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Full text of "The "M" book of the University of Maryland"

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NAME 

ADDRESS 

TELEPHONE NUMBER 



I 



ALMA MATER 

Hail! A J ma Mater! 
Hail to tJicc, Maryland! 
Steadfast in loyalty 
for thee we stand. 
Love for the baek and gold. 
Deep in our hearts we hold, 
Singi}ig thy praise forever, 
TJirouiiliout the land. 




lARLE OF CONTENTS 

hlistory (Uid Traditions 6 

C,(il('H(hir of Events 9 

AdniinistTdtiofi 11 

Academics 21 

Student Goxiernnient 35 

Publications 49 

Relio^ion 55 

()r^j^a)iizatio)hs 61 

Kntertainnieiit 71 

Athletics 79 

C.onnnuters 95 

Greeks 105 

Dortnitories 121 

(la})ipus Services 127 

Stndent Union 139 

Whom to See 147 

Maf) of University 150 

So)i<!^s and Cheers 152 

Around the Town 154 

Index 759 

3 



f^ 







DEDICATED TO: 

Miss Janyce Notopoulos 
In dedicating the 1968 M Book, the SGA is 
proud to honor the new Assistant Dean of 
Women for Student Life, Janyce Notopoulos. In 
her capacity as advisor to the Panhellenic Coun- 
cil and the Denton Hall Judicial Board, Dean 
Notopoulos has proven herself a capable ad- 
ministrator and source of inspiration to the stu- 
dents. She has sparked new life into the Greek 
system and has ignited new ideas for its growth. 
She has likewise inspired the independent wom- 
en to strive for higher goals and greater con- 
tributions to the University. 

Although it is unusual to dedicate a publi- 
cation to an administrator who has only been 
here for one year, we feel that her untiring ef- 
forts and sincere dedication to the welfare of 
the students have been more than deserving of 
this honor. 




A Message to the Class of 1^6S 

On behalf of the Student Gov- 
ernment Association of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, I bid you wel- 
come. You will hear the word "wel- 
come" many times in this opening 
week of school. But for you, the 
freshman it will take on a new 
meaning. It will mean welcome to 
self-dependence to a greater extent 
than you have ])reviously experienced. It will 
mean welcome to a new academic environment. 
It will mean welcome to a new world of extra 
curricular activities. The word welcome looms 
large on your horizon. But greater than the word 
itself are the Challenges that the word represents. 

For those who fail to realize the challenges or 
who simply neglect them I can only say your 
college experience will be like a black and white 
photograph, sufficient and representative. But 
to those students who have the initiative and 
the ability to grasp the challenges of academics, 
self-dependence and extra-curricidar activities, 
yoin- life will be like a color photograph, a 
little more than sufficient and a little more than 
representative. 

I say to each and everyone of you, set your 
goals high and seek them out. It is not failure 
that is a crime, but rather, low aims. 

Good luck to you in all your endeavors. 

Mike M en del son ^ 
SGA President 



u - ^^ 

HISTORY 

A dateline ol even is }3iececles the uuilding )f 
any great institution. The University of Mary- 
hmd can proudly boast a long series of occur- 
rences which have contributed to its present posi- 
tion of prestige. 

BALTIMORE (JAMPUS HISTORY 

The B('<yi)i)U)}(y 

1807 The College of Medicine established as 

the first school of the University fol- 

loAved by: 

]H2?> The School of Law-th. ..ih 
law school founded in the United 
States 

1882 The School of Dentistry-the first 
such school in the world thus 
making dentistry the only profes- 
sion ever to be established in the 
United States 

1889 The School of Nursing— founded 
by Louisa Parsons with direct 
operation from Florence Night- 
ingale 

1901 The Maryland College of Phar- 
macy 

COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS HISTORY 

1856 The Maryland Agricultural School was 
established as the first agricultural col- 
lege in the United States on an estate 
pmxhased from Charles B. Calvert, 
Esquire. 



1862 The ^^olrill Land Grant Act was passed 
by Congress allowing Maryland, a par- 
tially state-owned institution, to be one 
of the first to benefit from federal aid 
to education. 

1914 Maryland become wholly a state institu- 
tion. 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

1920 The Baltimore professional schools 
merged with Maryland State College at 
College Park to form the EJniversity. 

( ■ '^^'KAS 

19h/ The College of Special and Continua- 
tion Studies provided classroom courses 
equijjped wnth approved instructors for 
a program of tremendotis size in other 
countries. 



TRADITIONS ^ 

In a large iniiversity thousands of students 
may walk day after day on the same campus, 
often unaccpiainted with each other. What basic 
element holds this group together? Traditions— 
they serve as the essence of that which every stu- 
dent can tinn to and call his own. Exactly what 
are his possessions? 

1 set of well-used chimes which ring out 

"Maryland, My Maryland" on the hour or 

(lose to it 



1 five hundred pound turtle named Testudo 
who keeps residence in front of McKeldin 
library as an ever-present mascot 

1 ticket or more as lasting symbols of the 
j^erpetual lack of convenient parking spaces 
"on the hill" 

1 remnant of a visit from General Lafayette 
Called Rossborougli Inn found on the Boul- 
evard 

1 Avell de\elo]3ed headache from the usually 
hectic day of registration with an added cry- 
ing-towel for each course closed 

1 muddy fnall, most of the year, to splash 
through several times a day 

2 enjoyable evenings of singing per year as an 
all-Greek effort— H<7r mo??)' Hall and IFC 
Sing 

1 tray to use for "tray sliding" when mud gives 
way to ice and winter fun sets in 

1 spring whirlwind of conventions, parades 
and elections as the proper spirit for usher- 
ing in a new student administration 

1 much frequented Kissing Tunnel which 
serves to enhance even more, beautiful 
spring evenings on campus 

plus 
innimierable memories to carry through and 
beyond a four year experience in living at 
the University of Maryland. 





CALENDAR 

964-65 



OF 



14 



2-9 

.H 

4-5 

5 

6 



in. 11 
Jan. 20 

m. 21-27 



Sun.-Wed. 

iMon.-Fri. 

Mon. 

Thurs.-Sat. 
Sun 

iNTon. 

1 hurs. 

Wed.-Sat. 

Mon.-Sun. 

Tues. 

Wed.-Thius. 

Thurs. 

Fri. 

Sat. 

Thurs. 

Wed. 

Mon. 
Thurs. 
7 lies. 

Mon. 
Fri. 

Thurs. 
Wed. 
rhurs.-Wed. 



FOB Orientation 
Registration 
Max Lerner 

(Cult. Comm.) 
Panhel & IFC Rush 
FOB Orientation 

(Religious Life) 
C^lasses Begin 
National Symphony 
University Theatre 
Greek Week Workshop 
National Elections 
Red Cross Blood Drive 
Harmony Hall 
Honor's Convocation 
IFC^ Presents 
Concert 
Thanksgi\ing Recess 

begins alter last class 
(Classes Resume 8 a.m. 
National Symphony 
(Christmas V^acation 

alter last class 
Classes Resume 
N.Y. (Chamber Music 

Group 
National Symphony 
Pre-Exam Study Day 
Full Semester Exams 



Feb. 2-5 


Tues.-Fri. 


Spring; Registration 


Feb. 4 


Thurs. 


J.F.C. Ball 


Feb. 8 


Mon. 


Classes Begin 


Feb. 11 


Thurs. 


Guitar Quartet 


Feb. 22 


Mon. 


Washington's Birthday- 
Holiday 


Feb. 24 


Wed. 


A.W.S. Conventions 


Feb. 25 


Thurs. 


National Symphony 


Mar. 3-4 


Wed.-Thurs 


Blood Drive 


Mar. 5 


Fri. 


Sophomore Prom 


Mar. 8 


Mon. 


A.W.S. Elections 


Mar. 23-24 


Tues.-Wed. 


S.G.A. Convention 


Mar. 25 


Thurs. 


Champaign Begins 


Mar. 25 


Thurs. 


Maryland Day— 
Not a Holiday 


Mar. 26 


Fri. 


Junior Prom 


Mar. 31 


Wed. 


S.G.A. Elections 


Apr. 6 


Tues. 


A.W.S. Bridal Fair 


Apr. 7 


Wed. 


President's Convocation 


Apr. 8 


Thurs. 


A.W.S. Installation 


Apr. 15 


Thurs. 


Easter Recess- 
after last class 


Apr. 20 


Tues. 


Classes Resume 8 a.m. 


Apr. 22 


Thurs. 


S.G.A. Installation 


May 1 


Sat. 


Freshman Prom 


May 10-15 


Mon. -Sat. 


Spring Greek Week 


May 12 


\Ved. 


AFROTC Day 


May 27 


Thurs. 


Pre-Exam Study Day 


May 27 


Thurs. 


Senior Banquet k Prom 


May 28-June 4 


Fri. -Fri. 


Spring Semester Exams 


May 30" 


Sun. 


Baccalaureate 


May 31 


Mon. 


Memorial Day Holiday 


June 5 


Sat. 


Commencement 



10 



ADMINISTRATION 






W E. 



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11 



A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT 



A WELCOME: 

Welcome to the University of Maryland. You are about to 

enter the most rewarding period of your life. The measure of the reward will 

depend on how well you take advantage of the opportunities you will find here. The 

faculty and staff will cooperate in every way to help you. 

Success and happiness in life, however, are not easily bought. 
They must be achieved through hard work and application. At the University, this means 
keeping a good balance and perspective between scholarship, extra-curricular activities 
and social life. This part of the task is yours. 

I take this opportunity to extend every good wish for a pleasant 
and productive year. 

Sincerely yours, 



Wilson H. Elkins 
President 



13 



President Wilson H. Elkins 

Since Sej3tember, 1954, Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 
has been the President ot the University of 
Maryland. A man of outstanding abilities and 
achievements, Dr. Elkins has guided University 
students toward higher goals in education. 

Dr. Elkins did his imdergraduate work at the 
University of Texas from 1928 to 1932, where he 
was a member of Plii Beta Kappa, Phi Eta Sigma 
and Sigma Nu fraternities. After receiving his 
B.A. and M.A. degrees, he was awarded a Rhodes 
Scholarship to Oxford University, England, 
where he received his Bachelor of Letters and 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Besides these high 
academic achievements. President Elkins demon- 
strated athletic ability during his undergraduate 
and graduate careers at the University of Texas. 

Since he came to the University of Maryland as 
President, he has received two honorary degrees 
from Washington College and Johns Hopkins 
University. 



14 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

1 he Board of Regents is composed of eleven 
members, appointed by the Governor of Mary- 
hmd, for a term of seven years. The President of 
the University serves as the Executive Officer of 
the Board. 

The Board handles and approves University 
jjlans and policies dealing with appropriating 
funds, naming buildings, and appointments. The 
State of Maryland provides that the Board of 
Regents shall also constitute the Maryland State 
Board of Agriculture in order to manage agri- 
culture matters. 

Charles P. McCormick 1966 

Clifiirtna}! 

Edward F. Holter 1968 

Vicc-Chaivjiian 

B. Herbert Brown 1967 

Sccrclary 

Harry H. Nuttle 1966 

Treasurer 

Louis L. Kaplan 1964 

A ss i stunt S ccrct a ry 

Richard W. Case 1970 

William B. Long 1969 

Thomas W. Pangborn 1965 

Thomas B. Symons 1970 

William C. Walsh 1968 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst 1967 



16 




Dr. Hklen Clarke 
Dcfui of Women 

Dean Clarke administers all women's activities 
on campus, including women's discipline, wom- 
en's organizations, and recruitment oi house- 
mothers. She also supervises housing and student 
activities for the Baltimore campus. 
Mr. Gkarv Epplkv 
Dean of Men 

Alter tliirty years ol sei vice to tlic Uni\ersity 
as the first Dean of Men, Dean E])pley retired in 
June, 1961. 

Mr. Frank A. Gray 
Associate Dean of Student Life 

Dean Gray serves as advisor to the Interfrater- 
nity Council. He is in charge of the control and 
review of all University budgets, fiscal and physi- 
cal plant matters. 



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rt 



i 




Miss Julia Billings 

Assistant Demi of Women 

Dean Billings advises all 
women's organizations such as 
AWS, Diadem, Mortar Board, 
Alpha Lambda Delta, and 
Campus Judicial Board. 

Miss Marian Johnson 

Assistant Dean of Women 

Dean Johnson is in charge 
ot women's placement, coun- 
seling, arranging senior inter- 
views and advising the Com- 
muters Association. 



Miss Janvce E. Notopoulos 
Assistant Dean of Women 

Dean Notopoulos acts as 
advisor to the Panhellenic 
Council and the Women's 
Judiciary System of Denton 
Hall. 

Miss Joan McCall 

Assistant Dean of Women 

Dean McCall is director ol 
Women's Housing and is re- 
sponsible for women's resi- 
dence hall staff. 



k 



Dr. Bi rnard Hodinko 
Assist fuii Dean of Student Life 
Dr. Hodinko advises all 
(anipus judiciary systems. He 
also plays an important part 
in men's housing and the cap- 
ital improvement program. 

Mr. TnoNFAs E. Florfstano 
Assist (Hit Dean of Student Life 
Dean Florestano coordin- 
ates all student activities and 
organizations. He is advisor 
to the Student Government 
Association and its subsid- 
iaries, such as the Freshman 
Orientation Program. 

Dr. Fi rman Kridgers 
Assistant Dean of Student Life 
Dr. Briclgers acts as the for- 
eign student advisor and as- 
sists them in adjusting to 
American life and the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 

Mr. Dom.k Royai. 
Assistant Dean of Men 
Mr. Royal is in charge of 
off-campus housing, Chair- 
man of the Traffic Appeals 
lioard, and the Commence- 
ment C^onmiittee, and is coach 
of the soccer and tennis teams. 









Mr. George Kaludis 
Assistant Dean for 

Student Programming 
Dean Kaludis advises the 
Cultural Committee, the In- 
terfraternity Council Presents, 
and Senior Class Presents. 



Mr. George Hooper 
Fraternity Advisor 

Mr. Hooper advises the in- 
dividual fraternity in its ac- 
tivities and serves as sponsor 
of the University cheerleaders. 



ASSISTANTS TO THE PRESIDENT 

Assisting President Elkins on his administra- 
tive staff are: A. O. Kuhn, Executive Vice Presi- 
dent; R. Lee Hornbake, Vice President for Aca- 
demic Affairs; and Alvin E. Cormeny and 
Franklin L. Bentz, both Assistants to the Presi- 
dent. 



20 



lADEMIC INFORMATION 




A major purpose of going to college is to 
lurther one's education. Diligent scholarship is 
a responsibility of the student of higher educa- 
tion; the Freshman, particularly is responsible 
for taking the required courses, taking sufficient 
credits, and planning ahead. 



CLASSES 

Classes are of either 50 or 75 minute diuation 
(the 50 minute class conducted on a 3 day a week 
basis, the 75 minute class on 2 day a week basis). 
If the instructor is late, students are required to 
wait 20 minutes for deans, 15 minutes for doc- 
tors, and 10 minutes for all instructors before dis- 
missing themselves. There are no automatic 
"cuts" (absences) for freshmen (with the ex- 
ception of second semester freshmen who have 
attained a 3.5 average for the previous semester), 
and a report is turned in to the student's dean 
if he has more than three unexcused cuts in a 
class. Instructors may penalize freshmen for ab- 
sences. Excused absences include illness and par- 
ticipation in University activities at the request 
of University authorities. Upperclassmen (soph- 
omores, juniors and seniors) are allowed unlim- 
ited cuts in those courses classified as non-activity 
comses (those in which the student does not 
actively participate as a part of the instruction). 
Although this privilege has been extended, the 
University does not encourage the habit of cut- 
ting class. 



22 



EXAM IN Al IONS 

A ivvo hour exam is held at the end of each 
semester lor each course taken. Graduating sen- 
iors are not requiied to take a fuial exam. No 
notes or books are allowed at final exams. Two 
or three exams are usually given in each course 
during the semester. Only a student with a legal 
excuse will be allowed to make up an exam he 
has missed. 

MARKING SYSTEM 

The following symbols are used for marks: 
A, B, C, D, passing; F, failure; I, incomplete. 
In computing scholastic averages, numerical val- 
ues are assigned to the following marks: A— 4, 
K--i G-2, 1)-1, E-O. 

