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Full text of "McGinness and Scott families and their branches. Genealogical notes"

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ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 




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BINDER: 

Please add call number to 
spine as shown in red on 
title page. Thank you - 



McGINNESS AND SCOTT 



KA MILIKS 



AND THEIR BRANCHES, 



GENEALOGICAL NOTES. 



SAMUEI. W. McGINNESS 



MARY R. FORD. 



They who care not to know their 
ancestors are wanting in natural af- 
fection, and regardless of Glial duty. 

—A. H. Ward. 



k 



PITTSBURGH: 

Press of Murdoch, Kerr & Co., 53 Ninth Street. 
1892. 






CHILDHOOD. 



Pictured in memory's mellowing glass, how sweet 
Our infant days, our infant joys to greet ; 
To roam in fancy in each cherished scene. 
The village churchyard, and the village green. 
The woodland walk remote, the greenwood glade. 
The mossy seat beneath the hawthorn's shade. 
The whitewashed cottage, where the woodbine grew. 
And all the favorite haunts our childhood knew ! 
How sweet, while all the evil shuns the gaze, 
To view the unclouded skies of former days. 

Beloved age of innocence and smiles. 

When each wing'd hour some new delight beguiles. 

When the gay heart, to life's sweet day-spring true, 

Still finds some insect pleasure to pursue. 

Blest Childhood, hail! — Thee simply will I sing, 

And from myself the artless picture bring ; 

These long-lost scenes to me the past restore. 

Each humble friend, each pleasure, now no more. 

And ev'ry stump familiar to my sight 

Recalls some fond idea of delight. 

And oh ! thou Power whose myriad trains resort 
To distant scenes, and pictures them to thought. 
Whose mirror, held unto the mourner's eye, 
Flings to his soul a borrow'd gleam of joy; 
Blest Memory, guide, with finger nicely true. 
Back to my soul my retrospective view; 
Recall with faithful vigor to my mind 
Each face familiar, each relation kind; 
And all the finer traits of them afford 
Whose general outline in my heart is stored. 

— Henry Kirke White. 



1182976 

PREFATORY NOTES. 

f N the autumn of the year 1888, during a visit at the 

^ I home of my grandfather, the late Samuel W. Mc- 

\^ I Ginness, of Allegheny, Pa., I was called upon by 

^ him to assist in compiling genealogical notes of his 

t: family, both on the paternal and maternal side. As he 

^^ i was then the oldest living member of both families — gifted 

^ with a remarkable memory, and having a personal knowl- 

^ edge of many persons and places herein mentioned — he 

^^ was urged by many friends to produce a brief history of 

the McGinness and Scott families, for the benefit of those 

now living, and for future generations. Impelled by these 

V considerations, and having leisure time, as he had then re- 

X^ tired from active business, he decided to attempt the work, 

^ providing I would assist him with the writing. 

We at once embarked in the undertaking, and began 
collecting material and records necessary for the work, 
engaging in it at such times as Grandpa's health permitted. 
As the work progressed, it became evident that the family 
connection was more extensive than we had at first antici- 
pated, which, had we known in the beginning, would have 
made us hesitate to undertake so great a task, as it has 
involved an extensive correspondence, necessarily consum- 
ing much time and labor. 

In the midst of our work we were compelled to lay 
it aside, owing to Grandpa's sickness, which, after months 
of enfeebled health, finally terminated his life. 

" Friend after friend departs. 
Who has not lost a friend ? " 



4 PREFATORY NOTES. 

As Grandpa requested me to finish the work in 
which he had taken such great interest, and realizing the 
importance of preserving the records of our ancestors — the 
place of their birth and the home of their childhood — and 
of placing our family records in a permanent form, in 
order that they may be preserved for future generations, 
I resumed the task some months after his death. Being 
deprived of his valuable knowledge, and laboring under 
discouragements in seeking trace of many families whose 
records had not yet been obtained, I have found it some- 
what difficult to complete the work. The materials ac- 
cumulated on my hands, and the consequence is, the 
record has expanded as the work advanced, until it has 
reached a size far beyond what was anticipated. In order 
to keep the volume within the limits desired, it has been 
necessary to omit many details that might be interesting. 

In compiling these notes, no attempt has been made 
to eulogize, or give descriptions of the general appear- 
ance, or to delineate the character of the persons under 
consideration, except in a few cases where notes from the 
pen of others were inserted. "Personal knowledge," says 
Southey, in his Life of Cowper, "is indeed the greatest of 
all advantages for such an undertaking, notwithstanding 
the degree of restraint, which must generally be regarded 
as one of its conditions." Not having this "personal 
knowledge" of the persons herein mentioned, except in 
comparatively few cases, and realizing the difficulties 
which would arise in seeking to obtain reliable materials 
from which to compile such sketches, I have abstained 
from essaying a task so great. I am conscious of the 
fact that, by omitting this department of biographical 
work and presenting only unvarnished statements of the 
facts, and dates, the record is less interesting than it 
otherwise might have been ; but, in order to avoid undue 
partiality, or of hurting the feelings of any, it is best, per- 



PREFATORY NOTES. 5 

haps, that nothing further has been attempted, for in so 
tracing the Hves of persons, we are obliged to tread, oc- 
casionally, over very delicate and debatable ground. 

It is pleasing to review the lives and actions of those 
from whom we derive our immediate descent, and who 
have done honor to their family name by their talents and 
their virtues. It has been truly said, "The study of 
family history elevates and ennobles the nature of man, 
and lifts it up to a truer and nobler type. To know noth- 
ing of our ancestry, or from whence we came ; to have no 
reverence for the precious memories of the past, or an in- 
terest in those who are to succeed us in the battle of life, 
is to ignore the elements and influences that have made 
us what we are, to repudiate the natural instincts and af- 
fections of the human heart, and to suppress the aspira- 
tions and hopes of a soul that is to course on through 
endless cycles of eternity." 

A study of the pioneer life of our forefathers could 
not fail to be both interesting and instructive to us, who 
have, as it were, placed ourselves out of sight of the im- 
mediate past, and merged ourselves so deeply in the con- 
cerns of the present, as to regard the scenes through 
which our ancestors passed as almost a myth. 

Let us, however, try to forget the present for a brief 
period, and transport ourselves in imagination to the rude 
log cabin of our grandfathers. How interesting those 
early scenes upon which we look ! Let us pause in the 
"hurly burly" of busy life and contemplate them, if not 
for the instruction they afford, at least for the diversion 
they would give. Our pioneer forefathers had to suffer 
many privations, which extended not only to the luxuries 
of life, but to its very necessities. The most rigid sim- 
plicity was observed in furniture, food 'and dress. Truly, 
those were times of stern necessity. Then, too, their 
travel from place to place was beset with many trials and 



6 PREFATORY NOTES. 

dangers, for, in those early days of settlement, wagon roads 
where unknown in the " western wilds," much less the 
better facilities for travel, with which we are so familiar. 

It is greatly to be regretted that incidents and expe- 
riences of the pioneer life of our immediate ancestors have 
not been preserved, as it would certainly not only be in- 
teresting, but profitable to us all, as descendants of the 
pioneer forefathers herein mentioned, to be acquainted 
with the particulars of their lives ; but when we contem- 
plate the trials and dangers through which they passed in 
their struggles for existence in a new country, and of the 
difficulties which met them on every hand, we need not 
wonder that so little time was devoted to writing, and so 
little attention paid to the preservation of family records. 

Let us, and the future generations, profit by this neg- 
lect of those who have long since passed away, and give 
special attention to the preservation of important events, 
facts and records so that some one, in the future, may be 
enabled to "take up the thread, and weave a larger fabric 
of more varied colors." When notes and letters from the 
pen of those under consideration are accessible, it is a 
comparatively easy matter to produce satisfactory bio- 
graphical sketches; whereas, in retrospect, much must, of 
necessity, be overlooked and much be lost. 

Had the work of compiling this family record been 
attended to years ago, when the older members of the 
family were still living, much valuable and interesting 
information, relating to our ancestors, could have been 
obtained which is now lost; but such as has been written 
is herewith presented, with the hope that, while it may be a 
disappointment to expectations, yet it may serve the pur- 
pose intended and be appreciated by all herein considered, 
and also by future generations of the McGinness and 
Scott families. 

To those who have roamed the same hills and tra- 



PREFATORY NOTES. 7 

versed the same valleys in childhood, it will certainly be a 
pleasant pastime to review the lives of their former asso- 
ciates, and thus recall, with fond delight, the long-lost 
scenes of the past, and the old homestead, around which 
cluster many pleasant memories. 

"As figures in our dreams, how often pass 

The scenes of childhood through the busy brain, 
Flitting like shadows, o'er the waving grass, 
Each but a moment seen retreats again." 

The work, although tedious and somewhat arduous, 
has been in many respects pleasant and instructive, and I 
trust the readers may be both interested and profited by 
a perusal of its pages. I ask that it may be viewed, not 
with a critic's eye, but with indulgence. 

The compilation of the work necessarily involved the 
transcribing and arranging of a multiplicity of dates and 
names, together with notes from the numerous letters sent 
me, and, notwithstanding the fact that I have endeavored 
to be accurate, undoubtedly some errors will be detected 
by interested persons. Should any errors be discovered, 
they should be corrected at once, and all omissions sup- 
plied. 

It will be observed that the one form of writing the 
name "McGinness" has been adhered to throughout this 
work, as it was claimed by my grandfather to be the one 
adopted by this branch of the family, generally; however, 
some of the families herein considered write the name 
McGinnis, and others Maginess. The different ways of 
spelling it were brought about largely by the fancy of 
members of different branches of the original family. The 
proper spelling of the name, according to eminent Irish 
historians, is Magennis, which is explained in the pages 
following. 

I feel that I owe some apology to those interested for 
the delay in presenting this work to them. Various 



8 PREFATORY NOTES. 

duties, from which I could not well escape, have occupied 
or broken in upon my time to such a degree that I have 
been enabled to devote only a portion of it to the task, 
which partly accounts for the regretted delay in complet- 
ing it. The families herein considered are greatly scat- 
tered, many in the far West, and much time was neces- 
sarily consumed in tracing some of them and in ob- 
taining desired information. With but few exceptions, 
those to whom I have written soliciting information have 
gladly responded, though in some cases the answers were 
so long delayed as to greatly retard the work of compila- 
tion. In some instances no answers were received, which 
will account for the broken links in the genealogical chain, 
and the blanks in some family records. 

Some of the members of the families considered have 
rendered valuable assistance by furnishing information of 
others, which, perhaps, could not otherwise have been 
obtained, and I take the present opportunity to thank 
all who have in any manner assisted in the work. 

I desire especially to acknowledge indebtedness to 
John F. Meginness, Esq., of WilHamsport, Pa., — author 
of "Biography of Frances Slocum," "Origin and History 
of the Magennis Family," etc. — for very valuable assist- 
ance. The notes on the early history of the Magennis 
family and origin of the name, as found in the following 
pages, were furnished by him, he having gathered the same 
for insertion m his recent publication, " History of the 
Magennis Family," and kindly permitted me to re-pro- 
duce them here. His work is an exceedingly interesting 
and valuable compilation of genealogical notes of his 
branch of the family and of others of the name, and is not 
only interesting to every one bearing the name, but to the 
general reader, as it contains many historical facts of a 
most interesting nature. 

In the preface of his valuable book, Mr. Meginness 



PREFATORY NOTES. 9 

says: "The date of the origin of the clan of Magennis 
runs so far back that it has almost become obscured by 
the haze of antiquity. Long before the Christian era, 
eight sons of King Milesius, of Spain, raised a fleet and 
sailed for Ireland for the purpose of conquest. When 
about to land a storm arose and dispersed the fleet. Five 
of the eight brothers were drowned. The saved — Heber, 
Heremon, Amergin and Heber Don, son of Ir, (one of the 
brothers lost,) effected a landing, met the natives in battle, 
routed them, seized the country and founded a colony. 
Heber and Heremon divided the territory between them. 
The third brother became their arch priest. In the course 
of time quarrels arose between them and Heber was slain. 
Amergin then claimed a share in the conquest, when more 
trouble arose and he was killed in battle. Thus Heremon 
became sole monarch. He then made another division of 
the land amongst his friends. The northern part of Ire- 
land, now Ulster, he gave to his nephew, Heber Don, Ir's 
only son. From Ir, therefore, all the provincial kings of 
Ulster, and all the ancient nobility derive their pedigrees. 
The Magennis family had its origin in the Irian line, but 
it was not until the eleventh century that surnames were 
adopted and the name began to undergo changes in spell- 
ing. All, therefore, bearing the name, no matter how it 
is spelled, descended from the same stock and are of Mile- 
sian origin. 

" The clan, while in its original condition, was fierce 
and warlike, and engaged in many bloody conflicts. The 
meaning of the name in its original orthography, "great 
strength," indicates that the members of the family were 
physically strong and powerful. 

"An examination of the early Irish annals, as found 
recorded in that great work entitled. The Four Masters, 
which brings the history down to 1616, shows that the 
original seat of the family was in what is now known as 



10 PREFATORY NOTES. 

County Down, There they lived, multiplied and flour- 
ished for hundreds of years; there they often engaged in 
bloody conflicts with the clan O'Neill; there the Lords of 
Iveah came into existence and held sway until the rapa- 
cious English invaded Ireland, upturned society, confis- 
cated estates, devastated the land by fire and sword, 
crushed the hearts of the people and caused their sons and 
daughters to seek homes in foreign lands. 

" All the professions, with but few exceptions, are 
represented by those bearing the name, conspicuous among 
them being law, medicine, theology, education, journalism, 
history and literature. Many have attained to high dis- 
tinction in civil and military pursuits, and reflected credit 
and honor upon their names. The record is a proud one, 
and no descendant in the Irian line need be ashamed of 
his ancestry." 

Not having succeeded in gaining access to books 
bearing on the early history of the family, Mr. Meginness' 
timely assistance saved me much research, and rendered 
the work better deserving of favor than it otherwise might 
have been. Trusting that it may prove satisfactory to all 
concerned, it is submitted to their considerate judgment. 

Mary R. Ford. 

Green Tree, Pa., i8g2. 




(J^e-r^/ /-^W^/ fif:rii-U- ;" 






(yy, 



1/ 



THE FAMILY OF MAGENNIS. 

ITS ORIGIN AND HISTORY. 

THE following extracts were taken from the recent 
publication of John F. Meginness, as mentioned in 
the preface of this work. 

"The family of Magennis is one of the oldest in Ire- 
land, yet comparatively little of its history is known in 
America. There is a full record of the family in Ireland 
down to the time of the English invasion in 1600. After 
that time, on account of the destruction of records, there 
is a break which can only be supplied by tradition for 
nearly a hundred years. 

"Those bearing the name in its various forms of 
spelling — although they have all descended from the same 
parent stem — are very numerous in the United States to- 
day, the greatest number, perhaps, being found in Penn- 
sylvania, Philadelphia, it seems, was the point to which 
the early immigrants directed their steps, and from there 
they gradually spread to the interior and western part of 
the state, as well as to other states. 

"To Hon. Edmund Francis Dunne belongs the credit 
of making the first publication relating to the history of 
the family in this country. It is a pamphlet of only 
seventeen pages, however, and is composed of extracts 
from the Four Masters and other works on Irish history ; 
but, small as it is, it is an exceedingly valuable compila- 
tion, and shows, in brief, the wonderful history of a family 
whose origin dates so far back that it becomes lost in the 



12 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

misty past. In order to place the historical extracts in 
more permanent form for the benefit of whoever may be 
interested, they are, by his permission, reproduced here, 
together with many others bearing on the history of the 
family. 

" Irish scholars inform us that the ancient orthogra- 
phy of the name Magennis is Mag AengJnisa. O'Hart, 
in his great work on Irish Pedigrees, states that in olden 
times in Ireland society consisted of an aggregation of 
tribes or clans, and family names, as we use them, were 
unknown until the eleventh century. Individual members 
of the tribe, therefore, were designated by a name indica- 
tive of some distinguishing personal peculiarity. The 
word Aongiis or Aeneas^ derived from ao7i, excellent, and 
gus, strength, is the root of Guinness, MacGuinness, 
Innes, Ennis, etc.* Cionog, (or Cionga,) brother of Ros, 
who is No. 63 on the 'O'Farrel' pedigree, was the ^Vl- 
cestor of Mac Ao?ig-/iuts, (oneeth,) which has been angli- 
cised into the various forms of the name we find to-day. t 

"According to MoUoy's Irish Grammar, page 7, 
Dublin edition, 1867, in the Irish writing of the word 
there is no k after g; but the g- has a dot over it, and 
when g- or d are dotted and occur in the middle or at the 
end of a word they are silent, but have the effect of 
lengthening the preceding vowel. By usage, k is inserted 
in English after an Irish dotted letter to denote the dot. 
The word Aengktisa is, therefore, pronounced in Irish, 
Aen-us-a, with the accent on the first syllable. In time, 
for euphony, says Molloy, page 12, the final a was 
dropped, and the word became Aen-us, anglicised to 
Ennis or Innes. 

"The word Mag is Irish for son. It is generally 
anglicised mac, but sometimes, as wi^h this name, it is 

»0'Hart's Irish Pedigrees, p. 35, Dublin edition, i88i. 
tibid, p. 156. 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 13 

preserved in both forms. It appears in Irish also as mac. 
The son of Ennis, therefore, by the use of this prefix, be- 
came Mag Ennis, or he wrote it Mac-Ennis, if he chose, 
and thus this name, in the course of a thousand years, 
has been recorded by different writers as Magennis, 
Maginnis, Mac Ennis and Mac Innes. By a strange freak 
some writers have preserved both the c and the g termina- 
tion of mac and mag by writing it McGennis, McGinness, 
while others have it McGuinness and M'Guinness, and 
some write it Guinness, dropping the m altogether. The 
last transformation is to write it Meginness, which was 
evidently brought about by substituting e for c, although 
it does not clearly appear why it is done. But there is 
no end to the change in names, as well as everything else 
in nature. 

"As mac signifies son, iia signifies a grandson, and 
by an extension of meaning, any descendent ; but it is 
from this the anglicised O' comes for the same purpose. 
Ui is the nominative plural of ua, (Latinized and angli- 
cised hui or hy,) and is applied to a tribe or family as O' 
is to an individual.* From the foregoing the reader will 
clearly understand' the meaning of Mac and O' when ap- 
plied to Irish names — simply son and grandson. 

"There was but one original Magennis family in 
Ireland ; therefore, all who bear the name in any of its 
modifications in Europe, America, or Australia, undoubt- 
edly derive their descent from the same parent stem. 

"All well-versed writers inform us that the Irish peo- 
ple have the most ancient records in their own language 
of any people in Europe. Full details are preserved of 
events as far back as six hundred or seven hundred years 
before Christ, and the genealogy of the different noble 
families is accurately preserved as far back as 450 B. C, 
and of these families, that of Magennis is one of the most 

*Joyce, Irish Names, p. 117, edition 1871. 



14 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

distinguished.* It is not often that a private individual 
of the present day can find his name mentioned in the 
standard works of the history of his country, but it is 
hardly possible to find a history of Ireland in which the 
name of Magennis is not repeatedly mentioned as promi- 
nent in the stirring scenes therein described. 

"A few extracts relating to members of the family 
will show the part they bore in those early days of Irish 
history. About 450 B. C, according to the chronology 
of the 'Fair of Carmen,' Milesius was a king in the ex- 
treme northern part of Spain. In that year eight sons of 
Milesius, with a fleet of 160 vessels, set out from what is 
now Corunna, on the north coast of Spain, and con- 
quered Ireland. Five of the sons were drowned in effect- 
ing a landing, Heber, Heremon and Amergin surviving. 
Heber took Munster, Heremon had Leinster and Con- 
naught, and to Eimh-Ir, (son of the brother, Ir,) was as- 
signed the part now known as Ulster, anciently known as 
Ultonia. The Ultonians were kings of Ulster for upwards 
of seven hundred years, and occasionally one of the line 
attained supreme power over the whole island. About 
151 B. C. one of these Ultonians, named Rory, became 
monarch of Ireland. t 

"The Irish way of writing his name is Rtighridd-ht, 
that is as shown by the Jl with the g and d dotted, hence 
silent. Now, a final e is also silent when immediately 
preceded by a dotted d or gX Hence, of the word 
Riighriiid there remains for pronunciation only Rii-rtn, 
(accent on the first,) anglicised Rury, and now Rory.§ 
His descendants are known as the Clan-na Rory, clan 
meaning offspring. The Magennis family became the 

*Judge Dunne s sketch of the Magennis family, p. 2. 
tKeating's History ot Ireland, O'Connor's translation, p. 195. 
tSee Molloy's Irish Grammar, p. 10. 
§Judge Dunne's Pamphlet, p. 2. 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 16 

leading family of the descendants of Rory, and hence 
head of the clan. 

"In the year 322, A. D., according to Judge Dunne's 
compilation, a combination was made against the Clan-na 
Rory, the head of which was then king of Ulster, by the 
monarch of Ireland and the three Heremonian princes, 
known as the ' Three Collas,' — the monarch furnishing 
the army and the Three Collas commanding it. The 
Ultonians were attacked, and, after a seven days battle, 
defeated, their palace of Emania burned, and the Clan-na 
Rory driven back to the extreme northeastern part of 
Ulster — to the counties of Down and Antrim, where they 
made a stand, maintained their independence, and organ- 
ized there the new Kingdom of Ulidia, called, sometimes, 
Dal-Aradia. 

" The descent from King Rughruidhe, or Rory, is 
given by Irish antiquarians in the following order: Rory 
to Conall Cearnach — the great warrior — to Tiprait Tireach 
— thirtieth king of Ulster — to Fiacha Araidhe, thirty-sev- 
enth king of Ulster — to Conall, whose brother, Saraan^ 
was the last Ultonian king of Ulster, having been driven 
into Ulidia by the Three Collas, A. D. 332. The descent 
continues to Aenghusa, 12th in descent from Conall, and 
from this Aenghusa comes the family name of Magennis, 
in the manner before stated.* 

"As family names were not introduced until the elev- 
enth century — over eight hundred years ago — and the 
annals are as yet indexed only by family names, it would 
be a great task to trace the notices of the clan prior to 
the eleventh century. From that time down it is com- 
paratively easy. 

"The Magennis family had its armorial bearings also. 
The late Eugene O'Curry, Professor of Irish History and 
Archaeology in the Catholic University of Dublin, was 

♦See O'Hart's Irish Pedigrees, pp. 35, 156, 157, Dublin edition, 1881. 



16 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

regarded as the greatest among Irish antiquarians. He 
published two series of lectures; the first in i86i, entitled 
• Manuscript Materials for Irish History;' the second in 
1873, entitled 'Manners and Customs of the Ancient 
Irish.' In the latter series he recounts an important dis- 
cussion as to the right of the Magennis family to bear the 
'Red Hand of Ulster,' thus: 'About the year 1680 a con- 
troversy sprang up among some of the bards of Ulster as to 
what race, by ancient right, the armorial bearing of Ulster, 
the "Red Hand," belonged. Some person named Carmac 
said or wrote something, which I have never seen, to the 
effect that the "Red Hand" belonged by right to the 
Clan O'Neill, but he was called to account for so saying 
by Diarmait, the son of Laoighseal. Mac au Bhaird (called 
in English Louis Ward) wrote a poem of seventeen quat- 
rains, in which he adduces many historical reasons to 
prove that the Red Hand of Ulster belonged, by right, to 
the Ulidians of Rudrician or Irian race, of whom Mac 
Enis, (or Magennis,) of the County Down, was the chief." 
This poem* begins: 

" 'O Cormac! remember what is right; 
Take not from the Irian blood its honor. 
Justice is the best argument. 
The race is not now in bountiful affluence.' 

"It seems from a subsequent reference to this subject 
by O'Curry, that the author of this poem was, himself, of 
the Clan O'Neill, and that he felt bound to acknowledge 
the justice of the claim of the Magennis family. 

"Judge Dunne thinks there is much reason to believe 
that the ' Red Hand ' should belong to the family of 
Magennis rather than that of O'Neill. It is always spoken 
of as the ' Red Hand of Ulster.' The family of Magen- 
nis, he continues, represents the old Ultonians, the orig- 
inal Ulster kings, of the time of Ir, whereas the O'Neills 

*0'Curry, Ancient Irish, Vol. Ill, p. 265. 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 17 

are from the south, of the line of Heremon, and 
came into power in the north at a comparatively recent 
date, about one hundred years after the Three Collas had 
burned Emania, and driven the Ultonians into Ulidia, or 
about 432 A. D. 

" There is not in all Europe, continues this same 
writer, an armorial bearing of more distinction, or about 
which there has been more discussion, than that of the 

* Red Hand,' and as matters now stand, the family of 
Magennis seems to have the best of it, and they are not 
slow in asserting their rights in the matter. Richard 
Magennis, Esq.,* of Warrington, County Down, emblazons 
the hand in his coat of arms, and so probably will all other 
members of the family who desire to preserve the remem- 
brance of its ancient dignity and high standing in ages of n 
long ago. 

** Another view of the question, though, is that the 

* Red Hand ' was part of the royal arms of Ulster,t pass- 
ing with the sovereignty, and therefore rightly borne by 
the O'Neills after they became kings of that country. 
However this argument may be reconciled with the his- 
tory of heraldry, the O'Neills have carried this blazon over 
too many fields of victory, and have their possession of it 
too firmly planted in the poetry of Ireland to ever be 
deprived of it. The most the O'Briens or Magennises 
can now expect is a recognition of their ancient exclusive 
and present joint right to the use of it. 

"Judge Dunne calls attention to the variation in the 
orthography of Irish names, and says that a word of 
explanation may not be out of place. The Irish language 
is radically different from the English, and it is impossible 
to represent all Irish sounds by English letters. In angli- 
cising Irish names uniformity could have been secured 

*Burke's Heraldic History, Vol. II, p. 871. 

tjudge Dunne's Notes on the Magennis Family, p. 11. 



18 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

only by the existence, in Ireland, of some standard 
authority acceptable to Irish families. During the time 
the change was taking place the English laws not only 
permitted no institution of that kind, but it involved a 
penal offense for the native Irish to know how to read or 
write at all.* Naturally there was no concert of action in 
anglicising the names, and many variations occurred. It is 
only within the last few years that Irish scholars have taken 
the matter in hand and shown the correct Irish form of 
different names. As soon as that is once definitely estab- 
lished, the general tendency will be to conform to that 
spelling as fast as the change can conveniently be made. 
The true English form of this name, as settled by O' Don- 
ovan, is Magennis. 

"The Magennis family, it has been clearly shown, is 
not only one of the oldest, but one of the most illustrious 
in the world, and its members should take pride in keep- 
ing up its history. There are very few families that can 
trace their ancestry back for a thousand years; or whose 
ancestors have passed through more vicissitudes and trials, 
endured greater hardships to maintain their status, or who 
have maintained their individuality in a higher degree 
through the centuries than the family now under consid- 
eration. It has shown a long line of Lords, Earls and 
representative men; has furnished scores of members who 
have taken high rank as professional men, divines and 
educators, and men whose valor and prowess have been 
shown on many ensanguined fields." 

♦Mitchell's History of Ireland, p. 39, Glasgow edition, 1869. 



GREAT-GREAT-GRANDFATHER. 

WILLIAM McGINNESS, the head of the immediate 
family in America, with which this genealogy has 
to deal, was the eldest son of a family of five or 
six children. He was born in County Down, Ireland, in 
the latter half of the eighteenth century. The exact date 
of his birth has not been ascertained, but evidently 'it was 
sometime between 1750 and 1760. 

He was married, about the year 1780, in County 
Down, to Martha Wilson, a Scotch woman. Their de- 
scendants, who are of Scotch-Irish origin, may be found 
in many States of the Union, and many of them have 
figured prominently in military, political, commercial and 
professional life. 

Shortly after the birth of their eldest son, James, Mr. 
McGinness emigrated to America, and was located, for a 
time, in Lancaster county. Pa., where many of the early 
immigrants settled. He appears to have come to this 
countiy about the year 1782, but the precise date cannot 
be stated with certainty. His wife, with her infant son, 
sailed several months later, and, after a perilous voyage 
of three months, landed in Philadelphia, where she was 
met by her husband. 

They first settled at Carlisle, Cumberland county, Pa., 
where a relative, who had probably immigrated some 
time before, was then located. Here they remained a few 
years, after which they removed to Staunton, in what is 
now Augusta county, Va., where they continued to re- 
side a number of years ; but, on account of slavery exist- 



20 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

ing there, and being bitterly opposed to it, they removed 
from Virginia, shortly after the year 1796, to what is now 
Findlay township, Allegheny county. Pa., and settled 
near Cavett's Mills. From there they removed to what 
is now Shenango township, Crawford county, Pa., shortly 
before the formation of that county, in 1800, where they 
purchased a farm of 200 acres, about fourteen miles west 
of Meadville, in the valley of the Shenango, on which 
they permanently located, and here continued to reside 
during the remainder of their lives, being engaged in 
farming. 

Mr. McGinness was identified with the Seceder church 
of Crawford county. But few details of his life have come 
down to us, which is greatly to be regretted, as incidents 
connected with his pioneer life could not fail to be both 
interesting and instructive. 

The date of his death has not been ascertained, but 
it must have been previous to the year 1 8 1 7, as the fol- 
lowing will show : 

A deed recorded in Crawford county. Pa., conveying 
200 acres of land in Shenango township, said county, to 
James McGinness and Adam Stewart, administrators of 
the estate of William McGinness, deceased, in trust, and 
for the use of the heirs of said William McGinness, is 
dated Jan. 10, 1817, and acknowledged before Thomas 
Atkinson, a "Justice of the Peace" of Crawford county. 
Consideration, $100. Witnesses: J. A. Blossom and 
Thomas Atkinson. Signed by William Griffith, of Bur- 
lington, New Jersey, and John B. Wallace, of Philadel- 
phia, Pa. Attorney, Harm Jan Huidekoper. 

This property was afterwards conveyed to Robert 
Cotton, of Crawford county. Pa., by deed bearing date 
June 16, 1817. Consideration, $582. Witnesses: John 
Phillips and Michael Law. Signed by James McGinness 
and Mary his wife ; John McGinness and Margaret his 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 21 

wife ; William McGinness and Elizabeth his wife. Ac- 
knowledged before A. McCurdy, a "Justice of the Peace" 
for Allegheny county, Pa. 

This homestead farm is now owned by Mr. Hugh 
Blair, who, at present writing, resides on it. 

Mr. and Mrs. McGinness died on their farm in Craw- 
ford county, and were buried in the neighboring grave- 
yard. Five children were born to them, viz., James, John, 
Martha, Elizabeth and William. They all grew to ma- 
turity, married and had families. A separate sketch is 
given of each. 



FAMILY OF JAMES McGINNESS, 

OF ALLEGHENY COUNTY, PA. 

JAMES McGINNESS, the eldest son of William Mc- 
Ginness, Sr., was born in the year 1781, in County- 
Down, Ireland, and was but a child when he was 
brought from his native country to America. 

He spent his youthful days, mostly, at Carlisle, Cum- 
berland county. Pa., and at Staunton, Va., removing with 
his parents to Allegheny county, Pa., and thence to what 
is now Crawford county. Pa., in the latter part of the 
eighteenth century. He received such educational ad- 
vantages as the schools of those days afforded. 

In the early part of the present century, he returned 
to Allegheny county. Pa., and was located, for a time, at 
Cavett's Mills. He followed farming, and was also en- 
gaged, at times, in making mould-board plows, sleds, 
harrows, and all kinds of farming implements, being quite 
skilled at that work, but not having learned the trade. 

About the year 1806 or 1807, he went to Robinson 
township, Allegheny county, Pa., to erect a large horse- 
power mill on the farm of Samuel Scott, Sr. While here, 
young James formed an attachment for Mary, the third 
daughter of Samuel Scott, to whom he was united in 
marriage July 16, 1807. This determines the relationship 
between the McGinness and Scott families. 

The young couple remained at the home of Samuel 
Scott until May 4, 1809, when they removed to Cavett's 
Mills, Findlay township, Allegheny county. Pa., and here 
lived in true pioneer style, in a little log cabin, 8x10 feet, 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 23 

without window, chimney or floor, until a new house, 
which was being built by a Mr. Cruiks, was ready for 
occupancy. 

In the spring of 1814, they returned to Robinson 
township, where they rented the "Joseph Logan farm," 
adjoining the Scott farm. Here James McGinness died 
of typhus fever, July 8, 18 17, at the age of 36 years. He 
was buried in Union graveyard, Robinson township, his 
grave being marked by a plain tablet, suitably inscribed. 
He followed in the footsteps of his father in religious 
views, being identified with the Seceder church at the 
time of his death. 

Mrs. McGinness married, as her second husband, 
Joseph Logan, of Robinson township, Allegheny county. 
Pa., April 14, 1823.* She died March 30, 1849, and was 
buried in Union graveyard. 

James and Mary (Scott) McGinness had five children 
born to them, viz., Samuel W., William, John, James and 
Elizabeth. 

si^eitch: isio. 1. 

Samuel Wilson McGiNNESS,t the eldest son of 
James and Mary (Scott) McGinness, was born May 4, 
1809, in a little log cabin at Cavett's Mills, Findlay 
township, Allegheny county. Pa., and here spent five 
years of his early life. 

In the spring of 18 14 his parents removed to the 
"Logan farm" in Robinson township. When old enongh 
he attended school in a little log school-house near where 
Union church now stands. After the death of his father, 
he removed with his mother and family to the Scott 
homestead, same township, and here remained a few 

♦See sketch of Mary Scott in " Scott Family." 

tThe name Samuel was given to him in honor of his maternal grandfather, Samuel 
Scott, Sr., and his middle name, Wilson, in honor of both his paternal and maternal 
grandmothers, whose names were, respedlively, Martha Wilson and Elizabeth Wilson. 



24 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

months. On Christmas day, 1817, he went with his 
uncle, David George, to "Cherry Valley," Washington 
county, Pa., where he attended school until the spring of 
1 8 19, when he returned to Robinson township. Shortly 
after, in June, 18 19, he went to live with his uncle, 
William Scott, near Cadiz, Ohio, traveling on horseback 
with his uncle to that place. Here he attended school 
several months, and returned home the following winter, 
remaining until the spring of 1820, when he returned to 
his uncle's, who, in the meantime, had moved from Cadiz 
to Brooke (now Hancock) county, West Virginia. He 
remained in Brooke county, attending school, about a 
year. 

Being bereft, at the early age of eight years, of the 
care and guidance of a father, his welfare, early in life, be- 
came one of dependence upon his own efforts. At the 
age of thirteen years, in the year 1822, he came to Pitts- 
burgh to learn the trade of a cabinet-maker, with a Mr. 
Liggett. Being dissatisfied with the work, he remained 
but a short time, and, in the spring of 1823, returned to 
his uncle's in West Virginia. About this time his mother 
was married to Joseph Logan, and with him removed to 
his farm adjoining that of her father. Late in the autumn 
of 1823, Samuel returned home, and the following spring 
commenced farming for his step-father, at which work he 
continued until Dec. 24, 1824, when he went to Burgetts- 
town. Pa., intending to learn his chosen trade — that of a 
cabinet-maker — with Ebenezer Boice. He was to serve 
an apprenticeship of five years, but, in the meantime, in 
June, 1829, Mr. Boice quit the business, and Samuel re- 
turned to his home in Robinson township. 

In August, 1829, he walked to the home of his 
uncle, William Scott, in West Virginia — a distance of 
thirty-three miles — making the journey in two days. 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 25 

From there he went with his uncle to Mansfield, Richland 
county, Ohio, and with him worked out the road-tax due 
on the lands of his mother, his aunt, Nancy George, and 
his uncle, William Scott. In September, having com- 
pleted the work, they returned to West Virginia, and, 
after resting a few days, Samuel returned home on foot, 
making the thirty-three miles in one day. In the autumn 
of 1829 he commenced to build a hewed-log house on 
the farm of James Ross, in Robinson township, and while 
thus engaged boarded with Mr. Ross. Here he first saw 
Mary Forgey, who came to the house on an errand, and 
who afterwards became his wife. When this house was 
completed, he was engaged to build a house for William 
Forgey, (afterwards his father-in-law,) on the Forgey farm 
near Campbell's run. 

At a communion service, held at Union A. R. church 
in the autumn of 1830, conducted by Rev. Alexander 
McCahan, D. D., of Canonsburg, Pa., (the congrega- 
tion at that time being without a pastor,) Samuel McGin- 
ness, with thirteen others, united with that church. 

Mr. McGinness was married Nov. 8, 1831, to Mary 
Forgey, who was born April 28, 181 3, and was the eldest 
daughter of William and Rebecca (Thornburg) Forgey. 
The ceremony was performed by Rev. John Dickey, then 
pastor of St. Clair. A. R. church, at the residence of Will- 
iam Forgey, in Robinson township. They remained on 
the Forgey farm until the autumn of 1832, when they re- 
moved to the "Stewart" stone house at Campbell's Run, 
which was then owned by Samuel Glass, and was very 
much out of repair. Mr. McGinness was engaged to re- 
model it. After it was finished he assisted in the con- 
struction of the first brick building used by Union con- 
gregation. It was afterwards blown down, in 1855. 

In the spring of 1835, Mr. McGinness, having pur- 
chased twenty acres of the Scott farm in Robinson 



26 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

township, erected on this property a frame house, and, 
with his family, moved into it before its completion. Here 
they remained until April, 1837, when they removed to 
Allegheny City, and located first on Lacock street, remov- 
ing thence, in October of the same year, to East Lane, 
where they remained until April, 1838, when they re- 
moved to Ohio street — Mr. McGinness continuing at car- 
penter work. About this time he sold his property in 
Robinson township to Rev. John Ekin. In December, 
1838, he went with his uncle, John Thornburg, to Natch- 
ez, Miss., where he worked at his trade, receiving ample 
pay, until June, 1839, when he returned home. 

In November, 1840, Mr. McGinness and family re- 
moved to No. 7 Knoll street, Allegheny, which property 
he had purchased shortly before. Here his wife, Mary, 
died Jan. 7, 1848, in the thirty-fifth year of her age, and 
was buried in the burying ground belonging to the First 
A. R. church, Pittsburgh, and was afterwards reinterred 
in the family lot in Uniondale cemetery, Allegheny, Pa. 
Shortly after the death of his wife, in June, 1848, Mr. Mc- 
Ginness, with his two daughters and housekeeper, removed 
to the Logan farm, to take care of his mother and step- 
father. The latter part of the same month his step-father, 
Joseph Logan, died ; and in the spring of 1849 his mother 
died. After harvest of the latter year Mr. McGinness sold 
the farm which had been willed to him by his step-father, 
to William Hall, and returned to Allegheny, residing on 
Boyle street until April, 1850, when he returned to No. 7 
Knoll street, where he continued to reside during the re- 
mainder of his life. 

In the autumn of 1849 he formed a business partner- 
ship with Mr. James McKirdy, under the firm name of 
" McKirdy & McGinness, contractors and builders." Af- 
ter continuing in this business for a number of years, he, 
with the same partner, embarked in the lumber business. 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 27 

which was continued, to the interest of both parties, until 
the partnership was dissolved in the year 1884, and he re- 
tired from active business. 

On Nov. 7th, 1850, Mr, McGinness married, as his 
second wife, Miss Sarah Armstrong, daughter of William 
and Sarah (Robinson) Armstrong, who was born Oct. 10, 
1 809, near Faughenvale, about eight miles from London- 
derry, County Derry, Ireland, and came with her brothers 
and sisters to America in August, 1837. The ceremony 
was performed at the bride's home, No. 1 1 1 James street, 
Allegheny, by Rev. John F. McLaren, D. D., who was 
then pastor of the First Associate Reformed church, Pitts- 
burgh, of which church Miss Armstrong was a member. 

Mr. McGinness transferred his membership from Un- 
ion A. R. church to the First Associate Reformed (now 
Second U. P.) church, Pittsburgh, about the year 1837, 
during the pastorate of Rev. Jos. R. Kerr. In 1850 he 
again transferred to the First A. R. Church, of Allegheny, 
of which Dr. John T. Pressly was then pastor, and Aug. 
9, 1854, was elected ruling elder in that congregation. 
He remained in this connection until the call came to cease 
earthly duties and enter into the enjoyment of greater 
privileges. In answer to that summons he passed peace- 
fully away Nov. 5, 1890, in the eighty-second year of his 
age. His remains were interred in the family lot in Un- 
iondale cemetery, where a granite tablet, suitably in- 
scribed, marks his last resting place. His death resulted 
irom "heart failure." His widow, now in her eighty-third 
year, survives him, and resides at the old homestead, No. 
7 Knoll street, Allegheny, Pa. 

The following expression from the pen of his pastor. 
Rev. W. J. Robinson, D. D., is a worthy tribute to his 
memory : 

" Mr. McGinness was a Christian, and his religion en- 
tered into his whole life. He was not a saint in the 



28 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

church, and a mere worldling in the world. In his busi- 
ness life his Christian principles were as manifest as in 
his church life. In his business habits he was prompt, 
punctual, diligent, systematic, scrupulously honest and 
thoroughly reliable. 'Owe no man anything, but to love 
one another,' was a precept governing his business life. 
In his home life he was a kind, loving, considerate hus- 
band and father ; hospitable and cordial in his welcome 
to friends and strangers to his fireside ; and as the head 
of the house he was faithful in maintaining the ordinances 
of family religion and family worship. ' His children rise 
up and call him blessed.' 

"Of the church he was a faithful and consistent 
member, diligent in attendance on ordinances, cordial and 
sympathetic in his intercourse with the brethren, always 
ready to bear a helping hand in the enterprises of the 
church, and commending to the world, by his life, the 
profession which he made. 

"As a ruling elder he was zealous for the glory of 
God and the welfare of the church. He accepted the 
responsibilities of his office. He endeavored fully to dis- 
charge its duties. He often lamented his inability to do 
better service. He took a lively interest in everything 
that concerned the work, the welfare, the peace and pros- 
perity of the church. He was rarely absent from meet- 
ings of session. He never attempted to shirk a painful 
duty. He was often at the bedside of the sick, and was 
a welcome visitor in the homes of the members of the 
congregation. While health permitted, he carefully 
looked after the families in his district. 

"For nearly two years before his death he was al- 
most entirely confined to his home by the disease which 
finally carried him off. Much of the latter part of this 
time he was confined to his bed. From the nature of his 
disease he was oftentimes in great suffering. But he bore 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 29 

it all with patience and cheerful submission. ' It is all 
right,' was his oft-repeated expression. He had commit- 
ted himself long before to his covenant-keeping God, and 
he had no fear. His faith was strong. His hope was an 
anchor to his soul. He was ready when the Master 
called. He fell peacefully asleep in Jesus. ' There remain- 
eth, therefore, a rest for the people of God.' W. J. R." 

The following action was taken by the session of the 
the First United Presbyterian church of Allegheny, with 
reference to his death. 

" In the death of Mr. Samuel W. McGinness, who 
entered into his rest Nov. 5, 1890, this congregation has 
lost one of its consistent members and faithful overseers. 
It is fitting that we pay a tribute to his memory and re- 
cord our appreciation of his Christian character and of- 
ficial faithfulness. For a period of about forty years Mr. 
McGinness was a member of the congregation, and for 
thirty-six years he served it officially in the office of the 
ruling eldership. In all these years he approved himself 
an earnest follower of the Master, and a devoted and con- 
scientious ruler in the house of God. Among the people 
of God he was recognized as a humble and consistent 
exemplar of the truth. He endeavored to walk in wis- 
dom toward them who are without. In the exercise of 
his office he was diligent in the discharge of his duties ; 
watchful for the interests of the truth, and for the welfare 
of souls ; considerate in his judgments of life and con- 
duct ; wise in his counsels ; firm and decided in his con- 
victions of duty, and yet ready to yield his opinions and 
preferences to the judgment of his brethren. In his in- 
tercourse with men, and especially with the members of 
the session, he was uniformly kind, courteous and cordial. 
By his entire walk and conversation, through a long life of 
Christian usefulness 'he obtained witness that he was 



30 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

righteous,' both in the community in which he lived, and 
in the church of which he was a member. 

"We extend to the bereaved widow and family the 
assurance of our sincere sympathy in their affliction, and 
commend them to him who is the Father of mercies and 
the God of all consolation. 

"^By Order of the Session." 

Samuel and Mary (Forgey) McGinness had six chil- 
dren, three of whom — James, Mary and Margaret — grew 
to maturity, and three died in infancy. By his second 
wife, Sarah Armstrong, he had one son, Joseph Wilson. 



I. James McGinness, the eldest son, was born 
Feb. lo, 1833, in Robinson township, Allegheny county. 
Pa., and was four years of age when his parents removed 
to Allegheny, Pa., where his childhood and youth were 
passed. He attended school in the Third ward, Alle- 
gheny, one of his teachers being Campbell B. Herron, 
now a member of the firm of " Spang, Chalfant & Co., 
Iron and Steel Manufacturers," Allegheny City. 

When about fourteen years of age he was employed 
by James Gosling, a dry goods merchant on Market 
street, Pittsburgh, and continued in his employ until 185 i, 
when he went with his uncle, William Brown, to Kittan- 
ning to learn the trade of a nailer. He had been there 
but a few months when the work was suspended and he 
returned home to Allegheny. He then turned his atten- 
tion to school, and studied book-keeping at Iron City Col- 
lege, Pittsburgh, after which which he took a course of 
penmanship from Professor Chamberlin. 

About this time the "gold fever" was at its height, 
and he decided to go to California. He accordingly left 
his home on the morning of Feb. 22, 1852, for New York 
City, from which place he sailed — accompanied by his 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 31 

uncle William Neely and friends — on the second day of 
March, on the "William Penn." They arrived at Chagres, 
on the Isthmus of Panama, on the 12th day of March. 
From there they went, in small boats, up the Chagres 
river to Gorgona, from which place they traveled on foot, 
sending their baggage on mules, to Panama — a distance 
of twenty-eight miles. They left Panama March 22, on 
the steamer "Oregon," arriving at San Francisco, Cal., in 
the early part of April, and reaching Sacramento April 
8th or 9th. 

For a short time after reaching California, James was 
engaged in gold-mining for Mr. Cyrus McCluskey at 
"Doty's Flats," but, finding the work too heavy for him, 
he sought lighter employment. In June, 1852, he se- 
cured a situation in the sheet-iron and tin-ware house of 
Haworth, Ells & Co., Sacramento. While he was in their 
employ, the great fire of 1852 occurred, which laid in 
ashes almost the entire city of Sacramento. The loss 
was estimated at $10,000,000, Haworth, Ells & Co. be- 
ing among the sufferers, but immediately re-built. James 
lost all his clothes and bedding. 

In the latter part of 1853, he and his uncle, William 
Neely, embarked in the brick-making business — ^James 
still continuing in the employ of Haworth, Ells & Co. 
He only remained in this business a short time, as, on ac- 
count of the market being over-stocked, and from other 
causes, they were unsuccessful, and lost considerable 
money. They closed up their business in the summer of 
1854. 

In the spring of 1855 — Haworth, Ells & Co. having 
dissolved partnership — he was engaged as agent for the 
"California Stage Company," being stationed, at times, at 
Folsom, Sacramento and Oroville. In June, 1857, he 
quit working for the stage company, and was, for a time, 
in Chico, Butte county, Cal., where he obtained a clerk- 



32 THE McGlNNESS FAMILY. 

ship in the store of Mr. Thomas Bidvvell, and while there 
attended to the post-office. He remained in this employ- 
ment about a year, after which time he was again engaged 
by the stage company, acting as road-agent and pay- 
master for the same, this necesitating his making frequent 
journeys to Nevada City, Auburn, Illinoistown, Pine 
Grove, Rattlesnake Bar, Cooper's Ravine and Folsom. 
His frequent letters to his parents and sisters were full of 
interesting accounts of California life, with vivid descrip- 
tions of his travels — the scenery and curiosities. Time 
and space forbid giving his varied experiences, and the 
kindness of his many friends in his Western home. 

He remained in Sacramento until 1861 or '62, when 
he went to Gold Hill, Storey county, Nevada, where he 
was employed by Messrs. Harold, Hamilton and Newman 
as assistant superintendent and book-keeper of the " Em- 
pire Mill and Mining Company." While at this place, he 
was married. May 6, 1863, in St. Paul's Episcopal church, 
Virginia City, Nev., by Rev. F. Rising, to Miss Isabella 
Backus, of Coxackie, N. Y., whom he had met when she 
was visiting her sister, Mrs. Wright, with whom he 
boarded. 

After marriage they located in Gold Hill, where they 
remained about two years, when the mining company 
failed, and they removed to San Francisco, where they re- 
mained about six months. In the meantime, Mr. Mc- 
Ginness went to British Columbia, returning in a short 
time to his family, after which they removed to Crescent 
Mills, Plumas county, Cal., where he was engaged for 
about two years as superintendent of the "Crescent Mill 
and Mining Company." He then went to the Black 
Hawk mines, and on returning to Crescent Mills for his 
family, he accepted a position on the line of the then new 
Central Pacific Railroad, at Truckee, Cal., to which place 
the road had been completed. Not being able to stand 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 33 

the intensely cold climate of the latter place, situated as 
it is almost at the summit of the Sierra Nevada moun- 
tains, they were obliged to seek a milder climate ; conse- 
quently they left Truckee and removed to Austin, Lander 
county, Nev, After locating his wife and family here, 
Mr. McGinness went on other mining trips, returning 
from time to time to Austin. 

After a time he was appointed deputy sheriff of Elko 
county, Nev., which position he held at the time of his 
death, which occurred, at Elko, Feb. 7, 1871. He was 
buried in the cemetery at Elko. 

Some time after his death, the widowed mother with 
three small children removed to San Francisco, where 
they continued to reside for a number of years. Here the 
eldest daughter, Mabel, died. In the autumn of 1884 
Mrs. McGinness was married to Mr. James C. Reed, of 
New York City, to which place she and her only remain- 
ing daughter, Louise, removed. Here they now reside, 
Mr. Reed being engaged as U. S. Shipping Commissioner, 

James and Isabella (Backus) McGinness had born to 
them the following children : 

1. George Thornburg, born June 5, 1864, at 

Gold Hill, Storey county, Nev., and, at 
present writing, resides in San Francisco, 
Cal., being employed in the Freight Au- 
ditor's office of the Southern Pacific R. R. 
company at that place. 

2. Mabel, born Aug. 7, 1866, at Crescent Mills, 

Plumas county, Cal., and died June 30, 
1877, in San Francisco, Cal. 

3. Rowley Wilson, born Oct. 4, 1868, at Cres- 

cent Mills, Cal., and died July 10, 1869, in 
Austin, Nev. 



34 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

4. Louise, born Feb. 24, 1 87 1, in Austin, Lan- 
der county, Nev., and now resides in New 
York City. 



IL William McGinness was born July 21, 1835, 
in Robinson township, Allegheny county, Pa., and died 
Aug. I, 1839, in Allegheny City. 



in. Mary Jane McGinness was born Oct. 14, 
1837, on East Lane, (now Madison avenue,) Allegheny, 
Pa. Her girlhood days were spent mostly in that city, 
attending school in the Third ward. After the death of 
her mother, in the year 1848, she removed with her father 
to the "Logan" farm in Robinson township, where she 
attended school in the little log school house of the dis- 
trict during that winter, returning to Allegheny in the 
autumn of 1849, where she again pursued her studies in 
the Third ward. 

In girlhood she united with what is now the First U. 
P. church, Allegheny, afterwards transferring her member- 
ship to Mt. Pisgah Presbyterian church. Rev. P. S. Jen- 
nings pastor, with which church she is now connected. 

She was married, Nov. 30, 1858, to Benjamin Ford, 
youngest son of John and Mary (Jenkins) Ford, of Alle- 
gheny City. He was born in Worcestershire, England, 
Dec. 26, 1832, and came with his parents to America 
about the year 1843, locating in Allegheny, Pa. The 
ceremony was performed at her home. No. 7 Knoll street, 
Allegheny, by Rev. John T. Pressly, D. D. 

Mrs. Ford remained at the home of her parents 
during the time in which her husband made a trip to New 
Orleans, as he was then engaged in steam-boating. After 
his return, they went to house-keeping at the home of 
Mr. Ford's mother. No. 15 Knoll street, Allegheny, where 
they remained until after the birth of two children, when 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 35 

they removed to Beltzhoover's mill, Baldwin township, 
Allegheny county, Pa., Mr. Ford having purchased an in- 
terest in the mill. Here they remained until 1864, when 
the mill was sold and they returned to Allegheny, resid- 
ing on Jackson street until the autumn of 1865, when 
they removed to what is now Green Tree borough, Alle- 
gheny county. Pa., where Mr. Ford purchased a property 
and erected a house. Here the family now resides. Mr. 
Ford is identified with the American Steam Boiler Insur- 
ance Company, as their chief inspector for Western Penn- 
sylvania, West Virginia and part of Ohio, being stationed 
in Pittsburgh, Pa. He has been a member of the school 
board and borough council. j[ J 0^3 / C^ 

Benjamin and Mary (McGinness) Ford had born to 
them the following children : 

1. Mary Rebecca,* born Dec. 14, 1859, in Alle- 

gheny, Pa. 

2. John Dales, born Nov. 16, 1861, in Alle- 

gheny, Pa. He is at present engaged as 
book-keeper for the Porter Foundry and 
Machine Company, located on River avenue, 
Allegheny, Pa. 

3. Margaret V., born Nov. 10, 1863, in Alle- 

gheny, Pa. 

4. Samuel Wilson, born Nov. 26, 1866; died 

May 23, 1868. 

5. William James, born July 13, 1869, in Green 

Tree, Pa. At present writing, he is repre- 
senting the Pittsburgh Car Service Com- 
pany in the Connellsville district. 

6. Bessie Mabel, born March 30, 1874, in Green 

Tree, Pa. 

7. Sarah Edna, born July 4, 1876, (Centennial 

year,) in Green Tree, Pa. 

♦The compiler and writer of these notes. 



36 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

IV. Margaret Ann McGinness was born Aug. 
lo, 1840, on Ohio street, Allegheny, Pa. Her entire life 
was spent in her native city, with the exception of one 
year, during which time she resided with her father and 
family on the Logan farm, in Robinson township, and 
while there attended the district school. She received 
the greater part of her education in the Third ward, Alle- 
gheny, completing her studies in the First ward, Pitts- 
burgh. In early womanhood she united with the First 
United Presbyterian church, Allegheny, and remained in 
its communion until her death. 

She was married at her home on Knoll street, Alle- 
gheny, by Dr. John T. Pressley, April 8, 1862, to Samuel 
A. Chamberlin, of Pittsburgh, Pa. They first went to 
housekeeping on Washington street, Allegheny, where 
they remained about two years, after which they removed 
to Esplanade street, where Mrs. Chamberlin died Aug. 13, 
1866, at the age of twenty-six years. She was buried in 
the family lot in Uniondale cemetery. 

" Calm on the bosom of thy God, 

Fair spirit rest thee now, 
E'en while with ours thy footsteps trod, 

His seal was on thy brow. 
Dust to its narrow house beneath, 

Soul to its place on high ; 
They that have seen thy look in death, 

No more may fear to die." 

Several years after his wife's death Mr Chamberlin 
married as his second wife, Miss Emma Johnston, of Bal- 
timore, Md. They now reside in Sewickley, Allegheny 
county. Pa., where Mr. Chamberlin has been for many 
years engaged in the mercantile business. 

Samuel and Margaret (McGinness) „ Chamberlin had 
one daughter, viz.: 

Anna Mary, born June 21,1 864, in Allegheny, 
Pa., and now resides with her father in Se- 
wickley. 



THEMcGINNESS FAMILY. 37 

V. Infant, born July 2, 1843, died July 3, 1843. 



IV. Infant, born Sept. 12, 1846, died Oct. 4, 1846. 



VII. Joseph Wilson McGinness, the only child of 
Samuel McGinness' second wife, Sarah Armstrong, was 
born May 23, 1853, on Knoll street, Allegheny, Pa. He 
first attended school at the age of five years, in the Third 
ward, Allegheny — Mrs. L. H. Eaton being his first teach- 
er. From there he went to the Grant street school, Pitts- 
burgh, in the year 1867 — Professor George J. Luckey, now 
superintendent of the Pittsburgh schools, being at that 
time principal. Having passed the examination for ad- 
mission to the Pittsburgh Central High School, he en- 
tered that institution in September, 1868 and was grad- 
uated from the same in June, 1872, having completed the 
course in the Academical Department. 

In July, 1872, he began his career in business life as 
book-keeper for Lyle, Barchfeld & McCance, Pittsburgh, 
where he remained until February, 1876, after which he 
was employed by the firm of "Thomas Hare & Bro., Sad- 
dlery Hardware." He continued with the latter firm until 
April, 1883, when he embarked in the carriage hardware 
business in partnership with William Nease and J. H. 
McLean, as W. Nease & Co., Liberty street, Pittsburgh, 
which firm name was changed in 1880, to Nease, McLean 
& McGinness, and so continues. 

