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Full text of "The "M" book of the University of Maryland"

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The couple on the cover have been selected by the editors as 
a ''typical freshman couple." We have attempted as much as 
possible to follow them through their campus life, as will be seen 
in the rest of this book. 




BOOK 

1970 



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Welcome To The Freshmen— 1966: 

I extend a warm welcome to the University of 
Maryland. Although the enrollment is large, we are 
interested in you as an individual, and I believe that 
you will find on this campus the people and the facilities 
to help you achieve whatever your goal may be. 

We must assume that you are prepared to do 
college work. If this is correct, then the most important 
factor in your success will be self-discipline. It is up 
to you to make many choices, and self-discipline will 
play an important part in your progress as a student. 
Self-discipline is not easy for anyone, but it can be 
developed and it will pay rich dividends. 

We expect you to perform in accordance with 
your ability, and we hope that this will be a source 
of satisfaction to you and to the University. It is in 
your interest to make the most of the opportunities 
available to you. 

Sincerely yours, 
Wilson H. Elkins 
President 






TABLE OF CONTENTS 



^b^l0l 



Points of Pride 6 

Administration 12 

Academic Information 20 

Colleges 25 

Residences 29 

Greeks 35 

Commuters 45 

Student Services 49 

Student Union 62 

SGA 66 

Publications 74 

Organizations 79 

Entertainment and Events 87 

Athletics 95 

Religion 105 




POINTS OF PRIDE 



Each year the University prides itself on various claims to 
fame, and the 1965-66 academic year was no exception. The 
students, faculty, and facilities again won awards for which they 
may justly be proud. 

In the fall of 1965 the Carmichael Cup was presented to the 
University. This award is given each year to the outstanding school 
in the Atlantic Coast Conference for outstanding athletics. 

The University ranked tenth in the nation this year in 
enrollment, adequate proof that we have one of the fastest growing 
universities in the country. 

A point of pride on the campus which is continually receiving 
more recognition is the University's School of Engineering, which 
is ranked very highly throughout the nation. 

Research at the University touches virtually every segment 
of our economy. Expenditures for organized research have more 
than doubled over the past four years and totaled approximately 
$14,351,000 in 1965. 

The excellence of the University's high energy physics faculty 
and program was merited by an award of -13,000,000 from the 
Atomic Energy Commission for a 100,000,000 volt cyclotron. This 
cyclotron represents a great monetary investment and will require 
two years to construct and install. We are quite honored to have 
been considered worthy of such an award. 

During the spring of 1966 the Diamondback newspaper was 
recognized as one of the outstanding college newspapers in the 
country. We are also proud of our All-American Terrapin yearbook. 



WMUC, our campus radio station, is rated as the Number One 
college radio station in the country. 

The University was proud to have claimed six of the Woodrow 
Wilson Fellowship Award winners this year. These awards are 
presented to outstanding students throughout the country to 
enable them to further their studies through graduate work. These 
winners include: Charles Fefferman, Mathematics; James John- 
ston, Biochemistry; John H. Gillespie, Genetics; Nancy Harrison, 
Psychology; John Lilienfeld, History; and John E. Loft, Jr., 
German. 

The University is also unique in that its Board of Regents 
serves as the State Board of Agriculture. So in addition to its 
academic responsibilities, it also is responsible for a multitude of 
services and controls. These services are carried out in conjunction 
with teaching departments, research, and agricultural extensions. 

HISTORY 

The important events chronicled in the University's growth 
form an impressive list of contributions to the progress of higher 
education in the United States and in the world. We students can 
be justly proud of the University's record of early perception of new 
needs, of willingness to renovate, and of boldness in undertaking 
huge projects. 

Maryland has a rich heritage. The University began in 1807 as 
the University of Baltimore where the first school established was 
the College of Medicine, the fifth oldest in the U.S., and the first in 
America to make dissecting a compulsory part of the curriculum, 
also first to create an independent chair of diseases of women. The 
Maryland College of Pharmacy, which was added in 1871, was the 
first to establish a chair of analytical chemistry. The School of Law, 
the fourth law school in the U.S., was added in 1882. Also in 1882 
the School of Dentistry was founded, the first such school in the 
world, for the only profession to be established in the U.S. The 
School of Nursing was founded in 1889 by Louisa Parsons with the 
cooperation of Florence Nightingale. 



The College Park Campus, now the main campus, was 
established in 1856 when a group of southern Maryland farmers 
purchased the estate of Charles B. Calvert, Esquire, and founded 
the Maryland Agricultural College, the third oldest in the western 
hemisphere, and financed it by selling stock for $25.00 per share. 

In 1862 Congress passed the Morrill Land Grant Act which 
allowed Maryland, a partially state-owned institution, to be one 
of the first to benefit from federal aid to education. Due to a 
disastrous fire in 1912 and a decrease in enrollment because of the 
war, the College found it necessary to apply for further state aid; 
thus in 1914 the State Legislature bought all of the stock in the 
college which then became the Maryland State College. 

The University of ^Maryland was formed in 1920 when 
Maryland State College and the University of Baltimore merged. 
Another large expansion occurred in 1949 when the University 
established the College of Special and Continuation Studies which 
provides an overseas program for servicemen and dependents of 
government employees. This program is now available in twenty- 
five countries on four continents. 

The Baltimore campus has now been enlarged to include a new 
four year campus at Catonsville, which is opening this fall with 750 
freshmen. Recently there have also been significant additions to 
the College Park campus. In 1965 a new facihty, the Adult 
Education Center was completed. Also opened were the Fine Arts 
Building, the Education Building, and the Computer Science 
Center. Under construction are the Space Science Center and an 
addition to the Physics-Astronomy Building including the install- 
ment of a cyclotron. 

TRADITIONS 

Several long-established customs have served as traditions 
that have been observed from one generation to another at the 
Universit}'. 

Perhap the most notable is our terrapin mascot, Testudo, in 
front of McKeldin Library, who harbors the secrets of generations 



of students. Another mascot was born in 1965 — a huge mechanical 
turtle to be used at athletic events to boost school spirit. 

The chapel chimes echo ''Maryland, My Maryland" each 
hour, warning students that classes are about to begin. It is these 
hurrying footsteps which have created the well-worn paths on the 
mall. 

Certainly a notorious tradition is the mad rush and frustrating 
effort to prepare a schedule during Registration Week. Freshmen 
are repeatedly warned of this dark week, only to find that the 
worst result is a case of frayed nerves. 

In a happier vein, the Inter-fraternity Council sponsors many 
fun-filled traditions each year. Harmony Hall, IFC Sing, IFC Ball, 
and IFC Presents, featuring top entertainment, provide admirable 



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5P[ECH DEPT 

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memories for all. These events are good testimony to the organiza- 
tion and enthusiasm of the Greeks. 

Each year the Student Government Association sponsors 
Parents' Day, Homecoming, Away Weekend, Cultural Events, 
AWS Bridal Fair, and Class Proms. These activities provide great 
enjoyment and serve to bring the students into closer contact with 
one another. 

As soon as the weather is warm, and the sun dries the last 
of the winter snow, the mall is spread with students lounging, 
studying, or getting in some pre-Ocean City sun-bathing. 

Campaign battles and hectic conventions highlight the 
University's elections. Each year, when pandemonium is seen in 
front of the Student Union or the dining halls where voting is done, 
one can be sure that elections are here again. 

No account of the University's traditions would be complete 
without mention of the Kissing Tunnel. This secluded spot may be 
found under Chapel Drive in front of the Chapel. 

The constant lack of parking places throughout the campus 
brings many cries of woe and causes many an allowance to be 
spent paying for violations. 

One of the more useful traditions is the greatly needed pre- 
exam study day. This is one of the more quiet days on the campus 
as students prepare for their final exams. 

These are but a few of the unwritten and traditional posses- 
sions which give each student a feeling of unity and completeness 
during his memorable and eventful years at the University. 



10 




ADMINISTRATION 



Every freshman should be familiar with the mem- 
bers of the Administration and their responsibilities, 
for they coordinate and direct all phases of Uni- 
versity life. They are always anxious to meet 
students, listen to their views, and help them with 
their problems. 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

President of the University 

. . . Has served in this capacity since September, 
1954. A man of outstanding abilities and achieve- 
ments, Dr. Elkins has strengthened academic 
standards as well as teaching performance here at 
the University. 

Dr. Elkins is a graduate of the University of 
Texas, where he was awarded eight varsity letters 
for his participation in football, basketball, and 
track. A member of Sigma Nu fraternity, he served 
as president of the Student Association and was 
also selected for membership in Phi Beta Kappa, 
Omicron Delta Kappa, Phi Alpha Theta, Tau 
Kappa Alpha, and Alpha Phi Omega. After re- 
ceiving his B.A. and M.A. degrees, he was awarded 
a Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford University in 
England, where he received his Bachelor of Letters 
and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Since he came to 



12 



the University as it president, he has received an 
honorary degree from Johns Hopkins University. 

Dr. Albin 0. KuHN 
Vice President for the Baltimore Campus 

. . .has served as Executive Vice President of the 
University since 1958, and is now in charge of the 
professional schools in Baltimore and the University 
of Maryland in Baltimore County which opened 
this fall. 



Dr. R. Lee Hornbake 
Vice President for Academic Affairs 

. . . has served in this capacity since 1958. He 
supervises the academic programs, as well as the 
faculties, of all the colleges. 

Dr. Walter B. Waetjen 
Assistant to the President for Administrative Affairs 

. . . maintains close contact with the Board of 
Regents to help insure the availability of resources 
and the existence of working relationships to produce 
efficient results at the University. 



Dr. Frank L. Bentz, Jr. 

Assistant to the President 

... is in charge of development of the University's 
physical facilities, the annual Capital Budget Re- 
quests which are submitted to the State Legislature, 
and plant improvement projects undertaken from 
current operating funds. 



13 



Mr. Robert Beach 
Assistant to the President for University Relations 

. . . coordinates the Offices of Alumni Affairs and 
Endowment, and University Relations, which in- 
cludes the University's Gifts, the News Bureau, 
and the Office of Publications. 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

The Governor of Maryland appoints the eleven 
board members for a seven year term. 

The Board establishes policies and guidelines 
within which framework the University is operated. 
In addition, the Board makes appointments and 
names all new buildings on campus. 

Standing committees have been created to handle 
such matters as University expansion, buildings, 
governmental relations, agriculture, athletics, and 
endowments. 

Charles P. McCormick is the present chairman of 
the Board. President Elkins acts as the main Execu- 
tive Officer. The other members of the Board are: 

Edward F. Holter, Vice Chairman, 

B. Herbert Brown, Secretary, 

Harry H. Nuttle, Treasurer, 

Louis L. Kaplan, Assistant Secretary, 

Richard W. Case, Assistant Treasurer, 

William B. Long, 

Thomas W. Pangborn, 

Thomas B, Symons, and 

William C. Walsh. 



14 



Dr. Leslie R. Bundgaard 

Executive Dean for Student Life 

... is responsible for coordinating all student 
activities, including services and extracurricular. 
In his capacity, he's concerned with the SGA, the 
Student Union, Student Welfare, and Dining Halls, 
and Housing. 



Mr. Francis A. Gray 
Administrative Dean for the Office of Executive Dean 

. . . coordinates administrative affairs which deal 
with Student Life. 






Mr. Thomas Florestano 
Assistant to the Dean 

coordinates intercollege programs. 



Dr. Helen Clarke 
Associate Dean of Students 

. . . assists in the coordination of student activities 
and program development. 




15 




Dr. Thomas Magoon 

Associate Dean of Special Student Services and 
Director of the Counseling Center 

. . . coordinates Counseling Center, OIR and 
PCSS and Placement and Credentials as well as 
developmental aspects of other areas of student life. 



Professor Furaian A. Bridgers 
Director of International Education Services 
and Foreign Student Affairs 

. . . assists students from abroad to adjust to life 
at the University and to the local community. 





Dr. Palmer Hopkins 
Director of Student Aid 

. . . coordinates all forms of student aid — scholar- 
ships, workships, and loan arrangements for students 
requiring assistance. 



Dr. Lester M. Dyke 
Director of Health Services 



16 





Miss Margaret Lloyd 

. . . directs the University Housing Office, which 
receives all applications and contracts for rooms in 
the residence halls, and employs and supervises the 
faculty residents and staffs in the men's residence 
halls. 



Mr. Doyle Royal 

Associate Director of Housing 

... is also the chairman of the Traffic Appeals 
Board and the Commencement Committee and is 
the coach of the soccer and tennis teams. 



o, 







Mr. Robert Spence 
Director of Food Service 

. . . directs all phases of the food service programs 
at the University. 



Mr. William Hoff 
Managing Director of the Student Union 

. directs the many student activities of the 



Union. 




h 



17 




Miss Marian Johnson 

Assistant Director of Student Activities 

and Adviser to Interest Groups 



Mr. Alfred Miller 

Assistant Director of Student Activities 

and Fraternity Adviser 






Mr. Larry Lauth 

Assistant Director — Student Union 

Mrs. Macon Capelle 

Social Director 

. . . coordinates the social activities on campus. All 
off-campus events must be registered with her office. 

