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Full text of "McGuffey's newly revised eclectic first- reader, containing selections in prose and poetry, with rules for reading; and exercises in articulation, defining, etc"






JJ J.J V -I 



.EADER 



UNIVERSITY 
OF PITTSBURGH 



UNIVERSITY 

OF 

PITTSBURGH 



PE1117 

1853 
v.l 



LIBRARY 



< 



READING AND SPELLING COURSE. 



JHJUUMJJtt AINU bJfJliLLllMJ UJU.K&.&. 



McGUFFEY'S ECLECTIC PRIMER, 

McGUFFEY'S ECLECTIC SPELLING BOOK, 

McGUFFEY'S ECLECTIC FIRST READER, 

McGUFFEY'S ECLECTIC SECOND READER, 

McGUFFEY'S ECLECTIC THIRD READER, 

McGUFFEY'S ECLECTIC FOURTH READER, 

McGUFFEY'S ECLECTIC FIFTH READER, (Rhetor- 
$ ical Guide.) 

| THE HEMANS YOUNG LADIES' READER, for Fe- j 
male Schools, compiled expressly for the Eclectic Educational 
Series. By Da. T. S. Pinneo. 480 pages, 12mo. 





The best evidence of the merits of these Readers, is 
their unparalleled sale ; which vastly exceeds that of any j! 
other similar Series ever published in the United States. 
And the sale is still rapidly increasing. In many places, jl 
where intelligent teachers have, for a time, introduced ; 
other Reading Books, they have soon returned to the use j 
of McGuffey's Readers; convinced that in general merits, 
they are unequaled by any other similar works. 



JJST'See " Caution to Purchasers," on the back Cover 
of this volume. 

(1) 




James Bland and his Bird.— !?ee page 42. 




Albert and his dog.— See page 68. 



ECLECTIC EDUCATIONAL SERIES. 



M C GUFFEY ! S 



NEWLY REVISED 



i ECLECTIC FIRST READER: 



C O N T A I N I X O 



\ PROGRESSIVE LESSONS 



I N 



READING AND SPELLING. 



l&cbfse'D antJ Em probed. 



By Wm H MCGUFFEY, L.L.I). 



BEVISKD STEREOTYPE EDITION. 



PUBLISHERS: 

WINTHROP B. SMITH & CO., CINCINNATI. 

No. 137 Walnut Street. 



/ 



I 



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year Eighteen t 
Ilundred and Fifty-Three, by Winthrop B. Smith, in the Clerk's j 
Office of the District Court of the United States, for the District ' 
of Ohio. [ 



©*" 



10 HW ^0*f*0* *0 W * + 



k.^.^^%.*.**-*-^'* 






TO TEACHERS 



* 



This little book is offered to the public, in the hope t 
| that it may prove a valuable auxiliary to thoee engaged j 
| in the instruction of children. I 

! Great pains have been taken to select Lessons in which Ij 
the language is simple, and the subjects interesting j 
J and natural to childhood; as we have learned, from 
actual experience, that a child's progress is more rapid 
■when the subjects are agreeable, and he can understand 
the terms in -which they are conveyed. 

The Lessons are short, and many of them composed of 
word9 of one and two syllables. Much care has been !j 
taken to render them as progressive as possible, so that !; 
the child may not meet with many expressions which !j 
are strange to his ear, and none that are above his 
comprehension. 

The Spelling Lessons are composed of words derived 
from the Reading Lessons. Some of the words are re- 
peated in the spelling list of the different lessons, and 
the more difficult ones, as often as they can be found. \ 
This is particularly necessary in a work of this juvenile I 
character, where the Spelling Exercise is taken from the j 

f5) 



j Ti TO TEACHERS. 



t Reading Lesson. In a Spelling Book this would not 

t only be unnecessary, but "would be an entire waste of the 

| space occupied. There, each lesson is independent, and 
can be studied as often as may be desired; but in a 
Reading Book the spelling exercise is derived from the 

i reading matter, and must include the words there found ; 

> so that some repetition, especially of the more difficult 

J 'words, becomes necessary and desirable. 

$ J^^The book is now presented, thoroughly remodeled, 

| greatly improved, and printed on new stereotype plates. 

\ The cuts, many of which are from original designs, have 

I been engraved for the First Reader by one of the best 

* artists in the country. 



^»o 



o— - 



M C GUFFEY'S FIRST READER. 




can has 

her two 

see you 

boy how 



LESSON I 

the read 

that keep 



with 
girls 



Jane 
they 



John 
book 
hand 
must 



name 
there 
clean 
learn 



j Do you see that boy ? 

There are two girls with him. 
j The name of the boy is John. 

Jane has a book in her hand. 
j They can all read from the book. 

They must keep the book clean. 
j They must see how fast they can learn. 



o— ~ 



MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 



go 

let 

hit 

I his 





LESSON II 


• 




bat 


are 


kite 


fine 


boys 


run 


and 


will 


bite 


John 


top 


him 


ball 


play 


hand 


dog 


now 


balls 


here 


James 












The boys play with balls. 
John has a bat in his hand. 
I can hit the ball. 

James has a fine dog 



gL See him run and play. 



The dog will not bite. 



Here are my top and kite. 
And here is my ball. 
Now let us go and play. 



OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 



9 I 



on 
do 
up 

the 



LESSON III. 



see 
her 
bag 
box 



you 
was 
who 
with 



girl 
glad 
cart 
shut 



Jane 
back 
found 
lit-tle 




Here is lit-tle John. 
Jane is with John. 




John has a baa: on his back. 

Do you see this lit-tle cart ? 
Who is in the cart ? 



It is a lit-tle girl. 





^L^v-fl 






r^ll 




;%Sj|s2MH 




Mimui 





Jane has found her cat. 
It was shut up in a box. 
The cat is glad to see Jane, jl 



' 10 



~- o 



MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 



i L E S S ON I V . 

t 

j as boy talk hand bird 

! no run hear some birds I 

j hat fast they have bark 

one this play dogs barks 






This boy has a bird. 
The bird is on his hand. 
Some birds can talk. 

The dog barks. 

Do you hear the dog bark ? 

Boys play with dogs. 

The bovs run fast. 

They run as fast as they can. 

One of the boys has no hat. 



OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 



11 \ 



LESSON V. 

it get her eat milk 

is not hen eats boys 

us dog you hurt must 

the corn cow pond small 



picks 
gives 
chicks 
lit-tle 




Here is a small clog. 



He has the hoy's hat. 
The boys can not get it. 




This cow is in the pond. 
The cow gives us milk. 
You must not hurt the cow. \ 




The hen eats corn. 

The hen picks up the corn. 

The lit-tle chicks eat corn, i 



12 



M C GUFFEY'S FIRST READER 



LESSON VI. 



\ fly 
I lie 
\ off 

try 



rat 
pat 
pot 
fox 
eat 



air 

tea 

sun 

rug 

rim 



wet 
gay 
bee 
use 
hay 



men 
may 

way 
sees 
mew 



says 

eggs 

hens 

sting 

them 




The fly says, I fly in the 
air, if the sun is hot. If 
I see a boy at tea, I sit on 
the rim of the cup, and sip 
his tea. If he sees me, he 
may try to pat me, if he wish ; but I fly 
on, and go up in the air; so he can not 
get at me. I am a gay fly. 

The bee says, I fly too, 
if the sun is hot, and if it 
is not wet. I sip too, but I 
do not get in the tea cups. 
Boys do not try to pat me, 
for I do not go in the way, and boys 
can see I am of use; but if they hurt 
me, Twill stiiis them. 



i! 



! 




-o 



OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 



. — ~o 

13 



The cat says, I do not 
sip; I lap. I can get a rat, 
and I can get you, Mr. 
Fly, if you do not go too 
far up in the air. I can 
run, can mew, and can lie in the sun ; 
I or if it is not hot. I lie on the run:, or 




on my bed of hay. 



©5 



The rat says, I eat all I 
can get. The cat may try 
to get me, if she wish; but 
I can run out of her way. 

The hen says, I can fly, 
but not as far as the tom- 
tit can. I lay e^, and so 
am of use to man; but the 
fox may get me, and so 

The fox says, I am sly, 
and try to eat all the old 
hens ; but the dogs and 
men hear me, and try to 
take ine ; yet lam so sly, it is 
odd if the dogs and men can take me at all. 




may the rats. 










\ 14 



MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 




or 

we 

got 
doff 



her 
she 
you 
will 



LESSON VII. 

tail love pull 

hair give call 

wall puss teeth 

then milk sharp 



claws 
catch 
barks 
scratch 



We 



Do you see the cat and the dog ? 
call a cat, puss. 

Puss has got up on the wall. The 
dog barks, but he can not catch her. 

Puss has sharp claws, and sharp teeth ; 
if you pull her hair or her tail, she will 
scratch or bite you. 

Give puss some milk, then she will 
lov^fyou. 



OF THE ECLECTIC SEREIS. 



15 | 






LESSON 


VIII. 




his 


this 


bite 


keep 


wants 


can 


four 


play 


moon 


watch 


hog 


cow 


kind 


sheep 


stands 


how 


dark 


most 


chase 


shines 



See how this dog stands on his feet. 
He wants to play with John. 

A dog has four feet. A dog and a cat 
can see in the dark. 

Dogs keep watch at night, and hark. 
They bark most when the moon shines. 

A dog will chase a sheep, or a hog, or 
a cow, and bite it. If you are kind to 
the dog, he will not bite you. 



■w 
w 



16 



MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 




did 
apt 
den 
and 



tail 
like 
long 
bear 



LESSON 

call 
tree 
cross 
paws 



IX. 

lives 
large 
short 
woods 



strong 
brown 
ev-er 
Bru-in 



THE BEAR. 

Did you ev-er see a bear ? A bear has 
Ions;, brown hair, and a short tail. 

The bear has large paws. He lives in j 
a den in the woods. 

The bear can run up a tree, like puss. 
He is ver-y strong, and apt to be cross. 
We call the bear, Bru-in. 



OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 



17 




an hay 

ox side 

red lies 

two eats 



LESSON 

for legs 
cart plow 



X 



feet 
four 



down 
grass 

corn horns 
hard draws 



white 

works 

drinks 



the ox. 



black \ 



An ox has two horns. He has four i 
legs and four feet. 

The ox draws the plow and the cart. \ 
He is strong, and works hard for man. 

An ox has red, or white, or black hair, j 
He eats grass, and hay, and corn ; and \ 
drinks wa-ter. 

He lies down on his side to sleep. 



<,— 



18 



— o 



MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 




fix 

its 
air 
put 
new 



LESSON XI. 



rise 

kite 

hold 

with 

come 



that 

stay 

goes 

more 

home 



bow 

high 

wing 

make 

stone 



there 
soars 
skies 
darts 
turns 



dives 

string 

square 

wound 

ground 



THE ROYS AND THE KITE. 



See the boy with his new kite. Let 
me go and hold it up for him. Now * 
run with the string, and then we can 
j make it rise. 

There, it dives in the air. It will 
come down to the ground. Now it 
rises and soars in the skies. 

Oh, it has but one wing! it will not 
fly. Put a wing on the oth-er side. 



>v 



OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 19 J 

There, that will do. Now let us see [ 
I if it will rise. 

Oh, no ! it turns in the air, and darts 
J to the ground. Let me fix a small stone 
\ to the end of its tail. 

