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Full text of "The "M" book of the University of Maryland"

&^iM <u tns 




'TL^Ji^. 




AME 

DDRESS 

ELEPHONE 



PRINTED & BOUND BY H. G. ROEBUCK & SON, INC. 
BALTIMORE, 18 MD. 




Hail! Alma Mater! 
Hail to thee, Maryland! 
Steadfast in loyalty 
For thee we stand. 
Love for the black and gold. 
Deep in our hearts we hold. 
Singing thy praise forever. 
Throughout the land. 



M- BOOK 



FRESHMAN HANDBOOK 



i^entenniat ^l 



66ue 



Published Annually By 

THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Editor-in-Chief 
JOHN STAFFORD '63 

September, 1961 • College Park, Maryland 




1/ 

urn 

S50.0OI 




WINDOW IN THE PHYSICS BUILDINi 

(Looking towm 




REEZEWAY 

e North Administration Building) 



FROM THE EDITORS -^ Qj^ c^/lj i /n V 

Just as the window in tne picture on the preceding 
page lets you glimpse a part of the University, so this 
booklet gives you some insight into campus life. It is one 
of the most comprehensive publications on campus. One 
of you will be an editor in the near future — Editor of the 
M-BoOK, Diamondback. or possibly Terrapin. Four years 
seems like a long time now, but it is not. Make the most of 
every moment of college life. Plan at least a semester 
ahead. Take advantage of ever}^ beneficial opportunity — 
you may never again have the chance. And do not think 
of college as a daily chore to be forgotten as soon as the 
last class is over. Become a college student by devoting 
every hour of the next four years to the attainment of 
knowledge. 



Editor-in-Chief . . 
Associate Editors 



Assistant Editors 



John Stafford '63 

Jim Harris '62 

Jim Kennedy '63 

Fran Horwitz '63 

Phil Rever '63 

Sarah Schlesinger '62 

Ann Long-more '63 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Message from President Elkins 9 

Message from S. G. A. President 11 

Freshman Expectations 13 

Academic Life 17 

General Information 25 

History and Traditions 26 

Whom to see 30 

Calendar 41 

Faculty 45 

Administration , 51 

Student Government Association 61 

Publications and Communications 69 

Religious Life 75 

Culture and Entertainment 83 

Sororities 39 

Fraternities 97 

Athletics 105 

Student Activities 115 

Honorary Societies 116 

Professional Societies 117 

General Organizations 118 

Maryland Spirit 122 

Greek Patrons 128 

Around the Town 132 

College Park Area 132 

Washington Metropolitan Area 136 

Baltimore Metropolitan Area 136 




Dean Eppley receiving a special award from the Inter- 
fraternity Council at the Sing. 



The 1965 M-BooK 
is dedicated to 

GEARY EPPLEY 



The 1937-38 M-Book was first dedicated to Dean Eppley 
only one year after his assuming administrative duties as 
Dean of Men at the University of Maryland. In the past 
25 years his undying interest in the student has commanded 
respect and admiration from the University Community. 
The dedication of the 1965 M-BooK is made to him with 
the same spirit and devotion with which he has served the 
University. 




Wilson H. Elkins 

President of the University of Maryland 

Dr. Elkins, a Phi Beta Kappa, attended Schreiner Institute 
and the University of Texas, where he received his M. A. 
and B. A. degrees. In 1933, he was awarded a Rhodes 
Scholarship to Oxford University. 

Dr. Elkins was chosen to become President of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland in the Spring of 1954. His climb to 
this office began in 1936 when he started teaching at the 
University of Texas. Two years later, he became President 
of San Angelo Junior College, and President of Texas West- 
ern in 1949. He remained there until he accepted his pres- 
ent position. 

As an undergraduate he was a three-letter man, Phi 
Eta Sigma, and a member of Sigma Nu. 



September, 1961 
A Message to the Class of 1965 

I am delighted to have you with us, and I welcome 
you warmly to our campus. 

For each one of you this truly is the beginning of a 
great Adventure in Learning. Your association with the 
University of Maryland will provide many benefits for you, 
but it will concurrently require you to accept the obligations 
and responsibilities of the University citizen. Your efforts, 
primarily, allow the development of the proper atmosphere 
of the University, a community devoted to scholarship. 

In conjunction with the faculty and administration the 
next four years should be the most formative educational 
years of your life. 

May your years at the University of Maryland be mem- 
orable and rewarding ones. 

W. H. Elkins 
President 




Pete Wasmer 

President of Student Government Association 

Pete Wasmer, President of the Student Government As- 
sociation, has had previous experience in campus politics, 
sending as both the Sophomore and Junior Class President, 
Vice President of his fraternity, Sigma Chi, and overall 
Chairman of the Freshman Orientation Board. Wasmer is a 
member of D K and Kalegethos, as well as several class 
and Student Government Association committees. 



10 



September, 1961 
A Message to the Class of 1965 

Welcome Freshmen! These are words which repeat 
themselves through the years as every new class enters the 
University. This year however, these words have a deeper 
meaning than ever before. 

America is going through a great crisis; probably the 
greatest since the Korean conflict, and with the possibilities 
of becoming the greatest yet faced by the world. Thus, not 
only will it be left to you to become the leaders of the 
University, but through your modern background, your 
youth, and your education to help this asthmatic old world 
of ours overcome this slump and revive itself. 

I, and the whole student body sincerely welcome you 
with the hope that you will be the fresh start that we need 
to make the wheels and cogs of civilization run smoothly 
and peacefully. 

Pete Wasmer 
SGA President '62 



11 




LAND-GRANT CENTENNIAL 



DURING THIS ACADEMIC YEAR, the University of 
Maryland, along with 69 other land-grant institutions, is 
celebrating the Centennial of the Morrill Land-Grant Act 
which was signed by President Lincoln on July 2, 1862. 

The land-grant movement was a far-reaching vision of 
at least one college in every state, a movement to aid the 
educationally underprivileged to obtain an education. 

The University of Maryland is proud to have been one 
of the first in this movement. 



12 




EXPECTATIONS 



WHEN FRESHMEN ARRIVE at the College Park cam- 
pus they begin the first of innumerable steps in an adven- 
ture in learning. Adaptation to the new environment is the 
first of many adjustments to be made. The upperclassmen, 
administration, and faculty are all in a position to aid 
the new University citizen. The administration and faculty 
offer aid through counseling and advice; the administration, 
faculty and outstanding campus leaders contribute through 
the Two-Day Pre-College Program: and the upperclassmen 
conduct the Freshmen Orientation Board. Registration week 
is utilized as orientation week for the new student. Not 
only does he learn his fundamental obligations to the Uni- 
versity and to himself, but he also gains knowledge of 
academic terms, mechanics of registration, and University 
facilities. Shortly following orientation he is faced with 
a decision that will influence the rest of his life — whether 
to pledge a fraternity or sorority. Rush is the period of 
time set aside by the Greek system to allow the fraternities 
and sororities to gain new members, and the choice of a 
Greek House is the rushee's hardest decision. Classes have 
begun by now and the social season begins with football 
games, Homecoming, and IFC Presents. After the first six 
weeks Dean's slips are issued. In the next few weeks more 
adjusting is done than at any other time. 

Examination dates are announced in class. The lectures 
will not be hard to understand, providing enough before- 

14 



class preparation has been done. There are a whole host of 
counseling and tutoring services furnished by honor socie- 
ties and the counseling center; and the student who is 
having academic difficulties will take a step in the right 
direction by seeking aid. 

The cultural aspect of college life begins with the open- 
ing day. The University Theater, the various "Presents," 
and the Student Government Association Cultural Commit- 
tee all provide entertainment of high caliber for the student. 
Other campus events not previously mentioned which the 
entering student can participate in will be: 

1 . Freshman elections — which take place approximately 
four weeks after classes begin. 

2. Pledge Dance — sponsored by the sororities, takes 
place soon after pledging. 

3. Blood Drive — sponsored by Alpha Omicron Pi Sor- 
ority and Tau Epsilon Phi Fraternity. 

4. Sophomore Class Carnival — the proceeds go to Cam- 
pus Chest (the campus charity organization) 

5. The Freshman Prom — held towards the end of each 
school year. 

In conclusion we would like you to remember that pro- 
crastination is the outstanding reason for failure in college. 
The new student must realize his obligations are not only 
to himself, but also to the University and his community. 
He must realize that even with all the help offered him, 
only his personal effort will turn expectations into reality. 

15 



FRESHMAN CUSTOMS 

Class unity and school spirit are strengthened by wear- 
ing dinks and name tags, shouting songs and cheers, and 
participating in FOB activities. Freshmen customs are de- 
signed to aid the new freshman, not to discriminate against 
him. The general regulations are: 

1. Black and gold dinks must be > worn by all freshmen. 

2. Freshmen will be allowed to enter the armory to re- 
gister ONLY if they are wearing a dink and name 
tag. 

3. Freshmen shall walk ONLY on sidewalks and roads. 

4. Freshmen must know name and location of major 
campus buildings and all colleges. 

5. Freshmen shall know the name and location of the 
school mascot. 

6. The Freshmen shall know the names of the Presi- 
dent, Deans of Men and Women, and their respec- 
tive college. 

7. Freshmen must know the Alma Mater, songs, and 



O"^? 



cheers. 



8. Freshmen MUST know all the information in the 
M-BoOK. They must carry it at all times. 

The enforcement and interpretation of all rules is vested 
in the FOB Customs Committee. 



16 



ACADEMIC 




LIFE 



YOUR ENROLLMENT AT the University should indicate 
your acceptance of the responsibilities of higher education — 
namely, diligent scholarship. From 8:00 a.m. until 10:00 
p.m., Monday through Friday and on weekends, thousands 
of Maryland students study in McKeldin Library. They 
realize the importance of studying, and these hours in the 
library are reflected in better grades. The Freshman should 
keep foremost in mind is that he is responsible for taking 
the required courses, taking sufficient credits, and planning 
ahead. 

CLASSES 

Classes are of 50 and 75 minutes duration, begining 
on the hour or half hour respectively. If the instructor is 
late, students are required to wait 20 minutes for deans, 
L5 minutes for doctors, and 10 minutes for all instructors 
before dismissing themselves. 

CLASS AHENDANCE 

No automatic "cuts" (absences) are allowed except for 
students who have attained a 3.5 average for the previous 
semester at the University. Whenever a student has ac- 
cumulated more than 3 unexcused absences, the instructor 



reports such absences to the student's dean. Instructors may 
penahze students for absences. Excused absences include 
illness, and participation in University activities at the re- 
quest of University authorities. In case of illness the In- 
firmary or attending physician must give statements to the 
dean concerning absences. 

EXAMINATIONS 

A two hour exam is held at the end of each semester 
for each course taken. Two or three exams are usually 
given in each course during a semester, depending on the 
instructor. If a student misses an exam and has a legal 
excuse he will be allowed to take a make up exam. 

MARKING SYSTEM 

The following symbols are used for marks: A, B, C, D, 
passing; F, failure; I, incomplete. In computing scholastic 
averages, numerical values are assigned to the following 
marks: A-4; B-3; C-2; D-1 and F-0. 

DEAN'S LIST 

Students earning a 3.5 average or better are placed on 
the Deans's List, which is displayed in the office of your 
college. Students on the Dean's List enjoy extra privileges 
such as unlimited cuts and extra late leaves. 



19 



DEAN'S SLIPS 

All students doing work below "C" level after the first 
6 weeks of school receive slips from the dean. The dean 
tries in an appropriate manner to aid the student in the 
courses he is finding difficult. 



JUNIOR STANDING 

To obtain Junior Standing you must have an average 
grade of "C" or a 2.0 average in the courses you are taking 
and have completed 56 hours of academic work. (Does not 
include physical education; health; or, depending on the 
college. R. O.T. C.) 



PROBATION AND DISMISSAL 

If a student on a normal schedule fails to make junior 
standing by the fourth semester, he will be allowed one 
semester of grace. If he fails to make junior standing at 
the end of the probation semester, he will be dismissed. 

A student will be dismissed if he fails 507c or more of 
his academic work in a semester. An incomplete will not 
count against a student. 

All students must maintain at least a 1.5 average for a 
year's work or be placed on academic probation. 

A student will also be placed on academic probation if 



20 



he fails more than 35% of his academic work in any one 
semester. 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

At least 120 semester hours (excluding Basic AFROTC, 
Health 2 and 4, and the required program in physical ed- 
ucation) are required for graduation. The 24 hours re- 
quired in the American Civilization Program are included 
in this. An overall "C" or 2.0 average is required for grad- 
uation in all colleges. 

HONORS 

The overall average is used as a basis for honors. 
Only one fifth of the graduating class in each college re- 
ceives honors for excellence in scholarship. The top half of 
this group receives first honors and the lower half re- 
ceives second honors. At least a 3.0 overall average is re- 
quired for honors. 

CHANGES IN REGISTRATION 

Changes in registration may be made only with the 
written permission of the student's dean. After the first 
week there is a fee of $3.00 for every change in registration. 
Only in exceptional cases will a student be permitted to 



21 



enter a class later than one week after the beginning of in- 
struction. A $5.00 fee is charged for late registration. 



CHANGING COLLEGES 

A student transferring to another college will consult 
his new dean about the adjustment of records. In changing 
colleges, a student with unsatisfactory records will be placed 
under strict control (intermediate registration) and must 
make himself eligible for the new college in one or, at the 
most, two semesters. 



REPEATS 

A course may be repeated only once. When a course 
is repeated, both the original grade and the new grade will 
be posted on the student's record and used only in com- 
puting his average for probation and dismissal. However, 
only the new grade is used in computing the overall aca- 
demic average. 



DROPPING COURSES 

If a student has a legitimate reason, he is allowed to 
drop a course during the first three weeks of the semester. 
First-semester freshmen are allowed eight weeks in which 
to drop a course. Arrangements for th's are made with the 



22 



approval of the academic advisor and the dean. 

The above regulations are from the Academic Regula- 
tions which is published by the University. All students 
should obtain and read this publication for complete details. 

TUTORING 

Many groups on campus offer free tutoring to fresh- 
man in need of this service. Among these are Phi Eta 
Sigma and Alpha Lambda Delta, the freshmen honoraries. 
The individual departments also offer tutoring, though a 
nominal fee may be charged. 

FINANCIAL AIDS 

Students who have demonstrated academic ability and 
can show financial need may apply for aid through schol- 
arships and grants, loans or part-time employment. 

A full list of scholarships and grants is printed in the 
University of Maryland Bulletin, An Adventure In Learn- 
ing. All University scholarships and grants will be awarded 
before the beginning of the academic year in September. 

Under provisions of the National Defense Education Act, 
loans are available to qualified students in amounts not to 
exceed $800.00 per year. Repayment and interest at three 
per cent annum begins one year after completion of college 
work. 



