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Full text of "The "M" book of the University of Maryland"

/ / 



Class of 1962 



! 








Class of 1962 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 



PREFACE 

The following pages contain a wealth of 
important information about the University 
of Maryland, its academic policies, its extra- 
curricular activities, and its social activ- 
ities. This is information that we feel is 
important to you, the new student, in your 
inauguration as a part of this University. 

We feel that the M Book will prove use- 
ful to you every day for the first few weeks 
that you are here, and it will be a help- 
ful source of information throughout your 
college career at Maryland. 

The Book is designed, for the most part- 
as a collection of facts which may be located 
through the extensive index in the back of 
the Book on pages 163 through 168. 

We have dedicated the Book to the Class 
of 1962. We have designed it for your con- 
sumption. We hope we have done a good job 
and a useful service for you. 

The Editors 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

General Information 7 

Administration 29 

Student Go\ernment — - 41 

Publications and Communications — 65 

Religion 8 1 

Honoraries 9 1 

Organizations 107 

Sororities - 1 25 

Fraternities 133 

Athletics 143 

Songs and Cheers — 155 

Index 1 63 



M BOOK 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Editor— Be\erl.y J. May 

Managing Editor— Habt T. Joseph 

Business Afa/mger— Jerome M. Kender 

Faculty Advisor— Phofessor Robert G. Carey 

SECTION editors 

Diane Bottoms 

Jackie Eads 

Mary Lou Gosom 

Carol McCleary 

Ann Marie Perry 

Jeannette Richardson 

Katherine Ricketts 

Jacqueline Spencer 

William Wickert 

STAFF 

Grace Anderson Pamela Maher 

Marcia Clarke Sandie Patterson 

Norma Eberhart Joan Purdon 

L. Kathryn Godman Dottie Robinson 

Peggy Gordon Roberta Richardson 

Janet Johnson Linda Sobel 

Edna Kindleberger Pat Stretmater 

June Lambe Fred Thompson 

Harriet Love Joyce Tichnell 




GENERAL INFORMATION 



HISTORY AND TRADITIONS 

In 1807 THE College of Medicine was founded in 
Baltimore, the fifth such school to be established 
in the, United States. During the first century of 
the College's existence, schools of Law, Dentistry, 
Nursing, and Pharmacy were added, thus earning 
the name University of Maryland. 

The Maryland Agricultural College was char- 
tered in 1856. When Congress passed the Land 
Grant Act in 1862, requiring land to be set aside 
for the ". . .maintenance of at least one college to 
teach such branches of learning as are related to 
agriculture and the mechanical arts. , . ," the Mary- 
land Agricultural College was named beneficiary 
of the grant by Maryland's General Assembly. 

The Uni\ersity of Maryland in Baltimore and 
the Maryland Agricultural College in College 
Park were merged in 1920 by the Maryland State 
Legislature to form the present Unixersity. In ad- 
dition to the campuses in College Park and Balti- 
more, Maryland students are found throughout the 
Maryland students are found throughout the 
world, studying under the College of Special and 
Continuation Studies. 

History and tradition carry over to the way in 
which the University has been designed. Georgian 
type architecture has been preserved in the con- 
struction of the University over the past 102 years. 

One of the most beautiful buildings is the 
Memorial Chapel. From it comes the hourly chim- 



8 



ing of "Maryland, My Mar\'land" and the playing 
of seasonal music, which promotes a feeling of 
warmth and serenity. 

Other notable landmarks are: the tunnel— re- 
quirements for passing through include a boy, a 
girl, and a kiss; and the Rossborough Inn, the 
campus' oldest building, where General Lafayette 
was reported to ha\e \isited. Newer landmarks in- 
clude a four-story library, the Journalism Building, 
numerous dorms, and the convenient walks. 

Freshman Orientation, the first registration for 
classes, and the hectic purchasing of books and 
supplies are among a freshman's earliest acquaint- 
ances with the traditional busy life of Maryland 
students. Fall brings the football season, high- 
lighted by pep rallies, high spirits, Homecoming 
Weekend, and Harmony Hall. Winter means tray 
sliding, basketball, Christmas \acation, the KA 
Minstrel, cramming for finals, and the Interfrater- 
nity Ball. 

Blazers, trenchcoats, con\ertibles, and more 
mud than usual declare that spring has come. 
Freshman, Sophomore, and Junior Proms, the 
Sophomore Carni\al, elections, the Interfraternity 
Sing, Spring Week, and May Day are followed 
by finals and graduation— the height of Maryland 
tradition. 

No uni\'ersity would be complete without a 
mascot. Our mascot is Testudo, a five hundred 
pound bronze replica of the Maryland diamond- 
back terrapin. Testudo resides at the entrance to 
Byrd Stadium. 



TESTUDO 




10 



WHOM TO SEE 



All extensions listed are for 
map for building code. 



WA. 7-3800. See campus 



FOR: 


SEE: 


BLI 


)G.: PH 


[ONE: 


Absences 


Dean of College 








Admissions 


G. W. Algire 


Ad. 


Annex 


325 


AFROTC 


Col. R. Kendig 


AR 




351 


Alumni 


David Brigham 


IB 




366 


Athletics 


William Cobey 


GG 




372 


Baseball 


Burton Shipley 


GG 




467 


Basketball 


Bud Millikan 


GG 




501 


Football 


Tommy Mont 


GG 




242 


Golf 


Frank Cronin 


GG 




242 


Lacrosse 


Jack Faber 


GG 




231 


Rifle 


M./Sgt. Wilt 


GG 




637 


Soccer 


Doyle Royal 


IB 




375 


Swimminp 


Wiiliam Campbell 


GG 




544 


Tennis 


Doyle Royal 


IB 




375 


Track 


Jim Kehoe 


GG 




370 


Wrestling 


Sully Krouse 


GG 




467 


AWS 


Alice Heisler 




UN. 


4-9899 


Bills 


Cashier 


Ad. 


Annex 


340 


Dramatics 


Joe Warfield 


Charles 


81 


Employment: 










General 


Lewis Knebel 


Ad. 


Annex 


411 


Women's 


Marian Johnson 


Ad. 


Annex 


359 


Fraternities 


Rand Tuttle 




WA. 


7-9707 


Graduate School 


Dean Bamford 


T 




232 


Health Service 


Dr. L. Dyke 


Infi 


rmary 


326 


Housing: 










Men's 


Dean Eppley 


Ad. 


Annex 


338 


Women's 


M. Jameson 


Ad. 


Annex 


579 



11 



FOR: 


SEE: 


BLDG.: PHONE: 


Intramurals: 










Men's 


Jim Kehoe 


GG 




370 


Women's 


Dorothy Deach 


W 




267 


Library 


Desk 


Library 


260 


Lost and i'"ound 


Campus Police 


Gatehouse 


315 


Mail 


Post Office 


Stu 


Union 


386 


Men's League 


Charles Peterson 




WA. 


7-9563 


Music: 










Band 


H. Henderson 


B 




207 


Choir 


F. Springmann 


B 




207 


Glee Clubs 


F. Springmann 


B 




207 


Orchestra 


Bryce Jordan 


B 




207 


Police 


Gatehouse 






315 


Problems 


Counseling Center 


EE 




284 


Publications and Communications: 








Diamondback 


John Blitz 


G 




258 


Expression 


Sid Krome 








M Book 


Bev May 


G 


WA. 


7-9709 


Old Line 


Ken Duncan 


G 




361 


Terrapin 


B. May or J. Eads 


G 




361 


WMUC 


Tom Willoughby 






513 


Religious Groups 


F. DeMarr 


Ad. 


Annex 


377 


Scholarships 


P. Poffenberger 


O 




327 


SGA 


Vernon Briggs 




UN. 


4-9851 


Social Life 


E. McCormick 


Ad. 


Annex 


271 


Sororities 


Judy Purnell 




UN. 


4-9899 


Space Reservations: 








Student Union 


Bill Hoff 


Stu 


d. Union 


503 


Chapel and other buildings 




546, 371 


Stud. Life Com. 


R. Allen 


J 




346 


Summer School 


Dean Anderson 


T 




234 


Telegrams 


Switchboard 


T 




350 



12 



ACTIVITIES BOOK 

The acth ities book, presented with a Uni\ersity 
identification card, enables students to attend in- 
tercollegiate athletic e\ ents and all acti\ ities spon- 
sored by the Student Go\ emnient Association. The 
book is issued at registration when the Acti\ ity Fee 
is paid. The Fee also includes class dues and publi- 
cations. 



AFROTC PROGRAM 

Since the University of Mar\land is a Federal 
land-grant institution, ROTC training is required 
for all male students for two years. As a prereq- 
uisite for graduation, male students must com- 
plete two years of basic military training, unless 
they are \eterans of the armed services. Special 
pro\isions are made for those not phvsicallv quali- 
fied. 

The Air Force ROTC Program is di\ ided into 
two parts. The freshman and sophomore years 
are de\oted to the basic course, and the junior 
and senior years to the ad\anced course. 

Basic cadets ha\e two hours of classroom 
instruction each week and drill every Wednesday. 
Basic ROTC affords opportunity^ for cadets to 
participate in flights in Air Force aircraft. Some 
flights are o\ernight trips to Air Force bases in 
other sections of the country. 



13 



In addition to Wednesday drills, advanced 
cadets ha\'e four hours of class work each week. 
To qualify for the advanced ROTC program, cadets 
are carefully screened during their first two years. 
The adi^anced course is primarily concerned with 
imparting knowledge and mental skills that will 
increase a young man's opportunities for success 
as an Air Force officer. Those men who choose to 
fulfill their military obligations through advanced 
ROTC are granted a draft deferment. Upon com- 
pletion of four years of AFROTC training and 
graduation from the Uni\ ersity, the ad\ anced cadet 
receixes a commission as a Second Lieutenant in 
the U. S. Air Force Reser\e. 

Instructors in the Air Science Department are Air 
Force officers specially selected by the USAF for 
this assignment. Each officer has taken an Academic 
Instructors course at the Air Force's Air University 
to prepare for his job. The Air Science curriculum 
that these officers teach was designed by a commit- 
tee of top flight college educators and senior Air 
Force officers. 

Commanding Maryland's AFROTC unit is Col. 
Robert E. Kendig, Prof, of Air Science. Over 
35 regular Air Force personnel, who teach and 
keep detailed records on each cadet, compose Col. 
Kendig's staff. 

The AFROTC Program is also a\ailable for a 
few selected women students. Upon successful 
completion of the program, they may be commis- 
sioned as members of Women in the Air Force. 



14 



BOARD 

All dormitory residents are required to pay 
$200.00 for Dining Hall meals. Individual meals 
may be bought: $.60 for breakfast, $.80 for lunch, 
and $1.20 for dinner. 

DINING HALL HOURS: 





Breakfast 


Lunch 


Dinner 


Mon.-Fri. 

Saturday 

Sunday 


6:30-8:15 
7:30-8:30 
8:30-9:30 


11:10-1:10 
11:30-1:00 
12:30-1:45 


4:30-6:05 
4:30-6:15 
Not served 



A cafeteria is located on the ground floor of the 
Dining Hall and provides inexpensive lunches for 
commuting students. Students may also purchase 
meals at the Student Union cafeteria and various 
College Park restaurants and drugstores. 

The Terrapin Room, Dining Hall "training room," 
is reserv ed for the serving of meals to the members 
of athletic teams during their respective seasons. 

BOOKS AND SUPPLIES 

Book stores on the campus and in the College 
Park area charge approximately the same prices 
for books and supplies. The Student Supply Store 
in tlie basement of the Student Union has, in ad- 
dition to books and supplies, such items as svveat- 
I shirts, cosmetics, writing paper, and greeting cards. 
I The Marv'land Book Exchange, on the corner of 
Baltimore Bhd. and College Ave., does not have 



15 



such a wide \ ariety of items, but does ha\'e a greater 
selection of supplies for class. Alpha Phi Omega 
service fraternit>' operates a book store in the 
Journalism Building. APO sells books for students 
on a nonprofit basis. There are also various stores 
in the College Park Shopping Center that have 
supplies for all student needs. 

CLASS ATTENDANCE 

Instructors ma>' penalize students for absences. 
No automatic "cuts, " or absences, are allowed ex- 
cept for students who ha\ e attained a 3.5 a\erage 
for the previous semester. Whenever a student has 
accumulated more than three unexcused absences, 
the instructor reports such absences to the student's 
dean. 

Excused absences include illness and participa- 
tion in Uni\ ersit\^ acti\ities at the request of Uni- 
versity authorities. Absences due to minor illnesses 
are handled by instructors. The Infirmary or phy- 
sician in attendance to a serious illness may give 
statements to deans regarding absences. 

COUNSELING CENTER 

The purpose of the Counseling Center is to 
help students with \ocational choices and with 
educational and personal problems. Assistance is 
also axailable for diagnostic and remedial work in 
reading and study methods. The Center maintains 
an extensixe supply of tests of abilities, aptitudes. 



16 



interests, and personalities. Students pa\' an annual 
Ad\ isory and Testing Fee at the time ot registra- 
tion and are entitled to all ser\ ices offered. 



DROPPING COURSES 

If a student has a legitimate reason, he is allowed 
to drop a course during the first three weeks of the 
semester. First-semester freshmen are allowed eight 
weeks in which to drop a course. Arrangements 
are made with the student's academic advisor. 



EMPLOYMENT 

Part-time campus jobs are handled by the Dean 
of Men's office, the Dean of Women's office, or 
the individual college. Employment opportunities 
through the Dean of Men's office include clerical, 
stenographic, laboratory, photographic, Dining Hall, 
Student Union, Library, proctoring, and drafting 
jobs. 

Tlie Dean of Women's office works in coopera- 
tion with the Dean of Men in placing women 
students in jobs. Dean Jameson must approve all 
women student positions in the Dining Hall and 
receptionists in the dormitories. 

Each college offers a number of jobs for its 
students. 

General!) , positions are open to students who 
17 



maintain a 2.0 axerage. The minimum pay scale 
for campus part-time employment is TSc'- an hour. 

Other offices work in arranging summer employ- 
ment. Mr. Knebel, Director of Student Employment, 
holds jol) conferences in March and April. Approx- 
imately twenty companies send representati\ es at 
this time. A complete listing of opportunities is 
kept in the Dean of Men's office. Information con- 
cerning women's summer camp jobs may be ob- 
tained at the Women's Physical Education Depart- 
ment. 

Because of better pay scales, many students ar- 
range for off -campus work. The Dean of Men's 
office offers a listing of all jobs diat are reported to 
them, with information on the hours, t>pe of work, 
and amount of experience desired. The listing is a 
serxice to the students and the Dean of Men's 
office does not arrange for interxiews. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Periodic examinations are gi\en throughout the 
semester at the discretion of the professors and de- 
partment heads. If a student misses an exam and 
has a legitimate excuse, he will be allowed to make 
it up upon payment of $1.00 to the Registrar. 

Final examinations are given at the end of the 

semester in accordance with an official schedule. A 
few courses, in which the progress and proficiency 
of the student can be rated during die semester, do 
not require finals exams. 

18 



INFIRMARY 

Minor injuries and illnesses are treated at the 
Infirmary. A doctor is on call at all hours for 
emergencies. If the staff is unable to care for a 
patient, he is referred to outside treatment. A small 
ward, X-rays, a medical laboratory, and consulta- 
tion rooms are a\ ailable. 

Each matriculating student is charged $5.00 for 
a health ser\ice fee. The Infirmary's staff consists 
of the director. Dr. Lester Dyke; five part-time 
doctors; and eight nurses. 

HOURS: 

Mondav-Friday 8:00-1:00, 2:00-5:30 

Saturday 9:00-12:00 

Sunday 11:00-12:00 

LAUNDRY 

There are a number of laundromats and dry 
cleaning establishments located in the College 
Park shopping area. Washing machines and driers 
are located in most dorms. Students who subscribe 
to the Gordon-Da\is Linen Serxice for $26 a year 
receive weekly: three bath towels, two sheets, and 
one pillowcase. Blanket serxice is provided at an 
additional cost. 

LIBRARY 

The recently opened library is arranged to en- 
able students to find materials easily. There are six 



19 



subject reading rooms, each containing periodicals, 
reference books, and otlier materials. The book 
stacks are open to e\er>'one. Books are checked in 
and out at the loan desk. Two book depositories are 
located at the front entrance for the return of books 
when the library- is not open. 

Modem facilities include typing booths, study 
rooms, and indi\ idual study booths; Sepcial Col- 
lection Room: Maryland and Rare Books Room; 
piano rooms; and a browsing room, where recent 
no\els and fa\orite literar\" works are located. 

HOURS: 

Monday— Friday 8 a.m.— 10 p.m. 

Saturday 8 a.m.— 1 p.m. 

Sunday 3 p.m.— 10 p.m. 

LOST AND FOUND 

All students are requested to turn in found arti- 
cles to the Gatehouse, located at the north entrance 
on Route 1. This is the only official lost and found 
department on campus. 

MAIL 

A Unix ersity post office is located in the base- 
ment of the Student Union for the reception, dis- 
patch, and deli\er>' of U. S. mail, including parcel 
post packages and inter-office communications. 
U.S. mail is received at 8:30 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. 
and dispatched at 11:15 a.m. and 4:15 p.m. daily. 

Each student is assigned a post office box at 



20 



registration, for which a small fee is charged. Boxes 
are also pro\ ided for \arious Uni\ersity groups. 

A U. S. Post Office building is located in the 
College Park shopping area. The facilities are the 
same as those offered in any U. S. Post Office. 

PARKING FACILITIES 

The Unisersity provides parking facilities in 25 
separate parking lots. Of these, the large parking 
areas— A, B, F, and J— are reserved for student 
parking. The others are for faculty and guests. 
Curbed recesses are reserved for \isitor parking 
only. 

There are approximately 9,000 registered \'ehicles 
and 6,000 parking spaces within the parking areas. 
This condition calls for rigid parking regulations 
and fines for violations. Students are informed of 
all regulations by the pamphlet entitled University 

Traffic Regulations. 

A \ ehicle is considered illegally parked if it has 
not been registered, if the parking sticker which is 
obtained at registration is not properly placed, or if 
the \ ehicle is parked in a lot other than the one 
designated by its sticker. Duplicate stickers may be 
obtained at the Gatehouse at any time. 

Fines are paid at the Police Cashier window in 
the Ser\ ice Building. 

Commuters are encouraged to join car pools 
to reduce the number of cars on campus. 



