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Full text of "McCormick's Guide to Starke County, or, A past and a present view of our territory"

McCORMICK'S GUIDE 

TO 

^ STARKE COUNTY ^ 

OR.. 



•«• V^iV ... 



A PAST AND A PRESENT VIEW OF 
OUR TERRITORY 



... tJ X .*• 



..BY 
CHESTER A. McCOi MICK. 



f^ 



ILLUSTRATED 



f^ 



PUBLISHED 

BY THE AUTHOR 

J902. 




CHESTER A. McCORMICK. 



McCORMICK'S GUIDE 

//r/ i 



TO 



^ STARKE COUNTY ^ 



«•• OK. ••• 

A PAST AND A PRESENT VIEW OF 
OUR TERRITORY 



/ 



•♦• ^J X ••« 



„BY 
CHESTER A. McCORMICK. 



^ 



ILLUSTRATED 



fS&i 



PUBLISHED 

BY THE AUTHOR 

1902. 



DEDICATION 

To the memory of the early pioneers 
who settled in Starke County, to whom 
much of its growth is due, and to the 
spirited, energetic citizens of today, who 
are taking an active part in the progress 
and welfare ot our county, this little vol- 
ume is affectionately dedicated. 



Copyrighted 1902 
By CHESTER A. McCORMICK 



Introduction* 

It is with personal pride and pleasure that this 
little volume is presented to the people of Starke 
County. It was the purpose of the author to issue a 
volume small in size and containing only that part of 
historv of most value and interest that it migrht sell at 
a low price, thus placing it within the reach of every- 
body, rather than to put out a large volume of several 
hundred pages filled with minor events and facts and 
incidents of only passing interest, which wculd neces- 
sitate a much larger book, thus placing it within the 
reach of a comparative few. As it is, everybody is 
able to possess a brief history of his own county. 

While this little book is not as complete and at- 
tractive as more time and money could make it, yet it 
is all that is claimed for it — a work which seeks to 
trace the growth and progress ot Starke County from 
the time before its organization up to the present day. 
That the county has m^de* rapid strides forward dur- 
ing the past few years is a fact which all of our 
citizens are glad to admit. On looking over the old 
files of the Starke County Ledger, under date of March 
7. 1871, we find this advertisement: 

"Wallace Gould will carry passengers from Knox 
to Hamlet to meet the early morning and afternoon 
trains." 

At this time railroads were not as common in 

Starke County as they are today. We now have rail- 



6 INTRODITCTION 

roads crossing' the county in all directions. So it is 
with all lorms of progress At one time where stood 
a few lo<jc huts, dense forests, marshes and ponds, 
today stand larjre and elegant frame and brick build- 
ings and progressive little towns. We often hear the 
old settlers tell about their hardships in getting to this 
country in the e.irly days either by miring down in the 
swamps or being forced to cut their way through the 
dense forests. Roads were an unknown thing. Today 
we have public highwavs throughout the county, and 
the sand roads are being replaced with gravel and 
stone. If you had told a farmer fifty years ago that 
within a halt century his mail would be delivered to 
his door he would have laughed at the idea. But this 
has all come to pass. And what has brought about 
all this change? We can no better answer than to say, 
the spirit ot progress. 

In this connection I desire to acknowledge my in- 
debtedness for favors and assistance rendered me by 
the followiny gentlemen: John L. Moorman and S. 
M. Gorrell for access to newspaper files; James C. 
Fletcher for furnishing some early facts and for 
referring me to difterent sources; to H. E. White for 
use ot some county records; to Jacob Quigley for access 
to some old newspaper files which are in his office; to 
Jacob Keller for information pertaining to the arti- 
ficial stone industry; to P. H. McCormick for some 



INTRODUCTION 7 

information concerning' North Judson; to F. J. Wein- 
kauf for data concerning' San Pierre; to H. R. Kobbins 
for valuable information and fig^ures kindly furnished 
on the drainag^e of the county; to Glenn D. Peters for 
the article on "Bird Life of Starke County," the 
greater part of which was taken, by permission, from 
a graduation thesio on that subject; to H. S. Loring" 
for some information concerning" Hamlet; to W. S. 
Blatchley for reference to geoloj^ical reports, and to 
T. H. Ball for some informaMon contained in "North- 
western Indiana." 

It was the intention to on it nothing- from this 
little historv that would be of lasting- interest or g-reat 
importance at the present time, however, as years, or 
even mo?:ths. roll by, some of the history contained 
herein will become obsolute tor chang-es are constantly 
taking- place, new enterprizes are springing up, towns 
are rapidly growing, old citizens are passing away 
and a new population is rapidly overshadowing the 
old. And, loo. those who are today reading the his- 
tory with which they are familiar, and possibly of 
some of their own accomplishments, and whose hearts 
are throbbing with pride and patriotism to think of 
the rapid strides the county of their choice has made, 
will soon have left the shores touched by the mys- 
terious sea that has never yet borne on any wave the 
image of a returning sail. 



STARKE COUNTY. 

ITS PAST AND PRESENT. 



ORIGIN, POSITION, AREA AND TOPOGRAPHY OF THE COUNTY 

Starke County occupies an area of three hundred 
and fourteen square miles lying in the second tier ot 
counties south ot MichiL'^an, and in the third east of 
Illinoi'i. Nine miles west of its north-eastern corner 
the Kankakee river intervenes between it and Laporte 
county, and flowing' southwiisterly. forms the remander 
of the northern and all but five miles of the western 
boundry. The county was named after General Stark, 
a noted personage of the American Revolution, 
Tlirough some unknown way a final "e" was added 
which the name of the general does not possess. Set- 
tlement into Starke county, or rather what was later 
to become known as Starke county, began in the 
year 1835. 

The surface of tlie county is diversified by marsh, 
wet prairie, dry prairie and sand ridges; the latter 
predominating. More than half the area is covered to 
to a depth ot 2 to 15 feer by the fine grained buff sand 



10 HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 

so characteristic ot all the region adjacent to the 
Kankakee on the south. Experience has proven that 
this sandy soil, if properly cultivated, will produce ex- 
cellent melons, berries, grapes, sugar beets, etc. 
Where ploughed deep and fertilized it also yields good 
crops of corn, oats and potatoes. 

Within the past twelve years colonies of frugal, 
industrious Germans and Swedes have bought at a low 
price large areas of this once despised land and are 
making a good living from it. They utilize all fertil- 
izers produced on the farm, they haul muck from the 
low lands and mix it with the sand, they plow deeply 
each season, and by these and other means are prov- 
ing the land of far greater productive power than it 
was ever believed to be. 

Many thousand acres of marsh land have been 
recently drained (of which a detailed account will be 
given later) and where a fevv years asfo the waters 
were waist deep the year round, beautiful crops of corn 
are now produced. Beneath the sand, the prairie sod 
and the marsh bottoms of the county there is every- 
where the fine grained, ash blue boulder clay, which 
covers the entire area of Northwestern Indiana. In 
many places this comes close to the serface. Not an 
out crop ot rock occurs in the county. The only bores 
known to have pierced the thick mantle of drift are at 
Knox and North Judson, in both of which stratified 



HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 11 

rock was found about 200 feet below the surface. 

The only workable deposit of mRrl fonnd in Starke 
Countv IS wholly a marsh deposit, lyin^ in sections 10 
and 15 (32 north, 4 west), Railroad township, about 
three and a halt miles west of North Judson. The 
deposit occupies the basin of an extirct lake. Thirty 
years ago the lake had become replaced by a marsh 
over which duck hunters and muskrat trappers hunted 
and trapped with g^reat success. Now part of it is 
cultivated in corn and the remander furnishes latofe 
and excellent crops of hay. The marl is everywhere 
overlain with muck, except in one or two places, where 
it forms the surface. ihe muck varies in thickness 
from one to five feet, averaging about two and a half 
feet. 

II. 

SOME INTERESTING EARLY FACTS. 

The county seat was located at Knox. April 1, 
1850. In the same year and month the first county 
commissioners were elected: John W. P. Hopkins, 
George Estey and William Parker. They met at the 
home of Mrs. Rachel A. Tillman (Lambert), on the 
south bank of Yellow river Her house was used tor 
county purposes for several years. The next county 
officers elected were: Sheriff, Jacob I. VVampler; Aud- 
itor, J. G. Black; Clerk, Stephen Jackson, Sr. ; Re- 



12 HISTORY OK STARKE COUNTY 

corder, Jacob Bozarth; Treasurer, Jacob Tillman; 
County agent, C. S- Tibbits. 

The first term of the Starke Circuit Court was 
held at Mrs. Tillman's, May 19, 1851. The judge was 
E. M. Ciiamberlain; associates, Samuel Burke and 
Georg-e Milroy. "One indictment was found. That 
was for hog" stealing", and the defendant was acquitted. 
Hog- stealing m those days was very different from 
horse stealing"." 

T. H. Ball, author of "Northwestern Indiana," 
says the following were some ot the first things in 
Starke County: "The first boy born. Tipton Lindsay, 
1836. The first burial in the county was of Thomas 
Robb, who was frozen to death while out hunting and 
was buried in a canoe. The first church building was 
erected by the United Brethren in 1853; the second was 
built by the Methodists in Knox, in 1856. The first 
ministers in the county were: Elder Munson, Meth- 
odist; Elder Ross, United Brethern; and Rev. James 
Peele, Christian. The first physicians, 1851, Dr. Sol- 
omon Ward, Dr. Baldwin and Dr. Charles Humphreys-. 
The first lawyer, 1852, Judge Wilcughby M. Mc- 
Cormick. The first paper, the Starke County Press, 
published in May, 1861, Joseph A. Berry, editor." 
This paper is now known as the Starke County Demo- 
crat, S. M. Gorrell, publisher. 

"A Fourth of July celebration was held in the 



HISTORY OF STARKK COUNTY 13 

bounds of Starke County before the county was org-an- 
\7.cd, in either 1848 or 1849. the locality being near 
the present Toto. The company could not have been 
very large. They had a warm dinner. The cabin in 
which they met seems to have contained but two 
rooms, thev had tables from which to eat, and alter 
dinner they danced. She who. as a young girl remem- 
bers the circumstances, was born in 1840. was then 
living- in Pukiski County and came into the new 
county of which her father became a resident in 1851, 
and is now a resident in the town of Knox." 

The first musical organization in the county was a 
band organized at Knox in 1876. with twelve members. 
A. W. Swartzell was the leader. Old instn-ments 
were purchased from a Winamac band for $40. 

The present local telephone system began opera- 
tion June 20, 1898. The projectors were S. C. Close, 
A. W. Swartzell and J. N. Cotter. The present owner 
is J. G. Steinman. 

III. 

THE TOWNS OF STARKE COUNTY. 

In some stages of society, and connected with 
some occupations, the history of villages, towns and 
cities, IS to a large extent the history of that reg-ion, 
for the people are mostly in towns and cities, and 
from them usually go forth the guiding and control- 



14 



HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 




Beautiful Hotel Fitz, Knox. 



ling- influences. But the more any region is strictly 
agricultural, the less number of large towns will it 
have, and the true history will be made much more in 

the country homes, 

"T — —-r-r^, — -- ■' ■""" ■ - ' V"- »gg on the farms and 

by the firesides. 
And as the coun- 
ties south of the 
Kankakee are ag- 
ricultural, their 
liistory is to a larg^e 
extent the gradual 
increase of home 
comforts, the grow- 
th of school and church life, and the diffusion of 
intelligence among thousands of peaceful prospering 
homes. Yet villages and towns have sprung up many 
and prosperous, and a study of these will give quite a 
full ideaot the growth ot the communities. 

KNOX — Knox is the county seat and largest town 
of Starke County, situated in Center township. At 
tlie time of its organization, the town was mere land 
and trees, but soon town lots were laid out. building 
began, families moved in and village life was com- 
menced. Civil as well as social life began. Its growth 
for several years was slow, but in later years, as any 
of the old residents can testify, the growth has been 



HISTORY OF STARKK COUNTY 



15 



rapid, until we now have a population of 1,600, with 
brijrht prospects of even faster growth. 

Today in Knox there are about twenty larg-e 
brick blocks, a number more in coarse of construction, 
a larg^e number of eleji^ant brick 
and fratne residences, a beauti- 
ful brick jail, one ot the finest 
stone court houses in Northern 
Indiana, several very g^ood 
churches, a larg"e brick and st( n^ 
school house and various other 
attractive buildings. 

We now have paved streets, 
and stone roads pass through 
the town. The lown has an 
electric light system, and a 
waterworks plant is expected 
to be installed at most any lime. 
The town is very well sup- 
plied with churches, there be- 
ing' four: — Methodist Episcopal, 
Free Methodist, Chnstiati and 
Latter Day Saints. 

An extended account of our schools would here be 
unnecessary, for I dare say there is not a citizen who 
is not familiar with the excellent schools of Knox 
They are widely known and the Knox high school is 




First Brick Block, Knox, 
ii congregation of 



16 



HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 



recognized as one ot the best in the state. A uniform 
course of study is earned on in the common schools 
and a regular four years' course is maintained in the 
high school department. Prof. J. Walter Dunn is 




Beautifut Residence of H. R. Robbius. 

the very efficient superintendent of the schools 
and Sophie H. Luzadder the competent principal. 
The board of education lor 1903 is composed of James 
VV. Nichols, president; J. N. McCormick. secretary, 
and Charles H. Peters, treasurer. 

In the summer ot 1894 the present elegant and 
commodious ten-room brick building was erected at a 
total cost ot, including furnishings and equipment, 
about $15,000. "Our schools have made a wonderful 



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18 



HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 



growth during the last decade. From three teachers 
and a few pupils they have grown until the present 
large building is used throughout, employing eight 
teachers and a music instructor." Successful literary 
societies, known as the Star Literary Society and the 
Lew Wallace Club are maintained, also a foot ball 
team, quartettes and other organizations. Also in the 
grammar department are literary clubs known as the 
Whshington and Lincoln Literary Societies. The 
fifth and STxth grades have a Washington and an 
Irving Literary Society. The high school was com- 
missioned in 1900. 