He was married May 13, 1880, to Miss Agnes J. Gib- 
son, daughter of John H. and Lily (Allen) Gibson, who 
was born in Prospect, Butler county. Pa., Feb. 10, 1856. 
The ceremony was performed by Rev. William J. Rob- 
inson, D, D., at No. 10 Boyle street, Allegheny, Pa., 
which property Mr. McGinness had previously purchased, 
and where he and family now reside. 



38 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

Joseph McGinness united with the First U. P. church, 
Allegheny, Feb. i, 1866, during the pastorate of Rev. 
John T. Pressley, D. D., and remained in the communion 
of that church until February, 1891, when he transferred 
his membership to the Fourth U. P. church, Allegheny, 
now (1892) under the pastoral care of Rev. Joseph Kyle. 

Mr. and Mrs. McGinness have two children, both 
born at No. 10 Boyle Street, Allegheny, Pa., as follows : 

1. Samuel Wilson, born Aug. 28, 1881. 

2. LiLLlE, born July 2, 1883. 



William McGinness, the second son of James and 
Mary (Scott) McGinness, was born March 28, 181 1, in 
the "Cruick's" house at Cavett's Mills, Allegheny county, 
Pa., but spent his boyhood days mostly in Robinson 
township, same county — his parents having moved there, 
and settled on the Logan farm in the spring of 18 14. 
After the death of his father, which occurred when Will- 
iam was but six years of age, he removed with his mother 
to the home of his grandfather, Samuel Scott, where he 
remained until his mother's second marriage, returning 
with her to the Logan farm. 

He attended school, for a number of years, in a log 
school house near where Union church now stands. As 
soon as he was old enough, he went to Noblestown, Alle- 
gheny county. Pa., to learn the trade of a wagon-maker 
with George Huffman. Here he remained four or five 
years, completing his apprenticeship. He did not follow 
his trade long, but, about the year 1832 or 1833, engaged 
in teaching at "McCoy's" school in Robinson township, 
where he taught three terms — two before his marriage 
and one after. 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 39 

He was married May i6, 1835, to Matilda E. Huff- 
man, sister of George Huffman, with whom he learned his 
trade. 

Shortly after marriage, probably in the spring of 
1836, he and wife removed to Sharon, Allegheny county. 
Pa., where he was engaged in the mercantile business 
for about two years, being quite successful. He then re- 
moved to Stevenson's Mills, Washington county. Pa., 
where he remained three or four years. In the year 1 842 
or '43, he and family removed to Hickory, Washington 
county. Pa., where he again embarked in the mercantile 
business, dealing largely in wool. While he was in Phila- 
delphia purchasing goods for his store, his wife Matilda 
died, April 18, 1844, aged 30 years. She was buried in 
Robinson's Run A. R. churchyard. 

Mr. McGinness was married the' second time, March 
12, 1846, to Mary Tannehill, who was born Feb. i, 1825. 
The ceremony was performed by Rev. Alexander Donnan, 
pastor of Mount Pleasant Associate Reformed church. 

In the spring of 1848 Mr. McGinness discontinued 
his business at Hickory, and purchased a large farm in 
Beaver (now Lawrence) county, Pa., to which place he 
removed, with his family, April 21, 1848. He then en- 
gaged in farming, at which work he — assisted by his sons 
— continued for many years. He was elected a ruling 
elder in the Associate Reformed (now U. P.) church of 
Mount Jackson, Oct. 8, 185 1, during the pastorate of 
Rev. John Neil, and, by his own request, was released 
Feb. 15, 1858. That same year he and wife transferred 
their membership to the Bethel U. P. church, and finally, 
in the year 1861, returned to Mount Jackson U. P. church, 
continuing in its communion during the remainder of 
their lives. 

The infirmities of age and a complication of diseases 
rendered Mr. McGinness helpless for several years before 



40 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

his death. After much suffering, he was summoned to 
his reward Aug. 14, 1889, after a pilgrimage of 78 years. 
He died at his home near Mount Jackson. His wife, 
Mary, died three years and six months previous, Feb. 4, 
1886. Both were buried in Hilltown cemetery, Law- 
rence county, Pa. 

WilHam McGinness had by his first wife, Matilda, 
three children, viz., James, Mary and George; and by his 
second wife, Mary, six children, viz.: John, Wilson, Sa- 
rah, William, Duira and Ada. 



I. James McGinness was born April 22, 1836, in 
Sharon, Allegheny county, Pa., but spent his boyhood 
days in Washington and Beaver (now Lawrence) coun- 
ties, removing with his parents to the latter county April 
21, 1848. He united with the Free Presbyterian church 
of Mt. Jackson, in the year 1859. At the outbreak of 
the civil war, in response to the call for troops, he enlisted 
in Battery B., First Pennsylvania Artillery, commanded 
by Captain Cooper. He did not live to serve his country 
long, but, in the early part of the war, was taken sick, 
and consequently sent to the hospital at Washington, 
D. C, where he died of typhoid fever. May 22, 1862, at 
the age of twenty-six years. His remains were brought 
home by his father, and interred at Mt. Jackson. At the 
" roll-call" in heaven he will answer to his name. 



n. Mary Ann McGinness was born April 17, 
1840, at Stevenson's Mills, Washington county. Pa., and 
removed with her parents to Hickory, Pa., and thence to 
the farm near Mount Jackson, Pa., in childhood. She re- 
ceived the greater part of her education in the schools of 
Mount Jackson, and in the year 1858, united with the 
Bethel U. P. congregation, then in charge of Rev. Samuel 
Alexander. She was married June 15, 1869, to William 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 41 

L. Chambers, of Pleasant Unity, Westmoreland county, 
Pa., and after marriage removed to that place, where she 
continued to reside until her death, which occurred May 
22, 1875, in the thirty-sixth year of her age. Mr. and 
Mrs. Chambers had two children born to them, as follows : 

1. William M., born March 22, 1870. 

2. Mary Matilda, born Jan. 9, 1873. 



III. George Jefferson McGinness was bom 
April 14, 1842, at Stevenson's Mills, Washington county. 
Pa., but spent his boyhood days mostly, in what is now 
Lawrence county, Pa., receiving his early education in the 
schools of Mt. Jackson. He united with the Free Pres- 
byterian church of Mt. Jackson in early life, and after- 
wards transferred to Illinois. 

When but eighteen years of age, at the outbreak of 
the late war, he enlisted, with his brother James, in Bat- 
tery B., First Pennsylvania Artillery, commanded by Cap- 
tain Cooper. He paticipated in the battles of the Chick- 
ahominy, June 25-July i, 1862 ; the battle of Antietam, 
Sept. 17, 1862, under Gen. McClellan ; the battle of 
Gettysburg, July 1-3, 1863, under Gen. Meade, and the 
second battle of Bull Run, Aug 30, 1863, under Gen. 
Pope, at which battle the guns of Battery B. were cap- 
tured by the confederates. He was also in the battles of 
the Wilderness, May 5-6, 1864, under Gen. Grant, and in 
many other engagements too numerous to mention — in all 
twenty-five battles and skirmishes. He lost his health in 
the malaria-stricken swamps of the Rappahannock and 
Pawmunky rivers, but was only in the hospital two weeks. 

Regarding some experiences and incidents of his 
three years' " military life," Mr. McGinness says : *' My 
first 'baptism of fire' was at Mechanicsville, Va., in the 
Peninsular Campaign under Gen. McClellan. Our bat- 
tery was placed on the extreme right of our army, about 



42 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

five miles north of Richmond, on the Chickahominy riv- 
er. We were the first to open fire upon the advancing 
'hoards' of Lee, who commenced his first attack on our 
right flank with the ' flower of his army.' The battle was 
commenced in the afternoon of June 2, 1862, and only 
ceased when the day closed. Our battery, supported by the 
Pennsylvania ' Bucktails,' repulsed every attack, and when 
night came on, we could not sleep for the cries of the 
wounded and dying rebels, who covered the ground in our 
front. It was sad to hear them call for water. I was very 
sick that night, in consequence of breathing the dense 
smoke from burnt powder, but was all right the next day 
and ready for action. As soon as morning dawned the 
scenes of carnage and slaughter began, and continued for 
several hours, until we were finally compelled to retreat 
on account of Lee's getting in our rear. The next sev- 
eral days were destined to bring us more hardships than 
we had ever imagined — it was fighting by day and retreat- 
ing by night. Finally, our provisions gave out, and our 
haversacks were empty. Things were becoming desper- 
ate ! I asked a negro who was driving a baggage wagon, 
if he could give me some hard-tack. He replied, ' Lorda 
Massa! yes, hand me your haversack' — he filled it, and I 
had a sufficiency to last me until we reached our supplies 
on the James river. At Charles City cross-roads we lost 
all our guns by the rebels charging our Battery, and our 
infantry deserting us. Here we lost two officers. Lieu- 
tenants Danfort and Cadwalder — two as brave men as 
ever wore the 'blue.' We saved our ammunition wagons 
and brought them from the field. Our battery was cap- 
tured on two different occasions — the last being at the 
second battle of Bull Run. At that battle we were sup- 
ported by a New York regiment, which greatly hindered 
us from manning our guns. We were stationed near a 
dense pine thicket, and could not see the enemy until 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 43 

they were almost upon us. They made a charge and 
we * opened fire ' on them with double charge of canister. 
Here we were again deserted by our infantry support. 
Our horses all being shot down, it was impossible for us 
to save our guns. We lost here only one man — John Will- 
iams. At Gettysburg our corps was in the front, and we 
were the first to open fire in the afternoon of the first day's 
battle. It was here the lamented Gen. Reynolds was killed 
by a rebel sharp-shooter, and thus fell a noble and able 
commander. The enemy closed in on us with such fierce- 
ness and in such numbers that we were compelled to retreat 
southward through the town — the rebels constantly pour- 
ing shot and shell into the retreating army. We took 
our position on Seminary Ridge — a little to the right of 
where the seminary then stood. Having a good command- 
ing position we came into battery and waited that night, 
for we well knew the morrow would bring death and de- 
struction to one or the other of the grand armies. The next 
morning the ball was opened in earnest by the rebels, as 
their previous victory had given them great hopes. They 
commenced the attack with all their artillery, and the 
* very earth trembled ' ; then the rebels — charging and re- 
charging by brigades, only to be hurled back by the anni- 
hilating fire of our men — came in 'clouds,' even putting 
their hands upon our guns, only to be shot down by our 
brave boys. Gettysburg was won ! The Union was 
saved, and our nation was preserved! All glory to the 
brave boys in blue!" 

After returning from the war, Mr, McGinness was 
married, Dec. 8, 1864, to Nancy B. McCord, whose home 
was near Mt. Jackson, Pa. In February, 1865, they 
removed to the state of Illinois and first settled at Mi- 
nonk, Woodford county, where they remained until the 
spring of 1866, when they sold their property and pur- 
chased a farm near Wenona, Marshall county. Here they 



44 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

remained until the year 1871, when they disposed of this 
property, and bought two-hundred and seventy-eight and 
a half acres near LeRoy, McClean county — thirteen miles 
south of Bloomington. 

In the spring of 1887 they went to Sidney, Cheyenne 
county, Nebraska, where they took up a " homestead" of 
one hundred and sixty acres ; a "free claim" of one hun- 
dred and sixty one acres, and purchased three hundred and 
twenty acres, making in all six hundred and forty one 
acres — all adjoining. They returned to their farm in Le 
Roy, 111., in March, 1890, and here they now reside, Mr. 
McGinness being engaged in farming on an extensive 
scale. 

Mr. and Mrs. McGinness had six children, all born in 
the state of Illinois as follows : 

1. William James, born June 23, 1867. 

2. George Manning, born Dec. 13, 1868; died 

Feb. 27, 1873. 

3. John Davidson, bom May 14, 1872. 

4. Emma Adda, born April 27, 1874; died Jan. 

30, 1875. 

5. Bessie May, born Oct. 28, 1876. 

6. Samuel Robert, born Sept. 23, 1878. 



IV. John Murdock McGinness, the eldest child 
of the second wife, Mary Tannehill, was born Jan. 23, 
1847, "^ Hickory, Washington county. Pa., and was but 
an infant when his parents removed to Beaver (now Law- 
rence) county, Pa. Here he spent his boyhood days, re- 
ceiving his early education in the common schools of the 
district, and completing his studies at a select school in 
Mt. Jackson. In the year 1869 he went to Wenona, 
Marshall county. 111., where his brother George was lo- 
cated, but only remained there a short time. He removed 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 46. 

that same year to Dickinson county, Kansas, where he 
bought and homesteaded land near Abilene. In the au- 
tumn of 1875 he returned to his home near Mt. Jackson, 
and since that time has been engaged in farming. Mr. 
McGinness united with the United Presbyterian church of 
Wenona, 111., in the year 1869, and on returning home, 
connected with the U. P. church of Mt. Jackson, where 
he now worships. He was married Nov. 4, 1 891, to Miss 
Ada Hopper, daughter of John Hopper, of Lawrence 
county, Pa. They now reside on a farm near Mt. Jack- 
son, Pa. 



V. Wilson Tannehill McGinness was born Aug. 
18, 1849, near Mt. Jackson, Lawrence county. Pa., and 
died of scarlet fever Feb. 26, 1855. He is buried in Hill- 
town cemetery, Lawrence county. 



VI. Sarah Jane McGinnness was born June 27, 
1 85 1, in Lawrence county. Pa. She attended the com- 
mon schools of her native county, and a select school in 
Mt. Jackson, after which she completed her studies at 
Oakdale Academy, where she attended two terms. She 
became a member of the U. P. church of Mt. Jackson, in 
early life, and afterward transferred her membership to 
her different places of residence. She was married at her 
home near Mt. Jackson, June 12, 1884, to Rev. Robert B. 
Taggart, who was born in East Palestine, Ohio, Sept. 16, 
1842. Shortly after marriage they removed to New Wil- 
mington, Pa., where they purchased a property. Rev. 
Taggart being Professor in Westminster College during 
the years 1885-6. They removed from New Wilmington 
to Bellevue, Allegheny county, Pa., where they remained 
but a short time, and after some changes of residence, re- 
moved to Clinton, Allegheny county. Here they contin- 



46 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

ued to reside — Rev. Taggart being pastor of the U. P. 
church at that place — until April, 1892, when they re- 
moved to Harriman, Roane county, Tenn., Rev. Taggart 
having been recently appointed to take charge of a new 
mission work at that place. 

Mr. and Mrs. Taggart have one son, viz.: 

Joseph Harper, bom Dec. i, 1885. 



VII. William Scott McGinness was born April 
14, 1854, near Mount Jackson, Lawrence county, Pa. He 
received his primary education in the schools of the vicinity 
of his home, after which he attended a select school in 
Mount Jackson, two terms at Oakdale Academy, and com- 
pleted his studies at Edinboro, Pa. He was married, Oct. 
1 1, 1877, to Ella J. Wallace, who died at their home near 
Mount Jackson, Nov. 15, 1887, leaving two little daugh- 
ters. Mr. McGinness married as his second wife, Lizzie 
Belle Davison, Dec. 24, 1889, and now resides at the old 
homestead, being engaged in farming. In the autumn of 
1874 he became a member of the U. P. church of Mount 
Jackson, and since 1875 has been leader of the church 
choir. He was a trustee of the church and superintendent 
of the Sabbath school for four years, and is now president 
of the "Young People's Society" connected with that 
church. 

William and Ella (Wallace) McGinness had three 
children, as follows : 

1. Myrtle D., born Sept. 28, 1879; died Aug. 19, 

1881. 

2. Mary J., born Aug. 31, 1882. 

3. Laurena, born July 24, 1885. 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 47 

VIII. DuiRA Elizabeth McGinness was born 
Sept. 27, 1857, on the homestead farm in Lawrence 
county, Pa. She received her early education at Hickory 
Creek school, after which she attended Mount Jackson 
Academy, completing her studies at Edinboro, Pa. In 
early womanhood she united with the U. P. church of 
Mount Jackson, and, after her marriage, transferred her 
membership to the Presbyterian church of New Brighton, 
Pa., where her husband was a member, and from there 
successively to Beaver Falls and Westfield, Pa. She was 
married at her home Nov. 6, 1879, by Rev. Hugh R. Mc- 
Clelland, to John M, Critchlow, and removed with her 
husband to Burning Springs, West Virginia, Mr. Critch- 
low being engaged at that time in the lumber business at 
the above named place. In the year 1881 they removed 
to New Brighton, Pa., and thence to Beaver Falls, Pa., 
Mr. Critchlow being engaged, successively, as superintend- 
ent and secretary of the Beaver Falls Gas Co.; assistant 
superintendent of the Bridgewater Gas Co., and secretary 
and general manager of the American Gas Improvement 
Co., of Pittsburgh, Pa. While connected with the lat- 
ter corporation, they removed, in the year 1888, to a 
farm which they had purchased in North Beaver town- 
ship, Lawrence county. Pa., where they remained about 
eighteen months, after which time, they rented their farm 
and removed to a farm near Titusville, Crawford county. 
Pa., Oct. I, 1889, where they now reside. They had five 
children, as follows : 

I Frank Miner, born Sept. lo, 1881. 

2. Joseph McGinness, born May 27, 1883. 

3. Frances, born May 25, 1885; died May — 

1887. 

4. Florence Gay, born May 30, 1887. 

5. Walter, born June — , 1890. 



48 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

IX. Ada Rebecca McGinness was born May 17, 
i860, in Lawrence county, Pa., where she continued to 
reside until her death, which occurred Feb. i, 1874. She 
is buried at Hilltown cemetery, Lawrence county. Pa. 



ISTo. 3. 

John McGinness, the third son of James and Mary 
(Scott) McGinness, was born Feb. 13, 181 3, at Cavett's 
Mills, Findlay township, Allegheny county. Pa. 

In the spring of 18 14, his parents moved to the Logan 
farm, in Robinson township, Allegheny county, and from 
there, after the death of his father, he was taken to the 
home of his grandfather, Samuel Scott, where he remained 
until his mother's second marriage, when the family 
moved back to the Logan farm. He attended school in 
the little log school house near Union church. 

When quite young, he learned to make shoes with 
James McCalister, who had a shop on the Scott farm 
where the brick house now stands. After learning his 
trade, young John fitted up a shop on the Forgey farm, 
occasionally going through the country, as was the custom 
in those days, making shoes — remaining at the home of 
those by whom he was employed as long as his services 
were required. After working at his trade in this manner 
for some time, he went to Birmingham — now South Side, 
Pittsburgh — and embarked in the shoe business on his 
o^Yn account. 

In the year 1836 he was married to Hannah Cub- 
bage, daughter of George Cubbage, of what is now Mans- 
field, Allegheny county. Pa., and went to housekeeping 
in Birmingham, still continuing in the shoe business, 
which he carried on successfully until his death. 

Mr. McGinness was a ruling elder in the Associate 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 49 

Reformed (now U. P.) church of Birmingham, at the 
time of his death. Rev. James H. Buchanan was at that 
time pastor. 

The Master did not grant him long years of service, 
but called him to his reward in the noon-day of life. 
While he and family were on a visit at the home of his 
mother-in-law, in what is now Mansfield, Pa., he was 
attacked with bilious fever and lay prostrate for nine 
weeks, when he yielded to the disease and bade adieu to 
the scenes of earth Aug 24, 1845, at the age of thirty-two 
years, leaving a young wife and two small children to the 
tender care of a merciful Father. A few days before his 
death he called his little five-year-old son, who was play- 
ing in the room, to his bedside and urgently entreated 
him never to profane the name of God. He was buried 
in the graveyard attached to what is now St. Clair U. P. 
church. 

The following expression from the pen of his pastor 
is taken from one of the religious papers : 

"As a citizen, his intercourse with society was up- 
right ; as a Christian his deportment was becoming the 
gospel. In his last illness he afforded gratifying evidence 
to his friends, that he had been delivered from the power 
of darkness, and translated into the kingdom of God's 
dear Son. 

"The affliction which terminated his earthly career 
was of nine weeks' continuance, during which time his 
sufferings were often excruciating, yet they were endured 
with the utmost patience and resignation. To counter- 
balance the pain and prostration of the outward man the 
inward man was renewed day by day, and he was blessed 
with that to which comparatively few attain — 'the full 
assurance of hope.' Again and again did he — not in a 
spirit of pride and self-confidence, but in humble reliance 
upon a finished work of redemption — declare himself 



50 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

'ready to depart and be with Christ Jesus'; and when at 
length he was summoned to enter upon an unseen world, 
he departed full of hope and peace, leaving behind him 
the strong attestation of a dying man, to the power of 
the gospel to sustain the soul amid all the solemn realities 
of a dissolving nature, and an opening eternity. 

" In his death the church has lost a worthy member, 
and an energetic officer ; society, a useful citizen, and the 
partner of his bosom an invaluable friend. But let the 
church bow submissively to the removal of a pillar from 
the earthly to a heavenly temple ; and the bereaved wife 
and mother look to Him who has promised to be the 'wid- 
ow's stay and the orphan's help,' for the protection and 
support of herself and fatherless children." 

After almost three years' widowhood, in the spring 
of 1848, Mrs. McGinness married as her second husband, 
Henry Cowan, and with him and her two boys removed to 
the Cowan farm in Robinson township, Allegheny county. 
Pa., where she remained until her death, which occurred 
in February, 1880. She was buried in the graveyard at- 
tached to the Union U. P. church. 

John and Hannah (Cubbage) McGinness had five 
children born to them, three of whom — two daughters 
and one son — died in infancy. Two sons grew to matu- 
rity, viz.: William K. and George. 



I. William Kerr McGinness was born March 19, 
1840, in Birmingham borough — now South Side, Pitts- 
burgh — and here remained until the death of his father, 
in the year 1845, when with his widowed mother and 
brother George, he was taken to the home of his grand- 
mother, Mrs. Ewing, at Campbell's Run, (now Mansfield,) 
Allegheny county, Pa., and here he remained about one 
year, removing thence to the Logan farm, in the north- 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 51 

west part of Robinson township — Mrs. McGinness keep- 
ing house for her mother-in-law, Mrs. Logan. Here he re- 
mained until 1847, when he returned to the home of his 
grandmother, Mrs. Ewing. 

During the early spring of 1 848 his mother married 
her second husband, and removed with her two boys to 
her new home in I^obinson township. Here young Will- 
iam spent the greater part of his boyhood days, attend- 
ing school during the winter months at Ewing, Hall, and 
Cowan schools ; and in the summer working with his 
step-father on the farm. 

When about fifteen years of age he resolved to leave 
home and seek his fortune elsewhere ; consequently from 
this point his path diverged from the parental roof, and 
his success in life was dependent, mainly, upon his own 
exertions. In speaking of the beginning of his career and 
of his military life, Mr. McGinness says : 

*' Having formed a friendship while at school with a 
young man named Clark, who had relatives living in 
southern Ohio, where he had spent about a year, I was 
induced to leave home to seek a livelihood for myself. Af- 
ter presenting my prospects to mother in glowing terms, 
I succeeded in obtaining her permission to embark on the 
voyage of life ; and, in company with young Clark, left 
Pittsburgh in October, 1855. After paying my passage 
on a steamboat to Ripley, Ohio, I had but fifty cents left 
to make the trip. We had a very pleasant trip down the 
Ohio river, arriving, in due time, at the home of young 
Clark's aunts, in Adams county, Ohio — about twenty 
miles distant from the river. During the evening of the 
day I arrived at the Clark home, I began to realize that 
the novelty and excitement of the adventure were passing 
away ; I took a walk over the farm, and, for the first time 
in my life, felt that, truly, I was penniless and a 'stranger 
in a strange land.' I would have then gladly exchanged 



52 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

my lonely condition to the presence of my mother, which 
would have brought delight to my desponding heart. 

" I found in young Clark a steadfast friend, and his 
maiden aunts very pleasant and cordial. In a few days 
the burden of melancholy passed away. The desire up- 
permost in my heart at this time was for employment. I 
secured from the Misses Clark a few days' work on the 
farm ; but about the time I had fairly commenced work, 
I was taken sick and lay prostrated by a long and severe 
attack of typhoid fever, which confined me to the house 
until the first of the following March. During this spell 
of sicknesss, the greatest kindness was shown me by the 
Clark ladies, while my young friend cared for me night 
and day without a murmur. I always felt that his watch- 
ful care over me was instrumental in saving my life. 

"From the time of my recovery until October, 1861, 
I was engaged at farm work in the summer, and in the 
winter at making rails and chopping cord-wood, with the 
exception of two winters, during which I attended the 
district school three months each winter, working morn- 
ings, evenings and Saturdays for my boarding. During 
these six years I visited my home in Pennsylvania twice, 
remaining but a few days each visit. I became very much 
attached to Ohio and its people ; acquaintances formed 
there were most pleasant and lasting. 

"In the winter of i860 and '61, while I was living 
with a farmer, working his farm on the shares in the sum- 
mer, and in the winter attending school, the dark clouds 
of secession began to hover over our fair country, and a 
call was made, in April, 1861, after the fall of FortSump- 
ter, for volunteers to serve for three months. My little 
interest in the crops — all I possessed in the world — and 
the influence of my employer, deterred me from enlisting 
in Captain Patterson's company, which was then being 
raised in the neighborhood, to help form the 24th Ohio 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 53 

regiment. I continued to look after my spring crops, 
but with anxious thought for the welfare of our nation's 
cause and principles. We were very busy with our har- 
vest work when the news was received of the disastrous 
defeat of our forces at the first Bull Run battle, July i6- 
19, 1 86 1. It was only by strong will power that I was 
prevented from abandoning my work and offering my ser- 
vices to the government. In a short time, however, the 
climax came when word was received of the account of 
the cold-blooded murder, by the rebels, of Col. Stone, a 
union officer, at Ball's Bluff, Va. My last day's work on 
a farm ended, and I gave up my 'all,' and enlisted as a 
private soldier, Nov. i, 1861, in Capt. John T. Wilson's 
company, then being formed of neighboring boys. This 
company occupied the position of Company E in the line, 
and formed a part of the 70th regiment, Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry, We went into camp at West Union, the county 
seat of Adams county, Ohio, and about the first of Feb- 
ruary, 1862, left the State for Paducah, Kentucky. Em- 
barking thence, on the 9th day of March, on one of a fleet 
of sixty boats, we started up the Tennessee river, and 
landed at Pittsburgh Landing. 

"The first battle in which I was engaged was at 
Shiloh, April d-y, 1862, and the last, the charge on Fort 
McCalister, Dec. 13, 1864. In a small pass-book I find 
the following memorandum, made in the evening after 
storming the fort : * Leaving King's Bridge, on the 
Ogeechee river, in Georgia, we marched twelve miles to 
Fort McCalister ; formed line of battle in view of the fort 
with considerable difficulty, much skirmishing, and heavy 
cannonading from the enemy's heavy mounted guns in the 
fort. While occupying this very uncomfortable position, 
orders were received from General Sherman to storm the 
fort at all hazards. At 5 P. M. the bugle sounded "for- 
ward." The line pushed steadily on, sanguine of success, 



54 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

although amidst the rattling of musketry, the showers of 
leaden hail which fell thick and fast, the booming of 
cannon, and the bursting of shells and torpedoes. Cheer 
after cheer from the quickly advancing and unbroken line, 
seemed to rise above all, until, in a very short time, victory 
was ours, and the old "starry banner" gently wafted its 
folds over Fort McCalister. The eternal destiny of many 
braves was sealed during these moments.' 

"During the war I was engaged in eighteen distinct 
battles, aside from the numerous skirmishes and sieges 
from Chattanooga to Atlanta, lasting from May until 
September, 1864. I accompanied the army in Sherman's 
famous ' march to the sea,' and then through the Caro- 
linas to Washington City, passing, with others of my 
comrades, in the second day's grand review — an event not 
only memorable in the nation's history, but in the history ' 
of each victorious returning soldier. From Washington 
City I accompanied my regiment to Little Rock, Arkansas, 
where, on the 14th day of August, 1865, 1 was discharged, 
and was finally mustered out of the service of my country 
at Camp Dennison, Ohio, Aug. 26, 1865, after a period of 
three years and ten months." 

After the war, Mr. McGinness located in Allegheny, 
Pa., and in February, 1866, engaged in the machine busi- 
ness as an equal partner in the firm of Fisher, Graham & 
Co., on Marion avenue, Allegheny. The business, prov- 
ing unsuccessful, was abandoned in the early spring of 
1869. He then engaged with the firm of Anderson Bros., 
engine builders and founders, March 12, 1869, as book- 
keeper, which position he held for twelve years — until 
Feb. I, 1 88 1 — when he embarked in the steam-heating 
business, as an equal partner, under the firm name of Mc- 
Ginness, Smith & Co., Steam Heating Engineers, Water 
street, Pittsburgh, in which business he at present writing 
continues. 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 65 

He was married Oct. 29, 1868, by Rev. David Mac- 
Dill, to Harriet E. McCreight — daughter of Joseph Mc- 
Creight, of Adams county, Ohio — who was born Sept. 16, 
1844. After several changes of residence in Allegheny 
City, Mr. McGinness and family located on Perrysville 
avenue, where he had purchased a property, and on which 
he erected his present residence. 

When about twenty-one years of age, Mr. McGinness 
united with the U. P. church at Cherry Fork, Adams 
county, Ohio, under the pastorate of Rev. David MacDill, 
D. D., and after locating in Allegheny, transferred his 
membership to the Fifth U. P. church, Allegheny, now 
under the pastoral care of Rev. James Witherspoon, D.D. 
He has been a worthy and efficient member of the session 
of that congregation for more than twenty-two years, 
having been elected a ruling elder Oct. 6, 1869, and or- 
dained as such on the 29th day of the same month, con- 
tinuing to serve in that capacity up to the present time. 

William and Harriet (McCreight) McGinness had five 
children, all born in Allegheny City, as follows : 

1. Ella Maud, born Oct. 26, 1869. 

2. Joseph Elmer, born Sept. 24, 1872. 

3. Hannah Ola, born Oct. 15, 1877 ; died Nov. 

I, 1878. 

4. Edna Belle, bom June 6, 1883. 

5. William Scott, bom June 20, 1887. 



n. George Edward McGinness was born Dec. 
— , 1 84 1, in Birmingham borough — now South Side, 
Pittsburgh — but spent his youthful days mostly in Rob- 
inson township, Allegheny county, Pa., where he attended 
the Cowan school for a number of years. 

Being bereft, when but a child, of the guidance and 



66 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

* 

assistance of a father, his welfare in life became one of 
dependence upon his own efforts. His ambition was to 
enter the Christian ministry, and, not having sufficient 
means to obtain the necessary education preparatory to 
engaging in that noble work, he resolved to improve 
every opportunity to fit himself for his calling. He ac- 
cordingly attended school during the winter months, and 
worked on a farm during the summer. Being a great 
reader and very fond of study, and with his cherished ob- 
ject in view, his spare moments were employed in the 
pursuit of his studies. 

He attended Mansfield Academy two winters, quali- 
fying himself for a teacher, after which, in the year 1859, 
he went to visit his brother William in Adams county, 
Ohio, While there he succeeded in securing a position 
as teacher in a district school, which he taught success- 
fully until the war broke out. 

When the call for troops was made in the autumn of 
'61, he gave up his school and responded by enlisting in 
Company E, 70th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. After having 
spent a few weeks in preparatory drilling in Ohio, the 
regiment, with others, was taken to Pittsburgh Landing, 
on the Tennessee river. He was engaged in the battle of 
Shiloh, April 6-7, 1862, and from the exposure was 
taken sick and was removed to his home in Ohio, where 
his promising life terminated June 21, 1862, at the early 
age of 2 1 years. His remains were interred in St. Clair 
U, P. graveyard. 

The epitaph on the stone which marks his last rest- 
ing-place, is a worthy tribute to his memory : " He, like 
many others, for the love of liberty, and to put down re- 
bellion, offered himself upon the altar of his country." 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 57 

No. 4. 

James McGinness, the youngest son of James and 
Mary (Scott) McGinness, was born March i , 1 8 1 5 , on the 
Logan farm in Robinson township, Allegheny county. 
Pa. In the fall of 1817, after the death of his father, he 
was taken, with the rest of the family, to the Scott home- 
stead at Campbell's Run, where he remained until his 
mother's second marriage, April 14, 1823, when he re- 
turned to the Logan farm, and here he spent six years of 
his youthful life, attending school with his brothers in the 
little log school house of the township. 

When about fourteen years of age — May 17, 1829 — 
he went to learn the trade of a blacksmith with John 
Armstrong, of Sharon, Moon township, Allegheny coun- 
ty, Pa. He served four years as an apprentice, after 
which he followed his trade for a livelihood until 1837, 
when he engaged in steamboating from Pittsburgh to 
St. Louis, continuing in this employment until Oct. 8, 
1839, when he removed to Lawrenceburg, Dearborn coun- 
ty, Indiana, where he again engaged in blacksmithing. 

Mr. McGinness was married Aug. 19, 1 841, by Rev. 
Albert J. Cotton, of the M. E. church, to Eliza Mericle, 
who was born in Waterford, N. Y., Jan. i, 18 19, and re- 
moved with her parents to the state of Indiana in the 
year 1837. 

After marriage they located in Guilford, Dearborn 
county, Ind., where they remained for a number of years, 
removing thence to Lawrenceburg, same county, Aug. 27, 
1857, but in the meantime residing for a brief period near 
Westport, Decatur county. From Lawrenceburg they re- 
moved to Morris, Ripley county, Ind., thence to Indian- 
apolis, Marion county, where they now reside. 

In the year 1850 Mr. McGinness united with the 
Methodist Episcopal church, with which body he and 
wife continue to worship. 



58 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

Since the year 1857 ^^ has been employed by the 
Cincinnati, Indianapolis, St. Louis and Chicago Railroad 
Company — as blacksmith until Jan. 15, 1887, when, on 
account of infirmity, he was obliged to discontinue work- 
ing at his trade, and was given a position as flagman by 
the same company, which position he now holds. 

James and Eliza (Mericle) McGinness had six sons, 
viz.: William, Edgar, James W., Ralph E., John E., and 
Frank. 



I. William McGinness was bom June 19, 1842, 
in Guilford, Dearborn county, Ind., and here spent his 
boyhood days, receiving the greater part of his education 
in the schools of his native county. He began his ca- 
reer as a railroad man, in August, 1858, when he was em- 
ployed by the Cincinnati, St. Louis and Chicago Railroad 
Company, continuing in its employ until the war broke 
out. In the month of April, 1861, he responded to the 
call for troops, and was assigned to Company D., 7th 
Indiana regiment. Having served his time, he was hon- 
orably discharged from the army, after which he was again 
employed by the railroad company, and continued in this 
employment until 1884, when he engaged in the lumber 
business. At present writing he is proprietor of the South 
Side planing mill at Indianapolis, Ind. He was married 
March 2, 1865, to Julia Evans, and located in Lawrence- 
burg, Ind., where they resided a number of years, after 
which they removed to La Fayette, Tippecanoe county, 
Ind., and thence to Indianapolis, where he and family 
now reside. 

William and Julia (Evans) McGinness had four chil- 
dren born to them, as follows : 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 59 

1. Harry, born Dec. 2, 1866, at Lawrenceburg ; 

died May 17, 1877. 

2. Alice, bom July 13, 1868, at Lawrenceburg; 

died Aug. 4, 1868. 

3. Percy, born Nov. 22, 1870, at La Fayette. 

4. Clare, bom May 18, 1878, at Indianapolis. 



n. Edgar McGinness was bom Nov. 30, 1843, in 
Guilford, Ind., and died Sept. 5, 1850. 



in. James Wilson McGinness was born Dec. 25, 
1847, near Westport, Decatur county, Ind., but spent 
his boyhood days in Dearborn county, receiving the 
greater part of his education at Lawrenceburg, to which 
place his parents moved in the year 1857. He was em- 
ployed by the Indianapolis and Cincinnati Railway Com- 
pany in Sept., 1 86 1, and remained with that company 
about twenty-one years, serving successively as fireman, 
four years; brakeman, one year ; baggage-master, one 
year ; conductor, eight years, and general yard-master, 
with headquarters at Indianapolis, seven years. In De- 
cember, 1882, he was employed by the Vandalia Line 
Railway Company as "Master of Transportation" for all 
freight arriving at Indianapolis on the Vandalia Line ; the 
Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and St. Louis R. R. ; the Jefferson- 
ville, Madison and Indianapolis R. R., and Union Stock 
Yard Company — to be delivered to connecting roads. He 
continued in this capacity until June i, 1885, when he en- 
tered the U. S. government service as " Deputy Collect- 
or of Internal Revenue" for the 6th District of Indiana, 
having charge of the following counties : Marion, Hen- 
dricks, Hancock, Shelby, Johnston, Morgan, Brown, Bar- 
tholomew, Jackson, Lawrence and Monroe. 



60 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

In the meantime, Mr, McGinness was married at La 
Fayette, Ind., Oct i, 1870, to Amanda V. Shaffer, who 
was born in New Comerstown, Ohio, Feb. 11, 1853. 
After some changes of residence, they removed to Indian- 
apolis, where the wife, Amanda, died Sept. 20, 1880, leav- 
ing one daughter. Mr. McGinness was married the second 
time, Sept. 28, 1881, to Miss Louisa R. Kurtz, who was 
born at La Fayette, Ind., May 10, 1853. They now re- 
side in Indianapolis, Ind. James McGinness had by his 
first wife, Amanda, one daughter : 

Edna Pearl, born in Lawrenceburg, Ind., 
April 22, 1874. 



IV. Ralph Edward McGinness was born Aug. 4, 
1852, in Guilford, Ind., and died Aug. 30, 1859. 



V. John Elliott McGinness was born April 1 1 , 
1857, in Guilford, Dearborn county, Ind., and was but an 
infant when his parents removed to Lawrenceburg, same 
county. He received his primary education in the dis- 
trict schools of the vicinity of his home, completing his 
studies in Indianapolis. When about eighteen years of 
age he was employed by the Cincinnati, Indianapolis, St. 
Louis & Chicago Railway Company, and has continued in 
its employ ever since, with the exception of one year, 
during which time he worked for the Union Railway Com- 
pany, and at several other places in Indianapolis. He 
began the train service under his brother William, upon 
whose train he was employed as brakeman four years, 
after which he was promoted to the position of "Train 
Baggage Master," running between Indianapolis and Chi- 
cago, which position he now holds. He kept a daily 
record of the baggage handled during one year, which 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 61 

amounted to 1 1 ,970 pieces. Mr. McGinness was married 
in Indianapolis in the year 1880, to Joanna Wood Swigart, 
who was born Jan. 25, 1858, in New Castle, Henry county, 
Ind., her parents having emigrated from near Chambers- 
burg, Pa., and settled at New Castle in the early settle- 
ment of Henry county. After marriage, Mr. and Mrs. 
McGinness located in Indianapolis, where they have since 
continued to reside. Three children have been born to 
them, as follows : 

1. Nellie, born Nov. i, 1880; died Oct. 25, 

1885. 

2. William James, born May 14, 1886. 

3. Florence, born Jan. — , 1890. 



VI. Frank McGinness was born in Lawrenceburg, 
Dearborn county, Ind., Sept. 9, i860, and died Oct. 22, 
1865. ■ 

iSTo. e. 

Elizabeth McGinness, the only daughter of James 
and Mary (Scott) McGinness, was born March 14, 1817, 
on the Logan farm, in Robinson township, Allegheny 
county, Pa. After the death of her father, which occurred 
when Elizabeth was about four months old, she was 
taken, with the rest of the family, to the home of her 
grandfather, Samuel Scott, whose farm was adjacent to 
the Logan farm. Here her early years were spent. 
When she was about six years of age, her mother, hav- 
ing married Joseph Logan, returned to the Logan farm. 
Here Elizabeth spent her girlhood and early womanhood. 
She attended school in a little log school house near 
Union church. 

She was married at her home in Robinson township, 
Sept. 5, 1843, by Rev. James H. Buchanan, then pastor 
of the Birmingham A. R. church, to William Neely, of 



62 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

Robinson township, Allegheny county, Pa. They first 
went to housekeeping on Boyd's Hill, Pittsburgh, Pa., 
where they remained about eight years — until 185 1, when 
they removed to Duquesne borough, (now Eighth ward, 
Allegheny, Pa.) 

In the spring of 1852 Mrs. Neely and family removed 
to Samuel Scott's farm in Robinson township, Allegheny 
county, Pa., and here remained until the fall of that same 
year, when they returned to Allegheny City. After sev- 
eral changes of residence in the Third ward, Allegheny, 
where they lived for many years — with the exception of a 
short time in which they resided on Federal street, Fourth 
ward — they removed to Jackson street. Second ward, 
where they purchased a property. Here they resided for 
a number of years. 

Mrs. Neely died at her home on Jackson street, Feb. 
21, 1882, having contracted a severe cold which developed 
into pneumonia. She was buried in Uniondale cemetery, 
Allegheny, where a granite tablet, properly inscribed, 
marks her last resting-place. 

In early womanhood she united with what is now 
Union U. P. church, during the pastorate of Rev. John 
Ekin, and after marriage transferred to the First A. R. 
(now Second U. P.) church of Pittsburgh, and finally to 
what is now the First U. P. church, Allegheny, continuing 
in its communion until the Master called her to "come 
up higher." 

"Around her loved and honored grave, 

The severed ' household band ' may come. 
And seem to hear those blessed tones 

That made the music of their home. 
The faded form, the silent shroud, 

These, these were all they gave the tomb; 
. She watches o'er them, while she wears 
The freshness of immortal bloom." 

Mr. Neely was engaged in brick-making in Pitts- 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 63 

burgh for a number of years, but, ir> 1852, went to the 
newly discovered gold fields in California. He continued 
to reside in that state until the spring of 1889, when he 
returned to Pittsburgh with his son William, who went to 
visit him at San Buenaventura, Ventura county. He now 
resides with his daughters on Atwell street, Pittsburgh, 

William and Elizabeth (McGinness) Neely had four 
children born to them, viz., Mary A., William, Georgetta 
and Sarah E. 



I. Mary A. Neeley was born Aug. 11, 1844, on 
Boyd's Hill, Pittsburgh, Pa., and here spent her childhood 
days, removing with her parents to Allegheny in girlhood. 
She attended school for a time in the Eighth ward, Pitts- 
burgh, and afterward in the Third ward, Allegheny. Af- 
ter the death of her mother she and her two sisters re- 
mained at their home on Jackson street, Allegheny, for a 
brief period, after which, in April, 1884, they removed to 
East End, Pittsburgh, and resided about four years at 
the home of their brother William, on Lake street, East 
Liberty. From there they removed, in January, 1888, to 
Atwell street, where they had purchased a property and 
on which they had erected their present residence. In 
girlhood Mary united with the First United Presbyterian 
church of Allegheny, during the pastorate of Rev. John 
T. Pressly, D. D., continuing in its membership until 
shortly after her removal to East Liberty, when she 
transferred her membership to the Sixth U. P. church of 
Pittsburgh, now under the pastoral care of Rev. Robert 
M. Russell. She has been for a number of years em- 
ployed by Hostetter & Co., Water street, Pittsburgh, as 
fore-woman in the binding department. 



n. William J. Neeley was born Dec. 6, 1847, o" 



64 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

Boyd's Hill, Pittsburgh, Pa., but spent the greater part of 
his youth and early manhood in Allegheny, Pa. He re- 
ceived his early education in the Third ward public 
schools, Allegheny, and afterward attended the Iron City 
Business College, Pittsburgh. 

Early in life, in the year 1859, he secured a position 
in the dry goods store of George R. White & Co., remain- 
ing in their employ about four years, after which he ob- 
tained a clerkship in the office of J. W. Arrott, insurance 
agent, and continued in his employ about two years. He 
then secured a position as assistant book-keeper for Mair 
& Davison, and continued with this firm until the year 
1867, when he was employed as book-keeper for Bailey, 
Fan ell & Co., manufacturers and dealers in plumbers' 
supplies, continuing in that capacity until the spring of 
1889, when he gave up his position and went to visit his 
father in San Buenaventura, Cal. 

On his return in May, 1889, he entered into business 
with the Standard Manufacturing Co., in the capacity of 
cashier and general financial manager, and so continues. 

Mr. Neely was married to Rebecca E. Tannehill, who 
was born near Hickory, Washington county, Pa., June 18, 
1847. She was educated at Mansfield and Oakdale 
academies, after which she entered the teachers' profes- 
sion. They remained at the home of Mr. Neely's moth- 
er, in Allegheny, for a short time after marriage, removing 
thence to East Liberty, Pittsburgh. After several changes 
of residence in the East End they located on Lake street, 
where Mr. Neely had purchased a property and on it 
erected his present residence. Mr. and Mrs. Neely and 
three children, William, Frank and Mary, are members of 
the Sixth U. P. church, Pittsburgh, where Mr. Neely takes 
an active part in the Sabbath school work. 

William and Rebecca (Tannehill) Neely had six chil- 
dren, all born in Pittsburgh, Pa., as follows : 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 66 

1. William Reed, bom May 24, 1876. 

2. Frank Tannehill, born Jan. 16, 1878. 

3. Mary Alice, born Jan. 28, 1880. 

4. Elizabeth McGiNNESS, born Feb. 17,1882. 

5. Homer, born Sept. 25, 1885. 

6. Martha Watson, born Sept. 14, 1888 ; died 

Dec. II, 1890. 



III. Georgetta Neely was born Jan. 19, 1850, on 
Boyd's Hill, Pittsburgh, Pa., but spent her girlhood days 
mostly in the Third ward, Allegheny, receiving her pri- 
mary education in the schools of the vicinity of her home. 
After completing the course as taught by the public 
schools, she attended the Curry Institute, Pittsburgh, then 
under the supervision of Robert Curry, A. M., prepara- 
tory to engaging in teaching. She taught successfully for 
a number of years in the Third ward, Allegheny, being 
engaged first in the North avenue building and removing to 
Chestnut street in 1871 — the time of the erection of the 
new building at that place. When about fifteen years of 
age she united with the First U. P. church of Allegheny, 
and from there transferred to the Sixth U. P. church of 
Pittsburgh, where she is now a communicant, residing 
with her sisters on Atwell street. East End. 



IV. Sarah E. Neely was born Nov. 8, 1852, in Al- 
legheny City, Pa., and here spent her youth and early 
womanhood. She received her early education in the 
Third ward public school, Allegheny, and also attended 
the Fourth ward during the time in which the family lived 
on Federal street. After qualifying herself in the com- 
mon schools she attended the Curry Institute, with a view 
of becoming a teacher. After taking the necessary course 
she received a permanent certificate, and entered upon her 
chosen work. She taught successfully in the Second 



66 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

ward, (Irwin avenue,) Allegheny, for a number of years, 
until September, 1885, when she secured a position in the 
Lincoln school, Pittsburgh, where she has, since that time, 
been engaged. She was received into the First U. P. 
church of Allegheny, on profession of her faith, Feb. i, 
1866, during the pastorate of Rev. John T. Pressley, 
D. D., transferring her membership to the Sixth U. P. 
church, Pittsburgh, subsequent to her removal to the 
East End, where she is at present located. 



FAMILY OF JOHN McGINNESS, 

OF CLINTON, ALLEGHENY COUNTY, VA. 

JOHN McGINNESS, the second son of William and 
Martha (Wilson) McGinness, was bom in the year 
1787 in Staunton, Augusta county, Va., and here 
spent his early years, removing with his parents, in 
boyhood, to Allegheny county. Pa., and thence to what 
is now Shenango township, Crawford county. Pa. He re- 
ceived a common school education, such as the schools of 
those days afforded, and followed farming for a livelihood. 

In early manhood he left Crawford county and re- 
turned to Allegheny county, locating near Cavett's Mills. 
He engaged in working the farm of Mr. Cavett, of Cavett's 
grist and saw mill, on the north branch of Montour's 
run. He was married, in the year 18 10, to Margaret, 
daughter of P. and Mary Porter Cavett. They continued 
to reside at Cavett's Mills until after the birth of three 
children, when they removed to a farm about one mile 
from Clinton, Findlay township, Allegheny county. Pa., 
Mr. McGinness having purchased the same from one John 
Wheeler, in the year 18 16. A few years after, he erected 
on said farm a frame house, in which he resided during 
the remainder of his life. 

His wife Margaret died Aug. 23, 1849, and was buried 
in Clinton cemetery. In the year 1853 Mr. McGinness 
married as his second wife, Catherine Gauntz, a native of 
Mexico, but a resident of the vicinity of Clinton. 

Mr. McGinness was elected elder in the Associate 
(now U. P.) church of Clinton in the year 1823, during 
the pastorate of Rev. William Wilsort, and continued to 



68 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

serve as such until his death, which occurred June 20, 
1863, 3-t the age of ^6 years. He was buried in Clinton 
cemetery. His wife Catherine survived him several years, 
and died Sept — , 1879. She, also, was buried in Clinton 
cemetery. 

The following memorial was written by John Mc- 
Ginness to his children, and dated June 13, 1858 : 

^^Dear Childrtu: — This memorial is for you, that 
you may remember your father when he has gone to rest. 
I have been very earnest for you at the 'Throne of Grace.' 
The salvation of your souls has been very near to my 
heart. I have engaged in solemn covenant duty, and 
given you up to God by name. I hope God has accepted 
the dedication. Now, dear children, as the vows of God 
are upon you, strive to make your calling and election 
sure. Dear children, God has given you children — set be- 
fore them a godly example — a godly life makes a happy 
death. It grieves me when I think how carelessly I spent 
my early life. It is of God's mercy that he has spared an 
incumberer of his ground so long. I bless God that he 
ever brought me into the pale of the visible church. I 
have engaged in many sweet communion Sabbaths, and 
hope, through the merits of Jesus Christ, to spend an 
eternal Sabbath with God in heaven. There are many 
of God's dear saints whose names are dear to me, but the 
name of Jesus is much dearer. Now, my dear wife and 
children, I commend you to God in the hope that I shall 
meet you in heaven, where I hope to rest. Come death 
when it will, I hope to say, 'Even so, come, Lord Jesus,' 
'into Thy hands I commit my spirit.' 

" John McGinness, 
"In the 71st year of my age." 

John and Margaret (Cavett) McGinness had seven 
children born to them, viz : William, Mary, Samuel, 
James, Jane, Elizabeth and Margaret. 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 69 

Sl*e;teix No. 1. 

William McGinness was bom about the year 1 8 1 1 
at Cavett's Mills, Allegheny county, Pa., and was but a 
child when his parents removed to a farm near Clinton, 
Pa., where he spent his boyhood days, receiving his edu- 
cation in the schools of the township. 

He was married to Sarah A. Grienstack, but the 
date of marriage has not been ascertained. He removed 
to Tennessee about the year 1852, where he died, leaving 
sons and daughters. All trace of his family has been lost. 



ISIo. ^. 

Mary McGinness was born about the year 1812, at 
Cavett's Mills, Allegheny county. Pa., but spent her girl- 
hood days on the homestead farm near Clinton, where 
she now resides with her widowed sister, Margaret Wil- 
son. She is unmarried. 



No. 3. 

Samuel McGinness was born Sept. 9, 18 14, at Cav- 
ett's Mills, but spent his boyhood days on the home- 
stead farm near Clinton, Pa., receiving his education in 
the schools of the vicinity of his home. 

He learned the trade of boiler-maker, but the con- 
stant noise of that occupation being hurtful to him, he, 
with his brothers, engaged in the lumber business, at 
which he continued for about three years. He then went 
back to the old homestead to manage and work the farm 
— his father having retired from active life. 

He was married Jan. — , 1836, by Rev. Carr, to Isa- 
belle Reed, of Pittsburgh, Pa. After marriage they re- 
sided near the homestead farm — Mr. McGinness continu- 



70 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

ing to work the same — until 1842, when they removed to 
Indiana county, Pa., where they had purchased a farm. 
Here they resided about six years, when they removed to 
Allegheny City, Pa., remaining here about five years — un- 
til March 12, 1853, when they bade adieu to parents and 
home, and with a party of friends and their families, 
started for California, going to St. Joseph, Mo., by water, 
and thence across the plains with ox teams as a means 
of transportation. 

Before leaving home a company was organized by 
Rev. Thompson, who drew up a constitution and by-laws 
which all signed, agreeing to take turns in guarding the 
train and doing sentinel duty ; but during the journey 
some of the younger members of the company grew res- 
tive, and were disrespectful to their elders and uncontrol- 
able in their actions. When they reached the Platte river, 
Mrs. Thompson, the minister's wite, died and was there 
buried by Mr. McGinness and a man named McKine. 

Great difficulty was experienced in fording the Platte 
river. It required the assistance of all the men and ani- 
mals to get the wagons across, one by one — resting them 
on the sand-bar in the middle of the river. When the last 
wagon — in it a delicate woman named French and her 
children — was on the sand-bar, the fractious element re 
fused to assist in getting the wagon off, and the family 
was left, in great terror, on the bar all night. The next 
morning they received assistance from a strange company 
near by, and succeeded in getting the wagon across. 

Being disgusted with such heartless conduct on the 
part of some of the company, Mr. McGinness, the French 
family, and a family named Brown, parted from the train, 
which took the Oregon road, and proceeded on their 
way to California. When they reached Great Salt Lake 
Mr. McGinness was detained three weeks on account of 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 71 

sickness in his family. During his stay here he had quite 
an interesting interview with Brigham Young, who strong- 
ly advised him to become a Mormon. 

After his family recovered Mr. McGinness joined com- 
pany with a Southern family named Willson, and con- 
tinued on the journey. Finally, after having endured 
great hardships and being subject to the dangers of a 
long and perilous journey in those days of wagon-travel, 
they reached Hangtown, now Placerville, El Dorado 
county, Cal., Oct. lo, 1853, where they located. 

Mr. McGinness was engaged for many years in the 
mines with varying success. He purchased a property in 
Placerville, on which he now resides. He also has one 
hundred and sixty acres in the pine forests, about thirty 
miles from Placerville. 

About the year 1840 Mr. McGinness united with the 
Associate (now U. P.) church at Clinton, Rev. William 
Wilson pastor, and afterwards connected with the Presby- 
terian church at Placerville, Cal., with which body he now 
worships. 

His wife, Isabelle, died Jan. 10, 1889, aged 75 years. 
She was buried in Union cemetery, Placerville, Cal. 

Samuel and Isabelle (Reed) McGinness had born to 
them eight children, only four of whom grew to maturity 
— the others having died from scarlet fever during the 
year 1843. William and John died and were buried at 
the same time. Franklin died a month after, and James 
died six months later. Thus, in a few short months, these 
parents were made childless. Their family record is as 
follows : 



I. William Reed McGinness, born in Findlay 
township, Allegheny county, Pa., Feb. 22, 1837, and died 
in Indiana county, Pa., in the year 1843. 



72 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

II. John McGinness, born near Clinton, Allegheny 
county, Pa., Dec. 24, 1838, and died in 1843. 



III. Franklin McGinness, born near Clinton, Pa., 
Aug. II, 1843, and died in 1843. 



IV. James Harry McGinness, born in Indiana 
county, Pa., April 8, 1843, and died that same year. 



V, Margaret McGinness was born Oct. 29, 1845, 
in Indiana county. Pa. When she was about three years 
of age her parents removed to Allegheny, Pa., where she 
spent about six years of her early life, removing thence, 
in girlhood, to Placerville, Cal., where she received her 
education in the public schools and at C. B. Conklin's 
Academy. She was married, Feb. 22, 1870, to W. H. 
Brown, of Shingle Springs, Cal., who has served twice as 
sheriff of El Dorado county, Cal., and twice as state 
senator from the same county. He also served one term 
as United States Surveyor General for the state, and is at 
present one of the State Harbor Commissioners, located 
in San Francisco, Cal., where he and wife now reside. 
Two children were born to them, both now deceased. 



VI. John Reed McGinness was bom Oct. 24, 1849, 
in Allegheny City, Pa., and removed with his parents to 
Placerville in the year 1853. Here he spent his boyhood 
days, receiving his education in the public schools and 
Conklin's Academy, of Placerville ; Brayton's College, Oak- 
land, and Heald's College, San Francisco. He has had 
charge of several mercantile houses, and was, for a time, 
clerk in the U. S. Surveyor General's office. At present 
writing he is head clerk in the State Surveyor's office, 
located in Sacramento, Cal. He was married, in the year 
1882, to Catherine Beauchamp, of San Francisco. One 
son has blessed their union. 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 73 

VII. Samuel Henry McGinness was bom June 6, 
1852, in Allegheny City, Pa., and was but an infant when 
his parents crossed the plains to California. He spent 
his boyhood days in Placerville, receiving his primary 
education in the public schools of that place, after which 
he attended Conklin's Academy and Heald's College, 
San Francisco. He was married, March 20, 1877, to 
Hattie J. Graham. Mr. McGinness has been for the past 
eighteen years in the wholesale grain and flour business 
at Shingle Springs, Cal., where he and wife at present re- 
side. No children. 