23 



Information on financial aids may be obtained in the Of- 
fice of Student Aid, North Administration Building. 

LIBRARIES 

McKeldin Library, which was opened in January of 
1958 has four main floors and three mezzanines. The book 
stacks are open to all students, and books may be checked 
in and out at the loan desk upon presentation of a University 
ID card. 

Library hours during regular sessions: 

Monday-Friday 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. 

Saturday 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. 

Sunday 3:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. 

Other libraries on campus include the Chemistry Li- 
brary and the Engineering and Physical Science Library. 
Chemistry Library Hours: 
Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. 

7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. 
Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 

Sunday 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. 

7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. 

Chemistry exams given in previous years are available 
for viewing upon request to the librarian. 
Engineering Library Hours: 

Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. 

Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. 

Sunday 5:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. 



24 




^ 'm\t^ *^^T, 



^K^^^jmii^ 







GENERAL 
INFORMATION 



HISTORY 

In more than 150 years since its founding, the Univers- 
ity has expanded both physically and academically until it 
now occupies a position as one of the leading universities 
in the country. 

The University dates back to 1807 when the College of 
Medicine was founded in Baltimore. During the first cen- 
tury of the College's existence the School of Law (1823), 
the School of Dentistry (1882), the School of Nursing 
(1889), and the Maryland College of Pharmacy (1904) 
were founded. At CoUege Park, in 1856, the Maryland 
Agriculture College, the first agricultural college in the 
United States, and the second in the western hemisphere, 
was established at Riversdale, an estate purchased from 
Charles B. Calvert. In 1862 when Congress passed the 
Morrill Land Grant Act, The Maryland Agriculture College 
was named beneficiary of the grant to receive federal aid 
to education. In 1920 the University of Maryland in Balti- 
more and The Maryland Agricultural College, as it was 
then known, were merged to form what is now the Univers- 
ity of Maryland. 

In addition to the campuses in College and Baltimore, 
Maryland students are found throughout the world, study- 
ing under the University College. The total enrollment of 
the University is 48,000 including 14,000 on the College 



26 



Park campus, with the remainder at the Baltimore campus 
and overseas. 

TRADITIONS 

The seven-story library rising above the mall exemplifies 
the new Maryland in which the past is intermingled with 
the present; a campus where atomic reactors, wind tunnels, 
space programs, and physics labs rest side by side with 
stately white columned buildings on the Hill; the past is 
reflected in the two centuries old mellowed English brick 
of Rossborough Inn where General Lafayette visited; and 
the bustling future is reflected by new, nine story dorms, 
and mobile homes behind the Row. 

Maryland is a campus where growth is the greatest 
tradition, but a campus where other quiet traditions still 
survive. In the past, freshmen couples have quickly dis- 
covered the secluded tunnel by the chapel; requirements for 
passing through include a boy, a girl, and a kiss. The 
wishing well at Rossborough; the mud on the mall; the 
leisurely walk up the hill; and the chapel bells chiming, 
"Maryland, My Maryland," are all Maryland traditions 
which unite the past and the present. 

Traditions also mean activities; Freshmen Orientation, 
the first registration for classes, and the hectic purchasing 
of books are among a freshman's earliest acquaintances 



27 



with the traditional busy life of Maryland students. Fall, 
highlighted by Homecoming, brings football, pep rallies, 
high spirit, rush and Harmony Hall with its barber shop 
music taking us back to the gay nineties. 

Winter means tray sliding, basketball, fraternity and 
sorority winter formals, and Christmas. Christmas is im- 
pressively celebrated at Maryland with the A. W. S. pageant; 
the lighting of the Christmas tree in front of the Chapel, 
the chapel bells chiming Christmas carols; the decorating 
of the Student Union by daydodgers, and the caroling by 
everyone on campus, finally stopping at President's Elkins' 
for punch and cookies. 

Blazers, trenchcoats, convertibles, and more mud than 
usual declare that spring has come. Freshman, Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior Proms, the Sophomore Carnival, SGA 
elections, the Interfraternity Sing, Greek Week, and May 
Day are followed by finals and graduation. Our years of 
fun and accomplishment leave us with a pride known only 
to those who have experienced life at Maryland. 

UNIVERSITY SEAL 

The University Seal, the oldest of the state seals, was 
sent to the province of Maryland in 1648 by Lord Balti- 
more. More than 300 years old, the seal is the only state 
seal of strictly heraldic character, since other state seals 



28 



bear emblems representing agriculture, commerce, or some 
related subject. 

MASCOT 

Testudo, the campus mascot who now resides in front 
of the Byrd Stadium Fieldhouse, is a 500 pound bronze re- 
plica of Maryland's famous diamondback Terrapin. He furn- 
ishes the names for the two major school publications, 
The Diamondback and The Terrapin. 

SCHOOL COLORS 

The official school colors of the University of Maryland 
are black and gold. These colors, along with the red and 
white, our athletic colors, are on the state seal. 

A\ACE 

The Mace, Maryland's symbol of authority, is carried by 
the University Marshall at all official functions. The ma- 
hogany and brass mace, capped by the University seal, is 
kept in the library. 

OLD LINE AND FREE STATE 

The name, Old Line, stems from the Revolutionary War, 
when at the Battle of Brooklyn, General George Washing- 
ton said of the Maryland defenders "the old line will hold." 

Maryland became known as the "free state" during the 



29 



WHOM TO SEE 



All Extensions are for WA. 7-3800 



For 


See 


Where 


Phone 


Absences 


Dean of College 


Dean's Office 




Admissions 


G. W. Algire 


N. Administration Bldg. 








(KK) 


396 


ATROTC 


Col. Theodore Aylesworth 


Armory 


351 


Alumni 


David Brigham 


N. Admin. Bldg. 


366 


Athletics 


William Cobey 


Cole Field House (GG) 


372 


BasebaU 


lack Jackson 


Cole 


467 


Basketball 


Bud Millikan 


Cole 


505 


Cross Country 


Jim Kehoe 


Armory 


370 


Football 


Tom Nugent 


Cole 


242 


Golf 


Frank Cronin 


Cole 


631 


Lacrosse 


Jack Faber 








Al Heagy 


Cole 


231 


Rifle 


Sgt. WiUiam Holland 


Armory 


637 


Soccer 


Doyle Royal 


N. Admin. Bldg. 


375 


Swimming 


WUliam Campbell 


Cole 


544 


Tennis 


Doyle Royal 


N. Admin. Bldg. 


375 


Track 


Jim Kehoe 


Armory 


370 


Weight Lifting 


Hap Freeman 


Cole 


467 


Wrestling 


Sully Krouse 


Cole 


467 


AWS 


Karen Jacobsen 


N. Admin. Bldg. 


UN 4-9806* 


Bills 


Cashier 


N. Admin. Bldg. 


340 


Breakage Cards 


Cashier 


N. Admin. Bldg. 


340 


Car Pools 


University Commuters 


Student Union 






Qub 




503 


Dramatics 


Sonja Smith 


Speech Depl. (K) 


WA 7-9031* 


Employment 








General 


Lewis Knebel 


N. Admin. Bldg. 


338 


Part Time 


Palmer Hopkins 


229 N. Admin. Bldg. 


774 


Women's 


Dean Marian Johnson 


N. Admin. Bldg. 


263 


Fraternities 


Jim Kenney 


Student Union 


WA 7-9707- 


Graduate School 


Dean Ronald Bamford 


BPA Bldg. (Q) 


232 


Health Service 


Dr. Lester Dyke 


Infirmary 


326 


Housing 








Men's 


Joseph Hall 


N. Admin. Bldg. 


338 


Women's 


Dean of Women 


N. Admin. Bldg. 


263 


Intramurals 








Men's 


Jim Kehoe 


Armory 


370 


Women's 


Roberta Hastings 


Preinkert Field House 





Loan Desk McKeldin Library (L) 261 

Chemistry Library Chemistry Bldg. (C) 525 

Eng. and Physical Science Math Bldg. (Y) 4«4 
Library 



For 


See 


Where 


Phone 


Lost and Found 


Campus Police 


Service Bldg. 


315 


Mail 


U. S. Post Office 


College Park 


UN 4-3264 




University Post Office 


Service Bldg. 


386 


Meeting Rooms 


Student Union 


Student Union 


503 


Men's League 


Bruce Gold 


Student Union 


12 Men's 
Dorms* 


Music 








Band 


Hugh Henderson 


Music Dept. (B) 


567 


Chapel Choir 


Fague Springman 


Music Dept. 


207 


Men's Glee Glut 


) Paul Traver 


Music Dept. 


683 


Women's Chorus 


Paul Traver 


Music Dept. 


683 


Orchestra 


Joel Berman 


Music Dept. 


207 


Parking Tickets 


Police Cashier 


Service Bldg. 


435 


Police 


Service Bldg. 


Servi'ce Bldg. 


315 


Problems 








Men's 


Dean of Men 


N. Admin. Bldg. 


338 


Women's 


Dean of Women 


N. Admin. Bldg. 


263 


Study 


Advisor or Counseling 
Center 


Office 




Vocational 


Counseling Center 


Counseling Center CEE) 


' 248 


Communications 








Diamondback 


Buck Hoyle 


Journalism Bldg. (G) 


258 


Expression 


Leonard Lutwack 


English Dept. (A) 


289 


M-BooK 


George Kaludis 


N. Admin. Bldg. 


377 


Old Line 


Ken Waissman 


Journalism Bldg. (G) 


361 


Terrapin 


Janice Montgomery 


Journalism 


WA 7-9871* 


WMUC 


George Batka 


Speech Dept. 


550 


Religious Groups 


George Kaludis 


N. Admin. Bldg. 


377 


RMA 


Richard Edgar 


Harford HaU 


Wash. K Dorm' 


Scholarships 


H. Palmer Hopkins 


N. Admin. Bldg. 


774 


SGA 


Pete Wasmer 


Student Union 


UN 4-9807* 


Social Life 


Dean McCormick 


N. Admin. Bldg. 


263 


Sororities 


Nancy Julius 


Student Union 


WA 7-9828* 


Space Reservations 








Student Union 


Bill Hoff 


Student Union 


503 


Chapel 


George Kaludis 


N. Admin. Bldg. 


377 


Student Life Comm. 


Dean Gray 


N. Admin. Bldg. 


437 


Summer School 


Dr. 0. Ulry 


Admin. Bldg. (IB) 


586 


Telegrams 


Switchboard 


Education Bldg. (T) 


350 


WRA 


Roberta Hastings 


Preinkert Field House 


UN 4-9491* 



'Denotes Phone Numbers of Individuals to 



-not the number of the office listed. 



3] 



prohibition era when she said that prohibition was against 
state's rights. 

A. F. R. O. T. C. 

A pre-requisite for graduation, all male students must 
complete two years of basic military training, unless they 
are veterans of the armed services. 

The freshman and sophomore years are devoted to the 
basic course, and the junior and senior years to the ad- 
vanced course, which is optional. 

BOOKS AND SUPPLIES 

Alpha Phi Omega service fraternity operates a book 
store on the first floor of the Student Union at the beginning 
of each semester. APO sells books for students on a non- 
profit basis, and is the best way for students to buy books 
and to sell books that are no longer needed. 

CAMPUS RESIDENCE VISITING HOURS 

Women students are not permitted to visit men's dorms 
except for registered parties in the recreation room. Par- 
ents or relatives desiring to visit students in the men's 
dorms should call at the dormitory office in Annapolis Hall 
or at the housemother's quarters. 

Men may visit the women's dorms during the following 
hours: 



32 



Monday 1:00 p.m. to 9:45 p.m. 

Tuesday to Thursday 1:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. 

Friday and Saturday 12:00 noon to 12:45 p.m. 

Sunday 9:00 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. 

Men may visit sorority houses during the following 
hours: 

One day 2:00 p.m. until Dinner 

Two days 2:00 p.m. until 10:00 p.m. 

One day Closed 

CAR POOLS 

A car pool service is operated by the University Com- 
muters Club. A table is set up at registration for students 
to sign up for Car Pools. Commuters may get car pool 
information from the Commuters Club Den in Room 116 
of the Student Union. 

CATALOGS 

The University publishes a general information bulletin, 
An Adventure In Learning. Catalogs of the individual col- 
leges are available at the Dean's office of the desired college. 

COUNSELING CENTER 

The University maintains the Counseling Center to as- 
sist students in attaining a better understanding of them- 



33 



selves, and to develop improved methods for dealing with 
vocational, educational, and personal problems. A Read- 
ing and Study Skills Laboratory, directed by a staff of well- 
trained psychologists, is available to aid students in improv- 
ing their reading and study habits. This program is given 
on an individual basis. 

EATING PLACES ON CAMPUS 

All students who live in University dormitories must 
have their meals in their respective dormitory dining halls. 
Other students may make arrangements to board by the 
semester at the Main Dining Hall. 

The University Dairy, next to Rossborough Inn, serves 
ice cream, dairy products, and sandwiches. 
Dairy 

Monday-Friday 9:30 a.m.— 5:30 p.m. 

Saturday-Sunday 11:30 a.m. — 5:30 p.m. 

A cafeteria is located on the ground floor of the Student 
Union Building and provides inexpensive lunches for com- 
muting students. 

Hours of SU Cafeteria 

Monday-Friday 7:15 a.m. — 4:15 p.m. 

Saturday 8:00 a.m.— 12:30 p.m. 

Sunday 4:00 p.m.— 7:00 p.m. 



34 



Students also purchase snacks and lunches from the 
Macke machines located in most buildings, and at various 
College Park restaurants and drugstores. 

EMPLOYMENT 

On and off campus part-time employment and workships 
are two types of student employment. Part-time campus 
jobs are handled by the Office of Student Aid, North Ad- 
ministration Building. 

Because of better pay scales, many students arrange for 
off-campus work. A complete listing of jobs in nearby 
commercial areas are maintained in the Student Employ- 
ment Office, which is located in Shoemaker Hall. 

ID CARDS 

New students receive their ID Cards at registration. 
This card has three primary uses for undergraduate stu- 
dents: it serves as a general identification card, as an ad- 
mission ticket for athletic and Student Government events, 
and as a Dining Hall Card for those with dining hall priv- 
iledges. 

The ID card is required to withdraw library books, for 
identification in cashing checks, to vote in student elec- 
tions, to obtain the Terrapin, to check out athletic equip- 
ment at Cole Activities Building and the Armory, and to 



35 



use the golf course, tennis courts, and other athletic facil- 
ities. 

Students who lose their ID Card should notify the Office 
of the Executive Dean For Student Life. A fee is charged 
for the new ID Card. 

INFIRMARY 

Students are treated for illnesses and injuries at the In- 
firmary, which is located directly behind the Dining Hall. 
A registered nurse is on duty 24 hours a day in the In- 
firmary when the dormitories are open. Physicians will be 
present at the Infirmary during the following hours: 
Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. 