21 



PUBLICATIONS DISTRIBUTION 

The Diamondback is published Tuesday dirough 
Friday and may be obtained at Diamondback 
boxes located at many places around campus. The 
M Book is distributed to all new students during 
Orientation Week. The two magazines, Expression 
and Old Line, are published frequently each year. 
The yearbook, the Terrapin, is distributed in May 
to students who hold University identification cards. 

SCHOLASTIC REQUIREMENTS 

The standard unit of academic work at the Uni- 
versity is tlie semester hour, commonly called the 
"credit." One semester hour, or credit, is equivalent 
to one hour a week of class work for a semester. 
Two or three hours of laboratory work is equal to 
one credit. The standard academic load is 15 to 19 
credits a semester. 

The grades given at Maryland are: A— superior, 
B— good, C— average, D— passing, and F— failing. 
Grades are assigned numerical \'alues starting with 
points for "F" and going up to 4 points for "A." 
The student's grade-point a\'erage is found by 
multiplying the number of credits of each individ- 
ual course by the numerical value of the grade re- 
cei\'ed, adding all of the products and dividing by 
the total number of credits. 

To make junior standing a student must com- 
plete 56 semester hours of academic work and have 
a scholastic average of at least 2.0. An average of 



22 



2.0 or better and completion of tlie required cur- 
riculum are necessary for graduation. 

A report of students doing work of caliber less 
than "C" is made at the end of the first six weeks 
of each semester. Each instructor reports the names 
of such students to their respectixe deans. Each 
dean then notifies the student by means of a "dean's 
slip." 

Information concerning the Academic Probation 
Plan and other academic regulations may be found 
in University Regulations and General Information, 
a booklet issued to students by the Uni\ersity. 

STUDENT DIRECTORY 

The Student-Faculty Telephone Directory is 
published by the Unix ersity each year and sold at 
the book stores a few weeks before the Christmas 
holidays. A general telephone directory, academic 
calendar, names and addresses of Board of Regents 
members, Administration officers, department heads, 
and organization officers are included. The Direc- 
tory also has a complete listing of students— their 
year and college, campus post office box number, 
home address, campus address, and the phone 
number at which they can be reached. 

STUDENT UNION 

The Student Union provides a cafeteria, a to- 
bacco counter, a book store (see BOOKS AND 
SUPPLIES), a post office, recreation facilities, 
meeting rooms, and student offices. 



23 



Recreational facilities include a theater in which 
recent full length motion pictures are shown at 
7:30 p.m. on Friday and Sunday, and at 7 and 
9 p.m. on Saturday; tele\ision rooms, with three 
black and white and one color sets, which allo\\- 
each local channel to be viewed at the same time; 
a browsing library, which contains periodicals and 
light reading material; lounges; a music librar>' 
with a piano, music listening booths, and records; 
a game room, for table games, which ser\es also 
as a lunch room for daydodgers during the noon 
hour; and a billiard room with sLx tables. 

Meeting rooms, which may be used b\' an\' rec- 
ognized campus organization, must be reser\ed 
in ad\ ance through the manager's office. There are 
9 meeting rooms with capacities ranging from 20 
to 300 persons. Special supplies— such as extra 
tables, chairs, and projection equipment— may be 
reciuested. 

HOURS: 
General 

Monday— Thursday 7 a.m.— 10 p.m. 

Friday 7 a.m.— 12 p.m. 

Saturday 8 a.m.— 12 p.m. 

Sunday 2 p.m.— 10 p.m. 

Supply Store 

( Special hours are held during the first weeks of 
school. ) 

Monday— Friday 8:30 a.m.— 4:15 p.m. 

Saturday and Sunday Closed 



24 



Cafeteria 
Snacks : 

Monday— Friday ...7 a.m.— 4:30 p.m. 

Saturday .'. 8 a.m. -12:30 p.m. 

Sunday ..„ 2 p.m.— 7 p.m. 

Breakfast : 

Monday— Friday - 7 a.m.— 10 a.m. 

Saturday .— 8 a.m.— 10 a.m. 

Lunch : 

Monday— Friday 11 a.m.— 12:30 p.m. 

Saturday 11 a.m.— 12:30 p.m. 

Billiard Room 

Monday— Friday 9 a.m.— 4:30 p.m. 

and 7 p.m.— 10 p.m. 

Saturday 1 p.m.— 10 p.m. 

TRANSPORTATION 

Greyhound's Baltimore-Washington buses leave 
College Park every half hour and go to the Wash- 
ington, D. C. terminal at 1110 New York Ave., N.W. 
Trailways has a temiinal in Washington at 1201 
New York Ave., N.W. Suburban Transit buses go, 
via Unixersity Bhd., to SiKer Spring e\ery half 
hour. Also, a streetcar lea\ es e\ ery half hour from 
the corner of College Ave. and Rhode Island Ave., 
east of Baltimore Blvd., with destination of 19th 
and D Streets, N.W., Washington. 

All major east coast airlines and many small 
ones serve the Washington National Airport in 



25 



Virginia. The Airport can be reached by crossing 
Memorial Bridge and continuing out Route 350. 
Ticket offices are located in the Suburban Trust 
Company buildings in College Park and in Wash- 
ington. Baltimore's Friendship International Airport 
can be reached by following the signs on the Balti- 
more-Washington Parkway. 

B. & O., C. & O., R. F. & P., Pennsylvania 
Southern, Atlantic Coast, Seaboard, Norfolk, and 
Western trains ser\e directly and indirectly into 
Union Station in Washington. The phone number 
is Executive 3-7900. 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS 

Each spring the SGA, in cooperation with the 
Dean of Women, compiles a master calendar from 
which a semester's calendar is printed for student 
distribution. A weekly social calendar, issued for 
students by the social director, is mailed to resi- 
dences on Thursday morning. 



SEPTEMBER 


14 




Dormitories open 


14-27 




Freshman Orientation 


15-19 




Registration 


20 




Away football— Wake Forest 


20-Oct. 


2 


Sorority rushing 


22 




Instruction begins 


25-Oct. 


4 


Fraternity rushing 


27 




Away football-N. C. State 



26 



OCTOBER 

4 Home footliall— Clemson 

7 Angel Flight Tea 

11 Parents' Day— Texas A 6c M 

18 Away football— North Carolina 

24 Panhellenic Pledge Dance 
25-26 Panhellenic Pledge Camp 

25 Away football— Auburn 

NOVEMBER 

1 Homecoming— South Carolina 

8 Football— Na\y at Baltimore 
12-13 Red Cross Blood Drive 

14 Away football— Miami 

22 Away football— Virginia 

26 Thanksgiving Recess begins 

DECEMBER 

1 Thanksgix ing Recess ends 

20 Christmas Recess begins 

JANUARY 

5 Christmas Recess ends 

21 Pre-Examination Study Day 
22-28 Examinations 



27 



FEBRUARY 




2-6 


Registration 


5 


I. F. C. Ball 


9 « 


Instruction begins 


23 


Washington's Birthda\'— Ik 


27 


Sophomore Prom 


MARCH 




6 


Angel Flight Talent Show- 


13 


Junior Prom 


13-20 


Ugly Man Contest 


16-21 


Campus Chest 


20 


Sophomore Carni\al 


25 


Maryland Day 


26 


Easter Recess begins 


31 


Easter Recess ends 


APRIL 




10 


Freshman Prom 


23 


Interfraternity Sing 



holidaN 



I 
I 



MAY 



14 Military Day 

28 Pre-Examination Study Day 

29-June 5 Examinations 



JUNE 
6 



Commencement Exercises 
28 



\mmm9 




ADMINISTRATION 




Dr. Wilson H. Ei^ki^s— President 

Dr. Elkins was chosen to become President of the 
University of Maryland in the spring of 1954, He 
was officially inaugurated on January 20, 1955. Dr. 
Elkins' climb to this office began in 1936 when he 
started teaching at the University of Texas. Two 
years later he became president of San Angelo 
Junior College, and in 1949 he assumed the presi- 
dency at Texas Western. He remained there until 
he accepted his present position. 

Dr. Elkins attended Schreiner Institute, in Texas, 
and the University of Texas, where he received B.A. 
and M.A. degrees in history. In 1933 he was 
awarded a Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford Unixersity 
in England. There, in 1936, he received Bachelor of 
Literature and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. 

A member of Phi Beta Kappa, Dr. Elkins was 
also a three-letter man as an undergraduate. 



30 



THE PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 

As President of the Uni\ersity of Maryland, Dr. 
Elkins directs the staff, faculty, and students of 
the Unixersity. His direct responsibility is to the 
Goxernor of Maryland and to the Board of Regents. 

Some of Dr. Elkins' top aides are: Dr. Alb in 
O. Kuhn, Executix e Vice President; James Borreson, 
E\ecuti\e Dean for Student Life; Dr. Frank L. 
Bentz, Jr., Assistant in the President's Office; Al\in 
E. Cormeny, Assistant to the President, in Charge 
of Endowment and Dexelopment; and Dr. R. Lee 
Honibake, Dean of the Faculty. 

Some of the general administrative officers are: 
G. Watson Algire, Director of Admissions, who 
approves all new students and organizes registration 
procedures; Mrs. Norma Azlein, Registrar, who is 
in charge of grade records and processes. 

Also included are: Robert J. McCartney, Uni- 
versity Relations Director, who takes care of 
University publications and publicity; and Dr. 
Lester M. Dyke, Director of Student Health Serv- 
ice, who supervises the Infirmary and oversees 
health control measures in campus residences. 

Other administrators include: Adele Stamp, Dean 
of Women; Ceary Eppley, Dean of Men; and Wil- 
liam Cobey, Director of Athletics. 



31 




Dr. Albin O. Kuhn— 
Executive Vice President 

Dr. Kuhn was appointed Executhe Vice Presi- 
dent of the Uni\ersity in February, 1958. Prior to 
his present position, he ser\ed for three years as 
Assistant to the President, handhng much of the 
work arising in the President's office. 

Dr. Kuhn attended the University of Maryland 
and did graduate work at the University of Wis- 
consin. He began teaching agronomy at Maryland 
in 1939 and by 1948 was a full professor and head 
of the Agronomy Department. He was named As- 
sistant to the President in 1955. 

While at Maryland, Dr. Kuhn has been tapped 
by ODK, Alpha Zeta, and Sigma Xi, graduate re- 
search fraternit\'. 



32 




B. James Borresox— 
Executive Dean for Student Life 

Dean James Borreson, one of the newest ad- 
ministrators at Maryland, recei\ed his B.A. degree 
from tlie Uni\ ersity of Minnesota in 1944. During 
liis undergraduate years lie was president of his 
social fratcrnit)', Alpha Delta Phi, president of IFC, 
and co-cliainnan of a campus political part\ . 

He began teaching in Minnesota's Humanities 
Department in 1946, became Director of Student 
Acti\ ities in 1947, and received the Facult> Rec- 
ognition Award from the student bod\' in 1954. 

From Minnesota Dean Borreson mo\ed to 
Harvard where he was appointed Assistant Dean 
of the Graduate School of Business and Instructor 
of Administrative Practices. 



33 




Adele Stamp— Dean of Women 

At Dean Stamp's office all campus social func- 
tions are registered and all women's housing is 
approved. 

Assistant Dean Eileen M. McCormick handles 
registration of social functions and also ser\es as 
adxisor to Panhellenic Council, while Associate 
Dean M. Margaret Jameson superxises women's 
residences. 

Job placement and counseling are Assistant Dean 
Marian Johnson's responsibility. Assistant Dean 
Julia E. Billings serves as advisor to AWS and 
Campus Judicial Board. 



34 




Geary Eppley— D(?rt/i of Men 

Dean Eppley, in addition to being Dean ot Men, 
is also Chairman of the Athletic Council. 

Some of the duties and responsibilities of his 
office are handled b\' a staff of assistants, which in- 
clude Assistant Dean D()\le Royal, Director of Off- 
Campus Housing, and Associate D^'an Robert C. 
James, Director of Men's Housing. 

Professor Furman Bridgers, Foreign Student Ad- 
visor; Assistant Dean Lewis Knebel, Director of 
Student Placement Serxice; and Assistant Dean 
Fred DeXhirr, Coordinator of Student Actixities 
and Chapel Functions; are imder the directorship 
of the E.\ecuti\e Dean for Student Life. 



oo 



4% 



^wM 



Dr. Lee Hornbake 
Dean of the Faculty 



Dr. Ronald Bamford Dr. Ray Ehrensberger 
Dean of the Graduate College of Special and 

SrJuHi] Continuation Studies 




36 



Dh. Leox p. Smith 

C.ollc^c of Arts and 

Sciences 




Dh. J. FhKKM AN PVLE 

College of Business and 
Fuhlic Administration 



Dk. Fhederic: M \\ is 
CoUcfic of Eti^inccring 





ot 




Dr. Vernon Anderson 
College of Education 



Dr. Gordon Cairns 
College of Agriculture 




Acting Dean 

Florence King 

College of Home 

Economics 



Dr. Lester Fraley 

College of Physical 

Education 



38 



STUDENT LIFE COMMITTEE 

The Faculty Senate Committee on Student Life, 
or the SLC as it is often called, is the policy-making 
hod\- in the field of student life and acti\ ities at 
Maryland. All campus organizations are subjuct to 
its policies and appro\al. The committee also rec- 
ognizes new organizations, regulates social func- 
tions, and makes recommendations to SGA. 

Members of SLC are appointed by the Executive 
Committee of the Uni\x'rsity Senate on the basis of 
applications and recommendations for membership. 
Members represent the \arious areas of campus life 
through which the student comes in contact with 
the faculty and administration. 

Three students ser\ e on the committee; they are 
the presidents of SGA, AWS, and Men's League. 
A student from the Baltimore schools is also offi- 
cially on die committee, although most of the com- 
mittee's functions concern only the College Park 
campus. 

The committee chairman is Professor Russell 
Allen. Other members include: Dean Borreson, 
Dean Eppley, Dean Stamp, Dean James Reid, Dean 
Lester Fraley, Dr. Dorothy Deach, Eileen Mc- 
Cormick, Ann Norton, Dr. Fred Thompson, Dr. 
Norman Laffer, Dr. Joseph Mattick, Virginia Con- 
ley, Dean James, and Professor Bridgers. 



39 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

Charles P. McCormick, Sr., Chairman 1966* 

Edward F. Holter, V ice-Chairman 1959 

B. Herbert Brown, Secretary 1960 

Harry H. Nuttle, Treasurer 1966 

Louis L. Kaplan, Assistant Secretary 1961 

Edmund S. Burke, Assistant Treasurer 1959 

Thomas W. Pangborn 1965 

Enos S. Stockbridge 1960 

Thomas B. Symons 1963 

C. Ewing Tutde 1962 

Al\m L. Aubinoe 1967 

* Denotes expiration of term of office. 



40 




STUDENT GOVERNMENT 



STUDENT GO\ ERNMENT 
ASSOCIATION 

The Student Government Association ( SGA ) , 
is the main organization of student go^'emment at 
the Universit>' of Maryland. Its major function is 
to coordinate organizations, other go\'erning and 
law-making groups, and to appropriate student 
funds. 

SGA has three di\isions. The first is the Execu- 
tive Council, consisting of 15 members who are 
the SGA administrative oflBcers— President, Vice- 
President, Secretar>% and Treasurer; tlie four class 
presidents; the president of AWS; the president of 
the Men's League; two independent representatives; 
and one fraternit>' and one sorority representati\ e. 

Aiding tlie Comicil in its work is the Legislature, 
composed of nine seniors, eight juniors, seven 
sophomores, and sLx freshmen. 

The third di\'ision, composed of AWS, Men's 
League, and the \arious special and standing com- 
mittees of SGA, carries out the action designated by 
the Council and Legislature. 

Standing committees of SGA include: Finance, 
headed by the SGA Treasurer; Elections, headed 
by the Men's League President; and Organization 
and Procedures, headed by the Vice-President of 



42 



SGA. Special Committees, sucli as StucKiit Welfare, 
Social Affairs, Campus Improx (incut. Student 
Acti\ ities. Constitution, Campus (>liest. Fresh- 
man Orientation, Homecoming, Dad's Da\', Stu- 
dent Union, Culture, Public Relations, Traffic 
Appeals, Job Placement, and Who's Who among 
Students in American Universities and Colleges, 
are headed by students appointed by the SGA 
President with the appro\ al of the Executive Coun- 
cil. An\ student ma\' appK' for these chairmanships 
or for membership on the committees. 

Sub-committee chairmanships and committee 
members, in most instances, are chosen by the 
chairman of the acti\ it>'. 

Class acti\it>' chairmanships are appointed by 
the respecti\ e class executive councils. 

Students that are interested in working for an 
SGA committee should fill out an application, 
obtainable at the SGA office in the Student Union 
Building. Reminders that applications are being 
accepted for a particular committee and notification 
of the deadline for application usualK' appear in the 
Diamondhack before the committee is selected. 

Most of the students' extracurricular activities 
are go\ erned, regulated, or planned by one or more 
of SGA's committees; thus committees are impor- 
tant to e\er>' Maryland student. Operation of the 
various committees is solely dependent upon stu- 
dents, and e\er\ student is welcome to participate. 



43 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOC. 



EXECUTIVE 
COUNCIL 



LE6I8U 
TURE 



STUDENT 

LiFE 

COMMITTEE 



ASSOC. 

WOMEN 

STUDENTS 



MEN'S 
LEAGUE 



STUDENT COMMITTEES 



44 



THE EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 

The Exocutixe Council ot the Student Cioxcrn- 
nient Association meets each Tuesday e\ening in 
the Student Union Buildint];; all regular meetings 
are open. Students are welcome and are urged to 
attend meetings concerning their particular interests. 

If a student has a problem which he feels the 
entire Coiuicil should discuss, he may bring this 
matter to the attention of the Council at an>' SGA 
meeting. Action on a motion, howexer, must origi- 
nate in the Legislature. 

The Student Life Committee, a part of the 
Facult>' Senate, aids the Council in an ad\ isory 
capacit)-. This committee makes recommendations 
to SGA, which the group considers but is not 
forced to accept. In addition, this 17 member com- 
mittee must approxe e\ery organization, honorar>-, 
fraternity, and sorority that wishes to become estab- 
lished on this campus. Thus the Student Life Com- 
mittee is the main link between the student bod\' 
and the administration. 

The Council, known in the SGA Constitution as 
the Cabinet, executes all laws enacted b\- the Legis- 
latixe Council. They also ha\e the power to \eto 
any action of the Legislature b\ a inajoritN xote. 