VIII. ISABELLE McGinness was born Jan. 23, 1855, 
in Placerville, Cal., where she has always resided. She 
was educated in the public schools and at Conklin's 
Academy, and also received a musical education. She is 
at present writing an invalid, rendered so from catarrh in 
the head, from which she has suffered many years. 



No. 4. 

James McGinness was born in the year 1 8 16, on 
his father's farm near Clinton, Pa., and here spent his 
boyhood days, receiving his education in the schools of 
his native township. He was engaged in agricultural 
pursuits. 

He was married Nov. 28, 1844, to Mary M., daugh- 
ter of Mitchell and Ann (George) Ramsey, and niece of 
Rev. James Ramsey, D. D., of Canonsburg, Pa. They 
resided in the vicinity of Clinton until the year 1848, 
when they removed to Carroll county, Ohio, and thence, 
in 1857, to Bloomington, Ind., where they remained until 
the year 1876, removing, finally, to College Springs, Page 
county, Iowa. 



74 THEMcGINNESS FAMILY. 

Early in manhood James McGinness united with the 
Associate Reformed (now U. P.) church of CHnton. From 
the time of his removal to College Springs until his death 
he was a member of the United Presbyterian church of 
that place — Rev. William Johnston, D. D., pastor. His 
widow still worships with that congregation. 

In the month of March, 1890, Mr. McGinness con- 
tracted a severe cold, which developed into la grippe, 
from which he died March 15, 1890. He was buried in 
the cemetery at College Springs. 

" By death comes life — by loss comes gain ; 
Heaven's joy for a tear — heaven's peace for the pain." 

James and Mary (Ramsey) McGinness had five chil- 
dren born to them, viz.: John M., William J., Annie E., 
Thomas P. and Mareraret E. 



I. John M. McGinness was born Jan. 25, 1847, in 
Clinton, Pa., but spent his boyhood days in Carroll coun- 
ty, Ohio, and in Bloomington, Ind., receiving his educa- 
tion in the schools of those places. He removed with 
his parents to College Springs, Iowa, in 1876. He is un- 
married, and, at present writing, lives in Chase county, 
Nebraska. 



II. William J. McGinness was born Aug. 14, 
1850, in Carroll count}^, Ohio, and here spent his early 
years, removing with his parents to Bloomington, Ind., 
when about seven years of age. He was married in the 
year 1875 to Miss Ella Barnes, who died leaving five 
children. 

On the 7th of June, 1892, Mr. McGinness married as 
his second wife. Miss Etta Bean, and now resides in Col- 
lege Springs, Iowa. 

William and Ella (Barnes) McGinness had five chil- 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 75 

dren, all born in Page county, Iowa, except the eldest, 
who was born in Clay county, 111. The family record is 
as follows : 

1. Frank, born Jan. 25, 1876. 

2. Lulu, born May 24, 1878. 

3. Georgetta, born March 24, 1880. 

4. Grace, born Feb. 14, 1882. 

5. Ella, born Jan. 25, 1884. 



III. Annie E. McGinness was born Nov. 5, 1852, 
in Carroll county, Ohio, and, in childhood, removed with 
her parents to Bloomington, Ind., and thence to College 
Springs, Iowa. Here she was married, Feb. — , 1882, to 
John C. George, of Carroll county, Ohio, and returned 
with him to her native state and county, and located in 
Mechanicstown, where they now reside. 

John and Annie (McGinness) George have five chil- 
dren, as follows : 

1. Mary Mertie, born Jan. 24, 1883. 

2. Sarah Ethel, born Nov. 17, 1884. 

3. James Edwin, born Feb. 9, 1887. 

4. Thomas Edgar — twin of James E. 

5. John Walter, born, Oct. 15, 1889. 



IV. Thomas R. McGinness was born Dec. 2, 1855, 
in Carroll county, Ohio, but spent his boyhood days in 
Bloomington, Ind., removing with his parents to College 
Springs, Iowa, in early manhood. Here he was married 
March — , 1883, to Miss Maggie Coleman. Their pres- 
ent address is Imperial, Chase county. Neb. 

Thomas and Maggie (Coleman) McGinness have five 
children, all born in Chase county, Nebraska, except Le- 
roy and Jessie, who were born in Page county, Iowa. 
The family record is as follows : 



76 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

1. Leroy, born Dec. i8, 1883. 

2. Jessie Maud, born March 22, 1885. 

3. Mary Alice, born Feb. 9, 1888. 

4. William Forrest, born Nov. 16, 1889. 

5. IVA Belle, born Oct. 15, 1891. 



V. Margaret Emma McGinness was bom April 
23, 1861, in Bloomington, Ind., and there spent her early- 
life, removing to College Springs, Iowa, when about fif- 
teen years of age. She was married June 6, 1883, to Da- 
vid McAfee, and with him now resides at the above 
named place. 

David and Emma (McGinness) McAfee had three 
children born to them, as follows : 

1. Louis Clyde, bom Feb. 19, 1884 ; died Jan. 

17, 1885. 

2. David Clarence, born June 20, 1885. 

3. Mary Elizabeth, bom Aug. 7, 1889. 



No. S. 

Jane McGinness was born between the years 18 17 
and 1822 — the exact date has not been ascertained. She 
died in early womanhood, June 16, 1845, on her father's 
farm, where she was born, having lived there all her life. 
She was buried in Clinton cemetery. 



No. e. 

Elizabeth McGinness was born June 23, 1823, on 
the homestead farm in Findlay township, Allegheny 
county. Pa., and here spent her girlhood days, receiving a 
good, common-school education in the schools of her na- 
tive township. 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 77 

She was married at her home, June 22, 1849, by Rev. 
James G. Rankin, to John Witherspoon, of Robeson 
township, Washington county, Pa. — brother of Rev. 
James W. Witherspoon, D. D., of Allegheny City. 

In the month of July, following their marriage, Eliza- 
beth removed to her husband's home on the Witherspoon 
farm, in Robeson township, where they continued to re- 
side until March i, 1855, when they left the farm and re- 
moved to the village of Bavington, Washington county, Pa. 

In early womanhood Mrs. Witherspoon united with 
the Associate (now U. P.) church of Clinton, and after 
marriage transferred her membership to what is now 
Robinson U. P. church, continuing in its communion until 
her death, which occurred at her home in Bavington, Dec. 
30, 1885. She was buried in Robinson U. P. churchyard, 
where a gray granite shaft, bearing suitable inscriptions, 
marks the place of her interment. Mr. Witherspoon still 
resides in Bavington. 

John and Elizabeth (McGinness) Witherspoon had 
two children born to them, as follows : 



I. John McGinness Witherspoon was born Aug. 
26, 1850, on the homestead farm in Robeson township, 
and was but a child when his parents removed to Baving- 
ton, Pa., where he spent his boyhood days, receiving his 
primary education in the schools of the village. 

Having decided to study for the Christian ministry, 
he entered Westminster College, New Wilmington, Pa., 
from which institution he was graduated in 1873. He 
studied theology at the U. P. Theological Seminary in 
Allegheny, Pa.; was licensed May 2, 1876, by Frankfort 
Presbytery, and ordained June 12, 1877, by Allegheny 
Presbytery. He was pastor of East Union congregation 
— Allegheny county. Pa. — from June 12, 1877, until Dec. 
5, 1882. Rev. Witherspoon was married Nov. 9, 1876, 



78 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

to Miss Annie Nevin, of Allegheny City. They now re- 
side at Hulton, Allegheny county, Pa. Three sons have 
been born to them, viz : 

1. John Nevin, born Jan. 24, 1878. 

2. Joseph Boyd McGinness, born Aug. 13, 1880. 

3. Samuel Calvin, born July 24, 1885. 



II. Jane Eliza Witherspoon was born Feb. 6, 
1852, on the homestead farm in Washington county, Pa., 
but spent her girlhood in the village of Bavington, receiv- 
ing a good common school education in the schools of 
her native county. She was married at her home, Sept. 
28, 1S76, to James T. Patterson. They now reside in 
Burgettstown, Washington county. Pa. Five children 
have been born to them, (James and Emma twins,) as 
follows : 

1. Lenora, born Nov. 16, 1877. 

2. Lizzie Myrtle, born Dec. 7, 1882. 

3. Jennie Estelle, born Jan. 5, 1888. 

4. James Witherspoon, born Jan. 21, 1890; 

died July 6, 1890. 

5. Emma Margaret, twin sister of James W.; 

died July 4, 1890. 



ISTo. tZ. 

Margaret McGinness was born March 22, 1826, 
on her father's farm near Clinton, Allegheny county. Pa., 
and here spent the greater part of her life. She received 
her education in the schools of the vicinity of her home. 

In girlhood, about the year 1841, she became iden- 
tified with the Associate (now U. P.) church of Clinton, 
of which she is still a consistent member. 

Margaret McGinness was united in marriage Aug. 7, 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 79 

1847, by Rev. Alexander Murray, to Hamilton W. Wilson, 
who was born Oct. 31', 1812, at Wilson's Mills, Beaver 
county. Pa., and was a farmer by occupation. They re- 
sided near Clinton, Pa. until the spring of 1858, when 
they removed to Clinton county, Ohio, where they re- 
mained six or seven years, after which they returned to 
the old homestead near Clinton. Here Mr. Wilson died 
Feb. 2, 1888, and was buried in the cemetery at Clinton. 
His wife Margaret still survives him, and resides, with her 
sister Mary, in the McGinness homestead near Clin- 
ton, Pa. 

Hamilton and Margaret (McGinness) Wilson had 
eight children, all born near Clinton, Allegheny county. 
Pa., except John, Catherine and Robert, who were born 
in Clinton county, Ohio. The family record is as follows : 



I. Margaret Jane Wilson, born Nov. — , 1848, 
and married Feb. — , 1866, by Rev. Samuel C. Jennings, 
D. D., to John A. Onstott, a machinist by trade. They 
resided at Phillipsburg, Beaver county. Pa., and were 
members of the Sharon Presbyterian church. Mr. Ons- 
tott died in April, 1872, and his wife, Margaret, died in 
Nov. 1887; both are buried in the cemetery at Sharon, 
Moon township, Allegheny county, Pa. Their children 
are as follows : (surname Onstott.) 

1. ROBBALENA, bom April — , 1867 ; educated at 

Beaver Female College, from which institu- 
tion she was graduated in music. She was 
married Sept. — , 1889, to F. M. Golden. 
Their present residence is Fallston, Beaver 
county. Pa. 

2. Lizzie H., born April — , 1869. 

3. Margaret E., born April — , 1871. 



80 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

II. Mary Susan Wilson, born Nov. 25, 1850. She 

united with the Clinton U. P. congregation in the year 

1870. She resides on the homestead farm near Clinton. 



III. James Hamilton Wilson, born March 20, 1853, 
and died in Clinton county, Ohio, in the year 1861. He 
was buried in Wilmington cemetery, Ohio. 



IV. Elizabeth Ida Wilson, born Feb. 5, 1856, and 
when about fourteen years of age united with the Clinton 
U. P. congregation. She resides with her mother on the 
old homestead farm near Clinton, Pa. « 



V. John McGinness Wilson, born May 5, 1858, 
and married Lizzie Casber, of Canonsburg, Washington 
county, Pa. They now reside in the vicinity of Clinton, 
Mr. Wilson being engaged in farming. They are mem- 
bers of Clinton U. P. church. 



VI. Catherine W. Wilson, born Aug. 28, i860, 
and married by Rev. D. K. McKnight, to William S. 
White, of Uniontown, Pa., June 9, 1879. Mr. White is a 
painter by occupation. They now reside at Clinton, Pa., 
and are members of the U. P. church at that place. Mr. 
and Mrs. White have children, as follows: 

1. John H., born March 27, 1880. 

2. Ralph J., born Aug. 28, 1881. 

3. Beulah S., born Nov. 27, 1883. 



VII. Robert W. Wilson, born April 30, 1863, and 
married by Rev. D. K. McKnight, March 27, 1883, to 
Ellen J. Bailey, of Allegheny county. Pa. He was a car- 
penter by trade, which occupation he followed success- 
fully until his death, which was caused by his falling from 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 81 

a height of 80 feet while working at his trade. He died 
Nov. 2, 1889, at the early age of 26 years, and was buried 
in the graveyard at Hebron, Allegheny county. Pa. He 
was a worthy and zealous member of Hebron Presbyte- 
rian church at the time of his death, and resided near Clin- 
ton, Findlay township, Allegheny county. Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilson had four children born to them, 
as follows : 

1. Joseph B., born Oct 31, 1884. 

2. John H., born July 26, 1886. 

3. Robert L., born Feb. 26, 1888. 

4. Margaret E. born March 3, 1890. 



Vni. AUDELLIA S. Wilson, born in the year 1866, 
and married March 8, 1886, by Rev. D. K. McKnight, 
then pastor of Clinton U. P. congregation, to David A. 
Doughty. Their present residence is in Moon township, 
Allegheny county, Pa., where Mr. Doughty is engaged in 
farming. They are members of the Sharon Presbyterian 
church. Their children are as follows : (surname Doughty.) 

<^imESTER A., born Dec. 30, 1887. 

2. Bessie M., born May 22, 1889. 

3. Margaret J., born Dec. i, 1891. 



FAMILY OF MARTHA (McGINNESS) COTTON, 

OF CRAWFORD COUNTY, PA. 

JlIT ARTHA McGINNESS, the eldest daughter of 
/ Y I William and Martha (Wilson) McGinness, was 

1 I born Dec. 6, 1 791, in Staunton, Augusta county, 
^— • Va., and there spent several years of her early 
life. In girlhood she removed with her parents to Alle- 
gheny county, Pa., and thence to a farm in Shenango 
township, Crawford county, Pa., where she spent the 
greater part of her life. She received an education such 
as the schools of those days afforded. 

She was married, in the year 18 10, at the age of 
nineteen, to Captain Robert Cotton,* who was born in 
Washington county. Pa., Aug. 2, 1787, and in the year 
1797 removed with his parents to a farm four miles west 
of Meadville, on Vanhorn's run, in what is now Crawford 
county. Pa. A few years after marriage, in the year 18 17, 
they purchased the McGinness homestead in Crawford 



♦Robert Cotton was a son of Colonel John Cotton, who fought through the revolu- 
tionary war under General Washington ; and a descendent of John Cotton, the first 
Puritan minister in New England. In Bancroft's History of the United States we find 
the following : " In 1633, during the long summer voyage of the two hundred passen- 
gers who freighted thfe Griffin, three sermons a day beguiled their weariness. .... 
Then came tlie most revered spiritual teachers of two commonwealths : the acute and 
subtile John Cotton, the son of a Puritan lawyer; eminent at Cambridge as a scholar; 
quick in the nice perceptions of distindlions, and pliant in dialedls ; in manner, pur- 
suasive rather than commanding ; . . . . deeply devout by nature, as well as habits 
from childhood ; hating heresy, and still precipitately eager to prevent evil actions by 
suppressing ill opinions, yet verging toward a progress in truth and in religious freedom; 
an avowed enemy to democracy, which he feared as the blind despotism of animal in- 
stinfls in the multitude, yet opposing hereditary power in all its forms ; desiring a gov- 
ernment of moral opinion, according to the laws of universal equity, and claiming the 
ultimate resolution for the whole body of the people." Such was the ancestral relative 
of Robert Cotton. 

According to Lossing's Pidlorial Field Book of the Revolution, " the Peninsula of 
Shawmut, on the coast of Massachusetts Bay, was called by the English Tri-mountain, 
and afterwards changed to Boston as a compliment to Rev. John Cotton, who emigrated 
from Boston, Lincolnshire, England." 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 83 

county, [see sketch of William McGinness, Sr.] where 
they continued to reside during the remainder of their 
lives, Mr. Cotton being engaged in farming. 

In early life Martha McGinness became a member of 
the Covenanter church, and afterwards connected with the 
Methodist Episcopal church, of which body she remained 
a consistent member until her death. Mr. Cotton was in 
the communion of the Presbyterian church for many years, 
and also transferred his membership to the M. E, church. 

Mrs. Cotton died on the homestead farm Nov. 20, 
1845. Her husband Robert Cotton survived her a few 
years, and died May 21, 1848. Both were buried in 
Espyville cemetery, Crawford county. Pa., where marble 
tablets, properly inscribed, mark the place of their inter- 
ment. 

*' Call not back the dear departed, 

Anchored safe where storms are o'er; 
On the border land we left them, 

Soon to meet and part no more. 
Far beyond this world of changes, 

Far beyond this world of care, 
We shall find our missing loved ones, 

In our Father's mansion fair." 

Robert and Martha (McGinness) Cotton had four 
children born to them, viz : Margaret, Eliza, William and 
John V. 



Siteitch ISTo. 1. 



Margaret Cotton, the eldest child of Robert and 
Martha (McGinness) Cotton, was born Sept. 5, 181 1, in 
Shenango township, Crawford county, Pa., and here spent 
her girlhood days, receiving her education in the schools 
of the vicinity of her home. 

She was married at her home in the above named 
township. May 20, 1834, (the day on which Lafayette 



84 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

died,) to William Hamill, who was born in Beaver town- 
ship, Beaver county, Pa., July 22, 1809, and was a tailor 
by trade. 

They located after marriage in Hartstown, Crawford 
county, Pa., where they remained several years, removing 
thence to East Fallowfield township, same county. In 
May, 1 860 they emigrated to Kansas and located in Leav- 
enworth City, where they remained until 1866, when they 
removed to Wyandotte county, and from there, April 14, 
1876, to Cowley county — all in the above named state. 
Here Mr. Hamill died June 14, 1882. Margaret, his 
wife, removed to Optima, Beaver county, Oklahoma, in 
August, 1890, where she at present resides. 

About the year 1839 she and her husband united 
with the Methodist Episcopal church in Hartstown, Pa. 
/ William and Margaret (Cotton) Hamill had three 
children born to them, viz.: John K., Robert C, and 
Martha E. 



I. John K. Hamill was born Dec. 24, 1835, in 
Hartstown, Crawford county, Pa., and spent his youth and 
early manhood in his native county, receiving his educa- 
tion in the schools of the township. He was married in 
East Fallowfield township, Crawford county, Oct. 7, 1856, 
to Mary J. Anderson, of the above named township 
They removed from Crawford county, Pa., to Kansas in 
the early part of 1 860, and located in Leavenworth coun- 
ty, where they remained for some time, removing finally, 
to Grenola, Elk county, Kan., which is their present resi- 
dence. They are connected with the Presbyterian church 
at that place. Mr. Hamill is engaged in farming. Seven 
children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Hamill, as 
follows : 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 85 

1. William Cyrus, born Aug. i, 1857. 

2. RiLLA D.,born Sept. 28, 1858 ; died May 29, 

1885. 

3. Minnie E., born April 5, i860; died Sept. 

15, 1862. 

4. Maggie Eliza, born March 5, 1863. 

5. John Vance, born March 8, 1866. 

6. Walter A., born July 28, 1868 ; died Sept. 

2, 1871. 

7. Marian Jackson, bom Jan. 27, 1872. 



II. Robert Cotton Hamill was bom April 17, 
1837, in Hartstown, Crawford county, Pa., and received a 
common-school education in the schools of his native 
county. When he grew to manhood he learned the trade 
of a carpenter, which occupation he followed for many 
years. He was married May 26, 1857, in Crawford coun- 
ty. Pa., to Elizabeth Jackson. They remained in said 
county until after the birth of two children, when, in the 
the spring of i860, they removed to Kansas and located 
first in Leavenworth county. After several changes of 
residence, residing respectively in Johnston, Wyandotte, 
Cowley, Chautauqua, Greenwood and Montgomery coun- 
ties, they removed to Thayer, Neosho county, Kan., and 
here they now reside. 

In the year 1859 Mr. Hamill joined the M. E. church 
in Crawford county, on probation, but during his residence 
in Cowley county, Kan., he became identified with the 
"United Brethren in Christ," and since that time has been 
preaching that faith — their ministers being established on 
the itinerant plan. Mr. Hamill was in regular service 
sixty days during the " Price raid " in Missouri in the au- 
tumn of 1864. 

Robert and Elizabeth Hamill had seven children bom 
to them, as follows : 



86 THE McGINNESS FAMILY.. 

1. MiRON Abel, bom May 12, 1858 ; died Sept. 

15, 1858, in Crawford county, Pa., and was 
buried in Jackson graveyard. 

2. Levret Llewllyn, born April 8, 1859 ; died 

in Johnston county, Kan., Sept. 18, i860. 

3. Abram Robert, born , i860, in St. 

Louis, Mo., and married in Elk county, 
Kan., March i, 1883, to Nannie Sanders, 
formerly of Kentucky. 

4. Samuel McCown, bom June 25, 1863, in 

Leavenworth county, Kan. 

5. William Thomas, born June 17, 1868, in 

Wyandotte county, Kan., and married Oct. 
26, 1890, to Ella Haas. 

6. Martha Jane, born April 24, 1870, in Wy- 

andotte county, Kan., and married March 
9, 1892, in Thayer, Neosho county, Kan., 
to S. C. Yockey. 

7. John Walter, bom July 6, 1873, in Wyan- 

dotte county, Kan. 



in. Martha Eliza Hamill was born March 14, 
1849, in East Fallowfield township, Crawford county, 
Pa., and there spent her childhood days, receiving her pri- 
mary education in the schools of the vicinity of her 
home. When eleven years of age she emigrated with her 
parents to Leavenworth, Kan., where she attended school 
several years, afterwards completing her studies in Bald- 
win City. She was married at her home in Wyandotte 
county, June 9, 1870, to Warren Kean, who was born in 
Putnam county, Ohio, June 19, 1845, and is engaged in 
farming. After marriage they located in Wyandotte coun- 
ty, Kan., where they remained until April 14, 1876, when 
they removed to Cowley county. From there they re- 
moved to Stevens county, in February, 1888, and thence 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 87 

in June, 1890, to Optima, Beaver county, Oklahoma, 
which is their present residence. In early life Martha be- 
came a member of the Methodist church and remained in 
its communion until some time after her marriage, when 
she identified herself with the Christian church, of which 
her husband was a member. 

Warren and Martha (Hamill) Kean had eight chil- 
dren, all born in' Kansas except Hattie May, who was 
born in Optima, Oklahoma. The family record is as 
follows : 

1. Infant, born Aug. 20, 1871 ; died the same 

day. 

2. Thomas Edwin, bom Jan. i, 1873 ; died Sept. 

10, 1874. 

3. Margaret Eliza, born June 17, 1875 ; died 

Jan. 3, 1877. 

4. Rosa Leona, born June 20, 1877. 

5. Almeria Mabel, born Dec. 17, 1879. 

6. John Hamill, born April 8, 1883. 

7. Warren, born April 13, 1885 ; died Aug. 24, 

1885. 

8. Hattie May, born Sept. 8, 1890. 



ISTo. ^. 

Eliza Cotton, the second daughter of Robert and 
Martha (McGinness) Cotton, was born Nov. 16, 181 5, in 
Shenango township, Crawford county, Pa. Her early life 
was spent on the homestead farm, and her education re- 
ceived in the schools of that vicinity. 

She was married at Evansburg, Crawford county. 
Pa., Aug. 23, 1835, by Rev. J. R. Findley, to John W. 
Murray, who was born Sept. 10, 18 14, in Baltimore, Cum- 
berland county, Maryland, and was a tailor by trade. 



88 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

They were located at Andover, Ashtabula county, Ohio, 
for a few years, until after the birth of two children, when 
they removed to Jamestown,Mercer county. Pa., where they 
remained but a short time, removing thence to Gustavus, 
Trumbull county, Ohio. Here they resided for a number 
of years, after which they removed to New Castle, Law- 
rence county, Pa., where Mrs. Murray died March 12, 
1884. Her husband survives her, and is located in Co- 
lumbiana county, Ohio. 

John and Eliza (Cotton) Murray had five children 
born to them, viz.: Martha E., Robert W., Mary M., Ella 
A., and John W. 



I. Martha E. Murray was born July 18, 1837, i" 
Andover, Ashtabula county, Ohio, and was but a child 
when her parents removed to Jamestown, Pa. Her girl- 
hood days were spent mostly in Gustavus, Ohio, where 
she received a good education, removing thence, with her 
parents, to New Castle, Pa. 

She was married at the latter place, Oct. 31, i860, 
by Rev. Elliot E. Swift, of Allegheny, Pa., to James R. 
Percival, who was born in Youngstown, Ohio, June 14, 
1837. Mr. and Mrs. Percival were located in New Lis- 
bon, Columbiana county, Ohio, for more than twenty 
years, after which, about the year 1888, they removed to 
Leetonia, same county, where Mr. Percival had purchased 
the "Valley House." He was conducting that hotel at 
the time of his death, which occurred at his home Feb. 6, 
1890. His remains were taken to New Lisbon for inter- 
ment. 

The following extract from a sketch of the life of 
Major J. R. Percival, was taken from a New Lisbon 
paper : 

"At the breaking out of the war of the rebellion, 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 89 

when President Lincoln issued a call for seventy-five thou- 
sand men to serve for three months to put down the re- 
bellion, he was among the first in Youngstown to enlist 
in the 19th O. V. I., and his record as a soldier was as 
enviable as that of any of Ohio's sons who wore the blue. 
He served with distinction to the end of the three months 
service. At the close of his first term of enlistment he 
re-enlisted in the same regiment, and was commissioned 
first lieutenant for the remainder of the war. He was 
afterwards made captain of the company, and for brave 
and meritorious conduct on the battle fields of Chicka- 
mauga and Stone River, was promoted to major of the 
regiment. In his years in camp and field, on the march 
and in the fierce crash of battle, and in every crucible in 
which Major Percival was tried, he was the true, unselfish 
friend, the staunch comrade and unflinching soldier. As 
private, lieutenant, captain and later as major of the 
regiment, he was ever faithful to his trust, and in the en- 
tire command he had not one enemy. He was held in 
such high esteem by his superior officers that he was re- 
quested by them to enlist in the regular army, in whicli 
he was offered a high rank, but he declined. At the 
close of the war he laid aside his uniform and returned to 
his citizenship. In 1884 he was appointed by Governor 
Hoadley, Oil Inspector for this district, which office he 
well filled until a change in the administration. He was a 
man of high sense of honor ; of exceptionally fine mental 
attainments; was unusually well read, and possessed the 
invaluable faculty of remembering accurately all that he 
read. Major J. R. Percival is gone! A truer comrade, 
better soldier, or more unselfish man never wore the blue, 
or marched under the stars and stripes. After life's hard 
fought battles his tent is pitched in the camp of everlast- 
ing peace." 



90 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

Mrs. Percival still resides in Leetonia, and conducts 
the "Valley House." 

James and Martha (Murray) Percival had one daugh- 
ter born to them, viz.: 

Mary T., bom March 4, 1873, in Oil City, Pa., 
and married, Sept. 24, 1891, to John Morri- 
son, only son of Harvey Morrison, Esq., of 
New Lisbon, Ohio. The ceremony was 
performed at the bride's home in Leetonia, 
Ohio — Rev. L. F. Laverty, of New Lisbon, 
officiating. Mr. Morrison is a lawyer by 
profession, and is, at present writing, lo- 
cated in New Lisbon. 



n. Robert W. Murray was born July 26, 1838, in 
Andover, Ashtabula county, Ohio, and died July 28, 1839, 
in Jamestown, Pa. 

in. Mary M. Murray was bom Jan. 6, 1840, in 
Jamestown, Mercer county, Pa., but spent her girlhood 
days in Gustavus, Ohio, and there received her primary 
education, completing her studies in Perkiomen College, 
near Philadelphia. She died in Meadville, Pa., in early 
womanhood, Nov. 24, 1867. 



IV. Ella A. Murray was bom Feb. 15, 1845, in 
Gustavus, Trumbull county, Ohio, and there spent her 
childhood days, removing with her parents to New Cas- 
tle, Pa., in girlhood. She received her primary education 
in the schools of the vicinity of her home, completing her 
studies in Meadville, Crawford county. Pa. 

She was married Oct. 16, 1862, in Meadville, by Rev. 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 91 

E, L. Plant, to Robert Riddle, who was engaged in the 
hotel business. They remained in Meadville a few years 
after marriage, removing thence to Oil City, Venango 
county, Pa., where they were located several years. From 
there they removed to New Castle, Lawrence county, 
Pa., which was their home for many years. Here Mr. 
Riddle died May 12, 1884. His widow and two children 
now reside in Stockton, San Joaquin county, Cal. 

Robert and Ella (Murray) Riddle had six children 
born to them, as follows : 

1. Ralph P., bom May 28, 1864, in Meadville, 

Pa., and received the greater part of his ed- 
ucation in Youngstown, Mahoning county, 
Ohio, where he is now located, being em- 
ployed as clerk by the Penna. R. R. Com- 
pany. He was married in New Castle, Pa., 
June 12, 1886, to Miss Mary Beebe. One 
child has blessed their union, viz.: 

(a) Lela, born April 10, 1889, in 
Youngstown, Ohio. 

2. John M., born Sept. 13, 1865, in Oil City, 

Pa.; died Aug. 11, 1867. 

3. William Thompson, born April i, 1867, in 

Oil City, Pa.; died March 30, 1868. 

4. J. RUNCE, born March 30, 1870, in New Cas- 

tle, Pa.; died June 7, 1872. 

5. Helen, born July i?, 1876, in Youngstown, 

Ohio. 

6. Clair Lamont, bom Sept. 15, 1878, in New 

Castle, Pa. 



V. John Winfield Murray was bom April 13, 
1850, in Gustavus, Ohio, and died Dec. 9, 1850. 



92 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

nsTo. S. 

William Cotton, the eldest son of Robert and 
Martha (McGinness) Cotton, was born Oct. i8, 1818, on 
the homestead farm near Hartstown, Crawford county, 
Pa., and there spent his early life, receiving his primary 
education in the schools of his native township. 

Having concluded to adopt the medical profession, 
alter receiving sufficient education, he commenced the 
study of medicine under the direction of Doctor William 
Gibson, a practitioner of Jamestown, Mercer county, Pa. 
He afterwards attended medical lectures at Geneva Col- 
lege, N. Y., and entered upon the practice of his profes- 
sion in Jamestown, Pa. 

While located in Jamestown he was married, in the 
year 1842, to Mary Gibson, sister of Dr. William Gibson. 
He continued his practice in Jamestown for a brief pe- 
riod, after which he and wife removed to Edenburg, Law- 
rence county. Pa., where they remained but a short time, 
removing thence to Brownsville, Fayette county. Pa. 
From there they removed to the town of Centreville, 
(East Bethlehem P. O.,) Washington county. Pa., where 
Doctor Cotton had an extensive and very successful prac- 
tice for a period of thirty-four years, after which he re- 
tired from practice and removed to Brownsville, Pa. He 
was president of the " National Deposit and Discount 
Bank " of the latter place at the time of his death, which 
occurred at the home of his son. Dr. William G. Cotton, 
in Centreville, Washington county, Pa., Nov. 23, 1881. 
He was buried in the cemetery attached to Taylor's 
church, Washington county. Pa. The family lot is 
marked by a granite monument, upon which is inscribed 
the date and place of birth, death, etc., of Doctor Cotton, 
also the same of his wife and daughter. 

His widow survived him nine and one-half years, re- 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 93 

siding part of that time with her son. She died in Cen- 
treville, Pa., May 14, 1891, and was buried beside her 
husband in Taylor's cemetery. 

William and Mary (Gibson) Cotton had two chil- 
dren born to them, viz.: Ella M. and William G. 



I. Ella M. Cotton was born Oct. 9, 1843, in 
Brownsville, Fayette county. Pa., but spent her girlhood 
days in Centreville, Washington county. Pa. She re- 
ceived her education in the schools of the vicinity of her 
home, completing her studies at Bellsville High School, 
Washington county, Pa. 

She was married Oct. 14, 1863, to A. B. Richardson, 
of Bentleyville, Washington county, Pa. — a farmer by oc- 
cupation. They resided in Centreville about four years 
after marriage, removing thence to a farm near Williams- 
port, Morrow county, Ohio. Here Mrs. Richardson died 
Sept. 13, 1879, aged thirty-six years, and was buried in 
Mt. Tabor cemetery. Her husband afterwards married a 
very estimable woman, and continues to reside on the 
homestead farm in Morrow county, Ohio, (Andrews P. O.) 

A. B. and Ella (Cotton) Richardson had eight chil- 
dren born to them, as follows : 

I. Annetta B., born Oct. 23, 1864, and married 
May 30, 1882, to Dr. G. W. Whitney. 
They now reside in Little Sandusky, Wyan- 
dot county, Ohio. Three children have 
been born to them, viz.: 

{a) Ethel, born April 30, 1883. 

(b) Grace, born March 11, 1884. 

(c) George W., born Aug. 12, 1888; 

died Aug. 27, i' 



94 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

2. Mary C, born Jan. 6, i866, and married Jan. 

II, 1890, to George G. Lydy, a lawyer by 
profession. Their present residence is 
Springfield, Green county, Missouri. One 
daughter has blessed this union, viz.: 

Edna Richardson, born May 29, 
1891. 

3. William D., born June 13, 1867, and married 

Oct. 10, 1888, to Nora E. Caldwell. They 
reside in Galion, Crawford county, Ohio, 
where Mr. Richardson is engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits. Their children are as 
follows : 

(a) Clyde Donald, born Sept. 11, 

1889. 
(d) Wanneda Bernice, born Oct. 8, 
1891. 

4. Clyde V., born Nov. 19, 1868. He is en- 

gaged as book-keeper for Wagner & Son, 
of Mansfield, Richland county, Ohio. 

5. Walter, born June 8, 1870; died June 10, 

1870. 

6. Lulu B., born Sept. 13, 1871, and is now at- 

tending a female seminary at Granville, O. 

7. Eldora, born Jan. 25, 1874. She, also, is at- 

tending Granville Female Seminary. 

8. Adalaide, born Oct. 5, 1875, She is now at- 

tending school with her sisters at Granville, 
Ohio. 



II. William Gibson Cotton, the only son of Will- 
iam and Mary (Gibson) Cotton, was born Jan. 8, 1848, in 
Centreville, Washington county, Pa., and here spent his 
youth and early manhood. He received his primary edu- 
cation in the schools of the vicinity of his home. 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 96 

Desiring to enter the medical profession, he accord- 
ingly began preparation for his chosen vocation. After 
receiving a preparatory education in the schools of his 
native county, he entered Jefferson Medical College, Phila- 
delphia, Pa., from which institution he was graduated 
March 12, 1869, when but 21 years of age. He at once 
commenced the practice of medicine with his father at 
Centreville, (East Bethlehem P. O.,) Pa., where he con- 
tinued for a number of years, with the exception of a 
short time in which he practiced in Coal Center, same 
county. 

Dr. Cotton was married in the year 1876 to Anna 
Vance Young, daughter of Robert Young, of Mononga- 
hela City, Washington county. Pa., and continued to re- 
side in Centreville for several years, removing thence to 
Washington, Pa., and from there, in the year 1887, to 
Pittsburgh, Pa., where he continues the practice of medi- 
cine, his present address being No. 506 Penn avenue. 

William and Annie (Young) Cotton had three chil- 
dren born to them, as follows : 

1. Robert William, born May 26, 1877, in Cen- 

treville, Pa. 

2. Emily, born May i, 1882, in Centreville, Pa. 

3. Harry Donald, born Jan. i, 1885, in Monon- 

gahela City, Pa. 



ISto. 4. 

John Vance Cotton, the youngest son of Robert 
and Martha (McGinness) Cotton, was born Sept. 9, 1820, 
on the homestead farm in Shenango township, Crawford 
county. Pa., and there spent his boyhood days. He re- 
ceived a common school education in the schools of his 
native county, and has been engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits during the greater part of his life. 



96 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

He was married May 13, 1847, to Mary Wright, of 
Crawford county, Pa. They continued to reside in Craw- 
ford county — on the homestead farm — until December, 
1859, when they removed to Washington county. Pa., 
locating near Brownsville, Fayette county. Here they re- 
mained until March, 1865, when they removed to Ohio 
and located near Mount Vernon, Knox county, removing 
thence in December, 1869, to Baldwin, Douglass county, 
Kansas, where they settled on a farm, on which they 
have since continued to reside — Mr. Cotton being a re- 
spected citizen and successful farmer. 

About the year 1840 he united with the Methodist 
Episcopal church in Crawford county, transferring his mem- 
bership to his different places of residence, but still con- 
tinuing in the communion of the M. E. church. During 
the greater part of his more than fifty years' service in that 
church he has been a worthy class leader. 

John and Mary (Wright) Cotton had four children — 
Martha, Margaret, Simon and Lilla — all born in Crawford 
county, Pa. They were educated in the common schools 
of their different places of residence, completing their 
studies at Baker University, Baldwin, Kansas. The 
family record is as follows : 



I. Martha N. Cotton was born June 20, 1849^ 
and married in Baldwin, Kansas, Jan. i, 1872, to Ross I. 
Gallagher. They remained in Douglass county, Kansas, 
for several years after marriage, removing thence to Deep- 
water, Henry county, Missouri, where they now reside — 
Mr. Gallagher being engaged in farming. They are mem- 
bers of the M. E. church. They have two children, both 
born in Douglass county, Kan., as follows: 

1. Bertha, born May — , 1874. 

2. Ina, born June — , 1876. 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 97 

II. Margaret E. Cotton was bom Aug. 31, 1851, 
and emigrated with her parents to Baldwin, Kansas, 
when about eighteen years of age. She was married Jan. 
I. ^^73y to Henry H. Bratton, a farmer by occupation. 
They located in Miami county, Kan., where they remained 
a short time, removing about the year 1876 to Wilsie, 
Morris county, Kan., where they now reside. They are 
in the communion of the M. E. church of the latter place. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bratton had four children, all born in Morris 
county, Kan., except the eldest, who was born in Miami 
county. The family record is as follows : 

1. Fred S., born March — , 1875. 

2. Vance, born March — , 1877; died, aged 18 

months. 

3. Leroy, born April — , 1879. 

4. Mary, born Oct. — , 1882. 



III. Simon L. Cotton was born April 2, 1854, and 
spent his childhood and early youth in Crawford and 
Washington counties. Pa., and in Knox county, Ohio, re- 
moving with his parents to Baldwin, Kansas, in the year 
1869. Here he now resides, being engaged on the home- 
stead farm. He is a member of the M. E. church. 



IV. LiLLA May Cotton was born April 3, 1858. 
After receiving a preparatory education in the public 
schools near Mt. Vernon, Knox county, Ohio, and in Bald- 
win, Douglass county, Kansas, she entered Baker Uni- 
versity, Baldwin, and after completing her studies in 
that institution, entered the teachers' profession. She 
has been for several years a successful teacher in the 
schools of the vicinity of her home, being engaged from 
six to ten months in the year. In early life she united 
with the M. E. church, of Baldwin, Kansas, where she 

continues to worship — residing with her parents. 

7 



FAMILY OF ELIZABETH (McGINNESS) GELVIN, 

OF NEVILLE, CLERMONT COUNTY, OHIO. 

T-^LIZABETH McGINNESS, theyoungest daughterof 
I * William and Martha (Wilson) McGinness, was born, 
I as near as can be estimated, about the year 1793, 

^^_^ in Staunton Augusta county, Virginia, and was 
but a child when her parents removed to Allegheny county, 
Pa., and thence to Shenango township, Crawford county, 
Pa., where her girlhood days were spent. 

She was married, when quite young, about the year 
1 8 10, to Jeremiah Gelvin, who was born May 2, 1788, in 
Pennsylvania, though of Irish descent — son of James and 
Nancy Gelvin. Several years after marriage, they located 
in Neville, Clermont county, Ohio, where Mr. Gelvin pur- 
chased, from Morgan Neville, one hundred acres of land. 
He was engaged in farming, carpentering, and hewing 
timber. 

Elizabeth Gelvin died in Neville, Ohio, some time 
between the years 1822 and 1826, but the exact date has 
not been ascertained. She was buried in a neighboring 
burying ground, about two miles from Neville. The 
graveyard has long since been abandoned. 

Mr. Gelvin was afterwards married, Nov. 20, 1826, to 
Temperance Liggett, by whom he had five children — 
Kate, now Mrs. McKee ; James H., now living in Augusta, 
Ky.; Mary Ann, now Mrs. Massy ; Joseph and Washing- 
ton. Temperance Gelvin died in the year 1858. Mr. 
Gelvin continued to reside in Neville until his death, which 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 99 

occurred in the spring of 1861. He was buried in the 
vicinity of Neville. For many years before his death he 
was a member of the Baptist church. 

Jeremiah and Elizabeth (McGinness) Gelvin had six 
children born to them, viz., Emily, William, Martha, Mar- 
garet, Elizabeth, and John, 



Slte:teh ]Sro. 1. 



Emily Gelvin, was born May 26, 18 11, in the state 
of Pennsylvania, and here spent the early years of her life, 
removing with her parents, in girlhood, to Neville, Ohio, 
where the greater part of her life was spent. 

She was married in Neville, May 20, 1830, to William 
Megibben, who was born in Pennsylvania, June 4, 1808. 
They spent their entire wedded life in Clermont county, 
Ohio. Mr. Megibben was what was called in those days 
a " boatsman," in connection with the " McMaths " of the 
same locality. 

William Megibben died in Neville, Ohio, July i, 
1845, at the comparatively early age of thirty-seven years, 
and was buried in the cemetery at the above-named place. 
His widow continued to reside in Neville, though in the 
year 1854 she went to Harrison county, Ky., where her 
sons were located, and there sojourned for a brief period, 
afterwards returning to Ohio. In the autumn of the year 
1857 she again went to Harrison county, Ky., to visit 
her children, who, thinking the change would be beneficial 
to her health, had induced her to take the trip. While at 
the home of her son Thomas, near Cynthiana, she was 
summoned to the home beyond. In answer to that sum- 
mons she passed away Nov. 5, 1857. Her remains were 
taken to Neville for interment, and placed beside her hus- 
band in the cemetery at that place. 



100 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

" The loved of earth — how they pass away ! 
Like the sunny smiles of a summer day ; 
They pass from earth, we see them fall 
As a gem drops out from a coronal — 
As blossoms torn from a healthy stem ; 
'Tis thus that we ever think of them. 
We look with tears on a vacant place, 
And sigh for the loss of a well-known face ; 
We murmur the names we loved, in vain — 
They cannot answer our call again." 

William and Emily (Gelvin) Megibben had eight 
children born to them, viz.: Thomas J., William, Martha, 
John W., Elizabeth, Eliza J., Jeremiah, and James K. 



I. Thomas J. Megibben was born March 28, 1831, 
in the vicinity of Neville, Clermont county, Ohio, and 
there spent his boyhood days. He received his educa- 
tion in the schools of the vicinity of his home, and in 
early life became a member of the Methodist church. 
When about eighteen years of age, in the year 1849, he 
left his native state and went to Harrison county, Ky., 
where an uncle, Nelson Megibben, was then engaged in 
the distilling business. He located near Cynthiana, 
(Harrison county,) where he continued to reside during 
the remainder of his life. 

He was married near Cynthiana, June 23, 1853, to 
Elizabeth J. David, who was born near Indianapolis, Ind., 
Feb. 2, 1833. 

Several years after locating in Kentucky, Thomas Me- 
gibben and brother established the Excelsior Distillery 
at Cynthiana, Ky., which emerged into the Edgewater 
Distillery about the year 1873. Mr. Megibben was presi- 
dent of the " Kentucky Horse Breeders Association," of 
Lexihgton, Ky., and of the " Short-Horn Cattle Breeders 
Association," of Chicago, 111. He was also president for 
many?years of the " Agricultural and MechanicaPAssocia- 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 101 

tion," of Harrison county, Ky. He was the first projector 
and president of the Kentucky Union railroad, and also 
president of the " Latonia Association," of Covington, 
Ky.,' from its organization, in the year 1881, until his 
death. 

Mr. Megibben represented Harrison county two terms 
in the lower branch of the Legislature, and the counties 
of Robertson, Nicholas, and Harrison, four years in the 
state (Kentucky) Senate. 

He died at his palatial residence, " Monticello," Cyn- 
thiana, Ky., Jan. 23, 1890, and was buried in Battle Grove 
cemetery. His widow and family still reside at the above- 
named place. Mrs. Megibben is connected with the 
Christian church. 

Thomas and Elizabeth (David) Megibben had eight 
children, all born in Harrison county, Ky. Some of the 
children were educated at Shelbyville Female College, Ky., 
and the eldest son, James W., was graduated from Wes- 
leyan College, Cincinnati, Ohio. The family record is as 
follows: 

1. Mary Lorain, born Nov. 8, 1854. 

2. Martha J., born July 25, 1857. 

3. James William, born July 7, 1861. 

4. Nannie W., born March 21, 1864. 

5. John Thomas, born Feb. 5, 1866. 

6. Perry Rufus, born Oct. 2, 1871. 

7. BiRDELLA, born Dec. 29, 1873. 

8. David Clyde, born Aug. 6, 1878. 



IL William Megibben, Jr., was born June 12, 
1832, in Neville, Ohio, and died April 26, 1842. 



in. Martha Megibben was born May 24, 1834, 
in the vicinity of Neville, Ohio, and there spent her girl- 
hood and several years of her wedded life. She was 



102 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

married in September, 1 849, to James Miller, of Neville. 
They continued to reside in Neville until the year 1854, 
when they removed to Louisville, Kentucky, and thence 
to Illinois, where Mrs. Miller died about the year 1870, 
She was connected with the Methodist church. 

James and Martha (Megibben) Millei had two daugh- 
ters born to them, as follows : 

1. Lavinia, born in 1850, and married in Sept., 

1869, to O. P. Boyers, who died April 24, 
1889, in Anthony, Kan. She afterwards 
married a banker named Smith, who was 
located in Anthony, but was formerly of 
Connecticut. 

2. Mary, born in 1852, and married Dr. George 

Righter, of Bourbon county, Ky. 



IV. John Wesley Megibben was bom Feb. 26, 
1836, in the vicinity of Neville, Clermont county, Ohio, 
and there spent his early life, receiving his primary edu- 
cation in the schools of his native county. He afterwards 
pursued his studies two years under the instruction of a 
private tutor. Prof. T. J. Norcum, formerly of North 
Carolina. 

When about fifteen years of age, Nov. 15, 185 1, 
he went to Harrison county, Ky., to which place his 
brother, Thomas J., had removed a few years before. He 
located near Cynthiana, and there began his business 
career. Soon after reaching his majority he became 
engaged in business with his brother, Thomas J., and 
later, in the month of March, 1865, they formed a co- 
partnership in Memphis, Tenn., under the firm name of 
"Megibben & Bro.," wholesale dealers in tobacco, cigars, 
wines, etc. Mr. Megibben was engaged in this capacity 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 103 

until March, 1870, when the business was discontinued, 
and he returned to Harrison county, Ky., locating near 
Cynthiana. 

In the meantime, April 11, 1867, he was married at 
Covington, Ky., to Margaret Gray, who was born near 
Cynthiana, June 18, 1838. After twenty-one years of 
wedded life, on the 5th of October, 1888, the wife, Mar- 
garet Megibben, was called by the Master to her re- 
ward. Her remains were interred in Battle Grove ceme- 
tery, Cynthiana. 

" By the river's crystal brink, 
We shall find each missing link, 
Some sweet day, by and by." 

Mr. Megibben is still located near Cynthiana, Ky., 
being engaged in agricultural pursuits. He and children 
are identified with the Presbyterian church — his wife and 
son also having been of that faith. 

John and Margaret (Gray) Megibben had three chil- 
dren, all born near Cynthiana, Harrison county, Ky., as 
follows : 

1. Edward Thomas, bom July 3, 1869; died 

Sept. I, 1887. 

2. Fannie Gray, bom June 10, 1870. She now 

resides with her cousin, Mrs. T. S. Ash- 
brook, in Cynthiana. 

3. Robert Briggs, born July 18, 1873. Since 

his mother's death he has spent the greater 
part of his time at the home of his Grand- 
father Gray. 



V. Elizabeth Megibben was born Nov. 26, 1837, 
and died Oct. 18, 1838. 



VI. Eliza Jane Megibben was born April 29, 
1840, in Clermont county, Ohio, and there spent her 



104 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

early life, removing thence, in the year 1856, to Harrison 
county, Ky., where she continued to reside during the re- 
mainder of her life. 

She was married, in the year i860, to Thomas Lair, 
who was born in Harrison county, Ky., and there spent 
his entire life. He died about three months after mar- 
riage, and was buried in the cemetery near Cynthiana, 
Ky. His young wife survived him until Oct. 19 1871, 
when she died near Cynthiana, and was buried in Battle 
Grove cemetery. She was identified with the Christian 
church. 



Vn. Jeremiah Megibben was born May 29, 1842, 
in Neville, Ohio, and received the greater part of his edu- 
cation in the schools of his native county. When about 
fifteen years of age, in the year 1857, he removed to 
Harrison county, Ky. He was in the Confederate army 
during the civil war. 

He was married, in the year 1864, to Miss Davidson, 
of Indiana, and located near Cynthiana, Ky., where he 
continued to reside during the remainder of his life. Mr. 
Megibben was clerk and superintendent of the Excelsior 
Distillery — T. J. Megibben & Bro. — at the time of his 
death, which occurred at his home Nov. 8, 1869. His 
remains were interred in Battle Grove cemetery. He was 
a member of the Christian church. 

Mrs. Megibben was afterwards married — in the year 
1 87 1 — to Mr. Maehle, of Edinburg, Ind., to which place 
she and children removed, and there they now reside. 

Jeremiah Megibben and wife had two children born 
to them, viz : 

1. Alice, 

2. RUFUS. 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 105 

VIII. James K. Megibben was born May 15, 1844, 
in Neville, Ohio, and there spent his childhood days, re- 
ceiving his primary education in the schools of the 
vicinity of his home. On the 20th day of March, 1855, 
he left his native state and joined his brothers in Harrison 
county, Ky. There he pursued his studies one session in 
Mt. Vernon Seminary. 

During the late war he served in the confederate 
army. He is president of the Edgewater Thoroughbred 
Breeding Establishment, and also of The Megibben Ex- 
celsior Co. — the Excelsior Distillery, T. J. Megibben & 
Bro., Lair, Ky., having been turned into a corporation 
after the death of T. J., and styled "The Megibben Ex- 
celsior Co." He is vice-president of The Megibben- 
Sharp Distilling Co., and one of the associate governors 
of the Latonia Association, of Covington, Ky. He 
farms on an extensive scale, and is well known among 
the turf fraternity. 

He was married June 20, 1866, in Cynthiana, Ky., 
to Mary Shawhan, who was born at the above-named 
place, April 22, 1845. They located in Cynthiana, where 
they have since continued to reside. 

James and Mary (Shawhan) Megibben had eight 
children, all born in Harrison county, Ky., as follows : 

1. John William, born May 19, 1867. 

2. Shawhan, born Feb. 3, 1869. 

3. Charles Kimbrough, born July 25, 1870. 

4. Lela May, born Sept. 21, 1872 ; died Jan. 14, 

1892. 

5. Lizzie Lawrence, born July 10, 1877. 

6. Thomas Jefferson, born Aug. 9, 1881. 

7. James Keller, born April 26, 1884. 

8. Joseph Todd, born Aug. 3, 1888. 



1D6 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

ISTo. ^. 

William Gelvin, the eldest son of Jeremiah and 
Elizabeth (McGinness) Gelvin, was born Aug. 4, 1813, in 
Western Pennsylvania, and in youth removed with his 
parents to Neville, Ohio. 

When quite a young man, during the time of slavery, 
he went to Louisiana, where he was engaged as overseer 
for a widow. In the year 1840, on account of his having 
punished an octoroon, he was ambushed and shot by her 
paramour. 



No. 3. 

Martha Gelvin, the second daughter of Jeremiah 
and Elizabeth (McGinness) Gelvin, was born Oct. 15, 181 5, 
She spent her girlhood and early womanhood in the 
vicinity of Neville, Clermont county, Ohio, to which place 
her parents removed from Pennsylvania. 

She was married to Leroy Hill, and afterwards re- 
moved to Illinois, and thence to Monmouth, Crawford 
county, Kan. Nothing further has been learned of her, 
except that she had two sons, who, it is supposed, are 
living in Kansas. 



ISTo. 4. 

Margaret Gelvin was born Jan. 17, 1817, and 
spent her girlhood days in Clermont county, Ohio. She 
left that county when quite young. No further informa- 
tion of her has been obtained. It is not known whether 
or not she was married, or where she spent the remainder 
of her life. 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY, 107 

iSTo. e. 

Elizabeth Gelvin was bom March 17, 1820, and 
spent her early Ufe in Clermont county, Ohio. She was 
married to a Mr. Coleman, and went West. All further 
trace of her has been lost. 



isio. e. 

John Gelvin was born May 4, 1822. When but a 
child, being bereft of the loving- care of a mother, he was 
taken to the home of his aunt Rachel, his father's sister, 
and was cared for by her until he was eight or nine years of 
age. When about seventeen years of age he left Neville 
and went to the state of Illinois, where he died several 
years after his location there. He owned a large tract of 
land which he left to his father, as he was unmarried. 



FAMILY OF WILLIAM McGINNESS, 

OF MOUNT JACKSON, LAWRENCE COUNTY, PA. 

WILLIAM McGINNESS, the youngest child of Will- 
iam and Martha (Wilson) McGinness, was born 
Sept. 12, 1796, in Staunton, Augusta county, Va., 
and was but a child when his parents removed to what is 
now Findlay township, Allegheny county, Pa., and thence 
to Shenango township, Crawford county, Pa. — some time 
previous to the year 1800. His youthful days were spent 
on the homestead farm in Shenango township. 

He, like his brothers, received only a limited amount 
of schooling — such as the schools of those days afforded 
— and followed farming during the greater part of his life. 
When quite a young man he left Crawford county and re- 
turned to Allegheny county, locating near Cavett's Mills, 
Findlay township. 

On the 9th day of February, 181 5 — in the nineteenth 
year of his age — he was married to Elizabeth Turner. 
They first made their home in Washington county. Pa., 
where they remained until after the birth of three children. 
From there they removed to Beaver county. Pa., about 
the year 1822 or '23, and settled on a farm about three 
miles south of Mount Jackson.^. Here his wife Elizabeth 
died Aug. 14, 1830, aged thirty-three years, and was 
buried in Niel graveyard, near Mount Jackson. 

Mr. McGinness married, as his second wife, Eliza 
Justice, Nov. 6, 1832, and continued to reside at the 
above-named place for a number of years, removing, finally, 
about the year 1839 or 1840, to a farm in Mount Jackson, 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 109 

Beaver (now Lawrence) county, Pa., which was the family 
residence for many years — until marriage and death made 
separation, 

Eliza Justice, the second wife, died July 19, 1840, aged 
thirty-nine years, after which Mr. McGinness married his 
third wife, Elizabeth Kennedy, Sept. 17, 1841. 

Mr. McGinness was justice of the peace in North 
Beaver township for many years before his death, which 
occurred at his home in Mount Jackson, July 17, 1873. 
He was buried in Niel graveyard. At the time of his 
death he was a ruling elder in Mount Jackson U. P. 
church, having served in that capacity for many years. 
He has always been spoken of as a Christian gentleman, 
with all the characteristics that the term implies. " It is 
the glory of a good man that his influence survives him. 
He being dead yet speaketh." His wife, Elizabeth Ken- 
nedy, survived him several years, and died on the home- 
stead farm, Aug. 17, 1878, aged sixty-eight years. 

William McGinness had by his first wife, Elizabeth 
Turner, six children, viz.: Nancy, Sarah, John T.,William, 
James, and Elizabeth ; by his second wife, Eliza Justice, 
two children — Jacob, and Martha ; and by his third wife, 
Elizabeth Kennedy, three children, viz.: Samuel K., Mar- 
garet, and Eliza Jane. 



Slteiteln. No. 1. 

Nancy McGinness, the eldest child, was born April 
5, 1 8 16, in Washington county. Pa., and there spent her 
early years, removing with her parents, in girlhood, to a 
farm in Beaver county. Pa., where she received her educa- 
tion in the schools of the vicinity of her home. 

She was married Feb. 4, 1836, to Benjamin Morrison, 
who was born in Beaver (now Lawrence) county, Oct. 30, 
1 816, and was a farmer by occupation. 



110 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

They located on a farm in Beaver county, where they 
remained until April, 1844, when they emigrated to Fort 
Madison, Lee county, Iowa, and thence, in August, 1856, 
to Marion county, Iowa, locating near Knoxville, where 
they spent the remainder of their lives. 