Now let us see if that will do. Oh. 
yes; how fast it goes up! Now the 
string is all wound off. 

If you will stay and hold it, I will run i 
home and get some more string. 

Some kites are square, and some are \ 
round. My kite is a bow kite. 

It is called a bow kite be-cause it has j 
a round top, like a bow. 

Which kind of kites do you like best? 
I like the bow kite. 

How high the kite has gone ! It is up 
| a-bove the house. It would go up more, 
j if we had more string. 

The kite would not fly, if I did not hold 
; the strinsr. Oh. the string is bro-ken ! 

See, John! it has gone in-to the tree. \ 
I Now we must get it down as well as we 
I can. 

I To Teachers. — Words are repeated in the spelling lists, 
< that the pupil may frequently spell them. This is the only way, 
5 as every teacher is aware, of learning this branch thoroughly. 



~~ o 



20 



MCQUFFEY'S FIRST READER 




j 




LESSON XII. 




[ all 


day 


live 


rain 


fret 


does 


j too 


are 


lark 


hear 


fine 


have 


! out 


yet 


sing 


cage 


look 


small 


t far 


sun 


bird 


dear 


wish 


seeds 


| why 


gay 


1 walk 


kept 


room 


would 


A 


WALK. 

1~+ HO TUT 


l- TV. 



I sun is up, but it is not too hot. I hear a j 
j bird. 

Do you hear it sing? I can hear it, 
but I can not see it. It is a lark, and it 
; is far off. 

It does not look as large as a bee ; and 



J OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 21 J 

I yet we can hear it sins:. I wish I had a i 
\ lark. Why do you wi^h for a lark ? 

I wish to put it in a cage, and then I j 
| can hear it sing all day. 

No, my dear, it can-not live in a cage. 
I If you take a lark and keep it in a cage, 
I it will die. 

But I will take good care of it. I a\ i 1 1 
give it some seeds to eat, ana fr^sh wa-ter j 
| to drink. 

But, my child, it will not be free, and \ 
that will make it sad. j 

If you were kept in a small room, you j 
would not be so gay as you now are. \ 
You would pine and fret to get out, to 
j run and play. \ 

Well, then, I will walk out to hear ; 
I the lark sing. I do not wish to have a 
lark to shut up in a cage. 
Now, we have had a fine walk ; but \ 
| the sun is high in the air, and it is ver-y < 
I hot. It is time to go home. \ 

Some oth-er day, when it does not \ 
rain, we will walk a-gain, and look at j 
the pret-ty trees, and the green grass, and I 
hear the birds sing. 



J 22 



MCGUFFEY'^ FIRST READER 



1 lllillilill 
llilll 



^;"!!i ! ;,ifli : ' 






LESSON 


XIII. 




low 


soil 


said 


what 


child 


yes 


join 


here 


wean 


bring 


sew 


nice 


caps 


wash 


frocks 


hem 


frill 


done 


seam 


la-dy 


new 


turn 


wipe 


made 


up-on 


may 


stool 


your 


pains 


moth-er 






THE GOOD 


GIRL. 





Moth-er, may I sew to-day ? 

Yes, my child; what do you wish to j 



sew : 



I wish to hem a frill for your cap. Is 
j not this a new cap ? I see it has no frill. 
You may make a frill for me ; I shall 



I OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 23 \ 
i !; 

| like to wear a frill that you have made. 
I Here is a bit of cloth which will make a 
nice frill. You must hem it. I will 
\ turn it down for you ; but take care not 
i to soil it. 

Wash your hands, and take care to 
j wipe them dry. Now sit down on your 
low stool. Now you may go on. You 
will see best here by my side. 

You must join these two bits with a 
| seam ; and when you have done as far 
as this pin, bring it to me to look at. 

Jane sat down upon her stool and 
sew-ed like a lit-tle la-dy. In a short 
time she said, Moth-er, I have done as 
far as you told me ; will you look at it ? 
Yes, my child, it is well done ; and if 
\ you take pains, as you have done to-day, 
you will soon sew well. 

I wish to sew well, Moth-er, for then 
I can help you to make caps and frocks, 
j and I hope to be of some use to you. 



Pi >»i>>» mn 



24 



MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 




fit well 

ate took 

eat read 

dry love 

new dare 

who sure 



LESSON XIV. 

rest gave three 

sick some 

tear good 

cake folks 

kept what 

each work 



large 
piece 
blind 
much 
mates 



John 

share 

could 

school 

James 

George 



LIT-TLE HEN-RY. 

Well, Hen-ry, what have you read 
in your new book ? 

I read of three boys who went to 
school. 

What does your book say a-bout the 
three boys ? 



c.~~~ 



-o 

' OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 25 

i 

i 

Each of them had a fine lars;e cake. 
\ James ate so much that it made him 
\ sick. George kept his so long that it got j 
j dry, and was not fit to eat. 
\ But John save some of his cake to \ 
i each of his school mates, and then took 
j a piece him-self, and gave the rest to an j 
\ old hlind man. 

The old man could not see to work I 
j for his food. So John gave him a share 
of his cake. 

How kind John was! I love kind 
boys and girls. 

We must be kind and good to the 
| blind. 

If we were blind, we should be glad 
] to meet with kind folks, who would give || 
j us some thing to eat. 

When I have read my book, Ann, I ij 
will lend it to you, and I will read to 
I Jane. I dare say it is a nice one, and I i 
\ am sure you will take care of it. 

Aunt says, that none but a bad girl 
will tear or soil a book. How glad I ' 
I am to have a kind aunt and a srood book, j 



26 



AFGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 




LESSON XV. 



set 
old 
ran 

gay 
! one 
ram 



full 

tale 

spot 

here 

lamb 

blow 



free 
coat 
held 

help 

wind 

warm 



told 

case 

vain 

next 

bush 

time 



loss 

long 

near 

field 

bleat 

ought 



flock 

round 

thorns 

heard 

young 

a-gain 



THE SHEEP AND THE LAMB. 



One day, an old sheep and her young 
lamb were in the field with the rest of 
the flock. The sun was warm, and the 
lamb was quite gay, and full of play. 

It ran here and there, up and down, 
|| round and round ; but it ran most by 



OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 27 j 

some bush-es, as it was a warm spot, and [ 
the wind did not blow hard there. 

At last the lamb ran in-to a bush, full 
of thorns, and the thorns took hold of its 
coat of wool, and held it fast, so that it 
could not get a-way. j 

The old sheep heard it bleat, and ran j 
to it to help it; but she pull-ed the bush 
in vain; she could not set her lamb free. 
I At last the sheep left the bush, and ran 
\ as fast as she could to an old ram with 
\ horns, that was in the next field. She 
j told him, in her way, the sad case of her 
\ lamb. 

The ram ran with her to the bush, 
and with the help of his horns, he and 
the old sheep set the lamb free, with the j 
loss of some of its wool. 

I dare say the lamb did not go near I 
that bush a-gain for a long time. 

I have told you this tale, that you may 
learn some-thing from it. Lit-tle boys 
and girls are apt to go where they ought 
not, and then they get hurt. I hope you 
will not for-get this tale a-bout the sheep 
and the lamb. 



~a 



28 



MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 




lie 
) die 
j out 
j day 
| sea 

noon 



fair 

cool 

soft 

fool 

doth 

give 



LESSON XVI 

wise fruit 

come raise 

grow clear 

swim roots 

move brook 

worm praise 



I 



trees cur-tain 

thick wash-es 

shade sum-mer 

beats up-ward 

heads pleas-ant 

green branch-es 



THE COOL SHADE. 



Come, let us go in-to the thick shade, 
J for it is noon-day, and the sum-mer sun 
j beats hot upon our heads. 

The shade is pleas-ant and cool; the 
! branch-es meet a-bove our heads, and shut 
| out the sun, as with a green cur-tain. 



I OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 29 j 
| J 

| The grass is soft to our feet, and the \ 

I clear brook wash-es the roots of the I 

i * 

\ trees. | 

| The sheep and cows can lie down to \ 
j sleep in the cool shade, but we can do j 
I bet-ter; we can praise the great God j 
who made us. 

He made the warm sun, and the cool \ 
| shade ; the trees that grow up-ward, and I 
] the brooks that run a-long. \ 

The plants and trees are made to give 
fruit to man. \ 

All that live get life from God. He 
made the poor man, as well as th'e rich 
man. j 

He made the dark man, as well as the j 
j fair man. He made the fool, as w r ell as 
the wise man. All that i\iove on the \ 
land are his ; and so are ull that fly in j 
the air, and all that swim in the sea. 

The ox and the worm are both the j 
work of his hand. Ir A him they live and j 
move. He it is thr t t doth give food to 
j them all, and wh'jn he speaks the word, 
they must all dia . 

3* 



fc : W-»^-V^W^.^'^^^'%^W'W»>'»'»^T 



St 



30 



M C GUFFEY'S FIRST READER. 




* 

i 



| 



too 
eat 
buy 
may 
\ God 



pair 

suit 

asi>s 

neea 

wool 



LESSON XVII. 

have girls rains 

hard cents shoes 

kind there house 

sends thing snows 

much bread which 



earth 

should 

cheese 

friends 

clothes 



I 



\ 



THi" POOR OLD MAN. 

Jane, there is a poor old man at the 
door. \ 

He asks for something to eat. We 
will give him some bi ea d and cheese. 

He is cold. Will yc 1U g* ve nim some 
clothes too ? \ 



O**^*^^*^ 



\ 



\ OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 31 $ 



I will give him a suit of old clothes, 
which will be new to him. 

Poor man ! I wish he had a warm 
' house to live in, and kind friends to live 
\ with him: then he would not have to 
\ bes; from door to door. 
\ We should be kind to the poor. We 
may be as poor as this old man, and 
I need as much as he. j 

Shall I give him some cents to buy a \ 
I pair of shoes ? ; 

j No ; you may give him a pair of shoes. \ 
| It is hard for the poor to have to beg j 
! from house to house. \ 

Poor boys and girls some -times have | 
j to sleep out of doors all night. When j 
| it snows, they are ver-y cold, and when \ 
| it rains, they get quite wet. \ 

Who is it that gives us food to eat, and J 
clothes to make us warm ? 

It is God, my child ; he makes the sun j 
j to shine, and sends the rain up-on the j 
earth, that we may have food. 

God makes the wool grow up-on the j 
lit-tle lambs, that we may have clothes \ 
to keep us warm. 



I 32 



MCGUFFEY'8 FIRST READER 



I 




i sa y 


sits 


j use 


seen 


i y° u 


duck 


J now 


wall 


1 way 


yard 



LESSON XVIII. 

life stay shell 

last peck their 

four does there 

born eggs think 

lead know break 



makes 

young 

ver-y 

wa-ter 

moth-er 



THE DUCK. 



Have you seen the duck on her nest ? 
J She sits near the wall of the yard. She 
\ has eggs in her nest, and she sits on them . 
j to keep them warm. 

And what is the use of this, do you 
think? Why, to make them come to 



OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 33 \ 

I life. She has been there, as you see her 
now, for the last ten days. 

When she has kept her eggs warm in 
j this way for four w T eeks, the shell of the 
e^g will break, and the old duck will 
help to peek it off. 

At last, out will come young live 
ducks; one out of each shell. Then she 
will have ten young ducks, for she has 
ten eggs in her nest. 

God makes her know this; and has 
made her love her young so well, that 
she does not mind the long time she 
must stay on her nest, till they come 
out of the egg-shell. 