DEANS SLIPS 

All P'reshmen students doing work below "C" 
le\el after the first 6 weeks of school receive slips 
Irom the dean. (A copy is also sent to the stu- 
dents' j)arents. Though a dean's slip has no bear- 
ing on a final grade, the student shoidd talk with 
his instructor to find out how he can improve 
his work. 

REPEAES AND DROPOUTS 

lioth the original grade and the new grade will 
l)c posted on the student's record and used only 
in computing his average for probation and dis- 
missal. However, only the new grade is used in 
computing tlie o\erall academic average. 



23 



First semester freshmen are allowed to wait 8 
weeks before dropping a course; all other stu- 
dents are allowed 3 weeks. The student must see 
his academic advisor and dean for approval. 
Students should consult the Academic Regula- 
tions booklet })ublished by the University. 

CHANGING COLLEGES 

A student must consult his new dean upon 
transferring colleges. A student with unsatisfac- 
tory records will be placed under control of the 
Office of Intermediate Registration lO.LR.). Un- 
der the O.I.R. program, the student can absolve 
his trial or probationary status and be eligible 
for admission into the new college; eligibility 
must be achieved in one, or at the most, two 
semesters. 

PROBA HON AND DISMISSAL 

A student is placed on academic probation if 
he has not maintained at least a 1.5 average for a 
year's work or if he fails more than 35% of his 
academic work in any one semester. A student 
will be dismissed after he has been on probation 
more than 2 separate times or if he fails 50% or 
more of his academic work in a semester. 

ACADEMIC AND JUNIOR STANDING 

An average of C and a minimum of 56 hours 
of academic work (not including P.E., health or, 
depending on the college, R.O.T.C.) are re- 
(juired for Junior Standing. A student is allowed 

24 



one semester ol grace it he lails to make Junior 
jStancling at the end of the fourth semester. Dis- 
missal will result il it is not achieved at the end 
of the Probationarv semester. 



CX)1]NSEL1N(, C^ENIER 

rhe University maintains the Counseling Cen- 
ter to assist students to maintain a better under- 
standing of themselves and to develop improved 
methods for dealing with vocational choice, ed- 
ucational and personal problems. The Center 
provides an extensive program on reading and 
study skills given on an individual basis on a 
six-week cycle wth two cycles each semester. 
Students pay an annual "Advisory and Testing 
Fee" at the time of registration and are entitled 
to the services of the Counseling Center without 
further charge. Psychological tests of abilities, 
a]3titudes, interests and personality are employed 
when a])}jropriate. The Counseling Center is 
located in Shoemaker Hall. 



TUTORINC; 

Many groups on campus offer free tutoring for 
freshmen. Among these are Phi Eta Sigma and 
Alpha Lambda Delta, the Men's and Women's 
Freshmen Honoraries. The individual depart- 
ments also offer tutoring, though a nominal fee 
may be charged. 

25 



HONORS 

Freshmen who aiLain a 3.5 average are eligible 
ior initiation into the scholastic honoraries 
(either a first semester average or cumulative for 
the year) . Any student who earns a 3.5 is placed 
on the Dean's List, and may enjoy the privileges 
of inilimited cuts and extra late leaves. Each 
year an Honor's Convocation is held to honor 
those sttidents who have maintained an average 
of 3.5 or better for the preceding year. Otitstand- 
ing figures in civic life and five outstanding pro- 
fessors also recei\'e recognition at the Convoca- 
tion. 



DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

At least 120 semester hours (excluding Basic 
AFROTC, Health 2 and 4, and the required 
program in physical education) are required for 
graduation. The requirements in the American 
Civilization Program (nine credit hours of Eng- 
lish—three in comj3osition and six in literatme, 
six hours of history— three in American history 
and the remaining three to be selected as elec- 
tives, two three-hour courses from the fields of 
anthropology, economics, political science, psy- 
chology and sociology, seven hours of science, 
and a requirement of one college-level math 
course) are included in this. An overall "C" or 
2.0 average is required for graduation in all 
colleges. 



26 



4 



V 



.^ 





FINANCIAL AID 

Students who have shown academic abiHty and 
can show financial need may apply for aid 
through scholarships, grants, loans or part time 
employment. A full list of these is published in 
the bulletin. An Adventure in Learning. Mary- 
land residents signing a pledge to teach for two 
years in the state of Maryland following gradua- 
tion will be exempt from paying tuition. 



28 



DEANS OF COLLEGES 

Agrh uUurc Gordkn M. Cairns 

Symons Hall 

Arts (uid Sciences Charles Manning 

Francis Scott Key Hall 

Bus'nicss (Did Public 

Adfninistration Donald W. O'Connell 

B.P.A. Building 

Ediicdlion Vernon E. Anderson 

Skinner Building 

rj)o^i}U'cri)iiy Frederic T. Mavis 

Engineering Building 



Gradudle School Ronald Bamford 

B.P.A. Building 

Hotnc Economics Selma F. Lippeatt 

Margaret Brent Hall 

Physicdl Education, Recreation 

and Health Lester M. Fraley 

Cole Field House 

Unix'ersity College Ray Ehrensberger 

College Park Campus 

29 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

The College of Agriculture provides a num- 
ber of curricula to prepare persons for the wide 
variety of careers open to graduates in agricul- 
tural productions, business, technology and sci- 
ence. All four-year programs lead to the Bache- 
lor of Science degree. 

Curriculums in Agriculture include study in 
the basic physical and biological sciences, in 
liberal arts and social sciences, physical educa- 
tion and military studies, basic studies of the 
entire field of agriculture, and specialized study 
in the students' chosen curriculum. 

Some of the careers which graduates of speci- 
fic curriculums enter are: Agriculture— General 
Agricultural Chemistry, Agricultural Economics; 
Agricultural and Extension Education; Agricul- 
tural Engineering, Agronomy; Animal Science; 
Botany; Dairy Science; Technology; Entomol- 
ogy; Horticulture; Poultry Science. 

C0LLE(;E of ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Established in 1921, the college of Arts and 
Sciences is the largest in the University. Within 
its fifteen departments are the physical sciences, 
the fine arts and the humanities. Graduates may 
earn degrees of Bachelor of Sciences, of Arts 
and of Music. 

An expanding and active college under Dean 
Charles Manning, the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences produces graduates with a full and useful 
academic background. 

30 



C0LLE(;E of business R: 
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Accounting, Real Estate, Transportation, For- 
eign Service, Geography, Government and Poli- 
tics, Journalism and Office Management are 
some of the fields open to BPA students. 

Last year two important projects were initi- 
ated: a program leading to the degree of Master 
of Business Administration, and a joint appoint- 
ment with the Computer Science Center to ad- 
vance computer-related research and instruction. 

Led by the new Dean, Donald W. O'Connell, 
the College of Business and Public Administra- 
tion continues its program of expansion and 
progress. 

collec;e of educa lion 

From the College of Education come teachers 
prepared for classes in nmsery school, kinder- 
garten, elementary school and secondary schools, 
and in fields of special education. 

Established in 1920, the College awards either 
a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Sciences 
degree. 

Headed by Dean Vernon E. Anderson, the 
College of Education provides aspiring teachers 
with practical experience teaching children in 
local schools. 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERINC 

The College of Engineering, headed by Dean 
Frederick Mavis, encourages in its instruction 

31 



and research a vast and varied body of subject 
matter. Students may select from six areas of 
study: Civil, Aeronautical, Chemical, Electrical 
and Mechanical Engineering and Fire Protec- 
tion. To keep abreast of advancements in sci- 
ence and industry, the College must continually 
recognize and supplement its curricula. Pres- 
ently the engineering programs integrate basic 
sciences, engineering sciences, professional stu- 
dies, liberal arts and social studies. 

COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Over 2,000 students, predominately feminine, 
follow courses in the department of Food, Nutri- 
tion, Institutional Administration, Textiles and 
Clothing, Family Life and Management, and 
Practical Art in the College of Home Economics. 

Graduates are prepared to work in various 
technical and commercial fields, education, com- 
munity and family relations. Practical experi- 
ence gained by living in the "Home Manage- 
ment House" gives the girls the chance to apply 
methods and ideas learned in class and actual 
home situations. 

COLLEGE OF 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The College of Physical Education, Recrea- 
tion and Health, in keeping with national em- 
phasis on physical fitness, offers vigorous indoor 
and outdoor programs for students. Under the 
direction of Dean Lester M. Fraley, the College 



32 



j)ioviclcs j)rcparatiori Icadin^r lo the Bachelor of 
Sciences clegrees in fi\e j)rofe,ssional areas: Physi- 
cal Education, Dance, Health Education, Rec- 
reation and Physical 1 herapy. Special curricida 
are also ottered in safety education and elemen- 
tary physical education. 

PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS 

Located in Baltimore, only 32 miles from the 
College Park campus, are the University of 
Maryland's six ])r()fessional schools. The schools 
on the Baltimore cam})us are Medicine, Law, 
Dentistry, Pharmacy, Nursing, and Physical 
Therapy. All of these schools require at least 
two or more years at the College Park campus 
before being admitted to them. The University 
maintains a very excellent hospital where the 
students gain invaluable practice. All of the 
Maryland professional schools have very high 
ratings on the national scale. 

c;raduaie school 

1 he Graduate School is an administrative of- 
fice organized to establish requirements and 
policies for degrees of advanced study from the 
more than fifty co-operating departments and to 
handle and approve dissertations and oral exam- 
inations. Since its establishment in 1918, the 
College has grown rapidly, and now awards o\er 
100 doctorates each year. Despite this expan- 
sion, the program remains essentially that of 
individual study imder competent supervision. 



33 



UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 

More than 40,000 part-time adult students en- 
roll each year in courses offered through Uni- 
versity College in the state of Maryland and 
overseas. The overseas courses are offered on 
200 military installations in 25 foreign countries 
in cooperation with the Armed Forces of the 
United States. Full-time resident faculty is sup- 
plemented by part-time faculty drawn from the 
local areas. All overseas study is fully accredited 
by the University of Maryland. Approximately 
200 military and civilian personnel stationed 
overseas complete their Bachelor degree each 
year. Commencement exercises are held each 
spring in Tokyo and Heidelberg, Germany. 
Headquarters of the entire program is here in 
College Park. 



34 



TUDENT GOVERNMENT 




Hi'. 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 
ASSOCIATION 

The Student Government Association plays 
an integral part in the coordination of activities 
in a large university. At Maryland the SGA is 
patterned after the national government, con- 
sisting of three branches: executive, legislative 
and judicial. 

The individual student is the most important 
factor in the effective functioning of the SGA. 
He finances the operation of all student activi- 
ties and services through the $12 fee he pays in 
September, and elects the people who represent 
him as officers. Therefore, you, the freshmen 
are urged to become and remain well informed 
concerning the activities of the SGA. 



CABINET 

The executive branch of the SGA, the cabi- 
net, is responsible for policy making. It acts on 
motions passed by the legislature and appoints 
people to SGA committees and vacated posi- 
tions. Primarily it is your representative to the 
faculty and administration of the University. 

36 



MEMBERS OF THE CABINET FOR ] 964-65 

S.G.A. President Michael Mendelson 

S.G.A. Vice-President Steven Dubnoff 

S.G.A. Secretary Maria Valencia 

S.G.A. Treasurer Frank Downey 

Senior Class President Rick Robinson 

Junior Class President Neil Brayton 

Sophomore Class President Miller Hudson 

Freshman Class President (to be elected) 

Sorority Representative Karen Pollack 

Fraternity Representative Rodger Kaplan 

A.W.S. Representative Janice Browning 

Men's League Representative . Perikles Perikles 

Independent Women's Rep Karen Dorn 

Independent Men's Rep Jan Carter 

Commuter's Rep Caren Harnest 

LEGISLATURE 

Proposed legislation is submitted by the cabi- 
net to the legislature for initial action. Con- 
cerned primarily with finances, the legislature 
reviews the recommendations from the Finance 
Committee and passes the budget for the year. 
All freshmen are encouraged to attend meetings 
and submit suggestions. 

37 



LEGISLATURE MEMBERS 1964-65 



Senior: 
Iris Benjamin 
Debra Pollekoff 
Mary Smith 
Chipper Debuskey 
Jean May 
Junior: 
Ted Levin 
Dee Jolles 
Sue Bryan 
Stephanie Jacobs 
Sophomore: 
Dick May 
Royal Hutchinson 
Barbara Lock 
Bob Ferguson 



Betty Schaff 
Carol Lee 
Ann Wire 
Robin Kessler 



Mark Anderson 
Duffy Browne 
Ken Stiles 
Wayne Legum 

Lee Seabolt 
Andy Tackett 
Pat Hupp 




STUDENT COURT 

All judicial power held by students is granted 
by the Faculty Senate Committee on Student 
Discipline and is vested in several judicial 
boards. Cases involving student infractions of 
University regulations or public laws are re- 
ferred to student judicial boards by the Judici- 
ary Office according to the assigned jurisdic- 
tional area of each. 

Central Student Court. Central Student Court 
is staffed to render the judgment of the student 
body. It is composed of nine members, includ- 
ing fraternity, sorority, residence hall, commu- 
ter, male and female respresentation. Each jus- 
tice must be a junior or senior and maintain a 
minimum of a 2.5 cumulative grade-point aver- 
age. Central Student Court has appellate juris- 
diction over other major student judicial boards, 
hears constitutionality cases and infractions of 
major University rules. 

Student Traffic Court. The Student Traffic 
Court consists of seven justices, including four 
men and three women. The Board has jurisdic- 
tion over cases involving violation of campus 
traffic rules and regulations. 

A.W.S. Judicial Board. The A.W.S. Judical 
Board has nine members representing sorority, 
dormitory and commuter women. The Board 
has jurisdiction over cases involving major vio- 
lations incurred by women, and appellate juris- 
diction over women's dormitory and sorority 
judicial boards. 



39 




Resident Men's Judicial Board. Six residents 
of men's residence halls on campus sit on the 
Resident Men's Judicial Board. They are se- 
lected to represent the four residential areas — 
Cambridge, Denton, "Prefab" and "Hill." The 
Resident Men's Board hears cases involving 
dormitory groups and violations of dormitory 
safety rules by individual residents. It has ap- 
pellate jurisdiction over Men's House judiciaries. 

Panhellenic Judicial Board. This board is 
composed of the executive officers of Panhel- 
lenic. It deals with sorority houses which have 
broken Panhellenic Rules such as those concern- 
ing rush. 



40 



I.F.C. Judicial Board. The Inter-Fraternity Judi- 
cial Board is composed of five senior fraternity 
men. The board hears cases involving an in- 
fraction ol I.F.C. legislation or University rules 
by a fraternity group. 



ASSOCIATED WOMEN STUDENTS 

The governing body for women students on 
campus, A.W.S., provides a variety of services 
and activities. Some annual projects are: a 
Christmas Program, Bridal Fair, workshops, Or- 
phans' Party with Panhel, and the women's con- 
vocation. Throughout the year positions are 
available to freshman women on committees 
such as: cultural, social, elections, constitution, 
publicity and Information Please Handbook. 

A.W.S. EXECUTIVE COUNCIL FOR 1964-65 

President Janice Browning 

1st Vice President Elizabeth Dunn 

2nd Vice President Mattye Messeloff 

Secretary Barbara Atherton 

Treasurer Elizabeth Mullen 

Senior Representative Sally Reed 

Junior Representative Tay Kincaid 

Sophomore Representative . . Shelah Rappaport 
Freshman Representative (to be elected) 



41 



EXECUTIVE 



CABINET 



LEGISLATIVE 



LEGISLATURE 



RULES 

APPROPRIATIONS 

ACADEMIC 

PUBLICATIONS 

STUDENT WELFARE 

TRAFFIC 

CAMPUS 

IMPROVEMENTS 
STUDENT ACTIVITIES 



FINANCE 

AND 

OUTSTANDING 

COMMITTEES 



ASSOCIATED 
WOMEN 
STUDENTS 



UNIVERSITY 
COMMUTERS' 
ASSOCIATION 



men's 

LEAGUE 



FOUR CLASSES 

SENIOR 

JUNIOR 

SOPHOMORE 

FRESHMAN 







. 




_ 


_! 