Nancy McGinness was raised in the faith of her an- 
cestors, but about the year 1859, she, with her husband 
and family, joined the United Brethren church, in Marion 
county, Iowa, and a few years after embraced the faith of 
the Seventh Day Adventists, continuing in the same until 
her death, which occurred Dec. 10, 1877. Her husband 
survived her, and died May 13, 1885. Both are buried in 
Caloma, Marion county, Iowa. 

Benjamin and Nancy (McGinness) Morrison had nine 
children, viz.: Eliza, Rachel L., James H., Lucinda J., 
William M., Buena Vista, Oscar O., John M., and Ben- 
jamin G. The family record is as follows : 



I. Eliza Morrison was born Sept. 5, 1837, in 
Beaver (now Lawrence) county. Pa., and when about seven 
years of age, removed with her parents to Lee county, 
Iowa, where she was married, in the year 1854, to J. W. 
Davis, and with him removed to Marion county, Iowa, in 
1856. Here they remained until 1882, when they re- 
moved to Tyndall, Bon Homme county, Dak., where they 
now reside. Their children are (surname Davis) as follows : 

1. Walter, born Aug. — , 1855. 

2. Benjamin, born May — , 1857. 

3. James, born July — , 1859. 

4. William, born Sept. — , 1865. 



II. Rachel L. Morrison, was born Oct. 27, 1839, 
in' what is now Lawrence county. Pa., and removed with 
the family to Fort Madison, Iowa, where she spent her 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. HI 

girlhood days, removing thence to near Knoxville, Marion 
county. Here she was married, April 15, 1857, to Jesse 
Vansyoc, and with him removed to Warren county, 
Iowa, where they are, at present writing, located. Two 
children (surname Vansyoc) have been born to them : 

1. Harvey Elmer, born May — , 1858. 

2. William Edson, born Aug. — , 1864. 



HI. James Harvey Morrison was born Oct. 22, 
1 84 1, in Beaver (now Lawrence) county. Pa., and was 
quite young when his parents removed to Lee county, 
Iowa, where his childhood days were passed. When 
about fifteen years of age he removed with the family to 
Marion county, Iowa. After qualifying himself he entered 
Iowa University, at Pella, where he pursued his studies 
from 1862 until 1865 — preparatory to entering the minis- 
try. He was married Aug. 17, 1871, to Miss Jennie 
Mitchell, of Whiteside county, Iowa, and located at 
Milo, Warren county, Iowa. Here they continued to re- 
side until March 20, 1887, when they removed to Knox- 
ville, Marion county, returning to Milo, Feb. 20, 1890, 
where they are at present located. Mr. Morrison was 
raised and schooled in the Presbyterian faith, but about 
the year 1862, became a member of the United Brethren 
church. Being impressed with a desire to know more 
about God and the Bible, he began a careful and thorough 
investigation of the Scriptures, which resulted in making 
him a firm believer in the doctrine of the Seventh Day 
Adventists, and he, accordingly, entered the ministry in 
that denomination. He is now president of the " Iowa 
State Conference," also of the " Iowa Tract Society," of 
Des Moines, Iowa. James H. Morrison and wife had six 
children, as follows : 



112 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

1. Myrtle, born Aug. 27, 1872. * 

2. Winnie Eldora, born July 31, 1874 ; died 

Oct. 21, 1878. 

3. Stella May, born Feb. 3, 1876 ; died Oct. 24, 

1878. 

4. ViNNiE Maude, born July 4, 1877. 

5. Harvey Archie, born Dec. 2, 1879. 

6. Bertha Mabel, born Feb. 23, 1884, 



IV. LuciNDA Jane Morrison was born Oct. 5, 
1843, in what is now Lawrence county, Pa., and was but 
an infant when her parents removed to Lee county, Iowa, 
where her childhood days were spent. When about thir- 
teen years of age she removed to Marion county, Iowa, and 
remained at the homestead until March, 1878, when she 
located in the town of Knoxville, removing thence, in 1 882, 
to Battle Creek. Calhoun county, Mich., where she is at 
present located, being employed in the printing office of a 
publishing company, in charge of her brother-in-law, 
Russell A. Hart. 



V. William M. Morrison was born May 4, 1846, 
at Fort Madison, Lee county, Iowa, and at the age often 
years removed with the family to Marion county, Iowa., 
where he remained until the year 1872, when he was 
married to Mary E. Wick, of Whiteside county. 111., after 
which he located in Warren county, Iowa, and here con- 
tinued to reside until his death, which occurred Jan. 24, 
1886. He left children as follows: 

1. Grace Edith, born Oct. — , 1873. 

2. William Wick, born Aug. 25, 1877. 

3. John Everest A., born Dec. 24, 1884, 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 113 

VI. BuENA Vista Morrison was born Feb. 27, 
1848, at Fort Madison, Lee county, Iowa, and here spent 
her early years, removing to Marion county in August, 
1856. She was married, in the year 1869, to Russell A. 
Hart, of State Center, Marshall county, Iowa, to which 
place she removed after marriage. They returned to Ma- 
rion county in 1871, and in 1878 located at Knoxville — 
same county — removing thence in the year 1882 to Bat- 
tle Creek, Calhoun county, Mich., where Mr. Hart has 
charge of a publishing association. Three children have 
been born to them, as follows (surname Hart): 

1. Minnie O., born Jan. 20, 1873. 

2. Ellis Ray, born Nov. 23, 1875. 

3. Lela May, born Feb. 11, 1880. 



VII. Oscar O. Morrison was born April 16, 1850, 
in Lee county, Iowa, but spent his boyhood days mostly in 
Marion county. After receiving a preparatory education 
he entered Monmouth College, 111., which institution he at- 
tended two years. He studied law and was admitted to 
the bar in the year 1879. He located in Warren county, 
Iowa, but removed in 1881 to Colorado, where he now 
resides. He was married, but the name of his wife has 
not been ascertained. One child was born to them, viz.: 
I. Lela, born May — , 1886. 



VIII. John Marion Morrison was born Feb. 29, 
1852, in Lee county, Iowa, but spent his boyhood days in 
Marion county. Here he was married when about twen- 
ty years of age, but the name of his wife has not been 
obtained. They removed from Iowa to Dakota in the 
year 1873, but only remained there about a year, after 
which they returned to Marion county, Iowa, and located 
in Knoxville. From there they removed to Colorado in 



114 ^ THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

1 88 1, thence to Broken Bow, Neb., and from there to 
Lincohi, Lancaster county. Neb., where they are at pres- 
ent writing located. Their family record is as follows: 

1. Chester, born March — , 1873. 

2. Clara, born Sept. — , 1875; died Sept. — , 

1890. 

3. Burl, born June — , 1880. 



IX. Benjamin Gailey Morrison was born May 
10, i860, in Marion county, Iowa, and died Sept. 15, 1862. 



ISTo. 2. 

Sarah McGinness was born Oct. 10, 1818, in Wash- 
ington county. Pa., and in childhood removed with her 
parents to a farm in Beaver (now Lawrence) county. Pa., 
and here spent her girlhood days, receiving her education 
in the schools of the district. When she was about twen- 
ty-one years of age her parents removed to Mount Jack- 
son, Pa., where she was married Jan. 18, 1842, to Samuel 
W. Gailey, who was born of Scottish parentage in Beaver 
county. Pa. For a number of years after marriage they 
continued to reside in Mt. Jackson, removing thence to 
Salem, Columbiana county, Ohio, and finally to Aledo, 
Mercer county, 111., where they are now located. They 
have been for many years in the communion of the M. E. 
church. Mr. Gailey, although in the seventy- fourth year 
of his age, is still an active justice of the peace, having 
served in that capacity for several years. Eight children 
have been born to them — three sons and five daughters — 
four of whom died in infancy. Those who grew to ma- 
turity are as follows : 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 115 

I. Adeline Francis Gailey was born Nov. 9, 1 846, 
in Mount Jackson, Pa., and married in Mercer county, 111., 
in the year 1865, to William Duncan, a farmer by occupa- 
tion. They located on a farm in Mercer county, 111., 
where they remained for a number of years — Mr. Duncan 
serving that county as sheriff several years, and also the 
Illinois State Legislature during one session as sergeant- 
at-arms. They afterwards sold their farm in Illinois and 
removed to Kearney county. Neb., where they purchased 
land where old Fort Kearney stood, and also a tract ad- 
joining. Here they now reside — Mr. Duncan conducting 
a large cattle-ranch. They are connected with the M. E. 
church. Mr. and Mrs. Duncan had five children born to 
them, two of whom died in infancy. Those living are as 
follows : 

1. WiLLMETl'A, the only daughter, married Lem- 

uel Copeland, a druggist by profession. 
They now reside in Minden, Kearney coun- 
ty. Neb. 

2. William McGinness, born about the year 

1875, and now attending Minden Academy, 

3. Donald, born about the year 1881. 



II. Olive Gailey was born June 15, 1850, in 
Mount Jackson, Lawrence county, Pa., and married in 
Aledo, Mercer county. 111., May 10, 1887, to Robert A. 
McDonald, who was born in Ohio, but is now a resident of 
Aledo, having been for a number of years cashier of the 
Aledo Bank. They are in the communion of the M. E. 
church. No children. 



III. Mary Ella Gailey was born Aug. 8, 1854, in 
Salem, Columbiana county, Ohio, and in childhood re- 
moved with her parents to Aledo, 111. After qualifying 



116 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

herself she entered the teachers' profession, and taught 
successfully in the schools of Aledo for a period of eight 
years. She was married March 29, 1881, to Dr. E. L. 
Emerson, who was born in Mercer county, 111., and is a 
graduate of Rush College, Chicago. They reside in New 
Windsor, Mercer county, 111., where Dr. Emerson, in ad- 
dition to practicing his profession, conducts a large drug- 
store. Two years after marriage Mrs. Emerson passed 
an examination before the "Board of Pharmacists," and 
received a druggist's diploma. Dr. and Mrs. Emerson are 
connected with the M. E. church at the above-named 
place. No children. 



IV. Martha Jane Gailey was born May 8, i860, 
in Mercer county. 111. She was married Feb. 19, 1880, to 
George Gillespie, who was born in Cumberland county, 
Pa., byt a resident of Aledo, 111., at the time of marriage. 
They went to housekeeping in Aledo, Mr. Gillespie hav- 
ing built a home and engaged in the grocery business. 
They are members of the M. E. church. Two children 
have been born to them, viz.: 

1. Fern. 

2. Edna. 



No. S. 

John Turner McGinness, the eldest son of William 
and Elizabeth (Turner) McGinness, was born Sept. 4, 
1 82 1, in Washington county, Pa., but spent his boyhood 
days in Beaver (now Lawrence) county. He received a 
common school education in the schools of the vicinity of 
his home ; was raised on a farm and has followed farming 
the greater part of his life. 

He was married at Mount Jackson, Nov. 25, 1844, to 
Margaret Keddoo, who was born Feb. 19, 1824. Two 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 117 

years after marriage, in the spring of 1846, he and wife 
left their native state for the west, and, after a long and 
toilsome journey, arrived in Mercer county. 111., July 26, 
1846, where they located, and have since continued to 
reside. They endured hardships and suffered from sick- 
ness and inconveniences peculiar to pioneer times. 

In speaking of his pioneer life in Illinois, Mr. McGin- 
ness says : " When we arrived in Illinois we had but fifty 
dollars. My wife and I both took the ague — the great 
drawback of the west at that time — and for six months I 
was unable to work, consequently by spring our money 
was all gone, except three dollars. I went seven miles to 
purchase some groceries, but was refused credit. The 
next week I went to another town to buy my wife a calico 
dress, but was again refused credit. About this time an 
elder of the church came around to obtain subscriptions 
for the support of a minister. I subscribed one dollar, 
not knowing when or how I might get it ; but the Lord 
had better days in store for us. When the fever left us 
our health and strength returned, and success attended 
our efforts." 

Surmounting all the difficulties which met these early 
settlers, Mr. McGinness has continued t(^ prosper, and has 
been for many years a successful farmer and highly- 
respected citizen of Joy, Mercer county. 111., where he 
owns a fine farm. He has held many offices of trust and 
honor, and was a representative from Mercer county to the 
Illinois Legislature of 1874-75. 

In early manhood Mr. McGinness united with the 
Presbyterian church of Mount Jackson, and afterwards 
transferred to the Presbyterian »church of Joy, Mercer 
county, 111., in which he and family are active members — 
Mr. McGinness having been elected a ruling elder in 1855, 
has continued to serve in that capacity up to the present 
time. 



118 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

John and Margaret (Keddoo) McGinness had nine 
children, all born and raised in the vicinity of Joy, Mercer 
county. 111. They received a common school education at 
Pleasant Hill. The family record is as follows : 



I. Mary E. McGinness was bom Oct. 25, 1846, 
and married Oct. 20, 1864, to Beard Church, who is now 
deceased. She now resides at Sunbeam, Mercer county, 
111., and is a member of the United Presbyterian church 
at that place. Her family consists of the following chil- 
dren (surname Church) : 

1. Everett Wood, born Sept. 24, 1865. 

2. Frank McGinness, born May 10, 1868, and 

married Jan. 21, 1891, to Nellie Decker. 
They now reside in Joy, 111. 

3. Beard Ernest, bom Jan. 4, 1883. 

4. Mary Bertha, twin sister of Beard. 



II. Sarah McGinness, was born Feb. 17, 1849, 
and married Feb. 17, 1869, to John A. Gilmore, a banker. 
They now reside in Garnett, Anderson county, Kan., and 
are members of the Presbyterian church at that place. 



III. Emily McGinness, was born Dec. 2, 1 850, and 
married Feb. 14, 1871, to Cliff Haverfield. They now re- 
side in Aledo, Mercer county, 111., Mr. Haverfield being en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits at that place. They are 
members of the Presbyterian church. Their children are 
as follows (surname Haverfield) : 

1. Sarah Nallie, born May 22, 1873. 

2. Coz\^ Ethel, born April 23, 1881. 

3. ROSCOE Hertzel, born , 1882. 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 119 

IV. William McGinness was born Aug. 12, 1853, 
and died Feb. 16, 1855. 



V. Alice McGinness was born May 8, 1856, and 
married Feb. i, 1877, to William Love. They are located 
at Joy, Mercer county, III, where Mr. Love is engaged in 
the mercantile business. They are in the communion of 
the Presbyterian church at Joy. They have but one child 
living, viz.: 

Virgil Arthur, bom Feb. 16, 1881. 



VL Margaret McGinness was born Jan. 30, 1859. 
She resides with her parents on the homestead farm at 
Joy, 111. She is a member of the Presbyterian church at 
that place. 

VII. Mattie McGinness was born May 11, 1861, 
and died in early womanhood, March 19, 1886. 

" There is no death ! The flowers go down 
To rise upon some fairer shore ; 
And bright in Heaven's jewelled crown 
They shine forever more." 



VIII. Charles E. McGinness, the only living son 
of John and Margaret (Keddoo) McGinness, was born Sept. 
24, 1864, in Joy, Mercer county, 111., and here spent his 
early life, receiving his primary education in the schools 
of the vicinity of his home. 

In youth he made a public profession of his faith in 
Christ by uniting with the Presbyterian church of Joy, 
111., and at an early age, being impressed with a desire to 
enter the ministry, began preparation for that great and 
noble work. 

At the age of thirteen, in 1877, he entered Aledo 
Academy, 111. — then under the care of J. R and J. M, 



120 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

Wylie — intending a four years course, but on account of 
his health being somewhat impaired, he omitted the sum- 
mer terms, and finished the course in the spring of 1882, 
when he was graduated with honor, being valedictorian of 
the class. After one year of post-graduate study at the 
same institution, he went to Lake Forest University, 111., 
where he entered the freshman class in 1883. At the end 
of the junior year he captured the first prize for oratory — a 
prize of fifty dollars. He pursued his studies in Lake For- 
est University for three years, after which he entered the 
senior class of Princeton College, New Jersey, where (in 
Whig Hall) he again took a prize for oratory — the prize 
being a gold medal. He was graduated from Princeton with 
a class of eighty-six, in June, 1887, and in the autumn of 
the same year, entered Princeton Theological Seminary, 
from which institution he was graduated, with a class of 
sixty, May 6, 1890. 

He was licensed by Rock River Presbytery at Morri- 
son, 111., in September, 1889; ordained at Schaghticoke, 
N. Y., by Troy Presbytery, in April, 1890, and installed 
assistant pastor of Olivet Presbyterian church, Lansing- 
burg, N. Y., May 14, 1890— Rev. G. P. Tyler, D. D., be- 
ing the senior pastor. By request of Rev. McGinness, 
the congregation granted him permission to spend the 
winter months of 1890-91 in New York, taking courses in 
philosophy and ethics in New York University — return- 
ing on alternate Sabbaths to his congregation to preach. 
This course requires two years' study — one of which must 
be spent as a resident student, and in that year he did the 
work of two years, except the "thesis." Having com- 
pleted the "thesis," thus finishing the required course, the 
University granted him, June 9, 1892, the degree of Doc- 
tor of Philosophy. His present address is Lansingburg, 
N. Y. 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 121 

Rev. McGinness was married May 4, 1892, to Miss 
Chariotte Lela Judson, an earnest worker in his congre- 
gation — second and youngest daughter of David and An- 
ne Eliza (Cowee) Judson. The ceremony was performed 
by Rev. G. P. Tyler, D. D., at the home of the bride on 
Eighteenth street, Lansingburg. 



IX. Cora McGinness was born Oct. 12, 1867, and 
at present writing resides with her parents on the home- 
stead farm, in the vicinity of Joy, Mercer county, 111. She 
is in the communion of the Presbyterian church at that 
place. 

nsTo. 4. 

William McGinness, the second son of William 
and Elizabeth (Turner) McGinness, was born July 3, 1824, 
on a farm three miles south of Mount Jackson, in Beaver 
(now Lawrence) county, Pa., and there spent his early 
life, receiving his education in the schools of the vicinity 
of his home. When fourteen years of age, he went to 
Mount Jackson to learn the trade of a tailor, which vo- 
cation he afterwards followed. 

He was married March 4, 1847, to Lydia Welk, of 
Dutch descent — daughter of Anthony and Susanna Welk. 
They located in New Middletown, Mahoning county, Ohio, 
and here Mrs. McGinness died Aug. 29, 1848, leaving an 
infant son, William. She was buried in a neighboring 
burying ground, known as the " old Springfield church- 
yard." 

Mr. McGinness was married Nov. 8, 1849, tQ his sec- 
ond wife, Clarissa Budd, who was born July 2, 1825. 
They continued to reside in New Middletown for several 
years, removing thence to Greenville, Mercer county. Pa., 
where Mr. McGinness was engaged for a few years in the 



122 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

grocery business, afterwards removing to Grasshopper 
Falls, (now Valley Falls,) Jefferson county, Kan., where 
they have since continued to reside. They are members 
of the United Presbyterian church of that place. 

William McGinness had by his first wife, Lydia, one 
son, William ; and by his second wife, Clarissa, two sons 
and two daughters, viz.: George, Olive, Laura, and Samuel. 



I. William Henry McGinness, the only child of 
William McGinness' first wife, Lydia Welk, was born in 
New Middletown, Mahoning county, Ohio, Dec. 21, 1847. 
Being bereft, at a very early age, of the tender and loving 
care of a mother, he was taken to the home of his grand- 
parents, Anthony and Susanna Welk, where his childhood 
days were spent. He received his education in the schools 
of his native town. 

In April, 1861, when but thirteen years of age, he 
left his grandparents' home, and went to Youngstown, 
Mahoning county, Ohio, where he entered the employ of 
his uncle, Mr. John Brenner, of the firm of Manning and 
Brenner, nurserymen and florists. He continued with this 
firm about four years. 

William McGinness was married in Sharon, Pa., by 
Squire Abner Applegate, Feb. 23, 1865, when but seven- 
teen years of age, to Miss Mary, daughter of Morgan and 
Sarah (Griffiths) Morgans, who was born June 10, 1847, 
in Ebbw Vale, South Wales, and came to America when 
but eight years of age. 

After marriage they located in New Middletown, Ohio, 
where they resided until the autumn of 1865, removing 
thence to Youngstown, Ohio, where Mr. McGinness was 
engaged in the "Nut and Bolt " Works for about five and 
one half years. In the spring of 1871 they removed to 
Grasshopper Falls, (now Valley Falls,) Jefferson county, 
Kan., where they remained but two months, after which 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 183 

time they returned to Youngstown. Here Mr. McGinness 
was employed as assistant superintendent of Oak Hill 
cemetery, from the early part of 1871 until the spring of 
1876, when he and family removed to New Castle, Law- 
rence county. Pa., where he was engaged in the meat 
business. In the autumn of 1876 they again located in 
Youngstown, their former place of residence, and here Mr. 
McGinness embarked in the monumental business, in 
which capacity he has since been engaged. His present 
address is 1020 Orange street, Youngstown, Ohio. 

Mr. McGinness and family are members of Trinity 
M. E. church of the above-named place. 

William and Mary (Morgans) McGinness had seven 
children, all born in Youngstown, Ohio, as follows : 

1. Charles Ellsworth, bom Jan. 24, 1866, 

and was accidentally killed, Nov. 8, 1887, 
while in the line of duty, as assistant miller 
in the " City Flouring Mills," Youngstown, 
Ohio. 

2. Harry, bom March 9, 1868 ; died Oct. 29, 

1869. 

3. Edward William, born Sept. 30, 1871 ; died 

April 24, 1873. 

4. Grace May, bom May 29, 1874, and married 

in Warren, Ohio, July 22, 1892, to Mr. 
John R. Howells, of Girard, Ohio. 

5. Rutherford B., bom Feb. i, 1877. He is 

a cigarmaker by occupation. 

6. William Wade, born April 12, 1882. 

7. Infant, bom Sept. 30, 1887, (dead.) 



II. George McGinness was bom Aug. 9, 1850, in 
Middletown, Ohio. He is a stonemason by occupation, 
and is unmarried. 



124 THEMcGINNESS FAMILY. 

III. Olive McGinness was born April 7, 1852, in 
Middletown, Ohio, and married Dec. 29, 1872, to George 
Lewis, who was born Dec. 4, 1847, and is a barber by 
occupation. They reside in Valley Falls, Jefferson county, 
Kan. Four children have been born to them, as follows : 

1. Edward B., born Oct. 21, 1873. 

2. George, born May 22, 1875 ; died Oct. 4,1876. 

3. Flora Belle, born March 16, 1877. 

4. David E., born Feb. 7, 1882. 



IV. Laura McGinness was born Oct. 12, 1857, and 
married Jan. 15, 1880, to Wilbert Burket. They now 
reside in Mount Pleasant, Henry county, Iowa, and are 
identified with the Congregational church. Their children 
are as follows : 

1. Inna, born Feb. 15, 1881. 

2. Wilbert E., born Nov. 8, 1884. 

3. Onnie, born Sept. 15, 1886. 



V. Samuel McGinness was born July 21, 1861, 
and married in the year 1883, to Miss Cowan, daughter 
of Doctor Cowan. They reside in Colorado Springs, El 
Paso county. Col. One son was born to them, viz.: 

Harry, born — , 1885 ; died Dec. 30, 

1890. 



ISCo. S. 

James McGinness, the youngest son of William 
McGinness' first wife, P21izabeth Turner, was born Sept. 
30, 1827, in what is now Lawrence county, Pa., and here 
spent his childhood days, removing with the family to 
Mount Jackson, Lawrence county, when about twelve 
years of age. 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 125 

He received his education in the schools of his na- 
tive county, and when about fifteen years of age went to 
Birmingham — now South Side, Pittsburgh — to learn the 
trade of a shoemaker. Here he spent five years, after 
which, about the year 1847, he emigrated to Iowa and en- 
gaged in farming, which he has since continued to follow. 

He was married March 29, 1849, to Miss Nancy Saf- 
fell, and continued to reside in Iowa until 1851, when he 
and wife removed to Buffalo Prairie, Rock Island county, 
111., where they have since resided. They are members 
of the Presbyterian church at that place. 

James and Nancy (Saffell) McGinness had nine chil- 
dren born to them, as follows : 



I. John McGinness was born May 9, 185 1, and 
spent his early life on the homestead farm at Buffalo 
Prairie, 111. He was married Dec. 24, 1874 to Laura M. 
Reynolds. They are located at Davenport, Iowa, where 
Mr. McGinness is engaged in dealing in horses. They 
have two children, viz.: 

1. Jessie M. 

2. Bessie C. 



II. William McGinness was born at Buffalo Prai- 
rie, 111., March 26, 1855, and was married March 8, 1877, 
to Mattie Boney. He is engaged in farming. Three 
children have been born to them, viz.: 

1. John L. 

2. Oakley. 

3. Earle. 



III. Mary McGinness, born March i, 1859; died 
Sept. 17, i860. 



126 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

IV. Adaline McGinness, born Sept. lo, 1861 ; 
died Feb. 29, 1862. 



V. James Monroe McGinness, born Jan. 10, 1863 ; 
died March i, 1864. 



VI. Ida May McGinness was born Feb. 5, 1865, 
and resides with her parents at Buffalo Prairie, 111. After 
qualifying herself she entered the teachers' profession, and 
is employed in that capacity in the vicinity of her home. 



VII. Emma McGinness was born Jan. 3, 1867, and 
married Oct. 9, 1890, to Everett Collins, of Muscatine, 
Muscatine county, Iowa, where they now reside. 



VIII. Mattie E. McGinness, was born Jan. 13, 
1869. After receiving a preparatory education, she, like 
her sister, entered the teachers' profession, and at present 
follows that vocation. 



IX. Aubrey C. McGinness was born Aug. 3, 1877, 
and at present resides with his parents in Buffalo Prairie, 111. 



ISTo. e. 

Elizabeth McGinness was born July 15, 1830, in 
what is now Lawrence County, Pa., and died Sept. 20, 1830. 



ISlo. T7. 



Jacob J. McGinness, the eldest child of William 
McGinness' second wife, Eliza Justice, was born Sept. 25, 
1833, in Beaver (now Lawrence) county, Pa., and here 
spent the first six years of his life. He removed with his 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 127 

parents to a farm in Mount Jackson, Lawrence county, 
where he remained until he was about twenty years of 
age. He received a common school education in the 
schools of Lawrence county, and has since been engaged 
in farming. 

He was married in Joy, Mercer county, 111., Jan. i, 
1856, to Minerva Safifell, who was born Oct. 7, 1837, near 
Lexington, Ky. — sister of Nancy Saffell, the wife of 
James McGinness. They located in Mercer county. 111., 
where they continued to reside until 1888, when they re- 
moved to Hand county. South Dakota, and there re- 
mained about two years, after which they returned to Mer- 
cer county. 111., and located in Viola. Here they now 
reside. 

In the year 1858 Mr. and Mrs. McGinness became 
members of the Presbyterian church and have since been 
in the communion of that denomination. 

Jacob and Minerva (Safifell) McGinness had ten chil- 
dren, all born and educated in Mercer county, 111., as 
follows : 



I. John Harvey McGinness was born Nov. i, 
1857. His youth and early manhood were passed in his 
native state. He removed to Burdette, Hand county, 
South Dakota, in the year 1 884, where he has since con- 
tinued to reside, being engaged in farming. 



II. Mary Eliza McGinness was born May 27, 
1859. She was married Sept. 18, 1881, to Joseph A. 
Downey, of Millersburg, Mercer county. 111. He was 
formerly engaged in farming, but is at present in the mer- 
cantile business in Marston, 111. In the year 1883 they 
joined the Presbyterian church. Mr. and Mrs. Downey 
have four children, viz.: 



128 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

1. George Justice, born Jan. 14, 1883. 

2. Ollie Theressa, born Aug. 27, 1885. 

3. Bessie Mabel, born Sept. 25, 1887. 

4. Mamie Fern, born April 19, 1890. 



III. Martha Jane McGinness was born June 6, 
1 86 1. She was married Jan. 18, 1879, to John G. Dow- 
ney, and continued to reside in Mercer county, 111., until 
her death, which occurred Oct. 22, 1888. She was buried 
in Millersburg cemetery, 111. Two children were born to 
this union, as follows : 

1. Bertha May, born Feb. 3, 1881. 

2. Lena Agnes, born April i, 1886. 
** 

IV. Allie Belle McGinness was born Aug. 3 1 , 
1863. She was married Nov. 25, 1886, to John T. 
Mitchell, of Marston, 111. — a farmer by occupation. Their 
children are as follows : 

1. Joseph Fred, born May 14, 1890. 

2. Robert Irwin, born March 5, 1892. 



VI. Nancy Emma McGinness was born July 28, 
1865, and married Jan. 19, 1888, to Scott M. Hunt, a 
farmer of Millersburg, Mercer county, 111., but a native of 
Lawrence county. Pa. They united with the Presbyterian 
congregation of Millersburg, in the year 1888. Two 
children — twins — have been born to them, viz.: 

1. Herald Thurman, ) , ^ „ „„„ 
,, \, ' Vborn Oct. 28, 1888. 

2. KssA May, 



VI. William Eddy McGinness was born Aug. 
22, 1867, and was married Feb. 23, 1888, to Lola Rainey, 
of Aledo, Mercer county, III. He is engaged in farming. 
No children. 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 189 

VII. Samuel Elmer McGinness was born Jan. 
28, 1872, and died March 20, 1876. He was buried in 
Buffalo Prairie cemetery, Rock Island county, 111. 



VIII. Julia Ann McGinness was born Oct. 22, 
1873. Her entire life has been spent in Illinois, with the 
exception of three years, which she spent in Dakota. 



IX. Sarah Olive McGinness was born Feb. 12, 
1875. She resides with her parents in Viola, 111. 



X. Lewis Saffell McGinness was born May 18, 
1877. He is still attending school. 



ISlo S. 

Martha McGinness, the only daughter of William 
McGinness' second wife, Eliza Justice, was born Jan. 10, 
1837, in what is now Lawrence county. Pa., but spent her 
girlhood days on the homestead farm at Mount Jackson, 
Pa., to which place her parents removed when she was 
but a child. She received her education in the schools of 
the vicinity of her home. 

She was married in Aledo, Mercer county. 111., May 
24, 1866, to Robert Lawrence Hunter, of Jacksonville, 
Indiana county. Pa., whom she had met while visiting 
friends. They located in Aledo, where Mr. Hunter em- 
barked in business. They remained there but a short 
time, removing thence to Sunbeam, Mercer county, 111. 
Here Mrs. Hunter died March 3, 1870, when but a young 
woman, and was buried in Sunbeam churchyard. 

In early womanhood she united with the United 
Presbyterian church of Mount Jackson, and continued in 
its membership until after her marriage, when she trans- 



130 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

ferred with her husband to the M. E. church at Sunbeam, 
111., and continued in its communion until her death. 

Robert and Martha (McGinness) Hunter had one son 
born to them, as follows : 



I. William Lawrence Hunter was born Oct. 5, 
1868, in Sunbeam, Mercer county, 111., and when but a 
child was bereft of the tender care and guidance of a 
mother. When not quite five years of age, in May, 1873, 
he was taken by his father to Jacksonville, Indiana county, 
Pa., and here spent his childhood days, receiving his 
primar}' education in the schools ot that vicinity. In 1881 
he removed with his father to Shelocta, same county, and 
here attended school one year, removing thence, March 
30, 1884, to Leechburg, Armstrong county. Pa., where he 
pursued his studies until the year 1887, and since that 
time has been employed in a rolling mill at the above- 
named place. In early manhood he identified himself 
with the M. E. church at Leechburg, where he still con- 
tinues to worship. 



]Sro Q. 

Samuel Kennedy McGinness, the youngest son of 
William McGinness, Sr., and the eldest child of his third 
wife, Elizabeth Kennedy, was born Sept. 3, 1842, on the 
homestead farm in Mount Jackson, Beaver (now Lawrence) 
county, Pa., and here spent his youthful days, receiving 
his early education in the common schools of the village. 

In the year 1859 he went as an apprentice to learn 
the printing trade in the office of the " Lawrence Journal," 
published in New Castle, Pa., and continued at this work 
until the war broke out, when, in response to the call for 
troops, he enlisted as a private in the Mount Jackson 
Guards, April 22, 1861. 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 131 

The company, which was organized and drilled by 
Captain Henry T. Danforth — who had served through the 
Mexican war in Bragg's celebrated " Battery of Artillery" 
— was early mustered into service and was known on the 
rolls during the war, as Battery B, First Artillery, Pennsyl- 
vania Reserves, but better known as "Cooper's Battery" 
— J. Cooper having succeeded to the captaincy on the 
promotion of Captain Danforth to be lieutenant-colonel 
of the regiment. 

Samuel McGinness was promoted to corporal Oct. 12, 
1 86 1, and to sergeant, April i, 1864. He participated, 
with the battery, in all the leading battles of the "Army 
of the Potomac" — from Dravosville in 1 861, until the sec- 
ond series of battles before Richmond in 1864 — covering 
a period of three years' service. He was severely wound- 
ed at the second battle of Bull Run, Aug. 29, 1862, by a 
shell from the enemy's artillery, which shot away his sa- 
bre and revolver. Statistics recently published show that 
"Cooper's Battery" suffered a greater numerical loss than 
any other artillery organization in the Union Army. At 
the close of the war this battery was under the command 
of Captain William McClelland, the late Adjutant Gen- 
eral of Pennsylvania, who was a life-long, warm, personal 
friend of S. K. McGinness, having been born (March 2, 
1842) and raised in the vicinity of Mount Jackson. Ser- 
geant McGinness was mustered out of service June 6, 
1864, "having proved himself a brave and able officer," 
and returned to his home and friends at Mount Jackson. 

In the year 1869 he was elected Prothonotary for 
Lawrence county, Pa., for a term of three years. He was 
married Jan. 30, 1873, to Anna M. Keepers, of New Cas- 
tle, Pa. They continued to reside in New Castle until 
the year 1881, when they removed to Jamestown, N. D., 
Mr. McGinness having purchased a property there in 1879 
and established a banking and real estate business in 1880. 



132 THE McGINNESS FAMILY. 

He has held many offices of trust and honor, among' 
them that of County Treasurer of Stutsman county, North 
Dakota, having been elected first in 1886 and re-elected 
in 1888 and 1890 successively. In the year 1889 he was 
nominated by the Democratic party for the office of lieu- 
tenant-governor of North Dakota, and carried his own 
(Stutsman) county by a handsome majority, notwith- 
standing the fact that the county is Republican in politics 
and his opponent was a citizen of Jamestown. His present 
address is Jamestown, Stutsman county, North Dakota. 

Samuel and Anna (Keepers) McGinness had six chil- 
dren born to them, as follows : 



I. Lillian McGinness, born Dec. 18, 1873, in 
Lawrence county, Pa., and when about eight years of age 
removed with her parents to Jamestown, N. D. She re- 
ceived a preparatory education in the schools of the latter 
place, after which she attended the Pennsylvania Female 
College, Pittsburgh, Pa., returning to her home in Dakota, 
in the spring of 1892. 



n. Samuel McGinness, born in Lawrence county, 
Feb. 12, 1875. 



ni. William McGinness, born in Lawrence coun- 
ty, Pa., July 25, 1877, and died Dec. 25, 1887. 



IV. Irma McGinness, born in Lawrence county. 
Pa., April 2, 1879. 



V. Raymond McGinness, born in Jamestown, 
Dak., Sept. 30, 1882. 



VI. Anna Marie McGinness, born in Jamestown, 
Dak., March 13, 1885. 



THE McGINNESS FAMILY. , 133 

ISTo. lO. 

Margaret A. McGinness was born July 1 8, 1 845 , on 
the homestead farm at Mount Jackson, Pa., and died in 
childhood Aug. 4, 1851. 



]Nro. 11. 



Eliza Jane McGinness was born Oct. 25, 1851, in 
Mount Jackson, Lawrence county, Pa., and has always 
lived in that vicinity. 



THE OLD HOMESTEAD. 



The old homestead, a cherished spot 
Where first we saw the light of day, 

Where infant tottering feet were taught 
The step that faltering leads the way. 

The old farmhouse, what memories cling 
Within its old time-honored walls, 

Where childhood Voices, with merry shouts 
Of mirth and laughter, filled its halls. 

The barn, when filled with new mown hay, 
Exhaled sweet perfumes rich and rare. 

The gathered harvest filled each bin. 

While plenty crowned the laborers' care. 

In sunshine and in summer hours. 
We romped about in childish glee ; 

No shadows then obscured our sky, 
From care and sorrow we were free. 



Though years have passed, since there we roamed 
O'er hillsides, fields, and pastures through, 

In search of spring's first sweetest flowers 
To gather them so fresh and new. 



But now how changed, the fleeting years 
Have rolled in quick succession by, 

And scattered our once happy band — 
Some in the silent churchyard lie. 

Where are the cherished forms we loved. 
And voices sweet we used to hear. 

The eyes that beamed with love and hope, 
Where is the circle once so dear? 

Ah, some have laid their garments by 
And passed beyond the mystic tide, 

While we who linger on the shore, 
May anchor, and with Him abide." 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 



MEMORY. 



" How painfully pleasing the fond recollection 

Of youthful connections and innocent joy, 
When blest with parental advice and affection, 
•* Surrounded with mercies and peace from on high ! 
' I still view the chairs of my sire and my mother, 

The seats of their offspring as ranged on each hand, 
And that richest of books which excelled every other — 
The old family Bible that lay on the stand." 

" Whatever has once given us pain or pleasure is remem- 
bered long and recurred to often as we pass down the journey 
of life. Everyone has treasured away on the sacred pages of 
memory, a thousand little incidents, ever to be revealed in time, 
to which, as to some fascinating fiction, it returns whenever a 
gloomy or an idle unsocial hour calls up the musing spirit 
and turns the mind upon the past. Life, reviewed through a 
mist of by-gone years, sees rather a curiously wrought fiction 
than a stern reality. We are surrounded by mementos of the 
affection of friends ; but those friends themselves are gone. 
We remember the counsels of wisdom, the sage instructions 
of experience by which our minds were formed and a direc- 
tion given to the current of our thoughts and habits ; but the 
lips from whence they flowed have long been mute as the still 
valley where they lie smouldering. In one graveyard and 
another there are little hillocks and white stones bearing re- 
membered names, and this is all, all that is left to us. But it is 
in the melancholy ruins of the past that we gather the richest 
stores for the future. It is there we learn how very vain are 
earthly hopes ; how fleeting earthly friends ; how frail even 
the strongest cords of affection. It is there we learn to pre- 
pare for another state of being." 



INTRODUCTION. 

" What's in a name?" 

HE name Scot was applied to the ancient ii. hab- 
itants of Scotia or Scotland. They were originally 
Irish Celts who settled in the Western Highlands 
of Albion. Versed writers inform us that the original 
Scotia or Scotland was Ireland, and the Scoti or Scots, at 
their first appearance in authentic history, were the peo- 
ple of Ireland. The Scots were a Celtic race, and their 
■original seat in Northern Britain was in Argyle, which 
they acquired by conquest before the end of the 5th cen- 
tury, and from whence they spread themselves along the 
western coast, from the Firth of Clyde to the modern 
Ross-shiie. 

The name Scotland seems first to have been given to 
the united kingdom of the Picts and Scots, in the loth 
century. It was then sometimes styled, by way of dis- 
tinction, Scotia Nova, (New Scotland,) and it was a con- 
siderable time afterwards before the name of Scotland 
was applied to it to the exclusion of Ireland. 

The first prince of the British Scots mentioned in 
our authentic annals, was Fergus, son of Ere, who crossed 
over to Britain about the year 503. His great-grandson, 
Conal, was king of the British Scots when Columba be- 
gan the conversion of the Northern Picts. Conal was 
succeeded by his nephew, Aidan, who was inaugurated as 
sovereign by St. Columba on the Island of lona. Aidan 
was a powerful prince, and more than once successfully 
invaded the English border. 



140 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

The Scots were for a time under some sort of sub- 
jection to the English of Northumbria, but recovered 
their independence on the defeat and death of King Eg- 
frid, in battle with the Picts at Nechtansmere in 685. 

In the middle of the 9th century, by a revolution — 
the exact nature of which has never been ascertained — the 
Scots acquired a predominance in Northern Britain. Ken- 
neth, son of Alpin, the lineal descendent of Fergus and 
Aidan, succeeded his father as king of the Scots in 836. 

The Picts and Scots, each speaking a dialect of the 
Celtic tongue, gradually coalesced into one people, whose 
territory extended from the P'irths of Forth and Clyde to 
the northern extremity of Great Britain. The crown de- 
scended to a line of princes of the family of Kenneth, 
whose rule gave a unity and comparative tranquility to 
the Scots of Britain, which those of Ireland, at no time 
really united under one prince, never possessed ; and the 
good effects of which, as contrasted with the state of the 
sister Ireland, are experienced to the present day. 

In the course of time, it became necessary to par- 
ticularize families by the use of surnames or family names, 
as individuals were distinguished, one from another, by 
the use of individual or Christian names. 

Surnames began to be used by the English nation 
about the time of William the Conquerer, in 1066, when 
the conquest was achieved. In some instances they are 
known to have been assumed before the Norman con- 
quest. The Scotch date the use of surnames from about 
the same time as the English. 

The practice of assuming surnames from the birth- 
place of the person, or from his residence, is of very high 
antiquity. In the early annals of Scotland we find the 
name Scol used as a family name. When it was changed 
into its present spelling, Scott, we have no means of as- 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 141 

■certaining, though we find record of one, Michael Scott, 
whose traditional birth is 1190. 

There is no reason to doubt the Scottish origin to 
which this family name, Scott, testifies — "it expresses the 
country of the original assumer," and represents the 
Scotch nation. 

The ancestors of the family now under consideration 
have been traced back to the time of the persecutions in 
Scotland, and the name may be found among those of the 
stern Covenanters of those days. 

Researches have given us, as the head of the family 
with which this genealogy has to deal, the name William 
Scott, but of his ancestral relatives we have not obtained 
any data. 



GREAT-GREAT-GREAT-GREAT GRANDFATHER. 

" Should auld [relations] be forgot, 
And never brought to mind? 
Should auld [relations] be forgot, 
And days of auld lang syne?" 

WILLIAM SCOTT, the progenitor of the family with 
which this genealogy has to deal, was born in 
Scotland in the latter half of the seventeenth cen- 
tury — tlie exact date has not been ascertained. On ac- 
count of his loyalty to the principles of the " Church of 
Scotland," and bitter opposition to Popery, he, with many 
other families of Covenanter sympathies, in order to en- 
joy peace and safety, was compelled to leave his native 
land and find a home elsewhere. He, accordingly, went 
to the north of Ireland and settled at Ballymacran — near 
New^town Limavady, in the northern part of County Der- 
ry. There he laid out a deer park and salmon fishery, as 
he was a man of considerable wealth — which, be it re- 
membered, must be judged by the standard of those days, 
not of the present time. 

But few details of his life have come down to us, 
which is greatly to be regretted. The date of his mar- 
riage or the name of his wife has not been learned ; nor 
do we know when or where he died, though it is sup- 
posed that, after locating in Ballymacran, he continued to 
reside there during tli,e remainder of his life, and that he 
also died there. We have gained knowledge of but one 
child — a son, Joseph — though undoubtedly there were 
other representatives of the family. 



GREAT-GREAT-GREAT GRANDFATHER. 

JOSEPH SCOTT, son of William Scott, was born in 
Ballymacran, County Derry, Ireland, as near as 
can be estimated, in the early part of the eigh- 
teenth century. He was twice married, but the 
names of his wives and the dates of his marriages have not 
been obtained. His children were, so far as has been as- 
certained, one daughter and five sons, viz.: Mary, William, 
Zaccheus, Nathan, Samuel and James. 

He died in Ballymacran, Ireland, after which his chil- 
dren emigrated to America. Although the exact date of 
their arrival is not known, it was, most probably, between 
the years 1760 and 1770 — in colonial days. 

They first located in Lancaster county. Pa., and 
shortly after, with a number of others from the same 
place, removed to Western Pennsylvania and settled in 
what is now Allegheny county. Being among the early 
settlers of that county, they endured the hardships, and 
were subject to the dangers of pioneer times. 

William Scott, the eldest son of Joseph Scott, Sr., 
was killed in one of the Indian wars. 

Zaccheus Scott settled, with his brother James, on 
a farm in Elizabeth township, Allegheny county. Pa. All 
trace of him has been lost. 

Nathan Scott located in New Jersey. Nothing fur- 
ther has been learned of him, except that he had a son, 
Nathan, who married a Miss Andrews ; and a daughter, 
who married John Connell. No information or records of 
their families have heen obtained. 



U4 >' THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

" And parted thus they rest, who played 
Beneath the same green tree ; 
Whose voices mingled as they prayed 
Around one parent knee. 

" The same fond mother bent at night 
O'er each fair sleeping brow ; 
She had each folded flower in sight — 
Where are those dreamers now ? 

" They that with smiles lit up the hall, 
And cheered with song the hearth — 
Alas ! for love, if thou wert all. 
And naught beyond, O earth ! " 



A separate sketch is given of Mary and James, with 
particular mention of Samuel and his descendants, with 
whom the family of James McGinness, of Allegheny 
count}% Pa., is connected, by marriage of said James Mc- 
Ginness with Mary, daughter of Samuel Scott. 



FAMILY OF MARY (SCOTT) YOUNG, 

OF ROBINSON TOWNSHIP, ALLEGHENY COUNTY, PA. 

Jl Jf ARY SCOTT, the eldest child and only daughter 

/ y I of Joseph Scott, Sr., was born in County Derry, 

X 1 Ireland, about the year 1734, and, in early wo- 

^-» manhood, emigrated with her brothers from her 

native county, to America. 

She was married sometime in the 6o's of the past 
century, to James Young, of what is now Bart township, 
Lancaster county, Pa. He lived on the main road lead- 
ing from Philadelphia to Lancaster, where he kept an inn 
at which the wagoners stopped on their route. It is not 
known in what year Mr. Young died, but evidently it was 
prior to 1780. He was buried in the burjnng ground of 
one of the Seceder or Covenanter churches of Bart town- 
ship. His wife, Mary, afterwards married John Morgan, 
arid, with her eight children, came to Western Pennsyl- 
vania about the year 1780. Their first location, in what 
is now Allegheny county, seems to have been in the 
neighborhood of the land settled by the Scotts in Robin- 
son township, and near where the fort (afterwards known 
as the Cowan Fort) was built by John Peter Beyl, or Bail. 
Mary Scott Young, after her second marriage, was 
known to the succeeding generation of Youngs as " Grand- 
mother Morgan." She died Sept. 21, 18 14, aged 80 
years, and was buried in the cemetery of Union A. R. 
church, Robinson township, her grave being marked by a 

stone which gives her name as " Mary Morgan." 
10 



146 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

" Sleep oa, sleep on, thou pulseless heart, 
Where jasamine stars drop golden rain ; 
From every troubled thought apart, 
Forgotten every earthly pain. 

" Sleep on ; thy long repose is sweet. 
Tender and cool thy grassy sod. 
O traveler ! stay thy hurrying feet ; 

Step softly here — ' she rests in God.' " 

James and Mary (Scott) Young had eight children, 
viz.: Letitia, Matthew, Ann, Thomas, Mary, Margaret, 
John and James, Jr. 



SkertcH ISlo. 1. 



Letitia Young, the eldest daughter of James and 
Mary (Scott) Young, was born about the year 1762. She 
was married to John Hall, of Scotch-Irish descent, who, 
in the latter part of the eighteenth century, purchased and 
settled upon a farm of about three hundred acres, on the 
Steubenville turnpike in what is now Robinson township, 
Allegheny county. Pa. Mr. Hall died April 24, 1829, 
aged 76 years. His wife, Letitia, died Sept. 11, 1836, 
aged 74 years. They were buried in the cemeter>^ of 
Union A. R. church, of which church they were members. 

John and Letitia (Young) Hall had seven children 
born to them, viz.: John, Matthew, Sarah, Mary, William, 
Elizabeth and Ann. 



L John Hall, the eldest son, died when young. 



n. Matthew Hall died in early manhood. 



in. Sarah Hall was born about the year 1786, 
and married, in the year 18 10, to Samuel Scott,* fourth 

*See sketch of Samuel Scott in " Scott Family." 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 147 

son of Samuel Scott, Sr., of Robinson township. She 
died May 21, 181 7, leaving three children. 



IV. Mary Hall was born about the year 1788, 
and was married to Joseph McCurdy,* second son of 
Hugh McCurdy, who emigrated from Ireland at an early 
day, and purchased three hundred acres of land in what is 
now Robinson township, Allegheny county, Pa. They 
located on the McCurdy farm, where they lived during the 
remainder of their lives — Mr. McCurdy being engaged in 
farming. He died Sept. 9, 1825, aged thirty-seven years. 
His wife died May 16, 1857, aged 69 years. Both were 
members of Union A. R. church, and were buried in the 
cemetery attached to it. 

They had six children, all born and raised on the 
homestead farm ; and educated in the schools of their 
native township. They were Letitia, Emeline, Sarah, 
Mary, Elizabeth and Joseph. 



I. Letitia McCurdy was married to Andrew Dick- 
son, of what is now North Fayette township, Allegheny 
county. Pa. They located on the Dickson farm in said 
township, where Mr. Dickson still resides, being engaged 
in farming. Mrs. Dickson has been dead many years. 
Eight children were born to them, viz.: 

(i) Samuel, who is engaged on the home farm. 

(2) Joseph, who married Sadie McBride. He is 

in the grocery business in Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Children : Andrew Howard, (died Aug. 8, 
1884,) Herbert and Porter. 

(3) Mary, who resides on the homestead farm. 

(4) Emeline, who was married to Thomas Ad- 

ams, and located in Toronto, Ohio, where 



♦Joseph McCurdy was a brother of Margaret McCurdy, wife of Joseph Scott, of 
Washington county, Pa. See sketch of Joseph Scott in " Scott Family 



148 * THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

Mr. Adams afterwards died. Mrs. Adams 
returned to the homestead in Allegheny 
county, Pa., where she now resides. 

(5) James, who married Jennie Bird. He is en- 

gaged in the grocery business with his 
brother, Joseph, in Pittsburgh, Pa. They 
have two children. 

(6) Sarah Ann — resides at home. 

(7) Andrew Wilson, born May 14, 1849; died 

May 5, 1872. 

(8) William Aitken. 



2. Emeline McCurdy was married to Hugh Brown, 
of Robinson township — a carpenter by trade. They con- 
tinued to reside in said township until death. Mrs. Brown 
died Nov. 8, 1846, aged thirty-three years. 



3. Sarah Ann McCurdy was married Dec. 20, 
1855, to William E. Riddle, of Robinson township — who 
was born June — , 1807. They located on a farm which 
Mr. Riddle had purchased, in the above named township, 
where they resided for many years, removing thence, Oct. 
31, 1890, to Crafton, Allegheny county. Pa. — having pur- 
chased a property there. Mr. Riddle died at his home in 
Crafton, Pa., March 24, 1892, and was buried in the cem- 
etery attached to Montour Presbyterian church. He had 
been, for many years, a worthy member of session of 
Montour congregation. Mrs. Riddle still remains in Its 
communion. One son has blessed this union, viz.: 

George W. — an architect — engaged in busi- 
ness with J. P^dward Keirn as "Riddle and 
Keirn," Pittsburgh, Pa. He is a member 
of the Montour Presbyterian church, and 
was for several years previous to his removal 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 149 

to Crafton, (his present residence,) super- 
intendent of the Sabbath school connected 
with that church. 



4. Mary McCurdy died March i, 1833, aged fif- 
teen years, and was buried in Union cemetery. 



5. Elizabeth McCurdy was married to James W. 
Bell, son of James and Elizabeth (Fairley) Bell, of Rob- 
inson township. They located on a farm in the above 
named township, which Mr. Bell had purchased from Mr. 
Marks. Mrs. Bell died in February, 1889. She was a 
member of Union U. P. church. James and Elizabeth 
(McCurdy) Bell had seven children born to them, as fol- 
lows : 

(i) Anna Mary, married to Prof Samutl An- 
drews, and now resides in the West End, 
Pittsburgh, Pa. They have one son, Frank. 

(2) James Hays married Mary Young. They 

reside in Robinson township. Five chil- 
dren were born to them — Lizzie, Birdie, Al- 
ice, (deceased,) Ella and Laura. 

(3) Elizabeth J. — died in girlhood. 

(4) William Wallace married Miss Bertha 

Sprung. He is connected with the "Holmes 
Bank," of Pittsburgh, and resides in the 
West End. One son has blessed this union, 
Charles J. 

(5) Henderson J., who was married March 17, 

1883, to Eliza Jane, daughter of Samuel 
and Elizabeth (Phillips) Scott, of Robin- 
son township. They now reside at North 
Star, Allegheny county. Pa. Four children 



150 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

have been born to them, viz.: Howard 
Scott, (deceased,) Mattie E., Harry W. and 
George.* 

(6) John W., married Agnes Ellen, daughter of 

Jonathan and Evaline (Nickle) Aiken. They 
reside at North Star, Pa., where Mr. Bell 
is engaged in farming. They have two chil- 
dren : Walter and Jonathan. 

(7) Robert Wilson, married Sadie Conway, 

daughter of Francis Conway. He is a 
farmer and lives at North Star. 



6. Joseph J. McCurdv, the only son of Joseph and 
and Mary (Hall) McCurdy, was born in the year 1824 on 
the homestead farm, in Robinson township — one hundred 
and twent}' acres of which he now owns. He was mar- 
ried in the year 1856 to Mary Ann, daughter of Samuel 
and Priscilla (McFadden) Phillips, and sister of Mrs. Eliz- 
abeth Scott, widow of Samuel Scott. They continued to 
reside on the"McCurdy" farm until November, 1 891, when 
they and family removed to Ingram, Allegheny county, Pa., 
which is their present residence. They are members of 
Union U. P. church, where Mr. McCurd}- has been for 
several years a ruling elder. Joseph and Mary McCurdy 
have six children, as follows : 

(i) Laura J., who was married in June, 1891, to 
Nathan D. Jones, of "Patterson and Jones." 
They reside in the East End, Pittsburgh. 
A son, Dudley Graham, was born May 16, 
1892. 

(2) Joseph Andrew, who married Kate L., 
daughter of James and Mar}- (Stonecipher) 
McCormick, of Moon township, Allegheny 



•See sketch of Eliza (Scott) Rell 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 151 

coanty, Pa. They reside on the McCurdy 
tarm in Robinson township. Two children 
have been born to them : Mary and Joseph 
Dudley. 

(3) Samuel P. — en£^a;_:;ed as book-keeper for the 

*' Oil Well Supply C'ornpany," Pittsburgh, 
Pa., and residt-s ;it Ingrani, Pa. 

(4) Florence R. — resides at home. 

(5) Frank W., who is now attending the Pitts- 

burgh Academy. 

(6) George W. — engaged on the homestead farm 

with his brother Andrew. 



V. William Hall, son of John and Letitia (Young) 
Hall was born Feb. 13, 1795, and spent his life upon the 
farm purchased by his father. He was married in the 
year 1821, to Jane, daughter of John and Mary (Mc- 
Michael) McFadden. Mr. Hall owned three hundred 
acres of land, known as the "Hall Farm," Robinson 
township, Allegheny county, Pa. He died Aug. 31, 1870, 
and was buried in Union cemetery. His widow still re- 
sides on the homestead farm, at an advanced age, having 
been born Feb. i, 1798. His family are members of the 
United Presbyterian church. 

William and Jane (McFadden) Hall had nine children 
born to them, as follows : 



I. Mary A. Hall, the eldest child, was married to 
John B. Kelso, and was located for a number of years in 
Noblestown, Allegheny county. Pa., removing thence to 
California, where Mr. Kelso died. His widow now resides 
with her only son. William, in the above named state. 
Two children were born to John and Mary Kelso, viz.: 

(i) William Hall. 

(2) Anna Mary, died in 1888 or '89. 



152 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

2. John Hall, the eldest son, died of a fever Dec, 
4, 1845, aged 19 years. 



3. Matthew Hall was married to Eliza, daughter 
of Robert Palmer, of Pittsburgh, Pa. They were located 
in Allegheny City, Pa., Mr. Hall being then engaged in 
the planing-mill business on Anderson street. He was 
killed, more than twenty years ago, by being thrown from 
a buggy by a runaway horse. His wife died several years 
after. They had one daughter, who is also dead. They 
are buried in Union cemetery, Robinson township. 



4. Sarah Ann Hall, the second daughter, was 
born Feb. 8, 1830. In early womanhood she went as a 
missionary to the " Freedmen's Missions," but returned 
home in a short time and died July 25, 1865 — that grim 
destroyer, consumption, having early marked her for one 
of his victims. She was buried in Union cemetery. 