The Knox high school was the first school in 



^i#>>" 




^■Wwj 



Residence of A. W. Swartzell. 



Northern Indiana 
to publish a paper 
The Eclipse, a four 
piige, three column 
publication was 
founded in 1899, 
and the following 
year was ch^nyed 
to may^azine form. 
In 1902 the Sopho- 
more class issued a 
32 page souvenir 



magazine. 



\i\ Knox there are two pickle factories, a handle 
factory, a rough lumber mill, two grain elevators, one 



HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 19 

owned by Wtn. Guyatt, another by the Churchill* 
White Co., a beer storage, a tomb-stone factory and a 
railway velocipede factory. 

Knox has two newspapers, the Starke County 
Democrat and the Starke County Rebub.ican, botli 
being- issued every Thursday. The Democrat is rec- 
og-nized as one of the ablest democratic organs in this 
part of the country, and likewise the Republican holds 
a high place among the publications of Northern 
Indiana. 

Knox has quite a number of secret societies, 
women's clubs, literary clubs, religious clubs, etc.. of 
which mention is made on another page under the 
head of "societies." 

A volunteer tire company known as the Knox 
Hook and Ladder Company, is an organization for the 
protection of the town, with George \V. Sarber as 
fire chief. 

The practicing physicians are: Dr. Glazebrook, 
Dr. Brown, Dr. M. C. Bonar, Dr. White, Dr. Wright, 
Dr. M. H. Bonar and Dr. Dolson, dentist. 

The practicing attorneys are: Peters & Peters, 
Nichols & Foster. Adrian L. Courtright, Henry R. 
Robhins. Fletcher & Beeman, and B. D. L. Glaze- 
brook. 

Knox has two well conducted banks, the First 
National Bank and the Farmers' State Bank. The 




The Late Mrs. Rachael A. Lambert, the First White Woman 
to Settle in Starke County. 



HISTORY OK STARKE COUNTY 21 

First National Dank began business August 6, 1901, 
its number being 5919. It has a capital stock of 
$25,000. Its history, although short, shows remark- 
able growth. A general banking business is con- 
ducted. The otiicers are: O. D. Fuller, president; 
Ed<iar W. Shilling, vice president, M. C. McCormick, 
cashier. These gentlemen together with Francis 
Ytager and Robert H. Bender form the board of 
directors. 

The oldest financial institution in the county is 
the Farmers' State Bank. It was organized as a 
private bank in 1892. and on May 30, 1901, it was in- 
corporated as a state bank with a paid in capital of 
525,000. Xhe bank is a member of the American 
Bankers' Association, and a general banking business 
is carried on. The officers are: A. P. Dial, president, 
H. A. Bllingson, vice president; Isaac Templin. cash- 
ier. 

Knox has two b^Nuitiful large brick hotels, known 
as the Fitz House. T. A. Wetherferd proprietor, and 
the Stevens' House. A. J. Stevens, proprietor. AUo 
there is the Commercial hotel, J. G. Kratli. proprietor, 
which occupies a new brick building. 

There is one creamery in the town, located in the 
southwest part, owned by J. B. Prettyman. 

Knox has one opera house, the Metropolitan, 
owned by P. VanDerweele, and another under con- 



22 HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 

struction owned by Rice and Horner, which wil! sur- 
pass anything of the kind in the county. 

One of the best equipped steam laundries in this 
part of the country is owned and operated by Orris 
Booth. A g-eneral laundry business is conducted and 
branch ag^encies are established in a number of towns. 

First-class telephone and telegraph service is had 
with surrounding towns and cities. The Knox tele- 
phone Companv, J. G. Steinman proprietor, and the 
Bell Telepohne Company, furnish the telephone facil- 
ities. The Western Union Telegraph Company fur- 
nishes the telegraph communication. 

Three express c(^mpanies have agencies here. The 
United States, the National and the American. 

The railroads entering the town are the New 
York, Chicajio & St. Louis, P. M. Beauchamp agent, 
end the Indiana, Illinois »fe Iowa, George W. Weigner, 
agent. 

The present town officials are: William Booth, 
George H. Brown and Frank L. Brown, town council; 
M. T. Hepner, clerk; T. H. Claussen, treasurer; 
George Stewart, marshal; B. D. L. Glazebrook, town 
attorney. 

NORTH JUDSON- This enterprising little city is sit- 
uated in Wayne Township, ten miles south-west ot the 
county seat. It is particularlv known as the railroad 
center of the county, being on four different lines. In 



HISTORY OF STARKtO COUNTY 23 

North Judson there are several large brick and frame 
business blocks, a number of beautiful residences, a 
large brick school building, several very good churches, 
two opera houses and several other attractive buildings. 
There are stone streets and a large amount of brick 
and cement side-walks. That North Judson is speed- 
ily advancing is due to the meritorious efforts of her 
citizens ot whom she can justly teel proud. 

The town is well supplied with churches, there 
being tour: Methodist Episcopal, German Lutheran, 
United Brethern and a Roman Catholic church. 

The schools of North Judson are among the very 
best in the county. The building is fully as good as 
the one at Knox. The common schools maintain a 
standard course of study and in the high school de- 
partment a regular four years course is had. That 
the North Judson sch )ols are up to the standard, is 
a fact of which her citizens can justly be prord. Be- 
sides the public schools thhre is a German Lutheran 
school, controlled by that denomination. 

The practicing physicians are: P. O. Englerth, 
W. A. Noland, C. VVaddell, and Dr. G. B. Corbett, 
dentist. 

Oscar B. Smith and Simon Bybee are the two 
practicing attorneys: Henry Lightcap and A. T. Het- 
field are the justices of the peace. The real estate 
m^n are A. J. Lintz Jacob Keller, and E. T. Short. 



24 HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 

The post master is Charles H. Keuster. There is a 

North Judson Building-, Loan and Savings Associa- 
tion and a North Judson Commercial Club. The town 
has two musical organizations — North Judson Military 
Band and Smith's Orchestra. There is a Volunteer 
Fire Department numbering twenty members. There 
are three hotels: The Eagle flouse, the Hotel Transit 
and the Erie Hotel and Railroad Restaurant. 

The principal financial institution is the Citizens' 
Bank, Wm. Luken president; G. N. Peterson, cash'er. 
A general banking business is conducted. 

There Is a Roller mills, Jachins Brothers pro- 
prietors, a grain elevcitor owned by the Churchill- 
White Company; a brewery, North Judson Brewing 
Company; two pickle factories, one owned by th<; 
Stafford & Goldsmith Co.. and another by the W. H, 
Bunge Co.; a wholesale frog and turil-j industry, 
owned by A. A. Sphung; a poultry packing house, by 
D. D. Bowersock; a cigar factory, by George Smith; 
and an artificial stone industry, owned by Jacob 
Keller. The Crown, the Columbia and the Schlitz 
Brewing Companies nave branch depots in North 
Ju'ison. Also the McCormick Harvester Company has 
a branch depot here. Burch's opera house and Dusek's 
opera house furnish the accommodations for theatrical 
purposes. 

The North Judson News, Harry O. Warvel pub- 



HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 25 

lisher, is one of llie principal publications of the 
county. The hig^ti standing of the News was attained 
by the persistent efforts of the late J. Don Gorrell, 
who made it one of tlic cleanest and best edited 
weeklies in Northern Indiana. Under the present 
editor the News continues to be one of the principal 
papers in this part of the state. 

The four railroads entering- North Judson are: 
Tlie Chicaj;o & Erie; Cincinnati, Richmond & Muncie; 
Indiana. Illinois & Iowa; and the Pittsburgh, Chicago 
& St. Louis The Adams Express Company and the 
VVells-Fargo Co have a joint agency at North Judson. 
Also the United States and American Express Com- 
panies h;.ve offices at this point. The Western Union 
Telegrapli Co. affords the telegraphic accommodations 
and the North Judson Telephone Co., Truman Smith 
proprietor, affords local communication and connec- 
tion with surrounding towns. 

HAMLET — The progressive little town of Hamlet is 
situated in the northern part of the county, in the 
southeastern part of Davis and the south-western part 
of Oregon townships, about six miles from the county 
seat. The town is on two railroads, the Pittsburjrh, 
Ft. Wayne & Chicago and the Indiana, Illinois & 
Iowa. It is next n' size to North Judson and third in 
size among the towns of the county. 

Hamlet has four churches, a Methodist Episcopal, 




J. B. Prettymari, Citizen and Stock Dealer 

Who R«^niembers Well the Days of 

the Pioneer in Starke County. 



HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 27 

a Weslyan Methodist, a Roman Catholic and a German 
Lutheran. Also a large and attractive new school 
house costing about $7,000. The two prominent hotels 
in the town ate, Hotel Jolly. J. E. Jolly." proprietor; and 
the McKinley House, G. M. Veach. proprietor. There 
are five general stores, a furniture store and a drug 
store. 

The town has two grain elevators, one owned by 
the Churchill- White Co., another by H. Hardesty; and 
two lumber yards. Tlie local real estate dealers are: 
C. J. Dauielson, J. E. Jolly, G. M. Veach and H. J. 
Childs. Sr. 

The Hamlet Foundry and Machine Works, L. D. 
Parmley proprietor, occupies a building 32x70 feet in 
size. While repairing receives prompt attention at all 
times, the main feature of the enterprise will be the 
manufacture of patent wind stackers and threshing 
machines, both inventions of Mr. Parmley. 

'•The press is the greatest public benefactor." 
This is an old yet wise saying. What would a nation, 
state, county, city or village be without some means 
of communication am*)ug her people? The little city 
ot Iliimlet. while progressive, lacked something that 
would bring her people nearer together and establish 
socia 1 intercourse with her neij^hhoring towns. This 
work was performed by Harry S. Loring, a practical 
all-round printer and long employed on the Democrat 



28 HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 

at Knox, who founded on December 12, 1901. the [Iain- 
let Herald, which proved a great suv.-cess from the very 
start. This fact can be no better illustrated than bv 
a glance at its advertising; columns. The Herald gave 
new life to the town and the citizens w^ere quick to 
recognize the beneficial results of the new enterprise. 
In November Mr. uormu retired from the newspa per 
business and the Her. i Id became the property of Dr. 
W. Bowman, who is the present editor. 

The secet societies in Hamlet are: Modern Wood- 
men of America, Knijihts of f he Marcabees. Knights 
of Columbia, Ladies of the M.'ccabees and Ladies of 
Columbia. The Hamlet band is a succes.-iful musical 
organization. Besides the societies named ihere are 
women's clubs and other social organizations 

SAN PIERRE— This quiet little town of about 350 
inhabitants is situated in Railroad township, in the 
north-east quarter of section twenty-one, range four 
west. It is on two railroads, the Chicago. Indiana- 
polis & Louisville and the Indiana, Illinois & Iowa. It 
is well provided with churches, there being four: a 
Roman Catholic, German Lutheran, Methodist Epis- 
copal and an "Evangelical Association" church. 

A modern fiame school house was built in 1899. 
costing over $2,000. 

In San Pierre there are three general stores, two 
hay and grain enterprises, a lumber, tile and brick 




Isaac Drake, ajjed '.*t year.-,.-Tlie oldest man 
living in Starke Connty to-duy. 



30 HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 

yard, two hotels, two saloons and three general black- 
smiths. There is one physician, Dr. W. J. Solt. The 
Churchill-White Co. has a grain elevator at this place. 
The Modern Woodmen of America and the G. A. R. 
have organizations here. The post master is Fred J. 
Weinkauf. A grocery is conducted in connection with 
the post office. 

GROVEHa^OWN— This little town is situated in Oregon 
township, on the Pittsburgh, Ft. Wayne & Chicago 
railroad. The town has not made as much advance- 
ment as its larger neighbors, yet it has three general 
stores, a large new pickle factory, owned by the H. J. 
Heinz Co., a fine brick church building and some other 
improvements. There are two lodges in the town, the 
Modern Woodmen and the Gleaners. The town has a 
frame school building-. There is one real estate dealer 
in the town, A. J. Uncapher, who also buvs hay and 
grain. This gentleman is accorded with owning more 
land than any other individual in the county. 

The other towns or stations which are of minor 
importance are named below, each containing a post 
office and from one to three general stores: Aldine, 
Bass Station, Davis, English Lake, Nickel Plate, 
Ober. Ora, Toto and Winona. 

IV. 

FINANCIAL CONDITION OF THE COUNTY. 
Below will be found the financial condition of 



HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 31 

Starke County up to December 31, 1901, at which time 
the last annual report was made. 

County orders outsta tiding", Dec. 31. 1901, . ..$ 16.112 59 

County orders issued for the vear 1901, 43,003.61 

Total ■. 59,116.20 

From which deduct county orders redeemed 

for 1901 38,583.32 

Leaves countv orders outstanding Dec. 31, '01 20,532. 88 

From which deduct cash in treasury 2,634.22 

Leaves floiitintr indebtedness Dec. 31, 1901 . . 17,898.66 

COUNTY BONDED INDEBTEDNESS 

Court house bonds oulstHndinjr Dec.31.1901 $ 102. 000.00 

From which deduct casli in treasury 2,856.05 

Leaves court house bond indebtedness. ... 99.143.95 

CxRAVEL ROAD BONDS. 

St<»ne road bonds. Center townsliip, out- 
standing, Dec. 31. 1901 $ 34,124.80 

Gravel road bonds, W<ivne township, out- 

standinjr ijec 31, 1901 38,989 60 

Total 73,114.40 

Total bonded and floatintr indebtedness out- 

standinj^ Dec. 31, 1901 $190,157.01 



V. 
OUR LAKES. 
The lakes of Northern Indiana are the brightest 
jrems in the corona of the state They are the most 
beautiful and expressive features of the landscape in 
the region wherein thev abound. Numbered by hund- 
reds, they range in size from area of half an acre up to 
five and a halt squire mil s With the fertile soil, the 




The old Court house, still standing north of the 
present magnificent structure. 



HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 33 

{j^reat beds of gravel and the myriads of bowlders, 
larj^e and small, they are to be classed as mementos 
of those mighty ice sheets which, in the misty pMst. 
covered the northern two-thirds of our state. Out«ide 
of the counties in which they occur but few of the 
citizens of Indiana know of their presence, their 
beauty, their value. Their origin, their fauna and 
flora, the cause of their gradual diminution in size and 
final distinction, are likewise known to but few. By 
the red man these lakes were more highly appreciated 
than by his more civilized Caucasian successor, tor the 
reasi^n that the Indian stood much nearer to wild 
nature than we. On the hijj^her ridges overlooking the 
lakes he had his villati^e sites. Over their placid waters 
he paddled his birch bark canoe, and from their depth 
he secured with spear and hook fishes sufficient to 
supply his needs, while mussels and the roots of the 
water lily added variety to his daily food. Wild fowl 
by myriads, in their migrating seasons, came and 
went, stopping to feed upon the lakes, thus offering 
him many a chance to test his marksmanship with 
bow and arrow, while the skins of the muskrat, otter 
and beaver which he trapped about the marshy mar- 
gins, furnished him protection aga'n«t the cold. Thus 
it will be seen that his verv existence depended often 
times upon these living bodies of water. It is little 
wonder, therefore, that l.e remained in this vicinity 



34 HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 

until driven westward by the conquering- white man, 
leavirg- only the sig-ns of his feast — vast piles of shells, 
bones and pit-ovens — as reminders of his former 
presence. 

The lakes of Starke County all owe their orioin to 
the irregular deposition of the drift brought in by the 
glaciers. The origional hollows or lake basins are the 
counterparts and complements <>f the surrounding 
hills and knobs so characteristic of the terminal 
moraines of the retreating ice sheets. The moranic 
lakes are classified, according to the shape of their 
basins, into three division-: (1) "Kettle-hole" lakes 
with round cauldron siiaped b;.sins, usually of great 
depth. (2) Channel lakes, or those with long narrow 
basins, whose bottoms are very uneven, the water in 
places forming deep por.is, in others being shallow. 
(3) "Irregular lakes." whose basins are very complex 
in outline, being branched, lobed and otherwise irreg- 
ular. The bottom is also verv uneven, deep pools of 
water alternating with shallow areas, without regard 
to order or regularity. The majority ot the lakes in 
Indiana belong to this class, tiass lake, Starke 
County, belongs to this division, and is one of the 
largest examples of this group. 

The following table shows the area and greatest 
depth of the five largest lakes in the state: 



HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 35 

Area sq. miles. Depth. 
Lake Wavasee. or Turkey Lnke, Kos- 
ciusko County 5 66 68 ft. 

Lake Maxiiikuck'te, M<irsl;all Co., ....297 89 

Lake James, Steuben Co., . 2.62 87 

Bass Lake. Starke Co., . . 2.23 32 

Tipptcan-e Lake, Ko-ciusko Co., . . .1.61 121 

III conclusion it may be said tbat all of the mo- 
ranic lakes in Si.irke C«»unty, as well as the State in 
jreneral, are "g-eol'»g-ically youn^'-, beinjj^ confined to the 
very latest mornines of the j^lacia! period. They are 
mere babes, born yesterday and destined to die to- 
morrow. The present dominant race of men may pass 
away and leave these lakes still lyin^ like brio^ht 
jewels among- the hills; but every one is doomed to 
final extinction. 

'The hills are shadows and they tiow 

From form to form, and nothing stands: 

They melt like mist, the solid lands, 

Like clouds they shape themselves and go.' 

"But of all the beauties of the landscape, lakes 
are the most ephemeral. As long as they remain they 
will continue to contribute to the service and delight 
of man, by affording means for that relaxation and 
healthful pleasure which the conditions of modern 
life demand." 

KOOMZ LAKE. — Koontz Lake lies in sections 1 and 
J2 (34 north, 1 west) Oregon township. It is a shallow 
body of water covering 200 or more acres, and is largely 




■V n- -i--i-s;-^~VSr-r=iir;~irs,---; 



Hon. Geo. W. Beeman, Starke County's First Judge. 



HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 37 

artificial. All tlie sliallow water area around the 
sliores contains liard bottom, except in a few places 
where beds of muck have accumulated. Many acquatic 
plant"- abound in the Inke, and as a result the fishing' 
is excellciii Many people from Hamlet. Grovertown 
and other -urrounding places, spend several days or 
weeks here during tlie liot summer months, enjoying- 
a pleasant (>utin<r. 

EACxLE LAKE. — Eagle Lake lies in the north-west 
quarter (^f sfction 13 (33 north, 1 west) Washington 
township. Its area has recently been reduced more 
than one-halt by drainage. The area covered by the 
lake is ab-mt 70 acres The north and south shores 
slope liradually upward into sandy, cultivated fields 
or woodland. The outlet, Eagle creek, leaves the west 
end and flows almost due west into Yellow river. The 
lake is nowhere more than eighteen feet in depth, 
while much of its area is less than five feet, and bids 
fair to soon become extinct, as the decay of the abund- 
ant water vegetation is rapidly adding to the extensive 
beds of muck. 

KOrM> LAKE. — Tliis is a small and nearly circular 
lake lying in the west half of section 8, (32 north, 2 
we«t) California township. It is located about six 
miles south- west of Knox, and about three miles south- 
east of Toto. The lake covers an area of about 120 
acres. The water is. for the most part, quite deep, 




North Judsoii's Bt'MUt ifiil Sclmf)! U iidinj; 



HISTORY OF STARKt: COUNTY 39 

the only shallow area of any size lying along- the north 
shore. The lake abounds in plant life, pond weeds and 
millfoils being- especially common. The banks of the 
lake are everyv^here low and, except on the north, 
marshy. 

BASS LAKE. — Among the prominent lakes of Indi- 
ana, Bass Lake stands out as one of the famous sum- 
mer resorts ot the state. This beautiful lake ranks 
fourth in c^ize among those found in Indiana; its water 
area comprising 2.23 square miles. It lies about six 
miles south ot Knox, and covers parts of sections 7 and 
18, (32 north, 1 west) North Bend township, and sec- 
tions 12, 13, 14. 23 and 24, (32 north. 2 west) California 
township. The extreme length from north-east to 
south west is just about three miles. The northern or 
longer lobe averages about three quarters of a mile in 
width, while the southern basin is a little over a mile 
wide. These two lobes are separated by long sandy 
bars which extend out from Cedar and Gull points. 
Over the bars the water in many places is less than 
two feet deep. A narrow channel of deep water inter- 
venes between the ends of the sand spits. 

The lake occupies a shallow basin on top of a 
ridge. The natural surface drainage being all away 
from its area. The fall from its water level to tliat c.f 
the water in the Tippecanoe river, five miles south- 
west, is fifteen feet. At present it has no natural oi.l- 




Andrew J. Uncapher, an old and prominent resident, 
and an extensive leal estate owner. 



HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 41 

let or inlet. Two artificial ditclies drain into it from 
the marsh latid on he east. Its overflow formerly 
found its way through the marshes at the south west 
in a north-westerly direction to the Kankakee river. 
A portion of the old outlet is now a shallow water 
marsh, filled with spatterdock, rushes and cat-tail 
flags. It was formerly an arm or bay of the lake, but 
has been separated from the main body of water by a 
level or fill constructed for a roadway along the north- 
west shore of the south basin. For a number ol' years 
there has been little or no overflow, and the waters of 
the lake seem to be slowly receding. It is fed almos?t 
wholly by subaqueous springs and by the waters of 
flowing wells, a number of which occur on the north 
and east shores of the nortliern lobe. These wells 
range from 20 to 80 feet in depth They pass through 
from two to ten feet of sand, then through a hard pan 
clay into a stratum of gravel in which the water is 
found. More than half of the water area is less than 
seven feet in depth and fully ont-third is less than five 
feet. Of 516 soijndin;^^s made by the U. S. Fish Com- 
missioner in the summer of 1900. 3i>7 showed less than 
seven feet of water, while 200 showed less than Hve 
teet. The aveiage depth found by the .^1(' soundings 
was 8.7 feet, while the maximum depth was 3>2, feet at 
a point one-third of the way across the lake, north of 
Cranberry Point. 




James C Fletcher, County Clerk. Manager Starke 

County Abstract Co., Dtmocraiic District 

Chairman, and Prominent in 

Political Circles. 



HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 43 

The greater pari of the shore line of Bass Like is 
low and marshy. This is especially true of the west 
half of the soutli shore, almost tlie eniire west sliore, 
and tlie west third or the north shore. On Cranberry 
Point there is hiirher irround and a fine gravel, which 
is the resort of numerous picnic and fishing- parties. 
3a Cedar Point is located a large hotel. The nortli 
and east shores, about Winona P. O , furnish by tar 
the better quarters for summer visitors. 

At L ike Park Station are several large ice Houses 
belonging to the Knickerbocker Ice Co., of Chicago. A 
switch connects these with the Chicago & Erie railway 
at Bass Lake Station, two miles south. Over this 
switch a regular tram runs daily during the tourist 
season, and connects with steamers wliicli land pas- 
sengers at the end of long piers on various sides of the 
lake. A hack from VVii.ona also connects with all 
trains at Bass Lake Station. 

The bottom of the lake is, for the most part, sand 
or blue, sticky clay. In the bay east of Cranberry- 
Point there are extensive muck beds. Muck also oc- 
curs in quantity beneath a strip 200 feet or more wide, 
along the west shore of the lake. There muck deposits 
contain a lu.\uriant growth of aquatic vegetation. In 
June the waters of the lake are said to contain vast 
quantities of a green sediment — probably unicellular 
plants. When these are present the fishing is poor. 



44 HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 

The sandy and clay bottoms of the shallow water pro- 
duce also their characteristic water plants, so that the 
lake flora is a very rich one, and worthy of extended 
study. 

Many pleasure seekers from Chicago. Indianapolis 
and other large cit'es, spend a few weeks' vacation 
here during the hot summer months. 

THE OTHER LAKES of the county, which are of 
little importcuce are: English Lake, Lake Rothermel 
and Hartz Lake, in the south-west corner of the 
county, one in section 35, one in section 36, and Black 
Lake (not always classed as a lake) in section 25. 

DRAINAGE IN STARKE COUNTY. 

Without drainage Starke County would represent 
a vast area of swamps, shallow ponds and marshes 
covered witii grass and weeds of sufficient height to 
furnish a rendezvous for bear, wolves, foxes and mons- 
ter reptiles. The higher portion of the county being 
denominated and known as ridges and islands, each 
having its unique and appropriate- name, such as, 
Dutch Island, Eagle Point, Coon Ridge, Jackson Is- 
land, Pigeon Roost, Grape Island, etc., the geographv 
of which is well known to most of the older citizens 
still residing in the county. 

Efforts had been made to reclaim this wilderness 
ever since 1352. but some of the owners and occupants 



HISTORY OF STARKIC COUNTY 45 

of the ridges, exercising' a squatter sovereignty over 
the adjoining wild lands, made a comfortable ex- 
istence out of wild game, fish and fruit and forght 
against an enterprise whicii sought the reclamation 
of the jungles which are now the most fertile tracts ot 
the country. 

Various methods were sought to reclaim, but the 
fight was so bitter that enterprise was frequently 
driven away, and the bitterest persecution followed 
upon its projectors. The Kankakee Valley Drainage 
Law was enacted, but, on account of its opposition, 
was abandoned and its projectors subjected to bitter 
persecution. The p[on . L. A. Cole was constructively 
put in jai! for violating a restraining order. Judge 
Elanna. of uaporte, left his home and sought refuge 
from a howling mob. Bennet abandoned his law 
S. L. Tripp left Laporte on account of ostracism 
awakened by championing drainage, and others who 
favored it were compelled to circumscribe their actions 
in behalf of improvement to suit the caprice of the 
remonstrators. 

In this condition ot affairs John ]\I. Wolfram and 
others engaged Henry R. Robbins as attorney and pe- 
titioned for what was then called the Wolfram Ditch. 
This ditch was defeated and so strong was the oppo- 
sition that it discouraged all but the attorney who 
rallied and refiled it as tlie Webb Ditch. This met wiih 




Hon. Chas. C. Kelley. Ex-Joint Representative 
Starke and Laporte Counties, and for- 
merly a Prominent Knox Attorney. 



HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 47 

the same fate as the Wolfram Ditch, but so determined 
was the fiji:ht that the chances seemed possible when 
Attorney Robbins Inid out and platted the town of 
North Star, containing- ten lots, each lot being given 
to two owners who favored ditching. 

With this new strength; with S. L. Webb, Hattie 
L, Robbins and Nellie V. Robbions as oetitioners; and 
George Burson as judge, the Robbins Ditch was es- 
tablished. This ditch was excavated by the Lowell 
Dredging Co., and caused the reclamation of about 
20,000 acres of land, and became so popular th-it even 
the parties who formerly opposed it sought the same 
attorney to file another petition for an enlargement of 
the same which was called the Bliss Extension of the 
Robbins Ditch. This done drainage began proper, 
and parlies heretofore persecuted were now highly 
praised, and people began to see the value of Starke 
County land. 

The largest ditch constructed, and the one that 
has reclaimed the most land is the Place, or Kankakee 
River Ditch. The work of construction was beg^un in 
June, 1901, and finished in August, 1902. The ditch 
was established in the Starke Circuit Court in March, 
1901. Hon. W. H. H. Coffin was appointed construc- 
tion commissioner and Omer A. Garner, engineer. 