INTER 


Ri:SIDENT 


DORMITORY 


PAN HELLENIC 










FRATERNITY 


men's 


COUNCIL 


COUNCIL 














com 


4CIL 


ASSOC] 


ation 


^vo^ 


en's 


SORC 


)RnY 


FRATE 


RNIT\ 


Mt 


n's 


DORMITORIES 


HOUSES 


HOUSES 


DORMITORIES 





42 



I 



JUDICIAL 



CENTRAL 

STUDENT 

COURT 





1 1 _ _^ _ 




<I..SIDF.M 

men's 

JD. BOARD 


INTIRIRATERNITV 

COUNCIL 

JUD. BOARD 


STUDENT 
TRAFFIC 
C;OURT 


I'ANHELLENIC 

JUDICIAL 

BOARD 


associaied 
women's 
students 

jud. board 












)RMIT()KY 

AND 
lATERNlTV 
UD. BOARD 




DORMITORY 

AND 

SORORir'i 

JUD. BOARD 



YOUR 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

ASSOCIATION 



43 



MEN'S LEAGUE 

The Men's League, male counterpart of the 
A.W.S., coordinates the activities of men stu- 
dents on campus to promote the educational, 
cultural, social, and athletic welfare of the men 
of the University. All effort is undertaken to 
promote the greatest possible benefit to be de- 
rived from college life. Men's League sponsors 
a variety of activities: the No Shave contest and 
the Senior Awards Banquet are among the more 
popular campus events. 

MEN'S LEAGUE OFFICERS 1964-65 

Preside?! t Perikles Perikles 

Vice-Preside?! t Allan Snyder 

Executive Secretary Allan Kurland 

Correspondi7!g Secretary George Brouillet 

Treasurer Barry Silber 

Se?!ior Representative George Steelberg 

Junior Representative Gary Fisher 

Sopho??!ore Representative Brian Barkley 

Freshma?! Representative (to be elected) 



COMMrrTEES 

Most SGA committees recruit their member- 
ship in the spring after elections and appoint- 
ments are made. However, certain committees 
are open to Freshmen in the fall. Notices of 
openings are announced in the Diamondback. 
You may apply for all SGA committees in Dean 
Florestano's office in the Student Union. 



44 



Of special interest to Freshmen arc the fol- 
lowing. 

Klcctiojis— Members of the Election Board 
supervise election practices, count ballots and 
work at the polls. Positions as poll workers will 
be available during Freshman elections. 

Homecoming— The biggest event of the fall 
semester is Homecoming. Sororities and wom- 
en's dorms build large displays in front of their 
respective residences while fraternities and men's 
dorms build floats to be entered in comj^etition 
during an extravagant pre-game parade. Campus 
beauties vying for the coveted Homecoming 
Queen title are also crowned at the football 
game. Open houses in the residences for the 
alumni add to the festivities. The day is cli- 
maxed with a formal dance featuring big name 
band attractions. Any student may apply to 
work on the Homecoming Committee to help 
plan the events. 

Cultural Committee— %\ of each SI 2 fee paid 
to the Student Government is allocated to the 
Cultural Committee. This committee coordi- 
nates cultural events all over the University, 
such as the University theater, Glee Clubs, Gym- 
kana and Flying Follies. In addition the com- 
mittee brings famous stars to entertain the stu- 
dent body. This year the Cultural Committee 
hoj)es to present among its programs five na- 
tional symphony concerts, an opera, jazz con- 
certs, and classical and flamingo guitarists. 



^^ m 


^ iCv"^. 





Campus Chest— Thh committee is composed 
of representatives of all campus groups which 
promote projects to raise funds for charity 
throughout the year. Campus Chest sponsors 
its own week of activities to raise funds through 
its IJgly Man Contest and its College Casino. 

FOB— The Freshman Orientation Board spon- 
sors Orientation week in the Spring and Fall 
to acquaint new students with the campus 
through toins, lectures, assemblies, and dances. 
It is comparable to the two day pre-college pro- 
gram held throughout the summer. 

Pcople-to-Pcoplc— The People-to-People Pro- 
gram is of special interest to you. Through its 
various projects, including the Big Sister-Brother 
program and social and cultural functions, it 
helps to orient foreign students to life in the 
United States. Participation in any aspect of 
this program can offer rewarding and memora- 
ble experiences. 

Other committees of interest are: Campus Im- 
provements, Who's Who, Parents' Day, Away 
W^eekend, Public Relations, Student Union, 
Student Activities, and Traffic. For informa- 
tion concerning any of these committees ask at 
the SGA office in the Student Union or a mem- 
ber of the SGA. 



47 



CAMPUS ELECTIONS 

Elections of the president, vice president, sec- 
retary, treasurer, A.W.S. representative, and 
Men's League representative for the Class of '68, 
and six legislature seats, will be held in the fifth 
or sixth week of the first semester. Aspiring 
candidates must submit an application and a 
petition signed by fifty members of the class in 
order to run for office. Campaigning lasts for 
two weeks, one week for the primary and one 
week for the final elections. 

General elections are held in March or April. 
Candidates are nominated by the Old Line, Free 
State, and Chesapeake Bay Parties at conven- 
tions a few weeks prior to elections. Complete 
election rules and procedures can be obtained 
by contacting the Election Board. 



48 



PUBLICATIONS 




DIAMONDBACK 

The DiAMONDBACK, the university newspaper 
is published four times weekly, and is a vital 
channel of communication on campus. Tuesday 
through Friday we read all the news while it's 
news. The many columns keep us posted and up 
to date on all campus activities, lectures, meet- 
ings, and "try-outs" as well as inform us of world 
happenings. The sports page covers all events 
both varsity and intramural. The music and 
drama columns clue us in to the "latest." The 
DiAMONDBACK cauuot fimctiou without you, the 
Freshman Class. There are several opportunities 
for you to try your journalistic abilities by writ- 
ing or reporting for the Diamondback. You will 
seek out the news, put it into print, and keep 
the presses rolling. Interested? 

The Diamondback holds its Open Houses in 
the fall and also in the spring. The present staff 
urges you to attend and learn more about this 
vital and dynamic publication. Although help- 
ful, experience is not necessary and there is a 
job waiting for you in the Diamondback office 
of the Journalism Building. When you come to 
apply, ask for Marie Howell, Editor-in-Chief, or 
see Sterling Shiftman, Business Manager, or 
meet Doug Gould, Executive Sports Editor and 
Charles Rhudy, Managing Editor. We'll be 
looking for your by-line next edition. 

50 



TERRAPIN 

"Deadlines, deadlines, deadlines!" Yes, you're 
nearing the Terrapin office when you hear these 
words. From September to April this cry as- 
cends from Room 207 and it is this sense of vital 
activity that makes the yearbook such dynamic 
work. If you would like the challenging activity, 
come in and watch the "cuts" and "copy" being 
planned for next year's Terrapin. Your talent 
will surely be snatched up as soon as you sub- 
mit your application. Like to plan pages of 
copy and pictures, edit a section of Drama or 
Fraternity and Sorority life or is photography 
your hobby? Let it work for you on the Ter- 
rapin. The opportunity is yours in Room 207 
of the Journalism Building. Come in and get 
acquainted with the staff! 



WMUC 

All dials are set at 650. Why? It's WMUC, 
the voice of the University of Maryland affili- 
ated with NBCA and a member of the Intercol- 
legiate Broadcasting Co. You hear news as it's 
being made and much more. Twenty-four hours 
a day WMUC is heard— entertaining and in- 
forming the Campus. And who could ever for- 
get the voice of the anonymous Miss Midnight 
who closes the evenings with her very special 

51 



goodnights. If you have a yen to be a jazz D.J., 
or a mysterious voice at midnight, you will be 
welcomed at the WMUC office, in Building FF 
in the "Gulch." 



CALVERT REVIEW 

Are you a budding James Joyce, T. S. Eliot, 
or Pablo Picasso? If you are— the Calvert Re- 
view wants you. The Calvert Review is the 
Maryland literary magazine and was established 
in the fall of '63. The Calvert Review is new 
and is searching for new talent— your talent in 
prose, poetry or art. Submit your latest manu- 
script in the Calvert Review office in the Jour- 
nalism Building. Your work may win the $20.00 
prize for the best piece of prose or verse. 

M BOOK 

Hopefully, this publication, the M Book, 
which you are now reading, will be the Fresh- 
man's "bible". In handbook form, the M Book 
compiles and organizes all the information a 
new student on campus would want to know. It 
lists hours, dates, activities, phone numbers, and 
regulations which the Freshman cannot possibly 
learn all at once, or for that matter, learn dur- 
ing his four years here at Maryland. This com- 
pact University encyclopedia includes everything 
a newcomer needs to know to make his adjust- 
m.ent to college life a pleasant and profitable 
experience. 

52 



The M Book staff is mainly composed of 
Freshman and Sophomores with a few upper- 
classmen in editorial positions. All Freshman 
are urged to apply for work on the staff, espec- 
ially if you are considering furthering your par- 
ticipation in college publications, since this is 
excellent background experience. Applications 
may be picked up and returned to Dean Flo- 
restano's office in the Student Union and more 
information may be obtained from Steve Dub- 
noff, S.G.A. Vice President. 



54 



RELIGION 




55 



RELIGION 

THE UNIVERSITY MEMORIAL CHAPEL, 

dedicated in 1952 to those of the University who 
gave their lives in war for the cause of freedom, 
is the center of religious life on campus. It is 
composed of the East or main Chapel, the West 
Chapel, and the Roman Catholic Chapel and 
houses the offices of the chapel staff. 

THE STUDENT RELIGIOUS COUNCIL, 

with representatives from each of the student re- 
ligious groups, strives to coordinate the activities 
of these groups and to promote religious interest 
and activity on campus. 

THE RELIGIOUS LIFE COMMITTEE is a 

standing committee of the University Faculty 
Senate and functions by making and executing 
policy, sponsoring non-denominational religious 
j^rograms and acting as an advisory group. 

There is an inter-Protestant service at 1 1 a.m. 
in the main Chapel each Sunday. 

Those interested in joining a religious organ- 
ization may contact the advisor, or simply attend 
the meetings. Notice of meetings is usually pub- 
lished in the "Diamondback." 

BAPTIST 

Meetings: Daily meetings of Baptist Student 
Union from 12:15 to 12:50 p.m. in the chapel 
office. Room 252 (Ext. 541) 
Services: 11 a.m., with Sunday School at 9:80 
a. Hi. 



56 



Cliurcli: Second Baptist Church on Campus 

Drive 

Advisor: Mr. Howard Reese 

BRETHREN 

Meetings'. Youth Grouj) 6:30, Sunchiy evening 
at the church 

Services: 1 1 a.m., with Sunday School at 9:45 
a.m. 

ChurcJi: LIniversity Park Church of the Breth- 
ren on Bahimore Boulevard at Tuckerman 
Street 
Pastor: Rev. Philip E .Norris (AP. 7-2116) 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 

Meetings: Wednesday evenings 6:30, in West 

Cha])el; Room 235 open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily 

Services: 1 1 a.m. 

Church: First Chinch of Christ Scientist, 8300 

Adelphi Road 

Advisors: Dr. James Shanks (Ext. 277) ; Mrs. 

Louise D. Yuill, co-advisor (conference hours 

7:30 to 10 a.m. Thursdays) 

CHURCH OF CHRIST 

Meetings: Meetings of the Church of Christ 

Fellowship in Room 9 of the Chapel (Ext. 548 

or 277-8851) ; Office hours from 1 to 4 p.m. 

weekdays 

Churcli: University Park Church of Christ, 

6420 Adelphi Road 

Advisor: Professor Faye Mitchell (Ext. 215) 

Chaplain: Mr. William Medearis 



57 



EASTERN ORTHODOX 

Meetings: Ethos, the organization for Russian, 
Greek, and Syrian Orthodox faiths, meets ev- 
ery first and third Tuesday in the Chapel 
Lounge at 7 p.m. 

Services: Divine Liturgy celebrated Sundays in 
Saint Sophia Cathedral, Washington, D.C. at 
10.30 a.m. and the Trisagion Prayers are re- 
cited weekdays at noon in the chapel office. 
Room 23 (ext. 546) 
Advisor: Dr. George Anastos (Ext. 574) 

EPISCOPAL 

Meetings: Canterbury Forum at 7 p.m. Wed- 
nesdays in the University Episcopal Center, 
7506 Princeton Ave., open daily from 10 a.m. 
to 10 p.m. (for other activities, contact the of- 
fice. Room 243 (Ext. 547) of the Chapel) 
Services: Celebration of Holy Communion 
daily at noon and at 8:30 a.m. on Sunday in 
West Chapel; St. Andrews Episcopal Church 
services of Holy Communion at 7 a.m. each 
Wednesday; Prayer Book Holy Days; Evening 
Prayer held in the West Chapel each weekday 
and Saturday at 5 p.m. 

Church: St. Andrews Episcopal Church, Col- 
lege Ave. 

FRIENDS 

Chaplain: Father Merrill A. Stevens 
For information about the Society of Friends, 
contact Mr. Edward F. Snyder, 7512 Princeton 
Avenue (277-1342), or Adelphi Friends Meet- 
ing, Adelphi, Maryland. 

58 



ISLAM 

Foi- information I'.bont the meetings and serv- 
ices lor Moslem students, contact Professor 
Furman Bridgcrs (Ext. 508). C^haplain offices 
lor the Islam Society are in Room 23. 

JEWISH 

Meetings: B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation on 
Wednesday evenings at 6:30; the Hillel House 
open daily until 10 p.m. and provides such fa- 
cilities as library, Kosher Dining Club, game 
room, lounge and study rooms 
Services: Sabbath Services held Friday evenings 
at 6:30 (followed by an Oneg Shabbat at 7:30) 
and Saturday mornings at 9:30 
Cliuplain: Rabbi Meyer Greenberg .(AP 7-8961) 

LUTHERAN 

Meetings: Wednesday 7:30 p.m. in the Student 

Center; Student Discussion Group and Coffee 

Hour at 9:45 a.m. Simdays and Supper Club at 

5:30 p.m. Sunday evenings 

Services: 8:45 and 11 a.m. (Communion on 

first Sunday of the month) 

Church: Hope Church and Student Center, 

just south of the University at intersection of 

Guilford Drive and Knox Road 

Pastor: Rev. Ted Caspar, office in Room 247 

of the Chapel (Ext. 547) 

MARYLAND CHRLSTL\N FELLOWSHIP 

The Maryland Christian Fellowship with their 
chaj3el office in Room 235 is a chapter of the 
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship, a nation- 



59 



wide interdenominational student organiza- 
tion. Mr. Charlton Meyer (Ext. 555) is the 
faculty advisor. 

METHODIST 

Meetings: Wesley Foundation Sundays at 5:30 
p.m. at University Methodist Church 
Services: 11 a.m. in East Chapel and at 9:30 
and 1 1 a.m. at University Methodist Church 
Church: University Methodist Church, located 
west of campus on Campus Drive 
Chaplain: Rev. Richard Vieth (Ext. 541) of- 
fice in Room 255 of the Chapel 

ROMAN CATHOLIC 

Meetings: Catholic student center located just 
south of Parking Lot 3 

Services: Daily Mass at noon and 5 p.m. and 
three Sunday Masses; Catholic Chapel of the 
Blessed Sacrament always open for prayer. 
Chaplain: Father William Tepe (Ext. 546), 
office in Room 32 of the Chapel. 

UNITED CAMPUS CHRISTIAN 
FELLOWSHIP 
The Presbyterian Chaplain serves the members 
of the United Church of Christ (Evangelical, 
Reformed, and Congregational), the Disciples 
of Christ, the Evangelical United Brethren, 
and the United Presbyterian Churches, U.S.A. 
Meetings: Informal discussion Wednesday eve- 
nings at 7:30 p.m. 

Services: Communion at 7:30 a.m. on Wednes- 
day and worship at 9:45 a.m. on Sunday 
Chaplain: Rev. Jesse W. Myers (Ext. 548), of- 
fice in Room 239 of the Chapel 



60 



ORGANIZATIONS 




(il 



GENERAL ORGANIZATIONS 

Many organizations at the university offer 

opportunities for students to explore their areas 

of interest. If you wish to take advantage of the 

memberships opened to you, please contact the 

advisors of the clubs concerned. 