Did you ev-er see young ducks, that 
had just come out from the shell ? 

As soon as they are born, their j 
moth-er w r ill lead them to the wa-ter; 
there they can swim, and they seem to j 
like it ver-y much. \ 

The ducks must love their moth-er, j 

and do all that she would have them 

do. And I dare say they will do so, for 

God has made them know that they j 

j must. \ 



* 34 



MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 







LESSON XIX. 

sits west pray stars sides blows 

saw walk grow night sweet words 

rise wind harm trees songs should 

east moon light gives speak ri-ses 



* 



THE SUN IS UP. \ 

See, the sun is up. The sun gives us \ 
light. It makes the trees and the grass I 
grow. * 

The sun ri-ses in the east and sets in. t 
the west. When the sun ri-ses, it is day. j 



\ OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 35$ 

When the sun sets it is nig-ht. 

This lit-tle boy was up at five. He 

j saw the sun rise, and heard the sweet 

\ songs of birds on ev-er-y bush. 

\ Do you know who made the sun ? 
j J 

; God made it. 

| God made the moon and all the stars. 
\ How good God is to us ! he gives us all 
\ we have, and keeps us a-live. 

We should all love God, and o-bey his 
ho-ly will. God sees and knows all 
things, for God is ev-er-y where. 

He sees me when I rise from my bed, 
| and when I go out to walk and play. 
\ When I lie down to sleep at night, he 
\ keeps me from harm. 
\ Though I do not see the wind, yet it 
\ blows round me on all sides: so God is 
\ with me on all sides, and yet I see him 
| not. 

If God is with me, and knows all that 
I do, he must hear what I say. O, let 
j me not, then, speak bad words; for if I 
j do, God will not love me. Lit-tle boys \ 
| and girls should pray to God. 



I 36 



MOGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 



i a 




J LESSON XX. 

| ill see sent look sick does 

x sad you face food poor hope 

s out may help cake lame mind 

5 act feel glad done want jump 

I nor pale milk kind come made 

THE LAME MAN. 

See that poor man ! He is lame, and 
has no hat on. 
Jane, will you give him John's old 
j hat 1 Yes, that you will. You will be 
| glad to help him. 



**4 

OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES 37 | 

We must feel for the lame, and do all 
we can to help them. Jane, you are a 
kind girl, and I love you. 

Poor old man ! he is sad ; he is in 
want. Ah ! see how pale he is. He is 
sick. Come in, poor man, come in; we j 
will give you a bit of cake to eat, and 
some milk, and Jane will give you a hat. 



Look, now, at that sick hoy; he is not 
sick for want of food. He had a cake 
sent to him, and was told not to eat too [ 
much of it; yet he did, and that has j! 
made him sick. 

See how pale and sad his face is ! If 

he had not done so, he need not have 

| been ill. But now he is so sick that he 

\ can but just walk out this fine day. 

He can not run, nor jump, nor play. j 
I hope you will not act like this boy, but 
mind what is said, and not eat more than 
is good for you, that you may not look 
like him, nor feel sick, as he does. 

What was the matter with the old man 1 What must we do for 
those who are in trouble 1 



38 



M C GUFFEY'S FIRST READER 




LESSON XXI. 



one 

fed 

day 

man 

saw 

own 



lift 

first 

foot 

take 

walk 

town 



then^ 

pain 

back 

came 

same 

home 



each 
once 
been 
pray 
arms 
warm 



THE LAME DOG. 



pit-y 

al-so 

dress 

great 

bound 

ground 



One day a man went to take a walk 
in the town, and on his way home he 
saw a lit-tle dog which had hurt his leg. 

The poor dog was so lame he could 
not lift his foot off the ground with-out 
great pain. 



~~ ^o 

OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 39 J 
I _ > 

When this kind man saw there was > 

i j no one to take pit-y on the poor dog, he j 

] took him in his arms, and brought him j 

home, and bound up his leg. Then he 

fed him, and made a warm place, and 

kept him in his house for two days. 

He then sent the dog out of his house, 
to his old home ; for, as it was not his 
own dog, he had no right to keep him; 
but each day the dog came back for this 
kind man to dress his leg. And this he 
| did till he was quite well. 

In a few weeks the dog came back 
once more, and with him came a dog 
that was lame. 

The dog that had been lame, and was 
j now well, first gave the man a look, and 
j| then he gave the lame dog a look, as 
|| much as to say: 

"You made my lame leg well, and 
j now pray do the same for this poor dog I 
that has come with me." 

Then the kind man took care of this j 
dog al-so, and kept him in his house till [ 
his leg was quite well, and he could go 
home. 



| 40 


MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 




LESSON 


XXII. 




cry 


best 


live 


stood 


chair 


put 


road 


door 


sleep 


might 


pay 


fond 


meet 


pains 


friend 


: buy 


cups 


near 


stone 


bought 


low 


night 


read 


plates 


would 


few 


slept 


room 


small 


school 


own 


when 


house 


where 


clothes 


JAMES SMITH. 





Ann Smith had but one child, and 
his name was James. Ann was poor; 
but she did her best to work hard, that 
she might pay for her house, and buy 
food and clothes. 

Her house was small, and stood near 
the road. There were two small rooms 
in it ; one for her to sleep in, and one for 
her to live in. She made a bed in the 
room she had to live in, and in this bed 
she put James to sleep. 

In this room she had one chair, one 
low stool, for James to sit on, a few cups 
and plates, and some oth-er things that 
she had bought. In the room where she 
slept, she had her own bed, and a box 
made of wood, in which she kept her 
clothes. 



OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 41 

"James was so fond of her, that he 
would run out to meet her, w T hen she 
came home at night from her work ; and 
when she left him to go out to work, he 
would sit on a large stone near the door 
of the hut, and look at her as long as he 
could see her, and then he would cry, j 
and wish for her to come back to him. 

James went to school ; and he took so ; 
much pains that in a few months he 
could read. Poor Ann Smith was glad 
of this, for, at night, when she came home 
from work, James would read to her in 
a large book, which a kind friend had 
giv-en him. 

Some day I will tell you what was in | 
that book, and I think you will love to 
hear of it, and to read in it as James 
Smith did. 

When James grew up, he be-came a 
good man, and was much lov-ed by 
ev-er-y one. But if he had not ta-ken 
pains to learn when he was a boy, this jj 
| would not have been so. 

| Will you relate the story of James Smith and his mother ! 



42 



MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 




m 



ha 
try 

fire 
Ann 
who 
flew 



LESSON 

cold 
rain 



none 
road 
poor 
from 



kept 

died 

took 

some 

chirp 

wants 



XXIII. 

found 

James 

young 

would 

ground 

thought 



cru-el 

a-way 

be-gan 

look-ed 

wick-ed 

n aught- y 



THE YOUNG BIRD. 



James Bland found a poor young 
bird on the cold ground. It was all wet, 
for there had been rain that day. 
*"Ha!" said he, "I will have a fine 
pet, now." So James took it home. He 
met his sister Ann at the door. 



** 



OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 43 

" Here, Ann," said he, " is a young 
blue-bird. I found it in the road. We 
will put it in a cage and keep it." Ann 
look-ed at it. "Poor thing," said she, 
"it is cold ; let us take it to the fire." 

So she took it, and warm-ed it. As 
soon as it was dry and warm, it be-gan ij 
to chirp and try to get a-way. 

Ann told James that it would be cru- 
el to keep the bird. " See, it wants to 
go back to its nest. We should not like 
to be ta-ken from home and kept in a 
cage." 

James thought so too ; so he took the 
bird to the door. " There, go, poor bird," 
said he ; and a-way it flew. 

Some boys would have kept it, and 
jj per-haps it would have died. But James 
was a good boy, and would not be cru-el, 
e-ven to a bird. 

I hope that no boy who reads this 
book, will ev-er rob a bird's nest. It is 
ver-y cru-el and wick-ed, and none but 
j naugh t-y boys will do so. 

What did James do with hia bird 1 How should we treat birds ? j 

4 



44 



M^GUFFEY'S FIRST READER 



LESSON XXIV. 



ails 


tears 


smile 


tight 


sleeve 


rose 


pinks 


frock 


faults 


taught 


mine 


pride 


dwelt 


books 


change 


sense 


ought 


bloom 


meant 


spo-ken 


Grace 


proud 


praise 


please 


flow-er 



GOOD SENSE AND PRIDE. 



Ann had a new dress, of which she 
thought much more, than a good girl 
ought to have done. She was so proud 
of it, that she could not think of her 
hooks; and off she went to Grace, to 
show her new clothes. 

She found Grace where her pinks 
grew, at the back of the house in which 
she dwelt. Grace ran to meet Ann with 
a smile, and said, "I am quite glad you 
are come, for my rose-bush is in bloom, 
and you shall have the best flow-er on it." 

" Thank you," said Ann, as she look-ed 
at her dress ; " but this sleeve hurts my 
arm ; do you think it quite fits me ?" 



o 



„ o 

OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 45 : 

"I should think not, if it hurts you," 
said Grace, " and, if you please, you can 
take it off, and I will lend you one of 
mine while you stay." 

Grace meant this as she said it. She 
did not think that Ann had spo-ken of ij 
the tight sleeve, on-ly that she should : 
praise the dress. 

"What ails you, Ann?" said Grace,;: 
"you look as though you could cry. If '■ 
the frock hurts you, you shall not keep 
it on ; come, let us change it." 

"Oh ! Grace," said Ann, as the tears 
fell fast from her eyes, "it is not the 
frock that hurts me, but my pride. But 
1 will tell you all my faults, and will try 
to he as good and as kind as you are, for 
the time to come." 

Ann kept her word ; and though she 
found it a hard thing, at first, to give up 
her love of dress, yet good sense, at last 
taught her that the sure way to he 
happy was to be good. 

How did Ann feel about her new dress? What was it that 
made her weep 1 What is the sure way to be happy ! I 




all 

rub 

two 

arm 

new 

now 



pig 
pen 

tall 

four 

what 

want 



LESSON 
will 
pail 
nose 
long 
maid 
draw 



XXV. 

safe 

slate 

eggs 

have 

drawn 

bought 



THE NEW SLATE. 



giv-en 

Bet-ty 

read-y 

fa-ther 

ci-pher 

pict-ures 



Here is a lit-tle boy who had a new j 
slate giv-en him. It was bought for him 
by his fa-ther, that he might learn to ci- 
pher. One day he made some pict-ures 
on his slate. 



OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 47 *t 

Look here, Charles, I have drawn a \ 

boy on my new slate. See what a long j 

nose he has! Ah ! he has but one arm. i 

Now I will draw a milk-mdd, with j 

her pail. 

There, I have drawn a pig, and a hen 

and a duck. Why, the pig has but two j 

, legs, and the duck has four. Well, I can t 

jj rub out two of the duck's legs, and give j 

jj them to the pig. \ 

There, now I will draw a man, with a j 

whip in his hand. The man has come 

j to put the pig in the pen. 

Why, the man is not as tall as the pig. 
I must rub them all out, for they are not 
well done. 

There, I have a boy, with a nest full 
of eggs in his hand. He is a bad boy to j 
take a poor bird's nest. 

And here is Bet-ty, the maid ; she has 
come to take me to bed. Well, if it is \\ 
j time, I must go. Put my slate by, that 
j; I may have it safe when next I want to 
draw. Thank you, Bet-ty. Well, now jj 
I am read-y. 