Mr. Bruce Ritter 
Director of Placement and Credentials 

. . . coordinates career programs and placement 
opportunities with business and government. 

Dr. Darrell Rishel 
Director of Judicial Office 

. . . advises all campus judiciary systems. 



18 



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ACADEMIC INFORMATION 



Diligent scholarship is a major responsibility of the student 
of higher education; the freshman is especially responsible for 
taking the required courses, taking sufficient credits, and planning 
ahead. 



CLASSES 

Classes are of either 50 or 75 minute duration (the 50 minute 
classes meet three days a week; the 75 minute classes, two days a 
week). If the instructor is late, students must wait 20 minutes for 
deans, 15 minutes for doctors, and 10 minutes for instructors 
before dismissing themselves. There are no automatic absences for 
freshmen (with the exception of second semester freshmen who 
have attained a 3.5 average for the first semester); a report is 
turned in to the student's dean if he has more than three unexcused 
absences in one class. Instructors may penalize freshmen for 
absences. Excused absences include illness and participation in 
University activities at the request of University authorities. 
Upperclassmen (sophomores, juniors, and seniors) are allowed 
unUmited absences in those courses classified as non-participation 
courses. Although this privilege has been extended, the University 
does not encourage the habit of missing classes. 

20 



EXAMINATIONS 

A two-hour exam is held at the end of each semester for 
every course. Two or three one-hour exams C'Hourlies") are 
usually given in each course during the semester. Only a student 
with a legal excuse will be allowed to make up an exam he has 
missed. 



MARKING SYSTEM 

The following symbols are used: A, B, C, D, passing; F, 
failure; and I, incomplete. In computing scholastic averages, the 
following numerical values are assigned: A-4, B-3, C-2, D-1, and 
F-0. 

DEAN'S SLIPS 

Any freshman student doing work below the C level after the 
first six weeks of school receives a slip from his dean. A copy is also 
sent home to the student's parents. Though a dean's slip has no 
bearing on his final grade, the student should talk with his instruc- 
tor to learn how to improve his work. 

REPEATS AND DROPOUTS 

Both the original grade and the new grade will be posted on 
the student's record and used in computing his average for 
probation and dismissal. However, only the new grade is used in 
computing the academic average. First semester freshmen are 
allowed to wait eight weeks before dropping a course; all other 
students are allowed three weeks. The student must see his 
academic advisor and dean for approval. For further inform.ation, 
consult the ACADEMIC REGULATIONS booklet pubUshed by 
the University. 

21 



CHANGING COLLEGES 



A student must consult his new dean before transferring 
colleges. A student with less than a 2.0 average will be placed under 
control of the Office of Intermediate Registration (O.I.R.). Under 
the O.I.R. program, the student can absolve his trial or proba- 
tionary status and be eligible for admission into the new college; 
eligibihty must be achieved in one, or two at the most, semesters. 



ACADEMIC AND JUNIOR STANDING 



An average of C and a minimum of 56 hours of academic work 
(excluding P.E., health, or R.O.T.C.) are required for junior 
standing. A student is allowed one semester of grace if he fails to 
make junior standing at the end of the fourth semester. Dismissal 
will result if it is not achieved at the end of the probationary 
semester. 



COUNSELING CENTER 

The University maintains the Counseling Center to assist 
students to maintain a better understanding of themselves and to 
develop improved methods for deahng with vocational choice, 
educational, and personal problems. The Center provides an 
extensive program on reading and study skills given on an 
individual basis on a six-week cycle with two cycles each semester. 
Students pay an annual ''Advisory and Testing Fee" at the time 
of registration and are entitled to the services of the Counseling 
Center without further charge. The Counseling Center is located 
in Shoemaker Hall. 

22 



HONORS 

Many groups on campus offer tutoring for freshmen. Among 
these are Phi Eta Sigma and Alpha Lambda Delta, the men's and 
women's freshmen honoraries. The individual departments also 
offer tutoring, though a nominal fee may be charged. 

TUTORING 

Freshmen who attain a 3.5 average are eligible for initiation 
into the scholastic honoraries (either a first semester average or 
cumulative for the year). Any student who earns a 3.5 is placed on 
the Dean's List. Each fall an Honors Convocation is held to honor 
those students who have maintained an average of 3.5 or better for 
the preceding year. 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

At least 120 semester hours (excluding P.E., R.O.T.C., and 
health) are required for graduation. An overall average of C or 2.0 
is required for graduation in all colleges. See the dean of your 
college to learn its specific requirements. 



23 




u 




COLLEGES 



One of the most challenging aspects of a large University is its 
diversity, academically, as well as socially. Since other parts of this 
book describe the social opportunities, this section is devoted to 
the academic possibilities for the new student. 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

Dr. Gordon M. Cairns has the distinction of being dean of the 
oldest division of the University of Maryland at College Park. 

The College of Agriculture offers many diverse fields of 
study, including: General Agriculture, Agricultural Economics, 
Agricultural Chemistry, Agricultural and Extension Education, 
Agricultural Engineering, Agronomy, Animal Science, Botany, 
Conservation and Resource Development, Entomology, Food 
Science, Horticulture, Pre-Forestry, and a program for Pre- 
Theological students who wish to prepare for a rural ministry. 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Established in 1921, the College of Arts and Sciences is the 
largest in the University. Within its fifteen departments are the 
physical sciences, the fine arts, and the humanities. Graduates may 
earn degrees of Bachelor of Sciences, of Arts, and of Music. 

An expanding and active college, under Dean Charles Man- 
ning, the College of Arts and Sciences produces graduates with a 
full and useful academic background. 

25 



Its majors include: American Studies, Art, Astronomy, 
Botany, Chemistry, Classical Languages and Literatures, Com- 
parative Literature, Computer Science, Economics, English 
Language and Literature, Foreign Languages and Literatures, 
General Biological Sciences, General Physical Sciences, Geography, 
Government and Politics, History, Mathematics, Microbiology, 
Molecular Physics, ]\Iusic, Philosophy, Physics, Astronomy, the 
Pre-Professional Curricula, Psychology, Sociology and Anthro- 
pology, Speech and Dramatic Arts, and Zoology. 

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRA- 
TION 

Accounting, Real Estate, Transportation, Foreign Service, 
Geography, Government and Politics, JournaHsm, and Office 
Management^ are among the fields available to B.P.A. students. 

Last year two important projects were initiated: a program 
leading to the degree of Master of Business Administration, and a 
joint appointment with the Computer Science Center to advance 
computer related research and instruction. 

Led by its new dean, Donald W. O'Connell, the College of 
Business and PubHc Administration continues this program of 
expansion and progress. 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

From the College of Education come teachers prepared for 
classes in nursery school, kindergarten, elementary and secondary 
school, and fields of special education. 

Estabhshed in 1920, the College awards either a Bachelor of 
Arts or a Bachelor of Sciences degree. 

Vernon E. Anderson is dean of this college. 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

The College of Engineering, under Acting Dean Russell B. 
Allen, offers degrees in: Aeronautical Engineering, Chemical 

26 



Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical 
Engineering, and Fire Protection. 

COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 

The Acting Dean of the College of Home Economics is Erna R. 
Chapman. In this college a student may study: food, nutrition or 
institution administration, general home economics, home econom- 
ics education, home economics extension, housing, apphed design 
or crafts, and textiles or textiles and clothing. 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Under the direction of Dean Lester M. Fraley, the College 
of Physical Education provides Bachelor of Sciences degrees in five 
professional areas: Physical Education, Dance, Health, Recrea- 
tion, and Physical Therapy. Special curricula are also offered in 
safety education and elementary physical education. 

PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS 

The University has six professional schools in Baltimore; 
these schools are: Medicine, Law, Dentistry, Pharmacy, Nursing, 
and Physical Therapy. All of Maryland's professional schools have 
very high national ratings. 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 

More than 40,000 part-time students enroll each year in 
courses offered through University College in the state of JNIaryland 
and overseas. The overseas courses are offered on 200 military 
installations in twenty-five foreign countries in cooperation with 
the Armed Forces of the United States. All overseas study is fully 
accredited by the University of Maryland; approximately 200 
mihtary and civihan personnel stationed overseas complete their 
Bachelor's degree each year. Commencement exercises are held 
each spring in Tokyo, and Heidelberg. 



27 




RESIDENCES 



Some of the most enjoyable hours of your college life will be 
found in your new second home — the residence hall. You soon 
realize that your residence hall is more than just a place to eat and 
sleep. Here you learn to live with many types of people from many 
different backgrounds. You learn how to give and take in order to 
estabhsh a harmonious and enjoyable equilibrium. 

Your room is your own personal domain which you may 
decorate as you wish. Besides the bed, chest of drawers, desk and 
chair which you are given, you and your roommate may add any 
accessories such as posters, curtains and bedspreads. Fans, radios, 
and record players are permitted but televisions, hot plates and 
electric blankets are not. Linens and towels may either be brought 
from home or obtained weekly from the Gordon-Davis Linen 
Supply Company, which you can contact directly through an 
agent on campus. For your further convenience many residence 
halls are equipped with kitchens, laundry facilities and vending 
machines. 

Because the University realizes the importance of a noiseless 
atmosphere in which to study, quiet hours are strictly enforced. 
These are continuous with the exception of 11:30 A.M. to 1:30 
P.M. and 4:30 P.M. to 7:30 P.M. Monday through Friday. Quiet 
hours on Saturday and Sunday are somewhat relaxed. If for some 
reason you don't want to study in your room, you may go to one 
of the study rooms in every dorm. After hours, the main lobby is 
often used for study. Should you be studying for an hourly, you 

29 



can always turn to the academic file, filled with past exams, notes 
and term papers. 

Each residence hall has graduate assistants and ofl^cers who 
are there to help you adjust to your new residence hall life. But 
dorm life also has its social aspect. Through frequent intramural 
sports and desserts sponsored by the residence halls men and 
women have a greater opportunity to meet other students and 
experience a very essential part of college life. 

TELEPHONES 

Intercampus telephone service has been provided for your use 
and is always available. Certain halls, though, do not permit 
either outgoing or incoming calls after 11:00 P.M. This is not an 
established rule; but is left up to the students on the individual 
halls. Although intercampus telephone calls are continuous, 
off-campus ones are not. These calls may be received only until 
10:00 P.M. on Monday nights and 11 :00 P.M. on the other nights. 
All outside calls must be made on the pay phones. 

The main desk extensions for women's residence halls are: 

Anne Arundel 7301 Montgomery C-D-E 7341 

Caroline 7312 Montgomery F-G 7342 

Carroll 7313 Montgomery A-B 7340 

Centreville North 7310 Queen Anne's 7347 

Centreville South 7311 St. Mary's 7348 

Denton 7500 Somerset 7349 

Dorchester 7331 Wocomico 7350 

Elkton 7700 Worchester 7351 

Men's halls do not have main desks but their extensions are 
provided in the University Faculty-Staff telephone directory. 

VISITING REGULATIONS 

All residence halls have certain regulations concerning 
visitors. Male callers to a female residence hall should go to the 
main desk and have the woman paged. Women may visit men's 

30 



residences during calling hours or for regularly scheduled parties 
which will be on the weekly social calendar. 

Overnight guests of college age (no younger than sixteen) may 
spend Friday and Saturday nights in your residence if there is 
room and if you have the head resident's permission. Guests must 
be registered 24 hours in advance. A fee of $.50 or $1.00 is charged 
for Unens. 

DRESS REGULATIONS 

Skirts and dresses are the standard attire for women in 
classrooms, administration buildings, the chapel and women's 
residence hall lobbies. To these places men must wear shirts and 
trousers. The same dress should be worn on the first and second 
floors of the Student Union, although casual clothes are permitted 
on the lower level at any time. Such attire is permitted at the 
evening movies. 






Women students may wear tailored bermudas and slacks in 
the dining halls for breakfast and for lunch Monday through 
Friday and all day Saturday. For dinner the remaining five nights 
a skirt or dress is required. To Sunday dinner women should wear 
heels and men should wear ties. 

During inclement weather the choice of clothes is left to the 
student's discretion. 

CURFEWS 

Curfews affect only the female students and are dependent 
upon their year in college. Monday night is a closed night meaning 
that the curfew for all women is 10:00 P.M. Tuesday through 
Thursday and Sunday the freshman curfew is 11:00 P.M. while 
sophomores, juniors and seniors have a 12:00 A.M. curfew. All 
women students have until 1 :30 A.M. on Friday and Saturday to 
return to the residence hall. 

Freshmen sophomores and juniors receive three, six and nine 
overnights respectively. Seniors are unrestricted as to the number 
they may take. In addition, freshmen receive six 12:00 A.M. late 
leaves per semester. 