ACCOUNTING CLUB-Prof. C. B. Edelson, 345 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING CLUB - 
Dr. R. L. Green and Dr. W. L. Harris, 239 

AGRICULTURAL STUDENT COUNCIL - 
Dr. Robert Wiley, 276 

AGRONOMY CLUB-Mr. Charles P. Ellington, 
222 

AMATEUR RADIO CLUB-Mr. Kenneth H. 
Guy, Jr., 356, 565 

AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY - Dr. Al- 
fred C. Boyd, 408 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF AERONAU- 
TICS AND ASTRONAUTICS-Prof. Robert 
M. Rivello, 452 ,7384 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF CHEMICAL 
ENGINEERS-Dr. Albert Gomezplata, 381 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL 
ENGINEERS AND INSTITUTE OF RADIO 
ENGINEERS-Mr. H. C. Jones (AIEE), 692 
and Mr. H. W. Price (IRE), 455 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS - Dr. 
Phillip Steinberg, 619 

AMERICAN MARKETING ASSOCIATION - 
Dr. J. Allan Cook, 380 

62 



AMERICAN PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIA- 

TION-Mi . I). E. Leavitt, 457 
AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGIN- 

NEERS-Mr. Presley A. Wedding, 336 
AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MECHANICAL 

ENGINEERS-Dr. Redfield Allen, 428 
AMERICAN SOCIETY OF MILITARY EN- 

GINEERS-Maj. James F. Casey, 464 
AQUALINERS-Miss Beverly Holden, 267, 339* 
ART LEAGUE 
BLOCK AND BRIDLE-Dr. Edgar Young, 348, 

489 
BRIDGE CLUB-Mr. William Hoff, 7654 
CALVERT DEBATE SOCIETY-Dr. Calvin W. 

Downs, 201* 
CHINESE STUDENT CLUB-Mr. Chimjen C. 

Chen, 292, 640 
COLLEGIATE 4-H - Miss Charlotte Conaway, 

358 
FLYING FOLLIES* 
FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA - Mr. 

Howard P. Addison, 321 
GYMKANA TROUPE-Mr. William A. Riley* 
HOME ECONOMICS CLUB - Mrs. Louise 

Johnson, 219 
INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION-Dr. S. 

M. Bhagat, 473 
INSTITUTE OF AEROSPACE SCIENCES - 

Mr. J. L. Rand, 225 
INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL AND ELEC- 
TRONIC ENGINEERS-Mr. Henry V. Price, 

455 



63 



INTERNATIONAL CLUB-Mi. F. A. Bridgers, 
508 

ISLAMIC ASSOCIATION - Mr. H. Sharabi, 
204B 

LOUISA PARSONS NURSING CLUB - Miss 
Margaret Hayes, 496 

MAJORS CLUB-Mr. Bill Campbell, 544 

MARYLAND MARKETING ASSOCIATION- 
Prof. J. A. Cook, 407 

MEN'S GLEE CLUB - Mr. Paul Traver, 683, 
207* 

MODERN DANCE CLUB-Miss Dorothy Mad- 
den, 389* 

MUSIC EDUCATORS NATIONAL CONFER- 
ENCE-Dr. :\Iary de Vermond, 555 

NATIONAL COLLEGIATE PLAYERS - Dr. 
W. L. Straiisbaugh, 291, 7616 

OLYMPIC BARBELL CLUB-Physical Educa- 
tion Department 

PHILOSOPHY CLUB-Mr. James Celarier, 439 

PHYSICAL THERAPY CLUB - Miss Ruth M. 
Latimer 

POLITICAL SCIENCE CLUB-Dr. Walter D. 
Jacobs, 400 

PSYCHOLOGY CLITB-Dr. Nancy I. Anderson, 
376 

RECREATION SOCIETY-Dr. Ellen E. Har- 
vey, 300 

SOCIETY FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF 
MANAGEMENT-Mr. C. Clinton Spivey, 345 

SOCIETY OF FIRE PROTECTION ENGIN- 
EERS-Prof. John Bryan, 266 

64 



^^Si' 



fs^mf^' 



J 



\ *- 



?^ 



b^ 



S^- 



-^/ W- 







SOCIOLOGY CLUB - Dr. Annabel Motz, 443, 

7003 
STUDENT NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSO- 

CIATION-Mr. Edmund Crosby, 204 
SPANLSH C:LUB-Mr. Paul Rodriguez, 401 
TERRAPIN SKI CLUB-Mr. Doyle Royal, 375 
TERRAPIN TRAIL CLUB-Dr. John H. Axley, 

231,384 
UKRANIAN CLUB-Dr. A. P. Hansen, 214 
UNIVERSITY BAND-Mr. Hubert P. Hender- 
son, 683* 
UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA - Mr. Emerson 
Head, 207* 



65 



UNIVERSITY THEATRE-Dr. R. E. Pugliese, 

550* 
VETERANS CLUB-Mr. William Hoff, 7654 
VETERINARY SCIENCE CLUB - Mr. E. C. 

Brown, 383, 77360 
WOMEN'S CHORUS - Mr. Paul Traver, 683, 

207* 
* These organizations are performing groups. 

(The series of numbers beside the advisor's 

name is his extension to WA 7-3800.) 



POLITICAL PARTIES 

The university has three of its own political 
parties, which are involved in campus politics, as 
well as sub-divisions of the major two national 
]3arties. Membership is acquired by group affilia- 
tion or individual participation. 
CHESAPEAKE BAY PARTY 
FREE STATE PARTY 
OLD LINE PARTY 
YOUNG DEMOCRATS CLUB 
YOUNG REPUBLICANS CLUB 



SERVICE GROUPS 

ALPHA PHI OMEGA is the National Service 
Fraternity whose goal is to serve the campus, the 
communitv, and the nation. 

GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA is the girls' Nation- 
al Service Fraternity. Rush to gain membership 
is in the mid-fall. 

66 



MILITARY ORGANIZATIONS 

ANGEL FLIGHT is the official auxiliary of 
Arnold Air Society (Advanced R.OT.C.) and 
serves as the official hostess to the university. 
Girls may sign up for rush, held in the early part 
of the fall semester. If you are interested in 
Angel Flight, contact Gaptain Delmar, room 26, 
Reck lord Armory. 

PERSHING RIFLES is a National Military 
Fraternity for freshman and sophomore basic 
cadets who are chosen during fall rush on the 
basis of leadership qualities and interest. Cadets 
may contact Major Earl O. Brown, Reckford 
Armory, room 26. 

VANDENBURG GUARD, a military frater- 
nity imique to the University of Maryland, has 
represented the university in various trick drill 
competitions. Members are selected on the basis 
of their marching ability and leadership qual- 
ities. Interested men may contact Major E. L. 
Thompson, Reckford Armory, room 31. 



HONORARY SOCIETIES 

llie local and national honoraries are organ- 
izations which give recognition to students who 
have distinguished themselves in various fields. 
Membership is selective and is based on leader- 
ship, scholarship, and achievement. 

67 



LOCAL SOCIETIES 

DL\DEM— Sophomore Women' Achievement 
DL\MOND— Sorority Achievement 
KALEGETHOS-Fraternity Achievement 
PHI ALPHA EPSILON-Physical Education 
SIGMA TAU EPSILON-Women's Recreation 
VARSITY "M" CLUB-Varsity Athletics 

NATIONAL SOCIETIES 

ALPHA KAPPA DELTA-Sociology 
ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA-Freshmen Wom- 
en's Scholastic 
ARNOLD AIR SOCIETY-Aclvanced 

R.O.T.C. 
BETA GAMMA SIGMA-Commerce 
CHI EPSILON-Civil Engineering 
ETA KAPPA NU-Engineering 
KAPPA ALPHA MU-Photography 
KAPPA DELTA Pi-Education 
KAPPA KAPPA PSI-Men's Band 
KAPPA TAU ALPHA-Journalism 
MORTAR BOARD-Outstanding Senior 

Women 
OMICRON DELTA KAPPA-Men's Leader- 
ship and Scholarship 
OMICRON NEJ-Home Economics 
PHI ALPHA THETA-History 
PHI ETA SIGMA-Freshmen Men's Scholastic 
PHI KAPPA PHI-Senior Scholarship 
PHI SIGMA-Biology 
PI DELTA EPSILON-Journalism 
PI MU EPSILON-Mathematics 
PI SIGMA ALPHA-Political Science 



68 



PI TAU SIGMA-Mechani(al Engineering 

PSI CHI-Psydiolooy 

SCAIiBARl) AND P>L.ADK-Aclvancecl 

R.O.T.C. 
SIGMA PI SIGMA-Physics 
TAU BETA Pi-Engineering 
TAU BETA SIGMA- Women's Band 
TAU KAPPA ALPHA-Forensics 
WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN COLLEGES 
AND UNIVERSITIES-Overall Achievement 

PROFESSIONAL SOCIETIES 

Professional societies are organizations for up- 
perclassmen who have shown an active interest 
in their major field. 
ALPHA PHI SIGMA-Chemistry 
ALPHA DELTA SIGMA-Men's Advertising 
ALPHA ZETA-Agriculture 
BETA ALPHA Ps'l-Accounting 
DELTA NU ALPHA-Transportation 
DELTA SIGMA PI-Business 
GAMMA ALPHA CHI-Women's Advertising 
GAMMA THETA UPSILON-Geography 
IOTA LAMBDA SIGMA-Geography 
PHI CHI THETA-Women's Business 
PHI DELTA KAPPA-Men's Education 
PHI MU ALPHA SINFONIA-Men's Music 
PI ALPHA XI-Floriculture 
SIGMA ALPHA ETA-Speech Therapy 
SIGMA ALPHA lOTA-Women's Music 
SIGMA ALPHA OMICRON-Bacteriology 
SIGMA PHI SIGMA-Zoology 

()9 



RELIGIOUS SOCIETIES 

There are many societies on campus represent- 
ing religious denominations. Students are more 
than welcome to join the group of their choice. 

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION- 

Rabbi Meyer Greenberg, 546 
CHAPEL CHOIR - Mr. Fague Springman, 

207, 555 
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION- 

Mr. James Shanks, 277 
CHURCH OF CHRIST FELLOWSHIP - 

Prof. Faye Mitchell, 215 
DISCIPLES OF CHRIST FELLOWSHIP - 

Memorial Chapel 
ETHOS (EASTERN ORTHODOX ORGAN- 

IZATION)-Dr. George Anastos, 256, 574 
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION - 

Rev. Theodore R. Casper, 547 
MARYLAND CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP- 

Mr. Charlton G. Meyer, 555 
NEWMAN FOUNDATION - Dr. Alfred 

Boyd, 381 
STUDENT RELIGIOUS COUNCIL - Dr. 

Redfield W. Allen, 242, 428 
UNITED CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOW- 

SHIP-Rev. Jesse W. Myers, 548 
WESLEY FOUNDATION - Mr. Richard F. 

Vieth, 546 
WESTMINISTER FOUNDATION - Mem- 
orial Chapel 

70 



ENTERTAINMENT 




71 



CLASS ACTIVITIES 

The Freshman Class sponsors their Class Prom, 
and the campus wide Sadie Hawkins Day Dance. 

Sophomores sponsor their Class Prom, an event 
which sophomores look forward to each year. 

The Juniors highlight their year with the 
Junior Prom, held at Indian Spring Country 
Club. At this time Miss Maryland is crowned. 

Seniors climax their college years with their 
prom and a "Senior Class Presents." In previous 
years outstanding entertainers have included 
Danny Kaye, Peter, Paul and Mary, and Bob 
Hope. Held in Cole Fieldhouse, this event al- 
ways draws tremendous crowds. 

GREEK WEEK 

Sororities and fraternities set aside one week in 
May for Greek Week. Through various compet- 
itive activities Greeks promote unity. Events in- 
clude Interfraternity Sing, ATO Chariot Race, 
SAE Jazz Concert, ZBT Bike Race, Re-dedica- 
tion, Sorority Olympics, and Boat Ride, which 
climaxes the week. Various Greek houses also 
hold open house. 

KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA 
SKIT NIGHT 

Each fall KKG sponsors Pledge Skit Night. 
Fraternity and sorority pledge classes join forces 
to present skits that are written, produced, and 
directed by themselves. 

72 



HARMONY HALL 

Phi K;i|)|)a I an Fraternity annually presents 
Harmony Hall, an evening of entertainment by 
(ireek barbershop (juartets. The groups compete 
in Ritchie Coliseum, where they are judged by 
the Society for the Preservation and Encourage- 
ment of Barbershop Quartet Singing. 

During intermission a favorite housemother is 
honored with the Battleaxe Award. 



IFC PRESENTS 

Each fall the Interfraternity Council brings 
toj) name entertainers to Cole Fieldhouse. Re- 
cent performers have included the Chad Mitchell 
1 rio, Harry Bellafonte, the Kingston Trio, and 
Ella Fitzgerald. These shows are financed and 
j)r()cUiced by llic Interfraternity Council. 



INTERFRA TERNrrV SING 

Each spring Delta Delta Delta sponsors Inter- 
fraternity Sing on the Thursday night of Greek 
Week. Fraternities and sororities ])articipate, and 
their songs are recorded by RCA Victor. 

During intermission various honors are be- 
stowed. Diamond (sorority honorary) and Ka- 
legethos (fraternity honorary) tap their new 
members. The Morty Cohen Award, the Hillock 
Award, and the Fraternity Man and Sorority 
Woman of the Year Award are presented. 

78 



KAPPA ALPHA MINSTREL SHOW 

In this comedy show the KA Minstrels present 
a barrel of laughs. For over thirty-five years the 
end men and black faces have presented this 
hilarious spring event. 

AWS BRIDAL FAIR 

The Associated Women Students sponsor a 
Bridal Fair every spring. In the displays the new 
bride can find everything imaginable for her 
new home. 



UNIVERSITY THEATRE 

This dramatic group presents four outstanding 
]:)roductions every year. Last year students pre- 
sented "Music Man," "Six Characters In Search 
of an Author," "Beaux Stratagem," and "Picnic." 

Plays are given in Central Auditorium or 
Ritchie Coliseum, where students are admitted 
free. 



DRAMA WING 

Education as well as entertainment is the goal 
of performances. The group travels throughout 
the United States with its dramatic service. 
Through the presentation of plays, these stu- 
dents dramatize problem areas of children and 
their parents. They perform without props or 
costumes. 



74 



•> I 



I 



FLYING FOLLIES 

This organization is composed of many types 
of entertainers, including singers, comedians, 
dancers, and musicians. Flying Follies promotes 
better public relations through their U.S. tours, 
and tours to such countries as Puerto Rico, Scot- 
land, The Azores, and Iceland. 

MODERN DANCE CLUB 

This grou]3 presents an annual concert, "An 
Evening With Modern Dance." They give var- 
ious other dance demonstrations in the campus 
vicinity. 

CxYMKANA TROUPE 

Members exhibit their acrobatic and tumbling 
ability throughout the year. They practice in 
nightly sessions and take their shows to various 
cities throughout the country. 

AOUALINERS 

This group presents a synchronized swimming 
show each year. By learning new methods they 
present unique themes carried through by a 
clever routine. 



7G 



NATIONAL SYMPHONY CONCERT 

Four limes a year ihe SG A Cultural Commit- 
tee sponsors the National Symphony Concert; 
Howard Mitchell conducting. Concerts are given 
at Ritchie Coliseum, and presentation of an ID 
C^ard admits a student tree. 



MARYLAND CONCERT BAND 

I'ryouls lor band are held early in the fall. 
The concert band meets during a regidar class 
period; students participating receive one credit. 



MARYLAND MARCHINC BAND 

1 his unit has tryouts and begins practice early 
in the year. 1 hey present half-time shows at foot- 
ball games, where they exhibit their marching 
ability in fancy routines. Students receive credit 
for this if they also are part of the Concert Band, 
which practices at the same time. The Maryland 
Marching Band adds a great deal of spirit to the 
athletic e\ents on campus. 



// 



MADRIGAL SINGERS 

This small group of singers give performances 
through various media and also take their con- 
certs on tour. Rehearsals are scheduled so that 
they may receive one credit per semester for par- 
ticipation. Last spring the Madrigals toured the 
Mediterranean countries on a 4 month goodwill 
tour for the State Department. 



WOMEN'S CHORUS and 
MEN'S GLEE CLUB 

Choral renditions are presented by these out- 
standing groups at various times during the year. 
Often these two groups work together. Both re- 
ceive the same credit per semester. 



CHAPEL CHOIR 

Numerous religious programs are given 
throughout the school year. A campus favorite 
is Handel's Messiah, presented every Christmas. 
Participating students meet during regular class 
periods, and receive one credit. Registration for 
Chapel Choir is during registration week. 