1:00 p.m. to 4:45 p.m. 

Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. 

Holidays and Sundays 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. 

All students pay a fee at the time of registration for 

Infirmary service and are entitled to this service without 

further charge. 

PARKING FACILITIES 

The University provides parking for students and faculty 
in 31 lots. Lots one through seven are assigned to students 
during registration. All cars driven to the campus by stu- 
dents must be registered, regardless of ownership, with 



36 



the University Police within 24 hours of arrival (Duplicate 
stickers are issued to students in cases where more than 
one car is driven). A three dollar fine is charged for each 
traffic violation. Penalties must be paid to the Office of the 
Police Cashier in the Service Building within 10 calendar 
days. Cars not registered at the appropriate time during 
registration may be registered in this office. Any person 
who has an excessive number of violations is subject to dis- 
missal from the University. 

Students may appeal fines with the Appeals Board. Time 
and place can be ascertained at the Police Cashier's Office. 
// the appeal is denied, a two dollar additional fine is levied. 
The total amount must be paid at the time of the hearing. 
Also, all witnesses and evidence m.ust be presented at this 
time. 

Unrestricted parking is permitted on lots one through 
seven from 4 p.m. to 12 midnight, Monday through Thurs- 
day, from 4 p.m. Friday to 12 midnight Sunday, and all day 
on holidays. Students may park on all lots except G, T, In- 
firmary, and Reserved Spaces from 6 p.m. to 12 midnight, 
Monday through Thursday; from 6 p.m. Friday to 12 mid- 
night Sunday, and all day on school holidays. 

Parking is prohibited on campus roads at any time. 
Curbed recesses are reserved for visitors only. 



37 



PLACEMENT SERVICE 

The University Placement Service has a program de- 
signed to offer job opportunities related to the student's 
present and future employment needs. This program in- 
cludes the Career Week and the Summer Job Conference. 

The most assistance is received during the senior year. 

Mr. Lewis Knebel is the Director of the Placement 
Service, located in Shoemaker Hall. 

PUBLICATIONS DISTRIBUTION 

The Diamondback is published Tuesday through Friday 
and may be picked up by students at Diamondback boxes 
located in most campus buildings. The M-BoOK is distrib- 
uted to all new students during Orientation Week. The 
literary magazine, Expression, is published twice yearly and 
the humor magazine. Old Line, is published five times each 
year. The yearbook, Terrapin, is distributed at the end of 
May upon presentation of the ID Card. 

STUDENT UNION 

The Student Union is a center of activity for the Uni- 
versity community — the living-room of the campus. A cup 
of coffee before that 8 o'clock class; a casual visit with 
friends; a lecture, a dance, or three meetings at one time- 
these make up the fast-paced life of the SU. 



38 



Student Union Services 

A Check Cashing Service for amounts up to $10.00 with 

a 10^ service charge Room 120 

Listening booths and record rooms where recorded music 
or F. M. radio may be played by request. Monday-Friday, 

11-5 p.m. and 6-10 p.m Room 213 

Tobacco Shop and Candy Store Lobby 

A seven table pool room and shuffle board are provided 
at a charge of 400 per half-hour for pool and 15<* per 

half-hour for shuffleboard Sub-basement 

Organizational Services that are provided include provisions 
for office and filing space; use of meeting and conference 
rooms, and a mimeograph and poster service. Room 120 
First run movies are shown every Friday and Saturday 
night at 7:00 and 9:00 and on Sunday at 7:30. Charge 
is 25c. Foreign movies are shown on Tuesday and Thursday 

afternoons Auditorium 

SU Dances are held once a month, usually near a holiday. 
The dances are free, and usually feature a well-known band. 

Coffee Shop 

In one year many additional services will be added with 
the completion of the new SU wing. New ballrooms, a new 
cafeteria, bowling alleys, fine arts rooms, a hobby shop, 
and outdoor patios will greatly increase the extra-curricular 



39 



life of the campus. 
SU Hours 

Monday-Thursday 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. 

Friday 7:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. 

Saturday 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. 

Sunday 2:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. 

TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH SERVICES 

The University switchboard connects to all phones on 
the University line. 

The switchboard telephone hours are: 



00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. 
00 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. 
00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. 



Monday 8: 

Tuesday-Thursday 
Friday-Sunday 8: 

Students are asked to limit calls to five minutes due to 
the large number of telephone calls the switchboard must 
handle. 

Telegrams are handled through extension 350 of the 
University switchboard, between 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. 
Monday through Friday. 

TRANSPORTATION 

Buses leave College Park every half hour to Washing- 
ton, D. C. 



40 



All major east coast airlines and many small ones 
serve the Washington National Airport in Virginia. Balti- 
more's Friendship International Airport can be reached by 
following the signs on the Baltimore-Washington Parkway. 

Train service is available at Union Station in Washing- 
ton. The phone number is EX 3-7900. 

UNIVERSITY TELEPHONE DIRECTORY 

The Student-Faculty Directory is published by the Uni- 
versity each year and sold at the book stores six weeks 
after classes begin. 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS 

Each spring the SGA, in cooperation with the Dean of 
V^'^omen, compiles a master calendar from which a sem- 
ester's calendar is printed for student distribution. A weekly 
social calendar, issued by the social director, is mailed to 
residences on Thursday morning. The following calendar 
is subject to change. 

FALL SEMESTER 1961 
SEPTEMBER 

17 Dormitories Open 

17-23 Freshman Orientation 

18-22 Registration 



41 



23-Oct. 1 Sorority Rush 

25 Classes begin 

OCTOBER Fraternity Rush — Dates to be announced 

7 Home Football — Syracuse 

10 SGA Cultural Series — 

"Midsummer Night's Dream" 

14 Parents' Day — North Carolina 
IFC Presents 

19 National Symphony 

21 Away Football — Air Force 

27 Panhellenic Pledge Dance 

28 Away Football — South Carolina 

NOVEMBER 

4 Homecoming — Penn State 

8-9 Blood Drive 

11 Home Football— N.C. State 
18 Band Day— Wake Forest 

22 Thanksgiving Recess begins 
25 Away Football — Virginia 
27 Thanksgiving Recess ends 
30 National Symphony 

DECEMBER 

2 Calvert Cotillion — ODK Tapping 



42 



20 


Christmas Recess begins 


JANUARY 




3 


Christmas Recess ends 


18 


National Symphony 


24 


Pre-Exam Study Day 


25-31 


Examinations 




SPRING SEMESTER 1962 


FEBRUARY 




5-9 


Registration 


8 


IFC Ball 


12 


Classes begin 


22 


Washington's Birthday 


MARCH 




3 


RMA Presents 


7 


President's Convocation 


8 


National Symphony 


9 


Junior Prom 


22 


National Symphony 


25 


Maryland Day 


APRIL 




4-5 


Blood Drive 


19 


Easter Recess begins 



43 



24 


Easter Recess ends 


29 


Senior Class presents 


MAY 




8 


May Day 


16 


Military Day 


30 


Memorial Day — holiday 


31 


Senior Prom 


JUNE 

1 


Pre-Exam Study Day 


2-8 


Examinations 


3 


Baccalaureate 


9 


Commencement 




SUMMER SESSION 1962 


JUNE 




25 


Summer Session Registration 


26 


Summer Session begins 


30 


Classes as Usual 


JULY 




4 


Independence Day — Holiday 


AUGUST 




3 


Summer Session ends 



44 



u 




* / 



Dr. Hornbake's major responsibility is the administra- 
tion of the academic programs and procedures of the Uni- 
versity. Dr. Hornbake graduated from California State Col- 
lege in Pennsylvania in 1934. Ohio State University con- 
ferred his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees, the latter in 1942. 
While an undergraduate, he was tapped by Phi Kappa Phi 
and Omicron Delta Kappa. 



Dr. R. Lee Hornbake 

Vice President for Academic Affairs 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

A & S is designed to provide 
its graduates with a broad 
background of knowlege in 
the humanities, physical sci- 
ences, social studies, and 
fine arts. Dean Smith was 
dean of Arts and Science at 
the Universities of Chicago 
and Georgia, before coming 
to Maryland University. 




Dean Leon P. Smith 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Dean Frederic T. Mavis 



This college offers young 
men and women a four year 
program which challenges 
the analytical mind. Those 
courses leading to a B.S. in- 
clude the fields of aeronau- 
tical, chemical, civil, elec- 
trical, and mechanical engi- 
neering. Mathematics and 
science make up the core ol 
the program. 




47 



BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 
Dean Reid has been act- 
ing dean since the re- 
tirement of Dean J. Free- 
man Pyle, who had been 
dean for 18 years. Be- 
sides business adminis- 
tration, the College in- 
cludes the departments of 
journaUsm, economics, 
government and politics, 
and geography. 




Acting Dean James H. Reid 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
Dean Gordon M. Cairns 




The College of Agriculture 
was the first college estab- 
lished at Maryland. Under 
the leadership of Dean 
Cairns, w^ho assumed his 
position in 1950, the two 
basic programs of the col- 
lege are training of students 
in agriculture and extensive 
research on campus and in 
outlying areas. 



48 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION, 
RECREATION, AND HEALTH 

Since 1949, Dean Fraley 
has headed the college, 
whose main functions are 
providing the required P. E. 
and health programs and 
training students for teach- 
ing careers in P. E. The col- 
lege works in close cooper- 
ation with the College of 
Education, and future Phys- 
ical Education instructors 
may carry out their pro- 
grams in either college. 




Dean Lester M. Fraley 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 
Preparing students for Dean Vernon E. Anderson 
childhood, elementary, and 
secondary levels of instruc- 
tion; for industrial, library 
science, and special educa- 
tional fields; and for posi- 
tions as supervisors, admin- 
istrators, and counselors, 
constitute the college's pro- 
gram. 




49 



COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Home Economics today in- 
cludes art, for application in 
home and industry, child 
development and family 
living, clothing and textiles, 
merchandising, and family 
economics. 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 





Dean Ronald Bamford 



Dean Selma F. Lippeatt 

Maryland's Graduate 
School administers and de- 
velops programs of ad- 
vanced study and research 
for graduate students in all 
branches of the University. 
Currently, 54 departments 
are authorized to offer 
graduate programs leading 
to advanced degrees. 



UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 
University College includes Dean Ray IV. Ehrensberger 
the extension courses as 

well as the overseas pro- ^*^te^.iHPI^^*3Pl 

gram, which operates in 23 
Allied countries. 



50 














^^-...^.^.^ 



N 



N 



M 



51 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

and 

MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 

Term 
Expires 

CHARLES P. Mccormick i966 

Chairman 

EDWARD F. HOLTER 1968 

V ice-Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN 1967 

Secretary 

HARRY H. NUTTLE 1966 

Treasurer 
LOUIS L. KAPLAN 1961 

Assistant Secretary 

C. E. TUTTLE 1962 

Assistant Treasurer 

RICHARD W. CASE 1967 

THOMAS W. PANGBORN. 1965 

THOMAS B. SYMONS 1963 

WILLIAM C. WALSH 1968 

MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 1967 

Members of the Board are appointed by the Governor of the 
State for terms of seven years each, beginning the first 
Monday in June. Members may serve only for two con- 
secutive terms. 

The President of the University of Maryland is, by law, 
Executive Officer of the Board. 

The State law provides that the Board of Regents of the 
University of Maryland shall constitute the Maryland State 
Board of Agriculture. 

52 




Dr. Alhin 0. Kuhn 
Executive Vice-President 



Dr. Kuhn was Assistant to 
the President for three 
years before becoming Ex- 
ecutive Vice-President in 
1958. Dr. Kuhn received his 
B. S., M. S., and Ph. D. from 
the University of Maryland. 
As an undergraduate he was 
a member of Alpha Gamma 
Rho and has been tapped by 
ODK, Alpha Zeta, Phi Kappa 
Phi, and Sigma Xi. 



As Assistant to the Presi- 
dent, Dr. Bentz's work cov- 
ers many areas of the Uni- 
versity. His general duties 
include work on the devel- 
opment of the University's 
long range capital improve- 
ments. 

Dr. Bentz is a graduate of 
this University, having re- 
ceived his B. S. in 1942, and 
his Ph. D. in 1952. He is a 
member of Delta Sigma Phi, 
Alpha Zeta, and Sigma Xi. 



Dr. Frank L. Bentz, Jr. 

Assistant to the President 







Mr. B. James Borreson 
Executive Dean for Student Life 



Dean Borreson is responsible for all matters concerning 
the life of the student outside the classroom. He was ap- 
pointed Executive Dean for Student Life in 1958, after 
serving as Assistant Dean of the Graduate School of Bus- 
iness and instructor of Administrative Practices at Harvard 
University. In 1947 he became Director of Student Activ- 
ities at Minnesota, and in 1954 he received the Faculty 
Recognition Award from the Student body. While an un- 
dergraduate at the University of Minnesota, Dean Borreson 
was president of Alpha Delta Pi and president of the IFC. 



54 



ASSOCIATE DEANS 

FOR STUDENT LIFE 

Dean Gray was appointed 
Associate Dean for Student 
Life in 1960. An under- 
graduate here at Maryland, 
he was a member of Alpha 
Gamma Rho. Among his 
present duties he is faculty 
advisor to the fraternities. 



i 




Mr. Frank A. Gray 



Dr. Bernard Hodinko 




Dean Hodinko was appoint- 
ed Director of Housing in 
1960, and just recently be- 
came Associate Dean for 
Student Life. Dr. Hodinko 
received his B. S. at the Uni- 
versity of Akron and is 
a member of Lambda Chi 
Alpha. 



ASSISTANT DEANS 

FOR STUDENT LIFE 




Mr. Lewis Knebel 



Dr. Furman Bridgers assists 
all foreign students in their 
adjustment to American 
life. 



Mr. George Kaludis 




Mr. Knebel is the di- 
rector of the Univer- 
sity's Placement Ser- 




Dr. Furman Bridgers 



Mr. Kaludis' duties in- 
clude co-ordination of 
campus religious life, 
student activities, and 
orientation programs. 



DEANS OF MEN 




Mr. Geary Eppley 
Dean of Men 



Dean Eppley, an alumnus of 
Maryland, has been Dean 
of Men since 1936. 

He has served as Director 
of Athletics and President 
of the Atlantic Coast Con- 
ference. 

In 1960 he was tapped by 
Kalegethos, the fraternity 
honorary. He is also the re- 
cipient of a one-time award 
from the Interfraternity 
Council in appreciation of 
his many efforts on behalf 
of the fraternity system. 

Mr. Doyle Royal 
Assistant Dean of Men 



Dean Royal directs off-cam- 
pus housing, and with Dean 
Eppley helps to co-ordinate 
the campus life of male stu- 
dents. 