RESIDENCE HALL GOVERNMENT 

With the rapid expansion of the student population, com- 
munication among residence hall students became difficult. 
Although each dorm had its own officers, there was little interaction 
among them. The first step forward was the formation of Area 
Councils, corresponding to the geographical location of the dorms. 
At present, there are four Councils: the Hill; the Mobile Units; 
Cambridge Complex, and Denton Complex. When Elhcott City 
Hall and Hagerstown Hall are completed, they will form a fifth 
Council. Representatives from each dorm make up the Area 
Councils, which plan dances, and other social events, as well as 
sponsor sports and work with the administration on dorm problems. 

Last year, the Residence Hall Council was formed. Its purpose 
is to co-ordinate Areas, and exchange ideas. The President and a 

32 



representative from each area sit on the Council. The President 
and Executive Vice-President of the RHC, who are elected by 
Area Councils, are members of the SGA Cabinet. The RHC has 
several standing committees: Housing — through which the RHC 
works with the Housing office for better student living; Social — 
which works with dorm social chairmen and the University Social 
Director for better activities, and Food Service — which presents 
students' suggestions to the Dining Hall Staff. To insure contin- 
uous, well-informed leaders, the RHC has established Leader 
Training Sessions for all dorm officers and chairmen, to be held 
during Orientation Week. 



33 





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GREEKS 



Greek - rush - Panhel - active - pledge — what do all of these 
words mean? As a new student at the University, you are likely to 
hear these terms many times. Perhaps the "Greek Dictionary" 
below will help to clarify their meanings. 

'^GREEK DICTIONARY" 

Active — an initiated member of a fraternity or sorority who 
has completed pledgeship 

Fraternity — a group of men joined together for social and 
educational purposes, dedicated to common goals and ideals 

Greek — a person affiliated with a fraternity or sorority 

Independent — a person who is not affiliated with a fraternity 
or sorority 

Interfraternity Council — the coordinating body of the fra- 
ternity system 

Panhellenic Association — the regulating body for the sorority 
system 

Pledging — a period of learning about the fraternity or sorority, 
helping with projects, and getting to know the brothers or sisters 

Rush — a period of social activity during which men and 
women interested in fraternities and sororities get a glimpse 
of Greek life 

Sorority — a group of women joined together for social and 
educational purposes, dedicated to common goals and ideals 

35 



GREEK LIFE 

Fraternity men and sorority women at the University play an 
active part in sports, student government, publications, honoraries, 
clubs, and all facets of college life. Besides campus activities, 
Greeks are busy with philanthropic projects and with national 
fraternity or sorority events or projects. Greek organizations are 
versatile — and always busy with some activity or project. Greeks 
are always striving for scholarship, leadership, and an active role 
in any aspect of college life. 

SORORITY RUSH 

For the new University coed, sorority rush will be an exciting 
and unforgettable experience. Rush is a week during which 
sorority women and girls interested in sororities become acquainted. 
It is also a week of selection — selecting the sorority in which you 
feel at home and of which you would hke to become a member. 

Rush is divided into several rounds of parties. The first set 
of parties are called Open House; during this round, each rushee is 
required to visit each of the eighteen sorority houses. She is then 
issued invitations from several houses and must limit her choices to 
eight. After the set of eight parties, she must choose four and then 
two. The set of two parties is named Preference Teas. 

Rushing culminates in a period of pledging. Scholarship is 
emphasized during pledging because each pledge must have a 2.2 
academic average to be initiated into any of Maryland's eighteen 
sororities. 

PANHELLENIC 

Panhellenic is the regulating body for the entire sorority sys- 
tem. The Panhellenic Council is composed of two delegates from 
each of the eighteen sorority houses and provides a forum for the 
exchange of ideas between sororities and plans worthwhile projects 
to be carried out through the cooperation of all sorority groups for 
the betterment of the sorority system. 

36 



The council makes the rules concerning membership selection, 
pledging, and initiation, with the aid of faculty and administration. 

In addition, our campus also has a Pledge Panhellenic Council 
which coordinates the activities of the pledge classes and trains 
future members and officers of the Panhellenic Council. The Pledge 
Panhellenic consists of a representative from each pledge class and 
the president of each pledge class. 

Both councils promote intersorority cooperation through such 
activities as exchange dinners, fireside chats, dances, workshops, 
and retreats. 

FRATERNITY RUSH 

Rush is the life-line of the fraternity system for it is through 
rush that men learn about and become members of fraternities. 
During the rushing period there is a series of scheduled events 
including an introduction to the individual fraternity houses. 
Fraternity rush consists primarily of stag and dated parties which 
allow the rushee the opportunity to meet members of the twenty- 
four University fraternities. 




Rush ends in pledging, a period during which the pledge learns 
about his fraternity, accepts responsibility, and gains a knowledge 
of his fraternity's ideals. Pledging also stresses scholarship since 
fraternity initiation requires a 2.0 academic average. 

INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL 

The Interfraternity Council (IFC) is the coordinating body 
of the fraternity system which functions to strengthen and 
co-ordinate the activities of each house into a group effort. Each 
of the fraternities has one voting delegate to the council. The IFC 
also sponsors several annual events: IFC Presents, IFC Ball, 
IFC athletic programs, a tutoring service, and workshops during 
Fall Greek Week. 



38 



SORORITIES 

ALPHA CHI OMEGA ''ALPHA CHI" 

Gamma Theta Chapter established here — 1948 

President Terry O'Neal 

45-5 College Ave. 864-9893 

ALPHA DELTA PI ''AD PI" 

Beta Phi Chapter established here — 1940 

President Carol Lawson 

4603 College Ave. 927-9864 

ALPHA EPSILON PHI "A E PHI" 

Alpha Mu Chapter established here — 1943 

President Carol Coburn 

11 Fraternity Row 927-9701 

ALPHA GAMMA DELTA "A G D" 

Alpha Xi Chapter established here — 1947 

President : Elaine Folk 

4535 College Ave. 277-9876 

ALPHA OMICRON PI "A O PI" 

Pi Delta Chapter established here — 1924 

President Suzanne Landrieu 

4517 College Ave. 927-9870 

ALPHA PHI 

Delta Zeta Chapter established here — 1961 

President Pat Roach 

7402 Princeton Ave. 

ALPHA XI DELTA "ALPHA XI" 

Beta Eta Chapter established here — 1934 

President Jane Terzick 

4517 Knox Road 779-2231 

DELTA DELTA DELTA "TRI DELTA" 

Alpha Pi Chapter established here — 1934 

President Ann Ulman 

4606 College Ave. 277-9867 

DELTA GAMMA "D G" 

Beta Sigma Chapter estabhshed here — 1945 

President Jan MiUiken 

4518 Knox Road 864-5880 

39 



DELTA PHI EPSILON ''D PHI E" 

Delta Xi Chapter established here — 1945 

President Sheila Deitz 

4514 Knox Road 864-9692 

GAMMA PHI BETA ''GAMMA PHI" 

Beta Beta Chapter established here — 1940 

President Gail Holland 

9 Fraternity Row 927-9773 

I^PPA ALPHA THETA "THETA" 

Gamma Mu Chapter established here — 1947 

President Dannye Crawford 

8 Fraternity Row 927-9606 

I^PPA DELTA "K D" 

Alpha Rho Chapter estabUshed here — 1929 

President Gail Block 

4610 College Ave. 927-9759 

KAPPA KAPPA GAJNIMA ''KAPPA" 

Gamma Psi Chapter established here — 1929 

President Marilyn Quinn 

7407 Princeton Ave. 927-9886 

PHI SIGMA SIGMA "PHI SIG" 

Beta Alpha Chapter estabUshed here — 1936 

President Nancy Chotiner 

4531 College Ave. 927-9828 

PI BETA PHI "PI PHI" 

Maryland Beta Chapter established here — 1944 

President Nancy Mott 

12 Fraternity Row 864-9885 

SIGMA DELTA TAU "S D T" 

Alpha Theta Chapter established here — 1951 

President Joyce Epstein 

4516 Knox Road 864-8803 

SIGMA KAPPA 

Beta Zeta Chapter established here — 1941 

President Karen Yablonski 

10 Fraternity Row 779-2191 
Delta Deuteron Chapter established here — 1940 



40 



FRATERNITIES 

ALPHA EPSILON PI ^'A E PI" 

President Paul Savanuck 

13 Fraternity Row 277-9748 

Alpha Theta Chapter established here — 1928 

ALPHA GAMMA RHO ^^A G R" 

President Ken Stiles 

7511 Princeton Ave. 927-9831 

Epsilon Gamma Chapter estabUshed here — 1930 

ALPHA TAU OMEGA ''A T 0" 

President John Harris 

4611 College Ave. 927-9769 

Alpha Sigma Chapter established here — 1924 

DELTA SIGMA PHI ^'DELTA SIG" 

President Chuck Bongar 

4300 Knox Road 927-9770 

Delta Sigma Chapter established here — 1948 

DELTA TAU DELTA ''DELT" 

President Rick Tyner 

3 Fraternity Row 864-9780 

Beta Kappa Chapter established here — 1914 

KAPPA ALPHA ''K A" 

President Charles Moran 

1 Fraternity Row 864-9846 

Epsilon Pi Chapter established here — 1932 

LAMBDA CHI ALPHA ''LAMBDA CHI" 

President Charles Dombrowski 

6 Fraternity Row 927-9778 

Alpha Chapter established here — 1930 

PHI DELTA THETA 'THI DELT" 

President Bob Campbell 

4605 College Ave. 927-9884 

Beta Theta Chapter estabUshed here — 1962 

PHI EPSILON PI 'THI EP" 

President Barry Fingerhut 

Alpha Zeta Chapter estabUshed here — 1899 

41 



PHI KAPPA SIGMA 'THI KAP" 

President Tom Mershan 

5 Fraternity Row 864-9828 

Beta Omicron Chapter established here — 1950 

PHI KAPPA TAU 'THI TAU" 

President Kent Hardling 

Box 24, Campus 864-9886 

Phi Epsilon Chapter estabUshed here — 1959 

PHI SIGMA DELTA 'THI SIG BELT" 

President Bob Zitin 

14 Fraternity Row 927-9557 

PHI SIGMA KAPPA "PHI SIG" 

Eta Chapter established here— 1897, 1923 

President Sither Chebithes 

7 Fraternity Row 864-9851 

PI KAPPA ALPHA 'TI K A" 

Delta Psi Chapter established here — 1952 

President Paul Jankovic 

4530 College Ave. 779-9801 

SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON "S A E" 

Maryland Beta Chapter established here — 1943 

President Gil Hendrickson 

4 Fraternity Row 927-9707 

SIGMA ALPHA MU "SAM" 

Sigma Chi Chapter established here — 1933 

President Arthur Goldberg 

2 Fraternity Row 927-9845 

SIGMA CHI 

Gamma Chi Chapter estabhshed here — 1942 

President Bob Hubscher 

4600 Norwich Road 864-9807 

SIGMA NU 

Delta Phi Chapter established here — 1917 

President Dick White 

4617 Norwich Rd. 927-9563 

SIGMA PHI EPSILON "SIG EP" 

Maryland Beta Chapter established here — 1949 

President Ed Dodd 

7403 Hopkins Ave. 864-3855 

42 



SIGMA PI 

Alpha Chi Chapter established here — 1949 

President Doug Watson 

4502 College Ave. 864-9583 

TAU EPSILON PHI 'TEP'' 

Tau Beta Chapter established here — 1925 

President Mark Farbman 

4607 Knox Road 864-9513 

TAU KAPPA EPSILON ^TKE" 

Tau Beta Chapter established here — 1947 

President Joe Riley 

Campus 864-9765 

THETA CHI 

Alpha Psi Chapter established here — 1948 

President Hank Romberg 

7401 Princeton Ave. 927-9525 

ZETA BETA TAU '^ZBT" 

Beta Zeta Chapter estabhshed here — 1948 

President Mark Mason 

4400 Knox Road 864-9786 



43 



-4^ 





COMMUTERS 



RELAXATION 

The Student Union offers many lounges for relaxation; the 
quietest and most comfortable areas are the main ones on the first 
and second floors. 

''Meet me at the Union" is a common cry heard across campus. 
The cafeterias, billiards room, television room, and the bowhng 
alleys are social havens for commuters. 

If you're on the lower portion of the campus, drop in at the 
Dairy. You'll find many of your friends fattening up on the 
University's own ice cream. 

MEALS 

Macke vending machines are located in the basements of 
most of the classroom buildings. These machines offer a wide 
variety from cigarettes to sandwiches. 

Whether you prefer pizzas, hamburgers, or cheese sandwiches, 
the Student Union Cafeteria or Snack Bar is prepared to serve you. 
If you are on the outer reaches of campus, try the Adult Education 
Center for moderately priced lunches. 

STUDY FACILITIES 

For some concentrated study, the library will probably be 
your immediate destination. The increasing demand for quiet study 

45 



areas has converted the luxurious lounges of the Student Union 
into study rooms. Frequently, classrooms will be available for an 
hour or two for this purpose. Before and after meal times, the 
Dairy is also a quiet refuge for the conscientious student. With the 
arrival of warm weather, the largest study area — the Mall — opens. 