78 



ATHLETICS 




Varsity athletics at the University of Mary- 
land are as fine as can be found anywhere. The 
University is a member of the Atlantic Coast 
Conference (ACC), the National Collegiate Ath- 
letic Association (NCAA), the Amateur Athletic 
Association of America, and cooperates with oth- 
er national organizations in the promotion of 
amateur athletics. 

Maryland has the Cole Activities Building 
which contains a modern gymnasium, a swim- 
ming pool, training facilities for indoor sports, 
physical education laboratories, and an arena 
with a seating capacity of 13,000. The Field 
House is the heart of the Athletic Department 
containing the offices of Mr. William Cobey, Di- 
rector of Athletics, and the head coaches of foot- 
ball, swimming, wrestling, baseball, and basket- 
ball. Cole Field House is the scene of all home 
wrestling matches and basketball games. Other 
Maryland University facilities include a large 
armory, which houses the indoor track and rifle 
teams, modern Byrd Stadium with a running 
track circling a football gridiron, a number of 
athletic fields, tennis courts, a golf course, base- 
ball diamonds, and a gymnasium and swimming 
pool for women. 

FOOTBALL 

The major question in everyone's mind is who 
will replace All-American Quarterback Dick 
Shiner. Of those players competing for the posi- 
tion, Ken Ambrusko, Jim Corcoran, and Ed Pine 

80 



arc top caiulidaies. Shiner accounted for 1200 
yards total ofiensc last season; the man that fills 
his shoes will have a tough job. This year Coach 
roni Nugent and Staff will present a quick, hard 
hitting, and colorful football team that Mary- 
land fans have been seeing in the past. With a 
lax in college substitution rules, look forward to 
a Nugent platoon system. Returning lettermen 
Daryll Hill, Moe Arbitina, George Stem, Len 
Chiaverini, and Mike Funk will be needed for 
next year's rough season, especially Oklahoma, 
Navy, and Penn State. 

SOCCER 

Scoring 61 goals (new ACC record) the soccer 
team posted an overall won-lost record of 10-3 
and reached the semi-finals of the NCAA Cham- 
j3ionship Tournament. Maryland lost to its old 
nemesis, cmrent champion St. Louis, by a score 
of 7-3. Maryland had beaten Drexel (5-2) and 
Bridgeport (5-3) before bowing to St. Louis. In 
eleven years of ACC competition the overall rec- 
ord is 42-0-2. Maryland's all time NCAA Tour- 
nament record is 6-5, having reached the semi- 
finals three times and the finals twice but failing 
to reach the coveted number one position. 

The Ter])s were hit hard by a new ACC ruling 
making foreign students ineligible for competi- 
tion. All-American Ersin Bacinoglu was declared 
unable to play during the season. Looking to the 
future Coach Doyle Royal's team should con- 
tinue to excel despite loss of key personnel. 

81 



,.3* 




BASKETBALL 

The future for Bud Millikan's junior dom- 
inated basketball team can be nothing but op- 
timistic. At the beginning of last season the all- 
sophomore line-up consisted of George Suder, 
Mike DeCosmo, Jackie Clarke, Neil Brayton and 
Rick Wise. Outstanding performances were 
made by George Suder and Rick Wise against 
some of the best teams in the nation. Suder 
scored a team high of 327 points and maintained 
a 13 point per game average. Wise shot for 293 
points and an average of 11.3 per game. Gary 
Ward, injured midway through the season, had a 
13.9 game average. His loss to the team must be 
associated to the tail-spinning effort during the 
latter portion of the season. 



82 



The freshman basketball team, led by room- 
mates Joe Harrington and Jay McMillen, rolled 
to an impressive record of 15-1. The only loss 
came at the hands of the Navy Plebes. Forward 
McMillen boasts a 374 point total and a 23.4 
point per game average. Harrington, who made 
107 out of 211 field goal shots for a team high 
50.7 percentage, sports a 270 point total and a 
16.9 scoring average per game. These boys also 
accounted for one-third of the total number of 
rebounds last year. Both boys will probably find 
starting berths on the varsity team this season. 

The greatest assets of the basketball team are 
its natural ability and youth; the team only 
needs experience to carry it to higher levels. Such 
experience was gained in the regular season play 
and in such tournaments as the VPI Invitational 
Tournament, Evansville Invitational, and the 
ACC Tournament. Look forward to an exciting 
and a winning basketball team next year. 

WRESTLING 

Maryland's dominance over ACC rivals con- 
tinued as Sully Krouse's Terps won their 11th 
consecutive Atlantic Coast Conference Cham- 
pionship in as many years. Maryland wrestlers 
placed nine of ten possible men in the cham- 
pionship finals; finishing with seven firsts and 
two runners-up. The individual ACC champion- 
shi]3 hnalists are Thomas Schleicher (115 lbs.), 
Samuel Cole (130 lbs.), John Henderson (137 
lbs.), Bob Kopnisky (147 lbs.). Nelson Aurand 



83 



(157 lbs.), Marshall Dauberman (177 lbs.), Gary 
Wikander (191 lbs.) . Most of these boys will 
return and are expected to comtinue their win- 
ning ways. 



SWIMMING 

The Terp Mermen finished second to North 
Carolina in regular season dual meets but were 
tops in the ACC Tournament scoring 145^/^ team 
points. Outstanding individual performances at 
the meet were made by Kevin Gilson in the 50 
yard freestyle (time 22.5 sec.) and Bill Doheny, 
100 yard breast stroke (time 1:03.8) . All-Amer- 
ican diver and co-captain, Ron Squires, won the 
one meter diving event. A fine team effort was 




made in the 400 yd. Relay; a combination of 
Nullmeyer, Gilson, Lampe, and Geary, was used 
to win. 

Looking to next year Coach Campbell has 
reason to be optimistic. Baltimorean Phil Den- 
kevitz set a world record of 21.00 seconds for the 
50 yard freestyle event while swimming for the 
freshmen team. Two other sophomores include 
high school Ail-Americans Joe Brey and Mac 
Pardew. 

The best meet of the season will most likely 
be against Navy. Last season the Terps beat the 
Midshipmen 48-47 in the final event. 



LACROSSE 

Al Heagy's team is second only to Navy in 
nationwide collegiate lacrosse. Lost through 
graduation was Ail-American attackman Bill 
Petit. Remaining attackmen include amazing 
junior Bob Newkirk, senior Pete Smith, and 
Robert "Chopper" Wright. Midfielders not re-, 
turning include Ail-American candidate Bob 
Schied, Fred Betz, and John Anderson; back next 
year are Jerry "Beast" Trosian, and Bob Rhom- 
bro. The outstanding Maryland defense contains 
All-American candidate Jackie Schofield, goalie, 
Denny Synder and Billy Bucks. Late Spring la- 
crosse will pit Maryland against the other Big 
Four Lacrosse teams in the nation, Navy, Hop- 
kins, Army. 

85 



BASEBALL 

With the loss of pitchers Klvac, Vezendy, and 
Lund, it would seem that Coach Jack Jackson 
would have a serious problem. Sophomore pitch- 
ers, Jerry Bark, Joe Heckel, and Sonny Novak 
have the talent and need only the experience to 
take over the vacant positions. Also up from the 
freshmen team is first baseman Larry Davis who 
is expected to be great. 

TENNIS 

Maryland lost several stalwarts in Barny Clev- 
eland, Gene Gerber, and Tom Marcellino. Re- 
turning to this year's team is nationally ranked 
Jim Busick, Len Modzelewski, Roger Flax, and 
Lou Dobies. The biggest match of the season 
will come against North Carolina. 

GOLF 

Despite the loss of six lettermen Maryland is 
expected to repeat its good showing of last year. 
The boys to watch are Bob McFerren and Tom 
Righter. 

CROSS COUNTRY 

The cross-country team compiled an overall 
seasonal mark of 3-2 and a 2-2 Atlantic Coast 
Conference mark. The Kehoe men placed third 
in the ACC meet; a top individual effort was 
made by George Michael in this event. 

86 



INTRAMURALS 

An integral part of campus life is athletics, 
and although varsity sports are more in the lime- 
light, intramurals are marked by outstanding 
skill and fierce competition. Intramurals are 
composed of the Dormitory League, the Open 
League, and the highly rated Fraternity League. 

Intramurals have grown in popularity and 
size as a major campus event. Under the auspices 
of Coach Jim Kehoe and the direct supervision 
of Raymond Mullis, intramural sports on cam- 
pus have risen from obscurity to widely publi- 
cized and highly competitive athletic contests. 
Intramurals are open to Greeks and Independ- 
ents in three respective leagues— the Fraternity, 
Open, and the Dorm Leagues. Such team sports 
as football, volleyball, basketball, softball, bowl- 
ing, and swimming; and individual sports such 
as table tennis, golf, wrestling, weightlifting, 
badminton, tennis, and cross country are includ- 
ed in the varied program. Although fraternity 
teams have dominated University championships 
in the past because of their superior organization 
and high spirit, some strong Independent teams 
have been successful in challenging this mon- 
opoly. Thus competition grows keener, and the 
quality of the sports increases in value. 

87 



Individual sports winners include: Denny 
Koch (SC)-tennis, Clarke Goldstein (TEP)- 
table tennis, John Kenworthy (ATO)— badmin- 
ton, and Wade Whitner (ATO)— cross country. 
Winners of team sports include: Sigma Phi Ep- 
silon, fraternity football champions, and the 
Aces, Open League champs. The Aces beat SPE 
in the University Championship. The fraternity 
dominated swimming event was won by the ap- 
propriately named. The Dark Horses, an inde- 
pendent team. The University volleyball cham- 
pionship was won by Sigma Phi Epsilon as they 
beat the Open League champs, the Ukes. In 
University basketball the Untouchables defeated 
Phi Kaj3pa Sigma for the first place crown. 

It is recommended that each incoming fresh- 
man explore the possibilities of intramural ac- 
tivities to experience the thrill of competitive 
s]3orts on the college level. Information about 
intramurals may be secured from Coach Kehoe 
or Mr. Mullis at the Intramural Office in the 
Armory. 



88 



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WOMEN'S RECREATION 
ASSOCIATION 

The Women's Recreation Association is a stu- 
dent organization which plans and sponsors 
\'aried recreational and sports activities. It is 
designed to meet your interest and is dedicated 
to making your college years more enjoyable. 
Each season brings forth popular activities in 
WRA 1)1 tra murals. In the fall, tennis singles, 
badminton doubles, archery, bowling and ping 
pong offer a challenge. The winter season brings 
basketball, volleyball, and badminton singles, 
while springtime ]3roduces the swimming meet, 
Softball and tennis doubles. Co-ed volleyball 
and bowling tournaments, are planned in co- 
operation with the Men's Intramural Depart- 
ment. 

Eleven seasonal uiicrcst groups are open to 
all beginners as well as experienced persons. You 
may chose from tennis, horseback riding, golf, 
basketball, competitive swimming, fencing, field 
hockey, lacrosse, bowling, ice skating and judo. 

Our Co-ed affiliated clubs include Modern 
Dance Club and Aqualiners. Aqualiners is 
Maryland's synchronized swimming club, which 
presents a big water pageant in the spring under 
the magic spell of lights and music. The mod- 
ern Dance Club puts on several concerts and 
programs throughout the year. 

90 



WRA's Annual Events include the Freshman 
Picnic, Sports Day and Spring Banquet. The 
Annual Freshman Picnic is held behind Prein- 
kert Field House during F.O.B. Week, and is 
designed to welcome all new women students to 
Maryland and WRA. Sports Day is WRA's 
largest single event, and is attended by most of 
the colleges and universities in Maryland and 
Washington, D.C. area. 

Each woman student is a member of WRA 
an can participate in a sports or leadership ca- 
pacity. You can receive more information and 
application blanks from your WRA representa- 
tive. Miss Kesler in Preinkert Field House (X- 
7109) or the officers of WRA. 

OFFICERS FOR 1064-65 

President Jean DeGaston 

Vice President Pat Connelly 

Recording Secretary ]^^^ Pennefeather 

Corresponding Secretary Barbara Miller 

Treasurer Fran Trager 

Advisor Miss Ethel Kesler 

M CLUB 

Maryland athletes who have earned the right 
to wear a varsity letter are honored by member- 
ship in the M Club. It is a social group, but 
also sponsors such awards as the Outstanding 
Intramural Athlete of the Year, and several ath- 
letic scholarships. The organization was estab- 
lished at Maryland in order to bring together 
the outstanding athletes at Maryland. 

91 



COLOR C;UARD MAJORE7TES 

The Color Guard Majorettes at the University 
of Maryland are the flag bearers of the Univer- 
sity Band. Carrying the American and State 
flag, as well as the flag of each school in our 
Atlantic Coast Conference, the thirteen Color 
Guard Majorettes march at all of the home foot- 
ball games and several of the away games dur- 
ing the fall semester. 

No previous majorette experience is necessary 
in order to try-out for Color Guard. However, 
a girls must meet the qualifications of being 
between 5'4" - 5'8" in height, must not be stu- 
dent teaching in the fall, and must be able to 
attend practice the week preceding fall registra- 
tion. Try-outs are held every spring when nine 
or ten girls are chosen. 



CHEERLEADERS 

If you'd like to spur the Terps on during 
football, basketball, and lacrosse games, start 
getting in shape for the mid-football season se- 
lection of cheerleaders. The cheerleaders organ- 
ize pep rallies during the football season and 
attend a few of the away games. If you are 
interested contact any of the cheerleaders and 
watch the Diamondback for notices. Males will 
also be selected for the squad. The present 
squad consists of: 

92 



R()l)iii Kcsslcr, Cfiptnin 

Iris licnjainin, Co-Cajildin Judy Klein 

liiidgctf Forshew ji'"*^' lOyc 

Jaiu- Pemufcathcr (.ail Klcgcr 

Margif Kiausc Mollv W'licslc 

FOOIRALL SCHEDULE 

Home 

Oklahoma Sept. 19 

South Carolina Sept. 26 

Wake Forest (Band Day) Oct. 24 

Navy (Parent Day) Nov. 7 

C^lemson (Homecoming) Nov. 14 

Aiuay 

N. C. State Oct. 3 

Duke Oct. 10 

N. Carolina (Oyster Bowl) Oct. 17 

Penn State Oct. 31 

Virginia Nov. 21 

BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 

Home 

Penn State Wed, Dec. 2 

North Carolina State Tues., Dec. 8 

West Virginia Sat.. Dec. 12 

University of Kansas Fri., Dec. 18 

North Carolina State Mon., Jan. 4 

Navy Wed., Jan. 13 

Virginia Wed., Feb. 17 

Duke Tues., Feb. 23 

Clemson Fri., Feb. 26 

South Carolina Sat., Feb. 27 

NCAA Regional Playofts Fri., Sat., Mar. 12,13 



9: 




'^m-^t 



COMMUTERS 




S)5 



TO THE COMMUTER 

Residents of the dormitories on the hill have 
only a step to go to class but some have a very 
long walk for that first cup of coffee in the old 
Dining Hall. You commuters may eat breakfast 
and dinner cosily at home, but you have to make 
a substantial effort to get to class. 

Each group has physical hurdles like cars to 
class or walks to meals. Each group must move 
out of its shelter into a new day. 

Everyone has some psychological and social 
adjustments to make and a lot of changing to do 
in the process of becoming self-directed, appro- 
priately oriented and self-fulfilling personalities. 

You as a reasoning person should recognize 
when the going is rough and look for someone 
who can help best to release your own powers 
of self direction. 

The whole staff of the Executive Dean of Stu- 
dent Life, whether you find us in the North Ad- 
ministration Building, the Student Union, the 
Counseling Center or the Health Service, stand 
ready just for this purpose and we expect to be 
called upon. Our information, our skills, our 
intelligence and our good will are at your service. 

I hope to see many of you in the UCA where 
all types of new students, from the confused to 
the most confident, may grow through friendship 
and joint endeavor into men and women of per- 
sonality and purpose. (,^,.^.^„^,^ 

Marian Johnson 

Advise. ■ to UCA Assistant Dean of Women 



96 



TRANSPORTATION 

Carpooh 

All commuting students, with or without a 
car, are urged to sign up at the end of the regis- 
tration procedure in the Armory or in the Stu- 
dent Union during registration week. Mimeo- 
graphed lists of drivers and riders will be pub- 
lished by areas. The list is posted in the Student 
Union. 

A weekend ride service has been set up for all 
those students who desire a ride home on week- 
ends. Students may sign up in the Commuters' 
Association office in the Student Union. 