45 




Vernon Briggs 
SGA President 



EXECUTIVE COUNCIL MEMBERS 

President Vernon Briggs 

Vice-President Joe Hardiman 

Secretary Judy Taggart 

Treasurer Bruce Colvin 

AWS President Alice Heisler 

Mens League President Charles Peterson 

Fraternity Representative Fred Denenburg 

Sorority Representative Arlen Kelly 

Independent Representative Bob Bailey 

Independent Representative Barbara Green 

Senior Class President Rand Tiittle 

Junior Class President (Vacant) 

Sophomore Class President Edward Griswold 

Freshman Class President (To Be Elected) 



46 



ASSOCIATED WOMEN STUDENTS 

President .\\kv lliisKi 

Vice-President .- Putritia Henslcy 

Secretary „ Martlia Tatiuii 

Treasurer Barlxira Green 

Associated Women Students (AWS), is the gov- 
erning body of all women students at the Uni\ ersity 
of Mar\land. 

lis main tunetioii is to tornmlatc and administer 
the campus rules and standards ot conduct appK ing 
to women. This is accomplished through thi' follow- 
ing suh-di\ isions: the Residence Council, composed 
of dormitory and sororit\ house presidents; the 
Dormitory Council, which is concerned with the 
problems of dormitor)' govcniment and E.\ecuti\e 
Council policies affecting women's dormitories; 
the Judicial lioard, goxerning board tor campus 
women's regulations; ;md the Academic lioard, 
ri'sponsible for encouraging high standards and 
stinmlating intellectual acti\ it\ . 

The AWS also sponsors \ arious social activities, 
assists WRA in its intramural program, and directs 
special e\ents such as the (^hristuKis Pageant. 



47 



MEN'S LEAGUE 

President Charles Peterson 

Vice-President Bert Coble 

Secretary Charles Broadrup 

Treasurer Roger Barker 

Men's League, the men's counterpart to AWS, 
is the body which administers the rules and regula- 
tions go\erning the men's dorms. It also works to 
promote the educational, cultural, social, and ath- 
letic welfare of the men at the University, 

The Men's League consists of an Executi\e 
Council and the Dormitory Council. 

The Executi\ e Council is composed of the Lea- 
gue's officers and elected representati\es of each 
class. Alpha Phi Omega, the Interfraternity Council, 
and the Independent Students Association. 

The Dormitory Council works to encourage dorm 
acti\ities and ser\es, through the proctors, as a 
disciplinary board for offenders in the dormitories. 

Proctors are students who maintain order and 
discipline in the dormitories. They are responsible 
for enforcing quiet hours and seeing that rooms are 
kept clean and that health standards are maintained. 



48 



LEGISLATURE 

The Legislature is composed of nine seniors, 
eight juniors, sexen soplioniores, and six freslimen. 
Its purpose is to gi\e each class a direct \oice in 
SGA affairs. Freshmen members are elected in 
October. 

All bills and resolutions must originate in the 
Legislature. Furthermore, the Legislature must ap- 
proxe all allocations of student funds proposed by 
the Finance Committee of the Cabinet. In turn, 
however, the Executixe Council has the right of 
xeto o\er the Legislature, thereby checking the 
powers of the largest of the student governing 
bodies. 

If a student has a problem or idea that he would 
like to ha\ e discussed in SGA, a motion is arranged 
b>" contacting a member of the Legislature. The 
Legislature is new this year and only by \ oicing the 
wishes of the students as a whole can it he success- 
ful. 

Members of the Legislature, other than freshmen, 
are elected in the spring during the annual campus 
elections. 



49 



MEMBERS OF THE LEGISLATURE 

Seniors 

Teeter Heterick 
Barbara Glaser 
Karen Ulrieh 
Jerry Bank 
Clyde CuKer 
Margo Dieterich 
Frank Ratka 
Barbara Meleber 
Bill Taylor 

Juniors 

Bob Yellowlees 
Linda Gertner 
Naney Bowen Croce 
Barbara Grimes 
Jaek MeCartln 
Robert Berger 
Linda Beek 
Robert Yerman 

SopJiomores 

Lanee Billingsley 
Joanne SiKer 
Linda Cntting 
Elaine Kallis 
Tbonias Boote 
S\bil Rappaport 
\\'arren Duekett 

Freshmen (To Be Elected) 

50 



CLASS OFFICKS 

IiuIiN idiial classes elect officers to plan and carry 
out student acti\ities. These subdi\ isons of SGA 
organize recreational, social, and cultural tunctions 
that supplement other proi^ranis sponsored 1)\ the 
\ari()us di'i)ar(iuents ot the L'ni\ersit\'. Each class 
holds its o\N n prom and other traditional events. 

The j^raduatin.^ class' annua! show. "The Senior 
(-lass Presents," is usualK held in tiie spring. The 
Senior Class arranges to bring a big name orchestra, 
jazz band, or xocal group to the Uni\ersity. Last 
\ear Fred Waring and his Penns\I\ anians were the 
featured attraction. 

The Junior Class gives the largest prom; it is at 
this dance that "Miss Mar\land" is crowned. The 
Juniors also arrange the program h)r the Fall Con- 
ference ( the training camp tor Freshman Orienta- 
tion "Hat People"), 

The Sophomore Class traditionalK' sponsors the 
Sophomore Carnixal. The Carni\al is held in early 
spring to raise mone)' for Campus Chest. 

The Freshmen sponsor their prom in the spring 
and traditionalK hold a "F'reshman Day." 

To work in the production of an\' of these 
activities, watch for notices in the Diamondhack 
and appK to the individual executive councils of 
the class. Each event needs and welcomes your sup- 
port. 



51 



CLASS OFFICERS 

Senior Class 

President Rand Tuttle 

Vice-President Jean Lacey 

Secretary Bev May 

Treasurer Jackie Eads 

AWS Representative Margaret Duncan 

Men's League Representative Edward Cox 

Junior Class 

President ( Vacant ) 

Vice-President Betty Conklin 

Secretary Jacqueline Spencer 

Treasurer Margaret Foster 

AWS Representative Patsy Kanner 

Men's League Representative Paul Gardella 

Sophomore Class 

President Edward Griswold 

Vice-President Arlene JofiFe 

Secretary Be\ erly Fussell 

Treasurer Neil McNerny 

AWS Representative Sue Laffan 

Men's League Representative Tom Baker 

Freshman Class 

(To Be Elected) 



52 



ELECTIONS 

Every spring ck-ttioiis art' lield tor the S(iA, 
AWS, Men's Leagne, class offices, and Legislature 
positions. Each candidate nuist meet the re(iuire- 
nients enumerated in the SCA Constitution, and he 
nmst agree to follow the regulations go\erning 
election rules. 

Freshman elections are held earK in October. 
The offices to be filled at this time are: 

President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

AWS Representati\e 

Men's League Representative 

Any freshman may be nominated for an office by 
securing the signatures of 50 of his classmates on 
a petition for office and by presenting this list to 
the Elections Board before an announced deadline. 
If there are more tium two candidates for an office, 
primar\ elections are held to narrow the field to 
two. 



DO 



S. G. A. CONSTITUTION 



(A summary of the new S. G. A. Constitution) 
Preamble 



We, the students of the Uni\ersity of Mary- 
land, in order to encourage democratic thought 
and action, offer training in the apphcation of our 
cherished principles of self-go\ernment, secure 
to ourselves the right to discuss and formulate 
our own policies, demonstrate our concern for 
and promote the interest of our alma mater, and 
pro\ide the fullest degree of self-go\ernment 
possible under the jurisdiction of the Uni\ersit>''s 
administrati\ e personnel and governing bodies 
and under the constitution and laws of the State 
of Maryland and of the United States of America, 
do hereby ordain and establish, under God, this 
Constitution to be the fundamental law governing 
ourseh es and our successors, now and hereafter, 
so long as it shall stand the test of time and re- 
spond to our need for self-go\ ernment. 



54 



Article 1— General Purposes of S. G. A. 

The S. G. A. shall lonniilatc policies goxcniin^ 
tlic acti\ ities and wclfart' ol tlu" stiiclciits and will 
ad\ isc the President and the Faeult> Senate on 
student \ iewpoint concerning all matters affect- 
ing students. The S. G. A. will he the supreme 
student governing body at the University of 
Mar\land and shall try to implement the ob- 
jcctixcs set forth in the Preamble. 



Artich' II—Org(miz(iti()n 

All full-time undergraduate students are mem- 
bers of S. G. A., but the Association shall be 
divided into three branches: Executive, Legisla- 
tive, and Judicial. 



A. Executive Brancli 

Sectii>ii }. All executive powers granted 
herein shall be vested in the Cabinet of 
S. G. A. 

This Cabinet shall consist of: the President, 
\'ice-President, Secretary, and Treasurer of 
the Student Government Association: the Pre- 
sidents of the four classes; the President of the 
Men's League; the PresideTit of .\\\'S; a frater- 
nity representative; a sorority representative; 



55 



an independent men's representatixe; and an 
independent women's representatixe. 

In addition, the Associated Women Students 
of the University of Maryland shall constitute 
a department of this go\ernment, operating 
under the direction and control of the Cabinet 
of the Student Government Association, and 
shall go\ern only and exclusi\ely on matters 
pertaining solely to women students. The Presi- 
dent of AWS, as a member of the Cabinet of 
SGA, shall be responsible to the Cabinet for 
any and all action of AWS. 

The Men's League of the Uni\ersit>' of 
Maryland shall constitute a department of this 
go\ ernment, operating under the direction and 
control of the Cabinet of the Student Go\ ern- 
ment Association and shall go\ern only and ex- 
clusix ely on matters pertaining soleh' to men 
students. The President of Men's League as 
a member of the Cabinet of SGA shall be re- 
sponsible to the Cabinet for any and all actions 
of Men's League, 



Section 2. Major Powers and Duties 

Subsection A. All Executi\e powers and 
duties granted herein, except those specifi- 
cally designated to the AWS and Men's 
League, shall be \ested in the Cabinet of 
the Student Go\emment Association. 



56 



Subsection B. Tlie Cahinet sluill execute 
all laws t'uactecl by the Legislative Council. 

Siih.si'ction C. The (Cabinet shall make rec- 
onnnendations to the Legislative Council. 

Suhscctioti D. The (Cabinet nia\' \eto an\' 
action of the Legislatixe Council b>' a ma- 
jority vote, but such vetoes may be over- 
ridden by a three-fourths vote of the Legisla- 
tive Council. 

Sub.scctiofi E. The Cabinet shall bring 
formal charges before the Student Court 
against any Student Organization on the 
(iolli'gc Park (>ani[)us which violates anv 
provisions of the Student Covernment As- 
sociation Constitution and Bvlavvs. 

Sul)scction F. The Cabinet shall have the 
power to recognize new student organiza- 
tions except social, fraternal, professional, or 
honor societies, and student mass media of 
communication and to approve new and re- 
V ised student organization constitutions 
subject to the final action ot the Facultv' 
Senate Committee on Student Life and 
Activ ities. 

SiiJ)scrtion G. The Calnnet may initiate 
action before the Student Court regarding 



57 



the legality of any student constitution or 
bylaws by a majority petition of the Cabinet. 

Subsection H. The Finance Committee of 
the Cabinet shall recommend to the Legis- 
lative Council for its approval all proposed 
allocations of student funds. 

Subsection I. The Cabinet shall fill any \ a- 
cancies in the Legislative Council by 
appointment. 



Subsection J. The Cabinet shall appro\'e all 
appointments of student communication 
officers made by the Faculty Senate 
Committee on Student Publications and 
Communications. 



B. Legislative Branch 

Section 1. The senior class shall elect nine 
representatives to the Legislature from their 
class; the junior class shall elect eight repre- 
sentatives to the Legislature from tlieir class; 
the sophomore class shall elect seven repre- 
sentati\es to the Legislature from their class; 
the freshman class shall elect six representati\es 
to the Legislature from their class. Two-thirds 



58 



of tile total nunihtrsliip of the legislative 
branch shall constitute a (luornin. 



Section 2. Mdjor Poticrs unci Duties 

Suhscctii)n A. All Legislative powers granted 
herein shall be \ested in the Legislative 
Couneil subjeet to the right of \eto b\ the 
Cabinet. 

Subsection B. All bills and resolutions shall 
originate in the Legislative Couneil. 

Subsection C. The Legislative Couneil shall 
approve or disapprove, by a majoritv vote 
of those present and voting, all alloeations 
of student funds proposed bv' the Finance 
Committee of the Cabinet. The Legislative 
and Executive Branches shall be elected 
annuallv bv- the student body located at 
College Park, Md., in accordance with rules 
and regulations governing elections. 



C. Judicial Branch 

Section I. Organization of Student Court 

Subsection A. \\\ judicial powers granted 
herein bv- the Facultv Senate Committee on 
Student Discipline shall be v ested in student 

59 



courts. The Central Student Court shall be 
composed of seven \oting members with a 
2.5 average appointed by the President of 
the Student Go\'ernment Association with a 
two-thirds approval of the Cabinet; one half 
shall be members of Mortar Board or Mortar 
Board nominees other than members of said 
group and not holding an office in the SGA 
Cabinet; one half shall be members of Omi- 
cron Delta Kappa or Omicron Delta Kappa 
nominees other than said group and not 
holding an office in the SGA Cabinet. One 
shall be a member of the Senior Class who 
holds no office in the SGA Cabinet, the In- 
terfraternity Council, or the Panhellenic 
Association and whose record of conduct is 
abo\'e reproach in the eyes of the University. 

The Student Court will ha\"e three ad- 
visors as follows: the Dean of Women or her 
designated representati\e; the Dean of Men 
or his designated representati\e, and the 
Chairman of the Committee on Student 
Discipline of the Faculty Senate or a mem- 
ber or the committee designated as his 
representative. 



Section 2. Major Powers and Duties 

Subsection A. The Central Student Court 
shall have original jurisdiction in all cases 
inxolving the Constitution or the B>laws 



60 



passed in pursuanco tlicrcof. Such action 
shall he initiated h\ : 

1. Majorit)' petition of the Legislative 
(-ouneil and/or the Cahinet. 

2. Majority request of the Student Court. 

3. Petition ol ten per eent of the Student 
Body. 

Subsection B. The Central Student Court 
shall ha\e jurisdiction in all disciplinary 
cases referred to them by the Dean of Men, 
Dean of Women, or the Dean of an under- 
graduate college located on the campus at 
College Park. 

Subsection C. The Central Student Court 
shall ha\e appellate jurisdiction o\er any 
case originating in an inferior student court 
which is appealed to that court and which 
the justices deem wortln' of re\ iew. 

SuJ)scctioii D. The Student Court shall rec- 
ommend, to the Committee on Student 
Discipline, punitixe action to be taken 
<igainst indi\ iduals or organizations adjudged 
guilt) b> the Student Court. 



Subsection E. All decisions of the Student 
Court rendered under the authorit>' granted 



61 



in Subsections B and C abo\ e, may be ap- 
pealed to the Discipline Committee of the 
Faculty Senate. 



Article III— Advisory Board 

Section 1. The Advisory Board of the Student 
Go\ emment Association shall consist of the 
Assistant Dean of Men, Coordinator of Student 
ActiN'ities; the Assistant Dean of Women, ad- 
\isor to Associated Women Students; the 
Chaimian of the Faculty Senate Committee on 
Student Life; the Chairman of the Faculty 
Senate Committee on Student Publications and 
Communications; the Chairman of the Faculty' 
Senate Committee on Student Discipline; and 
the President of the Student Government 
Association. 

Section 2. The Assistant Dean of Men, Coordi- 
nator of Student Acti\ities, shall act in the 
capacity- of Chairman of this Board. 



Article IV— Precedence 

Section 1. The Constitution shall take pre- 
cedence o\ er any odier instrument governing 
the student bod>' of the Uni\ersity of Mary- 
land, subject only to the rules and regulations 



62 



of tlie Uni\t'rsit>' Administration and its duly 
constituted rogulatorx l)odies. 

Section 2. All student organizations shall be 
under the authoritN' ot the Cabinet ot the 
Student Go\ ernnient Association. 

Section 3. Any person or group desiring to 
form a new student organization on the College 
Park campus must first petition the Cabinet of 
the Student Go\ernment Association. Upon the 
majorit\' appro\ al of the Cabinet this person or 
group shall then petition tlie P"acult\' Senate 
Committee on Student Life for final official 
Uni\ersity recognition. 



Article V— Student Fees 

Student Activity fees shall be paid to the 
University at the time regular session fees are 
payable. These fees shall constitute a general 
student acti\it\- fund to encourage activities 
beneficial to the general student bod\-, the four 
classes, Associated Woman Students, Men's 
League, and any other organizations as can be 
interpreted to benefit the general student body, 
and shall be disbursed only by the Student Gov- 
ernment Association subject to the regulations of 
the Universitv. 



63 



Article VI— Elections 

Section 1. No regularly enrolled, fulltime 
undergraduate student shall be denied the right 
to \ ote. 

Section 2. Elections for all student go\ emment 
offices shall be conducted by the standing com- 
mittee on elections. 



Article VU— Petition, Initiative, Referendum, and 
Recall 

The members of this organization shall ha\e 
the right of petition, initiative, referendum, and 
recall in the manner specified in the Bylaws. 



64 




PUBLICATIONS AND 
COMMUNICATIONS 



COMMITTEE ON STUDENT PUBLI- 
CATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS 

The Faculty Senate Committee on Student 
Publications and Communications provides facult>^- 
student cooperation in regard to all publications and 
communications and their particular problems. 
Operating with near-equal student-faculty repre- 
sentation, the committee consists of eight students, 
eight faculty members, and a faculty chairman. 

Student members include the editors-in-chief of 
the Diamondback, Terrapin, and Old Line; Radio 
Station WMUC's station director; and four students 
who, in the opinion of the committee, are repre- 
sentative of the major areas of campus life. The 
eight faculty members include three ex-officio 
members: The Head of the Department of Journal- 
ism and Public Relations, a representative of the 
President, and the Executive Dean for Student 
Life. The remaining five faculty members are per- 
sons not directly associated with the communica- 
tions media. 

During the latter part of the spring semester, the 
committee interviews and appoints the top editorial 
and business executives of the publications and 
Radio Station W'MUC for the following year. All 
students appointed to executive positions by the 
committee must have at least a 2.2 cumulative 
academic average, and at least a 2.2 academic 
average for the semester prior to their appointment. 