TRAFFIC 

Between the hours of 7:30 A.M. and 6:00 P.M., the campus 
becomes a massive traffic jam; the cooperation of each driver is 
necessary to keep the ever-swelling tide of cars on the move. 
Maryland traffic regulations also apply to driving on campus. The 
traffic signs may seem unending, but they are vital to the safety 
of students walking to classes. The pedestrian always has the right 
of way. Please don't test his abiUty to dodge cars. 

All cars must be registered and the lot's parking sticker clearly 
visible on the rear bumper. No duplicates of parking stickers are 
available. Parking in a restricted lot without a sticker can be a 
costly mistake! 

UNIVERSITY COMMUTERS ASSOCIATION 

The University Commuters Association offers you, the 
Commuter, numerous opportunities to become active in campus 
fife. As a freshman, you represent the prime concern of this 
organization. The doors of the Commuters' Den in the Student 
Union are always open to all. 

SERVICES: Carpools are arranged at the beginning of each 
semester in the Commuters' Den. UCA also provides bus schedules. 
Due to the efforts of past UCA members, D.C. Transit buses stop 
regularly in front of the Student Union. 

Academically, the Association has provided exam files for 
Commuter use. A tutoring service is also available to remedy 
scholarship difficulties. 

Each semester, the club concentrates its efforts on a major 
community service project. Last semester, members collected 
"goodies" for patients at a VA mental hospital. 

46 



Each month a newsletter is published to inform members of 
the many upcoming activities. 

SOCIAL: The annual Playboy Ball is the highlight of the 
UCA social world. For one evening the S.U. Ballroom is converted 
into a Playboy Lounge — complete with bunnies ! 

Other opportunities to meet fellow commuters include picnics, 
casual dances, and Friday afternoon coke dates. During Home- 
coming, the Daydodgers join the festive spirit by building and 
stuffing a float for the annual competition. 

The UCA cultural committee offers guest speakers with 
interesting talks at luncheons and fireside chats. 

ATHLETICS : The Commuters are active participants in the 
intramural programs on campus; you may sign up in the Com- 
muters' Den. Coeds are included. 

POLITICS: The UCA actively participates in campus 
elections, by nominating and supporting its candidates for office. 




^ 




STUDENT SERVICES 



The following section contains an alphabetical listing of the 
most commonly used services provided by the various facilities on 
campus and in the near-by area. At the end of the section is 
''Whom to See," containing various campus activities and their 
sponsors. 

BOOKS 

The Student Supply Store, maintained by the University, is 
located in the Student Union. Here one may obtain all required 
texts, new or used, and other supplies at reasonable rates. Profits 
are placed in a student scholarship fund. Upon resale of books, the 
student is given a credit slip which can be used only in the Student 
Union; no cash refunds are given. Its hours are 8:30 to 4:30, 
Monday thru Friday. 

Alpha Phi Omega (APO), a service fraternity, sells used texts 
in the Student Union at the beginning of each semester. They buy 
books from students and give cash refunds. 

The Maryland Book Exchange, on College Ave., also sells new 
and used texts, plus supplies. Cash refunds are given on resale, and 
during the first week of classes, new books may be resold at 
original cost. 

CHECK CASHING 

Checks for any amount up to $10.00 may be cashed on the 
first floor of the Student Union from 9:00 to 3:00, Monday thru 

49 



Friday. Checks for any amount may be cashed at Suburban Trust 
Co. or the University National Bank in College Park. 

CATALOGS 

The University publishes a general information bulletin, 
AN ADVENTURE IN LEARNING. Catalogs for individual 
colleges are available in the dean's office of each college. 

COLLEGE PARK SERVICES 

The following is a hsting of stores in the College Park area: 
Barber Shops: 

Anthony's Barber Shop, 7419 Baltimore Blvd. 

Old Line Barber Shop, 7414 Baltimore Blvd. 
Beauty Shops: 

Color 'N Curl, College Ave. 

Glamour Girl Hair Designers, 7420 Baltimore Blvd. 

IMartini Hairdressers, 7244 Baltimore Blvd. 

Novel's Hair Stylist, 7421 Baltimore Blvd. 
Cleaners: 

Topper Cleaner, 7408 Baltimore Blvd. 

University Cleaners, Baltimore Blvd. 
Drug Stores: 

Albrecht's Pharmacy, Baltimore Blvd. and College Ave. 

People's Drug Store, Shopping Center. 
Florist: 

College Park Florists, 4412 Knox Rd. 
Gas Stations: 

Shell Oil, Baltimore Blvd. 

Sunoco, Baltimore Blvd. 
Groceries: 

Food Fair, Shopping Center. 
Jewelers: 

College Park Watch Shop, 7406 Baltimore Blvd. 

Powers Jewelers, Shopping Center. 

50 



Men's Clothing: 

Powers and Goode, 4509 College Ave. 

Everett Simons Men's Wear, Shopping Center. 

University Shop, Baltimore Blvd. 
Restaurards: 

College Park Delicatessen, 7400 Baltimore Blvd. 

Hot Shoppes, 7300 Baltimore Blvd. 

Howard Johnson's, Baltimore Blvd. 

Howie's, Lehigh Rd. 

Italian Gardens, 7408 Baltimore Blvd. 

Pizza Hut, 7409 Baltimore Blvd. 
Shoes: 

Triangle Shoes, Shopping Center. 
Sports Equipment and Clothing: 

Varsity Sports Shop, 7501 Baltimore Blvd. 
Women's Clothing: 

Karen Ames, Shopping Center. 

DAIRY 

The University Dairy, on Baltimore Blvd, across from Ritchie 
Coliseum, serves dairy products and light lunches. They make 
their own ice cream. Its hours are: 

Monday-Friday 9:30 A.M.-10:00 P.M. 

Saturday 9:30 A.M.-5:00 P.M. 

Sunday 12:00 P.M.-10:00 P.M. 

ESCORT SERVICE 

The Escort Service, recently formed on campus, will be 
conducted to help women students who must walk across campus 
alone at night. Watch the Diamondback for details. 

FINANCIAL AID 

Students who have demonstrated academic abihty and have 
financial need may apply for scholarships, grants, loans, or part- 

51 



time employment. These are listed in the bulletin, AN ADVEN- 
TURE IN LEARNING, and are awarded before the beginning 
of the academic year or the semester. Specific information may be 
obtained in the Office of Student Aid, North Administration 
Building. 

IDENTIFICATION CARDS 

A new student receives during registration his ID card which 
will be needed as a general identification card, admission ticket to 
athletic and SGA events, and as a dining hall card. 

The ID is also required to draw library books, for obtaining 
the yearbook, to vote in student elections, to check out athletic 
equipment at Cole Field House and the Armory, and to use the 
golf course, tennis courts, and other facilities. 

Loss of an ID card should be reported immediately to the 
Office of the Executive Dean for Student Life in the North 
Administration Building. A SIO.OO fee is charged for replacement. 

INFIRMARY 

The infirmary is located on Campus Drive across from the 
Student Union. It is open to all students free of charge. A registered 



S^^^ 



nurse is on duty 24 hours a day, and a doctor is on call for emer- 
gencies. Physicians will be present at the infirmary during the 
following hours: 

Monday-Friday 8:00 A.M -11 :45 A.M. 

1:00 P.M.-5 :00 P.M. 

Saturday 9:00 A.M.-11:00 A.M. 

Sunday 10:00 A.M.-ll :00 A.M. 

Vacations 9:00 A.M.-4:30 P.M. 

In emergencies, when the infirmary is not open, call the 
campus poHce, Ext. 315. 

LIBRARIES 

The INIcKeldin Library is a depository of information on 
many subjects. It contains four main floors, three mezzanines, 
several reading rooms, and many special studies rooms. 

Books and records may be checked out upon presentation 
of the ID card. Books miust be re tuned to the loan desk; the fine on 
overdue books is fifty cents a day. 

During the regular school year, Library Hours are : 

Monday-Friday 8:00 A.M.-12:00 A.M. 

Saturday 8:00 A.M.-5:00 P.M. 

Sunday 2:00 P.M.-12:00 AM. 

The General Reference Service of the Library may be used to 
find out if a book is on the shelves. The phone extension for this 
information is 259. 

Chemistry and J\Iath libraries are maintained by the indi- 
vidual departments in their own buildings. The Engineering 
Library is also in the Math Building. Public libraries in the College 
Park and Washington, D.C. areas are listed in the phone book. 

LOST AND FOUND 

The Campus PoHce Office in the General Services Building 
will accept lost articles. Administrative offices on campus receive 
lost articles and forward them to the police. Individuals finding 
articles should insist on receiving a receipt for them for they may 

53 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
College Park Campus 




BUILDING CODE LETTERS 


FOR CLASS SCHEDULES 








-T.H»ftm> HmU 


AA 


Nunciy School 


AR 


Armory 


B 


Music 


BB 


Center of Adult Education 


IB 


Adminiitration 


C 


Chcmiitiy 


CC 


Zoology 


Col 


ColiKum 


D 


Dairy— TuriKr Laboratory 


DD 


Psychology Rcxarch Laboratory 


E 


Agionomy— Botany— H. J. Pattcnon HaU 


EE 


Psychology 


F 


Horticultur.^Hohap(el HaU 


FF 


Temporary Classroom 


G 


Journalism 


GG 


Cole Student Activities BuiWmg 


H 


Home Economic. 


HH 


Music Annejt 




Agricultural Engineering — Shriver Laboratory 


II 


Poultry-Jull HaU 


I 


Engineeririg Classroom Building 


ir 


Engines Rcsearti Laboratory (Molecular Physics) 


K 


Zoolog,^-Silvester Hajl 


KK 


North Administration BuUding 


L 


Ubrary-McKeldin HaU 


LL 


Forrign Language. Building 


M 


Psychology-MorriU Hall 


MM 


Computer ScieiKe Center 


N 


Shoemaker Building 


NN 


Fine Arts Building 


O 


Agriculture— Symons HaU 


oo 


CoUege of Education and Classroom Building 


p 


Industrial Arts and Education 




—J M Patterson Building 


Q 


Business and Public Administration 




and Classroom Building 


R 


Classroom Building— Woods Hall 


S 


Engineering Laboratories 


T 


Education— Skinner Bmlding 


U 


Chemical Engineering 


V 


Wind Tunnel 


w 


Preinkert Field House 


X 


Judging Pavilion 


Y 


Mathematics 


z 


Physics 




Sororities Not Shown 




Alpha Xi Delta 




Fraternities Not Sho%>-n 




Tau Epsilon Phi 




Phi Epsilon Pi 




Tau Kappa Epsilon 






be claimed, but if they are not the police send them to charity after 
90 days. The loss of textbooks should be reported to both book- 
stores at once. 

PLACEMENT SERVICES 

The University Placement Service, located in Shoemaker Hall, 
offers job opportunities related to present and future employment 
needs. This program includes Career Week and summer job 
interviews with representatives from many companies. The 
placement director and your department's faculty placement 
representative are available for conferences to aid your future 
planning. 

POST OFFICES 

The University operates a post office in the General Services 
Building for the reception and dispatch of U.S. mail, including 
parcel post items and inter-office communications. This office is not 
a part of the U.S. postal system and no facilities are available for 
the reception or transmission of postal money orders. All registered 
mail must be picked up at the U.S. Post Office in College Park on 
Baltimore Blvd. 

RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 

The University offers many recreational facilities, supple- 
mented by local community activities. Bowling alleys may be 
found in the Student Union as well as in Adelphi, College Park, and 
Clifton Park. 

There are no movie theatres in College Park, but movies are 
shown in the Student Union on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday 
evenings. Classical films are shown Tuesday and Thursday 
afternoons. Theatres are located in Langley Park, Silver Spring, 
Beltsville, Beltway Plaza, Hyattsville, Bethesda, Wheaton, and 
downtown Washington. 

56 



Swimming is available for women only m Preinkert Field- 
house, and for men and women at Cole Field House. In winter, 
there is an Ice Skating Rink at Wheaton Plaza. Indoor rinks are 
found in Silver Spring, Rockville, and downtown Washington. 

The University offers archery targets and tennis courts at no 
charge. There is a miniature golf course at Green Meadows on 
University Blvd., and one at Prince George's Plaza. 

There are listening booths and record rooms in the Fine Arts 
Room of McKeldin Library; records and record players are 
available. The Student Union has televisions, a billiard room, and 
a hifi and stereo room. Campus-wide dances are held at least twice 
a month in the S.U. Ballroom. 

TRANSPORTATION 

Greyhound's Baltimore-Washington buses pass through 
College Park; Greyhound and Trailways both have terminals on 
New York Ave. in Washington, D.C. 

All major east coast airhnes and many small ones serve the 
Washington National and Dulles International Airports. 

Trains come into Union Station in Washington and there is a 
B&O terminal in Silver Spring. 

Local cab companies are listed in the phone book. 

UNIVERSITY DIRECTORY 

The Student-Faculty Directory is published by the University 
each year and is sold at the book stores approximately six weeks 
after classes begin in the fall. The cost is $.75. 



58 



WHOM TO SEE 



FOR 


SEE 


WHERE PHONE 


Absences 


Dean of College 


Dean's Office 


ex. 