Numerous ditches have been constructed in this 
county, tlie first one being the Robbins Ditch, mention 



48 HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 

of which has been made. It cost almost $14,000 and is 
counting- arms, about thirty miles long-. The Bliss 
extension to the Robbins Ditch cost about $40,000. 
Since tben the Craigmile Ditch, eighteen miles h'li}^- 
and costing about $12,000 has been dug. Also the 
Lucas or Bogus Run, costing about $22,000; the 
Osborn Ditch, eight rniles long costing $9,000; the Fell 
Ditch is 6 miles long and $6,500; the Bartee Ditch, six 
cind one-half miles long and costing about $7,000; the 
Eagle Creek Ditch, ten miles long, cost $11,000 and 
the famous Place or KankaUee River Ditch. The 
Place Ditch with its arms is 24 miles long and cost 
about $80,000, and will reclaim, perhaps, 150.000 acres 
of land — the best land in all Indiana. The Yelluw 
River Ditch is eighteen miles long and will cost about 
$22,000. 

A brief summary will show that StarUe County 
has about 130 miles of dred^'e ditches wliicli will cost 
about $225,000. What other county in Indiana has 
spent such a vast sum of money in the past ten years 
for drainage? Nor does tins sum lepresent the entire 
cost of drainag-e in the county, for the ditches dug in 
other ways than by dredges are numerous and 
expensive. 

All of the above named ditches were constructed 
with dredging machines at an average cost of six 
cents per cubic yard lor e.xcavatiou. The amount of 



HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 



49 



excavation bv dredj^e has aggreg-ated 2,500,000 cubic 
yards. This excavation has reclaimed and benefitted 
over 100 000 acres of land — land which a few years iigo 
sold as low as from SI 50 to $5.09 per acre, and which 
is today — since the ditching" — worth from $40.00 to 
$75.00 per acre. In regard to Starke County ditching, 
as witii every other improvemen. parties who once 
fought the idea of drainage are now pointing with 
pride and admiration to the work we have done. 

The County, which ten years ago was worth 
$2,000,000. is now worth $7,000,000, and is steadily in- 
creasing in value. No one man, nor for that matter, 
no one hundred men. cculd be given the credit, but it 
IS the just recompense of great and noble public 
spirited men tiiat has caused the blessing oi drainage 
to fall upon Starke County. 




WBESSB S 




ResiJence of Adrian L ("ourtriKli^i Knox. 



50 HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 

VII. 
THE KANKAKEE REGION. 

The source of the Kackakee River is in St. Joseph 
County, this State, and from its source to where it 
crosses the state line, at the south-west corner of Lake 
County, IS almost st venty-fiv/e miles. It is a slow, slug^- 
g"ish stream with a fall of from one to one and one- 
half feet to the mile in tiiis State. It being very 
crooked and the land on either side being- low and 
marshy, the water moves on very slowly, and these 
low lands forming what is familiarly known as the 
Kankakee marsh, are for quite a period of time each 
year covered with from one to three feet of water. 
About six sections of this marsh land in the south- 
east corner of Lake County are covered with timber, 
composed mostly of ash and elm with, some sycamore 
and gum trees. The balance of these wet lands, run- 
ning west to the State line, are open marsh covered 
with a luxuriant growth of wild grass, wild tice and 
flags. It is the home of the water iowl and musk-rat, 
and a paradise for hunters. 

The number of acres of this wet land in the Kan- 
kakee valley, in the seven counties through which the 
Kankakee River flows in this state was, in 1894, about 
SIX hundred thousand. However, in the past lew 
years this vast number has been greatly decreased by 



HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 51 

extensive drainag-e. Prominent among- the counties 
which are pushing- this important enterprise is Starke 
County. The vat.t amount of good being accomplished 
by the drainage of the Kankakee region is set forth 
in another chapter. 

It is only a question of time until these lands 
will all be drained, as the Kankakee valley has a 
main elevation of ninety feet above Lake Mich- 
igan and one hundred and sixty feet above the waters 
of the Wabash river and lying as they do at the very 
doors of Chicago, the greatest stock and grain market 
in the world, it would be strange if they long remain 
in their present condition Some portions of these 
lands are hijih dry ground, like an island in the ocean, 
and as they are otten surrounded by water they are 
called islands. These islands have all once been cov- 
ered with a heavy growth of timber, but the farmers 
living on the prairies north of the marsh have stripped 
most of them of all that is desirable. Hauling timber 
from these islands and from the ash swamps further 
east, a few vears ago v.-as the farmers' winter harvest, 
and was called swamping. Some authorities hold that 
the lives of nianv of the early settlers were shortened 
by exposure and over work in some of our bitter cold 
winters on these marshtrs Cheap lumber and baroed 
wire now almo&t entirely take the place of the swamp 
timber for fencing, etc . and but little swampirg has 



52 HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 

been done for a number of years. Many of the islands 
where the timber has been cut off are now excellent 
grazing" lands and nearly all ot the larger islands have 
one or more fan'ilies living on ihem who keep stock, 
and some good farms are under cultivation. 

Many old land marks go to show that these lands 
bordering on the Kankakee river were, before the 
white man came, the favorite stamping ground of the 
Indians. Many of the islands have tlieir mounds and 
burying grounds, and on some ot them are plats of 
ground which still hold the name of the Indian's 
gardens. Truly, the Kankakee regicm of today shows 
a marked advancement and improvement over that 
region of a score of years a*^o. 

VIII. 

BIRD LIFE OF STARKE COUNTY. 

Starke County has been accused of a paucity of 
bird life. Upon careful examination, this has been 
shown to be an erroneous accusation. In the richness 
of its bird life, Starke County equals, if not surpasses 
any of the other counties of the state. This is es- 
pecially true of the aquatic birds. Only two of the 
numerous species of wild ducks, that have ever been 
found within the ninety-two counties of Indiana, are 
not found on the marshes of Starke County. Looking 
over the Indiana Geological report of 1897, in which 



HISTORY OF STARKK COUNTY 53 

Mr. Amos W. Butler gives a catalog"ue of the birds ot 
Iiidiana, we find almost every species of birds to have 
been recorded at some point of this county. 

About Febiuary the ,15th the first migratory 
movements of birds begin. Most species of wild 
ducks, the robin and the meadow lark, in sunny 
homes farther south, have an irresistible longing for 
the meadows and marshes of the Hoosier state. A 
little later that beautiful songster, the blue bird, ar- 
arrives at this neighborhcod. After these come the 
black birds, the orioles, the warblers, the fly catchers, 
the vireos and last, but not least, the swallows. Al- 
most every species of the wild duck has been found to 
breed in this county. 

When the lingerers of the ducks are still wander- 
ing over our marshes and the blue birds and robins 
have arrived come the snipes and plovers. Passing 
along;- a piece of wet ground you hear the sharp cry ot 
the rising jack snipe, with its erratic zigzag flight it 
presents a difficult target to the sportsman. On the 
great hay marshes myriads of plover and sand pipers 
feed. These are most wonderful birds. When seen 
in our countv they are in great flocks, so many in one 
flock that a haphazard shot often brings twenty or 
thirty to the ground. The king of birds, the robin, is 
always seen around the home, being the most sociable 
of all birds. 




Prof. J. Walter Dunn, Superintendent Knox Public 
Schools and Prominent in Educational Circles. 



HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 55 

In the woods are to be seen wood peckers, fly- 
catchers, orioles wrens, sap suckers and song" spar- 
rows. On the edge of the woods appear the chewinks 
and the warblers. In the meadow the bobolink, the 
black birds, the meadow lark and the crow. A little 
later in the spring, than the robin and the blue bird, 

come the turtle doves, tiie thrushes, the nighthawks, 
the whip poor-wills, the bumming birds arid the tan- 

agers. These not only add to the beauty of the land- 
scape, but they destroy innumerable insects. Passing 
through the woods one is startled by a pheasant, or in 
reality a ruffled giouse. Its whirrino^ wings and its 
brown body are seen by you through an opening in 
the trees. 

At one time the marshes of our county were 
peopled by almost innumerable prairie chickens. The 
old settlers tel! of going out and killing ten or twelve 
in an hour's time; but this species has been greatly de- 
creased in recent years so that 0)ily a small number at 
present abound in the county. While rambling about 
in the marshes you hear a queer rumbling sound. 
Sometimes it sounds like distant thunder, othertimes 
like an old wood pump. Looking around, you see a 
queer stick on the marsh. Soon this turns to life and 
an American bittern flies awkwardly away. Tiiis 
bird is locally known as the thunder pumper. The 
purple martin is one of the most interesting and 
beautiful of our songsters. 



56 HISTORY OF STARKE COUiNTY. 

From observation and authorities, it is found that 
there are about fifty species of birds found here in 'he 
winter time. The wood peckeis, a few varities of tllr 
Finch family, the snow birds, the nuthatches, the 
crows and the blue jays are some of the more common 
ones. 

IX. 

TWO LIVING CURIOSITIES. 

Eli Green. — Doubtless there is not a single per- 
son in the county who has not at least heard of Ind- 
iana's greatesflivingf cuiiosity. The name, Eli Green, 
the ossified man of North Judson, has been heard not 
only in county and state, but throui(hout the United 
States and other countries, and while most of the 
readers of th's little volume are familiar with this 
strange personag^e yet there are many interesting" 
facts connected with his life that are not generally 
known, and fur that reason the following comj^lete 
history of his life is giver. 

Eli Green was b(^ra near Foreston, Ogle County, 
Illinois, June 22, 1862^ of humble parentage. His boy- 
hood was spent on his father's farm and his early 
education was obtained in the Foreston public schools. 
Young Green worked on the farm until he was 25 
years of age, after which he was a carpenter until 
disability. From Forej-ton, Green moved to Ora, Ind., 



HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 57 

from there to Akron, Ind., thence to Monterey, Ind., 
then to Harper 111., and from here to North Judson, 
Ind., at which place he wao living- at the time of af- 
fliction, but was working- at Streator, 111. Here 
Green was building- a platform tor the Streator bottle 
works and on account of g-reat need ol same bv the 
company he worked in a heavy cold ra^n. 

Three da} s later the first change in his condi- 
tion was noticed, the same being- a binding- and pres- 
sing- sensation. He took several hot baths and dur- 
ing one of these was first noticed the hardening- ot the 
flesh ot the arms and hands. The same continued to 
harden and spread over the entire body and limbs 
from collar bone to feet. Mr. Green possesses no 
sense of feeling- at all. He says one can jab a knife or 
needle through his hands or feet without any pain 
wliatever. His joints are so stiff that it is with great 
difficulty that he walks or uses his arms. He has prac- 
tically no use of his fing-ers. The x-rays show his bones 
to have shrunk or diminished to one-half their normal 
size. 

He has tried various treatments cf the leading- 
doctors of the land; has attended Medical Society 
g-atherings of the most noted doctors of the country, 
and has taken various treatments prescribed by th;^m. 
He has been placed in an over, with the exception of 
the head, and baked with the temperature as high as 




Henry R. Robbins. a Prominent Knox Attorney, and 

Promoter of the Great Industry of Drainage 

in Starke County. 



HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 59 

360 detrrees. No reliet or benefit whatever was de- 
rived from any source of treatment. 

I[e recently started into business, selling- candy, 
peanuts and cig"ars, from which source he supports his 
family at the present time. 

He has attended a few fairs and has had several 
temptinjr propositions from larg-e museums in Chicago 
and elsewhere, but declines on account of being so 
ch^soly confined, and again he does not like to ap- 
pear on exhibition. 

He is of a clever and jolly temperament and never 
tires of telling and showing his friends and visitors of 
his peculiar affliction. 

With the exception of Green, but one case of the 
kind hag ever been recorded. This was in Australia, 
and the man died a couple of years ago 

Green was married June 2. 1887, to Ella M. War- 
ren, of Or. I, Indiana, and has six children: Irving W., 
Tracy G.. Charles C. Harold C. Loyd R. and Grant 
W,, rangi»'g in yrars from one to thirteen in the 
order named. 

Thus far Green has not been internally troubled, 
and, while he does not anticipate any cure, he still 
looks on the bright side of life. 

Che Mah — Starke County has the snmllest man 
in the world. His name is Clie-Mah, and by nation- 
ality he is a Chinese. His home is at Knox. 



60 HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 

"Are you actuallv the smallest man in the world?" 
was asked of him by the writer. 

"I am," he replied, "and with no exception. Of 
course," he continned, "there are children smaller than 
I, but I am the smallest man in the world." 

Che-Mah is only 28 inches high. Hit, weight is 40 
pounds. He was born in China in April. 1838, making 
him at the present tim^ 64 years old. He came to the 
United States in 1881, or at the age of 43 years. 

He has traveled with shows the greater part of his 
life. He is the most polite and intelligent manikin 
ever on exhibition, oeing with the largest shows in 
the country and having appeared before all the crowned 
heads in Europe. He has appeared and performed 
in all the big museums and circuses in Europe. 

Mr. Mah is in great demand by the world's biggest 
circuses, and he may again join Barnum & Bailey 
when they return to this country from their present 
tour in Europe. 

Che-Mah is one of the most highly respected cit- 
izens of Knox, and owns considerable property in this 
county. 

The more notable human mites of the world living 
today aie named below: 



Name. Inches Hi 


igh. 


Date of Birth. 


Place of Birth. 


Tom Thumb, 31. 






1837. 


New York. 


(Chas S.StrattOD.) 










Mrs. T. Thumb, 32. 






1842. 


New York. 


Che-Mah, 28. 






1838. 


China. 



HISTORY OF STARKK COUNTY 61 

From the above table it is seen that Che-Mah is 
by lar the smallest man in the world. 

"How does it feel to be the smallest man in the 
world?^" was asked of him. 