66 



DIAMONDHACK 

Editor Joliii Blitz 

Kxcciitiic Editor Heather MaeKiimon 

MdUd'^infi Editors Bonnie Felclesnian 

Frank Hunt 

Ellen Raj^an 

Harold Taylor 

Executive Sports Editor Bol) Irelan 

Business Manuf^er Frank Ratka 

The Diamondhack is tlie newspaper for Mary- 
land's studt'nt l)od\ . All phases of publishinij the 
paper are handled 1)>- students; thus nian\ oppor- 
tunities to gain experienee in tlu- field of newspaper 
produetion are ofliTt-d to aspiring reporters, artists, 
photographers, and business executi\es. 

The Diamondhack is published four times a 
week, Tuesday through Frida\ , and may be ob- 
tained by students at distribution points located 
throughout the campus. 

l.XPRESSION 

Editor Sidnex' Krome 

Manaf^ing Editor ...David Newman 

Business Manager Thomas W'illoughln 

Expression is the newest publication at Mar\land. 
ha\ ing been gi\en S.G.A. recognition last \ear. It 



67 



grew rapidl> from mimeographed stapled pages to 
its present booklet form. 

Contributions for Expression are accepted from 
anyone that would like to write for student and 
facult>' consumption. It pro\"ides an outlet for 
creatix e thought and expressi\ e writing. 

Expression is published semi-annually— the first 
edition in late fall and the second during the spring. 

Material that is welcomed includes: poems, short 
stories, translations, and essays. 



M BOOK 

Editor Beverly May 

Managing Editor Hart T. Joseph 

Business Manager Jerome Kender 

M Book, the freshman handbook, is one of the 
new student's first introductions to Uni\'ersity life. 
It is published during the summer for incoming 
freshmen and is distributed with the dinks during 
Orientation Week. 

As a reference for new Mar>land students, the 
M Book is invaluable. It contains as much informa- 
tion about the University of Mar>'land as it is possi- 
ble to get into one small hand\' \ olume. 

The editor, managing editor, and business man- 
ager are appointed by the Publications Board early 
in the spring. Other staff members are appointed by 



68 



the editor tioni applications submitted by interested 
indix iduals. These appHeations are accepted at the 
beginning of the second semester. No experience is 
necessary to work on tlie M Book. 

OLD LINE 

Editor Kenneth Duncan 

Managing Editor. Gary PhiUips 

Business Manager ..WilHam Demas 

Pubhshed six times during the school vear, the 
Old Line magazine is well known to Maryland 
students. The magazine presents the best in campus 
humor, with emphasis on situation comedy and 
satire. It also contains poetry; articles on news, 
campus personalities, and actixities; cartoons; and 
photo features. 

The editor, managing editor, and business man- 
ager are chosen by the Publications Board in the 
spring. New general staff members are selected at 
any time during the school year. Membership on 
the staff is open to all students. Especially needed 
are satire and humor writers, poets, and students 
interested in ad\ertising. Anyone who wishes to 
work for the Old Line should apply at the Old Line 
office located on the second floor of the Journalism 
Building. Contributions from any student, whether 
on the staff or not, are always welcomed. 

The Old Line is axailable to all students and may 
be picked up at conxenient distribution points 
throughout the campus. 



69 



TERRAPIN 

Co-Editors Jackie Eads and Beverly May 

Managing Editor Carol Plumhoff 

Business Manager Jerome Kender 

A pictorial account of a year at Maryland, show- 
ing the social, athletic, academic, and political life 
of the students, is presented in the Terrapin, the 
student annual. 

During the Ma>' Day ceremonies, the May Queen 
is presented the first copy. Later in tlie month, stu- 
dents recei\ e their copies at the Journalism Build- 
ing. 

Many Terrapins have been gi\ en an All-American 
rating, the highest award a yearbook may receive. 

Long hours and hard work went into last year's 
colorful volimie of 376 pages. SGA spent $42,000 
on the 1958 yearbook, making it the largest and 
most expensive issue to date. 

Positions on the staff are open to students as fea- 
ture writers, photographers, business assistants, 
typists, and copy readers. Those interested should 
apply to the editors. 



70 



WMUC 

Station Director Thomas W'illouglihy 

Progrmn Director _ ._. Jack Bowden 

lUisincss Manager ._ John McGeady 

Located in the old Joiirnahsm Building (FF), 
WMUC, the radio Noice of the Uni\ersit\, oper- 
ates ten hours a da>— Sunday through Frida> — on 
650 kilocycles. 

Featuring l^roadcasts of campus activities, 
WMUC: coNcrs the IFC Sing, the "Messiah," and 
Student Union Dances. 

Recently a \ariety of new programs ha\e been 
inaugurated: "Campus Dinner Views," exchange 
programs \\ ith other colleges, li\e co\ erage of home 
and away basketball games, and SGA meetings. 

Future plans for WMUC include complete cam- 
pus reception and record hops. 

WMUC is a member of the College Radio Cor- 
poration and the National Advertising Agency. 

Those students interested in annoimcing, writing 
scripts, or participating in any other aspects of 
radio should see Tom Willoughby. 



71 



PI DELTA EPSILON BANQUET 

Pi Delta Epsilon, national publications honorary, 
gives the Publications Banquet each spring. 

Immediately preceding the Banquet is the 
initiation of new members and afterward is the 
presentation of awards and keys to students that 
ha\e done outstanding work for the \arious publica- 
tions. 

Editors, at this time, introduce their successors 
and recognize the outstanding members of their 
staffs. 

In honor of a former Diamondhack business 
manager, the E. A. Coblentz Memorial Cup is 
presented to a freshman who has done outstand- 
ing work during his first year m publications. 

The William H. Hottel Award is given, by Pi 
Delta Epsilon, to the senior who has contributed 
the most to publications during his four years at 
Maryland. 

National Pi Delta Epsilon medals of merit are 
awarded to the most outstanding male and female 
students in publications. 

All students are welcome to attend the Banquet. 



72 




CULTURE AND ENTERTAINMENT 



There Is Bound to be something that suits e\'en 
collegian's taste with all of the cultural and enter- 
tainment opportunities and facilities at Maryland. 
Possibly he will e\"en find new interests. 

UNIVERSITY THEATER 

The University Theater, composed solely of 
students, gives jFour productions a year in the 
Central Auditorium in the Skinner Building, Tick- 
ets are obtained in return for a ticket from your 
activities book. Students w4io enjoy being on the 
other side of the footlights should watch the Dia- 
mondback for tryout annoucements. Last year's 
productions included "Teahouse of the August 
Moon," "Antigone," and "Oklahoma." The plays 
run for a week. 

KA MINSTREL 

The annual Kappa Alpha Cotton Pickers Min- 
strel always entertains a full house. Songs, dancing, 
music, and comedians are featured in the show that 

f)resents black faces and the favorities, Mr. Gal- 
agher and Mr. Sheen. 

OVERSEAS SHOW 

This production is a variety show composed of 
student acts ranging from singers to magicians. 
Tryouts are open to all students. The show goes on 
an annual tour during the Christmas recess to en- 
tertain servicemen. A preview performance is pre- 
sented for the students on campus before the tour. 



74 



NATIONAL SYMPHONY SERIES 

The world-renowned National Symphony Or- 
ehestra, under the direction of Dr. Howard Mitchell, 
offers the National S\ niphony Series to students for 
the special rate of $3. This ticket entitles holders 
to four concerts during the year— usually two a 
semester. Concerts are held in Ritchie Coliseum, 
and tickets ma\" be purchased in the Student Union, 
Albrecht's Drugstore, and the Record Center of 
College Park. Last year Violinist Isaac Stern and 
Pianist Phillippe Entrcmont appeared. The Civic 
Ballet Society of Washington's performance of 
"Copellia" and Italian Opera Night were the other 
two features of the series. 

GUEST ARTIST SERIES 

The Culture Committee of S. G. A. sponsors 
a guest artist series through which Alec Templeton, 
the National Ballet of Canada, and Manto\ ani en- 
tertained students last year. Concerts are usually 
iield in the Cole Field House, and tickets are free 
on presentation of the activities book. 

SENIOR CLASS PRESENTS 

J. J- Johnson, Kai Winding, and the Australian 
Jazz Quartet have been guests at Maryland under 
the auspices of the senior class and the "Senior 
Class Presents" show. Last spring Fred Waring 
entertained. Each year an outstanding entertain- 
ment personality is presented and tickets are sold 
for a nominal amount. 



75 



Tivo Flapper Girls from the Annual 
KA Minstrel Show 



UNIVERSITY BAND 

Band concerts iisiialK arc ^i\cn twice a year 
in Ritchie Coliseiuu, anil admission is free. The 
group is composed cntircl\' of students. Anxone 
who is (piahfii'd ma\' au(htion h)r mcmhcrship. 



INTEHFRATEHNITY SING 

Tlu' IntcrhatcrnitN' Sing, sponsored annuall\ 
in die spring In Delta Delta Delta sororit\ . is lield 
in Hitchii' (-oliscum. It is the largest gathering ol 
Greeks all \car, hut, ot course, all are welcome and 
admission is free. 

Each sororit)' and fraternit>' ma>' enter a group 
to present a song for competition. While judges 
decide the winners, special awards, including the 
Morty Cohen Award and Fraternit> Man of the 
Year, are presented. Tapping for Diamond, sorority 
lionorar\', also t.ikes j^lace. 



HARMONY HALL 

In the tall, Harmon\ Hall is presented !")> Phi 
Kappa Tan. Barbershop (piartets entered b> sorori- 
ties and fraternities sing in competition. It is held 
in Ritchie Coliseum and admission is free. 




^W^v^-^^^. ^. 



Pianist Alec Templeton Performs at Maryland 



CHAPEL CHOIR 

Tlu' Uni\ ersit> s Chapel Choir prt'sents miineroiis 
pr()jj;ranis of religions music during the school 
year. Higlihghting their annual schedule is Handel's 
"Messiali, " wliich is presented at Christinas and 
Easter. It is given in the Memorial C'hapel tlie 
Sunda\' before classes adjourn for the holidays. In- 
terested students are urged to audition. 



WOMEN'S CHORUS 

The Women's Chorus presents concerts period- 
ically during the year. Following the A.W.S. 
Christmas Pageant, the Chorus presents annualK 
the "Ceremonv of Carols." 



MEN'S GLEE CLUB 

The University's Men's Glee Club offers a con- 
cert in both the fall and spring. The Diamondback 
announces the dates of these e\ents. 



A.W.S. COFFEE HOURS 

Coffee hours are sponsored b\' the Associated 
Women Students on Tuesday or Thursdas' after- 
noons, usualK' once a month. Discussions and talks, 
led b\' facult>' members, include \ arious subjects of 
interest to students. The Di(nnon(ll)ark carries the 
times and dates. 



79 



AQUALINERS 

Each spring the s>'nchronized swimming group, 
the Aquahners, stages a water show. The group 
meets e\ ery Tuesday night at Preinkert Field House 
where instruction is offered. Tlieir annual show is 
held in the men's pool of the Cole Field House. 
Tickets ma>' be obtained at the door. 

GYMKANA 

An annual g>mnastics show is presented by the 
G>"mkana Troupe each spring. Ticket books ser\ e 
as admission to the show, which is held at Cole 
Field House. Brief shows are also given during 
intermissions in athletic e^ents. Everyone is wel- 
come to try out for membership in this student 
group. 

ART EXHIBITS 

Each >'ear the Fine Arts Department sponsors 
se\ eral art exhibits which are held in the Student 
Union. Last >ear renowned teacher-artist Professor 
Joseph Wrobel ga\ e a demonstration with his ex- 
hibition. 

STUDENT UNION MOVIES 

First rate Hollywood films are shown at the 
Student Union on Friday and Sunday nights. Last 
year such attractions as "Rebel without a Cause," 
"The Robe," and "Teahouse of the August Moon" 
were shown. Each semester a schedule of the pro- 
gram is issued. Admission is 25c. 



80 





-^^ 


^_ •'" 




^I^HJ 


rrv:.-! 










The University of Maryland has many religious 
organizations which students can join and include 
as a part of their college life. Most of the clubs 
meet on Wednesday nights, offering social and 
religious acti\'ities throughout the year. Through 
these organizations the student may meet others 
who share a common interest in his religious de- 
nomination. 

Offices are located in the Chapel for each denom- 
ination represented on campus. Each of the clubs 
ha\e chaplains or advisors to help the students with 
their organizations. 

Those interested in joining a religious club ma>' 
contact the ad\ isor, an officer, or simply attend one 
of the regular meetings. 



STUDENT RELIGIOUS COUNCIL 

The Student Religious Council is organized to 
stress the importance of religion in the college stu- 
dent's life. The Council is the interfaith group that 
ser\es to coordinate the activities of the \arious 
religious groups. 

The Council is composed of representati\es from 
each of the \ arious religious clubs. They meet 
weekly in the Chapel with this year's president, 
Charles Peterson, presiding. 

The main project of the group is the sponsor- 
ship of Fireside Chats. Each semester one of the 



82 



I'niv t-rsity's chaplains \isils rach of tin- campus 
rc'sidenct's and gives a brief talk that is followed by 
a ciuestion and answer ix*riod. 



BAPTIST STUDENT UNION 

ThroMiihotit the yi-ar the Baptist Stiidtiit I'nion 
oilers a lull and acti\e program— tall and spring 
retreats, summer activities, conventions for Baptist 
college students in the area schools, and dinners 
lor foreign students. 

I lie chil) meets daily at 12:20 and on Wednesday 
nights in room 252 in the C^hapel. Students inter- 
estc'cl in learning more ol the club's acti\ities should 
call C-arol Sa\age at W'A 7-8347. 

Advisor— yir. Houarcl Hees 

7006 West Park Dri\e 
Lewisdale, Md 

C/iurc/j — Xorthucstern High School 
(]oles\ille Hoad 
Hvattsville, Md. 



CANTERBURY ASSOCIATION 

Each Sunda> the Canterbur> Assoeiation has a 
supper club for Episcopalians at 5:30 in the St. 
Andrew's Parish House. The club holds its regular 
meetings on \\'ednesda> at 7:30 in the student 
lounge of the church. HoK' C'omnmnion is cele- 



83 



brated e\ er>" Thursda\' morning at 7 in the West 
Chapel of the Uni\ ersity Chapel. 

The Canterbury Club holds two conference re- 
treats a >'ear, an annual Christmas part>' for children 
of the Episcopal Home, and a spring banquet 
and picnic. Sara Lee Gribbon can be contacted for 
other information. 

ChopIain—Re\ . Edward X. Burdick 
3419 Tulane Dri\e 
West Hyattsville, Md. 

Church—St. Andrew's Episcopal Church 
College A\enue 
College Park, Md. 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION 

The Christian Science Organization meets every 
Wednesday e\ening at 6:30 in die West Chapel. 

The organization ofiFers Bible studies and testi- 
monials at meetings. Ray Ri\era may be contacted 
at JU 9-0243 for further information. 

Advisor— Dr. James B. Shanks 
211 Tecumseh Street 
Adelphi, Md. 

CJnirch— First Christian Scientist Church of 
Hyatts\ille 
6221 43rd A\enue 
H>'atts\ ille, Md. 



84 



lilLl.EL FOUNDATION 

Hillcl Foundation of B'nai H'ritli meets e\er\' 
riuirsday at 8 p.m. in the Hilk'I House. The club 
lias its socials Wednesda>' nights at 8. 

Amon^ the club's acti\itics arc an annual carni\al 
in the tail and a skit ni^lit during tlic winter. Any- 
one interested in joining the group ma\' call Stuart 
Hack at the TEP house. 

A(/ti.sor— Rabbi Me\er Grecnberg 
4602 CaKert Road 
College Park. Md. 

C/<J/rr/j — Hillel Foundation 
7505 Vale Avenue 
College Park, Md. 



ISLAxVIIC FOUNDATION 

The Islamic Foundation sponsors a program eacli 
week, usuall)' including speakers trom Moslem 
countries. The club meets at 7:30 p.m. even' 
Wednesday in the Student Union and on Fridavs 
at 12:30 p.m. 

The purpose of the group is not onl\ to know 
and better understand the Moslem religion, but 
also to bring Moslem and American students to- 
gether. The membership of all students is encour- 
aged. Hameed \az is a\ ailable at .\P 7-1433 for 
turtlier information about the foundation. 



85 



Advisor— FioiessoT Fumian Bridgers 
6911 Oak Ridge Road 
Hyattsville, Md. 

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

The Lutheran Club has its regular Wednesday 
night meetings at 7:30 and holds a supper club 
on Sunda>' e\enings at 6 in the church. Speakers 
highlight the regular meetings and socials are held 
on Friday nights. 

The annual regional meeting is held at Buckhill 
Falls in eastern Pennsyhania. Retreats are also an 
important part of the yearly program. 

Those interested in learning more about the pro- 
gram of the association may contact Gary Plat- 
terspiel. 

Advisor— Rev . Otto Reimherr 
4806 Cherokee Street 
College Park, Md. 

C/i«rc/]— Hope E\angelical Lutheran Church 
Guilford Drive and Knox Road 
College Park, Md. 



MARYLAND CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 

The Maryland Christian Fellowship is a non- 
denominational organization that brings together 
students of many different faiths. 



86 



Nkitiiig tu«) Tiu'sdiiNS a moiitli, the clul) holds 
it'triats, iittc'iids an aiimial conicrciicc in Lancaster, 
Penns\l\ ania, and luis soeials onee a month in the 
home.s ot its nienil)ers. For niore intornialion ( ontact 
John Janney in Charles HaH. 

Advisor— Wt. Charlton Mever 

Hmn Piney Brant h Hoad 
SiKcr SprinjL^, Md. 

C/u/rc/j — Memorial (>'hapel 
Campus 



NEWMAN CLUB 

Tiie Newman (>lul) offers a wide \ ariet\' of re- 
ligious, edueational, and soeial aeti\ ities. The elub 
meets e\ ery Wednesday evening at 7:30 in the 
Student Union. 

The organization's biggest social e\ent of the 
year is the Sno-Ball dance in January. Tom White- 
leather at the SAE house may be contacted for 
further information about the organization. 

AJi /.so/ — Father William C. Tepe 
57()() Sargent Road 
HyattsNille, Md. 

C/n/rr/< — Memorial Chapel 
C'ampus 



87 



WESLEY FOUNDATION 

E\ery Wednesday night at 7:30 the Wesley 
Foundation discusses current rehgious issues and 
holds other interesting programs. The club has 
suppers and holds discussions on Sundays. Twice a 
year the members participate in retreats. 