Admissions 


G. W. Algire 


N. Admin. 


396 


AFROTC 


Col. Reeves 


Armory 


351 


Athletics 


William Cobey 


Cole Field House 


5 372 


AWS 




N. Admin. 


271 


Bills 


Cashier 


N. Admin. 


340 


Breakage Cards 


Cashier 


N. Admin. 


340 


Car Pools 


Univ. Commuters 


Student Union 


503 


Counseling 


Dr. Thomas Magoon Shoemaker Hall 


7641 


Dramatics 


Prof. Strausbaugh 


Woods Hall 106 


7647 


Employment 


Palmer Hopkins 


N. Admin. 


7361 


Fraternities 


IFC Office 


Student Union 


7654 


Graduate School 


Dean Bamford 


BPA Building 


232 


Health Service 


Dr. Lester Dyke 


Infirmary 


7666 


Housing 


Miss Lloyd 


N. Admin. 


319 


Information (Telephone) 




622 


Libraries 


General Reference 


McKeldin Library 259 




Loan Desk 


McKeldin Library 261 




Chemistry Library 


Chem. Building 


525 




Engin. & Phys. Sci. 


Math Building 


484 


Lost and Found 


Campus Police 


Service Bldg. 


315 


Mail 


U.S. Post Office 


College Park UN 4-3264 




Univ. Post Office 


Service Bldg. 


386 


Meeting Rooms 


Student Union Desk — first floor 


7654 


Music 








Bandroom 


Acton Ostling 


Fine Arts Bldg. 


7431 


Band Office 


Acton Ostling 


Armory 


567 


Chapel Choir 


Fague Springman 


Fine Arts Bldg. 


7431 


Combined Glee Club Paul Traver 


Fine Arts Bldg. 


7431 


Orchestra 


Emerson Head 


Fine Arts Bldg. 


7431 


Parking Tickets 


Pohce Cashier 


Service Bldg. 


435 



59 



Problems 

Men's Dr. Bundgaard N. Admin. 

Women's Dean Clark N. Admin. 

Study Advisor or Counseling Center 

Publications and Communications 



Diamondback 


John Purnell 


DBK Office Jourl 


Calvert Review 


Ralf Muthopp 


Journalism Bldg. 


M Book 


Dean Florestano 


Student Union 


Terrapin 


Ken Firestone 


Journalism Bldg. 


WMUC 


WMUC Office 


FF Building 


Religious Groups 


Chaplin Casper 


Lutheran Church 


Scholarships 


Palmer Hopkins 


N. Admin. 


SGA President 


Miller Hudson 


Student Union 


Social Life 


Dean Capelle 


Student Union 


Sororities 




N. Admin. 


Space Reservations 






Student Union 


JNIrs. Lilly 


Student Union 


All Other Places 


Mrs. Armstrong 


Physical Plant 


Sports 






Baseball 


Jack Jackson 


Cole Field House 


Basketball 


Bud Millikan 


Cole 


Cross Country 


Jim Kehoe 


Armory 


Football 


Lou Saban 


Cole 


Golf 


Frank Cronin 


Cole 


Lacrosse 


John Howard 


Taliaferro Hall 


Soccer 


Doyal Royal 


N. Admin. 


Swimming 


Wm. Campbell 


Cole 


Tennis 


Doyal Royal 


N. Admin. 


Weight Lifting 


Hap Freeman 


Cole 


Wrestling 


SuUy Krouse 


Cole 


Sunmier School 


Dr. C. Smith 


Main Admin. 


Telegrams 


Switchboard 


Skinner Bldg. 


Tickets 






Movies and 






Cultural Events 


Stu. Union Box Office— first floor 


University Theater Fine Arts Bldg. 


Box Office 


Women's Rec. Assoc. Ethel Kessler 


Preinkert Field 






House 



60 



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I 







J 




STUDENT UNION 



The Student Union provides the students with activities and 
facilities to meet their need for extra-curricular activities. Whether 
it is food, week-end dances, well-known speakers, or a quiet place 
in which to study, the Student Union is there for the enjoyment 
of all. 

The general hours of the Student Union are : 

Monday through Thursday 9 a.m.-ll p.m. 

Friday and Saturday 10 a.m.-12 a.m. 

Sunday 2 p.m.-ll p.m. 

STUDENT SUPPLY STORE 

Located on the basement level of the Union is the Student 
Supply Store which is a haven for those students seeking almost 
anything. In addition to books and school materials, the Supply 
store offers a miscellaneous variety of items for sale such as 
^Maryland sweatshirts and jackets, college jewelry, drugs, cards, 
novelties, and records. During registration week the Supply Store 
is also open in the evening and on Saturday. 

Hours 
Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 

CAFETERIA 

The Cafeteria, especially popular with commuters, provides a 
pleasant atmosphere for dining. Full course meals as well as a la 

62 



carte sandwiches may be purchased here on the basement level 
of the Union. 

Hours 

Monday-Friday 7:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m. 

Saturday 8:00 a.m.-10:30 p.m. 

Sunday 2:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m. 

AMUSEMENTS 

Bowling: In the sub-basement of the Union are located 16 tenpin 
bowling lanes. Before six o'clock p.m., these lanes may be rented 
for $.40 per hour. After six p.m. the cost is $.45 per lane per hour. 

Monday-Thursday 7:00 p.m.-ll :00 p.m. 

Friday 3:00 p.m.-12:00 p.m. 

Saturday 10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 

Sunday. . 2:00 p.m.-10:00 p.m. 

Billiards: There are twelve billiard tables available for use during 
the general Union hours. There tables, located next to the bowling 
alleys, may be rented for $.80 an hour. 

Movies: Every weekend two full length motion pictures are shown 
in the auditorium on the main floor of the Union. The cost is 
$.25 per person. 

Hours 

Friday-Saturday 7:00 p.m. & 9:00 p.m. 

Sunday 7:30 p.m. 

Game Room: Various card games may be played in the Game 

Room which is located on the basement level of the Union next to 

the Supply Store. 

Television Roorn: Three black and white TV sets and one color TV 

set are available for viewing in this room on the main floor of 

the Union. 

Music Room: Stereo music for listening is piped into one of the 

Music Rooms on the second floor. The other rooms contain three 

pianos and an organ which may be played by students for their 

own enjoyment. 

63 



A major portion of campus business is conducted in numerous 
offices located in the Student Union. Among the student organiza- 
tions housed in the Union are SGA, AWS, IFC, UCA, and the 
Student Union Board. The offices of Dean Florestano and Dean 
Cappell are also located here on the main level. 

SPECIAL ROOMS 

Basement: 

Commuters^ Den: A lounge provided by the University Commuters 
Association, the Commuters' Den is a place where day students 
meet to study, chat, or play cards. 

First Floor: 

Discount Bureau: The ticket booth located in the main lobby 
enables students to receive reduced rates on many items from area 
merchants. 

Activities Lounge: This plush room is the largest study area in the 
Student Union. Student-Faculty Coffee Hours with guest faculty 
speakers are frequently held here. 

International Language Lounge: This room affords the opportunity 
for foreign students to converse in their native tongue. 
Smoke Shop: The store sells all the necessities of college life such 
as candy, cigarettes, nylons, and newspapers. The shop is open 
from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday-Friday. 
Telephone Center: This area is equipped with pay telephones for 
off campus calls as well as campus phones for dorm conversations. 
Second Floor: 

Ballroom: The scene of many campus activities such as monthly 
dances, receptions, political conventions, speaker series, and 
prefinal cartoon shows. 

Fine Arts Lounge: Many exhibitions of student art work from this 
University and other campuses are on display in this area. 
Browsing Room: A quiet reading area supplied with recent maga- 
zines and newspapers. 

64 



w 




V:' 



'*^- 4*.. 





SGA 



Every student pays a S12 fee during registration to finance 
campus activities and services. The representatives of the student 
body who coordinate the activities and their budgets are known as 
the SGA or the Student Government Association. 

The SGA is composed of three branches : executive, legislative 
and judicial. 

CABINET 

Policy making is the major responsibility of the cabinet, the 
executive branch of the SGA. As part of this function the cabinet 
acts on motions passed by the legislature and appoints and 
supervises the numerous SGA committees. The members of the 
cabinet also serve as a liaison between the student body and the 
faculty and administration of the University. 

1966-67 MEMBERS OF THE CABINET 

President INIiller Hudson 

Vice-President John Barron 

Secretary Lynn Hamilton 

Treasurer Tom Hendrickson 

Senior Class President Dick Mortimer 

Junior Class President Bob Fine 

Sophomore Class President Jerry Fleischer 

Freshman Class President (to be elected) 

66 



A.W.S. Representative Mary Lafans 

Men's League Representative Tom Aaron 

Commuter^ s Representative Sam Powell 

IFC President Tom Marshall 

Panhel President Kathy Cooney 

RHC President Reesa Woolf 

RHC Executive Vice-President Brad Larson 

LEGISLATURE 

Initial action on legislation takes place in the legislature. Most 
bills authorize budgets for campus activities. These allocations are 
made on an annual basis and are subject to the recommendations 
of the S.G.A. Finance Committee. Cabinet and legislature meetings 
are open to all students. 

1966-67 MEMBERS OF THE LEGISLATURE 



Senior: 

Gail Abrahams 
Bob Bauer 
Brian Benson 
Duffy Browne 
Nancy Chotiner 

Junior: 

Lou Adorian 
Barbara Jo Dubnoff 
Bill Howard 
Andy O'Neill 

Sophomore: 

Steve Berenson 
Beverly Bondy 
Debbie Cohen 
Sue Ellen Cohen 



Elaine Folk 
Annie Groer 
Jean Inouye 
Rod Urban 



Carol Orban 
Jan Orban 
Mike Rawl 
Walt Robertson 



Gerry Combs 
Rickie Lamb 
Connie Little 



67 



STUDENT COURT 

The Faculty Senate Committee on Student Discipline grants 
judicial power to each of several campus judicial boards. The 
Judiciary Office assigns cases to student judicial boards according 
to the jurisdiction covering the student infraction of a University 
regulation or pubhc law. 

CENTRAL STUDENT COURT has appellate jurisdiction 
over other major student judicial boards, constitutionality cases, 
and infractions of major University rules. Each of its nine members 
must be either a junior or senior with a minimum of a 2.5 cumula- 
tive grade-point average. 

STUDENT TRAFFIC COURT renders decisions in cases 
involving violation of campus traffic rules and regulations. Four 
men and three women students serve as justices in this court. 

AWS JUDICIAL BOARD makes rulings over cases involving 
women's violations. It has appellate jurisdiction over women's 
dormitory and sorority judicial boards. Nine members are selected 
from sororities, dormitories, and commuters. 

RESIDENT MEN'S JUDICIAL BOARD consists of six 
members of the men's residence halls in the four campus areas — 
Cambridge Complex, Denton Complex, Prefab or Trailers and 
Hill Area. The Resident Men's Board hears cases involving 
dormitory groups and violations of dormitory safety rules by 
individual residents. It has appellate jurisdiction over Men's 
House Judiciaries. 

PANHELLENIC JUDICIAL BOARD handles infractions 
of Panhellenic Rules such as those concerning rush. The executive 
officers of Panhellenic hold jurisdiction over the sorority houses. 

IFC JUDICIAL BOARD is composed of five senior fraternity 
men who hear cases involving infractions of IFC legislation or 
University rules by a fraternity. 

68 



ASSOCIATED WOMEN STUDENTS 

The A.W.S. is the governing body of all women students, 
administering campus regulations, and standards of conduct. They 
sponsor a variety of services and activities, such as a Christmas 
Program, orphan's party. Bridal Fair and the Women's Convoca- 
tion. Committees as cultural, social, elections, constitution, 
publicity and Information Please Handbook positions are open for 
almost every woman's interests. Applications are available in the 
A.W.S. office in the Student Union. 



MEN'S LEAGUE 

The Men's League is the representative body of all the male 
students on campus, enforcing rules and regulations set forth by 
the University. They work to promote the educational, cultural, 
social and athletic interests of Maryland Men. The Men's League 
sponsors a variety of activities; the No-shave Contest and the 
Senior Awards Banquet are among the better known. 

COMMITTEES 

The Student Government Association operates through 
committees, open to all students, who may apply stating their 
interests and quaUfications. Notices of specific openings are 
announced in the Diamondback. Applications may be obtained in 
the SGA oflfice, Room 114 of the Student Union. 

ELECTIONS BOARD supervises all campus elections. It 
controls balloting at the polls, handles the complaints registered 
against illegal practices of candidates, and the IBM counting 
of ballots. 

HOMECOMING COMMITTEE plans all the events of this 
colorful fall week-end. They plan for the floats, built by all dorms, 
fraternities and sororities, which are entered into competition 
during the pre-game parade. The committee also administers the 
selection of the Homecoming Queen and arranges the outside 
entertainment for the Homecoming Dance. 

CULTURAL COMMITTEE coordinates cultural events all 
over the campus including well-known entertainers, symphonies, 
orchestras. University Theater, Glee Club, Gymkana, and Flying 
Follies. 