"Well," he replied, "I don't know as it feels any 
different from being- any other kind of a man. It's not 
the size ot the man that counts, but it is his brains or 
what he knows," he said, pointing' to his forehead. 

With an ossified man, and a man 28 inches hio^h, 
Starke County has two world's wonders. 

X. 

RELIGIOUS HISTORY. 

The following- account will show the different 
religious denominations in the County, their locations 
and in some instances, the number ot membership. 

In preparing- this brief summary of the religious 
history of Stark^e County, it is as Mr. Ball says on the 
same subject in his reviw of Northwestern Indiana: 

"Some of the denominations have succeeded much 
better than others, in maintaining- church life and in 
securing- a fair amount of g-rowth. The real g-ood ac- 
complished cannot be estimated by any standards or 
measurements known in this world. Some churches 
die and some live. As it is with men, so it is with 
organizations, who can tell what is really failure and 
what is success? In the realm of the moral and 



62 HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 

spiritual, neither wealth nor numbers can be tiie sure 
criterion by which to determine what God at iast will 
call success. From tlie words 'well done, when writ- 
ten by the great Judge, there will be no appeal." 

1. — The Methodist Episcopal. In Starke County, 
the first Methodist minister was Elder Munson. The 
first Methodist church was built at Knox in 1856. Be- 
sides the church and congregation at Knox, there are 
Methodist Episcopal churches in North Judson, San 
Pierre and Hamlet, making four now in the County. 
Regular Sundav Schools are held in connection with 
the church in each of these towns, also the young 
people's Epworth League societies. 

2. — The Baptists. In Starke County the first 
Baptist church was organized December 3, 1899, with 
fifty-eight members, through the efforts ot J. W. 
Keller, a licentiate. This is known as the Nickel Plate 
Baptist Church, and is the only class of that denomi- 
nation in the county. 

3. — The Lutherans. There are four different 
churches of this denomination in the county. One at 
North Judson. with 405 members; one at San Pierre 
with about 200 members; one at Winona, with 185 
members, and one at Hamlet, just organized. 

4. — The "Christians." There is but one church 
of this denomination in the county. This is at Knox. 




Starke County's Present Mapnlflcent Court House, 
Erecerd In 189H, iit a Cost of Jl JO.OOO. 



64 HISTORY OF STARKE COUiNTY 

A successful Sunday School is carried on, as is also a 
young- people's Christian Endearor society. 

5. — Roman Catholics. In Starke County there 
are three churches of this denomination; one at North 
Judson. one at San Pierre and one at Hamlet. 

6. — Free Methodists. There are two churches 
of this denomination in tlie county, one at Knox and 
one at Toto. each of which have successful Sunday 
Schools. The church at Knox was erected in the 
spring- of 1880, and was dedicated in that year by Rev. 
Philip C. Hanna, who is now United States Minister 
to Mexico. Rev. John D. Kelsey was the first regular 
pastor. 

7. — United Brethern. We have three different 
societies ot this denomination, one at North Judson, 
one at Round Lake and one at Grovertown. the latter 
having a beautiful brick church building. A very suc- 
cessful youjigf people's society, called the Young Peo- 
ple's Christian Union, is carried on by each of these 
churches. 

8. — Weslyan Methodists. The only church of 
this denomination is at Hamlet, where there is a sat- 
isfactory membershi{/. 

9 —Latter Day Saints. This denomination has 
a church at Knox, the only one in the county. The 
church has a somewhat peculiar and interesting his- 
tory, with which comparatively few people are familiar, 



HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 65 

Owinjc to this fact, and by several requests, the fol- 
low\ntc suminary is given, which shows what this 
denomination advocates, believing it will be of interest 
to many readers: 

We believe in God. the Eternal Father and in His 
Son Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Ghost. 

We believe that men will be punished for their own 
sins, and not for Adam'ss transgression. 

We believe that through the atonement of Christ, 
all men may be saved by the obedience to the laws and 
ordinances of the Gospel. 

We believe that these ordinances are: First. Faith 
in God and the Lord Jesus Clirist; Second, Repentance; 
Third, Baptism by immersion for the remission of 
sins; Fourth, laying on of the hands for the gift of the 
Holy Ghost; Fifth, We believe in the resurrection of 
the body, that the dead in Christ will rise first, and 
the rest ot the dead will iK)t live ai^ain until the thous- 
and years are expired; Sixth. We believe in the doc- 
trine of Etcfrnal Jiidj^ment. which provides that men 
shall be judged, rewarded, or punished according to 
the deiiree <»f gO"d, or evil, they shall have done 

We believe that a man must be Called of God. and 
ordained by the l.iying on of Hands of those who are 
in authority, to entitle him to preach toe Gospel and 
administer in the ordinances thereof. 

We believe in the same kind of organization that 
existed in the primitive church, viz: Apostles, Proph- 
ets. Pastors. Teachers. lOvanjjelists, etc. 

We believe tha^ in the Bible is contained the word 
of God. so far as it is translated coorrectly. We be- 
lieve that the canon of scripture is not fu'l. but that 



()b HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 

God, by His Spirit, will continue to reveal His word 
to man until the end of time. 

We believe in the powers and gifts of the Ever- 
lasting Gospel, viz: The gift of faith, discerning of 
spirits, prophecy, revelation, liealing. visions, tongues 
and the interpretation of tongues, wisdom, charity, 
brotherly love, etc. 

We believe that Marriage is ordained of God; and 
that the law of God provides but one companion in 
wedlock, for either man or woman, except in cases 
where the contract cf Marriage is broken by death or 
transgression. 

We believe that the doctrines of a plurality and a 
community of wives are heresies, and are opposed to 
the laws of God. 

We believe that the religion of Jesus Christ, as 
taught in the New Testament Scriptures, will, if its 
precepts are accepted and obeyed, make men and 
women better in the domestic circle, and better citizens 
i)f town, county and state, and consequently better 
fitted for the change which cometh at death. 

We believe that man should worship God in 
'Spirit and in truth," and that such worship does not 
require a violation of the csnstitutional law of the land. 

XL 

THE COUNTY'S OLDEST MAN. 

It is with great interest that we view the faces 
and read the biographies of men and women who have 
lived ninety or more years. Isaac Drake, who lives 
near Bass Lake, is credited with being the oldest man 
in the County. Mr Drake was born in Dearborn 



HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 67 

County, now Ohio County, near Rising- Sun, in 1809. 
making- him at this time past 93 years ot age, with 
every promise reasonably hoped for of his living sev- 
eral years more, for his habits are of the very best, 
and so active and ambitious is he that it is nothing 
uncommon for him to mount a horse and ride five or 
ten miles or walk two miles to a post office to get his 
mail. He is a great reader and reads without glasses. 
He chops nearly all of his own wood, not from force of 
need, but force of habit, as he has a step-son who is 
very mindful of this old gentleman and sees that his 
wants are well supplied, 

Mr. Drake joined church when 43 years old and 
has been a faithful member ever since, believing that 
"The love of God is broader than thh measure of man's 
mind, and the heart of the Eternal is most wonder- 
fully kind, if our love were but more simple. We 
should take Him at His word, and our lives would be 
all sunshine in the sweetness of the Lord." 

Mr. Drake's first vote for president of the United 
States was for Andrew Jackson, but he has been an 
ardent republican ever since the party was organized, 
never missing an election. He has a distinct recollec- 
tion of his boyhood days, and is a pleasant and intel- 
ligent conversationist. He helped build the first rail- 
road in Indiana. 



68 HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 

XII. 
FIRST WHITE WOMAN IN THE COUNTY. 

Mrs. Rachael A. Lambert, wlio died only in Au- 
gust, 1901, is credited by some autliorities as being" 
the first white woman to settle in Stark County. She 
was, nevertheless, one of the first pioneers in the 
County, and was the very first white woman to take up 
her residence in the town of Knox. Slie came to this 
County in 1850 and took up lier abode in Knox, 

The County was almost in a primeval state at that 
time, there being many more Indians than white peo- 
ple living* here. Tlie family settled on the place where 
Mrs. Lambert d'ied, and during the half century and 
more that has rolled away since her coming, she con- 
tinued to reside at thf" old homestead. 

She was born in Dark County, Ohio, in 1821. being- 
almost eighty years old at the time of her death. 
Until recently her memory was strong", and she made 
hundreds of affidavits concerning early residents here 
in the adjustment of titles to real estate. Because she 
was the first white woman to take up her residence 
here, Mr. Shields, who laid out the town, gave her a 
deed to seven acres of land within the confines of the 
town. Since the death ol her husband in 1866, she 
lived alone with her adopted son, Thomas Lambert, 
whom she adopted in 1873, at Peru, Indiana. 



HISTORY OF STARKbO COUNTY 69 

Her maiden name was Rachael Ann Murpliy. Her 
first husband was Jacob Tillman, and to them two 
children were born, only one of whom survives. Her 
second husband was Adam Lambert, who died in 1866. 

Mrs. Lambert's home, which stands north of the 
present court house, was used lor county purposes for 
a number of years. Here was held the first term of 
the Starke Circuit Court. 

xni. 

IN MEMORIAM. 

"Behold, we know not anvthinji^: 
We can but trust that ;^ood shall fall 

At last — far off— at last, to all. 

And every winter change to spring-." 

On the following tew pages are given sketches of 
a few principal characters who have been prominent 
lu the affairs of the County, and whom death has 
claimed as her own. To make mention of all the 
characters who have played important parts in our 
history, would here be impossible, and mention is 
made only of those who have just recently died and 
whose memory is yet fresh upon most of our minds. 

Dr. Alexander H. Henderson. — One of the con- 
spicuous characters in the death annals of Starke 
County is tlie name of Ale.xander Hamilton Hender- 
son. Ho was born near Lafayette, February 21, 1841, 



70 HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 

being sixty-one years and two months old at the time 
of his death. He worked on his father's farm until 
fifteen years of age, after which he attended school 
for a time and became a teacher. 

In August, 1862, he enlisted in Company C, 72nd 
Indiana Volunteers. At the close of the war he again, 
taught school, studying medicine at tlie same time. 
He began the practice of medicine in 1868, at Monee, 
lUinois. In 1871, he came to Knox and remained here 
until his death. In 1873 lie was elected county super- 
intendent of schools. While holding that office he was 
elected county aiditor, being the only republican ever 
elected to that office in Starke County. In 1882 he was 
eleceed joint representative for Starke and St. Joseph 
Counties. He was several times chairman of the re- 
publican central committee ot this county, was post 
master here from 1889 to 18%, member of the pension 
examining board for years, and a member of the G. A. 
R., Odd Fellows and Knights af Pythias. In business 
he was considered upright and honorable, and he had 
a large circle of friends over the county and state. 

Dr. Henderson died suddenly April 21, 1901, from 
congestion involving the entire system. The Indian- 
apolis Sentinel spcke of Dr. Henderson's absence from 
the republican state convention being greatly noted, 
and stated that a chair in the convention hal: was 
draped in flags and crepe in his memory. 




Chas. J. Danlelson, one of the County's most honored 
citizens, who has done much for the im- 
provement of his ("(luiity. 



72 HISTORY OK STARKE COUNTY 

Samuel R. Guilds. — This very old g-entleman, 
whose face was familiar to almost every body in the 
county, died August 30, 1901. He was more than 77 
years of age, having been born in New Jersey, in 
March, 1824. 

Mr. Childs had been a resident of this county for 
many years, living near Grovertown for several years, 
when he moved to Knox. Until the last two years ot 
his life he was actively engaged in the real estate 
business, in winch lie was quite successful. In his 
younger days he was an extensive traveler and trader. 
For some time he was in business in Chicago. In pol- 
itics he was an uncompromising democrat and was 
never slow to make the fact known. 

George S. Savery. — This influential citizen, who 
was one of the first residents of Knox and Starke 
County, and prominent in political afiairs. passed 
from this life November 27, 1901. 

Geo-'ge S. Savt-ry was born at Rollinsville, Lan- 
caster County. Pa., December 17. 1832- He moved to 
this county in 1869, after residing for two years in 
Marshall County, and lived for a time on Bogus Creek, 
rhis side of North Judson. In 1874 he was elected 
sheriff of this county on the democratic ticket, and 
was reelected in 1876. 

"George Savery, like every other son ol Adam, 
had his virtues and his faults. The commendable thing 



HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 73 

for erring" mortals to do is to remember and emulate 
his virtues, and in the presence ot the great leveler, 
throw a mantle of charity over whatever faults he may 
have had, for we are all in need of sincere charitable 
consideration." 

Albert Irving Gould. — Albert I. Gould was born 
in Saratoga County, New York, March 26, 1833. 
When a child he was taken by his family to Ohio. At 
the age of eighteen he entered the law office of Law- 
rence S. West, at Beltountaine, Ohio, and at the age 
of twenty was admitted to the bar by Chief Justice 
Corwin. Previous to this he taught school. He be- 
gan the practice of law at Marysville. Ohio, but shortly 
removed to Jowa, where he conducted a newspaper for 
two years. In 1858 Judge Gould located at Wmamac, 
Indiana, where he practiced law ten years, and was for 
nine succeeding years manager of the auditor's office 
a1 Covington. He then removed to Indianapolis, where 
he practiced law until February, 1882. when he came 
to Knox and opened a law office. For several years he 
was associated with George A. Murphy, now of 
Beatrice, Nebraska, in the practice of law in Knox. 
Later Charles H. Peters was associated with him, the 
firm dissolving two years ago, when Judge Gould re- 
tired. He was for many years attorney for the county 
and for the town of Knox. 

In May, 1861, he was united in marriage to Martha 



74 HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 

M. Tibbetts, and to them two daughters were born, 
one of whom survives. His second wife was Elizabeth 
Wierbauu;"h. 

Judg-e Gould died May 1, 1901, and according to 
his wishes the body was cremated at Ft. Wayne. 