Socials on the weekends, as well as dramatic 
presentations, are included in the organization's 
social program. 

Larry Nowack, in Alleghany B, may be con- 
tacted for more information about the group. 

Advisor— B.e\ . Richard Vieth 
3419 Tulane Drive 
Hyatts\ille, Md. 

C/iurc/i— University Methodist Church 
Unixersity Lane 
College Park, Md. 



WESTMINISTER FOUNDATION 

The Westminister Foundation holds Christian 
fellowship meetings on Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m. 
in the Student Union. To discuss tlie meaning of 
Christianit}' in campus and everyday life is the 
purpose of the club. 

Bible studies are held at 10 a.m. and serxices at 
11 a.m. every Sunday in the Chapel. On Sunday 



88 



CNonings at 5:30 tlic Foiiiulalioii IiolcK a supper 

Cllll). 

Donald Campbell is available at West Charles 
Hall to proN ide further information. 

Advisor— l\vv. Jesse Nh'ers 

8402 Hamliler Drive 
Hyattsxiile, Md. 

C/n/rr/i— Memorial Chapel 
Campus 

Other Loeal Houses of Worship: 

BAPTIST 

First Baptist Cluireh of Hyatts\ille 
5701 42nd A\e. 
H\ attsx ille, Md. 

BRETHREN 

Chureh of the Brethren 
College Park, Md. 

CATHOLIC 

H()l\' Redeemer 
4902 BerwAn Road 
College Park, Md. 

St. Mark's 
Coles\ ille Road 
College Park, Md. 



89 



CHURCH OF CHRIST 

The Church of Christ 
•Sbth and Jefferson Streets 
^^'est Hyattsxille, Md. 

EPISCOPAL 

St. Matthews 

36th and Nicholson A\e. 

Hyatts\ille, Md. 

HEBREW 

Langle\ Hebrew Congregation 
Langley Park, Md. 

LUTHERAN 

St. John's Lutheran Church 
6103 Kenleworth A\e. 
East Ri\erdale, Md. 

METHODIST 

Branchxille Methodist Church 
9001 51st Ave. 
College Park, Md. 

PRESBYTERIAN 

Adelphi Presbyterian Church Manse 
9401 Riggs Road 
Adelphi, Md. 

UNITED PRESBYTERIAN 

Wallace Memorial United Presbyterian Church 
7201 16th Place 
Hyattsville, Md. 



90 




"^5>^^ 



HONORARIES 



MORTAR BOARD 

( National Honorary Fraternity ) 

Established at the University of Maryland in 
1934, Mortar Board is one of the highest honors a 
senior woman may recei\e. Outstanding second 
semester junior women are tapped at the annual 
May Day Pageant. Selection is based on serxice, 
leadership, and scholarship. 



OMICRON DELTA KAPPA 

( National Honorary Fraternity 
FOR Men ) 

To be tapped for ODK is one of the highest 
awards for Maryland men. The fraternit>' was 
established at the Uni\ ersity in 1927, Membership 
is based on ser\ice, fellowship, and adherence to 
democratic ideals in campus life. Members are 
selected on the basis of accomplishment in such 
fields as drama, scholarship, social and religous 
affairs, athletics, and publications. 

WHO'S WHO AMONG STUDENTS IN 
AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES 
AND COLLEGES 

( National Recognition Society ) 

Members are chosen on the basis of leadership, 
scholarship, and ser\ice to the school. A special 
student-facult\- board taps in the spring. Who's 



92 



wilt) aids thi)s(.' lioiiort-d 1)\ providing jol) platc- 
iiK'iit stM\ ices l)t't()ic> ami alter graduation. 

ACCOUNTING 

Bkta Alpha Psi ( National Prolessional 
Fraternity ) 

The aeeounting honorarx, louiided at Mar\iand 
in 1926, is designed to bring together the outstand- 
ing aeeounting students. Prerequisites tor member- 
ship ineludi' junior standing, a 3. .5 average in ae- 
eounting eourses, and a S.O o\ I'rall average. Ad- 
ditional infonnatiou ean be obtained honi Prof. 
L. L. Lee. 

AGRICULTURE 

Alimlv Zeta (National I'rolessional Fraternit\ ) 

The traternity, established in 1920 at Maryland, 
seleets from the field of agrieulture men who have 
exeelled in leadership and eiuiracter. To be eligi- 
ble, a man must complete three semesters and rank 
in the upper two-fitths ol his class. Further informa- 
tion will be supplied b> Dr. AKin Deeher, Jr. 

ATHLETICS 

\'ahsitv "M" Club (Local Recognition Society) 

Membership in the M Club is limited to holders 
of \arsit\ letters. The group is designed to bring 
together and honor atheletes who ha\e preformed 
outstandingK in one or more \arsit\' sports. W 
Heag\ nia\ be contacted for more information. 



93 



BACTERIOLOGY 

Sigma Alppl\ Omicron (National Professional 
Fraternity ) 

The society, established at Maryland in 1925, 
strixes to promote friendh' cooperation among 
bacteriology majors. It recognizes those students 
who demonstrate an interest and an aptitude in 
bacteriolog>'. Prerequisites include junior standing, 
a 2.5 a\erage, and at least 12 credits in bac- 
teriolog)'. Dr. Norman LafFer will supply more 
information. 



BUSINESS 

Beta Gamma Sigma ( National Honorar>- 
Fraternit>' ) 

Established in 1940, this frateniit>- is the onl>' 
scholastic honorar\' in the field of business that is 
recognized by the American Association of Collegi- 
ate Schools of Business. The group's purposes are to 
encourage and reward outstanding scholarship and 
accomplishment among students of commerce and 
business administration and to promote the ad- 
\ancement of education in business. Dean James 
Reid can pro\"ide further infomiation. 

Delta Sigma Pi (National Professional Frater- 
nity for Men) 

Delta Sigma Pi was established at the Uni\er- 
sity in 1950 for male students in the College of 
Business and Public Administration. Students ha\- 



94 



ing an a\ crage higher than the all-men's a\ erage are 
eligible for nienihership. Additional intorniation is 
obtainable from Dr. Allen Fisher and Robert 
Moreland. 

Phi Chi Theta ( National Professional Fraternity 
for Women) 

Phi Chi Theta, a professional fraternity for 
women enrolled in the College of Bnsiness and 
Public Administration, was established at Mar\land 
in 1955. It is open to students who maintain an 
o\erall axerage of 2.2. Members attend many pro- 
fessional meetings during the >'ear. Contact Jud\ 
Arrovo for more information. 



CHEMISTRY 

Alpha Chi Sigma ( National Professional 
Fraternity ) 

Students majoring in chemistr\ or chemical en- 
gineering who ha\ e a 2.5 or abo\e academic 
axerage are eligible for membership in this organi- 
zation. Further information ma>' be obtained from 
Dr. Fletcher N'eitch. 

DRAMATICS 

National Collegiate Pl.wers ( National 
Recognition Society ) 

Established at the Uni\ersity of Maryland in 
1947, this society is limited to juniors and seniors 
who ha\e made outstanding eontributions to Uni- 



95 



\ ersit>' Tlu-ater and lia\e taken an acti\e part in 
pla\ productions. Students chosen for membershij^ 
are tapped semianniiall>\ Interested persons should 
contact Prof. Warren L. Strausbaugli. 

EDUCATION 

Phi Delta Kappa ( National Professional Frater- 
nit> for Men) 

Graduate and undergraduate male students, with 
junior standing, who are planning careers in the 
field of education are eligible for membership. The 
Beta Epsilon chapter was established at the Unix er- 
sit\ in 1942. Dr. Warren S. Blake will answer an\' 
questions. 

ENGINEERING 

Civil Engineering Honor Society ( Local Rec- 
ognition Society) 

Ci\ il engineering students who ha\ e junior stand- 
ing and rank in the upper third of their class are 
eligible for membership in this society. Further in- 
formation ma>- be obtained from Prof. Russell Allen. 

Eta Kappa Nu (National Honorary Fraternity) 

Eta Kappa Nu, established at the University in 
1957, honors students majoring in electrial en- 
gineering. Juniors who rank in the upper third of 
their class, or seniors in the upper quarter, are eligi- 
ble for membership. Dr. H. R. Reed can pro\ ide 
more infomiation. 



96 



Pi Tau Sigma (National Honorary Fraternity) 
Pi Tau Sigma, mechanical engineering honorary, 
was established at Maryland in 1956. Qualifications 
for membership are based on scholastic standing, 
faculty and membership rating, actix ities, and ex- 
perience. Further information may be obtained 
from Prof. Gather. 



Tau Beta Pi ( National Honorary Fraternity ) 
Established at the University of Maryland in 
1942, Tau Beta Pi honors engineering students who 
maintain an academic standing in the upper fifth of 
the senior class or upper eighth of the junior class. 
Interested students may contact Prof. Russell Allen. 

FLORICULTURE 

Pi Alpha Xi ( National Professional Fraternity ) 
In 1950, Pi Alpha Xi was established at Maryland 
to bring together those students interested in horti- 
culture. Membership requirements include an oxer- 
all a\erage of 2.5 and a 3.0 average in horticulture 
courses. Dr. Conrad Link can pro\ide more 
information. 



GEOGRAPHY 

Gamma Theta Upsilon (National Professional 
Fraternity ) 

Gamma Theta Upsilon was organized at Mary- 
land in 1957. The fraternity is open to upperclass 



97 



geography majors who ha\e abo\"e a\ erage grades. 
Joe Wiedel \\ill supply further information. 

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 

Pi Sigma Alpha ( National Honorary Fraternity ) 

This honorary was established at Maryland in 
1938 to form an association of students interested 
in goxemment and politics. Membership may be 
attained b\' showing interest and by accomplishing 
outstanding work in the field of go\ ernment and 
politics. Dr. W. V. Hohenstein can provide more 
information. 

HISTORY 

Phi Alpha Theta (National Honorary 
Fraternity ) 

The Beta Omega chapter of this national history 
honorary- was established at the Unix ersity in 1948. 
Its purpose is to honor those students who ha\e 
maintained a 2.7 academic axerage and a 3.0 
axerage in eighteen or more hours of history, six of 
which must be in adxanced courses. Interested 
persons may contact Robert J. Henault. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Omicron Nu ( National Honorary Fraternity ) 

This organization was established for the purpose 

of recognizing outstanding junior and senior home 

economics students. Alpha Zeta chapter, founded 

at the Unix ersity in 1937, also honors the freshman 



98 



home economics stiulcnt who attains the highest 
a\('ra<ic' in her class. AnNonc wishing turtiicr inh)r- 
niatioii nia>' contact Prof. Jane C'row. 

LNDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Iota L.\mbda Sigma ( National Professional 
Fraternit\') 

The Maryland chapter cjf Iota Lambda Sigma 
was established in 1941. The fraternity promotes 
the recognition of professional training in industrial 
education. A scholarship of $250. 00 is gi\en an- 
nualK to a freshman who plans to enter the educa- 
tion field. Dr. William F". Tierne\ will supply more 
information. 



JOURNALISM 

Pi Delta Epsilon ( National Recognition 
Society ) 

The Uni\ersity of Marvland chapter of Pi Delta 
Epsilon, established in 1980, honors juniors and 
seniors in the field of publications. Members must 
ha\ e done outstanding publication work and ha\e 
held a major editoral position for at least one year. 
For more information contact Prof. Robert Carey 
or Frank Ratka. 

Sic;ma Delta Chi (National Professional 
Fraternity) 

Sigma Dc^lta Chi, established in 1956, honors 
those men who ha\e chosen journalism as their 



99 



career. Interested students should contact Dr. Car- 
ter Bryan. 

MATHEMATICS 

Pi Mu Epsilon ( National Professional 
Fraternity ) 

This fraternity, established in 1956, is one of the 
newer professional groups on campus. Its purpose is 
to honor outstanding students in the field of mathe- 
matics. Further information may be obtained from 
Dr. J. McCarthy. 



MILITARY 

Arnold Air Society (National Recognition 
Society ) 

The Arnold Air Society, a national military hon- 
orary, is composed of advanced cadets who have 
demonstrated exceptional qualities in the AFROTC 
program. Its purpose is to develop leadership in 
future Air Force officers and to enhance relations 
among cadets and student and faculty officers. Fur- 
ther information can be obtained from Richard 
Morgan or Maj. David Brown. 

Pershing Rifles ( National Recognition Society ) 

Pershing Rifles is a national military honorary for 

freshman and sophomore basic cadets who show the 

desired qualities of leadership and interest. The 

group, which makes numerous appearances, is 



100 



iiiadt' up ot a tolor guard, trick drill team, and 
precision niarehing unit. Donald Nasli or Maj. 
H>i)ki will suppK more inlorn)ation. 



ScAUHAHD ANo Blaol ( National Recognition 
Societ>' ) 

Seahhard and Blade is a national honorary fra- 
ternit\ tor all militarx' forces. Onl\ men with out- 
standing scholarship, leadership, efficiency, lo\alt\, 
and tellouship equalities are selected for member- 
ship in the highest military honorary on campus. 
Scholastic recjuirements are a 2.5 oxerall a\erage 
and a 3.0 average in Air Science. Howard Turner 
or Maj F. W. Littleton, Jr., will pro\ ide further 
information. 



V'andenberc; Guard ( Local Recognition Society) 

X'andenberg Guard is a precision sabre drill imit 
composed of volunteer basic cadets. The group 
often performs in local, state, and national competi- 
tions. Additional information can be obtained from 
Frederick L\iich or Capt. Thomas Thamann. 



MUSIC 

Kappa Kappa Psi (National Recognition Society 
for Men) 

This organization honors outstanding male band 
members who ha\e one .semester's participation in 
the Band and a 2.0 overall average. Kappa Kappa 



101 



Psi, established in 1955, strives to promote the ex- 
istence and welfare of university bands and to fos- 
ter a close relationship and pleasant social experi- 
ence for band members. Jim Murphy will suppK 
more information. 



Phi Mu Alpha (Local Recognition Society for 
Men) 

This organization, which honors top male music 
students, works toward the devolopment of profes- 
sional attitudes among its members. Projects are 
directed toward the advancement of American 
music. More information can be obtained from 
Dr. Bryce Jordan. 

Sigma Alpha Iota (National Professional Fra- 
ternity for Women) 

Members of Sigma Alpha Iota stri\e to promote 
the professional ideals of the Department of Music. 
Miss Mary K. Green, who advises the group, will 
provide additional information. 



Tau Beta Sigma (National Recognition Society 
for Women) 

Tau Beta Sigma, established at Maryland in 1956, 
honors outstanding women members of the Band. 
Active participation in the Band for a semester 
and a 2.0 overall average are prerequisites for mem- 
bership. Marilyn Sanders will supply further 
information. 



102 



P!IYSICAL EDUCATION 

Fill Alfha Epsilon (Local Recognition Society) 

Plii Alplia Epsilon, I'stablished at tlie Uni\ersit>' 
in 1953, brings together pinsical education, health, 
i:)Ii\sical therap\', and recreation majors. Qualifica- 
tions lor meinhership include a 3.0 a\erage in ma- 
jor subjects and a 2.7 oNcrall a\crage. Interested 
students should contact Dr. Dorothy Mohr. 

PHYSICS 

Sic;m.\ Pi Sic;m.\ (National Honorary Fraternity) 
Sigma Pi Sigma w as established at the Uni\ ersit\ 
in 1948 to further relations among stutlents major- 
ing in physics. Students must ha\e a better than 
axerage scholastic standing to attain membership. 
Those interested should contact Dr. Howard 
Lastner, 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Psi Chi (National Recognition Society) 
The Mar>land chapter of this societ\' was estab- 
lished in 1956. Psi Chi honors those students who 
are in the upper fourth of their class and who main- 
tain a 3.0 a\erage in psxcholog)' courses. Interested 
persons should contact Thomas Magoon. 

RECREATION 

SicMA T.\u Epsilon ( Local Recognition Society 
for Women ) 

Sigma Tau Epsilon was established at Mar\land 



103 



in 1940. Students who are outstanding in some 
phase of Women's Recreation Association and who 
maintain an o\erall a\erage of 2.5 are ehgible for 
membership. Interested students should contact 
Miss Ethel Kesler. 



SCHOLARSHIP 

Alpha Lambda Delta ( National Honorary Fra- 
ternit>' for Women) 

Freshmen women who attain a 3.5 average or 
abo\"e during their first semester or as a cumulatix e 
a\ erage for their first year are eligible for member- 
ship in Alpha Lambda Delta. Students who qualify 
should contact Dean Julia Billings. 



Phi Eta Sigma ( National Honorary Fraternity 
for Men) 

The purpose of Phi Eta Sigma, established at 
Maryland in 1940, is to honor freshmen men who 
attain a 3.5 axerage for their first semester or for 
the entire year. Members of Phi Eta Sigma remain 
acti\e throughout their college careers. Interested 
men may contact Prof. John Daiker. 

Phi Kappa Phi ( National Honorary Fraternity ) 
Phi Kappa Phi was established at the L^ni\ ersity 
in 1920. Seniors who are in the upper ten per cent 
of their class are eligible for membership. The pur- 
pose of this honorary is to maintain democracy and 



104 



unity ot education. Dr. C>liatc'lain will proN ide ad- 
ditional information to interested students. 



SOCIOLOGY 

Alpha Kappa Delta ( National Recognition 
Societ>' ) 

Alpha Kappa Delta, established at Maryland in 
1946, honors students who ha\ e done outstanding 
work in the field of sociolog>'. Upperclassmen must 
ha\e a 3.0 overall axerage and 18 credit hours in 
sociologN'. For more information contact Dr. Peter 
Lejins. 



SORORITY 

Dl\m()Nd ( Local Recognition Society tor 
Women ) 

Sororitx" women are elected to Diamond on the 
basis of their outstanding leadership and service 
within their respective groups. Membership is lim- 
ited to three from each sororit>". Requirements 
are junior standing and a 2.3 a\erage. Miss Ann 
Norton will suppK' more information. 



SPEECH 

Sigma Alpha Eta ( National Professional 
FraternitN' ) 

Sigma Alpha Eta, established at the Uni\ersit> in 
1953, offers membership on three levels. An associ- 



105 



ate membership is a\ ailable to students interested 
in the field. Ke\' membership is open to those who 
are in the speech pathology curriculum with a 2.5 
o\'erall and a 8.0 axerage in speech and who were 
associate members for a semester. Honor member- 
ship is awarded to those who ha\e done outstanding 
work in the organization and in the field of speecii. 
Interested students should contact Miss Dorothx 
Craven. 