The Finance Committee is composed of five members chosen 
by the Student Government treasurer on the basis of knowledge 
and previous experience on matters of finance. The chief concerns 
of the Committee are the investigation of campus organizations 
requesting funds, the recommendation of such allocations to the 
SGA, and ultimately, the investigation of organizational spending. 

70 



The Freshman Orientation Board will guide you through 
assemblies, dances and orientation regulations during your first 
week on campus. 

CAMPUS CHEST sponsors projects throughout the year to 
raise funds for charity. They also sponsor their own week of 
activities, including College Casino and Ugly Man Contest. 

PEOPLE-TO-PEOPLE sponsors social and cultural events to 
help orient foreign students to life in the United States. 

STUDENT UNION BOARD strives to make all parts of the 
Student Union a warm and colorful place to gather. They sponsor 
eminent guest speakers, coffee hours with faculty and students, 
and big name bands, plus other events of interest. 

The Who's Who Committee selects outstanding senior men and 
women in every field of University life to be recognized in the 



1 



national manual under ''Who's Who Among Students in American 
Colleges and Universities." 

CAMPUS ELECTIONS 

Election of officers for the class of 1970 will be held within the 
first six weeks of the fall semester. The positions open will be: 
President, Vice-President, secretary, treasurer, A.W.S. representa- 
tive and Men's League representative and six legislature seats. 
Campaigning for aspiring candidates begins with a primary when 
the field is narrowed to two candidates for each position, before a 
final election is held. 

General campus elections are held in March or April. Candi- 
dates are nominated by the Old Line, or Free State Parties at 
conventions a few weeks prior to elections. Individual candidates 
may also run independently without party affiliation. Spring 
elections is a coloiful and tense week of campaigning, so ''please 
vote — for a unified, moving SO A." 



72 




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--"fs^^ ■' 




PUBLICATIONS 



dia:\iondback 

The DIA^MONDBACK is the University newspaper which 
comes out four days a week and reports on campus, local, and 
international news. The News Board, members of the newspaper 
staff, and the journahsm classes report activities, announcements, 
and special events. The News Board recruits its members from 
students who have previous experience working on the DIA- 
MONDBACK. 

There is a separate daily staff for each day of the week. A daily 
editor and a copy chief direct the copyreading, editing, and typing 
of stories two days in advance of publication. Help is always 
needed, and since no experience is necessary, freshmen have an 
ideal opportunity to gain experience and develop their journalistic 
talent. The business, editorial, and sports staffs complete the 
picture of the pubHcation of the DIAMONDBACK. 

The students are especially proud of the DIAMONDBACK 
this vear because for the first time since 1940, the DIAMOND- 
BACk has received an ALL AI^IERICAN RATING, the highest 
homor a school newspaper can receive. 

TERRAPIN 

TERRAPIN, the school yearbook, highlights all the interest- 
ing events which occur on campus during the school year. Candid 
pictures, pictures of deans, sports events, campus queens, dorm 
residents, seniors, sororities, and fraternities make up a large part 
of the yearbook. 

74 



Section editors, copy editors, and photographers are the force 
which makes the yearbook possible. Students interested in working 
on the yearbook may apply in the TERRAPIN office in the 
Journahsm Building. 

WMUC 

Campus radios set their dials on 650 to tune in WMUC, the 
University's radio station which is Number One among college 
radio stations in the nation. WMUC broadcasts 24 hours a day, 
focusing attention on campus activities. Try outs for disc jockeys 
and announcers are open to both men and women in the WMUC 
office in Building FF in the gulch. 

CALVERT REVIEW 

Original poetry, short stories, essays, and art by University 
students fill the pages of the CALVERT REVIEW. This hterary 
magazine has been published semi-annually since its establishment 
in 1963. Awards of $20 are given in each category: poetry, prose, 
and art. Interested students should submit their work to the 
CALVERT REVIEW office in Taliaferro Hall. 

ARGOS 

This year the students will witness the initiation of a feature 
magazine on campus — the ARGOS, which will contain feature 
articles on student life, fashions, sports, traditions, and human 
interest stories. The ARGOS will be published twice a semester. 

The staff consists of an editor-in-chief, section editors, and 
their staffs. These positions are open to anyone interested in 
working to make this magazine a success; applications are av^ailable 
in Room 103 of the Student Union. 

The University campus has long been in need of a magazine 
of this kind and we offer our congratulations and support to Terry 
Baxter, who pioneered this magazine. 

75 



M-BOOK 

Hopefully, this publication, the M-Book, which you are now 
reading will be the Freshman's ''Bible". In handbook form, the 
M-Book compiles and organizes all the information a new student 
on campus would want to know. It Hsts hours, dates, activities, phone 
numbers, and regulations which the freshman cannot possibly learn 
all at once, or for that matter, learn during his four years at 
Maryland. 

The M-Book staff is mainly composed of Freshmen and 
Sophomores with a few upperclassmen in editorial positions. All 
freshmen are urged to apply for work on the staff, especially if you 
are considering furthering your participation in college pubhca- 
tions, since this is excellent background experience. Apphcations 
may be picked up and returned to Dean Florestano's office in the 
Student Union. 




COURSE GUIDE 

The Course Guide is published in order to give students some 
concept of a course and what it entails. It is compiled from student 
evaluations and includes criticisms of professors and their tech- 
niques, descriptions of tests and material covered, and a summary 
of the course requirements. The guide is pubhshed in the spring and 
is available at no cost to the student. 



77 







/ 



'^'. 




\ 





ORGANIZATIONS 



No matter what your special skill or inclination, there is likely 
to be a campus organization with a group of students interested in 
the same thing. Many clubs are designed to further your education 
in special activities outside of the classroom; some are just for fun; 
most offer both. 

Below is a partial list of the many honoraries, clubs, and 
organizations and their advisors at the University. A complete hst 
may be found in the Student Directory. 

GENERAL ORGANIZATIONS 

ACCOUNTING CLUB enlightens students on various 
accounting principles. Prof. C.B. Edelson, Ext. 345. 

AGRICULTURAL STUDENT COUNCIL promotes incen- 
tive in its field by sponsoring career days, convocations, and socials. 
Dr. Robert Wiley, Ext. 276. 

AGRONOMY CLUB allows an exchange of ideas and infor- 
mation on crops and soils. Dr. Conrad Kresge, Ext. 281. 

AMATEUR RADIO CLUB is a social organization that 
unites its members by studying technical theory and development. 
Mr. K.H. Guy, Jr., Ext. 7758. 

AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY promotes the chemical 
profession by sponsoring a program of chemical speakers. Dr. 
Alfred Boyd, Ext. 408. 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF AERONAUTICS AND 
ASTRONAUTICS' main purpose is to acquaint students with the 

79 



technical and professional aerospace field by affiliation with the 
national organization. Prof. R.M. Rivelle, Ext. 4^2. 

AjNIERICAN institute of PHYSICS' main objective is 
to stimulate interest in physics outside the classroom by sponsoring 
lectures and tours. Dr. P. Steinberg, Ext. 581. 

AMERICAN MARKETING ASSOCIATION provides con- 
sultations with prominent businessmen and conducts a placement 
service for its members. Dr. J. Allan Cook, Ext. 345. 

ALPHA PHI O:\IEGA is a service fraternity. Rush is held 
each fall. Mr. George Fogg, Ext. 270. 

AQUALINER'S develop grace and skill in all phases of syn- 
chronized swimming. Miss Beverly Holden, Ext. 267. 

ART LEAGUE plays an important role in increasing recogni- 
tion of creative arts at the University. Art Department. 

BLOCK AND BRIDLE sponsors activities for students in- 
terested in animal husbandry. Dr. E. Young, Ext. 348. 

BRIDGE CLUB is for students who want to enjoy and im- 
prove their game. Mr. William Hoff, Ext. 7553. 

CALVERT DEBATE SOCIETY always focuses on a current 
subject whether here or on a trip to another campus. Mr. John 
Fitzgerald, Ext. 7555. 

CHAPEL CHOIR performs at several programs during the 
year. Mr. F. Springman, Music Department. 

CHINESE STUDENT CLUB furnishes a place where stu- 
dents can gain an understanding of the Oriental culture. Dr. Jack- 
son Yang, Ext. 7461. 

COLLEGIATE 4-H acts as a service organization for state 
and local 4-H activities. Mr. Hugo Bourdeau, Symons Hall. 

DRAMA WING presents plays that deal with the behavior 
of teen-agers. They appear before area PTA's and other civic organ- 
izations. Mr. T. Starcher, Ext. 75555. 

FENCING CLUB fosters skill and improves technique in this 
exciting sport. Prof. Ethel Kessler, Ext. 7109. 

FLYING FOLLIES are the University's travelling diplomats. 
Mr. Al Dannager, Ext. 415, 

FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA is designed for those 

80 



interested in making farming their career. Prof. H. P. Addison^ 
Ext. 311. 

GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA is a service sorority. Rush is held 
each fall. Prof. Margaret Stant, Ext. 7467. 

GYMKANA TROUPE allows students to participate in 
gymnastic activities for their own interest and development. It 
performs throughout the community. Prof. George Kramer, Ext. 
463. 

HOME ECONOMICS CLUB plans program? with profes- 
sional speakers, demonstrations, and fashion shows. Miss Ruth 
Knighton, Ext. 633. 

INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION is a social organiza- 
tion which helps Indian students at the University become familiar 
with U.S. and college hfe. 

INTERNATIONAL CLUB works with People-to-People to 
foster a greater emphasis on foreign students in all phases of campus 
life. Dr. F.A. Bridgers, Ext. 251. 

ISLAMIC ASSOCIATION helps foster better relations be- 
tween the Islamic students and the campus. 

LOUISA PARSONS NURSING CLUB fosters cooperation 
and understanding between students and faculty. Miss Margaret 
Hayes, Ext. 496. 

MARYLAND MARKETING ASSOCIATION builds in- 
terest and knowledge in the marketing field among students. Dr. 
Allen G. Brunner. 

MEN'S GLEE CLUB is for all men students interested in 
choral singing. Mr. Paul Traver. 

MODERN DANCE CLUB provides an opportunity for 
interested in interpretative dance to develop original choreography, 
perform, and participate in theatrical productions. Dr. Dorothy 
Madden. 

NATIONAL STUDENT EDUCATION ASSOCIA- 
TION provides the student in education the opportunity to gain 
membership in national NSEA. 

PEOPLE-TO-PEOPLE welcomes and helps orient foreign 
students to the campus. 

81 



PHILOSOPHY CLUB offers stimulating lectures and group 
discussions to interested students. Dr. James Celarier. 

PHYSICAL THERAPY CLUB offers field trips, projects, 
and lectures to students interested in this field. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE CLUB brings outstanding civic and 
political leaders to the campus. Dr. Walter Jacobs. 

PSYCHOLOGY CLUB acquaints the student with various 
fields of this science and their application. Dr. Nancy Anderson. 

SOCIETY FOR ADVANCEMENT OF MANAGEMENT 
(SAM) offers round tables, discussions, conferences, and projects 
in the field of management. Dr. C. Clinton Spivey. 

SOCIETY OF FIRE PROTECTION ENGINEERS, for 
majors in the area, holds professional meetings with speakers and 
slides. Dr. John Bryan. 

SOCIOLOGY CLUB gives students an opportunity to meet 
prominent leaders in the field and experiment with research. Dr. 
Arthur Jones. 

SPANISH CLUB furthers knowledge and interest in the 
Spanish culture and language. 

STUDENT UNION BOARD is responsible for all the 
activities and events in the Student Union. Mr. Larry Lauth. 

TERRAPIN SKI CLUB takes frequent skiing trips, offers a 
Learn-to-Ski weekend, and holds exciting and informative meet- 
ings. Mr. Doyle Royal. 

TERRAPIN TRAIL CLUB promotes student interest in 
camping, cUmbing, spelunking, and related activities. Dr. John 
Axley. 

UKRAINIAN CLUB promotes fun and fellowship for Ukrain- 
ian students on campus. 

UNIVERSITY BAND performs at football games in the fall. 
Mr. Acton Ostling. 

UNIVERSITY COMMUTERS ASSOCIATION offers social 
and cultural events to the commuter student. Miss Marian 
Johnson. 

UNIVERSITY THEATER presents a number of plays and 
musicals throughout the school year. 

82 



VETERANS CLUB brings together University students who 
have served in the military. 

VOLUNTEERS FOR MENTAL HEALTH donates a few 
hours per week to the mental patients in area hospitals. Mark King. 

WOMEN'S CHORUS combines with the Men's Glee Club 
to form a choir. Mr. Paul Traver. 

WOMEN'S RECREATION ASSOCIATION coordinates 
an extensive program of intramural athletics for University women. 
Prof. Ethel Kessler. 

HONORARIES 

ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA honors freshmen women with 
a scholastic average of 3.5. The membership emphasizes service to 
the community as weU as to the campus through several tutoring 
projects. 

PHI ETA SIG]\IA honors freshmen men with a 3.5 average. 
This organization sponsors an extensive tutoring service covering 
freshmen and upper level courses. 