^ \Jpf*'8^%»,^^ 



DIRECTORS 



Mr. Joseph Hall 
Director of Housing 



t 





Mr. H. Palmer Hopkins 
Director of Student Aid 



Mr. George Weber 
Director of Physical Plant 





:i 



Dr. Helen E. Clark (Right) 
Dean of Women 

Dean Clarke administers all Women's activities on the 
College Park campus. Her education has included a B. S. 
at the University of Michigan, an M. A. at the University 
of Illinois, and a Ph. D. at Columbia University. 

Before becoming Dean of Women in 1960, she was As- 
sistant Dean of Students at the University of California 
and Associate Dean of Students at Lake Forest College in 
Illinois. A member of Pi Lambda Theta, Dean Clarke was 
also in Kappa Delta Pi and Alpha Lambda Delta. 



59 




Miss Eileen McCormick 
Social Director 



Dean Billings, advisor to 
AWS, also serves as advi- 
sor to the Campus Judicial 
Board. 



Miss Marian Johnson 
Women's Placement 




ASSISTANT DEANS 
OF WOMEN 



Dean McCormick handles 
registration of social func- 
tions, and also serves as ad- 
visor to Panhellenic Council. 




Miss Julia Billings 
Housing and Discipline 



Miss Johnson's responsi- 
.^ bilities are counseling, 
placement, and advising the 
Commuters Club. 




STUDENT GOVERNMENT 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT HAS had a long history at 
the University of Maryland, as the University has recognized 
the need for self-government and the value of the experience. 

The SGA is closely patterned after the system of the 
Federal Government, consisting of the executive, legislative, 
and judicial branches. All student groups are subordinate 
to the SGA, and it controls and coordinates student ac- 
tivity. With a budget derived from the S12 SGA fee, it 
fmances the major student organizations and student pub- 
lications. 

Individual students financially support the SGA with 
this fee, and through election of officers and membership 
on committees, participate fully in running extracurricular 
activities. But the SGA does not exist solely for non- 
academic activities. Many policy decisions affect the type 
and quality of the curriculum and the prestige of the Uni- 
versity. 

CABINET 

The executive branch is kno^vn as the Cabinet. It is 
the major policy and decision-making body. Also, it is the 
major appointive body, with the concurrence of the Legisla- 



62 



ture. SGA committees, standing and special, are responsible 
to this body. 

Members of the Cabinet 

Executive Officers: 

President Pete Wasmer '62 

Vice-President Warren Duckett '62 

Secretary Linnell Robinson '62 

Treasurer John Stafford '63 

Class Officers: 

Senior Ron Grudziecki '62 

Junior Wayne Robertson '63 

Sophomore Dave Sullivan '64 

Freshman To be elected 

Represen.tatives 

President of AWS Karen Jacobsen '62 

President of Mens League Bruce Gold '62 

Fraternity Representative Ben Pettee '62 

Sorority Representative Jean Richey '62 



63 



Independent Mens Rep Chuck Darby '62 

Independent Women's Rep Vera Mae Ernst '63 

LEGISLATURE 

Proposed legislation must be presented to the Legislature 
for initial action, even if it is first proposed in the Cabinet. 
Also, a major duty of this body is the reviewing of the 
budget proposals of the Finance Committee. Through 
committees and personal contacts, the Legislature reflects 
and implements the opinions and desires of the student 
body. Students are encouraged to attend the Legislature 
meetings. Dates and times are announced in the Diamond- 
back. 



Seniors — Class of '62 
Jim Benson 
Bill Clark 
Casey Croghan 
Cal Gray 



Dick Millhouser 
Lee Stuckey 
Neil Thigpen 
Ken Waissman 
Jim Wood 



Juniors — Class of '63 
Elaine Downs 



Jean O'Hare 



64 



Stenny Hoyer Paula Prusch 

Nancy Long Bill Stasiulatis 

Jordon "Obe" Obertier Jack Taggart 

Sophomores — Class of '64 

Jim Beattie Marlene Finklestein 

Tom Bowman Teddie Lou Kelly 

Kay Daniels Ronnie Myers 

Sue Tribbett 

CENTRAL STUDENT COURT 

This court is the highest student court, deciding ques- 
tions of constitutionality, major breaches of discipline, and 
appeals from lower courts. It is now composed of seven 
members from Omicron Delta Kappa and Mortar Board. In- 
ferior student courts are Men's League, AWS, IFC, Pan- 
hel, RMA, Dorm Council, Dorm Judicial Board, House 
Rules Committee, Fraternity and Sorority. The entire stu- 
dent judicial system is now being revised with a view toward 
greater student responsibility and better representation. 

CLASSES 

The basis for the SGA system is the class. Direct con- 



65 



tact between students and elected officers is possible, and 
those students who take the time and opportunity can best 
make themselves heard through their classes. Committees 
necessary for the running of traditional class events (such 
as the Proms, Sophomore Carnival, and Senior Class Pre- 
sents) provide valuable experience in leadership. Strong 
classes mean a unified student body and an effective SGA. 



I 



Camp Letts — Freshman Orientation Board 




COMMITTEES 

Chairmanships of committees are zealously sought be- 
cause the work benefits a large number of people and pro- 
vides valuable experience. Each chairmanship also carries 
a certain amount of prestige. Chairmen work their way up 
through membership and participation. Reminders that ap- 
plications are being accepted are printed in the Diamond- 
back. Refer to the list of SGA standing committees in the 
SGA Ofl&ce in the Student Union. 

ELECTIONS 

General SGA elections are held in the spring. Two po- 
litical parties, Free State and Old Line, nominate candidates 
for the various offices in the conventions a few weeks prior 
to election day. Campaigning lasts for one week. In gen- 
eral, a 2.2 average is needed for top offices, and a 2.0 for 
the lesser ones. Complete election rules can be found in 
the SGA Constitution. 

MEN'S LEAGUE 

Men's League should gain new importance this year if 
plans for a Men's League Court are carried out. Every 
male undergraduate is a member of Men's League, an or- 



67 



ganization to promote the educational, cultural, social, and 
athletic welfare of men students. The League Banquet in 
the spring honors outstanding campus leaders among both 
the student body and the faculty. 

ASSOCIATED WOMEN STUDENTS 

Also slated to set up a court. AWS parallels Men's 
League in that all women students are members. AWS is 
the governing body of the campus women. If formulates 
and administers campus rules and standards of conduct for 
women. AWS also sponsors social activities and assists 
WRA in its athletic program. 

DORM COUNCIL 

Composed of the presidents of all the women's resid- 
ences, Dorm Council coordinates activities and provides for 
the betterment of dorm life. 

RESIDENT MEN'S ASSOCIATION 

RMA is a growing organization which originally was 
known as Men's Dorm Council. Last year, it became inde- 
pendent of Men's League and elected its own officers. It is 
made up of the presidents of the men's dorms, and acts to 
promote the welfare of the dormitory men. 



68 



PUBLICATIONS 




COMMU NICATIONS 



COMMIHEE ON STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 
AND COMMUNICATIONS 

PUBLICATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS are one of 
the most important aspects of the college campus. They 
serve to inform and unite the various segments of the 
University. Also, they provide valuable experience in journ- 
alism and related fields, and are one of the most worth- 
while of all extracurricular activities. 

Governing the selection of editors for the fine publica- 
tions and the top station personnel for WMUC is the 
Facuhy Senate Committee on Student Publications and Com- 
munications — known as Publications Board. This committee 
is composed of six students, six faculty members, and a 
chairman. Publication editors, the station manager of 
WMUC, and the head of the Journalism department are ex 
officio members. Others are appointed. Publications Board 
and its sub-committees meet regularly to select and advise 
editors and solve problems. 

Editors are appointed during the latter part of the spring 
semester for the coming school year. Those appointed must 
have at least a 2.2 cumulative academic average, and at 
least a 2.2 academic average for the semester prior to ap- 
pointment. 

PI DELTA EPSILON AND SIGMA DELTA CHI BANQUETS 
Both these societies are composed of outstanding stu- 



70 



dent journalists. Pi Delt is an honorary society for both 
men and women, while Sigma Delta Chi is a professional 
society for men who intend to make journalism their ca- 
reer. In the spring semester these two groups give banquets 
for their members and new initiates. Awards are made to 
particularly outstanding students, and the editors for the 
coming year are introduced. 

DIAMONDBACK 

Editor-in-chief Buck Hoyle '62 

Executive Editor Paul Case '63 

Managing Editors Liz Shay '62 

Ernie Freda '63 

Liz Hall '63 

Adrian Sybor '63 

Executive Sports Editor Bruce Weber '62 

Business Manager Larry Granat '62 

The class of '65 will be the first freshman class to 
benefit from a new innovation with Diamondhack. This 
year the campus newspaper will be printed by the offset 
process, allowing, among other things, superior quality pho- 
tographs and late deadlines. Deadlines will be the night 
before, allowing the Diamondhack to compete favorably 
with commercial dailies in rapid reporting of news. Sports 
scores and campus election returns will be published the day 



71 



after. Buck Hoyle has a trained, experienced staff, but new 
student journalists are needed every fall to replace those 
who graduate. DBK offices are located on the first floor 
of the Journalism Building. 

TERRAPIN 

Co-Editors Janice Montgomery '62 

John Rodgers '62 

Managing Editor Frank Tucci '63 

Business Manager Ross Beville '64 

Art Editor Jim Hahn '64 

Terrapin is the student yearbook. Compiled and written 
during the school year, it is a record of the academic, so- 
cial, athletic, and political life of the students. The Terrapin 
appears in the latter part of May. SGA spent over $40,000 
last year to publish this book. It is distributed free, as are 
all student publications. 

New students are needed every year to maintain the 
quality of the Terrapin. Many of these yearbooks have re- 
ceived All-American ratings. Positions are open to students 
as writers, photographers, business assistants, typists, and 
copy readers. Those interested should apply in the Terrapin 
office on the third floor of the Journalism Building. 

OLD LINE 

Editor Ken Waissman '62 



72 



Managing Editor Larry Pearson '63 

Business Managers Claire Feldstein '62 

Joyce Schroeder '62 

Photo Editor Emory Kristof f '64 

Maryland students may expect to see a greater use of 
pictures and art work in the Old Line this year. Ken Waiss- 
man, the new editor, has been the art editor for two years. 
Old Line has been continually improving, and this should 
be one of its best years. 

In addition to campus humor, the Old Line also includes 
photo features, articles on the news, and campus personal- 
ities and activities. Old Line's offices are located on the 
second floor of the Journalism Building. 

M BOOK 

Editor-in-chief John Stafford '63 

Assistant Editors Jim Harris '62 

Jim Kennedy '63 
Fran Horwitz '63 

Assistant Editors Phil Rever '63 

Sarah Schlesinger '62 

Ann Longmore '63 

M-BooK switched to a different form this year — a small 

compact booklet. This change helps it to better perform 

its chief function — being a guide and information source 



73 



for the new freshman. And while it is prim^arily for fresh- 
men, M-BoOK serves as a handy reference for upperclass- 
men. Staff members are appointed in May. 

EXPRESSION 

Editor William Cooper '62 

Business Manager Ric Blacksten '64 

Expression magazine has proved itself to be an impor- 
tant and integral part of the campus. Dealing chiefly with 
poems, plays, and art, it provides an outlet for the campus 
literary talent. Essays, translations, short stories, and some 
photographs are welcomed. Offices are in the Journalism 
Building, first floor. 

WMUC 

Station Director Stan Rudick '62 

Program Director Steve Johnson '63 

Business Manager Howard Stevens '62 

WMUC is the campus radio station. Offices and studios 
are located in building FF in the Gulch next to Caroline 
Hall. Operation is Sunday through Friday, 6:30 — 8:30 
A.M. and 6:30—12:00 midnight. 

WMUC features all kinds of music, with practically no 
interference from commercials. Records are as current as 
any commercial station. Students interested in announcing, 
writing, engineering, or selling should contact Stan Rudick 
or Steve Johnson. 



74 



RELIGIOUS 



LIFE 




.. ^^«bE 



THE UNIVERSITY MEMORIAL CHAPEL is a com- 
plex composed of three chapels, usually referred to as the 
East Chapel, West Chapel, and the Roman Catholic Chapel, 
and offices housing the chapel staff. Listed below each de- 
nomination is information explaining how it functions on 
the campus. For those groups not having a structured pro- 
gram, a local church and or an advisor is named. The 
Chapel Staff is always happy to have you stop by for in- 
formation, or just to talk. 

STUDENT RELIGIOUS COUNCIL 

The Student Religious Council is composed of repre- 
sentatives from each of the student religious groups. Its 
purpose is to coordinate the activities of the student re- 
ligious organizations and to promote religious interest and 
activity on campus. The group meets monthly, with Harold 
O'Flaherty '63 presiding. 

RELIGIOUS LIFE COAAMITTEE 

The Religious Life Committee, which meets monthly, is a 
standing committee of the University Faculty Senate. The 
chairman of the committee is Dr. Redfield Allen and the 
Chaplains are ex-officio members. The committee makes 
and executes policy, sponsors religious programs, and acts 
as an advisory group. 

BAPTIST 

The Baptist Student Union is the connecting link between 

76 



the campus and the local church, and has a program de- 
signed to meet the needs of those in a college community. 
An emphasis is placed on the development of Christian 
character for today's world. Meetings are held every day 
from 12:15 to 12:50 in the Chapel office. Sunday Service 
is held at the Second Baptist Church on Campus Drive at 
11:00 a.m., with Sunday School at 9:30 a.m. 
Advisor : 

Mr. Howard Rees 
Chapel Office 252 
Campus Ext. 548 

BRETHREN 

University Park Church 
Baltimore Boulevard 
at Tuckerman Street 

Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 
Worship Services 9:00 a.m. 
11:00 a.m. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 

There is a meeting of the Christian Science Organization 
each week on Wednesday evening in the West Chapel. Sun- 
day services are held at First Church of Christ Scientist, 
6221 43rd Avenue, Hyattsville, at 9:30 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. 
Faculty Advisor: 
Dr. James B. Shanks 
Campus Ext. 277 

77 



EASTERN ORTHODOX 

Members of the Eastern, Greek, Russian and Syrian 
Orthodox faiths are given an opportunity to become more 
knowledgeable Christians according to the faith and tradi- 
tions of the Eastern Orthodox Church through Ethos. This 
organization meets on the second and fourth Tuesday of 
each month in the Student Union from 7:00 to 8:00 p.m. 
Faculty Advisors: 
Dr. George Anastos 
Univ. Ext. 574 
Dr. Peter Diamodopoulos 
Univ. Ext. 439 
Chapel Office 23 
Campus Ext. 546 
Saint Sophia Greek Orthodox Cathedral Washington, D. C. 
Sunday services — 10:30 a.m. 