106 




ORGANIZATIONS 



ACCOUNTING CLUB 

Students in BPA may further their professional 
interests through the Accounting Club. The club 
meets with Beta Alpha Psi, accounting honorary, 
one Wednesday each month. The meetings feature 
guest speakers and a social hour. Prospective mem- 
bers may contact Prof. LeRoy Lee. 

AFROTC BAND 

The AFROTC Band is composed of freshmen 
and sophomore cadets who are members of the 
Uni\ersity Marching Band. Uniforms and instru- 
ments are pro\ided by the Federal Government. 
Capt. Peter Hamel can pro\ ide more information. 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS CLUB 

Open to anyone interested in the field of 
agricultural economics, this club meets each 
second and fourth Thursday. The club features 
guest speakers and social functions. Clarence Reeder 
or Dr. Paul Poffenberger may be contacted for fur- 
ther information. 

AGRICULTURAL STUDENT COUNCIL 

The Council coordinates the acti\ ities of \ arious 
agricultural organizations through representati\'e 
members. As a part of their work, the members 
sponsor the Agricultural Student Loan Fund and 
square dances. Dr. Paul Poffenberger advises the 
Council. 



108 



AGRONOMY CLUB 

Projects unci discussions on soils and crops make 
up the program of the AgrononiN Chib. A.t^rieulture 
majors interested in this field should contact Dr. 
l']ugene Younts. 



ALPHA PHI OMEGA SERVICE 
FRATERNITY 

APO is for male students interested in ser\ ing the 
community and campus. Projects of the group in- 
clude a book exchange and the annual UgK' Man 
Contest to benefit Campus Chest. Interested persons 
should see Don VVessel or Mr. George W. Fogg. 



AMATEUR RADIO CLUB (W3EAX) 

This club pro\ ides training classes in Morse Code 
and radio theory for students interested in obtaining 
licenses. Meetings are on Thursda\' nights in An- 
napolis Hall. Mr. Alois Burda or BudcU' Tretick may 
be contacted for further information. 



AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF 
CHEMICAL ENGINEERS 

The student affiliate of the national AIChE ad- 
\ ances the professional de\ elopment of the chemical 
engineering students. The programs feature speakers 
and technical mo\ ies. Dr. \\\ A. Pennington will 
pro\ ide additional infonnation. 



109 



AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF 
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS AND 
INSTITUTE OF RADIO ENGINEERS 

Any electrical engineering student may join this 
student branch of the national organization. The 
purpose of the club is to promote electrical engi- 
neering and pro\ ide further information in the field. 
Interested students should see Ira Staley or Mr. 
Lawrence Hodgins. 

AMERICAN PURLIC RELATIONS 
ASSOCIATION 

Maryland's chapter of APRA was the first student 
chapter of this international public relations organi- 
zation. Its membership is limited to public relations 
majors who work together for their mutual ad\ ance- 
ment within the field. 

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF 
CIVIL ENGINEERS 

Each member of this organization is automati- 
cally a member of the International Society of Ci\ il 
Engineers upon graduation. The Society helps to 
broaden interest in ci\il engineering. To secure 
membership applications, see Donald Hughes or 
Dr. Cournyn. 

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF 
MECHANICAL ENGINEERS 

Promotion of professionalism in student engineers 



110 



is the purpose of this orj^ani/ation. An\' student 
working toward a degree in nieclianieal engineering 
is welcome. Interested persons should attend a 
meeting on the first Thursda>- of each month or 
contact Donald Spencer or Prof. A. B. Eyler. 

ANGEL FLIGHT 

Angel Flight is a group of selected coeds who 
represent the AFROTC Corps at social and official 
campus functions. Each cadet unit elects one coed 
who will work with Angel Flight to boost the 
esprit de corps. ser\ e as hostesses for dignitaries, co- 
sponsor the Militar\- Ball, and help the cadets and 
Air Science Department in an>" acti\ ity. Sani Stack 
or Capt. Messinger can pro\ ide more information. 

AQUALINERS 

Members meet each Tuesda\" in Preinkert Field 
House pool to de\elop interest and skill in syn- 
chronized swimming. A spring water show cul- 
minates the acti\ it>' of the \ear. Interested swim- 
mers should contact Miss Carole Frick or Miss 
Florence Clapliam. 

ART CLUB 

.\rt exhibits of student works, trips to museums, 
and discussions on art make up the program of the 
Art Club. Any person in the Art Department is free 
to attend the Wednesda\' afternoon meetings. For 
furtlur information contact Ralph Freeny or Dr. 
lames Wharton. 



Ill 



BLOCK AND BRIDLE CLUB 

Students interested in livestock and dairy man- 
agement problems are invited to join the Club. In 
addition to regular meetings with li\estock men, 
Block and Bridle sponsors a barbeque, a li\estock 
judging contest, and a picnic. Further information 
may be obtained from Dr. Francis Wingert or Dr. 
Roger Heinken. 

CALVERT DEBATE SOCIETY 

Intercollegiate and intracollegiate tournaments 
are held each year by the CaKert Debate Society. 
Any person interested in devoloping debating 
techniques is encouraged to join. Meetings are held 
on Mondays and practices on other weekdays. Mr. 
Malthon Anapol will supply additional information. 

CHAPEL CHOIR 

This co-educational \ ocal group makes numerous 
appearances each year under the direction of Prof. 
Fague Springmann. Its programs feature religious 
music. Roger Mitchell is president of the Choir. 

CHESS CLUB 

For students interested in chess, this club offers 
a chance to compete in games e\ ery Thursday after- 
noon. Matches are held with other area colleges in 
order to promote interest and skill in the game. 
Prospecti\e members should contact Rodney 
Joseph. 



112 



CHINKSE STUDKNTS CLUB 

Oriental stiiclt'iits and tliose intert'Sted in ^aininji 
a hetttT undiMstancling ot the Chinese culture are 
in\ ited to join this club. MontliK' meetings are held 
to promote a closer association between the students 
and to listen to gui'st speakers. Social acti\ities 
include a dance ami picnic. Additional questions 
should be referred to Mr. C. (>. C>hen. 



COLLEGIATE 4-H CLUB 

Former members ot 4-H groups are invited to 
continue their (^lub activities in college. This 
chapter works w ith local, state, and national groups 
in program plamiing. It also sponsors a 4-H Club 
(]itizenship Tour and Square Dance Jamboree. 
Interested students can contact Mr. R()>- Cassel or 
Miss C'harlotte Cona\\a\ . 



DAIRY SCIENCE CLUB 

Any student with an interest in the dair\ indus- 
tr>' is welcoiue to join this club. Manx functions are 
held jointi> with the Block and HridU- C.nib. Dr. 
j. F. Mattick ma\ be contacted for further 
information. 

ECONOMICS DISCUSSION CLUB 

MonthK' meetings are held tor students who are 
inttrested in economic conditions. Guest speakers 
priscnt new ideas for discussion. An>' student of 



113 



economics may contact Thomas Mariani or Dr. 
Allan Gruchy concerning membership. 

FRENCH CLUB 

Students having knowledge of or interest in 
French are in\ ited to join the French Club, whose 
purpose is to stimulate use of con\ ersational French. 
Lectures and discussions are held in French at the 
regular meetings. Annual acti\ ities include a dinner 
featuring food of Normandy and a Christmas party. 
Dr. A. Zucker will answer any questions. 



FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA 

The Maryland chapter of the national FFA 
participates in the state organization. Most of the 
monthly meetings are directed toward preparing 
members to become ad\'isors to local high school 
chapters. Meetings are held on Thursdays in Symons 
Hall. Additional information may be obtained from 
Mr. Arthur Chalk and Mr. Palmer Hopkins. 



GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA 
SERVICE SORORITY 

Women students interested in aiding the school 
and community are welcome to join this national 
ser\ice sorority. The members ser\e as hostesses 
and usherettes at student functions. Their main 
project is making toys for an orphanage. Mrs. 
Dutton ad\ ises the group. 



114 



(;()\'KH\MKNT AND POLITICS CLUB 

riiis ilul), uliosf purpose is to lurllur {\\c uiicler- 
standii)^ of go\ ernnient and politital science, meets 
to (listnss current ko\ ernnwnlal prohleins. Panel 
discussions, torunis, and j^ncst speakers lii^lili^lit 
tlic proiiratns. Dr. (mi\ Hatliorn mi.i\ 1)c contacted 
for nienihersliip intorination. 



CYMKANA TROUPE 

The (A-nikana Troupe specializes in g>innastics, 
tunil)lin^, dancing, and other forms of exhibition 
acti\ ities tor both men and women students. 
Numerous pertormances— some as far away as Ber- 
nmda and the Azores— are ^i\en durinji tlie school 
Near. Boh l^liillips is president of the i^ronp. 



iio.ML lco\omk:sclub 

Primarily a social orjjanization, the Home Eco- 
nonucs (]lul) holds montliK meetinus in the Marx- 
land Hoom. Both departmental and outside speakers 
liive the members added information about f(M)d, 
furniture, china and siKer, and jo!) opportunities. 
Interested students should see Miss Helen Ste\ens. 



INDUSTRIAL EDUC.\TI()\ 
ASS()CL\TK)\ 

Bi-monthl> meetings of the club are open to any 
student enrolled in Industrial Education. Each vear 



115 



the group has a road show which attempts to in- 
terest high school students in the field. Among the 
annual social e\ ents are a Christmas party and a 
spring picnic. Dr. Maley can provide additional 
information. 

INSTITUTE OF AERONAUTICAL 
SCIENCES 

This student branch of the National I. A. S. 
features talks by practicing aeronautical engineers 
at the Wednesday meetings. Competition with 
nearby engineering schools in writing technical 
papers is another part of the program. Interested 
students should contact Prof. Robert Ri\'ello. 



INSTITUTE OF FOOD TECHNOLOGY 

A junior chapter of the National I. F. T., this 
group takes field trips to restaurants and cafeterias 
in the Washington area to study food handling 
methods. The bi-weekly meetings feature discus- 
sions and prominent speakers. Dr. Robert Wile\ 
will i)ro\ ide more information, 

INTERNATIONAL CLUB 

Speakers, mo\ies, and panel discussions are 
utilized b>' the International Club to foster better 
foreign and American student relations. The weekl>' 
meetings are held in the Student Union. An Inter- 
national Fiesta is presented each year. Prof. Furman 
Bridgers will proxide additional information. 



116 



INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB 

Ciirrt'iit international pr()l)lcn)s arc tlu* main 
topics of tlu- conversation, Icctnrcs, and discnssion 
groups in this organization. Any student interested 
in gaining a better understanding of world problems 
is in\ited to attend the bi-montliK Wednesday 
meetings. Dr. Horace Harrison will provide addi- 
tional information. 

JUDO CLUB 

Members of this club promote judo as an art 
and as a form of self-defense. The group partic- 
ipates in judo contests and programs to develop 
skill in the sport. Practices are held Monda\ , Wed- 
nesday, and Frida\' in the Acti\ ities Building. In- 
terested students should contact Da\e Gunlock or 
Dr. George Weigand. 

LITERARY CLUB 

This club, sponsored by the English Department, 
honors outstanding juniors and seniors in the field 
of literature. Although membership is limited, open 
meetings are held twice a month. The programs 
consist of discussions of various phases of literature. 
For information, contact Dr. O. L. Rice, Dr. MeK in 
J. Friedman, or Carol Cushard. 

MARYLAND FLYING 
ASSOCIATION, INC. 

Three planes and several trained instructors pro- 



ir 



\ide any interested student with the opportunity to 
learn to fly. The club meets all CAA requirements 
and offers a chance to earn a pilot's license. Meet- 
ings are held on Tuesdays in the Student Union. 
Those interested in flying should contact Raymond 
Moffett. 

MARYLAND MARKETING 
ASSOCIATION 

This group is a member of the American Market- 
ing Association. Its purpose is to bring marketing 
methods and the practices of leading marketing 
organizations to the members. Interested students 
are encouraged to attend the meetings, which are 
announced in the Diamondback, or to see Dr. Allan 
Cook. 

MEN'S GLEE CLUB 

A wide xariety of music, ranging from semi- 
classic to barbershop, is included in the Glee Club's 
program. The purpose of the group is to broaden 
interest in music on campus. Additional information 
can be obtained from William Balser or Paul 
Traver. 

MR. AND MRS. CLUB 

Married students on campus find an opportunity 
to socialize in the Mr. and Mrs. Club. Among the 
activities are card parties, picnics, and weekends in 
the mountains. More information can be obtained 
from Mike O'Donnell or Mr. Dennis Hanley. 



118 



MODERN DANCE CLUB 

(>()t'cls intcii'slt'cl in tin- crcatiM' forms of dance 
art" wclionii' to join the Modern Dante (Mnl). K\('r\ 
Tni'sda) ni^Iit in Prcinkert Field House llie nieni- 
ht'rs learn niw (eelini(ines and prai ticc numbers for 
tile Spring Dance (Concert and the University 
riicater musical. Interested persons ma> contact 
Nan DebuskcN or Miss Mar\ W. Harrinjiiton. 

NURSING CLUB 

The purpose of the Louisa Parsons Nursing Club 
is to I'stablish a greater appreciation of professional 
nursing. (Campus and communitx' philanthropic 
I)r()jects are undertaken each year. Meetings, held 
e\ery other Thursda> , are open to anNone interested 
in nursing. See Dean Margaret Hayes for more 
inh)rmation. 

OLYMPIC BARBELL CLUB 

Ciompeting in \ arious intercollegiate meets and 
promoting weight lifting as a sport are the objects 
of this club. Meetings are held twice a month. For 
additional information, Mr. Harold Freeman or Ed 
Lanehart ma\ be contacted. 

PROPELLOR CLUB 

The purpose of this club is to establish a better 
understanding of the transportation systems in the 
United States. An>- interested student is welcoHie 
to attend meetings. For additional information con- 



119 



tact Robert Gro\e, Dr. R. L. Dawson, or Mr. 
Charles Heye. 

PSYCHOLOGY CLUB 

Open to any undergraduate student taking a 
course in psychology, this club attempts to en- 
courage interest and participation in the field. 
Speakers, films, trips, and discussions pro\ide the 
program for the weekly meetings. Interested stu- 
dents should see Dr. Norma Wegner or Stanley 
Sellars. 

RED CROSS STUDENT UNIT 

Helping with the Red Cross sponsored blood 
dri\'e twice a year and sponsoring a training pro- 
gram for new members are the club projects. Dean 
Julia Billings or Betty May O'Brien will supply 
information. 

ROSSBOROUGH CLUB 

This social organization is open to all students 
on campus. The annual Rossborough Dance and 
the crowning of a queen climax the actixity of the 
year. Meetings are held on Wednesday nights in 
the Student Union. Jack Caldwell or Dean Doyle 
Royal will pro\ ide additional information. 

SAILING CLUB 

Participation in interscholastic sailing regattas is 
the main function of this club. Any person, experi- 



120 



t'iKt'cl or not, is welcome to join. Instruction is 
Ui\en to tlie less skilled sailors. For iniormation 
contact Mr. Charles Barrett. 



SOCIETY FOR THE ADV.WCEMEXT 
OF MANAGEMENT 

The main ohjectix e of the Societ> is to promote 
and advance interest in the field of management. 
Leading business men are featured at the meetings. 
Membership is open to anyone interested in the 
inanagment asixct of business. To obtain more in- 
formation see Bob Urcjuhart. 



SOCIOLOGY CLUB 

The SociologN Club stri\es to draw together the 
course majors and minors. The group meets e\ery' 
two weeks to hold discussions and to listen to 
speakers from the Naried fields of sociolog>'. Dr. 
\\ illiam Felton or Harr>- Cranford will pro\ ide ad- 
ditional infomiation. 



SPANISH CLUB 

This club proN ides a program of mo\ies, annual 
dinner, discussions, and guest speakers. The pur- 
pose is to proxide a better understanding of the 
cultures of the Spanish countries. Dr. G. P. Nemes 
or Sharon Reexes ma> be contacted concerning 
membersiiip. 



121 



STUDENT NATIONAL EDUCATION 
ASSOCIATION 

This club is the student affihate of the National 
Education Association. Supplements to education 
courses are offered by this group. All types of 
education— such as childhood, home economics, and 
industrial— are subjects of the program. Students in- 
terested in joining should contact Dr. Fem 
Schneider. 

TERRAPIN SKI CLUB 

Ski trips to northern resorts are among the 
activities of the Ski Club. The Club also holds 
meetings with films and demonstrations on skiing 
Anyone interested in joining should contact Bruct 
Coh'in or Dean Doyle Royal. 

TERRAPIN TRAIL CLUB 

Ev ery two weeks the members of the Trail Club 
take part in an outing. This co-educational group 
meets every other Thursday night to plan and 
discuss coming acti\ities. Dr. John Axley or Paul 
Wright should be contacted for membership 
information. 

UNIVERSITY BAND 

Pep rallies, parades, football games, and concerts 
make up a large part of the Band's regular program. 
Practices are held three times a week. Students in- 
terested in auditioning should see Prof. Hubert 
Henderson. 



122 



UNIV ERSITY ORCHESTRA 

Pcrformiiiu toiKcrf inusic is the puriiosc of this 
orj^aiiization, wliitli wclcoiiu's both stucK'iits and 
iacult\ to its nuMiil)('rsliip. Interested persons 
should contact Dr. Hrvtc Jordan. 



UNIX'ERSITY THEATER 

Uni\('rsit>' Theater presents opportunities for 
students to learn all phases of pla\' production and 
to pro\ ide experienced personnel for the handling 
of each of UT's four major productions. Prof. 
Warren Straushaugh ad\ ises the group. 



VETERANS' CLUB 

The purpose of this cluh is to maintain contact 
between \eterans and the X'eterans Administration. 
Included in the social program are sports, dances, 
and a beach partx'. Meetings are held bi-monthly in 
the Student C^nion. Interested \ eterans should con- 
tact Mr. Hill HoH. 



VETERINARY SCIENCE CLUB 

Students interested in scterinary science are in- 
\ ited to join this organization which fosters infor- 
mation and education in the field. Guest speakers 
and discussions make up the program for the 
inonthK Thursda\ night meetings. For more infor- 
mation see Dr. James Sperr\ . 



123 



WOMEN'S CHORUS 

The Chorus is open to all women students inter- 
ested in singing. Concerts with other \ ocal groups 
are part of the program. Paul Tra\ er directs the 
group; Deborah Gude is president. 



