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Full text of "The "M" book of the University of Maryland"

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BOOK 



1969 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Letter from the President 5 

Points of Pride 6 

History 7 

Traditions 8 

Administration 11 

Academic Information 19 

Services 24 

Student Union 34 

Residences 38 

Commuters 44 

Greeks 50 

Map of University 54 

Student Government 64 

Publications 72 

Organizations 76 

Entertainment and Events 84 

Athletics 94 

Rehgion 103 

Index 108 

Staff Inside Back Cover 



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A MESSAGE 



It is a great pleasure for me to welcome you to 
the University of Maryland. As freshmen, you are on 
the threshold of a most important phase of your 
development as an individual. 

The administration, faculty and staff are dedi- 
cated to the task of giving you all possible assistance 
in your development and the State of Maryland has 
provided the physical facilities to insure that you 
have the best possible academic climate of learning. 

How well you succeed in your educational 
endeavors during the next four years depends on how 
much personal effort you are willing to exert. 

Your aims should be as high as your learning 
capacity will allow. 

Good luck! 

Wilson H. Elkins 
President 



POINTS OF PRIDE 

Each year the University is highly recognized for the out- 
standing academic achievements won by its students, facuhy 
members, and facihties. The year 1965 is no exception, for again 
Maryland has won many honors. 

Phi Beta Kappa: On December 16, 1964 a chapter of Phi Beta 
Kappa, an academic society for students in liberal arts with a 3.5 
overall average for their college career, was installed at the 
University. 

Cyclotron: The University of Maryland was recognized for the 
excellence of its high energy physics faculty and program by an 
award from the Atomic Energy Commission for a 100 million volt 
cyclotron. This cyclotron was the only one granted to a university 
by the AEC during the past year. It represents a great monetary 
investment and will require two years to construct and install. 

Guggenheim Fellowships: During 1965, four University of Mary- 
land faculty members were awarded Guggenheim Fellowships. 
They were: 

Paul K. Conkin, Associate Professor of History 

Jack Colvard Jones, Professor of Entomology 

Jerry B. Marion, Professor of Physics 

George A. Snow, Professor of Physics 
In respect to numbers of fellowships, the University is among the 
18 leading institutions in the nation and is in a class with Brown 
University, the University of Texas and the University of Wis- 
consin. 

Comparative Literature Studies: A quarterly publication of the 
Comparative Literature program, edited by Alfred Owen Aldridge, 
head of the department at Maryland, Comparative Literature 
Studies features articles contributed by eminent American and 
European scholars on literary history and the history of ideas. 
Through this journal the University has gained recognition in the 
United States and abroad as an outstanding literary center. 



HISTORY 

The University of Maryland began in Baltimore in 1807 as the 
University of Baltimore. The College of Medicine was the first 
school of the University. 

The University grew in 1823 with the addition of the School of 
Law, the fourth law school opened in the United States. 

In 1882 there was a high point in the University's history when 
the School of Dentistry was founded. This was the first such school 
in the world. 

Louisa Parsons, with the cooperation of Florence Nightingale, 
instituted the School of Nursing in 1889. 

The last addition to the Baltimore campus before it was 
united with the College Park branch was the College of Pharmacy 
in 1904. Since that time the College of Social Work has also been 
added. 

The College Park campus began in 1856 when a group of 
southern Maryland farmers purchased the estate of Charles B. 
Calvert, Esquire, and founded the Maryland Agricultural College. 
It was financed by selling stock for $25.00 per share. 




The College was the first school to benefit from the Morrill 
Land Grant Act passed by the United States Congress in 1863 and 
from subsequent federal aid to higher education. The College thus 
became in part a state institution. 

Due to a disastrous fire in 1912 and a decrease in the enroll- 
ment because of the war, the College found it necessary to apply 
for further state aid. In 1914 the State Legislature bought all the 
stock in the College which then became the Maryland State 
College, a part of the State's educational system. 

The University of Maryland was formed in 1920 when Mary- 
land State College and the University of Baltimore were merged. 
Since theh both campuses have expanded greatly with the acquire- 
ment of more land and the building of more administration build- 
ings, class and laboratory buildings, dormitories and recreation 
facilities. 

In 1949 the University established the College of Special and 
Continuation Studies in various countries of Europe. Students 
abroad are able, by this program, to further their studies. 



TRADITIONS 

The University of Maryland, as all colleges, abounds in tra- 
ditions which help to create a treasure of memorable experiences 
to be remembered in later years by its students. 

One of the first traditions a new student meets is the friendly 
atmosphere which makes the campus seem much smaller than it 
really is. A cheerful smile and a friendly "hello" are often seen 
and heard while walking between classes. 

Students rush to class in order to arrive before the chapel 
chimes play "Maryland My Maryland" and ring out the hour 
before classes begin. Sometimes the walk is a little sloppier than 
usual as students splash across the mall after a rainstorm. 



The Kappa Alpha Theta kite flying eontest is an annual spring 
tradition to be remembered by students who worked long hours 
constructing their kites and then competed with others to see 
which kite flew the best. 

Tray sliding is one of the newer traditions at the University. 
With snow on the slopes and plenty of trays (much to the dining 
hall's dismay) to go around, this winter sport has become very 
popular. 

Naturally, since the University is in an historic area, there is 
a "someone slept here" house. Our "someone" was General 
Lafayette who visited at Rossborough Inn, the oldest building on 
campus, which is found on Baltimore Boulevard, and now serves 
as a faculty dining area. 

Behind Rossborough Inn is the wishing well. As with other 
wishing wells, a penny brings good luck! 

Testudo, Maryland's five hundred pound terrapin mascot, 
is perched on his pedestal in front of McKeldin Library. From 
there he watches students lounging, studying, and singing folk 
songs on the mall during beautiful fall and spring days. 

The story of the University's traditions would not be complete 
without mention of the Kissing Tunnel. By tradition a couple must 
kiss on their first trip to this secluded spot which is found under 
Chapel Drive in front of the Chapel. 

Traditional events sponsored by the Student Government 
highlight every year. Homecoming, Parent's Day, Cultural events, 
Class Proms, Senior Class Presents, the AWS Bridal Fair, and 
many other functions are held for the students enjoyment. 

Greek sponsored events also occur yearly. Many students 
enjoy listening to sorority and fraternity members harmonizing 
barbershop style at Harmony Hall and singing as a group in the 
Interfraternity Sing. Spring and Fall Greek Weeks, held each 
year, offer opportunities for the campus at large to see the Greek 
System working together. 

Not as amusing but quiet as traditional are six week's exams 
(hourlies) and finals which never cease to plague M.U.'s students. 



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ADMINISTRATION 




The Administration coordinates and directs all phases of 
University life. Every freshman should be familiar with the mem- 
bers of the administration and with their responsibilities. They are 
always anxious to meet students, listen to their views, and help 
them with their problems. 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

President of the University 



Dr. Wilson H. Elkins has been the President of the University 
of Maryland since September, 1954. A man of outstanding 
abilities and achievements. Dr. Elkins has guided University 
students toward higher goals in education. 

Dr. Elkins did his undergraduate work at the University of 
Texas, where he was awarded eight varsity letters for his partici- 
pation in football, basketball, and track. A member of Sigma Nu 
fraternity, he served as president of the Student Association and 
attained membership in Phi Eta Sigma and Phi Beta Kappa. After 
receiving his B.A. and M.A. degrees, he was awarded a Rhodes 
Scholarship to Oxford University, England, where he received 
his Bachelor of Letters and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Since 
he came to the University of Maryland as President, he has re- 
ceived honorary degrees from Washington College and Johns Hop- 
kins University. 



Dr. Albin O. Kuhn 

Executive Vice President 

Dr. Albin O. Kuhn has served as Executive Vice President of 
the University of Maryland since 1958. Dr. Kuhn works closely 
with the President and makes certain that the Administration's 
policies are carried out. 



Dr. R. Lee Hornbake 

Vice President of Academic Affairs 

Dr. R. Lee Hornbake has been Vice President of Academic 
Affairs since 1958. His duties include expanding and improving 
the academic program offered at the University. 



Mr. Alvin E. Gormen y 

Assistant to the President for Endoicment 

Mr. Alvin E. Cormeny, Assistant to the President for Endow- 
ment and Development, is in charge of securing private donations 
for projects such as scholarships and faculty development pro- 
grams to improve the University. 



Dr. Frank L. Bentz, Jr. 

Assistant to the President 

Dr. Frank L. Bentz, Assistant to the President, is in charge of 
development of the University's long-range Capital Improvements 
Program, the annual Capital Budget Requests which are sub- 
mitted to the State Legislature, and plant improvements projects 
undertaken from current operating funds. 



12 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

The Board of Regents is composed of eleven members who 
are appointed by the Governor of Maryland for a seven year term. 

The Board is vested with the power of the University. They 
handle and approve plans and policies concerning the University 
and pass judgement on the use of funds. In addition to these 
duties, the Board names all newly constructed building on campus 
and make appointments. The work of the Board is varied. They 
also attend meetings of the State Board of Agriculture in order to 
gain insight into the management of numerous agriculture mat- 
ters. 

Standing committees are appointed to handle such matters as 
making studies of policies concerning business and management 
and endowments. 

Charles P. McCormick is the present chairman of the Board. 
President Elkins, as President of the University, acts as the main 
Executive Officer of the Board. 

Charles P. McCormick 1966 

Chairman 
Edward F. Holter 1968 

Vice-Chairman 
B. Herbert Brown 1967 

Secretary 
Harry H. Nuttle 1966 

Treasurer 
Louis L. Kaplan 1966 

Assistant Secretary 
Richard W. Case 1970 

Assistant Treasurer 

Wilham B. Long 1969 

Thomas W. Pangborn 1965 

Thomas B. Symons 1970 

Wilham C. Walsh 1968 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst 1967 



13 




Dean Frank A. Gray 

Acting Dean of Student Life 

Dean Gray supervises students' needs of both an 
academic and a personal nature. In coordinating the 
offices which deal with student life. Dean Gray is 
concerned with dining halls, housing, and student 
aid. 



Dean Helen Clarke 

Dean of Women 

Dean Clarke administers all women's activities 
on campus, including women's organizations, 
women's discipline, and recruitment of house- 
mothers. She also supervises housing and activities 
for the Baltimore Campus. 



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Mr. Alan Miller 

Fraternity Adviser 

Mr. Miller councils and directs the IFC and the 
various fraternities and guides them in the selection 
of projects of benefit to the campus and community. 



Dean Marian Johnson 
Adviser of UCA 

Dean Johnson advises the Commuters Asso- 
ciation and is in charge of women's placement, 
counseling, and arranging senior interviews. 




Dean Janyce E. Notopoulos 
Adviser of the Panhellenic Council 
Dean Notopoulos acts as advisor to the Panhel- 
lenic Council, the AWS Campus Judicial Board, the 
individual residence hall and sorority judicial 
boards, and the Denton Complex. 



Dean Joan McCall 
Director of Women s Housing 

Dean McCall is responsible for women's housing 
and for women's residence hall staffs. She also 
advises the Cambridge Complex. 






Dean Bernard Hodinko 

Director of the Judiciary Office 

Dean Hodinko advises all campus judiciary 
systems. He also plays an important part in men's 
housing and the capital improvement program. 



Dean Thomas E. Florestano 
Adviser to the SGA 

Dean Florestano coordinates student activities 
and organizations. He is advisor to the Student 
Government Association and its subsidiaries, such 
as the Freshman Orientation program. 



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Dean Furman Bridgers 
Foreign Student Adviser 

Dean Bridgers advises the foreign students and 
assists them in adjusting to American life and to the 
University of Maryland. 



Dean Doyle Royal 
Adviser of Off -Campus Housing 

Dean Royal, the advisor of off-campus housing, 
is also the chairman of the Traffic Appeals Board 
and of the Commencement Committee, and is the 
coach of the soccer and tennis teams. 



Miss Margaret Lloyd 
Acting Director of Housing 

Miss Lloyd directs the University housing office 
which receives all applications and contracts for 
rooms in the residence halls and employs and super- 
vises the faculty residents and staff in the men's 
residence halls. 



Dr. Thomas Magoon 

Director of the Counseling Center 

Dr. Magoon directs services of the Counseling 
Center and the placement and credentials service, 
develops new methods of counseling students, and 
conducts research studies. 






16 




Dr. Lester M. Dyke 
Director of the Health Service 

Dr. Dyke supervises the health service on cam- 
pus, formulates infirmary policies as well as caring 
for student patients. 



Mr. William Hoff 

Manager of the Student Union 
Mr. Hoff manages the Student Union and directs 
the many student activities of the Union. 







Mr. Robert Spence 
Director of Food Service 

Mr. Spence directs all phases of the food service 
program at the University. He establishes policies 
and procedures for the food service department and 
selects and manages a staff of about 800 people. 



17 



ACADEMIC 
INFORMATION 




Diligent scholarship is a responsibihty of the college stu- 
dent; the Freshman, particularly is responsible for taking the 
required courses, taking sufficient credits, and planning ahead. 

CLASSES 

Classes are either of 50 or 75 minute duration (the 50 minute 
classes are conducted on a 3 day-a-week basis and the 75 minute 
classes on a 2 day-a-week basis). If the instructor is late, students 
are required to wait 20 minutes for deans, 15 minutes for doctors, 
and 10 minutes for all instructors before dismissing themselves. 
There are no automatic "cuts" (absences) for freshmen (with the 
exception of second semester freshmen who have attained a 3.5 
average for the preceding semester). A report is sent into the 
student's dean if he has more than 3 unexcused absences. Ex- 
cused absences include illness, death in the immediate family, 
and participation in University activities at the request of the 
University authorities. Instructors may penalize students for un- 
excused absences. Upperclassmen, (soph., jr., sr.) are allowed 
unlimited cuts in courses classified as non-participation courses 
(those in which the student does not actively participate as part of 
the instruction). The University urges all students to attend classes 
regularly. 