All cars must be registered in the Armory dur- 
ing registration, or at the Campus Police Station 
after registration. Then you will be issued a 
]3arking sticker which must be kept in your car 
at all times ($5 fine if it isn't). Betw^een 7 a.m. 
and 4:45 p.m., cars must be parked in the lot to 
which they are assigned. After 4:45 p.m. they 
may be parked in a lot other than those marked 
reserved at all times. Never make the expensive 
mistake ($3) of parking in a lot which your 
car's sticker doesn't match. Metered spaces are 
available at the Student linion and on the lot 
behind the Infirmary. 

97 



Drii'i}ig 

The 20 mph. signs on campus are for the 
safety of students who wish to attend classes or 
just stroll about campus— minus scratches. Please 
don't leave home so late you have to disobey 
them to make your classes. The stop signs at 
every corner are for the same reason and the 
penalty for going through a stop sign is an $11 
fine. Pedestrians always have the right of way, 
but on the other hand, it's only fair to drivers 
for pedestrians to cross at the corners. 



PubUc Trdu.sportation 

Greyhound Bus Lines offer direct service to 
the Varsity Grill on Baltimore Ave. in College 
Park. Buses leave the terminals in AVashington 
(12th and Ncav York Ave.) and Baltimore (How- 
ard and Centre), approximately every half-hour. 
For further information in Washington call NA 
8-8000 or in Baltimore call SA 7-5780. 

D.C. Transit System operates a direct line be- 
tween Friendship Heights terminal at Wisconsin 
and Western Ave. in Chevy Chase, Md., and the 
Beltway Plaza just on the east side of campus in 
College Park. The following map shows the route 
followed by this line and the lines which may be 
used for easy access to the Bethesda-College Park 
Line. The map was reproduced with the per- 
mission of D.C. Transit System Inc. For further, 
information call D.C. Transit information at 
FE 7-1300. 



98 



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IJNIVERSI lY COMMUTERS' 
ASSOCIATION 

The Commuters' Association was organized 
in an effort to provide commuting students with 
the extracurricuhir activities they so often miss 
as a result of their non-resident status. Although 
primarily a social organization, the U.C.A. pro- 
vides a well roimded program which attempts to 
encompass the diverse interests of over fifty per- 
cent of the campus population. Dances, parties, 
picnics and hayrides highlight the social program 
along with luncheons featuring guest speakers 
and a spring banquet heading the list of cidtural 
events. For those with an interest in sports, 
there are both men's and women's teams spon- 
sored by the U.C.A. in the intramural leagues as 
well as a Commuters' Association bowling league. 

(Commuters have shown an increasing interest 
in campus politics and the U.C.A. has become an 
active participant sending representatives to all 
three campus parties. The U.C.A. President was 
recently placed on the Student Government As- 
sociation Cabinet and in that capacity represents 
the commuter viewpoint in student government 
affairs. 

The U.C.A. den and adjoining office, located 
in the basement of the Student Union Building, 
provide commuters with a place to gather with 
their friends between classes and in the evenings. 
Also located here is the Carpool Service which is 
available to all students. Persons wishing to 

101 



form carpools or find rides to and from tfie uni- 
versity may stop in and use tfie lists to locate 
others commuting from the same area. 

Probably the most important benefits of mem- 
bership in the U.C.A. are the lasting ties of 
friendship which develop as a result of the daily 
social and academic contact with fellow students. 



WHERE TO EAT WHEN: 

You xoisJi to be xvitJi friefids: 

• The Student Union Cafeteria 

• The Student Union Snack Bar 

You arc in a hurry: 

• The Mackes (Automats) in the Basement of 
Woods Hall, Francis Scott Key Hall, Skinner 
Building, B.P.A., Taliferro Hall, Cole Field 
House (just outside the swimming pool), 
Language Building, and the Engineering 
Building. 

WHERE TO STUDY IF: 

You fired a quiet place: 

• The Dairy— it's pine paneled and quiet 
enough for studying. The Dairy is also 
known for its ice cream. 

• At the picnic tables on the right of the Stu- 
dent Union. 

• Under the trees along the mall or benches 
along the walks. 



102 




You need (ibsolutc quiet: 

• The Reference and Humanities' rooms of 
MtKeklin Library (air conditioned.) 

• The "stacks." 

• The Math or Chemistry Libraries. 

• The Student LJnion Study Lounge (second 
Floor) . 

ACTIVITIES ESPECIALLY 
CONVENIENT FOR DAYDODGERS: 

You want to relax by music: 

• The Stereo Lounge in the Student Union. 

• 1 he Fine Arts Room in McKeldin Library. 



103 



Intra murals and Sports: 

• Women— sign up in Prienkert Fieldhouse 
with WRA Advisor or consult the Daydodg- 
er bulletin board. 

• Men— sign up in the Armory. 

• Co-ed— sign up with the Commuters' Asso- 
ciation for bowling leagues. 

Social Activities 

• Commuters' Association Theme parties and 
dances are scheduled often. Check the S.G.A. 
calendar and Diamondback for dates. 

• Student Union Dances are held biweekly 

(Free) 

• International Club holds socials or fiesta 
every other Friday night. Everyone is wel- 
come. 

• Lectures and art exhibits are sponsored by 
the Student Union Board and are held dur- 
ing the afternoon for anyone who would 
like to attend. 

• Student Union Movies (25 cents) feature 
many favorites both foreign and domestic. 
The movie schedule is posted on the Student 
Union Bulletin Board and in the Diamond- 
back. 

• For more information concerning activities 
open to Daydodgers consult the Activity 
News' section in the Diamondback. 



CREEKS 




GREEK LIFE 

Greeks! That's a term you'll hear many times. 
A Greek is someone who is a member of a frater- 
nity or sorority. This leads to the question, what 
is a fraternity or sorority? A college Greek 
organization is a group of girls (or boys) banded 
together for social or intellectual purposes, and 
dedicated to common ideals. 

Greeks play an important role in the campus 
community. In politics, sports, publications, hon- 
oraries— all the facets of campus life, Greeks are 
active. Each group supports a nation-wide phil- 
anthropic project together with chapters across 
the nation. Projects vary from helping the blind 
to aiding an entire mountain settlement. 

Great emphasis is placed on scholarship. High 
scholarship is encouraged by study progiams, 
tutoring service, and trophies. The all-sorority 
average is above the all-women's average and 
the all-fraternity average is usually above the all- 
men's. Greeks not only work for personal merit 
in their academics but work in a united group 
effort for scholastic achievement. 

Fraternity and sorority houses are located 
across Route 1 from the main campus on Frater- 
nity Row, and on College Avenue, Princeton 
Avenue, Norwich Road, and Knox Road in Col- 
lege Park. Within these houses lifelong friend- 
shipes are made, card games are lost, study sess- 
ions riui into the wee morning hours, and pro- 
blems and joys are shared. We urge you to find 
out more about the Greek system and how it 
-will benfit you, by going through rush this fall. 



IOC) 




Helen ^^^B^^^^^^H Panhellenic 

Hyre ^^^^^^^^^^^B President 

SORORITY RUSH 

Your first introduction to sorority life at the 
University is an exciting week of rush. Rush 
is the period of social activity in which sorority 
women and girls interested in sororities may be- 
come acquainted. 

Rushing lasts for a week and a half and is 
divided into sets of parties. During the first set 
of Open House Teas rushees must visit all 18 
sororities. After Open House Teas there are 
two sets of informal parties where the rushee 
returns to eight and four sororities respectively. 
On the last night. Preference teas are held to 
give the rushee one more opportimity to make 
a choice. 

Rushing culminates in pledging. Pledgeship 
is a period of learning about the sorority, help- 
ing with the pledge projects, and, most impor- 
tantly, getting to know new-found sisters. The 
major emphasis during pledgeship is on scholar- 
ship because a girl must have at least a 2.2 
average to be initiated into any of Maryland's 18 
sororities. 

Sorority women participate in many enjoyable 
and worthwhile activities— fireside chats with 
favorite professors, deserts with fraternities, and 
philanthropy projects are but a few of these. 

107 



Dear Fresluneii: 

It is a pleasure to welcome you to the Uni- 
versity of Maryland on behalf of the Panhellenic 
Association and every sorority woman on cam- 
pus. During the next few years you ivill be 
seeking and discovering your aims, goals, and 
most lasting friendships Membership in the 
sorority system can enhance your opportunities 
to develop socially and personally and offer you 
your most enriching and reioarding experiences. 
As a Greek you can experience a true college 
education with emphasis on scholarship; de- 
velopment and extension of interests and ideas: 
service to college and community; social life; 
and warm fellowsliip, friendship, and fun. Soror- 
ity study programs, tutoring, and trophies add 
incentive for high scholastic achievement and 
keep the all-sorority average consistently higher 
than the all-women's average. Greeks expect 
their members to be active in campus activities. 
Each sorority sponsors a nationwide philan- 
thropic project. Cultural activities include fire- 
side chats by members of the university faculty. 
Most important to Cjreek women is the ivarm, 
close, and lastijig friendships that come from 
living with a group of people who truly are 
your sisters. As you seek what will be most 
worthwhile for you at Maryland, we hope that 
you will consider sorority membership. 
Helen Hyre, 
Panhellenic President 



108 



PANHELLENIC 

Every soioiiiy woman on campus is a member 
ot the Panhellenic Association, The Panhellenic 
Council, the regulating body of the Association, 
is composed of two delegates from each sorority. 
The Coimcil provides a forum for the exchange 
of ideas between sororities and plans worthwhile 
projects to be carried out for the betterment of 
the sorority system and the entire campus. 

In addition, our campus has a Junior Panhel- 
lenic Council which serves to coordinate the 
activities of the pledge classes and to train fu- 
ture members and officers of Senior "Panhel." 



INTERFRATERXITY COUNCIL 

Here, at Maryland, The IFC or Interfratern- 
ity Council, who's fimction is to strengthen and 
co-ordinate the activities of the individual 
houses in a group effort, is composed of twenty- 
four fraternities each having one voting dele- 
gate to the Council. Business of the IFC meet- 
ings concern such aspects of fraternity life as 
IFC Presents, IFC Ball, IFC Athletic Program, 
IFC Scholarship, a tutoring service, and IFC 
Rush. 



110 




Dave X^jfr^^. ^^^ 

SuIIivnn ^Jiil^^^^^ President 



1MERFRATERNH Y RUSH 
Rush is one of the most important aspects oT 
the fraternity system because it is the life-line 
of the system. Rush at the Maryland campus is 
composed of a series of schedided events; Indoc- 
trination in Rush policies and Rush procedures, 
and an introduction to the indixidual fraternity 
houses. 

Vou may wonder ho^v to go about rushing. 
Ihe IF(^ has prepared a Rush Booklet intro- 
ducing Fraternities, the Fraternity system, and 
Rush to the rushee. Publicity is distributed 
throughout the Maryland campus and the siu- 
rounding areas. Any questions on the Fratern- 
ity system or any parts of the system will be 
gladly answered by the fraternity member on 
campus or through the IFC. 

If you, an indi\'idual who wants to kno^v 
more about the Fraternity system, or you, an 
individual who is just curious, take the time to 
look into the Fraternity system, YOU will -want 
to become a Fraternitv Man. 



Ill 



Dear Freshmen, 

It is with great pleasure that I welcome you 
to the University of Maryland, On behalf of 
the Interfraternity Council and its 24 member 
fraternities, I would like to extend to you an 
invitation to become familiar with Greek life. 

The fraternities at Maryland, ranging in size 
from 15 to 100 members, offer the student 
countless opportunities to develop personal 
friendships, engage in a well-structured intra- 
mural sports program, and achieve academic 
excellence. 

Fraternities are also well represented in al- 
most all phases of extracurricular student life; 
S.G.A., University Theater, University athletics, 
and campus publications, to mention but a few. 

Pledge programs place an organized emphasis 
on scholastic achievement coupled vjith growth 
of you as an individual. 

The primary objective of your college career 
is the development of a more complete man, 
both academically and socially. The fraternity 
compliments the University toward the fulfill- 
ment of this objective. 

Leaving you with these thoughts, I wish you 
every success in your college endeavors and urge 
you to sample for yourself, in the coming Fall 
rush, the experience of Fraternity. 

Sincerely, 

Dave Sullivan 
IFC President 



112 



SORORITIES 
ALPHA CHI OMEGA "ALPHA CHI" 

Gamma Theta Chapter established here—\9A9) 

President Barbara Williams 

4525 College Avenue UN 4-9893 

ALPHA DELTA PI "AD PI" 

Beta Phi Chapter established here -1940 

President Patricia Smith 

4603 College Avenue WArfield 7-9864 

ALPHA EPSILON PHI "A E PHI" 

Alpha Mu Chapter established here— 1943 

President Lois Mazoh 

11 Fraternity Row WArfield 7-9701 

ALPHA GAMMA DELTA "A G D" 

Alpha Xi Chapter established here— 1947 

President Karen Reynolds 

4535 College Avenue UNion 4-9806 

ALPHA OMICRON PI "A O PI" 

Pi Delta Chapter established here— 1924 

President Maria Valencia 

4517 College Avenue WArfield 7-9871 

ALPHI PHI 

Delta Zeta Chapter established here— 1961 

President Carole Anderson 

7402 Princeton Avenue UNion 4-5910 

ALPHA XI DELTA "ALPHA XI" 

Beta Eta Chapter established here— 19S4 

President Robin Trainor 

4517 Knox Road WArfield 7-9720 
DELTA DELTA DELTA "TRI DELT" 

Alphat Pi Chapter established here— 1934 

President Jane Edwards 

4606 College Avenue UNion 4-9491 

DELTA GAMMA "D G" 

Beta Sigma Chapter established here— 1945 

President Kay Dougherty 

4518 Knox Road UNion 4-5880 



114 



DELTA PHI EPSILON "D PHI E" 

Delta Xi Chapter established here — 1945 

President Judy Goldberg 

4514 Knox Road UNion 4-9692 

GAMMA PHI BETA "GAMMA PHI" 

Beta Beta Chapter establislied /<ere— 1940 

President Maureen Watkins 

9 Fraternity Row WArfield 7-9773 

KAPPA ALPHA THETA "THETA" 

Gamma Mil Chapter established here— \947 

President Jeanne Buckingham 

8 Fraternity Row WArfield 7-7606 

KAPPA DELTA "K D" 

Alpha Rho Chapter established here-1929 

President Carol Lee 

4610 College Avenue WArfield 7-9759 

KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA "KAPPA" 

Gamma Psi Chapter established here— 1929 

President Sandy Hughes 

7407 Princeton Avenue WArfield 7-9886 

PHI SIGMA SIGMA "PHI SIGGY SIGGY" 

Beta Alpha Chapter established here— 19S6 

President Deena Chesler 

4531 College Avenue WArfield 7-9828 

PI BETA PHI "PI PHI" 

Maryland Beta Chapter established here— 1944 

President Sue Dayton 

12 Fraternity Row UNion 4-9885 

SIGMA DELTA TAU "S D T" 

Alpha Theta Chapter established here— 1951 

President Linda Pollack 

4516 Knox Road WArfield 7-9513 

SIGMA KAPPA 

Beta Zeta Chapter established here— 194\ 

President Emmy Lou Moke 

10 Fraternity Row WArfield 7-9861 



115 



A. 


. . Alpha 


N 


. . . . Nu 


B . 


. . . Beta 


hH 


. . . . Xi 


r . 


Gamma 


o. 


Omicron 


A 


. . Delta 


n 


. ... Pi 


E . 


Epsilon 


p . 


. . . Rho 


z. 


. . . Zeta 


% . 


. Sigma 


H 


. . . . Eta 


r . 


. . . Tau 


e 


. . Theta 


Y. 


Upsilon 


I . 


. . . Iota 


0). 


Phi 


K 


. . Kappa 


X 


Chi 


A. 