* 48 



»»»vfc^ 



M C GUFFEY'S FIRST READER 






LESSON 


XXVI 




eat 


that 


loud 


their 


a-fraid 


felt 


cage 


went 


great 


dan-ger 


fast 


roar 


with 


chain 


slow-ly 


post 


seen 


whip 


struck 


walk-ed 


wild 


said 


were 


which 


play-mates 


show 


they 


cross 


li-ons 


el-e-phants 




THE WILD 


BEASTS. 





James and George had been good boys 
at school all the week. They had been 
kind and mild to their play-mates, and 
their fa-ther said he would take them to 
the show. 



OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 49 j 

They saw there a great ma-ny wild || 
beasts in ca-ges, and some with a chain 
round one leg, made fast to a post. 

There were li-ons, and ti-gers, and 
el-e-phants. The boys walk-ed round 
slow-ly, look-ing at ev-er-y thing. They 
felt a lit-tle a-fraid of some of the beasts, 
but were much pleas-ed with most that 
they saw. 

The show-man went in-to the cage 
with the li-on, and James and George 
said they were a-fraid. But a man, who 
sat near them, told them there was no 
dan-ger. The show-man struck the li- 
on with a whip, which made the li-on 
roar ver-y loud, and look cross, but he 
did not hurt the man. 

James said, "I wish the man would 
come out; I do not like to see him in : 
the cage. That big li-on might eat him \ 
I up, and then I should be sor-ry." James 
was a good boy, and did not like to see 
any one hurt. 

Aft-er they had seen the show, their 
kind fa-ther took them to the book-store, 
and bought each of them a new book. 



50 



MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 






LESSON 


XXVII. 




died 


goat 


work 


heard 


o-pen 


was 


gate 


noise 


taught 


ta-ken 


care 


took 


could 


strange 


Ma-ry 


babe 


grew 


know 


thought 


na-med 


arms 


large 


where 


go-ing 


per-son 




MR. POST. 





One cold night, aft-er old Mr. Post 
had gone to bed, he heard a noise at the 
door. So he got up, and went out. 

And what do you think he found? 
A dog? No. A goat? No: he found 
a lit-tle babe on the steps. 



OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 51 jj 

Some bad per-son had left it there, 
and if Mr. Post had not ta-ken it in-to 
the house, it might have died with cold. 

He held it to the fire un-til it was 
warm, and then took it in his arms, and 
went to bed. How kind old Mr. Post 
was. He did not know what to do with 
the lit-tte babe, but he could not let it die. 

When Mr. Post's lit-tle friends came 
to see him the next day, they thought it ; 
ver-y strange to see him have a lit-tle 
babe with him. He told them where 
he found the babe, and they all said that 
they would bring it milk, and some-times 
come and help him to take care of it. 

The lit-tle girl was na-med Ma-ry, and 
was soon ver-y fond of Mr. Post, and 
j call-ed him fa-ther. In a short time she 
|| grew so large that she could run out and 
o-pen the gate for her fa-ther, when he 
was go-ing out. 

Mr. Post taught her to read, and at 
{ night, Ma-ry would read the Bi-ble to [ 
her fa-ther ; and when Mr. Post was so 
old that he could not work, Ma-ry took 
care of him. 



52 



MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 




LESSON X J VIII. 



let 

joy 

tell 

live 

you 

way 

ij tops 



still 

hills 

bark 

hunt 

noise 

teach 

mouse 



folks 

these 

scent 

smell 

please 

means 

known 



be-gin 

nev-er 

mas-ter 

ap-pear 

care-ful 

chil-dren 

snow-drifts 



THE STO-RY TELL-ER. 



Pe-ter Pin-dar was a great story 
: tell-er. This is known to all chil-dren 
who have read his books. One day as 
he was go-ing by the school, the chil- 



OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 53 t 

j dren came a-round him, and they all 
wish-ed him to tell them a new sto-ry. 

" Well," says Pe-ter, " I love to please 
good chil-dren; and as you all ap-pear 
kind and civ-il, I will tell you a sto-ry j; 
! which you have nev-er heard. But he- 
fore we he-gin, let us go and sit down in 
a cool, sha-dy place. 

And now, mas-ter John, you must be 
as still as a lit-tle mouse. And Ma-ry, 
you must he care-ful not to let Tow-ser 
bark and make a noise. 

A long way from this place, in a land 
where it is ver-y cold, and where much 
snow falls, and where the hills are so 
high that their tops ap-pear to reach to 
the sky, there live some men, whose joy 
it is to help folks who cross these hills. 

These men keep large dogs, which 
they teach to go out and hunt for per- 
sons who may be lost in the snow-drifts. 

The dogs have so fine a scent or smell, 
that they can find folks by means of it, 
\ e-ven when it is too dark to see, or when j 
the folks they go out to hunt for, lie hid 
in the deep snow-drifts. 



54 



MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 







I 





LESSON 


XXIX. 




fell 


coat hair 


stiff 


good 


lain 


rode mean 


close 


shrill 


star 


hour drew 


child 


could 


seen 


walk quite 


snow 


heard 


blew 


weak arms 


might 


lengtr 



PE-TER PEtf-DAR S ST0-RY. 



One sad cold night, when the snow ; 
fell fast, and the wind blew loud and 
shrill, and it was quite dark, with not a ji 
star to be seen in the sky, these good j 
men sent out a dog to hunt for those 
who might want help. 



~* 



iOF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 55 

In an hour or two the dog: was heard at j 
I the gate ; and, on look-ing out, they saw 
j the dog there, with a boy on his back. 

The poor child was stiff with cold, and 

I could but just hold on to the dog's back. 

He told the men that he had lain a 

Ions: time in the snow, and was too ill 

\ and weak to walk, and the snow fell fast 

on him. At length, he felt some-thing j 
j pull him by the coat, and then he heard j 
\ the bark of a dog close to him. j 

j The boy then put out his hand, and 
j he felt the hair of the dog ; and then the 
dog gave him one more pull. This gave 
the poor boy some hope, and he took 
hold of the dog, and drew him-self out 
of the snow; but he felt that he could 
not stand or walk. 

He then got up-on the dog's back, and | 
put his arms round the dog's neck, and 
thus 'he held on. He felt sure the door 
did not mean to hurt him ; and thus he 
rode on the dog's back, all the way to 
the good men's house, w r ho took care of 
the boy till the snow was gone, when 
they sent him to his own home. 



56 



MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 




tea 
how 
1 does 

!neat 
seem 

i 

; 



keep 

dead 

stick 

want 

looks 



LESSON 

rest 

once 

dear 

hard 

work 



X X X. 

trots 

since 

guess 

should 

thought 



mon-ey 
fear-ed 
in-deed 
earn-ed 
e-nough 



THE SON 3 RE-TUEN. 



How glad that old wo-man looks ! 
Can you guess what it is that has made 
her so glad and s mi-ling ! 

Sfie trots a-lonsr, and does not seem 



kJ.0 want her stick to help her. I am 
sure she has heard some-thing to please 



OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 57 J 

■ ___ - j 

| her ver-y much in-deed. What can it be ? 
Her dear son John, who has been in 
Spain for so long a time, has come home \ 
at last. 

Poor wo-man ! she fear-ed she should < 
nev-er see him more ; for it was so long 
since she had heard from him, that she i 
thought he must be dead. Think how 
hap-py she must be to see him once \ 
more ! It was but last night that he 
came back. 

She had been hard at work all day, 
and just made her room neat aft-er tea, ( 
and had sat down to spin, when he came 
in-to her room, and told her that he had 
J come home to live with her, and to take 
care of her. 

He said she nev-er more should want 
for a-ny thing, for he had earn-ed mon- 
ey e-nough to keep her all the rest of 
her life. 

Well, may she be hap-py, and thank 
God for giv-ing her so good and kind a 
son, and for bring-ing him safe home : 
to her once more. 

What pleased the old woman so much 1 What did her son tell 
her 1 Whom should we thank for all our blessings 7 I 



\ 58 MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 










dirt 
seed 
spill 
peep 



LESSON XXXI. 

near tries beak 

tear shelf wash 

bird harm clean 

mice claws tease 



hemp 
know 
wires 
pecks 



THE CAT AND BIRD. 



Do not let the cat go near the hird; 
she will tear him with her claws, and eat 
him up. 

She may go and catch the mice, for 
| they do us harm and eat our food ; but 
5 she must not get our poor hird, for the 
| bird sings to us, and lets us know when 
J it is time to rise. 



OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 59 I 

The bird sings as soon as it is day, at j 
I the first peep of light. This bird has no J 
i seed in his box. Give him some hemp- 
| seed ; it is in the bag, on the high shelf. 
I Do not spill it on the floor. 

May 1 put this bit of sweet cake in 
j the wires of his cage ? He is like me ; 
he is fond of sweet cake. See how he 
pecks at it ! 

Now he goes to drink at the glass, 
and to wash the dirt off his beak. See ! 
you may learn e-ven from a poor lit-tle 
bird, that it is right to be neat and clean. 



LESSON XXXII. 

BE CARE-FUL IN PLAY. 

In your play be ver-y care-ful 
Not to give each oth-er pain ; 

And if oth-ers hurt, or tease you, . 
Nev-er do the like to them. 

God will love the child that's gen-tle, 
And who tries to do no wrong ; 

You must learn then to be care-ful, 
Now while you are ver-y young. 



I^I VW V^^-^^^-^V^^fc- J *^^^-V*^'%^^^^^-*^^^^ J V J %^'W^>-*V^ 



•^•V^V«VA^%^\^V-%^.^-^V t 



60 MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 





LESSON 


XXXIII. 




say 


nest 


come 


in-to 


car-ry 


old 


gone 


them 


hap-py 


go-ing 


kill 


hand 


what 


win-ter 


sea-son 


nor 


birds 


warm 


wan-der 


care-ful 


dare 


their 


could 


wick-ed 


par-ents 



THE NEST OF YOUNG BIRDS. 



Win-ter is now gone, and the warm 

sea-son is come. See ! what has that boy 

in his hand? It is a nest of young birds. 

I won-der what he is go-ing to do with 

I them. I hope he will not kill them : 

poor lit-tle birds ! what a wick-ed boy, 

j to take them from their par-ents ! 

I dare say he will be care-ful of them, 

|l and put them into a cage and feed 

them; but he can not take as good care 

! of them, nor feed them so well as the 

old bird can. 

Now he has put the nest on the 
ground, and has gone to his work and 
left them ; the old birds can now come 
and feed them. Oh ! I am so hap-py ! I 
wish they could car-ry them back ; but 
they can not. 



o- 



OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 



61 




LE-SiSON XXXIV. 



wags 
what 



beat 
know 



ver-y 
fel-low 



pret-ti-ly 
when-ev-er 



THE LIT-TLE DOG. 

I like to see a lit-tle dog, 

And pat him on the head; 
So pret-ti-ly he wags his tail, 

When-ev-er he is fed. 

Some lit-tle dogs are ver-y good, 

And ver-y use-ful too ; 
And do you know that they will mind 

What they are bid to do ? 

Then I will nev-er beat my dog, 
And never give him pain; 

Poor fel-low ! I will give him food, 
And he will love me then. 