EXAMINATIONS 

A two hour exam is held at the end of each semester for each 
course taken. No notes or books are allowed at finals. Two or 
three exams (called "hourlies") are usually given in each course 
during the semester. Only a student with a legal excuse will be 
allowed to make up an exam he has missed. 



MARKING SYSTEM 

The following symbols are used for marks: A, B, C, D, 
passing; F, failure; I, incomplete. In computing the scholastic 
average the numerical values are assigned as follows: A-4, B-3, 
C-2, D-l,F-0. 

DEAN'S SLIPS 

All Freshmen doing below "C" level work after the first six 
weeks of school receive slips from the dean. A copy is also sent to 
the student's parents. Although a dean's slip has no bearing on the 
student's final grade, it is advisable for the student to consult with 
his instructor to find out how he can improve his work. 

REPEATS AND DROPOUTS 

Both the original grade and the new grade will be posted on 
the student's transcript when a course is repeated. In computing 
the overall average the two grades are averaged together. 

First semester freshmen are permitted to wait eight weeks 
before dropping a course. All other students are allowed three 



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weeks. The student's academic advisor and dean must approve 
this action. 

CHANGING COLLEGES 

A student wishing to change colleges must have a minimum 
of a 2.0 overall average. If the student's average is unsatisfactory, 
he will be placed under the control of the Office of Intermediate 
Registration (O.I.R.). Under the O.I.R. program a student is given 
one, or at the most, two semesters to absolve his trial or probation- 
ary status and become eligible for admission into the new college. 
The student must consult his new dean upon transferring colleges. 

ACADEMIC AND JUNIOR STANDING 

In order to achieve Junior standing a student must maintain 
an average of "C" with the minimum of 56 semester hours not 
including P.E., Health, or depending on the college, R.O.T.C. 
If a student fails to make Junior standing by the end of his fourth 
semester, he is allowed one semester grace. If he has not achieved 
Junior standing by the end of this probationary semester, dis- 
missal results. 



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THE COUNSELING CENTER 

The University's Counseling Center is located in Shoemaker 
Hall and is maintained to assist students not only to better under- 
stand themselves but also to develop improved methods for 
dealing with vocational choices as well as educational and per- 
sonal problems. The Center provides an extensive program on 
reading and study skills, given on an individual basis for six 
weeks, and is offered at the beginning and middle of each semes- 
ter. When appropriate, psychological tests in the areas of ability, 
aptitude, interest, and personality are administered. The Advisory 
and Testing Fee, which all students pay at registration, entitle 
them to these services without further charge. 

TUTORING 

Many opportunities for free tutoring are offered by groups 
on campus. Among these are Alpha Lambda Delta and Phi Eta 
Sigma, the women's and men's freshman scholastic honoraries. 
Individual departments also offer tutoring- for which a nominal 
fee may be charged. 

HONORS 

A freshman who achieves a 3.5 average for his first semester 
or a 3.5 cumulative average for the year is eligible for member- 
ship in a freshman scholastic honorary. Any student attaining a 
3.5 semester average is placed on the Dean's List. An Honor's 
Convocation is held every fall honoring all students who have 
maintained a 3.5 average or better for the preceding year. 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

At least 120 semester hours are required for graduation. An 
overall average of "C" or 2.0 is required for graduation in all 
colleges. See the dean of your college to learn its requirements. 

For additional academic information, consult the Academic 
Regulation Booklet published by the University, which may be 
obtained from the Registrar's Office (N. Admin.). 



22 



SERVICES 




The following section contains an alphabetical listing of the 
most commonly used services provided by the various facilities 
on campus and in the nearby area. At the end of the section is 
Whom To See, a brief summary of campus activities, etc. and their 
sponsors. 

BOOKS 

The Student Supply Store, maintained by the University, is 
located in the Student Union. Here one may obtain all required 
texts, new or used, and other supplies at reasonable rates. It 
functions for student benefit in that profits are placed in a student 
scholarship fund. Upon resale of books, the student is given a 
credit slip which can be used only in the Student Union. No cash 
refunds are given. 

Alpha Phi Omega (APO), a service fraternity, sells used 
texts in the Student Union early each semester. They buy books 
from students and give cash refunds. 

The Maryland Book Exchange, on College Ave., also sells 
new and used texts plus supplies. Cash refunds are given on re- 
sale, and during the first week of classes new books may be resold 
at original cost upon presentation of sales receipt. 

CHECK CASHING 

The Student Union cashier will cash checks up to $10.00 for 
a ten cent fee. It is open from 9-3 p.m. Monday through Friday. 
Checks for any amount may be cashed at Suburban Trust Co. or 
the University National Bank in College Park. 

Bank hours are: 

Suburban Trust: Monday-Thursday 8:30-2 pm. 

Friday also 5-8 pm. 

24 



University National: Monday-Friday 9-5 pm. 

Saturday 9-1 pm. 

CATALOGS 

The University publishes a general information bulletin. An 
Adventure in Learning. Catalogs for individual colleges are avail- 
able in the Dean's office of each college. 

COLLEGE PARK 

The following is a listing of stores and shops frequented by 
students in College Park: 
Banks 

see CHECK CASHING above. 
Barber Shops 

Anthony's Barber Shop, 7419 Baltimore Blvd. 

Old Line Barber Shop, 7414 Baltimore Blvd. 
Beauty Shops 

Color 'N Curl, College Ave. 

Glamour Girl Hair Designers, 7420 Baltimore Blvd. 

Martini Hairdressers, 7244 Baltimore Blvd. 

Novel's Hair Stylist, 7421 Bahimore Blvd. 
Cleaners 

Topper Cleaners, 7408 Baltimore Blvd. 

University Cleaners, Baltimore Blvd. 
Drug Stores 

Albrecht's Pharmacy, Baltimore Blvd. and College Ave. 

Peoples Drug Store, Shopping Center. 
Florist 

College Park Florists, 4412 Knox Rd. 
Gas Stations 

Chaney's Garage, 7505 Baltimore Blvd. 

Shell Oil, Baltimore Blvd. 

Sunoco, Baltimore Blvd. 
Groceries 

Food Fair, Shopping Center 
Jewelers 

CoUege Park Watch Shop, 7406 Baltimore Blvd. 

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Powers Jewelers, Shopping Center. 
Mens Clothing 

Powers and Goode, 4509 College Ave. 

Everett Simon's Men's Wear, Shopping Center. 
Restaurants 

College Park Delicatessen, 7400 Baltimore Blvd. 

Hot Shoppes, 7300 Baltimore Blvd. 

Italian Gardens, 7408 Baltimore Blvd. 

Pizza Hut, 7409 Baltimore Blvd. 
Shoes 

Triangle Shoes, Shopping Center 
Sports Equipment and Clothing 

Varsity Sports Shop, 7501 Baltimore Blvd. 
Variety Store 

F.W. Woolworth, Shopping Center 
Women's Clothing 

Brass Buttons, College Ave. 

Karen Ames, Shopping Center. 
Prince Georges Plaza 

Ten minutes from the University by Capital Transit Bus, 
PGP contains stores to fill almost any need. 

COUNSELING CENTER 

See Academic Information. 

DAIRY 

The University Dairy, on Baltimore Blvd., across from Ritchie 
Coliseum, serves dairy products and light lunches. Its hours are: 

Monday-Friday 9:30 am. -10:00 pm. 

Saturday 9:30 am. -5:00 pm. 

Sunday 12:00 pm. -10:00 pm. 

ESCORT SERVICE 

The Escort Service recently started on campus, will be con- 
ducted to help women students who must walk across campus 
alone at night. Watch the Diamondback for listings of whom to 
call. 



26 



FINANCIAL AID 

Students who have demonstrated academic abihty and have 
financial need may apply for scholarships, grants, loans, or part- 
time employment. These are listed in the bulletin, An Adventure 
in Learning, and are awarded before the beginning of the aca- 
demic year or the semester. Specific aid information may be 
obtained in the Office of Student Aid, North Administration 
Building. 

IDENTIFICATION (ID) CARDS 

A new student receives his ID card at registration, and will 
need it as a general identification card, admission ticket to ath- 
letic and SGA events, and as a dining hall card. 

The ID is required to draw library books, for obtaining the 
yearbook, to vote in student elections, to check out athletic 
equipment at Cole Activities Building and the Armory, and to use 
the golf course, tennis courts, and other facilities. 

Loss of an ID card should be reported immediately to the 
Office of the Executive Dean for Student Life in the North 
Administration Building. A $10.00 fee is charged for replacement. 

INFIRMARY 

The infirmary is located across from the Student Union 
Building on Campus Drive. Its major function is to assist the 
students and the University in maintaining good health standards 
by treating students. It is open to all students free of charge. A 
registered nurse is on duty 24 hours a day, and a doctor is on call 
for emergencies. Physicians will be present at the Infirmary 
during the following hours: 

Monday-Friday 8:00 a.m. -11:45 a.m. 

1:00 pm.-5:00 pm. 

Saturday 9:00 am. -11:00 am. 

Sunday 10:00 am.-ll:00 am. 

Vacations 9:00 am. -4:30 pm. 

In emergency situations when the infirmary is not open, 
call the campus police, ex. 315. 



27 



LIBRARIES 

The McKeldin Library is a depository of information on many 
subjects. It contains four main floors, three mezzanines, several 
hght reading rooms, and many special subject rooms. 

Books and records may be checked out upon presentation of 
the ID card. Books must be returned to the loan desk or the book 
depositories by the due date (usually two weeks). On most books 
a five cent fine is charged for each day the book is overdue. 

During the regular school year. Library hours are: 

Monday-Friday 8:00 am. -10:00 pm. 

Saturday 8:00 am. -5:00 pm. 

Sunday 3:00 pm.-10:00 pm. 

The General Reference Service of the Library may be used to 
find out if a book is on the shelves. The phone extension for this 
information is 259. 

Chemistry and Math Libraries are maintained by the individ- 
ual departments in their own buildings. The Engineering Library 
is also in the Math Building. Other hbraries in the College Park 
and Washington, D.C. area which may be useful to students are: 
the College Park Library, on Knox Road, the Library of Congress, 
in downtown Washington, and the National Library of Medicine, 
in Bethesda, Md. 

LOST AND FOUND 

The Campus Pohce Office in the General Services Building 
will accept lost articles. Administrative offices on campus receive 
lost articles also and forward them to the police. Individuals 
finding articles should insist on receiving a receipt for them. Lost 
articles may be reclaimed with reasonable identification. After 
90 days, the police will dispose of unclaimed goods to charity. 
The loss of textbooks should be reported to both bookstores at 
once. 

PLACEMENT SERVICE 

The University Placement Service, located in Shoemaker 
Hall, offers job opportunities related to present and future em- 



28 



ployment needs. This program includes Career Week and sum- 
mer job interviews with representatives from many companies. 
The placement director and your department's faculty placement 
representative are available for conferences to aid your future 
planning. 

RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 

The University offers many recreational facilities. Local 
community activities supplement the variety and number of 
services. Bowling alleys may be found in the Student Union as 
well as in Adelphi, College Park and Clifton Park. Rates are 
lower during the day generally. 

There are no movie theatres in College Park, but movies are 
shown in the Student Union on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday 
evenings. Classical films are shown Tuesday and Thursday after- 
noons. Theatres are located in Langley Park, Silver Spring, Belt- 
way Plaza, Greenbelt, Beltsville, Hyattsville, and downtown 
Washington. 

Swimming is available for women only in Preinkert Field- 
house and for both men and women in Cole Field House. In winter, 
there is ice skating on the duck pond behind the University Hills 
Apartments and year round at indoor rinks on Baltimore Blvd., 
Silver Spring, and downtown Washington. 

The University offers recreational facilities such as archery 
targets and tennis courts at no charge. There is a miniature golf 
course at Green Meadows on University Blvd. and at Prince 
Georges Plaza. 

There are listening booths and record rooms in the Fine Arts 
Room of McKeldin Library. Records and record players are avail- 
able. The Student Union has televisions, a billiard room, and a hi- 
fi and Stereo room. Campus-wide dances are held at least twice 
monthly in the Student Union Ballroom. 

TRANSPORTATION 

Greyhound's Baltimore-Washington Buses pass through 
College Park every half hour to the D.C. Terminal at 1110 New 



29 



York Ave.. Trailways also has a terminal in D.C. at 1201 New 
York Ave. 

All major East Coast airlines and many small ones serve 
either the Washington National or DuUas International Airports. 
Friendship Airport in Baltimore can be reached by following the 
signs on the Baltimore-Washington Parkway. 

Trains come in at Union Station in Washington and there is 
a B and O terminal in Silver Spring. 

The local cab companies include the Blue Bird Cab Com- 
pany. 864-7700, and the Suburban Cab Company, WA 7-4800. 

UNIVERSITY DIRECTORY 

The Student-Faculty Directory is published by the University 
each year and is sold at the book stores approximately six weeks 
after classes begin in the fall. The cost is $.75. 

UNIVERSITY OFFICES 

Most University offices close at 4:45 pm. The cashier in 
the North Administration Building closes at 3:00 pm. 

UNIVERSITY POST OFFICE 

The University operates a post office in the General Services 
Building for the reception, dispatch and delivery of the U.S. mail, 
including parcel post items and inter-office communications. 

This office is not a part of the U.S. postal system and no 
facilities are avialable for the reception or transmission of postal 
money orders. All registered and insured mail must be picked up 
at the U.S. Post Office in College Park. Resident students' mail 
will be delivered directly to the dormitory. The University Post 
Office closes at 4:00 pm during the week. The U.S. Post Office 
closes at 5 pm. Monday through Friday and at noon on Saturday. 



30 



WHOM TO SEE 



FOR 


SEE 


WHERE PHONE 


Absences 


Dean of College 


Dean's Office 


ex. 