Lambda 


^ 


. ... Psi 


M 


Mu 


a 


. Omega 



116 



FRATERNITIES 
ALPHA EPSILON PI "A E PI" 

Delta Deuteron Chapter established /iere— 1940 

President Mike Mendelson 

13 Fraternity Row 277-9748 

ALPHA GAMMA RHO "A G R" 

Alpha Theta Chapter established here— 192S 

President Max Perry 

7511 Princeton Avenue WArfield 7-9831 

ALPHA TAU OMEGA "A T O" 

Epsilon Gamma Chapter established here— 1930 

President James Smith 

4611 College Avenue WArfield 7-9769 

DELTA SIGMA PHI "DELTA SIG" 

Alpha Sigma Chapter established here— I92i 

President Ed Mver 

4300 Knox Road WArfield 7-9770 

DELTA TAU DELTA "DELT" 

Delta Sigma Chapter established here— \948 

President John Prusch 

KAPPA ALPHA "KA" 

Beta Kappa Chapter established here— 1914^ 

President Bill Thomas 

1 Fraternity Row UNion 4-9846 

LAMBDA CHI ALPHA "LAMBDA CHI" 

Epsilon Pi Chapter established here-l9S2 

President Jim Graef 

6 Fraternity Row WArfield 7-9778 

PHI DELTA THETA "PHI DELT" 

Alpha Chapter established here-\930 

President Joe Moore 

4605 College Avenue WArfield 7-9884 



117 



PHI EPSILON PI "PHI EP" 

Beta Theta Chapter established here— 1962 

President Bruce Fingerhut 

4229 Guilford Road 779-5581 

PHI KAPPA SIGMA "PHI KAP" 

Alpha Zeta Chapter established here-lS99 

President Dave Nardo 

5 Fraternity Row UNion 4-9828 

PHI KAPPA TAU "PHI TAU" 

Beta Omicron Chapter established here— 1950 

President Rod Frederick 

Box 24, Campus UNion 4-9886 

PHI SIGMA DELTA "PHI SIG DELT" 

Phi Epsilon Chapter established here— 1959 

President Eugene Korth 

14 Fraternity Row 927-9557 

PHI SIGMA KAPPA "PHI SIG" 

Eta Chapter eslablisher here-\^91 , 1923 

President Bob Bounds 

7 Fraternity Row UNion 4-9851 

PI KAPPA ALPHA "PI K A" 

Delta Psi Chapter established here— 1952 

President Charles Bowers 

4530 College Avenue 779-9801 

SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON "S A E" 

Maryland Beta Chapter established here— 1945 

President Hal Brierly 

4 Fraternity Row WArfield 7-9707 

SIGMA ALPHA MU "S A M" 

Sigma Chi Chapter established here—\9SS 

President Bob Rombro 

2 Fraternity Row WArfield 7-9845 

118 



SIGMA CHI 

Gamma Chi Chapter established here— 1942 

President James Owens 

4600 Norwich Road UNion 4-9807 

SIGMA NU 

Delta Phi Chapter established here-\9n 

President Bill Henshaw 

4617 Norwich Road WArfield 7-9563 

SIGMA PHI EPSILON "SIG EP" 

Maryhmd Beta Chapter established here— 1949 

President William Butcher 

7403 Hopkins Avenue 864-3855 

SIGMA PI 

Alpha Chi Chapter established here— 1949 

President Bill Gscheidle 

4502 College Avenue 864-9583 

TAU EPSILON PHI "T E P" 

Tail Beta Chapter established here— 1925 

President Malcolm Paul 

4607 Knox Road UNion 4-9513 

TAU KAPPA EPSILON "T K E" 

Tau Beta Chapter established here— 1947 

President Richard Clay 

Campus UNion 4-9765 

THETA CHI 

Alpha Psi Chaptei established here— \949> 

President Robert Maurer 

7401 Princeton Avenue UNion 4-9883 

ZETA BETA TAU "Z B T" 

Beta Zeta Chapter established here— \94^ 

President Barry Bricken 

4400 Knox Road UNion 4-9786 



119 




*- 1 




^*^*i* #jg^^ 





1 



RESIDENCES 




DORM LIFE 

A warm welcome will be yours in your new 
campus home. You will find that, in the resi- 
dence halls, every effort has been made to offer 
you comfortable and pleasant living conditions 
and facilities for conscientious studying, for 
this is, after all, your home where you will be 
spending a great deal of your time. Here you 
will hang your hat, that picture of someone 
special, a football schedule, or the latest Uni- 
versity Theater program. Here you will study, 
sleep, laugh, cry, and enjoy an occasional "bull 
session." 

Your room will be provided with single beds, 
bureaus, desks, closets, and chairs. You may want 
to avail yourself of a towel and linen service. 
Curtains, rugs, bedspreads, and lamps that you 
will want to bring can reflect your own personal- 
ity and give the room a personal touch. Don't 
forget such extras as a pillow, wastebasket, clock, 
iron, and ashtrays if you smoke! Hairdryers are 
permitted in the rooms but no hotplates, please! 

Though you will spend much of your time 
studying, you can relax by attending the social 
functions sponsored by the residence. Desserts 
are held frequently and consist of men and wom- 
en residents getting together in the recreation 
room or lounge of the hall for two hours of light 
refreshments and dancing. Fireside chats and 
other talks given by your favorite professors or 

122 



other speakers at the request of your residence 
are also popular. You may want to join one of 
the intramural teams organized in your hall. 
This will give you an opportunity to exercise 
your skill in basketball, volleyball, football and 
Softball. 

You may find it convenient to study in the 
special study rooms or lounges provided in all 
residences. To help you with your studies all of 
the halls have accumulated files of old tests and 
exam papers which may be consulted "legally." 



TELEPHONES 

In each residence, you will find phones which 
you may use to receive calls and to place direct 
calls, at no cost, to other on-campus phones. 
Calls may be received on these phones from 8 
a.m. to 10 p.m. on Mondays, to 11 p.m. on week- 
ends and to 10:30 p.m. on other nights. You are 
asked to be considerate when using these phones 
and to observe the time-limit for each call set by 
your dorm. The following are main desk exten- 
sions for women's residences: 

Anne Arundel 7301 Montgomery C,D,E . 7341 

Caroline 7312 Montgomery F,G 7342 

Carroll 7313 Queen Anne's 7347 

Centreville North . . . .7310 St. Mary's 7348 

Centreville South 7311 Somerset 7349 

Dorchester 7331 Wicomico 7350 

Montgomery A,B 7340 Worcester 7351 

Denton 7500 



123 



Men's residence halls have no desk phones. 
You can find student's extentions by consulting 
the Student Directory or by calling Information, 
extention 622. 



VISITING REGULATIONS 

Both men and women should make themselves 
known to their residence directors. They are 
there to help you and answer any questions you 
might have. 

Men should call for women by having them 
paged at the main desk of the lobby. Observe 
good manners in the lobby and remember that 
smoking is prohibited there. Women may enter- 
tain friends in the recreation room which is pro- 
vided with a ping-pong table, television, and 
piano. 

Women are permitted only on the ground 
floor public lounges and lobbies of men's resi- 
dence halls, and only when these areas are cha- 
peroned by a House Director or other authority. 

Visitors may stay overnight on weekends at 
the request of a resident for a fee of $.50 or fl.OO 
if linens are provided by the residence. This is 
subject to available space, approval of the house 
director, and permission which must be re- 
quested 24 hours in advance. 

124 



DRESS REGULATIONS 

A blouse or sweater and skirt, or dress for 
women and a shirt and trousers for men are ap- 
propriate for wear in all classroom and admin- 
istrative buildings, chapel, library, first and sec- 
ond floors of the Student Union, dining halls at 
all meals from Monday through Friday, and 
women's residence hall lobbies. On Saturday, at 
breakfast and lunch only, tailored bermudas and 
slacks may be worn by men and women. Coat 
and tie and trousers for men, dress or coordin- 
ated outfit with hose and heels or flats for wom- 
en should be worn to Sunday dinner at all din- 
ing halls. Monday through Friday, on the two 
lower levels of the Student Union, tailored ber- 
mudas or slacks may be worn after 3 p.m. Ber- 
mudas and slacks may be worn on these levels 
all day on the weekend except for Sunday Buffet 
in the cafeteria. Coat and tie or heels and hose 
are worn for the buffet. Bermudas and slacks 
are allowed at any time while bowling. 



CURFEWS 

Curfew hours for women vary as to year in 
college. Freshman women have three overnights 
and three twelve o'clock late leaves per semester; 
sophomores, six of each; juniors, nine; and sen- 
iors have unlimited privileges in these areas. All 
weekends are free. Men have no curfews what- 
soever. 



125 



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BOOKS 

The Student Supply Store, maintained by the 
University, is located in the Student Union. 
Here one may obtain all required texts, new or 
used, and other supplies at reasonable rates. It 
functions for student benefit in that profits are 
placed in a student scholarship fund. Upon re- 
sale of books, the student is given a credit slip 
which can be used only in the SU. No cash re- 
funds are given. Alpha Phi Omega (APO) , a 
service fraternity, sells used texts consigned to 
them by students in the SU. 

The Maryland Book Exchange, on Baltimore 
Boulevard in College Park, also sells new and 
used texts plus supplies. Cash refunds are given 
on resale, and during the first week of classes 
new books may be resold at original cost upon 
presentation of sales receipt. 

Both bookstores post approved text lists for 
all courses. 

CHECK CASHING SERVICES 

Checks on all banks may be cashed at Subur- 
ban Trust Co. in College Park for a small serv- 
ice charge. Bank hours are: 

Monday - Thursday 8:30-2 p.m. 

Friday 8:30 -2 p.m. 

also 5 - 8 p.m. 
Two banks in Prince Georges Plaza are open 
on Saturday. The SU will cash checks up to |10. 
There is a 10c fee. 



128 



CATALOGS 

The University publishes a general informa- 
tion bulletin, AN ADVENTURE IN LEARN- 
ING. Catalogs for individual colleges are avail- 
able at the respective Dean's office. 

COLLEGE PARK SERVICES 

Many shops are conveniently located here in 
College Park. Clothing stores, a shoe store, shoe 
repair shops, jewelry and drug stores are located 
within walking distance. Nearby are hair sty- 
lists, barber shops, a grocery store, hardware 
store, three laundries (two self-service) , a 5 & 
10c store, gift shop, stationery shop, florist, and 
dressmaker. 

Prince Georges Plaza, Silver Spring and D.C. 
may be reached by car or bus. 

COUNSELING CENTER 

The University maintains a Counseling Center 
to aid students in maintaining a better under- 
standing of themselves and to improve methods 
of dealing with vocational, educational, and 
personal problems. The new office for the Cen- 
ter is located in Shoemaker Hall. No fee is 
charged for assistance to undergraduates. Psy- 
chologists staff the center. Counseling is on an 
individual basis. A Reading and Study Skills 
Laboratory is available for the purpose of im- 
proving student reading and study habits. 

129 



DAIRY 

The University Dairy, next to the Rossbor- 
ough Inn, serves dairy products and light 
lunches. Its hours are: 

Monday - Friday 9:30 - 5:30 p.m. 

Saturday - Sunday ... 1 1 : 30 - 5 : 30 p.m. 

FINANCIAL AIDS 

Students who have demonstrated academic 
ability and have financial need may apply for 
aid through scholarships and grants, loans, or 
part-time employment. These are listed in the 
bulletin, AN ADVENTURE IN LEARNING, 
and are awarded before the beginning of the 
academic year. Specific aid information may be 
obtained in the Office of Student Aid, North 
Administration Building. 

ID CARDS 

A new student receives his ID card at regis- 
tration, and it will stay with him throughout 
his college years. For the undergraduate, it 
serves as a general identification card, an admis- 
sion ticket to athletic and SGA events, and as a 
Dining Hall card for those with dining hall 
privileges. 

The ID is required to draw library books, for 
identification in cashing checks, to vote in stu- 
dent elections, to obtain the TERRAPIN, to 
check out athletic equipment at Cole Activities 
Building and the Armory, and to use the golf 
course, tennis courts, and other facilities. 



130 




*^1 




Loss of an ID should be reported immediately 
to the Office of the Executive Dean for Student 
Life. A $10 fee is charged for replacement. 

INFIRMARY 

The new infirmary is located across from the 
SU building. Its major function is to assist the 
students and the University in maintaining good 
health standards by treating students. It is open 
to all students free of charge. A registered nurse 
is on duty 24 hours a day, and a doctor is on 
call for emergencies. Physicians will be present 
at the Infirmary during the following hours: 

Monday - Friday 8:30 - 1 1 :45 a.m. 

I- 4:15p.m. 

Saturday 9-11 a.m. 

Sunday 10-11 a.m. 

LIBRARY 

The McKeldin Library is a repository of in- 
formation on many subjects. It contains four 
main floors, three mezzanines, several light read- 
ing rooms, and many special subject rooms. All 
are open to students. 

Books and records may be withdrawn upon 
presentation of Student ID. Books must be re- 
turned to the loan desk or the book depositories 
on the due date. 

During the regular school year, Library hours 
are: 

Monday - Friday 8 a.m. - 10 p.m. 

Saturday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. 

Sunday 3 p.m. - 10 p.m. 

132 



There are also special subject libraries in the 
Chemistry, Math and Engineering Buildings. 
Students are encouraged to use the SU study 
rooms, the College Park Library, the Library of 
Congress, the Army Medical Library and Mu- 
seum, and the National Institutes of Health 
Library. 

LOST AND FOUND 

The Campus Police Office in the General Serv- 
ices Building will accept lost articles. Adminis- 
trative offices on campus receive them and for 
ward them to the police. Individuals finding 
articles shoidd insist on receiving a receipt for 
them. Lost articles may be reclaimed with rea- 
sonable identification. After 90 days, the police 
will dispose of unclaimed goods to charities. The 
loss of textbooks should be reported to both 
bookstores at once. 

PLACEMENT SERVICE 

The University Placement Service, located in 
Shoemaker Hall, offers job opportunities related 
to present and future employment needs. This 
program includes Career Week and summer job 
conferences when representatives from com- 
panies will be on hand to interview interested 
applicants. 

The placement director and your department's 
faculty placement representative are available 
for conferences with sophomwes and juniors to 
aid their future planning. The most assistance 
is received in your senior year. 

183 




RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 

The University offers many recreational facil- 
ities. Local services are available too. Bowling 
alleys may be found in the SU. Adelphi, and 
College Park. Rates are cheaper during the day. 

There are no movie theatres in College Park, 
but movies are shown at the SU Friday, Satur- 
day, and Sunday evenings. Classical films are 
shown Tuesday and Thursday afternoons. There 
are nearby theatres in Langley Park, Silver 
Spring, D.C. 



134 




Swimming is available for women only in 
Preinkert Fieldhouse and to both men and wo- 
men in Cole Field House. In winter, there is ice 
skating on the duck pond behind the University 
Hills Apartments and any time at indoor rinks 
on US 1, in Silver Spring, and in D. C. 

The University offers recreational facilities 
such as archery targets, tennis courts, etc. — at 
a reasonable rate or at no charge. There is a 
miniature golf course at Green Meadows on 
University Boulevard, a university golf course, 
and a Maryland driving range behind the sta- 
dium. 



135 



'ijFi 




There are listening booths and record rooms 
in the Fine Arts room of McKeldin Library. 
Records and record players are available. The 
SU has televisions, a billiard room, and a Hi-Fi 
and stereo room. The SU provides special facil- 
ities for commuters. 

Campus-wide dances are held at least twice 
monthly in the SU Ballroom, Several groups 
sponsor hootenannies, which are campus folk 
sings. In addition to the athletic and recrea- 
tional activities in and around College Park, 
campus organizations and the different classes 
plan recreational evenings throughout the year. 



TRANSPORTATION 

Greyhound's Baltimore-Washington buses pass 
through College Park every half hour to the 
D.C. terminal at 1110 New York Avenue, N.W. 
Trailways has a terminal in Washington at 1201 
New York Avenue, N.W. Suburban Transit 
buses go, via University Boulevard, to Silver 
Spring every half hour. Other local transporta- 
tion includes the Capitol Transit Buses, the 
College Park, and Mt. Rainier lines. 

All major East Coast airlines and many small 
ones serve the Washington National Airport in 
Virginia. Baltimore's Friendship International 
Airport can be reached by following the signs 
on the Baltimore-Washington Parkway. 

137 



Trains come and go from Union Station in 
D. C. The phone number is EX 3-7900. The 
Blue Bird Cab Company and the Suburban Cab 
Company are local cab companies. 

UNIVERSITY DIRECTORY 

The Student-Faculty Directory is published 
by the University each year and is sold at the 
book stores 6 weeks after classes begin. The cost 
is usually less than $1.00. 

UNIVERSITY OFFICES 

Most University offices close at 4:45 p.m. The 
cashier in the North Administration Building 
closes at 3 p.m. 

UNIVERSITY POST OFFICE 

The University operates a post office in Gen- 
eral Services Building for the reception, dispatch 
and delivery of the U.S. Mail, including parcel 
post items and inter-office communications. 