EPISCOPAL 

The Episcopal Foundation plans a full church life for 
Episcopalians on campus. Worship opportunities in Mem- 
orial Chapel include Holy Communion daily at noon, and on 
Sunday at 8:30 a.m. These services are held in the West 
Chapel. The Canterbury Association meets at 7:00 p.m. on 
Wednesdays in St. Andrew's Church Parish House. In ad- 
dition, those students who are on campus on weekends are 
invited to join in an informal supper club also held in the 
Parish House at 5:30 Sunday evenings. 
Chaplain: Father Merrill A. Stevens 

78 



Assistant to the chaplain: 
Miss Sara Lee Gribbon 
Chapel Office 243 
Campus Ext. 547 

FRIENDS 

Anyone wishing information or having questions per- 
taining to the Friends is urged to contact the 
Faculty Advisor: 

Dr. E. E. Haviknd, Campus Ext. 378 
Adelphi Friends Meeting 
Adelphi, Maryland (University Boulevard) 

ISLAM 

Information concerning meetings and services for Mos- 
lem students can be obtained by contacting the 
Faculty Advisor: 
Professor Furman Bridgers 
Campus Ext. 508 

JEWISH 

The Jewish student body at Maryland is served by the 
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation, with facilities located at 
7505 Yale Avenue. The house is open until 10 p.m. daily, 
providing such facilities as a game room, library, television, 
hi-fi. Student Executive Board office. Director's office, lounge 
and kitchen. Shabbett services are held weekly at 8:00 p.m. 
on Friday evenings. Both the Director and student officers 
may be reached daily at the HHlel House in person or by 



79 



phone at AP 7-8961. 

Director: Rabbi Meyer Greenberg 

LUTHERAN 

The Lutheran Student Foundation provides a full-orbed 
campus ministry to the Lutheran community at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland through a campus Pastor, a Counsel- 
lor, the facilities of Hope Lutheran Church, The Student 
Center, and the University Chapel. Sunday worship is at 
9:00 and 11:00 a.m. at Hope Church (Guilford Drive and 
Knox Road), with a student Bible Study-Coffee Hour at 
9:45 a.m. The Lutheran Student Association meets Wed- 
nesday evenings at 7:30 at the Student Center, and The 
Supper Club provides Sunday evening suppers at 6:30 p.m., 
also at the Center. Evening vespers are held each weekday 
except Friday at 5:00 p.m. in the East Chapel. 
Chaplain: The Rev. Theodore R. Caspar 
Counsellor: 

Miss Margaret E. Oppegard 
Chapel Office 247 
Campus Ext. 547 

METHODIST 

The ministry of the Methodist Church on the campus 
is carried out through the Methodist Chaplain, services in 
the Chapel and University Methodist Church, and the Wes- 
ley Foundation. The Wesley Foundation meets Wednesday 



80 



at 7:30 p.m. at University Methodist Church, east of the 
campus on Campus Drive. Sunday services are also held at 
this church at 9:30 and 11:00. 

Chaplain : 

The Rev. Richard Vieth 
Chapel Office 255 
Campus Ext. 546 

ROAAAN CATHOLIC 

The Newman Foundation is the central organization for 
students of the Catholic faith. Daily Mass at noon and 
three Sunday Masses are the center of Catholic worship. 
Theology classes, weekly meetings, the Newman Library, 
and discussion groups help in the development of under- 
standing of the faith. A varied social program is main- 
tained. 

Father William Tepe 
Chapel Office 32 
Campus Ext. 546 

UNITARIAN 

The Diogenes Society serves as a study group for mem- 
bers of the Unitarian Church on campus. Discussion meet- 
ings are held bi-weekly on Wednesdays at 8:00 p.m. Sunday 
services are held in University Building EE at 11:00 a.m. 
Faculty Advisor: 
Dr. Paul Conkin 
Campus Ext. 201 



81 



UNITED PRESBYTERIAN 

A ministry is provided through the United Camp 
Christian Fellowship for members of the United Church 
of Christ (Evangelical and Reformed, and Congregational) 
and the Evangelical United Brethern, as well as the United 
Presbyterian churches. The concern of the ministry is to 
provide opportunity for the expression of the Church's wit- 
ness to the campus and a fellowship which enables its 
members to grow in the Christian Hfe. This fellowship 
meets in worship each Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. in the West 
Chapel and 11:00 a.m. in the Memorial Chapel. 
Chaplain : Rev. Jesse W. Myers 

Assistants: 

Mr. Donald M. Curtis 
Mr. James B. Langworthy 
Chapel Office 239 
Campus Ext. 548 

MARYLAND CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 

The Maryland Christian Fellowship is a non-denomina- 
tional student religious organization. 

Faculty Advisor: 
Mr. Charlton Meyer 
Campus Ext. 555 



82 



CULTURE 
and 
ENTERTAI NMENT 



THE END PRODUCT of your University experience 
cannot be measured in terms of knowledge gained in the 
classroom alone. Your career here at Maryland will be 
packed full of much that is new and enlightening. The op- 
portunities for extra-curricular enrichment offered by the 
University's student organizations are varied and the SGA 
Cultural Committee seeks to bring the student body a well 
diversified program of attractions each year. Their series 
includes four concerts by the National Symphony of Wash- 
ington featuring such outstanding soloists as Phillipe Entre- 
mont and appearances by such groups as the Modern Jazz 
Quartet and the Ximenez-Vargas Spanish Ballet. Admis- 
sion to these events is free to all students presenting ID 
Cards and to members of the faculty and administration. 
Coffee hours with faculty members informally discussing 
their special interests are offered by AWS and are also held 
in individual dorms and Greek Houses. By taking advan- 
tage of this cultural program, you can assure yourself of a 
well rounded college experience. 

Outstanding evenings in popular entertainment are of- 
fered by such organizations as the Interfraternity Council, 
the Senior Class, and the Resident Men's Association. These 
groups have brought Harry Belafonte, Bob Hope, the King- 
ston Trio, and the Limelighters to campus in the past years. 



84 



UNIVERSITY THEATRE 

Central Auditorium is the scene of the four student plays 
given each year by University Theatre. "Streetcar Named 
Desire," "I Am A Camera," "South Pacific," and "Julius 
Caesar" were presented to sellout crowds last year. U. T.'s 
productions have always been of high quality. Students are 
admitted free after receiving tickets from the box office in 
the Skinner Building. Tryout announcements are published 
in the Diamondback. 

IFC PRESENTS 

Consistently a mainstay of the entertainment year, IFC 
presents brings big-name entertainment to the Maryland 
campus. Harry Belafonte and the Kingston Trio drew ca- 
pacity crowds to Cole Fieldhouse in past years. Ella Fitz- 
gerald is scheduled to appear this year on October 14th. 
These shows are produced and financed by the Interfratern- 
ity Council, and require months of preparation. 

NATIONAL SYMPHONY CONCERTS 

Four times a year the SGA Cultural Committee spon- 
sors a performance by the National Symphony Orchestra, 
Howard Mitchell conducting. The concerts are given at 
Ritchie Coliseum, and presentation of an ID Card admits 
a student free. 



85 




Homecoming ivill feature Lionel Hampton this year. 



SENIOR CLASS PRESENTS 

Jonathon Winters; Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross; and 
Bob Hope have appeared here for a night of entertainment 
sponsored by the Senior Class. Cole Field House is usually 
packed for these shows, as it is for IFC Presents. Admis- 
sion is open to the public and usually costs about $2.00. 

INTERFRATERNITY SING 

Delta Delta Delta sorority annually sponsors the Inter- 
fraternity Sing in Ritchie Coliseum on Thursday night of 
Greek Week. Fraternities and sororities practice for weeks, 
and the competition produces performances that are pro- 
fessional in quality, and are recorded by RCA Victor. Dia- 
mond (sorority honorary) and Kalegethos (fraternity hon- 
orary) tappings take place; the Morty Cohen, Fraternity 
Man of the Year, and Sorority Woman of the Year awards 
are presented at intermission. Admission is free. 



86 



GREEK WEEK 

Greek houses go all out to promote competition and 
unity. IFC and Pan-Hel coordinate the many activities such 
as the Boat Ride, Re-dedication, Interfraternity Sing, ZBT 
Bike Race, ATO Chariot Race, and the SAE Jazz Concert. 
Open houses are the order of the weekend, with the entire 
campus invited. Finally, the King and Queen of Greek 
Week are crowned. 

KAPPA ALPHA MINSTREL 

End men, black faces, and plenty of laughs are char- 
acteristics of the Kappa Alpha Cotton Pickers Minstrel, giv- 
en in the spring. For over thirty-five years Kappa Alpha 
Fraternity has given this show, which always attracts a full 
house. 

HARMONY HALL 

Phi Kappa Tau Fraternity annually presents Harmony 
Hall, which features competition among Greek barbershop 
quartets. Judging is by the Society for the Advancement 
of Barbershop Singing. 

GYMKANA TROUPE 

Many exhibitions of acrobatics and tumbling are given 
throughout the year by this group. It never ceases to thrill 



87 



the crowd, whether at a football game or in Cole Field 
House. 

FLYING FOLLIES 

This organization provides vaudeville entertainment not 
only for the campus but also for other cities and countries. 
Originally an overseas show for servicemen, it has greatly 
expanded. 

ASSOCIATED WOMEN STUDENTS COFFEE HOURS 

One of the major contributions of the AWS is the spon- 
sorship of coffee hours, featuring talks and discussions with 
members of the faculty. Usually they take place on week- 
day afternoons in the Student Union Building. 

CHAPEL CHOIR 

Numerous religious music programs are presented by 
this organization during the year, Handel's Messiah, given 
at Christmas, is a highlight of the annual schedule. 

WOMEN'S CHORUS & MEN'S GLEE CLUB 

The choral renditions are given by these outstanding 
student groups at various times during the year. The ac- 
tivities of the Womens Chorus are highlighted by its part 
in the Associated Women Students Christmas Pageant. 



88 



'^M^ 






SORORITIES 



***** 






PANHELLENIC CREED 

"We, the fraternity undergraduate members, stand for 
good health, for wholehearted cooperation with our col- 
lege's ideals for student life, for the maintenance of fine 
social standards, and for the serving, to the best of our 
ability, of our college community. Good college citizenship 
in the larger world of alumnae days is the ideal that shall 
guide our chapter activities. 

"We, the fraternity women of America, stand for pre- 
paration for service through the character building inspired 
in the close contact and deep friendship of fraternity life. 
To us, fraternity life is not the enjoyment of special priv- 
ileges but an opportunity to prepare for wide and wise 
human service." 

CONCERNING SORORITIES 

A SORORITY IN college refers to a group of women 
joined together under a Greek name to form a strong sis- 
terhood. The eighteen national sororities at Maryland share 
similar high ideals and goals and they all contribute to the 
University culturally, scholastically, and socially. 

All sororities place great emphasis on scholarship. Study 
programs, tutoring, and trophies all add incentive for high 

90 



scholarship; consequently the sorority average is always 
higher than the all-women's average. 

Social life within the sorority consists of deserts with 
fraternities, sorority parties, banquets, and formal dances. 
Members of Panhellenic are also active in inter-sorority 
functions. Each year there are teas, the Pledge Formal, 
and Interfraternity Sing. 

Sorority life encompasses more than social life. Each 
sorority contributes time and money to a national or a 
local philanthropy. These include work with programs for 
rheumatic fever and help for the blind. Culture is brought 
to each group by numerous fireside chats and speakers. 

PANHELLENIC COUNCIL 

President Nancy Julius '63 

l5^ Vice President Mary Carhart '62 

2nd Vice President Val Wood '63 

Secretary Fran Horwitz '63 

Treasurer Elaine Ricca '63 

Rush Chairman Dee Latimer '63 

The Panhellenic Council is composed of two delegates 

from each of the eighteen national sororities on campus. 

Its purposes include promoting cooperation in inter-sorority 



91 



and faculty relationships, furthering high scholarship and 
high social standards, and coordinating rules governing 
rushing, pledging, and initiation. Annual activities of the 
council include the fall Pledge Dance, adopting a foster 
child, and a car wash in the spring for the benefit of 
Campus Chest. 

A Junior Panhellenic Council, composed of one pledge 
from each house, is set up to prepare them for membership 
on Senior Panhel. Each year this group sponsors one ma- 
jor project. 

RUSHING, PLEDGING, AND INITIATION 

"Rushing" is a term applied to the method of securing 
new members. From September 23rd to September 30th 
the sororities will entertain girls in order to become ac- 
quainted with them. There are open house teas, theme 
parties, and preference teas during this period of formal 
rush. Pledging will be held this year on October 1st. For 
girls who w^ould like to see what a sorority house is like. 
Open House will be held by all of the houses during Fresh- 
man Orientation Week. 

Any woman enrolled at the University of Maryland and 
unaffiliated with any National Panhellenic sorority is ehgi- 

92 



ble for rushing. 

No women, except sorority actives, pledges, and rushees 
may be present for rush functions. Rush functions will be 
held at specified times only, and rushees will be allowed 
to visit sorority houses only for specified functions. No 
men nor alumnae may be present at any rush function. 

All women who are formally rushing are required to 
observe a silence period which extends from the beginning 
of rush to pledging. During this time rushees and sorority 
women are forbidden to talk to each other, except when in 
a sorority house during a scheduled party. Sorority women 
may not call for rushees nor return them to their residences, 
and sorority women may not "double d'ate" with rushees. 

Following formal rushing in September and February 
there is an informal rush period. Girls who are interested 
should sign up in the Dean of Women's Office. 

A "pledge" becomes an "active" when she has satisfied 
the requirements for initation. These requirements include 
completion of at least 12 academic credits in the preceding 
semester at the University of Maryland with a 2.2 overall 
academic average and no failures for that semester, with 
the exception of a 2.5 academic average. 