Admissions 


G.W. Algire 


N. Admin. 


396 


AFROTC 


Col. Reeves 


Armory 


351 


Athletics 


William Cobey 


Cole Field House 


372 


AWS 


Julia Billings 


Student Union — 136 


7552 


Bills 


Cashier 


N. Admin. 


340 


Breakage Cards 


Cashier 


N. Admin. 


340 


Car Pools 


Univ. Commuters 


Student Union 


503 


Counseling 


Dr. Thomas Magoon Shoemaker Hall 


7641 


Dramatics 


Prof. Strausbaugh 


Woods Hall 106 


7647 


Employment 








General 


Lewis Knebel 


Shoemaker Hall 


7647 


Part-time 


Palmer Hopkins 


N. Admin. 


7361 


Summer 


Lewis Knebel 


Shoemaker Hall 


7647 


Fraternities 


IFC Office 


Student Union 




Graduate School 


Dean Bamford 


BPA Building 


232 


Health Service 


Dr. Lester Dyke 


Infirmary 


7666 


Housing 








Men's 


Miss Lloyd 


N. Admin 


319 


Women's 


Dean McCall 


N. Admin. 


578 


Off Campus 


Dean Royal 


N. Admin. 


375 


Information (Telephone) 




622 


Libraries 


General Reference 


McKeldin Library 


259 




Loan Desk 


McKeldin Library 


261 




Chemistry Library 


Chem. Building 


525 




Engin. & Phys. Sci. 


Math Bldg. 


484 


Lost and Found 


Campus Police 


Service Bldg. 


315 


Mail 


U.S. Post Office 


College Park UN 4-3264 




Univ. Post Office 


Service Bldg. 


386 


Meeting Rooms 


Student Union Desk 


: — first floor 


7654 


Music 








Bandroom 


Hugh Henderson 


Armory 


567 


Band Office 


Hugh Henderson 


Fine Arts Bldg. 




Chapel Choir 


Fague Springman 


Fine Arts Bldg. 





31 



Men's Glee Cb. 


Paul Traver 


Fine Arts Bldg. 




Women's Chorus 


Paul Traver 


Fine Arts Bldg. 




Orchestra 


Emerson Head 


Fine Arts Bldg. 




Parking Tickets 


PoHce Cashier 


Service Bldg. 


435 


Problems 








Men's 


Counsehng Center 


Shoemaker Hall 


7641 


Women's 


Dean Clarke 


N. Admin. 


263 


Study 


Advisor or Counseling Center 


7641 


Publications and Communications 






Diamondback 


Martin Kuhn 


DBK Office Jourl. 


258 


Calvert Review 




Journalism Bldg. 




M Book 


Dean Florestano 


Student Union 


7657 


Terrapin 


Bill Clark 


Journalism Bldg. 


361 


WMUC 


WMUC Office 


FF Bldg. 


513 


Religious Groups 


Chaplin Veith 




541 


Scholarships 


Palmer Hopkins 


N. Admin. 


7375 


SGA President 


Ted Levin 


Student Union UN 4-9807 


Social Life 


Julia Billings 


Student Union 


7552 


Sororities 


Janyce Notopoulos 


N. Admin. 


271 


Space Reservations 


Bill Hoff 


Student Union 


7553 


Sports 








Baseball 


Jack Jackson 


Cole Field House 


467 


Basketball 


Bud Milikan 


Cole 


505 


Cross Country 


Jim Kehoe 


Armory 


370 


Football 


Tom Nugent 


Cole 


242 


Golf 


Frank Cronin 


Cole 


631 


Lacrosse 


Al Heagy 


Chem. Bldg. 


540 


Soccer 


Doyle Royal 


N. Admin. 


375 


Swimming 


Wm. Campbell 


Cole 


252 


Tennis 


Doyle Royal 


N. Admin. 


375 


Weight Lifting 


Hap Freeman 


Cole 


467 


Wrestling 


Sully Krouse 


Cole 


509 


Summer School 


Dr. C. Smith 


Main Admin. 


586 


Telegrams 


Switchboard 


Skinner Bldg. 


350 


Women's Rec. Assoc. 


Ethel Kessler 


Preinkert Field 
House 


7109 



32 



tmm 



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% 



STUDENT UNION 



P 



•Vi 



*'Meet you at the Union" is a commonly heard phrase on the 
University campus. For the Student Union, under the direction 
of Mr. WilHam L. Hoff, is the focal point of activity for Maryland's 
students. 

General Hours 

Monday-Thursday 7:00 am. -11:00 pm. 

Friday-Saturday 7:00 am. -12:00 pm. 

Sunday 2:00 pm. -10:00 pm. 

STUDENT SUPPLY STORE 

Located on the basement level of the Union is the Student 
Supply Store which is a haven for those students seeking almost 
anything. In addition to books and school materials, the Supply 
store offers a miscellaneous variety of items for sale such as Mary- 
land sweatshirts and jackets, college jewelry, drugs, cards, novel- 
ties, and records. During registration week the Supply Store is 
also open in the evening and on Saturday. 

Hours 

Monday-Friday 8:30 am. -4:30 pm. 

CAFETERIA 

The Cafeteria, especially popular with commuters, provides 
a pleasant atmosphere for dining. Full course meals as well as 
a la carte sandwiches may be purchased here on the basement 
level of the Union. 

Hours 

Monday-Friday 7:00 am. -10:00 pm. 

Saturday 8:00 am. -10:30 pm. 

Sunday 2:00 pm.-10:00 pm. 



34 



AMUSEMENTS 

Bowling: In the sub-basement of the Union are located 16 tenpin 
bowling lanes. Before six o'clock pm., these lanes may be rented 
for $.40 per hour. After six pm. the cost is 1.45 per lane per hour. 

Hours 

Monday-Thursday 7:00 pm.- 11:00 pm. 

Friday 3:00 pm.-12:00 pm. 

Saturday 10:00 am. -12:00 pm. 

Sunday 2:00 pm. -10:00 pm. 

Billiards: There are twelve billiard tables avialable for use during 
the general Union hours. There tables, located next to the bowling 
alleys, may be rented for $.80 an hour. 

Movies: Every weekend two full length motion pictures are shown 
in the auditorium on the main floor of the Union. The cost is $.25 
per person. 

Hours 

Friday-Saturday 7:00 pm. and 9:00 pm. 

Sunday 7:30 pm. 

Game Room: Various card games may be played in the Game 
Room which is located on the basement level of the Union next to 
the Supply Store. 

Television Room: Three black and white TV sets and one color 
TV set are available for viewing in this room on the main floor of 
the Union. 

Music Room: Stereo music for listening is piped into one of the 
Music Rooms on the second floor. The other rooms contain three 
pianos and an organ which may be played by students for their 
own enjoyment. 

OFFICES 

A major portion of campus business is conducted in numerous 
offices located in the Student Union. Among the student organi- 
zations housed in the Union are SGA, AWS, IFC, UCA, Chesa- 
peake Bay Party, and the Student Union Board. The offices of 



35 



Dean Florestano and Dean Billings are also located here on the 
main level. 



SPECIAL ROOMS 

BaSExMENT: 

Commuters' Den: A lounge provided by the University Commuters 
Association, the Commuters' Den is a place where day students 
meet to study, chat, or play cards. 

First Floor: 

Discount Bureau: The ticket booth located in the main lobby 

enables students to receive reduced rates on many items from area 

merchants. 

Activities Lounge: This plush room is the largest study area in 
the Student Union. Student-Faculty Coffee Hours with guest 
faculty speakers are frequently held here. 

International Language Lounge: This room affords the opportu- 
nity for foreign students to converse in their native tongue. 

Smoke Shop: The store sells all the necessities of college life such 
as candy, cigarettes, nylons, and newspapers. The shop is open 
from 8:00 am. to 4:00 pm., Monday-Friday. 

Telephone Center: This area is equipped with pay telephones for 
off campus calls as well as campus phones for dorm conversations. 

Second Floor: 

Ballroom: The scene of many campus activities such as monthly 
dances, receptions, political conventions, speaker series, and pre- 
final cartoon shows. 

Fine Arts Lounge: Many exhibitions of student art work from this 
University and other campuses are on display in this area. 

Browsing Room: A quiet reading area supplied with recent maga- 
zines and newspapers. 

36 



RESIDENCES 




DORM LIFE 

A home away from home will be yours in your new dormitory 
surroundings. You will find your room itself very comfortable, 
A bed, a chest of drawers, a desk and chair, and ample closet 
space has all been provided for your use. The selection of addi- 
tional accessories such as curtains and bedspreads will be left to 
you and your roommate. You are allowed to bring with you a radio 
or record player, but please leave your television, hot plate and 
electric blanket at home. Linens and towels can be brought from 
home, or, they may be obtained through a linen supply service. 
Washing machines and dryers are provided so that you may wash 
at your convenience. 

If it is time to study, there is a study hall or lounge provided 
in your dormitory. For help during hourlies or exams you will 
find that many students in the residence offer tutoring services. 
The dorm files, which contain copies of old exams, term papers, 
and chapter outlines, will be of great assistance to you. For late 
evening snacks, many residences have a kitchen where you may 
keep a supply of food on hand. You may also use the vending 
machines located in the dormitory that supply you with things 
such as milk, candy, and cigarettes. 

Desserts are held frequently in the recreation room or lounge. 
Here men and women get together for dancing and refreshments. 
Other activities include intramural teams, such as basketball, and 
Softball. All of these functions offer perfect opportunities for you 
to meet other students on campus. 



38 



TELEPHONES 

Telephone service has been provided for your convenience 
so that you may make on-campus calls at no charge. These calls 
may be made or received any time from 8:00 A.M. until 10:00 P.M. 
on Mondays, 10:30 P.M. on other week nights and 11:00 P.M. on 
weekends. If you wish to make an off-campus call, pay phones 
have been provided in the dorms. 

The main desk extensions for women's dorms are as follows: 



Anne Arundel 7301 

Caroline 7312 

Carroll 7313 

Centerville North 7310 

Centerville South 7311 

Denton 7500 

Dorchester 7331 

Montgomery East A-B . . 7340 



Montgomery 

Center C-D-E 7341 

Montgomery West F-G . . 7342 

Queen Anne's 7347 

St. Mary's 7348 

Somerset 7349 

Wicomico 7350 

Worchester 7351 



/ ^ 



VISITING REGULATIONS 

Both men and women's dormitories have certain regulations 
concerning visitors. Men calHng on women should go to the dorm 
desk and have the girl paged. Women are permitted in men's 
lobbies and lounges only when they are chaperoned by the proper 
authority. 

Weekend or overnight guests are permitted in the dorm. A 
fee of $.50 or $1.00 is charged for guest linens. Notice must be 
given to the house director 24 hours in advance and her permission 
obtained. 



DRESS REGULATIONS 

Women should wear a skirt and blouse, and men must wear 
shirts and trousers in the administrative buildings, classrooms, 
library, and residence lobbies. The same attire should be worn on 
the first and second floors of the Student Union, and Monday 
through Friday in the dining halls. Tailored bermudas may be worn 
by both men and women on the lower level of the Student Union 
after 3:00 P.M. during the weekdays and all day Saturday. This 
same type of clothing may also be worn for Saturday breakfast 
and lunch in the dining halls, and for bowling in the Student Union 
at any time. Heels for women and ties for men are proper attire 
for Sunday Buffet. 



CURFEWS 

The curfew hours followed by women depend upon their year 
in college. Women are allowed a certain amount of late leaves 
and overnights per semester. Freshmen are permitted three 
overnights and three twelve o'clocks; sophomores, six of each; 
juniors, nine of each; and seniors have unlimited privileges in 
these areas. Weekends are not included in these restrictions. 
Men do not have any curfew. 



40 



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COMMUTERS 




TRANSPORTATION 

Carpools 

AH commuters are urged to sign up for carpools in the Armory 
during registration week. Mimeographed hsts of drivers and riders 
can be obtained in the Student Union. 

The University assumes no responsibihty for car accidents, 
so it is most important that drivers have adequate insurance. 

Parking 

During registrati(m week all cars must be registered. Parking 
stickers are issued and must be kept on the cars at all times. 
Failure to do so may result in a $5.00 fine. Between 7:00 A.M. 
and 4:45 P.M. parking is allowed in all lots other than those 
marked "reserved at all times". There is a 13.00 fine for parking 
on unassigned lots during the day. 

Buses 

The Baltimore-Washington Greyhound buses run Monday 
through Saturday every hour, (slight changes on Sundays and 
holidays), with extra buses during rush hours. The buses stop 
at Bladensburg, Hyattsville, Riverdale, College Park (on Rt. 1 in 
front of the Varsity Grill), Berwyn, and Plant Industry. D.C. transit 
buses run between College Park and Mt. Ranier, Langley Park, 
Silver Spring, and Potomac Park (Hollywood). 
Don't Forget 

When driving on campus, be sure to obey all Stop signs and 
speed limits. Pedestrians have the right of way, so be extremely 
careful — especially between classes! 



44 



PLACES TO EAT 

Complete meals may be purchased in the Student Union 
cafeteria, Student Union cardroom, the lower level (^f the main 
Dining Hall, and College Park restaurants. The basements of 
many of the larger classroom buildings are equipped with the 
automats (for those who are in a hurry), and the Dairy provides 
snacks and the best (and most original) ice cream available. 

PLACES TO STUDY 

Daydodgers who wish to study during their spare hours on 
campus can find peace and quiet in the McKeldin Library, Math 
Library, and Chemistry Library. Study rooms in the newer dorms 
may also be convenient, but check with friends first. 

For a more informal atmosphere, the Student Union Study 
Room on the second floor and the Student Union lounges are 
popular. 

ACTIVITIES ESPECIALLY CONVENIENT 
FOR DAYDODGERS 

Intramurals and Sports: 

Women — sign up in Prienkert Fieldhouse with WRA Advisor or 

consult the S.G.A. calendar and Diamondback for dates. 
Men — sign up in the Armory. 
Co-ed — sign up with the Commuters Association for bowling 

league. 