: 62 



M C GUFFEY'S FIRST READER 








LESSON 


XXXV. 




hurt 


neck 


flies 


laugh 


act-ed 


both 


catch 


threw 


heard 


vex-ed 


week 


three 


wrong 


wings 


pull-ed 


head 


years 


string 


young 


kit-tens 


hu 


ng 


round 


friend 


George 


con-duct 



THE CRU-EL BOY. 

George Craft is a ver-y cru-el boy. 
He is but six years old, and yet he is 
ver-y wick-ed. 

George's moth-er had a cat, which she 
kept in the house to catch rats and mice. 

The old cat had three lit-tle kit-tens, 
which she lov-ed ver-y much. 



i 



OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 63 

One day when the old cat had gone ij 
for food, George took one of the kit-tens ij 
and tied a string round its neck. He ' 

| then took the kit-ten to the riv-er, and 
tied a stone to the string, and threw it 
in-to the wa-ter. 

George will al-so catch flies, and pull 
off their wings and legs, and then laugh 
to see their pain. The dog and cat are 
both a-fraid of George, and will run and 
hide when they see him. One day, last 

f week, a young friend of his came to see 

j him, and was ver-y much vex-ed at his 

\ con-duct. 

| He ask-ed George, how he would like 

ij to have his legs and arms pull-ed off. i 
George hung his head. "Why," said he, ij 
" flies can not feel much." His friend : 
told him, that he had heard men say, 
that ev-er-y thing that could move, could 
feel ; and that it was wrong in a-ny one || 
to hurt or kill them. 

| George felt ver-y sor-ry when he heard 
his young friend tell him how bad-ly ij 

! he had act-ed, and I hope he will not do jj 
so a-ny more. 



*- 



£ — 

II 64 



MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 







kid 


next 


was 


yard 


Tom 


dead 


laid 


side 


play 


flock 



LESSON XXXVI 

field great 

drink times 

drank straw 

leave hearth 

goats whose 



al-most 

moth-er 

learn-ed 

warm-ed 

car-ri-ed 



MA-RY AND HER KID. 



A lit-tle girl who liv-ed in a place 
where there are a great ma-ny goats, took 
a walk one day, and found a lit-tle kid. 

The old goat, the moth-er of the lit-tle 
kid, had left it, and it was al-most dead. 

Ma-ry felt sor-ry for the poor lit-tle 
thing; so she took it up in her arms, 



OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 65 jj 

j and car-ri-ed it home with her. Her 

moth-er gave her leave to keep the kid 
l for her own. Ma-ry got some clean jj 
j straw, and laid it on the w r arm hearth ; 
1 for a bed for the kid. She warm-ed \ 
j some milk and held it to him to drink. 
The kid drank it, and then lay down j 

and took a fine nap. The next day jj 
| Ma-ry nam-ed her kid Tom. Tom soon ;| 
j learn-ed to fol-low Ma-ry a~bout the jj 

house, and trot hy her side in-to the jj 
| yard. He would run ra-ces with her in 

the field : feed out of her hand, and was ;i 
i a great pet at all times. 

One line warm day, aft-er Ma-ry had 
* done her morn-ing's work, she went out 
\ to play with her kid; she look-ed a-bout j 
| the house door, and could not see Tom ; jj 

she then ran to the field, and call-ed, 

"Tom! Tom!" 

But Tom had found a flock of goats, 
j and was play-ing with them ; he lov-ed to 

stay with them bet-ter than with Ma-ry. 

Ma-ry went home cry-ing, and it w T as a : 

long time be-fore she for-got lit-tle Tom. 

What did Mary do with the kid ? What became of it ? 



66 



MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 




last 

five 

skin 

pain 

ways 



LESSON 

trick 
taste 



XXXVII. 



cause 
years 
would 



plate 

glass 

found 

break 

throat 



quite 

haste 

tricks 

mouth 

though 



un-til 
liq-uid 
with- out 
al-though 
some-thin' 



knew wrong where thought what-ev-er 



JANE BROWN. 



Jane Brown was five years old. Jane 
had a bad trick, which she at last got rid 
of, but not un-til it had been the cause 
of great pain to her. j 

She would taste of ev-er-y thing she 



OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES 



thought might be good to eat. She was 
told "not to do so; but still she would, 

| al-though she knew it was wrong. 

If she saw a cup or a glass with some- 
thing to drink in it, she would take a sip 
of it: if she found a plate, she would bite 
or break a part of what-ev-er was on it : 
and though she did not find them all 
nice, yet she still went on in her bad 
ways. 

She one day came in-to a room where 
she saw a glass with some-thing in it, 
which she took to be wine. She took a 
sip in great haste, for fear some one 
would see her. 

As soon as she had drank it she cried 
out in great pain, for the liq-uid in the 
glass was not fit to drink, and it took all 

j the skin off her lips, and her mouth, and 

| her throat. 

She could not eat or drink with-out 
great pain, for more than a week. She 

j grew thin, and pale, and weak, and was 
quite ill. All this led her to think how 
wrong she had done, and that it all came I 
from her own bad tricks. $ 



WV'"W'*V%'^'^ , ^^ ' 



— ^o 



o — 

I 68 



*-<> 






MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 




j ho 

j £»g 

j tail 

j haw 

i back 



LESSON 

large 

know 

takes 

horse 

hitch 



goes 



size 

turn 

care 

calls 

right 

curls 

Dash 



black 
laugh 



XXXV1I1. 

on-ly 

shafts 

where 

drives 
streets 
wheels 
taught 



oth-er 

bush-y 

Al-bert 

wag-on 

wish-ed 

har-ness 

wan-ted 



AL-BERT AXD HIS DOG. 



Do you know Al-bert Ross? He has 
a larsje dos;, and he calls him Dash, i 
Dash is ver-y black, and has a long j 
bush-y tail, which he curls up ov-er his j 
back. 



,s> 

OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 69 j 

z 



Dash is fond of Al-bert, and goes with 
I him in the streets, and keeps off all 
\ oth-er dogs, and drives a-way the hogs, j 
and takes good care that Al-bert is not \ 
| hurt. j 

But you will laugh when I tell you \ 
\ that Al-bert calls Dash his " Horse," < 
| for he does not look at all like a horse ; j 
| but Al-bert has taught him to act like 
j one. He has a lit-tle w T ag-on with four 
i wheels, and shafts like the shafts of a 
| gig; and a lit-tle set of har-ness, just the 
\ size to fit Dash. 

\ Ma-ny a time I have seen Al-bert j 

hitch Dash to the lit-tle wag-on, and j 

then s;et in ; and Dash would trot off \ 

\ with him, and go just where Al-bert 

1 wish-ed. 

\ Al-bert would say, " Jee, Dash!" and 
Dash would go to the right. Then 
Al-bert would say, " Haw, Dash ! " and 
the dog; would turn to the left. When 
he want-ed Dash to stop, he had on-ly to 
j say, "Ho!" and then Al-bert could get j 

out of the wag-on. Is not Dash a 
| fine dog? 



70 



MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READEfi 




LESSON 



all 

off 

air 

out 

dew 



blue 
lane 
once 
aunt 
soon 



flies 

song 

Ruth 

point 

warm 



XXXIX 

shines 

smoke 

blades 

a-ble 

bon-net 



spark-le 
flow- era 
moth-er 
won-der 
stand-ing 



THE MOEX-ING WALK. 



Come, John, let us take a walk this 

fine morn-ing, while the air is still cooL 

Jane may go with us, if she wish-es. 

Get your hat, and tell Jane to put on her 

j bon-net, and we will be off at once. 

J The sun is out so warm ; and (he wind 

j is so soft ; and the sky is so blue ; and 



OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 71 f 
I — j 

j there is so sweet a smell from the \ 
| flow-ers; and the song of the birds is so 
j gay, that I long to be out of doors and 
| be gay too. \ 

i The flies and the bees are all on the j 
j wing ; and the lark flies high in the air, < 
I and sings as he goes up. Do you see j 

I him ? I can hear his sons:, but he is so 

] - I 

high that I can not see him. 

! How the dew-drops spark-le on the 

| blades of grass, as the sun shines on I 
them ! Do not go off the grav-el walk, \ 

j or you will get your feet wet. 

As soon as we sret to the end of the \ 
lane, you will be a-ble to see aunt Ruth's 
house. I won-der if aunt Ruth is up 

| yet. We will go and see. Do not run \ 

so fast, or you will fall. \ 

Now if you will look the way I point, \ 

you can see aunt Ruth's house. Do you j 

think she is up, my son ? j 

Yes, moth-er, for I see the blue smoke 

j curl-ino: o-ver the house. 

j Ah ! there is aunt ; she is stand-ing in 

| the door. How glad she will be to see us ! 



J 72 



MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 




LESSON XL. 



fox 



$ nose 

4 
I 



ears 
farm 



live 
hide 
have 
catch 



holes 
geese 
woods 
shape 



bod-y 
sharp-er 
chick-ens 
them-selvea 



THE FOX. 



The fox is like a dog in the shape of 
his bod-y ; but his nose is sharp-er than 
the nose of a dog ; and his ears stand up 
like the ears of a cat. Fox-es live in the 
woods, and have holes, in which they 
hide them-selves. 

A fox w r ill eat chick-ens and geese 
from a farm yard, if he can catch them. 



: 



*~ 



~o 

OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 73 5 



LESSON XLI. 

■ 

eye like light world a- sleep 

are star show sound won-der 

sky dark when which win -do w 

dew peep spark nev-er twin-kle 



THE LIT-TLE STAR. 

Twin-kle, twin-kle, lit-tle star, 
How I won-der what you are; 

Up a-bove the world so high, 
Like a dia-mond in the sky. 

When the bla-zing sun is set, 
And the grass with dew is w r et, 

Then you show your lit-tle light : 
Twin-kle, twin-kle, all the night ! 

Then if I were in the dark, 

I would thank you for your spark : 

I could not see which way to go, 
If you did not twin-kle so. 

And when I am sound a-sleep, 

Oft you through my win-dow peep, 

For you nev-er shut your eye, 
Till the sun is in the sky. 



i & v^^$0v+t v +m^m & np 



74 



M C GUFFEY'S FIRST READER 





LESSON XLII. 




cry . 


five 


pluck 


ea-sy 


apt 


girls 


touch 


tir-ed 


t033 


right 


think 


sor-ry 


tore 


years 


point 


col-ors 


sore 


nurse 


fields 


ev-er-y 


was 


threw 


thorn 


want-ed 


most 


hedge 


please 


learn-ed 


harm 


Ralph 


scream 


bright-ly 


know 


wrong 


brought 


snatch-ed 



STO-RY A- BOUT RALPH WICK. 

Ralph Wick was five years old ; and 
in most things he was a fine boy. But 
he was too apt to cry when he could not 
have his own way. 

This was wrong. All good boys and 
girls know, that they should take what 
their kind friends see fit to give them, 
| and be glad to get it. 