OTHER HONOR SOCIETIES are also on campus; however, 
these are the only two open to freshmen. Further information is 
available from your college. 

POLITICAL ORGANIZATIONS 

In addition to chapters of two national clubs, the YOUNG 
DE:\I0CRATS and the YOUNG REPUBLICANS, there are two 
campus political parties, FREE STATE and OLD LINE. Mem- 
bership in these parties is open to all resident and commuter 
students. 

MILITARY ORGANIZATIONS 

ARNOLD AIR SOCIETY is a professional military fra- 
ternity. Major A. C. Hamby. 

VANDENBURG GUARD is a military fraternity with a 
top-flight sabre drill team. Captain G. N. Talios. 

84 



PERSHING RIFLES is a national military fraternity with 
units that are integral with ROTC programs. Major Earl Brown. 

ANGEL FLIGHT is the women's auxiliary organization of 
the Arnold Air Society. They act as official hostesses for the 
University, take part in drill competition, entertain servicemen in 
area bases, and work in the office of the Society. Major Hamby. 

RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS 

BAPTIST STUDENT UNION— Mr. Howard Rees 
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE FOUNDATION— Captain R. 

Raschke 

CHURCH OF CHRIST— W. Medearis 

DIOGENES SOCIETY 

EASTERN ORTHODOX 

EPISCOPAL FOUNDATION— W. Smith 

HILLEL— Rabbi Greenberg 

ISLAMIC ASSOCIATION— Helen Rivhn 

MARYLAND CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP— Charlton 

Meyer 

NEWMAN FOUNDATION— Father Tepe 
WESLEY FOUNDATION— Mr. Richard Vieth 



85 




ENTERTAINMENT 

and EVENTS 



Under the direction of the S.G.A. cultural committee, a 
program of entertainment is presented free to University of 
Maryland students. This year the cultural committee offers: 
Martha Graham, October 6; National Symphony with Van 
Cliburn, October 13; National Touring Group of the Metropolitan 
Opera, November 9; National Symphony with pianist Pennario, 
December 8; Porgy and Bess, January 10; National Symphony with 
Copeland, February 23; Baltimore Symphony and University of 
Maryland Choir performing Beethoven's ^ 9 Symphony, February 
28; National Symphony and Dave Brubeck, March 16; and 
Half -Sixpence, sl musical comedy, March 21. 

SGA CULTURAL EVENTS 

SpotHght Series is a program of approximately four shows each 
semester. The shows feature vocalists, instrumentaUsts, comedians, 
and group singers. Last year, the Kai Wining Jazz Quartet, the 
Brandywine Singers, and Mad(e) in England highhghted the 
series. 

The Speaker Series brings prominent figures, such as Drew 
Pearson and Hon. Tran Van Dinth who spoke on the war in Viet 
Nam, to address students. 

Student-Faculty Coffee Hours allow faculty members and 
students to meet informally through casual discussions. The coffee 
hours are held from 4-5 P.M. in the main lounge of the Student 
Union. 

87 



STUDENT UNION BOARD 

Dances are held on selected Friday and Saturday nights where 
name bands perform in the SU ballroom. 

Movies include a weekend film series in which recent movies 
are presented at 7 and 9 p.m. on Friday and Saturday and 7 :30 p.m. 
on Sunday. International and classic films are shown at 3 and 7 p.m. 
on special dates throughout the year. 

CLASS ACTIVITIES 

Each spring, the Freshman, Sophomore, and Junior Proms 
are held at the Indian Springs Country Club. Traditionally, the 
Senior Prom at the Sheraton Park Hotel is the last social event 
of the year. The class also sponsors the annual ''Senior Class 
Presents". Last April, the class brought Roger Miller and the 
Good Time Singers to campus. 

GREEK WEEK 

There are two Greek Weeks — one in the fall and one in spring. 
Greek Week in the fall is of a serious nature opening with a 
rededication program in the chapel. It also includes Harmony Hall 
which consists of barbershop quartet competition among the 
fraternities and sororities. 

Spring Greek Week is of a lighter nature. In the past there 
have been chariot races, phone-booth stuffing contests, tug-of-wars, 
bike races, and pie eating contests. Sorority Olympics sponsored by 
Lambda Chi Alpha occurs in the middle of the week. Tri-Delta 
sponsors I.F.C. Sing on Tuesday night. The week is climaxed by 
beach parties and fraternity formals on Saturday. 

CAMPUS CHEST WEEK 

In the spring. Campus Chest sponsors Campus Chest Week 
as a fund-raising project for charity. During the week, ''penny" 
votes are cast for the Ugly Msm On Campus and the Miss Maryland 
Campus Chest Queen contests. On Friday night, College Casino 
brings legal gambling to campus for the benefit of charity. 

88 



HOMECOMING 

Homecoming is the highlight of the football season. The 
residences have open-house for returning alumni and visitors. The 
Greek houses and dormitories construct elaborate floats which are 
viewed in the pre-game parade. At half-time, the Homecoming 
Queen is crowned and in the evening the Homecoming Dance in the 
Armory climaxes the day's events. 

BLOOD DRIVE 

Three days in the fall and two days in the spring are annually 
set aside for the Red Cross Blood Drive sponsored by AOPi 
sorority and TEP fraternity. Students donate blood in the Student 
Union. Trophies are awarded to the largest group donors. 

PARENTS DAY 

Sponsored by the SGA and held in October, Parents Day 
provides an opportunity for students and parents to attend a 
football game and visit residences having open-house. 

BAND DAY 

Sponsored by the SGA, Maryland high school bands combine 
their talents and perform during the half-time of an October 
football game. 

AWS-SAE CHRISTMAS PARTY 

In the spirit of the Christmas season, AWS and SAE fraternity 
co-sponsor an evening of music in the chapel with the Men's and 
Women's Glee Club performing. 

IFC PRESENTS 

The ^'presents" is an annual fall spectacular sponsored by the 
Interfraternity Council. In the past the Council has presented the 
Kingston Trio, Harry Bellafonte, Peter, Paul, and Mary, and this 
past year, Sammy Davis Jr. 

89 



HILL AREA COUNCIL PRESENTS 

The Council is in their third year of presenting a big name on 
campus. Last year the Hill Area Presents sponsored Carolyn 
Hester and Godfrey Cambridge. The preceding year, Bud and 
Travis appeared. 

Also the Council sponsors an Easter Egg Hunt on the Mall. 
The dorms, sororities, and fraternities compete. 

PRESIDENT'S CONVOCATION 

Each spring semester President Elkins addresses the student 
body in Cole Field House. Classes are called to enable students to 
hear the ''state of the University" message. 

AWS BRIDAL FAIR 

The annual Bridal Fair in April is unique in that it is singular 
to the University of ^Maryland. Contrary to popular belief, you do 
not have to be engaged to attend. 

There are booths on housewares, china, crystal, silver, wedding 
invitations, photography, luggage, jewelry, catering, interior 
decoration, and real estate. The evening is highlighted by a 
fashion show of bridal gowns and a wardrobe for the trousseau. 

UNIVERSITY THEATER 

The Theatre presents five productions including one musical, 
an opera, and an Evening of Modern Dance. Last season, ''Show- 
boat", "The Imaginary Invalid", "The Marriage of Figaro", and 
"Othello" were presented in the new J. Millard Tawes Fine Arts 
Center. Admission is by I.D. for students and a minimum price 
for non-students. 

FLYING FOLLIES 

A self-supported group of thirty amateurs and professionals, 
the folUes presents a variety show in the spring while throughout 

90 



the year, the troupe performs for army bases and hospitals in the 
area. Also the troupe sponsors the half-time shows at basketball 
games. In the past, folhes has toured Germany, the Caribbean, and 
Greenland. Last April, they visited New York. 

AQUALINERS 

A co-ed synchronized swimming group, the Aqualiners 
present an annual spring show based on a central theme. Last 
year's ''Aquademics" portrayed the hfe of a typical student done 
in precise swim routines. Try-outs for the group are held the first 
week in October. 

GYMKANA 

SGA and student supported, the Gymkana troupe demon- 
strates their breath-taking skills on parallel bars, the horse, the 
rings, the high bar, the balance beam, and the mats weekly to area 
high schools. Each April, the troupe presents a show at Cole Field 
House. 




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Members for the group are accepted after a fall pledgeship in 
which students are required to achieve a 2.0 average and have 
participated in a set number of shows. 

MODERN DANCE CLUB 

The Modern Dance Club's annual presentation appears as 
part of the University Theatre's program in ''An Evening of 
Modern Dance" each April. Solo as well as group performances 
highlight numbers which are highly creative in both choreography 
and costuming. 

MADRIGALS 

Performing in their Renaissance attire, the Madrigal Singers 
are interested in instrumental and choral works of the 15th and 16th 
centuries. The singers perform in numerous engagements both on 
campus and on radio and television. In the spring of '65, the group 
toured the Middle East. 

CHAPEL CHOIR 

Two traditional concerts are performed annually by the 
Chapel Choir. The ELIJAH is presented before Thanksgiving and 
Handel's ''Messiah" is presented in the Chapel before Christmas 
vacation. 

MARYLAND MARCHING BAND 

This group combines the Concert Band, the Symphonic Band 
and the Varsity Band. Each year this combined group presents two 
free concerts, one on the Mall and the other in the Cambridge 
Complex. 



92 



WOMEN'S CHORUS AND MEN'S GLEE CLUB 

These combined groups have an annual Spring Concert which 
is open to the campus. Past programs have concentrated on show 
tunes. 

SPRING WEEKEND 

This annual weekend of activities falls at the end of Campus 
Chest Week. It traditionally begins with College Casino on Friday 
night, a lacrosse game on Saturday, and I.F.C. Presents on Sunday. 





ATHLETICS 



Athletics plays an important part on the University campus. 
School spirit, sparked by the Pep Committee and the purchase of 
Mobile Testudo II, is at an all-time high. 

Cole Field House, houses a modern gymnasium, an olympic- 
size swimming pool, training facilities for indoor sports, and a 
modern arena with a seating capacity of 15,000. The armory boasts 
an indoor track and basketball courts for intramurals. Byrd 
stadium contains the football field which is encircled by a running 
track. Preinkert Field House, the center of women's athletics, has 
a gym, a swimming pool, and a modern dance studio inside, and 
tennis courts, Softball diamonds, and an archery range outside. 

Maryland also has a newly completed golf course, tennis 
courts, and fields for baseball and soccer. Mr. William Coby, 
Director of Athletics, coordinates the entire program at Maryland. 

BASKETBALL 

Last year the highlight of the basketball season at Maryland 
was winning the Sugar Bowl Tournament against Houston and 
Dayton. The Cagers ended the season with a 14-11 record. 

Back to lead the team to another victorious season are letter- 
man Jay McMillen, Joe Harrington, Gary Williams, and Billy 
Jones. Dick Drescher, Pete Johnson, and John Avery will also see 
action. 

Although this year's team will not be as big or as deep as last 
year's team due to the loss of five key lettermen, the Cagers will 

95 



have a quicker team, a good-shooting ball club, and more pressure 
defense. Coach Bud MilHkan has been at Maryland for the past 
sixteen years. 

FOOTBALL 

Coach Lou Saban is new to Maryland and this year should be 
a good test of his coaching ability. Formerly he led the Buffalo 
Bills, a professional team, to several championships. 

Returning to the Terps lineup this year are Dick Absher at 
end, Tom Chockoski and Tom Myslinski at tackle, John Trachy at 
defensive tackle, Jim Lavrusky as line backer. Bob Collins as 
pass receiver, and Whitey Marciniak, Tony Santy, Billy Van 
Heusen, and Al Pastrana. 

GOLF 

The golf team under the leadership of Coach Frank Cronin 
has won fifty-one consecutive home games. This year, the Mary- 
land ACC Champions return to another good season with Steve 
Rosen, Tom Bartolec, Larry Pearson, Charles Schleichter, Denny 
Robinson, Joe Pugh, and Roger Martino. The Terps should show 
good team depth when they meet all the schools in the ACC as well 
as Princeton, Dartmouth, Navy, Hopkins, and Penn State. 

The new 18-hole golf course and driving range is one of the 
nicest intercollegiate courses in the country. 

LACROSSE 

In the 1965 season, Maryland was the ACC Champion and 
head coach John Howard says it is hkely that Maryland will be 
able to retain this championship in the coming seasons. The team 
plays such schools as Princeton, Navy, Army, Duke, and John 
Hopkins. 

Returning players will be Jack Heim and Allen Lowe, attack 
men; Walter DeHoust and Bill Howard, goalies; and Bob Newkirk, 
Ed Helm an as mid-fielders. 

96 



SOCCER 

Our soccer team has won the ACC championship every year 
since the ACC was formed. This year a brand new team will play 
soccer in the recently completed soccer stadium. Although most 
of the players are inexperienced, Coach Doyle Royal hopes to 
maintain the team's winning reputation. 