WOMEN'S PROFESSIONAL CLUB 

Connected with the College of Health, Ph>sical 
Education, and Recreation, this group attends con- 
\entions and sponsors a college play day and a high 
school sports da>'. Dr. Dorothy Mohr or June 
Kennard will pro\ ide more information. 



WOMEN'S RECREATION 
ASSOCIATION 

WRA sponsors all women's athletic tournaments 
and associated recreational acti\ ities. E\ ery woman 
student is automatically a member of WRA and is 
urged to participate in its functions. Barrie Xeal or 
Miss Ethel Kesler can answer an>- questions. 



YOUNG DEMOCRATS CLUB 

Interested students are in\'ited to join this affiliate 
of the Democratic Part>'. The group participates in 
primaries, rallies, and political forums and prepares 
political literature. Dr. Verne Chatelain is the 
: d\isor. 



124 




SORORITIES 



PANHELLENIC COUNCIL 

President Judy Purnell 

Rush Chairman Kate Ricketts 

The Panhellenic Council, consisting of one rep- 
resentati\ e from each of the 16 national sororities at 
the Unix ersity, is the sorority advisory and govern- 
ing body. 

Panhel strixes to promote close intersorority re- 
lations and to maintain high scholastic and social 
standards. It formulates and enforces the rules 
goxerning rushing, pledging, and initiation. 

The Panhellenic Council sponsors the annual 
Pledge Dance, held every fall in honor of the 
pledges; the Panhel Car Wash for Campus Chest; 
and an Easter Egg Roll for orphans. Last year 
Panhel sponsored the spring issue of Expression, 
the campus literary magazine. Soon after pledging 
in the fall, Panhel holds a weekend camping trip to 
acquaint new pledges with the campus and its 
opportunities and acti\ities. 



FALL RUSH SCHEDULE 

Open House Teas September 20-21 

Invitational Parties September 22-28 

Preference Teas September 30 

Pledging October 1 

126 



STANDARD PAMIKLLEMC IR'LKS 

Any woiiu'u clij^iljlc lor iiiatrit ulation at the 

U»i\t'rsity of Mar\laiul and unaiiiliafiil with any 

National PanlitlKnic Fraternity is t'li^il)l(' for 

rusliin^. 

All wonuMi who art' fornialK rushinj^ art* rcciuired 
to ohstTNe a silence period which extends from the 
hej^inning of fomial rushing to pledging. At this 
time, rushees and sororitN' uomen are forbidden to 
talk to each other, except when in a sororitN house 
(hiring a scheduled part\ . In order to he pledged, 
a girl must ha\e \ isited all the sororities on campus 
during the open house tours. 

Initiation ot an\ pledge results from the com- 
pletion of filteen credit hours in tlie preceding 
semester at the L'ni\(rsit\ of \hir\land with a 2.2 
a\erage and no failures for that semester. These 
women nmst he students in good standing. 

A woman ma\ not pledge a second sororit\ until 
a period of one Near has elapsed from her last 
sororitN aifiliation. 

Following formal rushing in September and 
l-'ebruar) there is an informal rush period. Girls 
who are interested should sign up in the Dean of 
Women's office. The informal rusii period is deter- 
inined 1)\ the ranhellenic Council. 



127 



JUNIOR PANHELLENIC COUNCIL 

Junior Panhellenic Council is composed of one 
pledge from each sororit\'. Its purpose is to get 
these representati\ es acquainted with the functions 
of the Panhellenic Council and to prepare them to 
be better sororitv women. 



At the Council meetings the members discuss 
mutual problems and plans. E\"ery year the group 
sponsors one big project. Last year Junior Panhel 
wrote to \arious colleges inquiring about rushing 
programs and compiled all the material gathered. 
The information was then used by Panhellenic 
Council to impro\ e the rushing system at the Uni- 
\ ersit\- of Maryland. 



Panhellenic 

Council 

President- 



Judy 
Purnell 




ALPHA CHI OMEGA "alpha rm" 

Founded at DcFuuw i'nivcrsitij—lHHo 
Gamma Tlwta Chapter established at the 
University of Maryland— 1948 

President Sandra Stant 

4603 Calxert Road UNion 4-9893 



ALPHA DELTA PI "a d pi" 

Founded at Wesleyan Female College— 1851 
Beta Phi Chapter established at tlie 
University of Maryland— 1940 

President Martha Lee Thomas 

4603 College A\enue WArfield 7-9864 



ALPHA EPSILON PHI "a e pki" 

Founded at Barnard College— 1909 
Alpha Mu Chapter established at the 
i'tiiversity of Maryland— 194-3 

President Ina Bluniberg 

11 Fraternity Row WArfield 7-9701 



ALPHA GAMMA DELTA "alpha gam" 

Founded at Syracuse University— 1904 
Alpha Xi Chapter established at the 
University of Maryland— 1947 

President Margaret Price 

Campus UNion 4-9^0f) 



129 



ALPHA OMICRON PI "a o pi" 

Founded at Barnard College— 1897 

Fi Delta Chapter established at the 

University of Maryland— 1924 

Fresident Carol PlimihofF 

4517 College Avenue WArfield 7-9871 



ALPHA XI DELTA "alpha xi" 

Founded at Lombard College— 189S 
Beta Eta Chapter established at the 
University of Maryland— 1934 

Fresident Sandra Patt:rsoii 

4517 Knox Road WArfield 7-9720 



DELTA DELTA DELTA "tri delt" 

Founded at Boston University— 1888 
Alpha Pi Chapter established at the 
University of Maryland— 1934 

Fresident Barbara Heterick 

4604 College Avenue WArfield 7-9795 



DELTA GAMMA "dg" 

Founded at Lewis School— 1873 
Beta Sigma Chapter established at the 
University of Maryland— 1945 

Fresident Arlen Kelly 

4502 College Avenue WArfield 7-9844 



130 



GAMMA PHI BETA "gamma phi" 

I'Ouudcd (it Synicti.si' Unit crsity—IH74 
Beta Beta Chapter cstahlisficd at the 
University of Maryland— 1^)40 

President - Joanne Carroll 

9 Fratt-rnity Row WArfiekl 7-9773 



KAPPA ALPHA THETA "theta" 

Founded at DePauu I'niversity—IHVO 
Cannna Mu Chapter established at the 
University of Maryland— 1947 

President Nancy Mason 

8 Fratt-rnity Row UNion 4-9829 



KAPPA DELTA "k d" 

Founded at Mr^inia State \ornial Sehool—lH97 
Alpha Rho Chapter established at the 
University of Maryland— 1929 

President V'ir^inia Duke 

4(S1() College Avenue WArfiekl 7-9759 



KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA "kappa" 

Founded at Monmoutli College— 1H7() 
Cannna Psi Chapter established at the 
University of Maryland— 1929 

President iXanev Nvstroni 

7407 Princeton Avenue WArfiekl t-9886 



131 



PHI SIGMA SIGMA "phi siggy siggy" 

Founded at Hunter College— 1913 
Beta Alpha Chapter established at the 
University of Maryland— 1936 

President Joanne Price 

4812 College Avenue WArfield 7-9828 



PI BETA PHI "pi phi" 

Founded at Monmouth College— 1867 
Maryland Beta Chapter established at the 
University of Maryland— 1944 

President Adele Ritchie 

12 Fraternity Row UNion 4-9885 



SIGMA DELTA TAU "s d t" 

Founded at Cornell University— 1917 
Alpha Theta Chapter established at the 
University of Maryland— 1951 

President Carol Blumenthal 

Campus WArfield 7-9513 



SIGMA KAPPA 

Founded at Colby College— 1874 
Beta Zeta Chapter established at the 
University of Maryland— 1940 

President Margo Dieterick 

10 Fraternity Row WArfield 7-9861 



132 




FRATERNITIES 



INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL 

President . - ^ Rand Tuttle 

Riisli Chairman- , Bob Shoemaker 

The Interfraternity Council is composed of rep- 
resentati\ es of the 24 national fraternities on cam- 
pus. Through the Council the fraternities are 
banded together to promote and maintain a friendh 
and cooperatix e relationship. 

The Council organizes and supervises fraternity 
rushing. The IFC Rush Chairman is in charge of 
coordinating all rush functions. Fall formal rushing 
lasts for tvvo weeks, beginning September 25 and 
ending October 6. Informal rushing follows Septem- 
ber and February fonnal rushing. The infonnal 
rush period is determined by the Council. 

The Interfraternit\' Council sponsors the frater- 
nity athletic program throughout the year; the In- 
terfraternity Ball, which is held between semesters; 
Greek Week, held in the spring; and Help Week, 
when pledges from all fraternities work together on 
a community project. The Council presents awards 
for participation in campus acti\ities and for scho- 
lastic achievements. Four academic scholarships 
are also awarded. In addition, IFC maintains an 
o\erseas philanthropic program. Monthh' banquets 
are held for fraternity presidents and faculty 
members. 



134 



RUSHING REGULATIONS 

The fomial rush program gi\es fraternities the 
opportunity to obtain new members and allows 
rushees to familiarize themsehes with the fraterni- 
ties at the Unixersity of Maryland. Any male stu- 
dent attending the Uni\ersit\' is eligible to rush. 

E\'er>' rushee must \ isit 14 fraternity houses 
during the open house parties. At eaeh house he 
must obtain a signature on a printed card, which is 
obtained at the first house he \isits. The card must 
be turned in to the Interfraternity Council by the 
Tuesday preceding the in\ itational parties. At the 
same time, the rushee also picks up his in\ itations 
to the second round of parties. Bids for pledging are 
distributed the Monday following the inxitational 
parties. 

A male student may be initiated into a fraternity- 
after pledging a full semester and attaining at least 
a 2.0 average, with no failures, for that semester. 
He must also be a student in good standing widi the 
Unix ersity. 

FALL RUSH SCHEDULE 

Open House Fraternity Parties September 25-27 

Turn in Signature Cards ....September 30 

Pick up Invitations September 30 

In\ itational Parties October 1-4 

Pick up Bids.. .October 6 



135 



ALPHA EPSILON PI "a e pi" 

Founded at Sew York University— 1913 
Delta Deuteron Chapter established at the 
University of Maryland— 1940 

Presiden t Douglas Gelf eld 

7303 Yale Avenue UNion 4-9785 



ALPHA GAMMA RHO "a g r" 

Founded at Ohio State-1904 
Alpha Theta Chapter established at the 
University of Maryland— 1928 

President George Roche 

7511 Princeton Avenue WArfield 7-9831 



ALPHA TAU OMEGA "a t o " 

Founded at Virginia Military Institute— 1865 
Epsilon Gamma Chapter established at the 
University of Maryland— 1930 

President Jerry Hurle\' 

4611 College Avenue WArfield 7-9849 



DELTA KAPPA EPSILON "deke" 

Founded at Yale Univers^ity—1844 
Kappa Delta Chapter established at the 
University of Maryland— 1952 

President James Alberts 

4317 Lehigh Road WArfield 7-9520 



136 



DELTA SIGMA PHI 'dklta sic." 

Foimdcd at City College of Sen Yoik-lHm 
Alpha Sigma Ctiapter established at the 
I'uiversity of Maryland— 1924 

President _ — Robert Clevelv 

43()() Knox Road WArfield 7-9T7() 



DELTA TAU DELTA "delt" 

Founded at Bethany College— 1859 
Delta Sigma Chapter established at the 
University of Maryland— 1948 

President- Rudolph \'ignone 

3 Fratemitv Row U\it)n 4-9780 



KAPPA ALPHA "k a" 

Founded at Washington and Lee— 1865 
Beta Kappa Chapter esiahlished at the 
University of Maryland— 1914 

President Jack Barrett 

1 Fraternity Row UNion 4-9504 



LAMBDA CHI ALPHA ''lambda cm" 

Founded at Boston University— 1909 
Epsilon Pi Chapter established at the 
University of Maryland— 19S2 

President - Chuck Graf 

6 Fraternity Row WArfield 7-9778 



137 




Clowning at the Fraternity House 



PHI ALPHA "phi alph" 

Founded at George \Vashinfi;ton University— U)14 
Epsilon Chapter established at the 
University of Maryhind—1919 

President Btn Krause 

4609 College A\ enue WArfield 7-9557 

PHI DELTA THETA "phi delt" 

Founded at Miami University, at Oxford, 

Ohio-lH4H 
Alpha Chapter estabUshed at the 

University of Maryland— 1930 

President Joe Hurdinian 

4605 College Avenue WArfield 7-9884 

PHI KAPPA SIGMA "phi kap" 

Founded at University of Pennsylvania— IHZO 
Alpha Zeta Cha])ter established at the 
University of Maryland— 1899 

President Cliff Taggart 

5 Fraternity Row UNion 4-9828 

PHI KAPPA TAU "phi tau ' 

Founded at Miami University, at Oxford, 

Ohio- 1906 
Beta Omieron Chapter established at the 

University of Maryland— 1950 

President Cal\ in Lungacre 

Campus UNion 4-9886 



139 



PHI SIGMA KAPPA "phi sig" 

Founded at Massachusetts Agricultural 

College- 187 3 
Eta Chapter established at the 

University of Maryland— 1897 , 1923 

President Robert Payne 

7 Fraternity Row UNion 4-9851 



PI KAPPA ALPHA pi k a" 

Founded at University of Virginia— 1868 
Delta Fsi Chapter established at the 
University of Maryland— 1952 

President Jack Zane 

7514 Rhode Island Avenue WArfield 7-9891 



SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON "s a e" 

Founded at University of Alabama— 1856 
Maryland Beta Chapter established at the 
University of Maryland— 1943 

President Rand Tuttle 

4 Fraternit>' Row WArfield 7-9707 

SIGMA ALPHA MU "sam" 

Founded at City College of New York— 1909 
Sigma Chi Chapter established at the 
University of Maryland— 1933 

President To Be Elected 

2 Fraternity Row WArfield 7-9845 



140 



SICMACHI 

bounded at Miami L'liiicrsiti/, at (Ixford, 

Ohio-IHSS 
Gamma Chi Chapter established at the 
I'niversittf of Maryland— 19 42 

President Bill Denial 

4600 Norwich Road UXion 4-9807 



SIGMA NU 

Founded at Virfiinia Military Institute— 1868 
Delta Phi Chapter established at the 
University of Maryland— 1917 

President Charles Pt'terson 

4617 Norwich Road WArfield 7-956.3 



SIGMA PHI EPSILON "sig ep" 

Founded at University of Ric}imond—19()l 
Maryland Beta Chapter established at the 
University of Maryland— 1949 

President - Joe Cox 

7403 Hopkins A\enue UNion 4-9770 

SIGMA PI 

Founded at Vineennes l^niversity—1 S97 
Alpha Chi Chapter established at the 
University of Maryland— 1949 

President .Richard Iniirahani 

4302 Knox Road UNion 4-9771 



141 



TAU EPSILON PHI "t e p" 

Founded at Columbia University— 1910 
Tau Beta Chapter established at the 
University of Maryland— 1925 

President Joel Rubenstein 

4607 Knox Road WArfield 7-9700 



TAU KAPPA EPSILON "teke" 

Founded at Illinois Wesley an— 1899 
Beta Delta Chapter established at the 
University of Maryland— 1947 

President Dick Powell 

Campus UNion 4-9765 

THETA CHI 

Founded at Norwich University— 1856 
Alpha Psi Chapter established at the 
University of Maryland— 1929 

President Jim Halev 

7401 Princeton Avenue WArfield 7-9733 



ZETA BETA TAU "z b t " 

Founded at Columbia University— 1894 
Beta Zeta Chapter established at the 
University of Maryland— 1948 

President Hank Goldberg 

4400 Knox Road UNion 4-9786 



142 




ATHLETICS 



FOOTBALL 

This year, faced with a tough schedule that in- 
cludes the 1957 National Collegiate Football 
Championship team of Auburn, Terp gridders are 
looking forward to providing more joyful Saturday 
afternoons for their fans. 

Over the past ten years, supporters of the Mary- 
land Terrapins have grown accustomed to top- 
notch football. It is the aim of Coach Tommy 
Mont to rejuvenate widespread backing and interest 
in the University's football program by bringing 
the Terps back to national ranking. 

Mont is entering his third year as head coach 
at his alma mater with high hopes. In 1956, Mary- 
land's record was 2-7-1— a bitter disappointment to 
Coach Mont and the fans. The 1957 season was 
concluded with a more promising 5-5 record, with 
the Terps overcoming their injury jinx of the pre- 
vious year and the outstanding sophomore play 
being attributable to the marked improvement. 

The most important clash of the 1957 season was 
the North Carolina game on October 19. The Terps 
upset former Maryland coach Jim Tatum's Tarheels 
21-7 to the delight of Her Majesty Queen 
Elizabeth II and her "court" of more than 40,000 
fans. 

This year the Terps will be led on the battlefield 
by co-captains Fred Cole and Bob Rusevlyan. 
Backing up these able men will be such veteran 



144 



pcrtormcrs as Al Bcarclsk'v aiicl Bt-n Scotti at tlic 
end positions, Kurt Schwarz and Tom Flor at 
tackle, Rod BrecdloNe, Fred Kern, and Tom 
Gundernian at guard, and Vic Schwartz at center. 

Mont has John Forbes, Jim Joyce, and Larr\ 
Casparro hatthng for tlie fullback position and Ted 
Kershncr, Joe Behrniann, Bob Layman, and Gene 
W-rardi strixing for the halfback slots. As for new 
talent, Terp supporters can be optimistic about the 
potential power of prospects Dick Scarbath, Ed 
Xickla, Dwayne Fletcher, and E\erett Cloud. 

BASKETBALL 

Highlights in the 1958 schedule will no doubt 
be home games with Texas A & M and the Naval 
Academy. 

Terp cagers ended last year's season of basket- 
ball being voted sixth in the nation by the Associ- 
ated Press, United Press, and International News 
Service polls. Now Marxland's team is recognized 
as an outstanding one in basketball circles through- 
out the country. 

Coach Bud Millikan's crew posted the best 
record in the University's history. The Terrapins 
won 22 and lost 7, not only capturing the coveted 
ACC crown, but defeating Boston College in the 
first round of the NCAA Tournament at Madison 
S(iuare Garden. At Charlotte, N. C, Temple edged 
out the Terps 71-67 in the NCAA Regional Tour- 
nament. By defeating Manhattan College 59-55, 
the Maryland hoopsters ended in the consolation 
position in the tourney. 