5. Jamjjs Hall went West in early manhood and 
remained a number of years. After returning home he 
was married to Miss Hannah Lindsay, of Allegheny City, 
Pa. They resided for a brief period on the "Hall farm," 
after which they emigrated west and were located in Iowa 
for a number of years, Mr. Hall being engaged in farming. 
He died July — , 1892, leaving seven children, viz.: 

(i) William. 

(2) James Bvron. 

(3) Jennie. 

(4) Laura Drane. 

(5) John. 

(6) Matthew W. 

(7) Paul Rutledge. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 153 

6. Eliza Jane Hall was married to Dr. J. K. Rut- 
ledge. They located in Blairsville, Indiana county, Pa., 
where Dr. Rutledge had an extensive and successful prac- 
tice for many years. He died at his home July 3, 1892. 



7. Letitia Hall died in early womanhood, April 
13, 1859, and was buried in Union cemetery. 



8. William Hall, Jr., was born Oct. 16, 1839. 
He served three years in the late war — enlisted as ser- 
geant in "Young's Independent Battery G.," Pennsylva- 
nia Volunteer Artillery, and was promoted to second 
lieutenant. He entered the United Presbyterian Theo- 
logical Seminary in Allegheny City, preparatory to enter- 
ing the ministry, but died in early manhood, Aug. 5, 
1870, before he had completed the necessary course of 
study. He was buried in Union cemetery. 



9. Samuel Hall, the youngest child, died in youth, 
April 6, i860. 



VI. Elizabeth Hall was born Aug. 16, 1799, and 
was married, about the year 1823 or 1824, to John Mc- 
•Cluskey, who was born Nov. 28, 1797, and was a son of 
Henry McCluskey, a native of Ireland, who settled in 
Washington county. Pa., and afterwards took up govern- 
ment land in Ohio. A few years after marriage they 
located in Robinson township, Allegheny county, Pa. 
John McClusky was a prominent farmer and respected 
-citizen, and took an active part in the interests of the 
township. He was elected to the Pennsylvania legisla- 
ture in the autumn of 185 i, and served in 1852. Eliza- 
beth McCluskey died Oct. 18, 1857. Her husband sur- 
vived her, and died April 15, 1879. 



154 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

John and Elizabeth (Hall) McCluskey had nine chil- 
dren, all born in Robinson township, except Cyrus and 
John. The family record is as follows : 



I. Cyrus McCluskey was born June 3, 1825, in 
Guernsey county. Ohio. In the year 1852 he went to 
California, where he remained until the year 1867, when 
he returned home. He was married Oct. 13, 1870, to 
Rachel, daughter of Gabriel and Mary McGregor, of Rob- 
inson township. They located in Allegheny City, Pa., 
removing thence to Mecklenburg county, Virginia, where 
they remained about nineteen years — Mr. McCluskey be- 
ing engaged in farming. In the year 1891 they returned 
to Pennsylvania, and are now (1892) located in Ingram, 
Allegheny county, Pa. 



2. John Hall McCluskey was born Feb. 7, 1827, 
in Guernsey county, Ohio. In the year 1853 he went to 
California. While located in Healdsburg, Sonoma county, 
Cal., he was thrown from a cart and received injuries from 
which he died, Dec. 13, 1878. He was unmarried. 



3. Henry McCluskey was born Dec. 12, 1828, on 
the property where he now resides, and owns, and where 
he has always lived. He was married, March 13, 1871, 
to Ann Eliza, daughter of Joseph Stewart, of near Mid- 
dleport, Ohio. At the death of his father, by buying out 
the heirs, Mr. McCluskey became possessor of one hun- 
dred and seventy acres of valuable farm land, one hundred 
of which his mother inherited from her father. No chil- 
dren. 



4. William McCluskey was born June 15, 1831. 
He went to California in the year 1852, and is now lo- 
cated in Healdsburg, Sonoma county. He is unmarried. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 155 

5. Mary Jane McCluskey, the only daughter, was 
born Aug. 4, 1833. She was married Dec. 31, 1863, to 
James Brown, and died a few years after marriage, Dec. 
' 10, 1867. 



6. Samuel C. McCluskey was born Jan. 2, 1836. 
He was a sergeant in Young's Independent Battery G., 
Pennsylvania Volunteer Artillery, and served three years 
in the late civil war. He studied dentistry under Dr. 
Calvin King, of Pittsburgh, and, after the war, went to 
Marysville, Nodaway county, Missouri, where he prac- 
ticed dentistry for several years. He was married May 
23, 1869, to Anna Kemper, of the above named place, 
who died Oct. 15, 1879. Mr. McCluskey still resides in 
Marysville, and is engaged in the real estate business. 
He has one daughter, Maud, who is now attending 
school in Marysville. 



7. Hiram McCluskey was born May 16, 1838, and 
continued to reside on the homestead farm until his death, 
which occurred Aug. 23, 1880. 

8. Matthew Hall McCluskey was born Aug. 4, 
1840. He also enlisted in Young's Independent Battery 
G., Pennsylvania Volunteer Artillery, and served three 
years in the late war, and .studied dentistry under Dr. 
King, of Pittsburgh. He located in Glenwood county, 
Iowa, where he practiced dentistry for a number of years, 
and afterward embarked in the drug business. He was 
married July 23, 1871, to Jennie R. Barker, of Florida. 
They still reside in Glenwood. P'our children have 
been born to them. 



9. Milton McCluskey was born Aug. 23, 1843, 
and died July 26, 1844. 



156 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

VII. Ann Hall was twice married ; first to John 
Walker, by whom she had three children. After his death 
she married Benjamin Robinson, of Noblestown, Pa. 
They located in Moon township, Allegheny county, Pa., 
and aftervvard removed to Indiana, where they continued 
to reside during the remainder of their liv^es. Four or 
five children were born to them. 



]Sro. 21. 

Matthew Young, the eldest son of James and Mary 
(Scott) Young, was married to PvHzabeth Bail, daughter 
of John Bail, of Robinson township, Allegheny county. 
Pa., and sister of Abigail Bail, who married John Young. 
They lived on a farm in Mercer county, Pa. — between 
Clarksville and Mercertown. Mr. Young died Jan. 31, 
1844. Seven children were born to them, viz.: P21iza- 
beth, (married to Samuel P'oster,) John, James, Mary, 
Lewis Bail, (married to Betsy Bail, daughter of George 
Bail,) Abigail Bail, and Joseph. 



ISCo. 3. 

Ann Young, daughter of James and Mary (Scott) 
Young, was married to William Hall,* brother of John 
Hall, who married Letitia Young. They located in Rob- 
inson township, Allegheny county, Pa., where the}' con- 
tinued to reside during the remainder of their lives. Mrs. 
Hall died March 29, 1840, and was buried in Union cem- 
etery. No children. 

* William Hall purchased from the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, a tradt of about 
400 acres of woodland, in Robinson township, known as " Hall's Grove." He sold 76 
acres of it to his brother-in-law. John V'oung, Sr., and bequeathed the remainder in 
equal parts to William Brannan, Hugh Quin, and John Young, Jr. William Hrannan 
afterwards sold his [)art to Jonathan Smart, who sold it to Joseph B. Young. William 
Hall's old home was, until recently, occupied by Mary Young, widow of Joseph B. 
Young. Andrew B. Young, Mary E. Young, .\nn H. Young, John (". Young, and Au- 
gustus B. Young are now the only owners of parts of " Hall's Grove."' 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 157 

ISTo. 4. 

Thomas Young, son of James and Mary (Scott) 
Young, was married to a Miss Merriman. They resided in 
Allegheny county. Pa., back of what is now Sewickley. 
He died, it is supposed, at a comparatively early age. 
Nothing further has been learned of him, except that he 
had four daughters, viz., Peggy, married to Andrew Jack ; 
Sally, married to Samuel Moore ; Letty, married to James 
Moore, and Polly, married to William Moore — -all brothers 
of Martha Moore, who married Samuel Owen, and was 
the mother of Eliza Jane Owen, wife of Samuel Neely 
Young.* 



]Sro. S. 

Mary Young, daughter of James and Mary (Scott) 
Young, was married, in the early part of the present cen- 
tury, to Thomas McMillen, a native of Ireland. They 
located in Robinson township, Allegheny county. Pa. 
Mrs. McMillen died Nov. 12, 1844, having survived her 
husband many years. Ten children were born to them, 
viz.: John, Matthew, William, James, Samuel, Ann, 
Joseph, Ebenezer, Margaret and Morrison. 

John McMillen went south in early manhood, and 
was married in Cincinnati. Nothing further has been 
learned of him. 

William McMillen also went south when a young 
'man. It is not known whether or not he was married. 

James McMillen was married April ii, 1839, to 
Catherine Scott, t second daughter of James Scott, of 
Robinson township. They had two daughters, Mary L. 
and Elizabeth Jennings. 

*See Sketch of Samuel N. Young. 

tSee sketch of Catherine (Scott) McMillen. 



l.:S THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

Samuel McMillen died unmarried. 

Ann McMillen was married to Captain John Mc- 
Michael, son of Isaac and Mary (Holtz) McMichael. They 
resided in what is now Collier township, Allegheny county, 
Pa., where Mr. McMichael was engaged in farming. Mrs. 
McMichael died in the year 1845, aged thirty years. Her 
husband died in 1873, aged fifty-seven years. Five chil- 
dren were born to them, of whom two sons — Isaac and 
John — and a daughter are now living. 

1. Isaac McMichael was born in the year 1836, 
on the farm which he now owns at Walker's Mills, Alle- 
gheny county, Pa. He was married, in the year 1S76, to 
Ella, daughter of John McCoy, of Allegheny county, and 
to them were born four children — three of whom are now 
living, viz.: George Clarence, Stella and Ralph Cleveland. 

2. John McMichael was born in the year 1842, 
and married, in 1863, to Ann Eliza, daughter of Captain 
Samuel Ewing. They are located at Imperial, Allegheny 
count}', Pa., where Mr. McMichael owns a farm of 192 
acres. Seven children have been born to them, viz : 
Nora, (Mrs. Armour,) Samuel, John, Ida, Maud, Blanche 
and Ewing. 

Joseph McMillen was married to Catherine Holmes. 
Four children were born to them, viz.: Thomas, Joseph, 
Elizabeth and Marw 

Ebenezer McMillen married Margaret Murray. 
Their children were: Emma, Marv and Elizabeth. 



JSIo. e. 

Margaret Young, the youngest daughter of James 
and Mary (Scott) Young, married Robert Lutton, of 
Moon township, Allegheny county. Pa. Eight children 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. • 159 

were born to them, viz.: Betsy Jane, who married Garrett 
Eaton ; John ; James ; Nancy, married to Thomas Mor- 
gan ; Robert, married to Peggy Harper ; Peggy, married 
to John Harper ; Thomas and Lettie. 



John Young, son of James and Mary (Scott) Young, 
was born in the year 1773, in Bart township, Lancaster 
county, Pa., and was but a child when his mother re- 
moved, with her family, to what is now Robinson town- 
ship, Allegheny county. Pa. Here the greater part of his 
life was spent. 

In early manhood, Feb. 18, 1794, he was married to 
Abigail Bail who was born in the year 1775 — daughter of 
John Bail, Robinson township. Mr. Young purchased 
from his brother-in-'aw William Hall, 76 acres of land in 
the above named township, on which they located and 
continued to reside during the remainder of their lives.* 
The name "John Young," appears among those given in 
a list of the residents of Robinson township in the year 
1803. 

John Young died Feb. i. 1853, and was buried in 
Union A. R. (now U. P.) cemetery. His wife, Abigail, 
survived him .several years and died April i, i860. She 
was also buried in Union cemetery. 

The following sketch (dated i860) was taken from 
the Pittsburgh Dispatch: 

"Death of A Veteran Mother: On the ist of April 
last, Mrs. Abagail Young, Sr., died at her residence in 
Robinson township, in the eighty-fifth year of her age. 
The deceased was born in Allegheny county, in 1775, and 
passed through many trying scenes in her early life. Her 



*See foot note — sketch of Ann (Young) Hall. 



160 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

father's family, with a few other families, had erected a 
small fort on the farm now belonging to John McMichael, 
about nine miles from Fort Pitt and one mile from the 
present Steubenville turnpike. While occupying this fort, 
one of her brothers was killed by the Indians. She was 
married at the age of eighteen, raised a family of thirteen 
children, and lived to see her youngest child reach the age 
of forty years. She had also sixty-two grandchildren 
and thirty-eight great grandchildren — in all one hundred 
and thirteen descendants." 

John and Abigail (Bail) Young had thirteen children, 
all born and raised on the homestead farm in Robinson 
township. They are all now (1892) dead except one son, 
Samuel Neely. The family record is as follows : 



I. Elizabeth Young was born Nov. 22, 1794, and 
married June 17, 1822, to Robert Miller. She died April 
25, 1880; her husband died in June, 1836. Six children 
were born to them, viz.: Mary Jane, Margaret, John, 
James McCormick, Robert and Joseph. 

Mary Jane Miller was married^ to John Mc- 
Clinton. Four children were born to them, viz.: William, 
George, Charles and Frank. 

Margaret Miller was married to William Aiken. 
Seven children were born to them, viz.: Hannah, 
Elizabeth, John, James, Agnes, Robert M., and Birdella. 
Hannah, James and Robert died in infancy. 



n. Matthew Young was born Jan. 15, 1797, and 
died in the twenty-first year of his age. May 4, 18 17. 



ni. Mary Young was born March 4, 1799, and 
married March 29, 18 14, to John Gibson. She died Aug. 
15, 1817. Two children were born to this union: James 
M. and Robert. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 161 

Robert Gibson married Sarah Porter, by whom he 
had four children : Lewis Bail, Florence, Walter and 
Robert. 



IV. Ann Hall Young was born June 22, 1801, 
and married Oct. 14, 1822, to Jonathan Smart, who died 
Feb. 28, 1830. Four children were born to them : James, 
Mary Ann, John and William. The youngest two died in 
infancy. 

Mrs. Smart afterwards married Joel Chapman. By 
this marriage she had children, as follows : Joseph War- 
ren, Morgan Young, who died unmarried, Alice, who 
died in infancy, Robert and Violet. Mrs. Chapman died 
Feb. I, i860. 

Joseph Warren Chapman married Jane McClinton. 
Children : Ella, Irene and Harper. 

Robert Chapman married Ann M. Logan. Chil- 
dren : George, Charles, Harry, Joseph and Eugene. 

Violet Chapman married William Meanor. Chil- 
dren : Joseph W., Martha, Margaret, Adele Y., Ella Irene 
and Rachel. 



V. John Young, Jr., was born July 16, 1803, and 
married Dec. 30, 1824, to Hannah Phillips,* daughter of 
John and Esther (Phillips) Scott. Eleven children were 
born to them — four sons and seven daughters. John 
Young, Jr., died on the homestead farm in Robinson 
township, April 17, 1873, and was buried in Union ceme- 
tery. He was a captain of the Pennsylvania Militia, and 
once held the office of Clerk of the Orphans' Court of 
Allegheny county. Pa. 



VI. Joseph Bail Young was born Aug. 24, 1805, 
and married Sept. 10, 1829, to Mary Cracraft, who was 

*See sketch of Hannah P. Scott and children in "Scott Family." 
11 



1«2 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

born July 28, 1808. In the early part of the present 
century Joseph Young purchased from his brother-in-law, 
Jonathan Smart, a tract of land in Robinson township — a 
portion of a larger tract purchased by William Hall,* and 
known as " Hall's Grove." Mr. Young continued to re- 
side in Robinson township until his death, which occurred 
Dec. 29, 1833. His widow occupied the old homestead 
of William Hall for many years. She died, Jan, 7, 1892, 
at the advanced age of eighty-three years. 

Joseph and Mary (Cracraft) Young had four sons 
born to them, as follows : 



1. Andrew B. Young, born June 5, 1830, and 
married Oct. 25, 1855, to Agnes McFadden, who was 
born Nov. 6, 1832. He was twice elected as a represent- 
ative for Allegheny county in the Legislature of Pennsyl- 
vania, and has served as deputy sheriff. Mr. Young is 
now in possession of a portion of the original " Hall 
Grove." He is in the employ of Scobie & Parker, Pitts- 
burgh, and resides in Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

(i) Mary Luella, born July 24, 1856. 

(2) Joseph Story, born April i, 1858. 

(3) Bertha Eugenie, born Feb. 21, i860. 

(4) Agnes Jane, born June 5, 1862. 

(5) Frank Sherman, born July 24, 1865. 

(6) Effie Aldine, born Jan. 7, 1871. 

2. Joseph C. Young, born Nov. 7, 1831, and mar- 
ried Dec. 15, 1858, to Mary E. Rhodes. He served in 
the war of the rebellion as second lieutenant in Young's 
Independent Battery G., Pennsylvania Volunteer Artil- 
lery. He is now a member of the Pittsburgh bar. Their 
children are as follows : 

(i) Carrie Victoria, bom Dec. 10, 1859. 

*See foot-note — sketch of Ann (Young) Hall, 156. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 168 

(2) Hattie Bissell, born Jan. 31, 1863; died 

Feb. 23, 1863. 

(3) Kate Meech, bom May 2, 1866; died July 

10, 1866. 



3. John Morgan Young, bom June 25, 1833, and 
died Jan. 5, 1834. 



4. BazilWilliams Young, bom June 25, 1833, and 
died July 4, 1833. 



VII. James Scott Young* was bom Nov. 27, 
1807, and died Dec. 27, 181 7. 



VIII. Abigail Young was bom July 30, 18 10, and 
married in early womanhood to William Gribben, of Rob- 
inson township. She died soon after marriage, April 25, 
1830. Mr. Gribben afterwards married Esther Scott,t 
fourth daughter of John and Esther (Phillips) Scott. 



IX. Lewis Young was born Sept. 3 , 1 8 1 2 , and mar- 
ried in Pittsburgh, Pa., Nov. 5, 1835, to Hannah Lenhart, 
who was born Dec. 6, 1810. The ceremony was per- 
formed by Rev. Andrew Fulton. He served in the war 
of the rebellion as lieutenant and quartermaster in the 
Fourth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteer Cavalry, and 
was deputy clerk of Orphans' Court of Allegheny county. 
Pa. Lewis Young died April 15, 1874. His wife sur- 
vived him and died May 9, 1879. Six children have been 
born to them, as follows : 

* The name "James " was given him in honor of his grandfather, James Young; 
and the name " Scott," in honor of his grandmother, Mary Scott — presumably to keep 
the name in the family. It continues in that of James Scott Young, Attorney, No. g8 
Diamond street, Pittsburgh, Pa., and in that of his son, James Scott, Jr. See sketch of 
William Hall Young and family. 

t See sketch of Esther (Scott) Gribben, in " Scott Family." 



164 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

I. John Jay Young* born Oct. 14, 1836, and mar- 
ried Sept. 21, 1862, to Alice Victoria Maples, who was 
born June 29, 1839 — daughter of Capt. D. J. Maples. 
He served in the war of the rebellion as captain of 
Young's Independent Battery G, Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Artillery, and was commissioned lieutenant colonel, by 
James A. Beaver, Governor of Pennsylvania. Col. 
Young is now (1892) located in Canton, Ohio, being pres- 
ident and general manager of the "Canton Steel Com- 
pany." John and Alice (Maples) Young had four chil- 
dren born to them, as follows : 

(i) Maud Alice, born Sept 3, 1863 ; died Nov. 
10, 1864. 

(2) Betsey Maples, bom Sept. 28, 1865. 

(3) Marian Russell, born Nov. 13, 1866 ; mar- 

ried Nov. 26, 1890, to James M. McNeill, 
son of the late Senator Hugh McNeill, of 
Allegheny City. They have one child — 
Alice Russell, born June 30, 1892. 

(4) Paul Frederick, born Sept. 2, 1871 ; died 

Dec. 31, 1889. 



2. Herman Lenhart Young, born March 8, 1838, 
and died May 22, 1874. Unmarried. He served in the 
late war as quartermaster sergeant of Young's Independ- 
ent Battery G, Pennsylvania Volunteer Artillery, and af- 
terwards as first lieutenant in Richard B. Young's com- 
pany — Colonel Gallupe's Regiment, Pennsylvania Volun- 
teer Heavy Artillery. 



3. William H. Harrison Young, born July 30, 
1840, and married to Charlotte Deuchar. He served in 
Chicago-Light Battery A, Illinois Volunteer Artillery ; 

* To Col. John J. Young I am indebted for records of the " Young Family ;" also for 
data ol James and Mary (Scott) Young. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 165 

was taken prisoner near Jackson, Miss., and held in An- 
dersonville, N. C, rebel prison for two years. One child, 
May, has been born to them. 

4. Lewis Albert Young, born May 30, 1843, and 
married Jan. 14, 1874, to Carrie M. Maples, who was 
born Nov. 18, 1846. Mr. Young died Sept. 15, 1882, 
leaving one daughter, viz.: 

(i) Jessie Alice, born Oct. 16, 1875. 

5. Sarah Jane Young, born May 16, 1845, and 
died June 19, 1846. 

6. Elizabeth Viola Young, born April 12, 1847, 
and married Dec. 20, 1877, to John P. Van Sickle, who 
was born Oct. 19, 1844. They have one child, viz.: 

(i) Garrett Foster, bom Nov. 23, 1880. 



X. Samuel Neely Young was born April 22,1815, 
and married Feb. 6, 1840, to Eliza Jane Owen, who was 
born July 8, 1822 — daughter of Samuel and Martha 
(Moore) Owen.* Mr. Young is now (1892) the only sur- 
viving member of a family of thirteen — children of John 
and Abigail (Bail) Young. His present address is Ewing's 
Mills, Allegheny county, Pa. Samuel and Eliza (Owen) 
Young had six children born to them, as follows : 



I. David C. W. Young, born March 30, 1841. He 
served in the war of the rebellion as "color bearer" of 
the 70th Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry, and 
was killed in the battle of Williamsburg, May 5, 1862. 

" Sleep, soldier ! still in honored rest 
Your truth and valor wearing ; 
The bravest are the tenderest, — 
The loving are the daring." 

* gee sketcl) of Thomas Young, page 157. 



166 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

2. John James Young, born Jan. 7, 1843. He 
served in the late civil war in Company E, 70th Regi- 
ment, New York Volunteer Infantry, and died, Sept. 14, 
1863, of disease contracted in the service. 



3. Martha W. Young, born Aug. 6, 1846, and 
married to Joseph H. Powell. No children. 



4. Samuel Lewis Young, born Feb. 10, 1852, and 
married Feb. 9, 1875, to Artelissa Angelina Hill, Six 
children were born to them, viz.: 

(i) Roy Le Mont, bom Feb. 6, 1876. 

(2) Eugene Leaf, bom Sep. 19, 1877. 

(3) Clyde, born Aug. 27, 1879. 

(4) Ora Belle, born May 27, 1881. 

(5) Joseph Berlin, born Jan. 18, 1884. 

(6) Clifford, bom Jan. 12, 1886. 



5 . Franklin Walter Hampton Young, born Mar. 
23, 1855, and died when young. 



6. Florence Berlin Young, born Nov. 2, 1861 ; 
drowned at Davis Island Dam, Dec. 31, 1881. 



XI. William Hall Young was born April 22, 181 5, 
and married April 27, 1842, to Jane Ann Peters, who was 
born in the year 18 16 and died March 13, 1886. William 
Young died in Allegheny City, Pa., Dec. 19, 1890. Five 
children were born to them, as follows : 



I. Augustus Byron Young, born Dec. 14, 1843, 
and married April 26, 1883, to Mary R. McDonald. He 
served in the war of the rebellion in Young's Independent 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 167 

Battery G, Pennsylvania Volunteer Artillery. He is now 

"Superintendent of the Letter Carriers" in Pittsburgh 

post-office. Their children (twins) are : 

(i) Mary, ) , t oo 

; ( ^ V born Tune 12, 1884. 

(2) Jeanette, ) 



2. Adele Young, born April 10, 1846. She re- 
sided with her father on Palo Alto street, Allegheny, un- 
til his death, in the year 1890. She is unmarried, and is 
now a resident of Canton, Ohio. 



3. James Scott Young,* bom Dec. 3, 1848, and 
married March 4, 1873, to Eliza Jane Baldwin, daughter 
of Dr. James D. Baldwin. He is an eminent lawyer, with 
an extensive and lucrative practice, in Pittsburgh, Pa. 
James and Eliza Young had seven children born to them, 
as follows : 

(1) Bertha, born Jan. 9, 1875. 

(2) James Scott, Jr., born Nov. 18, 1876. 

(3) Amy, born Dec. 2, 1878. 

(4) LiDA Byron, born June 18, 1881. 

(5) William Worthley, born Aug. 20, 1883 ; 

died in the year 1887. 

(6) Alice Maples, born Nov. 26, 1885. 

(7) Philip Sydney, born Nov. 8, i; 



4. Bertha Young, born Aug. 2, 1851, and died 
Feb. II, 1856. 



5. William Eugene Young, born Jan. 12, 1854, 
and married May 21, 1878, to Kate Bessie Maria Young, 
who was born Jan. 5, 1859. He is superintendent of 

*§ee foot note, page i6|. 



168 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

motive power and machinery in the works of the Canton 
Steel Co., at Canton, Ohio. Six children have been born 
to them, as follows : 

(i) William Paul, bom June 4, 1879. 

(2) Emily Jane, bom Jan. 16, 1882. 

(3) Eugene, born Feb. 20, 1884; died the same 

year. 

(4) Donald Breck, born Sept. 10, 1885. 

(5) John Byron, born Jan. 28, 1888. 

(6) Ruth Adele, born May 21, 1891. 



XII. Jacob Beltzhoover Young was born June 
4, 1 817, and married Feb. 14, 1839, to Margaret Jane 
Watt. He died Feb. 14, 1890. Three children were 
born to them, as follows : 



I. John Young, who died in childhood. 



2. David Watt Young, who married Harriet Hil- 
liard. He is a painter by occupation, and resides in Alle- 
gheny City, Pa. Their children are Elmer E. and Pearl. 



3. Amelia J. Young was married to John Gray. 
Three children have been born to them, viz.: Lillian G., 
John and Olivet. 



XIII. Morgan Neville Young, the youngest child 
of John and Abigail (Bail) Young, was born June 16, 
1820, and married March 17, 1842, to Hannah Cracraft, 
who was born Jan. 15, 1823. He died March 21, 1884. 
The family record is as follows : 



I. George W. Young, born Jan. 27, 1843, and 
died Aug. 25, 1844. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 169 

2. Martha J. Young, born Nov. 27, 1844, and died 
Dec. 9, 1846. 



3. Robert G. Young, born Jan. 26, 1847, and mar- 
ried Aug. 27, 1872, to Mary C. Wheeler, daughter of 
Seymour Wheeler. Seven children have been born to 
them, as follows : 

(i) Arthur Eugene, bom Jan. 31, 1874. 

(2) Andrew Harry, born Feb. 28, 1876. 

(3) Morgan Seymour, born April 26, 1878. 

(4) Homer Wilson, born Feb. 14, 1880. 

(5) Howard Adelbert, twin brother of Homer 

W., died Jan. 17, 1881. 

(6) Robert Leroy, born Aug. 8, 1883; died 

Aug. 20, 1883. 

(7) Oscar Everett, born Feb. 13, 1887. 



4. Mary L. Young, born Dec. 9, 1849, and married 
May 18, 1869, to George W. Bowers, son of John Bowers. 
Their children are as follows : 

(i) Ross E., born July 11, 1870; died May 10, 
1872. 

(2) Florence L., born May 10, 1874. 

(3) Ray R., born April 11, 1880. 



5. Andrew J. Young, bom May 26, 1851, and 
married Dec. 25, 1877, to Nellie H. Johnson, daughter 
of Jeremiah Johnson. Their children are as follows: 

(i) Roy O., born Sept. 27, 1878. 

(2) Josie a., born Sept. 6, 1879. 



6. Elizabeth A. Young, born Oct. 9, 1853. 



ISTo. 8. 

James Young, Jr., the youngest child of James and 
Mary (Scott) Young, died in youth. 



FAMILY OF JAMES SCOTT, SR., 

OF ELIZABETH TOWNSHIP, ALLEGHENY COUNTY, PA. 

JAMES SCOTT, SR., the youngest son of Joseph 
Scott, was born in Ballymacran, County Derry, 
Ireland. The exact date of his birth is not known, 
but, as near as can be estimated, it must have been 
between the years 1752 and 1755. 

In youth he emigrated from Londonderry, Ireland, to 
America, but the exact date of his arrival is not known. 
When he came to Western Pennsylvania, he settled on a 
farm in the narrow peninsula between the Monongahela 
and Youghiogheny rivers — known as the "Forks of 
Yough" settlement — in what is now Elizabeth township, 
Allegheny county. Pa. This farm he afterwards patented, 
Nov. 9, 1789.* (Part of this farm is now owned by his 
grandson, Zaccheus Scott.) In the meantime, probably in 
the year 1781 or 1782, he had married Mary Pearson, who 
was born in Westmoreland county, Pa. 

James Scott was among the earliest settlers of Alle- 
gheny county, and was identified with the Indian troubles 
of pioneer times. In one instance he and wife were driven 
from their farm by the Indians, and took refuge at Han- 
nastown (then the county seat of Westmoreland county) 
— traveling a distance of about thirty miles, and being be- 
set with difficulties and dangers peculiar to those days of 
Indian hostilities. After remaining at Hannastown for a 
time, in constant dread, they concluded to return home. 

♦The lop; house built by James Scott, Sr,, more than a century ago, is still standing 
and occupied, 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 171 

The morning after they left the town, the fort in which 
they had taken refuge was destroyed by Indians, and all 
the inmates, except a few persons, were killed.* 

James Scott died in the year 1825, on his farm in 
Elizabeth township, having lived there about a half-cen- 
tuiy. Eight children were born to James and Mary 
(Pearson) Scott, viz.: John, (who died in 181 5;) James, 
Zaccheus, Kennedy, (who died in 1809;) Joseph, Sarah, 
Margaret and Hannah. They were all born and raised in 
Elizabeth township, and were prominently identified with 
the history of that section. 



Sketch ISTo. 1. 



James Scott, Jr., was born about the year 1785, 
though the exact date has not been ascertained. He 
participated in the war of 18 12 — held a commission as 
captain, and was afterwards colonel of a militia regiment. 
During the years 1832-34, he represented Allegheny 
county in the House of Representatives. He was married 
to Mary Van Kirk, daughter of Samuel Van Kirk.f She 
died in the year 1863. Colonel Scott died in the year 
1868, having reached an advanced age. 

James and Mary (Van Kirk) Scott had twelve chil- 
dren born to them, viz.: 

1. Diana, now Mrs. James Wycoff, of Uniontown, 
Pa. 

2. Susan, who lives with her brother, John V. 

3. Mary, married to Samuel Van Kirk, nephew of 
the above mentioned Samuel Van Kirk. 

*The trusty rifle of James Scott, Sr., is now in the possession of his great grandson, 
Vankirk Scott, of McKeesport, Pa. 

tSamuel Van Kirk served through the Revolutionary War — carried the colors at the 
battle of Long Island ; was present at the surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown. Shortly 
after the war, he came from New Jersey and settled in Elizabeth township, Allegheny 
county. Pal The Van Kirk family were prominently identified with Elizabeth township 
history. 



172 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

4. John Van Kirk, born in the year 1820, on the 
farm on which he now resides, near Elizabeth, Allegheny- 
county, Pa. He was married in 1850 to Nancy A., daugh- 
ter of James and Rebecca Nicholls, of Allegheny county. 
Mr. Scott has been for thirty-six years an elder in the 
Presbyterian church of Round Hill. Mr. and Mrs. Scott 
have seven children living, as follows : James H., an at- 
torney in Burlington, Iowa; Joel F., a physician in Coal 
Valley, Pa.; Lizzie R., Mary J., William D., Nannie L., 
and John K., all at home. 

5. James, deceased. 

6. Samuel, a farmer, living near Huntington, Ind. 

7. Sarah J., who was married in 1869 to Matthew 
J. Taylor, a farmer. They reside near Wilkinsburg, Pa. 
Their children are : Corrinne M., James Marshall and 
Mary Agnes. 

8. Rebecca, wife of Joseph Patterson, of Monon- 
gahela City, Pa. 

9. Joseph, an attorney, of Huntington, Ind. 

10. Harvey, now located in Wisconsin. 

11. William, living in the State of Washington. 

12. Isaac, who was drowned in the year 1864. 



No. ^. 

Zaccheus Scott, the third son of James Scott, Sr., 
was born in the year 1787. He was raised on a farm and 
followed farming for a livelihood. He served through the 
war of 18 12 — was captain of his company and was the 
officer in charge of the prisoners at Fort Duquesne. In 
June, 1828, he was married to Catharine, daughter of 
Jeremiah Andrews, of Burgettstown, Pa. They both died 
in the year 1870, at an advanced age. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 173 

Zaccheus and Catherine (Andrews) Scott had seven 
children born to them, viz.: 

1. Mary, now Mrs. James L. Gufifey, of Allegheny- 
county, Pa. 

2. Susan, died when young. 

3. Amanda, died the same time as Susan. 

4. Eliza Jane, wife of Alexander Thompson, of 
Westmoreland county. Pa. 

5. Kate, wife of Allen Williams, of Westmoreland 
county. Pa. 

6. Lucinda, Mrs. Josiah P. Johnston — died in 1868. 

7. Zaccheus, the only son, was born May 12, 1840, 
on the farm which he now owns and occupies, in Eliza- 
beth township, Allegheny county. Pa. — part of the land 
patented by his grandfather, James Scott, Sr., in the 
year 1789.. He received his education in the township 
schools, and at Elizabeth Academy. After qualifying 
himself he was engaged in teaching in the schools of Al- 
legheny, Fayette and Westmoreland counties for a period 
of six years, and since then has followed farming. In the 
year 1871, he was married to Eliza Jane, daughter of Jo- 
seph Hutchinson, of Elizabeth township. They are mem- 
bers of Bethesda Presbyterian church. Their present ad- 
dress is Blythesdale, Allegheny county. Pa. Five chil- 
dren have been born to them, viz.: Maud C, Jessie May, 
J. Milton, Zaccheus Roscoe and Olive Florence. 



ISTo. Q. 

Joseph Scott, the youngest son of James Scott, Sr., 
was born, as near as can be estimated, about the year 
1 79 1 or 1792. He, like his brothers, participated in the 
war of 1 81 2, and followed farming for a livelihood. He 
was married to Ruth Van Kirk, daughter of Samuel and 



174 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

Mary (Price) Van Kirk, and sister of Mary Van Kirk, wife 
of James Scott, Jr. Joseph Scott lived and died on the 
farm patented by his father, James Scott, Sr. 

Joseph aud Ruth (Van Kirk) Scott had ten children 
born to them, viz.: John W., James, Zaccheus, William 
Marshall — who died when young, Susan, (wife of John W. 
Patterson,) Ursula, (wife of William Brisbin,) Samuel, 
Mary, Joseph, (died Aug. 26, 1892,) and Ruth. 

I. John W. Scott was born May 31, 18 19, in 
Elizabeth township, and there resided for many years, re- 
moving thence to McKeesport, Allegheny county. Pa., 
where he is now located. He was for many years a mem- 
ber of the board of education, being chairman of that 
body ; and has been a member of council, borough treas- 
urer, justice of the peace and served two terms as bur- 
gess. He is a stair-builder by occupation. Mr. Scott 
was twice married, his first wife being Matilda Marston, by 
whom he had four children, viz.: Joseph L., who is mar- 
ried and lives in the East End, Pittsburgh ; John Frank- 
lin, engaged in stair-building in Pittsburgh ; I. Maslon, 
married and lives in Allegheny — engaged in stair-building, 
and Sarah Matilda, who is also married. Mr. Scott mar- 
ried as his second wife, Rachel, daughter of Thomas and 
Frances (Clendenning) Humphreys. Seven children were 
born to them, viz.: Vankirk, Belle, (married,) Stella, Vic- 
tor, Cordelia, Irene, (married,) and Blanche. 

Vankirk, born Jan. 2, 1861, in Elizabeth 
township, but was raised in McKeesport, 
Pa., receiving his education in the schools 
of that place. He is a civil engineer, be- 
ing engaged in business under the firm name 
of "Taylor, Rominie & Scott," McKees- 
port, Pa. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 176 

ISTo. 4. 

Sarah Scott, the eldest daughter of James and 
Mary (Pearson) Scott, was married to Joseph Weddle. 
Five children were born to them, viz.: Rebecca, wife of 
John Penney ; Hannah, wife of Thomas Penney, (brother 
of John,) Jesse, Scott and Peter — a Baptist minister. 



No. S. 

Margaret Scott married John Pierce. Nine chil- 
dren were born to them, viz.: Margaret, married and lives 
in Athens, Ohio ; Mary, wife of John Cowen ; David ; 
Martha, wife of Col. Joseph Gufifey ; Ann, wife of Rob- 
ert Pinkerton ; John ; James ; Hannah, wife of Edward 
Buck, of Tennessee ; William and Sarah. 



isco. e. 

Hannah Scott, the youngest child of James and 
Mary (Pearson) Scott, was married to James Guffey. Sev- 
en children were born to them, viz.: John ; Mary, wife of 
Jacob Funk ; Scott ; William ; Margaret, wife of E. Grif- 
fith ; Rebecca, and Zaccheus. 



GREAT-GREAT GRANDFATHER. 

(TAMUEL SCOTT, SR., the pioneer of the family 
y\ under special consideration, was a son of Joseph 

J Scott. He was born in the year 1751, in Bally- 
^^'"'^ macran — near Newtown, Limavada — County 
Derry, Ireland, and in youth came with his brothers and 
sister to America. 

Comparatively little is known as to where he first lo- 
cated in this country, though we hear of his being at 
Pequa, Lancaster county, Pa., attending a communion 
service of the Reformed Presbyterian church, of which he 
was a member ; and again at a service at Conecocheague, 
Franklin county. Pa. — being, it is supposed, located in 
Lancaster county. Sometime after this he purchased a 
team of horses, a conestoga wagon and farming imple- 
ments and started for the West, going by way of Bedford 
Springs, Bedford county. Pa. — which place was then 
owned by Rev. James Renwick Wilson. 

Samuel Scott was married about the year 1775 or 
1776, to Elizabeth Wilson, who was born in the year 1749 
— a sister of Rev. J. R. Wilson. After marriage he set- 
tled on a farm at " Mingo Creek," Washington county. 
Pa., which is the first place we hear of his being perma- 
nently located. There he remained for a number of 
years, removing about the year 1795 to a farm at Camp- 
bell's Run, Washington county, now Robinson township, 
Allegheny county. Pa. He was one of the pioneers of 
that township, enduring the trials, hardships and priva- 
tions of a pioneer life. Since that time this family name 
has been connected with Robinson township history. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 177 

In those early days of settlement, the settlers were 
subject to frequent attacks by the Indians, consequently 
the most important matter to attract the attention of our 
pioneer forefathers was to defend, not only themselves, 
but also their wives and children, against the tomahawk 
of the savages. In order to afford protection, the settlers 
had built a block-house or fort on the McMichael farm, 
(afterwards known as the Cowan farm,) near Campbell's 
Run. As was the custom in those days the neighbors as- 
sisted each other with their work, going in companies to 
the different farms, and leaving their wives and children 
in the block-house. About sunset each day they all re- 
assembled at the block-house, where they often remained 
all night. If any of their number failed to appear at the 
appointed time, their friends concluded they had been 
massacred by the Indians. 

When Samuel Scott first came to Robinson township, 
he rented a farm of 331 acres from John Bail, and en- 
gaged in tilling the soil. This farm he purchased, Nov. 
23, 1799, for £s^^ specie. The deed for the same may 
be found recorded in Allegheny county court house, ^ 
March i, 1800, Volume 9, p. 317. This farm was part 
of a tract of land granted unto John Bail by patent, un- 
der the great seal of Pennsylvania, bearing the date March 
the nineteenth, A. D., 1789. 

Having considerable means, according as wealth was 
estimated in those days, Mr. Scott purchased, May 4, 
1805, another farm of 309^ acres on Miller's run, Wash- 
ington county. Pa., from Alexander Addison in considera- 
tion of $2,474. Recorded in Washington county, Feb. 
10, 1806, in Deed Book T, folio 296. "This farm is part 
of a larger tract of land which the king of Great Britain, 
by patent bearing date the fifth day of July, in the year of 
our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy-four, 

under the hand of John Earl of Dunmore, Lieutenant 
12 



178 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

Governor of the then colony of Virginia, and the seal of 
the said colony, granted in fee to GEORGE WASHINGTON, 
Esquire, who, with Martha, his wife, by deed bearing date 
the first day of June, in the year of our Lord, one thou- 
sand seven hundred and ninety-six, conveyed the same in 
fee to Matthew Ritchey, Esquire, since deceased, who by 
his last 'will and testament,' devised the same in fee to 
Alexander Addison." 

From the time of his removal to Campbell's Run, Mr. 
Scott lived in true pioneer style, in a little log cabin, un- 
til 1806, when he erected a large two story stone house, 
in which he lived during the remainder of his life. 

Some incidents which have been related in connection 
with the life of Samuel Scott might here be inserted : 

In the fall of 1805 a communion service, conducted 
by Rev. Gilmore, was held on the farm of Mr. Scott. It 
was attended by about fifty persons, who came a distance 
of from twenty to thirty miles, in wagons and on horse- 
back. They arrived on Wednesday preceding the com- 
munion and remained until the following Monday, during 
which time they enjoyed the hospitality of Mr. Scott and 
wife — such as the circumstances of frontier life would per- 
mit. As the home at that time was a small log cabin, 
the people could not be accommodated in the house, con- 
sequently the barn floor was covered with straw, over 
which was spread wagon covers, blankets, etc. Here the 
guests slept — Mr. Scott lodging with the company. 

Thursday was kept as a fast day preparatory to the 
communion. On Friday, all the able-bodied men went to 
work, hewing and hauling logs with which to erect a com- 
munion table, seats and a tent, from which the minister 
addressed the audience. [This tent was located where 
John Scott's barn now stands.] Services were held Thurs- 
day, Saturday afternoon. Sabbath and Monday morning, 
after which the worshipers returned to their homes. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY, 179 

Samuel Scott owned a fine horse named "Coley," 
which was regarded as very swift and sure-footed. Some 
time in the year 1815, he started, on his fleet-footed 
horse, "Coley," on a chase to the land office at Canton 
or Mansfield, Ohio, to enter some land. Leaving his 
home in Robinson township, he journeyed through Frank- 
fort to Yellow Creek, Jefferson county, Ohio, where he 
lodged the first night at the home of Hon. Thomas 
George, (brother of David George, who married his 
daughter, Nancy Scott,) who was afterwards a prominent 
member of the Ohio Legislature. He continued on his 
journey, carrying food for himself and " Coley" in his sad- 
dle-bags, and lodging at night at convenient places along 
the route. 

This was a very perilous journey, as the country at 
that time was infested with hostile Indians ; but despite 
the dangers and difficulties he encountered, he reached the 
land office in safety, and, being first of the numerous 
competitors, accordingly entered a section (640 acres) of 
land in the territory of Ohio — " section twenty-five of 
township twenty-three, in range nineteen" — twelve miles 
northwest of what is now Mansfield, Richland county, 
Ohio — on the main road leading to Sandusky. 

He also entered one-half section in the same territo- 
ry — distinguished as the " east half of section one, of 
township twenty-three, range seventeen," making in all 
960 acres of land in Ohio, which in addition to his farms 
in western Pennsylvania, made about 1600 acres of land 
in his possession. 

He continued to prosper until his death, which oc- 
curred at the homestead in Robinson township, Dec. 27, 
18 1 9, he being 68 years of age. His wife, Elizabeth, sur- 
vived him and died Feb. 13, 1827, in the seventy-eighth 
year of her age. Both are buried in Union graveyard, on 
the Steubenville turnpike, about one-half mile from the 
homestead. 



180 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

On the day previous to his death, Mr. Scott made* 
his will, of which the following is a copy : 

" In the name of God, Amen. I, Samuel Scot, of 
Robinson Township, Allegheny County, and State of 
Pennsylvania, ailing in my person, but, praise be to God, 
in the full possession of my mental powers, believe it my 
duty to set my house in order, as it is appointed for all men 
once to die, make this my last will and testament, hereby 
ignoring and revoking all others of previous date. 

"I bequeath my soul to God through the merits of 
my dear Redeemer, my body to a decent interment at the 
discretion of my executors, in hopes of a glorious and 
blessed resurrection, and arrange my worldly affairs in the 
following order : 

"My funeral expenses and my other debts owing by 
me at my death, I desire my executors to pay expedi- 
tiously after my interment, and my worldly property I 
dispose of as follows : 

" First : I bequeath to my wife, Elizabeth Scot, my 
dwelling-house as long as she lives ; a sufficiency of wood 
and coals, cut and hauled home to the house ; one horse, 
the choice of my stable ; two ot the best of my cows ; 
ten sheep ; all the furniture my house contains, and one- 
third of the small grain and one-half of the hay which 
grows annually on my farm. Said chattel property I au- 
thorize her to dispose of as she pleases, the grain to be 
cut, stored and threshed for her annually without trouble 
or expense. 

" Secondly : I bequeath to the orphan children of my 
son John, now deceased, to his five daughters, Hannah, 
Betsey, Polly, Esther and Rachel, equal shares in the 
whole amount of the chattel property, coming to him 
from the vendues made — the one after the death of 
their father, the other after the death of their mother — 
and the yearly profit rents of the farm on Miller's Run to 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 181 

Samuel when he comes to the age of twenty-one years — 
the aggregate amount I desire to be equally divided 
among them when Samuel comes of age. I desire my 
executors to divide honestly, that farm of land my son 
John occupied, into three equal parts, of which I allow 
them immediate possession, providing they don't claim a 
child's part in the chattel property I have bequeathed to 
their sisters ; if they do claim a child's part of the chattel 
property reserved for their sisters, I, by these presents, 
authorize my executors to withhold from them claim, pos- 
session or any privilege arising to them from said shares 
in the above-mentioned farm, until they pay to my execu- 
tors a sum of money amounting to the sum of the shares 
in the chattel property they claimed, and having fulfilled 
said condition, I bequeath to my three grandsons, Samuel 
Scot, Jonathan Scot, and John Scot, said freehold farm, 
as divided by executors, to them and to their heirs for- 
ever, free of rent. 

"Thirdly: I bequeath to my daughter, Margaret, 
the wife of Archibald Slater, the sum of three hundred 
and fifty dollars, to be paid her by my executors twelve 
months after my decease. 

"Fourthly: I bequeath to my daughter, Betsy, the 
wife of William Wright, the sum of three hundred and 
fifty dollars, to be paid her twelve months after my death. 

" Fifthly : I bequeath to my daughter, Polly,"^'" one 
quarter section of land in the territory of Ohio, called 'the 
north-half, section twenty-five, of township twenty-three, 
in range nineteen,' to her and her heirs forever, free of all 
rents or demands save the taxes; said pioperty I have 
leased ten years from April, 1820. At the expiration of 
said term she shall have, by my executors, quiet and 
peaceable possession of said quarter section, to be enjoyed 
forever by her and her heirs, free of rent. I also be- 

*Mary Scott, wife of James McGinness. 



182 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

queath to her eight sheep, to be fed for her free of expense. 

"Sixthly: I bequeath to my daughter, Nancy, the 
other quarter remaining, of the above-mentioned portion 
of land in the territory of Ohio, being the second quarter 
section of a half-section, distinguished 'the north-half, 
section twenty-five, of township twenty-three, in range 
nineteen,' on the lines with her sister Polly's quarter-sec- 
tion, to be held forever by her and her heirs free of rent. 

"Seventhly: I bequeath to my son William all of 
that half-section of land in the territory of Ohio — adjacent 
to his sisters' division — already in his possession, of which 
he has a conveyance, under my hand, in the presence of 
Andrew McCurdy, Esq., to be held and occupied forever 
by him and his heirs free of rent. 

"Eighthly: I bequeath to my son Joseph, one 
hundred and fifty acres of land on the waters of Miller's 
run, which he now occupies, to be held and possessed by 
him and his heirs forever free of rent. 

"Ninthly : I bequeath to my son Samuel Scot, the 
one-half of my own farm. The survey of it is 310 acres, 
of which I bequeath to him one hundred and fifty-five 
acres, free of rents or demands ; and during my wife's 
life, he has to occupy the whole farm and discharge the 
conditions of my will expressed in the division which re- 
spects his mother. I bequeath to him the large still and 
wagon free of expense. 

"Tenthly : I bequeath to my son James one-half 
section of land in the territory of Ohio, distinguished as 
' the east half of section one, of township twenty-three, 
in range seventeen,' of which I bequeath him the full and 
free enjoyment of during his life, and authority to be- 
queath it to his children at his death, to be the property 
of them and their heirs forever free of rent and equally di- 
vided among them. I bequeath him one good horse ; one 
cow; one patent plow ; trees and harness for ploughing 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 183 

and six good sheep. If there be a second horse to spare, 
I allow it to him or else that Samuel will move him out. 
"Lastly: The other half of my farm, after the 
death of my wife, I desire to be disposed to my son Sam- 
uel, providing he pays for it the sum of two thousand 
dollars, for which I allow him seven years to pay the 
money ; the first seventh part of it to be paid in twelve 
months after the death of my wife ; another seventh part 
to be paid next twelve months, and so, annually, until he 
pays in the whole of the purchase, every year one-seventh 
part. When the within mentioned 700 dollars are paid to 
my two daughters, the remainder is to be equally divided 
to each of the within named legatees, besides the amount 
of the sales of chattel property that remains unbe- 
queathed in the within testament, and I, by these pres- 
ents, authorize, nominate and appoint my three sons, Will- 
iam Scot, Joseph Scot, and Samuel Scot, to execute this, 
my last will and testament. Signed, sealed and delivered 
this twenty-sixth day of December, A. D., eighteen hun- 
dred and nineteen. 

his 

" Samuel x Scot. [Seal.] 

mark. 

" Witnesses : 

"A. McCURDY, 
"Jos. McCURDY, 

"Moses Kerr." 

Samuel and Elizabeth (Wilson) Scott had nine chil- 
dren born to to them, viz.: John, Margaret, Elizabeth, 
William, Mary, Joseph, Samuel, Nancy and James. They 
all grew to maturity, married and had families. A sepa- 
rate sketch of each is given in order. 



FAMILY OF JOHN SCOTT, 

OF miller's run, WASHINGTON COUNTY, PA. 

JOHN SCOTT, the eldest son of Samuel and Eliza- 
beth (Wilson) Scott, was boin in the year 1777, at 
Mingo Creek, Washington county. Pa., and was 
baptized Oct. 7, 1 779, at the " Forks of Yough " set- 
tlement, by Rev. John Cuthbertson, who had emigrated to 
America in the year 175 1 — having been sent by the 
Scottish church to minister to her followers in this coun- 
try. 

The following record of the baptism of John Scott, 
and his sister Margaret, is found in the diary of Rev. 
Cuthbertson:* "Oct. 7, 1779 — Rode 14 miles to Sam 
Wilson's. Preached Heb. 12: 14. Baptized Elizabeth to 
S. Wilson John, and Margaret to Samuel Scott." 

John Scott spent his boyhood days on the farm at 
Mingo Creek, removing thence with his parents to the 
"Campbell's Run" farm, Allegheny county, Pa., when 
about eighteen years of age. 

He was married, in the year 1800, to Esther Phillips, 
daughter of Jonathan Phillips, who had emigrated from 
his native county, Ireland, sometime previous to the revo- 
lutionary war, and purchased from the government four 
hundred acres of land in what is now Robinson township, 
Allegheny county. Pa. 

After his marriage, Mr. Scott rented a farm at Miller's 
Run, Washington county, Pa., adjoining the farm of his 
brother-in-law, John Berry, from Alexander Addison. 

♦This diary is now in the possession of Rev. Joseph Buchanan, of Steubenville, Ohio. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 185 

This farm is the one purchased by his father, Samuel 
Scott, Nov. 5, 1805. He lived on the south end of the 
farm, in a little log cabin, until 1809, when he removed, 
with his family to the north end, where he had built a 
hewed-log house. Here he continued to reside during the 
remainder of his life, being engaged in farming. This 
portion of the farm was afterwards willed to his three 
sons, Samuel, Jonathan and John, by their grandfather, 
Samuel Scott, Sr. 

Mr. John Scott was a ruling elder in Robinson's Run 
Associate Reformed (now U. P.) church — Dr. John Rid- 
dell then pastor — at the time of his death, which occurred 
at his home at Miller's Run, Feb. 19, 18 17, at the com- 
paratively early age of forty years. His wife, Esther, 
died six months after, July 19, 1817. Both were buried 
in the little cemetery attached to Robinson's Run church. 

" They have passed away to their quiet rest, 
Earth foldeth them in her silent breast ; 
The chill winds howl, or warm rains weep 
Alike unheeded above their sleep ; 
And flowers may burst at the touch of spring, 
And green leaves rustle, and wild birds sing; 
But it matters not to the mouldering dust, 
The green earth holdeth in faithful trust." 

John and Esther (Phillips) Scott had eight children, 
viz.: Hannah P., Elizabeth W., Mary, Samuel, Jonathan, 
Esther, John and Rachel. 



Slisteh ISCo. 1. 



Hannah Phillips Scott was born Oct. 14, 1 801, at 
Miller's Run, Washington county. Pa., and here spent her 
early life. After the death of her parents, she, with her 
sister Esther, removed to the home of her grandfather, 
Jonathan Phillips, in Robinson township, Allegheny 
county. Pa., where she remained until Dec. 30, 1824, 



186 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

when she was married, by Rev. Moses Kerr, to John 
Young* — son of John and Abigail (Bail) Young — who was 
born in what is now Robinson township, Allegheny county, 
Pa., July i6, 1803. She removed to the home of her 
husband, in the northern part of the township, where they 
continued to reside during the remainder of their lives. 

Captain Young died April 17, 1873. His wife Han- 
nah died Dec. 20, 1882. Both were buried in Union U. 
P. cemetery. 

In early womanhood Hannah united with Union A. 
R. (now U. P.) church, and remained in its communion 
until her death. 

John and Hannah (Scott) Young had eleven chil- 
dren — Esther, Mary, Abigail, Elizabeth, Hannah, William, 
Richard, Anna, Samuel, Joanna and John — all born and 
raised on the homestead farm in Robinson township. 
The family record is as follows : 



I. Esther Scott Young was born April 19, 1826. 
She received her education in the schools of the vicinity 
of her home, and in early life professed her faith in Christ 
by uniting with what is now Union U. P. church, after- 
Avards transferring her membership to Forest Grove Pres- 
byterian church, where she continued to worship during 
the remainder of her life. She was married to John Reed 
Verner, who was born in the year 1826, in Washington 
county. Pa., but was raised in Robinson township, Alle- 
gheny county. Esther Verner died at her home in Rob- 
inson township, Aug. 7, 1871, and was buried in the 
burying-ground of Forest Grove Presbyterian church. 

" They never quite leave us, our friends who have passed 

Througli the shadows of death to the sunlight above, 
A thousand sweet memories are holding them fast 

To the places they blessed with their presence and love. 
The work which they left, and the books which they read, 

Speak mutely, though still with an eloquence rare, 
And the songs that they sung, the dear words that they said, 

Yet linger and sigh on the desolate air." 



*See sketch of John Young, page i6i. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 187 

John and Esther (Young) Verner had eight children 
born to them, as follows : 

1. Rachel Frances, born June 22, 1850, and 

married Oct. 27, 1870, to Robert H. Gib- 
son, a farmer by occupation. They reside 
in Stowe township, Allegheny county. Pa., 
(postoffice Groveton,) and are members of 
Forest Grove Presbyterian church, of which 
congregation Mr. Gibson is an elder. Their 
children are as follows : 

(a) Ira Burnette, born March 28, 
1872. 

(d) Everett Hale, born Jan. 10, 
1877. 

(c) Robert Byron, born Aug. 22 

1880. 

2. Alfred John, born May 7, 1852, and married 

Oct. 30, 1 879, to Elizabeth Wilson. He is 
a gardener, and resides on the homestead 
farm at Groveton, Allegheny county. Pa. 
He and wife are members of Forest Grove 
Presbyterian church. They have three 
children, viz.: 

(a) Esther Mabel, born Nov. 14, 
1880. 

(d) Nettie Wilson, born Dec. 17, 

1882. 
(c) John Reed, born May 25, 1884. 

3. Andrew William, born May 25, 1854, and 

married, Aug. — , 1875, to Mary Frances 
McConnel. He studied theology in Alle- 
gheny, Pa., and entered the ministry of the 
Presbyterian church. He is at present 
(1892) located in Wayne county, Ohio, be- 
ing pastor of Apple Creek congregation. 