Social Activities: 

Commuters' Association Theme parties and dances are sched- 
uled often. Check the S.G.A. calendar and Diamondback 
for dates. 

Student Union Dances are held bi-weekly (free) 

International Club holds socials or fiesta every other Friday night. 
Everyone is welcome. 

Lectures and art exhibits are sponsored by the Student Union 
Board and are held during the afternoon for anyone who 
would like to attend. 



45 



Student Union Movies (25 cents) feature many favorites both 
foreign and domestic. The movie schedule is posted on the 
Student Union Bulletin Board and in the Diamondback. 

Student-Faculty Teas are an excellent opportunity for commuters 
to become acquainted with the faculty. 

For more information concerning activities open to Daydodgers 
consult the Activity Newts' section in the Diamondback. 

Relaxation: 

The Stereo Lounge in the Student Union. 

The Fine Arts Room in McKeldin Library has both albums and 

listening booths available. 
Television sets, bowling alleys, billiard and game rooms are also 

provided by the Student Union. 
Free swimming facilities are provided for women in Prienkert 

Fieldhouse and for men in Cole Fieldhouse. Co-ed sessions 

are also held in Cole. 



I^p. 




frr^\ 



UNIVERSITY COMMUTERS' 
ASSOCIATION 

Commuting students may find a sense of belonging and an 
opportunity to take an active part in University life through the 
University Commuters' Association. Aside from being primarily 
a social organization, the U.C.A. provides a wide and varied pro- 
gram through which day-students may participate in the many 
extra-curricular activities available on our large campus. The 
U.C.A serves as a link between the commuter and such activities 
as the Student Government Association, clubs and intramurals. 
Students who are interested in serving on an S.G.A. committee 
may inquire and apply through U.C.A. There has been quite an 
increasing interest in campus politics among commuters, and this 
fall finds several commuters serving in key positions in S.G.A. 
The U.C.A. President serves on the S.G.A. Cabinet and each of 
the three campus political parties has a U.C.A. representative. 
Thus, the commuter is well represented in student government. 

For those interested in sports, there are both men's and 
women's teams sponsored by U.C.A in the intramural leagues as 
well as a U.C.A. bowling league. 

Among the cultural events which commuters may enjoy are a 
spring banquet, teas, and luncheons featuring guest speakers. 
Highlighting the social program are parties, hayrides, picnics and 
dances. 

U.C.A. also provides the commuter with worthwhile services. 
Of special notice are the Weekend Trip Service, new this year, 
the Carpool Service, and the Dorm Affiliation Project. Students 
who live on campus and wish to secure rides home on weekends 
or vacations may make plans by consulting the U.C.A. bulletin 
board in the Student Union. The Carpool Service is for those 
who wish to form a carpool or find rides to and from the University 
with other commuters from the same area. Lists for this purpose 
may also be found on the U.C.A. bulletin board across from the 
U.C.A. Den. The Dorm Affiliation Program, initiated last fall, 
was organized by the Associated Women Students for commuting 
freshmen women, to acquaint them with dormitory life and bring 



47 



them closer to the University. Any freshman woman may take 
part by applying for a dorm "big sister". A tea is held during 
freshmen orientation at which time the commuter will meet her 
"big sister" and other commuters. The commuter and her "big 
sister" may meet for coke dates, and she is free to use the facilities 
of the dorm during the day to study, relax, or visit with friends. 

The recently remodeled U.C.A. Den, center of commuter 
activity, is located in the basement of the Student Union. The 
U.C.A. Den provides pleasant and convenient place for students 
to gather between classes and in the evenings. 

Some of the most important benefits from membership in 
the U.C.A. are the lasting ties of friendship formed through 
daily social and academic contact. 



48 



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1 



GREEKS 




GREEK LIFE 

To a student first entering a University the term Greek may 
have Httle or no meaning, yet it is a term he will hear many times. 
The simplest definition of the term Greek is a student who belongs 
to either a fraternity or a sorority. This, in turn, may lead to the 
question, what is a fraternity or sorority? A college Greek organi- 
zation is a group of women or men joined together for social and 
educational purposes, and dedicated to common goals and ideals. 

The Greek population on our campus plays an important role 
in the college community. They are active in politics, sports, 
publications, honoraries and all other facets of college Viif Be- 
sides their activities on campus, each group supports a nation- 
wide philanthropic project together with other chapters of their 
fraternity across the nation. Projects vary from helping the blind 
to aiding an entire mountain settlement. 

Although scholarship and activities play a major role in the 
organization of fraternities and sororities, brotherhood and sister- 
hood are more adequate words to describe the basis on which 
these organizations are built. 

SORORITY RUSH 

Your first introduction to sorority life at the University is an 
exciting week of rush. Rush is the period of social activity in which 
sorority women and girls who are interested in sororities may be- 
come acquainted. Rushees are also in the process of selecting the 
sorority in which they will feel most comfortable. 



50 



Rush lasts for a week and a half and is divided into several 
rounds of parties. The first set of parties are known as Open House 
Teas. During this round, each rushee is required to visit each of 
the eighteen sorority houses. She is then issued invitations from 
various houses and she must limit these to eight. After the set of 
eight parties she must choose four and after the set of four parties 
the rushee's next step is to limit her invitations to two. The round 
of two parties is referred to as Preference Teas and it gives the 
rushee one more chance to meet the sorority women before 
making her final choice. 

Rushing culminates in pledging. Pledgeship is a period of 
learning about the sorority, helping with the pledge projects, and 
getting to know new-found sisters. The major emphasis during 
pledgeship is on scholarship because a girl must have at least a 
2.2 average to be initiated into any of Maryland's 18 sororities. 




Dear Freshmen Coeds: 

It is a great pleasure to welcome you to 
the University of Maryland on behalf of the 
Panhellenic Association and every sorority 
woman on campus. During your college 
years, you will be discovering your aims in 
life. You will be formulating the goals you 
some day hope to achieve and you will be 
developing the ideals which will guide your 
actions throughout your future years. 

Through active participation in the 
sorority system, you will be given opportu- 
nities to develop socially and personally and 
you will find the means to help y<^u answer 
your basic questions, meet your funda- 
mental needs, and provide you with your most enriching and 
rewarding experiences. 

As a Greek you will have an opportunity to experience a 
complete college education. You will be aided by an extra em- 
phasis on scholarship and you will also experience an extension 
of interests and your ideas. Through sorority living you will find 
yourself taking an active part in service projects for your college 
and your community, you will find an enjoyable social life, and 
most of all, you will realize all the warmth, fellowship and friend- 
ship that engulfs the sorority system. Most important to Greek 
women is the warm, close, and lasting friendships that come from 
living with a group of people who truly are your sisters. 

As you seek what will be most worthwhile for you at Maryland 
we hope that you will consider sorority membership. We are 
looking forward to meeting you during Rush. 

Sincerely, 
Nancy Chotiner 
Panhellenic President 



52 



FRATERNITY RUSH 

Rush, although it only lasts for a short period, is one of the 
most important aspects of the fraternity system because it is the 
life-line of the system. During the rushing period, there is a series 
of scheduled events including an introduction to rush policies and 
and procedures and an introduction to the individual fraternity 
houses. 

The Interfraternity Council (IFC) has prepared a Rush Book- 
let introducing the Rushee to the fraternity system and other 
publicity is distributed throughout the campus. You will also find 
that fraternity men will be more than willing to answer any ques- 
tions you may have. Fraternity rush itself consists primarily of 
both stag and dated parties which give the rushee an opportunity 
to meet the fraternity members. 

Rush ends in Pledgeship. During the pledging period, a young 
man learns more about his fraternity, accepts responsibility and 
comes to have a knowledge of the ideals his fraternity holds. 



W^^ 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
College Park Campus 




BUILDING CODE LETTERS 


FOR CLASS SCHEDULES 


A 


Am lad Sdrnco— Frmaca ScMt Kry HaB 




-T»K.fcTT«> Ha 


AA 


NuncTf School 


AR 


AmKKT 


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BB 


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CX 


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DD 


Piychology Racmirh Ubontary 


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Agronomy-Bouny-R J. Pancnoi. Hall 


EE 


Plycbology 


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FF 


Temporary Clauroom 


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H 


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HH 


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I 




II 




J 


Engineering Cb»room Building 


ir 




K 


Zoology— Silve«er Hall 


KK 


North Administration Building 


L 


Library— McKeldin HaU 


LL 


Fomgn L««uag« Building 


M 


Psychology— MorriU Hall 


MM 


Computer Science Center 


N 


Shoemaker Building 


NN 


Fine Arts Building 


O 




oo 


College of Education and Clasnootn Building 


p 


Industrial Arts and Education 




—J. M. Patteison Building 


Q 


Business and Public Administtatioo 




and ClassnxM. Building 


R 


Classroom Building-Wood, Hall 


S 


Engineering Laboratories 


T 


Education— Skinner Building 


U 


Chemical Engineering 


V 


Wind Tunnel 


W 


Preinkert Field House 


X 


Judging Pavilion 


Y 


Mathematics 


Z 


Physics 




Sororitin Not Shown 




Alpha Xi Delu 




Fraternities Not Shovt-n 




Tau Epsikn Phi 




Phi Epsilon Pi 




Tau Kappa Epsilon 



Dear Freshmen, 

It is with great pleasure that I welcome you to the University 
of Maryland. On behalf of the Interfraternity Council and its 
twenty-four member fraternities, I shall extend an invitation to 
you to become a part of the Greek system. 

The national fraternities at Maryland, ranging in size from 
thirty to one hundred members, offer you countless benefits and 
opportunities. By being a member one develops many close, 
lifelong friendships, participates in a well-structured intramural 
sports program and also can achieve academic excellence. 

Fraternities are extremely well represented in all phases of 
extracurricular student life; Student Government Association, 
varsity athletics. University Theater, and campus publications, 
just to mention a few. 

Pledge programs place an emphasis upon scholastic achieve- 
ment coupled with growth of character within you, as an individ- 
ual. 

The primary objective your college career is to develop as a 
more complete man, by combining academics and social life 
gradually to increase maturity. The fraternity compliments the 
University in the final fulfillment of this objective. 

Leaving you with these thoughts, I hope you will be successful 
in your college aims and endeavors. I hope that you will sample 
fraternities for yourself, by participating in rush and joining a 
fraternity that will give you a lifelong taste of completeness. 

Sincerely, 
Elwood Stark 
IFC President 



56 



PANHELLENIC 

Panhellenic is the regulating body for the entire sonority 
system. The Panhellenic Council is composed of two delegates 
from each of the eighteen sorority houses, however, every sorority 
woman on campus is a member of the Panhellenic Association. 
The council provides a forum for the exchange of ideas between 
sororities and plans worthwhile projects to be carried out through 
the cooperation of all sorority groups for the betterment of the 
sorority system. 

The council serves as a representative organization which 
makes the rules concerning membership selection, pledging and 
initiation with the aid of faculty and administration. 

In addition, our campus also has a pledge panhellenic council 
which serves to coordinate the activities of the pledge classes and 
to train future members and officers of the Panhellenic Council. 
The Pledge Panhellenic Council consists of a representative from 
each pledge class and the president of each pledge class. 

Both councils promote intersorority cooperation through such 
activities as exchange dinners, fireside chats, dances, workshops 
and retreats. 



INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL 

The Interfraternity Council (IFC) is the coordinating body of 
the fraternity system. It functions to strengthen and co-ordinate 
the activities of the individual houses in a group effort. Each of the 
twenty-four fraternity houses have one voting delegate to the coun- 
cil. The IFC also sponsors several annual events; IFC Presents, 
IFC Ball, IFC athletic programs, a tutoring service, IFC rush, and 
workshops during Fall Greek Week. The highlight of the year is 
the Interfraternity Ball held at Indian Springs Country Club. 



57 



SORORITIES 

ALPHA CHI OMEGA "ALPHA CHI" 

Gamma Theta Chapter established here -1948 

President Betsy Tait 

4525 College Avenue UNion 4-9893 

ALPHA DELTA PI "A D PI" 

Beta Phi Chapter established here — 1940 

President Bettie Field 

4603 College Avenue WArfield 7-9864 

ALPHA EPSILON PHI "A E PHI" 

Alpha Mu Chapter estabhshed here — 1943 

President Bonnie Fox 

11 Fraternity Row WArfield 7-9701 

ALPHA GAMMA DELTA "A G D" 

Alpha Xi Chapter established here — 1947 

President Betty Beckham 

4535 College Avenue UNion 4-9806 

ALPHA OMICRON PI "A O PI" 

Pi Deha Chapter estabhshed here — 1924 

President Helen Hyre 

4517 College Avenue WArfield 7-9871 

ALPHI PHI 

Delta Zeta Chapter established here— 1961 

President Nancy Baker 

7402 Princeton Avenue UNion 4-5910 

ALPHA XI DELTA "ALPHA XI" 

Beta Eta Chapter established here — 1934 

President Sharon Kilbaugh 

4517 Knox Road WArfield 7-9720 

DELTA DELTA DELTA "TRI DELT" 

Alpha Pi Chapter established here — 1934 

President Joan Quigley 

4606 College Avenue UNion 4-9491 

DELTA GAMMA "D G" 

Beta Sigma Chapter established here— 1945 

President Mary Wright 

4518 Knox Road UNion 4-5880 



DELTA PHI EPSILON "D PHI E" 

Delta Xi Chapter established here— 1945 

President Sandy Sher 

4514 Knox Road UNion 4-9692 

GAMMA PHI BETA "GAMMA PHI" 

Beta Beta Chapter established here— 1940 

President Dale Holland 

9 Fraternity Row WArfield 7-9773 

KAPPA ALPHA THETA "THETA" 

Gamma Mu Chapter established here— 1947 

President Cathy Fondren 

8 Fraternity R(.w WArfield 7-9606 

KAPPA DELTA "K D" 