But Ralph did not think of this. All 
he thought of, was, to get what he 
want-ed to have. If he was told that 
it was not right for him to have it, or 
that it would do him harm, he would 



*- 



~~~^o 



OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 75 { 

say, "I will have it." And then, if he 
did not get it, he was sure to cry. 

One day he went with his nurse in-to 
| the fields. The sun shone bright-ly; the j 
| grass was cut ; the plants in bloom were 
{ of all co-lors ; and Ralph thought he was, 
j for once, a good boy. A smile was on 
his face, and he felt a wish to do as he 
| was told. 

So he said, "Nurse, I will be good 
now, and do as you bid me ; now please 
help me to toss this hay." 

"That I will," said the nurse; and 
they threw the hay as Ralph wish-ed, till 
he said he was tir-ed, and must sit down 
and rest. 

" You have been so good a boy," said 
the nurse, "that if you will sit here, I 
j will go to the hedge, and get a nice red 
rose for you." 

"I should like ver-y much to have 
one," said Ralph, "and if you will get it 
for me, I will not move till you come 
j! back." 

The nurse soon brought the rose, and 
gave it to him. "Thank you, my kind 



J 76 M C GUFFEY'S FIRST READER 

! nurse," said he , "I like this sweet red 

! rose. But I see you have a white one, 

l| too 5 pray give that to me." 

The nurse said, "no, my dear; I on-ly 
brought this white rose, to show you 
how ma-ny thorns it has on its stem. 
You must take care not to touch one of 
this kind. If you should try to pluck a 
white rose like this, you w T ould be sure 
to hurt your hand." 
Now what do you think Ralph did? 

I I will tell you. He found it ver-y ea-sy 

jj to be good when he had ev-er-y thing he 
want-ed. But as soon as the nurse told 

I him he must not have the white rose, he 
be-gan to scream, and snatch-ed it. 

But he was soon ver-y sor-ry for what 

| he had done. The thorns on the stem 
of the rose tore the skin of his hand, and 
it was sore for a long time. 

Aft-er this, when he want-ed what it \. 

\ was not best for him to have, his nurse 
would point to his sore hand ; and Ralph 
at last learn-ed to do as he was told, and 
be-came a much bet-ter and hap-pi-er boy. 



I OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 77 I; 



LESSON XLIII. 

will some quite ver-y 



deal looks large pa-pa 

high sight world lar-ger 

walk moon clouds pret-ty 

gone small bright bon-net 



THE WALK. 



Come, Ma-ry, get your bon-net, and 
we will take a walk. 
See, the sun is in the west. It is] 
| go-ing to set. How large it looks. We 

may look at it now. It is not so bright j 

I now, as when it was up high in the sky. : 

j It will soon be out of sight. Now it is j 

quite gone. 

How red the clouds are. We can see j 
|j the moon and all the pret-ty stars, when \ 
the sun sets. The moon is not so bright j 
as the sun. 

See the pret-ty bright stars. Some of 
the stars are as large as the world. But 
they are so far off, that they look small. 
Pa-pa, is the sun as large as the world ? 
| Yes, my child, and a great deal larg-er ? jl 
\ but it is ver-y far off, and thus seems small, ji 



78 



MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 




I 



LESSON XLIV. 



laid 


lamb 


where 


fol-low 


rule 


what 


fleece 


ev-er-y 


that 


harm 


school 


wait-ed 


love 


made 


ea-ger 


ap-pear 


sure 


snow 


Ma-ry 


a-gainst 


bind 


white 


gen-tle 


an-i-mal 


near 


laugh 


a-fraid 


ling-er-ed 


went 


makes 

MA 


teach- er 


pa-tient-ly 




■ry's lamb. 





Ma-ry had a lit-tle lamb, 
Its fleece was white as snow, 

And ev-er-y where that Ma-ry went, 
The lamb was sure to go. 



OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 79 

He went with her to school one day; 

That was a-gainst the rule ; 
It made the chil-dren laugh and play, 

To see a lamb at school. 

So the teach-er turn-ed him out, 
But still he ling-er-ed near, 

And wait-ed pa-tient-ly a-bout, 
Till Ma-ry did ap-pear. 

And then he ran to her, and laid 

His head up-on her arm, 
As if he said ; I'm not a-fraid, 

You'll keep me from all harm. 

"What makes the lamb love Ma-ry so?" 
The ea-ger chil-dren cry ; ^ 

" O Ma-ry loves the lamb, you know," 
The teach-er did re-ply. 

"And you, each gen-tle an-i-mal 

To you, for life, may bind, 
And make it fol-low at your call, 

If you are al-ways kind." 



MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 



LESSON XLV. 



left 


colt 


field 


o-bey 


ride 


rate 


cross 


un-til 


stop 


door 


fence 


gen-tle 


told 


neck 


crept 


be-fore 


hurt 


tame 


great 


kiss-ed 


stay 


much 


street 


kick-ed 


soon 


down 


would 


par-ents 


once 


knew 


threw 


be-cause 


Holt 


thought 


Pe-ter 


car- ri age 




PE-TER 


HOLT. 








Pe-ter Holt was left at home one 
day by his par-ents, when they went out 
to take a ride. 

His moth-er told him to stay in the 
house un-til she came back. "Be ver-y 
sure that you do not go out a-mong the 
hors-es," said she, "they may hurt you." 

Pe-ter said he would do as he was bid. 
So his moth-er kiss-ed him and start-ed. 
He was soon ver-y tir-ed of stay-ing in 
the house ; so he went to the door, and 
soon aft-er ran down in-to the lot, to look 
at a "iit-tle colt, which his fa-ther had 
giv-en him. 



■»« 



* 



OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 81 | 



I It was ver-y tame, so he put his hand 
on its neck, and then on its head. At 
last he thought it was so tame and gen-tle j 
that he would ride it. He led it to the 
I fence and jump-ed on its back. 

The colt had nev-er be-fore felt a-ny 
jj thing on his hack, and was ver-y much ji 
jj a-larm-ed. It put down its head and ran || 
|l off at a great rate, and, at last, kick-ed up jj 
|| its hind feet, and threw Pe-ter over its 
head. 

Pe-ter was ver-y much hurt, but he 
| crept home as well as he could. If he 
jl had been so bad-ly hurt as not to be a-ble 
i| to get home, he might have died in the 
field he-fore his moth-er came home. 
Lit-tle chil-dren may learn from this, 
| that they should al-ways o-bey their 
par-ents. How ma-ny lit-tle girls and 
| boys have been hurt, be-cause they did | 
not do as they were bid ! 

I once knew of a lit-tle girl who was 
told not to cross the street be-fore a 
car-riage. But she would not stop ; and 
when the car-riage came up, it ran \ 
di-rect-ly o-ver her. 



S'Z 



MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 




bo-som 

nurs-ed 

gar-den 

earn-ed 

mead-ow 

to-geth-er j 



THE GOOD OLD MAN. 



There once liv-ed an old man in a 
j snug lit-tle cot-tage. It had but one j 
| room, and one win-dow; and a small | 
j gar-den with a neal white fence, lay just 
j be-hind the cot-tage. 

Old as the poor man was, he u-sed to I 



*-' 



\ OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 83 \ 



work in the fields; and he would come 
home at night ver-y tir-ed and weak, 
with his tools on his shoul-der, and his 
hard earn-ed loaf of bread, tied up in a 
bag. 

And who do you think u-sed to meet j 
him at the door? His two lit-tle grand- j 
chil-dren, Ma-ry and Jane. They were 
too young to w r ork, ex-cept to weed in 
the gar-den, or bring wa-ter from the 
spring, or pick up small stones in the j 

i mead-ow. 

In win-ter, when it was cold, they had 
no lamp, and as they were too poor to jj 
buy much wood or coal, they had ver-y 
lit-tle fire. So they u-sed to sit ver-y 
close to-geth-er, to keep warm: Ma-ry 
on one of the old man's knees, and Jane 
on the oth-er. 

Some-times this good old man would j 
tell them a droll sto-ry; and some-times 
he would teach them a hymn, or talk to 

j! them a-bout their fa-ther, who had gone 

j j to sea, or a-bout their good, kind moth-er, 

ji who was in her grave. 

And then they would rest on the old j 



j 84 MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 

' ' "" ' 

man's bo-som, while he pray-ed God to | 
bless them, and bring back their fa-ther 
safe. Aft-er this, they would lie down j| 
on their straw bed, and sleep sweet-ly. 

Ev-er-y year the old man grew weak- 1 
er, and less a-ble to work. But then the 
; lit-tle girls were grow-ing strong-er ev- ij 
er-y day, and were a-ble to give him more |j 
help. How glad they were to work for jj 
{ Ami, who had been so good to them! So 
they got on pret-ty well ; for four young \ 
hands could do more than two old ones. !| 
One cold wind-y night, as they were jj 
get-ting read-y to go to bed, they heard 
a knock at the door. The lit-tle girls 
ran and o-pen-ed it. Oh joy! There 
stood the fa-ther of lit-tle Ma-ry and 
Jane. He had been to sea for a long 
time ; but had, at last, sa-ved some mon- 
| ey, and had come home to live with them. 
I Aft-er this, the old man did not Work 
; a-ny more. His son work-ed for him, 
\ and his grand-chil-dren nurs-ed him, and 
jj they all lov-ed him. And ma-ny hap-py 
jj days and nights did they spend to-geth-er 
|j be-fore the old man died. 



i OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 85 



LESSON XLVII. 

fail close trust food health 

else learn sleep gift3 friends 

good those drink shame clothes 

ways harm thank young strength 



E-VEN-ING PRAY-ER. 



At the close of the day, be-fore you j 
go to sleep, you should not fail to pray 
to God to keep you from sin and from 
harm. 

You ask your friends for food, and 
drink, and books, and clothes ; and when 
they give you these things, you thank 
them, and love them for the good they j 
do you. 

So you should ask your God for those 
things which he can give you, and which i 
no one else can give you. 

You should ask him for life, and j 
health, and strength; and you should jj 
pray to him to keep your feet from the 
way of sin and shame. 

You should thank him for all his good 
gifts; and learn, while young, to put 
your trust in him. 



o 



86 



MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 






LESSON 


XLVIII. 


odd 


built 


think 


aft-er 


just 


plate 


hatch 


search 


pick 


years 


crums 


choose 


bold 


while 


where 


though 


these 


wheel 


chance 


brush-ed 




THE ROB-IN. 



rob-in 

load-ed 

wag-on 

dis-tant 

per-haps 



See that pret-ty rob-in ! You may 

take your plate, and put all the crums 

of bread that are left on the ta-ble on it 

J and put it on the out-side of the win- 

I dow ; you will see how he will pick 

j them up, for he is ver-y hun-gry. 

Now while he eats, I will tell you 



> I 






OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 87 



: what your fa-ther and I once saw of 
bold, or tame rob-ins. 

Some years a-go, one of the men that 
work on the farm, came to tell your 
fa-ther that a rob-in had built her nest — | 
where do you think? It was on the 
wag-on ! Was it not an odd place for 

; her to choose? 

Fa-ther and I went out to see it ; and 

