy door, 

Maryland! My Maryland! 
Their hearts and hopes they bring to thee, 

Maryland! oh Maryland! 
And place them in thy custody. 
Proud hearts that pledge their love for thee: — 
They come from mountain, farm and shore 

Maryland University! 

Go forth, brave youth, throughout the state: 

Maryland! My Maryland! 
And your actions, show her great: 

Maryland ! Our Maryland ! 
Thy Alma Mater's name and fame. 
Oh keep alive her holy flame. 
Until all hearts as one exclaim, 

Maryland! My Maryland! 

Cheer, three times cheer, and one cheer more 
For Maryland! Dear Maryland! 

Send forth that cry from hill to shore: — 
Maryland University! 

Fair Mother of our brightest dreams, 

Blest giver of life's precious things. 

To thee each heart its service brings: — 
Maryland ! My Maryland ! 

106 



U. of M. 
(Tune of Caisson Song) 

U. of M., U. of M. 
Keep the ball away from them, 
Keep that piK'>;kin a-rollins? along! 
Up the field, down the field. 
Not an inch of ground we'll yield, 
Keep that pigskin a-rolling along- 
Then it's Whiff! Wham! Whack!! 
Hear that Maryland quarterback 
Shout out his signals loud and strong! 
Where'er you go. you will always know 
That the pigskin is rolling along, 
(shouted) Maryland! Maryland! 
Keep that pigskin a-rolling along! 

Sons of Maryland 

(Tune, Sons of America) 

Sons of the Gold 
Sons of the Black, 

Fight, No spirit lack. 
Your Alma Mater 
Needs you today. 
To help win the fray. 
Shoulder to shoulder. 
Back to back. 
We'll fight together 
For the Gold and Black. 
Fair Sons and Daughters 
Of Maryland 

Upon you all vict'ries stand. 
Chorus 

Sons of Old Maryland, 

Old Maryland needs you! 

Stand by your colors, boys, 

And to them e'er be true! 

Fight for old Maryland, 

Old Liners! Stand. 

Defenders of the Black and Gold 

Throughout this land. 

Team ! Team ! Team ! 

107 



MY MARYLAND 

The despot's heel is on thy shore, 
Maryland I My Maryland! 

His torch is at thy temple door, 
Maryland! My Maryland! 

Avenge the patriotic gore, 

That flecked the streets of Baltimore, 

And be the battle queen of yore 
Maryland! My Maryland! 

Thou wilt not cower in the dust 

Maryland ! My Maryland ! 
Thy gleaming sword shall never rust 

Maryland! My Maryland! 
Remember Carroll's sacred trust, 
Remember Howard's war-like thrust, 
And all the slumb'rers with the just, 
Maryland ! My Maryland ! 



Maryland 



In the very heart of Maryland. 

In the heart of every Maryland man. 
There's a spirit so endearing 

It will win your heart and hand. 
For she doth hold sway, 
She will win the day. 
And her glorious men will ever win the fray. 

Chorus 

Then it's Hurrah! Hurrah! for Maryland. 
Then's it Hurrah! Hurrah for U. of M. 
With her banners ever streaming high, 
She will always win or die. 
Never forget the glories of the past, 
Carry on triumphant to the last, 
For we love, we love Old Maryland, 
Hurrah! Hurrah! Hurrah! 

108 



All Hail! to Our Maryland 

Let us sing to Alma Mater 

University of Maryland 
Let us deck her o'er with glory, 
Wth triumph and honor, hand in hand: 

University of Maryland, 

The college so dear to our hearts, 
We'll cheer for the teams which are all so 
great, 

Its prarises ring, from State to State; 
Along the well-worn trail of victory 

Maryland will follow on and on, 
And the colors in the lead, 

Will be Black and Gold, indeed. 



Alma Mater 

(By Bob Kinney, '41) 

Hail, Alma Mater! 
Hail to thee Maryland- 
Steadfast in loyalty 
For thee we stand. 
Love for the Black and Gold, 
Deep in our hearts we hold. 
Singing thy praise forever, 
Throughout the land. 

Victory Song 

Down on the field they're fighting. 

Pride of the Black and Gold, 

Men, every one of them. 

Warriors of L^. of M. 

Our honor they'll uphold. 

On toward the goal they're marching. 

It will not take them long, 

So, let's give a cheer. 

For the men we hold dear, 

And sing to them our Victory Song. 

109 



Chorus 

Maryland, we're all behind you; 

Wave high the Black and Gold, 

For there is nothing half so glorious 

As to see our men victorious; 

We've got the team boys, 

We've got the steam, boys, 

So keep on fighting, don't give inl 

(Shout) M-A-R-Y-L-A-N-D! 

(Sing) Maryland will win! 

U. M. Rah 

U. M. Rah Rah 

U. M. Rah Rah 

U. Rah 

M. Rah 

U. M. Rah Rah 

Whistle — Boom — Rah 

Team Team Team 

Red Hot Yell 

Our team is red hot 

Our team is red hot 

Our team is red hot 

Red Hot— Red Hot— Red Hot 

Swing 

M! M! Mary 
L! L! Land 
M— A— R— Y 

L— A— N— D 
Fight, team, fight 

Sway 

M— A— R— Y— L— A— N— D 

Mary Land 

Fight, team, fight 

110 



Yea, Maryland 

Vea, Maryland! Yea, Team! 
Fight 'em ! Fight 'em ! Fight 'em I 



Letter Yell 

M— A— R— V— L— A— N— D 
Mary Land 



Hooray 



Hoooo- 

Hoooo- 



-Ray 
-Rah 



Maryland 
Team Team 



Team 



Locomotive 

MMMM AAAA RRRR YYYY 

LLLL AAAA NNNN DDDD 

Maryland 
Team Team Team 



Whistle 
Team 



Team 



Siren 

— Boom 



Rah 



Team 



Maryland- 



Mary 

Mary 

Maryland! 
Maryland! 
Hoo-Rah ! 
Maryland ! 
Team ! 



-land- 
-land- 



Rah! Rah! 
Rah ! Rah ! 
Hoo-Rah ! 



Team ! 



Team ! 



-U! 



-U! 
-U! 



Ill 



Lord Calvert Inn 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



3 minutes from the University 
The Ideal Place to Hold Your 

Serving Distinctive Food 
At All Times 

! Breakfast — Luncheon — Dinner 

Accommodations for your Visiting 
Family and Friends in our 

|| Tourist Units I| 

Each Equipped with Tub j 

or Shower 

Individual Garages Steam Heat 



BANQUET f 

DINNER DANCE ! 

PARTY 

Phone Berwyn 276 

JEANNE H. WRIGHT 
OTIS L. DAVIS 



112 



SAVE ON TEXTS 

and 

SUPPLIES 

Cash Paid for Your 
Old Texts 



Phone Ber. 475 and 72 

MARYLAND 

BOOK 
EXCHANGE 

Opposite The Gate 



113 



THE HOTEL 
ABERDEEN 

I 17 W. 32nd St. 

New York 



The home for students of ] 
Maryland while in New York 



In the Shadow of the i 

Empire State Building i, 

s 

Convenient to everything || 



Joseph E. Martire 
Manager 



114 



H.G. ROEBUCK & SON 

Printers of the 

"M" BOOK 



119 W. Mulberry St. 

Baltimore, Maryland 



115 



mJ. 9/928 

378.73 

M36lrr, 
'*»3q|40