93 



SORORITIES 

ALPHA CHI OMEGA "ALPHA CHI" 

Gamma Theta Chapter established /iere-1948 

President Anne Whiton '62 

4525 College Avenue Union 4-9893 

ALPHA DELTA PI "A D PI" 

Beta Phi Chapter established /iere-1940 

President Kay White '62 

4603 College Avenue Warfield 7-9864 

ALPHA EPSILON PHI "A E PHI" 

Alpha Mu Chapter established /iere-1943 

President Claire Feldstein '62 

11 Fraternity Row Warfield 7-9701 

ALPHA GAMMA DELTA "A G D" 

Alpha Xi Chapter established here-194,7 

President Karen Dunkin '62 

4535 College Avenue Union 4-9806 

Sorority Olympics 




ALPHA OMICRON PI "A PI" 

Pi Delta Chapter established /lere- 1924 

President Margie Turner '62 

4517 College Avenue Warfield 7-9871 

ALPHA PHI 

Delta Zeta Chapter established here-1961 

President Kathy Porter '62 

4210-A Knox Road 

ALPHA XI DELTA "ALPHA XI" 

Beta Eta Chapter established ^ere-1934 

President Roberta Patterson '62 

4517 Knox Road Warfield 7-9720 

DELTA DELTA DELTA "TRI DELT" 

Alpha Pi Chapter established /iere-1934 

President Linnell Robinson '62 

4604 College Avenue Union 4-9491 

DELTA GAMMA "D G" 

Beta Sigma Chapter established /iere-1945 

President Pam Clayton '62 

4502 College Avenue Warfield 7-9844 

DELTA PHI EPSILON "D PHI E" 

Delta Xi Chapter established here-1960 

President Jane Magidson '62 

Box 85, Student Union 

GAMMA PHI BETA "GAMMA PHI" 

Beta Beta Chapter established ^ere-1940 

President . . . Peggy Lotz '63 

9 Fraternity Row Warfield 7-9773 



95 



KAPPA ALPHA THETA "THETA" 

Gamma Mu Chapter established /iere-1947 

President Sandy Foulis '62 

8 Fraternity Row Union 4-9829 

KAPPA DELTA "^ D" 

Alpha Rho Chapter established here-1929 
President Lyl Wray '62 

4610 College Avenue Warfield 7-9759 

KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA "KAPPA" 

Gamma Psi Chapter established here-1929 

President Cynthia Heisler '62 

7407 Princeton Avenue Warfield 7-9886 

PSI SIGMA SIGMA "PHI SIGGY SIGGY" 

Beta Alpha Chapter established here-1936 

President Cookie Kahn '63 

4531 College Avenue Warfield 7-9828 

PI BETA PHI "PI PHI" 

Maryland Beta Chapter established /iere-1944 

President Linda Poore '62 

12 Fraternity Row Union 4-9885 

SIGMA DELTA TAU "S D T" 

Alpha Theta Chapter established /iere-1951 

President Sue Greenwald '62 

Campus Warfield 7-9513 

SIGMA KAPPA 

Beta Zeta Chapter established /iere-1941 

President Donann Gloss '62 

10 Fraternity Row Warfield 7-9861 



96 






FRATERNITIES 






*««■«»' 



^m^. 




.i^^»i 



^m^' 



CONCERNING FRATERNITIES 
From the 1934 M-BooK 

"The aim and dream of many a freshman is to attain 
membership in a great college fraternity. Tor many, this 
dream means luxury of living, a sense of superiority, a 
good time among "brothers," and a shining pin to show the 
home folks. 

A fraternity or sorority should mean much more. It 
should mean closer companionship with other men or wo- 
men with similar ideals who are pledged to raise the moral, 
educational, and social standards of the group. 

In a few weeks many will have the opportunity to 
join one of these Greek letter organizations. The oppor- 
tunities for you to benefit from these affiliations are nu- 
merous, but please keep in mind: 

That your decision will probably have more effect on 
your future life than any you have ever made in the past. 

That you are not an outcast if you do not receive the 
bid you wish, or any bid-you may be too intelligent instead 
of too backward to interest that particular organization. 

That many of the potentially fine men have been com- 
pletely buried in their fraternities. 

That men in other fraternities may be worth cultivating 
or keeping as friends. Some of your best friends in the 
Freshman Class will not be in your fraternity. Do not lose 
them. 



98 



That you are entitled to know the financial setup of the 
fraternity that rushes you. 

That it is neither any credit to you nor to a fraternity 
to obligate yourself before the official pledge day. 

And that your success or failure does not rely on whether 
you make a fraternity or not, but on the initiative and 
perserverance you show in either situation." 

FRATERNITY CRITERIA 

The National Interfraternity Conference, founded in 
1908, serves to bring about closer harmony among the 59 
national fraternities in the group. Annually, national under- 
graduate councils and college administrators attend a con- 
ference, the results of which are reported in the NIC 
yearbook. 

A fraternity criteria, which serves to advance fraternity- 
educational institution cooperation, was submitted by NIC 
executives in 1934 and approved by the American Associa- 
tion of Deans and Advisors of Men. It reads as follows: 

1. That the objectives and activities of the fraternity 
should be in entire accord with the aims and pur- 
poses of the institutions at which it has chapters. 

2. That the primary loyalty and responsibility of a 
student . . . with hio institution are to the institu- 
tion, and that ... a chapter of a fraternity involves 
the definite responsibility . . . for the conduct of the 
individual. 

99 



3. That the fraternity should promote conduct consis- 
tent with good morals and good taste. 

4. That the fraternity should create an atmosphere 
which will stimulate substantial intellectual progress 
and superior intellectual achievement. 

5. That the fraternity should maintain sanitary, safe, 
and wholesome physical conditions in the chapter 
house. 

6. That the fraternity should inculcate principles of 
sound business practice both in chapter finances and 
in the business relations of its members. 

JNTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL 

President Jim Kenney '63 

Ist Vice-President John Haas '62 

2nd Vice-President Larry- Granat '62 

Secretary Neil Thigpen '62 

Treasurer Bill Binch '62 

The IFC on the Maryland campus is responsible for the 
coordination of all fraternity activities including rush, sports 
social, and scholastic. It is composed of a representative 
and the president of each of the 23 fraternities on our 
campus. IFC is responsible for the sponsorship of some 
of the campus "big weekends", such as the IFC Ball, IFC 
Presents, and Greek Week. Coupled with its administrative 
functions, the IFC has taken the lead in the field of on- 
campus scholarship responsibilities, with awards, scholar- 

100 



ships, and grants; and has a special committee headed by 
the 1st Vice-President that makes studies and recommenda- 
tions concerning fraternity scholarship. 

GENERAL RUSH RULES 

1. Formal rush will take plac€ once this year, about 
the third week of the Fall semester. 

2. No student on probation may pledge. 

3. No man may be pledged or initiated with less than 
a 2.0 average. 

4. Rushees must sign the "Rush Roster." 

5. Signatures must be obtained in accordance with the 
IFC rush plan. 

6. Informal rush begins 15 days after the close of 
formal rush. 

GENERAL RUSH SCHEDULE 

All Houses open Tuesday, Wednesday, & Thursday 

of the first week, 8-11 p.m. 
Signatures Friday & Saturday, 8-12 p.m. 

Invitation Parties Thursday, Friday, & Saturday 

8-12 p.m. 

FRATERNITIES 
ALPHA EPSILON PI "A E PI" 

Delta Deuteron Chapter established /lere- 1940 

President Richard Rose '63 

13 Fraternity Row JUniper 5-6897 

101 



ALPHA GAMMA RHO "A G R" 

Alpha Theta Chapter established here-l92S 

President George Adkins '62 

7511 Princeton Avenue WArfield 7-9831 

ALPHA TAU OMEGA "A T 0" 

Epsilon Gamma Chapter established here-1930 

President Ben Pettee '62 

4611 College Avenue WArfield 7-9769 

(y DELTA SIGMA PHI "DELTA SIG" 

Alpha Sigma Chapter established /iere-1924 

President Bob Schick '63 

4300 Knox Road WArfield 7-9770 

DELTA TAU DELTA "DELT" 

Delta Sigma Chapter established here-194S 

President Tom Brown '63 

3 Fraternity Row UNion 4-9780 

KAPPA ALPHA "K A" 

Beta Kappa Chapter established here-191^ 

President . Dave Sykes '62. 

1 Fraternity Row UNion 4-9504 

LAMBDA CHI ALPHA "LAMBDA CHI" 

Epsilon Pi Chapter established her e-l932 

President Bill Clark '62 

6 Fraternity Row WArfield 7-9778 

PHI DELTA THETA "PHI DELT" 

Alpha Chapter established here-1930 

President Charlie Hart '62 

4605 College Avenue WArfield 7-9884 

PHI KAPPA SIGMA "PHI KAP" 

Alpha Zeta Chapter established here-lS99 

102 



President Bob Barry '62 

5 Fraternity Row UNion 4-9828 

PHI KAPPA TAU "PHI TAU" 

Beta Omicron Chapter established /iere-1950 

President Malcolm Jordan '63 

Campus UNion 4-9886 

PHI SIGMA DELTA "PHI SIG BELT" 

Phi Epsilon Chapter established here-l9S9 

President Barry Hurwitz '62 

4609 College Avenue WArfield 7-9557 

PHI SIGMA KAPPA "PHI SIG" 

Eta Chapter established here-lS97, 1923 

President Cal Hook '62 

7 Fraternity Row UNion 4-9851 

PI KAPPA ALPHA "PI K A" 

Delta Psi Chapter established here-1952 

President Peter Rios-Velez '64 

7514 Rhode Island Avenue 

SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON "S A E" 

Maryland Beta Chapter established ^ere-1943 

President John Lauer '63 

4 Fraternity Row WArfield 7-9709 

SIGMA ALPHA MU "SAM" 

Sigma Chi Chapter established here-1933 

President Nard Helman '62 

2 Fraternity Row WArfield 7-9845 

SIGMA CHI 

Gamma Chi Chapter established her e-194'2 
President Bill White '62 

4600 Norwich Road UNion 4-9807 



103 



SIGMA NU 

Delta Phi Chapter established here-\9\l 

President Dick Rothenberg '63 

4617 Norwich Road WArfield 7-9563 

SIGMA PHI EPSILON "SIG EP" 

Maryland Beta Chapter established /iere-1949 

President Bruce Tucker '62 

7403 Hopkins Avenue WArfield 7-7560 

SIGMA PI 

Alpha Chi Chapter established /iere-1949 

President Charles Adams '63 

4302 Knox Road WArfield 7-9673 

TAU EPSILON PHI "TEP" 

Tau Beta Chapter established here-192S 

President Joe For&ter '63 

4607 Knox Road UNion 4-9513 

TAU KAPPA EPSILON 'TEKE" 

Beta Delta Chapter established Aere-1947 

President Will Johnson '62 

Campus UNion 4-9765 

THETA CHI 

Alpha Psi Chapter established here-1929 

President Bob Wright '63 

7401 Princeton Avenue UNion 4-9883 

ZETA BETA TAU "Z B T" 

Beta Zeta Chapter established here-194S 

President Bob Schaftel '62 

4400 Knox Road UNion 4-9786 



104 



ATHLETICS 




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ANOTHER IMPORTANT PART of campus life is ath- 
letics, and although varsity sports are more in the limelight, 
intramurals are marked by outstanding skill and fierce com- 
petition. Intramurals are composed of the Open League, the 
Fraternity League, and the Women's Recreation Association. 
The freshman teams are important in providing experience 
for future varsity players. 

Varsity athletics at Maryland are as fine as can be 
found anywhere. Maryland is a member of the Atlantic 
Coast Conference, one of the best in the country. Especially 
in wrestling, lacrosse, soccer, and track, Maryland has ex- 
celled, often going undefeated year after year in the Con- 
ference. Although having won the ACC Championship in 
1958, basketball has not been quite as successful, but it 
must be remembered that the ACC has consistently placed 
teams in the top ten in the nation and the NCAA tourna- 
ment. Lacrosse is a popular sport here, and crowds at la- 
crosse games are large and vocal. 

And always there is football. Coach Nugent has the 
makings of one of the top ten teams in the nation this 
year, possibly number one. Even while recruiting and build- 
ing, he has never had a losing season. 

FOOTBALL 

To claim top honors a team must play and beat the 
best. Athletic director Bill Cobey must have had this in 



106 



mind when the department picked the opposition for 1961. 
Coach Nugent remarked that we are "playing the best." 
Penn State, Syracuse, and SMU are three of the opponents. 
And then there is Clemson. This rivalry is beginning to be 
nationally known. Nugent's Terrapins have upset Clemson 
two years running, but Clemson plays at home this year. 
That is a glimpse at the competition. 

Our team is ready to go. The men are large, but quick. 
They want to win. There are a number of Ail-American 
candidates. Here are some names you will become very 
familiar with: Garry Collins, Richie Novak, Dick Shiner, 
Dick (Moose) Barlund, Tom Sankovich, Jimmy Davidson, 
Dennis Condie, Pat Drass, Roger Shoals, Bill Kirchiro, and 
Tommy Brown. Some outstanding sophomores include Er- 
nie Arizzi, Dave Nardo, and Gary Wikander. 

Given half a chance in the first three games, Maryland 
could go all the way this year. Coach Nugent says, "I have 
the utmost faith and confidence in the team." 

SOCCER 

NUMBER TWO IN THE NATION! 
Scoring 50 goals (a new season record) the soccer team 
won 9 games, lost 2, tied one, and almost went all the way 
in the NCAA Championship tournament. Maryland lost in 
the finals to the national champion, St. Louis, after beating 
Connecticut 4-0, and previously undefeated Rutgers 4-3 in 



107 



overtime. The ACC record is 30-0-1 for the eight years 
in the conference. Overall, Maryland is 106-23-8. Top 
hooters were Ail-American Bob Vosswinkle, Dick Romine, 
Juan Carlos Martin, and high-scoring Cliff Krug, who set a 
new ACC record with five goals against Johns Hopkins and 
26 for the season. Other top men are Oyston Tertemis, 
Richard Bruckner, and Louis Velarde. Even though we lost 
some top men through graduation and we face the toughest 
schedule ever, this year's season looks bright. 

BASKETBALL 

Coach Bud Millikan lost two top men in Bob McDonald 
and Bob Wilson, but the future looks good with Bruce 
Kelleher, Paul Jelus, Bill Stasiulatis, Jerry Greenspan, and 
Bob Eicher returning. Backing them up are Ted Marshall, 
Connie Carpenter, George Hoder, and Dave Schroeder, with 
6'9" Scott Ferguson and 6'2" Rudy Zatezala coming up 
from the freshman team. 

Tough opposition is expected from the ACC teams as 
usual. Maryland's traditional rivalry with Navy will be re- 
newed, as well as the one with North Carolina. Maryland 
has beaten Navy the past two years by one point. 

Last season's record was 14 and 12. Several Maryland 
and fieldhouse records were set, and McDonald and Stasiu- 
latis racked up some impressive free throw percentages. 
Maryland will again try to win the D. C. area crown, play- 



108 



ing Georgetown and George Washington both twice during 
the season, 

WRESTLING 

Maryland's unbelievable wrestling squad did it again — 
it won the ACC championship for the eighth consecutive 
year. But this feat was overshadowed by the fact that 
the Terps took all ten individual matches. To top it off, 
Gene Kerin set a record by being selected as the outstanding 
wrestler of the meet for the second consecutive year. Mary- 
land's only losses were close ones to Pitt and Penn State, 
two of the best nationally. Coach Sully Krouse's Terps have 
never lost in ACC competition, and every conference champ- 
ion will be back this year. We are fortunate in this respect, 
because this year's schedule is the toughest yet. Such 
teams as Oaklahoma, Penn State, and Pitt will be giving 
Maryland stiff competition. Ron Maunder, Gene Kerin, 
Roger Shoals, John Sikora, Gary Wikander, and Bob Burton 
are a few of the names you'll be hearing quite a bit this 
year. 