: there, on the out-side of that, part of the 

I wag-on, which is call-ed the bed, just 
o-ver the hind wheel, was a lit-tle rob-in's 
nest, and it had four eggs in it. 

The man told us that the poor bird sat 
on her eggs in this odd place, and had ij 
not left it, though the wag-on had been 

j sent to a dis-tant place for wood. 

The wag-on had just come back, 
load-ed with wood, when we saw it, but 
the bird was not there then. She had j 
gone off — per-haps in search of food. 

Poor thing! her nest was not left for j 
her to hatch her eggs; for soon aft-er we 
saw it, it was, by some chance, brush-ed \ 
off, and then the bird flew a- way. 



I ■VW^W%'^V^'% ^' ^^ 



, 88 MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER J 

! 1 

LESSON XLIX. 

days digs firm ask-ed 

stick brick roots cel-lar 

make build stand fel-low 

Main blown plants show-ed 

week square ground watch-ed 



LEARN SOME-THING EV-ER-Y DAY. 

As Hen-ry Da-vis was go-ing down 
Main street last week, he saw some men 
dig-ging a square hole in the ground. 
He did not know what it could be for; 
so he ask-ed one of the men. 

"Why, my lit-tle fel-low," said the j 
man, "we are go-ing to build a house." 

" Build a house down in a hole in the 
ground?" cri-ed Hen-ry. "I think that 
i is ver-y strange. It will be so dark, that 
I am sure I should not like to live in it" j 

"Come a-gain some oth-er day," said 
the man, "and you will see." 

A few days aft-er that, Hen-ry went 
back, and found that the men had built 
a stone wall all a-round the hole, and 
were now ma-king a brick wall a-bove 
the stone wall. 



OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 89 |i 



L 



" Oh ! oh ! " says Hen-ry, " I see, aft-er 

all, you are go-ing to build your house 

like oth-er hous-es, and I think I know 

| why you be-gin so low down." 

" Well, tell us, if you know," said the 
man. 

"When fa-ther plants a tree," Hen-ry 

|i said, "he digs a hole, and puts the roots 

deep in the ground, that the tree may 

stand firm, and not be blown down by 

the wind." 

" So the stone walls are the roots of 
the house; and now I see that if you 
had not dug that hole, you would not 
have had a-ny cel-lar. I was ver-y sil-ly, 
or I should have thought of that at first." j 

Hen-ry hav-ing found out that he did 
not know ev-er-y thing a-bout build-ing 
a house, stood a good while, and watch-ed 
the ma-son lay-ing bricks. When he 
went home that day, he had a great 
ma-ny things to tell his sis-ters. 

He show-ed them the way the bricks 
were pla-ced, to make a wall; and told 
them a-bout the mor-tar which the ma- 
sons u-sed to make the bricks stick fast. 

*8 



i 90 MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 



LESSON L. 

fire fine lives use-fnl 

lane last right sis-ters 

hear they night can-die 

than poor dress play-ed 

were book there eew-ing 

more blind bu-sy chap-ter 

hums doubt cous-in bright-er 

know wheel sweet-er pleas-ant 



THE FIRE-SIDE. 



!j 

One win-ter's nidit, James was read- 
ing to his moth-er, and sis-ters, as they 
sat by a fine fire. The lit-tle girls were 
sew-ing, and their moth-er was bu-sy at 
her wheel. 

At last James fin-ish-ed the chap-ter, i 
and Em-ma, look-ing up, said, " Moth-er, 
I think your wheel hums ver-y sweet-ly 
to-night." 

"And it seems to me," said Ma-ry, 
"as if the fire was bright-er than u-su-al. 
How I love to hear it crack-le !" 

" And I was just go-ing to say," cri-ed 

James, "that this is a bet-ter can-die 

than we had last night." 
>^^ W ° WVWWW1C . I 



OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 91 ' : 

"My dears," said their moth-er, "1 
have no doubt that you feel more than 
u-su-al-ly hap-py to-night; and per-haps 
that is the rea-son why you think the 
hum of the wheel sweet-er, the fire j 
|i bet-ter, and the can-die-light bright-er j 
than they were last night." 

"But, moth-er," said Ma-ry, "I don't 
see why we are hap-pi-er now, than we 
were last night. For last night cous-in jj 
Jane was here, and we play-ed "Puss in 
the cor-ner" and "Blind man" un-til we 
were all tir-ed." 

"/know! / know ! " shout-ed James. 
"It is be-cause we have been do-in^ 
some-thing use-ful to-night. Ma-ry, you ji 
and Em-ma have been ma-king a dress 
for the poor wo-man who lives at the 
end of the lane; and I have been read-ing : 
j a good book. We all feel hap-py, jj 
be-cause we have been bu-sy." 

"You are right, my son," their moth-er jj 
said; "and 1 am glad you have all 
learn-ed that there is some-thing more 
pleas-ant than play, and, at the same time, 
much more in-struct-ing." 



[ 92 


MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 






LESSON 


LI. 




! Bail 


ship 


beach 


la-bor 


vil-lage 


1 each 


their 


might 


bro-ken 


joy-ous 


: gold 


shore 


grand 


sigh-ed 


strain-ed 


j view 


crew 


hearts 


pro-tect 


sum-mer 


! calm 

; 
I 


sight 


church 


nee-dles 


splen-dor 









THE HAP-PY RE-TURN. 

Ma-ry and Mar-tha were two sis-ters, 
who dwelt in a vil-lage near the sea. 
They were both good girls, and each 
lov-ed the oth-er so much, that it would 
have al-most bro-ken their hearts to have 
j been part-ed. Their par-ents w r ere both 
dead, and their broth-er John was far 
a-way at sea. 

They work-ed hard with their nee-dles, 

and pray-ed God to pro-tect them, and to 

| bless their la-bor. They nev-er miss-ed 

go-ing to church, nor ev-er fail-ed to pray 

for their broth-er 's safe re- turn. 

One fine sum-mer morn-ing, they 
went, as they oft-en did, to the beach, to 
view the sun rise up-on the wa-ter. This 
is al-ways a grand sight, but this morn- 
ing they thought the sun seem-ed to 



( OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 93 



shine with more splen-dor than it had 

. done for the past week. 

| The sea was calm and still ; but though j 

\ they strain-ed their eyes to see if a-ny 
ship might be pass-ing by, not a sail was j 
to be seen ; and both sigh-ed, as they jj 
thought of their broth-er John, and 
turn-ed to go home. 

They had walk-ed a lit-tle way in j 
si-lence, when Mar-tha said, "Dear 
Ma-ry, I was just think-ing how kind j 

| God has al-ways been to us: and was 
wish-ing that it might please Him to send 
John home to us this ver-y day. What 
a day of joy would it then be ! " 

And such a joy-ous day it was to them 
both ; for no soon-er had they left the 
beach, than the good ship Ro-ver came 
in sight of the ver-y spot where they had 
stood. Her crew had all been paid, and 
John step-ped on shore with a light 
heart: his dis-charge was in its tin case, 
and his pock-et was full of gold. It 
was, in-deed, a hap-py day for the two 
af-fec-tion-ate sis-ters. 

Will you relate the story of Mary and Martha 1 



MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER T 



LESSON LII. 

rich shall hands place blank-et 

hide seals sweet found kitch-en 
what thief might watch chim-ney j 

j down could sweep thought cham-ber '■ 

. 

_ — j 

THE LIT-TLE CHIM-NEY SWEEP. 

Some time a-go, there was a lit-tle j 
chim-ney sweep, who had to sweep a 
chim-ney in the house of a ver-y rich j 
lady. The lit-tle sweep went up at the \ 
kitch-en fire place, and came down in j 
I the cham-ber. 

When he got in-to the cham-ber, he j 
found him-self all a-lone. He stop-ped 
j a mo-ment to look round up-on the rich 
ij things he saw there. As he look-ed on 
j; the lop of the ta-ble, he saw a fine gold 
| watch, with gold seals to it. 

He had nev-er seen a-ny thing so 
i beau-ti-ful be-fore, and he took it up in 
ij his hands. As he list-en-ed to hear it 
j: tick, it be-gan to play sweet mu-sic. He 
then thought, that if it was on-ly his j 
own. how rich he would be; and then he j 
thought he might hide it in his blank-et. 



4 



OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 95 

"Now," said he, "if I take it, I shall 
be a thief — and yet no bod-y sees me. 
No bod-y ? Does not God see me ? 
Could I ev-er a-gain be good? Could 1 
then ev-er say my pray-ers a-gain to 
God? And what should I do when I 
come to die?" 



LESSON LIII. 

jail says leave for-got small-est 

fear steal would o\vn-ed trem-bled 

grew knees school al-ways yester-day 

crept years thieves steal-ing com-mand-ment 



MORS A-BOUT THE CHIM-NEY SWEEP. 

While the lit-tle sweep was think-ing 
a-bout tak-ing the la-dy's watch, he felt 
cold all o-ver, and trem-bled with fear. 

"No," said he, "I can not take this 
watch. I would rath-er be a sweep and 
al-ways be poor, than steal." And down 
he laid the watch, and crept up the 
chim-ney. 

Now the la-dy who own-ed the watch 
was just in the next room, and she could j 
look through, and see and hear all that 



96 MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 

■ — — — ; 

pass-ed. She did not say a-ny thing to 
the boy then, but let him go a-way. 

The next day she sent for him, and j 
when he came, she said to him, "Well, 
my lit-tle friend, why did you not take ; 
my watch yes-ter-day ? " The lit-tle 
sweep then fell up-on his knees and told 
the la-dy all a-bout it. 

Now, as the lit-tle sweep did not steal 
the gold watch, nor tell a-ny sto-ries 
a-bout it, the la-dy let him stay and live 
in her house. For ma-ny years she sent 
him to school, and when he grew up, he 
be-came a good man, and nev-er for-got 
the com-mand-ment which says, "Thou 
shalt not steal." 

Had he ta-ken the la-dy's watch, he 
would have sto-len. Then he would 
have been sent to jail. 

Let no lit-tle boy or girl ev-er take 
. things with-out leave, for it is steal-ing ; 
and they who steal are thieves. 

You can not steal the small-est pin, 
with-out its be-ing a sin, nor with-out 
be-ing seen by that eye which nev-er I 
sleeps. 

4 W&+* ^ ^ q* *f+A^^^^**A^^*^***^^ ^ *^*^^^0+*^***0&+t+' +t +0+l%0^*0^&* t V10*Jt / ^0 & *0* 0* t&10+ Qj 




soft-ly 
col-ors 



good-by 



liv-ing 



but-ter-fly 
but-ter-flies 



BUT-TER-FLIES. 

But-ter-flies are pret-ty things ! 

Pret-ti-er than you or I , 
See the col-ors on their wings ! 

Who would hurt a but-ter-fly ? 

Soft-ly ! soft-ly ! girls and boys ; 

He'll come near us by and by; 
Here he is ! do n't make a noise ! 

We '11 not hurt you, but-ter-fly. 

Not to hurt a liv-ing thing, 
Let all young chil-dren try ; 

See, a-gain he 's on the wing ; 
Good-by ! pret-ty but-ter-fly ! 



98 



iMCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 



LESSON LV. 



sick 

saw 

road 

hour 

house 



aunt 

been 

wide 

hung 

knew 



gone 

walk 

home 

while 

might 



speak 

school 

thought 

un-cle 

ly-ing 



ei-ther 

dear-ly 

com-ing 

in-stead 

teach-er 



SPEAK THE TRUTH. 



One day An-na thought she would 
take a walk, in-stead of go-ing to school. 
But she saw that her moth-er was 
watch-ing her from the win-dow. 

So she went a-long the road, and 
turn-ed round the cor-ner that led to the 
school-house, that her moth-er might 
think she was go-ing there. Was not 