145 



Maryland rooters were thrilled by the sharp 
shooting of Xiek Da\is, the defensive work of John 
Xacincik, and outstanding play by Tom Young. 

nold-o\ers from last vear's first string team are 
Charles MeXeil, 6'6" forward, and Al Bunge, 6'8" 
eenter. This season's squad will be bolstered by 
returning players Gene Danko, Jerry Beehtle, Bill 
Murphy, Jim Halleck, and Julian Weingarten. 

The Terp performers are accustomed to playing 
before large crowds such as the 15,200 fans that 
\iewed Maryland's win over North Carolina 74-61 
in the Cole Activity Building. The team played 
before television viewers in games against Navy, 
North Carolina State, and South Carolina. 

Sparked with last season's excellent record, this 
year's basketball team looks promising to the 
experts for a national championship. 

TExNNIS 

Coach Doyle Royal's tennis squad ended the 
1958 season with an e\en split— six wins against six 
defeats. In conference play the Terp netmen posted 
a four win, three loss record. 

The outstanding performer for Maryland last 
year was Jackson Yang, a steady man on the courts. 
Yang was six and one for the season. 

A newcomer to the Terp squad in 1959 will be 
Chuck Abelson, a top freshman prospect who is the 
Mar\land State Junior Champion and who ranked 



147 



third in the Mid- Atlantic Lawn Tennis Association. 
Abelson should brighten Maryland's outlook toward 
spring court activities. 

INDOOR TRACK 

Last year's indoor track team romped home with 
the Atlantic Coast Championship tucked under 
their arm. Maryland's closest competition, North 
Carolina, lagged 24 points behind. The only team 
to defeat our runners over the past season was 
Navy, by a score of 54 to 46. The Terrapins have 
won the ACC Championship consistently over the 
past several years. 

OUTDOOR TRACK 

For the past three years the Maryland track 
team has been undefeated in outdoor comj)etition. 

Besides winning every meet last season, the 
Kehoe cindermen captured the DCAAU, their 
closest competition some 72 points behind. 

Existing school records fell frequently last year 
with Ed Cooke putting the shot 55 feet 9/2 inches; 
Cooke also hurled the discus 153 feet 7 inches. 
Larry Salmon ran the 220 low hurdles in a record 
time of 23.3, and Tom Tait set a new record for the 
high jump, 6 feet 5/1 inches. 

Maryland can look forward to another brilliant 
track team this year; Coach Kehoe plans to bring 
up men from his 1958 undefeated freshman team. 



148 



WRESTLING 

With five consecutive ACC Championships un- 
der their belts, Maryland matmen look forward to 
an equally successful season this year. 

Last year the Terps set an ACC record for total 
points scored in a tournament; they posted 109 
points to capture nine out of ten trophies. In the 
XCAA Tournament held in Laramie, Wyoming, 
Maryland grapplers were disappointed in their 
showing, not taking a single match. 

Coach Sully Krouse is looking to better last 
year's record of six wins, two ties, and one loss. 
The lone loss was at the hands of Pittsburgh. Out- 
standing freshmen to look for this year are Bill 
Trexler, Pete Wolf, and Gerry Styers. 



GOLF 

The Maryland golf team ended a successful 
season by posting its best record in years— nine 
wins and one loss. The Terps' lone loss was an 
upset at the hands of Duke. 

Coach Frank Cronin can look forward to the 
1959 season with confidence. Not only does his 
team have a tremendous record, but they also 
have one of the most sensational collegiate golfers 
in the nation in Deane Beman, a junior this year. 
Last year Beman shot par or under par most of the 
season. 



149 



SWIMMING 

Entering their fourth year of collegiate competi- 
tion, Coach Bill Campbell's swimmers are establish- 
ing themselves as definite contenders for the league 
title. 

Although Coach Campbell lost two top men, Ray 
Ashenfelt and Stape Shields, he has ample replace- 
ments in co-captains John Bell and Dick Sinclair. 

The swimming team is steadily improving and 
the sport is gaining in popularity every year. 



SOCCER 

The Red and White clad hooters of coach Doyle 
Royal have become the perennial champions of the 
Atlantic Coast Conference. Last year the Terps 
walked off with their fifth straight conference 
crown. 

Maryland's soccer team went undefeated in the 
ACC and also beat such strong opposition outside 
our league as Washington and Lee and Johns 
Hopkins. The team lost a strong Penn State team 
and tied Navy. 

Although such men as Andy McDonald and 
Leroy Skinner depart through graduation, Asad 
Shukry and Taras Charchalis are scheduled to pick 
up the slack. 



150 



BASEBALL 

Maryland's baseball team lifted itself out ol the 
league cellar duriim the last uei'k of eonterence 
pla\' to finish the season in next to last place. As 
usual Coach Burton Shi[)le\'s stpiad was struggling 
to keep its head abo\e water. 

However, Shipley expects his 1959 team to be 
much stronger. This is based on the season ending 
upsets of Wake F'orest and North Carolina. 

The Terps lose a stead>' performer in And> 
McDonald, but seasoned \eterans Art Clesstiras, 
Pat Clarke, and John Barrett are expected to carry 
the load in 1959. The Old Liners look for new 
power in Charlie Keller, Jr., son of Mar\land grad- 
uate and New York Yankee star "King Kong" 
Keller. 

Baseball enthusiasts are looking forward to 
the 1959 squad becoming a contender in the ACC 
race. 



LACROSSE 

The Terp .stickmen will be right in the nuddlc 
of the battle for national honors again this year, 
just as they have been since lacrosse was initiated 
at Mar\land nian\ decades ago. 

Last year the Terp ten fell short b\ only one 
game of winning the Class A National Champion- 

151 



ship. Undefeated until their last game, Maryland 
lost the championship to the Johns Hopkins 
University team in a close game in Baltimore. 

The Terrapins lose All-Americans Ernie Betz, 
Dick Corrigan, and Leroy Skinner along with 
steady performer Dick Szlasa. One consolation will 
be the return of honorable mention All-American 
Ted Kyte. Roger Goss is a sure choice for the All- 
American team. 

Coaches Al Heagy and Jack Faber, after man>' 
years as pilots of the lacrosse team, expect another 
outstanding team in the spring. 




INTRAMURALS 

A complete intramural program, under the direc- 
tion of Prof. James Kehoe, is provided for the 
students by the Athletic Department. The program 
is divided into two divisions— the open league and 
the fraternity league. 

All undergraduate males are eligible for the open 
league, while participation in the fraternity league 
is restricted to imdergraduate actives and jpledges 
of the various fraternities. 

One or more sports are offered each season dur- 
ing the school year. Tournaments are held in each 
of the following fields: touch football, basketball, 
Softball, wrestling, boxing, golf, tennis, gymnastics, 
horse shoes, track, cross-country, bowling, weight 
lifting, badminton, volley ball, table tennis, and 
others. 

Additional information concerning intramural 
athletics may be obtained at the Intramural Office 
located in the Armory or by calling Extension 470. 

Women's intramural athletics operate under the 
direction of the Women's Recreation Association 
(See index Women's Recreation Association). 



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154 




SONGS AND CHEERS 



CHEERLEADERS 

At every athletic event and pep rally the cheer- 
leaders can be seen leading the crowd in rooting 
their team to victory. Many hours of practice take 
place before the group appears in their bright red 
and white uniforms. 

Students who maintain a 2.0 average are eligible 
for tryouts in the fall. Current members of the 
cheering squad are: Judy Eberts, Bev May, Pat 
Smith, Jackie Eads, Sue Gumpper, Joan Purdon, 
Bonnie Girard, Linda Cutting, Sue Ramsburg, 
Harvey Beavers, and Don Ritnour. 



CHEERS 



U. M. RAH RAH 



U. M. Rah! Rah! 

U. M. Rah! Rah! 

U. Rah! M. Rah! 

U. M. Rah! Rah! 

(Whistle . . . ) Boom! Rah! 

Fight! Team! Fight! 

TERPS 

T-E 

T-E-R 

T-E-R-P-S Rah! 

( Repeat four times ) 

156 



MARYLAND LOCOMOTIVE 

M-M-M-M 

A-A-A-A 

R-R-R-R 

(etc. spelling Maryland) 
Mary . . . land! 
Fight! Team! Fight! 



SOUND OFF 

(leaders) Sound oft! 

(stands) One! Two! 

(leaders) Hit it again! 

(stands) Three! Four! 

( leaders ) Maryland Count! 

( all) M-A-R-Y-L-A (Pause) N-D! 



GIMEE-GIMEE 

(leaders) Gimee an M! 
(stands) M! 

(leaders) Gimmee an A! 
(stands) A! 

(etc. spelling Maryland) 
(leaders) What have yon got; 
(all) Maryland! 

L57 



MARYLAND SWING 

M! M! M-A-R-Y 
L! L! L-A-N-D 
M-A-R-Y 
L-A-N-D 

Fight! Team! Fight! 

MARYLAND SWAY 

M . . . (Crowd sways to right) 
A . . . ( Crowd sways to left ) 
( etc. spelhng Maryland ) 
Mary . . . land! 
Fight! Team! Fight! 

LONG CHEER-SHORT CHEER 

( leaders ) Gimee a long cheer! 
(stands, extending arms) Yaaa . . 
( leaders ) Gimee a short cheer! 
( stands, extending arms ) Yea! 
(leaders) Gimee a silent cheer! 
( stands, extend arms only ) . . . 

RED AND WHITE YELL 

Red! Red! Red! 
\Miite! White! White! 
Team! Team! Team! 
Fight! Fight! Fight!. 

158 



SONGS 



MARYLAND VICTORY SONG 

Maryland, we're all behind you, 
Raise high the Black and Gold. 
For there is nothing half so glorious 
As to see our team victorious. 
We've got the team, boys, 
We've got the steam, boys. 
So keep on fighting, don't give in! 
M-A-R-Y-L-A-X-D (yell) 
Maryland will win! 



SONS OF OLD MARYLAND 

Sons of old Maryland 
Old Maryland needs you! 
Stand by your colors, boys, 
And to them e'er be true! 
Fight for old Maryland, 
Old Liners stand, 
Defenders of the Black and Gold 
Throughout the land! 

160 



TERRAPIN DRINKING SONG 

Drink to the Terrapin! 

All stout hearted men. 

We have no fear of hell, 

For we're loyal sons and fellows. 

Drink to the Terrapin, 

May God bless her sons! 

When the toast is in the cup, 

Bottoms up! Bottoms up! 

To Maryland! 



ALMA MATER 

Hail! Alma Mater! 
Hail to thee Maryland! 
Steadfast in loyalty 
For thee we stand. 
Love for the Black and Gold 
Deep in our hearts we hold. 
Singing thy praise forever 
Throughout the land. 

161 



MARYLAND, MY MARYLAND 

The despot's heel is on thy shore, 

Maryland, my Maryland! 
His torch is at thy temple door, 

Mar>4and, my Maryland! 
Avenge the patriotic gore 
That flecked the streets of Baltimore, 
And be the battle-queen of yore, 

Maryland, my Maryland! 

Hark to an exiled son's appeal, 

Maryland, my Maryland! 
My Mother State, to thee I kneel! 

Maryland, my Maryland! 
For life and death, for woe and weal, 
Thy peerless chivalry reveal. 
And grid thy beauteous limbs with steel, 

Maryland, my Maryland! 

Thou wilt not cower in the dust, 

Maryland, my Maryland! 
Thy beaming sword shall never rust, 

Maryland, my Maryland! 
Remember Carroll's sacred trust, 
Remember Howard's warlike thrust, 
And all thy slumberers with the just, 

Maryland, my Maryland! 

162 



INDEX 



Accounting Club 108 

Activities - ~ 13 

AFROTC Band 108 

AFROTC Program . „ 13 

Agricultural Economics Club _ — 108 

Agricultural Student Council - - 108 

Agronomy Club - - 109 

Alpha Chi Omega ._ 129 

Alpha Delta Pi 129 

Alpha Epsilon Phi _ 129 

Alpha Ei)silon Pi - 136 

Alpha Gamma Delta 129 

Alpha Gamma Rho 136 

Ali)ha Omicron Pi - _ 130 

Ali)ha Phi Omega ^ - 109 

Alpha Tau Omega _ - 136 

Alpha Xi Delta - 130 

Amateur Radio Club _ _ 109 

Amer. Inst, of Chemical Engineers _ 109 

Amer. Inst, of Electrical Engineers and 

Radio Engineers _ 110 

Amer. Public Relations Asso 110 

Amer. Soc. of Civil Engineers _ 110 

Amer. Soc. of Mechanical Engineers 110 

Angel Flight - - Ill 

Aqualiners _ 80, 111 

Art Club . „ - _ - --- 111 

Art e.xhibits - 80 

Associated Women Students 47 



163 



AWS Coffee Hours._ 79 



Band, University 77, 122 

Baptist Student Union 83 

Baseball 151 

Basketball 145 

Block and Bridle Club --.. 112 

Board - 15 

Board of Regents — 40 

Books and supplies — - 15 

Borreson, B. James 33 



Calendar of events 26 

Calvert Debate Society 112 

Canterbury Association 83 

Chapel Choir 79, 112 

Cheerleaders 156 

Cheers 156, 157, 158 

Chess Club . ._ 112 

Chinese Students Club 113 

Christian Science Organization — 84 

Churches ( Local ) - -- - - 89, 90 

Class attendance 16 

Class officers 52 

Class offices 51 

Constitution, S.G.A. 54 

Counseling Center — 16 



Dairy Science Club 113 

Delta Delta Delta 130 

Delta Gamma _- 130 

Delta Kappa Epsilon 136 



164 



Delta Sigma Phi 137 

Delta Tau Delta _ _ 137 

Diamondback 67 

Dining Hall _. 15 

Dropping courses 17 

Economics Discussion Club „ 113 

Elections — 53 

Elkins, Wilson H. 30 

Employment 17 

Eppley, Geary _. 35 

Examinations 18 

Executive Council, S.G.A. 45 

Members 46 

Expression 67 

Football 144 

Football schedule _ „ 154 

French Club 114 

Future Farmers of America 114 

Gamma Phi Beta 131 

Gamma Sigma Sigma _ 114 

Golf _ 149 

Government and Politics Club 115 

Guest Artists Series 75 

Gymkana - _ 80, 115 

Harmony Hall 77 

Hillel Foundation — _ 85 

History and traditions.. - 8 

Home Economics Club 115 



165 



Honoraries: 

Accounting 93 

Agriculture — . 93 

Athletics -- -- 93 

Bacteriology — 94 

Business 94 

Chemistry 95 

Dramatics 95 

Education _ _ — - 96 

Engineering — ., 96 

Floriculture — - — - — - 97 

Geography 97 

Government and Politics 98 

History - -- -. 98 

Home Economics 98 

Industrial Education — — 99 

Journalism 99 

Mathematics 100 

Military 100 

Music - 101 

Physical Education - 103 

Physics . 103 

Psychology 103 

Recreation -— - 104 

Scholarship 104 

Sociology 105 

Sorority 105 

Speech - 106 

4-H Club, Collegiate 113 



Industrial Education Association 115 

Infirmary 19 

Islamic Foundation 85 



166 



Institute of Aeronautical Sciences _ 116 

Institute of Food Technology 116 

Interfraternity Council 134 

Interfraternity Sing 77 

International Club 116 

International Relations Club 117 

Intramurals 153 

Judo Club _ 117 

KA Minstrel 74 

Kappa Alpha _ 137 

Kappa Alpha Theta 131 

Kappa Delta ..- 131 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 131 

Kuhn, Albin O 32 

Lacrosse 151 

Lambda Chi Alpha 137 

Laundry 19 

Legislature, S.G.A. 49 

Members _ 50 

Library 19 

Literary Club _ 117 

Lost and Found 20 

Lutheran Student Association 86 

M Book 68 

Mail 20 

Maryland Christian Fellowship 86 

Maryland Flying Association, Inc. 117 

Maryland Marketing Association 118 

Men's Glee Club .. 79 



167 



Men's League - 48 

Modern Dance Club. 119 

Mortar Board - 92 

Movies, Student Union _-. — 80 

Mr. and Mrs. Club 118 

National Symphony Series 75 

Newman Club 87 

Nursing Club 119 

Old Line 69 

Olympic Barbell Club 119 

Omicron Delta Kappa - 92 

Orchestra, University 123 

Overseas Show 74 

Panhellenic 

Council 126 

Junior Council 128 

Rules - - 127 

Parking facilities 21 

Phi Alpha 139 

Phi Delta Theta 139 

Phi Kappa Sigma ..— - 139 

Phi Kappa Tau 139 

Phi Sigma Kappa... — .- 140 

Phi Sigma Sigma 132 

Pi Beta Phi 132 

Pi Delta Epsilon Banquet 72 

Pi Kappa Alpha 140 

President's Office - 31 

Propellor Club _.. 119 

Psychology Club 120 



168 



Publications Committee _ 66 

Publications distribution 22 

Red Cross Student Unit _ 120 

Religious Council, Student 82 

Rossborough Club _- 120 

Rush Schedule: 

Men's Fall _ 135 

Women's Fall 126 

Rushing Regulations: 

Men's 135 

Women's — 127 

Sailing Club _ 120 

Scholastic requirements 22 

Senior Class Presents 75 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon _. 140 

Sigma Alpha Mu 140 

Sigma Chi 141 

Sigma Delta Tau 132 

Sigma Kappa 132 

Sigma Nu 141 

Sigma Phi Epsilon... „ 141 

Sigma Pi 141 

Ski Club, Terrapin 122 

Soccer - 150 

Society for the Advan. of Management 121 

Sociology Club _ 121 

Songs 160, 161, 162 

Spanish Club 121 

Stamp, Adele H. 34 

Student Directory „ 23 

Student Government Association 42 



169 



Student Life Committee __ 39 

Student National Education Association .._ 122 

Student Union 23 

Swimming 150 

Tau Epsilon Phi 142 

Tau Kappa Epsilon _ 142 

Tennis ._ 147 

Terrapin _ _ 70 

Theta Chi 142 

Track 148 

Trail Club, Terrapin. 122 

Transportation, Public _ __ 25 

University Theater 74, 123 

Veterans' Club 123 

Veterinary Science Club 123 

Wesley Foundation .— 88 

Westminister Foundation 88 

Whom to See 11, 12 

Who's Who „. 92 

Women's Chorus 79, 124 

Women's Professional Club _ 124 

Women's Recreation Association 124 

WMUC -- 71 

Wrestling _ 149 

Young Democrats Club. 124 

Zeta Beta Tau 142 

170 



NOTES 



171 




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