CROSS COUNTRY 

Headed by Guy Harper, Jon Garten, and Mark Wells, 
cross country swept through six dual meets, five in the 
ACC and one with Navy, undefeated. Unfortunately Mary- 
land lost to Duke, a team it had beaten 17-43 in a season 



109 



dual meet, during the ACC championships held here. Coach 
Jim Kehoe expects the team to be very strong again this 
year with promising sophomores John Irby and Leonard 
Patrick up from the Freshman team. Maryland won two 
consecutive ACC championships in 1954-55 and 1955-56. 

INDOOR AND OUTDOOR TRACK 

Again Maryland swept the ACC Indoor Team champion- 
ships — 'for the sixth consecutive time. Nine out of thirteen 
individual events were won by the Terps. This was also the 
seventh championship in eight years. Butch Speigel in the 
60 yard dash, Bill Johnson (also IC4A champion) in the 70 
yard high hurdles, and John Belitza in the pole vault were 
just three of the outstanding cindermen. Others included 
Rod Lambert, Dick Smith, Jim Bland, and Dick Estes. 

Maryland's mile and two mile relay teams won ACC 
championships, the mile relay team setting a new confer- 
ence record of 3:24.1. 

Outdoor track was equally successful, with the Terps 
taking the ACC and DCAAU meets handily. The men who 
sparked the indoor team did even better outdoors. Several 
new records, ACC and University, were set. Nick Kovala- 
kides was outstanding in both the javelin and discus. Jon 
Garten, Wayne Smith, and Rod Lambert also deserve re- 
cognition. Next season looks bright, as usual. 



no 



RIFLE 

Although not particularly successful during the season, 
Maryland's team fired brilliantly in the first ACC Rifle 
Tournament and in their section of the National Rifle As- 
sociation sectionals held here at College Park, winning both 
championships. Phil Hansen won the ACC individual title 
with a fine 289, and Craig Hardy won the NRA sectional 
title with a 290, beating defending champion Walter Hutch- 
ison of Navy. Other fine Terp shooters are Allan Leaman, 
Nicholas Toth, and John Schmidt. S/Sgt. BiU Holland is 
head coach. 

SWIMMING 

Once again the Terps won the ACC Championship, but 
had to share it with North Carolina and North Carolina 
State. Maryland won the 1959-60 championships outright. 
After losing a close meet with North Carolina State, Mary- 
land won several meets until stopped by Navy in the last 
event of the meet. Navy had just snapped Yale's fantastic 
winning streak. The Terrapins then bounced back to beat 
North Carolina just after the Tar Heels had beaten North 
Carolina State. Ray Ostrander tied the conference 50 yard 
freestyle record with a new meet record of 22.6. Dave 
Fleming set a new conference and meet record of 56.4 in 
the 100 yard butterfly. Next season should be even better 
than 1960-61. Hugh Roddin, Ted Lupien, Mike Shaverly, 



in 



and Jerry Greenberg are some of the top sophom'ores. 

LACROSSE 

A lack of reserve strength was the factor which stopped 
an otherwise excellent team from again taking a national 
championship spot. Maryland lost to Army, Johns Hopkins, 
and Navy in overtime. Coaches Jack Faber and Al Heagy's 
team led the Baltimore Lacrosse Club until the last minutes 
in a game which wasn't even supposed to be close. Often- 
times superb, the Terps were unable to continue this type 
of play toward the end of the game. Buddy Beardmore, 
All-American, Fritz Waidner, 2nd Team All-American, Bob- 
by Lemken, honorable mention All-American, Bill Chamb- 
ers, Walt Durigg, and a surprising Duke Bowen were some 
of Maryland's outstanding players. Many fine stickmen will 
return next season; but some of Maryland's top men were 
lost through graduation. 

TENNIS 

Key men back this year are Charlie Shapiro, Bill Stasi- 
ulatis, and John Nogrady. Chuck Ableson was Maryland's 
number one singles man, although not able to play in all 
the season matches or in the ACC Tournament. Coach 
Doyle Royal's team compiled an 8-4 record overall and 5-2 
in the Conference. Four regulars were lost from the pre- 
vious year's team, putting Maryland at a distinct disadvan- 



112 



tage. Nevertheless, we took third place in the ACC. Next 
season looks good with the addition of transfer student 
Barry Cleveland to the squad, along with Gene Gerber, 
Lou Dobies, and Tom Marcellino up from the undefeated 
freshman team, 

GOLF 

Coach Frank Cronin's golf team had an outstanding sea- 
son, although runner-up to Duke in the ACC tournament 
held here. The Terp's only other loss was in a triangular 
meet with Wake Forest and North Carolina State. Maryland 
has won its last 19 season matches at home; 24 of 25 in 
the past three years; and 35 of 36 over the past four years. 
Paul Quinn, Ronnie Righter, and Ron Scales are three of 
Maryland's best, along with Tom Bartolec and Curt That- 
cher. Upcoming Vernon Novak, a sophomore, shares the 
course record of a five under par 67 with Paul Quinn. 
Next season's team figures to give the golfers their first ACC 
Championship. 

BASEBALL 

Highlight of "Jack" Jackson's first year as baseball 
mentor was Maryland's win over defending champion North 
Carolina here. Stronger pitchers up from the freshman 
squad are expected to bolster the pitching staff this year. 
Maryland loses stars Don Brown, Phil Rodgers, and George 



1 13 



Klinedinst, but consistent Tommy Brown and Jim Fowler 
will return to what is expected to be a winning season. 
Last year's mark was 8-12. 

INTRAMURALS 

Intramurals have grown from obscurity to a major cam- 
pus activity. Last year over 3,000 Greeks and Independents 
participated in touch football, basketball, softball, wrestling, 
golf, tennis, cross country bowling, weightlifting, badmin- 
ton, volley ball, table tennis, and others. Although the 
fraternity teams have dominated University championships 
in the past, some strong independent teams have recently 
been challenging this monopoly. All of which makes for 
keen competition, and keeps up the quality of ball being 
played. All undergraduate men are eligible to play intra- 
mural sports; the one restriction being that only pledges 
and undergraduate actives may play fraternity ball. Infor- 
mation about intramurals may be obtained from Coach Ke- 
hoe at the Intramural Office in the Armory, or by calling 
EXT. 470. 

WOMEN'S RECREATION ASSOCIATION 

The Women's Recreation Association directs women's 
intramurals and athletic tournaments. Every coed is auto- 
matically a member and is urged to participate. Bobbi 
Hastings '62 is president, and can be contacted at the Tri- 
Delt House. 



14 



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HONORARY SOCIETIES 

THESE ORGANIZATIONS ARE of either a national 
or local nature. They give recognition to students who have 
distinguished themselves in various fields. Membership is 
selective; and is based on leadership, scholarship, achieve- 
ment or a combination, depending upon the society. Us- 
ually, the programs of these organizations are confined to 
annual banquets, the selection and initiation of members, 
and the carrying out of traditional service projects. 

NATIONAL SOCIETIES 

ALPHA DELTA SIGMA— Advertising 

ALPHA KAPPA DELTA— Men's Sociology 

ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA— Women's Freshman Scholar- 
ship 

ARNOLD AIR SOCIETY— Advanced ROTC 

BETA GAMMA SIGMA— Commerce 

CHI EPSILON— Civil Engineering 

ETA KAPPA NU— Electrical Engineering 

KAPPA KAPPA PSI— Men's Band 

MORTAR BOARD— Senior Women— Leadership, Service, 
and scholarship 

NATIONAL COLLEGIATE PLAYERS— Dramatics 

OMICRON DELTA KAPPA— Men's— Leadership, Scholar- 
ship 

OMICRON NU— Home Economics 

PERSHING RIFLES— Basic ROTC 

PHI ALPHA THET A— History 

116 



PHI ETA SIGMA— Men's Freshman Scholarship 
PHI KAPPA PHI— Senior Scholastic 
PHI SIGMA— Biology 
PI DELTA EPSILON— Journalism 
PI SIGMA ALPHA— Political Science 
PI TAU SIGMA— Mechanical Engineering 
PSI CHI— Psychology 

SCABBARD AND BLADE— Advanced ROTC 
SIGMA PI SIGMA— Physics 
TAU BETA PI— Engineering 
TAU BETA SIGMA— Women's Band 
TAU KAPPA ALPHA— Debate 

WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES AND COL- 
LEGES — Overall achievement 

LOCAL SOCIETIES 
DIADEM — Sophomore Women's Achievement 
DIAMOND — Sorority Achievement 
KALEGETHOS— Fraternity Achievement 
PHI ALPHA EPSILON— Physical Education 
SIGMA TAU EPSILON— Women's Recreation 
VANDENBURG— ROTC 
VARSITY "M" CLUB— Varsity Athletics 

NATIONAL PROFESSIONAL SOCIETIES 
ALPHA CHI SIGMA— Chemistry 
ALPHA ZET A— Agriculture 

117 



BETA ALPHA PSI— Accounting 

DELTA NU ALPHA— Transportation 

DELTA SIGMA PI— Business 

GAMMA THETA UPS I LON— Geography 

IOTA LAMBDA SIGMA— Industrial Education 

PHI CHI THETA— Women's Business 

PHI DELTA KAPPA— Men's Education 

PHI MU ALPHA SINFONIA— Men's Music 

PI ALPHA XI— Floriculture 

PI MU EPSILON— Mathematics 

SIGMA ALPHA ETA— Speech Therapy 

SIGMA ALPHA IOTA— Women's Music 

SIGMA ALPHA OMICRON— Bacteriology 

SIGMA DELTA CHI— JournaHsm 

SIGMA PHI SIGMA— Zoology 

GENERAL ORGANIZATIONS 
These groups give students the opportunity to pursue 
their special interests outside the classroom. A few se- 
lected activities can take as much time as a part-time job. 

ORGAN IZ A TION ADVISER 

ACCOUNTING CLUB— Professor Leroy Lee 
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING CLUB— Dr. Wesley 

Hariss 
AGRICULTURAL STUDENT COUNCIL 
AGRONOMY CLUB— Dr. Kresge, Dr. Clark 
ALPHA PHI OMEGA— Mr. George Fogg 

118 



AMATEUR RADIO CLUB-(W3EAX) 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERS— 

Dr. Albert Gomezplata 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS 
AND INSTITUTE OF RADIO ENGINEERS 

AMERICAN PUBLIC RELATIONS ASSOCIATION— Maj. 

J. Casey 

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS— Prof. Pi- 
per 

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS— 
Prof. Sayre 

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MILITARY ENGINEERS-Maj. 
J. Casey 

ANGEL FLIGHT— Captain Sluss 

AQUALINERS— Miss Freundschuh 

BLOCK AND BRIDLE CLUB— Dr. Edgar Young 

BRIDGE CLUB— Mr. Bill Hoff 

CALVERT DEBATE SOCIETY— Mr. Milton H. Copeland 

CAMPUS CHEST— Dean Julia Billings 

CHAPEL CHOIR— Prof. Fague Springmann 

CHESS CLUB— Mr. Robert Gauntt 

CHINESE STUDENT CLUB— Dr. C. C. Chen 

CIVIL WAR CLUB— Dr. David S. Sparks 

COLLEGIATE 4-H— Mr. Loren Goyen 

DAIRY SCIENCE CLUB— Dr. Joseph Mattick 

ECONOMICS DISCUSSION CLUB— Dr. Allen Gruchy 

FLYING FOLLIES— Mr. Alfred Danegger 

119 



FREE STATE POLITICAL PARTY 

FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA— Mr. C. R. Smith 

GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA SERVICE SORORITY— Mrs. G. 

Dutton 
GRADUATE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION— Dean Praal 
GYMKANA TROUPE— Mr. Charles Witten 
HOME ECONOMICS CLUB— Miss Eileen Heagney 
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION— Dr. Donald 

Maley 
INSTITUTE OF AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES— Dr. John 

Weske 
INTERNATIONAL CLUB— Prof. Furman Bridgers 
JUDO CLUB— Mr. M. Higashi 
LOUISA PARSONS NURSING CLUB— Dean Margaret 

Hayes 
MARYLAND FLYING ASSOCIATION, INC.— Capt. D. 

Cor rick 
MARYLAND MARKETING ASSOCIATION— Dr. Allan 

Cook 
MEN'S GLEE CLUB— Mr. Paul Traver 
MODERN DANCE CLUB— Miss Dorothy Madden 
MR. AND MRS. CLUB 
NATIONAL SOCIETY OF INTERIOR DESIGNERS— Miss 

Woodlock 
OLD LINE POLITICAL PARTY 
OLYMPIC BARBELL CLUB— Mr. Harold Freeman 
PHILOSOPHY CLUB— Dr. Peter Diamodopoulos 
PHYSICAL THERAPY CLUB— Miss Ruth Hall 

120 



POLITICAL SCIENCE CLUB— Dr. Elbert Byrd 
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB— Dr. William S. Verplanck 
RED CROSS STUDENT UNIT— Dean Julia Billings 
SAILING CLUB— Mr. Charles Barett 
SGA PEP CLUB— Mr. George Kaludis 
SOCIETY FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF MANAGE- 
MENT— Mr. C. C. Spivey 
SOCIOLOGY CLUB— Dr. Bruce Melvin 
SPANISH CLUB— Dr. G. P. Nemes 
STUDENT NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION 
TERRAPIN SKI CLUB— Dean Doyle Royal 
TERRAPIN STUDENT CLUB— Dr. John Axley 
UKRAINIAN STUDENT CLUB— Dr. Arne Hansen 
UNIVERSITY BAND— Prof. Hugh Henderson 
UNIVERSITY COMMUTERS CLUB— Dean Marian John- 
son 
UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA— Prof. Joel Berman 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND RECREATION SOCIETY 

— Dr. Harvey 
UNIVERSITY THEATRE— Mr. Rudolph Pugliese 
VETERANS' CLUB 

VETERINARY SCIENCE CLUB— Dr. James Sperry 
WOMEN'S CHORUS— Mr. Paul Traver 
WOMEN'S PROFESSIONAL CLUB— Dr. Dorothy Mohr 
WOMEN'S RECREATION ASSOCIATION— Miss Ethel 

Kessler 
YOUNG DEMOCRATS CLUB— Dr. V. Chatelain 
YOUNG REPUBLICANS CLUB 

121 



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SPIRIT 



UNDER THE DIRECTION of Jordan 'Obe" Obertier, 
'63, the SGA Pep Committee has assumed responsibility 
for the cheerleading squad, and together they have formed 
the Maryland Pep Club. Membership in this club will be 
selective, with campus leaders heading the list. The purpose 
of the club is to promote spirit and cheering, and to form 
a core of reliable people to compose the card section. 