Albert I. Gould was one of 1he best known men in 
Northern Indiana, and enjoyed the respect a!:d confi- 
dence of his large circle of acquaintances. He was a 
partisan in politics, being an ardent republican, and 
his work for the party was keen and effective. At the 
time of his death he weighed about 300 pounds, but he 
had weighed as much as 435 pounds; 

Jeremiah Good. — Jeremiah Good was born in 
Starke County, May 2, 1855, and died May 20, 1902, be- 
ing a few days past 47 years of age. Mr. Good lived 
in Starke County all his hie, and being connected with 
it in its pioneer lite took an active part in building up 
the county and making it what it is. He had a multi- 
tude of friends who honored and trusted him. For 
eight years he was the honored clerk of the county. 
He received a good education in the Knox schools and 
at the Valparaiso Normal. For the past twenty years 
he had been engaged in leachin*^ school. In 1877 he 
was married to Miss Martha Coonfare. Mr, Good was 
brought up in the German Reform Church, but for the 
past sixteen years had been a member of the M. E. 
Church. During his sickness he frequently said he 




Jacob Keller, a Prominent North Judson Heal 

Estate Mao, Who Has Done Much to 

Promote His County and State. 



76 HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 

was reconciled to the will of God. He said he would 
like to stay with his companion and children, but if 
it was God's will for him to go he was ready. 

"His life w.js gentle and the elements so mixed in him 
That Nature mig^ht stand up to all the world 
And say, 'This was a man!''' 

J. Don Gorrell. — It is with a feeling of sadness 
and regret that we chronicle the death of J. Don Gcr- 
rell, the late editor of the North Judson News, which 
occurred August 27, 1902. Mr. Gorrell had suffered 
for nearly two weeks prior ^o his death with cranial 
neuralgia and a complication of other diseases, which 
the heroic treaiment of eminent physicians and trained 
nurses could not abate. For several days physicians 
had announced his condition hopeless, but his numer- 
ous friends throughout the county silently prayed 
that he might rally and recover. The deceased who 
was 31 years old at the time of His death, is survived 
by his wife and three children, ranging in age from 
three to six years. His death at such an early age is 
extremely sad, following so closely the death of his 
aged father, the late James Gorrell, who passed away 
just a week before. 

J. Don Gorrell came to Knox from Ossian, Wells 
County, in June, 1892, where he published the Knox 
Democrat for nearly a year. He purchased the North 
Judson News in 1894, which he had since published, 



HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 



/ / 



making it one of tlie brightest and best weekly papers 
in this part of the state. He was a prominent mem- 
ber of the Masonic and Woodmen orders, and carried 
$2,000 life insurance in the last mentioned. He was 
sincerely loved by all who knew him, and his death is 
a source of regret to his town, his county and his 
state. 

XIV 

COUNTY CENSUS FIGURES. 

The following table shows the population of the 
townships and corporations ot Starke County in 1900 
and in 1890: 



Township or Corporation. 1900. 

Calitornia Township 949 

Center Township, 2264 

Davis Township 793 

Jackson Township, 340 

North Bend Township 1217 

Orejron Township . 1035 

Railroad Township 1045 

Washington Township 1092 

Wavne Township, 1696 



Total in County 

Total Oain in County,.. 

Gain percent in County, 



10331 



1890. 

521 

1480 

430 

225 

884 

773 

875 

846 

1305 

7339 

3092 

42.1 



There are but six counties in the state that have 
made a greater gain in the past ten years than Starke. 
They are Blackford, Delaware, Grant, Lake, Madison, 




Che-Mah, the Smallest Man iu the World, 
[see page 59| 



HISTORY OF STARKIO COUNTY 79 

and Marion. Starke county lias made the gain of 42.1 
per ceut in the past ten years while the surrounding- 
counties have made the following gains: Laporte, 11.4 
per cent; St. Joseph, 38.7 per cent: Marshall, 5.5 per 
cent; Fulton, 4.2 per cent; Pulaski, 24.9 per cent; Jas- 
per, 27.8 per cent; Porter, 6.2 per cent. 

The first census of Starke County was taken in 
1840, when the population was 149. In 1850 the popu- 
lation was 557; in 1860, 2,195; in 1870, 3,888; and in 
1880, 5,105. It will be seen that the population of the 
county has made rapid increase each decade. The 
official population figures of the three principal towns 
are shown below: 

Town. 1900. 1890. 

Ktiox 1466 . . . 790. 

North Judson 944 ... . 572. 

Hamlet, 432 .... 

The gain per cent in Knox was in the past ten 
years. 85 5. In North Judson. 65 per cent. Hamlet 
was not incorporated before 1890. so the gain percent 
cannot be ascertained. 

The county seats of contiguous counties shows 
the following gain per cent, which will be of interest 
in comparing the increase of our own towns: 

Laporte City, 0; South Bend, 65; Plymout!i. 34; 
Rochester, 34; Winamac, 38.5; Rensselaer. 55; and 
Valparaiso, 23 per ci:nt. By comparison it is seen 



80 HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 

that Knox is far ahead of the list, which speaks well 
of Starke County in general; also there is only one 
equal to North Judson. 

Coming- down to the county itself, the gain per 
cent in each township is: California, 82; Center 53; 
Davis, 84; Jackson 51, North Bend, 37.6; Oregon, 34; 
Railroad, 20; Washington, 29; and Wayne, 30 per cent. 

Jt will be seen that the greatest gain was made in 
Davis Township, with 84 per cent, followed close by 
California with 82 per cent, the rest of the townships 
ranging in the following order: Center, 53; Jackson, 
51; North Bend, 47.6; Oregon, 34; Wa>ne, 30; W^ashing- 
ton, 29; and Railroad, 20 per cent. 

XV. 
OUR PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

It has been truly said that, "The public schools 
are the hope of our country." If asked what is the 
greatest accomplishment one could possess, the answer 
would doubtless be, without hesitation, education. 
The "little red school house" has accomplished won- 
ders. The vast amount of good it has done is self 
evident. As time passes, these "little red school 
houses" are being supplied with large and elegant 
brick structures. The people of Starke County are 
unquestionably in the educational spirit ^nd love to 
work for its advancement. 



HISTORY OF STaKKJC COUNTY 



81 



Closely associated with educational work of Starke 
County is the name of" the late William 13. Sinclair, a 
name with which we are all familiar and proud. It was 
through his untiriiii: efforts that the schools of Starke 
County came to the front. 

The I'^rand work of ed- 
ucation is at present being- 
carried on by our able sup- 
ermtendent. George E. 

Butcher. Through his 
zealous efforts our stand- 
ard has been raised until 
today our schools are 
among- the best in the 
state. 

At Knox. North Jnd- 
tson. and at Hamlet there 
are eleg"ant biick school building-s. The success 
that has met with the Kn<>x sc1i<H)Is has already Iteen 
mentioned. To Superintendent .1. Walttr Dunn be- 
long-s most of ihe hou^r ot bring-ing- about the present 
standing of the Knox sclv ols. The schools vf North 
Judson are also amony^ 'he prominent; insi i t ulic>ns (if 
the county. Hamlet and San Pierre have good schools. 
In fact, the sciiools all over i he count y are to be hi;j hi v 
praised. 

The school enumeration of Starke Count v tor tlio 




Prof. George E. Butelier. 



82 



HISTORY OF STARKE COU^ITY 



year 1902, as shown by the county superintendent's 
report, is as follows: 



Township. Male. 

North Bend . . 237 

Washington 197 

Oregon 184 

California .... 190 

Center 134 

Wayne 139 

Railroad 192 

Davis 76 

Jackson 72 

Knox Corporation 209 

Nortii Judson Corporation . . 172 

Hamlet in Oregon 32 

Hamlet in Davis 43 

Total 1877 



Female. 



Total. 



. 213 .. 


. . 450 


. 186 .. 


. . 383 


. 160 .. 


. 344 


. 140 . 


. . 330 


110 . 


. . 224 


130 . 


. 269 


. 10(. .. 


. . 358 


. 61 .. 


. . 137 


. 71 .. 


.. 143 


. 221 . 


. . 430 


. 182 .. 


. 354 


. 18 .. 


. 50 


49 .. 


92 


.1707 .. 


.3584 



All the pupils in the county are white except one 
one colored female in Knox corporation. 

In 1901 the tables were 1872 male.s and 1696 
females, showing a net gain of only 16 since last year. 
The gains and losses in the thirteen school towns 
were as follows: — North Bend lost 9 males and 8 fe- 
males; Washington lost 11 males and gained 9 fe- 
males; Oregon lost 1 male and 14 females; California 
gained 11 males and lost 2 females; Center lost 14 
males and 2 females; Wayne lost 9 males and gained 




Ocner A. Garner, I'romlnent in Drulnuge Matters and 
Enfflueer of the Place or Ka.nkHkee River Ultch. 



84 HISTORY OK STARKE COUNTY 

1 female; Railroad g-uined 19 males and 17 females; 
Davis lost 6 males and 7 temdcs; Jackson gained 13 
males and 8 females; Knox gained 3 males and lost 19 
females; Nortli Judson gained 4 males and 21 females; 
Hamlet in Orco-on lost 1 male and 4 females; Hamlet 
in Davis, iiained 6 males and 11 females. 

XVI. 
OUR INDUSTRIES. 

Tlie industries of Starke County, while varied, 
would, tor the m.)st part, come under the one head of 
agriculture. Correctly speaking, Starke County is an 
agricultural rejj;ion, particularly so du'-ing the last tew 
years as the result of many hundred acres of land in 
the Kankakee valley region being reclaimed by drain- 
age. The chief products raised include the various 
grains, potatoes, melons, fruits and vegetables, among 
which some of the more important are: Corn, wheat, 
rve, oats, millet, cucumbers, onions and most all the 
smaller truits and vegetables. Car loads of mellons 
are shipped each season to several of the larger cities. 
The soil is exceptionally fine for the raising of sugar 
beets. 

Buying and selling grain and stock is another in- 
dustry of prominence. 

Prominent among the industries of the county is 
that of drainage. The vast amount of good and the 



HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 85 

speedy results brought about by this great industry 
are self-evident to all. A further, lengthy and inter- 
esting account on this subject has already been given 
on anotlier page- under the head ol "drainage in Starke 
County." 

While Starke Countv is not a manufacturing 
district there are, however, several factories employ- 
ing a number of men. The county has five pickle 
factories, each doing a large business and causing 
pickle raising to be quite extensively carried on. At 
Knox there are two factories, at Nortli Tudson two. 
and at G rover town, one 

There is a handle factory in Knox, owned by F.A. 
Hoffman, which maufactures almost any kind of 
handles. 

The county has six grain elevatois — at Knox two, 
at Hamlet two, at San Pierre cne, and at North Tuc- 
son one . 

There are three flouring mills, located at Knox, 
North Judson and Koontz Lake near Grovertown. 

At North Judson tlieie is a peculiar industry, 
known as the "frog and turtle industry."' owned by 
A. A. Sphung. A wholesale business is carried on 
and shipments are made to all parts of the United 
States. 

In Knox are two cij^ar factories, one owned b}' 
Bill Solliday the other by Harr\ S. Loring. There is 



86 HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 

also a cigar factory at North Judson, owned by George 
Smith. 

One ot the largest and finest ranches in Northern 
Indiana is the one known as the Jamison Ranch, sit- 
uated but a short distance from Hamlet. There is a 
large number of buildings, including a big steel and 
concreti^ fire proof barn, and a number of other sub- 
stantial structures. In fact, the ranch presents the 
appearance of a small town in itself. C. A. Jamison, 
of Peoria, Illinois, is the proprietor ot this enterprise 
Here can be found some of the finest bred stock in the 
United Stares. Cattle from this ranch are continually 
capturing first and second prizes at live stock exhibi 
tions all over the co\intry. 

The manufacture of artificial stone in Starke 
County has proven a great success. What is known 
as the Keller industry, owned by Jacob Kelle**, of 
North Judson, has for its purpose the manufacture of 
a product made of gravel and cement, pressed and 
shaped so that it can scarcely be told from ordinary 
stone. The demand for the material is very large. 
Mr. Keller also has a factory at East Chicago, where 
the same product is manufactured. 

There is one brewery in the county, located at 
North Judson. Its product is shipped to surrounding 
towns and to various points throughout the country. 

The only industry of its kind in existence is the 




Wm. II n. (offln. iin Old Resident and Former County 
Officer. Prominent In Drainu^c Matters and Con- 
struction Commissioner of the Famous 
Kanl<;ikrc River Ditch. 



88 HISTORY OF STARKK COUNTY 

mauufacture of a foldinji railroad velocipede, patented 
by Marion F. McCormick, ot Knox, and manufactuaed 
by the McCormick Foldin^r Velocipede Company, M. 
F. McCormick and F. E. Dumas, proprietors. The 
company has a modest factory in Knox, where the 
attachments are made. From here they are sent out 
to all parts of the country. The invention comprises 
an attachment by which an ordinary bicycle may be 
ridden on the railroad tracks, at -any desirable speed, 
over trogs, switches and crossing's. One of the princi 
pal features of the invention is that when off the 
track the attachment may be folded and carried con- 
veniently along the wag"on road. In the near future 
the company e-xpects to buiid a lar^^er factory and 
manufacture other articles. 

About a mile and a half south of Knox is the large 
fruit and berry farm of Hugh Rogers, known as the 
"Tiger Lily Fruit Farm. From here comes most of 
the shrubbery and trees used in Knox and surround- 
ing towns. 

At Hamiet there is a foundry and machine work**, 
owned by L. D. Parmley, where all kinds of general 
repairing is done, also blacksmith and foundry work. 
It is expected in the near future to manufacture a pat- 
ent wind stacker and threshing machine, which were 
invented by Mr. Parmley. 



HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 89 

XVII. 
SOCIETIES. 

"It is probable that quite early in llie history of 
the world men learned the benefit of uniling*. for better 
self protection and for improving their condition, in 
organizations or compacts which bore various names 
and had various purposes. Whether from the first 
age ot civilization, before the time of what is known 
as Noahs flood, living through that period of destruc- 
tion, any traces of man's earliest organizatitms have 
come down to us is not easily proved, nor }et can it be 
entirely disproved. In well chosen words Professor 
John Russell, in 1852, before a large and highly intel- 
lectual audience declared: •Lon;'- before the period of 
written history, there existed an order of men, known 
only to the initiated. It is the oldest human societ y 
in existence. The dim tv^'ilight of the early ages 
rested upon its broad arch, yet throii;:h every period 
ot its existence has it bet-n the agent cf onward pro- 
gress.' While some may quest'on these statements, 
it is true that some forms of organization, some 
societies, are sufficiently old. while others are distinctly 
modern, very, very new. 

•The pioneers in these beautiful svilds retained 
their recollections of the old lionu-s and vf the associa- 
ations and ot the ties which had been plcasa;it to them 




The New Opera House at Knox, One of the Best 
Opera Houses in Northern Indiana. 



HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 91 

there; and so, along' with civil society and the new 
formed ties of social life, along with schools, churches 
and Sunday schools, they S'ton began to organize 
literary societies, and to form lodges, to organize 
library associations, agricultural societies, temperance 
societies, and in late years, study clubs and reading- 
circles, and the new orders of the present day came 
into existence in all our larger towns." A lull occount 
of these would here be unnecessary, and only brief 
mention is made of all the societies and org-anizations 
reflecting- credit upon the community. 

In Nortli Jndson there is an Odd Fellows, a Mod- 
ern Woodmen, a Knights of Pylhias ^nd a Masonic 
lodge. There are ladies' fraternities of some of the 
same orders known as tlie Ladies of Maccabees, L/ddy 
Rebeccas, and a ladies order ot the Odd Fellows. The 
G. A. R. lias a post here. There are two young peo- 
ple's societies, the Epworth League ana the Young- 
People's Christian Union. 

In Knox are the following- prominent societies and 
clubs: Knights of Pythias, Modern Woodmen of 
America, Maccabees, Odd Fellows. Masons, Royal 
Neighbors of America, Lady Rebeccas, Lady Macca- 
bees and a G. A. R. post. Some of the prominent 
women's clubs are: The P. E. O. Society, Ladies' 
Aid Society of the M. E. Church. Ladies' Aid Society 
of the Christian Church, Ladies" and Pastors' Union 



92 HISTORY OF STARKb: COUNTY 

of the M. E. Church, Book Club. Whist Club, and 
Literary Clubs. The Cliristian Endeavor and the 
Epworth Leag-ue are tlie two youn«r people's relig"ious 
societies. The Knox Hig-h School has two literary 
societies of surpassing- merit. The High School and 
Instructors have been liighly praised for conducting" 
so successful literary societies. Interesting- programs 
are rendered every two weeks. An annual debate be- 
tween the two clubs is an interesting- attraction. 
These organizations which reflect much credit upon 
the school and community in general are known as the 
Ivew Wallace Club and the Star Literary Society. 

Hamlet has five secret orders: The Modern Wood- 
men of America, Knights of Maccabees, Knights of 
Colun-.bia, Ladies of Maccabees, and Ladies of Colum- 
bia. There are also women's clubs and young people's 
societies. 

At Grovertown there is an organization of the 
Modern Woodmen of America and of the Gleaners. 

At San Pierre there is a G. A. R. post and an 
order of the Modern Woodmen of America. 

Toto has an organization of the gleaners. 

Ober has the Modern Woodmen and Gleaners. 

Various other societies and clubs exist in the 
county, where names were not obtained. 



D 
C 
X 

r. 

5 
o 

w 

c 



D 




94 HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 



XVIII. 
A RECORD OF COUNTY OFFICIALS. 

COUNTY CLERKS. 

The first County Clerk was appointed in 1850. 

Steplien Jackson. Mathias T. Hepner. 

Jacob Bozarth. Mathias T. Hepner. 

Chas. Humphreys. Mathias T. Hepner. 

John S. Bender. Jeremiali Good. 

Oliver H. P. Howard. Jeremiah Good. 

Andrew W. Porter. James C. Fletcher. 

Andrew W. Porte . James C. Fletcher. 

Wiloug-hby M. McCor- Henry E. White. 

mick. ' Henry K. White. 

Wiloug-hby M. McCor- 

mick. 



COUNTY AUDITORS. 

The first County Auditor was appointed in 1850. 

Jacob G. Black. William Perry. 

Chas. S. Tibbits. William Perry. 

Chas. Humphreys. Robert H. Bender. 

John S. Bender. Robert H. Bender 

James H. Adair. Aug-. H. Knosman 

James H. Adair, Aug. H. Knosman 

Robt. H. Bender John. W. Kurtz 
Robt. H. Bender. 

Alexander H. Henderson 



HISTORY OF STaRKR COUNTY 95 

COUNTY TREASURER. 

First County Treasurer Elected in 1853. 

Jacob Tillman. } , , Austin P. Dial. 

Adam Lamt)ert f '^P Jo^epll K. Hartzler. 

VViloug^hby McCormick Frank-lin P. Whit^on. 

Solon O. VVhitson. Franklin P. Whitson 

Solon O. Wliitson. Andrew O. Cattleman. 

Wingate Prettyman. Andrew O. Castleman. 

Wingate Prettyman. Oratio D. Fuller. 

John Good. Oratio D Fuller. 

John Good Georg-e Lig"litcap. 

Matnias T. llepner. Georg-e Li;^litcap. 

Mathias T. Hepner. Wilbert A. Pierscm. 

William H. H. Cffin. Wilbcrt A, Pierson. 
William H. H. Coffin. 

Austin I^. Dial. 

COUNTY RECORDERS. 

First County Recorder Appointed in 1850. 

Jacob Bozartli. Jacob Bozarth 

William M. Calkins Jacob Bozarth 

Wiloug^liby McCormick Henry Seegrist 

Sylvester A. \fcCrackin Henry Seei^rist 

Austin P. Dial Jacob P. Qnigley 

Austin P. Dial Jacob P. Quigley 
Austin P. Dial 
Michael Kelley 

Michael Kelley 



96 HISTORY QW STARKE COUNTY 

COUNTY SHERIFF, 

First County Slieriff Appointid in 1850. 

Jacob S. Wampler I . William Sey^ravis 
A. W. Porter \ ^PP' William Sejiravcs 

Solon O. Whitson John W. Segraves 

William P. Chapman Mathew Hays 

Winjy;-ate Prettyman Joseph LC. Jones 

Wing-ate Prettyman Joseph K. Jones 

Mathias T. Hepiier Jacob VanUerweele 

Matliias T. Hepner Jacob VanDer wcele 

William Elmandorf Jc^sepii E Harvey 

William Anderson Wiiliiim 11. Harh-r 

William Emandorf William H. Harter 

William H. H. Coffin Sidney A. Uncaplier 

George S. Savery Sidney A. Uncaphtr 
Georg-e S, Saver v 
William Elmandorf 

Wiliam Elmandorf 



COUNTY CORONERS. 

First County Coroner Appointed in 1850. 

James B Prettyman Joseph W. Hiler 

John Lindsey Thomas R. Lambert 

Adam Lambert Thomas R. Lambert 

Adam Lambert Leander E. Conner 

J. K. Crites Mark R Wright 

Samuel Smith Mark R. Wrii»ht 

Elijah Wood Mark R Wriuht 

David P. Favorite William M. Kelley 

David P. Favorite Charles Waddell 

Wingate Prettyman Thomas J. Agnew 



HISTORY OK STARKE COUNTY 97 

Georg-e VV. Scofi^ld Janics S. Denaut 

Israel Uncaplier Samuel S. Bonar 

Israel Uncdplier William J. Solt 

Wilson T. Loring- 

Joseph \V. Hiler . 



COUNTY SURVEYORS. 

First County Surveyor Elected in 1856. 

John S Bender. Appd. Abner L. Purcell 

Robert H. Bender Abner L. Purcell 

Robert H. Bender Henry C. Roney 

John P. Kellcy Joseph N. McCormick 

John P. Kelley Joseph N. McCormick 

William C. Boyles John W. Good 

William C. Boyles John W. Good 

John E. Short Howard M. Chapel 

John E. Short Adam F. Seidc-r 

Joseph N. McCormiek Leo M. Kelley 

Joseph N. McCormick Alfred A Savory 
William C. Bowles 
William C. Boyles 

Georjre M. D Fisher 



COUNTY ASSESSORS. 

First County Assessor Elected in 1803. 

Nathan McCumber. Appd Jacob Keller 

Eli Brown, Appointed Albert C. Wolfram 

Christopner Hillabold William James 

Tliom; s Cussins Georjjfe W. Harkins 

Peter Speelman 

William P. Stanton ... 



98 



HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 



COUNTY COMMISSIONERS. 

The first County Commissioners appointed to 
locate the seat of justice ol Starke County on the first 
day of April, 1850, were: 

Wm. C. Barnette, L. Chomberlin, Wm. N. Patterson 
The first regular elected Commissioners, in 1850, were: 



t William Parker 

} George Esty 

I John W. P. Hopkins 
Andrew Long 
Edward Smith 
Abram Welsh 
George Felden 
John Good 

William P. Chapman 
James P. Fry 
George Felden 
William Swartzell 
Isaac Reed 
Jacob Kelver 
Eli Brown 
Amos A. Green 
Jacob Kelver 
Eli Brown 
Jesse Jackson 
Jacob Kelver 
Madison Jones 
Elijah W. Geiselm.in 
Madison Jones 
Maihias T. Hepner 
Madison Jones 



John W. Rea 
J-'fferson Sea graves 
Christian Kreis 
Richard M. Gibbs 
William h. Scudder 
Oratio I). Fuller 
Oratio D. Fuller 
William Turner 
Georj^e Stocker 
Richard M. Gibbs 
George Stocker 
Joseph M. Hiler 
Jaincs M. Tucker 
Daniel H. Stanton 
Daniel Lefever 
Jacob Kreis 
Daniel Lefever 
Jacob Kreis 
Daniel H. Stanton 
William T Collins 
William T. Collins 
Fred E. Vergin 
William Miller 
William T. Ct)lliiis 
Wiiliam Miller 



HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 99 

Samuel Lefever Christian Borchardt 

Elijali W. Geiselman Christian Borchardt 

Jacob Sliilling- Henry C.Shcrt 

Samuel Ltrfever Sherman Carne? 

Henry Bender Sherman Carnes 

Edvv.ird Tucker James G. Heilman 
Christian Kreis 

Elij ih W. Geiselman 



COUNTY SUPERINTENDENTS. 

First Supcrintendant (County Examiner) App'd 1861 

Andrew W. Porter William B. Sinclair 

M. T. Howard William B. Sinclair 

S-imnel Jacobs William B Sinclair 

John E. Short William B, Sinclair 

Wilonj^hby McCormicW William B. Sinclair 

Uziah Kline William ^. Foust 

Alt-xander H. Henderson George E. Butcher 
Oliver Musselman 
George A. Netherton 

Henry C. Rogers 



100 HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 

INDEX. 

Page 

Area ot the County, 9 

Birds of ihe County, . . . 52 

Census Figures 77 

Drainag:e in the County 44 

Financinl Condition of Starke County, .. 30 

First White Woman in the County, 68 

Grovertovvn, 30 

Hamlet, . .. 25 

In Memoriam, 69 

Dr. A H. Henderson 69 

S. R. Childs 72 

Georg-e S. Savery 72 

Albert I. Gould 73 

Jeremiih Good, 74 

J. Don Gorrell 76 

Industries of the County 84 

Ajjriculture .... 84 

Drainag^e , 84 44 

Pickle Factories, 85 

Handle Factory, 85 

Grain Elevators 85 

Flouring- Mills, 85 

Faog- and Turtle Industry, 85 

Cig-ar Factories, 85 

Big- Jamison Ranch, 86 

Manufacture of Artificial Stone, 86 

North Jiidson Brewery .... 86 

Manufacture of Railway Velocipedes, 86 

Fruit and Berry Raising, 88 

Hamlet Foundry SS 

Kankakee Region 50 



HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 101 

Page 

Knox .... 14 

Lakfs (I the County. ....... 31 

Bass Lake, 39 

Koontz Lake, .... 35 

Eagle Lake 37 

Round EaUe, . 37 

Otiier Lake?, . . . . 44 

North Jnd&oii 22 

Newspapers 19 

Kn-.x ... ... . 19 

North Judscn 24 

llatnlet 27 

Old^-st Man in tiie Ccunl y, 66 

Our Public Schools ' 80 

P«»sitinn (if the County 9 

Record ol County Officials .... 94 

Religious History 61 

Methodist Episcopal 62 

Baptist, 62 

Free Methodist 64 

Lutheran 62 

Christian . . 62 

Cath..lic . . . 64 

Latter Dav Saint 64 

Uniiihtcd Brethern. (>4 

Weslyan Methodist 64 

Some Interesting Early Facts 11 

Lf)c;»tion of County Seat 11 

First County Officers 11 

Firsr Term ot Circuit Court 12 

First Bov Born. . . . 12 

First Burial, 12 



102 HISTORY OF STARKE COUNTY 

First Church Erected, 12 

First Ministers 12 

First Lawyers, , .... 12 

First Newspaper 12 

First Musical Org-anizatioi 13 

Early t^elebration. 12 

Societies ... 89 92 

Maccabees 

Knights of P\ lliias 

Odd Fellows.". 