188 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

4. Oliver N., bom Aug. i, 1856. After receiv- 

ing a preparatory education, he entered the 
Western Theological Seminary in Allegheny, 
Pa. Having completed the theological 
course, he entered upon the duties of the 
Christian ministry, and has been for several 
years pastor of McKee's Rocks Presbyterian 
church. He was a delegate to the 104th 
session of the Presbyterian General Assem- 
bly, which opened May 19, 1892, in Port- 
land, Oregon. 

5. James Madison, born Oct. — , 1858; died 

Feb. — , 1859. 

6. Samuel Young, born June 12, i860, and mar- 

ried, Feb. 22, 1883, to Jennie Estella Miller. 
They reside in Ingram, Pa., and are mem- 
bers of Ingram Presbyterian church, Rev, 
James B. Hill pastor. Mr. Verner is a con- 
tractor and builder. Their family record is 
as follows : 

{a) Alfred Miller, born Feb. 25, 

1884. 
{b) Ida May, born Oct. — , 1888 ; died 

July — , 1889. 
{c) William Newlin, born July 5, 
1890. 

7. Hannah Ella, born Nov. 14, 1862; died 

March 28, 1881. 
• 8. Anna Maud, born Jan. 22, 1865. She is in 
the communion of the Presbyterian church. 



II. Mary Ewing Young was born Sept. 10, 1827, 
and now resides at the old homestead in Robinson town- 
ship, where her early life was spent. She received her 
education in the schools of her native township, and in 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 189 

early womanhood united with what is now Union U. P. 
church, where she was for many years a member, but 
afterwards transferred her membership to Forest Grove 
Presbyterian church — Rev. J. J. Beacom pastor — where 
she now worships. 



III. Abigail Bail Young was born June 30, 1829, 
and spent her girlhood and early womanhood on the home- 
stead farm. She was married, Oct. 9, 1872, by Rev. J. J. 
Beacom, to John R. Verner. In the year 1875 Mr. Ver- 
ner purchased a farm of sixty-five acres at Groveton, 
Allegheny county, Pa., where they now reside. In early 
life Mrs. Verner became a member of Union Associate 
Reformed (now U. P.) church, and afterwards transferred 
her membership to Forest , Grove Presbyterian church, 
where she and her husband now worship. 



IV. Elizabeth Marks Young was born June 24, 
1831, and married May 22, 1851, by Rev. J. Ekin, D. D., 
to William Ewing, Jr., who was born at Ewing's Mills, 
Allegheny county. Pa., July 15, 1830 — his father, David 
Ewing, having built the present mill at that place. They 
now reside at the above-named place, Mr. Ewing being 
the present post-master. They are members of Forest 
Grove Presbyterian church. Mr. and Mrs. Ewing have 
seven children, as follows : 

1. David K., who married Laura Allen, and now 

resides in Denver, Col. 

2. J. Y., who married Jennie Harbison, and now 

resides at Ewing's Mills. He is engaged in 
the mercantile business. 

3. Sarah W., who married Matthew Phillips, of 

Moon township, Allegheny county, Pa. 

4. Hannah, who married Frank Woods, of 

Bethel township, Allegheny county. 



190 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 



5. T. M., who Still resides at the homestead at 

Ewing's Mills. 

6. Lizzie, who also resides at home. 

7. Edwin, who is assistant miller with his father. 



V. Hannah Phillips Young was born March 23, 
1833, 'ii'id in early life united with Union A. R. (now U. 
P.) church. She was married June 8, 1854, by Rev. John 
Ekin, D. D., to William S. Phillips, son of Alexander and 
Mary (Sharp) Phillips, who was born in the year 1831. 
He now owns a farm of eighty-four acres — part of a tract 
of land purchased from the government and patented by 
his grandfather, Samuel Phillips, March 21, 1788. Mrs. 
Phillips died at the home of her father, John Young, Oct. 
9, 1858, leaving one daughter, Biantha Jane, who is now 
the wife of D. K. Ewing. 



VI. William Hall Young was born Nov. 3, 1834, 
and died Sept. 16, 1865. He served in the civil war as 
captain of Company B, Fourth Regiment, Pennsylvania 
Volunteer Cavalry. 



Vn. Richard Biddle Young was born June 24, 
1836, and spent his youthful days on the homestead farm, 
receiving his early education in the schools of his native 
township. He served in the war of the rebellion as cap- 
tain of a company in Colonel Gallupe's regiment, Penn- 
sylvania Volunteer Heavy Artillery. He was married Jan. 
I, 1863, by Rev. Samuel C. Jennings, D, D., to Mary 
Olivia Ferree, of what is now Coraopolis — daughter of 
Jacob Ferree, a French Huguenot, who immigrated to 
America at an early day, and, in 1800, purchased three 
hundred acres of land where Coraopolis now stands. His 
wife, Mary, died, leaving two children, after which he 
married a second wife, and now resides in St. Louis, Mo. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 191 

Richard and Mary (Ferree) Young had two children born 
to them, as follows : 

1, Ada L., born March 22, 1864. 

2. John F., born Aug. 16, 1868. 



VIII. Anna Hall Young was born Jan. ii, 1838, 
and now resides in the old homestead in Robinson town- 
ship, where she has spent the greater part of her life. 
She first united with what is now Union U. P. church, 
and afterwards transferred her membership to Forest 
Grove Presbyterian church, of which she is now a mem- 
ber. 



IX. Samuel Baldwin Marks Young was born 
Jan. 9, 1840, and married Sept 2, 1861, by Rev. J. G. 
Brown, to Margaret J. McFadden, of Pittsburgh, Pa. — 
daughter of Joseph and Nancy (Cavitt) McFadden, and 
grand-daughter of John and Mary (McMichael) McFadden. 
Mr. Young served in the civil war successively a^ suc- 
cessfully as captain, major, lieutenant-colonel and colonel 
of the Fourth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Cavalry. 
For brave and meritorious conduct he was brevetted 
brigadier general. He participated in fifty battles, actions, 
engagements, scouts and skirmishes, and was three times 
wounded during his service. After the war he was ap- 
pointed a captain in the regular army, and is now a 
lieutenant-colonel — assigned to duty with the Fourth 
Regiment, U. S. Cavalry, his present address being Jeffer- 
son Barracks, Mo. 

Samuel and Margaret (McFadden) Young had six 
children born to them, as follows : 

I. Edith, born Aug. 3, 1865, and married Sept. 
2, 1886, to Lieutenant John Thornton 
Knight, who was born April 16, 1861. 
Two children have been born to them, viz.: 



192 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

(a) Alice Margaret, born July 29, 

1888. 
(d) Samuel Young, born — , 

1890. 

2. Hannah Haliburton, born Nov. 22, 1866, 

married Sept. 2, 1886, to Lieutenant George 
Wendle Read, who was born Nov. — , 1859. 
One son has blessed this union, viz.: 

(a) Burton Young, born Feb. 1 1 , 
1889. 

3. Lilian D., born Sept. 24, 1868. 

4. Majorie G., born April 26, 1872. 

5. Ranald Mackenzie, born June 12, 1880 ; died 

Sept. — , 1882. 

6. Bessie W., born March 24, 1883. 



X. Joanna Crawford Young was born June 6, 
1842, and died Aug. 2, 1858. 



XL John Callahan Young was born Dec. 3 1 , 1845. 
He served in the war of the rebellion as a private soldier 
in Company I, Sixty-seventh Regiment, Pennsylvania Vol- 
unteer Lifantry. After qualifying himself, he entered the 
Christian ministry, and was, for a number of years, pastor 
of the Presbyterian church at Clinton, Allegheny county. 
Pa., but in the spring of 1892 was called to the pastorate 
of the Presbyterian church of Shousetown, same county, 
where he is now located. He was married Dec. 14, 1871, 
by Rev. H. C. Beacom, to Clara A. Day, of Washington, 
Pa. Six children have been born to them, as follows : 

1. John, born Nov. 3, 1877. 

2. Ralph Emerson, born Oct. 22, 1879. 

3. LucRETiA Russell, born Sept. 19, 1881. 

4. Bennett Henderson, born April 5. 1883. 

5. Henry Drummond, born July 17, 1887. 

6. Ruth Abigail, born Dec. 19, 1888. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 193 

ISTo. ^. 

Elizabeth Wilson Scott, the second daughter of 
John and Esther (Phillips) Scott, was born April 22, 1803, 
at Miller's Run, Washington county, Pa., and here spent 
her childhood days. After the death of her parents, she 
removed to the home of her uncle, Samuel Phillips, of 
Robinson township, Allegheny county. Pa. Here she 
lived until 1825, when she was married, by Rev. Moses 
Kerr, to John Kearns, of Pittsburgh, Pa. 

They located on what is now Penn avenue. Tenth 
ward, Pittsburgh, Pa. — then generally known as Bayards- 
town. Here they continued to reside during the remain- 
der of their lives. 

Mrs. Kearns died Feb. 11, 1842. Her husband sur- 
vived her, and died June 13, 1866. Both are buried in 
Allegheny cemetery, Pittsburgh, Pa. They were mem- 
bers of the First Associate Reformed (now Second U. P.) 
church of Pittsburgh. 

John and Elizabeth (Scott) Kearns had three chil- 
dren, all born in Bayardstown — in what is now the Tenth 
ward, Pittsburgh, as follows : 



I. Susanna Kearns was born Oct. 25, 1825, and 
received a common school education in the Fifth (now 
Tenth) ward, Pittsburgh. She resided on Penn avenue, 
Pittsburgh, until Sept., 1884, when she and her sister, 
Mrs. Conway, removed to Ingram, Allegheny county, Pa., 
where Mrs. Conway had purchased a property, and on it 
erected a house. Here she now resides. In early wo- 
manhood she united with the Third A. R. (now Fourth 
U. P.) church, Pittsburgh, where she was for many years 
a consistent member. Some time after her removal to 
Ingram, she and sister, with fourteen others as charter 
members, applied to Presbytery for an organization of a 
13 



194 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

United Presbyterian church at Ingram, which organization 
was granted. The congregation purchased property and 
erected a church building. Rev. Van Fossen is the 
present pastor. 



II. John Scott Kearns was born July 2, 1827, 
and attended school mostly in what is now the Tenth 
ward, Pittsburgh. He learned the trade of a blacksmith, 
which occupation he followed for a time in Pittsburgh, 
and then removed to Wheeling, W. Va., where he con- 
tinued to work at his trade. Here he was married, but 
his wife died shortly after marriage. He then went west, 
and, after traveling from one place to another, finally set- 
tled in Pueblo ^county. Col., and engaged in farming. 
Here he married Miss Mary Randall, and continued to re- 
side in Colorado for a number of years, after which he 
removed to Texas to engage in cattle raising. He was 
there but a short time, when he died, June 14, 1879. 

John and Mary (Randall) Kearns had five children, 
as follows, all born in Pueblo county. Col.: Bessie, Willie, 
Esther V., John and Mary. 

Esther V. was born Oct. 20, 1 87 1 . She came 
to Pennsylvania in 1882, and is now living 
with her aunts, Mrs. Conway and Miss 
Kearns, at Ingram, Pa. She is attending 
school in Pittsburgh. 



III. Esther Kearns was born March 26, 1833, 
and received her education in what is now the Tenth ward 
school, Pittsburgh, and at a private school conducted by 
Miss Jane Richmond. She was married from her home 
on Penn street, Nov. 5, 1853, to Thomas Conway, of 
Pittsburgh. They located in Birmingham borough, (now 
South Side, Pittsburgh,) where Mr. Conway was engaged 
in the grain and feed business. Here they had resided 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 195 

about fourteen months, when Mr. Conway died, Jan. ii, 
1855, and was buried in Allegheny cemetery. After the 
death of her husband, Mrs. Conway, with her infant 
daughter, returned to her home on Penn street, where she 
continued to reside until her removal to Ingram, Pa., in 
the year 1884. In early life she united with what is now 
the Fourth U. P. church, Pittsburgh, and continued in its 
membership until her marriage, when she went with her 
husband to the Third U. P. church, Pittsburgh, and from 
there transferred to Ingram U. P. church, where she now 
worships. Mr. and Mrs. Conway had one daughter born 
to them, viz.: 

Elizabeth Kearns was born in Birmingham, 
Nov. 3, 1854. She received her early edu- 
cation in the Tenth ward school, Pittsburgh, 
completing her studies in the Pittsburgh 
Female College. She is also a graduate of 
the School of Design, Pittsburgh. In early 
life she identified herself with the Third U. 
P. church, Pittsburgh, afterwards transferring 
her membership to the U. P. church at In- 
gram, Pa., where she now resides. She 
was married, Dec. 28, 1886, to Benton F. 
Petrie, of Ingram. They have two chil- 
dren, viz.: 

(a) Esther Kearns, born Feb. 29, 
1888. 

{d) Thomas William, born March 15, 
1891. 



ISTo. 3. 



Mary Scott was born in the year 1805, at Miller's 
Run, Washington county. Pa., and here spent her early 



196 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

life. After the death of her parents, she removed to the 
home of her grandfather, Samuel Scott, Sr., in Robinson 
township, Allegheny county, Pa., where she continued to 
reside until her death, which occurred Feb. 14, 1826. She 
was buried in Union church-yard. 



ISTo. 4. 

Samuel Scott, the eldest son of John and Esther 
(Phillips) Scott, was born in the year 1807, on his grand- 
father's farm in Washington county, Pa., and here spent 
his childhood days, removing, after the death of his 
parents, to the home of his uncle, John Berry, on an ad- 
joining farm. 

He received a common school education in the schools 
of his native county, and, when old enough, learned the 
trade of a carpenter, which occupation he afterwards fol- 
lowed, having sold his farm (inherited from his grand- 
father) to his uncle, John Berry. 

He was married to Catherine Collins, of Robinson 
township, Allegheny county, Pa., and for a time lived at 
the Collins home, after which they went to housekeeping 
in Robinson township, and soon after the young wife died 
leaving an infant daughter. Mr. Scott then returned with 
his infant daughter, Anna, to the Collins home where he 
died a few years after the death of his wife. Both were 
members of what is now Union U. P. church, and were 
buried in the cemetery attached to it. 

Samuel and Catherine (Collins) Scott had one daugh- 
ter, Anna. 



I. Anna Scott was born in Robinson township, but 
the date of her birth has not been ascertained. Being 
left, at a tender age, without the care of mother or father. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 197 

she was taken by her aunt, Rachel Collins, and with her 
spent her early life. While visitin^ an uncle in Kentucky, 
she was married to Alfred B. Alder, of the above named 
place. They had children, but no record of them has 
been obtained. 



Jonathan Scott, the second son of John and 
Esther (Phillips) Scott, was born in the year 1809, on the 
homestead farm in Washington county. Pa., and after the 
death of his parents lived for a time with his uncle, John 
Berry, after which he removed to the home of his grand- 
father, Jonathan Phillips, of Robinson township, Alle- 
gheny county, Pa. 

He received a common school education, such as the 
schools of the vicinity of his home afforded, and followed 
farming. 

In early manhood he left his grandfather's home and 
went to Ohio, where he was married, but the date of mar- 
riage or the name of his wife has not been learned. He 
remained some years in Ohio, but in the meantime re- 
turned to Pennsylvania to settle up his business, he having 
sold his farm at Miller's Run to his uncle, John Berry. 
After this he and family went farther west, and since then 
all trace of him has been lost. Nothing further of the 
family has been learned. We cannot say with any cer- 
tainty how many children were born to them, though we 
learn they had four sons, but of them we have not ob- 
tained any record. 



n:o. e. 



Esther Scott, the fourth daughter of John andv 
Esther (Phillips) Scott, was born in the year 181 1, at Mil- 



198 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

ler's Run, Washington county, Pa. Being left an orphan 
at the age of six years, she was taken with her sister, 
Hannah, to the home of her grandfather, Jonathan Phil- 
Hps, in Robinson township, Allegheny county, Pa., and 
there spent her girlhood days, receiving her education in 
the schools of the township. 

In early life she became a member of Union Associate 
Reformed (now U. P.) church, and continued in its com- 
munion until her death. 

She was married in early womanhood, to William 
Gribben,* (brother-in-law of Captain John Young,) of Rob- 
inson township — a weaver by trade. They located on a 
farm in said township — a section of what was known as 
'* Hall's Grove." f There they continued to reside until 
the death of Mrs. Gribben, which occurred Aug. 19, 1851. 
She was buried in the cemetery attached to Union A. R. 
(now U. P.) church. 

" One by one earth's ties are broken, 

As we see our love decay; 
And the hopes so fondly cherished 

Brighten but to pass away. 
One by one our hopes grow brighter, 

As we near the shining shore; 
For we know across the river 

Wait the loved ones gone before." 

A few years after his wife's death, Mr. Gribben mar- 
ried, as his third wife, Sarah Gibson, daughter of Robert 
Gibson, ofMiddletown, Moon township, Allegheny county, 
Pa. They resided in Middletown (now Coraopolis) a few 
years after marriage, removing thence about the year 1855 
or 1856 to what is now South Side, Pittsburgh. Here 
Mr. Gribben died Dec. 24, 1876, and was buried in the 
South Side cemetery. His wife, Sarah, died several years 
after, leaving one daughter, Sarah, who is now engaged in 
teaching in the South Side schools. 

* See sketch of Abigail (Young) Gribben, page 163. 
t See foot-note — Sketch of Ann (Young) Hall, page 156, 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 199 

William and Esther (Scott) Gribben had eight chil- 
dren, viz.: John S., Mary J., James, Rachel, Elizabeth, 
Oliver P., Leonard and Esther A. 



I. John Scott Gribben was born Feb. 13, 1832, 
in Robinson township, Allegheny county, Pa., and there 
spent his boyhood days, receiving his primary education 
in the township schools. After qualifying himself in the 
public schools he entered Jefferson College, Canonsburg, 
Pa., which institution he attended one year. 

When about 21 years of age he went to Pittsburgh, 
Pa., where he secured a clerkship in a retail grocery store, 
which position he retained about three and one-half years, 
after which he carried on the grocery business on his own 
account until the civil war broke out. 

Mr. Gribben was united in marriage March 25, 1856, 
to Priscilla McFadden,* who was born Oct. 31, 1835, i^ 
Moon township, Allegheny county. Pa., but at the time of 
marriage, was a resident of Pittsburgh. The ceremony 
was performed by Rev. John G. Brown, D. D., who was 
then pastor of the Second A. R. (now Third U. P.) church, 
Pittsburgh. 

They continued to reside in Pittsburgh until July — , 
1862, when they, with two children, removed to Cleve- 
land, Ohio, where Mr, Gribben engaged in the manufac- 
turing of roofing material, at which business he continued 
until the year 1881, and since that time he has been con- 
nected with the Brush Electric Company, of Cleveland, 
being employed as their shipping and receiving clerk. 

Priscilla, wife of John Gribben, died in Cleveland, 
Feb. 10, 1888, and was buried in Woodland cemetery, 
Cleveland. 

In early life Mr. Gribben united with Union Asso- 

* Priscilla McFadden was the third daughter of Joseph and Nancy (Cavitt) Mc- 
Fadden, and grand-daughter of John and Mary (McMichael) McFadden. 



200 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

ciate Reformed (now U. P.) church, Robinson township, 
afterwards transferring to the Third U. P. church, Pitts- 
burgh, and finally, about the year 1877, connected with 
the Methodist Episcopal church, Cleveland, with which 
body he now worships. His present address is No. 1 1 1 
Sawtell avenue, Cleveland, Ohio. 

John and Priscilla (McFadden) Gribben had born to 
them the following children : 

1. Will Rinaldo, born Feb. 26, 1857, in Pitts- 

burgh, Pa. He now resides in Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

2. Cora Inglewood, born Aug*. 14, 1859. in 

Pittsburgh, Pa. She died Nov. 2, 1866, in 
Cleveland, and was buried in Woodland 
cemetery. 

3. Forest Ellwood, born June 29, 1866, in 

Cleveland, Ohio, and married Oct. 21, 1891, 
to Julia McGrath, of Youngstown, Ohio. 
Their present address is No. 515 Belmont 
avenue, Youngstown, Ohio. 

4. Alberta Du Mars, born July 27, 1870, in 

Cleveland. 

5. Herbert King, born Dec. 17, 1872, in Cleve- 

land, 



II. Mary Jane Gribben was born Feb. 9, 1834, in 
Robinson township, Allegheny county, Pa., and here spent 
her girlhood days, receiving her education in the schools 
of that vicinity. About the year 1855 she removed with 
her father and family to Birmingham, now known as the 
South Side, Pittsburgh, and here continued to reside until 
her death, which occurred July 25, 1888. She was buried 
in the South Side cemetery. She was a member of the 
U. P. church. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 201 

III. James McFadden Gribben was born April 24, 
1836, in Robinson township, Allegheny county, Pa., and 
here spent his youthful days. He received a common 
school education in the schools of his native township. 

When about nineteen years of age, he removed with 
his father to Birmingham, where he was married. May 3, 
1859, to Mattie A. Evans. They continued to reside in 
Birmingham (now South Side, Pittsburgh) until Nov., 1886, 
when they removed to their present residence at Ingram, 
Allegheny county. Pa. They are members of the U. P. 
congregation of Ingram. 

Mr. Gribben is a machinest by trade, and is employed 
in the planing-mill of Schuette & Co., South Side. 

James and Mattie (Evans) Gribben have two children, 
both born in Birmingham, Allegheny county. Pa., as fol- 
lows : 

1. William J., born Jan. 28, 1861, and received 

a common school education in the South 
^ Side public schools. He was married in 

the year 1881, to Miss Maggie Evans, of 
Allegheny, Pa. They removed from Alle- 
gheny to Ingram, Pa., in the year 1886. 
They are members of the Presbyterian 
church of Ingram, now under the pastoral 
care of Rev. James B. Hill. Mr. Gribben is 
employed as clerk by the Dawes Manufac- 
turing Co., of Pittsburgh. They have two 
children : 

(a) Roy. 

(/;) John Lawrence Dawes. 

2. Ira Perry, born June 12, 1870, and educated 

in the common schools of the South Side, 
Pittsburgh. He is employed as cashier in 
the dry goods store of Biber & Easton, 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 



Pittsburgh, Pa. He resides with his parents 
at Ingram, and is connected with the U. P. 
church at that place. 



IV. Rachel Gribben was born Sept. 1 1 , 1838, and 
spent her girlhood days at the place of her birth, remov- 
ing to what is now the South Side, Pittsburgh, at the age 
of seventeen years. Here she died, Dec. 19, i860, and 
was buried beside her mother in Union U. P. graveyard. 



V. Elizabeth Gribben was born May 5, 1 841, in 
Robinson township, Allegheny county. Pa., and there 
spent her early life, receiving her education in the schools 
of the vicinity of her home. In girlhood she removed 
with her father and family to Birmingham, Pa., (now 
South Side, Pittsburgh.) Here she was married, June 7, 
1859, to John P. Bryce, son of James Bryce, the well- 
known glass manufacturer of the South Side, Pittsburgh. 
They continued to reside on the South Side during the 
remainder of their lives. 

Mr. Bryce died Jan. 31, 1864, and his wife, Elizabeth, 
died Dec. 5, 1875. Both were buried in the Allegheny 
cemetery, Pittsburgh, Pa. Mrs. Bryce was a member of 
the First U. P. church, Pittsburgh, Rev. W. J. Reid, pas- 
tor. 

John and Elizabeth (Gribben) Bryce had one son born 
to them, viz.: 
Marion G., born March 6, 1861, on the South 
Side, Pittsburgh, and received his education 
in the public schools of that place, and in 
the Pittsburgh Central High School. He is 
a glass manufacturer in one of the oldest 
glass manufactories on the South Side. Mr. 
Bryce was married, June 4, 1884, to Marion 
S. Lewis, of Jamestown, N. Y., who died in 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 208 

Pittsburgh, April 8, 1889. On the 12th 
day of May, 1892, Mr. Bryce married as his 
second wife Julia S. Waters, of Cromwell, 
Conn. Their present residence is No. 401 
South Highland avenue, Pittsburgh. By 
his first wife, Marion Lewis, Mr. Bryce had 
three children, as follows: 

{a) Janet, born June 29, 1885. 

[b) James, born Sept. 8, 1887. 

[c) Richard M., born April 2, 1889. 



VI. Oliver Perry Gribben was born Nov. 5, 
1843, and died in childhood, Nov. 11, 1846. He was 
buried in Union U. P. graveyard. 



VII. Leonard Gribben was born July 25, 1846, 
in Robinson township, Allegheny county. Pa., and here 
spent his early years, receiving his primary education in 
the schools of his native township. 

When about nine years of age, he removed with his 
father to what is now the South Side, Pittsburgh, and here 
attended school for several years. After completing the 
course as taught by the public schools, when about six- 
teen years of age, he obtained employment in the firm of 
James Bryce & Co., glass manufacturers, Pittsburgh, re- 
maining in their employ about two years. 

At this time the civil war was at its height, and 
young Leonard, though but a boy in years becoming im- 
bued with the martial spirit, succeeded, after persistent 
entreaties in gaining his father's permission to enter the 
army. He accordingly enlisted on the 24th day of Aug., 
1864, in the Fifth Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery, to serve 
one year or during the war. In speaking of his military 
career he says: " While I cannot recall any act of con- 
spicuous bravery, I, at least, have the satisfaction of know- 



204 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

ing that I obeyed orders and did my duty." He was mus- 
tered out of service June 30, 1865, at Vienna, Va., and 
received an honorable discharge at the close of the war. 

In the latter part of the year 1866, or early in 1867, 
Mr. Gribben engaged in ser\dce in the Pittsburgh post- 
office — S. M. Von Bonhorst at that time postmaster — re- 
maining there until 1876. In the meantime he was mar- 
ried, June 6, 1872, to Ada Barr, daughter of John U. 
Barr, of the firm of Barr & Moser, architects. The cere- 
mony was performed at the residence of Mr. Barr, No. 52 
North Diamond street, Allegheny, Pa., and here the young 
couple first went to housekeeping. 

After several changes of residence in Allegheny, they 
removed, in the summer of 1876, to Uhrichsville, Ohio, 
where Mr. Gribben accepted a situation with the Pitts- 
burgh, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis Railway Co., as 
coal inspector. The office was abolished after about six 
months time, when he, desiring to become an engineer, 
engaged as fireman on the same road, remaining in that 
position until Aug. 7, 1880, when he was promoted to 
the position of freight engineer, and in January, 1890, he 
was again promoted^ to passenger engineer, which re- 
sponsible position he now holds. 

While residing in Allegheny, Mr. Gribben and wife 
were members of the First U. P. church, Allegheny, Rev. 
William J. Robinson, D. D., pastor, afterwards transferring 
to the Presbyterian " Dennison Railway Chapel," where 
they still worship. Their present address is Uhrichsville, 
Tuscarawas county, Ohio. Three children have been 
born to them, as follows : 

1. John Upton, born Jnjly 17, 1873, in Alle- 

gheny, Pa. 

2. William Rees, bom Nov. 25, 1874, in Alle- 

gheny, Pa. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 205 

3. Ruth Margarite, born June 27, 1890, in 
Uhrichsville, Ohio. 



VIII. Esther Amanda Gribben was born June, 
30, 1849, and died Sept 9, 1851. She was buried in 
Union U. P. graveyard. 



nsco. :?. 

John Scott, the youngest son of John and Esther 
(Phillips) Scott, was born July 8, 18 13, on his grand- 
father's faim at Miller's Run, Washington county, Pa., 
and after the death of his parents, which occurred when 
he was about four years of age, he was taken with his 
brothers to the home of his uncle, John Berry, on the 
farm adjoining that on which he was born. Here he 
spent his early years, receiving an education such as the 
schools of those days afforded. 

When he was old enough, he learned the trade of a 
wagon-maker, but the work did not agree with him, con- 
sequently he abandoned it, and afterwards engaged in 
farming, which occupation he followed during the remain- 
der of his life. 

Mr. Scott was married Aug. 29, 1836, to Ann White, 
who was born in the year 18 15. After marriage he and 
wife removed to his own farm at Miller's Run, which he 
had inherited from his grandfather, Samuel Scott, Sr., and 
here continued to reside until his death, which occurred 
June 10, 1887, in the 74th year of his age. He died on 
his farm within a few feet of where he was born, having 
lived there the greater part of his life, and was buried in 
the cemetery attached to Venice U. P. church. 

After her husband's death, Mrs. Scott rented the 
farm at Miller's Run, and removed to the home of her son. 



206 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

John P. Scott, near Venice, Washington county, Pa. Here 
she died, Jan. 31, 1892, in the 77th year of her age, and 
was buried in Venice U. P. cemetery. 

John and Ann (White) Scott had four children, all 
born on their father's farm at Miller's Run, Washington 
county, Pa., as follows: 



I. Mary Scott was born June 29, 1837, ^^'^^ re- 
ceived a common school education in the schools of the 
vicinity of her home. She was married, Sept. 9, 1858, to 
Robert W. Lawrence, of Washington county, Pa. They 
located on a farm in Independence township, about three 
miles west of West Middletown, Washington county, Pa., 
and here Mr. Lawrence died March 28, 1870. His wife 
and family then removed to Venice, Washington county, 
Pa., and here Mrs. Lawrence died of consumption, Feb. 
13, 1889. She was a worthy member of Venice U. P. 
church at the time of her death. Robert and Mary 
Lawrence had three children, all born in Independence 
township, Washington county, Pa., as follows : 

1. William Walker, born May 15, 1859, and 

died in Venice, Pa., Oct. 2, 1874, aged 15 
years. He was buried in the U. P. church 
yard at Venice. 

2. James H., born Aug. 20, 1 861, and married 

June 2, 1887, to Anna Herriott. Mr. Law- 
rence is a wagon-maker by trade, and car- 
ries on a very successful business in Venice, 
Pa., where he and wife now reside. They 
are members of Venice U. P. church. One 
son has blessed their union: Ira Morgan, 
born July 6, 1888. 

3. Ella Jane, born Oct. 17, 1863. After her 

father's death, she resided in Venice, until 
the fall of 1 89 1, when she and her cousin. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 207 

Eva Scott, removed to Canonsburg, Pa,, 
where she now resides. In early life she 
became a member of Venice U. P. church, 
where she continued to worship until her 
removal to Canonsburg where she trans- 
ferred her membership to the Greenside 
Avenue U. P. congregation of the above 
named place. 



II. John P. Scott was born April 17, 1839, and re- 
ceived a good common school education in the schools of 
his native county. He was married, Jan. i, 1861, to Mary 
A. Cook. They located on a farm near Venice, in Cecil 
township, Washington county, Pa., where they have since 
continued to reside, Mr. Scott being a successful and 
respected farmer and wool-grower ; his farm is known as 
the " Visuvius Stock Farm." He has been for many 
years a worthy member of Venice U. P. church, of which 
congregation he was elected ruling elder, Aug. 28, 1864, 
and ordained in December of the same year, and con- 
tinues to serve in that capacity. Mr. and Mrs. Scott have 
children as follows, all born and raised on the homestead 
farm in Cecil township, Washington county. Pa., and mem- 
bers of Venice U. P. church : 

1. Robert Cook, born May 17, 1862, and re- 

ceived his primary education in the schools 
of his native township, completing his stud- 
ies at Ingleside Academy. He resides at 
home and is engaged in farming. 

2. Annie, born Sep. 10, 1864, and was ejducated 

in the common schools and at Ingleside 
Academy. She was married Jan. i, 1890, 
to James R. White, of Canonsburg, Pa. 
They reside in Cecil township, Washington 
county. Pa. — their address being McDon- 



208 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

aid, Washington county, Pa. They have 
one son, John Lee, born Jan. lo, 1891. 

3. John E., born March 19, 1867, and received 

his early education in the schools of the 
vicinity of his home, after which he at- 
tended Ingleside Academy. He is engaged 
in farming, being employed on the home^ 
stead farm near Venice. 

4. William L., born April 7, 1870. After re- 

ceiving a preparatory education in the 
schools of his native county, he entered 
Westminster College, from which institu- 
tion he was graduated with the class of '91. 
He is at present writing engaged as assistant 
principal of West Sunbury Academy, Butler 
county. Pa., but intends later to pursue the 
study of medicine, and enter the medical 
profession. 

5. George Wilson, born July 22, 1878, and 

now attending school in the vicinity of his 
home. 



III. William J. Scott was born June 25, 1841, 
and received a common school education in the schools of 
his native county. He was married Dec. 22, 1864, to 
Sarah A. Douglass. They located in Venice, Washington 
county, Pa., where Mr. Scott was engaged in the mercan- 
tile business, until about a year before his death. Here 
his wife, Sarah, died Oct. 25, 1871. Mr. Scott died March 
25, 1873. Both were buried in the burying ground at- 
tached to Venice U. P. church, of which congregation they 
were members at the time of their death. They had five 
children, all born in Venice, Pa., as follows: 

I. Agnes Jane, born Nov. — , 1865, and mar- 
ried from the home of her uncle, Martin 



14 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 209 

Douglass, April lo, 1888, to Thomas Chal- 
mers, of McDonald, Pa., where they now 
reside. Their children are, Allen, born 
Jan. 8, 1889, and William, born, Jan. — , 
1891. 

2. Anna Mary, born May 27, 1867. Since the 

death of her parents she has resided with 
her father's aunt, Rachel Dunn, on Herron 
avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. She is connected 
with the Seventh Presbyterian church, of 
Pittsburgh. 

3. Edith A., born Feb. 9, 1869, and died, at 

the residence of her cousin, Ella Lawrence, 
in Venice, Pa., March 25, 1890, at the age 
of 21 years. She was buried in Venice U. 
P. graveyard, of which church she was a 
member. 

4. Eva L., — twin sister of Edith — was born Feb. 

9, 1869. She now resides with her cousin, 
Ella Lawrence, in Canonsburg, Pa. She 
was a member of Venice U. P. church until 
recently, when she transferred to the Green- 
side Avenue U. P. church, of Canonsburg. 

5. William John, born July 3, 187 1. After the 

death of his mother, which occurred when 
he was but an infant, he was taken to the 
home of his grandfather, John Scott, where 
he lived until the death of the latter, in the 
year 1887, when he removed to Pittsburgh, 
Pa., and was employed by a tea company. 
While on a visit at the home of his cousin, 
Mary Lawrence, he died of spinal-menin- 
gitis, April 3, 1 89 1, and was buried in 
Venice U. P. graveyard. 



210 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

IV. Samuel Wilson Scott was born Aug. i, 1852. 
After attending the common schools of his native county, 
he was graduated from Duff's Mercantile College, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., and also attended an academy for some time. 
He was married April 27, 1882, to Anna M. May, and 
located on a farm in Cecil township, Washington county, 
Pa., being engaged in agricultural pursuits. He died at 
his home near Venice, Pa., April 28, 1888, at the age of 
35 years. He was a member of Venice U. P. church, 
and was buried in the graveyard attached to it. His 
widow and children still reside on the farm in Cecil town- 
ship — their address being Venice, Washington county. 
Pa. Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Scott had three children, all 
born on the farm on which they now reside, as follows : 

1. Ada Blanche, born March 8, 1883. 

2. Laura May, bom Nov. 27, 1884. 

3. Ethel White, born Sept. 24, 1887; died 

Aug. 28, i; 



ISTo. S. 

Rachel Scott, the youngest child of John and Esther 
(Phillips) Scott, was born Dec. 30, 181 5, at Miller's Run, 
Washington county, Pa., and, at an early age, being be- 
reft of both parents, was taken to the home of her uncle, 
Samuel Phillips, in Robinson township, Allegheny county, 
Pa., and here spent her childhood days, attending school in 
the log school house of the township. 

After the marriage of her sister, Elizabeth, she re- 
moved with her to the borough of Bayardstown, locating 
on what is now Penn avenue, Tenth ward, Pittsburgh, 
Pa., where she attended school for a number of years. 

She was married Dec, 5, 1844, to Allen Dunn, who 
was born in Falkirk, Scotland, March 11, 1822, and emi- 
grated to America in 1840. She removed to the home of 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 211 

her husband in what was then the Fifth ward, Pittsburgh, 
and, after several changes of residence, finally removed to 
Herron avenue, Thirteenth ward, where Mr. Dunn had 
previously purchased a property. 

Major Dunn was honored with a good share of the 
civil offices in the distribution of the city councils. He 
was connected with the banking house of Herron & Co. 
for some years, and acted for a time as cashier of the 
Fourth National Bank of Pittsburgh, which position he 
was compelled to resign on account of ill health. 

In the year 1866 Mr. and Mrs. Dunn took a trip to 
Scotland, and three months after their return to Pitts- 
burgh, Mr. Dunn died, Oct. 24, 1866, and was buried in 
Allegheny cemetery. For many years before his death 
he was a trustee of the First R. P. church, of Pittsburgh. 

In early womanhood Mrs. Dunn united with the 
above-named church, and continued in its communion for 
many years, transferring to the Seventh Presbyterian 
church, Pittsburgh, (during the pastorate of Rev. Robert 
Hill,) where she now worships. She resides on Herron 
avenue, Pittsburgh. 



FAMILY OF MARGARET (SCOTT) SLATER, 

OF LAWRENCE COUNTY, PA. 

If If ARGARET SCOTT, the eldest daughter of Samuel 
I Y j and Elizabeth (Wilson) Scott, was born at Mingo 
i I Creek, Washington county. Pa., in the year 1779, 
V^,and was baptized with her brother, John, Oct. 7, 
1779, at the " Forks of Yough " settlement, by Rev. John 
Cuthbertson, of the Reformed Presbyterian church. 

She spent her girlhood days mostly in Washington 
county, removing with her parents to a farm in what is 
now Robinson township, Allegheny county. Pa., about the 
year 1795. 

She was married in Feb., 1805, to Archibald Slater, 
of Noblestown, Washington county. Pa., who was born in 
County Armagh, Ireland, in the year 1780, and came 
to this country in 1794. They located after mar- 
riage, in Noblestown, where they resided about two 
years, removing thence to the Scott farm at Camp- 
bell's Run, where they remained until the year 1823, when 
they purchased a farm in Mercer (now Lawrence) county. 
Pa. Here Mr. Slater died Sept. 18, 1850. His wife sur- 
vived him and died Aug. 26, 1862, at the advanced age of 
eighty-three years. Both are buried in Neshannock grave- 
yard, Hickory township, Lawrence county, Pa. 

" They have passed beyond sight at the touching of death; 
But they live, like ourselves, in God's infinite care." 

Archibald and Margaret (Scott) Slater had nine chil- 
dren, viz.: John, Elizabeth, Samuel, Mary, Thomas, 
Margaret, Archibald, James and Nancy — all born on the 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 213 

Scott farm in Robinson township, Allegheny county, Pa., 
except John, who was born in Noblestown, and Nancy, 
who was born in Mercer (now Lawrence) county, Pa. 



Slierteh ISCo. 1. 



John Slater was born Dec. 25, 1805, and was mar- 
ried Sep. 14, 1830, to Mary Wright, daughter of William 
and Elizabeth (Scott) Wright. They resided in Franklin 
township, Beaver county. Pa. Mr. Slater died March i, 
1877. His wife, Mary, died June — , 1883. Both were 
buried in Wurtemburg U. P. churchyard, Lawrence county, 
Pa. Seven children were born to them, viz.: Margaret, 
(died in childhood;) George, (killed in the late war;) Eliza- 
beth, (died in early life;) Joseph, (resides in Zeleinople, 
Butler county, Pa.;) Mary Jane, (resides in Beaver county. 
Pa. — post office Shiner;) Wright, (located in Pawnee, 
Neb.;) Scott, (resides in Pawnee, Neb.) 



]sro. ^. 

Elizabeth Slater, the eldest daughter of Archibald 
and Margaret (Scott) Slater, was born June i, 1807, and 
married Oct. i, 1829, to Samuel McCaslin. Their home 
was in Scott township, Lawrence county. Pa. Mr. McCas- 
lin died June 13, 1844. His wife, Elizabeth, survived him 
manyyears, and died March 15, 1883, and was buried in 
Neshannock graveyard, Lawrence county, Pa. Eight chil- 
dren were born to them, of whom two — Archibald and 
Rachel are deceased. Those living all reside in Lawrence 
county. Pa. — Margaret, Mary, William and Jane at 
McCaslin ; Robert, at Rose Point, and John, at New 
Castle. 



214 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

nSTo. 3. 

Samuel Slater was born Oct. lo, 1810, and mar- 
ried Sept. — , 1843, to Rachel Gibson, who was born 
Sept. 16, 1823. They resided in Scott township, 
Lawrence county, Pa. Mrs. Slater died July 19, 1878. 
Her husband died Nov. 7, 1881, in Detroit, Mich., while 
on a visit to his daughter, Mrs. C. T. Ufford. His re- 
mains were brought home and interred in Neshannock 
graveyard. 

Samuel and Rachel (Gibson) Slater had six children 
born to them, as follows : 



I. Maria Slater was born May 19, 1849, and mar- 
ried to C. T. Ufford. They were located in Detroit, Mich., 
and here Mr. Ufford died May 28, 1889. Four children 
were born to them, viz.: 

1. Clinton. 

2. Emma. 

3. Mame. 

4. Nellie. 



II. James A. Slater was born June 28, 185 1, and 
married Feb. 14, 1884, to Miss Maggie McCreary. They 
reside in East Brook, Lawrence county, Pa. Two chil- 
dren have been born to them, as follows : 

1. Carl, born April 15, 1885. 

2. Phcebe, born Dec. 16, 1890. 



III. Margaret Slater was born Sept. 10, 1854. She 
is unmarried, and resides in Detroit, Michigan. 



IV. Jennie Slater was born Jan. 10, 1857, and re- 
sides in Detroit. Unmarried. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 216 

V. William Slater was bom Jan, 2, 1864. He is 
located in Detroit. 



VI. Emma Slater, the youngest child, is deceased. 



No. 4. 

Mary Slater was bom Sept. 3, 1812, and married 
Nov. 22, 1836, to William McCaslin, brother of Samuel 
McCaslin. Their home was in Hickory township, Law- 
rence county. Pa., and here Mr. McCaslin died, Sept. 13, 
1849. His widow still survives him, and resides in the 
above-named township and county. No children. 



]sro. s. 

Thomas Slater was bom Oct. — ,1814- He is un- 
married, and resides in Clarion, Clarion county, Pa. 



No. e. 

Margaret Slater was born Dec. 25, 18 16, and 
married June 25, 1840, to Alexander McConnell, a half- 
brother of John and Mary Carr. They resided in Lees- 
burg, Mercer county. Pa. Mrs. McConnell died Aug. 14, 
1849, and was buried at Rich Hill, Wilmington town- 
ship, Lawrence county. Pa. Her husband survived her 
many years, and died March 23, 1883. Three children 
were born to them, William J., Archibald and David — all 
died in childhood. 



iSTo. :7. 

Archibald Slater, Jr., was born Nov. 15, 18 19, 
and married Oct. 7, 185 i, to Mary Carr. He died at the 



216 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

old homestead in Washington township, Lawrence county, 
Pa., March lO, 1890, from injuries received by being 
kicked by a horse. His widow still survives him, and re- 
sides in the old Slater homestead. No children. 



ISTo S. 

James Slater was born Oct. 21, 1821, and married 
Jan. 10, 1848, to Sarah Whitehall. He died Nov. 22, 
1876, at his home in Clarion, Pa., and was buried in the 
cemetery at that place. His widow still resides in Clarion. 
Five children were born to them, viz.: Josephine, (deceased;) 
Albert, (resides in Arizona;) Harrison, (located in Curls- 
ville. Clarion county, Pa.;) Nannie, (Curlsville;) Margaret, 
(Clarion, Pa.) 



nsTo. e. 

Nancy Slater, the youngest child of Archibald and 
Margaret (Scott) Slater, was born March 24, 1824, and 
married in the year 1842, to John Carr, brother of Mary 
(Carr) Slater. Mr. Carr died March i, 1881. His widow 
survives him, and resides with her widowed sister, Mary 
McCaslin, in East Brook, Lawrence county, Pa. 

John and Nancy (Slater) Carr had nine children born 
to them, as follows : 



L James Carr was born Jan. 10, 1843, and married 
Sept. 15, 1864, to Sarah Amanda McMillen. Mr. Carr is 
a carpenter and contractor by occupation, and resides in 
New Castle, Pa. He was wounded while serving his 
country in the late civil war. The family record is as 
follows : 

I. Charles, born Nov. 5, 1865; died July 29, 
1883. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 217 

2. Harry W., born Aug. i, 1867, and married 

to Sarah Kirkpatrick. They are located in 
Galion, Ohio, Mr. Carr being in the employ 
of the Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati & 
Indianapolis R. R. A son was born to 
them June 17, 1892. 

3. Mary, born Oct. 3, 1869, and married Oct. 10, 

1889, to James Robinson, an iron worker 
by trade. They reside in New Castle, Pa. 
A daughter, Susan, was born to them Oct. 
7, 1890. 

4. Anna Belle, born March 29, 1873, and mar- 

ried Jan. — , 1892, to Harry Lutz, an iron 
worker by occupation. They reside in 
New Castle, Pa. 

5. Fred Written, bom Nov. 15, 1875. 

6. Olive Bertha, born Oct. 28, 1880. 



n. Sarah Carr was born May 3, 1845, and married 
Aug. 6, 1862, to John Marshall McMillen, but her 
wedded life was of short duration. The morning after 
their marriage, the husband bade adieu to his young bride 
and left home and friends to serve his country in the civil 
war, which was then at its height. After but four months 
service, he was killed, Dec. 13, 1862, in the battle of 
Fredericksburg. 

" Many a son and husband 
That day in the battle fell." 

The following beautiful lines of the poet may, with 
singular propriety, be applied to her, who may be classed 
among " the brave at home," while her young husband 
was numbered with the brave who fell on the battle field: 



218 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

" The maid who binds her warrior's sash, 

With smile that well her pains dissembles, 
The while beneath her drooping lash 

One starry tear-drop hangs and trembles; 
Though Heaven alone records the tear. 

And fame shall never know her story, 
Her heart has shed a drop as dear 

As e'er bedewed the field of glory." 

Mrs. McMillen still remains a widow and resides in 
New Castle, Lawrence county, Pa. She is a member of 
the United Presbyterian church of that place — Rev. 
McDowell, pastor. 



III. William John Carr was born Oct. 25, 1847, 
and died June 2, 1849. 



IV. Margaret Carr was born Jan. 30, 1850, and 
married Dec. 30, 1869, to John McConaghy. They now 
reside in East Brook, Lawrence county, Pa. Nine chil- 
dren (all at home) have been born to them, as follows : 

1. Nancy, born July 30, 1870. 

2. Alexander, born July 4, 1872. 

3. Jennie, born Feb. 22, 1874. 

4. Lewis, born Oct. 23, 1875. 

5. William, born Aug. 23, 1877. 

6. Florence, bom April 14, 1883. 

7. Leroy, born March 23, 1885. 

8. Norman, born Feb. 5, 1887. 

9. Nellie, born Jan. 16, 1889. 



V. Mary Ann Carr was born April 7, 1853, and 
died Dec. 28, 1882. 



VI. Joseph Carr was born March 22, 1856, and 
married March 28, 1883, to Agnes Hartsufif. They reside 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 219 

in Edenburg, Lawrence county, Pa., where Mr. Carr is en- 
gaged in farming. Three children have been born to 
them, viz.: 

1. Theressa, born June 15, 1886. 

2. Clare, born Sep. lo, 1889. 

3. Melissa, born Nov. 10, 1891. 



VII. Elizabeth Carr was born May 19, 1859, and 
married May 28, 1878, to Walker Alexander. They reside 
in Portersville, Butler county. Pa. Their children are as 
follows : 

1. John, born Jan. 21, 1879. 

2. Edward, bom Dec. 7, 1881. 

3. Oscar, born March 21, 1886. 

4. Ada, born Oct. 9, 1890. 



VIII. David Lewis Carr was born July 4, 1862, 
and married March 23, 1882, to Ida May Black, of Law- 
rence county, Pa. They are located in New Castle, Law- 
rence county. Pa., where Mr. Carr is engaged in stock- 
raising and farming. Two daughters have been born to 
them, viz.: 

1. Narcissa May, born Aug. 28, 1883. 

2. ESLI LoviNA, born Dec. 10, 1889. 



IX. Ella Carr was born April 15, 1865. She re- 
sides with her mother in East Brook, Lawrence county, 
Pa. 



FAMILY OF ELIZABETH (SCOTT) WRIGHT, 

OF BEAVER COUNTY, PA. 

t LIZABETH SCOTT, the second daughter of Samuel 

I and Elizabeth (Wilson) Scott, was born in the year 

1 1780, at Mingo Creek, Washington county. Pa., and 

^^■^"^ there spent her early life. When about fifteen 

years of age she removed with her parents to what is now 

Robinson township, Allegheny county, Pa., where she 

lived until her marriage. 

On the 22d day of April, 1807, she was married to 
William Wright, a native of Ireland, but at the time of 
marriage a resident of Camp Run, Beaver county. Pa. — 
near Zelienople — where he owned a large farm, on which 
they located shortly after marriage. 

Mrs. Wright died at her home at Camp Run, Sept. 7, 
1833, aged 53 years. Her husband survived her, and died 
July 7, 1849, aged seventy-six years. Both are buried in 
the old Covenanter graveyard, near Camp Run. 

" Of all the thoughts of God that are 

Borne inward into souls afar, 

Along the Psalmist's music deep, 
Now tell me if that any is 
For gift or grace surpassing this — 

' He giveth His beloved sleep.' " 

William and Elizabeth (Scott) Wright had eight 
children, all born on the homestead farm at Camp Run, 
as follows : 

Slte:te;H ISTo. 1. 

Elizabeth Wright was born Feb. 6, 1808, and 
married May — , 1825, to Isaac Sterrett. Several children 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 221 

were born to them, but they are all now dead. They 
have one grandson living — Mr. C. Barr — who is married 
and has a family, but no record has been obtained. Mrs. 
Sterrett died April 2, 1842, aged thirty-four years, and was 
buried in the Covenanter graveyard near Camp Run, Pa. 



ISTo. ^. 



John Wright was. born Jan. i6, 1810, and died in 
infancy. 



]Sro. 3. 

Mary Wright was born April 8, 181 1, and married 
Sept. 14, 1830, to John Slater, son of Margaret and Archi- 
bald Slater. Seven children were born to them.* Mrs. 
Slater died June 2, 1883, and was buried in Wurtemburg 
U. P. graveyard, Lawrence county. Pa. 



]Sro. 4. 
I 

Samuel Wright was born July 17, 181 3, and mar- 
ried Martha Morrison. He died July 18, 1844, at the 
early age of thirty-one years, and was buried in the Cove- 
nanter burying-ground, near Camp Run. His wife, one 
daughter and a son survive him, and are now located in 
Tarkio, Missouri. 



iSTo. e. 

John Wright was born Nov. 18, 181 5, and married 
Mary Scott, who died Jan. 27, 1873. On the 22d day of 
August, 1877, h^ married, as his second wife, Mrs. Mary 

* See sketch of John Slater, page 213. 



222 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

R. Smith, who died Sept. i, 1885. Mr. Wright still sur- 
vives her, and resides on the old homestead farm near 
Zelienople, Pa. By his first wife, Mary Scott, he had 
seven children — Elizabeth, Francis, Margaret, Rachel, 
William, Mary and Rosanna. By his second wife he had 
one daughter, Terzah Eldora. 



I. Elizabeth Wright was born Nov. 10, 1838, 
and died April 19, 1862, 



II. Francis Wright was born Dec. 13, 1 84 1. He 
was a "nine months volunteer" in the civil war, and died, 
Dec. 15, 1863, of disease contracted while in service. 



III. Margaret J. Wright was born Aug. 24, 1843, 
and was married to Miller Wright. Their present address 
is Rochester, Beaver county, Pa. No further information 
of the family has been obtained. 



IV. Rachel Wright was born Aug. 20, 1846, and 
married to Charles Steoffier. Their present address is 
Zelienople, Butler county, Pa. 



V. William Wright was born Aug. 13, 1850, and 
married Sept. 3, 1872, to Mattie R. Young, who was born 
Aug. 5, 1850. They now reside in Beaver county. Pa. — 
post-office Fombell. Eight children have been born to 
them — seven daughters and one son. 



VI. Mary Wright was born May 7, 1853, and died 
March 12, 1864. 



VII. Rosanna Wright, twin sister of Mary, was 
married in the year 1877, to Curtis Brown, and now re- 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 223 

sides in Ellwood City, Lawrence county, Pa. They have 
seven children — five sons and two daughters. 



VIII. Terzah Eldora Wright was born May 22, 
1878, and resides with her father on the homestead farm 
in Beaver county, Pa. 



]sro. e. 

James Wright was born Jan. 10, 18 19, and married 
Margaret Stewart. He died April 9, 1845, and was buried 
in the Covenanter graveyard, Rose Point, Lawrence county, 
Pa. He left one son, Stewart, who now resides in Olathe, 
Johnston county, Kan. His widow afterwards married 
Charles Stoner, and now resides in Lawrence county, Pa. 
— post-office Rose Point. 



No. :z. 

William Wright, Jr., was born May 25, 1821, and 
died in early manhood, Aug. 7, 1846. He was buried in 
the Covenanter burying ground near Camp Run. He was 
unmarried. 



KTo. S. 



Joseph Wright was born April 11, 1825, and died 
Oct. I, 1845. He was buried in the family burying 
ground near Camp Run. He was unmarried. 



FAMILY OF WILLIAM SCOTT, 

OF BROOKE COUNTY, W. VA. 

WILLIAM SCOTT, the second son of Samuel and 
Elizabeth (Wilson) Scott, was born at Mingo 
Creek, Washington county, Pa., about the year 
1782, though the exact date is not known. He spent his 
childhood days on the farm at Mingo Creek, removing 
with his parents to Robinson township, Allegheny county, 
Pa., in boyhood. 

When about sixteen years of age, in the summer of 
1798, he left home, and for a long time his parents did not 
know where he was located, but finally heard from him 
at Cadiz, Harrison county, Ohio. Here he married Miss 
Nancy Grimes, whose brother at that time kept a hotel in 
Cadiz, known as the " Cross Keys House." They located 
on a farm, which Mr. Scott had purchased, about three 
miles north of Cadiz, and here his wife died, but the date 
of her death has not been ascertained. She left two chil- 
dren, both now dead. 

In the year 1 8 19 Mr. Scott married, as his second 
wife, Catherine Thompson, of Red Stone, Fayette county, 
Pa., who was at that time living with her brother, David, 
near Cadiz, Ohio. Shortly after marriage they removed 
to Brooke (now Hancock) county, W. Va., opposite East 
Liverpool, Ohio, where Mr. Scott purchased a farm. 

In the year 1830 he and family removed to East 
Liverpool, Ohio, where he erected a steam saw-mill. In 
Sept., 1832, he went to Pittsburgh for machinery for the 
mill, stopping at the home of his nephew, Captain John 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 225 

Young, at Montours, Allegheny county, Pa., where he left 
his horse and proceeded to Pittsburgh on Captain Young's 
mule. Leaving the mule at " Jones' Ferry," he crossed 
the river to Pittsburgh to make his purchases. After the 
lapse of several days, as he did not return to the stable for 
the mule, Mr. Jones, becoming alarmed at his absence, sent 
for Captain Young, who, with the coroner, Ebenezer Kerr, 
made diligent search for about two weeks, but could find 
no trace of Mr. Scott. The conclusion arrived at, was 
that he had been murdered at, or near the " Point," Pitts- 
burgh. 

" We shall meet there many a loved one, 
That was torn from our embrace; 
We shall listen to their voices, 
And behold them face to face." 

His wife Catherine removed with her family, in No- 
vember, 1844, to Richland county, Ohio, where she died 
Jan. — , 1848, and was buried in Rome cemetery, in the 
above-named county and state. 

William Scott had by his first wife, Nancy, two chil- 
dren, Elizabeth and Samuel, and by his second wife, Cath- 
erine, five children, Mary Jane, Clarissa W., Zorayda, 
Robert C. and Martha T. 



Sksteti ISCo. 1. 



Elizabeth Scott was born Oct. i o, 1 8 ii , near Cadiz, 
Ohio, and here spent her childhood days. In early life 
she identified herself with the Associate Reformed church, 
and in after years united with Peters Creek U. P. church. 

She was married in Beaver county. Pa., Sept. 22, 

1842, to John Anderson, and with him removed to his 

farm in Washington county. Pa., where he was engaged 

in agricultural pursuits. Here they continued to reside 

until death — Mr. Anderson's occurring June 3, 1868, aged 
15 



226 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

78 years, ii months and 28 days. His wife, Elizabeth, 
died April 20, 1873. Both are buried in Peters Creek 
U. P. graveyard. 

John and Elizabeth (Scott) Anderson had six chil- 
dren, all born on the farm in Washington county. Pa,, as 
follows : 



I. William John Anderson, born Jan. 22, 1844, 
and married Dec. 21, 1876, by Rev. C. W. Wycoff, to 
Agnes Kiddoo. They reside on the homestead farm in 
Washington county, and are members of Peters Creek U. 
P. church. A daughter was born to them April 26, 1878, 
but died in infancy. 