1961-62 Cheerleaders 

Linda Cook '62 Alice Gumper '62 

Joanna Cato '63 Reggie Klein '63 

Julia Cobey '62 Judy Wueste '63 

"OBE" 



SONGS 



ALMA MATER 
Hail! Alma Mater! 
Hail to thee Maryland! 
Steadfast in loyalty 
For thee we stand. 
Love for the black and gold 
Deep in our hearts we hold, 
Singing thy praise forever 
Throughout the land. 



124 



MARYLAND VICTORY SONG 

Maryland we're all behind you, 

Wave high the black and gold. 

For there is nothing half so glorious 

As to see our team victorious. 

We've got the steam boys, 

We've got the team boys, 

So keep on fighting, don't give in! 

M-A-R-Y-L-A-N-D (yell) 

Maryland will win! 

SONS OF OLD MARYLAND 
Sons of old Maryland, 
Old Maryland needs you! 
Stand by your colors, boys, 
And to them e're be true! 
Fight for old Maryland! 
Old Liners stand. 
Defenders of the black and gold 
Throughout the land! 



125 



CHEERS 



MARYLAND DRINKING SONG 

Drink to the Terrapin! 

All bold-hearted men. 

We have no fear of hell, 

For we're loyal sons and fellows. 

Drink to the Terrapin ! 

May God bless her sons! 

When the toast is in the cup, 

Bottoms up! Bottoms up! 

To Maryland! 



MARYLAND LOCOMOTIVE 

M-M-M-M 

A-A-A-A 

R-R-R-R 

(etc., spelling MARYLAND) 

Mary Land! 

Fight, Team, Fi-ht! 

SOUND OFF 

(leaders) Sound off! 



(stands) 


One! Two! 


(leaders) 


Hit it again! 


(stands) 


Three! Four! 


(leaders) 


Maryland Count! 


(all) 


M-A-R-Y-L-A (pause) N-D! 




126 



GIMMEE-GIMMEE 


(leaders) 


Gimmee an M! 


(stands) 


M . . .! 


(leaders) 


Gimmee an A! 


(stands) 


A . . .! 


(etc., 


spelling MARYLAND) 


(leaders) 


What have you got? 


(stands) 


MARYLAND! 


MARYLAND STUHER 


M! M! M-A-R-Y 


L! L! L-A-N-D 


M-A-R-Y 




L-A-N-D 




Fight, Team, 


Fight! 


LONG CHEER SHORT CHEER 


(leaders) 


Give me a long cheer, 


(stands) 


Yeaa . . . 


(leaders) 


Give me a short cheer, 


(stands) 


Yeaaa . . . 


(leaders) 


Give me a silent cheer, 



(stands) 



(extend arm only.) 



127 



GREEK 

THE INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL 
WELCOMES 

The Class of 1965 

ALPHA EPSILON PI Juniper 5-6897 

13 Fraternity Row 

Founded at New York University -191?, 
ALPHA GAMMA RHO Warfield 7-9831 

7511 Princeton Avenue 

Founded at Ohio State-1904 
ALPHA TAU OMEGA Warfield 7-9769 

4611 College Avenue 

Founded at VMl-1863 
DELTA SIGMA PHI Warfield 7-9770 

4300 Knox Road 

Founded at City College of New York-1899 
DELTA TAU DELTA Union 4-9780 

3 Fraternity Row^ 

Founded at Bethany College-1859 
KAPPA ALPHA Union 4-9504 

1 Fraternity Row 

Founded at Washington and Z-ee-1865 
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA Warfield 7-9778 

6 Fraternity Row 

Founded at Bos'on University-1909 
PHI DELTA THETA Warfield 7-9884 

4605 College Avenue 

Founded at Miami Univrsity, at Oxford 
O/i/o-1848 
PHI KAPPA SIGMA Union 4-9828 

5 Fraternity Row 

Founded at University of Pennsylvania-lS50 
PHI KAPPA TAU ' ' Union 4-9886 

Campus 

Founded at Miami University, at Oxford, 
Ohio-1906 



128 



PATRONS 

THE PANHELLENIC COUNCIL 

WELCOMES 

The Class of 1965 



ALPHA CHI OMEGA Union 4-9893 

4525 College Avenue 

Founded at DePauiv University-1885 
ALPHA DELTA PI Warfield 7-9864 

4603 College Avenue 

Founded at Wesleyan Female College-1851 
ALPHA EPSILON PHI Warfield 7-9701 

11 Fraternity Row 

Founded at Barnard College-1909 
ALPHA GAMMA DELTA Union 4-9806 

4535 College Avenue 

Fo'inded at Syracuse University-190'i 
ALPHA OMICRON PI Warfield 7-9871 

4517 College Avenue 

Founded at Barnard College-lS97 
ALPHA PHI 

4210-A Knox Road 

Founded at Syracuse University-1872 
ALPHA XI DELTA Warfield 7-9720 

4517 Knox Road 

Founded at Lombard College-1893 
DELTA DELTA DELTA Union 4-9491 

4604 College Avenue 

Founded at Boston University-lSSS 
DELTA GAMMA Warfield 7-9844 

4502 College Avenue 

Founded at Lewis School-lS73 
DELTA PHI EPSILON 

Box 85, Stud-nt Union 

Founded at Neu; York Universi(y-I9n 
GAMMA PHI BETA Warfield 7-9773 

9 Eraternity Row 

Founded at Syracuse University -187 4 



129 



N 



FRATERNITIES 



PHI SIGMA DELTA Warfield 7-9557 

4609 College Avenue 

Founded at Columbia University -1909 
PHI SIGMA KAPPA Union 4-9851 

7 Fraternity Row 

Founded at Massachusetts Agricultural 
College-lS73 
PI KAPPA ALPHA 

7514 Rhode Island Avenue (Old House) 

Founded at University of Virginia-lS6S 
SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON Warfield 7-9709 

4 Fraternity Row 

Founded at Univrsity of Alabama-lS56 
SIGMA ALPHA MU Warfield 7-9845 

2 Fraternity Row 

Founded at City College of New York-1909 
SIGMA CHI Union 4-9807 

4600 Norwich Road 

Founded at Miami University, Oxford, 
Ohio-lS55 
SIGMA NU Warfield 7-9563 

4617 Norwich Road 

Founded at VMI-1868 
SIGMA PHI EPSILON Warfield 7-7560 

7403 Hopkins Avenue 

Founded at University of Richmond-1901 
SIGMA PI Warfield 7-9673 

4302 Knox Road' 

Founded at Vincennes University -1891 
TAU EPSILON PHI Union 4-9513 

4607 Knox Road 

Founded at Columbia University-1910 . 
TAU KAPPA EPSILON Union 4-9765 

Campus 

Founded at Illinois Wesleyan-lS99 
THETA CHI Union 4-9883 

7401 Princeton Avenue 

Founded at Norivich University-1856 
ZETA BETA TAU Union 4-9786 

4400 Knox Road 
Founded at New York University-lS98 



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SORORITIES 



Nu 



KAPPA ALPHA THETA Union 4-9829 

8 Fraternity Row 

Founded at DePauw University-lSlO 
KAPPA DELTA Warfield 7-9759 

4610 College Avenue 

Founded at Virginia State Normal-lS97 
KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA Warfield 7-9886 

7407 Princeton Avenue 

Founded at Monmouth College-lSlO 
PHI SIGMA SIGMA Wariield 7-9828 

4531 College Avenue 

Founded at Hunter Colleg^-1913 
PI BETA PHI Union 4-9885 

12 Fraternity Row 

Founded at Monmouth College-lS67 
SIGMA DELTA TAU Warfield 7-9513 

Campus 

Founded at Cornell University-1911 
SIGMA KAPPA Warfield 7-9861 

10 Fraternity Row 

Founded at Colby College-lS74> 



Xi 



Omicron 



Rho 



Sigma 



Tau 



Upsilon 

Phi 

Chi 

Psi 

Omega 



131 



AROUND THE TOWN 

TO AID YOU further, this list of firms and businesses 
is included. On these next few pages there are firms which 
can provide most of the services you will need in the coming 
year. 

COLLEGE PARK AREA 

Automobiles 

Lustine Chevrolet, Oldsmobile, and Fiat (Wa. 7-7200), 

5710 Baltimore Avenue, Hyattsville. 
Banks 

Suburban Trust Company (JU. 8-5000), 7360 Balti- 
more Boulevard, C. P. 
Barber Shops 

Anthony's Barber Shop (WA. 7-9608), 7419 Balti- 

more Boulevard, C. P. 

Old Line Barber Shop (UN. 4-9772), 7414 Bait. Blvd. 
Beauty Shops 

Lorraine Hair Stylists (UN. 4-5015, UN. 4-5060), 3110 

Queen's Chapel Ptoad, Hyattsville. 

Martini Hairdressers (WA. 7-9641), 7244 Bait. Blvd. 

. . . exclusive, but not expensive . . . 

Novel's Hair Stylist (WA. 7-2800), 7421 Bait. Blvd. 

. . . convenient, skillful , . . 
Books, Art and Engineering Supplies 

College Park Gift Shop (AP. 7-3900), 7334 Bait. Blvd. 

: . . Dietzgen, Pickett . . . known brands . . . framing . . . 

Maryland Book Exchange (WA. 7-2510), 4500 College 

Ave. . . . large selection . . . books and supplies . . . 

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Student Supply Store, University of Maryland, C. P. 

. . . new-used texts . . . bought and sold . . . 
Department Stores 

Lansburgh's (NA. 8-9800), Langley Park, Maryland. 

The Hecht Company (AP. 7-3400) , Prince Georges Plz. 
Drug Stores 

Albrecht's Pharmacy (WA. 7-3838), Corner of College 

Avenue and Baltimore Boulevard, C. P. . . . all drug- 
store items . . . lunch counter . . . 
Florists 

Bon La Che Florist (WA. 7-1655), Knox Road, C. P. 

. . . best for less . . . new management . . . 
Gas Stations 

Chaney's Garage (UN. 4-3400), 7505 Baltimore Blvd. 

College Park Esso (WA. 7-9835), 7110 Baltimore Blvd. 
Gifts 

College Park Gift Shop (AP. 7-3900) , 7334 Bah. Blvd. 

. . . all the world here, why go elsewhere . . . 
Hardware 

College Park Hardware (UN. 4-1185), 7350 Baltimore 

Boulevard, College Park. 

. . . everything in hardware . . . garden supplies . . . 

HyattsviUe Hardware Co. Inc. (WA. 7-1915), 5121 

Baltimore Avenue, HyattsviUe Md. 
Insurance 

Thos. F. Rosewag Assoc. (AP. 7-3550), 4505 Knox 

Road. 
Jewelery and Watch Shops 

College Park Watch Shop (WA. 7-6800) , 7406 Balti- 
more Boulevard. 

133 



... all types of repair . . . jewelry, cards . . . 

Hanley Jewelers (WA. 7-8102), 5119 Baltimore Ave- 
nue Hyattsville, Md. 

Lisenbee's Jewelry Company (WA. 7-4706), 5219 Bal- 
timore Avenue, Hyattsville, Md. 

Wolpe Jewelers (UN. 4-0444), College Park Shop 

Center. 

. . . since 1910 . . . class rings . . . watch repair . . . 

Castelberg's Jewelers (HE. 4-3135), 7690 N. Hamp. 

Ave., Langley Park. 
Laundry and Dry Cleaning 

Finercraft Valets (AP. 7-1222), 7411 Baltimore Blvd. 

. . . drycleaning, tux rental, shoe repair . . . 

Topper Cleaners (WA. 7-1845), 7408 Baltimore Blvd. 

. . . quick, efficent service . . . 
Mens Clothing 

Everett Simon Men's Wear (WA. 7-9663), College 

Park Shopping Center. 

. . . college clothes at reduced prices . . . 

Herbie Kaye's University Shop (WA. 7-9400), 7417 

Baltimore Boulevard. 

... all men's needs, reasonable prices . . . 

Old Squire Shoppe (UN. 4-9299), 7402 Baltimore Blvd. 

. . . new management . . . good luck . . . 

Powers and Goode (WA. 7-0421), 4509 College Ave. 

. . . quality men's clothing . . . 
Motels 

Royal Pine Motel (WE. 5-0311), 9113 Baltimore Blvd. 

134 



Music 

House of Sound (AP. 7-2500), 4410 Knox Road, C. P. 

. . . records, phonos . . . radios , . . 
Optometrists 

Dr. H. Parmet (WA. 7-6165), 7402 Baltimore Ave. 

C.P. 
Printing 

Allen Printing Service (UN. 4-9719), 5303 Baltimore 

Avenue, Hyattsville, Md. 
Restaurants 

College Park Delicatessen (UN. 4-4101), 7400 Balti- 
more Ave. C. P. 

. . . made to order snacks, take out . . . 

Howard Johnson's (HE. 9-3161), University. Blvd. E. 

Adelphi. 

New Asia Restuarant (UN. 4-0200), 3114 Queens Chap- 
el Road, Hyattsville. 

Town Hall Restuarant (TO. 9-6322), 8135 Bait. Blvd. 

... 1/2 price pizza Tuesday, other specials . . . 

Varsity Grill (WA. 7-2866), 7410 Baltimore Blvd. 

. . . cafeteria, close, convenient . . . 
Sports Equipment 

The Varsity Sport Shop (UN. 4-4441), 7501 Baltimore 

Avenue, C. P. 

. . . C. P.'s only sports store . . . 
Toys and Hobbies 

College Park Trading Post (WA. 7-7666), 7310 Balti- 
more Ave. C. P. 

. . . everything in hobbies . . . 

135 



TV Service 

College Park TV Service, Inc. (WE. 5-5366), 9409 

Baltimore Blvd. 
Women s Clothing 

Karen Ames (UN. 4-6944), College Park Shop Center. 

. . . Ladie's ready-to-wear shop in C. P. . . . 

WASHINGTON METROPOLITAN AREA 

Night Clubs 

Hayloft Rock and Roll Night Club (NA. 8-3410), 1411 
"H" St. N. W., Wash., D. C. 

Restuarants 

Water Gate Inn, (DI. 7-9256), On-the-Potmac at "F" 
Street, N. W. 

Formal Wear 

Hannes Formal Wear (JU. 9-0505), 8229 Georgia Ave- 
nue, Silver Spring, Md. 

Motels 

Diplomat Motor Hotel (LA. 6-1400), 1850 New York 

Avenue, N. E., Wash., D. C. 
Soft Drink Companies 

Washington Coca-Cola Bottling Company, Inc. (JU. 5- 

3100), Silver Spring, Maryland. 

BALTIMORE METROPOLITAN AREA 

Jewelry 

L. G. Balfour Co. (Tom Wieczorek), 404 West Sara- 
toga Street, Suite 201-201A. Bait. 1, Md. 



136