this ly-ing ? 

An-na took a long walk, and came 
home a-bout the time when the schol-ars 
came back from school. Her moth-er 
thought she had been at school ; and her 
teach-er thought she must be sick. So, 
you see, she de-ceiv-ed them both. 

One day while An-na was out, her 
un-cle, and aunt, and lit-tle cous-in, came 
to see her moth-er. They liv-er' a great 



OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 99 



way off, and did not come ver-y oft-en. 
They said they were go-ing a-way o-ver 
the wide o-cean to Eng-land, and did not 
ex-pect ev-er to come hack. 

As they were to leave in an hour or 
two, they wish-ed to see An-na. Her 
moth-er sent to school for her to come 
home. Her teach-er sent back word 
that she was not there, and had not been 
for two or three days! So her un-cle, 
and aunt, and cous-in, had to go a-way 
with-out bid-ding her good-by. 

When An-na came home, her moth-er 
said, "Where have you been, An-na?" 
The lit-tle girl hung down her head, and 
did not say a-ny thing ; for she saw from 
her moth-er's look, that she knew all 
a-bout it. 

The wick-ed lit-tle girl was then told 
that her un-cle, and aunt, and cous-in, 
had gone a-way with-out see-ing her, and j 
that they were nev-er com-ing back. 

An-na cri-ed ver-y much, for she 
| lov-ed them dear-ly, and said she would j 
| nev-er a-gain ei-ther act or speak an- Is 
i oth-er lie. 



100 M C GUFFKY'S FIRST READER t 



LESSON LVI. I 

air toys eight aft-er be-tween \ 

buy soon dodge sil-ver skip-ping > 

soft sport bright mer-ry tbrow-ing j 

whip broke gloves gath-ers cov-er-ed 



THE ERO-KEN WIN-DOW. 

George El-let had a fine New 

Year's gift. What do }'ou think it was? j 

A bright sil-ver dol-lar! A mer-ry boy j 

was George, when he thought of all the j 

|j fine things he might buy with it. And j 

as soon as the sun be-2;an to make the air 
1 feel a lit-tle warm, he put on his cap and ; 
i gloves, and ran in-to the street. 

The ground was cov-er-ed with snow, \ 

; but the sun shone out, and ev-er-y thing j 

: look-ed bright. As George went skip- j 

ping a-long, he met some boys who were \ 

j throw-ing snow-balls. This is fine sport, j 

|| and George pull-ed off his gloves, and 

|| was soon as bu-sy as the rest. See, how j 

he gath-ers up the snow, and press-es it \ 

be-tween his hands. \ 

Now he has hit James Ma-son. But $ 



OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES 101 ! 

the ball was soft, and James is not hurt. 

Now he has made an-oth-er ball, and if 

James does not dodge, George will hit 

him a-gain. A- way goes the ball ! But 

it miss-ed James, and broke a win-dow 

j on the oth-er side of the street. George 

J was a-fraid that some one would come 

| out of the house and whip him; so he 

| ran off, as fast as he could. 

j As soon as he got round the next 

\ cor-ner, he stop-ped, be-cause he was ver-y 

\ sor-ry for what he had done. Just then 

| he saw a man car-ry-ing a box with glass 

,' doors, full of pret-ty toys; and as George 

l was on-ly eight years old, he for-got the 

{ bro-ken win-dow, and ran aft-er the man. 



I 





LESSON 


LVII. 




gift 


rang 


ought 


dol-lar 


in-tend 


door 


glass 


wrong 


mon-ey 


e-nough 


once 


right 


thought 


hon-est 


morn-ing 


mean 


threw 


scold-ed 


beat-en 


mis-chief 



MORE A-BOUT THE BRO-KEN WIN-DOW. 

As George was a-bout to buy a lit-tle 
| house with doors and chim-neys, and : 



e — „ — 

102 MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 

put his hand in his pock-et for the mon- 
ey, he thought of the bro-ken win-dow. j 
Then he said to him-self, " I have no j 
right to spend this dol-lar for a toy-house, j 
I ought to go back, and pay for the glass 
I broke with my snow-bail." 

So he gave back the house to the 
toy-man, and turn-ed round. But he 
was a-fraid of be-ing scold-ed or beat-en, 
and did not know what to do. He went 
| up and down the street, and felt ver-y 
bad-ly. Ht wish-ed to buy some-thing \ 
nice with his mon-ey ; and he al-so wish- j 
ed to pay for the glass he had bro-ken. 

At last he said to him-self, " It was 
wTons: to break the win-dow, al-thou2;h I 
did not mean to do it I will go and pay ; 
: the man for it at once. If it takes all 
i my mon-ey, I will try not to be sor-ry; j 
j and I do not think the man will hurt 
me, if I of-fer to pay for the mis-chief I 
have done." He then start-ed off, and 
felt much hap-pi-er for hav-ing made up 
his mind to do what was rio;ht 

He rang the door bell ; and when the 
man came out, George said, "Sir, 1 threw > 



I a snow-ball through your v> in-dow. But 
i I did not in-tend to do it, and am ver-y 
\ sor-ry, and I wish to pay you. Here is 
; the dol-lar my fa-ther gave me as a New 
[ Year's gift, this morn-ing." 
j The man took the dol-lar, and ask-ed 

George if he had a-ny more mon-ey. j 
I George said he had not. "Well," said 

the man, "this will be e-nough." So! 
j aft-er ask-ing George where he liv-ed, 
! and w r hat was his name, he call-ed him j 

an hon-est lad, and shut the door. 





LESSON 


LVIII. 




I felt 


store years 


din-ner 


part-ner 


rich 


knew would 


play-ed 


fore-noon 


j paid 


spend bought 


be-came 


me r- chant 


j eyes 


thinks months 


want-ed 


hon-est-ly 



l 



MORE A- BOUT THE BRO-KEN WIN-DOW. $ 

i 

When George had paid the man, he | 
ran a-way, and felt ver-y hap-py, be- j 
cause he had done what he knew to be j 
right. He play-ed ver-y mer-ri-ly all the j 

: fore-noon, al-though he had no mon-ey ! 

| to spend ; and went home at din-ner j 



! 



104 MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER 



time, with a face as ro-sy, and eyes as 
bright, as if noth-ing had gone wrong. 

At din-ner, Mr. El-let ask-ed George 
what he had bought with his mori-ey. 
George ver-y hon-est-ly told him all i 
a-bout the bro-ken win-dow. and said he < 
felt ver-y well, with-out a-ny mon-ey to \ 
\ spend. When din-ner was o-ver, Mr. El- j 
\ let told George to go and look in his hat. j 
\ He did so, and found two sil-ver j 
! dol-lars. The man, whose win-dow had 1 
i been bro-ken, had been there, and told ; 
| George's fa-ther a-bout it. He al-so 
! gave back the dol-lar which George had 
\ paid him, and an-oth-er one with it. 

A few months aft-er that, the man 
\ came and told Mr. El-let that he want-ed 
\ a good boy to stay in his store, and would 
\ like to have George, as soon as he left \ 
j school, for he was sure that George was j 
an hon-est boy. George went to live \ 
with this man, who was a rich mer-chant. j 
| In a few years he be-came the mer-chant's j 
j part-ner, and is now rich. George oft-en 
thinks of the bro-ken win-dow. 

Will you relate the whole story of George and the man whose 
window he broke 1 



OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 



105 1 




W \ 



LESSON LIX. 



cuts 
coat 
wool 
sheep 



seems 
brown 
comes 
spring 



serve 
fields 
grows 
clothes 



la-zy 
dew-y 
eat-ing 
dai-sies 



farm-er 
wool-ly 
nip-ping 
pleas-ant 



THE SHEEP. 



La-zy sheep, pray tell me why, 
In the pleas-ant fields you lie, 
Eat-ing grass and dai-sies white, 
From the morn-ing till the night? 
Ev-er-y thing, can some-thing do, 
But of what kind of use are you ? 



I 106 MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER } 



Nay, my lit-tle mas-ter, nay, 
Do not serve me so, I pray ; 
Do n't you see the wool that grows 
On my back, to make you clothes? 
Cold, oh, ver-y cold you'd be, 
If I did not give it thee. 

Sure it seems a pleas-ant thing, 
Nip-ping dai-sies in the spring ; 
But how ma-ny days I pass 
On the cold and dew-y grass; 
Or I get my din-ner where 
All the ground is brown and bare. 

Then the farm-er comes at last, 
j 

When the mer-ry spring is past, 

Cuts my wool-ly coat a- way, 

For your clothes in win-try day. 

Lit-tle mas-ter, this is why 

In the pleas-ant fields I lie. 



Of what use are sheep to us ? Who made them and gave 
them to us ? 



O— 



OF THE ECLECTIC SERIES. 



107 « 



well 



j play 
puss 
mice 

what 
which 



spell 

trees 

know 

catch 

climb 

words 



LESSON LX. 

tricks on-ly 

grown 

guilt-y 

read-er 

ad-vice 



lit-tle 

bet-ter 

fast-er 



rea-son 



les-sons 

get-ting 

be-canse 

wis-dom 

there-fore 



learn-ed can-not re-mem-ber I 



TO LIT-TLE READ-ERS. 



What a fine thing it is to read ! A 
lit-tle while, a-go, you know, you could 
on-ly read lit-tle words, and you had to 
spell them — c-a-t, cat ; d-o-g, dog. 

And you have been a long time 
get-ting through the "First Read-er." 
But now you can read quite well. 

Do you know why you are bet-ter 
than Puss ! Puss can play as well as 
you, and can run as fast as you, and 
fast-er too ; and she can climb trees 
bet-ter; and she can catch mice, which 
you can not do. 

But can she talk? No. Can she 
read ? No. Then that is a rea-son why 
you are bet-ter than Puss; be-cause you 
can talk and read. 



~o 






108 MCGUFFEY'S FIRST READER. 



GOOD-BY. 






Now, my lit- tie read-er, we have 
come to the end of the book, and I must 
bid you good-by. But be-fore we part, j 
let me give you a lit- tie ad-vice. 

You are now a lit-tle child ; you are i 
but a few years old, and have not much 
wis-dom. There-fore, al-ways list-en to 
your teach-cr and to your par-ents. 
| They are old-er than you, and they 
know bet-ter what is for your good. 
My lit-tle friend, v you must love your 
J par-ents. You should be kind to your 
j teach-ers, and gen-tle to your broth-ers, i 
and sis-ters, and play-fel-lows. Use no 
hard words; be guilty of no ill-na-tur-ed 
| tricks, and tell no ill-na-tur-ed tales. 
Al-ways do to oth-er chil-dren as you 
wish them to do to you. This is the 
"Gold-en Rule;" re-mem-ber it in your 
| plays. Act up-on it now, and when 
| you are grown up, do not for-get it. 
If you have been a good child, and 
have learn-ed your les-sons well, you I 
may now have the " Sec-ond Rea-der." 






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UTION. TO rURCHlS*Efi.S 



Booksellers, Teachers, Part . «. a. ,d uUi«r p^rebam-rs of 
itioaal Series,' -,•(■•, coj^fui to mer 

HcfWZY as l)i« aufho: wiiov* .-lead'ug Books «u« 







ho first reader. 
:tic second •] 

L'lC Till RD . 

i "10 FOURTH RKADKR. 

HO FIFTH* RKADKR, 

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since tk • popularity And sal< 
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OLD books h 
■•' : South* 
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ferent book frrj 





he one wisi 



vvor 

as well ft 



■'j assertion. 



f McGufley's Eclectic Readers, wi 
ction, that a series of bocks bi 
1 ihe pupil from the dements of spe< 
;, which the u\ 
. 
■nt qualifier-. ons ct the auihtr for 
(d,varied ejk!>erience as e 
ualit'.'s of mind — the care, retY-ar 
i- work — and, lastly, the enipha 
stowed on f j bw 

:, o. v d evidence of ihe truth of t