Modern Woodmen 

Masons 

Royal Neijihbors 

Gleaners 

Lady Rebt. ccas 

Lady Maccabees 

G. A. R.. .... 

Knights of Columbia 

Ladies of Colunibi;i 

San Pierre 28 

Schools of Knox l.S 81 

Schools of North Jndson.. 23 81 

Schools of the county .... .... .80 

Two Living Curiosities .... 56 

Eh Green 56 

Che-Mah ... 59 

Towns of the County 13 

Knox . 14 

North Judson 22 

Hamlet 25 

San Pierre 28 

Gn>v^ertown .... • • 30 

Other towns 30 



COUNTY 
BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



McCormick's Guide to Starke Co. 



rS ON SALE AT THE FOLLOWING PLACES 

KNOX — NEWS AND BOOK STORE. 

KNOX-COOPER & DUMAS* STORE- 

NORTH JUDSON — P. H. McCORMlCK & GO'S DRUG STORE. 

SAN PIERRE— F. J. WEINKAUF P. M. 

HAMLET -C- MCCORMICK'S GENERAL STORE. 

GROVERTOWN— A. J. UNCAPHER, OR ADDRESS 

C- A- MCCORMICK, knox. ind- 



Established 1893 




GUS REISS 

The Square Man, Knox, Ind. 

The largest establishment oi the 
kind in the county. 

CLOTHING. 

GENTS FURNISHINGS. 

BOOTS and SHORS. 

HONEST TREATMENT. 
HONEST GOODS. 
HONEST PRICES. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed or 
Money Refunded. Your Patron- 
age is Respectfully Solicited 



Gus Reiss, The Square Man, Knox 



A. L, McKINNEY & SON, 

REAL ESTATE 

B"U«j;-lit, Sold and Excliang-ed. Money to Loan on 
Ten Years' Time at Lowest Rate of Interest 

A L. McKINNEY & SON. KNOX, IND. 

FRANK L. BROWN, 

FOR DRUGS. 

Wall Paper, Paints, Oils, Varnishes. 

:: :: Prescriptions Carefully and Promptly Filled. :: :: 
: KNOX, INDIANA. : 



A. J. U N C A P H E R, 
General Merchandise, Real Estate and Insurance. 

ALSO DEALER I\ 

..HAY AND GRAI N... 
G R O V E R T O VV N. - - INDIANA. 



THE STARKECOUNTY DEMOCRAT 

S. M. GORRELL. PUBLISHER. 

EVERY THURSDAY ONLY $1. PKK YEAR. 

...All tlic New.s and the Truth About it... 
KNOX. INDIANA. 



,:KNOX GENERAL STORE:. 

...LEADERS IN... 

Dry Goods, Groceries, Tobaccos, 
Cigars, Boots, Shoes, Etc. 

:BR1NG US YOUR COUNTRY PROUUCH:-. 

MaVe Our Store Your Headquarters wli. n 

in Knox Courteous 'rnatiuent and 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 

C. .J. LUNDIN, Prop'r, Knox, Ind. 
STARKE COUNTY REPUBLICAN 



Every Thursday, by John L. Mookman. 



KNOX, - INDIANA 



BARNUM'S STUDIO, Knox, Ind. 

PHOTOS 50 CENTS PER DOZ. UP. 
CABINETS, $2 00 PER DOZEN. . . . 

We have Photos on hand nf Starke County's Three 
Court Houses, like those which appear in this book. 

COME IN AND SEE US. 



JACOB KELLER, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

Artificial Stone, .. Tile and Brick. 

FACTORIES AT... 

East Chicago, and North Judson. 
J. W. WEINKAUF, Postmaster. 

— DEALER IN — 

General Merchandise* 

San Pierre, : : Indiana. 



THE TIGER LILY FRUIT FARM, 

HUGH ROGERS, Prop., Knox, Indiana. 

Slnpprr of Sni.ill Fruits, and Niirstrrv Stock of All 
Kim's. S(»l(l On Time to Suit Purcli;isc-r. 

ALL STOCK GUARANTEED 

F.irm One Mile Sontlj (»f Knox, Indiana. 

C. McCORMICK, Hamlet Indiana. 

— DEALER IN — 

General Merchandise, All Kinds. 

M iktr Our Sore Your Headquarters When in Hamlet. 



OSCAR B. SMITH. 

...L A W Y ER... 



General Practice 
and 
First Mortgage Loans. 



North Jud^on, 

Indiana. 



Cooper & Dumas.... 

Jewelry, China, 

Men's Furnishing-s, 

Shoes and Notions. 

Knox, : : Indiana. 



Qeorge Trevor 

Dry Goods and Notions. 
Boots, Shvies and 

...Ladiejs' Furnishings... 
Knox, : : Indiana 



NEWLY furnished. BETTER THAN EVER. 

YOU ARE ALWAYS WELCOME AT 

THE EAGLE HOTEL. 

C. C. COLLIER, PROPRIETOR. 

Transients a Specialty. Rates, $1 50 Per Day. 

Oldest Hotel in ihe County. NORTH, JUDSON IND. 



DR. S. S. BONAR & SON. 

— DEALERS IN — 

DRUGS AND MEDICINES, PAINTS AND OILS. 
WALL PAPER STATIONERY, ETC. 



HAMLET, 



INDIANA 



R R McCORMICK & CO 

Reliable Dealers In 

..DRUGS.. 

Patent Medicines, Toilet Articles, Wall Paper, 
Paints and Oils, Watches, Clocks, and Jewelry, 
Musical Instruments, Stationery and School Sup= 
plies. Watch and Jewelry Repairing a Specialty. 

NORTH JUDSON, - INDIANA. 

•^ You Are Always Welcome Here Whether You Buy Or Not. ^ 
ESTABLISHED DEC. 1901. ONLY $1 00 A YEAR. 

...THE HAMLET TIMES... 

DR W. BOWMAN. EDITOR AND PROP. 

BEST ADVERTISING MEDIUM IN STARKE COUNTY 
ISSUED EVERY THURSDAY, AT HAMLET, IND. 

C. H. CONRAD, 

Groceries, Dry Goods, Notions, Boots and Shoes, 

...Felts and Rubbers... 

Courtpotis Treatment and Satisfaction Guaranteed. 

KXOX, :: :: INDIANA. 



FOR 

A Clean Fresh Line of Drugs, Wall Paper, 
Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Etc. We keep every= 
thing that is to be found in a First=Class Drug 
Store. Courteous Treatment and Satisfaction 
Guaranteed. A Fine Selection of CIGARS 

OHiS. A. BE ATTY, PROP. 

KNOX, - - INDIANA. 



Adrian L* Courtright 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

MONEY & INVESTMENTS 

Phone: Office, 37. Residence, US. 

Knox^ - - Indiana. 



W. D. S. RODGERS & SON 

Breeders and Shippers ot Thor.mglibi ed 
POLAND CHINA HOGS ..f tlie Leading- 
Strains Wt* Han le 'I'horoug-l.bred 

B. P. C nek' ns F inn N^ar Hound Lake. 

Address KNOX, : : : INDIANA. 



THE NORTH JUDSON NEWS. 

HARRY O. WARVF.L. PUBLISHER. 

EVli^RY THURSDAY. $1.50 PER YEAR 

...JOB WORK OE ALL KINDS... 

NORTH JUDSON. - INDIANA. 



HENRY R. ROBBINS. 

ATTORNEY. 



O F K I C E ON W A S 1 11 .N C, T O N S T R K K T 

.. oppo.'^rrK coiJK r iiousio .. 



KNOX, - INDIANA. 



Starke County Abstract Co. 

SUCCESSORS TO BOZARTH & FLETCHER. 




WASHINGTON STREET OPPoSITE THE COURT HOUSE. 

Tl I.EPIIONE > O 67. 

AI.L WORK {^.IVKX PROMPT ATTRN IION. 



KNOX, 



INDIANA. 



OLDEST HARDWARE IN THE COUNTY. ESTAULISHED lt^84. 

11 /\ IVDWA RE 



— DEALERS IN — 



HARDWARE, STOVES, TINWARE AND 
AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS 

HARD & SOFT COAL, WINDMILLS. PUMHS. ETC 

Knox, - - Indiana. 



FRANK SLIDINGER & SON 

MERCHANT TAILORS 



>HOP Over Lundins Store. 

ALL 

WORK 

NEATLY 

DONE 





.'HONK. SHOP 



KKSIDKNCK. H'.^ 



KNOX, ::::: INDIANA 



CHARLES H. PETERS. ROBERT. D. PETERS. 

PETERS & PETERS. 

(SUCCESSORS TO GOULD & PEFERS.) 

ATTO R N E Y S. 

TELEPHONE 57. 

Knox, :: :: Indiana 

PRETTYMAN BROTHERS 

MEAT MARKET 

FOR FRESH AND SALT MEATS OK ALL KINDS 
ALSO CREAMERY BUTTER 

BRING US YOUR PRODUCE. 
WE DEAL IN LIVE STOCK. 

THIRD DOOR NORTH OF THE POST OFFICE. 

Knox, - - Indiana. 



FURNISHED WITH ALL THE MODERN IMPROVEMENTS 

...HOTEL Fl TZ ... 

THE ONLY $2.00 A DAY HOUSE JN THE TOWN 

Knox, :: Indiana. 



A FIRST-CLASS HOTEL. RATES. $1.50 PER DAY. 

...H OT E L J O L L Y... 

J. E JOLLY. PROPRIETOR. 

STOP WITH us WHEN YOU ARE IN HAMLET 

HAMLET, :: :: INDLAXA. 

FROM 1870 TO 1903. 

:: A Third Of A Century :: 

A STORE HANDED DOWN 
FROM FATHER TO SON... 

A CONTINUED SUCCESS. 

A GENERAL MERCHANDISE STORE 

A. W. Swartzell, /. Knox. 



....CHARLES WINDISCH... 



DEALER IN 



GROCERIES 



FRESH AND SALT MEATS 

Cigars and Tobacco, Confectionery, Etc. Our 
Line Is Always Complete and Up=to=date, and We 
Respectfully Solicit a Share of Your Patronage. 



KNOX, 



INDIANA. 



H. A. ROCKHILL, 

FOR DRY GOODS, 
GROCERIIiS. FRESH 
and SALT MEATS . . 

KNOX, - IN'D. 



ED. KREIS 



GROCERIES AND HARDWARE 



North Judsi^n. Ind 



D. H. BACON. 

Hardware, Farm Implements and Machinery, 
Wagons, Buggies, Etc 

COME IN AND SEE US BEFORE YOU BUY. 

KNOX, - INDIANA. 



THE FAVORITE. 



The Leading Dry Goods 
Store in Starke County. 



KNOX, ^ ^ ^ INDIANA. 



C. M. TOWNSEND, THE GROCER 

(successor to m. h. chapel.) 

A Fresh and Complete Line of Groceries Always 
On Hand. Your Patronage Appreciated. 

KNOX, : : IFJ DIANA. 



H A R K y S. L H I N U 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER 

KNOX, : : INDIANA. 
C U R LEADERS... 



% » 



'•Knox 'Em All 
"Old Starke" 
" Loring's Best" 



=: J. A. BYERS' CASH STORE := 



— DEAI.ER IN — 

Dry Goods, Groceries, General 
Merchandise,Etc. I have Some 

Bargains For You 

Come In and See Me. 

Yours Truly, 
J. A. BYERS, 

KNOX, - - INDIANA. 




MUm Normal UiilvGrsiiu. 

RocHester, Indiana.. 



/^KFERS Special Inducements to Persons Desiring 
^"'^lo Take Up A Course in the Common Branches, 
Higli Sc1k)o1 Brandies, A Teaclier's Course, Short 
Hand. Typewritin<jr, Bookkeepintf, Music and Other 
Departments. For Information and Catalogue, address 



W. H. BANTA, President. 



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Where will you attend School? 

Valparaiso College and Northern Indiana Normal Scliotil, 

— ONE OF THE — 

LARGEST AND BEST EijUiPPED COLLEGES IN THE U. S., 

ofters except! 'iially Hie 0,4) 'riunities tor doiii^ a liigli 
g^rade ot wink 111 tlie (••llowing' J)epartnients: Prep.ira- 
lory, Tcaclit^rs. Scieiililic. C a-sic, liiiyn.eeriiiLj. Ora- 
tory, Pliannacy. Musical. Fine An, Law, vJoimiieiciHl, 
Piioii(»gTa|tliy and Ty pewiitin;^. Review, 

Tli^ iiisi itiilioii is well equipped with building's, 
apartments, library, etc. (The uew Science Kail, recent- 
ly completed, iias labratory faciliiies sutficieut tor ac- 
commodating- 400 si udenls working at one time ) Each 
department of the school is supplied with every.tliitig 
necessary tor its special work. For Example, The 
Colle^ate Department is provided witii special library, 
apparalu>i. laboratories. etc. .and offers every advantage 
for thoroughness that can be found at the older colleges 
and universities. The Pedagogical Department is not only 
supplied with a full reference library, consisting of all 
the latest and rno^st approved books treating on profes- 
sional work but it has als</*excellent apparatus for ex- 
perimental purposes. The (^omniprdal Department is pro- 
vided with a more extensive line of ofhces than has ever 
been attempted by any other school. The Pharmaey 
Department is one of the few in the U. S that has lab- 
oratory facilities tor do'tig all the work. What is true 
of the equipments of these departments is true of the 
other departments. Attention is c.illed to this to show 
that while the 

EXPENSES HERE ARE ABOUT ONE-THIRD AS GREAT 
as at uiher hivh grade •ichonU. yet the advantages arc in every way equal and in 
most ca»e« superior. 'I'liitinn, $io per term. Hoard and furnished room, f i 50 
:<) 1 1 90 per week Catalojjiic free Address M H. HKUWN, President; or 
P. «>. KI\SKV. Vice- Pre .idcnt, Vali araiso, Indi^-na 

CM,KN().AR: Second Winter I'cnni, J m. .0, n,o ; Fpring I erm, March' 
31, 1903; Summer Teriti, June 9, i9->«. 



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