This office is not a part of the U.S. postal 
system and no facilities are available for the re- 
ception or transmission of postal money orders. 
All registered and insured mail must be picked 
up at the U.S. Post Office in College Park. Resi- 
dent students' mail will be delivered directly to 
the dormitory. The University Post Office closes 
at 4 p.m. during week days while the U.S. Post 
Office closes at 5 p.m. Monday through Friday 
and at noon on Saturday. 

138 



STUDENT UNION 




1:^9 



STUDENT UNION 

The hub of activity for the University is the 
Student Union, which is under the direction of 
Bill Hoff. To students the Union means visits 
with friends over lunch, dances, meetings, mov- 
ies, and other varied activities. 

General Hours: 

Monday-Thursday 9 a.m.-l 1 p.m. 

Friday-Saturday 10 a.m.~12 p.m. 

Sunday 2 p.m.-l 1 p.m. 

Do you need books and supplies for classes? 
Are you looking for aspirin or records?— all the 
required supplies for classes are sold in the Stu- 
dent Supply Store along with drugs, cards, nov- 
elty items, college jewelry, and Maryland jack- 
ets, etc. The store is located on the basement 
level of the Union. 

Hours: 

Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 

(During Registration Week— open in the eve- 
nings and on Saturday.) 

A game room is located near the entrance to 
the Supply Store where all kinds of table games 
may be played. Bridge tournaments are held 
here every Tuesday evening. 

140 



CAFETERIA 

A popular eating place for commuters is the 
new cafeteria. Here you can buy a sandwich or a 
full course meal. 

Hours: 

Monday-Friday 1 1 a.m.-2 p.m. 

The Snack Bar located next to the cafeteria is 
a popular meeting place for friends. Here a coke 
and pizza may be enjoyed during the day. 
Hours: 

Monday-Friday 7 a.m.-lO p.m. 

Saturday 8 a.m.-10:30 p.m. 

Sunday 2 p.m.-lO p.m. 

An Activities Lounge is located on the first 
floor. The lounge is a popular study room dur- 
ing the daytime. 

Two outside patios are located off the Activ- 
ities Lounge. The patios can be used for eating 
or just relaxing. 

BOWLING 

There are 16 tenpin bowling alleys in the sub- 
basement of the Union. 

Hours: 
Monday-Thursday 3 p.m.-ll p.m. 

Friday 3 p.m.-midnight 

Saturday 10 a.m.-midnight 

Sundays ^ holidays 2 p.m.-lOp.m. 

Cost: 

$2.40 per lane per hour. 

141 



MOVIES 

A large Auditorium on the main floor is used 
on weekends to show full length motion pictures. 

Show times: 

Friday and Saturday 7 p.m. & 9 p.m. 

Sunday 7:30 p.m. 

Price: 25^ per person 

A Smoke Shop is located near the main en- 
trance. Here tobacco, candy, and paperback 
books are sold. 

Hours: 

Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. 

7 p.m. -closing 



A Telephone Center is next to the Smoke 
Shop. The center has seven pay phones and two 
campus phones. 



An International Language Lounge is another 
feature of the main floor. Only foreign lan- 
guages are spoken in the lounge. 

A Television Room is a popular attraction on 
this floor. There are three black and white sets 
and one color set, which makes it possible for 
all local channels to be tuned in at the same 
time. 



142 



OFFICES 

The rest of the first floor consists of offices. 
Dean Florestano's office, the SGA and class of- 
fices, are all located in the Student Union. Dean 
Billings, the social director, also has her office 
located on this floor. In addition, there are 10 
meeting rooms. 

On the second floor there is a large study room 
with desks and lounge chairs. 

Music rooms are to be found on the second 
floor. Stereo music is piped in for listening. In 
the other rooms there are three pianos and one 
organ. 

A browsing library with current periodicals 
and light reading material can be found in this 
floor. 

The Ballroom, where most campus dances 
originate, is on the second floor. There is at 
least one dance held here each month. 

A new addition is the Fine Arts Lounge. Many 
paintings are exhibited on the walls. This room 
may be used for lounging or studying. 

Twelve billiard tables are located in the room 
next to the bowling alleys. A billiard table can 
be rented for 80^ an hour. The hours are the 
same as the general SU hours. 

143 




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151 



ALMA MATER 

Hail, Alma Mater! 
Hail to thee Maryland 
Steadfast in loyalty 
For thee we stand. 
Love for the black and gold 
Deep in our hearts we hold. 
Singing thy praise forever 
Throughout the land. 



SONS OF OLD MARYLAND 

Sons of old Maryland, 
Old Maryland needs you! 
Stand by your colors, boys. 
And to them e're be true! 
Fight for old Maryland. 
Old Liners stand, 
Defenders of the black and gold 
Throughout the land! 



MARYLAND MY MARYLAND 

Thou wilt not cower in the dust, 
Maryland, my Maryland. 
Thy gleaming sword shall never rust 
Maryland, my Maryland. 
Remember Carroll's sacred trust 
Remember Howard's war-like thrust. 
And all thy slumberers with the just 
Maryland, my Maryland. 



152 



MARYLAND VICTORY SONG 

Maryland we're all behind you, 
Raise high the black and gold. 
For there is nothing half so glorious 
As to see our team victorious. 
We've got the steam boys, 
We've got the team boys, 
So keep on fighting, don't give in! 
M-A-R-Y-L-A-N-D (yell) 
Maryland will win! 



MARYLAND DRINKING SONG 

Drink to the Terrapin! 

All bold-hearted men. 

We have no fear of hell. 

For we're loyal sons and fellows. 

Drink to the Terrapin! 

May God bless her sons! 

When the toast is in the cup, 

Bottoms up! Bottoms up! 

To Maryland! 



153 



AROUND THE TOWN 

The following list of restaurants, stores, and 
places of entertainment have been compiled to 
aid you, the newcomer to this area, by inform- 
ing you of the local commercial establishments 
and facilities. 



COLLEGE PARK AREA 

RESTAURANTS 

College Park Delicatessen, 7400 Bait. Blvd. 

made to order snacks, take out . . . 
Hot Shoppes, 7300 Bait. Blvd. (TU 2-2000) 

good old American food . . . 
Huddle, 4439 Lehigh Rd., (WA 7-6560) . . . 

pizza, coffee, soft lights . . . 
Italian Gardens, 7408 Bait. Blvd. . . . good 

Italian food and atmosphere . . . 
Little Tavern, 7413 Bait. Blvd. (WA 7-9717) 

open all night . . . 
Pizza Hut, 7409 Bait. Blvd. (UN 4-9700) . . . 

pizzas, delivery service . . . 
Prince Georges Restaurant, 7325 Bait. Blvd. 

(UN 4-3060) . . . full course meals . . . 
Student Union, campus, (WA 7-3800, ext. 

503) . . . snacks, lunches, congenial atmos- 
phere , . . 

STORES 
BANKS 

Suburban Trust Co., 7360 Bait. Blvd. (JU 8- 
5000) , College Park . . . 

154 



BARBER SHOPS 

Anthony's Barber Shop, 7419 Bait. Blvd., 

(WA. 7-9608) . . . the best in town . . . 
Campus Barber Shop, next to the Chicken 'n 

Bucket, we cut your hair with special care 
Old Line Barber Shop, 7414 Bait. Blvd., (UN 

4-9772) . . . shear artistry . . . 
BEAUTY SHOPS 

Color 'N Curl, College Ave. 

Glamour Girl Hair Designers, 7420 Bait. Blvd. 

(779-6666) . . . meet your friends here . . . 
Martini Hairdressers, 7244 Bait. Blvd., (WA 

7-9641) . . . exclusive but not expensive . . . 
Novel's Hair Stylist, 7421 Bait. Blvd., (WA 7- 

2800) . . . convenient, skillful . . . 
BOOKS, ART SUPPLIES 

College Park Gift Shop, 7334 Bait. Blvd., (AP 

7-3900) . . . gifts for all occasions . . . 
Maryland Book Exchange, 4500 College Ave., 

(WA 7-2510) . . . new and used textbooks, 

books bought and sold, engineering supplies 
Student Supply Store, Student Union, U. of 

Md. . . . new and used texts bought and 

sold , . . 
CAR WASH 

Nu Look Car Wash, 5506 Bait. Ave., Hyatts- 

ville . . . student discount slips available 

through the Diamondback . . . 
CLEANERS 

Topper Cleaners, 7408 Bait. Blvd., (WA 7- 

1845) . . . special student discount cards . . . 
University Cleaners 

155 



DRUG STORES 

Albrecht's Pharmacy, Bait. Blvd. and College 
Ave., (WA 7-3838) ... all drugstore items, 
lunch counter . . . 

Peoples Drug Store, Bait. Blvd. 

FLORISTS 

College Park Florists, 4412 Knox Rd., (927- 
1655) . . . quality, economy, dependability, 
24 hour phone service . . . 

GARAGES AND GAS 

Chaney's Garage, 7505 Bait. Blvd., (UN 4- 
3400) . . . serving the University of Mary- 
land for 42 years . . . 

Shell Oil, Bait. Blvd. ... 

Sunoco, Bait. Blvd. . . . 

GROCERIES 

Food Fair, College Park Shopping Center . . . 
shop at Food Fair, you'll like the change, 
discounts to sororities & fraternities . . . 

JEWELERS 

College Park Watch Shop, 7406 Bait. Blvd., 
(WA 7-6800) ... all types of repair — cards, 
jewelry, Keep Sake diamonds . . . 

Powers Jewelers, College Park Shopping Cen- 
ter, (UN 4-0444) . . . Fraternal jewelry . . . 

MEN'S CLOTHING 

Powers and Goode, 4509 College Ave., (WA 7- 

0421) . . . men's clothing . . . 
Everett Simon's Men's Wear, College Park 

Shopping Center, (WA 7-9663) . . . 

156 



SHOES 

Triangle Shoes, College Park Shopping Cen- 
ter, ... so much for so little . . , 

SPORTS 

Varsity Sports Shop, 7501 Bait. Blvd., (UN 4- 
4441) ... see us for your athletic needs . . . 
U. of M. "T" shirts, jackets, sweatshirts . . . 

VARIETY STORE 

F. W. Woolworth, College Park Shopping Cen- 
ter, (UN 4-9843) . . . satisfaction guaranteed 
—replacement or money refunded . . . 

WOAfEN'S CLOTHING 
Brass Buttons 

Karen Ames, College Park Shopping Center, 
(UN 4-6944) . . . smart, casual clothes for 
the coed, "Home of Fashion Shopping" . . . 

ENTERTAINMENT 

College Park Bowling Alley, 7416 Bait. Blvd. 

(WA 7-1247) . . . pinballs, snack bar . . . 
Student Union, campus, (ext. 503) . . . T.V., 

movies, bowling, pool room, listening . . . 
Town Hall Restaurant, 8134 Bait. Blvd., (TO 

9-5814) . . . Greek get-togethers, fun . . . 
Campus Door, 7410 Bait. Blvd. (WA 7-2866) 

. . . close, convenient, fun, dancing . . . 
College Park Library, Knox Rd. . . . available 

to all University students . . . 
Bicycle Rental, College Park Shopping Center 

. . . rent by the hour or day . . . good rates. 

157 



WASHINGTON AREA 
RESTAURANTS 

Aldo Cafe, 1143 New Hampshire Ave. (FE 7- 

2985) . . . spaghetti, pizza, vineyard terrace. 
Alpine Room, 312 Kennedy St., N.W., (TU 2- 

6399) . . . rock and roll, dancing . . . 
Bavarian, 727 11th St., N.W., (ST 3-5769) . . . 

accordian, German beer . . . 
Ben's Hideaway, 221 Riggs Rd., N.E., (LA 9- 

3355) ... all new, announcing our new 

private party room in Ben's Den, free park- 
ing .. . 
Blacky's House of Beef, 1217 22nd St., N.W., 

(FE 3-1100) . . . prime ribs of beef . . . 
Brickskeller, 1523 22nd St., N.W., (DE 2-1885) 

... 46 kinds of beer, pizza . . . 
Casino Royal, 804 14th St., N.W., (NA 8-7700) 

. . . top names in popular music . . . 
Caruso's Italian Kitchen, 1305 F St., N.W. . . . 

various location, Italian food . . . 
Crosstown, 3102 Mt. Pleasant St., N.W. (HO 

2-8943) . . . highly recommended $3 min. . . 
Devonshire Grill, 4241 Wisconsin Ave., N.W., 

WO 6-2766) . . . college people, frosties . . . 

"The finest Italian cuisine," spaghetti . . . 
Flag Ship, 951 Main Ave., S.W., (RE 7-8683) 

. . . fresh seafood near the wharves . . . 
Hay Loft, 1411 H St., N.W., (NA 8-3410) . 

rhythm and blues . . . 
Gusti's, 19th and M Sts., N.W., (RE 7-0895) | 

. . . red checked tableclotlis, chiante . . . 



158 



INDEX 



AWS 41 

baseball 85 

basketball 82,93 

Board of Regents 16 

book stores 128 

campus elections 44 

calendar of events . . . .9,10 

cheerleaders 92 

cheers 152,153 

classes 22 

coaches 89 

Colleges of: 

Agriculture 30 

Arts & Sciences 30 

B.P.A 31 

Education 31 

Engineering 31 

Home Economics .... 32 
Physical Education . . .32 

color guard 92 

counseling center 129 

cross country 85 

Deans of Colleges 29 

Deans of Men . . . .17,19,20 
Deans of Women .... 17,18 

dedication 4 

football 80,93 

fraternity rush Ill 

Freshman handbook .54 
general organizations . . .62 

golf 85 

Greek directory 114 

graduate school 33 

history of UM 6,7 

lionoraries 68 



Interfratenity 

Council 110,112 

intramurals 87 

lacrosse 85 

library 132 

literary magazine 52 

map of UM 150 

Men's League 44 

military organizations . .67 

newspaper 50 

Panhellenic 108,110 

placement service 133 

political parties 66 

professional schools ... 33 
professional societies .... 69 
President Elkins 12,13,14 

radio station 51 

religious societies 70 

service groups 66 

SGA cabinet 36,37 

committees 44,45,46 

court 39,40 

legislature 37,38 

President 5 

soccer 81 

sorority rush 107 

swimming 84 

tennis 85 

transportation .97,98,137 

U.C.A 93 

University College 34 

Whom to See 147 

womens' hours 126 

WRA 90 

wrestling 83 

yearbook 51 



159 



LETTER FROM THE EDITORS 

After a careful reading of the M Book, we 
are certain that you are now aware of the multi- 
tude of worthwhile campus activities and organ- 
izations that the University has to offer. These 
organizations will solicit your membership and 
the truly interested student will want to ftke 
part in some of these activities. We feel that 
your college years will be greatly enriched by 
participation in some phase of campus life. How- 
ever, the careful student would be wise to limit 
his selection to one or two well chosen extra- 
curricular activities. 

In addition to actual participation, the stu- 
dent should make it his duty to become well 
informed about his Student Government Associ- 
ation. Approximately $175,000 is spent each year 
from the student activity fees toward student 
activities, so we hope you will share the respons- 
ibility of channeling this money into worthwhile 
and purposeful events which are enjoyed by the 
students. 

Always remember, these four years ahead of 
you will only be as meaningful as you make 
them. Make your years at the University of 
Maryland cherished ones! 

Our very best wishes to the Class of '68! 

The Editors, 
Carol Gebert 
Steve Dubnoff 



160 



STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief . Carol Gebert 

Assistant Editor Steve Dubnoff 

Layout Editor Jane Edwards 

Copy Editor Sue Dayton 

4pt yUtwr>.^<->^.r-.^^.,^-r':-r ..... . -rTTTSttsan Swartz 

Pfioto Editor Kenneth Neil 

JfAwft^0$^g\^fdrk.g<rr-^^^ 

Advisor Thomas Florestano 

SECTION EDITORS 

History and Tradition Phyllis LaBorwit 

Administration Judy Baker 

Academic Sharon Goldstein 

Student Government Gretchen Schwarting 

Publications Anne Hayes 

Religion Beth Bauer 

Organizations Renee Polakoff 

Entertainment Sonya Rovin 

Athletics Mark Anderson 

Commuters Michael Leaky 

Greeks Reba Murray 

Residences Barbara Bourgeois 

Services Lu Kauffman 

Student Union Pat Mullendore 

Index Barbara Piquet 





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