II. A DAUGHTER, born April 27, 1845, and died in 
infancy. 



III. A SON, born Dec. 27, 1847, and died in infancy. 



IV. James Grimes Anderson, born Dec. 30, 1848, 
and died July 20, 185 i. 



V. Martha Elizabeth Anderson, bom May 19, 
185 I. She received her primary education in the schools 
of her native place, completing her studies in Washington 
Seminary, Pa. She was married at her home in Washing- 
ton county, Pa., Nov. 5, 1874, by Rev. R. M. Patterson, 
to James C. Boreland, a farmer by occupation. They 
were located for a number of years in Houstonville, 
Washington county, Pa., where they and their eldest son 
were connected with the United Presbyterian church. 
They removed, recently, to Sewickley, Allegheny county. 
Pa., where Mr. Boreland embarked in the grocery busi- 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 227 

ness, in which he is still engaged. Four children have 
been born to them, as follows : 

1. William A., born Nov. lo, 1875. 

2. A DAUGHTER, born Sept. 16, 1877 ; died Nov. 

7, 1877- 

3. Ada Bertha, born June 12, 1880. 

4. Elmer Scott, born Dec. 26, 1882. 



VI. Adelaide Virginia Anderson, born Aug. 
16, 1854. After receiving a preparatory education in the 
common schools of the vicinity of her home, she com- 
pleted her studies in Washington Seminary — Mrs. S. R. 
Hanna being at that time principal. She is a member of 
Peters Creek U. P. church, and now resides with her 
brother William on the homestead farm in Washington 
county, Pa., their address being Library, Allegheny coun- 
ty, Pa. 

Samuel Scott was born on his father's farm near 
Cadiz, Ohio, and here spent his boyhood days. He was 
married in Pittsburgh, but the date of his marriage or the 
name of his wife has not been ascertained. He went to 
New Orleans, Louisiana, where he died, in early manhood, 
about the year 1838. He left one daughter, who is mar- 
ried, but further trace of her has been lost. 



IsCo. Q. 

Mary Jane Scott, the eldest child of William 
Scott's second wife, Catherine, was born March 16, 1821, 
on the farm, in what is now Hancock county. West Vir- 
ginia, and there spent her early life. 



228 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

She was married in the year 1842, to James Ander- 
son, of Beaver county, Pa., a nephew of John Anderson, 
her sister's husband. 

In early womanhood she united with the Associate 
Reformed church of Hanover, Beaver county, Pa., and 
afterward transferred to the U. P. church of Knoxville, 
Marion county, Iowa, where she now resides. Her hus- 
band died in Beaver county, and is buried at Harshaville. 

James and Mary (Scott) Anderson had two daughters, 
as follows : 



I. Mary L. Anderson, born July 17, 1845, and 
married J. J. Hanna. They now reside with her widowed 
mother at Knoxville, Iowa, and are members of the U. P. 
church at that place. No children. 



II. Kate T. Anderson, born Aug. i, 1848, and 
married John Black. They are located in Knoxville, 
Iowa, and are members of the Methodist church at that 
place. They have children as follows : 

1. Lois, born Dec. 3, 1875. 

2. Ines, born May 17, 1878. 

3. Jennie, born Jan. 25, 1881. 



IsTo. 4. 

Clarissa Wilson Scott, was born Aug. 7, 1823, 
in what is now Hancock county, W. Va., and there spent 
her childhood days. She received a common school edu- 
cation in the district schools, and in early life united with 
the Associate Reformed church of Hanover, Beaver coun- 
ty, Pa., afterwards transferring her membership to the U. 
P. church at Tiro, Ohio. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY, 229 

She was married in the year 1847 to James Hanna, 
of Tiro, Crawford county, Ohio. They located on a farm 
near Tiro, where Mr. Hanna was for many years engaged 
in agricultural pursuits. He is a worthy member of session 
of the U. P. church at that place. 

James and Clarissa (Scott) Hanna have three chil- 
dren, as follows : 



I. Kate T. Hanna, born Dec. 25, 1847, and educat- 
ed at Savannah Academy, Ashland county, Ohio. She 
was married in the year 1875 to James Cahill and with 
him now resides on a farm near Tiro, Ohio. They are 
members of the U. P. church at that place. No children. 



II. James Melancthon Hanna, born June 27, 185 1 , 
and educated at Savannah Academy, Ohio. He was mar- 
ried in the year 1875 to Hattie Chambers, and now resides 
on the homestead farm near Tiro, being engaged in farm- 
ing. He is an elder in the U. P. church at Tiro. They 
have children as follows : 

1. Jennie W., bom March 6, 1876. 

2. Charles Mitchell, born Dec. 8, 1878. 

3. Grace Adora, born Aug. 20, 1880. 

4. Martha May, born Aug. 23, 1885. 

5. Robert Rowe, born Nov. 20, 1889. 



III. William Scott Hanna, born Sept. 31, 1857, 
and educated at Ada College, Ohio. He married Minnie 
Yarnell and now lives on the homestead farm, being en- 
gaged in working part of it. He and wife are members 
of the U. P. church of Tiro. They have two children : 

1. Edith Florence, born June 15, 1886. 

2. James Winnifred, born Nov. 30, ii 



230 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

nSTo. S. 

ZORAYDA McKeever Scott was born Feb. 28, 1826, 
in Brooke county, W. Va., and moved with her parents in 
childhood to East Liverpool, Ohio. She received her 
primary education in the district schools, after which she 
attended Vermillion Institute, Haysville, Ohio. 

In early womanhood she united with the Associate 
Reformed church of Hanover, Beaver county, Pa., and 
from there transferred her membership to the U. P. church 
at Tiro, Ohio, where she now resides. 

She was married at Brown's Hotel, Pittsburgh, Pa., 
Oct. 20, 1852, by Rev. J. G. Brown, to James English, of 
Crawford county, Ohio. Her husband is now deceased. 

James and Zorayda (Scott) English had one daugh- 
ter, Catherine, who was born July 23, 1854. She is an 
invalid and lives with her widowed mother in Tiro. 



isio. e. 

Robert Cochran Scott was born in West Virginia, 
and died in early manhood Oct. — , 1848. He was buried 
beside his mother in Rome cemetery, Richland county, 
Ohio. 



3S[o. TZ. 

Martha Thompson Scott, the youngest child of 
William and Catherine (Thompson) Scott, was born March 
12, 1830, in Brooke (now Hancock) county. West Virgin- 
ia, but spent her childhood days in East Liverpool, Ohio, 
to which place her parents removed when she was but an 
infant. When about fourteen years of age, she removed 
with her uidowed mother and family to Auburn, Richland 
county, Ohio. After receiving a preparatory education 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 231 

in the schools of the vicinity of her home, she attended 
Glome Seminary, Canonsburg, Pa. 

In April, 1848, she united with the Associate Re- 
formed church of Auburn, Ohio, afterwards transferring 
her membership to churches near her different places of 
residence. 

She was married July 1 1 , 1 861 , to Rev. R. G. Thomp- 
son, of De Kalb, Crawford county, Ohio. Rev. Thomp- 
son was principal of De Kalb Academy from the year 
1857 until 1863. He was chaplain of the Sixty- fourth 
Ohio Regiment in the civil war, from July i, 1863, until 
mustered out Jan. 5, 1866. 

They removed from De Kalb in June, 1866, to Kings- 
ville, Missouri, where Rev, Thompson organized and sup- 
plied a United Presbyterian church. They are now located 
in Santa Ana, Los Angeles county, Cal., to which place 
they removed in December, 1888. 

Robert and Martha (Scott) Thompson have one son, 
Robert S. 



I. Robert Scott Thompson was born Sept. 12, 
1868, in Kingsville, Johnston county. Mo., and there 
spent his youthful days, receiving his early education in 
the schools of that place. In the year 1888 he removed 
with his parents to Santa Ana, Cal., where he pursued 
his studies in Santa Ana High School. In April, 1885. 
he became a member of the United Presbyterian church 
of Kingsville, Mo. 



MARY (SCOTT) McGINNESS, 

OF ROBINSON TOWNSHIP, ALLEGHENY COUNTY, PA. 

II If ARY SCOTT, the third daughter of Samuel and 
lyi Elizabeth (Wilson) Scott, was born June 22, 
i I 1783, at Mingo Creek, Washington county, Pa., 

v^,and there spent her childhood days, removing 
with her parents, when about twelve years of age, to Rob- 
inson township, Allegheny county, Pa. 

She was married at her home at Campbell's Run — in 
the above-named township — July 16, 1807, to James Mc- 
Ginness, of Findlay township, Allegheny county, Pa. — 
eldest son of William and Martha (Wilson) McGinness.* 
They remained at the Scott homestead until May 4, 1809, 
when they removed to Cavett's Mills, Findlay township, 
where they remained until the year 1814, when they re- 
turned to Robinson township and rented a farm from Jo- 
seph Logan. Here Mr. McGinness died July 8, 181 7, 
aged thirty-six years, and was buried in Union cemetery. 

Shortly after the death of her husband, the widowed 
mother, with five small children, returned to the home of 
her father Samuel Scott, where she remained until April 
14, 1823, when she was married by Rev. Anderson to Jo- 
seph Logan, of Robinson township, and with him re- 
moved to the Logan farm. Here a son, Joseph Scott Lo- 
gan, was born Feb. i, 1824, and died Sept. 10, 1824. 

Joseph Logan, the husband, died at his home at 
Campbell's Run, June 19, 1848, aged sixty-seven years. 

•See sketch of James McGinness, page 22, 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 233 

His wife, Mary, died March 30, 1849, in the sixty-sixth 
year of her age. Both are buried in Union cemetery, 
Robinson township. 

*• They come not back — they shall rise again 

In fairer forms than on earth they wore, 
And free from fear of decay and pain, 

Shall live in heaven forevermore. 
They seem to pass like the flowers; but they 
Only put oif their mortality, 
To claim it again when it shall be made 
Holy, immortal, no more to fade. 

In early life Mary Scott identified herself with the 
"McCoyites," but afterwards joined the Reformed Presby- 
terian church of Miller's Run, Washington county, Pa., 
where she was a consistent member for many years, often 
going on horseback, from her home at Campbell's Run, to 
attend its services. She continued in the communion of 
that church until her death. 

James and Mary (Scott) McGinness had five children 
born to them, viz.: Samuel W., William, John, James and 
Elizabeth.* 

* For sketch of children see McGinness Family, pages 23-66. 



FAMILY OF JOSEPH SCOTT, 

OF miller's run, WASHINGTON COUNTY, PA. 

JOSEPH SCOTT, the third son of Samuel and Eliza- 
beth (Wilson) Scott, was born in the year 1786 at 
Mingo Creek, Washington county. Pa., and there 
spent his early life, removing with his parents, in 
boyhood, to what is now Robinson township, Allegheny 
county. Pa. 

He was married April 10, 1809, to Margaret McCur- 
dy, daughter of Hugh McCurdy, who had emigrated from 
Ireland at an early day and purchased three hundred acres 
of land in Robinson township. After marriage he re- 
moved to the south end of his father's farm at Miller's 
Run, Washington county. Pa., where he occupied the lit- 
tle log cabin which had previously been occupied by his 
brother John. This portion of the farm, consisting of 
one hundred and fifty acres, was afterwards willed to him 
by his father, Samuel Scott. 

In the autumn of 18 12 Mr. Scott was cited to appear 
in Washington to enroll himself as a soldier — under com- 
mand of General Harrison — in the war going on between 
Great Britain and the United States, as the following no- 
tice, which is copied from the original, will show : 

"Take Notice — That you are hereby required, per- 
sonally, or by sufficient substitute, to appear in Washing- 
ton, properly armed and equipped for service, at the hour 
of 10 o'clock, A. M., on Monday, the 28th inst., to march 
when required. Appeals to be held at Richard Donald- 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 235 

son's, in the borough of Washington, on Tuesday, the 
20th of October next, at lo o'clock, A. M. 

"Given under my hand this 15th day of September, 
1812. 

"Thomas Donaldson, Lieutenant. 
"To Joseph Scott." 

He accordingly made the necessary preparations for 
leaving home, his wife and two small children, Samuel 
and Hugh. Taking the youngest child, Hugh, who was 
but eight months old, from the cradle, and kissing him 
good bye, he picked up his knapsack and started for 
the war. 

At the time of election for regimental officers, Thom- 
as Donaldson was made captain, and Joseph Scott, first 
lieutenant. They were encamped, most of the time, at 
Fort Meigs, near Sandusky, Ohio. 

His term of service — nine months — having expired, 
Mr. Scott returned to his home and family in June, 18 13, 
not having participated in any battles. 

His wife, Margaret, died June 4, 1827, aged forty- 
four years, and was buried in Robinson's Run A. R. 
churchyard. She had eight children, six sons and two 
daughters. 

Mr. Scott married, April 10, 1829, as his second wife, ' 
Sarah Douglass, who was born May 4, 1795, and lived 
on an adjoining farm. 

In the year 1832 he built a large barn in which 
church services were often held, as the nearest Covenanter 
church at that time was at the " Forks of Yough." 

During the year 1833 he burnt brick on his own 
place for a dwelling, and in the year 1834 erected a fine 
brick house, which he occupied until his death, which oc- 
curred May 14, 1 86 1, he being seventy-five years of age 
and having lived fifty-two years on the farm on which 
he died. He was for many years an elder in Miller's 



236 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

Run Reformed Presbyterian church near Venice, Washing- 
ton county, Pa. He was buried in the little cemetery at- 
tached to that church. 

" Ye wheels of nature, speed your course ! 
Ye mortal powers decay ! 
Fast as ye bring the night of death. 
Ye bring eternal day." 

His wife, Sarah, survived him and died Aug. 2, 1882, 
aged eighty-eight years. She was buried in Miller's Run 
R. P. churchyard. 

Joseph Scott had by his first wife, Margaret McCur- 
dy, eight children, viz.: Samuel, Hugh, Eliza, Andrew, 
John, William, Mary Jane and Joseph L. By his second 
wife, Sarah Douglass, he had six children, viz.: Nancy, 
Margaret, Nancy, Robert D., James and John. 



SlteteH ISTo. 1. 



Samuel Scott, the eldest son of Joseph and Marga- 
ret (McCurdy) Scott, was born Feb. 25, 18 10, on his 
grandfather's farm at Miller's Run, Washington county, 
Pa., and there spent his youth and early manhood, receiv- 
ing his early education in the schools of the vicinity of 
his home. When old enough, he learned the trade of a 
blacksmith, which he followed for a livelihood. 

He was married March 6, 1834, to Elizabeth Bu- 
chanan of Cherry Valley, Washington county. Pa., and 
after marriage located near Hickory, Washington county, 
where they remained three years. From there they re- 
moved to Bloomfield, Muskingum county, Ohio, thence to 
Indian Camp, Guernsey county, and finally returned to 
their former home near Bloomfield, where the remainder 
of their lives was spent. 

His wife, Elizabeth, died between the years 1848 and 
1852 — the exact date has not been obtained — and was 
buried in Bloomfield cemetery, Ohio. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 237 

Mr. Scott was married the second time, Oct. lo, 1852, 
to Martha Forsythe, of New Concord, Ohio. He died 
at his home near Bloomfield, Oct. 10, 1871, and was 
buried in Bloomfield cemetery. He was identified with 
the "Seceder" church in early life, and at the time of his 
death was a member of Bloomfield U. P. church, having 
been a ruling elder in that congregation for many years. 
His widow now resides with her son Elijah in Venice, 
Washington county, Pa. 

Samuel Scott had by his first wife, Elizabeth, eight 
children, viz.: John, Margaret, Joseph, Mary, Esther, An- 
drew, Robert and William. By his second wife, Martha, 
he had two children, viz.: Elijah and Samuel. 



I. John Buchanan Scott was born 



near Hickory, Pa., but spent his boyhood and early man- 
hood near Bloomfield, Muskingum county, Ohio. He re- 
ceived a common school education in the schools of the 
above-named place and is an engineer by trade. He was 
married July 10, 1861, to Margaret Thompson, of New 
Concord, Ohio, and located in Bloomfield, where they re- 
mained for several years. During the civil war he re- 
sponded to the call for troops and served his country until 
the close of the war. In the spring of 1866, he and wife 
removed from Bloomfield to Washington county. Pa., re- 
siding respectively near Venice, Primrose and McDonald 
for several years, after which they removed to Canons- 
burg, Pa., where they have been located for a number of 
years. They are members of the United Presbyterian 
church. No children. 



n. Margaret McCurdy Scott was born 



, near Bloomfield, Ohio. She was married at the 

home of her grandfather, Joseph Scott, to John D. Reed. 



238 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

They first located near Primrose, Pa., removing thence to 
Cambridge, Ohio. From there they returned to Wash- 
ington county, Pa., and located near Venice, removing 
thence to Washington, Pa., and from there to the vicinity 
of Houstonville, Washington county, Pa., where they at 
present reside. They are connected with the U. P. 
church. One daughter has blessed this union. 

I. Lizzie O. L., born , near Primrose, 

Washington county, Pa., and here spent her 
early life. She received the greater part of 
her education in Cambridge, Ohio, and in 
Washington, Pa., and in early womanhood 
united with the U. P. church. She was mar- 
ried to Mont. Miller, and has since resided 
in Houstonville, Pa. Two children have 
been born to them, viz.: 
(a) A. Reed. 
(l?) J. Mont. 



III. Joseph Scott was born , near 

Bloomfield, Ohio, and there spent his early life. He re- 
ceived a common-school education in the schools of the 
vicinity of his home, and is now engaged in agricultural 
pursuits. When the civil war broke out, and the call for 
troops was made, he responded by enlisting in the Union 
army and served as lieutenant during the war. He was 
honorably discharged at the close of the war. He was 
married Nov. 29, i860, to Elizabeth Thompson — a sister 
of Mrs. John B. Scott — of New Concord, Ohio, and lo- 
cated near Bloomfield. After the close of the civil war, 
they removed to Washington county. Pa., where they re- 
mained until the year 1880, when they returned to Bloom- 
field, Ohio, where they now reside. They are connected 
with the United Presbyterian church. Four children have 
been born to them, as follows : 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 239 

Anna Adella, born Oct. lo, i86i,in Bloom- 
field, Ohio, and married June 26, 1884, to 
William Osier. They now reside near 
Bloomfield, Ohio, and are members of the 
U. P. church. Mr. Osier is engaged in 
farming. Their children are as follows : 

(a) Harold S., born Oct. 14, 1885. 
(d) Jessie A., born Sept. 21, 1887. 

(c) Hester, born Dec. — ,1889. 
{d) Infant, born March — , 1892. 

Hester Elsie, born Dec. 22, 1864, in Bloom- 
field, Ohio, and married Nov. 9, 1887, at 
the residence of her uncle, John B. Scott, 
in Canonsburg, Pa., to William H. Farrar. 
They now reside in Cherry Valley, Wash- 
ington county. Pa., and are in connection 
with the Presbyterian church. One son has 
been born to them : 

William Scott, born April — , 1889. 

Maggie, born , 1866, in Washington 

county. Pa., and married March 24, 1886, 
to Wilmer Lane, M. D., of Bloomfield, 
Ohio. At present writing they reside in 
Bloomfield, where Dr. Lane has an exten- 
sive practice. They are connected with the 
U. P. church at that pla'ce. Their children 
are as follows : 

{a) Maggie Burt, born May 3, 1888. 

(d) Nellie Irene, born Jan. — , 1891. 



4. Mary, born June 11, 1871, in Washington 
county. Pa. She resides with her parents 
near Bloomfield, Ohio, and is a member of 
the U. P. church at that place. 



240 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

IV. Mary Henderson Scott was bom , 

near Bloomfield, Ohio, She is unmarried and lives with 
her sister, Mrs. Forsythe, in Cambridge, Ohio. 



V. Esther Jane Scott was born Feb. 13, 1843, 
near Bloomfield, Ohio, and there spent her early life. She 
received a common-school education in the schools of the 
vicinity of her home, and in early womanhood united with 
the U. P. church. She was married in Bloomfield, Nov. 
13, 1861, to V. H. Forsythe. They continued to reside 
in Bloomfield until 1866, when they removed to Cambridge, 
Guernsey county, Ohio, thence to Philadelphia, Pa., in 
1 87 1, where they remained until 1881, when they returned 
to Cambridge, where they at present reside. No children. 



VI. Andrew George Scott was born Aug. 23, 
1844, near Bloomfield, Muskingum, county, Ohio, and 
there spent his youth and early manhood. He received 
a common-school education in the schools of his native 
county. 

On the breaking out of the rebellion, he responded 
to the call of his country, by enlisting on his seventeenth 
birthday, in Company F, 78th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, to 
serve three years. He served under General Grant in the 
campaign of western Tennessee and in the Vicksburg 
campaign — participating in the memorable siege of that 
city, after which General Pemberton, who commanded the 
rebel forces in Vicksburg, surrendered to General Grant 
on the day of the "National Jubilee" — July 4, 1863, 
after a long and obstinate defence, and the " stars and 
stripes waved in triumph on the fortifications of Vicks- 
burg." He accompanied the expedition under General 
W. T. Sherman into central Mississippi, February, 1864, 
reaching Meridian, the great railroad centre, by the mid- 
dle of the month, and after destroying one hundred and 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 241 

fifty miles of railroad, and killing, wounding or captuiing 
five hundred rebels, retraced their steps to Vicksburg. 
On this expedition eight thousand negroes were freed. 

Mr. Scott was also with Sherman in his movements 
against Gen. Joseph E. Johnston — the objective point be- 
ing Atlanta, the " heart of the confederacy." Defeating 
Johnston at Resaca, May i6, 1864, the army followed up 
the retreat of the adversary, and after a series of actions 
— among them the battle of "Kenesaw Mountain" — 
drove him to Atlanta, near which city the Confederates 
were defeated July 22, 1864. In this battle, known as 
the battle of " Peach Tree Creek " — in which the lament- 
ed Gen. James B. McPherson was killed — Mr. Scott was 
twice wounded. In September, by a series of operations, 
the confederates were forced to evacuate Atlanta, and 
Sherman wrote, "Atlanta is ours, and fairly won." 

After the Atlanta campaign was ended, in November, 
1864, Mr. Scott accompanied a force of 65,000 men, un- 
der Gen. Sherman, in the famous "march to the sea" — 
memorable, especially, to those who participated in it. 
Penetrating through Georgia, they occupied Savannah on 
the 2 1st of November, and, after resting here a short 
time, moved on to Hilton Head, South Carolina, thence to 
Columbia, reaching the latter place Feb. 17, 1865 — wit- 
nessing the burning of Columbia, which city was speedily 
reduced to ashes, notwithstanding the efforts of Union of- 
ficers to check the flarrles. The army then moved on to 
Raleigh, North Carolina, where the Confederates under 
Gen. Joseph E. Johnston surrendered to Gen. Sherman, 
April 26, 1865. After a few days' rest, the troops marched 
to Washington, D. C, via Richmond, Mr. Scott partici- 
pating in the "grand review" of the army. May 23 and 
24, and was discharged from service June 17, 1865, re- 
tiring to his family circle and friends, " secure and happy 
under the old flag." 

16 



242 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

After returning home he engaged in carpentering, 
which occupation he followed until 1883, and since then 
he has been engaged in the gas-fitting business. 

He was married Dec. 31, 1867, near Bloomfield, 
Ohio, to Lizzie Black, of Guernsey county, Ohio. After 
two years residence at the home of his father and father- 
in-law, respectively, he removed to Cambridge, Guernsey 
county, Ohio, where he and family now reside. 

In youth Andrew united with the U. P. church of 
Bloomfield, remaining in its communion until 1872, when 
he transferred his membership to the Presbyterian church 
of Cambridge, Ohio, where he now worships. 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Scott had six children, all, ex- 
cept the eldest daughter, born in Cambridge, Ohio, as 
follows : 

1. Lizzie O. L., born May 24, 1869 ; died Oct. 

28, 1870. 

2. Wilbur H., born Nov. i, 1871. 

3. James V., born Feb. 9, 1874. 

4. John H., born Sept. 17, 1876. 

5. Mary E., born March 24, 1879. 

6. Esther A., born Oct. i, 1881. 



VIL Robert Harper Scott was born 



near Bloomfield, Ohio, and here spent his youthful days, 
receiving a common-school education in the schools of 
that place. He was three times married. His first wife 
was Amanda Duff. After her death he married, as his 
second wife, Sarah Watters, and lastly a widow, Mrs. Da- 
vis — all residents of Muskingum county, Ohio. He now 
resides in Wheeling, W. Va. By his second wife, Sarah 
Watters, he had three children, viz.: 

1. Mary. 

2. Frank, 

3. Lulu. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 243 

VIII. WiLLLlAM T. Scott was born June 17, 1848, 
near Bloomfield, Ohio, where he spent his youth and early- 
manhood. He received his education in the schools of 
Muskingum county. He was married Nov. 25, 1869, to 
Maggie A. Sims, and located in his native county, where 
they remained for a number of years. From there they 
removed to Nebraska and located in Pawnee county, re- 
moving thence to Beatrice, Gage county, where they at 
present reside. Mr. Scott is engaged in electric light work 
and engineering. He is connected with the U. P. church. 
Mr. and Mrs. William Scott had six children born to 
them. The eldest three were born in Muskingum county, 
Ohio — the others in Pawnee county, Nebraska. The fam- 
ily record is as follows : 

1. Samuel R., born July 6, 1871. 

2. J. Clova, born May 27, 1873. 

3. William W., born Oct. 20, 1876. 

4. Bertie, born Feb. 12, 1880; died July 23, 1880. 

5. Harry H., born May 31, 1881. 

6. Mamie, born July 13, 1887. 



IX. Elijah F. Scott was born June i, 1854, near 
Bloomfield, Ohio, and here spent his boyhood days. He 
was married Feb. 17, 1881, to Sibella M. Scott, daughter 
of Joseph L. Scott, at the home of the bride near 
Venice, Washington county, Pa. He resided on the 
homestead farm of his father-in-law, near Venice, and en- 
gaged in working the same, until Jan. i, 1891, when he 
and wife removed to the Village of Venice and engaged 
in the mercantile business. They are connected with the 
U. P. church at the above-named place. One son has 
blessed this union : 

Joseph Marion W., born April 19, 1882. 



244 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

X. Samuel Scott was born March 17, 1856, near 
Bloomfield, Ohio, and died Oct 26, 1856, 



No. ^. 

Hugh McCurdy Scott was born Feb. 2, 181 2, on 
his grandfather's farm in Mt. Pleasant township, Washing- 
ton county, Pa., and here spent his early life. He re- 
ceived a common-school education in the schools of his 
native township and was afterwards engaged in farming. 
He was married April 14, 1862, to Mary Douglass (his 
step-mother's sister) at her home in Cecil township, 
Washington county, Pa. They resided at the Douglass 
homestead until 1870, when they removed to Venice, Pa. 
Mr. Scott died at the residence of his brother, Joseph L. 
Scott, near Venice, Aug. 23, 1873. His wife survived 
him about one year ; both are buried in Venice U. P. 
churchyard. He first identified himself with the Seceder 
church of Noblestown, Pa., and afterwards transferred to 
Venice U. P. church, remaining in its communion until 
his death. No children. 



iSTo. a. 

Eliza W. Scott was born Feb. iq, 18 14, on the 
homestead farm near Venice, Pa., and received her educa- 
tion in the schools of the vicinity of her home. She was 
indentified with the Seceder church. She was married at 
her home, March 7, 1838, to James Palmer. They located 
near Perrysville, Carroll county, Ohio, where they contin- 
ued to reside until death. Mrs. Palmer died June 13, 
1845, at the early age of thirty-one years, and was buried 
in North Union cemetery near Carrollton, Ohio. Her 
husband survived her for many years, and died in the win- 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 245 

ter of 1 88 1. He was buried in Perrysville cemetery, 
Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Palmer had three children, all born 
near Perrysville, Carroll county, Ohio, as follows : 



I. Mary Palmer was born Sept. 14, 1840, and 
died March — , 1883, having been an invalid for many 
years. She was buried in Perrysville cemetery. 



II. Joseph S. Palmer was born Jan. 14, 1842, and 
married Nov. i 5, 1883, to Nannie Price, near New Hagers- 
town, Ohio. Their present address is Lamertine, Carroll 
county, Ohio. Two children have been born to them, as 
follows : 

1. A DAUGHTER, born June 12, 1889, and died in 

infancy. 

2. Ira James, born Dec. 31, 1890. 



III. Samuel Palmer was born Oct. 2, 1843, and 
died Sept. — , 1844. He was buried in North Union 
cemetery, Ohio. 



ISTo. 4. 

Andrew Scott was born Feb. 23, 18 16, in Mount 
Pleasant township, Washington county. Pa., and here his 
youthful days were passed. He received his education in 
the schools of the district in which he lived, and in early 
life united with the Seceder (now U. P.) church at Hick- 
ory, Pa. He was married at Kilgore, Carroll county, 
Ohio, Aug. 25, 1853, to Isabella Wagner, who died in 
April, 1854, and was buried in the cemetery at Kilgore. 
Mr. Scott was married the second time, March 17, 1857, 
to Mary Kenger, also of Kilgore, Ohio. They resided 
on a farm near Perrysville, Carroll county, Ohio, Mr. 



246 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

Scott being engaged in farming. He died Aug. 2, 1858, 
and was buried in the cemetery attached to Kilgore Pres- 
byterian church. Andrew and Mary (Kenger) Scott had 
one son, Joseph. 



I. Joseph Scott was bom Dec. 25, 1857, near 
Perrysville, Ohio, and died June 10, 1858. He was buried 
at Kilgore. 



ISTo. S. 

John Scott was bom June 21, 18 18, and died in 



1819. 



ISTo. e. 



William Scott was born May 31, 1820, on the 
homestead farm in Washington county. Pa. He received 
a common-school education in the schools of Mount 
Pleasant township, and learned the trade of a carpenter 
and wagon-maker, which occupations he followed for a 
livelihood. In early manhood he united with Robinson's 
Run A. R. (now U. P.) church. He was married March 
25, 1852, to Miss Margaret Reed — sister of John D. 
Reed — and located, after marriage, in his native county, 
residing, respectively, near McDonald, Venice, and Prim- 
rose. He died Feb. 9, 1862, at the residence of John D. 
Reed, near Primrose, Pa. His wife, Margaret, died July 
8, 1873. Both were buried in the cemetery attached to 
Center U. P. church, near Midway, Pa. Three children 
were born to them, as follows : 



I. Lizzie Scott, born Aug, 12, 1853, in Venice, 
and died Aug. 27, 1877. She was buried in Center U. P. 
cemetery. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 247 

II. MiNA Scott, born Dec. 21, 1855, and died May 
14, 1876. She was buried in Center U. P. cemetery. 



III. Joseph J. Reed Scott, born Nov. 2, i860, 
at John D. Reed's, near Primrose, and died May 15, 1861. 



]SCo. :7. 

Mary Jane Scott was born May 29, 1822, on the 
homestead farm, near Venice, Pa., where she spent her 
early life, receiving her education in the schools of the 
vicinity of her home. She became a member of Miller's 
Run Reformed Presbyterian church in girlhood, and after 
marriage transferred to the Associate (now U. P.) church. 
She was married at her home, Nov. 12, 1845, to Samuel 
Thompson. They located near New Rumley, Harrison 
county, Ohio, which was their home for many years. Mr. 
Thompson died at the family residence, Aug. — , 1884, 
and his wife, Mary, died April 20, 1885. Both were 
buried in New Jefferson cemetery, Harrison county, Ohio. 
Mr. and Mrs. Thompson had seven children, all born and 
raised near New Rumley, Ohio, as follows : 



I. Joseph Thompson was born in the autumn of 
1846, and died in infancy. 



II. Joseph Scott Thompson was born in the year 
1848. He received a common-school education in the 
schools of the vicinity of his home, and in early manhood 
united with New Jefferson U. P. congregation, Harrison 
county, Ohio. He was married Jan. 17, 1878, at the 
residence of Rev. Joseph P. Waddell, near Midway, Wash- 
ington county, Pa., to Sarah Thompson, (sister of Mrs. 
James Scott,) of Kilgore, Carroll county, Ohio, which is 



248 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

their present address. Mr. Thompson is engaged in farm- 
ing. Two children have been born to them, as follows : 

1. Infant, born Nov. i6, 1879; died Dec. 10, 

1879. 

2. George, Henderson, born Feb. 26, 1883. 



III. Margaret McC. Thompson was born Aug. 
15, 185 I. After qualifying herself she engaged in teach- 
ing school, which vocation she followed for several years. 
She died July 7, 1872, at the age of twenty-one years, 
and was buried in New Jefferson cemetery, Ohio. She was 
a member of the U. P. church at the time of her death. 



IV. Samuel George Thompson was born Feb. 
II, 1854, and received his education in the schools of his 
native county. He was married Dec. 24, 1878, to Maggie 
J. Patton, of New Rumley, Ohio. They resided, after 
marriage, near Kilgore, Harrison county, Ohio, where Mr. 
Thompson was engaged in agricultural pursuits. Here 
the wife, Maggie, died April 6, 1887, and in eight months 
after, Dec. 8, 1887, Mr. Thompson's life was terminated. 
Both were buried in New Rumley, Ohio. Two children 
were born to them, as follows : 

1. David Patton, born Dec. 15, 1879, near New 

Rumley, Harrison county, Ohio. 

2. Forest Scott, born Jan. 14, 1882, near Kil- 

gore,. Carroll county, Ohio. 



V. Hans Thompson was born Feb. 28, 1858, and 
received his education in the district school near New 
Rumley, Ohio. He learned the trade of a carpenter, 
which occupation he followed for a livelihood. He died 
Sept. 15, 1883, at the age of twenty-five years, and was 
buried in New Jefferson cemetery. He was a member of 
the U. P. church. 



» 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 249 

VI. John A. Thompson was born Nov. 24, i860, 
and received a common-school education in the schools 
of his native county. He was married Dec. 25, 1890, to 
Maggie O. McNary, of Germano, Ohio, and located near 
New Rumley, Harrison county, Ohio, where they still re- 
side. They are connected with the U. P. church. One 
child has been born to them, viz.: 

Irma Stella, born Nov. 7, 1891. 



VII. Eliza Henderson Thompson was born Sept. 
25, 1863. She received her education in the schools of 
New Rumley, and in early life united with the U. P. 
church. She died in early womanhood March 6, 1884, 
and was buried in New Jefferson cemeter>% Ohio. 

" There's a reaper whose name is Death, 
And with his cycle keen 
He reaps the bearded grain at a breath. 
And the flowers that grow between." 



]>To. 8. 

Joseph L. Scott was born Sept. 9, 1825, on the 
homestead farm in Mount Pleasant township, Washington 
county, Pa., and here spent his boyhood days. He re- 
ceived the greater part of his education at Pleasant Val- 
ley school and at the age of seventeen engaged in teach- 
ing. He taught in the various districts of Mount Pleas- 
ant and Cecil townships, Washington county ; then 
taught one year in Carroll county, Ohio — in all four 
years, after which he followed farming, until i860. 

He was married June 14, 1854, to Isabella E. Rutan, 
who was born April 2, 1832, near Kilgore, Carroll coun- 
ty, Ohio ; received her education in Carrollton High 
School, and Richmond College, and was a teacher by pro- 
fession. After marriage they located near Perrysville, Car- 



250 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

roll county, where they remained two years, after which 
they purchased a farm near Kilgore, removing thence to 
the village of Kilgore, in the fall of i860. Here Mr. 
Scott opened a general village store, and was postmaster 
five years, after which time, in the spring of 1865, he 
and family removed to Venice, Washington county. Pa. 
Here he again embarked in the general mercantile busi- 
ness, also acting as postmaster. He continued in this ca- 
pacity until 1870, when he removed to a farm near Ven- 
ice, and here remained until 1883, when he and wife re- 
turned to their former home in Venice, leaving the farm 
to their children. 

At the the early age of seventeen years, Joseph Scott 
united with the Miller's Run R. P. church, and continued 
in its membership until 1856, when he transferred to the 
Associate Reformed church, of Kilgore, Ohio, and thence 
to Venice U. P. church, where he and family now worship. 

Joseph and Isabella (Rutan) Scott had four children, 
as follows : 



I. SiBELLA M. Scott, born Oct. 29, 1855, near 
Perrysville, Carroll county, Ohio. She received her early 
education in Kilgore, Ohio, and at Venice, Pa., complet- 
ing her studies in Canonsburg Academy, Washington 
county, Pa. In early life she united with Venice U. P. 
church, where she continues to worship. She was mar- 
ried at her home near Venice, Feb. 17, 1 881, by Rev. A. 
R. Anderson, to Elijah F. Scott,* of Bloomfield, Mus- 
kingum county, Ohio. They resided on the homestead 
farm near Venice, until Jan. i, 1891, when they removed 
to the village of Venice, where they now reside, Mr. Scott 
being engaged in the mercantile business. One son has 
been born to them, viz.: 

Joseph Marion W., born April 19, 1882. 

♦ See sketch of Elijah F. Scott, page 243. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 251 

II. Sarah Margaret Scott, born Oct. 28, 1858, 
near Kilgore, Ohio, and died Jan. 15, 1863. She was 
buried in the cemetery at Kilgore. Although not five 
years of age, she had almost memorized the catechism and 
could recite quite a number of the Psalms at her death. 

" Ere sin could harm or sorrow fade, 
Death came with friendly care, 
The opening bud to Heaven conveyed 
And bade it blossom there." 



III. M. Jennie E. Scott, born July 4, 1862, in 
Kilgore, Ohio, but spent her girlhood days mostly on her 
father's farm, near Venice, Pa. She received her educa- 
tion in the schools of the vicinity of her home, and at a 
very early age professed her faith by uniting with Venice 
U. P. church. She died July 17, 1883, at the age of 
twenty-one years, and was buried in the U. P. cemetery 
at Venice. 



IV. Robert James Scott, born July 24, 1866, in 
Venice, Pa., and received a common-school education in 
the schools of that place. He has spent his life, so far, 
on his father's farm. He was married Jan. i, 1891, to 
Hattie Farrar, daughter of Robert S. Farrar, of Cherry 
Valley, Washington county, Pa. They reside on the 
homestead farm, near Venice, and are connected with the 
U. P. church. One son has been born to them, viz.: 
Lloyd Farrar, born Sept. i, 1892. 



isco e. 

Nancy Scott, the eldest child of the second wife, 
Sarah Douglass Scott, was born Dec. 31, 1829, and died 
in the year 1830. She was buried in Miller's Run R. P. 
graveyard. 



252 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

No. lO. 

Margaret Scott, was born Jan. 19, 1 831, on her 
father's farm, near Venice, Washington county, Pa., and 
there spent her girlhood and early womanhood days. She 
received her education in the schools of the vicinity of 
her home. 

. She was married March 5, 1856, to James K. Robb, 
of Washington county. Pa., a carpenter by occupation. 
The first three years after marriage they lived on the 
" Robb " farm, about one mile from Venice, removing 
thence to the little log cabin on the Scott farm, in Mount 
Pleasant township, Washington county, Pa. Here they 
remained until August, 1866, when they removed to 
Muskingum county, Ohio, and located on a farm near 
New Coftcord. Here Mr. Robb died, June 7, 1869, and 
was buried in the cemetery near New Concord, Ohio. 

Some time after the death of her husband, in the 
year 1871, the widowed mother, with her family of six 
small children, left the farm and removed to the town of 
New Concord, in order that the children might have better 
educational advantages. They remained in New Concord 
until the spring of 1885, when they removed to Kansas, 
and after residing two months at Winchester, Jefferson 
county, settled on a farm four miles from what is now 
Denison, Jackson county, where they have since resided. 

In early womanhood Margaret Scott united with 
Miller's Run R. P. church, transferring thence to New 
Concord R. P. church, and finally to North Cedar R. P. 
congregation at Denison, Kan. 

James and Margaret (Scott) Robb had six children 
born to them, as follows : 



I. Sarah Adella Robb was born Dec. 18, 1856, 
near Venice, Pa., and here spent her childhood days, re- 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 253 

ceiving her primary education in the schools of the vicinity 
of her home. After the family removed to Ohio she pur- 
sued her studies in the schools of New Concord. Having 
completed the course, as taught by the public schools, 
she entered Muskingum College in the fall of 1871, and 
spent a number of years, alternately, teaching and attend- 
ing college. When prepared for the senior class, she 
went to Geneva College, located at Beaver Falls, Pa., 
from which institution she was graduated in the year 
1882. She again engaged in teaching in the schools of New 
Concord, and in Jackson county, Kan., continuing in this 
capacity for six years. She was married at Denison, Kan., 
June 28, 1888, to Rev. W. C. Paden, of Manilla, Crawford 
county, Iowa, and removed to that place. From there 
they removed to Manning, Carroll county, thence to 
Schaller, Sac county, Iowa, where they remained until 
August, 1892, when they located in Topeka, Kan., where 
they now reside. In early womanhood she united with 
the Covenanter church at New Concord, Ohio, and re- 
mained in its communion until her marriage, when she 
transferred her membership to the Presbyterian church — 
her husband being a minister in that denomination. Mr. 
and Mrs. Paden have two children, viz.: 

1. Elsie, born Oct. 25, 1890. 

2. William Irwin, born , 1892. 



II. George Calvin Robb was born Feb. 7, 1858, 
near Venice, Washington county, Pa., and there spent his 
early years. He received a common-school education in 
the schools of his native county, and in Muskingum coun- 
ty, Ohio. When about twenty-one years of age, he 
learned the carpenters' trade, serving his apprenticeship 
under M. A. Brown, of New Concord, Ohio. After com- 
pleting his apprenticeship, he followed his trade for a 



254 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

number of years, after which he engaged in farming in 
Jackson county, Kansas — which is his present occupation. 
In the year 1876, while on a visit to friends in the West, 
he united with the Covenanter church, and still continues 
in its communion. He was married Feb. 27, 1889, to 
Miss Nettie Braum, of Denison, Jackson county, Kan., 
near which place they have since resided. 



III. Jennie Alice Robb was born June 2, 1862, 
near Venice, Pa., where the first four years of her life were 
spent. Her girlhood days were passed in Muskingum 
county, Ohio, where she received her education in the 
public schools and at Muskingum College, which institu- 
tion she attended for several years. She graduated from 
the Chautauqua course of study in the year 1886, and won 
a " seal " the following year. She is an expert needle-wo- 
man. In early youth she united with the Reformed Pres- 
byterian church at- New Concord, transferring to the 
North Cedar congregation at Denison, Kan., where she is 
now located. 



IV. Wilson Joseph Robb was born Oct 31, 1863, 
near Venice, Pa. His parents removed to Muskingum 
county, Ohio, in the year 1866, where his childhood and 
youth were passed, attending school in New Concord. 
He also attended several terms at Muskingum College, 
qualifying himself for teaching, which work he began in 
the year 1884. He was thus employed until the fall of 
1 89 1, when he entered the senior class of the scientific 
course at Valparaiso, Ind., in order to better prepare him- 
self for his chosen profession, having always made it a 
subject of special study and preparation. He was mar- 
ried Aug. 17, 1892, to Miss McCreary, of Holton, Jack- 
son county, Kan. The ceremony was performed at the 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 255 

bride's home, by Rev. W. H. Lytle. They located in 
Maywood, Cook county, 111. — Mr. Robb having been 
elected to the principalship of Maywood school. 

He became a member ot the Covenanter church in 
the year 1884 at Glenvvood, Pope county, Minn., where 
he was then engaged in teaching, and is still in the com- 
munion of that denomination. 



V. Andrew Irwin Robb was born July ii, 1865, 
in Washington county. Pa., but spent his childhood and 
youthful days in Muskingum county, Ohio, to which 
place his parents removed when he was but an infant. 
He received his early education in the schools of New 
Concord, Ohio, and after completing the course as 
taught by the public schools, entered Muskingum Col- 
lege in the year 1880, where he pursued his studies for 
four winters. In the year 1883 he made a public pro- 
fession of his faith by uniting with the Reformed Pres- 
byterian church of New Concord, Ohio. At the age of 
nineteen he engaged in teaching in Pope county, Minn., 
and afterwards went to Kansas, where he taught successfully 
for several years. Being impressed with a desire to enter the 
Christian ministry, and having made this determination, 
he bent all his energies to make a suitable preparation for 
his noble calling. He pursued his preparatory studies in 
Campbell University, Holton, Jackson county, Kan., from 
which institution he was graduated in July, 1889. He 
entered the Reformed Presbyterian Seminary, in Alle- 
gheny, Pa., Sept. 16, 1890, and after completing the full 
theological course, will be graduated (D. V.) in March, 
1894. 



VI. John Knox Robb was born Aug. 13, i; 
near New Concord, Muskingum county, Ohio, and here 



256 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

spent his early life. After receiving a preparatory educa- 
tion in the public schools of New Concord, he completed his 
studies by attending one year at Muskingum College, and 
one year at Campbell University, Holton, Kan. He learned 
the carpenters' trade under the supervision of his brother, 
George, which vocation he followed about two years. He 
then entered the teachers' profession, about the year 1890, 
and has since been engaged in teaching in the schools of 
Jackson county, Kan., where he is at present located. In 
the year 1884 he united with the Reformed Presbyterian 
church in New Concord, and afterwards transferred to 
North Cedar congregation, Denison, Kan. 



nsco. 11. 

Nancy Scott was born Feb. 26, 1832, on her 
father's farm in Washington county, Pa., where she spent 
the greater part of her life. She received a common- 
school education in the schools of the vicinity of her 
home, and in early life united with the Miller's Run R. P. 
church. While on a visit at the home of her brother, 
Robert, near Venice, Pa., she died, Oct. 6, 1883, and was 
buried in the cemetery attached to Miller's Run R. P. 
church. 



ISCo. 1^. 

Robert Douglass Scott, the eldest son of Joseph 
Scott's second wife, Sarah Douglass, was born Jan. 16, 
1834, in Mount Pleasant township, Washington county, 
Pa. He spent his youth and early manhood on the home- 
stead farm, and received a common-school education in 
the schools of his native township. He was engaged in 
agricultural pursuits until about the year 1866 or '^J^ 
when he embarked in the mercantile business in Venice 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 257 

Pa., which vocation he followed about three or four years. 

He was married May 28, 1870, to Mattie R. Thomp- 
son, of Washington county, Pa., who was born Oct. 20, 
1842. They located on his farm near Venice, where they 
have since continued to reside, Mr. Scott being engaged 
in farming. 

He united with Miller's Run Reformed Presbyterian 
congregation about the year 1854, and was elected ruling 
elder in that congregation in the year 1882, in which 
capacity he continues to serve. 

Robert and Mattie (Thompson) Scott had three 
children, all born on the homestead farm, near Venice, 
Washington county. Pa., as follows : 



I. J. Herbert Scott was born Dec. i, 1875, 
and united with Miller's Run R. P. church in the year 
1890. 



n. Bessie Scott was born Jan. 4, 1878, and also 
became a member of Miller's Run R. P. church in 1890. 



HI. Mary Scott was born Nov. 14, 1882, and died 
May 28, 1890. 

" Gems snatched from earth are re-set in heaven ; 
Flowers which died here in their beauty's prime 
Live there in endless summer-time." 



ISlo. IQ. 

James Scott was born Jan. i, 1836, on the home- 
stead farm in Mount Pleasant township, Washington 
county, Pa., where he has spent the greater part of his 
life. He received a common-school education in the 
schools of the vicinity of his home, and has followed farm- 
ing all his life. 

17 



258 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

He was married Oct. 31, 1867, to Eliza Thompson, 
of Kilgore, Carroll county, Ohio, who was born Feb. 12, 
1839. After marriage Mr. Scott located on a farm, form- 
erly owned by his uncle, John Douglass, in Cecil township, 
Washington county, Pa., and here remained about twelve 
years. In the year 1880 he built his present residence on 
the homestead farm — all of which is now in his possession 
— to which he and family removed that same year, and 
where they have since continued to reside. Their address 
is Primrose, Washington county, Pa. 

In the year 1856 Mr. Scott united with Miller's Run 
R. P. church, and since the year 1869 has served that 
congregation as a ruling elder. 

James and Eliza (Thompson) Scott have four daugh- 
ters, all, except the youngest, born in Cecil township, 
Washington county. Pa., as follows : 



I. Lizzie H. Scott was born March i, 1869. 
She received her early education in the schools of the 
vicinity of her home, and afterwards attended the National 
Normal University at Lebanon, Ohio. She also received 
a musical education, after which she engaged in teaching 
music, in which capacity she has since been employed. 
In the year 1885 she became a member of Miller's Run 
R. P. church. 



II. Sadie B. Scott was bom April 15, 1870. 
She received a preparatory education in the schools of 
her native county, after which she attended the National 
Normal University, at Lebanon, Ohio. After qualifying 
herself she entered the teachers' profession, which voca- 
tion she now follows. She united with Miller's Run R. P. 
congregation in the year 1886. 



III. Ida M. Scott was born Oct. 13, 1873, and is 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 269 

now attending school in the vicinity of her home. In the 
year 1889 she united with Miller's Run R. P. church. 



IV. Jennie A. Scott was born May 30, 1882, (Dec- 
oration day.) She is attending school in the vicinity of 
her home. 

ISTo. 14. 

John Scott, the youngest son of Joseph Scott, was 
born June 3, 1837, in Mount Pleasant township, Washing- 
ton county, Pa., and there remained until the year 1887. 
He, like his brothers, received a common-school educa- 
tion in the schools of Mount Pleasant township, and fol- 
lows farming for a livelihood. 

In the year 1858 he united with Miller's Run R. P. 
church, where he still worships. 

Mr. Scott was married May 18, 1880, to Lizzie Bol- 
ton, of Washington county. Pa., who was born June 18, 
1852. They resided in the old homestead until the year 
1887, when they removed to Mr. Scott's own farm in 
Cecil township, and in Nov., 1888, removed to the farm 
of his cousin, John Scott, deceased, adjoining the farm of 
his brother James. Here the family now reside. 

John and Lizzie (Bolton) Scott had four children, all, 
except the youngest, born on the homestead farm in Mount 
Pleasant township, Washington county. Pa., as follows : 



I. A. Walter Scott was born July i6, 1881. 



II. W. Howard Scott was born July 22, 1883. 



III. Cora A. Scott was bom Aug. 22, 1885. 



IV. Infant, was bom Feb. 8, 1890 ; died Feb. 
II, 1890. 



FAMILY OF SAMUEL SCOTT, 

OF ROBINSON TOWNSHIP, ALLEGHENY COUNTY, PA. 

rr AMUEL SCOTT, the fourth son of Samuel and 
jr\ EHzabeth (Wilson) Scott, was born Oct. 29, 
i 1789, at Mingo Creek, Washington county. Pa., 
^""^^ and, at the age of six years, removed with his 
parents to what is now Robinson township, Allegheny 
county. Pa., where he spent the greater part of his life. 
He received an education such as the schools of the vi- 
cinity of his home afforded. 

He was married about the year 18 10 to Sarah Hall,* 
who was born about the year 1786 — daughter of John 
and Letitia (Young) Hall, of Robinson township. They 
went to housekeeping in the little log cabin adjoining his 
father's new stone house, at Campbell's Run — Samuel 
being engaged in working the homestead farm. 

His wife, Sarah, died May 21, 1817, when but thirty- 
one years of age, leaving three children. She was buried 
in the burying-ground attached to Union A. R. (now U. 
P.) church, Robinson township. 

In the year 1818 Mr. Scott married, as his second 
wife, Elizabeth McMillen, of Washington county. Pa., and 
in May, 1823, after his sister Mary's second marriage, 
moved from the little cabin, into the stone house to take 
care of his widowed mother — his father having died in the 
year 18 19. He inherited one hundred and fifty-five acres 
of the "Campbell's" Run farm, and continued to reside 

*See Sketch of Sarah Hall, page 146. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 261 

on it until his death, which resulted from dropsy and oc- 
curred Sept. 29, 1829 — he being forty years of age. He 
was buried beside his first wife in Union cemetery. 

His wife Elizabeth survived him many years, and 
died Nov. 5, 1857, in Slippery Rock township, Lawrence 
county, Pa., having left the homestead farm soon after 
the death of her husband. She was buried in Center 
graveyard, Lawrence county, Pa. 

Samuel Scott had by his first wife, Sarah Hall, three 
children, viz.: Letitia, Samuel and John. By his second 
wife, Elizabeth McMillen, he had six children, viz.: Sarah, 
Rebecca, William, Joseph, James and Thomas, All the 
children were born and raised on the Scott farm in Rob- 
inson township. 

SkstcH ISTo. 1. 

Letitia Scott was born Jan. ii, 1811, and married 
April 19, 1 83 1, to William McCune, who was born April 
3, 1803. They located in East Brook, Lawrence county, 
Pa., where Mr. McCune owned a fine farm, and was en- 
gaged in working it. There they resided during the re- 
mainder of their lives. Mr. McCune died June 6, 1866, 
and his wife, Letitia, died June 15, 1869. Both were 
buried in East Brook U. P. cemetery. 

" But far above earth and its trials, 

We know that their spirits have flown, 
And we think of them bending in rapture 
With angels and saints 'round the Throne." 

William and Letitia (Scott) McCune had four chil- 
dren, all born and raised on the farm in Lawrence county, 
Pa., as follows : 



L Alexander Hall McCune was bom March 
I, 1832. He went west in early manhood and was mar- 



262 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

ried Feb. 22, 1864, to Martha Collins, of Missouri. He 
is now located in Albany county, Wyoming — post-office, 
Centennial. 



II. Sarah H. McCune was bom Aug. 16, 1836, 
and resided with her brother Samuel on the homestead 
farm in East Brook, Pa. In the autumn of 1891 she vis- 
ited friends in McDonald, Pa., and in Allegheny City. 
While visiting her cousin, Mrs. Albert Scott, on Sarah 
street, Allegheny, she died suddenly of heart failure, Nov. 
20, 1 891. Her remains were taken to her home and in- 
terred in East Brook U. P. cemetery. She was an active 
and worthy member of East Brook U. P. church and an 
earnest teacher in the Sabbath school. 



III. Samuel Scott McCune was born May 6, 
1843, and married Nov. i, 1 871, to Wealthy P. Wolcott, 
of Austinburg, Ohio. They resided on the homestead 
farm in East Brook, Pa., and are members of East Brook 
U. P. church, of which congregation Mr. McCune has 
been a ruling elder since Sept 16, 1876. 



IV. John McCune was born March 7, 1846. He 
is unmarried and lives with his brother Samuel on the 
homestead farm. 



]sro. ^. 

Samuel Scott was born Oct. i, 18 12, in the little 
log cabin on his grandfather's farm at Campbell's Run, 
Allegheny county. Pa. He spent his entire life on said 
farm — received a common-school education in the district 
school, and followed farming for a livelihood. 

He was married March 6, 1845, to Elizabeth M. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 263 

Nickle, of Robinson township, who died Dec. — , 1851, 
and was buried in the burying ground of Union A. R. 
church. On the 23d of November, 1852, he married as 
his second wife, EHzabeth Phillips, daughter of Samuel and 
Priscilla (McFadden) Phillips,* of Robinson township. 

Mr. Scott was for many years a member of Union U. 
P. church, and was elected a ruling elder in that congre- 
gation, March 4, 1869, serving in that capacity until his 
death, which occurred at his home at Campbell's Run, 
March 24, 1886. He was buried in Union cemetery. He 
was among the most highly respected and well-to-do 
farmers of Robinson township. 

" Life's labor done, as sinks the clay, 
Light from its load the spirit flies ; 
While heaven and earth combine to say, 
' How blest the righteous when he dies !' " 

Mrs. Elizabeth Scott still survives her husband and 
resides in East Liberty, Pittsburgh. 

Samuel Scott had by his first wife, Elizabeth Nickle, 
four children, viz.: Sarah A., Mary J., Evaline and Sam- 
uel. By his second wife, Elizabeth Phillips, he had five 
children, viz.: Leander H., Emma P., Eliza J., Hannah 
and John P. They were all born and raised on the Scott 
farm in Robinson township, as follows : 



I. Sarah Ann Scott, died in infancy. 



II. Mary Jane Scott, also died in infancy. 



III. Evaline Scott, born Sept. 13, 1849, and mar- 
ried Dec. 9, 1869, to H. M. Glass. They now reside at 
North Star, Allegheny county. Pa., and are members of 
Robinson U. P. church. Five children have been born to 
them, as follows : 

*Priscilla McFadden was the daughter of John and Mary (McMichael) McFadden, 
and sister of Jane (McFadden) Hall. See sketch of William Hall, page 151. 