Alpha Rho Chapter established here— 1929 

President Ann Bender 

4610 College Avenue WArfield 7-9759 

KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA "KAPPA" 

Gamma Psi Chapter established here— 1929 

President Mary Jane Nystrom 

7407 Princeton Avenue WArfield 7-9886 

PHI SIGMA SIGMA "PHI SIGGY SIGGY" 

Beta Alpha Chapter established here — 1936 

President Susan Katz 

4531 College Avenue WArfield 7-9828 

PI BETA PHI "PI PHI" 

Maryland Beta Chapter established here — 1944 

President Dawn Sheeler 

12 Fraternity Row UNion 4-9885 

SIGMA DELTA TAU "S D T" 

Alpha Theta Chapter established here— 1951 

President Carol Schwartz 

4516 Knox Road \^ Arfield 7-9513 

SIGMA KAPPA 

Beta Zeta Chapter established here— 1941 

President Diane Chase 

10 Fraternity Row WArfield 7-9861 



FRATERNITIES 
ALPHA EPSILON PI "A E PI" 

Delta Deuteron Chapter established here— 1940 

President Richard Keller 

13 Fraternity Row 277-9748 

ALPHA GAMMA RHO "A G R" 

Alpha Theta Chapter established here— 1928 

President Oliver Ridgely 

7511 Princeton Avenue WArfield 7-9831 

ALPHA TAU OMEGA '' T O" 

Epsilon Gamma Chapter established here— 1930 

President Don Robertson 

4611 College Avenue WArfield 7-9769 

DELTA SIGMA PHI "DELTA SIG" 

Alpha Sigma Chapter established here — 1924 

President Bob Ferguson 

4300 Kn<.x Road WArfield 7-9770 

DELTA TAU DELTA "DELT" 

Delta Sigma Chapter established here— 1948 

President F'rank (^irillo 

3 Fraternity Row 

KAPPA ALPHA "KA" 

Beta Kappa (chapter established here— 1914 

President Dick O'Neill 

1 Fraternity Row UNion 4-9846 

LAMBDA CHI ALPHA "LAMBDA CHI" 

Epsilon Pi Chapter established here — 1932 

President T<»m Verzi 

6 Fraternity Row WArfield 7-9778 

PHI DELTA THETA "PHI DELT" 

Alpha Chapter established here— 1930 

President Al Parker 

4605 College Avenue WArfield 7-9884 

PHI EPSILON PI "PHI EP" 

Beta Theta Chapter established here— 1962 

President Gary Levin 



PHI KAPPA SIGMA 'PHI KAP" 

Alpha Zeta Chapter estabHshed here-- 1899 

President T^*»f" Marshall 

5 Fraternity Row UN ion 4-9828 

PHI KAPPA TAU "I'HI TAU" 

Beta Omicron Chapter established here — 1950 

President J"h" ^""^^'^ 

Box 24, Campus ^^Nion 4-9886 

PHI SIGMA DELTA "PHI SIG DELT" 

Phi Epsilon Chapter established here -1959 

President ^^^"^ Korth 

14 Fraternity Row 927-9557 

PHI SIGMA KAPPA "PHI SIG" 

Eta Chapter estabHshed here -1897, 1923 

President Joseph Boiseau 

7 Fraternity Row IJii**" 4-9851 

PI KAPPA ALPHA "PI K A" 

Delta Psi Chapter established here— 1952 

President Charles Randall 

4530 College Avenue 779-9801 

SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON "S A E" 

Maryland Beta Chapter established here— 1943 

President Don Imwald 

4 Fraternity Row WArfield 7-9707 

SIGMA ALPHA MU "S A M" 

Sigma Chi Chapter established here -1933 

President J^Y Feinglass 

2 Fraternity Row WArfield 7-9845 

SIGMA CHI 

Gamma Chi Chapter established here -1942 

President <^ary Adams 

4600 Norwich Road UNion 4-9807 

SIGMA NU 

Delta Phi Chapter established here— 1917 

President Bob Maddox 

4617 Norwich Road WArfield 7-9563 



SIGMA PHI EPSILON "SIG EP" 

Maryland Beta Chapter established here — 1949 

President Dennis Dutterer 

7403 Hopkins Avenue 864-3855 

SIGMA PI 

Alpha Chi Chapter established here — 1949 

President Douglas Watson 

4502 College Avenue 864-9583 

TAU EPSILON PHI T E F' 

Tau Beta Chapter established here— 1925 

President Howard BVeidman 

4607 Knox Road UNion 4-9513 

TAU KAPPA EPSILON ^T K E" 

Tau Beta Chapter established here— 1947 

President John Bertinatti 

Campus Union 4-9765 

THETA CHI 

Alpha Psi Chapter established here— 1948 

President Bob Maurer 

7401 Princeton Avenue 

ZETA BETA TAU 'Z B T" 

Beta Zeta Chapter established here— 1948 

President Gene Walman 

4400 Knox Road UNion 4-9786 



62 





! im 



iA- 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT ^ #^ 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION 

The Student Government Association is the organ through 
which students coordinate all student activities and services. 
During fall registration, each student pays a $12 fee which pro- 
vides the working capital for the S.G.A. The students themselves, 
through SGA representatives, determine how this money is allo- 
cated, as well as many other policy decisions. 

Like the national government, the University has three 
branches: executive, legislative and judicial. 

EXECUTIVE BRANCH 

The SGA cabinet determines student policies and represents 
student opinion to the faculty and administration of the University. 
Officers and members of the cabinet are elected by the student 
body. 

MEMBERS OF THE CABINET FOR 1965-66 

S.G.A. President Ted Levin 

S.G.A. Vice-President Miller Hudson 

S.G.A. Secretary Margaret Hall 

S.G.A. Treasurer Bob Maddox 

Senior Class President Neil Brayton 

Junior Class President Jay McMillen 

Sophomore Class President Tom Hendrickson 

Freshman Class President (to be elected) 

Sorority Representative Stephanie Jacobs 

Fraternity Representative Wayne Legum 

A.W.S. Representative Tay Kincaid 



64 



Mens League Representative Bob Martz 

Independent Women s Representative Caren Harnest 

Independent Mens Representative John Slade 

Commuter's Representative Ralph ConHn 



LEGISLATIVE BRANCH 

The SGA legislature passes bills which are then sent to the 
cabinet for action. SGA finances are of primary concern to the 
legislature. The students determine how money is allocated among 
the classes and the many student organizations which submit 
budgets to the Finance Committee for approval. Legislature 
meetings, like the cabinet, are open to all interested students and 
suggestions are welcome. 



LEGISLATURE MEMBERS 

Senior: 

Carolyn Birely 
Bob Bories 
Duffy Brown 
Eileen Burke 
Lynn Edgley 

Junior: 

Gail Abrahams 
Barbara Bourgeois 
Linda Chase 
Sheila Deitz 

Sophomore: 
Connie Chung 
Mark Dubinsky 
Howard Metro 
Muriel Zetter 



Dee Jolles 
Eileen Kelly 
Dawn Sheeler 
Dick Zimmerman 



Bunny McKenna 
Dick Mortimer 
Joyce Munk 
Cindy Salzman 

Carol Orban 
Jan Orban 
Larry Thomas 



65 



STUDENT COURT 

All judicial power held by students is granted by the Faculty 
Senate Committee on Student Discipline and is vested in several 
judicial boards. Cases involving student infractions of University 
regulations or public laws are referred to student judicial boards 
by the Judiciary Office according to the assigned jurisdictional 
area of each. 

Central Student Court. Central Student Court is staffed to 
render the judgment of the student body. It is composed of nine 
members, including fraternity, sorority, residence hall, commuter, 
male and female representation. Each justice must be a junior or 
senior and maintain a minimum of a 2.5 cumulative grade-point 
average. Central Student Court has appellate jurisdiction over 
other major student judicial boards, hears constitutionality cases 
and infractions of major University rules. 

Student Traffic Court. The Student Traffic Court consists 
of seven justices, including four men and three women. The 
Board has jurisdiction over cases involving violation of campus 
traffic rules and regulations. 

A.W.S. Judicial Board. The A.W.S. Judicial Board has nine 
members representing sorority, dormitory and commuter women. 
The Board has jurisdiction over cases involving major violations 
incurred by women, and appellate jurisdiction over women's 
dormitory and sorority judicial boards. 

Resident Mens Judicial Board. Six residents of men's resi- 
dence halls on campus sit on the Resident Men's Judicial Board. 
They are selected to represent the four residential areas — Cam- 
bridge, Denton, "Prefab" and "Hill." The Resident Men's Board 
hears cases involving dormitory groups and violations of dormitory 
safety rules by individual residents. It has appellate jurisdiction 
over Men's House judiciaries. 

Panhellenic Judicial Board. This board is composed of the 
executive officers of Panhellenic. It deals with sorority houses 
which have broken Panhellenic Rules such as those concerning 
rush. 



66 



I.F.C. Judicial Board. The Interfraternity Judicial Board is 
composed of five senior fraternity men. The board hears cases 
involving an infraction of I.F.C. legislation or University rules 
by a fraternity group. 

ASSOCIATED WOMEN STUDENTS 

The governing body for women students on campus, A.W.S., 
provides a variety of services and activities. Some annual proj- 
ects are: a Christmas Program, Bridal Fair, workshops. Orphan's 
Party with Panhel, and the women's convocation. Throughout the 
year positions are available to freshman women on committees 
such as: cultural, social, elections, constitution, publicity and 
Information Please Handbook. 

A.W.S. EXECUTIVE COUNCIL FOR 1965-66 

President Tay Kincaid 

1st Vice President Carolee Foley 

2nd Vice President Nancy Chotiner 

Secretary Karen Tulin 

Treasurer Kathy Seward 

Senior Representative June Toye 

Junior Representative Anne Ulman 

Sophomore Representative Ellie Kurtz 

Freshman Representative (to be elected) 

MEN'S LEAGUE 

The Men's League, male counterpart of the A.W.S., coordi- 
nates the activities of men students on campus to promote the 
educational, cultural, social, and athletic welfare of the men of 
the University. All effort is undertaken to promote the greatest 
possible benefit to be derived from college life. Men's League 
sponsors a variety of activities; the No-Shave contest and the 
Senior Awards Banquet are among the more popular campus 
events. 



t7 



MEN'S LEAGUE OFFICERS 1965-66 

President Bob Martz 

Vice-President Brian Benson 

Executive Secretary Richard Tyner 

Treasurer Mark Mason 

Senior Representative Larry MacMillan 

Junior Representative Richard Brodsky 

Sophomore Representative Jeffrie Luntz 

Freshman Representative (to be elected) 



COMMITTEES 

Membership in most of the SGA Committees is open follow- 
ing spring elections and appointments. A few, however, are open 
to freshmen in the fall and notices of these openings will be pub- 
lished in the Diamondback sometime during the fall semester. 
You may apply for all SGA committees in Dean Florestano's 



;i 



office in the Student Union. 

Some committees of special interest to freshmen are: 

Homecoming. One of the biggest events in the fall is home- 
coming. Sorority houses and women's dorms build displays in 
front of their respective residences while fraternities and men's 
dorms build floats to be entered competition during an extrava- 
gant pre-game parade. The game, open houses and a formal dance 
complete the day. Any student may apply. 

Cultural Committee. $1 of each $12 fee paid to the Student 
Government is allocated to the Cultural Committee. This com- 
mittee coordinates cultural events all over the University, such as 
the University theater. Glee Clubs, Gymkana and Flying Follies. 
In addition, the committee brings famous stars to entertain the 
student body. 

Campus Chest. This committee is composed of representa- 
tives of all campus groups which promote projects to raise funds 
for charity throughout the year. Campus Chest sponsors its own 
week of activities to raise funds through its Ugly Man Contest 
and its College Casino. 

People to People. People to People is a program sponsored to 
bring foreign students together with Maryland students. Through 
its Big Sister-Brother program, social, and cultural events, it 
helps to orient foreign students to life in the United States. Partici- 
pation in any aspect of this program offers a rewarding experience. 

Student Union Board. The Student Union Board sponsors a 
variety of social and cultural events. They sponsor speakers, 
dancers, movies and big name bands, as well as other events of 
interest. 

FOB. The Freshmen Orientation Board sponsors Orientation 
Week in the Spring and Fall to acquaint new students with the 
campus through tours, lectures, assemblies, and dances. It is 
comparable to the two day pre-coUege program held throughout 
the summer. 

Elections. Members of the Election Board supervise election 
practices, count ballots and work at the polls. Positions as poll 
workers will be available during Freshman elections. 



69 



Other committees of interest are: Campus Improvements, 
Who's Who, Parents' Day, Away Weekend, PubHc Relations, 
Student Activities, and Traffic. For information concerning any 
of these committees ask at the SGA office in the Student Union 
or a member of the SGA. 



CAMPUS ELECTIONS 

Elections of the president, vice president, secretary, treas- 
urer, A.W.S. representative and Men's League representative 
for the Class of 1969 and six legislature seats, will be held in the 
fifth or sixth week of the first semester. Aspiring candidates must 
submit an application and petition signed by fifty members of the 
class in order to run for office. Campaigning lasts for two weeks, 
one week for the primary and one week for the final elections. 

General elections are held in March or April. Candidates are 
nominated by the Old Line, Free State, and Chesapeake Bay 
Parties at conventions a few weeks prior to elections. Candidacy 
may also be obtained by submitting to the SGA cabinet a petition 
with 750 signatures. Complete election rules and procedures can 
be obtained by contacting the Election Board. 



70 




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PUBLICATIONS 



DIAMONDBACK 

Campus, local, and international news is reported daily in the 
University newspaper, the Diamondback. The News Board, the 
journalism classes, and members of the newspaper staff report 
activities, announcements and special events. The News Board 
recruits its members from students who have previous Diamond- 
back experience. Working on the daily editions accounts for most 
of this experience. 