SWIMMING 

Maryland's swimming team is considered one the the strongest 
teams in the East This year the team again faces top competition, 
but led by Phil Denkevitz, Wayne Pawlowski, Doug Springer, and 
Dave Hein, victory should be easy. Phil Denkevitz has the fastest 
50 yard freestyle in the country, and Pawlowski just set a new 
record in the 100 yard breast stroke. The team is coached by Bill 
Campbell who is in his eleventh year at the University. 



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TRACK 

Last year Jim Kehoe's track team completed one of their most 
successful season's ever, winning for the eleventh consecutive time 
the ACC Cross Country Indoor and Outdoor Championships. In 
addition, Maryland established itself as the top track figure in the 
East by winning their first IC-4A Outdoor Championship against 
heavily-favored Villanova. 

Led by Frank Costello, the sensational high jumper, Maryland 
should have another winning season. Also, Jack Bickley and Jim 
Lee should be outstanding in the sprints, along with Bruce Carson 
in the hurdles. Elmore Hunter and Jack Warfield are competing 
again in the 440 yard run, and George Henry, Dave Starnes, Milt 
Matthews, John Amoss, as well as Dan Donahue, Charles Koester, 
and Steve Washburn in the middle distances. Ed Marks and Bob 
Schnetzka return to broad jumping, while Russ White and Dick 
Dull in the javelin hurhng will round out the Terp line-up. 

TENNIS 

Coach Doyle Royal will again lead the tennis team to a suc- 
cessful season, as they meet Clemson, Cornell, Dartmouth, Duke, 
Georgetown, Johns Hopkins, Navy, Penn, Penn State, North 
Carolina, Virginia and Wake Forest. 

Back to lead the Terps are lettermen Len ^Nlodzelewski who 
lost only two matches last year, and Tom Alerryweather, who went 
to the ACC quarter finals. John Schaffer, Richard Harrington, 
Richard Davis, and Frank Kready are also returning. 

The ACC Tennis Championships will be held at Maryland for 
the first time this year. 

WRESTLING 

Coach Sully Krouse is rightfully proud that Maryland has 
been the undisputed champion of ACC wrestling since the con- 
ference was formed. This year the grapplers are looking forward 
to meeting Lehigh, Iowa State, Army, Navy and Penn State. 

98 



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Bob Karch (167) and Jim Arnoult (123) are coming back to 
continue their winning ways. Gobel Kline (145) and Kevin Gilliad 
who were outstanding on their freshman team, will also be back. 

M-CLUB 

The M-Club honors Maryland athletes who have shown out- 
standing skill in a particular sport and have thereby earned varsity 



letters. M-Club sponsors the Outstanding Intramural Athletes of 
the Year Award, and several athletic scholarships. 

INTRAMURALS 

Intramurals offer everyone an opportunity to participate in 
athletics and to develop s^c I'tsmanship, leadership, and team 
spirit. 

Coach Jim Kehoe coordinates one of the largest intramural 
programs in the country. Last year, over 10,000 people participa- 
ted in team sports such as basketball, bowling, football, softball, 
swimming, and volleyball. Individual sports including badminton, 
cross-country, golf, horseshoes, table tennis, tennis, weight Ufting 
and wrestling, are also available. 

Intramurals. are open to Greeks and Independents in three 
respective leagues — the fraternity, open, and dorm league. 

WRA 

The Women's Recreation Association is the heart of the sports 
program for coeds. WRA is made up of elected officers, committee 
chairmen, interest group and club leaders, and dormitory, sorority, 
and Day dodger representatives. 

Each season WRA offers intramurals on a team or individual 
basis. Badminton doubles, bowling, archery, tennis singles, and 
ping-pong are held in the fall. In the winter. Badminton singles, 
volleyball, and basketball are played. Swimming, tennis doubles, 
and Softball are offered in the spring. 

Interest groups include sports such as tennis, field hockey, 
golf, and horseback riding in the fall, competitive swimming, 
basketball, ice skating in the winter, and tennis, lacrosse, and 
horseback riding in the spring. Judo is offered year round. 

The Aquahners, Modern Dance, and Fencing Clubs also play 
an important part in WRA's activities throughout the year. WRA 
sponsors annual events such as sports Day, Freshman Picnic, 
Physical Fitness Week, WRA-M Club Banquet, and WRA Spring 
Picnic. 

101 



Since every woman student is automatically a member of 
WRA, she should take advantage of the opportunities WRA pro- 
vides for her to become physically fit, have fun, and make friends. 

COLOR GUARD 

The only girls in the University's Marching Band are the 
thirteen members of the color guard. The center section consists of 
three girls bearing the flag of the United States, the state of Mary- 
land flag, and the band flag, guarded by two girls carrying rifles 
The two outside sections carry the flags of the Atlantic Coast 
Conference (ACC), which includes Clemson, Duke, Maryland, 
North Carolina, North Carolina State, South Carolina, Virginia, 
and Wake Forest. 

The color guard marches with the band at all home and away 
games and also at the Baltimore Colt football games. Tryouts are 
held every spring. 

CHEERLEADERS 

The cheerleaders who will cheer Maryland on to victory this 
year are Gail Claggar, capt.; Dottie Wells, co-capt; Jeanne Lamond 
co-capt.; Gracie Rowell, Rosemary Sissler, Mary Vastine, and 
Carol Coputa. Tryouts are held the week before the last home 
football game. Male cheerleaders are also chosen. 



102 



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III 





RELIGION 



UNIVERSITY MEMORIAL CHAPEL 

The center of religious life on campus is the University 
Memorial Chapel. It was dedicated in 1952 to those persons of the 
University who died for their country. Worship is held in the East 
or Main Chapel, the West Chapel, and the Roman Catholic Chapel. 

STUDENT RELIGIOUS COUNCIL 

Representatives from each student religious group on campus 
make up the Student Religious Council, Its purpose is to co- 
ordinate the activities of these groups and to promote religious 
interest on campus. 

RELIGIOUS LIFE COMMITTEE 

This adjunct committee of the University Faculty Senate 
Committee of Student Life and Welfare functions by making and 
executing policy, sponsoring non-denominational religious pro- 
grams and acting as an advisory group. 

RELIGIOUS SERVICES FOR UNIVERSITY STUDENTS 

BAPTIST 

Meetings: Daily meetings of Baptist Student Union from 12 :10 
to 12:50 p.m. in the chapel office, room 252. Two Thursday 
evenings a month. Fireside Dialogues are held at the advisor's 
home. 

105 



Services: 11 :00 a.m. with Sunday evening worship at 7:30 p.m. 
Church: Seconds Baptist Church, 3515 Campus Drive. 
Advisor: Mr. John Jamison, 3617 Campus Dr., 422-6178. 

BRETHREN 

Meetings: Youth Group — 6:30 p.m. Sunday at the church. 
Services: 11:00 a.m. 

Church: University Park Church of the Brethren. 
Pastor: Rev. Phihp E. Norris, AP 7-2116. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 

Meetings: Tuesday, 4:30 to 5:15 in room 25 of the Chapel. 
Services: 11:00 a.m. Sunday, 8:15 to 9:15 p.m. Wednesday. 
Church: First Church of Christ Scientist, 8300 Adelphi Rd. 
Advisors: Captain Rupert T. Raschke, Ext. 636, or Mrs. 
Louise Yuill, co-advisor. 

CHURCH OF CHRIST 

Meetings: Fellowship in room 32 of the Chapel, 3-5 p.m 
Thursdays. 

Church: University Park Church of Christ, 6420 Adelphi Rd. 
Advisor: Mr. William D. Medearis, WA 7-7277. 

EASTERN ORTHODOX 

Meetings: Ethos, the organization for Russian, Greek, and 
Syrian Orthodox faiths, meets every first and third Tuesday in the 
Chapel Lounge at 7 p.m. 

Services: Divine Liturgy celebrated Sundays in Saint Sophia 
Cathedral, Wash., D.C., 10:10 to 11:30. 

Advisors: Rev. John Tavlarides, Dr. George Anastos, ext. 256. 

EPISCOPAL 

Meetings: Canterbury Forum at 7 p.m. Wednesdays in 
University Episcopal Center, 7506 Princeton Ave., 779-9799. 

Services: Celebration of Holy Communion daily at noon and 
8 :30 a.m. on Sunday in the West Chapel. 

106 



Church: St. Andrews Episcopal Church, College Ave. 
Advisors: Rev. Wofford K. Smith, 864-5430; Julie Burroughs. 

FRIENDS 

Meetings: Devotional meeting and forum 7 p.m. Wednesdays 
in room 213 of the Student Union. 

Church: Adelphi Friends Meeting, Metzerott Road; Worship 
at 11:00 a.m. 

Advisor: Dr. John R. Weske, Ext. 542 or 924-4963. 

ISLAM 

Meetings: Fridays at noon in room 247 of the Chapel. 

Services: Prayer and sermon on Fridays at noon in room 247 
of the Chapel. Services are also held at the Islamic Center, 2551 
Massachusetts Ave., N.W. Wash., D.C. 

Advisor: Dr. Helen Rivlin, Ext. 685, room 247 Chapel. 

JEWISH 

Programs: B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation on Wednesday 
evenings at 6:30. The Hillel House is open daily until 10 p.m. and 
provides such facilities as library. Kosher dining club, game room, 
lounge, and study rooms. Location is at 7505 Yale Ave. 

Services: Sabbath services held Friday evenings at 6:30 
followed by an Oneg Shabbat at 7:30 and Saturday mornings at 
9:30; daily Minyan at 7:00 p.m. 

Director: Rabbi Meyer Greenberg, AP 7-8961. 

LUTHERAN 

Meetings: Student Discussion Group and Coffee Hour at 9 :4c 
a.m. Sundays and Supper Program at 5:30 p.m. 

Services: 8:45 and 11:00 a.m. (Communion on first Sunday of 
the month). 

Church: Hope Church and Student Center, just south of the 
University at intersection of Guilford Dr. and Knox Rd. 

Pastor: Rev. Ted Casper, Room 6, Chapel, ext. 547; Beth 
Platz, associate. 

107 



MARYLAND CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 

The Maryland Christian Fellowship with their chapel office 
in room 32 is a chapter of the Inter- Varsity Christian Fellowship, 
a nationwide interdenominational student organization. 

Meetings: Thursdays at 7:00 p.m. Bible studies in the dorms 
and in the Chapel for commuters. 

Services: Prayer Monday at 4 p.m. in room 453 of the Library. 

Advisor: Mr. Charlton Meyer, ext. 546. 

METHODIST 

Meetings: Wesley Foundation Sundays at 5:30 p.m. at the 
University Methodist Church. 

Services: 11 :00 a.m. in the East Chapel and at 8:30 and 11:00 
a.m. at the University Methodist Church. 

Church: University Methodist Church, located west of campus 
on Campus Drive. 

Chaplain: Rev. Richard Vieth, ext. 541, Asst. Chaplain Rev. 
James Harrell. Room 255 of the Chapel. 

ROMAN CATHOLIC 

Meetings: Every Wednesday at 7 p.m. at the Catholic Student 
Center located just south of parking lot 3. 

Services: Daily Mass at noon and 5 p.m. in the East Chapel; 
Sunday Masses at 8 and 9:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. in the East 
Chapel. Catholic Church of the Blessed Sacrament always open 
for prayer. 

Chaplain: Father William Tepe; Asst. Chaplain, Father 
William Kane, 864-6223. 

UNITED CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 

The Presbyterian Chaplain serves the members of the United 
Church of Christ (Evangelical, Reformed, and Congressional), the 
Disciples of Christ, the Evangelical United Brethren, and the 
United Presbyterian Churches, U.S.A. 

Meetings: Informal discussion Wednesday evenings at 
7:30 p.m. 

Services: Communion at 7:30 a.m. on Wednesdays and 
Worship at 9:45 a.m. on Sunday in the West Chapel. 

Chaplain: Can be reached in room 243 of the Chapel, ext 547. 

108 



Editor^n-Chief Anne Nicholas 

Assistant Editor Suzanne Landrieu 

Copy Editor Dawn Sheeler 

Business Manager Susan Schwartz 

Photography Editor Elaine Harris 

Art Editor Nancy Crowther 

Academic Information Jane Goldman 

Sue Cerv^eny 

Administration Cindy Salzman 

Athletics Muriel Einspruch 

Gloria Hynson 

Colleges Lindy Lyon 

Carol Orban 

Commuters Phyllis Allen 

Entertainment and Events Mary Anne Goley 

Cindy Plachta 

Greeks Ilene Herstone 

Susan Wineburgh 

Index Sharon Harper 

Robyne Lieberman 

Organizations Nancy Horwitz 

Elsie McKittrick 

Points of Pride Robyn Richard 

Susie Bradshaw 

Publications Kathy Kowal 

Religion Marilyn Lyman 

Beth St. Clair 

Residences Fran Greenberg 

Gayle Branoff 

SGA SungChu 

Elaine Davidson 

Student Services Trudy Triplet 

Liz Kaiser 

Student Union Nancy Herchenroeder 

Judy Reitman 

Whom to See Susan IMyerberg 

Photographer Carl Sanger