264 THi: SCOTT FAMILY. 

1. Albert P., born Sept. 26, 1870. 

2. S. James, born March i, 1873. 

3. William H., bom June 10, 1877. 

4. R. John, born Sept. 20, 188 1. 

5. S. Elizabeth, born March 31, 1884. 



IV. Samuel Scott was born Dec. 21, 185 1, and 
raised on the farm on which his great grandfather, Samuel 
Scott, Sr., had settled. He received a common-school 
education, and is engaged in farming for a livelihood. He 
was married March 12, 1878, to Susie A. Young. They 
now reside on the Hall farm, on the Steubenville turnpike, 
in Robinson township, Allegheny county, Pa. — post-office, 
Remington. They are members of Union U. P. church. 
Five children have been born to them, as follows : 

1. Nannie C, bom Feb. 10, 1879 ; died March 

12, 1882. 

2. William Hall, born Jan. 31, 1882. 

3. Hays Bell, born April 2, 1885. 

4. John Albert, bom Feb. 24, 1890. 

5. Eva May, born May 9, 1892. 



V. Leander H. Scott was born Nov. 12, 1854, 
and died Sept. 4, 1866. 



VI. Emma Priscilla Scott was born Sept. 21, 
1856. A few years after the death of her father she pur- 
chased property and erected a house in McDonald, Wash- 
ington county. Pa., where she and her widowed mother 
resided about two years, until Nov. 4, 1891, when they 
removed to Aurelia street. East Liberty, Pittsburgh, where 
they now reside. She united with Union U. P. church, 
and from there transferred her membership to the U. P. 
church at McDonald, Rev. W. D. Irons being the present 
pastor. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 265 

VII. Eliza Jane Scott was born Oct. 22, 1885, 
and married March 17, 1883, to Henderson J. Bell.* They 
now reside at North Star, Allegheny county, Pa., and are 
members of Robinson U, P. church. Four children have 
been born to them, viz.: 

1. Howard Scott, born Dec. — , 1883 ; died 

Sept. 10, 1884. 

2. Mattie E., born July 28, 1885. 

3. Harry W., born Aug. 8, 1887. 
3. George, born Oct. 10, 1889. 



VIII. Hannah Scott was born Sept, 3. 1861, and 
married June 23, 1886, to Charles G. Hadden. They lo- 
cated at McDonald, Pa., where Mr. Hadden was engaged 
in the meat business for a number of years. From there 
they removed, Nov. 4, 1 891, to Aurelia street, East Lib- 
erty, Pittsburgh, where they now reside. They connected 
with the U. P. church at McDonald, and are still in its 
communion. Their children are as follows : 

1. Elizabeth Jane, born May 10, 1887. 

2. Mary Priscilla, born March 2, 1891. 



IX. John Phillips Scott was born Dec. 23, 1863, 
and raised on the Scott farm, in Robinson township, re- 
ceiving his education in the common schools. He was 
married Oct. 20, 1887, to Mattie B. Walker, and now 
resides on the homestead farm, of which he owns a part, 
and is engaged in farming. He and wife are members of 
Union U. P. church. Their address is Remington, Alle- 
gheny county, Pa. One son has been born to them, viz.: 

Frank Walker, born Jan. 20, 1889. 



♦See sketch of Henderson Bell, page 149. 



266 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

No. Q. 

John Scott was born Aug. 24, 181 5, and spent his 
boyhood days on the Scott farm, in Robinson township, 
receiving his education in the schools of the vicinity of 
his home. He learned the trade of a blacksmith, which 
occupation he followed for a livelihood. He was married 
April I, 1852, to Lizzie W. Irwin, and now resides in 
Steubenville, Ohio, where he was for many years engaged 
in the foundry business. 

John and Lizzie (Irwin) Scott had two sons born to 
to them, as follows : 



I. William M. Scott was born Feb. 3, 1854, and 
married March 24, 1887, to Ada Powell. He is a moulder 
by trade, which vocation he followed for a livelihood, but 
at present writing (1892) is mayor of Steubenville, Ohio, 
where he and family now reside. One son, John, has 
been born to them. 



II. Robert I. Scott was born Jan. 30, i860, and 
married April 21, 1889, to Mary Grisinger, of Steubenville, 
Ohio. He learned the trade of a glass blower, which 
vocation he followed, residing in Tiffin, Ohio. He is at 
present writing on the poMce force in Steubenville, where 
he and family now reside. They have one son, John. 



No. 4. 

Sarah Scott, the eldest child of Samuel Scott's second 
wife, Elizabeth McMillen, was born June 5, 18 19. She 
was unmarried, and after the death of her father, lived 
with her widowed mother, in Slippery Rock township, 
Lawrence county, Pa., where she died, June 12, 1855, and 
was buried in Center graveyard, in the above-named county. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 267 

Rebecca Scott was bom Oct. 2, 1820, and married 
Nov, 26, 1842, to Arthur E. Alford, of Lawrence county, 
Pa. Mr. Alford died at his home in Princeton (Lawrence 
county) May 30, 1885, and was buried in Center grave- 
yard. His widow still survives him, and resides at the 
above-named place. They had six children, all born in 
Lawrence county, Pa., as follows : 



L Sarah Elizabeth Alford was bom Nov. 2, 
1844. 



n. James Scott Alford was born Oct. 20, 1846, 
and died March 17, 1850. 



in. Ruth Ellen Alford was born April 27, 
1850, and married Jan. 16, 1879, to Daniel Gross. They 
now reside with the widowed mother, at Princeton, Pa. 
No children. 



IV. John C. Alford was born Sept. 30, 1853, 
and married Jan. 31, 1 871, to Eleanor Jane McCullough. 
They reside in Princeton, Pa., where Mr. Alford is engaged 
in farming. Four children have been born to them, as 
follows : 

1. Mary Rebecca, born Nov. 6, 1872. 

2. Howard Scott, born Jan. 5, 1874. 

3. John Calvin, born April 29, 1883 ; died 

March 12, 1884. 

4. Eva Eliza, bom Dec. 31, 1884. 



V. Samuel Scott Alford was bom Oct. 10, 
1856, and married Oct. 26, 1881, to Mary E. Kerchoff. 



268 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

They reside at Princeton, Pa., and follows farming for a 
livelihood. Three children have been born to them, as 
follows : 

1. Ira Kerchoff, born May 14, 1883. 

2. Mary Keller, born Dec. 10, 1885. 

3. Rena Scott, born April 27, 1889. 



VI. Rebecca Alford was born Aug. 18, i860, 
and died March 27, 1873. 

" Leaves have their time to fall, 

And flowers to wither vi'ith the north wind's breath, 
And stars to set ; but all — 

Thou hast all seasons for thine own, O Death! " 



nsTo. e. 

William Scott was born April 20, 1822, and married 
Nov. 2, 1 843, to Elizabeth Thornburg, daughter of Samuel 
Thornburg, of Robinson township, Allegheny county, Pa. 
After some changes of residence they located in Sharon, 
Mercer county, Pa., where Mr. Scott died April 28, 1853, 
his death being caused by his falling from the roof of a 
rolling mill while working at that place. He was buried 
in the cemetery at Sharon. Mrs. Scott was afterwards 
married, in the year 1855, to John Ward, and still resides 
in Sharon. To this marriage were born three sons — Al- 
fred, Frank, and Harry, all living. 

William and Elizabeth (Thornburg) Scott had three 
children born to them, viz.: Elizabeth, Mary E., and 
William J. 



I. Elizabeth Jane Scott was born Dec. 12, 1844, 
on the Thornburg homestead in Robinson township, and 
died Aug. 19, 1850, in Sharon, Pa. She was buried in 
the cemetery at that place. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 269 

II. Mary Ellen Scott was born Dec. 5, 1847, in 
Temperanceville, Allegheny county, Pa., but spent her 
girlhood days in Sharon, Pa. She was married at the 
latter place, Dec. 22, 1868, by Rev. B. K. Ormond, to 
Jacob Colmer, who was born April i, 1842, near Duff's 
Mill, Allegheny county. Pa. Mr. Colmer served as a 
soldier in the civil war, enlisting early in 1861, as a pri- 
vate, and was promoted to second lieutenant, Sept. 29, 
1862. 

In the month of April following their marriage, Mr. 
and Mrs. Colmer went to housekeeping on Jackson street, 
Allegheny, removing thence to Webster street, where they 
remained fourteen years, after which, in January, 1883, 
they removed to Avalon, Allegheny county, Pa., where 
they are now located, Mr. Colmer being agent for the 
" Allegheny Insurance Company," of Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Jacob and Mary (Scott) Colmer have four children, all 
born in Allegheny, Pa., except Charles S., who was born 
in Avalon. The family record is as follows : 

1. William Howard, born Oct 11, 1869. 

2. Alice Scott, born Aug. 12, 1874. 

3. Lizzie Bell, born Dec. 13, 1875. 

4. Charles Stevenson, born April 13, 1886. 



III. William James Scott was born Nov. 8, 1851, 
in Sharon, Mercer county, Pa. He was married in the 
autumn of 1872 to Mrs. Kate Stevenson, and continued 
to reside in Sharon for several years, after which they re- 
moved to eastern Ohio, and were located for a time in 
Youngstown, and afterwards in Warren. Mrs. Scott died 
at the latter place Oct. 11, 1889, and was buried in the 
cemetery at Sharon. Mr. Scott has been in the South for 
several years, and is at present (1892) in Tennessee. 

William and Kate (Stevenson) Scott had two daugh- 
ters, both born in Sharon, Pa., as follows : 



270 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 



1. Carrie Foster, born Sept. 27, 1873. 

2. Eva, born Feb. — , 1876 ; died in 1882 in 

Youngstown, Ohio, and was buried in Sha- 
ron cemetery. 



]sro. :?. 

Joseph Scott was born April 22, 1824. He, like 
his brothers and sisters, spent his early life on the Scott 
farm in Robinson township and received a common-school 
education in the schools of the vicinity of his home. He 
was married to Hannah Robinson, and now lives in Alle- 
gheny City, Pa. Four children were born to them, viz.: 
Ida, Ella, Walter and Frank. They are all now living in 
Allegheny. No records have been obtained. 

Ella Scott was married to Albert Scott and now re- 
sides on Sarah street, Allegheny. They have two chil- 
dren. 



ISTo. B. 

James Scott was born June 7, 1826, and in the year 
1853 went to California. He was for many years con- 
nected with a newspaper office in Sacramento, but of late 
years all trace of him has been lost. 



ISTo. e. 



Thomas Scott, the youngest child of Samuel and 
Elizabeth (McMillen) Scott, was born Feb, 2. 1829, and 
died May 7, 1831. He was buried in Union graveyard. 



FAMILY OF NANCY (SCOTT) GEORGE, 

OF CHERRY VALLEY, WASHINGTON COUNTY, PA. 

NANCY SCOTT, the fourth and youngest daughter 
of Samuel and Elizabeth (Wilson) Scott, was born 
Feb. — , 1792, at Mingo Creek, Washington coun- 
ty. Pa., and in childhood removed with her parents 
to Robinson township, Allegheny county. Pa., where she 
spent her girlhood days, receiving her education in the 
schools of the vicinity of her home. 

She was married April 25, 18 16, to David George, of 
Miller's Run, Washington county. Pa. They located on 
a large farm in Cherry Valley, Washington county, which 
Mr. George had purchased and was engaged in farming — 
which occupation he followed successfully for many years. 
Mrs. George died at her home in Cherry Valley, May 
— , 1857. Her husband survived her and died Feb. 23, 
1866. Both were buried in the old Covenanter burying- 
ground near Venice, Pa. They were members of Miller's 
Run R. P. church. 

" Their feet have trod the path to God — 
Not lost but gone before." 

David and Nancy (Scott) George had seven children — 
Elizabeth, Crissy, Margaret, Nancy, Robert, Mary and 
Samuel — all born in Cherry Valley. 



Slte:tsla INTO. 1. 



Elizabeth W. George was born Jan. 16, 1817, and 
died in early womanhood, June — , 1842. She was buried 
in the old Covenanter graveyard near Venice, Pa. 



272 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

ISTo. 2. 

Crissy Ann George was born Feb. 14, 1819, and 
died when a young woman, Sept. — , 1843. 



]SCo. S. 

Margaret George was born April 25, 1821, and 
married April 27, 1837, by Rev. John Crozier, to John 
Roney, of Canonsburg, Washington county, Pa., who was 
born Jan. 25, 181 1. 

Shortly after marriage they settled on a farm near 
Claysville, Washington county, Pa., where they lived, for 
a time, in a little log house, after which they built a large 
brick one, in which they now reside — Mr. Roney being 
a successful and respected farmer. 

They are members of Middle Wheeling R. P. church, 
of which Mr. Roney is a ruling elder. He was a radical 
abolitionist, and has been quite prominent as a temper- 
ance advocate, and in all the leading moral questions of 
the day. 

John and Margaret (George) Roney had thirteen 
children, as follows — all born on the homestead farm near 
Claysville, and educated in the schools of that vicinity : 



I. James Roney was born Jan. 2, 1838. Hewasbut 
a young man, when — in Sept., 1862 — he was enrolled as 
a soldier in the war of secession — enlisting in Company 
K., Sixteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry. While engaged in 
fighting for the presentation of the union he was captured 
by the rebel cavalry Feb. 25, 1863, taken to Richmond 
and confined in Libby prison, Feb. 27 ; exchanged and 
left Richmond March 7, 1863, arriving at Annapolis, Ma- 
ryland, on the 8th of March. He died in the hospital at 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 273 

Annapolis, March 22, 1863, of typhoid-pneumonia. His 

remains were brought home and interred in the family 

burying-ground. 

" How sleep the brave who sink to rest, 
By all their country's wishes blessed ! 
When Spring, with dewy fingers cold, 
Returns to deck their hallowed mould. 
She there shall dress a sweeter sod 
Than Fancy's feet have ever trod." 



II. David G. Roney was born Aug. 12, 1840. 
Shortly before the close of the civil war, March 10, 1865, 
he enlisted in Company H., Eighty-seventh Pennsylvania 
Infantry, and was in service up to the closing scenes. 
He was in front of Petersburg when the lines were 
broken and followed General Lee's army to Appomattox 
Court House, where General Lee surrendered his army 
April 9, 1865. Mr. Roney was married May i, 1872, by 
Rev. W. H. Lester, to Martha J. Sutherland, who was born 
Sept. 26, 1845. They now reside in West Alexander, 
Pa., where Mr. Roney is engaged in the mercantile busi- 
ness in partnership with his brother, John C. Roney. 
They are members of Middle Wheeling R. P. church. 
David and Martha Roney had four children born to them, 
as follows : 

1. A SON, born Feb. 26, 1873 ; (deceased.) 

2. E. E., born June i, 1874. 

3. Ralph R., born Oct. 8, 1875. 

4. Julia J., born Feb. 22, 1879. 



III. John Crozier Roney was born Feb. 26, 1842, 

and married Sept. 11, 1872, by Rev. M. Ormond, to Mary 

L. Blake, who was born Aug. 3, 1850, and died April 29, 

1 88 1. He was married the second time, Sept. 29, 1885, 

by Rev. R. A. Browne, to Marie T. McBurney, who was 

born March 2, 1843. They now reside in West Alexan- 
18 



274 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

der, Pa., where Mr. Roney is engaged in the mercantile 
business under the firm name of J. C. Roney & Bro. 
They are connected with the U. P. church of West Alex- 
ander, of which Mr. Roney is a ruling elder. He had by 
his first wife, Mary, children, as follows : 

1. Mary A. Mertie, born July — , 1873. 

2. J. Earl, born Feb. 16, 1875. 

3. Beulah Belle, born Aug. 9, 1876. 

4. Flora Adele, born Sept. 25, 1878. 

5. Robert Irwin, born Sept. 11, 1880; died 

Oct. 18, 1888. 



IV. Nancy Roney was born Dec. i, 1843, and 
married Oct. 9, 1870, by Rev. W. H. Lester, to John Pat- 
terson. She died April 4, 1873, 



V. Jane Roney was born Oct. 3, 1845, and now 
resides with her parents near Claysville, Washington 
county. Pa. She is a member of Middle Wheeling R. P. 
church. 



VI. Robert M. Roney was born Oct. 18, 1847, and 
died in early manhood, Jan. 8, 1872. 



VII. Samuel S. Roney was born Feb. 8, 1850, and 
died March 14, 1852. 



VIII. William Slater Roney was born June 21, 
1852, and married Jan. 30, 1879, by Rev. Alexander Mc- 
Lachlan, to Alice Elnora Woodburn. They now reside in 
Claysville, Washington county. Pa., where Mr. Roney is 
engaged in the carpenter work, being employed in the 
planing-mill at the above-named place. They are mem- 
bers of Claysville U. P. church. Their children are as 
follows : 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 275 

1. Harry Everett, born Feb. 13, 1880. 

2. Clark H., born Nov. i, 1881. 

3. Mary Edna, born Oct. 22, 1883. 

4. Georganna Elnora, born Oct. 22, 1890. 



IX. Joseph Wylie Roney was born March 14, 
1855, and married Oct. 14, 1880, to Mary Virginia Mc- 
Ninch. They now reside on a farm near Claysville, Pa., 
not far from the Roney homestead, Mr. Roney being en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits. They are connected with 
the Claysville U. P. church. Three children have been 
born to this union, as follows : 

1. Clyde Wayne, born Aug. — , 1882. 

2. Forest Everett, born July — , 1884. 

3. Etha May, born March 2, 1889. 



X. Albert Roney was born Feb. 12, 1857, ^^d 
died in early manhood, July 29, 1887, 



XL Infant, born June 26, 1859. (Deceased.) 



XII. Infant, bom March 30, i860. (Deceased.) 



XIII. Armour Jason Roney was born Dec. 17, 
1862, and married Nov. 6, 1889, by Rev. Smith, to Ame- 
lia Burig. They now live with his parents on the home- 
stead farm near Claysville, Pa., and are members of Mid- 
dle Wheeling R. P. church. Their present address is 
Elvilla, Washington county. Pa. One son has blessed 
this union : 

Charles George, born Sept. 10, 1890. 



No. 4. 

Nancy George was born Oct. 17, 1823, and mar- 



276 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

ried Aug. 29, 1850, by Rev. McKaig, (a Presbyterian min- 
ister,) to William Conner, of Washington county, Pa. 

They located on a farm at what is now Midway, 
Washington county, Pa — formerly called Egypt. Here 
they lived for a number of years, after which they re- 
moved to a farm near Hickory, Washington county, Pa., 
where they resided until death. Mr. Conner was engaged 
in farming. 

Mrs. Conner died March 30, 1884. Her husband sur- 
vived her until July 29, 1887. Both are buried in the 
burying-ground of the U. P. church at Hickory. They 
were members of Miller's Run R. P. church. 

" A land all green and bright and fair 
Lies just beyond this vale of tears ; 
And we shall meet immortal there, 
The loved ones of our mortal years." 

William and Nancy (George) Conner had six children 
— all born on the farm at Midway, except Robert E. They 
are as follows : 

I. Margaret Ella Conner was born Sept. 10, 
1 85 1, and received a common-school education in the 
schools of the vicinity of her home. She died at her 
home in Hickoiy, Pa., Jan. — , 1892, and was buried in 
the U. P. graveyard at that place. She was a member of 
Miller's Run R. P. church. 



H. Nancy Jane Conner was born Oct. 21, 1853, 
and spent her childhood days at the place of her birth, 
removing with her parents to the farm near Hickory in 
girlhood. She received a common-school education in 
the schools of her native count}', and has been for many 
years a member of Miller's Run R. P. church. She now 
resides with her brother Samuel G., in Venice^ Pa. 



HI. Samuel George Conner was born Dec. 11, 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 277 

1855, and spent his early years on the farm at Midway, 
I Washington county, Pa., removing with his parents to 

' their farm near Hickory, in boyhood. He received most 

of his early education in the schools of the vicinity of his 
home. Having decided to devote his life to the Christian 
ministry, he accordingly began preparation for his noble 
calling. After qualifying himself he entered Geneva Col- 
lege at Northwood, Ohio, Sept. 3, 1877. The college 
was afterward removed to Beaver Falls, Pa., and from this 
place he was graduated May 27, 1885. He entered the 
Reformed Presbyterian Seminary in Allegheny, Pa., Sept. 
14, 1885, and, after completing the course at the semina- 
ry, was licensed to preach the gospel April 10, 1888. He 
was ordained and installed pastor of Miller's Run R. P. 
congregation May 23, 1889, and at present writing contin- 
ues to minister to that congregation. He was united in 
marriage, by Rev. H. W. Temple, Sept. 2, 1890, to Miss 
Anna M. Hill, of Stanton, Jeffeison county, Pa. They 
now reside in Venice, Washington county, Pa., where 
Rev. Conner recently purchased a property and on it 
erected their present residence. One son has been born 
to them, viz.: 

William Dwight Hill, born Aug. 31, 1892.' 



IV. David Clement Conner was born Aug. 18, 
1858, and spent his boyhood days mostly on his father's 
farm in Venice, Washington county. Pa., receiving his 
education in the schools of the county. He was married 
Sept. 13, 1883, by Rev. G. M. Kerr, of Candor, Pa., to 
Julia Alice McFarland, of Cherry Valley, Pa., and now 
lives on the homestead farm near Hickory, where he is 
engaged in farming. They are members of the U. P. 
church at Hickory. Two children have been born to 
them, viz ; 



278 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 



1. Laura Edna, born Sept. 20, 1884. 

2. Margaret Ella D., born Nov. 29, 1886. 



V. WiLLL\M John Conner was born Sept. 15, 
i860, and when but a child removed with his parents to 
Hickory, where his boyhood days were spent. He re- 
ceived a common-school education in the schools of the 
district and has always followed farming as an occupa- 
tion. Mr. Conner was married Sept. 18, 1884, by Rev. 
W. A. McConnell, to Cora B. McCalmont, of Hickory, 
Pa., and continued to reside on the homestead farm until 
April — , 1 89 1, when he removed to the farm of his uncle, 
Robert George, in Cherry Valley, having rented the farm 
from April, 1891, and is now engaged in working it. He 
and wife are members of the U. P. church, at Hickory. 
Their present address is Primrose, Washington county. 
Pa. Four children have been born to them, as follows : 

1. William Walter, born June 9, 1885. 

2. Alexander Carleton, born Sept 10, 1887. 

3. Robert George, born Sept. 23, 1889; died 

Jan. 29, 1890. 

4. Mary Belle, born Dec. 12, 1890. 



VI. Robert Everett Conner was born Aug. 20, 
1866, on the homestead farm near Hickory, Pa., and here 
spent his boyhood days, receiving his primary education 
in the district schools. After completing the course as 
taught by the public schools, he was engaged in farming 
for a brief period — until 1883, when he entered Geneva 
College, Beaver Falls, Pa., from which institution he was 
graduated May 29, 1889. Having concluded to adopt 
the medical profession, he commenced the study of med- 
icine Sept. 22, 1890, at the West Penn Medical College, 
of Pittsburgh, intending to pursue his studies in that in- 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 279 

stitution until graduation in 1893. He is a member of 
Miller's Run R. P. church, of which his brother is pastor. 



No. S. 

Robert George was born Jan. 24, 1826, on his 
father's farm in Cherry Valley, Washington county, Pa., 
and there spent his boyhood days, receiving his primary 
education in the log school-house of the district. During 
the winter of 1845-6 he attended a school on Ferry street, 
Pittsburgh, of which Prof Williams was principal. He 
was raised a farmer, which occupation he followed for a 
number of years. 

In the year 185 1 he removed to his own farm in 
Cherry Valley, which had been given him by his father, 
and here lived in true bachelor style, until June 8, 1852, 
when he was married to Eleanor Stewart, daughter of 
James Stewart, of West Middletown, Washington county. 
Pa. The ceremony was performed by Rev. Samuel Tag- 
gart, then pastor of the United Presbyterian church at 
the above-named place, after which Mr. George returned, 
with his wife, to his farm in Cherry Valley. Here his 
wife, Eleanor, died, July 10, 1853, and was buried in Mil- 
ler's Run R. P. graveyard. 

Mr. George remained on his farm until the year 1868, 
when he rented it and went to Primrose, Washington 
county. Pa., where he was engaged in the mercantile busi- 
ness until April i, 1870, when he returned to his farm. 

He was married the second time, July 10, 1870, by 
Rev. Stewart, assisted by Rev. Alcott, to Maggie S. 
Gregg, of Savannah, Ohio. During the month of Octo- 
ber, 1876, they attended the Centennial Exposition in 
Philadelphia, and while there Mrs. George contracted a 
cold which developed into pneumonia, from which she 



280 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

died Oct. 27, 1876 — a few days after their return home. 
She was buried in Miller's Run R. P. burying ground. 
In December, 1879, Mr. George rented his farm, and 
lived with his brother Samuel on the homestead farm 
until 1887, when he removed to Penn avenue, Pittsburgh, 
and from there, in 1891, to Allegheny, Pa., where he now 
resides. He is a member of the Eighth Street R. P. 
church, of Pittsburgh, Pa., Rev. D. McAllister, pastor. 



ISTo. e. 

Mary George — twin sister of Robert — was born 
Jan. 24, 1826. She has been an invalid for many years. 



No. :?. 

Samuel George was born Sept. 19, 1828, on his 
father's farm in Cherry Valley, where he now resides, hav- 
ing lived there all his life. He received a common-school 
education in the schools of his native county, and has al- 
ways followed farming. 

He was married Dec. 24, 1863, by Rev. William 
Slater, to Crissy . George, daughter of the late John 
George, of Beaver Falls, Pa. Their present residence is 
on the George farm, a few rods from the old homestead, 
and their address, Primrose, Washington county. Pa. 
They are members o( Miller's Run R. P. church. 

Samuel and Crissy George have six children, all born 
on the homestead farm in Cherry Valley, as follows : 



I. Jennie Slater George was born April — , 
1868. She received a preparatory education in McDon- 
ald high-school, completing her studies in Beaver Fall55 
Academy. She resides at home, 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 281 

II. Anna M. George was born Sept. — , 1871. 
She, also, attended McDonald high-school, after which 
she attended Lebanon College, near Cincinnati, Ohio, and 
also Beaver Falls Academy. 



III. John D. H. George was born June — , 1874. 
He received his primary education in the public schools 
of Midway, Pa., after which he entered Oakdale Acad- 
emy, where he is now pursuing his studies. 



IV. Lizzie E. George was born May — , 1878. 



V. Maggie M. George was born Sept. — , 1880. 



VI. William L. George was born Jan. — , 1872. 



FAMILY OF JAMES SCOTT, 

OF ROBINSON TOWNSHIP, ALLEGHENY COUNTY, PA. 

JAMES SCOTT, the youngest child of Samuel and 
Elizabeth Wilson Scott, was born in the year 1 797 
on his father's farm at Campbell's Run, in what is 
now Robinson township, Allegheny county, Pa. 
Here he spent his boyhood days, receiving his primary 
education in the log school-house in the vicinity of his 
home. 

His father, desiring to educate him for the Cove- 
nanter ministry, sent him to Canonsburg Academy. 
After pursuing his studies there for two or three sessions 
he stated to his friend, John Morrow, that he had given 
up the idea of entering the ministry and had decided to 
become a lawyer. His father, upon hearing this, was 
greatly disappointed and immediately took him from 
school and put him to work on the farm, at which he 
continued until September, 1817, when he was married to 
Catherine Fitzgerald, of Pittsburgh, Pa. 

After marriage, he and w^fe located on what is now 
the South Side, Pittsburgh, where they continued to 
reside until the spring of 18 19, when they removed to a 
little log cabin on the farm of Isaac McMichael, in Rob- 
inson township. Here Mrs. Scott died Feb. — , 1821, 
and was buried in Union graveyard — the head-stone of 
Samuel Scott, Sr., serving as her foot-stone. 

After the death of his wife Mr. Scott broke up house- 
keeping and, with his infant daughter Catherine, made 
his home with his mother in the old stone house at 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 283 

Campbell's Run, and was engaged in farming until the 
fall of 1823, when he went to Ohio on business. On 
returning home by way of Zanesville, Ohio, he stopped 
at the home of Mr. McCluskey, (formerly of Allegheny 
City,) where he died of bilious fever Oct. — , 1823. He 
was buried in Ohio. 

James and Catherine (Fitzgerald) Scott had two 
daughters, Elizabeth and Catherine. 



Slte^teH ]Sro. 1. 



Elizabeth Scott was bom June ii, 1818, on the 
South Side, Pittsburgh, Pa. When but a child, being 
bereft of the tender care of a mother, she was taken to 
the home of Isaac McMichael — who was one of the 
pioneers of Robinson township. Pa. — and there spent her 
girlhood days. 

She was married March 25, 1847, to John Wilkeson, 
Jr., of South Fayette (now Collier) township, Allegheny 
county. Pa., and removed with him to his father's farm in 
the above-named township. Here they have continued to 
reside, with the exception of three years — from 1867 to 
1870 — during which time they lived on the farm of John 
Taggart, Fayette township. 

The family are members of Robinson's Run U. P. 
church. Their post-office address is Federal, Allegheny 
county. Pa. 

John and Elizabeth (Scott) Wilkeson had five children, 
all born on the farm in South Fayette (now Collier) town- 
ship, as follows: 



I. Eli Henry Wilkeson was bom May i, 1849, 
^nd mc^rned March 14, 1875, to Mary Geary, of Washing- 



284 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

ton county, Pa. Their present residence is Rosevale, 
Allegheny county, Pa. Ten children have been born to 
them, viz.: 

1. Elizabeth F., born March 29, 1876; died 

April 19, 1880. 

2. Agnes, born July 26, 1877; died Oct. 22, 

1877. 

3. Agnes Sarah, born Sept. 18, 1878, 

4. Maria J., born Oct. 4, 1880. 

5. Catherine, born July 3, 1882. 

6. Samuel Scott, born March 17, 1884. 

7. Eli, born Oct. 6, 1886. 

8. John, born April 30, 1889. 

9. Robert, (twin brother of John;) died May 22, 

1889. 
10. Mary Elizabeth, born June 17, 1892. 



II. Catherine Wilkeson was born Dec. 10, 1851, 
and lives with her parents at Federal, Pa. 



III. Samuel Scott Wilkeson was born Aug. 9, 

1854, and died July 24, 1871, aged 17 years. He was 

buried in Chartiers cemetery, Allegheny county. Pa. 

" There is no fireside, howsoe'er defended, 
But has one vacant chair." 



IV. Priscilla Wilkeson was born Jan. 15, 1S57. 
After finishing the course as taught by the public schools 
of her native township, she attended one term at Mans- 
field Academy, under Prof. Dickson, completing her stud- 
ies under the instruction of Prof T. M. Williams, of Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. She received a teacher's certificate, after 
which she taught two terms — one at Walker's school and 
the other at Pleasant Grove, Collier township, Allegheny 
gount^. Pa. She now resides with her parents at Federal, Pa. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 285 

V. Rachel Wilkeson was born Jan. 26, i860, 
and married Dec. 18, 1883, to Abel Head. They are 
now located on a farm at Federal, Pa., and are living in 
the house in which Mrs. Head was born. Their children 
are as follows : 

1. Jessie Lois, born Oct. 7, 1884. 

2. Lucy E., born June 9, 1887. 

3. George W., born Sept. 14, 1889. 

4. James Dickson, born Feb. 14, 1892. 



]sro. ^. 

Catherine Scott was born May 17, 1820, in Rob- 
inson (now Collier) township, Allegheny county, Pa., and, 
being left an orphan at an early age, spent her childhood 
days under the care of her grandmother, Elizabeth Scott, 
on the Scott farm at Campbell's Run. After her grand- 
mother's death she was taken to the home of her aunt, ^ 
Elizabeth Wright, near Camp Run, Beaver county. Pa., 
and there continued to reside until April 11, 1839, when 
she was married to James McMillen, of Robinson township. 

Soon after marriage they removed to a house on the 
McCurdy farm, in Robinson township, removing thence to 
the McMillen farm — same township. Finally, in 1841, 
they removed to Ohio, and there Mrs. McMillen died Feb. 
— , 1842. She was buried in Mansfield, Ohio. • 

James and Catherine (Scott) McMillen had two 
daughters born to them in Robinson township, as follows: 



L Mary L. McMillen was born in the year 1840, 
and married Thomas Wilkin. Their present residence is 
Garwood, Washington county, Pa. Three children have 
been born to them, viz.: Callie, Frank and Elizabeth. 



IL Elizabeth Jennings McMillen was born 



286 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

Feb. — , 1 84 1, and married John Dorrington, of the 
West End, Pittsburgh. They had two sons, James G., 
who was killed on the Western railroad Aug. 9, 1882, 
and Joseph, who now resides in Colorado. 

Mrs. Dorrington married as her second husband, Jo- 
seph Parrish, of Topeka, Kansas, where she now resides. 



THE SCOTT FAMILY. 287 

ERRATA. 

Page 91, read correctly, as follows : 

Robert and Ella (Murray) Riddle had seven children 
born to them, as follows : 

1. Ralph P., born May 28, 1864, in Meadville, 

Crawford county. Pa., and received the 
greater part of his education in Youngs- 
town, Mahoning county, Ohio, where he is 
now located, being employed as clerk by 
the Penna. R. R. Company. He was married 
in New Castle, Lawrence county. Pa., Sept. 
29, 1885, to Miss Mary Beebe. One child 
has blessed their union, viz.: 

Anna Lela, born June 28, 1887, in 
Youngstown, Ohio. 

2. John M., born Sept. 1 1, 1865, in Oil City, Pa.; 

died Aug. 13, 1866. 

3. William Thompson, bom April 2, 1867, in 

Oil City, Pa.; died March 29, 1868, in New 
Castle, Pa. 

4. Grace, born Nov. 22, 1868, in New Castle, 

Pa.; died Nov. 23, 1868. 

5. J. RUNCIE, born March 31, 1870, in New Cas- 

tle, Pa.; died June 30, 1870. 

6. Helen, born July 12, 1874, in Youngstown, 

Ohio. 

7. Clair Lamont, born Sept. 15, 1877, in New 

Castle, Pa. 



Page 103, for " Mrs. T. S. Ashbrook," read Mrs. Fe- 
lix Ashbrook. 

Page 155, sketch of Matthew H. McCluskey, for 
"Glenwood county," read Glenwood, Mills county. 



288 THE SCOTT FAMILY. 

Page 1 88, sketch of Mary Ewing Young, for "at the 
old homestead," read on the homestead farm. 

Page 190, sketch of Richard B. Young, eighth line 
of text, for "daughter," read grand-daughter. 

Page 204. In the sketch of Leonard Gribben, for 
"their present address is Uhrichsville, Ohio," read : In 
the summer of 1892 Mr. Gribben and family removed 
from Uhrichsville to Columbus, Ohio, where they now re- 
side, their present address being No. 102 East Lincoln 
Street. 



ADDENDA. 

Page 65. To the family record of William and Re- 
becca (Tannehill) Neely add : 

Raymond Kennedy, born Sept. 6, 1892. 

Page 71. To the sketch of Samuel McGinness add : 
In February, 1892, Mr. McGinness went to visit his chil- 
dren, in San Francisco, Cal., and while there was attacked 
with la grippe, which finally developed into pneumonia 
and terminated his life. His death occurred April 9, 
1892, in the seventy-eighth year of his age. He was 
buried beside his wife in Union cemetery, Placerville, Cal. 
Page 73. To the sketch of Samuel H. McGinness 
add : Mr. McGinness removed, recently, from Shingle 
Springs to Placerville, Cal., where he is now located, be- 
ing manager of the " Pioneer Flour Mills." 

Page 10 1. In connection with the sketch of Thomas 
Jefferson Megibben, read : 

The following extracts were taken from a sketch of 
the life of Mr. Megibben, which was published in one of 
the papers subsequent to his death : 

" Mr. Megibben was, undoubtedly, the most public 
spirited man that ever figured in the history of Harrison 
county. Kentucky does not present a more striking ex- 
emplification of the old maxim, ' Industry brings its own 
reward,' than in the life of this gentleman, who, by his own 
efforts, became the most prominent farmer, distiller, thor- 
ough-bred stock-raiser, etc., of Harrison county, and in- 
deed, among the first of Central Kentucky. 

" In the year 1859 he bought a farm at Lair station, 
(Harrison county,) containing about two hundred acres, 
upon which he resided until 1882. He added to it from 
19 



290 ADDENDA. 

year to year, until he owned, at the time of his death, 
2800 acres, being the largest land owner in Harrison 
county. 

" His liberality was by no means an uncommon sub- 
ject of discussion. Those interested in the cause of re- 
ligion and education in Harrison county and vicinity are 
largely indebted to his generosity. The poor and needy 
found no cause for complaint when applying to him. He 
was always a man of fine personal and business habits, 
with a high sense of social and business integrity. His 
whole career presents one of the finest instances of a suc- 
cessful self-made man anywhere to be found in the state." 

The Frankfort Capital says : " Hon. T. J. Megibben, 
of Harrison county, ex-Representative and ex-Senator, is 
dead, after a long illness, and the state has lost another 
of its good citizens. Nearly twenty years ago the editor 
of the Capital sat with him as a member of the House, 
where he was the personification of honesty and upright- 
ness, as he was in his private affairs during his busy and suc- 
cessful life. Modest as a woman, gentle as a child, 'Tom' 
Megibben, as those who loved him loved best to call him, 
never betrayed a trust, faltered in his devotion to a friend 
or forgot to keep his plighted faith to any man. Emi- 
nently successful in life, amassing a vast estate, he died as 
he lived— a simple gentleman, a worthy example of strug- 
gling youth, and leaving behind him a wide circle of de- 
voted friends. Lightly may the earth lie upon him, and 
may his soul rest with the peace of God which passeth all 
understanding." 

The following resolutions were passed in the Ken- 
tucky Legislature by the House and Senate : "Whereas, 
information has just been received of the death of Hon. 
T. J. Megibben, of Harrison county, an ex-member of 
each House of the General Assembly of this state, there- 
fore, be it 



ADDENDA. 291 

"Sec. I. Resolved by the General Assembly of the 
Commonwealth of Kentucky, that in his death the state 
has lost an eminent and useful citizen, whose services for 
his state had won for him in the hearts of his people a 
high and lasting appreciation, enjoyed by but few. 

"Sec. 2. That we hereby extend to his widow and 
children our most profound sympathy in this, the hour of 
their deepest gloom. 

" Sec. 3. That a copy of this resolution be forward- 
ed to his widow by the Clerk of the Senate. 

" Sec. 4. That in further token of appreciation of 
his memory, this body do now adjourn. 

"Sec. 5. That this resolution take effect and be in 
force from its adoption." 

Page 10 1. To the family record of Thomas and 
Elizabeth (David) Megibben add the following: 

Mary Loraine Megibben was married Oct. 2, 1873, 
to Eloh W. Bramble. They reside in Cynthiana, Ky. 
No children. 

Martha J. Megibben was married Sept. 26, 1876, 
to Joseph M. Kimbrough, who died July 12, 1890. Mrs. 
Kimbrough married as her second husband, Reese P. 
Coughlin, April 27, 1892. They now reside in Lexing- 
ton, Ky. To the first marriage were born two sons, viz.: 

Megibben, bom Jan. 10, 1878. 

Joseph M., Jr., born Oct. 8, 1879, 

James W. Megibben was married Jan. 11, 1888, to 
Mary L. Wolford. They reside in Cynthiana, Ky. One 
son has blessed this union, viz.: 

James Wolford, born May 9, 1889. 

Nannie W. Megibben was married Dec. 18, 1884, 
to Felix Ashbrook, who is the present Mayor of Cynthi- 



292 ADDENDA. 

ana, Ky. Three children have been born to them, as fol- 
lows : 

Betsy M., born Jan. 15, 1886. 

James Ried, born Nov. 19, 1888. 

Artie B., bom Feb. 8, 1890. 



The above information was received after the chapter 
containing the sketch of Thomas J. Megibben was 
printed. 



CONCLUSION. 

" Live truly, and thy life shall be 
A great and noble creed." 

The work is done. Across the years that have 
stretched between us and our forefathers herein considered 
— whom we have known only by tradition — we see 
many changes, many vacant places, vacant save in 
memory. " Life itself is not the boundary of a good 
man's usefulness, for an influence never dies — once born it 
is immortal." Peace to the memory of the fathers, who, 
long years ago, were called to their reward ! Green be 
their graves, and calm their resting place ! 

Friends are passing away — many, undoubtedly, are 
now standing upon the margin of the unknown future. 
Another and younger generation is on the stage to take 
up the world's work. " Sacred be the trusts committed to 
our care, and bright the visions of the coming ages !" Let 
those of us who are, as it were, but beginning our career 
and have yet our record to make, as we start out on the 
voyage of life, form the solemn purpose to make the most 
of the powers and talents that God has given us, and to do 
our best to ennoble our calling whatever it may be. There 
is no work so humble, but that it may be done to a great 
purpose and ennobled thereby. Let us not be indifferent 
to life's purposes, but have ever before us the thought 
that " life is a fixed and stern reality, fuller of duties than 
the sky is of stars," and that we each have a great work to 
do — " a deep and earnest life-work, solemn, real and use- 
ful." We must meet the issues of life and press onward 
in the conflict. 

If we would win in the battle of life and leave behind 
us a life-work worth preserving — one that will live after 



294 CONCLUSION. 

US — we must have a worthy object and a noble purpose in 
view, and concentrate all our powers and energies upon 
that object. Franklin says, " If you would not be for- 
gotten as soon as you are dead, either write things worth 
reading or do things worth writing." The immediate 
demands of the present are enough to inspire and impel 
us to the noblest thoughts and actions and to stimulate 
us to lay the foundation for a noble and useful manhood 
or womanhood. 

Let us not stand idly dreaming, waiting until occa- 
sion tells us what to do, or to have our task marked out, 
else we shall die and leave our errand unfulfilled ; but 
rather let us wisely avail ourselves of every opportunity 
and " gather roses while they bloom," not waiting for the 
"golden chance." In the words of the poet: 

" He who is wise will not sit down 

With folded hands and say, 
' Sometime, I trust, the Golden Chance 
Will come along this way.' 

" To such, the opportunity 

They wait for never comes : 

It does not herald its approach 

With noisy beat of drums. 

" It comes with quiet tread and mien ; 
The dreamer does not see 
That which he's waited for so long — 
His opportunity. 

" And so the chance he seeks goes by 
To never come again, 
And all too late he learns the truth, 
When other watchful men 

•' Who do not fold their hands and wait 
For great things, win the prize ; 
They sieze the chance of every day 
Before it hither flies. 

" And thus they gain what dreamers lose ; 
Each chance that comes may be 
The Golden Chance ; so squander not 
One opportunity." 



CONCLUSION. 295 

Let US remember that we are responsible for time, 
for talents and for opportunities, therefore we should im- 
prove them, for of them we must give an account, — 

" The life above, when this is past. 
Is the ripe fruit of life below." 

The past life, like neglected opportunities, comes 
not back except in retrospect, therefore we should so 
live that when we reach the evening of life — if such be 
our lot — and look back through the mist of years, it may 
not be with the sad consciousness that our life has been 
a failure, but rather may the years rise before us as a 
beautiful edifice, enduring forever to our praise. 

" Life is before you ! from the fated road 
Ye cannot turn ; then take ye up the load ; 
Not yours to tread or leave the unknown way, 
Ye must go o'er it, meet ye what ye may. 
Gird up your souls within you to the deed, 
Angels and fellow-spirits bid you speed ! " 

M. R. F. 



INDRX. 



Alexander, Elizabeth, (Carr,) . 219 

Alford, John C, .... 267 

" Rebecca, (Scott,) . . 267 

" Samuel Scott, . . . 267 

Anderson, Adelaide V., . . 227 

" EHzabeth, (Scott,) . 225 

" Mary, (Scott,) . . 227 

" William John, . . 226 

Bell, Elizabeth, (McCurdy,) . 149 

" Eliza, (Scott,) .... 265 

Black, Kate, (Anderson,) . . 228 

Boreland, Martha, (Anderson,) 226 

Bovvers, Mary, (Young,) . . 169 

Bratton, Margaret, (Cotton,) . 97 

Brown, Margaret, (McGinness,) 72 

Bryce, Elizabeth, (Gribben,) . 202 

Burket, Laura, (McGinness,) . 124 

Cahill, Kate, (Hanna,) . . 229 

Carr, David Lewis, .... 219 

" James, 216 

" Joseph, 218 

" Nancy, (Slater,) ... 216 
Chamberlin, Margaret, (McGin- 
ness,) 36 

Chambers, Mary, (McGinness,) 40 

Church, Mary, (McGinness,) . 118 

Collins, Emma, (McGinness,) 126 

Colmer, Mary, (Scott,) . . 269 

Conner, David C, . . . . 277 

" Nancy, (George,) . . 275 

Robert E.,. ... 278 

" Rev. Samuel G., . . 276 

" William J., . . . 278 

Conway, Esther, (Kearns,) . 194 

Cotton, John Vance, ... 95 

•' Martha, (McGinness,) 82 

" Simon L., .... 97 

" William, M. D., . . 92 

" William Gibson, M. D., 94 

Critchlow, Duira, \McGinness,) 47 

Davis, Eliza, (Morrison,) . . no 

Dickson, Letitia, (McCurdy,) 147 

Dorrington, Elizabeth, (McMil- 

^ len,) 285 

"Ooughty, Audellia, (Wilson,) 81 

Downey, Mary, (McGinness,) 127 



Downey, Martha, (McGinness 
Dunn, Rachel, (Scott,) . 
Duncan, Adeline, (Gailey,) 
English, Zorayda, (Scott,). 
Emerson, Mary, (Gailey,). 
Ewing, Elizabeth, (Young,) 
Ford, Mary, (McGinness,) 
Forsythe, Esther, (Scott,) . 
Gailey, Sarah, (McGinness,) 
Gallagher, Martha, (Cotton,) 
Gelvin, Elizabeth, (McGinness, 

John, 

" William, 
George, Annie, (McGinness, 
" Nancy, (Scott,) . 
" Robert, .... 
" Samuel, 
Gillespie, Martha, (Gailey,) 
Gilmore, Sarah, (McGinness, 
Glass, Evaline, (Scott,) 
Gribben, Abigail, (Young,) 
Esther, (Scott,) . 
" James McFadden, 
" John Scott, . 
" Leonard, . 
Gross, Ruth, (Alford,) . . 
Hadden, Hannah, (Scott,) 
Hall, Ann, (Young,) 
" Letitia, (Young,) 
" William, Sr., . . . 
Hamill, John K., . . . 
" Margaret, (Cotton,) 
" Robert Cotton, 
Hanna, Clarissa, (Scott,) . 
" James M., . 
" Mary, (Anderson,) 
" William Scott, . 
Hart, Buena Vista, (Morrison,) 
Haverfield, Emily, (McGinness, 
Head, Rachel, (Wilkeson,) . 
Hill, Martha, (Gelvin,) . . 
Hunt, Nancy, (McGinness,) . 
Hunter, Martha, (McGinness,) 
" William Lawrence, . 
Kean, Martha, (Hamill,) . . 
Kearns, Elizabeth, (Scott,) 



128 
210 

"5 
230 

"5 
189 

34 
240 
114 

96 
I 98 
107 
106 

75 
271 
279 
280 
160 
118 
263 
163 
197 
201 
199 
203 
267 
265 
156 
146 

151 



85 
228 
229 
228 
229 

113 
1118 
285 
106 
12S 
129 
130 
86 
193 



INDEX. 



297 



Kearns, John Scott, . . . 194 
" Susanna, .... 193 
Kelso, Mary, (Hall,) ... 151 
Lair, Eliza, (Megibben,) . . 103 
Lawrence, Mary, (Scott,) . . 206 
Lewis, Olive, (McGinness,) . 124 
Love, Alice, (McGinness,) . 119 
Lutton, Margaret, (Young,) . 158 
Magennis, Family of, its Origin 

and History, 11 

McAfee, Margaret, (McGinness,) 76 
McCaslin, Elizabeth, (Slater,) 213 
" Mary, (Slater,) . . 215 
McConaghy, Margaret, (Carr,) 219 
McConnell, Margaret, (Slater,) 215 
McCluskey, Elizabeth, (Hall,) 153 
McCune, Alexander Hall, . . 261 

" John, 262 

" Letitia, (Scott,) . . 262 

" Samuel Scott, . . 262 

McCurdy, Joseph ]., . . . 150 

Mary, (Hal!,) . . 147 

McDonald, Olive, (Gailey,) . 115 

McGinness, Rev. Charles E., . 119 

" Eliza Jane, . . 133 

" George, . . . 123 

" George Edward, . 55 

" George Jefferson, 41 

" Jacob J 126 

" James, of Allegheny 

Co., Pa., 22 

McGinness, James, of California, 30 
" James, of Lawrence 

Co., Pa., 40 

McGinness, James, of Indianap- 
olis, Ind., 57 

McGinness, James, of College 

Springs, Iowa, .... 73 
McGinness, James of Buffalo 

Prairie, 111 124 

McGinness, James Wilson, . 59 
" John, of Birming- 

ham, Allegheny Co., Pa., . 48 
McGinness, John, of Clinton, Al- 
legheny Co., Pa., ... 67 
McGinness, John, of Davenport, 

Iowa, 125 

McGinness, John Elliott, . . 60 
" John Harvey, . 127 

John M., of Chase 

Co., Neb., 74 

McGinness, John Murdoch, . 44 
" John Reed, . . 72 

" John Turner, . . 116 

" Joseph Wilson, . 37 

" Mary, (Scott,) . 232 

20 



McGinness, Samuel, of Placer- 

ville, Cal., 69 

McGinness, Samuel, of Colorado 

Springs, Col., 124 

McGinness, Samuel Henry, . 73 
" Samuel Kennedy, 130 
" Samuel Wilson, . 23 
" Thomas R., . . 75 
William, Sr., of Ire- 
land, 19 

McGinness, William, of Law- 
rence Co., Pa., .... 38 
McGinness, William, (son of 

William, Sr.,) 108 

McGinness, William, of Indian- 
apolis, Ind., 58 

McGinness, William, of Tennes- 
see, 69 

McGinness, William, of Valley 

Falls, Kan., 121 

McGinness, William, of Buffalo 

Prairie, 111., 125 

McGinness, WiUiam E., . . 128 

" William Henry, . 122 

William J., . . 74 

" William Kerr, . 50 

" William Scott, . 46 

McMichael, Ann, (McMillen,) 158 

McMillen, Catherine, (Scott,) 285 

" Sarah, (Carr,) . . 217 

" Mary, (Young,) . 157 

Megibben, Emily, (Gelvin,) . 99 

" James K., . . . 105 

" Jeremiah, . , . 104 

" John Wesley, . . 102 

" Thomas Jeffei-son, icx) 

Miller, Elizabeth, (Young,) . 160 

" Martha, (Megibben,) . 102 

Mitchell, Alice, (McGinness,) 128 

Morrison, James Harvey, . . iii 

" John Marion, . . 113 

" Nancy, (McGinness,) 109 

" Oscar O., . . . 113 

" William M., . . 112 

Murray, EHza, (Cotton,) . . 87 

Name, (Magennis,) Root of, . 12 

Neely, Elizabeth, (McGinness,) 61 

" Georgetta, .... 65 

" Mary A., 63 

Sarah E., .... 65 
" William J., . . . . 63 
Onstott, Margaret, (Wilson,) 79 
Paden, Sarah, (Robb,) . . 252 
Palmer, Eliza, (Scott,) . . 244 
" Joseph S., . . . . 245 
Patterson, Jane, (Witherspoon,) 78 



298 



INDEX. 



Percival, Martha, (Murray,) . 88 

Phillips, Hannah, (Young,) . 190 

Reed, IMargaret McC, (Scott,) 237 

Richardson, Ella, (Cotton,) . 93 

Riddle', Ella, (Murray,) . . 90 
" Sarah, (McCurdy,) . 148 

Robb, Andrew Irwin, . . . 255 
" George Calvin, . . . 253 
" Jennie Alice, . . . 254 
" John Knox, .... 255 
" Margaret, (Scott,) . . 252 
" Wilson J., .... 254 
Loney, Armour J., . . . . 275 
David G., .... 273 

James, 272 

John C, .... 273 
Joseph Wylie, . . . 275 
" William Slater, . . 274 

Rutledge, Eliza, (Hall,) . . 153 

Scott, Andrew, 245 

" Andrew G., . . . . 240 

" Elijah F,, 243 

" Emma Priscilla, . . . 264 
" Hugh McC, .... 244 
" James, Sr., of Elizabeth 
Tp., Allegheny Co., Pa., . 170 

Scott, James, Jr., of Elizabeth 
Tp., Allegheny Co., Pa., . 171 

Scott, James, of Robinson Tp., 
Allegheny Co., Pa., . . . 282 

Scott, James, of Washington Co., 
Pa., 257 

Scott, John, Sr., of Miller's Run, 
Washington Co., Pa., . . 184 

Scott, John, Jr., of Miller's Run, 
Washington Co., Pa., . . 205 

Scott, John, of Cecil Tp., Wash- 
ington Co., Pa., .... 251 

Scott, John, of Steubenville, 
Ohio, 266 

Scott, John Buchanan, . . 237 
" John P., of Venice, Pa., 207 
" John Phillips, . . . 265 

" John v., 172 

" John W., 174 

" Jonathan, 197 

" Joseph, of Ireland, . 143 
*' Joseph, of Elizabeth Tp., 
Allegheny Co., Pa., . . . 173 

Scott, Joseph, of Miller's Run, 
Washington Co., Pa., . . 234 

Scott, Joseph, of Bloomfield, 
Ohio, 238 

Scott, Joseph, of Allegheny, Pa. , 270 
" Joseph L., .... 249 
'« Robert D., . , . . 256 



Scott, Robert Harper, . . . 242 
" Robert I., .... 266 
" Robert James, . . . 251 
" Samuel I, (Great-great- 
grandfather,) 176 

Scott, Samuel II, .... 260 
" Samuel III, .... 262 
" Samuel IV, .... 264 
" Samuel, (son of John 
Scott, Sr.,) 196 

Scott, Samuel, of New Orleans, 
La., 22 

Scott, Samuel, of Bloomfield, 
Ohio, 236 

Scott, Samuel Wilson, . . . 210 
" Sarah, (Hall,) ... 146 
" William, of Ireland, . 142 
" William, of Brooke Co., 
W. Va., 224 

Scott, William, of Washington 
.Co., 246 

Scott, William, of Sharon, Alle- 
gheny Co., Pa., .... 268 

Scott, William James, of Ten- 
nessee, 269 

Scott, William J., of Venice, 
Pa., 208 

Scott, William M., .... 266 
" William T., . . , . 243 

" Zaccheus, Sr 172 

" Zaccheus, Jr., . . . 173 

Slater, Archibald, . . . . 215 

" James, 2l6 

" James A., . . . . 214 

John, 213 

" Margaret, (Scott,) . 212 
" Samuel, 214 

Sterrett, Elizabeth, (Wright,) 220 

Taggart, Sarah, (McGinness,) 45 

Thompson, John A., . . . 249 
" Joseph Scott, . 247 

" Martha, (Scott,) 230 

" Mary, (Scott,) . 247 

" Samuel George, . 248 

Ufford, Maria, (Slater,) . . 214 

Vansyoc, Rachel, (Morrison,) no 

Verner, Abigail, (Young,) . i89 
" Esther, (Young,) . . 186 

White, Catherine, (Wilson,) 80 

Wilkeson. Elizabeth, (Scott,) 283 
" Eli Henry, ... 283 

Wilkin, Mary, (McMillen,) . 285 

Wilson, John McGinness, . 80 
" Margaret, (McGinness,) 78 

Witherspoon, Elizabeth, (McGin- 
ness,) . , 76 



INDEX 



299 



Witherspoon, Rev. John McGin- 
ness, 77 

Wright, EHzabeth, (Scott,) . 220 
" John Wright, , . 221 

Young, Andrew B., . . . 162 
" Anna Hall, . . . 191 
" Augustus B., . . . 166 
" Hannah, (Scott,) . 185 
" Jacob B., .... 168 
" James Scott, . . . 167 
" John, of Robinson Tp., 
Allegheny county, Pa., . 159 

Young, John, Jr., of Robinson 
Tp., Allegheny county, Pa., 161 

Young, Rev. John C, . . . 192 



Young, Col. John Jay, 
" Joseph B., . 
" Joseph C, . 
" Lewis, 
" Mary, (Scott,) 
" Mary Ewing, 
" Morgan Neville, 
" Richard Biddle, 
•' Robert G., . . 
" Lieut. -Colonel Sam u 
B. M., 

Young, Samuel Neely, . 
" Samuel Lewis, 
" William Eugene, 
" William Hall, . 



el 



164 
161 
162 
163 

145 
188 
168 
190 
169 
I 

191 
165 
166 
167 
166 



8465 



>■■■ •!■ . :. s":