There is a separate daily staff for each day of the week. A 
daily editor and a copy chief direct the copyreading, editing, and 
typing of stories two days in advance of publication. Help is always 
needed, and since no experience is necessary, freshmen have an 
ideal opportunity to gain experience and develop their journalis- 
tic talent. The business, editorial, and sports staffs complete the 
picture of the publication of the Diamondback. 

The open house teas in the Journalism Building at the be- 
ginning of each semester serve to introduce all interested stu- 
dents to Diamondback operations. 

TERRAPIN 

Information and candid pictures are features of the school 
yearbook, the TERRAPIN highlights all the interesting events that 
occur on campus during the school year. Included are pictures of 
sports events, campus queens, dorm residents, seniors, and soror- 
ities and fraternities. 

Section editors, copy editors, and photographers make up 
the Terrapin. Students interested in working on the yearbook 
may apply in the TERRAPIN office in the Journahsm Building. 

72 



WMUC 

Campus radios set their dials on 650 to tune in the University 
radio station, WMUC. An affiliate of NBC and a member of the 
Intercollegiate Broadcasting Co., WMUC broadcasts 24 hours a 
day. Special programs, such as those during big sports events and 
elections, focus attention on major campus activities. Try-outs 
for disc jockeys and announcers are open to both men and women 
in the WMUC office in building FF in the gulch. 

CALVERT REVIEW 

Original poetry, short stories, essays, and art by University 
students fill the pages of the Calvert Review. This literary maga- 
zine has been published semi-annually since its establishment in 
1963. Awards of $20 are given in each category: poetry, prose, and 




art. Interested students should submit their work to the Calvert 
Review office in TaHaferro Hall. 



M-BOOK 

Hopefully, this publication, the M Book, which you are now 
reading, will be the Freshman's "Bible". In handbook form, the 
M Book compiles and organizes all the information a new student 
on campus would want to know. It lists hours, dates, activities, 
phone numbers, and regulations which the freshman cannot 
possibly learn all at once, or for that matter, learn during his four 
years at Maryland. This compact University encyclopedia in- 
cludes everything a newcomer needs to know to make his adjust- 
ment to college life a pleasant and profitable experience. 

The M Book staff is mainly composed of Freshmen and Soph- 
omores with a few upperclassmen in editorial positions. All 
freshmen are urged to apply for work on the staff, especially if 
you are considering furthering your participation in college pub- 
lications, since this is excellent background experience. Applica- 
tions may be picked up and returned to Dean Florestano's office 
in the Student Union. 



74 



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ORGANIZATIONS 




The University of Maryland offers a vast scope of opportu- 
nities and benefits for its students. One of the greatest opportu- 
nities is the chance to belong, join and become a real part of a 
great university. Below is a partial list of the many clubs, honor- 
aries, publications, and organizations with their advisers which 
are available to all students. A complete list may be found in the 
Student Directory. 

GENERAL ORGANIZATIONS 

ACCOUNTING CLUB enhghtens students to various ac- 
counting principles. Prof. C.B. Edelson, Ext. 345. 

AGRICULTURAL STUDENT COUNCIL promotes incentive 
and dedication in its field by sponsoring career days, convoca- 
tions and socials. Dr. Robert Wiley, Ext. 276. 

AGRONOMY CLUB allows an exchange of ideas and infor- 
mation on crops and soils. Mr. Charles Ellington, Ext. 222. 

AMATEUR RADIO CLUB is a social organization that 
unites members in a world-wide program and study of technical 
theory and development. Mr. K.H. Guy, Jr., Ext. 356. 

AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY works to promote the 
chemical profession by arranging a program of chemical speakers. 
Dr. Alfred C. Boyd, Ext. 408. 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF AERONAUTICS AND AS- 
TRONAUTICS' main purpose is to acquaint students with the 
technical and professional aerospace field by affiliation with the 
national organization. Prof. R.M. Rivelle, Ext. 452. 



76 



AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS' main purpose is to 
stimulate interest in physics outside the classroom by sponsoring 
lectures and tours. Dr. P. Steinberg, Ext. 619. 

AMERICAN MARKETING ASSOCIATION provides con- 
sultations with prominent businessmen and conducts a placement 
service for its members. Dr. J. Allan Cook, Ext. 380. 

AQUALINERS' main function, besides their Spring Show, is 
the achievement of grace and skill in all phases of synchronized 
swimming. Miss Beverly Holden, Ext. 267. 

ART LEAGUE provides stimulation and knowledge for those 
interested; it also plays an important role in increasing recognition 
of creative arts at Maryland. 

BLOCK AND BRIDLE is a club that attracts students 
interested in animal husbandry. Dr. E. Young, Ext. 348. 

CALVERT DEBATE SOCIETY always focuses on a current 
subject whether here or on one of their trips to another campus. 
Dr. Calvin W. Downs, Ext. 201. 

CHAPEL CHOIR promotes a cuhural interest in choral 
music on campus. They perform annually at Baccalaureate and 
graduation as well as at other programs throughout the year. 
Mr. F. Springman. 

CHINESE STUDENT CLUB furnishes a place where stu- 
dents can gain an understanding of the Oriental culture. Mr. 
Chunjen C. Chen, Ext. 292, 640. 

COLLEGIATE 4-H acts as a service organization for state 
and local 4-H activities. 

DRAMA WING presents plays that deal mainly with the 
behaviour of teen-agers. They travel around appearing before 
PTAs and other civic organizations. Mr. T. Starcher. 

FLYING FOLLIES are the University's travelhng diplomats. 
This organization is designed to reveal the special talents of its 
individual members. 

FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA is designed for those 
interested in making farming their future. Mr. H.P. Addison. 

GYMKANA TROUPE allows students to participate in gym- 
nastic activities for their own interest and development. It also, 

77 



performs throughout the community. Mr. William Riley — Cole. 

HOME ECONOMICS CLUB keeps abreast of current oppor- 
tunities and trends in the field. They plan programs with profes- 
sional speakers, demonstrations, and fashion shows. 

INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION is primarily a social 
organization to unite the Indian students at Maryland and help 
them gain knowledge of the U.S. and college life. 

INTERNATIONAL CLUB offers each of us an international 
flavor and world-wide variety. They are also working with People- 
to-People to foster a greater emphasis on foreign students in all 
phases of campus life. Mr. F.A. Bridgers. 

ISLAMIC ASSOCIATION helps foster better relations be- 
tween the Islamic students and the campus. 

LOUISA PARSONS NURSING CLUB encourages fellowship 
among student nurses, fosters correct professional standards, and 



78 



creates a strong sense of unity, cooperation and understanding 
between students and faculty. Miss Margaret Hayes. 

MARYLAND MARKETING ASSOCIATION helps assist 
tomorrow's businessmen while in college and helps them to be- 
come more acquainted with marketing. 

MEN'S GLEE CLUB provides an opportunity for male stu- 
dents to study choral music. Mr. Paul Traver. 

MODERN DANCE CLUB promotes interest in interpretive 
dance and provides an opportunity to develop original choreog- 
raphy. Miss Madden. 

OLYMPIC BARBELL CLUB represents the University at 
various competitions and promotes interest in weightlifting con- 
tests and physical education courses on campus. 

PEOPLE-TO-PEOPLE serves foreign students who are new 
on campus. They meet the new students, welcome them, and 
acquaint them with the different facets of University life. Mr. 
Furman Bridgers. 

PHILOSOPHY CLUB offers any interested student intel- 
lectual stimulation through discussions and lectures. Dr. Van 
hen. 

PHYSICAL THERAPY CLUB tries to spur interest in this 
subject on campus. Trips, projects, and lectures are planned. 
Miss Ruth Latimer. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE CLUB brings many outstanding 
citizens and political leaders to campus. The club stresses political 
awareness and understanding of daily events. Dr. Walter Jacobs. 

PRE-LAW CLUB delves into the theory and practice of law 
by studying and discussing conflicting cases. 

PRE-MED CLUB gives students an opportunity to view the 
medical profession through trips to hospitals, speakers, and 
volunteer hospital work. 

PSYCHOLOGY CLUB provides the student with knowledge 
of the various fields within this science and of its application. 
Dr. Nancy Anderson. 



79 



SOCIETY FOR ADVANCEMENT OF MANAGEMENT 

broadens the members' outlooks on the field of management. 
Round tables, service projects, conferences and speakers are 
planned. Dr. C. Clinton Spivey. 

SOCIETY OF FIRE PREVENTION promotes activities in- 
cluding engineering displays and social gatherings. Prof. John 
Bryan. 

SOCIOLOGY CLUB is for students majoring and minoring 
in sociology. Dr. Annabel Motz. 

SPANISH CLUB offers exciting and worthwhile activities 
to students interested in the language. 

STUDENT UNION BOARD helps co-ordinate and plan the 
activities taking place in the Student Union. Mr. Lawrence 
Lauth. 

TERRAPIN SKI CLUB promotes and stimulates an interest 
in skiing among University students, teaches skiing to interested 
members, and takes ski trips which promote intercollegiate com- 
petition. Mr. Doyal Royal. 

TERRAPIN TRAIL CLUB promotes knowledge of hiking,' 
camping, climbing, spelunking and other related activities. Dr. 
John Axley. 

UKRANIAN CLUB promotes cuhural and social functions to 
further the members' understanding of their native culture. 

UNIVERSITY BAND performs in the fall during football' 
season in pre-game and half-tipie activities. Mr. H. Henderson.^ 
' UNIVERSITY COMMUTERS ASSOCIATION sponsors 
activities for the social, intellectual, and cultural interests of its 
members. Miss Marion Johnson. ,. ^ 

UNIVERSITY THEATRE sponsors numerous plays and 
musicals throughout the school year. Membership is attained 
when a student has worked on two productions as an actor or 
crew member and completed ten hours of construction or cos- 
tuming. 



80 



VETERANS CLUB serves as a meeting place for men of 
military experience who have come to the University. 

VETERINARY SCIENCE CLUB provides professional and 
social activities for students interested in the field. Mr. E.C. 
Brown. 

WOMEN'S CHORUS is made up of girls interested in con- 
temporary music. On-campus concerts are presented throughout 
the school year. Mr. Paul Traver. 

WOMEN'S RECREATION ASSOCIATION provides ath- 
letics for women students at Maryland. Its purposes are to provide 
opportunities for fun and leadership in women's sports. Miss 
Ethel Kessler. 



HONORARIES 

ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA honors freshman women with 
high academic achievement. In order to be eligible for member- 
ship, a woman student must attain a scholastic average of 3.5 
during the first semester, or a 3.5 overall average during the 
freshman year. 

PHI ETA SIGMA, the freshman men's honorary, emphasizes 
the importance of getting off to a good start scholastically, and 
aims to assist all freshmen in this endeavor. Membership is 
attained by having either a 3.5 average for the first semester or 
an overall 3.5 for the entire freshman year. 

Many other honoraries are also present on campus, but these 
listed above are the only ones open to freshmen. More information 
about the others is available from your respective college. 



MILITARY ORGANIZATIONS 

ARNOLD AIR SOCIETY is a professional service organiza- 
tion. Major A.C. Hamby. 

VANDENBURG GUARD is a mihtary fraternity unique to 



81 



Maryland. It is one of the few sabre drill teams in the United 
States. Captain G.N. Talios. 

PERSHING RIFLES is a national military fraternity with 
units that are integral with ROTC programs throughout America. 
Major Earl C. Brown. 

ANGEL FLIGHT is an auxihary organization of the Arnold 
Air Society. They act as official hostesses of the University, pre- 
sent a talent show to benefit the campus chest, and co-sponsor 
the military ball. Rush is held for all girls in the early fall. Major 
Ham by. 

POLITICAL ORGANIZATIONS 

There are many opportunities available for the politically- 
minded students. Besides the two national clubs. Young Demo- 
crats and Young Repubhcans, there are also three campus politi- 
cal parties. Membership in these parties may be either by resident 
or independent affiliation. 

CHESAPEAKE BAY PARTY 

FREE STATE PARTY 

OLD LINE PARTY 

YOUNG DEMOCRATS 

YOUNG REPUBLICANS 

RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS 

BAPTIST FOUNDATION -A/r. Howard Rees 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORG ANIZATION - Rupert T. Raschke 

CHURCH OF CHRIST -r. Faye Mitchell 

EASTERN ORTHODOX -c/iape/ 

EPISCOPAL FOUNDATION -c/iape/ 

ISLAMIC ASSOCIATION -//e/en Rivlin 

MARYLAND CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP -C/iar/^ori Meyer 

NEWMAN FOUNDATION -Dr. Alfred Boyd 

STUDENT LUTHERAN ASSOCIATION 

WESLEY FOUNDATION -Mr. Richard Vieth 



82 



WF 



f^ 




ENTERTAINMENT 
and 

EVENTS 



SGA CULTURAL EVENTS 

Throughout the year a variety of cultural activities are spon- 
sored by the SGA. 

Among the events offered are five performances by the 
National Symphony Orchestra with Howard Mitchell conducting. 
The first performance will be October 28 in conjunction with the 
Goldovsky Grand Opera Company and will be "Don Giovanni" 
in concert. Other productions include a Sibelius festival December 
9; Ralph Votapek, pianist, February 17: Itak Pearlman, violinist, 
March 17; and Andre Watts, pianist, April 14. 

Other SGA sponsored cultural activities include "The Music 
of Richard Rogers," November 18: Ferrante and Teicher, January 
12; Carlos Montoya, February 23: Hal Holbrook in "Mark Twain 
Tonight", March 24: and the Robert Shaw Chorale, April 3. Some 
of these dates are tentative: watch The Diamondback for further 
notice. 

All SGA cultural events are free to students upon presenta- 
tion of their I.D. cards. 

SPOTLIGHT SERIES 

Sponsored by the Student Union Board, this is a series of 
approximately four shows each semester. Each show features a 
well-known vocalist, instrumentalist, or comedian, such as Josh 
White, Jr., The Charlie Byrd Trio, and Max Morath Ragtime 
Quartet. The series is extremely popular with the student body: 
admission is by I.D. card. 



84 



VARIOUS PRESENTS 

During the school year four "presents" or programs are 
sponsored by the Senior Class, the Hill Area Council, Interfra- 
ternity Council, and IFC and Panhellenic Council. 

Last year entertainment such as Ella Fitzgerald, Bud and 
Travis, the Smothers Brothers, and the Boston Pops Symphony 
was presented. 

IFC Presents and Hill Area Presents are usually sponsored 
during the first semester. 

IFC and Panhel Presents is presented during the second 
semester. 

Senior Class Presents is the high point of Spring Weekend in 
May. 

CLASS ACTIVITIES 

In addition to their prom, which was off-campus for the first 
time last year, the Freshman Class sponsors a Sadie Hawkins Day 
dance for all students. 

The Sophomore Class Prom is held early in the spring each 
year. 

At the Junior Class Prom and Banquet, Miss Maryland is 
crowned. 

Seniors end their four years at the University with a lovely 
formal prom. The Senior Class also sponsors one of the year's 
top events, the "Senior Class Presents." This event, which takes 
place during Spring Weekend, has featured such prominent 
entertainers as Peter, Paul and Mary, and Ella Fitzgerald. 

HOMECOMING 

Homecoming is the largest campus event of the football 
season. The fronts of women's residences and sororities are 
decorated for competition, while fraternities and men's dorms 
construct elaborate floats which are displayed in the big pre-game 
parade. The residences have open-house for returning alumni and 
visitors. The Homecoming formal dance brings the exciting day to 
an end. 



85 



GREEK WEEK 

There are two Greek Weeks — one in the fall and one in the 
spring. 

Greek Week in the fall is of a serious nature and includes 
such activities as the rededication program in the chapel, various 
workshops and philanthropic activities. Harmony Hall, which 
consists of barbershop quartet competition among the fraternities 
and sororities, is also presented during the fall Greek Week. 

During the spring Greek Week members of sororities and 
fraternities participate in a variety of amusing, enjoyable contests 
and activities. 

Any type of contest is possible. Activities in the past have 
ranged from the ever-popular chariot races, phone-booth stuffing, 
tug-of-war, bike races, hat snatching and pie eating contests. 

There have also been sports car rallies, a milking contest and 
the Beetle Race which involved carrying a Volkswagen placed 
across two logs. 

One evening during the week Tri-Delta sorority sponsors IF 
Sign, a singing competition between fraternities and sororities. 




BLOOD DRIVE 

Three days of the fall and spring are annually set aside fur 
the Red Cross Blood Drive sponsored by AOPi sorority and TEP 
fraternity. Students donate blood in the Student Union; and re- 
freshments are served afterward. Trophies are awarded to the 
largest group donors, 

PARENTS DAY 

This year. Parents Day will be Saturday, October 2. All stu- 
dents may invite their parents to the football game, after which 
the residences have open-houses. Usually, the IFC Presents is 
scheduled for that night. 

CAMPUS CHEST 

A student committee overseeing campus charity contribu- 
tions and allocating funds to various foreign, domestic, and stu- 
dent charities. Campus Chest is active raising money throughout 
the school year. In addition to the committee's activities, such as 
the Miss Campus Chest and the Ugly Man on Campus contests. 



each organization sponsors an event to raise money for this comm- 
ittee. These events range from car washes to trophy pohshes to 
auctioning pledges. 

Campus Chest Week in the spring highhghts the committee's 
activities and sponsors many more fund-raising events. An annual 
highlight is Campus Casino, which features gambling for charity. 



UNIVERSITY THEATRE 

During the school year University Theatre presents four major 
productions. 

These plays usually include a musical, a comedy and a more 
serious piece. 

Last year the plays presented included "Anything Goes," 
"Waltz of the Toreadors," "The Knight of the Burning Pestle," 
and "Witness for the Prosecution." 

Open try-outs are held for all of the performances. 

University students can attend the productions by presenting 
their I.D. cards at the Student Union Box Office. Non-students 
can also buy tickets for a minimum price. 



CHAPEL CHOIR 

Two traditional concerts are performed annually by the 
Chapel Choir. The ELIJAH will be performed November 23, the 
Tuesday before Thanksgiving in the new music building on 
campus. The other traditional performance is Handel's "Messiah" 
which will be performed the Sunday before Christmas in the 
Chapel. 

In early December the Chapel Choir will perform Brahm's 
"Requiem," in conjunction with the Baltimore Symphony under 
the direction of Dr. Herman Adler at the Lyric Theatre. Fague 
Springmann, assistant professor of music and director of the 
Chapel Choir, will be the soloist for this performance. 

Chapel Choir is open to anyone on campus who enjoys sing- 
ing. There are no auditions. 

88 



MADRIGAL SINGERS 

The University of Maryland Madrigal Singers are under- 
graduate students with a deep interest in instrumental and choral 
works of the Renaissance. Since the group's establishment in 
1958, under the leadership of Rose Marie Grentzer,the repertoire 
of the ensemble had broadened and now includes early and con- 
temporary American music and folk songs. 

According to performance practices of the period instruments 
such as the recorder, lute, guitar, clavichord, rebec, and harpsi- 
chord are used. Colorful costumes of the period are also worn. 

The Madrigal singers perform in numerous engagements in- 
cluding a campus concert. They have performed on radio and 
television. In the winter of 1964-65 they toured Europe, singing 
as they went. 

New members are always welcome to the group. 



imv 



MARYLAND MARCHING BAND 

Students interested in joining the band may audition in the 
first week of school since practice begins early. This unit presents 
half-time shows at football games, executing intricate marching 
routines. After football season, the Marching Band splits up into 
the Concert Band, the Symphonic Band, and the Varsity Band. 



CONCERT BAND 

The elite of the Marching Band comprise the Concert Band 
which tours the state during semester break. It also presents a 
few performances throughout the year at Ritchie Coliseum. 



WOMEN'S CHORUS AND 
MEN'S GLEE CLUB 

Practicing and performing as one unit, these groups present 
various programs throughout the year. Well known for their 
singing perfection, they accompanied the National Symphony 
Orchestra last year. 

DRAMA WING 

The Drama Wing of the Department of Speech was formed in 
1957 under the direction of E. Thomas Starcher, assistant pro- 
fessor of speech and drama. 

The purpose of this group is to perform for PTA's and civic 
organizations who are interested in the behaviour problems of 
children from 4-18. 

An essential part of the program is the discussion period 
which follows each performance. 

Anyone can apply for this group, but must serve two semes- 
ters to qualify for membership. Drama Wing averages two per- 
formances each week during an active semester. Those students 
interested in joining this group cannot participate in any other 
extra curricular activity that will conflict with performance time. 



90 



FLYING FOLLIES 

The singers, dancers, musicians, and comedians of this 
variety troupe exhibit their entertaining talent to army camps and 
installations in the area. The Follies, which has about 30 members, 
presents one campus show in the spring. 



AQUALINERS 

Both men and women compose this synchronized swimming 
group. They spend the entire year practicing and perfecting their 
skills; the culmination of their efforts comes in the spring when 
the Aqualiners present their annual show. The performance is 
based on a central theme; each act portrays some phase of this 
theme. 



GYMKANA 

The men and women of this troupe combine their amazing 
skills on apparatus such as the parallel bars, the horse, the rings, 
high bar, uneven parallels, balance beam, and on the mats to 
perform for high schools in the surrounding area. In April, they 
bring their show home to Cole Field House, greatly impressing the 
student spectators. There are approximately forty members of 
the troupe divided into thirteen groups. All freshmen are welcome 
to join. 



SPRING WEEKEND 

The first annual spring weekend took place during the 1965 
spring semester. 

The entertainment catered to all tastes. A pep rally and 
spectator sports such as lacrosse and baseball games, a hooten- 
anny and a college casino are only a few of the activities high- 
lighted during this weekend. 

A guest entertainer also appears during this weekend; last 
year it was Ella Fitzgerald. 



91 



BRIDAL FAIR 

The annual Bridal Fair, sponsored by AWS in April, is anx- 
iously awaited by many University women. 

A variety of booths, including housewares, china, crystal, 
silver, wedding invitations, photography, luggage, jewelry, and 
catering can be visited. 

Male students who accompany their girlfriends can stop by 
the men's department and also admire the automobile display. 

At last year's Bridal Fair, two new booths, interior decora- 
tion and real estate, were added. 

The evening is highlighted by a fashion show of bridal gowns 
and trousseau. Last year Hutzler's Department Store sponsored 
the show. 

BRIDE AND HOME magazine thinks Bridal Fair is a unique 
activity and wrote two articles concerning the event in their pub- 
lication. 

This event is free and is open to the public. You don't have 
to be engaged to attend. 



92 



.^1^ 




a 



V. 




ATHLETICS 




Maryland University is unsurpassed in varsity athletics. The 
University is a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC), 
the Amateur Athletic Association of America, and the National 
Collegiate Athletic Association, and cooperates with other national 
organizations to promote amateur athletics. 

The Cole Activities Building is the heart of the athletic depart- 
ment and boasts a modern gymnasium, an olympic-size swimming 
pool, training facilities for indoor sports, numerous physical 
education laboratories and a modern arena with a seating capacity 
of 13,000. Mr. Wilham Coby, director of athletics, works dih- 
gently with the head coaches of basketball, football, swimming, 
wrestling, baseball, and tennis, toward the extension of athletics 
at the University. Maryland facilities continue in the Armory, 
which houses the indoor track and rifle teams and basketball 
courts for intramurals. Byrd stadium has a track circling the foot- 
ball gridiron. This is not to mention athletic fields, tennis courts, 
a golf course, baseball diamonds, and separate facilities for 
women in Preinkert. 

FOOTBALL 

This year Coach Tom Nugent and staff will present the same 
quick, hard hitting, and colorful football team that Maryland fans 
have seen in the past. Ken Ambrusko, Jim Corcoran, and Ed Pine, 
along with the rest of the team, look forward to Nugent's platoon 
system against a rough schedule including Navy and Penn State. 



94 



SOCCER 

Maryland's soccer team, under the guidance of Coach Doyle 
Royal, remains a top contender in the Atlantic Coast Conference. 
With gold awards given to twenty of last year's players, this year's 
team hopefully will have an outstanding season. 



BASKETBALL 

The greatest assets of the basketball team are its natural 
ability and youth; these assets carried the team to great heights 
last year. Experience gained in the VPI Invitational Tournament 
and the ACC Tournament should help this year's team immensely. 

Dominating Coach Bud Millikan's team are Neil Brayton, 
Jay McMillan, and Joe Harrington, each with impressive records. 
Their continuance of good ball playing should be indicative of 
future success for the Terps. 

WRESTLING 

Coach Sully Krouse's Terps dominate the ACC in wrestling. 
This year's team promises to break all records; most of last year's 
wrestlers such as Tom Greiger, Olaf Drozdof will return and are 
expected to continue their winning ways. Bob Kopnisky made 
Maryland history last year by becoming the first terrapin wrestler 
to win a NCAA championship. 



LACROSSE 

Maryland's lacrosse team, under the direction of Coach Al 
Heagy, is second only to Navy in nationwide collegiate lacrosse. 
Eleven lettermen are on the roster to start the season's opener 
against Maryland Lacrosse Club. 

Ten of Maryland's fifteen games will be played at home. The 
team should have a challenging year since its schedule includes 
Virginia, Army and Johns Hopkins. 



95 



TRACK AND FIELD 

ACC broad jumper champion Mike Cole was the high point 
scorer on last year's team. This year he will be backed in the 
jumps by Don Smith and Bob Schnetzka; Steve Lamb in the 440 
and Ramsy Thomas in the 880 are top running stars. 

Dick Sheer, Tom Finly, and Ed Bury spearhead a fine group 
of hurdlers and pole vaulters including ACC champions Ed 
Bennett (indoors) and Stu Markly (outdoors). Twenty returning 
lettermen will make this year's relays truly exciting. 

Coach James Kehoe is in his nineteenth year at the Univer- 
sity. 



GOLF 

Under the able guidance of Coach Frank Cronin, this year's 
golf team should prove to be one of great agility and spirit. Cro- 
nin's team will face such opponents as Dartmouth in games which 
hopefully will repeat its good showing of last year. Frank Gorelko 
will lead this year's team. 



BASEBALL 

Coach Jack Jackson will direct this year's baseball team. Top 
hitter Dick Horton and top pitchers Brad Frost and Ike Issacson 
should be able to lead the team to victory. 



TENNIS 

Last year's undefeated tennis team will again reach for the 
ACC championship this spring, under the direction of Coach 
Doyle Royal. With netmen such as Jim Busick, the host singles 
player in the conference, and Lew Dobbs, Ken Chapman, Vaughn 
Baker, Richard Gains, and Roger Flax, the team will challenge 
such opponents as Dartmouth, Syracuse, and Clemson. 



96 



SWIMMING 

The Terps swimming team will again aim at the Eastern 
Regional Swimming Championship at Yale, under the direction 
of Coach Bill Campbell. The seven major components of this team 
are: Phil Denkevitz, Bill Nullmyer, Eric Lampe, Bill Deheny, 
Bruce Phillips, Raoul Rebillard and Doc Dunphy. 

M-CLUB 

Maryland athletes who have earned the right to wear a 
varsity letter are honored by membership in the M-club. It is a 
social group, but also sponsors such awards as the Outstanding 
Intramural Athletes of the Year and athletic scholarships. The 
organization was established at Maryland to bring together the 
outstanding athletes. 

INTRAMURALS 

Athletics form an integral part of campus life; although var- 
sity sports are more in the limelight, intramurals are marked by 
outstanding skill and fierce competition. 

Under the auspices of Coach Jim Kehoe and the direct super- 
vision of Raymond Mullis, intramural sports on campus have risen 
from obscurity to widely-publicized events. Intramurals are open 
to Greeks and Independents in three respective leagues — the 
fraternity, open and dorm leagues. Such team sports as football, 
volleyball, basketball, softball, bowling, and swimming; and in- 
dividual sports such as table tennis, golf, wrestling, weight lifting, 
badminton, tennis and cross country are included in the program. 

It is highly recommended that each freshman explore the 
possibilities of intramural activities. 

WRA 

The Women's Recreational Association is a student organiza- 
tion that plans and sponsors many recreational, sport, and social 



97 



activities. WRA consists of officers elected by University women, 
committee chairmen, interest group and club leaders, and intra- 
mural managers from each dorm, sorority, and the Daydodgers. 
Every University woman is automatically a member of WRA and 
should take advantage of the program offered to her. WRA pro- 
vides a chance to have fun, make new friends, and become a part 
of campus life. 

Intramural games between dorm, sorority, and commuter 
teams are played throughout the year. WRA advocates good 
sportsmanship along with competition. 

WRA interest groups offer instruction, a chance to improve 
skills and competition with other colleges. You do not have to be 
a professional to participate, either! 

Clubs add to the variety of the WRA program — the modern 
dance club, aqualiners, and the fencing club are popular coed 
groups. Each presents its own spectacular productions both on 
and off campus. 

Your WRA representative will keep you well informed of 
its activities. WRA welcomes anyone that is interested; contact 
Miss Ethel Kessler in Preinkert Field House. 

Annual events that WRA sponsors are: Sports Day, Fresh- 
man Picnic, WRA-M-Club Banquet, and WRA Spring Banquet. 

GYMKANA 

Gymkana, Maryland's coed gymnastic group, strives for the 
highest in physical training, perfection, balance, and teamwork. 
All students are welcome to try out for membership. 

CHEERLEADERS 

MARYLAND -MARYLAND -Fight Team Fight!! This is 
a sample cry from the cheerleaders as they cheer our teams to 
victory. Tryouts are held in the fall; males are also selected for 
the squad. The present squad consists of: 

Judy Klein — Co-Captain 

June Toye — Co-Captain 



98 



Gail Kleger 
Margie Krause 
Jeanne Lamond 
Betsy Park 
Dottie Wells 
Molly Wueste 



COLOR GUARD 

The University's thirteen color guard majorettes are the flag 
bearers of the University band. They carry the American, state, 
and schools of the ACC flag as they march in all of the home foot- 
ball games and several of the away games. 

Try-outs are held every spring. 




WRA CALENDAR OF EVENTS 

INTRAMURALS INTEREST GROUPS 

Fall Badminton Doubles Tennis 

Bowling 

Archery 

Tennis Singles 

Ping Pong 
Winter Badminton Singles 

Volleyball 

Basketball 

Spring Swimming 

Tennis Doubles 
Softball 



Clubs 



Tennis 


Aqualin- 




ers 


Field Hockey 


Modern 




Dance 


Golf 


Fencing 


Horseback Riding 




Judo 




Competitive Swim- 


Aqualin- 


ming 


ers 


Basketball 


Modern 




Dance 


Ice Skating 


Fencing 


Judo 




Tennis 


Aqualin- 




ers 


Lacrosse 


Modern 




Dance 


Horseback Riding 


Fencing 


Judo 





100 



DIRECTORY OF COACHES 



Sport 


Coach 


Where 




Ext. 


Director of Athletics 


William Cobey 


Cole Field House 


372 


Baseball 


Jack Jackson 


Cole 




467 


Basketball 


Bud MiUikan 


Cole 




505 


Cross Country 


Jim Kehoe 


Armory 




370 


Football 


Tom Nugent 


Cole 




242 


Golf 


Frank Cronin 


Cole 




631 


Lacrosse 


Al Heagy 


Cole 




231 


Rifle 


Sgt. W. Halland 


Armory 




637 


Soccer 


Doyle Royal 


N. Admin. 


Bldg. 


375 


Swimming 


William Campbell 


Cole 




544 


Tennis 


Doyle Royal 


N. Admin. 


Bldg. 


375 


Track 


Jim Kehoe 


Armory 




370 


Weight Lifting 


Hap Freeman 


Cole 




467 


Wrestling 


Sully Krouse 


Cole 




467 



101 



■tttx^ 




RELIGION 




UNIVERSITY MEMORIAL CHAPEL 

This chapel was dedicated in 1952 to those persons of the 
University who died for the cause of freedom. The Chapel, com- 
posed of the East or Main Chapel, the West Chapel, and the 
Roman Catholic Chapel, is the center of campus religious life and 
houses the chapel staff. 

STUDENT RELIGIOUS COUNCIL 

This council is composed of representatives from each of 
the student religious groups on campus. Its function is to co- 
ordinate the activities of these groups and to promote religious 
interest on campus. 

RELIGIOUS LIFE COMMITTEE 

This committee is an adjunct committee of the University 
Faculty Senate Committee of Student Life and Welfare and func- 
tions by making and executing policy, sponsoring non-denomina- 
tional religious programs and acting as an advisory group. 

Religious services which are available to University stu- 
dents include: 

BAPTIST 

Meetings: Daily meetings of Baptist Student Union from 
12:10 to 12:50 p.m. in the chapel office, room 252. Ext. 541 

Services: 11:00 a.m. with Sunday evening worship at 7:30 p.m. 

Church: Second Baptist Church, 3515 Campus Drive Ad- 
visor: Mr. Howard Reese 



103 



BRETHREN 

Meetings: Youth Group — 6:30 p.m. Sunday at the Church 
Services: 11:00 a.m. 

Church: University Park Church of the Brethren on Tucker- 
man Street 

Pastor: Rev. Philip E. Norris, AP 7-2116 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 

Meetings: Tuesday, 4:30 to 5: 15 in room 25 of the Chapel 
Services: 11:00 a.m. Sunday, 8:15 to 9:15 p.m. Wednesday 
Church: First Church of Christ Scientist, 8300 Adelphi Road 
Advisers: Captain Rupert T. Raschke, Ext. 636, or Mrs. 
Louise Yuill, co-adviser 

CHURCH OF CHRIST 

Meetings: Fellowship in room 9 of the Chapel, Ext. 548, 3-5 
p.m. Thursday 

Church: University Park Church of Christ, 6420 Adelphi 
Road 

Advisor: Mr. Wihiam D. Medearis, 779-7580 

EASTERN ORTHODOX 

Meetings: Ethos, the organization for Russian, Greek, and 
Syrian Orthodox faiths meets every first and third Tuesday in 
the Chapel Lounge at 7 p.m. 

Services: Divine Liturgy celebrated Sundays in Saint Sophia 
Cathedral, Washington D.C., 10:10 to 11:30 

Advisers: Rev. John Tavlarides, 277-1419; Dr. George 
Anastos, Ext. 256 

EPISCOPAL 

Meetings: Canterbury Forum at 7 p.m. Wednesdays in Uni- 
versity Epsicopal Center, 7506 Princeton Ave., 779-9799 

Services: Celebration of Holy Communion daily at noon and 
8:30 a.m. on Sunday in the West Chapel; Evening prayer Monday 
through Saturday at 5 p.m. in the West Chapel 



104 



Church: St. Andrews Episcopal Church, College Avenue 
Advisers: Rev. Wofford K. Smith, 864-5430; Juhe Burroughs, 
Ext. 548 

FRIENDS 

Meetings: Devotional meeting and forum 7 p.m. Wednesdays 
in room 213 of the Student Union 

Church: Adelphi Friends Meeting, Metzerott Road; Worship 
at 11:00 a.m. 

Adviser: Dr. John R. Weske, Ext. 542 or 924-4963 




ISLAM 

Meetings: Fridays at noon in room 247 of the Chapel 
Services: Prayer and sermon on Fridays at noon in room 247 

of the Chapel. Services are also held at the Islamic Center, 2551 

Massachusetts Ave., N.W. Washington 

Adviser: Dr. Helen Rivlin, Ext. 685, Chapel office in room 247 

JEWISH 

Programs: B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation on Wednesday 
evenings at 6:30; the Hillel House open daily until 10 p.m. and 
provides such facilities as library, Kosher dining club, game room, 
lounge, and study rooms. Located at 7505 Yale Ave., College 
Park 

Services: Sabbath services held Friday evenings at 6:30 
followed by an Oneg Shabbat at 7:30 and Saturday mornings at 
9:30: daily Minyan at 7 a.m. 

Director: Rabbi Meyer Greenberg, AP 7-8961 

LUTHERAN 

Meetings: Student Discussion Group and Coffee Hour at 
9:45 a.m. Sundays and Supper Program at 5:30 p.m. 

Services: 8:45 and 11:00 a.m. (Communion on first Sunday of 
the month) 

Church: Hope Church and Student Center, just south of the 
University at intersection of Guilford Drive and Knox Road 

Pastor: Rev. Ted Caspar, office in Room 6 of the Chapel, 
Ext. 547 

MARYLAND CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 

The Maryland Christian Fellowship with their chapel office 
in room 235 is a chapter of the Inter-Varsity Christian Fellow- 
ship, a nationwide interdenominational student organization. 

Meetings: Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. Bible studies in the dorms 

Services: Time of Prayer Monday at 4 p.m. in room 453 of 
the Library and Wednesday at 7:30 a.m. in room 235 of the Chapel 

Adviser: Faculty adivser is Mr. Charlton Meyer, Ext. 555 



106 



METHODIST 

Meetings: Wesley Foundation Sundays at 6:00 p.m. at Uni- 
versity Methodist Church 

Services: 11:00 a.m. in the East Chapel and at 9:30 and 11:00 
a.m. at the University Methodist Church 

Church: University Methodist Church, located west of cam- 
pus on Campus Drive. 

Chaplain: Rev. Richard Vieth, Ext. 541,; Asst. Chaplain Rev. 
James Harrell. Office in room 255 of the Chapel 

ROMAN CATHOLIC 

Meetings: Every Wednesday at 7 p.m. at the Catholic Stu- 
dent Center located just south of parking lot 3 

Services: Daily Mass at noon and 5 p.m. in the East Chapel; 
Sunday Masses at 8 and 9:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. in the East 
Chapel. Catholic Church of the Blessed Sacrament always open 
for prayer. 

Chaplain: Father William Tepe; Asst. Chaplain, Father 
WiUiam Kane, 864-6223. Office in room 32 of the Chapel 

UNITED CAMPUS 
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 

The Presbyterian Chaplain serves the members of the United 
Church of Christ (Evangelical, Reformed, and Congregational), 
the Disciples of Christ, the Evangelical United Brethren, and the 
United Presbyterian Churches, U.S.A. 

Meetings: Informal discussion Wednesday evenings at 7:30 
p.m. 

Services: Communion at 7:30 a.m. on Wednesday and worship 
at 9:45 a.m. on Sunday in the West Chapel 

Chaplain: Can be reached in room 243 of the Chapel, Ext. 
547 



107 



INDEX 



Administration 11,12 

aqualiners ^^ 

athletics 94,95.96,97 

AWS 67 

baseball 96 

basketball • 95 

blood drive " ' 

Board of Regents 13 

book stores ^'^ 

Bridal Fair 92 

calendar of events 100 

Campus Chest 87 

chapel choir o" 

cheerleaders 99 

class activities ^^ 

1 19 

classes ^^ 

coaches °9 

color guard 99 

commuters 44,45,46 

counseling center 22 

deans slips 20 

degree requirements 22 

drama 88,90 

Drama Wing 90 

dress regulations 40 

electicms ^0 

examinations 19 

Flying F.>Uies 91 

football 94 

fraternity rush 53 

general organizations 76,77,78,79 

golf 96 

Greek directory 58,59,60,61,62 

Greeks 50,51,52,53,56,57,86 

Greek Week 86 

gymkana 91 

history of UM 7,8,9 

Homecoming 85 

honoraries 81 

Interfraternity Council 56,57 

intramurals 97 

junior standing 21 

1 95 

lacrosse ^"' 

library 28 

literary magazine 74 



Madrigal singers 89 

map<.f UM ^^4,55 

marching band 90 

marking system 20 

M-Book 74 

M-Club 97 

Men's League 67,68 

military organizations 81,82 

music 88.89,90 

newspaper '^ 

Panhellenic '^2,57 

Parents Day 87 

points of pride 6 

political organizations 82 

President Elkins 4,5,10,11 

publications 72,73,74 

radio station '^ 

religious organizations 82,103,105 

repeats and dropouts 20 

residence hours 4z. 

residences 38,39 

services 24,25,26,27,28,29,30,31 

SGA cabinet 64,65 

committees 68,69 

court 66 

cultural events 84 

legislature 65 

soccer ^'^ 

sorority rush 50,51 

Spring Weekend 92 

student life (.ffice 14.15.16 

student union 34,35,36 

swimming 97 

tennis 96 

track and field 96 

transportation 20,30,44 

tutoring 22 

U.C.A 47,48 

University Theatre 88 

Whom to See 31,32 

women's and men's chorus 90 

WRA 98 

wrestling 95 

yearbook 72 



108 



STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief Maria Valencia 

Assistant Editor Anne Nicholas 

Copy Editor Dawn Sheeler 

Photography Editor Patricia Mullendore 

Business Manager Gail Abrahams 

Academic Information Judy Selznik 

Lindalee Wilson 

Administration Marilyn Manser 

Athletics Harvey Dubin 

Cindy Salzman 

Commuters ^ Susan Mossburg 

Anne Wright 

Dorms Judy Brickell 

Entertainment and Events Michele Kayne 

Elsie McKittrick 

Greeks Nancy Chotiner 

Paul Miller 

Index Nancy Crowther 

Kathy Kowal 

Organizations Margie Koziol 

Points of Pride Jan Milliken 

Sandra Myrant 

Publications Linda Kaufman 

Religion Nancye Baker 

Lana Parresol 

SGA Muriel Zetter 

Student Services Elaine Davidson 

Nancy Horwitz 

Student Union Phyllis Allen 

Barbara Graham 
Photographer Dick Byer